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Citrus County chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02755
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 04-30-2012
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:02755

Full Text


PGA Tour: Dufner hangs on for Zurich victory


I M 0ND I


CITRUS


COUNTY


TODAY & Tuesday morning -B
HIGH Partly cloudy. East
87 winds 10 to 15mph. H
LOW No rain chance until J 1
65 Wednesday. PAGE A4
APRIL 30, 2012 Florida's Best Communit


ONI L.
Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community 50* VOLUME 117 ISSUE 267


WORLD NEWS:


Narrowing the gap between employers, jobseekers


SHEMIR WILES
Staff Writer
It is a sad truth, but Mike
Kazemfar, co-owner of the
Quiznos sub sandwich
restaurant in Crystal River,
said he wouldn't hire 90
percent of the people who
come into his shop looking
for jobs.


It's not an absolute re-
quirement to have superior
sandwich-making skills to
work at Quiznos. However,
the shocking thing jobseek-
ers lack is basic job skills,
Kazemfar said. Having a
strong work ethic, solid peo-
ple skills to handle cus-
tomers and a sense of
responsibility are just a few


of the important attributes
he looks for when hiring, he
said. However, Kazemfar
explained, it's hard to find
people who possess these
fundamental abilities so
they can be employable.
As economic recovery
proceeds slowly, the call for
finding people with the em-
ployability skills needed for


jobs grows louder and
stronger from business
owners and human re-
source managers.
"We have the jobs, but
people don't have the
skills," Rusty Skinner, chief
executive officer of Work-
force Connection, recently
told the Chronicle editorial
board.


Therefore, Workforce
Connection, which serves
Citrus, Levy and Marion
counties, will be working
through the summer to get
educational and economic
development partners' input
to address the "skills gap"-
the distinction between the
See Page A5


Found
Body of slain British aid
worker discovered in
Pakistan./Page A14

LOCAL EFFORTS:
Give blood
Find out where the
LifeSouth
Bloodmobile
will be
parked for
donations
during
upcoming
weeks./Page A7
Get food
Area groups offer
low-cost food options
and free meals each
week./Page A7

OPINION:
It's a
major
improvement
from the initial
missteps
taken by local
officials when
considering
potential
for a port.


ONLINE POLL:
Your choice?
Is the anti-incumbent
sentiment as
@ strong in the
current elec-
tion cycle as
the last one?
A. Yes. Those
presently in office are
all bums and should be
thrown out.
B. No. Overall, those
elected in the last cycle
understand public intol-
erance for politics-as-
usual.
C. Yes. Once even good
people are elected, they
become corrupted by
the system.
D. No. I'll support some
incumbents and vote
against others.
To vote, visit www.
chronicleonline.com.
Click on the word
"Opinion" in the menu
to see the poll.
Results will appear
next Monday. Find last
week's online poll
results./Page A4


TOMORROW:
Brain tumor
May is Brain Tumor
Awareness Month. Meet
a local man who not
only deals with an
inoperable brain tumor,
but has been
quadriplegic since a
diving accident years
ago./Tuesday

C om ics ....................B 7
Crossword ................B6
Editorial ................ A12
Entertainment ..........B5
Horoscope ............. B5
Lottery Numbers ......B3
Lottery Payouts ........ B5
M ovies ...................... B7
Obituaries ................A6
TV Listings................B6
Classifieds .............B8


Life


I


CITRUS COUNTY

QUALIFY

on2012 Chrocle project
2012 Chronicle project


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Citrus High School student Sally Jaimes, 17, works with Withlacoochee Technical Institute post-secondary student David Warden, 24, in the au-
tomotive technology service class. Jaimes says she hopes to move on and go to college and one day open an automotive repair shop.


Schools get

tough on

tormenters

On campus or off,

bullying affects

students
MATTHEW BECK
Staff Writer
CRYSTAL RIVER Victoria
Cunningham and her sister Mor-
gan are on a mission.
The two teenagers, who attend
Crystal River High and Crystal
River Middle Schools respec-
tively, want to institute "No Bully
Zones," in their campuses.
Through the Dream, Believe,
Know It Foundation, the teens
have a goal of making their
schools and themselves better by
focusing on positivity and over-
coming everyday obstacles like
insecurities, peer pressure and
jealousy
Bullying is a fact of life for stu-
dents and the ways students are
being bullied are changing.
It's not just face-to-face
anymore.
Victoria, a 16-year-old sopho-
more, said today's students have
to deal with being bullying on the
Internet
"I see it on Facebook a lot," she
said. "Not just with me in partic-
ular, but I see a lot of people post-
ing things about other people.
They will call them out, call them
stupid or put them down in some
type of way Over the Internet'
bullying is so much easier, be-
cause you can say something
without having to look at the per-
son in the face. Most people don't
think before they type."
Brian Lancaster is an assis-
tant principal at Crystal River
Middle School and said school
officials have no jurisdiction out-


,-

MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Morgan Cunningham, left, and her sister Victoria hope to get their
schools involved in a program called No Bully Zone that will help make
the educational experience on campus more productive for all students.


side of the confines of the cam-
pus, yet many times when cyber-
bullying occurs remotely, the
conflicts that ensue find their
way onto campus.
He said that's when adminis-
tration gets involved.
"I would say most of the issues
See BULLYING/Page A1O


MORE INSIDE
* What's is like being a teen
nowadays?/Page A8
* Groups teach youngsters
self-respect./Page A10
* Definition of a bully, spot
signs of bullying./Page A10
* Next month: Housing


At WTI, students

take a vocational

path through

high school

Editor's note: Today, the
Chronicle looks at other life is-
sues for children, from bullying
to existing in a high-tech world.

MIKE WRIGHT
Staff Writer
INVERNESS
T here are some who say
the only path to a well-
paid career is through
college.
Jesse Hooper is not one of
them.
Hooper graduates in a few
weeks from Citrus High School.
Not long after that, Hooper ex-
pects to land a job as a handy-
man, well on the way toward a
career as an electrician.
Hooper's high school diploma
comes with no special standard-
ized testing recognition, though
he scores well on tests. He has
no plans for a college degree.
But he expects to take and
pass a test that shows he is in-
dustry certified, meaning he can
land any number of entry-level
jobs that will lead to a successful
career.
It's a significant step for a
teenager who just a few years
ago wasn't sure what life after
high school would be like.
"I wondered what in the world
I was supposed to do," Hooper
said.
He enrolled in the electri-
cians' program at Withlacoochee
Technical Institute, though that
was not his first choice. His first
choice at WTI was auto mechan-
ics, perhaps the school's most
popular program that fills up
fast
Hooper's teacher, John
Woythaler, knows the impor-
tance of the WTI program. He


See Page A10


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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OWNER
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Licensed Hearing Aid Specialist


352-795-1484


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Page A3 MONDAY, APRIL 30, 2012



TATE&


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Around
THE STATE

Citrus County
Road resurfacing
project begins
A resurfacing project will
be under way on some main
roadways throughout Citrus
County in the weeks ahead.
These roads include County
Road 491 from West Noble
Street to Grover Cleveland
Boulevard, County Road 495
from North Turkey Oak Drive
to U.S. 19; and County Road
581 North from Grain Court
to East Banks Court.
The project includes milling
up old surface and re-paving
with new asphalt and new
striping. The work on all three
roads is expected to be com-
pleted by Saturday, May 12,
depending on weather. Per-
manent striping will be done
in 30 days.
Traffic will be reduced to
one lane during construction.
Some work may be done at
night to reduce traffic
interruption.
The project is co-funded
with FDOT through the Small
Community Outreach Pro-
gram (SCOP). FDOT is pro-
viding 75 percent funding and
the county is providing 25
percent funding through the
Gas Tax Program.
The contractor, D.A.B.
Constructors Inc., starts the
project on Monday, April 30,
on C.R. 491. C.R. 581 will be
next, followed by C.R. 495.
For more information, con-
tact the county Engineering
Department at 352-527-5446.
Water board positions
up for election
The Homosassa Special
Water District Election takes
place this year in conjunction
with the 2012 General Elec-
tion and will be limited to reg-
istered voters who reside
within the boundaries of the
Homosassa Special Water
District.
The election will be for
Commission Seats 1, 3 and 5.
Candidates qualify to have
their name placed on the bal-
lot by either submitting 25 valid
petitions or paying $25 qualify-
ing fee per F.S. 99.061(3).
Qualifying information can
be obtained by contacting
Elizabeth Atkinson at the Su-
pervisor of Elections Office at
352-341-6751.
Qualifying dates election
are from noon June 4 to noon
June 8. Candidates qualify in
person at the Supervisor of
Elections office in Inverness.
The election will be Tuesday,
Nov. 6. Registration to vote in
this election will end at 5 p.m.
Tuesday, Oct. 9.

Ocala
Man on motorcycle
dies in deer collision
Funeral arrangements are
pending for a Pembroke Pines
man who was killed in a mo-
torcycle collision with a deer.
The Florida Highway Patrol
reported 57-year-old Bruce
Pelish died after being thrown
from his bike Saturday morn-
ing when a deer darted into
his path. He was driving north
on State Road 19 in the
Ocala National Forest.
Pelish and his wife left Fri-
day for the annual Leesburg
Bikefest in Lake County with
other South Florida couples.
Two others in the group were
injured when they hit Pelish's
motorcycle after the collision.
The deer died.

St. Petersburg
Man holding ax
shot by police
St. Petersburg Police said
a suspected armed robber
shot by an officer as he was
holding a three-foot ax is re-
covering in the hospital.
Police said a 911 caller re-
ported a man armed with an ax
had robbed him of his bicycle


early Sunday morning. A re-
sponding officer found Stahley
riding the bike in an alley.
A police statement said
Stahley picked up the ax and
threatened a police sergeant
who had responded.
-From staff and wire reports


Thursday a day to

Convicted murderer is keynote NATIONAL DAY OF music will be provided
PRAYER EVENTS by Kevin and Cherie
speakerfor Night of Prayer Daniels.
e en t Night of Prayer, 7 p.m. U Two prayer gatherings
S W nes InvWerness wednesday, May 2 at will take place at noon
event Wedin Vess the Citrus CountyFair- Thursday, May 3, one


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff Writer
Today he's Jack Roland
Murphy, Christian evangel-
ist, grandfather, artist,
musician.
He prays with a
group of men in
Crystal River on
Saturday mornings,
visits inmates in I '
jails and prisons.
In a prior life, he
was "Murf the Surf," \,
surfing champion,
infamous jewel Jack
thief, convicted the S
murderer Mur
His short-lived keyr
career as a cat bur- spec
glar included stealing the
Star of India, the world's
largest star sapphire, part of
the J.P Morgan Gem Collec-
tion, from the American Mu-
seum of Natural History in
New York.
After being convicted of
the murder of Terry Rae
Frank, a 24-year-old Califor-


nia secretary, in 1968, he
was sentenced to two con-
secutive life sentences plus
25 years, eligible for parole
in 2244.
The judge told him, "You
will never again walk the
streets with law-
- abiding society. It's
only because of the
4 jury's recommenda-
tion that we don't put
you in the electric
chair"
But something
happened while he
Murf was in a Florida
urf' state prison. God in-
phy tervened when for-
ote mer Dallas Cowboys
ker. player Roger
Staubach and some other
Christian leaders visited
him and shared with him
the gospel message, which
turned Murphy's life
around.
He was released from
prison in 1986 and placed
on parole with lifetime
monitoring, which was ter-


grounds arena in Inver-
ness with guest speaker
Jack "Murf the Surf"
Murphy and the Rev.
Lloyd Bertine, pastor of
Gulf to Lake Church in
Crystal River. Special

minated in 2000.
Today Murphy travels the
world, speaking about the
power of Christ to change a
person's life.
In a recent interview,
Murphy said his past is past
and he doesn't like to dwell
on it. However, he uses it as
a "calling card," a way to get
people's attention, in hopes
that they will listen to his
gospel message.
Jack "Murfthe Surf" Mur-
phy will be the keynote
speaker at a Night of Prayer
event beginning at 7 p.m.
Wednesday, May 2, at the
Citrus County Fairgrounds
arena in Inverness.
Also speaking will be the
Rev Lloyd Bertine, pastor of
Gulf to Lake Church in Crys-
tal River Special music will


outside the Inverness
Government Center, 212
W. Main St., Inverness,
and the other at the
gazebo behind City Hall
in Crystal River. Each will
last about an hour.

be provided by Kevin and
Cherie Daniels.
Murphy said when he
heard his sentence, it
sucked the life out of him.
Barely 30 years old, he was
looking at decades behind
bars.
"I was thinking, 'How am
I going to do this?"' he said.
"How will I survive this?"
He said prior to that, he
was just having the time of
his life. He said he had no
sense of guilt whatsoever.
His main guiding thought
had been: Can I get away
with this?
"When I was in prison, I
started getting letters from
Christians," he said. "And it
was Christians who came
regularly to visit. No one
else did, but the Christians


Boat building extravaganza


RIC BUSH/Special to the Chronicle
Bill Whalen, a member of the Crystal River Boat Builders, stands between a new scow under construction and
a model of the project, explaining 1800s boat construction.


Crystal River group hosts annual Boat Bash


SANDRA FREDERICK
Staff Writer
CRYSTAL RIVER Lea Con-
verse and Paul Lessard learned
something new about Citrus
County: It is not just about kayak-
ing and manatees.
The Lakeland couple traveled to
Crystal River Preserve State Park
on Saturday to learn about wooden
boats and how they
are made during
S | the annual Boat
S Bash hosted by
Crystal River Boat
For more Builders and the
photos, click Florida Archaeol-
on this story at ogy Network.
www.chronicle "This is wonder-
online.com. ful," Converse said
as she talked to Bill
Whalen about the Wartappo, a
replica of a late 1800s Union Navy
scow being built by the Crystal River
Boat Builders.
Saturday was the group's annual
outing when the public was invited
to peruse a variety of handmade
wooden boats and get a history les-
son, as well. Upwards of 700 to 800
people were expected to attend the
outdoor event.
In all, it will take the boat builders
about 15 tons of wood to build the
scow, the types of boat used prior to
the Civil War to carry cotton, tur-
pentine, pitch, lumber and even cat-
tle. During the war, the Union
confiscated the boats.
And they are doing it entirely the
old-fashioned way without elec-
tric tools. Awls and a foot-pedaled
reciprocating saw and lathe are
being used to build the boat, one
pine plank at a time.
"It is all with hand tools," said
Whalen, the secretary of the Crys-
tal River Boat Builders said. "It is
tough carrying these planks (eight
inches thick) around."


RIC BUSH/Special to the Chronicle
Alan Wentzell knits a fishing net with a needle that was often made in the
1800s out of bamboo.


The public was
invited to peruse a
variety of handmade
wooden boats.
Steve Kingery, also a member
and volunteer for the day, was
quick to talk about the Rushton
Princess replica he built It is also
an 1800s boat.
Mike Holup said he attended the
event two years ago as a tourist. He
was so impressed, he joined the
group so he could share his wood-
working expertise.
"I got hooked," the Pine Ridge
man said with a smile. "Many of us
have never built a boat before, but
we have skills and when you put it
all together, you've got something.
It is a great group of guys."
Alan Wentzell, a Mississippi
transplant, is another example of
the team effort
He spent most of Saturday knitting
a fishing net out of cotton thread, the


same way his ancestors did before
him. He was raised in a fishing fam-
ily, and for generations the skill of
making nets was handed down.
"I learned when I was just nine
years old," he said as he sat under
a tent in the 90 degrees heat. "I've
been doing it ever since."
Dave Ekardt and Huberto Al-
varez had one of the hottest jobs of
the day Dressed in period wool
Marines uniforms, they talked
freely about life during the war as
part of the re-enactment of the USS
Fort Henry
Many people don't know it, but
there was a Medal of Honor won
for an action on Crystal River: Ma-
rine Orderly Sgt. Christopher Nu-
gent. He led an attack driving a
guard of rebel soldiers into a
swamp, capturing their arms,
which ultimately won him the
highest of awards.
"It was a tough war," Ekardt said.
Chronicle managing editor San-
dra Frederick can be reached at
352-564-2930 or sfrederick@
chronicleonline. com.


off errors in the state's
billing system.
Likewise, counties do not
want their tax revenue
share automatically raided
to pay bills under the
new scheme enacted by
Section 12.


pray
came consistently"
Murphy added that these
Christians prayed for him.
"That's what I'll be talking
about on May 2, the impor-
tance of prayer," he said. "I
know what it can do; I know
the importance. I'm a prod-
uct of prayer"
On National Day of
Prayer, always the first
Thursday in May, two prayer
gatherings will take place at
noon Thursday, May 3, one
outside the Inverness Gov-
ernment Center, 212 W Main
St., Inverness, and the other
at the gazebo behind City
Hall in Crystal River
This year, with the theme
"One Nation Under God," is
the 61st annual nationwide
observance whereby Ameri-
cans pause and pray for our
country, its leaders on all lev-
els, military members and
emergency first responders.
For information about the
Night of Prayer event, call
Richard Adelberg at (352)
795-6556. For details about
the local National Day of
Prayer events on Thursday,
call Crystal River Church of
God office at 352-795-3079.
Chronicle reporter Nancy
Kennedy can be reached at
nkennedy@ chronicle
online, corn or 352-564-2927.



Counties


join in


Medicaid


lawsuit
CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff Writer
Fighting back against al-
leged inaccurate Medicaid
billing by the state, 47 coun-
ties joined the Florida As-
sociation of Counties (FAC)
file suit Thursday in the
Circuit Court of the 2nd Ju-
dicial Circuit in Leon
County.
Citrus County was not
among those 47 counties.
The 47 include: Alachua,
Bay, Bradford, Broward,
Charlotte, Clay, Collier, Des-
oto, Dixie, Escambia, Fla-
gler, Franklin, Gulf,
Hamilton, Hardee, Hendry,
Hernando, Highlands, Hills-
borough, Lafayette, Lake,
Lee, Leon, Levy, Manatee,
Marion, Martin, Miami-
Dade, Monroe, Nassau,
Okaloosa, Okeechobee,
Osceola, Pasco, Pinellas,
Polk, Putnam, St. Johns, St.
Lucie, Sarasota, Seminole,
Suwannee, Taylor, Volusia,
Wakulla and Walton.
The suit was filed against
the Florida Department of
Revenue and the Agency for
Health Care Administra-
tion. It said the state's effort
to make counties pay dis-
puted Medicaid billing by
withholding their shares of
state sales taxes from them
amounts to an unfunded
mandate that did not get ap-
proval in the Legislature,
which is required to be
passed by a super-majority
vote in each house.
The suit also makes the
case for observing a statute
of limitations, as the state
wants the disputed billing
paid back to 2001. It claims
Section 12 of the new Medi-
caid Billing law violates two
sections of the unfunded
mandates provision of the
Florida Constitution (Arti-
cle VII, Sections 18 (b) and
(a)) and that it is invalid by
requiring payment on dis-
puted bills older than the
previous law required
records to be kept four
years.
According to the lawsuit,
counties want to pay their
fair and accurate share of
Medicare bills on behalf of
their residents, but have not
been able to do so because


s
rF
n
al






A4 MONDAY, APRIL 30, 2012


HOW YOUR LAWMAKERS VOTED
Key votes for the week ending: April 27
By Voterama in Congress
* Student-Loan Interest Rates: Members voted, 215-195, to prevent interest rates on
student loans from doubling on July 1 from 3.4 percent to 6.8 percent. The GOP bill
would offset the $6 billion cost with cuts in the 2010 health law's preventive-care
section. A yes vote was to pass HR 4628. Rich Nugent, Yes.
* Women's, Children's Care: Members defeated, 178-231, a Democratic bid to pre-
vent cuts in healthcare spending in the GOP student-loan bill (HR 4628, above) from
reducing benefits in or raising the cost of private health insurance for women and
children. A yes vote backed the motion. Nugent, No.
* Cybersecurity, Liberty: Members expanded, 248-168, data-sharing between busi-
nesses and federal security agencies to bolster U.S. defenses against Internet at-
tacks by terrorists, foreign government and others. A yes vote backed HR 3523 over
arguments it violates civil liberties. Nugent, Yes.
* Financial Deregulation: Members voted, 312-111, to exempt derivatives transac-
tions by credit unions, small banks and rural lenders from transparency and collat-
eral rules set by the 2010 Dodd-Frank financial-regulation law. A yes vote was to
waive the regulations on grounds that they raise the cost of credit for small busi-
nesses. (HR 3336) Nugent, Yes.
* Violence Against Women: Senators renewed, 68-31, the Violence Against Women
Act and expanded it to cover gay men and battered undocumented immigrants and
Native Americans on reservations, A yes vote was to pass a bill (S 1925) also pro-
tecting children and the elderly from abuse. Bill Nelson, Yes; Marco Rubio, No.
* Republican Substitute: Senators defeated, 37-62, a GOP substitute for S 1925
(above) that also extended coverage to gay men but which was less comprehensive
and costly than the underlying bipartisan bill. A yes vote backed a plan that dealt
harshly with pornographers and child-abusers. Nelson, No; Rubio, No.
* Votes on Unions: Senators failed, 45-54, to kill a National Labor Relations Board
rule that speeds the pace for holding workers' votes on whether to unionize. A yes
vote opposed the new rule on grounds it denies employers time they need to cam-
paign against a union shop. (SJ Res 36) Nelson, No; Rubio, Yes.
* Postal Service Overhaul: Senators voted, 62-37, to make the U.S. Postal Service
profitable within a few years by steps such as reducing its workforce by 18 percent
through buyouts and early retirements and cutting contributions to employee health-
care. A yes vote was to pass a bill (S 1789) that keeps post offices open and pre-
serves Saturday deliveries, at least for the next year or two. Nelson, Yes; Rubio, No.
* Collective-Bargaining Rights: Senators refused, 23-76, to strip U.S. Postal Service
employees of collective-bargaining rights. Backers said this would trim the agency's
high labor costs while foes called it wrong to tamper with such a fundamental work-
place right. A yes vote backed the amendment to S 1789 (above). Nelson, No;
Rubio, No.
* Local Postal Autonomy: Senators defeated, 35-64, an amendment to S 1789
(above) to start testing a plan in which local post offices would have autonomy to cut
costs, define service levels and try innovative programs without waiting for approval
from U.S. Postal Service headquarters. A yes vote backed the amendment. Nelson,
No; Rubio, Yes.
* Union Dues, Political Donations: Senators defeated, 46-53, a Republican bid to add
the so-called "Paycheck Protection Act" to S 1789 (above). A yes vote backed a pro-
posed law under which U.S. Postal Service workers would have to grant permission
before their union dues could be spent for political purposes. Nelson, No; Rubio,
Yes.
* Key votes ahead: Congress is in recess the week of April 30. In the week of May 7,
the Senate will take up on student-loan interest rates, while the House schedule is to
be announced.
2012 Thomas Reports Inc. Call: 202-667-9760.


For the RECORD

Citrus County Sheriff's Office
BUI arrest
Steven Hunter Balius, 25, of 2376 S.E. 80th St., Ocala,
at 11:22 p.m. Saturday on a misdemeanor charge of boating
under the influence. He was issued a citation for not having
navigational lights in operation and two warnings: one for not
having a fire extinguisher and one for no registration certifi-
cate. Bond $500.
Other arrests
Jeffrey Gil Hannie, 32, of 2805 Eastwood St., Inver-
ness, at 10:07 p.m. Saturday on a misdemeanor charge of
criminal mischief. Bond $500.

SO YOU KNOW

For more information about arrests made by the
Citrus County Sheriff's Office, go to www.sheriff
citrus.org and click on the Public Information
link, then on Arrest Reports.
Also under Public Information on the CCSO web-
site, click on Crime Mapping for a view of where
each type of crime occurs in Citrus County.
Click on Offense Reports to see lists of burglary,
theft and vandalism.
Citrus County Sheriff's Office/Fire Rescue Chief
Larry Morabito said the fire service is seeking
volunteers to serve alongside paid staff at all
stations. For information, call John Beebe, volun-
teer coordinator, at 352-527-5406.
The Sexual Predator Unit is responsible for
tracking all registered sexual offenders and
predators in the county. Click on the Sexual Of-
fender Information link on the CCSO website.
The "Sheriff's 10-43" show airs on TV station
WYKE, digital channel 47 and Bright House
cable channel 16. The show features interviews
with sheriff's office staff from all areas of the
agency.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE










QUESTION: Do you
deem the Legisla-
ture's allocations of
$100K for cleanup
of King's Bay and
$200K for a traffic
signal on S.R. 44
"turkeys"?
Yes, of course they
are I'm glad the
governor vetoed the
expenditures. 30
percent (157 votes)
No. Public safety
and environmental
initiatives are not
turkeys. 30 percent
(156 votes)
The money for the
bay- yes, a turkey.
The money for the
Meadowcrest signal
no, not a turkey.
17 percent (88
votes)
The money for the
bay no, not a
turkey. The money
for the Meadowcrest
signal -yes, a
turkey 23 percent
(118 votes)
Total votes: 519.


regal notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle



Notice to Creditors/

A, Administration................B10



.. Surplus Property................B10
e, -... .::


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


F'cast
s
ts
ts
s
ts
s
ts
pc
pc


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


L F'cast
73 ts
66 s
70 s
70 s
70 ts
63 s
70 pc
73 ts
74 ts


MARINE OUTLOOK


East winds around 15 knots. Seas 2 to
3 feet. Bay and inland waters will have
a light to moderate chop. Skies will be
partly to mostly sunny today.


88 66 0.00 88 64 0.00

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Exusive daily
TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 87 Low: 65
Partly cloudy; breezy

TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
High: 86 Low: 67
Partly cloudy and breezy; 20% chance of a PM
t-storm
....................WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY MORNING
High: 85 Low: 66
Partly cloudy; 40% chance of a PM t-storm

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Sunday 92/56
Record 94/44
Normal 86/57
Mean temp. 74
Departure from mean +3
PRECIPITATION*
Sunday 0.00 in.
Total for the month 2.61 in.
Total for the year 6.47 in.
Normal for the year 12.50 in.
*As of 6 p m at Inverness
UV INDEX: 10
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Sunday at 3 p.m. 30.07 in.


DEW POINT
Sunday at 3 p.m. 58
HUMIDITY
Sunday at 3 p.m. 35%
POLLEN COUNT**
Grasses and weeds were absent and
Today's active pollen:
Oak, hickory, grasses
Today's count: 6.1/12
Tuesday's count: 5.2
Wednesday's count: 3.5
Sunday was good with pollutants
mainly particulates.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
4/30 MONDAY 1:14 7:27 1:39 7:51
5/1 TUESDAY 1:59 8:12 2:24 8:36
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK


MAY 12 MAY 20 M
MAY12 MAY20 MAY28


SUNSET TONIGHT 8:06 PM.
SUNRISE TOMORROW .....................6:49 A.M.
M OONRISE TODAY ...........................2:29 P.M.
M OONSET TODAY ............................2:43 A.M.


BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
One-day-per-week irrigation schedule as follows for addresses ending in:
0 or 1 Monday, 2 or 3 Tuesday, 4 or 5 Wednesday, 6 or 7
- Thursday, 8 or 9 & subdivision common areas Friday. Before 8 a.m. or
after 6 p.m.
Hand watering of non-grass areas can take place any day before 8 a.m. or
after 6 p.m.
PLEASE CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL NEW PLANT MATERIAL. Citrus
County Water Resources can explain additional watering allowances for
qualified plantings.
Questions, concerns or reporting violations, please call Citrus County at
352-527-7669, or email waterconservation@bocc.citrus.fl.us.


TIDES
*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Monday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 12:12 a/9:04 a 1:59 p/9:39 p
Crystal River** 12:20 p/6:26 a /7:01 p
Withlacoochee* 10:07 a/4:14 a 9:55 p/4:49 p
Homosassa*** 1:09 p/8:03 a /8:38 p


***At Mason's Creek
Tuesday
High/Low High/Low
1:47 a/10:13 a 2:51 p/10:53 p
12:08 a/7:35 a 1:12 p/8:15 p
10:59 a/5:23 a 11:18 p/6:03 p
12:57 a/9:12 a 2:01 p/9:52 p


Gulf water
temperature


76
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Sat. Sun. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 26.80 26.79 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 32.74 32.72 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lInverness 34.96 34.94 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 36.48 36.45 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211

THE NATION


-,90as,

FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
MONDAY


Sunday Monday Sunday Monday
City H LPcp. FcstH L City H LPcp. FcstH L


Albany 58 31 pc 63 43
Albuquerque 78 56 s 84 48
Asheville 81 50 ts 78 58
Atlanta 84 62 pc 89 63
Atlantic City 65 38 pc 58 52
Austin 88 70 pc 89 72
Baltimore 70 41 .02 c 63 56
Billings 61 36 .08 c 66 44
Birmingham 87 60 pc 90 65
Boise 64 38 sh 64 40
Boston 59 39 s 61 46
Buffalo 56 28 c 58 49
Burlington, VT 50 26 pc 57 39
Charleston, SC 89 61 s 82 65
Charleston, WV 71 49 ts 83 59
Charlotte 83 53 pc 81 63
Chicago 57 43 ts 66 50
Cincinnati 67 46 .01 ts 81 62
Cleveland 57 28 ts 68 50
Columbia, SC 88 64 pc 88 63
Columbus, OH 70 42 pc 79 61
Concord, N.H. 55 28 s 63 40
Dallas 86 68 pc 84 68
Denver 64 35 pc 75 47
Des Moines 50 46 .06 c 71 55
Detroit 60 30 trace ts 60 50
El Paso 88 58 pc 90 67
Evansville, IN 82 56 ts 84 65
Harrisburg 69 36 c 62 49
Hartford 61 34 s 64 45
Houston 84 73 pc 85 71
Indianapolis 62 46 ts 77 59
Jackson 84 61 pc 90 65
Las Vegas 83 62 s 92 70
Little Rock 85 63 pc 85 66
Los Angeles 71 57 s 64 56
Louisville 79 51 .04 ts 84 63
Memphis 85 67 pc 87 68
Milwaukee 50 38 pc 53 45
Minneapolis 57 44 pc 68 53
Mobile 86 59 pc 88 69
Montgomery 88 58 s 90 65
Nashville 86 61 pc 87 65
KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02012 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


New Orleans 86 70 pc 87 69
New York City 63 44 pc 65 50
Norfolk 63 54 .04 pc 69 59
Oklahoma City 80 64 .07 ts 80 68
Omaha 51 48 .22 c 74 58
Palm Springs 95 65 s 95 63
Philadelphia 67 40 pc 64 52
Phoenix 93 66 s 96 68
Pittsburgh 65 32 ts 74 55
Portland, ME 54 33 s 56 41
Portland, Ore 65 53 sh 57 45
Providence, R.I. 60 39 s 63 45
Raleigh 77 55 pc 71 59
Rapid City 58 37 pc 72 46
Reno 77 43 pc 76 47
Rochester, NY 55 27 pc 61 49
Sacramento 85 50 pc 82 53
St. Louis 64 51 .52 ts 76 61
St. Ste. Marie 60 31 pc 52 37
Salt Lake City 61 42 pc 75 52
San Antonio 86 72 pc 89 71
San Diego 65 60 s 66 56
San Francisco 70 50 pc 63 52
Savannah 90 62 s 85 66
Seattle 60 50 r 56 46
Spokane 63 42 sh 58 41
Syracuse 53 29 pc 63 46
Topeka 66 55 .67 ts 75 61
Washington 72 46 .03 pc 65 57
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 96 Thermal, Calif. LOW 16 Fraser, Colo.

WORLD CITIES


MONDAY Lisbon
CITY H/L/SKY London
Acapulco 86/74/s Madrid
Amsterdam 71/53/pc Mexico City
Athens 82/60/s Montreal
Beijing 80/58/c Moscow
Berlin 78/52/s Paris
Bermuda 69/61/pc Rio
Cairo 87/65/c Rome
Calgary 57/36/sh Sydney
Havana 86/70/ts Tokyo
Hong Kong 83/78/sh Toronto
Jerusalem 78/56/pc Warsaw


62/48/pc
65/49/pc
65/42/pc
80/54/ts
55/43/s
59/42/s
67/46/sh
76/66/sh
73/53/pc
65/56/sh
70/57/c
50/45/c
85/51/s


C I T R U S


C 0 U N TY


LHIKON1CLL
Florida's Best Communlty Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community

To start your subscription:
Call now for home delivery by our carriers:
Citrus County: 352-563-5655
Marion County: 888-852-2340
13 weeks: $36.65* 6 months: $64.63*
1 year: $116.07*
*Subscription price includes a separate charge of .14 per day for transportation cost
and applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352-563-6363 for details.
There will be a $1 adjustment for the Thanksgiving edition. This will only slightly
affect your expiration date. The Viewfinder TV guide is available to our subscribers for
$13.00 per year.
For home delivery by mail:
In Florida: $59.00 for 13 weeks
Elsewhere in U.S.: $69.00 for 13 weeks
To contact us regarding your service:

352-563-5655
Call for redelivery: 7 to 10 a.m. Monday to Friday
7 to 11 a.m. Saturday 7 to 10 a.m. Sunday
Questions: 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday to Friday
7 to 11 a.m. Saturday 7 to 10 a.m. Sunday

Main switchboard phone numbers:
Citrus County 352-563-6363
Citrus Springs, Dunnellon and Marion County
residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.
I want to place an ad:
To place a classified ad: Citrus 352-563-5966
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To place a display ad: 352-563-5592
Online display ad: 352-563-5592
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MAIL: 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
FAX: Advertising 352-563-5665, Newsroom 352-563-3280
EMAIL: Advertising: advertising@chronicleonline.com
Newsroom: newsdesk@chronicleonline.com

Where to find us:
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D nkenleld -- Cannondale Dr Blvd.
Ave Crystal River,
S \\ Mrdowcrest FL 34429
kileadowlres t
N \ \:

I CooI se l Inverness
SCourthouse office
To pkins St. square
0 Cn 106 W. Main
S 41 4Inverness, FL
34450


Who's in charge:
G erry M u lliga n ............................................................................ P ub lish er, 5 6 3 -3 2 2 2
Trina Murphy ...................... Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232
C harlie B rennan .................................................................................. Editor, 5 6 3 -3 2 2 5
Tom Feeney .................................................... Production Director, 563-3275
Kathie Stewart .............................................. Circulation Director, 563-5655
John M urphy ........................ ............................ Online M manager, 563-3255
John M urphy.................................................... Classified M manager, 564-3255
Jeff Gordon .................................................. Business M manager, 564-2908
Mike Arnold.......... .................... Human Resources Director, 564-2910
Report a news tip:
Opinion page questions.................................. Charlie Brennan, 563-3225
To have a photo taken ........................................ Darlene Mann, 563-5660
News and feature stories .................................. Sandra Frederick, 564-2930
Community/wire service content.................... Sarah Gatling, 563-5660
Sports event coverage ...........................Jon-Michael Soracchi, 563-3261
S o u n d O ff ............................................................... .......................................... 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9
The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please
recycle your newspaper
www.chronicleonline.com
Published every Sunday through Saturday
By Citrus Publishing Inc.
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
Phone 352-563-6363
S1 POSTMASTER: Send address changes to:
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PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL
SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280


0
MAY5





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Day camp draws crowds


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Melissa Briggs and Raeanne Collins finally make it to the front of the line to register for the Citrus
County Sheriff's Office Summer Day Camp at the Citrus County Auditorium. Kris Reinhard fits 4-year-
old Christian Martin with one of the more than 400 helmets that were given away Saturday, and many dis-
plays and booths filled the auditorium and parking lot, including a cut-away, spinning car from the Florida
Highway patrol to simulate a rollover accident.


Event gives away

goodies, knowledge

DAVE SIGLER
Chronicle

Children and their parents
turned out in droves Saturday to
attend the Citrus County Sheriff's
Office Summer Day Camp at the
Citrus County Auditorium. More
than 400 bicycle helmets were
given away, and many displays
and booths filled the auditorium
and parking lot. Citrus County
Sheriffs Office Sgt. Ron Frink was
pleased with the event.
"This is our fifth annual event,"
Frink said. "Great turnout so far,
inside the booths are looking good
and the line out front is full."
Melissa Briggs and young
Raeanne Collins waited in that
line, and Briggs thought it was a
very good event.
"She (Raeanne) likes to come
and get the bike helmets," Briggs
said. "It's good for families, and
we need more of that around
here."
The carnival atmosphere of the
event did not diminish its educa-
tional value.
The Florida Highway Patrol
had a cut-away, spinning car to
simulate a rollover accident. The
device ejected dummies to illus-
trate the importance of wearing
seatbelts.
The county's "Learn Not to
Burn" house taught children about
fire safety. The Citrus County
school resource officers' vehicles
were shined up and on display


Deputy Andy McEwen, right, salutes the flag as it is presented by the Nature Coast Young Marines during the opening ceremony of the camp.

* Citrus County Sheriff's Office/Fire Rescue VOLUNTEER WITH CCSO years of life experience. This experience,


Chief Larry Morabito said the fire service is
seeking volunteers to serve alongside paid
staff at all stations. For information, call
John Beebe, volunteer coordinator, at 352-
527-5406.


* The Citrus County Sheriff's Office Volunteer
Unit is comprised of nearly 900 citizens
serving Citrus County. Members come from
all walks of life and bring with them many


combined with dedication and a willingness
to help fellow citizens, is an excellent exam-
ple of people "helping one another." To
volunteer, call Sgt. Chris Evan at 352-527-
3701 or email cevan@sheriffcitrus.org.


