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Citrus County chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02726
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 04-01-2012
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:02726

Full Text


2012 Medical & Wellness directory /Inside today


TODAY & Monday morning
HIGH Partly cloudy. West
83 winds 5 tol 0 mph.
LOW Mostly clear tonight.
58 PAGE A4
APRIL 1, 2012


I S-]m U N DP:N'd


CITRUS S CUOONT Y






www.chronicleonline.com
* Best Community I Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community $1


VOLUME 117


ISSUE 238


CITRUS COUNTY FAIR:


Homosassa Heritage Day


brings history to life


Fair ends
The midway is open
from 2 to 7 p.m. Sun-
day, offering only $22
armbands for the rides;
no single tickets sold.
* See photos of the
steer and swine
champions./Page A2
* See photos of many
pageant winners.
/Pages A17 and A18

STATE NEWS:









Illegal now
Synthetic substances
such as this are illegal


SHEMIR WILES
Staff Writer
HOMOSASSA The visitors center at
Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park
transformed into a figurative time machine
Saturday morning as a number of people
filled the Florida Room to learn a bit of his-
tory during Homosassa Heritage Day
This year, the park collaborated with Cit-
rus County Historical Society, Florida Ar-
chaeological Society, Crystal River
Archaeological State Park, Homosassa
River Garden Club and other local groups to
present the annual event with sponsorship
by the Citrus County Chronicle and the
Friends of Homosassa Springs Wildlife Park


The morning began with a special
Florida Archaeological Month presentation
by Dr. Lucy Wayne, an archaeologist and ar-
chitectural historian. Wayne just recently
completed a book titled "Sweet Cane: The
Architecture of the Sugar Works of East
Florida."
During Wayne's presentation, she talked
about the history of sugar, which she said
See Page A2
Homosassa Heritage Day took place Satur-
day at Homosassa Springs Wildlife State
Park. Candace Boothe, impersonating
Dessie Smith Prescott, left, and Betty
Berger talk about the presentation.
DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle


It's official:



re in a drought


COMMENTARY:


Senate maps
Sen Paula Dockery
relates her experiences
with the redistricting
process./Page C1
OPINION:
Joe
Meek stood
his ground ...
and would not
be bullied.



HOMEFRONT:


IinlNII


- -- .


Front page
Can you spot the clue
that indicates the value
of this newspaper? John
Sikorski can./Page E6
MR-o.,irriM"'i i-
TOMORROW:
Homeless
The latest statistics on
the homeless in Citrus
County indicate a large
number of them are
children./Monday


Annie's Mailbox ......A16
Classifieds................ D4
Crossword ............ A16
Editorial .......... .... C2
Entertainment ..........B6
Horoscope ............. B6
Lottery Numbers ......B4
Lottery Payouts ........ B6
Movies .................. A16
O bituaries ................A6
Together................ A14


6 81 4I 5 1571812101 o


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
The lack of water on the Tsala Apopka Chain is obvious as Gospel Island homeowner Ray Michael, left, and his son
Michael, stand on their seawall. The small channel in front of the two men is a boat slip that Michael says he has-
n't been able to use in years due to low-water conditions.

Florida Fish and Wildlife confirms natural climate cycle


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff Writer
For the past 20 years, Gary Kuhl
has lived on the Floral City pool of
the Tsala Apopka chain of lakes.
He has seen the water come and
go.
In 2007, the last big drought here
in Citrus County, he took a photo of
his wife and grandchildren stand-
ing on dry ground out in the middle
of the lake, flying kites.
While the water isn't nearly as
low as it was five years ago, Kuhl
estimated it's clearly down maybe
3 feet from where it was just six
months ago.
Paul Pilny, a retired federal soil
scientist who lives on Big Lake
Henderson in Inverness, said he's
about to plant corn, sunflowers and
maybe some pumpkins and gourds
in what used to be his canal.
"That's what I did last time, ex-
cept the turkeys and the hogs ate it
all," he said.
He said right now, his waterfront
See Page A8


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
State Rep. Jimmie T. Smith, R-Inverness, is proposing the
state of Florida privatize the school bus system. "I feel you
need to have the discussion with the private sector," Smith
said. "They might show up at the table and provide a cheaper
and better service."


WATER CONSERVATION MONTH
April is Water Conservation Month. Here are some simple things to do
to conserve water:
* Check your sprinkler system frequently and adjust sprin-
klers so only your lawn is watered and not the house,
sidewalk or street.
* Avoid planting turf in areas that are hard to water such
as steep inclines and isolated strips along sidewalks
and driveways.
* Check your water meter and bill to track your
water usage.
* Put food coloring in your toilet tank. If it seeps
into the toilet bowl, you have a leak. Toilet flappers
should be replaced with the proper model-specific
flapper.
* Use porous materials for walkways and patios to keep water in your
yard and prevent wasteful runoff.
* Direct downspouts and other runoff towards shrubs and trees, or
collect and use for your garden.
* Install a rain shut-off device on your automatic sprinklers to eliminate
unnecessary watering.
* Use a commercial car wash that recycles water.
* For more suggestions, visit online at www.tampagov.net/dept_water/
information_resources/Saving_water/110_Ways_to_Save_Water.asp


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff Writer
INVERNESS A few years ago,
a national school bus company ap-
proached Citrus County School Dis-
trict officials with the offer to -
privatize transportation service.
District officials listened,
crunched some numbers and de- Jim
cided that while the company could Sr
probably deliver school bus service R-In
less expensive at first, it wouldn't
guarantee long-term savings.
And there was another significant hitch:
The school district transports children who
live within two miles of elementary schools,


.J


mi
rni
'er


Grim


Reaper


trial


ends


Sentencing

set May 14
A.B. SIDIBE
Staff Writer
INVERNESS An ex-
Marine arrested in a cyber
sex sting in 2010 was found
guilty by a jury Saturday
In a rare Saturday ses-
sion by Circuit Judge Ric
Howard, the six-person jury
deliberated for about an
hour before returning the
verdict against Glen Beck of
Gainesville.
Beck, 27,
was one of
22 people
arrested in
Operation
G r i m
Reaper
who al-
legedly Glen Beck
used the In- Gainesville
ternet to so- man found
licit sex guilty in trial
from chil- after 2010's
dren and Operation
eled to Cit-
rus County with the
intention of engaging in
sexual activity with the sup-
posed minors. Several of
the defendants nabbed in
the sting have already been
sentenced.
Beck stood motionless as
the clerk read the verdict
and Judge Howard thanked
the jurors and released
them from their duties.
Howard also set a sen-
tencing date of May 14 at
1:30 p.m. for Beck.
On Saturday, jurors hears
closing arguments by the
prosecution and defense.
There were three days of
testimony in which the
prosecutor Rich Buxman
deliberately laid out a pat-
tern of cyber and other ac-
tions in which Beck partook
to set the stage for his


even though the state doesn't pay for
it. A private company likely would
not do more than the state required.
"They asked us for a lot of infor-
mation," district transportation su-
pervisor Marilyn Farmer said. "We
3)r sent them the number of routes and
our driver pay rates, then we never
ie T. heard back from them."
ith The district had not sought re-
mess. quests for bus services, and officials
let the matter drop.
Now state Rep. Jimmie T Smith,
R-Inverness, is exploring the possibility of
introducing legislation next year to privatize


Page A7


See Page A7



Smith: Consider privatizing


S

CiL~NQi


W





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


The Week IN REVIEW


Editor'snote: While thousands of
Citrus Countians soaked in the
beautiful weather and enjoyed the
Citrus County Fair this past week,
the good life here on the Nature
Coast didn't necessarily dominate
the headlines. High-interest sto-
ries of this past week include:

Deputy back to work
The Florida Department of Law En-
forcement has yet to conclude its investiga-
tion into the circumstances that led a
sheriff's deputy to shoot a Pine Ridge man,
but the deputy is back on the job.
Nicholas Dinovo, who was armed and in
his driveway when the deputy responded to
his home after several 911 calls, remained
medically unresponsive in Shands Hospi-
tal in Gainesville. Sheriff's officials plan to
charge him with aggravated assault
The personnel file of the deputy, who has
been on the force for seven years, includes
a mixture of commendations and repri-
mands, one of which for yelling at her ser-
geant and another for an insufficient
search.
Mall changes hands
As Sears is packing up for its exit from
the Crystal River Mall, not everyone is giv-


ing up hope on the
canopied shopping
center. Mike Kohen of
Crystal River Mall Re-
alty Management LLC
has stepped in and
taken ownership.
"The mall is still a
very viable asset
which needs responsi-
ble ownership and
new tenants to fill va-
cancies," said Kohen,
who owns 10 commer-
cial properties
throughout the
country
From 11 a.m. to 1
p.m. this coming Sat-
urday, the mall will
host a customer ap-
preciation event that
will include food sam-


* WHAT:
Customer
appreciation
event.
* WHEN: 11
a.m. to 1 p.m.
Saturday,
April 7.
* WHAT: Kids
Summer
Activity Expo.
* WHEN: 1 to 4
p.m. Satur-
day, April 7.
* WHERE:
Crystal River
Mall, 1801
N.W. U.S. 19.


ples, among other things; then there will be
a "Kids Summer Activity Expo," from 1 to 4
p.m. that day, with various kid-oriented or-
ganizations on hand to advise of summer
activities they have planned.
Recycling can be criminal
Thanks to an observant homeless fellow,
local lawmen appear to have an open-and-
shut case on their hands. After the witness
observed some young men lugging appli-
ances around a Crystal River area apart-
ment complex, deputies started keeping an
eye on the place.


What they saw: Windows were closed -
then windows were open. One window had
been removed. Blinds were moving back
and forth.
When suspicions got the better part of
deputies, they entered the apartment
building and found the trio of 20-
somethings hiding out.
The suspected burglars said they were
removing fixtures and taking them to a re-
cycling center
That's not exactly the method of opera-
tion recycling proponents advocate.
Lawyer vs. commissioner
A fiery local legal eagle and one of Citrus
County's most polite elected officials tan-
gled in verbal fireworks during Tuesday's
county commission meeting.
Attorney Bill Grant told county commis-
sioners of his objections to handful of board
actions that excluded state Sen. Charlie
Dean from the process. Commissioners' de-
cision to advise the state Senate that they
favor keeping Childhood Protective Serv-
ices with the Citrus County Sheriff's Office
and the expenditure of $50,000 on a lobby-
ist for Port Citrus were a couple items of
note.
"... I believe that you disastrously wasted
political capital," he told the board. He
then acknowledged that he called Commis-
sioner Joe Meek in late February, as a citi-
zen, voicing objections to stances Meek has
taken. He apparently became miffed when
Commissioner Meek said he didn't care
what he thought
"You basically gave me a political ulti-
matum: If I don't vote the way you saw fit,
that you were going to do everything you
can to work against me," Meek told Grant at
Tuesday's meeting. '"Let the the chips fall
where they may' has been told to me by
other people who have threatened me,"
Meek said.
"I didn't threaten you, Mr. Meek," the at-
torney responded.
Vet awaits living status
An Inverness resident and Vietnam War
vet who learned from the Department of
Veterans Affairs last year that he was dead
was relieved when the VA recently reme-
died his status and again listed him among
the living.
When Richard Miller received a retro
payment for benefits due, all seemed to be
back on track. However, while he's living
and breathing, his status with the govern-
ment remains in limbo.
"I always follow my claim benefits on the
eBenefits website to check my status and I
found out I must be dead again," he said
this past week.
Citrus County's veterans service officer
is rattling some cages and is confident Mr
Miller will soon again be listed among the
living.


Donations sought for Ranches stores


Special to the Chronicle
Do you have items in your home that you
no longer need or use, such as cameras, jew-
elry, houseware and antiques? Would you
consider donating furniture you are replac-
ing or appliances you are upgrading? Are
you getting a new car or truck? Consider do-
nating your usable and sellable items to
Sheriffs Ranches Enterprises Inc. (SRE).
SRE is a subsidiary of the Florida Sher-
iffs Youth Ranches. SREs sell donated


goods to the public at thrift stores in Crys-
tal River, New Port Richey, Dunedin and
Live Oak. Visit a thrift store location or
browse the eBay site by visiting www.
sheriffsranchesenterprises.org and fol-
lowing the eBay link.
To donate, drop items by the thrift store,
or to schedule a time for pickup, call 800-
765-3797. All proceeds from sales help
support the youths of the Florida Sheriffs
Youth Ranches. For more information,
visit www.floridasheriffsyouthranches.org.


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Dr. Lucy Wayne gives a presentation titled "Sweet Cane Florida Sugar Prior to the
Civil War."


HERITAGE
Continued from Page Al

began in India in 100 A.D.
and gradually moved west-
ward. It finally came to
Florida in 1565 when Spain
established St. Augustine,
she said.
Wayne also explained
how sugar was raised and
processed in Florida be-
fore sugar production
was extremely hot and
dangerous.
To make sugar from
sugar cane, the cane had to
be crushed and then the
liquid had to be clarified,
boiled and purged.
Other products created
at sugar mills or sugar
works included molasses,
which was a byproduct of
the purging process, and
rum.
Wayne also took those in


attendance on a Power-
Point tour of other sugar
mill ruins around the state,
including the Yulee sugar
mill ruins in Homosassa.
Also during Homosassa
Heritage Day, Candace
Boothe and Gus Valder-
rama presented a cos-
tumed re-enactment of
conversations between
Florida pioneer woman
Dessie Smith-Prescott (por-
trayed by Boothe) and au-
thor Ernest Hemingway
(portrayed by Valderama).
Betty Berger, as herself,
also read a few pages about
Smith-Prescott from her
book, "Back Roads."
Valderrama, acting as
Hemingway, explained how
he met Smith-Prescott in
the Bahamas and was
drawn to her ability to hunt
and fish. They also liked to
share a bit of moonshine.
Boothe, who was Smith-
Prescott's caretaker for 18


years, also shared personal
anecdotes about Smith-
Prescott and marveled at
how headstrong and spe-
cial she really was.
She recalled when she
told Smith-Prescott she had
been inducted into the
Florida Women's Hall of
Fame and her response
was: "They just didn't have
anything else to do."
After the presentation,
Avis Craig, who lived across
the street from Smith-
Prescott, said she enjoyed
it, but knows that no one
could ever truly portray her
beloved neighbor and
Florida's "Queen of the
Wild Frontier."
"She was one of a kind,"
Craig said. "I feel very
blessed to have known her"
Chronicle reporter
Shemir Wiles can be
reached at 352-564-2924 or
swiles@chronicleonline.
corn.


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CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


THAroundTE Stray joins Devil Dogs 2 fatally

Sanford CHRIS VAN ORMER 1. i shot, 12


Protesters march in
town of shooting
Thousands joined a march
Saturday through the town
where 17-year-old Trayvon
Martin was shot and killed by
a neighborhood watch volun-
teer, vowing to continue
protesting until an arrest is
made.
Protesters carried signs,
chanted "Justice for Trayvon,"
and clutched the hands of
their children while they
walked to the Sanford Police
Department from a local high
school that served black stu-
dents during the segregation
era. The march organized by
the NAACP was one of sev-
eral taking place over the
weekend.
Martin was shot to death
by 28-year-old George Zim-
merman on Feb. 26 as he
walked from a convenience
store back to his father's fi-
anc6e's home in a gated
community outside Orlando.
The case has stirred a na-
tional conversation about
race and the laws of self-
defense. Martin, a black
teenager from Miami, was
unarmed when he was shot
by Zimmerman, whose father
is white and mother is His-
panic. Zimmerman told police
the teen attacked him before
he shot in self-defense.

Orlando

Senate candidates
address tea party
Former Sen. George
LeMieux is continuing attacks
on GOP Senate frontrunner
Rep. Connie Mack IV and
Mack is fighting back.
The candidates, along with
retired Army Col. Mike McCal-
ister, separately addressed a
statewide group of tea party
organizers on Saturday.
LeMieux told the group that
a U.S. Senate seat should not
be a crown handed down
from father to son a refer-
ence to Mack seeking the
same seat his father served in
before retiring in 2001.
McCalister said the elec-
tion won't be about the candi-
date who is the media darling
or the biggest fundraiser.
-From wire reports


Campaign TRAIL

The Citrus County
Chronicle's political forums
are: 7 p.m. Tuesday, July 31
at the Citrus County Audito-
rium; and 7 p.m. Thursday,
Oct. 18 at the College of
Central Florida. Information:
Mike Wright, 352-563-3228.
County commission Dis-
trict 1 Republican candidates
- Renee Christopher-
McPheeters, incumbent
Dennis Damato and Ron
Kitchen are invited to par-
ticipate in a Citrus County
Republican Executive Com-
mittee forum at 7 p.m. Mon-
day, April 2 at the Realtors
Association office off State
Road 44 just east of County
Road 491.
Sandy Balfour, Repub-
lican for superintendent of
schools, will speak at the
Ronald Reagan Republican
Assembly of West Central
Florida at 1 p.m. Saturday,
April 7, in the South Square
Plaza, 938 N. Suncoast
Blvd., Crystal River.
Winn Webb, Republican
for sheriff, will have a
fundraiser from 4 to 6 p.m.
Saturday, April 21, at the Re-
altors Association of Citrus
County, 714 Scarboro Ave. at
S.R. 44, Lecanto. Informa-
tion: 352-634-0983,
The Citrus Hills Civic As-
sociation is hosting a candi-
dates' forum at 7 p.m.
Thursday, Oct. 4, at the Cit-
rus Hills Golf and Country
Club.
The Campaign Trail is a
listing of political happenings
for the 2012 election season.
Send events or campaign
fundraisers to Mike Wright at
mwright@chronicleonline.


com.


Staff Writer
If a dog won't behave, call
in the Marines.
County Commissioner JJ
Kenney, a veteran of almost
23 years in the U.S. Marine
Corps, stepped up last week
with his wife, Brenda, to
mold the character of Chevy,
a female bulldog and pug
mix, who has been 35
pounds of undisciplined,
continuous energy
"My wife and I were at the
shelter last Saturday to look
at a stallion," Kenney said.
"We saw the dog being
brought back. It was run-
ning back and forth and was
very frisky. It was possible it
would have to be put down.
So we asked if we could take
her home."
The Kenneys are approved
adopters, said Pattie Amon,
director of the Citrus County
Animal Shelter in Inverness.
So it was a good transition to
let them become Chevy's fos-
ter caretakers.
"We may have a dog for
potential adoption, but it
may have behavioral is-
sues," Amon explained. "We
try to put it into foster care.
In foster homes, dogs can
get their final polish to help
them into a forever home."
People who foster such a
dog take it to events and try
to get it adopted. They work
on obedience and on mak-
ing the dog behave better
around people.
Amon said Chevy had
been in three homes and
still needs training. Chevy


Special to the Chronicle
Commissioner JJ Kenney and his wife Brenda stop by Citrus County Animal Services
recently to foster Chevy who has been undergoing rigorous obedience training at the hands
of volunteer Cindy Carver. They were taking Chevy home to meet Chesty, their American
bulldog.


has been taken home by
Cindy Carver, a volunteer
trainer, who has been work-
ing with her But Carver can
train Chevy only during
short amounts of time be-
cause her employment re-
quires her to travel. When
Carver took Chevy back to
the shelter again, the Ken-
neys saw the dog and of-
fered to work with her.
It was a challenge.
"The first day and a half
was rough," Kenney said.
"She's a 35-pound dog com-
pared to a (much larger)
dog. But finally Chesty got


out those big meat-hooks of
his and held her down."
Chesty is the Kenneys' full-
time house pet, a big bulldog
similar to the Marine Corps'
mascot, named Chesty in
honor of Marine Lt. Gen.
Lewis B. "Chesty" Puller Jr
Chesty the mascot resides at
the Marine Barracks in
Washington, D.C., and walks
in weekly parades.
Kenney reported that
Chevy has had only one "ac-
cident" in the house. But
she and Chesty are sleeping
through the night
"She's a beautiful dog,"


Kenney said. "We'll hang
onto her until she finds a
home. She needs a younger
couple with a yard."
Chevy may not have the
military association of her
adopted brother, and she
may be hard to train. But
she has one trick that ap-
peals to Kenney
"You point your finger at
her like a gun and say bang
and she flops down," Ken-
ney said with a laugh.
Chronicle reporter Chris
Van Ormer can be reached
at cvanormer@chronicle
online.com or 352-564-2916.


Going the distance for a cause


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
The annual Clean Air Ride on the Withlacoochee State Trail kicked off early Saturday at the trail head on North
Apopka Avenue in Inverness. The event offered a variety of distances from 14 miles to 100 miles for every-
day riders to elite cyclists and clubs from across the state. Proceeds from the event go to Key Training Center.


hurt


outside


funeral


home
Associated Press

MIAMI Two people
were fatally shot and 12
others were injured when
gunmen opened fire on
mourners outside a
Miami funeral home,
leaving a scene that one
witness described as "a
war zone," authorities
said Saturday.
It happened about 9:35
p.m. Friday as services
were taking place at the
Funeraria Latina
Emanuel, about 10 miles
north of the city's down-
town, the Miami-Dade Po-
lice Department said.
Jaques Leonet, a pho-
tographer for the funeral
home, said a wake for 21-
year-old Marvin Andre
was just finishing and
people had begun walking
outside.
A crowd of mostly young
adults had gathered in
front of the funeral home
when a car drove by and
opened fire.
People screamed and
took cover. Several were
left bleeding on the
ground. Others ran back
into the church, Leonet
said.
"It was like a war zone,"
Leonet said.
When officers arrived at
the scene, one man was
dead and 13 others were
injured. A second man
died after being taken to
the hospital. Police said
the injured include a 5-
year-old girl.
"I grabbed her so we
could go and she was
screaming," Someta Eti-
enne, the girl's mother,
told WSVN-TV
Etienne thought her
daughter was just scared,
but then saw blood com-
ing from the girl's pants
and realized she'd been
shot in the leg. The child
was taken to Jackson Me-
morial Hospital's Ryder
Trauma Center, and au-
thorities said Saturday
she was in stable
condition.
The names of the two
deceased adults have not
been released. Police said
they are ages 27 and 43.
Leonet said Andre was
a twin and a nursing stu-
dent at Broward College.
Miami-Dade Police were
not able to provide any
information on how he
died.
Authorities declined to
release further details
about the shooting Satur-
day, and urged anyone
with information to con-
tact CrimeStoppers at
305-471-8477.


Synthetic marijuana, bath salts now against the law


Special to the Chronicle

On March 23, Gov. Rick
Scott signed into law
HB1175, which deems syn-
thetic substances such as
synthetic bath salts and syn-
thetic marijuana to be a
significant threat to health
and public safety within the
state of Florida.
It also states that the most
recently scheduled 90 or
more chemicals found in
these synthetic substances
are now considered to be
Schedule I drugs, which
makes it a felony if anyone
is found to purchase, pos-
sess, sell and/or distribute
any of them.
Synthetic drugs are
among the latest in a series
of synthetic substances that,
when used, offer alterna-
tives to traditional illegal
drugs. These powerful syn-
thetic stimulants, suspected
as being produced as substi-
tutes for ecstasy, cocaine,


amphetamines and mari-
juana, have been specifi-
cally designed to avoid legal
prosecution. They com-
monly are available on the
Internet, and in specialty
smoke shops and conven-
ience stores.
Bath salts with brand
names like Bolivian Bath,
Vanilla Sky and Ivory White
- as well as synthetic
cannabinoids (or com-
pounds present in mari-
juana plants) sold with
brand names like K2, Spice
Gold and Blue Majik can
be comprised of multiple,
different regulated and un-
regulated chemical sub-
stances.
Although these synthetic
substances have become in-
creasingly popular due to
the perception that they
pose a seemingly safer al-
ternative to illegal methods
of getting high and have
been readily available, the
truth is, they can cause side


effects ranging from ele-
vated blood pressure, ag-
gression, hallucinations,
risk of kidney failure and
even death.
Florida's newly adopted
law forbids the sale, posses-
sion, consumption and de-
livery of these synthetic
substances.
The Citrus County Sher-
iff's Office has been distrib-
uting informational warning
fliers to retailers still selling
these products, but con-
sumers also should take
note.
Agency members will
begin a more aggressive
phase next, making arrests
whenever possible.
More than 2,000 packages
of these now-illegal syn-
thetic substances have al-
ready been confiscated
throughout the county. In
response to the distributed
fliers, stores have been
more than cooperative
about turning their stock in.


Special to the Chronicle
This image shows Spice Gold, a type of synthetic marijuana.
Possession of this and similar substances has been
outlawed with a bill Gov. Rick Scott signed into law.
Retailers and those inpos- disposal of these products
session of synthetic sub- are asked to contact the sher-
stances who require iff's office at either 352-
assistance with the lawful 726-4488 or 352-726-1121.


's' .f
MR


. i






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Deputies arrest Inverness


man in burglary case


SHEMIR WILES
Staff Writer

HERNANDO A 26-year-old Inverness
man accused of burglarizing a Hernando
home and having his girlfriend pawn stolen
items was arrested Thursday on multiple
felony charges.
James Warren Graham was
charged with planning/managing/
supervising and trafficking in
stolen property, trafficking/endeav-
oring to traffic in stolen property,
grand theft and armed burglary. He
was transported to the Citrus
County Detention Facility where r
his bond was set at $79,000. Jar
According to the Citrus County Gral
Sheriff's Office, a Hernando faces r
woman reported March 20 that her chain
home had been burglarized while
she was sleeping. She noticed four guns
missing.
On Tuesday, investigators found two of the
woman's guns had been sold to a local pawn-
shop. The woman positively identified the
two guns as hers.
On March 25, the woman reported her
home had been burglarized again while she
was asleep and this time, she found a pres-
sure washer, some costume jewelry and a
baseball cap were gone.
A detective made contact Wednesday
with the person whose name was listed on
the documents at the pawnshop. The wit-
ness, Lynn Hallman, reportedly stated her
boyfriend, Graham, asked her to pawn two
guns and a pressure washer because he
didn't have any identification. She stated
she had no idea the items were stolen, the
report said.
Later, investigators received a call from


Graham, who agreed to turn himself in.
During an interview with the detective,
Hallman reportedly said Graham contacted
her on two separate occasions. The first
time, she pawned two guns and gave him
$150 for the sale. The second time, she
pawned a pressure washer and gave him
$50. However, she reportedly stated
he wouldn't tell her where the items
came from when she asked.
'" bGraham told the detective he had
been staying on the property located
8 next to the alleged victim's home.
He reportedly admitted to enter-
ing the woman's home through a
rear sliding glass door with the in-
ies tent to take food but discovered the
ham cooler inside the home was pad-
nultiple locked. He then said he pulled back
ges. the lower left part of the door and
found the guns inside the home,
which he decided he would take and sell for
money, the report stated.
According to law enforcement, Graham
said he contacted his girlfriend later that
day to have her sell the guns on his behalf.
He also said he took a Dale Earnhardt col-
lector clock, which he sold at an auction for
$10.
Officials said Graham further admitted to
going back to the home a few days later
through the same door and taking the pres-
sure washer, a jewelry box containing cos-
tume jewelry and a black baseball cap. He,
again, stated he contacted his girlfriend and
had her sell the pressure washer for cash.
Graham reportedly confessed he did the
burglaries during the early morning hours
when he knew the alleged victim was asleep.
Chronicle reporter Shemir Wiles can be
reached at 352-564-2924 or swiles@
chronicleonline. com.


SO YOU KNOW
* Citrus County Sheriff's Office/Fire Rescue Chief Larry Morabito said the fire service is
seeking volunteers to serve alongside paid staff at all stations. For information, call
John Beebe, volunteer coordinator, at 352-527-5406.
* The "Sheriff's 10-43" show airs on TV station WYKE, digital channel 47 and Bright
House cable channel 16. The show features interviews with sheriff's office staff from
all areas of the agency. It also features Sheriff Jeff Dawsy taking live calls during the
entire show on the last Wednesday monthly.


For the RECORD


Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
DUI arrest
Titus Nathan Scott, 26, of
4149 W. Pinto Loop, Beverly
Hills, at 4:04 a.m. Saturday on a
misdemeanor charge of driving
under the influence. According to
the arrest report, a deputy came
across a black Corvette parked
on County Road 486 near North
Annapolis Avenue in Hemando
and Scott, who was sitting in the
driver's seat, was vomiting on
the roadway. He reportedly
failed all field sobriety tasks he
was asked to perform and re-
fused to submit to an approved
test of his breath. Bond $500.
Other arrests
Derrick Glen Buchanan,
21, of 5051 N. Alabaster Drive,
Hemando, at 5:19 p.m. Thurs-
day on felony charge of traffick-
ing/endeavor to traffic in stolen
property, grand theft, providing
false information a metal recy-
cler and burglary of an unoccu-
pied structure. Bond $14,000.
Tyler Young George, 30,
of 5829 W. Rodeo Lane, Bev-
erly Hills, at 8:34 p.m. Thursday
on felony charge of possessing
a controlled substance with the
intent to sell and trafficking in
oxycodone. Bond $60,000.
Derick Keith Wood, 21, of
8753 St. Regis Lane, Port
Richey, at 12:42 Friday on a
felony charge of possession of


ON THE NET
* For more information about arrests made by the
Citrus County Sheriff's Office, go to www.sheriff
citrus.org and click on the Public Information link,
then on Arrest Reports.


a controlled substance and mis-
demeanor charges of resisting
an officer without violence and
possession of cannabis (less
than 20 grams). Bond $6,000.
Frank Peter Lanzilotta,
36, of 56 Beverly Hills Blvd.,
Beverly Hills, at 8:10 a.m. on ac-
tive Citrus County warrants for
failures to appear on original
felony charges of forgery, retail
theft, obtaining a controlled sub-
stance, grand theft and dealing
in stolen property. No bond.
William Christopher
Yates Jr., 18, of 116 Hudson St.,
Inverness, at 10:12 a.m. Friday
on a felony charge of burglary of
an unoccupied structure. Bond
$3,000.
Marvin Richards, 54, of
7100 S. Tommy Point, Lecanto,
at 12:16 p.m. Friday on an ac-
tive Citrus County warrant for a
violation of probation on an orig-
inal felony charge of possession
of cocaine. No bond.
Forrest Robert Haag, 24,
of 5040 S. Kris Point, Ho-
mosassa, at 12:47 p.m. Friday
on a active Citrus County war-
rant for a failure to appear on an
original misdemeanor charge of
driving with a suspended/re-


evoked license and a violation of
probation on an original felony
charge of armed burglary. No
bond.
Joshua Marcel Carter, 22,
and Amber Renee Mucklow,
20, both of 327 S. U.S. 41 Lot
53, Invemess, at 11:26 a.m. Fri-
day on felony charges of pos-
sessing a controlled substance
(marijuana) with the intent to sell
and tampering with evidence.
Bond $10,000 and $5,000.
Sean Robert Heaney, 18,
of 2630 N. Reston Terrace, Her-
nando, at 12:26 p.m. Friday on
misdemeanor charges of crimi-
nal mischief and trespassing.
Bond $1,500.
Dale Edwin Hamilton Jr.,
26, of 27 N. Melbourne St., Bev-
erly Hills, at 9:06 a.m. Saturday
on a felony charge of posses-
sion of a controlled substance
(cocaine) and misdemeanor
charges of petit theft and pos-
session of drug paraphernalia.
Bond $5,000.
Kent Vernon Hamilton,
59, of 1177 N. Trudel Point,
Crystal River, at 9:26 a.m. Sat-
urday on a misdemeanor charge
of possession of cannabis (less
than 20 grams). Bond $500.


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


F'cast
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


MARINE OUTLOOK


West winds at around 10 knots. Seas
2 feet. Bay and inland waters will
have a light chop. Skies will be partly
cloudy today.


78 62 0.20 78 63 0.20

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Exclusive daily
| TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 83 Low: 58
Mostly sunny

M- MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 85 Low: 59
Mostly sunny to partly cloudy

TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
High: 86 Low: 59
m An isolated inland storm is possible in the afternoon

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 90/56
Record 92/33
Normal 80/52
Mean temp. 73
Departure from mean +7
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday 0.00 in.
Total for the month 0.63 in.
Total for the year 3.86 in.
Normal for the year 10.27 in.
*As of 6 p m at Inverness
UV INDEX: 10
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Saturday at 3 p.m. 29.94 in.


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 66
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 90%
POLLEN COUNT**
Grasses and weeds were absent and
Today's active pollen:
Oak, juniper, bayberry
Today's count: 8.8/12
Tuesday's count: 10.1
Wednesday's count: 9.8
Saturday was good with pollutants
mainly ozone.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
4/1 SUNDAY 1:43 7:55 2:08 8:20
4/2 MONDAY 2:28 8:41 2:53 9:06
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK


APL 13 APL 21 AP 29
APRIL13 APRIL21 APRIL 29


SUNSET TONIGHT 7:49 PM.
SUNRISE TOMORROW .....................7:18 A.M.
MOONRISE TODAY ...........................2:43 PM.
MOONSET TODAY ...................... 3:29 A.M.


BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof .com/fire weather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
One-day-per-week irrigation schedule as follows for addresses ending in:
0 or 1 Monday, 2 or 3 Tuesday, 4 or 5 Wednesday, 6 or 7
- Thursday, 8 or 9 & subdivision common areas Friday. Before 8 a.m. or
after 6 p.m.
Hand watering of non-grass areas can take place any day before 8 a.m. or
after 6 p.m.
PLEASE CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL NEW PLANT MATERIAL. Citrus
County Water Resources can explain additional watering allowances for
qualified plantings.
Questions, concerns or reporting violations, please call Citrus County at
352-527-7669, or email waterconservation@bocc.citrus.fl.us.


TIDES
*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Sunday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 12:41 a/10:01 a 3:04 p/10:07 p
Crystal River** 1:25 p/7:23 a /7:29 p
Withlacoochee* 11:12 a/5:11 a 10:22 p/5:17 p
Homosassa*** 2:14 p/9:00 a /9:06 p


***At Mason's Creek
Monday
High/Low High/Low
2:14 a/11:08 a 3:53 p/11:21 p
12:35 a/8:30 a 2:14 p/8:43 p
12:01 p/6:18 a 11:38 p/6:31 p
1:24 a/10:07 a 3:03 p/10:20 p


F'cast
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc


Gulf water
temperature

77

Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 27.03 27.02 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 33.41 33.38 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lInverness 35.41 35.39 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 37.31 37.28 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydroloaical Data Section at (352) 796-7211


THE NATION


Saturday Sunday Saturday Sunday
City H LPcp. FcstH L City H LPcp. FcstH L


Albany 47 34 sh 51 33
Albuquerque 80 47 s 81 38
Asheville 74 57 .01 pc 78 50
Atlanta 79 63 .35 pc 83 60
Atlantic City 50 45 sh 55 49
Austin 87 68 s 90 67
Baltimore 57 47 c 64 48
Billings 80 46 pc 62 32
Birmingham 81 63 pc 86 64
Boise 77 51 .04 sh 46 32
Boston 43 38 .02 sh 46 38
Buffalo 42 34 sh 47 37
Burlington, VT 48 33 sh 46 30
Charleston, SC 79 68 pc 77 61
Charleston, WV 61 53 pc 76 55
Charlotte 77 62 .11 pc 79 57
Chicago 50 39 ts 68 54
Cincinnati 54 48 ts 76 55
Cleveland 43 37 ts 61 39
Columbia, SC 79 66 .04 pc 83 56
Columbus, OH 48 42 ts 72 51
Concord, N.H. 49 35 sh 47 34
Dallas 83 64 s 91 66
Denver 81 42 s 83 39
Des Moines 75 53 pc 87 61
Detroit 44 36 pc 64 43
El Paso 87 58 s 88 56
Evansville, IN 72 53 pc 83 63
Harrisburg 48 44 .01 sh 63 46
Hartford 45 36 .02 sh 53 37
Houston 86 69 pc 87 69
Indianapolis 55 46 ts 80 59
Jackson 83 66 pc 87 64
Las Vegas 86 66 pc 67 53
Little Rock 87 61 s 89 64
Los Angeles 62 54 trace s 64 51
Louisville 67 57 pc 82 63
Memphis 85 61 pc 89 71
Milwaukee 40 37 pc 61 46
Minneapolis 50 42 pc 76 57
Mobile 84 64 .24 pc 82 67
Montgomery 81 64 .28 pc 86 64
Nashville 82 55 pc 86 62
KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02012 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


New Orleans 85 66 pc 81 69
New York City 42 39 .01 sh 56 40
Norfolk 73 55 pc 66 55
Oklahoma City 83 58 s 92 63
Omaha 91 56 s 89 62
Palm Springs 85 60 s 74 51
Philadelphia 45 43 sh 61 48
Phoenix 94 63 s 73 52
Pittsburgh 47 41 sh 65 45
Portland, ME 45 34 sh 44 33
Portland, Ore 54 41 .49 sh 50 43
Providence, R.I. 42 36 .08 sh 48 37
Raleigh 76 62 .12 pc 73 56
Rapid City 83 51 pc 80 39
Reno 61 38 pc 50 30
Rochester, NY 42 35 sh 49 37
Sacramento 58 49 .23 pc 61 41
St. Louis 76 50 s 89 66
St. Ste. Marie 42 30 pc 50 33
Salt Lake City 80 55 sh 50 35
San Antonio 88 66 s 91 68
San Diego 60 56 s 62 50
San Francisco 60 50 .53 pc 59 45
Savannah 86 67 pc 81 61
Seattle 49 37 .47 sh 50 43
Spokane 50 36 .15 sh 46 32
Syracuse 44 36 sh 49 36
Topeka 85 54 s 91 65
Washington 64 49 pc 65 49
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 98 Junction, Texas LOW 13 Greenville,
Maine
WORLD CITIES


SUNDAY Lisbon
CITY H/L/SKY London
Acapulco 88/72/c Madrid
Amsterdam 48/37/c Mexico City
Athens 66/49/s Montreal
Beijing 47/37/c Moscow
Berlin 45/29/pc Paris
Bermuda 71/65/r Rio
Cairo 85/63/pc Rome
Calgary 46/23/sh Sydney
Havana 89/67/ts Tokyo
Hong Kong 73/64/c Toronto
Jerusalem 70/51/sh Warsaw


64/53/sh
54/39/pc
73/46/pc
71/46/ts
44/31/c
37/22/sn
55/35/s
84/70/sh
65/51/pc
79/64/pc
52/40/pc
47/36/sh
38/29/rs


C I T R U S


C 0 U N TY


egal notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle


Bid Notices........................................ D6

Meeting Notices................................D6

Lien Notices...................................... D6

Miscellaneous Notices.......................D6

Self Storage Notices........................D6


LHRKON1CLL
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N I \ \

Iz I Inverness
SCourthouse office
To pkins St. square
0 Cn 106 W. Main
S 41 4Inverness, FL
34450


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Tom Feeney .................................................... Production Director, 563-3275
Kathie Stewart .............................................. Circulation Director, 563-5655
John M urphy ........................ ............................ Online M manager, 563-3255
John M urphy.................................................... Classified M manager, 564-3255
Jeff Gordon ............................. ..................... Business M manager, 564-2908
Mike Arnold.................................... Human Resources Director, 564-2910
Report a news tip:
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SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280


A4 SUNDAY, APRIL 1, 2012


LOCAL


h
rI
M





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Special to the Chronicle
Kacie Carpenter from Citrus High School FFA earned Grand Champion Steer honors. The an-
imal weighed 1,290 pounds and came from Rick Williams. Presenting the trophy is Sherri
Sanders, livestock co-chairman, and Bryan Reaves from BR's Feed & Western, the trophy
sponsor.


