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Citrus County chronicle
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Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02754
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 04-29-2012
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:02754

Full Text



Be somebody: Six tips to get noticed in politic


CITRUS S COUNTY '


TODAY & Monday morning
HIGH Partly cloudy. East
90 winds 5 to 10 mph.
LOW
64 PAGE A4
APRIL 29, 2012


Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community 1 VOLUME 117 ISSUE 266
Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community $1 VOLUME 117 ISSUE 266


Court's stance could spur immigration laws


Subscriber service
hours change
The Sunday Chronicle
customer service hours
have changed as of
today, Sunday, April 29.
Representatives will be
available from 7 a.m. until
10 a.m. and messages
left on voicemail will be
attended to in the
afternoon.
Should you have a
problem with service, call
the customer service
number 563-5655.
Resurfacing work
to start Monday
A resurfacing project
will begin Monday for
County Road 491 from
West Noble Street to
Grover Cleveland Boule-
vard, then C.R. 581
(north) from Grain Court
to East Banks Court, fin-
ishing with C.R. 495 from
North Turkey Oak Drive
to U.S. 19.
The work should be
completed by Saturday,
May 12, depending on in-
clement weather condi-
tions. Traffic will be
reduced to one lane during
construction. Some work
may be done at night to re-
duce traffic interruption.
For information, call
Citrus County Engineer-
ing Department at 352-
527-5446.


HOMEFRONT:


Florida flora
This variety of anise
plant can be found from
North Florida to
Louisiana./Page E9


ENTERTAINMENT:
i 'fjw


The big 5-0
The Chieftains celebrate
five decades of Irish
music./Page B6
OPINION:
County
government
needs to keep
spending flat.




TOMORROW:
Part two
Day two of this month's
Quality of Life series
looks at bullying,
alternatives to college
and the Young Marines
program./Monday


Annie's Mailbox ......A14
Classifieds ............ D5
Crossword ...........A14
Editorial ............ C2
Entertainment ..........B6
Horoscope ................B6
Lottery Numbers ......B4
Lottery Payouts ........ B6
Movies ................. A14
Obituaries ........... A6
Together.............. A16


SI IJL178 200! o


DAVID CRARY
AP National Writer
Emboldened by signals that the
U.S. Supreme Court may uphold
parts of Arizona's immigration law,
legislators and activists across the
country say they are gearing up to
push for similar get-tough meas-
ures in their states.


"We're getting our national net-
work ready to run with the ball, and
saturate state legislatures with ver-
sions of the law," said William
Gheen, president of Americans for
Legal Immigration. "We believe we
can pass it in most states."
That goal may be a stretch, but
lawmakers in about a dozen states
told The Associated Press they


were interested in proposing Ari-
zona-style laws if its key compo-
nents are upheld by the Supreme
Court. A ruling is expected in June
on the Department of Justice's ap-
peal that the law conflicts with fed-
eral immigration policy
Dan Stein, president of the Fed-
eration for American Immigration
Reform, said he was encouraged


that several justices suggested dur-
ing Wednesday's oral arguments
that they are ready to let Arizona
enforce the most controversial part
of its law a requirement that po-
lice officers check the immigration
status of people they suspect are in
the country illegally

See Page A10


for


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Gary Umandap, 9, uses his fingers to help count while solving a math problem during a recent FCAT prepa-
ration class at Pleasant Grove Elementary School.


IB challenges students like no other program


'You have to

worry about

school all the time'
MIKE WRIGHT
Staff Writer
LECANTO The Interna-
tional Baccalaureate program at
Lecanto High School is full of
challenges.
It gives students with high aca-
demic drive a chance to prepare
them for college.
It keeps students busy, engaged
and on top of their game.
And one more thing: It's hard.
Hard, as in completing essays
and scoring well on tests. Not just
every once in a while. Every
week, in some cases.


Hardin the courses CITRUS
required. IB students
won't find Algebra 2 J
or English Literature U
among the require-
ments. They will sign
up for four semesters
of Spanish, two se-
mesters of Integrated
Technology in a
Global Society, plus 2012 Chr
two semesters of The-
ory of Knowledge. Editor
Plus physical fit- This m
ness, health, chem- Chronicl
istry and art. pressure
How hard is Inter- for Citr
national Baccalaure- schooled
ate, commonly called teens.
IB? Seniors who will
become the program's
first graduating class this spring
say college will be easier.
"Our IB classes are supposed
to be harder than college," Jes-


f
onic
r's
0o
le
et
rUs
nil


COUNTY sica Jackson said.
"It truly tests your
L commitment," Ed-
ward Daly added.
Juniors say it's no
picnic for them, either
"I think you have to
\ J | be well rounded,"
Morgan Dawson said.
"IB kids, a lot of us
cle project have homework to do,
tons of homework.
note: There's a test one day
nth, the and a test the next
examines day, and you have to
o succeed worry about school all
s County the time."
dren and Make no mistake.
IB is not for the aca-
demically weak. This
is how the school dis-
trict's student progression plan
describes the IB program:
See .Page A9


High school diploma not enough for CRHS senior


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff Writer

LECANTO The seeds of
Regan Townsend's young aca-
demic life were planted way back
in the third grade at Citrus
Springs Elementary School.
It was there Regan met teacher
Lou Anne Crosswhite and her in-
fluence was felt immediately
"She asked if I was excited
about third grade," Regan said. "I
said yeah. She leaned in and said,
'What did you say?' I said, 'yes
ma'am.'
"It was very impactful."
Apparently so. Regan took to
school like a fish to water, and
she has excelled in it.
She has excelled so much that
when Regan graduates in May
from Crystal River High School,
she will also be earning her asso-
ciate's degree at the same time
from the College of Central
Florida.
While dual enrollment classes
are common among high school
students with a focus on higher
learning, the diploma-degree
combination is rare.
Regan is the only student in the
Citrus County School District to


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Regan Townsend will graduate from Crystal River High School next
month. Soon afterward, she will have also earned an associate's degree
from the College of Central Florida.


achieve it this year
"I'm really impressed with my-
self," Regan, 18, said during a re-
cent interview in the CF library
at the Lecanto campus. "The
classes are very challenging. I'm
really excited to know how far
I've come."
Regan's mother, Kim, said she
never pushed the academic fast
track on her daughter, but she


certainly helped.
Dissatisfied with the effort by
Regan's guidance counselor,
Townsend took the unusual step
of asking the school district that
Regan take all her college-credit
courses at CF, rather than at the
high school.
Dual enrollment allows high


Page A8


More than in

any other time,

youths feel the

pressure to succeed
"All my life I have been in in-
tensive reading classes because I
couldn't pass my reading FCAT I
feel like this test has been stran-
gling me. I know that if I don't
pass I won't be able to graduate.
Not graduating has been my
biggest fear; the weight on my
shoulder is tremendous." -
Lecanto High School junior
Ashley Saunders.
MIKE WRIGHT
Staff Writer
It's the rigors of life for public
schoolchildren.
On nearly every single day,
someone in the Citrus County
School District is either taking a
state-required test, preparing
for a test or receiving remedial
instruction after failing a test.
They all are known by their
acronyms: FCAT, SAT, ACT, EOC,
PERT. Children are tested on
writing, reading, math, algebra
or science.
Some tests carry more weight
depending on the test and grade
level. Third-graders must pass
the Florida Comprehensive As-
sessment Test to advance to the
fourth grade. Students cannot
graduate high school without
passing the FCAT, given in 10th
grade and offered several times
after that for students who fail
the first time.
Passing end of course (EOC)
exams is necessary to pass a
course, regardless of a stu-
dent's grade in the class enter-
ing that final test.
Then there's the PERT -
Post Secondary Education
Readiness Test. This 25-ques-
tion reading, writing and math
test is administered to high
school juniors to make sure
they're ready for college. Fail-
ing the test requires a college
remedial course their senior
year whether they plan to
attend college or not.
Teachers and administrators
try to play down the significance
of tests to ease students' fears,
while at the same time some tests,
especially FCAT, carry a certain
reverence. Elementary school-
children receive free breakfast
the morning of the FCAT, and the
tests themselves are stored be-
forehand in a locked vault in ac-
cordance to state guidelines.
Educators say they under-
stand the need for state testing,
but they also dread the psycho-
logical impact on students.
"We're making our kids into
widgets," Lecanto High School
art teacher Connie Phillips said.
"Where is the time for creativ-
ity? Where does their individu-
ality fit in?"
School board member Pat
Deutschman believes testing is
out of control.
"Our kids are being tested to
death," she said. "These two
See Page A9

MORE INSIDE
What do art students do
when asked to think about
testing?/Page A8
Glossary of terms/Page A9
School enrollment/Page A9
Next month: Housing





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


The Week IN REVIEW


Editor's note: The news of this
past week has no central theme,
but it's been interesting for those
involved. Top local stories
included:

Mum on the blazes
A Monday fire at Highland Terrace in In-
verness is the second at that assisted living
facility in 11 days. Both blazes are classified
as "suspicious" possibly arson.
The fires have law enforcement and fire
officials concerned.
And they also have people affiliated with
Highland Terrace tight-lipped. Neither
local officials with the ALF nor parent-
company honchos have offered public
comment
Citrus Health and Rehabilitation Center
took in the 32 Highland Terrace residents
while things were getting squared away
Down the road
Proponents of extending of the Suncoast
Parkway through Citrus County read wel-
come news this past week. During a visit to
the Citrus County Chronicle, Florida's De-
partment of Transportation secretary said
a traffic and revenue study will get rolling
in July
Plans for the toll-road extension came to
a screeching halt when the economy
crashed a few years ago.
Factors that could get the project rolling
again include Progress Energy's intentions
to fix or fold the Crystal River nuclear plant
and whether plans for two new nuke plants
in southwest Levy County ultimately get the
green light.
The feasibility of Port Citrus and antici-
pation of lots of rock trucks needing to roll
southward through West Central Florida
will also be factors the DOT will weigh
when pondering the parkway's future.


Breaking through
In an unfortunate incident last Sunday
evening, a motorist made a surprise en-
trance into the Krystal Klean Laundromat
in Hernando, accidentally launching his ve-
hicle through the front of the business and
trapping a man against a washing machine.
The man, who sustained injuries, was
taken to the hospital and patched up while
plywood was brought in to board up the
storefront until more permanent measures
are taken.
Launching online
Our clerk of courts is doing some launch-
ing of her own, in the form of an online fore-
closure sale website.
In partnership with RealAuction.com,
the first electronic sale is planned June 21.
To help both plaintiffs and bidders, train-
ing will be offered in early June.
More info can be found by calling the
Clerk of Courts Office or going on its
website.
Bad business
As reported this past week, a Floral City
20-year-old was recently busted on charges
of selling marijuana to undercover cops in
Sumter County.
The aroma of hemp reportedly emanated
from him and an 18-year-old Inverness
sidekick when the dope-holding duo en-
countered arresting officers.
While the sidekick only had a little bit of
weed in his possession, he reportedly did
have his 13-week-old child in the car, who
also smelled of the herb and was said to
have had glassy eyes.
Both guys face child-neglect charges. The
20-year-old faces a bunch of other charges
and finds himself in this predicament while
on drug-offender probation after being
sprung from the loving care of the Depart-
ment of Corrections in 2011.


CITRUS COUNTY SCHOOLS
Elementary schools
Breakfast
Monday: MVP breakfast,
grits, cereal and toast, milk,
juice.
Tuesday: Sausage and egg
biscuit, tater tots, cereal and
toast, milk, juice.
Wednesday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, grits, cereal
and toast, milk, juice.
Thursday: Ultimate break-
fast round, cheese grits, tater
tots, cereal and toast, milk,
juice.
Friday: Ultra cinnamon bun,
grits, cereal and toast, milk,
juice.
Lunch
Monday: Mozzarella
MaxStix, fajita chicken and rice
with ripstick, PB dippers, fresh
baby carrots, ranch pasta
salad, chilled applesauce, milk,
juice.
Tuesday: Sausage pizza,
baked chicken tenders, ham
super salad, yogurt parfait,
garden salad, sweet peas,
seasoned rice, warm apple
slices, crackers, milk, juice.
Wednesday: Hot dog on
bun, macaroni and cheese,
PB dippers, fresh baby car-
rots, steamed green beans,
baked beans, mixed fruit,
milk, juice.
Thursday: Oven-baked
breaded chicken, turkey
wrap, turkey super salad, yo-
gurt parfait, garden salad,
seasoned mashed potatoes,


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peaches, crackers, milk, juice.
Friday: Pasta with moz-
zarella and meat sauce, pep-
peroni pizza, PB dippers, fresh
baby carrots, sweet corn,
steamed broccoli, dried fruit
mix, milk, juice.
Middle schools
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, MVP breakfast,
grits, cereal and toast, milk,
juice.
Tuesday: Sausage, egg
and cheese biscuit, ultra cinna-
mon bun, tater tots, cereal and
toast, milk, juice.
Wednesday: Breakfast egg
and cheese wrap, MVP break-
fast, tater tots, cereal and
toast, milk, juice.
Thursday: Breakfast sand-
wich stuffer, ultimate breakfast
round, peach cup, grits, cereal
and toast, milk, juice.
Friday: Ham, egg and
cheese biscuit, ultra cinnamon
bun, tater tots, cereal and
toast, milk, juice.
Lunch
Monday: Sausage pizza,


breaded chicken sandwich, yo-
gurt parfait, fresh baby carrots,
Normandy-blend vegetables,
Italian pasta salad, pineapple,
milk, juice.
Tuesday: Crispy Mexican
tacos, fajita chicken and rice,
ham super salad, PB dippers,
garden salad, glazed carrots,
Mexicali corn, Spanish rice,
applesauce, crackers, milk,
juice.
Wednesday: Hamburger on
bun, baked chicken nuggets,
yogurt parfait, fresh baby car-
rots, green beans, colossal
crisp french fries, chilled
peaches, milk, juice.
Thursday: Oriental orange
chicken, mozzarella MaxStix,
chef's super salad, PB dippers,
garden salad, sweet corn,
dried fruit mix, Jell-O, crackers,
milk, juice.
Friday: Baked chicken ten-
ders, macaroni and cheese,
turkey super salad, fresh baby
carrots, broccoli, seasoned
rice, chilled mixed fruit, crack-
ers, milk, juice.
See Page A5


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A2 SUNDAY, APRIL 29, 2012


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Page A3 SUNDAY, APRIL 29, 2012



TATE&


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Around Authorities make arrests in two sex cases
THE COUNTY


NRC deems new Levy
nuke plant safe
The agency that regulates
the country's nuclear power
plants said a new plant
planned for west-central
Florida won't harm the
environment.
The Nuclear Regulatory
Commission issued a report
Friday saying construction
and operation of Progress
Energy's two new reactors
planned for rural Levy County
wouldn't harm ground water,
the air or people living in
close proximity.

Campaign TRAIL

The Citrus County
Chronicle's political forums
are: 7 p.m. Tuesday, July 31,
at the Citrus County Audito-
rium; and 7 p.m. Thursday,
Oct. 18, at the College of
Central Florida. Information:
Mike Wright, 352-563-3228.
The Nature Coast Re-
publican Club and Citrus Re-
publican Women's Club is
sponsoring the following fo-
rums at 9 a.m. at the Ameri-
can Legion Post 155 on State
Road 44 in Crystal River:
Saturday, May 12, Sandy
Balfour and Robert Cum-
mins, candidates for superin-
tendent of schools; Saturday,
June 9, Shannon Heath-
cock and Joe Meek, candi-
dates for county commission
District 3; Saturday, July 14,
forum for all Republican pri-
mary candidates. Information:
Fred or Rosella Hale, 352-
746-2545.
The Citrus County Tea
Party Activists have sched-
uled the following forums at 1
p.m. at the Inverness
Women's Club, 1715 Forest
Drive, Inverness: Saturday,
May 19, state representative
candidates Nancy Argen-
ziano, Lynn Dostal and in-
cumbent Jimmie T. Smith;
Saturday, June 16, candi-
dates for sheriff with details to
be announced.
Ron Kitchen, Republi-
can for county commission
District 1, will greet the public
at Howard's Flea Market,
Booth 52, from 8 a.m. to 3
p.m. Sunday, April 29.
Steve Burch, Republi-
can for sheriff, will have a
fundraiser from 1 to 5 p.m.
Sunday, April 29, at Sleepy
Hollow, 10333 E. Gobbler
Drive, Floral City.
Shannon Heathcock,
Republican for county com-
mission District 3, will speak
at 1 p.m. Saturday, May 5, at
the Ronald Reagan Republi-
can Assembly of West Cen-
tral Florida in the South
Square Plaza, 938 N. Sun-
coast Blvd., Crystal River.
Shannon Heathcock,
Republican for county com-
mission District 3, will have a
fundraiser from 2:30 to 5:30
p.m. Saturday, May 5, at the
Realtors Association of Citrus
County, 714 Scarboro Ave.,
Lecanto. Information: 352-
302-0962.
The Beverly Hills Civic
Association candidates'
forum is at 7 p.m. Thursday,
Sept. 27, at 77 Civic Circle,
Beverly Hills. Information:
Rosella Hale, 352-746-2545.
The Citrus Hills Civic As-
sociation is hosting a candi-
dates' forum at 7 p.m.
Thursday, Oct. 4, at the Cit-
rus Hills Golf and Country
Club.
The Campaign Trail is a
listing of political happenings
for the 2012 election season.
Send events or campaign
fundraisers to Mike Wright at
mwright@chronicleonline.
com.

Correction

Due to an editor's error,
columnist Paula Dockery's
name is misspelled on Page
C1 of today's Commentary
section. The Chronicle re-
grets the error.
Readers can alert The
Citrus County Chronicle to


any errors in news articles by
mailing dmann@chronicle
online.com or by calling 352-
563-5660.
-From staff and wire reports


SHEMIR WILES
Staff Writer


A 13-year-old Gulfport boy
was arrested Friday for al-
legedly molesting a 4-year-
old Inverness boy
The 13-year-old was
charged with two counts of
lewd and lascivious molesta-
tion. Authorities transported
him to the Citrus County De-
tention Facility in Lecanto
and later transferred him to
the juvenile assessment cen-
ter in Ocala on the felony ju-
venile charges.
According to the arrest re-
port, the Citrus County
Sheriff's Office learned in
March of accusations re-


garding alleged sexual ac-
tivity between the two boys,
who know each other
The 4-year-old child was
taken to the local children's
advocacy center for an in-
terview, but purportedly re-
fused to talk. On April 16, a
detective met with the boy
and his mother. The 4-year-
old told the detective how
the 13-year-old boy touched
him inappropriately, the re-
port stated.
The 13-year-old met with
the detective Friday in
Lecanto and reportedly ad-
mitted to touching the
young boy and having the
boy touch him. The older
boy couldn't explain why he


did it, the report stated. He
denied anyone had ever
abused him. He did, how-
ever, state the 4-year-old
boy's brother watches adult
pornography and has shown
it to him.
Also:
In an unrelated case, a
20-year-old Floral City man
accused of having sex with a
13-year-old Floral City girl
was also arrested Friday
Sucre A. Figuereo was
charged with one count of
lewd and lascivious battery
He was transported to the
Citrus County Detention Fa-
cility in Lecanto where he
was given no bond.
According to the arrest re-


port, the Citrus County Sher-
iff's Office learned about the
alleged sex abuse during an
interview in a different case
with the girl's sister She also
told authorities Figuereo
and her sister were "holding
hands, kissing and they
sleep together in the same
bed," the report stated.
However, she was unsure if
the two were engaging in
sexual activity together
During multiple inter-
views, the report stated fam-
ily members confirmed the
young girl and Figuereo slept
together in the same bed and
considered each other
boyfriend and girlfriend.
On Friday, a detective


conducted interviews with
the 13-year-old girl. Author-
ities state she initially de-
nied there was a sexual
relationship but later ad-
mitted to having sex multi-
ple times with Figuereo
since they moved to Florida.
When the family moved to
Citrus County near the end
of 2011, the girl reportedly
said, the activity continued
in Figuereo's bedroom.
According to the report,
Figuereo admitted to engag-
ing in sexual activity with
the girl.
Chronicle reporter Shemir
Wiles can be reached at
352-564-2924 or swiles@
chronicleonline. com.


Let the race begin!


SHEMIR WILES/Chronicle
Participants in this year's Ozello Adventure Race gather near the water's edge to launch their kayaks Saturday at the Pirates Cove boat ramp.
The triathlon race, sponsored this year by the Rotary Club of Crystal River, consists of 1.5 miles of kayaking, 7 miles of bicycling and 2 miles
of running.

Triathlon draws athletes to Ozello


SHEMIR WILES
Staff Writer

OZELLO Early Saturday
morning, roughly 50 to 60 triath-
letes gathered at the Pirates Cove
boat ramp at the end of West
Ozello Trail to participate in this
year's Ozello Adventure Race.
Pulsating tunes pumped
through speakers near the sign-
up booth as people dressed to
compete stretched, prepped
their bicycles and secured their
kayaks in anticipation of starting
the race, sponsored this year by
the Rotary Club of Crystal River
Funds raised from the race go
toward providing local students
with college scholarships.
Race director Barry Schwartz
said the triathlon consists of 1.5
miles of kayaking, 7 miles of bicy-
cling and 2 miles of running. And
the weather was perfect,
Schwartz remarked before noting
about a third of the participants
this year are past competitors
who return each year to have fun
and break personal records.
Looking to break last year's
record in the women's category
was Crystal River native Kristen
Hall, a student and personal
trainer at the University of
Florida.


"I wouldn't have missed it for
anything," she said.
Hall took first place in 2008
and 2009; however, she missed
last year's race and she hoped to
beat the reigning women's cham-
pion, Liza Hash of Inglis. How-
ever, Hash didn't attend this year
Hall said the adventure race is
the only triathlon she does, and
she loves it.
As a person who is not a natu-
ral swimmer, Hall said she likes
the fact she can kayak, though
she didn't get much practice on
the water before the race. How-
ever, for the past couple of
months, she said she has been
hitting the stationary bike and
treadmill to be in tip-top shape
for the rest of the race.
It's her strategy to just "keep
pushing it" until the very end.
"It should be a fun race," she
said.
Standing by watching everyone
else warm up, Dr Bob Brockett,
who has won in the men's cate-
gory twice in the past, said he was
glad to be participating this year
A regular at the Crystal River
Sprint Triathlon, he said the
Ozello race has a nice, laid-back
feel.
"This kind of has a hometown
appeal," he said.


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Three triathletes pedal down West Ozello Trail during the cycling
portion of the race.


An avid cyclist, Brockett was
confident he would dominant
that portion of the race. However,
he admitted he uses a kayak
maybe once a year and is "too
big" to be an efficient runner
Since children as young as 14
years old can participate, Brock-
ett, 57, said the competition


keeps getting younger every year,
making it a bit challenging to
keep up.
"But I'll give it my best," he
said. "It's all I can do."
Chronicle reporter Shemir
Wiles can be reached at 352-564-
2924 or swiles@chronicle
online.com.


Phone survey on tap for all-hazards evacuation planning


GAIL TIERNEY
Special to the Chronicle

Starting Monday, April 30,
residents living in Citrus and
Levy counties may be con-
tacted by telephone to take
part in an all-important
emergency evacuation plan-
ning survey The reasoning
behind the survey is to
gather data for use by the
Citrus County Sheriff's Of-
fice emergency management


section to improve evacua-
tion plans for both natural
and man-made disasters.
The telephone survey is
being conducted by Boston-
based First Market Re-
search, and all calls made
on weekdays will be con-
ducted between 6 and 8 p.m.
On the weekends, calls will
be made between 10 a.m.
and 8 p.m.
Responding to the survey
will take about 10 minutes


by either the head of house-
hold or his/her spouse.
No personal or financial
questions will be asked by
the caller
Instead, survey questions
will seek specific informa-
tion, such as how long it
takes to drive from work to
home and how many vehi-
cles typically are available to
the household for use if an
evacuation were necessary
Responses to questions like


these will provide critical in-
formation for the purpose of
emergency planning.
Survey results will give
emergency management
personnel a better estimate
of the number of people
evacuating any given area,
the number of vehicles used
to evacuate and the length
of time needed to prepare
for evacuations.
The data collected by the
survey also will be used in a


traffic engineering study to
identify roadways and areas
with significant traffic con-
gestion during evacuations,
and to pinpoint methods for
reducing delays caused by
traffic gridlock.
For more information,
contact the sheriff's office
emergency management
section at 352-746-6555.
Gail Tierney is the
spokeswoman for the Citrus
County Sheriff's Office.


State BRIEF


Toddler struck by SUV,
killed at softball game
TITUSVILLE. The wife of the po-
lice chief in a Central Florida community
accidentally ran over a family friend's
22-month-old son in a parking lot, au-
thorities said.


Pamela Bodenheimer, 51, was back-
ing up from a parking spot Friday night
at Titusville High School when she
drove over Brady Hutto. She told police
she did not see the boy. No charges
have been filed.
Bodenheimer's daughter and the
boy's sister are teammates on the


Auburndale Bloodhounds softball team.
The game was postponed after the
tragedy.
"We have been in close contact with
that family," said Lake Alfred police Chief
Art Bodenheimer. "We are a close-knit
community that has been impacted
greatly. We ask for support and prayers."


A witness tried to perform CPR on the
boy before he was taken by ambulance
to a hospital, police said. He was pro-
nounced dead soon after arrival.
"It appears to be a tragic accident," said
Titusville Police Maj. Todd Hutchinson.

-From wire reports






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Clubs plan car show fundraiser


Special to the Chronicle

Boys & Girls Clubs of Citrus County
will sponsor the organization's first
car show, Cruisin' for Kidz, on May 5 at
the Love Honda/Motorsports property
on U.S. 19 in Homosassa.
Car entry fee is $15, which includes
tickets for two adults. Groups must
pre-register and prepay to reserve
parking spots together Cost at the gate
is $5, with children younger than 12
admitted for free.
Any kind of car classic, old, new,


antique, or otherwise or truck or
motorcycle may be entered as long as
the owner is proud of the vehicle and
wants to show it
Classes to be judged are 1976 and
Older, 1977 and Newer, Off-Road Vehi-
cles, Motorcycles, and the Craziest
Ride. Vehicles will be judged by the
public and trophies awarded.
Registration begins at 8:30 a.m., with
the show open to the public at 10 a.m.
All spots must be claimed by 9:30 a.m.
Food, beer, soda and water will be on
sale all day


Live bands, including the popular
local band Moccasin Slough, will play
from 10:30 until 4 p.m.
Included in the day's happenings
will be a "Blow up the Car" event with
people predicting how long a car will
operate with no oil in it. There will
also be 50/50 drawings and door
prizes.
Trophy sponsors, a competition
sponsor and individual banner spon-
sors are being sought. Call 352-621-
9225 for more information about
registration or sponsorships.


Local/State BRIEFS


Man injured at
local boat ramp
An Inverness man was flown
to a regional hospital Saturday
after being run over at a local
boat ramp, according to
authorities.
Gail Tierney, spokeswoman
for the Citrus County Sheriff's
Office, said a call came in at
3:25 p.m. in reference to a man
being run over by a boat trailer
at the Fort Island boat ramp,
12073 W. Fort Island Trail,
Crystal River.
Tierney stated Daniel Stat-
ton, 42, of Lecanto, was back-
ing up in an unknown vehicle,
which had a boat on top of a
trailer attached to the back, to
leave the boat ramp parking lot
when he ran over 63-year-old
Ruben Cardona.
Cardona was airlifted to Re-
gional Medical Center Bayonet
Point in Hudson.
Tierney said as of Saturday
evening, the crash remained
under investigation.
Scalded baby dies,
mother jailed
TAMPA- Florida authorities
say the 2-month-old boy whose
mother placed him under scald-


ing water for several minutes
has died.
A Pasco County sheriff's of-
fice press release says Emilio
Jesus Bautista died Saturday
morning at Tampa General
Hospital.
His mother, 18-year-old
Chekayla Dampier, is charged
with child abuse causing great
bodily harm. Authorities say she
confessed to holding the baby
under the scalding water April
17 because he wouldn't stop
crying. Dampier is being held
on $150,000 bail.
The case remains under
investigation.
Adoptive parents
to attend training
MIAMI Hundreds of foster
and adoptive parents and chil-
dren will gather in Miami this
weekend for a special training
event.
Foster parents are required
to complete a certain number of
in-service training hours to stay
qualified. Saturday's workshop
will focus on quality parenting,
life skills and efforts to help fos-
ter kids live normal lives by en-
couraging foster parents to
enroll them in extracurricular
activities.


Children will be placed in
groups by age and go on field
trips to local attractions while
parents attend training.
The state's local foster care
contractor, Our Kids of Miami-
Dade and Monroe, is hosting
the event.
Superintendent of Miami-
Dade Public Schools Alberto M.
Carvalho is the keynote
speaker.

Florida gets
official flagship
TALLAHASSEE Gov. Rick
Scott has signed a bill naming a
73-year-old schooner the
state's official flagship.
The 130-foot Schooner
Western Union is based in Key
West where it's being turned
into a floating museum.
Construction of the yellow
pine and mahogany ship began
in Grand Cayman, but it was
completed in Key West in 1939.
It served as a cable vessel for
the Western Union Telegraph
Co. for three decades.
It later was put to work as a
charter boat.
The bill was passed unani-
mously Friday. It takes effect
July 1.


MacDill opens
restricted shoreline
TAMPA- Some 40 boaters
in Tampa are hoping for a large
catch as they fish in two miles
of usually-restricted shoreline.
MacDill Air Force Base has
opened two miles of restricted
shoreline to fishing boats for
first time since 2009. The wa-
ters were open Saturday and
Sunday for boaters who pre-
registered.
The Tampa Bay Times re-
ported seven miles of coastline
have been closed to boats
since the Sept. 11 terrorist at-
tacks. A similar weekend in
2009 opened the shoreline.
-From staff and wire reports


Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Arrests
Crystal Star Ellis, 33, of
1086 S. Candlenut Ave., Ho-
mosassa, at 1:21 p.m. Thurs-
day on a misdemeanor charge
of petit theft and an active Cit-
rus County warrant for a viola-
tion of probation an original
misdemeanor charge of petit
theft. Bond $1,855.
Marcus R. Hile, 19, of
3079 N. Melody Terrace, Crys-
tal River, at 12:52 a.m. Saturday
on a misdemeanor charge of
possession of cannabis (less
than 20 grams) Bond $500.
Burglaries
SA vehicle burglary occurred
about 7:17 a.m. April 26 in the
400 block of Quail Roost Drive,
Inverness.
SA vehicle burglary occurred
about 8:08 a.m. April 26 in the
4000 block of E. Allendale
Street, Inverness.
MA vehicle burglary occurred
about 9:48 a.m. April 26 in the
400 block of Quail Roost Drive,
Inverness.
A commercial burglary oc-
curred about 11:19 a.m. April 26
in the 2500 block of State Road
44 West, Inverness.
A residential burglary oc-
curred about 4:54 p.m. April 26
in the 300 block of Hemlock
Street, Inverness.
A residential burglary oc-


curred about 9:39 p.m. April 26
in the 8600 block of N. Lind-
hurst Circle, Dunnellon.
A residential burglary oc-
curred about 9:42 p.m. April 26
in the 3100 block of N. Quarter-
horse Terrace, Crystal River.
Thefts
A grand theft occurred
about 10:01 p.m. April 25 in the
3300 block of W. Cypress
Drive, Dunnellon.
A grand theft occurred
about 10:17 a.m. April 26 in the
2600 block of N. Forest Ridge
Boulevard, Hemando.
A grand theft occurred
about 11:11 a.m. April 26 in the
5200 block of S. Cherokee
Way, Homosassa.
A grand theft occurred
about 11:19 a.m. April 26 in the
6200 block of S. Lima Avenue,
Homosassa.
A grand theft occurred
about 5:58 p.m. April 26 in the
1300 block of N. Florida Av-
enue, Hemando.
A grand theft occurred
about 6:58 p.m. April 26 in the
6600 block of W. Van Buren
Drive, Homosassa.
M A petit theft occurred about
6:50 a.m. April 27 in the 60 block
of S. Smith Avenue, Inverness.
Vandalism
A vandalism occurred
about 12:58 p.m. April 26 in the
2400 block of N. Junglecamp
Road, Inverness.


regal notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle



Meeting Notices......................D8


I Miscellaneous Notices...........D8


S .. Surplus Property....................D8


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


F'cast
s
ts
pc
ts

ts
ts
s
s


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
ts
s
s

pc
s
s

pc
ts


MARINE OUTLOOK


East winds around 10 knots. Seas 2
feet. Bay and inland waters will have a
light chop. Mostly sunny skies today.


87 52 0.00 NA NA 0.00

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Exusive daily
TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING

Partly cloudy and warm

MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 87 Low: 67
Mostly sunny; breezy

.i. TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
High: 86 Low: 67
Partly cloudy; breezy

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 91/53
Record 97/46
Normal 85/57
Mean temp. 72
Departure from mean +1
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday 0.00 in.
Total for the month 2.61 in.
Total for the year 6.47 in.
Normal for the year 12.43 in.
*As of 6 p m at Inverness
UV INDEX: 10
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Saturday at 3 p.m. 30.07 in.


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 65
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 51%
POLLEN COUNT**
Grasses and weeds were absent and
Today's active pollen:
Oak, hickory, grasses
Today's count: 6.3/12
Monday's count: 6.7
Tuesday's count: 5.5
Saturday was good with pollutants
mainly particulates.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
4/29 SUNDAY 12:28 6:40 12:52 7:04
4/30 MONDAY 1:14 7:27 1:39 7:51
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK


MAY 12


SUNSET TONIGHT 8:05 PM.
SUNRISE TOMORROW ........ 6:50 A.M.
M OONRISE TODAY ...........................1:30 P.M.
M OONSET TODAY ............................2:05 A.M.


BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
One-day-per-week irrigation schedule as follows for addresses ending in:
0 or 1 Monday, 2 or 3 Tuesday, 4 or 5 Wednesday, 6 or 7
- Thursday, 8 or 9 & subdivision common areas Friday. Before 8 a.m. or
after 6 p.m.
Hand watering of non-grass areas can take place any day before 8 a.m. or
after 6 p.m.
PLEASE CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL NEW PLANT MATERIAL. Citrus
County Water Resources can explain additional watering allowances for
qualified plantings.
Questions, concerns or reporting violations, please call Citrus County at
352-527-7669, or email waterconservation@bocc.citrus.fl.us.


TIDES
*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Sunday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 12:58 p/7:54 a /8:13 p
Crystal River* 11:19 a/5:16 a 10:33 p/5:35 p
Withlacoochee* 9:06 a/3:04 a 8:20 p/3:23 p
Homosassa*** 12:08 p/6:53 a 11:22 p/7:12 p


***At Mason's Creek
Monday
High/Low High/Low
12:12 a/9:04 a 1:59 p/9:39 p
12:20 p/6:26a -- /7:01 p
10:07 a/4:14 a 9:55 p/4:49 p
1:09 p/8:03 a /8:38 p


Gulf water
temperature


70
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 26.81 26.80 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 32.76 32.74 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lInverness 34.89 34.96 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 36.52 36.48 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211

THE NATION


S/ Houston .. -


/ FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY


Saturday Sunday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
Albany 53 30 s 55 28
Albuquerque 74 46 pc 80 52
Asheville 70 51 ts 81 56
Atlanta 80 62 s 88 63
Atlantic City 55 28 .03 s 63 42
Austin 91 66 pc 87 68
Baltimore 55 35 .01 pc 65 41
Billings 43 39 .02 sh 57 39
Birmingham 83 65 s 88 62
Boise 60 37 pc 66 44
Boston 60 37 s 56 36
Buffalo 50 29 s 53 32
Burlington, VT 49 31 s 47 28
Charleston, SC 89 64 pc 87 65
Charleston, WV 66 42 .18 ts 70 49
Charlotte 68 60 pc 84 62
Chicago 50 45 .25 pc 51 43
Cincinnati 53 43 .92 pc 68 49
Cleveland 46 37 .11 s 51 40
Columbia, SC 83 66 s 90 67
Columbus, OH 51 42 .07 pc 63 42
Concord, N.H. 55 32 s 54 20
Dallas 87 69 pc 85 69
Denver 61 35 pc 64 40
Des Moines 57 44 .03 sh 59 47
Detroit 47 41 s 56 38
El Paso 89 54 s 90 65
Evansville, IN 82 57 pc 77 59
Harrisburg 50 35 s 64 35
Hartford 60 38 s 55 29
Houston 86 72 pc 83 72
Indianapolis 52 44 .29 pc 62 49
Jackson 85 62 s 85 63
Las Vegas 81 65 s 86 65
Little Rock 85 67 pc 82 64
Los Angeles 68 55 s 67 59
Louisville 81 51 .01 pc 78 58
Memphis 86 66 pc 86 67
Milwaukee 43 39 .23 pc 50 42
Minneapolis 51 39 .25 pc 59 44
Mobile 83 63 s 85 65
Montgomery 86 59 s 91 63
Nashville 83 55 pc 84 62
KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02012 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


Saturday Sunday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
New Orleans 85 66 pc 86 70
New York City 60 38 s 63 42
Norfolk 63 52 .09 c 64 49
Oklahoma City 80 63 ts 77 59
Omaha 63 46 ts 64 47
Palm Springs 97 64 s 95 69
Philadelphia 55 38 s 65 40
Phoenix 92 65 s 94 69
Pittsburgh 45 32 .02 s 60 35
Portland, ME 53 30 s 52 28
Portland, Ore 64 48 c 65 50
Providence, R.I. 60 35 s 58 34
Raleigh 60 54 pc 74 54
Rapid City 53 40 .01 sh 56 38
Reno 70 40 s 77 48
Rochester, NY 48 27 s 53 31
Sacramento 83 46 s 85 56
St. Louis 80 56 .58 ts 66 58
St. Ste. Marie 53 28 s 54 33
Salt Lake City 54 33 pc 65 45
San Antonio 90 68 pc 87 70
San Diego 71 57 s 64 57
San Francisco 64 51 s 66 54
Savannah 91 64 s 88 65
Seattle 61 47 sh 61 48
Spokane 57 34 pc 56 40
Syracuse 50 26 s 53 28
Topeka 71 54 ts 58 53
Washington 56 45 .05 pc 67 43
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 98 Thermal, Calif. LOW 18 Big Piney,
Wyo.
WORLD CITIES


SUNDAY Lisbon
CITY H/L/SKY London
Acapulco 86/72/s Madrid
Amsterdam 60/52/sh Mexico City
Athens 78/58/s Montreal
Beijing 76/53/pc Moscow
Berlin 78/56/s Paris
Bermuda 73/68/c Rio
Cairo 88/65/pc Rome
Calgary 58/39/sh Sydney
Havana 84/69/r Tokyo
Hong Kong 83/78/sh Toronto
Jerusalem 76/55/c Warsaw


59/47/sh
58/45/sh
59/43/sh
80/51/sh
48/31/s
74/53/pc
61/47/c
86/69/sh
74/58/sh
67/55/c
74/59/pc
53/34/s
84/59/s


C I T R U S


C 0 U N TY


For the RECORD


LHRKON1CLL
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To start your subscription:
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0 Cn 106 W. Main
S 41 4Inverness, FL
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A4 SUNDAY, APRIL 29, 2012


LOCAL


A




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

MENUS
Continued from Page A2
High schools
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast sausage
pizza, MVP breakfast, grits, ce-
real and toast, milk, juice.
Tuesday: Sausage, egg and
cheese biscuit, ultra cinnamon
bun, tater tots, cereal and toast,
milk, juice.
Wednesday: Breakfast egg
and cheese wrap, MVP break-
fast, tater tots, cereal and toast,
milk, juice.
Thursday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, ultimate break-
fast round, grits, cereal and
toast, milk, juice.
Friday: Breakfast sandwich
stuffer, ultra cinnamon bun,
tater tots, cereal and toast, milk,
juice.
Lunch
Monday: Fajita chicken and
rice, hamburger, pizza, fajita


super salad, yogurt parfait,
fresh baby carrots, broccoli,
french fries, fruit juice bar,
crackers, milk.
Tuesday: Pasta with moz-
zarella and meat sauce,
chicken sandwich, pizza, turkey
super salad, yogurt parfait, gar-
den salad, sweet corn, peas
and carrots, french fries,
peaches, crackers, milk.
Wednesday: Baked chicken
tenders, pizza, hamburger,
turkey wrap, ham super salad,
PB dippers, baby carrots, peas,
dried fruit, mashed potatoes,
baked beans, french fries,
crackers, milk.
Thursday: Cheesy chicken
and rice burrito, chicken sand-
wich, pizza, turkey super salad,
yogurt parfait, garden salad,
green beans, sweet corn,
french fries, mixed fruit, crack-
ers, milk.
Friday: Creamy chicken al-
fredo, hamburger, pizza, ham
super salad, yogurt parfait,
fresh baby carrots, peas, baked


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Toll Free 1-877-345-BUSH Crystal River 795-8600
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352-586-7599


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french fries, peaches, milk.
Lecanto High School lunch
Monday: Chicken tenders,
macaroni and cheese, ham-
burger, chicken sandwich, fajita
chicken salad, pizza, yogurt
parfait, baby carrots, baked
beans, peas, french fries, juice
bar, baked chips, crackers,
milk.
Tuesday: Fajita chicken and
rice, pizza, turkey and gravy
over noodles, hamburger,
chicken salad, turkey salad, yo-
gurt parfait, garden salad,
sweet corn, green beans,
french fries, peaches, crackers,


baked chips, milk.
Wednesday: Turkey wrap,
chicken alfredo, hamburger,
chicken sandwich, pizza, ham
super salad, yogurt parfait,
baby carrots, french fries, ranch
pasta salad, broccoli, dried fruit
mix, baked chips, crackers,
milk.
Thursday: Breaded chicken,
macaroni and cheese, ham-
burger, chicken sandwich,
pizza, turkey super salad, yo-
gurt parfait, garden salad,
french fries, corn, seasoned
mashed potatoes, mixed fruit,
baked chips, crackers, milk.


Friday: Crispy Mexican tacos,
pizza, hamburger, chicken sand-
wich, spaghetti with mozzarella
and meat sauce, fajita chicken
salad, yogurt parfait, fresh baby
carrots, peas, french fries, Span-
ish rice, peaches baked chips,
crackers, milk.
SENIOR DINING
Monday: Beef with rotini
pasta, parslied carrots, Italian
vegetable medley, applesauce,
white bread with margarine,
low-fat milk.
Tuesday: Barbecued chicken
thigh, mashed potatoes, green
beans, graham crackers, slice
whole-grain bread with mar-
garine, low-fat milk.
Wednesday: Breaded fish
filet with tartar sauce, cheese


SUNDAY, APRIL 29, 2012 A5
grits, tomatoes and okra, oat-
meal raisin cookie, slice whole-
grain bread with margarine,
orange pineapple juice, low-fat
milk.
Thursday: Salisbury steak
with brown gravy, rice pilaf,
spinach, peaches, slice whole-
grain bread with margarine,
low-fat milk.
Friday: Pork chop patty with
brown gravy, black-eyed peas,
country vegetable medley,
mixed fruit, dinner roll with mar-
garine, low-fat milk.
Senior dining sites include:
Lecanto, East Citrus, Crystal
River, Homosassa Springs, In-
verness and South Dunnellon.
For information, call Support
Services at 352-527-5975.


with Multiple Product


Send your resume in confidence to:
The Villages of Citrus Hills
Attn: nancy@citrushills.com
Fax: 352-746-7707


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries


Daniel "Mike"
McCormick, 65
CRYSTAL RIVER


Robert
Blakesley, 88
SARASOTA
Robert B. Blakesley Aug.
7, 1923, to April 15, 2012,
passed away peacefully at
Manor Care, Sarasota, Fla.
Bob was a distinguished
World War II veteran,
worked at Columbus Auto
Parts, and retired from An-
heuser-Busch after 20 years.
A native of Columbus, Ohio,
he moved to Dunnellon, FL,
where he enjoyed his retire-
ment and volunteered for
more than 1,000 hours at
Rainbow Springs State
Park. He was also active in
VFW 8201. He then moved
to Bradenton, Fla.
Brown and Sons Funeral
Homes and Crematory are
in charge of arrangements.
Survivors include broth-
ers Bill, Dick and Jim; sis-
ters Pat, Nancy and
Virginia; sons Dan (Noe),
Bill, Bobby (Brenda) and
Tom; grandchildren Craig,
Sebastian, Marisa, Travis,
Brittany and Alyssa. He also
is survived by four great-
grandchildren and many
cousins, nieces and
nephews. He will be laid to
rest at Sarasota National
Cemetery beside his
beloved wife, Evelyn, at 2
p.m. May 3,2012.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.
Michelle
Drawdy, 47
CRYSTAL RIVER
Michelle Del Carmen
Wright Drawdy, 47, of Crys-
tal River, died Tuesday,
April 24,
2012, ofcan-
cer in HPH
Hospice
House of
Lecanto.
She was
born Octo-
W ber 9, 1964,
Michelle in Las
Drawdy Vegas, Ne-
vada, to the
late Suzanne Summers
Wright and James William
Wright. Michelle was office
manager for Dr. Geoffrey
Roberts. A good Christian
Seventh-day Adventist
She was deeply loved by
her family and all her many
wonderful friends. Mother
of Megan S. Drawdy, 22, of
Crystal River Longtime love
of David Lee Drawdy of
Morriston. Sister of Maria S.
Wright, Mark D. Borrego of
Homosassa, and Michael D.
Cupid of Philadelphia.
Wilder Funeral Home as-
sisting with private crema-
tion arrangements.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.






To Place Your
S"In Memory" ad,
Call Mike Snyder at 563-3273
msnyder@chronicleonline.com
or
Saralynne Schlumberger at 564-2917
sschlumberger@chronicleonline.com


OF HOMOSASSA, Inc.
w.verticalblindsofhomosassa.com
f More
Than Just
Lorrie Verticals

,ST 2" Faux Wood
Woven Woods
* Cellular & Roman Shades
Plantation Shutters
Ado Wraps
Custom Drapery
Top Treatmentsi
* Etc. S
5454 S. Suncoast Blvd.
(Hwy 19, next toSugarmill Family Rest.)


Daniel M.
Cormick, 65,
River, passed


"Mike" Mc-
of Crystal
away Tues.,
April 24,
2012, at his
home. A na-
tive of
Charleston,
WVa., he
was born
June 26,
1946, to Dil-
lard and
Mortan a
(Griffith)


McCormick and moved to
Crystal River in 1983 from
New Orleans.
Mike was a heavy equip-
ment operator by profes-
sion; was a member of
ABATE and loved motorcy-
cles, especially his Honda
Goldwing.
He is survived by his wife
of 22 years, Diane Mc-
Cormick, Crystal River;
brother David McCormick,
Sod, WVa., stepdaughters
Lorrie Cutsforth, Tracy Stef-
fenhagen, and Jessica Hens-
ley; stepgrandchildren
Amber Lafritz, Stephanie,
Jennifer and Codie
Cutsforth, Kalissa and
Jaiden Hensley; stepgreat-
grandchildren Elijah and
Justin Mosher; two nieces;
three nephews; great-nieces
and nephews; cousins; and
many friends. In addition to
his parents, Mike was pre-
ceded in death by his only
son, the late Daniel M. Mc-
Cormick Jr. in 2007; step-
daughter, the late Deborah
Jean Burch; and a sister, the
late Linda Dunlap. Wilder
Funeral Home, Homosassa
Springs.
wwwwilderfuneral.com.


I3D. Sr
SUEA" OO'
& CkEtM S


Douglas
Hummer, 91
INVERNESS
Douglas Dillon Hummer,
age 91, Inverness, died
Wednesday, April 25, 2012,
at Citrus Memorial hospital.
A graveside Masonic
honor service will be at 2:30
p.m. Monday, April 30, 2012,
at Fero Memorial Gardens
in Beverly Hills. Chas. E.
Davis Funeral Home with
Crematory is in charge of
arrangements.
Marcia
Michel, 66
INVERNESS
Marcia A. Michel, age 66,
Inverness, died Friday,
April 27, 2012, at HPH Hos-
pice Center in Inverness.
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory is
in charge of private
arrangements.
Vera
Moulton, 87
HOMOSASSA
Vera M. Moulton, 87, of
Homosassa, Fla., died Fri-
day, April 27, 2012, in Crys-
tal River
Arrangements are under
the direction of the Ho-
mosassa Chapel of Hooper
Funeral Home & Crematory

SO YOU KNOW
The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits both free and
paid obituaries. Email
obits@ chronicle
online.com or phone
352-563-5660 for
details and pricing
options.
Paid obituaries are
printed as submitted by
funeral homes.




Funeral Home
With Crematory
Burial Shipping
Cremation
Member of
International Order of the



For Information and costs,
0009YE4 call 726-8323


Scandal highlights lack of


women in Secret Service


Associated Press
WASHINGTON Secret
Service agents are often
portrayed in popular cul-
ture as disciplined, unflap-
pable, loyal and male. A
spiraling prostitution scan-
dal that has highlighted the
dearth of women in the
agency that protects the
president and dignitaries
has many wondering: Would
more females in the ranks
prevent future dishonor?
Only about a tenth of
field agents and uniformed
officers are women, a
shortage some attribute to
travel demands that can be
especially taxing on
women balancing families
and careers. A scandal that
risks portraying the agency
as unfriendly to women,
however, could set back ef-
forts to close the gender
gap.
"I can't help but think
that there would be some
progress if there was more
diversity and if there were
more women that were
there," said Rep. Carolyn


Associated Press
A female Secret Service agent introduces herself May 3,
2007, to Chicago Police outside the home of then-Democ-
ratic Sen. Barack Obama, in Chicago's Hyde Park neigh-
borhood. The Secret Service has been tarnished by a
prostitution scandal that erupted April 13 in Colombia in-
volving 12 Secret Service agents, officers and supervisors
and 12 more enlisted military personnel ahead of President
Barack Obama's visit there for the Summit of the
Americas.


Maloney, D-N.Y, of the
House Oversight and Gov-
ernment Reform Commit-
tee. "When you have a
diversity of people there, it
brings more accountability.
What you see is a lack of ac-


Touching lives, improving life. 1kGTM
oual3oD1


WELLRfl^MBCOMEL NIL


countability in this."
Women make up about 25
percent of the agency's
workforce, but only about
11 percent of agents and
uniformed officers, said
spokesman Ed Donovan.










Burial
Cremation
Pre-Planning
Funeral Directors
C. Lyman Strickland & Tom L. Pace
1901 SE HwY. 19
CRYSTAL RIVER
352-795-2678
www.stricklandfuneralhome.com



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Your


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for hearing aid
comparison study.
Gardner Audiology
invites you to join a field
study that will compare
conventional digital
hearing aids with Spectral
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boosts speech recognition
because it bypasses
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amplified speech to the
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largest manufacturer of
hearing aids in the U.S.,
is partnering with
Gardner Audiology to
perform this study.
You will receive free
services that include:
candidate screenings,
evaluation, lab services,
and hearing aid fittings in
exchange for sharing your
experience on pre and
post fitting questionnaires.
At the end of 30 days you
will return the study aids
or purchase at a discount.
It's your choice.
Call 795-5700
Crystal River Inverness
Over 2000 participants
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reduced fee services, examination, or treatment. Cosmetic dentistry is not recognized as a specialty area
by the American Dental Association or the Florida Board of Dentistry. Some restrictions may apply.


A6 SUNDAY, APRIL 29, 2012


*





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


PAID ADVERTISEMENT


NEWS IN BRIEF
STAFF REPORT
Ed Johnson, heavy equip-
ment operator, was surprised
when he pulled the giant scoop
of earth from the basement he
was digging. "What is that?" he
thought. "An old whiskey bar-
rel or a wooden box of some
kind?" He jumped off his back-
hoe to investigate. As he ap-
proached, his mind was racing.
He could see that the wooden
box was badly decayed and full
of something. As he got closer,
he could make out a sword, an
old canteen and remnants of an
old military uniform. While sift-
ing through the box, he found a
bugle, tattered papers and some
military badges. It appeared to
be the belongings of a soldier of
some kind. He spent the rest of
the day collecting and examin-
ing the items he had found. He
needed to find out more.
The next morning he
stopped by the local coffee shop
to ask questions about the lot he
was digging on. He stopped at
the right place. Three elderly
gentlemen were swapping sto-
ries as they did every morning.
Ed approached the group and
asked if they were from the
area. They all laughed and said
"Who's asking?" Ed explained
that he was building a new
house on a lot he recently pur-
chased and told them where it
was. One gentlemen said, "Oh,
you mean the old Norris place?
That place was demolished over
50 years ago. Been an empty lot
ever since." Ed was intrigued-
he hadn't realized there had
been a house there. "Place
caught fire in the 1940's. I was
just a school boy at the time-
no one was home, but the place
was a total loss. The charred
remains sat there for 4 or 5
years before it was cleaned up.
I walked past that place twice a
day, five days a week, back and
forth from school. Went all the
way to the 8th grade," the fel-
low said with a smile. "After
that, no one ever rebuilt on the
lot. I'm glad to see somebody's
doing something with it. Go
down and talk to Larry at the
court house. He can pull the plat
book and tell you all about it."
The old guy was right, Larry
was a wealth of information.
The original farm house was
built by Elsie and Thomas Lit-
tle back in 1845. They moved
out and sold to Elijah Miller in
1883. Then in 1916, the place
was sold to Henry Norris who
tore down the existing two-
room farm house and built a
new house. That house burned
down in 1943.
All of this was great info,
now what about the military
items? Ed needed to find out
exactly what they were. When
Ed learned that the Treasure
Hunters were coming to town,
he thought this would be his
chance to learn more about
the items he had found. The
advertisement had said that
the experts would offer advice
on any antique and collectible
items and they would do it for
free. It also said that they would
make offers to purchase items.
He wasn't interested in selling,
but you never know. Hey, if the
price is right, who knows?
Ed walked into the hotel
where the show was and fol-
lowed the signs to the meeting
room with great anticipation.
"My heart was actually beat-
ing at twice the normal rate," he
said. "As soon as I walked in I
was welcomed to the show and
given a number. They said it
would be about 10 minutes un-
til they would call my number.
While I waited, I looked at all
the unusual antiques on display.
There were old toys, coins, sil-
ver tea sets and old metal signs.
There was even a sword simi-
lar to mine. My number was
called and it was the moment
I'd been waiting for. I would
finally learn about the items I
had found."
Ed continued, "almost im-
mediately after I sat down,
Greg the antique guru was as-
signed to assist me said, 'hey
nice Civil War sword and bu-
gle. Where did you get them?'
I told him my story and he said
the family most likely buried
the items in honor of the sol-
dier who owned them, and who
most likely fought in the Civil
War." The soldier's uniform, or
what was left of it, the sword
and other items would have
been distributed by the Union
Army. The items were that of
an infantry soldier and dated at
around 1863. Because a bugle
was found, this soldier was
most likely the company bugle
boy. Most buglers were young
boys. Also, the hat in the col-
lection would have fit a very
small head-that of a 12 to 14
year old boy.
Greg also explained that
since the uniform, sword and
other items were together, the
soldier most surely survived the
war and returned home. Ed re-
flected that "learning about the
items was very interesting and
definitely worth the trip. The


entire collection was valued at
$2,200. Most of the value was
the sword and the bugle. I de-
cided to take pictures and sell
the collection. I had a great time
learning about it and thought it
should be in a Civil War enthu-
siast's collection. I'm actually
having a small monument made
in honor of the find and putting
it at the exact location where it
was found."


OOOB9WN


Treasure Hunters are coming to Lecanto


BY DAVID MORGAN
STAFF WRITER

Got Booty? If you
have a coffee can full of
old coins, an old guitar
or maybe the costume
jewelry your aunt gave
you, it's time to bring it
out of hiding. This week,
Treasure Hunters will be
in town and want to see
what you have. These
Treasure Hunters aren't
armed with a shovel and
metal detector, rather
their weapon of choice
is their expertise and
the collectors they buy
for. You see, these guys
know all about diamonds,
coins, antiques and col-
lectibles, musical instru-
ments and anything that's
old. They are asking you
to bring your booty and


make your best deal.
These guys pay cash for
just about anything that's
old. The items they buy
go straight to collectors
all over the world. How
much is a 1960 Gibson
Les Paul worth? Well, to
some, it might be worth
a couple hundred dol-
lars but to a serious col-
lector it could be worth
thousands, even ten's of
thousands. These guys
are buying for these col-
lectors. They pay more
for the things their col-
lectors want.
The event is free to at-
tend and there is no ob-
ligation to sell anything.
If it's information you
want, that won't cost you
a thing. But be prepared,
as an offer to purchase
your treasures is high-


ly likely. About eighty
percent of the stuff that
comes into the show is
purchased by these hun-
gry treasure hunters.
According to the Trea-
sure Hunters I talked to,
the wait time to get your
items looked at is usually
a half hour or less. Once
there, your items will be
examined, identified and
an offer will quickly fol-
low. Then it's up to you...
do I sell, do I hold out for
more or do I walk? The
whole thing sounds like a
lot of fun and might put
some jingle in your pock-
et. So dig up that booty
and head down to the
show. You might have the
treasure they have been
looking for!


ABOVE A customer brought in his father's coin collection that he had
inherited. He was pleasantly surprised with his offer and decided to
sell the collection. He said that the money would go towards a down
payment on a house for his family.


WE WANT TO
BUY ANY TYPE
OF GOLD
YOU HAVE
GOLD IS ALMOST AT
$1,700 PER OZ.
IT'S TIME TO SELL!

Hi, I'm
Archie.
I've been
a Trea-
sure Hunt-
er since
1996. Back then, gold
was around $225 per
oz.-now it's six times
that. Gold has never been
this high and may never
be again in my lifetime.
Back in the 1980's,
gold and silver soared in
price, but soon fell back
to rock bottom. Well, it's
a seller's market right
now. The poor world
economy and weak dol-
lar have increased prices
to all-time highs. My ad-
vice to people is to sell
now at the high side.
Many people have
gold in their jewelry box
and don't realize how
valuable it really is. If
you've got old rings,
necklaces, mismatched
earrings or even gold
teeth just sitting in a
dresser drawer, dig it out
and bring it in. You will
be surprised just how
much we can pay you.


Old Coins and

Paper Currency
Did you know that the United States started mint-
ing coins in 1793? All coins are worth something:
old silver dollars, half dollars, quarters and dimes
made before 1965 are mostly silver and worth many
times their face value. A $20 gold coin from the ear-
ly 1 900's could be worth $2,000 or more to collec-
tors. If you have any older coins or paper currency,
please come see us. We will buy one coin or million
dollar collections.


JEFFERSON "WAR"
NICKEL





ROOSEVELT DIME


WASHINGTON QUARTER


KENNEDY HALF


MORGAN DOLLAR






$20 LIBERTY HEAD
DOUBLE EAGLE


MERCURY DIME


STANDING LIBERTY
QUARTER


3
WALKING LIBERTY HALF
WALKING LIBERTY HALF


FRANKLIN HALF


PEACE DOLLAR


$20 ST. GAUDENS
DOUBLE EAGLE


BUYING PRE-1934 PAPER CURRENCY




~,


*fl


Hi, my name is David. I've been
collecting coins since I was a child. I
can't wait to visit with you and exam-
ine your old coins and paper currency.
I will be honest and fair with you and
pay you as much as I can for your old


coins. I have purchased millions of dollars worth of
coins from people all over the world.


LUELD
SILVER


5 DAY BUYING EVENT



TUESDAY-FRIDAY 9AM-6PM SATURDAY 9AM-4PM

HOLIDAY INN EXPRESS & SUITES
903 E. GULF TO LAKE HWY. LECANTO, FL 34461

DIRECTIONS 352.341.3515
INFORMATION 217.787.7767


f What kind of things are
they looking for?

I'm Tony, and I get asked this
question a lot. I usually say, "if
it's gold or old, they will prob-
ably be interested in it." I know that's a vague
answer, so here's a list that might get you
thinking:

Gold Jewelry, Costume Jewelry, Dia-
monds, Silver Coins, Silver Dollars,
Gold Coins, Old Paper Currency, Old
Wheat Pennies, Old Pocket Watches,
Toys made before 1 970, Wrist Watch-
es, Foreign Coins, Silver Bullion, Ster-
ling Silver, Barbie Dolls, Tonka Trucks,
Coin Collections, Advertising Signs,
Old Guitars, Saxophones, All Musical
Instruments, Comic Books, Historical
Documents, Oil Paintings


MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS WANTED
We pay for any instrument, including guitars,
saxophones, clarinets, flutes, drums, cymbals,
french horns, tubas and bass guitars.









S..




SILVER
S Hi, I'm Dennis and I am a Treasure
Hunter. Silver is almost $35 per oz. Five
years ago, it was $2.50 per oz. If you
have old silver jewelry, tea sets, sterling
and old silver coins, I want to see it. I
buy hundreds of pounds of silver every
week. If it's silver, please come and see me!


BUYING ALL POCKET WATCHES
AND WRISTWATCHES
We are one of the largest pocket watch and
wristwatch buyers in the world. We deal in
all makes and models, including:

MARTIN BRAUN, BREITLING, CARTIER,
LECOULTRE, OMEGA, PATEK PHILIPPE,
ROLEX, TIFFANY & CO., VACHERON &
CONSTANTIN, HAMILTON, ILLINOIS


SUNDAY, APRIL 29, 2012 A7


BI -A


I *W". 0-1





A8 SUNDAY, APRIL 29, 2012


QUALITY OF LIFE


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



N f


Students express sentiments through art


Editor's note: Juniors at the Lecanto were asked to explain their feelings on
School of Art's advanced placement class being part of the "Testing Generation" via


Candice Christian: "The stress, anxiety, studying,
pressure, rushing and the USELESSNESS of it all."

Tawnie Tricomi: "We go through our classes, do all our
work, take all our quizzes, all for what? To take the
FCAT and SATs and ACTs and CBATs and now even
EOC ... tests that some people can't even take
successfully due to nerves and being terrified that if they
mess up, their future will be curved and may not become
successful. How would YOU feel?"


their artwork. Here is a sampling, along
with some comments by the artists.


Ashley Saunders: "I feel like this test has been
strangling me. I know that if I don't pass I won't be able
to graduate. Not graduating has been my
CITRUS COUNTY greatest fear; the weight on my shoulder is
QUALI Y tremendous."
< OFr<3!,

LIFE, Noor-Rose Alyounces: "I've noticed that with
&-& \ all the testing that my generation has to do,
2012 Chronicle project
there is so much emphasis on college, test
scores and all things education, and hardly any emphasis
on artistic or vocational programs."











; 'IJ"


DIPLOMA
Continued from Page Al
school students to take courses that
simultaneously provide high school
and college credit Because it's part
of the high school curriculum, the
courses even those taken at CF -
come at no cost to parents.
In Regan's case, she took the nec-


essary core classes her freshman
and sophomore years in high
school, and then switched to an all-
college course load that also
counted toward her high school
diploma as well.
She began the college courses
during the summer after her soph-
omore year at Crystal River High,
and Regan has virtually continued
in school since then, stopping only
for normal school breaks.