GAP
Continued from Page Al

skills needed for a job and
those possessed by the
job-hunters.
Starting next month,
Workforce Connection will
begin a collaboration
process to develop the tal-
ent pool in the region to pro-
vide businesses with an
enhanced skilled workforce.
A Chicago-based firm,
Thomas P Miller and Asso-


ciates, has been selected to
work with Workforce Con-
nection and its community
partners to discover key in-
dustries, identify the de-
sired skills these industries
require and find what gaps
exist between their needs
and the qualifications of job
applicants and recent
graduates.
Though the economy
hasn't picked up yet, Skin-
ner said institutions like the
College of Central Florida
and Withlacoochee Techni-
cal Institute want to know


what to add to their curricu-
lum to send out better
trained graduates.
Businesses want to feel
confident in three or four
years there will be qualified
workers to fill open
positions.
Moreover, enhancing re-
cent graduates and job ap-
plicants' talents can
potentially bring new busi-
nesses in the area that, in
turn, could help stimulate
economic development
The project kick-off meet-
ing with top-level partner


From time to time our agreements with cable channels and television stations come up for renewal. While we do not
anticipate any loss or disruption of service, regulations require us to notify you of the possibility of losing programming.
Therefore, please be advised that our agreements with Antenna Satellite, BBC America, Channel One Russia, Cooking
Channel, Country Music Television (CMT), Current TV, DIY, Encore, Encore Action, Encore Drama, Encore Family, Encore Family
West, Encore Love, Encore Suspense, Encore West, Encore Westerns, ETTV-Super, The Filipino Channel, Game Show Network
(GSN), Gospel Music Channel (gmc), Great American Country (GAC), MC, IndiePlex, NHL Center Ice, NHL Network, Ovation,
RetroPlex, Sprout On Demand, Starz, Starz Cinema, Starz Edge, Starz in Black, Starz Kids & Family, TV Japan, TruTV, You Too
and Zee TV remain in effect on a month-to-month basis, but we may have to cease carriage in all formats if our authority to
continue is withheld. Additionally, our agreement with Gol TV expires on June 18, 2012, and we may have to cease carriage
in all formats if our authority to continue is withheld.
Effective April 19, 2012, Cornerstore TV will be replaced by Shop Zeal 3.
Effective May 28, 2012, Planet Green will change its name to Destination America
Bright House Networks utilizes a new digital video delivery technology known as Switched Digital Video (SDV). SDV is a
robust bandwidth management system that makes it possible to offer more digital video programming services than before
including new HD channels. To be able to offer more new video services, Bright House Networks will be moving some
existing programming services to the new SDV system as well as adding new services on the SDV system.
Effective April 10, 2012, the following channel was launched on the SDV system:
MLB Strike Zone HD Sports Pass Channel 1143
On or after June 6, 2012, the following new channels will be delivered to the SDV System:
Fuel HD Sports Pass Channel 1136
NASA Public Channel HD Channel 1230
On or after June 20, 2012, the following services will be delivered on the SDV system:


HBO HD West
HBO West
HBO HD East
HBO Zone West
HBO Family West
HBO Signature West
HBO Family East
HBO Signature East
HBO Comedy West


Premium Channel 1408
Premium Channel 208
Premium Channel 1401
Premium Channel 213
Premium Channel 211
Premium Channel 210
Premium Channel 204
Premium Channel 203
Premium Channel 212


HBO Comedy East
HBO 2 East
HBO 2 West
HBO Zone East
Shop Zeal 2
Shop Zeal 3
Cooking Channel
Fox Business
TBN


Premium Channel 205
Premium Channel 202
Premium Channel 209
Premium Channel 206
Channel 164
Channel 167
Channel 142
Channel 149
Channel 131


These services will not be available on uni-directional retail devices as of the date(s) noted above. If you want to subscribe
to these services, you will need a digital set-top box or tuning adaptor from Bright House Networks. Customers may
continue to use their uni-directional retail device and CableCARD to receive video programming other than the programming
delivered on the SDV system. Customers who also utilize a digital set-top box or tuning adapter will be able to receive video
programming delivered on the SDV system.
Customers will be notified in advance of any other programming changes.

For more information on Bright House Networks programming,
please call 1-866-976-EASY or visit our website at www.brighthouse.com

bright house
NETWORKS


leadership will be offered
Wednesday, May 2. Then
skills gap forums will be of-
fered in each county
throughout May and June.
There will also be an online
survey to gather insight


about the top five occupa-
tions identified. A final re-
port is anticipated by
August.
For more information
about the skills gap analysis
and details about attending


the forums, visit www.clm
workforce.com for updates.
Chronicle reporter
Shemir Wiles can be
reached at 352-564-2924 or
swiles@chronicleonline.
comn.


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MONDAY, APRIL 30, 2012 A5





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Richard
Berry, 87
DUNNELLON
A Celebration of Life for
Mr. Richard W Berry of
Dunnellon, Florida, will be
held 4 p.m. Tuesday, May
1st, at the
Berry Resi-

Richard
went to be
with his
Lord and
Savior on
Friday,
April 27,
2012. Richard
B o r n Berry
June 25,
1924, Richard was a native
of Milwaukee, Wisconsin.
Richard was in the Navy
and was a Navy Seal UDT
14. Richard was quite the
warrior, a true American
Hero. He loved his United
States of America. While he
lived in New Jersey, he
worked for Ford Heavy Duty
Trucks in Manahawkin, NJ.
He also drove a school bus
for Citrus County for 10
years, was dedicated to ed-
ucation in Citrus County
and loved those little kids be
drove for. He had a great
personality, winning smile,
and a beautiful voice. At one
time he sang in the choir at
Seven Rivers Presbyterian
Church, of which he was a
member of about 12 years.
He made a Presbyterian out
of his wife, Helen. He was a
member of the Grand Lodge
of New Jersey for 50 years, a
Most Worthy Grand Patron
of the Order of Eastern Star
of Tuckerton and a member
of many Eastern Star Chap-
ters in New Jersey His
biggest hobby was enter-
taining by his lovely swim-
ming pool he designed at his
home. He loved entertain-
ing his family, friends and
neighbors.
The family requests in
lieu of flowers please send
contributions to the Moffitt
Cancer Center, 12902 Mag-
nolia Drive, Tampa, Florida
33612 or to the National
UDT Seal Museum Highway
A1A, Fort Pierce, Florida
34949.
His wife, Edith, to whom
he was married for many
years, preceded him in
death in 2002. He is sur-
vived by his wife of 8 years,
Helen Berry of Dunnellon;
sons, Howard Berry of
Tuckerton, NJ, and Kenneth
Berry of Clearwater; daugh-
ter, Shirley Ochs, of Inver-
ness; stepsons, Robert and
Ranza Bateman, both of
Dunnellon; stepdaughter,
Tracy Mickel of Toledo, OH;
many, many grandchildren,
great-grandchildren and
one great-great grandson.
He was truly loved by every-
one that knew him. He will
be missed by all.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.
Deaths ELSEWHERE

John Moody, 95
JOURNALIST
RIDGEWOOD, N.J. -
John P Moody, a longtime
journalist who won praise
for his coverage of organized
labor and business issues,
died Saturday He was 95.
Moody died of natural
causes in Ridgewood, his
son, John Moody, said.
Known among colleagues
for his frayed leather pocket
notebook, which was
crammed with the names
and numbers of sources,
John P Moody worked for
The Associated Press and the
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette dur-
ing his nearly 30-year career
Besides his son, Moody is
survived by his wife of 65
years, Beulah, and two
grandchildren.
-From wire reports

To Place Your
( "In Memory" ad,
Call Mike Snyder at 563-3273
msnyder@chronicleonline.com
or
Saralyinne Schlumberger at 564-2917
sschlumberger@chronicleonline.com


is dysp iort u ae


Clara
Gonsorowski,
95
HERNANDO
Clara Joan (Ozechowska)
Gonsorowski, age 95, passed
away on Thursday, April 26,
2012, at Woodland Terrace
of Citrus County, Hernando,
FL, and under Hospice of
Citrus County
Clara was born on De-
cember 26, 1916, in Salem,
MA to the late Helen
(Laskowska, Ozechowski)
Pszcolkoski and Stefan Oze-
chowski. She married
William A. Gonsorowski on
January 7, 1939, and he pre-
ceded her in death in 1984.
She leaves her two sons,
Kenneth William (Virginia)
of Homosassa, FL, and
Vasily Goncharov of
Durham, NC. She also
leaves her two beloved
granddaughters, Pamela Pa-
tricia (Neal) Washburn of
Escondido, CA, and Chris-
tine Anita (Steven) Poitras.
She also leaves eight great-
grandchildren, Whitney,
Evan, Annalise Washburn,
Clariessa, Christopher,
Mark, Kevin Chaput and
Chanel Poitras. She is also
survived by her sister Mar-
cella Juralewicz of Salem,
MA; and was preceded in
death by her brother,
Alphonse Pszcolkoski. She
leaves several nieces and
nephews.
Burial will be private and
held at a later date. Brown
Funeral Home & Crematory,
Lecanto, FL, is helping with
the arrangements. www.
brownfuneralhome.com

Evelyn
Potts, 70
HERNANDO
Evelyn Pauline Potts, age
70, Hernando, died April 27,
2012, at her son James'
home.
Evelyn was born on Sep-
tember 18, 1941 in Mineola,
Long Island, NY, to the late
Gilbert and Evelyn
(Schmitt) Kopper. She was
employed as a certified
nurse's aide. Evelyn was a
loving Mother and Grand-
mother, who especially en-
joyed spending time with
her grandchildren.
Survivors include two
sons, Kenneth "Tiger" (Jen-
nie) Potts, Hernando, James
(Denise) Potts, Dunnellon;
three daughters, Kathleen
(Ricky) Miller, Inverness,
Colleen (Bill) Neale, Coral
Springs, FL, Noreen
(Tommy) Long, Inverness;
two sisters, Barbara Lars-
son, Baldwin, L.I., NY,
Pauline Sullo, Beverly Hills;
and seven grandchildren.
A memorial service will
be announced by the family
at a later date. Chas. E.
Davis Funeral Home with
Crematory is in charge of
arrangements.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.

SO YOU KNOW
The Citrus County Chron-
icle's policy permits
both free and paid obit-
uaries. Email obits@
chronicleonline.com or
phone 352-563-5660
for details and pricing.


C1I7A. 2CtAI
Funeral Home
With Crematory
Burial Shipping
Cremation
MImber m O ero
G LDEN SK
ULE q.-... '
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For Information and costs,
000.YE4 call 726-8323


Kent
Perrins, 75
HERNANDO
Kent E. Perrins, 75, of
Hernando, FL, died on
April 28, 2012, at the Hos-
pice of Citrus County House
in Lecanto.
Kent was born on Decem-
ber 25, 1936, in Oakley, ID,
the son of Estel and Dorothy
Perrins. He was a veteran of
the U.S. Air Force. Kent was
a computer programmer
and analyst for McDonald
Douglas. He moved to Citrus
Hills in 2010 form Burbank,
CA.
He was a member of El
Diablo Golf and Country
Club in Citrus Springs.
Survivors include his
wife, Deborah Allen, of Her-
nando; daughter Rebekka
Bernotat of Portland, OR;
and son Benyamin Perrins
and his wife, Cindy, of Port-
land, OR; sister Nancy
Aldrich and her husband,
Pat, of Bend, OR; and five
grandchildren.
The family of Mr. Perrins
will receive friends on Tues-
day, May 1, 2012, from 9 a.m.
until the hour of service at
the Heinz Funeral Home in
Inverness. Funeral services
will begin at 10 a.m. Burial
will follow at Florida Na-
tional Cemetery in Bushnell
with military honors. In lieu
of flowers, donations may be
given to Hospice of Citrus
County or the American
Cancer Society Heinz Fu-
neral Home & Cremation,
Inverness, FL 34453.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.
Deaths ELSEWHERE

Robert Smith, 78
SKI GOGGLE PIONEER
KETCHUM, Idaho -
Robert Earl "Bob" Smith, an
orthodontist whose passion
for skiing deep powder snow
helped turn him into a gog-
gle and sunglasses pioneer,
has died of complications
related to heart surgery
Smith's family confirmed
his April 18 death in Cali-
fornia. He was 78.
After enduring frustrating
goggle-fogging experiences
while skiing in Utah, Smith
in the 1960s began develop-
ing prototypes for an ad-
vanced pair of goggles to
solve the problem. Smith sat
at the kitchen table with his
wife Jean, using dental tools
and foam to create a double-
lensed, vented ski goggle
whose inner lens was pro-
tected from the cold.
He patented his inven-
tion, which is now consid-
ered the industry standard.
Smith founded Smith
Sport Optics in 1965 and es-
tablished its headquarters
in Ketchum, Idaho, in the
early 1970s. Before he
struck a deal to manufac-
ture Smith goggles, however,
he often would trade his
goggles for lift tickets.
He sold the company in
1991.
Smith Optics Inc. sells its
products in 50 countries.
-From wire reports


FUNERAL]
& CREM
5,

J.


5430 W Gul to Lake Hwy.
Lecanto, Florida 34451
(352)
795-0111

Richard 7 Brown
FUNERALDIRECTOR


In Loving Memory of 7


Dterek Cin


09-29-1983 04-30-2009

God Has You

In His Keeping,

I 'e Haveo 'o.

In Our Hearts.


Mom. Dud.
Fumillv &
Frio'wl-


Albina
Spittlehouse,
95
INVERNESS
Albina Mary Spittlehouse,
age 95, Inverness, died April
29, 2012, at New Horizon
Senior Citizen Home.
Albina
was born on
April 21,
1917, in
Worcester, ,
Massachu-
setts, to the .
late Charles
and Delia
(Buckley) Albina
Valatkevich. Spittlehouse
She was em-
ployed as a bookkeeper for
more than 30 years for a
wholesale produce com-
pany in Miami. She enjoyed
flower gardening. She was a
devoted Mother, Grand-
mother and Great-Grand-
mother.
Survivors include her
son, Robert J. Spittlehouse
and his wife, Mary; one
grandson, Robert B. Spittle-
house; and 5 great-grand-
children, Joshua Gonzalez,
Hannah Spittlehouse, Brett,
Sierra and Cheyenne Hahn.
She was preceded in death
by her husband, Robert T
Spittlehouse, on 02/16/1974;
and her only granddaughter,
Deanna Hahn, on
11/30/2007.
A Mass of Christian Burial
will be offered on Wednes-
day, May 9, 2012, at 10 a.m.
from Our Lady of Fatima
Catholic Church. Inurnment
will be held at a later date at
the Florida National Ceme-
tery in Bushnell. Chas. E.
Davis Funeral Home with
Crematory is in charge of
arrangements.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. com.

FREE OBITUARIES
Free obituaries, run one
day, can include: full
name of deceased;
age; hometown/state;
date of death; place of
death; date, time and
place of visitation and
funeral services.
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear in
the next day's edition.
Email obits@chronicle
online.com or fax 352-
563-3280.


Obituaries


Associated Press
HARTFORD, Conn. -
Less than a year after
NASA ended its shuttle
program, players in Amer-
ica's space business are
casting around for new
direction.
United Technologies
Corp. is the most recent
company to announce it
will sharply scale back its
role in space exploration.
It's selling Pratt & Whitney
Rocketdyne, a manufac-
turer of rocket engines and
liquid-propulsion systems
that it's owned for seven
years. The sale of Rocket-
dyne and other businesses
are intended to raise $3 bil-
lion to finance United
Technologies' purchase of
aerospace parts maker
Goodrich Corp.
Greg Hayes, chief finan-
cial officer at United Tech-
nologies, rapped U.S.
space policy when he an-
nounced the decision in
mid-March to sell
Rocketdyne.
"Growth will be limited
at Rocketdyne," Hayes told
investor analysts. "It's still
a very good business. It's a
national asset ... but unfor-
tunately, without a national
space policy, growth will be
limited for some time."
Rocketdyne dates to
early rocketry, working
with pioneers such as
Wernher von Braun and
contributing to propulsion
on Apollo spacecraft in the
1960s and '70s that brought
astronauts to the moon.
The company has a fu-
ture with NASA even if the
space agency's path is un-
clear, said Rocketdyne
President Jim Maser.
Three of four companies
vying to take crew to the
space station would use
Rocketdyne propulsion,
he said. Still, he said,
NASAs path is unclear.


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"There is an official
space policy and I can't cite
it, to be honest," Maser
said.
NASAs 30-year shuttle
program ended last July
with the voyage of Atlantis.
The space shuttle Discov-
ery has become a museum
piece, turned over by
NASA in mid-April to the
Smithsonian Institution.
Other companies have
shifted some business from
space exploration. Lock-
heed Martin Corp. closed
its shuttle tank production
line in New Orleans in
2010, ending the jobs of
about 1,400 workers. A year
later, NASA chose that site
in New Orleans to build
components of its new
heavy-lift rocket, but only if
Congress funds the project.
ATK Space SystemsTech
has laid off hundreds of
workers in Utah, citing the
phase-out of the space shut-
tle and the Minuteman III
ballistic missile programs.
And Florida's Space
Coast, once the center of
rocket launches, has lost
thousands of jobs.
NASA is still using com-
panies such as Boeing,
SpaceX and others to ferry
cargo and astronauts to
and from the International
Space Station in three to
five years. Until then, the
space agency will spend
tens of millions of dollars
per seat on Russian Soyuz
spacecraft.



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study that will compare
conventional digital
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You will receive free
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Bloodmobile schedule for
May: LifeSouth Community
Blood Centers remains in emer-
gency need for all blood types.
According to LifeSouth, fewer
than one in 10 Citrus County
residents regularly give blood,
so this small group is challenged
to keep up with the need.
Hospitals are not fully
stocked, and LifeSouth does
not have the ability to stock
them. In this status, the hospi-
tals may have to look to other
communities to import blood.
To find a donor center or a
blood drive near you, call 352-
527-3061. Donors must be at
least 17, or 16 with parental
permission, weigh a minimum
of 110 pounds and be in good
health to be eligible to donate.
A photo ID is also required.
The Lecanto branch office is
at 1241 S. Lecanto Highway
(County Road 491), open from
8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays
(7 p.m. Wednesdays, 8:30
a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday and
10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sunday.
The Inverness branch is at
301 W. Main St., open from
8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. week-
days, (6:30 p.m. Wednesdays,
8 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Saturday
and closed Sundays.
Visit www.lifesouth.org for
details.
11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday,
April 30, Wal-Mart, 3826 S.
Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa.
0 8:30 to 11 a.m. Tuesday,
May 1, Citrus County Schools
Bus Transportation, 710 N.E.
Sixth Ave., Crystal River.
Noon to 3 p.m. Tuesday,
May 1, Wal-Mart Supercenter,
3826 S. Suncoast Blvd.,
Homosassa.
10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednes-
day, May 2, Wal-Mart Super-
center, 2461 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Inverness.
2 to 8 p.m. Friday, May 4,
Hernando Elementary School,
2353 N. CroftAve., Hernando.
3 to 6 p.m. Saturday, May
5, St. Thomas the Apostle
Catholic Church, 7040 S. Sun-
coast Blvd., Homosassa.
10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday,
May 5, Bizco Shredding Event,
204 S.E. U.S. 19, Crystal River.
0 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Sunday, May 6, St. Thomas the
Apostle Catholic Church, 7040
S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
Springs.
1 to 3 p.m. Sunday, May 6,
Wal-Mart Supercenter, 3826 S.
Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa.
9 to 11 a.m. Monday, May
7, Nature Coast EMS, 3876 W.
Country Hill Drive, Lecanto.
Noon to 3 p.m. Monday,
May 7, Wal-Mart Supercenter,
3826 S. Suncoast Blvd.,
Homosassa.
0 8:30 to 11 a.m. Tuesday,
May 8, Citrus County Schools
Bus Transportation, 710 N.E.
Sixth Ave., Crystal River.
Noon to 3 p.m. Tuesday,
May 8, Wal-Mart Supercenter,
3826 S. Suncoast Blvd.,
Homosassa.
d 10 a.m. to noon Wednes-
day, May 9, Wal-Mart Super-
center, 2461 W. Gulf-to-Lake


Highway, Inverness.
1 to 4 p.m. Wednesday,
May 9, Arbor Trail Rehab and
Skilled Nursing, 611 Turner
Camp Road, Inverness.
9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday
May 10, Seven Rivers Regional
Medical Center, 6201 N. Sun-
coast Blvd., Crystal River.
E 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday,
May 11, Lowe's, 2301 E. Gulf-
to-Lake Highway, Inverness.
8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Sunday,
May 13, Our Lady of Fatima
Catholic Church, 550 U.S. 41
S., Inverness.
Noon to 6 p.m. Monday,
May 14, Eagles Aerie 4272,
5340 W. Grover Cleveland
Blvd., Homosassa.
12:30 to 4:30 p.m. Tues-
day, May 15, Wal-Mart Super-
center, 2461 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Inverness.
8 to 11:30 a.m. Tuesday,
May 15, Stoneridge Landing
Clubhouse, Inverness.
0 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Wednesday, May 16, Citrus
County Government Building,
3600 W. Sovereign Path,
Lecanto.
E 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Thurs-
day, May 17, Nick Nicholas
Ford, 2901 State Road 44 W.,
Inverness.
8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Friday,
May 18, Rock Crusher Elemen-
tary School, 814 S. Rock
Crusher Road, Homosassa.
8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday,
May 19, Our Lady of Grace
Catholic Church, 6 Roosevelt
Blvd., Beverly Hills.
2 to 5 p.m. Sunday, May
20, Wal-Mart Supercenter,
2461 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway,
Inverness.
d 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Sun-
day, May 20, St. Scholastica
Catholic Church, 4301 W. Ho-
mosassa Trail, Lecanto.
8 a.m. to noon Monday,
May 21, Anytime Fitness, 5723
S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa.
1 to 4 p.m. Monday, May
21, Wal-Mart Supercenter,
3826 S. Suncoast Blvd.,
Homosassa.
8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday,
May 22, Homosassa Elemen-
tary School, 10935 W. Yulee
Drive.
D 4 to 7:30 p.m. Wednesday,
May 23, First Baptist Church of
Crystal River, 700 Citrus Ave.
Noon to 3:30 p.m.
Wednesday, May 23, Wal-Mart
Supercenter, 3826 S. Suncoast

Noon to 5 p.m. Thursday,
May 24, Sumter Electric Coop-
erative, U.S. 301 and Sumter
County Road 471, Sumterville.




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Alan Shawn Feinstein will
add money to donations given
to the Beverly Hills Commu-
nity Church's Food
Pantry. Donations must be re-
ceived by today and can in-
clude cash, checks, and/or
food items. Call the church of-
fice at 352-746-3620.
Crystal River United
Methodist Church food pantry
is open from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
the second and fourth Thurs-
days monthly at 4801 N. Citrus
Ave., Crystal River. Call 352-
795-3148 or visit
www.crumc.com.
Suncoast Baptist
Church, 5310 S. Suncoast
Blvd., Homosassa Springs,
has its food pantry open from 9
a.m. to noon the second
Wednesday monthly for pre-
bagged food. Free bread is
available from 9 a.m. to noon
Wednesday. This is for Ho-
mosassa people in need only.
Call the office at 352-621-3008
on Tuesday and Wednesday
or call Pastor Fizer at 352-586-
0341 any time.
Calvary Chapel of Inver-
ness "Feed the Hungry" free
lunch is served from noon to 1
p.m. Thursday in the fellow-
ship hall, 960 S. U.S. 41. The
Feed the Hungry program has
expanded to include a soup
kitchen from 11:30 a.m. to 1
p.m. Tuesday.
Call 352-726-1480.
The Salvation Army's
Food Pantry is open to Citrus
County and southern Levy
County residents from 8:30
a.m. to noon and 1 to 4 p.m.
Monday through Friday (ex-
cluding holidays) at 3975 W.
Grover Cleveland Blvd., 3/4
mile west of Lecanto Highway
(County Road 491). Applicants
are interviewed for food after a
photo ID and secondary ID are
provided for all adults in the
household and an ID for all
children in the household. Call
352-621-5532.
Floral City United
Methodist Church hosts a
free breakfast from 7 to 9 a.m.
Tuesday in Hilton Hall, 8478
E. Marvin St., across from the
elementary school. All are wel-
come. Call 352-344-1771.
Daystar Life Center's
Food Pantry is open to Citrus


County residents from 9 a.m.
to 1:15 p.m. Monday through
Friday (excluding holidays) at
6751 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway,
Crystal River.
Applicants will be given an
interview for food after a photo
ID and Social Security cards
for all family members are
provided.
Call 352-795-8668.
The Hernando Seventh-
day Adventist Church, at
1880 N. Trucks Ave., Her-
nando, provides food distribu-
tion for needy families through
its food pantry, open from 10
a.m. to noon the second and
fourth Tuesdays monthly.
Please have proper photo ID
available at the first request for
food. Call 352-212-5159.
Nature Coast Ministries'
food pantry is open from 10
a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday and
Thursday. The office is at 999
State Road 44 in Crystal River
(next to RaceTrac in the old
Skidmore building). Call 352-
563-1860.
SOS Ministry food pantry
is open from 9 a.m. to noon
Thursday at Good Shepherd
Lutheran Church, 439 E.
Norvell Bryant Highway
(County Road 486), opposite
the entrance to Citrus Hills.
Call 352-527-0052 or 352-
746-7161. If new to the pro-
gram, bring driver's license
and Social Security cards for
all family members for initial
registration. Food is distributed
according to family size.
St. Anne's Anglican
Church food pantry opens
from 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. daily in
the administration building.
Citrus United Basket
(CUB) food pantry is open to
all underserved Citrus County
residents from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Monday through Friday
at 103 Mill Ave., Inverness).
Participants must provide
proof of income, photo ID and
Social Security numbers for
each family member. Contact
CUB at 352-344-2242 or
cublisa@embarqmail.com.
First Baptist Church of
Crystal River has its food
pantry open from 10 a.m. to 1
p.m. Monday, Wednesday and
Thursday. The church is at
700 N. Citrus Ave., Crystal


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River. Call 352-795-3367.
Our Lady of Fatima's
Food Pantry, at 604 U.S. 41 S.,
is open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Monday to Friday. Proper
photo ID, proof of residence
and interview are required for
assistance to needy residents
of Floral City, Hernando and In-
verness. Call 352-726-1707.
First United Methodist
Church of Inverness God's
Kitchen serves from 11:30 a.m.
to noon Mondays in the fellow-
ship hall, 3896 S. Pleasant
Grove Road.
Call 352-726-2522.
The New Church Without
Walls gives free food boxes
away at 5 p.m. Monday at the
neighborhood park in Hernando
off Railroad Drive where feed-
ing the homeless takes place.
Call 352-344-2425.
Our Lady of Grace
Catholic Church food pantry
is open from 9 to 10 a.m. the
third Tuesday monthly at 6
Roosevelt Blvd.
Pantry is open to those who
truly qualify for this program.
No vouchers or financial aid
given. Call Anna at 352-527-
2381 or the church at 352-746-
2144. Have proper photo ID
available at the time of the re-
quest for food.
Call 352-212-5159.
EI-Shaddai food min-
istries "brown bag of food" dis-
tribution takes place from 10
a.m. to 1 p.m. Tuesday at
Crystal River Church of God,
2180 W. 12th Ave..
Although food is distributed
once a week, families are only
eligible for food once a month.
Call 352-628-9087 or 352-
302-9925.
Citrus County Veterans
Coalition operates a Veterans
Food Bank for Citrus County
veterans and their family mem-
bers in need at 1039 N. Paul
Drive, Inverness.
Food distribution is from 10
a.m. to 1 p.m. Tuesday and
Thursday. Call Richard at
352-400-8952 or Gary at 352-
527-4537 with any questions
or emergency food requests.


We Care Food Pantry
gives out food to needy people.
Initial registrations are ac-
cepted from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Tuesday and Thursdays. To
qualify for assistance, partici-
pants must be Homosassa or
Homosassa Springs residents
with ID. Call 352-628-0445.
The food pantry of First
Presbyterian Church of Crys-
tal River is open from 10 a.m.
to 3 p.m. Tuesday.
Everyone is invited to partici-
pate once a week as needed.
Bring a photo ID and the
date of birth for each member
of your household.
The church is at 1501 S.E.
U.S.19, north of Sweetbay.
Call 352-795-2259.
St. Margaret's Episcopal
Church's Feed My Sheep out-
reach provides a hot lunch at
11:30 a.m. Wednesday. Food
pantry is open from 9:30 to
11:45 a.m. Tuesday and Wed-
nesdays. Call 352-726-3153.
Food pantry of Floral City
First Baptist Church Emer-
gency Feeding Program is
open from 1 to 3 p.m. the third
Wednesday monthly.
Dunnellon Presbyterian
and Holy Faith Episcopal
food pantry is open from 9 a.m.
to noon Thursdays at 19924 W.
Blue Cove Drive, Dunnellon.
Our Father's Table
serves free Saturday lunches
from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
at St. Anne's Anglican Church,
one mile west of the Plantation
Inn on West Fort Island Trail.
Call 352-795-2176.
St. Elizabeth Ann Seton
Catholic Church in Citrus
Springs serves those in need
with free boxes of food from its
food pantry the third Saturday
morning monthly.
Call 352-465-6613 on the
preceding Tuesday to sign up
for the distribution.
Inverness Church of
God hosts a soup kitchen the
first and third Sunday monthly
following the 10:30 a.m. wor-
ship service in the Family Life
Center, 416 U.S. 41 S., Inver-
ness. Call 352-726-4524.


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MONDAY, APRIL 30, 2012 A7







CITRUS COUNTY

U.OF Young meets not-so-young

2012 Chronicle project Editor's note: Chronicle reporter Mike Wright high-tech world. Since he couldn't go back in time, Citrus High School junior In keeping with the theme,
wanted to know what it's like being a teenager in this Wright asked Samantha Kennedy, a 16-year-old the interview took place via email. Here it is:


Samantha, thanks very much for agreeing to an interview in
this format Basically, I want to know what it's like to be 16
years old in this high-tech world. Can you remember back to
g? your first encounter with gadgets and by that I mean com-
puters, cell phones, email, texting, that kind of thing?




I remember when MySpace started
becoming popular. My mom didn't want
kB me to have one, and I thought I was
*, sneaky and made one behind her back
EN- T because I was afraid I wouldn't be as
'cool' as everyone else. With texting, it
took me a long time to get unlimited tex-
ting like I'd wanted (not to mention
everybody else had), and my mom originally gave me
200 texts a month while I was in 8th grade, which was
also when I got my first phone. However, my earliest
memory from all of the technology boom was trying to
get onto the Disney Channel website with dial up, talk
about a nightmare.



So you don't ever remember a time when the Internet -
even slow, boring dial-up wasn't part of your life? Did a
bunch of your friends have MySpace?






We'd always had a computer at my
A house, actually. I think I do remember a
k1 time (possibly early elementary school)
when we didn't have internet access at
-. the house, but again, I was really young
then, so it didn't matter to me either
way. And yes, it seemed like all of my
friends had a MySpace at the time, be-
cause it was the popular thing.
___


Going back to my youth, oh so many years ago, I took typ-
ing in high school. Just curious: Have you ever seen a type-
writer? Could you pick one out of a lineup? Do they teach you
about typewriters and rotary telephones in history class?





I've both seen and could pick out a
H typewriter out of a lineup. They've al-
ways kind of interested me because I've
wanted to use one. And we don't really
discuss typewriters/rotary telephones in
my history class. We touch on things
like that, but haven't gone into detail.




Biggest problem with a typewriter is sometimes the keys
would stick or I'd run out of ink. I guess that's about the same
as your computer freezing up. But I digress. Facebook is the
rage these days, right? Do you know anyone who is NOT on
Facebook?




I actually do know people who aren't
on Facebook. I know a lot of people
who've started deleting their Facebook
accounts due to drama, and for about a
Sw-. 2-week period I deleted mine, as well.
After that I haven't really paid as much
attention to my account.




Why is that? Not you specifically, but it does seem the whole
Facebook scene is beginning to fade. Since a major selling
point of FB is to stay in touch with friends, are kids finding
other ways to communicate other than actually, you know,
talking?




Facebook is all about he said this or
she said that, or you could get the oc-
& casional break-up fight. It's just not what
everyone wants to see. The purpose is
NT-. to keep in touch with people, not docu-
ment your life. Most people just text, or
use Twitter as a way to still keep others
"updated".


So, between tweets, texts, email and even Facebook, are you
pretty much glued to a gadget all the time? I'm not trying to
be a jerk, it just seems like teenagers spend all their waking
hours communicating in some electronic form with their
friends. OK, maybe I am being a jerk...




Hahaha, I always have my phone on
me. I only really text three people, and
once in a while I'll tweet from my phone.
But as for my laptop, I'm hardly sitting
s.- in front of it. I don't really have much
time to be glued to the computer, nor do
I have the desire to be anymore. And
you're not being a jerk, it's realistic.




You're very kind to your elders. That's nice to see. Before
we leave Facebook, I was wondering whether you've ever wit-
nessed online bullying, or if you know someone who has had
that happened to them.





Oh my. Online bullying is way too
A common, which is one of the reasons I'm
not too keen on keeping up with social
networking devices. I see people being
bullied all the time, at the High School
AND Middle School level. It's not some-
thing that I find to be fair, or right. I've
been bullied (anonymously) on the inter-
net more times than I can count, and so have people
that are close to me. Just because you can say it
through a computer screen doesn't mean you should;
unless you were willing to say it to them in person.


Grownups do it too. There's something about posting an
anonymous remark online that seems to bring out the worst in
people. To wrap up here, do you see how quickly the technol-
ogy is changing with the devices you deal with every day?
From my standpoint, it's amazing. For example, I grew up
with textbooks in school. In a few years, they will be replaced
with e-books. Is that something you notice or do you pretty
much flow with the changes?

More or less, I love the idea of tech-
nology, but hate the way that people
abuse the privilege of having it. I love
messing around with the newest devices
N- T that make things so much easier. I see
how quickly everything is changing, but
I basically roll with the punches with the
updates in technology. It makes things
easier, but is far too easily abused in my opinion.


I appreciate your time Samantha. Now get to your home-
work! Haha.







Haha, I definitely need to....


-'
Talk to me about Twitter. With texting, email and Facebook
available, I don't get the Twitter thing at all. Yet, it's every-
where. Do you tweet often and what about?






You tweet quotes, or little blurbs
^ about what's going on. Its basically like
a Facebook status update, but shorter.
S You can get tweets sent to your phone
by people you follow. And I tweet pretty
often, about stuff people say, or what's
going on in my life.
#___________________


A8 MONDAY, APRIL 30, 2012


QUALITY OF LIFE


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


-W


-W




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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MONDAY, APRIL 30, 2012 A9












'It's like family here'


CITRUS COUNTY


QUALITY






UFE

2012 Chronicle project



Groups like

Young Marines

teach youngsters

self-respect
MIKE WRIGHT
Staff Writer

CRYSTAL RIVER Even at a
young age Shane Blische knew he
was headed in the wrong
direction.
"I used to be a bad kid in school
last year," Shane, now 13, said.
"My mom got tired of it."
So Shane's mother learned
about the Nature Coast Young
Marines, a program that empha-
sizes discipline, self-respect and
proper manners.
"She thought it would help with
my attitude," he said.
And it did.
Shane is nearing the end of his
13-week recruit period for the
Young Marines, who meet each
Monday evening (except during
the summer) at the National
Guard Armory in Crystal River.
Like other youth groups, such as
Sea Cadets and 4-H, the Young
Marines emphasizes a way of life
that excludes drugs, alcohol, video
games and boredom.
Young Marines is not a military
recruitment program. It focuses


RIC BUSH/Special to the Chronicle
Young Marine cadets and recruits stand in order during a drill led by Douglas Jessup and Sara Atwood at the beginning of Monday evening's class
at the National Guard Armory in Crystal River.


on character-building, leadership
and a healthy lifestyle.
"It helps with self-esteem, self-
discipline and respect for others,"
said Lisa Gonzales, the unit com-
mander for the Nature Coast
Young Marines in Citrus County.
Staff Sgt. Sara Atwood can attest
to that. The Citrus High School
sophomore joined Young Marines
eight years ago and now it's an im-
portant part of her life.


YOUNG MARINES
The Nature Coast Young
Marines meets every Monday
at 6:15 p.m. at the National
Guard Armory in Crystal
River. Boys and girls ages 8
to 18 are welcome.

"My first week here I hated it,"
she admitted.


Atwood grew with the program
and now she's the one who makes
sure Shane answers "Yes Sir" and
"No Sir" to a reporter's questions.
She enjoys the physical fitness
and leadership skills.
"It helps me choose better
friends," Atwood said. "I'm able to
see the good side and bad side of
people."
This summer Atwood is headed
to a Young Marines leadership


school at Camp Pendleton, Calif.
She's a little nervous but knows
it'll pay off.
Atwood is planning to enlist in
the Air Force after graduation and
wants a career in nursing.
She enjoys her Young Marines
experience, and said: "It's like
family here."
Chronicle reporter Mike Wright
can be reached at 352-563-3228 or
m wrigh t@chronicleonline. com.


WTI
Continued from Page Al

took this same class in 1982
after high school, which led
to a 28-year career repairing
air conditioning units.
Woythaler, who began
teaching at WTI in 2010,
said high school students
who take WTI courses as
electives have the chance to
jump into a career right
after graduation.
"He'll have a step up on
the average Joe off the
street," Woythaler said of
Hooper.
While many students ar-
rive at WTI looking for voca-
tional direction, they are no
slouches in the classroom.
"If they're not good at
math, they won't make it in
our class," Woythaler said.
High school students take
WTI courses as electives,
which is the same as other
students taking art or music.


