<%BANNER%>
Citrus County chronicle
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02747
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 04-22-2012
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:02747

Full Text


United for charity: Community plays in tournament r'./A3


CI' CITRIU.S COUNT YM b


TODAY & Monday morning
HIGH Showers exit; windy and
79 partly cloudy.
LOW PAGE A4
51
APRIL 22, 2012


With a view
Groups oppose efforts
by area residents to pro-
hibit viewing platforms
at some King's Bay
springs./Page Cl
LOCAL NEWS:


Water levels continue to drop


MARK SCOHIER
Special to the Chronicle
CHIEFLAND While
scientists, policymakers
and stakeholders alike dis-
agree on how to address the
issue of Florida's water, one
thing is certain: It continues
to become less available.
Drought is part of the
problem.
The Suwannee River
Water Management Dis-
trict, which manages 14
counties in Northern


Florida, reports an overall
rainfall deficit of about 16
inches for the last year,
which, from April to
March, has been the "dri-
est April March period
since 1932."
Florida is known to un-
dergo periods of drought
every few years. Still, data
from both SRWMD and the
Florida Geological Society,
taking drought years into
account, shows groundwa-
ter levels in the area trend-
ing downward since the


middle of the 20th century,
suggesting increased with-
drawal is having an affect.
"We're mining the
aquifer," Chiefland resi-
dent and Save Our Suwan-
nee Inc. representative
Annette Long, said in an in-
terview at Fanning Springs
State Park Friday "We're
taking more than is being
recharged.
One hundred percent of


the data shows that's
what's happening."
It was at Fanning
Springs on Aug. 9 where
Long, a veteran cave diver
and springs advocate, cap-
tured on video a steady in-
flux of brown river water
flowing into the spring.
"I said, 'I think I'm going
to have a stroke. I need to
See Page A9


Alleged


shooter


urged to


keep low


profile


Lawyers worry

for his safety


Associated Press


Portraits of pain


Top honors
Citrus County Chamber
of Commerce honors
members at annual
dinner/Page A3
COLSON DIES:


Key player
Charles "Chuck" Colson
was known as a
Watergate figure,
evangelist.
/Page A13
HATS OFF:


Mr. Perfect
White Sox starter
Phil Humber throws the
season's first perfect
game and the 21st in
MLB history./Page BI


Mini iPad?
Rumors abound about a
smaller version of the
iPad to compete with
Kindle./Page Dl
ICONIC:
Warhol
New photo exhibit fea-
tures rare photos of the
artist./Page B6
M-ffIo r iT r Uin
TOMORROW:
Dogs for vets
With help of inmates,
woman trains rescued
greyhounds for veterans
suffering from
PTSD./Monday

Annie's Mailbox ......A16
Classifieds................ D4
Crossword ............ A16
Editorial .............. C2
Entertainment ..........B6
Horoscope................ B6
Lottery Numbers ......B4
Lottery Payouts ........ B6
M movies .................. A16
Obituaries ................A6
Together............... A18


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Amy Hunt Avery, right, was a young, healthy person. She taught aerobics and was a personal trainer until 2008,
when she started having problems with her foot swelling up. A neurologist diagnosed her with RSD reflex sym-
pathetic dystrophy. Amy, with the help of her mother, Dolores Edwards, left, fights constant pain and is under the
care of a pain-management specialist.


When suffering becomes part

of everyday life

Editor's note: Chronic pain comes in many
forms and affects thousands throughout Citrus
County Each person's pain is different, but there
are common elements when it comes to how pain
changes people's quality of life. The following are
just two examples of people in our community
who live in constant pain.
NANCY KENNEDY
Staff Writer
Amy Hunt Avery was Citrus High School's homecom-
ing queen in 1985.
She taught aerobics, worked as a personal trainer
About 10 years ago, a trailer at her house ran over her
foot. Some time after that, she stepped off a StairMaster
and noticed a big bruise on the bottom of her right foot
Nine years ago, she had surgery to fix several things
wrong with her foot and felt better, but not completely
Then in 2008, she was walking up steps and felt a
Charley horse in her foot and leg.
"My foot started swelling up I thought one of the
See Page A5


Managingpatients 'pain

NANCY KENNEDY
Staff Writer
LECANTO What happens when your pain
won't go away?
Where do you go? What do you do?
Doctors Mark Fallows and Mark Hashim of Na-
tures Coast Pain Associates together see upwards
of 1,600 patients dealing with chronic pain -
pain that affects every aspect of life, pain that
makes everyday life sometimes unbearable.
And they are not the only pain management
physicians in the county
However, as Fallows said, this is an exciting
time to be in pain management
Both he and Hashim are particularly excited
about the improvements in spinal cord stimula-
tion devices, especially a current-driven device
made by Boston Scientific.
As Hashim explained, the device is implanted
above the spinal cord and emits a current that
switches off the "I'm in pain" message being sent
See Page A5


Response to fire brings out community spirit
SA.B. SIDIBE April 14 at 7105 N. Co-
Sammy Staff Writer manche Terrace, Her-
Sammye nando. The house was a
Johnson, ARROWHEAD When total loss.
ta roster, this bucolic slice of Citrus "A lot of people were
Taroeen It County on the cusp of the worried. They didn't want
Marilynn "Withlacoochee River had a their homes to burn and
ClraII dIIU


Charlie
Lugsdin were
some of the
volunteers
who helped
feed
firefighters
battling a
muck fire in
Arrowhead.
A.B. SIDIBE/
Chronicle


brush with a potential fire
problem, the community
stood up and helped the
people who were there to
put out the fire.
Residents heeded a call
by Frank and Mary DeLay
to feed and water the vol-
unteer firefighters who
were trying to contain a
two-acre muck fire
spawned by a house fire


here were these volunteers
working really hard to help
to stop it, but they didn't
have enough food," Mari-
lynn Green said.
Beginning April 15,
Green banded together
with the likes of Rita
Troester, Charlie Lugsdin,
Debbie Harper, Sonny
See PageA4


SANFORD George
Zimmerman is getting out of
jail. Now his defense team
has to worry about keeping
the neighborhood watch
volunteer accused of gun-
ning down Trayvon Martin
safe on the outside.
Defense attorneys for
other high-profile clients
who awaited trial on bail
had advice for how to pro-
tect the man whose shoot-
ing of the unarmed black
17-year-old sparked nation-
wide protests: Get him out
of Florida, keep him from
going out in public and
never leave him alone.
"He clearly puts himself
in jeopardy unless he takes
precautions," said New
York attorney Barry Slot-
nick, who represented sub-
way shooter Bernhard
Goetz in the 1980s.
A half dozen reporters,
photographers and camera-
men began staking out the
Seminole County Jail early
Saturday in Sanford, a day
after a Florida judge
agreed to let Zimmerman
out on $150,000 bail. Zim-
merman's attorney, Mark
O'Mara, said it would take a
few days before Zimmer-
man is released. His family
needs time to secure collat-
eral for the bail, Zimmer-
man needs to be fitted with
an electronic monitoring
device and O'Mara said he
must find a secure location
for him.
Zimmerman appeared to
be wearing a bulletproof
vest under his charcoal suit,
and his wife and parents
testified by telephone in-
stead of in the courtroom
because they said they've
been threatened and feared
for their safety His wife,
Shellie Zimmerman, testi-
fied she had received hate
mail.
Circuit Judge Kenneth
Lester on Friday indicated
that Zimmerman would be
allowed to leave Florida if
arrangements can be made
with law enforcement to
have him monitored out of
state.
"The initial challenge is
going to be first be getting
him out of Sanford," said at-
torney Jose Baez, whose
former client, Casey An-
thony, endured similar
scrutiny when she was re-
leased from an Orlando jail
last summer after being ac-
quitted of killing her 2-year-
old daughter. "Everybody
knows where he is getting
released from. That is the
first problem."
Before he turned himself
in to authorities earlier this
month to face a second-de-
gree murder charge, mem-
bers of the New Black
Panthers had put out a
bounty for Zimmerman's ar-
rest. Protesters nationwide
had held rallies carrying
signs and chanting "Arrest
Zimmerman Now!" Be-
cause of the emotions sur-
rounding the case, O'Mara
said of Zimmerman's re-
lease: "I would much rather
do this safely than quickly"
O'Mara said he had sev-
eral options for where Zim-
merman should go, but he
wouldn't disclose them. The
judge appeared willing to
help keep Zimmerman's
See Page A9


COMMENTARY:


Residents' wells running dry


Data shows groundwater levels in
the area trending downward since
the middle of the 20th century.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Food pantry gives away Ram truck




4 EJi


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
A winner was drawn Saturday for the Dodge Ram Hemi Quad 1500 ST with Express Pack-
age at the Crystal Chrysler Dodge Jeep dealership near Homosassa. Mr. Michalski was
drawn as the winner by John Dickey, representing the accounting firm of Williams, Mc-
Cranie, Wardlow and Cash. All proceeds go to benefit the capital campaign fund of Feed Cit-
rus County Food Bank and the We Care Food Pantry. Taking part in the drawing, pictured
from left, are: John Marmish, president of the board of Community Food Bank; John Dickey,
accountant, Williams McCranie, Wardlow & Cash; Diane Toto, president of We Care Food
Pantry; Jewel Lamb, owner of Crystal Motors.


The Week IN REVIEW


Editor's note: Loss, in
some form or fashion,
was the premise for a
majority of the top-read
stories in the Chronicle
this past week. Top
local stories included:
Lost 'turkeys'
One make that two -
losses that came as a blow to
Citrus County involved state
allocations.
Gov. Rick Scott vetoed
$100,000 earmarked to help
with cleanup efforts in
King's Bay as well as
$200,000 for a traffic signal
near the new West Citrus
Government Center, at State
Road 44 and Meadowcrest
Boulevard.
Having those projects
deemed as "turkeys" by
TaxWatch of Florida and the
governor elicited this re-
sponse from state Sen.
Charles Dean, who advo-
cated for the allocations: "A
traffic light is public safety
That water project is for
water quality There's not-
ing turkey about it"
No cannabinoids
Local stores that cater to
"legal" recreational-drug
consumers in Citrus County
are losing a source of
income.
Sheriff's officials are
dropping in on the mer-
chants and advising them of
a new law that bans the sale
of synthetic cannabinoids
known variously as K2 and


Spice Gold, as well as other
buzz-inducing pseudo-dope.
There's incentive to heed
the warning: Possession can
bring a felony charge.
Adios mobiles
County Planning and De-
velopment Review Board
folks are clearing the way
for the clearing of a dozen
aging mobile homes on land
near the RaceTrac station
in Homosassa.
Residents in eight of the
units will have to find new
digs, but were aware that
eviction was likely
The razing of the homes,
along with a couple of wood-
framed structures and a
couple of masonry build-
ings, will clear the way for
- you guessed it a Dollar
General store.
Love and loss
A 19-year-old man lost
some freedoms Thursday
when sentenced to four
years of sex offender proba-
tion for a relationship, when
18, with a 15-year-old girl.
The case was an emo-
tional loss for the girl's dad,
who sought to have the
young man adjudicated as a
sex offender for life and
incarcerated.
The judge exercised dis-
cretion in doling out the pun-
ishment under a "Romeo
and Juliet" law put in place
in 2007 to offer latitude in
sentencing older teens for
having consensual encoun-
ters with younger partners.


Timely collisions
Two sheriff's officials
were involved in separate
wrecks within a minute of
each other Monday
It was at a Homosassa in-
tersection where one
deputy, in a patrol car with
emergency gear activated,
encountered another mo-
torist in an unfortunate
manner. The two collided,
sending the deputy and his
vehicle spinning counter-
clockwise. The deputy re-
ceived minor injuries, but
his car sustained about
$5,000 in damage. Damage
to the other guy's vehicle
was estimated at $6,000.
That was at 2:39 p.m.
It was one minute later
and a short distance to the
south of the first wreck -
this one on Oak Village
Boulevard where a
deputy in an unmarked unit
was clipped by a passing
motorist, causing about
$2,000 in damage to the
deputy's car and $4,000 in
damage to the unsuccessful-
passer's car


Cosmetic Plastic Surgery

Breast Augmentation


A Q&A with bo
Dr. James Rogers, D.M.D., M.D.




If I have implants, will I have
to get them replaced every 10 years?
No. Breast implants do not have a fixed lifespan; although, like all
medical devices, they should not be expected to last forever. Generally speaking,


if there is no implant failure (i.e. leakage) and a woman's
breasts don't change, they can be left in indefinitely.

Does it matter how large an implant I
choose, and are there limits as to how large
they should be?
A number of factors determine how large an implant a
patient should have. As a general rule, the more breast
tissue and body fat covering an implant, the better. Many of
the problems associated with implants, including implant
visibility, rippling or wrinkling, tend to increase with the
size of the implants.


Dr. James Rogers


Do breast implants increase the risk of BoardC 'wi.
getting breast cancer? Plastic Surgeon
There is no evidence that suggests breast implants increase
the risk of breast cancer or delay the detection of early breast cancer. All women 35
years or older should have a mammogram prior to having breast augmentation and
practice routine self-examination as well as have annual exams by their physician.

Do I have to go to the hospital to have my surgery?
No. Most of our outpatient procedures are done in our own ambulatory surgery center,
Paddock Park Surgery Center. The center is certified by the Agency for Health Care
Administration (AHCA) and is a fully staffed and equipped surgical facility.

Are silicone implants safe? Are they better than saline implants?
Both silicone and saline filled implants are safe. Which implant is better for a particular
patient depends on a number of factors. Generally speaking, if a patient has very little
breast tissue and body fat, silicone implants may be softer and less likely to "ripple" or
"wrinkle."This advantage diminishes with increased breast tissue.
Silicone implants are generally more expensive, and leakage may be more difficult to
detect. In addition, silicone implants are not available to women under 21 years of age.


OCAIA PLASTIC SURGERY
3320 SW 34TH CIRCLE, OCALA, FLORIDA 34474

VILLAGES PLASTIC SURGERY
1501 US HWY 27-441, THE VILLAGES, FL 32159

WWW.OCALAPLASTICSURGERY.COM
352.629.8154


Workshop to teach

online business safety


SHEMIR WILES
Staff Writer

LECANTO Worms, Tro-
jan horses, spyware, adware
- anyone who knows about
malicious software and
viruses have heard and
know these terms.
But for people who may
not have a clue how these
security pitfalls and other
information risks can have a
negative effect on business,
the Citrus County Business
Resource Alliance Partners
are presenting a workshop
from 6 to 8 p.m. Wednesday,
April 25, at the College of
Central Florida Learning
Center in Lecanto. Business
Network Solutions sponsors
the workshop.
Mike Orlito, certified
business analyst with the
Small Business Develop-
ment Center (SBDC), said
featured presenter Jim
Green, managing partner of
Business Risk Solutions,
will speak mostly about in-
formation security.
Customers have an expec-
tation their sensitive and
personal information will
be protected, he said.
Last year when a number
of people in Citrus County
were experiencing theft of
their debit and credit card
numbers, it became clear it
would be beneficial to hold
a workshop aimed at edu-
cating businesses about the
steps they can take to keep
customer and, also, em-
ployee information safe.
The workshop will also
touch on small businesses
developing an online pres-


* WHAT: "Your Online
Business is Everyone's
Business" workshop.
WHEN: 6 to 8 p.m.
Wednesday, April 25.
WHERE: College of
Central Florida,
Learning Center
Building L-4, 3800 S.
Lecanto Highway,
Lecanto, FL 34461.
COST: $15 per person
for members of EDC,
chamber, SBDC and
SCORE; $20 per person
for the general public.
CONTACT: Call 352-
795-2000 or email
matthew@citruscounty
chamber.com.

ence and benefiting from
social media marketing.
From firewalls to pass-
word protection, Orlito said
Green, whose company's
primary goal is to help
clients reduce their total
cost of risk, will show small-
business people how to ma-
neuver the digital world
safely
The workshop cost is $15
for members of the Citrus
County Chamber of Com-
merce, the Citrus County
Economic Development
Council, the Small Business
Development Center at the
University of North Florida
and SCORE; and $20 for the
public.
To register online, visit
the "Events" page on
www.citrusedc.com. To reg-
ister by phone, call 352-795-
2000 or e-mail: i.itthew\.
citruscountychamber. com.


Your heart deserves the best. For cardiovascular care, we have formed an alliance with Munroe Heart

which includes Dr. von Mering and a cardiology team that's ranked among the top in the nation.

Utilizing a cooperative approach to cardiac testing, medical management and cardiac catheterization,

Dr. von Mering and his team deliver life-saving care to meet the cardiovascular needs of their

patients. For diagnostic, invasive and interventional cardiology, this nationally recognized team is

unmatched in clinical excellence-something you can positively keep close to heart.

Learn more at SevenRiversRegional.com.






Positively -SEVEN RIVERS
REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER


in alliance with


Munroe Heart is #1 in Florida for Medical Excellence in Interventional Coronary Care 2012


Munroe
Heart


CARECHET\
A Rating Service of The Delta Group


00B7LY


A2 SUNDAY, APRIL 22, 2012


LOCAL







Page A3 SUNDAY, APRIL 22, 2012



TATE&


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE




Chamber awards county's finest


SHEMIR WILES
Staff Writer
CITRUS HILLS Only one
man has been awarded the honor
of being a lifetime member of the
Citrus County Chamber of
Commerce.
But Friday night, another out-
standing citizen joined the ranks
when chamber president and CEO
Josh Wooten presented renowned
Crystal River artist Don Mayo
with the Lifetime Chamber Mem-
ber Recognition.
Accepting the award with his
wife, Sue, by his side, Mayo said
when he moved to Crystal River in
1988, he thought it would be a
great place to live.
"And I still do," he said as the
crowd cheered.
Humbled and lost for words,
Mayo said he just enjoys doing
what he does best.
"I'm just caught off guard," he
said.
Mayo was one of 16 recipients at
the chamber's annual awards din-
ner at Citrus Hills Golf and Coun-
try Club.
Members of the chamber and
the community dressed in their
finest flapper or gangster-inspired
attire to complement the 1920s
theme of the evening.
However, the true spectacle of
the evening was the amount of
gratitude shared among the award
winners as they accepted their re-
wards for a job well done.
For the first time, Bill Winkle,
chairman of the chamber's board


RIC BUSH/Special to the Chronicle
Recipients of the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce annual awards pose after the "Swing into the 1920s"
awards dinner Friday night at Citrus Hills Golf and Country Club.


of directors, presented a Lifetime
Ambassador Recognition to its
first recipient, Pete Burrell. Bur-
rell, an advertising sales repre-
sentative with the Citrus County
Chronicle, has been a chamber
ambassador for more than 20
years.
Rhonda Lestinsky presented
the Jean Grant Business Women's
Alliance Award to Dee Peters,
calling her a "ray of sunshine" and
someone who "has a smile that
will make you smile back."
"I always look for a miracle
everyday and there's so many mir-
acles in this room," Peters said
while accepting her award.


"Thank you so much."
In honor of her daughter, Citrus
County Tax Collector Janice War-
ren said she was honored to give
the Mandi Warren Richards Ris-
ing Star Award to Amy Kingery, a
young woman who exudes some of
the same qualities her daughter
possessed. Known for her work at
Seven Rivers Regional Medical
Center, Warren also listed a num-
ber of Kingery's accomplishments
and community involvement.
In addition, Jennifer Duca pre-
sented the Ambassador of the
Year Award to Bonnie Hardiman-
Pushee, who stated for once, she
was lost for words. And Joe and


Lynn Turck awarded the Rick
Quinn Distinguished Citizen
Award to Neale Brennan.
"I could never be more proud
and honored to receive something
like this," Brennan said, holding
back tears.
Other award winners:
Tim Winker, a student at Cit-
rus High School, received the
Shawn Harrison Youth Service
Award.
The Black Diamond Founda-
tion received the John Barnes
Outstanding Community Organi-
zation Award.
Sunflower Springs Assisted
Living Community received the


~t1
V-


The Lifetime Chamber Member
Recognition given to artist Don
Mayo was only the second lifetime
award ever handed out.
Walt Connors Small Business
Award.
Lou Miele received the Dr.
O.J. Humphries Community Serv-
ice Award.
Mike Scott Plumbing received
the J.L. Hassell Award.
Ginger West received the Out-
standing Leadership Citrus Grad-
uate Award.
Jennifer Duca, Dan Pushee,
Dawn Faherty and the Agricul-
tural Alliance of Citrus County re-
ceived Chamber Champion
Awards.
Chronicle reporter Shemir Wiles
can be reached at 352-564-2924 or
swiles@chronicleonline. com.


Around
THE COUNTY
Democratic club to
meet in Crystal River
The Crystal River Demo-
cratic Club is having a com-
bined Democratic club
meeting at 7 p.m. Monday,
April 30, at the Seven Rivers
Golf and Country Club, 7395
W. Pinebrook St., Crystal
River.
The guest speaker will be
Brad Thorpe, county adminis-
trator. Thorpe will be present-
ing information about Port
Citrus. All registered Democ-
rats are invited to attend.
RSVP no later than April
26. For information, contact
Bob Campbell, president of
Crystal River Democratic
Club, at 352-513-4803 or
mdewolf@earthlink.net.
-From staff reports

Campaign TRAIL

The Citrus County
Chronicle's political forums
are: 7 p.m. Tuesday, July 31,
at the Citrus County Audito-
rium; and 7 p.m. Thursday,
Oct. 18, at the College of
Central Florida. Information:
Mike Wright, 352-563-3228.
The Citrus County Tea
Party Activists have sched-
uled the following forums at 1
p.m. at the Inverness
Women's Club, 1715 Forest
Drive, Inverness: Saturday,
April 21, superintendent of
school candidates Sandy
Balfour, Robert Cummins
and incumbent Sandra
"Sam" Himmel; Saturday,
May 19, state representative
candidates Nancy Argen-
ziano, Lynn Dostal and in-
cumbent Jimmie T. Smith;
Saturday, June 16, candi-
dates for sheriff with details to
be announced.
Ron Kitchen, Republi-
can for county commission
District 1, will greet the public
at Howard's Flea Market,
Booth 52, from 8 a.m. to 3
p.m. Sunday, April 22.
Shannon Heathcock,
Republican for county com-
mission District 3, will have a
fundraiser from 2:30 to 5:30
p.m. Saturday, May 5, at the
Realtors Association of Citrus
County, 714 Scarboro Ave.,
Lecanto. Call 352-302-0962.
The Citrus Hills Civic As-
sociation is hosting a candi-
dates' forum at 7 p.m.
Thursday, Oct. 4, at the Citrus
Hills Golf and Country Club.
The Campaign Trail is a
listing of political happenings
for the 2012 election season.
Send events or campaign
fundraisers to Mike Wright at
mwright@chronicleonline.
com.


Playing united




Community teams up to

raise fund for charities (
SHEMIR WILES
Staff Writer
LECANTO .
here was fierce, intense com- .
petition on the basketball
court Saturday at Lecanto High
School as 11 teams faced offdur-
Iing United Way of Citrus County's
third "April Madness" basketball
tournament.
The first game tipped offat 9 a.m., with L
contests going all day long. The tournament
culminated with its championship game,
where the winning team earns a trophy
Jennifer Barber, office manager with
United Way, said they would also be giving
out a sportsmanship award, in honor of-.
Lecanto High School basketball coach Chris
Nichols.
Hustling with streams of sweat pouring
down their faces, men and woman played in
the name of charity, though it was clear this .b"
wasn't just a friendly game of basketball for
some.
"The players all play hard," Roger Carl-4
son, who is on United Way's Board of Direc-
tors, said. "The competition gets tough."
Barber called it a "fighting" contest with
people who definitely play to win.
Watching the action from the sidelines,
Carlson said the event isn't a huge
fundraiser for United Way, but it does bring
the families out, and it's a way for United
Way to reach out to the youth in the county.
"So it's a fun time," he said.
This year, each team played twice, giving
losing teams a shot to redeem themselves
later in the day
At the door, United Way accepted dona-
tions of non-perishable food or new clothing
for admission to the event. In addition, peo-
ple clamored to purchase tickers for one of
two iPad 2 tablet computers being given
away in drawings.
Other than basketball, United Way had a LIVE
face-painter and Citrus Clowns as entertain-
ment. Barber said a lot of the day wouldn't UNITED
have been possible without Lecanto High Find out
School and the great volunteers who came about the
out to support the agencies
tournament sup-
Chronicle reporter Shemir Wiles can be \ __,_ ported by
reached at 352-564-2924 orswiles@,".. ..... United
chronicleonline.com. Way of
Citrus
TOP: ..*~TCounty
TOP: Lecanto Legend players Stephen and how
Buckley and Seamus Lawler gang up on anto donate
F -" "' '7 to donate
Jailhouse Jammer Luis Rivera in tough action or volun-
Saturday during the April Madness teer at
Basketball tournament to benefit United Way - -www.
of Citrus County. The Legends are playing for citrus
Lecanto High School and the Jailhouse united
Jammers are playing for Corrections un
way~org
Lecanto Legends' Frank Vilardi works to get the office
off the end line against some tough pressure _at 352-
brought on by Jailhouse Jammers Dresdian 795-
Grippe and Luis Rivera. 5483.
DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle -






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Lecanto man arrested on




sexual battery charges



Alleged victim is 17-year-old student incident, the officer spoke
with the girl again. Accord-
SHEMIR WILES report, a student anony- allegedly exposed himself ing to the report, she re-
Staff Writer mously told a high school re- and attempted to get the girl vealed that Cinco had
source officer in February to touch him inappropri- sexually battered her and
LECANTO Citrus the girl had revealed to her ately, but she refused. repeatedly tried to make
County deputies arrested a that Cinco molested her The girl said Cinco con- her perform sexual acts,
38-year-old Lecanto man Another resource officer tinued to make sexual re- which she refused.
Friday after a 17-year-old spoke with the girl, who re- marks and asked her if she She also stated Cinco
Hernando girl reportedly portedly began to cry when would tell anyone about purchased marijuana the
stated he sexually battered the officer mentioned what happened. night of the alleged inci-
her. Cinco's name. After com- The girl reportedly prom- dent, and they smoked it
Scott Thomas Cinco was posing herself, the girl said ised she wouldn't say together.
booked at the Citrus County in October while traveling anything. After gathering additional
Detention Facility in with Cinco, he began to ask The report stated the information, a deputy made
Lecanto on charges of sex- her sexually explicit ques- girl's father did find out contact with Cinco, who de-
ual battery on a person tions and touched her inap- about the incident, but the lined to speak.
under the age of 18 and un- propriately as she sat in the girl talked him out of con- Chronicle reporter
lawful sexual activity with a passenger seat. acting the sheriff's office. Shemir Wiles can be
minor. He is being held The girl said she told Later, after Cinco was in- reached at 352-564-2924 or
without bond. Cinco to stop but he didn't, formed a school resource of- swiles@chronicleonline.
According to his arrest the report stated. Cinco also ficer knew about the alleged com.


S Ffought and monitored until
SPIRIT The Fire Marshal called the Wednesday
Continued from Pae.A1 house fire unintentional, but "Those guys needed our
help, and we were glad we
officials believe the fire spawned a were able to step in and
Groves and Sarah and Paul help them," Lugsdin said.
VIorelock to provide home- brush fire in the swampy area of Ar- Lugsdin was one of the
cooked chow, water and a people responsible for the
little respite for the fire- rowhead that fire crews fought and logistical rotation of fire-
fighters. monitored until Wednesday. fighters in and out the area's
"One day, we even pro- community center
vided breakfast," added Now that fire has been
Troester, who is recognized out here, but we all know possible brush fire in the contained, some of the
as the expert cook in the each other and try to do as area of East Grantham same group is busy Friday
bunch. much as we can to help each Court and East Turkey Trail organizing a garage sale to
This development, which other," said Sammye in Hernando, where the raise funds to among other
is tucked away in the Johnson. structure fire was discov- things fix their roads.
canopied warren of dirt The owners were not ered instead. "This is what we do. If
roadways just off State Road home at the time the fire The Fire Marshal called there is a need, we will
200 and on the edge of the broke out. the house fire uninten- help," Johnson said.
county, prides itself on its According to the initial tional, but officials believe Chronicle reporter A.B.
collective community zeal. report, Citrus County Sher- the fire spawned a brush Sidibe can be reached at
"We are so close, but so iff's Office's Fire Rescue fire in the swampy area of 352-564-2925 or asidibe@
far away Kind of on our own was called to respond to a Arrowhead that fire crews chronicleonline.com.


Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Burglary
A residential burglary oc-
curred at about 9:49 a.m. April
19 in the 8000 block of W.
Longfellow Street, Homosassa.
Thefts
An auto theft occurred at
about 10:08 a.m. April 19 in the
10200 block of N. Dunedin
Road, Dunnellon.
A grand theft occurred at
about 10:19 a.m. April 19 in the
3800 block of E. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway.


A petit theft occurred at
about 12:42 p.m. April 19 in the
300 block of N. Suncoast
Boulevard, Crystal River.
A grand theft occurred at
about 2:39 p.m. April 19 in the
600 block of Independence
Highway, Inverness.
A petit theft occurred at
about 4:56 p.m. April 19 in the
20 block of E. Golden Street,
Beverly Hills.
Vandalism
A vandalism occurred at
about 4:31 a.m. April 19 in the
800 block of Birch Avenue,
Inverness.


ON THE NET

* For more information about arrests made by the
Citrus County Sheriff's Office, go to www.sheriff
citrus.org and click on the Public Information link,
then on Arrest Reports.
* Also under Public Information on the CCSO website,
click on Crime Mapping for a view of where each
type of crime occurs in Citrus County. Click on
Offense Reports to see lists of burglary, theft and
vandalism.
* For the Record reports are also archived online at
www.chronicleonline.com.
* The Citrus County Sheriff's Office Volunteer Unit is
comprised of nearly 900 citizens serving Citrus
County. To volunteer, call Sgt. Chris Evan at 352-
527-3701 or email cevan@sheriffcitrus.org.


first offenders of local
watering rules.
* The county is issuing
citations that carry with
them a fine of $100.


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
1) PR HI LO PR HI LO PR
0 90 / "NA NA NA ,. J82 65 0.80


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
.1 l-i i 11 i ll
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
sh
ts
ts


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W -'ilim Bch.


F'cast
ts
ts
ts
pc
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts


MARINE OUTLOOK


HI LO PR HI LO PR
B2 68 0 10 -- 81 65 0.40

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Ex us ivdaily

TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 79 Low: 51
Showers exit: windy and i'rli.r
cloudy
MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 72 Low: 39
.jll, cloudy to ii', breezy

TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
High: 70 Low: 42
Sunny and nice


ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
,l I; .' 1 91/65
Record 94/44
Normal 84/55
Mean temp 78
Departure from mean t9
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday 0.33 in.
Total for the month 0.71 in.
Total for the year 4.57 in.
Normal for the year 11.98 in.

UV INDEX: 10
0-2 minimal. 3-4 low. 5-6 moderate.
, i i ,.jih 1 .. ;J ',
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Saturday at 3 p.m 29.73 in.


DEW POINT
.' I' I ,i at 3 p m
HUMIDITY
' ,'i, ,i at 3 p.m 6
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:


Oak, bayberry, grasses
Today's count: 4.6/12
Monday's count: 8.7
Tuesday's count: 6.8
AIR QUALITY
Saturday was good with pollutants
mainly ozone


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MA
r,llI r: l .in I M : -.rj ,
4/22 SUNDAY 6:46 12:34 7:09 1
4/23 MONDAY 736 1:24 8:00 1


CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
SUNSET TONIGHT ..
SUNRISE TOMORROW
MONRIHAF TORAYN


MA I2


ST DA .................
123 MOONSET TOOAY


BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban
For more information cail FloIda Dison o Forestry t (352} 754-6777 For
riformaiorl on drought condIs, please visit thei Division of Forestry's Web
tlip: /flame (-dof corrmlre weatherbadi
WATERING RULES


"l),:rIl,..l:e winds from 20 to 25 knots.
Seas 3 to 5 feet. .v, and inland
waters will be rough. Chance of inur,
derstorms today.


Gulf water
temperature



72
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 26.67 26.70 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 32 83 32.83 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 34.86 n/a 40.60
Tsala A.p.i,,-Floral City : ".7 36.54 4240
alu ntfim1 "a d 1-bnI0 Wi (; h pfivof! D t a l rI lua du o, is e c t I n a ivson Ia 115 rt


THE NATION


*
Wa


I-

65

700o


hJOR

1258
1 48


9:01 PM

.7:35 AM.




more
s te.


One-day-per-week .i .!....: schedule as follows for addresses ending in:
0 or 1 Monday, 2 or 3 Tuesday. 4 or 5 Wednesday, 6 or 7
- Thursday, 8 or 9 & subdivision common areas Friday. Before 8 a.m or
after 6 p.m,
Hand watering of non-grass areas can take place any day before 8 am. or
after 6 p.m.
PLEASE CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL NEW PLANT MATERIAL. Citrus
County Water Resources can explain additional watering allowances for
qualified plantings.
Questions, concerns or i. [-.. ,, 4 violations, please call Citrus County at
352-527-7669, or email waterconservation @ bocc,citrusJ f.us


TIDES
Fromr mouths ot rivers "At King's Bay
Sunday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahliotluka 7 26 a2 58 a 6 46 p'2 47 p
Crystal Rive* 5 47 a1220 a 5 07( p1209 p
Witllicooliee' 334 a, 9 5a 2 54 p/10 40 p
Hon osassa'" 636 al 57a 5 56 p;l 46 p


""At Mason's Crook
Monday
High/Low High/Low
U I13330a 713 p317 pp
) 22 ,1252 a 5 34 p,12:39 p
4 09a 102ia 3:21 p '11:13 p
7 11 a/229 a 6 23 p,2:16 p


I0O
20s 50s
30s .40, "
50s


HoaolulW

80s


40s
w vnill


'-U a,


0 lh
DFlV

tOiap-
0 r0 5 J.-


a.-.


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY


Saturday Sunday
H LPcp. Fcst H L


Albany
Al iqurqt e
Ashevile
Atlatani
AtlatlCi Cily
Austin
Balriflgfle
Bitmllings
Boise
BosIon
Bufatlo


Charfotte
Chicae
Ceveland
1olundha SC
Coluiius OH
Concord NH
Dallis

Det of
[I Paso
F:Ali IN
Harrisftmig
Hobison
Indianapolls
Jickson
as Vegas
Litle Rock
LoS Aigeli'S


Nasill vle
Melftmphas yI
M2012 Weapothe
Mobile
Montgorner
Nashville
KEY TO CON0I
f=fair, h-haiy
rssrain/snow ET
sn-snow; ts-tI
2012 Weathe


48 39
4i
52
60 tiace
39
50
53
49
59
50
54 01
3!9 41
41 16
H3
49 16
54
44 12
39 11

43 58
53


39 02

55
57
54
41
bi
49


r 55
sh 59
pc 68
S 58
s 81
55
pc 69
pc 85
55

a 75
S6
sh 64
pc 51
pc 55
49
sh 71
53
I 51
s 81
pc 78
s 63
pc 5

92
53
S 59
pc 58

s 72


63 57 pc 70 57
52 16 20 pc 59 38
641 50 pc 69 4B
47 33 pc 49 36
52 11 06 pc 55 41
77 63 pc 72 46
54 18 58 pc 64 38
ITIONS: c=cloudy dr=drizne;
pc-partly cloudy; r-ram;
nil; &:sdnny, sh:showers,
thunderstorms; w=windy.
r Central, Madison, WI.


City
New Oileans
Norfolk
Oklahorn: City
Palm Springs
Philadelphia
PhoenIx
Pittsburghn
Pill ild ME
Portldand Oie
Piovidence R I
Raleigh
Hil d (; ity
RNno
Rochester. NY
Sacrarenlo
St Ilog s
St Ste Mane
San Antonio
San Diwgo
San Francisco
Savannah
Seattle
Spokane
1 Syracise
Waishinotnr


Saturday Sunday
H LPcp. Fcst H L


82 60


,63 pC 76
f 57
64
s 77
s 63
57
s 101
.30 c 49
f 53
pC 78
01 t 57
59
s 70
pc 83
b5 c 49
pc 88
pc 59
s 48
s 84
pc 69
pc 67
si 75
pc 65
pc 78
22 c 53
C B
f 55


44


YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH I7 Theala Cal LOW 8 Kentor
Mich
WORLD CITIES


SUNDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 8?t73/c
Amsterdam 53/43/sh
Athens 73/54/s
Berlin 11sh
BeIriuntd /11 67pc
Cairo 88159, s
Calgary 17545/s
Hdvanld 87 67/SI!
Hong Knrg 8278/sl3
Jerusalem 73/51/s


I isbon 65 ,1/c
I ndondon 8/40sh
Madid 67/44/s
Mexo City 7,'241ipc
Monlreal 5? 36;c
Moscow 8i48,pc
Pans 54 ;41/sh
Rio a)/69 sh
Rome 05/52slh
Sydney 7760/c
Tokyo 60/52 Sl
Toroinlto 48/38 pc
Warsaw 67 39/pc


1- CITRUS S C COUNTY



CHRObNiCEt
Florida's Best Communlty Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community

To start your subscription:
Call now for home delivery by our carriers:
Citrus County: 352-563-5655
Marion County: 888-852-2340
13 weeks: $36.65* 6 months: $64.63*
1 year: $116.07*
*Subscription price includes a separate charge of .14 per day for transportation cost
and applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352-563-6363 for details.
There will be a $1 adjustment for the Thanksgiving edition. This will only slightly
affect your expiration date. The Viewfinder TV guide is available to our subscribers for
$13.00 per year.
For home delivery by mail:
In Florida: $59.00 for 13 weeks
Elsewhere in U.S.: $69.00 for 13 weeks
To contact us regarding your service:

352-563-5655
Call for redelivery: 7 to 10 a.m. Monday to Friday
7 to 11 a.m. Saturday and Sunday
Questions: 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday to Friday
7 to 11 a.m. Saturday and Sunday

Main switchboard phone numbers:
Citrus County 352-563-6363
Citrus Springs, Dunnellon and Marion County
residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.
I want to place an ad:
To place a classified ad: Citrus 352-563-5966
Marion 888-852-2340
To place a display ad: 352-563-5592
Online display ad: 352-563-5592
I want to send information to the Chronicle:
MAIL: 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
FAX: Advertising 352-563-5665, Newsroom 352-563-3280
EMAIL: Advertising: advertising@chronicleonline.com
Newsroom: newsdesk@chronicleonline.com

Where to find us:
Meadowcrest
l44 office
Norvell Brant Hwi 1624 N.
Dunkeneld Meadowcrest
D~nken -d _-. Cannondale Dr Blvd.
AveA Crystal River,
S \\ Medowcrest FL 34429


z IInverness
Courthouse office
To mpkins St. square
S n 2 106 W. Main
41 4 Inverness, FL
34450


Who's in charge:
G erry M u lliga n ............................................................................ P ub lish er, 5 6 3 -3 2 2 2
Trina Murphy ...................... Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232
C harlie B rennan ............................ .................................... Editor, 563-3 2 25
Tom Feeney .................................................... Production Director, 563-3275
Kathie Stewart .............................................. Circulation Director, 563-5655
John M urphy ........................ ............................ Online M manager, 563-3255
John Murphy.......................................................... Classified Manager, 564-3255
Jeff Gordon .............................................................. Business M manager, 564-2908
Mike Arnold.................................... Human Resources Director, 564-2910
Report a news tip:
Opinion page questions.................................. Charlie Brennan, 563-3225
To have a photo taken ........................................ Darlene Mann, 563-5660
News and feature stories ............................ Sandra Frederick, 564-2930
Community/wire service content.................... Sarah Gatling, 563-5660
Sports event coverage ...........................Jon-Michael Soracchi, 563-3261
S o u n d O ff ............................................................. .......................................... 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9
The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please
recycle your newspaper
www.chronicleonline.com
Published every Sunday through Saturday
By Citrus Publishing Inc.
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
Phone 352-563-6363
S POSTMASTER: Send address changes to:
Citrus County Chronicle
1624 N. MEADOWCREST BLVD., CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429

PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL
SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280


For the RECORD


0MA 5


- ...................


A4 SUNDAY, APRIL 22, 2012


LOCAL


WATERING FINES

* Effective Jan. 1, Citrus
County has stopped
issuing warnings for


50s


70S 61114





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Large, 100-year-old
tortoise dies
SILVER SPRINGS -A 660-
pound tortoise in central Florida
believed to be more than 100
years old has died.
The Ocala Star-Banner re-
ported Frank the Tank died in
his pen at Silver Spring Na-
ture's Theme Park on
Thursday.
The Aldabra tortoise was the
oldest animal at the theme
park, where he lived for nearly
40 years.



PATIENTS
Continued from Page Al

to the brain and replaces it
with a pleasant sensation.
"The cool thing about this,
you first do it as a trial for
four to seven days," Hashim
said. "Ninety percent of my
patients love the sensation."
If the patient wants to do
it as a permanent solution, a
surgeon implants it.
"As a physician, it's so sat-
isfying; I see patients who
can barely walk in because
of their pain, and I put the
trial in and immediately
they walk out normally"
Hashim said he prefers
this method of pain man-
agement to the use of nar-
cotics; they prescribe pain

CHRONIC PAIN BY
THE NUMBERS
116 million Americans
suffer from chronic pain.
20 percent of Americans
report that pain or physi-
cal discomfort disrupts
their sleep a few nights a
week or more.
Low back pain is the
most common chronic
pain condition and the
leading cause of disabil-
ity in Americans 45 and
younger. More than 26
million Americans be-
tween age 20-64 experi-
ence frequent back pain.
In the 2006 Voices of
Chronic Pain survey con-
ducted for the American


State BRIEFS
Aldabra tortoises are a native
species in a group of islands
belonging to Seychelles, a
country off Africa's east coast.
Frank the Tank is believed to
have died from old age.
Liquor store made
into church
LAKE WALES -A Pente-
costal church in Polk County
has renovated a former liquor
store and turned it into a house
of worship.
The Lakeland Ledger re-
ported the Pentecostals of Lake


killers as needed, but
cautiously.
"Narcotics cover up the
problems instead of attack-
ing the problem and taking
care of it," he said.
Fallows said spinal cord
stimulation has actually
cured cases of CRPS, com-
plex regional pain syn-
drome, if done early on.
"That was never an option
before," he said.
Other treatments used to
treat chronic pain include
injection therapies and
nerve blocks, topical creams
and gels and radio fre-
quency nerve ablation,
which uses an electrical
current produced by a radio
wave to heat up a small area
of nerve tissue.
"Devices are getting bet-
ter and better all the time,

Pain Foundation:
More than half felt they
had little or no control
over their pain.
Almost two-thirds (59
percent) said their pain
impacted their overall en-
joyment of life.
77 percent said they felt
depressed.
70 percent said they have
trouble concentrating.
86 percent said they
don't sleep well.
25 percent have seen a
pain management
specialist.
38 percent have con-
sulted with more than
one physician about their
chronic pain.


Wales church opened March 31
in a former ABC Liquor store.
The pastor and congrega-
tion members stripped the
store back to bare concrete
and its steel roof, then rein-
stalled electrical and plumbing
lines with new walls, lighting
and floors.
The church pastor said quite
a few members of his congre-
gation tell him their former life
used to be connected to the
liquor store.
-From wire reports


safer and easier to put in
and covering a larger area
of the body," Fallows said.
"They're making longer-
lasting batteries and meds
are getting better there
are now three new meds
that treat fibromyalgia -
five or six years ago we had
nothing."
Fallows said it's rare to
cure pain, but it can be
managed.
"We keep trying; we don't
give up on a patient," he
said. "If we can take some-
one's pain from a 10 down to
a 2, that's a big improve-
ment. If we can cut it from
debilitating to a nuisance,
that's a home run for us."
Chronicle reporter Nancy
Kennedy can be reached at
nkennedy@ chronicle
online. com or 352-564-2927.

* Among the major adjust-
ments chronic pain suf-
ferers have made
include: taking disability
leave from work (20 per-
cent), changing jobs (17
percent), getting help for
everyday activities (13
percent) and moving to a
different, easier to live in
home (13 percent).
* Almost six in 10 (57 per-
cent) said they would be
willing to pay $1 more
per week in taxes to in-
crease federal funding for
the scientific research
into the causes and treat-
ment of pain.
unless otherwise noted, information
comes from a 2009 Department of Health
and Human Services Report, compiled by
Nancy Kennedy


SUFFERING
Continued from Page Al

screws (from the surgery)
might've been coming out,"
Avery said.
The pain wouldn't go
away She said it was hor-
rendous, like electric cur-
rents shooting up her leg.
"She was a real basket
case for a while," said her
mother, Dolores Edwards.
"No one knew what was
wrong."
Almost as bad as the con-
stant pain was not being
taken seriously and being
told there was nothing
wrong with her, that the
pain was in her head.
Finally, a neurologist di-
agnosed her with RSD, re-
flex sympathetic dystrophy,
which has been renamed
complex regional pain
syndrome.
It's chronic, continuous,
debilitating pain, charac-
terized by an intensity
that's disproportionate to
the severity of the original
injury and gets worse over
time, not better.
Shoes are painful to
wear. A bed sheet on her
foot at night feels
excruciating.
At 45, Avery takes
methadone, which helps.
But she's always concerned
about addiction.
As for her quality of life,
if you ask her she'll say she
has none.
On disability, she can't
work. Her pain and her
$720 a month income se-
verely limit what she can
do.
"I watch TV," she said.
"The happiest hour of my
day is when 'Ellen' is on."
She's depressed. On the
outside she looks normal,
all tan and pretty when she
fixes her hair and puts on
her makeup.
When she does go out,
maybe up to Wal-Mart, peo-
ple either give her skepti-
cal looks when she's in a
cart or wheelchair or they
look past her.
"That feels belittling,"
she said. "They look right
past you."
At home she lives in a
sort of limbo. She said the
doctors have said she's not


"bad enough" for a Medi-
caid-approved electric cart,
yet it hurts to walk and she
can't afford to buy
one herself.
So, she sits and
fidgets, trying to
get comfortable.
She remembers
when she used to
dance and exer-
cise, go running -
walk to her mail- Tim H
box. Even if she living
could do that chronic
again, she'd feel pai
better about herself.
"She needs help," Ed-
wards said. "She's my
daughter and it hurts me to
see her in so much pain."
The doctors have sug-
gested implanting a spinal
cord stimulation device,
but that terrifies her.
"I manage the pain, but
there aren't enough drugs
in the world to take it
away," she said. "People
tell me to 'think positive,'
and I know they mean well,
but if it were that easy I
would've done that.
"Amy's not here any
more not the Amy I
know," she said. "This Amy
is just existing."
MEN
In 1997, Tim Hess was
on top of his boat that was
in his driveway and
jumped down from it onto
his lawn.
"I felt a twinge in my
back, but no big deal," he
said. "It was one of those
things, I was in my early 40s
and probably too old to
have done that, but didn't
realize it until after I did
it."
Later that night, he bent
over and ruptured a disc in
his back.
That was the beginning
of the end of his active
lifestyle of boating and bik-
ing, playing guitar with his
garage band, vacationing
with his family
From that time on, every-
thing revolved and still re-


volves around his back
pain.
"I got so bad that I had fu-
sion surgery in '99,"
S he said. "Everything
they did was correct,
but I did not get a
good result."
Hess retired as
the Chronicle's di-
rector of operations
in 2006.
less On an average day,
with his pain level is be-
back tween six and eight
n. on a scale of one to
10. Mornings are his worst
times; mid-day is best
"I'm never not in pain,
even with medication,"
Hess said. "You learn to
deal with it and change
your lifestyle to reduce the
chances of hurting yourself
more."
Hess, 54, said one of the
best things he has done was
to buy an iPad. Sitting at a
computer puts pressure on
his spine, which is painful.
With an iPad, he can do al-
most everything he wants
to do while reclining -
compose music, answer
emails, play games, com-
municate with people, read
news and books. An avid
photographer, he still takes
pictures and uses his iPad
to work on them.
His 4-year-old grand-
daughter, Haleigh, adds
tremendous quality to his
life, he said. When she's
over, they often spend time
in the pool together.
"Living with pain is a way
of life, and quality of life is
all about attitude," Hess
said. "I have hobbies I can
do despite being in a seden-
tary position, so that helps.
But it's mostly about ac-
cepting what I can't change
and making adjustments -
making the best of my
situation."
Chronicle reporter
Nancy Kennedy can be
reached at nkennedy@
chronicleonline.com or
352-564-2927.


I SAVED $100


ON MY NEW INSULATION.


Plus, I lowered my electric bill.

You can too. Adding insulation saves energy plus helps your home feel

more comfortable. Progress Energy can help with rebates for insulation

upgrades. It's easy and can make a real difference in your bill.


Insulation Upgrades:
Average rebate: $100
Average yearly savings: $100
Average improvement cost: $300




.. . . . . .. . . . . .. . . . .


Scan for more about our
insulation upgrade rebates.


Visit progress-energy.com/save
or call 1.888.456.7652.




j Progress Energy


Estimated yearly savings are based on 1,850 sq. ft. home with 15,665 annual kWh calculated at $.13/kWh and on engineering approximations from PEF Base
Study, DOE and ENERGY STAR*. Actual savings may vary due to weather, energy use habits and home characteristics. Actual costs (based on work completed
in PEF territory) and rebate amounts may vary based on: current insulation R-value, insulation type/level and total sq. footage installed. Requirements: must
be Progress Energy customer, must use Progress Energy prequalified contractor, must have Home Energy Check with qualifying recommendations, must have
whole house electric heating or cooling. Other restrictions may apply. @2012 Progress Energy Florida, Inc.
OOOAY5H


* The entire main building is insulated
* Both Building with multiple 50 & 30
amp services
* Central water & sewer


* Main building includes like new 12'x23'
office with central A/C & Heat
* Equipped with three 14' high garage doors
and one with an electric opener
* Full restroom facility with hot water heater
* Excellent lighting inside and outside
* Both buildings plumbed with high pressure
air lines & concrete pad for compressor
* The main building can house three 45'
motor-coaches with ease


This warehouse is located on almost an acre of well maintained property. This facility is
in like new condition and I believe that you will not find a nicer one anywhere. If you are
that person who has been searching for a place to store his big boy toys, you have just
found it. Will consider trade of high end motor-coach or automobile.
For more information and additional photos
please contact Bruce Davidson at 727-709-6607
or bdavidsonl@tampabay.rr.com


Almost as bad as the constant
pain was not being taken
seriously and being told there
was nothing wrong with her, that
the pain was in her head.


SUNDAY, APRIL 22, 2012 A5


H
ic
iir


MWD





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries


Virginia
Berry, 94
BEVERLY HILLS
The Service of Remem-
brance for Mrs. Virginia J.
Berry, age 94, of Beverly
Hills, Florida, will be held
at 1 p.m. Monday, April 30,
2012, at the Beverly Hills
Chapel of Hooper Funeral
Homes with Pastor Marple
Lewis. Cremation will be
under the direction of
Hooper Crematory, Inver-
ness. The family requests
expressions of sympathy
take the form of memorial
donations to Hospice of Cit-
rus County, PO. Box 641270,
Beverly Hills, FL 34464. On-
line condolences may be
sent to the family at
www. Hooper Funeral
Home.com.
Mrs. Berry was born June
30, 1917, in Allegan County,
MI, daughter of the late Leo
and Retta (Slentz) DeLano.
She died April 12, 2012, in
Lecanto.
She was a homemaker
and moved to Beverly Hills,
Florida, from Battle Creek,
MI, in 1977. She enjoyed
walking, taking care of oth-
ers, playing cards and
spending time with her fam-
ily She was a terrific mom
and caregiver. Mrs. Berry
was a member of the First
Baptist Church of Beverly
Hills, TOPS in Beverly Hills,
and was a volunteer for
Meals on Wheels.
Mrs. Berry was preceded
in death by her parents;
husband, Rolland Berry;
brother, Arthur DeLano;
and sister, Lucille Wertzler.
Survivors include three
daughters, JoAnn M. (James
E.) Spear of Sarasota, FL,
Janet K. Odom of Beverly
Hills, FL, and Jacqueline L.
(Douglas J.) Roach of
Lexington, KY; eight
grandchildren; 14 great-
grandchildren; and five
great-great-grandchildren.

Wilbur
Shepardson, 62
CRYSTAL RIVER
Wilbur Lee Shepardson,
62, of Crystal River, died
Thursday, April 19, 2012, as
a result of a motorcycle
accident.
He was born March 4,
1950, in Tampa, Florida, and
came here 27 years ago from
Plant City. He was a mem-
ber of the Boilermakers
Local 433 of Tampa and was
of the Christian faith. He
was dearly loved by all who
knew him.
He is survived by his
daughter, Angel Jones
(Doug); son, Shannon Lee
Shepardson; brother,
Howard A. Shepardson; sis-
ters Layne Sheppard and
Valdenna "Dennie" Duffell;
and grandchildren Austin
and Anna Jones and Jacob
Shepardson.
A graveside Funeral Serv-
ice will be held at 3 p.m.
Monday, April 23, at the
Turkey Creek Baptist
Church Cemetery in Plant
City, FL, under the direction
of Strickland Funeral
Home, Crystal River.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.


SO YOU KNOW


* The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits both free and
paid obituaries.



-1. E. viA
Funeral Home
With Crematory
Burial Shipping
Cremation
Member of
Inte tio-Il Order of the
GeLDEN PP'5

For Information and costs,
.000..4 call 726-8323

To Place Your
"In Memory" ad,
Call Mike Snyder at 563-3273
msnyder@chronicleonline.com
or
Saralynne Schlumberger at 564-2917
sschlumberger@chronicleonline.com

is 4 aspiortrndae


Thomas
Vosmek, 81
LECANTO
Graveside services for
Thomas J. Vosmek, 81, of
Lecanto, will be at 1 p.m.
Monday, April 23, 2012, at
Oak Ridge Cemetery, Inver-
ness. Mr. Vosmek died Sun-
day, April 8, 2012, in
Lecanto.

Orlando 'Joe'
LaPorte Jr., 82
HOMOSASSA
Orlando (Joe) LaPorte Jr.,
age 82, of Homosassa, FL,
passed away peacefully at
home surrounded be his
family April 16, 2012.
Born on January 10, 1930,
in Champlain, NY, to Or-
lando and Florida (Blaine)
LaPorte, Sr, Orlando was
predeceased by his wife of
46 years, Shirley T Boyce
LaPorte.
He worked as a truck
driver and Teamster 404
Steward in Massachusetts
before his retirement. He
moved to Citrus County in
1998 from Springfield, MA.
Joe loved family gatherings,
golf, cigars and his dogs
Betsy, Roger and Mylo.
Joe is survived by his
seven children, Cheryl
Hausrath with whom he
lived in Homosassa, FL,
Joanne DiCarlo of MT, Eliz-
abeth and her husband,
John Kenney, Susan La-
Porte, William and his wife,
Patty LaPorte, all of Spring-
field, MA, John and his wife,
Judy LaPorte, of Ware, MA,
and David and his wife Lori
LaPorte ofAgawam, MA; his
siblings Ross LaPorte, Leo
LaPorte, Leona Lessard and
Merrill LaPorte; as well as
12 grandchildren and four
great-grandchildren. He
also leaves two dear family
friends, Helen Gannon and
Juana Diaz. He was prede-
ceased by siblings Kenneth,
Iona, Reggie, Millie, Robert,
Del and Raymond.
Private cremation under
the direction of Brown Fu-
neral Home and Crematory
in Lecanto, Florida.
A funeral Mass will be
held at 9 a.m. Saturday, May
5, 2012, St. Michaels Cathe-
dral on State Street in
Springfield, MA.
In lieu of flowers the fam-
ily request the donations be
made in Orlando's name to
Goodwill Industries of
Springfield, MA.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.

Alice Groom, 77
LECANTO
Mrs. Alice Elizabeth
Groom, 77, of Lecanto, died
Thursday, April 19, 2012, in
Lecanto.
Arrangements are under
the direction of the Ho-
mosassa Chapel of Hooper
Funeral Home & Crematory


OBITUARIES
Obituaries must be
verified with the funeral
home or society in
charge of
arrangements.





FUNERAL HOMES
& CREMATORY
Inverness
Homosassa
Beverly Hills
(352) 726-2271
1-888-746-6737
www.HooperFuneralHomne.comn











Lorrie Verticals


,BEST 2" Faux Wood
4 RWoven Woods
SCellular & Roman Shades
Plantation Shutters
Ado Wraps
Custom Drapery
Top Treatments.
Etc.
5454 S. Suncoast Blvd.
(Hwy 19,next to Sugarmill Family Rest.)

AL


Arthur
'Bill' Pate, 64
YANKEETOWN
Arthur "Bill" Pate, AKA
"Frog," 64, of Yankeetown
(formerly of Tampa), passed
away on April 15, 2012.
He was a great family
man and a gifted musician.
He is survived by his par-
ents, Arthur and Joyce; wife,
Mary; children Byron (Amy)
and Henry (Beth); two
grandchildren; a sister,
Cindy Gibbs (Bill); and
many nieces and nephews.
Services will be held pri-
vately. In memory of Bill,
the family request dona-
tions to St. Jude's Children
Research Hospital in Mem-
phis, TN, or to the charity of
your choice.
Brewer & Sons, South
Tampa 813-835-4991.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.

OBITUARIES
Free obituaries, run one
day, can include: full
name of deceased;
age; hometown/state;
date of death; place of
death; date, time and
place of visitation and
funeral services.
Paid obituaries are
printed as submitted by
funeral homes.
Phone 352-563-5660
for details.


Hubert 'Bear'
Greiner, 75
HOMOSASSA
Homosassa resident Hu-
bert Rene Greiner, AKA
"BEAR," age 75, died on
March 28 2012. The family
service will be held on April
28 on the Gulf of Mexico.
Mr. Greiner loved being
out on the gulf, boating and
fishing.
Mr. Greiner was born in
France and served in the
French Navy before coming
to the U.S. Virgin Islands
and becoming an American
citizen. He opened his first
restaurant there, then
moved to Albuquerque, NM,
and opened another restau-
rant. He later moved to
Florida and ran businesses
in Holiday and Inglis,
Florida. He was a very gen-
erous man and was loved
and respected by many
He is survived by his
three sons, Gerard, Claude
and Robert; five grandchil-
dren; and four great-
grandchildren.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. com.

OBITUARIES
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear in
the next day's edition.
All obituaries will be
posted online at
www.chronicleonline
.com.


Catherine
Silver, 99
VEVAY, INDIANA
Catherine Louise
Thurston Silver, 99, of Vevay,
Indiana, (formerly of Inver-
ness) died April 20, 2012, at
Swiss Villa Nursing and Re-
habilitation Center in Vevay
She was born July 21,
1912, in Indianapolis, the
daughter of Harrison and
Cecilia Thurston. She was
raised in Indianapolis, grad-
uating from Shortridge High
School in 1929, and Butler
University in 1933. She was
a homemaker, florist and
dietician.
She moved to North Web-
ster, Indiana, in 1957, where
her late husband owned and
operated the Indian Hills
Golf Course, along with his
real estate agency and law
practice. She was a member
of the North Webster United
Methodist Church. She en-
joyed traveling the U.S. and
abroad with various travel
groups. She moved to Inver-
ness, Florida, in 1994 (hav-
ing wintered there since
1968), and to Lamb, Indiana
in 2001.
She is survived by her
daughter, Sue Huffman, of
Lamb, Indiana; grandson
Steve Huffman of Lamb, In-
diana; and niece Cecilia
Beaman, of Mobile, AL.
She was preceded in
death by her husband, Burl
Silver, and three brothers,
George Thurston, Harrison


Thurston II and Bernie
Thurston.
There will be no formal
funeral services. Haskell &
Morrison Funeral Home,
Vevay, Indiana, is handling
local arrangements. Owens
Family Funeral Home, Syra-
cuse, Indiana, is handling
final arrangements.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. com.

Deaths ELSEWHERE

George
Cowan, 92
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M.
Devoted to finding a way
for science to help society,
not much escaped the influ-
ence of chemist George
Cowan. From the Manhat-
tan Project and the hunt for
evidence of the Soviet
Union's first nuclear tests, to
the Santa Fe Institute and
the iconic Santa Fe Opera,
friends recalled the fruits of
his visionary ways.
Cowan died Friday at his
home in Los Alamos. He
was 92.
Friends confirmed his
death to The Associated
Press, saying it was the result
of a fall at his home. Cowan
was in good health and was
planning to travel and con-
tinue working with the non-
profit science institute that
he helped found in 1984.
-From wire reports


(R DISCOUNTS AT THIS STORE ONLY



sea Nrs CRYSTAL RIVER
1801 NW US Highway 19




STORE CLOSING


LMI


While Quantities Last.


While Quantities Last.
While Quantities Last.


*~~~H 5T V T?^













ivjioiiijl


EVERYTHING WILL BE SOLD!

Din Fin, innn & !muauInm U I il
ALL SALES FINAL. NO REFUNDS OR EXCHANGES. OPEN DAILY REGULAR HOURS. WE ACCEPT VISA, MASTERCARD, DISCOVER, AMERICAN EXPRESS AND SEARS
CARDS. WE ACCEPT SEARS GIFT CARDS. DISCOUNTS DO NOT APPLY TO PREPAID GIFT CARDS. INVENTORY IS LIMITED TO STOCK ON HAND. THIS STORE IS NOT
PARTICIPATING IN CURRENT SEARS CIRCULARS. 10OK GOLD JEWELRY UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED. THIS EVENT EXCLUDES ELECTROLUX.
THE AUTO CENTER IS NOT PARTICIPATING IN THIS SALES EVENT.