Regan said she doesn't miss
summer vacation.
"What do you do in the summer?
Sleep?" she said.
It's also not like Regan was
locked her in room studying all the
time. She was a cheerleader and
participated in track and cross
country She meets with her
friends like other high school
teens.
"I don't think I missed out on


anything," she said.
Regan will be entering the Uni-
versity of Florida in the fall as a
junior, hoping to major in crimi-
nology law. She said her time on
the CF campus helped her prepare
for life at a university.
"I have the time management
down pat," she said.
Regan wants to attend law
school and work for her Ph.D.
Her mother, coincidentally, also


attended CF this year and is grad-
uating with a nursing degree.
And Regan's sister, Tate, is a Cit-
rus Springs Middle School sixth-
grader with straight As.
"She loves school," Townsend
said.
Regan also enjoyed her school
years.
"I love school. I love learning,"
she said. "It's given me a lot of self-
confidence."


4-





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


TEST
Continued from Page Al

weeks of FCAT everything
comes to a screeching halt.
That's two weeks we're not
teaching. We're spending so
much time testing kids that
we're losing out on instruc-
tional time."Students ac-
knowledge the pressure, but
most say it's just a regular
part of life.
"If we weren't testing,"
Lecanto High senior Taylor
Keeran said, "I think we
would all be really confused
why we weren't testing."
MEN
Cody Rankin may be only
9, but he knows the FCAT
truth.
"I want to pass it so I can
go to the fourth grade," the
Pleasant Grove Elementary
third-grader said. "I've
never failed a grade."
FCAT tests are scored on
a scale of 1 to 5. Students
must score at least a 2 in
reading to advance to the
fourth grade. They need to
score a 3 or higher in math
to avoid remediation the fol-
lowing year
Educators know that ele-
mentary schoolchildren, in
particular, can struggle -
sometimes not with the ma-
terial itself, but the way the
test is administered.
So they conducted pre-
FCAT exercises at the ele-
mentary schools to give
children pointers.
Gathering in the library,
PGE Principal Lynne Kirby
encouraged her third-
graders to relax.
"It's not anything to be
stressed about," she said. "I
want you to take a deep
breath and let that stress
out. You're going to be just
fine."
Brady Hannett, a teacher
on special assignment, and
program specialist John
Mullen lead children
through several sample
FCAT questions. While this
is math, all the questions
are in story form and re-



IB
Continued from Page1Al

"The International Bac-
calaureate (IB) program of-
fers an internationally
competitive curriculum in
the 11th and 12th grade to
challenge those students
with a demonstrated talent
in academics and a need for
an advanced curriculum to
match their high motivation.
The program is designed to
develop both the academic
and social skills of academi-
cally talented students inter-
ested in curricular and
extracurricular experiences
not offered through the regu-
lar high school curriculum."
Teacher Darrick Buett-
ner, who coordinates the
program at Lecanto High,
said the International Bac-
calaureate Organization in
Cardiff, Wales, United King-
dom, must authorize indi-
vidual schools before they
can offer IB programs.
Lecanto High is the only
school in Citrus County au-
thorized to offer the
diploma program to high
school juniors and seniors.
Students say they are not
only challenged by the aca-
demic learning that takes
place, but the program also
strongly encourages inde-
pendent thought backed by
knowledge in science, his-
tory, math, language and the
arts.
One course Theory of
Knowledge is entirely de-
voted to those discussions.
"In other classes we have
to wait until after the class
to talk about the application
of whatever we're learning,"
junior Adrian Fonseca said.
"The entire class is devoted
to that"
Students say the workload
is tremendous and can be
overwhelming at times.
Lecanto High offers a pre-
IB program for freshmen


and sophomores called
Preparing for IB Studies, or
PIBS, designed to both pre-
pare some students for the
rigors of IB and weed out
those who decide on an-
other high school path.
Taylor Keeran, who is
part of this year's graduat-
ing class, said 70 students
were in the first freshman
PIBS class and about half
made it through the entire
four years.
"Our sophomore year, Mr
Buettner would ask about
once a week, 'What's your
stress level this week? How
many hours of homework are


QUALITY OF LIFE


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Hannah Viglione solves a math problem during an FCAT preparation class at Pleasant Grove
Elementary School in Inverness.


quire students to pay close
attention.
"You should read that
question at least three times,"
Mullen said. "Read it to your-
self the way your teacher
would read it to you."
Hannett also encourages
children to read each ques-
tion carefully
"Guys, it's not that diffi-
cult," he said. "It's not a
hard test if you take your
time."
Kirby later said children
like Cody grasp the signifi-
cance of the FCAT scoring.
"The line in the sand is
definite," she said. "They
have to be at grade level."
Actually, very few stu-
dents are detained solely on
FCAT results. Last year, of
1,071 third-graders, only 29
were retained because they
did not score higher than a
1 in reading, said Patrick
Simon, the district's direc-
tor of research and
accountability
Children who fail the
FCAT during the school
year receive remediation
and another chance to take
the test before the next
school year begins. Simon


said many students pass the
FCAT on the second chance.
Cody was hoping for the
best.
"I've taken tons and tons
of tests," the 9-year-old said.
"My dad said if I pass the
FCAT that would be really
great."
MEN
Daisy Souther loves art.
The Lecanto High School
junior is enrolled at the Art
Academy and spends her
lunch hour in the art class-
room, working on her latest
project.
Like many students,
Souther doesn't think much
about being a member of the
testing generation.
"We grew up with it," she
said. "It's normal. It's just
that you have to know to do
things."
Souther, however, may
feel differently after her ex-
perience with PERT.
The Post Secondary Edu-
cation Readiness Test is de-
signed to make sure high
school graduates have a
seamless academic transi-
tion to college. Odd thing is,
PERT is given to high
school juniors whether they


have plans for college or
not
Failing any part of the
PERT math, writing or
reading test requires a stu-
dent to take a post-sec-
ondary remedial class her
senior year. And that reme-
dial class would take the
place of an elective class.
Souther received a 4, one
level below the highest
grade. Yet, she failed the
PERT math test by two
points and now must wait to
see if her SAT scores are
high enough to overcome the
PERT results so that she can
avoid remediation next year.
"I'm not in the clear at
all," she said. "I just don't
want to think about it."
MEN
The problem with placing
so much focus on tests, edu-
cators say, is the impact on
students who do well in the
classroom but freeze under
the pressure.
Simply put, some kids
don't test well.
High school students
must pass FCAT reading
and writing to graduate.
The tests are adminis-
tered in the 10th grade; stu-


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Adrian Fonseca listens to a classmate during a class discussion on knowledge in his
Lecanto High School International Baccalaureate class. The diagram on the board behind
him was used by the teacher to illustrate areas of knowledge.


There was a time I wanted to
completely quit IB and I talked
with my mom and my mom said
I couldn't quit.

Jessica Jackson
International Baccalaureate student at Lecanto High School.


you doing?"' Keeran said.
Daly added: "Looking
back on what we did, some-
times I think wow, I can't
believe we did all that!"


Jackson admitted the
stress at times was
unbearable.
"I've actually complained
about it a couple times," she


said. "There was a time I
wanted to completely quit
IB and I talked with my
mom and my mom said I
couldn't quit. I was strug-
gling, trying to get every-
thing in homework, tests.
I didn't feel like this is
where I belonged. I'm glad
it's almost over."
Despite the workload,
though, students say they
need the challenge that IB
provides.
"We do learn a lot," junior
William Davis said, "and we
learn it fast."


SUNDAY, APRIL 29, 2012 A9


GLOSSARY OF TERMS
Some lowdown on the tests:
* FCAT Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test.
Graded on score of 1 to 5; third-graders are retained
with a level 1 score; tests reading in grades 3 to 10;
math grades 3 through 8, and writing or science
mixed in; test is computerized and based on Sunshine
State Standards.
* PERT Post Secondary Education Readiness Test.
Computer based test for high school juniors in the
areas of reading, writing and math. The test is 25
questions and difficulty increases with each correct
answer, so no two tests are alike. Designed to ensure
high school graduates are prepared academically for
college. Failing PERT requires students to take a post-
secondary remedial course their senior year, whether
they plan to attend college or not.
H AP Advanced Placement. College-level courses and
tests that provide high school and college credit simul-
taneously. Multiple course subjects.
* SAT Scholastic Aptitude Test for reading, english
and math.
* ACT American College Testing Program; reading,
science, math and writing in grades 4, 8 and 10.
* EOC End of Course exams. State-issued tests that
are required to pass the courses. Includes biology,
algebra and, in 2013, geometry.
* IB International Baccalaureate. Seniors must pass
for an IB diploma.
Sources: Citrus County Schools;
School Board member Pat Deutschman


dents who fail receive re-
mediation and several
chances to retest before
graduation.
Citrus High had 200 FCAT
retakes about a third of
the students taking the test
- in the 11th or 12th
grades, assistant principal
Teresa Alvarado said.
Keith Crisp teaches reme-
dial reading at Citrus High
School.
His students have not
earned a 3 or higher on the
FCAT reading and they
know the clock is ticking.
Sophomore Patricia De
Noma is borderline dyslexic
and struggles with reading.
Her mother reads to her,
and that helps De Noma
learn how to follow a story
But she admits being
nervous about her FCAT
tests and she won't know
until this summer whether


she passed or not
"I honestly don't know
how well I did," De Noma
said.
Fellow sophomore Austin
Wilcoxon recalled passing
his first FCAT in third grade.
"I remember how hard I
would try but I almost ran
out of time," he said.
The stress is worse now,
especially knowing that
FCAT scores are calculated
for the school's grade and
even a teacher's pay
"They're telling you that
you have to pass," Wilcoxon
said. "The pressure is on us.
We all want to do good. The
administration expects us to
represent the school.
"It's just something we
have to do."
Chronicle reporter Mike
Wright can be reached at
352-563-3228 or mwright@
chronicleonline com.


2011-12 ENROLLMENT COUNTS
in Citrus County public schools as of 04/25/2012.
For grade-by-grade listings, view the PDF file on
www.chronicleonline.com with the testing story.
School Nam e.............................................. Enrolled
* Central Ridge Elementary ........................... 760
* Citrus Springs Elementary ......................... 696
* Crystal River Primary ................................. 618
* Floral City Elementary ................................. 359
* Forest Ridge Elementary ............................. 742
* Hernando Elementary ................................. 659
* Homosassa Elementary ............................... 319
* Inverness Prim ary ......................... .......... 695
* Lecanto Primary ................ .... ............... 761
* Pleasant Grove Elementary ......................... 723
* Rock Crusher Elementary ........................... 665
* Elementary School Total ............................6,997
* Citrus Springs M iddle ................................. 775
* Crystal River M iddle ................................... 801
* Inverness M iddle ..................................... 1,079
* Lecanto M iddle ................ ..... .............. 740
* Middle School Total ..................................3,395
School Name ......................Grade ..........Enrolled
* C itrus H igh ........................09 ........................379
* C itrus H igh ........................10 ........................396
* C itrus H igh ........................11 ........................3 78
* C itrus H igh ........................12 ........................399
* Citrus H igh ......................... ................... 1,552
* Crystal River High ..............09 ........................327
* Crystal River High ..............10 ........................293
* Crystal River High ..............11 ........................291
* Crystal River High ..............12 ........................269
* Crystal River High ................................... 1,180
* Lecanto H igh ....................09 ........................489
* Lecanto H igh ....................10 ........................420
* Lecanto H igh .................... 1 ........................4 15
* Lecanto H igh ....................12 ........................ 423
* Lecanto High .................. ...................... 1,747
* High School Total ......................................4,479
School Nam e.............................................. Enrolled
* Academy of Environmental Science .............. 102
* CREST .................................... 168
* Renaissance ................... ...................... 124
* Withlacoochee Technical Institute ................ 438
* Alternative School Total ............................832

* District Total (PK-12) without Alternative Schools ..
................................................................. 14 ,8 7 1
* District Total with Alternative Schools ........15,703
Source: Department of Planning and Growth Management



QUALITY





A10 SUNDAY, APRIL 29, 2012


LAWS
Continued from Page Al

Another provision allows
suspected illegal immi-
grants to be arrested with-
out warrants
"The justices sent a clear
signal that there's a huge
zone for state action in this
area," Stein said. "There
will be an enormous amount
of energy spent in the next
few months examining the
full range of possibilities."
For starters, a ruling in
favor of Arizona's Senate
Bill 1070 would likely en-
able Alabama, Georgia, In-
diana, South Carolina and
Utah to move forward with
comparable measures that
were enacted but have been
on hold pending the high
court's decision.
"IfArizona does very well,
we'll do very well," said Ala-
bama Sen. Scott Beason,
sponsor of a law that in
some respects is tougher
than Arizona's. In addition
to requiring police to deter-
mine citizenship status dur-
ing traffic stops, it directs
government offices to verify
legal residency for transac-
tions like obtaining a car li-
cense, enrolling a child in
school and getting a job.
Lawmakers in such di-
verse states as Mississippi
and Pennsylvania said they
would be eager to follow the
Arizona/Alabama model if
the Supreme Court gives a
green light.
"You look at poll after poll
after poll, whether they're a
business owner or em-
ployee or small business
owner or executive, the ma-
jority of Americans support
bills like 1070," said Penn-
sylvania Rep. Daryl Met-
calfe, a Republican who
chairs the House State Gov-
ernment Committee.
Metcalfe has already in-
troduced a bill that incorpo-
rates Arizona's law and is
waiting for a favorable
Supreme Court ruling to
bring it up in his committee.
In Mississippi, a get-tough
immigration bill passed the
House earlier this year but
died in a Senate committee.
Its backers plan to try again
next year, and hope for a
Supreme Court ruling that
gives them guidance.
"This just ensures to the
taxpayers of Mississippi
that when we pass the law,
we won't end up in a long
court battle," said Republi-
can Rep. Becky Currie.
As in Mississippi, South
Dakota lawmakers also
have rejected a measure
based on the Arizona law,
but its sponsor, Republican
Rep. Manny Steele of Sioux
Falls, says he's ready to try
again.
"I would be excited to get
another bill going back in
there, according to what the
Supreme Court decision is,"
Steele said.
In Rhode Island, Rep.
Peter Palumbo said he was
pleased by the Supreme
Court's apparent support
for allowing states to en-
force immigration law.
"It's tremendous," said
Palumbo, a Democrat who
would like to empower the
state police to help federal
authorities with immigra-
tion enforcement
In several states where
neither major party has a
monopoly on power- Iowa,
Colorado, Montana and
Kentucky, among them -
lawmakers said the fate of
any hardline immigration
bill likely will depend on
the outcome of state elec-
tions in November
One of Kentucky's leading
critics of illegal immigra-
tion, Republican Rep. Stan
Lee, said an Arizona-style
bill has little chance of over-
coming staunch opposition
from the Democratic major-
ity in the House.
"Even if the Supreme
Court upholds all or virtu-
ally all of that, I don't expect
to pursue any of that type of
legislation unless there's a


significant change in the
makeup of the House," Lee
said. "The votes, as I've dis-
covered, just aren't there."
In Minnesota, Republican
Rep. Steve Drazkowski said
he'll consider proposing a
bill modeled in part on the
Arizona law but acknowl-
edged that it could well be
vetoed by Democratic Gov.
Mark Dayton, whose term
runs until 2014.
In Kansas, where Repub-
licans dominate, GOP legis-
lators are split over
immigration, preventing ac-
tion both on proposals to
crack down on illegal immi-
gration and a business-
backed program to place


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


/~


I


A'
V


Associated Press
Immigration reform advocate Rep. Becky Currie, R-Brookhaven, right, confers Thursday with House Education Committee chairman John Moore, R-Bran-
don, at the Capitol in Jackson, Miss. Currie is a staunch proponent for stronger immigration laws.


some immigrants in hard-to-
fill jobs in farming and
other sectors.
Among the leaders of the
get-tough faction in Kansas
is Secretary of State Kris
Kobach, a former law pro-
fessor who helped write the
Arizona and Alabama laws.
Kobach said the Supreme
Court arguments bolstered
his view that the most con-
troversial part of the Ari-
zona law the "show your
papers" provision would
withstand a legal challenge.
If the Supreme Court up-
holds key parts of the law, "it
will be a huge green light,"
he said. "All of the other
states will have a blueprint
that they can copy."
In Virginia, which already
has numerous restrictive
immigration laws, Republi-
can Delegate David Albo
said there may not be room
for many more.
"We're already bumping
up against the legal limits of
what we're allowed to do,"
said Albo, author of a law
that denies adult illegal im-
migrants non-emergency
public benefits such as food
stamps and welfare benefits.
In many states, there is lit-
tle or no prospect for adopt-
ing Arizona-style laws
anytime soon. In some
cases, such as in Idaho, it's
because the agriculture in-
dustry worries about losing
needed workers; elsewhere
it's a question of immigrant-
friendly politics.
"I can't envision the state
adopting the position that
we should be enforcing im-
migrant laws," said New
York Gov. Andrew Cuomo,
noting that his state has
ample law enforcement


total, roughly 6.1 million are
from Mexico, down from
nearly 7 million in 2007, ac-
cording to a Pew Hispanic
Center study released Mon-
day That decline has coin-
cided with a cooling-offofthe
immigration debate in some
states, such as Tennessee.
"It doesn't seem to have
the same numbers that were
here a couple of years ago,"
said state Sen. Bill Ketron, a
Republican who has spon-
sored a number of bills tar-
geting illegal immigrants.
Clarissa Martinez of the
National Council of La
Raza, a Hispanic civil rights
and advocacy organization,
predicted that most states -
regardless of the Supreme
Court's decision would
stay away from Arizona-type
laws out of self-interest.
"For most of them, the
balance sheets do not add
up," she said, referring to
the Alabama law that has
created burdens for some
businesses and caused


farmers to complain about
lack of workers to pick their
crops.
Vermont, where a growing
number of Hispanic mi-
grants work in the dairy in-
dustry, is among a handful
of states overtly welcoming
immigrants regardless of
their legal status. Last fall,
Gov Peter Shumlin urged
police to "look the other
way" when the only legal
problem might be an immi-
gration violation.
"Vermont is the antithesis
of Arizona," said Rep. Suzi
Wizowaty of Burlington,
who has backed a bill to re-
quire police to follow such
policies. "Our goal in Ver-
mont is to be the kind of
place that welcomes all
kinds of people."
The welcome mat is out in
Alaska, also.
"We want more immi-
grants," said Republican
Rep. Paul Seaton. "There
just aren't people from here
to do the work."


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challenges on its plate
already
In Illinois, which has
some of the most immigrant-
friendly laws in the nation,
Republican Rep. Randy
Ramey has tried four times
to propose an Arizona-style
law but failed to get a meas-
ure out of committee. Heart-
ened by the Supreme Court
arguments, Ramey said he
may try again despite the
odds.
"It encourages me, but
doesn't mean anything will
move here as long as De-
mocrats are in charge," he
said. "They'll just laugh at
it."
Stands on the issue don't


always follow predictable
party lines. Republican
Govs. Susana Martinez of
New Mexico and Brian San-
doval of Nevada both His-
panics say Arizona-style
laws aren't needed in their
states. Hispanics account
for 46 percent of the popula-
tion in New Mexico, the
highest proportion of any
state.
"Gov Martinez fully be-
lieves that any policies ad-
dressing illegal immigration
have to begin at the federal
level," said her spokesman,
Greg Blair.
There are an estimated 11
million illegal immigrants in
the United States. Of that


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Alabama tornado victims remember

About 62 twisters tore through the state, leaving more than 250 dead and destroying several towns


Associated Press
Sherrell and Bobby Barnwell hold their grandson Michael,
whom they are raising, as they stand beside a memorial
Saturday in Hackleburg, Ala. The memorial is dedicated to
the victims of the April 27, 2011, tornado which devastated
Hackleburg. The Barnwell's daughter Bridgett Barnwell,
Michael's mother's name is etched on the dark stone
behind them.


Kevin Gloda, left, of Baton
Rouge, La., Robert McCray
of Tuscaloosa and Aaron
Fleshner, right, of Spring,
Texas, sit on a dock to
reflect Friday at Forest Lake
in Tuscaloosa, Ala.


: Shay Harris
listens as first responders
are thanked at a tornado
commemoration service, Cel-
ebrate Birmingham, Tragedy
to Triumph, on Friday in Pratt
City, Ala. Harris lost her
home to the storm but was
able to rebuild.
: Garrett LeClere
wears a button with a photo
of him and his parents, Jay
and Amy LeClere, during a
memorial service Friday at
the Phil Campbell football
stadium in Phil Campbell,
Ala. Garrett's home was de-
stroyed by a tornado a year
ago, killing his parents and
severely injuring him. People
across Alabama are
remembering the horror of a
deadly twister outbreak a
year ago. Memorials took
place in the college town of
Tuscaloosa and smaller com-
munities still struggling to re-
build. Empty lots and debris
still remain in many areas.


HEALTH


SCREENING

Wednesday, May 9

Vision Cataract Glaucoma
Blood Pressure Eyeglass Adjustments
Linda Azwell, OD


Please RSVP
352.795.3317
Crystal Eye Center
1124 N. Suncoast Blvd.
Crystal River, FL 34429


In association with:
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Friday, May 4, 2012

8:30 am 11:30 am
Complimentary continental breakfast


HOSPICE
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of the Nature Coast
LKmsed 1985
OOBAHK


Lakeside Bar & Grill
4543 East Windmill Drive,
Inverness
Call Linda Baker
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E


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SUNDAY, APRIL 29, 2012 All











NATION


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


orBRIEFS U.S.-Chinese relations deteriorate

Beautiful


Associated Press
Models wait on their way
to the jury during the fifth
German Nailart-Trophy
'Waterworld The Deep
Blue' at the Beauty Forum
and Trade Fair on Saturday
in Leipzig, Germany.

Chavez returns
after treatment
CARACAS, Venezuela -
Venezuelan President Hugo
Chavez has returned home
after 11 days of cancer treat-
ment in Cuba.
State television showed im-
ages of Chavez chatting with
his vice president and other
aides after arriving at Cara-
cas' international airport early
Thursday.
Chavez traveled to Cuba
on April 14 for radiation ther-
apy treatment. He said earlier
this week he expects to re-
turn to Havana soon to un-
dergo more treatments.
The Venezuelan leader
began radiation treatment in
Cuba in late March after an
operation in February he says
removed a second tumor
from his pelvic region. The
first tumor was taken out in
an operation last June.

Reforms


Associated Press
Malaysian opposition leader
Anwar Ibrahim speaks to
protesters during a rally
Saturday to demand
electoral reforms in Kuala
Lumpur, Malaysia.


Two gunmen kill
2 Afghan guards
KANDAHAR, Afghanistan
- Two Taliban militants hiding
handguns in their shoes infil-
trated a government com-
pound in southern Afghanistan
on Saturday in an attempt to
assassinate a provincial gover-
nor, setting off a fierce gunbat-
tie that left two security guards
and both attackers dead.
The assailants passed
through a pair of security
checks without their weapons
being detected before a
guard at the last check in
the reception room for the
governor's office noticed
something suspicious and
stopped them, said Gov.
Tooryalai Wesa, the apparent
target of the attack. The mili-
tants then pulled the guns out
of their shoes, shot the
guards and took their
weapons, he said.

Saudi closes
embassy in Egypt
RIYADH, Saudi Arabia -
Saudi Arabia closed its Cairo
embassy Saturday and re-
called its ambassador follow-
ing protests over a detained
Egyptian human rights lawyer.
The unexpected escalation
followed days of protests by
hundreds of Egyptians out-
side the Saudi Embassy in
Cairo and consulates in other
cities to demand the release
of Ahmed el-Gezawi. Rela-
tives and human rights
groups say he was detained
for allegedly insulting the
kingdom's monarch.
Saudi authorities denied that
and said he was arrested for
trying to smuggle anti-anxiety
drugs into the oil-rich kingdom.
-From wire reports


Blind lawyer's

escape creates

more tension

Associated Press
WASHINGTON Less
than a week before annual
U.S.-Chinese diplomatic
and economic talks, rela-
tions between the powers
risked sharply deteriorating
Saturday with an escaped
Chinese activist reportedly
under American protection
and a U.S. fighter jet sale to
Taiwan now being
considered.
Fellow activists say Chen
Guangcheng, a blind lawyer


who exposed forced abor-
tions and sterilizations as
part of China's one-child
policy, fled house arrest a
week ago and has sought
protection at the U.S. Em-
bassy in Beijing.
Neither the U.S. nor Chi-
nese government has con-
firmed the reports, but the
saga looks set to over-
shadow this coming week's
Strategic and Economic Di-
alogue in the Chinese capi-
tal. Secretary of State
Hillary Rodham Clinton
and Treasury Secretary
Timothy Geithner are lead-
ing the U.S. side at the talks
beginning Thursday
A potential further com-
plication is a letter from the
White House director of leg-
islative affairs, Rob Nabors,


to Sen. John Cornyn, R-
Texas, explaining that the
Obama administration
would consider selling new
U.S. warplanes to Taiwan. A
sale would infuriate China,
which considers the island
nation an integral part of its
state, even after their split
more than six decades ago.
Chen's status and the
fighter jets represent the
latest strains in Washington
and Beijing's up-and-down
relationship in recent years.
President Barack Obama
has sought to "pivot" Amer-
ican military might and
diplomatic energy toward
Asia to improve America's
standing in the region and
check the expansion of Chi-
nese power, and achieved
mixed results.


Associated Press
President Barack Obama, left, greets Chinese President Hu
Jintao at the start of their bilateral meeting March 26 in Seoul,
South Korea. Obama's "pivot" to China's neighborhood and
the "reset" in relations with Russia have produced limited
results for signature foreign policy initiatives designed to
improve America's standing with its former Cold War rivals.


Super science


Associated Press
Godwin employees Robert Magdin, of Bridgeport, N.J., and Troy Ward, of Charleston, S.C., weld the support
structure for the return lines OF the ReOxygenation Demonstration Project on Aug. 2, 2007, in Savannah, Ga.
Plans to deepen the Savannah harbor include a costly proposal to ensure fish can still breathe by using a dozen
machines to inject oxygen into the river.


River respirators

Associated Press
SAVANNAH, Ga. As govern-
ment engineers work to keep the
nation's fourth-busiest seaport
from losing its competitive edge,
they are also planning what
amounts to a massive science proj-
ect to ensure fish in the harbor can
still breathe.
When the Savannah harbor is
deepened to allow for supersized
cargo ships, the U.S. Army Corps of
Engineers wants to install a dozen
machines that function like bub-
blers in a home aquarium to com-
pensate for an expected drop in
dissolved oxygen. The 20-foot-tall
steel cones suck water from the
river, swirl it with oxygen from a
generator until the bubbles break
down and then pump it back.
Buying and installing the ma-
chines costs a hefty $70 million,
plus yearly operating costs of $1.2
million. And the manufacturer said
they've never been used for a proj-
ect of this scale.
The oxygen machines are a piece
of the $653 million proposal to
dredge the Savannah River ship-
ping channel to the Port of Savan-
nah, a project officials hope will
win final approval later this year.
East Coast seaports are scrambling
to deepen their harbors to accom-
modate supersized cargo ships ex-
pected through an expanded
Panama Canal in 2014.
Deeper water will mean less oxy-
gen toward the river bottom for
bacteria, worms, shrimp, crabs and
fish. But some scientists aren't sure
the machines will be able to boost
low oxygen levels as planned along
27 miles of the river
"It's like putting the river on a
respirator," said Chris DeScherer,
an attorney for the Southern Envi-
ronmental Law Center, which has
sued on behalf of environmental-
ists who say the project would do
irreparable harm.
The Army Corps of Engineers
said in its final report on the har-
bor deepening this month the Sa-
vannah River would lose relatively


help fish breathe at


Georgia seaport


r ".tr'W-V~n,.am.. taf ""
Stainless steel Speece cones inject extra oxygen into the Savannah River
in Savannah, Ga. The Georgia Ports Authority hopes the cones can alleviate
the oxygen depletion caused by a proposed harbor deepening.


little dissolved oxygen overall. Still,
it would dip below minimum stan-
dards set by Georgia and South
Carolina, which share the river
Pumping oxygen into water has
been done since the 1960s, though
usually in smaller bodies such as
reservoirs and lakes, said Alexan-
der Home, an ecological engineer
who has consulted on more than 20
projects to replenish oxygen in
stressed waterways.
"It's like giving these systems an
extra breath," said Horne, a pro-
fessor emeritus at the University of
California, Berkeley. "If I were a
fish, I would vote for it hands
down."
Rivers tend to be shallower and
more turbulent, making them bet-
ter at mixing oxygen on their own.
But some still need a mechanical
boost. A 12-mile stretch of the San
Joaquin River in northern Califor-
nia installed an oxygen injection
station in 2007. The Thames River
in London uses barges equipped
with bubblers.
Rivers naturally take in oxygen
from the air, and their flows help
mix it down below the surface. The


deeper the water, the harder it is to
push oxygen to the bottom. That's
especially true in the Savannah
harbor, where the land is flat and
motion is slowed by pushback from
the ocean tides.
Oxygen levels in the harbor,
which stretches 38 miles from the
Atlantic Ocean to the port up-
stream from downtown Savannah,
are already stressed by decades of
dredging. The river was deepened
five times between 1912 and 1994,
nearly doubling its depth from 21.5
feet to 42 feet.
Now the Corps and the Georgia
Ports Authority want to scoop an-
other 5 feet from the river bottom.
Standards imposed by Georgia
and South Carolina say the river at
minimum should have 4 milligrams
of oxygen per liter of water The
Army Corps says the harbor's oxy-
gen level tends to stay above 6 mil-
ligrams in the winter, but in places
can sink to 3 milligrams per liter
during the hot summers.
And they would decline further
- by an estimated 3/10 of a mil-
ligram per liter or less with an
additional 5 feet of dredging.


FBI agent


known for

naming


robbers

retires

Trombitas pegs

burglar as

3-eyed Bandit'
Associated Press
COLUMBUS, Ohio -
FBI agent Harry Trom-
bitas took bank robberies
seriously, but not always
the people who commit-
ted them.
As a
lead agent A j
handling
crime in
the 1990s, r'
Trombitas
grew frus-
trated try- Harry
ing to Trombitas
figure out
how to draw attention to the
enormous number of bank
robberies in those days -
more than 100 a year in
central Ohio, and five rob-
beries in a single day on at
least two occasions.
Trying to cut through the
clutter of numerous news
releases and catch people's
attention, Trombitas began
writing his official crime
notices with a bit of flair
"Three-Eyed Bandit
Robs Huntington Bank"
was his release from 2009
about a robber with a tattoo
of an eyeball on his neck.
'"Church Lady' Strikes
Again," said a 2010 re-
lease about a woman who
witnesses described as
dressing "like she just
came from church."
'"Droopy-Drawers Ban-
dit' Hits Reynoldsburg
Credit Union," said a 2011
release about a man wear-
ing low-riding trousers.
Trombitas, 56, who lives
outside Columbus, retires
Monday as an FBI agent
ahead of the mandatory re-
tirement age of 57. In his
career, he chased car
thieves in St Louis, organ-
ized crime bosses in New
York City and several noto-
rious criminals in Ohio, in-
cluding serial killer
Thomas Dillon, who shot to
death five outdoorsmen
from 1989 to 1993.
"It just occurred to me
that if we could take a look
at what happened in the
robbery or how the person
looked, and come up with
some kind of a nickname
for that robber, that would
give him his own identity,"
Trombitas said.
His FBI supervisors
never saw a problem with
his approach. Others were
initially uncomfortable
with the practice, but they
eventually came around.
"After a while they saw
the value of doing that,
and then it got to the point
where everybody ex-
pected a nickname,"
Trombitas said.











EXCURSIONS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


* Veterans Notes can be found
on Page A15 of
today's
Chronicle. .


40 NYC historic sites compete for $3M in grants


Associated Press The group said it's asking the public to
vote online for their favorite site before al-
NEW YORK The National Trust for locating the funds. The top four vote-getters
Historic Preservation has announced $3 will be guaranteed their full grant request
million in grants for preservation projects up to $250,000. The top winners will be
at 40 New York City historic sites. announced May 22.









o .? 'o


The balance will be distributed among
the remaining sites.
The voting kicked off Thursday To vote,
go to: www.partnersinpreservation.com.
The Partners in Preservation grants are
part of a joint initiative of the Trust and


5.


American Express.
The sites include the Coney Island B&B
Carousel, the Ellis Island Hospital com-
plex, the Gateway National Recreation
Area in Brooklyn and the Alice Austen
House Museum on Staten Island.









t o


1 I ,


n __ .. .


'41 -


CARRIE OSGOOD/Associated Press
A lone visitor sits on a pier in January with a book in Bocas del Toro, Panama. Traveling solo can involve big or small adventures, with all the decisions about itineraries and
plans left up to the individual.


Traveling alone can be a fun way to satisfy wanderlust


CARRIE OSGOOD
Associated Press
NEW YORK
Sre you
filled with
wanderlust, but
sticking close to home
because you lack a like-
minded companion? Solo
travel is an extraordinary,
accessible opportunity
that can involve big or
small adventures, easy or
difficult as you choose.
You can do what you want, when you
want, how you want, where you want
You pick your own pace, budget, itiner-
ary and can always change your mind
on a whim, never having to negotiate.
The experience can be liberating and
thrilling, igniting a rewarding sense of
accomplishment, and the detachment
from your "real" life is often therapeu-
tic.
When entering a new place on your
own, you may notice more than you do
when you travel with others. I strike up
conversations more easily when I'm
solo, something I've done in dozens of


countries across six continents. But not
all destinations are right for solo travel-
ers. Here are some tips.
Visit walkable destinations con-
nected by trains, buses, ferries and
flights. Getting around this way will be
straightforward, prices will be per per-
son, and you increase your odds of
meeting others, unlike destinations best
seen or reached by car, where there may
be fewer interactions. I've found places
outside the U.S. and Caribbean are
sometimes more friendly to individuals,
with reduced-fare single-person rooms.
Youth hostels are great for 20somethings
and travelers of any age on tight budgets
who crave conversation and don't need
upscale accommodations.
Traveling offseason can save a lot of
money One year in October, it was
cheaper for me to spend a week in Costa
Rica than to visit the Adirondacks in up-
state New York. The off-peak flight, local
transport and single accommodation in
Costa Rica was less than the car rental
and pricier double rooms during fall
foliage season here.
If you can't fly nonstop, turn your
stopovers into perks. I've visited Fiji,
Iceland, London, Paris and Rome, at no
extra cost, all on extended layovers.
Ask others about their vacations to
get ideas for your own trips, and read up
online and in guidebooks. Publishers
can vary tremendously so look at a vari-
ety of brands in a bookstore or library,
then travel with a guidebook that best


suits your priorities.
Keep expectations to a minimum so
you're not disappointed. Instead, be
flexible, go with the flow and treasure
the unexpected. I've stumbled upon
some amazing hidden gems. Bedouins
invited me for tea in the caves of Petra,
and a Portuguese model in Lisbon de-
clared his affection for me by saying it
was "love at first look."
Be prepared for the occasional bad
day I've been tired, cranky, lonely and
frustrated, suffering from food poison-
ing and stressed out by emergency land-
ings, 14-hour flight delays, altercations
with customs officials, bad weather and
other complications. But temporary
misery is part of travel, and can help
you enjoy the magnificent moments that
much more. And sometimes the worst
experiences generate great stories
later on.
Write in a journal every night It
records your adventures while also giv-
ing you the conversational outlet to ex-
press and process the details of your
action-packed day
When dining alone, bring a book or
journal. Eating at the bar may feel more
comfortable than a table for one.
Be respectful, inconspicuous and
dress to blend in. Local fashion norms
vary, but I typically wear jeans with sub-
dued colors, dark shoes and subtle ac-
cessories so as not to attract undue
attention.
English has become the world's sec-


ond language, but learning to say hello
and thank you in the local tongue goes a
long way
Be cautious but not paranoid. If
there's a site that piques your interest,
but it's out of the way or you have con-
cerns about personal safety, take a day
tour or hire a guide. Independent fe-
male travelers may face harassment and
other dangers, while men traveling
alone may be targeted by scam artists
and touts peddling illicit activities.
Ignoring verbal aggressors -
whether beggars, vendors or passers-by
- is frequently the best defense, al-
though in some cultures, like the mar-
kets in Istanbul, a simple "no, thank
you" works better Intimidation and ha-
rassment are never fun; feel empow-
ered by your ability to say no.
Check guidebooks and consult with
local tourist offices and hotel staff for
advice on what to watch out for. Take
special care after dark, in dense crowds,
and with likable strangers. The freedom
of being far from home can release inhi-
bitions in wonderful ways. In fact, I try
to do something new every trip. But if
you feel as though you're taking a risk,
have an exit strategy, inform the hotel
staff of your whereabouts, or make sure
you're in a place where you can shout
out to others.
Gratifying solo travel comes from
following your bliss. Don't let societal
pressures rattle you. Don't let loneliness
paralyze you.


Ecuador adventure
Howard and Nancy Geer of Crystal River rang in the new year in Ecuador this year.
They celebrated with the locals with fireworks, bonfires and more. They took a
tour into the heart of the country to visit the Andes Mountains, hike the rainforest
and travel down the Amazon River. Here, Howard blows a dart through a six-foot
blow gun used in the Amazon for hunting. He hit the wooden monkey target!
Special to the Chronicle


DREAM
VACATIONS

The Chronicle and The
Accent Travel Group are
sponsoring a photo con-
test for readers of the
newspaper.


Readers are invited to
send a photograph from
their Dream Vacation with a
brief description of the trip.
If it's selected as a win-
ner, it will be published in
the Sunday Chronicle. At
the end of the year, a
panel of judges will select
the best photo during the
year and that photograph


will win a prize.
Please avoid photos
with dates on the print.
Photos should be sent
to the Chronicle at 1624
N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429
or dropped off at the
Chronicle office in Inver-
ness, Crystal River or any
Accent Travel Office.


- a*h"- J|B


mr, -.., I ry -A


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-WWPF"






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Woman unsure how


to handle bad news


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D earAnnie: Two years
ago, my younger sis-
ter learned that her
grown daughter had been
molested as a child by our
then-teenage brother. I be-
lieve her, but was totally un-
aware of the situation, as I
moved away nearly 25 years
ago.
Her daughter had a friend
who was also molested.
Both girls were under age 6
when this hap-
pened, and the
molestation
lasted several
years. I urged my
sister to seek
professional help
for her daughter
and herself, and
to find a way to
approach the
other young
woman to let her
know that we are AN N
now aware of
what our brother MAEl.
did and offer our
support.
Since my children also
were in contact with my
brother during that time, I
immediately asked them
about this. They both said
nothing happened. I'm
pretty sure my daughter was
not exposed to any harm,
but there is a strong chance
my son was molested, as he
was never the same after
one particular summer trip.
In fact, he refused to ever
visit his grandparents' home
again.
I have heard nothing
more about this in the two
intervening years. I asked
my sister whether the other
girl had been contacted,
etc., and was told this was a
private matter and the dis-
cussion was closed. She says
it happened a long time ago
and to forget about it. She


SToday's MOVIES


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness;
637-3377
"Safe" (R) ID required. 1:20 p.m.,
4:20 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
"The Five-Year Engagement"
(R) ID required. 1:10 p.m., 4:10
p.m., 7:15 p.m.
"Pirates! Band of Misfits" (PG)
In real 3D. 1:45 p.m., 7 p.m. No
passes.
"Pirates! Band of Misfits" (PG)
4:45 p.m.
"The Lucky One" (PG-13) 1:30
p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
"The Three Stoges" (PG) 1:40
p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7:40 p.m.
"The Hunger Games" (PG-13) 1
p.m., 4 p.m., 7 p.m.

Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Safe" (R) ID required. 2 p.m., 5
p.m., 8 p.m.
"Pirates! Band of Misfits" (PG)


1:45 p.m., 7:15 p.m.
"Pirates! Band of Misfits" (PG)
In real 3D. 4:15 p.m. No passes.
"The Five-Year Engagement"
(R) ID required. 1:20 p.m., 4:20
p.m., 7:20 p.m.
"The Raven" (R) 1:55 p.m., 4:45
p.m., 7:45 p.m.
"The Lucky One" (PG-13) 1:40
p.m., 4:50 p.m., 7:50 p.m.
"Think Like a Man" (PG-13) 1:10
p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:10 p.m.
"The Three Stoges" (PG) 1:15
p.m., 4:35 p.m., 7:35 p.m.
"Cabin in the Woods" (R) ID re-
quired. 1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:30
p.m.
"The Hunger Games" (PG-13) 1
p.m., 4 p.m., 7 p.m.

Visit www.chronicleonline.com for
area movie listings and entertain-
ment information.


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Short and stout
6 Ending for sea
or sound
11 Snake
16 Place
21 Sudden movement
22 Arboreal primate
23 Flora and fauna
24 Laconic
25 Of a grain
26 Skillful
27 Tokyo native, e.g.
28 and raves
29 Schuss
30 Far too heavy
31 English school
32 Numbers pro (abbr.)
34 Annoy
35 Loud laugh (hyph.)
38 Crowbar
40 "- goes around comes
around"
41 Dawn personified
42 Meara or Hathaway
44 Liver secretion
45 Anger
47 Bar bill
49 Hallowed
52 Cut of meat
54 Parish official
56 Swearword
60 Cilium
61 In flames
62 Skateboarder
Hawk
63 A Great Lake
65 Table scrap
66 de menthe
67 Snippy
68 Part of NB
69 Hotel
70 In the past
71 Edgar Burroughs
72 Bugle
73 Swindle
74 Middle Ages lord
76 Highest
78 Average
79 Helen of-
80 Ran in neutral
81 Playing card
82 Actual
83 Something desirable
84 Opp. of NNW
85 Bare
88 Animal's hair
89 Hammer part
90 West Indies island
94 comitatus


95 Decay
96 Raucous
97 Marching band instru-
ment
98 Lump
99 Museum's contents
100 "Star -"
102 Church area
103 Of flax
104 Become smaller
105 Stiffly formal
107 Party
108 Device for
measuring
109 A cheese
110 Simple
111 Force
113 Home in
the country
114 A little crazy
115 Acquired
117 Drunkard
118 Film spool
119 Part of the arm
121 Name for
a bystander
124 Play
126 Zodiac sign
128 Coffee shop
132 Doctors' org.
133 "You here"
134 Dull
135 Rope for a roper
139 volente
140 Hood
142 Column order
144 Name
145 Lawful
147 Throw carelessly
148 Pointless
149 Ready to use
(2 wds.)
150 Oh, woe!
151 Therefore
152 Cringe
153 Nile Valley nation
154 Begrimed


DOWN
1 Splash
2 Tremble
3 Release a
certain way
4 Time
5 Sawbuck
6 Thick slice
7 Dress or area
8 Greek god
9 Conduit for oil


Superlative suffix
Lessen
Confuse
Kill (2 wds.)
Letter after zeta
Kind of dressing
Rock layers
Oolong, e.g.
Bert and -
Jetsons' dog
Escritoires
Have
Name in Genesis
Kind of leather
Diner fare
Insect
Member of a lodge
Marry
Bring about
Make public
Sunbeam
Feathery scarf
Become swollen
Key -
Bar legally
Acidic fruit
"- Free"
Bonkers
Sprite in
"The Tempest"
Bit of color
Sharpened
Come to be
Become
Good-luck charm
Frontiersman Davy -
Ember
Midday
Word in a recipe
Boast
Mental object
Makes imperfect
Edible portion
Tailless amphibian
Chess piece
Sad
Sword
Muscle contraction
Fancy cake
Moving about
System of beliefs
Inlet
Capital of Alaska
Sluggish
Old measure
of length
Westminster -
Tardy
Work the soil
Member of


the clergy
102 Cousin to the peach
103 Quiet spell
106 Gam
107 Move to and-
108 Variety
of white wine
109 Yacht
112 Sixth sense (abbr.)
113 A letter
114 Letters in genetics


Spectrum color
Bone
MGM's lion
Area of wet land
Soap plant
Simple house
Corpsman
Souped-up car
Cayce or Degas
Respond
Like breakfast dishes


Puzzle answer is on Page A16.
12 13 14 15 6 17 18 T 10


Stalemate
Legal counsel (abbr.)
Strike
Clan
Abbr. in bus.
Yoko -
Shoe part
Youth
Quarterback
Manning


2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


says she will not have fur-
ther contact with our
brother But she hasn't con-
sidered the impact this has
had on me. I was 14 when
our brother was born, and I
helped raise him after our
parents divorced and our fa-
ther died.
My brother never married
and lives alone. He cannot
hold down a job. I have no
idea whether he is still mo-
lesting children.
Meanwhile, an-
other brother is
asking for a fam-
ily reunion. How
do you respond
when something
this horrific is
disclosed? -
Older Sister
Dear Sister:
You can't dictate
to your sister how
IE'S to handle this.
That is her deci-
sion. But her rev-
elation also
affects you and the relation-
ships you have with all of
your siblings, not to mention
the possibility that your son
was molested. The rest of
the family should know
about the molestation, not
least because it protects any
grandchildren from poten-
tial harm. The family re-
union may be an opportune
time to do this, but you
should alert your sister so
she is prepared. We also
suggest you get some short-
term counseling for your-
self. This is obviously hard
on you.


Annie's Mailbox is written
by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy
Sugar, longtime editors of
the Ann Landers column.
Email questions to annies
mailbox@comcast net.


A14 SUNDAY, APRIL 29, 2012


ENTERTAINMENT


II





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Veterans NOTES


Due to space considera-
tions, the Veterans Notes
sometimes contain only basic
information regarding each
post. For more information
about scheduled activities,
meals and more for a specific
post, call or email that post at
the contact listed.
Space is still available for
the annual trip to Hawaii for
veterans, their families and
friends scheduled for Feb. 21
through March 9,2013. The
trip, organized and led annually
by U.S. Navy veteran Don
McLean, includes tours, events
and memorials services.
Islands to be visited include
Oahu, Kauai, Hawaii and Maui.
For information or to sign up,
call McLean at 352-637-5131
or email dmclean8@tampa
bay.rr.com.
The community is invited
to a special celebration of
benefactors at 9 a.m. Saturday,
May 5, at the Citrus County
Fallen Heroes Monument in
Bicentennial Park next to the
airport in Crystal River. Twenty-
eight new tiles on the base of
the monument will be unveiled
that morning from contributors
supporting the local monument.
The benefactors are diverse:
some are veterans' organiza-
tions, some are individuals who
are veterans, some are veteran
members of a family being hon-
ored, some are posthumously
being honored, some are busi-
nesses and others are private
individuals who understand the
importance of having a monu-
ment like this in the community.
Light refreshments will be
served after the celebration
ceremony. Attendees should
bring their own lawn chairs, as
only limited seating will be
provided.
After this unveiling event,
there will be fewer than 20 tiles
remaining for purchase. If any
member of the public would like
to purchase a tile for engraving,
they range from $150 to $300,
in three different sizes. Two of
the three sizes are very limited
- there are only three left of
each.
Anyone interested in sup-
porting the monument in this
manner may visit the website at
www.citruscountyfallenheroes
.org. Ongoing support is also
sought to ensure the monu-
ment is properly maintained.
For more information, call Avis
Craig at 352-564-7151.
Ex-military and retired mili-
tary personnel are needed to
assist the U.S. Coast Guard
Auxiliary to help the Coast
Guard with non-military and
non-law enforcement programs
such as public education, ves-
sel safety checks, safety pa-
trols search and rescue,
maritime security and environ-
mental protection. Wear the
Auxiliary uniform with pride and
your military ribbons. Criminal
background check and mem-
bership are required. Email
Vince Maida at vsm440@
aol.com, or call 917-597 6961.
HPH Hospice, as a part-
nering agency with the Depart-
ment of Veterans Affairs (VA),
provides tailored care for veter-
ans and their families. The pro-
gram is provided in private
homes, assisted living facilities
and nursing homes, and staff is
trained to provide Hospice care
specific to illnesses and condi-
tions unique to each military
era or war. It also provides
caregiver education and a
recognition program to honor
veterans' services and sacri-
fices. HPH Hospice care and
programs do not affect veter-
ans' benefits. For more infor-
mation, call the Citrus Team
Office at 352-527-4600.
The U.S. Air Force is
looking for prior enlisted men
and women from all services
interested in both direct duty
assignments in previously ob-
tained career fields or retraining
into select career fields. Some
of the careers include aircraft
electronics/mechanical areas,
cyber operation fields, and vari-
ous other specialties. Enlisted
career openings that include
the opportunities to retrain con-
sist of special operations posi-
tions and unmanned aerial
vehicle.


Assignment locations are
based on Air Force needs.
For more information, call 352-
476-4915.
Citrus County Veterans
Coalition has a new building
holding freezers, refrigerators
and all necessary requirements
to provide food to veterans in
need. Food donations and vol-
unteers are always welcomed
and needed.
The CCVC is on the DAV
property in Inverness at the


corner of Paul and Independ-
ence, off U.S. 41 north. Hours
of operation are 10 a.m. to 1
p.m. Tuesday and Thursday.
Appointments are encouraged
by calling 352-400-8952.
CCVC general meetings are
at 10 a.m. the fourth Thursday
monthly at the DAV building in
Inverness. All active duty and
honorably discharged veterans,
their spouses, widows and wid-
owers, along with other veter-
ans' organizations and current
coalition members are wel-
come. Members are encour-
aged to attend general
meetings.
Annual membership dona-
tion is $10 for a calendar year
or $25 for three years. The
CCVC is a nonprofit corpora-
tion, and your donations are tax
deductible. Current members
should check their membership
card for expiration dates, and
renew with Gary Williamson at
352-527-4537, or at the meet-
ing. Visit www.ccvcfl.org.
AMVETS William Crow
Post 447, Inglis, is on State
Road 40 East.
For more information about
the post and its activities, call
352-447-1816; email
Amvet447@comcast.net.
Blanton-Thompson
American Legion Post 155, is
at 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way, Crystal River. Doors open
at 4 p.m. with dinner available;
entertainment at 7 p.m.
For information about the
post and its activities, call
Cmdr. Jay Conti Sr. at 352-
795-6526 or visit
www.postl55.org.
American Legion Auxil-
iary Unit 155 meets at 7:30
p.m. the fourth Tuesday of
every month at the post. The
American Legion Auxiliary is
the world's largest women's pa-
triotic service organization with
nearly 1 million members in
10,100 communities. The prin-
ciples of the American Legion
Auxiliary are to serve veterans,
their families and the
community.
Eligibility in the Auxiliary is
open to mothers, wives, sisters,
daughters, granddaughters,
great-granddaughters or grand-
mothers of members of the
American Legion and of de-
ceased veterans who served
during war time (also stepchil-
dren); stepchildren; and female
veterans who served during
war time. Call Unit President
Shawn Mikulas, 352-503-5325,
or membership chairman
Barbara Logan, 352-795-4233.
H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post
10087, Beverly Hills, offers
meals, bingo, golf, karaoke and
pool. Review the monthly
newsletter for activities and up-
dates, and call the post at 352-
746-0440. The VFW Post
10087 is off County Road 491,
directly behind Superior Bank.
Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs,
352-465-4864. Wi Fi is now
available at the post; bring your
laptop or any other item that
will access the Internet and
enjoy the free service.
The post is now a nonsmok-
ing facility; smoking is allowed
on the porch.
All are welcome at the baked
chicken breast dinner from 5 to
6:30 p.m. Friday, May 4, at the
post. Cost is $8.
Information regarding any
post events is available at the
post or call 352-465-4864.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Chapter No. 70 meets
at 2 p.m. the second Tuesday
monthly at the chapter hall,
1039 N. Paul Drive, Inverness,
at the intersection of Independ-
ence Highway and U.S. 41.
The chapter hall is on the cor-
ner of Independence Highway
and Paul Drive.
We thank veterans for their
service and welcome any dis-
abled veteran to join us from 9
a.m. to 1 p.m. any Tuesday or
Thursday at the chapter hall.
This is also the time that we ac-
cept donated nonperishable
foods for our continuing food
drive.
Our main function is to assist
disabled veterans and their
families when we are able.
Anyone who knows a disabled


veteran or their family who re-
quires assistance is asked to
call Commander Richard Floyd
727-492-0290, Ken Stewart
at 352-419-0207, or 352-
344-3464.
Service Officer Joe McClister
is available to assist any vet-
eran or dependents with their
disability claim by appointment.
Call 352-344-3464 and leave a
message.
Ambulatory veterans who
wish to schedule an appoint-


ment for transportation to the
VA medical center in
Gainesville should call the vet-
erans' service office at 352-
527-5915. Mobility challenged
veterans who wish to schedule
an appointment for transporta-
tion to the VA medical center in
Gainesville may call the Citrus
County Transit office for wheel-
chair transportation; call 352-
527-7630.
For more information about
chapter activities, veterans'
benefits or membership, Call
Ken Stewart at 352-419-0207;
leave a message, if desired,
should the machine answer.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Auxiliary Unit No. 70
meets at 2 p.m. the second
Tuesday of the month at the
chapter hall, corner of U.S. 41
north, Independence Boulevard
and Paul Drive, Inverness.
The DAV Auxiliary has ongo-
ing projects to help needy vet-
erans. Members recently took
more than 150 lap robes, 200
ditty bags and more than 100
wheelchair and walker bags to
area nursing homes. Members
collect good, clean cotton ma-
terial, yarn and toiletry items to
make lap robes, wheelchair
and walker and ditty bags for
veterans in nursing homes.
Membership has expanded
to include many more who are
eligible to join. For more infor-
mation or to donate items, call
Commander Linda Brice at
352-560-3867 or Adjutant Lynn
Armitage at 352-341-5334.
Eugene Quinn VFW Post
4337 and Ladies Auxiliary, is
at 906 State Road 44 E., Inver-
ness. Call the post at 352-344-
3495 for information about all
weekly post activities, or visit
www.vfw4337.org.
The public is welcome to join
the post family for a Kentucky
Derby party at 4 p.m. Saturday,
May 5. There will be food and
fun to include a "crazy hat" con-
test. Call the post at 352-344-
3495 or visit www.vfw4337.org.
The American Legion
Wall-Rives Post 58 and Auxil-
iary, 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnellon.
Post and auxiliary meet the first
Wednesday of the month.
Dunnellon Young Marines
will meet at 6 p.m. Tuesday.
The public is welcome at
bingo at 6 p.m. Thursday.
A pancake breakfast and
outdoor flea market will be from
7:30 to 10:30 a.m. Saturday,
May 19. Cost is $5 for all you
can eat.
The Memorial Day Service
will be at 11 a.m. Monday, May
28. A picnic will follow.
For information about activi-
ties and the post, call Carl Boos
at 352-489-3544.
Rolling Thunder Chapter
7, a POW/MIA awareness
group, meets at 10 a.m. sec-
ond Saturday at the VFW Post
10087 in Beverly Hills. Call Bob
Bruno, secretary, at 352-201-
1228.
SA Marine Corps League
Ladies Auxiliary Citrus Unit
meets at 1 p.m. the third Tues-
day monthly at the VFW in
Beverly Hills. New members
are welcome. Membership fee
is $30 a year. Female relatives
ages 16 or older who are a
wife, widow, mother, step-
mother, sister, daughter, step-


daughter, grandmother, grand-
daughter, aunt or daughter-in-
law of honorably discharged
Marines and FMF Corpsmen
are eligible to belong to the
Marine Corps League. Female
Marines (former, active and re-
serves) and associate mem-
bers are eligible for MCLA
membership. Call President
Elaine Spikes at 352-860-2400
or Secretary/Treasurer Joan
Cecil at 352-726-0834
for information.
Hunger and Homeless
Coalition -Anyone who
knows of a homeless veteran in
need of food, haircut, voter ID,
food stamps, medical assis-
tance or more blankets is
asked to call Ed Murphy at the
Hunger and Homeless Coali-
tion at 352-382-0876, or pass
along this phone number to the
veteran.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW
Post 4252 and Ladies Auxil-
iary 3190 N. Carl G. Rose
Highway, State Road 200,
Hernando; 352-726-3339.
Send emails to fw4252@
tampabay.rr.com.
Everyone is welcome. Post
and auxiliary meet at 6:30 p.m.
every second Thursday.
Post honor guard is available
for funerals, flag raising and
nursing home visits.
The public is welcome to the
Friday night dinner and dance
at 5 p.m.
See our post activities:
Google us as VFW 4252,
Hernando.
Dumas-Hartson VFW
Post 8189 is on West Veterans
Drive, west of U.S. 19 between
Crystal River and Homosassa.
Call 352-795-5012 for
information.
VFW membership is open to
men and women veterans who
have participated in an over-
seas campaign, including serv-
ice in Iraq and Afghanistan. The
Korean Campaign medal re-
mains open, as well. Call the
post at the phone number
above for information.
Joe Nic Barco Memorial
VFW Post 7122, 8191 S.
Florida Ave., Floral City. For in-
formation about the post and its
activities, call 352-637-0100.
Friday is AUCE fish or
three-piece chicken for $7.
American Legion, Bev-
erly Hills Memorial Post 237,
4077 N. Lecanto Highway, in
the Beverly Plaza, invites all eli-
gible veterans and their families
to visit our post and consider
joining our Legion family: Amer-
ican Legion, Sons of the Ameri-
can Legion (SAL), or American
Legion Auxiliary (ALA). Color
Guard/Honor Guard accepting
volunteers.
Beverly Hills Memorial Amer-
ican Legion Post 237, by ap-
proval of its Executive Board on
Jan. 22, and by those members
present at the Jan. 26 general
membership meeting, has
changed its regular meeting
time to 7 p.m. on the fourth
Tuesday monthly. Contact the
post at 352-746-5018 for more
information.
American Legion Riders
Chapter now being formed.
Visit the post for printed sched-
ule or visit the website at
www.post237.org.
For information, call the post at


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352-746-5018.
The Korean War Veter-
ans Association, Citrus
Chapter 192 meets at the VFW
Post 10087, Beverly Hills, at 1
p.m. the first Tuesday monthly.
Any veteran who has seen
honorable service in any of the
Armed Forces of the U.S. is eli-
gible for membership if said
service was within Korea, in-
cluding territorial waters and
airspace, at any time from
Sept. 3, 1945, to the present or
if said service was outside of
Korea from June 25, 1950, to
Jan. 31, 1955. For information,
call Hank Butler at 352-
563-2496, Neville Anderson at
352-344-2529 or Bob
Hermanson at 352-489-0728.
Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 and Auxiliary
Unit 77 meet the first Thursday
monthly at the Inverness High-
lands Civic Center at 4375 Lit-
tle Al Point Road, Inverness.
Call Post Cmdr. Norman
Brumett at 352-860-2981 or
Auxiliary president Marie Cain
at 352-637-5915 for information
about the post and auxiliary.
U.S. Submarine Veterans
(USSVI)-Sturgeon Base meets
at 11 a.m. the first Saturday
monthly at the American Legion
Post 155, 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River. Visitors
and interested parties are al-
ways welcome. Call Base
Cmdr. Billy Wein at 352-
726-5926.
American Legion Post
166 meets 1:30 p.m., first Sat-
urday monthly at the Dumas-
Hartson VFW Post 8189 Ladies
Auxiliary facility on Veterans
Drive, Homosassa, on the west
side of U.S. 19 at Dixon's Auto
Sales across from Harley-
Davidson. We meet in the small
building to the left of the main
building. All former and current
post members, as well as all in-
terested veterans, are cordially
invited to be a part of American
Legion Post 166.
For information about the
post or the American Legion,
call and leave a message for
the post commander at 352-
697-1749. Your call will be re-
turned within 24 to 48 hours.
Seabee Veterans of
America (SVA) Island X-23
welcomes all Seabees and
Honeybees to its monthly
meeting at 10:30 a.m. the third
Tuesday monthly at Citrus Hills
Country Club, Rose and Crown
restaurant, Citrus Hills. Call
John Lowe at 352-344-4702.
Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219
and Cabane 1219 conducts its
meetings at 7 p.m. the second
Thursday monthly at the Ameri-
can Legion Post 155 on State
Road 44 in Crystal River (6585
E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway). For
more information about the
40/8, call the Chef De Gare
Tom Smith at 352-601-3612;
for the Cabane, call La Presi-
dente Carol Kaiserian at 352-
746-1959; or visit us on the
Web at www.Postl55.org.
Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 Military Order of the
Purple Heart (MOPH) meets at
2 p.m. the third Tuesday of Jan-
uary, March, May, July, Sep-
tember and November. All
combat-wounded veterans, lin-
eal descendants, next of kin,
spouses and siblings of Purple


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Heart recipients are cordially in-
vited to attend and to join the
ranks of Chapter 776.
To learn more about Aaron A.
Weaver Chapter 776 MOPH,
visit the chapter's website at
www.citruspurpleheart.org or
call 352-382-3847.
Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment
1139 will conduct its regular
meeting at 7 p.m. the third
Wednesday monthly at DAV
Post 70 in Inverness at the in-
tersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41 North. All
Marines are welcome. Call
Jerry Cecil at 352-726-0834 or
Wayne Howard at 352-
634-5254.
Marine Corps League
Citrus Detachment 819 meets
at 7 p.m. the last Thursday
monthly at VFW Post 10087 on
Vet Lane in Beverly Hills, be-
hind Superior Bank. Social
hour follows. All Marines and
FMF Corpsmen are welcome.
Meet new friends and discuss
past glories. Call Morgan
Patterson at 352-746-1135, Ted
Archambault at 352-382-0462
or Bion St. Bernard at 352-
697-2389.
Gilley-Long-Osteen VFW
Post 8698 is at 520 State Road
40 E., Inglis, one mile east of
U.S. 19. The Men's Auxiliary
meets at 7 p.m. the second
Monday. LAVFW meets at 5
p.m. and the membership
meeting is at 6:30 p.m. the third
Wednesday at the post.
Call the post at 352-
447-3495 for information about
the post and its activities.
Fleet Reserve Associa-
tion, Branch 186 will meet at 3
p.m. the third Thursday monthly
at the DAV Building, Independ-
ence Highway and U.S. 41
North, Inverness. Call Bob
Huscher, secretary, at
352-344-0727.
American Legion Her-
bert Surber Post 225 meets at
7 p.m. the third Thursday
monthly at the New Testament
Baptist Church of Floral City,
9850 S. Parkside Ave. adjoin-
ing Floral Park, southeast side.
All eligible veterans are
welcome to join.
Landing Ship Dock
(LSD) sailors meet at Denny's
in Crystal River at 2 p.m. the
fourth Thursday monthly. Call
Jimmie at 352-621-0617.
Suncoast U.S. Navy
Armed Guard and Merchant
Marine Veterans of World
War II meetings for 2012 will be
at 11:30 a.m. at Kally K's
restaurant in Spring Hill on the
following dates: May 12, Sept.
8, Oct. 13, Nov. 10 and Dec. 8.
The USS Long Beach
CGN-9 Association Inc. 2012
reunion will be Sept. 8-16 at the
Embassy Suites Hotel, 1445
Lake Cook Road, Deerfield, Ill.
Group reservation code is
CGN.
Call 847-945-4500 for reser-
vations. Ask for the USS Long
Beach reunion rate of $99.68,
which includes all taxes on
rooms. Cutoff date is Aug. 13.
For more information,
contact Don Shade, 299
Kiantone Road Lot 92,
Jamestown, NY 14701-9370,
or email lbcgn9@aol.com or
visit www.usslong
beach-assoc.org.