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Jesse Hooper, 18, is studying in the electricity course at the Withlacoochee Technical In-
stitute. Many WTI students prepare to move straight into the workforce by attending trade
classes at the school based in Inverness.
They attend their home WTI the other half. an electrician and now the
schools for half the day and Dalton Tinsley's father is Citrus High junior hopes to


follow in his footsteps.
"He's taught me a lot," he
said. "I was always the
handyman, watching over
his shoulder what he did. I'd
like to still help him out."
Tinsley said he doesn't
understand the push for
high school students to at-
tend college.
"I have my plans," he said.
"I have no desires to do any-
thing else."
Fellow CHS junior Dalton
Homan's father went to
school with Woythaler.
"My dad said this would
be a good skill to have in
life," he said.
As with interest in electri-
cal work, many students in
WTI's auto mechanics pro-
gram have fathers who are
mechanics or the skill grew
on them naturally
"I like this class. It's
hands-on," CHS senior Sally
Jaimes said.
"My dad used to fix cars
and I would always help
him. I got interested doing it


with my dad."
Jaimes has plans for col-
lege, but she also wants to
be a certified auto me-
chanic which graduating
WTI students have the
chance to become.
"There are not many
women who do this," she
said.
Teacher Bob Irving has 30
students in his auto me-
chanics program. He said
students who become certi-
fied can make $8.50 to $10
an hour right out of high
school. After three months
on the job, the wage can
jump higher.
"It takes the right kind of
person to have the stamina
to stand out there eight
hours a day," Irving said.
"That's what our industry
needs. We need laborers. We
need people who are
skilled."
Chronicle reporter Mike
Wright can be reached at
352-563-3228 or mwright@
chronicleonline. com.


BULLYING
Continued from PageAl

we see now have changed due to
the popularity of Facebook and
other social media," he said.
"Most of our issues we get come
from that. It's starts there and
makes its way to school."
If an event at the school is re-
ported, an investigation begins. If
the incident is deemed a bullying
act, Lancaster said, a bullying/
harassment complaint report is
filed by school personnel. That
gets forwarded to the district level
where a plan of follow-up action
and counseling is made.
He said the overall goal is stop
the bullying behavior, help the stu-
dent understand why his or her
behavior is wrong and correct it.
Lancaster, the 2007 Crystal
River Middle School Teacher of
the Year, said many times there is
confusion about exactly what bul-
lying is.
The Citrus County School Dis-
trict Code of Student Conduct de-
fines the act of bullying in part as,
"systematically and chronically
inflicting physical hurt or psycho-
logical distress on one or more
students or employees."
He stresses the definition
makes it clear that a bullying act
is something that is repeated, not
a one-time incident. Those one-
time incidents are dealt with in a
different disciplinary manner.
Physical bullying on school


DEFINITION OF BULLYING
The 2011-12 Citrus County Schools Code of Student Conduct
defines bullying as follows:
* Bullying means systematically and chronically inflicting physical
hurt or psychological distress on one or more students or
employees. It is further defined as unwanted and repeated written,
verbal or physical behavior, including any threatening, insulting or
dehumanizing gestures by a student or adult that is severe or
pervasive enough to create an intimidating, hostile or offensive
educational environment; cause discomfort or humiliation; or
unreasonably interfere with the individual's school performance or
participation; and may involve but is not limited to: physical,
verbal, emotional or sexual.


grounds, according to Lancaster, is
something that happens infre-
quently due to the visibility of
teacher manning duty stations
while students move in mass be-
tween classes, a time Lancaster
said these types of events occurs
most often.
But teachers can't always be
around the corner watching for
students who are making poor
decisions.
Lancaster said that in ways
communicating over the computer
or other device gives youngsters
misguided sense of security as
well as the lack of immediate con-
sequences for harsh words.
"I think it's almost like their
alter ego coming out. They feel
empowered and I think they ex-
press themselves in a way that
they want to be perceived," he
said. "Plus, they're not going to get
that instant challenge they might
if they say something to somebody
in person. So they feel freer to say
things that they wouldn't normally


say I guess you could say its Inter-
net courage."
He also said students are learn-
ing more about bullying.
"There have been some things
in the national news that (have)
brought a higher awareness about
bullying," he said. "They're a lot
more educated than they were
years back."
He, along with other adminis-
trators and teachers, are trained
on what to look for and what to do
when they see behavior that could
be defined as bullying.
"Our district office is very
proactive on anti-bullying and
they set specific procedures that
we have to follow if bullying is re-
ported to us," he said. "And we
have signs placed around campus
to inform students and parents
what to do if they are being bullied
or witness bullying."
Lancaster said there isn't mold
for a typical bully They can be big,
small, boy or girl.
They come in all shapes, sizes


SIGNS A CHILD IS BEING BULLIED
* Look for changes in the child. Be aware that not all children who
are bullied exhibit warning signs.
* Some signs that may point to a bullying problem are:
* Unexplainable injuries.
* Lost or destroyed clothing, books, electronics or jewelry.
* Frequent headaches or stomach aches, feeling sick or faking
illness.
* Changes in eating habits, suddenly skipping meals or binge
eating. Kids may come home from school hungry because they
did not eat lunch.
* Difficulty sleeping or frequent nightmares.
* Declining grades, loss of interest in schoolwork or not wanting to
go to school.
* Sudden loss of friends or avoidance of social situations.
* Feelings of helplessness or decreased self-esteem.
* Self-destructive behaviors such as running away from home,
harming themselves, or talking about suicide.
Source: Stopbullying.Gov


and backgrounds, he said.
The assistant principal said that
while bullying receives a lot at-
tention, the number of actual bul-
lying events on campus is very low.
"I would say that due to teacher
and staff visibility on campus, we
may only have a few cases of this a
year," he said. "Some years we've
had none. We let the students
know that this is their school, and
the school is here for you.
For the victim of a bullying
event, keeping quiet is what many
feel is the best thing, so as to not
bring on more trouble.
"I think a lot of students are
afraid that their peers will call


them a snitch for telling," he said.
"But we're pretty familiar with
that aspect of it. So we find ways
to allow them to report that activ-
ity in a way that (is) confidential,
anonymous. Part of their bullying
education is to stand up for those
students, and we try to teach them
to be assertive. We want them to
stand up for themselves and
others."
For more on the DBK Founda-
tion, go to it website at http://
thedbkfoundation. org
Chronicle staff writer Matthew
Beck can be reached at 352-564-
2919 or mbeck@chronicleonline.
comn.


A10 MONDAY, APRIL 30, 2012


QUALITY OF LIFE


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


02011 Media Services S-9041 OF24759R-1 Advertisement



Abdominal fat reducer provided to




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I BEFORE I


I BEFOE


MONDAY, APRIL 30, 2012 All







Page A12 MONDAY, APRIL 30, 2012



PINION


"It is the chiefest point of happiness
that a man is willing to be what he
is.Desiderius Erasmus, 1465-1536
Desiderius Erasmus, 1465-1536


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan........... .................. publisher
Charlie Brennan ............. ................. editor
Mike Arnold ........... .................. HR director
Sandra Frederick....................... managing editor
Z...u Curt Ebitz.............. ............ citizen member
Founded Mac Harris ........................ citizen member
by Albert M.
Williamson Rebecca Martin ..........................guest member
'You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


PORT STUDY



Feasibility





meets with




anticipation


After all the early turmoil
surrounding Port Citrus,
we're finally getting
down to the real work of find-
ing out what we have and what
we might be able to do with it.
Nine firms responded to the
Port Citrus feasibility study
Request for Qualifications
(RFQ); six were shortlisted.
The Board of
County Commis-
sioners, sitting as THE I
the Citrus County Port
Port Authority feasibili
board, spent a draws t
long day in mid- draws
April listening to consult
and questioning
the firms' presen- OUR 01
ters. At the end of Chosen c
the day, they is experie
chose Martin As- well-kno'
sociates of Lan- indL
caster, Pa., a
well-known, expe-
rienced firm that has assem-
bled a strong team including
Moffat & Nichol out of Tampa
and a former Florida Ports
Council executive.
Possibly due to the state of
the economy, Citrus County's
opportunity drew interest from
some high-powered respon-
dents. The bad news is that
Port Authority board members
said it was a tough decision to
make; the good news is exactly
the same. The final tally
showed just two-tenths of a
point separating the top two
firms.
The successful Martin Asso-
ciates firm, which detailed its
experience with major Florida
ports, particularly shallow-
draft ports, and many others
around the Gulf area, said it ex-
pected to complete the feasibil-
ity study within three months.
What will the study include?
Negotiations on the scope of
work are still ongoing, but it


S
C
t
o


P


should assess potential to stim-
ulate economic development,
develop ways to identify poten-
tial port users and market
strategies, and explore funding
options for port development,
if that's a viable option.
Martin Associates said it will
conduct a "reliable and defen-
sible" analysis for existing and
potential markets,
which could in-
;SUE: clude cargo, in-
d us trial
;itrus development, dis-
y study tribution center
p-notch development,
nt firms. recreational de-
velopment, com-
INION: mercial fishing,
)nsultant and marine repair
nced and work/barge con-
vn in the struction. The
stry. study will address
costs, logistics,
commercial activ-
ity, infrastructure and environ-
mental constraints, among
other things. One key pledge is
that the consultants will tell us
if they see no financially sensi-
ble future for the port.
We are particularly fortunate
that Martin Associates brings
expertise and industry connec-
tions with major players in
port investment and funding
options, and public-private
partnership development
opportunities.
Port Authority Chairman
Dennis Damato observed at the
end of the day that the RFQ
process was a good example of
open government. The scope-of-
work negotiations will also be
"in the sunshine," so taxpayers
can watch as the project takes
shape. Let's keep an eye on it,
but the purposeful path we're
now on is a major improvement
from the initial missteps taken
by local officials when consid-
ering the potential for a port.


Retire on Medicare
Politicians need to feel the pain
of the working-class American. As
citizens, we need to demand a cut
in their salaries, perks and retire-
ment packages. We, as Ameri-
cans, have to insist they retire on
Social Security and
Medicare, just like their
fellow Americans. Every 0
one of the problems fac-
ing America is a result of
their incompetence and
corruption. If they had
worked in the private sec-
tor, their employment
would have been termi-
nated long ago. I ask my CAL
fellow Americans if they
have any ideas of how to 563
accomplish this. Now
what do we do? Please set
aside at least 15 minutes each
day to discuss with your children
and grandchildren, nieces and
nephews just what is happening
to our country and prepare them
for the debt we are leaving them.
$15 trillion debt
We hear all the reasons why the
United States is so deep in debt
and often different versions of
how we got here. Does it really
matter how we got here? We are


here. I hope each citizen will focus
on the national debt of over $15
trillion. Each taxpayer owes
$137,744. Many socialist issues
in today's news are important. I
hope each citizen will encourage
more discussion on how we are
going to get out of this mess.
What will happen when
JND China says no more
loans to cover our debt?
lF Our country has a real
problem. Future citizens
have a bigger problem.
Politics pays
Ladies and gentlemen,
I would sure love to know
one thing: Why is Obama
0579 flying around as if he
owns the plane that we
have bought for and paid
for with our hard-earned dollars
.... promising more stuff he can't
produce? I can't understand why
he's allowed to fly around free of
charge and us paying for it. Some-
one speak up. Someone say
something, do something, be-
cause it's a shame and a disgrace
that we have to pay for his poli-
tics. No one else gets free of
charge except what people give to
them. I'm tired of it. I raised my
children. I worked hard.


A ridiculous comparison


ohn Raese is feeling perse- to wear yellow stars. "It might be
cuted. Raese, a smoking today, it might
West Virginia be Big Macs tomorrow,
businessman running then Coca-Colas the
for the U.S. Senate, next day, then Jack
declared in a recent Daniel's, then we're in
speech that he doesn't trouble."
want the government Yes, he actually said
telling him what to do that. And one can't help
"because I'm an but recall the famous
American." Specifi- thing Martin Niemoller
cally, he lamented that said about the Holo-
he is required to place Leonard Pitts caust: "First they came
a "huge sticker" on his OTHER for the Big Macs, and I
buildings declaring did not speak out-- be-
them smoke-free VOICES cause I did not eat at
environments. McDonald's.


"Remember Hitler used to put
Star of David on everybody's
lapel, remember that? Same
thing," he said.
Ahem.
For the record, the Nazis did
not require the Star of David on
"everybody's" lapel. Only Jews
were forced to sew the symbol on
their clothing under penalty of
being fined, imprisoned or shot.
But maybe we should just be
grateful Raese did not compare
smoker's lounges to concentra-
tion camps or some tobacco
junkie hiding in the toilet to
sneak a smoke to Anne Frank,
hiding out for her life.
Predictably, Raese has come
under fire from Jewish groups,
including the Simon Wiesenthal
Center He has refused to back
down. "I'm not apologizing to any-
body or any organization," he told
the Charleston Daily Mail. He
went on to say, "I am not going to
be intimidated by a bunch of
bull-t."
Requiring him to put up no-
smoking signs, is, he reiterated,
"very similar" to requiring Jews


"Then they came for the Coca-
Colas, and I did not speak out -
because I prefer Pepsi.
"Then they came for the Jack
Daniel's and I did not speak out
- because I was not a whiskey
drinker
"Then they came for me and
there was no one left to speak for
me."
OK, so that's not quite what
Niemoller said. But does it really
matter? Does anyone care? Do
the great words, noble precepts
and tragic occurrences of yester-
day still matter in a nation where
reverence is something some of
us can no longer even pretend to
feel?
Raese made his asinine re-
mark in furtherance of his belief
in small government. It is an ide-
ology whose adherents habitually
squander whatever appeal it
might otherwise hold through ex-
tremist statements such as these.
Surely reasonable people can de-
bate the proper size and role of
government. But one begins to
believe people like Raese seek
not small government, but no gov-


ernment. And that, putting it
mildly, is bizarre.
Worse, he compounds the sin
by committing this act of violence
against memory, this vandalism
of simple respect. At one fell
swoop, he manages to illustrate
both American political extrem-
ism and American incapacity of
reverence.
He is hardly unique. The Nazis
have become the go-to image of
political demonization. We've
seen Barack Obama as Hitler and
George W Bush as Hitler But any-
one who understands what hap-
pened when Hitler was Hitler
cannot help but decry such a mon-
umental trivialization of atrocity.
The crimes of the Nazi regime
were singular, unprecedented in
their sheer awfulness. Because of
this, thoughtful observers draw
Nazi parallels carefully and rarely
if at all. And then there are the
John Raeses of the world.
For what it's worth, the experi-
ence of a Jew in the Holocaust
and a smoker in America are
comparable in only one regard:
the death toll. The Nazis killed 6
million Jews in 12 years. Ciga-
rettes kill that many Americans
every 13 and a half. Of course, a
smoker has a choice. A Jew had
none.
And the idea of equating the
two is ridiculous, offensive and
unworthy of serious people. That
should go without saying.
The key word there being,
"should."

Leonard Pitts is a columnist for
the Miami Herald. Readers may
contact him via email at
lpitts@miamiherald. com.


_ LETTERS to the Editor


Rethink fees
We moved to Chassahowitzka
because of the river more than
six years ago. Most of the people
who live here are here because
of the river Most of us do not
mind paying something but think
we should have passes, like they
do in other counties around us,
for their citizens.
We are on a fixed income and
there are many people here like
us or who are low-income.
Boaters have been made to feel
unwelcome even if they are will-
ing to pay As far as the people
who stay out for more than one
day, if they pay for the days, how
are they taking up space?
They don't want us to use the
parking lot at night. I personally
fish late and there are many who
like to go crabbing at night. They
want to limit the parking for
boats so they can have more
space for single cars because
that's $10 instead of $7.
The county paid over $330,000
for a bathroom for the camp-
ground and then just hands over
our ramp to Moore and Moore
Realty Inc., along with the camp-
ground. If the county doesn't
come up with a solution at least
for the people who live in Chas-
sahowitzka, they have literally
sold us down the river
It's not as if we would be there
every day taking up a space if we
have a pass. That's not true. The
only people who would be doing
that are the people who live on


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in Chroni-
cle editorials are the opinions of
the newspaper's editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Groups or individuals are invited
to express their opinions in a let-
ter to the editor.
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at 352-563-5660.
All letters must be signed and in-
clude a phone number and home-
town, including letters sent via
email. Names and hometowns will
be printed; phone numbers will
not be published or given out.
We reserve the right to edit let-
ters for length, libel, fairness and
good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
350 words, and writers will be
limited to three letters per month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to
352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

the river, the crabbers and the
guides.

Teresa Weimar
Chassahowitzka

Perfect prose
There are many wonders in
this world, and one of those is
that there are so few typographi-


cal mistakes in our newspaper
After 20 years of reading the
Chronicle, I can remember find-
ing extremely few errors of any
kind.
Think about it! Our newspaper
is generated by myriads of peo-
ple from every walk of life con-
tributing various verbal and
typed data such as advertise-
ments, obituaries, political arti-
cles, sports updates, dozens of
organizational announcements,
etc.
News material is given to re-
porters and other newspaper
staff who in turn read it and
make judgments about what
should be included in the paper
This typed material, in turn, is
given to a copy editor who then
retypes it and processes it to the
printer to become the morning
paper
All this is done in an ex-
tremely limited time frame
under deadline pressure each
and every 24 hours.
Every day, the editors manage
to include compliments to indi-
viduals and groups.
Perhaps it is high time for
those thousands of Citrus
County readers to provide ap-
preciation to the Chronicle staff
for all they do to create an
amazing 20 to 40 pages of print
almost always typographically
perfect.
William C. Young
Crystal River


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


Hot Corner: SPENDING


-(





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Secrets of the secret service


What happened in Colombia

didn't stay in Colombia


Associated Press

WASHINGTON The
Secret Service does not
often get a black eye behind
those oh-so-cool sunglasses.
It's got a shiner now.
The public face of the
service is one of steely pro-
fessionals in impeccable
suits, wearing discreet ear-
pieces and packing even
more discreet weapons.
Agents are expressionless
except for their ever-search-
ing gaze, lethal automatons
ready to die for a president.
By reputation, stoked by
Hollywood myth and the
public's fleeting glances at
dark-windowed motor-
cades, they are anything but
party animals.
But what happened in
Colombia didn't stay in
Colombia.
The exposed Secret Serv-
ice secrets have put the sto-
ried agency under a different
line of fire, as lawmakers and


internal investigators try to
get to the bottom of officers'
behavior and any implica-
tions for the safety of those
they protect, starting with
President Barack Obama.
Eight Secret Service offi-
cers have been fired and
three disciplined, and a
dozen military personnel
have had their security clear-
ances suspended, in the un-
folding investigation of
sexual misbehavior by agents
who traveled to Cartagena,
Colombia, this month to set
up security for Obama's visit
The agency says it is also
looking into whether agents
hired prostitutes and strip-
pers in El Salvador in ad-
vance of the president's trip
last year. More reports are
emerging of allegedly ribald
conduct, off duty on official
trips.
John Brennan, Obama's
top counterterrorism ad-
viser, said Sunday investiga-
tors want to know whether


UNITED STATES


Associated Press
Secret Service agents watch as Air Force One departs Midland International Airport on
Oct. 4, 2008, with President Bush and first lady Laura Bush aboard in Midland, Texas.
there was any time "these agents being on a shorter pared, but I have to get the
activities put at risk either leash in his remarks to the Secret Service home in time
classified information or se- White House Correspon- for their new curfew."
curity." He said officials are dents' Association dinner Altogether, the perception
satisfied the Colombian Saturday night. "I really do is forming of frat boys being
episode did not pose a enjoy attending these din- frat boys, except these ones
threat to the president, ners," he said. "In fact, I had have top security clearance,
Obama joked about a lot more material pre- access to the president.


"They're on the receiving
end of this incredibly power-
ful fire hose" of allegations
and rumors, said Eric Dezen-
hall, a scandal-management
consultant and author who
counsels corporations and
institutions. "They're going
to be under it for a while."
As a young aide in Ronald
Reagan's White House,
Dezenhall looked upon Se-
cret Service agents as "su-
perhuman" and their
professional culture "as the
coolest thing in the world."
The code words -
"Rawhide" for Reagan,
"Stagecoach" for the heli-
copter (and now "Rene-
gade" for Obama) feed
into the cool factor So does
the one thing that most peo-
ple have known about the
trusted band of bodyguards:
their willingness to take a
bullet for those they protect.
"I just don't think their
reputation could be much
higher," Dezenhall says.
"But, as with happens with
everybody now, we're going
to see the humanity in it,
which takes some of the
mythology away from it."


Weaker al-Qaida still plots payback for US raid


Associated Press

WASHINGTON A year
after the U.S. raid that
killed Osama bin Laden, al-
Qaida is hobbled and
hunted, too busy surviving
for the moment to carry out
another Sept 11-style attack
on U.S. soil.
But the terrorist network
dreams still of payback, and
U.S. counterterrorist offi-
cials warn that, in time, its
offshoots may deliver.
A decade of wars in Iraq
and Afghanistan that has
cost the U.S. about $1.28 tril-
lion and 6,300 U.S. troops'
lives has forced al-Qaida's
affiliates to regroup, from
Yemen to Iraq. Bin Laden's
No. 2, Ayman al-Zawahri, is
thought to be hiding, out of
U.S. reach, in Pakistan's
mountains, just as bin Laden
was for so many years.
"It's wishful thinking to
say al-Qaida is on the brink
of defeat," said Seth Jones,
a Rand analyst and adviser
to U.S. special operations
forces. "They have in-
creased global presence,
the number of attacks by af-
filiates has risen, and in
some places like Yemen,
they've expanded control of
territory"
It's a complicated, some-
what murky picture for
Americans to grasp.
U.S. officials say bin
Laden's old team is all but
dismantled. But they say
new branches are hitting
Western targets and U.S. al-
lies overseas, and still as-
pire to match their parent
organization's milestone of
Sept. 11, 2001.
The deadliest is in
Yemen.
"They are continuing to
try to again carry out an at-
tack against U.S. persons in-
side of Yemen, as well as
against the homeland,"
White House counterterror-
ism advisor John Brennan
said Sunday on ABC's "This
Week."
"We're working very


closely with our Yemeni
partners to track down all
these leads," he said.
Brennan said there's no
sign of an active revenge plot
against U.S. targets, but U.S.
citizens in Pakistan and be-
yond are being warned to be
vigilant ahead of the May 2
anniversary of the night raid.
U.S. helicopters swooped
down on bin Laden's com-
pound in the Pakistani army
town of Abbottabad, killing
him, one of his sons, two
couriers and their wives.
The last view for Ameri-
cans of the mastermind be-
hind the Sept 11 attacks was
that of a wizened old man
sitting in front of an old tele-
vision, wrapped in a blanket
The world may never see
photographic proof of his
death. U.S. District Judge
James E. Boasberg in Wash-
ington ruled last week that
the Obama administration,
under the Freedom of Infor-
mation Act, would not have
to turn over images of bin
Laden during or after the
raid.
"Verbal descriptions of
the death and burial of
Osama Bin Laden will have
to suffice," Boasberg wrote
in his ruling on the lawsuit
by the public interest group
Judicial Watch.
Bin Laden's killing and al-
Qaida's stumbling efforts to
regroup are now the national
security centerpiece of Pres-
ident Barack Obama's re-
election campaign.
The White House fre-
quently cites the president's
decision to approve the
raid, with only a 50-50
chance that bin Laden was
even at the compound.
Obama could have gone
down in history as the man
who put the Navy SEALs
and the relationship with
Pakistan in jeopardy, while
failing to catch the al-Qaida
leader
"Al-Qaida was and is our
No. 1 enemy," White House
spokesman Jay Carney said
last week. "So it's a part of


his foreign policy record,
obviously, but it's also part
of a very serious endeavor
to keep our country safe."
How safe remains in
question.
U.S. officials say al-Qaida
is less able to carry out a
complex attack like Sept 11
and they rule out al-Qaida's
ability to attack with
weapons of mass destruc-
tion in the coming year.
These officials spoke on
condition of anonymity be-
cause they say publicly
identifying themselves
could make them a target of
the terrorist group.
U.S. counterterrorist
forces have killed roughly
half of al-Qaida's top 20
leaders since the raid. That
includes U.S.-born cleric
Anwar al-Awlaki, killed by a
drone in Yemen last Sep-
tember, less than six months
after bin Laden's death.
Only a few of the original
al-Qaida team remain, and
most of the new names on
the U.S. target lists are rela-
tive unknowns, officials say
"The last terror attack
was seven years ago in Lon-
don and they haven't had
any major attacks in the
U.S." said Peter Bergen, an
al-Qaida expert who once
met bin Laden. "They are
recruiting no-hopers and
dead-enders."
Yet Zawahri is still out
there. Though constantly
hunted, he has managed to
release 13 audio and video
messages to followers since
bin Laden's death, a near
record-rate of release ac-
cording to the IntelCenter, a


private intelligence firm.
He has urged followers to
seize on the unrest left by
the Arab Spring to build or-
ganizations and influence in
Egypt, Libya and elsewhere,
and back rebels in Syria a
call that U.S. intelligence of-
ficials say is being heeded.
U.S. attempts to deliver a
"knockout punch" to Za-
wahri and his followers in
Pakistan have been ham-
strung by a breakdown in


relations with Pakistan's
government over the bin
Laden raid.
Pakistani officials saw the
raid as a violation of their
sovereignty, made worse by
a U.S. friendly fire attack
that killed almost two dozen
Pakistani troops on the bor-
der with Afghanistan last
fall. Pakistan's parliament
called for a redrafting of
what the U.S. is allowed to
do, and where.


CIA drone strikes in Pak-
istan's border area con-
tinue, but are limited to a
relatively small area of the
tribal region.
"Our efforts are focused
on one small kill box and,
we've hit them hard, but
they still maintain a vital
network throughout Pak-
istan" says Bill Roggio, edi-
tor of the Long War Journal,
which tracks U.S. countert-
errorism efforts worldwide.


of Citrus County, Inc.

TEXT... CITRUS + Your Tip to 274637 (CRIMES)

CLICK... www.CrimeStoppersCitrus.com

CALL ... 1-888-ANY-TIPS (1-888-269-8477)

Funded by the Office of the Attorney General, Crime Stoppers Trust Fund


FON AI N~SNiIFBHOiniH
I PA^^*nk ;^^^


NATION


MONDAY, APRIL 30, 2012 A13











NATION


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Dinner US protecting escaped activist?

Dinner


Associated Press
President Barack Obama
attends the White House
Correspondents' Associa-
tion Dinner headlined by
late-night comic Jimmy
Kimmel on Saturday in
Washington.

Campus locked
down after robbery
MOBILE, Ala. The Uni-
versity of South Alabama
locked down its campus for
several hours Sunday follow-
ing an armed robbery in a
college dormitory, but officials
say no one was hurt.
University spokesman Keith
Ayers said Sunday evening
that the Mobile campus issued
a crime alert to students at
about 3:30 p.m. CDT.
The school used loud
speakers, emails and a dial-in
phone system to advise stu-
dents to seek shelter and
stay indoors.
"We did in fact do a cam-
pus lockdown," Ayers said.
Ayers said officials issued
the alert after receiving a re-
port that two armed male sus-
pects robbed students in
campus housing.
Campus police were "work-
ing the case right now," Ayers
said. "It was an armed robbery
on campus ... No one was hurt."

WorldBRIEFS

Crowned


Associated Press
Newly crowned Bismark
Martinez poses for a pic-
ture Saturday after winning
the 2012 Miss Gay
Nicaragua beauty contest
at the Ruben Dario Na-
tional Theatre in Managua,
Nicaragua.

Yacht debris,
bodies found
ENSENADA, Mexico -A
37-foot racing yacht was re-
duced to debris that looked it
"like it had gone through a
blender," a searcher said
Sunday after the boat appar-
ently collided with a larger
vessel, killing three sailors
and leaving a fourth missing.
The U.S. Coast Guard, the
Mexican navy and civilian
vessels scoured the waters
off the shore of both countries
for the missing sailor from the
Aegean, which was taking
part in a 124-mile race that
began Friday from Newport
Beach, Calif., to Ensenada,
Mexico. The sailboat, carry-
ing a crew of four, was re-
ported missing Saturday.
It was California's second
deadly accident this month in-
volving an ocean race.
Race officials said they had
few explanations for what
may have happened to the
Aegean other than it must
have collided with ship like a
freighter or tanker that did not
see the smaller vessel. The
Coast Guard said conditions
were fine for sailing, with
good visibility and moderate
ocean swells of 6-to-8 feet.
If the smaller boat was
bobbing around in light wind,
the crew might not have been
able to get out of the way of a
larger ship, perhaps a
freighter, said Rich Roberts, a
spokesman for the Newport
Ocean Sailing Association.
-From wire reports


Associated Press
WASHINGTON A top
White House aide on Sun-
day said President Barack
Obama wants to strike an
"appropriate balance" be-
tween advancing human
rights and maintaining U.S.
relations with China, the
first public comments by the
administration on its poten-
tial involvement in harbor-
ing a Chinese activist on the
eve of diplomatic talks be-
tween the two world powers.


John Brennan, Obama's
counterterrorism adviser,
declined to provide details
on the incident or say
whether the activist, Chen
Guangcheng, might be hid-
ing in the U.S. embassy in
Beijing as reported.
Chen, who has exposed
forced abortions and steril-
izations in villages as a re-
sult of China's one-child
policy, escaped house arrest
a week ago in Shandong
province in eastern China.
Chinese-based activists say


he was driven away by sup-
porters and then handed
over to others who brought
him to Beijing.
"I think in all instances the
president tries to balance
our commitment to human
rights, making sure that the
people throughout the world
have the ability to express
themselves freely and
openly, but also that we can
continue to carry out our re-
lationships with key coun-
tries overseas," Brennan
told "Fox News Sunday."
The U.S. relationship
with China is "very impor-
tant," he added, "so we're
going to make sure that we
do this in the appropriate


way and the appropriate
balance is struck."
Chen's escape comes at a
politically sensitive time for
the U.S. This week, Secre-
tary of State Hillary Rod-
ham Clinton and Treasury
Secretary Timothy Geithner
head to Beijing for long-
planned strategic and eco-
nomic talks. Assistant
Secretary of State Kurt
Campbell began a hurried
mission to Beijing on Sun-
day to smooth the way for
the annual talks involving
Clinton and Geithner
The U.S. has been looking
to China for help on trying to
curb the suspected nuclear
ambitions of North Korea


Aid worker killed in Pakistan


Associated Press
Pakistani volunteers and hospital staff transport the body of British Red Cross worker Khalil Rasjed Dale at a
local hospital Sunday in Quetta, Pakistan. Dale was held captive in Pakistan since January, and his body was
found in an orchard Sunday, his throat slit and a note attached to his body saying he was killed because no
ransom was paid, police said.


British man had been held captive since January


Associated Press
QUETTA, Pakistan The body
of a British Red Cross worker held
captive in Pakistan since January
was found in an orchard Sunday,
his throat slit and a note attached
to his body saying he was killed be-


lhalail
Dale
killed in
Pakistan.


cause no ransom
was paid, police
said.
Khalil Rasjed
Dale, 60, was man-
aging a health pro-
gram in the city of
Quetta in south-
western Pakistan
when armed men
seized him from a
street close to his
office. The identi-


ties of his captors are unknown, but
the region is home to separatist
and Islamist militants who have
kidnapped for ransom before.
The director-general of the In-
ternational Committee of the Red
Cross condemned the "barbaric
act."
'All of us at the ICRC and at the
British Red Cross share the grief
and outrage of Khalil's family and
friends," said Yves Daccord.
Dale's throat had been slit, ac-
cording to Safdar Hussain, a doctor
who examined the body
Quetta police chief Ahsan Mah-
boob said the note attached to it
read: "This is the body of Khalil
who we have slaughtered for not
paying a ransom."
Militants and criminal gangs
often kidnap wealthy Pakistanis
and less commonly, foreigners.
British Foreign Secretary
William Hague condemned Dale's


Dale's throat had
been slit, according
to Safdar Hussain, a
doctor who
examined the body.
killing, and said "tireless efforts"
had been under way to secure his
release after he was kidnapped.
Khalil had worked for the Red
Cross for years, carrying out as-
signments in Somalia, Afghanistan
and Iraq, the group said.
Quetta, the capital of Baluchis-
tan province, lies close to the
Afghan border and for decades has
hosted thousands of refugees from
that country The Red Cross oper-
ates clinics in the city that treat
people wounded in the war in
Afghanistan, including Taliban
insurgents.
A Pakistani foreign office state-
ment condemned the crime, prom-
ising to bring its perpetrators to
justice. However, arrests for this
type of crime are rare.
Much of Baluchistan and the
tribal regions close to Afghanistan
are out of Pakistani government
control, and make good places to
keep hostages. Large ransoms are
often paid to secure their release,
but such payments are rarely
confirmed.
Two Pakistani intelligence offi-
cials in Quetta said they were in-
vestigating whether this could be
the work of the Pakistani Taliban.
They spoke on condition of
anonymity because they were not
authorized to talk to the media.


There are at least four other for-
eigners being held in Pakistan.
Last August, a 70-year-old Amer-
ican humanitarian aid worker was
kidnapped from his house in the
Punjabi city of Lahore. Al-Qaida
claimed to be holding the man,
Warren Weinstein, and said in a
video he would be released if the
United States stopped airstrikes in
Afghanistan, Pakistan, Somalia
and Yemen.
In March, a Swiss couple held
captive for eight months by the Tal-
iban turned up at an army check-
point close to the Afghan border
Insurgents have claimed a large
ransom was paid to secure their
freedom. That has not been con-
firmed by Pakistani or Swiss au-
thorities, who are unlikely to
acknowledge it even if they did.
The couple was kidnapped in
Baluchistan.
Also Sunday, American missiles
killed three suspected Islamist mil-
itants sheltering in an abandoned
school in North Waziristan, said in-
telligence officials, who did not
give their names because they
were not authorized to speak to
reporters.
Pakistan's government strongly
condemned the attack. In a
statement, it said such attacks vio-
late international law and Pak-
istan's "territorial integrity and
sovereignty."
The strike comes as the U.S. is
trying to rebuild its relationship
with Pakistan, which opposes the
missile attacks and has demanded
they stop. The frequency of the at-
tacks, which critics say kill inno-
cents and energize the insurgency,
has dropped dramatically this year


21 killed in north church service attacks


Associated Press
KANO, Nigeria Gun-
men attacked worship serv-
ices at a university campus
and a church Sunday in
northern Nigeria, killing at
least 21 people in coordi-
nated assaults that saw pan-
icked Christians gunned
down as they tried to flee,
witnesses and officials said.
The deadlier attack tar-


geted an old section of
Bayero University's cam-
pus in the city of Kano
where churches hold Sun-
day services, with gunmen
killing at least 16 people
and wounding at least 22
others, according to the
Nigerian Red Cross.
A later attack in the
northeast city of Maiduguri
saw gunmen open fire at a
Church of Christ in Nigeria


chapel, killing five people,
including a pastor prepar-
ing for Communion, wit-
nesses said.
No group immediately
claimed responsibility, but
the attacks bore similarities
to others carried by a radi-
cal Islamist sect known as
Boko Haram.
The Bayero University at-
tack occurred around an old
theater and lecture halls


where local churches hold
services, Kano state police
commissioner Ibrahim Idris
said. The gunmen rode into
the campus on motorcycles,
then threw small explosives
made out of soda cans
around the area, Idris said.
The worshippers ran out
in an attempt to escape,
only to be shot by the wait-
ing gunmen, the commis-
sioner said.


Blind lawyer escaped house

arrest in China a week ago


ing on a pickup truck in a
parking lot.


and Iran, and to push Syria
toward a cease-fire with
anti-government protesters.
While the White House
has remained mostly mum
on the incident and how
much it might factor into the
upcoming discussions in
Beijing Brennan sug-
gested that the diplomatic
dance with China isn't new.
"I think it would be fair to
say the president has faced
similar situations in the past
in terms of this balancing
requirement and so I'm con-
fident that the president
and others within the U.S.
government will be able to
find the right way forward,"
Brennan said.