IC B YOUR WAY'
Ir7 10 REWARDS


A6 SUNDAY, APRIL 22, 2012





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Weekly ROUNDUP


The week in state government: $70B good, nearly $143M bad


MICHAEL PELTIER
The News Service of
Florida
TALLAHASSEE Gov.
Rick Scott signed a $70 bil-
lion budget this week as he
touted new money for edu-
cation, but wielded more
than $142 million in vetoes
for projects he said the
cash-strapped state can't
afford.
Facing a budget that had
already been cut after suc-
cessive years of tough eco-
nomic times, the governor's
veto pen used less ink this
time, as he marked out far
less than the $600 million he
axed a year ago.
The courts were also busy
this week, as cases dealing
with congressional and state
Senate reapportionment
wound their way through
separate courts. The
Florida Supreme Court took
a look at revised maps for
the state Senate, while a few
blocks away a circuit judge
took arguments in a tussle
over congressional districts
drawn by the Republican-
led Legislature.
Meanwhile, the focus con-
tinued on the killing of 17-
year-old Trayvon Martin by
a neighborhood watch vol-
unteer back in February A
day before shooter George
Zimmerman appeared on
his own behalf, apologized
to Martin's family and was
released on $150,000 bail,
Scott introduced members
of a committee set up to re-
view Florida's controversial
"stand your ground" law
and related issues dealing
with race, guns and citizen
protection.
Serving as a backdrop,
businesses and individuals
marked two years since the
BP Deepwater Horizon oil
spill shut down Florida's
tourism and seafood
industries.
Whether coincidental or
not, the company this week
outlined a $7.8 billion class
action settlement that
comes in additional to
nearly $6.3 billion already
spent.
Budget
Scott kicked off the week
by signing the state's $70 bil-
lion budget. Meeting with


Associated Press
Florida Gov. Rick Scott talks with children Tuesday at Cunningham Creek Elementary School in Fruit Cove before signing
the state budget. Standing behind the Governor, from left, are Rep. Ronald "Doc" Renuart, Sen. Stephen Wise (not shown),
Sen. John Thrasher and Rep. Fred Costello.


elementary school students
at Cunningham Creek Ele-
mentary School in St. Johns
County, Scott used the occa-
sion to tout a $1 billion in-
crease in K-12 funding, a
boost that critics were quick
to point out does not make
up for nearly $1.3 billion in
cuts made last year to state
public schools.
"This budget is an educa-
tion budget," Scott told a
small crowd of squirming
but quiet elementary stu-
dents at the school.
But attention turned to
what the governor did not
allow to remain in the
state's spending blueprint.
From local museums and
neighborhood development
projects to bigger items,
Scott downsized the budget.
Among the vetoes was $2
million less for attorneys to
represent low-income resi-
dents through foreclosure
proceedings, domestic vio-
lence hearings and con-
sumer fraud cases. Critics
say the cuts to the state's
civil legal assistance pro-
gram will mean a 25 percent
reduction in the number of
attorneys available for legal
assistance on civil matters
in the coming year
On the health care front,


$38.2 million in vetoes hit
the health- and human-ser-
vices section of the budget,
and some money for health-
related projects also was
eliminated from other parts
of the spending plan.
The vetoes were only a
tiny fraction of the roughly
$29.9 billion the state ex-
pects to spend in 2012-13 on
health- and human-services
programs, but still are ex-
pected to be felt by hospitals
and others in health care.
"I focus on the hundreds
and hundreds of projects
and meritorious programs
that were funded," said Sen.
Joe Negron, R-Stuart and
chairman of the Senate
HHS budget committee.
In a letter issued as part
of the budget-signing, Scott
praised legislative decisions
such as setting aside money
for development of a new
hospital-payment system in
Medicaid and providing
money for mental-health
and substance-abuse
programs.
Redistricting
Democrats and three vot-
ing-rights organizations
asked a Leon County judge to
throw out newly-passed con-
gressional districts this week


in a battle likely to make its
way to the Florida Supreme
Court, maybe further
In several hours of argu-
ments before Circuit Court
Judge Terry Lewis, the
groups accused the Legisla-
ture of racial and political
gerrymandering. The Legis-
lature's lawyer countered
that the Democrat's objec-
tions would mean black vot-
ers would be parceled out
among districts that would
subsequently elect white
Democrats.
The case marks the first
time a court has reviewed
the congressional plan
under the anti-gerryman-
dering Fair Districts
amendments, approved by
voters in a November 2010
referendum.
On Friday, the Florida
Supreme got into action as it
reviewed, for the second
time, maps outlining the
state's Senate districts. Dur-
ing testimony, the high court
appeared to blunt argu-
ments by Fair Districts that
the revised plans still do not
satisfy requirements under
the act.
Rich in race
Senate Democratic leader
Nan Rich confirmed this


week she'll run for governor
in 2014, the first to toss a hat
in the ring to challenge the
Republican governor.
The Democrat from We-
ston, in Broward County,
said comments she made to
Broward Democrats on
Tuesday evening weren't in-
tended as a formal an-
nouncement, but confirmed
she's in and "formulating a
strategic and financial plan."
Asked whether a liberal
Jewish woman from South
Florida can succeed in a
statewide race, Rich said
voters would have to decide
that
BP spill
Meanwhile Floridians
marked the second anniver-
sary of the BP Deepwater
Horizon oil spill this week
as the oil company came to
terms with parties in a class
action lawsuit over the ex-
plosion and fire that killed
11 and sent 4.9 million bar-
rels of crude into the Gulf.
Two years after the explo-
sion, BP has paid nearly
$2.7 billion in claims to
Florida businesses and in-
dividuals for damages
caused by the worst spill in
U.S. history
Florida regions economi-


cally devastated by the spill
that began April 20, 2010,
have generally rebounded,
as tourists have returned to
the beaches.
Along with payments to
individuals and businesses
totaling more than $6.3 bil-
lion to date, BP has spent
millions more to reimburse
local and state governments
from Louisiana to Florida
on an array of fronts, from
helping market Florida
seafood to restoring sand
dunes and building parks in
the Pensacola area.
But despite the dollars
spent, critics say the long-
range effects of the spill may
take years to ascertain, while
the issue slips from the col-
lective memory of state and
federal officials charged
with making sure BP pays to
clean up the mess.
Stand your ground
Gov Rick Scott on Thurs-
day named the members of
a task force formed to look
at the state's self-defense
law in the wake of Trayvon
Martin's shooting death Feb.
26.
Last month, as national
outrage grew about the lack
of an arrest in the case, Scott
announced the task force
and tapped Lt. Gov Jennifer
Carroll to chair it. But he
said at the time he would not
name the panel members or
schedule their first meeting
until the criminal investiga-
tion was complete.
Now, with special prose-
cutor Angela Corey's an-
nouncement last week that
the acknowledged shooter,
neighborhood watch volun-
teer George Zimmerman,
would face second-degree
murder charges, Scott said
the task force will meet
starting May 1.
STORY OF THE
WEEK: Gov Scott signs $70
billion budget, touts $1 bil-
lion for education.
QUOTE OF THE
WEEK: "We're not walking
into this with any precon-
ceived notions. We live in a
state where the crime rate is
at a 40-year low, and I want
to keep it that way." Gov.
Rick Scott on naming a com-
mission to examine the
state's "stand your ground"
self-defense law.


L st p on


** S u


A Ws e-gie v -




Weight loss surgery is a life-changing event


If you have tried less
invasive ways to lose weight,
such as diet and exercise,
with no success, join us to
learn about the latest
minimally invasive surgical
techniques for weight loss.


Salvatore Ramos, MD


Wednesday, April 25, 2012

6pm


Holiday Inn Express
903 East Gulf to Lake Highway,
Lecanto, FL 34461


Please register by calling

1-800-530-1188




OCALA HEALTH SYSTEM
OCALA REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER
WEST MARION COMMUNITY HOSPITAL



Wes Mrin Cmmniy Hspta


JOIN US IN THE


FIGHT AGAINST CANCER.


THE HUGS AND LAUGHTER


ARE JUST A BONUS.


























Get your team together
for the American Cancer
Society Relay For Life



Lecanto

Lecanto High School

May 4


Ci ii LN1 .I..E

More people than ever before are surviving cancer. A
Here's your chance to recognize those survivors and honor the T
memory of friends and loved ones. We invite the whole community / RELAY
to reach out and get your teams together for this celebration of life. FOR LIFE
Sign up today for the American Cancer Society Relay For Life.
1\ (352) 585-4162 www.cancer.org
000 4N


STATE


SUNDAY, APRIL 22, 2012 A7





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Floral City continues


preserving history


MARCIA BEASLEY
Special to the Pioneer
Floral City Heritage Council will gather
for its spring quarterly meeting Tuesday,
April 24, at the Floral City Community
House on Orange Avenue in Floral City.
A member and guest potluck dinner
starts at 7 p.m., followed by the "Snippet of
History" at 7:30 p.m., and then the quarterly
meeting.
The public is invited to the "Snippet of
History" presentation "The Historic Duval
House," which will be presented by Chair-
man Frank Peters and member H.D. Bas-
sett. This is the oldest house in Floral City
and is thought to be the oldest continuously
used residence in Citrus County. Situated
on the corner of Orange Avenue and Old
Floral City Road, it was built by early Flo-
ral City landowner, John Paul Formy-Duval,
in the mid-1860s.
This one-acre property with house was
recently purchased by the Duval descen-
dants through the formation of the Duval
Historic Preservation Trust. One may ex-
pect to hear more as fundraising and
restoration begin.
At the general membership meeting, Pe-
ters will share the results of events com-
pleted and plans for activities to come in
the summer.
One of those activities includes the


fundraiser in partnership with the Floral
City Garden Club: 'A Garden Tour with His-
torical Overtones, Including Art, Music and
a Chocolate Tasting"
This event will take place from 10 a.m. to
4 p.m. Saturday, May 19, and 1 to 4 p.m. Sun-
day, May 20.
In addition, information about the initial
plans for Floral City Heritage Days 2012
slated for Nov 30 and Dec. 1 will be pre-
sented.
Now that the office, kitchen and restroom
are renovated at Floral City Heritage Mu-
seum, the council will stage a "Museum
Shower." Any useful item for less than $5
that can be used by the council in any one
of these rooms will be welcomed.
A small thank-you gift will be given at this
meeting to all who bring a shower gift for
the museum.
Members are also reminded to bring a
plate and tableware for the dinner and a
nonperishable food item or a grocery store
gift card for the Citrus County Veterans
Coalition Food Pantry
Visitors are welcome to join the council,
which provides a 12-month membership
plus full privileges in the Citrus County
Historical Society Inc.
Visit the website at floralcityhc.org, or
call Chairman Frank Peters at 352-860-0101,
or email the-fchc@hotmail.com for more
information.


Special to the Chronicle
The Citrus County
Builders' Association
(CCBA) and FD.S. Disposal
Inc. will present the 17th an-
nual Family Fishing Tour-
nament on May 5 and 6 at
the Homosassa Riverside
Resort in Homosassa, with
the Captain's Meeting to be
May 4 at the same location.
The Coastal Conservation
Association, Citrus Chapter,
plans its Aaron Monier Me-
morial Youth Tournament
in conjunction with the
CCBA tournament, to make
the weekend a true family
experience for all.


The CCBA annual Family
Fishing Tournament is a
local favorite that boasts
more than $12,500 in cash
and prizes (based on 125
boat entries), with this
year's top prize being $3,000
each for both Trout and
Redfish.
Last year, the tournament
brought entries from as far
as Miami-Dade, Apopka and
Gainesville and
Apalachicola. This year,
entry fees are $150 for each
boat, with no extra angler
fees.
For more information
about this tournament, as
well as online registration


and payment, visit www.
citrusbuilders.com and
click on the gray fishing logo
on the home page. Youth
entry forms are available on
the CCBA website, as well.
Official entry forms may
be picked up in person at
the Homosassa Riverside
Resort, Riverside Crab
House, FD.S. Disposal Inc.,
Citrus 95.3 and Fox 96.3 and
the Citrus County Builders
Association. The CCBA is
open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Monday through Thursday
and can be contacted by
email to info@citrus
builders.com or by calling
352-746-9028.


WEEKLY LINEUP
0 Medical professionals share their expertise with columns in Health & Life./Tuesdays
0 Read up on all things school-related in the Education section./Wednesdays
0 Plan menus for the week from the recipes in the Food section./Thursdays
0 Get a jump on weekend entertainment with the stories in Scene./Fridays
0 See what local houses of worship plan to do in the Religion section./Saturdays
0 Read about area businesses in the Business section./Sundays


0 = I-a
WE'LL MEET OR BEAT ANY
COMPE11TORS PRICE*

BLIND FACTORY
LECANTO TREETOPS PLAZA : iVnsstaation
1657 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY e . In Home Consulting !
52 00 1 2 18740 M nwww.72-hourblinds.com
5 2 7 -0 0 1 2 1-877-746-0017 *Mustpresentwntenestimatefrom mipettororrthispnce-



Solutions for knee and hip
pain are a free seminar away!
Physicians at the Florida Knee and Orthopedic Pavilion
have performed thousands
of minimally invasive Largo Medical Center
surgeries on people just ATeaching Hospital
like you. Surgeries like -
Partial or Total Resurfacing FLORIDA KNEE &ORTHOPEDIC PAVILION
can get you back to your
active lifestyle.
l V Our surgeons have
performed oye, 11000
X 3 surgeries since
A C aE ,rarr,, ,n n lUl.


Come to our -o



SEMINAR
if I u You'll be glad you did


need surgery,
EXPERIENCE MATTERS!


Fri. April 27
Homosassa
10am
West Citrus Elks Lodge #2693
7890 W. Grover Cleveland Blvd.
RESERVATIONS & INFORMATION:
1-888-685-1594 (toll free)
www.LargoMedical.com


April23 to 27MENUS


CITRUS COUNTY SCHOOLS
Elementary schools
Breakfast. All meals include milk and juice.
Monday: Ultra cinnamon bun, grits, cereal
and toast.
Tuesday: Breakfast egg and cheese wrap,
tater tots, cereal and toast.
Wednesday: Breakfast sausage pizza, grits,
cereal and toast.
Thursday: Ham, egg and cheese on warm
flatbread, tater tots, cereal and toast.
Friday: Pancake slider, grits, cereal and
toast.
Lunch. All meals include milk and juice.
Monday: Crispy Mexican tacos, mozzarella
MaxStix, PB dippers, garden salad, sweet
peas, Spanish rice, juice bar.
Tuesday: Stuffed-crust pizza, chicken al-
fredo with RipStick, Verry Berry Super Salad,
yogurt parfait, fresh baby carrots, sweet corn,
wheat roll, fruit juice bar.
Wednesday: Oven-baked breaded chicken,
turkey wrap, PB dippers, garden salad, sweet
corn, sweet potato souffle, chilled applesauce.
Thursday: Macaroni and cheese, breaded
chicken sandwich, ham super salad, yogurt par-
fait, fresh baby carrots, steamed broccoli apple
crisp, peaches, crackers.
Friday: Baked chicken tenders, pepperoni
pizza, PB dippers, garden salad, peas and car-
rots, Italian pasta salad, warm apple slices.
Middle schools
Breakfast. All meals include milk and juice.
Monday: Breakfast sausage pizza, MVP
breakfast, grits, cereal and toast.
Tuesday: Breakfast sandwich stuff, ultra cin-
namon bun, tater tots, cereal and toast.
Wednesday: Breakfast egg and cheese
wrap, MVP breakfast, tater tots, cereal and
toast.
Thursday: Breakfast sausage pizza, ultimate
breakfast round, peach cup, grits, cereal and
toast.
Friday: Ham, egg and cheese biscuit, ultra
cinnamon bun, tater tots, cereal and toast.
Lunch. All meals include milk and juice.
Monday: Oven-baked breaded chicken,
chicken alfredo, yogurt parfait, fresh baby car-
rots, peas and carrots, seasoned mashed pota-
toes, cornbread, mixed fruit.
Tuesday: Pasta with mozzarella and meat
sauce, pepperoni pizza, ham super salad, PB
dippers, garden salad, sweet corn, warm apple
crisp, chilled pears, crackers.
Wednesday: Hamburger on bun, turkey
wrap, yogurt parfait, fresh baby carrots, peas,
ranch pasta salad, colossal crisp french fries,
fruit juice bar.
Thursday: Stuffed-crust cheese pizza,
cheesy chicken and rice burrito, chef super
salad, PB dippers, garden salad, glazed car-
rots, applesauce, Jell-O, crackers.
Friday: Hot ham and cheese sandwich, fajita
chicken and rice, Very Berry Super Salad, fresh
baby carrots, green beans, sweet potato souf-
fle, peaches, wheat roll.
High schools
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast sausage pizza, MVP
breakfast, grits, cereal and toast, milk, juice.
Tuesday: Sausage, egg and cheese biscuit,
ultra cinnamon bun, tater tots, cereal and toast,
milk, juice.
Wednesday: Breakfast egg and cheese
wrap, MVP breakfast, tater tots, cereal and
toast, milk, juice.
Thursday: Breakfast sausage pizza, ultimate


, *Check& TopOff All Fluids
S*Check rrePressure on AU4 res
S*27-Point Inspection
*Battery Test 9
m NO APPOINTMENT NEEDED!
S Allmakes&modes.Validonanvy nior eniti punuucr3idiswhere


breakfast round, grits, peach cup, cereal and
toast, milk, juice.
Friday: Breakfast sandwich stuffer, ultra cin-
namon bun, tater tots, cereal and toast, milk,
juice.
Lunch
Monday: Oriental orange chicken, ham-
burger, pizza, fajita chicken super salad, yogurt
parfait, baby carrots, green beans, chilled
peaches, french fries, crackers, milk.
Tuesday: Turkey and gravy over rice,
chicken sandwich, pizza, Very Berry Super
Salad, yogurt parfait, fresh garden salad, peas
and carrots, baked french fries, warm apples,
crackers, milk.
Wednesday: Macaroni and cheese, pizza,
hamburger, turkey wrap, turkey super salad, PB
dippers, baby carrots, baked beans, corn,
mixed fruit, cornbread, french fries, crackers,
milk.
Thursday: Crispy Mexican tacos, chicken
sandwich, pizza, ham super salad, yogurt par-
fait, garden salad, glazed carrots, Spanish rice,
french fries, applesauce, crackers, milk.
Friday: Oven-baked breaded chicken, ham-
burger, pizza, ham super salad, yogurt parfait,
fresh baby carrots, corn, peas, sweet potato
souffle, french fries, peaches, crackers, milk.
Lecanto High School lunch
Monday: Hot ham and cheese, macaroni
and cheese, hamburger, chicken sandwich, fa-
jita chicken super salad, pizza, yogurt parfait,
baby carrots, green beans, baked beans, warm
apples, french fries, baked chips, crackers,
milk.
Tuesday: Oriental orange chicken, ham-
burger, chicken sandwich, turkey and gravy
over noodles, ham salad, yogurt parfait, pizza,
garden salad, glazed carrots, french fries, peas,
peaches, baked chips, crackers, milk.
Wednesday: Brunch bowl, chicken alfredo,
hamburger, chicken sandwich, pizza, turkey
super salad, yogurt parfait, baby carrots, french
fries, ranch pasta salad, broccoli, tater tots,
mixed fruit, baked chips, crackers, milk.
Thursday: Cheesy chicken and rice burrito,
hamburger, chicken sandwich, macaroni and
cheese, pizza, ham super salad, yogurt parfait,
garden salad, green beans, sweet corn, french
fries, applesauce, baked chips, crackers, milk.
Friday: Chicken tenders, pizza, hamburger,
chicken sandwich, spaghetti with mozzarella
and meat sauce, Very Berry Super Salad, par-
fait, baby carrots, seasoned rice, wheat roll,
sweet potato souffle, peaches, french fries,
peas, baked chips, milk.

SENIOR DINING
All meals offer margarine and low-fat milk.
Monday: Chunky barbecued chicken, Lyon-
naise potatoes, California-blend vegetables,
sugar cookie, whole-grain wheat bun.
Tuesday: Three-bean beef chili, parslied
rice, carrot coins, peaches wheat crackers.
Wednesday: Sausage and bean casserole,
buttered spinach, yellow corn, citrus fruit,
whole-grain bread.
Thursday: Sliced meatloaf, tomato gravy,
mashed potatoes, green peas, graham crack-
ers, whole-grain bread.
Friday: Chef salad with ham, cheese, whole
boiled egg and tomato, french dressing, carrot-
raisin salad, mixed fruit, whole-grain bread.
Senior dining sites include: Lecanto, East Cit-
rus, Crystal River, Homosassa Springs, Inver-
ness and South Dunnellon. For information, call
Support Services at 352-527-5975.


FREE iFREEi
Timing Belt I Alignment I
in April I CheckR $g1 s I
up Notto ecombinedwthanyotherdisounts Expir 430/12
WH II IHH R


Buy3llres ~


Get *, 1 .
IRI Wiper Blaes
'alratLOwCheW rLol- nda PnsmayamyNbymdPI.elPlust.. I I ValdatLowCheworLoveHonda Pn. mayvabymcdel Plus


& m .m m m m, m m m A m m m km -=m ,,mmm d

S2209 Highway 44 West Inverness, FL 34453 2219 S. Suncoast BlvdXL Homosassa. FL34448
352.341.0018 352.628.9444
lovechevysales.com lovehonda.com
CHEVY LET HOURS OF OPERATION: H HOURS OF OPERATION:
Sales 9AM-8PM Mon.-Fri.: 9AM-6PM Sat. Soles- 9AM-8NI Mton. ri; 9AM-6PM Sat: 1 AM 4PM Sun.
Service 8AM-5PM Mon.-Fri.: 8AM-Noon Sat. Service 8AM-5PM Mon.-FrL: 8AM-2PM Sat.







Now through May 31
Buy one syringe of
Radiesse or Juvaderm
and receive one box of

Latisse FREE

Also receive a 50% discount
on second syringe




SUnCOART DERMATOlOGY *
AnD SKin SURGERY CENTER
; Allen Ridge Professional Village
525 North Dacie Point, Lecanto, Florida 34461

I. ; B www.dermatologyonline.com 352-746-2200


- I -


Family fishing tournament


May 5 and 6 in Homosassa


I NESECECOPO


A8 SUNDAY, APRIL 22, 2012


LOCAL


I S M CUMI


wjl





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SHOOTER
Continued from Page Al

whereabouts secret in the
court file, as O'Mara re-
quested.
"I don't know where we're
going to end up," O'Mara
said after the bail hearing.
"It's a very difficult decision
to make. It's an enormously
high-profile case, and there
are just a lot of emotions
that exist"
In Anthony's case, Baez
had the cooperation of sher-
iff's deputies who blocked
traffic from the Orange
County Jail and entrances to
a nearby interstate so they
could have unimpeded ac-
cess to the highway during
her late-night release. An-
thony later made her way to
Ohio without being de-
tected, but had to return to
an undisclosed location in
Florida to serve out proba-
tion on a check-fraud
charge.
A spokeswoman for the
Seminole County Sheriff's
Office said late Friday that



WATER
Continued from Page Al

sit down," Long said. "The
smallest rise or fall now
causes the springs to
reverse."
At about 50 cubic feet of
water per second, both Fan-
ning and Manatee springs
are at about half the flow
that typically categorized
them as first magnitude
springs. Fanning's decline,
according to SRWMD
records, has been slow and
steady during the last year,
while Manatee has seen a
sharp decline from more
than 150 cubic feet per sec-
ond a year ago.
Levy County representa-
tives reported recently that
Bronson Blue Springs has
ceased flowing, and repre-
sentatives from two of
Williston's most popular at-
tractions, Blue Grotto and
Devil's Den, also report
record low levels.
Dan Fisher, who has
worked at Blue Grotto for
about 14 years, said he's
never seen the spring's level
so low.
"The water is dropping
like a rock," he said Friday
"It's probably a good 10 feet
down from the average."
According to Fisher, it
measures at about 100 feet
at its deepest point on aver-
age. He said he's noticed
levels dropping for the past
two years.
Fisher said the lack of
rain is certainly an issue,
but agriculture and devel-
opment also play a part,
both of which, unlike rain,
can be managed.
"Florida is just totally
being destroyed," he said.
"The economy is the only
thing anybody cares about
anymore. Gotta make
money But once you destroy
everything that everybody
came here for, what's left?"
Rowena Thomas, who co-
manages Devil's Den, said
Friday the spring is down
about 12 feet from its aver-
age of about 60 feet
"Residents are con-
cerned," she said. "I would
be too if I had wells. If
you're not concerned about
it, you're putting your head
in the sand."
There have been 71 wells
reporting record low levels
for March, according to
SRWMD.
Jamie Storey, owner of
Action Pump Repair and
Well Drilling in Old Town,
said he's seen a lot of wells
go dry in the past year.
"A lot of the 30- to 40-foot
wells are drying up right
now," he said. "A lot of them
are starting to pump air and
sand."
He said wells went dry
during the drought in the
early 2000s as well, though
most of those were shal-


lower wells, extending on
average only about 20 feet
into the ground. From that
time, he said, water levels
have continued to drop.
Storey said most of the
wells he's seen run dry re-
cently are in the Dixie
County area. People have
had to extend wells to get
their pumps farther down,
sometimes having to pur-
chase a more powerful
pump.
Jody Stephenson, owner
of Stephenson Septic Tank
Services Inc., of Old Town,
said he contracts out a lot of
well drilling and pump re-


The Hearing Aid
Myth Busters!

A TTT T T


Homosassa
S -" I k 5699 S. Suncoast Blvd.
. .J 352-621-8000


1 ..LJ -LJ L-.
Inverness
2036 Hwy. 44 West
352-586-7599


STATE/LOCAL


no special arrangements
like that had been made yet
for Zimmerman's release.
But Baez said law en-
forcement officials would
be called on to safely get
him out of jail and away
from media. "From then on,
it's really up to Mr. Zimmer-
man as to whether he's
going to be able to keep a
low profile," he said.
Baez said he expects
there to be a cooling-off pe-
riod over the next couple of
months as Zimmerman
fades from the spotlight, and
the public's attention moves
on.
But until then, Zimmer-
man's attorneys should ex-
pect intense interest in
where Zimmerman is, said
Kendall Coffey, a former
U.S. Attorney in Miami who
is now in private practice.
"I think they have to be
prepared for a manhunt by
not only members of the
media but curious onlook-
ers," Coffey said. "The
whereabouts of George Zim-
merman will be one of the
most intriguing curiosities
of the legal world in the


pair and is running into the
same problems.
"There are a lot of wells
going dry, mostly in Dixie
County. But it's all around,
Levy and Gilchrist. Every-
body's in the same boat," he
said last week.
The problem, which
started about two years ago,
has gotten worse in the last
year, he said.
Steve Quinata, owner of
Williston Well and Pump
Inc., said he's been seeing
wells run dry in Morriston,
Williston and in areas closer
to Gainesville. He said the
problem became most ap-
parent at the beginning of
the year
Still, SRWMD board
members continue to issue
permits for millions of gal-
lons of water withdrawals a
day
On April 10, the board ap-
proved for a third time tem-
porary permits initially
approved in December for
about 3.9 million gallons of
water a day to three farms
operating in the Lower
Suwannee River Basin
wishing to expand
operations.
The William Douberly
Farm, Alliance Grazing
Group (Lancala) and its sis-
ter operation, Piedmont
Dairy Farm, are in total
permitted to use about 6.3
million gallons of water a
day. Combined, the farms
will be using 15 new spray
pivots for irrigation pur-
poses, according to SRWMD
records.
Long said she thinks peo-
ple would be shocked to
know that taxpayers eat the
lion's share of the cost of


coming weeks."
Post-bail security costs
don't come cheap, either,
and it could be extremely
difficult for Zimmerman to
pay for it. His attorney is
considering having him de-
clared indigent, and his wife
has no income because she
is in nursing school and
does not work.
In an extreme case, it cost
some $200,000 a month to
keep Dominique Strauss-
Kahn under house arrest at
a luxury Manhattan town
house when he was accused
of assaulting a hotel maid.
Disgraced financier
Bernard Madoff was pro-
tected by 24-hour-a-day
armed guards and cameras
recording his every move.
Retired federal and high-
ranking New York City po-
lice officers kept tabs on
everything at his secured
Upper East Side penthouse,
even deliveries to the
building.
Once he is situated in
his new location, Zimmer-
man needs to never be
alone so he can have some-
one at his side should a


such pivots when farmers
expand operations.
"We are out of water, and
the feds and the state are
helping farmers get 80 per-
cent cost share for circle
pivots for new land. That is
insane!" she said.
John Sage Jr, who lives
between Fowlers Bluff and
Chiefland, complained last
week about the installation
of new pivots on farms near
his home.
"It's OK if there's plenty of
water," he said. "But I don't
see me or anyone else, just
regular people, losing their
wells."
Sage, who has lived in the
area for 25 years, said he's
never seen the water situa-
tion so bad. He also said he
does his part to conserve
water, something SRWMD
asks residents to do.
But he is losing his gar-
den, and he's starting to see
a lot of iron in his water
He said he's not sure if he
can afford the $3,500 it
would cost him to increase
the size of the pipe his well
uses.
If he could address the
water district, he said, "I'd
ask them to curtail water
use. These guys use enough
water for a small city."
And that's another prob-
lem, Long said. The district
doesn't actually know how
much water farmers are
using because the vast ma-
jority of agricultural wells
are not monitored.
"My theory is that they're
using a whole lot more
water than they are permit-
ted for," said Long, who has
been attending SRWMD
meetings regularly for sev-


SUNDAY, APRIL 22, 2012 A9


Associated Press
Mark O'Mara, attorney for George Zimmerman, gets into his car Saturday after speaking
with his client at the Seminole County Jail in Sanford. Zimmerman was a neighborhood
watch volunteer who shot unarmed teenager Trayvon Martin. O'Mara said it would take a
few days before Zimmerman is released.


threat arise, and he
shouldn't associate with
anybody he hasn't known
for a long time, said Slot-
nick. His client, Goetz, was


eral years.
Why else would a farm
lobbyist tell SRWMD board
members at the December
meeting that monitoring
agricultural wells would put
farmers out of business, she
asked.
"I'm not asking them to
lose business," she said.
"But they're asking us to
have a crisis."
Several state agencies
are currently working to-
ward sharing resources and
coming up with a single
model to help determine


acquitted of most charges
except several firearm
charges for shooting four
men who he alleged tried
to mug him in a case that


what happens to the
groundwater in North
Florida, but Long said an
accurate understanding of
what's going on depends on
agricultural wells being
monitored. Meanwhile, she
said, water districts use
outdated groundwater
models for permitting
purposes.
"The model shows we're
not supposed to be running
out of water yet. This was
way down the road. That's
why I was so shocked: be-
cause it's happening."


came to symbolize vigi-
lante justice.
"He will not be forgotten.
He will be recognized," Slot-
nick said of Zimmerman.


When enough springs quit
flowing, she said, parts of
the aquifer will be inun-
dated with river water.
River water has high dis-
solved oxygen levels that can
spur the quick release of
salts such as gypsum,
sulpher and arsenic found
naturally in Florida's
geology
"There will come a point
when the water will poison
the crops."
Mark Scohier is a re-
porter with the Chiefland
Citizen.


If I could show you a way to -
make more by spending less,
would you be interested? .
Of course you would. \

There are no secret formulas or magic tricks;
however, there are multiple methods of
compensation that should match your o
investment management expectations..
Join me for brunch on Tuesday, ; / ]



(352) 873-4 14 1 Paul Grant Truesdell, J.D., AIF, CLU, ChFC, RFC
Reservations: Required -Location: Lecanto, Florida -Length: 45 Minutes
Securities & Investment Advisory Services offered through Titan Securities, -'
Broker/Dealer, Member FINRA& SIPC. The Truesdell Professional Building,
200 N.W. 52" Avenue, Ocala, FL 34482 Phone Number (352) 873-4141 x 23 OoB77L


FREE HEARING TEST
+ EVALUATION


Donate. Shop. Repeat.
70oa c &u W& ifAlt qjov.
Earth Day is Sunday, April 22.
Repurpose items by donating to Goodwill on
April 21 & 22 and you'll receive a
brand new, reusable tote bag FREE.
(while supplies last)





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


County & State BRIEFS


Budget workshop
April 24 at auditorium
Due to citizen interest in the
budget process, the Citrus
County Board of County Com-
missioners has moved the
budget workshop at 5 p.m.
Tuesday, April 24, to the Citrus
County Auditorium, 3610 S.
Florida Ave., Inverness (Citrus
County Fairgrounds).
The auditorium is not
equipped to accommodate live
television feed; therefore the
budget workshop will not be a
live broadcast, but will be avail-
able for viewing by May 1 on
the Clerk of the Court's website
at www.clerk.citrus.fl.us.
This is a workshop; therefore
there will be no vote by the
Board of County Commission-
ers at this meeting.
For information, call Public
Information Officer Lindsay Ubi-
nas at 352-527-5484.
Congregation to
remember Holocaust
The annual Yom Hashoah -
Holocaust Remembrance Pro-
gram for Citrus County will take
place at 2 p.m. Sunday, April
22, at Congregation Beth
Sholom of Citrus County in
KellnerAuditorium (62 Civic
Circle, Beverly Hills).
This year's program is "Es-
cape to Shanghai," featuring
Manny Bloch (former president
of the congregation), who will
talk about his life from Berlin to
Shanghai to the United States.
More than 20,000 Jews sur-
vived the Holocaust living in
Japanese-occupied Shanghai.
It is a story of courage, luck and
survival.
A special presentation, "GIs
Remember," which includes in-
dividual photographs and narra-
tives of servicemen who
witnessed the liberation of Nazi
concentration camps, will be on
display. For more information,
call Karl Seidman, chairman of
the Commemoration Commit-
tee, at 352-344-1531.
Friends seek
answers in deaths
WINTER PARK The fam-
ily and friends of two central
Florida teenagers whose bod-
ies were found engulfed in


flames are trying to help find
out who is responsible for their
deaths.
The Orlando Sentinel re-
ported more than two dozen
people passed out flyers Satur-
day with details about a reward
for information leading to an
arrest.
The bodies of 16-year-old
Nicholas Presha and 18-year-
old Jeremy Stewart were found
about a week ago by bicyclists
on an Orange County trail. Both
teens were students at Winter
Park High School and said to
be best friends.
Few details have been re-
leased on their deaths.
Crimeline has offered a re-
ward of $5,000 for information
leading to an arrest; a fund set
up at United Legacy Bank by
the families will be used to bol-
ster that amount.
Boy tests positive
for cocaine
JACKSONVILLE Jack-
sonville police have charged a
man with child neglect after a 4-
year-old boy tested positive for
cocaine.
The Florida Times-Union re-
ported police responded to a
complaint of prostitution and
narcotics activity at a Candle-
wood Suites hotel room
Wednesday.
When they arrived and
knocked on the door, a 4-year-
old boy answered and said, "Hi,
policeman."
The door was then abruptly
shut.
Officers were eventually able
to get inside the room, where
they found a substance that
tested positive for crack cocaine
on a table and on the floor.
The boy was taken to a hos-
pital, where he tested positive
for cocaine. Quentine Crawford
has been charged with posses-
sion of cocaine. Matthew Rea-
gan is charged with renting a
space for prostitution and will-
fully neglecting a child, among
other charges.
Ocala judge
violated ethics
TALLAHASSEE -An inves-
tigative panel said an Ocala
judge should be reprimanded
for habitual tardiness but that a


religious comment he made
was an isolated incident.
Circuit Judge William
Singbush agreed with the rec-
ommendation in a stipulation


Making Freelance
Work Work for You

Wednesday, April 25
3 4:30 p.m.
College of Central Florida
Klein Conference Center
3001 S.W. College Road
Ocala, FL 34474

Monday, April 30
3 4:30 p.m.
College of Central Florida
Citrus Campus
Learning & Conference Center
3800 S. Lecanto Highway
Lecanto, FL 34461

Information:
352-291-9551 or
800-434-5627, ext. 1147

Register:
talenthub@clmworkforce.com


WORKFORCE


CITRUS LEVY MARION
www.clmworkforce.com

SeCOLLEGE of
CENTRAL
FLORIDA
an equal opportunity college


filed Friday with the Florida
Supreme Court.
It was signed by Singbush
and the Florida Judicial Qualifi-
cations Commission's inves-


tigative panel.
The agreement said
Singbush should keep his job
but appear before the high
court for a public reprimand.


He agreed his repeated tardi-
ness violated a judicial canon
saying judges should act
promptly and efficiently.
-From staff and wire reports


Why Freelancing?

Are you ready for something new
in your career? Are you looking
to boost your earnings potential?

These days, you can work from
just about anywhere if you have
Internet and a computer or a
mobile device. Right now, there


are tens of thousands of
freelance opportunities from *
social media to project _
management to virtual assistance to content development
and much more. We'll show you how to find them!

Our Goal: Teach you the skills needed to
compete in the exciting New World of Work

Take the first step Come to one of the free orientation
sessions to learn about emerging trends in the workforce
and find out how you can take advantage of your talents to
be a part of the New World of Work!

After your orientation, sign up for a special training
program that begins in May. The class
takes place once a week for four
weeks. The program is sponsored by
Workforce Connection, the region's
workforce expert. There is no charge! n

To register, email: talenthub@clmwo force.

Workforce Connection is a member of Employ Florida and an Equal Opportunity Em r yer Program. Auxiliary
aids/services are available upon request to those with disabilities via Florida Relay a 11. For assistance, call
352- 840-5700, ext. 7878 or email accommodations@clmworkforce.com at least th e business days in advance


Guess who's


open in

=a-=- ol


County?


I#o


INSIGHT

CREDIT UNION


Federally
insured by
NCUA


WE'RE NOW OPEN!
211 E. HIGHLAND BLVD., INVERNESS

We're open to anyone who lives or works in
Citrus, Sumter, Marion and Lake County.


407.426.6000 or

Toll-Free 888.843.8328

www.insightCreditUnion.com


000AS45


New World of Work Innovation

FREELANCE TALENT HUB
Orientation Sessions April 25 and April 30


A10 SUNDAY, APRIL 22, 2012


LOCAI/STATE


q"s


som-





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


From pollution to politics


Photos chart

EPA's progress
DINA CAPPIELLO
Associated Press
WASHINGTON A pol-
luted drainage ditch that
once flowed with industrial
waste from Lake Charles,
La., petrochemical plants
teems with overgrown, wild
plants today.
A light-rail line zips past
the spot where a now-de-
funct Portland, Ore., gaso-
line station advertised in
1972 it had run out of gas.
A smoking Jersey City, N.J.,
dump piled with twisted,
rusty metal has disappeared,
along with the twin towers of
the World Trade Center in
lower Manhattan that were
its backdrop.
Forty years after the En-
vironmental Protection
Agency sent an army of
nearly 100 photographers
across the country to cap-
ture images at the dawn of
environmental regulation,
The Associated Press went
back for Earth Day this year
to see how things have
changed. It is something the
agency never got to do be-
cause the Documerica pro-
gram, as it was called, died
in 1978, the victim of budget
cuts.
AP photographers re-
turned to more than a dozen
of those locations in recent
weeks, from Portland to
Cleveland and Corpus
Christi, Texas. Of the 20,000
photos in the archive, the
AP selected those focused
on environmental issues,
rather than the more gen-
eral shots of everyday life in
the 1970s.
Gone are the many obvi-
ous signs of pollution -
clouds of smoke billowing
from industrial chimneys,
raw sewage flowing into
rivers, garbage strewn over
beaches and roadsides -
that heightened environ-
mental awareness in the
1970s, and led to the first
Earth Day and the EPA's
creation in 1970.
Such environmental con-
sciousness caused Congress
to pass almost unanimously
some of the country's
bedrock environmental laws


-_ --.-_- r_ -p- .





-".-- " ~' ~" ""'. ., -.-" "' .

-- .. ~, ... --..
.-- -
-r




Associated Press
This photo taken in July 1972 shows part of the Olin-Matheison Plant on the far side of Lake
Charles, La. The photo was taken for the "Documerica" program, 1972-77, instituted by the
then-new Environmental Protection Agency to document subjects of environmental concern.


Army data gives snapshot

of drug trade in war zone


Associated Press
WASHINGTON The
U.S. Army has investigated
56 soldiers in Afghanistan
on suspicion of using or
distributing heroin, mor-
phine or other opiates dur-
ing 2010 and 2011, newly
obtained data shows. Eight
soldiers died of drug over-
doses during that time.
While the cases repre-
sent just a slice of possible
drug use by U.S. troops in
Afghanistan, they provide
a somber snapshot of the il-
licit trade in the war zone:
young Afghans peddling
heroin, soldiers dying after
mixing cocktails of opiates,
troops stealing from med-
ical bags, Afghan soldiers
and police dealing drugs to
their U.S. comrades.
In a country awash with
poppy fields that provide
up to 90 percent of the
world's opium, the U.S.
military struggles to keep


an eye on its far-flung
troops and monitor for sub-
stance abuse.
U.S. Army officials say
that while the presence of
such readily available
opium, the raw ingredient
for heroin, is a concern,
opiate abuse has not been
a pervasive problem for
troops in Afghanistan.
The data represents only
criminal investigations
done by Army Criminal In-
vestigation Command in-
volving soldiers in
Afghanistan during those
two years.
The cases, therefore, are
just a piece of the broader
drug use statistics released
by the Army this year re-
porting nearly 70,000 drug
offenses by roughly 36,000
soldiers between 2006 and
2011.
The number of offenses
increased from about 9,400
in 2010 to about 11,200 in
2011.


W4a
fAN MnH.In


This photo taken April 13, 2012, shows people sunning themselves on a beach on Lake
Charles, La., opposite a cement terminal on the far side of the lake near the site of the old
Olin-Matheison Plant.


in the years that followed.
Today's pollution prob-
lems aren't as easy to see or
to photograph. Some in in-
dustry and politics question
whether environmental reg-
ulation has gone too far, and
whether the risks are worth
addressing, given their costs.
Republican presidential
contender Mitt Romney has
called for the firing of EPA
chief Lisa Jackson, while
GOP rival Newt Gingrich
has said the EPA should be
replaced altogether. Jack-
son has faced tough ques-
tioning on Capitol Hill so
often the in past two years a
top Republican quipped
that she needs her own
parking spot.


"To a certain extent, we
are a victim of our own suc-
cess," said William Ruck-
elshaus, who headed the
EPA when it came into exis-
tence under Republican
President Richard Nixon
and was in charge during
the Documerica project.
"Right now, EPA is under
sharp criticism partially be-
cause it is not as obvious to
people that pollution prob-
lems exist and that we need
to deal with them."
Environmental laws that
passed Congress so easily in
Ruckelshaus' day are now at
the center of a partisan dis-
pute between Republicans
and Democrats. Dozens of
bills have been introduced


to limit environmental pro-
tections critics say will lead
to job losses and economic
harm, and there are those
who question what the vast
majority of scientists accept
- that the burning of fossil
fuels is causing global
warming.
In the 1970s, the first en-
vironmental regulations
were just starting to take ef-
fect, with widespread sup-
port. Now, according to
some officials in the oil and
gas and electric utility in-
dustries, which are respon-
sible for the bulk of
emissions and would bear
the greatest costs, the EPA
has gone overboard with
rules.


36,99
Crown
Royal
1800
Tequiia
-S =


--18,99 !33,99
4-k
Canadian
Club JackDonieis
.Black
Bacardi
wwRum Ketel One
c-,...: ,:, Vodka


Unbelievable HOtiuDealson yurJ
PrMIce on Rums HFlv Bicit rands


10 Cane 750 mi............... 19.99
Bacardi 8 7o ml.............. 17.99
Sailor Jerry Rum 1.75 L ....... 19.99
Mallbu Rum 1.75 L............... 17.99
Don Q Rum 1.75L ............... 14.99
Admiral Nelson
Spiced Rum 1.75 L.............. 12.99
Coulsons Rum 1.75 L .......... 11.99


7,99
Suffer Home
,i11 ,,r.rr,c

Cupcake
oll ,jrl.r,e
*lT,1


Robert Boissoneault Oncology Institute is the only
cancer treatment center in Citrus County to offer the
Calypso" System GPS for the Body The Calypso
System provides a giant leap forward in our ongoing
fight against cancer
What Makes the Calypso System Different?
The prostate like many organs in the body is never in a state
of complete rest but can move during radiation treatment Three
tiny Beacon' electromagnetic transponders provide positioning
guidance to the clinician during therapy Clinicians can use the
motion data to monitor the prostate position to accurately
target the cancer during radiation delivery


Lecanto Office
522 N. Lecanto Hwy.
Lecanto FL 34461
352-527-0106


Inverness Office
605W. Highland Blvd.
Inverness FL 34452
352-726-3400


Accredited by the American College of Radiology since August 1998
CalypsoO, Beacon*, and GPS for the Body* are registered trademarks, and 4D Localization System" is a trademark of Calypso* Medical Technologies, Inc.


Johnnie Walker Red
1.75 L ............................... 27.99
Johnnie Walker Black
750 mi................................ 27.99
Dewar's White Label
Scotch 1.75 L.................. 27.99
Maker's Mark 750 ml........... 19.99
Courvoisier VS 750ml .......... 19.99
Remy Martin VSOP
75 m l ...................................3 1.99


W IINISE



18.99
Santa
,: ~ Margherita
Pino Grngio
S Black Box
WE1.Ior,


WEIE KIl


12,99
Sam Adamorns
or Seasonal,
Newcaslle
Brown Ale
I, ,: C ilkl


SPECIAL



5.99

Bud or


'Bud Light or
Michelob Ultra
12 pack 8 oz cans

10,99 Mikes All Flavors
Modelo or Smirnoff Ice
Especial
S0odeo. or Smirnoff
Presldente i el...
orUght Twisted Flavors
,I Ir,, 6 pack 12 oz bottles
I -~r,~ne .


OOOAY4K
PMNOW-e&MMrAD422WMl4PSOMn DA02 B 22 e 4 A...
R WHa rs
U 4. .V. -c0,w A ] hi' .5
~ fltlCY.~If~ P


www.acr.org


RBOI is the only radiation oncology facility in
Citrus County to achieve accreditation by the
American College of Radiology.


ROBERT BOISSONEAULT

ONCOLOGY INSTITUTE
v:. .. rboi com


NATION/WORLD


SUNDAY, APRIL 22, 2012 All


5









Sean Penn says he's in Haiti for the long haul


Associated Press

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti
- Sean Penn no longer lives
in a tent, surrounded by
some 40,000 desperate peo-
ple camped on a muddy golf
course. And he no longer
rushes about the capital
with a Glock pistol tucked in
his waistband, hefting bags
of donated rice and warning
darkly of a worsening hu-
manitarian crisis.
But the actor who
stormed onto the scene of
one of the worst natural dis-
asters in history has cer-
tainly not lost interest.
Defying skeptics, he has put
down roots in Haiti, a coun-
try he hadn't even visited
before the January 2010
earthquake, and has be-
come a major figure in the
effort to rebuild.
"At the beginning, we
thought he was going to be
like one of the celebrities
who don't spend the night,"
said Maryse Kedar, presi-
dent of an education foun-
dation who has worked
alongside Penn. "I can tell
you that Sean surprised a
lot of people here. Haiti be-
came his second home."
Penn's role has evolved
over the two years of Haiti's
meandering recovery He
started as the head of a
band of volunteers, mor-
phed into the unofficial
mayor of the golf course-
turned-homeless camp and
became a member of what
passes for Haiti's establish-
ment a part of the presi-
dent's circle who addresses
investors at aid conferences
and represents this tumble-
down Caribbean country to
the world.
He is now an ambassador-
at-large for President
Michel Martelly, the first
non-Haitian to receive the
designation, and the CEO of
the J/P Haitian Relief Or-
ganization, a rapidly grow-
ing and increasingly
prominent aid group. The
actor, who is being honored
for his work in Haiti April 25
with the 2012 Peace Summit
Award at the 12th World
Summit of Nobel Peace
Laureates in Chicago, has
yoked himself to an unlikely
cause: helping a country
that has lurched from one
calamity to another.
"This country is finally
getting out of the hole," he


Associated Press
In this April 11, 2010, file photo, Colombian singer Shakira, center left, and U.S. actor Sean
Penn, right, walk with children during a visit to the makeshift camp in the Petionville Golf
Club in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. The actor who stormed onto the scene of one of the worst
natural disasters in history two years ago has certainly not lost interest. Defying skeptics,
he has put down roots in Haiti, a country he hadn't even visited before the January 2010
earthquake, and has become a major figure in the effort to rebuild.


said in an interview with
The Associated Press at a
house in the Haitian capital
that serves as his NGO's
crash pad, with rooms di-
vided by plywood and a sign
in the kitchen saying no sec-
onds until everyone has had
a chance to eat.
It's strange to see a
celebrity of his stature in
these surroundings. He
brings glamour to a country
that has none, where the
streets are largely dirt and
most people don't have in-
door plumbing, not to men-
tion any kind of steady job.
His leftist politics don't
seem like a match for right-
of-center Martelly, and his
leadership of an aid group
partially funded by the U.N.
doesn't square with his con-
tempt for foreign NGOs. His
salty language is not exactly
diplomatic.
But maybe there is a kind
of weird logic to Penn's ad-
venture in Haiti. He is an
actor whose most famous
roles are underdogs and
whose politics frequently
put him at odds with the
U.S. government, embracing
the likes of Venezuela's so-
cialist President Hugo
Chavez. Haiti is a land of
contrasts and contradic-
tions, a poor country in the


shadow of the U.S., a place
of inspiration and despair.
Or maybe he just wanted
to help, said Bichat
Laroque, a 26-year-old who
lives with his mother in the
displaced persons camp
managed by Penn's NGO:
"He married Madonna and
he made a lot of money and
after a terrible earthquake
he says, 'Let's do good things
in Haiti.'"
MEN
When not at home in Los
Angeles, Penn spends about
half his time in Haiti and
public sightings are com-
mon. On a recent morning at
the camp his group man-
ages, at the Petionville Club,
he lumbered through wear-
ing faded jeans, a plaid but-
ton-down shirt and aviator
sunglasses, greeted by resi-
dents in English ("Sean, my
friend!") and Creole ("Bon-
jou, Sean!")
He sat down on the ter-
race of the house overlook-
ing the tarp-covered
shanties, and talked for
more than an hour because
the subject was Haiti, a
topic he riffs on with a pas-
sionate, sometimes ram-
bling intensity, sprinkled
with the obscenities. When
it comes to the mission of
his outfit, he veers toward


grandiose, even choking up
at times.
"My job is to help people
get the future they want to
have," he said.
The Haiti that Penn saw
when he arrived in the
country for the first time,
about a week after the
earthquake, was apocalyp-
tic, a tableau of death and
destruction that shocked
the world.
Port-au-Prince, the
densely packed capital with
an estimated 3 million peo-
ple, was shaken by a magni-
tude 7.0 earthquake on Jan.
12, 2010, which flattened
thousands of schools filled
with students and offices
filled with workers. Officials
estimated the death toll at
more than 300,000, an equal
number injured, and at least
1.5 million homeless. The
government was crippled;
aid groups were swamped.
Benjamin Krause, the
country director for Penn's
group, said the quake res-
onated with the actor in part
because his son, Hopper,
had recently recovered
from a skateboarding acci-
dent that caused a serious
head injury
"Sean turns on the televi-
sion and sees parents next to


children holding their hands
as they are having surgeries
in the streets with no pain
medication whatsoever," he
said. "It moved him to call up
all the people he could to get
pain medication lined up
and as many medical profes-
sionals as possible."
He also may have been in
search of a cause. A 2010
Vanity Fair profile sug-
gested as much, saying he
had been rudderless, de-
spite his movie success, fol-
lowing the death of his
brother, Chris, in 2006 and
the divorce from Robin
Wright Penn in 2009.
Penn and Diana Jenkins,
a Southern California phi-
lanthropist, put together a
planeload of supplies and
volunteers seven doctors
and 23 relief workers. They
called themselves the Jenk-
ins/Penn Haitian Relief Or-
ganization, which changed
to J/P HRO after her in-
volvement waned.
The actor, who carried a
gun in the chaotic early
days, landed with his co-
terie at the Petionville Club,
where they found a contin-
gent from the U.S. Army's
82nd Airborne Division.
Penn embedded with the
military, and his involve-
ment grew from there.
He soon started showing
up at meetings of aid offi-
cials trying to coordinate
the disparate relief efforts.
"He would sit down like
everyone else and listen,"
said Giovanni Cassani of the
International Organization
for Migration.
Former U.S. President
Bill Clinton, a U.N. special
envoy to Haiti, was among
those impressed with
Penn's efforts.
"He was not a drive-by
celebrity," Clinton said in a
recent interview. "He went
into those camps and he was
actually solving their water
problems, solving their san-
itation problems."
J/P HRO now operates out
of airy office space in a for-
mer school, has a fleet of
trucks and heavy equip-
ment, a staff of 300 and hires
so many laborers to clear
rubble that on some days it's
the largest employer in
Petionville, one of several
cities that make up the cap-
ital region.


The irony is that Penn has
been a critic of foreign non-
governmental organizations
in Haiti, so plentiful that the
country has been ridiculed
as the "Republic of NGOs."
He still tells the story of a
"very reputable" NGO
whose actions after the
quake were "akin to the
worst of Hollywood ambi-
tion." Penn's group had do-
nated a shipment of
painkillers, but distribution
was delayed, he said, so the
organization that would
hand out the drugs could
affix stickers on the boxes
and get credit.
"What's wrong with NGOs
goes much deeper in terms
of development and in
terms of emergency relief
and the lack of coordination
of the two," Penn said.
"Everybody waits for some-
body to demonstrate that
something's going to be im-
pressive to donors to steal
the idea from the person
that actually did it and then
try to sell it as their thing
until that gains or loses
popularity."
He ridiculed what he sees
as the typical "NGO person"
or "U.N. person" as out of
touch and ineffective. "It's
Lance Armstrong on a sta-
tionary bike saying, 'I'll get
there as soon as the corrup-
tion is over,"' he said.
Penn and his staff say
their mission evolved as
new challenges surfaced.
They started managing the
camp, then took over the
clinic when the Army pulled
out, and did the same with
the schools, allowing other
groups, including Save the
Children, to focus
elsewhere.
To move people off the
club's steeply sloping golf
course and make room for
them outside the camp, they
cleared 250,000 cubic me-
ters of rubble, provided
rental assistance, repaired
damaged homes and subsi-
dized a local bakery to cre-
ate jobs.
Outside the country club,
they run a community cen-
ter and two clinics, treating
2,000 patients a week, and
are building a new school.
"I always describe us as
an airplane that built itself
after takeoff," Penn said.


Sprin F



CARE


WEDNESDAY, APRIL

CENFLORIA College of

WORKFORCE Learning and


CITRUS LEVY MARION11


FIRST AMERICAN TRUST. nw u. LV. r, 1.. r 'o r... k'I" L' t ".J -Sfl% .-iJ l I"3 la .. I

00OB84W APPOINTMENTS RECOMMENDED



[IMSIMDED
SOUTHEASTERN INTEGRATED MEDICAL


JOIN OUR PHYSICIANS AS THEY PRESENT EDUCATIONAL SEMINARS
ON HEALTHCARE TOPICS THAT MAY AFFECT YOU

FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

Monday, April 23rd

Topics in Women's Health
Oscar Osorio, MD & Alain Smolarski, MD


All seminars will be held from:
1:00 3:00pm
COMFORT SUITES
1202 AVENIDA CENTRAL NORTH
THE VILLAGES, FL 32159
Refreshments and snacks will be served.
For Reservations Call: (352) 391-6464

Offices conveniently located in Lake Sumter Landing, Highway 441 and Ocala.
Now accepting new patients. www.simedpl.com
000AYNH


380


College Students and
Meet with local employers
Learn about Workforce program
Dress professionally

No charge! For information, ca
For the latest alerts and updates,
www.clmworkforce.cor
Workforce Connection is a member of Employ Florida and a
available with disabilities. Telephone numbers may be re
call 352-840-5700, ext. 7878 or e-mail accommodations


ERFAI'R


25 10 A.M. TO 2 P.M.

Central Florida Citrus Campus
Conference Center (Building C4)
0 S. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto

Community Job Seekers
Explore career options
s Register with Employ Florida
- Bi i ig copies of resume

1ll 352-637-2223 or 1-800-434-5627
follow us on Twitter@WorkforceCLM
m www.citrus.CF.edu
in equal opportunity employer/program. Auxiliary aids/services are
reached via the Florida Relay Service at 711. Accommodations:
@clmworkforce.com at least three business days in advance.


W-


A12 SUNDAY, APRIL 22, 2012


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Watergate figure

Charles Colson dies


Associated Press
WASHINGTON He was
described as the "evil genius"
of the Nixon administration,
and spent the better part of a
year in prison for a Water-
gate-related conviction. His
proclamations following his
release that he was a new
man, redeemed by his reli-
gious faith, were met with
more than skepticism by
those angered at the abuses
he had perpetrated as one of
Nixon's hatchet men.
But Charles "Chuck" Col-
son spent the next 35 years
steadfast in his efforts to
evangelize to a part of soci-
ety scorned just as he was.
And he became known per-
haps just as much for his ef-
forts to minister to prison
inmates as for his infamy
with Watergate.
Colson died Saturday at
age 80. His death was con-
firmed by Jim Liske, chief
executive of the Lansdowne,
Va.-based Prison Fellowship
Ministries that Colson
founded. Liske said the pre-
liminary cause of death was
complications from brain
surgery Colson had at the
end of March. He under-
went the surgery to remove
a clot after becoming ill
March 30 while speaking at
a conference.
In 1972, The Washington
Post called him "one of the
most powerful presidential
aides, variously described as
a troubleshooter and as a
'master of dirty tricks."'
"I shudder to think of
what I'd been if I had not
gone to prison," Colson said
in 1993. "Lying on the rotten
floor of a cell, you know it's
not prosperity or pleasure
that's important, but the ma-
turing of the soul."
He helped run the Com-
mittee to Re-elect the Presi-
dent when it set up an effort
to gather intelligence on the
Democratic Party.
But it was actions that pre-
ceded the actual Watergate
break-in that resulted in Col-
son's criminal conviction.
Colson pleaded guilty to ef-
forts to discredit Pentagon
analyst Daniel Ellsberg. It
was Ellsberg who had leaked
the secret Defense Depart-
ment study of Vietnam that
became known as the Penta-
gon Papers. The efforts to
discredit Ellsberg included
use of Nixon's plumbers a
covert group established to
investigate White House
leaks in 1971 to break into
the office of Ellsberg's psy-
chiatrist to look for informa-
tion that could discredit
Ellsberg's anti-war efforts.
The Ellsberg burglary was
revealed during the course of
the Watergate investigation
and became an element in
the ongoing scandal. Colson
pleaded guilty in 1974 to ob-
struction of justice in connec-
tion with attempts to discredit
Ellsberg, though charges
were dropped that Colson ac-
tually played a role in the
burglary of Ellsberg's psychi-
atrist's office. Charges related
to the actual Watergate bur-
glary and cover-up were also
dropped. He served seven
months in prison.
Before Colson went to
prison, he became a born-
again Christian. Colson
stayed with his faith after Wa-
tergate and went on to win
praise including the pres-
tigious Templeton Prize for
Progress in Religion- for his
efforts to use itto help others.
Colson later called going to
prison a "great blessing."
He created the Prison
Fellowship Ministries in
1976 to minister to prison-
ers, ex-prisoners and their
families. It runs work-re-
lease programs, marriage
seminars and classes to
help prisoners after they get
out. An international off-
shoot established chapters
around the world.


Associated Press
Charles Colson bears testi-
mony Aug. 2, 2000, at a con-
ference for evangelical
Protestants at Amsterdam's
RAI congress center. Colson,
the tough-as-nails special
counsel to President Richard
Nixon who went to prison for
his role in a Watergate-
related case and became a
Christian evangelical helping
inmates, has died. He was
80. Jim Liske, chief execu-
tive of the Lansdowne-based
Prison Fellowship Ministries
that Colson founded, said
Colson died Saturday.



Lend

Your

Ears


Participants sought
for hearing aid
comparison study.
Gardner Audiology
invites you to join a field
study that will compare
conventional digital
hearing aids with Spectral
10. This new technology
boosts speech recognition
because it bypasses
damaged inner ear
hearing cells and diverts
amplified speech to the
useable cells. Starkey, the
largest manufacturer of
hearing aids in the U.S.,
is partnering with
Gardner Audiology to
perform this study.
You will receive free
services that include:
candidate screenings,
evaluation, lab services,
and hearing aid fittings in
exchange for sharing your
experience on pre and
post fitting questionnaires.
At the end of 30 days you
will return the study aids
or purchase at a discount.
It's your choice.

Call 795-5700
Crystal River Inverness
Over 2000 participants
have joined
Gardner Audiology's
research studies.
Gardner
I Audiology


Citus County's Best Kept Dining Secuet!
Ce[ebaatinq
11 Yeaas
Sending Citacus
Cornfy?



PRIME RIB & .AL
CRAB STUFFED SHRIMP AX
Book Now for Mother's Day '
Hours:
llam-9pm Visit our website at
W wed.-Sat. www.bentlysrestaurant.com
9am-9pm to view all our menus or call
Closed 352-465-5810
Mon. & Tue. 11920 N. Florida Ave. (Hwy 41)
S Citrus Springs One mile south of Dunnellon


Kony not


biggest threat


Associated Press
RIVER VOVODO, Central
African Republic For
Ugandan soldiers tasked
with catching Joseph Kony,
the real threat is not the
elusive Central Africa war-
lord and his brutal gang.
Encounters with the Lord's
Resistance Army rebels are
so rare that Kony hunters
worry more about the
threats of the jungle: armed
poachers, wild beasts,
honey bees and even a fly
that torments their ears.
A soldier crossing the


Chinko River in the Central
African Republic on
Wednesday was drowned
and mauled by a crocodile.
This week's crocodile at-
tack was the second in two
months, highlighting the per-
ils of trying to catch a rebel
leader about whom so little is
known and who could be
anywhere in the Central
Africa jungle. There have
been no signs of Kony in a
long time, and the soldiers
whose goal it is to catch him
are in fact more likely to be
killed by elephants and
snakes in their path.


Associated Press
Ugandan soldiers working as technicians Friday request a
military helicopter to bring them water deep inside the jun-
gle. For Ugandan soldiers tasked with catching Joseph
Kony, the real threat is not the elusive warlord and his bru-
tal gang. It is armed poachers and jungle creatures.


Soar with Us Now!


Send your resume in confidence to:

The Villages of Citrus Hills

Attn: nancy@citrushills.com

Fax: 352-746-7707


PETER YUNG KIM, M.D.
Cardiovascular & Thoracic Surgery


ii~Ei


HERE

WHEN YOU

NEED

CITR
When it comes to outstanding cardiovascular care, trust
your heart to Citrus Memorial Heart and Vascular Center.
With nearly a decade of experience, our expert team of
surgeons, physicians and nurses offer the most advanced
expertise when you need it most, right here at home.

From advanced heart surgery such as coronary artery
bypass (CABG) and heart valve repairs to the implantation
of pacemakers and automatic defibrillators, Citrus
Memorial is at the heart of it. Our minimally invasive
abdominal aneurysm surgery, carotid artery procedures
and lung surgery techniques help in reducing the risks and
complications associated with more traditional methods
and promote improved healing that helps speed you back to
normal daily living.

So when it comes to matters of the heart, coupled with
our proven record for compassionate care and excellent
outcomes, you can depend on Citrus County's most
comprehensive heart and vascular center. Learn more about
us by visiting on-line at www.heartofcitrus.com.

For a free Citrus Memorial Heart & Vascular Center tour,
please call 352.344.6952.




CITRUS MEMORIAL


He art
& VASCULAR CENTER


502 West Highland Boulevard Inverness, Florida 34452
352-726-1551 I citrusmh.com I heartofcitrus.com


NATION/WORLD


SUNDAY, APRIL 22, 2012 A13











NATION


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Nation BREFS UN monitors visit opposition stronghold

iB- kitt4--


Five unarmed observers tour Homs, hear

appeals from residents for outside military help


Associated Press
Veterinarian Dr. Jennifer
Steketee holds Meow, a 2-
year-old tabby Thursday at
the shelter in Santa Fe,
N.M. Meow, arrived at the
shelter weighing in at more
than 39 pounds, after his
elderly owner could no
longer care for the feline.
The shelter plans to put the
cat on a special diet so he
can lose weight gradually.
Adult cats typically weigh
between 7 and 12 pounds.


Weakness shown
in defense plans
WASHINGTON One of
President Barack Obama's
signature defense programs,
a missile defense shield de-
signed to protect the United
States and Europe from an
Iranian missile attack, faces
major delays, cost overruns
and critical technological
problems, according to two
recent government reports.
The reports by the Defense
Department and congres-
sional investigators cast
doubt on a program that is at
the core of American plans to
defend Europe and a sensi-
tive political issue both do-
mestically and in relations
with Russia. They say missile
interceptors are running into
production glitches, the sys-
tems' radars are underpow-
ered and the sensors cannot
distinguish between war-
heads and other objects.

World BRIEFS

Heating up


Associated Press
Popocatepetl volcano
spews lava, ash and steam
during an eruption Satur-
day as seen from from
Xalitzintla, Mexico. Author-
ities prepared evacuation
routes, ambulances and
shelters in the event of a
bigger explosion after the
volcano that looms over
Mexico City emitted a low-
pitched roar early Saturday
morning. Popo, as it's com-
monly known, has put out
small eruptions of ash al-
most daily since a round of
eruptive activity began in
1994. A week ago, the
eruptions started growing
larger.


