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Citrus County chronicle
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02742
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 04-17-2012
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:02742

Full Text



Four-hitter: Shields shines as Rays avoid sweep in Boon /B1


TODAY & Wednesday morning
HIGH Partly cloudy. Slight
84 chance of a.m. showers
LOW Wednesday.
59 PAGE A4
APRIL 17, 2012


CITR U- CO U N TY





HRONICL
www.chronicleonline.com
;Best Community k-Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community 50* VOl


Commissioner's
son-in-law hurt
in accident
Citrus County
Commissioner Winn
Webb's son-in-law
was seriously injured
in a swimming accident
over the weekend in
Northwest Florida.
Danny Mar-
gagliano, who is mar-
ried to Webb's
daughter April, was
boating with friends
Saturday near Destin
when he dived into
shallow water, Webb
said.
Margagliano, 35,
underwent surgery
Saturday night.
"It's going to be
'wait and see,'" Webb
said. "There is some
paralysis. We don't
know yet how bad."
Margagliano's par-
ents, Frank and Ar-
lene Margagliano,
live in Citrus Hills.
Want to run
for office?
Time to file
Candidates who
want their name on
the ballot for state at-
torney, public de-
fender and circuit
court judge must file
the necessary paper-
work next week.
Qualifying for
those offices begins
Monday and ends at
noon Friday, April 20.
Candidates qualify
through the state Di-
vision of Elections in
Tallahassee.
Qualifying for all
other offices, includ-
ing Congress, county
commission and
school board, occurs
during the week of
June 4.
County candidates
qualifying by the peti-
tion method will need
to have the required
981 valid petition
cards to the supervi-
sor of elections office
by noon Monday,
May 7.
Story on water
levels delayed
until Friday
The story about
Lake Rousseau
water levels sched-
uled for today has
been postponed to
allow for additional
information to be
gathered. It should
appear on Friday.
-From staff reports


70 YEARS STRONG:
Going platinum
Dick and Anita Colvin
celebrate seven decades
of marriage, and share
their secrets./Page A3
COMING TOMORROW:
In blood,
and in arms
Four brothers, scattered
around the country and
world by their shared
commitment to the Air
Force, reunite in Florida.
/Wednesday


Comics ..........C8
Community .......C6
Crossword ....... C7
Editorial ........A10
Entertainment . . .B6
Horoscope ........B6
Lottery Numbers . .B4
Lottery Payouts . .B6
Movies .......... .C8
Obituaries . . ... .A6
Classifieds . . ... .C9
TV Listings .......C7


I6 184178I L 20I 02! I


Deputies involved in separate crashes

One unhurt, transported to en Rivers hpitl cruiser was unmarked and the middle of the intersec-
Ol zUn rl, one IJrnported to Seven Rivis hrUsli there are no reports of any tion of Oak Village Boule-


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff Writer
HOMOSASSA Two Cit-
rus County patrol deputies
were involved in crashes
within a minute of each
other Monday in Homosassa.


Deputy James Sudlow's
cruiser was involved in a
crash at 2:39 p.m. on West
Halls River Road and U.S.
19. Sudlow was transported
to Seven Rivers Regional
Medical Center in Crystal
River with minor injuries.


Sudlow was treated for his
injuries and later released.
At 2:40 p.m., dispatch got
another call that Deputy
Christopher Reeves was in-
volved in a crash in the area
of Daisy Street and Oak Vil-
lage Boulevard. Reeves'


injuries from that crash, ac-
cording to the Florida High-
way Patrol (FHP).
Reeves, 27, was traveling
southbound on Oak Village
Boulevard South, when a
2010 Toyota Avalon driven
by John McLaughlin, 70,
passed Reeves' vehicle in


Bay fight spills onto lawns


MIKE WRIGHT/Chronicle
Wayne McAteer received a letter from the city of Crystal River saying his front yard Save Crystal River sign is in
violation of the city's signage code.

City: 'Save Crystal River'yard sigs violate code


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff Writer
CRYSTAL RIVER Wayne
McAteer spent a career at the Mar-
ion County Sheriff's Office, retiring
as a captain, and he knows a thing
or two about the law.
So McAteer was quite surprised
to receive a registered letter from the
City of Crystal River saying an 18-
by-24 inch "Save Crystal River" sign
in the landscaped area of his man-
icured front lawn violated city code.
The sign, featuring a red-and-white
buoy as the group's logo, is McAteer's
way of protesting federal manatee-
protection rules in King's Bay
"I asked for one of those signs,"
McAteer said. "The feds are being
too restrictive in the bay"
Now McAteer has 10 days to
remove the sign or face a formal
violation.


They do violate
the city code. ... If we
try to get away with
it, everybody's going
to be sticking up
signs, and we don't
want that.
Jewel Lamb
member of Save Crystal River.

"Someone's going overboard," he
said. "I'm waiting until the 12th
hour to take mine down."
The city sent 39 registered letters
to homeowners who had the signs
in their yards, city planning and
community development director


Jackie Gorman said.
City code lists a number of tem-
porary sign uses in neighborhoods,
but the Save Crystal River signs
don't fit in any category The city al-
lows political signs, but Gorman
said those are designed to support
candidates and must be removed
after an election.
Gorman said city officials told
Save Crystal River organizers that
the yard signs violated city code.
"This has been an issue since
they first started going in the
ground," Gorman said. "We want to
work with people, but they need to
know they're in violation."
The letter encourages property
owners to attend the April 23 city
council meeting to suggest council
members change the sign ordinance
to allow Save Crystal River-type signs.
See Page A4


vard and Daisy Street. The
left front of McLaughlin's
vehicle hit the right rear of
the 2004 Crown Victoria
driven by Reeves. Damage
to McLaughlin's car was
$4,000 and $2,000 to Reeves'


PageA2


Bay


cleanup


labeled


a turkey

Meadowcrest

traffic light

also makes list
CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff Writer
The King's Bay cleanup
and a future traffic light at
Meadowcrest and State
Road 44 have both been la-
beled turkeys by Florida
TaxWatch, which could
threaten the projects.
The 30-year-old private,
nonprofit research institute
announced last week that
statewide it had identified
159 appropriations or
turkeys costing Florida
taxpayers $170.9 million on
the 2012-13 state budget.
The annual "turkey watch"
lists legislative projects it
claims are placed in the budget
without the proper oppor-
tunity for public review and
debate, thereby circumvent-
ing established procedures.
See Page A2


Dealership

rolls out new

showroom
NANCY KENNEDY
Staff Writer
HOMOSASSA As
Penny Hughes drove into
work Monday, it was not yet
completely daylight.
She approached Eagle
Buick-GMC and saw the
lights from inside the show-
room and got a thrill.
Then as she walked in-
side, it was like a reveal on
an HGTV design show. Every-
thing was new and fresh,
contemporary and shiny
"It's so exciting," said
Hughes, Eagle's customer
relations manager. "I've
been here for 13 years and
I've seen it grow and change
over the years."
See Page A5


Discovery ready for voyage to Smithsonian


Associated Press
CAPE CANAVERAL Space
shuttle Discovery has one last mis-
sion to complete.
At daybreak Tuesday, the oldest
of NASA's retired shuttle fleet will
leave its home at Kennedy Space
Center for the final time, riding on
top a modified jumbo jet.
Its destination: the Smithsonian
Institution's hangar outside Wash-
ington, D.C.
The plane and jet will make a
farewell flight over Cape Canaveral
before heading north. The pair also
will swoop over the nation's capital,
including the National Mall, before
landing in Virginia.
Space center workers arrived by
the busloads Monday at the old
shuttle landing strip, where the jet


-!- **** ....
Associated Press
Crews at the Kennedy Space Center work on attaching the space shuttle Dis-
covery to a modified 747 early Sunday morning in Cape Canaveral. The 747
will ferry the shuttle to the Smithsonian in Washington, D.C.


was parked with Discovery bolted
on top. Security officers, firefight-
ers, former shuttle workers and
even astronauts all posed for pic-


tures in front of Discovery
The six astronauts who flew on
Discovery's final space trip a year
ago were on hand to bid it goodbye.


Discovery first launched in 1984
and flew 39 times in space, more
than any other shuttle. It is the old-
est of NASA's three surviving space
shuttles and the first to head to a
museum.
It will go on display at the Smith-
sonian's hangar at Dulles Interna-
tional Airport in Virginia, replacing
Enterprise, the shuttle prototype
that never made it to space but was
used in landing tests in the late
1970s. Enterprise is bound for New
York City's Intrepid Sea, Air &
Space Museum.
"It's good to see her one more
time, and it's great that Discovery is
going to a good home. Hopefully, mil-
lions of people for many, many years
to come will go see Discovery," said


Page A2


IE 254





A2 TUESDAY, APRIL 17, 2012


SHUTTLE
Continued from Page Al
Steven Lindsey, the last
astronaut to command Dis-
covery. "It's also sad ... it's
sad to see that the program
is over."
NASA ended the shuttle
program last summer after
30 years to focus on destina-
tions beyond low-Earth
orbit. Lindsey, no longer
with NASA, now works in
the commercial space in-
dustry, helping to develop a
successor for launching
American astronauts to the
International Space Station.
Stephanie Stilson, a NASA
manager heading up the
transition and retirement of
the three remaining shuttles,
said Discovery looked as
though it had arrived from a
ferry trip from the backup
landing site in California, as
it did so many times prior


TURKEYS
Continued from Page Al

The list is significant be-
cause it influences Florida
governors. During the more
than 20 years the list has
been compiled, governors
have vetoed about $2 billion
of listed projects, according
to Florida TaxWatch. More
than 90 percent of last year's
list was vetoed by Gov Rick
Scott.
County Administrator
Brad Thorpe said he did not
know how inclusion on the
list would affect the two
projects because Citrus
County has not had any
projects listed in the recent
past.
The research institute
made it clear that calling a
project a turkey does not
question its value, just the
lack of adherence to the
budget process, saying
turkeys are "mainly in-
stances where the Legisla-
ture has not followed its
own policies and proce-
dures to ensure the highest
standards of accountability
and government efficiency"
"Despite sometimes con-
tentious budget debates of
relatively small amounts of
money, a large number of
member projects found
their way into the budget,"
said Dominic M. Calabro,
Florida TaxWatch president
and chief executive officer
"While the Legislature
should be commended for
making state government
leaner and more efficient,
and making unpopular deci-
sions in the best interest of
Floridians this year, their
achievements make the
high number of turkeys dis-
appointing. In yet another
budget year requiring sub-
stantial cuts, our legislators
should have been as disci-
plined and consistent with
taxpayer money as Florida
families are forced to be
with their own budgets."
The King's Bay cleanup
project is the work of the
King's Bay Rotary Club to
remove muck and weeds
and encourage new growth
of the bay's natural grass on
the bottom to produce oxy-
gen for the health of the
water body
State Sen. Charlie Dean,
R-Inverness, procured
$100,000 in state funding for
the project, which will still
need volunteer labor and
donations.
Florida TaxWatch labeled
the project a turkey because
it claims the King's Bay


LOCAL/STATE


"To see her like this is
quite an amazing sight,"
Stilson said. "We're finally
here" almost an exact year
since Discovery launched and
landed for good, she noted.
Discovery's list of
achievements include deliv-
ering the Hubble Space Tel-
escope to orbit, carrying the
first Russian cosmonaut to
launch on a U.S. spaceship,
performing the first ren-
dezvous with the Russian
space station Mir with the
first female shuttle pilot in
the cockpit, returning Mer-
cury astronaut John Glenn
to orbit, and bringing shuttle
flights back to life after the
Challenger and Columbia
accidents.
A white tail cone covers
the three replica main en-
gines at the back end of Dis-
covery, to keep them safe
during the ferry flight and
provide for better aerody-
namics. (Only the nozzles

cleanup, along with 22 other
water projects within 17
counties ranging in costs
from $5.6 million for the St.
John's River restoration to
$35,000 for a study of Lake
Panasoffkee, did not follow
statutory procedure.
"The Department of Envi-
ronmental Protection (DEP)
is required to administer
the grant program and eval-
uate proposals," Florida
TaxWatch stated. "The de-
partment did not review
proposals for any of these
projects and did not partici-
pate in their selection."


are there, no massive power
assemblies.)
The original air lock is on
board that spacewalking as-
tronauts used to step out
into the vacuum; Discovery
is the only shuttle keeping
one because it's considered
the spacecraft of historic
record. The robot arm is al-
ready in Virginia and will be
placed on side-by-side dis-
play
NASA spent the past year
draining all toxic fuels from
Discovery and removing un-
necessary plumbing.

Florida TaxWatch also
stated that DEP has other
grants and loan programs
for which water projects
could have qualified.
Dean also got $200,000 in-
cluded in the new state
transportation budget to pay
for a traffic signal at the in-
tersection of State Road 44
and North Meadowcrest
Boulevard in Crystal River,
the intersection nearest the
new satellite government
center
The state was asked to in-
stall the signal, as S.R. 44 be-
longs to the state. However,


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Crews at September Shuttle Atlantis
the Kennedy will remain at Kennedy; a
Space Center huge display area is in works
work on at the visitor complex.
attaching the With the shuttles retired,
space shuttle U.S. astronauts are hitching
Discovery to big-bucks rides on Russian
a modified Soyuz rockets to get to the
747 on Sun- space station. A variety of
day in Cape American companies are
Canaveral. vying for astronaut trans-
Associated Press portation rights. Officials
expect it to be five years or
Stilson said she's man- so before spacecraft will be
aged to keep her emotions ready to carry passengers.
in check by staying busy One of the main competi-
She's one of the luckier tors, Space Exploration
ones; thousands of shuttle Technologies Corp. orSpaceX,
workers have lost their jobs. is due to launch its Falcon
Astronaut Nicole Stott rocket and Dragon capsule
had "mixed feelings" as she from Cape Canaveral on
gazed up at Discovery April 30 with an unprece-
"There's no denying the dented trip to the space sta-
sadness associated with it," tion. It will be the first time
said Stott, who was on Dis- a private company makes
cover's last crew. such a cargo run.
The newer shuttle Endeav- Station managers met
our is promised to the Cali- with SpaceX officials Mon-
fornia Science Center in day to review the status of
Los Angeles; it ships out in the flight.


a conflict arose because
North Meadowcrest Boule-
vard is a private road, which
goes against state practice
for improvements. The
county would have to own
about 100 feet of right of
way, which could be do-
nated to it by the homeown-
ers' association that jointly
owns the road.
Again, Florida TaxWatch
said the funding for the traf-
fic light did not go through
the proper review process.


Thorpe said funding for
the traffic signal was a cost-
share agreement with the
state. Safety, he said, made
the project's completion es-
sential for the county
Dean said he had not
heard anything negative
from the governor's office
regarding either of the
projects.
Chronicle reporter Chris
Van Ormer can be reached
at cvanormer@chronicle
online.com or 352-564-2916.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CRASHES
Continued from Page Al

vehicle. They both had
their seat belts on.
According to FHPSudlow
was traveling westbound
on Grover Cleveland to-
ward U.S. 19 in a marked
cruiser with his emergency
equipment activated. He
reportedly stopped at the
red light at the intersec-
tion, but with all other
traffic stopped, Sudlow, 27,
began to proceed through
the intersection when
another motorist hit his
vehicle.
The impact of the crash
caused Sudlow's vehicle
to rotate counterclockwise
before coming to a rest.
Robert Ellwood, 20, of
Spring Hill was the driver
of the other vehicle a
2005 Mercury Montego.
Both Sudlow and Ellwood
were wearing seat belts.
Damage to Ellwood's
vehicle is estimated at
$6,000 and damage to Sud-
low's 2009 Crown Victoria
is $5,000. According to the
FHP report, both drivers
suffered minor injuries. It
is not clear if Ellwood was
transported to a hospital.
A report on Sudlow's
condition was unavailable
at press time.
Florida Highway Patrol
said the crashes remain
under investigation.


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Page A3 TUESDAY, APRIL 17,2012



TATE &


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE




County advocate set to fight Medicaid bills


BOCC may

join challenge
CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff Writer
Sometime soon, county commis-
sioners will decide what action to
take regarding paying the state its
disputed Medicaid bills amount-
ing to at least $844,000.
The Citrus County Board of
County Commissioners (BOCC)
could fall in with other counties in
a legal challenge recently an-
nounced by the Florida Associa-
tion of Counties (FAC), a group
that advocates for Florida's 67
counties.
"From the outset, we've said


that local taxpayers shouldn't be
forced to pay for Tallahassee's ac-
counting errors," said Chris Hol-
ley, FAC executive director,
announcing the intention to sue.
"And to ensure that they are not,
we will be pursuing legal action."
FAC's decision comes less than
two weeks after Gov Rick Scott
signed into law HB 5301, a contro-
versial measure that puts the ex-
pense of $325.5 million in state
Medicaid accounting errors back
on the counties.
The suit would be filed in the
2nd Judicial Circuit in Leon
County in the coming weeks. Al-
ready Pasco, Polk, Manatee and
Leon counties have voted to join
with the FAC's suit and with this
decision more counties are ex-
pected to join.


"We appreciate the governor's
promise to address these systemic
Medicaid billing errors," said Hol-
ley "However, HB 5301 has made
this multi-million dollar account-
ing mess the law of the land a
reality we are forced to confront
in the courtroom on behalf of
Florida's communities and
taxpayers."
All counties' Medicaid debts
would be paid through the De-
partment of Revenue withholding
each county's share of state sales
tax on a per-month pro-rata basis
over a five-year period.
County Attorney Richard Wesch
has participated in conference
calls with the FAC and other coun-
ties to track the reaction to the
signing of H.B. 5301, said Lindsay
Ubinas, public information officer


for Citrus County.
At the BOCC's April 10 meeting,
commissioners appointed a team
to prepare for a visit from a repre-
sentative of the state's Agency for
Health Care Administration
(AHCA), who will set a final dollar
amount by Aug. 1 on how much the
county is said to owe for unpaid
Medicaid billing that dates back to
2001.
A preliminary accounting of
$1.1 million represents Medicaid
billing the county has disputed for
patients it can't be certain were its
responsibility and some cases of
double billing and other clerical
errors. If the amount stays at $1.1
million and the county does not
challenge it, the state will dis-
count the amount by 15 percent,
making the debt $844,000.


If the BOCC wants to challenge
the amount, it could dispute it on
its own up to Aug. 31 through a
petition to the Division of Admin-
istrative Hearings, but would
have to pay the full $1.1 million if
it lost.
Or the BOCC could join the
FAC's effort to challenge the con-
stitutionality of the statute on two
issues: The statute is an unfunded
mandate that did not pass with the
required two-thirds majority of
both sides of the Legislature; and
the state practices a general pol-
icy of a four-year statute of limita-
tions that is contradicted by
billing back to 2001.
Chronicle reporter Chris Van
Ormer can be reached at
cvanormer@chronicle
online, com or 352-564-2916


Around the
COUNTY

'School Zone' TV
show airs April 18.
Tune in at 8 p.m. Wednes-
day, April 18, for the newest
edition of the Citrus County
School District's TV show,
"School Zone." The show airs
on the local station WYKE
(Channel 16).
The show will highlight
Lecanto Middle School's "A
Night of Talent."
Tea Party Patriots to
host candidate forum
The Citrus County Tea
Party Patriots will be hosting
a candidate forum for the su-
perintendent of schools race
at 1 p.m. Saturday, April 21,
at the Inverness Women's
Club, 1715 Forest Drive, In-
verness.
Participants are Nancy
Balfour, Robert Cummins and
Sandra Himmel.
Democrat committee
meets Wednesday
The Citrus County Demo-
cratic Executive Committee
will meet at 7 p.m. Wednes-
day, April 18, at the Beverly
Hills Recreation Center, 77
Civic Center, Beverly Hills,
FL. For more information,
contact Roz Odell at 352-
513-4803 or rozodell@
gmail.com.
Republicans to host
candidate forum
The North Suncoast Re-
publican Club will have its
monthly meeting on at 9 a.m.
April 21 at the Sugarmill
Country Club. Complimentary
coffee and donuts are served
from 8:30 to 9 a.m.
There will be a forum for
District 3 County Commission
Republican candidates.
For more information, con-
tact President Bill Conner at
352- 382-0811, Bruce Bryn at
352-503-7375, or on the web
at www.NSRC-gop.com.
Parents' group to
meet today
The Citrus County Interna-
tional Baccalaureate Parent
Organization, CCIBPO, will
meet at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday,
today, at Lecanto High
School cafeteria, 3810 W.
Educational Path, Lecanto.
Parents of PIBS and IB
students are encouraged to
attend.
For more information,
email David Strickland,
CCIBPO president, at
DSTRICKLAND18@
tampabay.rr.com or call 352-
302-4272.
-From staff reports

Correction

Due to a reporter's error, a
story on page Al of Monday's
Chronicle, "Bicentennial Park
Pool users say budget plan
all wet," contained incorrect
information. Closing the Bi-
centennial Pool for the four
winter months would save
the county $73,960.
The Chronicle regrets the
error.
Readers can alert The
Citrus County Chronicle to
any errors in news articles by
mailing dmann@chronicle
online.com or by calling 352-
563-5660.


70 years strong


Couple celebrates

seven decades of

marriage
NANCY KENNEDY
Staff Writer
INVERNESS Dick and
Anita Colvin's love story began in
a typical way
Mutual friends had set them up
on a blind date. When Anita first
saw Dick, she thought, "Eh."
When Dick first saw Anita, he
thought, "Oh boy!"
Anita soon changed her mind
and the couple married April 17,
1942, at Zion Lutheran Church in
Chicago 70 years ago today
Recently, the couple sat down
with their children, Richard
Colvin and Vicki Martin, as a
guest asked questions about
being married for seven decades.
What was your first date?
Dick: We went bowling. I think
our friends set us up because
they wanted another couple to
bowl with.
Anita: I wasn't looking for an-
other boyfriend. I was already
dating someone. But we got along
pretty good.
How did you get engaged?
Dick: I didn't practice a speech.
I just said, "Hey, can we get
married?"
Anita: There was no hesitation
on my part. I guess that's why
we're here after 70 years.
What were your early years
like?
Anita: It was during World War
II and times were unsettled.
Dick: My son was only 10 days
old when I left for the Navy in
1944. I got drafted and I said,
"Can you give me a few days? My
wife's going to have a baby"
Anita: When he was gone I
lived at home with my mother,
who was widowed. He was gone
18 months.
What were some of your tough-
est times?
Dick: Our son got sick at age 2
with nephritis and for eight years
we didn't know if he would live or
die they had no cure for it. He
was in a children's hospital for
nine months.
Anita: I had a miscarriage be-
tween our two children; that was
hard.
Are there any surprises after
70 years?
Dick: We have no secrets.
Anita: Those days are gone.
What has kept you together all


NANCY KENNEDY/Chronicle
and Dick Colvin, of Inverness, are celebrating their 70th anniversary today.


these years?
Dick: Being in love.
Anita: It hasn't been easy He
had (prostate) cancer in 1992 and
I had a stroke in 2004. Now he
does all the things I used to do,
the cooking and the cleaning. I
still do the ironing. He doesn't
iron. It's hard to give over the
things you're used to doing a cer-
tain way to someone else. You
have to learn to say, "It's OK."


Dick: After her stroke I did
everything. It says in your mar-
riage vows "for better or for
worse." I learn something new
every day in the kitchen, but
there are no roasts I can make
hamburgers, though.
What have you (Vicki and
Richard) learned about marriage
by watching your parents?
Richard: You're in it to win it
and stay together As an example,


they set the bar pretty high.
Vicki: Commitment. Most peo-
ple today don't stay together
Dick: Family is number one.
Anita: And sometimes you have
to learn to look the other way
when things aren't going exactly
as you plan them.
Contact Chronicle reporter
Nancy Kennedy at 352-564-2927
or nkennedy@chronicleonline.
con.


Citrus County Habitat seeks female volunteers


National

Women Build

day is May5

Special to the Chronicle
Bring a smile and a can-
do attitude to register for
the annual Habitat for Hu-
manity of Citrus County's
Women Build. This year's
event is scheduled for 10:30
a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, May
5, at 8569 N. Buscetta Loop


in Crystal River To partici-
pate, pre-registration is re-
quired.
This marks the fourth
consecutive year that Habi-
tat has partnered with
Lowe's home improvement
centers on the Women Build
project. In 2011, more than
80 women from across Cit-
rus County teamed up for a
few hours to build a home. It
was the first time that many
of them had ever taken part
in the construction process.
"Women want to make a
difference in their commu-
nity," said Lowe's Commer-


ON THE NET
www.habitatcc.org.

cial Sales Specialist Fran
Zimmerman. "I live and
work in Citrus County. I care
about local residents here."
Habitat's Women Build
project in Crystal River is
one of some 275 other
homes being built around
the country The Mother's
Day timeframe was selected
for its significance because
a majority of Habitat home
recipients are women with


children, much like C.D.
Perez.
"Habitat for Humanity
has literally changed the
course of my life. I started
out as a volunteer some
years ago, and now my fam-
ily has a roof and a safe
place to call home my
Habitat home," said Perez.
"I could not have done it
without the many volun-
teers that made it possible."
Recruits need not worry
about construction experi-
ence. Habitat representa-
tives offer on-site, hands-on
direction to volunteer


groups throughout the day
Tools and training are
also provided; however, par-
ticipants must wear com-
fortable closed-toe shoes.
The first 35 to register will
receive a free Women Build
T-shirt. Early birds are wel-
come to attend a 9 a.m.
home dedication also taking
place on North Buscetta
Loop that morning.
Interested volunteers
should contact the Habitat
for Humanity Citrus County
office at 352-563-2744 or on
the web at www.habitat
cc.org.






A4 TUESDAY, APRIL 17, 2012




Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
DUI arrest
Adam Joseph Bombly, 20,
5191 S. Hummingbird Ave., In-
verness, at 4:15 a.m. Sunday
was arrested on a charge of driv-
ing while intoxicated (DUI).
Bombly was reportedly followed
by a deputy for driving erratically
and going over the yellow line
several times. He allegedly failed
all field sobriety tests. Bond
$500.
Other arrests
Tracy Lynn Vining, 24,
1825 Kimberly Lane, Invemess,
at 8:37 a.m. Sunday was ar-
rested on an aggravated battery
charge. Vining is accused of
beating and biting another
woman. Bond $5,000.
Vanessa Nicole Ginda, 22,
1475 S. Candlenut Ave., Ho-
mosassa, at 4:27 p.m. Sunday
was arrested on a charge of pos-
session of a controlled sub-
stance (carisoprobol, aka Soma).
Bond $2,000.
Burglaries
A vehicle burglary occurred
at about 7:13 a.m. April 13 at N.
Washington Street, Beverly Hills.
A residential burglary oc-
curred at about 5:08 p.m. April13
at Linder Street, Homosassa.
A commercial burglary oc-
curred at about 5:17 a.m. April 14
in the 1100 block of E. Invemess
Boulevard, Invemess.
A residential burglary oc-
curred at about 5:43 a.m. April 14
in the 2400 block of S. Hull Ter-
race, Homosassa.
A residential burglary oc-
curred at about 8:44 a.m. April 14
in the 8400 block of N. Ira Martin
Avenue, Crystal River.
A residential burglary oc-
curred at about 10:05 a.m. April
14 in the 2300 block of N. Hizz
Terrace, Lecanto.
A vehicle burglary occurred
at about 10:19 a.m. April 14 in
the 8900 block of N. Mendoza
Way, Dunnellon.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


For the RECORD

ON THE NET

For more information
about arrests made by
the Citrus County Sher-
iff's Office, go to
www.sheriffcitrus.org
and click on the Public
Information link, then
on Arrest Reports.
For the Record reports are
also archived at www.
chronicleonline.com.

A commercial burglary oc-
curred at about 9:03 a.m. April 15
in the 2800 block of N.
Seabreeze Point, Crystal River.
A residential burglary oc-
curred at about 12:06 p.m. April
15 in the 10500 block of E. Rab-
bit Lane, Floral City.
A vehicle burglary occurred
at about 7:08 p.m. April 15 in the
10200 block of N. Spaulding
Drive, Dunnellon.
A residential burglary oc-
curred at about 7:41 a.m. April 16
in the area of N. Lecanto Highway
and W. Norvell Bryant Highway.
Thefts
A grand theft occurred at
about 11:17 a.m. April 13 in the
6500 block of W. Country Club
Drive, Homosassa.
A grand theft occurred at
about 2:02 p.m. April 13 in the
4600 block of S. Slash Pine Av-
enue, Homosassa.
A petit theft occurred at
about 3:43 p.m. April 13 in the
4900 block of W. Norvell Bryant
Highway, Crystal River.
A grand theft occurred at
about4:27 p.m.April13 in the 5700
block ofW. Tirana Lane, Dunnellon.
A grand theft occurred at
about 6:36 p.m. April 13 in the
4700 block of W. Sandy Hill
Street, Lecanto.
A petit theft occurred at
about 9 p.m. at S. Jefferson
Street, Beverly Hills.
A petit theft occurred at
about 9:43 p.m. April 13 in the
2700 block of N. Florida Avenue,
Hemando.


A petit theft occurred at
about 8:54 a.m. April 14 in the
6300 block of S. Suncoast
Boulevard, Homosassa.
A petit theft occurred at
about 8:54 a.m. April 14 in the
3100 block of S. Arundel Terrace,
Homosassa.
A petit theft occurred at
about 9:38 a.m. April 14 in the 200
block of S.E. U.S. 19, Crystal River.
A petit theft occurred at
about 1:09 p.m. April 14 in the
8000 block of W. Miss Maggie
Drive, Homosassa.
A grand theft occurred at
about 1:42 p.m. April 14 in the
4000 block of N. Elwyn Point,
Hemando.
A petit theft occurred at
about 6:06 p.m. April 14 in the 30
block of E. Golden Street, Bev-
erly Hills.
An auto theft occurred at
about 6:10 p.m.April 14 in the 5400
block of S. Pike Way, Floral City.
A grand theft occurred at
about 9:28 a.m. April 15 in the
7900 block of N. Primrose Drive,
Dunnellon.
An auto theft occurred at
about 12:37 p.m. April 15 in the
4200 block of W. Glen Street,
Lecanto.
A grand theft occurred at
about4:42 p.m. April 15 in the 600
blockof E. LaSalle Street, Hemando.
An auto theft occurred at
about 5:40 p.m. April 15 in the
8700 block of W. Mayo Drive,
Crystal River.
A petit theft occurred at
about 8:07 a.m. April 16 in the 20
blockof N. LincolnAve., Beverly Hills.
Vandalisms
A vandalism occurred at
about 7:34 p.m. April 15 in the
8400 block of W. Periwinkle
Lane, Homosassa.
A felony vandalism occurred
at about 9:36 p.m. April 15 in the
6800 block of S. Suncoast Blvd.,
Homosassa.
A vandalism occurred at
about 9:46 p.m. April 15 in the
9300 block of W. Fort Island Trail,
Crystal River.


Save Crystal River group sends


Salazar notice of intent to sue


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff Writer

CRYSTAL RIVER A citizens group
has served notice that it plans to sue the
federal government over recently enacted
manatee-protection rules in King's Bay.
Save Crystal River Inc. sent a notice-of-
intent letter to Ken Salazar, secretary of
the U.S. Department of the Interior, giving
60 days' notice of a lawsuit.
The group is headed where the Crystal
River City Council declined to go. Council
members, citing the potential cost to tax-
payers and the uncertainty of prevailing in
a lawsuit, declined to send a similar letter.
The notice gives the federal government
60 days to "fix their actions," Save Crystal
River said in a news release.
The group believes the U.S. Fish and
Wildlife Service overstepped its authority
in creating a series of rules in state waters.


SIGNS
Continued from Page Al

Mayor Jim Farley said
the city had no choice but
to enforce the sign ordi-
nance on the city attorney's
recommendation.
Farley loathed the
thought of re-addressing the
sign rules, which have long
been a thorn in the side of
council members who want
to balance aesthetics with


The rules create a manatee refuge for
the entirety of King's Bay Among other
things, the rules reduce size, location and
speed limit of a summer "sport zone" near
Buzzard Island. Speed limits in the sport
zone are reduced from 35 mph to 25 mph.
When the federal government first pro-
posed the rules in July, it eliminated the
sport zone entirely and made King's Bay a
slow speed zone year-round.
Save Crystal River members say the rules
result in the federal government "seizing"
the bay without state or local input
The notice states neither the Marine
Mammal Protection Act nor the Endan-
gered Species Act give the federal govern-
ment authority to set quotas for the
number of motorized boats or jet skis in a
particular zone.
Save Crystal River also says the federal
government does not have funding avail-
able to enforce the new rules.


property rights.
"The sign ordinance has
always been such a mess,"
he said.
Save Crystal River mem-
ber Jewel Lamb said she
knew the city would even-
tually react to the signs.
"They do violate the city
code," Lamb said, but added:
"I'm being violated because
it's freedom of speech. Talk
aboutgovernment overreach"
Still, Lamb said she would
remove the signs from her
yard and reimburse the city


for its expenses in sending
a registered letter
"If we try to get away
with it, everybody's going to
be sticking up signs, and we
don't want that," Lamb said.
Farley said he hopes to
find middle ground.
"The shame of it is the
council supports Save Crys-
tal River and what they're
trying to do," he said. "Ifthey
put the sign in their window,
it would be OK. Why not
just compromise a little bit
and put it in the window?"


legal notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle

y TTown of Yankeetown................................All

; Meeting Notices........................................ C12

Notice to Creditors/Administration.........C12


B Surplus Property...................................... C12


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


El Paso


Honolulu
85/70
SOs


F'cast
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
S
S
S
S
S

S
S
S


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
s
s
s
ts
s
pc
s
s
s
S


MARINE OUTLOOK


Southeast winds from 10 to 15 knots.
Seas 2 to 3 feet. Bay and inland
waters will have a light chop. Mostly
sunny today.


HI LO PR III LU P
85 58 0.00 88 58 0.00

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Exuie daily
forecast by:
TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 84 Low: 59
-'Partly cloudy.

WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY MORNING
SHigh: 83 Low: 59
S Mostly cloudy with a slight chance of showers
and thunderstorms.
THURSDAY & FRIDAY MORNING
High: 84 Low: 60
-."1 Partly cloudy with a slight chance of showers
and thunderstorms.


ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Monday
Record
Normal
Mean temp.
Departure from mean
PRECIPITATION*
Monday
Total for the month
Total for the year
Normal for the year
*As of 6 p.m, at Inverness
UV INDEX: 6


87/56
90/33
83/54
72
+4

0.00 in.
0.06 in.
3.92 in.
11.66 in.


0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Monday at 3 p.m. 30.19 in.


DEW POINT
Monday at 3 p.m.
HUMIDITY
Monday at 3 p.m.


55

1%


POLLEN COUNT**
Grasses and weeds were absent and
Today's active pollen:
Oak, bayberry, hickory
Today's count: 8.8/12
Wednesday's count: 7.2
Thursday's count: 6.6
Monday was good with pollutants
mainly ozone.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
4/17 TUESDAY 3:20 9:30 3:41 9:51
4/18 WEDNESDAY 3:57 10:07 4:18 10:28
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
SSUNSET TONIGHT ........................... 7:58 PM.
SUNRISE TOMORROW.....................7:01 AM.
MOONRISE TODAY...........................4:44 A.M.
APRIL 21 APRIL 2 MAY5 MAY 12 MOONSET TODAY ............................5:03 PM.

BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http: flame.fl-dof.com fire weather kbdi
WATERING RULES
One-day-per-week irrigation schedule as follows for addresses ending in:
0 or 1 Monday, 2 or 3 Tuesday, 4 or 5 Wednesday, 6 or 7
- Thursday, 8 or 9 & subdivision common areas Friday. Before 8 a.m. or
after 6 p.m.
Hand watering of non-grass areas can take place any day before 8 a.m. or
after 6 p.m.
PLEASE CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL NEW PLANT MATERIAL. Citrus
County Water Resources can explain additional watering allowances for
qualified plantings.
Questions, concerns or reporting violations, please call Citrus County at
352-527-7669, or email waterconservation@bocc.citrus.fl.us.
TIDES
*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay ***At Mason's Creek
Tuesday Wednesday
City High/Low High/Low High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 3:58 a/12:10 p 4:29 p/- 4:51 a/12:34 a 4:59 p/12:47 p
Crystal River* 2:19 a/9:32 a 2:50 p/9:56 p 3:12 a/10:09 a 3:20 p/10:37 p
Withlacoochee* 12:06 a/7:20 a 12:37 p/7:44 p 12:59 a/7:57 a 1:07 p/8:25 p
Homosassa*** 3:08 a/11:09 a 3:39 p/11:33 p 4:01 a/11:46 a 4:09 p/--


Gulf water
temperature



76
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Sun. Mon. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 26.75 26.73 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 32.94 32.91 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 34.97 34.95 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 36.74 36.71 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level. Flood stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision. In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data. If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211.

THE NATION


/ isrtle

50s
SSan -
80 60s

Lo 80 -70
Angel e
90s


2Os 1 Os
n, n,:.. I Jui,3
30s '"
40s
i"


Monday Tuesday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
Albany 91 52 s 68 35
Albuquerque 66 33 s 73 47
Asheville 80 59 ts 69 48
Atlanta 81 61 ts 78 57
Atlantic City 82 54 s 75 50
Austin 75 50 s 81 58
Baltimore 90 63 s 74 49
Billings 60 33 sh 61 37
Birmingham 78 65 .30 sh 73 54
Boise 5841 .02 sh 61 43
Boston 87 59 s 76 46
Buffalo 82 57 s 50 35
Burlington, VT 85 62 pc 61 36
Charleston, SC 82 57 s 80 63
Charleston, WV 84 67 pc 70 46
Charlotte 84 56 ts 78 55
Chicago 67 48 .01 pc 51 44
Cincinnati 75 64 04 pc 65 44
Cleveland 79 66 s 52 38
Columbia, SC 87 59 ts 84 61
Columbus, OH 77 65 s 63 44
Concord, N.H. 90 54 s 77 33
Dallas 74 54 s 79 54
Denver 59 29 pc 72 44
Des Moines 60 44 .01 pc 65 52
Detroit 72 55 s 56 41
El Paso 74 41 s 84 58
Evansville, IN 74 58 .33 pc 68 47
Harrisburg 87 54 s 73 43
Hartford 89 57 s 77 41
Houston 71 64 2.22 c 80 60
Indianapolis 72 57 44 pc 66 42
Jackson 76 59 10 sh 71 49
Las Vegas 78 54 s 82 63
Little Rock 7355 .01 pc 77 53
Los Angeles 67 53 s 71 56
Louisville 73 64 .17 pc 67 48
Memphis 67 57 .35 pc 74 54
Milwaukee 68 47 pc 47 40
Minneapolis 48 34 .25 pc 60 47
Mobile 82 69 .39 ts 77 59
Montgomery 7567 .53 ts 79 60
Nashville 73 63 .14 pc 70 47
KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
2012 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


30s
.n SI-Pau.,
-- : ,. .1
D- i 6
Gol


D.
s50s "-


70


SOs*
MeFop .e "
80s -
nouston
- Cildl-C s


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
TUESDAY


Monday Tuesday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
New Orleans 87 71 .16 sh 78 58
New York City 88 65 s 78 48
Norfolk 90 65 pc 76 56
Oklahoma City 69 48 s 77 54
Omaha 60 45 pc 71 50
Palm Springs 87 57 s 90 60
Philadelphia 89 59 s 76 49
Phoenix 84 56 s 91 63
Pittsburgh 82 63 s 63 40
Portland, ME 74 50 s 73 38
Portland, Ore 61 51 .41 c 59 44
Providence, R.I. 83 53 s 79 43
Raleigh 84 60 ts 77 56
Rapid City 50 32 sh 66 41
Reno 70 38 pc 71 44
Rochester, NY 87 57 .01 s 51 33
Sacramento 71 49 pc 70 45
St. Louis 68 54 pc 72 50
St. Ste. Marie 63 32 .41 pc 39 29
Salt Lake City 62 40 sh 68 51
San Antonio 76 56 s 81 60
San Diego 69 52 s 73 56
San Francisco 61 50 pc 62 47
Savannah 81 58 s 81 64
Seattle 56 48 .32 c 56 43
Spokane 50 40 .13 c 57 38
Syracuse 90 52 s 55 33
Topeka 67 48 s 73 54
Washington 89 63 pc 74 52
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 93 Westfield, Mass.
LOW 14 Monarch, Colo.
WORLD CITIES


TUESDAY
CITY HIL/SKY
Acapulco 87/73/s
Amsterdam 49/40/sh
Athens 71/55/sh
Beijing 80/54/s
Berlin 50/37/sh
Bermuda 68/60/sh
Cairo 90/75/s
Calgary 46/39/sh
Havana 86/65/pc
Hong Kong 85/77/c
Jerusalem 81/58/s


Lisbon
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Paris
Rio
Rome
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Warsaw


64/51/c
56/42/sh
65/37/pc
75/50/ts
57/33/pc
65/46/sh
50/39/sh
81/69/pc
64/45/c
70/64/r
62/51/sh
49/31/pc
49/34/pc


C I T R U S


C U N TY


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


"LA


LHRKONICLE
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Courthouse office
Tompkins St. g square
S 8 106 W. Main
B I St
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Aj 34450


Who's in charge:
G erry M u lliga n ............................................................................ P ub lish er, 5 6 3 -3 2 2 2
Trina Murphy ............................ Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232
Charlie Brennan.......................... .. ............... ............. Editor, 563-3225
Tom Feeney .......................................................... Production Director, 563-3275
Kathie Stew art .................................................... Circulation Director, 563-5655
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LOCAL





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Budget vetoes to test Scott's tiesRedistrictin
shift to coui


Associated Press


TALLAHASSEE Florida Gov
Rick Scott on Tuesday will sign a new
$70 billion state budget at a St. John's
County elementary school.
Scott wants the lesson from the
budget signing to be about the in-
creased money that state lawmakers
steered toward schools during an elec-
tion year
But how far Scott uses his veto pen
to whack projects backed by his fellow
Republicans could say a lot about
whether he has completely discarded
his 2010 campaign message that he is
an outsider willing to make tough
decisions.
"It's what he doesn't approve that
will tell you what he's thinking," said
Rep. Ron Saunders, D-Key West and a
one-time legislative budget chairman.
"Any action he takes will have more of
an impact on Republican legislators
than Democratic legislators. Republi-
cans have a lot more in the budget and
they have a lot more at risk."
During his first year in office, Scott
angered legislative leaders when he
vetoed more than $600 million and
then briefly suggested that they return


to Tallahassee and take the money
and set it aside for schools. This trig-
gered protests from GOP leaders who
pointed out that last year's budget cut
school spending less than what Scott
himself initially proposed.
Scott this January, however, threat-
ened to veto the entire state budget if
it did not include a significant in-
crease of new money for schools.
Legislators went along with the gov-
ernor, but the roughly $1 billion in-
crease is not enough to wipe out last
year's cuts. And some of it is just filling
budget holes brought on by more stu-
dents and a loss in local property taxes.
At the same time, however, legisla-
tors approved a budget that eliminates
thousands of state government jobs,
cuts health and human service pro-
grams, and slashes money to state uni-
versities. But powerful GOP legislators
were still able to insert millions in the
budget for hometown projects.
Last Friday a research and advocacy
group with close business ties urged
Scott on Friday to veto $149.6 million
in spending "turkeys," including proj-
ects that lawmakers added outside the
normal budget process or that serve
strictly local or private purposes.


But top Republicans point how that
Scott got much of what he asked for in
the budget now sitting on his desk.
"We gave the governor's recommen-
dations every consideration and many
are included in the final product," said
Rep. Denise Grimsley, R-Sebring and
the House budget chair, in an email.
The governor in his budget message
a year ago warned that there were
programs that could get vetoed in 2012
if there weren't clear standards in
place that measured how the money
was being spent He also had repeat-
edly said since then that he wants to
limit state borrowing.
Scott will also have to make a deci-
sion on whether to keep in place more
than $33 million intended for a 12th
state university pushed by Sen. J.D.
Alexander, R-Lake Wales.
The governor must also decide the
fate of more than $60 million intended
for a new computer system that will be
used to determine eligibility for Med-
icaid and the state's subsidized chil-
dren's health insurance program. This
system will also allow the state to meet
requirements under the federal health
care overhaul Scott and other Repub-
licans staunchly oppose.


TALLAHASSEE
state's redistricting
sions shift this wee
of courtrooms in T;
On Monday, Cir
Terry Lewis will bec
on challenges to the
led Legislature's re
map for Florida's 2
sional seats.
On Friday, the F
Supreme Court wi
ments on lawmaker
attempt to draw st;
districts. The justice
proved a 120-seat
but shot down lawn
plan for the 40-dis
In both cases, De
a coalition of three
back new anti-gerr
standards contend
violated those reqi
The Fair District
include a ban on ir
drawing districts to
cumbents and poli
They also include a
to protect minority\


State BRIEFS
ig talks Rooftop blast
rtrooms under investigation
- The TARPON SPRINGS Po-
discus- lice are investigating a rooftop
ek to a pair explosion that rocked a Tampa
allahassee. Bay-area neighborhood.
cuit Judge Tarpon Springs Police said
gin a hearing two people were injured by
SRepublican- glass and debris from a shed
districting destroyed by the explosion
27 congres- Sunday. Several businesses
reported having broken glass,
lorida cracked windows or other
II hear argu- structural damage.
ers' second Capt. Barb Templeton said
ate Senate a bag found nearby contained
:es have ap- "suspicious materials related
House map, to this incident" that will be
makers' initial processed for evidence.
trict Senate. Meanwhile, as emergency
democrats and workers treated the injured, a
groups that man stole an ambulance from
rymandering the scene. Police tracked the
I lawmakers ambulance to a nearby water
uirements. treatment facility, where Tem-
ts standards pleton says the man struggled
intentionally with officers and brandished a
favor in- flashlight and a potato. The man
tical parties, faces charges of grand theft,
requirement burglary and resisting arrest.
voting rights. -From wire reports


SHOWROOM
Continued from Page Al

She added that the deal-
ership's late owner, Rob
Phillips, who died in a boat-
ing accident Aug. 21, 2011,
would've been pleased.
Weeks before he died he
had finalized the plans for
the $1.5 million renovation,
part of the Buick GMC cor-
porate Essential Brand Ele-
ments (EBE) facility
upgrade program.
Participating dealerships
can recoup part of the
money spent on the up-
grades if they comply with
GMC requirements, said
Russ Baldner, Eagle Buick's
general manager.
On Monday morning,
Baldner was still getting


used to the acoustics of the
higher ceiling and the feel
of the new office furniture.
Employees had moved
out of the old building and
into temporary trailers in
October and moved into
their new digs over the
weekend.
Monday was the first day
in the new showroom.
The colors Tyler taupe,
shaker beige, white dia-
mond the brushed alu-
minum signage, even the
glass tile behind the coffee
makers in the customer
waiting area in the service
department are all uniform
throughout the EBE program.
Baldner said the goal is to
have all Buick stores look
the same.
There's now a covered
area out front so customers
can stay out of inclement


weather, and the lot is well-
lighted so customers can feel
safe shopping at night. Also,
the service department's
waiting area has doubled in
size and now has two com-
puter desks where people
can plug in their laptops.
Baldner said once the me-
morial to Phillips is com-
pleted, they will have a
grand opening.
"Since the day after Rob's
accident we've kept on doing
what we believe he'd want
us to do," he said. "We've
stuck to his plan and what
he believed in. Some people
said they were surprised we
went ahead with this. But
besides the die already
being cast, it's what he
would've wanted us to do. Of
course, we certainly wish he
could be here and sitting in
this very chair"


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I I


LOCAL/STATE


TUESDAY, APRIL 17, 2012 AS





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries


Patrick
Eastwood, 38
Patrick Francis Eastwood,
38, died Saturday, April 14,
2012.
Services at 2 p.m. Friday,
April 20, at Chas. E. Davis
Funeral Home, Inverness.
Burial at Hills of Rest
Cemetery

Hugh 'Poppy'
Fults, 78
INVERNESS
It's with saddened hearts
and loving memories we an-
nounce the passing of Hugh
"Poppy" Fults, 78, of Inver-
ness, Friday, April 13, 2012.
Hugh was born on Octo-
ber 5, 1933,
to TB. and
Annie Fults
in Grundy
County, TN.
9 After his ca-
reer at
Frosty Bot-
tling Com-
Hugh Fults pany in
Tampa, FL,
Hugh and his family moved
to Citrus County in 1973.
Hugh was an avid family
man who enjoyed working
in the yard and spending
time with his grandchil-
dren.
Hugh is survived by his
wife of 55 years, Verna J.
Fults; daughter, Brenda
Saltmarsh (Ken) of Inver-
ness, FL; three sons, Brent
Fults (Ann) of Dunnellon,
FL, Dwayne Fults of Her-
nando, FL, and Keven Fults
(Claudine) of Inverness, FL;
5 grandchildren; 6 great-
grandchildren; two broth-
ers, James Fults of
Dunnellon, FL, and Ray
Fults of Tampa, FL; and
much extended family
A celebration of life will
be held by the family at a
later date. In lieu of flowers,
please send donations to
your favorite charity in
Hugh's name. McGan Cre-
mation Service LLC, Her-
nando, FL.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.

SO YOU KNOW
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear in
the next day's edition.
Phone 352-563-5660
for details.


Jesse
Thomas Sr., 68
HOMOSASSA
Jesse Harvard Thomas Sr,
68, of Homosassa, died Sun-
day, April 15, 2012, at Tampa

Hospital. He
was born
Jan. 2, 1944,
Sa native and
lifelong resi-
dent of Oak
Grove, Cit-
-rus County.
Jesse Jesse re-
Thomas Sr. tired as a
Journeyman Lineman for
Withlacoochee River Elec-
tric Co. after 42 years of serv-
ice. He was a member of the
Christian Center Church, a
lifelong Rancher, Cattleman
and loving husband, father
and grandfather
He was preceded in death
by his parents, Jesse R. and
Helen (Thompson) Thomas,
and brother Ronnie
Thomas.
Jesse is survived by his
wife of 44 years, Donna R.
Thomas, of Homosassa;
daughter Tanya Brown and
husband Jimmy, of Ho-
mosassa; son Jesse H.
Thomas, Jr and wife Shan-
non, of Homosassa; sister
Carolyn Stewart, of
Brooksville; brother John
Thomas, of Inverness; and
four grandchildren, Brian,
Joshua, Jesse III and
Kaleigh.
A celebration of Jesse's
life will be held at 2 p.m.
Saturday, April 21, at the
Christian Center Church
with Pastor Marcus Rooks
officiating. Burial will fol-
low at Lake Lindsey Ceme-
tery. Friends will be
received Saturday at the
church from 1 p.m. until the
hour of service. Condolence
may be given at www.wilder
funeral.com.

Hermann
Bont, 91,
BEVERLY HILLS
Hermann J. Bont, 91, of
Beverly Hills, Fla., died Mon-
day, April 16,2012. Visitation
is Tuesday, April 17, from 5 to
7 p.m. at Fero Funeral Home.
A funeral Mass is Wednesday,
April 18, at9 a.m. at Our Lady
of Grace Catholic Church.
Arrangements entrusted
to Fero Funeral Home.


To Place Your

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Funeral Home for 50 Years"


Burial
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CRYSTAL RIVER
352-795-2678
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Harold 'Bubba'
Lockler, 79
HOMOSASSA
The Service of Remem-
brance for Mr Harold
"Bubba" Lockler, age 79, of
Homosassa, Florida, will be
held 11 a.m. Saturday, April
21, 2012, at the Homosassa
Chapel of Hooper Funeral
Homes. Cremation will be
under the direction of
Hooper Crematory, Inver-
ness, Florida. Online condo-
lences may be sent to the
family at www.Hooper
FuneralHome.com.
Mr Lockler was born Au-
gust 5, 1932, in Tampa, FL,
son of Jessie and Annette
Lockler He died April 13,
2012, in Gainesville, FL. Mr
Lockler was an Air Force
veteran and worked as a
union marine pipefitter He
moved to Homosassa,
Florida, nine years ago.
Mr Lockler was preceded
in death by his parents and
brother, Jimmy Lockler Sur-
vivors include wife of 39
years, Margaret "Ann" (Hil-
ley) Lockler, four sons, Gre-
gory, Steven, Robert "Scott"
(Debbie), Mark (Cecelia);
sister, Patricia Harris; step-
son, Ronald (Mary); step-
daughter, Camellia (David);
eight grandchildren; and 11
great-grandchildren.
Arrangements are under
the direction of the Ho-
mosassa Chapel of Hooper
Funeral Homes &
Crematory


Thomas
Golec Jr., 70
FLORAL CITY
Thomas Stanley Golec Jr,
age 70, Floral City, passed
away April 15, 2012, in Cit-
rus Memorial Hospital. Mr
Golec was born Oct 30,1941,
in Chicago, IL. He leaves be-
hind his beloved wife Vir-
ginia of 50 years and three
loving children, Gail Golec
of Scottsdale, Ariz., Sherri
Kawell (James) of Gilberts,
IL, and Allen Golec (Paris)
of Mission Viejo, CA. He is
also survived by his grand-
children Eric, Cody, Kacy,
Natascha and Abigaile as
well as two "adopted"
grandchildren, Jack and
Samantha. He was pre-
ceded in death by his father,
Thomas S. Golec Sr; his
mother, Bernice Goryl, sis-
ters Joanne and Cynthia,
with his surviving brother,
Ronald (Fran) Golec.
Tom had a servant's heart
and was always finding a
way to help others. Working
with the Lions Club, he
founded the Philip Rock
Benevolent Association,
which monies went directly
to benefit deaf and blind
children. He served as
Lions district governor from
1988-1989. He loved to cook
and when Katrina hit, he
and Virginia were there
along with their church fam-
ily (Faith Lutheran, Glen
Ellyn) to cook meals for
many Over the years, Tom
has cooked meals for thou-
sands at many charitable
events. He was also a mem-
ber of the Inverness Moose
Lodge, Inverness Eagles


and the First Lutheran
Church of Inverness. Tom
also formerly owned his
own restaurant and was em-
ployed for 25 years in the
Greater Chicago area with
the Perfection Spring Com-
pany as a spring maker
A Celebration of Life will
be conducted on Friday,
April 20th at 10 a.m. from
the clubhouse of the Terra-
wood Subdivision south of
Floral City Pastor Tom
Beaverson will officiate. Ad-
ditional services will be
conducted at a later date in
Illinois. There will be no
calling hours at the funeral
home. In lieu of flowers, me-
morials are requested to the
food pantry program of the
First Lutheran Church or
the Hearts of Hope organi-
zation, PO Box 3314, St
Charles, IL. 60174. Chas. E.
Davis Funeral Home with
Crematory Funeral Home &
Crematory

Richard
Demaio, 66
CRYSTAL RIVER
Richard D. Demaio, age
66, of Crystal River, died
Sunday, April 15,2012, at his
home in Crystal River
Private cremation
arrangements are under the
care of Strickland Funeral
Home with Crematory Crys-
tal River


Inverness
3733 E Gulf to Lake Hwy
465-8001
Homosassa
7991 S Suncoast Blvd
621-8083
Citrus Springs
10489 N Florida Ave. r
489-2486 -,,


Edlin
Torralba, 69
CRYSTAL RIVER
Edlin R. Torralba, 69, of
Crystal River, Fla., died
Monday, April 16, 2012. Visi-
tation, Wednesday, April 18,
and Thursday, April 19 from
5 to 7 p.m. at Fero Funeral
Home. A funeral Mass is 10
a.m. Friday, April 20, at St.
Benedict's Catholic Church
in Crystal River, Florida.
Arrangements entrusted
to Fero Funeral Home.
See Page A7

ON THE NET
The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits both free and
paid obituaries.
Email obits@chronicle
online.com or fax 352-
563-3280.


L'A". E. bavIs
Funeral Home With Crematory
DOROTHY MILLER
Service: Wed. 10AM
Viewing: Tues. 5-7PM
RICHARD P. JONES
Graveside: Wed. 2:30PM
Florida National Cemetery
MARVIN AABERG
Service: Thurs. 10AM
Florida National Cemetery
AGUIDO RODRIGUEZ
Service: San Sebastian,Puerto Rico
DAVID HOVIOUS
Service: Friday 11AM
House of Power Church
PATRICK EASTWOOD
Service: Fri. 2:00PM- Chapel
726-8323 .BN


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A6 TUESDAY, APRIL 17, 2012


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DEATHS
Continued from PageA6

Helen Janco, 69
ALBANY, N.Y.
Mrs. Helen K. Janco, 69,
of Albany, N.Y, died
Wednesday, April 11, 2012,
in Inverness.
Arrangements are
under the direction of the
Homosassa Chapel of
Hooper Funeral Home &
Crematory

Joan
Rebone, 77
BEVERLY HILLS
Joan D. Rebone, 77, of
Beverly Hills, Fla., died
Sunday, April 15, 2012.
Arrangements entrusted
to Fero Funeral Home.


TUESDAY, APRIL 17, 2012 A7


Chemical plant shutdown

could snarl auto production


Associated Press

DETROIT The potential
shortage of a key component used
to make fuel lines and brake lines
could force automakers in the U.S.
and around the world to close car
and truck plants as they run short
of parts.
Auto industry executives have
scheduled an unprecedented
meeting on Tuesday in suburban
Detroit to talk about the problem.
Officials from as many as 10 au-
tomakers and dozens of parts sup-
ply companies are set to attend.
A March 31 explosion at Evonik
Industries in western Germany
killed two workers and damaged a
factory that makes CDT That
chemical is a key component in a


nylon resin called PA12, which is
used to make a specialized plastic.
The plastic is used in auto fuel
lines and brake lines. It is also a
component in solar cells, pipelines,
sporting goods and household items.
Auto parts makers can't switch to
another chemical quickly because
it would need to be thoroughly
tested, said J. Scot Sharland, exec-
utive director of the Automotive
Industry Action Group.
PA12 has been in short supply of
for about two years. The Evonik in-
cident will worsen the shortage.
"These guys are a major player.
As such, the supply of the material
is going to be compromised," he
said, adding that the Evonik plant
is expected to be out of commis-
sion for months.


Spanish king, 74, goes on

safari, outraging Spaniards


Associated Press

MADRID In one fell swoop,
King Juan Carlos of Spain has man-
aged to unite right and left, young
and old, those with jobs and those
without in universal outrage over
his tone-deafAfrican hunting safari.
As Spain foundered amid eco-
nomic woes, what did the 74-year-
old monarch do? He slipped away
to hunt elephants in southern Africa.
Interest rates for Spanish bonds
have risen alarmingly in recent
days, with fears mounting that the
country could be the next in Eu-
rope to need a bailout. Not exactly
the right time to go on an exotic
holiday one major newspaper esti-
mated could cost twice a Spanish
worker's average annual wages.


Spain is also struggling with 23
percent unemployment the
highest in the 17-nation eurozone
-which soars to nearly 50 percent
for young workers. The trip makes
the king's earlier comments about
how he can't sleep at night think-
ing about the country's unem-
ployed ring rather hollow.
This particular trip it is not
clear if taxpayer money was used
- only became public when the
king stumbled and fell before dawn
Friday at his bungalow in
Botswana and fractured his right
hip, forcing an emergency flight
home and hip replacement surgery
Newspaper El Mundo said the
king had not told Prime Minister
Mariano Rajoy's government of his
trip abroad until after the accident


OBITUARIES


* The Chronicle policy
permits both free and
paid obituaries.
* Obituaries must be
verified with the funeral
home or society in charge
of arrangements.
* Free obituaries, run one
day, can include: full
name of deceased;
age; hometown/state;
date of death; place of
death; date, time and
place of visitation and
funeral services.
* Additionally, all obituar-
ies will be posted online
at www.chronicleonline
.com.
* Area funeral homes
with established ac-
counts with the Chroni-
cle are charged $8.75
per column inch.
* Non-local funeral
homes and those with-
out accounts are re-
quired to pay in
advance by credit card,
and the cost is $10 per
column inch.


Former TSA officer pleads guilty to bribery


Associated Press

NEW HAVEN, Conn. -
A former Transportation
Security Administration
officer pleaded guilty
Monday to federal
charges of accepting cash
in exchange for allowing
illegal prescription
painkillers to pass
through airport security
without detection.
Christopher Allen, 46, of
Palm Beach Gardens,
Fla., pleaded guilty to ex-
tortion and receipt of a
bribe, the U.S. attorney's
office said.
Authorities say Allen
accepted cash from a traf-
ficker to ensure that the
trafficker would not be
stopped by TSA officers as
he carried oxycodone
pills through airport secu-
rity on his way to Con-
necticut. He was one of 20
people arrested last year


after an investigation by a
Drug Enforcement Admin-
istration task force.
"This defendant received
cash payments to violate his
oath of public office and
look the other way as large
quantities of oxycodone
pills passed unlawfully
through airport security,"
U.S. Attorney David Fein
said. "For obvious reasons,
we cannot tolerate corrup-
tion within the ranks of
those who are entrusted
with the responsibility for
screening air travelers and
their baggage. I commend
the DEA Task Force for
shutting down a pipeline of
highly addictive prescrip-
tion pills from Florida to
Connecticut, and for bring-
ing to justice this federal
employee and others who
participated in this illegal
scheme."
Allen, while employed as
a TSA officer at Palm Beach


International Airport in
West Palm Beach, Fla., on
four occasions last year was
paid $500 by the trafficker,
who by this time was coop-
erating with law enforce-
ment, authorities said.
Allen, who is scheduled to
be sentenced on July 5,
faces up to 20 years in


prison on the extortion
count and up to 15 years on
the bribe count
In February, Michael
Brady, a former New York
police officer, admitted ac-
cepting cash payments in
exchange for permitting the
transport of prescription
drug trafficking proceeds


through Westchester County
Airport. The 36-year-old
Brady pleaded guilty to
bribery and extortion.
A former Florida state
trooper, Justin Kolves,
pleaded guilty last month to
conspiracy to distribute and
to possess with intent to dis-
tribute oxycodone.