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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Special to the Chronicle
Encore Swing Band will provide the music for an upcoming evening of good food, fun and dancing from 5 to 9 p.m. at a
Spring Fling Dinner Dance Friday, May 11, at the Citrus County Resource Center, 2804 W. Marc Knighton Court, Lecanto.
The group is a local 21-piece band and well known to many Citrus Countians. The roasted chicken dinner, to be served 5
to 6 p.m., will include mashed potatoes, gravy, green beans, salad, roll, dessert and beverages. Tickets are $15 and are
available at all Citrus County community centers. Proceeds benefit the Citrus County Home Delivered Meals Program. For
more information and tickets, call 352-527-5975.



Cruisin' for Kidz fundraiser on tap


Sponsors sought for May 5 event


Special to the Chronicle

Boys & Girls Clubs of Cit-
rus County will sponsor the
organization's first car show,
Cruisin' for Kidz, on May 5
at the Love Honda/Motor-
sports property on U.S. 19 in
Homosassa. Car entry fee is
$15, which includes tickets
for two adults. Groups must
pre-register and prepay to


reserve parking spots to-
gether Cost at the gate is $5,
with children younger than
12 admitted for free.
Any kind of car classic,
old, new, antique, or other-
wise or truck or motorcy-
cle may be entered as long
as the owner is proud of the
vehicle and wants to show it
Classes to be judged are
1976 and Older, 1977 and


Newer, Off-Road Vehicles,
Motorcycles, and the Crazi-
est Ride. Vehicles will be
judged by the public and
trophies awarded.
Registration begins at
8:30 a.m., with the show
open to the public at 10 a.m.
All spots must be claimed by
9:30 a.m. Food, beer, soda,
and water will be on sale all
day
Live bands, including the
popular local band Moc-
casin Slough, will play from


10:30 until 4 p.m.
Included in the day's hap-
penings will be a "Blow up
the Car" event with people
predicting how long a car
will operate with no oil in it.
There will also be 50/50
drawings and door prizes.
Trophy sponsors, a com-
petition sponsor and indi-
vidual banner sponsors are
being sought
Call 352-621-9225 for more
information about registra-
tion or sponsorships.






FREA
award

Ruth Levins, program
chairwoman of the Citrus
County Retired Educators
and delegate to the Florida
Retired Educators
Convention, presents the
FREA Unit Membership
Award to Ethel Winn,
membership chairwoman.

Special to the Chronicle


Of cupcakes, teen moms, crazy nuptials


Have you ever watched more
than one television show about
the making, eating or selling of
cupcakes? If your answer is "yes" and
you're not in some way connected to
the cupcake business, I'm worried
about you. And not just about your
adult-onset diabetes.
I can't be the only person surprised
to learn that there is a
show on television devoted
exclusively to cupcakes. To
find out there are at least
three of them is troubling.
Normally I would say "to
each his own," but "Cup-
cake Wars"? Really?
When the reality TV
craze started years ago
with "Survivor" and "Big
Brother," I used to wonder JAi
what was wrong with tele- MUL
vision. It turns out that was
the wrong question. Now,
after the success of "Jersey Shore" and
programs about multiple Kardashians,
hoarding, pawning, extreme fishing,
ice truck driving and very unreal
housewives of Who-Cares, it seems the
question should have been, "What is
wrong with television viewers?"
Have you been following the MTV
hit "Teen Mom"? Neither have I, as I
am older than 13 and no longer think
turning 16 is the biggest thing that will
ever happen in my entire life, the life
that my parents are trying to wreck.
"Teen Mom" is a spinoff of the previ-
ous MTV reality show "16 and Preg-


I


Marriages 4/16/12 to 4/22/12
Alejandro Arcelay, Inverness/Zahyra
Coreixi Rodriguez, Inverness
Glenn David Bloom, Crystal River/
Nichole Danielle Zettle, Lecanto
Sylvester Orson Brown/Joffiena
Augustine
Esmat Ramzy Hanna, Lecanto/
Samia Farid Barsoum, Lecanto
Justin Alan Heiss, Lecanto/Chelsea
Marie Bascos, Beverly Hills
Christopher Matthew Orsic,
Homosassa/Ashley Marie Tanguay,
Homosassa
Todd Michael Snedeker,


Homosassa/Sriphrai Janphuk, Homosassa
Adam Robert Vicchiollo,
Homosassa/Jennifer Lynn Schedivy,
Homosassa
Divorces 4/9/12 to 4/22/12
Richard Alvin Corns, Howe, Ind. vs.
Cathryn Mary Corns, Homosassa
Jessica Crisler, Inverness vs. Patrick
Timothy Crisler, Inverness
Richard H. Densmore, Inverness vs.
Catherine T. Densmore, Inverness
Timothy Jack Duprez, Floral City vs.
Amy B. Duprez, Spring Hill
David Kruchinsky, unknown vs. Lisa
Panek Kruchinsky, unknown


nant," and it "stars" the same cast of
teens, celebrated for making poor life
choices.
I thought maybe it would be good for
teens to see how hard it is to be a
teenage parent, to learn that raising
children isn't a cakewalk even for ma-
ture, well-adjusted women with re-
sponsible partners. Surely the 4.5
million teens who watched
the first year's finale learned
an important life lesson.
Then I looked at the Face-
book comments for the show
Here's a typical comment
(with the original spelling):
"I'm 17 an preganat I would
like to be apart of the show."
Well, who hasn't mis-
spelled things on Facebook?
MI It's hard to type with your
LEN thumbs. More disturbing is
that someone thinks being 17
and pregnant is the road to
stardom. Why waste all that time and
money on singing and dancing lessons
if all it takes to get on TV is to be a baby
mama? You'd think there was a na-
tional competition to be the first one
in your high school class to have a
baby shower.
If the teen mom could learn to make
cupcakes, there's no telling how far
she could go on reality television.
Maybe she could get engaged. Plan-
ning a wedding is also a good way to
become a reality TV star. Not planning
any old wedding, but a huge, expen-
sive wedding that will impress all your


friends with how much money you've
wasted. Because, as every teen bride
knows, the more you spend on your
wedding, the longer the marriage will
last. Just ask the Kardashians,
whichever one had the weeklong mar-
riage.
The good news is that it doesn't mat-
ter whom you marry A reality TV
bride will spend much more time pick-
ing a wedding dress than she will a
groom. Practically any guy in a tux will
do. What's really important is the cake,
the paper the invitation is printed on
and the DJ.
The husband is just there for cere-
monial purposes, like a ref at a hockey
game. A husband is also a good thing
to drag along when your friends start
having over-the-top weddings.
What's odd is that there are 21 real-
ity shows about weddings, but only 12
shows about being wives. It seems
"getting" married is twice as popular
as "being" married. Is it because the
husband is always in one room watch-
ing "SportsCenter" and the wife is in
the next room watching wedding-plan-
ning shows? Or vice versa?
Well, I guess that's why we have Dr
Phil's reality show to sort it out
when it all goes south.


Jim Mullen's newest book, "How to
Lose Money in Your Spare Time -
At Home," is available at
amazon.com. You can reach him at
jimm ullenbooks. com.


Mosibudi Priscilla Martins Taylor,
Crystal River vs. Rene Charles Taylor,
Crystal River
George S. Mavros, Homosassa vs.
Renee A. Mavros, Lecanto
Bryan T. McCarter, Ocala vs. Katie M.
McCarter, Inverness
Gavin N. McWhirter, Holly Springs, N.C.
vs. Misha L McWhirter, Crystal River
Vincent Brandon Smith, Amarillo, Texas
vs. Tara Michelle Smith, Inverness
Scott L. Hill, Perry vs. Dana M. Hill,
Macon, Ga.
Gary J. Moynihan, Crystal River vs.
Tina L. Moynihan, Crystal River


60th ANNIVERSARY

The Veselys


Don and Phyllis Vesely
of Arbor Lakes, Hernando,
celebrated their 60th an-
niversary on April 26,2012.
The couple were mar-
ried on April 26, 1952, in
Berwyn, Ill.
They have been resi-
dents of Citrus County for
16 years.


The Veselys have two
daughters, Kathy, of Inver-
ness, and Sherri, of Char-
lotte, N.C., as well as two
grandchildren.
In honor of their 60
years together, the Veselys
and their family recently
enjoyed a fabulous
Caribbean cruise vacation.


50th ANNIVERSARY

The Fahrentholds


Harvey and Sandra
Fahrenthold of Hernando
celebrated their 50th wed-
ding anniversary on April
28, 2012.
The couple were mar-
ried April 28, 1962, in
Macon, Ga. They have lived
in Citrus County for 12
years.


The Fahrentholds have a
son, Todd, who lives in
Frisco, Texas, and a daugh-
ter, Michele, who lives in
Georgetown, Texas. They
have four grandchildren.
They will celebrate with
friends at a brunch, and
later with family on a
cruise.


First BIRTHDAY

Pender Jadon Brisson

Pender Jadon Brisson
celebrated his first birth-
day April 20, 2012.
He is the son of Ben-
jamin and Michelle Bris-
son of Raritan, N.J.
Maternal grandparents
are Emil and Pat Brisson
of Phillipsburg, N.J. Pater-
nal grandparents are Don-
ald and Janet Luff of Lake
Tranquility, N.J.
Mary Pearl Green Luff of
Inverness is his paternal
great-grandmother.


Humane Society
OF CITRUS COUNTY


Boomer


Boomer (Boo for short) is a
3-year-old Chihuahua and
Boston terrier mix. He
weighs just 10 pounds. Boo
is a little shy to begin with,
but once he gets to know
you he gives his heart
completely. He is fully
vetted and housebroken.
For more information, call
Karron at 352-560-0051. An
approved adoption applica-
tion and donation are
required. To access an
application and to see
additional pets, visit the
website at ww.roomforone
more.net and click on
"homes wanted."


FOR THE RECORD
Divorces and marriages filed in the state of Florida are
a matter of public record, available from each
county's Clerk of the Courts Office. For Citrus County,
call the clerk at (352) 341-6400 or visit the website
at www.clerk.citrus.fl.us/. For proceedings filed in
another county, contact the clerk in that area.


Sunday's PUZZLER

Puzzle is on Page A14.

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4-29 2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


Fling into spring at dinner/dance


For the RECORD


A16 SUNDAY, APRIL 29, 2012


TOGETHER & COMMUNITY











SPORTS


The Orlando
Magic opens its
NBA playoff series
at the Indiana
Pacers./B5

CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


0 Adult recreation/B2
0 MLB/B3
0 NFL draft results/B4
I Sprint Cup/B4
0 NBA, NHL/B5
0 Golf/B5
0 Entertainment/B6


Williams memorabilia sells for record prices


MVPplaque goes

for $299,000 at

Fenway Park

Associated Press
BOSTON Boston Red Sox
slugger Ted Williams' 1949 MVP
plaque sold Saturday for nearly
$300,000 at the first major auction
of his sports, military and per-
sonal memorabilia.


Nearly 800 items sold at Fen-
way Park, the world's oldest base-
ball park and home field of the
only team that Williams played
for during his 1939-1960 major
league career. Some of the pro-
ceeds from the auction will ben-
efit The Jimmy Fund, a charity
affiliated with Boston's Dana-
Farber Cancer Institute for which
the slugger helped raise money
during his lifetime.
A baseball in pristine condition
that Babe Ruth autographed for
Williams sold for $195,500. The
ball, which had the inscription:


"To my pal Ted Williams, League MVP plaque,
From Babe Ruth," set a which fetched $299,000, a
record sale for a baseball used Red Sox road jersey
signed by Ruth that wasn't from 1955 that sold for
used in a game, Hunt Auc- $126,500 and Williams'
tions Inc. said. The ball Hall of Fame induction
was stolen from the ring, which went for
Williams family's Florida nearly $110,000.
home in the 1970s and was- Ted An 8-year-old Texas boy
n't recovered until 2005. Williams and his parents were the
Williams' 1957 Babe famed Red Sox winning bidders on
Ruth Sultan of SwatAward slugger was Williams' 1957 Silver Bat
for outstanding batting Citrus County award, which sold for
achievement sold for resident. nearly $195,500, and
$230,000. Other top items Williams' 1960 All-Star
included his 1949 American game bat, which went for $80,500.


Williams, the last major league
hitter to bat .400 posting a .406
average in 1941 enjoyed a di-
verse life, including as a U.S. Ma-
rine in World War II and the
Korean War, a member of the
fishing hall of fame and a skilled
hunter. He flew 39 combat mis-
sions in Korea and took enemy
fire three times, including during
an encounter that forced him to
land his stricken jet on its belly
"There're not many elements
of his life that did not exude the


Page B4


Bagging the big ones


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Dave Givens and Lisa Opel caught the heaviest bag of bass Saturday at the 8th Annual Citrus County Bass Challenge on the Withlacoochee
River. The winning total was 18.88 pounds after taking a penalty for having a dead fish in the catch and release competition. Givens and
Opel are pictured with Matthew Beck, right, tournament director, for the annual event. Proceeds from the tournament go to benefit the
Key Training Center.

Team of Givens and Opel take 1st place in Citrus County Bass Challenge


DAN HERMES
Correspondent
DUNNELLON Watch out
men ... the days of Bubba and
Jimbo reigning supreme at
local bass tournaments is fast
coming to an
end.
The eighth By 1
annual Cit-
rus County OVer. They
Bass Chal- turned off by
1 e n g e
(CCBC), to
benefit the co-winner of Citrus C
Key Training said of the ba
Center, saw
women bass
anglers make their presence
known in a big way The duo of
David Givens and Lisa Opel,
from Hernando, grabbed the
top spot by weighing in 18.86
pounds of bass that was good


2:



ou

ss


for first-place prize money in
the amount of $3,950.
The tournament drew 79 boats
to the city ramp in Dunnellon.
Keith Fels and David Hunter
of Ocala came in a close second
with 17.76 pounds of fish, while
Scott Bullard
and Tracey
:30, it was H u r s t
aly rounded out
ere totally the top three
then. with a five-
fish bag tip-
Lisa Opel ping the
unty Bass Challenge scales at 16.98
s' behavior Saturday. pounds. Fells
and Hunter
will cash a
check for $1,738 while Bullard
and Hurst went to the bank
with a check good for $1,185.
"We were fishing soft plastics
in the stumps and by 10 a.m. we
had three decent fish in the


boat," said Givens, who has
been a fixture on several bass
fishing circuits over the years.
"The next place we went to, the
schoolers started up and I
caught a 3-pounder on the first
cast. A few casts later came a
four-pounder and that was
about it for the day"
Opel is also a seasoned bass
veteran, having competed in her
fair share of bass fishing events.
"By 12:30, it was over," Opel
said with a sigh. "They were to-
tally turned off by then."
Fels and Hunter made a last-
minute surge to place second.
"It was 2:45 and we had
maybe 10 pounds in the
livewell," Hunter said. "We
were coming back to the ramp
and came across a mat and
Keith flipped in with his Deep
See Page B4


CCBC final results
David Givens/Lisa Opel
18.86 $3,950
Keith Fels/David Hunter
17.76 $1738*
Scott Bullard/ Tracey Hurst
16.98 $1,185
Donald Emrick/ James Cox
16.7 $711
Jason Guynn/Kevin Guynn
16.48 $474
Marcus Arrendondo/
Allen Curington 16.02 $237
Robert Rushing/Cliff
Sanders 15.8 $237
Harold Beasley/Mike Tacak
15.14 $237
Robert Heron/Chris Heron
15 $237
Dave Cutler/Shawn Lyons
14.9 $237


Tafoya


takes


home


medal


CR senior claims

seventh in 300

meter hurdles
LARRY BUGG
Correspondent
JACKSONVILLE -Martina
Tafoya saved her best for last
The Crystal River High
School senior took seventh
place in the 300 hurdles
Saturday at the FHSAA Class
2A State Track and Field
Championships.
It was her fourth trip to
state, her very last high school
track and field meet and her
first medal.
It also came at the right
place as she said she is seek-
ing a track scholarship at the
University of North Florida.
Before the race, she said
this was a tough time for her.
"I'm really nervous," she
said. "I want to do well for
Mom, who is not here today.
It's hot. I am sweating. I am
thinking medal. I really am."
She won the only medal for
the Crystal River High team.
Manuel Henriquez was very
close to a medal.
The Crystal River High dis-
cus thrower tossed a 136-3. The
toss left him in ninth place,
one place away from a medal.
He was clearly disappointed.
"It wasn't my best," he said.
"It felt good. I scratched my
first two."
Fortunately, Henriquez is a
junior. A week earlier, he took
third at the state weightlifting
meet in the heavyweight class.
Crystal River freshman
pole vaulter Angela Byrne
was 11th in the girls pole vault
with a 9-6.
The Crystal River girls
4x400 relay team was 12th.
Tafoya, Byrne, Delaney
Caleau and Haley Clark were
on that team.
The Pirate boys 4x400 relay
team also finished 12th. Jesus
Beneditti, John McAteer,
Napoleon Hutcherson and
Corey Pollard ran on that team.
Corey Pollard was 13th in
the boys 800 meters with a
time of 2:10.08.
John McAteer was 16th in
the 300 meter hurdles with a
time of 41.59.


Fagan set to attend Saint Leo


Citrus senior will

run cross country

for D-IILions
J.M. SORACCHI
Staff writer
In 2011, cross country was a di-
version for Kylie Fagan, some-
thing to do in order to stay in
shape for soccer and track.
Just eight months later, the Cit-
rus senior will be accepting ath-
letic scholarship money to run in
college.
Fagan recently committed to
attend Saint Leo University, a Di-


vision II program in Pasco
County. The Lions compete in the
Sunshine State Conference.
In her short time running 5K
(3.1 miles) races, Fagan fell in
love with the sport. The Hurri-
cane is also a standout on the soc-
cer field and for the track and
field team, so she had a difficult
choice to make.
"It was a tough decision be-
cause I didn't know what I
wanted to do more," Fagan said.
"I've played soccer my whole life
and I love it."
At the collegiate level, Fagan
will have to make the short ad-
justment from running all 5K
races to the 6K (3.7 miles) events
Saint Leo will run come during


their conference, regional and
national events.
Although Fagan had a running
background from track, Citrus girls
cross country coach Brian Lattin
was impressed with the seamless
transition his runner made.
"The fact that she was able to
run one year (before college) says
a lot about her athleticism," Lat-
tin said. "For a kid who'd never
run cross country, she stepped up
and was a leader for us."
Fagan came in third overall in
the Citrus County Championship J.M. SORACCHI/Chronicle
meet and her personal record Citrus senior Kylie Fagan, front center, recently signed a letter of intent
was a time of 20:56. The Citrus to run cross country for Saint Leo University, a Division II college in Pasco
senior reached the Region 3A-1 County. Fagan is flanked by her father Kerry and mother Tammy. In the
back row, from left, is Tim Wenger, Citrus coaches Brian Lattin and James
See Page B4 Martone, Alyssa Weber, Citrus principal Dale Johns and Brandon Roberts.















CITRUS COUNTY SP


CITRUS COUNTY'S RECREATIONAL GUIDE TO ADULT SPORTS

a a
= Mc

z
Q Q

'EEDWAY HITTING THE LINKS OUTDOORS YOUTH LEAGUE SPORTS


IN


THE


jAME


Chronicle wins United Way tournament


Special to the Chronicle
The Chronicle, left, defeated Lecanto Faculty, right, 22-19 to win the United Way April Madness charity basketball tournament Saturday, April 21. The Chronicle, which received a first-
round bye, won two games to reach the title game while Lecanto Faculty had to win three contests. Capital City Bank (not pictured) earned the Chris Nichols sportsmanship award.


Oh, my aching back!


Last week, I emphasized
the fact that those
headline injuries to
professional athletes are also
the same problems the rest of
us face without being glori-
fied in the press. As the Or-
lando Magic's Dwight
Howard has come to find out,
one of the most common rea-
sons for missed
playing time in
professional
sports is lower .
back pain.
In the U.S.,
lower back pain is
the leading cause
of lost time from
work, as well as a
leading reason Dr. Ron
for visits to doc-
tors, chiroprac- DOCi
tors and physical ORD
therapists.
As the population ages, so do
the ages of many athletes both
professional and amateur,
whether weekend warriors or
competitive senior athletes.
The most common causes of
lower back and leg pain in the
aging population and the ma-
ture athlete are the degenera-
tion of the lumbar discs, the
soft cushions between the
spine bones or vertebra, this
being in association with de-
generation of the joints hold-
ing these vertebra together
Add the narrowing of the canal
through which the terminal
end of the spinal cord passes
(called spinal stenosis) and you
have a lousy back, preventing
you from working out
Not only is the mature ath-
lete not immune from these
processes, but also injuries
to the back occur more fre-
quently in younger athletes
than in their less athletic or
non-athletic associates. Sur-
prisingly, lower back pain
and back injuries occur more
commonly in inactive or
sedentary kids.
Acute disc herniation occurs
in the lumbar spine more
often in adults but must be
considered in the athletic
teenager, especially with radi-
ating pain and numbness
and/or tingling in a leg or in
cases difficult to diagnose with
low back or buttock pain. The
groups at risk for a herniated
lumbar disc are football play-
ers, weightlifters and gym-
nasts. Also, athletes with lower
back pain include figure
skaters, kids waking boarding,
motor cross riding or jet skiing.
The question is how to get
the best answer for caring for
an injured back for an ath-
lete. Avoidance, in the first
place, is difficult if you play
your sport with vigor and due
to aging changes in the spine.
Once your lower back pain
hinders your sport and train-
ing, the first step is to get a di-
agnosis. The correct
diagnosis is preferable.
When it comes to lower back
pain, it is a complex task be-
cause there are a number of
anatomic pain generators.
Diagnosis involves testing,
a competent physical exam as
well as lumbar spine X-rays


and an MRI. If there is associ-
ated numbness or weakness,
the doctor will order an elec-
trical nerve test to help local-
ize the source of pain.
The trouble in understanding
the rationale for a treatment
program is the subtle differ-
ences of where the pain is com-
ing from. Therefore an accurate
diagnosis is crucial.
Also, a work com-
pensation injury or
personal injury
from a car accident
or slip and fall is far
different than a
sports-related in-
jury Doctors and
the scientific litera-
Joseph ture often do not
su efficiently
OR'S differentiate.
ERS The place to
start recovering
from a back injury is with the
obvious need to rest, ice/heat
and anti-inflammatory
agents. Physical therapy or
chiropractic care initially
control the inflammation of
the muscle injury, the disc,
arthritic joint or narrowed
spinal canal. Disc herniation,
while not an inflammation,
can be controlled initially in
the same manner
Most important, maintain-
ing abdominal or core
strength and overall flexibility
and unloading the spine is
crucial. Being overweight and
prolonged sitting or standing
will aggravate any lower back
condition. With severe and un-
relenting pain and especially
if associated with pain, numb-
ness and tingling or weakness
radiating to either leg, corti-
sone injections called trans-
foraminal epidural injections
can be a gift from heaven.
While not curing the situation,
it can provide relief, even if
transient
The best way by far to ex-
ercise and maintain physical
conditioning is to walk in the
shallow end of a swimming
pool. Water provides buoy-
ancy to reduce the weight of
gravity on the spine and pro-
vides resistance for increas-
ing muscle strength and
endurance.
Lower back pain is a diffi-
cult, frustrating and painful
challenge. Get several opin-
ions from different specialists.
Experience and reputation
speaks volumes, especially
how they deal with the not so
good results.
Above all else, stay away
from or minimize pain med-
ication. Pain medications are
obviously taken to deal with
pain, but these medications
do not fix the injury. Addic-
tion to these medications is
waiting in the wings, ask for-
mer NFL quarterback Brett
Farve, Randy Grimes of
Tampa Bay, commentator
Rush Limbaugh and a host of
others you will meet in the
next few weeks.
Ron Joseph, M.D., a hand
and shoulder orthopedic
specialist at SeaSpine Ortho-
pedic Institute can be
reached at rbjhand@cox.net
or 352-212-5359.


Recreation BRIEFS


Men's, co-ed softball
leagues forming now
The City of Inverness Department of
Parks & Recreation's Men's and Co-ed
Adult Recreational Softball Leagues are
forming now for all levels of players. Men
play on Tuesdays and the co-ed leagues
play on Fridays.
Games are played at Whispering Pines
Park in Inverness; all are welcome.
For more information, call Shaun Mira-
cle at 352-726-2611, ext. 1311 or email
smiracle@inverness-fl.gov. For more in-
formation about other programs and
classes, call Whispering Pines Park ad-
ministration office at 352-726-3913 or
email parks@inverness-fl.gov.
Skeet shoot, fish fry benefits
Covenant Children's Home
A skeet shoot and fish fry to benefit the
Covenant Children's Home is planned for
Saturday, May 19, at Robinson Ranch,
19730 S.E. 127 Terrace, six miles west of
Dunnellon on County Road 40.
Skeet shooting is from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
and lunch begins at 11 a.m. with food
provided by Charlie's Fish House of
Crystal River.
The charge for skeet shooting is $20
for 25 shots, using personal firearms or
those provided. The fish fry is $10. Veter-
ans may "skeet and eat" for $25.
All proceeds go to the home.
Tickets are available at www.cchfl.org
or call 352-489-2565.
Tampa Bay Rays' game trip
helps seniors in need
Tickets are available for a trip to the
Tampa Bay Rays vs. Red Sox ballgame
May 16 at Tropicana Field in St. Peters-
burg.
Cost is $45 and includes one game
ticket and round-trip transportation from
the Citrus County Resource Center to
Tropicana Field.
Proceeds go to the Senior Foundation
of Citrus County and the Home Delivered
Meals Program.
For tickets, call 352-527-5975.
Calling all anglers for tourney
The Citrus County Builders'Associa-
tion (CCBA) and Exclusive Platinum
Sponsor F.D.S. Disposal Inc. will present
the 17th annual Family Fishing Tourna-
ment on May 5 and 6 at the Homosassa
Riverside Resort in Homosassa.
Captains' meeting will be May 4 at the
same location. Youth Partner Coastal
Conservation Association Citrus Chap-
ter, will also have its Aaron Monier Me-
morial Youth Tournament in conjunction
with the CCBA tournament to make the
weekend a family experience.
The tourney is a local favorite that
boasts more than $12,500 in cash and
prizes (based on 125 boat entries), with
this year's top prize being $3,000 each for
trout and redfish. Entry fee is $150 for
each boat, with no extra angler fees.
For more information, as well as online
registration and payment, visit www.
citrusbuilders.com and click on the gray
fishing logo on the home page. Youth
entry forms are available on the CCBA
website.
Official entry forms may be picked up
in person at the Homosassa Riverside
Resort, Riverside Crab House, F.D.S.
Disposal Inc., Citrus 95.3 & Fox 96.3 and
the Citrus County Builders Association,
which is open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Monday through Thursday (email info@
citrusbuilders.com or call 352-746-9028).
Citrus YMCA expands
group exercise program
The Citrus County YMCA now offers


Special to the Chronicle
Julia Gruber, member of the Showtime Equestrian team, competed at the
Interscholatic Equestrian Association National Championship in Syracuse, NY.
Gruber, a Crystal River High School freshman, placed 6th in the Junior Varsity
Novice Cross-Rails division. This is the 10th year of lEA competition, and the
second year that Showtime Equestrian has fielded a team. The team, under the
direction of trainer Bridget Imparato (left), is based in Pine Ridge and is open
to middle and high school riders.


its Group Exercise program at First
United Methodist Church in Homosassa,
the Y's westside venue for health and
wellness classes.
Currently, there are Pilates, cardio in-
terval and stability and strength classes
offered at these locations. The regular
schedule is:
Monday: Cardio interval from 9:30
to 10:15 a.m., stability and strength from
10:30 to 11:15 a.m.
Wednesday: Pilates from 9:30 to
10:15 a.m., stability and strength from
10:30 to 11:15 a.m.
Friday: Pilates from 9:30 to 10:15
a.m., cardio interval from 10:30 to 11:15 a.m.
For more information about the YMCA
Group Exercise program, call the office at
352-637-0132. Financial assistance is
available to all those who qualify. The
YMCA office is in Beverly Hills at 3909 N.
Lecanto Highway, and is open noon to
5:30 p.m. Monday through Friday.
Learn to stretch
with Parks & Rec
Citrus County Parks & Recreation of-
fers a low-impact stretching class. This
on-going class will be from 10 to 11 a.m.
at Citrus Springs Community Center.
Cost is $5 per class.
The low-impact class is easy and fun
with good benefits. Stretching helps to
make you more flexible and regular
stretching will help mobility and balance.
This helps to slow down the onset of com-
mon degenerative conditions, such as os-
teoarthritis. Stretching increases physical
and mental relaxation and reduces the


risk of joint sprain, muscle strain or back
problems. Low-impact exercises can im-
prove health and fitness without harming
weight-bearing joints. Research suggests
moderate-intensity, low-impact activity is
just as effective as high-impact activity in
lowering the risk of heart disease.
For more information, visit www.citr-
uscountyparks.com and click on instruc-
tional classes, or call 352-465-7007.
Jazzercise at West Citrus
Community Center
Citrus County Parks & Recreation will
offer Jazzercise at West Citrus Commu-
nity Center. The 60-minute class in-
cludes a warm-up, high-energy aerobic
routines, muscle toning and cool-down
stretch segment.
One-hour classes are offered at 5:30
p.m. Monday, Tuesdays and Thursdays.
Unlimited monthly ticket is $25.
Call 352-465-7007 or visit www.
citruscountyparks.com.
Zumba at Citrus Springs
Citrus County Parks & Recreation offers
Zumba classes with instructor Lynn
DaSilva at Citrus Springs Community Cen-
ter. Zumba is a fitness program designed
with exciting Latin and international dance
rhythms. No membership or contracts.
Ongoing classes are: 11:30 a.m. to
12:30 p.m. Monday; 6:30 to 7:30 p.m.
Tuesday; and 6:30 to 7:30 p.m.
Thursday. Cost is $5.
For more information, visit www.
citruscountyparks.com or call
352465-7007.


n
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)


E Z APR
-ET






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




AL

Angels 2, Indians 1
Los Angeles Cleveland
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Trout If 4 0 0 0 Brantly cf 4 0 1 0
HKndrc2b 3 1 1 0 Kipnis2b 4 1 1 0
Pujolslb 4 01 0 ACarerss 3 0 0 0
KMorlsdh 4 01 1 Hafnerdh 4 00 0
TrHntr rf 4 1 1 1 CSantn c 4 0 0 0
Trumo3b 2 00 0 Hannhn3b 4 0 1 1
Callasp 3b 1 0 0 0 Duncan If 3 0 1 0
Aybarss 4 01 0 Ktchmlb 2 00 0
BoWlsn c 4 00 0 Cnghm rf 3 00 0
Bourjos cf 3 0 0 0
Totals 33 25 2 Totals 31 1 4 1
Los Angeles 100 100 000 2
Cleveland 000 100 000 1
E-Kipnis (2). LOB-Los Angeles 6, Cleveland
5. 2B-Brantley (6). HR-Tor.Hunter (2).
IP H RERBBSO


Los Angeles
Haren W,1-1
S. Downs S,1-3
Cleveland
J.Gomez L,1-1
J.Smith
Hagadone
WP-Haren. PB-


8 4 1 1 2 7
1 0 0 0 0 1

6 5 2 2 2 7
2 0 0 0 0 2
1 0 0 0 0 1
-C.Santana.


Tigers 7, Yankees 5
Detroit NewYork
ab rh bi ab rh bi
AJcksn cf 3 2 1 0 Jeter dh 3 0 0 0
Boesch rf 3 1 1 1 Swisher rf 4 2 2 2
Kellyrf 000 0 Cano2b 4 00 0
MiCarr3b 4 1 2 3 ARdrgz3b 3 1 1 0
Fielder b 2 1 0 0 Teixeirib 4 0 0 0
Dirks If 4 1 1 3 Grndrs cf 4 2 2 2
Eldred dh 4 0 0 0 AnJons If 2 0 0 0
Avilac 4 1 1 0 Ibanezph 1 0 1 1
JhPerlt ss 4 0 1 0 Martin c 3 0 0 0
RSantg 2b 4 00 0 ErChvz ph 1 0 0 0
ENunez ss 3 0 0 0
Totals 32 77 7 Totals 32 5 6 5
Detroit 330 000 010 7
NewYork 100 000 103 5
DP-Detroit 1, New York 2. LOB-Detroit 2,
New York 3. 2B-Boesch (1), Ibanez (3). HR-
Mi.Cabrera (7), Dirks (1), Swisher 2 (6),
Granderson (7). SB-A.Jackson (3).
IP H R ER BB SO
Detroit
SmylyW,1-0 6 2 1 1 2 7
Coke 1 1 1 1 0 0
Dotel 1 0 0 0 0 2
Valverde 1 3 3 3 1 0
New York
FGarcia L,0-2 12-3 5 6 6 2 3
Rapada 11-3 0 0 0 0 0
Phelps 3 0 0 0 1 2
Eppley 3 2 1 1 1 3
Smyly pitched to 1 batter in the 7th.

Blue Jays 7, Mariners 0
Seattle Toronto
ab r h bi ab rh bi
Figgins If 4 0 0 0 YEscorss 4 1 1 0
Ackley2b 4 00 0 KJhnsn2b 4 2 2 0
ISuzuki rf 4 0 2 0 Bautist rf 4 2 1 1
Smoaklb 4 0 0 0 Lindlb 3 1 2 1
Seager 3b 3 02 0 Encrnc dh 3 1 2 5
Kawsk ph 0 00 0 Thams If 2 00 0
JMontr dh 3 00 0 Lawrie 3b 4 0 1 0
Jaso ph 1 00 0 Rasms cf 4 0 0 0
MSndrs cf 4 0 1 0 Arencii c 3 0 1 0
Olivo c 4 01 0
Ryan ss 3 0 0 0
Totals 34 06 0 Totals 31 710 7
Seattle 000 000 000 0
Toronto 003 000 04x 7
E-Seager (2), K.Johnson (2). DP-Seattle 2.
LOB-Seattle 8, Toronto 4. 2B-Seager (6),
M.Saunders (7), Bautista (2), Lind (6), Encar-
nacion (8). HR-Encarnacion (6). CS-Encar-
nacion (1). SF-Encarnacion.
IP H RERBBSO


Seattle
Millwood L,0-2
Iwakuma
Toronto
Morrow W,2-1
Frasor H,4
Oliver H,3
Villanueva


7 7 3 1 2 4
1 3 4 4 1 2


Red Sox 1, White Sox 0


Boston

Aviles ss
Sweeny rf
Pedroia 2b
AdGnzl lb
Ortiz dh
Youkils 3b
Sltlmch c
C.Ross If
Byrd cf


Totals
Boston
Chicaao


LOB-Boston 4,
Konerko 2 (9).

Boston
Lester W,1-2
FMorales H,5
Padilla H,2
Aceves S,5-7
Chicago
Peavy L,3-1


Chicago
ab r h bi
4 0 0 0 De Aza cf
4 1 2 0 AIRmrzss
4 0 0 0 A.Dunndh
4 0 1 1 Konerklb
4 00 0 Riosrf
3 0 0 0 Viciedo If
3 00 0 Flowrs c
3 0 0 0 Fukdm ph
2 0 1 0 Morel 3b
Przyns ph
Bckhm 2b
31 14 1 Totals
000 100 000
000 000 000


ab r h bi
4 00 0
4 0 1 0
3 00 0
3 02 0
4 000


1 0 0 0


3 0 0 0
330 6 0
1
0


Chicago 8.2B-Sweeney (11),

IP H RERBBSO


7 5 0
2-3 1 0
1-3 0 0
1 0 0


9 4 1 1 1 7


Orioles 10, Athletics 1
Oakland Baltimore


ab r h bi


ab r h bi


JWeeks 2b 3 00 0 Reimld If 4 01 0
Crisp If 4 0 2 0 Hardyss 2 1 0 1
S.Smith If 0 0 0 0 Markks dh 4 1 1 0
Reddckrf 4 01 0 AdJonscf 4 33 1
Cespdscf 4 00 0 Betemt3b 4 1 2 1
JGomsdh 3 1 1 1 C.Davislb 4 2 3 4
KSuzuk c 3 01 0 RPaulnc 4 1 1 2
Reckerc 1 00 0 Flahrtyrf 4 0 0 0
Kaaihulb 4 0 1 0 Andino2b 4 1 3 1
LHughs 3b 4 0 1 0
Pnngtnss 4 00 0
Totals 34 17 1 Totals 34101410
Oakland 000 001 000 1
Baltimore 051 030 10x 10
E-K.Suzuki (1). DP-Oakland 2. LOB-Oak-
land 8, Baltimore 3. 2B-Reddick (7), Betemit
(4). HR-J.Gomes (4), C.Davis (4). SB-
J.Weeks (4), Crisp (4). SF-Hardy.
IP H RERBBSO
Oakland
TRossL,1-1 4 11 9 9 1 1
Blevins 1 1 0 0 0 1
Figueroa 1 1 0 0 1 0
J.Miller 2 1 1 1 0 1
Baltimore
W.ChenW,2-0 7 6 1 1 2 4
Ayala 2 1 0 0 0 1
TRoss pitched to 3 batters in the 5th.


Rays schedule
April 29 at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
April 30 Seattle, 7:10 p.m.
May 1 Seattle, 7:10 p.m.
May 2 Seattle, 7:10 p.m.
May 3 Seattle, 1:10p.m.
May 4 Oakland, 7:10 p.m.
May 5 Oakland, 7:10 p.m.
May 6 Oakland, 1:40 p.m.
May 8 at N.Y Yankees, 7:05 p.m.
May 9 at N.Y Yankees, 7:05 p.m.
May 10 at N.Y Yankees, 7:05 p.m.
May 11 at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m.
May 12 at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m.
May 13 at Baltimore, 1:35 p.m.
May 14 at Toronto, 7:07 p.m.
May 15 at Toronto, 7:07 p.m.


BASEBALL


SUNDAY, APRIL 29, 2012 B3


AMERICAN LEAGUE


W
Baltimore 13
Tampa Bay 13
NewYork 11
Toronto 11
Boston 10


East Division
L Pct GB WC L10
8 .619 6-4
8 .619 8-2
9 .550 1Y2 1Y2 6-4
10 .524 2 2 5-5
10 .500 2Y2 2Y2 6-4


Str Home
W-1 7-4
L-1 8-1
L-1 5-4
W-1 5-6
W-6 3-5


Away
6-4 Cleveland
5-7 Detroit
6-5 Chicago
6-4 Kan. City
7-5 Minnesota


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L10
9 .526 - 5-5
10 .524- 2 3-7
11 .4761 3 4-6
14 .300 412 612 3-7
15 .250 512 712 2-8


Str Home
L-1 3-7
W-16-7
L-5 3-7
W-30-10
L-6 2-8


Texas
Oakland
Seattle
L. Angeles


NATIONAL LEAGUE


Washington 14
Atlanta 13
New York 11
Philadel. 10
Miami 8


East Division
W L Pct GB WC L10 Str Home Away


6 .700 -
8 .619 112
9 .550 3
11 .476 412
12 .400 6


L-2 8-2
L-1 6-2
L-1 8-5
W-1 4-4
W-16-3


St. Louis
Cincinnati
Pittsburgh
Milwaukee
Houston
Chicago


Central Division
W L Pct GB WC L10
14 7 .667 6-4
10 11 .476 4 3 6-4
9 11 .450 4/2 3/2 6-4
9 12 .429 5 4 4-6
8 13 .381 6 5 4-6
7 14 .333 7 6 4-6


Str Home Away
W-36-2 8-5
W-1 6-5 4-6
W-1 5-4 4-7
L-3 6-6 3-6
L-1 4-5 4-8
L-1 5-8 2-6


L. Angeles
Colorado
San Fran.
Arizona
San Diego


West Division
L Pct GB WC L10
5 .762- 7-3
11 .500 5Y2 2Y2 6-4
11 .500 5Y2 2Y2 5-5
14 .333 9 6 3-7




West Division
L Pct GB WC L10
6 .700 5-5
9 .526 3Y2 2 6-4
10 .500 4 2Y2 6-4
11 .476 4Y2 3 3-7
14 .333 7Y2 6 4-6


Str Home
W-1 8-4
L-1 6-7
L-1 3-6
W-14-6


Str Home Away
W-1 8-2 6-4
W-1 6-4 4-5
L-1 4-3 6-7
L-1 6-7 4-4
W-2 5-9 2-5


Detroit has to hold off hard-charging Yankees


-^ '- I

Associated Press
New York Yankees center fielder Curtis Granderson, rear, runs the bases after hitting a solo home run off Detroit Tigers
relief pitcher Phil Coke during the seventh inning Saturday in New York. The Tigers got the last laugh in a 7-5 win.




Cabrera homers as Tigers win


Rays fall to Rangers;


box score on Page B4

Associated Press

NEW YORK Miguel Cabrera
homered and drove in three runs
and Drew Smyly pitched into the sev-
enth inning for his first major league
win to help the Detroit Tigers snap a
five-game losing streak by beating
the New York Yankees 7-5 Saturday
Andy Dirks hit a three-run homer
in the first off Freddy Garcia. Playing
Delmon Young's usual position of left
field, Dirks made a pair of nice de-
fensive plays, too, running down
balls that looked like extra-base hits
off the bat
Young was placed on the restricted
list earlier Saturday to be evaluated
under baseball's employee assis-
tance program. He was arrested
early Friday on a hate crime harass-
ment charge following an encounter
at his hotel during which police say
he yelled anti-Semitic epithets and
appeared intoxicated.
AMERICAN LEAGUE

Rangers 7, Rays 2
ARLINGTON, Texas Colby Lewis al-
lowed one run in six innings, Josh Hamil-
ton had a two-run single and the Texas
Rangers snapped Tampa Bay's six-game
winning streak, beating the Rays.
Lewis (3-0) allowed three hits and
three walks to improve to 4-0 in his ca-
reer against the Rays. Tampa Bay's only
scoring off Lewis came on Matt Joyce's
second-inning homer.
Rays starter Jeff Niemann (1-3) gave up
three runs and three walks in 5 2-3 innings.
The right-hander has not pitched past the
sixth inning in his four starts this season.
Angels 2, Indians 1
CLEVELAND Dan Haren pitched
eight strong innings for Los Angeles though
Albert Pujols remained homeless as the
Angels defeated the Cleveland Indians.
Torii Hunter hit a solo homer for Los
Angeles, which snapped a five-game los-
ing streak after a cold drizzle delayed the
start of the game 147 minutes.
Pujols went 1 for 4 with his single dur-
ing a first-inning rally giving the Angels a
1-0 lead off Jeanmar Gomez (1-1).
Hunter's homer in the fourth made it 2-
0. The Angels have hit only five homers in
their last 104 innings.
Haren (1-1) made the lead stand up.
The right-hander allowed four hits and
struck out seven.
Red Sox 1, White Sox 0
CHICAGO Jon Lester outdueled
Jake Peavy, lifting the Boston Red Sox
over the Chicago White Sox for their sixth
straight win.
Adrian Gonzalez had an RBI single in
the fourth as Lester (1-2) picked up his
first win of the season. Lester snapped a
career-worst streak of losing five straight
decisions and going eight starts without a
win dating to Sept. 11 of last season.
Alfredo Aceves pitched the ninth for his
fifth save in seven chances.
Peavy (3-1) failed in his bid to win a
fourth straight start for the first time with
the White Sox, but threw a complete
game for a second consecutive start for
the first time in his career.


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Saturday's Games
L.A. Angels 2, Cleveland 1
Kansas City at Minnesota, ppd., rain
Detroit 7, N.Y. Yankees 5
Toronto 7, Seattle 0
Baltimore 10, Oakland 1
Boston 1, Chicago White Sox 0
Texas 7, Tampa Bay 2
Sunday's Games
Detroit (Scherzer 1-2) at N.YYankees (Sabathia 2-0), 1:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels (E.Santana 0-4) at Cleveland (D.Lowe 3-1),
1:05 p.m.
Seattle (Vargas 3-1) at Toronto (H.Alvarez 0-2), 1:07 p.m.
Oakland (Colon 3-2) at Baltimore (Tom.Hunter 2-1), 1:35 p.m.
Boston (Beckett 2-2) at Chicago White Sox (Floyd 1-3),
2:10 p.m.
Kansas City (B.Chen 0-2) at Minnesota (Marquis 1-0), 2:10p.m.
Tampa Bay (Price 3-1) at Texas (D.Holland 2-1), 8:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
Baltimore at N.Y.Yankees, 7:05 p.m.
Kansas City at Detroit, 7:05 p.m.
Texas at Toronto, 7:07 p.m.
Oakland at Boston, 7:10 p.m.
Seattle at Tampa Bay, 7:10 p.m.
Minnesota at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Saturday's Games
St. Louis 7, Milwaukee 3
Cincinnati 6, Houston 0
Philadelphia 5, Chicago Cubs 2
Miami 3, Arizona 2
Pittsburgh 4, Atlanta 2
N.Y Mets at Colorado, late
San Diego at San Francisco, late
Washington at L.A. Dodgers, late
Sunday's Games
Arizona (Miley 2-0) at Miami (Jo.Johnson 0-2), 1:10 p.m.
Houston (Lyles 0-0) at Cincinnati (Latos 1-2), 1:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Garza 1-1) at Philadelphia (K.Kendrick0-
1), 1:35 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Correia 1-0) at Atlanta (T Hudson 0-0), 1:35 p.m.
Miwaukee (Greinke 2-1) at St. Louis (J.Garcia 2-0), 2:15 p.m.
N.Y Mets (J.Santana 0-2) at Colorado (Moyer 1-2), 3:10 p.m.
San Diego (Richard 1-2) at San Francisco (Bumgarner 3-
1), 4:05 p.m.
Washington (G.Gonzalez 2-0) at L.A. Dodgers (Capuano
2-0), 4:10 p.m.
Monday's Games
Arizona at Miami, 12:40 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Atlanta, 7:10 p.m.
N.Y Mets at Houston, 8:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers at Colorado, 8:40 p.m.
Milwaukee at San Diego, 10:05 p.m.
For more box scores,
see Page B4.



Blue Jays 7, Mariners 0
TORONTO Brandon Morrow
pitched six innings, Edwin Encarnacion
hit a grand slam and the Toronto Blue
Jays beat the Seattle Mariners, snapping
a four-game losing streak.
Morrow (2-1) won his second straight
start and improved to 3-0 with a 1.89 ERA
in three starts against the team that
drafted him fifth overall in 2006.
The right-hander allowed five hits,
walked none and struck out a season-
high nine.
Encamacion went 2 for 3 with a double
and a sacrifice fly, matching his career-high
with five RBIs. Encamacion's first-pitch
drive to right off Hisashi Iwakuma in the
eighth was his team-leading sixth home
run and his fourth career grand slam.
The loss ended Seattle's season-best
four-game winning streak.
Orioles 10, Athletics 1
BALTIMORE Wei-Yin Chen pitched
seven strong innings, Chris Davis had
four RBIs, Adam Jones and Robert
Andino each had three hits and the Balti-
more Orioles beat the Oakland Athletics.
Chen (2-0) allowed six hits and didn't
allow a run until Jonny Gomes' one-out
home run in the sixth. By then, he led 9-0.
He struck out four and walked two.
The Orioles scored five runs in the sec-
ond on a season-high six hits. They're
13-8 and haven't been more than five


games above .500 since July 20, 2005.
NATIONAL LEAGUE

Cardinals 7, Brewers 3
ST. LOUIS Yadier Molina tied his ca-
reer high by going 4-for-4 with a two-run
homer, and Kyle Lohse allowed three
runs over six innings to run his record to
4-0 for the first time as the St. Louis Car-
dinals defeated the Milwaukee Brewers.
Molina's home run to left field with one
out in the sixth off Milwaukee starter
Marco Estrada (0-1) broke a 3-3 tie.
Molina has 10 four-hit games in his ca-
reer, the last coming on May 22, 2011,
against Kansas City.
St. Louis has won three straight and
leads the Brewers by five games in the
NL Central.
Marlins 3, Diamondbacks 2
MIAMI Hanley Ramirez hit a run-
scoring single with two outs in the ninth
inning to lift the Marlins over the Arizona
Diamondbacks, snapping Miami's losing
streak at six games.
Ramirez's line drive to left off reliever
Brad Ziegler scored Giancarlo Stanton after
he reached on a one-out infield single and
advanced to second on Emilio Bonifacio's
grounder to first. Ziegler (0-1) intentionally
walked Jose Reyes to face Ramirez.
Logan Morrison hit a leadoff homer in
the eighth to tie it 2-2, driving Arizona re-
liever David Hernandez's pitch over the
right-field fence for his second home run
of the season.

Phillies 5, Cubs 2
PHILADELPHIA- Carlos Ruiz home-
red and drove in three runs, Joe Blanton
threw 7 1-3 sharp innings and the Philadel-
phia Phillies beat the Chicago Cubs.
Jimmy Rollins, back in the leadoff spot
for the first time this season, added a two-
run double for the Phillies, the five-time
defending NL East champions who are
off toa 10-11 start.
Blanton (2-3) allowed two runs and
eight hits, striking out eight. Chad Quails
got the last two outs in the eighth.
Jonathan Papelbon finished for his sev-
enth save in as many tries.
Reds 6, Astros 0
CINCINNATI Jay Bruce homered for
the third consecutive game and drove in
four runs to back Johnny Cueto's solid ef-
fort as the Cincinnati Reds beat the
Houston Astros.
Bruce had a two-run double and Bran-
don Phillips added two hits for the Reds,
who had lost the first two games of a 10-
day, nine-game homestand.
Cueto (3-0) wasn't dominant, allowing
five hits and a walk while hitting a batter
and striking out just three over seven in-
nings, but he was able to make enough
quality pitches to keep in check an Astros
team that hit .301 over the first four
games of their six-game road trip.
Pirates 4, Braves 2
ATLANTA- Streaking Alex Presley
helped the Pirates finally provide tough-luck
starter Erik Bedard some support and the
Pittsburgh Pirates beat the Atlanta Braves.
Presley had two hits to extend his ca-
reer-best hitting streak to 12 games. He
scored two runs and drove in a run with a
double. Pedro Alvarez also had a run-
scoring double.
Bedard (1-4) gave up only one run in
five innings.


NL

Cardinals 7, Brewers 3
Milwaukee St. Louis
ab rh bi ab rh bi


3 0 1 0
4 00 0
4 00 0

4 0 1 0
4 00 0
3 1 1 1
3 0 1 1
2 00 0
0 0 0 0
0 00 0
1 0 1 0


Furcal ss
Jay cf
Hollidy If
Beltran rf
Freese 3b
YMolin c
MCrpnt lb
Schmkr 2b
Lohse p
Descals ph
VMarte p
Boggs p
Komats ph
Motte p
Totals
111 000
102 02x


5 1 0 0
4 0 3 1
4 0 0 1

4 1 1 1
4 24 2
3 1 1 0
4 0 1 2
1 1 0 0
1 0 0 0
1000
0000
1 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
34710 7
3
7


RWeks 2b
CGomz cf
Braun If
ArRmr3b
Hart rf
Gamel1ib
AIGnzlz ss
Kottars c
Estrad p
Loe p
Veras p
Aoki ph


Totals 32 37 3
Milwaukee 000
St. Louis 002


E-Gamel (3). DP-Milwaukee 1, St. Louis 1.
LOB-Milwaukee 7, St. Louis 6. 2B-Hart (7),
M.Carpenter (4), Schumaker (1). HR-
Ar.Ramirez (2), Ale.Gonzalez (4), Freese (5),
Y.Molina (4). SB-Jay (3). S-Estrada.
IP H RERBBSO
Milwaukee
EstradaL,0-1 6 7 5 4 2 2
Loe 1 1 0 0 0 1
Veras 1 2 2 2 1 0
St. Louis
LohseW,4-0 6 6 3 3 4 5
V.MarteH,1 1 0 0 0 0 2
BoggsH,6 1 0 0 0 0 1
Motte 1 1 0 0 0 1

Reds 6, Astros 0
Houston Cincinnati
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Schafer cf 4 0 1 0 Stubbs cf 4 0 0 0
Lyon p 0 00 0 Cozart ss 4 1 1 0
Altuve2b 4 00 0 Vottolb 4 2 1 0
Lowrie ss 3 0 1 0 Phillips 2b 4 2 2 1
JDMrtn If 3 0 0 0 Bruce rf 3 1 2 4
T.Buckrf 3 0 2 0 Rolen3b 4 0 1 1
MDwnslb 4 0 1 0 Heisey If 4 0 1 0
CJhnsn 3b 3 0 1 0 Hanign c 4 0 1 0
CSnydrc 4 00 0 Cuetop 2 00 0
Harrell p 2 00 0 Ondrskp 0 00 0
Wrghtp 0 00 0 Chpmnp 0 00 0
Bixler ph 1 0 0 0
Maxwll cf 0 0 0 0
Totals 31 06 0 Totals 336 9 6
Houston 000 000 000 0
Cincinnati 202 020 00x 6
E-Altuve (3). DP-Cincinnati 2. LOB-Hous-
ton 8, Cincinnati 5. 2B-C.Johnson (5), Votto
(9), Bruce (5). 3B-Phillips (1). HR-Bruce (6).
SB-Votto (1). S-Cueto.
IP H RERBBSO
Houston
HarrellL,1-2 6 9 6 5 1 1
W.Wright 1 0 0 0 0 1
Lyon 1 0 0 0 0 2
Cincinnati
CuetoW,3-0 7 5 0 0 1 3
Ondrusek 1 0 0 0 0 1
Chapman 1 1 0 0 2 1
HBP-byCueto (TBuck).

Phillies 5, Cubs 2
Chicago Philadelphia
ab rh bi ab rh bi
DeJess rf 4 0 1 0 Rollins ss 4 0 1 2
Barney 2b 4 0 1 0 Polanc 3b 4 00 0
SCastro ss 4 1 1 1 Pence rf 4 1 1 0
LaHairlb 4 0 1 1 Thomelb 1 00 0
ASorinlf 4 0 1 0 Wggntnib 2 0 1 0
IStewrt 3b 4 0 0 0 Victorn cf 4 1 1 0
RJhnsncf 4 0 1 0 Nix If 1 1 0 0
WCastll c 3 0 0 0 Mayrry ph-lf 1 0 0 0
R.Wellsp 1 0 1 0 Ruizc 4 22 3
Bowdenp 1 0 0 0 Orr2b 3 00 0
Camp p 0 0 0 0 Galvis ph-2b 1 0 0 0
Campn ph 1 1 1 0 Blanton p 1 0 0 0
Maine p 0 0 0 0 Qualls p 0 00 0
Papelnp 0 00 0
Totals 34 28 2 Totals 305 6 5
Chicago 100 000 010 2
Philadelphia 000 401 00x 5
DP-Philadelphia 1. LOB-Chicago 5, Philadel-
phia 6. 2B-LaHair (5), Rollins (3), Pence (3),
Victorino (2). HR-Ruiz (3). SB-S.Castro 2
(10), Victorino (7).
IP H RERBBSO
Chicago
R.Wells L,0-1 32-33 4 4 4 3
Bowden 21-32 1 1 0 3
Camp 1 1 0 0 0 1
Maine 1 0 0 0 0 2
Philadelphia
Blanton W,2-3 71-38 2 2 0 8
Qualls H,5 2-3 0 0 0 0 1
Papelbon S,7-7 1 0 0 0 0 2
HBP-by R.Wells (Blanton). WP-Blanton.

Marlins 3, D-backs 2
Arizona Miami
ab rhbi ab r h bi


Blmqst ss
GParra cf
J.Upton rf
Kubel If
MMntr c
Gldsch1ib
A.Hill 2b
RRorts 3b
IKnndy p
Shawp
DHrndz p
Ziegler p

Totals
Arizona
Miami


3 1 1 01
4 1 1 1r
3 00 0
4 00 0
4 0 1 1
3 00 0
3 00 0
4 0 0 01
2 0 0 0


0 0 0 0

30 23 2

000


Bonifac 2b
Reyes ss
HRmrz 3b
Morrsn If
GSnchz lb
Dobbs rf
Cishek p
Hayes c
Coghln cf
ASnchz p
Infante ph
Choate p
Stanton rf
Totals
000 000
000 111


31111
4 0 1 0
2 0 1 1
4 0 1 1
3 1 1 1
4 00 0
4 0 1 0

4 0 2 0
4 0 0 0


1110
0 0 0 0
1 1 1 0
33310 3
2
3


Two outs when winning run scored.
DP-Arizona 1. LOB-Arizona 6, Miami 10.
2B-Bloomquist (5), G.Parra (4), Hayes 2 (2).
3B-Dobbs (1), Infante (2). HR-Morrison (2).
CS-Reyes (3). S-Reyes.
IP H RERBBSO


Arizona
I.Kennedy 61
Shaw H,3 2-
Hernandez BS,2-2 1
Ziegler L,0-1 2-
Miami
A.Sanchez 7
Choate 1
CishekW,2-0 1
HBP-by I.Kennedy
A.Sanchez.


-37 1
3 0 0
1 1
3 2 1


3 2 2 4 14

orrison). WP0
(Morrison). WP-


Pirates 4, Braves 2
Pittsburgh Atlanta
ab r h bi ab r h bi


Presley If 5 2 2 1
Tabata rf 5 0 1 1
McCtchcf 4 01 0
GJoneslb 3 0 0 1
J.Cruzp 0 00 0
Grillip 0 0 0 0
McLothph 1 0 0 0
Hanrhnp 0 00 0
Walker 2b 3 1 2 0
PAIvrz 3b 4 0 2 1
Barmes ss 4 00 0
Barajsc 2 1 1 0
Bedardp 2 00 0
Resop p 0 000
McGehlb 1 0 00
Totals 34 49 4
Pittsburgh 120
Atlanta 001


Bourn cf
Prado If
Fremn lb
Uggla 2b
Heywrd rf
D.Ross c
JFrncs 3b
Pstrnck ss
Delgad p
LHrndz p
C.Jones ph
CMrtnz p
Hinske ph


Totals 34 2 8 2
010 000 4
001 000 2


E-Tabata (1). DP-Pittsburgh 1. LOB-Pitts-
burgh 9, Atlanta 7.2B-Presley (4), McCutchen
(6), Walker (1), PAlvarez 2 (3), Prado (6), Hey-
ward (3). SB-Heyward (8). S-Bedard. SF-
G.Jones.
IP H RERBBSO
Pittsburgh
BedardW,1-4 5 5 1 1 2 9
Resop H,2 1 2 1 1 0 0
J.Cruz H,2 1 1 0 0 0 0
GrilliH,4 1 0 0 0 0 3
HanrahanS,4-4 1 0 0 0 0 2
Atlanta
Delgado L,2-2 41-38 4 4 3 4
L.Hernandez 12-30 0 0 1 0
C.Martinez 3 1 0 0 0 4
WP-Delgado. PB-Barajas.