SUV
sUv


plunges


into


NYC's


Bronx


Zoo

Associated Press
NEW YORK An out-of-
control SUV barreled across
several lanes of traffic on a
highway overpass Sunday,
then plunged more than 50
feet off the side of the road
and landed in a ravine on
the grounds of the Bronx
Zoo, killing all seven people
aboard, including three
children, authorities said.
The SUV apparently
flipped over a 4-foot-high
iron fence before landing
upside-down on the prop-
erty of the nation's largest
city zoo. The cause of the
crash was unclear, and po-
lice haven't yet said how fast
the SUV was traveling. A city
official said the guardrail's
height would be one of the
safety issues investigated.
The victims were three
girls, ages 3, 7 and 10, an 85-
year-old man and three
women, ages 81, 45 and 39,
police said. The 45-year-old
woman was driving. The vic-
tims' names weren't imme-
diately released.
The Honda Pilot was
headed south on the high-
way that cuts through a
working-class neighborhood
when it bounced off the me-
dian, crossed all south-
bound lanes and hit the
guardrail, police said.
"Obviously, the vehicle
was traveling at a high rate
of speed," FDNY deputy
Chief Ronald Werner said.
"It hit something that caused
it to become airborne."
The SUV landed in a
wooded area on the edge of
zoo property that's closed to
the public and far from any
animal exhibits, zoo spokes-
woman Mary Dixon said. The
vehicle lay mangled hours
later, its right doors ripped
offand strewn amid the trees
along with items from the car
Next to the heavily wooded
area are subway tracks and a
train yard.
It's not clear what caused
the SUV to go out of control.
The southbound side of the
highway was closed briefly
Sunday afternoon while po-
lice investigated but later
reopened.
The medical examiner's
office said it expected to re-
lease the victims' causes of
death on Monday
The accident was the sec-
ond in the past year where a
car fell off the same stretch
of the Bronx River Parkway
Last June, the driver of an
SUV heading north lost con-
trol and the SUV hit a di-
vider, bounced through two
lanes of traffic and fell 20
feet over a guardrail, land-











.PORTS


Bynum ties
postseason
record for blocks
in a game during
Lakers' win over
Nuggets./B4

CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


0 MLB/B2
0 Scoreboard/B3
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Dufner holds off Els to capture Zurich


Golfer needs

playoff to claim

first PGA victory

Associated Press
AVONDALE, La. Jason
Dufner beat Ernie Els with a
birdie on the second hole of a
playoff Sunday in the Zurich
Classic to win for the first time in
164 starts on the PGA Tour.
Entering the fourth round with
a two-shot lead, Dufner shot a 2-
under 70 at TPC Louisiana, while
Els had a 67 to match Dufner at
19-under 269.
Both missed birdie putts within
8 feet on the par-5 18th in the first


playoff, so they went back to the
18th tee for the second extra hole,
which Dufner won by hitting the
green in two strokes and tapping
home a short birdie putt after Els'
birdie attempt from the fringe
narrowly missed.
Dufner lost playoffs
last year to Mark Wilson More
in the Phoenix Open
and Keegan Bradley in 0 For tl
the PGA Championship par s
for two of his three ca- plus
reer runner-up finishes, news
"It's always really see F
tough playing on Sun-
days whether you're in
lead or middle of pack, and today
I was fighting, trying to win event,
and I think I showed myself a good
bit out there," Dufner said. "It was
tough. Ernie made a great run at
me and it felt like with five or six


holes (to go) we were probably
going to be battling for the win.
"To get the monkey off of my
back, it's a great feeling."
The 6-foot-3 Els, who goes by
the nickname "The Big Easy,"
hasn't won on the PGA Tour since


e gogf
he PGA
scores,
LPGA
s, please
Page B4.


the 2010 Arnold Palmer
Invitational at Bay Hill,
a little more than two
years ago.
He did not have a sin-
gle bogey in the final
round or playoff, and
would have won his 19th
on p A T tit-,ftl in


of al
Easy, if he c(
birdie putt of
feet on the fir
pushed it mo


Ir 17 --Lourti nei n,
l places, the Big .
would have made a
a little less than 6
rst playoff hole. He Associated Press
re than 2 feet past Jason Dufner kisses the trophy after defeating Ernie Els in a sudden-
death playoff Sunday to win the Zurich Classic golf tournament at TPC
See Page B3 Louisiana in Avondale, La.


Unhappy campers


Associated Press
Although he led a race-high 206 laps, Carl Edwards, right, jumped the restart and fell to 15th after being penalized by NASCAR on
Saturday night during the Sprint Cup race. The penalty paved the way for Kyle Busch, left, to motor into victory lane.

Edwards, Stewart both displeased after Richmond race late Saturday night


Associated Press
RICHMOND, Va. Not even
a meeting with NASCAR offi-
cials helped Carl Edwards un-
derstand why he was given a
penalty at Richmond Interna-
tional Raceway
"We had to just agree to dis-
agree and that's the way it is,"
Edwards said.
In contrast, Tony Stewart
knew exactly why he lost Sat-
urday night's race.
"We did everything we could
to throw it away, it got taken
away," the defending Sprint
Cup champion said. "I'm pretty
ticked off about it."
Both drivers were less than
pleased when they left Rich-
mond, where late drama


spiced up what had been yet
another bland NASCAR race.
There were just three cautions
- one was a NASCAR-planned
competition through the first
310 laps and none had much
impact on the race.
That changed when Jeff Bur-
ton smacked the wall, leaving
behind debris that brought out
the yellow with 89 laps remain-
ing. It was Stewart and Ed-
wards on the front row for the
restart, and both believed they
were the leader.
Edwards sailed away at the
green flag, and was immedi-
ately penalized for jumping the
restart and passing the leader
before it was permitted.
What followed was a heated
confrontation between crew


chief Bob Osborne and the
NASCAR official assigned to
his pit stall, and a lengthy dis-
cussion on the team radio be-
tween Edwards and Osborne
as they tried to figure out ex-
actly what happened.
Edwards had been told by
his spotter he was the leader,
and the spotter said that infor-
mation came from NASCAR.
And the leaderboard backed it
up, as Edwards was shown in
first place. So when he was
lined up on the outside of the
track, Edwards said he figured
NASCAR had made a mistake,
and he made a split-second de-
cision to try to get the best
restart he could.
This part is not in dispute: Re-
plays clearly showed Edwards


rocketed past Stewart and had
cleared him before reaching the
official restart zone.
And that's against the rules,
no matter who was leading the
race.
"At the end of the day, it
comes down to jumping the
restart and that's pretty
straightforward," Osborne
said. "Our issue was the confu-
sion about who was the leader
and who wasn't the leader."
But why was Edwards being
shown as the leader? NASCAR
vice president of competition
Robin Pemberton said Ed-
wards had tripped the timing
and scoring when he crossed
the line ahead of Stewart

See Page B3


Bucs


focus on


defense

Draf yields what

TB hopes are

improvements

Associated Press
TAMPA- Najee Goode has
never doubted himself, going
from walk-on linebacker at
West Virginia to fifth-round
NFL draft pick of the Tampa
Bay Buccaneers.
The Bucs continued to re-
build one of the NFL's worst
defenses, selecting Goode and
then adding his college team-
mate, cornerback Keith
Tandy, in the
sixth round.
Tampa Bay
closed out
their first
draft under
coach Greg
Schiano late
Saturday by tak-
ing Utah State running back
Michael Smith and North-
western tight end Drake Dun-
smore in the seventh round.
"We got better this week-
end," Schiano said, adding
that it's still far too early to say
how much better.
The Bucs went 4-12 in 2011,
ending the season on a 10-
game losing streak.
"We're a work in progress. I
don't know I wish I could have
one of those thermometer's
that go up when you're doing
a fundraiser, saying we're get-
ting better and better and bet-
ter," Schiano said. "You won't
know until we hit the field and
start competing with other
teams. But I can feel a sense
of: 'Hey, we're moving this
thing forward."'
Goode was the 140th pick
overall, and the first player se-
lected by Tampa Bay on Satur-
day. A high school
quarterback, the 6-foot, 244-
pound native of Cleveland ar-
rived at West Virginia in 2008
as a walk-on hoping to do well
enough to eventually earn a
scholarship.
His father, John, was a tight
end at Youngstown State and
fifth-round draft choice of the
St Louis Cardinals in 1984.


Pacers try to avoid 0-2 hole vs. Magic


Associated Press
Orlando Magic forward Ryan Anderson defends Indiana Pacers forward
David West on Saturday in Indianapolis during the the Magic's 81-77
victory in Game I of the NBA Eastern Conference quarterfinals.


Associated Press
INDIANAPOLIS It's a good
thing Pacers coach Frank Vogel
warned his team to ignore the
experts.
Indiana entered its first-round
Eastern Conference playoff series
heavily favored, yet the Pacers
surrendered home-court advan-
tage in an 81-77 loss on Saturday
to a Magic team whose best player,
All-Star center Dwight Howard, is
out for the season with a back in-
jury A loss in Game 2 Monday at
home would put the Pacers in bad
shape before heading to Orlando.
Indiana had momentum from a
12-3 finish to the regular season,
so the Game 1 disaster was unex-
pected. After the team had some
time to breathe, the Pacers felt
like themselves again.


"We lost a game," forward
Danny Granger said. "We
watched it. It's not the end of the
world. It's a seven-game series.
We don't want to overreact."
If nothing else, the Pacers re-
spect this new ver-
sion of the Magic. NBA p
"Even though U WHAT: OrI
they're a sixth Indiana Pa
seed team, they're of Eastern
still good with or quarterfinal
without Dwight
Howard," Pacers 0 TIME: 7:30
guard Darren Col- 0 TV: NBA T
lison said. "I really
feel like we have
our hands full. Everybody's say-
ing that we're favored. No, it's a
series. We're going to try to take it
one game at a time and we can't
overreact because we lost one
game. We've got to protect home


ila
an
ce
C
als

V.


court tomorrow and go out there
and get after it."
Vogel remained calm, despite
facing the possibility of a two-
game deficit.
"It's not in my nature to panic,"
he said. "It's not in
3yoffs this team's nature
do Magic at to panic. The an-
.rs, Game 2 swers are clear.
conference Our deficiencies
n. last night are very
fixable. Things
).m. Monday. we've done all year
We're still a very
confident bunch."
So are the
Magic, who always thought they
had a chance in the series.
"I just think they're good and
they believe they can win games,"
Orlando coach Stan Van Gundy
said of his players after Game 1.






B2 MONDAY, APRIL 30, 2012


AL


Yankees 6, Tigers 2


Detroit

AJcksn cf
Boesch rf
MiCarr3b
Fielder 1b
Eldred dh
Raburn If
Dirks If
RSantg ss
Laird c
Worth 2b
Totals
Detroit
New York


NewYork
ab r h bi
4 0 0 0 Jeterss
4 1 2 0 Grndrscf
4 0 1 1 ARdrgz3b
4 1 1 1 Cano2b
4 0 0 0 Teixeirlb
3 0 0 0 Swisher rf
1 0 0 0 AnJonspr-lf
3 0 0 0 Ibanez If-rf
2 0 0 0 ErChvz dh
2 0 0 0 CStwrt c
31 24 2 Totals
000 101 000
020 100 21x


ab r h bi
3 1 2 0
3 1 1 2


5 3100
1 0 0 0
2 1 2 1
3 1 0 0
4 1 2 0
5 1 1 0
34611 6
2
6


LOB-Detroit 4, NewYork 15. 2B-Boesch (2),
Mi.Cabrera (2). HR-Fielder (3), Granderson
(8), An.Jones (3). S-Granderson. SF-Cano.
IP H RERBBSO
Detroit
ScherzerL,1-3 42-37 3 3 7 4
Putkonen 12-33 2 2 2 0
Balester 12-31 1 1 0 1
New York
SabathiaW,3-0 8 4 2 2 2 8
Robertson 1 0 0 0 0 2

White Sox 4, Red Sox 1
Boston Chicago
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Aviles ss 3 0 0 0 De Aza cf 3 1 1 0
Sweeny rf 3 0 0 0 Lillirdg3b-1b 2 0 1 0
DMcDn ph-cf1 0 0 0 Rios rf 4 1 1 1
Pedroia2b 4 1 1 0 A.Dunnib 2 1 1 2
AdGnzlib 4 00 0 Morelpr-3b 0 00 0
Ortiz dh 4 0 1 0 Przyns c 4 0 0 0
C.Ross If-rf 2 0 1 1 AIRmrzss 4 1 1 0
Punto 3b 3 0 0 0 Fukdm If 3 0 0 0
Byrd cf 2 0 0 0 Viciedo dh 4 0 2 1
LAndrs ph-lf 1 0 0 0 EEscor 2b 4 0 1 0
Shppch c 2 000
Sltlmch ph-cl 0 0 0
Totals 30 13 1 Totals 304 8 4
Boston 000 000 100 1
Chicago 300 000 01x 4
DP-Boston 1. LOB-Boston 4, Chicago 8.
2B-Ortiz (9). HR-A.Dunn (5). SB-Lillibridge
(6). S-Lillibridge.
IP H RERBBSO
Boston
BeckettL,2-3 62-36 3 3 3 8
Atchison 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
R.Hill 2-3 1 1 1 2 0
Tazawa 1-3 1 0 0 0 0
Chicago
FloydW,2-3 62-33 1 1 1 9
ReedH,4 1 0 0 0 1 1
ThorntonS,1-1 11-30 0 0 0 2

Indians 4, Angels 0
Los Angeles Cleveland
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Trout cf 3 0 0 0 Brantly cf 3 1 2 0
HKndrc2b 4 00 0 Kipnis2b 4 01 0
BoWlsnc 0 00 0 ACarerss 4 00 0
Pujolslb 4 00 0 Hafnerdh 4 01 0
KMorls dh 4 0 2 0 Donald pr-dh0 1 0 0
TrHntrrf 4 0 0 0 CSantnc 4 1 3 0
Trumo 3b 3 0 0 0 Hannhn 3b 2 0 0 0
V.Wellslf 3 0 0 0 Duncan If 3 0 0 1
Mlztursss 1 0 0 0 Ktchmlb 4 0 1 0
lannettc 3 0 1 0 Cnghmrf 3 1 1 0


Bourjos pr 0 0 0 0
Aybarss 0 00 0
Totals 29 03 0
Los Angeles 000
Cleveland 000


Totals 31 4 9 1
000 000 0
020 02x 4


E-Tor.Hunter (1), Jepsen (1), C.Santana (1).
DP-Los Angeles 2, Cleveland 1. LOB-Los
Angeles 5, Cleveland 7. 2B-C.Santana (3).
SB-M.Izturis (5). S-Hannahan. SF-Duncan.
IP H RERBBSO


Los Angeles
E.Santana L,0-5
Jepsen
Cleveland
D.LoweW,4-1
Pestano H,5
C.Perez


7 7 2 0 2 3
1 2 2 1 0 0

72-33 0 0 2 1
1-30 0 0 1 1
1 0 0 0 0 2


Orioles 5, Athletics 2
Oakland Baltimore
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Crisp dh 3 0 0 0 Reimld If 4 0 1 0
Pnngtn ss 4 0 1 0 Hardy ss 4 1 1 0
Reddckrf 4 1 2 0 Markks rf 4 0 1 0
Cespds cf 4 0 2 1 AdJons cf 4 1 1 0
Kaaihulb 3 0 0 0 Wietersc 4 0 1 2
Barton ph-1b1 0 1 0 EnChvzpr 0 1 0 0
S.Smith If 3 1 2 1 C.Davisdh 2 1 1 0
KSuzuk c 4 0 0 0 Betemt 3b 4 1 1 3
Sogard2b 4 0 0 0 MrRynlib 3 0 0 0
LHughs 3b 3 0 0 0 Andino 2b 3 0 2 0
Totals 33 28 2 Totals 325 9 5
Oakland 000 001 100 2
Baltimore 000 000 005 5
One out when winning run scored.
E-Colon (1). DP-Oakland 2, Baltimore 1.
LOB-Oakland 6, Baltimore 4.2B-Cespedes
(4), Barton (4), Reimold (6), Markakis (4), Wi-
eters (2). HR-S.Smith (2), Betemit (3).
IP H RERBBSO
Oakland
Colon 81-37 2 2 1 5
Balfour L,0-1 BS,2-8 0 2 3 3 1 0
Baltimore
Tom.Hunter 7 7 2 2 1 2
O'Day 1 0 0 0 0 1
Strop W,3-1 1 1 0 0 1 0
Balfour pitched to 3 batters in the 9th.

Blue Jays 7, Mariners 2
Seattle Toronto
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Figgins If 4 1 1 1 YEscor ss 5 0 1 0
Ackley 2b 51 0 KJhnsn 2b 3 0 1 1
ISuzukirf 4 0 0 0 Bautistrf 4 1 1 0
Liddi b 4 0 0 0 Lind lb 4 0 0 0
Seager3b 4 0 1 0 Encrncdh 1 2 1 1
MSndrs cf 3 0 1 0 Thams If 3 0 1 0
Olivoc 4 1 2 1 RDavisph 0 1 0 0
Jaso dh 3 0 1 0 BFrncs If 0 0 0 0
Kawskss 3 0 1 0 Lawrie3b 4 1 1 2
Rasmscf 4 1 1 0
Mathisc 4 1 1 2
Totals 34 28 2 Totals 32 7 8 6
Seattle 100 000 001 2
Toronto 000 011 05x 7
E-Olivo 2 (3). LOB-Seattle 9, Toronto 6. 2B-
Ackley (6), Seager (7), M.Saunders (8), Jaso
(1), Y.Escobar (3), Thames (3), Lawrie (1). HR-
Figgins (2), Olivo (2), Encarnacion (7), Mathis
(2). SB-Olivo (1), Bautista (2), Encarnacion
(4). S-Figgins.
IP H RERBBSO
Seattle
VargasL,3-2 6 4 2 2 3 4
Delabar 11-32 2 2 0 1
Furbush 2-3 2 3 3 1 1
Toronto
H.AlvarezW, 1-2 6 6 1 1 3 1
E.CrawfordH,1 1 0 0 0 0 0
Janssen H,1 1 0 0 0 0 0
Cordero 1 2 1 1 0 1
H.Alvarez pitched to 1 batter in the 7th.
HBP-by Delabar (Encarnacion).WP-Cordero.


Rays Schedule
April 30 Seattle, 7:10 p.m.
May 1 Seattle, 7:10 p.m.
May 2 Seattle, 7:10 p.m.
May 3 Seattle, 1:10 p.m.
May 4 Oakland, 7:10 p.m.
May 5 Oakland, 7:10 p.m.
May 6 Oakland, 1:40 p.m.
May 8 at N.Y.Yankees, 7:05 p.m.
May 9 at N.Y.Yankees, 7:05 p.m.
May 10 at N.Y Yankees, 7:05 p.m.
May 11 at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m.
May 12 at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m.
May 13 at Baltimore, 1:35 p.m.
May 14 at Toronto, 7:07 p.m.
May 15 at Toronto, 7:07 p.m.
May 16 Boston, 7:10 p.m.


BASEBALL


AMERICAN LEAGUE


W
Baltimore 14
Tampa Bay 13
NewYork 12
Toronto 12
Boston 10



W
Atlanta 14
Washington 14
New York 13
Philadelp. 10
Miami 8


East Division
L Pct GB WC L10
8 .636-- 7-3
8 .619 12 8-2
9 .571 112 1 6-4
10 .545 2 112 6-4
11 .476 312 3 6-4


East Division
L Pct GB WC L10
8 .636-- 7-3
8 .636-- 5-5
9 .591 1 1 6-4
12 .455 4 4 5-5
13 .381 512 512 3-7


Str Home
W-2 8-4
L-1 8-1
W-1 6-4
W-2 6-6
L-1 3-5


Away
6-4 Cleveland
5-7 Chicago
6-5 Detroit
6-4 Kan. City
7-6 Minnesota


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L10
9 .550 6-4
11 .500 1 2Y2 5-5
11 .500 1 2Y2 2-8
15 .286 5Y2 7 3-7
15 .286 5Y2 7 3-7


Str Home
W-14-7
W-14-7
L-1 6-7
L-1 0-10
W-13-8


Texas
Oakland
Seattle
L. Angeles


NATIONAL LEAGUE


Str Home Away
W-17-2 7-6
L-4 8-2 6-6
W-28-5 5-4
L-1 4-5 6-7
L-1 6-4 2-9


St. Louis
Cincinnati
Milwaukee
Pittsburgh
Chicago
Houston


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L10
8 .636 5-5
11 .500 3 3 7-3
12 .455 4 4 4-6
12 .429 412 412 5-5
14 .364 6 6 5-5
14 .364 6 6 4-6


Str Home Away
L-1 6-3 8-5
W-2 7-5 4-6
W-1 6-6 4-6
L-1 5-4 4-8
W-1 5-8 3-6
L-2 4-5 4-9


L. Angeles
San Fran.
Arizona
Colorado
San Diego


West Division
L Pct GB WC L10
5 .762-- 7-3
12 .478 6 3 5-5
12 .478 6 3 4-6
15 .318 9Y2 6Y2 3-7



West Division
L Pct GB WC L10
6 .727-- 7-3
10 .545 4 2 6-4
11 .500 5 3 4-6
11 .476 5Y2 3Y2 5-5
16 .304 9Y2 7Y2 4-6


Str Home
W-18-4
L-2 6-7
L-2 3-6
L-1 4-6


Str Home Away
W-310-2 6-4
W-2 6-3 6-7
W-1 6-7 5-4
L-2 6-6 4-5
L-2 5-9 2-7


Red Sox stymied by Chicago pitching


Associated Press
Boston Red Sox shortstop Mike Aviles looks to first after forcing out the Chicago White Sox's Brent Morel at second
during the eighth inning Sunday. The White Sox won 4-1.



Floyd strong in White Sox win


Rays game not over


atpress time

Associated Press

CHICAGO Gavin Floyd carried
a no-hitter into the seventh inning,
Adam Dunn hit a two-run homer and
the Chicago White Sox beat the
Boston Red Sox 4-1 on Sunday.
Floyd (2-3) struck out nine in 6 1-3
innings, yielding one run and three
hits. He improved to 7-0 with a 3.21
ERA in nine career appearances
against Boston, helping the White
Sox stop a five-game losing streak.
Dustin Pedroia singled with one
out in the seventh for Boston's first
hit of the game.
Yankees 6, Tigers 2
NEW YORK-- CC Sabathia steadied
New York's rocky rotation with eight sharp
innings, Alex Rodriguez passed Willie
Mays for eighth on the career RBIs list
and the Yankees beat the Detroit Tigers
despite leaving 14 men on base in the
first six innings.
A-Rod drove in two runs for 1,904 RBIs
without hitting the ball out of the infield.
He singled on a dribbler down the third
base line with the bases loaded in the
second, the Yankees' only hit in six plate
appearances with three men on. Chris
Stewart slid under catcher Gerald Laird's
tag on Rodriguez's grounder to short in
the seventh.
AMERICAN LEAGUE

Orioles 5, Athletics 2
BALTIMORE Wilson Betemit hit a
three-run homer in the bottom of the ninth
inning after Matt Wieters doubled in two
runs, giving the Baltimore Orioles an un-
likely comeback victory over the Oakland
Athletics.
Oakland starter Bartolo Colon took a
four-hit shutout into the ninth without al-
lowing a runner past second base.
After J.J. Hardy led off with an infield
hit and Nick Markakis struck out, Adam
Jones hit a chopper down the third-base
line that Colon collected before throwing
wildly to first. The single and error put
runners at second and third and ended
Colon's afternoon.
Blue Jays 7, Mariners 2
TORONTO Edwin Encarnacion hit
his third home run in three games, Hen-
derson Alvarez won for the first time since
August and the Toronto Blue Jays beat
the Seattle Mariners.
Jeff Mathis added a two-run homer as
Toronto broke open a close game with a
five-run eighth inning.
Chone Figgins and Miguel Olivo hit
solo homers for the Mariners, who lost
their second straight.
Indians 4, Angels 0
CLEVELAND Derek Lowe pitched
three-hit ball into the eighth inning and
the Cleveland Indians scored three runs
on Angels errors to beat Los Angeles.
Lowe (4-1) retired 12 batters on ground
balls, including Albert Pujols three times.
Pujols also struck out against reliever
Chris Perez, extending his career-long
homeless streak to 117 at-bats.
Ervin Santana (0-5), in his first start
against Cleveland since throwing a no-
hitter at Progressive Field last July 27, al-
lowed two unearned runs over seven
innings. The runs scored when nine-time


AMERICAN LEAGUE
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Sunday's Games
N.Y Yankees 6, Detroit 2
Cleveland 4, L.A. Angels 0
Toronto 7, Seattle 2
Baltimore 5, Oakland 2
Chicago White Sox 4, Boston 1
Minnesota 7, Kansas City 4
Tampa Bay at Texas, late
Monday's Games
Baltimore (Hammel 3-0) at N.YYankees (Kuroda 1-3), 7:05 p.m.
Kansas City (Hochevar 2-1) at Detroit (Below 2-0), 7:05 p.m.
Texas (Darvish 3-0) at Toronto (Drabek 2-1), 7:07 p.m.
Oakland (Milone 3-1) at Boston (Buchholz 2-1), 7:10 p.m.
Seattle (FHernandez 2-1) atTampa Bay (Hellickson 3-0),
7:10 p.m.
Minnesota (Blackburn 0-2) at L.A. Angels (C.Wilson 2-2),
10:05 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Sunday's Games
Arizona 8, Miami 4
Cincinnati 6, Houston 5
Chicago Cubs 5, Philadelphia 1
Atlanta 4, Pittsburgh 3
Milwaukee 3, St. Louis 2
N.Y Mets 6, Colorado 5, 11 innings
San Francisco 4, San Diego 1
L.A. Dodgers 2, Washington 0
Monday's Games
Arizona (Corbin 0-0) at Miami (Buehrle 1-3), 12:40 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Volstad 0-3) at Philadelphia (Worley 2-1),
7:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Ja.McDonald 0-1) at Atlanta (Minor 2-1), 7:10 p.m.
N.Y Mets (Dickey 3-1) at Houston (Norris 1-1), 8:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Harang 1-1) at Colorado (Nicasio 1 -0), 8:40 p.m.
Milwaukee (Wolf 1-2) at San Diego (Wieland 0-3),10:05 p.m.

For more box scores,
see Page B3.


Gold Glove outfielder Torii Hunter lost a
routine two-out fly ball in the sun for an
error in the fifth.
Twins 7, Royals 4
MINNEAPOLIS Josh Willingham
had three hits and came a homer away
from hitting for the cycle to help the Min-
nesota Twins snap their six-game losing
streak by beating the Kansas City Royals.
Jason Marquis (2-0) threw six strong in-
nings for Minnesota, who also got three hits
and a pair of RBIs from Danny Valencia.
NATIONAL LEAGUE

Diamondbacks 8, Marlins 4
MIAMI Unbeaten Wade Miley held the
Miami Marlins hitless until the sixth inning,
and Jason Kubel drove in three runs to lead
the Arizona Diamond backs to a victory.
Miley (3-0) gave up one hit and an un-
earned run in 6 1-3 innings to lower his
ERA to 1.29. He also singled and scored
the game's first run.
The retractable roof over the Marlins'
new ballpark averted a rainout, because
showers fell all day. But even inside, it was
a gloomy afternoon for the home team, and
boos rained down from the crowd of 34,918
during Arizona's five-run sixth inning.

Cubs 5, Phillies 1
PHILADELPHIA- Matt Garza pitched
one-hit ball for seven shutout innings and
struck out 10 as the Chicago Cubs beat
the Philadelphia Phillies.
Garza (2-1) gave up a pop-fly single to
Jimmy Rollins leading off the first and
nothing more.
Garza retired 20 of the next 21 batters,
with Juan Pierre's seventh-inning walk
accounting for the only other baserunner.
Braves 4, Pirates 3
ATLANTA- Tim Hudson survived five
tough innings to win in his return from off-
season back surgery and the Atlanta
Braves held on in the ninth to beat the
Pittsburgh Pirates.
Hudson (1-0) pitched in the majors for
the first time since his operation last No-
vember to repair a hemiated disc. The right-


hander threw 96 pitches while giving up two
runs on six hits and two walks. He allowed
at least one baserunner in every inning.
The Pirates stranded 10 runners, in-
cluding eight against Hudson.
Craig Kimbrel gave up one run in the
ninth before earning his eighth save.
Brewers 3, Cardinals 2
ST. LOUIS Zack Greinke worked six
strong innings and Jonathan Lucroy's
two-run double capped a three-run sixth
as the Milwaukee Brewers beat St. Louis
to avoid a three-game sweep.
Greinke (3-1) allowed a run on seven
hits to help stop the Brewers' six-game road
losing streak. He's 2-1 with a 2.11 ERA in
four career games in St. Louis.
Jaime Garcia (2-1) fell to 17-10 at
home with a 2.38 ERA and all three of
his shutouts, and 12-7 with 4.15 ERA on
the road.

Reds 6, Astros 5
CINCINNATI Jay Bruce's fourth
home run in four games lifted the Cincin-
nati Reds to a comeback win over the
Houston Astros.
Bruce hit reliever Fernando Ro-
driguez's (0-3) first pitch 381 feet into the
right field seats for his seventh homer of
the season. Bruce has hit home runs in a
career-high four consecutive games, one
short of tying Cincinnati's club record.
Logan Ondrusek (1-0) pitched a per-
fect eighth to get the win. Sean Marshall
earned his fifth save in six tries.

Dodgers 2, Nationals 0
LOS ANGELES Chris Capuano
struck out nine while combining with two
relievers on a four-hitter, James Loney
drove in two runs with a bases-loaded
single and the Los Angeles Dodgers
completed a three-game sweep of the
Washington Nationals.
Capuano (3-0) allowed three hits and
two walks in 6 2-3 innings, helping send
the Nationals to their fourth straight loss
after they entered the series with an NL-
best 14-5 record.
Kenley Jansen followed Josh Lindblom
out of the bullpen and pitched a hitless
ninth for his second save in three
chances after starting out with six straight
balls and getting a visit from pitching
coach Rick Honeycutt.
Mets 6, Rockies 5, 11 innings
DENVER Ike Davis singled in the
go-ahead run in the 11th inning and the
New York Mets overcame two tying
homers allowed by their bullpen to beat
the Colorado Rockies.
David Wright started the 11th with a
single off Matt Belisle (1-2) and Lucas
Duda followed with a single. After Scott
Hairston hit into a fielder's choice, Davis
lined a single to left to score Wright and
rescue the Mets.
Ramon Ramirez nailed down the save,
holding onto a lead after Tim Byrdak and
Frank Francisco (1-0) couldn't.
Giants 4, Padres 1
SAN FRANCISCO Pablo Sandoval
homered to back Madison Bumgarner's
fourth straight victory, and the San Fran-
cisco Giants beat the Padres to deny San
Diego its first series win of the year.
Joaquin Arias added a two-run triple in the
sixth inning to turn a one-run lead into 4-1.
The Giants wasted no time giving
Bumgarner (4-1) a lead against Clayton
Richard (1-3), a day after Anthony Bass
retired the first 17 San Francisco batters
before pitcher Tim Lincecum broke up the
no-hit bid with an infield single with two
outs in the sixth.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




NL

D-backs 8, Marlins 4
Arizona Miami
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Blmqst ss 5 1 2 1 Bonifac cf 4 0 0 0
JMcDnIlss 0 0 0 0 Reyes ss 3 0 0 0
GParracf 3 1 2 1 Gaudinp 0 00 0
J.Uptonrf 4 21 0 Coghlnph 1 00 0
Kubellf 5 1 3 3 Mujica p 0 0 0 0
MMntrc 4 1 1 1 HRmrz3b 3 1 0 0
Ransm3b 5 0 1 2 Morrsnlf-1b 4 1 1 0
Overaylb 5 0 1 0 Infante 2b 3 1 1 0
A.Hill2b 4 1 2 0 Stantonrf 4 1 1 4
Mileyp 3 1 1 0 GSnchzlb 2 0 0 0
Zieglerp 0 0 0 0 MDunnp 0 0 0 0
Breslw p 0 0 0 0 DMrph ss 1 0 0 0
Pollockph 1 0 0 0 J.Buckc 3 0 1 0
Zagrsk p 0 0 0 0 JJhnsn p 1 0 0 0
Shaw p 0 0 0 0 Kearns If 3 0 0 0
Totals 39 8148 Totals 324 4 4
Arizona 001 025 000 8
Miami 000 000 103 4
E-Overbay (1), Ransom (1), Bloomquist (2).
DP-Arizona 1, Miami 1. LOB-Arizona 10,
Miami 5. 2B-Kubel (5), Ransom (3), Overbay
(3), Infante (6), J.Buck (3). HR-Stanton (1).
SB-G.Parra (7), J.Upton (2). S-Miley.
IP H RERBBSO
Arizona
MileyW,3-0 61-31 1 0 2 6
Ziegler 2-3 0 0 0 1 0
Breslow 1 0 0 0 0 0
Zagurski 1-3 3 3 3 0 0
Shaw 2-3 0 0 0 1 0
Miami
Jo.Johnson L,0-3 51-310 5 5 2 8
M.Dunn 2-3 2 3 3 2 1
Gaudin 2 2 0 0 1 1
Mujica 1 0 0 0 0 1


Cubs 5,1
Chicago
ab r h bi


Phillies 1
Philadelphia
ab r


h bi


Campn cf 4 2 2 0 Rollins ss 3 0 1 0
Barney2b 3 0 0 0 Pierre If 3 0 0 0
SCastro ss 3 0 0 2 Pence rf 4 0 1 0
LaHairlb 4 2 3 0 Wggntn3b 3 0 0 1
JeBakr rf 4 0 2 1 Victorn cf 4 0 0 0
Dolisp 0 0 0 0 Nixlb 3 0 0 0
Marmlp 0 00 0 Schndrc 3 0 0 0
IStewrt 3b 4 0 0 1 Galvis 2b 3 0 0 0
Mather If 3 1 1 1 Kndrck p 1 0 0 0
WCastll c 4 0 0 0 Mayrry ph 1 0 0 0
Garza p 3 0 0 0 Contrrs p 0 0 0 0
DeJess rf 1 0 0 0 Herndn p 0 0 0 0
Orrph 0 1 0 0
Totals 33 58 5 Totals 281 2 1
Chicago 011 100 020 5
Philadelphia 000 000 001 1
E-Nix (2). LOB-Chicago 4, Philadelphia 4.
2B-LaHair 2 (7), Je.Baker (2). HR-Mather (1).
SB-Campana (6), Mather (1). CS-S.Castro
(3). S-Barney. SF-S.Castro.
IP H RERBBSO


Chicago
Garza W,2-1
Dolis
Marmol
Philadelphia
K.Kendrick L,0-2
Contreras
Herndon


7 1 0 0 1 10
1 0 0 0 0 0
1 1 1 1 3 0

6 5 3 2 1 7

2 3 2 2 0 1


Braves 4, Pirates 3
Pittsburgh Atlanta
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Presley If 4 0 0 0 Bourn ocf 4 1 3 0
Tabata rf 5 1 3 2 Prado If 4 1 1 1
McCtchcf 4 00 0 Fremnib 3 0 1 1
GJoneslb 5 0 1 0 McCnnc 2 0 0 0
Walker 2b 3 0 1 0 Uggla 2b 2 1 1 1
PAIvrz 3b 4 1 2 0 C.Jones 3b 4 0 0 0
Barmes ss 3 0 0 0 Heywrd rf 4 0 0 0
Lincoln p 0 0 0 0 Pstrnck ss 3 0 1 1
Watson p 0 0 0 0 OFIhrt p 0 0 0 0
McGeh ph 1 0 0 0 Ventersp 0 0 0 0
Meekp 0 0 0 0 Hinskeph 1 0 0 0
McKnrc 3 1 1 0 Kimrelp 0 0 0 0
Correia p 0 0 0 0 THudsn p 2 1 0 0
JHrrsnss 2 0 0 0 Durbinp 0 00 0
JWilson ph-ss2 0 0 0
Totals 34 38 2 Totals 31 4 7 4
Pittsburgh 020 000 001 3
Atlanta 001 110 l10x 4
E-McCutchen (1), PAIvarez (3), McCann (1),
Pastornicky (2). DP-Pittsburgh 1. LOB-Pitts-
burgh 10, Atlanta 10. 2B-Tabata (2), G.Jones
(3), Walker (2), RAIvarez (4), Pastornicky (2).
HR-Prado (2). S-Correia 2. SF-Freeman.
IP H RERBBSO
Pittsburgh
Correia L,1-1 41-34 3 2 5 0
Lincoln 2 2 1 1 1 2
Watson 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
Meek 1 1 0 0 0 1
Atlanta
T.HudsonW,1-0 5 6 2 2 2 6
DurbinH,1 1 0 0 0 0 0
O'Flaherty H,3 1 0 0 0 0 1
VentersH,5 1 1 0 0 1 2
KimbrelS,8-8 1 1 1 1 0 2
HBP- byT.Hudson (McCutchen).WP-Kimbrel.

Brewers 3, Cardinals 2
Milwaukee St. Louis
ab rh bi ab rh bi
RWeks 2b 3 0 0 0 Furcal ss 5 0 2 1
CGomz cf 4 1 1 0 Jay cf 3 0 1 0
Braun If 4 0 1 0 Hollidy lf 3 0 0 0
ArRmr3b 4 1 1 1 Greenepr 0 0 0 0
Hart rf 4 1 1 0 Beltran rf 3 0 1 0
AIGnzlz ss 4 0 0 0 Freese 3b 5 0 1 0
Lucroy c 4 0 2 2 YMolin c 5 0 1 0
Ishikawlb 4 0 1 0 MCrpntib 4 1 2 0
Greinkp 2 0 1 0 Schmkr2b 3 1 1 0
Aokiph 1 0 1 0 JGarcip 3 0 2 0
Veras p 0 0 0 0 McClln p 0 0 0
Loep 0 0 0 0 Descalsph 1 00 1
FrRdrg p 0 0 0 0 Rzpczy p 0 0 0 0
Clzturs ph 1 0 0 0
Axfordp 0 0 00
Totals 35 39 3 Totals 35211 2
Milwaukee 000 003 000 3
St. Louis 010 000 010 2
DP-Milwaukee 2, St. Louis 1. LOB-Milwau-
kee 6, St. Louis 13.e2B-Lucroy (2), M.Carpen-
ter (5). SB-R.Weeks (2). CS-Holliday (1),
Greene (1). S-Jay.
IP H RERBBSO
Milwaukee
Greinke W,3-1 6 7 1 1 4 2
Veras H,2 2-3 1 0 0 1 1
Loe H,1 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Fr.Rodriguez H,4 1 2 1 1 0 0
Axford S,5-5 1 1 0 0 1 2
St. Louis
J.Garcia L,2-1 7 9 3 3 1 6
McClellan 1 0 0 0 0 0
Rzepczynski 1 0 0 0 0 1

Reds 6, Astros 5
Houston Cincinnati
ab rh bi ab rh bi


Schafer cf
Bogsvc cf
Altuve 2b
Lowrie ss
JDMrtn If
T.Buck rf
MDwns lb
CJhnsn 3b
JCastro c
Lyles p
WLopez p
DvCrpn p
FRdrgz p
Maxwll ph

Totals
Houston
Cincinnati


2 0 1 0
3 0 1 0
5 4123 0
3000
4000
4 1 1 1
4 1 2 0

0 00

1 0 0 0

36 5115
110
000


Stubbs cf
Cozart ss
Votto lb
Phillips 2b
Bruce rf
Ludwck If
Frazier 3b
Marshll p
Hanign c
Mesorc pr-c
Latos p
Arrdnd p
Heisey ph
Ondrsk p
Rolen ph-3b
Totals
021 000
210 21x


LOB-Houston 6, Cincinnati 8.2B-Altuve (7),
C.Johnson (6), Cozart 2 (7), Votto (10). HR-
Lowrie (2), M.Downs (1), Votto (2), Bruce (7).
SB-Cozart (1), Bruce (3). CS-Schafer (3).
S-Lyles, Latos.
IP H RERBBSO
Houston
Lyles 6 4 3 3 3 5
W.Lopez 0 2 2 2 0 0
Carpenter BS,1-1 1 1 0 0 0 1
Fe.Rodriguez L,0-3 1 2 1 1 2 3
Cincinnati
Latos 61-310 5 5 0 4
Arredondo 2-3 1 0 0 1 0
OndrusekW,1-0 1 0 0 0 0 1
Marshall S,5-6 1 0 0 0 0 1
W.Lopez pitched to 2 batters in the 7th.