YOUR PRESENCE IS REQUESTED
AT THE SEVENTH ANNUAL
CITRUS MEMORIAL BLACK TIE & TIARA BALL
Saturday, May 12, 2012

Black Diamond Ranch Club House, Lecanto
Cocktail Hour/Silent Auction 6:00 p.m.
Followed by Dinner & Dancing


rmal Attire CITRUS MEMORIAL
rmeavl SXtiewt


I u Culd n I

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Anytime before Noon on April 30, 2012
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A S P 7 SOKCTYINR)VCHROIC


IHowT"S *E 'THI MATIN EI


MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) Here are the 825 most active stocks on the New York Stock Exchange, 765
Name Vol(00) Last Chg Name Vol(00) Last Chg Name Vol(00) Last Chg most active on the Nasdaq National Market and 116 most active on the Ameri-
BkofAm 2062038 8.79 +.11 Vringo 182217 3.97 +.93 SiriusXM 599614 2.17 -.06 can Stock Exchange. Tables show name, price and net change.
S&P500ETF1377222137.05 -.09 Dreams 135090 3.40 +.79 MicronT 550990 7.12 +.16 Name: Stocks appear alphabetically by the company's full name (not abbrevia-
SPDRFncI1092568 15.24 +.11 CheniereEn 104409 16.99 +.13 PwShsQQQ542559 65.45 -.74 tion). Names consisting of initials appear at the beginning of each letter's list.
iShEMkts 606143 41.95 -.22 NovaGldg 35735 6.63 -.36 Microsoft 375037 31.08 +.26 Last: Price stock was trading at when exchange closed for the day.
NokiaCp 604030 4.09 +.07 NthnO&G 22476 19.00 -.94 Apple Inc 367551 580.13-25.10 Chg: Loss or gain for the day No change indicated by.

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) Stock Footnotes: ld Issue has been called for redempbon by company d- New 52-week
low. dd Loss in last 12 mos. ec- Company formerly listed on the Amencan Exchange's
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Ch %Chg Emerging Company Marketplace. h- temporary exmpt from Nasdaq capital and surplus list-
AmrRty 3.05 +71 +30.2 Vringo 3.97 +93 +30.6 Endocyte 7.62 +3.82 +100.5 qualification n Stock was a new issue in the last year.The 52-week high and low fig-
BkAtl Ars 5.94 +.55 +10.2 Dreams 3.40 +.79 +30.3 EdelmanFn 8.74 +2.56 +41.4 ures date only from the beginning of trading. pf- Preferred stock Issue. pr- Preferences.pp-
Sealycv16 72.95 +6.16 +9.2 AvalonHId 5.08 +.48 +10.3 OptiBkrsh 2.60 +.60 +30.0 Holder owes installments of purchaseprice. rt Right to buy security ata specifiedprce. s -
iPSEEafe 92.17 +7.17 +8.4 ParkCity 3.70 +.30 +8.8 ExceedCo 2.39 +.35 +17.2 Stock has split by at least 20 percent within the last year. wi Trades will be settled when the
Feihe Intl 3.82 +.29 +8.2 ProlorBio 5.47 +.40 +7.9 CdrsVlly 12.98 +1.87 +16.8 stock is issued. wd When distributed, wt Warrant, allowing a purchase of a stock. u New
52-week high. un Unit, including more than one security. vj Company in bankruptcy or re-
LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) ceivership, or being reorganized under the bankruptcy law. Appears in front of the name.
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.
E-CDang 8.63 -1.56 -15.3 Orbital 5.11 -.71 -12.2 Halozyme 8.56 -2.72 -24.1
YPFSoc 19.50 -2.45 -11.2 Glowpoint 2.26 -.24 -9.7 NewLeadH 2.21 -.41 -15.6 _T'_
Lentuo 3.31 -.33 -9.1 WizrdSftrs 2.58 -.26 -9.2 FFinSvc 3.41 -.56 -14.1


NBGrepfA 5.42 -.52 -8.8 UraniumEn 2.85 -.23 -7.5 Spreadtrm 14.93 -2.03 -12.0
FortunaSlv 3.81 -.33 -8.0 MGTCaprs 2.31 -.16 -6.5 Wstptlnng 33.47 -4.16 -11.1


DIARY


1,724 Advanced
1,305 Declined
117 Unchanged
3,146 Total issues
58 New Highs
51 New Lows
3,405,562,332 Volume


DIARY


211 Advanced
253 Declined
32 Unchanged
496 Total issues
9 New Highs
10 New Lows
103,698,855 Volume


1,318
1,177
120
2,615
58
55
1,553,073,596


52-Week
High Low Name
13,297.11 10,404.49Dow Jones Industrials
5,627.85 3,950.66Dow Jones Transportation
467.64 381.99Dow Jones Utilities
8,718.25 6,414.89NYSE Composite
2,498.89 1,941.99Amex Index
3,134.17 2,298.89Nasdaq Composite
1,422.38 1,074.77S&P500
14,951.57 11,208.42Wilshire 5000
868.57 601.71 Russell 200


Last
12,921.41
5,234.65
456.24
7,949.57
2,358.76
2,988.40
1,369.57
14,386.90
798.08


I NYSE


Net % YTD % 52-wk
Chg Chg Chg %Chg
+71.82 +.56 +5.76 +5.90
+37.61 +.72 +4.28 +.44
+4.14 +.92 -1.82+10.60
+18.47 +.23 +6.32 -3.96
+5.42 +.23 +3.53 -.68
-22.93 -.76+14.71 +9.25
-.69 -.05 +8.90 +4.94
-11.48 -.08 +9.07 +3.78
+1.79 +.22 +7.71 -2.85


Request stocks or mutual funds to be listed here by writing

the Chronicle, Attn: Stock Requests, 1624 N. Meadowcrest

Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429; or call 563-5660. Include

the name of the stock, market and ticker symbol. For mu-

tual funds, list parent company, symbol and the exact name

of the fund. Staff will not provide real-time quotes.


I NEWYORK STOKECAG


Name Last Chg BkofAm 8.79 +.11
BkMontg 58.25 +.46
BkNYMel 23.29 +.18
Barday 13.56 -.04
ABBLtd 19.66 +.31 BariPVix 18.99 -.30
AESCorp 12.44 +.04 BarrickG 40.81 -.80
AFLAC 42.80 -.08 BasicEnSv 15.18 -.45
AGLRes 38.16 +.32 Baxter 54.10 -3.93
AK Steel 7.39 Beamlnc 57.00 -.02
AOL 25.50 -.29 BeazerHm 2.85 -.05
ASA Gold 24.37 -.16 BectDck 75.02 +.23
AT&Tlnc 30.61 +.07 BerkHaA119525.00+1140.00
AbtLab 59.85 +.26 BerkH B 79.67 +.85
AberFitc 46.78 -.38 BestBuy 21.85 -.19
Accenture 61.88 -.67 BigLots 45.00 -.51
AdamsEx 10.72 ... BBarrett 21.89 -.88
AdvAmer 10.48 +.01 BIkHillsCp 32.62 +.32
AMD 7.70 -.03 BlkDebtStr 4.13 -.06
AdvSemi 4.93 -.06 BlkEnhC&l 13.14 -.04
Aeropost 21.09 -.01 BIkGlbOp 14.99 -.06
Aetna 47.23 -.59 Blackstone 14.59 +.06
Agilent 41.99 -.25 BlockHR 16.70 -.18
Agnimog 32.57 -.81 Boeing 72.68 -.24
AlcatelLuc 1.95 -.04 BostBeer 102.86 +.26
Alma 9.86 +.01 BostProp 101.90 +1.60
AllegTch 40.30 +.32 BostonSci 5.51 -.11
Allergan 94.08 -.57 BoydGm 7.78 -.08
Allete 40.34 +.42 Brinker 28.08 +.05
AlliBGlbHi 15.07 +.03 BrMySq 32.93 +.39
AlliBlnco 8.15 +.01 BrkfidOfPr 17.22 +.18
AlliBern 14.75 -.04 BrwnBrn 24.04 +.55
Allstate 32.47 +.17 Brunswick 25.22 +.03
AlphaNRs 15.53 -.13 Buckeye 56.21 -1.35
AlpAlerMLP 16.43 -.08 C&JEgyn 16.49 -.54
Altia 31.38 -.11 CBLAsc 18.80 +.36
AmBev 42.45 -.27 CBREGrp 18.36 +.15
Ameren 31.64 +.17 CBSB 32.31 -.20
Amerigrp 67.31 -1.00 CFlnds 182.78 -3.47
AMovilLs 23.76 -.10 CHEngy 66.03 +.61
AEagleOut 17.22 +.37 CMSEng 21.89 +.35
AEP 37.76 +.45 CSSInds 19.24 +.14
AmExp 57.83 +.55 CSXs 22.08 +.16
AmlntGrp 32.81 +.33 CVREngy 27.62 -.50
AmSIP3 6.90 -.02 CVSCare 43.61 +.18
AmTower 63.72 +.56 CblvsNYs 13.34 +.13
Amerigas 37.78 -.32 CabotOGs 29.54 -1.06
Ameriprise 53.64 +.51 CallGolf 6.52 -.03
AmeriBrgn 37.48 -.05 Calpine 16.81 -.29
Anadarko 73.37 -1.59 Camecog 20.53 +.04
AnglogldA 33.45 -.56 Cameron 49.49 -1.32
ABInBev 72.08 +1.22 CampSp 33.27 +.26
Ann Inc 28.85 +.53 CdnNRsgs 31.89 .10
Annaly 15.77 +.07 CapOne 53.28 -.19
Anworth 6.50 +.04 CapilSrce 6.54 +.02
Aonplc 48.52 +.06 CapMpfB 14.72 +.18
Apache 92.27 -1.38 CardnlHlh 40.58 +.05
AquaAm 21.70 +.18 CareFusion 25.39 -.10
ArcelorMit 17.41 +.13 Carnival 31.44 +.22
ArchCoal 9.75 -.24 Caterpillar 106.74 +.85
ArchDan 30.79 +.04 Celanese 46.55 -.06
ArmosDor 18.83 -.04 Cemex 6.67 -.13
ArmourRsd 6.73 +.01 Cemig pf 24.95 +.08
Ashland 61.91 +.83 CenterPnt 19.32 +.15
AsdEstat 16.45 +.27 Cntylink 38.11 +.02
ATMOS 31.45 +.50 Checkpnt 10.71
AuRicog 8.71 -.24 ChesEng 19.19 -.76
Avon 23.03 -.49 ChesUfi 40.87 +.58
BB&TCp 30.83 +.34 Chevron 101.51 +.73
BHPBiIILt 70.84 +.39 Chimos 15.07 +.15
BP PLC 42.51 +.36 Chimera 2.76 +.01
BPZRes 4.03 +.11 Chubb 71.00 +1.34
BRFBrasil 18.62 ... Cigna 47.68 -.63
BRT 7.85 +.06 CindBell 3.66 -.04
BakrHu 40.80 -.25 Cifgrp rs 34.00 +.59
BallCorp 42.78 +.01 CleanHs 63.24 -1.72
BcBilVArg 6.83 -.02 CliffsNRs 69.25 -.06
BmoBradpf 16.64 -.03 Clorox 70.08 -.15
BmoSantSA 6.43 +.03 Coach 73.84 -.40
BmoSBrasil 8.31 -.19 CobaltlEn 26.35 -2.03


CCFemsa 104.17 -.18
CocaCola 72.44 +.50
CocaCE 27.98 +.20
CohStlnfra 17.08 -.19
ColgPal 97.67 +.46
CollctvBrd 19.32 +.32
Comerica 30.86 +.31
CmwREIT 18.68 +.24
CmtyHIt 21.95 +.13
CompSci 27.36 +.34
ComskRs 15.46 -.52
Con-Way 33.14 +.65
ConAgra 25.87 +.10
ConocPhil 73.83 +.20
ConsolEngy 34.01 +.31
ConEd 58.22 +.47
ConstellA 21.51 -.08
Cnvrgys 13.04 +.18
Corning 13.57 -.01
CorrecInCp 29.29 +.29
CosanLtd 13.65 -.28
CottCp 6.48 -.05
CovenbyH 32.28 -.72
Covidien 53.50 +.26
Crane 47.07 +.07
CSVS2xVxS 8.41 -.12
CSVellVSts 10.57 +.20
CredSuiss 26.03 +.30
CrwnCsfe 54.26 +.40
Cummins 114.10 +.08

DCTIndl 5.75 +.11
DDRCorp 14.32 +.19
DNPSelct 10.32 -.11
DR Horton 14.78 -.04
DSWInc 54.75 +.54
DTE 55.01 +.76
DanaHldg 14.24
Danaher 54.04 +.16
Darden 50.21 -.07
DeanFds 11.72 +.14
Deere 79.57 +.10
DelphiAun 31.99 +.14
DeltaAir 10.25 +.12
DenburyR 18.00 +.09
DeutschBk 44.39 +.09
DBGoldDS 4.72 +.04
DevonE 67.00 -.84
DicksSptg 49.44 -.02
DxFnBullrs 99.09 +1.92
DirSCBear 19.63 -.08
DirFnBear 22.26 -.47
DirLCBear 21.69 +.09
DirDGIdBII 13.42 -.77
DrxEnBear 11.15 +14
DirEMBear 13.42 +.24
DirxSCBull 55.12 +.28
DirxEnBull 44.12 -.52
Discover 32.52 -.37
Disney 41.66 -.19
DollarGen 45.89 -.41
DomRescs 50.74 +.46
DEmmett 22.58 +.64
Dover 61.00 +.08
DowChm 33.60 +.40
DrPepSnap 39.36 +.10
DuPont 52.72 +.70
DukeEngy 20.63 +.22
DukeRlty 14.36 +.16
Dynegy .36 -.01
E-CDang 8.63 -1.56
EMCCp 28.81 -.06
EOG Res 102.77 -.56
EQT Corp 45.33 -.85
EastChm s 52.45 +.31
Eaton 46.71 -.16
EathVan 26.61 +.14
EVEnEq 10.85 +.01


EVTxMGlo 8.70
Edisonlnt 42.44
EdwLfSci 68.44
BPasoCp 29.31
Ban 13.63
BdorGldg 14.23
EmersonEl 50.20
EmpDist 20.11
EnbrEPts 30.77
EnCanag 17.50
Enerplsg 18.52
EnPro 40.36
ENSCO 51.46


Entergy 66.10 +.60
EntPrPt 50.41 -.01
EqtyRsd 62.01 +1.16
EsteeLdrs 62.68 -.28
ExooRes 5.93 +.08
Exelon 37.81 +.32
ExxonMbl 84.01 +1.06
FMC Tech 46.38 -.74
FamilyDIr 64.63 +.37
FedExCp 88.18 +.15
FedSignl 5.43 +.01
Ferrellgs 13.44 -.55
Ferro 5.15 -.01
RdlNRn 18.53 +.11
FidNatlnfo 32.85 +.37
FstHorizon 9.83 +.06
FTActDiv 8.50 +.04
FtTrEnEq 11.80 +.01
FT Find 14.95 +.06
FTIndPrd 18.89 +.07
FirstEngy 45.42 +.48
Rotek 11.98 -.19
Ruor 58.28 +.18
FootLodkr 30.71 +.11
FordM 11.88 -.04
ForestLab 33.64 +.19
ForestOil s 11.41 +.05
FranceTel 13.36 +.04
FMCG 36.92 -.02
Fronfline 6.61 -.07
Fusion-io n 26.49 -.88


GATX 41.19 +.44
GabelliET 5.41 +.01
GabHIthW 8.31 +.05
GabUIl 8.03 +.07
GaisaSA 4.27 -.06
GameStop 21.70 +.47
Gannett 13.89 -1.15
Gap 26.43 -.13
GenDynam 69.20 +.32
GenElec 18.90 +.02
GenGrPrp 17.00 +.30


GenMills 38.74 +.04
GenMotors 23.42 -.38
GenOnEn 1.94 -.03
Genworth 7.62 -.03
Gerdau 9.38 -.12
GlaxoSKIn 45.58 +.99
GolLinhas 5.57 -.21
GoldFLtd 12.77 -.05
Goldp g 41.40 -.21
GoldmanS 117.73 +2.64
Goodrich 125.36 +.04
Goodyear 10.41 -.18
GtPlainEn 19.68 +.08
Griffon 9.97 +.10
GuangRy 19.03 -.14
HCAHIdg 27.18 +18
HCP Inc 39.33 +.40
HSBC 43.09 +.13
HSBCCap 26.31 +.16
Halibrhn 32.06 -.35
HanJS 15.50 +.07
HanPrmDv 13.22 -.02
Hanesbrds 27.41 -.48
Hanoverlns 39.54 +.27
HarleyD 48.01 -.15
HarmonyG 9.63 -.16
HartfdFn 20.10 -.05
HatterasF 28.61 +.16
HawaiiEl 25.18 +.37
HItCrREIT 53.85 +.63
HItMgmt 7.09 -.16
HIlthcrRIlty 21.16 +.11
Heclmnann 4.15 -.05


HeclaM 4.16 -.04
Heinz 52.62 -.03
Hershey 61.69
Hertz 14.33 -.30
Hess 54.26 -1.02
HewlettP 24.31 -.26
HighwdPrp 33.18 +.67
HollyFrts 28.38 -1.66
HomeDp 51.69 +.73
Honwlllnf 58.00 -.07
HospPT 26.94 +.10
HostHofs 16.38 +.07
HovnanE 1.98 -.02


Humana 87.46 -1.15
Huntsmn 14.35 +.13
IAMGIdg 12.41 -.31
ICICI Bk 33.49 +.21
ING 6.95 -.10
IONGeoph 5.45 -.10
iShGold 16.10 -.04
iSAsfia 23.24 +.09
iShBraz 62.10 -.40
iSCan 27.41 -.03
iShGer 21.93 +.31
iSh HK 17.34 -.04
iShJapn 9.74 +.02
iSh Kor 58.92 -.11
iSMalas 14.57 -.06
iShMex 60.07 -.03
iSTaiwn 13.03 -.08
iShSilver 30.56 +.01
iShChina25 37.08 -.34
iSSP500 137.48 -.11
iShEMkts 41.95 -.22
iShiBxB 116.00
iShB20T 116.67 -.17
iS Eafe 52.70 +.38
iShiBxHYB 89.99 +.14
iSR1KV 68.06 +.21
iSR1KG 64.54 -.28
iSR2KV 70.44 +.38
iSR2KG 91.35 -.27
iShR2K 79.67 +.13
iShREst 61.70 +.71
iShDJHm 14.36 +.03
iShSPSm 73.77 +.17


iStar 7.16
ITTCps 21.38
Idacorp 39.87
ITW 55.15
Imafon 5.83
IngerRd 39.53
IntegrysE 52.21
IntcnfEx 131.34
IBM 202.72
InfiGame 16.11
IntPap 32.86
Interpublic 10.77
InvenSenn 14.65


Invesco 24.68 -.03
IronMtn 29.52 -.13
ItauUnibH 17.15 -.14


JPMorgCh 43.33 +.12
Jabil 23.07 +.04
JacobsEng 43.28 +.38
Jaguar g 3.43 -.11
JanusCap 8.08 +.06
Jefferies 16.99 +.04
JohnJn 63.98 +.44
JohnsnCi 32.40 -.17
JoyGIbl 74.13 -.56
JnprNtwk 20.84 -.36
KBHome 7.87 -.18
KBR Inc 33.60 -.37
KCSouthn 72.81 +.22
Kaydons 24.20 +.18
KA EngTR 27.37 -.04
Kelbgg 53.50 +.26
KeyEngy 13.86 -.68
Keycorp 8.04 +.07
KimbClk 74.73 +.38
Kimco 18.44 +.33
KindME 81.75 -.44
KindMorg 37.70 -.71
Kinross g 9.38 -.13
KodiakOg 8.97 -.33
Kohls 50.75 +1.16
Kraft 37.58 +.23
KrispKrm 7.13 +.16


Kroger 23.57 +.06 NCRCorp 21.95 +.52 PitnyBw 16.64 -.04 Rowan 32.40 -.66
LSICorp 8.08 -.05 NRGEgy 14.34 -.24 PlainsEx 39.71 -1.17 RylCarb 26.96 -.34
LTCPrp 31.69 +.56 NVEnergy 15.75 +.21 PlumCrk 41.10 +.26 RoyDShllA 67.84 +.60
LaZBoy 13.91 -.06 NYSEEur 27.34 -.15 Polariss 72.16 +.01 Royce 13.43 +.07
Ladede 39.10 +.49 Nabors 15.49 -.67 PostPrp 46.38 +1.08 RoycepfB 25.58 +.15
LVSands 58.91 -1.85 NatFuGas 44.72 +.38 Potash 42.90 +.08 Rand .0 -27
LeggPlat 22.42 +.10 NatGrid 51.21 +.49 PwshDB 28.06 -.28
LennarA 25.79 -.32 NOilVarco 77.91 -.61 PSUSDBull 22.07 -.09
Level3rs 24.98 -.28 Navistar 36.58 -.19 PSKBWBk 24.29 +.25 SAIC 12.17 -.07
LbtyASG 4.28 -.01 NewAmHi 10.14 +.08 Praxair 112.95 +.92 SAPAG 63.73 -1.69
LillyEli 39.60 +.42 NJRscs 42.70 +.49 PrecDrill 8.85 -.25 SCANA 44.36 +.08
Limited 47.91 +.24 NwOriEds 26.91 -.66 PrinFnd 27.84 +.13 SKTIcm 13.70 -.08
LincNat 24.18 +.03 NYCmtyB 13.28 +.12 ProLogis 34.01 +.53 SMEnergy 65.14 -.12
Lindsay 64.09 -.80 NYTimes 6.20 -.10 ProShtS&P 36.68 +.04 SpdrDJIA 129.07 +.67
Linkedlnn 101.08 -6.16 Newcaste 6.34 +.10 PrUShS&P 15.86 +.02 SpdrGold 160.46 -.39
LionsGtg 12.12 -.46 NewellRub 17.19 +.06 PrUlShDow 13.33 -.14 SpdrWldxUS 23.56 +.07
LizClaib 12.97 -.19 NewfdEgp 32.32 -.56 ProUltQQQ 111.66 -2.43 SPMid 175.62 +.08
LloydBkg 1.87 -.04 NewmtM 48.17 -.51 PrUShQQQ 32.11 +.69 S&P500ETF137.05 -.09
LockhdM 89.57 +.27 NewpkRes 7.20 -.26 ProUItSP 55.17 -.10 SpdrHome 20.80 +.07
LaPac 8.30 -.14 Nexeng 18.45 +.08 PrUShtFin 42.53 -.59 SpdrS&PBk 22.94 +.21
Lowes 32.05 +.36 NextEraEn 62.72 +.64 ProUShL20 18.73 +.04 SpdrLehHY 39.13 +.06
NiSource 24.16 +.24 ProUltFin 59.16 +.79 SpdrSTCpBd 30.53 +.02
ik i l ! NikeB 109.40 +.60 PrUPShR2K 9.78 -.02 SpdrLehAgB 58.24 +.04
NobleCorp 35.17 -.58 ProShtR2K 27.00 -.08 SpdrLel-3bll 45.82 +.01
M&TBk 85.62 +1.19 NokiaCp 4.09 +.07 SpdrS&P RB 27.38 +.29
MBIA 10.11 -.06 Nomura 4.29 +.05 ProUltR2K 40.38 +.05 SpdrRef 60.15 +.28
MDC 25.35 +.11 Nordstrm 55.52 +53 ProUSSP500 9.77 +.04 SpdrOGEx 52.45 -.91
MDURes 21.87 -.01 NorfikSo 68.24 +.80 PrUltSP500 78.01 -.22 SpdrMetM 48.09 -.11
MEMC 3.45 -.09 NoestUt 36.20 +.40 PrUVxSTrs 17.90 -.69 STMicro 6.79 -.06
MFAFnd 7.26 +.07 NorthropG 61.04 +.23 ProUSSilv 10.97 -.04 Safeway 21.63 +.44
MCR 9.54 +.03 Novarts 55.20 +.87 ProUShEuro 19.53 -.18 StJoe 17.64 -.14
MGIC 4.15 -.05 Nucor 41.68 +.11 ProctGam 66.78 +.97 Suude 38.25 -.33
MGMRsts 13.72 -.20 NuvMuOpp 14.68 -.02 ProgrssEn 51.67 +.14 Salesforce 154.93 -4.44
Macquarie 33.51 +.31 NvPfdlnco 8.82 -.02 ProgSVCp 22.61 +.27 SallyBty 25.49 -.07
Macys 40.01 +.03 NuvQPf2 8.64 +.03 ProUSR2K 31.81 -.07 SJuanB 17.27 -.82
MageMPtr 70.82 -.17 OGEEngy 51.73 +.43 Prudent 60.07 +.16 SandRge 7.11 -16
Magnalgs 45.06 -.34 OasisPet 30.76 +74 PSEG 30.02 +.33 Sanofi 36.55 +.34
MagHRes 6.11 +.04 OcciPet 87.26 -1.31 PubSrg 137.92 +1.14 SaraLee 21.54 +.04
Manitowoc 13.72 -.22 OfficeDpt 3.11 +.05 PulteGrp 8.43 -.11 Schlmbrg 67.44 -.94
Manulifeg 12.96 -.04 OilStates 70.93 -3.80 PPrlT 5.47 +.05 Schwab 13.75 -.12
MarathnOs 29.48 -.22 OldRepub 10.40 +.07 QEPRes 28.40 -.02 SeadrillLtd 37.18 +.11
MarathPn 40.01 -1.61 Olin 21.05 +.18 REnergy 19.22 -.11 SealAir 18.57 -.16
MktVGold 46.64 -.86 OmegaHIt 21.07 +.21 Qihoo360 20.14 -1.64 Sealy 2.30 +.10
MVOilSvs 38.62 -.59 Omni 49.19 +46 QuanexBd 18.05 +.13 SempraEn 63.18 +.79
MVSemi n 34.67 +.13 ONEOK 80.00 -.22 QuantaSvc 20.89 +.15 SenHous 21.40 +.24
MktVRus 29.65 -.49 OnekPts 53.17 34 QntmDSS 2.45 +.12 Sensient 36.82 +.37
MktVJrGld 22.61 -.44 OpkoHth 4.48 +10 Questaer 19.05 +.12 SiderurNac 8.99 -.12
MarlntA 37.31 OshkoshCp 21.43 QksilvRes 4.04 -.08 SilvWhtg 29.65 -1.51
MarshM 32.20 +.28 OwensCorn 3425 +02 RPM 26.04 +.24 SimonProp 148.64 +3.90
MStewrt 346 04 esl 2421 51 RadianGrp 3.44 -.10 Skechers 13.39 +.21
MStewrt 12.20 enslll06 24.21 +51 RadioShk 5.99 +.04 SmithAO 44.34 +.27
M rmnt 12.16 -270 Ralcorp 72.77 -.34 SmihfF 20.16 -.36
McDrmlnt 11.16 -.27
McDnlds 96.58 -.39 PG&ECp 43.01 +.75 RangeRs 55.25 -.61 Smudcer 78.81 -.44
McKesson 89.77 -.71 PNC 62.14 +.86 RJamesFn 35.10 +.04 Solua 27.99 +.03
McMoRn 8.72 -.29 PNMRes 18.26 +.22 Rayoniers 43.60 +59 SonyCp 17.51 +.15
McEwenM 3.82 -.09 PPG 96.90 1.18 Rayheon 52.60 +.07 SoJernd 48.02 +.40
Meohel 9.14 -.34 PPLCorp 26.93 +.16 Rltylnm 38.04 +53 SouthnCo 45.18 +.44
Menic 37.55 +04 Pallorp 59.10 .02 RedHat 60.06 -14 SthnCopper 31.26 +.17
Merck 37.95 +17 Pandoran 8.27 -.39 RealEnt 13.10 -.13 SwstAirl 7.99 +05
Meritr 6.95 -.02 PaiotCoal 6.26 +.08 RegionsFn 6.21 +.10 SwstEny 27.98 .42
MetLife 35.49 -.15 PeabdyE 27.94 -.44 Renren n 7.14 .19 SpecraEn 30.02 -.31
MeroPCS 8.29 -.11 Pengrthg 8.82 -.14 RepubSvc 30.73 -.05 SpiritAero 24.05 -.36
MeroHIth 8.67 PennVaRs 25.97 -.01 Revlon 17.79 +.17 SprintNex 2.51 .17
MKorsn 42.10 -1.52 PennWstg 16.96 -.03 ReynAmer 41.43 -.17 SPMats 36.24 +.11
MidAApt 66.90 +1.14 Penney 33.88 -.18 RioTinto 54.95 +.07 SP HlhC 36.59 +.01
Midas 11.48 -.01 Pentair 43.93 -.12 RiteAid 1.55 -11 SPCnSt 33.77 +14
MobiaeTele 18.15 -.09 PepBoy 14.95 +.0 RockwlAut 78.03 +.53 SPConsum 44.39 -.16
MolsCoorB 40.89 -.05 PepeoHold 18.47 +.11 RockOoll 57.50 +.50 SPEngy 68.24 -.46
Molymorp 31.68 -1.04 PepsiCo 65.99 +.93
MoneyGrs 16.62 +.20 Prmian 21.95 -.09
Monsanto 76.87 -.20 PerbrsA 23.30 -.28
MonsrWw 8.62 -.08 Perobras 24.24 -.26
MorgStan 17.50 +.22 Pfizer 21.98 +.13 The remainder of the
MSEmMkt 14.42 -.01 PhilipMor 87.04 -.80
Mosaic 50.12 -.12 PiedNG 29.56 +.20 NYSE listings can be
MolriaSolu 48.19 -.21 Pieri 17.51 -.34 NYSE ings can
MotrlaMob 39.14 ... PimoStrat 11.09 +.07 found on th next page.
MuellerWat 3.55 +.05 PinWst 46.68 +.45 found on the next page.
MurphO 52.01 -.75 PioNrl 104.60 -2.09


IA EIA N 5 XCANE1


Name Last Chg


AbdAsPac 7.35 +.03
AbdnEMTel 18.96 -.13
AdmRsc 71.03 +1.88
Adventx .61 -.03
AlexmoRg 6.35 -.15
AlldNevG 29.57 -1.33
AmApparel 1.02 +.02
AmLorain 1.36 +.15
AntaresP 3.00 +.01
Augustag 2.67 -.09
Aurizong 4.79 -.04
AvalnRare 2.53 -.13


Bacterin 2.27
Ballanty 5.77
Banrog 3.94
BarcUBS36 41.18
BarcGSOil 25.83
BiPTin 49.25
BioTime 3.90
BrigusGg .83
CAMACEn .86
CardiumTh .23
CelSd .41
CFCdag 21.46
CheniereEn 16.99
CheniereE 23.05
ChinaShen 1.48


-.10 ClghGlbOp 11.22 +.01
-.09 ComstkMn 1.86 -.05
-.24 CrSuislno 3.82 +.01
-.33 CrSuiHiY 3.09 -.01
+.02
-220 DeourEg .31 -.00
.01 DenisnMg 1.43 -.01
+.05 DocuSec 3.51 -.05
-.03 Dreams 3.40 +.79
-.01 EVLtdDur 16.04 +.06
-.02 EVMuniBd 13.22 +.09
-.14 EVMuni2 14.34 -.07
+.13 ElephTalk 1.70 -.20
-.45 EllswthFd 7.15 -.03
... EntGaming .62 +.09


ExeterRgs 2.47 -.09
ExtorreGg 5.15 -.26


GSESy 2.25 +.04
GamGldNR 15.67 -.18
GascoEngy .24 -.01
Gastargrs 2.51 -.02
GenMoly 3.08 +.06
GoldRsvg 4.03 +.07
GoldResrc 25.13 +.03
GoldenMin 6.52 -.40
GoldStrg 1.54 -.06
GldFld 1.13 -.03
GranTrrag 6.34 -.01


GrtBasGg .66 -.05
GtPanSilvg 2.00 -.06
Hemisphrx .33 -.02
HstnAEn 3.63 -.09
iBb 1.55 +.19
ImpOilgs 44.34 +.60
InovioPhm .60 -.03


KeeganRg 3.10 -.06
LadThalFn 1.72 +.12
LkShrGldg .90 -.03
LongweiPI 1.67 -.03
LucasEngy 1.81 -.38


Richmntg 6.85 +.08

MAGSIVg 9.47 -.48 ParaG&S 2.34 -.07
MadCatzg .55 -.01 PhrmAth 1.46 -.06 S 1.9 .
Metalio 4.09 +.03 PinDrill 7.75 -.30 Sams&ynyRs 3.40
MdwGoldg 1.35 +.03 PlatGpMet 1.34 -.04 TanzRyg 5.05 +02
NavideaBio 2.69 -.04 PolyMetg 1.05 -.07 Taseko 3.12
NeoStem .33 +.01 Protalix 6.12 -.13 TasmanMg 2.03 -.13
NBRESec 4.23 +.04 PyamidOil 4.16 -25 Tegso .94 -.02
Nevsung 3.62 -.05 Quaterrag .44 -.03 TrnsafiPet 1.21 -.02
NwGoldg 9.46 .22 Quepasa 3.85 -.03 TravelCts 5.81 -.10
a QuestRMg 2.15 -.10 TriValley .15 +.00
NAPallg 2.55 -.06 RareEleg 5.69 -.21 TriangPet 5.78 -.37
NthnO&G 19.00 -.94 Rentech 2.10 -.09 Tuwsg 1.33 -.11
NovaGldg 6.63 -.36 RevettMin 3.76 -.08 Ur-Energy 1.09 -.01


Uranerz 1.99 -.08
UraniumEn 2.85 -.23


VantageDrl 1.47 -.02
VirnetX 24.13 -.62
VistaGold 2.92 -.03
VoyagerOG 2.40 -.10
Vrigo 3.97 +.93
Vrigowt 1.18 +.33
WFAdvlnco 10.20 +.02
WizrdSftrs 2.58 -.26
XPOLogrs 16.98 -.08
YMBiog 1.69 -.06


I AASDAQ NATIONAL5MARKET 11


Name Last Chg


ASML HId 49.34 +.65
ATPO&G 6.42 -.09
AVIBio 1.04
AXTInc 6.19 +19
Aastom 2.24 +.06
Abraxas 2.90 -.09
Accuray 7.20 -.15
Achillion 8.77 -.25
AcmePkt 26.97 -.44
AmordaTh 24.27 +.02
AmrnEngy 11.50 +.16
AcivsBliz 12.26 -.16
Acxiom 13.92 +.13
AdobeSy 32.85 -.34
Adtan 29.51 -.36
AEternag .66 -.01
Affymax 11.70 -.16
Afsymetix 3.99 -.06
AkamaiT 36.73 -.03
Akorn 10.58 -.77
AlaskCom 2.47 -.09
Alexions 88.67 -.35
Alexzah .63 -.00
AlignTech 26.81 +.08
Alkermes 17.47 -.09
AllosThera 1.82 +.01
AllscriptH 16.00 -.29
AlnylamP 10.01 -.01
AltairNh .81 +.10
AlteraCplf 37.57 +.09
AlterraCap 22.80 +.40
AmTrstFin 26.27 -.05
Amarin 9.63 -.06
Amazon 185.50 -2.96
Amedisys 13.19 -.12
ACapAgy 30.09 -.02
AmCapLd 8.60 +.13
ARltyCTn 10.96 +.01
AmSupr 4.12 -.07
AmCasino 18.50 +.50
Amgen 66.26 +.67
AmkorTIf 5.64 -.05
Amylin 23.22 -.49
Amyris 3.61 -.22
Anadigc 2.26 -.08
AnalogDev 37.93 -.11
Anlogic 64.02 -.09
Analystlnt 4.87 -.30
Ancesry 22.25 -.55
AngiesLn 14.99 +.35
AnikaTh 16.25 +.45
AntheraPh 1.97 -.10
A123Sys .93 -.01
ApolloGrp 36.12 -.58
Apollolnv 7.15 +.01
Applelnc 580.13 -25.10
ApldMaf 11.86 +.06
AMCC 6.49 +.01
Approach 35.24 -1.18
ArQule 7.26 -.22
ArchCaps 37.90 +.18
ArchLearn 11.06 +.01
ArenaPhm 2.74 -.14
AresCap 16.13 +.20
AriadP 14.66 -.10
Aribalnc 35.01 +.18
ArkBest 18.20 +.31
ArmHId 27.89 -.05
ArrayBio 3.43 +.08
Arris 11.15 +.07
ArubaNet 20.89 -.25
AscenaRts 21.14 +.13
AsialnfoL 11.70 -.41
AssodBanc 13.22 +.11
AstexPhm 1.67 -.03
athenahlth 70.03 -1.25
Atmel 8.85
Autodesk 41.09 -.16
AutoData 54.70 +.21
Auxilium 18.17 -.13
AvagoTch 37.05 -.23
AvanirPhm 2.94 +.04
AvidTch 8.26 -.36
AvisBudg 12.58 -.09


Aware 3.76
Axcelis 1.52
BEAero 43.63
BGC Pts 6.72
BJsRest 48.71
BMCSft 39.31
Baidu 147.66
BassettF 10.68
BeacnRfg 25.57
BeasleyB 4.40
BedBath 69.55
BioRetLab 22.72
BioDlvrylf 2.91
Biodelh .61
BioFuelEh .55
Biogenldc 125.78
BioLase 2.85
BioMarin 32.73
BioSanteh .56
BIkRKelso 9.37
BlueNile 31.11
BobEvans 37.11
BonTon 7.23
BostPrv 9.43
BreitBurn 17.36
Brighpnt 7.28
Broadcom 36.54
BroadSoft 40.79
BroadVisn 30.00
Broadwd h .38
BrcdeCm 5.38
BrukerCp 14.36
BuffabWW 84.36
CA Inc 26.64
CBOE 26.62
CH Robins 64.81
CMEGrp 280.69
CVBFnd 11.30
CadencePh 3.30
Cadence 11.49
Caesars n 13.83
CdnSolar 3.54
CapCtyBk 7.59
CapFedFn 11.72
CpstnTrbh .94
Cardtronic 25.50
CareerEd 6.94
CaribouC 16.82
Carmike 13.02
Carrizo 25.39
CarverB rs 5.08
CathayGen 17.02
Cavium 28.69
Celgene 78.16
CellTherrsh 1.16
CelldexTh 4.17
Celsion 1.91
CentEuro 4.23
CEurMed 7.08
CentAI 8.22
Cepheid 38.39
Cereplast .64
Cerner s 73.24
CerusCp 3.65
ChrmSh 5.99
Chartlnds 70.60
ChkPoint 62.93
Cheesecake 29.45
ChelseaTh 1.97
ChildPlace 48.12
Chinalnfrs 1.23
ChipMOS 13.47
ChrchllD 58.38
CienaCorp 16.02
CinnFin 34.26
Cintas 38.49
Cirrus 23.18
Cism 19.73
CitzRpBrs 16.29
CitrixSys 75.56
CleanEngy 18.93
Cleantchrs 3.60
Clearwire 1.92
CoffeeH 9.26
Cognex 39.63
CognizTech 72.70
Cogo Grp 2.63
Coinstar 66.35


+.08 ColdwtrCrk .93 +.00
+.01 ColumLbh .69 +.01
-.57 Comcast 29.77 +.26
-.02 Comcspd 29.37 +.20
-.13 CmcBMO 40.02 +.27
+.12 CommSys 13.03 +.01
-3.72 CommVlt 52.78 -.11
+.39 CmplGnom 2.72 -.11
+.35 Compugn 5.16 -.27
+.36 Compuwre 8.58 +.01
+.14 ComScore 19.83 -.17
-.60 Comverse 6.42 -.01
-.02 ConcurTch 55.46 +.03
+.07 Conmed 28.68 +.03
-.01 Conns 18.69 +1.08
+.44 ConstantC 30.38 +.67
+.19 Coparts 26.06 +.42
-.01 CorinthC 3.64 -.08
-.03 CosiInc .90 -.10
+.09 Costm 86.88 +.56
+.11 CreeInc 30.92 -.63
+.27 CrimsnExp 4.41 -.17
+.04 Crocs 20.99 -.39
+.03 Ctrip.om 21.05 -.28
-.16 CubistPh 39.90 -.20
-.12 Curis 4.84 +.35
-17 CypSemi 14.32 +.07
-1.02 CytRxh .34 -.02

-.01
-.08
-19 DDiCorp 12.97 +.02
-1.26 DFCGlbl 17.06 -.14
-.11 DealrTrk 29.22 -.16
-.01 DeclksOut 61.53 -.58
+.68 Delcath 2.94
-1.47 DellInc 16.13 +.02
+.11 Dndreon 8.81 -.04
-.06 Dentsply 39.61 +.17
-.02 Depomed 6.05 -.19
-.72 DexCom 9.52 +.01
+.25 DiamndFlf 21.28 +.44
+.26 DigitalGen 9.22 -.04
+.03 DirecTVA 48.75 -.35
-.03 DiscCmA 51.89 +.19
+.17 DiscCmC 47.78 -.44
-.05 DiscovLab 2.51 -.11
-.16 DishNetwk 31.44 -.25
-.25 DollarTree 96.57 +.55
-.73 DonlleyRR 12.02 +.10
-.40 DrmWksA 16.99 -.01
+.23 DryShips 3.27 -.03
-.24 Dunkinn 30.95 -.42
-.16 DurectCph .70 +.01
-.01 Dynavax 4.67 -.08
-.01 E-Trade 9.91 -.15
-.12 eBay 35.50 -.62
-.41 eResrch 7.92 +.01
-.17 EVEngy 62.55 -1.72
+.07 EagleBulk 1.71 +.02
+.39 EaglRkEn 9.10 -.24
-.08 ErthLink 7.77 -.05
+.31 EstWstBcp 22.03 +.16
+.09 Ebixlnc 21.32 -.24
+.09 EdelmanFn 8.74 +2.56
-.89 EducDev 4.56 -.08
+.45 8x8 nc 3.98 -.03
-.15 ElectSd 14.85 -.10
-.08 ElectArts 15.21 -.97
-.32 EndoPhrm 35.69 +.07
-.14 Endocyte 7.62 +3.82
-.92 EnrgyRec 2.05 +.08
+.36 EngyXXI 33.56 -.52
-.14 Entegris 8.72 +.02
+.39 EntopCom 5.03 -.08
+.01 EnzonPhar 6.20 +.08
-.22 Equinix 153.99 -1.62
-.13 Ericsson 9.46 +.06
ExactScih 10.22 +.23
+.44 Exelids 4.67 -.10
-1.02 EddeTc 2.81 -.06
-.37 Eqxedias 31.21 -.60
-.21 Expdlni 46.02 -.31
+.24 EqxScripts 56.80 -.18
-.09 ExtmNet 4.18 -.04
-1.10 Ezcorp 31.18 +.44
-.14 F5Netwks 122.04 -.08
+.57 FEICo 47.18 +.06


FLIRSys 23.67 +.02 IdexxLabs 84.39 -.63
FSInfi 4.33 -.02 iGateCorp 18.35 -.77
FXEner 5.12 +.18 IPG Photon 47.81 -.66
Fastenals 48.25 -.54 iRobot 24.96 +.03
FifthStRn 9.28 -.02 iShAsiaexJ 55.72 -.08
FiftlhTird 14.11 +.09 iShsSOX 56.48 -.02
FindEngin 21.96 +.18 iShNsdqBio 117.74 -.41
Fndlnst 15.77 +.24 lonixBr 16.66 -.02
Finisar 17.62 -.44 IdenixPh 7.39 -.46
FinLine 20.93 -.14 Illumina 44.97 -2.20
FstCashFn 41.76 -.50 ImunoGn 12.26 -.08
FMidBc 11.31 +.06 Incyte 17.35 -.30
FstNiagara 9.13 +.10 Infinera 7.55 +.06
FstSolar 20.82 -.01 Informat 51.38 -.66
FstMerit 15.98 +.21 Infosys 47.49 -1.66
Fiserv 68.74 +.24 Insulet 16.93 -.42
Flextn 6.88 +.03 IntegLfSci 31.61 -.15
FocusMda 24.14 -.51 IntgDv 6.78 -.01
Fonar 4.12 +.34 Intel 28.41 +.32
ForcePro 5.55 ... InteractBrk 16.65 +.04
Forfnets 27.05 -.45 InterDig 31.85 -1.07
Fossil Inc 127.45 -3.00 InterMune 11.75 +.35
FosterWhl 21.76 -.16 InfSpdw 26.76 +.04
Francescn 28.39 -.66 Intersil 10.63 +.03
Fredslnc 14.60 +.25 Intuit 60.31 -.03
FreshMkt 51.51 -.30 IntSurg 541.09 -5.47
FriendFdn 1.14 -.07 InvRIEst 7.27
FronterCm 4.17 +.05 Isis 7.33 -.20
FuelSysSol 22.16 -1.00 IstaPh 9.04 +.01
FuelCell 1.25 -.05 Itron 43.76 +.15
FultonFncl 10.28 +.09 IvanhoeEn .89 -.08
FushiCo 700 +35
j2Global 25.89 -.06
GSVCap 18.96 -1.00 JA Solar 1.39 +.04
GTAdvTc 7.33 +.04 JDASoft 28.02 +.41
G-lll 27.98 +.41 JDSUniph 12.93 -.08
GTx Inc 3.30 +.05 Jamba 1.85 -.06
GalenaBio 1.76 +.03 JamesRiv 4.98
Garmin 44.59 -.32 JazzPhrm 44.75 -.93
Gentex 24.93 +.31 JetBlue 4.84 +.06
Genivah 8.48 +.20 JiveSoftn 25.75 +.12
GeronCp 1.56 +.01 JoesJeans 1.42 +.05
Gevo 9.10 -.04 JosABank 49.76 -.54
GileadSd 45.86 +.35 KITDigif 7.14 +.06
GladerBc 14.32 +.32 KLATnc 52.68 -.04
GlbSpcMet 14.13 +.18 KeryxBio 1.43 -.02
GluMobile 4.36 -.16 KiORn 11.56 -.38
GolLNGLd 35.99 -.61 Kulicke 12.42 +.14
Google 606.07 -18.53 L&L Engy 2.25 -.07
GrLkDrge 7.06 +.18 LJInt 1.90 -.13
GrWfRes 7.33 -.10 LKQCorp 30.05 +.08
GreenMtC 43.72 +.13 LPLInv 36.73 +.17
GrifolsSAn 7.88 +.06 LSI Indlf 7.08 +.23
Grouponn 12.67 -.45 LamResrch 42.15 -.03
Grpoin 5.82 -.14 LamarAdv 29.93 -.37
GuanwRh 1.50 -.02 Lattce 6.21 -.06
GulfportE 25.62 -1.12 LeapWirlss 8.22 -.30
HMNFn 2.66 -.09 LedPhrm 1.57 -.04
HMSHd s 27.60 -.76 LibGlobA 48.91 +.19
HSNInc 37.22 +.04 LibGlobC 46.95 +.18
Halozyme 8.56 -2.72 LibCapA 84.36 -.71
HancHId 34.45 +.44 LibtylntA 18.39 -.38
HansenMed 2.90 LifeTech 45.39 -.29
HanwhaSol 1.21 -.01 LimelghtN 3.04 +.01
Harmonic 4.81 ... Lincare 24.79 +.14
Hasbro 35.76 -.42 LinearTch 32.51 +.46
HaupDig 1.36 +.37 LinnEngy 37.97 +.03
HawHold 5.16 +.03 Liquidity 51.58 +.28
HlthCSvc 21.22 -.03 LodgeNet 3.65 +.03
HrfindEx 13.99 +.18 Logitech 8.03 +.04
HSchein 73.76 +.09 LookSmart .96 +.02
HercOffsh 4.25 -.29 Lulkin 74.67 -3.38
HercTGC 11.06 +.05 lululemnos 73.40 -.11
HiTchPhm 32.82 -.55
Hibbett 55.87 +1.08
Hollysys 10.70 -.38 MAPPhm 13.30 +.37
Hologic 20.60 -.27 MBFncl 20.65 +.45
Home Inns 26.45 -.62 MCGCap 4.13 +.04
HorsehdH 11.03 +.06 MGE 44.27 +.49
HotTopic 9.77 -.01 MIPSTech 6.28 -.03
HudsCity 6.67 +.03 MKSInst 27.55 +.12
HudsonHi 5.48 +.47 MTS 48.04 -.10
HumGen 7.14 -.04 MSG 34.47 -.54
HuntJB 56.91 +.91 MagicJcks 24.05 +1.13
HuntBnk 6.33 +.11 Majeso 2.43 -.07
IAC Inter 49.16 -.24 MAKOSrg 41.55 -.96
ICGGrp 8.62 +.20 Manitex 9.21 +.40


MannKd 2.11 -.05 Paccar 43.06 +.31
MktAxess 36.77 +1.06 Pacerlnf 6.94 +.07
MarvellT 15.25 +.13 PacBbsd 2.82 -.11
Masimo 21.15 -.34 PacEthrs .84 -.15
Mattel 31.01 -3.12 PacSunwr 1.49 -.01
Maximlntg 27.39 +.13 PanASIv 19.65 -.38
MaxllT 16.34 -.02 ParamTch 20.54 -.31
Maxygen 5.53 +.02 Parexel 26.01 +.25
MedAsstsh 12.40 -.49 ParkerVsn 1.14 -.01
MedicAcIn 4.90 -.07 Patterson 32.61 -.28
MediCo 20.05 +.27 PattUTI 15.66 -.54
Medivafon 73.37 -.23 Paychex 30.94 +.11
MeloCrwn 14.19 -.10 Pendrell 1.26 -.91
MentorGr 14.09 -.04 PnnNGm 41.88 +.31
MercadoL 91.97 -4.63 PennantPk 10.18 -.09
MergeHIth 4.61 +.16 PeopUdF 12.73 +.24
MeridBio 18.15 -.21 PeregrinPh .44 +.01
MeritMeds 11.95 +.35 PerfectWd 13.31 -.70
Merrimkn 7.69 +.75 Perrigo 104.53 +.39
Methanx 32.21 +.47 PetSmart 56.32 -.17
Micrel 9.49 ... PetoDev 31.69 -.51
Microchp 35.70 -.11 Pharmacyc 25.33 -.73
MicronT 7.12 +.16 Photrn 6.13 +.03
MicroSemi 20.26 -.06 Polymms 13.28 -.34
Microsoft 31.08 +.26 PoolCorp 38.65 +.47
MillerHer 20.92 +.28 Popular 1.86 +.06
Misonix 1.92 +.01 Power-One 4.56 +.11
MitekSys 5.78 -.23 PwShsQQQ 65.45 -.74
Molex 26.95 +.07 Powwvrs 1.22 -.10
Momenta 14.45 +.09 Pozen 7.61 +.45
MonstBvs 63.38 -.88 Presstekh .65 +.01
Motricity 1.10 -.03 PriceTR 62.18 +.13
Mylan 22.10 +.03 PrSmrt 75.38 -1.30
MyriadG 23.87 +.18 priceline 702.00 -33.18
NETgear 34.81 -1.03 PrimoWr 1.64 -.13
NIlHIdg 19.00 +.01 PrivateB 14.57 +.20
NPS Phm 6.50 ... PrUPShQQQ11.74 +.35
NXPSemi 24.74 +.59 PrUltPQQQ108.57 -3.53
NasdOMX 24.43 -.14 PrognicsPh 9.55 -.09
NatAmUnv 5.86 -.04 ProspctCap 10.79 +.11
NatPenn 9.14 +.17 PureCycle 2.50 -.01
NektarTh 7.21 -.03 QIAGEN 15.05 +.05
NetApp 39.79 -.34 QlikTech 29.99 -.54
NetEase 55.95 -1.03 Qlogic 16.29 -.21
Netiix 101.15 -3.02 Qualom 66.25 -.42
NetSolTh .45 +.03 QualitySs 39.93 -.07
NetwkEng .98 -.10 QuantFuel .58 -.02
Neurcrine 7.26 -.12 QuestSft 23.41 -.02
NeurogXh .52 +.00 Questcor 40.80 -.53
NewsCpA 19.12 -.03 QuinSteet 11.65 +.06
NewsCpB 19.44 -.08 RFMicD 4.38 -.09
NobltyH If 7.20 +.02 RFMonol 1.75 +.04
NorTrst 46.16 +.46 Rambus 5.66 +.01
Novavax 1.22 +.03 Randgold 86.79 -2.25
Novlus 47.13 -.04 RaptorPhm 5.95 -.25
NuVasive 15.56 -.05 RealPage 18.15 -.45
NuanceCm 23.65 -.34 Regenrn 122.54 -.06
NutiSyst 11.20 -.07 RentACt 37.24 +.27
Nvidia 13.99 -.17 Replgn 6.35 +.13
NxStageMd 17.96 -.06 RschMotn 13.42 +.53
OCZTech 6.42 -.12 ResConn 12.91 +.03
OReillyAu 94.76 +.41 RespGenet 1.80 +.08
Oclaro 3.48 -.05 RexEnergy 9.25 -.12
OdysMar 2.88 -.05 RiverbedT 26.51 +.99
OldDomFrt 48.12 +.81 RsttaGrsh .17 +.01
OmniVisn 19.18 -.37 RosettaR 46.51 -1.03
OnAssign 17.42 -.31 RossStrss 59.22 +.16
OnSmcnd 8.29 -.19 RoviCorp 28.81 -.37
Onothyr 4.06 -.15 RoyGId 60.42 -3.51
OnyxPh 40.92 +.08 RoyaleEn 4.69 -.34
OpenTxt 60.49 -.27 RubionTc 9.52 -.46
OpenTable 39.83 -2.08
OpnwvSy 2.76 +.17
Opnext 1.41 -.01 SBACom 52.26 +.12
OpbmerPh 13.22 +.09 SE Ilnv 20.04 +.16
OptBk rsh 2.60 +.60 SLMCp 14.84 -.01
Oracle 28.64 +.14 jSMFEn .29 -.55
Orexigen 4.01 +.11 STEC 8.78 +.04
OriginAg 1.73 -.17 SVBFnGp 61.86 +.49
Orthfx 37.12 +.38 SXCHIth 78.45 -.08
OtterTail 21.44 +.26 SabaSoftw 9.82 -.20
Overst 5.04 +.03 SalixPhm 48.46 -.05
SanDisk 40.95 -.17
Sanmina 10.76 +.16
PDLBio 6.17 +.08 Santarus 5.71 +.15
PFChng 39.53 +.09 Sapient 12.33 +.19
PMC Sra 6.88 -.03 Satconh .54 +.05
PSSWrld 23.72 -.13 SavientPh 1.98 -.01


Schnitzer 40.45 +.24 TiVoInc 10.92 -.38
SciClone 6.49 ... TowerSmh .88 +.04
SciGames 11.38 +.09 Towersht 4.52 +.14
SeaChange 8.19 TractSupp 98.01 -.37
SeagateT 28.51 +1.13 TransceptP 11.04 -.39
SearsHIdgs 57.90 +.23 Tra p -
SeattGen 18.28 -.22 Travezoo 26.81 .54
SelCmfrt 34.25 +.20 TrimbleN 53.17 +.42
Selectvlns 17.47 +.23 TripAdvn 33.83 -.67
Semtech 26.60 +.21 TriQuint 5.67 -.15
Sequenom 4.30 +.31 TrstNY 5.63 +.05
SvcSource 15.69 -.05 Trustmk 24.07 +.45
SvArtsrsh .14 +.03 USATechh 1.62 +.25
ShandaGs 5.28 -.19 UiWrldwd 17.13 +.32
Shenglnnrs 1.09 -.04
Shire 93.83 +1.01 Ubiquil n 32.97 -1.38
ShuffMstr 16.84 -.16 UltaSalon 93.15 -1.78
Shutterfy 29.16 -.32 Umpqua 12.89 +.15
SigaTechh 2.88 +.04 UtdOnln 4.56 -.09
SigmaDsg 5.01 +.14 USEnr 2.67
SigmaAld 70.89 -.07 UtdTherap 41.34 -.29
SignatBk 64.32 +.49 UnivDisp 35.59 -.52
SilicGrln 9.04 -.02 UnivFor 32.30 +.18
Silinlmg 5.80 +.03 UranmRsh .85 -.02
SilmLab 41.60 +.11
SiliMonLab 41.60 +.11 35 UrbanOut 28.48 -.19
SilinMotn 18.94 -.35
Slcnware 5.82 -.07
SilvStdg 13.76 -.40
Sina 61.56 -2.44 VCA Ant 22.46 -.20
SinoClnEn 1.63 -.02 VOXXlIn 13.16 -.05
SiriusXM 2.17 -.06 ValVisA 1.72 -.09
Skullcdyn 17.29 -.04 ValueClick 20.20 -.15
Sky-mobi 3.09 -.24 VandaPhm 4.41 -.08
SkyWest 10.19 -.08 VanSTCpB 79.25 +.06
SkywksSol 26.05 -.24 Veemlnst 27.50 .80
SmtHeatrs 7.08 +.17
SmithWes 7.88 +.03 V 1 -09
SmithMicro 2.05 +.27 VBradley 28.29 -1.05
SodaStrm 34.41 -1.21 Verisign 40.58 -.09
Sohu.cm 50.64 -1.91 Verisk 47.04 -.19
SolarCap 20.48 -.42 Vermillion 2.01 +.11
Solazymen 12.28 -.56 VertxPh 35.49 -.68
Somaxon h .41 -.05 ViacomB 46.40 -.38
SonicCorp 7.00 -.06 ical 3.09 -.04
Sonus 2.80 +.01
SouMoBc 25.50 +.35 VrgnMdah 24.30 +.10
Sourcefire 48.66 -.13 ViroPhrm 20.93 -1.08
SpectPh 9.83 +.32 VistaPrt 37.60 +.28
SpiritAirn 22.05 +.52 Vivus 21.85 -.29
Spreadtrm 14.93 -2.03 Vocus 12.54 -.18
Staples 15.67 +.14 Vodafone 27.24 +.29
StarSdent 2.76 -.07 Volcano 26.18 +.04
Starbucks 59.65 -2.02 WarnerCh 15.46 +.12
SfDynam 13.70 -.01 WashFed 17.05 +.48
StemCellrs .94
Stericyde 86.12 +.02 WaveSys 1.45 -.06
Stratasys 41.21 +5.23 WebMD 22.65 -.34
Stayer 86.40 -1.98 Websense 20.23
SunesisPh 3.05 ... WendysCo 4.89 -.07
SunPower 5.85 +.12 WernerEnt 24.00 +.21
SusqBnc 9.42 +.13 Wesbmrd 9.36 +.25
SwisherHy 1.99 +.12 Wsptlnng 33.47 -4.16
Symantec 18.18 +.10 WetSeal 3.34 +.14
Symeticm 5.66 +.25 holeFd 84.96 .35
Synapflcs 32.26 -.73
Synchron 31.75 +.47 WishBcp 4.79 +.11
Synopsys 29.90 +.05 Windstm 11.23 +.03
Syntolmh .87 -.01 Wowjointh .65 -.09
TDAmerit 18.78 -.08 Wynn 123.37 -2.11
THQh .47 +.00 XOMA 2.57 -.13
TakeTwo 14.15 -.52 X-Rite 5.52 -.01
Tangoen 19.05 -.07 ilinx 35.27 +.07
Targacept 4.46 +.06 YRCrs 7.18 +.85
TASER 4.09
TeaLab 4.46 +.9 Yahoo 14.79 -.09
TechData 53.00 -.30 Yandexn 26.46 -.10
Tellabs 3.85 -.01 Zagg 11.06 -.35
TescoCp 14.49 -.16 Zalicus 1.06 +.03
TeslaMot 32.25 -1.34 hongpin 9.38 -.32
TesseraTch 16.40 -.24 zllown 34.82 -2.22
TevaPhrm 45.05 +.86 ZonBcp 20.80 +.26
Texlnst 32.20 +.01 Zopharm 4.97 +.05
TexRdhse 16.64 +.05 1.3 .
Theravnce 20.28 -.29 pcar 13.32 +.14
Thoratec 32.31 -.11 ZollMed 92.88 +.02
ThrshdPhm 6.18 -.06 ZoomTech 1.40
TibcoSft 32.68 -.63 Zumiez 34.41 +.40
TitanMach 34.75 -1.25 Zyngan 10.95 -.91


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Yesterday Pvs Day
Argent 4.3950 4.3950
Australia .9651 .9631
Bahrain .3770 .3770
Brazil 1.8397 1.8378
Britain 1.5905 1.5854
Canada .9996 .9983
Chile 488.75 484.75
China 6.3163 6.3057
Colombia 1777.50 1777.50
Czech Rep 18.86 18.92
Denmark 5.6638 5.6871
Dominican Rep 38.97 39.05
Egypt 6.0461 6.0385
Euro .7614 .7645
Hong Kong 7.7581 7.7595
Hungary 226.76 227.48
India 51.678 51.303
Indnsia 9175.00 9140.00
Israel 3.7500 3.7482
Japan 80.49 81.10
Jordan .7095 .7091
Lebanon 1504.00 1505.50
Malaysia 3.0652 3.0531
Mexico 13.2070 13.1621
N. Zealand 1.2186 1.2119
Norway 5.7518 5.7884
Peru 2.658 2.660
Poland 3.19 3.20
Russia 29.6105 29.6025
Singapore 1.2482 1.2469
So. Africa 7.9374 7.9402
So. Korea 1138.75 1134.30
Sweden 6.7651 6.7861
Switzerlnd .9150 .9197
Taiwan 29.53 29.53
Thailand 30.78 30.77
Turkey 1.7948 1.7966
U.A.E. 3.6732 3.6731
Uruguay 19.4499 19.4499
Venzuel 4.2927 4.2927


British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.