(






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


2012 NFL Draft picks
At New York
Saturday
(x-compensatory selection)
Fourth Round
96. St. Louis, Chris Givens, wr, Wake Forest.
97. Miami (from Indianapolis through San
Francisco), Lamar Miller, rb, Miami.
98. Baltimore (from Minnesota), Gino Grad-
kowski, g, Delaware.
99. Houston (from Tampa Bay through
Philadelphia), Ben Jones, c, Georgia.
100. Cleveland, Travis Benjamin, wr, Miami.
101. Denver (from Jacksonville through
Tampa Bay), Omar Bolden, db, Arizona State.
102. Washington, Kirk Cousins, qb, Michigan
State.
103. Carolina (from Miami through San Fran-
cisco), Frank Alexander, de, Oklahoma.
104. Carolina, Joe Adams, wr, Arkansas.
105. Buffalo, Nigel Bradham, Ib, Florida State.
106. Seattle, Robert Turbin, rb, Utah State.
107. Kansas City, Devon Wylie, wr, Fresno
State.
108. Denver (from N.Y. Jets), Philip Blake, c,
Baylor.
109. Pittsburgh (from Oakland through Wash-
ington), Alameda Ta'amu, dt, Washington.
110. San Diego, Ladarius Green, te,
Louisiana-Lafayette.
111. Chicago, Evan Rodriguez, te, Temple.
112. Arizona, Bobby Massie, ot, Mississippi.
113. Dallas, Kyle Wilber, de, Wake Forest.
114. Seattle (from Philadelphia), Jaye
Howard, dt, Florida.
115. Tennessee, Coty Sensabaugh, db,
Clemson.
116. Cincinnati, Orson Charles, te, Georgia.
117. San Francisco (from Detroit), Joe
Looney, g, Wake Forest.
118. Minnesota (from Atlanta through Cleve-
land), Jarius Wright, wr, Arkansas.
119. Washington (from Pittsburgh), Keenan
Robinson, Ib, Texas.
120. Cleveland (from Denver), James-
Michael Johnson, Ib, Nevada.
121. Houston, Keshawn Martin, wr, Michigan
State.
122. New Orleans, NickToon, wr, Wisconsin.
123. Philadelphia (from Green Bay), Brandon
Boykin, db, Georgia.
124. Buffalo (from Baltimore), Ron Brooks,
db, LSU.
125. Detroit (from San Francisco), Ronnell
Lewis, de, Oklahoma.
126. Houston (from New England through
Denver and Tampa Bay), Jared Crick, de, Ne-
braska.
127. N.Y. Giants, Andrien Robinson, te,
Cincinnati.
128.x-Minnesota, Rhett Ellison, te, Southern
Cal.
129. x-Oakland, Miles Burris, Ib, San Diego
State.
130. x-Baltimore, Christian Thompson, db,
South Carolina State.
131. x-N.Y. Giants, Brandon Mosley, ot,
Auburn.
132. x-Green Bay, Mike Daniels, de, Iowa.
133. x-Green Bay Jerron McMillian, db,
Maine.
134. x-Minnesota, Greg Childs, wr, Arkansas.
135. x-Dallas, Matt Johnson, db, Eastern
Washington.
Fifth Round
136. Indianapolis, Josh Chapman, dt, Ala-
bama.
137. Denver (from St. Louis), Malik Jackson,
de, Tennessee.
138. Detroit (from Minnesota), Tahir White-
head, Ib, Temple.
139. Minnesota (from Cleveland), Robert
Blanton, db, Notre Dame.
140. Tampa Bay, Najee Goode, Ib, West Vir-
ginia.
141. Washington, Adam Gettis, g, Iowa.
142. Jacksonville, Brandon Marshall, Ib, Ne-
vada.
143. Carolina, Josh Norman, db, Coastal
Carolina.
144. Buffalo, Zebrie Sanders, ot, Florida
State.
145.Tennessee (from Miami), TaylorThomp-
son, te, SMU.
146. Kansas City, DeQuan Menzie, db, Ala-
bama.
147. Buffalo (from Seattle), Tank Carder, Ib,
TCU.
148. Detroit (from Oakland), Chris Green-
wood, db, Albion.
149. San Diego, Johnnie Troutman, g, Penn
State.
150. St. Louis (from Chicago), Rokevious
Watkins, g, South Carolina.
151. Arizona, Senio Kelemete, g, Washing-
ton.
152. Dallas, Danny Coale, wr, Virginia Tech.
153. Philadelphia, Dennis Kelly, ot, Purdue.
154. Seattle (from N.Y. Jets), Korey Toomer,
Ib, Idaho.
155. Miami (from Tennessee), Josh Kaddu,
Ib, Oregon.
156. Cincinnati, Shaun Prater, db, Iowa.
157. Atlanta, Bradie Ewing, rb, Wisconsin.
158. Oakland (from Detroit), Jack Crawford,
de, Penn State.
159. Pittsburgh, Chris Rainey, rb, Florida.
160. Cleveland (from Denver), Ryan Miller, ot,
Colorado.
161. Houston, Randy Bullock, k, Texas A&M.
162. New Orleans, Corey White, db, Samford.
163. Green Bay (from Green Bay through
New England), Terrell Manning, Ib, N.C. State.
164. Atlanta (from Baltimore), Jonathan Mas-
saquoi, de, Troy.
165. San Francisco, Darius Fleming, Ib, Notre
Dame.
166. Cincinnati (from New England), Marvin
Jones, wr, California.
167. Cincinnati (from N.Y Giants), George
Iloka, db, Boise State.
168. x-Oakland, Juron Criner, wr, Arizona.
169. x-Baltimore, Asa Jackson, db, Cal Poly.
170. x- Indianapolis, Vick Ballard, rb, Missis-
sippi State.
Sixth Round
171. St. Louis, Greg Zuerlein, k, Missouri
Western.
172. Seattle (from Indianapolis through
Philadelphia), Jeremy Lane, db, Northwestern
State.
173. Washington (from Minnesota), Alfred
Morris, rb, Florida Atlantic.
174. Tampa Bay, Keith Tandy, db, West Vir-
ginia.
175. Minnesota (from Cleveland), Blair
Walsh, k, Georgia.
176. Jacksonville, Mike Harris, db, Florida
State.
177. Arizona (from Washington), Justin
Bethel, db, Presbyterian.
178. Buffalo, Mark Asper, g, Oregon.
179. New Orleans (from Miami), Andrew
Tiller, g, Syracuse.
180. San Francisco (from Carolina), Trenton
Robinson, db, Michigan State.
181. Seattle, Winston Guy, db, Kentucky.
182. Kansas City Cyrus Gray, rb, Texas A&M.
183. Miami (from San Diego), B.J. Cunning-


ham, wr, Michigan State.
184. Chicago, Isaiah Frey, db, Nevada.
185. Arizona, Ryan Lindley, qb, San Diego
State.
186. Dallas, James Hanna, te, Oklahoma.
187. N.Y Jets (from Philadelphia through In-
dianapolis), Josh Bush, db, Wake Forest.
188. Denver (from N.Y Jets), Danny Tre-
vathan, Ib, Kentucky.
189. Oakland, Christo Bilukidi, dt, Georgia
State.
190. Tennessee, Markelle Martin, db, Okla-
homa State.
191. Cincinnati, Dan Herron, rb, Ohio State.
Detroit Forfeited
192. Atlanta, Charles Mitchell, db, Mississippi
State.
193. Washington (from Pittsburgh), Tom
Compton, ot, South Dakota.
194. Philadelphia (from Denver), Marvin Mc-


FOr the record


Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Saturday in the Florida Lottery:
.... CASH 3 (early)
0-6-4
CASH 3 (late)
1-1-3

S PLAY 4 (early)
S8-0-4-1
PLAY 4 (late)
2-7-8-1

FANTASY 5
or a Lotty 1-12-13-20-34

POWERBALL LOTTERY
31-39-40-57-58 4-11-13-17-20-28
POWER BALL XTRA
33 3



On the AIRWAVES=


TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
11 a.m. (NBCSPT) IndyCar: Sao Paulo Indy 300
7 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRA: O'ReillyAuto Parts Spring Nationals
(Same-day Tape)
BASEBALL
1 p.m. (FSNFL) Arizona Diamondbacks at Miami Marlins
1 p.m. (TBS) Detroit Tigers at New York Yankees
1:30 p.m. (WGN-A) Chicago Cubs at Philadelphia Phillies
8 p.m. (ESPN) Tampa Bay Rays at Texas Rangers
12:30 a.m. (ESPN2) Tampa Bay Rays at Texas Rangers
(Same-day Tape)
COLLEGE BASEBALL
2 p.m. (ESPN2) Georgia at LSU
3:30 p.m. (ESPN) Arkansas at Florida
BASKETBALL
NBA PLAYOFFS FIRST ROUND
1 p.m. (ESPN) Utah Jazz at San Antonio Spurs
3:30 p.m. (ABC) Denver Nuggets at Los Angeles Lakers
7 p.m. (TNT) Boston Celtics at Atlanta Hawks
9:30 p.m. (TNT) Los Angeles Clippers at Memphis Grizzlies
BICYCLING
10 p.m. (NBCSPT) 2012 Tour de Romandie (Taped)
EQUESTRIAN
2 p.m. (NBC) Equestrian Rolex Championships
GOLF
9 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour: Ballantine's
Championship (Same-day Tape)
1 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: Zurich Classic of New Orleans
3 p.m. (CBS) PGA Tour: Zurich Classic of New Orleans
3 p.m. (GOLF) LPGA Tour: Mobile Bay Classic
HOCKEY
3 p.m. (NBC) New Jersey Devils at Philadelphia Flyers.
Eastern Conference Semifinal, game 1
7 p.m. (NBCSPT) Nashville Predators at Phoenix Coyotes.
Western Conference Semifinal, Game 2
MOTORCYCLE RACING
1 p.m. (CBS) Monster Energy AMA Supercross World
Championship (Taped)
SOFTBALL
1 p.m. (SUN) Mississippi at Tennessee
SNOWMOBILE RACING
5 p.m. (NBCSPT)Amsoil Championship Series (Taped)

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


Nutt, wr, Iowa.
195. Houston, Nick Mondek, ot, Purdue.
196. Detroit (from New Orleans through
Miami and San Francisco), Jonte Green, db,
New Mexico State.
197. New England (from Green Bay), Nate
Ebner, db, Ohio State.
198. Baltimore, Tommy Streeter, wr, Miami.
199. San Francisco, Jason Slowey, ot, West-
ern Oregon.
200. Philadelphia (from New England), Bran-
don Washington, g, Miami.
201. N.Y Giants, Matt McCants, ot, UAB.
202. x-N.Y. Jets, Terrance Ganaway, rb, Bay-
lor.
203. x-N.Y Jets, Robert Griffin, g, Baylor.
204.x-Cleveland, Emmanuel Acho, Ib, Texas.
205. x-Cleveland, Billy Winn, dt, Boise St.
206. x-Indianapolis, Lavon Brazill, wr, Ohio.
207. x-Carolina, Brad Nortman, p, Wisconsin.
Seventh Round
208. Indianapolis, Justin Anderson, g, Geor-
gia.
209. St. Louis, Aaron Brown, Ib, Hawaii.
210. Minnesota, Audie Cole, Ib, N.C. State.
211 .Tennessee from Cleveland through Min-
nesota), Scott Solomon, de, Rice.
212. Tampa Bay, Michael Smith, rb, Utah
State.
213. Washington, Richard Crawford, db,
SMU.
214. Indianapolis (from Jacksonville through
N.Y Jets), Tim Fugger, Ib, Vanderbilt.
215. Miami, Kheeston Randall, dt, Texas.
216. Carolina, D.J. Campbell, db, California.
217. Washington (from Buffalo), Jordan Bern-
stine, db, Iowa.
218. Kansas City, Jerome Long, dt, San
Diego State.
219. Minnesota (from Seattle through De-
troit), Trevor Guyton, dt, California.
220. Chicago, Greg McCoy, db, TCU.
221. Arizona, Nate Potter, ot, Boise State.
222. Dallas, Caleb McSurdy, Ib, Montana.
223. Detroit (from Philadelphia through New
England and Minnesota), Travis Lewis, Ib, Okla-
homa.
224. New England (from N.Y Jets through
Green Bay), Alfonzo Dennard, db, Nebraska.
225. Seattle (from Oakland), J.R. Sweezy, ot,
N.C. State.
226. San Diego, David Molk, c, Michigan.
227. Miami (from Tennessee), Rishard
Matthews, wr, Nevada.
228. Jacksonville (from Cincinnati), Jeris
Pendleton, dt, Ashland.
229. Philadelphia (from Atlanta), Bryce
Brown, rb, Kansas State.
230. Oakland (from Detroit), Nate Stupar, Ib,
Penn State.
231. Pittsburgh, Tony Clemons, wr, Colorado.
232. Seattle (from Denver through N.Y Jets),
Greg Scruggs, de, Louisville.
233. Tampa Bay (from Houston), Drake Dun-
smore, te, Northwestern.
234. New Orleans, Marcel Jones, ot, Ne-
braska.
235. New England (from Green Bay), Jeremy
Ebert, wr, Northwestern.
236. Baltimore, DeAngelo Tyson, de, Geor-
gia.
237. San Francisco, Cam Johnson, Ib, Vir-
ginia.
238. Kansas City (from New England), Junior
Hemingway, wr, Michigan.
239. N.Y Giants, Markus Kuhn, dt, N.C. State.
240. x-Pittsburgh, David Paulson, te, Oregon.
241. x-Green Bay, Andrew Datko, ot, Florida
State.
242. x-N.Y. Jets, Antonio Allen, db, South
Carolina.


243. x-Green Bay, B.J. Coleman, qb. Chat-
tanooga.
244. x-N.Y Jets, Jordan White, wr, Western
Michigan.
245. x-Cleveland, Trevin Wade, db, Arizona.
246. x-Pittsburgh, Terrence Frederick, db,
Texas A&M.
247. x-Cleveland, Brad Smelley, rb, Alabama.
248. x-Pittsburgh, Kelvin Beachum, ot, SMU.
249. x-Atlanta, Travian Robertson, nt, South
Carolina.
250. x-San Diego, Edwin Baker, rb, Michigan
State.
251. x-Buffalo, John Potter, k, Western Michi-
gan.
252. x-St. Louis, Daryl Richardson, rb, Abi-
lene Christian.
253. x-Indianapolis, Chandler Harnish, qb,
Northern Illinois.



NBA playoff glance
(x-if necessary)
FIRST ROUND
(Best-of-7)
Saturday, April 28
Chicago 103, Philadelphia 91, Chicago leads
series 1-0
Miami 100, NewYork 67, Miami leads series 1-0
Orlando 81, Indiana 77, Orlando leads series 1-0
Dallas at Oklahoma City 9:30 p.m.
Sunday, April 29
Utah at San Antonio, 1 p.m.
Denver at L.A. Lakers, 3:30 p.m.
Boston at Atlanta, 7p.m.
L.A. Clippers at Memphis, 9:30 p.m.
Monday, April 30
New York at Miami, 7 p.m.
Orlando at Indiana, 7:30 p.m.
Dallas at Oklahoma City 9:30 p.m.
Tuesday, May 1
Boston at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
Philadelphia at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Denver at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 p.m.
Wednesday, May 2
Utah at San Antonio, 7 p.m.
Indiana at Orlando, 7:30 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at Memphis, 9:30 p.m.
Thursday, May 3
Miami at New York, 7 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Dallas, 9:30 p.m.
Friday, May 4
Atlanta at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
Chicago at Philadelphia, 8 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at Denver, 10:30 p.m.
Saturday, May 5
Indiana at Orlando, 2 p.m.
Memphis at L.A. Clippers, 4:30 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Dallas, 7:30 p.m.
San Antonio at Utah, 10 p.m.
Sunday, May 6
Chicago at Philadelphia, 1 p.m.
Miami at New York, 3:30 p.m.
Atlanta at Boston, 7 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at Denver, 9:30 p.m.
Monday, May 7
San Antonio at Utah, TBD
Memphis at L.A. Clippers, TBD
x-Dallas at Oklahoma City TBD
Tuesday, May 8
x-Philadelphia at Chicago, TBD
x-Orlando at Indiana, TBD
x-Boston at Atlanta, TBD
x-Denver at L.A. Lakers, TBD
Wednesday, May 9
x-New York at Miami, TBD
x-Utah at San Antonio, TBD
x-L.A. Clippers at Memphis, TBD
Thursday, May 10


Kyle Busch races to




Sprint Cup victory


Associated Press

RICHMOND, Va. Kyle
Busch capped a perfect
weekend Saturday night by
winning the spring race at
Richmond for the fourth con-
secutive year.
The victory snaps a 22-race
winless streak for Busch, and
came a day after he went to
Victory Lane for the first
time as a Nationwide Series
team owner. Kurt Busch
drove his younger brother's
car to its first victory Friday
night.
As he celebrated his first
Sprint Cup Series win as a
driver, Tony Stewart and Carl
Edwards both believed the
win was taken from them.
Stewart was upset because
a caution for debris he
claimed it was for a bottle of

x-Chicago at Philadelphia, TBD
x-Atlanta at Boston, TBD
x-Oklahoma City at Dallas, TBD
x-L.A. Lakers at Denver, TBD
Friday, May 11
x-Miami at New York, TBD
x-Indiana at Orlando, TBD
x-San Antonio at Utah, TBD
x-Memphis at L.A. Clippers, TBD
Saturday, May 12
x-Philadelphia at Chicago, TBD
x-Boston at Atlanta, TBD
x-Dallas at Oklahoma City TBD
x-Denver at L.A. Lakers, TBD
Sunday, May 13
x-New York at Miami, TBD
x-Orlando at Indiana, TBD
x-Utah at San Antonio, TBD
x-L.A. Clippers at Memphis, TBD



NHL playoff glance
CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS
(Best-of-7)
(x-if necessary)
EASTERN CONFERENCE
N.Y. Rangers 1,Washington 0
Saturday, April 28: NY Rangers 3, Washing-
ton 1
Monday, April 30: Washington at NY
Rangers, 7:30 p.m.
Wednesday, May 2: NY Rangers at Wash-
ington, 7:30 p.m.
Saturday, May 5: NY Rangers at Washington,
12:30 p.m.
x-Monday, May 7: Washington at NY
Rangers, 7:30 p.m.
x-Wednesday, May 9: NY Rangers at Wash-
ington, TBD
x-Saturday, May 12: Washington at NY
Rangers, TBD
Philadelphia vs. New Jersey
Sunday, April 29: New Jersey at Philadelphia,
3p.m.
Tuesday, May 1: New Jersey at Philadelphia,
7:30 p.m.
Thursday, May 3: Philadelphia at NewJersey,
7:30 p.m.
Sunday May 6: Philadelphia at New Jersey,
7:30 p.m.
x-Tuesday, May 8: New Jersey at Philadel-
phia, TBD
x-Thursday, May 10: Philadelphia at New Jer-
sey, TBD
x-Saturday, May 12: New Jersey at Philadel-
phia, TBD
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Phoenix 1, Nashville 0
Friday, April 27: Phoenix 4, Nashville 3, OT
Sunday April 29: Nashville at Phoenix, 8 p.m.
Wednesday, May 2: Phoenix at Nashville, 9
p.m.
Friday, May 4: Phoenix at Nashville, 7:30 p.m.
x-Monday, May 7: Nashville at Phoenix, 10
p.m.
x-Wednesday May 9: Phoenix at Nashville,
TBD
x-Friday, May 11: Nashville at Phoenix, TBD
Los Angeles 1, St. Louis 0
Saturday, April 28: Los Angeles 3, St. Louis 1
Monday April 30: Los Angeles at St. Louis, 9
p.m.
Thursday, May 3: St. Louis at Los Angeles,
10p.m.
Sunday, May 6: St. Louis at Los Angeles, 3
p.m.
x-Tuesday, May 8: Los Angeles at St. Louis,
TBD
x-Thursday, May 10: St. Louis at Los Ange-
les, TBD
x-Saturday, May 12: Los Angeles at St. Louis,
TBD



Rangers 7, Rays 2


Tampa Bay Texas
ab r h bi
Jnnngs cf 3 1 1 0 Kinsler dh
Zobrist 2b 3 0 0 0 Andrus ss
C.Penalb 4 0 1 0 Hamltncf
Longori 3b 4 0 2 1 Beltre 3b
Scott dh 3 0 0 0 MYong 2b
Joyce rf 3 1 1 1 N.Cruz rf
Allen If 4 0 0 0 DvMrplIf
EJhnsn ss 4 0 0 0 Torreal c
JMolinc 3 0 0 0 Morlndlb
Totals 31 25 2 Totals
Tampa Bay 010 000 010
Texas 200 001 40x


ab r h bi
3 2 1 0
3 1 1 0
3 222

3 00 0
4 00 0
4 00 0
3 00 0
4 1 2 0
31 7 8 5
2
7


E-J.Molina (1), E.Johnson (1). DP-Tampa
Bay 1, Texas 1. LOB-Tampa Bay 6, Texas 5.
2B-Longoria (7), Andrus (3), Moreland (2).
HR-Joyce (5), Beltre (4). SB-Jennings 2 (6),
Hamilton (2), M.Young (2). CS-Andrus (1).
IP H RERBBSO


Tampa Bay
Niemann L,1-3
McGee
Badenhop
Howell
Texas
Lewis W,3-0
Ogando H,6
Adams
Uehara


52-35 3
1-3 0 0
1 3 4
1 0 0


HBP-by Howell (Torrealba), by Lewis (Scott).
WP-Niemann. PB-J.Molina.
MLB leaders
AMERICAN LEAGUE
BATTING-Ortiz, Boston, .403; Sweeney,
Boston, .391; Hamilton, Texas, .388; Jeter, New
York, .386; Konerko, Chicago, .383; Span, Min-
nesota, .341; AdJones, Baltimore, .333; MY-
oung, Texas, .333; Willingham, Minnesota, .333.
RUNS-Kinsler, Texas, 23; Hamilton, Texas,
20; Jennings, Tampa Bay, 18; Granderson, New
York, 17; Aviles, Boston, 16; De Aza, Chicago,
16; AJackson, Detroit, 16; AdJones, Baltimore,
16.
RBI-Hamilton, Texas, 24; Swisher, New
York, 23; MiCabrera, Detroit, 19; Encarnacion,
Toronto, 19; Longoria, Tampa Bay, 19; Ces-
pedes, Oakland, 18; Ortiz, Boston, 18.


soda or water that wasn't an
on-track hindrance erased
his lead with 13 laps remain-
ing. He led the leaders down
pit road for a final stop, and
Busch beat him back onto
the track.
Busch also easily pulled
away from Stewart on the
restart with nine laps to go,
and Stewart was also passed
by Dale EarnhardtJr to fade
to third.
"When the caution is for a
plastic bottle on the back-
stretch, it's hard to feel good
losing that one," Stewart
said. "And we gave it away
on pit road. So, we did
everything we could to
throw it away, got taken
away from us."
Edwards thought the
same thing after NASCAR
penalized him for jumping

HITS-Jeter, NewYork, 34; Hamilton, Texas,
33; Konerko, Chicago, 31; Ortiz, Boston, 31; Ad-
Jones, Baltimore, 28; Span, Minnesota, 28;
Kinsler, Texas, 27; ISuzuki, Seattle, 27; MYoung,
Texas, 27.
DOUBLES-Sweeney, Boston, 11; Konerko,
Chicago, 9; Swisher, New York, 9; Cano, New
York, 8; Encarnacion, Toronto, 8; Ortiz, Boston,
8; JhPeralta, Detroit, 8.
TRIPLES-De Aza, Chicago, 2; Dirks, De-
troit, 2; Joyce, Tampa Bay 2; Kinsler, Texas, 2;
Kipnis, Cleveland, 2; Rasmus, Toronto, 2; 31 tied
at 1.
HOME RUNS-Hamilton, Texas, 9; MiCabr-
era, Detroit, 7; Granderson, New York, 7; Napoli,
Texas, 7; Encarnacion, Toronto, 6; AdJones,
Baltimore, 6; Swisher, NewYork, 6; Wieters, Bal-
timore, 6.
STOLEN BASES-Jennings, Tampa Bay, 6;
Lillibridge, Chicago, 5; Andrus, Texas, 4; Ces-
pedes, Oakland, 4; Crisp, Oakland, 4; AEsco-
bar, Kansas City, 4; MIzturis, Los Angeles, 4;
AdJones, Baltimore, 4; Kipnis, Cleveland, 4;
JWeeks, Oakland, 4.
PITCHING-Shields, Tampa Bay 4-0;
RRoss, Texas, 4-0; 14 tied at 3.
STRIKEOUTS-Weaver, Los Angeles, 36;
Verlander, Detroit, 35; Peavy, Chicago, 33; FH-
ernandez, Seattle, 33; Sabathia, New York, 30;
Haren, Los Angeles, 30; Lewis, Texas, 29.
SAVES-League, Seattle, 7; CPerez, Cleve-
land, 7; JiJohnson, Baltimore, 7; Balfour, Oak-
land, 6; Rodney, Tampa Bay, 6; Nathan, Texas,
5; Aceves, Boston, 5.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
BATTING-Kemp, Los Angeles, .452; Posey
San Francisco, .371; DWright, New York, .361;
Altuve, Houston, .359; Freese, St. Louis, .343;
SCastro, Chicago, .337; LaRoche, Washington,
.333.
RUNS-Kemp, Los Angeles, 21; Beltran, St.
Louis, 17; Headley, San Diego, 16; MEIlis, Los
Angeles, 15; Freeman, Atlanta, 15; Hart, Mil-
waukee, 15; Schafer, Houston, 15.
RBI-Ethier, Los Angeles, 24; Kemp, Los An-
geles, 23; Freese, St. Louis, 20; JDMartinez,
Houston, 19; Bruce, Cincinnati, 16; LaRoche,
Washington, 16; Freeman, Atlanta, 15; CGon-
zalez, Colorado, 15; YMolina, St. Louis, 15.
HITS-Kemp, Los Angeles, 33; Altuve, Hous-
ton, 28; Bourn, Atlanta, 28; SCastro, Chicago,
28; Sandoval, San Francisco, 27; Furcal, St.
Louis, 26; LaRoche, Washington, 25; Mc-
Cutchen, Pittsburgh, 25.
DOUBLES-YMolina, St. Louis, 9; Votto,
Cincinnati, 9; Cuddyer, Colorado, 8; Furcal, St.
Louis, 8; Tejada, New York, 8; Alonso, San
Diego, 7; Freeman, Atlanta, 7; Hart, Milwaukee,
7; GSanchez, Miami, 7.
TRIPLES-OHudson, San Diego, 4; Altuve,
Houston, 3; Maybin, San Diego, 3; Pagan, San
Francisco, 3; Schierholtz, San Francisco, 3; 12
tied at 2.
HOME RUNS-Kemp, Los Angeles, 10;
Bruce, Cincinnati, 6; Hart, Milwaukee, 6; Bel-
tran, St. Louis, 5; Ethier, Los Angeles, 5; Freese,
St. Louis, 5; Infante, Miami, 5; CYoung, Arizona,
5.
STOLEN BASES-SCastro, Chicago, 10;
DGordon, Los Angeles, 10; Bonifacio, Miami, 9;
Heyward, Atlanta, 8; Bourn, Atlanta, 7; Schafer,
Houston, 7; Victorino, Philadelphia, 7.
PITCHING-Lohse, St. Louis, 4-0; Lynn, St.
Louis, 4-0; 11 tied at 3.
STRIKEOUTS-ASanchez, Miami, 33;
Hamels, Philadelphia, 30; Volquez, San Diego,
29; Kershaw, Los Angeles, 28; Greinke, Mil-
waukee, 28; Hanson, Atlanta, 28; Worley,
Philadelphia, 27; GGonzalez, Washington, 27;
Gallardo, Milwaukee, 27; IKennedy Arizona, 27.
SAVES-Guerra, Los Angeles, 7; Papelbon,
Philadelphia, 7; Kimbrel, Atlanta, 7; RBetan-
court, Colorado, 6; Putz, Arizona, 5; HRo-
driguez, Washington, 5; 5 tied at 4.




BASEBALL
American League
DETROIT TIGERS-Placed OF Delmon
Young on the restricted list. Recalled INF
Danny Worth from Toledo (IL).
MINNESOTA TWINS-Reinstated OF Josh
Willingham from the paternity list. Optioned OF
Ben Revere to Rochester (IL).
National League
CHICAGO CUBS-Placed C Steve Cle-
venger on the 15-day DL, retroactive to April
26. Recalled C Welington Castillo from Iowa
(PCL).
COLORADO ROCKIES-Placed RHP Je-
remy Guthrie on the 15-day DL, retroactive to
April 23. Recalled RHP Guillermo Moscoso
from Colorado Springs (PCL).
MILWAUKEE BREWERS-Selected the
contract of RHP Vinnie Chulk from Nashville
(PCL). Optioned RHP Mike McClendon to
Nashville.
SAN DIEGO PADRES-Placed OF Jeremy
Hermida on the 15-day DL, retroactive to April
27. Recalled OF Blake Tekotte from Tucson
(PCL).
SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS-Optioned RHP
Eric Hacker to Fresno (PCL). Recalled RHP
Steve Edlefsen from Fresno.
WASHINGTON NATIONALS-Placed 3B
Ryan Zimmerman on the 15-day DL, retroac-
tive to April 21. Recalled Bryce Harper from
Syracuse (IL).
FOOTBALL
SEATTLE SEAHAWKS-Agreed to terms


with WR Phil Bates, CB London Durham, G
Rishaw Johnson, WR Jermaine Kearse, TE
Sean McGrath, T Jon Opperud, DB DeShawn
Shead, DE Monte Taylor, WR Lavasier Tuinei
and K Carson Wiggs.
WASHINGTON REDSKINS-Released QB
John Beck.
MOTOR RACING
INDYCAR-Fined Panther Racing owner
John Barnes $25,000 and placed him on pro-
bation until the end of the year for criticizing the
series.


the restart with 81 laps
remaining.
It capped a confusing se-
quence in what had been a
calm, quiet race through the
first 400 laps. But a caution
after Jeff Burton hit the wall
scrambled everything, and
only 15 cars were shown on
the lead lap when racing re-
sumed.
Edwards lined up next to
Stewart for the restart, and
his spotter had told the
driver that he was the leader
But NASCAR said Stewart
was the leader, and when Ed-
wards sailed past him on the
restart, NASCAR threw the
black flag.
Edwards questioned the
call to crew chief Bob Os-
borne, and neither seemed to
understand why Edwards
was penalized.



CCBC
Continued from Page B1


South Flipping Stick and
caught the seven pounder."
Fels grabbed big bass
honors with the fish, which
came in officially at 7.16
pounds.
"There was more fish
caught than I anticipated,"
said CCBC Tournament Di-
rector Matt Beck. "I was
amazed at how organized
and smoothly the anglers and
volunteers did their job, both
in the morning and the after-
noon. Everyone was patient
and they did a bang-up job."
Key Training Center Com-
munity Relations Manager
Iris Whitaker is retiring and
put in her last appearance
as the coordinator of the
event.
"This is my last year doing
this," a visibly worn-out
Whitaker said. "I will miss
the excitement, the cama-
raderie of the anglers, the
joint effort of the volun-
teers. But I won't miss the
hours.
"I may come back next
year for the weigh-in," she
said with a laugh.



WILLIAMS
Continued from Page B1


same excellence as he did
on the baseball field," said
David Hunt, whose com-
pany sold the memorabilia
on behalf of Williams'
daughter, Claudia Williams,
of Hernando, Fla. "And that
is really unique ... He's sort
of like the John Wayne of
baseball and sports of that
time period and I think that'
New Orleans Saints quar-
terback Drew Brees, who
bid by phone, bought
Williams' World War II and
Korean War flight log books
for $35,600 and planned to
send them to The National
World War II Museum in
New Orleans, Hunt Auc-
tions said.
The auction coincided
with the 10th anniversary of
Williams' death at age 83
and Fenway Park's 100th
anniversary




FAGAN
Continued from Page B1

meet after advancing out of
the district level but fell
short of qualifying for state.
Realizing her affection for
the sport, Fagan said she
began mailing college
coaches in order to continue
competing.
It didn't take long for
Saint Leo to show interest.
"I pretty much emailed
(Lions coach Melissa Miller-
Mangen) and she re-
searched my times," said
Fagan of the process before
she received an offer.
Although Fagan is still a
neophyte to cross country,
she's already accom-
plished quite a bit. She,
however, is not about to
rest on her laurels.
"I really love cross coun-
try," Fagan said, "and I
know I'm going to get better
at it"


Lattin agreed, saying, "I
think it's appealing to
coaches that she ran so well
and still has a lot of room to
grow."
J.M. Soracchi is the
Chronicle sports editor He
can be emailed at jmsorac-
chi@chronicleonline. com
or reached at 352-564-2928.


B4 SUNDAY, APRIL 29, 2012


SCOREBOARD






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


N.Y. Rangers up 1-0 after beating Capitals


Kings skate

past Blues 3-1

Associated Press

NEW YORK Rangers
rookie Chris Kreider scored
the go-ahead goal and then
set up Brad Richards' insur-
ance tally 90 seconds later in
the third period to lift New
York to a 3-1 victory over the
Washington Capitals in the


opening game of the Eastern
Conference semifinal series
on Saturday
Kreider, who earlier this
month helped Boston Col-
lege win the NCAA champi-
onship, scored his second
goal of his NHL career -
and these playoffs and he
did it at the perfect time to
give the Rangers a 2-1 lead
7:00 into the third. Richards
made it a two-goal lead off a
feed from Kreider, and gave
a two-fisted punch into the
glass behind goalie Braden


Holtby to celebrate his third
goal of the playoffs.
Kings 3, Blues 1
ST. LOUIS Matt Greene
scored shorthanded late in the
second period for the lead and
Jonathan Quick was strong in
net throughout as the Los Ange-
les Kings beat the St. Louis
Blues in the opener of a West-
ern Conference semifinal series.
Slava Voynov scored for his
first point of the postseason and
Dustin Penner added an empty-


netter for the Kings, who were
3-0 on the road while taking
down the President's Trophy-
winning Vancouver Canucks in
five games in the first round.
New York Rangers' Chris
Kreider shoots the puck past
Washington Capitals goalie
Braden Holtby for a goal as
teammate Mike Green looks
on Saturday during the third
period of Game I in the
second round of the NHL
playoffs in New York.
Associated Press


Taking Game 1


Associated Press
Orlando Magic forward Hedo Turkoglu shoots under Indiana Pacers center Roy Hibbert in the first half of an NBA Eastern
Conference first-round playoff game Saturday in Indianapolis.


Magic, Heat win NBA playoffopeners; Bulls lose Rose for season


Associated Press

INDIANAPOLIS Don't
count the Orlando Magic
out just yet.
Jason Richardson and
Jameer Nelson scored 17
points apiece to help sixth-
seeded Orlando, playing
without Dwight Howard,
surprise the third-seeded
Indiana Pacers 81-77 in
Game 1 of the first-round
Eastern Conference playoff
series on Saturday night
Howard, the Magic's lead-
ing scorer and the league's
top rebounder, will miss the
rest of the season after hav-
ing back surgery The Magic
played defense Howard
would have been proud of
down the stretch, overcom-
ing a seven-point deficit by


holding the Pacers score-
less for the final 4:05.
David West scored 19
points, Danny Granger
added 17 and Roy Hibbert
had eight points, 13 re-
bounds and nine blocks for
the Pacers. Granger traveled
with 7.5 seconds left and the
Pacers trailing by three.
Game 2 will be Monday
night in Indianapolis.
Orlando took a 68-67 lead
on a dunk by Earl Clark
with 9:41 remaining, but the
Pacers held the Magic
scoreless for nearly five
minutes to take a 75-68 lead.
A 3-pointer by Richardson
cut Indiana's lead to 77-75.
Heat 100, Knicks 67
MIAMI LeBron James
scored 32 points before getting


the fourth quarter off, Dwyane
Wade added 19 and the Miami
Heat rode the strength of a 32-
2 run to easily beat the New
York Knicks 100-67.
Mario Chalmers added 11
points and nine assists for
Miami, which turned 27 New
York turnovers into a franchise
playoff-record 38 points.
J.R. Smith scored 17 for the
Knicks, who have lost 11
straight playoff games dating to
2001. Carmelo Anthony
missed 12 of 15 shots and fin-
ished with 11 points and 10 re-
bounds, and Baron Davis
added 10 points for New York.
The Knicks lost starting
guard Iman Shumpert to a
knee injury in the third quarter.
Game 2 is Monday in Miami.


Bulls 103, 76ers 91
CHICAGO Derrick Rose
scored 23 points before being
helped off the court late in the
game with a torn ACL in his
left knee, casting a major
cloud over the Chicago Bulls'
103-91 victory over the
Philadelphia 76ers.
Rose crumbled to the
ground after he drove the lane.
He was going for a layup when
he came to a jump-stop and
seemed to change his mind,
passing off to a teammate be-
fore an awkward landing.
Team medical personnel im-
mediately rushed out and
tended to Rose for several
minutes as he was writhing in
pain near the baseline before
helping him to the locker room.


Dufner holds




advantage


Golfer leads at

Zurich Classic

Associated Press

AVONDALE, La. -Jason
Dufner got past Saturday
without any of the troubles
that have marked his week-
end struggles. He knows
Sunday will be a much big-
ger challenge.
Winless in 163 starts on the
PGA Tour, Dufner shot a 5-
under 67 on Saturday to take
a two-stroke lead over Gra-
ham DeLaet after the third
round of the Zurich Classic.
Dufner birdied three of
the first four holes to get to
15 under, holing 50-foot putt
on the par-4 fourth and a 25-
footer on the par-4 fifth.
After dropping a stroke
on the par-4 sixth, he
birdied the par-5 seventh
and got to 17 under with
birdies on the par-4 15th
and par-5 18th. He has
played the 18th in 4 under in
three days.
Dufner lost playoffs last
year to Mark Wilson in the
Phoenix Open and Keegan
Bradley in the PGA Cham-
pionship for two of his three
career runner-up finishes.
DeLaet, from Canada,
shot a 66. He birdied three
of the final six holes.
Ernie Els and John Rollins
were 14 under Els shot a 68,
and Rollins had a 69.
The Southern African
known as The Big Easy is
comfortable in the city that
shares the moniker.
Ryan Palmer tied the
course record with a 64 to
join Steve Stricker and
Cameron Tringale at 13
under. Tringale had a 68,
and Stricker a 69.
Second-ranked Luke Don-
ald was 12 under after a 66.
He needs to finish at least
solo seventh to regain the
top spot from Rory Mcllroy
Defending champion
Bubba Watson, playing in
his first tournament since
winning the Masters, was 9
under after a 65. He opened
with consecutive 71s to
make the cut by a stroke.


Lewis leads Mobile Bay
Classic after 3 rounds
MOBILE, Ala. Stacy Lewis
birdied five of the last seven
holes for her second straight 5-
under 67 and a two-stroke lead
over friend Brittany Lincicome
after the third round of the Mo-
bile Bay LPGA Classic.
Lewis, the Kraft Nabisco
Championship winner last year,
had a 14-under 202 total.
The long-hitting Lincicome, a
two-time winner last season,
also shot a 67.
Lewis had two bogeys on the
front nine to fall behind Linci-
come before making a late
charge for the second straight
day. The former Arkansas star
had four birdies on the final six
holes Friday, though she also
closed with a bogey.
Her third-round run started
with a fairway bunker shot to 8
feet on No. 12.
Now, she gets a chance "just
to kind of prove to people that
the major meant something."
Lewis said she didn't check
the leaderboard after the 13th
hole, when she was still two
strokes behind Lincicome.
Lincicome stayed in her zone
by playing Sudoku during waits
on the course, "just to take my
mind off playing golf." Sun
Young Yoo's caddie, Adam
Woodward, helped her finish a
puzzle she started in Hawaii at
the last tournament.
Karine Icher was third at 11
under after a 68. Yoo, the Kraft
Nabisco winner this month, and
Lindsey Wright shot 69 to reach
10 under.
Icher, seeking her first LPGA
Tour win, followed a birdie by
holing a wedge shot for eagle
on No. 13.
Six players, including 17-
year-old Lexi Thompson, Hall of
Famer Karrie Webb and Natalie
Gulbis, were 9 under on The
Crossings course at the Robert
Trent Jones Golf Trail's Magno-
lia Grove complex.
Webb shot a 64 to match the
tournament record, Thompson
had a 66, and Gulbis a 68.
Thompson teed off at No. 10
and bogeyed on her second
hole.


I




Associated Press
Jason Dufner hits off the 18th fairway Saturday during the
third round of the Zurich Classic golf tournament at TPC
Louisiana in Avondale, La.


Saturday's GOLF LEADERBOARD


Zurich Classic
Saturday
At TPC Louisiana, Avondale, La.
Purse: $6.4 million
Yardage: 7,425, Par 72
Third Round
Jason Dufner 67-65-67-199
Graham DeLaet 68-67-66 201
John Rollins 67-66-69 -202
Ernie Els 66-68-68 -202
Ryan Palmer 72-67-64 -203
Steve Stricker 66-68-69 -203
Cameron Tringale 65-70-68 -203
Luke Donald 73-65-66 -204
Ken Duke 65-68-71 -204
Ben Curtis 67-70-68 -205
Rickie Fowler 71-65-69-205
Alex Cejka 70-69-67 206
J.B. Holmes 71-67-68 -206
Daniel Summerhays 68-70-68 -206
Greg Chalmers 70-64-72 -206
Webb Simpson 68-72-67 207
George McNeill 70-70-67-207
Justin Rose 72-67-68 -207
Scott Piercy 72-66-69 -207
Kyle Reifers 69-68-70 207
Bubba Watson 71-71-65 207
Russell Knox 69-64-74 -207


Stuart Appleby
James Driscoll
Tim Herron
Daniel Chopra
William McGirt
Jason Kokrak
Jimmy Walker
Jonas Blixt
David Hearn
Charles Howell III
Chris Stroud
Erik Compton
Rocco Mediate
Kris Blanks
Camilo Villegas
David Toms
Seung-Yul Noh
David Mathis
Greg Owen
Brian Davis
Bobby Gates
Matt Jones
Fred Funk
David Duval
Mark Anderson
Chris DiMarco
Patrick Reed
Hank Kuehne
J.J. Henry


69-69-70
73-65-70
69-68-71 -
66-70-72
70-69-70
70-70-69
70-71-68
68-70-71 -
68-73-68
71-66-72-
66-71-72
69-68-72
71-65-73-
69-68-72
69-66-74
72-68-70
70-69-71 -
72-69-69-
70-69-71 -
71-67-72-
71-65-74-
72-70-68
72-67-72
72-69-70
69-70-72
71-70-70-
71-70-70-
71-70-70-
69-72-70


Will Claxton 72-69-70 -
John Senden 72-70-69 -
Brendon de Jonge 73-69-69 -
John Merrick 72-70-69 -
Graeme McDowell 69-73-69 -
Miguel Angel Carballo 69-70-73-
Colt Knost 70-70-72 -
Jeff Overton 72-67-73 -
K.J. Choi 71-68-73-
Tommy Biershenk 74-67-71 -
Peter Hanson 74-68-70 -
Vaughn Taylor 69-71-73-
Geoff Ogilvy 76-66-71 -
Lucas Glover 70-72-71 -
Danny Lee 72-68-74-
Briny Baird 69-71-74-
Brian Gay 70-70-74 -
Troy Kelly 69-72-73-
Kevin Streelman 69-73-72 -
Garth Mulroy 70-72-72-
Made cut; will not finish
Michael Bradley 72-68-75-
Tommy Gainey 73-69-73 -
Charley Hoffman 69-73-73 -
Scott Verplank 69-73-73-
Mathew Goggin 70-72-73 -
Chris Couch 72-69-75 -
Gavin Coles 72-70-75 -
Alexandre Rocha 72-70-77-


Mobile Bay Classic
Saturday
At Robert Trent Jones Golf Trail, Magno-
lia Grove, The Crossings, Mobile, Ala.
Purse: $1.25 million
Yardage: 6,521, Par 72
Third Round


Stacy Lewis
Brittany Lincicome
Karine Icher
Sun Young Yoo
Lindsey Wright
Karrie Webb
Pornanong Phatlum
Lexi Thompson
Christel Boeljon
Natalie Gulbis
Haeji Kang
Jennifer Rosales
Azahara Munoz
Mariajo Uribe
Sydnee Michaels
So Yeon Ryu
Eun-Hee Ji
Numa Gulyanamitta
Becky Morgan
Meena Lee


68-67-67.
70-67-67.
72-65-68.
68-69-69.
67-69-70.
73-70-64.
72-69-66.
70-71-66.
69-70-68.
69-70-68.
68-70-69.
67-72-69.
69-69-70.
68-69-71
68-68-72-
69-67-72-
74-68-67-
69-70-70.
74-65-70.
69-69-71


Nicole Castrale
Suzann Pettersen
Anna Grzebien
Hee-Won Han
Caroline Hedwall
Anna Nordqvist
Moira Dunn
Karin Sjodin
Hee Kyung Seo
Cristie Kerr
Brittany Lang
Angela Stanford
Hee Young Park
Beatriz Recari
Mina Harigae
Candle Kung
Jin Young Pak
Morgan Pressel
Sophie Gustafson
Cindy LaCrosse
Meaghan Francella
Alison Walshe
Kathleen Ekey
Giulia Sergas
Jessica Korda
Chella Choi
Jeong Jang
Jennifer Johnson


71-70-69-
73-68-69
74-66-70
71-69-70-
67-73-70
71-68-71 -
71-67-72-
72-64-74
71-71-69-
70-71-70-
72-69-70
72-69-70
70-70-71 -
70-70-71 -
76-68-68
72-70-70
70-72-70
68-74-70
70-71-71 -
68-70-74
75-69-69
72-71-70-
71-71-71 -
73-69-71 -
72-68-73
72-65-76
75-69-70
72-72-70


Marcy Hart
Dori Carter
Shanshan Feng
Pernilla Lindberg
Belen Mozo
Ji Young Oh
NaYeon Choi
Paige Mackenzie
Ryann O'Toole
Jee Young Lee
Reilley Rankin
Jenny Shin
Paula Creamer
Wendy Doolan
Lorie Kane
Song-Hee Kim
Sarah Kemp
Haru Nomura
Veronica Felibert
Lisa Ferrero
Katie Futcher
Tiffany Joh
Mi Jung Hur
Jessica Shepley
Stephanie Sherlock
Maria Hjorth
Vicky Hurst
Heather Bowie Young
Jacqui Concolino


71-72-71 -
69-73-72 -
70-71-73-
73-68-73 -
72-72-71 -
73-69-73 -
70-70-75 -
73-67-75 -
70-70-75 -
77-67-72 -
72-70-74 -
70-70-76 -
71-72-74-
72-71-74-
72-71-74-
70-73-74 -
69-71-77-
71-69-77-
73-71-74-
70-74-74 -
67-77-74 -
74-70-74 -
68-71-79-
74-70-75 -
75-69-75 -
71-72-76-
70-71-78-
76-67-77-
73-71-77-


SPORTS


SUNDAY, APRIL 29, 2012 B5












ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE


Associated Press
Sheryl Crow runs in the
half-marathon Saturday in
Nashville.

Sheryl Crow runs
half marathon
NASHVILLE, Tenn. -
Singer Sheryl Crow
joined more than 30,000
runners in her first half-
marathon, and she fin-
ished with a time of 1
hour, 59 minutes and 14
seconds at the St. Jude
Country Music Half
Marathon.
Crow was running to
raise money for New
Hope Academy, and she
said she got plenty of sup-
port from people cheer-
ing the runners all along
the course. She said she
can really see how peo-
ple get hooked on run-
ning marathons.
Ryan James, 19, a soph-
omore from Berry Col-
lege's cross country team,
won the first marathon
he entered, finishing a
time of 2:32:50.

Keillor celebrates
bookstore's move
ST PAUL, Minn. -
Garrison Keillor plans an
above-average celebra-
tion of his bookstore's
move in St. Paul.
The host of' "A Prairie
Home Companion" has
scheduled a three-day
grand opening of Com-
mon Good Books.
The celebration kicks
off Tuesday at 7 p.m. with
a Spring Poetry Free-for-
All at Macalester College's
Weyerhaeuser Chapel.
Audience members can
read aloud at an open
mic, backed by a jazz trio.
On Wednesday evening,
Keillor will be joined by
"Prairie Home" actors
Sue Scott and Tim Rus-
sell in reading from his
new book, "Guy Noir and
the Straight Skinny," at
Common Good Books.
Fans get to tell a story
to Keillor on stage at
Common Good Books on
Thursday evening.
Keillor opened his
bookstore in 2006. It's
now open in the Lampert
Building on Snelling
Avenue.


50 years of music


Chieftains celebrate

golden anniversary

Associated Press

NAPLES When Paddy
Moloney started considering possi-
ble collaborators for The Chief-
tains' 50th anniversary album, he
knew the kind of artists he didn't
want: Mick Jagger, Sinead O'Con-
nor, Van Morrison.
He'd worked with all of those
stars in the past: "I didn't want to go
in that generation," he explained.
"I wanted a newer generation;
new kids on the block, you might
say Great indie contemporary stars
of music."
Still, the 72-year-old Irish music
titan admits to being a bit nervous
about bringing young musicians
into the Chieftains' fold.
"I was 50-50 about doing it," he
said. "Because I haven't been happy
about what I've been hearing over
the last 20 years, the music that's
been coming out. I just wonder, is it
music at all, you know? It's all
commercial."
Here's who Moloney ended up
with on "Voice of Ages": Best new
artist Grammy winner Bon Iver, the
Pistol Annies, the Civil Wars, the Se-
cret Sisters, the Carolina Chocolate
Drops and the Decemberists to
name a few. It was the band's first
real collaboration with indie rock-
ers, and Moloney couldn't be hap-
pier with the results.
"These younger bands, I could
hear what I would call the revival of
the bands of the '50s and '60s," said
Moloney "The music and the great
songs and the lyrics."
Laura Rogers of the Secret Sis-
ters said they were initially asked to
collaborate with Moloney by mutual
friend and record producer T Bone
Burnett.
'A lot of the American music we
love has a strong Irish influence," she
said. "We grew up with folky Ap-
palachian bluegrass music. Those
styles of music have a lot in common."
Working in the studio with
Moloney on the Irish folk song
"Peggy Gordon" was exciting and
comfortable, said Rogers. She also
called him "sweet and encouraging."
Moloney and The Chieftains re-
cently finished a month-long U.S.
tour that ended on St. Patrick's Day
at Carnegie Hall. He spends his
down time, about four months of the
year, resting up in Naples, Fla., at
his sun-filled home with his wife,
children and grandchildren.
There's a grand piano in the living
room and about a dozen tin flutes
and other assorted instruments.
On most evenings, he walks from


Associated Press
Irish musician Paddy Moloney of The Chieftains plays a tin whistle at his
home April 2 in Naples, Fla. Moloney collaborates with musicians, Bon Iver,
the Pistol Annies, the Civil Wars, the Secret Sisters, the Carolina Chocolate
Drops on The Chieftains' 50th anniversary album, "Voice of Ages."


his home to the beach with a flute,
and plays as an orange sun dips into
the vibrant blue Gulf of Mexico. It's
a long way from where Moloney
began his career
Born in 1938 outside of Dublin,
Ireland, Moloney began playing a
tin whistle as a boy and at 8, he
learned the uilleann pipes. In 1962,
he formed The Chieftains with Mar-
tin Fay, Sean Potts and Michael
Tubridy and cut a record of tradi-
tional Irish songs. It would be six
years before the band made an-
other record and several members
kept their day jobs for a decade -
some worked for the post office and


Moloney was an accountant for a
building firm. Yet they kept playing
and in 1975, the popular British
music magazine Melody Maker
named them band of the year
"I was very determined to spread
the gospel of this great folk art,"
Moloney said.
The scope of the band's success
and lasting legacy is enormous: six
Grammys and more than 50 albums.
Their fans include everyone from
Anjelica Huston to Irish-American
astronaut Cady Coleman (who
played a solo on Moloney's penny-
whistle in space; the band included
it on the new album).


Ernie K-Doe biography captures quirks


Associated Press


NEW ORLEANS -Anew
Usher debuts new book captures the quirks
Usher debuts new and talent of one of New Or-
songs during play leans' most celebrated and
NEW YORK-- Usher eccentric entertainers, as
debuted new songs in an well as his ups and downs
uncon- and the era that shaped
ventional him.
way Fri- The title of the book, pub-
day night: lished by the Historic New
The Orleans Collection, is
singer "Ernie K-Doe: The R&B
danced to Emperor of New Orleans."
his new Later in life, K-Doe pro-
music as claimed himself the "Em-
Usher part of peror of the World," and few
the off- fans would disagree with
Broadway play "Fuerza him.
Bruta: Look Up." K-Doe emerged in the
"Fierza Bruta" is the early 1960s rock and R&B
fast-paced and acrobatic scene, and until his death at
play in which the audience age 65 in 2001 was one of the
stands as performers most unforgettable figures
dance and jump around on in New Orleans music.
the walls, onstage and on The book is the second for
the floor with the crowd. the Historic New Orleans
Collection a private col-
-From wire reports election of Louisiana materi-


Birthday An excellent way to make a lot of money in the
year ahead is to emulate our old friend the turtle. Slow but
steady progress can turn out to be one of the swiftest ways
to achieve an ambitious objective.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Having concern for others is
noble, but what really puts you in the right is you help peo-
ple without calling attention to it.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) -Although you might not show
any outward enthusiasm for the ideas or endeavors of oth-
ers, you'll appreciate what they do and, actually, won't hesi-
tate to try them yourself.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Even if your current actions
seem like they could be profitable, you'll still need to prime
the pump to get things going. Make sure trickle develops
into a strong, ropy flow.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Because you're full of fresh and
innovative ideas, those with whom you get involved will find


als and a museum which
plans a series on the
shapers of regional music.
The first "Unfinished
Blues: Memories of a New
Orleans Music Man" fo-
cused on jazz composer-pro-
ducer Harold Battiste Jr.
and was published in 2010.
Author Ben Sandmel,
who lives and plays music in
New Orleans and knows the
city's quirky music commu-
nity, tells K-Doe's story in
lively detail and colorful an-
ecdotes.
He opens the book with
an incident that took place
at K-Doe's Mother-in-Law
Lounge, named after the
song that took him to na-
tional fame in 1961.
K-Doe, whose birth name
was Ernest Kador Jr, called
the police during a perform-
ance in 2000 to report a rob-
bery When the cops showed
up, guns drawn, K-Doe said
the robbery was a man tap-
ing his performance. Not


only could police do little
about the alleged intellec-
tual theft, the man turned
out to be a New York Times
critic planning an article "to
let people know about Mr K-
Doe."
That sort of incident was
not unusual for the man
who made his motto, "I'm
cocky but I'm good."
K-Doe followed up his


Today's HOROSCOPE
you to be a most stimulating and interesting person. You
make life interesting.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) There is no doubt that sub-
stantial returns can be generated through some type of col-
lective endeavor. Don't try to do things on your own -
team up with others.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -Although it isn't a departure
from what you might usually take on when circumstances
call for it, you will do quite well acting as a middleman. Do
your thing.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Victory in a career situation
will not be predicated upon whom you know but what you
know. If you're better prepared than the next guy or gal,
you'll come out ahead.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -You have much more in
common with someone you recently met than you may ini-
tially realize. Today could mark the beginning of a long-term


Ernie K-Doe poses
outside of his Mother-
In-Law Lounge during
Jazz Fest in New
Orleans. A new book
published by the
Historic New Orleans
Collection, "Ernie
K-Doe: The R&B
Emperor of New
Orleans," by Ben
Sandmel, captures the
quirks and talent of
one of New Orleans'
most celebrated and
eccentric entertainers.
Associated Press

original hit with a string of
national hits. While it's dif-
ficult to say just how much
his style influenced Ex-Bea-
tle Paul McCartney and Led
Zeppelin, they and other
performers hung out with K-
Doe when they came to New
Orleans on tour
In some ways K-Doe's ca-
reer was similar to many
musicians.


relationship with this person.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Only if you truly feel that
you could help should you offer some advice to a friend
who is seeking an honest assessment of a puzzling situa-
tion. What you see could be of crucial assistance.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Keep as many channels of
communication open as possible. The more people with
whom you brainstorm, the greater the chances you have of
finding new opportunities.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Even tiny returns could be
extremely significant. Several people might have ways for
you to make small gains, which collectively could add up to
quite a bundle.
Aries (March 21-April 19) Because your directives are
nicely given and make sense, those in your charge will
have no trouble following your lead. You won't demand
anything of them you wouldn't do yourself.


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

FRIDAY, APRIL 27
Mega Money: 6 27 39 42
Mega Ball: 21
4-of-4 MB 1 winner $550,000
4-of-4 3 $2,435.50
3-of-4 MB 43 $372
3-of-4 811 $58.50
2-of-4 MB 1,150 $28.50
1-of-4 MB 11,093 $3
2-of-4 25,666 $2
Fantasy 5:3 10 16 24 33
5-of-5 3 winners $84,007.83
4-of-5 362 $112
3-of-5 11,026 $10

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
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bers, players should
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bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
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www.flalottery.com, or
call 850-487-7777.

Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, April 29,
the 120th day of 2012. There
are 246 days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On April 29, 1992, rioting
erupted in Los Angeles after
a jury in Simi Valley, Calif.,
acquitted four Los Angeles
police officers of almost all
state charges in the video-
taped beating of Rodney
King; the violence resulted in
55 deaths and more than $1
billion in damage.
On this date:
In 1429, Joan of Arc entered
the besieged city of Orleans to
lead a French victory over the
English.
In 1861, the Maryland
House of Delegates voted
53-13 against seceding from
the Union.
In 1916, the Easter Rising
in Dublin collapsed as Irish
nationalists surrendered to
British authorities.
In 1945, during World War
II, American soldiers liberated
the Dachau concentration
camp.
In 1961, "ABC's Wide
World of Sports" premiered,
with Jim McKay as host.
In 1974, President Richard
M. Nixon announced he was
releasing edited transcripts of
some secretly made White
House tape recordings re-
lated to Watergate.
In 1983, Harold Washing-
ton was sworn in as the first
black mayor of Chicago.
Ten years ago: A year
after the loss of a seat it had
held for over 50 years, the
United States won election to
the U.N. Human Rights Com-
mission.
Five years ago: An ele-
vated section of highway that
carried motorists from the
San Francisco-Oakland Bay
Bridge to a number of free-
ways was destroyed after
heat from an overturned
gasoline truck caused part of
one overpass to crumple
onto another.
One year ago: Britain's
Prince William and Kate Mid-
dleton were married in an op-
ulent ceremony at London's
Westminster Abbey amid
pomp, circumstance and
elaborate hats.
Today's Birthdays: Ac-
tress Celeste Holm is 95.
Poet Rod McKuen is 79.
Actor Keith Baxter is 79.
Bluesman Otis Rush is 78.
Conductor Zubin Mehta is 76.
Pop singer Bob Miranda (The
Happenings) is 70. Country
singer Duane Allen (The Oak
Ridge Boys) is 69. Comedian
Jerry Seinfeld is 58. Actress
Michelle Pfeiffer is 54. Singer
Carnie Wilson (Wilson
Phillips) is 44. Actor Paul
Adelstein is 43. Actress Uma
Thurman is 42. Tennis player
Andre Agassi is 42. Rapper


Master P is 42. Country
singer James Bonamy is 40.
Gospel/rhythm-and-blues
singer Erica Campbell (Mary
Mary) is 40.
Thought for Today: "It is
easier to believe than to
doubt." Gene Fowler, Amer-
ican journalist (1890-1960).












COMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


Suddenly someone


Nobodies find

politicalfame
NANCY BENAC
Associated Press
WASHINGTON
Wanna be
famous?
Forget real-
ity TV The
presidential campaign
could be just the ticket
from nowhere to
notoriety
It can be done with a
heartfelt story An off-
hand remark. Or simply
by having a distant con-
nection to someone who's
Somebody
Think Sandra Fluke.
She was just another out-
spoken college student
before her defense of in-
surance coverage for
birth control drew biting
ridicule from conserva-
tive commentator Rush
Limbaugh and then a
sympathetic phone call
from the president. Now
she's got more than
35,000 Twitter followers.
Think Joe the Plumber,
aka Samuel Wurzel-
bacher. The Ohio worker
rocketed to the center of
the 2008 presidential
campaign after John Mc-
Cain decided to play up
his encounter with candi-
date Barack Obama over
taxes. A poll at the height
of the campaign found 84
percent of Americans
knew that Joe the
Plumber was campaign-
ing for McCain. Now he's
running for Congress.
Think Mercede
Johnston.
Say who?
Sarah Palin's daugh-
ter's ex-fiance's little sis-
ter managed to parlay
her tangential connection
to the 2008 race into a
four-page photo spread
in Playboy last year in
which she said the
20011118 GOP\ni:e .
presidential cial- I f
dlidjte "$lreved y.1 :
IlI w( ole f. ii-
II.\ Lim
No. it doesn't
tjke iiih
toc. I niI t IIAit


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


Associated Press
In this Oct. 12, 2008, file photo, Democratic presidential candidate, Sen. Barack Obama, D-lll., left, talks to
plumber Joe Wurzelbacher in Holland, Ohio.


fleeting moment of politi-
cal fame for good or ill.
"It's like the fairy god-
mother of media taps you
on the head and says,
'Oh, we're going to pay at-
tention to you for a little
while,"' says Leo Braudy,
a University of Southern
California professor who
wrote a book on the his-
tory of fame.
"Some people shrug it
off," Braudy says. "Other
people are destroyed by
it."
And some, like Wurzel-
bacher, try to prolong
their moment as long as
possible.
Six tips on how to
make yourself a political
Somebody:
BECOME A SYMBOL
It's all about turning
yourself into a symbol of
something bigger. Candi-
dates are like moths to a
flame when they hear a
story from ordi-


Donna Rice Hughes pictured Nov. 29, 2001.


Winifred Skinner. The 79-
year-old great-grand-
mother met Democratic
presidential nominee Al
Gore when he was cam-
paigning in Iowa in 2000
and told him that she col-
lected soda cans to help
pay for her heart medica-
tion and other prescrip-
tion drugs. Gore liked her
4Ct.1 *11 lulch he lbroiiht
ler to his delete with
Geore \\ Bilsh in
Bostn1. l( ii mentioned
her tWiti: e Soon her life
aS I under a iii roco:pe.
\ iltl cl'tics qllesttio llll_
wh.\ she dlidnlt Let inl re
liell) frin lier well-of


SAY SOMETHING
OUTRAGEOUS
The more shameless
the better. It's catnip to
candidates who are al-
ways in need of some-
thing new to howl over.
Example' Hilary
Rosen. The Deilo-"
cratic consiiltjnt
was just another
t Iki n, hel l ,on
cjble TV untilt
she qiestioned 6,
Ann Riiine.\ '
tjllllee h,' 1:1
tiIk bo-ut
tie eco- t


nomic challenges facing
women, saying the GOP
candidate's wife had
"never worked a day in
her life." Republicans
seized on the dismissive
comment and even
Barack and Michelle
Obama hastened to dis-
tance themselves from it.
Rosen apologized. Ann
Romney was later over-
heard calling Rosen's
comment an "early birth-
day present."
MILK YOUR
PEDIGREE
For good or ill, the
Palin and Johnston clans
have masterfully lever-
aged their ties to Sarah
Palin into more than a
few moments of fame.
See Page C4


Bristol
P Palin. left.
and her
partner
Mark Bal-
November
S2010 on the celebrity
dance competition series
r" .- "Dancing with the Stars."


Gov. Scott in alternate STEM universe


F frequently I'm
asked what a state
senator does
when not in Tallahassee
for session or committee _"
weeks.
In addition to numer-
ous speaking engage-
ments, media inquiries,
visits to schools, prisons
and social service Paula I
providers, we meet with FLOI
constituents. And some
of us communicate VOI
through email, Facebook
and Twitter.
As the senator from Lakeland, my
last nine months have overwhelm-
ingly been focused on my con-
stituents' pleas to save USF Poly
from becoming an independent, un-
accredited 12th university. I have
heard from USF students and fac-
ulty, community members, Board of
Governor members, other legisla-
tors and many members of the
press.
While focused on the needs and
desires of the folks I represent, I re-


D
R


ceived a Facebook mes-
sage from a bright stu-
dent attending the
University of Florida. It
arrived a week before
Gov Rick Scott signed a
bill separating USF Poly
into a separate 12th uni-
versity, without ever hav-
ing given its 1,300
)ickery students and 100 faculty
|DA members the courtesy of
a meeting.
CES Despite overwhelming
opposition, the governor
said he signed the bill because "the
primary mission of educating stu-
dents in science, technology, engi-
neering and mathematics (STEM),
will be vital to our economy in the
years to come."
My young Facebook friend, who's
pursuing a degree in mathematics
and biomedical engineering at UF,
had a different take on the state's
investment in science and technol-
ogy education:
"I'm watching Dean (Cammy)
Abernathy getting annihilated in a


student town hall meeting about
budget cuts to UF College of Engi-
neering. She is looking bad. Also a lot
of the information discussed about
the state legislature is unclear"
I explained the cuts are the result
of the Legislature's poor decision to
cut $300 million from our existing
11 universities. Considering the
state's new emphasis on STEM ed-
ucation, it's a shortsighted move to
cut the budget for UF's College of
Engineering.
He responded with a link to an
online petition sent Dean Aber-
nathy, signed by 8,105 people. It said
the dean had proposed eliminating
all graduate and research activity
from UF's Computer and Informa-
tion Science and Engineering
(CISE) department. The depart-
ment has more than 600 bachelor
students, 400 masters students, 130
Ph.D. students and 32 tenure-track
faculty
How ironic that the governor who
wants to stress STEM education is
putting at risk Florida' s most es-
tablished, accredited, research uni-


versity with more than 1,000 stu-
dents in CISE by approving a
$300 million cut to state universi-
ties, while defending the creation of
a 12th university that has no ac-
creditation or students.
After the governor signed the bill
creating Florida Polytech, my
young Facebook friend sent another
message:
"After all of the USF Poly and
CISE nonsense, I feel as if money is
a much greater factor in decision
making at the top than logic or the
general welfare of the people. My
solution Get very wealthy one day
and support the logical and genuine
political candidates."
Out of the mouths of babes.
Governor, you got some 'splaining
to do.