Citrus County Fair
The livestock com-
petition at this year's
Citrus County Fair
took place this past
week. Area youths
spent months prepar-
ing their steer and
swine for the compe-
tition, and two ulti-
mately won grand
champion honors and
two won reserve
grand champion hon-
ors in each category.


n_


Madison McClain from Inverness Middle School FFA Chapter
earned the Reserve Grand Champion Swine honors. The an-
imal weighed 260 pounds and came from Southern Select
Show Pigs. Presenting the trophy is Taylor Waller for the tro-
phy sponsor VanNess Auto Parts, and Macie Waller for belt
buckle sponsor Marlene and Joe Law, doing business as
Travelisfun.us.


HEALTH


SCREENING

Friday, April 13

Vision Cataract Glaucoma
Blood Pressure Eyeglass Adjustments


Jay Newcomer, OD
352.746.0800
Beverly Hills Eye Clinic
3636 N. Lecanto Hwy.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465


In association with:


JiL,. CATARACT &
f- LASER INSTITUTE
-C./ "Excellence...with love"
StLukesEye.com
THE PATIENT AND ANY OTHER PERSON RESPONSIBLE FOR PAYMENT HAS A RIGHT TO REFUSE TO PAY, CANCEL
PAYMENT, OR BE REIMBURSED FOR PAYMENT FOR ANY OTHER SERVICE, EXAMINATION, OR TREATMENT THAT IS
PERFORMED AS A RESULT OF AND WITHIN 72 HOURS OF RESPONDING TO THE ADVERTISEMENT FOR THE FREE,
DISCOUNTED FEE, OR REDUCED FEE SERVICE, EXAMINATION, OR TREATMENT.

THE CITRUS COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY
IN PARTNERSHIPWITH
rHW CH!CE "% b EINZ


DISCOUNTS AT THIS STORE ONLY


Sears CRYSTAL RIVER
ool %J3 1801 NW US Highway 19


R a4


ALL SALES FINAL NO REFUNDS OR EXCHANGES. OPEN DAILY REGULAR HOURS. WE ACCEPT VISA, MASTERCARD, DISCOVER, AMERICAN EXPRESS AND SEARS
CARDS. WE ACCEPT SEARS GIFT CARDS. DISCOUNTS DO NOT APPLY TO PREPAID GIFT CARDS. INVENTORY IS LIMITED TO STOCK ON HAND. THIS STORE IS NOT
PARTICIPATING IN CURRENT SEARS CIRCULARS. 10K GOLD JEWELRY UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED. THIS EVENT EXCLUDES ELECTROLUX.
THE AUTO CENTER IS NOT PARTICIPATING IN THIS SALES EVENT.


H PiShYOUR WAYS r .
REWARDS g es


L0


IjKWI


CITRUS COUNTY FAIR


SUNDAY, APRIL 1, 2012 A5


Kylie Philipps
from Lecanto
Levi's 4-H Club
earned Grand
Champion
Swine honors.
The animal
weighed 265
pounds and
came from
Williams Show
Pigs. Present-
ing the trophy
is Kandi
McPherson,
livestock chair-
man. The tro-
phy is
sponsored by
John Thomas
Spreader Serv-
ice, and the
belt buckle is
sponsored by
Lori Corbin.


Reserve Grand
Champion
Steer winner is
Peter Uzar
from Floral City
Team Green 4-
H Club. The an-
imal weighted
1,255 pounds
and came from
Chi-Ferris
Farms. The Re-
serve Grand
Champion
Steer trophy is
sponsored by
Knights Farm
Fresh Feeds
and Rob Knight
presents the
trophy.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries


Hugh Flood, 88
BEVERLY HILLS
Hugh J. Flood, age 88, of
Beverly Hills, Florida,
passed away March 29,2012,
at Citrus Memorial hospital
in Inverness, FL.
He was born April 25,
1923, in Rochester, NY, to
Vincent and Alice (Metzger)
Flood. Hugh moved to Bev-
erly Hills 12 years ago from
Branch Port, New York. He
was a retired tile mason and
a World War II Army
veteran.
His memberships include
St. Michael's Catholic
Church, and he was a char-
ter member of the Branch
Port American Legion.
He is survived by his com-
panion Grace Bartolo; five
children, Michael and Deb-
orah Flood, Steven Flood,
Dawn and Vincent Marceno,
Susan and Thomas Scipioni,
and Lorraine Flood; seven
grandchild enndy and
Mark Fazio, Bryan Flood,
Heather and Ashton Bond,
Jerad and Sonya Flood, Re-
becca Egburtson, Lena
Marceno, and Erin
Marceno; and seven great-
grandchildren.
Memorial Services will be
announced at a later date.
In lieu of flowers donations
can be made to the Citrus
Memorial hospital.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.

Gene
Jackson, 81
BEVERLY HILLS
H. Gene Jackson, 81, of
Beverly Hills, FL, died
Wednesday, March 28, 2012,
at Hospice House in
Lecanto under the loving
care of his family, friends
and Hospice of Citrus
County.
Gene was born in Sara-
sota, FL, Jan. 1, 1931, and
after a career in agriculture
in California he moved to
Beverly Hills in 1980. He
was a member and deacon
of the First Baptist Church
of Homosassa.
Gene is survived by his
wife of 63 years, Ronice
Jackson of Beverly Hills;
daughter and son-in-law
Jean and Andy Harmon of
Pine Ridge, FL; brothers in
Christ Ray Cotton and War-
ren Bunts of Homosassa.
Celebration of Gene's life
will be held 1 p.m. Friday,
April 6, at the First Baptist
Church of Homosassa.
In lieu of flowers dona-
tions may be given to Hos-
pice of Citrus County, PO.
Box 641270, Beverly Hills,
FL 34464. Wilder Funeral
Home assisting the family
with private cremation
arrangements. Condolence
may be given at
www.wilderfuneral.com.





Lewis Wirth, 88
ST. PETERSBURG
Lewis A. Wirth, 88, St. Pe-
tersburg, proud veteranof
WWII, passed away March
17, 2012.
Owner operator L. Wirth
& Son Plumbing, Westport,
Ct, he retired to Inverness,
where he was captain of the
Sheriffs volunteer Neigh-
borhood Watch and Presi-
dent of Fletchers music
club.
Predeceased by daughter
Cindy Kerrigan, Westport,
he is survived by wife,
Loretta Wirth, St. Peters-
burg; son Lewis, Westport;
daughters Sandy Beardsley,
St. Petersburg, Wendy
Spencer, Inverness; 7 grand-
children; and 5 great-
grandchildren.
A Memorial will be at Bay
Pines National Cemetery,
St. Petersburg.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. cornm.


Ronald
Campbell, 81
HOMOSASSA
Ronald Clarence Camp-
bell, 81, of Homosassa, died
Saturday, March 31, 2012, at
Oak Hill Hospital in
Brooksville.
Private cremation
arrangements are under the
care of Strickland Funeral
Home with Crematory, Crys-
tal River





James
Ludtka, 88
DUNNELLON
James R. Ludtka, 88, of
Dunnellon, died Thursday,
March 29, 2012.
Private cremation will
take place under the direc-
tion of Brown Funeral
Home & Crematory in
Lecanto.
A Mass of the Resurrec-
tion will be at 10 a.m.
Wednesday, April 4, 2012, at
St. John the Baptist Catholic
Church in Dunnellon.

Madison
Rooney, 2
SPRING HILL
Madison Louise Rooney,
age 2, of Spring Hill, died
Tuesday, March 27, 2012, in
Brooksville.
A funeral service will be
conducted at 2 p.m. Tues-
day, April 3, 2012, at the
Holy Trinity Lutheran
Church in Masaryktown.
Burial will follow at Florida
Hills Memorial Gardens in
Spring Hill under the direc-
tion of Strickland Funeral
Home, Crystal River.

Mildred
Rowe, 77
HERNANDO
Mildred L. Rowe, 77, of
Hernando, Florida died
Thursday, March 29, 2012.
Services to be announced.
Cremation arrangements
under the direction of Chas.
E. Davis Funeral Home with
Crematory, Inverness.

Deaths ELSEWHERE

Dr. Paul
Crandall, 89
LOS ANGELES,
CALl F.
Dr. Paul Crandall, a co-
founder of UCLAs neuro-
surgery department who
pioneered widely used sur-
gical treatments for
epilepsy, has died. He was
89.
UCLA says Crandall died
on March 15 at Santa Mon-
ica-UCLA Medical Center
from complications of
pneumonia.
Crandall joined the UCLA
School of Medicine in 1954.
In 1960, he launched the
school's first research pro-
gram into surgical treat-
ment of epilepsy and went
on to perform or supervise
operations on more than 300
patients.
The school said he devel-
oped techniques for im-
planting electrodes in the
brain to monitor electrical
activity and for identifying
and removing abnormal
cells that caused seizures.
The techniques are now
considered standard.

Leonid
Shebarshin, 77
MOSCOW, RUSSIA
Russian investigators say
Leonid Shebarshin, who
headed the KGB for one day
after the 1991 Soviet coup
attempt, has been found
dead in an apparent
suicide.
The body of the 77-year-
old Shebarshin was found
Friday in his Moscow apart-
ment with a pistol near his
body, according to a state-
ment from the Investigative
Committee, which listed a
preliminary conclusion of
suicide.


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-From wire reports

OBITUARIES
The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits both free and
paid obituaries.
Obituaries must be
verified with the funeral
home or society in
charge of
arrangements.
Free obituaries, run one
day, can include: full
name of deceased;
age; hometown/state;
date of death; place of
death; date, time and
place of visitation and
funeral services.
If websites, photos,
survivors, memorial
contributions or other
information are in-
cluded, this will be
designated as a paid
obituary and a cost
estimate provided to
the sender.
A flag will be included
for free for those who
served in the U.S.
military. (Please note
this service when
submitting a free
obituary.)
Paid obituaries are
printed as submitted
by funeral homes or
societies.
Paid obituaries may
include the information
permitted in the free
obituaries, as well as
date of birth; parents'
names; predeceased
and surviving family
members; year married
and spouse's name
(date of death, if
predeceased by
spouse); religious
affiliation; biographical
information, including
education,
employment, military
service, organizations
and hobbies; officiating
clergy; interment/
inurnment; and
memorial
contributions.
Area funeral homes
with established
accounts with the
Chronicle are charged
$8.75 per column inch.
Non-local funeral
homes and those
without accounts are
required to pay in
advance by credit card,
and the cost is $10 per
column inch.
Small photos of the
deceased's face can be
included for an
additional charge.
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear in
the next day's edition.
Email obits@chronicle
online.com or fax 352-
563-3280.
Phone 352-563-5660
for details.




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Associated Press
Frank Verna, a real estate agent who specializes in distressed properties, knocks on the
door March 19 of a condominium that should be vacant in West Palm Beach. Thrashed
by the mortgage and foreclosure disaster, Florida has thousands of distressed proper-
ties. But figuring out just how many is not so simple. Each month, analysts issue reports
detailing the number of homes nationwide in foreclosure or held by banks. The implica-
tion is that if we can just find a cure for these loans and homes, either by matching buy-
ers with houses or helping the borrowers stay put, the economy will at last be able to heal.


Searching shadows for


end to foreclosure crisis


Associated Press

WEST PALM BEACH,
Fla. When Frank Verna
pulls up to a battered, four-
unit apartment building at
lunch hour, he's just over a
mile as the seagull flies
from the gated, oceanfront
palaces of South Florida's
wealthiest.
But this stretch of 21st
Street, pocked by homes
with boarded-up windows
and dead-ending at rail-
road tracks, is unlikely to
make it to a tourism poster
Verna turns the car around
in case he needs to make a
quick exit and tucks a
Smith & Wesson pistol into
his jeans.
"Just watch your step,"
the real estate agent says,
parting bushes grown
across the building's entry
path. Beyond is the dark-
ened doorway to Unit 1 -
missing its door
Verna is here because he
specializes in distressed
properties and Florida,
thrashed by the mortgage
crisis, has thousands. But
figuring out just how many
is not simple.
Each month, analysts
issue reports detailing the
number of homes nation-
wide in foreclosure or held
by banks. The implication
is that if we can match buy-
ers with these houses or
help borrowers stay put,
the economy will be able to
heal at last.
At ground level, though,
it's more complicated. The
building on 21st Street is a
good example.
The last buyer paid
$309,000 six years ago. But
today the county appraiser
says it's worth less than a
quarter of that amount. A
bank filed foreclosure pa-
pers in 2008, but it still be-
longs to the original owner,
subject to fines and liens by
the city. The bank sold the
underlying mortgage note
to a hedge fund for pennies
on the dollar. That com-
pany has hired Verna to
check the condition and
occupancy status of its in-
vestment, on the way to
making it profitable.
It's one thing to measure
the crisis in the black and
white of statistics. But


here's a reminder that real-
ity also comes shaded in
gray
People in the foreclosure
trade have a name for
buildings like the one on
21st Street: "shadow inven-
tory" Broadly speaking, it
refers to all the homes in
the foreclosure pipeline
that will eventually reach
the market but aren't there
yet. The definition, though,
varies considerably from
analyst to analyst and there
is truth to be gleaned from
each of their studies.
Numbers matter because
figuring out how long the
debacle will last requires
knowing the extent of the
damage. But if we're going
to take stock, reading re-
ports may not be enough.
The only way to fully
comprehend what's going
on out there is to move be-
yond the figures and charts,
and venture into the
shadows.
imE
All rise and come to
order Judge Diana Lewis'
court is now in session. On
a Monday afternoon, Court-
room 4B's benches are
packed. Lawyers and home
owners cluster around the
door and stand along the
walls. On a board in the
lobby, 16 sheets of paper list
136 foreclosure cases
awaiting Lewis on this one
afternoon.
Florida is one of 20 states
that rely entirely on courts
to deal with the crisis. A
major reason cases drag on
for an average of two years
is that last year's robo-
signing scandal forced
banks to put the brakes on
many cases with suspect
documents. A settlement
with state and federal offi-
cials has allowed the
process to get moving again.
But proceedings in
Lewis' courtroom hint at
the confusion, as well as de-
laying tactics by lenders
and borrowers, leaving
scores of homes stuck.
One of the first cases is




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Wells Fargo v Killgore. The
lawyer for a condo associa-
tion steps forward, pursu-
ing $15,000 in unpaid dues
and fines on a Boynton
Beach apartment in fore-
closure. But a woman
named Sue Elmore objects.
Elmore is the daughter of
the man who lived in the
condominium. She ex-
plains that her father is in a
nursing home.
Years ago, he took out a
reverse mortgage and when
he got ill, the family agreed
to surrender the home, a
deal they thought was long
done.
"In our minds, we didn't
own it any more. We gave it
back," Elmore said later
"We just did what they told
us to do."
Somehow, though, the
condo is still listed in her
father's name.
It's not clear exactly how
a home like this one should
be classified or what it will
take to figure out a solution.
imE
Economists at CoreLogic,
a California company that
analyzes mortgage data,
chart 1.6 million homes in
shadow inventory
nationwide.
They count homes not
listed for sale, with loans at
least 90 days overdue, in
foreclosure or bank-owned.
Others say the shadow is
much bigger Laurie Good-
man of Amherst Securities
in New York says it covers
from 8.3 million to 10.4 mil-
lion homes.
Goodman's analysis in-
cludes homes with loans at
least 60 days overdue, those
that were delinquent be-
fore and are likely to de-
fault again, and thousands
whose owners are making
payments but may give up
because they owe more
than homes are worth.
"The question is 'how
long is the shadow?"' Good-
man said. "I think some
people are definitely un-
derestimating the serious-
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Spinach could be weapon against citrus scourge


Associated Press

WESLACO, Texas In a
lab not far from the Mexican
border, the fight against a dis-
ease ravaging the worldwide
citrus industry has found an
unexpected weapon:
spinach.
A scientist at Texas A&M's
Texas AgriLife Research and
Extension Center is moving a
pair of bacteria-fighting pro-
teins naturally occurring in
spinach into citrus trees to
fight a scourge commonly
known as citrus greening.
The disease hasn't faced this
defense before and intensive
greenhouse testing so far in-
dicates the genetically en-
hanced trees are immune to
its advances.
Next month, dozens of
young sweet orange and
grapefruit trees developed by
Texas plant pathologist Erik
Mirkov will be planted near
Lake Okeechobee in South
Florida to see how they fare
in a commercial citrus grove.
"Some of these growers in
Florida, they say 'If you can't
have something for us in five
years, if you tell me it's going
to take eight we're dead,"'
Mirkov said.
To hurry along the process,
Mirkov and Southern Gar-
dens Citrus, a subsidiary of



SMITH
Continued from Page Al

school bus systems through-
out the state to save money
and provide more efficiency
"I feel you need to have
the discussion with the pri-
vate sector," Smith said.
"They might show up at the
table and provide a cheaper
and better service."
Citrus district officials say
they doubt that's possible.
Assistant superintendent
of schools Kenny Blocker
said transportation is part of
the overall education
process. Bus drivers gel with
students, teachers and
principals.
"If you're merely a cargo
transporter, you're not look-
ing at the whole picture,"
Blocker said.
The district transports
about 10,800 students,
Farmer said. It has 162
buses on the road each day,
most running double routes
mornings and afternoons.
The transportation budget
is about $7 million, Blocker
said.
Bus drivers work part-
time but receive the same
health insurance benefits of


U.S. Sugar that is funding his
research, are pursuing gov-
ernment regulatory ap-
provals while their field
testing continues.
Citrus greening was first
described in China in the
early 1900s as Huanglong-
bing, which growers and re-
searchers refer to as HLB.
The bacterium is carried
from an infected tree to
healthy ones by the Asian cit-
rus psyllid, a tiny dappled
brown insect that showed up
in Florida in 1998. The bac-
terium reproduces and
spreads through an infected
tree's vascular system mak-
ing it difficult to take up
water and nutrients.
Trees produce smaller
fruit that drops to the ground
prematurely, and eventually
the trees die.
In 2010, a panel convened
by the National Academy of
Sciences reported that the
sort of genetic engineering
Mirkov and others are doing
"holds the greatest hope" for
creating citrus trees resistant
to the bacterium. By that time
greening was already con-
firmed in every Florida
county with commercial cit-
rus groves.
Mirkov is not alone in his
pursuit. He decided early on
to only work with genes from


full-time workers. Blocker
said a private company
could eliminate benefits,
which would provide a
savings.
The district also provides
transportation to students
who live within two miles of
a school. The state, which
pays a portion of transporta-
tion costs, doesn't pay any-
thing for busing students
within that two-mile radius.
Blocker said he believes
that, to keep its costs low, a
private company would only
provide services that the
state reimburses.
Nothing stops school dis-
tricts from contracting now
with private companies. Two
school districts in Florida
have a private transportation
system Santa Rosa and
Duval.
Smith said he values the
opinion of Citrus County
school officials but believes
more discussion is needed.
"I want our school system
actively involved," he said.
"I'm not going to bring some-
thing up to privatize the sys-
tem and have it fall apart a
year or two later"
Chronicle reporter Mike
Wright can be reached at
352-563-3228 or mwright@
chronicleonline. com.


Associated Press
Plant pathologist Erik Mirkov holds an early citrus rootstock
called C22 that is enhanced with the genes from spinach
Wednesday, March 28, in a lab at the Texas AgriLife Re-
search and Extension Center in Weslaco, Texas. Testing has
shown the genetically enhanced citrus trees are immune to
citrus greening, a disease that has ravaged the industry.


foods that are already com-
monly eaten. But others are
pursuing research with
honey bee venom, a toxin
from a beetle and other com-
pounds. Even Mirkov's
backer Southern Gardens
Citrus is considering other
approaches, including one
that would create insect-
resistant trees.
Southern Gardens Citrus
President Rick Kress said
they're looking for trees that
are not only HLB resistant,
but also produce the fruit


TRIAL
Continued from Page Al

subsequent arrest.
In turn Beck's attorneys,
Thomas Edwards and Geoff
Mason, argued their client
got caught up in the swirl of
the World Wide Web and
was playing a part in a fan-
tasy world of role-playing
and lies.
In his closing, his attor-
ney Edwards implored ju-
rors not to believe any of
testimony of the police be-
cause they made everything
up and admitted as much in
court
"So, it is OK for them to
lie in order to ensnare peo-
ple, lure them, but when
anyone else does the same
thing, it's wrong, it's a
crime," Edwards said.
He conceded his client
did write all the vulgar
things alleged in the
charges and that Beck did
travel to the sting house,
but he did all those things
because he, too, was play-
ing a make-believe role
laden with lies, just as the
police were.
Edwards emphatically
added his client did not re-


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they need to be commer-
cially viable.
"The bottom line is the cit-
rus industry needs a solu-
tion," Kress said. "That's
what's driving all of this."
The disease was confirmed
in Florida in 2005 and is pres-
ent in several other south-
eastern states and around the
world, including major citrus
producer Brazil. A study re-
leased earlier this year by the
University of Florida's Insti-
tute of Food and Agricultural
Sciences estimated the dis-


ease had cost that state's in-
dustry $3.63 billion in lost
revenues since 2006.
By last year, more than 43
percent of Florida citrus
trees had been infected with
HLB and the rate is climbing
so steeply that Jim Graham, a
microbiologist at the Univer-
sity of Florida's Citrus Re-
search and Education Center,
expects it to double in the
next year or two.
"It won't be long before
Florida is 100 percent in-
fected," Graham said. He
said HLB has doubled the
costs of growing citrus in
Florida.
In January, researchers
surveying groves in South
Texas found infected orange
and grapefruit trees in two
groves across the street from
each other about 10 miles
from Mirkov's lab. California,
second to Florida in U.S. pro-
duction, hasn't detected the
disease in its citrus groves.
Pete Timmer, professor
emeritus at the University of
Florida's Citrus Research
and Education Center, was
called a pessimist when he
published an article two
years ago on the future of that
state's citrus industry He
predicted among other things
that genetically enhanced cit-
rus trees resistant to HLB


OPERATION GRIM REAPER
* "Operation Grim Reaper," a weeklong undercover
sting Oct. 11 to 17, 2010, led to the arrest of 22
people who used the Internet to solicit sex from chil-
dren and then traveled to Citrus County with the in-
tention of engaging in sexual activity with the
supposed minors.The operation involved undercover
detectives posing either as juvenile males or females,
or parents of minors actively looking for sexual in-
struction for their teens. Detectives logged nearly
700 hours chatting in Yahoo and AOL chat rooms
and also posted several personal ads on several on-
line dating sites, including Craigslist.


ally believe he was travel-
ing to go have sex with a 14-
year-old, as the prosecution
alleges.
But prosecutor Buxman
said all the markers were
present that Beck or his In-
ternet handle "gainesville-
cowboy" made contact with
the decoy and pursued hav-
ing sex with the supposed


child and subsequently
traveled to do it even
though at one point he had
a feeling it may be a sting.
"He didn't turn around
and drive home," Buxman
told jurors. "He drove an
hour-and-a-half to the
house," he added.
Buxman said Beck's de-
sire to have sex with the


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would be widely available in
20 years, but by then there
would be few small citrus
growers left in the business.
Even with aggressive con-
trol of pysllids, Florida has
struggled to get a handle on
HLB because so many trees
are infected, he said. The
problem is compounded be-
cause young trees planted to
replace those already in-
fected are more vulnerable
than mature trees.
"Once you get to 100 per-
cent infection you're dead,"
Timmer said.
Mirkov was drawn to the
spinach proteins because as
part of the plant's innate im-
mune system they shield it
against a broad spectrum of
threats. This sort of protein,
known as a defensing, is
found in plants, insects and
mammals, he said.
The trees that will soon
begin field testing represent
two generations of Mirkov's
research, each group carry-
ing one of the two spinach
genes. Those two genera-
tions of trees already spent 1
1/2 years in a greenhouse
packed with psyllids in
Florida that exposed them to
a concentration of infected
insects that far exceeds what
they would experience in a
commercial grove.


child overtook his better
judgment.
Ultimately, the jurors be-
lieved the prosecution's
case and found Beck guilty
According to Buxman, Beck
faces anywhere from five
years to 25 years in prison.
Howard said according to
sentencing guidelines,
Beck's lack of criminal his-
tory and other factors such
as his service in the
Marines will all figure in his
final sentence.
"I think the jury looked at
all the evidence and came to
the right conclusion," Bux-
man said after the verdict
Beck, who was on bail,
was immediately hand-
cuffed and taken off to jail
to await sentencing on May
14.
His parents sobbed as he
was led off.


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SUNDAY, APRIL 1, 2012 A7





A8 SUNDAY, APRIL 1, 2012


DROUGHT
Continued from Page Al

property is muck-front
property.
"I'm a fisherman," he said.
"I like to fish, but it's getting
bad. This morning I was at
the boat ramp on Apopka
and had a terrible time get-
ting my boat in the water.
"By next week," he said,
"I wouldn't be surprised if
they close the boat ramps;
it's that bad."
It's official. Here in Citrus
County we are in a moder-
ate drought cycle, on par
and potentially worse than
the drought of 2007, said
Karen Parker, spokes-
woman for the Florida Fish
and Wildlife Conservation
Commission (FWC).
The key word, Parker
said, is "cycle."
It's something that has
gone on for millennia.
In 2004, we were all talk-
ing about the terrible flood-
ing in the area.
"It's natural; it's normal
and recurring," Parker said.
"There are ecosystems that
are actually dependent on
it. The long-term benefits
often exceed any short-term
negative effects."
Still, nobody likes drought
conditions, other than buz-
zards and other scavengers
and birds of prey Pilny said
he remembered sitting out
on his dock one day watching
buzzards having a fish feast


Kuhl said he has recently
noticed a family of limpkins
(wading bird) enjoying
apple snails.
"But fishing's not as
good," he said.
According to information
from the FWC, during times
of prolonged drought, alli-
gators may start roaming,
looking for water However,
we're not at that level of
drought and alligators "fare
reasonably well" where
they are because of the
"temporary concentration
of prey items -fish, turtles,
birds in remaining
water," Parker said.
And as cruel as it may
sound, nature uses droughts
to eliminate weaker crea-
tures an example of sur-
vival of the fittest.
Drought exposes lake bot-
toms and allows accumu-
lated muck to dry out, which
is good. But it also reduces
the aquifer level, which in-
creases the opportunities
for sink holes to form,
Parker said.
Without a few tropical
storms or a period of steady
rain, we risk moving from
moderate drought to severe.
According to information
from Southwest Florida
Water Management District,
last year's rain level was
39.69 inches. Rainfall from
drought year 2007 was 44.92
and for the drought year
2000-01 it was 37.36 inches.
In comparison, in 2004
when four hurricanes hit
Florida, Citrus County re-


An aerial view of Hernando.
ceived 61.50 inches of rain.
So far rain for January
and February measured
3.88 inches, down from Jan-
uary and February 2011
total of 6.18 inches.
"Right now, the low water
levels in the lakes that resi-
dents are seeing are from a
lack of rainfall, evaporation
and no new water coming
into the system from the


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle


river," said Robyn Felix,
spokeswoman for the South-
west Florida Water Manage-
ment District
She said that when
there's available water in
the Withlacoochee River,
the water district will pull
some of the water and dis-
tribute it into the chain of
lakes, or it will pull water
from one lake into another,


such as the Inverness pool
into the Hernando pool.
"The river's so low right
now that we haven't re-
leased any water from the
Inverness pool in months,"
Felix said.
Pilny is particularly criti-
cal of the government agen-
cies that deal with water
issues.
"Everyone talks about
tourism, but nothing's done
to attract fishermen to this
part of the county," he said.
"There's no money; there's
no plan. The boat ramps are
in bad shape I'm dis-
gusted. My wife's in real es-
tate and selling waterfront
property is tough."
Pilny said the only thing
that can save the lakes is a
big tropical storm.
The most recent La Nifia
has dissipated, Felix said,
which means we're in neu-


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

tral conditions a 50-50
chance of increased or de-
creased rainfall.
Although no government
agency or frustrated citizen
can control the rainfall,
there are steps average citi-
zens can take to conserve
the water we do have. (See
fact box for suggestions.)
"April is Water Conserva-
tion Month -April is one of
the driest months of the
year and people tend to
start using more water in
April," Felix said. "But with
small actions from every-
one, that reaps big results.
The water in the aquifer di-
rectly affects the lakes and
rivers, and everything we do
above ground affects what
goes on below ground."
Chronicle reporter Nancy
Kennedy can be reached at
n kennedy@ chronicle
online, corn or 352-564-2927.


Send your resume in confidence to:

The Villages of Citrus Hills

Attn: nancy@citrushills.com

Fax: 352-746-7707


April 28, 2012


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Romney pivots to fall


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Associated Press
Republican presidential candidate former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney speaks with
supporters of Wisconsin Republican Gov. Scott Walker on Saturday at a phone bank
during a campaign stop in Fitchburg, Wis. The phone bank is used in support of Walker,
who is facing a recall election in June 2012.

Doubts linger in Republican right


Associated Press

FITCHBURG, Wis. -Ap-
pearing ever-more confi-
dent in Wisconsin's primary,
Republican presidential
candidate Mitt Romney fo-
cused entirely on Demo-
cratic President Barack
Obama during a campaign
trip through this upper Mid-
western battleground and
predicted a victory that
could effectively seal the
nomination for him Tuesday
"We're looking like we're
going to win this thing on
Tuesday," Romney told sup-
porters, suggesting he
could also claim wins in
Maryland and the District
of Columbia that day "If I
can get that boost also from
Wisconsin, I think we'll be
on a path that'll get me the
nomination well before the
convention."
At the same time, fading
rival Rick Santorum sought
to stoke doubts about Rom-
ney's conservative creden-
tials on the last weekend of
campaigning before the
critical showdown. It's San-
torum's last chance to prove
his strength in the indus-
trial heartland, where he's
said he can challenge
Obama but where Romney
has beaten him consistently
Still, Romney nodded to-
ward evangelical conserva-
tives Saturday,
acknowledging the doubts
in the former Massachu-
setts governor that linger
with these voters, and fore-
shadowing the balancing
act that will face him in the
months to come.
"President Obama be-
lieves in a government-cen-
tered society. He believes
government guiding our
lives will do a better job in
doing so than individuals,"
Romney told more than
1,000 Wisconsin conserva-
tives at a Faith and Free-
dom Coalition meeting in
the heart of GOP-heavy
Waukesha County. The
county, just west of Milwau-
kee, is home to the state's
largest evangelical mega-
churches.
Romney, tagged by oppo-


nents as rich and detached,
appealed to the spectrum
of households he will need
in the fall should he remain
on the likely course to the
GOP nomination. He men-
tioned a single mother he
met Friday in Appleton,
Wis., a landscaper from St
Louis and a Cambodian im-
migrant from Texas, all
while blaming Obama for
"the most tepid, weakest re-
covery we've seen since
Hoover"
Romney Saturday veered
slightly from the strict gen-
eral election message he's
offered since winning big in
the Illinois primary
"We were endowed by
our creator with our rights.
Not the king, not the state,
but our creator," Romney
told the packed hotel ball-
room who would later hear
Santorum. Romney prom-
ised to restore religious
freedom he and other Re-
publicans have accused
Obama of undermining,
and "to protect the sanctity
of life," an issue that has
haunted him since his con-
version to opposing abor-
tion rights as governor of
Massachusetts.
Romney received a
healthy if not thunderous
ovation from the group.
However, Santorum, who
has counted on like-
minded activists in winning
across the Bible Belt, did
not do much better in ap-
pearing before the group.
He described Romney's en-
actment of sweeping health
care legislation as governor
as disqualifying him from
challenging Obama.
"Don't listen to the pun-
dits ... They're telling you to
give up on your principles
in order to win," Santorum
said. "Stand up for what
you know is right for Amer-
ica. Stand up and vote your
conscience."
With about half of the
GOP nominating contests
complete, Romney has won
54 percent of the delegates
at stake, putting him on
track to reach the threshold
1,144 national convention
delegates in June.


Santorum has won 27
percent of the delegates at
stake. The former Pennsyl-
vania senator, who has de-
scribed Romney as too
moderate on key issues to
effectively confront Obama,
would need to win 74 per-
cent of the remaining dele-
gates. GOP rival Newt
Gingrich would need 85
percent.
Santorum has main-
tained a heavy schedule of
campaign events in Wiscon-
sin, imploring Republicans
in the state to keep his sput-
tering campaign alive.
"I ask you to shake this
race up. I ask you to let peo-
ple across this country
know that Wisconsin stands
... for the principles they
stand for," Santorum told a
local Republican fundrais-
ing event in Milwaukee.
Maryland and the Dis-
trict of Columbia also hold
primaries Tuesday Santo-
rum is not on the D.C. ballot
but could pick up delegates
in Wisconsin and Maryland,
although Romney is favored
in both states. A defeat for
Santorum in Wisconsin
would present him with a
difficult choice: drop out or
continue wounded into the
next round of primaries, an
April 24 five-state Eastern
gauntlet that favors Rom-
ney and includes Santo-
rum's home state of
Pennsylvania.
Still, cultural conserva-
tives have struggled to em-
brace Romney
On average, in states
where exit or entrance
polls have been conducted,
white evangelical conser-
vatives have made up about
half of the GOP primary
electorate.
Romney did not win in
any of the eight states
where they were a majority
of voters, and he carried
evangelicals themselves in
just five states.
Outside of those states,
Romney has won on aver-
age 28 percent of votes
among evangelicals, com-
pared with a 37 percent av-
erage support for
Santorum.


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Associated Press
President Barack Obama, center, greets supporters Friday before speaking at a fundraiser
at Southern Maine Community College in Portland, Maine. Obama was traveling to both
Maine and Vermont on campaign fundraisers.



Obama postpones many


issues until elections


Associated Press

WASHINGTON Missile
defense isn't the only area
in which President Barack
Obama will have "more
flexibility" if he's re-elected.
Immigration, the Canada-to-
Texas oil pipeline, gay mar-
riage, tax policy and other
issues could invite bold ini-
tiatives by a president who
knows he will never run for
office again, especially if his
party gains ground in con-
gressional elections.
For now, however, Obama
is postponing action on sev-
eral difficult issues, know-
ing that Republicans are
determined to deny him po-
litical victories a few
months before their chance
to oust him. He's hardly the
first to adopt that strategy
Obama expressed a fun-
damental truth when he
quietly told Russia's presi-
dent that he will have "more
flexibility" to deal with the
touchy issue of missile de-
fense after the Nov 6 elec-
tion if Obama wins, that
is. The statement might
have raised few eyebrows
had Obama made it noncha-
lantly to a U.S. audience. In-
stead, it kicked up a fuss


because Obama thought the
microphones were off when
he spoke with Dmitry
Medvedev in South Korea,
and because Obama seemed
to take his re-election for
granted.
Presidents traditionally
ease their foot from the gas
pedal in their fourth year,
when re-election politics
overshadow almost
everything.
President Bill Clinton, a
Democrat, played small-ball
in 1996, proposing school
uniforms and midnight bas-
ketball programs after pre-
viously tackling much
tougher issues such as wel-
fare cuts and targeted tax
increases (successfully) and
a major health care over-
haul (unsuccessfully).
President George W
Bush, a Republican, talked
vaguely of overhauling So-
cial Security during his 2004
re-election campaign, and
then found the public wasn't
ready for major changes
after he won. Had he em-
phasized the proposed revi-
sions during his campaign,
Democrats' cries of"privati-
zation" might have tipped
the close election to Massa-
chusetts Sen. John Kerry


"No president of either
party has any flexibility what-
soever during a re-election
year," said Dan Schnur, a for-
mer GOP presidential aide
who teaches political sci-
ence at the University of
Southern California.
"Your honeymoon is long
gone," he said. "Everything
you do will be judged
strictly in a political context.
And anything you do that's
remotely unpopular could
cost you the election."
Obama has been blunt
about election-year con-
straints. At a March 6 news
conference, he acknowl-
edged Hispanic supporters'
anger over his failure to
achieve immigration
changes, including paths to
legal status for some illegal
immigrants.
"When I came into office,
I said, 'I am going to push to
get this done,"' Obama said.
"We didn't get it done. And
the reason we haven't gotten
it done is because what used
to be a bipartisan agree-
ment that we should fix this
ended up becoming a parti-
san issue."
Obama said a presiden-
tial election can change the
policy landscape.