Yesterday Pvs Day

Prime Rate 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate 0.75 0.75
Federal Funds Rate .00-.25 .00-.25
Treasuries
3-month 0.08 0.085
6-month 0.135 0.15
5-year 0.85 0.91
10-year 1.97 2.05
30-year 3.13 3.20



FUTURES
Exch Contract Settle Chg
Lt Sweet Crude NYMX May12 102.93 +.10
Corn CBOT May12 6231/4 -6
Wheat CBOT May12 6161/4 -714
Soybeans CBOT May12 1420 -163/4
Cattle CME Jun12 116.15 +.08
Sugar (world) ICE Jul 12 22.31 -.50
OrangeJuice ICE May12 146.25 -.15


SPOT
Yesterday Pvs Day
Gold (trov oz.. spot) $1648.70 $1642.50
Silver(troyoz., spot) $31.364 $31.b13
Copper (pound) $3.6240 $3./160
Platinum (troy oz., spot)$1b/1./0 $1613.60

NMER= New York Mercantile Exchange. CBOT=
Chicago Board of Trade. CMER = Chicago Mercantile Ex-
change. NCSE = New York Cotton, Sugar & Cocoa Ex-
change. NCTN = New York Cotton Exchange.


I AMEX


I NASDA


YTD YTD
Name Div YId PE Last Chg %Chg Name Div YId PE Last Chg %Chg
AK Steel .20 2.7 ... 7.39 ...-10.5 Microsoft .80 2.6 11 31.08 +.26+19.7
AT&Tlnc 1.76 5.7 46 30.61 +.07 +1.2 MotrlaSolu .88 1.8 14 48.19 -.21 +4.1
Ametek .24 .5 20 47.64 -.01 +13.2 MotrlaMob ... ... ... 39.14 ... +.9
ABlnBev 1.57 2.2 ... 72.08 +1.22 +18.2 NextEraEn 2.40 3.8 14 62.72 +.64 +3.0
BkofAm .04 .5 ... 8.79 +.11 +58.1 Penney .80 2.4 21 33.88 -.18 -3.6
CapCtyBk ... ...26 7.59 +.26-20.5 PiedmOfc .80 4.7 13 17.07 +.15 +.2
CntryLink 2.90 7.6 23 38.11 +.02 +2.4 ProgrssEn 2.48 4.8 26 51.67 +.14 -7.8
Citigrprs .04 .1 9 34.00 +.59 +29.2 RegionsFn .04 .6 37 6.21 +.10 +44.4
CmwREIT 2.00 10.7 16 18.68 +.24 +12.3 SearsHldgs .33 ......57.90 +.23 +82.2
Disney .60 1.4 16 41.66 -.19 +11.1 Smucker 1.92 2.4 20 78.81 -.44 +.8
EnterPT 3.00 6.4 26 46.62 +.70 +6.7 SprintNex ... ... ... 2.51 -.17 +7.3
ExxonMbl 1.88 2.2 10 84.01 +1.06 -.9 Texlnst .68 2.1 17 32.20 +.01 +10.6
FordM .20 1.7 7 11.88 -.04+10.4 TimeWarn 1.04 2.9 13 35.71 +.02 -1.2
GenElec .68 3.6 15 18.90 +.02 +5.5 UniFirst .15 .2 15 60.21 +.12 +6.1
HomeDp 1.16 2.2 21 51.69 +.73 +23.0 VerizonCm 2.00 5.3 44 37.43 +.17 -6.7
Intel .84 3.0 12 28.41 +.32 +17.1 Vodafone 2.10 7.7 ... 27.24 +.29 -2.8
IBM 3.00 1.5 16202.72 -.08+10.2 WalMart 1.59 2.6 13 60.58 +.81 +1.4
Lowes .56 1.7 22 32.05 +.36+26.3 Walgrn .90 2.7 11 33.30 +.26 +.7
McDnlds 2.80 2.9 18 96.58 -.39 -3.7 YRC rs ......... 7.18 +.85-28.0


m


A8 TUESDAY, APRIL 17, 2012


STOCKS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BUSINESS


TUESDAY, APRIL 17, 2012 A9


I MB TA3lFUN Iy i


Name NAV Chg Name NAV Chg
Advance Capital I: TechGroA 34.94 -.49
Balancp 16.67 +.01 DreihsAclnc 10.50 -.02
Retlnc 8.81 ... Driehaus Funds:
Alger Funds B: EMktGr 28.69 +.08
SmCapGr 6.88 -.03 EVPTxMEmI46.34 -.10
AllianceBern A: Eaton Vance A:
BalanAp 16.53 -.01 ChinaAp 17.16 +.06
GIbThGrAp 64.94 -.52 AMTFMuInc 10.05
SmCpGrA 38.34 -.14 MulbCGrA 8.64 -.05
AllianceBern Adv: InBosA 5.78
LgCpGrAd 29.24 -.23 LgCpVal 18.34 +.06
AllianceBern B: NatlMunlnc 9.87
GIbThGrBt 55.87 -.45 SpEqtA 16.29 -.05
GrowthBt 27.31 -.22 TradGvA 7.43
SCpGrBt 30.66 -.11 EatonVance B:
AllianceBern C: HIthSBt 9.72 +.04
SCpGrCt 30.82 -.11 NatlMulnc 9.87
Allianz Fds Instl: Eaton Vance C:
NFJDvVI 12.05 +.03 GovtCp 7.42
SmCpVI 30.29 +.02 NatMunlnc 9.87
Allianz Funds C: Eaton Vance I:
AGICGrthC 26.21 -.21 FltgRt 9.01 +.01
TargetCt 15.57 -.11 GblMacAbR 9.96 -.01
Amer Beacon Insti: LgCapVal 18.39 +.06
LgCaplnst 20.60 +.06 FBR Funds:
Amer Beacon Inv: Focuslnvtn49.37 +.15
LgCaplnv 19.55 +.06 FMI Funds:
Ameri Century 1st: LgCappn 16.54 +.09
Growth 28.00 -.12 FPA Funds:
Amer Century Adv: Nwlnc 10.64
EqGroAp 23.53 ... FPACres 28.05 +.05
EqlncAp 7.56 +.04 Fairholme 29.89 +.11
Amer Century Inv: Federated A:
AIICapGr 30.83 -.33 MidGrStA 36.20 -.17
Balanced 16.99 -.01 MuSecA 10.48
DivBnd 11.08 ... TfRtBdp 11.42
Eqlnc 7.56 +.04 Federated Instl:
Growthl 27.76 -.12 KaufmnR 5.35 -.01
Heritagel 22.67 -.16 TotRetBd 11.42
IncGro 26.51 +.01 StrValDvlS 4.81 +.03
InfAdjBd 13.03 -.01 Fidelity Adv FocT:
IntDisc 9.64 +.06 EnergyT 34.75 -.34
InfiGrol 10.57 +.10 HItCarT 22.53 -.03
NewOpp 8.14 -.03 Fidelity Advisor A:
OneChAg 12.77 +.01 Nwlnsghp 22.13 -.17
OneChMd 12.29 +.01 StrnA 12.34
RealEstl 22.18 +.34 Fidelity Advisor C:
Ultra 25.78 -.26 Nwlnsghtn 20.94 -.16
Valuelnv 6.04 +.03 Fidelity Advisor l:
American Funds A: EqGrln 65.38 -.55
AmcpAp 20.68 -.04 Eqlnin 24.81 +.09
AMufAp 27.10 +.08 IntBdln 11.54
BalAp 19.36 +.04 Nwlnsgtln 22.41 -.18
BondAp 12.70 -.01 FidelityAdvisorT:
CaplBAp 50.71 +.15 BalancT 16.06 -.02
CapWGAp 34.57 +.14 DivGrTp 12.72 -.04
CapWAp 20.96 +.03 EqGrTp 61.15 -.50
EupacAp 38.50 +.19 EqlnT 24.43 +.09
FdlnvAp 38.34 +.02 GrOppT 41.00 -.41
GIblBalA 25.58 +.07 HilnAdTp 9.87
GovtAp 14.43 ... IntBdT 11.52
GwtAp 31.98 -.11 MulncTp 13.47
HITrAp 10.97 -.01 OvrseaT 16.94 +.12
IncoAp 17.25 +.07 STFiT 9.30
IntBdAp 13.69 ... SSelAIICp 19.48 -.03
IniGrlncAp 28.75 +.16 Fidelity Freedom:
ICAAp 29.18 +.04 FF2010n 13.84
LtTEBAp 16.22 +.01 FF2010K 12.79 -.01
NEcoAp 27.08 -.08 FF2015n 11.56 -.01
NPerAp 29.09 +.07 FF2015K 12.84 -.01
NwWrldA 50.91 -.04 FF2020n 13.97 -.01
STBFAp 10.09 ... FF2020K 13.24 -.01
SmCpAp 37.78 -.08 FF2025n 11.60 -.01
TxExAp 12.79 +01 FF2025K 13.35 -.02
WshAp 29.79 +.09 FF2030n 13.81 -.01
Ariel Investments: FF2030K 13.50 -.01
Apprec 42.82 -.22 FF2035n 11.42 -.01
Ariel 47.11 -.22 FF2035K 13.57 -.02
Artio Global Funds: FF2040n 7.97 -.01
GIHilnclr 9.63 ... FF2040K 13.62 -.01
InflEqlr 24.85 +.05 FF2045n 9.43 -.01
Artisan Funds: Incomen 11.56
Inf 22.50 +.19 FidelityInvest:
Infllnstf 22.63 +.20 AIISectEq 12.44 -.03
IniVal r 26.89 +.09 AMgr50n 15.88
MidCap 38.90 -.32 AMgr70rn 16.66 -.01
MidCapVal 20.92 -.04 AMgr20rn 13.09
SCapVal 15.95 +.01 Balancn 19.46 -.03
Baron Funds: BalancedK 19.46 -.03
Asset 50.80 -.31 BlueChGrn 48.95 -.46
Growth 54.38 -.01 CAMunn 12.64
SmallCap 25.41 -.07 Canadan 51.82 +.01
Bernstein Fds: CapApn 28.51 -.02
IntDur 13.93 +.01 CapDevOn11.34 -.07
DivMu 14.82 ... Cplncrn 9.14
TxMgdlnI 13.44 +.07 ChinaRgr 28.11 +.08
BlackRock A: CngS 465.09
EqtyDiv 19.24 +.08 CTMunrn 11.96
GIAIAr 19.21 ... Contran 75.91 -.60
HiYlnvA 7.69 ... ContaK 75.88 -.60
InflOpAp 30.18 +.15 CnvScn 24.80 -.08
BlackRock B&C: DisEqn 23.52 -.06
GIAICt 17.86 -.01 DiscEqF 23.50 -.06
BlackRock Instl: Divlntl n 27.88 +.12
EquityDv 19.29 +.08 DivrslntKr 27.85 +.12
GlbAllocr 19.31 DivStkOn 16.29 -.03
HiYldBd 7.69 DivGth n 28.92 -.08
Brinson FundsY: EmergAsrn28.12 +.02
HiYdlY 6.16 ... EmrMkn 22.67 -.08
BruceFund392.65 -.38 Eqlncn 44.14 +.17
Buffalo Funds: EQIIn 18.53 +.08
SmCapn 27.71 -.01 ECapAp 16.86 +.09
CGM Funds: Europe 27.78 +.16
Focusn 28.93 +.18 Exch 323.88
Mutin 27.83 +.07 Exportn 22.80 -.05
Realtyn 29.45 +.36 Fideln 34.64 -.09
Calamos Funds: Fifyrn 19.40 -.07
GrwthAp 52.80 -.56 FtRateHirn 9.81
Calvert Invest: FrlnOnen 27.97 +.04
Incop 15.96 +.02 GNMAn 11.89 +01
InfiEqAp 13.24 +.07 Govtnc 10.77
SocialAp 30.05 -.06 GroCo n 94.95 -.94
SocBdp 15.97 +.01 Grolncn 20.01 +01
SocEqAp 37.29 -.22 GrowCoF 94.89 -.94
GrowthCoK 94.89 -.95
TxF Lgp 16.14 ...
TCohFs& 1St6. GrSbratrn 20.13 -.15
Cohen& Steers:
RltyShrs 66.20 +1.02 Highlncrn 8.95
Columbia Class A: ndepnn 24.89 -.11
InProBdn 13.04
Acorn t 29.70 -.02 nroBd n 109
DivEqlnc 10.22 +.02 IntGvn 1098 +01
DivrBd 5.11 +01 lnfn 10 +01
DivOpptyA 8.42 02 n
In iscn 30.21 +.14
LgCapGrAt 25.74 -.20 Infscn 30.21 +.14
LgCorQAp 6.29 -.02 InrSCprn 19.76 +.01
MdCpGrOp 10.29 -.06 InvGBdn 117
InvGBn 7.79
MidCVlOpp 7.95 +.01 Jaan 987
PBModAp 10.98 Japanr 9.807
TxEAp 13.95n 8.80 .01
SelCommA4799 .21 LgCapVal 10.93 +03
SelCommA47.99 -.21 9
FrontierA 10.74 -.10 LatAm 53.39
LevCoStK n 28.43 -.08
GlobTech 22.71 -.12 LowPn 39.68 +04
LowPrn 39.68 +.04
Columbia Cl,T&G: LowPriKr 39.66 +.03
EmMktOp In 8.34 Magelln n 70.99 -.26
Columbia ClassZ: MagellanK 70.94 -26
AcornZ 30.76 -.02 MageanK 26
AcornZ 30.76 -.02 MDMurn 11.50 +.01
AcornlntZ 38.60 +.03 MAMunn 12.52
DivlncoZ 14.38 +.05 MegaCpStknl1.25
IntBdZ 9.36 MIMunn 12.38
IntTEBd 10.88 +.01 MdCapn 2938 .07
MidCapn 29.38 -.07
LgCapGr 14.09 -.17 MNMunn 11.93 +.01
MdCpldxZ 11.75 +.01 MtgSecn 1127
ValRestr 48.16 -.18 Munilncn 1328 +.01
Credit Suisse Comm: NJMunrn 12.16 +01
ComRett 8.02 -.08 NwMktrn 16.51 +.02
DFA Funds: NwMilln 31.76 +.01
InflCorEqn 9.99 +.04 NYMunn 13.46 +.01
USCorEql n11.75 ... OTCn 61.27 -.82
USCorEq2nll.53 ... OhMunn 12.16 +.01
DWS Invest A: 100ndex 9.67 -.01
CommAp 17.69 +.01 Ovrsean 29.66 +.23
DWS InvestS: PcBasn 24.17 +.01
CoreEqtyS 17.59 -.07 PAMunrn 11.28 +.01
CorPlslnc 10.92 ... Puritnn 19.11 -.04
EmMkGrr 16.29 ... PuritanK 19.11 -.03
EnhEmMk 10.41 -.01 RealEn 30.50 +.47
EnhGlbBdr 10.07 +.02 SAIISecEqF12.45 -.03
GIbSmCGr 37.89 -.05 SCmdtyStrtn8.79 -.08
GlblThem 21.93 SCmdtyStrFn8.81 -.07
Gold&Prc 14.22 -.17 SrEmrgMkt 16.30 -.04
HiYldTx 12.64 -.01 SrslntGrw 11.24 +.07
IntTxAMT 11.96 ... SerlnfGrF 11.26 +.07
InflFdS 40.10 +.23 SrslntVal 8.44 +.07
LgCpFoGr 32.78 -.26 SerlniValF 8.45 +.06
LatAmrEq 41.15 -.08 SrlnvGrdF 11.78 -.01
MgdMuniS 9.32 -.01 StlntMun 10.85
MATFS 14.93 ... STBFn 8.54
SP500S 18.22 -.01 SmCapDiscn21.92 +.06
WorldDiv 22.78 +.14 SmllCpSrn 18.08
Davis Funds A: SCpValur 15.11 +.06
NYVenA 35.29 +.04 StkSelLCVrn11.06 +.03
Davis Funds B: StkSlcACap n26.99 -.04
NYVenB 33.69 +.03 StkSelSmCp19.53 +.02
Davis Funds C: Stratlncn 11.05 +.01
NYVenC 34.00 +.04 StrReRtr 9.38
Davis FundsY: TotalBdn 11.04
NYVenY 35.68 +.04 Trendn 75.70 -.41
Delaware Invest A: USBI n 11.83
Diverlncp 9.25 ... Utilityn 17.17 +.05
SMIDCapG 25.17 -.09 ValStratn 28.17 +.03
TxUSAp 11.91 ... Valuen 70.39 +.18
Delaware Invest B: Wrldwn 19.13
SelGrBt 34.99 -.34 Fidelity Selects:
Dimensional Fds: Aim 38.59 +.19
EmMCrEqnl9.45 -.02 Bankingn 18.43 +.18
EmMktV 29.35 -.03 Biotchn 91.42 -.38
IntSmVan 15.13 +.01 Brokrn 45.85 +.12
LargeCo 10.81 ... Chemn 110.27 +.43
TAUSCorE2n9.39 +.01 ComEquipn23.70 -.13
USLgVan 20.75 ... Compn 65.23 -.54
USMicron 14.34 +.07 ConDisn 26.91 -.11
USTgdVal 16.55 +.03 ConsuFnn 13.04 +.02
US Small n 22.30 +.06 ConStapn 75.96 +.49
USSmVa 25.29 +.09 CstHon 42.03 +.35
IntlSmCon 15.29 +.02 DfAern 83.74 +.27


EmgMktn 26.43 -.03 Electbn 51.62 -.01
Fixdn 10.34 ... Enrgyn 49.59 -.48
IntGFxlnn 12.96 +.01 EngSvn 65.13 -.97
IntVan 15.48 +.08 EnvAltEnrnl5.93 +.03
Glb5Fxlncnll.11 ... FinSvn 57.76 +.36
TM USTgtV 21.84 +.05 Goldrn 38.45 -.69
2YGIFxdn 10.12 ... Healthn 128.64 -.17
DFARIEn 25.34 +.40 Insurn 48.02 +.32
Dodge&Cox: Leisrn 112.28 -1.42
Balanced 72.36 +.17 Materialn 67.48 +.14
Income 13.62 +.01 MedDIn 62.20 -.46
InflStk 31.29 +.16 MdEqSysn 27.15 -.25
Stock 110.57 +.33 Mulutdn 48.31 -.15
DoubleUne Funds: NtGasn 30.07 -.31
TRBdIn 11.24 +.01 Pharm n 14.04 +.07
TRBdNpn 11.24 +.01 Retailn 61.11 -.10
Dreyfus: Softwrn 85.37 -.57
Aprec 43.35 +.04 Techn 102.27 -1.15
CTA 12.19 +.01 Telcmn 45.47 -.11
CorVA 22.47 Transn 52.30 +.30
Dreyf 9.42 -.04 UtilGrn 53.04 +.35
DryMid r 28.52 +.03 Wireless n 7.63 -.02
Dr5001nt 37.60 -.03 Fidelity Spartan:
GNMA 16.09 ... 5001dxlnvn 48.57 -.03
GrChinaA r 33.02 +.05 5001dx I 48.57 -.03
HiYldAp 6.38 Inlflnxlnvn 31.78 +.21
StratValA 28.61 -.02 TotMktlnvn 39.53 -.02


Here are the 1,000 biggest mutual funds listed on Nasdaq. Tables show the fund name, sell
price or Net Asset Value (NAV) and daily net change.
Name: Name of mutual fund and family
NAV: Net asset value.
Chg: Net change in price of NAV
Data based on NAVs reported to Lipper by 6 p.m. Eastern.


Name NAV Chg
USBondl 11.82 -.01
Fidelity Spart Adv:
ExMktAd r n38.86
5001dxAdv n48.57 -.03
IntAdrn 31.79 +.21
TotMktAd r n39.53 -.02
USBondl 11.82 -.01
First Eagle:
GIbIA 47.74 -.01
OverseasA 21.43 -.06
First Investors A
BIChpAp
GloblAp 6.60 +.01
GovtAp 11.59 +.01
GrolnAp 16.03 +.02
IncoAp 2.53
MATFAp 12.31 +.01
MITFAp 12.62
NJTFAp 13.54
NYTFA p 15.04
OppAp 29.05 +.04
PATFAp 13.52
SpSitAp 24.68 -.01
TxExAp 10.12 +.01
TotRtAp 16.37 +.02
ValueBp 7.41 +.03
Forum Funds:
AbsStrlr 11.12
Frank/Temp Frnk A:
AdjUS p 8.89 +.01
ALTFAp 11.70 +.01
AZTFAp 11.27
CallnsAp 12.60 +.01
CAIntAp 11.97
CalTFAp 7.33
COTFAp 12.22 +.01
CTTFAp 11.31
CvtScAp 14.71-.02
DblTFA 12.22 +.01
DynTchA 33.40 -.37
EqlncApx 17.64 +.04
Fedlntp 12.35 +.01
FedTFAp 12.42 +.01
FLTFAp 11.87 +.01
FoundAlp 10.44 +.03
GATFAp 12.46 +.01
GoldPrMA 33.03 -.74
GrwthAp 49.23 -.14
HYTFAp 10.60 +.01
HilncA 1.99
IncomAp 2.13
InsTFAp 12.34
NYITFp 11.74 +.01
LATFAp 11.82 +.01
LMGvScA 10.38
MDTFAp 11.86 +.01
MATFAp 11.95
MITFAp 12.19
MNInsA 12.73 +.01
MOTFAp 12.55 +.01
NJTFAp 12.51
NYTFAp 11.97 +.01
NCTFAp 12.74
OhiolAp 12.88 +.01
ORTFAp 12.38 +.01
PATFAp 10.74
ReEScAp 16.16 +.24
RisDvAp 36.57 +.18
SMCpGrA 37.87 -.16
Sbratlncp 10.43 -.01
TtlRtnAp 10.24 -.01
USGovAp 6.91 +.01
UllsAp 13.17 +.11
VATFAp 12.06 +.01
Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv:
GlbBdAdvxnl2.93 -.10
IncmeAd 2.12 +.01
Frank/Temp Frnk C:
IncomC t 2.15
USGvCt 6.86
Frank/Temp Mtl A&B:
SharesA 21.09 +.03
Frank/Temp Temp A:
DvMktA p 23.05 -.23
ForgnAp 6.28
GIBdApx 12.97 -.09
GrwthAp 17.35 +.01
WorldAp 14.75
Frank/Temp Tmp Adv:
GrthAv 17.35 +.01
Frank/Temp Tmp B&C:
DevMktC 22.47 -.23
ForgnCp 6.14 -.01
GIBdCpx 13.00 -.09
Franklin Mutual Ser:
QuestA 16.99 +.03
GE Elfun S&S:
S&Slnc 11.83 +.01
USEqty 43.17 -.13
GMOTrust III:
Quality 23.53 +.01
GMOTrust IV:
InfGrEq 22.66 +.23
InilntrVI 19.42 +.14
GMOTrustVI:
EmgMktsr 11.38 -.05
Quality 23.54 +.01
SbrFxlnc 16.55
Gabelli Funds:
Asset 50.89 +.11
Goldman Sachs A:
MdCVAp 36.32 +.02
Goldman Sachs Inst:
GrOppt 25.07 -.10
HiYield 7.09 -.01
HYMuni n 8.96 +.01
MidCapV 36.60 +.02
Harbor Funds:
Bond 12.55
CapAplnst 43.14 -.37
Inllnvt 57.70 +.52
Inl r 58.27 +.53
Hartford Fds A:
CpAppAp 32.48 -.02
DivGthAp 20.08 +.08
IntOpAp 14.11 +.13
Hartford Fds Y:
CapAppl n 32.50 -.02
Hartford HLS IA:
CapApp 41.68 -.06
Div&Gr 20.70 +.09
Advisers 20.71 +.02
TotRetBd 11.89 +.01
Hennessy Funds:
CorGrllOrig
Hussman Funds:
SbrTotRetr 12.30 -.01
StrGrowth 11.69 +.01
ICON Fds:
EnergyS 18.00 -.11
HIthcareS 15.70 -.01
ISI Funds:
NoAmp 7.94
IVA Funds:
WldwideAt 15.91 -.01
WldwideIr 15.92 -.01
Invesco Fds Invest:
DivrsDivp 12.72 +.06
Invesco Funds:
Energy 37.25 -.42
Utliies 16.48 +.14
Invesco Funds A:
Chart p 17.26 +.02
CmstkA 16.52 +.05
Constp 24.14 -.21
EqlncA 8.80 +.01
GrlncAp 19.90 +.05
HilncMup 7.99
HiYldp 4.19 -.01
HYMuA 9.73
InfiGrow 27.21 +.19
MunilnA 13.63 +.01
PATFA 16.64 +.01
USMortgA 13.04 +.01
Invesco Funds B:
CapDevt 14.38 -.07
MunilnB 13.61 +.01
US Mortg 12.97
Ivy Funds:
AssetSC t 24.47 +.01
AssetStAp 25.24 +.02
AssetSbtlr 25.47 +.02
JPMorgan A Class:
CoreBdA 11.95 +.02
JPMorgan C Class:
CoreBdp 12.00 +.01
JP Morgan Instl:
MdCpVal n 25.93 +.07
JPMorgan RCI:
CoreBondnll.94 +.01
ShtDurBd 11.00 +.01
JPMorgan Select:
USEquityn 10.96 -.02
JPMorgan Sel CIs:
CoreBdn 11.93 +.01
HighYldn 7.87
IntmTFBd n 11.30
LgCpGr 24.66 -.24
ShtDurBd n 10.99
USLCCrPIsn21.82 -.05
JanusT Shrs:
BalancdT 26.30 -.08
ContrarnT 13.84 -.04
EnterprT 64.20 -.14
FIxBndT 10.73 +.01
GllfeSciTr 27.62 -.03
GIbSelT 10.75 -.13
GITechTr 18.33 -.16
Grw&lncT 33.26 -.17
JanusT 30.99 -.18
OvrseasTr 35.76 -.24
PrkMCValT21.50 +.04
ResearchT 31.49 -.13
ShTmBdT 3.09
TwentyT 60.01 -.48
VentureT 57.87 -.02


WrldWTr 44.17 -.01
Jensen Funds:
QualGrthJn28.63 +.10
John Hancock A:
BondAp 15.81
RgBkA 14.01 +.16
SblnAp 6.56
John Hancock B:
StlncB 6.56 -.01
John Hancock CI 1:
LSAggr 12.36 -.02
LSBalanc 13.06 -.01
LSConsrv 13.07


Name NAV Chg
LSGrwth 12.97 -.02
LSModer 12.90 -.01
Lazard Instl:
EmgMktl 19.17 -.11
Lazard Open:
EmgMkOp 19.61 -.11
Legg Mason A:
CBAgGrp 121.46 -.31
CBApprp 14.93 +.01
CBLCGrp 22.73 -.08
GCIAIICOp 8.14 +.03
WAHilncAt 5.95
WAMgMup 16.78
Legg Mason B:
CBLgCGrt 20.72 -.07
Legg Mason C:
CMSplnvp 29.42 +.02
CMValTrp 40.98 -.08
Longleaf Partners:
Partners 28.82 -.06
SmCap 26.76 -.12
Loomis Sayles:
LSBondl 14.63 +.01
StrlncC 15.13 +.02
LSBondR 14.57 +.01
StlncA 15.05 +.02
Loomis Sayles Inv:
InvGrBdAp 12.38 +.02
InvGrBdY 12.38 +.01
Lord Abbett A:
AffilAp 11.42 +.01
FundlEq 13.08 +.03
BdDebAp 7.88
ShDurlncAp 4.59
MidCpAp 17.03 +.03
Lord Abbett C:
ShDurlncCt 4.62
Lord Abbett F:
ShtDurlnco 4.59
MFS Funds A:
MITA 20.79 +.01
MIGA 17.19 -.05
EmGA 46.98 -.38
HilnA 3.45
MFLA
TotRA 14.76 +.03
UtilA 17.30 +.01
ValueA 24.44 +.09
MFS Funds B:
MIGBn 15.44 -.05
GvScBn 10.53 +.01
HilnBn 3.46
MulnBn 8.75 +.01
TotRBn 14.77 +.04
MFS Funds I:
RelnT 14.74 +.09
Valuel 24.55 +.09
MFS Funds Instl:
InflEqn 17.55 +.13
MainStay Funds A:
HiYIdBA 5.92
MainStay Funds B:
ConvBt 14.84 -.03
GovtBt 8.93 +.01
HYIdBBt 5.90 +.01
IncmBldr 16.70 +.02
InfiEqB 10.38 +.07
MainStay Funds I:
ICAPSIEq 36.59 +.09
Mairs & Power:
Growthn 78.97 +.24
Manning&Napier Fds:
WIdOppA 7.35 +.03
Matthews Asian:
AsianGllnv 16.64 +.03
Indialnvr 16.51 +.03
PacTgrlnv 22.40 -.01
MergerFdn 15.72 -.02
Meridian Funds:
Growth 45.95 -.06
Metro West Fds:
TotRetBd 10.60 +.01
TotRtBdl 10.60 +.01
Midas Funds:
Midas Fdt 3.06 -.08
Monetta Funds:
Monettan 15.30 -.15
Morgan Stanley B:
GlobStratB 15.37 +.02
MorganStanley Inst:
InflEql 13.25 +.08
MCapGrl 37.40 -.35
Muhlenkn 55.48 +.09
Munder Funds A:
GwthOppA 28.75 -.22
Munder Funds Y:
MCpCGrYn31.55 -.06
Mutual Series:
BeacnZ 12.54
GblDiscA 28.38 +.03
GIbDiscZ 28.75 +.03
QuestZ 17.13 +.02
SharesZ 21.26 +.03
Neuberger&Berm Fds:
Focus 20.56 -.11
Geneslnst 48.27 -.02
Int r 16.35 +.05
LgCapV Inv 25.99 +.07
Neuberger&Berm Tr:
Genesis 50.07 -.02
Nicholas Group:
Hilnc In 9.70
Nichn 46.97 +.07
Northern Funds:
Bondldx 10.92
HiYFxlnc 7.26
SmCpldx 8.93
Stkldx 17.21
Technly 16.83
Nuveen Cl A:
LtMBAp 11.18
Nuveen Cl R:
IntDMBd 9.24
HYMunBd 16.02 -.01
Nuveen Cl Y:
RealEstn 20.73 +.31
Oak Assoc Fds:
WhitOkSG 42.30 -.16
Oakmark Funds I:
Eqtylnc r 28.48 -.04
Global 22.08 -.09
Infllr 18.18 -.05
Oakmark 46.41 -.01
Select 31.51 -.13
Old Westbury Fds:
GlobOpp 7.20
GIbSMdCap 14.86 +.01
LgCapStrat 9.62 -.02
RealRet 9.36 -.03
Oppenheimer A:
AMTFMu 6.83
AMTFrNY 11.91 +.01
CAMuniAp 8.41
CapApAp 47.55 -.32
CaplncAp 8.83 +.01
ChmplncAp 1.80
DvMktAp 33.00 -.07
Discp 61.12 -.20
EquityA 9.26 -.01
GlobAp 58.85 +.16
GIbOppA 30.23 -.02
GblStrlncA 4.19
Goldp 31.87 -.78
IntBdAp 6.32
LtdTmMu 14.88
MnStFdA 35.90 -.17
PAMuniAp 11.45
SenFltRtA 8.23 -.01
USGvp 9.68 +.01
Oppenheimer B:
AMTFMu 6.79
AMTFrNY 11.92 +.01
CplncBt 8.65
ChmplncBt 1.81
EquityB 8.53 -.01
GblSbrlncB 4.20
Oppenheimer Roch:
LtdNYAp 3.37
RoMuAp 16.64 +.01
RcNtMuA 7.24
Oppenheimer Y:
DevMktY 32.64 -.07
InfiBdY 6.32 +.01
IntGrowY 28.17 +.16
PIMCO Admin PIMS:
ShtTmAdp 9.81
TotRtAd 11.18 -.01
PIMCO Instl PIMS:
AIAsetAutr 10.61
AIIAsset 12.10
ComodRR 6.56 -.06
Divine 11.68
EmgMkCur 10.42
EmMkBd 11.66 -.01
Fltlncr 8.60 -.02
ForBdUnr 11.00 +.05
FrgnBd 10.80 -.01
HiYld 9.23
InvGrCp 10.68
LowDu 10.45
ModDur 10.80
RealRet 11.77 -.02
RealRtnl 12.12 -.01
ShortT 9.81
TotRt 11.18 -.01
TRII 10.78
TRIll 9.84
PIMCO Funds A:
AIIAstAutt 10.54
LwDurA 10.45
RealRtAp 12.12 -.01
TotRtA 11.18 -.01
PIMCO Funds C:
AIIAstAutt 10.43
RealRtCp 12.12 -.01
TotRtCt 11.18 -.01


PIMCO Funds D:
TRhtp 11.18 -.01
PIMCO Funds P:
AstAIIAuthP 10.60
TotRtnP 11.18 -.01
Parnassus Funds:
Eqtylncon 27.78 +.03
Perm Port Funds:
Permannt 48.05 -.05
Pioneer Funds A:
BondAp 9.70
InfiValA 18.21 +.06
PionFdAp 41.02 +.01


Name NAV Chg
ValueAp 11.57 +.04
Pioneer Funds B:
HiYldBt 10.04 -.01
Pioneer Funds C:
HiYldCt 10.15
Pioneer Fds Y:
CullenVY 18.19 +.08
StatlncYp 10.91
Price Funds:
Balancen 20.27 -.02
BIChipn 44.98 -.55
CABondn 11.26
CapAppn 22.17 -.02
DivGron 25.10 +.04
EmMktBn 13.32 -.01
EmEurop 18.51 -.08
EmMktSn 31.49 -.01
Eqlncn 24.74 +.05
Eqlndexn 36.94 -.02
Europen 14.58 +.13
GNMAn 10.13
Growthn 37.08 -.47
Gr&lnn 21.78 -.02
HIthScin 37.02 -.13
HiYieldn 6.70
InsfCpG 18.69 -.27
InstHiYId n 9.43
MCEqGrn 29.63 -.09
InflBondn 9.87 .04
IntDis n 43.04 +.01
Inl G&l 12.37 +.05
InflSkn 13.63 +.04
Japan n 7.80 +.01
LatAmn 41.87 -.29
MDShrtn 5.24
MDBondn 10.89 +.01
MidCapn 58.01 -.17
MCapValn 23.15 -.03
NAmer n 34.80 -.26
NAsian 15.68 +.01
New Era n 42.42 -.30
NHorizn 34.90 -.16
NIncn 9.75
NYBondn 11.62
OverSSFn 7.88 +.05
PSIncn 16.69 -.01
RealAssetrnl0.84
RealEstn 20.39 +.30
R2010n 15.98
R2015n 12.43 -.01
R2020n 17.22 -.02
R2025n 12.62 -.02
R2030n 18.13 -.03
R2035n 12.83 -.02
R2040n 18.26 -.04
R2045n 12.16 -.02
SciTecn 29.37 -.36
ShtBd n 4.85
SmCpStkn 34.32 +.09
SmCapValn37.16 +.21
SpecGrn 18.74 -.05
Speclnn 12.62 +.01
TFlncn 10.33 +.01
TxFrHn 11.39
TxFrSln 5.69
USTIntn 6.24 +.01
USTLgn 13.30 -.01
VABondn 12.07 +.01
Value n 24.50 +.05
Principal Inv:
LgCGlln 10.21 -.10
LT20201n 12.17
LT20301n 12.03
Prudential Fds A:
BlendA 18.12 -.06
HiYldAp 5.50
MuHilncA 9.96 -.01
UllityA 11.15 +.05
Prudential Fds B:
GrowthB 18.61 -.16
HiYldBt 5.49
Putnam Funds A:
AmGvAp 9.20
AZ TE 9.36 +.01
ConvSec 19.60 -.01
DvrlnApx 7.54 -.04
EqlnAp 16.16
EuEq 18.02
GeoBalA 12.70 +.02
GlbEqtyp 9.01
GrlnAp 13.90 +.01
GIblHIlhA 41.43 -.05
HiYdAp 7.60
HiYldIn 5.92
IncmAp 6.91 +.01
IntGrlnp 8.83 +.05
InvAp 13.97 -.01
NJTxAp 9.70
MuliCpGr 54.82 -.53
PATE 9.38
TxExA p 8.87
TFInAp 15.41 +.02
TFHYA 12.27
USGvAp 13.70
GlblUtilA 10.17 +.11
VoyAp 22.63 -.20
Putnam Funds B:
TaxFrlns 15.43 +.02
DvrlnBt 7.47 -.04
Eqlnct 16.02
EuEq 17.29
GeoBalB 12.57 +.03
GIbEqt 8.14
GINtRst 17.60
GrlnBt 13.66 +.02
GIblHIthB 33.09 -.04
HiYldBt 7.58
HYAdBt 5.80
IncmBt 6.85 +.02
IntGrln t 8.75 +.04
InfiNopt 13.67 +.09
InvBt 12.58 -.01
NJTxBt 9.69
MultCpGr 46.96 -.45
TxExB t 8.88 +.01
TFHYBt 12.29
USGvBt 13.63
GlblUtilB 10.14 +.11
VoyBt 19.05 -.17
RS Funds:
IntGrA 17.16 +.16
LgCAIphaA 41.05 +.04
Value 24.29 +.02
RidgeWorth Funds:
LCGrStkApll.64 -.12
Royce Funds:
LwPrSkSvr 15.28 -.07
MicroCapl 15.70 +.04
PennMulr 11.61 +.01
Premierl r 19.97
TotRetlr 13.41 +.06
ValSvct 11.64 -.01
Russell Funds S:
StratBd 11.14
Rydex Advisor:
NasdaqAdv 16.18 -.18
SSgA Funds:
EmgMkt 19.98 -.03
Schwab Funds:
HIthCare 18.61 +.06
10001nvr 38.79 -.02
S&PSel 21.44 -.01
SmCpSI 20.56 +.05
TSMSelr 24.81
Scout Funds:
Inl 30.83 +.14
Selected Funds:
AmShD 42.76 +.06
AmShSp 42.75 +.05
Sentinel Group:
ComSAp 33.67 +.09
Sequoia 158.57 +.55
Sit Funds:
LrgCpGr 46.73 -.28
SoSunSClnvt21.30 ...
St FarmAssoc:
Gwth 54.75 +.28
Stratton Funds:
Mull-Cap 35.54 -.08
RealEstate 29.60 +.39
SmCap 52.73 +.19
SunAmerica Funds:
USGvBt 10.18 +.01
TCW Funds:
EmMktln 8.77
TotRetBdl 9.91 +.01
TIAA-CREF Funds:
Bdldxlnst 10.85 +.01
Eqldxlnst 10.42 -.01
Templeton Instit:
ForEqS 17.91 +.06
Third Avenue Fds:
InflValnstr 15.47 -.08
REVallnstr 23.82 +.11
Valuelnst 45.03 +.26
Thornburg Fds:
IntValAp 26.23 +.12
IncBuildAt 18.24 +.07
IncBuildCp 18.24 +.07
IntValuel 26.82 +.13
LtTMul 14.58 +.01
Thrivent Fds A:
HiYld 4.83
Incom 8.98 +.01
Transamerica A:
AegonHYBpx9.19 -.06
Flexlncpx 9.03 -.03
Turner Funds:
SmlCpGrn 34.78 -.13
Tweedy Browne:
GblValue 23.30 +.04
US Global Investors:
AIIAm 24.95 -.08
ChinaReg 7.43 -.06
GIbRs 9.68 -.08
Gld&Mtls 11.77 -.20
WIdPrcMn 12.44 -.26


Name NAV Chg
SciTech 14.31 -.09
ShtTBnd 9.19
SmCpSk 14.38 +.05
TxElt 13.48 +.01
TxELT 13.57 +.01
TxESh 10.81
VABd 11.45
WIdGr 19.67 +.13
VALIC :
MdCpldx 20.57 +.03
Skldxb 25.54 -.02
Value Line Fd:
LrgCon 19.28 -.06
Vanguard Admiral:
BalAdml n 23.04 -.01
CAITAdm n 11.53
CpOpAdln 73.15 +.06
EMAdmr rn 35.34 -.06
Energyn 109.51 -.43
EqlnAdm n n48.35 +.26
EuroAdml n 54.82 +.61
ExplAdmln 73.12 -.20
ExtdAdm n 43.58
500Adml n 126.31 -.06
GNMA Ad n 11.06
GrwAdm n 35.66 -.22
HlthCrn 57.05 +.13
HiYldCp n 5.82
InfProAdn 28.25 -.01
ITBdAdmln 11.84
ITsryAdmln 11.64
IntGrAdmn 57.92 +.38
ITAdmln 14.16
ITGrAdmn 10.13 -.01
LtdTrAdn 11.16
LTGrAdmln 10.39 -.02
LTAdmln 11.53
MCpAdmln 98.12 -.14
MorgAdmn 61.79 -.36
MuHYAdm nlO.96
NYLTAdn 11.55 +.01
PrmCaprn 68.63 +.10
PALTAdm nn11.53
ReitAdm r n 89.52 +1.40
STsyAdml n 10.77
STBdAdmlnlO.63 -.01
ShtTrAdn 15.93
STFdAdn 10.84
STIGrAdn 10.75
SmCAdm n 36.40 +.05
TxMCap r n 68.52 -.05
TfBAdmln 11.02
TStkAdm n 34.22 -.02
ValAdmln 21.84 +.10
WellslAdm n57.03 +.11
WelltnAdm n56.89 +.17
Windsorn 47.70 +.11
WdsrllAdn 49.78 +.06
Vanguard Fds:
CALTn 11.69
CapOppn 31.67 +.03
Convrtn 12.62 -.02
DivdGron 16.24 +.06
Energy n 58.33 -.23
Eqlncn 23.06 +.12
Explrn 78.57 -.21
FLLTn 11.96
GNMAn 11.06
GlobEqn 17.59 +.04
Grolnc n 29.22 -.04
GrthEqn 12.34 -.06
HYCorpn 5.82
HlthCren 135.21 +.30
InfaPron 14.38 -.01
InlExplrn 14.29 +.02
IntlGrn 18.21 +.12
InfiValn 28.71 +.09
ITIGraden 10.13 -.01
ITTsryn 11.64
LifeConn 16.85 +.01
LifeGro n 22.72 +.02
Lifelncn 14.44
LifeMod n 20.31 +.01
LTIGraden 10.39 -.02
LTTsryn 12.79
Morg n 19.93 -.11
MuHYn 10.96
Mulntn 14.16
MuLtdn 11.16
MuLongn 11.53
MuShrtn 15.93
NJLTn 12.13
NYLTn 11.55 +.01
OHLTTEn 12.45 +.01
PALTn 11.53
PrecMtlsrn 18.45 -.18
PrmcpCorn 14.30 +.01
Prmcprn 66.14 +.09
SelValu rn 19.81
STARn 20.07
STIGraden 10.75
STFedn 10.84
STTsryn 10.77
StratEqn 20.35
TgtRetlncn 11.91
TgRe2010n23.54 +.01
TgtRe2015nl3.01 +.01
TgRe2020 n23.08 +.02
TgtRe2025nl3.13 +.01
TgRe2030n22.52 +.02
TgtRe2035n13.54 +.01
TgtRe2040n22.24 +.02
TgtRe2050n22.14 +.02
TgtRe2045 n13.96 +.01
USGron 20.83 -.20
USValuen 11.08 +.04
Wellsly n 23.54 +.05
Welltnn 32.94 +.10
Wndsrn 14.13 +.03
Wndsll n 28.04 +.03
Vanguard Idx Fds:
DvMklnPl r n93.95 +.75
ExtMkt In 107.54
MidCplstPI n106.90 -.15
TotlntAdm r rn3.63 +.11
Totlntllnstr n94.51 +.43
TotlntllP r n 94.53 +.43
TotlntSigrn 28.35 +.13
500n 126.30 -.06
Balancedn 23.04 -.01
EMktn 26.90 -.04
Europen 23.53 +.26
Extend n 43.55
Growth n 35.66 -.22
LgCaplxn 25.34 -.02
LTBndn 13.78 -.02
MidCapn 21.62 -.03
Pacific n 9.84 +.03
REITrn 20.98 +.33
SmCapn 36.37 +.05
SmlCpGthn23.55 -.05
STBndn 10.63 -.01
TotBndn 11.02
TotllntlIn 14.13 +.07
TotStkn 34.21 -.02
Valuen 21.84 +.10
Vanguard Instl Fds:
Ballnstn 23.05
DevMklnstn 9.02 +.07
Extln n 43.57
FTAIIWIdl rn84.01 +.42
Grwthlstn 35.65 -.23
InfProlnstn 11.51
Instldxn 125.49 -.06
InsPIn 125.49 -.07
InstTStldxn 30.97 -.02
lnsTStPlus n30.97 -.02
MidCplstn 21.67 -.04
REITInstrn 13.86 +.22
SCInstn 36.40 +.06
TBlstn 11.02
TSlnstn 34.23 -.01
Valuelstn 21.84 +.11
Vanguard Signal:
500Sgln 104.33 -.05
GroSig n 33.02 -.20
ITBdSign 11.84
MidCpldx n 30.96 -.05
STBdldxn 10.63 -.01
SmCpSig n 32.80 +.05
TotBdSgl n 11.02
TotStkSgln 33.03 -.02
Virtus Funds:
EmMktl 9.75
Virtus Funds A:
MulSStAp 4.84
Waddell & Reed Adv:
AssetS p 9.56
CorelnvA 6.37 -.03
DivOppAp 15.07 -.02
DivOppC t 14.91 -.03
Wasatch:
SmCpGr 42.03 +.01
Wells Fargo Adv A:
AstAlAp 12.42
Wells Fargo Adv C:
AstAIICt 11.97
Wells Fargo Adv:
CmStklnv 20.58
Grwthlnv 39.72 -.35
Opptylnv 39.79 -.04
Wells Fargo Ad Ins:
UIStMulnc 4.82
Wells Fargo Admin:
Growth 41.74 -.37
Wells Fargo Instl:
UItSTMuA 4.82
Western Asset:
CorePlusl 11.32 +.01
William Blair N:
GrowthN 11.91 -.10
Yacktman Funds:
Fundpn 18.53 +.06
Focusedn 19.78 +.08


USAA Group:
AgvGt 36.73 -.30
CABd 10.77 +.01
CrnstSr 22.21 -.02
GovSec 10.41 +.01
GrTxStr 14.15
Grwth 15.93 -.03
Gr&lnc 15.87 -.04
IncStk 13.20 +.01
Inco 13.25
Inf 23.79 +.21
NYBd 12.25
PrecMM 28.56 -.59


Apple weighs on Nasdaq;




S&P flat; Dow climbs 72


Associated Press


NEW YORK For most
of the year, Apple has pro-
pelled the Nasdaq compos-
ite index forward. The stock
climbed from $405 at the
start of the year to more
than $630 last week, and the
Nasdaq easily beat the gains
of other indexes.
Now Apple is sliding the
other way and taking the
Nasdaq with it.
Apple stock dropped
more than $25 on Monday,
its fifth straight day of de-
clines. The losing streak has
wiped out about $60 billion
of Apple's market value.
That's more than the most
optimistic projections of the
value of Facebook.
Apple helped push the
Nasdaq composite index
down 22.93 points on Mon-
day to 2,988.40. The index is
now up about 15 percent for
the year after almost reach-
ing 20 percent by the end of
March.
"It's been a very quirky
market because it's been a
few companies that have de-
livered most of the rally this
year," said Mark Lamkin, CEO
of Lamkin Wealth Manage-
ment in Louisville, Ky. "It's
not been a broad-based rally"
Apple, still the most valu-
able company in the world,
accounts for 12 percent of
the Nasdaq, more than any
other stock. It has been on an
almost uninterrupted climb
for three years, powered by
its hot iPhones and iPads.


Market watch
April 16, 2012

Dow Jones +71.82
industrials 12,921.41


Nasdaq -22.93
composite 2,988.40


Standard & -0.69
Poor's 500 1,369.57


Russell
2000


+1.79
798.08


NYSE diary
Advanced: 1,724

Declined: 1,305

Unchanged: 117

Volume: 3.4 b

Nasdaq diary
Advanced: 1,318

Declined: 1,177

Unchanged: 120

Volume: 1.6 b
AP


But last week, a veteran
technology analyst boldly is-
sued a downgrade for
Apple. He predicted that
cellphone companies would
probably stop offering such
generous subsidies for cus-
tomers to adopt the iPhone.
Investors may also be
locking in profits and get-
ting out before Apple re-
ports earnings April 24.
Even after the five-day de-
cline, Apple stock is up 43
percent for the year.
The broader stock market
was flat, helped by strong
March retail sales but hurt


by continuing concerns
about rising borrowing costs
for debt-troubled Spain.
The Standard & Poor's 500
index dropped 0.69 point to
1,369.57.
Utility stocks and banks
rose, while energy compa-
nies and so-called con-
sumer discretionary stocks
fell.
All but six of the 30 stocks
that make up the Dow rose
for the day, explaining why
it rose while the S&P was
flat. Apple is not part of the
Dow
The government reported
that retail sales rose 0.8 per-
cent compared to the previ-
ous month, twice what
analysts had been expect-
ing. Skeptics noted that was
less than February's 1 per-
cent increase.
They also wondered
whether the buying was just
a result of the mild winter,
rather than a sign of recov-
ery: If people are buying
lawn mowers and other
warm-weather goods now,
then they probably won't be
later in the year. Building
materials and garden equip-
ment enjoyed the biggest
jump in March.
"It's nice to see the retail
sales were strong, but it's
one month and it's one data
point and it's not even the
biggest data point," said
Ryan Detrick, senior techni-
cal strategist at Schaeffer's
Investment Research in
Cincinnati. "Honestly, jobs
are much more important"


Rates decline at T-bill auction

Associated Press lowest since those bills averaged 0.130 per-
cent on March 5.
WASHINGTON Interest rates on short- The discount rates reflect that the bills
term Treasury bills fell in Monday's auction sell for less than face value. For a $10,000
with rates on six-month bills dropping to bill, the three-month price was $9,997.98
the lowest level since early March. while a six-month bill sold for $9,993.18.
The Treasury Department auctioned $30 That would equal an annualized rate of
billion in three-month bills at a discount 0.081 percent for the three-month bills and
rate of 0.080 percent, down from 0.085 percent 0.137 percent for the six-month bills.
last week. Another $28 billion in six-month Separately, the Federal Reserve said
bills was auctioned at a discount rate of 0.135 Monday that the average yield for one-year
percent, down from 0.150 percent last week. Treasury bills, a popular index for making
The three-month rate was the lowest changes in adjustable rate mortgages,
since three-month bills averaged 0.075 per- edged down to 0.18 percent last week from
cent on April 2. The six-month rate was the 0.19 percent the previous week.


Business HIGHLIGHTS


Exxon, Rosneft team

up on oil projects

NEW YORK- Exxon is
teaming up with Russian oil
giant Rosneft to develop oil and
natural gas fields in Russia and
North America.
The deal is a major score for
Exxon, granting the Irving, Texas
company access to some of the
world's richest sources of crude
oil and other hydrocarbons in the
Black Sea and Russian Arctic.
In turn, Rosneft subsidiaries will
take stakes in three Exxon proj-
ects in the U.S. and Canada.
In North America, Rosneft
subsidiaries will acquire minor-
ity stakes in Exxon investments
in oil projects in west Texas and
Alberta, Canada, while also re-
ceiving the option to buy a mi-
nority stake in some of Exxon's
oil fields in the Gulf of Mexico.


Family Dollar teams

up with Pepsi

NEW YORK Family Dollar
Stores Inc. said Monday it agreed
to a multiyear partnership with
PepsiCo Inc. to sell its bever-
ages effectively immediately.
Terms of the deal were not
announced.
Family Dollar, which has
7,100 stores nationwide, al-
ready offers other brands from
PepsiCo including Gatorade,
Frito-Lay and Quaker Oats
products. The deal does not af-
fect the discount chain's long-
standing distribution of drinks
from The Coca-Cola Co.
Earlier this month, Dunkin'
Brands Group Inc. said it
signed a deal with Coca-Cola to
replace the deal it had with
PepsiCo.
-From wire reports


Brashear's
www.BrashearsPharmacy.com PHARMACY

















471 N. Dacie Point, Lecanto...............746-3420
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Mon-Fri 8:30-6 206 W. Dampier Street, Inverness.....637-2079
Sat 8:30-1 One Block Behind City Hall On Seminole Ave., Inverness




NEW ORK STC E HAG


TECO 17.36
TJXs 40.19
TaiwSemi 15.10
Talbots 2.86
TalismEg 12.50
Target 57.39
TataMotors 28.85
TeckResg 36.70
TelcmNZs 10.41
TelefEsp 14.85
TempurP 85.72
Tenaris 35.23
TenetHlth 5.28
Teradata 67.39
Teradyn 16.29
Terex 22.19
TerraNitro 269.70
Tesoro 22.55
TetraTech 8.60
Texron 27.01
Theragen 1.81
ThermoFis 53.64
ThmBet 71.85
3DSyss 26.28
3M Co 86.40
Tiffany 66.66
TimeWarn 35.71
Timken 49.85
TitanMet 14.01
TollBros 23.22
TorchEngy 2.05
Trchmrk s 48.76


TorDBkg 82.64
Total SA 48.59
TotalSys 22.82
Transom 47.98
Travelers 59.16
Tredgar 18.11
TriConfi 15.56
TrinaSolar 6.40
TwoHrblnv 10.31
Tyolni 54.58
Tyson 17.89
UBSAG 12.48
UDR 26.43
UIL Hold 33.59
USAirwy 8.13
USG 16.80
UltraPtg 18.59
UniSrcEn 35.75
UniFirst 60.21
UnilevNV 32.84
UnionPac 108.09
UtdContl 22.30
UPSB 79.56
UtdRentals 40.30
USBancrp 31.16
USNGsrs 15.14
USOilFd 39.18
USSteel 28.33
UtdTech 79.88
UtdhlthGp 57.36
UnumGrp 23.54


ValeSA 22.70 -.56
ValeSApf 22.25 -1.41
ValeroE 23.36 -.78
VangTotBd 83.71
VangTSM 70.30 -.07
VanS&P500 62.67 -.07
VangREIT 63.12 +.85
VangEmg 42.37 -.20
VangEur 43.79 +.49
VangEAFE 32.60 +.20
VarianMed 66.37 -.16
Vecren 28.43 +.38
Ventas 56.31 +.39
VeoliaEnv 14.14
VeriFone 53.07 -1.33
VerizonCm 37.43 +.17
Visa 120.83 -2.33
VMware 109.00 -3.48
Vonage 1.99 -.05
Vornado 82.15 +2.21
WGL Hol 39.17 +.46
WPXEnn 15.74 -.21
Wabash 9.09 -.02
WalMart 60.58 +.81
Walgrn 33.30 +.26
WalterEn 62.87 -1.57
WsteMInc 35.35 +.21
WatsnPh 66.79 -.47
Weathflnfi 13.36 -.45
WeinRlt 25.46 +.40


WellPoint 68.73
WellsFargo 33.15
WestarEn 27.56
WAstEMkt 14.43
WstAMgdHi 6.19
WAstlnfOpp 12.80
WDigital 39.57
WstnRefin 17.62
WstnUnion 17.73
Weyerhsr 20.70
Whrlpl 71.03
WhitngPet 51.52
WmsCos 31.34
WmsPtrs 53.71
WillisGp 35.11
Winnbgo 9.33
WiscEngy 35.34
WT India 18.62
Worthgn 18.38
Wyndham 46.78
XLGrp 21.22
XcelEngy 26.39
Xerox 7.89
YPFSoc 19.50
Yamanag 14.83
YingliGrn 3.30
Youku 24.23
YumBrnds 72.25
Zimmer 63.21
ZweigTI 3.12


Name Last Chg
SPDRFncl 15.24 +.11
SPInds 36.43 +.10
SPTech 29.30 -.31
SP UIl 34.66 +.33
StdPac 4.53 +.18
Standex 41.74 +.29
StanBlkDk 77.36 +.70
StarwdHf 55.43 -.65
StateStr 43.68 +.49
Steris 30.32 -.01
SillwtrM 11.87 -.02
StratHotels 6.54 +.19
Sbyker 54.24 +.28
SturmRug 49.69 -.06
SubPpne 42.97 +.18
SumitMitsu 6.64 -.04
SunCmts 41.90 +.81
Suncorgs 30.79 +.26
Sunoco 37.92 +.02
SunstnHf 10.06 +.13
Suntech 2.71 -.02
SunTrst 22.83 +.25
SupEnrgy 24.61 -.04
Supvalu 6.52 +.11
SwERCmTR 8.68 -.12
SwiftTrans 10.52 +.31
Synovus 2.04 +.04
Sysoo 29.68 +.37
TCFFncl 10.91 +.08
TE Connect 35.11 +.35


Hollywood warms to

China's new openness

LOS ANGELES There's a
new breach in China's great
cultural wall.
Disney's announcement that
it will make "Iron Man 3" in part-
nership with a Chinese company
is the latest sign studios are warm-
ing to China's new openness.
For decades, China has
capped the number of foreign
films it allows into the country.
The limit was 20, but in February
Chinese officials announced they
are increasing the quota to 34.
China said it will also allow
foreign studios to gamer a greater
share of box office revenue.
Foreign companies can now
expect to earn 25 percent of
their movies' ticket sales in
China, up from between 13.5
and 17.5 percent.







Page A10 TUESDAY, APRIL 17,2012



PINION


"He who pays the piper may call the tune."
English proverb


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan....................................... publisher
Charlie Brennan ................... .......................editor
S Mike Arnold ....................................... HR director
Sandra Frederick........................... managing editor
Curt Ebitz......................................citizen mem ber
Founded Mac Harris ..................... ........... citizen member
by Albert M.
Williamson Rebecca Martin ................................guest member
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


UNFORTUNATE SITUATION




Tax dispute




reflects old




vs. new times


he Hamilton family Whe
lived on land in north- settled
west Citrus County for claimed
more than 100 years, but re- in and
cently lost the land to the state But as
in a longstanding tax dispute, were
The legal issue was simpler quiren
than the history of the dispute, owner
According to the
state, taxes were TH ISS
not paid on the HE ISS
land and, as a re- Family loses lan
sult, in 1939 the to the state.
land reverted to
the state due to OUR OPINIOI
the unpaid taxes.
While Hamilton Old times met
family members modern times, ar
disputed the modern times wo
state's claim, ar-
guing they had re-purchased passed
the land after it was lost under said la
the Murphy Act, they did not been u
produce documentation to con- owner
vince a local judge or the dis- A lat
trict court of appeals. And so opport
the state took ownership of the had pe
disputed property, and re- 1971 tc
cently a group of local sheriff's ship a,
deputies evicted the Hamilton and re
family Accorc
According to state officials, ily did
there were efforts to negotiate puted
a land swap for other lands them b
owned by the family to allow they h
them to keep their home site these 1
fronting Dunklin Avenue, but This
the family declined to negoti- discus
ate, and so in the end they lost litigati
the property, case i:
This is a case without winners, neerin
because while the state's claim homes
regarding ownership was up- is a ca
held, no one can take pleasure modern
in seeing families whose an- this to
cestors settled and cleared the modern
land in an earlier period of from
Florida history lose the property, county


Control gas prices dining
able to
I was glad to see that so many drinks.
callers understand that President and get
Obama has no control over gas I believe
prices. I do think that he could the c
stop giving money to those oil- being n
producing countries and divvy the staing
staying
money with the consumers of 20 per
gasoline in this country better i
Tip at 20 percent waiter t
I want to add my 2
cents to the big tipping OUND
controversy. I think any- U
one who tips at 10 per-
cent is a cheapskate.
These people are working -
for a living. If you can af-
ford to go out and eat,
give them a 20 percent
tip and let them have a
chance to enjoy life, too. CAL
Strip-search ruling 563-0579
The Supreme Court
has now ruled that any arrest can doing t
be followed by a strip search by as the
the police because, according to inconve
the Supreme Court, the person ar- needy c
rested may or may not be danger- an attit
ous if sent to prison without a In thosE
strip search. Whatever happened they de
to innocent until proven guilty? their jo
job is c
Tipping philosophy at a res
I would like to comment on the get up
subject of tipping the waitress. I That's t
believe fully that if you go to a do it, if
restaurant and you get excellent if they'
service, they keep your drinks re- around
filled, they ask if you need any- treating
thing, they bring things to you class, t
promptly, because when you're accord


n much of Florida was
I, land could basically be
ed by people who moved
declared the land theirs.
time passed, and taxes
levied, one of the re-
nents for maintaining
ship was paying taxes.
During the Great
Depression, many
families could not
d pay taxes and tax
warrants were is-
sued on land.
|: Many of these
tax warrants went
unpaid, and in re-
id sponse to this situ-
n. ation, in 1937 the
Legislature
d the Murphy Act that
Minds on which taxes had
unpaid reverted to state
ship in 1939.
;er state law created the
unity for anyone who
aid taxes on land since
make a claim of owner-
gainst the state by 1985
receive title to the land.
ling to the state, the fam-
not pay taxes on the dis-
lands, or lay claim to
by the 1985 deadline, and
have not paid taxes on
ots since.
issue has been under
sion since 2004, and in
on since 2007. The court
s now over, and a pio-
ig family has lost its
tead. In many ways, this
se of old times meeting
n times. It is a shame for
happen, but in the end,
n law won over practices
another time in the
's history.

n a restaurant, you're not
get up and get your own
You're not able to get up
t your own condiments. So
e if you're taken care of to
tacity of all your needs are
net and your drinks are
filled, I believe in tipping
:ent. I believe in tipping
f you have a waitress or
:hat's going above and be-
yond to see that your
needs are met. I believe
they deserve better. If
they do not, then I be-
lieve they deserve a max-
imum of 10 percent
because if they're not
doing their job, they
don't deserve a tip. I
have been a waitress in a
restaurant in this county,
Citrus County, where the
waitress or waiter has
had an attitude about
heir job or they treat you,
customer, like you were an
enience for being overly
or overly thirsty. They have
ude about getting things.
e cases, I don't believe
serve 5 percent because
b is called a server. Their
ailed a waiter. And again,
staurant, you're not able to
and get what you need.
:heir job and if they don't
they're not performing it,
re talking or running
visiting other tables and
Syou like you're second
hen you tip them
ngly.