Paula Dockeryis a term-limited
Republican senator from Lakeland
who is chronicling her final year in
the Florida Senate. She can be
reached atpdockery@
florida voices., corn


And now,


beliefs of


some


readers

Last week, I shared
with you the things
I believe about Cit-
rus County. And I invited
you to share your beliefs.
As you might imagine,
lots of readers responded
and their beliefs are all
over the spectrum. Today,
I share those beliefs with
you.
MEN
I believe the reason
drivers don't use their
turn signals is that they
don't feel it's safe to try
and manipulate the direc-
tional signal lever while
they are texting.
-Bill Fick, Hemando
I believe that Ozello of-
fers some of the best kayak
fishing in Florida (but don't
tell anyone)!
-Gary Rankel, Ozello
I believe the majority
of people in Citrus County
vote on the basis of per-
sonality likes/dislikes
rather than on the basis of
facts and understanding
matters.
-Fred Hale
I believe that Gerry
Mulligan actually sees the
"Emperor's New Clothes."
-Kim Cloud.
I believe the Citrus
County Chronicle is the
second worst newspaper
that God ever created.
-James McIntosh,
Lecanto
I believe that Citrus
County feels like home.
No matter how long I
spent away at college or
how many different
places I have lived, it al-
ways feels like home driv-
ing up (U.S.) 19 and seeing
the city of Crystal River
sign welcoming me back.
It feels like we are all
neighbors who help and
care about each other;
unlike bigger cities where
everyone fends for them-
selves. We have a terrific
sense of community to-
getherness in this county
and I wouldn't trade it for
anything!
-Saralynne
Schlumberger
I believe after many
years (70) I have finally
found a city where the
publisher of a newspa-
i per is not afraid to
speak his mind ... no
matter what the issue
or who it involves.
Thank you; and Citrus
County is lucky to have
you. Your Sunday articles
are always informative
and often humorous.
They are the first thing I
read on Sunday Thank
you for your service. If you
want me to I will be happy
to try and negotiate a raise
for you with your boss.
-Pat Haden
I believe people
should stop complaining
about their neighborhoods.
Join your HOA or Civic As-
sociation and volunteer to
make a difference together
communities can make a
difference!
-Rosella Hale
SI believe that we are
so fortunate to have our
beautiful college campus
right here in Citrus
County!!
-Amy Holaday
I believe if you own
property in Citrus County
(Florida) you should only
be allowed to have Bahia
grass and never water
your lawn; if you want
rich green grass move to
See Page 03







Page C2 -SUNDAY, APRIL 29, 2012



PINION


"Let us bo of good cheer, remembering
that misfortunes hardest to bear are
those which never come."
James Russell Lowell, 1819-1891


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan........... .................. publisher
o Charlie Brennan ............. ................. editor
Mike Arnold ........... .................. HR director
Sandra Frederick....................... managing editor
Z...u Curt Ebitz.............. ............ citizen member
Founded Mac Harris ..................... .........citizen member
by Albert M.
Williamson Rebecca Martin ................................guest member
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


IT'S A CHALLENGE





Extreme





measures





avoidable


Hundreds of people with
a variety of specific
concerns showed up at
a public hearing Tuesday to
tell county commissioners
about their budget-
ary priorities. THE IS
The long evening
was an opportunity County I
for commissioner
and staff to gain OUR OF
input into whether Ke
to cut programs, Keep sperm
raise taxes or
strike an as-yet-unknown mid-
dle ground.
It is the middle ground that
can and should be found.
County officials have been
out in the community caution-
ing some would say scaring
- people about services being
eyed for the chopping block.
Among those services, pro-
grams and other expenditure-
areas are: The UF/IFAS
Extension Service, 4-H, the Old
Courthouse Heritage Museum,
the Bicentennial Park pool,
aquatic maintenance of county
trails, the water/wastewater
fund, the East and West Citrus
Community Centers. Also
tossed out for consideration is
invading reserve funds and
that's neither a good idea nor
likely to happen.
While county government
can be accused of taking an
alarmist approach to garnering
public attention to its budget-
ary quandary, it's tough to deny
that major belt-tightening has
taken place in recent history


Working women
Most stay-at-home moms
worked before they had children
and usually after the children no
longer needed them at home. It's
true Hillary Rosen misspoke politi-
cally, but she had a point
in saying Ann Romney O L
never worked a day in her
life and didn't understand
the problems of women
in the workforce.
Follow the rules
I'd like to ask the driv-
ers of Citrus County to all CAL
quit trying to be traffic 563-C
police. You're not the traf-
fic police. If you have the
right of way, take it. If there's no
stop sign, go. I don't understand
the people in this county. Every-
body wants to be the traffic cop
and try and let people go. And
that's real nice and all, but you're
going to end up getting somebody
in an accident. Just take the right
of way and follow the driving
rules. That simple.
Thanks, deputy
On Sunday (April 15) I was out
on (U.S.) 19 near Sugarmill
Woods selling some household
items and I just want to thank the
sheriff's deputy that I don't
know his name, but I want to
thank him for stopping to check
on me. He stopped because he
thought I was broken down but I
wasn't. I explained to him that I
was selling household items and


More than 100 jobs have been
cut since the economy plum-
meted five years ago.
There's also no disputing
that with the decline in prop-
erty values comes
5SUE: a decline in tax
revenues which
budget. has brought us to
this point in the
'INION: budget-planning
ding flat. process.
ing at. We're still two
months away from
the tax roll being certified, so
speculation is the basis for the
preliminary shaping what the
budget should look like.
Assuming property value
may decrease a bit, a modest
uptick in the millage rate
would largely be a wash, keep-
ing spending flat, thus funding
services we now enjoy. If prop-
erty values hold steady, any in-
crease to the millage rate
should be nominal at best and
sufficient to fund the coveted
services.
Somewhere in the middle is
also the option to increase user
fees a bit.
Few fighting for specific pro-
grams indicated an unwilling-
ness to chip in a little to
maintain what they now enjoy
In a nutshell, county govern-
ment needs to keep spending
flat, taking in the same amount
of dollars in the upcoming fis-
cal year as the present fiscal
year.
Doing so should not require
anyone to panic.


he was very nice, very polite and I
just want to thank (him). Like I
said, I don't know his name, but I
want to thank him for stopping to
check on my safety. You know, I
really appreciate that.
Let's meet
JND Regarding the ... Sound
fl1 (Off) about the ultimate
g1 power of government's
supposed to be with the
people, according to our
Constitution. Our Founding
Fathers anticipated a series
of town meetings in which
town meeting members
)579 would voice their opinions
to the elected officials. In
all of the older communities in this
country, we have town meetings in
which the town meeting members
tell the officials what their thoughts
are and the town meeting mem-
bers vote on the important issues.
We need to institute something like
that here. That is what our Found-
ing Fathers anticipated.
Ignore spammers
Having problems with unwanted
emails? Learn about your com-
puter's unwanted email blocker.
Don't acknowledge you received
the unwanted email. They will just
send you more.
Crime realities
Why are TV shows talking so
much about stranger danger to
people's children when the truth
is, most children are molested by
someone they know?


All the way with LBJ


Around noon on Saturday,
Nov. 23, 1963, almost ex-
actly 24 hours after the as-
sassination in Dallas, while the
president's casket lay
in the East Room of
the White House,
Arthur Schlesinger,
John Kennedy's kept
historian, convened a
lunch at Washington's
Occidental restaurant /
with some other ad- "
ministration liberals.
Their purpose was to
discuss how to deny Georg
the 1964 Democratic OTI
presidential nomina-
tion to the new incum- VOI
bent, Lyndon Johnson,
and instead run a ticket of Attor-
ney General Robert Kennedy and
Sen. Hubert Humphrey
This example of the malignant
malice of some liberals against
the president who became 20th
century liberalism's most conse-
quential adherent is described in
Robert Caro's "The Passage of
Power," the fourth and, he insists,
penultimate volume in his "The
Years of Lyndon Johnson," which
when completed will rank as
America's most ambitiously con-
ceived, assiduously researched
and compulsively readable polit-
ical biography The new volume
arrives 30 years after the first,
and its timing is serendipitous:
Are you seeking an antidote to
current lamentations about the
decline of political civility? Im-
merse yourself in Caro's cringe-
inducing catalog of humiliations,
gross and petty, inflicted on John-
son by many New Frontiersmen,
and with obsessive hatred by
Robert Kennedy
Caro demonstrates that when,
at the Democrats' 1960 Los Ange-
les convention, John Kennedy se-
lected Johnson, an opponent for
the nomination, as his running
mate, Robert Kennedy worked
with furious dishonesty against
his brother, trying to convince
Johnson to decline. Had Robert
succeeded, his brother almost


H
<


certainly would have lost Texas,
and perhaps both Carolinas and
Louisiana President Eisen-
hower had carried five of the 11
Confederate states in
1956 and the elec-
tion.
Johnson, one of the
few presidents who
spent most of their
adult lives in Washing-
ton, had no idea how to
win the presidency
Convinced that the
country was as mes-
e Will merized as Washington
IER is by the Senate, John-
son did not formally
CES announce his candi-
dacy until six days be-
fore the 1960 convention.
Johnson did, however, know
how to use the presidency Almost
half the book covers the 47 days
between the assassination and
Johnson's Jan. 8 State of the
Union address. In that span he
began breaking the congressional
logjam against liberal legislation
that had existed since 1938 when
the nation, recoiling against
Franklin Roosevelt's plan to
"pack" the Supreme Court, pro-
duced a durable congressional
coalition of Republicans and
Southern Democrats.
Caro is properly enthralled by
Johnson putting the power of the
presidency behind a discharge
petition that, by advancing, com-
pelled a Southern committee
chairman to allow what became
the 1964 Civil Rights Act to get to
the Senate, where Johnson's
meticulous cultivation of another
Southern chairman prevented
tax cut legislation from becoming
hostage to the civil rights fili-
buster By taking such arcana se-
riously, and celebrating Johnson's
virtuosity regarding them, Caro
honors the seriousness of his
readers, who should reciprocate
the compliment.
Caro astringently examines
Johnson's repulsive venality (re-
garding his Texas broadcasting
properties) and bullying (notably


of Texas journalists, through
their employers) but devotes
ample pages to honoring Johnson
as the most exemplary political
leader since Lincoln regarding
race. As vice president, he re-
fused to attend the 400th an-
niversary of the founding of St.
Augustine, Fla., unless the ban-
quet would be integrated and
not, he insisted, with a "Negro
table" off to the side. He said civil
rights legislation would "say to
the Mexican in California or the
Negro in Mississippi or the Ori-
ental on the West Coast or the
Johnsons in Johnson City that we
are going to treat you all equally
and fairly" Caro never loses sight
of the humiliations and insecuri-
ties that were never far from
Johnson's mind.
Caro is a conventional liberal
of the Great Society sort ("Unless
Congress extended federal rent-
control laws the only protec-
tion against exorbitant rents for
millions of families ... ") but is
also a valuable anachronism, a
historian who rejects the aca-
demic penchant for history "with
the politics left out." These histo-
rians consider it elitist and anti-
democratic to focus on
event-making individuals; they
deny that a pre-eminent few have
disproportionate impact on the
destinies of the many; they pres-
ent political events as "epiphe-
nomena," reflections of social
"structures" and results of im-
personal forces. Caro's event-
making Johnson is a very
personal force.
Samuel Johnson said of Mil-
ton's "Paradise Lost" that no one
ever wished it longer. Not so
Caro's great work, which already
fills 3,388 pages. When his fifth
volume, treating the Great Soci-
ety and Vietnam, arrives, readers'
gratitude will be exceeded only
by their regret that there will not
be a sixth.

George Will's email address is
georgewill@washpost. com.


ENGCATIORAL EVOLITICN. -


_ LETTERS to the Editor


Lyngbya realities
Gov Scott was well advised to
veto the $100,000 expenditure
for the control of lyngbya in
King's Bay. There is no doubt
that lyngbya has few fans; we all
would love to have this noxious
algae disappear But with no ef-
fective controls presently avail-
able, spending money on this
makes no sense.
Lyngbya is a monocellular
alga that forms into mats which
cover the bottom and float on the
top of water. Attempts at harvest-
ing it result in only temporary
relief, as the manipulation of the
gunk causes parts of it to break
off, and a new algal bloom
erupts shortly after the harvest.
No safe, effective chemical ap-
plication is available. Attempts
to poison the algae have un-
wanted side effects, such as
heavy metal contamination and
the killing off of other plants
(and animals) not necessarily
targeted for removal. Even if we
could selectively poison just the
lyngbya, as it died, it would de-
plete the water of oxygen neces-
sary for other life to survive in
the water.
With current technology, there
is no easy answer to rid our-


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in Chroni-
cle editorials are the opinions of
the newspaper's editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Groups or individuals are invited
to express their opinions in a let-
ter to the editor.
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at 352-563-5660.
All letters must be signed and in-
clude a phone number and home-
town, including letters sent via
email. Names and hometowns will
be printed; phone numbers will
not be published or given out.
We reserve the right to edit let-
ters for length, libel, fairness and
good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
350 words, and writers will be
limited to three letters per month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to
352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

selves of this nasty goop. The
best we can hope for is an ag-
gressive effort to remove nutri-
ents from the water that support
the growth of lyngbya. That


means putting in public sewer
systems and eliminating private
septic systems anywhere near
the water. This is an unpopular
(and expensive) stance. But it is
another one of those "inconve-
nient truths."
Adele Jacobson
Crystal River

Keep centers
I am writing to urge support of
the maintenance of community
centers in county budget deci-
sions. These centers provide our
community a wide variety of so-
cial activities which promote the
health and well-being of county
residents. The following are just
some examples of these differ-
ent activities: aerobics, arts and
crafts, bingo, card games, clog-
ging, computer classes, dancing,
educational speakers, sign lan-
guage, table tennis, yoga, tai chi
and more.
Actually, enabling these cen-
ters to continue their operations,
which helps the community to
keep physically and mentally ac-
tive, saves the county money and
provides so much more than
money can buy
Dr. Susan Zimmer
Crystal River


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


S,

b





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Down under way, way, way down under


A after departing
Fiji, it would
take two sea
days before we
reached our next port .
of call Auckland,
New Zealand. We ar-
rived there on Feb. 20,
then, there would be
another sea day before
reaching Wellington Fred B
and the following day, A Sl
we would visit OF I
Dunedin.
Count them, three
sea days and three port days the
New Zealand portion of our ad-
venture would last for a total of six
days.
Australia, which is still to come,
makes the most of the descriptive
nickname "down under," but in
truth, New Zealand is farther


L
L


down and farther
under
1 My misconception
=* prior to taking this
most recent trip was
that New Zealand was
located to the north-
northeast of Australia
it isn't. Its position is
south-southeast and
rannen the distance is rather
-ICE significant.
IFE As previously indi-
cated, it would take
two sea days to move
from Fiji to Auckland which is
New Zealand's northernmost port
- a distance of some 1,300 miles.
From Auckland to the southern-
most port, Dunedin, is another 650
miles, and to clarify, based on how
it all fits on the globe, half to two-
thirds of New Zealand lies further


south than does Australia.
New Zealand is comprised of
two islands one is called the
north island and the other, natu-
rally, is called the south island. In
total, it is slightly larger than the
state of Florida; it has approxi-
mately 4 million people. While I
don't know how they got them to
hold still long enough to count
'em, the estimate is that there are
some 60 million sheep; and,
though I have nothing to back this
up, just watching them work, I'd
think 60 million sheep would most
likely keep at least 6 million work-
ing sheepdogs busy
I did try to research this but
found nothing substantial ... one
smart aleck said he'd check the
sheepdog time cards to see how
many were on the clock that day,
but he never got back with me.


All kidding aside Cheryl and
I simply adored New Zealand.
It is south of the equator, we
were there in February, so it was
summer, but the temperature was
pleasantly cool and it was without
a doubt the greenest place I've
ever seen.
The word I found myself using
most often was "fascinating."
Mountains and seacoasts run to-
gether seemingly throughout the
entire landscape and people have
not yet been able to bring the veg-
etation to its knees ... houses have
been built, roads have been paved,
but even just a few miles out of the
cities, the trees and other flora
continue to keep the scenery very
much as what one would have
seen 250 years ago when Captain
Cook first laid eyes on this grand
piece of God's creation.


My sweetheart and I did the
tourist things.
We visited sheep ranches and
rode old-fashioned trains on
tracks laid more than a century
ago, across trestles spanning ab-
solutely glorious gorges, but noth-
ing was more splendid than the
land itself and the people we
found there the friendly, wel-
coming people.
I'm an American through-and-
through, and I'm a documented
fourth-generation Florida
cracker; but if I had to pick some-
place else to call home, I might
just look down under way, way,
way down under!
--In--
Fred Brannen is an Inverness
resident and a Chronicle
columnist.


Florida Legislature out of order

in anti-Cuba commerce law

rom time to time, local and state law- The new law is likely unconstitutional
makers succumb to the narcissistic il- under the "Supremacy Clause" of the U.S.
lusion that they are members of the Constitution, which provides that the "Con-
U.S. Congress and therefore can legislate in stitution, and the Laws of the United States
the field of foreign policy ...shall be the Supreme Law of
The latest such mass delusion the Land."
involves a misguided effort by This means when the federal
the Florida Legislature to re- government exercises the pow-
strict foreign companies' com- ers given to it in the Constitu-
mercial activities with Cuba. tion, its actions must prevail
During the most recent leg- over any conflicting or inconsis-
islative session, House Bill 959 tent state laws.
passed the Florida House, 115- In 2000, the U.S. Supreme
0, and the Florida Senate, 39-1. Court unanimously found un-
It is worth mentioning that the constitutional, under the Su-
only negative vote was cast by Angel Castillo Jr. premacy Clause, a
Sen. Larcenia J. Bullard, 64, a FLORIDA Massachusetts statute that
Democrat from Miami. VOICES sought to prohibit that state
The bill prohibits companies from contracting with compa-
that do business with or in nies doing business with
Cuba, including through subsidiaries, from Burma/Myanmar, then a pariah nation like
contracting with Florida state agencies or Cuba and Syria.
local governments for goods or services It should be well known by most one
worth at least $1 million. For good interna- hopes by all state and local lawmakers
tional measure, the amendment also ap- that the president of the United States and
plies to Syria which, like Cuba, is listed by the U.S. Congress have exclusive constitu-
the U.S. State Department as a state spon- tional authority in conducting the foreign
sor of terrorism. relations of this country
"Business operations" are defined Florida lawmakers can approve all the
broadly to include: "engaging in commerce non-binding resolutions they want con-
in any form in Cuba or Syria, including, but demning the Cuban and Syrian regimes for
not limited to, acquiring, developing, main- all their crimes and abuses.
training, owning, selling, possessing, leasing, However, the State of Florida does not
or operating equipment, facilities, person- need, and is not allowed under the U.S.
nel, products, services, personal property, Constitution, to have its own foreign policy
real property, military equipment, or any In times of budget constraints, Florida
other apparatus of business or commerce." should not waste taxpayer dollars defend-
Gov Rick Scott has until Saturday, May 5, ing the new law against inevitable legal
to approve the law, veto it, or let it become challengers. Surely in Tallahassee, besides
law without his signature. Unless vetoed, Sen. Bullard, at least Gov Scott under-
the law will take effect July 1 and will im- stands this.
pact a number of important companies
from Canada, Brazil and other countries
doing business in both Florida and Cuba. Angel Castillo Jr, a former reporter and
Companies that do not properly disclose editor for the New York Times and The
their business ties to Cuba will face a Miami Herald, practices employment law
penalty equal to the greater of $2 million or in Miami. He can be reached at
twice the amount of their Florida contracts. acastillo@floridavoices.com.


For the RECORD


Ozello questions
In response to Mr Decker and Mr.
McLaughlin's "Bargaining Points" article
in (the) Chronicle dated April 13, 2012.
1. As of this date, we have 72 signatures
on petitions that are against this project.
Seventy-two constitutes more than Ce-
celia Treat and Linda Green, who were
interviewed by (the) Chronicle opposing
this project.
2. Yes, "there was plenty of sewage"
when the property consisted of 18 trail-
ers, five cabins and eight-unit motel plus
tents. Just ask the residents that live by
this property The sewage was in their
yards, carports and road. We realize that
a new sewage plant will have to be in-
stalled because of EPA regulations. My
questions are.
A. What type of system will be
installed?
B. Where is this unit installed and
presently working in Citrus County?
C. Who will supervise installation of
this system to protect the residents and
waterways of harmful outlet?
D. Who will inspect and maintain the
sewer system to protect waterways and
homeowners? Yes, who will have the wa-
terways' and homeowners' interest, and
whom will we contact if we feel there is a
problem?
3. I was at the first meeting Mr. Decker
arranged at Pecks. Mr. McLaughlin and I
disagree with the attitude of the resi-
dents. At that meeting it was certainly not
neutral. On one side were those opposed
to the project very strongly and those
who were for the project That meeting
was not a neutral atmosphere, more
heated I would say
4. If Mr. Decker and Mr McLaughlin
can do "Quite a bit without amendment,"
then why don't they? I am not opposed to
a restaurant on the footprint that is there
or building on the residential lots. I am
opposed to height variances and
re-zoning.
Cecelia Treat
Ozello


Get facts straight
"Congress shall make no law respecting
an establishment of a religion, or pro-
hibiting the free exercise thereof; or
abridging the freedom of speech, or the
press; or the right of people to assemble,
and to petition the government for a re-
dress of grievances."
If you do not recognize the above, it is
the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitu-
tion. Nowhere in the Constitution are the
words "separation of church and state"
used. Yet, in two separate letters to the edi-
tor, the phrase "separation of church and
state" was cited as if it was taken directly
from our Constitution.
The phrase "separation of church and
state" first appeared in a 1802 letter from
Thomas Jefferson to the Danbury, Conn.,
Baptist Association. Jefferson's letter, writ-
ten 15 years after the U.S. Constitution was
ratified, was addressing the Association's
desire to end the official relationship the
Episcopal Church and the State of Con-
necticut whose Constitution recognized es-
tablished religion.
The text "make no law respecting an es-
tablishment of religion, or prohibiting the
free exercise thereof," thus building a wall
of separation between church and state is
contained in Jefferson's letter It was not
until 1947, when Supreme Court Justice
Hugo Black cited the Jefferson letter in
McCollum v Board of Education, treating it
as if it was the Constitution itself. Never
mind the fact that Jefferson, in his letter to
the Association, had refused to denounce
the establishment of religion in the Consti-
tution of several states.
The fact is that God and religion has al-
ways been a part of America's history,
starting with the Mayflower Compact
Judges and liberals may take God out of
the government, but they cannot take God
out of the people as long as we have the
Constitution. In the future, please do not
imply the phrase "separation of church
and state" is from the Constitution. It is a
discredit to this great document and to
your knowledge of our Christian heritage.
Floyd Ford
Crystal River


Fast mall food
A restaurant suggestion: I see the new owners of
the Crystal River Mall would like to have a restau-
rant. How about a Friendly's Restaurant or Burger
King and McDonald's? It sure would be good to
have it in the mall.


Lost money clip
I'm hoping someone found a gold metal money
clip with a gator head on it at the Publix in Ho-
mosassa the past couple of days (April 18 or 19).
We'll make it good for you. It's very sentimental.
(Call) 464-0550. Thank you. Appreciate all your help.


Email harassment
To the person who called in about unwanted
emails trying to get them to cease: After trying to
get them to cease for so many times and they're still
getting the emails, wouldn't that maybe be consid-
ered harassment? Maybe they should check on that.


WINDOW
Continued from Page Cl

Kentucky; buy shrubs and
plants that are friends to
Citrus County. Watering a
garden or shrubs during dry
months is okay if not over-
done. Water is precious
here!
I believe we have a lot of
really good people in Citrus
County; we should all band
together and kick the bad
people out!
I believe Gerry Mulligan
and I are the only folks in
Citrus County that use a
turn signal; Paul Mellini
will attest to this for me; I
am not sure Gerry has any-
one who will confirm he
does!
But getting serious I be-
lieve that if the folks in Cit-
rus County government and
local businesses made deci-
sions based on God's princi-
ples we as a county would
make a mark at turning our
local economy around.
Pointing fingers and blam-
ing the state or the federal
government will not get us
anywhere! I believe in the
"we" philosophy, not what is
in it for me!
-Rhonda Lestinsky,
Beverly Hills
M I believe if you are the
last person to use your
blinker when you make a
turn, then I must be the next
to last. This is my pet peeve
with the drivers in Citrus
County
-Barbara Richie
I believe in Citrus
County, all the hard-working


people, the wonderful vol-
unteers, the police and fire
department, and all that
is good about Citrus County.
I believe we have wonderful
places of worship, breath-
taking beauty all around
and genuinely good people
working to make ends meet.
I believe that all of Citrus
County should have a say in
what is going on with our
hospital. The paper states
facts for both sides that are
confusing and conflicting
for everyone. I am tired of
consultants, mediators and
advisers that are costing us
way too much money for no
resolutions. In all the places
I have lived, with small local
hospitals or large metropol-
itan hospitals, I have never
seen or heard of such bick-
ering, accusations and con-
stant battles as we have with
CMH.
It is time for all of us to
say "enough is enough." If
you cannot figure out how to
balance a budget, live
within a budget, treat em-
ployees with respect and
decent salaries, and let the
registered voters decide. If
that isn't enough to scare all
of you into closure and re-
sults, nothing will and we
will all continue to watch
our tax dollars dwindle
away consultant after ad-
viser after this board or
that!
Please, don't let this trav-
esty with our hospital con-
tinue and turn what I
believe in into a continuing
disbelief and distrust
-Joyce Simek
I believe that Dr.
William Dixon is really a


nice guy and that his
columns are simply at-
tempts at political satire.
-Bill Fick, Hernando
I believe that you are
trying to make your fellow
creatures living in this
lovely place to think about
the direction we should fol-
low to keep it as God made
it, truly a Nature Coast.
I believe that the most de-
structive action to this area
would be the attempt to cre-
ate the unneeded; ruinous
to the environment and ru-
inously expensive "Port
Citrus"...
I believe that attention to
our water supply here is
mostly lip service. Citing
homeowners for violating
watering rules is penny-
ante. Where is there action
being taken to provide city
water and sewerage and fire
hydrants to all county resi-
dents? How long can the
present set-up in many
areas in the county of wells
and septic tanks on the
same lot be acceptable to
meet sanitary standards?
All those septic tanks will be
leaching into the aquifer
sooner or later. And then
what?
-Sylvia W Giese
I believe cronyism is
alive and well in Citrus
County and the Chronicle
chooses to ignore it.
-Kim Cloud
I believe in I was the
only one to use directional
signals here saw several
who didn't coming home
from the Crystal River
house this evening.
I believe, if in fact they do
teach driver's education


here, they for some reason
teach everyone to drive in
the left (passing) lane on all
4 lane highways! Virtually
everyone immediately
jumps into the left lane on
U.S. 19, 44, 486, etc. and
stays there, usually travel-
ing slower than the traffic in
the right lane, only moving
right to pass slower cars,
then jumping right back into
the left lane!! It drives me
crazy!
I believe what a lady
wrote in the Chronicle a
couple of months ago. She
said her real estate agent
years ago told here the
"good ol' boys" own every-
thing here, and they want to
keep it all for themselves.
I've found a lot of truth to
that, having watched and
read much in the last few
months. This is true in many
areas, but seems to be espe-
cially true here.
I believe we could eat out
virtually every night in Cit-
rus County, and not run out
of great restaurants.
I believe some of the best
fishing in the U.S. is right
here, but I'll be damned if I
can catch much, although I
always considered myself a
good fisherman my Dad
taught me when I was old
enough to hold a fishing rod.
-Phil Trask, Homosassa
I believe the "Oh, Poor
Me" Syndrome is alive and
well in Citrus County We
have all heard the excuses
for the out-of-work folks,
I've been; laid off, fired,
over qualified, under quali-
fied, underutilized, over uti-
lized, no contracts, no
customers, or whatever else


that caused your unemploy-
ment. Did you seek work
elsewhere? Another county
or state? Or do you sit
around with the "Oh Poor
Me" Syndrome, apply for
unemployment and com-
plain that the economic
downturn is the problem.
Many folks, in my time,
when becoming unem-
ployed, left town or even left
the state to find employment
only to return home when
the job market improved.
"When the going gets tough
the tough gets going."
I believe the FCAT is a
conspiracy against our chil-
dren. The teachers involved
in the current education en-
vironment teach the FCAT
and little else in the months
prior to the test. Why?
Schools and faculty are
graded on the results.
Teacher pay, federal fund-
ing, state funding, teacher
qualifications, school quali-
fications, school board qual-
ifications, are all dependent
on the FCAT test results.
I believe that the neigh-
bors of Three Sisters Spring
s who are now complaining
about the exposure of their
property to visitors of the
springs should not have
bought there in the first
place. It's like buying your
home near an airport and
then complaining about the
noise.
I believe that the veterans
in Citrus County should find
a single venue. If they did
they could elect every politi-
cian in the county.
I believe the retired pop-
ulation in Citrus County is
going to continue to expand


and should eventually take
over the political structure
of the county if they haven't
already We will know when
the over 65 property tax
break passes.
I believe that road con-
struction is a function of in-
convenience as gridlock is a
function of future inaction.
I believe that complaining
about the traffic in Citrus
County means you have no
idea what traffic is.
I believe that clean water,
good fishing, white sand bot-
toms, expansive grass beds,
breeding bass, red fish,
crappie, and other indige-
nous life is the past, present
and future of our county.
I believe that our kids
should be concerned with
their studies and not their
safety
I believe that a lackluster
political environment leads
to a lackluster community
with high taxes, high pollu-
tion and low esteem.
I believe government
should be limited to func-
tions that are closely defined.
I believe the worst thing
that happened to this county
is when the "Times" left
town.
-Richard "Dick"
Callahan, Crystal River
I believe Gerry Mulli-
gan has a friend named
Alice and they both live in
Wonderland.
-Kim Cloud


Gerry Mulligan is the
publisher of the Chronicle.
His email address is
gmulligan@chronicle
online. com.


SOUND
OFF
CALL
563-0579


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, APRIL 29, 2012 C3






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I. "X .
Associated Press
In this Aug. 6, 2009, file photo, Rielle Hunter, center, is es-
corted into the Terry Sanford Federal Building and Court-
house in Raleigh, N.C. Former Sen. John Edwards had an
extramarital affair with Hunter that he said ended in 2006.


W :.. -
In this July 20, 2001, file photo, Hilary Rosen, president and
CEO of the Recording Industry Association of America, ap-
pears before the House Energy and Commerce Subcommit-
tee on Telecommunications and the Internet on Capitol Hill
in Washington. The Democratic consultant was just another
talking head on cable TV until she questioned Ann Romney's
standing to talk about the economic challenges facing
women, saying the GOP candidate's wife had "never worked
a day in her life."


Continued from Page Cl


Bristol Palin landed a
spot on "Dancing With the
Stars," among other media
gigs. There's a rich tradition
of relatives glomming on to
the political spotlight
Example: Billy Carter
Jimmy Carter's little
brother cultivated the
image of a Southern good
old boy when Carter ran for
president in 1976 and used
it to land a job promoting
Billy Beer
PANDER TO
ANIMAL LOVERS
Candidates know just
about any animal is good for


some votes. The pets of all
recent presidents have
achieved minor celebrity
status.
Examples: Bo Obama, the
president's Portuguese
water dog, has appeared in
campaign ads.
George H.W Bush argued
during the 1992 campaign
that "my dog Millie knows
more about foreign affairs
than these two bozos," re-
ferring to Democratic nomi-
nee Bill Clinton and
running mate Gore.
Millie got a book deal.
START A
LOVE TRIANGLE
Candidates will try hard
to keep their extramarital
exploits a secret, but there's
a long list of "other women"


who've ended up in the
glare.
Examples: Rielle Hunter
The mistress to John Ed-
wards during his unsuccess-
ful campaign for the
Democratic nomination in
2008 is just one of the latest
to resist, and later embrace,
the public attention. After
initially hiding out, she went
on Oprah Winfrey's show
and posed for photos for GQ.
Now she's on the witness
list at Edwards' ongoing
trial.
Donna Rice. In 1987,
Democratic presidential
candidate Gary Hart
taunted reporters to check
up on his conduct after ru-
mors surfaced that he was
having an affair. Soon a


photo emerged of Hart sit-
ting on a dock with Rice on
his lap near a yacht named
Monkey Business. That
ended Hart's campaign.
Rice became a
spokesmodel for No Ex-
cuses jeans, said she turned
down big bucks from Play-
boy and went on to serve as
an advocate for children's
online safety.
NOT RECOMMENDED
Candidates trying to look
tough on crime love nothing
better than to find a new
heinous criminal to kick
around.
Example: Willie Horton.
In 1988, Republican opera-
tives went after Democratic
presidential candidate
Michael Dukakis with ads


In this Sept. 27, 2000, file photo Democratic presidential
candidate Vice President Al Gore kisses Iowa retiree
Winifred Skinner, 79, after listening to her talk about how
she struggles with the high costs of prescriptions, as Gore
spoke on his Medicare agenda at a community center in Al-
toona, Iowa. Skinner told Gore she collects discarded cans


to supplement her pension.

displaying a photo of Willie
Horton, a convicted mur-
derer who raped a woman
while out on weekend fur-
lough under a program that
Dukakis had supported as
Massachusetts governor
No one's advocating that
as the pathway to fleeting
fame. But even a small
slipup could do the trick.
When college student


Kolbi Zerbest's cup of yo-
gurt splashed the presi-
dent's pants during his visit
to Colorado this week,
Obama laughed it off and
told Zerbest she had "a good
story to tell."
She did on the "Today"
show
AP Deputy Director of
Polling Jennifer Agiesta
contributed to this report.


___ i~jiL~Lj1"" Li


3
Citrus Hills Information Fiesta


Relay For Life Lecanto


I I I


9
BHRA Card & Game Party


10
United Way Kick Off


Spring Fling Dinner Dance

ACT Moon over Buffalo


The Wine Festival


Fallen Heros Monument
Benefactors Ceremony
Movies in the Park Tangled
Citrus County Gator Club
Golf Tournament
Pet Adoptathon


12
The Wine Festival


Stamp Out Hunger


13 14 15 16 17 18 19
World's Greatest Baby Shower Rays vs. Red Sox Concert Spring Finale Farmer's Market Sheriffs All Hazard Expo
Beverly Hills Civic Association
Golden Citrus Scholar Awards Sports Banquet Beauties & Beast Car Show

Deux Oh Historical Society Hallelujah Girl Drama Production

A Garden Tour
with Historical Overtones
iiiiiiiiiiiiiii ~ iiiiiii iiiiiiii ~ iiiiiiiiiii7iiii


JANUARY
* Citrus Jazz Society Jam
* Manatee Festival
* Keys to Fashion West Citrus Ladies Elks
* Truck and Tractor Pull
* AWinter Wonderland
* CRWC Showtime
* Music in the Park
* Beatles Tribute
* Book Festival
* Concert at the Old Courthouse, The Porch Dogs
* Early Childhood Expo
* West Citrus Elks Fashion Show
* ACT The Kids Left The Dog Died, Now What?
* James Rogers Concert
* Music in the Park Southern Sounds
* Light Shine The Ashley Gang Folk Songs & Florida

FEBRUARY
* Citrus Jazz Jam
STaekwondo Women's Defense Class
* Mow It Dinner Beverly Hills Lions Club
* Best Friend Fest Citrus County Animal Services
* 2012 Festival of Books
* Rotary of Inverness Online and TV Auction
* Country Diamonds Show Beverly Hills Civic Assoc.
* Jr. Achiement Bowl-A-Thon
* Light Shine
* Dollars for Scholars Doo Wop
* Fitness in Citnus begins
* Jazz Valentine Concert
SCrystal Oaks Military Card Party
* Cattle Barons' Ball American Cancer Society
* Yoga Day USA
* CF Performing Adrs Series Cooking With
The Calamari Sisters
* Bartershoppers Singing Valentines
* Citrus Springs Library Book Sale
* Love Your Library Evening
* ACT Moonlight and Magnolias
* St. Patrick's Day Dinner Dance
* Concerned Citizen Commendation Award and Dinner
* West Citrus Elks Book Sale and Flea Market
* Kiwanis Concert Live
* Ozello Chili Cook Off and Craft Show
STricky Tray, CCW of St. Scholastica
* Purple Heart Ceremony
* Citrus Watercolor Show & Sale
SGerman American Club Celebrate Spring
SCelebrity Bartenders & Silent Auction
* Greek Festival
* Runway For Rescues
* Fashion Sweethearts
* Spring Fling Citrus County Craft Council
* Seminarian Dinner & Dance Knights of Columbus
* 8th Annual Kids Fishing Clinic Parks & Recreation
* Blessings in a Backpack
SAcademy of Environmental Science Dinner
* Oscar Night 2012 "Promoting Literacy' SMW Rotary
SAfrican American Read In
*'School'astic Golf Tournament
* Chet Cole Casino Night

MARCH
* Luminary At Nights
SStrawberry Festival
* Red Ribbon Tour of Homes
STricky Tray Crystal Oaks Civic
* Movies in the Park Kung Fu Panda 2
* Manatee Car & Truck Show
* Citrus Jazz Jam
STampa Bay Lightning vs. Ottawa Senators
* Habitat for Humanity Building Dreams
* Encore Ensemble The Last Dance of Dr. Disco
* Trivia Night Kiwanis Central RidgefCryslal River
* Will McLean Music Festival
SFriends of the Library Spring Book Sale


*Jim Blackshear Golf Tournament
* Nature Coast Corvair Car & Truck Show
* Dublin City Ramblers
* B&G 20th Anniversary Birthday Bash/Steak & Steak
* Homosassa Heritage Day
* Nature Coast Civil War Reenactment
* Benefit for Karen Dinner, Dancing, Entertainment
* Military Card Party Beverly Hills Recreation Assoc.
* Concert at the Old Courthouse, Jimmy Crowley
* St. Patrick's Day Dinner Dance
* Blood Drive Honor Larry Nestor
* Fort Cooper Days
* Inverness St Patrick's Day Parade
* Crystal River St. Patrick's Day Parade
* Nature Coast Dragon Boat Festival
* Mutt Strutt Parade
SSt. Patrick's Day Golf Classic
SSt. Paddy's Pot of Gold Card Party and Luncheon
SAll Mopar Car Show
* Crystal River Music in the Park
* Inverness Sertoma Club Golf Tournament
* Spring Book Sale Friends of Homosassa Library
* Scope it Out 5K
STampa Bay Lightening vs. NY Islanders
STeen Stock
* Swing into Spring Fashion Show
* International Food &Arts Festival
* Golf for Meals Citrus County Resource Center
* Steppin Out in Style
* Shrimpa-Palooza
* Withlacoochee Wilderness Canoe and Kayak Rally & Race
* Lakeside Craft Show
* Bluegrass Festival in Hemando
* Citrus County Fair
* ACT Dr. Cook's Garden
* 3rd Annual Spring "Eggstravaganza
* Sugarmill Woods Food Drive
* Floral City Library Friends March Book Sale
* Clean Air Bike Ride
* Bluegrass @ The Blue Lodge
APRIL
* Citrus Jazz Jam
* Jazz Spring Concert
* ACT Dr. Cook's Garden
* Movies in the Park Hop
* Invernes Rotary Golf Tournament
* Homosassa Springs Easter Egg Hunt
* Crystal River Relay For Life
* Citnis Has Talent
* Golf Tournament Vietnam Veterans Gathering
* Bluegrass & Oldlyme Music Festival
STaste of Inverness
* Camp Good Hope Golf Tournament
* Mel Tillis Fishing Tournament
* Floral City Garden Club Annual Plant Sale
* Annual Charity Ball Knights of Columbus
* Central Citrus Rotary Blood Screening
* CF Performing Arts Ballet Folkorico
* Inverness Relay For Life
* When Elvis Came to Town
* Red Eagle Lodge Intertribal Pow-Wow
* American Irish Club Golf Tournament
S2012 Ram Truck Drawing We Care Food Pantry
SMusic in the Park
Kayak Fishing Tournament Inglis Yankeetown Lions
* April Madness Basketball Tournament
* Evening of Elegance Friends of Crystal River
SLight Shine The Florida Dream
* Tampa Bay Rays Senior Prom
* Ozello Adventure Race
* Citrus County Bass Challenge
* Sheriffs Summer Safety Expo
* Black & White Gala Pope John Paul II School
* Day at the Races Tampa Bay Downs Senior Foundation
* Arbor Day Celebration


MAY
* Citrus Hills Information Fiesta
* Lecanto Relay For Life
SFallen Heros Monument Benefactors Ceremony
* Movies in the Park Tangled
SCitrus County Gator Club Golf Tournament
* Pet Adoptathon
* Open Jazz Session
* BHRA Card & Game Party
* United Way Kick Off
* Spring Fling Dinner Dance
*ACT Moon Over Buffalo
* The Wine Festival
* Stamp Out Hunger
SWorld's Greatest Baby Shower
* Golden Citrus Scholar Awards
* Rays vs. Red Sox
* Sports Banquet
* Deux Oh Historical Society
* Concert at the Old Courthouse, Spring Finale
* Farmer's Market Beverly Hills Civic Association
* Winds, Rains or Flames All Hazards Expo
* Beauties & Beast Car Show
* Hallelujah Girl Drama Production
* A Garden Tour with Historical Overtones

JUNE
* Farmer's Market Beverly Hills Civic Association
* Movies in the Park Happy Feet 2
* Boat Drawing
* Cobia Big Fish Tournament
* Military Card Party BHRA
* Rays vs. NY Mets
* Farmer's Market Beverly Hills Civic Association
* Flag Day at Fort Cooper
* Encore Ensemble The Pajama Party Murders
* Seminole Hard Rock Casino Trip
* Homosassa Fireworks & Poker Run
* Citrus Jazz Jam
* Jim Blackshear Memorial Golf Tournament
* 832 K-9's Deputy Dog's Annual Golf Tournament
JULY
* Patriotic Evening
* Fireworks over Kings Bay
* Rays vs. Yankees
* Key Training Center Celebrity Auction
* Key Run For the Money
* Key Center Tdethone
* Family Fun Day Kings Bay Park
* Firecracker 5K
* Beverly Hills Recreation Military Card Party
* Summer Sensations Fashion Show
* Uncle Sam's Scallop Jam
* Rays vs. Indians
* Citrus Community Concert Choir Great Music
for Your Summer Enjoyment
* Movies in the Park Madagascar 2
* Chronicle Political Forum
AUGUST
* Rotary Club of Sugannill Woods Arts and Crafts
* Pregnancy and Family Life Center Military Card Party
* So You Think You Can Dance ULike A Star
* Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Fundraiser Golf Tourney
* Gator Club Kick Off
* Concert at the Courhouse Back 2 School Bash
* Citrus Community Concert Choir Great Music
for Your Summer Enjoyment
*The Other Volumn
* OC5K
* Movies in the Park Shark Tale

SEPTEMBER
* Harvest Moon Craft Show
* Veterans Golf Tournament


Jazz Society Jam Session
* Citrus 20120 Fundraiser
* Rays vs. Yankees
* Save our Waters Week
* Christmas in September
* United Way Kick Off
* Business Women's Alliance Health & Fitness Expo
* Industry Appreciation Luncheon
* Industry Appreciation Week EDC Barbecue
* 832 K-9's Deputy Dog Fundraiser
SFW Post 10087 Golf Outing
* Rays vs. Red Sox
* Friends of the Library Fall Book Sale
* Music on the Square
* CF Professional Development Series
* Two Good Soles
* Matt Curley Memorial Blood Drive
* Barbecue Blast
* Okloberfest German American
* Health & Fitness Expo
* Under One Roof Campaign Auction
* Page it Forward
* Sunset Festival
* Country Western Hoedown Cruise
* Beat the Sheriff Race
* Movies in the Park G-Force

OCTOBER
* Sertoma Oktoberfest
* Bikes and BBQ
* Habitat For Humanity Golf Tournament
* Jazz Jam
* Rails to Trails Bike Ride
Artisans Boutique
* Great American Cooler Festival
* Day of CaringlMake a Difference Day Food Drive
* National Wildlife Refuge Week
* Scarecrow Festival
* West Citrus Elks Arts & Crafts Show
* Cooter Blast
* Harvest lime Festival
* Haunted Tram Ride
* Cooterween
* Greek Festival
. Spike Fitzpatrick Memorial Golf Tourney
* Haunted Halloween
* Herando Heritage Days
* Comedy Night at Citrus Springs
* Swing for a Cure
* Nerieds Military Card Party
* Lakeside Craft Show
* Chamber Business Expo
* Nature Coast All Veterans Reunion
* Citrus Garden Club Shades of Autumn
* Fr. Willie Classic Golf Memorial
*2nd Annual Ford Car & Truck Show
* Car Show for Charity
* We Care Golf Tournament
A Night at the Museum
* Citrus Springs Memorial Library Fall Book Sale
* Jazz Goes to Movies
* Nature Coast Fine Arts and True Crafts Show
SCitrus Haunted" Hills 5K
* Page it Forward
Make a Difference Day
SAuthors Fair
* Robby Brown Memorial Golf Tournament
* CASI Chili Cook Off
* Movie on the Square
* Ladies of the West Citrus Elks Fall Card Party
* Light Shine
* Art Fair and Auction
* Halloween Scramble for Hospice
* Candlelight Vigil
* Fall Fling
* Health & Wellness Fair
* Political Forum


NOVEMBER
* BH Lions Foundation Craft Fair
* InglisfYankeetown Arts and Seafood Festival
* Festival of The Arts
SJazz Society Jam
* Rotary Blood Screening
* Blues & Bar-B-Que
* Veterans Fair
* Veterans Day ParadelMemorial Service
* Veterans Appreciation Show
* Stone Crab Jam
* CCBA Home & Outdoors Show
* Camrh Camp Challenge
* Parade of Trees
* Citrus Stampede Rodeo
* Winter Wonderland Craft Show
* Ozello Arts & Crafts Festival
* Jazz Concert
SFriends of the Homosassa Library Book Sale
* SOS Golf Tournament
*Festival of the Arts Wine Tasting
SVeteran's Appreciation Week
* Annual Christmas Toy Run
* King's Bay 5K Run
* Hospice Tree of Remembrance
* Concert at the Old Courthouse, Jim Hurst
* Inverness Fall Classic
* BFF Society Fashion Show
* Light Shine Dunnellon Concert Singers
* Silver Jubilee Fashion Show
* Precious Paws Fundraiser
*Recycle Day
* Never Forget 5K Run/Walk
SKiwanis Pancake Breakfast
* Cooking for a Cause
* Wish Upon a Child Golf Tournament
* K-9 Karnival
* Cut-a-thon
* Citrus Community Concert Choir's Messiah
* Music in the Park
* Encore Ensemble Win, Lose or Die
DECEMBER
* Sweet Adelines Musical Performance
* Father Christmas Ball
* Fort Cooper State Park Nights of Lights
* Floral City Heritage Days
* Beverly Hills Christmas Parade
* Christmas Craft Show
* CRWC Silver Bells
* Crystal River Christmas Parade
* Jazz Holiday Concert
* Jazz Jam
* Inverness Christmas Parade
SHomosassa Boat Parade
SSugarmill Chorale Christmas Concert
SAirboat Christmas Parade
SCitnis Springs Holiday Parade
* Nutcracker Ballet
* Celebration of Lights
SACT Richard Gilewitz
* Inverness Winter Celebration
* ACT- Halvan Youth Theatre
* Fmsy's Winter Wonderland
SAnnual Holiday Party
* Suncoast Business Masters Auction
* Rotary of Sugarmill Woods Golf Tourmament
* Beverly Hills Recreation Center Military Card Party
* Citrus Springs Rockin the Holiday
* Citus Springs New Year's Eve Ball
* Send Them To Serve Golf Tournament
* IOTATV and Online Auction
* Citrus Community Concert Choirs Messiah
* Make a Smile Happen
* Music in the Park
* Adopt a Christmas Tree
SElvis & Friends
* Encore Ensemble Win, Lose or Die


29


30


Pet Adoptathon

Open Jazz Session


C4 SUNDAY, APRIL 29, 2012


COMMENTARY











BUSINESS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


'Cancer Votes' targets candidates


Local cancer advocate represents

Florida at national volunteer summit


Special to the Chronicle
Local cancer advocate C. Joseph
Bennett Jr, M.D., from Crystal River
recently represented Florida at the
annual volunteer leadership sum-
mit for the American Cancer Soci-
ety Cancer Action Network (ACS
CAN) in St Louis, Mo. He and oth-
ers worked to develop an aware-
ness campaign to present cancer
issues to candidates and the public.
ACS CAN hosts the annual sum-


mit to gather volunteer leaders
from across the country and pre-
pare them to lead grassroots cam-
paigns on federal legislative issues
impacting the fight against cancer
ACS CAN, the advocacy affiliate
of the American Cancer Society, is
the leading cancer advocacy organ-
ization fighting to make cancer a
national priority with lawmakers.
Founded in 2001, ACS CAN has
built a nationwide movement of ad-
vocates who are working to pass leg-


isolation and policies that help fight
cancer a disease that continues
to kill an estimated 1,500 people a
day in the United States.
Bennett has been the State Lead
Ambassador (SLA) in Florida for the
past two years and has championed
ACS CAN's legislative priorities with
both lawmakers and other advocates.
"I am honored to represent
Florida as an advocate in the fight
against cancer," said Dr Bennett
"We know what it will take to make
cancer history As citizen advocates,
we need to take action to make can-
cer a national priority by ensuring
that lawmakers are doing all they
can to support evidence-based policy


and legislative solutions that will
help defeat the disease."
As the Florida SLA, Dr Bennett
works closely with Society and ACS
CAN staff to manage volunteer activ-
ities across the state. Bennett also at-
tends meetings with lawmakers on
ACS CAN's priority legislative issues.
Bennett is a board certified radi-
ation oncologist at the Robert Bois-
soneault Oncology Institute, Past
President of the Citrus County Unit
of the American Cancer Society,
and a member of the Board of Di-
rectors and the Executive Commit-
tee of the Florida Division of the
American Cancer Society.
See Page D2


Economic deployment


Associated Press
Matthew Pizzo, an Air Force veteran who has law and business degrees and wants to find work in financial or business areas, walks down Fifth
Avenue on April 13 in New York. One potential employer, he says, surprised him by saying: "You're a little old to try to start working in the
banking industry." The 29-year-old, he suggested, might be uncomfortable taking orders from a younger boss.

Returning war veterans navigate tough new terrain the job market


SHARON COHEN
AP National Writer
CHICAGO
Matthew Saldana proved him-
self in a world where stress,
danger and life-and-death de-
cisions were routine. He
served one tour in Iraq and a
second in Afghanistan. But the Army vet-
eran is having a harder time back home
navigating a calmer but uncertain terrain -
the job market.
On this spring day, Saldana is roaming the
aisles of a noisy ballroom in the Hilton
Chicago at a Hiring Our Heroes job fair
Dressed smartly in red tie and black suit, he
clutches a leather folder containing his
three-page resume, joining hundreds of
other vets looking for opportunity and a
paycheck.
"It's frustrating trying to get back on
track," the 29-year-old Saldana says, his soft
voice barely audible in the din of the crowd.
"I always thought if I get out the military, I'd
be a step up. That's not what it takes. It's
who you know."
Saldana, who left the Army in 2004, hasn't
worked full time in 18 months. He's scoured
'"help wanted" listings, taken college
courses and earned an emergency medical
technician certificate. But he finds himself
pigeonholed. "What do you come out with
having been an artillery man or in the in-
fantry?" he asks. "The best job you can get
is security. That's not what I want to do for
the rest of my life."
Saldana's dream is to become a Chicago
firefighter he's been on a waiting list five
years. He's survived mostly by working se-
curity; he's a fill-in sub at one company and
also earns a modest on-call fee as a fire-
fighter-EMT in a southern suburb. "I'm
barely pulling through," he says. "I'm
drowning. I need to find something fast."
His predicament is shared by tens of
thousands of Iraq and Afghanistan veterans
facing a rocky transition from the routine
and reliability of military life to the volatil-
ity and limited job prospects of a nation


ON THE NET
Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of
America: www.iava.org
Joining Forces:
www.whitehouse.gov/joiningforces
Hiring Our Heroes:
www.us.chamber.com/hiringourheroes
Military.com: www.military.com
National Energy: www.NESI.biz


emerging from the worst economic crisis
since the Great Depression.
Like many other vets, Saldana misses the
Army's anchors: a sense of camaraderie and
its steady income. "Here," he says, "you've
got to worry about how you're going to find
money to eat and how you're going to pay
the bills."
And like many vets, he's now trying to
find his way in an ultra-tight labor market,
competing with millions of unemployed
people, some with long resumes and proven
records in the civilian workplace. Some vets
face even more hurdles: job-hunting skills
that are rusty after spending months, or
years, in uniform. No college degree. And
little exposure to a business culture that has
its own language and rules.
"We've had to be entrepreneurial and in-
novative and think on the fly and manage
people and logistics ... we know that we
have the skills," says Matthew Colvin, who
advises companies on hiring as a member of
Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America.
"But it's hard to convey our worth a lot of
times because we know it in military terms,
not in civilian terms."
"Sometimes we hide the fact that we're
veterans," adds Colvin, an Air Force vet of
two tours in Afghanistan. "I don't think
that's the way it should be.... We've got more
life experience than the kid coming out of
college or even the guy who's maybe equally
qualified on paper"
Vets aren't the only ones spreading the
we-need-work message. Their plight has at-


tracted powerful support from the White
House and Capitol Hill to Fortune 500 com-
panies, resulting in tax breaks, job fairs and
pledges to hire hundreds of thousands who
served.
Colvin says it's too early to gauge the im-
pact of those efforts some are just getting
under way on a population saddled with
high unemployment. In 2011, the jobless
level for those who've served since Sept. 11,
2001, was 12.1 percent, compared with 8.7
percent for the non-veteran public, accord-
ing to federal statistics. Among men 18 to 24
for the veteran group, it was nearly 2 1/2
times higher: 29.1 percent.
In March, 10.3 percent of post-Sept. 11
vets were out of work. Colvin's group sur-
veyed its own members last month and
found a nearly 17 percent jobless rate. For
those 20 to 24, it was almost 36 percent. Ex-
perts say these numbers are likely to grow
as more troops return from Afghanistan and
hundreds of thousands of people separate
from the military over the next five years.
The anemic economy the very reason
some young people enlisted is consid-
ered the main cause. But military and busi-
ness experts also cite a lack of
understanding among some employers of
post-traumatic stress and a lack of apprecia-
tion for the abilities of returning troops.
"Employers immediately think the trigger
part of the military," says T McCreary, a re-
tired rear admiral and president of Mili-
tary.com. "They don't know or haven't had
exposure to or forget there are a ton of jobs
out there that have almost directly transfer-
able skills heavy equipment operators,
machinists, welders, doctors, nurses, med-
ical technicians, pilots, financial
managers."
That problem is even greater than it was
40 years ago when more management and
company owners had military experience,
he says.
McCreary says some vets also struggle get-
ting jobs at home using their specialized
wartime skills treating the wounded or


. Page A4


Bruce Williams
SMART
MONEY


Goodbye,

paper

statements
DEAR BRUCE: For
many years, I did
business with the
same bank. Then I
changed banks, and along
with my regular accounts,
I transferred an IRA.
One day I realized I had
not received the quarterly
statement. I called the
bank and was told it did
not mail out statements
anymore. I thought it was
required by some law to
send out statements. -
S.R, via email
DEAR S.R.: I am not
aware of any require-
ments other than the
once-a-year statement
that tells how much inter-
est you have received and
the 1099 that has to be
filed with the IRS. Your
old bank may have been
sending you statements,
but an increasing number
of banks are going paper-
less. I'm sure you can sign
up on your bank's website
to view your accounts.
The reality is most peo-
ple don't require and often
don't look at quarterly
statements. In this diffi-
cult banking climate, I'm
sure your bank is cutting
back on the expenses of
printing, paper and
postage. It is much easier
to post information online.
DEAR BRUCE: Several
years ago, I took out a
home equity loan but have
never used the money I
hate to pay it back, as I
like having the deductions
every year for my taxes. I
have thought about maybe
investing this money, but I
wonder what you would
suggest. Pay off the loan
and forget the tax write-
off, or invest that money in
something instead of just
letting it sit there? Rich
in Utah
DEAR RICH: I under-
stand the attraction of see-
ing less money go to the
government, but in most
cases, the cost of the
write-off exceeds the sav-
ings. Assuming you have
the money sitting in a
checking account, when
it's all said and done, it's
likely you will have less
money at the end of the
year
There is no point in
speculating, however Sit
down with your yellow
pad. Figure out how much
you are saving on your
taxes by writing off the in-
terest on this loan, then
compare it to how much
interest you are currently
earning by keeping this
money Your calculator
will give you the correct
answer
If you find you are
ahead of the game by
keeping the proceeds of
your home equity loan,
work with a broker to see
what you might be able to
earn by investing this
money I am sure you will
then be able to make the
right decision.
DEAR BRUCE: We
have most of our savings
in CDs, which are paying
next to nothing, and mu-
tual funds, which are not
performing that well. We
are both retired and in
our early 80s.
Recently, we were con-
tacted by several sales-
people who are trying to
sell us annuities, saying
they are the way to go for
the long haul. They claim
the investment is guaran-
teed and the return is sub-
stantially higher than we
are getting. Reader, via
email
See Page D5





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Business DIGEST


Cortez named
accounting manager
LECANTO -Abelardo
Cortez has
recently been
named ac-
counting
manager at
Hospice of
Citrus
County.
Cortez has Abelardo
25 years of Cortez
experience in Hospice of
accounting. Citrus County. _[?
He is married
with three boys.
Visit Hospice of Citrus ,
County on the Web at
www.hospiceofcitruscounty.org.


CF committee to
meet May 1 in Ocala
The CF Foundation Real Es-
tate Committee will meet at
4:30 p.m. Tuesday, May 1, at
College of Central Florida (CF)
Enterprise Center, Foundation
Office, 3001 S.W. College
Road, Ocala. The purpose is to
discuss general business of the
CF Foundation Real Estate
Committee.
A copy of the agenda will be
available at the meeting. For in-
formation, contact the CF Foun-
dation office, 3001 S.W.
College Road, Ocala, FL
34474.
Business offers
butterfly festival
BELLEVIEW Timberline
Farms plans its 2012 Spring
Butterfly Festival every Satur-
day and Sunday through May
6.
Activities include: live butter-
fly exhibit, butter making, can-
dle making, blacksmith exhibit
and petting zoo.
A portion of the proceeds go
to benefit St. Theresa's Soup
Kitchen, Marion County Juve-
nile Detention Center and Good
Shepherd's Lighthouse.
The farm is at 3200 S.E.
115th St., Belleview. Call 352-
454-4113 for more information.
Hair stylists attend
international meet
The stylists at New Concepts
Hair Salon in Crystal River at-
tended the "Imagine All You
Can Be" styling convention in
Orlando sponsored by Matrix.
The show featured the latest in
hair styles, cutting and coloring



CANCER
Continued from Page D1

At the summit in St. Louis,
Bennett met with his volun-
teer counterparts from all
50 states, along with na-
tional and state ACS CAN
and Society staff, to discuss
and develop legislative
campaign strategies for the
next year
"We look forward to work-
ing with Dr. Bennett over
the coming year to imple-
ment legislative campaigns
in Florida to make cancer a
national priority," said Paul
Hull. "Together we will fight
for increased cancer re-
search funding, better ac-
cess to quality health care
and preventive cancer
screenings and strong to-
bacco control policies both
at the state and federal
level."
Cancer Votes
In addition to learning
about legislative campaign
priorities, Bennett and the


Chronicle Supports Camp Good Hope


Special to the Chronicle
The Citrus County Chronicle was a sponsor of the fourth annual Camp Good Hope Scramble on Saturday, April 14, at
Southern Woods Golf & Country Club in Homosassa. From left are: Chronicle golfers Alan Place, Trina Murphy, Parker
Murphy and John Murphy, who enjoyed a day of golfing fun and camaraderie. Camp Good Hope and Teen Encounter are bi-
annual camps for campers who have experienced the loss of a loved one or friend. Camp Good Hope and Teen Encounter
are supported solely through community donations, corporate sponsorships and grants. Visit Hospice of Citrus County on
the Web at www.hospiceofcitruscounty.org.


techniques demonstrated and
taught by some of the most fa-
mous stylists from around the
world.
New Concepts stylist
Amanda O'Neal said, "attend-
ing a show like this not only
gives us the opportunity to see
other styles and methods for
getting that great look, but this
show provides the opportunity
to actually do those cuts with in-
ternationally famous stylists like
Brian Smith."
For more information about
the show and current styles,
contact New Concepts Hair
Salon at 352-563-0005.
Sunshine Gardens
names director
Sunshine Gardens Crystal
River has named Jeff Scurlock


other volunteers spent time
developing ACS CAN's na-
tionwide electoral cam-
paign, Cancer Votes.
From now through Elec-
tion Day, volunteers in
nearly every congressional
district will inform candi-
dates and the public about
cancer issues in an effort to
make cancer a national
priority.
For more information,
visit www.cancervotes. org.
ACS CAN, the nonprofit,
nonpartisan advocacy affili-
ate of the American Cancer
Society, supports evidence-
based policy and legislative
solutions designed to elimi-
nate cancer as a major
health problem.
ACS CAN works to en-
courage elected officials
and candidates to make
cancer a top national prior-
ity. ACS CAN gives ordinary
people extraordinary power
to fight cancer with the
training and tools they need
to make their voices heard.
For information, visit
www.acscan.org.


as its director of marketing.
Scurlock has resided in Cit-
rus County for more than 16
years and has worked in the
health care industry his entire
career with experience in coun-
seling, home respiratory, and
assisted living.
Scurlock has been in market-


ing and administrative roles of
assisted living and knows the
importance of putting the needs
of each resident first.
"After meeting with Mr. Hilger
(owner of Sunshine Gardens), I
was so excited about becoming
a member of the Sunshine Gar-
dens' team," said Scurlock.


"You would be hard pressed to
find anyone who cares about
doing the right thing and provid-
ing excellent care more than
Bob and Jackie Hilger, and our
Crystal River Administrator
Marcey Mast. I love working
with seniors, and especially
helping families who have a


BUSINESS DIGEST
Submit information via
email to newsdesk@
chronicleonline.com or
fax to 352-563-3280,
attn: Business Digest.
The Chronicle reserves
the right to edit notices.
High-resolution photos
will be considered for
publication. Images
taken with most
cellphone cameras do
not reproduce well.
Publication on a
specific date or in color
cannot be guaranteed.
Submissions about
specific prices of
products or sales
events are considered
advertising and are not
eligible for Business
Digest.

loved one with memory
impairment.
"The most rewarding part of
my job is seeing the relief on
the faces of family members
when they see how well loved
and cared for their loved one
is."
Sunshine
Gardens
Crystal River
is at 311 N.E.
Fourth Ave.,
Crystal River,
behind the
Walgreens on
the corner of
State Road Jeff
44 and U.S. Scurlock
19. Sunshine Sunshine
GardensGardens
Gardens Crystal River.
Crystal River
will provide specialized care to
those with all types of demen-
tia.
For information about Sun-
shine Gardens Crystal River or
for help regarding Alzheimer's,
call the facility at 352-563-0235
or visit www.sgwseniors.com.


/ /
'- *

Beverly Hills
Card Club
will host a
Card and Game Party
* Wednesday, May 9th 12 Noon


Bring your friends, cards and/or .-
games and enjoy a brownie sundae
(other desserts available] with coffee or tea.

\ Duplicate Bridge will also be
available with reservations.