Celebrate Life
"'\ll I l I li II tI le \\ el l .lll C .ILnei'1, ['e. Rel I.I' F[i L ite'. I llll kin,''.
b.. I.l eI e, 1",. \ I I. t I h llIt ', .1. I .I ll e. i .i .l. ll nl l '. Il 1, 1 uI' IIL tIII -
,, 11lll 11cel llt t e llllll .ltc' [lil- t ll -' J .l-'e "
Katherine from Colorado
Cancer Survivor

M o le l l.lll t',' n ll lll pi'e p ', le I l I e ll.l ..X l,,-' tJl ','. It ll e.ll 'l ill '. '.ll..11 111lll li 'ee' I t I I
Wl' '%. i l le.l I TI l he llm.i C ll c. '1 C m1 i ', Rel.l, iF 'l LieI' i.1.i l111l11ulll t'%
.' lli 'l 111 1' le e' e'l Ill, 111' I i 1ll II II ile fl._ li .1'[.1111 i.Ill i 'l 'I 'e III' I c' .ill i .Il n e'l
,t l I1' II l I I I L- t 111111 tl l'l t lle le l.I'le i te li Iil 'lltl .i i 1 11,tl ', .ll itl R el.l' F i l L l e .
Pl.l-e ..ill ,..I.l'., ." -'*,:,"-; .-."
-----------------------------------------------------------------
I will D Crystal River April 13 4
attend: Crystal River High School v
Check all www.relayforlife.org/crystalriverfl RELAY
Relays that Inverness April 20 FOR LIFE
you ,sh 1to Citrus High School
attencl www.relayforlife.org/invernessfl
Lecanto May 4
CIClinghiI.E Lecanto High School
www.relayforlife.org/lecantofl

In honor of *,Our h llle ,.,1inSil ":nLer, we in.le ,0u and *,Our ire 1 .ier 10 jOin uS, Inll
I Celeibra.iOn of ,our c:ncer S-ur.i ...orShi l lkin] Ihe firS, l.p of Rel ., For Life.
Before ',0ur incir,.0r, L.P' Ihere will be I a. cOn lnlenlr., rece|liOn for .ll -Sur.i..or
.nd c.re i ..er, n .allend.nce. Ie.'nnnq 1 _. I. if.nI. VY ur -lrenlh .nd cour.ae
..re d ier-on..il le-slimnon,, of the ,ro,.re-,-, we .re m..kinjq in our fi,'hl .q.adin-, c..ncer.
i One |:,erSon. hd..nd in hd.nd Wilh .another. C.n m1. ke _.1 dfferenc"e.


Name T-Shirt size (Circle onei
Address
City Sale Zip___ Youth S M L
Ph-ione (Hi (W


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Signature
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Adult: S M L XL


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For more information call 637-5577
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Refreshments and snacks will be served.
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SUNDAY, APRIL 1, 2012 A9


F I..v..IU iI II ir vv I -


11 ,


MAYN9


i





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY SCHOOLS
Elementary schools
Breakfast
Monday: MVP breakfast,
grits, cereal and toast, milk,
juice.
Tuesday: Sausage and egg
biscuit, tater tots, cereal and
toast, milk, juice.
Wednesday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, grits, cereal and
toast, milk, juice.
Thursday: Ultimate break-
fast round, cheese grits, tater
tots, cereal and toast, milk,
juice.
Friday: Student holiday.
Lunch
Monday: Crispy Mexican
tacos, mozzarella MaxStix, PB
dippers, garden salad, sweet
peas, Spanish rice, juice bar,
milk, juice.
Tuesday: Stuffed-crust
pizza, chicken alfredo with Rip-
Stick, turkey super salad, yo-
gurt parfait, fresh baby carrots,
steamed green beans, mixed
fruit, crackers, milk, juice.
Wednesday: Oven-baked
breaded chicken, turkey wrap,
PB dippers, garden salad,
sweet corn, sweet potato souf-
fle, chilled applesauce, milk,
juice.
Thursday: Macaroni and
cheese, breaded chicken sand-
wich, ham super salad, yogurt
parfait, fresh baby carrots,
steamed broccoli, apple crisp,
peaches, crackers, milk, juice.
Friday: Student holiday.
Middle schools
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast sausage
pizza, MVP breakfast, grits, ce-
real and toast, milk, juice.
Tuesday: Sausage, egg and
cheese biscuit, ultra cinnamon
bun, tater tots, cereal and toast,
milk, juice.
Wednesday: Breakfast egg
and cheese wrap, MVP break-
fast, tater tots, cereal and toast,
milk, juice.
Thursday: Breakfast sand-
wich stuffer, ultimate breakfast
round, grits, cereal and toast,
milk, juice.
Friday: Student holiday.
Lunch
Monday: Sausage pizza,
breaded chicken sandwich, yo-
gurt parfait, fresh baby carrots,
Normandy-blend vegetables,
Italian pasta salad, strawberry
cup, milk, juice.
Tuesday: Crispy Mexican
tacos, fajita chicken and rice,
ham super salad, PB dippers,
garden salad, glazed carrots,
Mexicali corn, Spanish rice, ap-
plesauce, crackers, milk, juice.
Wednesday: Hamburger on
a bun, baked chicken nuggets,
yogurt parfait, fresh baby car-
rots, green beans, colossal
crsip french fries, chilled
peaches, milk, juice.
Thursday: Oriental orange
chicken, mozzarella MaxStix
chef's super salad, PB dippers,
garden salad, sweet corn,
warm apple slices, Jell-O,
crackers, milk, juice.
Friday: Student holiday.
High schools
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast sausage
pizza, MVP breakfast, grits, ce-
real and toast, milk, juice.
Tuesday: Sausage, egg and
cheese biscuit, ultra cinnamon
bun, tater tots, cereal and toast,
milk, juice.
Wednesday: Breakfast egg
and cheese wrap, MVP break-


fast, tater tots, cereal and toast,
milk, juice.
Thursday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, ultimate break-
fast round, grits, peach cup, ce-
real and toast, milk, juice.
Friday: Student holiday.
Lunch
Monday: Fajita chicken and
rice, hamburger, pizza, fajita
chicken super salad, yogurt
parfait, fresh baby carrots, broc-
coli, fruit juice bar, french fries,
crackers, milk.
Tuesday: Pasta with moz-
zarella and meat sauce,
chicken sandwich, pizza, ham
super salad, yogurt parfait, gar-
den salad, sweet corn, peas
and carrots, french fries,
peaches, crackers, milk.
Wednesday: Baked chicken
tenders, pizza, hamburger,
turkey wrap, turkey super
salad, PB dippers, baby car-
rots, peas, pineapple, mashed
potatoes, baked beans, french
fries, crackers, milk.
Thursday: Cheesy chicken
and rice burrito, chicken sand-
wich, pizza, ham super salad,
yogurt parfait, garden salad,
green beans, sweet corn,
french fries, mixed fruit, milk.
Friday: Student holiday.
Lecanto High School lunch
Monday: Chicken tenders,
macaroni and cheese, ham-
burger, chicken sandwich, fajita
chicken super salad, pizza, yo-
gurt parfait, baby carrots, baked
beans, peas, baked chips, fruit
juice bar, french fries, crackers,
milk.
Tuesday: Fajita chicken and
rice, pizza, turkey and gravy
over noodles, hamburger,
chicken sandwich, turkey salad,
yogurt parfait, garden salad,
sweet corn, green beans,
peaches, french fries, baked
chips, milk.
Wednesday: Turkey wrap,
chicken alfredo, hamburger,
chicken sandwich, pizza, ham
super salad, yogurt parfait,
baby carrots, french fries, ranch
pasta salad, broccoli, pineap-
ple, baked chips, crackers,
milk.
Thursday: Breaded chicken,
macaroni and cheese, ham-
burger, chicken sandwich,
pizza, turkey super salad, yo-
gurt parfait, garden salad,
french fries, corn, seasoned
mashed potatoes, mixed fruit,
baked chips, crackers, milk.
Friday: Student holiday.
SENIOR DINING
Monday: Beef with Rotini
pasta, parslied carrots, Italian
vegetable medley, applesauce,
slice white bread with mar-
garine, low-fat milk.
Tuesday: Barbecued
chicken thigh, mashed pota-
toes, green beans, graham
crackers, slice whole-grain
bread with margarine, low-fat
milk.
Wednesday: Pork chop
patty with brown gravy, black-
eyed peas, country vegetable
medley, mixed fruit, dinner roll
with margarine, low-fat milk.
Thursday: Sites closed for
Volunteer Appreciation Picnic.
Friday: Sites closed for
Good Friday.
Senior dining sites include:
Lecanto, East Citrus, Crystal
River, Homosassa Springs, In-
verness and South Dunnellon.
For information, call Support
Services at 352-527-5975.


WATERING FINES
* Effective Jan. 1, Citrus County has stopped issuing
warnings for first offenders of local watering rules.
* The county is issuing citations that carry with them a
fine of $100.



Win a 2012 Ram Truck!
Hemi Quad 1500 ST w/Express Package
I N N 1 ,


Only
2,000 Tickets will be sold for
a contribution of $50 each
Additional Prize: 1,000 gallons of gas will be awarded to
winner if drawing ticket is registered at any Crystal Chrysler,
Dodge, Jeep, Ram dealership on or before March 17,2012
All proceeds to benefit the Capital Campaign of Feed
Citrus County Food Bank and the We Care Food Pantry.
Visit wecarefoodpantry.org for more information.
Tickets available at We Care Food Pantry, Regions Bank,
Capital City Bank and all Crystal Motor Car dealership
offices. Also available by phone call 352-628-0445.
For credit card purchases call Jan at 352-613-6006.


d ated -

V-1-140 ,R-


hho
EIullng huger, niourtshlng hope


Ask your doctor if this column is right for you


There's a new ad on TV for an She thinks there are millions of other
acne medicine that shows one teens in high schools all across the
of the most stunning young country who look just like the woman
women I've ever seen complaining in the commercial because their par-
about her acne. ents aren't holding them
Let me be absolutely, per- back the way you are
fectly clear about this. She holding her back.
does not have acne. She's The girl in the commer-
never had acne. She is flaw- cial is beautiful and acne-
less, spotless, unblemished. free because (pick one or
She has no bumps, no pits, more of the following rea-
no scars just acres of sons):
china-doll skin. It's obvious 0 Her parents let her
that what she knows about date, and not just date.
acne could fit in a thimble They let her date anybody
with room left over for a fin- JIM she wants, no matter how
ger The only thing compa- MULLEN undesirable.
rable to watching her talk Her parents bought
about the horrors of acne her a brand-new (name of
would be watching Fabio complain expensive car here).
about hair loss. 0 Her parents make much more
She is also, I'm guessing, about 22. money than you do because they love
Her hair and makeup are perfect. It her enough to work two jobs, if that's
probably took 10 professional hair what it takes.
and makeup artists 18 hours to make 0 She lives in (name of fancy town
it look like she is wearing no makeup or neighborhood) instead of the
at all and like her hair is falling natu- sticks.
rally the way it does when she gets The disconnect between the model
out of bed in the morning, highlights and the product being sold is so great
and back-lighting included. In short, that I have to ask myself, what is the
she is exactly what your 14-year-old commercial really selling?
wishes she looked like, down to the Using someone without acne to sell
pouty, slightly bee-stung lips. acne medicine seems a little odd, like
The trouble is, except for the pout, using a cowboy to sell fish sticks or
your 14-year-old will never look like talking frogs to sell beer.
the woman in this ad, unless she is a Oh, wait, they really did that. Be-
pop star or the girlfriend of a Russian cause if anyone knows anything about
mobster. It is not possible for there to beer, it's frogs.
be two women who look like this on Still, you'd think if you wanted to
one little planet, sell the cure for acne, maybe a doctor
But your teen does not know that. would be able to make a better pitch


If you have to tell your
doctor about the best
medicine for your
disease, why are you
still going to him or her?

for it than a supermodel. Why not a
medical professional who would say
something like, "I am a dermatologist,
and here's what I recommend. And by
the way, unlike a model, I know what
I'm talking about." But an ad like that
wouldn't make teens depressed and
unhappy and vulnerable to a good
sales pitch.
Why am I nattering on about this?
Because there is something about
hawking remedies and medicines on
TV that has become disturbingly un-
seemly
Every time I see an ad for a pre-
scription medicine that ends with the
line, "Ask your doctor if such-and-
such is right for you," I wonder, how
stupid do they think your doctor is? If
you have to tell your doctor about the
best medicine for your disease, why
are you still going to him or her?
If watching commercials on the
nightly news is how he's keeping up
with the latest medical advances, I
have some news for you: You're gonna
die.


Contact author Jim Mullen at
jimmullenbooks. com.


Help available to complete tax forms


Special to the Chronicle

AARP Tax-Aide will pro-
vide free income tax form
preparation and electronic
filing services in Citrus
County again this year.
AARP Tax-Aide is a na-
tionwide service of the
AARP Foundation offered
in conjunction with the U.S.
Internal Revenue Service.
It is a volunteer-run pro-
gram whose mission is to
provide high-quality free
income tax assistance to
low- and middle-income
taxpayers with special at-
tention to those 60 and
older It is not necessary to
be a member of AARP; tax-
payers of all ages are wel-
come to use this service.
Volunteers are trained lo-
cally and certified by the
IRS to assist taxpayers in


preparing their federal in-
come tax returns. All taxes
are prepared using
IRS/AARP-provided com-
puters and software and the
returns are filed electroni-
cally free of charge. In Citrus
County, more than 110 vol-
unteers provide this service
at seven sites, open through
April 14. The final day for fil-
ing is April 17 this year
Where to go
All sites are by appoint-
ment only; you must go to
the library in person to
make an appointment; calls
not accepted.
Central Ridge Library:
425 W Roosevelt Blvd., Bev-
erly Hills, 352-746-6622;
from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. every
Friday through April 13 (ex-
cept Good Friday, April 6).
Saturday only on March 17


from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Ap-
pointments must be made
in person.
Citrus Springs Commu-
nity Center: 1570 W Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus
Springs, 352-465-7007; from
9 a.m. to 1 p.m. every Tues-
day through April 10. No
appointment necessary;
first-come, first-served
basis only
Coastal Region Li-
brary: 8619 W. Crystal St.,
Crystal River, 352-795-3716;
from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. every
Thursday through April 12.
Appointments must be
made in person.
Crystal River Moose
Lodge: 1855 S. Suncoast
Blvd., Homosassa, 352-795-
2795; from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
every Monday and Tuesday
through April 16. No ap-
pointment necessary; first-


come, first-served basis only
Floral City Public Li-
brary: 8360 E. Orange Ave.,
Floral City, 352-726-3671;
from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. every
Tuesday through April 10.
Saturday only on April 7, 10
a.m. to 2 p.m. Appointments
must be made in person.
Homosassa Public Li-
brary: 4100 Grandmarch
Ave., Homosassa, 352-628-
5626; from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
every Wednesday through
April 11. Saturday only on
April 14, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Appointments must be
made in person.
Lakes Region Library:
1511 Druid Road, Inver-
ness, 352-726-2357; from 10
a.m. to 5 p.m. every Wednes-
day through April 11. Satur-
day only on April 14, 10 a.m.
to 3 p.m. Appointments
must be made in person.


SCORE Thanks You!

I, For your sponsorship and

participation in our

-i14th Golf Classic


Thank you sponsors

Advanced Aluminum
Advanced Urology Specialists
Bob & Dottie Radcliffe
Boulerice Roofing & Supply Inc
Brice Insurance Agency
Bright House
Business Risk Solutions
Campaign of Sam Himmel
Cattle Dog Coffee Roasters
CC EDC
CC Sheriffs Office
Citrus County Lifestyles
Citrus Pet Resort
College of Central Florida
Crowley & Company
Crystal Motor Car Co.
Dave Williams
Dr. Frederick J. Herzog PhD., LLc
Eco Floridian
Edward J. Serra, CPA
Emily's/West Coast Realty
ERA Key 1 Realty
Evan & Rose Coe
Eveready Fire & Security Equip. Inc.
Frick's Painting
Jack Kenny
Gleason. Kagel. Lahey & Petersen
Harley Davidson of Crystal River
Homosassa Eye Clinic
Homosasa Open MRI
Jim's Quality Paint & Body
Law Offices of Robert Christensen
Nail Art
Neapolitan Ice Cream Shoppe
New Horizons Village


Nick Nicholas Ford
Norm and Anne Mangano
Pack N Post at Homosassa
Practical Business Concepts
Ralph & Del Russo
Remax Realty One
Rock Monsters Inc
Rock Solid Creations
Steve Centola Insurance Agency
The Election of Sheriff Jeff Dawsey
The Hagar Group
Tiffany Wigs
USA Credit Bureau
West Coast Insurers
Whiting Agency North Inc.
Windmill Self Storage
Yanni's Restaurant

Hole-In-One Sponsor

Eagle Buick

Special Recognition

Citrus County Chronicle
Citrus Chiropractic Group
Homosassa Wildlife Park
Outback Steakhouse
Scott Plumbing
WYKE TV

Special Donations

Black Diamond Golf Club
Chandler Hills Golf Club
Citrus Hills Golf Club
Country Club of Ocala
Golden Ocala Country Club
Haile Plantation Golf Club
Hernando Oaks Golf Club
Inverness Country Club
Juliette Falls Country Club
Plantation Inn Golf Club
Rainbow Springs Golf Club
Royal Oaks Golf Club
Seven Rivers Golf Club
Sugarmill Woods Country Club
Southern Hills Golf Club
Southern Woods Golf Club
University of Florida Golf Club
World Woods Golf Club


Special

Acknowledgments



This is the 14th Annual
SCORE Golf Classic.


We would like to give a
special thanks to the
Citrus County Chronicle,
and thanks also to golf pro
Herb Hurley and the
,giiiiml Woods Country
Clubfor all their donated

time and efforts to make
this year's tournament a
success. We would also like
to thank all the -oih,b,, iv
who assisted with g, d j;g
this event. Without their
tireless efforts this event
would not exist.


A very big thankyou to

sponsors, gift donors

and golfers!


S C I T R U S C 0 U N T Y er


'. www.chronicleonfine.com


April to 6MENUS


A10 SUNDAY, APRIL 1, 2012


LOCAL





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


'Unsurvivable!'


Associated Press
A man carries a young girl who was rescued May 22, 2011, after a tornado hit Joplin, Mo.
The National Weather Service is kicking off an experiment starting Monday with a new kind
of tornado warning that's aimed to scare people into seeking shelter.

New tornado warnings aim to scare public


Associated Press
KANSAS CITY, Mo. -
Even expert storm-chasers
would have struggled to de-
cipher the difference be-
tween the tornado warnings
sent last May before severe
weather hit Joplin and, a few
days later, headed again to-
ward downtown Kansas City
The first tornado was a
massive EF-5 twister that
killed 161 people as it wiped
out a huge chunk of the south-
west Missouri community.
The second storm caused
only minor damage when two
weak tornadoes struck in the
Kansas City suburbs.
In both cases, the warnings
were harbingers of touch-
downs. But three out of every
four times the National
Weather Service issues a for-
mal tornado warning, there
isn't one. The result is a "cry
wolf" phenomenon that's
dulled the effectiveness of
tornado warnings, and one
the weather service hopes to
solve with what amounts to a
scare tactic.
In a test that starts Mon-
day, five weather service of-
fices in Kansas and Missouri
will use words such as "mass
devastation," "unsurvivable"
and "catastrophic" in a new
kind of warning that's based
on the severity of a storm's
expected impact. The goal is
to more effectively commu-
nicate the dangers of an ap-
proaching storm so people
understand the risks they're
about to face.
"We'd like to think that as
soon as we say there is a tor-
nado warning, everyone
would run to the basement,"
said Ken Harding, a weather
service official in Kansas
City "That's not how it is.
They will channel flip, look
out the window or call
neighbors. A lot of times
people don't react until they
see it. "The system being
tested will create two tiers of
warnings for thunderstorms


and three tiers for torna-
does, each based on severity
A research team in North
Carolina will analyze the re-
sults of the experiment,
which runs through late fall,
and help the weather serv-
ice decide whether to ex-
pand the new warnings to
other parts of the country
Laura Myer, a social sci-
ence research professor at
Mississippi State University,
said people she has inter-
viewed want more advance
warning about a potential
tornado strike and more in-
formation on the specific lo-
cations where the storms
are expected to hit.
"We have found in Missis-
sippi and Alabama and vari-
ous other Southern states
that people feel they would
constantly be going to a shel-
ter if they heeded every tor-
nado warning," she said. "For
people in mobile homes,
that's the craziest thing.
"To get to a shelter, they
have to leave home," she
said. "They feel like if they
left during every watch or
warning, they would be on
the road all the time."
The primary audiences for
weather service's written
bulletins are broadcasters
who issue warnings on the air


and emergency management
agencies that activate sirens
and respond to the storm's af-
termath. In the event of a
Joplin-like tornado, the new-
look warning would have an
urgency hard to ignore.
Andy Bailey, a meteorolo-
gist with the National
Weather Service office in
Pleasant Hill, Mo., said it
might look something like
this: "THIS IS AN EX-
TREMELY DANGEROUS
TORNADO WITH COM-
PLETE DEVASTATION
LIKELY ... SEEK SHEL-
TER NOW! ... MOBILE
HOMES AND OUTBUILD-
INGS WILL OFFER NO
SHELTER FROM THIS
TORNADO ABANDON
THEM IMMEDIATELY."
Had such a warning come
across his television set on
May 22, Joplin resident Jeff
Lehr said he might have
sought shelter. Instead, it
wasn't until a siren dis-
tracted him from a sporting
event he was watching on
TV that he looked out a win-
dow and saw what appeared
to be dark thunderstorm
clouds.
Even then, he didn't take
cover until the windows
began imploding in his
apartment.


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Associated Press
This undated photo provided by Ralph White shows the bow of the Titanic at rest on the
bottom of the North Atlantic, about 400 miles southeast of Newfoundland. April 15, 2012,
is the 100th anniversary of the sinking of the Titanic, just five days after it left Southamp-
ton on its maiden voyage to New York.


Titanic still fascinates


Associated Press
Epic disasters the an-
guished cries, the stories of
heroism are the central
narratives of our age, both
enthralling and horrifying.
And our obsession began a
century ago, unfolding in
just 160 terrifying minutes,
on a supposedly unsinkable
ship, as more than 1,500
souls slipped into the icy
waters of the North Atlantic.
And the band played on.
It was the Titanic. And
ever since, we've been
hooked on disasters, in gen-
eral but the tale of the
great luxury liner, in partic-
ular And the approaching
100th anniversary of the
sinking has merely magni-
fied the Titanic's fascination.
There were catastrophes
before that fateful Sunday
night in April 1912, but noth-
ing quite captivated the
newly wireless-connected
globe's attention. It was more
than news. It was a macabre
form of entertainment
Bigger, deadlier disasters
followed, but they all bor-
rowed from the storylines -
morality plays, really es-
tablished by the Titanic's
sinking: The high-profile in-


vestigations ... wall-to-wall
news coverage ... issues of
blame, technological hubris,
ignored warnings and eco-
nomic fairness all were
themes that played out in
the BP oil spill, the space
shuttle disasters, Hurricane
Katrina, the Exxon Valdez
and the recent grounding of
the Costa Concordia.
"The story is ageless, like
all great stories," said
James Delgado, director of
maritime heritage at the
National Oceanic and At-
mospheric Administration.
"The elements in this case
of triumph, tragedy, and
hubris, of bravery and cow-
ardice, all wrapped up in
one brief moment. That
speaks to people."
And to this day, The Ti-
tanic is big business in
movies, books, songs, po-
etry, and museum exhibits
hundreds of miles from the
nearest ocean. Dozens of
tourists have paid tens of
thousands of dollars to dive
in Russian submersibles to
visit the ship's watery grave
and see in the ocean floor
"where the Titanic dug in
and the ship created this
knife-like sharp edge," Del-
gado said.


For decades that burial
spot was unknown, but the
discovery of the Titanic in
1985 brought Titanic back
to the world's attention.
Then a dozen years later,
another man raised the Ti-
tanic to an even greater
fame with a multi-Academy
Award winning movie and
follow-up documentaries.
This was, he said, a parable
that the storyteller in him
could not ignore.
"It's this great sort of
metaphorical novel that ac-
tually happened," said "Ti-
tanic" director James
Cameron. "You can go and
visit the wreck and go and
see this monument to
human folly"
The 882-foot long Titanic
steamed from Queenstown,
Ireland, on Apr. 11 toward
New York, carrying more
than 2,200 passengers and
crew, more than 130,000
pounds of meat and fish,
1,750 pounds of ice cream,
400 asparagus tongs and
only 20 of the 32 lifeboats
designed to be on board.
The ship ignored more than
30 different ice warnings. At
11:40 p.m. on April 14, The
Titanic hit an iceberg and
stalled. At 2:20 a.m., it sank.


P NYou Could Win k
You Could Win


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WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


NanBRIEFSClock ticking for diplomacy with Iran

Gratitude


Clinton says at conference policy


is prevention, not containment'


Associated Press
A large boulder with
"Thank You Firefighters!"
sits at the entrance to
Conifer High School where
firefighters set up their
command center Saturday
in Conifer, Colo. As many
as 500 firefighters are bat-
tling the Lower North Fork
Wildfire near Conifer that
killed two people after it
started Monday afternoon.
Access to the burn area
was restricted Saturday be-
cause of expected high
winds.

Supreme Court's
skeptical stance
WASHINGTON -The
Supreme Court left little doubt
during last week's marathon
arguments over President
Barack Obama's health care
overhaul that it has scant faith
in Congress' ability to get
anything done.
The views about Congress
underlay questions from jus-
tices who appear to be on
both sides of the argument
over the constitutionality of
the law's key provision, the in-
dividual insurance require-
ment, as well as whether the
entire law should be thrown
out if the mandate is struck
down. The comments were
particularly striking from the
conservative justices who
have called on unelected
judges to show deference to
the actions of elected officials.
Justice Antonin Scalia, who
appeared strongly in favor of
striking down the entire law,
was the most outspoken in
his disdain for the branch of
government that several jus-
tices can see from their office
windows.
"You can't repeal the rest of
the act because you're not
going to get 60 votes in the
Senate to repeal the rest. It's
not a matter of enacting a
new act. You've got to get 60
votes to repeal it. So the rest
of the act is going to be the
law," Scalia said, explaining it
might be better to throw the
whole thing out.

World BRIEF

Lights out


Associated Press
A child lights a candle
during a ceremony Satur-
day to mark Earth Hour at
Palace Square in St. Pe-
tersburg, Russia.
Event highlights
climate change
LONDON Hundreds of
world landmarks went dark
Saturday, part of a global ef-
fort to highlight climate
change.
Earth Hour, held on the last
Saturday of March every
year, began as a Sydney-only
event in 2007. The city's
iconic Harbor Bridge and
Opera House were dimmed
again this year. Australia is
among the first countries to
flick off the light switches
each year; in New Zealand,
Sky Tower in Auckland and
the parliament buildings in
Wellington switched off two
hours earlier; Tokyo Tower
was also dimmed and in
Hong Kong, buildings along
Victoria Harbour also went
dark. All the events took
place at 8:30 p.m. local time.
-From wire reports


about whether Iran has any
intention of negotiating a so-
lution that satisfies the U.S.,
Israel and other countries
that believe Iran is trying to
develop nuclear weapons.
Tehran contends the pro-
gram is solely for peaceful
energy and research pur-
poses.
"We're going in with one
intention: to resolve the in-
ternational community's
concerns about Iran's nu-
clear program," Clinton told
reporters after attending a
security conference in
Saudi Arabia.
"Our policy is one of pre-
vention, not containment.
We are determined to pre-
vent Iran from obtaining a
nuclear weapon," America's


top diplomat said.
"We enter into these talks
with a sober perspective
about Iran's intentions. It is
incumbent upon Iran to
demonstrate by its actions
that it is a willing partner
and to participate in these
negotiations with an effort
to obtain concrete results."
Her remarks followed
President Barack Obama's
announcement Friday that
the U.S. was moving ahead
with penalties aimed at de-
priving Iran of oil revenue,
while also working with
Saudi Arabia and other Per-
sian Gulf states to ensure
ample global petroleum
supplies.
Clinton prodded Gulf gov-
ernments to develop a coor-


Associated Press
RIYADH, Saudi Arabia -
U.S. Secretary of State
Hillary Rodham Clinton
made it clear Saturday that
time is running out for
diplomacy over Iran's nu-
clear program and said talks
aimed at preventing Tehran
from acquiring a nuclear
weapon would resume in
mid-April.
With speculation over a
possible U.S. or Israel mili-
tary attack adding urgency
to the next round of discus-
sions in Istanbul set for
April 13, Clinton said Iran's
"window of opportunity" for
a peaceful resolution "will
not remain open forever"
She also expressed doubt


North Korea prepares Pyongyang to welcome new leader,


Associated Press
PYONGYANG, North Korea -
The sprawling site, which buzzes
in the shadow of a giant bronze
statue of North Korea founder
Kim II Sung, looks at first like
a high-security military
installation.
Scores of soldiers march
through a zone sealed off by green
mesh fencing and checkpoints. A
crew of about 1,000 soldiers and
2,000 police officers works around
the clock, along with thousands
more civilians in street clothes and
hard hats, spurred on by billboards
that rate their performance.
But they are not building tanks
here at the foot of Mansu Hill, or
weapons, except perhaps for a
propaganda war They are building
3,000 new apartments, a depart-
ment store, schools and a theater,
in the hope of selling a modern
version of Pyongyang to the people


of North Korea albeit one that
most will never get to see.
North Korea has long been
known for its military-first policy,
which in effect translated into a
military-only policy with little
room left for investment any-
where else. But now, without
abandoning its focus on what it
calls defense and the world calls
defiance, it also appears to be
trying to revive a dying economy
and rebuild on the home front.
The stated aim of the recon-
struction sweeping Pyongyang is
to put North Korea on the path of
being a "strong and prosperous
nation" in time for the 100th an-
niversary of the birth of founder
and president Kim II Sung on
April 15. But the campaign also
serves another political purpose:
It sets up Kim Jong Un as the new
leader of a great people, just as a
construction frenzy heralded his
father's ascension before him.


"They had hoped, and will sell
it to their people, that they've
achieved something by the time
this anniversary comes around,"
said Hazel Smith, a professor of
humanitarianism and security at
Britain's Cranfield University
who lived in North Korea for a
few years. "This is to show their
own people they are not poor and
underdeveloped.... Construction
is the cheapest thing you can do
and show visible results if you're
an economy that hasn't got much
money."
Thirty years ago, when Kim II
Sung was grooming his son Kim
Jong II to succeed him, he
launched an urban makeover of
Pyongyang, the capital city. The
iconic landmarks built during
that succession campaign in-
cluded the Mansudae Assembly
Hall, the May Day Stadium where
the Arirang Mass Games are held,
and the ornate Grand People's


Humor holds perils for politicians


Associated Press


WASHINGTON Mitt
Romney hit an off note this
week when he told a "hu-
morous" story about his dad
shutting down a factory
Robert De Niro managed to
get both Newt Gingrich and
the Obama campaign riled
up when he joked at an
Obama fundraiser that
America isn't ready for a
white first lady Texas Gov.
Rick Perry, still nursing
wounds from his failed
presidential campaign, did
himself a world of good with
his self-deprecating jokes at


a recent Washington dinner
Done right, humor can be
a huge asset for a politician.
But it is easily fumbled in
the overheated environ-
ment of a political
campaign. That may be why
Romney's aides dispatched
him to the "The Tonight
Show" this week with these
instructions: "Don't try and
be funny"
The Republican presiden-
tial front-runner largely
complied, and that worked
out just fine for him. But he
apparently forgot his advis-
ers' advice the very next day
when he attempted to be


funny on a conference call
with people in next-to-vote
Wisconsin.
Romney recounted what
he called a "humorous" story
about the time his auto exec-
utive father shut down a fac-
tory in Michigan and moved
it to Wisconsin. Later, when
his dad was in a parade
while running for Michigan
governor, the marching band
kept playing the University
of Wisconsin fight song.
Democrats pounced on it
as fresh evidence that Rom-
ney is out of touch with the
economic concerns of ordi-
nary voters.


dinated defense strategy
against Iranian missiles.
With tensions rising in the
region, she said American
and Gulf militaries should
cooperate to improve mar-
itime security as well.
Underscoring the limits of
U.S.-Gulf cooperation, how-
ever, U.S. officials con-
firmed Saturday that the
United Arab Emirates had
shut down an American-
funded democracy group,
following similar Emirates
action against a German or-
ganization this past week.
Discussions also covered
ways to pressure Syrian
President Bashar Assad to
end a year of bloodshed from
the uprising against his rule,
but the focus was on Iran.


Associated Press
Secretary of State Hillary
Rodham Clinton speaks dur-
ing a press conference Sat-
urday with Saudi Foreign
Minister Prince Saudi al-
Faisal, not pictured, after her
meeting with the foreign min-
isters of the Gulf Cooperation
Council "GCC" in Riyadh,
Saudi Arabia.


celebrate founder

Study House overlooking the vast
plaza where the nation's biggest
parades and rallies are staged.
But upon taking power after
his father's death in 1994, Kim
Jong II focused resources on the
nation's defense, beefing up the
army and pumping money into
nuclear weapons and ballistic
missile programs. Projects like
the 105-story Ryugyong Hotel, a
pyramid-shaped behemoth once
envisioned as the world's tallest
building, stalled as funds for con-
struction dried up.
In turn, the succession of his son
Kim Jong Un has again brought a
wave of construction, but this time
the blueprints call for new homes,
shopping centers, restaurants and
playgrounds.
They fit into a distinct policy
shift designed to suggest that the
younger Kim's leadership will im-
prove the economy and the qual-
ity of life.


3 tickets win $640M


Associated Press
RED BUD, Ill. --Three
lottery tickets sold in Illi-
nois, Kansas and Mary-
land hit the world
record-breaking $640 mil-
lion Mega Millions jack-
pot, lottery officials said
Saturday, dashing the get-
rich-quick dreams of mil-
lions of players across the
country Illinois' winner
used a quick pick to select
the winning numbers at a
convenience store in the
small town of Red Bud,
near St. Louis, Illinois
Lottery spokesman Mike


Lang said. The winning
numbers also sold at a 7-
Eleven in Milford Mill,
Md., north of Baltimore.
Each winning ticket was
expected to be worth more
than $213 million before
taxes. The winners, for
now, remain unidentified.
"It's just unbelievable.
Everyone is wanting to
know who it is," said
Denise Metzger, manager
of the Motomart where
Illinois' winning ticket
was sold. "All day yester-
day I was selling tickets
and I was hoping someone
from Red Bud would win."


Building national pride


Associated Press
North Korean construction workers guide a large bucket of cement Oct. 11, 2011, to the roof of a building in the Mansudae area of Pyongyang,
North Korea. Throughout the capital, and in cities and towns across the country, construction workers are trying to finish building renovations
and major projects as the whole country prepares for celebrations on April 15 to mark the 100th anniversary of the birth of North Korean
founder Kim II Sung.






* Veterans Notes can be founc
Page A14 of today's Chronicle.


EXCURSIONS


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


ion


_^y--. ^


Wilderness women


-lilt-I


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te -j

'to. -
'a a
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Associated Press/Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission
Participants in a "Becoming an Outdoors-Woman" class get instructions from Kelly Langston in kayaking and canoeing basics in March on Lake Eaton at the Ocala
Conservation Center and Youth Camp in Ocala National Forest.



Instead of spas, ladies opt for hunting and fishing experience


MELISSA NELSON
Associated Press
OCALA NATIONAL FOREST

her cousin, Gale
Robinson, could
have met up for a
weekend spa retreat or
planned a shopping
excursion, but the two
middle-aged, suburban
moms opted for weekend
learning to shoot guns,
build campfires and track
deer deep in the Ocala
National Forest.
Faulk, Robinson and about 100 other
women were taking part in a three-day
workshop called "Becoming an Out-
doors-Woman." The program began two
decades ago in Wisconsin and has
spread to 40 states and Canada as a
way to teach women the skills needed
to enjoy outdoor activities. In Florida,
three workshops take place in different
parts of the state throughout the year
Organizers say the sessions are so pop-
ular they usually fill up just days after
they are announced.
Faulk's 18-year-old-son laughed at
her when she told him she was plan-
ning a weekend of camping in the
woods.
"He said, 'You are paying money to
do this, go outside? You don't want to go
to a Ritz Carlton?"' Faulk said.
Faulk, who is from the Tampa area,


Participants in a "Becoming an Outdoors-Woman" workshop learn handgun shooting
skills at the Ocala Conservation Center and Youth Camp in Ocala National Forest.


took classes in archery, boating and
firearms. Robinson's schedule included
a class in outdoor cooking. Robinson,
who lives in the Atlanta area, had not
been camping since she was child. But
the two cousins, both in their 50s and in
the pharmaceutical sales business, said
they had a blast sleeping in bunk beds
in a cabin shared with other women,
hiking in the woods and experiencing
the great outdoors.
The program began in 1991 in Wis-
consin after researchers at the Univer-
sity of Wisconsin-Stevens Point studied
why women were less likely than men
to participate in some outdoor activi-
ties, said Lynne Hawk, an education
specialist with the Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation Commission and
director of the Florida program.
"The women didn't feel like they had
the skills to be confident and comfort-
able to be outdoors doing these activi-
ties," Hawk said.