Santorum's impossible dream


Most campaigns have a
musical theme. Rick
Santorum, who "sus-
pended" his campaign for the Re-
publican presidential
nomination on Tuesday, might
have selected the song "The Im-
possible Dream."
Santorum's dream seemed im-
probable, if not impossible, from
the start. He lost his
last Senate race and
had been out of office
- and out of mind -
for the last few years;
not exactly a platform
on which one usually
runs for president.
Political "experts"
believed his chief foe,
Mitt Romney, was un- Cal T
beatable. Santorum OT
played an important
role by exposing some VOI
of Romney's weak-
nesses, but early enough that it
will help Romney in the general
election campaign.
Santorum was forced to "bear
with unbearable sorrow" the
health struggles of his daughter,
Bella, and he did it with a grace
that allowed others who are
struggling with physically- and
mentally-challenged children to
identify with him. No one could
credibly accuse him of being an
elitist and out of touch with aver-
age Americans.
The former senator ran where
others would not, or could not, go
successfully


H
I
(


Santorum is a decent man in an
indecent age, preaching to a
largely hedonistic culture about
old-time values abandoned by
many, perhaps even a majority of
Americans. At the very least, too
many are indifferent to them. In
doing so, he attempted to "right
the unrightable wrong" and en-
courage others to be "better far
than you are," even
when their "arms are
too weary."
Rick Santorum's
greatest contribution
to the Republican
campaign may have
been to force the now
presumed nominee,
Mitt Romney, to the
lomas right. Romney claims
IER he has always been a
conservative, but he
DES has had a difficult
time convincing vot-
ers who were attracted to Santo-
rum, whom they believed to be
the true conservative in the race.
If Santorum ends up cam-
paigning for Romney and brings
his religious and conservative
values voters with him, Romney
will owe him in a big way and that
might make him an important
powerbroker He could also serve
as a useful attack dog, snapping
at President Obama's heels.
Should Romney choose to use
him in that role, he could be an
effective counter to Vice Presi-
dent Joe Biden, who has been en-
gaging in demagoguery against


Republicans in recent speeches.
Though Santorum did not men-
tion Romney in his campaign sus-
pension announcement, Romney
mentioned Santorum in a brief
statement. Romney said of his
now former rival, "He has proven
himself to be an important voice
in our party and in the nation. We
both recognize that what is im-
portant is putting the failures of
the last three years behind us and
setting America back on the path
to prosperity."
If Santorum reciprocates,
maybe not immediately, but even-
tually, the healing of the divisive
primary campaign will have been
achieved. If Santorum does the
job well enough, he could find
himself in a Romney cabinet, say,
secretary of Health and Human
Services, where he could focus
on those moral and cultural is-
sues about which he cares so
much. Or, he might even be Rom-
ney's choice for vice president.
There have been stranger bedfel-
lows in American politics.
Santorum as vice president re-
ally would be an impossible
dream, but if elected he would
have come very close to almost
reaching "the unreachable star"
--in--
Direct all mail for Cal Thomas
to: Tribune Media Services,
2010 Westridge Drive, Irving, TX
75038. Readers may also email
Cal Thomas at tmseditors
@tribune.com.


SLETTERS to the Editor


Cause for concern
Don Hess' defense of Oba-
macare is cause for concern in
that he blows off the rule of law
and applies hype, overstatement
and gross exaggeration in sup-
port of a socialist power grab.
Has he ever read the Constitu-
tion of the United States of
America? He expresses a child-
like faith in the government to
right all wrongs and to take care
of us, but completely ignores the
document empowering the gov-
ernment with specific and lim-
ited powers. You have to visit his
website to find out that he's even
aware of the Constitution, but on
it he says, "It is absurd to say the
U.S. Constitution does not allow
passage of a law that immedi-
ately benefits one-third of all
Americans." I question his num-
bers but the point is that's not
how our government works.
Obamacare tramples on rights
guaranteed to me by the Consti-
tution. He espouses a system of
unlimited and unrestrained gov-
ernment power. I call that type
of system socialism, Marxism, or
communism depending on slight
details of implementation.
If we had a trillion dollars of
fraud, waste and abuse in our
old health care system as he
claims, you have to ask who was
minding the store. The govern-
ment was regulating the insur-
ance industry and providing
Medicare and Medicaid insur-
ance. If they couldn't hack it be-
fore, how are 2,000 pages of new
laws, most of which don't deal
with medical care, going to fix
anything. Obamacare has very
little to do with care, but every-
thing to do with control of one of
our largest industries. It's a so-
cialist power grab from start to
finish.
Hess states that our old system
delivered the worse results of
any major industrialized nation.
That system had twice the can-


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cer survivor rate at five years as
the systems of Canada or Great
Britain. It also had half the wait
time for surgery Hess cites glow-
ing early reports of the suc-
cesses of Obamacare. Of course
those reports were released by
governmental health care enti-
ties such as the IG of HHS. What
did you expect?
Harley Lawrence
Homosassa

Let facts play out
Political causes will end up
turning into a business, and then
into rackets or shakedown
schemes. Civil rights is a perfect
example, with Jesse Jackson and
Al Sharpton at the heads. In De-
troit a few days ago a 9-month-
old black baby was shot in a
blasting of AK-47 rounds. Where
was Jesse Jackson and Al Sharp-
ton? In Chicago on Saint
Patrick's Day there were 49
shootings with 10 black deaths.
This happens every week in
Jesse Jackson's own back yard.
Where were Al Sharpton and
Jesse Jackson? They don't care
because these are black on black
crimes and they cannot make
money on them.


As long as contributions and
federal grants keep rolling in,
Sharpton and Jackson will keep
the pot boiling even though
more than nine out of every 10
crimes are black on black, not
white on black. That's how these
so-called ministers make a living
instead of spreading the word of
God, love and fatherhood.
The death of Trayvon Martin
is a tragedy However Martin
wasn't a little boy, as being por-
trayed in the media He was 6-
foot-3 and Mr Zimmerman
allegedly suffered injuries. Let
the facts play out and our justice
system work like it was intended.
We have a RICO statute.
What we really need is a race-
racketeering statute for these
guys who hide behind the title of
minister but spread hate for their
fellow man. There is much to do
in their own neighborhoods to
save our innocent black children
from black on black crimes.
Claude Strass
Homosassa

Don't fear liberals
Poor Mr. Gino Calderone is so
afraid of liberals. He worries
that we are going to destroy the
United States Constitution. But
we are not going to harm the
Constitution. Not even one page.
Please stop shaking in your boots.
We do not plan on hurting you or
the Constitution, which believe it
or not, we all love. If you do not
want to use contraception, we will
not ask you to use any It's that
simple. It doesn't bother us. You
can have your own beliefs and
attend whatever church you wish.
It doesn't bother us. I am sure
President Obama is counting on
all of us liberals, independents and
understanding, intelligent Repub-
licans to vote for him. That makes
sense. And it doesn't bother us.
Ruth J. Anderson
Homosassa


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


News groups fight to open files

in Trayvon Martin shooting case


Associated Press
ORLANDO News organizations in
Florida, including The Associated Press,
challenged on Monday the sealing of
records related to the second-degree mur-
der case against George Zimmerman in
Trayvon Martin's fatal shooting. Mean-
while, Zimmerman's attorney wants the
current judge to step down because of a
potential conflict of interest in the case.
The organizations, led by The Miami
Herald, filed a motion in Seminole County
Circuit Court.
Zimmerman attorney Mark O'Mara
asked for the records to be sealed last
week, when his client was charged with
second-degree murder in the Feb. 26 fatal
shooting of Martin, 17.
Zimmerman, 28, is pleading not guilty
and says he acted in self-defense.
Hearings for both requests have not im-
mediately been scheduled. If a new judge
is assigned to the case, Zimmerman's bail
hearing originally scheduled for Friday
- could be pushed back.
Circuit Judge Jessica Recksiedler last
week revealed the potential conflict in the
case that relates to her husband, who works
with Orlando attorney Mark NeJame.
NeJame was first approached by Zim-
merman's family to represent the neigh-
borhood watch volunteer But the attorney,
who also is serving as a CNN legal analyst
in the case, declined and referred them to
O'Mara.


Florida court officials released a state-
ment Monday afternoon confirming that
O'Mara's request had been filed and "would
be ruled on in the appropriate manner"
Regarding the challenge by the media
groups, records such as full police reports,
autopsy reports and transcripts of witness
interviews are normally public under
Florida law.
Zimmerman's case doesn't meet the
standards that are typically used to create
an exemption to those laws, according to
the motion filed by the news organizations.
Those standards allow the sealing of
records if their public release would cre-
ate an imminent threat to the administra-
tion of justice, if there are no alternatives
for protecting a defendant's right to a fair
trial and if closing the records protects the
rights of the person being tried.
A spokeswoman for special prosecutor
Angela Corey said her office was reviewing
the media motion but had no immediate
comment
The delay in an arrest for almost a month
and a half inspired protests nationwide. Yet
Corey's decision to file a charge against
Zimmerman was not the result of public
outcry, Gov Rick Scott said Monday
"I don't think Angela gets influenced by
things other than what the facts are," he
said. "She's somebody that cares aboutvic-
tims, she wants due process for everybody
involved, she wants to get the facts out.
She makes decisions based on the facts
and on what's right."


TUESDAY, APRIL 17, 2012 All

Nation/World BRIEFS


Regime continues
to pound Homs
BEIRUT U.N. Secretary-
General Ban Ki-moon said
Monday the Syrian government
is responsible for guaranteeing
U.N. observers full freedom of
movement to monitor the coun-
try's tenuous cease-fire, which
appeared to be unraveling as
regime forces pounded the op-
position stronghold of Horns,
activists said.
Even though overall violence
in Syria has dropped significantly
since the truce took effect
Thursday, the government's
shelling of the central city of
Horns over the past four days
has raised doubts about Presi-
dent Bashar Assad's commit-
ment to special envoy Kofi
Annan's plan to end 13 months
of violence and launch talks on
the country's political future.
A team of six observers ar-
rived in Damascus late Sunday to
negotiate the mission's ground
rules with Syrian authorities.
Ban, speaking to reporters in
Brussels, called on Assad to
ensure the observers' work is
not hindered.
"It is the Syrian government's
responsibility to guarantee free-
dom of access, freedom of
movement within the country,"
he said.


ICE: Men hid drug
money in toy firm
LOS ANGELES Authori-
ties say seven people have
been indicted in connection
with a money-laundering
scheme that funneled millions
of dollars in drug profits
through an American toy
company.
Immigration and Customs
Enforcement said the two own-
ers of Industry, Calif.-based
Woody Toys and three com-
pany employees were arrested
Monday on charges of evading
federal reporting requirements
for financial transactions. Two
Mexican toy dealers were ar-
rested earlier this month on re-
lated charges.
Authorities said Woody co-
owner Jia Hui Zhou and toy
dealer Luis Ernesto Flores
Rivera are also charged with
conspiring to launder money.
The Mexican toy dealers
bought U.S. dollars made off
drug sales from currency bro-
kers in a "black market peso
exchange," officials said. That
exchange enabled drug traffick-
ers to get rid of drug dollars and
gave the toy dealers a more fa-
vorable exchange rate so they
could then purchase toys in the
United States, authorities said.


GOP, Dems clash
over "Buffett rule"
WASHINGTON -The day
before Americans' taxes were due,
Senate Republicans defied
President Barack Obama on
Monday and prepared to block
a Democratic "Buffett rule" bill
requiring the nation's top earn-
ers to pay at least 30 percent of
their income in taxes.
A near party-line roll call was
expected in a clash that was
aimed more at winning over
voters in this November's presi-
dential and congressional elec-
tions than in pushing legislation
into law. Democrats were using
the battle to paint themselves
as battling for equality for a
middle class that is struggling to
find jobs and make ends meet,
while Republicans called the
measure a divisive Democratic
distraction from the nation's real
problems that would not ad-
dress the economy's real woes.
Monday's vote was the first
time a "Buffett rule" proposal
has come to a Senate vote this
election year, though Democ-
rats have tried unsuccessfully
in recent months to impose
modest surcharges on the in-
come of the wealthy.


-From wire reports

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584-0417-TUCRN

PUBLIC NOTICE
THE TOWN
OF YANKEETOWN
INFORMATION
ON THE 2012
SPECIAL ELECTION

ELECTION DATE/TIME:
Tues., May 8, 2012 7:00am 7:00pm

ELECTION LOCATION:
Inglis /Yankeetown Lions Club
22 59th Street, Yankeetown, Florida

ON THE BALLOT:
Proposed Evaluation and Appraisal
Report (EAR) based Amendments
to the Town of Yankeetown
Comprehensive Plan

A copy of the proposed Ordinance
2012-01, containing the ballot
summary questions and the text of
each Comprehensive Plan
Amendmentss, is available for public
inspection at the Office of the Town
Clerk, located at Yankeetown Town
Hall, 6241 Harmony Lane,
Yankeetown, Florida, Monday through
Friday, during regular Town Hall
business hours (9:00 AM till 12:00
Noon) as well as the Town's Web Site
at http://yankeetownfl.govoffice2.com

TO VOTE ABSENTEE, YOU MAY:
Go to our Web Site at:
http://yankeetownfl.govoffice2.com
Email us at:
yankeetownth@bellsouth.net
Call Town Hall at: 352-447-2511

lAny handicapped or person with
disabilities requiring reasonable
accommodation to participate should
contact the Yankeetown Town Clerk at
(352) 447-2511 so arrangements can
be made pursuant to Florida Statutes
Section 286.26.


felay. -ae. a5mci(e.












NATION


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


ton BRIEFS US readies last big Afghan operation

Snapshot


Associated Press
Tang Min of Shanghai
takes photos of flowers
Monday on a trip to Niag-
ara Falls, N.Y.


Judge frees teen
who was raped
SACRAMENTO, Calif. -A
California judge on Monday
ordered the release of a 17-
year-old girl who had been
placed in juvenile hall last
month because prosecutors
feared she would flee rather
than testify at the upcoming
trial of a suspected rapist.
Superior Court Judge
Lawrence Brown previously
ordered the girl held because
she has a history of running
away. On Monday, he said
she would be freed with a
GPS ankle bracelet after
prosecutors and the girl's at-
torneys agreed to the
release.
The teen previously failed
to make two court appear-
ances when the suspect,
Frank William Rackley Sr.,
37, was previously charged,
forcing prosecutors to dismiss
charges against him.
Boy goes to school,
reports killings
LAS VEGAS -A 9-year-
old boy arrived at school
Monday with a grisly story:
His mother and sister were
dead at their home four
blocks away.
Minutes later, police found
the bodies of a woman and a
girl along with a blood-
covered man and an un-
harmed 4-year-old child in
the modest home in a West
Las Vegas neighborhood.
The man, who had unspec-
ified injuries, has not been
identified as a suspect or
charged. Police say the five
people belong to a single
family.

World BRIEFS

School day











Associated Press
A young Indian boy attends
morning prayers Monday at
an open-air school in
Jammu, India. A law mak-
ing primary education com-
pulsory across India came
into effect Monday.


Argentine leader:
Nationalize oil
BUENOS AIRES, Argentina
- President Cristina Fernan-
dez on Monday presented a
bold plan to seize control of
leading oil company YPF by
nationalizing the shares
owned by Spain's Repsol,
moving to expand the state's
control over Argentina's en-
ergy reserves despite fierce
criticism from abroad.
Argentina is an oil-produc-
ing nation that this year ex-
pects to import more than $10
billion worth of gas and natu-
ral liquid gas in the face of an
energy crisis, according to es-
timates from the hydrocarbon
sector. The president com-
plained that Argentina had a
deficit of $3 billion last year
partly due to energy imports.
From wire reports


Associated Press
KABUL, Afghanistan For Tal-
iban militants and U.S. strategists
alike, all roads in this impoverished
country of mountain passes, arid
deserts and nearly impassable goat
tracks lead to this ancient capital of
3 million people nestled in a high
and narrow valley
The Taliban made their inten-
tions clear over the weekend,
mounting spectacular coordinated
attacks that spawned an 18-hour
battle with Afghan and NATO
forces. And now, the U.S. is gearing
up for what may be the last major
American-run offensive of the war
- a bid to secure the approaches to
the city.
While bombings and shootings


elsewhere in Afghanistan receive
relatively little attention, attacks in
the capital alarm the general popu-
lation, undermine the government's
reputation and frighten foreigners
into fleeing the country That's why
insurgents on Sunday struck loca-
tions that were so fortified they
could cause little or no damage, in-
cluding the diplomatic quarter, the
parliament and a NATO base.
"These are isolated attacks that
are done for symbolic purposes,
and they have not regained any ter-
ritory," U.S. Defense Secretary
Leon Panetta said Monday
The U.S.-led spring offensive, ex-
pected to begin in the coming
weeks, may be NATO's last chance
to shore up Kabul's defenses before
a significant withdrawal of combat


troops limits its options. The focus
will be regions that control the main
access routes, roads and highways
into Kabul from the desert south
and the mountainous east. These
routes are used not only by mili-
tants but by traders carrying goods
from Pakistan and Iran.
The strategy in eastern
Afghanistan involves clearing mili-
tants from provinces such as
Ghazni, just south of the capital.
The pivotal region links Kabul with
the Taliban homeland in the south
and provinces bordering Pakistan
to the east.
NATO, under U.S. command, will
also conduct more operations in
eastern provinces such as Paktika
and Paktia that are considered
major infiltration routes to the cap-


'I admit to the acts'


Associated Press
Accused Norwegian mass killer Anders Behring Breivik gives a fascist salute Monday as he arrives at the court-
room, in Oslo, Norway.

Accused Norway murderer said he killed 77 in 'self-defense'


Associated Press

OSLO, Norway Anders
Behring Breivik shed tears as he
went on trial Monday for killing 77
people but not for his victims.
The emotional display came when
prosecutors showed his anti-
Muslim video.
Dressed in a dark suit and sport-
ing a thin beard, the right-wing fa-
natic defended the July 22
massacre as an act of "self-
defense" in his professed civil war,
and sat stone-faced as prosecutors
described how he killed each of his
victims.
But he was gripped by emotion
when they showed a video warning
of a Muslim takeover of Europe
and laden with crusader imagery
that he posted on YouTube before
the attacks. Suddenly, the self-
styled "resistance" fighter's eyes
welled up. He cringed his face and
wiped away tears with trembling
hands.
"Nobody believes that he cried
out of pity for the victims," said
Mette Yvonne Larsen, a lawyer
representing survivors and victim's
families in the court proceedings.
Breivik showed no signs of re-
morse on the first day of a trial that
is expected to last 10 weeks. After
being uncuffed, he extended his
right arm in a clenched-fist salute.
He refused to stand when the
judges entered the room.


Breivik, who is facing terrorism and
premeditated murder charges, re-
acts as a video presented by the
prosecution is shown in court.
Breivik was emotionless, however,
when prosecutors described each of
his killings.
"I don't recognize Norwegian
courts because you get your man-
date from the Norwegian political
parties who support multicultural-
ism," Breivik said the first time he
addressed the court
The 33-year-old Norwegian also
announced he doesn't recognize
the authority of Judge Wenche
Elisabeth Arntzen because he said
she is friends with the sister of for-
mer Norwegian Prime Minister
and Labor Party leader Gro
Harlem Brundtland.
Eight people were killed in
Breivik's bombing of Oslo's govern-
ment district and 69 were slain in
his shooting massacre at the left-
leaning Labor Party's youth camp
on Utoya island outside the capital.
Breivik has said the attacks were


necessary to protect Norway from
being taken over by Muslims and
that he deliberately targeted the
governing Labor Party, which he
claims has betrayed Norway with
liberal immigration policies.
"I admit to the acts, but not crim-
inal guilt," he told the court, insist-
ing he had acted in self-defense.
While Norway has a legal princi-
ple of preventive self-defense, that
doesn't apply to Breivik's case, said
Jarl Borgvin Doerre, a legal expert
who has written a book on the con-
cept "It is obvious that it has noth-
ing to do with preventive
self-defense," Doerre told The As-
sociated Press.
The key issue to be resolved dur-
ing the trial is Breivik's mental
state, which will decide whether
he is sent to prison or into psychi-
atric care. Anxious to prove he is
not insane, Breivik will call right-
wing extremists and radical Is-
lamists to testify during the trial, to
show that others also share his
view of clashing civilizations.
One mental examination found
him legally insane, while another
said he wasn't sick enough to be com-
mitted to psychiatric care instead of
prison. If deemed mentally compe-
tent, Breivik would face a maximum
prison sentence of 21 years or an al-
ternate custody arrangement under
which the sentence is prolonged for
as long as an inmate is deemed a
danger to society


Aging transit systems under strain


Associated Press
WASHINGTON Driven
by high gas prices and an
uncertain economy, Ameri-
cans are turning to trains
and buses to get around in
greater numbers. But the
aging transit systems
they're riding face an $80
billion maintenance back-
log that jeopardizes service
just when it's most in
demand.
The boost in ridership
comes as pain at the gas
pump and the sluggish eco-
nomic recovery combine
with a migration of young
adults to cities and new


technology that makes tran-
sit faster and friendlier
than in the past. The num-
ber of transit trips over a 12-
month period will likely set
a new record later this
month or next, said Fed-
eral Transit Administration
officials. The current peak
is 10.3 billion trips over a
year, set in December 2008.
But decades of deferred
repairs and modernization
projects also have many tran-
sit agencies scrambling to
keep trains and buses in op-
eration. The transit adminis-
tration estimated in 2010 that
it would take $78 billion to get
transit systems into shape,


and officials said the backlog
has grown since then. In
some places, workers search
the Internet for spare parts
that are no longer manufac-
tured. In others, trains oper-
ate using equipment
designed, literally, in the
horse-and-buggy era.
In Philadelphia, for exam-
ple, commuters ride trains
over rusty steel bridges,
some of them dating back to
the 19th century The South-
eastern Pennsylvania Trans-
portation Authority-which
operates subway, trolley, bus
and commuter rail systems
- is responsible for 346
bridges that are on average


80 years old. Officials said
they may be forced to slow
trains or even stop them
from crossing one bridge
that's 1,000 feet long and 90
feet above the ground if it
deteriorates further
A key power substation
relies on electrical equip-
ment manufactured in 1926.
There's no hope for acquir-
ing spare parts, so workers
try to open the boxes hous-
ing the equipment as infre-
quently as possible.
"We're operating on a
prayer on that line," Joseph
Casey, the transportation
authority's general man-
ager, said.


ital from insurgent safe havens in
Pakistan.
Declining numbers of interna-
tional troops in the coming months
are also forcing coalition forces to
focus less on remote and thinly pop-
ulated places such as eastern
Nuristan. They hope to move re-
sponsibility for those areas to the
Afghan security forces.
Coalition forces last summer
made gains in traditional Taliban
strongholds such as Kandahar and
Helmand provinces in the south,
areas they must now hold with
fewer troops. By September, as
many as 10,000 U.S. Marines are
scheduled to leave Helmand and
hand over the lead for security to
Afghan forces in the former Taliban
stronghold.


Panel


probes


wild gov't


spending


Accused exec

remains silent
Associated Press
WASHINGTON The
General Services Adminis-
tration investigator who re-
vealed a wild agency
spending spree said Mon-
day he's investigating possi-
ble bribery and kickbacks,
and has already recom-
mended criminal charges to
the Justice Department.
The key figure in the scan-
dal invoked his right to re-
main silent at the House
hearing.
Inspector General Brian
Miller made clear that he's
not done investigating cur-
rent and former GSA offi-
cials, following his lengthy
report April 2 on an Octo-
ber 2010 Las Vegas confer-
ence that cost taxpayers
$823,000.
The regional executive
who hosted the Western Re-
gions Conference, Jeffrey
Neely, invoked his Fifth
Amendment rights and his
chair remained empty the
rest of the House Oversight
and Government Reform
hearing. He could face a
criminal investigation.
"We do have other ongo-
ing investigations including
all sorts of improprieties, in-
cluding bribes, possibly
kickbacks but I'd have to
check on precisely kick-
backs," Miller told the com-
mittee.
He added later, "We have
recommended criminal
charges."
Toward the end of the
three-and-a-half hour hear-
ing, GSA chief of staff
Michael Robertson said he
had informed the White
House of the inspector gen-
eral's preliminary findings
last year. Robertson testi-
fied that he told a White
House lawyer, Kim Harris,
about the report shortly
after May 2011 "when I be-
came aware that the IG had
briefed (then-GSA adminis-
trator Martha) Johnson."
Committee members from
both parties could barely re-
strain themselves as they
sometimes shouted their
outrage over the spending.
They not only raged on
about the overall figure, but
at specific taxpayer expen-
ditures for a mind-reader,
over-priced commemora-
tive coins, bicycles for a
team-building exercise and
trips by GSA employees and
their family members to the
Las Vegas strip.
Lawmakers said they
couldn't understand why
Johnson, the agency head
who resigned after Miller's
findings became public,
waited for months to take
action after receiving a pre-
liminary report almost a
year earlier And demanded
to know why Johnson
granted Neely a $9,000
bonus after learning of the
conference.











SPORTS


ST.J. Duke drives
the fastest Super
Late Models at
Citrus County
Speedway./B2


SAM


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Hurricanes' speed leads to softball victory


Citrus wins 4-1, securesplace in district semifinal


p.m. today in Lecanto, with
second-seeded Lecanto and
third-seeded Central tangling
in the second 6A-6 semifinal
Tuesday as well.
"We played pretty funda-
mental defense," Citrus
coach Larry Bishop said.
"Kelly (Abramowich) did a
great job hitting her spots,
and (catcher) Melissa
Michaud did a good job set-
ting up Kelly's pitches. And
we did a pretty good job run-
ning the bases."


C.J. RISK
Correspondent
LECANTO Timely hit-
ting, good defense anchored
by strong pitching and great
base running propelled Cit-
rus to a 4-1 victory over West
Port in the first round of the
6A-6 District softball tourna-
ment Monday at Lecanto
High School.
The fourth-seeded Hurri-
canes (12-12 overall) will take
on top seed Springstead at 5


Associated Press
BOSTON The Tampa Bay
Rays needed a strong pitching
performance to avoid a four-
game sweep by the hot-hitting
Boston Red Sox.
They got it from James
Shields.
Shields allowed four hits all
singles in 8 1/3 innings, and
the Rays beat Boston 1-0 Monday
after being outscored 31-11 by
the Red Sox in the previous
three games.
"It was my job to stop the
bleeding," Shields said. "We had
a rough three games and they
were hot. They were swinging
the bats pretty well."
Boston had a chance to tie it in
the ninth when Shields (2-0) left
after walking Dustin Pedroia.
Fernando Rodney got his
fourth save in four opportunities
when he retired Adrian Gonza-
lez on a groundout that sent Pe-
droia to second, walked David
Ortiz intentionally, then got Cody
Ross on a called third strike.


The 'Canes' ability to take
the extra base proved a piv-
otal part of their offense. In
the second inning, Amy
Abramowich and Chelby
Lawler hit back-to-back
triples for a 1-0 lead. Then in
the third, a bunt single by
Devon Perrine, a stolen base
- the first of six by Citrus in
the game a walk to Aaron
McIntyre and another steal
put runners at second and
third. Michaud's sacrifice fly
delivered one run and Amy


Tampa Bay Rays starting pitcher James Shields delivers against the
Boston Red Sox during the first inning of Monday's game.


Ross slammed his helmet and ar-
gued with umpire LarryVanover
that the last two pitches should
have been balls.
"To me it's unacceptable,"
Ross said. "If I'm up there strik-
ing out every at-bat, I'm going to


get benched. They're not
accountable."
The only run came when
Daniel Bard (0-2) walked Evan
Longoria on four pitches with
the bases loaded in the seventh.
The traditional Patriots' Day


Abramowich's single scored
another, making it 3-0.
Citrus got its final run in
the sixth on a walk to Amy
Abramowich and a triple by
Emily Parker
West Port-which tied Cit-
rus, Lecanto and Central at3-
5 in district play but got the
fifth seed due to the
tiebreaker-had its chances,
but stranded nine base run-
ners in the game. The Wolf
Pack's best chance came in
the fifth when a walk to
Shelby Batchelor, an error on
Savannah Idell's sacrifice
bunt attempt and a bunt sin-


gle by Lauren Becker loaded
the bases with no one out.
Kelcie Morris drew a walk to
force home one run, but Kelly
Abramowich got three
straight outs on a foul pop up,
a strikeout and a ground out
"Citrus is a good hitting
team," West Port coach Diana
Greene said, "and when they
had players in scoring posi-
tion they came through. We
didn't
"The big thing was we got
runners in scoring position
and we didn't get them in."
KellyAbramowich allowed
four hits and four walks, but


home game began at 11:04 a.m.
The holiday observed in Massa-
chusetts and Maine marks Paul
Revere's ride and the battles of
Lexington and Concord in 1775.
"We absolutely needed some-
thing like that today James did
not disappoint," Rays manager
Joe Maddon said. "I really liked
the bounce back (at) 11 o'clock in
the morning. After losing three
games in a row here, a lot of
teams would give up at that
point. Our guys didn't."
The loss was Bobby Valen-
tine's first at Fenway Park as
Boston's manager. Fans booed
when he went back to the dugout
after lifting Bard for Justin
Thomas following the run-
scoring walk. Bard also walked
the previous batter, Carlos Pena,
on four pitches.
"It was the wrong decision, ob-
viously," Valentine said. "I
wanted to let him know right
there that I thought he could get
himself out of a jam."


Page B3


Potential Clemens jurors ask questions


Man, woman

wonder about cost

of trial to taxpayers

Associated Press
WASHINGTON Roger
Clemens stood and uttered "Morn-
ing" to the 90 potential jurors who
had gathered in the ornate, sixth-
floor ceremonial courtroom, the
one deemed big enough to hold
them all. After he sat down, he
swiveled his chair, as if trying to
make eye contact with as many as
possible.
Some of those looking back had
no idea who he was. Others, in-
cluding two who survived the first
cut, wondered if it was a waste of


taxpayer time and money that got
him to this point.
The seven-time Cy Young Award
winner was back in court Monday
in the government's second attempt
to prove he misled a House com-
mittee at a landmark drugs-and-
sports hearing in 2008. The first
trial last July ended in a mistrial
when prosecutors introduced inad-
missible evidence after only two
witnesses had been called.
One potential juror said he felt
"it was a little bit ridiculous" when
Congress held hearings on drug use
in sports because he felt the gov-
ernment should have been focusing
on bigger problems. Nevertheless,
the native of Chile an investment
officer for an international bank -
was asked to return, the only male
to remain in the jury pool among
those who were individually
screened on the first day


Another potential juror recalled
the 2008 hearing by saying: "At the
time, I remember thinking it didn't
seem to be a great use of taxpayer
money," but she was kept in the
pool after she said she could be
impartial.
"Even if I don't agree with the
reason that you're brought before
Congress, you still have to tell the
truth .... If you perjure yourself be-
fore Congress, it's still illegal," said
the woman, who is an executive for
an environmental nonprofit
organization.
But another potential juror was Associated Press
excused after she volunteered: "I Former Major League Baseball
don't know if that's the best use of pitcher Roger Clemens arrives at
government tax dollars at this federal court Monday in Washing-
time." She said her feelings could ton, D.C., for jury selection in the
influence her ability to serve. perjury trial on charges that he lied
Clemens lawyer Rusty Hardin when he told Congress he never
used steroids and human growth
See Page B4 hormone.


she struck out seven for Cit-
rus. West Port's Morris gave
up five hits and five walks
and struck out five. Amy
Abramowich led the 'Canes
with two hits.
But as well as the Canes
performed in this game,
they'll have to do even better
against Springstead, which is
unbeaten in district play
"We're pleased to just have
the opportunity to play the
top team in the district,"
Bishop said. "But we'll have
to play solid defense and
we've got to take advantage
when we have base runners."



3-run


third


dooms


Sharks

Lecanto wins

6-1 at home

JUSTIN PLANTE
Correspondent
LECANTO After
recording only one hit in the
first two innings, Lecanto
High School's bats erupted
in the third inning, as the
Panthers scored four runs
behind RBIs from Skylar
Summers, Sheldon Baxter
and Gary Levengood en
route to a decisive 6-1 win
over Nature Coast on
Monday night
It was a slow start for the
Panthers, whose only hit in
the first two innings came in
the form of a Levengood sin-
gle. The Panthers had to rely
on a sturdy defense to keep
them in the game until their
run production picked up.
Lecanto's Scott Sterns,
who finished with two
strikeouts while only giving
up five hits and one run, had
some early trouble in the
first Nature Coast's first two
batters reached base, but
Sterns hung on and downed
the next three batters.
"Our pitching did very
well tonight," Lecanto head
coach David Logue said.
"We gave up one run, so we
did well with that Scott did


Page B4


Kenyans


sweep

Boston

marathon
Associated Press
BOSTON Trailing the
leaders by 200 yards when
the Boston Marathon
slogged through Heartbreak
Hill, Wesley Korir passed
them one by one until he
took the lead on his way out
of Kenmore Square.
That's when leg cramps
forced him to slow down
and relinquish the lead.
"It's hot out there, in case
you didn't know," he told re-
porters after enduring tem-
peratures that rose into the
80s to win the 116th Boston
Marathon on Monday "I
knew it was going to be hot,
and one important thing
that I had to take care of
today was really hydrate as
much as possible. I guess my
biology degree kicked in a
little bit."
Singing religious songs as
he plodded along the
scorching pavement, the na-
tive Kenyan a permanent
resident of the United
States retook the lead
from Levy Matebo in the
final mile to win in a heat-
slowed time of 2 hours, 12
minutes, 40 seconds.
See Page B4


Tampa Bay on top


Associated Press
Tampa Bay Rays shortstop Reid Brignac tags out Boston's Cody Ross, who was trying to steal second base. The out ended the seventh
inning of Tampa Bay's 1-0 win Monday at Fenway Park in Boston.

Rayspitcher James Shields serves up four-hitter in 8 innings en route to 1-0 win


0 Citrus County Speedway/B2
0 Tennis/B2
0 Baseball/B3
0 Scoreboard/B4
0 Sports briefs/B4
0 NBA, NHL/B5
0 Entertainment/B6






B2 TUESDAY, APRIL 17, 2012

CITRUS COUNTY
SPEEDWAY

April 14 race results
Super Late Models


Driver's name
TJ Duke


Hometown
S.W. Ranches


Scott Grossenbacher San Antonio
Randy Anderson Wildwood
Todd Brown Lake Panasoffkee
Brannen Hester Lakeland
Drew Brannon Tampa
Dale Sanders Lecanto
Eric Stokes South Carolina
Keith Zavrel Brooksville
Gene Anderson Lakeland
Herb Neumann Jr. Inverness
John Gerstner Wesley Chapel
Ray Hester Lakeland
Andy Anderson Port Richey
William Fuller Lecanto
Tony Altiere Inverness
Don Altier Lecanto
Cody Lane Port Richey


Street Stocks


No. Driver's name
3 Curtis Flanagan
10 Kenny May
98 Bubba Martone
121 JoeyBifaro


Ho
In
SF
FlI
In


Dora Thorne Fl
Craig Cuzzone La
James Peters W
Austin Hughes He
Leonard Arnold Mo
Robert Kuhn Jr. Di
David Kingsbury Br

Mini Stocks
Driver's name Ho
Jeremy Sharrone FlI
Jessey Mallory Su
Jerry Daniels W
Jay Curry Hi
Kevin Stone D.


hometown
verness
)ring Hill
oral City
verness
oral City
ikeland
inter Garden
ernando
mount Dora
unnellon
ooksville


hometown
oral City
immerfield
eirsdale
omosassa
ade City


Shannon Kennedy Summerfield


Lenard Fussell
Tim Scalise
Mark Patterson
Bo Denney
Wayne Heater


Dade City
Lutz
Webster
Dade City
Homosassa


Modified Mini Stocks


Driver's name
Clint Foley
Chris Allen
Mark Powers
Ray Miller
Phil Edwards
Chris Snow
Jessica Robbins
Richard Kuhn
Robbie Yoakam


Hometown
Dunnellon
Bushnell
Hernando
Tampa
Crystal River
Inverness
Plant City
Ocala
Hernando


Hornet Division


Driver's name
Kane Dixion
Ron Dillon
Jennifer Dillon
Chris Hennessy


Hometown
Inverness
Inverness
Inverness
Beverly Hills


SPORTS


First win in new car


ri


R -i


Special to the Chronicle
T.J. Duke (28) leads Randy Anderson (4) in the Super Late Model feature Saturday at Citrus County Speedway.


T. J Duke dusts Super Late Modeie fld at local speedway


Special to the Chronicle

TJ. Duke started his weekend at
Citrus County Speedway inside a
new ride purchased from DickAn-
derson, "King of Florida short
tracks." Sliding into the driver's
seat of a racing legend can be a
difficult task, but Duke proved
ready for the challenge Saturday
night.
Eighteen Super Late Models
registered for the 35-lap feature
with Todd Brown (23) on the pole
position after a two-row invert.
Duke (28) was beside him for the
start.
Duke jumped out the early lead,
leaving the rest to battle for sec-
ond. Randy Anderson (4) applied
pressure to Brown and moved into
the second position.
Duke looked like a veteran be-
hind the wheel of his new racer,
pulling away on each restart after
a few mid-race cautions. Behind
him, sixth-place starter Scott
Grossenbacher (09) had moved
into third, but faced pressure from
multi-time division champion
Herb Neumann Jr (98). Neumann
found some traction and passed
Grossenbacher for third with 10
laps remaining.
Neumann set his sights on the
second-running Anderson. Neu-
mann took to the inside lane off of
Turn 2 and attempted the pass, but
contact between the drivers sent
Anderson spinning. Taking the
blame, Neumann was at the rear
of the field for the restart
Duke shot away on the restart
and claimed his first victory of the
2012 season.
Behind him, Anderson and


Grossenbacher battled for second.
Grossenbacher attempted an in-
side pass on Anderson on the final
lap. As the two cars exited Turn 4,
contact sent Grossenbachers' blue
racer over the hood ofAndersons'
car. Both cars slid across the line
with Grossenbacher taking sec-
ond, while on top of Andersons'
hood.
Both cars slid into the infield,
but both drivers were uninjured.
Brown finished fourth, moving
him to the top of the season-long
points championship chase, just
six points ahead of Anderson. An-
derson and Brannen Hester (77)
were heat-race winners.
Street Stocks
Eleven Street Stocks had a rough
time getting the 20-lap feature off and
running. After three failed attempts
complete a lap before a caution, the
field lined up for a single-file start.
Curtis Flanagan (3) moved quickly
from fourth to first. He went on to take
his fourth feature victory of the year
followed by Kenny May (10) in second.
Last-race winner Bubba Martone (98)
was third. Flanagan and Joey Bifaro
(121) were heat-race winners.
Modified Mini Stocks
Nine Modified Mini Stocks saw
Chris Allen (33) make a daring three-
wide move on the first lap to take the
top spot early. He had a comfortable
lead before a Lap 8 caution slowed the
field.
On the restart, Clint Foley (7) moved
byAllen and took the lead. Foley won
his fourth feature of the season followed
byAllen in second. Mark Powers (69),
driving Shaun Caters' racer, finished
third. Foley was the heat-race winner.


Mini Stocks
Early on, the Mini Stocks leaders
got crossed up heading into Turn 3. As
everyone checked up to avoid the inci-
dent, Bo Denny (18) ran out of racing
room and hit an infield dirt mound. His
car did a barrel roll into Turn 3. Denny
was uninjured.
Once back to green, Jeremy Shar-
rone (32) moved to the lead on Lap 8
and took his fourth victory of the sea-
son. Behind Sharrone, pole sitter
Jessey Mallory came home in second.
Shannon Kennedy (46) was headed
for a top-three finish, but a last lap, last
corner spin saw Jerry Daniels (11) slip
by for third. Sharrone and Kennedy
were the heat-race winners.
Hornets
Kane Dixon returned to Victory Lane
in the 15-lap Hornet feature. While
Dixon went unchallenged for the top
spot, a husband and wife battled for
second.
Ron and Jennifer Dillon were behind
the wheels of Hornet rental cars. Ron
got the early jump on Jennifer, but
soon felt the pressure of a determined
wife. Jennifer attempted an inside
pass, but run out of racing room enter-
ing the corner. Ron then pulled away
over the final few laps for second.
Upcoming races
On this week's program are Open
Wheel Modifieds, Sportsman, Street
Stock, Pure Stock, Mini Stock, Outlaw
Modified Minis and the crazy Pro Fig-
ure 8's.
Gates open at 4 p.m. and racing
starts at 6:30 p.m. Visit www.citrus
countyspeedway.com or call 352-726-
9339 for details.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

TOP FIVE POINTS
Super Late Models
No. Driver's name YTD points
23 Todd Brown 306
4 Randy Anderson 300
1 Dale Sanders 297
09 Scott Grossenbacher 292
47 Keith Zavrel 284


Open Wheeled Modifieds
Driver's name YTD points
Tommy Schnader 401
Troy Robinson 392
Doug Miller 389
Jarrett Snowden 361
Herb Neumann Jr. 306

Modified Mini Stocks
Driver's name YTD points
Clint Foley 440
Mark Powers 414
Richard Kuhn 393
Phil Edwards 313
Jessica Robbins 287

Sportsman
Driver's name YTD points
Andy Nicholls 397
Christopher Harvey 379
Jay Witfoth 370
Cody Johnson 356
Dennis Neighbor Sr. 339

Street Stocks
Driver's name YTD points
Curtis Flanagan 524
Bubba Martone 503
James Peters 489
Dora Thorne 486
David Kingsbury 467

Pure Stocks
Driver's name YTD points
Nicholas Malverty 522
Happy Florian 501
Eugene Malverty 497
Dustin Dinkins 459
Chris Ickes 450

Mini Stocks
Driver's name YTD points
Jeremy Sharrone 759
Shannon Kennedy 705
Jerry Daniels 646
Jessey Mallory 604
Tim Scalise 585

PRO FIGURE-8s
Driver's name YTD points
Benny Harris 100
Cliff Rousseau 98
Mason Love 96
Joey Catarelli 94
Charles Herne 92

PS/SS FIG-8s
Driver's name YTD points
Ronnie Schrefiels 100
Neil Herne 98
Charles Herne 96
William Stansbury 94
Jimmy Kruse 92

DWARFs
Driver's name YTD points
Bo Bass 325
Chris McClelland 304
Darren Bass 306
Danny Cretty 206
Stan Butler 304


Next round of league champs


another week, an-
other champion
that is the way
it goes in April in Citrus
County
This time around, we
turn our attention to the
Tuesday Team Tennis
League, which ended
its season with a round-
robin get-together The
gathering was followed
by a luncheon and the
championship was
awarded to the River-


Eric
van den Hoogen
ON COURT


haven Reds team.
The team won the title with 50
points followed by the Pine Ridge
Palominos with 41; Bicentennial
Breakers, 37; and Crystal River
Chip and Charge, 27. The winning
team was captained by Marciel
Marcus. Team members included
Georgica Kearney, Heidi Miller,
Patty Hardy, Nancy Bruins, Myrt
Thomas and Judy Lewis.
For information about the
league, contact chairwoman Can-
dace Charles at 352-563-5859 or
Candacecharles@tampabay.rr.
com.
Citrus County Tuesday
Womens Team Tennis
Results for March 20 are:
Riverhaven Reds def. Crystal
River Chip and Charge, 3-2;
Bicentennial Breakers def. Pine
Ridge Palominos, 4-0.
Final standings:
Riverhaven Reds, 50;
Pine Ridge Palominos, 41;
Bicentennial Breakers, 37;
Crystal River Chip and Charge,
27.
This ladies-only league is geared to-
ward players rated 3.0 to 3.5. If inter-
ested in playing or being a team
captain, call chairperson Candace
Charles at 352-563-5859 or email
Candacecharles@tampabay.rr.com.
Monday Night Ladies
Doubles League
Final standings:
Brooksville Kick Butt, 62;
Pine Ridge, 58;
Brooksville Aces, 49;
Bicentennial Babes, 32.


This league is geared
toward the 3.5 and 4.0 fe-
male players, who cannot
play during the day and
don't mind traveling for
tennis matches.
For more information,
contact Vivien Amabile at
tonykgbird@aol.com.
Ladies on the Court
Winners for April 12 are:
Mary and Jo, Barbara and
Marta.


Ladies on The Court
play at 8:30 a.m. Thursday at Le
Grone Park courts in Crystal River.
Bring a new can of balls and 50 cents
and sign up to play two out of three
tie-break sets.
For more information, contact Bar-
bara Shook at dshook@tampabay.rr.
com or 352- 795-0872.
Citrus Area Senior Ladies
3.0 to 3.5 Tuesday League
Results for April 10 are:
Riverhaven Ospreys vs. Mead-
owcrest Aces, 2-2;
Pine Ridge Mustangs def. Mead-
owcrest Racquettes, 4-0;
Crystal River vs. Sugarmill
Woods, 2-2.
End of season luncheon will be April
24. Call Luanne Miller if you have not
received any information regarding the
luncheon.
For information, contact chair-
woman Luanne Miller at lumiller62
@yahoo.com or 352-794-7247.
The Friday Senior Ladies
Doubles 3.0 to 3.5 League
The 2011-12 season champion is
the team from Riverhaven with 65
points, followed by Pine Ridge, 52; Bi-
centennial, 46; Citrus Hills, 46; Sug-
armill Woods, 33; and Meadowcrest,
18.
For information, contact chair-
woman Joyce Shiver at 352-795-1086
or jshiver@tampabay.rr.com.
Thursday Morning Citrus
Area Doubles League
Results for April 12 are:
Pine Ridge Mavericks def.
Skyview Aces, 6-4;


Bicentennial Babes vs Sugarmill
Woods, 4-4;
Skyview Advantage def. Bicen-
tennial Bratz, 8-0;
Pine Ridge Fillies vs Skyview,
4-4.
For information, contact chair-
woman Carol Keatts at 352-382-5280
or ckeatts@aol.com.
USTA Leagues
3.5 Adult Women: Skyview def.
Fort King, 4-1. Record 1-0.
Linda Homa won, 6-1, 6-4;
Lorie Wilkes lost, 6-3, 6-4;
Anne Finnin/Julie Poling won, 6-
4, 6-0;
Angela Koper/Michelle Jones
won, 6-1, 6-4;
Nelva Polich/Ann Sulinski won, 7-
5, 6-2.
Sugarmill Woods lost to Fort King,
4-1. Record 0-1.
The winter USTA leagues have
ended and the winning teams will
head to Daytona. The 3.5 and 4.5 lev-
els will play on May 4 through 6, fol-
lowed by the 3.0 and 4.0 level on May
18 through 20.
For information in District 4 (south),
contact Leigh Chak at 352-572-7157
or vacocala@comcast.net or
ustaflorida.com.
For information about the Hernando
leagues, contact Lou Giglio at 727-
207-4760 or Lou@topseedtennis
pro.com.
Tournaments
April 21 and 22: The Tournament
of Champions Event will be at Sug-
armill Woods/Oak Village Tennis Com-
plex. To enter, email
jjeanette3saj@aol.com.
May 5 and 6: Cinco De Mayo ten-
nis Tournament (mixed doubles) at
Deltona Woods Park in Spring Hill,
NCTF@tampabay.rr.com. Entry fee
$20 per player.
Oct. 27 and 28: eighth annual Fall
Fest Compass Tournament at Crystal
River High School.


Eric van den Hoogen, a tennis
columnist, can be reached at
hoera@juno.com.


Nadal worried about knee


heading into clay season
Associated Press


MONACO Rafael Nadal is
fretting over his troublesome left
knee as he attempts to win his
eighth straight Monte Carlo Mas-
ters and end a title drought dat-
ing to last year's French Open.
Nadal pulled out of his semifi-
nal against Andy Murray at last
month's Sony Ericsson Open. He
then received treatment for a
knee tendon problem after hav-
ing already skipped a chunk of
the season to rest his knees fol-
lowing the Australian Open.
"It's OK now. (I need) time to see
how it is at the top level, run with-
out thinking about the knee, when
I put all my pressure on the knee,"
Nadal said Monday "It's the start
of the clay-court season for me,
and hopefully it will work well."
But the 10-time Grand Slam
champion expects to be rusty in
his second-round match against
Finland's Jarkko Nieminen on
Wednesday He started practicing
only four days ago.
"I's not enough after 15 days off
without chances to practice a lot
because I couldn't move my
knee," the 25-year-old Spaniard
said. "I'm a little bit scared, but
seems like today I am able to
practice with no (problems)."
Nadal rested his knee after the
Australian Open, where he lost
his seventh straight tour final to
top-ranked Novak Djokovic. He
didn't play again until several
weeks later at Indian Wells,
where he lost in the semifinal to
Roger Federer in straight sets.
At the following tournament in
Miami, his left knee flared again.
He withdrew hours before he
was to play Murray
"It's not easy to explain, in Eng-
lish especially Even in Spanish it
will be difficult I had a little bit
broke in the tendon on the top, but
especially behind the knee," Nadal
said. "I did (have an injection). I did
the treatment two times."
He is relieved to be back on
clay, where there is less stress on
his knees.


Associated Press
Spanish player Rafael Nadal
returns the ball during a training
session Sunday for the Monte
Carlo Tennis Masters tournament
in Monaco.

"The worst surface for the
players is the hard," Nadal said.
"I believe we are wrong in the
tournaments) to play more and
more on hard (courts), and less
and less on clay and grass."
Since 2005, Nadal has won at
Monte Carlo and Roland Garros
every year except '09.
"It's special to come back to a
place where I have more success
than (anyone)," said Nadal, who
has won 37 consecutive matches
in Monte Carlo and holds a 39-1
record. "The conditions worked
for me in the past, I always played
my best tennis here, I believe."
The six-time French Open
champion, who could face
Djokovic in the Monte Carlo
final, is playing down his title
slump.
"I didn't win a title, but how
many final I played?" asked
Nadal, who has 46 career titles to
73 for Federer "I am doing my
calendar to try and win impor-
tant titles, or the most important
titles on the tour, to try to be
healthy as long as I can."


48
88
5
68
60
92
73






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




AL

Rays 1, Red Sox 0
Tampa Bay Boston
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Jnnngscf 4 02 0 Avilesss 4 0 0 0
C.Penalb 3 01 0 Pedroia2b 3 0 1 0
Longori3b 4 00 1 AdGnzllb 4 0 1 0
Scottdh 4 0 1 0 Ortiz dh 3 0 0 0
Zobristrf 2 0 1 0 Repkopr 0 00 0
Joyce If 4 01 0 C.Rosscf 4 0 2 0
Kppngr2b 2 00 0 Sweeny rf 3 00 0
Brigncss 1 00 0 Punto3b 2 0 0 0
JMolin c 4 0 0 0 Sltlmch c 3 0 0 0
SRdrgz ss-2b31 1 0 DMcDn If 3 0 0 0
Totals 31 17 1 Totals 29 0 4 0
Tampa Bay 000 000 100 1
Boston 000 000 000 0
DP-Tampa Bay 2, Boston 2. LOB-Tampa Bay
11, Boston 5.2B-Jennings (2). SB-Jennings
(2). CS-Zobrist (1), C.Ross (1).
IP H RERBBSO
Tampa Bay
Shields W,2-0 81-34 0 0 2 5
RodneyS,4-4 2-3 0 0 0 1 1
Boston
Bard L,0-2 62-34 1 1 7 7
J.Thomas 11-31 0 0 0 1
Albers 1 2 0 0 0 0
HBP-by Bard (Zobrist). WP-Shields.
T-3:08. A-38,108 (37,067).

Twins 7, Yankees 3
Minnesota NewYork
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Span cf 5 0 1 0 Jeterss 4 1 2 1
JCarrllss 5 1 2 1 Grndrscf 4 1 2 1
Mauerdh 4 1 3 1 ARdrgz3b 4 1 2 0
Wlngh If 5 1 1 1 Cano 2b 3 0 0 0
Mornealb 5 1 2 1 Teixeirib 4 0 2 1
Doumitc 5 1 2 1 Swisherrf 4 0 0 0
Valenci3b 4 1 1 1 Ibanezdh 4 0 1 0
CThmsrf 3 01 1 Martinc 3 0 0 0
ACasill2b 3 1 1 0 ErChvzph 1 0 0 0
Gardnr If 4 0 0 0
Totals 39 7147 Totals 35 3 9 3
Minnesota 200 021 020 7
NewYork 300 000 000 3
E-Valencia (1). DP-Minnesota 1, NewYork 1.
LOB-Minnesota 8, New York 6. 2B-Mauer 2
(2), Valencia (2), A.Casilla (1). HR-Morneau
(2), Jeter (3), Granderson (3). SB-Mauer (1).
CS-J.Carroll (1).
IP H RERBBSO
Minnesota
PavanoW,1-1 7 7 3 3 1 6
Duensing 1 1 0 0 0 0
Capps 1 1 0 0 0 0
New York
FGarciaL,0-1 52-39 5 5 0 5
Logan 2-3 0 0 0 2 0
Wade 12-34 2 2 0 1
Rapada 1 1 0 0 0 1
HBP-by Logan (C.Thomas).
T-3:04. A-40,218 (50,291).

Tigers 3, Royals 2
Detroit Kansas City


ab r h bi


ab r h bi


AJcksncf 3 1 1 1 AGordnlf 5 1 1 0
Boeschrf 4 01 0 Getz2b 3 0 0 0
Kellyrf 0 00 0 Hosmerlb 3 0 0 0
MiCarr3b 3 0 0 0 Butlerdh 4 0 2 1
Fielder1lb 3 0 0 0 Bourgspr 0 1 0 0
DYongdh 4 00 0 Francrrf 4 00 0
Raburnlf 4 00 0 Mostks3b 4 0 0 0
JhPerlt ss 4 1 3 0 Quinter c 4 0 2 1
Avilac 4 0 1 0 Maiercf 3 0 2 0
Inge2b 3 1 1 2 AEscorss 3 0 0 0
Totals 32 37 3 Totals 33 2 7 2
Detroit 100 020 000 3
Kansas City 100 000 001 2
DP-Kansas City 1. LOB-Detroit 5, Kansas
City 8. 2B-Jh.Peralta 2 (6), A.Gordon (1).
HR-A.Jackson (2), Inge (1). SB-Maier (1),
A.Escobar (2). S-Getz.
IP H RERBBSO
Detroit
VerlanderW,1-1 9 7 2 2 2 9
Kansas City
DuffyL,1-1 62-37 3 3 1 7
Crow 11-30 0 0 2 0
G.Holland 1 0 0 0 0 2
HBP-by Verlander (A.Escobar).
T-2:37. A-14,039 (37,903).



2012 Tampa Bay
Rays schedule
April 17 at Toronto, 7:07 p.m.
April 18 at Toronto, 7:07 p.m.
April 19 at Toronto, 7:07 p.m.
April 20 Minnesota, 7:10 p.m.
April 21 Minnesota, 7:10 p.m.
April 22 Minnesota, 1:40 p.m.
April 24 L.A. Angels, 7:10 p.m.
April 25 L.A. Angels, 7:10 p.m.
April 26 L.A. Angels, 1:10 p.m.
April 27 at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
April 28 at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
April 29 at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
April 30 Seattle, 7:10 p.m.
May 1 Seattle, 7:10 p.m.
May 2 Seattle, 7:10 p.m.
May 3 Seattle, 1:10 p.m.
May 4 Oakland, 7:10 p.m.
May 5 Oakland, 7:10 p.m.
May 6 Oakland, 1:40 p.m.
May 8 at N.Y Yankees, 7:05 p.m.
May 9 at N.Y Yankees, 7:05 p.m.
May 10 at N.Y Yankees, 7:05 p.m.
May 11 at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m.
May 12 at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m.
May 13 at Baltimore, 1:35 p.m.
May 14 at Toronto, 7:07 p.m.
May 15 at Toronto, 7:07 p.m.
May 16 Boston, 7:10 p.m.
May 17 Boston, 7:10 p.m.
May 18 Atlanta, 7:10 p.m.
May 19 Atlanta, 4:10 p.m.
May 20 Atlanta, 1:40 p.m.
May 21 Toronto, 7:10 p.m.
May 22 Toronto, 7:10 p.m.
May 23 Toronto, 1:10 p.m.
May 25 at Boston, 7:10 p.m.
May 26 at Boston, 7:15 p.m.
May 27 at Boston, 1:35 p.m.
May 28 Chicago White Sox, 3:10 p.m.
May 29 Chicago White Sox, 7:10 p.m.
May 30 Chicago White Sox, 1:10 p.m.
June 1 Baltimore, 7:10 p.m.
June 2 Baltimore, 4:10 p.m.
June 3 Baltimore, 1:40 p.m.
June 5 at N.Y.Yankees, 7:05 p.m.
June 6 at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 p.m.
June 7 at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 p.m.
June 8 at Miami, 7:10 p.m.
June 9 at Miami, 7:15 p.m.
June 10 at Miami, 1:10 p.m.
June 12 N.Y Mets, 7:10 p.m.
June 13 N.Y Mets, 7:10 p.m.
June 14 N.Y Mets, 1:10 p.m.
June 15 Miami, 7:10 p.m.
June 16 Miami, 7:10 p.m.
June 17 Miami, 1:40 p.m.
June 19 at Washington, 7:05 p.m.
June 20 at Washington, 7:05 p.m.
June 21 at Washington, 7:05 p.m.
June 22 at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m.
June 23 at Philadelphia, 4:05 p.m.
June 24 at Philadelphia, 1:35 p.m.
June 25 at Kansas City 8:10 p.m.
June 26 at Kansas City 8:10 p.m.
June 27 at Kansas City 2:10 p.m.
June 28 Detroit, 7:10 p.m.
June 29 Detroit, 7:10 p.m.
June 30 Detroit, 7:15 p.m.
July 1 Detroit, 1:40 p.m.
July 2 N.Y Yankees, 7:10 p.m.
July 3 N.Y Yankees, 7:10 p.m.
July 4 N.Y Yankees, 3:10 p.m.
July 5 at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m.
July 6 at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m.
July 7 at Cleveland, TBA


BASEBALL


AMERICAN LEAGUE


W
Baltimore 5
Toronto 5
New York 5
Tampa Bay 5
Boston 4




W
Washington 8
NewYork 7
Atlanta 5
Philly 4
Miami 4


East Division
Pct GB WCGB L10 Str HomeAway W
.556 /2 5-4 L-1 3-3 2-1 Detroit 7
.556 2 5-4 W-13-3 2-1 Chicago 5
.500 /2 1 5-5 L-1 2-2 3-3 Cleveland 4
.500 /2 1 5-5 W-13-0 2-5 Kansas City3
.400 1/2 2 4-6 L-1 3-1 1-5 Minnesota 3


Central Division
Pct GB WCGB L10 Str HomeAway
.700 - 7-3 W-25-1 2-2
.625 1 5-3 L-1 2-1 3-2
.500 2 1 4-4 W-31-4 3-0
.300 4 3 3-7 L-5 0-4 3-3
.300 4 3 3-7 W-12-4 1-3


Texas
Seattle
Oakland
L. Angeles


NATIONAL LEAGUE


East Division
Pct GB WCGB L10 Str HomeAway
.727 - 7-3 W-14-1 4-2
.700 '2 7-3 W-14-2 3-1
.500 2'2 2 5-5 L-1 3-1 2-4
.444 3 2/2 4-5 W-13-3 1-2
.400 3/2 3 4-6 W-12-2 2-4


St. Louis
Cincinnati
Houston
Milwaukee
Pittsburgh
Chicago


Central Division
Pct GB WCGB L10 Str HomeAway
.700 - 7-3 W-22-1 5-2
.400 3 3 4-6 W-13-3 1-3
.400 3 3 4-6 L-2 3-3 1-3
.400 3 3 4-6 L-4 1-2 3-4
.333 3/2 3/2 3-6 W-12-1 1-5
.300 4 4 3-7 L-2 2-5 1-2


L. Angeles
Arizona
Colorado
San Fran.
San Diego


West Division
Pct GB WCGB L10 Str HomeAway
.800 - 8-2 W-45-2 3-0
.545 2'2 /2 5-5 W-22-1 4-4
.400 4 2 4-6 L-2 3-4 1-2
.333 4/2 2/2 3-6 L-1 1-2 2-4




West Division
Pct GB WCGB L10 Str HomeAway
.900 - 9-1 W-66-0 3-1
.667 2/2 /2 6-3 W-13-0 3-3
.444 4/2 2/2 4-5 L-1 3-3 1-2
.444 4/2 2/2 4-5 L-1 2-1 2-4
.200 7 5 2-8 L-4 2-5 0-3


Safe at home


Associated Press
New York's Josh Thole scores on a wild pitch by Atlanta Braves pitcher Tommy Hanson, right, as the Mets' Ruben
Tejada looks on in the background in the seventh inning of Monday's game in Atlanta. The Mets won.