Pakistan detains
airline head
ISLAMABAD Pakistan
blocked the head of an airline
whose jet crashed near the
capital from leaving the coun-
try and ordered him into pro-
tective custody on Saturday
as it began an investigation
into its second major air dis-
aster in less than two years.
The Bhoja Air passenger jet
crashed Friday as it tried to
land in a thunderstorm at Is-
lamabad's main airport, killing
all 127 people on board and
reviving concerns about avia-
tion safety in a country sad-
dled by economic problems,
an embattled government,
and Islamist insurgency. The
small domestic airline, which
only resumed operations last
month after suspending them
in 2001 due to financial diffi-
culties, said after the crash
that the weather was the
cause of the accident. Interior
Minister Rehman Malik said
the airline "seems to be at
fault as it had acquired a very
old aircraft."
-From wire reports


Associated Press
BEIRUT Five unarmed
U.N. truce monitors toured
the battered city at the heart
of the Syrian uprising on
foot Saturday, encountering
unusually calm streets after
weeks of shelling as a
throng of residents clam-
ored for foreign military
help to oust President
Bashar Assad.
Their foray into a chaotic
crowd in the city of Homs
highlighted the risks faced by
the observers, protected only


Associated Press
NEW YORK The investiga-
tion into the disappearance of 6-
year-old Etan Patz has stretched
through decades and countries,
from basements to rooftops and
seemingly everywhere in between.
No one has ever been charged
criminally- and the little boy with
sandy brown hair and a toothy grin
was declared dead in 2001.
This week, after more than a
decade of relative quiet, the case
suddenly ran hot again, after a
cadaver-sniffing dog picked up a
scent in an old basement down
the street from the boy's home.
By Saturday, investigators had
finished ripping up the base-
ment's concrete floor with jack-
hammers and saws, and were
digging through the dirt in hope
of finding the boy's remains, or
any other evidence.
So far, authorities haven't given
any outward sign that they've
found anything.


by bright blue helmets and
bulletproof vests. It came as
the U.N. Security Council
voted Saturday to expand the
mission to 300 members in
hopes of salvaging an inter-
national peace plan marred
by continued fighting be-
tween the military and oppo-
sition rebels.
The observers, members
of an eight-member advance
team that has been on the
ground a week, were seen
on amateur video Saturday
walking through rubble-
strewn deserted streets
lined by gutted apartment


buildings. Activists reported
only sporadic gunfire, but
no shelling, and said troops
had pulled armored vehi-
cles off the streets. Two ob-
servers stayed behind in
Homs to keep monitoring
the city, after the rest of the
team left Saturday evening.
The mission approved
Saturday, initially for 90
days, is meant to shore up a
cease-fire that officially
took effect 10 days ago, but
has failed to halt violence.
U.N. chief Ban Ki-moon has
accused Assad of violating
the truce.


"Law enforcement is always cau-
tiously optimistic," said Tim Flan-
nelly, chief FBI spokesman in New
York "But this is one lead of many."
It's not clear what, if anything,
the dig will turn up, but the in-
vestigation has reached similar
highs before only for the trail
to go cold for years at a time.
Etan vanished on May 25, 1979,
while walking alone to his school
bus stop for the first time, two
blocks from his home in New
York's SoHo neighborhood.
There was an exhaustive
search by the police and a crush
of media attention. The boy's
photo was one of the first of a
missing child on a milk carton.
Thousands of fliers were plas-
tered around the city, buildings
canvassed, hundreds of people
interviewed. SoHo was not a
neighborhood of swank bou-
tiques and galleries as now, but of
working-class New Yorkers rat-
tled by the news.
"No one could understand how


Associated Press
This image made from video made available by Syrian TV
shows United Nations observers, led by Moroccan Col.
Ahmed Himmiche, center, during a visit Saturday to Homs,
Syria. Rve U.N. truce monitors ventured Saturday into the
heart of the Syrian uprising and were thronged by residents
clamoring for foreign military help to oust President Bashar
Assad.


winding probe regaining momentum


it could've happened. At
that time, we all felt safe;
we were a little commu-
nity," said Sandie Vega,
who was Etan's age when
he disappeared. "We also
thought it must've been
someone from the out-
side. No one we knew
could take him."
Yukie Ohta, now 43, re-
members police coming
to her door to talk to her


Eta
Pa
missing
197


about the boy's disappearance.
Her sister had gone to a child's
play group with Etan, in the very
basement police are searching.
By the time he disappeared, the
children's collective had moved
and the space was being used by
a handyman, Othniel Miller
"I didn't really know anything
helpful," Ohta said.
No one knew enough. Etan's
parents, Stan and Julie, offered a
$25,000 reward for information
leading to the boy's whereabouts,
and sightings were frequently re-


ported, to no avail. In
1986, a child resembling
Etan was spotted in Is-
rael, which prompted de-
tectives to circulate his
V photo there. Nothing
came of it.
A name gradually
an emerged as a possible
tz suspect: Jose Ramos, a
since drifter and onetime
'9. boyfriend of Etan's
babysitter. In the early
1980s, he was arrested on theft
charges, and had photos of other
young, blond boys in his back-
pack. But there was no hard evi-
dence linking Ramos to the
crime.
Missing persons cases, like
homicides, are generally consid-
ered cold after six months, but
they're never closed. And with
seemingly no new leads, the case
would go quiet for years. In three
decades, 10 detectives have been
assigned to head up the case. The
FBI and police are working


IMF warns Europe not to ease up on debt-control battle


Associated Press


WASHINGTON -An in-
fusion of hundreds of bil-
lions of dollars will give the
International Monetary
Fund a badly needed boost
to tackle Europe's pro-
longed debt crisis. But
global finance officials sent
a strong message Saturday
that struggling governments
must speed reforms or risk
spooking jittery markets
and raising the economic
danger.


The lending agency said
in a statement after its
weekend meetings that fi-
nancially-strapped Euro-
pean countries must put in
place bold changes to re-
solve their debt problems.
The IMF received $430 bil-
lion in pledges from indi-
vidual countries, nearly
doubling the agency's re-
serves available for loans to
almost $1 trillion.
"It is nice to have a big
umbrella," Managing Direc-
tor Christine Lagarde said


at a news conference. She
and other officials said the
new money should reassure
financial markets troubled
recently by the prospect that
Spain could come next to
the IMF for emergency
loans to escape a default.
The 188-nation IMF, work-
ing with European govern-
ments, has provided rescue
programs already for
Greece, Portugal and Ire-
land. Spain, however, has a
much bigger economy and
would require much more


financial assistance were it
unable to sell its government
debt to private investors.
The IMF's policy commit-
tee's statement said it was
important for European
countries to commit to bold
reforms and put them into
practice.
Europe's problems domi-
nated the discussions of fi-
nance officials who
assembled in Washington
for the spring meetings of
the IMF and the World
Bank. Those gatherings


were preceded by talks
among the Group of 20
major economic powers; the
G-20 includes traditional
economic powers such as
the United States and Ger-
many and developing na-
tions including China and
Brazil.
In past years, thousands
of demonstrators have
sometimes turned out to
protest against the ills of
globalization. But this year
only a handful of protesters
showed up.


Cold case revving up


^' j i.1^
.
O a, -


Associated Press
An Emergency Service Unit officer carries a chainsaw Saturday into the basement of a building on the corner of Wooster Street and Prince Street
in New York during a renewed investigation into the 1979 disappearance of 6-year-old Etan Patz. Patz vanished after leaving his family's home
for a short walk to his school bus stop. NYPD spokesman Paul Browne said the building being searched for his remains is about a block from
where the family lived.


Search for Etan Patz a decades-long;


MIS ywIll











EXCURSIONSON
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Veterans Notes can be found .
on Page A16 of
today's
Chronicle. "


-i^


Day four on the Colorado Trail, with the view toward Highline ridge flowers bloom at 12,000 feet, on the trail
Durango. toward Taylor Lake.


Mountains' majes



Denver to Durango: Treking the Colorado Trail


BARRY SCHWARTZ
Special to the Chronicle

You may be
familiar with the
Appalachian
Trail, but did you
know Colorado also has a
world-class system of
trails with amazing
scenery, aptly called the
Colorado Trail?
This trail was completed in 1988 by
joining many existing trails to connect
a path that runs from Denver to Du-
rango, more than
483 miles divided
into 28 segments.
It passes through
six National
Forests, while
climbing up and
down from 5,520
feet to as high as
13,271 feet with
the average eleva-
Barry Schwartz tion over 10,000
ROAD LESS feet much of it
TAKEN along the Conti-
nental Divide.
Last summer,
my friend Roger
Pool and I decided to fulfill a lifelong
ambition of hiking the entire Colorado
Trail. I joined him for more than 80
miles of the trek. What makes this trail
so different from the Appalachian Trail
is its remoteness. Each year, as many as
150 people set out as through hikers
with a plan of having friends resupply
them every week or two during their
four- to six-week marathon journey
Roger has two llamas so it made the
logistics much easier, as each llama
could carry 80 pounds. The lla-
mas could forage for food
along the path, so
Roger and I could
easily be on the
trail unsupported
for many days. ":
The segments of the
trail I hiked are from
Molas Pass to Durango.
about an 80-mile stretch
Even though we did this
in early August, due to tlie
cool, wet summer, the w Id
flowers were the most ..1111z-
ing sight I have ever seen in
the mountains of Color.do \\e
traveled through acres of, i,% ld-
flowers, some fields shoulder
height. Each day our goal was to
try to cover about 12 miles. Light-
ning, when we were above timber-
line, was very dangerous and would
slow us down as we hunted for cover
Sometimes it was a challenge to find a
flat space to erect a tent. But the good
thing is, you can pretty much camp


BARRY SCHWARTZ/Special to the Chronicle
The author and friend Roger Pool pose with llamas Falcon and Chili while hiking the Colorado Trail. The author and
Falcon at 12,000 feet on day three. F Roger and Chili descending toward Taylor Lake to camp on day four.


anywhere in the national forest.
For six days we trekked up and down
ridges and valleys as we crossed the
heart of the San Juan Moun-
tains. Every bend in the trail
seemed to open up a new
vista, from a view
across a wilderness
it Ili 141.i:I-f
M inV'"' it
exen


- from late June to early September
Most people only do a few segments of
the trail each year, making the logistics
and time commitment manageable.
There are many places in Colorado to
rent camping gear and the Colorado
Trail Foundation sponsors
guided treks with all equip-
inient aid lov-'iti: pro-
ided for.\ ii Bikes
-r re not jll> Ied


working knowledge of how to use your
GPS and topographic maps to make it
easier to follow the trails in the few
places it can be confusing.
I carry a SPOT when I am hiking or
kayaking. It is a small device that
sends your position to a satellite and
then relays it to a website where others
can track your location. It even has an
emergency button to push if you get in
trouble.
A good resource to learn more about
the Colorado Trail is at wwwcolorado-
trail.org/. I have posted a short video of
the trek on YouTube at
http://bschwartz.neVtcoloradotrail.html.
In the coming months, I hope to
share with you several other such
"soft" adventures. I call them soft
because my thinking is, if I can do it,
anyone can.

Barry Schwartz and his wife, Bette, live
at the end of Ozello Trail with their
mountain-climbing dog Rowdy. They
are retired teachers who now split their
time between Ozello and the Colorado
Mountains. During the past 30-plus
years, they have been hiking, climbing,
scuba diving, sailing or driving through
at least 50 countries around the world.
Email him at schwartzbb@gmail. com.


Cruising friends

Pine Ridge residents Jon and Gaby Thompson, Walt and Marsha Rogers, and
Clarence and Paulette Stewart enjoyed a wonderful 10-day Southern Caribbean
cruise aboard the Emerald Princess from March 17 to 27. Here, they take time for
a photo at their first stop in Antigua.
Special to the Chronicle


DREAM
VACATIONS


The Chronicle and The
Accent Travel Group are
sponsoring a photo con-
test for readers of the
newspaper.


Readers are invited to
send a photograph from
their Dream Vacation with a
brief description of the trip.
If it's selected as a win-
ner, it will be published in
the Sunday Chronicle. At
the end of the year, a
panel of judges will select
the best photo during the
year and that photograph


will win a prize.
Please avoid photos
with dates on the print.
Photos should be sent
to the Chronicle at 1624
N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429
or dropped off at the
Chronicle office in Inver-
ness, Crystal River or any
Accent Travel Office.


Llamas rest and graze near the campsite by Taylor
Lake at sunset.






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Stepdad wants to


step up his title


SUNDAY EVENING APRIL 22, 2012 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House DII: Comcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
C B D/I F H 6:00 16:30 I7:00 1 7:30 8:00 1 8:30 9:00 9:30 110:00 10:30 11:00 11:30
O_ WESHNBC 19 19 News News Dateline NBC (N) Harry's Law (N) 14' The Celebrity Apprentice (N) 'PG' News Access
Great Performances at the Met Food Finding Your Roots- Masterpiece Classic Lovers are torn Great As Time As Time
S [WED PBS 3 3 14 6 "Rodelinda" G' Forward G' Henry louis Gates apart by World War I. 14' Romances Goes By Goes By
0 WUFT PBS 5 5 5 41 Keep Up AsTime... NOVA'PG' Finding Your Roots Masterpiece Classic (N)'14' Power-Planet MI-5'14'
WFA NBC 8 8 8 8 8 News Nightly Dateline NBC "Driving" H,, i. Breaking The Celebrity Apprentice A display for Donald's Paid Paid
0 WF NB 8 8 8 8News (N) i i l new fragrance. (N) 'PG' c Program Program
WFTV ABC 20 20 20 News World America's Funniest Once Upon a Time "Firelight" (2012, Drama) Cuba Gooding Jr. News Sports
S ABC20 20 20 News Home Videos'PG' 'The Return"'PG' Premiere. (In Stereo) NR [ Night
Evening 10 News 60 Minutes (In Stereo) The Amazing Race (N) The Good Wife The NYC 22"Firebomb" (N) 10 News, Paid
0 [WTS)CBS 10 10 10 10 10 News (N) s (In Stereo) Penalty Box" (N) 14' '14'm 11pm (N) Program
S WTVT FOX 13 FOX13 6:00 News (N) Married... The Fox's 25th AnniversarySpecial Celebrities honor FOX13 10:00 News (N) The Closer "Round
0 FOX13 13 13 13 (In Stereo) cc With Simpsons the network. (N) '14, DLV' (In Stereo) Nc File"'14'mc
D WCJBl ABC 11 11 4 News ABC Funny Home Videos Once Upon a Time "Firelight" (2012) Cuba Gooding Jr. 'NR' News Brothers
WCF IND 2 2 2 22 22 Brody File Stakel/ Coral Great Awakening Love a The Place for Miracles Daniel Jesse Pastor Great
S WCIF IND 2 2 2 22 22 Terror Ridge Hr Child G' Kolenda Duplantis Dayna Awaken
WFTS ABC 11 11 11 News World America's Funniest Once Upon a Time "Firelight" (2012, Drama) Cuba Gooding Jr. News Grey's
W ABC 11 11 11 News Home Videos'PG' 'The Return"'PG' Premiere. (In Stereo)'NR' B Anatomy
Family Guy Family Guy Big Bang Big Bang Law & Order "Animal Law & Order ** "'"i'ea'il-" Crime Drama) Mira
[Wvol IND 12 12 16 14' 14' Theory Theory Instinct"'14' "Jurisdiction"PG ....... .- R
S[WTTA MNT 6 6 6 9 9 "Fantastic Four: Rise of the Silver Surfer" Seinfeld Seinfeld Chris Chris Paid Whacked Born Ride Paid
Of [WACX TBN 21 21 In Touch Rejoice in the Lord Variety King- Journey World 40 Days Variety Dayna Gaither
King of 'Til Death Two and Two and Criminal Minds Without a Trace "22 X NUMB3RS A serial let- The Unit "The Conduit"
S W cw 4 4 4 12 12 Queens '14'm Half Men Half Men "Retaliation"'14'B 42"'14' ter-bomber.'PG' '14'm
S WYK FAM 16 16 The Comedy The Comedy Spy Crime Your Citrus County Court Music Mix MusicMix TheCisco Black
NM FAM 16 16 16 15 Shop Shop Games Strike'14' USA USA Kid'G' Beauty
( CWOOX FOX 13 7 7 Law & Order'PG' Married Simpsons Fox's 25th Anniversary Special'14, D,L,V' FOX 35 News at 10 Big Bang Big Bang
S C[WVEA UNI 15 15 15 15 14 Comned. |Noticiero Rosa de Guadalupe Nuestra Belleza Latina (SS) Sal y Pimienta (SS) Comed. Noticiero
I [WPX ION 17 ** "Barbershop" (2002) Ice Cube. ** "Rebound" (2005) Martin Lawrence. ***t "A Few Good Men" (1992) 'R
Storage Storage Storage Storage Stor atge Se Stora Storage Breakout Kings "SEALd Breakout Kings "SEALd
E 54 48 54 25 27 Wars PG Wars PG Wars PG Wars PG WarsPG' Wars PG Wars'PG' Wars'PG Fate"'14' Fate"'14'
(NiJ **55 64 55 Sahara" (2005) Matthew McConaughey Premiere. Adventurers The Killing "Ghosts of Mad Men "Far Away The Killing "Ghosts of
55 64 55 search for a Confederate ship in Africa. PG-13' mc the Past"(N) Places" (N)'14' the Past" B
S 1 The Blue Planet: Seas Tanked "Old School vs. River Monsters (In Frozen Planet (In River Monsters "Asian Frozen Planet (In
(ofL52 35 52 19 21 of Life 'G' New School"'PG' Stereo) 'PG' Stereo) PG' Slayer"'PG' Stereo) PG 'B
S 96 19 96 "Hurrcane Season" (2009) Forest ***"Ee'sBayou"(1997)Jurnee Smollett. A girl's family The Game Let's Stay ThinkLi.- Let's Stay
96 19 96 Whitaker.'PG-13'c life unravels in 1960s Louisiana.'R' c 14 Together Man Together
[BIAVO] 254 51 254 Housewives/NJ |Housewives/NJ Housewives/Atl. Housewives/Atl. Housewives/NJ Happens Jersey
** "Year One"(2009, Comedy) Jack Black, ** "Without a Paddle" (2004, Comedy) Seth South Park Tosh.0 "Harold & Kumar
CC 27 61 27 33 Michael Cera. 'PG-13' Bc Green, Matthew Lillard. PG-13' 'MA 14' Escape Guantanamo"
Sit o 98 4**8 2"Blue Collar Comedy Tour: The Movie" Ron White's Celebrity Salute to the ** "Ace Ventura: Pet Detective" (1994) Jim Them
98 45 98 28 37 (2003) Jeff Foxworthy'PG-13' mc Troops'PG' c Carrey (In Stereo)'PG-13' Idiots
CNBC 43 42 43 Paid |Paid Diabetes |Wall St. Biography on CNBC The Coffee Addiction Marijuana USA American Greed
IM ) 40 29 40 41 46 CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Presents PG Piers Morgan CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Presents 'PG'
Jessie Shake It Austin & Austin & Austin & ** "Beethoven" (1992, Comedy) Austin & Jessie A.N.T Shake It
46 40 46 6 5 'G' Up! G AllyG' Ally G' AllyG' Charles Grodin.'PG' nAlly G' 'G' N Farm'G' Up! G'
:ESPN) 33 27 33 21 17 SportsCenter (N) Baseball Tonight (N) MLB Baseball New York Yankees at Boston Red Sox. (Live) SportsCenter (N)
ESPN2J 34 28 34 43 49 MLS Soccer: Red Bulls at United Quarterback FirstTake Gruden's QB Camp |Sport Sci. QB Camp Who's 1?
(EWTN) 95 70 95 48 Ben. |Crossing |SundayNight Prime Catholic. |Savoring G.K. Rosary EWTNon Location God Bookmark
S 29 52 29 0 ** "Paul Blart: Mall Cp"'"' Comedy) ** "Bedtime Stories" (2008, Comedy) Adam ** "Paul Blart: Mall Cop" (2009, Comedy)
1S 29 52 29 20 28 Kevin James, Jayma M., ,. FL_ Sandier, Keri Russell.'PC' Kevin James, Jayma Mays. 'PG'
"La Dolce *** "Roadracers" (1994) David ** "Godzilla" (1998, Science Fiction) Matthew Broderick, ** "Highlander: The Final
118 170 Vita"'NR' Arquette. (In Stereo) B Jean Reno, Maria Pitillo. (In Stereo) PG-13' Dimension" (1994) 'PG-13'm
(Et 44 37 44 32 Fox News Sunday FOX Report (N) Huckabee (N) Fox News Sunday Geraldo at Large (N) Huckabee
FOOD 26 56 26 Diners Diners Chopped All-Stars Cupcake Wars (N) Chopped All-Stars Iron Chef America Chopped
(FSNFLJ 35 39 35 Volvo Baseball In Magic |Magic NBA Basketball Orlando Magic at Denver Nuggets. Magic World Poker Tour
51 **n n "The Day After **+ "2012" (2009, Action) John Cusack, Chiwetel Ejiofor, Amanda Peet. A global **' "2012" (2009, Action) John
X 30 60 30 51 Tomorrow" cataclysm nearly wipes out humanity. PG-13' Cusack. PG-13'
GOLF 727 67 727 Golf Central (N) Top 10 |Haney Haney |Haney |Haney |The Haney Project The Haney Project Central
L 39 68 39 45 54 "Undercover Bridesmaid" (2012, Romance- *** "Straight From the Heart" (2003, Frasier Frasier PG Frasier PG Frasier PG'
39 68 39 45 54 Comedy) Brooke Burns. NR' Romance) Teri Polo, Andrew McCarthy B 'G'c
S**2 "Water for *2 "Your Highness"(2011, Comedy) Danny Game of Thrones (N) Veep 'MA' Girls (N) Game of Thrones (In
302 201 302 2 2 Elephants" (2011) McBride. (In Stereo) 'R' 'MA' c MA' Stereo) 'MA' B
Game of Thrones (In Real Time With Bill **2 "Fast Five" (2011, Action) Vin Diesel, Paul Making **+ "The A-Team" (2010) Liam
303 202 303 Stereo) 'MA' Maher'MA' Walker. (In Stereo) PG-13' Bc Veep'PG' Neeson.'PG-13'
(HGTVl 23 57 23 42 52 Hunters |Hunt ntl Holmes on Homes Holmes on Homes Best of Holmes Holmes Inspection Holmes on Homes
Ax Men "Let Er Rip" Ax Men "Burning the Ax Men "Where's Ax Men "Falling Apart" Ax Men "Up in Flames" Sold! 'PG' Sold! 'PG'
I 51 25 51 32 42 '14' Bear"'14' Willy?"'14'm (N)'14' (N) 14' B B
I 3 1 "The Wife Wife He Met "The Craigslist Killer" (2011, Docudrama) Army Wives "Non- The Client List Tough "The Craigslist Killer"
24 38 24 31 Online" (2012)'NR' Jake McDorman, Billy Baldwin. c Combatants" (N)'PG' Love"'14 (2011)Bc
"Living With the Enemy" (2005, Suspense) "Burden of Evil" (2012, Suspense) Rhona "Wandering Eye" (2011, Suspense) Amanda
11N 50 119 Sarah Lancaster'NR' Mitra. Premiere. NR N Righetti, KnstaBridges.'NR'
**** "Alien"(1979) Tom Skerritt. *** "The Tree of Life" (2011, Drama) Brad Pitt, Sean *** "X-Men: First Class"(2011, Action)
320 221 320 3 3 (In Stereo) 'R' c Penn, Jessica Chastain. (In Stereo) PG-13 B James McAvoy (In Stereo) 'PG-13' cc
MVISNBCJ 42 41 42 1 Caught on Camera ICaught on Camera |Caught on Camera |Caught on Camera Secrets-Suitcase |Children for Sale
Wicked Tuna 'Weekend Drain the Great Lakes Light the Ocean (N) 'G' The Whale That Ate Wicked Tuna "Size Light the Ocean 'G'
(W) 109 65 109 44 53 Warriors" '14 'G' Jaws 'PG, V Matters" (N) '14
tNi1KJ 28 36 28 35 25 Sponge. |Sponge. Sponge. |Sponge. '70s '70s George |George MyWife |MyWife Friends |Friends
WWN) 103 62 103 Oprah's Next Oprah's Next Oprah's Next Oprah's Next Master Class Oprah's Next
DiXYIJ 44 123 Snapped PG Sna 'PG' Snapp SnappedPG Sna G' Snapped (N) PG' Snapped 'PG' c Law Order: Cl
*** "180 Degrees The Borgias"Paolo" The Big C Nurse Nurse The Bi C The Borias (N) (In Nurse The Big C
340 241 340 4 South" (2010) 'MA'B c MA' Jackie Jackie (N) (N)MA' Stereo) iA'n Jackie 'MA
732 112 732 Motorcycle Racing SPEED Center (N) Wind Tunnel With Dave NASCAR Victory Lane Octane Car Crazy AMA Pro Racing
732 112 732 (Live) Despain (N) Academy (N) G' Atlanta. (N)
Bar Rescue "Bar Fight" Bar Rescue "Chumps" Bar Rescue "Bad to the Bar Rescue "Shabby Bar Rescue "Hogtied Bar Rescue "Beach
iE 37 43 37 27 36 'P PG' Bone"'PG' Abbey"'PG' Ham's" 'PG' Bummer"'PG'
** "Colombiana" (2011, Action) Zoe Saldana, Magic Ci "Castles ***t "Midnight in Paris" (2011) **t "The Sorcerer's Apprentice"
370 271 370 Jordi Molla. (In Stereo) PG-13' Mae of Sand"'MA' Owen Wilson.'PG-13' (2010) Nicolas Cage.
51l o36 301 36 NBA Basketball Houston Rockets at Miami Heat. From the Heat Live! Insidethe Addictive Professional Tarpon Reel Powerboating
36 31 36 AmericanAirlines Arena in Miami. (Live) (Live) HEAT Fishing Tournament Series Animals G'
** "Dead Silence" ** "Wrong Turn 3: Left for Dead" (2009, "Wrong Turn 4: Bloody Beginnings" (2011, "The Hills Have
31 59 31 26 29 (2007) 'R' c Horror) Janet Montgomery. NR cN Horror) Sean Skene. Premiere. R' Eyes 2"(2007)'R'
(IBS) 49 23 49 16 19 t** "Last Holiday" (2006) 'PG-13' c t*** "Hitch" (2005) Will Smith. 'PG-13' c *** "Hitch" (2005) 'PG-13'
169 53 169 30 *** 35 "Summertime"(1955, Romance) ** "Another Man's Poison" ** "A Stolen Life" (1946) Bette Davis.A woman's twin
M 169 53 169 30 35 Katharine Hepburn. 'NR' (1951, Drama) Bette Davis.'NR takes her place after she dies in a storm.'NR'
Bering Sea Gold (In Bering Sea Gold (In Frozen Planet "On Thin MythBusters "Battle of Unchained Reaction Frozen Planet "On Thin
(M) 53 34 53 24 26 Stereo) N Stereo) c Ice" (N) 'PG' the Sexes"'PG' (N) 'PG' Ice"'PG' m
(TIEC 50 46 50 29 30 Hoard-Buried Hoard-Buried Medium |Medium Medium |Medium William & Kate Medium |Medium
3 3**50 261 350 "Behind the Burly Q" (2010) "Talihina Sky: The Story of Kings ** "Windtalkers" (2002, War) Nicolas Cage, "Hellraiser:
L J 350 261 350 (In Stereo)'NR of Leon" (2011) NR' c Adam Beach. (In Stereo) R' Hellworld" (2005) 'R'
** "Resident Evil: Extinction" (2007, Horror) **** "The Dark Knight" (2008, Action) Christian Bale. Batman battles **t "Watchmen"
(W1) 48 33 48 31 34 Mila Jovovich, Oded Fehr. 'R a vicious criminal known as the Joker. PG-13 c (2009) R' c
(TOON) 38 58 38 33 Wallace |Wallace Wallace Gumball Level Up Level Up King/Hill |King/Hill Chicken Fam. Guy Fam. Guy Loiter
FRAV 9 54 9 44 RV 2012'G' Sand M. Sand M. Bggg Bggg Hotel Impossible 'G' Cool Tools: Try Travel Travel
uiITVJ 25 55 25 98 55 Wiener Wiener Wiener Wiener Bait Car Bait Car Vegas Vegas Vegas Vegas Forensic Forensic
(TVI 32 49 32 34 24 M*A*S*H M*A*S*H M*A*S*H M*A*S*H M*A*S*H M*A*S*H Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond King
Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special ** "He's Just Not
47 32 47 17 18 Victims Unit'14 Victims Unit'14 Victims Unit'14 Victims Unit'14 Victims Unit'14 That Into You" m
S 117 117 My FairWedding With My Fair Wedding With My Fair Wedding With Shannen Says'PG' Shannen Says'PG' MydFairWedding With
117 69 117 DavidTutera David Tutera David Tutera David Tutera
1 W 118 18 18 18 20 Law Order: Cl 30Rock Mother Mother |Mother Mother 1Mother News Replay The Unit'PG' c


Dear Annie: I am a 56-
year-old stepfather
to two wonderful
young women, ages 20 and
17. My wife of five years did
a wonderful job raising the
girls after their father died.
Our relationship is open
and trusting. I never call
them stepdaughters. I view
them as my own. And they
tell me they love me. My
problem? Lately, the title of
"stepfather" is having an
adverse effect. It makes me
feel excluded. I want them
to call me "Dad." I am start-
ing to feel less and less a
part of the family They've
done nothing to merit this.
It's all me.
I have talked about this
with my wife
and oldest child
because they
noticed me
withdrawing.
We've discussed
adoption, but
neither they nor
I want to write
their father off
their birth cer-
tificates. And a
piece of paper
isn't going to
change the way ANNI
we care about MAILI
each other. So,
why am I hung
up on a title? All I know is, I
don't like waking up at 3:30
a.m. feeling so despondent.
- Bob
Dear Bob: The girls can
call you "Dad" without hav-
ing it become official on
their birth certificates. It's a
form of address, not a legal
title. And while you can
point out that calling you
"Dad" doesn't undermine
the girls' respect for their
own father, you must allow it
to be their decision. If they
agree, they will need to
make a concerted effort to
use the title until it becomes


Today's MOVIES


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness;
637-3377
"The Lucky One" (PG-13)
1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
"The Three Stooges" (PG)
1:45 p.m., 4:45 p.m., 7:45 p.m.
"Titanic" (PG-13) In real 3D.
1 p.m., 5 p.m. No passes.
"Wrath of the Titans" (PG-13)
In real 3D. 1:20 p.m., 4:20 p.m.,
7:20 p.m. No passes.
"Mirror Mirror" (PG) 1:40 p.m.,
4:40 p.m., 7:40 p.m.
"The Hunger Games" (PG-13)
1:10 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:15 p.m.

Crystal River Mall 9
564-6864
"The Lucky One" (PG-13)
1:40 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7:40 p.m.
"Think Like a Man" (PG-13)


1:10 p.m., 4:15 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
"Lockout" (PG-13) 2 p.m.,
4:50 p.m., 7:15 p.m.
"The Three Stooges" (PG)
1:20 p.m., 4 p.m., 7 p.m.
"Cabin in the Woods" (R)
ID required. 1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m.,
7:55 p.m.
"Titanic" (PG-13) In real 3D.
1 p.m., 5 p.m. No passes.
"Mirror Mirror" (PG) 1:45 p.m.,
4:20 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
"Wrath of the Titans" (PG-13)
In real 3D. 1:55 p.m., 4:55 p.m.,
7:45 p.m. No passes.
"The Hunger Games" (PG-13)
1:05 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:10 p.m.

Visit www.chronicleonline.com
for area movie listings and
entertainment information.


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Go swimming
6 Get a point
11 Concerning
16 Dull surface
21 Man from Mars
22 Esteem
23 Discharge of guns
24 Hunter constellation
25 Rise
26 Last letter
27 Luster
28 "Divine Comedy" poet
29 Cup handle
30 Dandy
31 Jacob's twin brother
33 Alaskan island
35 -o'-shanter
36 Bureau part
39 Terrier variety
43 Lubricate
44 Cunning
45 Roughly
47 Pointed arch
49 Morning moisture
51 Leather strip
54 Synthetic fabric
57 Appear
59 Male deer
63 In medias -
64 CIA predecessor (abbr.)
66 Pitcher
68 White-tailed bird
69 Sufficiently,
long ago
70 Dismounted
72 Literary collection
74 Frond
76 Small
78 Opposing one
79 Somnambulate
82 Pickle spice
84 Volcanic event
86 Steed
87 Sleigh
89 Distribute cards
91 Big bird
92 Word in
a palindrome
93 Uncle-
95 Debatable
97 Apothecary weight
99 Cash dispenser (abbr.)
101 Special -
104 Hack
106 High-strung
108 Iowa State's city
110 Tries


114 Blue gem
117 Springe
119 Complain
121 Ringlet
122 Ericson
124 Secluded space
126 Light meal
127 Rent
128 Winglike parts
129 Taj Mahal site
131 Slight
133 Printer's measures
135 Directed
136 Pro -
137 Stick
139 Make into law
141 Infernal region
143 Excavation
145 Word in grammar
147 Weapon for Buck Rogers
(2 wds.)
149 Retired plane
152 Lump
154 Tampered with
157 Lloyd Webber
161 Sheep
162 Nourish
164 Summit
165 Psychic ability (abbr.)
167 Maria
168 Ross or Muldaur
170 Noted fabulist
173 ---garde
175 Worn-out
177 salts
178 Water park
attraction
179 From this time
180 Ape
181 Slender
182 Exhausted
183 Modify
184 Not wordy


DOWN
1 Founded
2 Communion table
3 Jeweled headband
4 Pullet
5 Tip
6 Go away!
7 Group of actors
8 United
9 Pilot's OK
10 Efface
11 Alleviate
12 Cry of contempt


Cry of approval
Eye part
The Lone Ranger's side-
kick
Component
Macaw genus
Dyes
Out-and-out
Foe
To and -
Fuss
Ebb or neap
Lacking color
Reasoner's word
Doing nothing
Juicy fruit
Turn inside out
Open, in a way
Tennessee Ford
Cereal grain
Rubbish
A greeting
Willow rod
Predatory bird
Requirement
Literary category
Girl in the funnies
Turning part
String
Witnessed
Police action
Hardy heroine
An astringent
Skedaddled
City in Arizona
Fuzzy fruit
Tangle
Pasternak character
Sealing material
Nanny
Aka Elia
Flexible armor
Become
Encounter
Edible part
Award name
Deen orAbdul
Jack in a rhyme
Daily -
New Mexico city
Like a winter's day
Berate
Playing card
Relays
Entreat
"- Days a Week"
Stick
Beat hard


Released
Kith and -
River in Italy
Horse
Eschew
Chills and fever
Got away from
Rhythmic flow
A connective
Notoriety
Catchall abbr.


Hiatus
Passover meal
Steal
Pester in fun
Brute
Western Indian
Wild party
Speed-trap device
Makes level
Cotter
Lunchtime


Puzzle answer is on Page A18.


destination
166 Ending for gag
or gang
169 Show assent
171 Gent
172 Work in verse
174 Insect
175 Iota
176 Exist


4-22 2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


automatic and natural, and
you will have to be patient
But also please work on
your attitude. If they opt to
call you "Bob," it doesn't
mean they don't consider
you their father. If you put
your mind to it, you can
learn to enjoy that name,
too.
Dear Annie: As someone
with bipolar disorder, I felt
the need to respond to "Con-
fused," who wants to marry
his girlfriend, but is con-
cerned that her bipolar son
might move in.
Bipolar disease is a ge-
netic disorder, and the mom
may have it. It can take 20
years to properly diagnose,
because the signs of mania
are often over-
looked when de-

symptoms are
prevalent. Before
"Confused" pro-
poses, he may
want to see a psy-
chologist with ex-
perience in the
field and attend
counseling ses-
sions for family
members to find
E'S out what he is get-
BOX ting into. Bipo-
lar in California
Dear Bipolar:
Thank you for your expert-
ise. We hope he follows
through.


Annie's Mailbox is written
by Kathy Mitchell and
Marcy Sugar, longtime
editors of the Ann Landers
column. Email questions to
anniesmailbox@
comcast.net, or write to:
Annie's Mailbox, c/o Cre-
ators Syndicate, 737 Third
St., Hermosa Beach, CA
90254. To find out more
aboutAnnie's Mailbox, visit
www. creators. com.


A16 SUNDAY, APRIL 22, 2012


ENTERTAINMENT


II
[]





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Veterans NOTES


Due to space considera-
tions, the Veterans Notes
sometimes contain only basic
information regarding each
post. For more information
about scheduled activities,
meals and more for a specific
post, call or email that post at
the contact listed.

Ex-military and retired mili-
tary personnel are needed to
assist the U.S. Coast Guard
Auxiliary to help the Coast
Guard with non-military and
non-law enforcement programs
such as public education, ves-
sel safety checks, safety patrols
search and rescue, maritime
security and environmental pro-
tection. Wear the Auxiliary uni-
form with pride and your
military ribbons. Criminal back-
ground check and membership
are required. Email Vince
Maida at vsm440@aol.com, or
call 917-597 6961.
HPH Hospice, as a part-
nering agency with the Depart-
ment of Veterans Affairs (VA),
provides tailored care for veter-
ans and their families. The pro-
gram is provided in private
homes, assisted living facilities
and nursing homes, and staff is
trained to provide Hospice care
specific to illnesses and condi-
tions unique to each military era
or war. It also provides care-
giver education and a recogni-
tion program to honor veterans'
services and sacrifices. HPH
Hospice care and programs do
not affect veterans' benefits.
For more information, call the
Citrus Team Office at 352-
527-4600.
Citrus County Veterans
Coalition has a new building
holding freezers, refrigerators
and all necessary requirements
to provide food to veterans in
need. Food donations and vol-
unteers are always welcomed
and needed.
The CCVC is on the DAV
property in Inverness at the cor-
ner of Paul and Independence,
off U.S. 41 north. Hours of op-
eration are 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Tuesday and Thursday. Ap-
pointments are encouraged by
calling 352-400-8952.
CCVC general meetings are
at 10 a.m. the fourth Thursday
monthly at the DAV building in
Inverness. All active duty and
honorably discharged veterans,
their spouses, widows and wid-
owers, along with other veter-
ans' organizations and current
coalition members are wel-
come. Members are encour-
aged to attend general
meetings.
Annual membership donation
is $10 for a calendar year or
$25 for three years. The CCVC
is a nonprofit corporation, and
your donations are tax de-
ductible. Current members
should check their membership
card for expiration dates, and
renew with Gary Williamson at
352-527-4537, or at the meet-
ing. Visit www.ccvcfl.org.
AMVETS William Crow
Post 447, Inglis, is on State
Road 40 East.
For more information about
the post and its activities, call
352-447-1816; email
Amvet447@comcast.net.
Blanton-Thompson
American Legion Post 155, is
at 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way, Crystal River. Doors open
at 4 p.m. with dinner available;
entertainment at 7 p.m.
For information about the
post and its activities, call
Cmdr. Jay Conti Sr. at 352-
795-6526 or visit
www.post155.org.
American Legion Auxil-
iary Unit 155 meets at 7:30
p.m. the fourth Tuesday of
every month at the post. The
American Legion Auxiliary is
the world's largest women's pa-
triotic service organization with
nearly 1 million members in
10,100 communities. The prin-
ciples of the American Legion
Auxiliary are to serve veterans,
their families and the
community.
Eligibility in the Auxiliary is
open to mothers, wives, sisters,
daughters, granddaughters,
great-granddaughters or grand-
mothers of members of the
American Legion and of de-
ceased veterans who served


during war time (also stepchil-
dren); stepchildren; and female
veterans who served during
war time. Call Unit President
Shawn Mikulas, 352-503-5325,
or membership chairman Bar-
bara Logan, 352-795-4233.
The auxiliary will have a
chicken casserole dinner from 5
to 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, April
25, at the post home. Donation
is $7. All members and the pub-
lic are welcome.
All profits from the dinners


will go to support the many pro-
grams of the American Legion
Auxiliary. For more information,
call Unit President Shawn
Mikulas at 352-503-5325.
H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post
10087, Beverly Hills, offers
meals, bingo, golf, karaoke and
pool. Review the monthly
newsletter for activities and up-
dates, and call the post at 352-
746-0440. The VFW Post
10087 is off County Road 491,
directly behind Superior Bank.
Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs,
352-465-4864. Wi Fi is now
available at the post; bring your
laptop or any other item that will
access the Internet and enjoy
the free service.
The post is now a nonsmok-
ing facility; smoking is allowed
on the porch.
All are welcome at the turkey
dinner from 5 to 6:30 p.m. Fri-
day, April 27, at the post. Cost
is $8.
Information regarding any
post events is available at the
post or call 352-465-4864.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Chapter No. 70 meets
at 2 p.m. the second Tuesday
monthly at the chapter hall,
1039 N. Paul Drive, Inverness,
at the intersection of Independ-
ence Highway and U.S. 41. The
chapter hall is on the corner of
Independence Highway and
Paul Drive.
We thank veterans for their
service and welcome any dis-
abled veteran to join us from 9
a.m. to 1 p.m. any Tuesday or
Thursday at the chapter hall.
This is also the time that we ac-
cept donated nonperishable
foods for our continuing food
drive.
Our main function is to assist
disabled veterans and their
families when we are able. Any-
one who knows a disabled vet-
eran or their family who
requires assistance is asked to
call Commander Richard Floyd
727-492-0290, Ken Stewart at
352-419-0207, or 352-
344-3464.
Service Officer Joe McClister
is available to assist any vet-
eran or dependents with their
disability claim by appointment.
Call 352-344-3464 and leave a
message.
Ambulatory veterans who
wish to schedule an appoint-
ment for transportation to the
VA medical center in
Gainesville should call the vet-
erans' service office at 352-
527-5915. Mobility challenged
veterans who wish to schedule
an appointment for transporta-
tion to the VA medical center in
Gainesville may call the Citrus
County Transit office for wheel-
chair transportation; call 352-
527-7630.
For more information about
chapter activities, veterans'
benefits or membership, Call
Ken Stewart at 352-419-0207;
leave a message, if desired,
should the machine answer.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Auxiliary Unit No. 70
meets at 2 p.m. the second
Tuesday of the month at the
chapter hall, corner of U.S. 41
north, Independence Boulevard
and Paul Drive, Inverness.
The DAV Auxiliary has ongo-
ing projects to help needy vet-
erans. Members recently took
more than 150 lap robes, 200
ditty bags and more than 100


wheelchair and walker bags to
area nursing homes. Members
collect good, clean cotton mate-
rial, yarn and toiletry items to
make lap robes, wheelchair
and walker and ditty bags for
veterans in nursing homes.
Membership has expanded
to include many more who are
eligible to join. For more infor-
mation or to donate items, call
Commander Linda Brice at
352-560-3867 or Adjutant Lynn
Armitage at 352-341-5334.
Eugene Quinn VFW Post
4337 and Ladies Auxiliary, is
at 906 State Road 44 E., Inver-
ness. Call the post at 352-344-
3495 for information about all
weekly post activities, or visit
www.vfw4337.org.
The American Legion
Wall-Rives Post 58 and Auxil-
iary, 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnellon.
Dunnellon Young Marines
will meet at 6 p.m. Tuesday.
The public is welcome at
bingo at 6 p.m. Thursday.
For information about activi-
ties and the post, call Carl Boos
at 352-489-3544.
Rolling Thunder Chapter
7, a POW/MIA awareness
group, meets at 10 a.m. second
Saturday at the VFW Post
10087 in Beverly Hills. Call Bob
Bruno, secretary, at 352-
201-1228.
SA Marine Corps League
Ladies Auxiliary Citrus Unit
meets at 1 p.m. the third Tues-
day monthly at the VFW in Bev-
erly Hills. New members are
welcome. Membership fee is
$30 a year. Female relatives
ages 16 or older who are a
wife, widow, mother, step-
mother, sister, daughter, step-
daughter, grandmother,
granddaughter, aunt or daugh-
ter-in-law of honorably dis-
charged Marines and FMF
Corpsmen are eligible to belong
to the Marine Corps League.
Female Marines (former, active
and reserves) and associate
members are eligible for MCLA
membership. Call President
Elaine Spikes at 352-860-2400
or Secretary/Treasurer Joan
Cecil at 352-726-0834 for
information.
Hunger and Homeless
Coalition -Anyone who
knows of a homeless veteran in
need of food, haircut, voter ID,
food stamps, medical assis-
tance or more blankets is asked
to call Ed Murphy at the Hunger
and Homeless Coalition at 352-
382-0876, or pass along this
phone number to the veteran.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW
Post 4252 and Ladies Auxil-
iary 3190 N. Carl G. Rose
Highway, State Road 200, Her-
nando; 352-726-3339. Send
emails to vfw4252@tampa
bay.rr.com.
Everyone is welcome. Post
and auxiliary meet at 6:30 p.m.
every second Thursday.
Post honor guard is available
for funerals, flag raising and
nursing home visits.
The public is welcome to the
Friday night dinner and dance
at 5 p.m.
See our post activities:
Google us as VFW 4252,
Hernando.
Dumas-Hartson VFW
Post 8189 is on West Veterans
Drive, west of U.S. 19 between
Crystal River and Homosassa.
Call 352-795-5012 for informa-
tion.
VFW membership is open to


men and women veterans who
have participated in an over-
seas campaign, including serv-
ice in Iraq and Afghanistan. The
Korean Campaign medal re-
mains open, as well. Call the
post at the phone number
above for information.
Joe Nic Barco Memorial
VFW Post 7122, 8191 S.
Florida Ave., Floral City. For in-
formation about the post and its
activities, call 352-637-0100.
Friday is AUCE fish or three-
piece chicken for $7.
American Legion, Bev-
erly Hills Memorial Post 237,
4077 N. Lecanto Highway, in
the Beverly Plaza, invites all eli-
gible veterans and their families
to visit our post and consider
joining our Legion family: Amer-
ican Legion, Sons of the Ameri-
can Legion (SAL), or American
Legion Auxiliary (ALA). Color
Guard/Honor Guard accepting
volunteers.
Beverly Hills Memorial Amer-
ican Legion Post 237, by ap-
proval of its Executive Board on
Jan. 22, and by those members
present at the Jan. 26 general
membership meeting, has
changed its regular meeting
time to 7 p.m. on the fourth
Tuesday monthly. Contact the
post at 352-746-5018 for more
information.
American Legion Riders
Chapter now being formed.
Visit the post for printed sched-
ule or visit the website at
www.post237.org.
For information, call the post
at 352-746-5018.
The Korean War Veter-
ans Association, Citrus
Chapter 192 meets at the VFW
Post 10087, Beverly Hills, at 1
p.m. the first Tuesday monthly.
Any veteran who has seen hon-
orable service in any of the
Armed Forces of the U.S. is eli-
gible for membership if said
service was within Korea, in-
cluding territorial waters and
airspace, at any time from Sept.
3, 1945, to the present or if said
service was outside of Korea
from June 25, 1950, to Jan. 31,
1955. For information, call
Hank Butler at 352-563-2496,
Neville Anderson at 352-344-
2529 or Bob Hermanson at
352-489-0728.
Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 and Auxiliary
Unit 77 meet the first Thursday
monthly at the Inverness High-
lands Civic Center at 4375 Little
Al Point Road, Inverness.
Call Post Cmdr. Norman
Brumett at 352-860-2981 or
Auxiliary president Marie Cain
at 352-637-5915 for information
about the post and auxiliary.
U.S. Submarine Veterans
(USSVI)-Sturgeon Base meets
at 11 a.m. the first Saturday
monthly at the American Legion
Post 155, 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River. Visitors
and interested parties are al-
ways welcome.
Call Base Cmdr. Billy Wein at
352-726-5926.
American Legion Post
166 meets 1:30 p.m., first Sat-
urday monthly at the Dumas-
Hartson VFW Post 8189 Ladies
Auxiliary facility on Veterans
Drive, Homosassa, on the west
side of U.S. 19 at Dixon's Auto
Sales across from Harley-
Davidson. We meet in the small
building to the left of the main
building. All former and current
post members, as well as all in-


000AYA5www.tntyp.cm
TIIYITRV

Tolre -8
PRCSSUJC O HNE


I Every Sunday
2 Foodcoupons d-
$55 Free Pay 79PP$ I
2I Casino Visits 7 PPDO


Pick Up at Spanish Springs Depot *4/115,520 & 6117
Pick Up at OTOW 4/22 & 5/20


2 Food coupons
Sk fU $55 Free Play
pA$1UPP/DO 2 Casino Visits
Attn coupon players, call for details to see if qualified


-EgITR AIN RIE$5p


IMMOKALEE OVERNITE LEISURE TRIP 5/17,6/14,7/19 $99pp/DO Call for all details
SOct.g9th & Nov 7th -8 Days
$799rrmo, $949sj. .Call fornmore details


OLDIES CRUISE JAN. 27, 2013
6 Nights Western Caribbean
P: M ,. 1 I. l 1.. it l. , r ,,, ;4.,II| I M | ,I | v,. l ,, ,[,w M l .IV
CL'osi' icludes speci per ormince' b Bo r.'11,'r a3 i SFujiwrJ),
,,,ei, Ocala 352-237-6251


terested veterans, are cordially
invited to be a part of American
Legion Post 166.
For information about the
post or the American Legion,
call and leave a message for
the post commander at 352-
697-1749. Your call will be re-
turned within 24 to 48 hours.
Seabee Veterans of
America (SVA) Island X-23
welcomes all Seabees and
Honeybees to its monthly meet-
ing at 10:30 a.m. the third Tues-
day monthly at Citrus Hills
Country Club, Rose and Crown
restaurant, Citrus Hills. Call
John Lowe at 352-344-4702.
Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219
and Cabane 1219 conducts its
meetings at 7 p.m. the second
Thursday monthly at the Ameri-
can Legion Post 155 on State
Road 44 in Crystal River (6585
E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway). For
more information about the
40/8, call the Chef De Gare
Tom Smith at 352-601-3612; for
the Cabane, call La Presidente
Carol Kaiserian at 352-746-
1959; or visit us on the Web at
www.Postl55.org.
Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 Military Order of the
Purple Heart (MOPH) meets at
2 p.m. the third Tuesday of Jan-
uary, March, May, July, Sep-
tember and November. All
combat-wounded veterans, lin-
eal descendants, next of kin,
spouses and siblings of Purple
Heart recipients are cordially in-
vited to attend and to join the
ranks of Chapter 776. To learn
more about Aaron A. Weaver
Chapter 776 MOPH, visit the
chapter's website at www.cit-
ruspurpleheart.org or call 352-
382-3847.
Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment
1139 will conduct its regular
meeting at 7 p.m. the third
Wednesday monthly at DAV
Post 70 in Inverness at the in-
tersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41 North. All
Marines are welcome. Call


7-night Bermuda Cruise
from $773.00pp
Includes all port charges, govt taxes and rt bus


Jerry Cecil at 352-726-0834,
or Wayne Howard at 352-
634-5254.
Marine Corps League
Citrus Detachment 819 meets
at 7 p.m. the last Thursday
monthly at VFW Post 10087 on
Vet Lane in Beverly Hills, be-
hind Superior Bank. Social hour
follows. All Marines and FMF
Corpsmen are welcome. Meet
new friends and discuss past
glories. Call Morgan Patterson
at 352-746-1135, Ted
Archambault at 352-382-0462
or Bion St. Bernard at 352-
697-2389.
Gilley-Long-Osteen VFW
Post 8698 is at 520 State Road
40 E., Inglis, one mile east of
U.S. 19. The Men's Auxiliary
meets at 7 p.m. the second
Monday. LAVFW meets at 5
p.m. and the membership
meeting is at 6:30 p.m. the third
Wednesday at the post.
Call the post at 352-447-
3495 for information about the
post and its activities.
Fleet Reserve Associa-
tion, Branch 186 will meet at 3
p.m. the third Thursday monthly
at the DAV Building, Independ-
ence Highway and U.S. 41
North, Inverness. Call Bob
Huscher, secretary, at 352-
344-0727.
American Legion Herbert
Surber Post 225 meets at 7
p.m. the third Thursday monthly
at the New Testament Baptist
Church of Floral City, 9850 S.
Parkside Ave. adjoining Floral
Park, southeast side. All eligible
veterans are welcome to join.
Landing Ship Dock (LSD)
sailors meet at Denny's in Crys-
tal River at 2 p.m. the fourth
Thursday monthly. Call Jimmie
at 352-621-0617.
Suncoast U.S. Navy
Armed Guard and Merchant
Marine Veterans of World
War II meetings for 2012 will be
at 11:30 a.m. at Kally K's
restaurant in Spring Hill on the
following dates: May 12, Sept.


VIKING
RIVER CRUISES
Christmas on the Danube
Very Limited Availablity
8 days Romantic Danube
Ask for special group price including air
and rt bus.
5390 South Suncoast Boulevard
Homosassa
(352) 628-0668
www.travelauthorityfl .om
SEmail: buzzgwen@yahoo.com


Becky's Travel Store

Aruba THE FLORED
S.s2130/,, AQUARIUM-
Dow DOWNTOWN TiMPA
Punta Cana Tampa Aquarium
i e-m5 74pp/pn with Wild Dolphins Cruise on the bay
Costa Rica July 426 2712 68
.... I pp/pn CALL FOR DETAILS
3557 N. Lecanto Hwy., Beverly Hills, FL 34465 527-8855
Located Next to Winn Dixie (352) 7-8855
00l138H v -ecy ta elevc- co


If you want

to advertise

here in the

Great

Getaways

call 563-5592


SUNDAY, APRIL 22, 2012 A17





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


few months ago,
there was a
brouhaha about
whether pizza sauce is a
vegetable. It certainly is to
me. But for years, I thought
bacon was a vegetable. I al-
ways wondered why no one
made salad bits to sprinkle
on my bacon, which is a
million-dollar idea if I ever
heard one.
The latest food fight is
over whether "pink slime"
should be used in ham-
burgers. My gut instinct is
that no, it shouldn't be used
in hamburgers. It should
be left in bologna and hot
dogs where it
belongs.
Still, I was .
surprised at
how many na-
tionally
known pur-
veyors of fine
burgers said
they would
stop using
pink slime JIM
now that their MULL
secret ingredi-
ent was no
longer secret. Until they
said they'd stop using it, al-
most no one knew they
were using it
It turns out that beef
"trimmings" used to be
sold mainly as pet food be-
cause they contained too
much E. coli and other bac-
teria that were harmful to
humans. But then the beef
industry started spraying
these leftovers with an am-
monia gas, killing the
pathogens, and renamed
them "lean finely textured
beef," which sounds so
much more appetizing
than "pink slime."
It reminds me of a story I
heard long ago from an old-
timer in the advertising
business. It seems a can-
nery had bought a batch of
salmon with very white
flesh. It tasted like salmon,
but it didn't look like
salmon. Some genius in the
marketing department
came up with a great idea.
The cannery printed
"Won't turn pink in the
can" on the label, which, of
course, was true.
I often wonder how
many people who have sa-
vored the fish known as or-
ange roughy in fine
restaurants realize that for
most of its history, that fish
was known as a slime-
head?
There were plenty of
slimeheads to go around
until the name change.
Now they are being hauled
out of the ocean faster than
they can reproduce. The
orange roughy population
would probably appreciate
it if we started calling the
fish slimeheads again.
It seems every week we


have another debate about
food. One year it's trans fat,
the next it's sugar. Trans fat
will kill you, sugar will kill
you, cholesterol will kill
you, salt will kill you, fat
will kill you, carbs will kill
you, not eating at all will
kill you, overeating will kill
you.
I just bought a half-gal-
lon of ice cream, and on the
lid it says it's packed with
calcium and vitamins A
and D. I don't think you
have to have a Ph.D. in nu-
trition to realize that even
with the vitamins and min-
erals, ice cream is not
health food. But it
does prove some-
thing that food
writer Michael
Pollan said about
food marketing:
"The more health
claims there are
on the label, the
unhealthier the
food." Adding a
multivitamin to a
EN frosted doughnut
does not magically
make it a balanced
meal.
Some clever scientist is
sure to tell you that ammo-
nia in its various forms oc-
curs naturally in some
plants, is used in food pro-
cessing and is perfectly
safe, and he would be right
But he also would be com-
paring apples and oranges
to unsellable scraps of fat,
sinew, effluvia and meat
bits, pulverized into a pink
paste and sprayed with am-
monium hydroxide.
Is that how the food sci-
entist makes his ham-
burger at home? Is this
what he feeds to his chil-
dren? Does he invite the
neighbors over to watch
this being made before
grilling a few burgers for
them on Saturday night?
There are many things
that some people eat that
others find supremely un-
appetizing Limburger
cheese, frog legs, fried
crickets, raw oysters, hag-
gis but they don't try to
sneak these things onto
your plate. Limburger is
proud of being a stinky
cheese; haggis is presented
with all the flourish of
Cherries Jubilee. They are
all upfront about what they
are.
If pink slime purveyors
want to proudly put it on
the store shelf, more power
to them. Otherwise, we
might think they have
something to hide.

Jim Mullen's newest book,
"How to Lose Money in
Your Spare Time -At
Home," is available at
amazon. com. Email him at
jimmullenbooks. com.


51st ANNIVERSARY

The Van Beerses


Bill and Trish Van Beers
of Homosassa celebrated
their 51st wedding anniver-
sary April 16, 2012.
The couple were married
on April 16, 1961, in
New Jersey


Putting slime



in food fight


They have been resi-
dents of Citrus County for
10 years.
The Van Beerses have
one daughter and one son,
as well as three grand-
daughters.


65th ANNIVERSARY

The Lucentes


Charlie and Dagmar Lu-
cente celebrated their 65th
wedding anniversary on
April 19, 2012.
The couple wed in Beth-
lehem, Pa., in 1947, one
year after Charlie's honor-


I rw


Vincent and Doris Bilotti
will celebrate their 64th
wedding anniversary April


24, 2012. The Inverness res-
idents were married April
24, 1948.


Sunday's PUZZLER

Puzzle is on Page A16.


able discharge from the
Army
The couple have three
sons: Chuck of Pine Ridge,
Randy of Kennesaw, Ga.,
and Larry of Bethlehem,
Pa.


For the RECORD


Marriages
4/9/12 to 4/15/12
Alexander Charles
Cavallaro, Citrus Springs/
ShilowMarie Luedtke, Citrus
Springs
Anthony Philip Dagostino
Jr., Hernando/Karolina Joanna
Krawiec, Hernando
John Crawford Fischbacher,
La Porte, Ind./Judith Ann
Burian, New Buffalo, Mich.
Ronald Lee Giles Jr.,
Homosassa/Natasha Marie
Antrim, Homosassa
Ty Raymond Hamilton,
Inverness/Angela Marie Duff,
Inverness
Taylor Nelson June,
Inverness/Cassie Collette
Combs, Inverness
Marshall Thomas Sorenson,
Homosassa/Michelle Lynne
Weigle, Homosassa
Shane Lee Stapp,
Hernando/Carrie Diane Jones,
Hernando
John Edgar Wall IV,
Homosassa/Sheri Lynne Wall,


You Could Win


TO ENTER: Go online at chronicleonline.com, click on "Features", enter contest.
Or fill out this form, mail or bring to 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
Anytime before Noon on April 30, 2012
-----------------------------I
Name............................................1 IR O N I("
P hO ne ................ *n...........................o l ne.com
Email...................................... Says Thanks to our
--------------------------------- loyal subscribers
Citrus Publishing employees and their families are not eligible to enter.

ASKBOUZ PAY!


Homosassa
Divorces and marriages
filed in the state of Florida are
a matter of public record,
available from each county's
Clerk of the Courts Office. For
Citrus County, call the clerk at
352-341-6400 or visit www.
clerk.citrus.fl.us/. For proceed-
ings filed in another county,
contact the clerk in that area.


4-22


2012


MO


2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


ME


64th ANNIVERSARY

The Bilottis








'A


. 1r
11


B|A|T|H|E SSCO|R|E A B0O U T MAT T E
A L I EN HONOR R SAL L V 0 I 0N
STAND OMEGA SHEEN DANTE
EJAiR FOP ES I NNATTU T AM
D WER R A I RREDA L E O I L S Ln Y
AM AROUND IVE D
T|H O0 N G N Y L O|N E MERGE RH|A|R|TI
H T
RES S EW ER ERN, E N O W
L A
S|L|E~sIo~~EwEIPWIII~~iL~E|RlmT~PITl l| N
A L I IA L EA F IN T A NIT I
S L E E PWAL W K D I L E|RUPT| I ||N
H O|R S E P N G D | E M E R E
SAM 0 0 T RA M A
OPS CAB TAUT MES T STS
S A P P lH I R E TRA BEL L A C H E
C U R L L E I F N 00 T|E|A 0TOR|N
A L A EM AGRA S L G I M M LED
R A TA AEDH E R E N T H DES
EI DIs 1G16ITDENS HE R IA INYG
SRS YT N U Bi D OC T ORE|D ANDRE W
E W E F E E D ACM E ESP SAVE
D I A N A ATES P AA VJA DED
E P SO|M S'L E HENCE ORANG
R|E|EDY T I RED A L TER TERSE


.;~ II "l,'[e UJ"
B~nHCalBBN~al



CALINGALLMOMS!I


A18 SUNDAY, APRIL 22, 2012


TOGETHER


A
.I











SPORTS


Nadal,
Djokovic
to meet
in Monte
Carlo
final/B3

CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


;S PORS]
IBRIEFSH


Associated Press
The Chicago Blackhawks'
Marian Hossa falls down
Tuesday after a hit from
the Phoenix Coyotes' Raffi
Torres during the first pe-
riod of Game 3 in Chicago.
Coyotes' Torres
suspended 25
games for Hossa hit
GLENDALE, Ariz. -A
blindside hit, a history of vio-
lence and a leaguewide crack-
down on rough play earned
Phoenix Coyotes forward
Raffi Torres one of the longest
suspensions in NHL history.
Torres was suspended 25
games by the league Satur-
day and will miss the rest of
the playoffs for a late hit that
resulted in Chicago's Marian
Hossa being taken off the ice
on a stretcher.
After one of the least-
penalized regular seasons in
the NHL's modern era, Torres
is the ninth player to be sus-
pended during what's been an
out-for-blood playoffs so far.
Torres' suspension is the
longest for an on-ice offense
since New York Islanders for-
ward Chris Simon was banned
30 games for stomping on the
ankle of Pittsburgh's Jarrko
Ruutu in December 2007.
It also matches the second-
longest suspension: Simon
also was suspended 25 games
for his two-handed stick attack
to the face of New York
Rangers forward Ryan Hollweg
in 2007, as was Philadel-
phia's Jesse Boulerice for
cross-checking Vancouver
center Ryan Kesler across
the face in 2007.
If the 25 games of his sus-
pension aren't exhausted
during the playoffs, the ban
carries over into the next reg-
ular season.
As a repeat offender, Tor-
res would forfeit $21,341 in
salary for every regular-
season game he sits out.
Bahrain tense
ahead of F1 after
protester dies
MANAMA, Bahrain The
discovery of a protester's
body near the scene of
clashes on Saturday threat-
ened to tip Bahrain deeper
into unrest as a 14-month-old
uprising overshadows the re-
turn of the Formula One
Grand Prix to the strategic
Gulf kingdom.
Bahrain's Sunni rulers had
pressed for the race to be held
as a chance to rebuild their
credibility on the world stage
after it was called off last year
as police and army troops
cracked dowonon dissent.
Persistent protests, how-
ever, have left the monarchy
struggling to keep attention
on Sunday's Formula One
race as the country's Shiite
majority pressed ahead with
a campaign to break the near
monopoly on power by the
ruling Sunni dynasty.
At least 50 people have
died in the conflict since
February 2011.
Protesters again took their
grievances to the streets na-
tionwide Saturday after oppo-
sition groups said a man was
killed the day before in clashes
with security forces. A state-
ment by the Interior Ministry
said the man who died was
identified as Salah Abbas
Habib Musa, 36.
Bahrain's monarchy is the
main backer of the F1 race,
and the crown prince owns
rights to the event.
Members of the ruling Al
Khalifa dynasty are huge fans
of the sport and the country's
sovereign wealth fund, Mum-
talakat, owns 50 percent of
leading team McLaren.
From wire reports


Curtis' six-year drought near an end in
Associated Press fairway was his only es- Mayakoba winner John
cape from under a tree Huh (67), Seung-Yui Noh
SAN ANTONIO Ben but his 1-over 73 was (68) and Charlie Wi (71)
Curtis is still ahead at the enough to stay atop the were five strokes back at 4
Texas Open, leaving him leaderboard at 9 under under
just one round from his first Saturday Aside from Huh, no one
PGA Tour victory since 2006 Matt Every was grateful within five strokes of Cur-
in what has been his most to end a long day in the tis has won on the tour De-
humbling year as a pro. same position where he spite six years passing
But a pack of mostly started -three strokes be- since his last victory, Cur-
non-winners could make hind the former British tis said he knows how to ,
redemption difficult. Open champion. Every handle the final round:
Curtis finally made his shot a 73 after waking Simply worry about him-
first stumbles at the Texas early to finish his sus- self.
Open once holding up a pended second round, but "In the past when I've
group playing six holes it's his course-record 63 played in these circum-


back when hacking the
ball into the neighboring


from Thursday that still
has him in contention.