The Wisconsin program was an enor-
mous success and spread from there,
she said. States tailor their workshops
to outdoor activities common in their
areas and teach whatever survival
skills are needed in the region.
Florida joined the program in 1995.
The state Fish and Wildlife Conserva-
tion Commission usually holds work-
shops every year near Tallahassee,
Ocala and West Palm Beach.
The Florida program includes
courses in boating, kayaking, whitetail
deer, fishing, knot tying and outdoor
photography
Instructors even teach students how
to back a boat trailer into the water and
how to tie a boat up to a dock.
"We think part of the whole boating
safety program is learning to control
the boat, control the trailer and to
know the knots necessary to secure the
boat to the dock," said Dot Goodwin, a
boating safety instructor "The husband


might want to be in the boat and then
the wife would have to put the boat in
the water with the trailer and then
bring the trailer away, so she needs to
know how to operate it also."
Debbie Hanson had a tough time ma-
neuvering a trailer hitched to the back
of a truck through a series of traffic
cones and into the lake.
"What can I say other than it took me
five hours," the Estero woman said to
roars of laughter from her companions
when finally she completed the task in
about 20 minutes with Goodwin's care-
ful coaching.
Julia Beasley, from Altha, met her
sister Dottie Love, who lives in North
Carolina, for the weekend. The sisters
joked that they are wilderness oppo-
sites -Julie has spent little time in the
great outdoors and Dottie loves to
camp, fish and hunt.
"She's 100 percent and I'm like five,"
Beasley said, comparing their enthusi-
asm for the outdoors.
Love has gone to Becoming an Out-
doors-Woman events in North Carolina
for more than 10 years. The Ocala pro-
gram was Beasley's first
The sisters' class choices reflected
their differences. Beasley learned
about bird watching, cooking outdoors,
and making ornaments from plant
leaves. Love got tips on deer hunting.
Despite their different tastes, the sis-
ters shared a cabin in the national park
and ate together at communal meals.
"It was a good time for us to get to-
gether as sisters, which we've never re-
ally done before, and I think it's great.
It's a good thing for all women to get
out and do their own thing," Beasley
said.
Florida's next Becoming an Out-
doors-Woman program is offered in No-
vember in the West Palm Beach area.


Australia, New Zealand, Hawaii

Lyle and Ruthie Adams of Lecanto (Kensington) recently returned
from a month-long dream vacation to Australia, New Zealand and Hawaii.
Here, Lyle poses with a sunrise view of Ayers Rock in the Australian Outback.
Special to the Chronicle


DREAM
VACATIONS


The Chronicle and The
Accent Travel Group are
sponsoring a photo con-
test for readers of the
newspaper.


Readers are invited to
send a photograph from
their Dream Vacation with a
brief description of the trip.
If it's selected as a win-
ner, it will be published in
the Sunday Chronicle. At
the end of the year, a
panel of judges will select
the best photo during the
year and that photograph


will win a prize.
Please avoid photos
with dates on the print.
Photos should be sent
to the Chronicle at 1624
N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429
or dropped off at the
Chronicle office in Inver-
ness, Crystal River or any
Accent Travel Office.


rp


-WWPF"





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Veterans NOTES


Due to space considera-
tions, the Veterans Notes
sometimes contain only basic
information regarding each
post. For more information
about scheduled activities,
meals and more for a specific
post, call or email that post at
the contact listed.
HPH Hospice, as a part-
nering agency with the Depart-
ment of Veterans Affairs (VA),
provides tailored care for veter-
ans and their families. The pro-
gram is provided in private
homes, assisted living facilities
and nursing homes, and staff is
trained to provide Hospice care
specific to illnesses and condi-
tions unique to each military era
or war. It also provides care-
giver education and a recogni-
tion program to honor veterans'
services and sacrifices. HPH
Hospice care and programs do
not affect veterans' benefits.
For more information, call the
Citrus Team Office at
352-5274600.
The Red Tail Memorial Chap-
ter 136 of the Air Force Associ-
ation will meet one week early
on April 12, the second Thurs-
day of the month, at 7 p.m. at
the Ocala Regional Airport Ad-
ministration Building, 750 S.W.
60th Ave., Ocala. For more infor-
mation, call Mike Emig at
352-854-8328.
Honor Flight of West
Central Florida (HFWCF)
needs people to serve as
guardians for the first flight of
2012, taking World War II veter-
ans to Washington, D.C., so the
veterans can see the memori-
als on the National Mall.
HFWCF has chartered a
plane from Allegiant Air to fly
approximately 75 elderly veter-
ans from St. Petersburg/Clear-
water International Airport to
Washington on a one-day trip.
The flight will leave at 7 a.m.,
Tuesday, April 3, and return at
7:30 p.m. to a public "Welcome
Home" parade.
While in Washington, stops
are planned at the Iwo Jima
and World War II Memorials,
and Arlington National Ceme-
tery. The veterans will also be
able to visit the Lincoln, Wash-
ington, Korea and Vietnam me-
morials. En route, the chartered
buses will pass the Navy, Air
Force and Jefferson memorials,
the U.S. Capitol, the Pentagon
and several other federal
buildings.
Each veteran will have a
"guardian angel" who will be re-
sponsible for pushing their
wheelchair and provide for their
safety.
In 2011, the West Central
Florida Honor Flight flew 241


veterans to Washington. This
first flight of 2012 is being made
possible by a donation from
Progress Energy Florida.
The veterans fly free; how-
ever, guardians are asked to
make a donation of at least
$400 to the operating fund of
HFWCF. All donations are tax
deductible.
Persons interested in serving
as a guardian can visit
www.honorflightwcf.org,
print the guardian application
and mail it to P.O. Box 55661,
St. Petersburg, FL 33732.
The U.S. Air Force is
looking for prior enlisted men
and women from all services in-
terested in both direct duty as-
signments in previously
obtained career fields or retrain-
ing into select career fields.
Some of the careers include
aircraft electronics/mechanical
areas, cyber operation fields,
and various other specialties.
Enlisted career openings that
include the opportunities to re-
train consist of special opera-
tions positions and unmanned
aerial vehicle.
Assignment locations are
based on Air Force needs. For
more information, call
352-476-4915.
Citrus County Veterans
Coalition has a new building
holding freezers, refrigerators
and all necessary requirements
to provide food to veterans in
need. Food donations and vol-
unteers are always welcomed
and needed.
The CCVC is on the DAV
property in Inverness at the cor-
ner of Paul and Independence,
off U.S. 41 north. Hours of op-
eration are 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Tuesday and Thursday. Ap-
pointments are encouraged by
calling 352-400-8952.
CCVC general meetings are
at 10 a.m. the fourth Thursday
monthly at the DAV building in
Inverness. All active duty and
honorably discharged veterans,
their spouses, widows and wid-
owers, along with other veter-
ans' organizations and current
coalition members are wel-
come. Members are encour-
aged to attend general
meetings.
Annual membership donation
is $10 for a calendar year or
$25 for three years. The CCVC
is a nonprofit corporation, and
your donations are tax de-
ductible. Current members
should check their membership
card for expiration dates, and
renew with Gary Williamson at
352-527-4537, or at the meet-
ing. Visit www.ccvcfl.org.
AMVETS William Crow
Post 447, Inglis, is on State


Road 40 East. Sons meeting is
at 5:30 p.m. first Monday; Rid-
ers meeting is at 5:30 p.m. first
Thursday; post meeting is at
5:30 p.m. second Thursday;
Ladies Auxiliary meeting is 5:30
p.m. third Thursday.
For more information about
the post and its activities, call
352-447-1816; email
Amvet447@comcast.net.
Blanton-Thompson
American Legion Post 155, is
at 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way, Crystal River.
The post invites members
and guests to celebrate the
grand opening of its new
non-smoking room on Friday,
April 6.
Doors open at 4 p.m. with
dinner available; entertainment
at 7 p.m.
For information about the
post and its activities, call
Cmdr. Jay Conti Sr. at
352-795-6526 or visit
www.postl55.org.
American Legion Auxil-
iary Unit 155 meets at 7:30
p.m. the fourth Tuesday of
every month at the post. The
American Legion Auxiliary is
the world's largest women's pa-
triotic service organization with
nearly 1 million members in
10,100 communities. The prin-
ciples of the American Legion
Auxiliary are to serve veterans,
their families and community.
Eligibility in the Auxiliary is
open to mothers, wives, sisters,
daughters, granddaughters,
great-granddaughters or grand-
mothers of members of the
American Legion and of de-
ceased veterans who served
during war time (also stepchil-
dren); stepchildren; and female
veterans who served during
war time. Call Unit President
Shawn Mikulas, 352-503-5325,
or membership chairman Bar-
bara Logan, 352-795-4233.
H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post
10087, Beverly Hills, offers
meals, bingo, golf, karaoke and
pool. Review the monthly
newsletter for activities and up-
dates, and call the post at 352-
746-0440. The VFW Post
10087 is off County Road 491,
directly behind Superior Bank.
Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs,
352-465-4864. Wi Fi is now
available at the post; bring your
laptop or any other item that will
access the Internet and enjoy
the free service.
The post is now a nonsmok-
ing facility; smoking is allowed
on the porch.
All are welcome at the baked
tilapia dinner from 5 to 6:30
p.m. Friday, April 6, at the post.


Cost for the meal is $8.
Information regarding any
post events is available at the
post or call 352-465-4864.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Chapter No. 70 meets
at 2 p.m. the second Tuesday
monthly at the chapter hall,
1039 N. Paul Drive, Inverness,
at the intersection of Independ-
ence Highway and U.S. 41. The
chapter hall is on the corner of
Independence Highway and
Paul Drive.
We thank veterans for their
service and welcome any dis-
abled veteran to join us from 9
a.m. to 1 p.m. any Tuesday or
Thursday at the chapter hall.
This is also the time that we ac-
cept donated nonperishable
foods for our continuing food
drive.
Our main function is to assist
disabled veterans and their
families when we are able. Any-
one who knows a disabled vet-
eran or their family who
requires assistance is asked to
call Commander Richard Floyd
at 727-492-0290, Ken Stewart
at 352-419-0207, or
352-344-3464.
Service Officer Joe McClister
is available to assist any vet-
eran or dependents with their
disability claim by appointment.
Call 352-344-3464 and leave a
message.
Ambulatory veterans who
wish to schedule an appoint-
ment for transportation to the
VA medical center in
Gainesville should call the vet-
erans' service office at 352-
527-5915. Mobility challenged
veterans who wish to schedule
an appointment for transporta-
tion to the VA medical center in
Gainesville may call the Citrus
County Transit office for wheel-
chair transportation; call
352-527-7630.
For more information about
chapter activities, veterans'
benefits or membership, Call
Ken Stewart at 352-419-0207;
leave a message, if desired,
should the machine answer.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Auxiliary Unit No. 70
meets at 2 p.m. the second
Tuesday of the month at the
chapter hall, corner of U.S. 41
north, Independence Boulevard
and Paul Drive, Inverness.
The Auxiliary's next meeting
will be at 2 p.m. Tuesday,
April 10.
The DAV Auxiliary has ongo-
ing projects to help needy vet-
erans. Members recently took
more than 150 lap robes, 200
ditty bags and more than 100
wheelchair and walker bags to


Page A15


Robert and Mary
Schlumberger of Crystal
River announce the en-
gagement and forthcoming
marriage of their daughter,
Saralynne Cecelia
Schlumberger, to Jacob
Wayne Miller, son of Sheila
Schmid of Crystal River
and Wayne Miller of St.
Joseph, Mich.
The bride-elect has a
Bachelor of Science de-
gree in biomedical science,
with a minor in public
health, from the University
of South Florida. She is as-
sociated with the Citrus
County Chronicle as an in-
side sales representative.
Her fiance was educated
at Coloma High School and
Lake Michigan College. He
is a chef at Lollygaggers


Marcia Banck and Isaac
Ryman of Hernando ex-
changed nuptial vows Feb.
25, 2012, in Micanopy Bill
Stevens of First Baptist
Church of Dunnellon offi-
ciated at the afternoon
ceremony at the home of
the groom's sister and
brother-in-law.
The bride is the daugh-
ter of Cerythia Banck and
Eddie Arnold of Ho-
mosassa. The groom is the
son of Isaac and Dawn
Ryman of Dunnellon.
Given in marriage by her
son, Nathaniel Perry, the
bride was attended by her
longtime best friend,
Wendy Stauffer of Ho-
mosassa, as matron of
honor. Serving as her
bridesmaids were Lisa
Banck of Homosassa, her
sister; Jennifer Banck of
Ocala, her sister; Pamela
Mitchell of Micanopy, sis-
ter of the groom; and Alissa
Grace of Inverness, a long-
time friend.
Cierra Perry, her daugh-
ter, and niece Julia Strobl
served as flower girls.
Ring-bearers were the


Divorces 3/12/12 to 3/18/12
Rexford C. Arnold, Lecanto
vs. Lauren L. Arnold, Crystal
River
George P. Bassett,
Inverness vs. Kathleen Cecila
Bassett, Inverness
Wade J. Chauncey, Crystal
River vs. Marsha H.
Chauncey, Crystal River
Shauna D. Fowler,
Inverness vs. Terry L. Fowler,
Inverness
Walter Dean Gusse,
Bushnell vs. Linda M. Gusse,
Bushnell
John F. Henry, Inverness
vs. Naomi H. Henry, Inverness
Bryan 0. Jones, Beverly
Hills vs. Ruth T. Jones,
Hernando
Aaron Wendell Manning,
Brooksville vs. Michelle Marie
Manning, Inverness
John L. Mathew,
Homosassa vs. Patricia
Mathew, Homosassa
Ramon P. Ragolta,
Inverness vs. Carmen B.
Ragolta, Homosassa
Divorces 3/19/12 to 3/25/12
Claudia D. Anderson, St.
Thomas, V.I. vs. Ransford E.
Anderson, Lauderdale Lakes


Sports Pub & Grill in Crys-
tal River.
The couple plan to ex-
change marriage vows in
the fall of 2013.


<-^-
groom's sons Isaac Ryman
and Colby Ryman, and
nephew Blake Mitchell.
John Ryman of Citrus
Springs stood with his
brother as the best man.
Groomsmen were Danny
Hastings of Crystal River,
his longtime best friend;
Josh Mitchell of Micanopy,
his brother-in-law; Wes
Weiseman of Citrus
Springs, a longtime family
friend; and family friend
Carlos Gutierrez of Romeo.
A reception followed at
the Micanopy home of Josh
and Pamela Mitchell.
Following the nuptials,
the couple took a honey-
moon trip to the Blue
Ridge Mountains in
Ellijay, Ga.


Bethann Sheldon, Lecanto
vs. Jonathan Moore Sheldon,
Lecanto
Ivan Vincente, Inverness vs.
Jana Vincente, Inverness

Marriages 3/19/12 to 3/25/12
Ronald Andrew Culver,
Homosassa/Caroline May
Pack, Inglis
Richard Jason Kelly,
Homosassa/Elaina Deanne
Danner, Homosassa
James Frances King Jr.,
Homosassa/Kendra Joezanne
Lubonski, Homosassa
Christopher Joseph
Kurowski, Homosassa/
Larelle Dawn Clark, Lecanto
Aubrey Craig Miller,
Homosassa/Helen Luverna
Lee, Homosassa

Divorces and marriages
filed in the state of Florida are
a matter of public record,
available from each county's
Clerk of the Courts Office. For
Citrus County, call the clerk at
(352) 341-6400 or visit
www. clerk.citrus.fl.us/. For
proceedings filed in another
county, contact the clerk in
that area.


Special to the Chronicle
Pictured, from left, in front of the Legion Riders at American Legion Post 237 are: Post 237 Commander Ray
Roby, Hospice of Citrus County Development Director Linda Baker and Sons of the American Legion Squadron Commander
and ride chairperson John Roby. American Legion Post 237, 4077 N. Lecanto Highway, Beverly Hills, hosted its annual
Poker Run Jan. 28 and raised a grand total of $5,000. Proceeds support dual donation recipients American Cancer Soci-
ety Ovarian Cancer Research and patients and families served by Hospice of Citrus County. From left are: Post
237 Commander Ray Roby, Vicki Richard of the American Cancer Society for Ovarian Cancer Research and Sons of the
American Legion Squadron Commander and Ride Chairperson John Roby. "We are proud to present one of the biggest rid-
ing events in Citrus County," said John Roby. "This is the only poker run in Citrus County which supports both hospice serv-
ices, as well as ovarian cancer research."


* Visit us online at www.chronicleonline.com
for news and more.



Sunday's PUZZLER

Puzzle is on Page A16.


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A14 SUNDAY, APRIL 1, 2012


COMMUNITY





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Annual Hawaiian holiday features ceremonies


DON MCLEAN
Special to the Chronicle

Our group of 33 recently re-
turned to Citrus County from a
beautiful trip to the Hawaiian Is-
lands, where we conducted the
annual services and wreath laying
at the USS Arizona Memorial
while a bugler from the U.S.
Navy's Pacific Fleet Band
sounded "Taps."
After the services, the group
viewed the newly completed USS
Arizona Museum and Park and
spoke with a few of the Pearl Har-
bor survivors who donate their
time to meet visitors.
As president of the Utility
Squadron One Association, I or-
ganize the annual trip to Hawaii.
The squadron was the only air
group able to launch planes
against the Japanese, armed with
only Springfield rifles in open
cockpits. I provided memorabilia
of the attack and told about the
squadron's exploits.
Following services and the mu-
seum tour, our group traveled to
Ford Island Airfield at Pearl Har-
bor, where we visited the USS
Oklahoma, USS Utah, memorials
and the "Mighty Mo," USS Mis-
souri. Next, we were off to the
National Cemetery of the Pacific,
"The Punchbowl," to honor com-
rades buried there and to have
services at the gravesite of a for-
mer shipmate.
After the completion of the
military ceremonies, the group
began sightseeing the magnifi-
cent beauty of Hawaii. For 16
nights and 17 days, we toured
Oahu, Kuai, Hawaii and Maui.
Oahu is home to both Pearl
Harbor and Waikiki Beach,


Special to the Chronicle
The 2012 group to take the annual trip to Hawaii pay their respects at the USS Arizona Memorial recently.
In front are: Pacific Fleet Band bugler, Kay Durandetto, Lois Phillips, Barb Manley, Gail Nave, Peggy McDon-
ald, Dot Smith, Charlene Westfall, Patty Bogard, Barbara Schaffer, Kathy Smith, Maryann Hartley and tour
leader Don McLean. In the center row are: Marie St. Pierre, Bob Nave, Ted Zander, Phil Manley, Vic McDon-
ald, Howard Crosby, Wendy Crosby, Shirley Stevenson, Ray Stevenson, Terry Bogard, Regina Saxton, Kathy
Hupchick, Joe Hupchick, Doris Zander and Len Hartley. In the back are: Noel St. Pierre, Ron Warnock, Mel
Merrill, Shirley Merrill and Philip Saxton. Photographer Jim Westfall, not pictured, was also with the group.


where the group lodged at the
Hale Koa Hotel. Sightseeing
there included Diamond Head
Crater and Hanauma Bay, where
Elvis Presley's "Blue Hawaii"
was filmed. I had been stationed
at NAS Barbers Point and was
able to meet "The King."
Next, the group trekked to the
Blowhole and the beach where
the love scene with Debra Kerr
and Burt Lancaster was filmed
for "From Here to Eternity."
Other sights of the island in-
cluded Chinaman's Hat, Turtle
Island and the Pali Lookout,


where King Kamehameha made
his stand driving the Oahuans off
the Nuuana Cliffs.
We traveled from the north
shore through the small remain-
ing pineapple and sugar cane
fields, to Schofield Barracks and
Wheeler AFB.
Our group next visited Kauai,
known as the "Garden Isle" of
Hawaii. From our "headquar-
ters" at the Marriott on Coconut
Beach, we traveled on the
Waimea River to the grotto. On a
"free day," many of the group vis-
ited Kilauea Lighthouse and bird


sanctuary Some took helicopter
tours. On our final evening on
Kauai, we attended the Smith
Family Luau for the best food in
the islands.
The "Big Island," Hawaii, was
our next stop. We motored to the
Kilauea Military Camp inside
Hawaii Volcanoes National Park.
Our group toured the craters
around the park, visiting the seis-
mograph center, Thurston Lava
Tube, museum and other areas.
An afternoon trek to the
Punaluu Black Sand Beach to
see the beautiful green sea tur-


tles was capped by a visit to the
most southern point of the
United States.
The next day, we went to an or-
chid farm and then on to Hilo,
the Chinese Gardens, rainforest,
Akaka Falls and farmers' market,
finishing the day at the
macadamia nut orchard and ice
cream store.
During our stay at Kilauea, our
group had the pleasure of watch-
ing the Kilauea Volcano erupt-
ing.
The final island destination of
our trip was to Maui, the "Magic
Isle." We lodged at the beautiful
golf venue, the Royal Lahina Re-
sort at Kannapali. One day trip
while on Maui was to the
Haleakala National Park (alti-
tude 10,000 feet), where we en-
joyed magnificent views of the
islands of Maui, Lanai, Molokai
and Kahoolawe from the summit.
During a visit to Lahaina Town,
formerly home to the whaling in-
dustry, we sailed on the "Pride of
Maui" for a whale-watching
cruise. This was followed by
snorkeling off Molokini. Our
group, while strolling Lahaina
Town, was able to marvel at the
city-block-size banyan tree, as
well as visit museums, art gal-
leries and more.
--In--
Planning has begun for the 2013
trip, slated for Feb. 12 through 28.
Anyone interested in joining the
group should call Don McLean as
soon as possible. Reservations
will accommodate the first 16 cou-
ples or total of32 participants. For
more information and reserva-
tions, call 352-637-5131, or email
dmclean8@tampabay.rrcom.


VETERANS
Continued from Page A14

area nursing homes. Members
collect good, dean cotton mate-
rial, yarn and toiletry items to
make lap robes, wheelchair and
walker and ditty bags for veterans
in nursing homes.
Membership has expanded to
include many more who are eligi-
ble to join. For more information
or to donate items, call Com-
mander Linda Brice at 352-560-
3867 or Adjutant Lynn Armitage
at 352-341-5334.
Eugene Quinn VFW Post
4337 and Ladies Auxiliary, is at
906 State Road 44 E., Inverness.
Call the post at 352-344-3495 for
information about all weekly post
activities, or visit
www.vfw4337.org.
The newly forming Men's Aux-
iliary to VFW Post 4337 will have
an organizational meeting at the
post home at 10 a.m. Saturday,
April 7. All members and
prospective members are urged
to attend. The unit will be initiated;
officers for 2012-13 will be
elected and installed. The new
unit will establish dues, meeting
dates and times.
Call 352-344-3495 for
more information.
The American Legion
Wall-Rives Post 58 and Auxil-
iary, 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnellon.
Dunnellon Young Marines will
meet at 6 p.m. Tuesday.
Free AARP tax services will be
available 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Wednesday through April 11.
For more information, call Wayne
Sloan at 352-489-5066.
The public is welcome at bingo
at 6 p.m. Thursday.
At 10 a.m. Wednesday, April
11, the post will be assisting sen-
ior citizens and providing a color
guard for festivities at the annual
Sunflower Festival at Rainbow
Springs State Park.
The outdoor flea market and
pancake breakfast will be Satur-
day, April 21. The public is wel-
come. Doors open 7:30 to 10:30
a.m.
For information about activities
and the post, call Carl Boos at
352-489-3544.
Rolling Thunder Chapter
7, a POW/MIA awareness group,
meets at 10 a.m. second Satur-
day at the VFW Post 10087 in
Beverly Hills. Call Bob Bruno,
secretary, at 352-201-1228.
A Marine Corps League
Ladies Auxiliary Citrus Unit
meets at 1 p.m. the third Tuesday
monthly at the VFW in Beverly
Hills. New members are wel-
come. Membership fee is $30 a
year. Female relatives ages 16 or
older who are a wife, widow,
mother, stepmother, sister,
daughter, stepdaughter, grand-
mother, granddaughter, aunt or
daughter-in-law of honorably dis-
charged Marines and FMF
Corpsmen are eligible to belong
to the Marine Corps League. Fe-
male Marines (former, active and
reserves) and associate mem-
bers are eligible for MCLA mem-


bership. Call President Elaine
Spikes at 352-860-2400 or Sec-
retary/Treasurer Joan Cecil at
352-726-0834 for information.
Hunger and Homeless
Coalition -Anyone who knows
of a homeless veteran in need of
food, haircut, voter ID, food
stamps, medical assistance or
more blankets is asked to call Ed
Murphy at the Hunger and
Homeless Coalition at 352-
382-0876.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW Post
4252 and Ladies Auxiliary 3190
N. Carl G. Rose Highway, State
Road 200, Hemando; 352-726-
3339. Send emails to
vfw4252@tampabay.rr.com.
Everyone is welcome. Post
and auxiliary meet at 6:30 p.m.
every second Thursday.
Post honor guard is available
for funerals, flag raising and
nursing home visits.
The public is welcome to the
Friday night dinner and dance at
5p.m.
See our post activities: Google
us as VFW 4252, Hemando.
Dumas-Hartson VFW Post
8189 is on West Veterans Drive,
west of U.S. 19 between Crystal
River and Homosassa. Call 352-
795-5012 for information.
VFW membership is open to
men and women veterans who
have participated in an overseas
campaign, including service in
Iraq and Afghanistan. The Ko-
rean Campaign medal remains
open, as well. Call the post at the
phone number above for informa-
tion.
Joe Nic Barco Memorial
VFW Post 7122, 8191 S. Florida
Ave., Floral City. For information
about the post and its activities,
call 352-637-0100.
Friday is AUCE fish or three-
piece chicken for $7.
American Legion, Beverly
Hills Memorial Post 237, 4077
N. Lecanto Highway, in the Bev-
ery Plaza, invites all eligible vet-
erans and their families to visit
our post and consider joining our
Legion family: American Legion,
Sons of the American Legion
(SAL), or American Legion Auxil-
iary (ALA). Color Guard/Honor
Guard accepting volunteers.
Meeting time to 7 p.m. on the
fourth Tuesday monthly. Contact
the post at 352-746-5018.
The Korean War Veterans
Association, Citrus Chapter
192 meets at the VFW Post
10087, Beverly Hills, at 1 p.m. the
first Tuesday monthly. Any vet-
eran who has seen honorable
service in any of the Armed
Forces of the U.S. is eligible for
membership if said service was
within Korea, including territorial
waters and airspace, at any time
from Sept. 3, 1945, to the present
or if said service was outside of
Korea from June 25,1950, to
Jan. 31, 1955. For information,
call Hank Butler at 352-563-2496,
Neville Anderson at 352-344-
2529 or Bob Hermanson at 352-
489-0728.
Allen-Rawls American Le-
gion Post 77 and Auxiliary Unit
77 meet the first Thursday
monthly at the Inverness High-


lands Civic Center at 4375 Little
Al Point Road, Inverness. Call
Post Cmdr. Norman Brumett at
352-860-2981 or Auxiliary presi-
dent Marie Cain at 352-
637-5915.
U.S. Submarine Veterans
(USSVI)-Sturgeon Base meets at
11 a.m. the first Saturday monthly
at the American Legion Post 155,
6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway,
Crystal River. Visitors and inter-
ested parties are always wel-
come. Call Base Cmdr. Billy Wein
at 352-726-5926.
Members of the U.S. Subma-
rine Veterans who have earned
the designation "qualified in Sub-
marines" at least 50 years ago
will be honored for their service in
a formal ceremony at American
Legion Post 155, State Road 44,
Crystal River, at 11 a.m. Satur-
day, April 7. The public is invited.
American Legion Post 166
meets 1:30 p.m., first Saturday
monthly at the Dumas-Hartson
VFW Post 8189 Ladies Auxiliary
facility on Veterans Drive, Ho-
mosassa, on the west side of
U.S. 19 at Dixon's Auto Sales
across from Harley-Davidson.
For information about the post
or the American Legion, call and


leave a message for the post
commander at 352-697-1749.
Seabee Veterans of Amer-
ica (SVA) Island X-23 welcomes
all Seabees and Honeybees to its
monthly meeting at 10:30 a.m.
the third Tuesday monthly at Cit-
rus Hills Country Club, Rose and
Crown restaurant, Citrus Hills.
Call John Lowe at 352-344-4702.
Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219
and Cabane 1219 conducts its
meetings at 7 p.m. the second
Thursday monthly at the Ameri-
can Legion Post 155 on State
Road 44 in Crystal River (6585 E.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway). For more
information about the 40/8, call
the Chef De Gare Tom Smith at
352-601-3612; for the Cabane,
call La Presidente Carol Kaiser-
ian at 352-746-1959; or visit us
on the Web at www.Postl 55.org.
Aaron A. Weaver Chapter
776 Military Order of the Purple
Heart (MOPH) meets at 2 p.m.
the third Tuesday of January,
March, May, July, September and
November. All combat-wounded
veterans, lineal descendants,
next of kin, spouses and siblings
of Purple Heart recipients are cor-
dially invited to attend and to join
the ranks of Chapter 776. To


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learn more about Aaron A.
Weaver Chapter 776 MOPH, visit
the chapter's website at www.
citruspurpleheart.org or call
352-382-3847.
Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment
1139 will conduct its regular
meeting at 7 p.m. the third
Wednesday monthly at DAV Post
70 in Inverness at the intersection
of Independence Highway and
U.S. 41 North. All Marines are
welcome. Call Jerry Cecil at 352-
726-0834 or Wayne Howard at
352-634-5254.
Marine Corps League Cit-
rus Detachment 819 meets at 7
p.m. the last Thursday monthly at
VFW Post 10087 on Vet Lane in
Beverly Hills, behind Superior
Bank. Social hour follows. All
Marines and FMF Corpsmen are
welcome. Meet new friends and
discuss past glories. Call Morgan
Patterson at 352-746-1135, Ted
Archambault at 352-382-0462 or
Bion St. Bernard at 352-
697-2389.
Gilley-Long-Osteen VFW
Post 8698 is at 520 State Road
40 E., Inglis, one mile east of U.S.
19. The Men's Auxiliary meets at
7 p.m. the second Monday.


LAVFW meets at 5 p.m. and the
membership meeting is at 6:30
p.m. the third Wednesday at the
post. Call the post at 352-447-
3495 for information about the
post and its activities.
Fleet Reserve Associa-
tion, Branch 186 will meet at 3
p.m. the third Thursday monthly
at the DAV Building, Independ-
ence Highway and U.S. 41 North,
Inverness. Call Bob Huscher,
secretary, at 352-344-0727.
American Legion Herbert
Surber Post 225 meets at 7 p.m.
the third Thursday monthly at the
New Testament Baptist Church of
Floral City, 9850 S. Parkside Ave.
adjoining Floral Park, southeast
side. All eligible veterans are wel-
come to join.
Landing Ship Dock (LSD)
sailors meet at Denny's in Crystal
River at 2 p.m. the fourth Thurs-
day monthly. Call Jimmie at 352-
621-0617.
Suncoast U.S. Navy
Armed Guard and Merchant
Marine Veterans of World War
II meetings for 2012 will be at
11:30 a.m. at Kally K's restaurant
in Spring Hill on the following
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COMMUNITY


SUNDAY, APRIL 1, 2012 A15






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Unsuspecting


eating 'dog' food


SUNDAY EVENING APRIL 1, 2012 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House DI: Comcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
C B D/I F H 6:00 6:30 7:00 1 7:30 8:00 1 8:30 I 9:00 1 9:30 110:00 10:30 11:00 11:30
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WED U PBS 3 3 14 6 To Be Announced To Be Announced Findin Your Roots- Masterpiece Classic Saving the Titanic (N) As Time As Time
0 WEDUPBS 3 3 14 6 Henrylouis Gates (N) (In Stereo) 'PG' 'PG' N Goes By Goes By
0 WUFT PBS 5 5 5 41 Keep Up As Time... NOVA'PG' Finding Your Roots Masterpiece Classic Saving the Titanic MI-5'14' Bc
News Nightly Dateline NBC (N) (In The Celebrity Apprentice "Walking Papers" A celebrity guidebook about News Paid
0 WF NBC 8 8 8 8 8 News Stereo) 'PG' New York. (N) (In Stereo) N Program
W FTV ABC 20 20 20 News World America's Funniest Once Upon a Time (N) Desperate Housewives GCB "Forbidden Fruit" News Sports
0 WFT AB 20 20 20 News Home Videos 'PG' 'PG'(N) PG' c (N) 'PG' Night
S WTP CBS 10 10 10 10 10 Evening 10 News 60 Minutes (In Stereo) The 47th Annual Academy of Country Music Awards Honoring achieve- 10News, Paid
0D ]CBS 10 10 10 10 10 News (N) N ment in country music. (N) (In Stereo Live)'PG, L m 11pm (N) Program
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0 (WTVTFOX 13 13 13 13 (In Stereo) N Simpsons Show Simpsons Burgers 14 Dad 14 (In Stereo) N Over'14'B
D WCJBl ABC 11 11 4 News ABC Funny Home Videos Once Upon aTime Desp.-Wives GCB (N) PG' B News Brothers
WCLF IND 2 2 2 22 22 Brody File Stakel/ Coral Great Awakening Love a The Place for Miracles Daniel Jesse Pastor Great
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WFT ABC 11 11 11 News Home Videos 'PG' PG'(N) PG' Bc (N) 'PG' B Anatomy
WMi.OR. ND 12| 12 16 Family Guy Family Guy Big Bang Big Bang Law & Order"Extended Law & Order Murder "Who's Your Daddy?"(2003, Comedy)
ED W IND 12 12 16'14' 14' Theory Theory Family"'14' case falls apart. 'PG' Brandon Davis, Colfeen Camp. 'NR '
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Mi N M FAM 16 16 16 15 Shop Shop Games Strike'14' USA USA Kid'G' Beauty
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55 64 55 (In Stereo) B Premiere) (N) (In Stereo) N (N) 14' My Lucky Day"
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(Et 44 37 44 32 Fox News Sunday FOX Report (N) Huckabee (N) Fox News Sunday Geraldo at Large (N) Huckabee
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(JSNFLJ 35 39 35 Hockey Panthers World Poker Tour World PokerTour The Best of Pride (N) Barfly (N) Boys in World PokerTour
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306 30 51 Jr.,Terrence Howard. PG-13 days of the starship Enterprise and her crew. Fiction) Chris Pine. PG-13'
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** I~ 350 261 350 "The Twilight Saga: New Moon" (2009) **2 "The Twilight Saga: Eclipse" (2010) Set ana a Girl" (2001) "Boogie
350 261 350 Kristen Stewart. 'PG-13'B Kristen Stewart. 'PG-13' mc .... ... H Woogie
mm 48 3**3 1 "Disturbia"(2007r Suspense) Shia "Law Abiding Citizen" (2009, Suspense) "Law Abiding Citizen" (2009, Suspense)
( 48 33 48 31 34 LaBeouf, David Morse. PG-13'B 3Jamie Foxx, Gerard Butler. 'R' Jamie Foxx, Gerard Butler. 'R'
(TOON] 38 58 38 33 ** "Space Jam" (1996) Michael Jordan. Level Up Level Up King/Hill |King/Hill Chicken IFam. Guy Fam. Guy |Loiter
TRAV 9 54 9 44 Favorite Waterpark Big Beef Paradise Sand Wars N Sand Wars N Toy Hunters G' Making Monsters 'G'
QjiITVJ 25 55 25 98 55 Most Shocking Most Shocking Jokers Jokers Jokers JJokers Forensic Forensic
(YLI 32 49 32 34 24 M*A*S*H M*A*S*H M*A*S*H M*A*S*H M*A*S*H M*A*S*H Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond King
Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special "Good Luck Chuck"
(MS&) 47 32 47 17 18 Victims Unit '14 Victims Unit '14 Victims Unit '14 Victims Unit '14 Victims Unit '14 (2007) 'R'
My Fair Wedding With My Fair Wedding With My Fair Wedding With My FairWedding With Mary Mary "Giving Braxton Family
117 69 117 David Tutera David Tutera David Tutera David Tutera Thanks" Reunion 2
WGNA 1 18 18 18 18 20 "Grow Old With" 30 Rock Mother Mother |Mother Mother |Mother News |Replay The Unit'PG' c


Dear Annie: Our town
has a small grocery
with popular hot and
cold bars where customers
can help themselves to deli-
ciously prepared food.
Lately, I have noticed a
nicely dressed man at the
store accompanied by his
medium-sized dog. The man
reaches into this food with
his fingers and then lets his
dog eat from his hand. This
action is repeated several
times.
When I complained to the
two employees behind the
customer service desk about
the contaminated food being
served to unsuspecting cus-
tomers, they replied that they
already knew.
Then they added
that the cus-
tomer told them
this is a seeing-
eye dog and they
have to allow it
into the store.
This cannot pos-
sibly be a seeing-
eye dog. The P( 4
man rides a bicy- .
cle to the store,
and the dog is ANNI
not on a harness.
In fact, the dog MAILI
often tugs at his
leash to get the owner to fol-
low wherever the dog wants
to go. Either way, it is still un-
sanitary to allow the man to
repeatedly pick up the food
with his fingers and then
feed the dog from his hand.
I watched this dog lick con-
densation off of the products
(milk, dips, cheeses, etc.) in
the open coolers on the
lower shelves.
No employees asked the
man to restrain his dog, nor
did they tell the deli employ-
ees to remove the contami-
nated food.