Mets win with three-run shot


Davis'home run,


Gee'spitchingput


New York ahead

Associated Press

ATLANTA Ike Davis hit a
tiebreaking three-run homer and
Dillon Gee pitched four-hit ball over
seven innings, leading the New York
Mets to another victory over the At-
lanta Braves 6-1.
The Mets snapped Atlanta's five-
game winning streak and added to
their three-game sweep of the Braves
in New York to start the season.
With the game tied at 1 in the sixth,
Atlanta intentionally walked hot-hit-
ting David Wright with two outs to get
to Davis, who was batting .118. The
strategy backfired when Tommy Han-
son (1-2) hung a 2-2 pitch and Davis
drove it into the right-field seats.
Gee (1-1) was never in much trou-
ble. Atlanta put together a couple of
hits and a walk in the second, lead-
ing to its only run on Jack Wilson's
RBI groundout.
NATIONAL LEAGUE

Nationals 6, Astros 3
WASHINGTON Stephen Strasburg
pitched six innings for his second win of
the season, to lead the Washington Na-
tionals to a victory over the Houston
Astros.
Strasburg looked nearly unhittable for
five innings, allowing three singles, but
the Astros got to him in the sixth for two
runs and three hits.
Strasburg (2-0) walked one and struck
out five. He hasn't allowed a home run in
50 1/3 innings since Aug. 15, 2010.
Steve Lombardozzi had three singles
and a two-run double in the sixth off Kyle
Weiland (0-2) that gave Washington a 4-2




TAMPA
Continued from Page B1


The boos likely were prompted by
an interview aired on WHDH-TV
Sunday night in which Valentine
questioned Kevin Youkilis' commit-
ment to the game. He apologized to
his third baseman, a fan favorite, on
Monday Valentine had said he didn't
think Youkilis was "as physically or
emotionally into the game."
Maddon got his 500th win as a
manager, all with Tampa Bay, as the
Rays stopped a four-game losing
streak.
"I just happen to be the steward of
this group," he said. "Better baseball
players make you a lot smarter
manager."
Shields retired the first four bat-
ters before Ross' broken-bat single
off the pitcher's glove. The next six
Red Sox made outs before Gonzalez
singled to left. He was erased on a
double-play grounder in the fourth.
Shields walked Nick Punto with two
outs in the fifth, allowed singles to Pe-
droia in the sixth and Ross in the sev-
enth and walked Pedroia in the ninth.
Bard gave up three hits through six
innings and set down the first two


LATE GAME

At press time, the Chicago White
Sox and Baltimore Orioles were
tied 4-4 in the top of the 10th
inning.


lead. Ryan Zimmerman followed with a
two-run single.

AMERICAN LEAGUE

Twins 7, Yankees 3
NEW YORK Carl Pavano quieted
an unfriendly Yankee Stadium crowd with
seven solid innings, Justin Morneau
played in the field for the first time this
season and hit a long homer, and the
Minnesota Twins earned a rare victory in
New York.
Joe Mauer had three hits, including two
doubles, and every position player had a
hit in a tweaked Minnesota lineup. Josh
Willingham batted fourth for the first time
this season and was one of seven Twins
to drive in a one run.
Minnesota won for just the sixth time in
34 regular-season games in the Bronx
since Ron Gardenhire took over as man-
ager in 2002.

Tigers 3, Royals 2
KANSAS CITY, Mo. Justin Verlan-
der beat Kansas City once again, surviv-
ing a shaky ninth inning to deliver the
Detroit Tigers a victory over the Royals.
Austin Jackson hit a leadoff homer and
Brandon Inge added a two-run shot in the
fifth for the Tigers, giving their reigning AL
Cy Young winner enough support when
things got tight.
Verlander (1-1) allowed an RBI single
by Humberto Quintero with two outs in
the ninth, and then loaded the bases
when he walked Mitch Maier and plunked
Alcides Escobar on the elbow. Verlander
came back to strike out Alex Gordon look-
ing, sending the Royals to their fifth con-
secutive loss.


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Sunday's games
Toronto 9, Baltimore 2
Boston 6, Tampa Bay 4
Cleveland 13, Kansas City 7
Detroit 5, Chicago White Sox 2
Texas 4, Minnesota 3
Seattle 5, Oakland 3
N.Y.Yankees 11, L.A. Angels 5
Monday's games
Tampa Bay 1, Boston 0
Minnesota 7, N.Y Yankees 3
Detroit 3, Kansas City 2
Baltimore at Chicago White Sox, late
Oakland at L.A. Angels, late
Tuesday's games
Minnesota (Liriano 0-1) at N.Y Yankees (Sabathia 0-0),
7:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Niemann 0-1) atToronto (R.Romero 1-0), 7:07
p.m.
Texas (Lewis 1-0) at Boston (Lester 0-1), 7:10 p.m.
Baltimore (W.Chen 0-0) at Chicago White Sox (Danks 1-1),
8:10 p.m.
Detroit (Smyly 0-0) at Kansas City (B.Chen 0-0), 8:10 p.m.
Oakland (TRoss 0-0) at L.A. Angels (Haren 0-1), 10:05
p.m.
Cleveland (Masterson 0-1) at Seattle (Millwood 0-0), 10:10
p.m.

NATIONAL LEAGUE
Sunday's games
Miami 5, Houston 4, 11 innings
Cincinnati 8, Washington 5, 11 innings
Atlanta 7, Milwaukee 4
Philadelphia 8, N.Y. Mets 2
St. Louis 10, Chicago Cubs 3
Arizona 5, Colorado 2
Pittsburgh 4, San Francisco 1
L.A. Dodgers 5, San Diego 4
Monday's games
Washington 6, Houston 3
N.Y Mets 6, Atlanta 1
San Diego at Colorado, late
Pittsburgh at Arizona, late
Philadelphia at San Francisco, late
Tuesday's games
Houston (W.Rodriguez 0-1) at Washington (G.Gonzalez 0-
0), 7:05 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Dempster 0-1) at Miami (Jo.Johnson 0-2),
7:10 p.m.
N.Y Mets (J.Santana 0-1) at Atlanta (Delgado 1-0), 7:10
p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Billingsley 2-0) at Milwaukee (Gallardo 1-1),
8:10 p.m.
Cincinnati (Cueto 1-0) at St. Louis (Lohse 2-0), 8:15 p.m.
San Diego (Bass 0-1) at Colorado (Moyer 0-2), 8:40 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Karstens 0-1) at Arizona (I.Kennedy 2-0), 9:40
p.m.
Philadelphia (Blanton 1-1) at San Francisco (Bumgarner
1-1), 10:15 p.m.


Associated Press
Tampa Bay Rays catcher Jose Molina pumps his fist after Boston Red Sox
outfielder Cody Ross struck out to end the game.


batters in the seventh. Then he lost
his control.
Sean Rodriguez walked, Desmond
Jennings singled and Pena walked,
loading the bases. Pitching coach
Bob McClure visited Bard and left
him in the game. The move backfired
as Bard walked Longoria with his
111th pitch. That's when Valentine


went to the mound to lift Bard and
was booed on the walk back.
"Mac came out and said, 'Do you
want this guy?' I wanted him," said
Bard, a converted reliever making
his second major-league start. "In
hindsight, probably I was tired."
Thomas ended the threat by retir-
ing Luke Scott on a fly to right.


TUESDAY, APRIL 17, 2012 B3




NL

Mets 6, Braves 1


NewYork

Tejada ss
DnMrp 2b
DWrght 3b
I.Davis lb
Bay If
Duda rf
Thole c
Niwnhs cf
Gee p
Rauch p
Baxter ph
Byrdak p
Totals
NewYork
Atlanta


ab r h bi
4 1 1 1
4000
3110
4113
3 1 10
4 1 1 3
4 1 1 1
4000
4 1 2 0
3 1 1 0
1 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
1 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
32 67 5
4120
310
1000
0000
1000
0000
32 675
001
010


Atlanta

Bourn cf
Prado If
C.Jones 3b
McCnnc
Uggla 2b
Heywrd rf
Hinske lb
JWilson ss
Hanson p
JFrncs ph
LHrndz p

Totals
003 101
000 000


ab rh bi


E-Thole (1), Hanson (1). LOB-New York 3,
Atlanta 6. 2B-Tejada (6). HR-I.Davis (2), Bay
(2). SB-Bourn 2 (4), Heyward (3). S-Gee 2.
IP H RERBBSO
NewYork
GeeW,1-1 7 4 1 1 1 5
Rauch 1 1 0 0 0 0
Byrdak 1 0 0 0 0 2
Atlanta
HansonL,1-2 7 5 5 4 2 4
L.Hernandez 2 2 1 1 0 1
WP-Hanson.
T-2:24. A-16,161 (49,586).

Nationals 6, Astros 3
Houston Washington
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Schafercf 5 1 1 0 Dsmndss 4 21 0
Lowriess 4 1 1 0 Lmrdzz2b 5 1 4 2
JMrtnzlf 4 0 0 0 Zmrmn3b 4 0 2 2
Ca.Leelb 4 0 0 0 LaRochIb 4 0 1 0
T.Buckrf 4 1 2 0 Werthrf 4 0 1 0
CJhnsn3b 4 0 2 2 Nadylf 4 01 0
JCastroc 4 0 0 0 Ankielcf 4 1 1 0
Altuve2b 4 0 2 0 Ramosc 3 1 1 1
Weilndp 1 0 0 0 Strasrgp 2 0 1 0
Wrghtp 0 0 0 0 Berndnph 0 1 0 0
Maxwllph 1 01 0 SBurnttp 0 00 0
Lyonp 0 0 0 0 Matthsp 1 00 0
Bogsvcph 1 00 0 Grzlnyp 0 00 0
HRdrgzp 0 00 0
Totals 36 39 2 Totals 35613 5
Houston 000 002 010 3
Washington 001 104 OOx 6
E-Weiland (1), Ankiel (1). DP-Houston 1.
LOB-Houston 9, Washington 10. 2B-T.Buck
(3), Altuve (3), Desmond (4), Lombardozzi (1),
LaRoche (3). HR-Ramos (1). SB-C.Johnson
(2), Zimmerman (1), Werth (1). S-Weiland.
IP H RERBBSO
Houston
Weiland L,0-2 52-310 6 6 4 2
W.Wright 1-3 0 0 0 0 1
Lyon 2 3 0 0 1 2
Washington
StrasburgW,2-0 6 6 2 2 1 5
S.Burnett 2-32 0 0 0 2
MattheusH,2 2-3 1 1 0 0 1
Gorzelanny H,1 2-3 0 0 0 0 1
H.RodriguezS,2-2 1 0 0 0 1 1
T-3:03. A-16,245 (41,487).


AMERICAN LEAGUE LEADERS
BATTING-Willingham, Minnesota, .419;
AJackson, Detroit, .412; Ortiz, Boston, .410;
Hamilton, Texas, .390; Span, Minnesota, .389;
Konerko, Chicago, .387; Jeter, New York, .366;
MYoung, Texas, .366.
RUNS-Kinsler, Texas, 11; Hamilton, Texas,
10; AJackson, Detroit, 10; KJohnson, Toronto,
9; ACabrera, Cleveland, 8; Hosmer, Kansas
City, 8; 13 tied at 7.
RBI-CPena, Tampa Bay, 11; Swisher, New
York, 11; Ortiz, Boston, 10; MiCabrera, Detroit,
9; Encarnacion, Toronto, 9; Ibanez, New York,
9; MYoung, Texas, 9.
HITS-Hamilton, Texas, 16; Ortiz, Boston,
16; Jeter, New York, 15; MYoung, Texas, 15;
AJackson, Detroit, 14; Span, Minnesota, 14;
CPena, Tampa Bay, 13; ISuzuki, Seattle, 13;
Willingham, Minnesota, 13.
DOUBLES-Ortiz, Boston, 6; Butler, Kansas
City 5; Moustakas, Kansas City, 5; 9 tied at 4.
TRIPLES-De Aza, Chicago, 2; 25 tied at 1.
HOME RUNS-Hamilton, Texas, 4; Kinsler,
Texas, 4; Willingham, Minnesota, 4; MiCabrera,
Detroit, 3; Cespedes, Oakland, 3; Encarnacion,
Toronto, 3; KJohnson, Toronto, 3; AdJones, Bal-
timore, 3; Kipnis, Cleveland, 3; CPena, Tampa
Bay, 3.
STOLEN BASES-Mlzturis, Los Angeles, 3;
AdJones, Baltimore, 3; 10 tied at 2.
PITCHING-Below, Detroit, 2-0; MHarrison,
Texas, 2-0; Gray, Minnesota, 2-0; CWilson, Los
Angeles, 2-0; Drabek, Toronto, 2-0; Nova, New
York, 2-0; RRoss, Texas, 2-0; Shields, Tampa
Bay, 2-0; DLowe, Cleveland, 2-0; Colon, Oak-
land, 2-1.
STRIKEOUTS-FHernandez, Seattle, 19;
Weaver, Los Angeles, 17; Sabathia, New York,
15; Nova, New York, 15; Lewis, Texas, 15;
Colon, Oakland, 14; Scherzer, Detroit, 14; Ver-
lander, Detroit, 14.
SAVES-Rodney, Tampa Bay, 4; League,
Seattle, 4; JiJohnson, Baltimore, 4; HSantiago,
Chicago, 3; Nathan, Texas, 3; Aceves, Boston,
2; Capps, Minnesota, 2; Balfour, Oakland, 2;
MRivera, New York, 2; CPerez, Cleveland, 2.
NATIONAL LEAGUE LEADERS
BATTING-Kemp, Los Angeles, .487;
Freese, St. Louis, .406; Cuddyer, Colorado,
.371; JMartinez, Houston, .371; CYoung, Ari-
zona, .364; SCastro, Chicago, .359; Desmond,
Washington, .354.
RUNS-Kemp, Los Angeles, 13; MEllis, Los
Angeles, 10; Beltran, St. Louis, 9; Infante,
Miami, 9; YMolina, St. Louis, 9; Zimmerman,
Washington, 9; 6 tied at 8.
RBI-Kemp, Los Angeles, 16; Ethier, Los An-
geles, 15; LaRoche, Washington, 12; Freese,
St. Louis, 11; CYoung, Arizona, 11; MCarpen-
ter, St. Louis, 10; JMartinez, Houston, 10;
YMolina, St. Louis, 10.
HITS-Kemp, Los Angeles, 19; Desmond,
Washington, 17; SCastro, Chicago, 14;
LaRoche, Washington, 14; Werth, Washington,
14; Cozart, Cincinnati, 13; Cuddyer, Colorado,
13; Freese, St. Louis, 13; JMartinez, Houston,
13; Rollins, Philadelphia, 13.
DOUBLES--Cuddyer, Colorado, 5; Tejada,
New York, 5; Braun, Milwaukee, 4; BCrawford,
San Francisco, 4; Furcal, St. Louis, 4; YMolina,
St. Louis, 4; DanMurphy, New York, 4; Sandoval,
San Francisco, 4.
TRIPLES-MCarpenter, St. Louis, 2; Cozart,
Cincinnati, 2; CGonzalez, Colorado, 2; Pagan,
San Francisco, 2; 29 tied at 1.
HOME RUNS-Kemp, Los Angeles, 6; Hart,
Milwaukee, 4; Infante, Miami, 4; CYoung, Ari-
zona, 4; 8 tied at 3.
STOLEN BASES-DGordon, Los Angeles,
7; SCastro, Chicago, 6; Bonifacio, Miami, 5;
Schafer, Houston, 5; Victorino, Philadelphia, 4;
Maybin, San Diego, 3; Reyes, Miami, 3.
PITCHING-12 tied at 2.
STRIKEOUTS--Hamels, Philadelphia, 19;
Harang, Los Angeles, 19; Volquez, San Diego,
17; MCain, San Francisco, 15; EJackson, Wash-
ington, 15; Billingsley, Los Angeles, 15; Demp-
ster, Chicago, 15; Chapman, Cincinnati, 15.
SAVES-Guerra, Los Angeles, 5; Kimbrel,
Atlanta, 4; Putz, Arizona, 4; FFrancisco, New
York, 3; Axford, Milwaukee, 2; Papelbon,
Philadelphia, 2; Myers, Houston, 2; Shaw, Ari-
zona, 2; RBetancourt, Colorado, 2; Motte, St.
Louis, 2.






B4 TUESDAY, APRIL 17, 2012



NTRA 3-year-old
Thoroughbred poll
NEW YORK The 2012 Three Year-Old
Thoroughred Poll, conducted by the National
Thoroughbred Racing Association NTRA, cov-
ering racing performances through April 15.
Rankings based on the votes of sports and thor-
oughbred racing media representatives on a 10-
9-8-7-6-5-4-3-2-1 basis with first place votes in
parentheses, record, total points and previous
rank Sex: C-colt, G-gelding, H-horse, F-filly, M-
mare):


S St
1. Union Rags (15) C 2
2. Bodemeister(14) C 4
3. Gemologist (9) C 2
4. Creative Cause (2) C 3
5. I'll Have Another(7)C 2
6. Dullahan (3) C 2
7. Alpha C 3
8. Hansen (1) C 3
9. Take Charge Indy C 2
10. Secret Circle C 4


3 Pts Pvs
1 411 1
0 400 9
0 385 2
1 317 4
0 309 3
0 277 -
0 183 6
0 174 5
0 157 7
0 50 8


2012 WNBA Draft List
By The Associated Press
At Bristol, Conn.
Monday
First Round
1. Los Angeles, Nnemkadi Ogwumike, F,
Stanford
2. Seattle (from Chicago), Shekinna Stricklen,
G, Tennessee
3. Minnesota (from Washington), Devereaux
Peters, F, Notre Dame
4. Tulsa, Glory Johnson, F, Tennessee
5. San Antonio, Shenise Johnson, G, Miami
6. Phoenix, Samantha Prahalis, G, Ohio
State
7. New York, Kelly Cain, C, Tennessee
8. Washington (from Atlanta), Natalie
Novosel, G, Notre Dame
9. Connecticut, Astan Dabo, C, Mali
10. Washington (from Seattle), LaSondra
Barrett, F, LSU
11. Indiana, Sasha Goodlett, C, Georgia Tech
12. Minnesota, Damiris Dantas, C, Brazil
Second Round
1. Los Angeles (from Tulsa), Farhiya Abdi, F,
Sweden
2. Atlanta (from Washington), Tiffany Hayes,
G, Connecticut
3. Los Angeles (from Chicago), Khadijah
Rushdan, G, Rutgers
4. Los Angeles, Tyra White, G, Texas A&M
5. Tulsa (from San Antonio), Riquna Williams,
G, Miami
6. Minnesota (from Phoenix), Julie Wojta, F,
Wisconsin-Green Bay
7. Minnesota (from New York), Kayla Stan-
dish, F, Gonzaga
8. Minnesota (from Atlanta), Nika Baric, G,
Russia
9. Connecticut, Chay Shegog, C, North Car-
olina
10. Seattle, Keisha Hampton, F, DePaul
11. Chicago (from Indiana through Seattle),
Shey Peddy, G, Temple
12. Phoenix (from Minnesota), C'eira Rick-
etts, G, Arkansas
Third Round
1. Tulsa, Vicki Baugh, C, Tennessee
2. Washington Anjale Barrett, G, Maryland
3. Chicago, Sydney Carter, G, Texas A&M
4. Los Angeles, April Sykes, F, Rutgers
5. Tulsa (from San Antonio), Lynetta Kizer, C,
Maryland
6. Phoenix, Christine Flores, F, Missouri
7. Minnesota (from New York), Jacki Geme-
los, G, USC
8. Atlanta, Isabelle Yacoubou, C, France
9. Phoenix (from Connecticut), Amanda
Johnson, F, Oregon
10. Indiana (from Seattle), Courtney Hurt, F,
VCU
11. Washington (from Indiana), Briana
Gilbreath, G, USC
12. NewYork (from Minnesota), Katelyn Red-
mond, G-F, Gonzaga



Boston Marathon
results
Monday
Men
1. Wesley Korir, Kenya, 2:12:40.
2. Levy Matebo, Kenya, 2:13:06.
3. Bernard Kipyego, Kenya, 2:13:13.
4. Jason Hartmann, Boulder, Colo., 2:14:31.
5. Wilson Chebet, Kenya, 2:14:56.
6. Laban Korir, Kenya, 2:15:29.
7. Michel Butter, Netherlands, 2:16:38.
8. David Barmasai, Kenya, 2:17:16.
9. HideakiTamura, Japan, 2:18:15.
10. Mathew Kisorio, Kenya, 2:18:15.
11. Tim Chichester, Mount Morris, N.Y,
2:21:10.
12. Sergio Reyes, Palmdale, Calif., 2:22:06.
13. Brendan Martin, Rochester, Mich.,
2:22:32.
14. Gebregziabher Gebremariam, Ethiopia,
2:22:56.
15. Uli Steidl, Seattle, 2:23:08.
16. Franklin Tenorio, Sr., Boulder, Colo.,
2:24:04.
17. Kota Shinozaki, Japan, 2:25:45.
18. Koji Hayasaka, Japan, 2:27:08.
19. Scott Mindel, New London, Conn.,
2:27:15.
20. Matt Hensley, Jacksonville, Fla., 2:29:17.
21. David Bedoya, Somerville, Mass.,
2:29:34.
22. Kieran O'Connor, NewYork, 2:30:09.
23. Jake Krong, Salt Lake City, 2:30:21.
24. Tracy Lokken, Marquette, Mich., 2:31:06.
25. Aaron Hohn, Kansas City, Mo., 2:31:09.
26. Josh Whitehead, Madison, Ala., 2:31:16.
27. Jason Ryf, Oshkosh, Wis., 2:31:50.
28. Craig Coon, Penfield, N.Y, 2:32:20.
29. Patrick Kuhlmann, Washington, D.C.,
2:32:55.
30. Sebastien Baret, New York, 2:33:13.
31. Mitch Vanbruggen, Durham, N.C.,
2:33:26.
32. Nicholas Wheeler, Rockland, Maine,
2:33:30.
33. Paul Molyneux, Britain, 2:33:37.
34. Ben Schneider, Minneapolis, 2:33:45.
35. Dustin Hicks, Chuluota, Fla., 2:33:53.
36. Tommy Greenless, Walnut Creek, Calif.,
2:34:08.
37. Mike Hensley, Gainesville, Fla., 2:34:42.
38. Brendon O'Leary Whitman, Mass.,
2:34:44.
39. AnkurTarneja, Los Angeles, 2:34:50.
40. Matthew Manning, Baton Rouge, La.,
2:34:54.
41. Justin Kowalski, Mishawaka, Ind.,
2:35:00.
42. Thomas Madut, Mitchell, S.D., 2:35:18.
43. Rich Burke, Morristown, N.J., 2:35:41.
44. Matthew Leduc, Canada, 2:35:48.
45. Wesley Turner, Erie, Pa., 2:35:51.
46. Ken Oishi, Tokyo, Japan, 2:35:54.
47. Brian Condon, Madison, Wis., 2:36:04.
48. Cameron Hanlin, Hagerstown, Md.,
2:36:04.
49. Patrick Reaves, Durham, N.C., 2:36:22.
50. Wayne Bias, Kansas City, Mo., 2:36:35.
51. Naoki Tashiro, Japan, 2:36:45.
52. Michael Dixon, Fanwood, N.J., 2:36:50.
53. Daniel McCue, Arlington, Mass., 2:37:02.
54. Glenn Randall, Mesa, Colo., 2:37:13.
55. Jonathan Baker, Cambridge, Mass.,
2:37:13.
56. Dave Vona, Valatie, N.Y, 2:37:19.
57. Joseph Koech, Sr., Chelmsford, Mass.,
2:37:35.
58. Karl Siebach, Orem, Utah, 2:37:36.
59. Alexander Looi, Ithaca, N.Y., 2:37:54.
60. Zachary Meineke, Wauwatosa, Wis.,
2:38:04.
61. Colman Hatton, Brighton, Mass., 2:38:05.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FOr the record


= lorida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Monday in the Florida Lottery:
CASH 3 (early)
6-1-9
CASH 3 (late)
.- 6-2-1

PLAY 4 (early)
2-5-0-2
PLAY 4 (late)
9-3-0-7

FANTASY 5
6 3-6-10- 12-30



On the AIRWAVES

TODAY'S SPORTS
BASEBALL
7 p.m. (FSNFL) Chicago Cubs at Miami Marlins
7 p.m. (SUN) Tampa Bay Rays at Toronto Blue Jays
COLLEGE LACROSSE
2 p.m. (SUN) Vanderbilt at Florida (taped)
NBA
8 p.m. (TNT) Boston Celtics at New York Knicks
10:30 p.m. (TNT) San Antonio Spurs at Los Angeles Lakers
NHL
7:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) Western Conference quarterfinal,
Game 4: Nashville Predators at Detroit Red Wings.
9 p.m. (CNBC) Western Conference quarterfinal, Game 3:
Phoenix Coyotes at Chicago Blackhawks

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.



Prep CALENDAR

TODAY'S PREP SPORTS
BASEBALL
5 p.m. Seven Rivers at Chiefland
6:30 p.m. Trinity Catholic at Citrus
7 p.m. Crystal River at Springstead
SOFTBALL
District 5A-7 Tournament at Crystal River High School
7:30 p.m. No. 3 Crystal River vs. No. 6 Nature Coast
District 6A-6 Tournament at Lecanto High School
5 p.m. No. 1 Springstead vs. No. 4 Citrus
7 p.m. No. 2 Lecanto vs. No. 3 Central
District 2A-4 Tournament at Hernando Christian
4:30 p.m. No. 3 Seven Rivers vs. No. 2 Hernando Christian
GIRLS TENNIS
8 a.m. Crystal River in FHSAA Class 2A state meet


PANTHERS
Continued from Page B1

a great job tonight. He wasn't
sharp all the time, but when
it mattered, he made the
pitch and got us out of
trouble."
Lecanto's drought at the
plate ended in the bottom of
the third. The rally began
with Lecanto's Jimmy
Mooney, who was the second
Panther of the night to find
first base. Then Patrick Col-
letti got on base. Next, Skylar
Summers ripped a single that
brought Mooney home and
moved Colletti to third. Shel-
don Baxter doubled to bring
Colletti home, while Leven-
good joined the RBI party
and brought in Summers.
Baxter scored off a wild
pitch that gave him the clear
shot from third, and the game
was all but over


62. Jason Warick, Canada, 2:38:08.
63. Kurt Warwick, Clinton, Wash., 2:38:10.
64. Erik Hanson, Moorhead, Minn., 2:38:15.
65. John Brigham, Mobile, Ala., 2:38:17.
66. Jesse Hugo, Winter Park, Fla., 2:38:23.
67. James Akita, Elmhurst, IIl., 2:38:27.
68. Tom Ritchie, Anchorage, Alaska, 2:38:39.
69.Junyong Pak, Beverly, Mass., 2:39:16.
70. Mike Davies, Santa Monica, Calif.,
2:39:23.
71.Justin Scheid, Sparta, N.J., 2:39:36.
72. Kent Garber, Brookline, Mass., 2:39:41.
73. Ashish Patel, Austin, Texas, 2:39:52.
74. Paul Hill, Annapolis, Md., 2:40:08.
75. Joe Kelly, Arlington, Va., 2:40:13.
76. Mike Carriglitto, Pottstown, Pa., 2:40:15.
77. Zachary Cater-Cyker, Houston, 2:40:17.
78. Adam Coon, Comfort, W.Va., 2:40:19.
79. Brian Reynolds, Kalamazoo, Mich.,
2:40:34.
80. Mike Fisher, Brookline, Mass., 2:40:41.
81. Nicolas Amouroux, New York, 2:40:47.
82. Gabriel Kliot, Redmond, Wash., 2:40:55.
83. Ryan Linden, Washington Twp, Mich.,
2:41:00.
84. Jacob Stout, Seattle, 2:41:09.
85. Scott Barnacle, Frankfort, Ind., 2:41:10.
86. Jason Holder, New York, 2:41:12.
87. Michael Daly, San Diego, 2:41:15.
88. Mike Knutson, North East, Pa., 2:41:22.
89. Joshua Ricardi, Seattle, 2:41:49.
90. Blue Benadum, Malibu, Calif., 2:42:08.
91.Alain Le Diouron, Sr, France, 2:42:16.
92. Chris Carrier, Richmond, Va., 2:42:21.
93. James Parejko, Pullman, Wash., 2:42:23.
94. Brad Orr, Rock Hill, S.C., 2:42:33.
95.T J. Sanderson, Bolivar, Mo., 2:42:36.
96. Brian Deal, St. Louis, 2:42:37.
97. Antony Keller, Brighton, Mass., 2:42:40.
98. Alejandro Troncoso, Flagstaff, Ariz.,
2:43:07.
99. Kyle Ormsby, Cambridge, Mass., 2:43:08.
100. Daniel Yi, Alexandria, Va., 2:43:14.
Women
1. Sharon Cherop, Kenya, 2:31:50.
2. Jemima Jelagat Sumgong, Kenya, 2:31:52.
3. Georgina Rono, Kenya, 2:33:09.
4. Firehiwot Dado, Ethiopia, 2:34:56.
5. Diana Sigei, Kenya, 2:35:40.
6. Rita Jeptoo, Kenya, 2:35:53.
7. Mayumi Fujita, Japan, 2:39:11.
8. Nadezdha Leonteva, Russia, 2:40:40.
9. Svetlana Pretot, France, 2:40:50.
10. Sheri Piers, Falmouth, Maine, 2:41:55.
11. Genet Getaneh, Ethiopia, 2:42:11.
12. Larisa Zyusko, Russia, 2:47:47.
13. Sheila Croft, Redmond, Was., 2:48:31.
14. Paula Keating, Canada, 2:48:58.
15. Hilary Dionne, Charlestown, Mass.,


Nature Coast added a run
in the top of the fifth, but Bax-
ter made it a moot point He
nailed a two-run homer in
the bottom of the fifth to put a
cap on the night
"We had those two big in-
nings," Logue said. "We had a
four-run inning and a two-
run inning, and that was the
margin of victory When we
scored, we scored in
bunches. So that's always
nice to see. Sheldon got that
big home run, and he hit that
ball well. We played great de-
fensively, only had one error
So we're playing good funda-
mental, all-around baseball
right now. And I'm really
happy with how we've play-
ing, especially with it being so
close to the end. But we have
to be humble, and we have to
stay hungry If we do that,
we'll have a good shot come
playofftime."
With the win, Lecanto im-
proved to 13-9 on the season.


2:51:56.
16. Shannon Miller, Jacksonville, Fla.,
2:55:47.
17. Lindsay Willard, Medford, Mass., 2:55:53.
18. Jen Nicholson, Canada, 2:56:01.
19. Akiko Kudo, Japan, 2:56:20.
20. Meredith Lambert, Ardmore, Pa., 2:56:42.
11. Dalena Custer, Charlotte, N.C., 2:58:00.
12. Rachel Stanton, Australia, 2:58:14.
13. Hollie Estupinian, Soquel, Calif., 2:59:23.
14. Denise Robson, Canada, 2:59:43.
15. Suzanne Evans, Canada, 2:59:50.



Tennis rankings
Through April 15
Men singles
1. Novak Djokovic, Serbia, 12670
2. Rafael Nadal, Spain, 9215
3. Roger Federer, Switzerland, 8880
4. Andy Murray, Britain, 7680
5. Jo-Wilfried Tsonga, France, 4795
6. David Ferrer, Spain, 4280
7. Tomas Berdych, Czech Republic, 3810
8. Janko Tipsarevic, Serbia, 2820
9. John Isner, United States, 2770
10. Mardy Fish, United States, 2725
Men doubles
1. Bob Bryan, United States, 8,730
1. Mike Bryan, United States, 8,730
3. Max Mirnyi, Belarus, 8,640
3. Daniel Nestor, Canada, 8,640
5. Michael Llodra, France, 7,560
6. Nenad Zimonjic, Serbia, 7,440
7. Leander Paes, India, 6,015
8. Robert Lindstedt, Sweden, 4,590
9. Horia Tecau, Romania, 4,590
10. Rohan Bopanna, India, 4,520
Women singles
1. Victoria Azarenka, Belarus, 8980
2. Maria Sharapova, Russia, 7930
3. Petra Kvitova, Czech Republic, 7095
4. Agnieszka Radwanska, Poland, 6710
5. Samantha Stosur, Australia, 5825
6. Caroline Wozniacki, Denmark, 5450
7. Marion Bartoli, France, 5020
8. Li Na, China, 4880
9. Serena Williams, United States, 4300
10.Vera Zvonareva, Russia, 3895
Women doubles
1. Liezel Huber, United States, 10,040
2. Lisa Raymond, United States, 10,040
3. Kveta Peschke, Czech Republic, 7,950
4. Katarina Srebotnik, Slovenia, 7,950
5.Vania King, United States, 7,225
6. Yaroslava Shvedova, Kazakhstan, 7,095


Associated Press
Indianapolis Colts quarterback Peyton
Manning greets Denver Broncos wide
receiver Brandon Stokley following a
Sept. 30, 2007, game. Stokley is returning
to Denver to play with old friend Manning.

Manning goes to work with his
new team
ENGLEWOOD, Colo. Peyton Manning said
he's pleased with the first day of offseason work-
outs with his new teammates on the Denver
Broncos.
The four-time MVP, who signed with the Bron-
cos after he was cut by the Colts, said he was
glad to throw the ball around at team headquar-
ters rather than sneaking around to Denver-area
high school fields to play catch with receiver Eric
Decker and good friend Brandon Stokley, as
they've done for the last month.
Manning declined to talk about his health or
the progress he's made as he works to regain
his arm strength following a series of neck oper-
ations that sidelined him for all of last season
and led to his departure from Indianapolis.
AP source: Brees, Fujita, Smith
meet with NFL
NEW YORK Saints quarterback Drew
Brees, former New Orleans linebacker Scott Fu-
jita and players union head DeMaurice Smith
were at the NFL offices Monday discussing the
team's bounty program.
Other issues also were being discussed with
league executives, according to a person with
knowledge of the meetings. The person spoke
on condition of anonymity because the talks are
not being made public.
The league would not comment on the meetings.
Brees and Fujita, who is now with the Browns,
are members of the NFL Players Association's
executive committee. Fujita was with the Saints
in 2009 when the pay-for-pain bounty pool grew
as large as $50,000 and the team won the Super
Bowl.
NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell is ex-
pected to soon punish players for their roles in
the program that got Saints coach Sean Payton
suspended for 2012. Between 22 and 27 current
and former Saints defenders were involved, ac-
cording to the league investigation.


BOSTON
Continued from Page B1

It was almost 10 minutes
behind the world best estab-
lished here a year ago by
Geoffrey Mutai and the sec-
ond-slowest Boston victory
since 1985. Mutai, who was
hoping a repeat victory
would earn him a spot on
the Kenyan Olympic team,
dropped out after 18 miles
with stomach cramps.
Instead, it was Korir who
may have won a ticket to the
London Games.
"To me, I think running
the Boston Marathon is an
Olympic event," the two-
time Los Angeles Marathon
winner said. "I don't care
what comes up after this,
but I'm really, really happy
to win Boston."
Sharon Cherop won the
women's race to complete
the Kenyan sweep, outkick-
ing Jemima Jelagat Sum-
gong to win by 2 seconds in
2:31:50. The women's win-
ner was decided by a sprint
down Boylston Street for the
fifth consecutive race all
of them decided by 3 sec-
onds or less.
Cherop, who was also


Ryan reiterates Sanchez is
Jets' starting quarterback
NEW YORK Jets coach Rex Ryan said
"there's no question" Mark
Sanchez will be New York's
starting quarterback this sea-
son, while recently acquired 4
Tim Tebow will be his backup.
Ryan reiterated Monday the
comments he has made since
the Jets traded for Tebow last
month, adding he doesn't think
having both will be "a problem Tebow
at all." Center Nick Mangold
says he's "all for it" if Tebow helps the Jets.
Players reported to the team's facility in
Florham Park, N.J., for voluntary workouts,
marking the official start of preparations for this
season.
Ford to use all-electric car
as NASCAR pace car
DEARBORN, Mich. Ford Motor Company
will become the first manufacturer in NASCAR his-
tory to supply an all-electric car as the pace car.
The new Focus Electric will lead the field at
the April 28 Sprint Cup Series race at Richmond.
"Highlighting the Focus Electric as a pace car
is a fun way to educate consumers about the
kinds of benefits our electrified vehicles deliver
and show people our commitment to provide
Ford customers the power of choice for leading
fuel economy in the vehicle that best meets their
needs," Mark Fields, president of Ford's Ameri-
cas division, said Monday.
The car will be unveiled to the public at the
Virginia State Capitol on April 25.
House votes to award Gold
Medal to Nicklaus
WASHINGTON The House has voted to
bestow the Congressional Gold Medal on golfing
great Jack Nicklaus.
Nicklaus was cited for his golfing achieve-
ments, including a record 18 major champi-
onships, and his humanitarian work. Nicklaus
heads the Nicklaus Children's Health Care Foun-
dation and has raised more than $12 million to
support pediatric health services.
The Congressional Gold Medal is awarded to
prominent military leaders, public servants, ath-
letes and artists. It was last given in 2010 to
Japanese-American World War II veterans.
Union Rags replaces Hansen
atop AP's Derby Top 10
Hansen blew his chance to be a Kentucky
Derby favorite. He finished second in the Blue
Grass Stakes.
After being beaten by Dullahan on the final
weekend of major prep races before the Derby
on May 5, Hansen has been replaced by Union
Rags at No. 1 on the AP's latest Run to the
Roses' Top 10 list of contenders.
From wire reports


-- -

Associated Press
ABOVE LEFT: Wesley Korir of Kenya smiles after crossing
the finish line to win the men's division of the 2012 Boston
Marathon on Monday in Boston. ABOVE RIGHT: Women's
winner Sharon Cherop of Kenya crosses the finish line.


hoping to be selected for the
Kenyan Olympic team, was
third at the world champi-
onships and third in Boston
last year
"This time around, I was
really prepared," she said.
"Last time the race went so
fast and I didn't know I was
about to finish. I didn't know
the course well and I didn't
know the finish line was
coming."
Matebo finished 26 sec-
onds behind Korir, and
Bernard Kipyego was third


CLEMENS Bonds
extend
Continued from Page BI May 4 in


even hinted that perhaps
the defense might challenge
Congress' authority to call
the hearing in the first
place, but U.S. District
Judge Reggie Walton was
skeptical of that line of ques-
tioning. The judge reminded
lawyers again some of the
jurors from the first trial felt
a retrial would be a waste of
taxpayer money, adding one
of the hurdles in the case is
some people think "we have
some significant problems
in this country that are not
being addressed by this
Congress."
By the end of the day -
after the proceedings had
moved to a smaller court-
room- only 13 potential ju-
rors had been screened and
seven had been asked to re-
turn Wednesday for more
screening. Clemens made
about $160 million in salary


SAN FRANC
Barry Bonds ha
an extension un
file written argui
appeal to overtu
struction of just
The 9th U.S.
of Appeals on M
granted a secor
request by Bon(
which had been
The original dea
been March 21
court granted ai
last month to Ap
Under the ne
the government
until June 4 to r
that, Bonds' law
have another 1'
a reply brief if th
choose.


and bonuses ii
major league c


as Kenyans swept the
podium in both genders.
Jason Hartmann, of Boul-
der, Colo., was in fourth
place and the top American.
"The pace wasn't blasting,
so it wasn't anything that
was over my head," Hart-
mann said. "There were so
many times that you wanted
to throw in the towel, but
you just fought on. I don't
think that anyone coming to
this race really could say
they were prepared for this
heat."


iven safe to say hardly any of it
given came from the three District
ion to of Columbia residents all
appeal African-American females
who made the cut after
ISCO saying they had never heard
s been given of him.
itil May 4 to "I'm not a fan of sports -
ments in his period," said one prospect,
urn his ob- who works as a cashier at a
ce conviction, grocery store.
Circuit Court As the clock was hitting 5
monday p.m., Walton called it a day
nd extension and chided the lawyers over
ds' lawyers, the day's tedious pace: "It
I filed Friday. doesn't help the process to
adline had repeat what I've already
before the asked."
n extension The retrial is expected to
pril 20. last four to six weeks, with
schedule, the first several days de-
twil have, voted to finding 12 jurors
ewill fthve and four alternates with no
respond. After preconceived opinion about
yearss will the case. The vetting process
4 days to file began with Walton taking
ley so more than an hour to read
86 yes-or-no questions to the
From wire reports entire pool, including "Do
you have any opinions about
n his 24-year Major League Baseball -
areer, but it's good, bad or whatever?"


Sports BRIEFS


SCOREBOARD





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Magic holds off 76ers for win


Anderson scores

26pointsfor

Orlando
Associated Press

ORLANDO Ryan An-
derson had 26 points and 16
rebounds, J.J. Redick
scored 18 points and the Or-
lando Magic held off the
Philadelphia 76ers 113-100
on Monday night.
The Magic won their sec-
ond straight game and
played their fifth consecu-
tive without Dwight
Howard, who is out indefi-
nitely with a herniated disc
in his back. He has missed
seven games overall with
the injury
Orlando improved to 3-4
without the All-Star center
this season.
Jrue Holiday led Philadel-
phia with 18 points and
Andre Iguodala, Thaddeus
Young and Lou Williams
each finished with 15.
Both teams shot above 50
percent, but the Magic were
aided by a 46-30 rebounding
advantage.
The Sixers dropped their
second straight game. They
continue their second back-
to-back-to-back stretch of
the season Tuesday against
Indiana.
Pacers 111,
Timberwolves 88
INDIANAPOLIS David
West had 22 points and 10 re-
bounds to help the Indiana Pac-
ers beat the Minnesota
Timberwolves for their fifth con-
secutive win.
Danny Granger scored 19
points, Paul George had 18 and
Roy Hibbert added 12 points
and 11 rebounds for the Pacers,
who solidified their grip on the
No. 3 position in the Eastern
Conference standings.
Jose Barea had 14 points
and nine assists and reserves
Michael Beasley and Derrick
Williams added 13 points each
for Minnesota, which lost its
10th in a row. Kevin Love sat
out for the third consecutive
game with a mild concussion


Associated Press
Orlando's Ryan Anderson gets around Philadelphia's Spencer Hawes for a basket during
the first half of Monday's game in Orlando. The Magic won 113-100.


and a neck strain.
Hawks 109, Raptors 87
TORONTO Jeff Teague
had 19 points and 10 assists,
Ivan Johnson scored 21 points
and the Atlanta Hawks beat
Toronto, their seventh win in
eight games against the Raptors.
Joe Johnson scored 18
points and Josh Smith had 15
points and nine rebounds as
the Hawks avenged Sunday's
102-86 home loss to Toronto, a
game in which the Raptors
never trailed.
Marvin Williams scored 16


for Atlanta and former Raptors
star Tracy McGrady scored
nine of his 11 points in the
fourth quarter.
DeMar DeRozan led Toronto
with 22 points, and James
Johnson had 18.
Hornets 75, Bobcats 67
CHARLOTTE, N.C. -
Greivis Vasquez scored 20
points and the New Orleans
Hornets handed the Charlotte
Bobcats a franchise-record
17th straight loss.
The Hornets, playing without
leading scorers Eric Gordon


and Chris Kaman, won despite
shooting 34 percent from the
floor in the second-lowest scor-
ing NBA game this season.
Carl Landry added 14 points
and 12 rebounds off the bench
for New Orleans.
Gerald Henderson led Char-
lotte with 27 points.
The loss assured the Bobcats
(7-53) of the worst record in the
league, giving them a 25 per-
cent chance of landing the No. 1
pick in the NBA lottery May 30.
Heat 101, Nets 98
NEWARK, N.J. LeBron


James scored Miami's final 17
points in a furious one-man
rally, finishing with 37 as the
Heat pulled out a victory over
the New Jersey Nets.
In a game the Heat never led
until the final 51 seconds,
James willed them to their 10th
straight victory over the Nets.
With Dwyane Wade resting,
James scored those 17 points
over the last 4:48.
Chris Bosh had 22 points
and 15 rebounds for the Heat,
carrying them early in the fourth
until James checked back in
midway through the period and
turned what appeared a certain
loss into a stunning victory.
Kris Humphries scored 29
points and MarShon Brooks
had 24 for the Nets.
Nuggets 105,
Rockets 102
HOUSTON -Arron Afflalo
scored 26 points, Ty Lawson
had 25 and the Denver
Nuggets continued their playoff
push with a victory over the fad-
ing Houston Rockets.
Al Harrington added 15
points and Andre Miller had 13
assists for the Nuggets, who
swept back-to-back games with
the Rockets, the team directly
behind them in the Western
Conference standings.
Goran Dragic and Chandler
Parsons scored 21 points
apiece for the Rockets, who
have dropped four straight.
Wizards 87, Bulls 84
CHICAGO Kevin
Seraphin had 21 points and 13
rebounds, John Wall scored 16
points, and the Washington
Wizards beat the short-handed
Chicago Bulls.
Richard Hamilton scored 22
points to lead the Bulls, who
played without stars Derrick Rose
and Luol Deng. Rose was out
with a sore right foot, and Deng
sat out due to sore right ribs.
After two straight games of
clutch 3-pointers in the finals
seconds to force overtime in
wins against Miami and Detroit,
the Bulls missed a third chance
when Hamilton's 3-pointer was
blocked by James Singleton
with 5.9 seconds left and C.J.
Watson missed in the final
seconds.


BASKETBALL/HOCKEY


x-L.A. Lakers
x-L.A. Clippers
Phoenix
Golden State
Sacramento


Pacific Division
W L Pct
39 22 .639
S 37 23 .617
31 29 .517
22 37 .373
20 41 .328


x-clinched playoff spot
y-clinched division
Sunday's Games
Miami 93, New York 85
L.A. Lakers 112, Dallas 108, OT
Sacramento 104, Portland 103
Toronto 102, Atlanta 86
Orlando 100, Cleveland 84
Boston 94, Charlotte 82
Chicago 100, Detroit 94, OT
New Orleans 88, Memphis 75
Denver 101, Houston 86
Monday's Games
New Orleans 75, Charlotte 67
Indiana 111, Minnesota 88
Atlanta 109, Toronto 87
Orlando 113, Philadelphia 100
Miami 101, New Jersey 98
Washington 87, Chicago 84
Denver 105, Houston 102
Dallas at Utah, late
Portland at Phoenix, late
San Antonio at Golden State, late
Oklahoma City at L.A. Clippers, late
Tuesday's Games
Indiana at Philadelphia, 7p.m.
Cleveland at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Memphis at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Boston at New York, 8 p.m.
San Antonio at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 p.m.


Lundqvist saves Rangers wins


Associated Press

OTTAWA Henrik
Lundqvist made 39 saves for
his fourth NHL playoff
shutout, and Brian Boyle
scored for the third straight
game as the New York
Rangers beat the Ottawa Sen-
ators 1-0 on Monday night
The Rangers, who lost
Game 2 at home in overtime,
lead the best-of-seven, first-
round series 2-1. Game 4 will
be Wednesday in Ottawa.
Lundqvist's biggest save
came in the last minute
when he robbed Kyle Turris
on the doorstep with a quick
pad stop.
Craig Anderson was
nearly as good, keeping the
Senators in it with a 22-save
effort.
Ottawa was without cap-
tain Daniel Alfredsson, who
sustained a concussion in
Game 2 when he was el-
bowed in the head by
Rangers rookie Carl
Hagelin. Hagelin served the
first of a three-game NHL
suspension for the hit.
Bruins 4, Capitals 3
WASHINGTON Zdeno
Chara scored the tiebreaking


Associated Press
New York's Brian Boyle, left, skates towards teammate Dan
Girardi as he celebrates his game winning goal against the
Ottawa Senators during the third period of Game 3 of the
first round of Stanley Cup playoffs Monday at the Scotiabank
Place in Ottawa. The Rangers defeated the Senators 1-0.


goal during 4-on-4 play with
less than 2 minutes left, and the
reigning Stanley Cup champion
Boston Bruins finally solved
playoff rookie goalie Braden
Holtby, beating the Washington
Capitals to take a 2-1 lead in
the first-round series.
Chara's shot from the right
circle appeared to get deflected
on its way past Holtby. The Bru-
ins captain also had two


NHL playoff glance
FIRST ROUND (Best-of-7) (x-if necessary)
AllTimes EDT


EASTERN CONFERENCE
N.Y. Rangers 2, Ottawa 1
Thursday, April 12: NY Rangers 4, Ottawa 2
Saturday, April 14: Ottawa 3, NY Rangers 2, OT
Monday, April 16: NY Rangers 1, Ottawa 0
Wednesday April 18: NY Rangers at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m.
Saturday, April 21: Ottawa at NY Rangers, 7 p.m.
x-Monday, April 23: NY Rangers at Ottawa, TBD
x-Thursday April 26: Ottawa at NY Rangers, TBD
Boston 2,Washington 1
Thursday, April 12: Boston 1, Washington 0, OT
Saturday, April 14: Washington 2, Boston 1, 20T
Monday, April 16: Boston 4, Washington 3
Thursday, April 19: Boston at Washington, 7:30 p.m.
Saturday, April 21: Washington at Boston, 3 p.m.
x-Sunday, April 22: Boston at Washington, TBD
x-Wednesday April 25: Washington at Boston, TBD
New Jersey 1, Florida 1
Friday, April 13: New Jersey 3, Florida 2
Sunday, April 15: Florida 4, New Jersey 2
Tuesday, April 17: Florida at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
Thursday, April 19: Florida at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
x-Saturday, April 21: New Jersey at Florida, 6:30 p.m.
x-Tuesday, April 24: Florida at New Jersey, TBD
x-Thursday April 26: New Jersey at Florida, TBD
Philadelphia 3, Pittsburgh 0
Wednesday April 11: Philadelphia 4, Pittsburgh 3, OT
Friday, April 13: Philadelphia 8, Pittsburgh 5
Sunday, April 15: Philadelphia 8, Pittsburgh 4
Wednesday April 18: Pittsburgh at Philadelphia, 7:30 p.m.
x-Friday, April 20: Philadelphia at Pittsburgh, 7:30 p.m.
x-Sunday, April 22: Pittsburgh at Philadelphia, TBD
x-Tuesday, April 24: Philadelphia at Pittsburgh, TBD


assists.
Tim Thomas, last season's
playoff MVP, made 29 saves
and ignored the taunting from
fans who held up photos of
President Barack Obama, re-
minding Boston's goalie that he
turned down a trip to the White
House in January with his
teammates.
Game 4 is Thursday in
Washington.


WESTERN CONFERENCE
Los Angeles 3, Vancouver 0
Wednesday April 11: Los Angeles 4, Vancouver 2
Friday April 13: Los Angeles 4, Vancouver 2
Sunday, April 15: Los Angeles 1, Vancouver 0
Wednesday April 18: Vancouver at Los Angeles, 10 p.m.
x-Sunday, April 22: Los Angeles at Vancouver, TBD
x-Tuesday April 24: Vancouver at Los Angeles, TBD
x-Thursday April 26: Los Angeles at Vancouver, TBD
San Jose 1,St. Louis 1
Thursday April 12: San Jose 3, St. Louis 2, 20T
Saturday April 14: St. Louis 3, San Jose 0
Monday, April 16: St. Louis at San Jose, 10 p.m.
Thursday, April 19: St. Louis at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.
Saturday April 21: San Jose at St. Louis, 7:30 p.m.
x-Monday, April 23: St. Louis at San Jose, TBD
x-Wednesday, April 25: San Jose at St. Louis, TBD
Phoenix 1, Chicago 1
Thursday April 12: Phoenix 3, Chicago 2, OT
Saturday April 14: Chicago 4, Phoenix 3, OT
Tuesday April 17: Phoenix at Chicago, 9 p.m.
Thursday April 19: Phoenix at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Saturday April 21: Chicago at Phoenix, 10 p.m.
x-Monday, April 23: Phoenix at Chicago, TBD
x-Wednesday, April 25: Chicago at Phoenix, TBD
Nashville 2, Detroit 1
Wednesday, April 11: Nashville 3, Detroit 2
Friday April 13: Detroit 3, Nashville 2
Sunday, April 15: Nashville 3, Detroit 2
Tuesday April 17: Nashville at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Friday April 20: Detroit at Nashville, 8 p.m.
x-Sunday, April 22: Nashville at Detroit, TBD
x-Tuesday April 24: Detroit at Nashville, TBD


Younger Pitino new
FlU coach
MIAMI Florida Interna-
tional has called a Monday af-
ternoon news conference to
introduce Richard Pitino as its
basketball coach.
He is the son of Louisville
coach Rick Pitino and spent
this past season as the associ-
ate head coach on his father's
staff, helping the Cardinals
reach the Final Four.
At FlU, Richard Pitino will
replace Isiah Thomas. The
Basketball Hall of Fame player
was fired by the Panthers on
April 6 after going 26-65 in
three seasons.
Terms of the contract were
not immediately released,
though as a public university
FlU will eventually have to
make them available.
Rick Pitino confirmed the
move Sunday, saying he was
"delighted" for his 29-year-old
son. Richard Pitino will be a
head coach for the first time.
Ogwumike taken
first in WNBA draft
BRISTOL, Conn. Stanford
star Nnemkadi Ogwumike was
selected with the No. 1 pick in
the WNBA draft by the Los An-
geles Sparks on Monday.
Ogwumike helped guide the
Cardinal to the Final Four dur-
ing all four of her seasons at
the school, including this year's
loss to eventual champion Bay-
lor. The 6-foot-2 forward aver-
aged 22.5 points and 10.2
rebounds this past season.
The Sparks finished with the
fourth worst record in the
league at 15-19 but won the
draft lottery in November. Los
Angeles also had the top pick
in 2008 and selected Ten-
nessee star Candace Parker,
who went on to win Rookie of
the Year and MVP honors in
her first season.
The WNBA season begins
May 18, with training camps
opening April 29.
2014 All-Star game
in New Orleans
NEW ORLEANS The
NBA is awarding New Orleans
the 2014 All-Star game, now
that Saints owner Tom Benson
has agreed to buy the Hornets


and sign a lease extension at
New Orleans Arena.
NBA Commissioner David
Stern, who made the an-
nouncement in New Orleans
with Benson and Louisiana
Gov. Bobby Jindal on Monday
afternoon, said the All-Star
game is a reward to the city
and state for efforts to secure
the Hornets' long-term future
in Louisiana.
Stern had already pledged
New Orleans would get an All-
Star game once a new owner
and lease extension were in
place. Because of potential
conflicts with Mardi Gras in
2015 and 2016, awarding the
game in 2014 made the most
sense.
The 2013 game will be
played in Houston.
Former UF star
Schintzius dies
TAMPA- Former Univer-
sity of Florida basketball star
Dwayne Schintzius, who also
played in the NBA, has died
after a two-year battle against
cancer. He was 43.
Relatives say Schintzius
died Sunday at a Tampa hospi-
tal following complications
from a failed bone marrow
transplant. Schintzius began
treatment for leukemia in 2010.
The 7-foot-2 center played
for the Gators from 1987 to
1990, helping Florida to its first
three NCAA Tournament ap-
pearances. He is Florida's
sixth-highest scorer with 1,624
points.
Ridnour finalist for
sportsmanship award
MINNEAPOLIS Min-
nesota Timberwolves guard
Luke Ridnour is one of six fi-
nalists for the NBA's annual
sportsmanship award.
Candidates were announced
by the league Monday, one for
each of the six divisions.
The winner will be revealed
after the regular season. The
award is named after former
Detroit Pistons star Joe Du-
mars and based on ethical be-
havior, fair play and integrity.
Ridnour, in his second year
with the team, averages a ca-
reer-high 12.1 points plus 2.7
rebounds and 4.8 assists.
From wire reports


12 Local Teams
Co-ed Tournament
to benefit
United Way
of Citrus County


$3 donation or
donation of food
or new clothes
at door.

* Drawings for

Apple iPads

* Family's: Bring

the kids to have

fun watching

your neighbors

play basketball

* Entertainment

* Food


For more information

call: 795-5483


- Basketball BRIEFS


TUESDAY, APRIL 17, 2012 B5

NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
x-Boston 36 25 .590 -
NewYork 31 29 .517 4Y2
Philadelphia 31 29 .517 4Y2
NewJersey 22 40 .355 14/2
Toronto 22 40 .355 14'2
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
y-Miami 43 17 .717 -
x-Atlanta 36 25 .590 712
x-Orlando 36 25 .590 712
Washington 15 46 .246 28/2
Charlotte 7 53 .117 36
Central Division
W L Pct GB
y-Chicago 46 15 .754 -
x-Indiana 39 22 .639 7
Milwaukee 29 31 .483 16'2
Detroit 22 38 .367 23/2
Cleveland 20 39 .339 25
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
y-SanAntonio 42 16 .724 -
Memphis 35 25 .583 8
Dallas 34 27 .557 9/2
Houston 32 29 .525 1112
NewOrleans 19 42 .311 24/2
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
y-Oklahoma City 44 16 .733 -
Denver 34 27 .557 10'2
Utah 31 30 .508 13/2
Portland 28 33 .459 16/2
Minnesota 25 37 .403 20












ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE

Ferguson to take
show to Scotland
NEW YORK- Craig
Ferguson is going back to
Scotland and taking
"Late
Late
Show"
viewers
along for
S, the trip.
CBS
says the
Scotland-
Craig based
Ferguson episodes
will air
the week of May 14.
While there, Ferguson
explores Edinburgh and
Glasgow. He also returns
to his hometown of Cum-
bernauld, with stops at
his childhood home and
high school.
On the trip, taped last
month, he's joined by ac-
tors Mila Kunis, Michael
Clarke Duncan and
Rashida Jones, as well as
author-humorist David
Sedaris.

Alec Baldwin
explains tweets
WASHINGTON -Alec
Baldwin says he's still a
fan of
NBC de-
spite
tweeting
angrily
last week
that he
was "leav-
ing NBC
Alec just in
Baldwin time"
after a
"Today" show crew
camped outside his
apartment building.
In Washington to push
for arts funding, the actor
said Monday that a big
draw ofjoining the cast
of "30 Rock" was working
at NBC.
Baldwin says he'll fin-
ish a seventh season of
"30 Rock" but that it's
slated to end next year.
He says NBC needs to
redo its lineup to get out
of ratings trouble.
Baldwin says NBC has
the best programming
legacy, but he's not a fan
of "Today" He says
there's always ABC's
"Good Morning America"
or CNN's Anderson
Cooper at night.

Pair lose appeal
in Stamos case
MARQUETTE, Mich. -
A federal appeals court
has upheld the convic-
tions of a man and
woman from Michigan's
Upper Peninsula who
were accused of trying to
blackmail actor John
Stamos.
A three-judge panel in
Cincinnati rejected chal-
lenges to the indictment
Monday, as well as
claims that Allison Coss
and Scott Sippola should
have received a break at
sentencing for accepting
responsibility.
They were sentenced
to four years in prison in
2010 after a jury con-
victed them of conspiracy
and using email to
threaten a person's repu-
tation. Coss and Sippola
threatened to sell old
photos of Stamos with
strippers and cocaine to
the tabloids unless he
paid $680,000. The FBI
said the photos didn't
exist. Stamos met Coss in
Florida in 2004.
-- From wire reports


Pulitzer winners tapped


Sandusky scandal

Muslim spying

stories get nods

Associated Press

NEW YORK The Associated
Press won a Pulitzer Prize for in-
vestigative reporting Monday for
documenting the New York Police i
Department's widespread spying
on Muslims, while the turmoil-rid-
den Philadelphia Inquirerwas
honored in the public service cate- ,
gory for its examination of vio-
lence in the city's schools.
The Patriot-News in Harrisburg,
Pa. and in particular, 24-year-
old reporter Sara Ganim were
honored for local reporting for Associated Press
breaking the Penn State sexual Patriot-News reporter Sara Ganim, 24, left, calls her sister on Monday while
abuse scandal that ultimately hugging Patriot-News reporter Jan Murphy after winning the 2012 Pulitzer
brought down football coach Joe Prize for Local Reporting, at the paper's offices in Harrisburg, Pa. Ganim
Paterno. broke the news of the grand jury investigation into allegations against for-
mer Penn State assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky, and she also was
Another Pulitzer for investiga- first to report his indictment on charges of molesting several boys involved
ive Sreprtig was foawarded to in a charity he ran. Sandusky has denied the allegations.
The Seattle Times for a series
about accidental methadone over-
doses among patients with
chronicpain. Fictin gets rare snub
David Wood of the Huffington
Post won for national reporting for
a look at the suffering endured by Firt time in 35years noprize awarded
American veterans wounded in
Iraq and Afghanistan. It is only the
second Pulitzer ever awarded for Associated Press Sig Gissler, administrator of the
reporting that appeared online Pulitzer Prizes. "There were mul-
only NEW YORK The late Man- tiple factors involved in these deci-
The New York Times received ning Marable won the Pulitzer sions, and we don't
two prizes: David Kocieniewski Prize for history discuss in detail why
was honored in the explanatory Monday, hon- ,. a prize is given or not
reporting category for a series on ored for a M."gl- iven."
how wealthy people and corpora- colm X book he I IN News about the
tions use loopholes to avoid taxes. worked on f:or fiction category was
And Jeffrey Gettleman won for in- decades butd ( 1 greeted with sur-
ternational reporting for his cover- not live to see prise.
age of famine and conflict in East published. F:r the "No fiction
Africa. first time in 35 prize!" Jane Smi-
Sig Gissler, administrator of the years, no fiction I Au[itV EiO1f. ley, a Pulitzer win-
prizes, said the winners in this prize was gi\ en ner in 1992 for "A
year's 96th annual competition Pulitzer jicl e I Thousand Acres,"
show that journalism is still a "vi- almost awarded wrote on her
brant force" as a watchdog for the two posthuni ii ls Facebook page.
public. prizes. David Fo-ter "" ..... "Not even to
A year after the Pulitzer judges Wallace's "The P.le 0.....".. (Geraldine
found no entry worthy of the prize King," a noel .I- c Brooks') 'Caleb's
for breaking news, The sembled from notes Crossing!' I did
Tuscaloosa News of Alabama won he left behind it the love that one."
the award for coverage of a time of his suit ide Vilng/ In an email to
deadly tornado. By blending tradi- in 2008, was dlmong Associated Press The Associated
tional reporting with the use of the finalists for fic- Manning Marable was awarded Press, Smiley
social media, the newspaper pro- tion. Also cited were a posthumous Pulitzer Prize in added: "I can't be-
vided real-time updates and Karen Russell's history for his book "Malcolm lieve there wasn't
helped locate missing people, "Swamplandia" and X: A Life Of Reinvention." a worthy one. It's
while producing in-depth print Denis Johnson's a shame. But
coverage despite a power outage novella "Train Dreams." sometimes a selection committee
that forced the paper to publish at "It's wonderful that the Pulitzer really cannot agree, and giving no
a plant 50 miles away nominating committee recom- award is the outcome. Too bad."
The Philadelphia Inquirer- mended 'The Pale King' to the Fiction judges have withheld the
which has recently gone through judges," the book's editor, Michael Pulitzer 10 times before, according
bankruptcy and repeated rounds Pietsch of Little, Brown and Com- to Gissler, most recently in 1977.
of cutbacks and has changed pany, wrote in an email. "Anything Among eligible books that have
hands five times in the past six that brings readers to David's bril- been bypassed: Thomas Pynchon's
years showed how school vio- liant novels, especially his great "Gravity's Rainbow," James
lence went underreported and novel 'Infinite Jest,' is a good Dickey's "Deliverance" and Kurt
shed light on the school system's thing!" Vonnegut's "Cat's Cradle."
lackluster response to the prob- "The main reason (for the fiction Quiara Alegria Hudes' play
lem. In response to the newspa- decision) is that no one of the "Water by the Spoonful," which
per's reporting, the school system three entries received a majority, centers on an Iraq war veteran's
established a new way of reporting and thus after lengthy considera- search for meaning, won the
serious incidents. tion, no prize was awarded," said Pulitzer for drama.