Tickets are $6.00 per person
and will be sold at 4
Central Ridge Community Center
77 Civic Circle, Beverly Hills
7:30 a.m.till 7:00 p.m.
Light lunch available for a fee

For information call 746-4882 or 746-3636
1W. U.

AN- N -, *


5th JYnnual

J7tfhlete of the ear

Sports ,J.wards BTanquet

Thursday May 17th
Reception 5:00pm 6:00pm
Awards Ceremony 6:00pm 8:00 PM
College of Central Florida Citrus Campus


FLORIDA U Ee -M







Citrus County
Health Department ...


Tickets are $20 and are available at
The Citrus County Chronicle offices
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River
,..,or more information call: 352-563-6363


Fhoraidl City's
Garden Cluh iand Heritage Coincil
)1 oILItd1V i|e 1t
A (atrden Tour with Historical Overtones
in. lIin.i art, music and chocolate-tasting

S Sattuirdaiy.ly NI h 19
1 ^ ; 10:00 4:(00 r

Su dan~ 1l, 1av )Ot i
1:00 4:00

V I i.,k -,



A --





ADVANCE TICKETS- 2 -21, -4f1I
DAY OF TOUR: Floral Ci,.1 CmrniuniTv House
8670 E. Orange Avenue in the Town Center


www.floralcilygardenclub.com www.floralcityhc.org


D2 SUNDAY, APRIL 29, 2012


BUSINESS


S I


h!


I





Promotional information provided by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce


numberr connection
28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


D3

SUNDAY
APRIL 29, 2012


Sponsors make Awards Dinner great


We would like to thank our sponsors and
supporters of the Chamber Annual Awards
Dinner on Friday, April 20, at Citrus Hills
Golf & Country Club.
Speakeasy Sponsor
Off the Cuff... and On the Fly
Table Sponsors
0 Center State Bank
0 Hospice of Citrus County
0 Powers Protection
0 Citrus County Chronicle
0 Mike Scott Plumbing
0 Angelic Air
0 Insight Credit Union
Bootleg Sponsor
Economic Development Council


Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center
Auction Donors
Powers Protection
Angelic Air
Don & Sue Mayo
River Safaris
New Concepts International Hair
Salon
Sky View Golf & Country Club
Key Training Center
Specialty Gems
WRGO 102.7 FM
Skyview Golf& Country Club
Larry Rooks
Hernando Heritage Council
Insight Credit Union


Chamber staffer recognized
As the Chamber's 2012 Awards season
ends, there is a recognition the staff of the
Chamber would like to give to one of our
own: Tobey Phillips.
Our Special Events Coordinator has
been instrumental in producing over 50
events for or supported by the Chamber.
Her organizational skills and attention to
detail raised the bar of success for events
that touched thousands of people and busi-
nesses in Citrus County over the past year
As she moves on in her career to accept
a new job, the staff and Board of Directors
wish to say "Thank you, Tobey! Job well
done!"


The Snyder Pharmacy


The Synder Pharmacy, at 102 E. Highland Blvd. in Inverness, specializes in compounding medications for various pharmaceutical needs, in-
cluding veterinary, bio-identical hormone replacement, dermatology, erectile dysfunction and many others, with their niche lying in topical
pain relief. Pictured above is the Synder Pharmacy staff at their recent ribbon cutting with the following Chamber Ambassadors: Tom Cor-
coran, LifeCare of Citrus County; Dennis Pfeiffer, Orkin Pest Control; Kim Baxter, Cadence Bank; Nicholle Fernandez, Coldwell Banker Next
Generation; Jennifer Duca, Comfort Keepers. For more information, please call 352-341-1212 or visit their website at www.snydercenter.com.


Workshop for entrepreneurs

in Citrus County on May 15

dA tO o Business Development Center at UNF in
Are you ready to grow Citrus County. The content for this work-
0 n iSe i shop is pulled from "Hire Your First Em-
m tO ployee," a book by small business expert
Rhonda Abrams. Ms. Abrams has advised,
small business owners? mentored and consulted entrepreneurs
Snd small business owners since 1986.
The Citrus County Business Resource An experienced entrepreneur herself,
Alliance Partners are presenting the work- Abrams has started three successful com-
shop "Hire your first Employee" from 5:30 panies, including a small business con-
to 8 p.m. Tuesday, May 15, at the College of sulting firm. Her experience gives her a
Central Florida Learning Center at 3800 S. strong real-life understanding of the chal-
Lecanto Highway in Lecanto. The cost is lenges facing entrepreneurs.
$15 per person for members of: Chamber, Currently, she is the founder and CEO of
EDC, SBDC and SCORE; $20 per person The Planning Shop, a company focused on
for general public: includes book to be providing entrepreneurs with high quality
used in the workshop. information and tools for developing suc-
This workshop is designed for self-em- cessful business plans.
played entrepreneurs who are ready to We'd like to thank our sponsors, Quick-
hire their first employee. Attendees will books Assist and HR Solutions in Tandem,
receive step-by-step guidance on finding for supporting our training efforts and
employees, how much to pay, navigating Economic Development in Citrus County.
red tape like payroll taxes and benefits, To register online, please visit "events"
and becoming the boss. The registration page, www.citrusedc.com. To register by
fee includes a book to be used in the work- phone or email, contact Matthew at 352-
shop. To ensure delivery by the workshop 795-2000 or matthew@citruscounty
date, pre-registration is highly recom- chamber.com. Veterans: You maybe able to
mended as soon as possible. attend this workshop free of charge. Go to
The featured presenter is Mike Orlito, http://vetsfastlaunch.org/coupon-signup/to
certified business analyst for the Small request a coupon to bring to the seminar





CITRUS COUNTY

FACEBOOK USERS |
We know you like us, so now "LIKE" us on Facebook!
Use your smartphone to scan the QR code. It will take you to the Citrus County
Chamber of Commerce's Facebook page.
Don't have a smartphone? Visit the page at www.facebook.com/CitrusChamber.
Visit the website at www.citruscountychamber.com.


May Chamber


Membership


Luncheon


Don't miss our guest
speaker!
The monthly Chamber
Membership Luncheon
will be Friday, May 11, at
Citrus Hills Golf & Country
Club. This event is spon-
sored by Superior Resi-
dences of Lecanto and
networking starts at 11:30
a.m., with lunch immedi-
ately following.
For additional informa-
tion about Superior Resi-
dences of Lecanto, please
visit their website www.
superioralf.com or call


352-746-5483.
Our guest speaker will
be professional speaker
and author Beth Ramsay,
who will present her pro-
gram "Working and Playing
Well with Others."
Her program focuses on
how to navigate people's
personalities and how to
change your interactions to
be a better business person
and leader.
To make your reserva-
tion, please visit www.cit-
rus countychamber.com or
call 352-795-3149.


Ambassador

Spotlight


Mike Buchanan is the
President of Excel Printing
in Crystal River.
Originally from St. Peters-
burg, he has been a resident
of Citrus County since 1990.
Mike enjoys fishing, bowl-
ing, kayaking, and anything
else outdoors!
Buchanan worked in pro-
fessional baseball for 17
years and was a member of
the Professional Bowlers
Tour for 16 years.
He has been a Chamber
Ambassador since 2012, and
previously served as an Am-
bassador from 1991-1996.


Chamber

After-Hours

Networking

Mixer-

May 10

Please join us Thursday,
May 10, at High Octane Sa-
loon for a Chamber
After-Hours Networking
Mixer from 5 to 7 p.m. at
1590 S. Suncoast Blvd. in
Homosassa.
High Octane offers live
entertainment, comedy club
programs, billiard tables,
nightly drink specials, and
so much more!
Bring your business cards
and mingle with business
professionals like yourself.
For more information
about High Octane's hours
and entertainment schedule,
visit their website at www.
highoctanesaloon.com.
For more information
about this event, call the
Chamber at 352-795-3149.


Shred papers, CDs, DVDs May 5


Document shredding

event in Homosassa
Businesses and residents of the Ho-
mosassa area will have the opportunity to
have their sensitive documents and papers
shredded from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday,
May 5, at Love Motorsports on US 19. BizCo
of Citrus County Inc. is providing this serv-
ice, by Crime Stopper Shredding of Marion
and Citrus counties, for your convenience.
Life South, nonprofit partner of BizCo of
Citrus County, will have the Blood Mobile
at this location also, and is asking for your
blood donations. Life South will serve hot
dogs and soft drinks to blood donors.
Almost anything with sensitive data, in-
cluding CDs and DVDs, can be shredded.
Everything that will fit into a 10-ream copy


paper box, 111/2 by 17 1/2 by 10 inches, will
be shredded for a fee of $5.
Business records of any kind should
never just be tossed into the trash or recy-
cling bin where they can become a windfall
for identity-theft criminals. All business
records containing names, personal infor-
mation and/or account numbers, which
have no further use, should be shredded.
BizCo of Citrus County Inc. is a not-for-
profit cooperative of business professionals
who have specialized knowledge in the 15
essential areas that make a business suc-
cessful. BizCo of Citrus County Inc. exists to
help businesses in Citrus County. Whether
you are starting a new business, or are al-
ready in business but need to plan the next
step to make your business more successful,
BizCo of Citrus County Inc. can assist you.
For more information, call 352-563-0985,
or visit www.bizcoteamcitrus.com.





D4 SUNDAY, APRIL 29, 2012


DEPLOYMENT
Continued from Page Dl

driving big rigs, for instance
- because they don't have
the medical certification or
commercial drivers' li-
censes required in some
states.
Case in point
Eric Smith is a case in
point. In congressional tes-
timony last year, the former
Navy corpsman and two-
tour Iraq vet detailed his
high-pressure experience
as a combat medic, heading
a team that monitored a 20-
bed intensive care unit. But
he couldn't find a medical
job when he returned.
"In the civilian world, my
military education and
training did not translate
because I didn't have a
piece of paperwork saying
so," he said. "The resume
that I thought would put me
ahead of the pack actually
put me behind."
Smith, who estimated the
Navy spent more than $1
million to train him, de-
scribed a desperate search
to eke out a living, seeking
out part-time jobs as a bar-
tender and mail sorter,
working as a day laborer,
volunteering to be a test pa-
tient in drug studies.
He's now working on his
EMT certification at a crim-
inal justice academy in Vir-
ginia and has a job offer,
according to the Iraq and
Afghanistan vets' group.
Joining Forces
Those kinds of stories
have turned the spotlight on
vets and accomplished
something rare in Washing-
ton bipartisanship.
Last year, Democrats and
Republicans overwhelm-
ingly supported a measure
that President Barack
Obama signed into law that
provides tax credits to busi-
nesses hiring vets. It allows
for up to $5,600 for each vet-
eran unemployed longer
than six months and as
much as $9,600 for those
with service-related disabil-
ities out of work that same
length of time.
First lady Michelle
Obama, along with the vice
president's wife, Jill Biden,
recently marked the year
anniversary of their own
campaign, Joining Forces,
to help vets and their
spouses, especially with em-
ployment. Mrs. Obama also
has made a new push for
hiring in and around mili-
tary bases; her program an-
nounced in April it has
lined up commitments for
more than 15,000 jobs in the
coming years, most in tele-
marketing and customer
support companies.
Private sector
The private sector has
stepped in, too.


BUSINESS


m4


Associated Press
First lady Michelle Obama addresses the audience of high school girls from military fami-
lies April 12 from the stage at Naval Air Station Jacksonville, Fla. Mrs. Obama visited Naval
Air Station Jacksonville as part of the one-year anniversary of her Joining Forces program,
which aims to help veterans and their families, especially with employment. Mrs. Obama
also has made a new push for hiring in and around military bases; her program announced
in April it has lined up commitments for more than 15,000 jobs in the coming years, most
in telemarketing and customer support companies.


Some are small ventures.
For example, Ray Sizer, co-
founder of National Energy
Solutions in Levittown, Pa.,
an energy efficient lighting
and electrical contractor,
says hiring vets is a major
priority and he hopes to add
10 or 15 for large projects
now lined up.
Sizer, a second-genera-
tion Navy vet, points out
Levittown, a planned subur-
ban community about 20
miles from Philadelphia,
"was built on (World War II)
veterans returning home.
They all had opportunity.
Now they're coming home
to what opportunity?
There's hardly any"
On a much larger scale,
the U.S. Chamber of Com-
merce has established the
Hiring Our Heroes program,
sponsoring about 150 job
fairs around the nation,
working closely with about
two dozen major employers,
as well as thousands of
smaller companies.
In March, the chamber,
partnering with Capital
One, announced a campaign
to hire a half million veter-
ans and military spouses by
the end of 2014. Several
companies have already
committed to adding more
than 10,000.
Kevin Schmiegel, a Ma-
rine vet who founded and
heads the program, says
many veterans return to
communities where they
have families and support
systems, but where opportu-
nities are scarce. "Most
folks leaving the military
are really making a decision
of the heart rather than go
where the jobs are," he says.
That's especially hard on
younger vets who enlisted
straight from high school
and have little or no work


history. "A large majority
are going into the job mar-
ket with their eyes closed,"
he says. "We need to help
them make informed deci-
sions" so they know where
there are growth industries.
Schmiegel says human re-
source managers and re-
cruiters also need to be
better educated to under-
stand most vets with post-
traumatic stress can function
fine in the workplace.
A 2010 poll conducted by
the Society for Human Re-
source Management found
46 percent of those sur-
veyed thought PTSD or
other mental health issues
could be a challenge when
hiring people with military
experience.
That survey, of 429 human
resource managers, found
60 percent felt the same way
about transferring military
skills to the civilian
workplace.
Tough search
Caleb Wohlford never ex-
pected that problem. He'd
been a cargo specialist in
Iraq and worked for a card-
board company before de-
ploying, so he figured he'd
settle into factory work back
home in Kokomo, Ind.
In two years, he found just
one job in construction -
but that ended last October
when business dried up.
After six months of unem-
ployment, an aunt told him
about an opening at her fac-
tory He's set to start next
week, operating a forklift.
"I honestly didn't think it
would be this difficult,"
Wohlford says. "When you
get out of the military, they
tell you there are all these
people out there begging to
give you a job (because
you're a vet). There's not any-


body You're in the same race
as everybody else.... It's mis-
erable being out of work."
The timing of his offer
couldn't be better. Wohlford
says his unemployment had
expired, his bills were
mounting and he and his
wife were stretching her in-
come from selling cosmetics
from home to support six
kids, ages 7 to 12. They also
had no health insurance.
"It's an amazing relief,"
Wohlford says. "I almost
can't wait to take my kids to
the eye doctor. Now it won't
be so much of a burden."
Wohlford 's success came
after he'd applied for more
than 100 jobs. He couldn't
even get rehired at his old
factory, though he says he
left on good terms. "I didn't
think they owed me that
job," he says. "But I don't
see how I couldn't meet the
requirements. I don't see
how anyone could better
meet the requirements."
He's grateful, too, for the
new opportunity, knowing
his family connection was
crucial. "I got lucky," he


says. "I knew somebody in
the right place."
That big break
Marcus Washington is
hoping for his break, having
returned from Iraq last fall
after his third tour.
While scouting out poten-
tial employers at the Chicago
job fair, he confessed that
after being in the Army
much of the last 11 years,
looking for work is "some-
what intimidating.... Military
experience should count for
something. If you weigh it on
a scale, it should be the same
as a college degree."
After one tour in Iraq,
Washington, 30, became a
prison guard in Arkansas,
but didn't like the atmos-
phere, so he re-enlisted, he
says, partly because of the
regular salary
Washington says he's tak-
ing job tips from his fiance,
a human resources man-
ager, but it takes some ad-
justment. "When you trade
your combat boots for a shirt
and tie and you hope some-
one hires you, it's hard con-
vincing them and," he says,
"it's hard convincing myself
that I can compete for a
job."
Unprepared civilian
Matthew Pizzo has the
confidence, but it hasn't
made a difference yet.
He enlisted at 17 he
was scheduled to report for
basic training on Sept. 11,
2001 and when he fin-
ished his Air Force duty in
Iraq, he earned a bachelor's
degree in international
business at the University of
Colorado. He started look-
ing for work before gradua-
tion but didn't know how to
write a good resume or how
to network.
"I never got any training
on how the civilian world
operates," he says. "Nothing
prepared me." The military
has an extensive transition
assistance program to
smooth the way out of the
military, but Pizzo says
when he left in 2005, it of-
fered little guidance. De-
spite improvements, some
vets still believe more needs
to be done.
Acting on a professor's


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

suggestion, Pizzo enrolled
in New York Law School
and graduated last May, im-
mediately scoping out legal,
business and financial
firms. He had military train-
ing. He'd handled stressful
situations, managed proj-
ects and operated with lim-
ited resources. He had two
degrees. He figured that
was a good foundation for a
promising career.
Some 75 resumes later,
he's still looking. Busi-
nesses, he says, see his cre-
dentials and conclude: '"It
would be risky to assume
you could apply those skills
in an office setting."'
One potential employer,
he says, surprised him by
saying: "'You're a little old to
try to start working in the
banking industry"' The 29-
year-old, he suggested, might
be uncomfortable taking or-
ders from a younger boss.
Pizzo senses trepidation,
too, from prospective
bosses, who may be leery of
his wartime experience. "I
think they're probably con-
cerned, or at least it's in the
back of people's minds that
I won't be able operate in
their landscape, maybe be-
cause of things I've seen."
Pizzo figures he'd have a
better shot if he'd gone the
traditional college-work
route, and made connec-
tions along the way "It
would be rare to find five
people on a base who know
five people on Wall Street,"
he says.
When he recently lobbied
in Washington with other
members of Iraq and
Afghanistan Veterans of
America, a colonel told him
companies are eager to hire
veterans and mentioned
one financial firm. Coinci-
dentally, Pizzo had already
applied there. When he
came home, he had a rejec-
tion letter.
Pizzo presses on, certain
he has much to offer.
"Whoever gives me the
opportunity," he says, "will
hit the jackpot."
Sharon Cohen is a
Chicago-based national
writer for The Associated
Press. She can be reached
atfeatures@ap. org.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



MONEY
Continued from Page D1

DEAR READER: If you
are a regular reader of my
column, you know I am not,
under ordinary circum-
stances, a fan of annuities.
Considering your age, I
would be reluctant to sug-
gest these investment
vehicles.
Would you be content
with purchasing a contract
that would pay during your
lifetime and then disap-
pear? Many annuities also
have penalties for early
withdrawal, so if for some
reason you need the funds,
you have to pay for the priv-
ilege of getting to your own
money
It seems to me you could
achieve a decent return in
many other areas. I would
keep looking.
DEAR BRUCE: While I
was going through my filing
cabinet at home, I saw some
receipts and wondered, why
do I have these? How long
should I keep receipts hav-
ing to do with the upkeep of
my house, like plumbing re-
pairs, electrical upgrades,
etc.? Are these important
receipts? WY, via email
DEAR WY: What to save
and what not to save: It's an
eternal question. Most re-


BUSINESS


ceipts can be destroyed
after three years. I keep tax
records a bit longer than
that.
As for home repair re-
ceipts, the cost of capital im-
provements can be
deducted from profits when
real estate is sold, so you
should keep all receipts for
those kinds of projects.
Capital improvements
would include such things
as adding a room, or build-
ing a new driveway in a dif-
ferent location. If the work
is not a capital improve-
ment, it has no effect on
taxes when property is sold.
So if you have receipts for
the paint you bought to re-
paint the dining room, toss
them.
If you are planning to sell
your home and you have put
on a new roof, for example,
or updated the wiring in
part of the house, it might be
worthwhile to keep docu-
mentation that gives the po-
tential buyer an idea of
when things were updated.
DEAR BRUCE: My
daughter has been in the
process of getting a divorce
for two years. It's not be-
cause of her soon-to-be ex-
husband, but her attorney
His office has been ill-pre-
pared and asks for continu-
ances.
Because this has been
strung along and she was


If it's too good to be true, then it's a

bad idea to go any further.


spending more and more
money, she fired the attor-
ney Now he is suing her for
$6,500.
Is there anyone to whom
she can report this negli-
gence? She also believes he
has been giving information
to her husband's lawyer, be-
cause they have information
that could have come only
from her attorney Is there
anything she can do? T.P,
via email
DEAR TP: It seems to me
there is more to this story
than meets the eye.
Your daughter should
confront her former attor-
ney about the information
she thinks he has provided
to the opposing attorney
She also should contact
the ethics committee of the
local bar association, tell
them her side and get their
opinion on whether her at-
torney has acted unethically
in divulging possibly confi-
dential information and in
dragging out the
proceedings.
DEAR BRUCE: Our chil-
dren are having a tough time
in public school. We have no
debt, including no mortgage,
and we make about $100,000
a year. We have looked into


sending our two kids to pri-
vate school. It's going to cost
a substantial amount of
money
We thought about getting
a mortgage on our home to
help cover the costs but at
the same time investing that
money, using only what we
need at the time and hoping
to come out with a little
extra in the end. What do
you think? Reader, via
email
DEAR READER: Is it re-
ally that necessary to send
your kids to a private school
that requires you to get an
additional mortgage? As de-
sirable as the private school
may be, in my view, it would
be imprudent to borrow
money to pay for it.
I would not go out and put
my house in hock the way
you have described. I'd
think about this long and
hard before I made the
commitment.
DEAR BRUCE: I re-
ceived a job offer from a
supposed company in the
United Kingdom.
They asked me to receive
checks from a company in
the United Kingdom, de-
posit the checks into my ac-
count here in the United


States, mail them a check
back (after I take out my
commission) and so forth.
Is this one of those "too
good to be true" scenarios?
- PR., Michigan
DEAR PR.: Dozens of
fraudulent schemes are float-
ing around all the time. This
is just another scenario in
which you get a check, take a
portion and then mail your
own check back to the issuer
I'm sure the check you
would receive is bad, mean-
ing then you would have a
bad check in your bank
while they have a good
check from you.
If it's too good to be true,
then it's a bad idea to go any
further
Check out the company
on the Internet. I'm sure you
will find all kinds of post-
ings describing this com-
pany as fraudulent.
Tear up the "job offer"
and throw it away
Everyone should be leery
of this type of arrangement,
since fraud is almost always
involved.
DEAR BRUCE: My eld-
erly father-in-law has been
living with us since his wife
passed away
He is wondering if the
will they had together is
now valid for just him.
It does read that every-
thing goes to the surviving
spouse.


SUNDAY, APRIL 29, 2012 D5


Does the will have to be
probated? Reader, via
email
DEAR READER: You
didn't mention what assets
were involved in the estate.
The overwhelming likeli-
hood is there will be no fed-
eral or state taxes unless
this is a huge estate.
If that's the case, it must
be probated.
Your father-in-law should
have a new will drawn, even
if the other one provides for
alternate beneficiaries.
The will should describe
how any remaining real es-
tate and personal property,
etc., will be distributed.
It is so much cleaner to do
this ahead of time than to
try and sort it out after
someone passes away
Time is of the essence.



Send questions to
bruce@brucewilliams. corn
or to Smart Money, PO. Box
7150, Hudson, FL 34674.
Questions ofgeneral
interest will be answered
in future columns. Owing to
the volume ofmail,
personal replies cannot be
provided. The Bruce
Williams Radio Show can
now be heard 24/7 via the
Internet and on iTunes at
www. ta radio. com.


CITRUS COUNTY




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loved and preserved
throughout the world
now and forever.
Sacred Heart of
Jesus, pray for us,
worker of miracles,
pray for us, St. Jude,
helper of the
hopeless, pray for us.
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9 times a day for
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$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
Paid for Junk Vehicles,
J.W. 352-228-9645
$$ CASH PAID $$
For Junk or wrecked
Cars/Trucks, $300 & UP
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL
Appls. Riding Mowers,
Scrap Metal, AC Unit
cell -352-270-4087



DACSHUNDS NEED
HOMES
Older dogs 3-6 yrs old)
need homes. Families
combined, health and
economic stress
cannot care for these
loving pets.
(352) 419-6298
FREE TO LOVING
HOMES ONLYMl VIII


#1 Employment source is









www.chronicleonline.com


mill. U pick up in Floral
City. 201-7305
FREE-FREE-FREE-FREE
CERAMIC MOLDS
MUST TAKE ALL. FLO-
RAL CITY AREA CALL
352-726-4788 FOR DI-
RECTIONS.
KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Savage Pays top $$$.
352-628-4144
MULCH
1.5 yards, you pick up
(352) 628-2483
ROOSTER
1 yr old
free to good home
(352) 341-0351
TAKING ALL
DONATIONS,CLOTHINGBAB
Y
STUFF, PURSES,SHOES,F
URNITURE,ECT.
PLEASE CALL JAMIE @
586-9754.THANK YOU



Apple I Phone
black, left corner
glass shattered
Wal Mart area,
Inverness, REWARD
(352) 726-6234
Black & White
Dashound,6 yo male
last seen 4/23 Near
Turkey Oak & Holiday
Crystal River
(352) 422-7381
Black Min. Schnauzer
Needs surgery
Name Leo
Pine Ridge Area
(352) 746-5019
CHIHUAHUA
Older blind black
w/tan male last seen
sat 4/21 on Seven Rivers
Farm St Crystal River
(352) 795-1277
DARK RED SUN ADULT
TRICYCLE lost in vicinity
of Melody Mobile
Home Pk, REWARD for
info.leading to location
(352) 212-5764
GE Camera
Red digital, left at
Elegant Nails, irre-
placeable memories,
Please return & reward
(352) 634-0370
Lost
Female Chihuahua
Fawn & White
16 yrs. old, bet. Green
Acres and W. Holi-
day(352) 476-8340






REWARD $1000.
No Questions ask.
Min Pin Female 10 lbs
name Zoey, Needs
meds. last seen Sun 8/7
Holiday Dr off Turkey
Oak Crystal River
(352)257-9546400-1519
White Bichon, Male
answers to
Winston or Big
Pine Ridge Estates
REWARD (352) 527-1482
805-905-9919
805-907-1119



Keeshound??
Must call to Identify
Indepence Hwy
Inverness
(352) 637-4179


approx 2 to 3 months old
gray w/yellow shadows
wearing pink collar
w/ rhinestones
(352) 621-0341
Young Golden Lab mix
male found near Publix
in Crystal River call
animal shelter.



BELLY DANCE AEROBICS
$7/Class, WED. 6P-7P
1925 S. E. US 19, Crystal
River (352) 503-7591
Huge discounts when
you buy 2 types of
advertising! 120 com-
munity newspapers,
32 websites, 26 daily
newspapers. Call
now to diversify your
advertising with Ad-
vertising Networks of
Florida
(866)742-1373

PRAYER
TO ST JUDE
May the Sacred
Heart Of Jesus be
adored, glorified,
loved and preserved
throughout the world
now and forever.
Sacred Heart of
Jesus, pray for us,
worker of miracles,
pray for us, St. Jude,
helper of the
hopeless, pray for us.
Say this prayer
9 times a day for
by the 8th day
your prayer will be
answered.
Publication must be
promised.
SB

Tupperware
Consultant Fran Smith
Is Back, 352-746-3652



2 Tickets to the Players
Championship, TPC,
Sawgrass, Friday, 5/11
Includes parking
Asking $125.
(352) 527-4910



Kiz "R" RUSS
Preschool

Is looking for Hard
working dependable
employees FT & PT
Certified Only
Apply Within
307 Zephyr Street
Inverness

TEACHER
Fulltime, Exp. Req.
CDA Preferred
TADPOLES EARLY
LEARNING
(352) 560-4222




STAFF
ACCOUNTANT

Seeking a qualified
individual who posses
excellent organiza-
tional skills. Proficient
in QuickBooks,
Accounting,
Accounts Payable
/Receivable & Excel
Call for more info
352-854-6557 x 13
DFWP/EEO


HAIR STYLIST
to take over clientele,
salary paid while in
training. Must have
experience.
Flexible hours.
Call Diane
352-302-9251




Cert./Lic CNA
Homosassa Area
352-382-1039







Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966




#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)

Avante
At Inverness
is currently looking for
INTERNAL ADMISSION
COORDINATOR
Qualified Canidates
must have
Knowledge of
Medicare, Medicaid
and other Insurances
Must have a
Bachelors Degree
and a minimum of
5 years experience in
long term care.
Knowledge of health-
care regulatory
standards is preferred
Please aply online at
Avantecenters.com
or email Resume to:
mdaniels@
avantecenters.com

DIETARY COOK/
DIETARY AIDE
Cook for 125 Bed
Facility, experience
preferred. Inquire at:
700 SE 8th Avenue
Crystal River, 34429
DFWP, EOE

Exp. Medical Asst
FT For Busy Medical
Office, 3 yrs Exp. req.
Fax resume to Fax
(352) 564-4222
Call (352) 564-0444

F/T CNA's

Shifts: 7a-3p & 3p-1 lp
For Assistant Living
Facility. Paid by
experience, benefits
avail, aft 60 days.
Vac. accrued after
90 days. Apply in
person @ Brentwood
Retirement Comm.
1900 W.Alpha Ct
Lecanto Fl.
DFWP/EOE


Hospital RN'S
Needed
MS/Tele ICU ER Float
WWW.
nurse-temps.com
352-344-9828

LPN
Full-time 7-3
We are expanding
our Nursing Services
Looking for
experienced nurse
leaders to join our
exciting team.
7-3 shift available
Excellent benefits
Applv in Person:
ARBOR TRAIL REHAB
611 Turner Camp Rd.
Inverness, FL Or Email
resume to: atdon@
southernLTC.com
An EEO/AA Employer
M/F/V/D

MARKETER
Health Care Co. is
seeking a Marketer
interested in profes-
sional & financial
growth & who also
possess the following
credentials.
Marketing
Experience, Positive
Attitude Good
Communication
Skills, Honesty &
Integrity.Self Confi-
dence & Motivation.
Those interested
individuals meeting
the above credentials
Please submit
resume to PO Box
2498 Inverness Fl
34451 or fax
352-726-2864

MEDICAL ASSIST.
Full time position for
front/back office for
FP Office by CMH.
Fax Resume:
(352) 726-2808

MEDICAL BILLING
TRAINEES NEEDED
Train to become a
Medical Office Assis-
tant! No Experience
needed! Job Training
& Local Placement
assistance. HS
Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)374-7294

Medical Office
Needs People
With Experience in
Insurances, Nursing,
and Computers.
SEND RESUME TO:
Citrus Co. Chronicle
Blind Box 1769M
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River
Florida, 34429

P.T. Tech
Part-time position
open for a physical
therapy clinic.
Experience preferred.
Please fax resumes
to (352) 726-7582.

RUN'S

Immediate Need
for non medicare
Home Visits,
Womb care/IV
INTERIM HEALTH CARE
(352) 637-3111


COMMUNITY
COORDINATOR
Mature individual with
interpersonal com-
munication skills and
working knowledge
of Microsoft
Office programs.
Must have demon-
strated work history
and ability to work
with individuals and
groups. Coordinates
& schedules events,
flexible to respond
24/7 via radio/cell in
the event of an emer-
gency. Benefits in-
clude medical and
401K. Apply in per-
son at Spruce Creek
Preserve SR 200 see
Julie. Deadline for
application will be
Friday, May 4, 2012.


Key Training
Center

has positions
available in group
home home setting.
Assist adults with
disabilities in daily liv-
ing skills. HS Diploma/
GED required
Apply in person at
5399 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy., Lecanto FL
34461 E.O.E.'


Staff Accountant
Experienced.
Bookkeeping, payroll
Please Send Resume:
Citrus Co. Chronicle
Blind Box 1772P
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River,
Florida 34429


Breakfast/Lunch
Server & Exp.
Sauteed Chef
For high volume
restaurant. Exp. only
need apply. Call for
appt. 352-503-6853

SERVERS
For upscale restaurant
Must be experienced,
neat, professional
and have great
customer service skills
Apply In Person at
2100 N Terra Vista
Blvd. Hernando. or
Phone (352) 746-6727
To make an appt.




"HUGE
OPPORTUNITY"
New company coming
to the area, looking for
3 Professional Sales
people
w/management skills..
Six figure Income.Call
410-202-2324
Advertising Sales
$1,500 a wk. Comm.
Caliber, a very exciting
program. 352-428-9664

RETAIL SALES
Citrus Co. For $$
Motivated person.
Positive attitude,
strong customer
service. Some
weekend shifts
Send Resume to
Citrus Co. Chronicle
Blind Box #1771P
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd Crystal River
Florida, 34429


SSALES POSITION
No Exp. needed, will
train.Strong personal
skill req.(352)410-6927



ALUMINUM
WELDER/
FABRICATOR
Experienced Aluminum
Welder with fabrication
skills. Press brake
experience a plus.
352-637-0645
Apply Now, 12 Drivers
Needed Top 5% Pay
2Mos. CDL Class A Driv-
ing Exp. (877)258-8782
www.meltontruck.com
AUTO
COLLISION TECH
352-726-2139 or
637-2258 Aft. 5 pm
CARPENTER
Experience in all phases
of carpentry, remodeling,
framing necessary.
HS Diploma/GED
Valid DL&Reliable Trans.
Call 637-4629
Fax resume 637-3258
Drivers
Knight has a steady &
Refrigerated freight.
Annual salary $45K to
$60K. Flexible
hometime. Modern
trucks! CDL-A, 3 months
current OTR expereince
800-414-9569
www.drivekniaht.com
IRRIGATION





920 E. Ray StrJ .{.e]et


SINGLE COPY

NEWSPAPER ROUTE

AVAILABLE.
There is an immediate opportunity for a single
copy independent contractor to service racks
and businesses in the Citrus County area.


V Early Morning

Hours


V Need reliable

vehicle


V Must be 18

years old


- [^^^^ I UT I~lfrTTu :iTT pigi[IJ 'i~Unf is^ -^^^

^ iThe CitrusCuntye Chroncle




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


0 %I FO 6 O T HI S'
FIRT EA1JATOYUUINEANEFJE


rJ









RECYCLE
YOUR OLD CAR


Come See
What LOVE Can
Do For You!


.2+ .. ... .. .. ... ....


*On approved credit. Must finance with AHFC. 1) 36 Month closed end lease 12,000 miles per year with approved credit, plus tax, tag, 1st payment, $4000 cash or trade equity and lease fees excess milage penalty
is 20 cents per mile. Limited to in stock vehicles only, all options are at additional price. Residual values: Civic $12043.50, Accord $13081.50, Pilot $16689.60. Pictures for illustration purposes only,
all prices plus tax, tag, state fees and $499 administrative fee. Dealer installed options additional cost, in stock units only. All vehicles subject to prior sale. Applies to in-stock units. Offers expire 4/30/12.


D6 SUNDAY, APRIL 29, 2012


.. RECEIVE






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Class A FlatBed
Driver's $$$
Home every weekend,
Run S.E. US Requires 1
YR OTR F.B. Exp. & pay
UP TO .39/mile call
800-572-5489 x 227
SunBElt Transport, LLC.
NEW TO TRUCKING?
Your new career starts
now! *0 Tuition Cost*No
Credit Check* Great
Pay & Benefits, Short
employment commit-
ment required
call (866)297-8916
www.ioinCRST.com
SEPTIC TRUCK
DRIVER
A-Able Septic is now ac-
cepting applications for a
septic truck driver. Re-
quirements: Class A CDL
with Tanker End., current
DOT Phy, clean driving
record, ability to lift 150
lbs. Full time, some
weekends, some OT,
DFWP EOE Pick up an
application at 2190 N
Crede Ave, C.R. Tues-
day through Thursday
9am to 2pm.




25 Driver Trainees
Needed Now!
at Schneider National
Earn $750 per week!
No experience
needed! Local CDL
Training! Job ready in
15 days!
(888)368-1964

CAREGIVERS
NEEDED
All Shifts No Exp.
Necessary Apply At
HOME INSTEAD
SENIOR CARE
4224 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Lecanto

FLORAL DESIGNER
Exp. only! Needed
for Holiday & possi-
ble P/T. 352-726-9666

Front Desk
Receptionist
& Locker Room
Attendant/
Housekeeper
For Upscale
Spa & Fitness Center
APPLY IN PERSON

2125 W Skyview
Crossing, Hernando.

NOW HIRING
Entry-level to upper
mgmt. Exp. not req'd.
Full training provided.
Medical and 401(k)
offered. $550-$800 a
week. Call Barbara,
352.436.4460


Sincere Animal/Ranch
Caretaker.
Live on property 1
person, Rm & board +
352-220-1296
SUMMER WORK
GREAT PAY!
Immed FT/PT
openings, customer
sales/serv, will train,
conditions apply, all
ages 17+, Call ASAP!
352-508-4577

TECHNICIAN
NEEDED

Must have 2 yrs. exp.
working with animals
and people.
Send Resume to
Citrus Co. Chronicle
Blind Box 1770P
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River
Florida 34429

The City of
Dunnellon
is accepting
applications for City
Beach Attendant.
Job includes en-
forcement of beach
rules & regulations,
maintaining
restrooms & picnic
areas, & collection of
daily admission fees.
Part-time, seasonal
position, May to
September, $7.67 per
hour. Job description
& required applica-
tion available at
City Hall, 20750 River
Drive, Dunnellon, FL.
(352) 465-8500
DFWP/EOE
TRUSS BUILDERS

Experienced preferred.
call Bruce Component
Systems, Inc.
(352) 628-0522 Ext 15




Administrative
Assistant

avg. 3 days wk. finan-
cial planning firm,
Inverness, upbeat
multitasker, detail ori-
ented, proficient
w/Word, Excel, Inter-
net, & dictation,
bckgrd ck, $10toS12
hr. email resume to:
Kingcfpl@
tampabay.rr.com

Outside Cart
Attendant
Flexible hours,
golf knowledge a +
Apply at
Southern Woods
Pro Shop


Hardworking,depend-
able, must pass
background check,
customer oriented,
reliable transportation
Call 302-6418 dfwp



#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)



AIRLINES ARE HIRING -
Train for hands on
Aviation Maintenance
Career. FAA approved
program.
Financial aid if qualified
Housing Available.
CALL Aviation Institute
Of Maintenance.
(866)314-3769



#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)
Attend College
Online from Home
*Medical, *Business,
*Paralegal,
*Accounting,
*Criminal Justice. Job
placement assis-
tance. Computer
available. Financial
Aid if qualified. Call
888-203-3179
www.CenturaOnline
.com
Can You Dig It?
We will train, certify
and provide lifetime
assistant landing work.
Hiring in Florida. Start
digging as a heavy
equipment operator
866-362-6497



TAYLORCOLLEGE



NE6R ffiW


2 WEEK
PREP COURSES!
*ALF ADMINISTRATOR
$300.
*EKG TECH $475.
* NURSING ASST. $475.
*PHLEBOTOMY $475.

tavlorcolleae.edu
(352) 245-4119
FB, twitter, you tube


r NOWZ -

ENROLLING
I FOR SPRING
2012 CLASSES
BARBERR
*rCOSMETOLOGY
W-FACIAL
wIFULL SPECIALTY
INSTRUCTOR
*MANICURE/Nall Ext
MASSAGE THERAPY

BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
NEW PORT RICHEY
/SPRING HILL
727-848-8415
352-263-2744





Pizza/Sub Biz
inside Cony. Store all
equip NEW. Ready to
go only $22K
(352) 637-1488





E Commerce
Business For Sale,
Incl. full training + an
est E Commerce
Store A generous
income for Anyone,
Any age, Any Ability
$12K (813) 445-7600

FOR SALE
BLIND CLEANING
and RETAIL SALES
20 Years Reputation
$2,995 Dr. Mini Blinds
Call (352) 637-1900



Collect ble


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
,i i # ,i,# ,i,# ,


CLASSIFIED





STERLING SILVER-
COLLECTOR BUYING
STERLING SILVER
FLATWARE & ITEMS.
KEN 352-601-7074




DRYER whirlpool white
looks good works great
100.00 352 503 7365
Kenmore Electric stove,
dishwasher and small
apartment size
refrigerator all in good
working order $125.
(352) 382-1830
Kenmore Washer &
Whirlpool Dryer
Works great
$200.
(352) 637-0397
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR, washers
dryers,FREE pick up
352-564-8179
WANTED DEAD
OR ALIVE
Washers & Dryers
(352) 209-5135




COMPUTER PRINTER
STAND OR T.V. STAND
28 high. 20 wide. 15 deep
In good condition $15.00
352-726-0686
HEAVY STEEL DESK
22x42has 5 drawers
needs paint $40
352-586-8657




10" Craftsman Radial
Arm Saw,
w/ stand, used 1 day,
New $1,600 Asking $500
10" Cut Off Saw, $50.
Framing Saw $100
(352) 621-1207
Delta Band Saw 14"
w/stand $200. DeWalt
Comp. mitter saw 10"
w/stand $150. Crafts-
man 10" band saw
w/stand $85.
many handtools (352)
419-7368/601-5119




SONY 13 INCH T.V
WITH REMOTE Very
good condition
$20.00 o.b.o.
352-726-0686




2 COMPUTERS
Towers from $70up.
complete systems
$110 (352) 586-6891


2 yrs. old Dell
Laptop Computer,
used very little. Inspiron
Windows 7, 4Gig, 13"
screen & camera asking
$350
Memorex DVD Player
w/ remote like new $25.
Call 352-419-5362
AUTO DC TO AC
CONVERTER FOR
COMPUTER, ETC.
12VDCto 120VAC 140
Watts. $20 352 726 9983
COMPUTER
DELL Desktop, windows,
XP, office $100.
Compaq Laptop win-
dows XP $75 /352
628-6806 228-0568
DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
KINGSTON PC3200
DDR RAM 512MB 184
pin, in box, $23 860-2475




MUST SELL
2 sm pick ups
2 forklifts
27' cabin cruiser
Many other items
Make offers
352-563-1033
352-601-0819




CRAFTSMAN TABLE
SAW 10 inch with 2 feet
metal side table top
extenders, roller stand.
$200.00 352-726-6845




CONCRETE LAWN OR-
NAMENT Japanese lan-
tern $45 352-860-0444




2 Twin beds
Headboards
w/cottage grey shell
pattren w/metal
frames, matt & bx
springs $700. Wooden
Computer desk
w/hutch top $200.
(352) 527-7885
50's Style Dining Table,
black & white chrome,
+ 4 blk./white chrome
vinyl chairs 1 leaf, ex-
cel. cond. $450 obo
+ acutal 50's yellow &
chrome dinette set
w/ 2 yellow vinyl and
chrome chairs $50.
(414) 379-3390
Bedroom set
3 pcs. Queen sz sleigh,
Lg triple decker &
mirror, 3 drawer night
stand, walnut $600.
like new(352) 746-9747


BEDROOM SET
F/Q Bed, Dresser
w/mirror,Chest,
Nightstand. $650.00
obo.(352)563-1692 or
ewaldu51@embarqmail.c
om
Broyhill Victorian
Loveseat, $100
(352) 613-5594
COMFORTS OF HOME
USED FURNITURE www.
comfortsofhomeused
furniture.com 795-0121
Couch & loveseat
set $350.
(352) 613-5594
COUCH
Traditional, Hunter
Green Brocadeapprox
90"long, Exc Cond. $100
(352) 382-4559
Entertainment Center
Lighted 10' wide 79'tall
incl TV stand area
46" W45" T $1500
(352) 527-7885
Flex Steel Sofa 80"
burgundy/grn leaf like
new $1500 2 matching
chairs available
(352) 527-7885
LAZY BOY Dble sofa
bed, hunter's green
$250. 60"x42" Wooden
Oval pedestal table
w/4 chrs. $500
(352) 527-7885
LIFT CHAIR
Brown, good condition
$175 obo
(352) 341-8417
Loveseat
sage.$200 brown
recliner $100. Lovely Kit
set 4 chairs on coasters
$200. wood baby
dressing table $75.
wooden end tables $35
ea. All show rm cond
(352) 795-0363
Matching Sofa &
Loveseat, brown tweed,
good condition,
New coffee & end
tables $325. obo
352-302-8265
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
352-628-0808
Sofa & Love Seat
good cond. $250.
Red Mahogany
Queen anne, end
tables & coffee table
$150. (352) 228-1325
SOFA, LOVESEAT
Light pattern, Striped
$300 set, Glass coffee
table, light wood, $250
obo. (352) 613-7941
TV 27 "
good condition
$50 (352) 613-7941
TWO END TABLES
$125, WALL UNITS,
Call for $$$$$$$$$
(352) 613-7941


S
Two extr
twin Ma
Like New $
(352) 794
USED QUE
TRESS SET
non-smoki
352-257-5722
USED TWIN
Clean, non
$75.00 352-25
deta



Craftsman H
Electric Lani
Edger
Craftsman
rear whee
propelled law
$125. (352)
(352) 34
Garden
Murry 20hpV
eng.48" mulc
$400 f
(352) 302
Weed Ea
Riding mowe
season, tun
ready mow a
obo (765)




PINE RI
Fri. Sat. & Su
Estate & Mo
5356 N. Red



Pine Ridge
Fri Sat Su
'94 Lebarro
round pe
sweeper, pia
LR furniture,
exercise m
variety tool:
4658 W. Hai




245/65 R17 H
Only asking
pair! (352)5


215/70 R16 N
Only asking$
pair! (352)5


R18 Nice
Only asking$
pair! (352)5

2 BARSTOC
BOO LOOKING
RUST CO
SEATS 30"to
50.00 pr. 4
12 x 2
Top of th
Above Groi
Excellent C
$800 4
(352) 46


SUNDAY, APRIL 29, 2012 D7



a long u eram ce
ttress's Chest NEW $20.
100. obo 24 Gal. Rubbermaid
14-3672 Action packed storage
EN MAT- box new $15.
Clean and (352) 382-1154
er $100. BANTAMS 4 mixed
2 for details bantams 9 weeks old $8.
352-563-2288
MATT SET
i-smoker Bevel Glass Mirror
57 5722 for 20x32in oak frame
ils 25x45 $8.
13" Sylvania color TV
Sw/remote $25.
(352) 746-9399
BIKE STAND Can hold
eavy Duty 3 bikes on each side
idscape $20.00 352-344-2321
$50 Boat, RV, Car
22" large Storage Indoor $75.
els, self month (352) 637-1739
wn mower Car Maintenance
1-3991 Ramp set $20.
1-3991 H.P. Office Jet-
Tractor All in one #7210
V-twin B&S Printer/fax/scanner
ching deck $55.(352) 382-1154
firm.
2-6069 0000000
CEMETERY PLOTS
iter One 2 cemetery plots and
ar, new last vaults for sale in The
ned up & Fountains Memorial Park
asking $450 Valor Section,
318-1156 Homosassa, FL $5,000
or best offer.
352-368-2358
GALLONS OF PAINT
assorted colors,left over
IDGE from several projects
un. 8a-3p $25.00 352-344-2321
vying Sale Janome Memory Craft
Ribbon Pt. 4800 Sewing Machine
Koala Cub, bleached
oak cabinet $425.
Kenmore Model 1913
e/ HUGE Zigzag Sewing Machine
n 8-7p & Cabinet $75
ne $1999. (352) 615-4037
n, yard (352) 341-3991
no, 56" TV MANS BROWN SUIT
patio furn. New w/tags size 46 pants
machines, can be hemmed to any
s & equip. length pants $15.00
cienda Dr 352-382-7329
MULCH FOR YOUR
GARDEN OR BUSHES
ONLY 20.00 U LOAD
YOUR PICK UP
!!!!!!!!!!!!! 464 0316
High tread!! NOKIA 2760 Cell Phone
$60 for the works on t-mobile, like
551-1810 new in box with cords and
book $35, 860-2475
ORIGINAL SCRUBBING
Nice tread!! BUBBLES BANK
$60 for the Collectors.bank in original
551-1 10. box and new condition.
$50.00 352-382-7329
- 245/45 SHARP "POWER PET"
tcd!! UPRIGHT VACUUM
$60 for the CLEANER LIKE NEW -
551-1810 Bagless. $30.00
-~~~~~~~~ 352-382-4911
OLS BAM- SIEMANS OVER THE EAR
NG PLUSH HEARING AID
LORED Good Condition
top of seat Includes batteries
64 0316 Paid $825. Asking $400
24 ft. (352) 382-3879
he Line SPARE "DONUT" TIRE
und Pool, 2006 Mere. Grand Marq.
conditionn Donut spare. Never
3bo Used. $25.00
5-3175 352-489-6840


Tansti &y


ROB SCREENING
Repairs Rescreen, Front
Entries, Garage, Sliders
Free Est. 352-835-2020



SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Washer &
Dryers, Free Pick Up
352-564-8179



Blind Factory
by Joanne We custom
make all types. Best
prices anywhere! Hwy
44 &CR 491. 746-1998





YOU'LL v THIS!
Assisted
Living,Secured
unit, Memory care for
Alzheimer/Dementia
Crystal Gem Manor
10845 W. Gem St.
Crystal River, FIl 34428
352-794-7601


LIC. & EXP. CNA
Will Care For You
Cook, Clean & Daily
Needs (352) 249-7451
Loving Adult Care
Home (SL 6906450)
Alzheimer/Dementia
no prob 352-503-7052
Senior In Home Care
Giver energetic local
resident Seeking to as-
sist Senior with personal
Care, companionship
Transportation, shopp-
ing assistance, meal
preparation and light
housekeeping.
Avail Mon. thru. Fri.
8a-4p Crystal River
& surrounding areas.
Please Contact Julie at
352-794-6571, 538-0408


ROGERS Construction
All Construction
sm jobs Free Est (352)
637-4373 CRC1326872




SHADY VIEW CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518




Clean Ups &
Clean Outs
(352) 220-9190




AFFORDABLE
COMPUTER SERV.
(352) 341-4150

Computer Problems?
Sr. Discount-In home
service. John Warken
(352) 503-4137

COMPUTER TUTOR!!
Do you have a computer
and wish you knew how
to use it more? Need to
know how to do navigate
the web better or manage
a social network profile?
Private lessons in my
home office (Homosassa)
or yours (Citrus County)
727-614-2685
DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469




Bianchi Concrete
inc.com ins.lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-
Sidewalks. Pool deck
repair/stain 257-0078


Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River rock
reseals & repairs. 352
364-2120/410-7383
FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, staining &
Garage Firs. Recession
Prices! 352-527-1097
ROB'S MASONRY
& CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs Tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554



All AROUND TRACTOR
Landcleanring,Hauling,
Site Prep, Driveways.
Lic. & Ins. 352- 795-5755



COUNTY WIDE DRY-
WALL -25 ys exp lic2875.
all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Pop Corn Removal
352-302-6838



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Plasma TV installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
ANNIE'S ELECTRIC
Husband & Wife
Team.(352) 341-5952
EC-13002696
BRIGHT ELECTRICAL
Res./Comm. Lic & Ins.
$50.hr. ECO001303
352-302-2366
CREATION ELECTRIC:
Full service contractor.
Residential & commer-
cial specialist. Service
changes, large or small
repairs, Spa hookups &
more. Lic/ins.
352-427-4216.
DUN-RITE Elect
since '78/ Free Est.
licEC 13002699
352- 726-2907


A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002
BOB BROWN'S
Fence & Landscaping
352-795-0188/220-3194
ROCKY'S FENCING
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
352 422-7279 *k



ALUMINUM
STRUCTURES
5" & 6" Seamless Gutters
Free Estimates, Lic &
Ins. (352) 563-2977
GUTTER CLEANING
FREE ESTIMATES
352-362-5187



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Plasma TV installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
Andrew Joehl
Handyman.
Gen/Maint/Repairs
Pressure cleaning.
Lawns/Gutters. No job
too small!Reli able ,ins.
0256271 352-465-9201

Affordable Handyman
FAST
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST
V AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *


ABC Painting &
Handyman Services.
Low rates Free Est.
Dale 352-586-8129
Affordable Handyman
V FAST
AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. .Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *A
Remodeling, Additions,
Doors, Windows, Tile
work. Lic.#CRC1330081
Free Est. (352)949-2292





* THIS OUT!
AC & HEAT PUMPS
FREE Estimate & 2nd
Opinion, 10yr. warr
on ALL Parts, Great
prices, ALL the time.
352-400-4945
Lic #CAC027361




Citrus Cleaning
Tecm
Remsonbe
Rates. Stacy
527-2279

Citrus Cleaning
Tecm
Remsonabe
Rates. Stacy
527-2279

Citrus Cleaning
Team Reasonable
Rates. Stacy 527-2279
MAID TO ORDER
House Cleaning *
(352) 586-9125
have vacuum will travel


Bath

The Tile Man
Bathroom remodel
Specializing in handi-
cap. Lie/Ins. #2441.
352-634-1584




All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
All AROUND TRACTOR
L ,,.,. I., I
,- III .. ) I : l W-- :
352-795-5755






CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, curbing,
flocrete. River rock
reseals & repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
Florida Sitescapes, LLC
FREE Est: Yard Clean Up
Mowing, and MORE
CALL 352-201-7374
RIVENBARK LAWN &
LANDSCAPE.
Best Prices in town for
all your lawn care
needs!! (352) 464-3566

SPRINKLER JOE'S
Complete Sys. Check
$25, Landscape
Design 352-212-2596




A + LAWN CARE
& LANDSCAPING
Affordable & Reliable
(352) 228-0421
AFFORDABLE Lawn care
CUTS STARTING AT $20
WE DO ITALLI!!
wCALL 352-228-7320


All 'n'1 Lawncare
property maintence
Full serv$55/mo.lic/ins
Rick 352-201-5193
Charlie 352-634-1070
ATTENTION! Snow Birds
Need your Lawn Maint.
Call Mowing & More...
352-419-6287, Lic/Ins.
Florida Sitescapes, LLC
FREE est: Yard Clean Up
Mowing, and MORE
Call 352.201.7374
JUSTIN LAWN CARE
Hedge & Tree Trimming
Lic. (352) 476-3985
Lawncare N More
Floral City to Bev. Hills
mow, trim haul $20 up
(352) 726-9570
MEAGHERS LAWN CARE
AND PINK MINI DUMP
Tree Service, Stump
Grinding, Free Est.
(352) 341-3478




AT YOUR HOME
Mower, Parts Service &
Repair.Visit our store@
1332 SE Hy 19 220-4244




A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs, trash,
lawn maint. furn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
ALL OF CITRUS
CLEAN UPS CLEAN OUTS
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790




Chris Satchell Painting
ASAP
30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996


A- I George Swedlige
Painting/press cleaning
Int/Ext. texture/drywall
repair (352) 794-0400
ABC Painting &
Handyman Services,
Low rates, Free Est.
Dale 352-586-8129
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998



CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
ABC Painting &
Handy an Services,
low rates Free Est.
Dale 352-586-8129
Pic PICARD'S Pressure
Cleaning & Painting
352-341-3300



Attention Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers are
required by state law
to include their state
license number in all
advertisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious that
you may be contact-
ing an unlicensed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For questions
about business
licensing, please call
your city or county gov-
ernment offices.


SPRINKLER JOE'S
Complete Sys. Check
$25, Landscape
Design 352-212-2596




A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest Rates
Free est.(352)860-1452
All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
DOUBLE J Tree Serv.
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
RWRIGHT Tree Service
Tree removal & trimming.
Ins. & Lic.# 0256879
352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree Serv
Trim, Shape & Remove
Lic/Ins Free Est.
352-628-2825



344-2556, Richard
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!




Your'\\orild firl

Nted 11 *jol
or l
qualified
employee?


This area's
#1
employment
source!


Classifieds
li sssssms


GENERAC I lt
Stand Alone ti\
Generator

Thomas Electric. LLC
Residential/Commercial Service
Generac Centurion
Guardian Generators
Factory Authorized Technicians
ER0015377

352-6* -124


DRERVETCLANN


L WILL CONSTRUCTION gl
rt 352-628-2291 cl
preventDryerFiresNow.com


POOL-TEC
REPAIRS EQUIPMENT
PUMPS FILTERS
HEAT PUMPS
SALT SYSTEMS

RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL
32 YEARS EXPERIENCE

9 CALL ALAN 422-6956
STATE LICENSE #CPCO51584





BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Day,
We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over"Your Old One!!!
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!
Call now for a FREE
In-Home Estimate

1-866-585-8827
BATHFITTER.COM
000BCSU


AAA ROOFING
Call the aka usees"
Free Written Estimate

:$100OFF
Any Re-Roof
Must present coupon at time contract is signed
Lic./Ins. CCCO57537 oooB08Y








When mopping

isn't enough call...

Mr. Tile Cleaner
Showers Floors Lanais
Pools & Pavers
Cleaning & Sealing
-i *Grout Painting
r, '4 \ Residential &
r Commercial

586-1816 746-9868


We Clean Windows and a Whole tot Morel
Window Cleaning
Window Tinting
Pressure Washing
Gutter Cleaning

I FREE ESTIMATES
352-683-0093
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/springhill


IREMODEL


U Decorative Mulch
NEW & Stones
COW Top Soil
S DELIVERY AVAILABLE
WE HAVE SPECIAL
PRICES AVAILABLE!


NURSERY
6658 W. GULF To LAKE HWY.
CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429
(352) 302-6436




* New Landscapes


* One Time Cuts

* Free Estimates




Rivenbark Lawn
(5 & Landscape
(352) 464-3566


COPES POOL
AND PAVER LLC
YOUR INTERLOCKING BRICK PAVER SPECIALIST
Build your new pool now and
be ready for next summer!
Refinish your pool during the cooler months.

352-400-3188







D8 SUNDAY,APRIL 29, 2012


SWIVEL DESK CHAIR
With adjustable
arms,back and height.
Good condition.
$20.00 352-382-7329
TOW DOLLY AND
SMALL REFRIGERA-
TOR Like new tow dolly
$700
Like new small
refrigerator $50 Call
352-207-3512
TRUCK BED
EXTENDER Fits Nissan
Frontier $75.
352-344-2321
TRUCK TOOL
BOX,Diamond plate
aluminum for truckbed.
$150. 352-726-6845
TRUCK TOOLBOX
black,fits Nissan Frontier
$30. 352-344-2321
WOOD FLOORING
Med. Oak-Tongue &
Groove Planks 3" x 3/8"
New in box 25 sq ft $55
352-382-3650



BRUNO POWER LIFT for
Scooter or Wheelchair
Programmed,
Exc Shape $400 obo
352-613-7302 or
352-613-4673
EMWAVE PERSONAL
STRESS RELIEVER BY
HEARTMATH. Like New
$75 352 726 9983
Jazzy Select Elite
Power chair, new never
used cost $3500 new
sell $1500 352 613-6173
MANUAL WHEELCHAIR
WITH FOOTRESTS AND
LEG EXTENTIONS
ONLY 100.00 464 0316












STERLING SILVER-
COLLECTOR BUYING
STERLING SILVER
FLATWARE & ITEMS,
KEN 352-601-7074



#24 JEFF GORDON
ELECTRIC GUITAR,LES
PAUL STYLE PLAYS
GREAT! $75
352-601-6625



ELECTRIC TREADMILL
VERY STABLE doesn't
fold up works fine only
100.00 464 0316
EXERCISE BIKE upright
type stationary, compact
only 75.00 464 0316
Treadmill, Sears
good condition
Paid $600.Asking $250
Stationary Bicycle,
Sears, Never Used $75.
(352) 794-6320



1997 Litespeed Ulti-
mate 58CM Polished Ti-
tanium, Road Bicycle
$900. (352) 726-2645
Basketball Hoop
$35
(352) 613-5594
Browning Superposed
mag 12 gauge, new in
box from early 70's also
presentation case
$2500 obo
(352) 344-1283
CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well pond, ATV
trails Price Reduced
352 795-2027/ 634-4745
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
GOLF CART
Yamaha,
$800 obo
(352) 795-1902
GOLF CLUBS,
LOTS of sets & singles,
equipment, technical
manuals to make
golf clubs $800 obo
(352) 621-3133

GUN & KNIFE
SHOW
BROOKSVILLE
HSC CLUB
Sat. April 28th 9-5p
Sun. April 29th 9a-4p
HERNANDO COUNTY
FAIRGROUNDS
Admission $6.00
(352) 799-3605


SMALL HUNTING
CAMPING AX composite
handle $20, 860-2475
TENT
Outdoor Spirit 18' x
10.5', dome, sleeps 10,
brand new, $100
(352) 563-0106

SWE BUY GUNS
On Site Gun Smithing
(352) 726-5238




18' Enclosed Cargo
side door, rear swing
doors, 4 wheel electric
brakes, good cond
$2800 Bob after 5pm
(352) 860-1106
4X8 UTILITY TRAILER
like new,wire mesh
floor,wood sides,ramp
gate,bought 2011 $575.
352-344-2321

EZ PULL TRAILERS,
New & Used

Utility & Enclosed
BUY, SELL, TRADE
Custom Built, Parts,
Tires, Whis, Repairs,
Trailer Hitches

New 6 x 12 open
utility w/ramp $935
2010 7x18 enclosed
$2595.
2010 8.5 x 20
encl.w/xtra's
$4295

Trailer Tires from
$34.49

Hwy 44 Crystal River
352-564-1299

GULF TO LAKE
TRAILER SALES

Largest Selection &
Lowest Prices.
Offering New & Used
Cargo & utility trailers

Triple Crown Utility TRL
6 x 12 w/new spare
$1050.
6 x 12 Enclosed w/
V nose, rear ramp
door, $1995.

Trailer Tires
starting at $69.95

352-527-0555
Hwy 44, Lecanto


a 1


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966











JUNK MOTORCYCLES
WANTED Will Pay up to
$200 for Unwanted Mo-
torcycle 352-942-3492


STERLING SILVER-
COLLECTOR BUYING
STERLING SILVER
FLATWARE. $1,000 &
UP ON SERVICE FOR 8.
KEN 352-601-7074
TOOLS OF ANY
value, rods, reels,
tackle, collectibles,
hunt equip352 613-2944
WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area.
Condition or Situation.
Call (352) 726-9369



ALPINE COACH 2001,
37', 2 slides, 330 cum-
mins turbo, loaded with
options and includes 18'
add a room. Warranty for
5 years or 80K miles!
$55,000 or BRO, no
trades. 207-852-5926


BEAGLE PUPPIES
$125
Crystal River Area
386-344-4218
386-344-4219
Dachshunds, Mini Long
Hair ,8 wks, H/C CH
Bid. Lines,Choc. Black/
cream shadded Eng.
Cream $300-$500 (352)
795-6870/220-4792
DESIGNER BREED
Shih-Poo, Yorkie -Poo
small non shedding,
intellect puppies $350
to $500 (352) 817-4718
KITTENS & CATS
MANY BREEDS
All neutered, micro chip,
tested, shots some
declawed $85-$150
352-476-6832
Koi and Gold Fish
FOR SALE, Great Prices
ALL SIZES. Call Jean
(352) 634-1783
Shih-Tzu Pups, ACA
starting@ $400. Lots of
colors, Beverly Hills,
FL (352)270-8827
www.aceofpous.net
YORKIE PUPS
5 wks taking deposits
Health certificates,
shots, M & F $700.
Parents 5 lbs
(352) 341-4009



BARN MASTERS
We Build..Horse Stalls
Barns,,Fences..Decks..
Pastures.(352) 257-5677
PIGLETS
Born 2/27,
$50. ea.
954-295-3055
-..