Today's MOVIES


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness;
637-3377
"Wrath of the Titans" (PG-13)
In real 3D. 1:50 p.m., 4:50 p.m.,
7:50 p.m. No passes.
"Mirror Mirror" (PG) 1:20 p.m.,
4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
"The Hunger Games" (PG-13)
1 p.m., 1:30 p.m., 4:05 p.m., 4:40
p.m., 7:10 p.m., 7:40 p.m. No
passes.
"21 Jump Street" (R) ID required.
1:05 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:15 p.m.
"Dr. Seuss' The Lorax" (PG) In
Real 3D. 2 p.m., 4:15 p.m., 7 p.m.
No passes.

Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Wrath of the Titans" (PG-13) In
real 3D. 1:50 p.m., 4:20 p.m.,
4:50 p.m., 7:20 p.m., 7:50 p.m.
No passes.


"Mirror Mirror" (PG) 1:10 p.m.,
4:10 p.m., 7:10 p.m.
"The Hunger Games" (PG-13)
1 p.m., 1:30 p.m., 4 p.m., 4:30
p.m., 7 p.m., 7:30 p.m. No passes.
"21 Jump Street" (R) ID required.
1:55 p.m., 4:55 p.m., 7:55 p.m.
"A Thousand Words" (PG-13)
1:40 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7:40 p.m.
"John Carter" (PG-13) In Real
3D. 1:20 p.m. No passes.
"Dr. Seuss' The Lorax" (PG)
4:05 p.m.
"Dr. Seuss' The Lorax" (PG) In
Real 3D. 1:05 p.m., 7:05 p.m. No
passes.
"Gone" (PG-13) 2 p.m., 5 p.m.,
8 p.m.

Visit www.chronicleonline.com
for area movie listings and
entertainment information.


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Reprimand
6 Cotton fabric
11 Walk
16 Handle with skill
21 Simonized
22 Place of contest
23 Risk
24 Young eel
25 Lunar path
26 Bazaar
28 Work very hard
29 Ear (prefix)
30 El-
31 That girl
32 Chunk of turf
34 Excavate
35 Semiaquatic
creature
37 Employ
38 Hard
40 Nugent or Danson
41 A letter
42 Listen!
44 Fruit-filled pastry
46 bene
49 Word with fire or search
52 Go away!
53 Yes vote
55 Something for lease
59 King or Hagman
60 Profound
61 Missing
64 Cordial flavoring
65 On the rocks
66 Leader
67 Horse's gait
68 John -
70 Repeat
71 Output of a mine
72 Young equine
73 Banister
74 Fruity drink
76 Range of
knowledge
77 Stress
79 Univ. in
Cambridge
80 Precious
82 Montana's capital
84 Bullion
85 Great number
86 Detonate
87 Use a blue pencil
88 Monopoly cousin
90 Stake
91 Skill
92 Math branch


95 In the past
96 Dirty, in a way
98 Edgar-
Burroughs
100 Succulent plant
101 Lubricant
102 Tempo
104 Gym pad
105 Yield by treaty
106 Blueprint
107 Hit high
into the air
108 Each and -
110 Asian temple
112 Annexes
113 Name
114 Disparage
116 Neither partner
117 Victim
118 Kitchen gadget
119 Birthright seller
121 Daughter in
"Hamlet"
124 Person
125 Maria
128 Spring
130 "- Marner"
131 Pointed tool
132 Coup d'-
136 Hodges of baseball
137 Military decoration
139 Merry
140 Insect
141 From --Z
142 Publish
144 Study of spiders
147 Station
149 Din
150 Of musical sounds
151 Story
152 Express a view
153 Barrier Reef
154 Foe
155 Cooked in oil
156 Edgy



DOWN
1 Faint
2 Ala-
3 Yoke part
4 Fragrant necklace
5 Old bug bane
6 Patterned fabric
7 Wipe out
8 Fiddling despot
9 -jet printer


Conductor
Tack on
Brooks or Gibson
Nail
Lawful
"Ocean's -"
Bridge position
Indisposed
Sidestep
Jeans brand
Lees
Old pronoun
Unmixed
Bouquet
Fractional part
Cease
Leavening agent
In case
Lean-to
Caustic substance
Kind of bag or cup
English queen
T.S. -
Mother-of-pearl
Trader in fresh foods
Close tightly
Stand
Box office (2 wds.)
Pale
Lewis or
Helmsley
College VIP
"Exodus" hero
Type style
A weight
Mobster
Raggedy
Rank
Did an office job
Afalling-out
Piece
Line of bushes
Drunkard
Lots of
Ireland
Tell a tall tale
Wickerwork
material
Like Superman
Century plant
Word of woe
Firearm
Revise
Plant fluid
Crete's Mount -
Friendly nation
A Great Lake
- de ballet


106 Entreaty
107 Cotton thread
109 Distance
measures (abbr.)
111 Something sticky
112 Discord goddess
113 Greek letter
115 Facilitate
117 Tiebreaker
118 Shed


Modernize
Extremely
- vital
Swung
Getting older
Cap part
Borden's cow
Brother of Moses
Fish with a hook
Ungulate animal


Make expiation
Carried
Encounter
Path
Vast desert
Mex. neighbor
Rotating part
Roman god
- Jones
Above (prefix)


Puzzle answer is on Page A14.


2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


At lunch, the unsuspecting
consumers purchased this
same "leftover dog food" to
feed their families.
I debated calling the
health department but fig-
ured they would have to
catch the man in the act.
What can I do?-NowShop-
ping at the Nearby Super-
store
Dear Shopping: Even if
this were a service dog (and
it seems unlikely), it does not
obligate the store to allow the
animal to lick the milk car-
tons and be fed by hand di-
rectly from the food
containers.
Please call the health de-
partment and ask them to in-
vestigate. That will
at least put the
store on alert
DearAnnie: This
is for "Montreal
Fan," whose father
lets his secretary
smoke in the office.
He should know
better
It is against the
law in Montreal to
smoke in all public
E'S buildings and in
ANY office, private
BOX or not If the father
allows her to con-
tinue smoking, he is breaking
the law.
He should get rid of this
secretary or force her to go
outside to smoke like every-
one else. Non-Smoker in
Montreal


Annie's Mailbox is written
by Kathy Mitchell and
Marcy Sugar, longtime
editors of the Ann Landers
column. Write to: Annie's
Mailbox, c/o Creators
Syndicate, 737 Third SL,
Hermosa Beach, CA 90254


A16 SUNDAY, APRIL 1, 2012


ENTERTAINMENT


II
[]





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Choosing the fairest of the fair ...



2012 Decorated Babies & Beautiful Babies

6to 11U

1 months girl
I : Jennifer Rylee
MacCurdy is queen in the
6 to 11 months girls'
-" category. She waits for her
trophy from Miss Citrus .
County, Savannah Joy
Heimann, 14, left, and sash
from Miss Rodeo Florida
Sweetheart, Kelly Harper,9.
CATHY KAPULKA/Chronicle
12 to 18
-months boy
Joaquin Miguel
Blanco is crowned king in
the 12 to 18 months boys'
category by Miss Citrus ..-
County, Savannah
Joy Heimann.


12 to 18 months girls


19 to 23 months girls


CATHY KAPULKA/Chronicle
In the 12 to 18 months girls' category are: Layla Jade Van Niersen, second runner-up; Kaylee CATHY KAPULKA/Chronicle
Noel Morris, honorable mention; Nikita Lynn Marchese, first runner-up; Cheyanne Demaris, In the 19 to 23 months girls' category are: Leah Rae Smallridge, second runner-up; Brooke
third runner-up and Catherine Skrabar Coble, queen. Rowand, queen; and Naomi Reed, third runner-up.

2-year-old girls


CATHY KAPULKA/Chronicle
In the 2-year-old girls' category are: Alexandra Grace Smallridge, honorable mention; Madelynn Pitts, second runner-up; Makiah Meier, honorable mention; Chloe Golish, third runner-
up; Addison Renee Garcia, first runner-up; Savannah Ewell, queen; Emma Cremeans, honorable mention; Lola Victoria Blanco and Alexa Anderson, honorable mentions.

2-year-old boy I

: James Copeland Jr. is crowned
king by Miss Citrus County, Savannah ;,I
Joy Heimann, in the 2-year-old boys'
category.

I.,'


CATHY KAPULKA/Chronicle




3-year-old boy
Cason H. Lane is crowned king
by Miss Citrus County, Savannah Joy
Heimann, In the 3-year-old
boys' category.


3-year-old girls


CATHY KAPULKA/Chronicle
In the 3-year-old girls' category are: Lillian Shaw, queen; Kayli Schaak, second runner-up; Ryleigh Elise Pitts, first runner-up; Gianna Gore, honorable mention; Alivia Paige Garrison,
third runner-up and Summer Christianson, honorable mention.


COMMUNITY


SUNDAY, APRIL 1, 2012 A17





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


2012 Citrus County Fair Pageants


4-year-old girls


CATHY KAPULKA/Chronicle
In the 4-year-old girls' category are: Kirsten Schaak, second runner-up; Reese Addison Jackson, third runner-up; Caitlin Bree Gustafson, first runner-up; Brooke Alayna Grace, queen;
Lily Skrabar Coble, honorable mention and Destiny Grace Brown, honorable mention.



2012 Little Miss & Little Mr.


5-year-old girls


5-year-old boys


In the 5-year-old girls' category are: Mackenzee Jade Jurasik,
Schreifels, second runner-up; and Alexis Holmes, third runner-up.


Special to the Chronicle
queen; Katherine Anne Costa, first runner-up; Jaimie


Special to the Chronicle
In the 5-year-old boys' category are: Justin Ryan Oney, king,
and Tanner Rowe, first runner-up.


6-year-old girls

: Ivy Lewis is crowned queen in
the 6-year-old girls' category. Grace
Powers was first runner-up.
Special to the Chronicle

6-year-old boy
Anthony Wilson is crowned
king in the 6-year-old boys'category.


The Chronicle regrets
that photos of the
Pre-teen contests were
unavailable for
publication.


7-year-old girls


Special to the Chronicle
In the 7-year-old girls' category are: Julia Forrester, queen; Cadyence Rose Bryan, first runner-up; Alicia Schaak, second
runner-up; Skylar Bowden, third runner-up; and Raeanne Collins, honorable mention.


2012 Pre-teens


8-year-olds
Kendric Alexander Hall. king
Bethany Herndon. queen
Paris Dillion. first runner-up

9-year-olds
Michael Forrester. king
Emily Densmore. queen
Bianca Dvorsky. first runner-up
Kylee Nicole Meier. second runner-up

10-year-olds
Taylor Jackson. queen
Biranna Arnold. first runner-up
Ciara Sullivan. second runner-up
Kelsey Sharrone. third runner-up
Kaitlin Zoucha. honorable mention

11-year-olds
Leya Alvares. queen
Logan Brianna Kelly. first runner-up

13-year-olds
Bobbi Fouts-Lizotte. queen
Michelle Graham. first runner-up


A18 SUNDAY, APRIL 1, 2012


COMMUNITY











SPORTS


Kasey Kahne will
start in pole position
for Sunday's Sprint
Cup race./B2


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


0 Auto racing/B2
0 MLB, NHL, NBA/B3
0 College basketball/B4
0 TV, lottery/B4
0 Golf, tennis/B5
0 Entertainment/B6


CR native Hall crowned handball champ


JUSTIN PLANTE
Correspondent
Any competitive person can tell you
one thing they all wish to be called: a
national champion. It's a title that is
held in high regard, and the person
who dons that title commands respect
no matter where they go.
Such is the case with Crystal River
native Kristen Hall, who just this
year stood out above the rest of col-
lege handball's elite as a national
champion as she took the top honors
as a part of the University of Florida
handball team.
For those unfamiliar with the
game: Just picture racquetball sans
the racquet. The rules are the same,
the serves are the same and the play
is the same.
The game was just as new for Crys-
tal River High School alum Hall
three years ago, when she sought to
broaden her horizons with new ex-
periences as she came into life as a
college student.
"Getting away from Crystal River, I
wanted to do something brand new,"
she said. "So I started doing new


things. I picked up tai chi for a little
while, then found handball."
It's not like Hall was new to athlet-
ics, however She was honored as the
Chronicle's Scholar Athlete of the
Year in 2009
after competing Gettil
in cross country,
soccer and track Crystal Riv
for the Pirates.
The move to do some
from small-town
athletics to col- brand ne1
legiate athletics
was quite a leap,
but the smaller Current Universi
community of CRHS gradual
the handball
squad helped her ease her way in.
"It was a huge culture shock," she
said of the move. "But getting into
handball, I found it was a smaller
community of people, more like what
it's like in Citrus County. And they're
great people, too. The team and
everyone involved really pushed me
to continue and stick it out It was just
a really great environment to get in-
volved with."
It was a full slate at nationals this


n
e
th
W

ty
te


year, as over 200 athletes represent-
ing colleges around the country were
joined by other teams from Ireland,
all there to duke it out for the rights
to call themselves champs.
After being in-
g away from evolved with the
sport for three
r, I wanted years, Hall's hard
work paid off as
iing she took top prize
in the woman's
division.
"It was so grat-
Kristen Hall ifying," she said.
of Florida student and "Getting into it
on taking up handball. freshman year
and working to-
wards this for the past few years, it
just feels great."
The Gators reached nationals last
See Page B4
University of Florida junior Kristen
Hall recently won an individual na-
tional handball title. Hall is a 2009
graduate of Crystal River High
School and it's just her third year
competing in the sport.
Special to the Chronicle


'Cats clip Cards


UK takes 69-61

victory to make V P

NCAA title game ""

Associated Press
NEW ORLEANS Ken-
tucky owns the Bluegrass
State. Now it can concentrate
on the rest of the country
Anthony Davis and top-
seeded Kentucky will play for
the national title Monday night
after finally putting away
pesky Louisville 69-61 in the
Final Four on Saturday night.
It will be Kentucky's first ap-
pearance in the title game
since win-
Final Four ning a sev-
enth
0 For the Ohio N C A A
State-Kansas c r o w n
result, please back in
see Page B4. 1998 and
gives
coach John Calipari another
shot at the title that has
eluded him. The Wildcats (37-
2) will face the winner of
Kansas-Ohio State.
As the final seconds ticked
down, Davis pointed to the
court and screamed twice ,
"This is my stage!"
Yes, yes, it is.
With Davis, everybody's
player of the year, leading a T
star-studded roster, Kentucky
was the top seed in the tour- V
nament and the heavy favorite
to cut down the nets when the
whole tournament was done. -
And Calipari wouldn't let his
young players consider any-
thing else, saying repeatedly
this was "just another game."
ff
But playing in-state rival '
Louisville (30-10) is never
just that, and the Cardinals
made Kentucky work deep
into the second half to grind r
this victory out.
Louisville outrebounded
Kentucky 40-33, including a
whopping 19-6 advantage on
the offensive glass the sole Associated Press
Kentucky forward Terrence Jones slam dunks over Louisville swingman Wayne Blackshear during the
See .Page B4 second half of an NCAA Final Four semifinal game Saturday in New Orleans. Kentucky won 69-61.


Griner,


Mulkey


honored

Player, coach

named best by

Associated Press

Associated Press
DENVER Whether em-
phatically blocking shots or
throwing down dunks on the
other the end of the floor, Brit-
tney Griner has been the most
dominant
player in
women's bas-
ketball this
season.
The 6-foot-8
junior phenom
has led Baylor
to a perfect
record and the Brittney
Lady Bears Griner
stand two wins Baylor center is
away from be- nation's best.
coming the first
team in NCAA
history to win
40 games in a
season. Now
she is The Asso-
ciated Press
player of the
year Her coach Kim
Kim Mulkey Mulkey
completed a Baylor coach
Baylor sweep of leads team.
the awards,
being selected coach of the year
"It's an honor," said Griner,
who became the first Baylor
player to win the award. "We
have a great year going and for
it to be the perfect season for
me, we've got to win the na-
tional championship."
The two-time All-American
got 36 of the votes from the 40-
member national media panel
that selects the weekly Top 25.
Delaware's Elena Delle Donne
received two votes while Notre
Dame's Skylar Diggins and
Stanford's Nnemkadi Ogwu-
mike got the other ones.
Mulkey, who won the award for
the first time, received 19 votes.
See Page B4


Sjodin, Tseng dead even at Kraft Nabisco Championship


Associated Press
RANCHO MIRAGE, Calif. Swe-
den's Karin Sjodin shot a steady 4-
under 68 through heavy wind while
chasing down top-ranked Yani Tseng
on Saturday, pulling even at 9 under
heading into the final round of the
Kraft Nabisco Championship.
The dominant Tseng proved she's
not unbeatable, showing visible frus-
tration while posting a 71 as inconsis-
tent as the wind that buffeted Mission
Hills throughout her round.
While Tseng is a five-time major
Karin Sjodin watches her drive on the
second hole during the third round of
the LPGA Kraft Nabisco Championship
on Saturday in Rancho Mirage, Calif.
Associated Press


champion, the long-hitting Sjodin
has never won in seven seasons on
the LPGA Tour. Yet Sjodin made just
one bogey in a remarkable round,
briefly taking the outright lead down
the stretch of the tour's first major of
the year
"The day was just kind of smooth,"
said Sjodin, who kept playing despite
apparently dislocating one of her ribs
Friday "I never felt like I was ever in
trouble. ... It feels great to be there. I
don't know if I've really had time to
think about it much. It's going to be fun
tomorrow, definitely"
Haeji Kang, who also has never won
on the LPGA Tour, was two strokes
back after struggling to a 72. She will
join Tseng and Sjodin in the final group
Sunday World No. 2 Na Yeon Choi was


among five players at 6 under
Sjodin is among the few LPGA Tour
pros who can compete with Tseng off
the tee, but the Oklahoma State alum-
nus is ranked 216th. Sjodin first
played the Kraft Nabisco on an ex-
emption in 2005 while still in college,
but had never made the cut until this
weekend, when she will play in a final
group for the first time in her LPGA
Tour career
Sjodin hasn't yet reached the enor-
mous potential suggested by her driv-
ing abilities, but the 28-year-old
smiled throughout her third round
after beginning the day three strokes
back. Sjodin has never finished higher
than 19th in her 18 majors, and has


See Page B4






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Kahne snags pole



for Martinsville race


Associated Press

MARTINSVILLE, Va. -
Kasey Kahne is the first
two-time pole winner of the
season in NASCAR's Sprint
Cup Series after he posted
the fastest lap in qualifying
Saturday at Martinsville
Speedway
He'll start the race 27th in
points, and hopes it's the start
of a turnaround in fortune.
"We have had great Fri-
day and Saturdays and just
haven't put together a Sun-
day yet," the Hendrick Mo-
torsports driver said.
"Hopefully tomorrow will
be a nice start to a really
good season."
Kahne, who also started
first at Las Vegas, toured the
0.526-mile oval at 97.126
mph, depriving Kevin Har-
vick of a sweep of weekend
qualifying at the track. Har-
vick, who won the pole for
Saturday's truck series race
earlier, had a run at 97.048.
The pole is the 24th of
Kahne's career, and first in
17 starts on the oldest, short-
est track in the premier se-
ries. He said patience will
be key at the start in
Sunday's 500-lap event.
"When you come to Mar-
tinsville, until about lap 250
you really don't know what
you have," he said. "You can
lead the race early, you can
slide around and be slow
early and after about lap
250, 300, that is when you fi-
nally realize how good your
car is or how bad it is."
That's a lesson it took
Harvick years to learn, and
he won here a year ago.
"For many years I could-
n't finish in the top 10," he
said. "It has just taken a
while to get to this point All
in all, we have had a good


Associated Press
Kasey Kahne smiles after winning the pole position during
Saturday's qualifying for Sunday's Sprint Cup auto race at
Martinsville Speedway in Martinsville, Va.


couple-year run. You never
know when it will end, but
all in all it has been pretty
good for us lately"
The top five also includes
Denny Hamlin, who has
four career victories on the
tight, tricky layout, followed
by Clint Bowyer and Ryan
Newman, followed by Brian
Vickers, Brad Keselowski,
Kyle Busch, Jeff Gordon, a
seven-time winner here,
and Joey Logano.
Defending series cham-
pion Tony Stewart, who won
here last fall, will start 15th,
and points leader Greg Bif-
fle will start 26th.
"It's not where we wanted
to be, but we've got 500 laps
tomorrow to get there,"
Biffle said.
Sprint Cup
Goody's 500 Lineup
After Saturday qualifying; race Sunday
At Martinsville Speedway
Ridgeway,Va.
Lap length: .526 miles
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 97.128.
2. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 97.048.
3. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 97.003.
4. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 97.003.
5. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 96.988.


6. (55) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 96.765.
7. (2) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 96.75.
8. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 96.746.
9. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 96.731.
10. (20) Joey Logano, Toyota, 96.706.
11. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 96.701.
12. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 96.627.
13. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 96.583.
14. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 96.43.
15. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 96.322.
16. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 96.215.
17. (78) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 96.2.
18. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 96.18.
19. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 96.049.
20. (1) Jamie McMurray Chevrolet, 96.049.
21. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 95.971.
22. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 95.854.
23. (98) Michael McDowell, Ford, 95.849.
24. (34) David Ragan, Ford, 95.83.
25. (13) Casey Mears, Ford, 95.796.
26. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 95.743.
27. (22) A J Allmendinger, Dodge, 95.738.
28. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 95.607.
29. (10) David Reutimann, Chevrolet, 95.607.
30. (26) Josh Wise, Ford, 95.583.
31. (83) Landon Cassill, Toyota, 95.511.
32. (42) J. Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 95.477.
33. (23) Scott Riggs, Chevrolet, 95.352.
34. (93) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, 95.347.
35. (74) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, 95.223.
36. (32) Ken Schrader, Ford, 95.127.
37. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 94.936.
38. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 94.78.
39. (30) David Stremme, Toyota, 94.609.
40. (51) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 94.567.
41. (33) Hermie Sadler, Chevrolet, 94.486.
42. (36) Dave Blaney Chevrolet, Owner Points.
43. (49) J.J. Yeley, Toyota, 93.212.
Failed to Qualify
44. (52) Scott Speed, Toyota, 92.101.
45. (19) Mike Bliss, Toyota, 84.846.
46. (37) Tony Raines, Ford.


Harvick leads throughout



to dominate Truck race


Associated Press

MARTINSVILLE, Va. -
Pole-sitter Kevin Harvick
led all but two laps and won
the spring NASCAR Truck
Series race at Martinsville
Speedway on Saturday for
the third time in the past
four years.
The former truck team
owner yielded the top spot
to teammate Ty Dillon for
the fourth and fifth laps, but
left no doubt which truck
was best in leading a series-
record 248 laps.
It was his fourth career
start from the pole in the se-
ries, and he's won all four
races.
It also was his first victory
in the truck series for team
owner Richard Childress.
Until this season, Harvick
owned his own truck teams,
but gave that up in the off-
season.
"I said to Richard when
he leaned in the window,
'Why did I ever start a race
team?'" he said. "'Can you
imagine how many wins we
would have if we'd never
done that?"'
This one looked simple,
and felt precariously easy,
Harvick said.
"Nine times out of 10,
when you have trucks like
this, or cars, and you have a
day like that where you
think you're by far the
fastest, usually they never
work out," he said, "so today
was a special day to win the
pole, lead the most laps and
win the race.
"It's something that you
don't do very often. I'm
pretty happy for everybody"
Dillon, in his fourth start,
was in close communication
with Harvick's team all day
and ran second almost the
entire race, but had to hold
off James Buescher on a
restart with six laps to go.
He did that easily, and fol-
lowed Harvick to a comfort-
able second-place finish.
Camping World Truck
Kroger 250 Results
Saturday
At Martinsville Speedway
Ridgeway,Va.
Lap length: .526 miles
(Start position in parentheses)
1. (1) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 250 laps, 150
rating, 0 points, $33,300.
2. (2) Ty Dillon, Chevrolet, 250, 121, 43,
$25,340.


Associated Press
Kevin Harvick celebrates in victory lane after winning the
Camping World Truck auto race Saturday at the Martinsville
Speedway in Martinsville, Va.


3. (9) James Buescher, Chevrolet, 250, 114.3,
41, $18,785.
4. (6) Justin Lofton, Chevrolet, 250, 108.3, 40,
$15,300.
5. (3) Timothy Peters, Toyota, 250, 113.6, 39,
$14,200.
6. (16) Nelson Piquet Jr., Chevrolet, 250, 87.5,
38, $11,675.
7. (17) Ross Chastain, Toyota, 250, 87.9, 37,
$14,525.
8. (12) Jason Leffler, Toyota, 250, 90.4, 36,
$9,225.
9. (32) John King, Toyota, 250, 70.7, 35,
$11,425.
10. (22) Jason White, Ford, 250, 65.3, 34,
$12,650.
11. (15) Parker Kligerman, Ram, 250, 90.2, 33,
$11,325.
12. (20) J.R. Fitzpatrick, Chevrolet, 250, 54.2,
32, $8,950.
13. (7) Jeb Burton, Chevrolet, 250, 76.2, 31,
$11,150.
14. (27) David Starr, Toyota, 250, 73.7, 30,
$8,850.
15. (4) Cale Gale, Chevrolet, 250, 92.5, 29,
$12,100.
16. (5) Ron Hornaday Jr., Chevrolet, 250, 80.5,
28, $8,700.
17. (14) Miguel Paludo, Chevrolet, 250, 76.1,
27, $10,900.
18. (31) Jake Crum, Chevrolet, 249, 46.5, 26,
$10,850.
19. (26) Max Gresham, Chevrolet, 249, 62.4,
25, $10,800.
20. (25) David Reutimann, Chevrolet, 249, 55.9,
0, $9,100.
21. (36) Dakoda Armstrong, Toyota, 248, 44.2,
23, $8,450.
22. (18) Paulie Harraka, Ford, 248, 60.7, 22,
$10,675.
23. (30) John Wes Townley, Toyota, 248, 43.8,
21, $8,400.


24. (11) Matt Crafton, Chevrolet, 246, 72.8, 20,
$10,600.
25. (13) Todd Bodine, Toyota, 246, 81.3, 19,
$8,425.
26. (33) Bryan Silas, Ford, 244, 33.9, 18,
$10,475.
27. (35) Chris Cockrum, Chevrolet, 241, 31.7,
17, $10,450.
28. (19) Brennan Newberry, Chevrolet, acci-
dent, 234, 58.2, 16, $8,175.
29. (8) Johnny Sauter, Toyota, 231, 88.2, 15,
$10,125.
30. (21) Joey Coulter, Chevrolet, 228, 54, 14,
$9,100.
31. (29) Clay Greenfield, Ram, suspension,
151, 34.3, 13, $8,155.
32. (28) Ryan Sieg, Chevrolet, oil line, 148,
44.6, 12, $7,625.
33. (24) Dusty Davis, Toyota, rear gear, 104,
42.8, 11, $7,600.
34. (34) Jennifer Jo Cobb, Ram, suspension,
95, 25.6, 10, $7,575.
35. (10) Jeff Agnew, Chevrolet, accident, 90, 35,
9, $7,550.
36. (23) Rick Crawford, Chevrolet, brakes, 6, 28,
8, $7,495.
Race Statistics
Average Speed of Race Winner: 70.752 mph.
Time of Race: 1 hour, 51 minutes, 31 seconds.
Margin of Victory: 0.953 seconds.
Caution Flags: 7 for 49 laps.
Lead Changes: 2 among 2 drivers.
Lap Leaders: K.Harvick 1-3; TDillon 4-5; K.Har-
vick 6-250.
Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps
Led): K.Harvick, 2 times for 248 laps; TDillon, 1
time for 2 laps.
Top 10 in Points: 1. J.King, 82; 2.T.Peters, 81; 3.
J.Lofton, 81; 4. TDillon, 78; 5. J.White, 74; 6.
J.Buescher, 69; 7. PKligerman, 66; 8. N.Piquet
Jr., 61; 9. R.Hornaday Jr., 58; 10. T.Bodine, 57.


B2 SUNDAY, APRIL 1, 2012


AUTO RACING





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Nothing decided in Rays, Red Sox contest


Tampa Bay forges

tie with Boston

in 9-inninggame

Associated Press

PORT CHARLOTTE, Fla. -
Carlos Pena, Evan Longoria and
Luke Scott homered for the
Tampa Bay Rays, but four errors
and a shaky relief outing from
Wade Davis led to a 7-all tie with
the Boston Red Sox on Saturday
The game was called after nine
innings.
Red Sox manager Bobby Valen-
tine left his regulars in Fort Myers
and opted to bring minor leaguers
and backups to Port Charlotte.
Rays manager Joe Maddon used
a handful of relievers because
scheduled starter Jeff Niemann
was a late scratch because of a
blister on his right middle finger.
Niemann, who beat out Davis for
the fifth spot in Tampa Bay's rota-
tion, isn't expected to miss his first
regular season start.
Davis gave up five runs only
one earned on five hits in three
innings.
Tigers 2, Braves 1, 6 innings
KISSIMMEE, Fla. Justin Verlan-
der tuned up for opening day with a
crisp outing in his final spring start and
the Detroit Tigers beat the Atlanta
Braves 2-1 in a game called after six
innings due to rain.
Verlander, who won the American
League Cy Young and Most Valuable
Player awards last season, allowed
four hits in six innings to finish the
spring with a 2.02 ERA. The right-han-
der will make his next start on Thurs-
day against the Boston Red Sox.
Tommy Hanson also pitched six in-
nings for the Braves, yielding five hits.
He's also slated to start on opening
day on Thursday against the New
York Mets.
Atlanta closer Craig Kimbrel came
in for the seventh but that's when the
game was called after a seven-minute
delay.
Marlins 6, Mets 5
JUPITER, Fla. Mark Buehrle al-
lowed three earned runs in his final ex-
hibition tuneup, and the Miami Marlins
beat the New York Mets 6-5.
Buehrle gave up seven hits and four
runs overall in 5 1-3 innings. He fin-
ished his first spring training with the
Marlins with a 6.62 ERA.
Miguel Batista, who learned Friday
he had made the team as a long re-
liever and spot starter, allowed a solo
homer to Hanley Ramirez in the sec-
ond inning. Batista pitched two innings.
Mets ace Johan Santana was
happy with his bullpen session at Port
St. Lucie earlier in the day and will see
how he feels Sunday before the team
names it's starting pitcher for opening
day on Thursday.
Minor leaguer Clint Sammons hit a
game-ending single for Miami.


\ ... ... ........"............


-. --^ I i -.-- -. .. .- .-. ,_" . .

Associated Press
Tampa Bay Rays first baseman Carlos Pena fields the throw as the Boston Red Sox's Nate Spears is out on
a grounder in the first inning Saturday in Port Charlotte, Fla.


Yankees 11, Astros 9,
8 innings
KISSIMMEE, Fla. Robinson
Cano and Raul Ibanez each had two-
run homers, 19-year-old Dante
Bichette Jr. connected on the first two
pitches he saw this spring and the
New York Yankees beat the Houston
Astros 11-9 in a game shortened to
eight innings by rain.
The Yankees and Astros combined
for nine home runs.
Jordan Lyles, bidding for one of two
open spots in the Astros' rotation,
gave up eight runs and 11 hits in
4 2-3 innings.
Justin Ruggiano, Carlos Lee, Brian
Bogusevic and Chris Johnson hit
home runs for the Astros in their final
spring home game in Florida.
Jose Gil also homered for the
Yankees.
Adam Warren, a candidate for a
spot in the Yankees' bullpen, gave up
six runs in 5 2-3 innings in his second
start.
Cardinals 6, Nationals 2
VIERA, Fla. Stephen Strasburg
pitched four innings in his tuneup to
start on opening day for the Washing-
ton Nationals in a 6-2 loss to the St.
Louis Cardinals.
Strasburg allowed three runs, two of
them earned, all in the second inning.
He gave up five hits overall, striking
out three and walking one.
Strasburg finished spring training
with a 1-4 record. He'll start on April
5 against the Chicago Cubs at
Wrigley Field.
Cardinals starter Jake Westbrook
gave up one run and two hits in 5 2-3
innings.
Daniel Descalso doubled twice and
drove in four runs. Chad Tracy home-
red for Washington.


Blue Jays 8, Phillies 5
CLEARWATER, Fla. Roy Halla-
day pitched two innings in a rain-short-
ened final spring start, and the
Philadelphia Phillies went on to an 8-5
loss to the Toronto Blue Jays.
Halladay allowed two runs and
three hits, struck out three and walked
none before a 37-minute rain delay in-
terrupted the exhibition game. The
right-hander finished his work inside
the batting cage and is set to face the
Pirates in Pittsburgh on opening day.
Jose Bautista, Edwin Encarna-
cion and Luis Valbuena homered for
Toronto. Bautista hit a solo drive off
David Herndon for his fourth spring
homer.
Blue Jays left-hander Ricky Romero
prepped for his opening-day start by
retiring all six batters he faced, striking
out two.
Twins 15, Pirates (ss) 3
FORT MYERS Justin Morneau
continued his surge since moving to
designated hitter, going 2 for 4 with a
double to help the Minnesota Twin
rough up Kevin Correia and a Pitts-
burgh Pirates split squad in a 15-3 win.
Correia gave up 10 runs and 12 hits
in 2 1-3 innings. The bad day more
than doubled Correia's run total
through his first 14 innings this spring.
The Twins, meanwhile, have
scored seven or more runs in four of
their last five games after finishing
second to last in runs in the American
League last year.
Denard Span went 4 for 5 with a
double for the Twins and Ryan Doumit
homered and had two hits.
Pirates (ss) 6, Orioles 6,
9 innings
BRADENTON, Fla. Erik Bedard
gave up four runs in five innings while


preparing to start on opening day start
for Pittsburgh, and a split squad of Pi-
rates tied the Baltimore Orioles 6-all.
The game was called after nine in-
nings because both teams ran out of
pitchers.
Bedard allowed five hits, walked two
and struck out two. He's set to start on
Thursday when the Pirates host
Philadelphia.
The Orioles took a 4-1 lead in the
fourth on consecutive home runs by
Ronny Paulino and Jai Miller.
Paulino's homer, his first of the spring,
was a three-run shot.
Brewers 10, Padres (ss) 7
PEORIA, Ariz. Mat Gamel hit a
grand slam and a solo home run and
the Milwaukee Brewers topped a split
squad of San Diego Padres 10-7.
Alex Gonzalez and Carlos Gomez
also homered for the Brewers.
Gamel hit his slam off Padres
starter Tim Stauffer and later con-
nected against San Diego closer
Huston Street.
Stauffer allowed six earned runs
and seven hits in five innings. Street
gave up four earned runs and two
homers in his inning.
Jesus Guzman hit a three-run
homer off Milwaukee starter Chris
Narveson, who allowed seven runs
and seven hits in five innings.
Ryan Braun had two hits for
Milwaukee.
Rockies 3, White Sox 1
GLENDALE, Ariz. John Danks
was sharp in his final outing before
starting on opening day, pitching six
innings for the Chicago White Sox in a
3-1 loss to the Colorado Rockies.
Danks allowed one run and three
hits, walking none and striking out two.
He will pitch Friday at Texas.
Rockies starter Drew Pomeranz


threw six scoreless innings. He gave
up four hits, struck out two and walked
one. Pomeranz will join the Rockies'
rotation as their fifth starter April 15.
Dodgers 9, D-backs (ss) 3
SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. -Aces Clay-
ton Kershaw and lan Kennedy both
struggled in their final spring tuneups,
and the Los Angeles Dodgers de-
feated an Arizona Diamondbacks split
squad 9-3.
Kershaw, the reigning NL Cy Young
Award winner, gave up three runs, six
hits and a walk in 3 2-3 innings for the
Dodgers.
Kennedy worked five innings allowed
three runs on five hits and a walk.
Outfielder Matt Angle hit a two-run
homer and shortstop Justin Sellers
had two RBIs for Los Angeles. Ronald
Belsiario pitched 1 1-3 perfect innings
to pick up the win.
D-backs (ss) 10, Royals 3
SURPRISE, Ariz. Geoff Blum
and A.J. Pollock homered to lead an
Arizona Diamondbacks split-squad to
a 10-3 victory over the Kansas City
Royals.
Pollock led off the game with a
home run on Danny Duffy's fourth
pitch. He also scored on Blum's drive
in Kansas City's four-run fifth.
Lyle Overbay went 3 for 5 and
Henry Blanco had a two-run triple for
Arizona. Chris Jakubauskas, who will
start the season in the minors, allowed
a run and six hits in five innings.
Diamondbacks closer J.J. Putz
gave up a run and three hits in the
seventh.
Eric Hosmer singled in a run for
Kansas City, extending his hitting
streak to 12 games and increasing his
RBI total to a Cactus League-leading
29. Duffy allowed six runs, five earned,
and seven hits in 4 2-3 innings.
Angels 3, Cubs 3, 10 innings
MESA, Ariz. -Albert Pujols home-
red for the second straight day and the
Los Angeles Angels played to a 3-all tie
with the Chicago Cubs in 10 innings.
Pujols hit the first pitch he saw from
left-hander Paul Maholm for a two-run
homer in the first inning.
Pujols had a career batting average
of .564 (22 for 49) with two homers
and eight RBIs in the regular season
against Maholm.
Reds 10, Giants 2
SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. Jeff Francis
scattered three hits across seven
strong innings and the Cincinnati Reds
routed the San Francisco Giants 10-2.
Francis, bidding for a spot in the
Reds' bullpen, gave up a one-out in-
field single to Melky Cabrera in the
first and then retired 15 straight hitters
before hitting Brett Pill with a pitch with
two outs in the sixth.
Buster Posey walked and Joaquin
Arias homered to left field with one out
in the bottom of the seventh for the Gi-
ants' runs.
Joey Votto doubled, his third extra-
base hit of the spring, and Scott Rolen
had two hits and drove in a pair of
runs for the Reds.