Ben Curtis hits from a sand bunker on the first hole Saturday
See Page B4 during the third round of the Texas Open in San Antonio.


27 up, 27 down


Lecanto's

Anderson

picks up

seventh at

state meet

Hurricane

McDow eyes

nextyear

LARRY BUGG
Correspondent
KISSIMMEE Ardante
"Dede" Anderson and
Kody McDow felt a little
different about their first
trip to the Class 2A state
boys weightlifting meet
Saturday at the Kissimmee
Civic Center
Anderson, a Lecanto
High School freshman, fin-
ished seventh in the 238-
pound class. He had a
365-pound bench press and
a 265-pound bench press
for a 630-pound total.
McDow wasn't so happy
with the results.
Anderson wasn't under
any pressure and now he
has three more possible
shots at a state lifting title.
"I want to thank my
coaches for pushing me,"
Anderson said. "I wasn't
sure I could get out of the
district qualifier Making it
to state was great."
His coach was happy to
see the freshman compete
at state.
"Dede is a special ath-
lete," said Lecanto coach
McKinley Rolle. "His expe-
rience at state today is in-
valuable. It's a credit to
him."
McDow has now tasted
the Class 2A Boys State lift-
ing meet and wants to
come back for more next
year
The Citrus High junior
had a bench press of 275
pounds and a clean and
jerk of 245 pounds for a
total of 520 pounds. He was
competing in the 154-
pound class in his first trip
to state.
McDow felt he should
have had a better clean
and jerk.
"I wasn't happy with it,"
he said. "On my last clean
and jerk, I ended up on my
heels."
Land 0' Lakes Sunlake
High was in a six-way tie
for fifth place with eight
points.
Punta Gorda Charlotte
won the state team title
with 17 points.


Associated Press
Chicago White Sox starting pitcher Phil Humber waves his cap Saturday after pitching a perfect game against
the Mariners in Seattle. The White Sox won 4-0. Humber's feat was the 21st perfect game in MLB history.


MLB sees perfection for

first time since 2010
Associated Press
SEATTLE
P hil Humber, who underwent
Tommy John surgery seven
years ago, threw the first per-
fect game in the majors in al-
most two years, leading the Chicago
White Sox to a 4-0 victory over the Seat-
tle Mariners on Saturday
It was baseball's 21st perfect game
and first since Philadelphia's Roy Hal-
laday threw one against the Florida
Marlins on May 29,2010. It was the third
See Page B3


Humber reacts after throwing the final pitch of his perfect game
against the Mariners.


This summer, remember: Tiger's heel not easily tamed


O ver the past
several weeks,
I have read
several newspaper
sports headlines and
stories dealing with /-
prominent athletes'
injuries. Two of the
most recent involved to
PGA golfer Tiger
Woods and Dwight Dr. Roi
Howard of the Orlando DOC1
Magic. ORE
Some clarification of
these athletic injuries
is in order Hopefully, this will pro-
vide not only some insight to the
stories, but will help you train and


avoid pitfalls that
cause these injuries.
Achilles tendinitis
(or now better known
as Tiger's heel) in-
r:, volves an injury to the
major tendon that con-
nects the calf muscles
to the foot. Anyone can
injure their Achilles
Joseph tendon like Tiger or
OR'S sustain a ruptured disc
ERS in their spine like
Dwight Howard, not
just professional ath-
letes. These injuries are incredi-
bly painful and disruptive to not
only the tendon and spine, but to


our lives as well, and can incapac-
itate for years.
The injuries to Howard and
Woods are common to all of us
who partake in sports and are as-
sociated with activities we all do.
Recovery is not as easy as the
media may make out.
As summer vacation ap-
proaches, running or walking on
the beach was always an activity I
enjoyed; however when you get
the urge to run on the beach with-
out shoes, as I did, for any pro-
longed time, think about it. As kids
and teenagers we were able to run
on the beach and go all day long
without shoes.


Exactly a year ago, while wait-
ing for my daughter to come down
to the beach, I decided to run a
few miles without shoes. I can say
that one year later my Achilles
tendinitis has finally left me after
using multiple therapies.
When we were younger, the con-
nective tissue in our heel cords,
better known as the Achilles ten-
don, was more pliable and
stretchy Three things happen to
the tendon as we get older
First, the strands of fibers
comprising the tendon are not as
stretchy
See Page B4


Texas


Associated Press


0 Basketball/B2
0 Hockey/B2
0 Baseball/B3
0 Scoreboard/B4
0 Golf/B5
0 Tennis/B5
0 NASCAR/B5


n i
TC
DE










Caps snap knotted series; Bruins on last legs


Panthers take 3-2

lead over Devils

Associated Press

BOSTON Troy Brouwer
scored on a power play with 1:27
left, giving the Washington Capi-
tals a 4-3 victory Saturday and
moving the defending champion
Boston Bruins a loss away from
elimination.
Brouwer gave the Capitals a 3-2
series lead with his second goal of
the playoffs, beating goalie Tim
Thomas over the glove with a wrist
shot from the right circle. It came
with 37 seconds left on a slashing
penalty against Benoit Pouliot.
The Bruins, who trailed 2-0 and
3-2, tied it at 8:47 of the third pe-
riod on Johnny Boychuk's goal.
The Capitals can wrap up the best-
of-seven series at home Sunday
The Bruins have been in this
predicament before. They trailed
the Vancouver Canucks 3-2 last
year in the Stanley Cup finals,
then won the last two games on
the road to capture their first title
since 1972.
Washington took a 2-0 lead in
the second period on goals by
Alexander Semin at 11:16 and Jay
Beagle at 14:27. That seemed to be
a sizable advantage in a series that


featured tight defense with each
team scoring only seven goals in
the first four games.
But the Bruins rallied with two
goals in 28 seconds late in the pe-
riod to tie at 2. Dennis Seidenberg
scored with 2:39 left on a one-
timer from the right circle that got
past goalie Braden Holtby. And
Brad Marchand tied with 2:11 to
go when he poked the rebound
through Holtby's legs after a shot
from the right point by Boychuk.
Washington regained the lead
3:21 into the third period when
Mike Knuble pounced on a re-
bound. Joel Ward shot from 50 feet
on the right side and Thomas
saved it But the goalie steered the
puck to the left side and couldn't
slide over in time to stop Knuble's
shot
Boston rallied again when Boy-
chuk scored on a 50-footer from
the left to the far side past
Holtby's glove.
Holtby finished with 34 saves,
and Thomas stopped 28 shots.
Panthers 3, Devils 0
SUNRISE, Fla. Kris Versteeg
scored a goal and set up another,
Jose Theodore made 30 saves for his
second postseason shutout, and the
Florida Panthers moved a win away
from their first series win in 16 years
with a 3-0 victory over the New Jersey
Devils on Saturday night.


The Washington Capitals' Keith Aucoin celebrates a goal by teammate
Mike Knuble as Boston Bruins goalie Tim Thomas lies face down on the
ice Saturday during the third period of Washington's 4-3 win in Game 5
in Boston.


Scottie Upshall also scored for
Florida, which leads the Eastern Con-
ference first-round series 3-2. The
Panthers' last series victory came in
the 1996 East finals, and they'll have
two chances to snap that drought.
Tomas Kopecky was credited with
an empty-net goal with 34 seconds
left, after Ilya Kovalchuk impeded his
clear path to the net.
Martin Brodeur made 30 saves for
New Jersey, which hosts a win-or-else
Game 6 on Tuesday night. If neces-
sary, Game 7 is at Florida on Thurs-
day night.


Senators 2, Rangers 0
NEW YORK Craig Anderson
stopped 41 shots to make Jason
Spezza's first-period goal stand up,
and the Ottawa Senators pushed the
top-seeded New York Rangers to the
brink of elimination with a 2-0 victory
Saturday night in Game 5.
The Senators, the No. 8 seed in the
Eastern Conference, have won two
straight and will have a chance to
knock out the Rangers on Monday
night in Ottawa. If New York can stay
alive, the deciding Game 7 would be
back at Madison Square Garden on


Thursday night.
Spezza added insurance by scor-
ing an empty-net goal with 55.3 sec-
onds remaining, and Anderson was
perfect in earning his second career
NHL playoff shutout. He stood tall in
the third period when the Rangers
pressed for the tying goal. Since
New York took a 2-0 lead in the first
period of its 3-2 overtime loss in
Game 4, Anderson has gone 116
minutes, 32 seconds without allow-
ing a goal.
Blues 3, Sharks 1
ST. LOUIS Jamie Langenbrunner
and David Perron scored in a 45-sec-
ond span in the third period, and St.
Louis Blues woke up in time to put
away the San Jose Sharks 3-1 and
wrap up the first-round series in five
games Saturday night.
Joe Thornton scored in the final
minute of the second period for San
Jose, and the Sharks were seemingly
in control before the flurry that ended
their season.
Brian Elliott made 26 saves, and
Andy McDonald ended all doubt with
an empty-net goal in the final minute.
St. Louis, the No. 2 seed in the West-
ern Conference, won a playoff series
for the first time in a decade against a
franchise that reached the conference
finals the previous two years. Before
this series, St. Louis hadn't won a
playoff game in eight years.


James, Bosh rest; Wade hurt; Heat lose


Associated Press

MIAMI LeBron James and
Chris Bosh sat out the game, rest-
ing for the postseason. Dwyane
Wade played and got hurt.
Wade lasted less than 3 minutes
before dislocating his left index fin-
ger, and without their three stars
Saturday night, the Heat lost 86-84
to the woeful Washington Wizards.
Wade appeared to get his finger
caught in another player's jersey
and immediately went to the locker
room grimacing in pain. He never
returned, even though fans chanted
"We want Dwyane!" a couple of times.
There was no immediate esti-
mate as to how long Wade might be
out, but with the playoffs beginning
next weekend, the Heat will hope
for a speedy recovery. He has al-
ready missed 14 games this season
because of injuries; the Heat are
13-1 without him.
Nuggets 118, Suns 107
PHOENIX Ty Lawson went 5 of 5
on 3-pointers and had 29 points and 10
assists to lead Denver to a 118-107 vic-
tory over the Phoenix Suns on Satur-
day that clinched a playoff berth for the
Nuggets.
The Suns fell a half-game behind
Utah for the eighth and final playoff spot
in the Western Conference. The Jazz
played at home against Orlando on
Saturday night. Phoenix plays at Utah
on Tuesday and holds the tiebreaker
over the Jazz.
Steve Nash of the Suns had 13 as-
sists, nine in the first quarter, and
passed Oscar Robertson into fifth place
on the NBA's career list. The Suns lost
Channing Frye to a shoulder injury in
the second quarter.
Shannon Brown scored 28 points for
Phoenix, including a career-best 6 3s.
76ers 109, Pacers 106 (OT)
INDIANAPOLIS Elton Brand
scored 20 points and Lou Williams
added 19 to help the Philadelphia 76ers
beat the Pacers 109-106 in overtime
Saturday night, stopping Indiana's win-
ning streak at seven games.
Jrue Holiday scored 17 points and
Andre Iguodala added 16 for the 76ers,
who inched closer to clinching a playoff
berth. The 76ers left the game needing
just a win or a loss by Milwaukee to
clinch a spot.
David West had a season-high 32 points
and grabbed 12 rebounds for Indiana.
Tyler Hansbrough scored 17 points and
Paul George added 16 for the Pacers, who
could have locked up the No. 3 seed in
the Eastern Conference with a win. Danny
Granger, Indiana's top scorer this season,
had four points on 2-for-12 shooting.
Rockets 99, Warriors 96
HOUSTON Courtney Lee scored
20 points, Goran Dragic added 18
points and seven assists and the Hous-
ton Rockets snapped a six-game losing
streak with a 99-96 win over the Golden
State Warriors on Saturday night.
Luis Scola had 13 points and Chase
Budinger added 11 for the Rockets,
who came into the game in the 10th
spot in the Western Conference, one
game behind Utah and Phoenix.
Houston went 10 for 26 from 3-point
range to snap a four-game home losing
streak and beat the Warriors for the
14th time in the last 16 meetings.
Klay Thompson scored 24 points and
Brandon Rush added 19 for the War-
riors, who have lost eight straight and
20 of their last 24.
The Warriors got within two points
midway through the fourth quarter, but
Lee hit two 3-pointers to help Houston
close it out.


Associated Press
The Washington Wizards' Nene scores the the game-winning basket Saturday against the Miami Heat in Miami.


Bulls 93, Mavericks 83 Grizzlies 93, Trail Blazers 89


CHICAGO Luol Deng scored 22
points, Richard Hamilton added 19 and
the Chicago Bulls held off a fourth-quar-
ter rally to beat the Dallas Mavericks
93-83 on Saturday night.
The victory by the Bulls (48-16) gave
them a 2 1/2-game lead over Miami for
the top seed in the Eastern Conference
playoffs. Chicago has two regular-sea-
son games left, against Indiana and
Cleveland.
Bulls star guard Derrick Rose re-
turned to the lineup after sitting out
three games with a right foot/ankle in-
jury and he had 11 points with eight as-
sists in 32 minutes.
Defending NBA champion Dallas,
which clinched a playoff berth on Thurs-
day night when Houston lost, was play-
ing the second game of a back-to-back,
so veteran guards Jason Kidd and
Jason Terry sat out to rest.
Dirk Nowitzki scored 17 points and
Rodrigue Beaubois, starting in place of
Kidd, added 16 10 in the final quarter.


MEMPHIS, Tenn. Rudy Gay
scored 21 points and had a key block in
the final seconds as the Memphis Griz-
zlies won their fourth straight, 93-89
over the Portland Trail Blazers.
Gay, who was 9 of 16 from the field,
blocked Wesley Matthews' 3-point at-
tempt with about 5 seconds left to seal
the win and send the short-handed Trail
Blazers to their fifth straight loss.
O.J. Mayo scored 14 points for Mem-
phis and Marreese Speights had 13
with Marc Gasol and Dante Cunning-
ham both adding 12.
J.J. Hickson scored 23 points to lead
Portland, while Jamal Crawford had 21
despite going 5 of 13 from the field, part
of the Trail Blazers' 37 percent shooting
for the game. Matthews had 16 points
and Luke Babbitt added 10.
The win kept Memphis' hopes alive
to try to reach the fourth seed in the
Western Conference. The Grizzlies
moved within a half game of the idle
Los Angeles Clippers.


Bucks 106, Nets 95
MILWAUKEE Brandon Jennings
scored 30 points to lead the Milwaukee
Bucks to a 106-95 victory over the New
Jersey Nets on Saturday night that kept
their slim playoff hopes alive.
Jennings, who hit three straight 3-
pointers late in the game, was 9 of 18
from the field and finished with six re-
bounds, six assists and four steals.
Ersan Ilyasova added 17 points and
17 rebounds for the Bucks, who snapped
a three-game losing streak and beat
New Jersey for the 11th straight time.
Philadelphia won in overtime at Indi-
ana, meaning the 76ers' magic number
is down to one to clinch the eighth and
final playoff spot in the Eastern Confer-
ence. Milwaukee trails Philadelphia by
three games with three games left, in-
cluding one against the 76ers on
Wednesday.
Gerald Wallace finished with 18
points and 11 rebounds for New Jersey,
which hasn't beaten Milwaukee since
March 3, 2009.


NHL PLAYOFF
GLANCE
FIRST ROUND
(Best-of-7)
(x-if necessary)
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Ottawa 3, N.Y. Rangers 2
Thursday, April 12: NY Rangers 4,
Ottawa 2
Saturday, April 14: Ottawa 3,
NY Rangers 2, OT
Monday, April 16: NY Rangers 1,
Ottawa 0
Wednesday, April 18: Ottawa 3,
NY Rangers 2, OT
Saturday, April 21: Ottawa 2,
NY Rangers 0
Monday, April 23: NY Rangers at
Ottawa, 7 p.m.
x-Thursday, April 26: Ottawa at NY
Rangers, TBD
Washington 3, Boston 2
Thursday, April 12: Boston 1,
Washington 0, OT
Saturday, April 14: Washington 2,
Boston 1,2OT
Monday, April 16: Boston 4,
Washington 3
Thursday, April 19: Washington 2,
Boston 1
Saturday, April 21: Washington 4,
Boston 3
Sunday, April 22: Boston at
Washington, 3 p.m.
x-Wednesday, April 25: Washington at
Boston, TBD
Florida 3, New Jersey 2
Friday, April 13: New Jersey 3, Florida 2
Sunday, April 15: Florida 4, New Jersey 2
Tuesday, April 17: Florida 4,
New Jersey 3
Thursday, April 19: New Jersey 4,
Florida 0
Saturday, April 21: Florida 3,
New Jersey 0
Tuesday, April 24: Florida at New Jersey,
TBD
x-Thursday, April 26: New Jersey at
Florida, TBD
Philadelphia 3, Pittsburgh 2
Wednesday, April 11: Philadelphia 4,
Pittsburgh 3, OT
Friday, April 13: Philadelphia 8,
Pittsburgh 5
Sunday, April 15: Philadelphia 8,
Pittsburgh 4
Wednesday, April 18: Pittsburgh 10,
Philadelphia 3
Friday, April 20: Pittsburgh 3,
Philadelphia 2
Sunday, April 22: Pittsburgh at
Philadelphia, noon
x-Tuesday, April 24: Philadelphia at
Pittsburgh, TBD
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Los Angeles 3,Vancouver 1
Wednesday, April 11: Los Angeles 4,
Vancouver 2
Friday, April 13: Los Angeles 4,
Vancouver 2
Sunday, April 15: Los Angeles 1,
Vancouver 0
Wednesday, April 18: Vancouver 3, Los
Angeles 1
Sunday, April 22: Los Angeles at
Vancouver, 8 p.m.
x-Tuesday, April 24: Vancouver at Los
Angeles, TBD
x-Thursday, April 26: Los Angeles at
Vancouver, TBD
St. Louis 4, San Jose 1
Thursday, April 12: San Jose 3,
St. Louis 2, 2OT
Saturday, April 14: St. Louis 3,
San Jose 0
Monday, April16: St. Louis 4, San Jose 3
Thursday, April 19: St. Louis 2,
San Jose 1
Saturday, April 21: St. Louis 3,
San Jose 1
Phoenix 3, Chicago 1
Thursday, April 12: Phoenix 3,
Chicago 2, OT
Saturday, April 14: Chicago 4, Phoenix 3,
OT
Tuesday, April 17: Phoenix 3, Chicago 2,
OT
Thursday, April 19: Phoenix 3,
Chicago 2, OT
Saturday, April 21: Chicago at Phoenix,
10p.m.
x-Monday, April 23: Phoenix at Chicago,
TBD
x-Wednesday, April 25: Chicago at
Phoenix, TBD
Nashville 4, Detroit 1
Wednesday, April 11: Nashville 3,
Detroit 2
Friday, April 13: Detroit 3, Nashville 2
Sunday, April 15: Nashville 3, Detroit 2
Tuesday, April 17: Nashville 3, Detroit 1
Friday April 20: Nashville 2, Detroit 1


B2 SUNDAY, APRIL 22, 2012


SPORTS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



AL

Rangers 10, Tigers 4
(Game 1)
Texas Detroit
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Kinsler dh 5 1 2 2 AJcksn cf 4 1 1 1
Andrusss 4 1 0 0 Boeschdh 4 1 1 0
Hamltncf 5 1 2 3 MiCarr3b 4 2 3 2
Beltre3b 2 1 2 0 Fielder 1b 4 0 0
AIGnzlz pr-3b31 2 0 DYong If 4 0 2 1
MYong 2b 5 1 2 0 Raburn rf 4 0 0 0
N.Cruzrf 5 1 2 2 JhPerltss 4 0 1 0
DvMrp If 5 1 2 0 Inge 2b 4 0 0 0
Napoli c 5 1 1 1 Laird c 3 0 0 0
Morlndlb 5 1 2 2
Totals 44101710 Totals 35 4 8 4
Texas 810 000 001 10
Detroit 000 200 020 4
E-Inge (1). DP-Detroit 1. LOB-Texas 8, De-
troit 4. 2B-Beltre (4), D.Young (3), Jh.Peralta
(7). 3B-Kinsler (2). HR-Hamilton (6), Napoli
(6), A.Jackson (3), Mi.Cabrera (4). SB-Kinsler
(2).
IP H RERBBSO


Texas
M.Harrison W,3-0
Uehara
Detroit
Porcello L,1-1
Below
Schlereth


72-36 3 3 0 6
11-32 1 1 0 2

1 10 9 8 1 1
6 4 0 0 0 4
2 3 1 1 0 0


Porcello pitched to 3 batters in the 2nd.
T-2:34. A-41,427 (41,255).

Yankees 15, Red Sox 9
New York Boston
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Jeter dh 4 2 3 1 Aviles ss 5 1 2 2
Swisher rf 6 2 3 6 Sweeny rf 4 1 1 1
Cano 2b 4 21 0 Pedroia 2b 5 0 2 1
ARdrgz3b 5 20 0 AdGnzllb 5 1 1 1
Teixeirib 6 3 3 6 Ortizdh 4 1 4 1
Grndrs cf 4 0 1 0 Youkils 3b 1 1 0 0
AnJons If 3 00 0 Spears ph-3b 2 0 0 0
Ibanezph-lf 1 00 0 Punto ph 1 0 0 0
Martin c 5 2 2 2 Sltlmch c 5 1 4 0
ENunezss 4 23 0 C.Rosscf 5 2 2 2
DMcDnlf 3 1 1 1
Totals 42151615 Totals 40917 9
NewYork 000 001 770 15
Boston 232 020 000 9
E-Aviles (2). DP-New York 2, Boston 2.
LOB-NewYork 8, Boston 8. 2B-Swisher (6),
Cano (7), Teixeira (4), Martin (1), Sweeney (7),
Ad.Gonzalez (3), Ortiz (8), Saltalamacchia 2
(3), D.McDonald (2). HR-Swisher (4), Teixeira
2 (3), C.Ross (3). SB-E.Nunez (3), Aviles (2).
SF-Sweeney, D.McDonald.
IP H RERBBSO
New York
FGarcia 12-37 5 5 0 0
Rapada 1-3 1 1 1 0 0
Phelps 4 6 3 3 1 2
R.SorianoW,2-0 1 1 0 0 0 1
Logan 1 1 0 0 0 1
Eppley 1 1 0 0 0 1
Boston
Doubront 6 4 1 1 3 7
Padilla 1-3 4 5 5 1 1
Albers 0 1 2 1 0 0
F.MoralesH,3 2-3 2 1 1 0 1
Aceves L,0-1 BS,2-4 0 2 5 5 4 0
J.Thomas 2-3 2 1 1 0 0
Tazawa 11-31 0 0 0 0
Albers pitched to 2 batters in the 7th.
F.Morales pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
Aceves pitched to 6 batters in the 8th.
Rapada pitched to 1 batter in the 3rd.
Logan pitched to 1 batter in the 9th.
HBP-by Phelps (Youkilis).WP-Eppley. PB-
Saltalamacchia.
T-3:52. A-37,839 (37,067).

White Sox 4, Mariners 0


Chicago Seattle
ab r h bi
De Aza cf 5 0 2 1 FigginslIf
Morel 3b 5 1 1 0 Ackley 2b
A.Dunn dh 4 00 0 ISuzukirf
Konerklb 4 1 2 2 Smoaklb
Przyns c 4 0 1 1 Seager 3b
Riosrf 3 0 1 0 JMontrdh
AIRmrz ss 4 0 0 MSndrs cf
Viciedo If 3 0 0 0 Olivo c
Lillirdg If 1 1 1 0 Jaso ph
Bckhm2b 3 1 1 0 Kawskss
Ryan ph
Totals 36 49 4 Totals
Chicago 012 000 001
Seattle 000 000 000


ab r h bi
3 00 0
3 00 0
3 00 0
3 00 0
3000
3000
3000
2000
1 0 0 0
2 00 0

2700 0
4
0


LOB-Chicago 7, Seattle 0. HR-Konerko (2).
SB-Lillibridge (3).
IP H RERBBSO
Chicago
HumberW,1-0 9 0 0 0 0 9
Seattle
BeavanL,1-2 6 7 3 3 1 1
Luetge 1 0 0 0 0 2
Delabar 2 2 1 1 0 4
HBP-by Beavan (Beckham).
T-2:17. A-22,472 (47,860).

Rays 4, Twins 1
Minnesota Tampa Bay
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Span cf 4 0 1 0 Jnnngs If 5 1 1 0
JCarrll ss 4 0 0 0 Zobrist 2b 4 0 0 0
Mauerlb 4 0 2 0 C.Penalb 2 1 1 0
Wlnghlf 2 1 1 0 Longori3b 4 1 1 1
Mornea dh 3 0 1 0 Scott dh 4 0 1 0
Doumit c 3 0 0 1 Joycerf 3 1 1 0
Valenci3b 4 00 0 BUptoncf 3 0 2 2
CThms rf 4 00 0 JMolin c 2 0 1 0
ACasill 2b 3 0 0 0 SRdrgz ss 3 0 0 0
Totals 31 15 1 Totals 304 8 3
Minnesota 000 000 001 1
Tampa Bay 000 003 10x 4
E-J.Carroll (1), Span (1), Valencia (2). DP-
Minnesota 3. LOB-Minnesota 7, Tampa Bay 9.
2B-Morneau (3), Scott (4), J.Molina (3). SB-
Mauer (2). S-S.Rodriguez. SF-Doumit.
IP H RERBBSO
Minnesota
PavanoL,1-2 6 7 3 2 2 7
AI.Burnett 1-3 1 1 0 0 0
Duensing 1 0 0 0 0 0
Gray 2-3 0 0 0 2 0
Tampa Bay
ShieldsW,3-0 8 5 1 1 2 7
Rodney S,5-5 1 0 0 0 0 2
Shields pitched to 2 batters in the 9th.
HBP-by Pavano (J.Molina), by AI.Burnett
(C.Pena), by Shields (Willingham). WP-Gray.
PB-J.Molina.
T-3:03. A-31,774 (34,078).

Tigers 3, Rangers 2
(Game 2)
Texas Detroit
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Kinsler 2b 4 00 0 AJcksn cf 3 0 0 0
Andrus ss 4 02 0 Boeschrf 3 1 0 0
Hamltn dh 5 0 0 0 JhPerltss 0 0 0 0
MYong3b 3 22 0 MiCarrdh 4 0 0 0
N.Cruzrf 3 00 0 Fielder 1b 3 1 1 0
DvMrpl If 2 0 1 2 DYongl If 4 1 1 1
Torreal c 4 0 1 0 Raburn If 0 0 0 0
Morlndlb 3 00 0 Avilac 2 0 0 0
BSnydr pr 0 0 0 0 RSantg ss-2b 3 0 1 2
Gentrycf 3 01 0 Kelly3b-rf 2 0 0 0
Napoliph 1 00 0 Inge2b-3b 3 0 0 0
Totals 32 27 2 Totals 273 3 3
Texas 000 100 010 2
Detroit 000 300 00x 3
LOB-Texas 10, Detroit 5. SB-Gentry (2).
SF-Dav.Murphy.
IP H RERBBSO
Texas
FelizL,1-1 8 3 3 3 4 6
Detroit
VerlanderW,2-1 6 4 1 0 3 8
DotelH,1 1 1 0 0 0 1
BenoitH,5 1 2 1 1 1 1
ValverdeS,4-5 1 0 0 0 2 2
HBP-by Feliz (Boesch). PB-Avila.
Umpires-Home, Paul Schrieber; First, Tim
Welke; Second, Mike Estabrook; Third, David
Rackley.
T-3:11. A-35,001 (41,255).


BASEBALL


SUNDAY, APRIL 22, 2012 B3


AMERICAN LEAGUE


W
New York 9
Baltimore 8
Toronto 8
Tampa Bay 8
Boston 4



W
Washington 12
Atlanta 10
New York 8
Philadelphia7
Miami 7


East Division
L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str HomeAway W
6 .600 - 7-3 W-34-3 5-3 Detroit 10
6 .571 Y2 5-5 L-1 3-3 5-3 Cleveland 7
6 .571 Y2 6-4 W-24-5 4-1 Chicago 8
7 .533 1 Y2 4-6 W-14-1 4-6 Minnesota 5
10 .286 4Y2 4 3-7 L-5 3-5 1-5 Kansas City 3


Central Division
L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str HomeAway
5 .667 - 6-4 W-16-3 4-2
5 .583 1Y2 7-3 W-21-4 6-1
6 .571 1Y2 6-4 W-23-4 5-2
10 .333 5 3Y2 4-6 L-1 2-4 3-6
11 .214 6Y2 5 1-9 L-9 0-8 3-3


W
Texas 12
Oakland 7
Seattle 7
Los Angeles5


West Division
Pct GB WCGB L10 Str HomeAway
.800- 8-2 L-1 5-2 7-1
.467 5 1/2 5-5 L-1 3-5 4-3
.438 5Y2 2 4-6 L-3 3-5 4-4
.357 6Y2 3 3-7 W-13-5 2-4


NATIONAL LEAGUE


East Division
Pct GB WCGB L10 Str HomeAway
.750 - 8-2 W-28-2 4-2
.667 1Y2 9-1 W-55-1 5-4
.571 3 1Y2 4-6 W-15-3 3-3
.500 4 2Y2 6-4 W-23-3 4-4
.467 4Y2 3 5-5 L-2 5-2 2-6


St. Louis
Milwaukee
Pittsburgh
Cincinnati
Houston
Chicago


Central Division
L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
5 .667 - 6-4 L-1 4-2 6-3
8 .467 3 3 4-6 W-14-4 3-4
8 .429 312 312 4-6 W-13-2 3-6
9 .400 4 4 4-6 L-1 3-3 3-6
10 .333 5 5 2-8 L-2 3-5 2-5
11 .267 6 6 3-7 W-13-6 1-5


Los Angelesl12
Colorado 7
San Fran. 7
Arizona 7
San Diego 3


West Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str HomeAway


3 .800 -
7 .500 4Y2
7 .500 4Y2
8 .467 5
12 .200 9


8-2 W-36-0 6-3
6-4 L-1 5-4 2-3
6-4 L-1 4-2 3-5
3-7 L-5 4-5 3-3
2-8 L-4 2-7 1-5


Rays even up series with 4-1 win


Associated Press

ST PETERSBURG James
Shields carried a three-hitter into
the ninth inning, B.J. Upton had a
key two-run single and the Tampa
Bay Rays beat the Minnesota Twins
4-1 on Saturday night.
Shields (3-0) allowed one run and
five hits over eight-plus innings while
winning his third consecutive start
after getting a no-decision on opening
day against the New York Yankees.
Upton's two-out hit off Carl Pavano
(1-2) gave the Rays a 3-0 lead in the
sixth. Another run scored on the play
when center fielder Denard Span was
charged with a throwing error attempt-
ing to cut down Matt Joyce at third.

AMERICAN LEAGUE

Rangers 10, Tigers 4 (Game 1)
DETROIT Josh Hamilton hit a three-
run homer during Texas' eight-run first in-
ning, and Mike Napoli went deep for a
fifth straight game to lead the Rangers to
a 10-4 win over the Detroit Tigers on Sat-
urday in the first game of a doubleheader.
Texas has won eight straight.
The Rangers routed Detroit 10-3 on
Thursday night in the first game of a four-
game set. After a rainout Friday, they
picked up where they'd left off, sending
12 men to the plate in the first against
Rick Porcello (1-1).
Matt Harrison (3-0) allowed three runs
and six hits in 7 2-3 innings. He struck out
six.
Miguel Cabrera and Austin Jackson
homered for the Tigers, who send Justin
Verlander to the mound for the nightcap.

Tigers 3, Rangers 2 (Game 2)
DETROIT Justin Verlander pitched
six innings without allowing an earned
run, and the Detroit Tigers salvaged a
split of their doubleheader with Texas,
beating the Rangers 3-2 in the nightcap
Saturday.

Yankees 15, Red Sox 9
BOSTON Nick Swisher hit a grand
slam to help the New York Yankees erase
a nine-run deficit, then he added a two-
run double to give them the lead as they
posted back-to-back seven-run innings to
beat Boston 15-9 on Saturday and send
the Red Sox to their fifth straight loss.
A day after Red Sox starter Clay Buch-
holz gave up five homers and the Yan-
kees spoiled Fenway Park's 100th
anniversary party, Boston chased New
York starter Freddy Garcia after 1 2-3 in-
nings and opened a 9-0 lead through five.
But Mark Teixeira homered twice, the
second a three-run shot in the seven-run
seventh that cut the deficit to 9-8.

Blue Jays 9, Royals 5
KANSAS CITY, Mo. Colby Rasmus
hit two home runs to help make Drew
Hutchison a winner in his major league
debut and the Toronto Blue Jays handed
the Kansas City Royals their ninth
straight loss, 9-5 Saturday night.
Edwin Encarnacion also homered and
drove in three runs for the Blue Jays.
The Royals' losing skid is their longest
since losing 10 in a row July 10-24, 2009.

NATIONAL LEAGUE

Nationals 3, Marlins 2
(10 innings)
WASHINGTON lan Desmond hit a
home run and had the game-winning sac-
rifice fly in the 10th inning to lift the Wash-
ington Nationals to a 3-2 win against the
Florida Marlins on Saturday.
Wilson Ramos singled to lead off the 10th
inning, took third on a throwing error and
scored on Desmond's fly as the Nationals
improved to 12-4, continuing their best start
since moving to Washington from Mon-
treal in 2005. Jayson Werth also homered
for the Nationals. Tom Gorzelanny (1-0)
pitched the 10th inning for the win.


NUMBER
Continued from Page B1

in White Sox's history, join-
ing Mark Buehrle against
Tampa Bay on July 23,
2009, and Charles Robert-
son against Detroit on
April 30,1922.
"This is awesome," Hum-
ber said. "I'm so thankful."
With the White Sox lined
up on the top step of the
dugout, Humber fell be-
hind 3-0 to Michael Saun-
ders leading off the ninth.
But he rebounded to strike
him out. John Jaso then
flied out before Brendan
Ryan, another pinch-hitter,
struck out to end the game.


Associated rress
Minnesota Twins catcher Joe Mauer steals second base ahead of the tag by
Tampa Bay Rays second baseman Ben Zobrist on Saturday during the fourth
inning in St. Petersburg.


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Sunday's Games
Texas (Lewis 2-0) at Detroit (Smyly 0-0), 1:05 p.m.
Minnesota (Liriano 0-2) at Tampa Bay (Niemann 0-2), 1:40 p.m.
Toronto (R.Romero 2-0) at Kansas City (Duffy 1-1), 2:10 p.m.
Baltimore (W.Chen 1-0) at L.A. Angels (Haren 0-1), 3:35 p.m.
Cleveland (Masterson 0-1) at Oakland (TRoss 0-0), 4:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Danks 1-2) at Seattle (Millwood 0-0), 4:10 p.m.
N.Y.Yankees (Sabathia 1-0) at Boston (Bard 0-2), 8:05 p.m.

NATIONAL LEAGUE
Sunday's Games
San Francisco (Lincecum 0-2) at N.Y Mets (Gee 1-1), 1:10 p.m.
Miami (Jo.Johnson 0-2) at Washington (G.Gonzalez 1-0), 1:35 p.m.
St. Louis (Lohse 2-0) at Pittsburgh (Bedard 0-3), 1:35 p.m.
Dodgers (Billingsley 2-0) at Houston (W.Rodriguez 0-2), 2:05 p.m.
Colorado (Guthre 1-1) at Milwaukee (Gallardo 1-1), 2:10 p.m.
Cincinnati (Cueto 1-0) at Chicago Cubs (R.Wells 0-0), 2:20 p.m.
Philadelphia (Blanton 1-2) at San Diego (Bass 0-2), 4:05 p.m.
Atlanta (Delgado 2-0) at Anzona (I.Kennedy 2-0), 4:10 p.m.

For more box scores,
see Page B4.


Cubs 6, Reds 1
CHICAGO Paul Maholm pitched six
solid innings to earn his first win in nine
months and the Chicago Cubs beat the
Cincinnati Reds 6-1 on Saturday to stop a
six-game slide.
Maholm (1-2) allowed one run and four
hits to snap a personal six-game losing
streak.
Darwin Barney and Steve Clevenger
each had three hits for the Cubs, who grabbed
control with a four-run second inning.
Starlin Castro had a double and a triple.

Mets 5, Giants 4
NEW YORK Ruben Tejada scored
the winning run on a throwing error by
catcher Buster Posey and the New York
Mets beat the San Francisco Giants after
blowing a three-run lead moments earlier in
one of the wackiest ninth innings imaginable.
Mike Pelfrey tossed eight terrific in-
nings, and it appeared the Mets were
headed to a fairly simple victory. They
were leading 4-2 with two outs in the top
of the ninth when Jon Rauch came out of
the bullpen and got pinch-hitter Brandon
Belt to hit a high popup to shallow center.
Tejada had trouble with it immediately,
though, fighting to get under the ball be-
hind shortstop as it swirled around in the
wind. Rookie center fielder Kirk Nieuwen-
huis came rushing in and overran the
ball, which dropped behind him for a two-
run double.

Pirates 2, Cardinals 0
PITTSBURGH A.J. Burnett pitched
three-hit ball for seven innings in his in-


Ryan took a check swing
and missed at a full-count
pitch, but the ball got away
from catcherAkJ. Pierzynski.
Ryan lingered outside the
batter's box, unsure of um-
pire Brian Runge's call,
and Pierzynski fired to first
to complete the play
Humber, who was in-
volved in a trade for Johan
Santana in 2008, fell to his
knees and his teammates
rushed toward the mound
to congratulate him.
"I don't know that I dom-
inated them," Humber said.
"Obviously the ball was hit
at people. I'm thankful for
that. It was a well-pitched
game. Definitely something
I'll never forget"
The right-hander struck


jury-delayed Pittsburgh debut and the Pi-
rates beat the St. Louis Cardinals 2-0 on
Saturday night.
Burnett, who missed the first three
weeks of the year while recovering from a
fractured right orbital bone sustained dur-
ing a bunting drill in spring training,
walked two and struck out seven while
giving up just three hits.
Joel Hanrahan worked out of a two-on,
one-out jam in the ninth for his second
save of the season.

Dodgers 5, Astros 1
HOUSTON Matt Kemp set a fran-
chise record for home runs through 15
games with his ninth of the season to
back up a solid outing by Clayton Ker-
shaw and the Los Angeles Dodgers got a
5-1 win over the Houston Astros on Sat-
urday night.
Kemp's two-run shot to center field in
the sixth inning off Kyle Weiland (0-3)
scored Dee Gordon, extending the lead
to 3-0 and giving him a home run in three
straight games. It also extended his major
league-leading RBI total to 22 and his hit-
ting streak to 10 games.

Brewers 9, Rockies 4
MILWAUKEE Ryan Braun broke out
of a slump with a solo homer and two RBIs,
helping the Milwaukee Brewers beat the
Colorado Rockies 9-4 on Saturday night.
Braun, who will be honored by the
Brewers on Sunday for winning the Na-
tional League's Most Valuable Player
award last season, hit his second homer
of the season and an RBI triple while
ending an 0-for-16 slide.
Alex Gonzalez hit a three-run homer
and Jose Veras (2-0) pitched a perfect
seventh inning to get the victory.
Troy Tulowitzki and Todd Helton home-
red for the Rockies.

Braves 9, Diamondbacks 1
PHOENIX Brian McCann hit a two-
run homer, Freddie Freeman had a pair
of RBI doubles and the Atlanta Braves
routed the Arizona Diamondbacks for the
second game in a row.
Brandon Beachy (2-1) allowed four hits
in 7 1-3 scoreless innings, striking out five
and walking none as the Braves won their
fourth in a row and ninth in 10 games
after starting the season 0-4.
Trevor Cahill (1-1) gave up seven runs,
four earned, and seven hits over 5 2-3 in-
nings in his Chase Field debut for the Di-
amondbacks.


out nine and threw just 96
pitches in his first career
complete game. He went to
a three-ball count only
three times.
It was quite a contrast to
his first start of the season,
when he went 5 1-3 innings
and threw 115 pitches in a
no-decision against Balti-
more on Monday
It was the majors' first
no-hitter of the season.
There were three last year:
Francisco Liriano of Min-
nesota, Justin Verlander of
Detroit, and Ervin Santana
of the Los Angeles Angels.
Humber struck out the
side in the second while
cruising through the first
four innings in just 45
pitches. Chone Figgins' fly


ball to left in the fourth was
the first ball to reach the
outfield. Dustin Ackley fol-
lowed with a hard liner to
right that Alex Rios
reached up and stabbed.
The White Sox moved far-
ther and farther away from
Humber as he approached
history, leaving him alone as
he sat on the bench in the
Safeco Field visitors' dugout
Justin Smoak struck out
swinging to start the eighth.
Kyle Seager lofted a fly to
left that looked momentarily
like it had a chance to land,
but was caught by Dayan
Viciedo. Jesus Montero fol-
lowed with an easy ground
ball to second base, send-
ing the perfect game to the
ninth.


NL

Nationals 3, Marlins 2
(10 innings)
Miami Washington
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Reyes ss 5 0 2 0 Dsmndss 4 1 1 2
Bonifac 2b-cf4 0 0 0 Espinos 2b 4 0 1 0
HRmrz3b 3 1 0 0 DeRosa3b-lf 4 0 1 0
Morrsnlf 4 1 2 2 Tracy1b-3b 4 0 0 0
GSnchzlb 4 0 0 0 Werth rf 4 1 2 1
Dobbsrf 3 0 1 0 Ankielcf 3 00 0
DMrph pr-2b0 0 0 0 Nady If 4 0 0 0
J.Buckc 4 0 0 0 Grzlnyp 0 0 0 0
Coghln cf-rf 3 0 1 0 Ramosc 4 1 2 0
ASnchz p 2 0 0 0 Strasrg p 1 00 0
Stanton ph 1 0 0 0 Berndn ph 1 0 0 0
Webbp 0 00 0 Matthsp 0 00 0
Infanteph 1 00 0 SBurnttp 0 00 0
Mujica p 0 0 0 0 Lmrdzz ph 1 00 0
Lidge p 0 00 0
LaRochib 1 00 0
Totals 34 26 2 Totals 35 3 7 3
Miami 000 000 002 0 2
Washington000 001 100 1 3
One out when winning run scored.
E-G.Sanchez (1). LOB-Miami 7, Washing-
ton 6.2B-Reyes 2 (5), Werth (4). HR-Morri-
son (1), Desmond (2), Werth (1). SB-Dobbs
(1), Do.Murphy (1). S-Bonifacio. SF-
Desmond.
IP H RERBBSO
Miami
A.Sanchez 7 5 2 2 0 8
Webb 1 0 0 0 0 0
MujicaL,0-1 11-32 1 0 1 1
Washington
Strasburg 6 4 0 0 1 6
MattheusH,3 11-31 0 0 0 0
S.BurnettH,3 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
LidgeBS,2-4 1 1 2 2 3 0
GorzelannyW,1-0 1 0 0 0 0 0
T-2:46. A-26,745 (41,487).

Cubs 6, Reds 1
Cincinnati Chicago
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Cozartss 5 1 2 0 DeJessrf 5 22 1
Stubbscf 5 0 0 0 Barney 2b 4 23 1
Vottolb 3 0 0 0 SCastross 5 02 1
Phillips2b 4 0 1 1 LaHairlb 2 0 0 1
Simonp 0 0 0 0 IStewrt3b 4 00 0
Ludwcklf 3 0 0 0 Clevngrc 4 1 3 1
Rolen 3b 4 0 1 0 DeWitt If 3 0 0 0
Heisey rf 3 0 1 0 Russell p 0 0 0 0
Mesorcc 3 00 0 Dolisp 0 00 0
Leakep 2 0 0 0 RJhnsnph 1 01 0
Ondrskp 0 0 0 0 Marmlp 0 00 0
Frazierph 1 0 1 0 Mathercf-lf 4 1 2 1
Valdez 2b 1 000 MahIlmp 2 00 0
Campnph-cf 2 0 1 0
Totals 34 16 1 Totals 36614 6
Cincinnati 100 000 000 1
Chicago 140 000 10x 6
E-Rolen (2), Leake (1), S.Castro 2 (7). DP-
Cincinnati 1. LOB-Cincinnati 10, Chicago 9.
2B-Cozart 2 (4), Heisey (2), Frazier (1), Bar-
ney (2), S.Castro (4), R.Johnson (2), Mather (1).
3B-S.Castro (1). SF-LaHair.
IP H RERBBSO
Cincinnati
Leake L,0-2 52-310 5 5 1 3
Ondrusek 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Simon 2 4 1 0 0 2
Chicago
MaholmW,11-2 6 4 1 1 3 5
Russell 1 2 0 0 0 1
Dolis 1 0 0 0 1 0
Marmol 1 0 0 0 0 1
HBP-by Simon (Barney).
T-2:40. A-38,405 (41,009).

Mets 5, Giants 4
San Francisco NewYork
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Pagan cf 5 1 2 0 Niwnhscf 5 0 0 0
MeCarr If 3 0 0 0 DnMrp 2b 4 1 3 0
Sandovl 3b 4 0 1 1 DWrght 3b 4 0 0
Poseyc 4 1 2 0 I.Davislb 4 0 1 1
A.Hufflb-2b4 0 0 0 Bay If 4 1 1 0
Schrhltrf 3 1 1 0 Dudarf 2 21 0
Burriss 2b-ss4 1 2 1 Hairstn pr 0 0 0 0
BCrwfr ss 3 0 0 0 Thole c 2 0 1 0
HSnchz ph 1 0 0 0 Tejada ss 3 1 1 3
Henslyp 0 0 0 0 Pelfreyp 2 0 0 0
Affeldtp 0 0 0 0 Frncscp 0 0 0 0
Vglsngp 3 0 0 0 Byrdakp 0 00 0
JaLopz p 0 00 0 Rauch p 0 00 0
Otero p 0 0 0 0 Baxter ph 0 0 0 0
Pill ph 0 0 0 0 Turner ph 1 0 1 0
Beltph-1lb 1 0 1 2
Totals 35 49 4 Totals 31 5 9 4
San Francisco 001 000 003 4
NewYork 000 010 211 5
Two outs when winning run scored.
E-A.Huff (1), Me.Cabrera (1), Posey (4).
DP-NewYork 1. LOB-San Francisco 6, New
York 6.2B-Pagan (3), Belt (2), Dan.Murphy
(5), Tejada (7). CS-D.Wright (2). S-Thole 2,
Pelfrey.
IP H RERBBSO
San Francisco
Vogelsong 7 5 3 3 2 8
Ja.Lopez 0 2 1 0 0 0
Otero 1 0 0 0 0 0
HensleyL,1-1 1-3 1 1 0 1 0
Affeldt 1-3 1 0 0 0 0
NewYork
Pelfrey 8 6 1 1 1 3
FFrancisco H,1 1-3 2 3 3 1 0
ByrdakH,3 1-3 0 0 0 0 1
RauchW,2-0BS,1-1 1-3 1 0 0 0 1
Ja.Lopez pitched to 3 batters in the 8th.
T-2:55. A-33,844 (41,922).

Pirates 2, Cardinals 0
St. Louis Pittsburgh
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Furcalss 2 0 0 0 Presley If 4 0 1 0
MCrpntlb 4 0 2 0 Tabata rf 3 00 0
Hollidy If 3 00 0 McCtch cf 4 22 0
Beltranrf 4 0 0 0 Walker2b 3 01 0
Freese3b 3 00 0 McGehlb 4 00 0
YMolin c 3 0 0 0 PAIvrz 3b 4 02 2
Jaypr 0 0 0 0 Barmesss 3 00 0
Descals 2b 3 0 1 0 Barajsc 3 01 0
Salas p 0 0 0 0 AJBrnt p 1 00 0
Rzpczy p 0 0 0 0 McLoth ph 1 00 0
Komatsph 1 00 0 J.Cruzp 0 00 0
Roinsncf 4 01 0 Watsonp 0 00 0
Westrkp 2 00 0 Grillip 0 00 0
Greene2b 1 01 0 Hanrhnp 0 00 0
Totals 30 05 0 Totals 302 7 2
St. Louis 000 000 000 0
Pittsburgh 000 101 00x 2
E-Robinson (1). DP-St. Louis 1, Pittsburgh 1.
LOB-St. Louis 8, Pittsburgh 7. 2B-Mc-
Cutchen (3). SB-Presley (3). CS-Tabata (3).
S-Furcal.
IP H RERBBSO
St. Louis
Westbrook L,2-1 62-37 2 2 2 6
Salas 1 0 0 0 1 0
Rzepczynski 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Pittsburgh
A.J.BurnettW,1-0 7 3 0 0 2 7
J.CruzH,1 1-3 2 0 0 0 0
WatsonH,2 1-3 0 0 0 0 1
GrilliH,2 1-3 0 0 0 0 1
HanrahanS,2-2 1 0 0 0 2 2
T-2:40.A-25,218(38,362).

Dodgers 5, Astros 1
Los Angeles Houston
ab rhbi ab rhbi
DGordn ss 4 2 3 0 Schafercf 3 00 0
AKndy2b 3 1 0 0 Altuve2b 3 00 0
MacDglp 0 00 0 JMrtnz If 2 01 1
Jansenp 0 00 0 Ca.Leelb 4 00 0
JWrghtp 0 00 0 Lowriess 4 01 0
Kempcf 3 1 1 2 CJhnsn3b 4 00 0
Ethierrf 4 0 1 2 MDwnsrf 3 01 0
JRiverlf 3 0 1 0 DvCrpnp 0 00 0


GwynJ If 0 00 0 WLopezp 0 00 0
Loneylb 3 1 1 1 MGnzlzph 1 0 0 0
Sellers3b 4 0 0 0 CSnydrc 2 00 0
A.Ellisc 3 0 0 0 Bogsvcph 1 0 0 0
Kershw p 3 0 1 0 Weilnd p 2 0 0 0
M.Ellis2b 1 0 0 0 R.Cruzp 0 0 0 0
Maxwllrf 1 1 1 0
Totals 31 58 5 Totals 30 1 4 1
Los Angeles 010 002 020 5
Houston 000 000 010 1
E-Weiland (2). DP-Los Angeles 1, Houston
3. LOB-Los Angeles 4, Houston 7. 2B-D.Gor-
don (3), J.Rivera (3), M.Downs (2). HR-Kemp
(9), Loney (1). CS-D.Gordon (3).
IP H RERBBSO
Los Angeles
KershawW,1-0 7 3 0 0 2 9
MacDougal 1-3 1 1 1 2 0
JansenH,4 2-3 0 0 0 1 0
J.Wright 1 0 0 0 0 1
Houston
WeilandL,0-3 7 6 3 3 1 6
R.Cruz 2-3 1 2 2 2 0
Davi.Carpenter 1-3 1 0 0 2 0
W.Lopez 1 0 0 0 0 1
Balk-Kershaw.
T-3:02. A-25,562 (40,981).






B4 SUNDAY, APRIL 22, 2012


Texas Open par scores
Saturday at TPC San Antonio,
Oaks Course, San Antonio
Purse: $6,2 million,Yardage: 7,435,
Par: 72, Third Round, a-amateur:
Ben Curtis 67-67-73 -207 -9
Matt Every 63-74-73 210 -6
John Huh 77-68-67-212 -4
Seung-YulNoh 73-71-68-212 -4
CharlieWi 72-69-71 -212 -4
Matt Kuchar 70-76-67-213 -3
Greg Chalmers 72-72-69-213 -3
Brian Gay 73-69-71 -213 -3
David Mathis 69-67-77-213 -3
Cameron Tringale 72-65-76-213 -3
Chris Stroud 72-73-69-214 -2
Bob Estes 72-72-70 214 -2
Martin Flores 71-73-70-214 -2
Ryan Palmer 71-69-74-214 -2
Ryan Moore 72-72-71 -215 -1
FredrikJacobson 68-76-71 --215 -1
Kris Blanks 74-73-68-215 -1
Kevin Streelman 71-70-74 -215 -1
Frank Lickliter II 71-70-74 215 -1
Scott Piercy 76-65-74-215 -1
Brian Harman 72-73-71 -216 E
Nathan Green 73-71-72-216 E
Brendan Steele 73-74-69 -216 E
Kevin Kisner 73-70-73-216 E
Billy Mayfair 70-73-73 216 E
Daniel Summerhays 74-68-74 216 E
Billy Hurley III 71-77-68-216 E
a-Jordan Spieth 75-70-72 -217 +1
J.J. Killeen 73-71-73 -217 +1
Charley Hoffman 72-74-71-217 +1
Justin Leonard 74-70-73-217 +1
Skip Kendall 71-73-73 -217 +1
Tom Gillis 72-72-73-217 +1
Russell Knox 72-71-74 -217 +1
Tim Herron 74-69-74-217 +1
Hunter Haas 66-74-77-217 +1
Tommy Biershenk 70-74-74-218 +2
Harrison Frazar 72-74-72-218 +2
Garth Mulroy 71-71-76-218 +2
Matt Jones 77-71-70 -218 +2
Will MacKenzie 72-76-70 -218 +2
Patrick Reed 71-74-74-219 +3
Kyle Reifers 70-75-74 -219 +3
Cameron Beckman 68-76-75-219 +3
Spencer Levin 71-75-73 -219 +3
Chad Campbell 73-71-75 219 +3
Miguel Angel Carballo 70-73-76-219 +3
David Hearn 74-74-71 -219 +3
Bill Lunde 73-70-76- 219 +3
BudCauley 70-72-77-219 +3
Blake Adams 71-69-79-219 +3
Will Claxton 75-71-74 -220 +4
Hank Kuehne 72-74-74 -220 +4
Paul Stankowski 73-74-73 -220 +4
Jerry Kelly 72-74-75-221 +5
Derek Lamely 68-75-78-221 +5
J.J. Henry 74-74-73-221 +5
Robert Damron 76-72-73 -221 +5
Scott Langley 72-76-73 221 +5
Stephen Ames 74-74-73-221 +5
Danny Lee 75-71-76- 222 +6
Graham DeLaet 73-74-75-222 +6
Marco Dawson 71-73-78 -222 +6
Ricky Barnes 74-74-74 -222 +6
Harris English 70-73-80 -223 +7
Nick O'Hern 73-74-76-223 +7
Bobby Gates 77-71-75- 223 +7
Briny Baird 73-73-78-224 +8
Ted Purdy 76-72-76 -224 +8
Joe Ogilvie 72-73-80 225 +9
Garrett Willis 75-72-78-225 +9
Shaun Micheel 77-71-77- 225 +9
Patrick Sheehan 72-71-82-225 +9
Billy Horschel 74-74-77-225 +9
David Duval 75-73-77-225 +9
Scott Dunlap 72-76-77--225 +9
Made cut did not finish


Brendon de Jonge
Rich Beem
Mark Anderson
Diego Velasquez
Zack Miller


72-75-79
69-78-79
71-77-79
73-75-80
72-76-84


NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct
y-Boston 37 27 .578
x-New York 33 30 .524
Philadelphia 33 30 .524
Toronto 22 41 .349
New Jersey 22 42 .344
Southeast Division
W L Pct
y-Miami 45 18 .714
x-Atlanta 38 25 .603
x-Orlando 36 26 .581
Washington 17 46 .270
Charlotte 7 55 .113
Central Division
W L Pct
y-Chicago 48 16 .750
x-Indiana 41 23 .641
Milwaukee 30 33 .476
Detroit 23 40 .365
Cleveland 21 41 .339
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct
y-San Antonio 46 16 .742
x-Memphis 39 25 .609
x-Dallas 36 29 .554
Houston 33 31 .516
New Orleans 20 43 .317
Northwest Division
W L Pct
y-Oklahoma City 46 17 .730
x-Denver 35 28 .556
Utah 33 30 .524
Portland 28 36 .438
Minnesota 26 38 .406
Pacific Division
W L Pct
x-L.A. Lakers 40 24 .625
x-L.A. Clippers 39 24 .619
Phoenix 33 31 .516
Golden State 22 41 .349
Sacramento 20 43 .317
x-clinched playoff spot
y-clinched division


226 +10
226 +10
227 +11
228 +12
232 +16





GB

31/2
31/2
14/2
15

GB

7
81/2
28
37/2

GB

7
17/2
24/2
26


GB

8
111/2
14
26/2

GB

11
13
181/2
20/2

GB
1/2
7
17/2
19/2


Friday's Games
Atlanta 97, Boston 92
Memphis 85, Charlotte 80
Cleveland 98, NewYork 90
Dallas 104, Golden State 94
San Antonio 121, L.A. Lakers 97
Oklahoma City 103, Sacramento 92
Saturday's Games
Denver 118, Phoenix 107
Philadelphia 109, Indiana 106, OT
Washington 86, Miami 84
Chicago 93, Dallas 83
Houston 99, Golden State 96
Memphis 93, Portland 89
Milwaukee 106, New Jersey 95
Orlando at Utah, 10:30 p.m.
Sunday's Games
New York at Atlanta, 1 p.m.
Oklahoma City at L.A. Lakers, 3:30 p.m.
Sacramento at Charlotte, 6 p.m.
Toronto at Detroit, 6p.m.
Houston at Miami, 6 p.m.
Golden State at Minnesota, 7 p.m.
Cleveland at San Antonio, 7 p.m.
Orlando at Denver, 8 p.m.
New Orleans at L.A. Clippers, 9:30 p.m.


Blue Jays 9, Royals 5


Toronto

YEscor ss
KJhnsn 2b
Bautist rf
Lind lb
Thams If
Encrnc dh
Lawrie 3b
Rasms cf


Kansas City


ab r h bi
5 0 1 1 YBtncr2b
2 0 1 0 AGordnlIf
5 0 0 0 Butler dh
5 1 1 0 Hosmerlb
4 1 1 0 Francrrf
5 2 3 3 B.Penac
4 2 2 0 Mostks 3b
4 3 3 4 AEscorss


ab r h bi
5 0 2 1
4 2 2 1
3 00 0

4 00 0
4 00 0
2 0 0 0
4 1 4 0


SCOREBOARD


FOTr the record


Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Saturday in the Florida Lottery:
.... CASH 3 (early)
.. -0-6-4
CASH 3 (late)
1-1-2

B- PLAY 4 (early)
7 -3-3-4
PLAY 4 (late)
9-4-6-5

FANTASY 5
or a Lotty 3-4-10-18-27

POWERBALL LOTTO
6-8-20-42-51 1 15 22 27 31 43
POWER BALL XTRA
16 2


On the AIRWAVES

TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
12:30 p.m. (FOX) Sprint Cup: STP 400. From Kansas Speed-
way in Kansas City, Kan.
COLLEGE SOFTBALL
3:30 p.m. (ESPN) Missouri at Oklahoma.
COLLEGE BASEBALL
6 a.m. (FSNFL) Memphis at Southern Mississippi. (Taped)
3 p.m. (ESPN2) Georgia at Florida.
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
1 p.m. (TBS) Texas Rangers at Detroit Tigers.
1:30 p.m. (FSNFL) Miami Marlins at Washington Nationals.
1:30 p.m. (SUN) Minnesota Twins at Tampa Bay Rays.
2:10 p.m. (WGN-A) Cincinnati Reds at Chicago Cubs.
8 p.m. (ESPN) New York Yankees at Boston Red Sox.
12:30 a.m. (ESPN2) New York Yankees at Boston Red Sox.
(Same-day tape)
BASKETBALL
5 a.m. (ESPN2) Denver Nuggets at Phoenix Suns. (Same-day
tape)
1 p.m. (ESPN) New York Knicks at Atlanta Hawks.
3:30 p.m. (ABC) Oklahoma City Thunder at Los Angeles Lakers.
6 p.m. (SUN) Houston Rockets at Miami Heat.
8 p.m. (FSNFL) Orlando Magic at Denver Nuggets.
2:30 a.m. (ESPN2) New York Knicks at Atlanta Hawks.
(Same-day tape)
3:30 a.m. (ESPN) Oklahoma City Thunder at Los Angeles
Lakers. (Same-day tape)
BICYCLING
12:30 a.m. (NBCSPT) 2012 Liege-Bastogne-Liege. From
Ardennes, Belgium. (Same-day tape)
GOLF
9 a.m. (GOLF) Volvo China Open, Final Round. (Same-day tape)
1 p.m. (CBS) Champions: Liberty Mutual Legends of Golf,
Final Round. From Savannah, Ga.
3 p.m. (CBS) Valero Texas Open, Final Round.
HOCKEY
12 p.m. (NBC) Conference Quarterfinal: Teams TBA.
3 p.m. (NBC) Conference Quarterfinal: Teams TBA.
7 p.m. (NBCSPT) Conference Quarterfinal: Teams TBA.
9:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) Conference Quarterfinal: Teams TBA.
COLLEGE LACROSSE
9:30 a.m. (SUN) Vanderbilt at Florida. (Taped)
OLYMPICS
4 p.m. (NBCSPT) U.S. Olympic Trials Wrestling. Finals. From
Iowa City, Iowa. (Taped)
MLS SOCCER
6 p.m. (ESPN2) New York Red Bulls at D.C. United.