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Twins 7, Royals 4


Kansas City Minnesota
ab r h bi
Getz 2b 3 00 0 Span cf
YBtncr ph 1 0 0 0 JCarrll ss
AGordn If 4 1 1 0 Mauerc
Butler dh 4 0 3 0 Wlngh If
Hosmerlb 4 1 0 1 Mornea lb
Francr rf 3 1 1 0 Valenci3b
Mostks3b 3 1 2 2 Doumitdh
B.Penac 3 0 0 0 Ploufferf
AEscor ss 4 0 1 1 CThms rf
Dyson cf 4 0 1 0 ACasill 2b
Totals 33 49 4 Totals
Kansas City 010 200 001
Minnesota 402 000 10x


ab r h bi
4 1 1 0
3 1 1 0
4 1 1 1
5 23 2
4 1 1 0
4 1 3 2
3 0 1 2
3 0000
0 00
4 0 0 0
34711 7
4
7


E-A.Escobar (2), Moustakas (2). DP-Kansas
City 1, Minnesota 2. LOB-Kansas City 6, Min-
nesota 9. 2B-A.Gordon (4), Willingham (7),
Morneau (5), Doumit (3). 3B-Willingham (1),
Valencia (1). HR-Moustakas (3). SB-A.Esco-
bar (5), Dyson (1). CS-Span (2). SF-Doumit.
IP H R ER BB SO
Kansas City
B.ChenL,0-3 22-3 6 6 6 2 1
Adcock 51-3 5 1 1 3 3
Minnesota
MarquisW,2-0 6 6 3 3 0 1
BurtonH,4 1 0 0 0 1 0
Perkins 1 1 0 0 1 0
Capps 1 2 1 1 1 1
HBP-by Burton (Moustakas). WP-Capps.
Giants 4, Padres 1
San Diego San Francisco
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Denorfi If 4 0 2 1 Pagan cf 4 11 01
Venale rf 4 01 0 MeCarrrf-lf 3 0 1 1
Headly3b 4 00 0 Sandovl3b 4 1 1 1
Hundlyc 4 0 0 0 Poseylb 3 11 01
Guzmnlb 4 0 1 0 SCasillp 0 0 0 0
Maybin cf 3 0 0 0 Pill If 3 1 2 0
Bartlett ss 3 1 1 0 Schrhlt rf 1 0 0 0
Parrino 2b 3 00 0 HSnchzc 4 00 0
Richrd p 2 0 0 0 Ariasss 3 0 1 2
OHudsn ph 1 0 1 0 Theriot2b 2 0 1 0
Thayer p 0 00 0 Bmgrnp 3 00 0
Romo p 0 0 0 0
Beltib 0 0 0 0
Totals 32 16 1 Totals 304 8 4
San Diego 000 010 000 1
San Francisco 200 002 OOx 4
E-Richard (3). DP-San Diego 1, San Fran-
cisco 1. LOB-San Diego 6, San Francisco 5.
2B-Denorfia (4), Guzman (4), Posey (5), Pill
(2), Theriot (1). 3B-Arias (1). HR-Sandoval
(4). CS-Venable (5). SF-Me.Cabrera.
IP H R ER BB SO
San Diego
Richard L,1-3 7 8 4 4 2 2
Thayer 1 0 0 0 0 1
San Francisco
BumgarnerW,4-1 72-3 6 1 1 1 6
RomoH,3 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
S.CasillaS,4-4 1 0 0 0 1 2
Dodgers 2, Nationals 0
Washington Los Angeles
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Dsmndss 4 01 0 GwynJ If 3 0 0 0
Lmrdzz 3b 3 01 0 M.Ellis2b 4 00 0
Espinos 2b 3 0 0 0 Kempcf 3 1 0 0
LaRochib 2 00 0 Ethierrf 2 1 0 0
Nadyrf 4 00 0 Uribe3b 2 0 0 0
TMoorelf 3 0 1 0 Loneylb 4 0 1 2
Stmmn p 0 00 0 Sellers ss 3 0 1 0
Tracy ph 1 0 0 0 Lindlm p 0 0 0 0
Harper cf-lf 3 0 1 0 Jansenp 0 0 0 0
Flores c 4 0 0 0 Treanr c 3 0 1 0
GGnzlzp 2 00 0 Capuanp 1 00 0
Ankiel cf 1 00 0 DGordn ss 1 0 0 0
Totals 30 04 0 Totals 26 2 3 2
Washington 000 000 000 0
Los Angeles 000 002 OOx 2
LOB-Washington 8, Los Angeles 7. 2B-
Desmond (5), Sellers (2). S-Lombardozzi,


Capuano.


Washington
Gonzalez L,2-1
Stammen
Los Angeles
Capuano W,3-0
Lindblom H,4
Jansen S,2-3
WP-G.Gonzalez.


IP H RERBBSO


3 2 2 5 7
0 0 0 1 1


62-3 3 0 0 2 9
11-3 1 0 0 0 2
1 0 0 0 2 3


Mets 6, Rockies 5,
11 innings,
New York Colorado
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Niwnhs cf 6 1 3 1 Scutaro 2b 6 0 0 0
Tejadass 6 1 3 0 Fowler cf 5 1 1 0
DnMrp 2b-1b6 0 2 0 CGnzlz If 3 2 2 1
DWrght3b 3 22 2 Tlwtzkss 5 0 1 0
Duda rf 5 01 0 Cuddyrrf 3 1 0 0
Hairstnlf 6 0 2 1 Giambilb 3 0 0 0
I.Davislb 6 0 3 1 Brothrsp 0 0 0 0
RRmrzp 0 00 0 EEsclnp 0 00 0
Thole c 6 1 1 1 Heltonph-lb 1 1 1 4
JSantnp 3 00 0 RHrndzc 5 0 0 0
Batista p 0 0 0 0 Nelson 3b 4 0 1 0
Lutz ph 1 00 0 Moyer p 0 0 0 0
Rauchp 0 00 0 JHerrrph 1 0 0 0
Byrdak p 0 00 0 Roenck p 0 00 0
Parnellp 0 0 0 0 Colvinib 1 0 0 0
Baxter ph 1 1 1 0 RBtncr p 0 0 0 0
Frncscp 0 00 0 EYongph 1 0 0 0
Vldspn2b 0 00 0 Belislep 0 00 0
Rosarioph 1 0 0 0
Totals 49 6186 Totals 395 6 5
NewYork 300 010 000 11 6
Colorado 000 000 040 10 5
E-Dan.Murphy (4), Nelson (3). DP-Colorado
2. LOB-New York 14, Colorado 8. 2B-
Nieuwenhuis (4), Dan.Murphy (6), D.Wright (4),
I.Davis (1), Nelson (4). HR-Thole (1), C.Gon-
zalez (4), Helton (4). SB-D.Wright (2), C.Gon-
zalez 2 (4). CS-Tejada (1). S-Moyer.
IP H R ER BB SO
New York
J.Santana 6 2 0 0 3 5
Batista 1 0 0 0 0 2
Rauch 2-3 1 3 3 2 0
Byrdak BS,1-1 0 1 1 1 0 0
Parnell 11-3 0 0 0 0 1
Francisco W,1-1 1 2 1 1 1 1
R.RamirezS,1-2 1 0 0 0 0 1
Colorado
Moyer 5 11 4 4 2 7
Roenicke 12-3 1 0 0 1 0
Brothers 1 1 0 0 0 3
E.Escalona 1-3 0 0 0 0 1
R.Betancourt 1 0 0 0 1 1
Belisle L,1-2 2 5 2 2 0 0
Byrdak pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
Balk-R.Betancourt.
MLB leaders
AMERICAN LEAGUE
BATTING-Jeter, New York, .396; Ortiz,
Boston, .395; Hamilton, Texas, .388; Konerko,
Chicago, .383; Sweeney Boston, .373; Willing-
ham, Minnesota, .353; Span, Minnesota, .337.
RUNS-Kinsler, Texas, 23; Hamilton, Texas,
20; Granderson, New York, 18; Jennings,Tampa
Bay, 18; De Aza, Chicago, 17; AdJones, Balti-
more, 17; Aviles, Boston, 16; AJackson, Detroit,
16; Jeter, New York, 16.
RBI-Hamilton, Texas, 24; Swisher, NewYork,
23; MiCabrera, Detroit, 20; Encarnacion, Toronto,
20; Cespedes, Oakland, 19; Longoria, Tampa
Bay, 19; Ortiz, Boston, 18; CRoss, Boston, 18.
HITS-Jeter, New York, 36; Hamilton, Texas,
33; Ortiz, Boston, 32; Konerko, Chicago, 31; Ad-
Jones, Baltimore, 29; Span, Minnesota, 29; But-
ler, Kansas City, 28.
HOME RUNS-Hamilton, Texas, 9; Granderson,
New York, 8; MiCabrera, Detroit, 7; Encarnacion,
Toronto, 7; Napoli, Texas, 7; AdJones, Baltimore, 6;
Swisher, New York, 6; Wieters, Baltimore, 6.
PITCHING-RRoss, Texas, 4-0; Shields, Tampa
Bay, 4-0; DLowe, Cleveland, 4-1; 15 tied at 3.
STRIKEOUTS-Sabathia, New York, 38;
Weaver, Los Angeles, 36;Verlander, Detroit, 35;
Peavy, Chicago, 33; FHernandez, Seattle, 33;
Floyd, Chicago, 31; Haren, Los Angeles, 30.
SAVES-League, Seattle, 7; CPerez, Cleve-


FOTr theI recoTrd


== lorida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Sunday in the Florida Lottery:
S.. CASH 3 (early)
.. ~ 6-7-3
.-,, :W CASH 3 (late)
;- A 7-9-5

PLAY 4 (early)
4-5-3-0
PLAY 4 (late)
3-4-6-3

FANTASY 5
lrtoftw y 14-17-20-23-31



On the AIRWAVES=


TODAY'S SPORTS
COLLEGE BASEBALL
12 p.m. (SUN) Virginia at Miami (Taped)
MLB
12:30 p.m. (FSNFL) Arizona Diamondbacks at Miami Marlins
7 p.m. (ESPN) Texas Rangers at Toronto Blue Jays
7 p.m. (SUN) Seattle Mariners at Tampa Bay Rays
3 a.m. (ESPN2) Texas Rangers at Toronto Blue Jays
(Same-day Tape)
NBA
NBA Playoffs Conference quarterfinals
7 p.m. (TNT) New York Knicks at Miami Heat
7:30 p.m. (NBA TV) Orlando Magic at Indiana Pacers
9:30 p.m. (TNT) Dallas Mavericks at Oklahoma City Thunder
NHL
Stanley Cup Conference Semifinals
7 p.m. (NBCSPT) Washington Capitals at New York Rangers
9:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) Los Angeles Kings at St. Louis Blues
SOCCER
2:30 p.m. (ESPN) English Premier League: Manchester
City vs. Manchester United

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


land, 7; JiJohnson, Baltimore, 7; Balfour, Oak-
land, 6; Rodney, Tampa Bay 6; Nathan, Texas,
5; Aceves, Boston, 5.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
BATTING-Kemp, Los Angeles, .425;
DWright, NewYork, .397;Altuve, Houston, .373;
Posey, San Francisco, .353; Bourn, Atlanta, .344;
Freese, St. Louis, .333; Kubel, Arizona, .333.
RUNS-Kemp, Los Angeles, 23; Beltran, St.
Louis, 17; MEllis, Los Angeles, 16; CGonzalez,
Colorado, 16; Hart, Milwaukee, 16; Headley,
San Diego, 16; 5 tied at 15.
RBI-Ethier, Los Angeles, 24; Kemp, Los An-
geles, 24; Freese, St. Louis, 20; JDMartinez,
Houston, 19; Bruce, Cincinnati, 17; LaRoche,
Washington, 17; Freeman, Atlanta, 16; CGon-
zalez, Colorado, 16; Helton, Colorado, 16.
HITS-Kemp, Los Angeles, 34; Altuve, Hous-
ton, 31; Bourn, Atlanta, 31; SCastro, Chicago,
28; Furcal, St. Louis, 28; DanMurphy, NewYork,
28; Sandoval, San Francisco, 28.
HOME RUNS-Kemp, Los Angeles, 11;
Bruce, Cincinnati, 7; Hart, Milwaukee, 6; Beltran,
St. Louis, 5; Ethier, Los Angeles, 5; Freese, St.
Louis, 5; Infante, Miami, 5; CYoung, Arizona, 5.
PITCHING-Lynn, St. Louis, 4-0; Lohse, St.
Louis, 4-0; Bumgarner, San Francisco, 4-1; 13
tied at 3.
STRIKEOUTS-Garza, Chicago, 36; Stras-
burg, Washington, 34; GGonzalez, Washington,
34; ASanchez, Miami, 33; Hamels, Philadelphia,
30; Greinke, Milwaukee, 30; JSantana, New
York, 29; Lincecum, San Francisco, 29; Ca-
puano, Los Angeles, 29;Volquez, San Diego, 29.
SAVES-Kimbrel, Atlanta, 8; Papelbon,
Philadelphia, 7; Guerra, Los Angeles, 7; RBe-
tancourt, Colorado, 6; Axford, Milwaukee, 5;
FFrancisco, NewYork, 5; HRodriguez, Washing-
ton, 5; Putz, Arizona, 5; Marshall, Cincinnati, 5.



Sprint Cup

Capital City 400 Results
Saturday
At Richmond International Raceway
Richmond,Va.
Lap length: .75 miles
(Start position in parentheses)
1. (5) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 400 laps, 133.8 rating,
47 points, $247,783.
2. (10) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevy, 400, 106.9,
42, $164,410.
3. (22) Tony Stewart, Chevy, 400, 126, 42,
$178,460.
4. (7) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 400, 111.6, 40,
$152,801.
5. (9) Kasey Kahne, Chevy, 400, 109.1, 39,
$113,210.
6. (27) Jimmie Johnson, Chevy, 400,104.1, 39,
$139,121.
7. (23) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 400, 97.9, 37,
$123,649.
8. (1) Mark Martin, Toyota, 400, 94.1, 37,
$92,360.
9. (16) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 400, 89.4, 35,
$120,880.
10. (2) Carl Edwards, Ford, 400, 126.4, 36,
$138,551.
11. (24) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 400, 86, 33,
$127,121.
12. (20) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevy, 400, 87.3,
32, $110,726.
13. (31) Paul Menard, Chevy, 400, 76.2, 31,
$88,110.
14. (37) Jamie McMurray, Chevy, 400, 71.9, 30,
$114,368.


15. (12) Ryan Newman, Chevy, 400, 84.5, 29,
$118,693.
16. (4) A J Allmendinger, Dodge, 400, 94.7, 28,
$117,860.
17. (19) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 400, 74.6, 27,
$102,768.
18. (28) Greg Biffle, Ford, 400, 69.5, 26,
$83,885.
19. (3) Kevin Harvick, Chevy, 400, 98.3, 26,
$120,896.
20. (21) Landon Cassill, Toyota, 399, 63.8, 24,
$103,055.
21. (26) Casey Mears, Ford, 399, 56.5, 23,
$91,418.
22. (14) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 399, 70.5, 22,
$102,893.
23. (6) Jeff Gordon, Chevy, 399, 63.9, 21,
$119,221.
24. (18) Joey Logano, Toyota, 399, 57.6, 20,
$82,535.
25. (8) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 399, 75.8, 19,
$102,024.
26. (11) Aric Almirola, Ford, 398, 69.2, 18,
$110,996.
27. (15) Regan Smith, Chevy, 398, 58.2, 17,
$95,968.
28. (13) Kurt Busch, Chevy, 397, 64.1, 16,
$93,243.
29. (17) Dave Blaney, Chevy, 397, 50.6, 15,
$70,460.
30. (29) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, 397, 48, 15,
$92,332.
31. (30) Jeff Burton, Chevy, 396, 62.1, 13,
$112,235.
32. (38) David Ragan, Ford, 394, 43.5, 12,
$72,510.
33. (33) David Reutimann, Chevy, 394, 40.7, 11,
$69,885.
34. (42) Reed Sorenson, Ford, 392, 37.6, 0,
$77,760.
35. (40) Stephen Leicht, Chevy, 391, 33.4, 9,
$77,635.
36. (41) David Gilliland, Ford, 355, 37.4, 8,
$69,485.
37. (34) David Stremme, Toyota, brakes, 139,
33.4, 7, $69,355.
38. (32) Josh Wise, Ford, accident, 127, 35.7, 6,
$70,703.
39. (25) Michael McDowell, Ford, brakes, 67,
38.8, 5, $66,325.
40. (43) Cole Whitt, Chevy, vibration, 29, 32.5,
0, $66,200.
41. (35) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, brakes, 28,
29.6, 0, $66,050.
42. (39) Mike Bliss, Toyota, rear gear, 23, 27.3,
0, $65,925.
43. (36) Scott Speed, Ford, electrical, 19, 26.4,
1, $66,293.
Race Statistics
Average Speed of Race Winner: 105.202 mph.
Time of Race: 2 hours, 51 minutes, 6 seconds.
Margin of Victory: 1.095 seconds.
Caution Flags: 5 for 31 laps.
Lead Changes: 14 among 7 drivers.
Lap Leaders: M.Martin 1-29; C.Edwards 30-53;
T.Kvapil 54; C.Edwards 55-200; T.Stewart 201-
205; C.Edwards 206; K.Harvick 207-219; C.Ed-
wards 220-250; T.Stewart 251-285; Ky.Busch
286-304; T.Stewart 305-309; J.Johnson 310;
C.Edwards 311-314; T.Stewart 315-387;
Ky.Busch 388-400.
Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps
Led): C.Edwards, 5 times for 206 laps; TStew-
art, 4 times for 118 laps; Ky.Busch, 2 times for
32 laps; M.Martin, 1 time for 29 laps; K.Harvick,
1 time for 13 laps; J.Johnson, 1 time for 1 lap;
T.Kvapil, 1 time for 1 lap.
Top 12 in Points: 1. G.Biffle, 338; 2. D.Earnhardt


Jr., 333; 3. D.Hamlin, 329; 4. M.Kenseth, 328; 5.
M.Truex Jr., 316; 6. J.Johnson, 314; 7. K.Har-
vick, 313; 8.T.Stewart, 307; 9. C.Edwards, 287;
10. R.Newman, 278; 11. Ky.Busch, 265; 12.
C.Bowyer, 264.



NBA playoff glance
FIRST ROUND
(x-if necessary)
(Best-of-7)
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Chicago 1, Philadelphia 0
Saturday, April 28: Chicago 103, Philadelphia 91
Tuesday, May 1: Philadelphia at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Friday, May 4: Chicago at Philadelphia, 8 p.m.
Sunday, May 6: Chicago at Philadelphia, 1 p.m.
x-Tuesday, May 8: Philadelphia at Chicago, TBD
x-Thursday, May 10: Chicago at Philadelphia,
TBD
x-Saturday, May 12: Philadelphia at Chicago,
TBD
Miami 1, NewYork 0
Saturday, April 28: Miami 100, NewYork 67
Monday, April 30: New York at Miami, 7 p.m.
Thursday, May 3: Miami at New York, 7 p.m.
Sunday May 6: Miami at NewYork, 3:30 p.m.
x-Wednesday May 9: NewYork at Miami, TBD
x-Friday, May 11: Miami at New York, TBD
x-Sunday, May 13: New Yorkat Miami, TBD
Orlando 1, Indiana 0
Saturday, April 28: Orlando 81, Indiana 77
Monday, April 30: Orlando at Indiana, 7:30 p.m.
Wednesday, May 2: Indiana at Orlando, 7:30 p.m.
Saturday, May 5: Indiana at Orlando, 2 p.m.
x-Tuesday, May 8: Orlando at Indiana, TBD
x-Friday, May 11: Indiana at Orlando, TBD
x-Sunday, May 13: Orlando at Indiana, TBD
Atlanta 1, Boston 0
Sunday April 29: Atlanta 83, Boston 74
Tuesday, May 1: Boston at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
Friday, May 4: Atlanta at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
Sunday May 6: Atlanta at Boston, 7 p.m.
x-Tuesday, May 8: Boston at Atlanta, TBD
x-Thursday, May 10: Atlanta at Boston, TBD
x-Saturday, May 12: Boston at Atlanta, TBD
WESTERN CONFERENCE
San Antonio 1, Utah 0
Sunday April 29: San Antonio 106, Utah 91
Wednesday, May2: Utah at San Antonio, 7p.m.
Saturday, May 5: San Antonio at Utah, 10 p.m.
Monday May 7: San Antonio at Utah, TBD
x-Wednesday, May 9: Utah at San Antonio, TBD
x-Friday, May 11: San Antonio at Utah, TBD
x-Sunday, May 13: Utah at San Antonio, TBD
Oklahoma City 1, Dallas 0
Saturday, April 28: Oklahoma City 99, Dallas 98
Monday April 30: Dallas at Oklahoma City,
9:30 p.m.
Thursday, May 3: Oklahoma City at Dallas,
9:30 p.m.
Saturday, May 5: Oklahoma City at Dallas,
7:30 p.m.
x-Monday, May 7: Dallas at Oklahoma City, TBD
x-Thursday, May 10: Oklahoma City at
Dallas, TBD
x-Saturday, May 12: Dallas at Oklahoma City,
TBD
L.A. Lakers 1, Denver 0
Sunday April 29: L.A. Lakers 103, Denver 88
Tuesday, May 1: Denver at L.A. Lakers,
10:30 p.m.
Friday, May 4: L.A. Lakers at Denver,
10:30 p.m.
Sunday, May 6: L.A. Lakers at Denver, 9:30 p.m.
x-Tuesday, May 8: Denver at L.A. Lakers, TBD
x-Thursday, May 10: L.A. Lakers at Denver, TBD
x-Saturday, May 12: Denver at L.A. Lakers, TBD
Memphis vs. L.A. Clippers
Sunday, April 29: L.A. Clippers at Memphis, late
Wednesday, May 2: L.A. Clippers at
Memphis, 9:30 p.m.
Saturday May 5: Memphis at L.A. Clippers,
4:30 p.m.
Monday, May 7: Memphis at L.A. Clippers, TBD
x-Wednesday, May 9: L.A. Clippers at
Memphis, TBD
x-Friday, May 11: Memphis at L.A. Clippers, TBD
x-Sunday, May 13: L.A. Clippers at Memphis,
TBD



NHL playoff glance
CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS
(Best-of-7)
(x-if necessary)
EASTERN CONFERENCE
N.Y. Rangers 1,Washington 0
Saturday, April 28: NY Rangers 3, Washing-
ton 1
Monday, April 30: Washington at NY
Rangers, 7:30 p.m.
Wednesday, May 2: NY Rangers at Wash-
ington, 7:30 p.m.
Saturday, May 5: NY Rangers at Washington,
12:30 p.m.
x-Monday, May 7: Washington at NY
Rangers, 7:30 p.m.
x-Wednesday, May 9: NY Rangers at Wash-
ington, TBD
x-Saturday, May 12: Washington at NY
Rangers, TBD
Philadelphia 1, New Jersey 0
Sunday April 29: Philadelphia 4, New Jersey
3, OT
Tuesday, May 1: New Jersey at Philadelphia,
7:30 p.m.
Thursday, May 3: Philadelphia at New Jersey
7:30 p.m.
Sunday May 6: Philadelphia at New Jersey
7:30 p.m.
x-Tuesday, May 8: New Jersey at Philadel-
phia, TBD
x-Thursday, May 10: Philadelphia at New Jer-
sey, TBD
x-Saturday, May 12: New Jersey at Philadel-
phia, TBD
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Phoenix 2, Nashville 0
Friday, April 27: Phoenix 4, Nashville 3, OT
Sunday April 29: Phoenix 5, Nashville 3
Wednesday May 2: Phoenix at Nashville, 9p.m.
Friday, May 4: Phoenix at Nashville, 7:30 p.m.
x-Monday May7: Nashvilleat Phoenix, 10 p.m.
x-Wednesday May 9: Phoenix at Nashville,
TBD
x-Friday May 11: Nashville at Phoenix, TBD
Los Angeles 1, St. Louis 0
Saturday, April 28: Los Angeles 3, St. Louis 1
Monday, April 30: Los Angeles at St. Louis, 9 p.m.
Thursday May 3: St. Louis at Los Angeles,
10p.m.
Sunday May 6: St. Louis at LosAngeles, 3 p.m.
x-Tuesday May 8: Los Angeles at St. Louis, TBD
x-Thursday May 10: St. Louis at Los Ange-
les, TBD
x-Saturday May 12: Los Angeles at St. Louis,
TBD


0 VER 20 YEARS EX ERIENCE WI i FLO IDA LAWNS

|!IR## [IISSl A pR6 100.(O O FF'
I gpe Beou tiri oetofS, 500
a Re-S LLF ULLW


NASCAR
Continued from Page BI

under caution while clean-
ing his tires.
"What you've got to un-
derstand is the electronics,"
Pemberton said. "When the
transponder crosses the
start/finish line when
Carl was scrubbing his tires,
he beat (Stewart) to the line
- so that instantaneously
puts him up top.
"It happens all the time,
but these circumstances don't
stack on top of it That put
him up on top of the board
just because he was coming
to the line with one to go."
The penalty dropped Ed-
wards to 15th. He briefly fell
a lap down, and wound up
finishing 10th. It was a dis-



ZURICH
Continued from Page BI

the edge of the hole.
"It was a nice little charge
I made and, you know, nice
to catch the leader," Els
said. "I had a chance to win
the tournament with a 6-
footer and missed it, but I
made quite a few putts on
the back nine to keep myself
in it. ... Hit the ball pretty
well today no bogeys on
the final round so there's
a lot of positives."
On the second playoff hole,
Els' tee shot went into a fair-
way bunker, and his second
shot landed 137 yards from
the pin. His third shot landed
on the fringe, nearly 19 feet
from the pin, but he nearly
saved birdie from there, his
putt missing by 2 inches.
Dufner then made his
birdie putt from less than 2
feet, and in his typically low-
key way, briefly raised both


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MONDAY, APRIL 30, 2012 B3

appointment considering
Edwards led a race-high
206 laps and is still seeking
his first win of the season.
And it didn't seem to matter
what NASCAR's explana-
tion was, Edwards believed
he had a win taken away
from him.
Stewart wasn't any hap-
pier about his race, which
ended with a third-place
finish to Kyle Busch.
Stewart had led four
times for 118 laps, and was
out front when NASCAR
called a caution for debris
12 laps from the finish. The
leaders pitted, and Busch
beat Stewart off of pit road,
and easily handled the
champion on the restart.
Stewart was annoyed with
NASCAR over the caution,
and his team for the slow pit
stop.


arms to acknowledge the
cheering crowd before casu-
ally walking off the green to
accept some congratulatory
hugs.
Dufner said his primary
emotion was relief when he
finally had a Tour victory
and conceded that he was
more nervous about that last
putt than getting married
next weekend to his fiancee,
Amanda Boyd, who watched
the win, teary-eyed, from be-
hind the green.
"Great wedding present
for both of us. It helps with
paying for the wedding, ob-
viously," said Dufner, who
earned $1,152,000. "They're
a little more expensive than
I thought or had imagined.
... It'll be a big celebration
not only for our marriage
but also for my first victory
out on the Tour"
Luke Donald shot a 67 to
finish third at 17 under, and
move past Rory McIlroy for
the No. 1 ranking in the
world.


OOAVEL











Dawson outlasts Hopkins for title belt


Associated Press

ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. -
Bad Chad is a champion
again.
He has his belt back -
and gave the ageless
Bernard Hopkins a major
decision to make about his
fighting future.
Chad Dawson defeated
Hopkins by a 12-round ma-
jority decision Saturday
night and won the WBC light
heavyweight title, taking the
rematch at Boardwalk Hall
without the controversy and
ugliness of their first bout
six months ago.
The 29-year-old Dawson
(31-1, 17 KOs) never let a
deep cut near his left eye af-
fect his methodical approach
at taking out Hopkins.
At 47, Hopkins (52-6-2) may
have fought his last fight,


though it seems impossible
to count him out for one
more bout as he pushes 50.
Dawson, though, may
have shut the faucet on
Hopkins' Fountain of Youth.
"I believe there's a lot of
people out there that
won't fight me," Hopkins
said. "It all depends on the
motivation."
This rematch was no clas-
sic, but it was an improve-
ment on their first bout in
October in Los Angeles.
Dawson had his TKO vic-
tory over Hopkins over-
turned and the decision was
ruled a no-contest and the
belt returned to the Philadel-
phia fighter Dawson lifted
Hopkins and tossed him to
the canvas in that one.
This time, Dawson was
the victim of at least one ac-
cidental head-butt that


Associated Press
Bernard Hopkins, left, ducks a punch by Chad Dawson in the
10th round of their light heavyweight boxing match late Sat-
urday in Atlantic City, N.J. Dawson won a majority decision.


busted open a cut near his
left eye.
He kept his composure
and cranked up the pres-
sure in the later rounds. No


fighter has ever knocked out
Hopkins and Dawson never
came close.
He didn't have to lay him
out to win this one.


Dawson held the belt
high over his head and
slung it over his shoulder in
celebration.
"My head is hurting from
all the head-butts," Dawson
said. "I've got to give him a lot
of credit He's a future Hall of
Famer, he's a hell of a fighter
But he's a dirty fighter But if
you can get through 12
rounds with him, you can get
through anything."
Hopkins will likely return
to Philadelphia and con-
sider his options. Hopkins
held his own against the
younger, more talented
fighter, but was never a seri-
ous threat to retain.
Hopkins said he will de-
cide his future on his own
terms after talking with
friends and promoters.
"I could be a mentor in
the game if I choose to go


out that way," he said.
Hopkins looked like he
wanted to keep going after
the 12th round. While Daw-
son's face was battered and
bloodied, Hopkins' mug
wasn't much more than
swollen.
He stood on the ring
apron after the bout and
barked at the crowd, "Look
at my face!"
Dawson could have told
him to look at the scorecard.
Two judges scored it 117-
111 and a third scored it 114-
114.
Dawson vowed to finish
Hopkins and earn the win
and championship he felt
he was wrongly denied after
Los Angeles.
Mission accomplished.
"I did what I came to do,"
Bad Chad said. "I got my
belt back."


Lakers drub Nuggets


Hawks, Spurs

each start with

playoffwins

Associated Press

LOS ANGELES Kobe
Bryant scored 31 points,
Andrew Bynum posted the
Lakers' first playoff triple-
double in 21 years with an
NBA postseason record-
tying 10 blocked shots, and
Los Angeles thoroughly
controlledthe t empo in a
playoff-opening 103-88 vic-
tory over the Denver
Nuggets on Sunday
Bynum, the Lakers' All-
Star center coming off his
best regular season, also
had 10 points and 13 re-
bounds while incredibly
blocking 11 percent of the
Nuggets' 90 shots.
While Bynum had the
Lakers' first playoff triple-
double since Magic John-
son in the 1991 NBA finals,
fellow 7-footer Pau Gasol
added 13 points, eight re-
bounds and eight assists for
the playoff-tested Lakers,
who never trailed while
forcing the NBAs highest-
scoring team to play Los
Angeles' preferred half-
court style.
Game 2 is Tuesday night.
Danilo Gallinari scored
19 points for the sixth-
seeded Nuggets, but the
NBAs second-youngest
playoff roster struggled to
run. Andre Miller had 12
points, eight rebounds and
seven assists while helping


Associated Press
Los Angeles Lakers center Andrew Bynum had a triple double, including an NBA playoffs
record-tying 10 blocks during his team's 103-88 victory over the Denver Nuggets.


out Ty Lawson, Denver's
leading scorer, who man-
aged just seven points
while failing to make a shot
in the first three quarters.
Bynum blocked eight
shots in the first three quar-
ters before surpassing Ka-
reem Abdul-Jabbar's
franchise-record nine
blocks in the fourth. He
swatted Timofey Mozgov's
shot for No. 10 in the clos-
ing minutes to equal the
NBA record set by Utah's
Mark Eaton on April 26,
1985, and matched by Hall
of Famer Hakeem Olaju-
won on April 29, 1990.
Spurs 106, Jazz 91
SAN ANTONIO Tony
Parker scored 28 points and the
San Antonio Spurs won their
first playoff opener in four years,


Briere's OT


Associated Press

PHILADELPHIA -
Danny Briere scored the
winning goal 4:36 into over-
time to lead the Philadel-
phia Flyers to a 4-3 win
over the New Jersey Devils
on Sunday to open the East-
ern Conference semifinals.
Briere had his second
chance at the winner count
minutes after his earlier at-


tempt was
review becz
into the net
in the secoi
He waste
ing it up fo
opportunity
slapper
Brodeur f
goal of
Brodeur w
front by PI
ward Jame


beating the Utah Jazz in Game
1 of their first-round series.
Tim Duncan added 17
points and 11 rebounds, help-
ing the Spurs dodge another
early playoff letdown. Despite
boasting the No. 1 seed again,
San Antonio hadn't won a
Game 1 in its last six postsea-
son series including the one
that began a shocking first-
round ouster last year.
Paul Millsap led Utah with
20 points. The Jazz hung close
until the third, when the NBA's
top 3-point shooting team
began burying Utah with three
in a two-minute burst to finish
the quarter.
The Spurs have won 11 in a
row.
Game 2 is Wednesday in
San Antonio.


winner propel

overturned on Game 2 is Tuesday
ause he kicked it The Flyers took the se-
t. He also scored ries lead in their first game
nd period, in a week after eliminating
ed no time mak- Pittsburgh in six games.
r the OT missed The Devils played their
y. He fired a third straight overtime
past Martin game after defeating
or his seventh Florida in Games 6 and 7 to
the playoffs. win the first-round series.
'as screened in The Flyers put a slow
hiladelphia for- start well behind them in
s van Riemsdyk. the third and completely


Hawks 83, Celtics 74
ATLANTA- Josh Smith
scored 22 points and grabbed
18 rebounds, leading the At-
lanta Hawks to a victory over
Boston in Game 1 of the East-
ern Conference playoffs, the
final minute turning ugly when
Celtics star Rajon Rondo was
ejected for bumping an official.
The Hawks, who led by as
many as 19 in the first half, were
clinging to a four-point lead
when Rondo lost his cool with
41 seconds remaining and
may have cost himself a chance
to play Game 2 Tuesday night.
Brandon Bass was called for
a foul on Smith tussling for a
loose ball. Rondo screamed at
official Marc Davis, who quickly
called a technical. Rondo then
bumped Davis with his chest.




Is Flyers

set the pace of the period.
They used a tremendous
forecheck to stave off the
Devils and played with
more life in their skates
than a weary Devils team
that had only a three-day
break since their clincher
"I thought we played real
well in the first," New Jer-
sey coach Peter DeBoer
said. "We just couldn't keep
it up."


Lewis deflects



Thompson's charge


Associated Press

MOBILE, Ala. Stacy
Lewis sweated out a win
that came down to the last
pressurized putt in a day
full of them.
Lexi Thompson, mean-
while, was at her poised
best not her worst on a
Sunday in Mobile.
Lewis outlasted the rising
teenager to win the Mobile
Bay LPGA Classic by one
stroke for her second LPGA
Tour title in a round that
supplied a measure of vin-
dication for both.
Lewis, five strokes ahead
early in the day, reclaimed
the edge with a birdie on
No. 16, while the 17-year-old
Thompson parred the final
hole and had to wait.
Lewis parred out. Her
week was so solid that her
finishing 3-under 69 was her
worst round en route to a 17-
under 271 total on The
Crossings Course at Magno-
lia Grove, part of the Robert
Trent Jones Trail. The for-
mer Arkansas star also won
the 2011 Kraft Nabisco
Championship.
"I'm getting more comfort-
able in this situation," said
Lewis, who earned $187,500.
"I think that's a lot of it, and


it's definitely been coming. I
lost in a playoff in Australia,
so I knew I was due."
She has five top 10s in
eight events this year, includ-
ing a tie for second in the
Women's Australian Open.
Thompson made her earn
it, and found redemption
from her final-round fall in
Mobile a year ago. She
didn't flinch under the pres-
sure given a second shot,
closing with rounds of 66
and 65, tying her career low
in a bogey-free round.
"1 wouldn't take last year's
Sunday round back for any-
thing, because I learned so
much from that," said
Thompson, whose closing 78
last season dropped her
from a share of the lead to
19th. "I knew what not to do
and how to prepare for it. It
was a really big learning
experience for me."
Thompson said she didn't
check out the scores coming
onto No. 18. "I looked away,"
she said.
Here's what she missed:
Lewis secured the win with
a two-putt par from the edge
of the green, which she said
was pretty standard for the
402-yard par 5.
"I knew it was going to be
a hard two-putt no matter
where I hit it," she said."


Associated Press
Stacey Lewis tees off on the first hole during the third round
of the Mobile Bay LPGA Classic golf tournament Saturday in
Mobile, Ala. Lewis had to hold off a surging Alexis Thompson
to win the event on Sunday.