Bolts outrace Jets Bryant's
T lrerc


Associated Press


TAMPA Steven
Stamkos scored his NHL-
leading 56th goal of the sea-
son 45 seconds into
overtime to give the Tampa
Bay Lightning a 3-2 victory
over the Winnipeg Jets on
Saturday night
Stamkos picked up his
NHL-record fifth OT goal in
one season, scoring from the
left circle.
Ryan Malone scored
twice, giving him five goals
in the past two games, for
the Lightning.
Goalie Sebastien Caron
made his second appear-
ance since signing with
Tampa Bay on March 19 and
his first NHL start since
Nov 10, 2006.
Antti Miettinen and Kyle
Wellwood scored for
Winnipeg.
Malone flipped the puck
over Grant Clitson in the
neutral zone, raced the past
the defenseman and beat
goalie Ondrej Pavelec to put
the Lightning up 1-0 with
4:23 left in the first. Mal-
one's rebound goal on the
power play tied it at 2 at 7:25
of the third.
Miettinen and Wellwood
had goals 3:08 apart in the
second. After Miettinen
scored from the slot off a pass
from Evander Kane 6:20 into
the period, Wellwood gave
Winnipeg a 2-1 lead with a
rebound goal at 9:28.
Caron made a strong
glove save on an in-close
shot by Ron Hainsey during
the first. Caron joined the
Lightning after playing in
Germany
Bruins 6, Islanders 3
UNIONDALE, N.Y. Brad


Associated Press
Tampa Bay Lightning right wing J.T. Brown controls the puck
ahead of Winnipeg Jets right wing Spencer Machacek during
the second period Saturday in Tampa.


Marchand snapped a third-pe-
riod tie with his team-leading
27th goal, and the playoff-bound
Boston Bruins ended the New
York Islanders' minuscule post-
season chances with a 6-3 win.
The defending Stanley Cup
champion Bruins, who lead the
Northeast Division, had plenty
of support as a large throng of
fans cheering "Let's Go Bruins"
throughout while decked out in
black and gold jerseys filled the
Nassau Coliseum and made up
about half of the sellout crowd.
Tyler Seguin, who made the
pass to set up Marchand's goal
3:13 into the third, pushed
Boston's lead to 4-2 with 9:23
remaining and matched Marc-
hand with his 27th goal.
Devils 5, Hurricanes 0
RALEIGH, N.C. Ilya Ko-
valchuk had a goal and two as-
sists, Martin Brodeur made 22
saves in his third shutout of the
season and the New Jersey
Devils clinched a playoff berth
by routing the Carolina Hurri-


canes 5-0.
Petr Sykora added a goal and
an assist for the Devils. David
Clarkson, Ryan Carter and Zach
Parise also scored, and Patrik
Elias had two assists.
New Jersey scored three
goals in a 3:50 span and had
no trouble after that while wrap-
ping up a return to the playoffs
after a one-year absence.
Brodeur's 119th career
shutout moved him one victory
from another NHL record. His
next win will give him 14 sea-
sons with at least 30 victories.
Maple Leafs 4,
Sabres 3
TORONTO Joey Crabb
had a goal and an assist, Ben
Scrivens made 29 saves and
the Toronto Maple Leafs ended
a team-record 11-game home
losing streak with a 4-3 victory
over the Buffalo Sabres.
Phil Kessel, John-Michael
Liles and Matt Frattin also
scored, and Clarke MacArthur
added two assists.


Tyler Ennis, Ville Leino and
Drew Stafford scored for Buf-
falo. The Sabres are trying to
chase down Washington for the
final playoff spot in the Eastern
Conference.
Senators 4,
Flyers 3, SO
PHILADELPHIA- Jason
Spezza and Milan Michalek
scored shootout goals to help
the Ottawa Senators beat the
Philadelphia Flyers 4-3.
The Senators blew a 3-0
lead before Michalek and
Spezza bailed them out in the
shootout. Matt Read scored in
the shootout for the Flyers.
Spezza, Daniel Alfredsson,
Chris Neil all scored first-period
goals for the Senators.
Wayne Simmonds, Sean
Couturier and Braydon Coburn
evened it at 3 with goals in the
second period for the Flyers.
Capitals 3,
Canadiens 2, SO
WASHINGTON The Wash-
ington Capitals welcomed back
Nicklas Backstrom and took a
big step toward the playoffs,
blowing a two-goal lead for the
second game in a row before
taking the shootout for a 3-2 win
over the Montreal Canadiens.
The result, coupled with
Toronto's 4-3 win over Buffalo,
moved the Capitals two points
clear of the Sabres with three
games to play. Washington also
moved within two points of South-
east Division leader Florida.
Alex Ovechkin and Alexan-
der Semin scored in the
shootout for the Capitals. David
Desharnais had his attempt
stopped by goaltender Michal
Neuvirth, and Max Pacioretty
missed wide for the Canadiens.


LJLJ(lA,1 kJL


LA nips New NE
NE
Orleans 88-85 thon'
York K
Associated Press bad in
ing th<
LOS ANGELES Kobe 91-75
Bryant hit a go-ahead 3- Alre
pointer with 20 seconds left, Stoud
after starting the game with
18 straight misses, and the nounc
Los Angeles Lakers rallied Jerer
to beat the last-place New gery ti
Orleans Hornets 88-85. in hisI
It was just the third field six we
goal of the game for withoi
Bryant, who finished with third-h
11 points on 3 of 21 shoot- try to
ing as the Lakers ended a But
two-game skid at home. may h
Pau Gasol had 21 points Chan(
and 11 rebounds, and An- 12 ret
drew Bynum added 19 place
points and 10 rebounds, Ant
while Ramon Sessions had for the
10 points and 10 assists., with
Bryant was 0 for 7 on 3- Irving.
pointers before making his Irving
only one. He had five as-
sists, three rebounds and B
four fouls in 39 minutes. AUI
76ers 95, Hawks 90 Will B
PHILADELPHIA- Elton 15.7 s
Brand scored 13 of his sea- sent tl
son-high 25 points in the and th
fourth quarter to lead the on to E
Philadelphia 76ers to a 95-90 cats 1
comeback win over the Atlanta The
Hawks. under
Andre Iguodala scored 18, Detroi
and Brand had 10 rebounds to a pair
go with his 10-for-12 shooting. Bynur
Josh Smith led Atlanta with from t
34 points and Joe Johnson dersol
had 15. The Hawks have lost win it
three of four after winning four driving
straight. the fin


-3 gives


ame
iicks 91, Cavs 75
W YORK-- JR Smith
d 20 points, Carmelo An-
had 19, and the New
Knicks shook off more
jury news before beat-
e Cleveland Cavaliers

ready without Amare
emire, the Knicks an-
;ed before the game that
ly Lin would have sur-
o repair a torn meniscus
left knee and could miss
weeks. That leaves them
ut their second- and
leading scorers as they
hold onto a playoff spot.
they showed they still
have enough. Tyson
dler had 14 points and
)ounds for the eighth-
Knicks.
awn Jamison scored 13
Cavaliers, who played
ut injured rookie Kyrie

Pistons 110,
Bobcats 107, OT
BURN HILLS, Mich. -
ynum's 3-pointer with
seconds left in regulation
he game into overtime,
ie Detroit Pistons went
edge the Charlotte Bob-
10-107.
Bobcats led 93-85 with
2:00 remaining before
it's Brandon Knight made
of 3-pointers and
m sank his tying shot
he left wing. Gerald Hen-
n had a great chance to
for Charlotte, but his
g bank shot missed in
lal seconds.


SPORTS


SUNDAY, APRIL 1, 2012 B3


'19






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Spring training glance
All Times EDT
AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L Pct
Toronto 23 5 .821
Oakland 14 5 .737
Detroit 17 7 .708
Los Angeles 17 10 .630
Seattle 12 8 .600
Minnesota 18 13 .581
New York 15 11 .577
Boston 13 11 .542
Kansas City 15 14 .517
Baltimore 11 12 .478
Chicago 12 17 .414
Texas 10 17 .370
Tampa Bay 8 16 .333
Cleveland 6 20 .231
NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L Pct
St. Louis 16 8 .667
San Diego 19 13 .594
Colorado 16 12 .571
San Francisco 16 13 .552
Los Angeles 14 12 .538
Houston 14 15 .483
Milwaukee 13 14 .481
Miami 11 12 .478
Chicago 14 16 .467
Cincinnati 14 16 .467
Philadelphia 12 16 .429
Washington 11 15 .423
Arizona 12 17 .414
Atlanta 10 17 .370
Pittsburgh 8 18 .308
NewYork 7 18 .280
NOTE: Split-squad games count in the stand-
ings; games against non-major league teams
do not.
Friday's Games
Detroit 6, Baltimore 3
Boston 9, Minnesota (ss) 7
Pittsburgh 3, Tampa Bay 3, tie
Minnesota (ss) 4, Toronto 1
St. Louis 4, N.Y Mets 3
L.A. Angels 9, Arizona 2
Cincinnati 6, Cleveland 5
L.A. Dodgers (ss) 6, Chicago Cubs 3
Milwaukee 9, L.A. Dodgers (ss) 4
Atlanta (ss) 3, Houston (ss) 1
Washington 3, Miami 2
Houston (ss) 5, Atlanta (ss) 1
N.Y Yankees 13, Philadelphia 9
Kansas City 7, Chicago White Sox 2
San Diego 8, San Francisco 7
Texas 5, Colorado 3
Saturday's Games
Toronto 8, Philadelphia 5
N.Y Yankees 11, Houston 9
St. Louis 6, Washington 2
Detroit 2, Atlanta 1, 7 innings
Minnesota 15, Pittsburgh (ss) 3
Pittsburgh (ss) 6, Baltimore 6, tie
Miami 6, N.Y Mets 5
Tampa Bay 7, Boston 7, tie
Milwaukee 10, San Diego (ss) 7
Colorado 3, Chicago White Sox 1
Chicago Cubs 3, L.A. Angels 3, tie, 10 innings
Arizona (ss) 10, Kansas City 3
L.A. Dodgers 9, Arizona (ss) 3
Cincinnati 10, San Francisco 2
San Diego (ss) vs. Seattle, late
Texas vs. Cleveland, late
Sunday's Games
Philadelphia vs. Atlanta at Kissimmee, Fla.,
1:05 p.m.
Houston vs. Detroit (ss) at Lakeland, Fla.,
1:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay vs. Baltimore at Sarasota, Fla.,
1:05 p.m.
Washington vs. St. Louis at Jupiter, Fla., 1:05
p.m.
Pittsburgh vs. Toronto at Dunedin, Fla., 1:05
p.m.
N.Y Yankees at Miami, 1:10 p.m.
Detroit (ss) vs. N.Y. Mets at Port St. Lucie,
Fla., 1:10 p.m.
Minnesota vs. Boston at Fort Myers, Fla.,
1:35 p.m.
Chicago Cubs vs. L.A. Angels at Tempe,
Ariz., 4:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox vs. Cincinnati at
Goodyear, Ariz., 4:05 p.m.
Arizona vs. L.A. Dodgers at Glendale, Ariz.,
4:05 p.m.
San Francisco vs. Milwaukee at Phoenix,
4:05 p.m.
Kansas City vs. Seattle at Peoria, Ariz., 4:05
p.m.
San Diego vs. Texas at Surprise, Ariz., 4:05
p.m.
Cleveland vs. Colorado at Scottsdale, Ariz.,
4:10 p.m.
Monday's Games
N.Y. Mets vs. Atlanta at Kissimmee, Fla.,
12:00 p.m.
Toronto vs. Detroit at Lakeland, Fla., 1:05
p.m.
Minnesota vs. Tampa Bay at Port Charlotte,
Fla., 1:05 p.m.
Washington vs. Boston at Fort Myers, Fla.,
1:35 p.m.
Cincinnati vs. Cleveland at Goodyear, Ariz.,
3:05 p.m.
Milwaukee vs. Chicago White Sox at Glen-
dale, Ariz., 3:05 p.m.
Colorado vs. Seattle at Peoria, Ariz., 4:05
p.m.
Chicago Cubs vs. Arizona at Scottsdale,
Ariz., 4:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m.
N.Y Yankees at Miami, 7:10 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers vs. L.A. Angels at Tempe, Ariz.,
10:05 p.m.
Oakland at San Francisco, 10:35 p.m.



NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
Boston 29 22 .569 -
Philadelphia 29 23 .558 12
New York 27 26 .509 3
New Jersey 18 35 .340 12
Toronto 17 35 .327 1212
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 37 13 .740
Orlando 32 20 .615 6
Atlanta 31 23 .574 8
Washington 12 39 .235 2512
Charlotte 7 43 .140 30
Central Division
W L Pct GB
x-Chicago 42 11 .792 -
Indiana 30 20 .600 1012
Milwaukee 24 27 .471 17
Detroit 19 33 .365 221/2
Cleveland 17 33 .340 231/2
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 35 14 .714 -
Dallas 30 23 .566 7
Memphis 27 22 .551 8
Houston 28 24 .538 812


New Orleans 13 39 .250 23Y2
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 39 12 .765 -
Denver 28 24 .538 111Y2
Utah 27 25 .519 1212
Minnesota 25 28 .472 15
Portland 24 28 .462 1512
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
L.A. Lakers 32 20 .615 -
L.A. Clippers 30 21 .588 11Y2
Phoenix 25 26 .490 61/2
Golden State 20 30 .400 11
Sacramento 18 33 .353 13/2
x-clinched playoff spot
Friday's Games
Denver 99, Charlotte 88
Miami 113, Toronto 101
Washington 97, Philadelphia 76


FOr the record


== lorida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Saturday in the Florida Lottery:
S.. CASH 3 (early)
2-1-4
CASH 3 (late)
[i.'tS 5 -5-7-9

K PLAY 4 (early)
S4-9-2-3
PLAY 4 (late)
7 -8-6-4

FANTASY 5
a Lotty 4-6-8-12-13

POWERBALL LOTTERY
5 14 36 54 58 1-15-17-23-31-33
POWER BALL XTRA
27 2


On the AIRWAVES

TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
12:30 p.m. (FOX) Sprint Cup: Goody's Fast Relief 500
2 p.m. (NBCSPT) IndyCar: Honda Indy Grand Prix of Alabama
7 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRA: SummitRacing.com Nationals
(Same-day Tape)
BASEBALL
1 p.m. (SUN) Preseason: New York Yankees at Miami Marlins
BASKETBALL
NBA
1 p.m. (ABC) Chicago Bulls at Oklahoma City Thunder
3:30 p.m. (ABC) Miami Heat at Boston Celtics
6 p.m. (SUN) Denver Nuggets at Orlando Magic
NCAA WOMEN'S FINAL FOUR
6:30 p.m. (ESPN) Connecticut vs. Notre Dame
8:30 p.m. (ESPN) Baylor vs. Stanford
HIGH SCHOOL BASKETBALL
4:30 p.m. (CBS) American Family Insurance Slam Dunk &
3-Point Championship (Taped) (CC)
BICYCLING
8:30 a.m. (NBCSPT) Tour of Flanders (Taped)
BOWLING
1 p.m. (ESPN) PBA Carmen Salvino Classic (Taped)
GOLF
7 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour: Sicilian Open
1 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: Shell Houston Open
3 p.m. (NBC) PGATour: Shell Houston Open
4:30 p.m. (GOLF) LPGA Tour: Kraft Nabisco Championship
HOCKEY
12:30 p.m. (NBC) Philadelphia Flyers at Pittsburgh
Penguins
4 p.m. (FSNFL) Florida Panthers at Detroit Red Wings
7 p.m. (NBCSPT) Boston Bruins at New York Rangers
MOTORCYCLE RACING
12 p.m. (CBS) Monster Energy AMA Supercross World
Championship (Taped)
RUGBY
10:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) Sevens World Series: Japan (Taped)
WOMEN'S SOCCER
6:25 a.m. (ESPN2) Japan vs. United States
COLLEGE SOFTBALL
1 p.m. (FSNFL) Florida at Georgia
TENNIS
1 p.m. (CBS) ATP: Sony Ericsson Open Men's Final
SNOWMOBILE RACING
5 p.m. (NBCSPT) Amsoil Championship Series (Taped)

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


Atlanta 100, New York 90
Milwaukee 121, Cleveland 84
Chicago 83, Detroit 71
Houston 98, Memphis 89
Boston 100, Minnesota 79
Dallas 100, Orlando 98
Sacramento 104, Utah 103
New Jersey 102, Golden State 100
L.A. Clippers 98, Portland 97
Saturday's Games
L.A. Lakers 88, New Orleans 85
Detroit 110, Charlotte 107, OT
New York 91, Cleveland 75
Philadelphia 95, Atlanta 90
Indiana at San Antonio, late
Memphis at Milwaukee, late
New Jersey at Sacramento, late
Utah at L.A. Clippers, late
Sunday's Games
Chicago at Oklahoma City 1 p.m.
Miami at Boston, 3:30 p.m.
Washington at Toronto, 6 p.m.
Denver at Orlando, 6 p.m.
Indiana at Houston, 7 p.m.
Minnesota at Portland, 9 p.m.
New Orleans at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
Golden State at L.A. Lakers, 9:30 p.m.
Monday's Games
Milwaukee at Washington, 7 p.m.
Houston at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Memphis at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Minnesota at Sacramento, 10 p.m.
Utah at Portland, 10 p.m.



NHL standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
x-N.Y Rangers 78 5021 7107217 173
x-Pittsburgh 78 4824 6 102264 208
x-Philadelphia 78 4524 9 99251 218
x-New Jersey 79 4528 6 96219 205
N.Y Islanders 78 3334 11 77193 236
Northeast Division
GP W LOT PtsGF GA
x-Boston 78 4628 4 96257 192
Ottawa 78 4028 10 90240 230
Buffalo 79 3831 10 86208 219
Toronto 79 34 36 9 77222 252
Montreal 79 2935 15 73202 221
Southeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Florida 78 3725 16 90192 215
Washington 79 4031 8 88212 223
Winnipeg 79 3634 9 81213 233
Tampa Bay 78 36 35 7 79223 268
Carolina 79 31 32 16 78208 237
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
x-St. Louis 78 4820 10 106202 151
x-Nashville 78 45 25 8 98223 203
x-Detroit 78 4627 5 97240 195
Chicago 78 4326 9 95235 225
Columbus 78 2645 7 59185 253
Northwest Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
y-Vancouver 78 4821 9 105236 189
Colorado 80 41 33 6 88205 209
Calgary 79 3529 15 85192 219
Minnesota 77 3235 10 74164 212
Edmonton 78 31 38 9 71208 230


Pacific Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
LosAngeles 78 3927 12 90182 166
Dallas 78 4231 5 89207 209
Phoenix 78 3827 13 89202 202
San Jose 78 3929 10 88211 201
Anaheim 77 3333 11 77194 213
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over-
time loss.
x-clinched playoff spot
y-clinched division
Friday's Games
Winnipeg 4, Carolina 3, OT
Columbus 4, Florida 1
N.Y. Rangers 4, Montreal 1
Pittsburgh 5, Buffalo 3
Nashville 4, Detroit 1
Colorado 4, Calgary 1
Los Angeles 4, Edmonton 1
Vancouver 5, Dallas 2
Saturday's Games
Ottawa 4, Philadelphia 3, SO
Washington 3, Montreal 2, SO
Boston 6, N.Y Islanders 3
Toronto 4, Buffalo 3
New Jersey 5, Carolina 0
Tampa Bay 3, Winnipeg 2, OT
Columbus at St. Louis, late
Chicago at Nashville, late
Los Angeles at Minnesota, late
Anaheim at Phoenix, late
Calgary at Vancouver, late
Dallas at San Jose, late
Sunday's Games
Philadelphia at Pittsburgh, 12:30 p.m.
Ottawa at N.Y. Islanders, 3 p.m.
Florida at Detroit, 4 p.m.
Boston at N.Y Rangers, 7 p.m.
Minnesota at Chicago, 7 p.m.
Edmonton at Anaheim, 8 p.m.
Monday's Games
Washington at Tampa Bay, 7p.m.
Edmonton at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.


BASEBALL
American League
BALTIMORE ORIOLES-Optioned RHP
Chris Tillman to Norfolk (IL).
CHICAGO WHITE SOX-Optioned RHP
Dylan Axelrod to Charlotte (IL). Reassigned
RHP Brian Bruney, C HectorGimenez, INF Rey
Olmedo, LHP Leyson Septimo and LHP Eric
Stults to their minor league camp.
MINNESOTA TWINS-Optioned C Drew
Butera to Rochester (IL). Placed RHP Kyle Wal-
drop on the 15-day DL, retroactive to March 26.
Reassigned INF Michael Hollimon to their minor
league camp.
NEWYORKYANKEES-Placed RHP Michael
Pineda and LHP Cesar Cabral on the 15-day
DL.
TAMPA BAY RAYS-Placed RHP Matt Bush
on the restricted list.
National League
HOUSTON ASTROS-Reassigned C Carlos
Corporan to their minor league camp.
MILWAUKEE BREWERS-Optioned RHP
Mike McClendon to Nashville (PCL). Assigned
RHP Amaury Rivas outright to Nashville. Reas-
signed INF Edwin Maysonet to their minor
league camp.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
SACRAMENTO KINGS-Signed G-F
Terrence Williams for remainder of the season.


Sports BRIEFS


Kansas punches ticket
to Final Four over OSU
Down nine points at halftime,
Kansas came back Saturday
night to defeat Ohio State 64-62
in the Final Four in New Orleans.
With the victory, Kansas will
meet Kentucky on Monday
night for the NCAA men's na-
tional championship.
Kansas forward Thomas
Robinson had 19 points to lead
the Jayhawks (32-6) while
Elijah Johnson added 13 points
and 10 rebounds.
For Ohio State (31-8),
William Buford led the way with
19 points. Jared Sullinger strug-



HALL
Continued from Page B1

year as well, and Hall is hop-
ing to do it again for the third
year in a row next year. This
time, however, she hopes to
help propel them to a team
national title.




UK
Continued from Page BI

said. "Sometimes there's a
lot of talk about these guys
fighting, dialysis, there's also
really a lot of people that get
along.... For those that have
brains, they root for each
other.
"We like their basketball
team; we hope they bring it
home for the state."
Bigger, bulkier and with
the 19-year-old freshman
Davis having a wider
wingspan than some small
airplanes, the Wildcats
looked like playground bul-
lies as they pushed
Louisville around on their
way to a 13-point lead early
in the second half. But the
Cardinals know a thing about
rallies after coming from 11
points down to beat Florida
in last weekend's West Re-
gional final, and they sure
made Kentucky sweat.
Russ Smith made back-to-
back buckets to start a 15-3
run, and Peyton Siva capped
it with a 3-pointer from NBA
range that tied the game at 49
with 9:11 to play. But Michael
Kidd-Gilchrist, who played
just 23 minutes because of
foul trouble, made back-to-
back buckets to give the
Wildcats some breathing
room.
After Siva made a pair of
free throws, Terrence Jones
scored on a jumper and Dar-



KRAFT
Continued from Page B1

only four top-10 finishes in
her career.
For three rounds, Sjodin
has matched Tseng, who
has won the last two tourna-
ments and three of five so
far this season, leading 10 of
the last 11 rounds on the
LPGA Tour. The 23-year-old
Tseng is shooting to become
the youngest six-time major
winner in golf history, even
three years younger than
Tiger Woods.
But Tseng knew she
might be in trouble when
serious wind hit the Dinah
Shore tournament course
right about when Tseng and
Kang teed off in the final



AP

Continued from Page B1

Tina Martin of Delaware
was second with 14. Jim
Crowley of St Bonaventure
got three votes and Kim
Barnes-Arico of St. John's,
Matt Bollant, who coached
Wisconsin-Green Bay this
season before recently tak-
ing the Illinois job, Muffet
McGraw of Notre Dame and
Katie Meier of Miami each
got one vote.
"I'm honored, but truth-
fully, I'm only as good as the
kids I get to coach," Mulkey


said. "I'm blessed they are
on my team, they make you
look good."
Mulkey knew it was going
to be a special year for her
team the moment Griner
texted her after a loss in the
NCAA regional finals last
season.
"She was the only kid
that texted me within an
hour of the loss," Mulkey
said. "She said she was
sorry that she didn't deliver
When you have a kid as tal-
ented as she is, you knew


gled inside most of the evening
but finished with 13 points and
11 rebounds.
Ohio State held a 34-25
advantage at halftime.
Kansas was still down 59-56
after a layup by Buckeyes
guard Aaron Craft, but used a
6-0 run to take a 62-59 lead
following a layup by the
Jayhawks' Johnson.
Tyshawn Taylor made two
big free throws as Kansas ral-
lied from 13 points down to
complete another comeback in
a game the Jayhawks led for a
grand total of 3:48 two of
those minutes coming when the
score was 2-0.


"This is one of those
sports where you can get in-
dividual awards and team
awards," she said. "So, we
couldn't bring home the title
for the team. But next year,
we're going to come back
and hopefully come away
with it next year."
There is a saying out
there that 'you only live


ius Miller drilled a 3 only
Kentucky's second of the
game to give the Wildcats
control for good.
"I'm proud of this team.
They're coming together,"
Calipari said. "They've taken
on shots and runs like
Louisville did today, and
they've held their own, so I'm
proud of them."
Just to make sure
Louisville didn't get any wild
notions about another late
comeback, Kidd-Gilchrist
threw down a monstrous
dunk with 1:05 to play that
had Kentucky fans on their
feet and assistant coaches
from Kansas and Ohio State
scrambling to try and find a
way to stop this juggernaut
Kentucky shot a dazzling
57 percent yes, that's right
- with Davis leading the
way He missed just one of
his eight shots and finished
with 18 points and 14 re-
bounds. Miller added 13
points, and Doron Lamb had
10. Kidd-Gilchrist had nine,
all in the second half.
"We're one game closer to
our dream and our goals,"
Davis said.
Siva led the Cardinals with
11 points, and Gorgui Dieng
had 12 rebounds.
The Kentucky-Louisville
rivalry caused tempers to
flare even in December
when, in the grand scheme of
things, games really don't
mean much. Heck, it took
government intervention just
to get the two schools to play


twosome of the day
"For the front nine, I
played very solid, espe-
cially in this wind," said
Tseng, who also has plenty
of experience in bad-
weather golf growing up in
Taiwan. "I don't think it
was as tough as I thought,
so maybe I was prepared
for this. But on the back
nine, I got kind of emo-
tional, maybe thinking too
much, trying too hard to
play better."
Tseng dropped back to 9
under with a bogey on the
seventh hole, and Sjodin
briefly grabbed a share of
the lead with a birdie putt
on the 11th before Tseng
birdied the 10th.
But Tseng was put on the
clock on the next hole, and
she bogeyed the llth with a


she was going to come back
an even better player. She's
stronger, she's forceful.
She's dominant."
Griner averaged 23.4
points, 9.4 rebounds and 5.2
blocks this season. She shot
61 percent from the field
and 80 percent from the
free throw line. And she
has raised her game over
the last month.
Griner wowed the nation
becoming the second
women's player ever to
dunk in the NCAA tourna-
ment with a one-handed
jam in the second-round
win over Florida. She took
it a step further in the next


game with a two-handed
slam on the fast break.
"The first one, I didn't
plan on dunking it," Griner
said. "It caught me off
guard that I did it. The sec-
ond one, yeah I knew be-
forehand I was going to try.
I'm so focused right now on
getting the win and moving
on to the next game. I'll cel-
ebrate it later. It was defi-
nitely great though."
She has been more ag-
gressive this season rarely
taking plays off, something


Ex-NFL quarterback Leaf
arrested in Montana
HELENA, Mont. Police in
Montana say ex-NFL quarter-
back Ryan Leaf broke into an ac-
quaintance's home and stole a
bottle of prescription painkillers.
Central Montana Drug Task
Force Commander Chris Hick-
man says he has reason to be-
lieve Leaf may have done the
same to others, and he is asking
other victims to come forward.
Leaf was arrested Friday in
Great Falls after police
searched him and his vehicle
and found 28 oxycodone pills, a
narcotic painkiller.


once.' It's been an adage for
countless years, and Hall
understands what it means.
It means making a name
for yourself, and leaving a
legacy, and Hall has definitely
left her imprint on the county
"Citrus County native
Kristen Hall: national
champion."
That has a pretty ring to it.


on a regular basis back in the
1980s.
With the NCAA title game
on the line, the latest skir-
mish in basketball's version
of the civil war so divided the
small hoop-crazed state that
senior citizens actually came
to fisticuffs and made for
must-see TV The game was
such a big deal that No. 1
Kentucky fan Ashley Judd
wasn't even the biggest celeb
in the house, with Jay-Z tak-
ing a prime seat behind the
Kentucky bench.
"It's our fans; our fans are
great to us," Davis said. "Our
fans travel a long way We
want to go out here and give
them a show and give them
what they want, which is a
national championship."
Bragging rights in the state
is sure a nice way to start
Kentucky is 19-11 since the
teams resumed playing in
1983-84, with the Wildcats
winning four straight, includ-
ing a 69-62 victory at Rupp
Arena on Dec. 31 almost
the exact score as Saturday
night's win.
"They made runs, and we
made our runs. That's what
coach always says," Jones
said. "We never get rattled."
The Wildcats know they're
talented there are three,
maybe as many as five NBA
lottery picks on the Kentucky
roster but they play with-
out ego or cockiness, choos-
ing instead to let their
superior play overwhelm
their opponents.


poor tee shot. She then
missed a 2-foot par putt on
the 13th hole, staring at her
ball blankly after it toured
the rim of the cup before
popping back out.
She fell back to 8 under
and a tie with Sjodin, but
reclaimed the lead with a
birdie putt on the next hole.
"I'm glad this happened
today instead of tomorrow,"
Tseng said. "I was just
thinking too much and try-
ing too hard. It's good to
find out earlier."
Sjodin pulled back into
the lead with a birdie putt
on the 16th while Tseng bo-
geyed the 15th after a poor
shot out of a bunker. Tseng
pulled even with Sjodin yet
again with a birdie on the
par-3 17th with a beautiful
6-iron shot.


she learned while playing
on the U.S. national team's
European training tour in
late September. She was
the only college player in
the group, and potentially
could be the only collegian
on the Olympic team this
summer.
U.S. coach Geno Au-
riemma sensed a master-
piece in the making.
"Who carved out the
statue of 'David', Michae-
langelo?" he said. "She's
got a chance to be that
down the road. Right now
there's a lot of uncarved
away stuff because she's so
young. There's things she
does that no one else can


do. I've never seen anyone
do things she can do. All the
things she can't do it's be-
cause she hasn't had the ex-
perience to do them yet.
The more she's put in that
situation I think her growth
is going to be exponential.
She's going to take off."
Griner wasn't one of the
11 players unveiled Friday
to make the Olympic team,
but there is still one spot
open and it's potentially
hers.


B4 SUNDAY, APRIL 1, 2012


SCOREBOARD






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Radwanska downs




Sharapova for Sony title


Polish player

takes two tight

sets for triumph

Associated Press

KEY BISCAYNE, Fla. -
Maria Sharapova lost her
serve in the final game of
each set Saturday and again
fell short in a bid for her
first Sony Ericsson Open
title, losing to Agnieszka
Radwanska 7-5, 6-4.
Sharapova, a three-time
Grand Slam champion, fell
to 0-4 in Key Biscayne finals.
She was also the runner-up
in 2005, 2006 and last year.
Radwanska, ranked a ca-
reer-best No. 4, earned her
ninth career title and fourth
since last summer. She's 0-4
in 2012 against top-ranked
Victoria Azarenka and 26-0
against everyone else.
The match was 72 minutes
old before Radwanska hit
her first baseline winner She
was content to play steadily
and extend rallies until the
more aggressive Sharapova
would make a mistake.
Sharapova finished with
45 unforced errors, many
from the backhand side.
Radwanska committed only
10 unforced errors and
erased all three break
points she faced.


Associated Press
Agnieszka Radwanska. right, holds her trophy after defeating
Maria Sharapova in the women's singles final 7-5, 6-4 at the
Sony Ericsson tennis tournament Saturday in Key Biscayne, Fla.


On a sunny, 85-degree af-
ternoon, the South Florida
crowd was divided in its
support.
"Vamos Maria!" one
spectator hollered for the
Russian.
"Vamos Agnes!" another
shouted for the Pole.
Sharapova draped a
rolled-up cold towel around
her neck during changeovers,
but the heat didn't seem to
faze either player But the
pressure to hold serve made
Sharapova wobble twice.
Serving at 5-6 in the first
set, she committed four un-
forced errors including a
blown overhead to lose
the set.
The pattern was similar
in the second set, when


Radwanska had only one
break point the last point
of the match. Sharapova
sailed a forehand long, and
Radwanska lifted her arms
in triumph.
Radwanska beat Venus
Williams en route to the
final and won every set she
played. She improved to 2-7
against Sharapova, with her
other victory at the 2007
U.S. Open.
Sharapova was trying to
extend her streak of win-
ning at least one title for a
10th consecutive year. In-
stead she settled for her
third runner-up trophy in
2012 she also lost finals at
the Australian Open and In-
dian Wells, both to
Azarenka.