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





Alum. 12-16' Boat
trailer, $800 obo
call for info
(352) 503-2423



'08 BENTLY
20 Ft. Pontoon, 60HP
Merc. 4 str. dbl. bimini,
new trlr. much more.
$11,500 (352) 341-4949
CENTURY
'99, 1901 Bay Boat, 115
HP, Yamaha w/ alum.
trailer, excel. cond. Lots
of extras, stored inside
$8,500 (352) 465-9395
Palm Beach 99
201 white cap C.C. '99
150hp merc. v. low hrs.
hydro steering, hi end
2 rail T-Top, elect box,
T bag, alum trailer, radial
tires, outrigger, down
rigger ready. True
off/Inshore boat 8'5"W
30" free board & more
exc cond.Steal $8995
(352) 563-5628
Palm Beach 99
201 white cap C.C. '99
150hp merc. v. low hrs.
hydro steering, hi end
2 rail T-Top, elect box,
T bag, alum trailer, radial
tires, outrigger, down
rigger ready. True
off/Inshore boat 8'5"
30" free board & more
exc cond.Steal $8995
(352) 563-5628
POONTON 26"
all new carpet, 70 hp
Merc.w/trailer $2000
(352) 464-1128
PROLINE
21' Cuddy, full transom,
w/brack, 150 HP Yam.,
Bimini, VHF, porta pot,
dep. finder, trailer $5K
firm (352) 382-3298
SEYLOR
15ft Center Console,
w/ 48HP Evin. mtr., trail,
Asking $2,100 obo
(352) 476-1113
TROLLER 85
14' 9.9 Yamaha 4 stroke
electric starttrolling
motor, hummingbird
fish finder w/trailer
$1800 bo 352-344-5993


Team Delivery



Opportunity .


Would you like to

deliver newspapers

but don't want to

work 7 days a week?


We are taking applications
for teams to contract a
route.

V Lead contractor must
be 18 yrs of age

V Must have valid driver's
license and insurance



MAKE EXTRA MONEY!

DELIVERING



Swwwchroniceonine corn

Email:
kstewart@chronicleonline.com
or come to
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River for an application.


WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LAKE
MARINE
We Pay CASH For Used
Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck & Fishing
Boats (352)527-0555
boatsupercenter.com





















YACHTSMAN
24' Pontoon. 70 HP Ev.
T/T, cust. trlr, bimini top.
stored inside $3500 incIs
all gear (231) 852-0061




BUY/ SELL AN RV
ONLINE
Best Deals and
Selections. Visit RVT.
corn Classifieds
Thousands of RVs for
Sale by Owner &
Dealer Lisitings www.
RVT.com call
888-260-2043
GULF STREAM 08
32 3 slides, rear. kit.
K bed,50amp, like new
extras $31,500
(352) 726-1906
HITCHHIKER II LS
2008, 3 slides, excel
cond. heat pump, de-
luxe pkg. too many ex-
tras to list $32,000.
Dodge Truck also avail
(636) 209-0308
Holiday Rambler
'98 38' 7.5 gen.super
slide, air lever, a/c susp.
loaded call for details
$41 K (352) 746-9211
I Buy RV'S Steve
Henry, RV World of
Hudson Inc.Since
1974. (888) 674-8376
(727) 514-8875

JAYCO '04
40', 5th whi toy hauler,
generator. slide, fuel
stalon $17,400. like new
Truck Avall For Sale
Local (502) 345-0285
SOUTHWIND
1992 FOR PARTS ONLY
2 airconditioners, 1 yr. old
refrigerator, hot water
heater, commode, re-built
Jasper transmission. Cell
423-292-4275




CAMPER/TRAILER
2010, Sportsman KZ
Hybrid, 19ft, like new
air, full kitch, bath
$8750 (352) 249-6098
Coachman Pop-up
08, 17' furnace,.a/c,
elect, water & propane
sys. 12' awning $4550
obo(352) 726-1303
GULF STREAM
Coach 25 ft. model
24RBL, sips upto 6 gas
& elect appls & heat,
shower/toliet $6,000
(352) 341-1714
I BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
call me 352-201-6945
KZ Toyhauler,07
32' like new, full slide
new tires, Owan Gen.,
gas tank, Lrg living
area separate cargo
$17,200. 352-795-2975
Prowler 02
26' T/T, electric or gas
all essentials incl $3500
obo cell (727) 678-1250
352-795-3729
RV Cruiser Fun '07
TV Body, microwave,
tv, bath w/shower, out
pull out awning/Bar b q
$6k(352) 628-0554
Sandy Oak 55+
1bd. 1 bathNew hot
water heater, furnace,
tub and surroundings
$2k obo See Rose at
Sandy Oaks
SKAMPER
2005 Travel Trailer 26ft
queen bed,toilet,shower,
frig,A/C,heat,Hot water,
slideout,awning,couch,
sleeps 6. $6900. ph
352-746-2172
leave
message
SUNNYBROOK
2005 36ftf, 5th whl,2
slides, kg bedlike
newheated tks, 60
amp service oak cab
$33,400 352-382-3298



Brand New 18" Alloy
Rims, 4 Good year tires
2754/65R18... $650
off Ford Expedition
will also fit a truck..
(352) 344-4384


CLASSIFIED



$$ CASH PAID $$
For Junk or Wrecked
Cars/Trucks.$300 & UP
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not*
CASH PAID $300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars Trucks
& Vans, For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES,
Hwy 19...352 564-8333
CASH PAID FOR JUNK
CARS Any Condition
Up to $500., Free
Towing 352-445-3909
KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Salvage Pays top $$$
352-628-4144
WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
Perfect Cond. or Not
Titled,No title,
No problem. Paying up
to $25K any make,
any model Call A.J.
813-335-3794/531-4298

WE FINANCE *
Consignment USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
AUTOS' FROM $1,500.
US 19 BY AIRPORT
US 44, BY NAPA
Low Payments *
461-4518 & 795-4440
consignmentusa.org




AFFORDABLE
AUTOS & VANS
Everybody Rides
$495 DOWN
$49 PER WEEK
BUY HERE PAY
HERE..
Lots of clean-safe-
dependable rides.
CALL DAN TODAY
(352)5 6 3 -1 902
"WE BUYS CARS
DEAD OR ALIVE"
1675 Suncoast Hwy.
Homosassa Fl.

BUICK
1992 Skylark, runs
good, good tires, $850.
(352) 419-6901
CADILLAC
2008 STS Northstar
system, 30K, still under
warranty. $24,500
352-249-7203
Camaro 97
Z28, 97K mis. T-tops,
exc cond. White with
orang strips $8K obo
352-302-7204
CHEVROLET
2002, Cavalier, 4 DR,
4 Cyl., runs great
looks good $2,275.
352-637-2588
or 845-701-6253
CHEVY
'07, Impala, V6, auto,
ice cold AC, non smok-
ers 100K mi $8,500
(352) 726-3093
FORD TAURUS 2001
AUTO 75K, new tires,
brakes $4200 o/b/o
One owner
352-302-9217

KIA
'02, Sportage,
Asking $2,500,
352-461-4518

KIA SEDONA
06 MINI VAN
Exc Cond, only
39,300 miles, comp.
to dealer prices for
same model w/high
mileage. Original
Owner,new tires,
battery, fuel
cannisterbk-up tv, up
to date maint. full
history $12,000
(352) 637-1527

MERCEDES
'78, 450SL, org. mi. 82K
2 tops, Florida Car, ga-
raged, very clean 8cyl,
auto/gas, beautiful
$13,000 (352) 344-4352
MERCEDES '99
S420, blue book $11,500
sell $10K FIRM
1729 W. Gulf to lake
Hwy, Lecanto
NISSAN ALTIMA
2011, Excel. condition
low miles, fully loaded
$18,500
(352) 274-1940

WE FINANCE *
Consignment USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
AUTOS' FROM $1,500.
US 19 BY AIRPORT
US 44, BY NAPA
Low Payments *
461-4518 & 795-4440
consignmentusa.org




CHEVROLET '01
Camaro, Z28, Org. 9000
miles, Pristine show car
frozen in time. Loaded
black/black leather
Flawless rare find!
$13,950 (352) 513-4257
CHEVY
1955 4 Door Sedan
good shape,
$9,000
(352) 621-1207


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


65, fastback 2+2 289
eng. a/c, power steer-
ing, disc brks. great
shape, runs great.
65,100K mi. recently
appraised for $25,378
sell $22,700 Owner fi-
nancing w/$10K dn
call Paul(352) 746-9585
TC by Maserati
'89,16 valve, 5spd,
turbo, conv. hd top, 30k
lown,exc.cond$12,500
Call 352-220-3883







Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





Ford 02
F150, Ext Cab,
fair cond, runs good
166K mis. $6k obo
352-302-7204
FORD '06
F250 Super Duty, 4 x 4,
6.0, Lariat Pkg. Off Rd.
Pkg., Hard Bed Cover
$21,500 (352) 586-8576
GMC
2005 Yukon GPS, Enter-
tainment Center, Memory
seats, Towing package
with leveler, backup cam-
era. Excellent condition.
160,000 miles. $7,500.
Call 726-4943.
POLAR '01
60HP, 2 Stroke Yamaha
motor. 17' Long, 8' Wide
Bimini top, ladder
$7,000, 352-494-0009
WE FINANCE *
Consignment USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
AUTOS' FROM $1,500.
US 19 BY AIRPORT
US 44, BY NAPA
Low Payments *
461-4518 & 795-4440
consignmentusa.org




2010 FORD ESCAPE
CREAM PUFF, LOADED
14K miles, Lmtd Edition,
Sunroof, Sync system,
GPS + MP3, USB, Fancy
Wheel Covers, Michelin
Tires, Rear Hitch,
Heated Leather Seats,
Spcl side mirrors, Sirius
Radio, Warranty
$24,500 (352) 509-7533




CHEVROLET
1999 venture van, 6-8
passenger, body in excel-
lent condition as well as
the interior and tires. V-6
motor, good gas mileage.
Loaded inside,velour
seats,tinted windows,
electrical windows, doors
and front seat. Also has
electrical hook-up for
campgrounds.Dual radia-
tors. Many extras,must
see to appreciate.
Asking $3,200.OBO,
call 637-4011
MERCURY
'99, Villager Estate
7 pass, low mi., loaded,
hitch, excel cond.
$3,500 (607) 592-5543



Harley 00
Roadking Classic, all
gear 17K miles 11K
obo.(352) 489-0873
Harley Davidson
03, Super Road King,
fuel inj. $48K up grades
too much to list/ Cry Riv
$8800 (727) 207-1619
HARLEY DAVIDSON
08 Night Train, flat blk,
11,500 mis. lots of extra's
$14K obo Jeff
(407) 712-0803
JUNK MOTORCYCLES
WANTED Will Pay up to
$200 for Unwanted Mo-
torcycle 352-942-3492
KAWASAKI
2006 Vulcan 1600 No-
mad Excellent condi-
tion, well serviced. 14k
miles. Newer tires and
battery. Bike jack,
Cycleshell, lots of ac-
cessories. Pix available.
$5995 352-601-7460



911-0430 DAILY CRN
Surplus Prop.
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County Board
of County Commissioners
will be selling surplus prop-
erty and equipment via
the internet at
govdeals.com, April 12
until April 30, 2012.
Pub:April 12 thru 30,2012


337-0429 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
THE CITRUS COUNTY CODE REVIEW AND APPEALS BOARD WILL CONDUCT A PUBLIC
MEETING ON MAY 9, 2011 AT 9:00 A.M. AT THE LECANTO GOVERNMENT BUILDING,
3600 W. SOVEREIGN PATH, ROOM 280, LECANTO, FLORIDA 34461
ORDINANCE NO. 2012 -
AN ORDINANCE OF CITRUS COUNTY, A POLITICAL SUBDIVISION OF THE STATE OF FLOR-
IDA, AMENDING CHAPTER 18 OF THE CITRUS COUNTY CODE ENTITLED BUILDINGS AND
BUILDING REGULATIONS, INCORPORATING ARTICLE 1, UNINCORPORATED CITRUS
COUNTY, CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY REGULATIONS AND TECHNICAL CODES; AMEND-
ING SECTION 18-36 AND RELOCATING A PORTION TO ARTICLE 1, SECTION 1, DEFINI-
TIONS, AND ALSO RELOCATING A PORTION TO ARTICLE 4, SECTION 1, DEFINITIONS;
AMENDING SECTION 18-37, AND RELOCATING A PORTION TO ARTICLE 4, SECTION 9,
VIOLATIONS, AND RELOCATING A PORTION TO ARTICLE 4, SECTION 12, DISCIPLINE AND
PENALTIES; AMENDING SECTION 18-38, AND RELOCATING TO ARTICLE 1, SECTION 2,
ADMINISTRATION; AMENDING SECTION 18-39, AND RELOCATING TO ARTICLE 4, SEC-
TION 3, CONSTRUCTION LICENSING AND APPEALS BOARD; AMENDING SECTION 18-40,
AND RELOCATING TO ARTICLE 1, SECTION 3, ELECTRIFICATION; AMENDING SECTION
18-43 AND RELOCATING TO ARTICLE 1, SECTION 4, CODE REVIEW AND APPEALS
BOARD; AMENDING SECTION 18-61, AND RELOCATING TO ARTICLE 1, SECTION 5,
ADOPTION OF CODES; AMENDING SECTION 18-62, AND RELOCATING TO ARTICLE 1,
SECTION 6, PERMITS; AMENDING SECTION 18-63, AND RELOCATING TO ARTICLE 1, SEC-
TION 7, FEES; AMENDING SECTION 18-64 AND RELOCATING TO ARTICLE 1, SECTION 8,
INSPECTIONS; AMENDING SECTION 18-86, AND RELOCATING TO ARTICLE 4, SECTION 4,
COMPLIANCE; EXEMPTIONS; AMENDING SECTION 18-87, AND RELOCATING TO ARTI-
CLE 4, SECTION 3, CONSTRUCTION LICENSING AND APPEALS BOARD; AMENDING SEC-
TION 18-88, AND RELOCATING TO ARTICLE 4, SECTION 2, CLASSIFICATIONS; AMEND-
ING SECTION 18-89, AND RELOCATING TO ARTICLE 4, SECTION 14, INSURANCE;
AMENDING SECTION 18-90, AND RELOCATING TO ARTICLE 4, SECTION 15, BUSINESS
TAX RECEIPT; INCORPORATING ARTICLE 2, PROVIDING FOR FLOODPLAIN MANAGE-
MENT; SECTION 1, RECITALS; SECTION 2, ADMINISTRATION; SECTION 3, APPLICABILITY;
SECTION 4, DUTIES AND POWERS OF THE FLOODPLAIN ADMINISTRATOR; SECTION 5,
PERMITS; SECTION 6, SITE PLANS AND CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENTS; SECTION 7, IN-
SPECTIONS; SECTION 8, APPEALS; SECTION 9, VIOLATIONS; SECTION 10, GENERAL; SEC-
TION 11, DEFINITIONS; SECTION 12, FLOOD RESISTANT DEVELOPMENT BUILDING AND
STRUCTURES; SECTION 13, SUBDIVISIONS; SECTION 14, SITE IMPROVEMENTS, UTILITIES,
AND LIMITATIONS; SECTION 15, MANUFACTURED HOMES; SECTION 16, RECREATIONAL
VEHICLES AND PARK TRAILERS; SECTION 17, TANKS; SECTION 18, OTHER DEVELOPMENT;
PROVIDING FOR AND ADOPTING FLOOD HAZARD MAPS; DESIGNATING A FLOODPLAIN
ADMINISTRATOR; PROVIDING FOR AND ADOPTING PROCEDURES AND CRITERIA FOR
DEVELOPMENT IN FLOOD HAZARD AREAS; AND FOR OTHER PURPOSES; PROVIDING FOR
AND ADOPTING LOCAL ADMINISTRATIVE AMENDMENTS TO THE FLORIDA BUILDING
CODE; INCORPORATING ARTICLE 3, ESTABLISHING THE CITRUS COUNTY POST DISASTER


REDEVELOPMENT PLAN; SECTION 1, ESTABLISHING PURPOSE AND INTENT; SECTION 2,
PROVIDING DEFINITIONS; SECTION 3, PROVIDING FOR RECOVERY COORDINATION;
SECTION 4, PROVIDING FOR POST DISASTER REDEVELOPMENT PRIORITIES; SECTION 5,
PROVIDING FOR ESSENTIAL SERVICES AND FACILITY RESTORATION PRIORITIES; SECTION
6, PROVIDING FOR POST-DISASTER DEBRIS CLEARANCE AND DISPOSAL STRATEGIES;
SECTION 7, PROVIDING FOR DETERMINATION OF DAMAGE OF BUILDBACK POLICY;
SECTION 8, PROVIDING FOR MORATORIA; SECTION 9, PROVIDING FOR EMERGENCY
REPAIRS AND EMERGENCY PERMITTING; SECTION 10, ESTABLISHING ECONOMIC REDE-
VELOPMENT POLICIES; SECTION 11, PROVIDING GUIDELINES FOR ACQUIRING DAM-
AGED PROPERTY; SECTION 12, PROVIDING FOR AUTHORITY; SECTION 13, PROVIDING
FOR PENALTIES; INCORPORATING ARTICLE 4, CONTRACTOR LICENSING; SECTION 1,
DEFINITIONS; SECTION 2, CLASSIFICATIONS; SECTION 3, CONSTRUCTION LICENSING
AND APPEALS BOARD; SECTION 4, COMPLIANCE; EXEMPTIONS; SECTION 5, CERTIFICA-
TION AND LICENSING REQUIREMENTS; SECTION 6, DISPLAY; SECTION 7, EMPLOYEE I.D.
CARDS; SECTION 8, EXAMINATION; SECTION 9, VIOLATIONS; SECTION 10, FINES; SEC-
TION 11, ENFORCEMENT; SECTION 12, DISCIPLINE AND PENALTIES; SECTION 13, FEES;
SECTION 14, INSURANCE; SECTION 15, BUSINESS TAX RECEIPT; BY PROVIDING FOR AP-
PLICABILITY; BY PROVIDING SEVERABILITY; BY PROVIDING FOR INCLUSION IN THE CIT-
RUS COUNTY CODE AND PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE.
RESOLUTION NO. 2012 -
A RESOLUTION OF THE BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF CITRUS COUNTY, A
POLITICAL SUBDIVISION OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, AMENDING AND ESTABLISHING A
FEE SCHEDULE FOR THE DEPARTMENT OF PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT; ESTABLISHING
A TABLE OF CONTENTS; INCORPORATING FEES FOR BUILDING DIVISION, EXHIBIT "A";
INCORPORATING FEES FOR CODE COMPLIANCE DIVISION, EXHIBIT "B"; INCORPORAT-
ING FEES FOR LAND DEVELOPMENT DIVISION, EXHIBIT "C"; INCORPORATING FEES FOR
GEOGRAPHIC RESOURCES AND COMMUNITY PLANNING DIVISION, EXHIBIT "D"; PRO-
VIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE.
ANY PERSON WHO DECIDES TO APPEAL A DECISION MADE BY THE CODE REVIEW AND
APPEALS BOARD WITH RESPECT TO ANY MATTER CONSIDERED AT THIS PUBLIC HEAR-
ING, HE/SHE WILL NEED TO INSURE THAT A VERBATIM RECORD OF THE PROCEEDING IS
MADE,WHICH RECORD SHALL INCLUDE THE TESTIMONY AND EVIDENCE UPON WHICH
THE APPEAL IS TO BE BASED, (SECTION 286.0101, FL. STATUTES.)
ANY PERSON REQUIRING REASONABLE ACCOMMODATION AT THIS MEETING BECAUSE
OF A DISABILITY OR PHYSICAL IMPAIRMENT SHOULD CONTACT THE COUNTY ADMINIS-
TRATOR' S OFFICE INVERNESS, FLORIDA 34450, (352) 341-6560 AT LEAST TWO DAYS BE-
FORE THE MEETING. IF YOU ARE HEARING OR SPEECH IMPAIRED, USE THE TDD TELE-
PHONE (352) 341-6580 OR LECANTO GOVERNMENT BUILDING (352) 527-5310.
April 29, 2012.


334-0429 SUCRN
5/17 meeting- Citrus County Transit
PUBLIC NOTICE
Public Notice:
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Transportation Disadvantaged Coordinating Board
will hold a regular meeting at 10:30 A.M. on the 17th day of May. 2012 at the
Lecanto Government Building at 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Room 166, Lecanto, FL
34461.
Any person requiring special accommodations or desiring further information regard-
ing this meeting may contact the Transportation Supervisor of Citrus County Transit,
1410 S. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto, FL 34461-9015. Telephone: (352) 527-7630.
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC: Any person who decides to appeal any decision of the gov-
erning body with respect to any matter considered at this meeting will need a rec-
ord of the proceedings and for such purposes may need to provide that a verbatim
record of the proceeding is made, which includes testimony and evidence upon
which the appeal is based. (Section 286.0101, Florida Statutes)
WINN WEBB, CHAIRMAN
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
April 29, 2012.

335-0429 SUCRN
5/9 Regular Meeting CC Tourist Development Council
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the CITRUS COUNTY TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL
will hold a regular meeting on Wednesday, May 9, 2012 at 9:00 a.m. at the Lecanto
Government Building, Room 166, Lecanto, FL 34461.
Any person desiring further information regarding this meeting may contact the
Executive Offices of the Board of County Commissioners, 110 N. Apopka Avenue,
Inverness, Florida, 34450 (352) 341-6560.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office, 110
N. Apopka Avenue, Room 102, Inverness, Florida, 34450 (352) 341-6560, at least one
day before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD tele-
phone (352) 341-6580.
WINN WEBB, CHAIRMAN
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC: Any person who decides to appeal any decision of the
Governing Body with respect to any matter considered at this meeting will need a
record of the proceedings and for such purpose may need to provide that a verba-
tim record of the proceeding is made, which record includes testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal is to be based (Section 286.0101, Florida Statute).
April 29, 2012.

336-0429 SUCRN
5/4 meeting Citrus County Public Safety Coordinating Council
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Citrus County Public Safety Coordinating Council
will meet on Friday, May 4, 2012 at 2:30 P.M. at the Citrus County Courthouse, 110
North Apopka Avenue, 2nd Floor Administration Conference Room, Inverness, Flor-
ida, to discuss business of the Public Safety Coordinating Council which may prop-
erly come before them.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the CountyAdministrator's Office,
110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL34450, (352) 341-6560, at least two (2) days
before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD Telephone
(352) 341-6580.
If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Public Safety Coordinat-
ing Council with respect to any matter considered at this meeting, he/she will need
to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made which record shall in-
clude the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.
BY: Amy Engelken,
Community & Recreational Programs Support Services
Operations Manager
April 29, 2012.

338-0429 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
THE CITRUS COUNTY CONSTRUCTION LICENSING AND APPEALS BOARD WILL CON-
DUCT A PUBLIC MEETING ON May 9, 2012 AT 2:00 P.M., AT THE LECANTO GOVERN-
MENT BUILDING, 3600 W. SOVEREIGN PATH, RM 166 LECANTO, FLORIDA 34461.
SCHEDULED TO MEET THE BOARD:
No one
CITATIONS:
A. DAVID ENGLISH Citation # 0023 Commence or perform work for which a
building permit is required, pursuant to an adopted state minimum building
code, without such permit being in effect.
SCHEDULED DISCUSSION:
1. ORDINANCE NUMBER 2012-
AN ORDINANCE OF CITRUS COUNTY, A POLITICAL SUBDIVISION OF THE STATE OF FLOR-
IDA, AMENDING CHAPTER 18 OF THE CITRUS COUNTY CODE ENTITLED BUILDINGS AND
BUILDING REGULATIONS, INCORPORATING ARTICLE 1, UNINCORPORATED CITRUS
COUNTY, CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY REGULATIONS AND TECHNICAL CODES; AMEND-
ING SECTION 18-36 AND RELOCATING A PORTION TO ARTICLE 1, SECTION 1, DEFINI-
TIONS, AND ALSO RELOCATING A PORTION TO ARTICLE 4, SECTION 1, DEFINITIONS;
AMENDING SECTION 18-37, AND RELOCATING A PORTION TO ARTICLE 4, SECTION 9,
VIOLATIONS, AND RELOCATING A PORTION TO ARTICLE 4, SECTION 12, DISCIPLINE AND
PENALTIES; AMENDING SECTION 18-38, AND RELOCATING TO ARTICLE 1, SECTION 2,
ADMINISTRATION; AMENDING SECTION 18-39, AND RELOCATING TO ARTICLE 4, SEC-
TION 3, CONSTRUCTION LICENSING AND APPEALS BOARD; AMENDING SECTION 18-40,
AND RELOCATING TO ARTICLE 1, SECTION 3, ELECTRIFICATION; AMENDING SECTION
18-43 AND RELOCATING TO ARTICLE 1, SECTION 4, CODE REVIEW AND APPEALS
BOARD; AMENDING SECTION 18-61, AND RELOCATING TO ARTICLE 1, SECTION 5,
ADOPTION OF CODES; AMENDING SECTION 18-62, AND RELOCATING TO ARTICLE 1,
SECTION 6, PERMITS; AMENDING SECTION 18-63, AND RELOCATING TO ARTICLE 1, SEC-
TION 7, FEES; AMENDING SECTION 18-64 AND RELOCATING TO ARTICLE 1, SECTION 8,
INSPECTIONS; AMENDING SECTION 18-86, AND RELOCATING TO ARTICLE 4, SECTION 4,
COMPLIANCE; EXEMPTIONS; AMENDING SECTION 18-87, AND RELOCATING TO ARTI-
CLE 4, SECTION 3, CONSTRUCTION LICENSING AND APPEALS BOARD; AMENDING SEC-
TION 18-88, AND RELOCATING TO ARTICLE 4, SECTION 2, CLASSIFICATIONS; AMEND-
ING SECTION 18-89, AND RELOCATING TO ARTICLE 4, SECTION 14, INSURANCE;
AMENDING SECTION 18-90, AND RELOCATING TO ARTICLE 4, SECTION 15, BUSINESS
TAX RECEIPT; INCORPORATING ARTICLE 2, PROVIDING FOR FLOODPLAIN MANAGE-
MENT; SECTION 1, RECITALS; SECTION 2, ADMINISTRATION; SECTION 3, APPLICABILITY;
SECTION 4, DUTIES AND POWERS OF THE FLOODPLAIN ADMINISTRATOR; SECTION 5,
PERMITS; SECTION 6, SITE PLANS AND CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENTS; SECTION 7, IN-
SPECTIONS; SECTION 8, APPEALS; SECTION 9, VIOLATIONS; SECTION 10, GENERAL; SEC-
TION 11, DEFINITIONS; SECTION 12, FLOOD RESISTANT DEVELOPMENT BUILDING AND
STRUCTURES; SECTION 13, SUBDIVISIONS; SECTION 14, SITE IMPROVEMENTS, UTILITIES,
AND LIMITATIONS; SECTION 15, MANUFACTURED HOMES; SECTION 16, RECREATIONAL
VEHICLES AND PARK TRAILERS; SECTION 17, TANKS; SECTION 18, OTHER DEVELOPMENT;
PROVIDING FOR AND ADOPTING FLOOD HAZARD MAPS; DESIGNATING A FLOODPLAIN
ADMINISTRATOR; PROVIDING FOR AND ADOPTING PROCEDURES AND CRITERIA FOR
DEVELOPMENT IN FLOOD HAZARD AREAS; AND FOR OTHER PURPOSES; PROVIDING FOR
AND ADOPTING LOCAL ADMINISTRATIVE AMENDMENTS TO THE FLORIDA BUILDING
CODE; INCORPORATING ARTICLE 3, ESTABLISHING THE CITRUS COUNTY POST DISASTER
REDEVELOPMENT PLAN; SECTION 1, ESTABLISHING PURPOSE AND INTENT; SECTION 2,
PROVIDING DEFINITIONS; SECTION 3, PROVIDING FOR RECOVERY COORDINATION;
SECTION 4, PROVIDING FOR POST DISASTER REDEVELOPMENT PRIORITIES; SECTION 5,
PROVIDING FOR ESSENTIAL SERVICES AND FACILITY RESTORATION PRIORITIES; SECTION
6, PROVIDING FOR POST-DISASTER DEBRIS CLEARANCE AND DISPOSAL STRATEGIES;
SECTION 7, PROVIDING FOR DETERMINATION OF DAMAGE OF BUILDBACK POLICY;
SECTION 8, PROVIDING FOR MORATORIA; SECTION 9, PROVIDING FOR EMERGENCY
REPAIRS AND EMERGENCY PERMITTING; SECTION 10, ESTABLISHING ECONOMIC REDE-
VELOPMENT POLICIES; SECTION 11, PROVIDING GUIDELINES FOR ACQUIRING DAM-
AGED PROPERTY; SECTION 12, PROVIDING FOR AUTHORITY; SECTION 13, PROVIDING
FOR PENALTIES; INCORPORATING ARTICLE 4, CONTRACTOR LICENSING; SECTION 1,
DEFINITIONS; SECTION 2, CLASSIFICATIONS; SECTION 3, CONSTRUCTION LICENSING
AND APPEALS BOARD; SECTION 4, COMPLIANCE; EXEMPTIONS; SECTION 5, CERTIFICA-
TION AND LICENSING REQUIREMENTS; SECTION 6, DISPLAY; SECTION 7, EMPLOYEE I.D.
CARDS; SECTION 8, EXAMINATION; SECTION 9, VIOLATIONS; SECTION 10, FINES; SEC-
TION 11, ENFORCEMENT; SECTION 12, DISCIPLINE AND PENALTIES; SECTION 13, FEES;
SECTION 14, INSURANCE; SECTION 15, BUSINESS TAX RECEIPT; BY PROVIDING FOR AP-
PLICABILITY; BY PROVIDING SEVERABILITY; BY PROVIDING FOR INCLUSION IN THE CIT-
RUS COUNTY CODE AND PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE.
2. RESOLUTION NO. 2012 -
A RESOLUTION OF THE BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF CITRUS COUNTY, A
POLITICAL SUBDIVISION OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, AMENDING AND ESTABLISHING A
FEE SCHEDULE FOR THE DEPARTMENT OF PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT; ESTABLISHING
A TABLE OF CONTENTS; INCORPORATING FEES FOR BUILDING DIVISION, EXHIBIT "A";
INCORPORATING FEES FOR CODE COMPLIANCE DIVISION, EXHIBIT "B"; INCORPORAT-
ING FEES FOR LAND DEVELOPMENT DIVISION, EXHIBIT "C"; INCORPORATING FEES FOR
GEOGRAPHIC RESOURCES AND COMMUNITY PLANNING DIVISION, EXHIBIT "D"; PRO-
VIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE.
ANY PERSON WHO DECIDES TO APPEAL A DECISION MADE BY THE CONSTRUC-
TIONLICENSING & APPEALS BOARD WITH RESPECT TO ANY MATTER CONSIDERED AT
THIS PUBLIC HEARING WILL NEED TO INSURE THAT A VERBATIM RECORD OF THE PRO-
CEEDING IS MADE, WHICH RECORD SHALL INCLUDE THE TESTIMONY AND EVIDENCE
UPON WHICH THE APPEAL IS TO BE BASED. (SECTION 286.0101, FL. STATUTES.)
ANY PERSON REQUIRING REASONABLE ACCOMMODATION AT THIS MEETING BECAUSE
OF A DISABILITY OR PHYSICAL IMPAIRMENT SHOULD CONTACT THE COUNTY ADMINIS-
TRATOR'S OFFICE, 110 NORTH APOPKA, INVERNESS, FL 34450, (352) 341-6560 AT LEAST
TWO DAYS BEFORE THE MEETING. IF YOU ARE HEARING OR SPEECH IMPAIRED, USE THE
TTY TELEPHONE (352-341-6580) OR LECANTO GOVERNMENT BUILDING (352-527-5350).
April 29, 2012.


I Misc. Nod


I Misc. Nod


I Mis. Notes


Meetng^O^
I Ntics


Meeting^f
I Ntiesj


Meng
I Ntics




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


.1~
IA


I


2012 CHEVROLET CRUZE


2012 CHEVROLET MALIBU


If1ftOlo.$169
IM PER MO.
WITH $1999 CASH OR TRADE.


2012 CHEVROLET IMPALA


0220800o^299
801V PER MO.
WITH $2999 CASH OR TRADE.


2012 (


35,80AOR$299
5, I PER MO.
WITH $2999 CASH OR TRADE.


,QOR 269
WT 9 WI9 | PER MO.
WITH $2999 CASH OR TRADE.


2012 CHEVROLET EQUINOX


21 s1269$
21 M PER MO.
WITH $2999 CASH OR TRADE.


2012 CHEVROLET SILVERADO


19H ASAVE A
9,800 *$6 O
WITH $2999 CASH OR TRADE.


CALL THE INSTANT APPRAISAL LINE: 800-440-9054


CR TAL crystalautos.com
CHEVROLET 352-564-1971
S1035 S. Suncoast Blvd Homosassa, FL 34448


I


SUNDAY, APRIL 29, 2012 D9


LET TAHOE
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


RYSiTVAW


ONE WEEK To DEAL


low


2012 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY


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S n 9oR$299
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D10 SUNDAY, APRIL 29, 2012


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Sikorski's
Attic
PAGE E6


S0o

S OME FRONT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE REAL ESTATE GUIDE


The Palm Springs-based Art
Innovation Style does a
modern riff on a classic
style with these neon
acrylic vases
-1 ih- i. .: .iii.:.r Style/Associated Press















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E2 SUNDA'I~ APRIL 29, 2012 Cimus Couivn' (FL) CHRONICLE


09:1 N. UKNN1 5 I11i.
PINE RIDGE
*4BD/3BA/3CG Over 3,600 SF Living
2nd Story Bonus Rm. or 4th Bedroom w/Bath
Office or Den Many Extras
PETER & MARVIA KOROL |j
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875


3 BEDROOM + OFFICE!! BEST BUY IN PINE Rll
* 3/2/2 Split Plan Office/4th BDRM Modified Cape Cod look in pristine
* Pantry in Kitchen In Wall Pest Tubes 3 bedroom, 2 bath, pool home v
* Neutral Tones Great Lot Elevation kitchen, solid surface counters,
* Biking/Tennis/Golf Close to Rivers!! garage, 10' ceilings & lots more! (
see it today.
KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536 see it today
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997 JOHN HOLLOWAY SR. (352) 212-600
ORS GRI, ABR, e-PRO
I" i Email: johnHoI lloway@tampaboy.rr.com
E MAIL kellyg, ]lemnmA nel www.TheHollowayTeam.com


2BR/2BA home located in
the Highlands. Fenced
backyard, garage, screen
room. r
BARBARA MILLS (352) 637-6200 I
Email barbarajmills@earthlink.net


VERY AFFORDABLE, 3BR/2BA with
cathedral ceilings. 2005 model, Great Room,
Dining Room, Breakfast Bar, wood flooring.
Situated on dead-end street. Convenient to
shopping & restaurants. Great for starter home
or winter retreat. Move-in ready. Call today for
appointment!!!!!
LOU HALLEY (352) 257-9016
Email: lounalley@tampabay.rr.com


4074 N. INDIAN RIVER DR.
Best value in Fairview Estates that you'll find!!!
Everything updated in this 3,000 sq. ft. of living
space home. 3BR, 3 bath pool home with hot tub
spa. Spacious living room, wood floors, cherry
cabinets in this island kitchen, gas fireplace, and
many more upgrades!
GARY ALTMAN (352) 795-2441
Email: garyallman@remax.net


CINNAMON RIDGE
* Great Cul-De-Sac Location 3/2/2 Split Bedroom Plan
SOffice or 4th Bedroom All Ceramic Tile Thru
* Updated Baths Covered Screened Lanai
*New Roof 2007 *Nicely Landscaped, Nice Trees
MARTHA SATHER (352)212-3929 S
Emlmil mailha solhei ileum nel
VIRTUAL TOURS al w... umilha salhei iema. coin


UUI I I :LU lUNt UHIVI
CITRUS SPRINGS
* 3BR/2BA/2CG Beautiful Kitchen
* Great Room 18 in Ceramic Tile in Living Area
* Newer Carpet & Paint Lots of Nice Upgrades
* 16x24 Patio Fenced Backyard
* Move-In Ready
LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611
Email: lenpalmer@remax.net



24 7 F Le


POOL HOME on corner lot in Lecanto.
3/2/2, move-in ready, kit. renovated
w/wood cabinets & Corian. Solar
heated pool w/pop-ups & Ig. hot tub
on screen lanai. A/C & heating 3 yrs.
& newer roof.
IODY BROOM (352) 634-5821 fl
Email: toom@dfrusrealty.com










GREAT BUY...CISE TO EVERYTIIIG. Completely furnished
2/2 condo on private second floor with great closet
space, master bedroom, open kitchen and living area,
pantry and new washer/dryer combo in unit. This
small condo complex has convenient parking and a
heated swimming pool. Edge of town location makes
shopping and dining convenient and affordable.
Outstanding price.
WAYNE HEMMERICH (352) 302-8575
Emaih Wayne@WayneHemmerich.com


3 Bedroom, 3 bath, 2-car garage block
home, office, eat-in kitchen with wood
cabinets, family room with fireplace,
formal living and dining areas, large
lanai, RV shelter and shed.
DIANNE MACDONALD (352) 212-9682
Email: djmfl@yahoo.com [


I UZW 5. ULiNLAULi I KKALt
LECANTO
* Nice 3BR/2BA/2CG Home
SRlorida Room
* Screened Lanai Area *22x1 4 Detached Garage/Workshop
* Fenced Backyard Vacant Lot Next To Home Included

LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611 l1
Email: lenpalmer@remax.net


* 2/1 Mobile Home *2.25 Fenced Acres
* 952 Sq. Ft. Living Bright and Cheery Kitchen
* Front and Back Screened Patios
*Workshop Indoor Laundry

KEVIN & KAREN CUNNINGHAM [r2-
(352) 637-6200
Email: kcunningham@remax.net


* 1995 Year Built 3/2/2 on .75 Acre
* Hardwood Floors Throughout Home
*Large Master Suites *Split Floor Plan
* Security System Fully Enclosed Screen
Room for Pool and More
Close to Schools Must See !!! -
CHERYL LAMBERT 352-637-6200 t
Email: cheryllamberl@remax.net


2I 242 N. Lea w.*eel il 2-82w wRMA~o 0 .Mi ,Ivres6760


E2 SUNDAY, APRIL 29, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Real Estate DIGEST


ERA ERA
American American
Realty. Realty.


David
Collins
ERA
American
Realty.


Vincent
McCrave
ERA
American
Realty.


Justin Mary
Monahan Waddington
ERA ERA
American American
Realty. Realty.

ERA agents
get top training
Local real estate profession-
als Al Antoni and Tony
Pauelsen, of ERAAmerican
Realty's Beverly Hills office,
and David Collins, Vincent
McCrave, Justin Monahan
and Mary Waddington of the


Sandra Dawn
Beck Theroux
ERA ERA
American American
Realty. Realty.
company's Inverness office re-
cently completed the ERAAc-
celERAtion training course.
The AccelERAtion program
educates ERA sales associates
on how to better assist buyers
and sellers through pricing and
preparing a home to sell;
prospecting; hosting open
houses; and negotiating. Other
topics include goal setting, time
management and implementing
ERA products and services.
Sandra Beck, sales man-
ager of ERAAmerican Realty's
Beverly Hills office, was also
the course instructor.
ERAAmerican is also proud
to announce the latest produc-
tion level achieved by one of its
Inverness office agent for 2012.
Dawn Theroux has surpassed
the $1 million mark in closed
sales volume in 2012.
Dawn Theroux can be
reached at the Inverness office
of ERAAmerican Realty by call-
ing 352-726-5855.
RE/MAX agents
hit new milestone
Two more RE/MAX Realty
One agents have passed the
$1 million mark in sales vol-


Jackie Gaffney Jason Gaffney
Realtor A HouSE RealtorEt.
I^U 302.3179 SoLDNl 287.9022 L
WEEKS REALTY, 5 BEVERLY HILLS BLVD.
The Golden Girl 746.6700
4124 un. BYNNER PASS TER.
BEVERLY HILLS
6, A/L in 'U6, exterior paint in IU. A turn
., -i r,,, I i I, I

518 S. HARRISON
BEVERLY HILLS
I .,1,, m,,,,,,-I I I ,.,,,,iI I, .-1,4
,I' l ,, h i I I i I h .
h,,mll=- |I I I i,,,h, I


ume. Johnny
Holloway and
Sally Cure
both passed
this milestone
very early this
year. They join
a select group Johnny
of agents who Holloway
have accom- RE/MAX
polished this Realty One.
level of success.
Johnny is an agent in the


Inverness
RE/MAX office
on Main Street.
Sally is a
Realtor and
manager in the
Homosassa -,d -
RE/MAX Sally Cure
office on RE/MAX
U.S. 19. Realty One.
Long time Realtor Lucy
Barnes has hit another major
mark in sales this year. She has


surpassed the
$3 million mark
in sales
volume.
Lucy has
been a suc-
cessful Realtor
in Citrus Lucy
County for Barnes
nearly 30 RE/MAX
years. She is a Realty One.
native of the Crystal River.
Lucy works out of the Crystal


River RE/MAX Realty One of-
fice on U.S. 19. The brokers
and associates of RE/MAX
congratulate Lucy on her out-
standing success.

The Chronicle has
forms available for
wedding and engage-
ment announcements,
anniversaries, birth an-
nouncements and first
birthdays.


-ERVNO LL OF CIT _US COU N


PINE RIDGE
1481 Pine Ridge Blvd.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465
(352) 527-1820


CITRUS HILLS
20 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 746-0744


For a VirtualSTu Ml le Phots

Swww.FloridaShowcaseropertiesc


MLS 353960 $229,900
3/3/2 Sweetwater custom home nestled on 1.30 acres.
Directions: Rte. 486 to north on Annapolis, to
end of road, to right on Indianhead to #4394.
Jo Ann Martin 352-613-2238


OPEN HOUSE SUN. 1-3
REDUCED



i.is l LS 872 E. Ray St.
+ t MLS #352070 $99,900
Cozy 3/2/2 located on an acre in Citrus Hills.
Directions: Rte. 486to south on Annapolis, to
the home at the corner of Ray St.
Jo Ann Martin 352-613-2238


NEW LISTING


2015 W. Melline Ln.
H MLS #355115 $189,000
"Really" A custom home priced at
$66.00 a sq. ft.
Matt Robinson 937-219-6949


4818 W. Ranger St.
/'-'P MLS #346934 $399,000
Beautiful 3BR, 3BA pool home on 2.75
acre lot.
Teresa Boozer 352-634-0213


lu MLS #355149 $169,900
Lovely 3/2/2 great room plan Rusaw
built model.
Florence Cleary 352-634-5523





183 E. Falconry CI.
MLS #354203 $234,900
Stunning 3/2/3 "New 2012 Construction"
on the Meadows.
Phil Phillips 352-302-3146


NEW LISTING


.)t4 MLS #355051 $26
Stylish, yet inexpensive 3/2/2 vil
Mark Casper 352-476-8136
NEW LISTING
I P


"?L44H1 11. beach t.
/2W60- MLS #355022 $199,900
3/2/2 home with caged inground pool
on corner lot.
Jo Ann Martin 352-613-2238


I.t 7I W. Lemon Slireel
4teU5, MLS #355045 $29,900
Cute, well maintained home.
Brian Murray352-212-5913


S.i. j 1815 W. Pearson SI.
S MLS #351889 $219,900
3/2/2 in the unique "Emerald Estates"
on a wooded 1 acre lot.
Phil Phillips 352-302-3146
PENDING
*?AW Si- .S


1284 N. Lombardo Ave.
MLS #354074 $159,000
Value excels in this spacious 3/2/2 on
an acre lot.
Mark Casper 352-476-8136
PENDING


, nWtto 2684 N. Brentwood Cir. ,- 3610 N. Lakeside Village Dr. -" 4372 N. Mae West Way /C t MLS #354309 $71,900
MLS#347113 $139,000 U" MLS#349062 $34,900 MLS #353656 $114,000 Very nice 2/2/1 fully furnished maintenance
Great value 3/2/2 pool home on a great lot. 1 BR, 1.5 BA & 1 CG maintenance free villa. 2/2/2 + den completely remodeled, fee villa.
Jane O'Gwynn 352-302-1926 Mike McHale 352-302-3203 Florence Cleary 352-634-5523 Jo Ann Martin 352-613-2238
= P 2011 Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities. An independently owned and operated broker member of Prudential Real Estate Affiliates, Inc., a Prudential Financial company. Prudential, the
LN"S Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are service marks of Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities, registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Used under license. Equal Housing Opportunity.


61 Prudential

Florida Showcase

Properties


SUNDAY, APRIL 29, 2012 E3







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUBMISSION DEADLINES
* Follow these guidelines to help ensure timely publication of submitted
material. The earlier Chronicle editors receive submissions, the better
chance of notes running more than once.

* Community notes: At least one week in advance of the event.

* Veterans Notes: 4 p.m. Wednesday for publication Sunday.

* Together page: 4 p.m. Wednesday for publication Sunday.

* Business Digest: 4 p.m. Wednesday for publication Sunday.

* Chalk Talk: 4 p.m. Monday for publication Wednesday.

* Health Notes: 4 p.m. Friday for publication Tuesday.

* Religious events : 4 p.m. Tuesday for publication Saturday.

* Real Estate Digest: 4 p.m. Thursday for publication Sunday.

* Photos and stories are published as space is available. The Chronicle can-
not guarantee placement on color pages.

* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or Crystal River; by fax
at 352-563-3280; or by e-mail to newsdesk@chronicleonline.com.





REALTY GROUP


2Bd/2.SBath/Den/2Car Pointe Vista



MLS#353660 $415,000


I 2Bd/Den/2Bath/2Car Brentwood Villas

MLS#353732 $145,000


I'" $203,700 I






4Bd/3Bath/2+Car Hillside South
Beautiful Home in Terra Vista wit a picturesque view of the Skyview Golf Course Popular
III I'll $409,000


T- 6 M.h o".l;-.et l .


Detached Villa/3Bd/2BathI2Car Southgate Villa Townhome/3Bd/2.SBath/Garage Brentwood
This fully furnished villa is ready now and offers a 6 month lease with the possblity
to 7 $1,500 extend1,100
#299307 $1,500 , a1,100


Terra Vista Realty Group, LLC
2400 North Terra Vista Blvd., Hernando, Florida 34442
(352) 746-6121 (800) 323-7703


Office in the
Terra Vista
Welcome Center


Cloth diapers have


wealth of alternative uses


C loth diapers
are a good in-
vestment.
They're durable, so
after they've saved
you money on dia-
pering your baby,
they can be resold,
donated or used
around your home.
Get them out of stor- Sara
age and put them to FRU
use. LIV
Cleaning rags:
Cloth diapers are sold in bulk
specifically for cleaning pur-
poses. They're lint-free and ab-
sorbent, so they're great for
dusting furniture, cleaning au-
tomobiles and boats, mopping
up big kitchen spills or drying a
wet-mopped floor One reader,
Diana from Iowa, shares: "I
used cloth diapers on my child,
who is now in his 30s. So my old
diapers are old! But I have used
them over the years as dust
cloths, window-washing cloths,
car washing cloths, etc. I wrap
them around my Swiffer to
scrub floors. My hubby uses
them in the shop as rags for
cleaning brushes or wiping his
hands, too."
Muddy feet: Need to clear
mud from paws or shoes? Grab
a cloth diaper to do the job.
Keep a couple on hand in the
car for any accidental spills or
to help with the mess of winter
boots, too.
First-aid kit: Keep one in
your first-aid kit to wrap
around an ice pack or to absorb
blood from a wound. Another
reader, A.M. from Pennsylva-
nia, shares: "I use them as
Kleenex. I have sinus and al-
lergy trouble. A soft cloth dia-
per is much more gentle on a
tender nose."
Fobr kids: Children can use
them to diaper dolls or to use as
doll blankets. Place them on
the ground to use as agility
squares/markers for footwork
drills and exercises.
Packing: Use to cushion
items when packing for a move.
Hot pads: Keep one handy to
grab hot pot handles or pans in
the oven.
Drying: Keep a couple in the


bathroom to dry the
floor after a shower,
or use to dry a dog
after you bathe him.
They work even bet-
ter than a towel.
- Accidents: Cloth
diapers work well as
pillow liners or on
the bed when kids
Noel are sick. They're
GAL useful to help with
ING potty training acci-
dents. They work
well for pet accidents, beds,
crates and carriers, too. An-
other reader, Palooka from
Pennsylvania, shares: "If you
like to paint or do any home re-
modeling, use cloth diapers for
cleaning up mistakes made
with the paint. They save us a
lot of money over paper tow-
els." When you run a vaporizer,
you can place a cloth diaper un-
derneath it so the floor or car-
pet doesn't get wet, too.
Homemade wipes: Pour a
cleaning solution into an empty
baby-wipes container, cut cloth
diapers into squares and stack
them in the container, allowing
them to absorb the solution.
Clearly label all containers. An-
other reader, Denise from Illi-
nois, shares her own
homemade cleaning solutions:
Facial wipes: 2 tablespoons
Johnson and Johnson Baby
Bath and 2 cups water
Bathroom disinfectant
wipes: 2 cups pine cleaner (or
Lysol) and 2 cups water
Bug wipe: 1 cup Avon Skin
So Soft and 1 cup water. -
Anti-bacterial wipes: 1 gallon
water and 2 tablespoons
bleach.
Window wipes: 1 cup glass
cleaner and 11/2 cups water.
MEN
Little girls love dollhouses,
but they can be pretty expen-
sive to buy Luckily, you can
make your own at home with
materials you probably already
have. Shoeboxes and cardboard
boxes will work well for short-
term play For something more
durable, a bookcase can be the
beginning of a great dollhouse.
Each shelf can be a different
room. Add wallpaper. You can


draw or print pictures, or even
cut out magazine photos of win-
dows, rugs, plants, etc. and glue
them on. Look around your
home for supplies such as car-
pet remnants, fabric scraps or
any empty food cartons that you
could make into furniture.
The first reader tip has an-
other suggestion:
DIY dollhouse: My husband
took all of the drawers out of a
tall dresser and turned into a
multi-level dollhouse for my
niece. He did it about two years
ago, and my sister says she still
loves to play with it. Jen,
Ohio
Onion storage: My husband
and I have a large vegetable
garden every year and we grow
a lot of onions. We reuse nylon
bags to hang our onions in our
shop and garage. We have our
own onions to use sometimes
until Christmas. -Elizabeth L.,
email
Use butter/margarine wrap-
pers: I save the paper from
margarine sticks in a coffee can
in the fridge. When I need to
grease a pan, I use the mar-
garine paper Works really well,
and it's free! -Karla C., email
Hot water when camping:
Fill empty, clean gallon milk
jugs with water, put a black
trash bag over the jugs and set
them out in the sun to heat. If
you need warm water to wash
the dog, rinse off the kids' feet
or take a shower, buy a new,
never-used black weed sprayer,
fill it with water and set it in the
sun. Don't use for potable water,
though. If we have power while
camping, or we're too lazy to
light the water heater, we just
use a two-gallon electric coffee
urn I got at the thrift store for
less than a dollar. S.D., Min-
nesota
Dish liquid degreaser: My
husband has an 18-wheeler and
he wears Carhartt overalls in
the winter when he works on
the truck. Last year, I took the
overalls outside and wet them
with the water hose, then
squirted dishwashing liquid di-
rectly on the greasy spots.

See FRUGAl/Page E11


E4 SUNDAY, APRIL 29, 2012


1
Iq
rl







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Regular maintenance can extend life of AC unit


BERT HENDERSON
Special to the Chronicle

This month is not too early to
begin to think about getting your
air conditioning unit serviced and
ready for the summer. Let's face it,
you wouldn't consider driving
your car to California without first
getting the car serviced with at
least a lube, oil change, and new
filters.
Because you are going to ask
your air conditioner to run for at
least six months beginning in May
or June, you should give serious
consideration to servicing your air
conditioning (AC) unit or units.
The cost is usually from $49 to
about $129. That annual service
provides you a reasonable level of
confidence your AC will not stop
working on July 4 when the tem-


perature could reach 100 degrees.
You can also keep your service
costs down when you have your
AC professional take care of your
equipment before June 1. After
that time, the temperatures in the
attic crawl space are close to 150
to 180 degrees, and many AC serv-
ice companies charge more be-
cause of working in very hot, and
sometimes dangerous, environ-
ments.
An advantage of yearly servic-
ing could increase the life of your
AC system. Think of the money
you spend on servicing as insur-
ance on your cooling equipment.
The industry average life span of
an AC unit is about 10 years. Reg-
ular maintenance can increase
that life expectancy twofold.
When you have professional
service done on your AC unit, one


Energy savings can be considerable


of the things the technician looks
at is the refrigerant level, to see if
the compressor needs to be
recharged with coolant fluids. Re-
search at the University of Florida
found that when an AC unit was
charged to 90 percent, the unit
worked almost normally, provid-
ing sufficient cooling. When the
charge dropped below 85 percent,
the equipment performance de-
clined significantly, and the sys-
tem provided 15 percent less cool
air than with a normal charge. At a
50 percent charge, the re-
searchers reported they were un-
able to measure any cooling at all.
Surveying 22 randomly chosen
commercial and residential AC
units in Gainesville, a total of 17,
or more than 75 percent, were un-
dercharged at the 85 percent level
or less. An undercharged unit uses
more electricity than a fully
charged unit because the unit has
to operate longer to achieve the


same cooling effect
During the service procedure
the technician also measures the
airflow over the AC's cooling coils.
An inadequate airflow is a com-
mon problem, and correcting the
airflow rate can increase the effi-
ciency of the system 5 to 10
percent.
In addition, the technician
cleans and visually inspects the
motor, compressor, air handler,
ducts, coils, air filter(s), solenoids,
switches, wires, etc., to make sure
the equipment works properly
throughout the year.
Here are some tips you can use
to take care of your AC unit and
maintain efficiency.
Replace the filters in the AC
unit monthly, because dirty air fil-
ters make the air handler work
harder, using more electricity.
When you get your utility bill,
change your filter.
Keep the grass and shrubs


)"Nancy Knows Sugarmill Woods"
i NANCY Direct: 352-634-4225
tfOPONTICOS yp 1
Multi-Million $$$ Producer ,T KEY1 REALTY INC.O
I 8015 S Suncoast Blvd Homosassa FL 382-1700







LOWEST PRICED "HAMMOCKS" HOME! SPECTACULAR HEATED POOL + SPA HOME!
3 Bed Split Plan Enclosed Florida Room NEW Stainless Appliances Granite Island Kitchen
Screened Porch 2,168 Sq. Ft. Under Air 4 Bed/3 Bath/3 CAR Garage Front Load Washer/Dryer
Q $115,000 MLS#355111 $254,900 MLS#353057 (



Pay for iNii
your %IIIN,.IN II E

The]EZway!





NO MORE
V Hassles! V Checks! V Reminders!


563-5655 It's EZ!
SCharge may vary at first transaction and at each vacation start


rkI hLJL1 IDGE BE L1 'S


Amnnda & Kirk Johnson Tom Balfour Ul Aenus & Hal Steiner Art Paty
BROR/ASSOC REALTOR REALTOR REAR LTOR-BROKER REALTOR


voomil 4.o$
ot~~~ ~~ NIP IMd14"wtm
, -- -l----


1 54 N. KOSLWOOD DUK.
3/2/3 345235 $229,900


3427 PINE RIDGE BLVD. 4889 N PEPPERMINT DR.
3/3/2 354267 $239,000 3/2/2 354938 $149,900


822WDEACON I 7768 N. SARAZEN 510 W. PLAYER PATH 2450 N. BRENTWOOD CIR. 44 CHICKAPIN CIRCLE
3/2/2 353982 $89,900 3/2/2 354564 $144,900 2/2/1 352984 $91,500 2/2/2 354530 $122,500 3/2/2 354378 $139,900

.


21 TRUMAN BLVD. 311 S. TYLER 15 S. FILLMORE 101 S. BARBOUR ST. 45 S. MELBOURNE 9570 N. CITRUS SPRINGS
2/Z/2 351656 $59,900 2/1.5/1 354946 $51,900 2/2 354359 $49,900 2/2/2 354334 $64,900 354341 $84,900 348850 $176,900
3521 N. LECANTO HWY., BEVERLY HILLS, FL 34465 1-888-789-7100 1


trimmed around the AC compres-
sor outside. Keep the landscaping
from growing into the compressor.
If any heavy plant materials, like
a tree or large shrub grows into
the compressor, that might stop
the fan from spinning or puncture
a hole in the soft copper tubing
containing the coolant fluids. In
addition, you don't want anything
to stop airflow around the com-
pressor, because that will also
make the equipment work harder
and using more electricity means
higher energy costs.
Have some type of shading
over your AC exterior compressor.
Shaded air is typically five to six
degrees cooler than the surround-
ing air. That means your AC unit
cools the fluids easier before they
get pumped back into your air
handler. According to the Depart-
ment of Energy, shading can
See AC/Page Ell


746-9000


SUNDAY, APRIL 29, 2012 E5


CITRUS SPRINGS







E6 SUNDAY, APRIL 29, 2012




HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information........352-563-5592
.................................................. advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information........................352-563-5966
News information............................................... 352-563-5660
....................................... ............. newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listing............www.ChronicleHomeFinder.com
"The market leader in real estate information"



HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-563-
3280, attention HomeFront.
News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront.
Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes for
space and/or clarity.
For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


Big lubbers are back

Fully grown, these grasshoppers are hard to miss
M y dear, sweet grandmother in The bright coloration of lubber
Pennsylvania says that the bugs in grasshoppers serves as a warning to birds
Florida are the size of small dogs. and other animals that the lubber
This is a wild exaggeration, but grasshopper contains toxic sub-
lubber grasshoppers are cer- stances. When threatened, a
tainly one of the larger insects \ lubber may shoot an irritating
in Florida. spray that looks like tobacco
Lubber grasshoppers are 3 juice and makes a loud, hissing
most noticeable in July and Au- noise to scare off predators.
gust because of the adults' The dark brown spray can stain
gaudy, almost "painted" mix of clothing.
yellow, orange and black, and If hand removal is not an op-
their large size over three tion and the use of pesticides is
inches! Right now, the lubbers absolutely necessary, control-
are in their small "nymph" Audrey Durr ling the small grasshoppers
stage, about a half-inch long FYN now is much more effective
and almost entirely black with than waiting until they're full-
red or yellow "racing stripes." grown. Lubber grasshoppers
Despite their large size as adults, lubber are not easy to kill, even with insecticides,
grasshoppers usually eat less and cause once they become large.
less damage than their smaller grasshop- When using any pesticide or chemical,
per relatives. Also, lubbers rarely occur in use caution and always follow the label di-
large enough concentrations to cause sig- reactions exactly to avoid contamination of
nificant damage, so control maybe unnec- our drinking water supply Also, pay at-
essary tention to the "Signal Word" on the label,
The lubber grasshopper cannot fly and which indicates the product's toxicity to
can only jump short distances. Because of humans. "DANGER" indicates an immi-
their slow, clumsy movement, they are best nently hazardous situation, which, if not
controlled with hand removal, being care-
ful of their potentially irritating spray See BUGS/Rage E7


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Inside...


Fantastic plastic
PAGE E8
Real Estate Digest
PAGE E3
For current property transac-
tions, use the search features on
the website for the Citrus County
Property Appraiser's Office,
www.pa.citrus.fl.us.


Coffee table trivia; auction advice for a Chinese scroll
ear John: I have a marble top
coffee table that was my
mother's. I would like to know
more about it. It has a thin metal plate
tacked to the underside that says, ., -


"Made in
Spain." There is
also some kind
of sticker that
has "No 14 and
8-445E" on it.
The top is a gray
marble and
quite heavy. I am
not sure about
the type of wood. John Sikorski
There are 50
hand-painted SIKORSKI
cameos in metal ATTIC
frames around
the sides and some other carved metal
details on the sides and legs.
My mom had this as long as I can re-
member but I do not know where or
when she got it. -M., Internet
Dear M.: Coffee tables first came on


See ATTIC/Page E7


m r.. 4
P .W U.
. . . ...- ' . ..... -.. "
Special to the Chronicle
This coffee table is done in Louis XVI style, but was likely made within the past 50 years. The coffee table is a relatively recent invention in
the world of furniture; it came about around the beginning of the 20th century.







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BUGS
Continued from Page E6

avoided will result in death or serious
injury. "WARNING" indicates a po-
tentially hazardous situation, which, if
not avoided could result in death or
serious injury "CAUTION" indicates
a potentially hazardous situation,
which, if not avoided could result in
minor or moderate injury
If pesticides are absolutely neces-


ATTIC
Continued from Page E6

the scene in the early 20th century
They were produced in all the revival
and period styles, though the most
popular today among collectors are
the original Art Deco and Modern cof-
fee tables produced during their re-
spective original periods.
The style of your coffee table is a
version of the Louis XVI era, late 18th
century It was likely made within the
past 50 years. The decorative metal
mounts are probably cast brass but
could also be cast spelter with brass
plating. Potential dollar value is
catch-as-catch-can.
Dear John: I have an antique scroll
that is about 13 feet long and is made-
up of Chinese, Mongolian, and Man-
darin transcripts. I was informed by
Alexandra Von Hawk Laboratories it
might also have some hidden BC writ-
ings found among the scroll along with
a piece of hair woven into it. I have
been through Christie's Fine Art Auc-
tion online and they told me it was
rare and I would have to meet them in
person or send the item.
I have also been in contact with
Princeton, Harvard, and local univer-
sities where I have received the fol-
lowing information. It is an official
document or decree issued from an
emperor of the Qing Dynasty, issued
for Zheng Tingbao, granting him the
title "general," and that the scroll
praised him for his courage and
wisdom.
The scroll is dated by the "lunar cal-
endar, the 25th day of 10th month in
the 11th year of the Guangxu Reign."
(1885) The scroll contains two five-
toed blue dragons to represent the em-
peror. All of this information has been
verified by Shiho Sasaki, conservator,
paintings on paper and silk Asian art
museum of San Francisco, Calif.
I was wondering if you would be
able to help me. I do not know where
else to turn and I have been told this
item is very valuable. It has been


sary, look for the active ingredients
carbaryl, bifenthrin, cyhalothrin, per-
methrin or esfenvalerate. The pesti-
cide may need to be applied directly
to the grasshoppers to be effective.
For more information about lubber
grasshoppers and their control, visit
the University of Florida's website at
www.SolutionsForYourLife.org and
refer to the article titled "Eastern
Lubber Grasshopper."
For more information on Florida-
friendly landscaping topics, call 352-527-
5708 or send an email to

passed down from generation to gen-
eration in my family and I am very in-
terested in getting it appraised. Thank
you ahead of time for anything you can
do to help me. FA, Internet
Dear FA: Yes, if you decide to sell
the scroll, it will have to be mailed to
the selling auction house, which
should not be very expensive to do.
The scroll dates back to 1885, which is
not very old relative to Chinese docu-
ments. My guess is it will not turn out
to be of much dollar value. To check
further on what it might sell for, I sug-
gest you contact Swann Galleries in
New York. They specialize in works on
paper The website is www.swanngal-
leries.com. For a comparison, contact
I.M. Chait Auction House at
www.chait.com. Good luck and let us
know how things work out.
Dear John: We have two figurines
from my mother-in-law. We were won-
dering where they came from and if
you could tell us anything about them.
The man figure has the name JLOZ
Lefton on the bottom. The lady figure
has 10268 the letter C in a circle and
JLOZLefton. Both have the year 1956.
Can you tell me anything about them?
-NB., Internet
Dear N.B.: I wish you had included
photographs. Your two figurines were
made in Japan for the Lefton Com-
pany George Zoltan Lefton started an
importing company in 1941 that con-
tinues into current times.
Most of the decorative pottery,
porcelain, glass and other wares were
produced in Japan. Vintage Lefton
pottery and porcelain figurines are a
specific category of collecting. Most of
the figurines sell in the $5 to
$20 range.