Sunday's GOLF LEADERBOARD


LPGA Mobile Bay Classic
Sunday
At Robert Trent Jones Golf Trail, Magnolia Grove, The Crossings,
Mobile, Ala.
Purse: $1.25 million
Yardage: 6,521, Par 72
Final
Stacy Lewis, $187,500 68-67-67-69 271 -17
Lexi Thompson, $114,347 70-71-66-65 272 -16
Karine Icher, $82,951 72-65-68-68 273 -15
Azahara Munoz, $44,887 69-69-70-68 276 -12
So Yeon Ryu, $44,887 69-67-72-68 276 -12
Karrie Webb, $44,887 73-70-64-69 276 -12
Sun Young Yoo, $44,887 68-69-69-70 -276 -12
Brittany Lincicome, $44,887 70-67-67-72 276 -12
Hee Young Park, $25,563 70-70-71-66 277 -11
Natalie Gulbis, $25,563 69-70-68-70 -277 -11
Lindsey Wright, $25,563 67-69-70-71 277 -11
Nicole Castrale, $19,407 71-70-69-68 278 -10
Caroline Hedwall, $19,407 67-73-70-68 278 -10
Suzann Pettersen, $19,407 73-68-69-68 278 -10
Haeji Kang, $19,407 68-70-69-71 278 -10
Pornanong Phatlum, $19,407 72-69-66-71 278 -10
Brittany Lang, $15,568 72-69-70-68- 279 -9
Meena Lee, $15,568 69-69-71-70 279 -9
Jennifer Rosales, $15,568 67-72-69-71 279 -9
Na Yeon Choi, $13,157 70-70-75-65 280 -8
Moira Dunn, $13,157 71-67-72-70 280 -8
Karin Sjodin, $13,157 72-64-74-70 280 -8
Eun-Hee Ji, $13,157 74-68-67-71 280 -8
Becky Morgan, $13,157 74-65-70-71 280 -8
Mariajo Uribe, $13,157 68-69-71-72-280 -8
Meaghan Francella, $10,655 75-69-69-68 281 -7
Cristie Kerr, $10,655 70-71-70-70 281 -7
Hee Kyung Seo, $10,655 71-71-69-70 281 -7
Hee-Won Han, $10,655 71-69-70-71 281 -7
Numa Gulyanamitta, $10,655 69-70-70-72 281 -7
Chella Choi, $8,545 72-65-76-69 282 -6
Jin Young Pak, $8,545 70-72-70-70 282 -6
Beatriz Recari, $8,545 70-70-71-71 282 -6
Anna Nordqvist, $8,545 71-68-71-72 282 -6
Sydnee Michaels, $8,545 68-68-72-74 282 -6


Christel Boeljon, $8,545
Paula Creamer, $6,667
Shanshan Feng, $6,667
Mina Harigae, $6,667
Morgan Pressel, $6,667
Angela Stanford, $6,667
Anna Grzebien, $6,667
Cindy LaCrosse, $5,759
Alison Walshe, $5,509
Lorie Kane, $4,767
Sarah Kemp, $4,767
Jenny Shin, $4,767
Marcy Hart, $4,767
Jeong Jang, $4,767
Jennifer Johnson, $4,767
Sophie Gustafson, $4,767
Vicky Hurst, $3,694
Song-Hee Kim, $3,694
Reilley Rankin, $3,694
Ryann O'Toole, $3,694
Dori Carter, $3,694
Pernilla Lindberg, $3,694
Jessica Korda, $3,694
Giulia Sergas, $3,694
Belen Mozo, $3,099
Kathleen Ekey, $3,099
Tiffany Joh, $2,942
Ji Young Oh, $2,942
Candle Kung, $2,942
Heather Bowie Young, $2,786
Haru Nomura, $2,786
Stephanie Sherlock, $2,629
Jee Young Lee, $2,629
Paige Mackenzie, $2,629
Veronica Felibert, $2,489
Wendy Doolan, $2,489
Katie Futcher, $2,425
Mi Jung Hur, $2,425
Jacqui Concolino, $2,365
JessicaShepley,$2,365
Maria Hjorth, $2,320
Lisa Ferrero, $2,291


69-70-68-75
71-72-74-66-
70-71-73-69-
76-68-68-71 -
68-74-70-71 -
72-69-70-72
74-66-70-73
68-70-74-72
72-71-70-72-
72-71-74-69-
69-71-77-69-
70-70-76-70
71-72-71-72-
75-69-70-72
72-72-70-72 -
70-71-71-74-
70-71-78-68-
70-73-74-70 -
72-70-74-71 -
70-70-75-72
69-73-72-73
73-68-73-73
72-68-73-74
73-69-71-74
72-72-71-73
71-71-71-75-
74-70-74-71 -
73-69-73-74
72-70-70-77-
76-67-77-70
71-69-77-73-
75-69-75-72
77-67-72-75
73-67-75-76
73-71-74-74-
72-71-74-75-
67-77-74-75
68-71-79-75-
73-71-77-73-
74-70-75-75
71-72-76-76-
70-74-74-81 -


Zurich Classic
Sunday
At TPC Louisiana, Avondale, La.
Purse: $6.4 million
Yardage: 7,425, Par 72
Final Round


Jason Dufner (500), $1,152,000
Ernie Els (300), $691,200
Luke Donald (190), $435,200
Graham DeLaet (123), $281,600
Ryan Palmer (123), $281,600
Steve Stricker (100), $230,400
Ken Duke (85), $199,467
Cameron Tringale (85), $199,467
John Rollins (85), $199,467
Rickie Fowler (70), $160,000
David Mathis (70), $160,000
Justin Rose (70), $160,000
Jonas Blixt (56), $116,480
Ben Curtis (56), $116,480
J.B. Holmes (56), $116,480
Scott Piercy (56), $116,480
Webb Simpson (56), $116,480
Alex Cejka (51), $80,640
Brendon de Jonge (51), $80,640
Jeff Overton (51), $80,640
Camilo Villegas (51), $80,640
Jimmy Walker (51), $80,640
Bubba Watson (51), $80,640
Bobby Gates (45), $51,840
David Hearn (45), $51,840
Colt Knost (45), $51,840
George McNeill (45), $51,840
Patrick Reed, $51,840
Chris Stroud (45), $51,840
Mark Anderson (37), $36,409
Kris Blanks (37), $36,409
Greg Chalmers (37), $36,409
Erik Compton (37), $36,409
Fred Funk (37), $36,409
Russell Knox (37), $36,409
William McGirt (37), $36,409
Greg Owen (37), $36,409


67-65-67-70.
66-68-68-67.
73-65-66-67.
68-67-66-71
72-67-64-69.
66-68-69-70.
65-68-71-70.
65-70-68-71
67-66-69-72
71-65-69-70.
72-69-69-65
72-67-68-68
68-70-71-67-
67-70-68-71
71-67-68-70.
72-66-69-69.
68-72-67-69.
70-69-67-71
73-69-69-66.
72-67-73-65.
69-66-74-68.
70-71-68-68-
71-71-65-70.
71-65-74-68.
68-73-68-69
70-70-72-66
70-70-67-71
71-70-70-67
66-71-72-69
69-70-72-68
69-68-72-70
70-64-72-73
69-68-72-70
72-67-72-68
69-64-74-72
70-69-70-70.
70-69-71-69.


Daniel Summerhays (37), $36,409 68-70-68-73 -
Miguel Angel Carballo (30), $25,600 69-70-73-68 -
K.J. Choi (30), $25,600 71-68-73-68 -
Brian Davis (30), $25,600 71-67-72-70 -
Tim Herron (30), $25,600 69-68-71-72 -
Charles Howell III (30), $25,600 71-66-72-71 -
John Senden (30), $25,600 72-70-69-69 -
Daniel Chopra (23), $17,938 66-70-72-73 -
Matt Jones (23), $17,938 72-70-68-71 -
Geoff Ogilvy (23), $17,938 76-66-71-68 -
David Toms (23), $17,938 72-68-70-71 -
Stuart Appleby (23), $17,938 69-69-70-73 -
James Driscoll (23), $17,938 73-65-70-73 -
Kyle Reifers (23), $17,938 69-68-70-74-
Will Claxton (17), $14,925 72-69-70-71 -
Peter Hanson, $14,925 74-68-70-70 -
J.J. Henry (17), $14,925 69-72-70-71 -
Danny Lee (17), $14,925 72-68-74-68 -
John Merrick (17), $14,925 72-70-69-71 -
Briny Baird (12), $14,208 69-71-74-69 -
Jason Kokrak (12), $14,208 70-70-69-74 -
Graeme McDowell (12), $14,208 69-73-69-72 -
Rocco Mediate (12), $14,208 71-65-73-74 -
Vaughn Taylor (12), $14,208 69-71-73-70-
Tommy Biershenk (8), $13,632 74-67-71-72 -
Chris DiMarco (8), $13,632 71-70-70-73 -
Troy Kelly (8), $13,632 69-72-73-70 -
Hank Kuehne (8), $13,632 71-70-70-73 -
David Duval (3), $13,056 72-69-70-74 -
Brian Gay (3), $13,056 70-70-74-71 -
Lucas Glover (3), $13,056 70-72-71-72 -
Garth Mulroy (3), $13,056 70-72-72-71 -
Seung-Yul Noh (3), $13,056 70-69-71-75-
Kevin Streelman (1), $12,672 69-73-72-74 -
Made cut did not finish
Michael Bradley (1), $12,288 72-68-75 -
Tommy Gainey (1), $12,288 73-69-73-
Mathew Goggin (1), $12,288 70-72-73-
Charley Hoffman (1), $12,288 69-73-73 -
Scott Verplank (1), $12,288 69-73-73 -
Chris Couch (1), $11,904 72-69-75 -
Gavin Coles (1), $11,776 72-70-75 -
Alexandre Rocha (1), $11,648 72-70-77-


B4 MONDAY, APRIL 30, 2012


SPORTS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE








E Page B5 MONDAY, APRIL 30, 2012



ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE -


Beauty queen
arrested
MANCHESTER, N.H.
- Police say a former
Miss New Hampshire
USA faces a simple as-
sault charge stemming
from a confrontation with
her boyfriend.
Police say Sunday that
26-year-old Nicole Houde
(hud) was arrested

day Au-
thorities
say the
o MManches-
ter beauty
queen
punched,
kicked,
Nicole scratched
Houde and bit
33-year-
old Scott Nickerson, also
of Manchester
Police say the two were
arguing and Nickerson
took Houde's cellphone,
prompting the physical
confrontation.
Houde was the 2010
Miss New Hampshire
USA.
Miss New Hampshire
USA and Miss Teen New
Hampshire USA are dis-
tinct from Miss New
Hampshire and Miss
America pageants.

Springsteen packs
'em in for Jazz Fest
NEW ORLEANS -
Bruce Springsteen has
closed out the first week-
end of the New Orleans
Jazz & Heritage Festival
with a 2 1/2-hour show
that combined crowd-
pleasers such as "Born to
Run" with the cover tune
of his new CD, "Wrecking
Ball."
Fans began staking out
spots when the fair-
grounds opened at 11
a.m. Sunday, rushing
from the entrance gates
to spread blankets and
set up chairs as close to
the stage as possible. By
the time Springsteen
stepped on stage fans
stretched around the fair-
grounds track, some
standing 10 to 12 people
deep.
At one point New Or-
leans legend Dr. John
took the stage with
Springsteen for a number
Springsteen last played
Jazz Fest in 2006.
But if Springsteen was
the biggest draw of the
day, he was far from the
only one. Soul singer Al
Green closed out the day
on the Congo Square
stage, drawing his faithful.

Fans can hear
Idol singers live
NEW ORLEANS The
45 stops on the "American
Idol Live!" tour include
one each in the home
states of gospel singer
Joshua Ledet and country
rocker Skylar Laine.
Ledet, of Westlake, La.,
Laine, of Brandon, Miss.,
and the other Top 10
singers will be at the
Louisiana Cajundome in
Lafayette on July 30, and
in the Mississippi Coli-
seum in Jackson on
July 31.
Ledet, Laine, Jessica
Sanchez, Hollie Ca-
vanagh and Phillip
Phillips remain in the
running. Colton Dixon,
DeAndre Brackensick,
Elise Testone, Erika Van
Pelt, and Heejun Han
have been eliminated
from the competition.
-From wire reports


Committed comedian


Associated Press
ABOVE: This Sept. 26, 2011, photo shows Ellen DeGeneres during a taping of "The Ellen DeGeneres Show" in Bur-
bank, Calif. Chef and cookbook author Roberto Martin featured in "Vegan Cooking for Carnivores," is the personal
chef to comedian and TV host Ellen DeGeneres, who is a vegan. BELOW: This book cover image released by Grand
Central Publishing shows "Vegan Cooking for Carnivores," by Roberto Martin.

Even for Ellen, vegan road wasn 't always easy


MICHELE KAYAL
For The Associated Press

Ellen DeGeneres may be an out-
spoken vegan today, but a life with-
out meat or dairy wasn't always
easy for her to, er.. digest
Raised in New Orleans and
Texas, the talk show host says she
always had a healthy appetite for
sausage-laden red beans and rice,
as well as for thick, juicy steaks. She
first tried to quit meat 15 years ago,
she said in a telephone interview,
but lasted only six months.
"I've always called myself an ani-
mal lover And yet I ate them," she
said. "Until four years ago, I would
be driving past these cows on pas-
tures, and think 'What a lovely life
that is,' and I'd go and order a steak.
It takes a click, just one light bulb,
and you're like 'I can't do that any-
more."'
The click that lit that bulb for De-
Generes came by way of chicken
four years ago. "Someone men-
tioned 'If you knew what chicken
looked like or you knew how
chicken was made, you'd never eat
it again,"' said the Emmy award-
winning comedian. "Something
snapped."
Since then, DeGeneres and her
wife, actress Portia de Rossi, have
purged their diet of all animal prod-
ucts, including milk and eggs. It
wasn't easy this time around, either
"It's like anybody who's trying to
make a change, especially a habit
like eating food every day," she said.
"It's hard to make a change."
But this time, she says, she forced
herself to watch gruesome video
footage and undercover documen-
taries shot by opponents of the meat
industry, and to read books on the
subject. The images that stuck in
her head from the films and the
books helped her stick to her
choice. But so did something much
simpler good food.
It helps that she and De Rossi
have a personal chef.
Roberto Martin, author of the
new book "Vegan Cooking for Car-
nivores" (Grand Central Life and


Style, 2012) -which includes many
of the recipes he created for the
couple made the transition eas-
ier by serving them dishes such as
sliders made with veggie patties
and smoked tempeh, Greek salad
with "tofeta" (vegan feta cheese
made of tofu), ceviche made from
hearts of palm, and beluga lentil
"caviar" complete with buckwheat
blinis. He even recreated De-
Generes' beloved red beans and
rice.
"They were over the moon
happy," said Martin, who follows a
largely plant-based diet, but is not a
strict vegan. "It was vegan food that
was completely different from what
they had before. They were living
on quinoa and kale salad."


Martin said the key to helping
people make the switch or even
simply reducing their consumption
of animal products is to think
about creative substitutions. Break
a recipe down into protein, acids,
liquids and fat. Substitute plant
products for the animal products
like meat or milk or butter, then
apply good technique, such as stir-
frying or sauteing to produce deep
flavors.
DeGeneres' own struggle to tran-
sition makes her sympathetic to-
ward others considering a switch.
"I know it's hard for people to di-
gest," said DeGeneres, who wrote
the afterward for Martin's book (de
Rossi wrote the forwardd. "No pun
intended."


Wyeth's Pa. world opening to public for first time


Associated Press


CHADDS FORD, Pa. -
Andrew Wyeth's humble
studio in the picturesque
Brandywine Valley isn't
something the average day-
tripper would stumble
upon, but the late artist
made his wishes loud and
clear for anyone who might


have found their way down
the winding wooded path to
his door
"I AM WORKING SO
PLEASE DO NOT DIS-
TURB. I do not sign auto-
graphs," announces a small
white sign at the entryway
Now for the first time, the
public will be able to get
past that sign and venture


into Wyeth's world.
Starting July 3, the studio
will be open to the public
for a handful of tours each
day. Shuttle buses will
transport a maximum of 14
people for the short ride
from the museum to the stu-
dio for each tour Timed
tickets go on sale June 1.
"He did a great job of


keeping the place under
wraps," said Christine Pod-
maniczky, a curator at the
Brandywine River Museum.
The fieldstone A-frame
structure was built as a
schoolhouse in 1875 and
purchased by Wyeth's father,
the celebrated illustrator
N.C. Wyeth, in 1925 when the
school closed.


Today's HOROSCOPE


Birthday It isn't likely that you'll be satisfied taking a back-
seat to anyone in the year ahead, especially when it comes
to something that affects your interests. You will do quite well
as long as you don't take on more than you can handle.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Don't allow anyone to involve
you in petty social games just because that person wants
to get even with someone he or she dislikes. Instead, enjoy
all of your friends.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) If you hope to be content
with your lot in life, it's important not to compare yourself to
others. Be honest with yourself and you'll realize how fortu-
nate you are.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Phrase your comments very
carefully lest you inadvertently blurt out something hurtful.
Once spoken, it could be quite difficult to explain or take back.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Put definite limitations on your
purchasing so that your extravagant urges don't get the


upper hand. Spending foolishly on expensive things or
events could do you in.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -Although at times you can get
away with handling several situations simultaneously, this
might not be the case today. Limit your focus and efforts to
one endeavor at a time.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Make sure you handle all of
your involvements in a mature manner. Others will have
more respect for you if don't try to play upon their sympathy
and goodness.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) There are times when your
strong personality can effectively enhance your image, but
if you go overboard, it could be another story. Being a
cocky hotshot will not play well.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -As long as you don't let
self-doubt weaken your thrust, you'll have what it takes to
be successful and accomplish your aims. However, any


form of negativity will be counterproductive.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Falsely flattering someone
could pump up the recipient for the moment, but come
back to haunt you later on when, as a result, your pal thinks
you owe him or her something.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) There's a strong chance
that once again you might not fare too well with someone
who has bested you in the past, especially if you try too
hard to overtake him or her.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Don't make any half-
hearted promises today that you aren't likely to be able to
keep. Unfortunately, you will be taken up on what you say
and embarrassed if or when you can't produce.
Aries (March 21-April 19) If you fail to help someone
who asks for your assistance and desperately needs it,
chances are you won't like yourself, especially if you fail to
lend a hand due to laziness.


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's winning
numbers, Page B3.

SATURDAY, APRIL 28
Powerball: 31 39 40 57 58
Powerball: 33
5-of-5 PB No winner
No Florida winner
5-of-5 No winner
Lotto: 4 11 13 17 20 28
6-of-6 1 winner $21 million
5-of-6 87 $2,475.50
4-of-6 3,878 $44
3-of-6 65,689 $5
Fantasy 5:1 12 13 20 34
5-of-5 1 winner $292,087.58
4-of-5 396 $118.50
3-of-5 11,738 $11
FRIDAY, APRIL 27
Mega Money: 6 27 39 42
Mega Ball: 21
4-of-4 MB 1 winner $550,000
4-of-4 3 $2,435.50
3-of-4 MB 43 $372
3-of-4 811 $58.50
2-of-4 MB 1,150 $28.50
1-of-4 MB 11,093 $3
2-of-4 25,666 $2
Fantasy 5:3 10 16 24 33
5-of-5 3 winners $84,007.83
4-of-5 362 $112
3-of-5 11,026 $10

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num-
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call 850-487-7777.

Today in
HISTORY =
Today is Monday, April 30,
the 121st day of 2012. There
are 245 days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On April 30, 1812,
Louisiana (formerly the Terri-
tory of Orleans) became the
18th state of the Union.
On this date:
In 1789, George Washing-
ton took office in New York
as the first president of the
United States.
In 1803, the United States
purchased the Louisiana Ter-
ritory from France for 60 mil-
lion francs, the equivalent of
about $15 million.
In 1980, Queen Juliana of
the Netherlands abdicated;
she was succeeded by her
daughter, Princess Beatrix.
Ten years ago: Benevo-
lence International Founda-
tion, an Islamic charity based
in suburban Chicago, and its
director were charged with
perjury; authorities accused
the charity of supporting
terrorists.
Five years ago: A British
judge sentenced five al-
Qaida-linked men, all British
citizens, to life in prison for
plotting to attack London tar-
gets, including a nightclub,
power plants and shopping
mall with bombs. An Israeli
government probe faulted
Prime Minister Ehud Olmert
for what it called "very severe
failures" in Israel's war with
Hezbollah militants in
Lebanon. Actor Tom Poston
died in Los Angeles at age 85.
One year ago: A Libyan
official said Moammar Gad-
hafi had escaped a NATO
missile strike in Tripoli that
killed one of his sons and
three young grandchildren.
(There have been conflicting
accounts about whether
Gadhafi's relatives even died
in the airstrike.)
Today's Birthdays: Ac-
tress Cloris Leachman is 86.
Singer Willie Nelson is 79.
Actor Gary Collins is 74.
Actor Burt Young is 72.
Singer Bobby Vee is 69.
Movie director Allan Arkush
is 64. Actor Perry King is 64.
Singer Merrill Osmond is 59.
Movie director Jane Cam-
pion is 58. Canadian Prime
Minister Stephen Harper is
53. Singer-musician Cole
Deggs (Cole Deggs and the
Lonesome) is 36. Actor
Kunal Nayyar is 31. Rapper


Lloyd Banks is 30. Actress
Kirsten Dunst is 30. Actress
Dianna Agron is 26.
Thought for Today:
"There's a difference be-
tween a philosophy and a
bumper sticker." Charles
M. Schulz, American car-
toonist (1922-2000).





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MONDAY EVENING APR IL 30, 2012 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D/h Comcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
C B D/I F H 6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 18:30 9:00 I 9:30 10:00110:30 11:00 11:30
0 WESH NBC 19 19 News News Ent Access The Voice Eight vocalists compete. (N) 'PG' Smash "Tech"'14' News Jay Leno
World Nightly PBS NewsHour (N) (In Antiques Roadshow Antiques Roadshow Himalaya With Michael Churchill "The Last
8 WE ) PBS 3 3 14 6 News Business Stereo) a "Atlanta" (N) 'G' "Providence, RI" 'G' Palin a Prize"'PG' c
0 WUFT PBS 5 5 5 41 News Business PBS NewsHour (N) Antiques Roadshow Antiques Roadshow America Revealed World T Smiley
W L NBC 8 8 8 8 8 News Nightly Entertainment Extra (N) The Voice "Live Semi-Final Performances" Eight Smash "Tech" (N) (In News Jay Leno
S (W NBC 8 8 8 8 8News Ton. 'PG' vocalists compete. (N) 'PG' Stereo) '14'x
SrWFTV ABC 20 20 20 News World Jeopardy! Wheel of Dancing With the Stars (N) (In Stereo) 'PG' c Castle "Undead Again" Eyewit. Nightline
S( ABC20 20 20 News (N)'G' Fortune (N)'PG'Ec News (N)jc
10 News, Evening Inside Be a Howl Met 2 Broke Two and Mike & Hawaii Five-0 "Pa Make 10 News Letterman
S ISP CBS 10 10 10 10 10 6pm (N) News Edition Millionaire Girls (N) Half Men Molly (N) Loa" (N) '14' 11pm (NJ
FOX13 6:00 News (N) TMZ (N) The Insider Bones "The Family in House "The C-Word" FOX13 10:00 News (N) News Access
0 (IV FOX 13 13 13 13 (In Stereo) a 'PG' 'PG' the Feud" (N) '14' (N)'14' c (In Stereo) ca Hollyw'd
S WCJB ABC 11 11 4 News ABC Ent Inside Ed. Dancing With the Stars (N) 'PG's Castle (N) 'PG' s News Nightline
W ND 2 2 2 22 Christian BelieversWay Z. Levitt Great Awakening Love a The Place for Miracles Jewish Life Today Jentezen Great
SIND 2 2 2 22 22 Fitness Presents Child G' Jewels Franklin Awaken
News World Wheel of Jeopardy! Dancing With the Stars (N) (In Stereo) 'PG' s Castle "Undead Again" News Nightline
J (WFTSABC 11 11 11 News Fortune (N) G' (N)'PG' x (N cc
WMR ND 12 12 16 .Family Guy Family Guy Big Bang Big Bang Law & Order: Criminal Law & Order: Criminal How I Met How I Met The Office The Office
BEWD lIND 12 12 16 14' 14' Theory Theory Intent'14' c Intent'14' a 'PG' '14'
D IWTTAI MNT 6 6 6 9 9 Raymond Seinfeld Family Fd Family Fd Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Scrubs Seinfeld Excused Excused
D WACX TBN 21 21 Variety The 700 Club (N) 'G' Variety Child |Give Me the Bible |Jentezen Studio Direct Variety
King of King of Two and Two and Gossip Girl Investigating Hart of Dixie (N) (In Friends Friends The According
I W G cW 4 4 4 12 12 Queens Queens Half Men Half Men a secret.'14' Stereo) 'PG' a 'PG' 'PG' Simpsons to Jim
Chamber Cancer County To Be Announced Straight Moving On'G' Music Mix Music Mix Planet X Black
I WY FAM 16 16 16 15 ChatCourty TTalkMed USA USA G'X Beauty
E DWOGX) FOX 13 7 7 Simpsons Simpsons Big Bang Big Bang |Bones(N)'14' c House (N)'14' c FOX 35 News at 10 TMZ'PG' Access
r WVEA UNI 15 15 15 15 14 Noticias Notic. Una Familia con Suerte (N)'PG'(SS) Abismo de Pasi6n La Que No Noticias Noticiero
SWWXPX ION 17 "A Few Good Men" Cold Case '14' c Cold Case '14' c Cold Case '14' c Criminal Minds'14' Criminal Minds'14'
E 54 48 54 25 27 Ou The First 48 "One of Beyond Scared Straight Beyond Scared Straight Beyond Scared Straight Beyond Scared Straight Beyond Scared Straight
54 48 54 25 27 Ours"'PG'c Xc "Lieber"'14' cX cc cc
CSI: Miami "Free Fall" CSI: Miami "Dead Air" CSI: Miami "Open The Pitch "Waste The Pitch "Subway: Mad Men "At the
c 55 64 55 '14' '14'Xc Water"'14'Ec Management" (N) McKinney&WDCW" Codfish Ball"'14'
River Monsters: The Swamp Wars "Killer River Monsters (In River Monsters: Killer Frozen Planet "Winter" River Monsters (In
52 35 52 19 21 Lost Reels'PG' Bees Attack"'PG' Stereo) 'PG' a Sharks 'PG'x Stereo)'PG'x
106 & Park: BET's Top 10 Live "Top 10 ***l "Boyz N the Hood" (1991, Drama) Larry The Game The Game The Game The Game
96 19 96 Countdown" (N) (Live)'PG'Ec Fishburne, Ice Cube.'R' c '14' '14' 14' '14'
fB!Al 254 51 254 Housewives/Atl. Don't Be Don't Be Housewives/NJ Housewives/NJ Bethenny Ever After Happens Bethenny
Daily Show Colbert 30 Rock 30 Rock Futurama South Park Always Always Always Always Daily Show Colbert
27 61 27 33 Report '14' '14' 'PG' 14' Sunny Sunny Sunny Sunny Report
S 98 45 98 28 37 Kitchen Nightmares Kitchen Nightmares The Singin Bee (In The Singing Bee (In The Singing Bee (In Jennie Jennie
98 45 98 28 37 "Secret Garden"'14' "Lela's"'14ca Stereo) PG' c Stereo) PG' Stereo) Pxc Garth Garth
ICNBC1 43 42 43 Mad Money (N) The Kudlow Report Costco Craze Cruise Inc. Apocalypse 2012 Mad Money
tCil 40 29 40 41 46 John King, USA (N) Erin Burnett OutFront Anderson Cooper Piers Morgan Anderson Cooper Erin Burnett OutFront
Shake It Good- Good- Good- Jessie "Radio Rebel" (2012) Debby Ryan. Austin & A.N.T Good- Shake It
46 40 46 6 5 Up!'G' Charlie Charlie Charlie 'G' c (In Stereo) 'NR' c Ally'G' Farm G' Charlie Up! 'G'
IE$PN 33 27 33 21 17 SportsCenter (N) MLB Baseball Teams TBA. (N Subject to Blackout) 'PG' s Baseball Tonight (N) SportsCenter (N)
(ESPN2J 34 28 34 43 49 NFL32 (N) c NFL Live (N) c SportsCenter c NFL Live c SportsNation cx
EWIN) 95 70 95 48 Saints |Founders Daily Mass The Journey Home Genesis |Rosary World Over Live Vaticano |Women
Secret Life of the Secret Life of the Secret Life of the Make It or Break It (N) Secret Life of the The 700 Club 'PG'
29 52 29 20 28 American Teenager American Teenager American Teenager (In Stereo) a American Teenager
1** "Godzilla" (1998, Science Fiction) Matthew ** "Gun Shy"(2000, Comedy) Liam Neeson, *** "Dead Again"(1991, Mystery) Kenneth
118 170 Broderick. (In Stereo)'PG-13' c Oliver Platt, Sandra Bullock. 'R Branagh, Emma Thompson. H'
FiF) 44 37 44 32 Special Report FOX Report The O'Reilly Factor Hannity (N) Greta Van Susteren The O'Reilly Factor
[F 26 56 26 Diners |Diners Diners |Diners Diners |Diners Diners |Diners Diners |Diners Meat Men |Diners
(iL) 35 39 35 World Poker Tour UFC Reloaded Edgar vs Maynard and Aldo vs Florian. Dan Patrick World Poker Tour
S 30 60 30 51Two and Two and ** "Mr. & Mrs. Smith" (2005, Action) Brad Pitt, Angelina Jolie, Vince Vaughn. A **t "Mr. & Mrs. Smith" (2005,
30 60 30 51 Half Men Half Men husband and wife are assassins for rival organizations. PG-13' Action) Brad Pitt. PG-13'
GOLF 727 67 727 Golf Central (N) The Golf Fix (N) The Haney Project Big Break |Big Break Feherty (N) Top 10 Central
Little House on the Little House on the Little House on the Little House on the Frasier 'PG' Frasier 'PG' Frasier 'PG' Frasier
ALL 39 68 39 45 54 Prairie'G' c Prairie'PG' c Prairie'PG' c Prairie 'G' a 'G' c
302 201 302 2 2 ""The REAL Sports With 24/7 Real Time With Bill **Y "Horrible Bosses" (2011) Making Ricky Mayweather
302 201 302 2 2 Dilemma" Bryant Gumbel 'PG' Mayweather Maher 'MA' a Jason Bateman. 'R' s VeepG' Gervais
iOi2) 303 202 303 **e "Monte Carlo"(2011)Selena Gomez, Veep'MA' Girls'MA' Game of Thrones (In ** "Green Lantern" 2011,Action) Ryan
303 202 303 Katie Cassidy (In Stereo) 'PG'x c c Stereo) 'MA' ca Reynolds. (In Stereo) 'PG-13' c a
(H1TV 23 57 23 42 52 First Pla. |First Pla. Love It or List It'G' Love It or List It'G' Property |Property Hunters Hunt Intl Love It or List It'G'
American Pickers American Pickers Pawn Stars Pawn Stars American Pickers Pawn Stars Pawn Stars American Pickers
MTiT) 51 25 51 32 42 'PG' 'PG' 'PG' 'PG' "Jurassic Pick"'PG' 'PG' 'PG' 'PG'
To Be To Be To Be To Be ** "August Rush" (2007, Drama) Freddie *** "The Memory Keeper's Daughter" (2008,
LiFE 24 38 24 31 Announced Announced Announced Announced Highmore, Keri Russell.'PG'm Drama) Dermot Mulroney 'NR' ca
"Eight Days to Live" (2006, Drama) Kelly "We Have Your Husband" (2011, Docudrama) **Y "Held Hostage" (2009, Suspense) Julie
i 50 119 Rowan. 'NR' Teri Polo, Esai Morales. 'NR' Benz.,
i 320 221 320 3 "Jaws- *** "Death Becomes Her" (1992) **W "Diggstown"(1992, Action) James *** T "Three of Life" (2011, Drama) Brad
320 221 320 3 3 Revenge" Meryl Streep. PG-13' Woods, Bruce Dern. (In Stereo) HR' c Pitt. (In Stereo) PG-13' c
MSNBC 42 41 42 PoliticsNation (N) Hardball Matthews The Ed Show (N) Rachel Maddow The Last Word The Ed Show
vviia Justice ueer Navajo uops (IN) 14 ATtermatn: Popuiation Lero envisioning hartn training or ine A1termatn: Mopuiation
109 65 109 44 53 MeatforMeth"'14' without humans.'PG' Apolcaypse'14,L,V' Zero'PG'
NICK 28 36 28 35 25 iCarly 'G' |Victorious Sponge. |Sponge. MyWife |MyWife |George |George '70s 1'70s Friends |Friends
OWN 103 62 103 Oprah's Next Oprah's Next Oprah's Lifeclass: The Tour (In Stereo)'PG' Breakthrough Oprah's Lifeclass
WXU J 44 123 Bad Girls Club Bad Girls Club Bad Girls Club Bad Girls Club Bad Girls Club Brooklyn 11223'14'
** "The Core"(2003) Aaron Eckhart. Weeds Weeds The Borgias "Stray Nurse The Big C The Borgias "Stray
340 241 340 4 Scientists travel to the center of the Earth., 'MA' 'MA' Dogs"'MA' c Jackie 'MA' Dogs"'MA' c
NASCAR Race Hub Pass Time Pass Time Two Guys Two Guys Gearz'PG' Gearz'PG' Hot Rod Hot Rod NASCAR Race Hub
732 112 732 (N) Garage Garage TV'PG' TV'PG'
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37 43 37 27 36 Die Riggs and Murtaugh battle Chinese mercenaries.'R' flashy mobster over his hard-working dad. (In Stereo)'RP
"Soul *** "The MaskofZorro" (1998) Antonio Banderas. ** "Priest" (2011) Paul Bettany. ** "Bad Teacher" (2011, Comedy)
370 271 370 Surfer" Zorro's protege crosses swords with a returning tyrant. (In Stereo) 'PG-13'x Cameron Diaz. 'R' sc
Inside the Rays Live! MLB Baseball Seattle Mariners at Tampa Bay Rays. From Tropicana Rays Live! Inside the Boxing in 60
36 31 36 Rays Field in St. Petersburg, Fla. (N Subject to Blackout) (Live) Rays
S**** "Raiders of the Eureka "Lost" (In Eureka The town con- Eureka "Force Quit" Lost Girl "Scream a Eureka "Force Quit"
31 59 31 26 29 Lost Ark"'PG' Stereo) c tinues searching. The ship is found. (N) Little Dream" (N) The ship is found.
(5I 49 23 49 16 19 King |King Seinfeld |Seinfeld FamilyGuy'14' FamilyGuy'14' FamilyGuy'14' Conan'14'x c
*'il "Stay Away, Joe" (1968, Comedy-Drama) **Y "Nobody Lives Forever" (1946, Drama) **Y "The Conspirators"(1944, Drama) Hedy
TCM 169 53 169 30 35 Elvis Presley 'PG' c John Garfield'NR'x c Lamarr, Paul Henreid.'NR' c
American Chopper (In American Chopper: American Chopper: American Chopper: Death Row: The Final American Chopper:
53 34 53 24 26 Stereo) 'PG' s Senior vs. Junior Senior vs. Junior Senior vs. Junior (N) 24 Hours (N) Senior vs. Junior
(TLC 50 46 50 29 30 Hoard-Buried Undercover Boss Undercover Boss Undercover Boss Undercover Boss Undercover Boss
*** "Agora" (2009) Rachel Weisz. A slave *** "As Good as It Gets"(1997, Comedy-Drama) Jack ** "The Tempest"(2010) Helen
350 261 350 falls in love with Hypatia of Alexandria. Nicholson, Helen Hunt. (In Stereo)'PG-13' Mirren.'PG-1i3'
f ~til 48 33 48 31 34 o7The Mentalist "The Red NBA Basketball Playoffs, First Round: Teams TBA. (N) (Live) NBA Basketball Playoffs, First Round: Teams TBA. (N) (Live)
fi 38 58 38 33 MAD'PG' |Gumball Adven |Adven Regular IMAD'PG' King/Hill King/Hill American |American Fam.Guy |Fam.Guy
(TIij 9 54 9 44 No Reservation No Reservation No Reservation No Reservation Hotel Impossible 'G' Last Resorts III 'G'
1~ii) 25 55 25 98 55 Cops'14' |Cops'14' World's Dumbest... World's Dumbest... Lizard Lizard Lizard Lizard Worked Worked
[ilJ 32 49 32 34 24 TV Land Awards 2012'PG' |Home Im Home Im Homelm Raymond Raymond Raymond The King of Queens King
NCIS "Corporal NCIS: Los Angeles NCIS Muslim Marine WWE Monday Night RAW (N) (In Stereo Live) ** "Fast& Furious"
47 32 47 17 18 Punishment"'PG'c "Ambush"'14' c found dead.'14' PG' (2009)'PG-13'
Golden Golden Golden Golden Golden Golden Golden Golden Golden Golden Golden Golden
IWEJ 117 69 117 Girls Girls Girls Girls Girls Girls Girls Girls Girls Girls Girls Girls
(WGN^A 18 18 18 18 20 30 Rock 30Rock Funny Home Videos Funny Home Videos Funny Home Videos WGN News at Nine 30 Rock Scrubs


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
SCKSUN / E

@2012 Trbune Meda Ser es, In
AllRghs R served
ACEBH/



SCORES



BOLUED
yTT 0 ^^


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Don't let last night's loss get
you down. Now get out there
and lets...