2012 PULITZER PRIZE WINNERS


Journalism
* Public service: The
Philadelphia Inquirer.
* Breaking news report-
ing: The Tuscaloosa
(Ala.) News staff.
* Investigative reporting:
Matt Apuzzo, Adam
Goldman, Eileen Sulli-
van and Chris Hawley
of The Associated
Press, and Michael J.
Berens and Ken Arm-
strong of The Seattle
Times.
* Explanatory reporting:
David Kocieniewski of
The New York Times.
* Local reporting: Sara
Ganim and members


Birthday: There are strong indications that you will be far
more appreciated by your peer group in the year ahead
than you ever were previously. This new esteem will usher
in fresh opportunities.
Aries (March 21-April 19) If you have work of a mental
nature that needs to get done, try to find yourself a se-
cluded corner. The fewer disruptions you have, the more
you'll get accomplished.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Take advantage of an oppor-
tunity to spend some time with a recent acquaintance you
found to be quite interesting. Things could develop into a
fun friendship.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) Don't hesitate to spend some
time trying out a few of your newer ideas. You actually
won't know how good they are until they have been tested
under real-life conditions.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) When it's properly chal-


of The Patriot-News
Staff, Harrisburg, Pa.
* National reporting:
David Wood of The
Huffington Post.
* International report-
ing: Jeffrey Gettleman
of The New York Times.
* Feature writing: Eli
Sanders of The
Stranger, a Seattle
weekly.
* Commentary: Mary
Schmich of the
Chicago Tribune.
* Criticism: Wesley Mor-
ris of The Boston Globe.
* Editorial writing: No
award.


* Editorial cartooning:
Matt Wuerker of
Politico.
* Breaking news photog-
raphy: Massoud Hos-
saini of Agence
France-Presse.
* Feature photography:
Craig F Walker of The
Denver Post.

Arts
* Fiction: No award.
* Drama: "Water by the
Spoonful" by Quiara
Alegrfa Hudes.
* History: "Malcolm X: A
Life of Reinvention" by
the late Manning
Marable (Viking).


Today's HOROSCOPE
lenged, one of your more valuable assets is your curiosity
Take some time to learn something about how to advance
your personal interests.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) -An arrangement you have with
another that seems to be going nowhere could be sub-
jected to some modifications. Your actions will put you on a
productive track.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -You may be required to make
an important decision, but consider it carefully, because it
might need several alterations that'll prove to be helpful, as
well as beneficial.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) When in a business meeting,
you should pay close attention to the small details. Al-
though they aren't always important, the nitty-gritty will be
especially vital at this time.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Because you'll be in a
friendly mood, in which others will enjoy being with you as


* Biography: "George F
Kennan: An American
Life" by John Lewis
Gaddis (The Penguin
Press).
* Poetry: "Life on Mars"
by Tracy K. Smith
(Graywolf Press).
* General nonfiction:
"The Swerve: How the
World Became Mod-
ern" by Stephen Green-
blatt (W.W. Norton and
Co.).
* Music: "Silent Night:
Opera in Two Acts" by
Kevin Puts, commis-
sioned and premiered
by the Minnesota
Opera in Minneapolis
on Nov. 12, 2011.


much as you'll enjoy being with them, this should turn out
to be a very pleasant day.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Owing to some very valu-
able information you'll get that was previously denied you,
an important matter can finally be completed to your advan-
tage and satisfaction.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) It behooves you to double
your efforts to get in touch with an important someone who
has recently proved elusive. You'll finally make contact, with
big results.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Be alert for a new way to
enhance your material security. There are strong indica-
tions that you will come up with a bright, profitable idea.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Don't delay what you want
to do by waiting on slowpokes lingering over a second cup
of coffee. Much can be accomplished when you get an
early start.


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

SUNDAY, APRIL 15
Fantasy 5:4 10 11 13 15
5-of-5 2 winners $95,862.07
4-of-5 343 $90
3-of-5 10,485 $8
SATURDAY, APRIL 14
Powerball: 14-15- 16-19-24
Powerball: 2
5-of-5 PB No winner
No Florida winner
5-of-5 3 winners $1 million
No Florida winner
Lotto: 1 3 22 -28 -36 -40
6-of-6 No winner
5-of-6 38 $5,221.50
4-of-6 2,225 $76
3-of-6 48,740 $5
Fantasy 5:6 11 12 29 31
5-of-5 4 winners $72,595.33
4-of-5 406 $115
3-of-5 13,155 $9.50
FRIDAY, APRIL 13
Mega Money: 33 34 35 38
Mega Ball: 22
4-of-4 MB 1 winner $500,000
4-of-4 7 $1,095.50

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num-
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call 850-487-7777.


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Tuesday, April 17,
the 108th day of 2012. There
are 258 days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On April 17, 1937, the ani-
mated cartoon character
Daffy Duck made his debut in
the Warner Bros. cartoon
"Porky's Duck Hunt," directed
by Tex Avery.
On this date:
In 1492, a contract was
signed by Christopher
Columbus and a representa-
tive of Spain's King Ferdi-
nand and Queen Isabella,
giving Columbus a commis-
sion to seek a westward
ocean passage to Asia.
In 1521, Martin Luther
went before the Diet of
Worms to face charges stem-
ming from his religious
writings.
In 1961, some 1,500 CIA-
trained Cuban exiles
launched the disastrous Bay
of Pigs invasion of Cuba in
an attempt to topple Fidel
Castro, whose forces
crushed the incursion by the
third day.
Ten years ago: Four
Canadian soldiers in
Afghanistan were killed when
they were mistakenly
bombed by an American F-
16 pilot. (The pilot, Maj. Harry
Schmidt, was later fined and
reprimanded in a non-judicial
hearing.)
Five years ago: Aday
after the Virginia Tech mas-
sacre, President George W.
Bush visited the campus,
where he told students and
teachers at a somber convo-
cation that the nation was
praying for them and "there's
a power in these prayers."
One year ago: U.S. Sec-
retary of State Hillary Rod-
ham Clinton visited Japan,
where she expressed confi-
dence the country would fully
recover from its tsunami and
nuclear disasters.
Today's Birthdays: Com-
poser-musician Jan Hammer
is 64. Actress Olivia Hussey
is 61. Rock singer-musician
Pete Shelley (Buzzcocks) is
57. Actor Sean Bean is 53.
Actress Lela Rochon is 48.
Singer Liz Phair is 45. Rap-
per-actor Redman is 42. Ac-
tress Jennifer Garner is 40.
Singer Victoria Adams Beck-
ham (Spice Girls) is 38. Ac-
tress-singer Lindsay Korman
is 34. Actress Rooney Mara
(Film: "The Girl with the
Dragon Tattoo") is 27.


Thought for Today: "A
cynic is not merely one who
reads bitter lessons from the
past; he is one who is prema-
turely disappointed in the fu-
ture." Sydney J. Harris,
American journalist (1917-
1986).





I I N S ^I D E


Section C TUESDAY, APRIL 17, 2012


H HEALTH


&


LIFE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


IA~~


* Lillian Yai
Yai Knipp
/Page C2
Dr. Frank
Vascimini
/Page C5


Papal



party


Pope celebrates a

very Bavarian

85th birthday
DANIELA PETROFF
Associated Press
-VATICAN CITY
P ope Benedict XVI cele-
brated a very Bavarian
birthday Monday, mark-
ing his 85 years with his
brother, German bishops and a
musical band from his native
land.
Benedict began the day with a
Mass in which he alluded to his
own mortality, saying he would
carry on his final years knowing
that God was watching over him.
"I am facing the final leg of the
path of my life and I don't know
what's ahead," Benedict said in his
homily. "I know though that God's
light is there ... and that his light is
stronger than every darkness."
Benedict was later joined in the
Vatican's frescoed Clementine Hall
by about 150 Bavarians, including
bishops, political leaders and rep-
resentatives of the region's Protes-
tant and Jewish communities.
He was serenaded by 10 chil-
dren dressed in traditional Bavar-
ian garb who danced for him and
recited a poem, and by Bavarian
musicians who performed a song
he and his siblings sang as chil-
dren while their father accompa-
nied them on a zither.
A very emotional pope said
those gathered "represent for me
the stations of my life." Speaking
off-the-cuff, he singled out the
role played by the Jewish commu-
nity in Bavaria for "bringing me
closer emotionally to the Jewish
people."
Sitting nearby was Benedict's
older brother, Monsignor Georg
Ratzinger, ordained on the same
day as the pope in 1951 and flew
to Rome for this week's celebra-
tions, which also include the sev-
enth anniversary of Benedict's
election as pope, on Thursday
Despite his age and increasing
frailty he has begun using a


Pope marks two major milestones
Pope Benedict XVI, the sixth oldest pontiff in history,
celebrates his 85th birthday Monday and the seventh
anniversary of his election to the papacy on Thursday.


OLDEST POPES YEAR YEAR
SINCE 1295 ELECTED DIED
1. LeoXIII 1878 1903
2. ClementXII 1730 1740
3. Clement X 1670 1676
4. Pius IX 1846 1878
5. Innocent XII 1691 1700
6. Benedict XVI 2005 -


AGE AGE YEARS
ELECTED DIED AS POPE
67 93 25
78 87 9
79 86 6
54 85 31
76 85 9
78 7*


7. John XXII 1316 1334 66 84 18
8. John Paul II 1978 2005 58 84 26
*To date


cane on occasion Benedict has
quashed speculation of a possible
resignation. On Sunday, he asked
for prayers and strength "to fulfill
the mission (the Lord) entrusted
to me."
Cardinal Angelo Sodano issued
birthday greetings on behalf of the
College of Cardinals that elected
Benedict, and welcomed the
Bavarian bishops to the "family


Outpatient surgery


and anesthesia
As an ear, nose, and throat performed on a patient, having the
doctor, the majority of my patient come in typically in the
surgical proce- morning at, say, 7 o'clock,
dures are performed ei- having the procedure
their in the office or the done, and home by noon.
ambulatory surgery cen- The advantages are ob-
ter setting, which is com- - vious and include cost
only called outpatient containment as well as a
surgery These proce- more personalized atten-
dures have drastically tion, typically one on one
increased in the past 20 with a nurse and the con-
years. venience of a more flexi-
We are fast approach- ble schedule, less down
ing the 80 percent mark Dr. Denis Grillo time from activities in-
for all operative proce- EAR, NOSE cluding work, and de-
dures performed and & THROAT creased exposure to
they will be done in one hospital-based infections.
of these two settings. There are many years
There is an advantage to both the pa- of data and studies that suggest
tient and doctor to have these proce- that complication rates are very
dures performed as an outpatient. low, especially if these procedures
An outpatient surgery would be
described as a procedure that was See Page C4


party" inside the Apostolic Palace.
Speaking in Latin, Sodano
wished Benedict "many happy
years" ahead sentiments that
were echoed in birthday greetings
that arrived from German Chan-
cellor Angela Merkel, Queen Eliz-
abeth II and Italy's president.
In Benedict's hometown of
Marktl Am Inn, the faithful
marked his birthday by rising at


4:15 a.m. the time he was born
- and walking from his house to
the local church for prayers.
He received several gifts, in-
cluding a large crucifix, a May-
pole, a traditional Bavarian
Easter basket and a bunch of
white flowers.
One birthday gift arrived ahead
of time: a book of 20 essays by
prominent Germans reflecting on
the papacy, including German
football great Franz Beckenbauer,
who recalled meeting the pope a
few months before Germany
hosted the 2006 World Cup.
Beckenbauer said the two dif-
fered over what kind of shape Ger-
many's squad was in, with the pope
suggesting it was "pretty good."
"I didn't have the same idea;
and so I told him that at the very
least they were on the right path
to becoming good," Beckenbauer
wrote. "He smiled kindly"
The book was curated by Bene-
dict's longtime secretary, Monsi-
gnor Georg Gaenswein. In an
interview Monday with Italy's La
Repubblica daily, Gaenswein said
the pope is often misconstrued
and should be known as a man of
great courage.
"The German pope doesn't fear
delicate questions or confronta-
tions for the good of the church
and faithful," he said.


Therapy challenge turns

into family project

T wenty-five years ago, I when they are really very sad.
worked in a lung disease re- What are you sad about?"
habilitation unit. His eyes filled, and he
As the new kid, I inher- whispered, "I can't go
ited the "problem" pa- fishing!"
tients. My first referral Later, his wife and
was the top problem, two sons took me aside
Gilbert. and explained that he
He'd raged at every delighted in taking his
staff member, calling sons and grandsons fish-
them names and refus- ing- sharing stories of
ing their requests. The the grandfather who
staff said his name with a raised him, truths and
long eye-roll and head Yvonne Hess wisdom about life and
shake, doing everything WALKING being a man. His lung
they could to delegate THE WALK cancer had stolen his
away a trip into his room. chance at fishing with
In my "never say his youngest grandson,


never" manner, I dodged his out-
bursts and continued with his ex-
ercise plan. After one particularly
horrendous barrage, I responded,
"sometimes people show anger


8-year-old Jeremy
Gilbert's sons were distraught
that Jeremy wouldn't have the
memories of fishing with their dad.
See .Page C4


Dr. C. Joseph
Bennett
AMERICAN
CANCER
SOCIETY


Breast

cancer

screening

works
n the past several
years, there has been
a great deal of debate
about the topic of cancer
screening and whether or
not it works, and if it is
worth it from a financial
standpoint.
As I have discussed
many times in this col-
umn, two things explain
the dramatic decrease in
the number of deaths we
have seen during the past
30 years from breast can-
cer and prostate cancer.
They are screening, and
better treatment.
And now, another study
supports this fact. Re-
cently, a Dutch study look-
ing at the effectiveness of
breast cancer screening,
showed that although
See Page C4


Dr. Sunil Gandhi
CANCER &
BLOOD
DISEASE


Should

I take

aspirin?
recently, one of my
patients called me.
She had breast can-
cer, which was rejected
and she is in complete re-
mission. She heard news of
aspirin and cancer She
wanted to know whether
she should start taking as-
pirin every day
Recently, three studies
were published: two in
Lancet and one in Lancet
Oncology These studies
were meta analysis,
meaning by they com-
bined data from many dif-
ferent studies and
analyzed them.
In the first study, pub-
lished online March 21 in
the Lancet, comparing
daily aspirin with no as-
pirin to prevent vascular
See Page C4


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Little to no out of pocket expense
for most Medicare Patients with
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Associated Press
Children dressed in traditional Bavarian costumes dance for Pope Benedict XVI on the occasion of the pontiff's
85th birthday celebrations Monday, April 16, in the Clementine hall at the Vatican.


x [Bas EtiAM
(64i^a
I a "f-


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-Assi









Keratin craze: Hair smoothing and straightening


Hello my friends!
The whole world is in a
craze over keratin hair-
smoothing treatments.
With several companies producing
the product now, there is competition
with who is going to be the best. This
always happens with any "new" salon
service.
As companies go to battle trying to
produce the best product, it some-
times becomes quite confusing to the
consumer trying to understand the
service and which product to use.
First, ask: What is this service and


Keratin treatments last for approximately four
months and require using sulfate-free shampoo.


what are the benefits to my style?
Hair consists primarily of keratin
protein. The protein bonds in the hair
become weakened by ultraviolet ex-
posure, styling and chemical process-
ing, which all decrease its strength.
The result is poor manageability,
breakage and decreased shine. The
keratin treatment fuses the keratin
protein into the hair shaft.


Look for a keratin treatment prod-
uct that bonds strongly to hair, restor-
ing strength and protecting it from
future damage by forming an invisi-
ble protective shield against environ-
mental effects.
Keratin treatments last for approx-
imately four months and require
using sulfate-free shampoo. Many of
the products on the market contain


formaldehyde. Choose a keratin
treatment that is formaldehyde-free.
For more information about choosing
a keratin treatment, feel free to send
me a message.

Lillian Yai Yai Knipp is an
internationally trained hair
designer makeup artist, skin-care
specialist, fashion designer and
Citrus County business owner A for-
mer model, modeling agency owner
and fitness instructor, she can be
reached a tyaiyaistyle@yaiyai.biz.


Health NOTES


Free 30-minute lecture:
"The Common Underlying
Cause for Chronic Disease,"
6:20 p.m. Tuesday, April 17, at
The Learning Center, 9030 W.
Fort Island Trail, Building 10,
Crystal River.
Dr. Roy A. Horn will cover the
common link for chronic long
term illnesses, such as autism,
rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis,
autoimmune disease, chronic
fatigue, joint pain, migraines,
peripheral neuropathy and
much more. Seating is limited;
call 352-563-2597 to reserve a
chair.
Amrit yoga classes, level
1: "The Posture of Conscious-
ness," $7, offered to 2:30 p.m.
Monday and Thursdays at
Pure Elements Yoga & Well-
ness 1925 S.E. U.S. 19, Crystal
River, across from the KIA
dealership.
Certified instructor is Donna
Palmyra. Wear comfortable,
stretchable clothing; bring a
mat, a water bottle and a small
pillow. Parking at the side of the
building and in front.
INVERNESS "Meet the
Experts" panel from 8:30 a.m.
to 11:30 a.m. Friday, May 4:
second of an ongoing mini-con-
ference series hosted by Hos-
pice of Citrus County at the
Lakeside Bar & Grill (formerly
VanderValk Lakeside), 4543 E.
Windmill Drive, Inverness.
A panel of local profession-
als, expert in financial planning,
tax law, elder law, estate plan-
ning, insurance, real estate and
charitable giving will include
Sally Long, Edward Serra,
Shawn Fitzpatrick, Eddie
Leven, Debbie Rector and An-
thony Palumbo with moderator
John J. Ceparano, CFP, PFS,
CPA, M, principal of Joseph
Capital Management.
Complimentary continental
breakfast included.
Space is limited. Reserve a
seat by calling Linda Baker at
352-527-2020.
Two-day new volunteer
orientation for HPH Hospice,
Healing People's Hearts, begin-
ning at 9 a.m. April 25 and 27 at
the HPH Hospice administra-
tive office, 3545 N. Lecanto
Highway in the Winn-Dixie
shopping plaza in Beverly Hills.
Qualifications needed: Caring
heart, positive attitude, extra
love to share and a big smile
that appears on demand.
RSVP or receive information by
calling Debi Shields, volunteer
coordinator, at 352-527-4600.
INGLIS Volunteer Ori-
entation for Hospice of Citrus
County/Hospice of the Nature
Coast, 9 to 11 a.m. Thursday,
April 26, at the Hospice Clinical
Office at 24-B County Road 40,
Inglis.
The class provides an
overview of Hospice philosophy
and history. Teens and high
school students are encour-
aged to attend. To register for
this class or to request training
for your group, call Dianna
Boggs, volunteer services man-
ager, at 352-621-1500 ext.
1706 or email DBoggs@
hospiceofcitruscounty.org. Visit
www.hospiceofthenaturecoast.
org.
I LifeSouth Community
Blood Centers: To find a donor
center or a blood drive near
you, call 352-527-3061. Donors
must be at least 17, or 16 with
parental permission, weigh a
minimum of 110 pounds and be
in good health to be eligible to
donate. A photo ID is required.
All donors during April will re-
ceive a LifeSouth Community
Blood Center backpack.
The Lecanto branch office is
at 1241 S. Lecanto Highway
(County Road 491), open from
8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays
(7 p.m. Wednesdays, 8:30
a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday and
10 a.m. to4 p.m. Sunday.
The Inverness branch is at
301 W. Main St., open from
8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. week-
days, (6:30 p.m. Wednesdays,
8 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Saturday
and closed Sundays.
Visit www.lifesouth.org.


1 to 4 p.m. Tuesday, April
17, Wal-Mart, 3826 S. Sun-
coast Blvd., Homosassa.
9 a.m. to noon Tuesday,
April 17, Walden Woods Com-
munity, 7086 W. Eatonshire
Path, Homosassa.
2 to 6 p.m. Wednesday,
April 18, Citrus County Chroni-
cle, 1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd., Crystal River.
10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Wednes-
day, April 18, Wal-Mart, 3826 S.
Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa.
9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday,
April 19, Citrus Kia, 1850 S.E.
U.S. 19, Crystal River.
8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday,
April 20, Citrus High School,
600 W. Highlands Blvd.,
Inverness.
Noon to 3 p.m. Saturday,
April 21, Inverness Elks Lodge
2522, 3580 E. Lemmon Drive,
Hernando.
11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday,
April 22, Wal-Mart, 3826 S.
Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa.
Noon. to 4 p.m. Monday,
April 23, College of Central
Florida, 3800 S. Lecanto High-
way, Lecanto.
9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday,
April 24, Citrus County Deten-
tion Facility, 2604 W. Woodland
Ridge Drive, Lecanto.
Free "Quit Smoking
Now" six-week tobacco de-
pendence program in Inverness
and Lecanto, offered by Gulf-
coast North Area Health Educa-
tion Center is partnering with
Robert Boissoneault Oncology
Institute, Citrus Memorial
Health System and Citrus
County Health Department.
Anyone interested in quitting to-
bacco can participate and will
be provided with a free and op-
tional supply of nicotine re-


placement therapy (NRT) in-
cluding patches, gum or
lozenges. This program is
funded by the Florida Depart-
ment of Health. To register and
find out more information on lo-
cations, dates and times, call
813-929-1000 or visit www.
gnahec.org.
3 to 4 p.m. Tuesday at
Robert Boissoneault Oncology
Institute, 522 N. Lecanto High-
way, Lecanto.
1 to 2 p.m. Tuesday at
Citrus Memorial Health System
Medical Office Building confer-
ence room, 502 W. Highland
Blvd., Inverness.
0 11 a.m. to noon Tuesdays
at Citrus County Health Depart-
ment, 120 N. MontgomeryAve.,
Inverness.
Upcoming seminars at the
SHARE Club at CMHS. Call
352-560-6266 to register.
"Heart-Healthy Eating,"
1:30 tp 3 p.m. April 11 in the
CMHS Medical Office Building
- Penny Davis, Citrus Memor-
ial's registered dietitian, helps
you make cooking healthy
much easier.
"Beyond Kubler-Ross:
New Perspectives on Death,
Dying And Grief," 9 a.m. to
noon April 18 at the Share Club


Auditorium, at 402 Grace St.,
Inverness -A Hospice Foun-
dation of America program.
Jonathan Beard, grief services
manager with Hospice of Citrus
County, will lead a debriefing on
the material covered, giving you
an opportunity to add insights.
SPRING HILL-- For
Your Health community educa-
tion program by Oak Hill Hospi-
tal, 5:30 to 7 p.m. Wednesday,
April 11, at the Palace Grand,
275 Della Court, Spring Hill.
Andre Brooks, M.D., will pres-
ent "Advances in Heart Treat-
ment." Admission is free and a
hot meal will be served. Seating
is limited and reservations are
required. Call 352-628-6060 in
Citrus or register online at
OakHillHospital.com/ForYour
Health.
Beginning the week of
April 16, Snyder Pharmacy, 102
E. Highland Blvd., Inverness,
will offer a drug Take-Back
program to help patients safely
dispose of medicines that may
be dangerous to others and to
the environment. Patients of
any pharmacy may bring in un-
used or expired drugs in their
original stock containers for free
disposal. For information, call
352-341-1212.


L JL JLj JL.
Inverness
2036 Hwy. 44 West
352-586-7599


Hospice of Citrus County
will provide Orientation Train-
ing for individuals who are in-
terested in learning more about
Hospice and Hospice volunteer
opportunities from 1 to 3 p.m.
Tuesday, April 17, at the Bev-
erly Hills Library, 425 W. Roo-
sevelt Blvd.
The class provides an
overview of Hospice philosophy
and history. Teens and high
school students are encour-
aged to attend. Volunteering for
Hospice of Citrus County will
provide community service
hours for the Bright Futures
Scholarship and other aca-
demic needs.
To register for this class or to
request training for your group,
call contact 352-527-2020.
CRYSTAL RIVER -


Seven Rivers Regional Med-
ical Center offers the following
health education programs pre-
sented by board certified physi-
cians and licensed medical
professionals. Website: Seven
RiversRegional.com.
Call 352-795-1234 to register
for the programs.
SAtrial Fibrillation and
Stroke 2 p.m. Wednesday,
April 18, cardiologist R. Prasad
Potu, M.D., explains why hav-
ing atrial fibrillation (Afib) in-
creases your risk of stroke by
500 percent. Then, stroke spe-
cialist Mary W. Narmore, MSN-
Ed, CMSRN, shares what it
means to have a Certified Pri-
mary Stroke Center at Seven
Rivers Regional and why the
hospital maintains the Stroke
See NOTES/Page C3


The #1 Provider of News and
Advertising Information in
Citrus County


Call to see how you can receive

A2 Weeks Free


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CH r)NICLE
, a.chror cleoniire.C orr


Lillian
Yai Yai Knipp
LIFE 'N'
STYLE


FREE HEARING TEST
+ EVALUATION
SThe Hearing Aid
Myth Busters!
A TTDT-1I- LTT


Homosassa
S5699 S. Suncoast Blvd.
S.352-621-8000


MISSING SOMETHING?
c CITRUS S --.C 0 U N T


Swww.chronicleonline.com


h, A..ft to^


Get current TV listing-s,

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AW3R3-3295


Citrus Count's May 14, 2012

2012 World's Greatest 5aby Shower at the Citrus County Auditorium

Expecting a baby? Come to our Baby Shower! Learn about taking care
of yourself and your baby. Parents of infants under 6 months old are
also invited. There will be exhibits, games, door prizes, a scavenger CHOOSE ONE
hunt and gifts for moms, dads and babies! First Session: 3:00pm 5:00pm OR
Second Session: 6:00pm 8:00pm
NO COST!!! Call 228-9047 for information. Cl 1I)IIC I


Seven Days A Wee


I Rain or S ^hin


C2 TUESDAY, APRIL 17, 2012


HEALTH & LIFE


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


769452





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Regenerative medicine developed for many ailments


Q What types of
regenerative
medicines are
being tested?
A: Regenerative
medicine is defined as
the clinical application
of biologic approaches
to repair, replace and
restore functional liv-
ing tissue.
In the world of
biotechnology, several
types of regenerative
therapies are in early-


F N-v--
Richard Hoffmann
ASK THE
PHARMACIST


related macular degen-
eration (AMD), Type 1
diabetes, cancer,
Parkinson's disease,
chronic wounds, AIDS
and even hair loss.
About 1.3 million
Americans live with
chronic spinal cord in-
juries that result in
paralysis. Studies are
now underway in ani-
mals and humans to see
if special types of human
stem cells injected into


stage testing, for use in patients injured spinal cord tissues can grow
with spinal cord injuries, age- into new nerve fibers.


AMD, the leading cause of vi-
sion loss in the developed world,
is caused by the death of cells
within the retina of the eye. Re-
searchers are now looking at the
possibility of injecting retinal cells
into the eye to rescue these dying
cells and restore vision.
A California company is testing
a system that can be implanted in
people with Type 1 diabetes to
help them grow new beta cells,
which produce insulin in the
pancreas.
Another California biotech firm
is testing the use of specialized
proteins that can be used to stim-


ulate hair growth, as well as to
cause cancer cells to die.
Yet another California-based
biotech company is studying how
a virus can be used to deliver a
human protein into the brain,
which would help keep brain cells
(neurons) alive and functioning in
people with Parkinson's disease.
In addition, a possible cure for
HIV/AIDS is being studied, which
uses specialized proteins that can
make cells that are resistant to the
HIV virus.
One type of regenerative medi-
cine that is already approved for
treating chronic leg ulcers and di-


abetic foot ulcers is a biotechnol-
ogy product named Apligraf. This
product contains living cells, pro-
teins, and other substances that
help to promote healing.
Many companies around the
world are actively pursuing re-
generative medicine research
programs and the future in this
area of study holds great promise.
--In--
Richard P Hoffmann, Pharm.D.,
has been a pharmacist formore
than 40years. Send questions to
him at 2960 E. Coventry Court,
Hernando, FL 34442.


NOTES
Continued from Page C2

Emergency Specialists alliance
with UF and Shands. Program
takes place in the Medical Of-
fices Building Community
Room at Seven Rivers Re-
gional. Refreshments served.
Pre-Surgery Ortho Camp
- Patients scheduled for knee
or hip replacement surgery
learn pre- and post-surgery ex-
ercises, how to use a walker,
knee and hip precautions and
adaptive equipment that may
be needed for activities of daily
living. Offered the first and third
Tuesday of each month at
1 p.m. at SRRMC.
Free Balance Screenings
- Seven Rivers Rehab &
Wound Center offers free bal-
ance screenings at 1675 S.E.
U.S. 19 in the Crystal River
Shopping Center (next to
Sweetbay). Call 352-795-0534
to schedule an appointment.
SPRING HILL -The inau-
gural Weeki Wachee Relay for
Life will from 6 p.m. Friday,
April 20, to noon Saturday, April
21, at Weeki Wachee High
School, 12150 Vespa Way,
Weeki Wachee.
Some 17 teams have regis-
tered with more than 220 partic-
ipants. The event is organized
by Stephanie Sutton, director of
volunteers and senior services
at Oak Hill Hospital.
For information, call Sutton at
352-597-6080 or email
Stephanie.Sutton@HCA
Healthcare.com.
Florida Blind/Disabled
Services Educational Semi-
nar, 2:30 p.m. April 20 at Citrus
Health & Rehabilitation Center,
701 Medical Court E., Inver-
ness. This seminar will provide
in-service training to the care-
giver, family member and those
having trouble reading print be-
cause of an eye problem, a
reading disability or difficulty
holding a book because of
arthritis, a stroke or an acci-
dent. Independent living serv-
ices are provided to enable
individuals who are blind and
impaired to live more independ-
ently in their homes and com-
munities with the maximum
degree of self-direction. BBBL
will demonstrate use of the lat-
est devices and accessories
available, answer questions
and assist with account serv-
ices.Contact Tracie Batten at
tracbat@gmail.com or 352-
897-0299.
Free educational event on
laparoscopic surgery op-
tions, 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, April
24, in the Citrus Memorial
Health System Gulf Room. Dr.
Declan Hegarty and Dr.
Farhaad Golkar, surgeons with
Inverness Surgical Associates,
will speak about treatment for
acid reflux, hernia and GERD.
Call 352-344-6732 to regis-
ter, as seating is limited. Re-
freshments will be served. For
information about Drs. Hegarty
and Golkar, visit www.cmh
invernesssurgical.com.
HOMOSASSA- Hospice
of Citrus County Wings Com-
munity Education will present
"In Memory of Mom: A Mother's
Day Tea" from 2 to 3:30 p.m.
Tuesday, April 24, at the Wings
Education Center at 8471 W.
Periwinkle Lane, Homosassa.
Participants are encouraged
to bring a photo or memory of
their mother to share on this
day. Tea/cookies will be served
as we reflect upon the memo-
ries of our mothers.
Part of the education series
Fourth Tuesdays at Two offered
monthly at the Hospice of Cit-
rus County Wings Education
Center, "In Memory of Mom: A
Mother's Day Tea" is free, open
to the public and reservations
are suggested. For information,
call Lynn Miller at 352-527-
2020. Visit www.hospiceofcitrus
county.org.
SPRING HILL-- For
Your Health community educa-
tion program by Oak Hill Hospi-


tal, 5:30 to 7 p.m. Wednesday,
April 25, at Silverthorn Country
Club, 4550 Gulf Club Drive,
Brooksville, 2.5 miles south of
Cortez Boulevard (State Road
50) on Barclay Avenue. William
J. Jason, M.D., will present "Hip
Pain? Knee Pain? Joint Preser-
vation & Operative Options."
Admission is free and a hot
meal will be served. Seating is
limited and reservations are re-
quired. Call 352-628-6060 in
Citrus or register online at
OakHillHospital.com/For
YourHealth.
SPRING HILL Free six-
week Quit Tobacco program
by Oak Hill Hospital and Gulf-
coast North Area Health Educa-
tion Center. The program will
meet from 6 to 7 p.m. on six
consecutive Wednesdays from
April 25 through May 30 (sec-
ond class will be Tuesday, May
1). The program will be at the
Oak Hill Hospital cafeteria con-
ference room at the main en-
trance, 11375 Cortez Blvd.
(State Road 50), Brooksville.
The free six week counseling
program provides free optional
nicotine replacement therapy
including patches, lozenges or
gum. The program is spon-
sored by the Florida Depart-
ment of Health.
Call 813-929-1000 ext. 213
or visit www.GNAHEC.org.
Tobacco-Free Partner-
ship of Citrus County meet-
ing, 9 a.m. Thursday, April 26,
at a new location, Inverness
City Hall Conference Room,
212 W. Main St., Inverness.
Special guest for this meet-
ing is Dr. C. Joseph Bennett,
board-certified Radiation Oncol-
ogist from Robert Boissoneault
Oncology Institute in Lecanto,
discussing the American Can-
cer Society's role in tobacco
prevention.
This meeting will feature a
youth advocacy report on the
activities in Citrus County for
Kick Butts Day, and upcoming
events and training.
The Tobacco-Free Partner-
ship's goals are to prevent initi-
ation of tobacco use among
youth and young adults, create
tobacco-free policies to protect
everyone from secondhand
smoke exposure, and to in-
crease the number of people
who receive information about
quitting tobacco use.
For information, call Jillian
Godwin at the Citrus County
Health Department, 352-726-
1731, ext 242, or email jillian_
godwin@doh.state.fl.us.
Join the free LifeSharers
program to donate your or-
gans. Everyone is welcome to
join LifeSharers. There is nei-
ther age requirement nor limit
and parents can enroll their
minor children as well. Pre-
existing medical conditions do
not exclude you from becoming
a member. Even if you are al-
ready a registered organ donor,
you can improve your chances
of getting an organ if you ever
need one by joining.
Visit the website to join online
at www.lifesharers.org.
From 5 to 8 p.m. the first
Tuesday monthly, Applebee's at
1901 Main St. in Inverness has
"Dining to Donate" 10 per-
cent of the guests' bill will be
sent to the corporate office of
LifeSharers. Aflier must be pre-
sented: email Anna DiPleco at
floridiananna@aol.com (with
the subject Re: LifeSharers) for
a copy of the flier for presenta-
tion. Call DiPleco at 352-726-
8489 to answer any questions.
The George A. Dame
Community Health Center
Board Meetings are at 3 p.m.
the first Wednesday monthly at
the Citrus County Health De-
partment, 3700 W. Sovereign
Path, Lecanto, in the first floor
conference room.
Bereaved Parents of the
USA 2012 National Gathering,
June 29 to July 1 at Wyndham
Tampa Westshore Hotel. The
Bereaved Parents of the USA
provides support groups, self-
help, resources and education


HEALTH NOTE GUIDELINES
* Support group information will list monthly meetings
first, as space is available, then weekly meetings.
* It is the responsibility of each organization to inform
the Chronicle about changes to existing listings.
* To submit information about upcoming seminars,
health-related events open to the public or support
group meetings, email newsdesk@chronicleonline
.com attn: Health Notes; fax (352) 563-5660 or write
to: Health Notes c/o Citrus County Chronicle, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429.
* Information relating to professional training or
seminars attended by those in the health care
industries are considered business briefs, and would
appear in the Business Digest listings of Sunday's
Business section.
* To submit story ideas for feature sections, call (362)
563-5660 and ask for Cheri Harris. Be prepared to
leave a detailed message with your name, phone
number and the address of the news event.
* Approval for story ideas must be granted by the
Chronicle's editors before a reporter is assigned.
* The Chronicle reserves the right to edit submissions.
* Publication of submitted information or photos on
specific dates or pages cannot be guaranteed.


to families who are going
through the grief process after
losing a child of any age. The
National Gathering is like a
convention, where there are
speakers and workshops that
pertain to grieving the loss of a
child and how to survive the
grief.
We are currently looking for
workshop presenters to partici-
pate in this year's National
Gathering, here in Tampa.
Complete an online workshop
application to submit your work-
shop information if interested in
facilitating one this year. We are
still in need of monetary dona-
tions, as well as donated items
for table favors, goodie bags,
butterfly boutique, silent auction
and raffles.
A discounted seven-meal
plan is $125 to April 30, then
$145.
Visit the National BP/USA
website at www.bereaved
parentsusa.org or call 813-
661-0680 or 813-495-7539.
LECANTO EMT and
Paramedic Program classes
at Nature Coast EMS, 3876 W.
Country Hill Drive in Lecanto.
Contact student services to
complete an application. The
office is open from 8:30 a.m.
until 5 p.m. Monday through
Friday; however, appointments
can be scheduled after busi-
ness hours if needed. For ad-
mission requirements, visit
www.naturecoastems.org or
call 352-249-4700.
The 16-week EMT (Emer-
gency Medical Technician)
classes begin Monday, May 14,
designed to prepare students to
provide basic life support meas-
ures as a member of an ambu-
lance crew, at the scene of an
accident, during transport to a
hospital or medical facility, and
in the medical facility. It will pre-
pare students to sit for the
Florida Bureau of EMS EMT
Certification Exam.
The 10-month paramedic
program classes begin July 23.
EMT students who have re-
cently graduated may register
for the paramedic course; how-
ever, are required to have their
EMT State of Florida certifica-
tion by the end of phase one
(midterm). The Paramedic pro-
gram is designed to prepare
students to provide advanced
life support measures.
The Citrus Alliance
Against Adult Abuse (C4A)
monthly meeting is at 9:30 a.m.
the second Wednesday
monthly at HPH Hospice, 3545
N. Lecanto Highway, Beverly
Hills.
For information, call Judy
Stauffer at 352-303-2620. Your
help is needed to protect our
vulnerable against abuse, neg-
lect and exploitation.
Partners for a Sub-
stance-Free Citrus Inc. will
meet the second Thursday
monthly in the basement of the
Citrus County School Board of-
fice in Inverness, 1007 W. Main
St. Use the elevator to go to the
basement.


8 to 9 a.m. board meeting.
0 9:15 to 9:30 a.m. coffee,
doughnuts, networking.
0 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. mem-
bership meeting.
Call the office at 352-389-
0472 or email substancefree.
citrus@yahoo.com.
Catholic Charities DOSP
has openings in its respite pro-
gram that meets from 11:30 to
3:30 p.m. Wednesday at Our
Lady of Grace Church in Bev-
erly Hills.
The program is for people
with early stage Alzheimer's
disease and other memory loss
illnesses including stroke,
Parkinson's disease or senile
dementia. It offers caregivers
short-term, dependable relief
from day-to-day responsibilities,
while providing loved ones the
opportunity to participate in
planned activities and loving re-
lationships.
For more information or to
make an appointment to ob-
serve the program, call Clara
Makoid at 352-422-7731.
OCALA Avante at
Ocala, 2021 S.W. First Ave., a
skilled nursing and rehabilita-
tion facility, is seeking friendly
people to interact with the peo-
ple who live here. If interested
in helping with any of the follow-
ing, contact Patty Hughes, ac-
tivity director at 352-732-0072.
Bringing your pet to visit.
Helping with bingo.
Helping residents play
board games in the evening.
Assisting/teaching the resi-
dents to use the internet or Wii
games.
Filing/painting ladies' nails.
Providing pastoral visits or
spiritual support.
Visiting individuals who
have little support.
"Navigating Cancer"
shows at 8:30 p.m. Tuesday
and 10 a.m. Thursday after
"Citrus Today" on WYKE TV
channel 16 and Bright House
47. The new program hosted
by Dr. Joey Bennett, radiation
oncologist, and Wendy Hall, li-
censed clinical social worker -
is sponsored by Robert Bois-
soneault Oncology Institute.
The purpose of the program is
to educate, empower and as-
sist individuals being affected
by cancer. To ask questions or
suggest topics for the show,
contact Dr. Bennett atjbennett
@rboi.com or Wendy Hall at
whall@rboi.com or call the
Lecanto office at 352-527-0601.
Visit www.rboi.com.
Nature Coast EMS pres-
ents "Every Minute Counts"
program airing at 8 p.m. Tues-
days and 10 a.m. Wednesday
on WYKE-TV 47 (Bright
House). "Every Minute Counts"
explores medical emergencies
and how to prevent them. The
next broadcast will feature John
Massa, director of emergency
services at Seven Rivers Re-
gional Medical Center. The
topic of discussion will address
the flu and pneumonia, how to
prevent and common issues
associated. "Every Minute


Counts" is supported by
Bouchard Insurance, the Na-
ture Coast EMS Board and em-
ployees, Explorers and Citizen
Academy members and alumni.
Basic belly dance, 11
a.m. to 12:15 p.m. the first and
third Saturday monthly, Pure El-
ements Wellness & Yoga Stu-
dio, Crystal River; $7 per class.
Call (772) 480-7427 for more
information or to register, or
visit pureelementswellness.
com.
The Alzheimer's Family
Organization is expanding its
volunteer program. We have a
new coordinator and there are
new and exciting opportunities
available for dedicated people
who would like to donate their
time to help a local, nonprofit
organization.
The group serves the central
Florida area, including Citrus,
Hernando, upper Hillsborough,
Lake, Pasco, upper Pinellas
and Sumter counties. Monies
raised remain locally and bene-
fit individuals with Alzheimer's
disease and their families in
Central Florida.
The AFO provides needed
programs and services, includ-
ing respite care assistance,
Wanderer's ID Program, sup-
port groups and educational
events. Call the office at 727-
848-8888 or 888-496-8004.
Rehab facilities Nar-
conon Arrowhead based in
Oklahoma offers free and confi-
dential help finding rehab facili-
ties in your local area through
findrehabnow.com, or 888-629-
0333 to speak to a counselor.
The American Cancer So-
ciety's Road to Recovery Pro-
gram is in need of volunteers
willing to drive cancer patients
to and from their treatments.
Requirements for volunteering
include having a good driving
record, a valid driver's license
and a vehicle in good working
condition. For information, call
800-227-2345.
In Florida, there are more
than 65 ACS offices and about
65,000 active volunteers. For
information about cancer, call
toll-free anytime at 800-ACS-
2345, or visit the ACS website
at www.cancer.org.
Speakers
Seven Rivers Regional
Speakers Bureau brings cus-
tomized programs to clubs,
churches and other community
organizations. ContactAmy
Kingery at 352-795-8344 or
amy.kingery@hma.com.
The Alzheimer's Family
Organization has speakers
available for your organization
or club. This presentation will
include basic Alzheimer's infor-
mation and the services and
programs that the organization
offers to the Central Florida
community. Call 888-496-8004
or 727-848-8888.
SPRING HILL Health
Matters Home Care has a
Registered Nurse available to
do free speaking engagements
for your group, club, church or
organization. Call 352-686-
4493 or 352-686-5593.
The Citrus Team of HPH
Hospice and its not-for-profit
Homecare affiliate, HPH Home-
care, provide free, ongoing ed-
ucation to Citrus County
residents about their many pro-
grams, services and volunteer
opportunities. There is no
charge for a speaker and the
solicitation of funds is never in-
volved. Educational materials
are provided at no charge. Call
Anne Black, community liaison,
at 352-527-4600.
Support GROUPS

Autism support group
sponsored by Isaiah Founda-
tion Inc., for adults taking care
of autistic children at home or at
work. "What is Pivotal Re-
sponse Therapy (PRT) and
how can it be used?" discus-
sion will be led by Brenda Bren-
nan, PRT clinician, from 6:30 to
8 p.m. Tuesday, May 1, at Cit-
rus Family Center, 719 S. Otis


Ave., Lecanto.
To sign up, contact Barbara
Washburn at isaiahfoundation
@ymail.com or 352-447-1775.
Visit isaiahfoundation.org. No
sitter is available adults only.
National Osteoporosis
Foundation Citrus County
Support Group, 1 p.m. the third
Tuesday monthly at the Citrus
Resource Center, 2804 W.
Marc Knighton Court, Lecanto.
Each month offers a different
speaker.
Call Laura Henderson at
855-592-7772 or email The
BoneZone2010@yahoo.com.
Nature Coast Multiple
Myeloma Support Group, 6
p.m. the third Wednesday
monthly at the Oak Hill Hospital
Partner's Club (formerly Spring
Hill Enrichment Center) at Oak
Hill Hospital, 11375 Cortez
Blvd. (State Road 50),
Brooksville. Free dinner buffet
will be served. Contact Herb
and Dianne Terry at 352-621-
0672 or hterryl@tampabay.
rr.com, or Richard Blustein at
352-428-4536 or Blustein22@
aol.com.
SPRING HILL Look
Good Feel Better Support
Group, 3:30 to 5 p.m. third
Wednesday monthly at the
Florida Cancer Institute-New
Hope's Spring Hill Center,
10441 Quality Drive, Suite 203,
in the Medical Arts Building
next to Spring Hill Hospital. Call
Peggy Beckett, R.N., group fa-
cilitator, at 352-688-7744.
NEW PORT RICHEY--
Community Chatterboxes
support group to assist individu-
als suffering from communica-
tion deficits (i.e., aphasia,
apraxia, dysarthria, etc.) as a
result of a cerebral vascular ac-
cident or other neurological dis-
orders, 3 to 4 p.m. every other
Thursday at Community Hospi-
tal, 5637 Marine Parkway, New
Port Richey, FL 34652.
Caregivers and spouses are
encouraged to attend. Call 727-
845-0757.
"Different Strokes for
Different Folks" stroke support
group, 10:30 a.m. to noon the
third Thursday monthly in the
Inpatient Rehabiliation Multipur-
pose Room at Seven Rivers
Regional Medical Center in
Crystal River. Call 352-795-
1234 for details.
The Center for Independ-
ent Living of North Central
Florida in Lecanto offers free
Social Security workshops, SSI,
SSDI, Medicare and Medicaid.
All questions are answered the
third Thursday monthly from 10
a.m. to noon. (Closed Wednes-
days.) Call for reservations,
352-527-8399.
FFRA (Families and
Friends Reaching for the Abili-
ties), third Friday monthly at the
Key Training Center in Inver-
ness at 130 Heights Ave. Social
time and business meeting at 9
a.m. is followed by a speaker at
10 a.m. Call Ron Phillips at
352-382-7819.
Support for People with
Oral and Head and Neck Can-
cer (SPOHNC), 2 p.m. the
fourth Monday monthly Robert
Boissoneault Oncology Institute
at the Allen Ridge CMHS cam-
pus, 522 N. Lecanto Highway
in Lecanto. Timothy A. Brant,
M.D., will speak April 23.
Monthly meetings offer infor-
mation, support and encour-
agement to newly diagnosed
patients, survivors, family mem-
bers and friends in a friendly
and non-threatening forum.
Contact Wendy Hall, LCSW,
at 352-527-0106 or whall@
rboi.com.
SPRING HILL--
Leukemia/Lymphoma Sup-
port Group, 5 to 6:30 p.m. the
fourth Tuesday monthly at the
Florida Cancer Institute-New
Hope's Spring Hill Center,
10441 Quality Drive, Suite 203
in the Medical Arts Building
next to Spring Hill Hospital.
Call Jeff Haight, R.N., group
facilitator, at 352-688-7744.

See GROUPS/Page C5


HEALTH & LIFE


TUESDAY, APRIL 17, 2012 C3





C4 TUESDAY, APRIL 17, 2012


BENNETT
Continued from Page Cl

treatments have also im-
proved, population-based
mammography initiatives
still save lives. That is,
screening all women over
the age of 40 will save lives.
Researchers at the Eras-
mus University Medical
Center in Rotterdam, The
Netherlands, presented
their research at the Eighth
European Breast Cancer
Conference (EBCC-8) in Vi-
enna, adding to the debate
surrounding screenings that
suggests they might do more
harm than good.
There is a growing argu-
ment against national
screening programs, with



GANDHI
Continued from Page C1

events, aspirin use reduced
the risk for nonvascular
death in all 51 trials exam-
ined. When data from 34 tri-
als were examined, there
were fewer deaths from
cancer in the aspirin than in
the control group.
Dr Peter M. Rothwell of
the University of Oxford and
colleagues noted that even
though the decreased risk



GRILLO
Continued from Page C1

are done in properly accred-
ited facilities. Currently we
have two hospitals with out-
patient surgery departments
and several freestanding fa-
cilities in the county.
Types of anesthesia per-
formed at these facilities in-
clude local anesthesia



HESS
Continued from Page C1

The oldest said he wished
he could just throw fish in
his father's swimming pool,
run extension cords out to
operate the ventilator, and
pretend they were on a
camping trip.
I said, why not? They
looked at me like I was
crazy I said that it's impor-
tant to do what's important.
Fishing with Gilbert was ob-
viously very important to
the family
I suggested they talk to
the doctor to see what was
feasible and go from there.
The sons took this on like
a mission. They investigated
how to disable the pool
chemicals to support fish.
They built a bonfire pit,
erected the old pole tent,
ran 600 feet of extension
cords, and invited the fam-
ily to a fishing trip with
Gilbert.
I found a trout hatchery
that donated 30 fish.
Gilbert did his part, too.
He worked hard on his ex-
ercises. He built his en-
durance for the long
afternoon and evening
ahead. His demeanor
changed and he told jokes
instead of yelling.
Three weeks later, an am-
bulance took Gilbert home
to fish. He told Jeremy the
old stories of growing up in
Poland during World War II

WEEKLY LINEUP
Nearly a dozen medical
professionals share
their expertise with
columns in Health &
Life./Tuesdays
Read up on all things
school-related in the
Chronicle's Education
section./Wednesdays
Plan menus for the
week from the recipes
in the Food section.
/Thursdays


* Get a jump on weekend
entertainment with the
stories in Scene.
/Fridays
* See what local houses
of worship plan to do in
the Religion section.
/Saturdays
* Read about area
businesses in the
Business section.
/Sundays
* Pick up tips for home
improvement, saving
money and cashing
in on antiques in
HomeFront./Sundays


detractors saying that treat-
ment for the disease is so ef-
fective nowadays that the
chances of surviving it are
just as good detecting it
later on versus earlier in the
course of the disease.
There is a growing belief
that these national pro-
grams lead to unnecessary
investigations, over-treat-
ment and worry, not to men-
tion that the scan is
relatively physically aggres-
sive to the breasts them-
selves, and also involves the
use of X-rays on a regular
basis.
Is our screening program
perfect? No, it is not, but it
is very good.
Dutch researchers now
say they identified the fact
that screening every two
years reduced deaths by an


for major vascular events in
these trials was initially off-
set by a higher risk for
major bleeding, both these
effects diminished over
time, leaving only the re-
duced risk for cancer after
three years.
The major limitation was
that despite the comprehen-
sive nature of the analyses,
they did not include the two
largest clinical evaluations
of aspirin's effect on cancer
risk. Neither of these two
studies demonstrated an ef-
fect of aspirin on cancer


where numbing medicine is
injected into the surgical
site and the procedure is
done without any further
medications.
The second option in-
cludes conscious sedation,
which usually involves IV or
intravenous medications,
sometimes combined with
local anesthetics.
Deep sedation is similar,
but uses different medica-
tions to get a more profound


in the loving care of his fa-
ther's father
His grandfather taught
him everything he needed
to know for a life in Amer-
ica: of taking pride in one's
family, of how important
one's word was, of how to
honor one's wife and chil-
dren, of how to forgive eas-
ily and smile often, even
when one's feet hurt.
Jeremy drew a picture of
his fishing trip that we
posted on the door to
Gilbert's room. It showed a
huge tent close to a fire pit
with bright red flames leap-
ing upward. His drawing
also had the orange lines of
the extension cords snaking
along the grass from the
house to the pool.
Center stage in the pic-
ture was a couple of grin-
ning guys: one small with
spiky black hair and one
bald, lying on a box with
wheels.
The day after his trip,
Gilbert was exhausted and
barely able to move. He
made a special effort to
mouth "thank you" to me
when I stopped by his room.
I shook my head and
pointed back at him and
thanked him. He died about
10 days later
He was a very changed
man, content and peace-
filled. His legacy stretched
out beyond his family and
embraced me, giving me
warm wonderful memories
of confronting an angry
man.


additional 15.7 percent.
They say treatment given in
addition to primary therapy,
such as surgery, has also re-
duced deaths by 13.9 per-
cent in 2008, when
compared to no treatment.
With the addition of screen-
ing every two years between
the ages of 50 and 75, re-
searchers showed the
deaths fell by a total of 27.4
percent
In this country, the effec-
tiveness of breast cancer
screening has been heavily
debated in the last couple of
years. One of the arguments
critics have is that, since
breast cancer patients can
be treated so effectively
with our current therapy,
the relative effects of
screening become smaller
and smaller


risk. Therefore, it appears
that meta analysis was
flawed.
The second study was a
case control study In that
study, patients allocated to
aspirin had a 38 percent
lower risk of colorectal can-
cer Similarly consistent ef-
fects of aspirin emerged
from analyses of
esophageal, stomach, bil-
iary and breast cancer
In short, all these three
studies showed the benefit
of aspirin in helping some
patients with cancer or


or deeper anesthetic level
without undergoing general
anesthesia.
General anesthetic is
when the patient is fully
asleep, which is usually ren-
dered with the combination
of IV medications as well as
inhaled gases.
These inhaled anesthet-
ics are preferred if the sur-
geon is interested in having
the patient immobile to
avoid the patient moving



Yvonne Hess is a Licensed
Marriage and Family /
Therapist (LMFT) and a
Certified Addictions
Professional (CAP) with an
International Certification
as an Alcohol and Drug
Counselor (ICADC) who
works for the Citrus County


This study shows that,
even in the presence of ad-
vanced, more effective ther-
apy, mammography
screening is highly effective
in reducing breast cancer
deaths, and, in fact, is
slightly more effective than
the advances we have made
in treatment.
Yes, early detection
through screening is saving
more lives than treatment
advances, and the combina-
tion of the two is dramatic.
In addition, if screening
could be started before the
age of 50, the breast cancer
mortality could be further
reduced, even when breast
cancer patients are effec-
tively treated by adjuvant
therapy
It has the potential to fur-
ther decrease breast cancer


without cancer This benefit
is significant
What is the downside?
Some may feel one baby as-
pirin a day is benign and it
does not hurt. One aspirin
once in a while for a
headache or backache is
OK. To reduce cancer risk,
one must take it daily for
many years.
This carries significant
risk of bleeding. At the least,
you are more likely to get
bruises (black and blue
marks). When this happens
internally, it can cause in-


around and being dis-
tracted, and they also facili-
tate better control of the
patient's vital signs and the
ability to secure the pa-
tient's airway during the
procedure.
Lastly, there is a type of
anesthetic called "blocks,"
which are commonly used in
orthopedic procedures
where an extremity, such as
the arm and leg, can be
numbed completely and


Health Department's
Phoenix Program. She can
be reached at 352-527-0068,
ext 251, oryvonnehess
@doh.state.fl.us.

DO YOU TWITTER?
Check the "tweets" at
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Li[rir SHNE U2012
Presented By Shepherd of the Hills Episcopal Church





The Florida

Dream
S, S, il I

A nationally acclaimed, Emmy awarded
documentary film on Florida's growth and
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This LightShineevent isproduced by Shepherdof theHills asanenrichnme n C i. ol iTE.
program for Citrus County and co-sponsored by the Citrus County Chronicle I

Admission is Free. No Tickets Required. Open Seating but Limited to 200.
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deaths by up to 5.1 percent
when 10 additional annual
screening examinations
starting from age 40 are per-
formed.
Policy makers should in-
vestigate further the ideal
age for starting screening,
taking into account not only
the effects, but also the risks
and costs of extending the
lower age limits.
This study will make an
important contribution to
the ongoing debate about
the level of benefit of a pop-
ulation-based mammo-
graphic screening program.
Many aspects of breast
cancer management have
improved since the original
trials of breast cancer
screening, and so it is im-
portant to continue to inves-
tigate the success of this


eternal bleeding like in the
stomach or colon, and can
cause ulcers in the gastroin-
testinal tract. Worse is, it
can cause bleeding in the
brain, particularly after a
head injury or car accident.
This may result in a blood
transfusion, hospitalization
or even death.
Obviously, the risk and
benefit need to be evalu-
ated. These studies will be
evaluated in depth and we
may need more prospective
studies. After thorough eval-
uation, proper guidelines


safely without putting the
patient to sleep. The obvious
advantage is that the patient
can follow directions, is im-
mobile, and has a quick re-
covery time and discharge.
Outpatient surgery is, and
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

program, and not stop what
is working unless something
better comes along.


Dr C. Joseph Bennett
is a board-certified
radiation oncologist,
member of the Citrus
County Unit and Florida
Division Board of
Directors of the American
Cancer Society
Watch "Navigating Cancer,"
hosted by Dr Bennett,
on WYKE TV at 6:30 p.m.
Monday and 10 a.m.
Thursday. Ifyou have
any suggestions for topics,
or have any questions,
contact him at 522 N
Lecanto Highway
Lecanto, FL 34461, or
email him at
cjbennett@rboi. com.


for prophylactic use of as-
pirin can be made. Until
this happens, it is prudent
not to take aspirin routinely
to prevent cancer


Dr Sunil Gandhi is a
hematologist and oncolo-
gist. He is the volunteer
medical adviser of the
Citrus Unit of the Ameri-
can Cancer Society Write
to 521 N Lecanto Highway
Lecanto, FL 34461, email
sgandhi@tampabayrrcom
or call 352-746-0707.


setting with your surgeon
and make sure that your fa-
cility is certified by an ac-
creditation group such as
JCAHO, which is nationally
recognized as the standard.


Denis Grillo, D.O., FOCOO,
is an ear nose and throat
specialist in Crystal River
Call him at 352-795-0011 or
visit CrystalCommunity
ENTcom.


-w."tmpW


I


I





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Frequently asked questions about screening event


April26 will be first-come, first-servecd

please don parkk on the grass


After last week's column re-
garding April being Oral
Cancer Awareness Month
and me offering an oral cancer
screening event at my office, it is
apparent that many people want
to take advantage of it.
My office staff has received
many phone calls asking numer-
ous questions. In order to let the
public know what to expect at this
event, I decided to print the most
common questions we received
along with my response.


Q: Are we using the oral cancer
screening light?
A: No, this will be an examina-
tion by sight and palpation (feel-
ing for any abnormalities).
Q: Are we providing a report for
them to bring back to their dentist?
A: If something unusual is found
I will write down what I see by de-
scription and location for you to
follow up with your dentist.
Q: Are we doing any type of
biopsy?
A No. You will be advised to fol-


low up on my findings ment for someone to
with your dentist or an come in that day at a
oral surgeon of your specific time?
choice. 'i s A: No. This is being
Q: If oral cancer is ;' "b) done on a first-come,
found will we be setting first-served basis. The
up no cost treatment? hours for the screening
A: No. You will be ad- are from 8 a.m. to noon.
vised to follow up with Q: What time can we
your dentist or oral sur- I start lining up outside?
geon of choice. Dr. Frank A: You can line up
Q: Are we providing Vascimini outside at any time you
any other free services SOUND BITES like, however, please be
(for example a tooth aware that the doors
ache)? will open up at 8 a.m.
A: No. This is only an oral can- Please realize that my office has
cer screening. My office will not parking available, but not much.
be set up to do anything else that Cars should be parked in parking
day spots only and not on the grass. In
Q: Can we make an appoint- the event that you arrive and see


the lot filled, please return at a
later time. The last thing we want
to see happen is someone get into
an accident.
Q: Will you be doing this again
next year?
A: The answer to this depends
on how things go this year.
I hope this helps clear up some
of the questions that have sur-
faced. I am looking forward to
meeting April 26.
--In--
Dr. Fank Vascimini is a
Homosassa dentist. Send your
questions to 4805 S. Suncoast
Blvd., Homosassa, FL 34446 or
email them to him at info@
MasterpieceDentalStudio. com.