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


Arenciic 4 0 2 1 Maiercf 3 1 1 1
Totals 38 9149 Totals 33 510 5
Toronto 000 402 300 9
Kansas City 100 040 000 5
DP-Toronto 4, Kansas City 2. LOB-Toronto
6, Kansas City 6. 2B-Lind (5), Thames (2),
Arencibia (2), Y.Betancourt (2), A.Escobar (4).
3B-Maier (1). HR-Encarnacion (4), Rasmus
2 (3), A.Gordon (2), Hosmer (3). CS-Thames
(1).
IP H RERBBSO
Toronto
Hutchison W,1-0 51-38 5 5 3 4
Oliver H,2 12-31 0 0 0 1
Villanueva 2 1 0 0 1 1
Kansas City
Mendoza 31-310 4 4 1 0
TeafordL,0-1 3 2 3 3 3 0
K.Herrera 12-32 2 2 0 1
Collins 1 0 0 0 0 2
HBP-by Hutchison (Butler).
T-3:03. A-27,804 (37,903).
Braves 3,
Diamondbacks 2


Atlanta Arizona
ab r h bi
Bourn cf 4 1 2 0 Blmqst ss
Prado If 4 0 2 1 GParra cf
Fremn lb 4 0 0 0 J.Upton rf
McCnnc 3 00 0 MMntrc
Uggla 2b 4 1 1 1 Gldsch lb
C.Jones 3b 3 0 0 1 Kubel If
Heywrd rf 4 0 0 0 A.Hill 2b
JWilson ss 4 1 1 0 RRorts 3b
Hansonp 2 00 0 JSndrs p
Venters p 0 0 0 0 Pollock ph
Kimrel p 0 0 0 0 Shaw p
DHrndz p
Totals 32 36 3 Totals
Atlanta 111 000 000
Arizona 110 000 000


ab r h bi
4 00 0
4 1 1 0
4 0 1 0

4 0 1 0
4 1 1 1
3 0 1 0
3 0 0 0
1 0 0 0
1 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
31 2 5 2
3
2


E-A.Hill (3). LOB-Atlanta 5, Arizona 4. 2B-
J.Upton (3). HR-Uggla (2), Kubel (1). CS-
Bourn (3). S-Hanson, J.Saunders.
IP H RERBBSO
Atlanta
Hanson W,2-2 7 5 2 2 1 7
Venters H,4 1 0 0 0 0 3
KimbrelS,5-5 1 0 0 0 0 3
Arizona
J.Saunders L,1-1 7 6 3 2 1 5
Shaw 1 0 0 0 1 0
D.Hernandez 1 0 0 0 0 3
T-2:17. A-30,188 (48,633).

Brewers 9, Rockies 4
Colorado Milwaukee
ab rh bi ab rh b


Scutaro 2b
Fowler cf
CGnzlz If
Tlwtzk ss
Helton lb
Cuddyr rf
Rosario c
Nelson 3b
Pomrnz p
EYong ph
Rogers p
EEscln p
Roenckp


4 01 0 RWeks2b
4 01 1 CGomzcf
4 1 0 0 Braun If
4 1 2 2 ArRmr3b
3 1 1 1 Hart rf
4 0 0 0 Ishikawlb
4 0 1 0 AIGnzlz ss
4 0 0 0 Gamel lb
1 0 0 0 Dillard p
0 1 0 0 Lucroyc
1 00 0 Estradp
0 000 0 Aokiph
0 00 0 MParr p
McCInd p
Veras p


Morgan ph-rf 2 0 0 0
Totals 33 46 4 Totals 329 9 8
Colorado 000 102 001 4
Milwaukee 000 021 60x 9
LOB-Colorado 4, Milwaukee 4. 2B-Rosario
(3), Hart (5), Ale.Gonzalez (3). 3B-R.Weeks
(1), Braun (1). HR-Tulowitzki (2), Helton (3),
Braun (2), Ale.Gonzalez (3). SB-C.Gonzalez
(2), Tulowitzki (1), Helton (1), E.Young (3),
C.Gomez (5). S-Lucroy.
IP H RERBBSO
Colorado
Pomeranz 5 2 2 2 3 6
Rogers L,0-1 BS,1-1 11-35 4 4 0 0
E.Escalona 2-3 2 3 3 1 1
Roenicke 1 0 0 0 0 1
Milwaukee
Estrada 5 2 1 1 0 9
M.Parra BS,1-1 2-3 1 2 2 1 0
McClendon 1-3 1 0 0 1 0
VerasW,2-0 1 0 0 0 0 2
Dillard 2 2 1 1 0 2
WP-Rogers. PB-Rosario 2.
T-3:13. A-43,565 (41,900).

Saturday's Sports Transactions
BASEBALL
American League
BALTIMORE ORIOLES-Traded INF Josh
Bell to the Arizona Diamondbacks for a player to
be named later.
BOSTON RED SOX-Acquired OF Marion
Byrd and cash considerations from the Chicago
Cubs for RHP Michael Bowden and a player to
be named later. Designated INF/OF Nate
Spears for assignment.
KANSAS CITY ROYALS-Placed RHP Greg
Holland on the 15-day DL. Recalled RHP Je-
remy Jeffress from Omaha (PCL).
OAKLAND ATHLETICS-Recalled LHP
Pedro Figueroa from Sacramento (PCL). Op-
tioned RHP Graham Godfrey to Sacramento.
National League
ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS-Placed RHP
Daniel Hudson on the 15-day DL. Recalled RHP
Jonathan Albaledejo from Reno (PCL).
CHICAGO CUBS-Placed RHP Ryan Demp-
ster on the 15-day DL, retroactive to April 18.
Recalled OF Tony Campana from Iowa (PCL).
PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES-Placed LHP
Cliff Lee on the 15-day DL. Recalled LHP Joe
Savery from Lehigh Valley (IL).
PITTSBURGH PIRATES-Activated RHP
A.J. Burnett from the 15-day DL. Optioned RHP
Jared Hughes to Indianapolis (IL).
Frontier League
FLORENCE FREEDOM-Signed RHP Tim
Adelman, RHP Maxx Catapano and RHP Jorge
Marban. Released RHP Ricardo Serrano.
LAKE ERIE CRUSHERS-Placed C Joel
Collins, RHPTim Holmes and SS Jodam Rivera
on the suspended list.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
NHL-Suspended Phoenix F Raffi Torres 25
games for a hit that injured Chicago's Marian
Hossa in an April 19 game.
FLORIDA PANTHERS-Recalled D Tyson
Strachan from San Antonio (AHL).
ECHL
ECHL-Suspended South Carolina's Andrew
Cherniwchan one game and fined him an undis-
closed amount after being assessed a major
penalty and game misconduct for kneeing in an
April 20 game against Kalamazoo.


Associated Press
Ai Miyazato watches her drive off the third tee
Saturday in the final round of the LPGA LOTTE Championship
at Ko Olina Golf Club in Kapolei, Hawaii.


Miyazato wins LOTTE


Associated Press

KAPOLEI, Hawaii -
Japan's Ai Miyazato won the
LPGA LOTTE Champi-
onship on Saturday for her
eighth career LPGA Tour
title, birdieing three of the
last six holes for a 2-under
70 and a four-stroke victory
Miyazato finished at 12-
under 276 at wind-swept Ko
Olina. She opened with
rounds of 71, 65 and 70 to
take a three-stroke lead in
the final round.
Meena Lee, ahead early on
the back nine and tied for the
lead after a birdie on No. 15,
had a 70 to tie for second with
Azahara Munoz at 8 under.
Munoz finished with a 70.
The 26-year-old Miyazato
made a 30-foot birdie putt
from the fringe on the 15th
to break a tie with Lee. Lee,
down one playing 18, then hit
her approach into a bunker
and three-putted from 30
feet for double bogey
Miyazato lost the lead
with a bogey on the par-3
12th after her tee shot




TEXAS
Continued from Page B1

stances, that's what I did: I
just focused on my game and
if at the end of 18 holes it's
good enough to win, great,"
Curtis said. "If not, I have to
shake the guy's hand that
won and move forward."
The Texas Open is only
the fourth PGA Tour stop
this year for Curtis, whose
tournament invitations are
no longer a sure thing after
his status plummeted near
the bottom rungs of the tour
Curtis preserved his lead
despite two double bogeys,
including a wayward drive
on the par-5 8th that left the
2003 British Open champion
hitting twice from the adja-
cent fairway Curtis said he
and his caddie decided
there was no other choice
after his tee shot veered left




ORDERS
Continued from Page B1

The second thing that
happens is that we are not
used to running barefoot for
prolonged periods of time.
Therefore, both walking and
running in the sand place a
great deal of stretch or ten-
sion on the not-so-stretchy
Achilles tendon.
The third thing is that
most adults now wear shoes
with elevated heels that ef-
fectively shorten our heel
cords. This results in a
tighter heel cord tendon
and makes it much easier
to sprain, partially tear
or completely rupture the
tissue.
What allows us to jump,
run and walk is the heel
cord that provides the
power needed to be able to
push off. Injury to the heel
cord weakens or does not
allow normal gait, running
or jumping. Achilles tendon
injury severely hampers the
leg power necessary in a
golf or tennis swing or the
push-off needed to propel
your body forward while
running and walking. Even
the calf muscle and tendon
support necessary to pad-


buried in a bunker, the second
straight day she carded a 4 on
the hole. But Lee dropped
back moments later with a
three-putt bogey at 14.
After Miyazato's birdie at
15, she saved par from 8 feet
at 16, then rolled in another
birdie putt from 25 feet at 17
to wrap up her first victory
since the Evian Masters.
Miyazato won after finish-
ing second behind top-ranked
Yani Tseng this year in Thai-
land and Phoenix. It was
Miyazato's fifth top-10 finish
in six events this year, and
her first victory in Hawaii in
nine tries.
After her father gave her
a putting tip following a poor
finish at the Kraft Nabisco
three weeks ago, the 5-foot-1
star needed only 53 putts in
the last two rounds.
Tseng, a three-time win-
ner this year, overcame an
ankle injury early in the
final round to shoot a 74 and
tie for 10th at 4 under. She
has finished in the top 10 in
all seven of her LPGA Tour
starts this year.


and landed under a
mesquite tree, surrounded
by cactus and with no clear
path back toward the hole.
"We were joking that we
were on the second hole for 50
minutes today," Curtis said.
Curtis has some history
on his side: Since 2000, eight
third-round leaders at the
Texas Open have held on to
win.
Every called his round
"scrappy" after he started
the week with a course
record at TPC San Antonio,
where he showed up just
two weeks removed from
ditching his swing instruc-
tor and a new laid-back
stance on practice which
sometimes means not prac-
ticing at all.
He had three bogeys Sat-
urday but was saved by a
couple birdies, including a
10-footer set up by a dead-
on tee shot on the par-3 3rd.
"Overall, not bad," Every


dleboard is lost and painful.
The insidious danger of
the beach is that your heel
cord may not feel the effects
of running or walking until
the next day. My advice is
work up slowly
Thus one has to be aware,
as the beach draws us, to
take care to run and walk on
the beach for shorter peri-
ods initially If heel or heel
cord discomfort or pain
starts, it is time for you to
stop. Put on beach or run-
ning shoes with a slightly el-
evated heel or a heel insert
that is available at any
sports or shoe store.
Be patient. It takes a long
time to recover from
Achilles tendinitis. As far
as Tiger is concerned, it has
been a long and frustrating
recovery. Also, drugs that
enhance performance or
aid in building muscle,
such as human growth hor-
mone, lead to an increased
number of such tendon
problems.
Recovery is extremely
time-consuming, uncomfort-
able and a pain in the heel
cord. Initially the best treat-
ment is the usual ice and
anti-inflammatory
The No. 1 thing to do is
put a heel lift insert into
every shoe you own or wear


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


LPGA-LOTTE
Championship par scores
Saturday at Ko Olina Golf Club Course,
Kapolei, Hawaii, Purse: $1.7 million,
Yardage: 6,421, Par: 72, (a-amateur),
Final Round:
Ai Miyazato, $255,000 71-65-70-70 -276 -12
Meena Lee, $135,444 74-65-71-70 280 -8
Azahara Munoz, $135,44472-64-73-71 280 -8
SoYeon Ryu, $79,508 71-70-69-71-281 -7
Cristie Kerr, $79,508 70-68-71-72-281 -7
Suzann Pettersen, $58,02070-69-74-69 282 -6
Mariajo Udbe, $43,121 77-65-73-68 -283 -5
Brittany Lang, $43,121 69-70-74-70-283 -5
Jiyai Shin, $43,121 69-71-70-73-283 -5
Karen Stupples, $33,522 72-70-73-69-284 -4
Yani Tseng, $33,522 69-72-69-74 284 -4
Pemilla Lindberg, $26,64576-66-75-68 285 -3
a-Hyo Joo Kim 71-71-73-70 -285 -3
Momoko Ueda, $26,645 74-69-70-72-285 -3
KarneWebb, $26,645 71-71-71-72-285 -3
Inbee Park, $26,645 70-70-72-73 285 -3
Angela Stanford, $26,645 69-71-70-75 285 -3
Hee-Won Han, $19,868 76-71-70-69-286 -2
Sophie Gustafson, $19,86871-71-74-70-286 -2
Candle Kung, $19,868 71-74-71-70 -286 -2
Julieta Granada, $19,868 74-70-71-71 -286 -2
Paula Creamer, $19,868 73-67-74-72-- 286 -2
Caroline Hedwall, $19,86873-70-71-72 -286 -2
SunYoungYoo, $19,868 70-73-71-72-286 -2
Alena Sharp, $16,718 73-70-74-70 -287 -1
Haeji Kang, $16,718 74-67-71-75 -287 -1
Lindsey Wight, $14,354 78-69-74-67-288 E
Jessica Shepley, $14,354 75-68-75-70 288 E
Kadn Sjodin, $14,354 74-72-72-70-288 E
Natalie Gulbis, $14,354 75-72-70-71 288 E
Becky Morgan, $14,354 75-70-71-72-288 E
Brittany Lincicome, $14,35470-71-73-74 288 E
Katherine Hull, $12,463 77-70-73-69-289 +1
Sandra Gal, $9,988 73-74-74-69-290 +2
Danah Bordner, $9,988 72-72-74-72-290 +2
Belen Mozo, $9,988 75-70-73-72 290 +2
NaYeon Choi, $9,988 74-68-75-73-290 +2
Amy Yang, $9,988 72-73-72-73 290 +2
Katie Futcher, $9,988 72-72-71-75 290 +2
Lorie Kane, $9,988 73-69-73-75-290 +2
Morgan Pressel, $9,988 72-69-74-75 -290 +2
Kris Tamulis, $9,988 74-68-73-75 290 +2
Jimin Kang, $9,988 72-66-75-77 290 +2
Tiffany Joh, $7,323 75-72-76-68-291 +3
JeeYoung Lee, $7,323 73-70-77-71 291 +3
Lizette Salas, $7,323 76-71-73-71 291 +3
Leta Lindley, $7,323 72-74-72-73 291 +3
You-Na Park, $7,323 73-74-71-73 291 +3
Jessica Korda, $5,974 72-75-74-71 292 +4
Laura Davies, $5,974 75-71-74-72 292 +4
llhee Lee, $5,974 73-74-73-72 292 +4
Giulia Sergas, $5,974 73-73-74-72 292 +4
Eun-Hee Ji, $5,974 73-73-73-73-292 +4
D. Claire Schreefel, $5,97472-74-72-74 292 +4
Anna Nordqvist, $4,814 72-72-78-71-293 +5
Nicole Castrale, 4,814 72-73-76-72-293 +5
Moira Dunn, $4,814 73-74-73-73 293 +5
R. Lee-Bentham, $4,814 73-73-74-73-293 +5
HeeYoung Park, $4,814 78-69-73-73-293 +5
Gerina Piller, $4,814 74-70-76-73 293 +5
Dor Carter, $4,814 74-68-77-74 -293 +5
Chella Choi, $4,169 73-71-77-73-294 +6
Shanshan Feng, $4,169 74-72-74-74-294 +6
Wendy Doolan, $3,954 76-70-75-74 295 +7
Jane Park, $3,954 75-71-75-74 295 +7
Jennie Lee, $3,954 72-73-71-79 295 +7
Mo Martin, $3,696 74-72-78-72 296 +8
Taylor Coutu, $3,696 76-71-76-73-296 +8
Ayaka Kaneko, $3,696 74-72-71-79 296 +8
Sydnee Michaels, $3,481 76-70-74-77 297 +9
Elisa Serramia, $3,481 70-71-78-78-297 +9
Beatiz Recad, $3,396 72-72-74-80-298 +10
Vicky Hurst, $3,352 73-74-76-76-299 +11
Beth Bader, $3,309 68-77-80-79-304 +16


said. "I have a chance to win."
Matt Kuchar, the tourna-
ment's top-ranked player at
No. 15, pulled back into con-
tention with a 67 that was
only marred by a bogey on
the par-4 11th when the
wind rolled his approach off
the green to 21 feet on the
fringe.
"I put myself in position,"
Kuchar said. "Maybe a long
shot, but at least a chance."
Kuchar was tied for sixth
at 3 under along with Greg
Chalmers (69), Brian Gay
(71), Cameron Tringale (76)
and David Mathis (77).
Mathis' tumble was par-
ticularly swift After starting
the day two strokes off the
lead, Mathis sank three
birdies and walked to No. 15
in third place. But he bogeyed
the hole and then made
matters worse on the par-3
16th when his tee shot sail-
ing into a crowded grand-
stand of ducking spectators.


a shoe with an elevated
heel. Women, because they
wear high heels, are very
prone to this injury, but
need to go back into their
heels to recover.
Wearing flip-flops and
sandals will aggravate the
heel cord. Modalities such
as ultrasound and med-
icated topical patches with
anti-inflammatory agents
such as diclofenac (pre-
scription only) are ex-
tremely helpful. These must
be used with the elevated
heel insert.
If surgery is needed for a
complete rupture, the time


for a complete recovery in
terms of regaining normal
pre-injury strength is in ex-
cess of a year, and fre-
quently full strength does
not come back entirely
Don't be a heel be
aware when running on the
beach this summer. Next
week is Dwight Howard's
back and disc problems and
what to do about your back
to stay in the game.


Ron Joseph, M.D., hand
and shoulder orthopedic
specialist at SeaSpine Or-
thopedic Institute, can be
reached at rbjhand@
cox.net or 352-212-5359.


-2
-2
-2
-2
-2





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Frost, Allen share lead in Savannah; Grace on top in China


Westwood at

13 under in

Jakarta

Associated Press
SAVANNAH, Ga. -David
Frost and Michael Allen
birdied nine of the first 13
holes and combined for a 9-
under 63 on Saturday for a
share of the second-round
lead with Tom Purtzer and
Brad Bryant in the Legends
of Golf.
The teams were at 19-
under 125 in the better
event. Bryant and Allen had
65 at The Club at Savannah
Harbor.
The leaders in the 54-hole
Champions Tour event were
one shot ahead of four teams:
Gil Morgan and Tom Kite (61);
Bobby Clampett and Andy
North (62); Jay Haas and
Fred Couples (63); and Jeff
Sluman and Brad Faxon (64).
Six other teams were at 17
under heading into the final
round.
"We had a good time out
there," Allen said about
their bogey-free round. "We
were fighting. It was fun."
Allen, coming off a victory
last week at TPC Tampa
Bay, currently tops the sen-
ior circuit's money list and
leads Bernhard Langer by
157 points in the Schwab
Cup race.


Frost had the hot hand
early, rolling in four birdie
putts on the first seven
holes. When he cooled off,
Allen took over, making
birdies on five of the next
six holes.
"Yeah, it's just nice gener-
ally to just have a good mate
to play out there with," Frost
said. "You know he's going
to come into play when
you're out ... and hopefully
we don't play the same holes
badly That's the only ques-
tion mark out there."
Mark James rolled in a 45-
foot birdie putt from off the
18th green as he and Des
Smyth repeated as champi-
ons of the unofficial 54-hole
Raphael Division title at 19-
under, one stroke better
than two teams: Dennis Wat-
son and Steve Jones, and
Mark McCumber and Wayne
Grady
Earlier in the week, Gibby
Gilbert and J.C. Snead re-
peated as champions of the
54-hole Demaret Division
for players 70 or older.
The Legends was first
played in 1978 in Austin,
Texas, and is considered the
event that launched the 50-
and-over tour. It was all
team play until 2002, but al-
ways unofficial money The
tournament was played in
four cities and on eight
courses before coming to
Savannah in 2003 as an in-
dividual event. It went back
to team play and official
money in 2008.


~- r.~
~
'~-


Associated Press
Gary Boyd of England watches the flight of his shot Saturday during the third round of the
China Open at the Binhai Lake Golf Club in Tianjin, China.


Branden Grace leads by
3 shots at China Open
TIANJIN, China Branden
Grace of South Africa shot an
8-under 64 and has a three-
shot lead after three rounds of
the China Open on Saturday.
The 23-year-old South
African moved to 18-under 198,
three shots ahead of defending
champion Nicolas Colsaerts of
Belgium.
Grace started the third round
one shot off the lead, but
gained four shots in three
holes, sinking a 15-foot eagle
putt on the sixth green.


On a day of light winds and
low scoring, Fabrizio Zanotti of
Paraguay also shot a 64 to
move to 14 under, four strokes
back. Alexander Noren of Swe-
den had a 63 to join four other
players at 13 under.
Grace is looking for his third
victory on the European Tour in
2012 having already won the
Joburg Open and Volvo Golf
Champions tournaments in
South Africa in January.
Grace's confidence is high
after having beaten major win-
ners Retief Goosen and Ernie
Els to win The Champions on a
very similar course at Fancourt


in South Africa.
"I can draw from experience,"
said Grace who had seven
birdies in his round and only
dropped one shot when he
three-putted on the 14th green.
"I am feeling really positive
after getting my first two wins
early in the year and just want-
ing to keep on pushing on from
there. The difference all this
year has been that I have been
holing more putts.
"But this course here in
China is very similar to Fan-
court. It is long has the same
links feeling about it and I am
getting the same feelings."


Colsaerts, trying to defend
the title he won last year and
playing alongside Grace,
started slowly but four birdies
on the back nine allowed him to
shoot a 6-under 66.
Noren's 9-under 63 was the
lowest round of the day. He
was joined at 13 under by
France's Jean Baptiste, who
had held a share of the halfway
lead, but dropped back with a
2-under 70.
The other overnight leader,
Gary Boyd of England, started
his third round by dropping two
shots in three holes. He had a
71 and was six shots behind
Grace.
Westwood holds leads in
rainy Indonesian Masters
JAKARTA, Indonesia De-
fending champion Lee West-
wood birdied two of the first four
holes and moved to 13 under at
the Indonesian Masters on Sat-
urday before lightning and rain
halted the third round.
Zaw Moe of Myanmar was
second at 9 under through four
holes when play was suspended
at the Royale Jakarta Golf Club.
"The suspension stopped a bit
of momentum. But if it is dan-
gerous weather out there then it
is the safest thing to do," West-
wood said. "It is disappointing for
everybody the players, spon-
sors and the spectators. But
this is the nature of the weather
in this part of the world."
The 70 golfers will resume
play early Sunday.


Associated Press
Spain's Rafael Nadal plays a return to Gilles Simon of France on Saturday during their
semifinal match of the Monte Carlo Tennis Masters tournament in Monaco.


Djokovic, Nadal to meet


in Monte Carlo final


Associated Press
MONACO Seven-time defending
champion Rafael Nadal will try to beat
top-ranked Novak Djokovic for the first
time in eight finals when they meet in the
Monte Carlo Masters final on Sunday
Nadal advanced to the final without
dropping a set in a 6-3, 6-4 win over Gilles
Simon, while Djokovic rallied from a set
down to beat Tomas Berdych 4-6, 6-3, 6-2
and reach his second final at Monte Carlo.
"He's the best ever in history of the sport
on this surface. It's an ultimate challenge,"
Djokovic said. "I cannot have ups and
downs. I cannot afford that against Rafa.
But why not believe that I can win?"
Djokovic has beaten the Spaniard in
seven consecutive finals, including the re-
cent Australian Open, and handed Nadal
his only two defeats on clay last year.
"I have everything to win. That's the
only positive thing about losing seven
times," Nadal said.
Overall, Nadal leads their head-to-
heads 16-14 but has not won since a group-
stage match at the 2010 ATP Finals in
London. Nadal has not lost in Monte Carlo
since 2003 he was injured the following
year and has won 41 straight matches
here.


Williams gives US 2-0 lead
against Ukraine
KHARKIV, Ukraine Serena Williams over-
powered Ukrainian teenager Elina Svitolina 6-2,
6-1 to give the United States a 2-0 lead in the
Fed Cup series on Saturday.
In the opening match, American Christina
McHale defeated Lesia Tsurenko 6-1, 4-6, 6-3.
The U.S. needs one victory among the re-
verse singles and doubles on Sunday to return
to the top tier of the Fed Cup group.
Williams is making her first Fed Cup appearance
on foreign soil in more than a decade to help gain
eligibility for the U.S. team at the London Olympics.
The 13-time Grand Slam champion could
seal the U.S. win with a victory over Tsurenko
on Sunday.
Williams only faltered once against the 17-
year-old Svitolina, who managed to reach 2-2 in
the first set after going down an early break.
"It's easier in the Fed Cup, as you have a
coach who can help and encourage to stay fo-
cused," Williams said about U.S. captain Mary
Jo Fernandez.
Williams won four straight games and sealed
the first set with an ace. The 30-year-old
Williams pounced on Svitolina's weak serve in the
second set and closed out the match in one hour.


Allmendinger to start on


pole at Kansas Speedway


Associated Press


KANSAS CITY, Kan. -AJ
Allmendinger rolled off the
track and hopped out of his
car, convinced that he'd put
together a decent qualifying
run but expecting to start
somewhere in the top 15 on
Sunday
Turns out he'll be starting
up front.
Allmendinger captured his
second career Sprint Cup
pole Saturday, turning a lap
of 175.993 mph in his Penske
Racing Dodge to knock Kevin
Harvick off the top spot.
Joey Logano had the third
fastest time but will start at
the rear after changing en-
gines during practice Friday
It was the first pole for
Allmendinger since 2010 at
Phoenix. He nearly had the
pole last month at Bristol but
was edged out by Greg Biffle
by a thousandth of a second.
"I didn't think the lap was
amazing. I thought it was
OK," said Allmendinger,
who learned his lap time
from crew chief Todd Gor-
don moments later and
couldn't help but smile.
Logano went off first in
qualifying and posted a lap
of 175.724 mph, then
watched as car after car
failed to touch his time. It
wasn't until Harvick turned
a lap of 175.747 that Logano
was finally bumped.
"We'll shotgun the field,"
Logano said. "It's like the
old short-track days. Didn't
they pay you more if you
started at the back and you
passed them all?
"I'll have to talk to
NASCAR about that."
Denny Hamlin posted the


Associated Press
AJ Allmendinger takes a lap Saturday during qualifying for
the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series race at Kansas Speedway in
Kansas City, Kan. Allmendinger won the pole position for


Sunday's race.
fourth-fastest lap, followed
by Mark Martin and Martin
Truex Jr.
Dale Earnhardt Jr. quali-
fied seventh for Hendrick
Motorsports, which is trying
to an end a 13-race drought
and reach milestone win
No. 200. The team hasn't
reached Victory Lane since
Jimmie Johnson's win at
Kansas last October, the
longest winless stretch since
the 2002 and '03 seasons.
Johnson qualified 15th
after going sideways in
Turns 1 and 2.
Local favorite Clint
Bowyer who is from Em-
poria, Kan., and raced on
the dirt track at nearby
Lakeside Speedway qual-
ified eighth. Kasey Kahne
was ninth and Sam Hornish
Jr was 10th.

Buescher wins
Trucks race
KANSAS CITY, Kan. James
Buescher finally got a chance to
drive his truck into Victory Lane.
Those second-place finishes
were getting a little old.


The 22-year-old Buescher
passed Brad Keselowski with 10
laps remaining Saturday at Kansas
Speedway, and then pulled
away to win for the first time in
76 tries in the Trucks series.
"I can't even count the number
of times we finished second,"
Buescher said. "We've had a lot
of second-place finishes, but
we finally got the win."
Buescher won his first
NASCAR race in the Nationwide
series at Daytona earlier this
season, but hadn't been able to
break through in the Trucks se-
ries, despite four runner-up
runs including last weekend
at Rockingham, where his
teammate Kasey Kahne won
for Turner Motorsports.
"Two weeks in a row is defi-
nitely something to be proud
of," Buescher said.
Buescher came into weekend
fourth in points and leaves in
second, just four behind Timo-
thy Peters, who also got around
Keselowski down the stretch to
finish second at Kansas.
Nelson Piquet Jr. finished fourth
and Todd Bodine was fifth.


ATLittle Srt6nPark
Little SDrlnas Park


Join the Crystal River
Tree Board for the

1st annual

Arbor Day

Tree-Give-Away.


Come Get Yours!

April 28th 11am-1 pi
Live Entertainment Featuring Lc
Refreshments by Calypso Conces

Clowns for Kids
FUN! FUN! FUN!


le Lyons
ns, Inc.


*zello
Adventure Race
Kayaking Bicycling Running I

Saturday April 28th, 2012
Starts: Pirates Cove Boat Ramp
Ozello Trail (County Rd. 494)
10 miles west of US 19 between Homosassa & Crystal River

^^Kayaking 1.5 miles

^^^Bicycling 7 mile

^^Running 2miles^


You can request an application form or
register online at www.OzelloAdventureRace.com
Barry Schwartz Race Director 352-795-4780
YOU ARE INVITED TO COMPETE IF YOU ARE
14 YEARS OR OLDER & PHYSICALLY FIT
Awards: Overall best times in team category & for individuals in age/gender classes.
The u0:ell,';, Ad v.:riurev Race
will provide scholarships to
i high school students. __JL _


SCitrus County Gator Club
Annual Scholarship Scramble
May 5, 2012
Shotgun Start 9:00 am

World Woods Golf Club Pine Barrens Course
All proceeds benefit the Citrus County
Gator Club,-, Scholarship Fund!
Chances to Win: Hole-In-One:
1st 3rd Team Cash Prizes 2012 GMC Canyon Truck
Closest to the Pin 2012 GMC
Longest Drive Male Donated by:
Longest Drive Female Eagle Buick GMC, Inc

S65 per person $260 per team $50 Hole Sponsorshipl
Orange & Blue Sponsor Foursome & Hole Sponsorship 1300.

SLunch is provided Cash Beverage Cart on Course
50/50 & Mulligan's available on Course
Goody Bags for every golfer!
Deadline for Entry and Sponsorship:
April 25, 2012
Register early
THE FIELD IS LIMITED!!!
j S Inquiries: Melanie Strickland
m OOtnL cell (352) 697-1499
GATOR email: ccgcgoll@gmail corn
Download registration form at
http://citruscounty.gatorclub.com
C IIOr( 1I The Citrus County Gator Clubo
N.M is a 501 C3 Tax Exempt Organization


SUNDAY, APRIL 22, 2012 B5


?
I












ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE

Unauthorized bio
spills secrets
LONDON -He gets
colonic irrigation, Botox
injections and vitamin
drips, and
Insists on
black toi-
let paper
in his
home.
A re-
vealing
new biog-
Simon raphy of-
Cowell fers
intimate
- some might say too in-
timate details about
Simon Cowell, along with
a portrait of the enter-
tainment mogul's savvy
business side.
"Sweet Revenge: The
Intimate Life of Simon
Cowell" is written by
British journalist and bi-
ographer Tom Bower,
whose previous subjects
include former British
Prime Minister Gordon
Brown, jailed media
mogul Conrad Black and
ex-Harrods owner Mo-
hammad al-Fayed.
His latest portrait of
power centers on the
tanned and brush-cut
Cowell, 52, who has
gained fame in both
Britain and North Amer-
ica as producer and an
acerbic judge on TV tal-
ent shows including "The
X Factor" and "America's
Got Talent."
The book paints a pic-
ture of a man who strug-
gled for years in the
music business, spurred
on to success out of a de-
sire to prove his detrac-
tors wrong.
"He had 20 years -
more than 20 years of
humiliation," Bower said.
"At school he was a
total failure and as a
music producer he was a
total failure. But what he
did have was charm and
an ability to understand
the music business be-
cause of all this failure."
"Sweet Revenge," pub-
lished in the U.S. by Bal-
lantine Books on
Tuesday, is billed as the
first book about Cowell
written with the mogul's
participation though
not his authorization.
Bower spent many hours
with Cowell. Cowell has
stressed that the book
was not written with his
approval, tweeting: "This
book is not written by me.
It is unauthorized. The
writer is Tom Bower"


Taylor Hicks to
get Vegas show
LAS VEGAS -'Ameri-
can Idol" Season 5 win-
ner Taylor Hicks is

his own
short-
term
show on
the Las
Vegas
Strip.
Casino
Taylor officials
Hicks an-
nounced
the Alabama native will
headline an eight-week
show at Bally's Las Vegas
beginning June 26.
The singer's show in
Las Vegas is a return to
where his winning run
began in 2005.
He's the first "Ameri-
can Idol" winner or final-
ist to secure a Las Vegas
residency
-From wire reports


Enduring appeal


NYCphoto exhibit

captures Warhol

as young artist

Associated Press

NEW YORK-Andy Warhol once
predicted 15 minutes of fame for
everyone.
But 25 years after his death, the
pop artist's reputation and impact
on the contemporary art world
show no signs of fading. His iconic
images of everyday consumer ob-
jects and celebrities consistently
command high prices and draw en-
thusiastic crowds to museum and
gallery shows.
But before he catapulted onto the
world stage, the young artist was al-
ready producing some of his most
iconic pieces. In a new exhibition,
Warhol is captured in photographs
at the very cusp of the pop art
movement.
"Before They Were Famous: Be-
hind the Lens of William John
Kennedy," at the Site/109 gallery in
lower Manhattan, features rare
shots of Warhol and artist Robert
Indiana posing together with what
were soon to become their most cel-
ebrated works Warhol's "Mari-
lyn" and Indiana's "LOVE" logo.
Kennedy, a freelance photogra-
pher when the photos were taken,
had nearly forgotten about them
and only rediscovered the images
several years ago in a "beat-up
cardboard box" while sorting
through his archive, he said.
He took them when Warhol "was
a known entity but had not yet ex-
ploded on the scene," said Eric
Shiner, director of the Warhol Mu-
seum, located in Warhol's home-
town of Pittsburgh. "They capture
Andy both in production mode and
also having fun mode."
The 82-year-old photographer,
who lives in Miami Beach, Fla., said
he set out to record "the rising stars
of the new movement in pop art."
He sensed immediately that Warhol
would become "a giant in the in-
dustry" but said he "was amazed to
meet this very withdrawn and taci-
turn man."
Among his favorite photographs
is one of the pop icon working at his
Manhattan studio, The Factory
"Piled up in the corner were 50-
75 sheets of acetate. Andy said
'Those are proofs of my work,"'
Kennedy recalled. As he unrolled
one, "there's this huge face of Mar-
ilyn Monroe a transparent proof
of his silkscreens."
He had Warhol hold it up in front
of him, creating a portrait within a
portrait.
In another image, the photogra-
pher posed Warhol with one of his
early flower paintings standing in a
field of black-eyed Susans, located
in a most unlikely spot an indus-
trial section of the Flushing neigh-
borhood in New York City's Queens
borough.
These and about 50 other silver
gelatin prints of Warhol and some
30 of Indiana capture the artists in


Associated Press
In this 1964 photo provided by Allen Cooper Enterprises, artist Andy Warhol
stands in a field of Black-Eyed Susans in New York. The image will be fea-
tured in an exhibit entitled: "Before They Were Famous: Behind the Lens of
William John Kennedy," which opened April 19 at the Site/109 gallery in
New York.


their studios, relaxing, editing,
painting and chatting on the phone.
The works presented by the
Miami-based publishing house
Kiwi Arts Group are shown
alongside some of the artists' origi-
nal works.
Kennedy shot hundreds of im-
ages of the artists; 100 will be
placed in the permanent collection
of the Warhol Museum.
The exhibition, which runs
through May 29, also includes a 40-
minute documentary film featuring
people still living who were in-
volved with Warhol, including such
Warhol superstars as Ultra Violet
and Taylor Mead.
"What's great is all these people
are in their 80s. We were able to cap-
ture them in this juncture about a pe-
riod that was almost lost in the early
1960s at such a monumental, pivotal
point in the pop art movement," said
Kiwi Arts founder Mike Huter
Warhol, who used every available
medium to create his brand of im-
agery, died in 1987 at the age of 58.
His output was prolific.
"If you amass all the sales of
Warhols, he is by far the most sold
... in the art world" today, said Alex
Rotter, Sotheby's pop art expert,
adding that Warhol began attracting
museums and collectors in a big


way in the 1980s.
The current auction record for a
Warhol is $71.7 million. Privately,
one of his works has sold for more
than $100 million.
The show at the Site/109 gallery is
just one of many current or planned
Warhol exhibitions around the
world.
A major Warhol retrospective is
now on a five-city tour of Asia. After
it concludes in Tokyo in 2014, it may
travel to New York, Mexico City and
possibly Istanbul, said Shiner
During New York's Frieze Art
Fair next month, the Warhol Mu-
seum will show some 20 Warhol Po-
laroids alongside those by Jeremy
Kost, a young New York artist who
works under the rubric of the great
pop artist. And Affirmation Art, a
nonprofit art space in Manhattan, is
showing 50 Warhol photographs,
eight of which have never been
seen outside the Warhol Museum.
But the showstopper will be a
major exhibition at the Metropoli-
tan Museum of Art titled "Regard-
ing Warhol: 50 Artists, 50 Years."
Scheduled to open in September
and travel to Pittsburgh in 2013, "it
will be a blockbuster exhibition
showing how deeply entrenched
Warhol is in contemporary art,"
Shiner said.


TV game-changer Fox marks 25th year Sunday


Associated Press


LOS ANGELES Televi-
sion networks are masters
of self-promotion, so it's no
surprise that Fox is carving
out two prime-time hours
Sunday to celebrate its 25th
year
But why quibble over the
hoopla planned for the 8 to
10 p.m. showcase? With
Ryan Seacrest as ringmas-
ter, let's give a shout-out to
the stars of "Married ... With
Children," "The X Files,"
"In Living Color," "Ally
McBeal," "Beverly Hills,


Birthday: Your ingenuity will be substantially heightened in
the year ahead, but it will be up to you to recognize this tal-
ent and take advantage of it. Believe in yourself, because
you are better equipped than you think to accomplish much
in life.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Take a deep breath and re-
think that matter you've been pondering. Give yourself all
the time you need to figure out exactly what you want to do
and how you want to do it.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) It's a good day to contact a
person whom you recently met and would like to get to
know better. People in general are in a friendly mood and
will itching to mingle.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Something you've been com-
peting with others for will make a shift that is likely to favor
you. Be prepared to make your move when you see this.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Many bright ideas for improving


90210," "House" and "24."
And, in center stage, the
enduring "The Simpsons"
and TV's great game-
changer, "American Idol,"
are taking a bow.
It's an impressive show-
ing for a network that's less
than half the age of com-
petitors NBC, CBS and ABC.
As analyst Brad Adgate of
Horizon Media sees it, Fox
hasn't just met expectations,
"it's exceeded them."
"Of the major networks,
it's the only one that can
bring in younger audiences
on a regular basis," Adgate


Today's HOROSCOPE
your financial position are likely to come to you in a rush.
Sort out your thinking so that you can take advantage of
the best ones.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Provided you know whom to
go to and what questions to ask, you can attain certain in-
formation critical to your interests. Make sure your game
plan is firmly in place.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Someone who hasn't always
been in your corner in the past might now want to back you
up. Even if you suspect an ulterior motive, take him or her
up on the offer.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) By being a bit adventurous
and resourceful, you can advance certain personal ambi-
tions. However, discard what hasn't worked before trying
something new.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) If you're on your toes and
have a weather eye open, a unique career opportunity will


said. "They have brought out
some breakthrough shows...
They've really done things
that the other three net-
works wouldn't have done
with their programming."
From a modest October
1986 debut with "The Late
Show Starring Joan Rivers"
and its first night of prime-
time programming in April
1987, Fox weathered indus-
try skepticism and midlife
crisis ("Who Wants to Marry
a Multi-Millionaire?" and
other groaners) to make its
case for survival and success.
Fox proved that, yes, there


was room for a fourth U.S.
broadcast network, three
decades after Dumont dis-
solved in 1955 and left the
Big Three networks to slice
up an increasingly rich pie.
That success turned com-
petitors into copycats, ex-
tending Fox's influence
across the medium. The net-
work's creation was "a real
trial by fire for all of us,"
said Garth Ancier, Fox's in-
augural programming chief.
"My mentor at NBC, Bran-
don Tartikoff, thought I was
crazy, and he was probably
right."


present itself. It could happen via a chance encounter at a
social gathering.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Utilize your ingenuity and a
matter of significance can be satisfactorily finalized. The
answer lies within certain ideas of yours that you've been
afraid to try.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Some extremely valuable
information might come your way via two people discussing
it in front of you who will be using what they think is their
private code. You'll know how to crack it.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) More than one financial op-
portunity is likely to be hovering about you, but you must be
alert. Those around you might suggest several potentially
profitable ventures. Pay attention.
Aries (March 21-April 19)-- Don't hesitate even a minute
to put some of your brightest ideas to work for you. Your
concepts are clever and your thinking is sharper than usual.


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

FRIDAY, APRIL 20
Mega Money: 8 11 39 43
Mega Ball: 13
4-of-4 MB 2 winners $550,000
4-of-4 7 $1,073.50
3-of-4 MB 36 $457.50
3-of-4 860 $57
2-of-4 MB 1,395 $24.50
1-of-4 MB 12,644 $2.50
2-of-4 28,032 $2
Fantasy 5:10 12 16 33 36
5-of-5 1 winner $254,806.05
4-of-5 278 $147.50
3-of-5 10,283 $11
THURSDAY, APRIL 19
Fantasy 5:2 12 18 19 20
5-of-5 2 winners $115,006.90
4-of-5 439 $84.50
3-of-5 12,008 $8.50
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 18
Powerball: 20 22 39 46 49
Powerball: 29
5-of-5 PB No winner
5-of-5 3 winners $1 million
1 Florida winner

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num-
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call 850-487-7777.

Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, April 22,
the 113th day of 2012. There
are 253 days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On April 22, 1912, the
United States Chamber of
Commerce had its begin-
nings with a National Com-
mercial Conference held in
Washington, D.C., at the be-
hest of President William
Howard Taft.
On this date:
In 1864, Congress author-
ized the use of the phrase "In
God We Trust" on U.S. coins.
In 1889, the Oklahoma
Land Rush began at noon as
thousands of homesteaders
staked claims.
In 1952, an atomic test in
Nevada became the first nu-
clear explosion shown on live
network television as a 31-
kiloton bomb was dropped
from a B-50 Superfortress.
In 1994, Richard M. Nixon,
the 37th president of the
United States, died at a New
York hospital four days after
suffering a stroke; he was 81.
Ten years ago: Actor
Robert Blake was charged
with murder, solicitation of
murder and conspiracy in the
shooting death of his wife,
Bonny Lee Bakley, outside a
Los Angeles restaurant;
Blake's bodyguard, Earle
Caldwell, was charged with
conspiracy to commit murder;
both men pleaded not guilty.
(Both were acquitted at crimi-
nal trial; Blake was later
found liable in a civil trial.)
Five years ago: In the first
round of the French presi-
dential election, conservative
Nicolas Sarkozy and Socialist
rival Segolene Royal re-
ceived enough votes to ad-
vance to a runoff, which
Sarkozy won.
One year ago: Pope
Benedict XVI consoled a 7-
year-old Japanese girl, reas-
sured a mother about her
ailing son's soul and advised
a Muslim woman that dia-
logue was the way to peace
in Ivory Coast during an un-
usual, pre-recorded Good Fri-
day appearance on Italian TV.
Today's Birthdays: Actor
George Cole is 87. Actress
Charlotte Rae is 86. Actress
Estelle Harris is 80. Singer
Glen Campbell is 76. Actor
Jack Nicholson is 75. Singer
Mel Carter is 69. Author
Janet Evanovich is 69. Coun-
try singer Cleve Francis is
67. Movie director John Wa-


ters is 66. Singer Peter
Frampton is 62.
Thought for Today: "It is
ideas, not vested interests,
which are dangerous for
good or evil." John May-
nard Keynes, British econo-
mist (1883-1946).











COMMENTARY


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Little
Tommy Tucker
teaches about
the ugly side
of smoking.
/Page C4


Not in their back yards?


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


Special to the Chronicle
Magnolia Springs is a popular gathering place for manatees. Many of those involved with the preservation of the Three Sisters Springs prop-
erty oppose efforts by area residents to prohibit viewing platforms overlooking Magnolia Springs, based on privacy concerns.


Group contends manatee viewing areas essential to


JAMES L. GREEN
Special to the Chronicle

City Council saw the availability of
the Three Sisters Springs property
as a tremendous opportunity to
both save a natural wonder and to ensure
the financial security of the city for genera-
tions to come. The city council became a
partner in the coalition that emerged to
raise funds to buy the property.
As a result of this visionary action by the
city council, and an appropriation of
$100,000 toward the purchase, the city is a
principal in the shared ownership of this fa-
cility Other major partners include our fel-
low Florida citizens, who contributed more
than $6 million through a grant administered
by the Florida Community Trust (FCT), $2
million through the Southwest Florida Water
Management District (SWFWMD) and an ad-
ditional $2 million from the local Felburn
Foundation. Other substantial funds came
from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
(FWS), local civic and private organizations
and thousands of contributions from private
citizens. Combined, they allowed the pur-
chase of this $11 million asset.
It was agreed that the property would be
operated as part of the Crystal River Na-
tional Wildlife Refuge, with the land being
held jointly by the city of Crystal River and
SWFWMD. To ensure that the interests of
Florida citizens are fairly and fully consid-
ered in the use of the facility, the FCT re-
quired the city to follow a development plan
in its set-up and operation, and that the city
periodically report back to FCT
Currently the development portion of the
plan is being pursued to allow opening the
refuge to its new owners our fellow citi-
zens as quickly as possible. The council
has wisely held workshops to allow neigh-
bors of the new refuge area to make sugges-
tions on ways to establish the facility with


Magnolia Springs is in a canal to the west of ti

The landowners, stating
that they do not want
visitors looking at their
houses from the refuge,
assert that the viewing
areas will unacceptably
violate their privacy.

minimum adverse impact on those living
near the property Several changes have re-
sulted from these meetings, including the
substitution of an alternative feature within
the refuge for a kayak landing, which
nearby homeowners feared might present a
safety hazard.
It now appears an issue has arisen over
which there is serious disagreement and, if


Three Sisters project


Google Maps/Chronicle illustration
he Three Sisters property.
not equitably resolved, could jeopardize the
entire project. A handful of homeowners
living across the canal from that portion of
the refuge bordering Magnolia Springs is
opposed to proposed ground-level manatee
viewing areas on the Three Sisters Springs
property. The areas would allow refuge visi-
tors to view the large number of manatees
in this part of the canal during the winter
months. During these months, the canal is
closed to navigation to protect the mana-
tees, except for those homeowners who live
bordering the property who may continue to
use their boats. The result is that the canal
becomes a private lagoon for manatees and
those homeowners.
The landowners, stating that they do not
want visitors looking at their houses from
the refuge, assert that the viewing areas will
unacceptably violate their privacy Access to

See Page C4


Peter Hagan: A lesson in leadership


My favorite book is "A Land
Remembered." (Patrick D.
Smith, published 1984 by
Pineapple Press) In addi-
tion to being a wonderful
story, it is steeped in
Florida history Many of
us who make Florida our
home come from outside
her boundaries, so we
don't really know much ,
about her history It's a
shame because we can
learn so much from
events that occurred in Paula
the past. FLOI
A powerful new book, VOI
"Age of Barbarity: The
Forgotten Fight for the
Soul of Florida," is about a period in
our state's history no one talks much
about. The author, Billy Townsend,
is a fellow Lakelander and former
reporter for several Florida news-
papers. The book focuses on what
Townsend calls the "near civil war"
that swept Florida between 1915
and 1930, in the aftermath of World
War I and Prohibition.
One of the key characters is Sher-
iff Peter Hagan of Putnam County, a


D


small county between Gainesville
and St. Augustine. Its largest city is
Palatka. Hagan was elected sheriff
in 1916, and between
1919 and 1923, he
stopped three attempts
to lynch black men. In
r__ the third attempt, a mob
of white men from
Gainesville shot more
-, than a dozen bullets into
the Putnam County jail.
They wounded Hagan in
the hand and nearly hit
)ockery his wife and daughter,
I DA who lived with him in the
CES jail.
According to
Townsend, Florida was
the American capital of lynching in
1923, and its mobs rarely went away
without their targets. But Peter
Hagan sent this mob home defeated
after fierce hand-to-hand combat
and exchanges of gunfire.
About a year later, however, not
long after he released a statement
declaring his opposition to the Ku
Klux Klan, the people of Putnam
County voted Hagan out of office.
His defeat allowed the Klan to take


over as Putnam County's governing
force. And it unleashed anti-liquor,
anti-black and anti-Catholic mobs.
Between 1924 and 1928, more than
70 men and women, black and white,
were abducted and savagely beaten
by Klan mobs. At least four people,
black and white, were killed.
It did not end until Hagan re-
turned to the political scene. He ran
for sheriff again in 1928, emphasiz-
ing his record of defending all peo-
ple and preserving law and order.
He won a narrow victory by
fewer than 60 votes in the Demo-
cratic primary This election,
Townsend argues, is one of the most
significant and little-known elec-
tions in Florida history
It ended the chronic mob vio-
lence in Putnam County and dealt a
major blow to the Klan's ambitions
of openly governing. Hagan died in
office in 1930 from what appears to
be a stroke. He lies buried next to
his daughter Gertrude his only
child and wife Sallie, in a tiny,
virtually unmarked, grave in a
Palatka cemetery
We politicians can learn some-
thing from Peter Hagan's example.


The first is that doing the right thing
often comes with personal and po-
litical consequences. Hagan bled
and then lost an election to do his
job. What have any of us in Florida's
legislature done to honor that
standard?
More importantly, not every de-
feat is permanent. Sheriff Hagan
stuck to his guns. He ran on his
record of fighting mobs and the
equal protection of all people,
which was hard to imagine in 1928.
He didn't change who he was or
reinvent himself. He gave the peo-
ple who elected and then unelected
him a chance to realize their mis-
takes. He believed in them. And
they rewarded him with their votes.
There are lessons to be learned
from Florida's rich history and the
brave and honorable leadership of
people like Sheriff Peter Hagan.

Paula Dockeryis a term-limited
Republican senator from Lakeland
who is chronicling her final year in
the Florida Senate. She can be
reached atpdockery@
florida voices. com.


Some


of the


things I


believe in
After living in Citrus
County for a very
long time, there are
things I believe to be true.
These beliefs are my opin-
ion, which make them
truths to me but maybe
not to you.
I believe Citrus
County is one of the most
beautiful places in all of
Florida. We are natural
Florida. We have springs
and lakes and swamps
and beautiful vistas. We
have open fields, and
miles of forests and a
coastline that is still ruled
by the dolphins, mana-
tees, birds and palm trees.
In a temperamental fit of
trying to be what we are
not, we tried and failed to
make a sandy white beach
on the Gulf of Mexico. We
discovered that man can-
not make a beautiful
sandy beach, only God can
make that happen.
I believe Citrus
County has more cranky
people per square mile
than any other county in
Florida. I believe I have
spoken to most of them.
I believe that along
County Road 48, under
the oak trees in Floral
City, is one of the most
beautiful places to live.
I believe we have
knocked down too many of
our old Victorian homes
in Citrus County and re-
placed them with busi-
nesses. We came to the
historical preservation
party very late, but we are
catching up in Inverness,
Crystal River and Floral
City
M I believe we have very
good schools in Citrus
County because we have
good people working in
them and because we
have parents who under-
stand the importance of a
strong education. I also
feel we still believe in dis-
cipline in our schools and
we have not yet become
wimpy bureaucrats afraid
to draw the line of what is
acceptable.
I believe I am the last
driver in Citrus County
who still uses a blinker
when I make a turn in my
car. I believe there must
be a solar disturbance
that stops the blinkers on
all the other cars from
working.
I believe one of the
worst decisions ever
made in Citrus County
was to block the Cleveland
Indians from building a
spring training facility in
Hernando.
I believe one of the
best decisions ever made
in Citrus County was to
block the construction of
10-story, time-share con-
dominiums out at Fort Is-
land Gulf Beach west of
Crystal River.
I believe that Chief
Osceola lived in Citrus
County in the cove of the
Withlacoochee and he
brought together a band of
Indians and escaped
slaves and out-witted
American soldiers for
years. I partially believe
the story that his where-
abouts were unknown
until he changed the loca-
tion of his camp and Cit-
rus County government
forced him to file for a
change-of-use permit and
he could not afford the
county fee, so he agreed to


Page C3







Page C2 -SUNDAY, APRIL 22, 2012



PINION


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan............. .................. publisher
H Charlie Brennan ............... .................. editor
Mike Arnold ............. .................. HR director
Sandra Frederick....................... managing editor
J Curt Ebitz............... .............. citizen member
Founded Mac Harris ........ .................. citizen member
by Albert M.
Williamson Rebecca Martin ...........................guest member
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


TALKING TURKEYS




Cuts to Citrus



projects hurt,



but understood


F lorida TaxWatch re-
vealed its latest list of
"turkeys" in Florida's
state budget and Gov. Rick
Scott was listening, which
leaves us with mixed emotions.
Florida TaxWatch, a private,
nonprofit, nonpartisan re-
search institute
that serves as a
watchdog of tax THE IS
dollars, provides Gov. Sco
valuable input on "turkeys
wasteful spend- bud
ing; but what it
classifies as
turkeys don't al- OUR O0
ways fit the label. Highway s
A Florida enviror
TaxWatch turkey initiative
is a legislative worthy o
project that has
not undergone
public review before being
placed into the budget. The
Florida Legislature estab-
lishes policies and procedures
that limit these practices in
order to appear accountable.
Two of the projects vetoed by
Gov. Scott were Citrus County
projects: $100,000 for cleaning
up King's Bay and $200,000 for
a traffic signal at Meadowcrest
Boulevard and State Road 44.
There is no argument that
any item placed into the
budget without proper public
review should be removed, de-
spite our dismay to see these
two projects disappear More-
over, we applaud Gov. Scott's
efforts to clean up the process.


S
Ot



P

S11
'e
f


He vetoed $142.7 million in
funding requests from this
year's budget.
Our complaint is that the gov-
ernor and his staff should be
scrutinizing all projects in the
budget. There are many other
projects that follow the proper
policies and pro-
cedures but do not
;SUE: have the same
:t vetoes merit as the
in state King's Bay
get. cleanup project-
for example, set-
I|NION: ting aside money
INION: to randomly drug
afety and test state employ-
mental ees and welfare
Es were recipients.
funding. Because of the
way Tallahassee
works, with leg-
islative members trading fa-
vors and votes for each other's
projects, a project may still be
a turkey even if the proper pro-
tocols are followed. Therefore,
it is incumbent upon the gover-
nor as the final steward of our
tax dollars to strike the unde-
serving pet projects from the
budget.
We're certain a budget of
more than $70 billion con-
tained more than $142 million
in bad choices.
While we are disappointed to
see our projects vetoed, we are
encouraged by Gov. Scott's con-
cern for following procedures
and urge him to look deeper
when vetting the budget.


Hot Corner: VETO


Spending cuts OK
I'm glad Gov. Scott vetoed some
spending. That's what needs to
happen on a federal level. King's
Bay cleanup I know everybody
wants it, but this was created by
private citizens with their fertilizer
and it can be cleaned up by pri-
vate citizens. Groups are doing it
all the time. Government needs to
get out of all these things that are
not security, infrastructure. I'm
sorry about the light, but they
could get by without it. Or they
could put a light up somehow
themselves in Meadowcrest. I'm
glad he vetoed. The budget needs
to be trimmed down all across the
country.
TaxWatch blinked
I see where TaxWatch has de-


Great workshops
Thank you for the front-page ar-
ticle about the Outdoors
Woman Program in the
Ocala National Forest two 0
weeks ago. I have been a
volunteer instructor for 10
years and live in Meadow-
crest. The workshops have
been truly positive, life-
changing experiences for
all the women who attend.
So check out the FWC CAL
website and come enjoy 563
the beautiful world of the
outdoors. Thanks for a
good Chronicle article.

Dental clinic
I see your piece in the paper
that a man who was a veteran and
he wanted dental help and he
said he was on Social Security


cared the Meadowcrest traffic
light and the cleanup of King's
Bay as turkeys and it's been ve-
toed by the governor. I just won-
der where this outfit was when the
biggest turkey of them all, the Taj
Mahal project, was being done.
We didn't hear anything from
them then.
Snubs Citrus County
All you Citrus County Republi-
cans who voted for Scott for gov-
ernor, are you happy now? He just
vetoed two items that (are) very,
very important to Citrus County.
Read your paper and you will see
it. Although he did allow money
for a rowing club in Sarasota for
the rich. That's the kind of guy
you put in office. We're going to
have to suffer with him for about
four and a half more years.


and didn't have any money and he
wants to know about the dental
help. Well, our church association,
the Nature Coast Baptist
UND Association, at, let's see
now, 726-7799 is the
Np telephone number. If he
EE calls them and, well, first
of all, before he calls
them, he's got to go to
the health clinic there
across from Sweetbay in
k Inverness if he lives in
Inverness. He goes there
0579 and then when he gets
the papers and he fills
them out and he holds
onto them. He needs to pick up
paperwork now. Then, the first
week of May, he takes it to the
health clinic at 936 (U.S.) 41
South, Inverness. In June, they
will do free dental work via a mo-
bile dental clinic.


"Adversity is the trial of principle.
Without it a man hardly knows
whether he is honest or not."
Hanry Fielding, 1707-1754


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Cruel and unusual a test case


In the summer of 1787, just 94
years after the Salem witch
trials, as paragons of the En-
lightenment such as James Madi-
son, George Washington and
Benjamin Franklin de-
liberated in the Con-
stitutional Convention
in Philadelphia, a mob
pelted and otherwise
tormented to death a
woman accused of
being a witch. Prose- /
cution of alleged
witches, writes histo- ,
rian Edmund Morgan,
had ceased in the Georg
colonies long before OTI
the English statute VOl
criminalizing witch-
craft was repealed in
1736. Some popular sentiment,
however, lagged.
Today, 221 years after the Bill
of Rights was added to the Con-
stitution, the Supreme Court is
again pondering the Eighth
Amendment's proscription of
"cruel and unusual punish-
ments." The case illustrates the
complexity of construing some
constitutional language in chang-
ing contexts of social science and
brain science.
Evan Miller, whose five suicide
attempts surely had something to
do with the serious domestic
abuse he suffered, was complicit
in a brutal murder and in 2006
was sentenced to life in an Ala-
bama prison without the possibil-
ity of parole. Kuntrell Jackson
was involved in a video store rob-
bery during which an accomplice
fatally shot the store clerk. In
2003, Jackson was sentenced to
life in an Arkansas prison with-
out the possibility of parole.
Miller and Jackson were 14 when
they committed their crimes.
Both were tried as adults before
judges who had no discretion to
impose any other sentence. Such
mandatory sentences preclude
judges weighing a consideration
of Eighth Amendment jurispru-
dence proportionality.
Before its June 26 recess, the
Supreme Court will decide


I









ic


whether sentencing children to
die in prison is cruel. It certainly
is unusual: Although 2,300 cur-
rent prisoners have been sen-
tenced to life without parole for
crimes committed as
juveniles (age 17 or
younger), just 79 pris-
oners in 18 states are
serving sentences of
life without parole for
crimes committed
when they were 13 or
14.
/ The court must con-
sider not only what is
e Will society's sense of cru-
IER elty, but also how that
DES sense should be
shaped by what some
new technologies re-
veal about adolescent brain biol-
ogy. Shakespeare's shepherd in
"The Winter's Tale" did not need
to see brain scans in order to
wish that "there were no age be-
tween ten and three-and-twenty,
or that youth would sleep out the
rest; for there is nothing in the
between but getting wenches
with child, wronging the ancien-
try, stealing, fighting."
And with age-related laws re-
stricting the right to drink, drive,
marry, serve on juries, etc., all
American states have long ac-
knowledged adolescents' devel-
opmental shortcomings.
Neuroscience, however, now
helps explain why aspects of ado-
lescents' brains make young peo-
ple susceptible to impulsive
behavior, and to failing to antici-
pate and understand the conse-
quences of it.
Without opening the floodgates
to "excuse abuse," the Supreme
Court has accommodated what
science teaches. In 2005, the
court proscribed imposing the
death penalty on someone who
committed a murder as a juve-
nile, arguing that "the suscepti-
bility of juveniles to immature
and irresponsible behavior" can
diminish the reprehensible na-
ture of their crimes.
In 2010, the court proscribed
sentences of life without parole


MAeEWWS


LETTER X to the Editor


Smith's record
Recent articles and an edito-
rial in the Chronicle have dis-
cussed state Rep. Jimmie
Smith's interest in purposing a
bill that would require our
elected school boards to contract
with private companies to trans-
port schoolchildren. He has not
shown any strong push by the
elected school boards, so what is
his motivation?
Privatization has its place. If
there is a need, a large pool of
possible bidders, it's cost-effec-
tive and it does not create more
low-paying, no-benefit jobs. In
addition, would the employees
be held to the same standards as
current ones, including back-
ground checks?
Working for the Department of
Juvenile Justice, I saw firsthand
how the private sector worked in
several juvenile commitment
programs. They hired minimum-
wage people with limited train-
ing, and the department dealt
with the many problems. Jeb
Bush privatized the food service
for detention centers. Unfortu-
nately, there was only one bid-


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in Chroni-
cle editorials are the opinions of
the newspaper's editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Groups or individuals are invited
to express their opinions in a let-
ter to the editor.
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at 352-563-5660.
All letters must be signed and in-
clude a phone number and home-
town, including letters sent via
email. Names and hometowns will
be printed; phone numbers will
not be published or given out.
We reserve the right to edit let-
ters for length, libel, fairness and
good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
350 words, and writers will be
limited to three letters per month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to
352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

der, which left after a few years,
forcing the department to recre-


ate its food service operation
again while still feeding three
meals a day to hundreds of kids.
Rep. Smith also forced drug
testing on public employees and
welfare recipients but exempted
our elected officials. His logic
that the courts, under the First
Amendment, struck down laws
requiring testing of elected offi-
cials was not correct. The ruling
from the court on other cases is
based on the Fourth Amend-
ment, which is illegal search and
seizure.
This same amendment will
end his bill in Florida aimed at
its citizens. He argues that the
Senate president can order drug
testing on elected officials. I
would like to know how many
have been done. I would venture
to say he has to have justifica-
tion (probable cause) to believe
there is a drug problem.
It appears Rep. Smith has his
own strange agenda which is not
necessarily beneficial for the
people of his district or the state
of Florida.
Roger B. Krieger
Beverly Hills


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


for juveniles convicted of a crime
other than homicide, arguing that
such sentences improperly deny
juvenile offenders "a chance to
demonstrate growth and matu-
rity."
In both cases, the sentences
were judged cruel and unusual
because they were dispropor-
tional to actual culpability. In-
creasingly, the criminal justice
system acknowledges the impor-
tance of scientific findings about
adolescents' entangled neurolog-
ical, physiological and psycholog-
ical developments. Such findings
condition how we read some con-
stitutional language.
In 1958, the court said: "The
(Eighth) Amendment must draw
its meaning from the evolving
standards of decency that mark
the progress of a maturing soci-
ety." Justice Antonin Scalia has
warned: "A society that adopts a
bill of rights is skeptical that
'evolving standards of decency'
always 'mark progress,' and that
societies always 'mature,' as op-
posed to rot." But even the "orig-
inalist" Scalia, although disposed
to construe the Constitution's
terms as they were understood
when ratified, would today pro-
scribe some late 18th-century
punishments, such as public lash-
ing and branding.
Denying juveniles even a
chance for parole defeats the
penal objective of rehabilitation.
It deprives prisoners of the in-
centive to reform themselves.
Some prisons withhold educa-
tion, counseling and other reha-
bilitation programs from
prisoners ineligible for parole.
Denying these to adolescents in
a period of life crucial to social
and psychological growth stunts
what the court in 2005 called the
prisoner's "potential to attain a
mature understanding of his own
humanity." Which seems, in a
word actually, three words -
"cruel and unusual."
--
George Will's email address is
georgewill@washpost. com.