'I,

Ii I
.4


30
AFTER THEIR PEFAT THE
NIGHT EFORE, THE COACH
WANTFP H15 TEAM
TO PO THIS.
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Answer: I
(Answers tomorrow)
Saturday's I Jumbles: CHAOS COMIC SUITOR BANDIT
I Answer: The bandleader feared becoming one as the
storm approached --A CONDUCTOR


ACROSS
1 Joule fraction
4 Daddy
8 Elec. measure
11 Charged
particles
13 Ounce or inch
14 Seek to win
15 No-hitter king
16 Indy
participants
18 Heir's legacy
20 Keep secret
21 Rival
22 So long!
24 Traffic snarl
(hyph.)
27 Spat
30 Fortas and
Lincoln
31 Wis. neighbor
32 Bruce -
of kung fu
34 Navaho
handiwork
35 Mete out
36 Verve
37 Jeans ao-with


39 Bushels
40 Sailor's gp.
41 Cry of disdain
42 Huff and puff
45 Unfired bricks
49 City
ordinance
(2 wds.)
53 Was, to Ovid
54 Ode inspire
55 Neat as -
56 Really bad
57 Yucky stuff
58 Doctrines
59 III. time


Answer to Previous Puzzle


MOD PUPA INCA

LA IS BU D
BUT HIS

AU G ERIE YUCK



RIGTS ASST DOEA



8 "The Bridgeon 19 Outperform

9 Promise neck
10 Nylons 23 and yang
12 Foul-ups 24 Bump hard
Atkins 26 RAM measure
8 "The Bridge on 19 Ou27 Thin gold
m 28 Raines of


____ 31 Poet's new
12 Foul-ups 33 Coast Guard
S Atkins 2635 Insult
Puzzles" books lay36 Bounced back
8 9 1940 38 Shacks
39 Mournful

31 42 Outlet'insert
36 43 Flying prefix
__ __ 44 Billionth, in
combos
46 ced-a-brac
39 M47Cornfield
32 33 41 Chess pieces



46 448 48 Dele canceler
53 50 "Bali -"
51 Vinyl records
---- 52 Intention


D ear Annie: Last June, I re-
tired from the company
where I had worked for 25
years. This past Janu-
ary, I had an unfortu-
nate accident that
resulted in a broken
foot and surgery on
one ankle. I was in the
hospital for four days
and in a rehab facility
for another month.
During my convales-
cence, I kept in touch
with co-workers by e-
mail, text and Face-
book. I also told my AN IN
sister where I was and MAIL
how long I would be
there.
My husband visited every day,
and my 93-year-old father called
frequently I also heard from a
sister-in-law, a niece, two neigh-
bors and three out-of-state
friends. However, you'd think
with all the people I know, some
of them would have made an ef-
fort to contact me. Since return-
ing home, I've received exactly
one Facebook message asking
how I'm doing. What hurts the
most is that my sister has neither
called nor come by
I want to tell my sister how I
feel, but my husband says to for-
get about it. I am still undergoing
physical therapy, and my hus-
band, who has his own limita-
tions, has to lift a wheelchair out
of the trunk every time he takes
me anywhere. He does all of the
household errands and grocery
shopping, as well as emptying my
bedpan. No one offers to help ei-
ther of us.
I am so full of anger and dis-
may that it is impacting my emo-


tional recovery What should I
do? -Alone and Not Liking It
Dear Alone: We agree your sis-
ter is being unsupport-
ive, but you are not
S "alone."
Focus on those who
are in touch and help-
ful your husband,
your father, your sis-
ter-in-law, niece,
neighbors and out-of-
state friends. That's
S more than many peo-
ple have. And some
folks have no idea you
IE'S want help or what you
BOX need unless you tell
them.
Post recovery up-
dates on your Facebook page,
and say how much you appreci-
ate any words of encouragement.
Call your sister and ask (nicely)
whether she could pick up some
groceries for you. We hope, when
given a specific opportunity to
step up to the plate, she will come
through.
Dear Annie: Does a person al-
ways need to confess an affair to
their spouse especially if it
was brief and is now over, and the
spouse has no idea it happened?
Feeling Guilty in Washington
Dear Guilty: Do you think your
spouse could forgive you? Is
there any chance the spouse
could find out down the road?
Might you have contracted an
STD? (Don't assume you haven't.
Get checked.)
We urge you to talk about this
with a counselor who can help
you decide the best course of ac-
tion and work on the issues that
propelled you into having an af-
fair to begin with to make sure it


doesn't happen again.
Dear Annie: I read with great
interest the letter from "Step-
mom," whose husband was irked
that she expected his two teenage
daughters to help pay for expen-
sive new jackets that they wanted
after Christmas.
We raised four children on a
modest income. There were a lot
of requests for us to buy things for
them. I often used the same tac-
tic. Not only did it tell me
whether they wanted the item
enough to pay half, but they also
took better care of those things
they had a financial investment
in. There were times when my
teenage kids did things that left
me baffled as to how to punish
them. I would send them to their
room with instructions to think
about what they'd done and what
they thought their punishment
should be. They usually selected
something much worse than I
would have. The beauty in this
method? They took the punish-
ment without arguing and felt it
was fair. They have grown into
wonderful adults, and I am so
proud of them. NY Mom
--In--
Annie's Mailbox is written by
Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar,
longtime editors of the Ann
Landers column. Email annies
mailbox@comcast.net, or write
to: Annie's Mailbox, c/o Creators
Syndicate, 737 Third St.,
Hermosa Beach, CA 90254. To
find out more aboutAnnie's
Mailbox and read features by
other Creators Syndicate writers
and cartoonists, visit the C
reators Syndicate Web page at
www creators. com.


Bridge

North 04-30-12
4 732
V 75 4
SAK6
A K 5 2
West East
S6 Q J 10 9
V KQJ98 V10 2
+ 1054 J 9 8 3
J 8 6 3 Q 10 7
South
4 AK 8 5 4
VA6 3
+ Q 7 2
94

Dealer: South
Vulnerable: Neither
South West North East
1 Pass 2 4 Pass
2 NT Pass 3 4 Pass
4 Pass Pass Pass


Opening lead: V K


PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

Mark Twain said, "If the world comes to an end,
I want to be in Cincinnati. Everything comes there
10 years later."
If a bridge player goes down in a contract he
thinks he should have made, he will spend some
time trying to work out a winning line. But it won't
take him 10 years; after the first couple, he will
conclude that the contract was unmakeable.
In today's deal, South's job is to win 10 tricks in
four spades. It does not matter how many losers he
has, as long as he takes 10 tricks. South wins West's
heart-king lead with the ace and cashes his two top
trumps, West discarding a heart on the second.
How should declarer continue?
This auction is awkward should North's
three-spade rebid be nonforcing or forcing? I am
in the forcing camp, but obviously if North has, say,
a 3-2-3-5 10-count, he would like it to be nonforcing.
However, that possibility is less likely and risks
contorting a stronger sequence, especially if North
is thinking about a slam.
South seems to have four unavoidable losers:
two spades and two hearts. But how might he take
10 tricks first?
Watch! Declarer cashes dummy's top clubs, ruffs
a club in his hand and takes his three diamond
winners, ending on the board. With nine tricks in,
South calls for the last club.
East is defenseless. If he discards, declarer
trumps for his 10th trick. And if East ruffs with one
of his trump winners, South pitches a heart loser
and concedes only two spades and one heart.


2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


B6 MONDAY, APRIL 30, 2012


ENTERTAINMENT


-i


y






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Peanuts


Garfield


Pickles


Sally Forth

SO YOU'RE SAYING ALICE NOW ONLY POSSIBLY. AT MY AGE 2 WHAT ABOUT W NOT AFTER THE-
SEES ME AS HER BOSS, NO LONGER I CAN'T AFFORD THE OTHER k "PHONE TREE"
HER FRIEND? TO LOSE A SINGLE SCHOOL PARENTS?. INCIDENT OF
FRIEND. AFTER ALL, EIGHT YEARS
WHERE COULD BACK. SOME
1 EVEN MEET CARS NEVER
NEW ONES? HEAL.






Dilbert


For Better or For Worse

LOOK, MIKE- / E E'V GOT0
EJEVE GOT L UMBER,WUHEELS,
ENOUGH STUFF I BOLTS, /
To BL D 3 ,e
Beetle BaiLLHleyi








Beetle Bailey


The Grizzwells


The Born Loser


Kit 'N' Carlyle Rubes


"It's for you."


Blondie

I'D LIKE TO TERRIFIC '
THROW A GREAT) WHAT'S TE L
BIG EXPENSIVE NAME OF YOUR
BASH FOR MY ) ASSOCIATION?,
ASSOCIATESJ J_-^-




/,!f -- ^__^^ i ''


OH, WE'RE JUST A GROUP THAT
GETS TOGETHER TO DISCUSS
*;Mz),--TERM


.V GOONESSl


'~C~EL IT

4

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WELL, OKAY, SUT WOULD YOU)
MIND PAVING IN ADVANCE?^

PAYING
_7 FOR
WHAT?

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i-1+.^ -'^
^" t=9


Dennis the Menace The Family Circus


D I KO FIur Synd
www familycircus corn
"So is it an 'Oh, yes!'
or an 'Oh, no!'?"


Doonesbury


4' Fyp p YoP. s5H
I -. .1 / T OVIE R
L TO TALK TO









Big Nate
EVERY TIME T SEE5 I
MRS CZERWLCKI.
5HE'S or ONE CF/
TNHOE CHeESY
AROM ANCE a i
NOVELS a







Arlo and Janis -


YEAH, REALLY'?
MY MOM WHY?
READS
THOSE ]fc ^
TOO L*/I LOTS
OF-


REA
'EM!-


JJ.'5 601IN6 TO I//ANT TO
HIJACK IT, TURN IT INTO
AN ART PROJECT, LIK6
/ HER EPPIAo6!











ACCORDING TO MY
BOOK OF FACTS, THE
ROKrANCE NOVEL
INtDUSTRY SENERATE5
OVER. t3 BILLION
DOLLARS A YEAR'


GUYS' ARE YOU
THININ4, WHAT
L13,'M TH"'NKINIG ?
YOOR EYES
% LOOK FUNNY.


., t'I


Betty


Frank & Ernest


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377
"Safe" (R) ID required. 1:20 p.m., 4:20 p.m.,
7:20 p.m.
"The Five-Year Engagement" (R) ID required.
1:10 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:15 p.m.
"Pirates! Band of Misfits" (PG) In real 3D.
1:45 p.m., 7 p.m. No passes.
"Pirates! Band of Misfits" (PG) 4:45 p.m.
"The Lucky One" (PG-13) 1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m.,
7:30 p.m.
"The Three Stoges" (PG) 1:40 p.m., 4:40 p.m.,
7:40 p.m.
"The Hunger Games" (PG-13) 1 p.m., 4 p.m.,
7p.m.

Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Safe" (R) ID required. 2 p.m., 5 p.m., 8 p.m.
"Pirates! Band of Misfits" (PG) 1:45 p.m.,


7:15 p.m.
"Pirates! Band of Misfits" (PG) In real 3D.
4:15 p.m. No passes.
"The Five-Year Engagement" (R) ID required.
1:20 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
"The Raven" (R) 1:55 p.m., 4:45 p.m., 7:45 p.m.
"The Lucky One" (PG-13) 1:40 p.m., 4:50 p.m.,
7:50 p.m.
"Think Like a Man" (PG-13) 1:10 p.m., 4:10 p.m.,
7:10 p.m.
"The Three Stoges" (PG) 1:15 p.m., 4:35 p.m.,
7:35 p.m.
"Cabin in the Woods" (R) ID required. 1:30 p.m.,
4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
"The Hunger Games" (PG-13) 1 p.m., 4 p.m.,
7p.m.
Visit www.chronicleonline.com for area movie listings
and entertainment information.


Times subject to change; call ahead.


WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public Local RADIO WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Contemp. WSKY 97.3 FM News Talk WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WXOF-FM 96.3 Adult Mix WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s, '60s, '70s
WEKJ FM 96.7, 103.9 Religious WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WRZN-AM 720 Adult Standards


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: 1V slenbe j


"XAT TDRHTRX XAHLN XB VT HL XAT


KBJZG HR MBY. XAT FBRX GHSSHUYZX


XAHLN XB VT HR KADX BXATJ WTBWZT


KDLX MBY XB VT." ZTB VYRUDNZHD

Previous Solution: "Human kindness is like a defective tap: The first gush may be im-
pressive, but the stream soon dries up." RPD. James
(c) 2012 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 4-30


AFTER ALL,OU' R
S 7UC-AT LER.TRAk
I tN VI


Today's MOVIES


COMICS


MONDAY, APRIL 30, 2012 B7








B8 MONDAY,APRIL 30, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY 0





CH ONICLE Classifieds

www.chronicleonline.com Classifieds In Print and Online All The Time!


BUSINESS HOURS:

MONDAY-FRIDAY

8:00 A.M. 5:00 P.M.

CLOSED SATURDAY/SUNDAY



WE GLADLY ACCEPT

VI. S


Publication Days/Deadlines

Chronicle / Daily..................................... 1 PM, Daily
Homefront / Sunday...............................3 PM, Friday
Chronicle / Sunday.............................4...4 PM, Friday
Chronicle / Monday............................4...4 PM, Friday
Sumter County Times / Thursday............ 11 AM, Tuesday
Riverland News / Thursday.....................2 PM, Monday
South Marion Citizen / Friday..................4 PM, Tuesday
West Marion Messenger / Wednesday.......4 PM, Friday


SWM, Desires SWF 74 +
Yrs. That lives in Crystal
River/Homosassa Area
for Steak night out
and/or Burger on the
dock. Quiet times,
I am a Member of
Elks & VFW, Respond
to Blind Box 1775P
Citrus Co Chronicle
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal Riv. 34429

The Riaht Lady
I'm beginning to think
she doesn't exist. I'm
ready to throw in the
towel after searching
a long time for the
right gal. I'm an ac-
tive widower in de-
cent shape, who
seeks to meet a
happy attractive, af-
fectionate, extro-
verted Christian lady
between 65-75 with a
warm personality, in
good health, slim
build for meaningful
conversation and
other social activities
and perhaps a per-
sonal, loving relation-
ship. Is this asking too
much? If you some-
how fit the bill, give
me a call at
527-0591. I'd love to
hear from you!


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Dept for details
352-563-5966









Youm'world first


Need a job

or a

qualified

employee?



This area's

#1

employment

source!




Classifieds

m e^-^^^


$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
Paid for Junk Vehicles,
J.W. 352-228-9645
$$ CASH PAID $$
For Junk or wrecked
Cars/Trucks, $300 & UP
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL
Appls. Riding Mowers,
Scrap Metal, AC Unit
cell -352-270-4087



DACSHUNDS NEED
HOMES
Older dogs 3-6 yrs old)
need homes. Families
combined, health and
economic stress
cannot care for these
loving pets.
(352) 419-6298
FREE TO LOVING
HOMES ONLY!!!
Free non-working tread-
mill. U pick up in Floral
City. 201-7305
FREE-FREE-FREE-FREE-
CERAMIC MOLDS
MUST TAKE ALL. FLO-
RAL CITY AREA CALL
352-726-4788 FOR DI-
RECTIONS.
KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Savage Pays top $$$.
352-628-4144
ROOSTER
1 yr old
free to good home
(352) 341-0351
TAKING ALL
DONATIONS
CLOTHINQPURSES,SHOES,
BABY
STUFF,FURNITURE,ECT
CONTACT JAMIE @
586-9754 THANK YOU



Apple I Phone
black, left corner
glass shattered
Wal Mart area,
Inverness, REWARD
(352) 726-6234
Black Min. Schnauzer
Needs surgery
Name Leo
Pine Ridge Area
(352) 746-5019
DARK RED SUN ADULT
TRICYCLE lost in vicinity
of Melody Mobile
Home Pk, REWARD for
info.leading to location
(352) 212-5764
Lost
Female Chihuahua
Fawn & White
16 yrs. old, bet. Green
Acres and W. Holi-
day(352) 476-8340







REWARD $1000.
No Questions ask.
Min Pin Female 10 Ibs
name Zoey, Needs
meds. last seen Sun 8/7
Holiday Dr offi Turkey
Oak Crystal River
(352)257-9546400-1519



Keeshound??
Must call to Identify
Indepence Hwy
Inverness
(352) 637-4179


KITTEN
approx 2 to 3 months old
gray w/yellow shadows
wearing pink collar
w/ rhinestones
(352) 621-0341
Young Golden Lab mix
male found near Publix
in Crystal River call
animal shelter



BELLY DANCE AEROBICS
$7/Class, WED. 6P-7P
1925 S.E. US 19, Crystal
River (352) 503-7591
HIGH SCHOOL DI-
PLOMA FROM HOME
6-8 weeks. Accredited.
Get a Diploma. Get a
Job! FREE Brochure.
800-264-8330 Benjamin
Franklin High School.
www.dinolmafrom
home.com
Huge discounts when
you buy 2 types of
advertising! 120 om-
munity newspapers,
32 websites, 26 daily
newspapers. Call
now to diversify your
advertising with Ad-
vertising Networks of
Florida
(866)742-1373




2 Tickets to the Players
Championship, TPC,
Sawgrass, Friday, 5/11
Includes parking
Asking $125.
(352) 527-4910




Kiz "R" RUSS
Preschool

Is looking for Hard
working dependable
employees FT & PT
Certified Only
Apply Within
307 Zephyr Street
Inverness

TEACHER
Fulltime, Exp. Req.
CDA Preferred
TADPOLES EARLY
LEARNING
(352) 560-4222




HAIR STYLIST
to take over clientele,
salary paid while in
training. Must have
experience.
Flexible hours.
Call Diane
352-302-9251










Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
^* ** ** *


000AN2T

Sudoku 4puz.com


9 6 5 _7


7 8 6


6 _347_ 2


58 ___94


62 85


93 67


3 874_ 6


5 3 7


_7 1 2 4

Fill in the squares so that each row, column, and
3-by-3 box contain the numbers 1 through 9.




TRACTOR WORK

$30 + $30/hr Mowing, Grading,

Lite Loader, Tree Work,

Cleanup, and Wood Fences

Licensed and Insured


352-270-6800 |


Cert./Lic CNA
Homosassa Area
352-382-1039




#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)

Avante
At Inverness
is currently looking for
INTERNAL ADMISSION
COORDINATOR
Qualified Canidates
must have
Knowledge of
Medicare, Medicaid
and other Insurances
Must have a
Bachelors Degree
and a minimum of
5 years experience in
long term care.
Knowledge of health-
care regulatory
standards is preferred
Please aply online at
Avantecenters.com
or e-mail Resume to:
mdaniels@
avantecenters.com

DIETARY COOK/
DIETARY AIDE
Cook for 125 Bed
Facility, experience
preferred. Inquire at:
700 SE 8th Avenue
Crystal River, 34429
DFWP, EOE

Exp. Medical Asst
FT For Busy Medical
Office, 3 yrs Exp. req.
Fax resume to Fax
(352) 564-4222
Call (352) 564-0444

F/T CNA's

Shifts: 7a-3p & 3p-1 Ip
For Assistant Living
Facility. Paid by
experience, benefits
avail, aft 60 days.
Vac. accrued after
90 days. Apply in
person @ Brentwood
Retirement Comm.
1900 W.Alpha Ct
Lecanto Fl.
DFWP/EOE

Hospital RN's
Needed
MS/Tele ICU ER Float
www.
nurse-temps.com
352-344-9828

MARKETER
Health Care Co. is
seeking a Marketer
interested in profes-
sional & financial
growth & who also
possess the following
credentials.
Marketing
Experience, Positive
Attitude Good
Communication
Skills, Honesty &
Integrity.Self Confi-
dence & Motivation.
Those interested
individuals meeting
the above credentials
Please submit
resume to PO Box
2498 Inverness Fl
34451 or fax
352-726-2864

MEDICAL BILLING
TRAINEES NEEDED
Train to become a
Medical Office Assis-
tant! No Experience
needed! Job Training
& Local Placement
assistance. HS
Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)374-7294

Medical Office
Needs People
With Experience in
Insurance, Nursing,
and Computers.
SEND RESUME TO:
Citrus Co. Chronicle
Blind Box 1769M
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River
Florida, 34429

P.T. Tech
Part-time position
open for a physical
therapy clinic.
Experience preferred.
Please fax resumes
to (352) 726-7582.



Immediate Need
for non medicare
Home Visits,
Womb care/IV
INTERIM HEALTH CARE
(352) 637-3111





Staff Accountant
Experienced.
Bookkeeping, payroll
Please Send Resume:
Citrus Co. Chronicle
Blind Box 1772P
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River,
Florida 34429


SERVERS
For upscale restaurant
Must be experienced,
neat, professional
and have great
customer service skills
Apply in Person at
2100 N Terra Vista
Blvd. Hernando. or
Phone (352) 746-6727
To make an appt.




Advertising Sales
$1,500 a wk. Comm.
Caliber, a very exciting
program. 352-428-9664
RETAIL SALES
Citrus Co. For $$
Motivated person.
Positive attitude,
strong customer
service. Some
weekend shifts
Send Resume to
Citrus Co. Chronicle
Blind Box #1771 P
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd Crystal River
Florida, 34429

SALES POSITION
No Exp. needed, will
train.Strong personal
skill req.(352)410-6927




25 Driver Trainee's
Needed Now!
Become a driver for
Schneider National!
Earn $800 per week! No
experience needed!
CDL & Job Ready in just
3 weeks!! 888-374-7644
ALUMINUM
WELDER/
FABRICATOR
Experienced Aluminum
Welder with fabrication
skills. Press brake
experience a plus.
352-637-0645
Apply Now, 12 Drivers
Needed Top 5% Pay
2Mos. CDL Class A Driv-
ing Exp. (877)258-8782
www.meltontruck.com
AUTO
COLLISION TECH
352-726-2139 or
637-2258 Aft. 5 pm
CARPENTER
Experience in all phases
of carpentry, remodeling,
framing necessary.
HS Diploma/GED
Valid DL&Reliable Trans.
Call 637-4629
Fax resume 637-3258
DRIVERS
New Freight for
Refrigerated & Dry Van
lanes. Annual salary
$45K to $60k. Flexible
hometime. CDL-A, 3
months current OTR
experience.
800-414-9569
Drivers Wanted
Class a CDL
w/hazmat. Company
& 0/0's. OTR/ Regional
Runs. LOts of Freight to
move! Call
877-893-9645
Experienced OTR
Flatbed Drivers
Earn 50 up to 55 cpm
loaded. $1000 sign on
to qualified drivers.
Home most weekends
Vets welcome
843-266-3731









NEW TO TRUCKING?
Your new career starts
now! 0 Tuition CostnNo
Credit Check Great
Pay & Benefits, Short
employment commit-
ment required
call (866)297-8916
www.ioinCRST.com
SEPTIC TRUCK
DRIVER
A-Able Septic is now ac-
cepting applications for a
septic truck driver. Re-
quirements: Class A CDL
with Tanker End., current
DOT Phy, clean driving
record, ability to lift 150
Ibs. Full time, some
weekends, some OT,
DFWP EOE Pick up an
application at 2190 N
Crede Ave, C.R. Tues-
day through Thursday
9am to 2pm.




CAREGIVERS

All Shifts No Exp.
Necessary Apply At
HOME INSTEAD
SENIOR CARE
4224 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Lecanto

Front Desk
Receptionist
& Locker Room
Attendant/
Housekeeper

For Upscale
Spa & Fitness Center


2125W Skyview
Crossing, Hernando.


FLORAL DESIGNER
Exp. only! Needed
for Holiday & possi-
ble P/T. 352-726-9666
Potential to Generate
$4000. to $20,000. or
more a month with this
activity. No selling.
Experience financial
& time freedom. Call
352-445-1385 Financial
FreedomWav.info.
Sincere Animal/Ranch
Caretaker.
Live on property 1
person, Rm & board +
352-220-1296
SUMMER WORK
GREAT PAY!
Immed FT/PT
openings, customer
sales/serv, will train,
conditions apply, all
ages 17+, Call ASAP!
352-508-4577

TECHNICIAN
NEEDED

Must have 2 yrs. exp.
working with animals
and people.
Send Resume to
Citrus Co. Chronicle
Blind Box 1770P
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River
Florida 34429
TRUSS BUILDERS
Experienced preferred.
call Bruce Component
Systems, Inc.
(352) 628-0522 Ext 15



#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)



AIRLINES ARE HIRING -
Train for hands on
Aviation Maintenance
Career. FAA approved
program.
Financial aid if qualified
Housing Available.
CALL Aviation Institute
Of Maintenance.
(866)314-3769



#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)
Attend College
Online from Home
*Medical, *Business,
*Paralegal,
*Accounting,
*Criminal Justice. Job
placement assis-
tance. Computer
available. Financial
Aid if qualified. Call
888-203-3179
www.CenturaOnline
.com
Can You Dig It?
We will train, certify
and provide lifetime
assistant landing work.
Hiring in Florida. Start
digging as a heavy
equipment operator
866-362-6497



TAYLOR COLLEGE


NE fW


2 WEEK
PREP COURSES!
*ALF ADMINISTRATOR
$300.
*EKG TECH $475.
*NURSING ASST. $475.
*PHLEBOTOMY $475.
tavlorcollege.edu
(352) 245-4119
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352-263-2744




Pizza/Sub Biz
inside Cony. Store all
equip NEW. Ready to
go only $22K
(352) 637-1488




FOR SALE
BLIND CLEANING
and RETAIL SALES
20 Years Reputation
$2,995 Dr. Mini Blinds
Call (352) 637-1900


STERLING SILVER-
COLLECTOR BUYING
STERLING SILVER
FLATWARE & ITEMS.
KEN 352-601-7074












Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





DRYER whirlpool white
looks good works great
100.00 352 503 7365
Kenmore Electric stove,
dishwasher and small
apartment size
refrigerator all in good
working order $125.
(352) 382-1830
Kenmore Washer &
Whirlpool Dryer
Works great
$200.
(352) 637-0397
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR, washers
dryers,FREE pick up
352-564-8179
WANTED DEAD
OR ALIVE
Washers & Dryers
(352) 209-5135




COMPUTER PRINTER
STAND OR T.V. STAND
28 high. 20 wide. 15 deep
In good condition $15.00
352-726-0686
HEAVY STEEL DESK
22x42has 5 drawers
needs paint $40
352-586-8657




10" Craftsman Radial
Arm Saw,
w/ stand, used 1 day,
New $1,600 Asking $500
10" Cut Off Saw, $50.
Framing Saw $100
(352) 621-1207
Delta Band Saw 14"
w/stand $200. DeWalt
Comp. mittersaw 10"
w/stand $150. Crafts-
man 10" band saw
w/stand $85.
many handtools (352)
419-7368/601-5119




SONY 13 INCH TV
WITH REMOTE Very
good condition
$20.00 o.b.o.
352-726-0686




2 yrs. old Dell
Laptop Computer,
used very little. Inspiron
Windows 7, 4Gig, 13"
screen & camera asking
$350
Memorex DVD Player
w/ remote like new $25.
Call 352-419-5362


2 9 36 1 5 4 7 83
147'28g635
658347,912
8sa: 73 2 9 4
7 6 2 4 9 1 8 5 3
93 4528 167
31 9,8 7 4 5 2'6
4 2 5 9 3 6 7 8 1
817 6 1 G52 3-4 9


Towers from $70up.
complete systems
$110 (352) 586-6891
AUTO DC TO AC
CONVERTER FOR
COMPUTER, ETC.
12VDC to 120VAC 140
Watts. $20 352 726 9983
COMPUTER
DELL Desktop, windows,
XP, office $100.
Compaq Laptop win-
dows XP $75 /352
628-6806 228-0568
DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469



MUST SELL
2 sm pick ups
2 forklifts
27' cabin cruiser
Many other items
Make offers
352-563-1033
352-601-0819



CONCRETE LAWN OR-
NAMENT Japanese lan-
tern $45 352-860-0444



2 Twin beds
Headboards
w/cottage grey shell
pattren w/metal
frames, matt & bx
springs $700 Wooden
Computer desk
w/hutch top $200.
(352) 527-7885
50's Style Dining Table,
black & white chrome,
+ 4 blk./white chrome
vinyl chairs, 1 leaf, ex-
cel. cond. $450 obo
+ acutal 50's yellow &
chrome dinette set
w/ 2 yellow vinyl and
chrome chairs $50.
(414) 379-3390
BEDROOM SET
F/Q Bed, Dresser
w/mirror,Chest,
Nightstand. $650.00
obo.(352)563-1692 or
ewaldu51@embarqmail.c
om
COMFORTS OF HOME
USED FURNITURE www.
comfortsofhomeused
furniture.com 795-0121
Couch & loveseat
set $350.
(352) 613-5594
COUCH
Traditional, Hunter
Green Brocade,approx
90"long, Exc Cond. $100
(352) 382-4559
Entertainment Center
Lighted 10'wide 79' tall
incl TV stand area
46" W 45" T $1500
(352) 527-7885
Flex Steel Sofa 80"
burgundy/grn leaf like
new $1500 2 matching
chairs available
(352) 527-7885
LAZY BOY Dble sofa
bed, hunter's green
$250. 60"x42" Wooden
Oval pedestal table
w/4 chrs. $500
(352) 527-7885
LIFT CHAIR
Brown, good condition
$175 obo
(352) 341-8417


Loveseat
sage.$200 brown
recliner $100. Lovely Kit
set 4 chairs on coasters
$200. wood baby
dressing table $75.
wooden end tables $35
ea. All show rm cond
(352) 795-0363
Matching Sofa &
Loveseat, brown tweed,
good condition,
New coffee & end
tables $325. obo
352-302-8265
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
352-628-0808
SOFA, LOVESEAT
Light pattern, Striped
$300 set, Glass coffee
table, light wood, $250
obo. (352) 613-7941
TV 27 "
good condition
$50 (352) 613-7941
TWO END TABLES
$125, WALL UNITS,
Call for $$$$$$$$$
(352) 613-7941
Two extra long
twin Mattress's
Like New $100. obo
(352) 794-3672
USED QUEEN MAT-
TRESS SET Clean and
non-smoker $100.
352-257-5722 for details
USED TWIN MATT SET
Clean, non-smoker
$75.00 352-257-5722 for
details



Craftsman Heavy Duty
Electric Landscape
Edger $50
Craftsman 22" large
rear wheels, self
propelled lawn mower
$125. (352) 615-4037
(352) 341-3991
Garden Tractor
Murry 20hp V-twin B&S
eng.48" mulching deck
$400 firm.
(352) 302-6069
Weed Eater One
Riding mower, new last
season, tuned up &
ready mow asking $450
obo (765) 318-1156



2 BARSTOOLS BAM-
BOO LOOKING PLUSH
RUST COLORED
SEATS 30"to top of seat
50.00 pr. 464 0316
12 x24 ft.
Top of the Line
Above Ground Pool,
Excellent Condition
$800 obo
(352)465-3175
BANTAMS 4 mixed
bantams 9 weeks old $8.
352-563-2288
Bevel Glass Mirror
20x32in oak frame
25x45 $8.
13" Sylvania color TV
w/remote $25.
(352) 746-9399

0000000
CEMETERY PLOTS
2 cemetery plots and
vaults for sale in The
Fountains Memorial Park
Valor Section,
Homosassa, FL $5,000
or best offer.
352-368-2358


SINGLE COPY


NEWSPAPER ROUTE


AVAILABLE.
There is an immediate opportunity for a single
copy independent contractor to service racks
and businesses in the Citrus County area.


S V Early Morning

Hours


V' Need reliable

vehicle


-V Must be 18

years old


kv/4v/4v/ :-]m[.[.rlB
I
TOADVERTISEoCALL:
352P563Bni66

OR PACE YOUR A 1 1NLINE AT



www^hronclenlin^co


(ONE(IN TH RGH


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BIKE STAND Can hold
3 bikes on each side
$20.00 352-344-2321
Boat, RV, Car
Storage indoor $75.
month (352) 637-1739
GALLONS OF PAINT
assorted colors,left over
from several projects
$25.00 352-344-2321
Janome Memory Craft
4800 Sewing Machine
Koala Cub, bleached
oak cabinet $425.
Kenmore Model 1913
Zigzag Sewing Machine
& Cabinet $75
(352) 615-4037
(352) 341-3991
MANS BROWN SUIT
New w/tags size 46 pants
can be hemmed to any
length pants $15.00
352-382-7329
MULCH FOR YOUR
GARDEN OR BUSHES
ONLY 20.00 U LOAD
YOUR PICK UP
464 0316
ORIGINAL SCRUBBING
BUBBLES BANK
Collectors.bank in original
box and new condition.
$50.00 352-382-7329
SIEMANS OVER THE EAR
HEARING AID
Good Condition
Includes batteries
Paid $825. Asking $400
(352) 382-3879
SPARE "DONUT" TIRE
2006 Merc. Grand Marq.
Donut spare. Never
Used. $25.00
352-489-6840
SWIVEL DESK CHAIR
With adjustable
arms,back and height.
Good condition.
$20.00 352-382-7329
TOW DOLLY AND
SMALL REFRIGERA-
TOR Like new tow dolly
$700
Like new small
refrigerator $50 Call
352-207-3512
TRUCK BED
EXTENDER Fits Nissan
Frontier $75.
352-344-2321
TRUCK TOOLBOX
black,fits Nissan Frontier
$30. 352-344-2321
WOOD FLOORING
Med. Oak-Tongue &
Groove Planks 3" x 3/8"
New in box 25 sq ft $55
352-382-3650




BRUNO POWER LIFT for
Scooter or Wheelchair
Programmed,
Exc Shape $400 obo
352-613-7302 or
352-613-4673
EMWAVE PERSONAL
STRESS RELIEVER BY
HEARTMATH. Like New
$75 352 726 9983
Jazzy Select Elite
Power chair, new never
used cost $3500 new
sell $1500 352 613-6173
MANUAL WHEELCHAIR
WITH FOOTRESTS AND
LEG EXTENTIONS
ONLY 100.00 464 0316












STERLING SILVER-
COLLECTOR BUYING
STERLING SILVER
FLATWARE & ITEMS,
KEN 352-601-7074




#24 JEFF GORDON
ELECTRIC GUITARLES
PAUL STYLE PLAYS
GREAT! $75
352-601-6625




ELECTRIC TREADMILL
VERY STABLE doesn't
fold up works fine only
100.00 464 0316
Treadmill, Sears
good condition
Paid $600.Asking $250
Stationary Bicycle,
Sears, Never Used $75.
(352) 794-6320


EXERCISE BIKE upright
type stationary, compact
only 75.00 464 0316




1997 Litespeed Ulti-
mate 58CM Polished Ti-
tanium, Road Bicycle
$900. (352) 726-2645
CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pond, ATV
trails Price Reduced
352 795-2027/ 634-4745
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238

GOLF CART
Yamaha,
$800 obo
(352) 795-1902
GOLF CLUBS,
LOTS of sets & singles,
equipment, technical
manuals to make
golf clubs $800 obo
(352) 621-3133
TENT
Outdoor Spirit 18' x
10.5', dome, sleeps 10,
brand new, $100
(352) 563-0106

WE BUY GUNS
On Site Gun Smithing
(352) 726-5238




18' Enclosed Cargo
side door, rear swing
doors, 4 wheel electric
brakes, good cond
$2800 Bob after 5pm
(352) 860-1106
4X8 UTILITY TRAILER
like new,wire mesh
floor,wood sides,ramp
gate,bought 2011 $575.
352-344-2321

EZ PULL TRAILERS,
New & Used

Utility & Enclosed
BUY, SELL, TRADE
Custom Built, Parts,
Tires, Whis, Repairs,
Trailer Hitches

New 6 x 12 open
utility w/ramp $935
2010 7x18 enclosed
$2595.
2010 8.5 x 20
encl.w/xtra's
$4295

Trailer Tires from
$34.49

Hwy 44 Crystal River
352-564-1299

GULF TO LAKE
TRAILER SALES

Largest Selection &
Lowest Prices.
Offering New & Used
Cargo & utility trailers

Triple Crown Utility TRL
6 x 12 w/new spare
$1050.
6 x 12 Enclosed w/
V nose, rear ramp
door, $1995.