Ooshuizen assumes



lead at Houston Open


Associated Press

HUMBLE, Texas Louis
Oosthuizen shot his second
straight 6-under 66 on Sat-
urday to reach 17 under and
take a two-shot lead over
Hunter Mahan after the
third round of the Houston
Open.
The 29-year-old South
African shook off two early
bogeys on a sunny, windy af-
ternoon at Redstone. He
reeled off four birdies in a
row on the back nine to surge
ahead.
"It's a great leaderboard
behind me," Oosthuizen said.
"It's going to be tough, but I
feel like I'm ready for it"
Mahan had a 65, rebound-
ing from a bogey on No. 9
with four birdies on the back
nine.
Carl Pettersson (67) and
Brian Davis (69) were three
strokes back at 14 under
James Driscoll (71) was alone


Kraft Nabisco Champ.
Saturday
At Mission Hills Country Club, Dinah
Shore Tournament Course, Rancho Mirage,
Calif.
Purse: $2 million
Yardage: 6,738, Par: 72
Third Round, (a-amateur)
Karin Sjodin 72-67-68 -207 -9
YaniTseng 68-68-71-207 -9
Haeji Kang 69-68-72 209 -7
Hee Kyung Seo 69-72-69-- 210 -6
Eun-HeeJi 71-69-70-210 -6
I.K. Kim 70-70-70 -210 -6
Na Yeon Choi 72-67-71 210 -6
Sun Young Yoo 69-69-72-- 210 -6
Katherine Hull 69-73-69 -211 -5
Vicky Hurst 70-70-71-211 -5
SeRiPak 70-69-72-211 -5
Suzann Pettersen 72-74-66-212 -4
AzaharaMunoz 73-72-67-212 -4
LexiThompson 72-72-68-212 -4
Ha-Neul Kim 71-71-70 -212 -4
Amy Yang 66-74-72 212 -4
Karine Icher 73-73-67 -213 -3
Inbee Park 71-74-68-213 -3
Hee Young Park 72-71-70 -213 -3
Jiyai Shin 72-71-70 -213 -3
Angela Stanford 72-71-70-213 -3
Paula Creamer 69-73-71 -213 -3
Cristie Kerr 71-70-72 -213 -3
Cindy LaCrosse 73-71-70-214 -2
Catriona Matthew 74-70-70 -214 -2
Jennifer Song 72-71-71 214 -2
Karrie Webb 71-72-71 214 -2
Lindsey Wright 67-71-76 214 -2
Anna Nordqvist 74-74-67-215 -1
a-Austin Ernst 77-70-68-215 -1
Kris Tamulis 72-75-68 215 -1
Stacy Lewis 74-71-70 215 -1
a-Ariya Jutanugarn 71-73-71-215 -1
SandraGal 71-72-72-215 -1
Jodi Ewart 69-73-73 -215 -1
ShanshanFeng 72-70-73-215 -1
a-Charley Hull 71-77-68-216 E
Seon Hwa Lee 76-72-68 216 E
Ji-HeeLee 74-73-69-216 E
Reilley Rankin 73-73-70-216 E
Mina Harigae 73-71-72-216 E
Jennifer Johnson 72-71-73-216 E
Pornanong Phatlum 71-72-73 --216 E
Maria Hjorth 73-68-75-216 E
Brittany Lang 74-74-69-217 +1
Natalie Gulbis 76-71-70 -217 +1
Dewi Claire Schreefel 75-72-70 -217 +1
Caroline Hedwall 74-72-71-217 +1
Sarah Kemp 71-75-71-217 +1
Lizette Salas 76-70-71 --217 +1
Candle Kung 70-75-72 -217 +1
Katie Futcher 72-72-73-217 +1
Hee-WonHan 70-74-73-217 +1
Heather Bowie Young 74-70-73 -217 +1
Ai Miyazato 71-72-74 -217 +1


at 12 under Defending cham-
pion Phil Mickelson (70),
Keegan Bradley (69) and
Ryan Palmer (66) were 11
under.
Three-time major cham-
pion Ernie Els, who must win
to qualify for the Masters
next week, was in a group at
8 under Els hasn't missed the
Masters since 1993 and knew
that his chances of winning
Sunday are remote.
"I needed to get to 10 or 11
under to really have a shot,"
Els said. "I need a 62 or 63.
It's tough to do on a Sunday,
but you might as well give it
a go."'
The tournament's sched-
ule was pushed back by a
thunderstorm Thursday, and
70 players resumed their
second rounds Saturday
morning.
Oosthuizen completed a 66
to move to 11 under, one be-
hind second-round leader
Jeff Maggert Oosthuizen


GolfSCORES


a-Jaye Marie Green
Caroline Masson
Beatriz Recari
Melissa Reid
Wendy Ward
Julieta Granada
Mi Jung Hur
Pat Hurst
Lorie Kane
Mo Martin
Diana Luna
Yukari Baba
Amanda Blumenherst
Becky Morgan
Morgan Pressel
Karen Stupples
Christina Kim
Momoko Ueda
So Yeon Ryu
Alena Sharp
Chella Choi
Cydney Clanton
Christel Boeljon
Leta Lindley
Nicole Castrale
Kyeong Bae
JiYoung Oh


71-77-70-
79-69-70-
72-76-70
77-70-71 -
71-76-71 -
70-75-73-
73-70-75-
75-73-71 -
74-73-72-
74-72-73
76-68-75-
75-73-72
75-73-72
76-72-72-
73-74-73
73-72-75
74-69-77-
71-69-80-
74-74-73-
75-73-73-
72-74-75-
70-76-75-
74-73-75-
76-70-77
69-73-81 -
74-74-78
74-72-81 -


-218 +2
-218 +2
-218 +2
-218 +2
-218 +2
-218 +2
-218 +2
-219 +3
-219 +3
-219 +3
-219 +3
-220 +4
-220 +4
-220 +4
-220 +4
-220 +4
-220 +4
-220 +4
-221 +5
-221 +5
-221 +5
-221 +5
-222 +6
-223 +7
-223 +7
-226 +10
-227 +11


Shell Houston Open
Saturday
At Redstone Golf Club (Tournament
Course), Humble,Texas
Purse: $6 million
Yardage: 7,457, Par: 72
Third Round


Louis Oosthuizen
Hunter Mahan
Carl Pettersson
Brian Davis
James Driscoll
Ryan Palmer
Keegan Bradley
Phil Mickelson
John Senden
Boo Weekley
John Huh
J.B. Holmes
Tommy Gainey
Jeff Overton
Ernie Els
Lee Westwood
Thomas Bjorn
Pat Perez
Brandt Jobe
Vaughn Taylor
Jeff Maggert
Bryce Molder
Johnson Wagner
Y.E. Yang
Cameron Tringale
Marc Leishman
Danny Lee
Henrik Stenson


67-66-66
69-67-65-
65-70-67-
68-65-69
67-66-71
71-68-66-
67-69-69-
65-70-70
72-65-69-
69-67-70-
66-70-70
68-67-71
68-67-71
69-70-69-
70-69-69-
68-70-70
69-69-70-
68-69-71
68-69-71
69-67-72
66-66-76-
70-70-69-
68-71-70-
69-71-69
69-70-70-
70-70-69-
69-68-72
69-68-72


started his third round with
a tee shot into a fairway
bunker, leading to a bogey,
then misjudged the wind off
the tee on No. 2 and bogeyed
again.
The 2010 British Open
winner sank an 11-foot birdie
putt on No. 6 to get going,
then made birdies at Nos. 8
and 9 to make the turn at 12
under.
'After that, I felt really
comfortable," Oosthuizen
said. "I made really good
swings after that"
Mahan made four birdies
in six holes to climb up the
leaderboard. He holed a 34-
footer on No. 6 and a 15-
footer on No. 7. The winner
of the Match Play Champi-
onship this year, Mahan
never considered skipping
Houston to go straight to
Augusta.
Mahan has three top-10
finishes in five previous
starts here since 2007.


Bud Cauley 67-69-73 -209 -7
John Mallinger 70-70-70-210 -6
Scott Piercy 70-70-70 210 -6
Nathan Green 70-70-70 -210 -6
Sean O'Hair 70-71-69 -210 -6
Harris English 69-68-73-210 -6
Tim Herron 74-68-68-210 -6
Jonas Blixt 70-66-74 -210 -6
Fred Couples 67-73-71 -211 -5
Tommy Biershenk 72-67-72 -211 -5
Jim Herman 68-70-73-211 -5
Erik Compton 71-67-73-- 211 -5
Mark Anderson 71-70-70-- 211 -5
Blake Adams 67-71-73-211 -5
Kyle Reifers 68-69-74 211 -5
Chad Campbell 69-67-75 -211 -5
Angel Cabrera 65-70-76 -211 -5
Greg Owen 66-69-76 -211 -5
Brendon de Jonge 70-70-72-212 -4
Graeme McDowell 70-69-73-212 -4
Ben Crane 69-70-73-212 -4
Rickie Fowler 68-70-74-212 -4
Billy Mayfair 70-71-71 -212 -4
Mathew Goggin 70-72-70-- 212 -4
Rod Pampling 73-69-70 -212 -4
Will Claxton 70-72-70 212 -4
Roberto Castro 71-69-73-213 -3
Steve Stricker 68-70-75-213 -3
Steve Wheatcroft 68-72-73-- 213 -3
Shawn Stefani 71-71-71 -213 -3
Shaun Micheel 70-72-71 -213 -3
Joe Ogilvie 71-69-74-214 -2
Ricky Barnes 66-74-74 -214 -2
Jamie Lovemark 70-70-74 -214 -2
Jason Bohn 69-72-73 -214 -2
Cameron Beckman 74-67-73 --214 -2
Troy Matteson 73-69-72-214 -2
Ted Potter, Jr. 74-68-72-214 -2
John Merrick 70-72-72 -214 -2
Jhonattan Vegas 72-70-72 -214 -2
Troy Kelly 71-71-72-214 -2
Miguel Angel Carballo 74-68-73-215 -1
Following players made cut, did not finish
Bill Lunde 69-71-76-216 E
Omar Uresti 71-69-76-216 E
Jimmy Walker 72-70-74 -216 E
Padraig Harrington 69-73-74-216 E
Hunter Haas 73-65-79-217 +1
Kris Blanks 69-72-76-217 +1
Kyle Stanley 73-69-75-217 +1
Charley Hoffman 74-68-75 -217 +1
Brian Harman 69-73-75-217 +1
Robert Allenby 72-68-78-218 +2
Chris Stroud 69-73-76 -218 +2
Lucas Glover 73-66-80 -219 +3
Kevin Stadler 73-69-77-219 +3
Duffy Waldorf 71-71-77-219 +3
William McGirt 70-72-77 -219 +3
Chris DiMarco 73-69-78 -220 +4
Daniel Summerhays 72-69-80-221 +5
Ryan Moore 71-66-85-222 +6
Colt Knost 69-73-81 --223 +7
Justin Leonard 69-72-83 -224 +8


SPORTS


SUNDAY, APRIL 1, 2012 B5












ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE

Jackie Mason
accuser arrested
NEW YORK-Police
say a woman who ac-
cused comedian Jackie
Mason of roughing her up
during a domestic dis-
pute has been arrested on
an assault charge stem-
ming from the incident
Police said Saturday
that Mason's 48-year-old
"compan-
ion"
scratched
and
bruised
Shis arm at
So around
6:30 a.m.
Friday as
Jackie he at-
Mason tempted
to call a
doorman to have her re-
moved from his Upper
East Side apartment.
Initially, police said the
woman had reported
being roughed up by the
comedian, who's known
for one-man shows on
Broadway like "Politi-
cally Incorrect." Mason
hasn't been charged.
It wasn't immediately
clear if the woman had a
lawyer A phone number
listed under her name
wasn't in service.

Swift's awards
date hospitalized
NASHVILLE, Tenn. -
The New Jersey teen who
is fighting cancer and
scored a date with Taylor
Swift to The Academy of
Country Music Awards is
in the hospital and won't
make the show.
A Facebook post Satur-
day said 18-year-old
Kevin McGuire was ad-
mitted to the hospital Fri-
day night and can't keep
his date with Swift. It was
not clear why McGuire
was hospitalized.
"Just talked to Kevin
McGuire," Swift said in a
tweet "He's not well
enough to join me at the
ACMs. Please keep him in
your thoughts. I'll make it
up to you, Kevin!"
Swift asked the
Somerdale, N.J., resident
to Sunday's ACMs after
his sister started a cam-
paign to get her to attend
his prom. The reigning
ACM entertainer of the
year couldn't make the
prom, but offered to go
on the date instead.

Casting call set
for Depp film
MOAB, Utah -An
open casting call will be
held Sunday in Moab for
Johnny Depp's latest film.
A Los Angeles-based
casting company is look-
ing for extras for "The
Lone Ranger," which is
scheduled to be filmed in
Utah and Colorado in
June and July
Directors are looking
for Native Americans
and Asians, and people
with "incredibly interest-
ing character faces."
They're also searching
for "extremely thin" peo-
ple and those who weigh
400 pounds or more.
The DeseretNews re-
ported the casting call for
people 18 and older be-
gins Sunday morning at
the Moab Valley Inn.
Depp will star as Tonto
and Armie Hammer will
take on the title role in
the remake of" The Lone
Ranger"
-From wire reports


A




t~esime


Associated Press
ABOVE: Taylor Swift, left, accepts the big help award onstage Saturday at Nickelodeon's 25th Annual Kids'
Choice Awards in Los Angeles. Looking on in center is first lady Michelle Obama. BELOW: Heidi Klum, left, and
Chris Colfer get slimed as they present the award for favorite TV actress at the Kids' Choice Awards.

Green stuffpours nonstop at Kids Choice Awards


Associated Press

The slime came fast and furious
at the 25th annual Kids' Choice
Awards, where even celebrities get
doused in bucket loads of green
gunk
Host Will Smith opened the 25th
annual Kids' Choice Awards
promising a record amount of
slime, and, halfway through the
show, he was delivering. Soon
after the first rows of fans were
covered in slime, so were Halle
Berry and "Glee" star Chris Colfer
"No one is safe from the slime!"
screamed Smith. "You have to
earn the slime! It's an honor"
Smith started the show with an
elaborate, digitally-animated sky-
dive from Nickelodeon's trademark
blimp. Smith was then hoisted from
the rafters to the stage of the Galen
Center at the University of South-
ern California in Los Angeles,
where thousands of glow-stick wav-
ing fans cheered him on includ-
ing first lady Michelle Obama.
Obama later presented "the big
help" award for charity work to
Taylor Swift. Upon receiving the
award, the pop star said, "I am
freaking out."
"This is, like, the coolest award


show ever," said "'Twilight" star
Kristen Stewart, accepting the
award for favorite movie actress.
The KCAs are Nickelodeon's an-
nual celebration for kids, and it's
often the most watched children's
program of the year More than 7.3
million watched last year's awards.
This year, Nickelodeon badly
needs the KCAs to continue to be
such a success. In March, the Dis-


ney Channel beat out N ickelodeon
in average total daily viewers.
Winners are chosen from kids
voting online. Selena Gomez won
for both favorite TV actress and fe-
male singer Adam Sandler took
home the award for favorite movie
actor And Katy Perry, shortly after
performing, was given the award
for favorite voice for an animated
movie for "Smurfs."


Aldean explains why ACMs are 'special' to him


Associated Press


NASHVILLE, Tenn. -
Jason Aldean will always re-
member his first time.
That's why the Academy
of Country Music Awards
hold a special place in his
heart.
"I won my first award
ever at the ACMs," he said.
"So yeah, it is special."
Aldean won the ACM's
Top New Male Vocalist
award in 2006.
His music caught fire with
fans soon after, but it took
longer for the industry to
catch up. Last year, the


Birthday In situations where you hope to strengthen
your image and advance your personal interests, you are
likely to receive considerable help from others in the year
ahead. Be sure to do all that you can to reciprocate.
Aries (March 21-April 19) Some interesting changes
could start taking place concerning your social life. You
could meet someone who will introduce you to a new and
exciting group of people.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Pay close attention to any in-
sights you get that have to do with ways you could help
your family. You might spot some advantages that would
aid those close to you.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) It behooves you to nurture a
relationship with someone you've just met. You have much
more in common than you may first realize, and you'll enjoy
sharing time together.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) If you are offered something


ACMs were the first awards
show to nominate him in the
entertainer of the year cate-
gory The Country Music As-
sociation Awards followed
suit in the fall.
Even though he lost both
times, the recognition alone
marked a breakthrough.
"Last year finding out we
were up for entertainer of the
year was obviously a big mo-
ment for me in my career,"
said Aldean. "To get nomi-
nated again this year, we're
excited to be heading back"
Aldean has the second
most ACM nominations be-
hind Kenny Chesney, with


Today's HOROSCOPE

that is quite unique, don't look this gift horse in the mouth.
Lady Luck may be rewarding you materially in a rather un-
usual manner.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Set aside routine activities that
are of a tiresome nature in order to experiment with some-
thing rather unique. Take advantage of opportunities the
second they arise.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) In situations where others
can't find a single answer, your facile mind will have much
to offer. However, it might take challenging circumstances
to stimulate your ingenuity and cleverness.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) This might be one of those
days an unusual amount of quick thinking will be called for.
Fortunately, your input will have a positive influence on
whatever situations arise.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Your progress may be predi-
cated upon your ability to effectively use new technology.


six, including entertainer
and album of the year His
No. 1 duet with Kelly Clark-
son, "Don't You Wanna
Stay," is up for ACM single of
the year and vocal event of
the year at the awards show,
airing Sunday, April 1, on
CBS.
He released the plat-
inum-selling hit at the end
of 2010, and over the past
year and a half, he has per-
formed it with Clarkson at
the CMAs, the Grammys, on
TV shows, and at the CMA
Music Festival last June.
"It's crazy It seems like
that song was out forever,


but it was a huge, huge song
for my career, and obviously
this year we got nominated
for a Grammy and things
like that. So it's just, that
song has been amazing,"
said Aldean. "I can't believe
it's still up for awards, but
I'm glad it is."
The momentum behind
Aldean's "My Kinda Party"
album has been building
since it was named album of
the year at the CMAs in No-
vember He's hoping for an-
other album win on Sunday
and has plans to follow it up
with new material he
recorded in December


Don't hesitate to be innovative in order to determine what
can be improved upon.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Don't tie yourself down
with things that can easily be handled by associates. You're
a good executive, and those whom you select for special
jobs will live up to your expectations.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) You should be rather lucky
in involvements with members of your immediate family. Nur-
ture these arrangements and something beneficial will result.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Ideas that are of a progres-
sive nature will have the best chances for success; tradi-
tional concepts won't be nearly as fruitful. This should be
right up your alley.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Give your limited resources
a break and try to do things yourself as much as possible. It
would help both your pride and your purse to avoid paying
others to do the work.


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

FRIDAY, MARCH 30
Mega Money: 4 6 9 37
Mega Ball: 9
4-of-4 MB 1 winner $500,000
4-of-4 6 $2,185
3-of-4 MB 115 $249.50
3-of-4 2,163 $39.50
2-of-4 MB 3,130 $19
1-of-4 MB 23,852 $2.50
2-of-4 58,397 $2
Fantasy 5: 3- 14- 17- 21 -23
5-of-5 4 winners $66,064.72
4-of-5 447 $95
3-of-5 13,218 $9
THURSDAY, MARCH 29
Fantasy 5:5 6 19 28 30
5-of-5 2 winners $113,327.32
4-of-5 372 $98
3-of-5 10,156 $10

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num-
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call 850-487-7777.

Today in
HISTORY

Today is Palm Sunday,
April 1, the 92nd day of 2012.
There are 274 days left in the
year. This is April Fool's Day.
Today's Highlight:
On April 1, 1912, the city of
Branson, Mo., was
incorporated.
On this date:
In 1789, the U.S. House of
Representatives held its first
full meeting in New York;
Frederick Muhlenberg of
Pennsylvania was elected
the first House speaker.
In 1939, the United States
recognized the government
of Gen. Francisco Franco in
Spain, the same day Franco
went on radio to declare vic-
tory in the Spanish Civil War.
In 1945, American forces
launched the amphibious in-
vasion of Okinawa during
World War II.
Ten years ago: Israeli
tanks and bulldozers rumbled
into more Palestinian towns
and massed on the edge of
Bethlehem in an expansion
of a West Bank offensive.
Maryland won its first NCAA
men's basketball champi-
onship with a 64-52 victory
over Indiana.
Five years ago: Iran's
state television aired new
video showing two of the 15
captured British sailors point-
ing to a spot on a map of the
Persian Gulf where they were
seized and saying it was in
Iranian territorial waters;
Britain's Foreign Office imme-
diately denounced the video.
One year ago: Afghans
angry over the burning of a
Quran at a small Florida
church stormed a U.N. com-
pound in northern
Afghanistan, killing seven for-
eigners, including four
Nepalese guards.
Today's Birthdays: Ac-
tress Jane Powell is 84. Ac-
tress Grace Lee Whitney is
82. Actress Debbie Reynolds
is 80. Country singer Jim Ed
Brown is 78. Actor Don Hast-
ings is 78. Blues singer Eddie
King is 74. Actress Ali Mac-
Graw is 74. Rhythm-and-
blues singer Rudolph Isley is
73. Reggae singer Jimmy
Cliff is 64. Supreme Court
Justice Samuel Alito is 62.
Rock musician Billy Currie
(Ultravox) is 62. Actress An-
nette O'Toole is 60. Movie di-
rector Barry Sonnenfeld is
59. Singer Susan Boyle (TV:
"Britain's Got Talent") is 51.
Country singer Woody Lee is
44. Actress Jessica Collins is
41. Rapper-actor Method
Man is 41. Movie directors
Allen and Albert Hughes are
40. Political commentator
Rachel Maddow is 39. Tennis


player Magdalena Maleeva is
37. Actor David Oyelowo is
36. Singer Bijou Phillips is 32.
Actor Josh Zuckerman is 27.
Thought for Today: "Life
is short. Live it up." Nikita
S. Khrushchev, Soviet leader
(1894-1971).












COMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


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/www.flsenate.gov/Session/Redistnricting/Plan/s016s9030
The proposed districts for the Florida Senate as of March 27. Citrus County is all part of one district now.


Lottery balls and last-minute deals


Nearly midnight on the last
day of the legislative ses-
sion, Florida senators
were told we would begin an ex-
traordinary session the following
week for a second attempt at draw-
ing new political districts. Earlier
that day, the Florida Supreme
Court ruled, 5-2, that
our first attempt failed
to meet the standards of
the Fair Districts
Amendment. The
House maps, by con- --
trast, passed the court's
review.
The court found
boundary problems
with eight of 40 Senate
districts. It also took ex- Paula ]
ception to how districts FLOI
were numbered, since VOI
odd versus even num-
bers determine who will
get two- or four-year terms, which
the constitution requires be stag-
gered. In some cases, the number
could mean a senator serves
longer than the eight-year term
limit
This past month's 15-day session
was convened to redraw only the
Senate maps, but by law, a quorum
first had to be convened in both the
House and Senate. Since the
House had deferred to the Senate
to redraw its map, representatives
had hoped to come back once the
work was done. To entice members
back to open the session, House
leaders brought in FSU basketball
coach Leonard Hamilton just as
the NCAA tournament was kicking
off. The 101 House members who


D
R
(


attended met for just 11 minutes.
After a short briefing by Redis-
tricting Chairman Don Gaetz, the
Senate similarly adjourned after
12 minutes so the 29-member re-
districting committee could con-
vene. The committee was
instructed on both the court's rul-
ing and the procedure
the Senate would be fol-
lowing.
Activity started in
earnest on Tuesday,
March 20. Democrats
questioned both process
and content. Republi-
cans offered amend-
ments and dissenting
opinions. At times it ap-
'ockery peared the chairman
ZIDA had lost control. He be-
CES came visibly testy at the
pace and promised to
convene an early-morn-
ing hearing the next day if the
work was not completed.
While Tuesday was dominated
by talk of appendages and oddly
shaped districts, Wednesday
proved more exciting and more
contentious. After the chairman's
map was adopted and amend-
ments were disposed of, the final
issue of numbering the districts
was at hand.
Sen. Thad Altman offered a se-
quential numbering plan that
seemed to be widely accepted,
with the exception of Sen. Gaetz,
who wanted a random lottery
Then out came a lottery-style ma-
chine that spun green and white

See Page C4


Associated Press
State Rep. Evan Jenne, D-Fort Lauderdale, discusses his alternative Sen-
ate redistricting plan March 26 after adjournment of the House Redis-
tricting Committee in Tallahassee. Jenne withdrew his amendment but
said he would offer it again on the House floor on Tuesday, when the full
chamber votes to ratify the plan approved by the Senate on March 22.


Employers' use of Facebook raises serious privacy concerns


In a society
where pri-
vacy is con-
stantly eroding,
recent efforts by
some employers
to pry into Face-
book pages to in-
vestigate job
applicants
should be resis-
ted as an unwar-
ranted intrusion
on personal free-
dom and dignity.


Angel Castillo Jr.
FLORIDA
VOICES


Some employers have re-
cently begun requiring job
applicants to provide their
Facebook user names and
passwords so they can review
whatever the applicant has
posted privately online. Oth-
ers so that the password
remains secret- are requir-
ing applicants to access their
Facebook pages during the
job interview to allow the in-
terviewer to see the content
While the applicant can


say no and with-
draw from further
consideration, at a
time of high un-
employment- 9.6
percent in Florida
- the request is
inherently eco-
nomically coer-
cive. Applicants
will often say yes,
reluctantly, hop-
ing to land a job.
More than 156
million Ameri-


cans use Facebook, and
Florida has the fourth
largest number of users,
around 9.5 million. And as
anyone who's been on Face-
book knows, users often
post excruciatingly personal
information.
While Facebook has
threatened to go to court
against employers to protect
its users' privacy, it is far
from clear whether this new
practice is illegal.


The Florida Supreme
Court first recognized a com-
mon law cause of action for
damages for tortious inva-
sion of privacy in 1944. How-
ever, one may not complain
of acts to which he or she has
consented, and an em-
ployer's request would likely
not be illegal if the applicant
freely and knowingly con-
sented to it, and if the policy
is applied to all applicants
without discrimination.
Nonetheless, the American
Civil Liberties Union be-
lieves it is an invasion of pri-
vacy for employers to insist
on looking at people's private
Facebook pages as part of the
job application process. And
some critics suggest the prac-
tice is a violation of First
Amendment rights, as well as
the Stored Communications
Act and Computer Fraud and
Abuse Act federal statutes
that prohibit access to elec-
tronic information and com-


puters without proper au-
thorization.
Two U.S. senators, Chuck
Schumer, D-N.Y, and
Richard Blumenthal, D-
Conn., have asked Attorney
General Eric Holder Jr. and
the federal Equal Employ-
ment Opportunity Commis-
sion to investigate whether
such employer practices vi-
olate federal laws. Legisla-
tors in several states also
have introduced bills seek-
ing to outlaw the practice.
Legal or not, this practice
adds another ugly tool to the
panoply already used by
employers to investigate job
applicants, one likely to
generate bad employee
morale and damage an em-
ployer's reputation.
Further, it opens employ-
ers to potential liability
under federal, state and mu-
nicipal anti-discrimination
laws because Facebook
might make them aware of


information that it would be
unlawful to ask the appli-
cant directly This can in-
clude, for instance, age,
religion, national origin,
disabilities, marital status,
political affiliation, sexual
preference, pro-union sym-
pathy and being the victim
of spousal or sexual abuse.
However, until Congress
or state legislatures enact
new laws, or the courts de-
finitively adjudicate the le-
gality of this new employer
practice, Facebook users
looking for a job should con-
sider carefully what to post
online or erase.

Angel Castillo Jr, a former
reporter and editor for the
New York Times and The
Miami Herald, practices
employment law in Miami.
He can be reached at
acastillo@floridavoices.
com.


- --
Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


". ,,
V,1- J,

r- "" ... ...


:*:?' --'


_ .......... .


Getting


old in


Citrus


County

My America is
aging.
We had a St.
Patty's Day party at the
house a few weeks back,
and four of the attendees
were in their 80s. Two are
quickly approaching their
90s.
They are the parents of
my wife and me, and we
know we are incredibly
fortunate to still be able to
celebrate St. Patrick's Day
with all four
We were less lucky that
our St. Patrick's Day event
ended with a Citrus
County ambulance at the
front door carting one of
those four parents off with
a broken hip. Even on St.
Patrick's Day, we know the
party is over when the am-
bulance arrives.
Joan Hemsworth, 89, is
now in Arbor Trail rehab
center recovering nicely
after she had three pins
placed in her hip. She's
tough and enjoys her
rehab work.
When you have aging
parents and you are in-
volved in their lives, your
perspective changes and
your priorities get redi-
rected on a daily basis. My
wife, Janet, has spent a
good part of the past two
years as the key caregiver
to her Inverness-based
parents. My parents still
live in the same house
where I was raised in
New York. Because they
are snowbirds to Citrus
County, we get the intense
short-term experience of
being very involved.
I know there are thou-
sands of people who live
in Citrus County who are
going through the same
experience. I am humbled
by how many younger
people move to this
county because they want
to take care of their aging
parents. They uproot their
own lives, leave good jobs
and come south to be in-
volved in this cycle of
their parents' lives.
Our community has the
third oldest average age in
the state of Florida and
our state has the largest
percentage of senior citi-
zens in the country
(Sumter County to the east
now has the oldest popula-
tion because of the influx
of seniors at The Villages.)
There is joy and great
humor in the experience,
but sometimes you have to
look for it
While waiting with Joan
for her hip surgery at Cit-
rus Memorial hospital,
husband Ed was seated in
a chair at the foot of the
bed. He eventually com-
plained that the chair was
very uncomfortable and
when he tried to stand up
he had difficulty.
Seemed that he had sat
down in the portable potty
chair and he had gotten
stuck in the round hole
that was clearly cut in the
center
How can you not laugh
at that? Ed laughed
louder than any of us.
Ed celebrated his 89th
birthday that week, so I
took him and my parents
to Stumpknockers in In-
verness for a casual
celebration.
In truth, there is no
such thing as a casual cel-
ebration when you are
See Page C4


I.--







Page C2 *SUNDAY, APRIL 1,2012



PINION


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan........... .................. publisher
Charlie Brennan ............. ................. editor
Mike Arnold ........... .................. HR director
Sandra Frederick....................... managing editor
J Curt Ebitz.... ......................... citizen mem ber
Founded Mac Harris ........................ citizen member
by Albert M.
Williamson Rebecca Martin ..........................guest member
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


HEATED DISCUSSION





Meek right





to stand




his ground


It's not always easy to do the
right thing.
County Commissioner
Joe Meek found
that out this past
week when he got THE IS
publicly lectured
by an Inverness Threa
attorney for taking accusati(
a stand against count
Charles Dean, R-
Inverness, our OUR 01
powerful state A cau
senator, optir
Inverness attor-
ney Bill Grant
reprimanded Commissioner
Meek and other members of
the board for opposing Sen.
Dean's positions on certain is-
sues, claiming "political capi-
tal" was being wasted. The
attorney stood before county
commissioners and argued
that they should not waste the
effort disagreeing with our
local senator because it hurts
when his support is needed on
other issues.
Joe Meek did the county
proud that afternoon. With
great passion, the young com-
missioner said he was going to
do the right thing for the peo-
ple of Citrus County and not
the politically expedient thing
just because it might help his
career.
Meek also acknowledged to
other board members that
Grant had called him prior to a
vote in question and said he
would campaign against him if
he took a position against Sen.
Dean.
"You basically gave me a po-
litical ultimatum: If I did not
vote the way you saw fit, that
you were going to do every-
thing you can to work against
me," said Meek. "I told you that
didn't matter to me."
Meek said he voted to protect
the children of Citrus County
in a commission resolution to
tell the state Senate that the
board favors keeping Child
Protective Services with the
sheriff's office and that he
would do it again.
Attorney Grant is a political
ally of Sen. Dean and has fre-
quently been in the headlines
over the last two years because
of his representation of the Cit-
rus County Hospital Board of
Trustees. It was Sen. Dean who
passed state legislation in sup-
port of Attorney Grant's client.
Grant has also served in key
positions with the Citrus


Deer dangerous (01
There was an article
about the coyotes pushing
boundaries in the March
20 paper.
One gentleman who lives "
in Pine Ridge was quoted CAL
as stating that the coyotes 56-
are not native and they are 56-(
hazardous to humans. He
cites two deaths.
Maybe he should check with the
naturalists and learn some stories
like I did; that the animal that


S

or
t


P


0
I'

6


County Republican Executive
Committee, and all of the par-
ties involved are Republicans.
Grant, who
along with Sen.
;SUE: Dean is a big critic
of Sheriff Jeff
s and Dawsy, said that
ns at the Dawsy presented
level. misinformation
when he ap-
INION: peared before the
se for board two weeks
lism. ago and sought the
resolution in sup-
port of keeping
Child Protective Services.
By a vote of 4-1, the commis-
sion passed the resolution.
Only commission Chairman
Winn Webb, who is officially a
candidate for sheriff himself,
voted to support Sen. Dean.
But Commissioner Meek
challenged Grant to identify
the misinformation he was
speaking about and the Inver-
ness attorney could not iden-
tify a single item. He said he
would get back with the county
on the details.
Attorney Grant also pro-
claimed that the county had
wasted $50,000 to hire a lobby-
ist to push legislation in Talla-
hassee for Port Citrus when
Sen. Dean sat on the commit-
tee that was doing the work.
But Commissioner Rebecca
Bays jumped in and said she
invited Sen. Dean to a meeting
before the lobbyist was hired
and Sen. Dean did not show up.
Attorney Grant may be an ex-
pert on the insider game of
local politics, but we're appre-
ciative that the majority of the
members of our county com-
mission don't back down when
threatened with election-time
backlash from members of
their own political party.
County commissioners did
the right thing when they chal-
lenged Sen. Dean on his cam-
paign to strip state funds from
the effort to protect abused
children. Attorney Grant has
not given a single credible rea-
son to the public as to why this
was in the best interest of the
children. All the non-political
data clearly shows the sheriff's
office was doing an excellent
job providing child protective
services.
Commissioner Joe Meek
stood his ground on Tuesday
and would not be bullied. In
the world of local politics,
that's cause for some optimism.


IND causes the most deaths to
humans are deer. So let's
get rid of all the deer.
Speeders beware
I was just reading your
.90 article on speeders on For-
est Drive. I think it would
1579 be really nice if the sher-
iff's office actually watched
Hemlock Street and watch
how fast people come up and
down my street. It's really ticking
me off and I'm getting sick and
tired of it.


"There is no possible line of conduct which
has at some time and place been condemned,
and which has not at some other time and
place been enjoined as a duty."
William Lecky, 1838-1903


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Baseball quiz: Batter up!


Think you're ready for
Opening Day? Prove it.
Name the person or per-
sons who:
1. Hit the most home runs in
the 1960s.
2. In 2011, joined
Hank Aaron, Brooks
Robinson and Pete
Rose as the only play-
ers to appear in at ('
least 140 games for 16
consecutive seasons. /
3. Had the most hits
in the 1950s.
4. Played for the
Boston Braves, Mil- Georg
waukee Braves and At- OTI
lanta Braves. VOI
5. Had the most hits
in the 1990s.
6. Had the most hits in the 1940s.
7. Holds the career record for
grounding into double plays.
8. Hit .322 with 42 homers and
129 RBIs in 1970 and .333 with 37
homers and 122 RBIs in 1972, but
finished second to Johnny Bench
in MVP voting both years.
9. Pitched the most wins in the
1960s.
10. Has the most career hits
without winning a batting title.
11. Led the majors in total
bases in the 1980s, ahead of Hall
of Famers Mike Schmidt, Eddie
Murray, Robin Yount and Andre
Dawson.
12. Is the only pitcher to hurl a
shutout in four decades.
13. Only once in a 22-year ca-
reer- in his last season, when he
was 42 struck out three times
in a game.
14. Allowed the fewest hits per
nine innings in a career
15. Started more World Series
games than any other pitcher
16. Is the only catcher to lead a
league in triples.
17. Turned an unassisted triple
play in a World Series.
18. Played more than 500
games each at catcher, first and
third base.


I


r

4
-i

ge
H



19. Has the highest single sea-
son batting average since 1901.
20. Led American League
pitchers in wins in the 1960s.
21. Has 283 wins (more than 40
Hall of Fame pitchers)
and 16 Gold Gloves but
is not in Cooperstown.
22. Played the most
games of anyone
whose entire career
was with one team.
23. Was the only
player to win the Cy
Young Award after
being traded in
e Will midseason.
IER 24. Led their three
DES respective teams in ca-
reer singles, doubles,
triples and home runs.
25. Was the only left-hander
since 1900 to win at least 350
games.
26. Won an American League
batting title without hitting a
home run.
27. Had the best career pitch-
ing record against the Yankees.
28. Leads all third basemen in
combined hits and walks.
29. Is the last pitcher to win at
least 20 games in four consecu-
tive seasons.
30. Pitched three Braves wins
over the Yankees in the 1957
seven-game World Series.
31. Pitched three Tigers wins
over the Cardinals in the 1968
seven-game Series.
32. Pitched three Giants wins
over the Athletics in the five-
game 1905 Series.
33. Pitched a record 24 consec-
utive wins.
34. Holds the National League
career record for grand slam
home runs.
35. Has appeared in more
games than any other pitcher
36. Had a career batting aver-
age of .356 but never won a bat-
ting title.
37. Got at least 100 extra-base
hits in two consecutive seasons.


38. Won Rookie of the Year,
MVP and Cy Young awards (not in
the same season).
39. Pitched the most consecu-
tive strikeouts in one game.
40. Hit his last three home runs
in one game.
41. Before David Freese did it
in Game 6 of last year's World Se-
ries, were the only two players to
hit an extra-inning walk-off home
run when facing elimination.
42. Was hitting .394 when the
players' strike ended the 1994
season on Aug. 12.
43. Said, "It beats rooming with
Joe Page."
Answers:
(1) Harmon Killebrew (2)
Johnny Damon. (3) Richie Ash-
burn. (4) Eddie Mathews. (5) Mark
Grace. (6) Lou Boudreau. (7) Cal
Ripken. (8) Billy Williams. (9)
Juan Marichal. (10) Paul Molitor
(11) Dale Murphy
(12) Jamie Moyer (13) Stan Mu-
sial. (14) Nolan Ryan. (15) Whitey
Ford. (16) Tim McCarver (17) Bill
Wambsganss, Indians, 1920. (18)
Joe Torre. (19) Napoleon Lajoie,
.426 in 1901. (20) Jim Kaat. (21)
Kaat (22) Carl Yastrzemski.
(23) Rick Sutcliffe. (24) Musial
(Cardinals), George Brett (Roy-
als), Robin Yount (Brewers). (25)
Warren Spahn. (26) Rod Carew.
(27) Babe Ruth, 17-5, .773. (28)
Wade Boggs. (29) Dave Stewart.
(30) Lew Burdette. (31) Mickey
Lolich. (32) Christy Mathewson.
(33) Carl Hubbell.
(34) Willie McCovey, 18. (35)
Jesse Orosco. (36) "Shoeless" Joe
Jackson. (37) Todd Helton. (38)
Don Newcombe and Justin Ver-
lander (39) Tom Seaver, 10. (40)
Ruth. (41) Carlton Fisk, 1975, Red
Sox, and Kirby Puckett, 1991,
Twins. (42) Tony Gwynn. (43) Joe
DiMaggio, about being married to
Marilyn Monroe.
--*--A
George Will's email address is
georgewill(at)washpost.com.