!
.(





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Does anybody really know what time it is?


'As I was walking down the
street one day, a man came up to
me and asked me what the time
was that was on my watch, yeah,
and I said, Does anybody really
know what time it is ... does
anybody really care?"
Robert Lamm,
with the group Chicago,
circa 1969.
MEN
Since 1884, the measurement
of time has begun and ended
in Greenwich, England.
GMT is short for Greenwich Mean
Time and is so called because of
the location of the The Greenwich
Meridian which, as you might
have guessed by now, is at
Greenwich, England.
While some areas have their


own idiosyncrasies,
there are generally 24
times zones that are
recognized worldwide.
Depending upon
whether one goes east
or west, the time moves
forward or backward
from Greenwich; then,
approximately midway
around the world, the Fred E
time zones collide with A SK
it being GMT plus 12 OFI
hours going east and
GMT minus 12 hours
going west. To reconcile this,
there's the international dateline.
When the line is crossed, the time
on clocks does not change, but the
date does folks heading west
lose a day and those heading east


I

l
l


gain one.
Have you got all of
this so far?
Good.
Because I'm reason-
ably certain I never
grasped it, not while
we were doing it.
After leaving Amer-
ican Samoa, our next
rannen stop was Fiji. It was a
LICE one sea-day trip, but it
LIFE took two days to get
there. After sailing
from Samoa on the
evening of Feb. 14, we lost Feb. 15
entirely and woke up the next
morning on Feb. 16 we never
had and will never have Feb. 15,
2012.
On to Fiji.


Fiji used to be a full-bore mem-
ber of the British commonwealth,
but the understanding I gained
while there is that it is now an in-
dependent republic, still with a
strong British influence, but with-
out a present formal relationship.
Frankly, my observation was also
that Fiji is more akin to America
in its commercialization of the wa-
terfront than is American Samoa
- still beautiful, still very desir-
able to visit, but not at all in a nat-
ural state. While there, Cheryl
bought a very appealing Maori
necklace, which upon closer in-
spection appeared to have possi-
bly been made in China!
What about our lost day?
We got it back somewhere
aboard an airplane while coming


home from Sydney March 1 lasted
for 48 hours. But, I assure you,
spending a bonus day traveling
home in no way made up for los-
ing a day of cruising!
Now, back to the question:
Does anybody really know what
time it is?
Probably not.
But, Cheryl and I enjoyed each
other and our trip together to the
fullest, even during those moments
when we didn't have a clue as to
the correct minute, hour or date.
We didn't know, but neither did
we care!

Fred Brannen is an
Inverness resident and a
Chronicle columnist.


Cut back to bare essentials
very storm cloud has a silver lining, portant tasks: They are to teach students
Our current economic problems are basic skills to enable them to find employ-
causing government at every level to ment, and they are to teach students skills
run out of money Spending priorities will necessary for citizenship in our republic.
have to be set for the first time in more than Music and art appreciation? Competitive
100 years. athletics, cheer-leading and
Political leaders have, through band? These are niceties but
the years, created new services most likely non-essential pro-
and facilities that government grams when compared with
provides to the public or to spe- math, reading and communica-
cial interest groups. Spending tion skills.
grew through grants of money The same can be said of the 4-
and tax subsidies to support cer- H clubs, public swimming pools,
tain activities (home ownership senior centers and, perhaps,
and marriage, for examples) and even the public libraries. Who
industries politically in favor uses these programs and facili-
such as anything "green." To sup- Dr. William Dixon ties at what cost to the taxpay-
port the increased spending, gov- OTHER ers? Are they as essential as
ernment took property from VOICES road maintenance, firefighters,
citizens by taxing them and by police and the court system? Our
borrowing or printing money local elected officials, with input
(Money printed by the Fed dilutes the pool from us, will be forced to make these
of existing dollars and makes dollars held spending decisions.
by all citizens worth less.) At the national level, cuts must be made
A good example of expanding govern- in spending on ineffective or useless de-
ment is President Lyndon Johnson's de- apartments such as the Departments of En-
claring that we were a rich nation and ergy, Education and Commerce. Defense
should do more to improve the lives of citi- spending needs a closer look.
zens. He initiated the "Great Society" pro- Federal entitlement programs are driv-
grams that gave us Medicare, Medicaid and ing us to bankruptcy They will have to be
welfare programs of every sort. He fi- cut back to bare essentials. We cannot con-
nanced his Great Society by borrowing at tinue to create new definitions of disabili-
home and abroad. A graph of levels of na- ties and then pay citizens who claim them.
tional debt shows quite clearly that most of The tax code will have to be simplified to
the $14 trillion we owe is the result of John- eliminate subsidies to special interest
son's and subsequent presidents' expan- groups.
sion of government services and payouts to There is little political will nor support
citizens. (President George W Bush gave us from the public for any of these spending
the costly prescription benefit added to cuts. But the economic crisis provides a
Medicare.) one-time opportunity for politicians to
While recognizing the failures of govern- claim they were forced to do what will be
ment programs, very few politicians have so unpopular. If this severe recession re-
had the courage to suggest eliminating any sults in a smaller, less wasteful government
of them. Those who do, like Wisconsin con- and a more competitive nation, then it will
gressman Paul Ryan, are accused of being indeed have had a silver lining.
heartless and of caring nothing for seniors,
the disabled and homeless by the spenders
and their lapdog media. William Dixon graduated from Columbia
Government is out of money Even the College in New York City, from New York
spenders are now forced to determine Medical College and from the College of
which programs and services are essential Business Administration at the University
to preservation of the nation. At state and of South Florida. He was an assistant
local levels the same determinations must professor at the University of Georgia and
be made. The howling from citizens who he has worked in the veterans
will have benefits or programs reduced or administration system. He served 11 years
eliminated has already begun and will only in the Army as a surgeon and as special
get worse. forces officer, achieving the rank of
Take, for example, tax-supported public lieutenant colonel. Dr Dixon can be
education. The schools have but two im- reached at Wdixonl6@yahoo.com.


Guest COLUMN


Thanks for supporting


Fallen Heroes Monument


Special to the Cronicle On May 5, another event will take
hankyoutoourgreat place to honor 28 benefactors.
Citrus County com-
munity who opened
their arms once again to dignity and respect to the Citrus County Fallen He-
the family of fallen Army family. Thank you. roes Monument Inc. Board
soldier PFC Michael Others we want to thank of Directors. We are a non-
Christopher Mahr He died for their contributions to the profit corporation that re-
just over a year ago and was ceremony and family recep- lies on community support
honored with more than 30 tion include: Brown Fu- and donations to maintain
members of his family pres- neral Home, Courter Films, the monument and flags
ent on April 14 at the Fallen Robert Crawford, Family and to conduct such events
Heroes Monument in Bi- Escort, Crystal River Na- On May 5, another event
centennial Park in Crystal tional Guard Armory, Crys- will take place to honor 28
River His name is now per- tal River Rotary Club, Kathy benefactors who have con-
manently engraved for pos- Garlock, Bagpiper, Half tribute by having a tile en-
terity as one of our fallen Caked Donuts and Desserts, graved on the base of the
Citrus County sons who Capt Tim Holmes USN-Re- monument. Without such
served in Afghanistan tired, Korean War Veterans support, the monument
Michael attended elemen- Chapter 192, LaPerle Me- could not be adequately
tary school at Rock Crusher morials, Glen Lloyd, Bugler, maintained. The public is
just a short distance from Marine Corps League 819 cordially invited to join us
our monument and 1139 Honor Guard and at 9 a.m. that first Saturday
Markmen, Ray Michael, in May, when we gather tc
There are so many we Naval Jr.ROTC from Crystal thank these special bene-
need to thank for support- River High School and factors, many of whom are
ing an event like this. Let Wayne Walker who veterans or family mem-
me begin with the Citrus arranged for their partici- bers honoring veterans, or
County, since the monu- pation, and Pastors Ken veteran organizations.
ment only exists because Blythe and David Jacobsen. Anyone with questions or
the county commission au- Music adds so much and an interest in getting in-
thorized the monument Phantastic Sounds, Paul volved and supporting the
construction within the and Jackie Stevio provided monument may want tc
county park. A special a musical tribute, along visit our website al
thanks to Bob Glancy and with an amazing 6-year-old www.citruscountyfallen
the staff who keep up the Karlynn Willoughby who heroes.org or contact Vin-
grounds so well. This year gave a moving rendition of nie DeRosa, chairman, al
the big American flag was "My Heart Will Go On." 888-738-7381; or by email
provided through the Fire The high point of the through the website.
Services under the auspice event was the poignant re- We are humbled and
of the Citrus County Sher- marks of Kerri Surber, honored to be entrusted
iff's Office. As well, honor whose son's name is also in- with the care of our Citrus
guards and motorcycle offi- scribed on the monument. County Fallen Heroes Mon-
cers from the sheriff's of- Each played an impor- ument, so ...NOT ONE IS
fice accompanied the tant part in the day's cere- FORGOTTEN.
family from the Crystal money Hopefully, I didn't
River National Guard Ar- miss anyone. I
mory to the monument. Behind the scenes there Avis Marie Craig, secretary
A full contingent of more were countless others so of the Citrus County Fallen
than 30 riders with the to all we express our Heroes Monument Board
American Legion Riders, appreciation. of Directors, wrote this
Chapter 155, also accompa- Programs like this are or- guest column on behalf of
nied the procession adding ganized and paid for by the the organization.


Guest COLUMN


Budget cuts: The debt crisis strikes home


DR. D.C. HAVRE
Special to the Chronicle

In response to the Chronicle's
"What to cut?" articles on April 16's
front page, I remembered some
thoughts I had recorded in a notebook
on Jan. 21, 2011. The new year was
starting on financially shaky ground,
and I realized that at all levels of gov-
ernment (federal, state, county, local),
the prevailing economic conditions
called for reduced spending and more
balanced fiscal responsibility "Debt
crisis" seemed to be the watchwords
of the day
Legislators are routinely pressured to
keep everyone under their aegis com-
fortable without raising taxes or cutting
services or programs. How is this possi-
ble? It can only be accomplished
through intelligent compromise.
Legislators should first begin to
rank or prioritize how important each
considered item or service is to their
constituents at large. Are they neces-
sary for the majority or all of the citi-
zens, or are they niceties? Nice vs.
necessary Necessary for what? Nec-


WINDOW
Continued from Page C1

leave Florida and move out west
where he eventually lost his head.
I believe we use too much fer-
tilizer on our lawns in an attempt
to make the grass green and we in-
stead are polluting the under-
ground water supply When we
have polluted the water to the
point where fish can't live and we
can't drink it, I believe we will be
very mad.
I believe Three Sisters
Springs in Crystal River is one of


Ambulances, fire and
police protection:
everybody is affected.
Aquatic exercises:
not so many.

essary for how many? Are major
health and welfare issues involved?
What percentage of the city's or
county's population will benefit from
(not just like) the programs?
For example, would it be a good
idea to reduce or eliminate ambu-
lance service, fire protection, or po-
lice protection? No. This would
endanger the entire population in
question: babies, kids, adults of all
ages. Legislators have to be very care-
ful here.
How about cutting back on boat
ramp construction or maintenance?
Or on public swimming pool availabil-
ity? A relatively small percentage of
citizens actually frequent pools or use


the very special places that God
has made on this whole planet.
I believe Citrus County needs
its own YMCA. (Notice of self inter-
est: Have I mentioned that I chair
the group that is trying to do that?)
I believe the city of Inverness
has been turned from a boarded-
up downtown to a thriving busi-
ness district with a real nightlife
with actual young people walking
around after 10 p.m.
M I believe Sam Tamposi, Jerry
Nash and Stan Olsen were vision-
aries who made incredible
changes to the standard of living
in Citrus County.
I believe nuclear power is


boat ramps on a regular basis. They
would not suffer inordinately or be in
danger, even if the pools or ramps had
to be closed temporarily But if they in-
sisted that the pools or ramps remain
open, then a fee or an increase in fees
would be a possibility. Is it sensible to
increase taxes for the entire citizenry
to mollify a minority of the popula-
tion? Do we have to continue lighting
up ball fields at the public parks? Per-
haps day games would be OK until the
budget deficit is eliminated.
These are all legitimate questions.
The answers are not simple. To reach
good answers, we must first prioritize
on the basis of safety beyond our per-
sonal capability and on actual num-
bers of people affected. Ambulances,
fire and police protection: everybody
is affected. Aquatic exercises: not so
many Until we're financially solvent
again, walking will have to do. These
are obvious extremes, but the concept
of how to tighten the belt is clear


Dr D.C. Havre is an Inverness
resident


safe and efficient.
I believe most people do not
have the skill required to speak on
a hand-held telephone and drive
a car at the same time.
I believe many people do not
have the skill required to drive a
car. Most of them can be found on
State Road 44.
M I believe Crystal River is a city
on the move with the development
of Citrus Avenue, the construction
of the Riverwalk and many new
restaurants and shops opening.
I believe Irish people must
use more sunscreen than people
of other backgrounds.
I believe you should tip a


t


.
t




8




t
t



l
t
y
s
s
y
0
e


e



0
it
n
L-




t
1
1

?

t
s


y
n


= Letters to the EDITOR


Sale a success
On behalf of Nature
Coast EMS, I would like to
thank the citizens of Cit-
rus County for their gener-
ous donations to our
"Treasures & Treats" sale
to benefit CASA (Citrus
Abuse Shelter Associa-
tion), and Blessings in a
Backpack.
Our event was also suc-
cessful due to community
partners at Publix of Her-
nando, Publix of Ho-
mosassa, Winn-Dixie in
Crystal River and Wal-
Mart Supercenter in
Inverness.
We collected close to
$700 plus tangible goods
that are specifically
needed by each of these
wonderful organizations.
Even in this harsh econ-
omy, I am always amazed
at the generosity of our
citizens and how they
come together for the sake
of others. The team mem-


waitress 20 percent unless the
service is poor.
M I believe Charlie Dean was a
good sheriff. I believe Jeff Dawsy
is a good sheriff.
M I believe Charlie Dean and Jeff
Dawsy will never like each other
I believe Whispering Pines
Park is the nicest and best run
public park in Central Florida and
we should all appreciate it more.
I believe young people who
grew up in Citrus County really
want to return here and raise
their own families but there are
not enough good jobs to attract
them home. I believe we need to
grow more good jobs in this county


bers of Nature Coast EMS
stand proud with you and
thank you again for your
thoughtful donations in
helping us with our com-
munity project.
Katie Lucas
public information officer
Nature Coast EMS,
Lecanto

Service charge
The Beverly Hills Com-
munity Church has been
having an Easter Sunrise
service in the adjacent
park for at least 20 years.
The Beverly Hills
Recreation Center had to
release its property to Cit-
rus County. If the church
wanted to have a service
in the park, the county
wanted $200.
This is outrageous; it's a
community park. Shame
on the county.
David Doyle
Beverly Hills


so families will have the income
and benefits they need to properly
prepare the next generation.
If you have made it this far, I'd
like to know what you believe. Send
me your favorite belief about Citrus
County to gmulligan@ chronicleon-
line.com or mail it to the Chronicle
at 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crys-
tal River, FL 34429 and I'll publish
the best of the beliefs. Because we
all believe in something. Right?
--In--
Gerry Mulligan is publisher of
the Chronicle. His email
address is gmulligan@
chronicleonline. com.


*


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, APRIL 22, 2012 C3






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


YARDS
Continued from Page C1

the viewing areas is pro-
posed to be by footpath,
which is largely concealed
from the homeowners by
trees and other vegetation.
Of course the homeown-
ers are correct that in the
winter months, during the
operating hours of the
refuge, there will be visi-
tors watching manatees
from designated areas.
During these limited hours,
they will be visible from the
backyards of the objectors
and occasionally a faint
voice announcing,
"Mommy, look at the baby
manatee!" may also be
heard. The viewing area
plans call for the use of fo-
liage to minimize the pres-
ence of visitors both on the
walking path and at view-
ing areas, but the handful
of homeowners are
adamant that there be no
viewing areas.
The FWS has advised the
city council that because
the canal is broad and
deep, it is often the best
place to observe manatees
from the refuge, and at
times it is the only place
where manatees can be
seen. Therefore, the view-
ing areas are essential. The
FCT has expressed its sup-
port of the viewing area
concept. The executive di-
rector of the Felburn Foun-
dation, appearing before
the city council, stated his


It would seem that the property

owners on both sides of the canal

have the same right to peaceably

enjoy their view from their property.

The planners of the refuge are

making reasonable attempts to

accommodate the complaints of

all the refuge neighbors.


strong support for the view-
ing areas and advised that
he is considering consulta-
tion with the foundation's
legal counsel regarding
possible recourse if the
areas are eliminated.
The matter was dis-
cussed by the city council
during its March 26 meet-
ing. The discussion in-
cluded comments by
council members on a vari-
ety of ways that would have
the least amount of impact
on the surrounding neigh-
bors as visitors view the
manatees in the wild.
Mayor Jim Farley stated: "I
do not see how we can have
viewing areas." City Man-
agerAndy Houston advised
that a revised viewing area
proposal would be submit-
ted to the council.
It would seem that the
property owners on both
sides of the canal have the
same right to peaceably
enjoy their view from their
property The planners of
the refuge are making rea-
sonable attempts to accom-


modate the complaints of all
the refuge neighbors. The
Chronicle, in a recent edito-
rial titled "Public access is
the priority," stated "... the
bottom line is that Three
Sisters was purchased in
the name of the citizens of
the county, state and nation.
And citizens have a right to
use their land."
If no amount of reason-
able accommodation will
result in an agreement,
fairness requires the city
council to insist on the
viewing areas. As the
Chronicle noted, "... citi-
zens have a right to use
their land." Those who
agree should let the city
council know, before an es-
sential feature of the refuge
is compromised or worse
yet, the existence of the
refuge is threatened.
James L. Green serves on
the Governmental Rela-
tions Committee of the
Friends of the Crystal River
National Wildlife Refuge
and is a former board
member.


I LEYE TO EI


Tommy Tucker is a Citrus County "Super Hero" who will guide you to a healthier lifestyle.
He is also the spokesperson against the abuse of alcohol, tobacco and prescription drugs.


House calls
Where is there one coura-
geous doctor in Citrus
County who will visit home-
bound patients? Not every-
one can physically get to a
doctor's office. Our doctor
of eight years has one of
his offices a stone's throw
away, yet will not visit the
home. Home health care
goes to the home, as well as
physical and occupational
therapy. Why not one coura-


= Sound OFF =

geous doctor to cover Citrus
County? Why? Why?
Editor's note: Hospice
doctors routinely make house
calls; however, patients must
be diagnosed with six months
or less to live. Find out more
about the two nonprofit
groups in the area by calling
Hospice of Citrus County at
352-527-2020 or HPH Hos-
pice at 352-527-4600.


Medicaid number
This is for the person who
wanted a phone number for
Medicaid. The phone number
is 866-762-2237 and there is
a family service center on
(U.S.) 41 going towards Inver-
ness right off (County Road)
486. It's on the right-hand
side after you turn on (U.S.)
41 off (C.R.) 486. It's not re-
ally too far up. Then also I
have another number for
Medicare: 800-633-4227.


to_ _ _ _^ ^ ^S^C .... |ko c m u t g a



8 cnga~y


22 Red Eagle Pow-Wow

When Elvis Came To Town
April Madness Baketball
Tournament
Evening of Elegance Friends of
Crystal River Annual Fundraiser


23


24


25


26
Tampa Bay Rays Senior Prom


27


28 0zello Adventure Race
Citrus County Bass Challenge
Sheriff's Summer Safety Expo
Black & White Gala -
Pope John Paull II School
Day at the Races -
Tampa Bay Downs


Light Shine The Florida Dream
Arbor Day Celebration


29


30


Citrus Hills Information Fiesta


Relay For Life Lecanto


J Cars in the Canyon
Movies in the Park Tangled
Citrus County Gator Club
Golf Tournament
Pet Adoptathon


6 7 8 9 10 11 12
Pet Adoptathon BHRA Card & Game Party United Way Kick Off Spring Fling Dinner Dance The Wine Festival

ACT Moon over Buffalo Stamp Out Hunger

The Wine Festival


JANUARY
* Citrus Jazz Society Jam
* Manatee Festival
Keys to Fashion West Citrus Ladies Elks
STruck and Tractor Pull
* AWinter Wonderland
* CRWC Showtime
SMusic in the Park
SBeales Tribute
SBook Festival
SConcert at the Old Courthouse, The Porch Dogs
SEarly Childhood Expo
SWest Citrus Elks Fashion Show
* ACT The Kids Left, The Dog Died, Now What?
SJames Rogersu Concert
Music in the Park Southern Sounds
* Light Shine The Ashley Gang Folk Songs & Florida
FEBRUARY
* Citrus Jazz Jam
STaekwondo Women's Defense Class
* Mow It Dinner Beverly Hills Lions Club
* Best Friend Fest Citrus County Animal Services
* 2012 Festival of Books
* Rotary of Inverness Online and TV Auction
* Country Diamonds Show Beverly Hills Civic Assoc.
* Jr. Achievement Bowl-A-Thon
* Light Shine
* Dollars for Scholars Doo Wop
SFitness in Citrus begins
SJazz Valentine Concert
Crystal Oaks Military Card Party
* Cattle Barons' Ball American Cancer Society
* Yoga Day USA
* CF Performing Arts Series Cooking With
The Calamari Sisters
* Bartershoppers Singing Valentines
SCitrus Springs Library Book Sale
* Love Your Library Evening
ACT- Moonlight and Magnolias
SSt. Patrick's Day Dinner Dance
Concerned Citizen Commendation Award and Dinner
SWest Citrus Elks Book Sale and Flea Market
* Kiwanis Concert Live
SOzello Chili Cook Off and Craft Show
STricky Tray, CCW of St. Scholastica
* Purple Heart Ceremony
SCitrus Watercolor Show & Sale
* German American Club Celebrate Spring
SCelebrily Bartenders & Silent Auction
* Greek Festival
* Runway For Rescues
* Fashion Sweethearts
* Spring Fling Citrus County Craft Council
* Seminarian Dinner & Dance Knights of Columbus
S8th Annual Kids Fishing Clinic Parks & Recreation
* Blessings in a Backpack
SAcademy of Environmental Science Dinner
* Oscar Night 2012 Promoting Literacy' SMW Rotary
African American Read In
*'School'astic Golf Tournament
* Chet Cole Casino Night

MARCH
* Luminary Art Nights
* Strawbeny Festival
* Red Ribbon Tour of Homes
STricky Tray Crystal Oaks Civic
* Movies in the Park Kung Fu Panda 2
* Manatee Car & Truck Show
* Citrus Jazz Jam
* Tampa Bay Lightning vs. Ottawa Senators
* Habitat for Humanity Building Dreams
* Encore Ensemble The Last Dance of Dr. Disco
* Trivia Night -Kiwanis Central Ridge/Crystal River


* Will McLean Music Festival
* Friends of the Library Spring Book Sale
* Jim Blackshear Golf Tournament
* Nature Coast Corvair Car & Truck Show
* Dublin City Ramblers
* B&G 20th Anniversary Birthday Bash/Steak & Steak
* Homosassa Heritage Day
* Nature Coast Civil War ReenacInent
* Benefit for Karen Dinner, Dancing, Entertainment
* Military Card Party Beverly Hills Recreation Assoc.
* Concert at the Old Courthouse, Jimmy Crowley
SSt. Palrick's Day Dinner Dance
* Blood Drive Honor Larry Nestor
* Fort Cooper Days
* Inverness St Patrick's Day Parade
* Crystal River St. Patrick's Day Parade
* Nature Coast Dragon Boat Festival
* Mutt Strutt Parade
SSt. Palrick's Day Golf Classic
St. Paddy's Pot of Gold Card Party and Luncheon
SAll Mopar Car Show
* Crystal River Music in the Park
* Inverness Sertoma Club Golf Tournament
* Spring Book Sale Friends of Homosassa Library
* Scope it Out 5K
STampa Bay Lightening vs. NY Islanders
STeen Stock
* Swing into Spring Fashion Show
* International Food & Arts Festival
* Golf for Meals Citrus County Resource Center
* Steppin Out in Style
SShrimpa-Palooza
SWithlacoochee Wildemess Canoe and Kayak Rally & Race
* Lakeside Craft Show
* Bluegrass Festival in Hemando
* Citrus County Fair
SACT Dr. Cook's Garden
* 3rd Annual Spring "Eggs'ravaganza
* Sugarmill Woods Food Drive
* Floral City Library Friends March Book Sale
SClean Air Bike Ride
Bluegrass Q The Blue Lodge
APRIL
* Citrus Jazz Jam
* Jazz Spring Concert
SACT Dr. Cook's Garden
* Movies in the Park Hop
* Inverness Rotary Golf Tournament
* Homosassa Springs Easter Egg Hunt
* Crystal River Relay For Life
* Citrus Has Talent
* Golf Tournament Vietnam Veterans Gathering
* Bluegrass & Oldtyme Music Festival
STaste of Inverness
* Camp Good Hope Golf Tournament
* Mel Tillis Fishing Tournament
* Floral City Garden Club Annual Plant Sale
* Annual Charity Ball Knights of Columbus
* Central Citrus Rotary Blood Screening
* CF Performing Arts Ballet Folkorico
* Inverness Relay For Life
* When Elvis Came to Town
* Red Eagle Lodge Intertribal Pow-Wow
* American Irish Club Golf Tournament
*2012 Ram Truck Drawing We Care Food Pantry
* Music in the Park
* Kayak Fishing Tournament Inglis Yankeetown Lions
* April Madness Basketball Tournament
* Evening of Elegance Friends of Crystal River
SLight Shine The Florida Dream
STampa Bay Rays Senior Prom
* Ozello Adventure Race
SCitnus County Bass Challenge
* Sheriff's Summer Safety Expo
* Black & White Gala Pope John Paul II School
* Day at the Races Tampa Bay Downs Senior Foundation


*Arbor Day Celebration


MAY
* Citrus Hills Information Fiesta
* Lecanto Relay For Life
* Cars in the Canyon
* Movies in the Park Tangled
* Citrus County Gator Club Golf Tournament
* Pet Adoptathon
* BHRA Card & Game Party
* United Way Kick Off
* Spring Fling Dinner Dance
* ACT Moon Over Buffalo
* The Wine Festival
* Stamp Out Hunger
* World's Greatest Baby Shower
* Golden Citrus Scholar Awards
* Rays vs. Red Sox
* Sports Banquet
* Concert at the Old Courthouse, Spring Finale
* Winds, Rains or Flames All Hazards Expo
* A Garden Tour with Historical Overtones
JUNE
* Movies in the Park Happy Feet 2
* Boat Drawing
* Cobia Big Fish Tournament
* Military Card Party BHRA
* Rays vs. NY Mets
* Encore Ensemble The Pajama Party Murders
*Seminole Hard Rock Casino Trip
* Homosassa Fireworks & Poker Run
* Flag Day at Fort Cooper
* Citrus Jazz Jam
* Jim Blackshear Memorial Golf Tournament
* 832 K-9's Deputy Dog's Annual Golf Tournament
JULY
*Patriotic Evening
* Fireworks over Kings Bay
*Rays vs. Yankees
*Key Training Center Celebrity Auction
* Key Run For the Money
* Key Center Telethon
* Family Fun Day Kings Bay Park
* Firecracker 5K
* Beverly Hills Recreation Military Card Party
* Summer Sensations Fashion Show
* Uncle Sam's Scallop Jam
* Rays vs. Indians
* Citrus Community Concert Choir Great Music
for Your Summer Enjoyment
* Movies in the Park Madagascar 2
* Chronicle Political Forum
AUGUST
* Rotary Club of Sugarmill Woods Arts and Crafts
* Pregnancy and Family Life Center Military Card Party
* So You Think You Can Dance Uke A Star
* Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Fundraiser Golf Tourney
* Gator Club Kick Off
* Concert at the Courhouse Back 2 School Bash
* Citrus Community Concert Choir Great Music
for Your Summer Enjoyment
*The Other Volumn
* OC5K
* Movies in the Park Shark Tale
SEPTEMBER
* Harvest Moon Craft Show
* Veterans Golf Tournament
* Jazz Society Jam Session
* Citrus 20120 Fundraiser
*Rays vs. Yankees
*Save our Waters Week


* Christmas in September
* United Way Kick Off
* Business Women's Alliance Health & Fitness Expo
* Industry Appreciation Luncheon
* Industry Appreciation Week EDC Barbecue
* 832 K-9's Deputy Dog Fundraiser
* VFW Post 10087 Golf Outing
* Rays vs. Red Sox
* Friends of the Library Fall Book Sale
* Music on the Square
* CF Professional Development Series
* Two Good Soles
* Matt Curley Memorial Blood Drive
* Barbecue Blast
* Oktoberfest German American
* Health & Fitness Expo
* Under One Roof Campaign Auction
* Page it Forward
* Sunset Festival
* Country Western Hoedown Cruise
* Beat the Sheriff Race
* Movies in the Park- G-Force
OCTOBER
* Seroma Okloberfest
* Bikes and BBQ
* Habitat For Humanity Golf Tournament
* Jazz Jam
* Rails to Trails Bike Ride
Artisans Boutique
* Great American Cootler Festival
Day of CaringdMake a Difference Day Food Drive
SNational Wildlife Refuge Week
* Scarecrow Festival
* West Citrus Elks ArtMs & Crafts Show
* Cooter Blast
Harvest Time Festival
SHaunted Tram Ride
* Cooterween
* Greek Festival
Spike Ftzpatick Memorial Golf Tourney
SHaunted Halloween
SHernando Heritage Days
Comedy Night at Citrus Springs
* Swing for a Cure
* Nerieds Military Card Party
* Lakeside Craft Show
* Chamber Business Expo
* Nature Coast All Veterans Reunion
* Citrus Garden Club Shades of Autumn
* Fr. Willie Classic Golf Memorial
*2nd Annual Ford Car & Truck Show
* Car Show for Charity
* We Care Golf Tournament
* A Night at the Museum
* Citrus Springs Memorial Library Fall Book Sale
* Jazz Goes to Movies
SNature Coast Fine Arts and True Craft Show
* Citrus "Haunted" Hills 5K
* Page it Forward
* Make a Difference Day
Authors Fair
* Robby Brown Memorial Golf Tournament
* CASI Chili Cook Off
* Movie on the Square
* Ladies of the West Citrus Elks Fall Card Party
* Light Shine
*Art Fair and Auction
* Halloween Scramble for Hospice
* Candlelight Vigil
* Fall Fling
* Health & Wellness Fair
* Political Forum

NOVEMBER
BH Lions Foundation Craft Fair
SInglis/Yankeetown Arts and Seafood Festival


* Festival of The Arts
* Jazz Society Jam
* Rotary Blood Screening
* Blues & Bar-B-Que
* Veterans Fair
* Veterans Day ParadelMemorial Service
* Veterans Appreciation Show
* Stone Crab Jam
* CCBA Home & Outdoors Show
* Caruh Camp Challenge
* Parade of Trees
SCitrus Stampede Rodeo
* Winter Wonderland Craft Show
* Ozello Arts & Crafts Festival
* Jazz Concert
SFriends of the Homosassa Library Book Sale
* SOS Golf Tournament
* Festival of the Arts Wine Tasting
* Veteran's Apprecialion Week
* Annual Christmas Toy Run
* King's Bay 5K Run
* Hospice Tree of Remembrance
* Concert at the Old Courthouse, Jim Hurst
* Inverness Fall Classic
* BFF Society Fashion Show
* Light Shine Dunnellon Concert Singers
* Silver Jubilee Fashion Show
* Precious Paws Fundraiser
Recycle Day
* Never Forget 5K RunfWalk
* Kiwanis Pancake Breakfast
SCooking for a Cause
Wish Upon a Child Golf Tournament
* K-9 Karnival
* Cut-a-thon
SCitrus Community Concert Choir's Messiah
* Music in the Park
* Encore Ensemble Win, Lose or Die
DECEMBER
Sweet Adelines Musical Performance
SFather Christmas Ball
Fort Cooper State Park Nights of Lights
SFloral City Heritage Days
* Beverly Hills Christmas Parade
* Christmas Craft Show
*CRWC Silver Bells
* Crystal River Christmas Parade
* Jazz Holiday Concert
* Jazz Jam
* Inverness Christmas Parade
* Homosassa Boat Parade
SSugarmill Chorale Chrisnmas Concert
* Airboat Christmas Parade
* Citrus Springs Holiday Parade
* Nutcracker Ballet
* Celebration of Lights
* ACT- Richard Gilewitz
* Inverness Winter Celebration
* ACT- Halvan Youth Theatre
SFrosty's Winter Wonderland
* Annual Holiday Party
* Suncoast Business Masters Auction
* Rotary of Sugarmill Woods Golf Tournament
* Beverly Hills Recreation Center Military Card Party
SCitrus Springs Rockin the Holiday
SCitrus Springs New Yeer's Eve Ball
* Send Them To Serve Golf Tournament
* IOTATV and Online Auction
* Citrus Community Concert Choir's Messiah
* Make a Smile Happen
* Music in the Park
* Adopt a Christmas Tree
* Elvis & Friends
* Encore Ensemble Win, Lose or Die


C4 SUNDAY, APRIL 22, 2012


COMMENTARY











BUSINESS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


I


ad


Rumors swirl of smaller

iPad which Jobs detested
PETER SVENSSON
AP Technology Writer
NEW YORK-Apple generates more gossip
than the Kardashians.
There's a constantly spinning mill of rumors
about Apple products, most of which turn out
to be untrue. What's unusual this week is that
talk has revived of a smaller iPad model, an
idea company founder Steve Jobs derided pub-
licly a year before he died.
Apple and its suppliers aren't commenting.
Rumors of a smaller iPad, or "iPad mini" have
percolated ever since the first iPad was
launched two years ago. This time around,
they're fed by media reports from South Korea,
China and Taiwan, saying Apple has ordered
Samsung screens that are 7.86 inches meas-
ured on the diagonal. That would make for a
screen about half the size of the current iPad,
which has a diagonal measurement of 9.7
inches.
WHY IT'S A GOOD IDEA: A smaller tablet
would help Apple further its lead in the tablet
market.
"From a competitive standpoint, we believe
an iPad mini with a lower price point would be
the competition's worst nightmare, said Shaw
Wu, an analyst at Sterne Agee. "Most (competi-
tors) already have a tough enough time com-
peting against the iPad 2, as well as the new
iPad."
Apple has successfully fended off competi-
tors who have tried to sell tablets in iPad's size
range. But last year, Amazon.com Inc. figured
out how to crack Apple's stranglehold on
tablets by making a half-size, no-frills tablet.
The result was the Kindle Fire, which sells for
$199 -basically, the cost of production. Ama-
zon has sold millions of them.
Apple sells the iPod Touch for $199, but its
screen is about a quarter of the size of the Kin-
dle Fire a big disadvantage for people who
want to enjoy books, movies and games. It also
sells the older iPad model for $399. It has noth-
ing in between.
Price isn't the only reason customers might
prefer a smaller tablet. A 7-inch model would
fit in many handbags, unlike the current iPad.
Wu said he's seen evidence of Apple experi-
menting with both smaller and larger tablet
screens since 2009, and doesn't sense that the
release of an iPad mini is "imminent."
WHAT IT MIGHT COST: It could be hard
for Apple to make money from an iPad-quality
7-inch tablet that sells for $299. Analysts at IHS
iSuppli estimate a smaller tablet would cost
around $250 to produce, a figure that doesn't in-
clude development costs, packaging or patent
royalties. That suggests Apple would price it at
$329 or $349.
"The first thing you always have to keep in
mind is: Apple is not going to sell an unprof-
itable product," said Rhoda Alexander at
iSuppli.
WHY IT'S A BAD IDEA: A smaller iPad
would be a headache for software developers.
"Going to a different screen size ends up
being a ton of work," said Nate Weiner, the cre-
ator of Pocket, an application that stores Web
pages and other material for later reading.
"If you take, for an example, an interface
built for the iPad and try to cram it into the Kin-
dle Fire, it just doesn't fit," he said.
However, developers who have already
adapted their programs to the Kindle Fire or
other 7-inch tablets wouldn't face a big hurdle
in adapting to a third Apple screen size, Weiner
said.
WHAT JOBS THOUGHT: Apple's late CEO
made a rare appearance on an October 2010
earnings conference call to launch a tirade
against the 7-inch tablet Samsung Electronics
Inc. was set to launch as the first major chal-
lenger to the iPad.
"The reason we wouldn't make a 7-inch
tablet isn't because we don't want to hit a price
point, it's because we don't think you can make
a great tablet with a 7-inch screen," Jobs said.


vs.


indle


Associated Press
An Associated Press reporter holds up the new iPad during an event March 7 in San Francisco. Ru-
mors of a smaller iPad, or "iPad mini" have percolated ever since the first iPad was launched two
years ago. This time around, they're fed by media reports from South Korea, China and Taiwan, say-
ing Apple has ordered Samsung screens that are 7.86 inches measured on the diagonal. That would
make for a screen about half the size of the current iPad, which has a diagonal measurement of
9.7 inches.


The Kindle Fire is
displayed Sept. 28
at a news
conference in New
York. Apple has
successfully
fended off com-
petitors who have
tried to sell
tablets in iPad's
size range. But
last year,
Amazon.com Inc.
figured out how to
crack Apple's
stranglehold on
tablets by making
a half-size, no-frills
tablet. The result
was the Kindle
Fire, which sells
for $199 -
basically, the cost
of production.
Amazon has sold
millions of them.


"The 7-inch tablets are tweeners, too big to
compete with a smartphone and too small to
compete with an iPad."
He said the resolution of the display could be
increased to make up for the smaller size, but
that would be "meaningless, unless your tablet
also includes sandpaper, so that the user can
sand down their fingers to around one quarter
of the present size."
"There are clear limits of how close you can


physically place elements on a touch screen be-
fore users cannot reliably tap, flick or pinch
them. This is one of the key reasons we think
the 10-inch screen size is the minimum size re-
quired to create great tablet apps," he said.
Jobs failed to mention Apple's success de-
veloping apps that use taps, flicks and pinches
on the iPhone, with its 3.5-inch screen.
Peter Svensson can be reached at
http://www twitter.com/petersvensson.


Think outside the box of a traditional job


If you think you're
boxed in by a lack of
career options,
maybe it's time to think
outside the box.
The "box" in this case
is our concept of a tradi-
tional job -working full- /
time for one company, \
more or less from 9 to 5,
five days a week. As such, Laura
we fill a functional role WORK
defined by a set of re- CONNI
sponsibilities and com-
petencies, with a job
title, spot on the company orgazina-
tional chart and career path.
But times change and today's
world of work is unlike anything
we've ever experienced.
If you are unemployed, there's no
need to belabor the point; you know
that businesses have had to remain
agile in this economy by downsiz-
ing, "right" sizing, outsourcing and
crowdsourcing.


Byrnes
(FORCE
SECTION


Unfortunately for
many, that means being
downsized, right sized,
outsourced or crowd-
sourced right out of a
regular paycheck.
Certainly, finding an-
other permanent job is
one solution. But if
you're ready for some-
thing new in your career,
or if you're already work-
ing and looking to boost
your earning potential, it
may be time to become a


free-agent.
Free-agent workers by any other
name are freelancers, temporary
contract workers and independent
professionals and consultants. Also
referred to as "knowledge work-
ers," they trade on the demand for
their skills and expertise, rather
than filling a particular job.
In other words, it's about expert-
ise as much as, or even more so,


than experience.
Today, more than four in 10 em-
ployees classify themselves as free
agents compared to 26 percent in
2008. These days you can work from
just about anywhere if you have the
Internet and computer or mobile
device. Right now, freelance oppor-
tunities abound, from social media
to project management to virtual as-
sistance to content development.
We'll show you how to find them.
Workforce Connection is launch-
ing "Your Talent Hub," an innova-
tive workforce program to assist
professionals in transition through
crowdsourcing and freelancing op-
portunities. Our goal is to teach you
the skills needed to compete and
succeed in the new world of work.
That new world of work is a "Free
Agent Nation" of borderless work-
places where freelancers profit by
coworking in project-specific vir-
tual teams that form, collaborate,
disband and form again. Collec-


tively, there are more than 25 mil-
lion members in this contingent
workforce which companies can tap
into to get work done without
weighing down the bottom line.
To get started, we are holding two
Freelance Talent Hub orientations
in partnership with the College of
Central Florida (CF): April 25 at
CF's Klein Conference Center in
Ocala, and April 30 at the college's
Learning and Conference Center in
Lecanto. Next month, we'll begin a
special training program that takes
place once a week for four weeks.
There is no charge to participate in
the training.
The program will be presented by
Steve Urquhart whose company,
T21 Solutions, specializes in work-
force alternative strategies and
project management. Urquhart, an
Army veteran, is also founder of
VETSourcing, a nonprofit that
See Page D4


Bruce Williams
SMART
MONEY


Family

could


use help

D EAR BRUCE:
Some family
friends bought a
house several years ago,
when the housing market
balloon was about to pop.
Needless to say, they way
overpaid for the house.
They were able to pay for
a couple of years, then,
unfortunately, one of them
lost their job. Now they
are in dire straits and may
lose their house.
Because we have a
great pension and a lot
saved, we are thinking of
helping them out I would
hate to see them lose their
house. Would it be wise to
help the family make their
house payments in hopes
that they can find work? If
they are unable to find
jobs equivalent to what
they were paid, might the
house be refinanced at a
later date at a lower rate
of interest? Trying to
Help, via email
DEAR TRYING TO
HELP: While I commend
you for considering such a
generous offer, if my sup-
positions are correct, it
probably would not be a
smart move. If the family
purchased the house a
few years ago at the height
of the market and now
that market has softened,
essentially they have no
equity in the home, and
little prospect of having
equity for a long time. If
you choose to help them,
you would have to go in
with the idea of never see-
ing the money again. If
you are OK with that, I ap-
plaud you.
I would not continue to
pay the mortgage on a
house that is undervalued
and has little chance of re-
covery for a considerable
time. A voluntary repos-
session would likely be in
your friends' best interest.
Helping them get into a
rental property would be
very generous.
DEAR BRUCE: I need
to make a change in my
will. Instead of going to my
attorney for this simple
change, can I just make it
myself, get the change no-
tarized and leave it at
that? TV, via email
DEAR TV: Very simple
reply: Never monkey with
a will. Never, never, never
write in the margins or try
to add a codicil of your
own.
If you make any change,
notarized or otherwise,
you are likely to invali-
date the entire document.
You would never know
if what you did was right
or not because, unfortu-
nately, these things don't
come to light until after
your demise. And at that
point, you no longer can
speak to your intentions.
If you wish to make a
change, see the attorney
who drew up the will or, if
he or she is no longer in
the picture, find another
attorney It might be eas-
ier to redraft the entire
document. That is up to
the attorney
DEAR BRUCE: I re-
cently received a phone
solicitation that has left
me a little disturbed. The
call supposedly came
from a well-known finan-
cial institution wanting to
consolidate and refinance
my debt. What disturbed
me was that she said, "I
ran your credit report and
saw that you had out-
standing balances on a
See Page D4










D2

SUNDAY
APRIL 22, 2012


Promotional information provided by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce


numberr Connection
28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


Is your online business safe?


Workshop April 25 for small businesses in Citrus County


The Citrus County Business Re-
source Alliance Partners are pre-
senting the workshop "Your
Online Business is EVERYONE's
Business" from 6 to 8 p.m. Wednes-
day, April 25, at the College of Cen-
tral Florida Learning Center.
This workshop is designed for
small businesses that have an on-


line presence. Does your business
have a website or Facebook page?
Do you use email or surf the Web?
With the increase in social media
marketing, most businesses are
now online. Find out what online
threats your business may be fac-
ing and learn how to protect your
information and files.


The featured presenter is Jim
Green, CRM, ARM, managing part-
ner of Business Risk Solutions,
LLC. The company approaches its
consulting with one primary goal
- helping clients to reduce their
total cost of risk. In addition to his
consulting services, Jim serves on
the National Faculty of the Certi-


fied Risk Management program,
teaching Risk Management semi-
nars from coast to coast, and as an
educational consultant to the Na-
tional Alliance for Insurance Edu-
cation and Research.
We'd like to thank our sponsor,
Citrus Networking Solutions
Group, for supporting our training
efforts and Economic Develop-
ment in Citrus County.
The cost is $15 per person for


members of Chamber, EDC, SBDC
and SCORE; $20 per person for
the general public. To register on-
line, visit "events" page, www.cit-
rusedc.com; to register by phone
or email, contact Matthew at 352-
795-2000 or matthew@citruscoun-
tychamber.com
Veterans: You may be able to at-
tend this workshop free of charge.
Go to wwwveteransfastlaunch.c
om to request a coupon to bring.


Donation to Hospice of Citrus County


The Chamber of Commerce was pleased to present a donation to Hospice of Citrus County
for their involvement in the 2012 Strawberry Festival at the April Membership Luncheon.
Hospice volunteers manned the strawberry shortcake booth during the festival weekend
on March 3 and 4 in Floral City. Pictured with Hospice staff members are Chamber CEO
Josh Wooten, Special Events Coordinator Tobey Phillips, and Chairman Bill Winkel.


The Synder Center


The Synder Pharmacy, at 102 E. Highland Blvd. in Inverness, specializes in compounding
medications for various pharmaceutical needs, including veterinary, bio-identical hormone
replacement, dermatology, erectile dysfunction, and many others with their niche lying in
topical pain relief. Pictured above is the Synder Pharmacy staff at their recent ribbon cut-
ting with the following Chamber Ambassadors: Tom Corcoran, LifeCare of Citrus County;
Dennis Pfeiffer, Orkin Pest Control; Kim Baxter, Cadence Bank; Nicholle Fernandez, Cold-
well Banker Next Generation; and Jennifer Duca, Comfort Keepers. For more information,
please call 352-341-1212 or visit their website at www.snydercenter.com.


Anytime Fitness


The staff of Anytime Fitness is pictured as they celebrate their new membership with the
Chamber. At 2668 W. Woodview Lane in Lecanto, they provide a variety of health and fit-
ness services. Please visit their websitewww.anytimefitness.com/gyms/2958/leanto-fl-
34461 for more information or call 352-270-8868. Pictured with owner Mark Liptak are
the following Chamber Ambassadors: Tom Corcoran, LifeCare of Citrus County; Betty Mur-
phy, Citrus Archives & Computers; Dennis Pfeiffer, Orkin Pest Control; Kim Baxter, Ca-
dence Bank; Sarah Fitts, First International Title; Bill Hudson, Land Title of Citrus County;
Janet Mayo, Plantation on Crystal River; Nicholle Fernandez, Coldwell Banker Next Gen-
eration; Jeanne Green, The Grove Downtown; and David Collins, ERA American Realty &
Investments.


Main Street Restaurant & Lounge


Main Street Restaurant & Lounge, at 4105 N. Lecanto Highway in Beverly Hills, recently
joined the Chamber of Commerce and celebrated with a ribbon cutting. Call 352-746-1770
for information about their hours and menu. Pictured with Main Street Restaurant & Lounge
are the following Chamber Ambassadors: Tom Corcoran, LifeCare of Citrus County; Den-
nis Pfeiffer, Orkin Pest Control; Sarah Fitts, First International Title; David Collins, ERA
American Realty & Investments; Rhonda Lestinsky, Nature Coast Bank; George Bendt-
sen, Insurance by George; Jennifer Duca, Comfort Keepers; Nancy Hautop, Cadence Bank;
and Pete Retzko, Citrus County Chronicle.


Chamber Membership
Breakfast make
reservations now!
We will be having a Chamber
Breakfast from 7:30 to 8:30 am.
Tuesday, April 24, at the Old
Courthouse in Inverness (2nd
floor courtroom) sponsored by
BizCo of Citrus County. Our guest
speaker will be Inverness City
Manager Frank DiGiovanni and
he will be sharing with us the fu-
ture plans for Inverness.
The cost will be $5 for mem-
bers pre-paid; $7 at the door and
for non-members. To register, visit
www.citruscountychamber.com.
For any questions, please call
352-795-3149.



New Image Award


Plantation on Crystal River, at 9301 W. Fort Island Trail in
Crystal River, was awarded the New Image Award at the
April Chamber Membership Luncheon. The Plantation un-
derwent major renovations in December and the new up-
dated look of the hotel and restaurant adds to their
peaceful location along Crystal River. Please call 352-795-
4211 for more information or visit their website at
www.plantationinn.com. Pictured are Chamber CEO Josh
Wooten; Chamber Ambassador Rhonda Lestinsky, Nature
Coast Bank; Janet Mayo, catering manager at Plantation
on Crystal River, and Chamber Board Chairman Bill Winkel,
Winkel Construction.


Wal-Mart Supercenter
Wal-Mart Supercenter, at the new
location on 6885 S. Suncoast Blvd. in
Homosassa, recently joined the
Chamber. Please call 352-628-4161
for more information on their hours.
Pictured with Wal-Mart staff are the
following Chamber Ambassadors: Tom
Corcoran, LifeCare of Citrus County;
Sarah Fitts, First International Title;
Janet Mayo, Plantation on Crystal
River; Jeanne Green, The Grove
Downtown; Jennifer Duca, Comfort
Keepers; Nancy Hautop, Cadence
Bank; Bonnie Hardiman-Pushee; Dan
Pushee; Mike Buchanan, Excel
Printing; Rhonda Lestinsky, Nature
Coast Bank; Chamber Director Carl
Flanagan, Nature Coast Bank; George
Bendtsen, Insurance by George; and
Sue Fullerton, Walk Don't Run Travel.


Camp E-Nini-Hassee


The Chamber of Commerce presented a donation to Re-
becca Schmalstig with Camp E-Nini-Hassee for their in-
volvement with the 2012 Strawberry Festival. The girls from
Camp E-Nini-Hassee spent several hours at Ferris Groves cut-
ting strawberries used for strawberry shortcake for the fes-
tival weekend. Also pictured are Chamber CEO Josh Wooten,
Special Events Coordinator Tobey Phillips and Chairman Bill
Winkel.


CONGRATULATIONS TO AWARD WINNERS
* The Chamber of Commerce Annual Awards Dinner
was Friday, April 20, at Citrus Hills Golf & Country
Club. We recognized the following individuals and
businesses for their contributions to our community
and we congratulate them!
* Rick Quinn Distinguished Citizen Award -
Neale Brennan.
* Dr. O.J. Humphries Community Service Award -
Lou Miele.
* John Barnes Outstanding Community Organization
Award Black Diamond Foundation.
* Walt Connors Small Business Award -
Sunflower Springs Assisted Living Community.
* J.L. Hassell Award Mike Scott Plumbing.
* Outstanding Leadership Citrus Graduate -
Ginger West.
* Jean Grant Business Women's Alliance Award -
Dee Peters.
* Mandi Warren Richards Rising Star Award -
Amy Kingery.
* Ambassador of the Year -
Bonnie Hardiman-Pushee.
* Lifetime Ambassador-- Pete Burrell.
* Lifetime Member- Don Mayo.
* Chamber Champions Jennifer Duca, Dan Pushee
and Dawn Faherty, Agricultural Alliance of Citrus
County.
* Four additional awards will be presented at the May
Chamber membership luncheon, since the recipi-
ents were unable to attend the dinner.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Business DIGEST


Donald Wexler, DDS,
recertified by ABO
SPRING HILLAND
LECANTO Donald L.
Wexler, DDS, Ph.D., P.A., of
Wexler Orthodontics recently
again passed
the American
Board of Or-
thodontics
board's recer-
tification ex-
amination
allowing him
to continue Dr. Donald
as a Diplo- Wexler
mate of the Wexler
ABO for the Orthodontics.
next 10
years. Only 20 percent to 25
percent of orthodontists nation-
ally are board-certified. Wexler
recently sat for the exam in Dal-
las, Texas.
Board certification is a volun-
tary credential provided by the
ABO, signifying an orthodontist
has demonstrated a certain
level of competency and profi-
ciency. In order to obtain board
certification, an orthodontist
must have completed an ac-
credited specialty program in
orthodontics and passed a
comprehensive written exam.
Successful passage allows the
orthodontist to present treated
cases, which are evaluated by
expert examiners of the board.
For more information about the
ABO, go to www.American
BoardOrtho.com.
Wexler practices orthodon-
tics in both Hernando and Cit-
rus counties. His Lecanto office
is at 573 N. Dacie Point; 352-
527-9927. His Spring Hill office
is at 1222 Mariner Blvd. ; 352-
688-0331.
Although Wexler practices in
both Hernando and Citrus
counties, he and his family live
in New Port Richey. He re-
ceived his DDS from Temple
University in Philadelphia. He
holds a Ph.D. degree in micro-
biology from the University of
Rochester in upstate New York.
He obtained his advanced train-
ing in orthodontics from the
University of Florida. For infor-
mation, call Wexler Orthodon-
tics or go to
www.WexlerOrthodontics.com.
Insurance agencies
make top 10 list
TALLAHASSEE Three
area businesses have been
named one of the Top 10
growth agencies for the com-
pany in the Tallahassee region
for 2011 by Auto-Owners Insur-
ance. They were recognized at
a luncheon meeting in Tallahas-
see and at a reception with all
regional associates, where they
and other recipients were pre-
sented with plaques commem-
orating their accomplishments.
The Hagar Group, Inver-
ness, has represented Auto-
Owners since 1974.


Bay Area Air Conditioning receives 2012 President's Award


Special to the Chronicle
Bay Area Air Conditioning recently
received the 2012 President's Award
from Carrier for its quality, leader-
ship and excellence in the heating,
ventilation and air conditioning
(HVAC) industry Dealerships were
honored at a Feb. 17 ceremony in
Orlando.
One of Carrier's highest honors for
its dealers, the Presidents Award is
given to Carrier Factory Authorized
Dealers who achieved excellence in
product promotions and delivered
superior customer satisfaction. Re-
cipients of this award exemplify Car-
rier's model for operational
excellence, business effectiveness
and delivering the best in cutting-
edge technology to consumers.
Bay Area Air Conditioning suc-
cessfully demonstrates technical ex-
pertise, while also serving as a leader
in promoting the Carrier brand and
raising the standard for equipment
sales.
Serving the Nature Coast for more
than 35 years, Dave Hutchins, presi-
dent and owner of Bay Area, attrib-
utes much of his success to taking
care of his customers, employees and
his community Hutchins follows the
principles of former President Harry
Truman and said, "If you make a good
living in your community, you owe
something back to that community"


Special to the Chronicle
Bay Area Air Conditioning recently received the 2012 President's Award from
Carrier From left are: Chris Nelson, president of residential sales for Carrier
Corp.; Joe Muley, president of Carrier Enterprise Florida; Dave Hutchins, pres-
ident and owner of Bay Area Air Conditioning; Jeff Hoffman, general manager
West Coast for Carrier Enterprise Florida; and David Meyers, vice president of
residential sales for Carrier Corp.


"Dave feels it is very important to
give back to the community; espe-
cially those who have special needs,"
said Cliff Pierson, general manager.
He added, "Bay Area is a Key Center
partner, which is one of the organiza-
tions Dave holds close to his heart."
To date, Hutchins and his employ-
ees have logged many hours of local
and national community service. The
National Home Builders Association,
Habitat for Humanity, Relay for Life,


Scouts of America, Key Training Cen-
ter and local Chamber of Commerce
are just a sampling of the organiza-
tions supported by Bay Area Air Con-
ditioning. Bay Area donates not only
time to worthy projects, but door
prizes, cash sponsorships and, in a few
cases, entire air conditioning systems.
To learn more about Bay Area and
its heating and cooling products and
services, call 352-795-2665 or visit
www.BayAreaCool.com.


Black Diamond Foundation supporters


Special to the Chronicle
Jay Joines of the Black Diamond Foundation, center right, presented the members of the Suncoast Business Masters with
a plaque in recognition of their continued support of the annual Black Diamond Foundation Pro-Am Golf Tournament. Each
year, the tournament raises funds to support local families through various charities, scholarships and other helpful pro-
grams. Accepting the award on behalf of the members is SBM club President Gailen Spinka, center left. Suncoast Busi-
ness Masters is a club comprised of Citrus County business owners or managers who meet each Wednesday for lunch at
Black Diamond for individual networking purposes and collectively to plan further ways to help local residents by coordi-
nating or participating in charitable fundraising events. Business people who may be interested in joining the SBM should
call Gailen Spinka at 352-726-9145.


Sheldon Palmes Insur-
ance Agency, Homosassa, has
represented Auto-Owners since
2003.
Brice Insurance Agency,
Inverness, has represented
Auto-Owners since 2010.
Jeff Harrold, Chairman &
CEO of Auto-Owners, thanked
the agencies for their support
and business, stating, "Their
growth and support only help to
make the entire community
stronger and more secure. We
are grateful they choose to do
business with us."
Auto-Owners Insurance was
founded in 1916 and has


served Florida since 1952.
Auto-Owners is a Fortune 500
company and one of nine car-
rier groups to receive A.M.
Best's highest rating, A++ (Su-
perior). Auto-Owners is head-
quartered in Lansing, Mich.,
and serves policyholders in 26
states.
Locher on board at
Audibel Hearing
Maureen Locher has attained
the position of professional
practice ambassador/office
manager for the Homosassa of-
fice of Audibel Hearing Centers
at 5699 S. Suncoast Blvd.


MISSING SOMETHING?




www.chronicleonline.com


Lk&4 iC6im^m


Get current TV listingi"7,

features, movie descriptions,

games and more!!





OOOAW3R563-3295


Before joining Audibel Hear-
ing Centers, Locher worked for
six years as a loan originator for
Reverse Mortgage LLC. Prior
to that, she was a water spe-
cialist and office manager for
BestBuy Water in Crystal River.
Many people know her through
her work as a family service di-
rector at Fountains Memorial
Park in Homosassa.


Her volunteer work includes
the Citrus County Sheriff's Of-
fice as manager for the Child ID
Program, as well as serving on
the board of directors for the
Citizen's Academy Alumni As-
sociation for the past five years,
which is also part of the sheriff's
office.
For the past year, she has
worked with the Citrus County


Board of County Commission-
ers as a casual worker. Joining
Audibel will allow her to con-

sion for
serving the
community.
She is mar-
ried to Robert
Locher in
Crystal River;
they have
three children Maureen
and four Locher
grandchil- Audibel
dren. Hearing
Audibel Centers.
Hearing Cen-
ters of Inverness and Ho-
mosassa are a part of a
nationwide network of 1,400
hearing care professionals.
Locher can be reached at
maureen.audibel@hotmail.com
or in the Homosassa office of
Audibel at 352-621-8000.
Workshop slated
for entrepreneurs
HOMOSASSA- The Citrus
County Business Resource Al-
liance Partners will present the
workshop "Hire Your First Em-
ployee" from 5:30 to 8 p.m.
Tuesday, May 15, at the Col-
lege of Central Florida Learning
Center, Building L-4, 3800 S.
Lecanto Highway.
This workshop is designed
for self-employed entrepre-
neurs who are ready to hire
their first employee. Attendees
will receive step-by-step guid-
ance on finding employees,
how much to pay, navigating
red tape such as payroll taxes
and benefits, and becoming the
boss. The registration fee in-
cludes a book to be used in the
workshop. To ensure delivery
by the workshop date, pre-reg-
istration is recommended as
soon as possible.
The featured presenter is
Mike Orlito, certified business
analyst for the Small Business
Development Center at UNF in
Citrus County. The content for
this workshop is pulled from
"Hire Your First Employee," a
book by small-business expert
Rhonda Abrams.
Abrams has advised, men-
tored and consulted with entre-
preneurs and small business
owners since 1986. An experi-
enced entrepreneur herself,
she started three successful
companies, including a small
business consulting firm. Her
experience gives her a strong,
real-life understanding of the
challenges facing entrepre-
neurs. Currently, she is the
founder and CEO of The Plan-
ning Shop, a company focused
See DIGEST/Page D4


Gra


Tell the special graduate in

your life how much you care.

Print an inspiring message in

our annual keepsake tab.

Include photos of your

graduate at no extra charge.

Ad Deadline: April 27, 2012

Publication Date: May 15, 2012


Call the
Chronicle
or stop by our
Meadowcrest
office
8am-5pm
Mon.-Fri.
to reserve
your space
call:

Saralynne
564-2917
or
Mike
563-3273


2 Column x 5" $89.00


2 Column x 3" $69.00




2 Column x 2" $49.00
2 Column x 2" $49.00


I


BUSINESS


SUNDAY, APRIL 22, 2012 D3





D4 SUNDAY, APRIL 22, 2012


BOX
Continued from Page Dl

helps veterans in the Or-
lando area make the tran-
sition from military service
to civilian careers. VET-
Sourcing's goal is to pro-
vide the veterans,
especially those with dis-
abilities which preclude
traditional employment,
with paid work opportuni-
ties and projects that will
help them earn a living,
sharpen their skills, and
become increasingly com-
petitive for full-time place-
ments, additional project
assignments and greater
earning potential.
"Jobs may be in short sup-
ply, but in some industries
there is actually more work
than ever as companies are
beginning to ramp back up
and prepare for market de-
mands," Urquhart said.
We are excited about the
potential for Your Talent
Hub and possibility of
opening up this new world


DIGEST
Continued from Page D3

on providing entrepreneurs with
high quality information and
tools for developing successful
business plans.
Workshop sponsors are
Quickbooks Assist and HR So-
lutions in Tandem.
Registration cost is $15 per
person for members of: Cham-
ber, EDC, SBDC and SCORE,
or $20 per person for the gen-
eral public. To register, contact
Matthew at 352-795-2000 or
matthew@citruscounty
chamber.com, or visit "events"
page at www.citrusedc.com.
Veterans may be able to at-
tend this workshop free of
charge. Go to http://vetsfast-
launch.org/coupon-signup/ to
request a coupon to bring to the
seminar.
Citrus County Business Re-


BUSINESS


of work to those who never
thought it was even possi-
ble. That's just the begin-
ning of what's in store for
Your Talent Hub.
If you are interested in
joining the talent hub, or
just finding out more, sign
up for one of the orienta-
tions by sending an email
to talenthub@clmwork
force.com. You may also
call the Talent Hub infor-
mation line at 800-434-5627,
ext. 1147.
You'll find a variety of
additional information by
visiting http://YourTalent
Hub. com and by following
us on Twitter @YourTalent
Hub and checking us out
on Facebook at Facebook.
com/YourTalentHub.