John Sikorski has been a profes-
sional in the antiques business for 30
years. He hosts a call-in radio show,
Sikorski's Attic, on WJUF (90.1 FM)
Saturday from noon to 1 p.m. Send
questions to Sikorski's Attic, c/o The
Citrus County Chronicle, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL
34429 or asksikorski@aol. com.


AudreyDurr@bocc.citrus.fl.us. Visit Cit-
rus County's website at www.bocc.
citrus.fl.us, the Southwest Florida Water
Management District's (SWFWMD)
website at www.WaterMatters.org and
the University of Florida's website at
www.SolutionsForYourLife.org.


The Citrus County Florida Yards &
Neighborhoods program is a free pub-
lic education program that is funded
jointly by the Citrus County Depart-
ment of Water Resources and the
Southwest Florida Water Manage-
ment District


598 or Kim Fuller 3522125752. FAB FIND RIGHT
NEXT TO THE GOLF
AND COUNTRY CLUB.
4 bedroom, 2 both home with over 2000 sq feet
OM HOME a 198 ea 2 of living. BARGAIN PRICED AT $77,900.
d attached 2 car garage. Own private deck Is a super deal for a concrete block home. All
I with fireplace. Lots of closets and storage furnishings included too. MLS# 355082 Kathy
g pole. ONLY $179,000 MS352486 n 52-416-4988
?01-7034 -506 Turner Camp Rd hapmIan I35 -476-49


A BIT OF HEAVEN IS AT
YOUR BACK DOOR!
2003 3 / 22 how. l I ,, I . .. i 11. 1. 1,,,I
Hills for ONLY $169 9001 .... i .t1, l -. i ,, .. I 'l ,a,
serene tropical ge , ,, 1 ,,ii,, .I l, ,, i I .I I , i,, I I
on the screen enclosed lanai. Home boast a split floor plan, cathedral
& tay ceilings, formal dining covered lanai corian counters & wooa
cabinets, interior laundry, finished garage with tons of storage, rounded
corners, plant shelving....make an appointment quick! MIS# 354230
Tomika Spires-Hanssen 352-586-6598 / Kim Fuller 352-212-5752


ADORABLE 3 2 DOUBLEWIDE IN HERNANDO CITY IT S A FANTASTIC TIME TO BUY A PIECE OF THE
HEIGHTS. H ....ii... II .i..... AMERICAN PIE CHEAP AND MAKE A PRICELESS
S I,,,, i ,, 1,,,,, ,, .. IN VESTM ENT ,, I ..... I .. .., .... ..I. .r Ii
I I ........ I, ,, 536 900. 1......... I. 1.. t .1 ......... I 1 .. ........ ......... ........
lu i !! L I 1 1 'U libl .Lu. Luull luL p il k i- Iuughuul. ASKING $419,000. .,L[ I I. lull uLu
Hanssen 352-586-6598 / KmFuller 352-212-5752 Spires-Hanssen 3525866598 KimFuller 352-212752


tII


M OM APPROVEDI 1 ........... ..I.... .....I d..I,
I e Landingds Homie locuied iii a bieouiluking lukelhoni colinuniii
minutes to downtown fun and shopping! Home boasts a rear screened FRESH MEAT OF THE WEEK! Ginormous 5/3/ home with
S porch, split floor plan, vaulted ceilings. Home has received an updated 2565 living on 2.3 Acres for ONLY $109,900! Yes....that
roof, AC, appliances. ASKING $129,900. MLS# 354212. Call means it needs a lot of work! Take a peek it's got great bones!
Tomika 586-6598 or Kim 212-5752. Tomika SpiresAanssen 352-586- MLS# 355148. 2390 Spring Leaf. Tomika Spires-Hanssen
6598/Kim Fuller 352212-5752 352-586-6598 / Km Fuller 352-212-5752


SUNDAY, APRIL 29, 2012 E7






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SYNTHETIC


,


DESIGNERS GET PLAYFUL

WITH PLASTICS


KIM COOK
For The Associated Press
Next time you're
having a backyard
barbecue or going
mod with some
new furniture,
thank science.
Your salad spinner's made of
the same sort of silicone rubber
developed to make Neil Arm-


strong's moon boot. And those
acrylic salad bowls and patio
chairs? World War II fighter pi-
lots needed safer canopies, and
Plexiglas was the answer
Manufacturers of home goods
are quick to adopt innovative ma-
terials and technology, and syn-
thetics have long been a favorite.
The newest ones are a designer's
delight: They're malleable, strong,
lightweight and take color easily.


ABOVE: A selection of acrylic
chairs from Kartell. RIGHT: Wavy
acrylic bowls, available from Art In-
novation Style.
Kartell/Art Innovation Style/Associated Press
The product range in colorful
plastics is expanding, with great
shapes and fun hues.
From a crafting standpoint,
acrylics are easy to work with.
Using heat, they can be stretched
and molded without losing clar-
ity, and joints are heat fused
rather than glued or screwed,
which makes a finished piece
See Page E9


E8 SUNDAY, APRIL 29, 2012







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


All about the alluring Anise plant


here are about 40 species of II-
licum or Anise plants that
evolved in warm temperate to
sub-tropical regions of the Americas
and eastern Asia. They are moderately
frost-hardy, bushy, evergreen shrubs
that slowly grow
to small tree size
at maturity if not
pruned. Anise
leaves, flowers
and fruit are al-
luringly fra-
grant. Illicum is
a Latin word
meaning allure.
Ch i n e s e
Jane Weber Anise, L. verum,
JANE'S grows the
largest at 26 feet.
GARDEN It produces star
anise, an aro-
matic spice used in Chinese cooking.
Slow-growing False Anise or Japanese
Tree Anise, I. anisatum, has excep-
tionally aromatic bark and matures at


See Page E10


OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 1-3PM


JANE WEBER/Special to the Chronicle
Florida Anise thrives best in part to full shaded, well-drained, moist, acid soil with abundant organic humus. Its natural habitat is along wood-
land streams and low areas of North Florida west to Louisiana.


STYLE
Continued from Page E8

virtually seamless.
Two Palm Springs, Calif., designers
- Larry Abel and Raymond McCal-
lister run Art Style Innovation, a
fun factory of whimsical takes on vin-
tage and modern d6cor The duo's
curvy acrylic vases and rippled
bowls, done in neon hues, are d6cor
dancing. Their playful acrylic book-
ends come in a variety of silhouettes
including cats, roosters, dogs, flow-
ers, even a pair of shapely female
legs. You'll find clear acrylic cube ta-
bles, too, in modern takes on classic
architectural design. (wwwartstyle
innovation.com, $35 and up)
Plexi-craft in New York stocks a
wide array of furniture in crystal-
clear acrylic. The material works
well in small spaces entryways,
boudoirs, small living rooms be-
cause it's nearly invisible. The com-


pany will custom tint, however; de-
signer Benjamin Noriega-Ortiz likes
to use a milky white acrylic for an
ethereal quality. (wwwplexi-craft
com)
Italian design powerhouse Kartell
has frequently dominated the syn-
thetic materials marketplace, with
"wow" factor pieces such as Philippe
Starck's Louis Ghost chair and Fer-
ruccio Laviani's Bourgie lamp.
There's a wide range of colorful
transparent pieces in the company's
collection. (www.allmodern.com,
from $73)
Kartell also has manufactured
Starck's Bubble chair, a cartoonishly
scaled piece that looks like an over-
size upholstered chair but is made
entirely out of polyethylene. It'll sur-
vive indoors or out, and comes in sev-
eral shades including pale yellow,
black and zinc white. (www.all
modern.com, $680)
There was a time when kitchen


6045 W. Ainsley Ct. Crystal River, FL 34429
Maintenance Free 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath Villa.
Directions: 486 to Meadowcrest entrance. Turn at Left at first
stop sign, on MacVicar. Go straight, several streets to Right
on Ainsley. Villa on Right at end of cul-de-sac. i
MLS#354805 $87,500 \:3 T
352-279-5058
EXIT Realty Leaders
352-527-1112


CITRUS HILLS CONDO
Sought after Greenbriar cottage unit. Maintenance free,
move-in condition, fully furnished 2/2 with cathedral ceiling
& carport. Community amenities include pool & tennis
courts. Citrus Hills Social Membership is available, but not
required. See it today! MLS #353964. $67,900
Hwy. 486 to Citrus Hills Blvd., to right on
Glassboro, to left into Bldg. 20 to Unit 1A.
Alan DeMichael 352-613-5752
Jeanne Gaskill 352-476-5582
m, AMERICAN 35246-3 aoxs
ERA REALTY & INVESTMENTS 352-746-3600


See Page E10


* c


SUNDAY, APRIL 29, 2012 E9







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


STYLE
Continued from Page E9

cupboards and drawers were
full of boring basics. But today's
cook has a paintbox of hues
available when buying mixing
bowls, cooking tools and
utensils.
Whether it's a Kitchenaid
blender in hot pink or a set of
Rachael Ray's sunny orange
cookware, there's more color in
good-quality, functional, syn-
thetic-material gadgets than ever
before.
Flexible silicone has fans in


JANE
Continued from Page E9

20 feet Both Asian species grow
in cold zones 8 to 11. Collectors
must seek sources on the
Internet.
Two native Anise shrubs grow
in Florida. Both grow in cold
Zones 7 to 10 and evolved in hot,
humid Heat Zone 10. Florida or
Red Anise, I. floridanum, is not
xeric (drought-tolerant) and
needs part to full shaded, well-
drained, moist, acid soil with
abundant organic humus. Anise
must have non-alkaline, lime-
free conditions. It benefits from
a protective layer of decorative
top mulch to prevent soil mois-
ture evaporation and moderate
soil temperatures.
Its natural habitat is along
woodland streams and low areas
of North Florida west to
Louisiana, so it's best used as a
specimen plant in an irrigated


fashion, where accessories de-
signers love its pliability, color
friendliness and soft feel.
The same characteristics
make it big with kitchen and
home designers, who also appre-
ciate that it's dishwasher-
friendly. Sky-blue spatulas,
tangerine whisks just about
any kitchen tool can be found in
a fun, friendly hue.
San Francisco-based Bkr
makes a glass water bottle with a
silicone sleeve, in hip shades
like Jet black, Rocket red, Julep
teal and Space indigo. Bkr do-
nates to cancer research, as well
as clean water projects in Africa.
(www.mybkr.com, $28)

garden setting, perhaps near a
pond or water feature. Compan-
ion forest plants include needle,
sabal and bluestem (Sabal minor)
palms; trees like bald cypress,
loblolly bay, red maple and river
birch; flowers such as Florida vio-
let, blue spiderwort and narrow-
leaf sunflower; and Pinxter azalea
and Walter's viburnum shrubs.
Yellow or Ocala Anise, I. parv-
iflorum, is often used as a dense
screening plant, as it adapts well
to dry sites in full sun provided
the soil is amended with plenty
of fine mulch or humus. En-
demic to North and Central
Florida, Yellow Anise grows nat-
urally in wetter swamps and
hammocks but is highly adapt-
able and readily available. It
makes a dense screening or
hedge plant. To create a denser
bush with a rounded form, prune
twice yearly while young. Natu-
ral height is 20 feet high by 6 feet
in diameter, but Yellow Anise
prunes easily to stay shorter. I
used four plants spaced 4 feet


Lifefactory goes one step fur-
ther in the category with not only
an adult bottle, but baby bottles
and sippy cups. The collection
comes in cheerful hues like
lemon, raspberry, lilac and
spring green. (www.lifefactory

apart to cover about 20 feet of
road frontage from both front
corners of my new property.
They will grow to provide a pri-
vacy screen and windbreak
while blocking dust, headlights
and traffic noise. They will never
get too tall to interfere with the
overhead utility lines.
Inside the Ocala Anise hedge,
away from the front corners, is a
triangle of a 'Little Gem' Magno-
lia flanked by red cedars about
11 to 15 feet away The plantings
will blend into a native
hedgerow. Smaller shrubs like
saltbush, wax myrtle and azaleas
fill in the understory Wildflow-
ers planted to eventually cover
the ground include perennial
evergreen goldenrod; vining
sunshine mimosa; self-seeding
beach sunflower, blue spider-
wort, coreopsis, and red salvia,
as well as some bunching
grasses. The biodiversity pro-
vides nectar and pollen, cover
and nest sites for birds, insects
and other wildlife


BANK OWNED-HOMOSASSA, FL
Handyman doublewide on corner lot with
detached 2 story garage. $32,900




OAKS GOLF COURSE-HERNANDO, FL
Best buy for 1/2 acre on the 3rd tee.
$29,900 MLS#321216


com, $14.99 and up)
Target's Room Essentials line
has everything from colanders to
mixing bowls in a rainbow of
pink, turquoise, lime or blue
heat-resistant synthetics. (www
target.com, $7.99 and up)

Native Anises are relatively
pest-free, low-maintenance
shrubs after a year or two when
they become established. Alter-
nate, leathery leaves are dark
green on Florida Anise and a
lighter, yellower leaf on Ocala
Anise. Florida Anise has attrac-
tive dark red flowers about 1 to
1.5 inches in diameter in the leaf
axils. Ocala Anise has small,
quarter-inch, yellow flowers.
Fruit follows fertilization in late
summer to fall farther north. The
woody seed pod is star-shaped,
with one seed in each of the
eight pointed carpels. A carpel is
one element of a compound fe-
male pistil where seeds develop.

Jane Weber is a Professional
Gardener and Consultant Semi-
retired, she grows thousands of
native plants. Visitors are wel-
come to her Dunnellon, Marion
County garden. For an appoint-
ment call 352-249-6899 or con-
tact JWeberl2385@gmail. com.


BANK OWNED-INVERNESS, FL
Commercial corner on Hwy 44 East with approx.
1300 sq. ft building. $71,900 MLS#354972


BANK BUILDING-INVERNESS, FL
Prime commercial location on Main Street. Over 1400
sq. ft situated on 100 x 212 lot. $450,000


CALL Roy Bass TODAY (352)726-2471
Email: roybass@fampabay.rr.com www.allcitrusrealty.com After Hours ,,,,302-6714 A


Whether it's a Kitchenaid blender in hot
pink or a set of Rachael Ray's sunny
orange cookware, there's more color in
good-quality, functional, synthetic
material gadgets than ever before.


How a tree


grows and


thrives
Like the human body, tree growth
is a miraculous process. Water,
sugar and nutrients are ab-
sorbed through the tree by the root
system and transported from the earth
up to the leaves
through hollow
cells (shaped
like big long "
drinking straws
with very tiny -_
openings) found
in the sapwood.
Leaves absorb
carbon dioxide
from the air, Kerry Kreider
which they com- THE
bine with chloro-
phyll (the green ARBORIST
matter of leaves)
and sunlight to manufacture food in the
form of various sugars for the tree's use.
This process is called photosynthe-
sis. A byproduct of this process is the
release of oxygen.
In fact, without the production of
oxygen by trees and other green plants
on our planet, humans and other ani-
mals could not survive. This is why we
need to preserve what trees we have.
Besides shade, beauty and habitat,
trees provide a great benefit to our
world. The nutrients (sugar solutions)
manufactured by the leaves are con-
ducted through inner bark (or phloem
cells) to the areas of a tree where growth
takes place, in the tips of branches and
roots and the cambium layer The cam-
bium is the layer of reproductive cells
found between the inner bark (phloem)
and sapwood portions of the tree.
The layer of cells creates new sap-
wood cells toward the inside and new
phloem cells towards the outside of the
cambium. Thus, the cambium layer is
responsible for the tree's outward
growth in diameter and circumference.
Trees, like the human body, need
care and nutrition in order to main-
tain a long, healthy life cycle.

Kerry Kreider is a practicing arborist
and a member of the International
Society ofArboriculture, a tree
preservationist and president ofAc-
tion Tree Service. You can reach him
at 352-726-9724 or actionpro
arborist@yahoo. com.


NEW HOME & HOMESITE IN SUGARMILL WOODS


Custom Homes
throughout the
.... . .a Nature Coast



Of Citrus
P ackae CBC049056
*f HfOMEB 00UILDER

HOMEBUILDER


Hwy. 19, 4/2 miles south of Homosassa Springs. 8016 S. Suncoast Blvd. f f 'r I
352-382-4888 www.sweetwaterhomes.com swhsales@tampabay.rr.com
NEW HOMES, VILLAS, REMODELS & COMMERCIAL


E10 SUNDAY, APRIL 29, 2012


-<

u
m







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Put together a


pepper garden


TABITHA ALTERMAN
Natural Home & Garden

If you've ever stood in
the produce aisle and
gasped at the price of pep-
pers, you're not alone.
Tasty peppers especially
those beyond basic green
bells can be expensive.
Couple that with the fact
that peppers are one of the
easiest plants to grow, and
you've got an easy choice
for this summer's garden.
In their glorious array of
bright hues, peppers are
worth growing for beauty
alone. They're also nutri-
ent powerhouses, chock-


AC
Continued from Page A5

provide 10 percent more
efficiency over the cooling
season than non-shaded
air.
Seal your ducts to save
energy and money year
round. Sealing the duct
joints with mastic and cloth
tape insures you receive all
the cool air the air handler
produces. Plain grey duct
tape will dry out and peel
off over time and is not rec-
ommended.
Keep your thermostat
set to 78 to 80 degrees in
the summer and 68 to 70
degrees in the winter.
Changing your thermostat
down in the summer or up
in the winter beyond those
settings can cost you about
7 to 10 percent per degree
on your utility bill.
There are two posi-
tions for your fan switch on
thermostat, auto and on.
Make sure the fan switch is
in the auto position. If you
leave the fan in the on posi-
tion, your utility bill could
grow about $25 per month
to operate the fan 24/7.
To make yourself
"feel" cooler in the sum-
mer time, use ceiling fans.


full of disease-fighting phy-
tochemicals and antioxi-
dants and among the
richest natural sources of
vitamins A and C. Keep
reading to learn about
how to grow peppers
successfully
Planting Peppers
If you hope to grow rare
varieties, which include
some of the tastiest pep-
pers, you'll want to start
plants from seed two to
three months before your
last spring frost date. Start
seeds indoors in a warm

See PEPPER/Page E12

That could allow you to in-
crease your thermostat set-
tings as high as two to three
degrees in the summer
Neglecting necessary
yearly maintenance on
your air conditioner en-
sures a steady decline in
equipment performance
while energy use steadily
increases and your operat-
ing costs go up.


Bert Henderson, M.Ed., is
a consultant for sustain-
ability, renewable ener-
gies, and is involved in
cutting edge "green"
building product research
with AZS Consulting in
Gainesville. He is also a
national speaker in sus-
tainability and writes and
delivers professional
training programs in sus-
tainability, renewable en-
ergies, energy efficient
design, and "green" con-
struction. He has been a
Sugarmill Woods resident
for 23 years, a Florida res-
ident for 53 years, and is a
retired faculty member
with the Programs for Re-
source Efficient Commu-
nities at the University of
Florida and building sci-
ence faculty for the Bush-
nell Center for
Sustainability


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E4

I then scrubbed the legs
on the overalls with a rela-
tively clean hand brush. I
took them inside and
washed them with regular
detergent, and we were very
surprised at how clean they
came out. Not all of the
stains were out, but they
looked better than they had
in a while. I was impressed,
and the dishwashing liquid
did not fade the color at all.
- C Maurer, forums
My top frugal living item:
I use a stockpot to dye my
white socks and T-shirts,
which look grungy due to
hard water. I dye them any
color in the rainbow using
the on-the-burner stove
method. -Larabelle, Texas
Reusable canning lids:
My mom found reusable
Tattler lids at reusablecan-
ninglids.com. They work
with pressure canning,
water bath canning and vac-
uum sealing. At 58 to 66
cents apiece, these are
going to save a lot of money
over a lifetime of preserving
food. They would pay for
themselves by the fourth
use. Constance, New
Jersey
Whiten toenails from
dark polish: Use whitening
toothpaste for toes that get
stained from dark nail pol-
ish. I used a nailbrush, but
an old toothbrush would
work. -Penny forums
Take before it's tossed: I
get free hand soap from a
housekeeper at work who
gives me the old soap dis-
penser bags when she has to
put in the new ones. She re-
stocks the dispensers at the
end of my daytime shift to
make sure there is enough
soap for the nightshift. I saw
her about to throw one of
the pouches out and I told
her I would take it home
and pour it into my dis-
penser She now saves all of
them for me. I cut the corner
off the pouch and use a fun-
nel to pour it into a recycled
bottle. -Leigh, Florida

Dear Sara: Do you have a
recipe for healthy deodor-
ant? I once tried one that I


heard about on a radio sta-
tion; it was made with alco-
hol, lemon juice and lime
juice, poured into a spray
bottle. It seemed to work,
but it burned after shaving.
Do you have any other
recipes? -Rita, email
Dear Rita: You can apply
witch hazel with a cotton
ball. Here's a recipe and a
link to more on my website:
Deodorant
E 1 part organic virgin co-
conut oil.
E 1 part baking soda.
1 part cornstarch.
Mix melted oil with re-
maining ingredients and
store in a jar. Apply with
your fingers or cotton ball.
The best time to apply de-
odorant is right after a
shower and/or before bed-
time. (Contributed by
reader D.L. from Florida.)
Deodorant recipes: fru-
galvillage.com/forums/make
-yourself/67931-make-your-
self-deodorant-recipes.
html.
Dear Sara: I have some
red lava rock that was put
down over black plastic in
the front of my house about
eight years ago. It now has
green mold or moss all over
the top of it What can I do to
get the green stuff off? I plan
on putting some more down
on top of it, but I think I
need to get the green stuff
off it first. Please help! -
Wava R., email
Dear Wava: I had the
same issue with red lava
rocks in a garden area at my
house, and I removed it all,
replacing it with mulch. It
was located in a shady area
with poor drainage, and I
knew the moss would con-
tinue to grow back. I wasn't
fond of the rocks because I
have kids and there always
seemed to be stray rocks on
the pathway So one option
is removing it completely I
suppose it really depends
on how much effort you
want to put into this and
how much you like the lava
rocks. You can start by try-
ing vinegar, or possibly even
power washing. There are
spray products to kill moss,
too, but you're still going to
have to remove the dead
moss from the rocks. If you
do go this route, I would re-
move the black plastic, or at


least poke some holes into
it. It's not a good idea to re-
move and replace the rocks
with new rocks or to top it
off; the fact that moss grows
there indicates that there is
probably poor water
drainage in the area. But
moss is pretty popular
lately You might just con-
sider keeping it.
Dear Sara: My daughter
got Silly Putty on her sheets.
Any idea how to remove it?
-Brenda, Illinois
Dear Brenda: According
to Crayola's stain guide
(crayola.com/canwehelp/
staintips/pdf/15.pdf), you
can use WD-40. Scrape off
excess Silly Putty, spray the
remainder with WD-40 and
let stand a few minutes.
Scrape off excess Silly Putty
with a dull-edge knife or
metal spoon. Re-spray with
WD-40 and wipe off stain
with cotton balls. If any stain
remains, saturate a cotton
ball with rubbing alcohol,
blot the stain and rinse.
Wipe any remaining residue
or stain with a damp sponge
or cloth moistened with liq-
uid dish soap.
Wash fabric per the man-
ufacturer's direction.
Dear Sara: I'm having an
outdoor wedding in May Do
you have any outdoor DIY
decoration ideas? -
Makayla G., email


SUNDAY, APRIL 29, 2012 El1

Dear Makayla: I like to
see fresh fruit and flowers.
You can use clay pots or
Mason jars for candles or
floral vases. The jars would
work well as drinking
glasses, too. You can serve
drinks from glass beverage
dispensers or put bottled
drinks in a large galvanized
steel tub with ice. Paper
lanterns or Tiki torches are
pretty, as well. Paper para-
sols or tissue paper pom-
poms or flowers would bring
in a lot of color. For a tissue
pom-pom tutorial, visit
aestheticnest.com/2012/02/
craft-eyelet-tissue-pom-
poms-tutorial.html. You
could use white string-lights
or luminarias, too.


Sara Noel is the owner of
Frugal Village (wwwfru-
galvillage.com), a website
tha t offers practical,
money-saving strategies for
everyday living. To send
tips, comments or ques-
tions, write to Sara Noel,
c/o Universal Uclick, 1130
Walnut Street, Kansas City,
MO 64106, or email
sara@frugalvillage. com.


INV HIGHLANDS -2/212 pool RAINBOW SPGS -211.5 Furnished
nome on oversized loI wibonus & Move -n Ready on goll course
Florida room 589,900 #352525 #346402 577,500
OPEN HOUSE
SUNDAY APRIL 29th 10am 4pm
4 Bedrooms, 2.5 Bathrooms
Formal Dinning, 25X13 Family
Room $159,900 #352325
IRECTIONS: Hwy 44 to R on Lecanto Hwy (491) to L on
Mustang to R on N. Elkcam Blvd to L on Century Blvd to L
o Pickinz Way to R on Babcock. R on N. Independence Way







E12 SUNDAY, APRIL 29, 2012


PEPPER
Continued from Page Ell

(about 85 degree), sunny lo-
cation with lightly moist soil.
Pepper seedlings benefit
from being transplanted into
a larger container before
going into the ground.
Harden seedlings off by
gradually exposing them to
outdoor conditions for about
a week before planting.
You can also buy pepper
transplants from a garden
center or mail-order sup-
plier Either way, you want to
plant seedlings outdoors a
couple of weeks after any
danger of frost has passed;
peppers planted too soon
will be stunted. If your grow-
ing season is short, don't
delay planting. Peppers like
a long season and plenty of
sunshine. You can grow pep-


OBAMI


Afca


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


pers in every state, even
Alaska, but in cooler areas,
use row covers to heat up
plantings and choose fast-
maturing varieties (check
"days to maturity" on labels
- most sweet peppers ma-
ture more quickly than hot
peppers, often in 60 to 90
days). All peppers are peren-
nials, so you can pot them up
and move them to a sunny
spot indoors in fall, where
they will survive winter and
leaf out again in spring.
Dig planting holes so
buried plants will sit about an
inch deeper than they were
in their starter pots. Set
plants about 1 1/2 feet apart
with 1 1/2 to 3 feet between
rows. Peppers also grow well
in containers, provided they
receive plenty of sun. All va-
rieties benefit from regularly
moist soil enriched with fin-
ished compost High Mowing
Organic Seeds recommends


I' ~


It/SI
BE ST
rE' r


IX]=111[]6 IAGENT O I I DAYS A W1 I


All peppers are
perennials, so
you can pot
them up and
move them to a
sunny spot
indoors in fall,
where they will
survive winter
and leaf out
again in spring.

using a high-phosphorus or-
ganic fertilizer when trans-
planting (nitrogen,
phosphorus and potassium
content are labeled on fertil-
izers). Don't use high-nitro-
gen fertilizer on pepper
plants, as it can reduce
yields. Professional pepper
grower Susan Welsand rec-
ommends dissolving a table-
spoon of Epsom salts in a
gallon of water to spray on
leaves every couple of weeks,
which will help with fruit set-
ting especially once tem-
peratures are high. Pepper
grower Joe Arditi recom-
mends fertilizing with an or-
ganic fish emulsion spray
every other week (on weeks
you don't use Epsom salts).
Karyn Bischoff and Nick
Nickens of Stargazer Peren-
nials say the secret to great
hot peppers is calcium,
which they supply in the form


of bone meal worked into the
soil every couple of weeks
through the growing season.
Harvesting Peppers
Nearly all peppers start
out green (a few varieties
start light purple or yellow)
then graduate to white, yel-
low, orange, red and some-
times dark purple or black.
As they mature, many flavor
and nutritional compounds
increase. So eat them green
(or at any other stage) if you
like, but you'll get more bang
for your buck if you wait If
you want bright red peppers
earlier in the season, grow
varieties with fewer days to
maturity such as Lipstick and
Gypsy bell peppers. Be quick
about harvesting the first few
fruits; it will encourage in-
creased production.
To save seeds from open-
pollinated peppers (the type
that will replicate parent
plants), simply select the
largest seeds and let them
air-dry completely Always
store saved seeds in a cool,
dark, dry place such as in
opaque seed packets inside
a lidded jar in the basement.
Excerpted from Natural
Home & Garden, a national
magazine that provides
practical ideas, inspiring ex-
amples and expert opinions
about healthy, ecologically
sound, beautiful homes. To
read more articles from Nat-
ural Home & Garden, please
visit www.NaturalHome
Magazine.com or call (800)
340-5846 to subscribe. Copy-
right2011 by Ogden Publica-
tions Inc.


KE "Always There For You"
REAL GAIL COOPER
NmE Multi-Million Dollar Realtor
ER Cell: (352) 634-4346
OFFICE : (352) 382-1700x309
E-mail me: homes4u3@mindspring.com


CUSTOM BUILT 12-ROOM HOME!
* Set on .59 acres on #1 Fairway of Pine
Vaulted family room has gas fireplace
SUpdated kitchen has newer appliances
* Oversize side entry 3-car garage
* New roof in 2011 well for irrigation
* Perfect home for extended family
#354992 $159,000


END UNIT GOLF COURSE CONDO!
* Newer painted interior and ceilings
2 Bedrm/2 Bath/Covered parking
New carpet in glassed Florida room
* Newer appliances and hot water heater
* Dual sinks in Master bath
* Community pool close by
#347098 $88,900


Weigh options


for outdoor


play surfaces



Give kids a soft place to fall


MELISSA KOSSLER
DUTTON
For The Associated Press

Joshua Barry knows that
wipeouts are inevitable
when children are climb-
ing and sliding on outdoor
play sets. So he placed
shredded rubber under
and around the climbing
toys his two children use in
the backyard of their Au-
rora, Ohio, home.
"It gives me peace of mind
knowing there's a little bit of
cushioning," he said.
Safety experts say it's im-
portant to address the area
around a swing set or
climbing equipment.
"Each year hundreds of
thousands of children are
treated in emergency
rooms for playground in-
juries, and these are pre-
ventable," said Dr.
Brunilda Nazario, senior
medical editor at WebMD,
a health information
website.
The key to avoiding in-
juries is adding surface
materials that will cushion
a fall, said Kate Carr, pres-
ident of Safe Kids, a Wash-
ington, D.C.-based
organization dedicated to
preventing childhood in-
juries.
Asphalt and concrete are
too hard, as are grass and
turf, Nazario said, since
normal wear and tear de-
stroys their quality and ab-
sorption properties.
Good options include
rubber mulch, wood
mulch, sand fine gravel or
safety-tested rubber mat,
which are more forgiving
than grass and dirt are
when a child falls, Nazario
said.


How deep you should lay
the ground material de-
pends on what you use and
how high the play equip-
ment is. The U.S. Product
Safety Commission recom-
mends using at least 9
inches of mulch or shred-
ded rubber for equipment
up to 7 feet high. For sand
or pea gravel, the commis-
sion recommends at least a
9-inch layer for equipment
up to 5 feet.
Mulch either wood or
rubber is a better choice
than sand or gravel be-
cause it provides more
shock absorption, said
Rick Jess, vice president of
merchandising for lawn
and gardening at Lowe's
headquarters in
Mooresville, N.C.
Wood mulch is less ex-
pensive than rubber, but it
decomposes and fades and
has to be added to each
year, he said. Rubber
mulch, which is increas-
ingly popular, lasts much
longer. It also is more than
double the price of tradi-
tional mulch, he said.
"It holds its color," he
said. "It doesn't wash away
It doesn't decompose."
Although cheaper than
mulch, sand and pea gravel
have become less popular
surfaces for backyard play
sets because they don't stay
put as well, added Ace
Hardware's Lou Manfre-
dini in Chicago.
"With sand and pea
gravel, it's a mess issue.
Sand moves around the
yard quite a bit and can
even get tracked into the
house on kids' shoes," said
the Ace Home Expert.

See SURFACE/Page E15


REAL ESTATE, INC.
5569 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY.
CRYSTAL RIVER,FL 34429
OFcE: (352) 795-6633
WWWALEXRE.COM E-MAIL: SALES@ALEXRE.COM


SeeVitua Turs@.Aw.miijaIehome..isu.i.. I








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



ghronicle


1st last, sec. Very nice
home. Ask for Walter
(561) 248-4200
INVERNESS
RENT SPECIAL: 55+ park
on the water w/5 piers
for fishing and
enjoyment, clubhouse,
onslte shuffleboard, &
much more! 1 BR home
$325 2BR home $450,
Includes H20. 2 BR, 1.5
bath, Park Model $500.
1/1 furn. w/CH/A,
on the water, $600.
Section 8 accepted.
(352) 476-4964
OLD HOMOSASSA
2 bedroom. 1-1/2 bath.
UNDER NEW MANAGE-
MENT Cedars Lake MH
and RV park with 1 and 2
bedroom mobile homes
and RV sites available
call:628-4441
cedarslakepark@aol.com




1/1 remod, shed $5k
1/lscrnrm/carprt $6k
2/1 carprt/rf.over $7k
furn, move-in ready
55+ park, clean quiet
Close to shopping
CR/Homossasa area
Owner Financing
Owner 352-220-2077

BOOM!!
New 3/2 Jacobsen
home 5 yr. Warranty
$2,650 down, Only
$297 44/mo.
Fixed rate! W.A.C,
Come & view
352-621-9182

CRYSTAL RIVER 2/2,
extremely reasonable,
owner finance $27,000
(352) 564-8057


down or trade anyth-
ing of value, trade
cars, boats, jewelry,
guns, etc. Call for
private interview
352-621-3807 After
hours 352-613-0587

NEW DEALER REPO
Beautiful 3/2 with
over 1600 sq. ft.
Includes appliance
pkg, delivery & set up
ONLY $59,900 or
5% down & $454/mo.
WAC 352-621-3807

ONLY $284.42
PER MONTH
A New 2/2 Home
On your lot,
Only $500 down. This
is a purchase W.A.C
Call to See
352-621-9181

Palm Harbor Homes
4/2 from $499 mo
Loaded. 3/2 from
$399 mo Loaded.
Homes on your lot
0 down.
800-622-2832 X 210

USED HOME/REPO'S
Doublewides from
$8,500.
Singwides from
$3,500.
New Inventory Daily
352-621-9183




Homossassa 2/2
nicely furnished
MH on canal, dock,
fenced yard,
W/D,shed short/long
term 1 st/Ist/sec $850
352-220-2077


NEW Flooring, $5000
Down, $435
(352) 302-9217



61 S. Atkins Terr.
Lecanto Very Nice 2 bed-
room. 1 bath. Mobile
Home in clean 55+ Park,
This is in very good con-
dition. Central Air And
Heat. New refrigerator,
Mostly Furnished. $230
park rent. $7500 Neg.
Please call 352-302-6586
1/1 remod, shed $5k
1 /1scrnrm/carprt $6k
2/1 carprt/rf.over $7k
furn, move-in ready
55+ park, clean quiet
Close to shopping
CR/Homossasa area
Owner Financing
Owner 352-220-2077

Lee k
CRYSTAL RIVER
VILLAGE 55+
A SUPER BUY 2/2/den
1457sq.ft 05 Hmof Merit
all appliances, carport,
Ig screen room im-
maculate $39,900
(352)419-6926
HOMOSASSA'S
Best Housing Value
Modern homes from
$8,400 or Lease to Own
from $139/mo.
$800.down + Lot rent at
Evanrldge Community
an exceptional 55+Park
352 628-5977
INVERNESS
55+ Park on the water
w/5 piers for fishing &
enjoyment, clubhouse,
onslte shuffleboard, and
much more! 2 BR 1.5 BA
or $2.900. 352-476-4964


2/2, totally remodeled,
furnished, w/Washer
& Dryer.... $5K
(352)634-1171
Stoneridge Landing
55+ Comm. Resales
starting @$13,500
Financing avail
1-800-779-1226
(352) 637-1400
WESTWIND VILLAGE 55+
Park. Updated 2/2 DW's
for sale. Reasonable
(352) 628-2090













835 NE Hwy 19
Crystal River, Fl
(352) 795-0021
View our website
C21NatureCoast.com




6139 Royal Drive
Homosassa
Waterfront 2/2/2.

'875mo.


CHASSAHOWITZKA
3/2 Wtrfront DW, $600.
3/2 Furnished DW., $600
2/2 DW $500
Agent (352) 382-1000


Lakefront /1.5/1 ............ $625
2/2/1 ............... ....... $650
2/1/1 ............................... $575
Roomy 2/2/2.................$650
2/2 Condo......................$550
1/l Apt........................ $375
2/1 Apt....................... $450

2/1.5/1 ................... $625

Waterfront2/2/1......... $750
Jennifer Fudge,
Property Manager
Cheryl Scruggqqs,
Realtor-Associate
352-726-9010

-ACTION
RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REALTY, INC.
352-795-7368

959 Mayo Dr.
Crystal River
$650
1/1 Studio, Fully Furnished
6 mo+, Heated Pool

1586 N. Endicott Pt.
Crystal River
$1300
2/2/2 Furnished, villa in
Meadowcrest. Inc. uti.

9432 E. Gable Ct.
Inverness
$700
2/2/1 home in Village Green
fenced w/screen room

Over 3,000 Homes
and Properties
listed at
www.naturecoast
homefront.com


--I

FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025
HOMOSASSA
1BR, Scrn. Porch, Boat
Dock, Stove, refrig. W&D,
cable, util. incld. $600.
mo.+ sec., 352-628-6537

INVERNESS
2 bedroom- 1-1/2 bath
VILLA- lanai, quiet, adj.
to State Park, commu-
nity pool, lawn svc.,
55+Adult, financially
secure, ref./dep. rq. Will
consider lease w/option
to buy. $650/mo.
727 862 3264 aft.5p, or
leave, msg.
forrkoen@hotmail.com




Alexander Real Estate
(352) 795-6633
Crystal River Apts
2 BR/1 BA $375-$500

BEVERLY HILLS
I Room Efflclency +
Kitchen. All Utilities,
Cable Included
$525 mo. pet ok
352- 228-2644

CRYSTAL RIVER
Large.2/1 incl water
sewer, W/D hook up
$475 (352)212-9205

INVERNESS
1/1 $400 2/1.. $500.
near hosp352-422-2393


A Beautiful place
to come home too.
35 units on private
street, situated on 10
wooded acres, near
Crystal River &
7 Rivers Hosp. fish-
Ing, walking, trails,
shopping near by.
Old Florida setting,
quite, clean well
malnt. central
laundry room.
352-795-3719
Directions:
Hwy 19 turn W. at
Days Inn, first right
onto Tallahassee Rd










YIr\\'orldl first

Need a jih
or a
qualified
employee?


This area's
#1
employment
source!


S .... ....


Elderly (62+)
Handicap/Disabled
wHith or without
children
1Bds $396;
2 Bds $ 436
TDD# 800-955-8771
"This institution is an
Equal Opportunity
Provider & Employer."






Over 3,000 Homes
and Properties
listed at
www.naturecoast
homefront.com


SUNDAY, APRIL 29, 2012 E13


To place an ad, call 563-5966



Classifieds


In Print


.and


Online


All

iThe Time


uOnice Space for Rent
800 sf, down town, CR
W. of US 19 Avail. May 1
Furnishing Avail.
(352) 422-6579





INVERNESS
Regency Park 2/2
Fr. PI. $650. 1st & last
No pets/No smoking
(352) 637-6993


SUGARMILL
WOODS 2/2/1
furnished, short or long
term.River Links
Realty(352) 628-1616


3 PROPERTIES IN CITRUS COUNTY, FL

DS8ABS 2 Business Distri Homes, Inverness
D65. Foreclosed Waterfront Acreage, Ozello
DG591- Forecloedd 1 Waterfront Lots/Acreage, Ozelo


May 1-2
On-Site & Online
emwiwtlefordMdtt
Tra m wiliteforf, l di trIk
E*Bt 8r ,HRAOI&A 45t I 10%9


~.


C.R/Homosassa HERNANDO Las Brisas CRYSTAL RIVER PARK MODEL CAST R REATI' INVERNESS Ventura Village FLORAL CITY
1& 2 Br. turn, quiet park Mobile Home Park, 55+, 4/2, on 5 Acres, nice 1 BR, CHA, Irg encl 2/1, Tri-plex, Great Loc., Viu ge STOREFRONT 1000 Sq Ft
Util. incl. clean, shrt/long 2/2, Furnished, clean, 15 X 30 family room, sun rm.cov porch on J clean & roomy. no pets Apartments Ideal location, corner
term 352 220-2077 own your own lot, Car- w/wet bar, fireplace. Lake Rousseau, boat Manaemn l n. $500.mo $300. Sec. 3580 E. Wood Knoll Hwy 41 & 48. $595 mo.
CRYSTAL RIVER port, attached shed, Reduced $139,500. parking $12K obo J.W. MORTON 33 N i. Cf 352-341-1847 Lane 813-310-5391
2br1ba Inclwater club house, heated (352) 465-8346 (386) 451-9266 REAL ESTATE, INC. Invr- L 34LECANTO Hernando, FL 34442
2br, iba, I water, pool, Priced to sell. H1645 W. MAIN ST 3(352) 637-6349
trash, frdge, st, W&D pool Ped sell. HERNANDO 2/2 DW 1EWMN ST lF rg 2/2, H/A, screen
$495mo 352-587-2555 765-212-0348 On lot, with Shed & Deck SINGLEWIDE Property Management porch, water incl. $500. NowAcceting
HOMOSASSA N2562 N. Treasure Pt. 5 piers to fish from, must : I -4 FS 4191 Applications
2/1, $450. mo. + sec. Over 30 homes on $29,900 obo be approved $1500 Need a Good Tenant? 'o. 352-697-5900
(352) 344-5457 display. Bad credit 352-464-0719 (352) 344-9705 .- -,--- r s SEVEN RIVERS Central H/A
O.K. I fiance any- APTS Storage;Carpet CRYSTAL RIVER
HOMOSASSA body, good rates. HOMOSASSA STONEBROOK 55+ Laundry Facilities; Appealing Professional
3/2 D/W $650 m o., IUs ou, r In n s- our 3/2 nc d Yarde .a.. . .. n Sie MA .m


I *. COM 0 8 3 7









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


HOMOSASSA
1/1 Non-smoker. $425
Fst/Sec. Pets? 795-0207
INVERNESS
2/1, Clean, W/D Hk.-up,
No pets, No smoking
$550mo. (352)220-4818




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




CRYSTAL RIVER
1, 2 & 3 Bedrms Furn. &
Unfurn. Like New Wkly,
Mnth Yrly 352-302-1370




INVERNESS
East Cove Waterfront,
turn., 2/2, C/A carport,
shed, $650
352-476-4964












Kristi Bortz
Let our property
management team
help you with your
short or long term
rentals.
See all our rentals in
Citrus Co.
www.plantation

352-795-0782 or
866-795-0784




BEVERLY HILLS
2/1 carport, remodeled
$575 first, last, sec
(786)286-1163
BEVERLY HILLS
Lg. 2/2/1, + Fm. Rm
$635. mo. 352-795-1722
BEVERLY HILLS
RENT TO OWN, 2/11/2/1 ,
$2,800 Down, $545. mo.
(352) 726-9369
CITRUS SPRINGS
RENT OR RENT TO OWN





DUNNELLON
2/2 Riverbend Rd near
plant$650 727 631-2680

YOU'LL v THIS!
DUNNELLON 3/2/2



(561) 575-1718 after 7pm
HOMOSASSA
2/1 Nice neighborhood
$600. mo. 239-272-9230


DUNNELLON 3/2/2
Rent to Own, Rent or
Buy Fabulous Home
Across City Beach
2 Fire Plces, wooden firs
www.rublesrentals.com
(561) 575-1718
(561) 719-8787
HOMOSASSA
2/2/1, $650/mo.Petsok
fst/Ist/sec 352-434-1235
Homosassa
3/1.5..$675 + sec.
(352) 746-3073
HOMOSASSA
Dup 1/1 $250, 2/1 $450
SMW Imm 3/2/2 no pets
ref's req. $850.
River links Realty
(352) 628-1616



Inver/Highlands.
Large 1 Family 2.8 acs
fenced, 2700 sq ft U/A
4 BR 3 BA, 16x34 pool,
costly updates Under
contract for $250K, tak-
ing too long to close,
will consider offers.
Owner 452-419-7017
INVERNESS 2/2/1
New paint & flooring
$695 mo. Inclds. trash,
352- 637-0765,
352-267-9941
PINE RIDGE 4/2/2
pool/g.course avail
5/15, $1250/m 746-7716




CRYSTAL RIVER
FURNISHED, water-
front 1 BR or 2BR,
Laundry Boatslip,
Lanai Pets? $850
352-220-6593
HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225
Homosassa
NICE 1/1 incls water,
garbage washer dryer,
convenient location
no pets $550 +sec.
cell (941) 730-2359
Homossassa 2/2
nicely furnished
MH on canal, dock,
fenced yard,
W/D,shed short/long
term Ist/Ist/sec $850
352-220-2077
INVERNESS
East Cove Waterfront,
turn., 2/2, C/A carport,
shed,$650
352-476-4964




INVERNESS
Phone, pool incl. $110
wk. (352) 419-2480




CITRUS SPRINGS
Lease or Rent to Own
3/3/2'/2, Custom Pool
Home on acre $799.
Special. 1st last dep.
bkgrd Ck 352-489-3997
CRYSTAL RIVER
for sale/lease purchase
3/2, fenced yd. water
access, huge lanai
remodeled, $875. mo
404-867-1501, Local


CRYSTAL RIVER
Office/home 4/2,
zoned commercial
perfect for someone
who needs office &
home $895 rent /sell
$99,50 Owner financing
w/$1 OK dn. call Paul
(352) 746-9585




INVERNESS
Rm w/ Priv. ba, $85. wk
no smoke 352-586-9932
INVERNESS
Room for Rent, util. inc.
share dbl wide w/two
tenants $325
(352) 726-0652




C.R/Homosassa
1& 2 Br. furn, quiet park
Util. incl. clean, shrt/long
term 352 220-2077




CRYSTAL RIVER
1, 2 & 3 Bedrms Furn. &
Unfurn. Like New Wkly,
Mnth Yrly 352-302-1370




AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE

FARMS, LAND,
COMMERCIAL
UNIQUE &
HISTORIC HOMES,
SMALL TOWN
COUNTRY LIFESTYLE
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989






"LIFE IS BETTER
WITH A PORCH"
WWW.
crosslandreal Ity.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.

Specializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches &
Commercial


Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ille-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination. "
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.









OPEN HOUSE, Sat. &
Sun. Old Homosassa,
5531 S. Magnolia,
5 blocks from
Homosassa River &
boat ramp, 3 blocks
from Elementary
School. 4/2 CB Stucco,
newly remodeled!
$115,000 352-546-2012
352-817-5099

SUNDAY 29, 1-4p
11221 N. Blackfoot Pt.
DUNNELLON
Dir: from Dunnellon S.
Hwy. 41, T/L on CR 39,
go 2 mi. T/L on Marti-
nelli go to end to sign
Withlacoochee Riv.
Totally Update 3/2
on 1.6+ Acres, Dock
& Boathouse, New
roof & AC, Stone FP,
Tile Firs., New SS appl's
scr. por. $399,000
Mary Lou Jordan
Roberts Real Estate
Inc. (352) 804-1856

SUNDAY, 12N-3p
Oakwood Village
BEVERLY HILLS
820 Sunset Strip, 3/2/1
1747 sf. New kit./bths.
flooring, paint in/out.
$79,900 352-527-1239




Oakwood Village
820 Sunset Strip
3/2/1, 1747 sf. New kit./
baths, flooring, paint,
in/out. Pix/Info
gcjcinc.com $79,900
(352) 527-1239


The Landings, new
Trane a/c & new lanai
screen porch,$58K
cell (352) 400-8130

HIGHLANDS
Lrg.2/2- 4 car garage
pool, game room,
mud room, on triple lot
fenced, price to sell
$65,500 (352) 564-4598




AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE




AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE




SI A'* IF.l1iE I


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work For You!

BETTY HUNT,
REALTOR
ERA KEY 1 Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.


Best Time To Buy!
I have lease options,
owner financing
Waterfront and
foreclosures
call Phyllis Strickland
(352) 613-3503
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.

CITRUS COUNTY
3BED/2Bath
Make Offers
352-563-9857


Michele Rose, Realtor
Simply put I '11 work
harder 352-212-5097
isellcitruscountv(y
yahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515





20 Acres-Live on Land
NOW'I Only $99/mo
$0 Down, Owner
Finance.NO CREDIT
CHECKS! Near El
Paso, Texas, Beautiful
Mountain Views! Free
Color Brochure.
800-755-8953www.
sunsetranches.com

Cashiers NC, 2 BR, 1 BA,
Cabin on 2 Acres
Updated, private rd.
private well, approx.
4K elevation. $170.000,
352-341-0336
Cell, 352-586-8946




"FREE foreclosure
and short sale lists


Office Open
7 Days a Week


Lisa VanDeboe
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com




CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pond ATV
trails Price Reduced
352 795-2027/ 634-4745





FLORAL CITY
1.33 acre nice lot on
dead end.Have survey
and clear title.listed 10k
below county land
value.Zoned rural
residential.See at 8678 s
greenhouse
ter.$16500.o.b.o.
813-792-1355


LOTS FOR

SALE!
6 Citrus Springs Lots
or Cash Discounts
Provided. Great
Investment Opprty.
803-403-9555
Ln3-And3-QF7


CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pond,ATV
trails Price Reduced
352 795-2027/ 634-4745




CHASSAHOWITZKA
DBL. LOT, chainlink
fence, Make Offer
352-613-7302 or
352-613-4673
GREAT BUY! 2 Lots for
Sale, Must buy both
1 in W. Highlands,
1 N. Highlands,
Inverness $15,000


1 itir' \,ii ILI' firsi
N,,*4.d a .ip
N lee aJol

qualified
employee?

This area's
#1
employment
source!

CrIT-)N-ICfE


FiJu Your Drw M, Homl

Search Hundreds of Local Listings
www.ch roniclehomefinder.com


E14 SUNDAY, APRIL 29, 2012







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Forest farming offers unique opportunities


DEAN FOSDICK
For The Associated Press

Forest farming can be an at-
tractive option for property own-
ers who want to earn more from
their land without cutting timber
It generally involves thinning
existing woodlots to leave the
best canopy trees for wood pro-
duction while opening the for-
est floor to understory crops -
things like mushrooms, black-
berries and ginseng.
The combination of those
products with timber "is a real
winner," said Kenneth Mudge,
an associate professor of orna-
mental horticulture at Cornell
University. "It's a good way to
get some early returns while
waiting for your trees to grow
large enough to be processed
into lumber"
The potential is huge, said
James Chamberlain, a non-tim-
ber forest products technologist
with the USDA Forest Service
Southern Research Station, at
Blacksburg, Va.
There are about 53 million
acres of family-owned forest in
Appalachia alone, Chamberlain
said. "Much of that area has
habitat for growing herbaceous
plants that can be harvested."
Almost any shade-tolerant
plant or fungus will grow in a
wooded setting.
"I recommend native plants,
though, that are attuned to the
area you're interested in,"
Chamberlain said.



SURFACE
Continued from Page E12

"Rubber mulch has gotten
quite popular over the last 10
years. It tends to look good
longer."
Regardless of what surface
parents choose, Manfredini
suggests first installing a weed
protection barrier a durable
fabric that prevent weeds from
growing up through the ground
cover He recommends against
using weed killers near play
sets.
Parents also should carefully
choose the location of their set,
Nazario said. She recommends


The costs of producing non-
timber products in forest farm
setups can vary dramatically,
the U.S. Department of Agricul-
ture says.
"Maple syrup or woods culti-
vated for ginseng production
may need an investment of sev-
eral hundred dollars or more to
purchase the necessary equip-
ment to get started," the agency
said in a fact sheet "On the other
hand craft materials, leeks, na-
tive fruits and nuts that are al-
ready growing on a site may not
require any out-of-pocket costs
other than containers to gather
the products while harvesting."
There's a difference between
forest farming and "wildcraft-
ing," which is gathering and
processing naturally occurring
forest products on private or
public lands.
"Advantages forest farmers
have over wild harvesters is
they can produce large volumes
of the product that is in demand,
their product will be more uni-
form and they can provide qual-
ity control," said Jeanine Davis,
an associate professor at North
Carolina State University's
Mountain Horticultural Crops
Research and Extension Center,
at Mills River
Some typical woodland
crops:
Edibles: Berries, pawpaw,
ramps.
Medicinals: American gin-
seng, goldenseal, bloodroot.
Ornamentals: Hostas, ferns,


shady areas where the ground
is level and there are no low-
hanging branches or wires.
Play set safety tips:
Place the equipment at
least 6 feet in all directions
away from obstructions such as
fences, buildings, trees, electric
wires or laundry lines. Keep as
far away as possible from
streets and driveways. Consider
erecting a fence between the
equipment and traffic.
Maintain equipment prop-
erly, following manufacturer's
guidelines. Check often to
make sure bolts are tightly an-
chored, and cut off or cap pro-
truding bolt ends, which can
cause cuts or catch on clothing.
Caps or nuts should be flush


heucheras, hellebores, daylilies.
Nuts: Walnuts, hickories,
pecans.
Mushrooms: Shiitake,
lion's mane, oyster
Others: Pine straw for
mulch, deadfalls for firewood,
maple syrup, honey
Is forest farming worth it?
Consider these net profit fig-
ures Davis compiled for several
high value specialty harvests:
Wild simulated ginseng will
generate an estimated $20,460
per half-acre after nine years.
Organic, forest-grown gold-
enseal will pay out some $2,490
per one-tenth acre after four
years.
Woods-grown ramps will be
worth $770 per one-tenth acre
after three years.
"Know and develop your
market before you plant," Davis
said. "Selling (non-timber) for-
est products is not a get-rich
scheme."
Consider value-added prod-
ucts if you want to make still
more money from your woodlot
Creating wreaths and garlands
from forest greenery and vines
and selling them directly to
consumers can boost the value
of that greenery 20 times or
more, Davis said.
"White oak baskets, herb ex-
tracts, herbal teas, beeswax
candles and other products you
can make and sell," she said.
"You can also run a native plant
nursery and sell seeds and
planting stock."


with the surface, with no gaps
or spaces that could create a
hook.
Inspect wood equipment
for splinters and cracks. It's
also a good idea to round off
edges of wood with a sander.
Sand it and apply a wood sealer
according to the manufac-
turer's recommendations.
Make sure hooks and chains on
swings aren't worn or too rusty.
Don't allow a free-swinging
rope on equipment or trees.
Loose ropes can form a loop or
noose and strangle a child.
Ropes that are securely an-
chored to the ground are OK as
long as they aren't frayed.
Source: Akron (Ohio) Chil-
dren's Hospital


Associated Press
The flowering plant Bloodroot, used now primarily for its ornamental value, is
seen near New Market, Va.

SGITTA BARTH
6S" 9REALTOR
Investors Realty (352) 220-0466
of Citrus County, Inc. (352) 220-0466
Visit my website at: www.myflorida-house.com gbarth@myflorida-house.com

A3

tt.. . .d .^ ...r \


38 HAWTHORNE
CYPRESS VILLAGE
Fabulous Sweetwater 3/2/2 home on cul-
de-sac! Move in ready condition. All
neutral colors and sparkling clean!
Conveniently located to the new 1.
center and Suncoast Parkway.
MLS 353832 $149,000


3644 E. LAKE TODD DR. PINE RIDGE
ARBOR LAKES One-of a-kind horse lover's dream home in
Beautiful 2/2/1 home in gated 55+ the Equestrian section next to trails
community on Lake Tsala Apopk-. r. Do''-t- 'v/exquisite taste, attention to
floor plan, vaulted ceilings, tile :1 I. ,i ..i quality & craftsmanship shows
i. .. i .: ... .. 1 .,has room throughout the 3 bed, 2 5 bath, 4-car garage
S. I home Fenced paddock w/water & shelter
MLS #353089 $116,000 MLS #349970 $415,000


3560 N WOODCATE DR. .... -
THE GLEN 1432 SEATTLE SLEW
.1 i .. I ,. I .... ... INVERNESS -
... .. .. . ...... ... I .. I .. ... CRAB THIS
surrounded by nature, close to ... ,. .... gated community ol BARGAIN!
dining, medical. The home is n. i ... .. 1 homes with upgrades like Take a look at this magnificent 4+/4/5
condition, ready for you to move in, relax on hardwood floors, gourmet kitchen and an Country Estate on 10+ acre and take a 360
your front porch and watch the wildlife in the impressive porch for entertaining It can be interactive virtual tour at
large greenbelt1 yours www-mycountrydreamhome corn
MLS #350097 $54,000 MLS#351012 $215,000 MLS# 350369. $565,000
.r u. W1 I aI


115 N. LEGION TERR.
CITRUS HILLS 7080 DUVAL ISLAND DR.
.... .1. FLORAL CITY
nice landscaping in beautiful Citrs Hills!! LIVING ON THE WATER! Incredible Vistas open waterfront on
Situated on a one acre corner lot, this This classic contemporary pool home is Lake Tsala Apopka, beautiful landscaped
:rr .r 1... .. 1 ...1 I right setting for living the Florida yard with waterfall and pond, a dock for
I ".... E r g 1 i. i.. n iustyle. Open and airy with the plantation your boat to go fishing -this 3/2/1 pool
want!! Everything is very well maintained, shutters diffusing the sunlight 190 ft of home on 05 acre offers the lifestyle and
New roof 5/2009. Just bring your suitcase seawall gives you plenty of room you deserve. It can be your
and move right in! 11 . .... .11 ..
MLS #346203 $175,000 $489,000 MLS #351008 $239,000


SUNDAY, APRIL 29, 2012 E15









E16 SUNDAY, APRIL 29, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


l-,n, I I n lhn; uisin ,;,fnn "'. hi,' nn silln ll





$229,900
Call Ruth Fiedeck I 352 563 6866


I 1HI HUMnIE run YUU!
I.lRno, RIVIR Vill I-l P' I-SAH '

.-'' | I -:.-'1 V ,T I' l iiiu.i I..I .I.' l ..i vi
n. .j .l...l.l i.r.l I.. ,. -.n .. i .. in nl. n i n


. ,l, ,, h, ,, ; ,, I l
$49,900
Call Do//s Mine/,- 352 422 4627


* 111 HiJIVII _it L.,,l:ii
* l , 1 Ii ,,I 1 I. n ,p

* Pn nli ..n 1 'n'll. VV.ii -1
Mi = 3"_'3 $114,500
illlaid Pickiel 352 2019871
nitii CitiusCountilSold como


LAUNCH YOUR BOAT -,jr.i ...i. ne

.. ,,' i,,. I' ,. ,,, I ..., h. ,1 '.I .
,, ,,-, Ir, I . .. -, I, .


I- pj .... . .. ........ ...
LISTED AT $20.000
Call Tell R Blanco atl 352 419 9252


HERNANDO




i .I . I

Ml_ = 7,I,1 $61,500
Call Nilda Cano 352 270 0202










COMMERCIAL USE BUILDING FOR SALE


l. I. I. ,,, i l i . ....... II t l. h -, 1 ll lh..


$225,000
Call l.ilth.i Sil del 352 416 8121


=-j
CRYSTAL RIVER
I-.., ...., fi... ir.,5i .i.II *.*un '7 holl'J

.I. uiJl l I n II'I .I 1

Mil'. = -. 4 ONLY $99,900
ivinn sell/nocitliscounti l/homes com
Call Nlancl Jenks 352 400 8072


INVERNESS HOME WITH 4 BEDROOMS!!!
* lh .i , ,. I


* I. Ii.. ii. h l.i I ih .I
Mt 5 = ONLY $63,000
Call Chatles Kelly 352 422 2387


HERNANDO
,,)I M( h ,,1,V 1&,In n ] b, ,, I lh lnn


i n 1,1,,,, ,iini. .., i ,nly $21,000 i .:.i
l.iDl h.ls Mo = 6 'II
Deh Thompson 634 2656


I. .1


DUPLEX


I .n nnn ,, n n n i nn i i ,n l

ASKING $99,900
C.ill l.iilh.i Sn dei 352 476 8727


rnmuimmIUU t.LUmnVIEwI B1ma1 2 I
S ulilull, U, i I i.....I hIn... .n full ... .,




Mi l' ASKING $238,900
P.i D.O is ,3521212 1280
I'iel hsting 11 it c2lp.ild.I is cornm


LECANTO

i.. . . ,
F ,'. .j ,,', ., I,,J .. ,' t 1..- ,' I I .).), .1 ,


$120,000
David HKu Ii Cell 95 4 383 8786
Office 352 72666668


GORGEOUS 3/2/2 HOME PLUS FAM. RM,
SCREEN PORCH AND CITY WATER!




,. nl, I nI. ni jI ll '. T 1A.I- I H I H II '.
$133,900
Call DOot Muei, at 352 422 4621 354916


- nj6i nn I..,n .... i

* ii IxI h.ll n illl in ; H .1
* Ml. = .l:7.7
PRICED TO SELL QUICK $49,000
Call Willaid Pickiel 220 9871
I''ir,. CiltusCountl Sold. conm


rm 1nIo IHUILL-nitInci rm //

. nfii inil ;. phl ff pl l.i, I.) pl .j i lh .i' I
hI nl i I ni in.] Ij L lq ;1 . 1 jl I

Mt 5= 3AlI:. $93,900
Ask lot Maidyn Booth 637 4904


$69,900

I1 1 -1 . ... l .ll I I 1 I I d


,,'II,,,
East Io See Call lodav'
iMap Pa, o s 352 634 1213


BEST LITTLE GETAWAY EVER:


* I-_l .. ..l l h l ln I..I ll ..l I .l.l .n h .l y :.1 ,;., .l l ..I -,, i I..v ,1l

Mt 5 = L.217/I $49,000 ...i.i. i :...I., .1
i''ir,. CilmusCountl'So/d. coon $69,900
Jeanne B Willaid Pickiel 212 3410 Call Ruth iedeick I 352 563 6866


RIVERFRONT MONEY CAN BUY!


ll,.: l II..,n I A 'iii' I l
Mt 5= il:x. JUST REDUCED TO S175,000
Call Ouade Feesei 352 302 7699


MI_ = .,IllIII lUiily $62,500
Call Chatles Kelly 352 422 2387


MBST WATEkHRHUONT IN INVERNESS




$179,000
Call Ouade Feesei 352 302 7699