G R U P S or the American Cancer Society
O U PS at 800-395-5665 to register.
Continued from Page C3 Weekly meetings


Caregivers' Support and
Information meeting, 1 p.m.
the fourth Tuesday monthly at
St. Timothy Lutheran Church,
1070 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal
River. Call Charlotte Downing
at 352-422-7044 for
directions/information. Refresh-
ments served.
The Leukemia & Lym-
phoma Society Suncoast
Chapter, Cancer Support
Group (including Multiple
Myeloma), 6 p.m. the fourth
Wednesday monthly at the
Moose Lodge, 5214 Mariner
Blvd., in Spring Hill. There is no
charge and light refreshments
are provided. Contact: Lourdes
Arvelo, LCSW, patient services
manager, at 813-963-6461 ext.
11, Lourdes.Arvelo@lls.org or
visit The Leukemia & Lym-
phoma Society website at
www.lls.org.
Alzheimer's caregiver
support group by Alzheimer's
Family Organization, 2 p.m. the
fourth Wednesday monthly at
Highland Terrace, 700 Medical
Court E., Inverness. Call Geor-
gia Litz at 352-860-2525.
Look Good ... Feel
Better, a free two-hour session
for women undergoing radiation
or chemotherapy, at 3 p.m. the
second Wednesday monthly at
the Cancer & Blood Disease
Center, Lecanto, and 3 p.m. the
fourth Wednesday monthly at
the Robert Boissoneault Oncol-
ogy Institute, Lecanto. Call
Joann Brown at 352-341-7741


"Together We Grow"
Nar-Anon Family Group, 6:45
p.m. Wednesday at Dunnellon
Presbyterian Church, 20641
Chestnut St., Room 204 in of-
fice building, use right-side en-
trance across from the
Memorial Garden; Nar-Anon is
for family and friends of addicts.
Find a free local support
group in your area: call 888-
947-8885 or go to www.
NARANONFL.org.
"Recovery from Food Ad-
diction," 1 p.m. and 7 p.m.
Thursday at St. Anne's
Church, 9870 W. Fort Island
Trail, Crystal River, in the parish
hall library. Call Peg at 410-
903-7740.
Food Addicts in Recov-
ery Anonymous (FA) is a free
12-step recovery program for
anyone suffering from food ob-
session, overeating, undereat-
ing or bulimia. For details or a
list of meetings, call 352-270-
8534 or visit: www.food
addicts.org.
0 7 to 8:30 p.m. Sunday at
Queen of Peace Catholic
Church Main Hall, 6455 S.W.
State Road 200, Ocala.
Depression and anxiety
peer support group meets at
10 a.m. Thursday at Central
Ridge Library.
Bereavement Group,
1:30 to 3 p.m. Thursday in the
back hall, St. Thomas Church,
off U.S. 19 south of Cardinal
Street. Group is composed of
men and women who are expe-
riencing grief and are con-


vinced "Life can be good
again." Open to all. Come or
call Anne at 352-212-0632.
Al-Anon groups meet reg-
ularly in Citrus County. Call
352-697-0497.
Inverness AFG: 8 p.m.
Monday, Our Lady of Fatima
Catholic Church, 550 S. U.S.
41.
Crystal River AFG: 8 p.m.
Tuesday, St. Benedict
Catholic Church, 455 S. Sun-
coast Blvd.
Last Resort AFG: 11:30
a.m. Wednesday, First United
Methodist Church, 3896 S.
Pleasant Grove Road,
Inverness.
LecantoAFG: 8 p.m.
Thursday, Unity Church of Cit-
rus County, 2628 W. Woodview
Lane, Lecanto.
Crystal River AFG: 11:30
a.m. Thursday at YANA Club,
147 Seventh St. (off Citrus Av-
enue), Crystal River.
*Awareness Lunch Bunch
AFG: 12:30 p.m. Friday, St.
Margaret Episcopal Church,
114 N. Osceola Ave.,
Inverness.
Beginners Al-Anon: 10
a.m. Saturday at Yana Club,
147 Seventh St. (off Citrus Av-
enue), Crystal River.
Tuesday Morning Serenity:
10 a.m. Tuesday at Unity
Church, 2628 W. Woodview
Lane, Lecanto.
Alcoholics Anonymous:
If you drink, and want to stop,
call Alcoholics Anonymous Na-
ture Coast Intergroup at 352-
621-0599. Visit the website:
www.ncintergroup.com.
AC Group, 7 p.m. Tues-
days at Church Without Walls,


3962 N. Roscoe Road, Her-
nando. Call Laverne at 352-
637-4563. Visit the website:
www.alcoholicsforchrist.com.
SA 12-step Christian sup-
port group meets at 6 p.m.
every Wednesday at Living Wa-
ters Ministries, 12 N. Melbourne
St., Beverly Hills. Call Meg at
352-527-2443. Free and open
to the public.
DUNNELLON Grief
support group, 6 p.m. Thurs-
days at the First Baptist Church
of Dunnellon, 20831 Powell
Road. Call the church at 352-
489-2730.
Narcotics Anonymous:
Easy Does It, 8 p.m. Mon-
day and Saturday, Lions Den,
U.S. 41, Floral City.
It Works How and Why, 7
p.m. Tuesday, Wednesday and
Saturday and noon Sunday,
YANA Club, 147 N.W. Seventh
St., Crystal River.
Focus on Recovery, 8 p.m.
Thursday, First Christian
Church, Grover Cleveland
Boulevard, Homosassa.
Recovery on the River, 8
p.m. Monday and Friday,
Lecanto Church of Christ, State
Road 44 and County Road 491,
Lecanto; 8 p.m. Sunday 797 S.
Rowe Terrace, Lecanto, east of
C.R. 491 and S.R. 44.
Narcotics Anonymous is not
affiliated with any of the meet-
ing facilities listed. Information
line: 352-382-0851.
Overeaters Anonymous:
5 p.m. Wednesday at St.
Anne's Episcopal Church. Call
Rita at 352-382-8503.
Voices of Recovery, 1 to
2:30 p.m. Monday at the Sen-
ior Center (V.A. building) on


County Road 491, Lecanto.
Call Dolores at 352-746-5019.
Solution, 3 to 4 p.m. Tues-
days at the Lakes Region Li-
brary, 1511 Druid Road,
Inverness. Call Marilyn at 352-
726-9112.
10:30 a.m. Wednesday at
St. Anne's Church, 9870 W.
Fort Island Trail, Crystal River,
in the parish hall library. Call
Peg at 410-903-7740.
The Circle of Love, 1 to
2:30 p.m. Thursday at Our
Lady of Grace Church in Bev-
erly Hills, 6 Roosevelt Blvd. Call
Carolyn at 352-341-0777.
The New Beginning, 7
p.m. Friday at Our Lady of
Grace, Roosevelt Boulevard,
Beverly Hills. Call Carolyn at
352-341-0777.
The Encouragers Sup-
port Group has been helping
people deal with depression,
anxiety, bipolar disorder and
more. Weekly meeting. Call
352-637-3196.
Anorexia and bulimia
anonymous 12-step support
group, 5:45 p.m. Monday at
the Yana Club, 147 N.W. Sev-
enth St., Crystal River (behind
the police station). Call Char-
maine at 352-422-3234.
Independent Living
Skills, Peer Support and Lit-
eracy workshops, 9 to 11:45
a.m. Monday at the Center for
Independent Living of North
Central Florida, 3774 W. Gulf-
to-Lake Highway, Lecanto. Call
Cathy Jackson at 352-527-
8399.
Citrus Abuse Shelter As-
sociation (CASA), 1100 Turner
Camp Road, Inverness, offers
two free weekly women's do-


mestic abuse support groups:
5:30 to 7 p.m. Tuesday and
10:30 a.m. to noon Wednes-
days. Child care available. Call
CASA at 352-344-8111.
Depression and Bipolar
Support Alliance of Citrus
County at 7 p.m. Thursday in
Bailey Hall, First Lutheran
Church, 1900 State Road 44
W., Inverness. Doors open at 6
p.m. Call 352-503-3262. The
National DBSAAssociation's
number is 800-826-3632.
Celebrate Recovery:
0 7 p.m. Wednesday and
Friday at the Christian Recov-
ery Fellowship Church, 2242
W. State Road 44. Call 352-
726-2800.
0 7 to 9 p.m. Friday at
Seven Rivers Presbyterian
Church's Student Ministries
Building. Dinner available be-
fore the meeting from 6 to 7
p.m. for $4 donation and a cof-
fee house after.
Call 352-746-6200.
Gulf to Lake Church Min-
istry Complex, West Gulf-to-
Lake Highway in Crystal River.
Dinner at 6 p.m. Friday, fol-
lowed by large- and small-
group time and a Coffee Cafe
at 9. Call 352-586-4709.
Nature Coast Ministries
seeks to help the homeless and
hurting of Citrus County. We
offer referrals to Celebrate Re-
covery, call 352-563-1860.
Overcomers Group for
people recovering from addic-
tions to drugs, alcohol or other
out-of-control habits, 8 p.m.
Monday at the Sanctuary,
7463 Grover Cleveland Blvd.
Call Paul at 352-628-2874.
See GROUPS/Page C9


HOPE


Our Reason to Relay

This is Relay For Life, a community event where people come
together to remember loved ones, inspire others and celebrate life.
It's your chance to make a difference in the fight against cancer. The
money you raise will fund lifesaving research, education, advocacy
and service programs. Call us to register your team for this
unforgettable event. This is the American Cancer Society.


"You feel so helpless when cancer hits. The American
Cancer Society Relay For Life allows you to fight back,
gives you hope that we are going to make a difference,
find a cure, save lives."
Joanne from Massachusetts
American Cancer Society Relay For Life Volunteer


Inverness April 20
Citrus High School


Lecanto May 4
Lecanto High School



CITRUS MEMORIAL
At t. Heart of Our Communit


4


REL
FOR


M.


AY
LIFE

V


For more information call 637-5577

Ci i r(N'ii. E
\ 1 ww.chroiilenline.com


IEd,_ I LI I ,



P L A YO U R I


2012


MO


,ME


HEALTH & LIFE


TUESDAY, APRIL 17, 2012 C5







Page C6 TUESDAY, APRIL 17,2012



COMMUNITY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


News NOTES

Wilderness Circle
on Earth Day
AWilderness Circle is
planned for 11 a.m. Sunday,
April 22, in celebration of
Earth Day.
Mackie Sanford of Chero-
kee descent will lead the
prayers in the circle. There
will be a fire built in the cen-
ter. Indian blood is not re-
quired; just the Indian heart.
The circle will be blessed and
saged, along with all who
wish to enter.
Potluck follows the circle
prayers. There will be after-
noon music. Bring a dish to
share and your soft drinks
and instruments. All are wel-
come. There is no electric or
water, but there's a port-a-
potty.
For more information, call
Betty Berger at 352-447-
2736 or email bberger@
bellsouth.net.
Sale to benefit
flotilla's efforts
Crystal River Search &
Rescue Inc. will have its an-
nual yard sale Friday, April
20, and Saturday, April 21,
starting at 8 a.m. both days.
The yard sale will take
place at the U.S. Coast
Guard Auxiliary building at
148 N.E. Fifth St. in Crystal
River. All proceeds from the
sale are donated to the U.S
Coast Guard Auxiliary, Flotilla
15-01, Crystal River, for use
in providing continued public
boating safety education and
services to the boating com-
munity.
For more information about
the sale or the auxiliary, call
Flotilla Commander Linda
Jones at 352-503 6199.
Grumman retirees
convene April 19
The Grumman Retiree
Club's Midwest Florida
Chapter will meet at 11:30
a.m. Thursday, April 19, at
Buffet City, 13235 Cortez
Blvd. (State Road 50),
Brooksville.
The buffet is $13. Call
Hank Mehl at 352-686-2735
at hmehl@tampabay.rr.com
to make reservations.
The program will be a per-
formance by a women's
quartet, the Coastal Chords,
members of Sweet Adelines
International. If any club
members are ill, let the Sun-
shine Committee know. In
Citrus County, email Gus
Krayer at g.krayer@ieee.org,
or call 352-586-1558.
All former Grumman and
Northrop Grumman employees
and their guests are invited.

Precious Paws
ADOPTABLE

Missy


Special to the Chronicle
Come and celebrate the
Precious Paws Rescue's
fourth birthday at the "Fe-
line Extravaganza Adop-
tion" at noon Thursday,
April 26. Cats are ready
and waiting for homes.
Some are lap trained, oth-
ers are a little more re-
served and a few will need
a little extra time to truly
join in family activities.
Some are dog friendly, a
few need to be the only cat
and some would prefer an
adult home. The Adoption
Center in Crystal River
Mall is open noon to 4 p.m.
Thursday through Sunday.
Pets available for adoption
can be viewed at precious-
pawsflorida.com. Cats and
kittens are available for
adoption at PetSupermar-
ket on State Road 44 in In-
verness during store hours.
Call 352-726-4700 for
more information.


Get ready to Relay


On-site meeting slatedfor April 19 at CHS


Special to the Chronicle

An Inverness Relay For Life on-site
meeting will take place at 5:30 p.m.
Thursday, April 19, at the Citrus High
School track.
Participants who have not gotten
team T-shirts, or team captain T-shirts
can pick them up at the meeting. Any-
one who has trophies from last year
must get their trophies turned in
ASAP
Inverness Relay For Life will begin
Friday evening, April 20, at the CHS
track; campsite set-ups may start at 10
a.m. Friday Absolutely no cars, trucks,


or motorized vehicles can be on the
track after 4:30 p.m. Friday or before
the closing ceremonies on Saturday
morning.
Survivor registration and the meal
for survivors will start at 4:30 p.m. Fri-
day, and the activities on stage will
begin at 5:30 p.m., followed by the Sur-
vivor Lap at approximately 6 p.m. (fol-
lowed by the team lap).
For the safety of all who attend In-
verness Relay For Life, from Friday
evening through 11 a.m. Saturday,
April 21, there cannot be any skates,
skateboards, bikes, heelies, or animals
of any type on the track or field area.


Wheelchairs and strollers for persons
needing them are allowed. Sheriff's
Dept K-9 Dogs and Service Animals
are the only animals to be allowed.
All children and teens younger than
18 must have a turned in signed per-
mission form and emergency contact
information from their parent or
guardian and they must receive an
armband to be at Inverness Relay For
Life after 11 p.m.
No charcoal products are allowed at
any campsite, and those cooking with
a gas grill must have a fire extin-
guisher at the campsite. No smoking is
allowed on any Citrus County School
System property
For more information, call Lisa
Stoessel at 352-585-4162.


Pow-wow slated for April 20


Inter-tribal event at Fort Cooper


Special to the Chronicle

Red Eagle Lodge of West
Central Florida Inc. Inter-
tribal Native Americans will
stage the 12th Annual Inter-
tribal Pow-wow on April 20,
21 and 22 at Fort Cooper
State Park in Inverness.
In addition to drumming,
flautists and other live en-


tertainment, there will be
many vendors of different
wares, storytelling and
dancing. Food offerings will
include Indian tacos, walk-
ing tacos, Indian fry bread,
barbecue sandwiches and
more.
State park fee is $3 per ve-
hicle. Donation to the event
is $3 for ages 16 and older;


$1 for youths age 6 to 16; kids
younger than 6 get in free.
Friday morning, April 20,
is student education day
from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Call
Pansey at 352-400-5644 to
schedule students and pro-
vide a number who will be
attending. There is a $2 per
child charge; no charge for
chaperones.
Elders' Evening (age 55
and older) will be from 3 to 7
p.m. Friday. Donation is $1.


Red Eagle Lodge will
have an Inter-tribal Cultural
Learning Center set up for
all to enjoy learning some-
thing new about very old
things, as well as some not-
so-very-old items.
Bring a chair and come
out to enjoy a family experi-
ence. The event is spon-
sored by Red Eagle Lodge of
WCF, the Citrus County
Chronicle and Fort Cooper
State Park.


Habitat at work in northwest county


-. wr -- a "r; :
Special to the Chronicle
ABOVE LEFT: Pastor Dairold Rushing, center, steps in for a photo with Shaunna and Matt Sims, as the first walls go up
on their Habitat for Humanity House in February. Rushing, of Inverness First Assembly of God, asked the blessing at the
wall-raising ceremony for Habitat house No. 77. ABOVE RIGHT: James and Blanca Wellman smile with family mentor Har-
riet Tuck, at the wall raising for their new home, Habitat house No. 78, in March. The Sims and Wellman families will be
neighbors on Buscetta Loop in northwest Citrus County, where Habitat plans to build eight homes this year.



Entertaining doctors debate moral issues


The audience was spellbound
throughout the performance of
"Dr Cook's Garden," the latest
production of the Art Center Theatre,
written by Ira Levin and masterfully
directed by Jeff Collum.
Sets can be meticulously built, cos-
tumes carefully selected, props cre-
atively placed, players masterfully
directed, but until a player
embraces the character and
takes ownership of it, the
depth of the writer's full
meaning and application
eludes the audience.
Ron Swick, as Dr Leonard
Cook, became his character,
mind, body and soul. So
much so that patrons were
overheard to say, "I think I'll
cancel my doctor's appoint- Ruth
ment in the morning." He AROU
was believability in the
fullest sense of the word COM
with his body language and
that soothing, rational way he ex-
plained everything away to the young
Dr Jim Tennyson, portrayed by Ben
Cannon in his debut with the Art Cen-
ter Theatre.
It's a small town of happy people in
Vermont and the good doctor still
makes house calls. He's at the ready
when his phone rings. He has a com-
pelling allegiance to his small town's
happiness, so much so that he stops at
nothing to keep it that way, including
his mysterious "three Rs" notations on
his medical records: Repeat, Rest and
Remove.
Dr Tim Tennyson of Chicago, as a


II
VI


boy growing up in Vermont, idolized
Dr. Cook, who was his inspiration to
enter the medical field as well. The
young doctor is encouraged to bring
his practice to Vermont, but as he ar-
rives for a visit and is in extended con-
versation with Kathy Capelle as Bea
Schmidt, and Pam Schreck as Dora
Ludlow, the nurse and the house-
keeper, and Tom Venable
as the gardener, Elias
Hart, he becomes
strangely suspicious of the
number of people who
have passed away while
under the care of his men-
tor, Dr Cook 30 in 21
years.
Capelle, in her fourth
role with the Art Center,
Levins and her third directed by
ND THE Collum, gave a convincing,
1UNITY insightful performance as
a loyal nurse. Lingering in
memory is her profound
portrayal in the 90-page monologue,
"The Bells of Amherst."
Surprisingly, Pam Schreck, as Dora
Ludlow, gave us pause in this matronly
role. Until she spoke, we hardly rec-
ognized her Kudos to the costumers
and makeup artists. Schreck's por-
trayal was flawless. It was a stretch for
her, from the romantic, fun-loving,
lighthearted, playful roles that have
endeared her to her fans. We applaud
her tireless commitment to the art of
theatre.
Tom Venable, as Elias Hart, was
welcomed back to the ACT stage fol-
lowing four Stage West productions.


Perfectly at ease with a minor role, he
is a well-respected contributor to the
success of ACT's productions.
The newcomers to ACT's stage were
magnificent in their old- and young-
doctor roles, exploring the ethical
questions surrounding the demise of
the old doctor's patients. Questions
arise: Is the doctor killing his pa-
tients? Is it ethical to "remove" those
who would or have done harm to the
tranquility of the town and its inhabi-
tants, those with terminal illnesses
who are hurting so bad for so long with
no hope, draining the hopes out of the
people around them? Even Dr. Ten-
nyson's father, who'd beaten him as a
young child?
Dr. Cook reasoned, "Why should a
garden be perfect and a town can't?"
And the proof of his actions is in the
town, and the people are happy And
the chilling fact is every doctor has a
choice with his patients.
Relentlessly, both doctors fervently
debate the moral issue of life or death.
We are called to agree with one, then
as the dialogue unfolds, we side with
the other A thrilling tug of war in our
heart of hearts. Merciful or cruel, that
was the question.
In the end, there were no secrets be-
tween the two. They became better
friends.

Ruth Levins participates in a variety
of projects around the community
Let her know aboutyourgroup's up-
coming activities by writing to PO.
Box 803, Crystal River FL 34423.


Friends


observe


Earth


Day


Park will

host special

exhibitors

Special to the Chronicle

The Florida Depart-
ment of Environmental
Protection's Friends of
Homosassa Springs
Wildlife Park Inc. plans
an Earth Day event at the
wildlife park Saturday,
April 21.
Many special Earth Day
exhibitors will be set up
in the park from 10 a.m. to
4:30 p.m.
Learn about butterflies,
bats, bears, native plants,
Native Americans and
more. Exhibitors include
Nature World Wildlife
Rescue, The Big Cat Res-
cue, Save the Manatee
Club, Homosassa Butter-
fly, Homosassa River Gar-
den Club, Friends of
Homosassa Springs
Wildlife State Park, META
and more.
Guy LaBree, the bare-
foot artist, will be on
hand, as will singer/biolo-
gist William Good and
Many Lakes Band of
Florida.
There will be a Native
American prayer circle at
10 a.m., noon and 2 p.m.
Regular park admission
applies for entrance into
the park.
Friends of Homosassa
Springs Wildlife Park is a
citizen support organiza-
tion for the park and
helps to raise funds for
park projects through
special events and activi-
ties and works in the com-
munity to increase the
public's awareness of the
park.
Other sponsors include
the Citrus County Chroni-
cle, Citrus 95.3 FM and
Classic Hits 96.3 FM,
WWJB 1450 AM.
Call the park at 352-628-
5343 for more information.


News NOTES

FFRA to learn
about canines
FFRA (Families and
Friends Reaching for the
Abilities) will meet Friday,
April 20, at the Key Training
Center in Inverness, 130
Heights Ave.
Social time and business
meeting are at 9 a.m., fol-
lowed by guest speaker Mary
Lee Johnson of Canine
Companions, at 10 a.m.
For more information, call
Ron Phillips at 352-
382-7819.
Program offers
new perspectives
The Wings Grief Services
Division of Hospice of Citrus
County will present the pro-
gram, "Beyond Kubler-Ross:
New Perspectives on Death,
Dying and Grief," from 9 a.m.
to noon Wednesday, April 18,
at the Share Club Auditorium,
402 Grace St., Inverness.
How has professional un-
derstanding of dying and
grief progressed and devel-
oped? Hospice of Citrus
County will offer this three-
hour program in coordination
with the Citrus Memorial
Health System Share Club
and The Hospice Foundation
of America.
The program is free, open
to the public and reservations
are requested.


Call Lynn Miller at 352-
527-2020 for information or
to make reservations.


* Submit information at least two weeks before the event. U Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
a Early submission of timely material is appreciated, but Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
multiple publications cannot be guaranteed, community@chronicleonline.com.


a Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be guaranteed.
* Expect notes to run no more than once.






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


TUESDAY EVENING APRIL 17, 201 2 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D/: Comcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
C B D/I F H 6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30
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0 WUFT PBS 5 5 5 41 News Business PBS NewsHour (N) Lidia Celebrates Amer. Experience Frontline (N) a World T Smiley
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S WF NBC 8 8 8 8 8 News Ton. 'PGPG G' c face elimination.'PG' the Box" (N)'PG'
News World Jeopardy! Wheel of Last Man Cougar Dancing With the Stars Private Practice "It Was Eyewit. Niqhtline
Q WFV) ABC 20 20 20 News (N) G' Fortune Standing Town (N) (N)'PG' c Inevitable"'14' News (N)Ec
10 News, Evening Inside Bea NCIS "Rekindled" (N) NCIS: Los Angeles Unforgettable 10 News Letterman
(o ITS CBS 10 10 10 10 10 6pm (N) News Edition Millionaire '14'c (DVS) "Lone Wolf"'14' "Trajectories"'14' c 11pm (N)
FOX13 6:00 News (N) TMZ (N) The Insider Glee Disco-inspired New Girl Raising FOX13 10:00 News (N) News Access
S WTV FOX 13 13 13 13 (In Stereo) a 'PG' 'PG' dance numbers.'14' (N)'14' Hope4' (In Stereo) a Hollywd
S WCJB1ABC 11 11 4 News ABC Ent Inside Ed. Last Man Cougar Dancing With Stars Private Practice'14' News Nightline
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S(WFTS ABC 11 11 11 News Fortune (N) G' Standing Town (N) (N)'PG Inevitable"'14' (N;Ec
Family Guy Family Guy BigBang Big Bang Law & Order: Criminal Law & Order: Criminal How I Met How Met The Office The Office
B(WM IND 12 12 16 'PG' 14' Theory Theory Intent'14' Intent'14' 'PG' '14'
D WTTAI MNT 6 6 6 9 9 Raymond Seinfeld Family Fd Family Fd Cold Case'14' Cold Case'PG' Scrubs Seinfeld Excused Excused
B WACX TBN 21 21 Faith The 700 Club (N)'G' Babers Amazing IManna Jewish IVariety Studio Direct Variety
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Y FAM 16 16 16 15 History Today Court Minute Show'G' Stereo)'G' USA USA News Beauty
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ri WVEIl UNI 15 15 15 15 14 Noticias Notic. Una Familia con Suerte(N)'PG'(SS) Abismo de Pasi6n La Que No Noticias Noticiero
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96 19 96 "Think Like a Man." (N)'PG'Ec Together Together 14' 14' 14' Together '14' Together
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27 61 27 3 Daily Show Colbert 30 Rock 30 Rock South Park Futurama Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Tosh.O Tosh.O Daily Show Colbert
(C) 27 61 27 33 Report '14' E '14' E 'MA' 'PG' '14' E '14' E '14' E '14' cc Report
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Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

Aaaayy! What are you
doing i' ih e. -
h",Hry ir.klr -




c'- < '' I..


4-~
I2
I


k k l A 4 I I- HIS ATTEMPT
TO IMPERSONATE
CREW HHNYWINKL WAS A---
CREWNH
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

A:III I
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: BATCH KHAKI FABRIC EXHALE
SAnswer: When the state park levied a usage fee for its
trails, he faced a TAX HIKE


7'


ACROSS
1 Jazzy
Fitzgerald
5 Huge racket
8 slaw
12 Weaver's
frame
13 Lyric poem
14 Felt sorry
about
15 Firefly catcher
(2 wds.)
17 Secondhand
18 Business VIP
19 "- Rides
Again"
21 Lake near
Reno
24 One of the
Mamas
25 Do very well
26 Force through
30 Layered
haircut
32 Reporter's
question
33 Does it wrong
37 Sedgwick of
the screen


38 Badminton
stroke
39 Marathon or
10K
40 Choir
members
43 Ms. Sumac
44 Departed
46 Went slowly
48 Jaunty hats
50 kwon do
51 Some CDs
52 Spaghetti
extra
57 Mislaid
58 Chef's phrase
(2 wds.)
59 Geodesic -
60 Potato buds
61 Speaker
pro -
62 Lost traction


4 Oil giant
DOWN of yore
1 Massachusetts 5 Karate studio
state tree 6 Ms. Lupino
2 Hawaii's 7 Bookish type
Mauna 8 Someone with
3 Part of LAX a cause


9 Deposes
10 Wolfish looks
11 Water swirl
16 -do-well
20 Environmental
prefix
21 Chore
22 "- Breaky
Heart"
23 Get wind of
27 Hole
punchers
28 Electrical
units
29 Bench garb
31 Talkathons
34 "The Big
Mouth" Martha
35 Mounties' org.
36 Straphanger's
lack
41 Legal rep.
42 Con game
44 Bad, bad
Brown of
song
45 Blank a tape
47 Cattails
48 III humor
49 Run-in
50 Cable car
53 Stein filler
54 Note before la
55 Fifi's
boyfriend
56 Jarrett of
NASCAR


Dear Annie: I am 24 and
have four small children
under age 10. My mother
was in a car accident
last fall that left her
paralyzed from the
chest down, and she
now lives with us. With
hardly any help from
my older sister, I strug-
gle every day trying to
take care of everyone's
needs.
Mom screams at me
and makes the smallest
of things seem like the
end of the world. I don't ANN
want to see her in a MAIL
nursing home, but I
cannot do this 24/7. I'm
losing my mind and my life. My
kids don't want to be around me,
and my oldest son's grades are de-
clining.
Do I keep going, hoping things
will get better? Or do I break the
news to my mom that I love her
dearly but can't take care of her?
-A
Dear A: You sound like a won-
derful, caring daughter, but Mom
is probably depressed and angry,
and is taking it out on you. There
are limits to what you can reason-
ably do for her without sacrificing
the well-being of your children.
Please don't feel guilty. Your
mother needs more help than you
can give her. She not only requires
round-the-clock physical care, but
also would benefit from counsel-
ing to deal with her other issues
and come to terms with her cur-
rent situation.
Please look into home-health
care options, including a full-time
caregiver (perhaps your sister
would contribute to the cost), as


well as nearby nursing homes.
Most do an excellent job, and you
can visit Mom every day, not only
to cheer her up, but
also to check on her
care. Then please get
Some counseling for
yourself in order to get
through this, because
we doubt Mom is going
to make it easy.
Dear Annie: Is it OK
to ask my 80-year-old
S parents whether they
will leave any inheri-
tance for my siblings
IE'S and me? I'm not look-
BOX ing to spend it. But get-
ting an answer will
help with our future
retirement planning. Of course, as
with most families, there are all
kinds of additional "wonderful"
dynamics at work that complicate
asking. What is your stance on
this? -Wondering
Dear Wondering: Children
should never assume there is an
inheritance to receive. Plan your
retirement according to what you
can manage on your own. You can,
however, discuss your parents'
plans for their future care, asking
whether they have a health care
power of attorney, a will, any
wishes for their funeral, etc.
These are important things that
ought to be arranged while your
parents are capable of doing so.
However, if they resist discussing
end-of-life issues, please leave it
alone.
Dear Annie: I teach treatment
of sexual dysfunction at Loma
Linda University School of Medi-
cine. You correctly identify low
testosterone as an important
cause of loss of desire. However, I


have found in many cases that the
cause is simple boredom with a
wife's participation.
Men and women both require
an average of 12 minutes of fore-
play to reach full arousal. A wife
who takes turns providing pleas-
ure should find her partner more
eager for sex. Men respond to ac-
tion far more than words. When
there is an expectation of pro-
longed mutual pleasuring, it cre-
ates a lovely aura of arousal long
before the clothes come off.
Please remind women that a
man is aroused by the sight of his
wife's naked body not because
she's a supermodel, but because
her body is only shown to him.
Mood lighting can help.
A semi-closed dressing gown or
the sight of her in one of his not-
quite-long-enough shirts can be a
powerful visual stimulant to a
man who sees offering sex as the
most powerful statement of love
and caring.
You do great good by helping
women understand that men will
never behave or understand them
the way a girlfriend does.
We men really are different and
often are unable to express our
needs clearly. D.B. M.D. Loma
Linda, Calif


Annie's Mailbox is written by
Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar,
longtime editors of the Ann
Landers column. Email annies
mailbox@comcast.net, or write
to: Annie's Mailbox, c/o Creators
Syndicate, 737 Third St.,
Hermosa Beach, CA 90254. To
find out more aboutAnnie's
Mailbox visit
wwwcreators. com.


Bridge


North 04-17-12
SKJ98
V K J 2
SKQ4
6 7 4 2
*742
West East
S42 475
V6 VA 98 73
S 9 6 5 3 10 82
SA Q J 10 9 5 K 8 6
South
A Q 10 6 3
V Q 10 5 4
AJ7
1 3

Dealer: South
Vulnerable: Neither
South West North East
14 3* ??

Opening lead: V 6

PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

Bidding is a two-edged sword if you do not be-
come the declaring side. You might have helped
partner to find the killing lead, but you might have
told the declarer how to make his contract.
In this deal, North chose to describe his hand
accurately, wondering if his side could make a
slam. But it helped the opponents to find the
killing defense.
After South opened one spade, West made a
three-club weak jump overcall, showing a good
six-card suit and 5 to 10 high-card points. What
should North have done next?
To counteract a weak jump overcall with sup-
port for partner's major, bid one level higher than
you would have done if the opponent had had the
courtesy to pass. So, a three-spade response shows
a decent single raise. A jump to four spades prom-
ises the values for a game-invitational limit raise.
And a four-club cue-bid indicates a game-forcing
raise.
Here, North chose the cue-bid, but it gave East
the opportunity to double to show a high club.
Now, when West had to lead against four spades,
he led his singleton heart, hoping his partner held
that ace and confident his partner had the club
king as an entry
East won with his ace and returned the heart
three, his lowest card being a suit-preference sig-
nal for clubs, the lower-ranking of the other two
side suits. West ruffed, underled his club ace to
give East the lead with his king, and a second heart
ruff defeated the contract.
True, if North had responded four spades, the
defenders might have found the same defense, but
it would have been harder.


Answer to Previous Puzzle


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


BRILLIANT AAA
BIO NIECDROE EHO R B
SR AN TAA A


DO GMA IT H RITY

TE R Y S IID I
SEEGA RII IT l

PERS I A O AIY S
N E V EIV E EEM

L IET OERi SPI T


ENTERTAINMENT


TUESDAY, APRIL 17, 2012 C7


I






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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SIDEBURNS ANY SHORT, SUPPOSED JUST TILT VOUR VOUR NECK, HONEY?
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LOPSIDEO! AROUND WITH GROW OUT A
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WHEN CLASS ENDED
YESTERDAY, PEOPLE,
WHAT DID I
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"Mommy, when will I be
four and up?"


"M0OM SAIP I SHOULDN'T HIT MARGARET SACK,
SHE PIPN'T SA'/ANT-HING A OUT KICKING,"
Betty


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377
"The Three Stoges" (PG) 1:45 p.m., 4:45 p.m.,
7:45 p.m.
"Titanic" (PG-13) In real 3D. 1 p.m., 5 p.m.
No passes.
"American Reunion" (R) ID required. 1:20 p.m.,
4:05 p.m., 7:10 p.m.
"Wrath of the Titans" (PG-13) In real 3D.
1:40 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7:40 p.m. No passes.
"Mirror Mirror" (PG) 1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m.,
7:30 p.m.
"The Hunger Games" (PG-13) 1:10 p.m.,
4:10 p.m., 7:15 p.m.

Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Lockout" (PG-13) 1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
"The Three Stoges" (PG) 1:20 p.m., 4:20 p.m.,


7:20 p.m.
"Cabin in the Woods" (R) ID required. 1:50 p.m.,
4:50 p.m., 7:50 p.m.
"American Reunion" (R) ID required. 1:35 p.m.,
4:35 p.m., 7:35 p.m.
"Titanic" (PG-13) In real 3D. 1 p.m., 5 p.m.
No passes.
"Mirror Mirror" (PG) 1:05 p.m., 4 p.m., 7 p.m.
"Wrath of the Titans" (PG-13) In real 3D.
1:15 p.m., 4:15 p.m., 7:15 p.m. No passes.
"The Hunger Games" (PG-13) 1:10 p.m.,
4:10 p.m., 7:10 p.m.
"21 Jump Street" (R) ID required. 1:45 p.m.,
4:45 p.m., 7:45 p.m.

Visit www.chronicleonline.com for area movie list-
ings and entertainment information.


Times subject to change; call ahead.


WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public Local RADIO WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Contemp. WSKY 97.3 FM News Talk WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WXOF-FM 96.3 Adult Mix WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s, '60s, '70s
WEKJ FM 96.7, 103.9 Religious WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WRZN-AM 720 Adult Standards


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: 0 slenba E


"KZ ZKF GJK FXFV LJTEFV EWF OJLF


ZP AJTFAJNN, ZV GZKBMFV DE. RZM


GJK ZKNR GWJNNFKOF DE."


NZM AVZGC


Previous Solution: "I got hate letters from girls all over America because I wouldn't go
to the prom with them." Davy Jones
(c) 2012 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 4-17


MMtAMMMMM MMhM
7 GREA WHATn.oES
PR.OZ SA L WILL
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LITTLE IN
WE KNOW ,


Frank & Ernest


CHAPTER .6,
QUESTIONS
IZ- 28 !

THEM
ALLL


Today's MOVIES


C8 TUESDAY, APRIL 17, 2012


COMICS





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


GROUPS
Continued from Page C5

Dunnellon Life Recovery
group for adults where addic-
tion, compulsion and codepen-
dency issues are dealt with, at
7 p.m. Monday at Rainbow
Springs Village Church, 20222
S.W. 102nd St. Road, Dunnel-
Ion. Call Char at 352-465-1644
or Nancy at 352-794-0017.
SPRING HILL Parkin-
son's Tai Chi Group, 2:30 to
3:30 p.m. Tuesday in the pri-
vate dining room at Health-
South Rehabilitation Hospital of
Spring Hill. Call Charissa
Haffner at 352-346-8864.
Organizations
Alzheimer's Association-
Florida Gulf Coast Chapter affil-
iated support groups are for
family members, caregivers
and others interested in learn-
ing more about Alzheimer's dis-
ease. Meetings are open to
everyone and free of charge. To
arrange free respite care so
you can attend a group, call the
Hernando office at 352-688-
4537 or 800-772-8672.
Website:
www.alzsupport.com Live
chat every Wednesday at noon.
Message boards open at all
times to post questions and
leave replies. Join the
Alzheimer's Association online
community at www.alz.org/
livingwithalzheimers
message_boards_lwa.asp.
Brooksville: Lykes Memo-
rial County Library, 238 Howell
Ave.; 2:30 p.m. first Friday
monthly. Call Jerry Fisher at
352-688-4537.
Brooksville: Oak Hill Hos-
pital Senior Partners, 11361
Cortez Blvd.; 2:30 p.m. first
Thursday monthly. Call Jerry
Fisher at 352-688-4537.
Spring Hill: The Residence
at Timber Pines, 3140 Forest
Road; 2 p.m. third Monday
monthly. Call Diane Koenig at
352-683-9009.


HEALTH & LIFE


First United Methodist
Church of Homosassa has
several support groups that run
on a monthly basis. All groups
are open to the public and free
of charge, and meet at 1 p.m. in
Room 203 in the Administration
Building:
First Monday: diabetic
support group.
Second Monday:
Alzheimer's/dementia care-
givers support group.
Fourth Monday: stroke
survivors support group.
Memory Lane Respite of-
fered weekly for people with
Alzheimer's/dementia. Anyone
bringing a loved one for the first
time is encouraged to come
early to fill out information
forms. Call 352-628-4083 for
meeting dates.
Citrus Memorial Health
System is a 198-bed, not-for-
profit community hospital that
provides health care services to
residents of Citrus County and
surrounding communities. Sup-
port group meetings are in the
CMHS Administration Building
unless indicated.
SACS Man to Man Prostate
Support and Education Pro-
gram, 11:30 a.m. the second
Wednesday monthly. Meetings
are in the conference room at
the Robert Boissoneault Oncol-
ogy Institute at 522 N. Lecanto
Highway in the Allen Ridge
Medical Mall.
Call 352-527-0106.
SAHEC Quit Smoking
Group: 3 p.m. Tuesday at
Robert Boissoneault Oncology
Institute, Allen Ridge Medical
Mall, 522 N. Lecanto Highway,
Lecanto. Call 813-929-1000,
ext. 213.
Breast Cancer Support
Group: 11:30 a.m. the second
Friday, Robert Boissoneault
Cancer Institute. Call Judy
Bonard at 352-527-4389.
Citrus Cancer Support:
4:30 p.m. the third Tuesday,
cafeteria meeting room. Call
Carol at 352-726-1551, ext.
6596 or ext. 3329.


HEALTH NOTE GUIDELINES
* Support group information will list monthly meetings
first, as space is available, then weekly meetings.
* It is the responsibility of each organization to inform
the Chronicle about changes to existing listings.
* To submit information about upcoming seminars,
health-related events open to the public or support
group meetings, email newsdesk@chronicleonline
.com attn: Health Notes; fax 352-563-5660 or write
to: Health Notes c/o Citrus County Chronicle, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429.
* Information relating to professional training or
seminars attended by those in the health care
industries are considered business briefs, and would
appear in the Business Digest listings of Sunday's
Business section.
* To submit story ideas for feature sections, call 362-
563-5660 and ask for Cheri Harris. Be prepared to
leave a detailed message with your name, phone
number and the address of the news event.
* Approval for story ideas must be granted by the
Chronicle's editors before a reporter is assigned.
* The Chronicle reserves the right to edit submissions.


Cancer Support: at Cancer
Treatment Center. Call Jean-
nette at 352-746-1100 for date
and time.
Diabetes Support Group:
Call Carol McHugh, R.N., at
352-341-6110 for details.
Head and Neck Cancer
Support: Robert Boissoneault
Cancer Institute. Contact
Wendy Hall for upcoming
schedule at 352-527-0106.
Heart-Healthy Eating
Workshop: 1:30 to 3 p.m. sec-
ond Wednesday every other
month, CMHS Medical Office
Building. Call 352-560-6266 or
352-344-6538 to registration.
Look Good Feel Better
Group: monthly at Robert Bois-
soneault Oncology Institute,
Allen Ridge Medical Mall, 522
N. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto,
sponsored by the American
Cancer Society, the Cosmetol-
ogy Association and the Per-
sonal Care Products Council. A
licensed cosmetologist is pres-
ent to advise women about
many issues. For dates, times,
more information or to register,
call the American Cancer Soci-
ety at 800-395-5665.
Mended Hearts Support
Group: 10 a.m. second Friday,


Gulf Room at CMHS Historic
Building. Call Cardiovascular
Services at 352-344-6416.
Ostomy Support: 2 p.m.
third Sunday, Cypress Room at
CMHS Historic Building. Call
Steve Spielman at 352-229-
4202, Sue Penner at 352-560-
7918, Sharon Brummer at
352-382-4446 or Betty or Mel
Shipley at 352-341-0005.
Stroke Support Group of
Citrus County: 3 to 4 p.m. third
Wednesday, CMHS Annex
Building, State Road 44 across
from Walgreens. Call 352-344-
6596 or 352-344-1646.
Hospice of Citrus
County support groups and
workshops. Call 866-642-0962
or 352-527-2348 for details.
Grief workshops:
0 1 p.m. Thursday- Hos-
pice of Citrus County Clinical
Office, 326. S. Line Ave.,
Inverness.
2 to 3:30 p.m. Wednesday
- Newly Bereaved Grief Work-
shop, Wings Education Center,
8471 W. Periwinkle Lane.,
Homosassa.
Grief support groups:
11 a.m. Tuesday- Our
Lady of Grace Catholic Church
Parish Life Center, 6 Roosevelt


Blvd., Beverly Hills.
9 a.m. Wednesday -
Grief's Journey ... AWalking
Group, Whispering Pines Park
(Parking Area E).
10 a.m. Thursday -
Wings Education Center, 8471
W. Periwinkle Lane,
Homosassa.
2 p.m. second Thursday
- Hospice of the Nature Coast
Levy Office, 24-B County Road
40 E., Inglis.
10:30 a.m. Saturday -
First United Methodist Church,
831 Bradshaw St., Homosassa.
Evening support groups (for
working people):
0 6 to 7:30 p.m. Tuesday,
newly bereaved Hospice of
Citrus County Clinical Office,
326 Line Ave., Inverness.
Social support:
10 a.m. Tuesday -
Frank's Family Restaurant,
2780 N. Florida Ave.,
Hernando.
1 p.m. first Thursday -
Skeet's Barbeque Restaurant,
3887 N. Lecanto Highway, Bev-
erly Hills.
11:30 a.m. third Tuesday
- LIFT luncheon (widows/wid-
owers), Citrus Hills Golf &
Country Club; call 352-621-
1500, ext. 1728 for
reservations.
Wings education series:
"4th Tuesdays @ 2" -
Wings Education Center, 8471
W. Periwinkle Lane,
Homosassa.
Teen Encounter and Camp
Good Hope Camps for griev-
ing children/teens offered in
April and October.
Hospice of Citrus
County/Hospice of the Nature
Coast licensed 1985, is a not-
for-profit charitable organization
providing comprehensively re-
sponsive and compassionate
end-of-life services to the termi-
nally ill and their families in 12
counties of North Central
Florida. It also provides grief
support services for children
and adults in the community.
HPH Hospice, in partner-


TUESDAY, APRIL 17, 2012 C9

ship with the Alzheimer's Asso-
ciation Florida Gulf Coast
Chapter, offers Caregivers Sup-
port Groups for caregivers of
dementia or Alzheimer's pa-
tients to provide information,
education and emotional sup-
port in a safe, comforting and
confidential environment.
There is no charge, and
everyone is welcome to join.
Call Sue Piatek at 352-527-
4600 with questions.
First Tuesday, 11 a.m., Our
Lady of Fatima, 550 S. U.S. 41,
Inverness.
Second Monday, 1 p.m.,
First United Methodist Church
of Homosassa, 8831 W. Brad-
shaw St., Homosassa (respite
care available).
Fourth Tuesday, 5 p.m.,
Emeritus at Barrington Place,
2341 W. Norvell Bryant High-
way (County Road 486 east of
C.R. 491), Lecanto (respite
care available).
Last Wednesday, 12:30
p.m., Our Lady of Grace
Catholic Church, 6 Roosevelt
Blvd., Beverly Hills (respite care
available).
Weekly ongoing Bereave-
ment Group from HPH Hos-
pice and St. Timothy's
Evangelical Lutheran Church,
available to anyone who has
experienced the loss of a loved
one, 2:30 to 3:30 p.m. Thurs-
days at St. Timothy's Evangeli-
cal Lutheran Church, 1071 N.
Suncoast Blvd. (U.S. 19), Crys-
tal River. There is no cost to at-
tend. Contact Paul Winstead at
352-527-4600.
HPH Hospice, a nonprofit
agency initially licensed in
1984, provides, care, comfort
and support to individuals af-
fected by a life-limiting illness in
Citrus County. In addition to its
office in Beverly Hills, its has a
Hospice House on Norvell
Bryant Highway in Lecanto for
patients with limited caregiving
assistance and a Hospice Care
Center in Citrus Health & Reha-
bilitation Center in Inverness for
patients with complicated pain
and symptoms.


CITRUS COUNTY



HR ONICLE
www.chronicleonline.com


Classifieds


Classifieds In Print and Online All


BUSINESS HOURS:

MONDAY-FRIDAY
8:00 A.M. 5:00 P.M.
CLOSED SATURDAY/SUNDAY


WE GLADLY ACCEPT

-i. 3


Publication Days/Deadlines

Chronicle / Daily.....................................1 PM, Daily
Homefront / Sunday.................................3 PM, Friday
Chronicle / Sunday...................................4 PM, Friday
Chronicle / Monday.................................4 PM, Friday
Sumter County Times / Thursday............... 11 AM, Tuesday
Riverland News / Thursday.......................2 PM, Monday
South Marion Citizen / Friday....................4 PM, Tuesday
West Marion Messenger / Wednesday.......4 PM, Friday


Gentleman in his sixties
would like to meet a
lady for out door
activities & fun. Please
call (352) 382-5661
White male
seeks a lady
to take to lunch.
dinner, ride bikes,
golf cart, walk on the
beach, go to church
etc.call to talk
(352) 563-5782
'. 1 as..-1s.
i II i IJ II st.
L .,- ,ID

CO RpN1TCiE
Classifieds


SEWING&
EMBROIDERY
MACHINE
with many extras, books
tapes,75+ spools of
thread some
needlepoint&crochet
items $600.00 or best
reasonable offer
352-382-1917 or
jgtroxel@embarq
mail.com


SlullE Dnrl ree irewoo


QQIK
CRYSTAL RIVER
VILLAGE -55+
A SUPER BUY 2/2/den
1457sq.ft 05 Hmof Merit,
all appliances, carport,
Ig screen room, im-
maculate $39,900
(352)419-6926







w chron cleon,,ne oml


Collection
classical country, pop
assorted albums
excel cond. $200 obo
(352) 628-3076
COM ERCAL L RESIDENIL

Green Valley
Landscape & Design Inc.
352.280.0269
Complete Lawn Maintenance
Free Fertilizing with new
accounts
General lonics
Water Conditioner
used 6 months
$1,500.
(352) 270-8743
Leave message
HERNANDO
Fri. 20 & Sat. 21, 8a-lp
massage tble, student
desk, tools, household
1368 W. Mineral Court.
NISSAN ALTIMA
2011, Excel. condition
low miles, fully loaded
$18,500
(352) 274-1940
RIVENBARK LAWN &
LANDSCAPE.
Best Prices in town for
all your lawn care
needs!! (352) 464-3566
WOOD CABINET
w/VCR & 25" Goldstar
Tv, has remote, bottom
door asking $75. 19"
Curtis Mathis TV w/ re-
mote $40.382-1167



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
Paid for Junk Vehicles,
J.W. 352-228-9645
$$ CASH PAID $$
For Junk or wrecked
Cars/Trucks, $300 & UP
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL
Appls. Riding Mowers.
Scrap Metal. AC Unit
cell -352-270-4087



FREE CATS
Male & Female.
approx. 3 month old
(352) 794-7496


Lecanto
most of it cut
(352) 513-4161
Free to good home
2 Female Maine Coon
Cats, spayed, 1 year
old. 1 black, 1 calico
(352) 212-4058
KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Savage Pays top $$$.
352-628-4144
Will pick up quality items
for fund raiser:
desks,dressers,
clothes,costume
jewelry,small appliances
and tools,etc.
352-270-3909


Aussie Shepherd
male, Black w/white &
tan markings, collar
w/tag last seen 4/12/12
off Homosassa Trail
(352) 628-1723
Lost Conure (small
Parrot)lnverness High-
lands on April 11,2012 If
seen or found please call
Mike @ 352-419-7821 or
352-267-6357
LOST PETS. Two A. Pit
Bull Terr's, one male
white with brown ear, one
female white with brown
spots. Lost Thursday
night in vicinity of Regions
Bank / Downtown Inver-
ness. They were not
wearing their collars at
the time of their great es-
cape / adventure.
697-3023 or 419-6970
Lost, black cat w/red
collar and red rabies tag
#700178. Mr. Whiskers
is friendly & was last seen
4/10 at Speceberry Ct E
and Linder Dr in
Sugarmill Woods. Call
Dana 621-5545.
Mans Wallet, with
North Carolina Drivers.
Lic, keep the money,
but important to se-
cure drivers Lic.
Publix Shopping or
S. Homosassa Area
(352) 628-2962
(812) 887-3463



Huge discounts when
you buy 2 types of
advertising! 120 com-
munity newspapers,
32 websites, 26 daily
newspapers. Call
now to diversify your
advertising with Ad-
vertising Networks of
Florida
(866)742-1373


15ct.@ $5 per lb
Stone Crab@ $6 per Ib
delivered 727-771-7500



TEACHER
40 hr. req., CDA Pref.
Ark Angels
(352) 795-2360
TEACHER
Fulltime, Exp. Req.
CDA Preferred
TADPOLES EARLY
LEARNING
(352) 560-4222



High paced office has
Immediate opening
Accounts
Payable/Payroll/
Admin. Assistant
Must have a
minimum of 5 years
experience in
Quickbooks & full
knowledge of Excel,
Word & all Micro soft
programs. Must type
a min of 55 wpm.
Paid Holidays, Paid
sick leave, Paid va-
cations & health
insurance available.
Pay DOE.
Apply in person at
711 S. Adolph Pt.
Lecanto Fl.
Receptionist
Must have good
organizational
skills, exp. in billing
and medical insur-
ance. Pleasant
personality with good
customer service
skills. Please fax
resume to
352-527-3627



HAIR STYLIST
FTIPT Immediate
Openings, Call Sue
352-628-0630


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966



#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aevourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)


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9 7 1 4 6 8 5 2 3'
-4 5 2 7S9 3 6 1 8
452793 1 8 518
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5 9 7 6 2 1 3 8 4
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328947156
2391568-47
1146879235
1 78 6 8 7234 9 215
7 8 5 2 3 4 9 6 1


SINGLE COPY

NEWSPAPER ROUTE

AVAILABLE.
There is an immediate opportunity for a single
copy independent contractor to service racks
and businesses in the Citrus County area.


V Early Morning
Hours

V Need reliable
vehicle

V Must be 18
years old


TheeCtrusCount Chrnicl
Emal: steatchoilenie^o


The Time!


00OB03G
Sudoku ** __ 4puz.con

6 5 2 7

9 3

45 7 3 18

6 8 2

76 13

3 4 6

23 1 6 47

1 5

8 2 4 6
Fill in the squares so that each row, column, and
3-by-3 box contain the numbers 1 through 9



TRACTOR WORK

$30 + $30/hr Mowing, Grading,
Lite Loader, Tree Work,
Cleanup, and Wood Fences

Licensed and Insured

352-270-6800


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ew fd


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I I A( WU IMAP







C10 TUESDAY,APRIL 17,2012


IMMEDIATE
OPENINGS
LPN & RN's
for Correctional and
Hospice RN's for
Hospitals Med/Surg
and ICU

APPLY IN PERSON
2008 Hwy 44 W,
Inverness, Or Online
www.nurse-temps
.com, 352-344-9828

Live In Care
Giver

Mature Person
For elderly gentle-
man. Must have
driver's lic.
duties inc: light
housekeeping, cook-
ing and laundry
as well assist with
showers. Ref's Req.
call for more info.
(352) 628-2777

MEDICAL BILLING
TRAINEES NEEDED
Train to become a
Medical Office Assis-
tant! No Experience
needed! Job Training
& Local Placement
assistance. HS
Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)374-7294

Medical Practice
looking for part time
employee to work
front and back office
Medical office exp
preferred.
Send resume to
Citrus Co Chronicle
1624 N Meadowcrest
Blvd Blind Box1765 P
Crystal River, Fl 34429

RESIDENT
ASSISTANT

Looking for reliable
staff. Must be
available any shift
any day of the week.
Looking for PRN and
PT Staff. Nursing expe-
rience preferred.
Apply at
BARRINGTON PLACE
2341 W Norvell
Bryant Hwy.Lecanto
EOE/DFWP


Class-A FlatBed Driv-
ers$ Home EVERY
Weekend, Run S.E. US
REQUIRES 1 Yr OTR F.B.
Exp, & payUP TO
.39/mile Call
(800)572-5489 x 227
SUNBELT TRANSPORT,
LLC
Drivers New Freight
for Refrigerated & Dry
Van lines. Annual Sal-
ary $45k to $60k. Flexi-
ble hometime. CDL-A,
3 months current OTR
experience.
800-414-9569
www.drivekniaht.com
WATER FILTRATION
TECH & INSTALLER

Must be of professional
appearance and
knowledgeable in all
phases of residential
water testing, treat-
ment, & installation.
Apply at Pro H20,
102 W. Main St.,
Inverness. No phone
calls please




25 Driver Trainees
Needed Now!
at Schneider National
Earn $750 per week!
No experience
needed! Local CDL
Training! Job ready in
15 days!
(888)368-1964

BOOKKEEPING
Quick Books a Must.
JOE'S CARPET
138 N. Florlda Ave.

CAREGIVERS
NEEDED
All Shifts No Exp.
Neccessary Apply At
HOME INSTEAD
SENIOR CARE
4224 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Lecanto


KFC


)U BELONG

AT

KFC..
@ 1110 Hwy 41 N,
Inverness
ring experienced
NERAL, ASSISTANT
SHIFT MANAGERS
competitive pay
d great benefits.
pply in Person
mail your resume
to info@
ineptuneinc.com



I' \ ll l st.


ROGERS Construction
All Construction
sm jobs Free Est (352)
637-4373 CRC1326872




Clean Ups &
Clean Outs
(352) 220-9190




AFFORDABLE
COMPUTER SERV.
(352) 341-4150
Computer Problem?
352 503 4137 House
calls .. John Warnken
Senior Discount
DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
NATURE COAST
COMPUTER Repairs
& Web Design
free insp 212-1551




Bianchi Concrete
inc.com ins.lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-
Sidewalks. Pool deck
repair/stain 257-0078
CURB APPEAL/ Lic
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River rock
reseals & repairs. 352
364-2120/410-7383
FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, staining &
Garage Firs. Recession
Prices! 352-527-1097
ROB'S MASONRY
& CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs Tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554



All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling,
Site Prep, Driveways.
Lic. & Ins. 352- 795-5755


Citrus County
Clerk of Courts
is accepting KFC,
applications at this
time. For information is hi
on current job GEN
openings, please and
view our website at an
www.clerk.citrus.fl.us, for
or contact Human and
Resources at A
(352) 341-6483. or ei
king
Volunteer Patriotic
Treasurer and
Campaign Manager i
needed. \Y,,|
Guaranteed long
hours and low pay.
Full balloon payment
after victory. Contact
and required reading
www. Wykes for Cu
Sheriff. corn


ROB SCREENING
Repairs Rescreen, Front
Entries, Garage, Sliders
Free Est. 352-835-2020



SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Washer &
Dryers, Free Pick Up
352-564-8179



Blind Factory
by Joanne We custom
make all types. Best
prices anywhere! Hwy
44 & CR 491. 746-1998



CNA
Interested in Full/Pt
Time, Home Health
Care position,
Contact Sissy
(352) 453-7255
LIC. & EXP. CNA
Will Care For You
Cook, Clean & Daily
Needs (352) 249-7451
Loving Adult Care
Home (SL 6906450)
Alzheimer/Dementia
no prob 352-503-7052




Yont \\or Id firtM

Need a J 4ib
4or i1
qualified
employee?


This area's
#1
employment
source!