Laura Byrnes, APR is a
Certified Workforce
Professional and commu-
nications manager at
Workforce Connection.
Contact her at 352- 291-955
or 800-434-5627, ext. 1234,
orlbyrnes@
clmworkforce. com.


source Alliance Partners are:
Citrus County BOCC, Agricul-
tural Alliance, Chamber of
Commerce, College of Central
Florida, Economic Develop-
ment Council, SCORE, Small
Business Development Center
at UNF in Citrus and Workforce
Connection.
DeFrancisco goes to
legislative caucus
Peggy DeFrancisco, vice
president of Taylor Rental in In-
verness and director/treasurer
of Florida American Rental As-
sociation, joined colleagues
from the equipment rental in-
dustry and the American Rental
Association recently on Capitol
Hill and met with elected repre-
sentatives on high-priority is-
sues within the industry. More
than 85 ARA members from 36
states met with members of the
U.S. Senate and the House of
Representatives for an intense
and successful advocacy ses-


MONEY
Continued from Page Dl

couple of credit cards."
How on earth can they
run my credit report with-
out me applying for any-
thing? It seems to me this
was done just to solicit busi-
ness. I thought credit re-
ports could be run only to
see if you were creditworthy
because you had applied for
a loan of some kind, not to
solicit someone. I feel this is
unethical. Reader, via
email
DEAR READER: You are
correct when you say that
the basic reason for credit
reports is to help businesses
weed out credit applica-
tions based on potential cus-
tomers' creditworthiness.
However, the reality is that
many companies can pull
credit reports before mak-
ing offers. I am not prepared
to comment on whether
using the information as
you've described is ethical.
The company's offer to


sion. Key issues addressed in-
cluded the Surface Transporta-
tion Reauthorization bill, repeal
of the health insurance tax, and
tax reform.
DeFrancisco is co-owner of
Taylor Rental, an equipment
rental business specializing in
construction/general tool/party
and event rentals. Contact De-
Francisco from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Monday through Friday at 352-
726-1900 or email trcrent@
hotmail.com.
Purves named as
Grassroots Champ
TALLAHASSEE The
American Hospital Association
(AHA), in partnership with
Florida Hospital Association
(FHA), announced Steve
Purves, president and CEO of
Munroe Regional Medical Cen-
ter in Ocala, as the AHA Grass-
roots Champion for Florida. As
a 2012 Grassroots Champion,
Purves is being recognized for


This is another example of how
having a properly drawn will can
obviate many problems. A few
dollars spent on a will would have
saved a great many dollars that will
now have to be expended.


help you consolidate your
debt makes me nervous. If
that is something you need
to look into, I would do just
that: Look into it. Do your
homework. There are so
many of these debt consoli-
dation/negotiation firms
that it leaves one question-
ing their motives. Walk
softly
DEAR BRUCE: My father
died without a will, thinking
the kids would "work it out
equitably on their own."
Boy, was he ever wrong.
There are three of us, and
my one sister had been
helping Dad with his bills,
etc. She has elected to "pay"
herself and remove all of his
money from his account.


his exceptional leadership in
generating grassroots and
community activity in support of
a hospital's mission.
"Steve Purves is a true
health care leader. He meets
routinely with members of Con-
gress in Washington and mem-
bers of the Legislature in
Tallahassee to inform and edu-
cate them on health care is-
sues. Steve is a tireless
champion for his patients, em-
ployees and community and
truly deserves to be named
AHA Grassroots Champion for
2012," said Bruce Rueben,
FHA president.
Purves' leadership roles in-
clude service on the FHA Board
of Trustees, strategic planning
committee and he currently
chairs the advocacy committee.
This year, his activism played a
key role in Florida hospitals'
success in averting a $2.1 bil-
lion proposed cut to hospital
payments for the care of low-


Since there wasn't a will,
is there any legal recourse
the rest of us can take, since
she's not returning phone
calls? No one, to my knowl-
edge, was ever given the re-
sponsibility of being in
charge of his estate. D.P,
via email
DEAR D.P: Since your fa-
ther died without a will, the
state will decide to whom
the remainder of his estate
will go, and in what
amounts, after his obliga-
tions have been settled. One
of you needs to apply to be
named administrator of his
estate in the surrogates
court of the county where
your father lived. All of his
children will be asked to


income families, children, the
elderly and disabled.
Networking
workshop at CF
There will be a networking
workshop from 4 to 6 p.m.
Wednesday, April 25, at the
College of Central Florida Cit-
rus Campus.
Networking can be one of the
most productive ways to invest
in your business and yourself,
or it can be a total waste of time
if not done well. What deter-
mines the value?
At this workshop, participants
will focus on how to approach
networking, how to accomplish
it in a variety of settings and
how to make it pay off.
The fee is $40 for Citrus
County Chamber of Commerce
members or Next Generation
Professionals.
For non-Chamber members,
the fee is $49. Call 352-249-
1210 to register.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

sign off on the application.
Your sister might object to
someone else being ap-
pointed administrator. If it
gets to that, legal motions
would be made on the part
of both parties, and the sur-
rogate would have to settle
the matter.
This is another example
of how having a properly
drawn will can obviate
many problems. A few dol-
lars spent on a will would
have saved a great many
dollars that will now have to
be expended. Good luck.


"The Bruce Williams
Show" is coming to the
Internet, and Bruce needs
your help. Learn more at
GetMoreBruce.com. Send
questions to
bruce@brucewilliams. com
or to Smart Money, PO. Box
7150, Hudson, FL 34674.
Questions ofgeneral
interest will be answered
in future columns. Owing to
the volume ofmail,
personal replies cannot be
provided.


Career Fair set for
job-seekers
OCALA-- Community job-
seekers are invited to join Col-
lege of Central Florida students
for the inaugural Spring Fling
Career Fair from 10 a.m. to 2
p.m. Wednesday, April 25, at
the Learning and Conference
Center at CF's Citrus Campus,
3800 S. Lecanto Highway, in
Lecanto.
The Career Fair is hosted by
the college in partnership with
Workforce Connection of Cit-
rus, Levy and Marion counties.
There is no charge to attend
the Career Fair.
Participants are asked to
bring at least 10 printed copies
of their resume and to dress
professionally.
For information, call 352-637-
2223 or 800-434-JOBS.
To learn more about Work-
force Connection, visit
www.clmworkforce.com.


CITRUS COUNTY 0



CHRONICLE Classifieds
www.chronicleonline.com Classifieds In Print and Online All The Time!


BUSINESS HOURS:

MONDAY-FRIDAY
8:00 A.M. 5:00 P.M.
CLOSED SATURDAY/SUNDAY


WE GLADLY ACCEPT

| S"Am1.


young Senior Citizen
seeking active, petite
woman who still has
some wild oats to sow.
Call (352) 322-1001
Gentleman in his sixties
would like to meet a
lady for out door
activities & fun. Please
call (352) 382-5661
The Riaht Lady
I'm beginning to think
she doesn't exist. I'm
ready to throw in the
towel after searching
a long time for the
right gal. I'm an ac-
tive widower in de-
cent shape, who
seeks to meet a
happv attractive, af-
fectionate, extro-
verted Christian lady
between 65-75 with a
warm personality, in
aood health slim
build for meaningful
conversation and
other social activities
and perhaps a per-
sonal, loving relation-
ship. Is this asking too
much? If you some-
how fit the bill, give
me a call at
527-0591. I'd love to
hear from you!




V THIS OUT!
AC & HEAT PUMPS
FREE Estimate & 2nd
Opinion, 10 yr. warr.
on ALL Parts, Great
prices, ALL the time.
352-400-4945
Lic #CAC027361
INVERNESS 2/2/1
New paint & flooring
$695 mo. Inclds. trash,
352- 637-0765,
352-267-9941
SUNDAY, 12N-3p
Oakwood Village
BEVERLY HILLS
820 Sunset Strip, 3/2/1
1747 sf. New kit./bths.
flooring, paint, in/out.
$79,900 352-527-1239



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
Paid for Junk Vehicles,
J.W. 352-228-9645


$$ CASH PAID $$
For Junk or wrecked
Cars/Trucks, $300 & UP
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$

$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191


FREE REMOVAL
Appls. Riding Mowers,
Scrap Metal, AC Unit
cell -352-270-4087




Crab Trap Found
on Ozello Trail
Call to identify
352-795-2974


Free to good Home
Brown Pitt Mix Puppy
male, 12 weeks,
amazing with kids.
(352) 422-0327

Male Chow
must have land &
fenced yard, neutered,
great dog w/kids
can't keep
352-621-0229


Team Delivery


Opportunity 4


Would you like to
deliver newspapers
but don't want to
work 7 days a week?


We are taking applications
for teams to contract a
route.
V Lead contractor must
be 18 yrs of age
V Must have valid driver's
license and insurance


MAKE EXTRA MONEY!

DELIVERING




Email:
kstewart@chronicleonline.com
or come to I
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River for an aDDlication.n


KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Savage Pays top $$$.
352-628-4144
Natural Soil Builder
Horse Manure
You Load. Pine Ridge
(352) 270-9372
taking all
donations,clothing,
furniture,baby
stuff,purses,shoes,toys,ectplas
e calljamb @
586-9754 thank you


African Grey Parrot
Floral city if you see
him please call
352-201-7080
or animal control


Publication Days/Deadlines

Chronicle / Daily.................................... 1 PM, Daily
Homefront / Sunday..............................3 PM, Friday
Chronicle / Sunday...........................4....4 PM, Friday
Chronicle / Monday..........................4....4 PM, Friday
Sumter County Times / Thursday............. 11 AM, Tuesday
Riverland News / Thursday...............2....2 PM, Monday
South Marion Citizen / Friday............4....4 PM, Tuesday
West Marion Messenger / Wednesday.......4 PM, Friday



-= -1.. -....


LOST PETS. Two A. Pit
Bull Terr's, one male
white with brown ear, one
female white with brown
spots. Lost Thursday
night in vicinity of Regions
Bank / Downtown Inver-
ness. They were not
wearing their collars at
the time of their great es-
cape / adventure.
697-3023 or 419-6970

Pit Bull Pup
male, champagne
we/white strip in head
white spot on back of
neck & paws weight
31 pounds, last seen
School Ave near why
44 REWARD
$100.(352) 527-0517
352-364-2747


JacK Russell Terrier
male 7 mos old white
brown eay & eye,
name Patch. Last seen
Homosassa Boys & Girls
Club 4/13/12
352- 287-5246 cell
(352) 628-4000





REWARD $1000.
No Questions ask.
Min Pin Female 10 lbs
name Zoey, Needs
meds. last seen Sun 8/7
Holiday Dr off Turkey
Oak Crystal River
(352)257-9546 400-1519


SINGLE COPY

NEWSPAPER ROUTE

AVAILABLE.
There is an immediate opportunity for a single
copy independent contractor to service racks
and businesses in the Citrus County area.


V Early Morning
Hours

V Need reliable
vehicle

SVMust be 18
years old


TheCitrsC u nty hnice


Pit Bull missing
male, red nose pit bull
Floral City Area
Diane (352) 419-2623
Toy Poodle, female
5 lb, Sassa Oaks Est.
Homosassa
REWARD
(352) 628-2271



KEYS
on ring w/flash light
8 keys found at Pac &
Fax Homosassa can be
picked up at Citrus
Chroncile 1624 N
Meadowcrest Blvd
Crystal River
352-563-6363 front desk



Huge discounts when
you buy 2 types of
advertising! 120 com-
munity newspapers,
32 websites, 26 daily
newspapers. Call
now to diversify your
advertising with Ad-
vertising Networks of
Florida
(866)742-1373
PRAYER TO THE BLESSED
VIRGIN
(Never known to fail)
0 most beautiful flower
of Mt. Caramel, fruitful
vine, splendor of
heaven.
Blessed Mother of the
Son of God,
Immaculate
Virgin, assist me in my
necessity. 0 Star of the
Sea, help me and show
me here you are my
mother. 0 Holy Mary,
Mother of God, Queen
of Heaven and Earth, I
humbly beseech you
from the bottom of my
heart to secure me in
my necessity. (Make
request). There are
none that can with-
stand your power. 0
Mary, conceived with-
out sin, pray for us who
have recourse to thee.
(3 times). Holy Mary, I
place this causein your
hands (3 times). Say this
prayer for 3 consecu-
tive days and then you
must publish and it will
be granted to you.
NL


Tupperware
Consultant Fran Smith
Is Back, 352-746-3652




TEACHER
40 hr. req., CDA Pref.
Ark Angels
(352) 795-2360




HAIR STYLIST
FTIPT Immediate
Openings, Call Sue
352-628-0630








Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966




#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)


(ONNE(TIG HERIITI
BUYE-R WIH IlY UbRIMESS
^^^lATA~arj 1 j^ 1 ~i ^-'i 111 JT''T^.

^^^* * ^

BT.n.i .








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


HOME HEALTH
CARE
PROFESSIONALS
Rapidly expanding home
health company, Village
Home Care is seeking
additional staffing Citrus
County, The Villages and
Ocala. These individuals
must have experience in
Medicare Home Health.
Full time and part time
positions are available for
RNs, LPNs, Physical
Therapists, Physical
Therapist Assistants.

Please respond by email:
plarkin@villagehome-
care.org or fax:
352-390-6559

Hospital RN's
Needed
MS/Tele ICU ER Float
www.
nurse-temps.comrn
352-344-9828

MEDICAL ASSIST.

Full time position for
front/back office for
FP Office by CMH.
Fax Resume:
(352) 726-2808

Medical
Billing Clerk
$11.50 Hr. Neg.
Nice Office.
Respond to: Citrus
County Chronicle
Blind Box 1735 P
1624 N Meadowcrest
Blvd, Crystal River
Florida 34429

MEDICAL BILLING
TRAINEES NEEDED
Train to become a
Medical Office Assis-
tant! No Experience
needed! Job Training
& Local Placement
assistance. HS
Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)374-7294

Medical Office
Needs People
With Experience in
Insurances, Nursing,
and Computers.
SEND RESUME TO:
Citrus Co. Chronicle
Blind Box 1769M
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River
Florida, 34429

RESIDENT
ASSISTANT
Looking for reliable
staff. Must be
available any shift
any day of the week.
Looking for PRN and
PT Staff. Nursing expe-
rience preferred.
Apply at
BARRINGTON PLACE
2341 W Norvell
Bryant Hwy.Lecanto
EOE/DFWP


CHIRO ASST. PT
PH & FAX 795-8911

P.T. Tech
Part-time position
open for a physical
therapy clinic.
Experience preferred.
Please fax resumes
to (352) 726-7582.

Specialty
Nurse Practitioner
Needed, Respond to:
Citrus County
Chronicle
Blind Box 1768 P
1624 N Meadowcrest
Blvd., Crystal River
Florida, 34429




EXP IRRIGATION TECH

clean driving record
(352) 527-3537

P/T CLERKS
retail experience
strongly preferred.
Must be able to work
in outside conditions
unloading & sorting
donated items.
Flexible schedule,
weekends.
Apply in person
Key Training Center,
5399 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy. Lecanto FL
*EOE**





AC SALES
Will train right person,
easy six figure income
Must have val. fl. DL,
Barb (352) 726-1002




Class-A FlatBed Driv-
ers$ Home EVERY
Weekend, Run S.E. US
REQUIRES 1 YrOTR F.B.
Exp, & payUP TO
.39/mile Call
(800)572-5489 x 227
SUNBELT TRANSPORT,
LLC

MECHANIC/
BOAT RIGGER


Apply in Person
at
Homosassa
Marine
3120 S.
Suncoast Blvd
Homosassa,
Fl. 34448
or Mail
Resume


a
Drivers New Freight
for Refrigerated & Dry
Van lines. Annual Sal-
ary $45k to $60k. Flexi-
ble hometimee. CDL-A,
3 months current OTR
experience.
800-414-9569
www.drivekniaht.comn

EXPERIENCED
ROOFING CREW
Must have Truck
Tools & Equipment.
A ly In Person
AWROOFING
Crystal River
(352) 563-0411




25 Driver Trainees
Needed Now!
at Schneider National
Earn $750 per week!
No experience
needed! Local CDL
Training! Job ready in
15 days!
(888)368-1964

APT
MAINTENANCE
40 hrs/wk, 2 days
@ Misty Woods Apts.
Bushnell,
3 days @ Candle-
wood, Inverness.
Call 352-344-1010
for an appt.

BOOKKEEPING
Quick Books a Must.
JOE'S CARPET
138 N. Florida Ave.

CAREGIVERS
NEEDED
All Shifts No Exp.
Necessary Apply At
HOME INSTEAD
SENIOR CARE
4224 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Lecanto

CITRUS MAIDS

Cleaning Person
needed. Must have
flex. schedule,
lic./vehicle. Exp. a
plus. Leave message
(352) 257-0925

DOCKHAND/
GEN LABOR
Mechanical Exp
pref. Apply in person
Magic Manatee
Marina
10806 Halls River Rd.

Exp. AC Installers

Own Tools & Truck,
TOP PAY, Call Barb
(352) 726-1002

EXPERIENCED
FIBERGLASS
LAMINATOR
(Min 5 yrs Exp) Small
custom fiberglass Boat
Builder accepting
applications. Please
apply in person.
131 Hwy. 19N-Inglis


HORSE FARM HELP
Experienced, stalls,
turn out, groom.
Inglis area.P/T EOE
352-447-1008

Housekeeping
Position
Relate well w/
people -able to lift
501bs. Hours vary,
able to work wknds.
Applyv in Person
M-F 10-34
Rainbow Rivers Club,
20510 The Granada,
Dunnellon,
No Calls Please.

PT Custodian
Afternoon & evening
work w/ occasional
weekends. Heavy
lifting. Tabaco free
campus, random
drug testing back-
ground check req.
Send resume to: info@
fbcinverness.com
1ST BAPTIST INVERNESS

TECHNICIAN
NEEDED

Must have 2 yrs. exp.
working with animals
and people.
Send Resume to
Citrus Co. Chronicle
Blind Box 1770P
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River
Florida 34429













KFC

YOU BELONG AT
KFC..
KFC@ 1110 Hwy 41 N,
Inverness
is hiring experienced
GENERAL, ASSISTANT
and SHIFT MANAGERS
for competitive pay
and great benefits.
Apply in Person
or e-mail your resume
to info@
kingneptuneinc.com




Admin. Assistant

avg. 3 days wk. finan-
cial planning firm,
Inverness, upbeat
multitasker, detail ori-
ented, proficient
w/Word, Excel, Inter-
net, & dictation,
bckgrd ck, $10 to S12
hr. email resume to:
Kingcfpl@
tampabay.rr.com


CLASSIFIED




Cleaner Wanted
Hardworking,depend-
able, must pass
background check,
customer oriented,
reliable transportation
Call 302-6418 dfwp

Convenience
STORE CLERK
PIT 20 Hrs.
Experienced. Apply in
Person @ PURE
1017 SE Hwy 19
NO PHONE CALLS!

OTR DRIVERS
NEEDED
Must have 2 yrs. OTR
experience, a clean
MVR, and pass drug
and safety test. Out 30
days, In 30 days. Per-
centage pay. Contact:
Angela @
352-637-3183

WORK CAMPER
Grounds Maint./
Housekeeping,
couple or single. Must
have own RV 24hrs.
for Site. No salary
352-601-0812





#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)

Freight Up = More $
2 Mos. CDL Class A
Driving Exp
(877)258-8782www.me
Itontruck.com/
drive




AIRLINES ARE HIRING -
Train for hands on
Aviation Maintenance
Career. FAA approved
program.
Financial aid if qualified
Housing Available.
CALL Aviation Institute
Of Maintenance.
(866)314-3769





"Can you Dig It?"
We will train, certify &
provide lifetime assis-
tance landing work.
Hiring in Florida. Start
digging as a heavy
equipment operator
(866)362-6497

#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)


SUNDAY,APRIL 22, 2012 D5


Attend College
Online from Home

*Medical, *Business,
*Paralegal,
*Accounting,
*Criminal Justice. Job
placement assis-
tance. Computer
available. Financial
Aid if qualified. SHEV
certified. Call
(877) 206-5165
www.CenturaOnline
.com




TAYLORCOLLEGE





2 WEEK
PREP COURSES!
*ALF ADMINISTRATOR
$300.
*EKG TECH $475.
*NURSING ASST. $475.
*PHLEBOTOMY $475.

tavlorcolleae.edu
(352) 245-4119
FB, twitter, you tube
---- E
S "" NOW 7

ENROLLING
FOR SPRING
2012 CLASSES
-BARBER
COSMETOLOGY
FACIAL
I*FULL SPECIALTY
INSTRUCTOR
*MANICURE/Nail Ext
reMASSAGE THERAPY

BENE'S
International
I School of Beauty
NEW PORT RICHEY
/SPRING HILL
727-848-8415
352-263-2744
L.-----J



Pizza/Sub Biz
inside Cony. Store all
equip NEW. Ready to
go only $22K
(352) 637-1488




Boat, RV, Car
Storage indoor $75.
month(352) 637-1739




Exclusive Record
Collection
classical country, pop
assorted albums
excel cond. $200 obo
(352) 628-3076
LARGE SERVING PLAT-
TER WITH SOUP OR
VEGETABLE TUREEN
$20 SMALL ROSE PAT-
TERN 419-5981


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





Free Standing
Electric Stove,
glass top, 5 burners,
convection oven self
cleaning, used 11/ yrs.
$350. (352) 503-6986
Frigidaire front load
Washer
3 years old, $200.
Hoover steam Vac
carpet cleaner
$40. (352) 400-4891
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR, washers
dryers,FREE pick up
352-564-8179

SOLD
Whirlpool
Free Standing Range &
matching microwave,
new/never used, black,
all electric
$700 for both
WANTED DEAD
OR ALIVE
Washers & Dryers
(352) 209-5135
WASHER OR DRYER
$150.00 Each. Reliable,
Like New, Excellent Con-
dition. Can Deliver 352
263-7398




COMPUTER DESK slide
out keyboard drawer.
$40.00 352-628-7619




10" Craftsman Radial
Arm Saw,
w/ stand, used 1 day,
New $1,600 Asking $500
10" Cut Off Saw, $50.
Framing Saw $100
(352) 621-1207
SHOP SMITH Mark IV
complete
w/attachments,manuals.
Like New $1500.00 OBO,
Wooden Bench 72x30,2
drawers,1 metal&1 wood
Vice $100.00
352-302-0289


I olet 1


RCA TV/DVD/VCR
COMBO
great condition
$100
(352) 465-4234
WOOD CABINET
w/VCR & 25" Goldstar
Tv, has remote, bottom
door asking $75.
19" Curtis Mathis TV w/
remote $40. 382-1167




2 COMPUTERS
Towers from $70up.
complete systems
$110 (352) 586-6891
AUTO DC CONVERTER
for computer, etc.
12vdc to 120ac 140
watts.
$20 352 726 9983
DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
DIGITAL PICTURE
FRAME With remote con-
trol and SD photo card.
Like new $20 352 726
9983
SHARP VL-NZ100 DIG-
ITAL VIEWCAM GENTLY
USED 3-TIMES
2-MUCH-2-LIST 4-INFO
586-7222



CRAFTSMAN TABLE
SAW 10 inch with 2 feet
metal side table top
extenders,roller stand.
$200.00 352-726-6845



2 END TABLES small,
round, off white,
marble-like finish $15 for
both (352)527-2422
3 Piece
Coffee, End & Sofa Ta-
bles, glass, faux marble
with gilded legs $175
(352) 419-6242
50's Style Dining Table,
black & white chrome,
+ 4 blk./white chrome
vinyl chairs, 1 leaf, ex-
cel. cond. $450 obo
+ acutal 50's yellow &
chrome dinette set
w/ 2 yellow vinyl and
chrome chairs $50.
(414) 379-3390
BAR STOOLS (2) OAK
Upholstered back and
seat Oak arms Seat
height 27" $80. pair Pine
Ridge 352-270-3909
Bedroom set
3 pcs. Queen sz sleigh,
Lg triple decker &
mirror, 3 drawer night
stand, walnut $600.
like new(352) 746-9747
CHEST OF DRAWERS
light wood, 7 drawers,
very good condition $50
(352)527-2422
CORNER COMPUTER
DESKS 2 light wood color
corner computer desks.
$50 each. Call
352-586-7346


PS D~w~~vy


ROB SCREENING
Repairs Rescreen, Front
Entries, Garage, Sliders
Free Est. 352-835-2020





SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Washer &
Dryers, Free Pick Up
352-564-8179





Blind Factory
by Joanne We custom
make all types. Best
prices anywhere! Hwy
44 &CR 491. 746-1998






LIC. & EXP. CNA
Will Care For You
Cook, Clean & Daily
Needs (352) 249-7451


Loving Adult Care
Home (SL 6906450)
Alzheimer/Dementia
no prob 352-503-7052





ROGERS Construction
All Construction
sm jobs Free Est (352)
637-4373 CRC1326872


SHADY VIEW CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
IBoat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518




Clean Ups &
Clean Outs
(352) 220-9190



AFFORDABLE
COMPUTER SERV.
(352) 341-4150
Computer Problems?
Sr. Discount-in home
service. John Warken
(352) 503-4137

NATURE COAST
COMPUTER Repairs
& Web Design
free insp 212-1551




Bianchi Concrete
inc.com ins.lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-
Sidewalks. Pool deck
repair/stain 257-0078
CURB APPEAL/ Lic
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River rock
reseals & repairs. 352
364-2120/410-7383
FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, staining &
Garage Firs. Recession
Prices! 352-527-1097
ROB'S MASONRY
& CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs Tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554


All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling,
Site Prep, Driveways.
Lic. & Ins. 352- 795-5755



COUNTY WIDE DRY-
WALL -25 ys exp lic2875.
all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Pop Corn Removal
352-302-6838



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Plasma TV installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
ANNIE'S ELECTRIC
Husband & Wife
Team.(352) 341-5952
EC-13002696
BRIGHT ELECTRICAL
Res./Comm. Lic & Ins.
$50.hr. EC0001303
352-302-2366
DUN-RITE Elect
since '78/ Free Est.
licEC 13002699
352- 726-2907
Thomas Electric LLC
Generator maint &
reair Guardian
Homestandby, &
Centurion. Cert. Tech.
Briggs Stratton 352-
621-1248 #ER00015377




A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002
BOB BROWN'S
Fence & Landscaping
352-795-0188/220-3194


ROCKY'S FENCING
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
352 422-7279 *k




ALUMINUM
STRUCTURES
5" & 6" Seamless Gutters
Free Estimates, Lic &
Ins. (352) 563-2977




Andrew Joehl
Handyman.
Gen/Maint/Repairs
Pressure cleaning.
Lawns/Gutters. No job
too small!Reli able ,ins.
0256271 352-465-9201

Affordable Handyman
V FAST
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST
AFFORDABLE
*" RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handyman
V FAST
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handyman
V FAST
V AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *


#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Plasma TV installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
Remodeling, Additions,
Doors, Windows, Tile
work. Lic.#CRC1330081
Free Est. (352)949-2292





V THIS OUT!
AC & HEAT PUMPS
FREE Estimate & 2nd
Opinion, 10 yr warr.
on ALL Parts, Great
prices, ALL the time.
352-400-4945
Lic #CAC027361




MAID TO ORDER
House Cleaning 4*
(352) 586-9125
have vacuum will travel





The Tile Man
Bathroom remodel
Specializing in handi-
cap. Lic/Ins. #2441.
352-634-1584




All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
All AROUND TRACTOR
L i, 1 i. -
352-795-5755


CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, curbing,
flocrete. River rock
reseals & repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
Florida Sitescapes, LLC
FREE Est: Yard Clean Up
Mowing, and MORE
CALL 352-201-7374
RIVENBARK LAWN &
LANDSCAPE.
Best Prices in town for
all your lawn care
needs!! (352) 464-3566
SPRINKLER JOE'S
Complete Sys. Check
$25, Landscape
Design 352-212-2596




A + LAWN CARE
& LANDSCAPING
Affordable & Reliable
(352) 228-0421
AFFORDABLE Lawn care
CUTS STARTING AT $20
WE DO IT ALL!!!
wCALL 352-228-7320
All 'n'1 Lawncare
property maintence
Full serv$55/mo.lic/ins
Rick 352-201-5193
Charlie 352-634-1070
ATTENTION! Snow Birds
Need your Lawn Maint.
Call Mowing & More...
352-419-6287, Lic/Ins.


Green Valley
Landscape & Design Inc.
352.280.0269
Complete LawV M.iirenance
Free Fertilizing with new
accounts


Florida Sitescapes, LLC
FREE est: Yard Clean Up
Mowing, and MORE
Call 352.201.7374
Lawncare N More
Floral City to Bev. Hills
mow, trim haul $20 up
(352) 726-9570
MEAGHERS LAWN CARE
AND PINK MINI DUMP
Tree Service, Stump
Grinding, Free Est.
(352) 341-3478



AT YOUR HOME
Mower, Parts Service &
Repair.Visit our store@
1332 SE Hy 19 220-4244



HIGH SPEED INTERNET
wherever you live,
starting @$29.99 per
mo.(352) 493-1327



A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs, trash,
lawn maint. furn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
ALL OF CITRUS
CLEAN UPS CLEAN OUTS
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790



Chris Satchell Painting
ASAP
30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996


A-I George Swedlige
Painting/press cleaning
Int/Ext. texture/drywall
repair (352) 794-0400
INTERIORIEXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
Pic PICARD'S Pressure
Cleaning & Painting
352-341-3300




Attention Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers are
required by state law
to include their state
license number in all
advertisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious that
you may be contact-
ing an unlicensed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For questions
about business
licensing, please call
your city or county gov-
ernment offices.


SPRINKLER JOE'S
Complete Sys. Check
$25, Landscape
Design 352-212-2596






A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest Rates
Free est.(352)860-1452


DAVID'S
TREE SERVICE
(352) 302-5641


All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955

DOUBLE J Tree Serv.
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852

R WRIGHT Tree Service
Tree removal & trimming.
Ins. & Lic.# 0256879
352-341-6827

RON ROBBINS Tree Serv
Trim, Shape & Remove
Lic/Ins. Free Est.
352-628-2825





344-2556, Richard
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


* New Landscapes

* One Time Cuts

* Free Estimates




~t Rivenbark Lawn
& Landscape
.Z.... (352) 464-3566





When mopping

isn't enough call...

Mr. Tile Cleaner
Showers Floors Lanais

*, i Cleaning & Sealing
Grout Painting
U r-" -Residential &
Commercial


586-1816 746-9868


* Furniture Refinishing
* Entryway Refinishing
* Tool/Knife Sharpening
* Pressure Washing
* Lawn/Property Maintenance

Classical Custom
Services, Inc.
Mark McClendon

352-613-7934
Over 20 Years Experience Licensed& Insured


BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In just One Day,
We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over"Your Old One!!!
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!
Call now for a FREE
In-Home Estimate

1-866-585-8827
BATHFITTER.COM
OOOAECJI


GENERAL 1
Stand Alone
Generator .7

Thomas Electric, LLC
Residential/Commercial Service
Generac Centurion
Guardian Generators
Factory Authorized Technicians
ER0015377

352-6 1-124


U Decorative Mulch AAA ROOFING
' NEW &Stones R O N
l Top Soil Call the "4 ak6usters"
DELIVERYAVAILABLE Free Written Estimate
WE HAVE SPECIAL
PRICES AVAILABLE! 100 OFF:
C'tlSNErnJ Any Re-Roof
NURSERY I Must present coupon at time contract is signed
6658 W. GULF To LAKE HWY. Lic./Ins CCC057537 B..
CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429 !S ,
(352) 302-6436


POOL-TEC
REPAIRS EQUIPMENT
PUMPS FILTERS
HEAT PUMPS
SALT SYSTEMS

RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL
32 YEARS EXPERIENCE

CALL ALAN 422-6956
STATE LICENSE #CPCO51584



IRE VET.LANN


WILL CONSTRUCTION
* 352-628-2291 c|
PreventDryerFiresNow.com


COPES POOL
AND PAVER LLC
YOUR INTERLOCKING BRICKPAVER SPECIALIST
Build your new pool now and
be ready for next summer!
Refinish your pool during the cooler months.

352-400-3188


USED FURNITURE www.
comfortsofhomeused
urnitur2e.com. 795-0121
DVD SHELF Black,
Holds 500+. Good Cond.
Adjustable shelves $20.
SMW 586-904-3262
KING MATTRESS SET
Used but very clean.
$1.0.00352-257-5722
for details
KITCHEN TABLE $40.00
46" Round, Formica Top,
Wicker/Ratan Base,
Great Condition.
SMW 586-904-3262
LAZY BOY LIFT CHAIR
1 Mauve, Great
Condition,$400 ea.
(352)897-4605 or
(352) 249-6621
PAUL'S FURNITURE
Open Tues.- Sat 9-2
628-2306 Homosassa
paulsfurnitureonline.com
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
352-628-0808
Round glass top table
w/Elephant base, top
22"W. 17" H $80.
(352) 465-1262
Sofa & Love Seat
good cond. $250.
Red Mahogany
Queen anne, end
tables & coffee table
$150. (352) 228-1325



CRAFTSMAN DLT-3000
LAWN TRACTOR
Briggs and Stratton
18.5 hp engine,
w/42"deck, cast iron
front axle, 3.5 gal fuel
tank, excellent condi-
tion. $560. Tractor ac-
cessories, Craftsman
utility dump cart $75,
Craftsman universal
broadcast spreader
$60, Craftsman 42"high
speed sweeper $140.
Craftsman Pressure
Washer, 2500 PSI, 2.0
GPM Briggs and Strat-
ton engine $120
352-465-4373
Garden Tractor
Murry 20hp V-twin B&S
eng.48" mulching deck
$400 firm.
(352) 302-6069


JOHN DEERE LAWN
TRACTOR, 54" CUT,
26 hp, deluxe seat &
wheel. 113 hours. Runs
great! $1500 OBO
CASH. call
352-419-1723
Toro Riding Lawn
Mower, 42" cut, 20HP
twin cam Kohler en-
gine, approx. 30 hrs.
operating time. $500
cash/firm, will deliver
(352) 341-1714



VARIGATED CENTURY
PLANTS YOU DIG
HEALTHY 5.00 10.00
12" TO 3 FEET CALL
DAVID AT 464 0316









D6 SUNDAY, APRIL




HERRY'S
MARKET DAY
FREE VENDOR SPACE!
Outdoor Flea Market
held on the grounds
8471 W Periwinkle Ln
HOMOSASSA
(behind Wendy's)
Last Saturday Every
Month 8am -noon
Saturday, April 28
Call Caroline at
352-527-2020





255/55 R18 Good tread!!
Only asking $100 for the
set (4)! (352)551-1810


245/45 ZR18 Nice tread!!
Only asking $60 for the
pair! (352)551-1810

-------------------
185/65 R15 Great tread!!
Only asking $60 for the
pair! (352)551-1810

6 King Size Sheet Sets
Floral Design
Excel cond.
$10 set
(352) 503-2154
7 DOLL STANDS METAL
$10 SAMSONITE
TRAVEL BAG $15
CLOTH FLORAL
TRAVEL BAG $10 CALL
419-5981
40 Gal Gas Tank Alumi-
num 53 x 29 x 8" from
Flat Boat, No leaks $40
Folding Dog ramp by
Petgear, used 1 time
$25. (352) 503-6986
300 POUND PROPANE
TANK 3001b propane
tank 4ft. highx79in. ninety
five dollars 95.00
3524474355
Auto 2000
Karaoke player AKJ
7809 recording system,
2 rechargeable micro
phono all new $500.
(352) 746-2665
BICYCLE BOY/MEN 26"
bike, excellent condition,
like new, single speed,
coast brakes, wide seat
$50. 352 794-3422
BIG BOX OF CHRIST-
MAS STUFF Ornaments,
lights, tree stand, more.
$10 352-563-5524
DANFORTH STANDARD
ANCHOR, 26 LBS- 35"
height, 27" width, 19"
flute length x 6", Ex.,
$100. 352-628-0033


401%tf



oooexos


22, 2012



U


F-AhMiVi I-LsH LUU
Brown and Green
2.00 a dozen
352-220-3189
HIGH-PRESSURE
WASHER 3.0 gal. per
minute@1250psi5HP
bnggs & stratton engine
75ft.discharge hose
$75.00 352-447-4355
lonics Water
Conditioner
used 6 months
$1,500.
(352) 270-8743
Leave message
Iron Breaker 3
Iron & Sulfur
Water Conditioner
Used, $600 obo
(352) 302-0648
PENN DEEP SEA ROD
& REEL- Oceanmaster
Rod, 6'6", #340 GTI Reel,
4 ball brgs, EX+, $75.
352-628-0033
PERSONAL LUGGAGE
CARRIER / DOLLY $10
TELEPHONE ANSWER-
ING MACHINE $10 CALL
419-5981
PRINCESS ARIEL TOD-
DLER TALKING VANITY
with stool & accessories.
Pink/purple, great fun!
$35 352-563-5524
QUICK SHADE CANOPY
Replacement for pop up.
Blue 10 'bylO'$40.00 Call
Ray @464-0573
REDBALL BOOTS Men's
size 8, knee high, used
for fishing. $7.00 Call
352 746-1017
SHARP DIGITAL
VIEWCAM/CAM ERA
GENTLY USED 3-TIMES
2-MUCH-2-LIST 4-INFO
CALL 586-7222. $100.
SHARPVL-NZ100 DIG
ITAL VIEWCAM GENTLY
USED 3-TIMES
2-MUCH-2-LIST 4-INFO
586-7222 $100. MIKE
SIEMANS OVER THE EAR
HEARING AID
Good Condition
Includes batteries
Paid $825. Asking $400
(352) 382-3879
SOFT-SERVE ICE
CREAM Black & Decker
Arctic Twister turns ice
cream into soft-serve.
$10 352-563-5524
TRUCK BED
EX TENDER, stainless
steel, for Ford Sport Trac
short bed truck. $100
352-563-5524
WOOD FLOORING
Med.Oak-Tongue &
Groove Planks 3"x 3/8"
New in box 25 sq ft $55
352-382-3650


For more information on how to reach
Citrus County readers call
352-563-5592.


BOX,Diamond plate
aluminum for truckbed.
$150. 352-726-6845



2 Power Lift Chair
Recliners,
1 med. $295.
1 Large $350.
both excel. cond.
(352) 270-8475
BRUNO POWER LIFT for
Scooter or Wheelchair
Programmed,
Exc Shape $400 obo
352-613-7302 or
352-613-4673
Front wheel foldable
walker &
Shower chair
$20. ea
(352) 249-1010
Heavy Duty Walker
w/seat & hand brakes,
alum w/16 x 21 tray.
1 pr alum crutches
(352) 746-2665
MANUAL WHEELCHAIR
& ALUMINUM FOLD UP
WALKER FOOTRESTS
ON CHAIR 20.00 EACH
464 0316












STERLING SILVER-
COLLECTOR BUYING
STERLING SILVER
FLATWARE. $1,000 &
UP FOR SERVICE FOR
8. KEN 352-601-7074



"NEW"TWO PICKUP
ELECTRIC
GUITAR,BLACK &
CHROME
W/GIGBAG&MORE $65
352-601-6625
BEACH ACOUSTIC GUI-
TAR!! BRAND NEW
LIGHTLY DAMAGED
$30 PLAYS PER-
FECTLY 352-601-6625
ELECTRIC LAP STEEL
ALL MAHOGANY
W/UPGRADES, GIGBAG
& EXTRAS $100
352-601-6625
SAXAPHONE Selmer
Bundy Tenor, plays
well-$250-Crystal River
795-8800


LITTLE TYKES EASEL
Toddler easel one side
chalkboard, other side
has clip to hold paper.
$15 352-563-5524
NEW QUEEN COTTON
WEAVE BLANKET $10
SOLID WOOD
KNICKNACK SHELF $10
419-5981
OSTER FUSION
BLENDER Black
w/stainless. Great condi-
tion. $10 352-563-5524
TABLETOP FOUNTAIN
NIB "awk! Cold Beer!"
drinking parrot fountain.
Great for bar or tiki hut.
$10 352-563-5524




AB LOUNGER $20 Great
for abs and stretching out
back. Folds for storage.
Ted 352-522-1815
ELECTRIC TREADMILL
VERY STABLE DOES
NOT FOLD UP SO YOU
CAN HANG CLOTHES
ON IT 100.00 464 0316
ELLIPTICAL momentum
620 Elliptical exercise
machine. $50.00
352-628-7619
EXERCISE BIKE
UPRIGHT TYPE COM-
PACT SIZE ONLY 75.00
464 0316
MANUAL TREADMILL
FOLDS UP FOR EASY
STORAGE ONLY 60.00
464 0316
PRO FORM
EXERCISE BIKE
great condition
$150
(352) 465-4234
TREADMILL Electronic
treadmill-Sportcraft
TX350. Good condition.
Needs a new home. $75
352-563-5524
Treadmill, Sears
good condition
Paid $600.Asking $250
Stationary Bicycle,
Sears, Never Used $75.
(352) 794-6320




BICYCLE BOY/MEN 26"
bike, excellent condition,
hardly used. single
speed, coaster brakes
$50.00 352 794-3422
CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pond, ATV
trails Price Reduced
352 795-2027/ 634-4745


EZ PULL TRAILERS,
New & Used

Utility & Enclosed
BUY, SELL, TRADE
Custom Built, Parts,
Tires, Whis, Repairs,
Trailer Hitches

New 6 x 12 open
utility w/ramp $935
2010 7x18 enclosed
$2595.
2010 8.5 x 20
encl.w/xtra's
$4295

Trailer Tires from
$34.49

Hwy 44 Crystal River
352-564-1299


CITRUS COUNTY


CH cONICLE
www.chronicleonline.com


*(Florida Fish and WildlifeConservation Commission; myfv.com/wildlifehabitats/AlligatorlncidentsFactsSheeLhtm) Scarborough 2010


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED



CLUB CAR
'08 President $2000
352-344-8516

Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
Golf Clubs &
Equipment, Utility
Building 15 x 10 loaded.
Thousands of clubs
bags, balls, antique
clubs, carts, etc.
No junk $950 for all
(352) 270-8475
GOLF CLUBS Spalding
clubs with bag. $50 Ted
352-522-1815

GUN & KNIFE
SHOW
BROOKSVILLE
HSC CLUB
Sat. April 28th 9-5p
Sun. April 29th 9a-4p
HERNANDO COUNTY
FAIRGROUNDS
Admission $6.00
(352) 799-3605

RUGER 9MM ACCES-
SORIES. Two 15 round
Ruger P95 Mags-$15 ea.
One Ruger P95 Pro Mag
32 cap mag- $12.
Adapter for most lower
rails to a combo lower
and top rail for Red
Dot/Sight- $15. Three
Ruger P95 Recoil spring
collar retainer P/N 65211
and 1 used Recoil spring
collar P/N 62209 -
$30/lot. 527-6709

SWE BUY GUNS I
On Site Gun Smithing
(352) 726-5238


*



Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966










m m illi. 14 ."


JUNK MOTORCYCLES
WANTED Will Pay up to
$200 for Unwanted Mo-
torcycle 352-942-3492

WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area
Condition or Situation.
Call (352) 726-9369




BUNNIES $10.00 each
have parents 746-0714

Dachshunds, Mini Long
Hair ,8 wks, H/C CH
Bid. Lines,Choc. Black/
cream shaded Eng.
Cream $300-$500 (352)
795-6870/220-4792

DESIGNER BREED
Shih-Poo, Yorkie -Poo
small non shedding,
intellect puppies $350
to $500 (352) 817-4718

GOLDEN RETRIEVERS
Pure breed pups, light
colors, 3fem 3 males,
shots & h/c. Parents on
Prem.. $400-450. ea
352-628-6050

Koi and Gold Fish
FOR SALE, Great Prices
ALL SIZES. Call Jean
(352) 634-1783

Shih-Tzu Pups, ACA
starting@ $400. Lots of
colors, Beverly Hills,
FL (352)270-8827
www.aceofauas.net

YORKIE PUPS
5 wks taking deposits
Health certificates,
shots, M & F $700.
Parents 5 lbs
(352) 341-4009





PIGLETS
Born 2/27,
$50. ea.
954-295-3055


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966






2 EVINRUDE
60 HSP PROPELLERS
1 REBUILT,
$60 FOR BOTH
(352) 726-9708

Alum. 12-16' Boat
trailer, $800 obo
call for info
(352) 503-2423





OLD TOWN CANOE
'94 Discovery 164; good
condition, red, 2 seats,
3rd seat; 3 paddles, 3
cushions, 2 PFDs trans-
port blocks, tie-downs.
$500 firm. 352-382-2657


GULF TO LAKE
TRAILER SALES

Largest Selection &
Lowest Prices.
Offering New & Used
Cargo & utility trailers

Triple Crown Utility TRL
6 x 12 w/new spare
$1050.
6 x 12 Enclosed w/
V nose, rear ramp
door, $1995.

Trailer Tires
starting at $69.95

352-527-0555
Hwy 44, Lecanto

TRAILER 4x8,
heavy duty
4.5 ft ramp. $450
(352) 344-1953

Utility Trailer
8x6 good cond
$175.(352) 382-5661




GRACO "PACK N
PLAY" Play pen in excel-
lent shape. $20 Call
352-949-5601

Nice wood baby crib in
excellent shape with mat-
tress...$55.00 Call
352-949-5601


Sell r Swa


Surplus Prop.
PUBLIC NOTICE


40 Gal Gas Tank
Aluminum 53 x 29 x8"
from Flat Boat, No leaks
$40 (352) 503-6986
'08 BENTLY
20 Ft. Pontoon, 60HP,
Merc. 4 str. dbl. bimini,
new trlr. much more.
$11,500 (352) 341-4949
17' Old Towne
Glass Canoe
w/accessories
$200(352) 382-4781
BASS TRACKER 16'
fiberglass, w/trailer
70 hp johnson, exc.
cond lots of extra's
$4500 (352) 302-6934
CAROLINA SKIFF 96
19' TUNNEL, 70hp Evin.
t/t, Low water pick up
hyd. jack plate CryRiv
$4600 ob(513) 260-6410
FISHING KAYAK
FREEDOM 12'w/trolling
motor & battery
misc. accessories $800.
(419) 944-8777
Keywest 1720 Pro
'03, 90 hp Yamaha
lots of upgrades, dual
batteries, bimini top,
full boat cover,
performance single
axle trIr Everything
like brand new.
Only 39 total hrs.
on boat, Mtr.,trlr.
Always kept inside
Mariner with annual
maint. check.
Best Boat Buy Ever
Only $10,500.
(352) 419-5836
Palm Beach 99
201 white capC.C. '99
150hp merc. v. low hrs.
hydro steering, hi end
2 rail T-Top, elect box,
T bag, alum trailer, radial
tires, outrigger, down
rigger ready. True
off/Inshore boat 8'5"W
30" free board & more
exc cond.Steal $8995
(352) 563-5628
PROLINE
21' Cuddy, full transom,
w/brack, 150 HP Yam.,
Bimini, VHF, porta pot,
dep. finder, trailer $5K
firm (352) 382-3298
Sports Craft 25'
fiberglass, c/c, t-top ,
'98 200hp Evin. 03 alum
tanden trailer. s/s prop
boat needs new deck
& strings, motor & trailer
very good cond.$3800
obo (352) 560-7469
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LAKE
MARINE
We Pay CASH For Used
Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck & Fishing
Boats (352)527-0555
boatsupercenter.com





















YACHTSMAN
24' Pontoon, 70 HP Ev.
T/T, cust. trlr, bimini top,
stored inside $3500 incls
all gear (231) 852-0061




GULF STREAM 08
32 3 slides, rear. kit.
K bed,50amp like new
extras $31,500
(352) 726-1906
HITCHHIKER II LS
2008, 3 slides, excel
cond. heat pump, de-
luxe pkg. too many ex-
tras to list $32,000.
Dodge Truck also avail
(636) 209-0308
Holiday Rambler
'98 ,38 7.5 gen.super
slide, air lever, a/c susp.
loaded call for details
$41K (352) 746-9211
I Buy RV'S, Steve
Henry, RV World of
Hudson Inc.Since
1974. (888) 6748376

JAYCO '04
36', 5th whl toy hauler,
generator, slide, fuel
station $17,400. like new
Truck Avail For Sale
Local (502) 345-0285




CAMPER/TRAILER
2010, Sportsman KZ
Hybrid, 19ft, like new
air, full kitch, bath
$8750 (352) 249-6098
Coachman Pop-up
08, 17 furnace,.a/c,
elect, water & propane
sys. 12 awning $4550
obo(352) 726-1303
Fun 07
TV Body, microwave,
tv bath w/shower out
pull out awning/Bar b q
$6k(352) 628-0554
GULF STREAM
Coach 25 ft. model
24RBL, sips upto 6 gas
& elect appls & heat,
shower/toliet $6,000
(352) 341-1714
HOLIDAY RAMBLER '05
29 Alum frame, Lg slide
out, exc cond. used
little, always covered
$12 500 (352)795-5310
cell 410-474-3454
I BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
call me 352-201-6945




911-0430 DAILY CRN


The Citrus County Board
of County Commissioners
will be selling surplus prop-
erty and equipment via


KEYSTONE
2003 COUGAR 276
Popular Fifth Wheel. 1
Large Slide. Clean, well
maintained.
Non-smokers. Sleeps
6. Tons of
storage.Includes hitch.
$10500. 352-341-0062
KZ Toyhauler,07
32' like new, full slide
new tires, Owan Gen.,
gas tank, Lrg living
area separate cargo
$17,200. 352-795-2975
Sandy Oak 55+
1 bd. 1 bath,New hot
water heater, furnace,
tub and surroundings
$2k obo See Rose at
Sandy Oaks
SUNNYBROOK
2005 36ft, 5th whl,2
slides, kg bedlike
new,heated tks, 60
amp service oak cab
$33,400 352-382-3298




GM, 16", 6 Lug
Chrome Rims
$100 (352) 382-2350
TIRES
6 used 800 x 16.5
$20 ea
(352) 201-8796
TIRES
FIVE ,225-60X16
$50 (352) 382-2350



$$ CASH PAID $$
For Junk or Wrecked
Cars/Trucks.$300 & UP
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
BIG SALE!
Consignment USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
AUTOS' FROM $1,500.
US 19 BY AIRPORT
US 44, BY NAPA
Low Payments *k
461-4518 & 795-4440
consignmentusa.org
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID $300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars Trucks
& Vans, For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES,
Hwy 19...352 564-8333
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars Trucks
& Vans, For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES,
Hwy 19... 352 564-8333
CASH PAID FOR JUNK
CARS Any Condition
Up to $500., Free
Towing 352-445-3909
KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Salvage Pays top $$$
for your autos.
352-628-4144
WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
Perfect Cond. or Not
Titled,No title,
No problem. Paying up
to $25K any make,
any model Call A.J.
813-335-3794/ 531-4298




AFFORDABLE
AUTOS & VANS
Everybody Rides
$495 DOWN
$49 PER WEEK
BUY HERE PAY
HERE..
Lots of clean-safe-
dependable rides.
CALL DAN TODAY
(352) 5 6 3 -1I 902
"WE BUYS CARS
DEAD OR ALIVE"
1675 Suncoast Hwy.
Homosassa Fl.

BIG SALE!
Consignment USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
AUTOS' FROM $1,500.
US 19 BY AIRPORT
US 44, BY NAPA
Low Payments *k
461-4518 & 795-4440
consignmentusa.org

BUICK
'04, Century, silver, gray
intr. 4 Door,99500 mi.
V6, Auto, trans, AC,
etc. very good cond.
well maint., garaged
(352) 794-3591
CADILLAC
1993 Allante Nstar. Soft
& hardtop auto
low miles black mint
$16KObo 352-563-1915
Camaro 97
Z28, 97K mis. T-tops,
exc cond. White with
orang strips $8K obo
352-302-7204
CHEVY
'07, Impala, V6, auto,
ice cold AC, non smok-
ers 100K mi $8,500
(352) 726-3093

IMMACULATE
FORD
2002 Thunderbird Road-
ster with only 10K miles,
V8, automatic, two tops,
like new. a real eye
catcher. Great car
Asking $20,000 OBO
Call 352-563-5150
FORD TAURUS 2001
AUTO 75K, new tires,
brakes $4500 o/b/o
One owner
352-302-9217
352-302-9217
MERCEDES '99
S420, blue book $11,500
sell $10K FIRM
1729 W. Gulf to lake
Hwy, Lecanto
MERCURY
'05, Grand Marquis LS
ultimate edition,
76k mi. $7,900
352-344-8256


govdeals.com, April 12
until April 30, 2012.
Pub:April 12 thru 30,2012


Misc. otice


333-0422 SUCRN
Elig, To Vote- Ingles, Neace
PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice is hereby given to the following, at last known address:
Vanessa L. Ingles Ronnie Neace
10427 E. Patience Lane 9510 E. Village Green Cir
Inverness, FL 34450 Inverness, FL 34450
You are hereby notified that your eligibility to vote is in question. You are required to
contact the Supervisor of Elections, in Inverness Florida, no later than thirty (30) days
after the date of this publishing. Failure to respond will result in a determination of in-
eligibility by the Supervisor and your name will be removed from the statewide voter
registration system. If further assistance is needed, contact the Supervisor of Elections
at the below listed address or call 352-341-6747.
Susan Gill, Citrus County Supervisor of Elections
120 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida, 34450
April 22,2012.


Mustangt03
Red Convertible,
4K chrome rims,
electrically loaded!!
remote door locks,
trunk, panic,cold air
intake, edlbrock dual
exh. 6 CD change
73K milesTMU, criuse
35mpg. auto. Cry Riv.
NEW CAR $8200. may
part trade cell
(727) 207-1619
NISSAN ALTIMA
2011, Excel. condition
low miles, fully loaded
$18,500
(352) 274-1940
Toyota 91
Camry, runs good
a/c, pwr windows steer-
ing & brakes $1500 as is
(352) 637-1456




CHEVROLET '01
Camaro, Z28, Org. 9000
miles, Pristine show car
frozen in time. Loaded
black/black leather
Flawless rare find!
$13,950 (352) 513-4257
CHEVY
1955 4 Door Sedan
good shape,
$9,000
(352) 621-1207
FORD MUSTANG
'65, fastback 2+2 289
eng. a/c, power steer-
ing, disc brks. great
shape, runs great.
65,100K mi. recently
appraised for $25,378
sell $22,700 Owner fi-
nancing w/$1OK dn
call Paul(352) 746-9585
PORSCHE 944
1984, 5 spd. new a/c,
runs great, garaged,
$1500 (516) 375-5728
TC by Maserati
'89,16 valve, 5spd,
turbo, conv. hd top, 30k
lown,exc.cond$12,500
Call 352-220-3883







Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





BIG SALE!
Consignment USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
AUTOS' FROM $1,500.
US 19 BY AIRPORT
US 44, BY NAPA
k Low Payments *
461-4518 & 795-4440
consignmentusa.org

Ford 02
F150, Ext Cab,
fair cond, runs good
166Kmis. $6kobo
352-302-7204
FORD '06
F250 Super Duty, 4 x 4,
6.0, Lariat Pkg. Off Rd.
Pkg., Hard Bed Cover
$21,500 (352) 586-8576
FORD 97
F150, runs, needs work
$800 obo
(352) 637-4676




2010 FORD ESCAPE
CREAM PUFF, LOADED
14K miles, Lmtd Edition,
Sunroof, Sync system,
GPS +,MP3, USB, Fancy
Wheel Covers, Michelin
Tires, Rear Hitch,
Heated Leather Seats,
Spcl side mirrors, Sirius
Radio, Warranty
$24,500 (352) 509-7533




CHEVROLET
1999 venture van, 6-8
passenger,body in excel-
lent condition as well as
the interior and tires. V-6
motor, good gas mileage.
Loaded inside,velour
seats,tinted windows,
electrical windows, doors
and front seat. Also has
electrical hook-up for
campgrounds.Dual radia-
tors. Many extras,must
see to appreciate.Asking
$3400.OBO,call
637-4011




Harley 00
Roadking Classic, all
gear 17K miles 11K
obo.(352) 489-0873
Harley Davidson
03, Super Road King,
fuel inj. $48K up grades
too much to list/ Cry Riv
$9200 (727) 207-1619
HARLEY DAVIDSON
08 Night Train, flat blk,
11,500 mis. lots of extra's
$14K obo Jeff
(407) 712-0803
JUNK MOTORCYCLES
WANTED Will Pay up to
$200 for Unwanted Mo-
torcycle 352-942-3492
KAWASAKI
2006 Vulcan 1600 No-
mad Excellent condi-
tion, well serviced. 14k
miles. Newer tires and
battery. Bike jack,
Cycleshell, lots of ac-
cessories. Pix available.
$5995 352-601-7460




the internet at






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY, APRIL 22, 2012 D7




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


w


V


72V 7w


V


'09 PRIUS
, _- !iifiN *


'08 ELANTRA


'08 SILVERADO


=FREERRD=EiMSK
1-80-58755 d.1121


$18,647 $9,775 $11
OR$292 OR,$153 OR1


'08 LIBERTY


'07 PT CRUISER


'07 TOWN & COUNTRY


$11,981
OR$187,R.
'07 ODYSSEY


$11,984
OR$187* M.
'06 SANTE FE


$6,640 $8,050 $12,844
,OR$104M OR $126M. ,OR$201 MO.,


'06 PACIFICA
-__ '___ -- -- ,,


'06 TITAN


'05 RAM


HR NM WrIN MI
4-O %12O-0 r.J-. w*-.11=040%


:1.J1 .. RN_ .,1 .I I.


$9,999+ $10,050 $11,506 $9,045
OR.$ 74 oR 74 MO.R$200M ORS 157 Mo.


'05 EXPLORER


'05 300


'04 F150
.a- .- I I


F EI2DE A IN SA
1l80058"75 : d5123


$9,874 $11,846 $8,021 $9,999
OR.$ 54 OR. 1 85 M OR 139 oOR $ 156 *


CALL THE INSTANT APPRAISAL LINE:

800-440-9054


'm


we


0


0


klJ


'08 R


I


'03


.ER
M.


RNE24HRINIREDME E WITHIN SITM RIIN
1i80058"75:E=673 l


D8 SUNDAY, APRIL 22, 2012


RE2HRMRE EUEffWITBH IFOAMSOKPiN
1-80-58 755 Ext61


RUE24 R RMEDMESAEWT NOMDWIX MI


RE 2!HRiECODEDMEJ GE WITHIN N PC RCN
:- ^ :58"75 EdA2 .I


FIE 4HRHMME ESG rHIFOADSECILWN





INSIDE
I Sikorski's
r Attic
V PAGE E6


} OME I RONT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE REAL ESTATE GUIDE


t4


ko


UJ SJJJ
I rj
Jj


'31/.


FD "

Ls't}f


-ii

AjJJ:
'5',


This bedroom room-is shared by-twe-yomung- -
sporting sisters. Designer Brian Patrick Flynn
created an L-shaped window seat to keep bulky
items such as tennis rackets and cheerleading
gear neatly organized and easily accessible.
.H.^ T I M ~ l' ** l [ l


[.


*^


:tx
1g










E2 SUNDA'I~ APRIL 22, 2012 Cimus Couivn' (FL) CHRONICLE


ENJOY EARTHDAY ON THE COURSE!!
On the 6th Green!! *View of the 7th Fairway
Well Cared For *2,056 SQ. FT of Liv.
Gorgeous Master e Walk-Thru Shower
Lived In Part-Time Neutral Colors!!
KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997
*mlrr ,>ir-a 4 rII ri I-l iisi, i 11


2417 IN .-S&LINo E
(s)637.2828


. & 1 RIII


BELOW ACCESSED VALUE!!!
4/3 with 2,612 sq. ft. of living.
Separate refrigerator & freezer, two
pantries, double oven, pool with hot
tub, detached garage with office, pole
barn, fully fenced and gated.
KEVIN & KAREN CUNNINGHAM
(352) 637-6200
Email: kcunningham@remax.net


NEW MEIAL nuur:
* Updated HNAC FR+LR+DR
* Garden Tub in MBR Central Vac.
* 3/2/2 Car Garage Gorgeous Pool/Spa
* Huge Kitchen Former Model!!
KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997
S1 x F5n ra 7 i-111 ii 11i, 1 .in ft
www.FloridaLislinglnIo.com










CAR ENTHUSIASTS DREAM!!

* Split Plan 3/2 Huge FR w/Hot Tub
* 1,800 SQ Wkshop A Great Buy!!
KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536 '
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997
E MAIL kellygiemn, nel


COMMERCIAL SPOT ON HIGHWAY 41!
Owner must sell, will hold mortgage and just
reduced the price. Approx. 1,700 building
space backs up to bike trail and is right next to
high exposure motel. Lots of potential here in
expanding area.
JENNIFER STOLTI (352) 637-6200
Email Info@CitrusCountyHomes.com
www.CitrusCountyHomes.com


* 1995 Year Built 3/2/2 on .75 Acre
* Hardwood Floors Throughout Home
* Large Master Suites Split Floor Plan
* Security System Fully Enclosed Screen
* Room for Pool and More
*Close to Schools Must See!!!
CHERYL LAMBERT 352-637-6200 .J
Email: cheryllomberl@remax.netl


242 N. Lecni Hw. eel il 2-8210 .Mi ,Ivres6760
837 S. Iucos BldHro*s 2-80w wHlr~nielsuecm54N w.1,Cy lRvr7524


7190 H. VARSITY DR.
CITRUS SPRINGS
* 4BD/2BA/2CG Heated POOL
* Living & Family RMS Large eat-in kitchen
* Formal Dining Shows like a model
PETER & MARVIA KOROL 0
(352) 527-7842
352) 422-3875


79 SPEND-A-BUCK DR, INVERNESS
WOWIII WHAT A HOME This 4/3 5/3, former
builder's model is ready for a new family Large
home situated on an acre in peaceful Clearview
Estates Interior features include gourmet kitchen,
den/office, wet bar, ceramic tile throughout, inside
laundry, tasteful window treatments/decor Master
bath boasts dual vanities, jetted tub, rate
shower and large walk-in closet I
DAVID IVORY 352-613-4460 1 -
Email: davidsivory@holmail.com


E2 SUNDAY, APRIL 22, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Local trees being stressed by drought


he cur-
rent
drought
has not only af-
fected our
rivers, lakes and
waterways, it
has put a hurt-
ing on the whole
ecosystem.
When the
water table
drops, so does
the quality of


life as we know it. Unfor-
tunately, nothing can be
done about Mother Na-
ture's events. So we pray
for some rain and deal
with it.
One of our readers
contacted the office and
asked me to mention the
importance of watering
new tree and shrub in-


ags]


Investors Realty
of Citrus County, Inc.


stallations -
anything that
has been
planted within
the past year.
He is noticing a
lot of stressed
plants and
trees through-
out the county.
Being a vet-
eran arborist
himself, he was
concerned


about the problem.
Thank you for caring
and calling.
While traveling
through the southwest
part of the county, I was
bewildered by the
stressed pines that I saw.
I noticed other stressed
species also, but not like
the pines and oaks. This


is not a good sign.
With stressed trees
come wood-boring in-
sects. Back in 1999, the
forestry division in Her-
nando County had their
hands full with wood-
boring insects, as did a
lot of homeowners.
As a rule, wood-boring
insects attack weak and
stressed trees. I believe
Citrus County will have a
big problem with these
wood-boring insects in
2012-13.
I hope I am wrong, but
with the continuing
drought I foresee a lot of
tree removals in the
county. Maybe summer
will bless us with the
desperately needed
rains. Our lakes, river
and waterways can be


GITTA BARTH
REALTOR@
(352) 220-0466


Visit my website at: www.myflorida-house.com


38 HAWTHORNE
CYPRESS VILLAGE
Fabulous Sweetwater 3/2/2 home on cul-
de sac! Move-in ready condition. All
neutral colors and sparkling clean!
Conveniently located to i. .. i. .
center and Suncoast Park ,
MLS 353832 $149,000


3644 E. LAKE TODD DR. PINE RIDGE
ARBOR LAKES One-of a-kind horse lover's dream home in
Beautiful 2/2/1 home in gated 55+ the Equestrian section next to trails
community on Lake Tsala Apopk. i-- D-i-4 *v/exquisite taste, attention to
floor plan, vaulted ceilings, tile :1 ,, n ...i. quality & craftsmanship shows
.. ... .. ...1 -1. yard even has room throughout the 3 bed, 2 5 bath, 4-car garage
i .> i home Fenced paddock w/water & shelter
MLS #353089 $116,000 MLS #349970 $415,000


TI~IIL^


3560 N WOODCATE DR. ... -
THE GLEN 1432 SEATTLE SLEW -
.. .. ..... . ... ...... IN V E R N E S S ,. 1. 1 . . ..
located in The Glen, a 55+ community, and catch the brezes this 3122 home in GRAB THIS
surrounded by nature, close to 1. i ,. ,;.; .. gated community of BARGAIN!
dining, medical. The home is ii i i... 11.11 homess with upgrades like Take a look at this magnificent 4+/4/5
condition, ready for you to move in, relax on hardwood floors, gourmet kitchen and an Country Estate on 10+ acre and take a 360
your front porch and watch the wildlife in the impressive porch for entertaining It can be interactive virtual tour at
large greenbelti yours www nycountrydreamhome comn
MLS #350097 $54,000 MILS #351012 $215,000 MLS# 350369. $565,000





115 N. LEGION TERR.
CITRUS HILLS 7080 DUVAL ISLAND DR.
.. .. .... .. .. ,FLORAL CITY
nice landscaping in beautiful Citrus Hills!! LIVING ON THE WATER! Incredible Vistas open waterfront on
S.. .. .... i rary pool home is Lake Tsala Apopka, beautiful landscaped
S . i . 1 ,,,, I living the Florida yard with waterfall and pond, a dock for
] ... . ... i with the plantation your boat to go fishing this 3/2/1 pool
S ..... 1...... .... i i,, .,, ,, sunlight. 190 ft. of home on 05 acre offers the lifestyle and
I -" ..... .... / ty of room to dock privacy you deserve. It can be your
and move right in! 11 .. ...1 paradise.
MLS #346203 $175,000 $489,000 MLS #351008 $239,000


replenished by the rains.
Can ourtrees? I hope so.