Trailer Tires
starting at $69.95

352-527-0555
Hwy 44, Lecanto


Sell r Swa


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
*{{^^^^if-


JUNK MOTORCYCLES
WANTED Will Pay up to
$200 for Unwanted Mo-
torcycle 352-942-3492




STERLING SILVER-
COLLECTOR BUYING
STERLING SILVER
FLATWARE. $1,000 &
UP ON SERVICE FOR 8.
KEN 352-601-7074

TOOLS OF ANY
value, rods, reels,
tackle, collectibles,
hunt equip352 613-2944

WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area.
Condition or Situation.
Call (352) 726-9369






ALPINE COACH 2001,
37', 2 slides, 330 cum-
mins turbo, loaded with
options and includes 18'
add a room. Warranty for
5 years or 80K miles!
$55,000 or BRO, no
trades. 207-852-5926






BEAGLE PUPPIES
$125
Crystal River Area
386-344-4218
386-344-4219

Dachshunds, Mini Long
Hair ,8 wks, H/C CH
Bid. LinesChoc. Black/
cream shadded Eng.
Cream $300-$500 (352)
795-6870/220-4792


DESIGNER BREED
Shih-Poo, Yorkie -Poo
small non shedding,
intellect puppies $350
to $500 (352) 817-4718


KITTENS & CATS
MANY BREEDS
All neutered, micro chip,
tested, shots some
declawed $85-$150
352-476-6832


Koi and Gold Fish
FOR SALE, Great Prices
ALL SIZES. Call Jean
(352) 634-1783


Shih-Tzu Pups, ACA
starting@ $400. Lots of
colors, Beverly Hills,
FL (352)270-8827
www.aceofpups.net






BARN MASTERS
We Build..Horse Stalls
BarnsFences..Decks..
Pastures.(352) 257-5677


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
r{{'{ r -hA #


PIGLETS
Born 2/27,
$50. ea.
954-295-3055




C.R/Homosassa
1& 2 Br. furn, quiet park
Util. Incl. clean, shrt/long
term 352 220-2077
HOMOSASSA
2/1, $450. mo. + sec.
(352) 344-5457
INVERNESS
RENT SPECIAL: 55+ park
on the water w/5 piers
for fishing and
enjoyment, clubhouse,
onsite shuffleboard, &
much more! 1 BR home
$325 2BR home $450,
includes H20. 2 BR, 1.5
bath, Park Model $500.
1/1 furn. w/CH/A,
on the water, $600.
Section 8 accepted.
(352) 476-4964
OLD HOMOSASSA
2 bedroom. 1-1/2 bath.
UNDER NEW MANAGE-
MENT Cedars Lake MH
and RV park with 1 and 2
bedroom mobile homes
and RV sites available
call:628-4441
cedarslakepark@aol.com




1/1 remodshed $5k
1/lscrnrm/carprt $6k
2/1 carprt/rf.over $7k
turn, move-in ready
55+ park, clean quiet
Close to shopping
CR/Homossasa area
Owner Financing
Owner 352-220-2077

BOOM!!
New 3/2 Jacobsen
home 5 yr. Warranty
$2,650 down, Only
$297.44/mo.
Fixed rate! W.A.C,
Come & view
352-621-9182

CRYSTAL RIVER 2/2,
extremely reasonable,
owner finance $27,000
(352) 564-8057
HERNANDO Las Brisas
Mobile Home Park, 55+,
2/2, Furnished, clean,
own your own lot, Car-
port, attached shed,
club house, heated
pool, Priced to sell.
765-212-0348

NEED A NEW HOME?
Over 30 homes on
display. Bad credit
O.K. I fiance any-
body, good rates.
Use your land as your
down or trade anyth-
ing of value, trade
cars, boats, jewelry,
guns, etc. Call for
private interview
352-621-3807 After
hours 352-613-0587

NEW DEALER REPO
Beautiful 3/2 with
over 1600 sq. ft.
Includes appliance
pkg, delivery & set up
ONLY $59,900 or
5% down & $454/mo.
WAC 352-621-3807

ONLY $284.42
PER MONTH
A New 2/2 Home
On your lot,
Only $500 down. This
is a purchase W.A.C
Call to See
352-621-9181

Palm Harbor Homes
4/2 from $499 mo
Loaded. 3/2 from
$399 mo Loaded.
Homes on your lot
0 down.
800-622-2832 X 210

USED HOME/REPO'S
Doublewides from
$8,500.
Singwides from
$3,500.
New Inventory Daily
352-621-9183




Homossassa 2/2
nicely furnished
MH on canal, dock,
fenced yard,
W/D,shed short/long
term 1st/lst/sec $850
352-220-2077


CLASSIFIED




CRYSTAL RIVER
4/2, on 5 Acres,
15 X 30 family room,
w/wet bar, fireplace.
Reduced $139,500.
(352) 465-8346
HERNANDO 2/2 DW
On lot, with Shed & Deck
See for yourself at
2562 N. Treasure Pt.
$29,900 obo
352-464-0719
HOMOSASSA
3/2, Fenced Yard,
NEW Flooring, $5000
Down, $435
(352) 302-9217




61 S. Atkins Terr.
Lecanto Very Nice 2 bed-
room. 1 bath. Mobile
Home in clean 55+ Park,
This is in very good con-
dition. Central Air And
Heat. New refrigerator,
Mostly Furnished. $230
park rent. $7500 Neg.
Please call 352-302-6586

1/1 remod, shed $5k
1/I scrnrm/carprt $6k
2/1 carprt/rf.over $7k
furn, move-in ready
55+ park, clean quiet
Close to shopping
CR/Homossasa area
Owner Financing
Owner 352-220-2077



CRYSTAL RIVER
VILLAGE 55+
A SUPER BUY /22/den
1457sq.ft 05 Hmof Merit,
all appliances, carport,
Ig screen room, im-
maculate $39,900
(352)419-6926
HOMOSASSA'S
Best Housing Value
Modern homes from
$8,400 or Lease to Own
from $139/mo.
$800.down + Lot rent at
Evanridge Community
an exceptional 55+Park
352 628-5977
INVERNESS
55+ Park on the water
w/5 piers for fishing &
enjoyment, clubhouse,
onsite shuffleboard, and
much more! 2 BR 1.5 BA
for $2.900. 352-476-4964
PARK MODEL
nice 1 BR, CHA Irg encl
sun rm.cov porch on
Lake Rousseau, boat
parking $12K obo
(386) 451-9266
SINGLEWIDE
1/1, 55 +, Park on Lake,
5 piers to fish from, must
be approved $1500
(352) 344-9705
STONEBROOK 55+
2/2, totally remodeled,
furnished, w/Washer
& Dryer.... $5K
(352) 634-1171
Stoneridge Landing
55+ Comm. Resales
starting @$13,500
Financing avail
1-800-779-1226
(352) 637-1400
WESTWIND VILLAGE 55+
Park. Updated 2/2 DW's
for sale. Reasonable
(352) 628-2090














835 NE Hwy 19
Crystal River, Fl
(352) 795-0021
View our website
C21 NatureCoast.com

CHASSAHOWITZKA
3/2 Wtrfront DW, $600.
3/2 Furnished DW., $600
2/2 DW $500
Agent (352) 382-1000


ll1 1 1 111
IIIIIIN 11 l FJ II


HOMOSASSA
1BR, Scrn. Porch, Boat
Dock, Stove, refrig. W&D,
cable, until. incld. $600.
mo.+ sec., 352-628-6537
INVERNESS
2 bedroom- 1-1/2 bath
VILLA- lanai, quiet, adj.
to State Park, commu-
nity pool, lawn svc.,
55+Adult, financially
secure, ref./dep. rq. Will
consider lease w/option
to buy. $650/mo.
727 862 3264 aft.5p, or
leave. msg.
forrkoen@hotmail.com




Alexander Real Estate
(352) 795-6633

Crystal River Apts
2 BR/1 BA $375-$500

BEVERLY HILLS
1 Room Efficiency +
Kitchen. All Utilities,
Cable included
$525 mo. pet ok
352- 228-2644

CRYSTAL RIVER
Large.2/1 incl water
sewer, W/D hook up
$475 (352)212-9205
INVERNESS
1/1 $400 2/1.. $500.
near hosp352-422-2393
INVERNESS
2/1, Tri-plex, Great Loc.,
clean & roomy. no pets
$500.mo $300. Sec.
352-341-1847




FLORAL CITY
STOREFRONT 1000 Sq Ft
Ideal location, corner
Hwy 41 &48. $595 mo.
813-310-5391




CRYSTAL RIVER
Appealing Professional
Office Space for Rent
800 sf, down town, CR
W. of US 19 Avail. May 1
Furnishing Avail.
(352) 422-6579




SUGARMILL
WOODS 2/2/1
furnished, short or long
term.River Links
Realty(352) 628-1616




HOMOSASSA
1/1 Non-smoker. $425
Fst/Sec. Pets? 795-0207
INVERNESS
2/1, Clean, W/D Hk.-up,
No pets, No smoking
$550mo. (352)220-4818




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225





CRYSTAL RIVER
1, 2 & 3 Bedrms Furn. &
Unfurn. Like New Wkly,
Mnth Yrly 352-302-1370


INVERNESS
East Cove Waterfront,
furn., 2/2, C/A carport,
shed, $650
352-476-4964




BEVERLY HILLS
2/1 carport, remodeled
$575 first, last, sec
(786)286-1163

BEVERLY HILLS
Lg. 2/2/1, + Fm. Rm
$635. mo. 352-795-1722

BEVERLY HILLS
RENT TO OWN, 2/1 '2/1 ,
$2,800 Down, $545. mo.
(352) 726-9369

CITRUS SPRINGS
RENT OR RENT TO OWN
This is a real cutie!
$649. Move-In Special
3Bed/1 /2 Bath/garage
tiled, spotless, Pets ok.
352-527-0493

DUNNELLON 3/2/2
Rent to Own, Rent or
Buy Fabulous Home
Across City Beach
2 Fire Plces, wooden firs
www.rublesrentals.com
(561) 575-1718
(561) 719-8787

HOMOSASSA
2/1 CHA, No pets
$575. mo. 1st + sec
(352) 628-4210

HOMOSASSA
2/1 Nice neighborhood
$600. mo. 239-272-9230

HOMOSASSA
2/2/1, $650/mo. Pets ok
fst/Ist/sec 352-434-1235

HOMOSASSA
Dup 1/1 $250, 2/1 $450
SMW Imm 3/2/2 no pets
ref's req. $850.
River links Realty
(352) 628-1616



Inver/Highlands.
Large 1 Family 2.8 acs
fenced, 2700 sq ft U/A
4 BR 3 BA, 16x34 pool,
costly updates Under


Homosassa
3/1.5..$675 + sec.
(352) 746-3073
PINE RIDGE 4/2/2
pool/g.course avail
5/15, $1250/m 746-7716




CRYSTAL RIVER
FURNISHED, water-
front 1 BR or 2BR,
Laundry ,Boatslip,
Lanai Pets? $850
352-220-6593

HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225
Homossassa 2/2
nicely furnished
MH on canal, dock,
fenced yard,
W/Dshed short/long
term 1 st/lst/sec $850
352-220-2077
INVERNESS
East Cove Waterfront,
furn., 2/2, C/A carport,
shed, $650
352-476-4964




INVERNESS
Phone, pool incl. $110
wk. (352) 419-2480




CITRUS SPRINGS
Lease or Rent to Own
3/3/2'/2, Custom Pool
Home on acre $799.
Special. 1st last dep.
bkgrd Ck 352-489-3997
CRYSTAL RIVER
for sale/lease purchase
3/2, fenced yd. water
access, huge lanai
remodeled, $875. mo
404-867-1501, Local
CRYSTAL RIVER
Office/home 4/2,
zoned commercial
perfect for someone
who needs office &
home $895 rent /sell
$99,50 Owner financing
w/$10K dn. call Paul
(352) 746-9585

Rooms^^^
For'?TTtff


INVERNESS
Room for Rent, until. inc.
share dbl wide w/two
tenants $325
(352) 726-0652




C.R/Homosassa
1& 2 Br. furn, quiet park
Util. incl. clean, shrt/long
term 352 220-2077





CRYSTAL RIVER
1, 2 & 3 Bedrms Furn. &
Unfurn. Like New Wkly,
Mnth Yrly 352-302-1370





PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ille-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination. "
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.


FLORAL CITY www.plantation contract for $250K tak- "
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm. rentals.com ing too long to close, INVERNESS
AC, Clean, No Pets 352-795-0782 or will consider offers. Rm w/Priv. ba, $85. wk A HU
(352) 344-1025 866-795-0784 Owner 452-419-7017 no smoke 352-586-9932


(352) 44-102


ROB SCREENING
Repairs Rescreen, Front
Entries, Garage, Sliders
Free Est. 352-835-2020




SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Washer &
Dryers, Free Pick Up
352-564-8179




Blind Factory
by Joanne We custom
make all types. Best
prices anywhere! Hwy
44 & CR 491. 746-1998





YOU'LL THIS!
Assisted
Living,Secured
unit,Memory care for
Alzheimer/Dementia
Crystal Gem Manor
10845 W. Gem St.
Crystal River, Fl 34428
352-794-7601


LIC. & EXP. CNA
Will Care For You
Cook, Clean & Daily
Needs (352) 249-7451

Loving Adult Care
Home (SL 6906450)
Alzheimer/Dementia
no prob 352-503-7052




ROGERS Construction
All Construction
sm jobs Free Est (352)
637-4373 CRC1326872


Clean Ups &
Clean Outs
(352) 220-9190




AFFORDABLE
COMPUTER SERV.
(352) 341-4150

Computer Problems?
Sr. Discount-In home
service. John Warken
(352) 503-4137
COMPUTER TUTOR!!
Do you have a computer
and wish you knew how
to use it more? Need to
know how to do navigate
the web better or manage
a social network profile?
Private lessons in my
home office (Homosassa)
or yours (Citrus County)
727-614-2685
DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469




Bianchi Concrete
inc.com ins.lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-
Sidewalks. Pool deck
repair/stain 257-0078
CURB APPEAL/ Lic
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River rock
reseals & repairs. 352
364-2120/410-7383
FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, staining &
Garage Firs. Recession
Prices! 352-527-1097
ROB'S MASONRY
& CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs Tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554


All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling,
Site Prep, Driveways.
Lic. & Ins. 352- 795-5755




COUNTY WIDE DRY-
WALL -25 ys exp lic2875.
all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Pop Corn Removal
352-302-6838




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Plasma TV installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
ANNIE'S ELECTRIC
Husband & Wife
Team.(352) 341-5952
EC-13002696
BRIGHT ELECTRICAL
Res./Comm. Lic & Ins.
$50.hr. EC0001303
352-302-2366
CREATION ELECTRIC:
Full service contractor.
Residential & commer-
cial specialist. Service
changes, large or small
repairs, Spa hookups &
more. Lic/Ins.
352-427-4216.
DUN-RITE Elect
since '78/ Free Est.
licEC 13002699
352- 726-2907




A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002

BOB BROWN'S
Fence & Landscaping
352-795-0188/220-3194


Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
352 422-7279 *



ALUMINUM
STRUCTURES
5" & 6" Seamless Gutters
Free Estimates, Lic &
Ins. (352) 563-2977
GUTTER CLEANING
FREE ESTIMATES
352-362-5187



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Plasma TV installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
Andrew Joehl
Handyman.
Gen/Maint/Repairs
Pressure cleaning.
Lawns/Gutters. No job
too small!Reli able ,ins.
0256271 352-465-9201
ABC Painting &
Handyman Services.
Low rates Free Est.
Dale 352-586-8129
Affordable Handyman
V FAST
AFFORDABLE
v' RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handyman
V FAST
FeAFFORDABLE
P RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handyman
v FAST
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *


Affordable Handyman
oe FAST
AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *k
Remodeling, Additions,
Doors, Windows, Tile
work. Lic.#CRC1330081
Free Est. (352)949-2292





V' THIS OUT!
AC & HEAT PUMPS
FREE Estimate & 2nd
Opinion, 10yr warr.
on ALL Parts, Great
prices, ALL the time.
352-400-4945
Lic #CAC027361





Citrus Cleaning
Tecm
Reasoantbe
Rates. Stacy
527-2279

Citrus Cleaning
Tecm
Recsooable
Rates. Stacy
527-2279

Citrus Cleaning
Team Reasonable
Rates. Stacy 527-2279

MAID TO ORDER
House Cleaning *
(352) 586-9125
have vacuum will travel


mB

The Tile Man
Bathroom remodel
Specializing in handi-
cap. Lic/Ins. #2441.
352-634-1584



All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
All AROUND TRACTOR

352-795-5755






CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, curbing,
flocrete. River rock
reseals & repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
Florida Sitescapes, LLC
FREE Est: Yard Clean Up
Mowing, and MORE
CALL 352-201-7374
RIVENBARK LAWN &
LANDSCAPE.
Best Prices in town for
all your lawn care
needs!! (352) 464-3566
| SPRINKLER JOE'S
Complete Sys. Check
$25, Landscape
Design 352-212-2596




A + LAWN CARE
& LANDSCAPING
Affordable & Reliable
(352) 228-0421
All 'n'1 Lawncare
property maintence
Full serv$55/mo.lic/ins
Rick 352-201-5193
Charlie 352-634-1070


AFFORDABLE Lawn care
CUTS STARTING AT $20
WE DO IT ALL!!!
*CALL 352-228-7320 v
ATTENTION! Snow Birds
Need your Lawn Maint.
Call Mowing & More...
352-419-6287, Lic/Ins.
Florida Sitescapes, LLC
FREE est: Yard Clean Up
Mowing, and MORE
Call 352.201.7374
JUSTIN LAWN CARE
Hedge & Tree Trimming
Lic. (352) 476-3985
Lawncare N More
Floral City to Bev. Hills
mow, trim haul $20 up
(352) 726-9570
MEAGHERS LAWN CARE
AND PINK MINI DUMP
Tree Service, Stump
Grinding, Free Est.
(352) 341-3478




AT YOUR HOME
Mower, Parts Service &
Repair.Visit our store@
1332 SE Hy 19 220-4244



A-I Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs, trash,
lawn maint. furn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
ALL OF CITRUS
CLEAN UPS CLEAN OUTS
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790




Chris Satchell Painting
ASAP
30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996


ABC Painting &
Handyman Services,
Low rates, Free Est.
Dale 352-586-8129
INTERIOR/IEXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
ABC Painting &
Handy an Services,
low rates Free Est.
Dale 352-586-8129
Pic PICARD'S Pressure
Cleaning & Painting
352-341-3300




Attention Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers are
required by state law
to include their state
license number in all
advertisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious that
you may be contact-
ing an unlicensed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For questions
about business
licensing, please call
your city or county gov-
ernment offices.


SPRINKLER JOE'S
Complete Sys. Check
$25, Landscape
Design 352-212-2596




A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest Rates
Free est.(352)860-1452
All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
DOUBLE J Tree Serv.
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
R WRIGHT Tree Service
Tree removal & trimming.
Ins. & Lic.# 0256879
352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree Serv
Trim, Shape & Remove
Lic/Ins Free Est.
352-628-2825



344-2556, Richard
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


MONDAY,APRIL 30, 2012 B9


.1


-" '-




LaughingStock International Inc, Dist by Universal UCIck for UFS, 2012

"I'll have the same as yesterday -
spaghetti and golf balls."


Reroofs Any Repairs r

Complete Home Inspections


I









BIO MONDAY,APRIL 30, 2012




W R U BY TRICKY RICKY KANE
1. Money owed for a plane (1) Every answer is a rhyming
1Money owe or apne pair of words (like FAT CAT
and DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
2. "Mad Men" star Jon's con games (1) theywill fit in the letter
-_-_-_-_ ---- squares. The number after the
FT TT _ definition tells you how many
3. Place potter's mud on a scale (1) syllables in each word.

I IIIIIII2012 UFS, Dist.bytUniv.UicklorUFS
4. Lemon-colored string instrument (2)


5. Seuss creature's cleansing agents (3)


6. Gratuity giver to Gilligan's boss (2)


7. Actress Keira in a sunny way (2)


4-30-12


CITRUS COUNTY
3BED/2Bath
Make Offers
352-563-9857





Cashiers NC, 2 BR, I1BA,
Cabin on 2 Acres
Updated, private rd.
private well, approx.
4K elevation. $170.000,
352-341-0336
Cell, 352-586-8946





"FREE foreclosure
and short sale lists


AIHOIHH A XLHDIKNH L HIdd lL IddlHS '9 SHXV1IOH SXVHO '9
OTIaJ MOTAI 1 VIJ3 HDIUAM S"KVS SSIIVHI'I 1lU ,P 'I
SHAMSKNV


*Residential Roto-Cl ai
* Commercial
Cleaning Service
* VCT Stripping
Wax
c./Ins. Carpet & Tile


SUPER SPECIAL
S3-Rooms S 400
I p to 250 so. it. each/ 0 0 -
Deep Cleaned Nof vao A ard is lrnE! I0 I.
& Deodorized xo...s5119112 Coupon Required.
First Room Of ScotchgardTM is Free! I '


FARMS, LAND,
COMMERCIAL
UNIQUE &
HISTORIC HOMES,
SMALL TOWN
COUNTRY LIFESTYLE
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989


"LIFE IS BETTER
WITH A PORCH"

crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.





Specializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches &
Commercial








Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com


Oakwood Village
820 Sunset Strip
3/2/1, 1747 sf. New kit./
baths, flooring, paint,
in/out. Pix/Info
gcjcinc.com $79,900
(352) 527-1239




2/2 villa
The Landings, new
Trane a/c & new lanai
screen porch,$58K
cell (352) 400-8130
HIGHLANDS
Lrg.2/2- 4 car garage
pool, game room,
mud room, on triple lot
fenced, price to sell
$65,500 (352) 564-4598



---


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work For You!

BETTY HUNT,
REALTOR
ERA KEY 1 Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.


Best Time To Buy!
I have lease options,
owner financing
Waterfront and
foreclosures
call Phyllis Strickland
(352) 613-3503
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.


Michele Rose. Realtor
Simply put I 'II work
harder 352-212-5097
isellcitruscountvd)
vahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515


Office Open
7 Days a Week

Lisa VanDeboe
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com





CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pond,ATV
trails Price Reduced
352 795-2027/ 634-4745





FLORAL CITY
1.33 acre nice lot on
dead end.Have survey
and clear title.listed 10k
below county land
value.Zoned rural
residential.See at 8678 s
greenhouse
ter.$16500.o.b.o.
813-792-1355











LOTS FOR

SALE!
6 Citrus Springs Lots
Available, Owner Fin.
or Cash Discounts
Provided. Great
Investment Opprty.
803-403-9555
803-403-9557





CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pond,ATV
trails Price Reduced
352 795-2027/ 634-4745


For more information on how to reach C TCTTRU \ CT O I
Citrus County readers call
S352-563-5592. www.chronicleonline.com
mm. srst 20o10


CLASSIFIED




CHASSAHOWITZKA
DBL. LOT, chainlink
fence, Make Offer
352-613-7302 or
352-613-4673
GREAT BUY! 2 Lots for
Sale, Must buy both
1 in W. Highlands,
1 N. Highlands,
Inverness $15,000
By owner 617-471-7417



'08 BENTLY
20 Ft. Pontoon, 60HP,
Merc. 4 str. dbl. bimini
new trir. much more.
$11,500 (352) 341-4949
CENTURY
'99, 1901 Bay Boat, 115
HP, Yamaha w/ alum.
trailer, excel, cond. Lots
of extras, stored inside
$8,500 (352) 465-9395
Palm Beach 99
201 white cap C.C. '99
150hp merc. v. low hrs.
hydro steering, hi end
2 rail T-Top, elect box,
T bag, alum trailer, radial
tires, outrigger, down
rigger ready. True
off/Inshore boat 8'5"
30" free board & more
exc cond.Steal $8995
(352) 563-5628
POONTON 26"
all new carpet, 70 hp
Merc.w/trailer $2000
(352) 464-1128
PROLINE
21' Cuddy, full transom,
w/brack, 150 HP Yam.,
Bimini, VHF, port pot,
dep. finder, trailer $5K
firm (352) 382-3298
SEYLOR
15ft Center Console,
w/48HP Evin. mtr. trail,
Asking $2,100 obo
(352) 476-1113
TROLLER 85
14' 9.9 Yamaha 4 stroke
electric starttrolling
motor, hummingbird
fish finder w/trailer
$1800 bo 352-344-5993
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LAKE
MARINE
We Pay CASH For Used
Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck & Fishing
Boats (352)527-0555
boatsupercenter.com





















YACHTSMAN
24' Pontoon 70 HP Ev.
T/T, cust. trlr bimini top.
stored inside $3500 incls
all gear (231) 852-0061




GULF STREAM 08
32 3 slides, rear kit.
K bed,50amp, like new
extras $31,500
(352) 726-1906
HITCHHIKER II LS
2008, 3 slides, excel
cond. heat pump, de-
luxe pkg. too many ex-
tras to list $32,000.
Dodge Truck also avail
(636) 209-0308
Holiday Rambler
98 ,38 7.5 gen.super
slide, air lever, a/c susp.
loaded call for details
$41K (352) 746-9211

I Buy RV'S Steve
Henry, RV World of
Hudson Inc.Since
1974. (888) 674-8376
(727) 514-8875

JAYCO '04
40', 5th whl toy hauler,
generator, slide, fuel
station $17,400. like new
Truck Avail For Sale
Local (502) 345-0285
SOUTHWIND
1992 FOR PARTS ONLY
2 airconditioners, 1 yr. old
refrigerator, hot water
heater, commode, re-built
Jasper transmission. Cell
423-292-4275




CAMPER/TRAILER
2010, Sportsman KZ
Hybrid, 19ft, like new
air, full kitch, bath
$8750 (352) 249-6098
Coachman Pop-up
08, 17' furnace,.a/c,
elect, water & propane
sys. 12' awning $4550
obo(352) 726-1303
GULF STREAM
Coach 25 ft. model
24RBL, sips upto 6 gas
& elect appls & heat,
shower/toliet $6,000
(352) 341-1714
I BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
call me 352-201-6945
KZ Toyhauler,07
32 like new, full slide
new tires, Owan Gen.,
gas tank, Lrg living
area separate cargo
$17,200. 352-795-2975
Prowler 02
26 T/T, electric or gas
all essentials incl $3500
obo cell (727) 678-1250
352-795-3729
RV Cruiser Fun '07
TV Body microwave


tv. bath w/shower, out
pull out awning/Bar b q
$6k(352) 628-0554
Sandy Oak 55+
1 bd. 1 bath,New hot
water heater, furnace,
tub and surroundings
$2k obo See Rose at
Sandy Oaks
SKAMPER
2005 Travel Trailer 26ft
queen bed,toilet,shower,
frig,A/C,heat,Hot water,
slideout,awning,couch,
sleeps 6. $6900. ph
352-746-2172
leave
message
SUNNYBROOK
2005 36ft, 5th whl,2
slides, kg bed,like
new,heated tks, 60
amp service oak cab
$33,400 352-382-3298


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Brand New 18" Alloy
Rims, 4 Good year tires
2754/65R18... $650
off Ford Expedition
will also fit a truck..
(352) 344-4384




$$ CASH PAID $$
For Junk or Wrecked
Cars/Trucks.$300 & UP
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not -
CASH PAID $300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars Trucks
& Vans, For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES,
Hwy 19... 352 564-8333
CASH PAID FOR JUNK
CARS Any Condition
Up to $500., Free
Towing 352-445-3909
KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Salvage Pays top $$$
352-628-4144
WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
Perfect Cond. or Not
Titled,No title,
No problem. Paying up
to $25K any make,
any model Call A.J.
813-335-3794/531-4298

WE FINANCE *
Consignment USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
AUTOS' FROM $1,500.
US 19 BY AIRPORT
US 44, BY NAPA
Low Payments *
461-4518 & 795-4440
consignmentusa.org




AFFORDABLE
AUTOS & VANS
Everybody Rides
$495 DOWN
$49 PER WEEK
BUY HERE PAY
HERE..
Lots of clean-safe-
dependable rides.
CALL DAN TODAY
(352) 563 -1902
"WE BUYS CARS
DEAD OR ALIVE"
1675 Suncoast Hwy.
Homosassa Fl.

BUICK
1992 Skylark, runs
good, good tires, $850.
(352) 419-6901
CADILLAC
2008 STS Northstar
system, 30K, still under
warranty. $24,500
352-249-7203
Camaro 97
Z28, 97K mis. T-tops,
exc cond. White with
orang strips $8K obo
352-302-7204
CHEVROLET
2002, Cavalier, 4 DR,
4 Cyl., runs great
looks good $2,275.
352-637-2588
or 845-701-6253
CHEVY
'07, Impala, V6, auto,
ice cold AC, non smok-
ers 100K mi $8,500
(352) 726-3093
FORD TAURUS 2001
AUTO 75K, new tires,
brakes $4200 o/b/o
One owner
352-302-9217

KIA
'02, Sportage,
Asking $2,500.,
352-461-4518

KIA SEDONA
06 MINI VAN
Exc Cond, only
39,300 miles, comp.
to dealer prices for
same model w/high
mileage. Original
Owner,new tires,
battery, fuel
cannister,bk-up tv, up
to date maint. full
history $12,000
(352) 637-1527

MERCEDES
'78, 450SL, org. mi. 82K
2 tops, Florida Car, ga-
raged, very clean 8cyl,
auto/gas, beautiful
$13,000 (352) 344-4352
MERCEDES '99
S420, blue book $11,500
sell $10K FIRM
1729 W. Gulf to lake
Hwy, Lecanto
NISSAN ALTIMA
2011, Excel. condition
low miles, fully loaded
$18,500
(352) 274-1940

WE FINANCE *
Consignment USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
AUTOS FROM $1,500.
US 19 BY AIRPORT
US 44, BY NAPA
Low Payments *A
461-4518 & 795-4440
consignmentusa.org





AUTO SWAP/
Corral CAR SHOW
Sumter County
Fairgrounds
SUMTER
SWAP MEETS
MAY 6. 2012
1-800-438-8559

CHEVROLET '01
Camaro, Z28, Org. 9000
miles, Pristine show car
frozen in time. Loaded
black/black leather
Flawless rare find!
$13,950 (352) 513-4257
FORD MUSTANG
65, fastback 2+2 289
eng. a/c, power steer-
ing, disc brks. great
shape, runs great.
65o100K mi. recently
appraised for $25,378


sell $22,700 Owner fi-
nancing w/$10OK dn
call Paul(352) 746-9585







Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
** *s *


CHEVY
1955 4 Door Sedan
good shape,
$9,000
(352) 621-1207
TC by Maserati
'89,16 valve, 5spd,
turbo, cony. hd top, 30k
lown,exc.cond$12,500
Call 352-220-3883




Ford 02
F150, Ext Cab,
fair cond, runs good
166Kmis. $6kobo
352-302-7204
FORD '06
F250 Super Duty, 4 x 4,
6.0, Lariat Pkg. Off Rd.
Pkg., Hard Bed Cover
$21,500 (352) 586-8576
GMC
2005 Yukon GPS, Enter-
tainment Center, Memory
seats, Towing package
with leveler, backup cam-
era. Excellent condition.
160,000 miles. $7,500.
Call 726-4943.

*WE FINANCE *
Consignment USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
AUTOS' FROM $1,500.
US 19 BY AIRPORT
US 44, BY NAPA
Low Payments *
461-4518 & 795-4440
consignmentusa.org


MITI,


POLAR '01
60HP, 2 Stroke Yamaha
motor. 17' Long, 8' Wide
Bimini top, ladder
$7,000, 352-494-0009




2010 FORD ESCAPE
CREAM PUFF, LOADED
14K miles, Lmtd Edition,
Sunroof, Sync system,
GPS + MP3, USB, Fancy
Wheel Covers, Michelin
Tires, Rear Hitch,
Heated Leather Seats,
Spcl side mirrors, Sirius
Radio, Warranty
$24,500 (352) 509-7533




CHEVROLET
1999 venture van, 6-8
passenger,body in excel-
lent condition as well as
the interior and tires. V-6
motor, good gas mileage.
Loaded inside,velour
seats,tinted windows,
electrical windows, doors
and front seat. Also has
electrical hook-up for
campgrounds.Dual radia-
tors. Many extras,must
see to appreciate.
Asking $3,200.OBO,
call 637-4011
MERCURY
'99, Villager Estate
7 pass, low mi., loaded,
hitch, excel cond.
$3,500 (607) 592-5543



402-0430CRN


Harley 00
Roadking Classic, all
gear 17K miles 11K
obo.(352) 489-0873

Harley Davidson
03, Super Road King,
fuel inj. $48K up grades
too much to list/ Cry Riv
$8800 (727) 207-1619

HARLEY DAVIDSON
08 Night Train, flat blk,
11,500 mis. lots of extra's
$14K obo Jeff
(407) 712-0803

JUNK MOTORCYCLES
WANTED Will Pay up to
$200 for Unwanted Mo-
torcycle 352-942-3492

KAWASAKI
2006 Vulcan 1600 No-
mad Excellent condi-
tion, well serviced. 14k
miles. Newer tires and
battery. Bike jack,
Cycleshell, lots of ac-
cessories. Pix available.
$5995 352-601-7460




911-0430 DAILY CRN
Surplus Prop.
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County Board
of County Commissioners
will be selling surplus prop-
erty and equipment via
the internet at
govdeals.com, April 12
until April 30, 2012.
Pub:April 12 thru 30, 2012


MITI,


Citrus County
Homes I


McCallister, Charles Edward 2012 CP 159 Notice to Cred.
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2012 CP 159 Division Probate
IN RE: ESTATE OF CHARLES EDWARD MCCALLISTER
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of CHARLES EDWARD MCCALLISTER, deceased,
whose date of death was February 22, 2012, file number 2012 CP 159, is pending in
the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division; the address of which is
110 N. Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL 34450. The names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file
their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is April 23, 2012.
Personal Representative:
/s/ Patricia Carol Lyons
914 S Waccamaw Drive, Murrells Inlet, SC 29576
Attorney for Personal Representative:
/s/ John S. Clardy III, Florida Bar No. 123129 Telephone: (352) 795-2946
Clardy Law Firm PA PO Box 2410, Crystal River, FL 34423-2410
April 23 and 30, 2012.


403-0430CRN
McCallister, R. Jeanne 2012 CP 158 Notice to Cred.
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2012 CP 158 Division Probate
IN RE: ESTATE OF R. JEANNE MCCALLISTER a/k/a REBA JEANNE MCCALLISTER
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of R. JEANNE McCALLISTER, deceased, whose date
of death was September 5, 2011, file number 2012 CP 158, is pending in the Circuit
Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division; the address of which is 110 N.
Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL 34450. The names and addresses of the personal rep-
resentative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file
their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is April 23, 2012.
Personal Representative:
/s/ Patricia Carol Lyons
914 S Waccamaw Drive, Murrells Inlet, SC 29576
Attorney for Personal Representative:
/s/ John S. Clardy III, Florida Bar No. 123129 Telephone: (352) 795-2946
Clardy Law Firm PA PO Box 2410, Crystal River, FL 34423-2410
April 23 and 30, 2012.


406-0507 MCRN
Whaley, Gladys Louise 2012-CP-110 Notice to Creditors
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT COURT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY
FILE NO: 2012-CP-110 IN PROBATE
IN RE: ESTATE OF GLADYS LOUISE WHALEY
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The ancillary administration of the estate of GLADYS LOUISE WHALEY, deceased,
whose date of death was October 12, 2011, and whose Social Security Number was
256-30-0616, File Number 2012-CP-110, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus
County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 110 North Apopka Avenue,
Inverness, FI 34450. The name and address of the personal representative and the
personal representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against
the decedent's estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, on
whom a copy of this notice is served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE
LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE
ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims against
decedent's estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, must file
their claims with this court WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUB-
LICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this Notice is: April 30, 2012.
Personal Representatives:
Sylvia Ensley
4312 Mt. Pleasant Road NE, Cohutta, GA 30710
Anita Thacker
3764 Mt. Pleasant Road NE, Dalton, GA 30721
Attorney for Personal Representatives:
Samuel P. Bennett, P.A. 7501 NW 162 Court, Morriston, FL 32668
April 30 and May 7, 2012.


407-0507 MCRN
Wheeler, Marie F. 2012-CP-222 Notice to Cred.
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2012-CP-222
IN RE: ESTATE OF MARIE F. WHEELER,
Deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of MARIE F. WHEELER, deceased, whose date of
death was March 5, 2012, and whose Social Security Number is 374-18-4505 File No.
2012-CP-222, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Divi-
sion, the address of which is 110 N. Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450. The
names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file
their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is April 30, 2012.
Personal Representative:
/s/ CAROL LeBLANC
12391 Sharon Valley Road, Brooklyn, Michigan 49230
Affttorney for Personal Representative:
/s/ Michael A. Siefert, P.A., MICHAEL A. SIEFERT, ESQ. Fla. Bar # 042315
351 NE Eighth Avenue, Ocala, FL 34470 Telephone: (352) 732-0141
April 30 and May 7, 2012.


408-0507 MCRN
DeMint, David W. 2012-CP-223 Notice to Cred.
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2012-CP-223
IN RE: ESTATE OF DAVID W. DeMINT,
Deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of DAVID W. DeMINT, deceased, whose date of
death was February 8, 2012, and whose Social Security Number is 363-58-3021 File
No. 2012-CP-223, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Di-
vision, the address of which is 110 N. Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450. The
names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file
their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is April 30, 2012.
Personal Representative:
/s/ EARL ALBERT DeMINT
14 West Golden Street, Beverly Hills, FL 34465
Attfforney for Personal Representative:
/s/ Michael A. Siefert, P.A., MICHAEL A. SIEFERT, ESQ. Fla. Bar # 042315
351 NE Eighth Avenue, Ocala, FL 34470 Telephone: (352) 732-0141
April 30 and May 7, 2012.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


.1~
IA


If


2012 CHEVROLET CRUZE


2012 CHEVROLET MALIBU


If1ftOoR$169
IM PER MO.
WITH $1999 CASH OR TRADE.


2012 CHEVROLET IMPALA


0220800o^299
201V PER MO.
WITH $2999 CASH OR TRADE.


2012 (


3 5,8 0OR299
WI I PER MO.
WITH $2999 CASH OR TRADE.


,QOR 269
W ITI 299 PER MO.
WITH $2999 CASH OR TRADE.


2012 CHEVROLET EQUINOX


21 AI s 1269$
21 M PER MO.
WITH $2999 CASH OR TRADE.


2012 CHEVROLET SILVERADO


19H ASAVE A
9,800 *$6 O
WITH $2999 CASH OR TRADE.


CALL THE INSTANT APPRAISAL LINE: 800-440-9054


CR TAL crystalautos.com
CHEVROLET 352-564-1971
S1035 S. Suncoast Blvd Homosassa, FL 34448


I


MONDAY, APRIL 30, 2012 B11


LET TAHOE
r mx




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CR 0 UA
AUTMOT CIVEi


'11 IMPALA


'11 MALIBU


$13350. $1M2 O


'11 200


ii982* S91
$13982oR $191


'11 CIVIC


s14896o204^O.


'11 CIVIC


'11 SILVERADO
1500


$15586o.$213Mo.


'11 SIENNA


$16871 R$231MO.


'12 FIAT
500


$225505 0MO38.


'12 ELANTRA


$14698o201 M


'12 CARAVAN


$159290R $218


)O 52. PER
)52o $28OA~fVMO.


FI CALL THE INSTANT APPRAISAL LINE:


*


0


PER
MO.


$15000MO5o.


B12 MONDAY, APRIL 30, 2012