Classifieds
k"NMII.IJI.IJJ..IIBd


IDRYER VENT CLEANIN


r-I


S WILL CONSTRUCTION..
I 352-628-2291 |
PreventDryerFiresNow.com


COUNTER HELP

APPLY IN PERSON
RIVER SAFARI CAFE
10823W. Yulee Dr.
Old Homossasa

INSURANCE
INSPECTOR
PT in Citrus County.
Work independently in
the field to verify meas-
urements and condition
of homes for insurance
companies. No sales.
Computer experience,
digital camera, car, cell
phone required. Knowl-
edge of home construc-
tion and customer service
experience a plus. Paid
Training. Paid per assign-
ment or minimum $14/hr.
Apply at
www.mueller-inc.com Ref
# 18990

POSITION AVAILABLE
in PRO SHOP
@ I.G.C.C

Must have computer
expereince
and be able to
multi -task
call M-F 352-637-2526
(352) 726-2583





Freight Up = More $
2 Mos. CDL Class A
Driving Exp
(877)258-8782www.me
Itontruck.com/
drive





AIRLINES ARE HIRING -
Train for hands on
Aviation Maintenance
Career. FAA approved
program.
Financial aid if qualified
Housing Available.
CALL Aviation Institute
Of Maintenance.
(866)314-3769


Schoos/
Instructio


"Can you Dig It?"
We will train, certify &
provide lifetime assis-
tance landing work.
Hiring in Florida. Start
digging as a heavy
equipment operator.
(866)362-6497

#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)

Attend College
Online from Home

*Medical, *Business,
*Paralegal,
*Accounting,
*Criminal Justice. Job
placement assis-
tance. Computer
available. Financial
Aid if qualified. SHEV
certified. Call
(877) 206-5165
www.CenturaOnline



VI


COUNTY WIDE DRY-
WALL -25 ys exp lic2875.
all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Pop Corn Removal
352-302-6838



ANNIE'S ELECTRIC
Husband & Wife
Team.(352) 341-5952
EC-13002696
BRIGHT ELECTRICAL
Res./Comm. Lic & Ins.
$50.hr. EC0001303
352-302-2366
DUN-RITE Elect
since '78/ Free Est.
licEC 13002699
352- 726-2907
Thomas Electric LLC
Generator maint &
repair. Guardian
Homestandby, &
Centurion. Cert. Tech.
Briggs Stratton 352-
621-1248 #ER00015377




A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002
BOB BROWN'S
Fence & Landscaping
352-795-0188/220-3194
ROCKY'S FENCING
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
352 422-7279 k



ALUMINUM
STRUCTURES
5" & 6" Seamless Gutters
Free Estimates, Lic &
Ins. (352) 563-2977




Andrew Joehl
Handyman.
Gen/Maint/Repairs
Pressure cleaning.
Lawns/Gutters. No job
too small!Reli able ,ins.
0256271 352-465-9201


AAA ROOFING
Call the eak6uste's"
Free Written Estimate

$100 OFF:
Any Re-Roof
SMust present coupon at time contract is signed |
Lic./Ins. CCCO57537 oBSY


TAYLOR LLEGE



NE6RIf.W


2 WEEK
PREP COURSES!
*ALF ADMINISTRATOR
$300.
*EKG TECH $475.
*NURSING ASST. $475.
*PHLEBOTOMY $475.

tavlorcolleae.edu
(352) 245-4119
FB, twitter, you tube
r--N-- .
NOW
ENROLLING
FOR SPRING
2012 CLASSES
I*BARBER
*COSMETOLOGY
FACIAL
.*FULL SPECIALTY

g MANICURE/Nall Ext
reMASSAGE THERAPY

BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
NEW PORT RICHEY
/SPRING HILL
I 727-848-8415
352-263-2744
i-- -- iil



FLEA MARKET STUFF
Miscellaneous flea goods
by the box $10.
352-527-3177



Wood Frame Wind. 22
3/4"x 75 3/4" Top, 11
1/2"Rounded,18 5 1/2"x9
1/2"glass panes plus 4 at
top $99 352-489-3914



ACRYLIC BOXES for col-
lectibles 1.00each
352-527-3177
Exclusive Record
Collection
classical country, pop
assorted albums
excel cond. $200 obo
(352) 628-3076

(t


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
AA AAAA i


4o r*a eanIvman
se FAST
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
.100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 k
Affordable Handyman
S FAST
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST
AFFORDABLE
e RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
.100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *
Remodeling, Additions,
Doors, Windows, Tile
work. Lic.#CRC1330081
Free Est. (352)949-2292



MAID TO ORDER
k House Cleaning *
(352) 586-9125



#1 Employment source is

www.chronicleonline.com


YO


CLASSIFIED



36" RCA TV
w/manual, loaded,
excellent cond,
$50 (352) 527-3396
Built In Micro Wave
$99.00
(352) 613-7700
DRYER Works great.
Older model. $100 Call
Leonard@727-563-4297
Frigidaire front load
Washer
3 years old, $200.
Hoover steam Vac
carpet cleaner
$40. (352) 400-4891
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR, washers
dryers,FREE pick up
352-564-8179
STOVE GE gas self
cleaning bisque stove.
Works great. $200
352-503-2226
TWO MICROWAVE
OVENS 1.2 cubft.
excellent condition
$15ea.(352) 527-3396
WANTED DEAD
OR ALIVE
Washers & Dryers
(352) 209-5135
WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 Each. Reliable,
like new, excellent condi-
tion. Can deliver
352 263-7398
WASHER Works great.
Warranty $100 Call
Leonard@727-563-4297



AUCTION WEEK
WITH 4 SALES
WED. Apr. 18 Education
Supplies pre-sale
3:30-7pm 1,000+ of NEW
books, toys, games,
learning tools from
wholesaler. Special
direct pick & choose
sale. Purchase at great
discount by the piece
or pile. Balance to be
sold at Auction Thurs.
*******
THURS. Apr. 19 Estate
Adventure Auction
3pm-10pm Come any-
time 2003 Buick Century
Estate car NEW QVC
Items, furn., appliances,
tools, Education sup-
plles, 3 full estates.
*******
FRI. Apr.20 Real Estate
Oakridae Home
6186 N. Misty Oak Dr.
Beverly Hills
Prev: 8AM Auction 9AM
3/2+ study custom
Rusaw upgraded home
w/poolscape $200k
construction cost Must
be sold to settle estate
*******
SAT.ADr.21 NASCAR FUN
Prev.10AM Auction 1PM
250 great lots DIecast,
caps, Matchbox &
Hotwheels, Signed
Memorabilia, 10000's
pcs. At the hall only,
bring your kids!
DudleysAuctlon.com
4000 S. Fla. Ave.
(US 41-S) Inverness
(352) 637-9588
AB1667 Maine-ly Real
Estate 381384 10% BP



SHOP SMITH Mark IV
complete
w/attachments,manuals.
Like New $1500.00 OBO,
Wooden Bench 72x30,2
drawers,1 metal&1 wood
Vice $100.00
352-302-0289


BBath


The Tile Man
Bathroom remodel
Specializing in handi-
cap. Lic/Ins. #2441.
352-634-1584




All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
All AROUND TRACTOR
L I,, ".) I. : :
352-795-5755






CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, curbing,
flocrete. River rock
reseals & repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
Florida Sitescapes, LLC
FREE Est: Yard Clean Up
Mowing, and MORE
CALL 352-201-7374
RIVENBARK LAWN &
LANDSCAPE.
Best Prices in town for
all your lawn care
needs!! (352) 464-3566

SPRINKLER JOE'S
If it's broken we can
fix It. Landscaping
Design 352-212-2596


BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Day,
We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over"Your Old One!!!
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!
Call now for a FREE
In-Home Estimate

1-866-S85-8827
BATHFITTER.COM
000AECJ





POOL-TEC

REPAIRS EQUIPMENT
PUMPS FILTERS
HEAT PUMPS
SALT SYSTEMS

RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL
32 YEARS EXPERIENCE

CALL ALAN 422-6956
STATE LICENSE #CPC051584


TOOLS hilti fastener
#350 85.00 plus shots all
colors 1.00 per clip cel
352 476 8352



RCA TV/DVD/VCR
COMBO
great condition
$100
(352) 465-4234
STEREO SYSTEM AIWA
WITH CD & DUAL CAS-
SETTE PLAYER HAS
REMOTE CONTROL
$100 352-613-0529
WOOD CABINET
w/VCR & 25" Goldstar
Tv, has remote, bottom
door asking $75. 19"
Curtis Mathis TV w/ re-
mote $40.382-1167




2 COMPUTERS
Towers from $70up.
complete systems
$110 (352) 527-7829
DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
HP ALL IN ONE WIRE-
LESS PRINTER excel-
lent condition $45.00
352-527-1399
HP PRINTER
Color,scan,copy,fax, print.
Great cond. w/stand.$45
352-465-4441
Dunnellon
WINDOWS XP Install
discs for HP and Compaq
laptops, $35 860-2475



PATIO SET Glass table,
3 chairs w/cushions, um-
brella. Excell. $100 firm
352-465-4441
Dunnellon



5 PIECE BEDROOM
SET $300 blonde wood
dresser w/mirror, queen
bed, armoire, night stand,
tv stand 352-270-7420
BAR STOOLS OAK (2)
Fabric back and seat
cushions in excellent con-
dition. $80. for both
352-270-3909
BROWN MICROFIBER
OTTOMAN Opens up for
storage. Like New. 32 x
18x15. $25.00
(352) 382-4911
COMFORTS OF HOME
USED FURNITURE www.
comfortsofhomeused
furniture.com. 795-0121
Dining Room Oak
hutch, serving table,
dbl pedestal table, 6
chrs. pads, exc. cond.
pd $10K new, sell 1500
(352) 527-3965
DINING ROOM TABLE
AND CHAIRS Light oak
dining room table and
4 chairs with casters,
excellent condition,
$ 200.00. Call
352 746 7290
EMERSON MICRO-
WAVE OVEN White 1.1
Cubic ft.microwave with
clock and turntable.
(352) 794-4164. $30.00
PAUL'S FURNITURE
Open Tues.- Sat 9-2
628-2306 Homosassa
paulsfurnitureonline.com


A + LAWN CARE
& LANDSCAPING
Affordable & Reliable
(352) 228-0421
AFFORDABLE Lawn care
CUTS STARTING AT $20
WE DO ITALLI!
wCALL 352-228-7320 v

All 'n'1 Lawncare
property maintence
Full serv$55/mo.lic/ins
Rick 352-201-5193
Charlie 352-634-1070

ATTENTION! Snow Birds
Need your Lawn Maint.
Call Mowing & More...
352-419-6287, Lic/Ins.
Florida Sitescapes, LLC
FREE est: Yard Clean Up
Mowing, and MORE
Call 352.201.7374


'*
Green Valley
Landscape & Design Inc.
352.280.0269
Complete L,1wi Maicenance
Free Fertilizing with new
accounts
HALLOCK & SON
LAWN CARE ALL Your
lawn care needs. Detailed
Work. 400-1197, Lic/Ins.
MEAGHERS LAWN CARE
AND PINK MINI DUMP
Tree Service, Stump
Grinding, Free Est.
(352) 341-3478


* Furniture Refinishing
* Entryway Refinishing
* Tool/Knife Sharpening
. Pressure Washing
" Lawn/Property Maintenance

Classical Custom
Services, Inc.
Mark McClendon

352-613-7934
Over 20 Years Experience Licensed& Insured





GENERAL
Stand Alone I
Generator

Thomas Electric. LLC
Residential/Commercial Service
Generac Centurion
Guardian Generators
Factory Authorized Technicians
ER0015377

352621124


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


4 17 LaughingStock International Inc, Dist by Universal UClick for UFS, 2012

"D'you want to look at the menu?"


Reroofs Any Repairs I

* Complete Home Inspections


CHAIR
floral green $50.
352-521-3177
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
352-628-0808
Solid OAK Book Case
purchased at Inverness
Wood Furniture Store.
$200
(352) 726-1526
TWIN MATTRESSES
Two twin mattresses
matching 3 mos old
100/set 352-586-3551
VACUUM CLEANER Dirt
Devil Featherlite vac-
uum cleaner. Like new.
$30 (352) 794-4164



CRAFTSMAN DLT-3000
LAWN TRACTOR
Briggs and Stratton
18.5 hp engine,
w/42"deck, cast iron
front axle, 3.5 gal fuel
tank, excellent condi-
tion. $560. Tractor ac-
cessories, Craftsman
utility dump cart $75,
Craftsman universal
broadcast spreader
$60, Craftsman 42"high
speed sweeper $140.
Craftsman Pressure
Washer, 2500 PSI, 2.0
GPM Briggs and Strat-
ton engine $120
352-465-4373


AT YOUR HOME
Mower, Parts Service &
Repair.Visit our store@
1332 SE Hy 19 220-4244




HIGH SPEED INTERNET
wherever you live,
starting @$29.99 per
mo.(352) 493-1327




A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs, trash,
lawn maint. furn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
ALL OF CITRUS
CLEAN UPS CLEAN OUTS
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790




Chris Satchell Painting
ASAP
30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST. (352) 586-2996
A-1 George Swedlige
Painting/press cleaning
Int/Ext. texture/drywall
repair (352) 794-0400
INTERIORIEXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998


Dixson 0 turn
Riding Mower $800
4x8 trailer $500
(352) 746-7357.

Garden Tractor
Murry 20hp V-twin B&S
eng.48" mulching deck
$400 firm.
(352) 302-6069
MULTI MOWER TORO
Self propelled, 6.Shp,
22" cut, like new $100
WeedEater Push Mower
4.5 hp 22" cut like new
$60 (352) 302-6069
Toro Riding Lawn
Mower, 42" cut, 20HP
twin cam Kohler en-
gine, approx. 30 hrs.
operating time. $500
cash/firm, will deliver
(352) 341-1714




Are U Moving? Estate?
In home liquidations?
MARTIN'S Estate &
Consign 352-209-4945




MENS CLOTHING
SHORTS, PANTS,
JEANS & SHIRTS 14
PIECES $25
352-613-0529


CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST. (352) 586-2996


Pic PICARD'S Pressure
Cleaning & Painting
352-341-3300






Attention Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers are
required by state law
to include their state
license number in all
advertisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious that
you may be contact-
ing an unlicensed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For questions
about business
licensing, please call
your city or county gov-
ernment offices.


* New Landscapes

* One Time Cuts

* Free Estimates




Rivenbark Lawn
& Landscape
-,1. (352) 464-3566




NEW Decorative Mulch
EW & Stones
OC IOH^' Top Soil
DELIVERY AVAILABLE
WE HAVE SPECIAL
PRICES AVAILABLE!


NURSERY
6658 W. GULF To LAKE HWY.
CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429
(352) 302-6436


WOMEN LEATHER
COAT size S, Black- Liz
Thomas Brand ,Like new
$60.00 352-382-0069





185/65 R14 High tread!!
Only asking $70 for the
pair!! (352)551-1810


225/65 R16 Nice tread!!
Only asking $70 for the
pair!! (352)551-1810



-------------------
275/55 R20 Great tread!!
Only asking $70 for the
pair!! (352)551-1810

1 5FT, Aluminum
fold uPladder
$25.
1 Sun Blocker 5 x 10
$50.
(352) 341-1649
26" MEN'S KENT GLEN-
DALE CS Contort BIKE-
7 spd., alum. frame, dual
susp., 1.95" tires, Ex.,
$60 628-0033
2nd Hand Store
Open Tues-Sat 9a-5p
Furn, Appliances, tools,
clothing, misc. Items,
@ N. Maynard & Hwy 44
1/4 ml E. of Stokes FLea


SPRINKLER JOE'S
If it's broken we can
fix It. Landscaping
Design 352-212-2596




A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest Rates
Free est.(352)860-1452
DAVID'S
TREE SERVICE
(352)302-5641
All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
DOUBLE J Tree Serv.
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
KING's Land Clearing &
Tree Serv. complete
tree & stump removal
hauling, demo& tractor
work 32 yrs. exp.
(352) 220-9819
R WRIGHT Tree Service
Tree removal & trimming.
Ins. & Lic.# 0256879
352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree Serv
Trim, Shape & Remove
Lic/Ins Free Est.
352-628-2825



344-2556, Richard
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


REMODELI


MW 4.







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DVD/CD PLAYER $25.00
for everything!
352-382-4911
AQUARIUM 25 GALLON
HIGH INCLUDES
STAND, LIGHT, FILTER
& GRAVEL $75
352-613-0529


BEI-NIAI 8U
SEWING&
EMBROIDERY
MACHINE
with many extras, books
tapes,75+ spools of
thread some
needlepoint&crochet
items $600.oo or best
reasonable offer
352-382-1917 or
jgtroxel@embarq
mail.com
BRIDGESTONE TIRES
(3) P195/70R14 radial.
good tread, mounted on
5 lug rim off chvy car
$15ea/$50 all 249-6293
COMFORTER SET HAN-
NAH MONTANA FULL
INCLUDES SHEETS &
PILLOW CASES $40
352-613-0529
END TABLE Old oak end
table. 30"H 24" square.
Glass ball and claw feet.
$100.00 Call
352 726 5753
General lonics
Water Conditioner
used 6 months
$1,500.
(352) 270-8743
Leave message
GENTLE LEADER HEAD
COLLAR for training your
dog to stp pulling on the
leash.Med.+Dog Training
DVD$ 10 746-7232
HUMMINGBIRD AND
FLOWER STAIN GLASS
HANGING $30 CAN
E-MAIL PHOTO
419-5981
MOVING SALE
Leather Couch,
Recliner, Love Seat &
matching chair, patio
set, yard tools, Bed rm
set and other misc.
Items. 352-465-5781
POOL SOLAR COVER
ROLLER with 12X24 so-
lar cover $60 5134614
QUICK SHADE CANOPY
Replacement canopy for
10'by10'
pop up,blue $40.00
Call Ray@464-0573
SEWING MACHINE
CASE White w/Metal
snaps 14"H x 17"Wx9"D
Like New $25 Call
352-746-7232
SIEMANS OVER THE EAR
HEARING AID
Good Condition
Includes batteries
Paid $825. Asking $400
(352) 382-3879
STEREO SYSTEM AIWA
WITH CD & DUAL CAS-
SETTE PLAYER HAS
REMOTE CONTROL
$100 352-613-0529
TALL BARSTOOLS
BAMBOO LOOKING
RUST COLORED THICK
CUSHIONS 2 FOR 50.00
464 0316
WALLPAPER FLORAL
DESIGN 3 DOUBLE
ROLLS $30 165 SQ FT
CAN E-MAIL PHOTO
419-5981



2 Power Lift Chair
Recliners,
1 med. $295.
1 Large $350.
both excel. cond.
(352) 270-8475
4 Wheel walker
with seat, basket
and brakes $55.
(352) 382-8802
BEDSIDE COMMODE &
FOLDING ALUMINUM
WALKER ONLY20.00
EACH 464 0316
ELECTRIC TREADMILL
STATIONARY TYPE
WORKS GREAT VERY
STABLE ONLY 100.00
464 0316
MANUAL WHEELCHAIR
WITH FOOTRESTS
ONLY 100.00 464 0316
WALKER WITH
WHEELS & SEAT
FOLDS UP SIX WHEELS
NO BRAKES 60.00 464
0316












STERLING SILVER-
COLLECTOR BUYING
STERLING SILVER
FLATWARE. $1,000 &
UP FOR SERVICE FOR
8. KEN 352-601-7074


SAXAPHONE Selmer
Bundy Tenor, plays
well-$250-Crystal River
795-8800




CAROUSEL ROTIS-
SERIE COOKER SUN-
BEAM USE ON
COUNTER TOP $45
CAN E-MAIL PHOTO
419-5981
KITCHEN SET Glass
table with 4 chairs
(352)220-1439 Jackie
WOOD FLOORING
Medium Oak Planks 3"
x 3/8" x random 25 sq ft
New in box $55 Email Pic
352-382-3650




AB LOUNGER TIME TO
WORK IT OFF ONLY
40.00 464 0316
MANUAL TREADMILL
WORKS GREAT WITH
ELECTRONICS NEEDS
A HOME!!!!!!!! YOURS
60.00 464 0316
PRO FORM
EXERCISE BIKE
great condition
$150
(352) 465-4234




40 Acres/Levy Co.
Hunting Property
Camper, Pond, Feed-
ers, Plots, Stands Blinds
$75,000. (352) 593-0335
45 ACP Ammo
One box of FMJ $23
352-860-2475
AUCTION WEEK
WITH 4 SALES
WED. Apr. 18 Education
Supplies pre-sale
3:30-7pm 1,000+ of NEW
books, toys, games,
learning tools from
wholesaler. Special
direct pick & choose
sale. Purchase at great
discount by the piece
or pile. Balance to be
sold at Auction Thurs.

THURS. Apr. 19 Estate
Adventure Auction
3pm-10pm Come any-
time 2003 Buick Century
Estate car NEW QVC
Items, furn., appliances,
tools, Education sup-
plles, 3 full estates.
*******
FRI. Apr.20 Real Estate
Oakridae Home
6186 N. Misty Oak Dr.
Beverly Hills
Prev: 8AM Auction 9AM
3/2+ study custom
Rusaw upgraded home
w/poolscape $200k
construction cost Must
be sold to settle estate

SAT.Apr.21 NASCAR FUN
Prev.10AM Auction IPM
250 great lots Dlecast,
caps, Matchbox &
Hotwheels, Signed
Memorabilia, 1000's
pcs. At the hall only,
bring your kids!
DudleysAuctlon.com
4000 S. Fla. Ave.
(US 41-S) Inverness
(352) 637-9588
AB1667 Maine-ly Real
Estate 381384 10% BP
BERETTA
M9 9mm 1 mag.
New in box $600
(352) 746-0100
CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pond,
ATV trails $165K obo
352 795-2027/634-4745
CLUB CAR
'08 President $2000
352-344-8516

Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238

Golf Clubs &
Equipment, Utility
Building 15x 10 loaded.
Thousands of clubs
bags balls, antique
clubs, carts, etc.
No junk $950 for all
(352) 270-8475
Men's Bicycle
Trek 7200, 10 speed
like new condition
hardly used $225.
(352) 382-7043
Men's Bicycle
Trek 7200, 10 speed
like new condition
hardly used $225.
(352) 382-7043
S & W, 38, 6 Shot,
Revolver,4" barrell blue
finish, model 15, & ex-
cel. cond. $550.holster
& box of ammo
(352) 637-0987

WE BUY GUNS
On Site Gun Smithing
(352) 726-5238


EZ PULL TRAILERS,
New & Used

Utility & Enclosed
BUY, SELL, TRADE
Custom Built, Parts,
Tires, Whis, Repairs,
Trailer Hitches
New6x 12 open
utility w/ramp $935
Used 7 x 12 enclosed
$1595
Used 6 x 12 enclosed
$1250
Trailer Tires from
$34.49

Hwy 44 Crystal River
352-564-1299

GULF TO LAKE
TRAILER SALES

Largest Selection &
Lowest Prices.
Offering New & Used
Cargo & utility trailers

Triple Crown Utility TRL
6 x 12 w/new spare
$1050.
6 x 12 Enclosed w/
V nose, rear ramp
door, $1995.

Trailer Tires
starting at $69.95

352-527-0555
Hwy 44, Lecanto
TRAILER 4x8,
heavy duty
4.5 ft ramp. $450
(352) 344-1953
TRLR TIRE 4.80 X 12
mounted on 4 lug rim.
good tread $15
352-249-6293
Utility Trailer
8x6 good cond
$175.(352) 382-5661



BABY MONITOR
Safety 1st, White, 2
channels, 400' range.
Excellent condition. $15
Call 352 746-7232
LITTLE TYKES KITCHEN
In like-new condition.
$25.00 352-3824911


Sell r Swa


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966











JUNK MOTORCYCLES
WANTED Will Pay up to
$200 for Unwanted Mo-
torcycle 352-942-3492
WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation.
Call (352) 726-9369
Wanting to Buy Any
make of outboard
motors, pre 1950's. Let
me restore that old mo-
tor and give it a good
home (315 )42-187O


WORDY U BY TRICKY RICKY KANE


1. Spend union membership fees (1) Every answer is a rhyming
pair of words (like FAT CAT
and DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
2. Married dancer Astaire (1) they will fit in the letter
2 _MariedacerAsr squares. The number after the
definition tells you how many
3. Sole member of Jagger's group (1) syllables in each word.

I1 2012 UFS, Dist. by Univ. Uclickfor UFS
4. Put on performance fury (1)


5. Alms seekers' beer blasts (2)


6. Toon Huckleberry acted the jester (1)


7. NBA great Moses' scented sprays (2)


SRN90'Ioo SHNOWVI 'L fNAMO'D (INflH '9 SE9 1IDOI SHV9O9l "s
OV H9VIS iTOM S aNO8 *s f 3H A GiM Sa317 1 Sfl "I
4-17-12 SagASNV


SResidential Rot -Clean
" Commercial
Cleaning Service
" VCT Stripping
Wax

LcJ.ns. Carpet & Tie

SUPER SPECIAL I
3-Rooms $6 00
I (Upto250 sq. ft. each)
Deep Cleaned Not validw/anyotheroffer.
& Deodorized Expires 5/19/12. Coupon Required.
First Room Of ScotchgardTM is Free!


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966


M, mil
I~ffiT~t~f~rI


ATTENTION
MOBILE HOME
& RV OWNERS
We want to PAY for
your MOBILE HOME
or RV to be MOVED
into OUR PARK! Lot
rent is only $295.00
per mo. and in-
cludes water, sewer,
trash, WiFi, club-
house, pool!
RV'ers WE WILL PAY
YOU $250.-$500. to
MOVE into our park!
We want YOU to live
in our beautiful RV
park all year long!
RV lot rent is only
$250. month and in-
cludes water, sewer,
trash, WiFi, pool,
clubhouse!

Call today for de-
tails! We look for-
ward to meeting
you.
AURORA ACRES
MOBILE HOME & RV
COMMUNITY
11240 N. Northwood
Dr. Inglis, FL 34449
352-239-4548 www.
auroraacresfl.com

DUNNELLON
Rent or Rent to Own
2/2, Pet OK, Lake
Access, Deer, quiet.
spotless Totally Reno-
vated. $499. Special
352-527-0493

HOMOSASSA
2/1,$475.+dep
(352) 634-4508
INVERNESS
Close In, 1 & 2 BR MH
Clean, Quiet & Com-
fortable 352-212-6182
INVERNESS
RENT SPECIAL: 55+ park
on the water w/5 piers
for fishing and
enjoyment, clubhouse,
onslte shuffleboard, &
much more! 1 BR home
$325 2BR home $450,
Includes H20. 2 BR, 1.5
bath, Park Model $500.
1/1 turn. w/CH/A,
on the water, $600.
Section 8 accepted.
(352) 476-4964




1/1 remod, shed $5k
1/ lscrnrm/carprt $6k
2/1 carprt/rf.over $7k
furn, move-in ready
55+ park, clean quiet
Close to shopping
CR/Homossasa area
Owner Financing
Owner 352-220-2077
Factory repo, home
built wrong colors,
2012,1600 sq. Ft $45000
call MARLON
386 590 0971
HERNANDO Las Brisas
Mobile Home Park, 55+,
2/2, Furnished, clean,
own your own lot, Car-
port, attached shed,
club house, heated
pool, Priced to sell.
765-212-0348


11 wks, 2 male I fern
parents on premises,
h/c shots $1200 Connie
or Jim (352) 341-7732
cell 352-613-3778
DESIGNER BREED
Shih-Poo, Yorkie -Poo
small non shedding,
intellect puppies $350
to $500 (352) 817-4718


Lecanto 55 Park
3 bed 2 bath. SWEET!
Ig. carport,2 porches,roof
over and shed w/electric.
httpJ/mobilhome.shuterly.com/
$13,000
724-312-6563
PARK MODEL
nice 1 BR, CHA, Irg encl
sun rm.cov porch on
Lake Rousseau, boat
parking $12K obo
(386) 451-9266
SINGLEWIDE
1/1, 55 + Park on Lake,
5 piers to fish from, must
be approved $1500
(352) 344-9705
Stoneridge Landing
55+ Comm. Resales
starting @$13,500
Financing avail
1-800-779-1226
(352) 637-1400
WESTWIND VILLAGE 55+
Park. Updated 2/2 DW's
for sale. Reasonable
(352) 628-2090


TUESDAY,APRIL 17, 2012 Cil


DOG Halo is a sweet,
active, spayed 2 y/o
bulldog mix. She is a
super happy, outgoing,
and loves to play. She
walks well on leash, is
a beautiful red color,
and medium size. She
is currently a shelter
dog and desperately
needs a human of her
own to love. She would
need to be the only dog
at home. Call Anne
352-201-8664
GOLDEN RETRIEVERS
Pure breed pups, light
colors, 3fem 3 males,
shots & h/c. Parents on
Prem. $400-450 ea
352-628-6050
Koi and Gold Fish
FOR SALE, Great Prices
ALL SIZES. Call Jean
(352) 634-1783
LAB PUPS
reg. white/yellow, 3
fem. left. can be seen
at the Hay Barn in Floral
City $500 ea.
(352) 302-3901
Miniature Poodle,
AKC reg.young female,
hsbrken, utd shots
beautiful & well social-
ized. $250
352-527-1920
Shih-Tzu Pups, ACA
starting@ $400. Lots of
colors, Beverly Hills,
FL (352)270-8827
wwwaceofouos.net




PIGLETS
Born 2/27,
$50. ea.
954-295-3055


0OB03C


CLASSIFIED



HOMOSASSA
2bdr/2bath, Florida
Room,CHA ,Some
Appliances, Furniture
$4K 352 503-6130

HUGE SALE
Going On Now!!!
New 2012 Jacobsen
Homes starting at
$33,900 Land home
packages and
financing available
with $500 down for
land owners. Rates as
low as 3.75% Stop by
Taylor Made Homes
and see what makes
us Best Of The Best.
352-621-9182

JACOBSEN
NEW 3/2 HOME
With 10 yr. extended
warranty. Highest
quality construction
and best value
available. Includes
appliance pkg.
delivery and set up.
Several models to
choose from as low
as $34,900 or 5%
down $315/mo WAC
CALL 352-621-9181

Lot model blowout
4bd/2 bath w retreat,
1900 sq. Ft. must go
64,900furnished call
MARLON 386 590 0971
NEW DEALER REPO
Beautiful 3/2 with
over 1600 sq. ft.
Includes appliance
pkg, delivery & set up
ONLY $59,900 or
5% down & $454/mo.
WAC 352-621-3807

Palm Harbor Homes
New 2012 Models
$15K off All Homes
800-622-28320x210

SAVE SS NOW
On a NEW 4/2 HOME
and receive an
extended warranty.
Highest quality
construction. Includes
appliance pkg., de-
livery & set up. Only
$62,900 or 5% down
&$469/mo. WAC
Only 1 unity left at this
special offer. CALL
352-621-9181 NOW

USED HOME 2/2
Like new, delivered
to your lot and set up
with AC & heat,
Only $21,900
Call 352-401-2979




CRYSTAL RIVER
4/2, on 5 Acres,
15 X 30 family room,
w/wet bar, fireplace.
Reduced $139,500.
(352) 465-8346
HERNANDO
2/1 Two lots, Shed,.
See for yourself at
3531 E. Brave Lane
$14,900 obo
352-464-0719
HOMOSASSA
3/2, 1,800 Sq Ft,
Fenced Yard,new
flooring $5000 down
$525 (352) 302-9217
OWNER FINANCING
3/2, Completely
Remodeled in & out,
on 11/2 Ac. off School
Ave. $40,000
(352) 302-7451
PRICE REDUCED-
NW Citrus Cty SWMH on
1 Acre, 2/1.5 paved rd,
screen porch, appliances
$39,900, Owner Fi-
nancing 352-795-9908




1994 PARK MODEL
1 Bedroom Furnished,
Homosassa River Park
Includes golf cart.
$26,000. for all
(352) 628-6435
1/1 remod, shed $5k
1/1scrnrm/carprt $6k
2/1 carprt/rf.over $7k
furn, move-in ready
55+ park, clean quiet
Close to shopping
CR/Homossasa area
Owner Financing
Owner 352-220-2077



CRYSTAL RIVER
VILLAGE -55+
A SUPER BUY 2/2/den
1457sq.ft 05 Hmof Merit,
all appliances, carport,
Ig screen room,
immaculate $39,900
(352)419-6926
Floral City Singing
Forest DW, 2/2, 2 Car-
ports, screen porch
Completely furn & re-
modeled, Lot Rent $176
$19,500 344-2420
HOMOSASSA'S
Best Housing Value
Modern homes from
$8,400 or Lease to Own
from $139/mo.
$800.down + Lot rent at
Evanrldge Community
an exceptional 55+Park
352 628-5977
INVERNESS
55+ Park on the water
w/5 piers for fishing &
enjoyment, clubhouse,
onslte shuffleboard, and
much more! 2 BR 1.5 BA
tor _2.900. 352-476-4964
Inverness/Oak Pond 55+,
well maintained 2/2, fur-
nished, screened lanai,
shed, Ig lot, xtra long cov-
ered carport, lots of stor-
age 352-344-1632 or
937-545-3413
Lake Henderson
$7,500. 55+ Waterfront
Park, Boat Dock &
Storage, Pool.
2/1,Carport, appli-
ances, Large combi-
nation LR/FI. rm.
(352) 476-8364


ent Houses

Furnished71


ATTENTION
MOBILE HOME
& RV OWNERS
We want to PAY for
your MOBILE HOME
or RV to be MOVED
into OUR PARK! Lot
rent is only $295.00
per mo. and includes
water, sewer, trash,
WiFi, clubhouse, pool!
RV'ers WE WILL PAY
YOU $250.-$500. to
MOVE into our park!
We want YOU to live
in our beautiful RV
park all year long! RV
lot rent is only $250.
month and includes
water, sewer, trash,
WiFi, pool, clubhouse!

Call today for details!
We look forward to
meeting you.
AURORA ACRES
MOBILE HOME & RV
COMMUNITY
11240 N. Northwood
Dr. Inglis, FL 34449
352-239-4548 www.
auroraacresfl.com














835 NE Hwy 19
Crystal River, Fl
(352) 795-0021
View our website
C21 NatureCoast.com
CHASSAHOWITZKA
3/2 Wtrfront DW, $600.
3/2 Furnished DW., $600
Agent (352) 382-1000




FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025
HOMOSASSA
1BR, Scrn. Porch, Boat
Dock, Stove, refrig. W&D,
cable, util. incld. $600.
mo.+ sec., 352-628-6537




Alexander Real Estate
(352) 795-6633

Crystal River Apts
2 BR/1 BA $375-$500
BEVERLY HILLS
1 Room Efficiency,
All Utilities Included
Cable,Sep. Kit./ bath
$525. mo.,pet ok
352- 228-2644
HOMOSASSA
1/1, Clean, Quiet, CHA
$375. Incl. Wtr. 563-2114
(352) 257-6461
INVERNESS
1/1 $400 2/1.. $500.
near hosp352-422-2393
LECANTO
Nice 1 Bedrm $500
352-613-6000. 216-0012
(352) 746-5238




INVERNESS
2/1, W/D hkup, all tiled
1st floor $500; No Pets
352-344-0238 419-6910




FLORAL CITY
STOREFRONT 1000 Sq Ft
Ideal location, corner
Hwy 41 & 48. $595 mo.
813-310-5391




INVERNESS
LANDINGS 2/1.5 clean
roomy, great location
$525/mo F/L/S No smke
No pets (352) 341-1847
SUGARMILL
WOODS 2/2/1
furnished, short or long
term.River Links
Realty(352) 628-1616




Citrus Springs
3/2/1 car $650/mo
352-746-7990
HOMOSASSA
1/1 Non-smoker. $425
Fst/Sec. Pets? 795-0207
INVERNESS
Lrg 2/2 tiled. Lg patio,
Quiet, W/D Hkup. No
Pet $575(727) 446-5871





Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp





Specializing in
Sugarmill Woods
Pantfl I


BEVERLY HILLS
2/1 carport, remodeled
$575 first, last, sec
(786)286-1163
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/1 CHA $575
1st Lst dp P & R Realty
Gloria Bonner 697-0375
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/1 plus FL RM
9 S. Lee St. $550.
Call 422 2798.
CRYSTAL RIVER
spacious 2/1 $500 inc
water/sewage
(352)212-9205
CRYSTAL RIVER
Stucco House 2BR, 2BA
carport. Deposits
based on credit report.
Non smoking. 564-4200
HOMOSASSA
2/2/1, $675/mo. Pets ok
fst/Ist/sec 352-434-1235
HOMOSASSA
Dup 1/1 $250,2/1 $450
SMW Imm 3/2/2 no pets
ref's req. $850.
River links Realty
(352) 628-1616
Lakefront Gospel
Island Location
Spacious 3/2/2
1/4 acre $800/m for
sale neg908-322-6529

LECANTO
Black Diamond
Ranch
Lease Option
3/2/2.5 car garage
SS appis custom
flooring 1100/mo
(352) 527-0456




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225
INVERNESS
East Cove Waterfront,
furn., 2/2, C/A carport,
shed,$650
352-476-4964




CITRUS SPRINGS
Lease or Rent to Own
3/3/2/2, Custom Pool
Home on acre $799.
Special. 1st last dep.
bkgrd Ck 352-489-3997
CRYSTAL RIVER
for sale/lease purchase
3/2, fenced yd. water
access, huge lanai
remodeled, $875. mo
404-867-1501, Local




HOMOSASSA
1/1 Everything Included
$300 mo (352) 422-4661











ATTENTION
MOBILE HOME
& RV OWNERS
We want to PAY for
your MOBILE HOME
or RV to be MOVED
into OUR PARK! Lot
rent is only $295.00
per mo. and in-
cludes water, sewer,
trash, WiFi, club-
house, pool! RV'ers
WE WILL PAY YOU
$250.-$500. to MOVE
into our park! We
want YOU to live in
our beautiful RV
park all year long!
RV lot rent is only
$250. month and in-
cludes water, sewer,
trash, WiFi, pool,
clubhouse!

Call today for de-
tails! We look for-
ward to meeting
you.
AURORA ACRES
MOBILE HOME & RV
COMMUNITY
11240 N. Northwood
Dr. Inglis, FL 34449
352-239-4548 www.
auroraacresfl.com

PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ille-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination. "
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



EQUAL HOUSE NG
OPPORTUNITY


3BR, 2-1/2BA, 2-car
garage, pool, jacuzzi,
new carpet & paint
Must see extraordinary
interior, 6560 N.
Deltona, off Lecanto
Rd., REDUCED PRICE
$139,000
(830) 534-1918
For Sale Or Rent
3/2/2 furn for rent
$800/mo or buy
(352) 445-5218
352-445-5260



3 Bedroom, 2 Bath
Double carport,
fenced yd. new roof,
1,100 sf, $55,500
(352)464-0641
(239) 298-0076
AUCTION WEEK
WITH 4 SALES
WED. Apr. 18 Education
Supplies ore-sale
3:30-7pm 1,000+ of NEW
books, toys, games,
learning tools from
wholesaler. Special
direct pick & choose
sale. Purchase at great
discount by the piece
or pile. Balance to be
sold at Auction Thurs.
*******
THURS. Apr. 19 Estate
Adventure Auction
3pm-10pm Come any-
time 2003 Buick Century
Estate car NEW QVC
Items, furn., appliances,
tools, Education sup-
plles, 3 full estates.
** * ***
FRI. Apr.20 Real Estate
Oakridae Home
6186 N. Misty Oak Dr.
Beverly Hills
Prey: 8AM Auction 9AM
3/2+ study custom
Rusaw upgraded home
w/poolscape $200k
construction cost Must
be sold to settle estate
** * ***
SAT.Apr.21 NASCAR FUN
Prev.10AM Auction 1PM
250 great lots Dlecast,
caps, Matchbox &
Hotwheels, Signed
Memorabilia, 1000's
pcs. At the hall only,
bring your kids!
DudleysAuctlon.com
4000 S. Fla. Ave.
(US 41-S) Inverness
(352) 637-9588
AB1667 Maine-ly Real
Estate 381384 10% BP
Handyman
Investor Special
2/1/1
1063 sf, needs TLC $20K
(352) 503-3245



OFF HWY 44
2 concrete cottages
on 6 lots, w/shed,
Motor Home hookup
owner financing $20's
(256) 335-4955



Forest Ridge Villages
Updated, move in ready
villa, 2/2/2, private lot,
opt. membership to Citrus
Hills. Appliances incl.
712 W Toucan Loop
352-746-0002



2/2 villa
The Landings, new
Trane a/c & new lanai
screen porch,$58K
cell (352) 400-8130
2/2/1
HIGHLANDS AREA
Lots of Upgrades
Move In Ready
Keller Williams Realty
352-746-7113
3/2/2, I.G. &C.C.
3k sf. new kit. Ig closets,
CHA, firepl. on golf
course $129K make of-
fer, norealtors 726-0652
HIGHLANDS
Lrg.2/2- 4 car garage
pool, game room,
mud room, on triple lot
fenced, price to sell
$65,500 (352) 564-4598



Homosassa/Riverhaven
On water, Grand canal
3BR, 2+BA, 2+ CG
Formal. Living Rm.
Formal Din. Rm., Lanai
front & rear. River View
Room. Dock, many
Upgrades, $255,000
forsalebvowner.com
Iistin On302n7n0 8 r


U


I 'I I

Debe Johns
Brkr/Assoc/PRM

Coldwell Banker Next
Generation Realty
Property Manager
(352) 382-2700 www.
coldwellbankernext
aeneration.com

See what a
Professional
Residential Manager
can do for you.




INVERNESS
East Cove Waterfront,
furn., 2/2, C/A carport,
shed, $650
352-476-4964
LAUREL RIDGE
Furnished. 2/2/2 Den
golf course, 6 mo. lease
Like new $900. mo.
(612) 237-1880


bt7Z VV. uunKln St 3
bedroom. 2 bath. Jacob-
sen Mobile Home (DW)
on 5 ACRES. Owner Fi-
nancing with $20,000
down Low interest. Mas-
ter Bedroom 14x20
w/carpet & Lg. walk-in
closet, has Master Bath
10x15 w/double vanity,
jetted tub, separate toilet
& shower. 2 other bed-
rooms 12x14 w/carpet
and walk-in closets. Liv-
ing Rm. 14x16 w/laminate
wood flooring and open
concept to Dining Room
14x12 w/bar sink
&Cabinetss w/sliding
glass doors which lead to
10x24 pressure treated 2
level deck. Lg. Kitchen
16x16 w/38 cabinets, is-
land cook top, wall oven
& tile flooring. Sunken
Family Room w/fireplace
15x14 tiled flooring. Laun-
dry Rm. w/cabinets which
lead to rear access to
deck. LOW PROPERTY
TAXES $660.00. 2 stor-
age bldgs 12x24 &
10x14, Carport 22x25.
$135k (561) 714-6024.


Real Estatle
For Sale


V2 Acre, Remodeled
pool w/deck
BY OWNER, price neg.
4141 S. Journey Point
352-342-0602
Water Access
2/2, 6 car garage
w/apt. ove, extra Lot
$200.K 352-302-7204


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work For You!

BETTY HUNT,
REALTOR
ERA KEY 1 Realty Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.


I Dunnellon







C12 TUESDAY,APRIL 17,2012


ATTENTION
MOBILE HOME
& RV OWNERS
We want to PAY for
your MOBILE HOME
or RV to be MOVED
into OUR PARK! Lot
rent is only $295.00
per mo. and in-
cludes water, sewer
trash, WiFi, club-
house, pool!
RV'ers WE WILL PAY
YOU $250.-$500. to
MOVE into our park!
We want YOU to live
in our beautiful RV
park all year long!
RV lot rent is only
$250. month and in-
cludes water, sewer
trash, WiFi, pool,
clubhouse!

Call today for de-
tails! We look for-
ward to meeting
you.
AURORA ACRES
MOBILE HOME & RV
COMMUNITY
11240 N.Northwood
Dr. Inglis, FL 34449
352-239-4548 www.
auroraacresfl.com




INVERNESS
Nice 2/2/1 new carpet
tile & paint. Whispering
Pines Villas furnished
$69,900(352) 726-8712




New York Stade
Lcnd
Sde Discornted
to
1990's prices!
3 Acre Starter
camp -
$17,995. 5 Acres
w/Farmhouse -
$49,995. 52
Acres,
Stream, 2
ponds,
Beautiful woods
&
views, Access
to road
front, utilities and
state land
Limited of-
fer. Call
Christmas &
Associates
(800)229-7843 or
visit
landand-
camps.com


You've Got It!



Somebody



Wants



It!


20 Acres-Live on
Land
NOW!! Only
$99/mo
$0 Down,
Owner
Finance.NO
CREDIT
CHECKS! Near
El
Paso, Texas,
Beautiful
Mountain
Views! Free
Color Brochure.
800-755-8953
WWW.
sunsetranch-
es.com






"FREE foreclosure
and short sale lists


Office Open
7 Days a Week

Lisa VanDeboe
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com

Floral City
105' open water, chain
of 5 lakes & river. 2/2/2
Phyllis Strickland
Tropic Shores Rity
(352) 613-3503





CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pond,
ATV trails $165K obo
352 795-2027/ 634-4745





CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pond,
ATV trails $165K obo
352 795-2027/ 634-4745





GREAT BUY! 2 Lots for
Sale, Must buy both
1 in W. Highlands,
1 N. Highlands,
Inverness $15,000
By owner 617-471-7417











LOTS FOR

SALE!
6 Citrus Springs Lots
Available, Owner Fin.
or Cash Discounts
Provided. Great
Investment Opprty.
803-403-9555
803-403-9557



Watercra


23' PRO LINE
1991 250 HP '96 Yamaha
23' Walk Around/cuddy
cabin with 250 hp
YAMAHA, runs great
$4,000 352-563-1518


OLD TOWN CANOE
'94 Discovery 164; good
condition, red, 2 seats,
3rd seat; 3 paddles, 3
cushions, 2 PFDs, trans-
port blocks, tie-downs.
$500 firm. 352-382-2657




'08 BENTLY
20 Ft. Pontoon, 60HP,
Mere. 4 str. dbl. bimini.
new trlr. much more.
$11,500 (352) 341-4949
17' Old Towne
Glass Canoe
w/accessories
$200(352) 382-4781
BASS TRACKER 16'
fiberglass, w/trailer
70 hpjohnsonexc.
cond lots of extra's
$4500 (352) 302-6934
FISHING KAYAK
FREEDOM 12 w/trolling
motor & battery
misc. accessories $800.
(419) 944-8777
HURRICANE
Deck Boat, 22 ft, 115
Yamaha, Trailer, Bimini,
full mooring cover
Good cond. $4,750.
Cry. Riv (513) 260-6410
Jon Boat /Lowes
#L1648M 31 hp Go Devil
w/trailer $4200 obo
(352) 270-0888
Palm Beach 99
201 white cap C.C. '99
150hp merc. v. low hrs.
hydro steering, hi end
2 rail T-Top, elect box.
T bag, alum trailer. radial
tires, outrigger, down
rigger ready. True
off/Inshore boat 8'5"W
30" free board & more
exc cond.Steal $8995
(352) 563-5628
PONTOON
18FT, '90 35HP Johnson,
new blmlnl, carpet,
seats, etc. nice cond.
$2,500. 352-637-3983
PROLINE
21' Cuddy, full transom,
w/brack, 150 HP Yam.,
Bimini, VHF, porta pot,
dep. finder, trailer $5K
firm (352) 382-3298
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LAKE
MARINE
We Pay CASH For Used
Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck & Fishing
Boats (352)527-0555
hnnhlnAercenter cnm


IAM.l Ivi'lt N
24' Pontoon, 70 HP Ev.
T/T, cust. trlr, bimini top,
stored inside $3500 incls
all gear (231) 852-0061




BIGHORN
2008 5th Wheel, 3400RL
37 ft. long, dual AC,
Non smoking or pets.
lots of extras $28,000
obo Very clean!
(419) 266-5580, 5581
GULF STREAM 08
32' 3 slides, rear. kit.
K bed,50amp, like new
extras $31,500
(352) 726-1906
HITCHHIKER II LS
2008, 3 slides, excel
cond. heat pump, de-
luxe pkg. too many ex-
tras to list $32,000.
Dodge Truck also avail
(636) 209-0308
Holiday Rambler
'98 38' 7.5 gen.super
slide, air lever, a/c susp.
loaded call for details
$41K (352) 746-9211

I Buy RV'S Steve
Henry, RV World of
Hudson Inc.Since
1974. (888) 674-8376
(727) 514-8875

JAYCO '04
36', 5th whl toy hauler,
generator, slide, fuel
station $17,400. like new
Truck Avail For Sale
Local (502) 345-0285


Team Delivery



Opportunity


Would you like to

deliver newspapers

but don't want to

work 7 days a weekP


We are taking applications
for teams to contract a
route.

V Lead contractor must
be 18 yrs of age

V Must have valid driver's
license and insurance




MAKE EXTRA MONEY!

DELIVERING

C'rnr cnrE

Swwwchroniceoninecorn

Email:
kstewart@chronicleonline.com
or come to
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River for an application.


CAMPER/TRAILER
2010, Sportsman KZ
Hybrid, 19ft, like new
air, full kitch, bath
$8750 (352) 249-6098
GULF STREAM
Coach 25 ft. model
24RBL, sips upto 6 gas
& elect appls & heat,
shower/toliet $6,000
(352) 341-1714
HOLIDAY RAMBLER '05
29' Alum frame, Lg slide
out, exc cond. used
little, always covered
$12,500 (352)795-5310
cell 410-474-3454
I BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
call me 352-201-6945
KZ toyhauler,07
32' like new, full slide
new tires, Owan Gen..
gas tank, Lrg living
area separate cargo
$18,200. 352-795-2975
Sandy Oak 55+
lbd. 1 bathNew hot
water heater, furnace.
tub and surroundings
$2k obo See Rose at
Sandy Oaks
SUNNYBROOK
2005 36ft, 5th whl,2
slides, kg bedlike
newheated tks, 60
amp service oak cab
$33,400 352-382-3298




$$ CASH PAID $$
For Junk or Wrecked
Cars/Trucks.$300 & UP
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$

BIG SALE!
Consignment USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
AUTOS' FROM $1,500.
US 19 BY AIRPORT
US 44, BY NAPA
Low Payments *
461-4518 & 795-4440
consignmentusa.org
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID $300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars Trucks
& Vans, For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES,
Hwy 19... 352 564-8333
CASH PAID FOR JUNK
CARS Any Condition
Up to $500., Free
Towing 352-445-3909
KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Salvage Pays top $$$
for your autos.
352-628-4144
WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
Perfect Cond. or Not
Titled,No title,
No problem. Paying up
to $25K any make,
any model Call A.J.
813-335-3794/531-4298




AUCTION WEEK
WITH 4 SALES
WED. Apr. 18 Education
Supplies pre-sale
3:30-7pm 1,000+ of NEW
books, toys, games,
learning tools from
wholesaler. Special
direct pick & choose
sale. Purchase at great
discount by the piece
or pile. Balance to be
sold at Auction Thurs.
*******
THURS. Apr. 19 Estate
Adventure Auction
3pm-10pm Come any-
time 2003 Bulck Century
Estate car NEW QVC
Items, furn., appliances,
tools, Education sup-
plies, 3 full estates.

FRI. Apr.20 Real Estate
Oakrldae Home
6186 N. Misty Oak Dr.
Beverly Hills
Prev: 8AM Auction 9AM
3/2+ study custom
Rusaw upgraded home
w/poolscape $200k
construction cost Must
be sold to settle estate
*******
SAT.Apr.21 NASCAR FUN
Prev.10AM Auction 1PM
250 great lots Dlecast,
caps, Matchbox &
Hotwheels, Signed
Memorabilia, 1000's
pcs. At the hall only,
bring your kids!
DudleysAuctlon.com
4000 S. Fla. Ave.
(US 41-S) Inverness
(352) 637-9588
AB1667 Maine-ly Real
Estate 381384 10% BP

'ni .11iTi


CLASSIFIED




AFFORDABLE
AUTOS & VANS
Everybody Rides
$495 DOWN
$49 PER WEEK
BUY HERE PAY
HERE..
Lots of clean-safe-
dependable rides.
CALL DAN TODAY
(352)5 6 3 -1 902
"WE BUYS CARS
DEAD OR ALIVE"
1675 Suncoast Hwy.
Homosassa Fl.

BIG SALE!
Consignment USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
AUTOS' FROM $1,500.
US 19 BY AIRPORT
US 44, BY NAPA
Low Payments *
461-4518 & 795-4440
consignmentusa.org

BUICK
'04, Century, silver, gray
intr 4 Door, 99.500 mi.,
V6,Auto, transAC,
etc. very good cond.
well maint., garaged
(352) 794-3591

CADILLAC
1993 Allante Nstar. Soft
& hardtop auto
low miles black mint
$16KObo 352-563-1915

Camaro 97
Z28, 97K mis. T-tops,
exc cond. White with
orang strips $8K obo
352-302-7204

CHEVY
'07, impalaV6,auto,
ice cold AC. non smok-
ers 100K mi $7,500
(352) 726-3093

IMMACULATE
FORD
2002 Thunderbird Road-
ster with only 10K miles,
V8, automatic, two tops,
like new. a real eye
catcher. Great car
Asking $20,000 OBO
Call 352-563-5150

FORD TAURUS 2001
P/W, P/L, A/C, AUTO
75K, new tires, brakes
$4500 o/b/o
352-302-9217

HONDA
2007 Accord 4 cyl,
52000 miles, leather,
moon roof, power seat
& windows, exc cond,
retirees car
$11,000 352-382-5313

MERCEDES '99
S420. blue book $11,500
sell $10K FIRM
1729 W. Gulf to lake
Hwy, Lecanto

MERCURY
'05, Grand Marquis LS
ultimate edition,
76k mi. $7,900
352-344-8256

Mustang 03
Red Convertible,
4K chrome rims,
electrically loaded!!
remote door locks,
trunk, paniccold air
intake, edlbrock dual
exh. 6 CD change
73K milesTMU, criuse
35mpg. auto. Cry Riv.
NEW CAR $8200. may
part trade cell
(727) 207-1619

NISSAN ALTIMA
2011, Excel. condition
low miles, fully loaded
$18,500
(352) 274-1940

SAND RAIL
project $800.
(352) 228-1897

Toyota 91
Camry, runs good
a/c, pwr windows steer-
ing & brakes $1500 as is
(352) 637-1456




CHEVROLET '01
Camaro, Z28, Org. 9000
miles, Pristine show car
frozen in time. Loaded
black/black leather
Flawless rare find!
$13,950 (352) 513-4257

MERCEDES' 84
380 SL. good cond.
$4500 obo
(352)382-1344

TC by Maserati
'89,16 valve, 5spd,
turbo, conv. hd top, 30k
lown,exc.cond$12,500
Call 352-220-3883


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





BIG SALE!
Consignment USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
AUTOS' FROM $1,500.
US 19 BY AIRPORT
US 44, BY NAPA
Low Payments *
461-4518 & 795-4440
consignmentusa.org

Ford 02
F150, Ext Cab,
fair cond. runs good
166K mis. $6k obo
352-302-7204
FORD '06
F250 Super Duty, 4 x 4,
6.0, Lariat Pkg. Off Rd.
Pkg., Hard Bed Cover
$21,500 (352) 586-8576
SIERRA 96
2500 diesel 153k miles,
very clean ,runs perfect
$4,500
352-494-0009




2010 FORD ESCAPE
CREAM PUFF, LOADED
14K miles, Lmtd Edition,
Sunroof, Sync system,
GPS +,MP3, USB, Fancy
Wheel Covers, Michelin
Tires, Rear Hitch,
Heated Leather Seats,
Spcl side mirrors, Sirius
Radio, Warranty
$24,500 (352) 509-7533




CHEVROLET
1999 venture van, 6-8
passenger,body in excel-
lent condition as well as
the interior and tires. V-6
motor, good gas mileage.
Loaded inside,velour
seats,tinted windows,
electrical windows, doors
and front seat. Also has
electrical hook-up for
campgrounds.Dual radia-
tors. Many extras,must
see to appreciate.Asking
$3400.OBO,call
637-4011




Harley 00
Roadking Classic, all
gear 17K miles 11K
obo.(352) 489-0873
Harley Davidson
03, Super Road King,
fuel inj. $48K up grades
too much to list/ Cry Riv
$9200 (727) 207-1619
HARLEY DAVIDSON
08 Night Train, flat blk.
11,500 mis. lots of extra's
$14K obo Jeff
(407) 712-0803
HARLEY-
DAVIDSON
2005 FLTRX Road Glide
Custom Oversized
Windshield, King/Queen
seat, Backrest, 24k miles,
$12K 352-257-3130
JUNK MOTORCYCLES
WANTED Will Pay up to
$200 for Unwanted Mo-
torcycle 352-942-3492
KAWASAKI
2006 Vulcan 1600 No-
mad Excellent condi-
tion, well serviced. 14k
miles. Newer tires and
battery. Bike jack,
Cycleshell, lots of ac-
cessories. Pix available.
$6495 352-601-7460



911-0430 DAILY CRN
Surplus Prop.
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County Board
of County Commissioners
will be selling surplus prop-
erty and equipment via
the internet at
govdeals.com, April 12
until April 30, 2012.
Pub:April 12 thru 30,2012


590-0417 TUCRN
Kershner Jr, Anthony Paul 2012-CP-114 Notice To Cred.
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO. 2012-CP-114
IN RE: ESTATE of ANTHONY PAUL KERSHNER, JR.,
Deceased,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of ANTHONY PAUL KERSHNER, JR., deceased,
whose date of death was FEBRUARY 7, 2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus
County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 110 North Apopka Avenue,
Inverness, Florida 34450. The names and addresses of the personal representative
and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice has been served must file their
claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE TIME OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this Notice is April 10, 2012.
Personal Representative:
/s/ SUSAN P. WARREN
5 New Florida Avenue, Beverly Hills, FL 34465
Attorney for Personal Representative
BRADSHAW & MOUNTJOY, P.A. /s/ Michael Mountjoy, Esq. Fla. Bar Number: 157310
209 Courthouse Square, Inverness, FL 34450 Telephone:(352) 726-1211
April 10 and 17, 2012.

589-0417 TUCRN
Trompeta, Purita M. 2012-CP-42 Notice to Creditors
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2012-CP-42
IN RE: ESTATE OF PURITA M. TROMPETA
Deceased,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Purita M. Trompeta deceased, whose date of
death was November 18, 2011, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Flor-
ida, Probate Division, the address of which is 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness,
Florida 34450. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice has been served must file their
claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file their claims with this Court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is April 10, 2012.
Personal Representative:
/s/ VIRGINIA M. POSTADAN
c/o 452 Pleasant Grove Road, Inverness, Florida 34452
Attorney for Personal Representative: HAAG, HAAG & FRIEDRICH, PA 452 Pleasant
Grove Road, Inverness, FL 34452 Phone: (352) 726-0901 Fax: (352) 726-3345
Jeanette M. Haag, Florida Bar No.: 0196529, Attorney for Estate
April 10 and 17, 2012.


591-0417 TUCRN
Leonard, Floyd B, 2012-CP- 156 Notice to Creditors (Ancillary Summ, Admin.)
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File No.: 2012-CP-156
IN RE: ESTATE OF FLOYD B. LEONARD,
DECEASED.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS (Ancillary Summary Administration)
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE:
You are hereby notified that an Order of Summary Administration has been
entered in the Estate of Floyd B. Leonard, deceased, File Number 2012-CP-156, by
the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is
110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450; that the decedent's date of
death was November 3, 2011: that the total value of the estate is $30,000.00 and
that the names and address of those to whom it has been assigned by such order
are:
George R. Fight, 21718 North 2300 East Road, Odell, IL 60460
Carole Louise Bockman, 1151 Penny Lane, Sycamore, IL 60178
Clarence Eugene Leonard, PO Box 375, Gridley, IL61744
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the estate of the decedent and persons having claims or demands
against the estate of the decedent other than those for whom provision for full pay-
ment was made in the Order of Summary Administration must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE TIME PROVIDED BY LAW.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER APPLICABLE TIME PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is April 10, 2012.
Person Giving Notice:
/s/ George R. Fight
21718 North 2300 East Road, Odell, IL 60460
Attorney for Person Giving Notice BRADSHAW & MOUNTJOY, P.A.
/s/ Michael Mountjoy, Esq. Florida Bar No. 157310 209 Courthouse Square, Inverness,
FL 34450 Telephone: (352) 726-1211
April 10 and 17, 2012.

592-0417 TUCRN
Janzen, Virginia Louise 2012-CP-221 Notice to Cred (Summ. Admin.)
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2012 CP 221
IN RE: ESTATE OF VIRGINIA LOUISE JANZEN A/K/A VIRGINIA L. JANZEN
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS (Summary Administration)
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE:
You are hereby notified that an Order of Summary Administration has been en-
tered in the estate of Virginia Louise Janzen a/k/a Virginia L. Janzen, deceased, File
Number 2012 CP 221, by the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450; that the
decedent's date of death was February 27, 2012; that the total value of the estate is
$0 (exempt homestead and exempt property) and that the names and addresses of
those to whom it has been assigned by such order are:
Name Address
Paula Louise McNamara 59 Southgate Course, St. Charles, IL 60174
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the estate of the decedent and persons having claims or demands
against the estate of the decedent other than those for whom provision for full pay-
ment was made in the Order of Summary Administration must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA
PROBATE CODE. ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER APPLICABLE TIME PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is April 10, 2012.
Person Giving Notice:
/s/ Paula Louise McNamara
59 Southgate Course, St. Charles, Illinois 60174
Attorney for Persons Giving Notice:
/s/ John A. Nelson, Esq. Florida Bar No.: 0727032 Slaymaker and Nelson, P.A.
2218 Hwy. 44 West, Inverness, FL 34453 Telephone: (352) 726-6129 Fax: (352) 726-0223
E-Mail: john@slaymakerlaw.com
April 10 and 17, 2012.

593-0424 TUCRN
Stratton, Robert E. 2012-CP-166 Notice to Creditors
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2012-CP-166
IN RE: ESTATE OF ROBERT E. STRATTON
Deceased,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Robert E. Stratton, deceased, whose date of
death was September 5, 2010, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Flor-
ida, Probate Division, the address of which is 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness,
Florida 34450. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice has been served must file their
claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file their claims with this Court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is April 17, 2012.
Personal Representative:
/s/ MARJORIE CRUSE
c/o 452 Pleasant Grove Road, Inverness, Florida 34452
Attorney for Personal Representative: HAAG, HAAG & FRIEDRICH, PA 452 Pleasant
Grove Road, Inverness, FL 34452 Phone: (352) 726-0901 Fax: (352) 726-3345
Jeanette M. Haag, Florida Bar No.: 0196529, Attorney for Estate
April 17 and 24, 2012.


594-0424 TUCRN
Cranmer, Anita P. 2012-CP-181 Notice to Creditors
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2012-CP-181
IN RE: ESTATE OF ANITA P. CRANMER
Deceased,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Anita P. Cranmer, deceased, whose date of
death was December 26, 2011, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Flor-
ida, Probate Division, the address of which is 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness,
Florida 34450. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice has been served must file their
claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file their claims with this Court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is April 17, 2012.
Personal Representative:
/s/ CINDY WEAVER
c/o 452 Pleasant Grove Road, Inverness, Florida 34452
Attorney for Personal Representative: HAAG, HAAG & FRIEDRICH, PA 452 Pleasant
Grove Road, Inverness, FL 34452 Phone: (352) 726-0901 Fax: (352) 726-3345
Jeanette M. Haag, Florida Bar No.: 0196529, Attorney for Estate
April 17 and 24, 2012.

595-0424 TUCRN
Wiggins, Sally R. 2012 CP 185 Notice to Cred.
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2012 CP 185 Division Probate
IN RE: ESTATE OF SALLY R. WIGGINS
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of SALLY R. WIGGINS, deceased, whose date of
death was February 20, 2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of which is 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Flor-
ida 34450. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file
their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is April 17, 2012.
Personal Representative:
/s/ Carol Hills
6028 South Lewdingar Drive, Homosassa, Florida 34446
Attorney for Personal Representative:
/s/ Thomas E. Slaymaker, Esq. Florida Bar No.: 398535 Attorney for Carol Hills
Slaymaker & Nelson, P.A. 2218 Hwy. 44 West, Inverness, Florida 34453
Telephone: (352)726-6129 Fax: (352) 726-0223 E-Mail: tom@slaymakerlaw.com
April 17 and 24, 2012.


596-0417 TUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Executive Board of the Citrus County Transporta-
tion Planning Organization (TPO) will meet on Thursday, April 19, 2012 at 5:00 PM at
the Inverness Government Center, City Council Chambers, 212 West Main Street, In-
verness, Florida, to discuss the business of the Transportation Planning Organization.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the Citrus County Administrator's Of-
fice, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL 34450, (352) 341-6560, at least two (2)
days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD Tele-
phone (352) 341-6580.
If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Transportation Planning
Organization with respect to any matter considered at this meeting, he/she will
need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made which record
shall include the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.
BY: Gary W. Maidhoff, Operations and Projects Officer
April 17, 2012.

597-0417 TUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Citrus County Transportation Planning Organiza-
tion (TPO) will meet on Thursday, April 19, 2012 at 5:15 PM at the Inverness Govern-
ment Center, City Council Chambers, 212 West Main Street, Inverness, Florida, to dis-
cuss the business of the Transportation Planning Organization.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the Citrus County Administrator's Of-
fice, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL 34450, (352) 341-6560, at least two (2)
days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD Tele-
phone (352) 341-6580.
If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Transportation Planning
Organization with respect to any matter considered at this meeting, he/she will
need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made which record
shall include the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.
BY: Gary W. Maidhoff, Operations and Projects Officer
April 17, 2012.


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