Kerry Kreider is a prac-
ticing arborist and a
member of the Interna-
tional Society ofArbori-
culture, a tree
preservationist and
president ofAction
Tree Service. You can
reach us a 352-726-9724
or actionproarborist
@yahoo.com.


www.3765NTyroneAve.info
or call 888-303-6405 Code 9414


FORMS AVAILABLE
* The Chronicle has forms available for wedding and en-
gagement announcements, anniversaries, birth an-
nouncements and first birthdays.





M EN- (352) 634-2371 Cell (800) 476-2590 Toll Free
ERA bob@bjdavis.com
REL ES"T For a Visual Tour of our listings and all MLS:b davis.corn


S What a unique floor plan: what should have
been a typical Gulf home was built without a
garage. It became a 3 bedroom 2.5 bath
home without being a conversion. The wing
that should have had the garage now has the
3rd bedroom, a half bath, a bonus room and
f i "" 1 an interior laundry. The master bedroom has
ll its own bath and bedroom #2 has a door to
| the hall bath. Clever! The Florida room has
S 2 venting skylights, sliders to the 15 x 30
pool. 2-Zone C/H/A, fenced rear yard,
S circular driveway, 1/2 acre. 44' Carport.
$115,000 MLS 354919


JOYFUL & CHEERY
2 eedr:ms 2 arnsh
Eat i.,n l.i,:hen
Cranr- ''.:.:funfirS
g * On 9th tee of Twisted Oaks
Lawn care provided
l^Jj $99.750 M LS ?S')49,-

. A GEM OF A HOME

2 Car qarade



$144.900 MLS 35,J371


SNOWBIRDS DON'T LEAVE WITHOUT BUYING
MRS. CLEAN LIVES HERE THIS GREAT WATERFRONT SEASONAL GOLF COURSE HOME ON GOSPEL ISLAND WATERFRONT SPECTACULAR SUNSETS
Spotless and sparkling 2BR, 2BA, fam. /den, FL rm., tile Located only min from Invernes, this charmin 2BR CBS home Affordable golf course living great snowbird get Premier location Paradise at its best Owner remodeled and
floors, large master suite. Great floor plan that flows. PLUS features new kit and appliances, new BA, metal roof, FL rmn, away! 2BR, 2BA with family rm., open floor plan updated. Bright and open floor plan, new kitchen, family room
additional lot in rear with WOODWORKING SHOP AND EOUIP. ar, central heat and air, all on beautiful fenced homeste on offers great space for entertaining. BRs split each with fireplace and large picture windows overlooking the open
BLDG. Access to back street. Great Privacy. OK to park motor the canal to the main lake BUYER WARRANTY INCLUDED with own bath. Owner will consider financing, lake. 2 Bedrooms, 2.5 baths, 2 car garae, dock and private
home, orboatPRICEREDUCED0NOW $97,900. MLS354416 $79,000. Call Quade Feeser302-7699 BRING OFFER! $89,900 MLS #353719 boatlaunch.MSIS 352O0. NOW S259,900





WEST HIGHLANDS SETTLE THIS ESTATE Backs to horse trail for 29 miles of riding. Enjoy the refreshin CUSTOM COUNTRY HOME WATERFRONT POOL HOME
First time offered! 2BR, 2BA with large family nature of country liv. with 5.5 acres and 2800 sq.ft liv. area, Built energy efficient and structural features seldom found 4BRs, 3BAs, 2400 sq. ft. living area, OPEN GREAT ROOM
room and 2 car garage. Huge screen porch with 3BRs PLUS office, 3 baths, beautiful wood floors, open island kit. in this area. This 3BR, 2BA home features a beautiful kit. with formal and casual living areas, oversized breakfast
beautiful backyard ready for your summer with volune ceilings, center ishnd, fam. m. with fpl. Formal liv. with custom birch cabinets, Ig. pantry, nook with huge bar, fireplace, large BRs, security system, volume
beautiful ac ard ready your ummer and din. Enjoy your personal paradise around enclosed inground adjoining screen lanai great for entertaining. Elegant ceilings, fully equipped home PLUS RV storage area. Canal
arden. 125x187 Lot. pool and spa PLUS 40 x 36 detached gar./workshop/barn and RV master suite, inside laundry, office and much more. Quality leads to Floral City Lakes PLUS easy access to the bike
PRICED TO SELL AT $69,900 MLS #354158 storage. PRICED RIGHT AT $385.000. MLS #353017 here is hard to match!!! MLS #354059. S197.500 trail. CHECK OUT THIS VALUE!!! MLS #354117. $239,900


Kerry Kreider
THE
ARBORIST


COLDWa.LL
RAN111i


ONT^


SUNDAY, APRIL 22, 2012 E3


A ,v







E4 SUNDAY, APRIL 22, 2012




HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information........352-563-5592
.................................................. advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information........................352-563-5966
News information................................................ 352-563-5660
....................................... ............. newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listing............www.ChronicleHomeFinder.com
"The market leader in real estate information"

Ci IIONICIAE


HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-563-
3280, attention HomeFront.
News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront.
Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes for
space and/or clarity.
For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Eco-friendly choices in mowers


Electric, solar or human-powered choices cut down on pollution


Each weekend, more than 54 mil-
lion Americans mow their lawns,
using 800 million gallons of gas
per year and producing tons of air pol-
lutants. Garden equipment
engines, which have had un-
regulated emissions until
very recently, emit high lev-
els of carbon monoxide, .
volatile organic compounds
and nitrogen oxides, produc-
ing up to 5 percent of the na-
tion's air pollution and a ,
good deal more in metropol-
itan areas. Unlike cars and Joan Bi
trucks, lawn mowers do not FLOE
come equipped with smog- FR|E
reducing attachments.
According to the U.S. En- LIV
vironmental Protection
Agency (EPA), a traditional gas-powered
lawnmower produces as much air pol-
lution as 43 new cars each driven 12,000
miles. Fortunately, the EPA is now phas-
ing in new emissions standards for gas
mower engines that will result in a 32
percent smog reduction. And with even
more stringent standards slated to go
into effect soon in California, environ-
mental leaders are hoping the old adage


I
I


for automobile trends will soon apply to
lawnmowers, too.
Eco-conscious consumers looking
for a new mower have a number of
mowing options to consider:
Electric Mowers: A num-
ber of electric models are
available, and many models
cost less than $200. The
trade-off is that they only
work for small lawns and
Sm must be tethered to a power
outlet during use. Keep in
mind, going electric is not
adshaw necessarily a way to reduce
IDA- pollution overall. According
NDLY to Consumer Reports,
'"Achieving a net environ-
ING mental savings from switch-
ing to electric mowers de-
pends on the efficiency of the power
plant" where the electricity originates.
Solar-Powered Mowers: Another
green option is a solar-powered
mulching mower, which is in essence a
cordless electric mower modified with
a small solar array to turn sunlight
into power The battery on this mower
can also be charged by simply plug-
ging it into an electric outlet. If money


is not an issue, the $2,500 solar-pow-
ered "auto mower" can't be beat for
both eco-friendliness and conven-
ience. It wanders unattended around
any level lawn, its collision sensors
carefully avoiding contact with any-
thing but the grass itself.
Reel Mowers: The most eco-friendly
lawn mower is the push mower. Reel
mowers are the ultimate in environ-
mentally friendly, quiet, maintenance-
free mowing. You push, they mow!
Although people unfamiliar with reel
mowers will try and tell you otherwise,
modem reel mowers are not difficult to
use and don't require much more effort
than power mowers. A reel mower takes
a bit longer to use than a power mower,
although it is a much more pleasant ex-
perience. If it takes 45 minutes to mow
with a traditional gas mower, it is likely
to take 60 to 70 minutes with a reel
mower It's possible to use them on large
lawns, but the time commitment isn't re-
alistic for most people.
This spring, consider switching to
lawn equipment that uses an alterna-
tive fuel or better yet, no fuel at all!

See MOWERS/Page E9


Radio rejuvenated; assessing value of a lighter collection


Dear John: I talked to you about this
lamp on your radio show. Here are
the photos. It is 36 inches high. Is it
bronze and what is it worth? EG.,
Brooksville
Dear EG.: The fig-
ural lamp consisting
of male and female A I
nudes holding aloft a
leaded glass globe
appears to be made -
of bronze. The style '-
of the lamp is Art
Nouveau, popular
circa 1890-1910. Art John Sikorski
Nouveau decorative
arts were produced SIKORSKI'S
in the United States, AT rIC
England, and Eu-
rope. Due to demand in the marketplace
for original Art Nouveau bronzes, repro-
ductions have been made for several
decades. Based on the close-up photos you
included, I think you have a reproduction
made within the past 25 years. The overall
detail is poor, and the figures seem lifeless.
Potential dollar value is catch-as-catch-can.
DearJohn: You said to let you know what
I did about my old radio that you featured


in your article. I just got it back from Radio
Daze and it now plays like new. The peo-
ple there were very polite, helpful and
knowledgeable. It was not the cheapest
thing I have done, as shipping was very
high, but the work for the money was well
worth it. They went through the whole
thing and what needed done got done.
Thank you for giving me the information
as to where to send it, and I would recom-
mend them to anyone who wants to save a
memory from the past. C.V, Internet
Dear C.V: Well, I am glad you had suc-
cess and a good experience with the peo-
ple at Radio Daze. As a reminder for those
who need old radio repairs, parts, etc., the
website is www.radiodaze.com. The toll-
free number is 877-653-8823. Thank you for
letting us know how things worked out
DearJohn: I just have one question. Con-
cerning the response you wrote in your ar-
ticle concerning collectable lighters: Can
you guide me in the right direction to
someone who might be interested in, or
could advise me on a collection I inherited
from my brother a few weeks ago? The col-
lection consists of many Zippos, some
plain, and some advertisement type. I also
have new executive Calibri and


Prometheus lighters, both pocket and desk
types. I have Marlboro, Flames, Crown
Jack, Safelite, Ronson and Scripto lighters.
Some are new in original boxes. Any help
is appreciated. -JC., Internet
DearJ.C.: First, make an inventory of the
collection, including photographs. There
are numerous lighter collector clubs, asso-
ciations and auction companies that can
be found on the Internet. If you are think-
ing of selling the collection, an auction
company that specializes would be
advisable.
Dear John: I have two dolls that are both
over 100 years old. One doll is 140 years old
and was given to my great grandmother on
her 11th birthday in 1873.
The other doll is 105 years old and was

See ATTIC/Page E9
This figural lamp depicting two nudes hold-
ing aloft a globe is done in "Art Nouveau"
style, which was popular around 1890 to
1910. Original Art Nouveau pieces are
highly prized, but this is likely a reproduc-
tion from the past 25 years. As such, there
is no special collector interest.
Special to the Chronicle







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Sizing up plant containers


Sometimes gardeners
need to sit back, sur-
vey the garden and
enjoy the fruits of their
labor from a comfortable
seat. A shady porch or patio
is a good spot to take a cup
of tea and leaf through a
magazine for half an hour.
Having a visitor join in the
social ritual makes the re-
laxing break all the more
enjoyable.
Stores and garden centers
display many kinds of
planters to tempt plant
lovers. Combination pots
are sold already planted to
decorate a terrace, porch or
outdoor living space. Over
the years, gardeners collect
planters in concrete, terra-
cotta clay, glazed ceramics,
durable wood, resin and
plastic. Plants get old, leggy
and cease to bloom. The soil


nutrients are
used up by the
plants and need
to be added to or
replaced annu-
ally The clutter
at the potting
shed needs to be
reduced, reused,
replanted or re-
cycled. Spring is Jane
an ideal time for
clean-up, repot- JAh
ting and refresh- GAR
ing planters.
In a square teak box, a
reused microwave turntable
at the bottom protects the
wood. A black plastic pot will
fit nicely inside. Fifteen years
ago, I had accidently altered
a batch of coontie seeds, and
the resulting plants are per-
fectly formed but have re-
mained miniature. The dwarf
specimen cycad, Zamia


Weber
IE'S
DEN


pumila, was repot-
ted with fresh
sandy soil mixed
with natural de-
cayed humus and
placed in the teak
box. Nestled in the
shade beside the
front porch pillar,
its erect, frond-
like leaves are
showcased nicely.
To balance the
coontie, I repot-
ted a multi-


crowned Mexican
Cardboard plant, Zamia
maritima, in an aged orange
plastic nursery pot and
placed it beside the oppos-
ing column. Perhaps a few
sprigs of small-leafed Hed-
era ivy could trail from one
pot and variegated ivy from
the other. Planters can be a


work in progress.
Cobalt blue is a popular
color in bottles and ceramic
glaze. A pair of rotund, 14-
inch diameter fired ceramic
planters had only one
drainage hole in the bottom.
The material was too hard
to make more holes. There
is always another way: Two
inches of red sandstone in
the bottom of the planters
keep roots out, along with
any standing water. If
planted directly in the pots,
roots and soil would fill it
and would require butcher-
ing to remove plants
through the narrower rim.
A plastic pot fit. One tall,
lance-leaved, variegated
Tasmanian Blue Flax lily in
the center surrounded by

See JANE/Page E7


GOT A NEWS TIP?
* The Chronicle welcomes tips from readers about
breaking news. Call the newsroom at 352-563-5660,
and be prepared to give your name, phone number,
and the address of the news event.
* To submit story ideas for feature sections, call 352-
563-5660 and ask for Nancy Kennedy. Again, be pre-
pared to leave a detailed message.



Jackie Gaffney Jason Gaffney
Realtor" SE Realtor@
A HOUIE
302.3179 so N 287-9022
S WEEKS REALTY, 5 BEVERLY HILLS BLVD.
The Golden Girl 7466700 ....
6340 N. WHISPERING OAK LP.
BEVERLY HILLS
F , 1 ,, 1 1,, ,,, 1 ,,I ,,,
h I I, I h -, I I1

3855 N. GRAPEFERN WAY


.I. ., I,
H'


REFURBISHED VILLA
* 2/2/1 *NewA/C
* New roof New paint
* New floors 1 1/2 lots
#346591 $74,900


ATTRACTIVE VILLA
* 2/2/1 Furniture avail.
* Breakfast bar Great room
* Screened lanai Laundry room
#354978 $82,500


BANK OWNED-HOMOSASSA, FL BANK OWNED-INVERNESS, FL
Handyman doublewide on corner lot with Commercial corner on Hwy 44 East with approx.
detached 2 story garage. $32,900 1300 sq. ft building. $71,900 MLS#354972
- m. A


OAKS GOLF COURSE-HERNANDO, FL
Best buy for 1/2 acre on the 3rd tee.
$29,900 MLS#321216


BANK BUILDING-INVERNESS, FL
Prime commercial location on Main Street. Over 1400
sq. ft situated on 100 x 212 lot. $495,000


CALL Roy Bass TODAY (352)726-2471
Email: roybass@fampabay.rr.com www.allcitrusrealty.com After Hours 302-6714


746-9000


0 00


51W.PLAYER PATH 822 W. DEACON 9S70 N. CORTLAND DR. 7768 N. SARAZEN 8920 TEMPEST 21 TRUMAN BLVD.
$91,500 3/2/2 353982 $89,900 : 74,500 3/2/2 354564 $144,900 3/2/2 354514 $89,900 351656 $59,900




2667 FLAME LP 311 S. TYLER 15 S. FILLMORE 101 S BARBOUR ST. 45 S. MELBOURNE 9570 N. CITRUS SPRINGS
3/3/2 354963 $139,900 2/1 5/1 354946 $51,900 2/2 354359 $54,900 2 2/2 354334 $64,900 354341 $84,900 I 348850 $176,900
S3521 N. LECANTO HWY., BEVERLY HILLS, FL 34465 1-888-789-7100


I


Amanda & Kirk Johnson Tom Balfour Ul Aenus & Hal $Steiner Art Paty
BROKER/ASSOC. *EALTORI REALTOR REALOR-BROKER REALTOR


0I





1238 E. TRIPLE CROWN 5984 N. ROSEWOOD DR 3427PINE RIDGE BLVD.
4/3/3 353329 $365,000 /3 345235 $229,9004267 $239,000




7170 N. GRACKLE 2173 W. TACOMA 6396 N. EARLSHIRE 2450 N. BRENT
3/2 2 348792 $109,900 4/3/3 353801 $149,900 4/2/2 350502 $129,900 2/2/2 354530 $


SUNDAY, APRIL 22, 2012 E5







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


..gh glo ss ... kitchen ..s

age ds-eg s f
god and kis' itms Bu deinrBiSnPtrc
Flynn suget pikn up pra kice- ai
Set fro big box reales thnisaligte
as strg souin fo kids roms
* ~rm eS .co/socae SPSes s 5


Having active kids doesn 't

have to lead to a cluttered house


MELISSA RAYWORTH
For The Associated Press

- t starts with a lacrosse
stick and cleats by the
front door. Then comes
the batting helmet and
- glove on the bedroom
floor, and the baseball hat
on the kitchen table.
Karate uniforms pile up in
the laundry room next to
team jerseys, and errant
tennis balls roll down the
hall.
Can we get through the
spring and summer sports
seasons without our homes
ending up in total disarray?
Interior designer Betsy
Burnham, founder of Burn-
ham Design in Los Angeles,
says nearly every home re-
modeling project she works
on these days includes a
mudroom with one prior-
ity: storing and organizing
sports equipment.
Here, she and interior
design experts Brian
Patrick Flynn of decor
demon.com and Kyle
Schuneman of Live Well
Designs offer tips on han-
dling all this gear without
sacrificing style, even when
you don't have a mudroom.
Begin with
workflow
Your system for handling
sports clothing, says
Schuneman, can be as sim-
ple as "two color-coded
baskets by the back door or
the laundry room: one for
dirty, one for clean. Make it


a habit to immediately put
your uniforms in the dirty
basket after the game," he
says. "Once it's out of the
wash, you fold it and put it
in the clean basket," rather
than putting it away with
other clothing in a
bedroom.
For a dose of style, use
colorful woven baskets
rather than typical plastic
hampers or laundry bins.
Just make sure the
youngest kids can easily
reach their items.
"Once you train yourself
to this habit, it will be a
natural," Schuneman says,
and the stress of searching
for a team jersey before a
game will be history The
key is sticking to the system
and putting things in their
place.
Choose one
location for gear
You don't need a huge
space for sports gear, and it
doesn't have to be in or
near a child's bedroom.
"Often people are chal-
lenged for space," Burn-
ham says. Any spot works:
"It can be a little area
under the stairs or one
area of your entryway," as
long as it's dedicated to
sports stuff.
One option is revamping
part of your garage, Burn-
ham says. Rather than
using plastic storage bins
and old boxes, outfit this
space with vintage metal
See Page E7


E6 SUNDAY, APRIL 22, 2012







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SPORTS
Continued from Page E6

containers refurbished with fresh
paint, or large baskets with lids.
The summer sports season "can be
a great reason to give your garage a
facelift," Burnham says, using stor-
age that is sturdy but attractive.
Or spend a Saturday cleaning out
an entryway closet, then add hooks
and baskets for sports items. You
may have more space available
than you think.
Get creative
with cabinets
There are many storage options
designed specifically for sporting
goods and kids' items. But Flynn
suggests thinking more broadly His
favorite creative solution, he says,
"always solicits an 'Are you kid-
ding?' response."
"I usually pick up pre-fab kitchen
cabinets from big box retailers,
then install them as storage solu-
tions for kids' rooms," Flynn says.
"They come in all different sizes,
many the ideal depth for basket-
balls or soccer balls, and many in
excellent heights, tall enough for
baseball bats or hockey sticks."
"My favorite is Ikea's Abstrakt in
high-gloss red. I usually adorn the
cabinet door fronts with large towel
rings instead of drawer pulls. This
way they add that playful, unex-
pected, kid's room touch, and kids
can actually lay their soccer socks
out on them, or their freshly
washed hand towels," Flynn says.
"For a 6-year-old boy in Los Ange-
les, I installed three of them side-
by-side on a wall below a window,
instantly adding concealed storage
for his sports gear Plus, it doubles
as a homework area, since I added
a countertop to it."
See Page E8


OVER 4,000 SQ. FT. OF LIVING
This Timberlane Estates 4/3/2 pool home features 2
master suites, upgraded master baths, bonus room,
double-sided fireplace, imported Italian porcelain tile
throughout, plus much more. Perfect for the in-laws.
MLS #353612 $299,900
Alan DeMichael 352-613-5752
Jeanne Gaskill 352-476-5582
SAMERICAN E T 352-746-3600
ERA REALTY& IWESTMENTS [B -


JANE
Continued from Page E5

three fragrant "Caliente
Pink" geraniums planted in
a garden soil filled the pot
The geraniums will grow to
cascade over the rim after
filling the pot. The combo
could last many years. Put it
on a plant dolly with caster
wheels so the heavy planter
can be wheeled into the
garage for frigid winter
nights.
Several more containers
were filled similarly with
different-colored sets of
geraniums: two with deep
carmine, two in scarlet and
another with variegated
leaves called "Caliente
Gem." Geraniums need full
sun to flower well. Planters
require fertilizing after the
first two months. A pre-


emergent herbicide such as
Free Hand or Ronstar will
prevent weed seeds for up
to three months. A little
Spanish moss decorates the
soil surface while the gera-
niums fill in. Place the moss
in a bag and microwave it
for a minute to kill chiggers
that may inhabit it. Deer
moss, a native lichen, also
makes a decorative ground
cover in planters.
Watering planters is an
easily forgotten chore. A bat-
tery operated timer and
micro or drip irrigation can
easily be installed to auto-
matically irrigate the plants.
Different sized and colored
drippers provide various
amounts of water, including
half, one or two gallons an
hour If the timer is set for 15
minutes every other day, the
pots would get two cups, a
quart or half a gallon each
time. Free instruction book-


S"Nancy Knows Sugarmill Woods"

NANCY Direct: 352-634-4225
PONTICOS Cr
Multi-Million 555 Producer T KEY 1 REALTY INC.
8015o5 S Suncoast Blvd Homosassa, FL 382.1700 C


BEAUTIFUL NEW OAK HARDWOOD FLOORS! LOVELY LANDSCAPING! LARGE CORNER LOT!
LARGE LANAI TO 14 X 28 POOL + SPA! FRENCH DOORS TO REFRESHING POOL
''* Updated Appliances, Extra Cabinets & Tile in Modern Kitchen Open Great Room 3 Bed + Den/Office & Music Room
, Gorgeous Cul-de-Sac Double Pane Windows 2,444 Living Walk-In Pantry Roman Tub + Separate Shower
$219,500 MLS#349266 $189,000 MLS#352071
Takemyvrtual ours


KEY "Always There For You"
mil GAIL COOPER
mou Multi-Million Dollar Realtor
ER 4 Cell: (352) 634-4346
OFFICE : (352) 382-1700x309
E-mail me: homes4u3@mindspring.com


.E!IMhE


* 3+office/2/2 on quiet cul de sac
* AC/heat new in 2007
* Glassed Florida room
* Solar tube in the kitchen
* Owner will consider financing
* Home warranty for buyers
#353253 $104,000


nrfAl u A.LI aTIEi.IN rUUL.
* 3+office/2/2 Tradewinds III
* Corian kitchen with maple cabinetry
* New range 2010 new microwave 2012
* Dual pane windows for energy efficiency
*Double tray ceiling in Great Room
* Home warranty for buyers
#351881 $229,900


lets are available in home im-
provement stores. Now is a
good time for that cup of tea!

Jane Weber is a Profes-
sional Gardener and Con-


sultant. Semi-retired, she
grows thousands of native
plants. Visitors are wel-
come to her Dunnellon,
Marion County garden. For
an appointment call 352-
249-6899 or contact


w


NEW HOME & HOMESITE IN SUGARMILL WOODS
Building
Custom Homes
iIrn,,so'hnt tho


Hwy. 19, 4% miles south of Homosassa Springs. 8016 S. Suncoast Blvd.
352-382-4888 www.sweetwaterhomes.com swhsales@tampabay.rr.com
NEW HOMES, VILLAS, REMODELS & COMMERCIAL


SUNDAY, APRIL 22, 2012 E7



|


I See Virtual Tours @ www.resalehomes4u.com







E8 SUNDAY, APRIL 22, 2012


SPORTS
Continued from Page E7

Combine seating
with storage
All three designers suggest invest-
ing in seating with built-in storage,
like a bench with cubbies underneath.
"In a bedroom redesign I did for
two young sisters in Atlanta, I had a
window seat outfitted with deep
drawers, which can hold everything
the girls need," Flynn says, including
tennis gear.
Schuneman hunts for vintage
trunks to use this way '"A trunk in a
mudroom or entryway can double as
a chic bench to be able to take on and
off those cleats," he says. "If you have
multiple items or sports, and want
them separate, try getting smaller
square trunks in varying shades and
place them next to each other. It's a
great way to have an easy color-
coded system, without it feeling like
a kids' playroom."


'"A vintage barrel or ceramic pot,"
he says, can "house your tall items,
like baseball bats, tennis racquets and
lacrosse sticks, next to the bench."
Put sports in
the spotlight
Sometimes, celebrating the pres-
ence of all this gear is better than
hiding it. Flynn is a fan of "open solu-
tions, whether with hooks, shadow-
boxes or shelves."
Schuneman agrees: "Hooks are es-
sential. No one wants to hang up their
coats, but hooks on the wall are an easy
way to throw your uniforms, hoodies
and track jackets up. Give everyone
their own hook with their initial on
them to make the process go smoothly"
All three designers suggest seeking
out vintage school lockers or gym
lockers, which can be found online at
eBay and elsewhere. Real lockers
bring "a retro schoolhouse feel,"
Schuneman says, and are "incredibly
useful. Each kid can have a locker
and even the parents, too!"
If a room is "going to be full of uni-
forms, cleats and gear, I run with the


preppy theme by bringing in vintage
wire baskets, plaid bowling bags,
school banners and vintage school-
house pieces to play it up," Flynn
says. "This way, it becomes an obvi-
ous part of the design but in a play-
ful, designer-caliber manner"
If "being a sports parent is who you


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

are right now," Burnham says,
"there's no reason to apologize for
it." Instead of hiding lacrosse sticks
and baseball bats, "get a great look-
ing umbrella stand" and keep those
items right by your front door.
"It's who you are," Burnham says.
"And everybody gets it."


S311 W. Main St., Inverness

LAND 352-726-5263
www.Iandmarkinverness.com J-:1
AM 1


REALTY GwROcUPo





2Bd/2.SBath/Den/2Car Pointe Vista
Detached Villa 3Bd/2Bath/2Car/Hillside Villas
Terra Vista Maintenance Free Villa Popular Lantana Model Open
fl I f ,,, t.... f ,,,, 1 I,,,,,,, I,, f f t I.,, and the 3rd
I..... finished with
S. . .... .1 W ell maintained
MLS#353663 $415,000 i I1 $219,000


Beautifully landscaped enhanced maintenance free villa Recently
painted inside and out this home features custom surround sound,
ii $225,000


Single Family/4Bd/2.5 Bath/3Car/Woodside


1 11 $359,000


T- -. Vista &.B..t.o :-.D...
Tm -b


Townhome/3Bd/2.5Bath/lCar/Brentwood Townhomes
Spacious unfurnished end unit Great location Enjoy the amenities
of Terra Vista with your rental including the luxurious BellaVita
Spa and Fitness Center
#1149 $1,100


Terra Vista Realty Group, LLC
2400 North Terra Vista Blvd., Hernando, Florida 34442
(352) 746-6121 (800) 323-7703


Detached Villa/2Bd/2Bath/2Car/Brentwood Villa
Immaculate unfurnished home in the Community of Brentwood
Open floor plan with lots of space Formal Dining area, breakfast
nook and Den Social Club Membership Included
#1230 $1,100


Office in the
Terra Vista
Welcome Center


-" ^ C l ,,,l, kIII llll ll 10 hlll l ll .. 1,,,,I -. fll
IN YOUR MEANS! Bult 1975, this 3/2/2 needs some i llilerSlOral shingles arid iarnslelable Wallarinly.
g but has been wellinaintained and loved. Features 1,515 Do not let this one pass you by. MLS #353220.
irea w/split floor plan & family room. $63,500 5291 E. ASKING $229,000. 3101 S. Graymor Path.
t Ln., Inverness. MLS #354515. Call Tonya Koch 352-613-
nr lhhiW Tnnnrv 9-Ai..9 Kath Chapman 352-476-4988.


CRYSTAL RIVER PRIVACY' .i, GREAT OPPORTUNITY" il i d ll ., k i i- 1
R O YA L O A K S B EA U T Y i . i .... ... I i i.. . .. l I I 1 l l I...I ,,, r ,,, ... .... .. I I ,,, ,,, ,,,,, r I,,,l,,,,,,,,. ... ., ,, I. ....I I,, I I I,, 1
I ,, ,,,,l l,, ,,,, i,, ,,,,, ,l ,,,, I ,,,,,,,I I O N LY 1 h u .. .l ..... .. 11 I O N LY S 7 9, 9 0 0 ,,i ,i ,, r,,, ,i ,,, ,,l ,, ,, ,, ,,I O N LY .
$84,900. 3532 S. Belgrave Dr. Call Kim Fuller 352-212-5752 or MIS #355008 2709 N. Turkey Oak Dr. Call Kim Fuller 352-212- $56,000. 483/485 N. Briarcreek Pt. MIS #355020 Call Kim
Tomka Spiresflanssen 352-5860598. 5752 or Tomika Spires-Hanssen 352-586-6598. Fuller 352-212-5752 or Tomika Spires-Hanssen 352-586-6598.


FANTAI1C A MOM APPROVED" . i.. H. l ,I.O...l In... i. i REDUCED ',r,. H.I in il...., .111 nih. HII
d, h 1r. ... l.. I,. ,h ..h .Il. I I .." -,1.1. 1. .11,. .l1, ,h I 1.. "I ..
I ,,I,, ., I .. .,I ..... ...... 1., ,..1 ..... ., laundry, pantry, open & splitfloor plans, alarm system, great room, rear $219,900! Caged inground pool, covered lanai with summer kitchen,
.....i ............. I..i .... .. .,. ,,,,i ....... .... ..... patio skylight, fenced yard, and more! ONLY $89,990. vaulted ceilings, split plan, 3-car side entry garage, int. laundry, great
.I ..... .. .b..6. ..1 I $111. ..1 ..,., MIS #354887 Call Kim Fuller 352-212-5752 or Tomika Spires- room with fireplace MIS 354103. 202 Indianapolis. Call Tomika
352-212-5752 or Tonka Spires-ianssen 352-586-6598. Hanssen 352-586-6598 to see this home. Spires-Hanssen 352-586-6598 or Kim Fuller 352-212-5752.




Sn.iail 4vin (OMMnit ian i i Crai CHEAP BUT SMELLS A LITTLE' i .... I ,d, I 1, I i .i
S liesded uln ul t lu lul 5u$500400. line lequines a lul ul updulnl. SUPER DUPER DEiAL .,, .. ... ,, , d
Home features a living room with fireplace, ginormous 10X42 screened ,,, i.. ,,, r .I .........., ,
fd i,,,Ih ,, I,,,,,,i. carport andshed. MIS #354677. 5190N. i. ..... ,, ,, ii,,, .,, .. ... .... .l f AC,
Or. s. .... ,, I. ,,,I,, allTomika Spires-Hanssen 352-586-6598 or ...... i .. ONLY SI299i I i. 2 Call
i i i ,"i i







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ATTIC
Continued from Page E4

given to my grandmother in
the year 1904.
I would like to find out
the value of these dolls. If
you are not familiar with
such dolls, could you possi-
bly point me in the right di-
rection? Any help would
be appreciated. D.L.,
Internet
Dear D.L.: It is nice you


SUNDAY, APRIL 22, 2012 E9


know the family history of
the dolls. However, without
photographs and more in-
formation about the maker
of the dolls, what they are
made of, and dimensions, it
is not possible to help you.
Maker's marks are typi-
cally located at the back of
the doll's head. Take sev-
eral good, clear photos of
the dolls, and include the
dimensions and what you
find on the back of the
doll's head. Then I will be
glad to help you.


John Sikorski has been a
professional in the an-
tiques business for 30
years. He hosts a call-in
radio show, Sikorski's
Attic, on WJUF (90.1 FM)
Saturday from noon to 1
p.m. Send questions to
Sikorski's Attic, c/o The
Citrus County Chronicle,
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd., Crystal River, FL
34429 or asksikorski
@aol. com.


MOWERS
Continued from Page E4

For more information, con-
tact Citrus County Exten-
sion at 352-527-5700.
Citrus County Extension
links the public with the Uni-
versity of Florida/IFAS's
knowledge, research and re-
sources to address youth,
family, community and agri-
cultural needs. Programs and
activities offered by the Ex-


I- PN RIDGE & CTRUS H OFFICE I


PINE RIDGE
1481 Pine Ridge Blvd.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465
(352) 527-1820


(k Prudential

Florida Showcase

Properties


CITRUS HILLS
20 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 746-0744


OPEN HOUSE SUN. 1-3 OPEN HOUSE SUN. 12-3 OPEN HOUSE SUN. 1-3 NEW LISTING


.l, 160 W Lihty SI 1147 S. Fieldview Loop
tLt' MLS#350237 $209,900 C61 MLS #354850 $175,000
3/2/2 situated on a beautifully landscaped Upgrades galore in this 3/2/2 pool home.
1 acre lot. Directions: East on Hwy, 44 to south on Crystal
Directions: Rte. 486 to south on Citrus Hills Glen Dr. (main entrance to Crystal Glen), to left
Blvd., to right on Ireland Ct., to home on right on S. Fieldview Lp., to home on left.
Jo Ann Martin 352-613-2238 Ron Egnot 352-287-9219
NEW LISTING


iIE ^^^--L*


.*LiUs .1 ii = K*; 46.000
Great investment, however, needs
some work.
Sandra Olear 352-212-4058


( S MLS #353393 $149,900
Picture perfect three bedroom home
w/new roof.
Steve Dobbyn 352-634-0499


783 E. Falconry Ct.
.ttUS MLS #354203 $234,900
Stunning 3/2/3 "New 2012 Construction"
on the Meadows.
Phil Phillips 352-302-3146


Vi"UA ~MLS #354323 $11;
Bright 2/2/1 pool home.
Tami Mayer 352-476-1507


-LiUS l.. I 149.000
Immaculate 3/2/2 Meadows Golf Course
pool home.
Directions: Rte. 486 to south on Citrus Hills
Blvd., to left on Falconry, to #652 on right.
Dick Hildebrandt 352-634-0499


S.l. j 165 E. Ireland CI.
44T "s M LS #354308 $199,000
Updated 3/2/2 Oaks Golf Course home.
Mike McHale 352-302-3203


Beautiful 3/2/2 pool villa.
Mark Casper 352-476-8136


/ [.11 ...... S99.900
Wow, 2/2/1 completely refurbished.
Mark Casper 352-476-8136






L 3842 W. NorlhcresI CI.
S MLS #352588 $170,000
3/2/2 home on a cul-de-sac.
Florence Cleary 352-634-5523


2274 N. Volusia P.
MLS #353010 $92,000
PATIO VILLA with lovely backyard
view& large.
Florence Cleary 352-634-5523


-, PENDING PENDING




S5501 W. Corral$P1.
4 iIt'L( 2340 N. Alachua PI. 624 W. Diamond Bird Lp. MLS #352720 $234,500 4370 N. Baywood Dr.
*iil S81.500 MLS #354309 $71,900 New construction charming custom MLS#348393 $201,000
Villa with a pool in a great location. 2/2/1 fullyfurnished maintenance free villa. 3/3/3 w/den. Stunning 3/3/3 home on an acre.
Dick Hildebrandt 352-634-0499 Jo Ann Martin 352-613-2238 Phil Phillips 352-302-3146 Florence Cleary 352-634-5523
2011 Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities. An independently owned and operated broker member of Prudential Real Estate Affiliates, Inc., a Prudential Financial company. Prudential, the BM
Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are service marks of Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities, registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Used under license. Equal Housing Opportunity.


tension Service are available
to all persons without regard
to race, color, handicap, sex,
religion or national origin.


Dr Joan Bradshaw is the
natural resource conserva-
tion faculty for specialized
programs in Citrus, Her-
nando, Pasco and Sumter
County University of
Florida/IFAS Extension
Service.


y111" Norm Overfield 00OB76.
Realtor KELLER WILLIAMS
352-586-8620 R A L T Y
Erra r.:. rr.:., erilo r.:.rr 352-746-7113
,rtr r,.:.rrr..:.verielo r:.rre.~,3rlrd r.,:,m 699 S. Adolph point, Lecanto

3822 E. Arbor Lakes Drive
Popular Sanibel floor plan with extra living area and
expanded garage. Backs to community property, no
S... close backyard neighbors. Ceramic Tile and carpeted
floors. Covered lanai with vinyl windows. In Ground
heated spa in screened area. Recent SEER 15 A/C unit.
Two ovens and 2 Refrigerators. Located in Arbor Lakes,
a gated lakeside 55+ community with lots of activities
and amenities. And, there is a One-year warranty, too!
ONLY $167,200. Call Norm Today!


OOB FY



L


REAL ESTATE, INC.
5569 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY.
CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429
OFFIcE: (352) 795-6633
WWW ALEXRE.COM E-MAIL: SALES@ALEXRE.COM


ii/^/
BEST

Realtor


I A N N D YSEV DYS A W








E10 SUNDAY, APRIL 22, 2012



Crn



Real Estate


Classifieds


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


To place an ad, call 563-5966


















.- The Tihne


C.R/Homosassa
1& 2 Br. furn, quiet park
Util. incl. clean, shrt/long
term 352 220-2077
Citrus Springs
2/1.5 on 2.5 acres,
clean, bright, quiet,
$600.(352) 603-0024
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1,
NEW, sen disc.
$600mnth, First, Last
Sec (352) 584-3348
CRYSTAL RIVER
2br, 1ba, Incl: water,
trash, frdge, stv, W&D
$495mo 352-587-2555
HERNANDO
2/1, $400 Mo. No Pets.
(352) 344-1476
HOMOSASSA
RENT TO OWN, 3/2, DW
on 1/2 Acre MOL,
$2,500 down $575.
monthly. (352) 726-9369
INVERNESS
RENT SPECIAL: 55+ park
on the water w/5 piers
for fishing and
enjoyment, clubhouse,
onsite shuffleboard, &
much more! 1 BR home
$325 2BR home $450,
includes H20. 2 BR, 1.5
bath, Park Model $500.
1/1 furn. w/CH/A,
on the water, $600.
Section 8 accepted.
(352) 476-4964
LECANTO
2/2 $500/ 1st & dep no
pets (352) 270-1563
OLD HOMOSASSA
2 bedroom. 1-1/2 bath.
UNDER NEW MANAGE-
MENT Cedars Lake MH
and RV park with 1 and 2
bedroom mobile homes
and RV sites available
call:628-4441
cedarslakepark@aol.com




1/1 remod shed $5k
1/lscrnrm/carprt $6k
2/1 carprt/rf.over $7k
turn, move-in ready
55+ park, clean quiet
Close to shopping
CR/Homossasa area
Owner Financing
Owner 352-220-2077


CRYSTAL RIVER 2/2,
extremely reasonable,
owner finance $27,000
(352) 564-8057
HERNANDO Las Brisas
Mobile Home Park, 55+,
2/2, Furnished, clean,
own your own lot, Car-
port, attached shed,
club house, heated
pool, Priced to sell.
765-212-0348
HUGE SALE
Going On Now!!!
New 2012 Jacobsen
Homes starting at
$33,900 Land home
packages and
financing available
with $500 down for
land owners. Rates as
low as 3.75% Stop by
Taylor Made Homes
and see what makes
us Best Of The Best.
352-621-9182

JACOBSEN
NEW 3/2 HOME
With 10 yr. extended
warranty. Highest
quality construction
and best value
available. Includes
appliance pkg.
delivery and set up.
Several models to
choose from as low
as $34,900 or 5%
down $315/mo WAC
CALL 352-621-9181

NEW DEALER REPO
Beautiful 3/2 with
over 1600 sq. ft.
Includes appliance
pkg, delivery & set up
ONLY $59,900 or
5% down & $454/mo.
WAC 352-621-3807

Palm Harbor Homes
4/2 From $499/month
Loaded.
3/2 From $399/month
Loaded.
Homes on Your Lot
0 Down.
800-622-2832 X 210

USED HOME 2/2
Like new, delivered
to your lot and set up
with AC & heat,
Only $21,900
Call 352-401-2979


SAVE SS NOW
On a NEW 4/2 HOME
and receive an
extended warranty.
Highest quality
construction. Includes
appliance pkg., de-
livery & set up. Only
$62,900 or 5% down
&$469/mo. WAC
Only 1 unity left at this
special offer. CALL
352-621-9181 NOW




CRYSTAL RIVER
4/2, on 5 Acres,
15 X 30 family room,
w/wet bar, fireplace.
Reduced $139,500.
(352) 465-8346
HERNANDO 2/2 DW
On lot, with Shed & Deck
See for yourself at
2562 N. Treasure Pt.
$29,900 obo
352-464-0719
HOMOSASSA
3/2, 1,800 Sq Ft,
Fenced Yard,new
flooring $5000 down
$525 (352) 302-9217
OWNER FINANCING
3/2, Completely
Remodeled in & out,
on 11/2 Ac. off School
Ave. $38,000
(352) 302-7451




61 S. Atkins Terr.
Lecanto Very Nice 2 bed-
room. 1 bath. Mobile
Home in clean 55+ Park,
This is in very good con-
dition. Central Air And
Heat. New refrigerator,
Mostly Furnished. $230
park rent. $7500 Neg.
Please call 352-302-6586

1/1 remod, shed $5k
1/lscrnrm/carprt $6k
2/1 carprt/rf.over $7k
furn, move-in ready
55+ park, clean quiet
Close to shopping
CR/Homossasa area
Owner Financing
Owner 352-220-2077


CRYSTAL RIVER
VILLAGE -55+
A SUPER BUY 2/2/den
1457sq.ft 05 Hmof Merit,
all appliances, carport,
Ig screen room,
immaculate $39,900
(352)419-6926

HOMOSASSA'S
Best Housing Value
Modern homes from
$8,400 or Lease to Own
from $139/mo.
$800.down + Lot rent at
Evanridge Community
an exceptional 55+Park
352 628-5977
INVERNESS
55+ Park on the water
w/5 piers for fishing &
enjoyment, clubhouse,
onsite shuffleboard, and
much more! 2 BR 1.5 BA
for $2.900. 352-476-4964

Lake Henderson
$7,500.55+ Waterfront
Park, Boat Dock &
Storage, Pool.
2/1,Carport, appli-
ances, Large combi-
nation LR/FI. rm.
(352) 476-8364

PARK MODEL
nice 1 BR, CHA Irg encl
sun rm.cov porch on
Lake Rousseau, boat
parking $12K obo
(386) 451-9266
SINGLEWIDE
1/1, 55 + Park on Lake,
5 piers to fish from, must
be approved $1500
(352) 344-9705

STONEBROOK 55+
2/2 totally remodeled,
furnished, w/Washer
& Dryer.... $5K
(352) 634-1171
Stoneridge Landing
55+ Comm. Resales
starting @$13,500
Financing avail
1-800-779-1226
(352) 637-1400

WESTWIND VILLAGE 55+
Park. Updated 2/2 DW's
for sale. Reasonable
(352) 628-2090


m






835 NE Hwy 19
Crystal River, FI
(352) 795-0021
View our website
C21 NatureCoast.com






122 NE 4th Ave.

/1 w/bonus rm., great Iocation,





-ACTION-
RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REALTY, INC.
352-795-7368


10939 W, Gem Street
N. Crystal River
$550
2/1 Duplex.
Remodeled & very clean

6139 S. Royal Dr.
Homosassa
$950
2/2 waterfront with
lanai and porch

2021 S. Comforter Pt.
$650
3/1/1 Just South of CR
in Homosassa



CHASSAHOWITZKA
3/2 Wtrfront DW, $600.
3/2 Furnished DW., $600
Agent (352) 382-1000


OntUr Re

J.W. MORTON
REAL ESTATE, INC.
1645 W. MAIN ST
INVERNESS, FL
Property Management

Need a Good Tenant?
Bring us your vacant home
and watch us work for you!


2/2/2 Lawncare Included $800
2/1.5/1 Lakeview... $625
2/2/2 Pool Home... $850
2/2/1 .......... $650

2/2/1 Waterfront ... $750

2/1.5/1 ..... .. .. $625
Jennifer Fudge,
Property Manager
Cheryl Scruggs,
Realtor-Associate
352-726-9010















FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025
HOMOSASSA
1BR, Scrn. Porch, Boat
Dock, Stove, refrig. W&D,
cable, util. incld. $600.
mo.+ sec., 352-628-6537




Alexander Real Estate
(352) 795-6633
Crystal River Apts
2 BR/1 BA $375-$500


BEVERLY HILLS
I Room Efficiency,
All Utilities included
CableSep. Kit./ bath
$525. mo.,pet ok
352- 228-2644

HOMOSASSA
1/1, Clean, Quiet, CHA
$375. Incl. Wtr. 563-2114
(352) 257-6461

INVERNESS
1/1 $400 2/1.. $500.
near hosp352-422-2393


SEVEN RIVERS
APTS
A Beautiful place
to come home too.
35 units on private
street, situated on 10
wooded acres, near
Crystal River &
7 Rivers Hosp. fish-
ing, walking, trails,
shopping near by.
Old Florida setting,
quite, clean well
maint. central
laundry room.
352-795-3719
Directions:
Hwy 19 turn W. at
Days Inn, first right
onto Tallahassee Rd



OPPORTUNITY






INVERNESS
2/1 W/D hkup, all tiled
1st floor $500; No Pets
352-344-0238419-6910





FLORAL CITY
STOREFRONT 1000 Sq Ft
Ideal location, corner
Hwy 41 &48. $595 mo.
813-310-5391


CRYSTAL RIVER
Appealing Professional
Office Space for Rent
800 sf, down town, CR
W. of US 19 Avail. May I1
Furnishing Avail.
(352) 422-6579




CITRUS HILLS
2/2 Furn. Condo, W/D &
Util. incl'd, No smoking
/No pets $700 mo 1st &
sec. 352-527-8075
INVERNESS
LANDINGS 2/1.5 clean
roomy, great location
$525/mo F/L/S No smke
No pets (352) 341-1847




CITRUS HILLS
2/2/1 enjoy maint free
living$750 352 613-5655
Citrus Springs
3/2/1 car $650/mo
352-746-7990
INVERNESS
Lrg 2/2 tiled. Lg patio,
Quiet, W/D Hkup. No
Pet $575(727) 446-5871




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225:
INGLIS
INGLIS WATERFRONT
Charming eff./cottage
turn. No smokers
$645/mo. incl. utilities
352-422-2994




Citrus Springs
8354 Legacy 3/2/2 $850
(352) 464-2701

INVERNESS
East Cove Waterfront,
turn., 2/2, C/A carport,
shed, $650
352-476-4964


BEVERLY HILLS
2/1 carport, remodeled
$575 first, last, sec
(786)286-1163
BEVERLY HILLS
2/11/1, Plus FL. RM.
9 S. Lee St. $550.
Call 352-422-2798
CITRUS SPRINGS
RENT OR RENT TO OWN
This is a real cutie!
$649. Move-In Special
3Bed/1 /2 Bath/garage
tiled, spotless, Pets ok.
352-527-0493
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2/2. 1430 NW 21st St.
Very Clean, fenced yard,
screened patio. No
smoking/no pets.
$900/mo. $1,000. dep.
408-489-0849
CRYSTAL RIVER
spacious 2/1 $500 inc
water/sewage
(352)212-9205
HOMOSASSA
2/1 CHA, No pets
$575. mo. 1st + sec
(352) 628-4210


. Fax (352 563566 1t Tollr, Fre (88 85-24 1 Em i:casfescrnceniecm Iw bi w~ hoiloln .c ,,m


Rent













Find creative new uses for old bath towels


B ath towels are
long-lasting, but
at some point
they need to be re-
placed. Maybe they're
no longer as absorbent
as they should be, or
are tattered or frayed.
Rather than throw
them away, give them a
second life. Sar
Here are a few ideas: FRU
Cleaning: Most peo- LIV
ple hang onto old tow-
els and use them as rags. You can
cut them into 8-inch squares and
sew flannel or micro fleece onto
the back. Use them for cleaning or
as homemade baby wipes. You can
also make your own Swiffer cloth
covers and dusters. For a pictorial,
visit saving4six.com/2012/01/home-
made-swiffer-sweeper-and-
duster.html.


II


Bath mat: Cut the
towel into pieces that
are 3/4-inch wide and 5-
inch long, then tie them
^ onto gridded matting to
make a bath mat. For a
*tutorial, visit finecraft
guild.com/eco-friendly-
bath-mat-fun-diy-
project-to-do-in-the-
Noel easter-break/. One
GAL reader, Tiffany from
NG Canada, shares: "I
reused an old bath
towel to make a bath mat. I topped
it with blue crushed panne velour,
put the towel inside to absorb the
water and added dark brown
fleece on the bottom to hold the
moisture in so it doesn't leave a
sopping mess on the floor. It's so
much cozier on my feet than a
store-bought one."
Pets: Call local animal shelters


and see if they would like your old
towels. Or use them for your own
pets to line carriers and kennels,
clean muddy paws, or dry their fur
after a bath. You can make a pull-
and-throw toy for dogs, too. Cut
three strips and braid them, then
knot the ends. Old dishtowels work
best for this.
Bath pouf: Make a bath pouf
that looks like a rose, either to
keep for yourself or to give as a
gift. Visit rufflesand
stuff com/2010/02/bath-pouf-that-
um-looks-like-rose.html. You can
easily fold and stitch the sides of
small washcloths to slip soap sliv-
ers into and use in the bath or
shower, or wrap the cloth around
the slivers, join at the top and use
a rubber-band to close it up.
Hand towels: Cut full-sized towels
into smaller hand towels (size: 28
inches long by 16 inches wide), hem


or use fabric glue and add lace or
fabric. Another reader, Carol from
Canada, shares: "I decided to put
lace on some of my towels, and what
a difference it made! I just cut off
the frayed part of my old towel, zig-
zagged the towel and then zigzagged
the lace. I did five old towels in one
afternoon, and now I have new tow-
els for cheap. So before spending
money, always look for ways to do
things with what you have."
Towel origami: Search online
for directions to make cute towel
animals or go to your local library
and find the book "The Lost Art of
Towel Origami" by Alison Jenkins.
For young kids: See instructions
for making hooded towels at
makeandtakes.com/easy-hooded-
bath-towel, or towel bibs at
martawrites. com/2010/09/how-to-
make-towel-bib.html.
In the car: Keep old towels in


the car for sudden spills, to cover
hot seats or to wipe muddy shoes.
They also come in handy when you
go to the park with kids and a
swing or slide is still wet from rain,
or if you want to sit on the grass.
Draft stoppers: Keep a few to
roll up and use as draft stoppers
for doors or window sills. For an
easy tutorial, visit craftydame.
blogspot.com/2011/01/easiest-
peasiest-draft-stopper-ever.html.


Sara Noel is the owner of Frugal
Village (wwwfrugalvillage.com),
a website that offers practical,
money-saving strategies for
everyday living. To send tips,
comments or questions, write to
Sara Noel, c/o Universal Uclick,
1130 Walnut St, Kansas City MO
64106, or email sara@
frugalvillage. com.


DUNNELLON
3/2/2 Fabulous Home
Across City Beach
2 Fire Pices, wooden firs
www.rublesrentals.com
(561) 575-1718
(561) 719-8787

YOU'LL THIS!
DUNNELLON 3/2/2
RENT TO OWN
Close to Rainbow River
RUBLESRENTALS.COM
(561) 719-8787
(561) 575-1718 aftr 7pm

DUNNELLON
Rent or Rent to Own
2/2, mobile pet ok,
Lake Access, Deer,
quiet. spotless Totally
Renovated. $499.
Special 352-527-0493

HOMOSASSA
2/2/1, $675/mo. Pets ok
fst/Ist/sec 352-434-1235

INVERNESS 2/2/1
New paint & flooring
$695 mo. Inclds. trash,
352- 637-0765,
352-267-9941

Inverness 3/2/2
Wheel Chair Access
$875/.F/L/S 637-2840

Lakefront Gospel
Island Location
Spacious 3/2/2
1/4 acre $800/m for
sale neg908-322-6529

LECANTO
Black Diamond
Ranch
Lease Option
3/2/2.5 car garage
SS appls ,custom
flooring 1100/mo
(352) 527-0456


HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225
INVERNESS
East Cove Waterfront,
turn., 2/2, C/A carport,
shed, $650
352-476-4964



CITRUS SPRINGS
Lease or Rent to Own
3/3/2'/2, Custom Pool
Home on acre $799.
Special. 1st last dep.
bkgrd Ck 352-489-3997
CRYSTAL RIVER
for sale/lease purchase
3/2, fenced yd. water
access, huge lanai
remodeled, $875. mo
404-867-1501, Local
CRYSTAL RIVER
Office/home 4/2,
zoned commercial
perfect for someone
who needs office &
home $895 rent /sell
$99,50 Owner financing
w/$1OK dn. call Paul
(352) 746-9585



CRYSTAL RIVER
Widow would like to
share spacious home,
room w/private bath
includes all utilities
$400 pr week
(352) 220-6100




C.R/Homosassa
1& 2 Br. turn, quiet park
Util. incl. clean, shrt/long
term 352 220-2077


FARMS, LAND,
COMMERCIAL
UNIQUE &
HISTORIC HOMES,
SMALL TOWN
COUNTRY LIFESTYLE
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989







WWW.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.
Specializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches &
Commercial


Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com


Get
Results in
the
homefront
classified!


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ille-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination.
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.









CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pondATV
trails Price Reduced
352 795-2027/ 634-4745


SUNDAY, 12N-3p
Oakwood Village
BEVERLY HILLS
820 Sunset Strip, 3/2/1
1747 sf. New kit./bths.
flooring, paint, in/out.
$79,900 352-527-1239





3BR, 2-1/2BA, 2-car
garage, pool, jacuzzi,
new carpet & paint
Must see extraordinary
interior, 6560 N.
Deltona, off Lecanto
Rd., REDUCED PRICE
$139,000
(830) 534-1918




3 Bedroom, 2 Bath
Double carport,
fenced yd. new roof,
1,100 sf, $55,500
(352) 464-0641
(239) 298-0076

Oakwood Village
820 Sunset Strip
3/2/1, 1747 sf. New kit./
baths, flooring, paint,
in/out. Pix/Info
gcjcinc.com $79,900
(352) 527-1239




Forest Ridge Villages
Updated, move in ready
villa, 2/2/2, private lot,
opt. membership to Citrus
Hills. Appliances incl.
712 W Toucan Loop
352-746-0002


2/2 villa
The Landings, new
Trane a/c & new lanai
screen porch, $58K
cell (352) 400-8130


HIGHLANDS
Lrg.2/2- 4 car garage
pool, game room,
mud room, on triple lot
fenced, price to sell
$65,500 (352) 564-4598






I S, l) I


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work For You!
BETTY HUNT,
REALTOR
ERA KEY 1 Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.






CITRUS COUNTY
3BED/2Bath
Make Offers
352-563-9857


Best Time To Buy!
I have options,
owner financing
Waterfront and
foreclosures
call Phyllis Strickland
(352) 613-3503
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.


Michele Rose, Realtor
Simply put I 'II work
harder 352-212-5097
isellcitruscountyv()
yahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515







INVERNESS
Nice 2/2/1 new carpet
tile & paint. Whispering
Pines Villas furnished
$69,900(352) 726-8712


20 Acres-Live on Land
NOW!! Only $99/mo
$0 Down, Owner
Finance.NO CREDIT
CHECKS! Near El
Paso, Texas, Beautiful
Mountain Views! Free
Color Brochure.
800-755-8953www.
sunsetranches.com

New York State Land
Sale Discounted to
1990' s prices!
3 Acre Starter camp -
$17,995. 5 Acres
w/Farmhouse -
$49,995. 52 Acres,
Stream, 2 ponds,
Beautiful woods &
views. Access to road
front, utilities and
state land Limited of-
fer. Call Christmas &
Associates
(800)229-7843 or visit
landandcamps.com




CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pond ATV
trails Price Reduced
352 795-2027/ 634-4745




CHASSAHOWITZKA
DBL. LOT, chainlink
fence, Make Offer
352-613-7302 or
352-613-4673

GREAT BUY! 2 Lots for
Sale, Must buy both
1 in W. Highlands,
1 N. Highlands,
Inverness $15,000
By owner 617-471-7417


"FREE foreclosure
and short sale lists


Office Open
7 Days a Week

Lisa VanDeboe
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com




JLand


AUCTIONS LAKE
ROUSSEAU!
5/3, @ 11am. 10.6 Acre
parcel & 4 residential lots
all on Lake Rousseau.
Proceeds benefit
FL Sheriffs Youth
Ranches. Pre-Auction
offers accepted.
Online/absentee bidding
available.
wwwhomestoranches.com.
AB1705AU2272. Call
Greg Lord of Homes to
Ranches Realty at
(352)266-6180.


SUNDAY, APRIL 22, 2012 E11


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Homes









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I. sI gI ll h q [..: i ; I..: .; ,: l l. lil ,: il l,:d le

hIIII jI .11 ....I ,in lh I": l % l .inw

$229,900
Call Ruth Fiedeiick 1 352 563 6866


10 ACRES ON THE RIVER!

H II, l. Ip i i ,.: l I 1.,i l i ,j' l .ill pi l

$165,000
Call Ouade Feesei 352 302 7699


INVERNESS HOME WITH 4 BEDROOMS!!!
* I i l. al i a I' all '
* p[.il hl .11 6I .1 h .i.l.l .


Mi 5 =~- ,_,l ONLY $63,000
Call Chailes Kelly 352 422 2387


COUNTRY QUIET DREAM


ali I ''''l II 'll allph ; ,I I .j llill

MIt 5= '.."' $120,000
Ask loi Maiildn Booth 637 4904


ACCESS TO RIVER & CHAIN OF LAKES
ilh, 1 n, I. . n n- 1 ,L d I h, 1 ,-h I, d 1'. ,,


I, , I d 1- ,1 ,d 1" "1. IhL b ,,hh,,I,
Ml .li .. $168,900
Pa D.a is ,35212/2 280
I'el hsting itc2iip.vdai.ns corn


U--7*
15,000 SO. FT. BLDG.
WITH COMMERCIAL KITCHEN
I ,,,,,,,, I ,, 1., ,I ni, I I 1,,,i ,,,



Cail il.iih.i Sndei 352 476 8727
.sk loi lie =35241/5


* l .I a wll' i I. ,:fII ia.Ih

Mi 5 =' -.'i'i $49,000
w'ivr. CitiusCount'Sold. conm
Jeanne Willaid Pickiel 212 3410


euKHeIus smtii numt rLUb PAm. Km,
SCREEN PORCH AND CITY WATER!

I l .lj jl I: 'l.. f :i 1 h .l lljl l 111. I lJl.ll


. ,.i. IUiI'.-T '.-I I I I H- IH IR L''
$133,900
Call Dor, Mi',er at 352422 4621 =354916


CRYSTAL RIVER


. 1u1 u ., ,I

Ml'. = 3 ONLY $112,000
ii', izr sell/incilinscountl l/homes corn
Call Nancj Jenks 352 400 8072









INVERNESS

.( I. I I I | I lh l. I :I F., l l ,,hil I I ,I i


S33,000 OR ANY COMBINATION OF LOTS
David Kuitl Cell 954-383 8786
O/hce 352 726B6668


BRENTWOOD BEAUTY POOL HOME!


il lih I-l.. I.pll.

Mi =~3 ',I $123,900
Call loiaine 0 Regan 352 586 0075


DO YOU NEED A 4800 SO. FT. BLDG.
WITH AN EXTRA DW MOBILE
ON APPROX. 2 ACRES?
(.iJ.li'll ', J :j ,: .r.'ljl..h'l .Ip j ', I.'ll, .ll' .i '
I.j. l- ij .i,, llll. $239,900
Call Ruth Fiedenick / 352 563 6866


bAY mHLLU IU A UUUU BUY!

'i, I l h,: i hdi' Ipi:n llt Il I ..Ia i


$179,000
Call Ouade 352 302 7699


- ....- ," I
GOSPEL ISLAND HOME ON 2 LOTS
* : PF A . iF .I I .F

* l i' 'l: 'in 11. Al. L '' ...:. I.: .
M III.L'''I 0I j ill
MI__ = ,' ONLY $134,900
Call Chailes Kelly 352 422 2387


LECANTO 2/2/4 7.8 ACRES
He 1,fil .).I R.el.l.:. I V q.I 'J' M1. ,1

l.I I :ll l l l l ,:


Mi_ =' '. $229,900
Call Nldda Cano 352 270 0202


NEWER (2206) 3/2/2
WITH 12X30 FLA. ROOM

HI)A 01', 1.:, pi l l(1 .1..1 lihnlil ,V bh ,il
II $ tll,: v I
ML I = 3,./h'i ASKING $114,900
Pal Davis 13521212 7280
Viewi hosting: iiw'i',. c21paldaris. coin


$69,900


l I I, h II ll i h - I.. 1 I. I I 1 1


East Io SEE Call lodav'
NMan Par ,os 352634 1213


L.minrnUM I nrivi"
Iji,, I,, I .,11 I ",,, BUILT IN 2004

. lh, l : ]xI: f.lh I,: Iu : 1.llili H ill;
PRICED TO SELL QUICK $49,000 PRICE REDUCED TO $134,900
Call Wdilaid Pickiel 220 9871 Call Maitha Sn;'dei 352 476 8727
i,'ivi',. CitiusCounlrSold. coin ask i /file =352412


"1 .1 ,1" /ji. . ,ll. .. I.l. 1 .. .. I" ',

lh.. li ile i.. li .il _. il i .
$49,900
Call Dons Minei -. 352422 4627


kHENANDUU
Tli .. De.l.. I. .hiom pl li I 6 1 3 .:4 I-


*il: ..11.:. ...hl 11, l iih y $21,000 1..,
l: i l M I = ...i M.' I-I
Deb Thompson 6342656


E12 SUNDAY, APRIL 22, 2012