_LETTER to the Editor


Control budget
Recently the county adminis-
trator recommended a millage
increase, claiming the tax base
has shrunk and county services
would have to be cut without the
increase. At the same time, he
included a pay increase for
county employees.
This proposal clearly shows
how inept and out of touch our
administrator is.
First, this is no time to suggest
a tax increase and certainly not
the time to suggest employee pay
increases even if warranted.
However, my main concern is
the fact that the county still does
not do a performance-based
budget and they do not require
elected officials such as the
sheriff to do so.
In keeping with the commis-
sioners' insanity, they gave con-
trol of the fire service and animal
control over to the sheriff's office.
The county commissioners have
never required the sheriff to jus-
tify his budget and now two de-
partments they once controlled
have been given over to the
blank-check king of the county.
Performance-based budget is


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in Chroni-
cle editorials are the opinions of
the newspaper's editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Groups or individuals are invited
to express their opinions in a let-
ter to the editor.
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at 352-563-5660.
All letters must be signed and in-
clude a phone number and home-
town, including letters sent via
email. Names and hometowns will
be printed; phone numbers will
not be published or given out.
We reserve the right to edit let-
ters for length, libel, fairness and
good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
350 words, and writers will be
limited to three letters per month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to
352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

not rocket science. It can be as
complicated or simple as you
want, but the basic premise is


every function is identified, cost-
assigned and performance eval-
uated. For example, the sheriff
has a motorcycle unit. That unit
has fixed costs such as personal,
vehicles, equipment, overtime,
etc. Its performance might be
calls answered, citations issued
and special functions attended.
Once these things are identified,
then a decision can be made as
to the value of the unit.
Once the process is in place,
the commissioners can clearly
see if the sheriff's requests are
warranted and if the benefit is
worth the cost Currently, there
is no such process. The sheriff
and other elected officials sub-
mit their budgets, and the com-
mission approves. The sheriff
can appeal a reduction in his
budget to the state, but if the
process is applied fairly he
would have little argument.
Now more than ever with the
sheriff controlling such a large
portion of the county budget, jus-
tification and actual costs must
be addressed before any new
taxes are discussed.
Roger B. Krieger
Beverly Hills


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


'Aloha' means both hello and goodbye


O n Thursday,
Feb. 9, after
cruising for five
days, the ship on which
Cheryl and I were *
traveling arrived at
Honolulu Harbor.
It was early, but the
sun was already up. It
was a gloriously
beautiful day; and Fred B
from our stateroom A Sl
balcony, we were able OF I
to fully admire the
scenery, including
passing directly by the Aloha
Tower
In addition to being a
lighthouse, this landmark is a
magnificent timepiece bells
and all. One hundred eighty-four
feet tall, the structure was
completed in 1926; and, since that
time, it has continued to be a


3r
I

L
L


guiding light as well as
a welcome sign for
=l those who come to
Hawaii by ship.
The first time I
"saw" the Aloha Tower
was in 1953 on the
silver screen in a
scene from the movie
"From Here to
rannen Eternity."
.ICE It was Sunday, Dec.
IFE 7, 1941, the tower's
clock was showing 7:50
a.m. and in the
background you could hear the
steady drone of the engines and
see images of the Japanese planes
on their way through the pass to
attack Schofield Barracks and
Wheeler Field while their
buddies were bearing down on
Pearl Harbor.
Cheryl and I had been to Hawaii


previously and had seen the Aloha
Tower from shore side, but to see
it as we did this time, cruising into
Honolulu Harbor, was a thrill.
As stated in previous writings,
as Americans, I believe there are
certain sites we should visit if op-
portunities present themselves,
places we should go and Cheryl
and I did that on our first visit to
Hawaii we went to Pearl Har-
bor and the USS Arizona Memo-
rial to shed tears and pay our
respect
This time, we felt no such need.
We don't appreciate the sacri-
fice of our sailors and soldiers any
less, but we'd been there and done
that, so, with just one day in port,
we chose to view the Pearl only as
we rode by on a tour bus, which
carried us all the way around the
island of Oahu.
The tour gave us the opportu-


nity to visit a pineapple planta-
tion, see the mountains and the
beaches, fantasize about surfing
and visit the Polynesian Cultural
Center All of these things were in-
teresting and enjoyable, but we
also received an education a
view of the islands from the
inside.
Our bus driver/tour guide was
Hawaiian and he gave us an ongo-
ing, uninhibited verbal history of
his native land a history that in-
cluded the unification of the is-
lands by King Kamehameha
creating a kingdom that lasted for
more than 100 years until it was
overthrown in 1893; the formation
of a republic that existed a few
short years until 1898 when, ap-
parently at the behest of Ameri-
cans with commercial interests
there, its annexation as an official
territory of the United States; and,


then, in 1959, its admission to the
union as our 50th state.
While our guide didn't seem
angry or conflicted he was very
proud to be both Hawaiian and
American the tale he told and
the way he told it pulled on the
heart strings. Of course, a similar
story could be told by virtually any
Native American none of 'em
were lost when "discovered" by
Europeans!
Upon returning to the ship and
sailing out of the harbor, I was
once again impressed by our
close-up view of the Aloha Tower
- which was appropriate after
all, "aloha" means both hello and
goodbye.

Fred Brannen is an Inverness
resident and a Chronicle
columnist.


EARL SCRUGGS
1924- 2012


Guest COLUMN


NARLEO supports trooper


Special to the Chronicle
Recent issues of the
Chronicle have featured
numerous letters in reply
to a guest editorial written
by a retired postal em-
ployee from Homosassa,
which detailed why this
gentleman felt that
Florida's seatbelt law
should not be enforced.
This gentleman conducted
a one-man "occupy Route
19" demonstration, putting
himself, fellow motorists,
and the Florida Highway
Patrol trooper in jeopardy
It has been heartening to
see that the vast majority of
responses to the guest col-
umn have been over-
whelmingly in support of
Trooper Tod Cloud, and
that most of our fellow citi-
zens agree that this law
saves lives, and should be
enforced.
We at the National Asso-
ciation of Retired Law En-
forcement Officers
(NARLEO) stand behind
Trooper Cloud, and all po-
lice officers, in the belief
that this is one of the laws
that should be vigorously
enforced.


NARLEO members rep-
resent a broad spectrum of
police departments from
cities and counties
throughout the United
States, along with many
state police and federal
agencies such as the FBI
and DEA, to name a few.
Our members have seen
the aftermath of minor
crashes that turned into
fatal accidents when an un-
secured occupant was
ejected onto the roadway
We have seen people sur-
vive horrific crashes, sim-
ply because they were
buckled up. The fairy tales
of belts trapping people in
cars are just that fairy
tales. While not a guaran-
tee of survival, the seatbelt
increases the odds in your
favor greatly
Numerous studies con-
ducted since the 1950s (and
earlier) have shown conclu-
sively that seat belt use
saves lives. In Citrus County
we have recently had a
spate of fatal auto crashes
that would have been sur-
vivable, had the occupants
been buckled up.
Had Trooper Cloud been
pulling over motorists for


having a taillight out, or
some other minor infrac-
tion, our organization
would not have written this
response. No one is happy
to receive a summons for
any kind of offense, but the
fact that this trooper feels
so strongly about our seat
belt law speaks volumes of
his concern for his fellow
citizens.
We are all tired of read-
ing about the senseless
waste of young lives on our
highways when the simple
act of buckling that belt
could make the difference
between getting a few
bruises or getting a funeral.
Come on, people! Don't
let your kids leave home
without buckling that seat-
belt. If you see a young
mother with unbuckled
children, ask her to secure
them. Let's do what the
Florida Highway Patrol
and our sheriff's office are
trying to do, and save some
lives!

This column was submit-
ted by the executive board
and general membership
of NARLEO.


Letter to the EDITOR


Chaz parking fee
The Chassahowitzka recreation area
has been a sore subject lately, most re-
cently with me about the $7 fee to park
my truck and trailer after launching my
boat. Who is letting this private company,
Moore & Moore, gouge the residents who
own this boat ramp?
The Southwest Florida Water Manage-
ment District owns the campground,
camp store and parking lot adjacent to
the boat ramp. The ramp is owned by
county residents. SWFWMD has, for
years, contracted Citrus County to man-
age its property. Now Citrus County has
contracted a private company, Moore &
Moore Inc., to manage the property it was
entrusted to manage by SWFWMD. Why
does a parking lot used only by boaters
need managing? No other county boat
ramps/parking lots have management or
any fees involved. Our taxes, licensing
fees and revenue from sporting-goods
purchases maintain these facilities.
After all, what good is a boat ramp
without parking? The good news: Moore
& Moore is going to give Chaz residents a
break! It will offer a yearly pass to Chas-
sahowitzka residents at a cost of $100 ...
but it can only be used Monday through
Thursday When I asked why they are ex-
cluding weekend use from passholders,
they responded, "We must save the week-
ends for the Tampa Bay area people."
From what Rafael Del Valle of the
county parks department told me, the
campground has lost some $100,000 the
past several years. Understandably; it
has no amenities for modern-day
campers with children and no restau-
rants or venues close by It is rarely filled.
It is a money-loser, so Moore & Moore is
trying to use the parking lot to balance its
books by charging the residents of Citrus
County with exorbitant parking fees.


Call SWFWMD at 352-796-7211, the
county parks department at 352-527-7540
or Citrus County Commissioner J.J Ken-
ney at 352-341-6560 and voice your com-
plaints. These facilities belong to the
residents and should not be used for
gains by private companies.
Bill Watkins
Chassahowitzka
Editor's note: The parking fee was in
place prior to Moore & Moore assuming
management.

Oil speculators
I see that the Republican Party is now
trying to place blame for higher gas
prices on President Obama. In doing so,
they (as usual) create their own version
of reality, attributing the rise in gas
prices solely to a "supply and demand"
issue. If this was truly the case, prices
should actually be falling because under
this administration, more areas for
drilling have been opened then ever be-
fore and, nationally, demand is down to
the point that the U.S. now exports more
oil then it imports.
The Republican Party has also com-
plained the president has blocked the
pipeline from Canada and the 2,000 jobs
it would create. But when Democrats of-
fered an alternative bill with the caveat
that the pipeline could be built but no oil
coming through it could be exported, the
Republican Party cried foul. If that does-
n't show you how closely the GOP is tied
to the oil industry, I don't know what will.
There is a global supply issue, to be
sure, but the primary reason oil prices
have risen this time is speculation, the
same cause as in 2008 (remember who
was president then?) when gas was at
$4.08 per gallon.
John Hogan
Hernando


The U.S. Supreme



Court vs. America?


Nine judges will soon decide if
million Americans will contini
be exposed to the untold horror
flicted by the train wreck we call
health care.
America already has univer-
sal health care of a sort: Stu-
pidly inefficient and
grotesquely dangerous, it is ad-
ministered by thousands of dif- 9
ferent people; in the insurance
business we call that insanity If
the legal profession knew the
whole truth, they would call it
mass murder Doing the math, it
will bankrupt the U.S. if not re-
formed.
Over the past seven years, the
Chronicle has published many C
of my columns. But never in my
entire life have I covered a subject as
portant to all Americans as what you
about to read.
By the time you read this, the
Supreme Court will have heard six hour
testimony regarding The Patient Protec
and Affordable Care Act (ACA), derisi
called Obamacare.
As noted by the New England Journm
Medicine, that was the longest Supr
Court hearing in 45 years. The ACA is
important, and its fate will be determi
by the Court's ruling.
Potentially, we are facing tragic new
the massive amount of media vitriol
rected against ACA proves successft
swaying the Court, we are all going to
very, very sorry
For we will have lost the one single
gram that is finally delivering the he
care reform that America has despers
required for 60 long years.
Reports of ACAs early, unqualified
cesses were just released by the Inspe
General of Health and Human Serv
(HHS), The Center for Medicare and M
caid Services (CMS) and The Governr
Accountability Office (GAO).
Presidents Roosevelt, Truman, Ei
hower, Kennedy, Johnson, Nixon, Ca
Clinton and Obama all pleaded with (
gress for the passage of fundamental he
care reform. Every single one of them k
there is no other way to purge from
midst the biggest den of thieves
wastrels in U.S. history
Operating from within the U.S. he
care system, these people divvy up tl
thousand, million dollars every nigh
more than one thousand, thousand, mi]
dollars a year, every penny lifted from
pockets of U.S. taxpayers.
You read that right. The ACA has be
the recovery of $1 trillion a year, equiva
to 10 Afghanistan wars and almost 10
cent of our entire economy; enough t(

Sound OFF
Call tl
Be fair
I'm reading the Chronicle
and I don't believe why the
Chronicle did not put on the
front page the Illinois Pri-
mary where Romney won it.
I'm on page 4 and I still
can't read anything where
Romney won the primary. If
it was a Democrat, it would 8:%
be published on the front
page in big, bold letters, Shot
"Democrat won this pri-
mary." What, is the Chronicle for inf
biased? They won't report on
the Republicans? I think you 72
ought to change your ways
and be fair and balanced.
Misinformed 21
The new pipeline. That
was not turned down by the
Republicans, only our glori-
ous President Obama. He
said no, we couldn't have
that, so he put a stop to it.
Know what you're talking
about when you put things
in the paper.
Believe the lie
The hallmark of an effec-
tive politician: One who can
look you straight in the eye,
tell you a blatant lie and
make you believe it.


Don
GUI
:OLI


structure a health care system covering
every man, woman and child in America
with excellent coverage.
Our problem is that the facts concerning
the early success of ACA may be surfacing
too late. And those facts are dif-
ficult to present to a citizenry
that is too busy to sort through
the massive quantity of media
smoke and mirrors created by
the very people stealing the
money from U.S. health care.
But truth is truth, facts are
facts and armed with accurate
information, the answers to this
Hess problem are easy to understand.
EST Some readers are aware that
I have been in the health care
UMN business for almost 50 years. I
know where to find the facts.
The challenge is in presenting information
to busy readers in both in a timely and time-
saving fashion.
By a stroke of good timing, two of my four
new websites were just released and I pur-
posely chose this subject for my first white
paper. The paper, titled "Wonderful Health
Care, Medicare and Economic News -
Maybe" is available now and found on my
front page at ThinkWeCan.com.
ThinkWeCan.com is my source and ref-
erenced-link backup for everything I write,
and HessPlan.com presents go-to informa-
tion for anyone with an interest in
Medicare and related retirement planning.
Related videos will soon be available.
The statements presented in this column,
and further proofs and research, are hy-
perlinked in my websites to the most pro-
found sources available. The sources are
unimpeachable, including Harvard, Yale,
Columbia and the HHS, CMS and GAO de-
partments of government.
I invite you to read my paper, email me
with questions, please offer any suggestions
and draw your own conclusions. When you
are familiar with the facts of this matter, I
believe you will come to the same conclu-
sion I have.
U.S. health care delivers the worst over-
all results of the major, industrialized na-
tions on Earth and must be restructured. If
we fail to accomplish this now, it may be 20
years, if ever, before we get another chance.
It will be the greatest economic and
human tragedy of our age if the U.S.
Supreme Court dismantles the ACA.

Don Hess, a Crystal River resident, has
spent 48 years in the health insurance
business. He is a civic activist, farmer,
Army veteran, pilot and professional pool
player His websites, ThinkWeCan.com
and HessPlan.com, support his columns
with reference links and videos.

SOUND OFF


he anonymous Sound Off line at 352-563-0579.


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ANNUAL


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CHARITY


GOLF TOURNAMENT

30 a.m. Saturday
gun Start April 7

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:::1 .": (..N (, E


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, APRIL 1, 2012 C3


ti

fc






C4 SUNDAY, APRIL 1, 2012


VOICES
Continued from Page C1

balls to determine odd or
even districts.
Many members strongly
opposed. Sen. Ronda
Storms objected to the
"casting of lots" to make the
decision. Sen. Maria Sachs
called the process "bizarre."
The surreal scene was de-
scribed as a carnival, a
sideshow, a quick pick and
illegal gambling. Jokes were
running rampant through
Twitter and in the blogs.
Media and camera crews
were hurrying in to capture
this unorthodox process. In
short order, the 40 districts
were numbered a strange
historical moment.
Thursday on the floor


brought more intrigue. Sen.
Chris Smith's amendment
involving minority repre-
sentation in Volusia County
was voted down on a voice
vote. Sen. Miguel Diaz de la
Portilla withdrew his
amendment for a fourth
Hispanic district in Miami-
Dade, predicting the federal
court might order one any-
way And Sen. Jack Latvala
brought forth a new, more
modest map that changed
only four districts in and
around Polk County
Despite previously saying
he would not support any
changes on the floor, Sen.
Gaetz informed me he
would be accepting the Lat-
vala amendment. This
change of heart took many,
including me, by surprise.
There are two theories as
to why:


To save face. Sen. Gaetz
told me he didn't think he
had the votes to defeat the
Latvala amendment. The
irony is he did.
To prevent a new num-
bering system from passing.
Sen. Gaetz might have
traded his support in return
for Sen. Altman withdraw-
ing his amendment on se-
quential numbering. Altman
did withdraw it
There was also political
intrigue. Leadership races
were playing into redistrict-
ing Sen. Latvala wanted to
change the districts to help
Rep. Denise Grimsley, who
was pledged to him in his
Senate leadership race. He
teamed up with Sen. J.D.
Alexander, who wanted to
keep former Rep. Baxter
Troutman out of a Senate
race by taking away a sec-


ond Polk County seat.
Latvala's "official" ration-
ale was that he was fixing
Plant City at the behest of its
mayor, though he doesn't
represent the area and the
senator who does was not
contacted. Sen. Alexander,
who like me is also from
Polk, spoke in favor of and
voted for the Latvala map,
which splits Winter Haven
in half and drops Polk's
share of District21 from 50.4
percent to 39.1 percent
Interestingly, while Sen.
Gaetz had said he was op-
posed to last minute
changes to the map, he was
willing to risk the lack of
scrutiny and transparency
with this new amendment.
Even his top lieutenant,
Rules Chair John Thrasher,
said, "I believe it puts the
entire plan in jeopardy"


The Latvala Amendment
passed on a narrow vote, 20-
15, with Sen. Gaetz debating
and voting in favor of its
adoption, swaying three
other senators to vote with
him. The final bill passed
with a bipartisan vote, 31-6.
The Senate left on Thurs-
day
The House came back this
past week and after some
debate, voted for the same
plan, 61-47, with some Re-
publicans joining Democ-
rats in opposition.
After the attorney general
reviews the map, it goes
back to the Supreme Court
where many questions re-
main: Will the court go
along with drawing lottery
balls for district numbers?
Will the court find the last-
minute amendment trou-
bling? Will the court


COMMENTARY


WINDOW
Continued from Page C1

taking three 80-year-old people to
lunch. One is almost blind, one is
completely deaf and the third has
issues of her own.
The shuffle from the car to the
restaurant table was a 15-minute
affair. The near-blind attendee got
to the table and almost sat down
where there was no chair. When
we settled in at the table, the deaf
attendee startled the entire
restaurant by yelling at the top of
his lungs: "What are the spe-
cials?"
Before you have too much sym-
pathy for my deaf father, you have


to accept the fact that the reason
he cannot hear is because he al-
ways loses his hearing aids. He
loses his hearing aids because
they don't work that well because
he gets them from the VA.
He gets them from the VA be-
cause they're free.
He can afford to purchase real
hearing aids, but my father has 80
years experience of being cheap.
He calls it thrifty; I call it cheap.
"Dad," I rhetorically ask him,
"what good are the free VA hear-
ing aids if they don't actually help
you hear?"
"What did you say?" is his pre-
dictable response.
Even his hearing difficulties
have a story: While in the Navy, he
served on the battleship Missouri.


Even his hearing difficulties have a story:

While in the Navy, he served on the

battleship Missouri. He and a buddy one day

thought it would be a good idea to stay

outside when the big guns were fired. It

turned out not to be such a good idea.


He and a buddy one day thought it
would be a good idea to stay out-
side when the big guns were fired.
It turned out not to be such a good
idea.
"That was a dumb thing to do," I
told him just last week when he
retold the story


"What did you say?" he asked in
response.
"Point made," I told him.
Caring for aging parents takes a
great deal of patience and forti-
tude. We all have our stories and
can see the big gaps that exist in
the delivery of services.


We are fortunate in Citrus
County that we have built up a
medical and social service struc-
ture to help families deal with
some of those issues. There is no
way the system can be perfect, and
it takes angels like my wife (and
my sisters up in New York) to help
navigate the system.
I tried to speak to my father
about it and his response was pre-
dictable.
"What did you say? And tell that
waitress to bring me some clam
chowder"


Gerry Mulligan is the publisher
of the Chronicle. His email
address is gmulligan@
chronicleonline. com.


ACT: Dr. Cook's Garden


8th Annual Spring Concert
Citrus Community Concert Choir


Jazz Spring Concert


ACT: Dr. Cook's Garden


ACT: Dr. Cook's Garden

Movies in the Park Hop


Inverness Rotary Golf Tournament


Citrus Jazz Jam
Easter Egg Hunt Homosassa
Springs Wildlife State Park

8 9 10 11 1 1 14 Taste of Inverness
87 10 11 12 13 1t Bluegrass & Oldtyme
ACT: Dr. Cook's Garden ACT: Dr. Cook's Garden Music Festival
ACT: Dr. Cook's Garden
Relay For Life Crystal River Camp Good Hope Golf Tourney
Mel Tillis Fishing Tournament
Citrus Has Talent Floral City Garden Club
Plant Sale
K of C Annual Charity Ball
Starring Citrus County
Blood Screening
Golf Tourney Vietnam Veterans
Gathering


15
ACT: Dr. Cook's Garden

CF Performing Arts Ballet
Folkorico


16


JANUARY
* Citrus Jazz Society Jam
SManatee Festival
* Keys to Fashion West Citrus Ladies Elks
* Truck and TractorPull
SAWinter Wonderland
SCRWC Showtime
* Music in the Park
SBeatles Tribute
* Book Festival
* Concert at the Old Courthouse, The Porch Dogs
Early Childhood Expo
* West Ciltus Elks Fashion Show
* ACT The Kids Left, The Dog Died, Now What?
James Rogers Concert
Music in the Park Southern Sounds
* Light Shine The Ashley Gang Folk Songs & Florida

FEBRUARY
* Citrus Jazz Jam
* Takwondo Women's Defense Class
* Mow It Dinner Beverly Hills Lions Club
* Best Friend Fest Citrus County Animal Services
S2012 Festival of Books
Rotary of Inverness Online and TV Auction
* Country Diamonds Show Beverly Hills Civic Assoc.
* Jr. Achiewment Bowl-A-Thon
* Light Shine
* Dollars for Scholars Doo Wop
* Finess in Citrus begins
* Jazz Valentine Concert
SCrystal Oaks Military Card Party
* Cattle Barons' Ball American Cancer Society
* Yoga Day USA
* CF Performing Arts Series Cooking With
The Calamari Sisters
* Bartershoppers Singing Valentines
* Citrus Springs Library Book Sale
* Love Your Library Evening
* ACT Moonlight and Magnolias
* St. Patrick's Day Dinner Dance
*Concemed Citizen Commendation Award and Dinner
* West Citrus Elks Book Sale and Flea Market
* Kiwanis Concert Live
* Ozello Chili Cook Off and Craft Show
* Tricky Tray, CCW of St. Scholastic
* Purple Head Ceremony
SCitrus Watercolor Show & Sale
German American Club Celebrate Spring
* Celebrity Bartenders & Silent Auction
* Greek Festival
* Runway For Rescues
* Fashion Sweethearts
* Spring Fling Citrus County Craft Council
* Seminarian Dinner & Dance Knights of Columbus
S8th Annual Kids Fishing Clinic Parks & Recreation
* Blessings in a Backpack
* Academy of Environmental Science Dinner
* Oscar Night 2012 Promoting Literacy" SMW Rotary
SAfrican American Read In
*'School'astic Golf Tournament
* Chet Cole Casino Night

MARCH
* Luminary Art Nights
* Strawberry Festival
* Red Ribbon Tour of Homes
STricky Tray Crystal Oaks Civic
* Movies in the Park Kung Fu Panda 2
* Manatee Car & Truck Show
* Citrus Jazz Jam


17


18


19


20


Relay For Life Inverness

When Elvis Came To Town


Red Eagle Pow-Wow


_______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________


STanpa Bay Lightning vs. Ottawa Senators
* Habitat for Humanity Building Dreams
* Encore Ensemble The Last Dance of Dr. Disco
STrivia Night Kiwanis Central Ridge/Crystal River
* Will McLean Music Festival
* Friends of the Library Spring Book Sale
* Jim Blackshear Golf Tournament
* Nature Coast Corvair Car & Truck Show
* Dublin City Ramblers
* B&G 20th Anniversary Birthday Bash/Steak & Steak
* Homosassa Heritage Day
* Nature Coast Civil War Reenactment
* Benefit for Karen Dinner, Dancing, Entertainment
* Military Card Party Beverly Hills Recreation Assoc.
* Concert at the Old Courthouse, Jimmy Crowley
SSt. Patick's Day Dinner Dance
* Blood Drive Honor Larry Nestor
* Fort Cooper Days
* Inverness St Patrick's Day Parade
* Crystal River St. Patrick's Day Parade
* Nature Coast Dragon Boat Festival
SMutt Stitt Parade
* St. Patrick's Day Golf Classic
SSt. Paddy's Pot of Gold Card Party and Luncheon
SAll Moper Car Show
Crystal River Music in the Park
* Inverness Sertoma Club Golf Tournament
* Spring Book Sale Friends of Homosassa Library
* Scope it Out 5K
STanpa Bay Lightening vs. NY Islanders
* Teen Stock
* Swing into Spring Fashion Show
* International Food & Arts Festival
* Golf for Meals Citrus County Resource Center
* Steppin Out in Style
SShrimpa-Palooza
* Withilacoochee Wilderness Canoe and Kayak Rally & Race
* Lakeside Craft Show
* Bluegrass Festival in Hemando
SCitrus County Fair
* ACT Dr. Cook's Garden
* 3rd Annual Spring "Eggstravaganza
* Sugarmill Woods Food Drive
* Floral City Library Friends March Book Sale
* Clean Air Bike Ride
* Bluegrass @ The Blue Lodge

APRIL
SCitus Jazz Jam
SJazz Spring Concert
* ACT Dr. Cook's Garden
* Movies in the Park Hop
* Inverness Rotary Golf Tournament
* Homosassa Springs Easter Egg Hunt
* Crystal River Relay For Life
* Citrus Has Talent
* Golf Tournament Vietnam Veterans Gathering
* Bluegrass & Oldtyme Music Festival
STaste of Inverness
* Camp Good Hope Golf Tournament
* Mel Tillis Fishing Tournament
* Floral City Garden Club Annual Plant Sale
* Annual Charity Ball Knights of Columbus
SStoaring Citrus County Homosassa Elementary
* Central Citrus Rotary Blood Screening
* CF Performing Arts Ballet Folkorico
* Inverness Relay For Life
* When Elvis Came to Town
* Red Eagle Lodge Intertribal Pow-Wow
* American Irish Club Golf Tournament
*2012 Ram Truck Drawing We Care Food Pantry
* April Madness Basketball Tournament
* Ozello Adventure Race


* Citrus County Bass Challenge
* Sheriffs Summer Safety Expo
* Black & White Gala Pope John Paul II School

MAY
* Citrus Hills Information Fiesta
* Lecanto Relay For Life
* Cars in the Canyon
* Movies in the Park- Tangled
* Citus County Gator Club Golf Tournament
* BHRA Card & Game Party
* Sports Banquet
* Spring Fling Dinner Dance
* ACT Moon Over Buffalo
* Stamp Out Hunger
* World's Greatest Baby Shower
* Golden Citrus Scholar Awards
* Concert at the Old Courthouse, Spring Finale
* Winds, Rains or Flames All Hazards Expo
* A Garden Tour with Historical Overtones

JUNE
* Movies in the Park Happy Feet 2
* Military Card Party- BHRA
* Encore Ensemble The Pajama Party Murders
* Cobia Big Fish Tournament
* Homosassa Fi Rrewoks Poker Run
*Flag Day at Fort Cooper
* itus Jazz Jam
* Jim Blackshear Memorial Golf Tournament
* 832 K-9's Deputy Dog's Annual Golf Tournament

JULY
* Patriotic Evening
* Fireworks over Kings Bay
* Key Training Center Celebrity Auction
* Key Run For the Money
* Key Center Telethon
* Family Fun Day Kings Bay Park
* Firecracker 5K
* Beverly Hills Recreation Military Card Party
* Uncle Sam's Scallop Jam
* Citrus Community Concert Choir Great Music
for Your Summer Enjoyment
* Movies in the Park Madagascar 2
* Chronicid Political Forum

AUGUST
* Rotary Club of Sugarmill Woods Arts and Crafts
* Pregnancy and Family Life Center Military Card Party
* So You Think You Can Dance Like AStar
* Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Fundraiser Golf Tourney
* Gator Club Kick Off
* Concert at the Courhouse Back 2 School Bash
* Citrus Community Concert Choir Great Music
for Your Summer Enjoyment
*The Other Volumn
* OC5K
* Movies in the Park- Shark Tale

SEPTEMBER
* Harvest Moon Craft Show
* Veterans Golf Tournament
* Jazz Society Jam Session
* Citrus 20120 Fundraiser
* Save our Waters Week
* Christmas in September
* United Way Kick Off
* Business Women's Alliance Health & Fitness Expo
* Industy Appreciation Luncheon
* Industry Appreciation Week EDC Barbecue


* 832 K-9's Deputy Dog Fundraiser
* VFW Post 10087 Golf Outing
* Friends of the Library Fall Book Sale
* Music on the Square
* CF Professional Development Series
* Two Good Soles
* Matt Curley Memorial Blood Drive
* Barbecue Blast
* Under One Roof Campaign Auction
* Page it Forward
* Sunset Festival
* Country Western Hoedown Cruise
* Beat the Sheriff Race
* Movies in the Park- G-Force

OCTOBER
* Sertoma Oktoberfest
* Oktoberfest German American
* Bikes and BBQ
* Habitat For Humanity Golf Tournament
* Jazz Jam
* Rails to Trails Bike Ride
*Artisans Boutique
* Great American Cooler Festival
* Day of Caring/Make a Difference Day Food Drive
*National Wildlife Refuge Week
* Scarecrow Festival
* West Citrus Elks Arts & Crafts Show
* Cootler Blast
* Harvest Time Festival
* Haunted Tram Ride
*Cootorween
*Greek Festival
* Spike Fitzpatrick Memorial Golf Tourney
* Haunted Halloween
* Hernando Heritage Days
* Comedy Night at Citrus Springs
* Swing for a Cure
* Nerieds Military Card Party
* Lakeside Craft Show
* Chamber Business Expo
* Nature Coast All Veterans Reunion
* Citrus Garden Club Shades of Autumn
* Fr. Willie Classic Golf Memorial
* 2nd Annual Ford Car & Truck Show
* Car Show for Charity
* We Care Golf Tournament
* A Night at the Museum
* Citrus Springs Memorial Library Fall Book Sale
*Jazz Goes to Movies
* Nature Coast Fne Arts and True Crafts Show
* Citrus Haunted" Hills 5K
* Page it Forward
* Make a Difference Day
*Auhors Fair
* Robby Brown Memorial Golf Tournament
* CASI Chili Cook Off
* Movie on the Square
* Ladies of the West Citrus Elks Fall Card Party
* Light Shine
*Art Fair and Auction
* Halloween Scramble for Hospice
* Candlelight Vigil
* Fall Fling
* Health & Wellness Fair
* Political Forum

NOVEMBER
* BH Lions Foundation Craft Fair
* InglisiYankeetown Arts and Seafood Festival
* Festival of The Arts
* Jazz Society Jam
* Rotary Blood Screening


* Blues & Bar-B-
* Veterans Fair
* Veterans Day P
* Veterans Appre
* Stone Crab Jar
* CCBA Home &
* Candh Camp C
* Parade of Tree
SCitrus Stamped
* Winter Wonder
* Ozello Arts & C
* Jazz Concert
SFriends of the I
*SOS Golf Toun
SFestival of the
* Veteran's Appr
* Annual Christin
* King's Bay 5K
* Hospice Tree o
* Concert at the
* Inverness Fall
* BFF Society Fa
* Light Shine D
* Silver Jubilee F
Precious Paws
Recycle Day
* Never Forget 5
* Kiwanis Pancal
* Cooking for a Q
* Wish Upon a C
* K-9 Kamival
* Cut-a-thon
* Citrs Commurn
* Music in the Pa
* Encore Ensemb

* Father Christm
* Fort Cooper Sl
* Floral City Heri
*Beverly Hills C
* Christmas Craft
*CRWC Silver B
SCrystal River C
* Jazz Holiday C
*Jazz Jam
* Inverness Chris
* Homosassa Bo
Sugamnill Chor
Airboat Christm
SCitrus Springs
* Nutcracker Ball
* Celebration of
* ACT- Richard G
* Inverness Wint
* ACT Halvan YI
SFrosly's Winter
* Annual Holiday
* Suncoast Busir
* Rotary of Suga
*Beverly Hills R
* Citrs Springs
* Citrus Springs
* Send Them To
*IOTATV and O
* Citrus Commun
* Make a Smile I
* Music in the Pa
* Adopt a Chdris
* Elvis & Friends
* Encore Ensemb


21 Red Eagle Pow-Wow

When Elvis Came To Town

American Irish Club Golf
Tournament

2012 Ram Truck Drawing

April Madness Baketball
Tournament


Quo
'arade/Memorial Service
citation Show
n
Outdoors Show
Challenge
s
Ie Rodeo
land Craft Show
Crafts Festival
Homosassa Library Book Sale
lament
Arts Wine Tasting
eciation Week
as Toy Run
Run
f Remembrance
Old Courthouse, Jim Hurst
Classic
shion Show
unnellon Concert Singers
Fashion Show
Fundraiser
K RunfWalk
ke Breakfast
Cause
hild Golf Tournament

nity Concert Choir's Messiah
irk
ble Win, Lose or Die

DECEMBER
as Ball
ate Park Nights of Lights
tage Days
hristmas Parade
t Show
ells
.hristmas Parade
concert
stmas Parade
at Parade
ale Chrisnmas Concert
as Parade
Holiday Parade
let
Lights
Gilewitz
er Celebration
Youth Theatre
rWonderland
Party
ness Masters Auction
mlill Woods Golf Tournament
recreation Center Military Card Party
Rockin the Holiday
New Year's Eve Ball
Serve Golf Tournament
line Auction
nity Concert Choir's Messiah
Happen
irk
mas Tree
ble Win, Lose or Die


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

determine that the issues on
the eight noncompliant dis-
tricts have been resolved?
Will the court object to split-
ting Winter Haven in two
while drawing a district for
a specific candidate? Will
the court agree with the ar-
gument for a fourth His-
panic seat in Miami?
Most importantly, will the
court affirm that the map
complies with the constitu-
tional amendment for Fair
Districts? The lottery ball is
in their court.


Paula Dockeryis a
term-limited Republican
senator from Lakeland who
is chronicling her final
year in the Florida Senate.
She can be reached at
pdockery@florida
voices. com.


G**ipiE












BUSINESS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Quality assurance


Bruce Williams
SMART
MONEY


Associated Press
In this May 26, 2010, file photo, staff members work on the production line at the Foxconn complex in the Chinese city of Shenzhen, southern
China. A pledge reported Thursday, March 29, by the manufacturer of Apple's iPhones and iPads to limit work hours at its factories in China could
force other global corporations to hike pay for Chinese workers who produce the world's consumer electronics, toys and other goods. Foxconn
Technology's promise comes as Beijing is pushing foreign companies to share more of their revenues with Chinese employees.

Apple pledge to limit work hours could lead to wage hikes throughout China


JOE MCDONALD
AP Business Writer

BEIJING -A pledge by the manufacturer
of Apple's iPhones and iPads to limit work
hours at its factories in China could force
other global corporations to hike pay for Chi-
nese workers who produce the world's con-
sumer electronics, toys and other goods.
Foxconn Technology's promise comes as
Beijing is pushing foreign companies to
share more of their revenues with Chinese
employees. It follows a report by a labor au-
ditor hired by Apple Inc. that found Foxconn
was regularly violating legal limits on over-
time, with factory employees working more
than 60 hours per week.
"I think whatever Foxconn did will have an
impact, certainly, on all Chinese workers in
all trades," said Willy Lin, managing director
of Hong Kong-based Milo's Knitwear, which
makes clothing in three factories in China for
European clients.
Foxconn, owned by Taiwan's Hon Hai Pre-
cision Industry Co., promised to limit hours
while keeping total pay the same, effectively
paying more per hour Foxconn is one of
China's biggest employers, with 1.2 million
workers who also assemble products for Mi-
crosoft Corp. and Hewlett-Packard Co.
Japan's Toshiba Group, which employs
32,000 workers in China to make goods such
as refrigerators and TVs, said it, too, is taking
measures to reduce overtime work and cre-
ate safe working conditions at its factories.
China has long been a low-cost manufac-
turing center for goods sold under foreign
brand names. But wages already were rising
quickly as companies compete for workers
and communist leaders try to push the coun-


try up the technology ladder to make more
profitable products.
After a lull following the 2008 global crisis
when Beijing froze the minimum wage to
help exporters compete, Chinese workers
have received big pay hikes over the past two
years, though salaries still are low by West-
ern standards.
Foxconn responded to a spate of suicides
by employees at one of its mainland factory
campuses in 2010 by more than doubling its
basic monthly salary to 1,800 yuan ($290). The
same year, Toyota Motor Corp. and other
Japanese automakers granted pay hikes fol-
lowing a wave of strikes that had tacit gov-
ernment support.
Communist leaders have promised to dou-
ble the country's minimum wage from 2010
levels by 2015.
The minimum wage in Shanghai, one of the
world's most expensive cities, is about 1,200
yuan ($200) a month after an increase of more
than 10 percent last year The northern city
of Tianjin raised its minimum wage to 1,070
yuan ($175).
Beijing has tightened enforcement of wage
and hour rules "because there has been a
general lack of compliance greater than in
other countries," said K Lesli Ligorner, head
of the China employment group for law firm
Simmons & Simmons.
"China is trying to make sure that at least
at the lowest level of unskilled workers there
are greater protections in place for them,"
she said.
Export-driven manufacturers along
China's booming east coast also have to pay
more to get and keep workers as rising living
standards in the countryside mean fewer
people migrate to cities for factory jobs.


U.S. and European clients might push Chi-
nese suppliers to pay more so they look bet-
ter in front of consumers, Ligorner said.
Higher wages at Foxconn "will have a rip-
ple effect," she said.
Pay and working and environmental con-
ditions are a sensitive issue for U.S. and Eu-
ropean companies, some of which have been
criticized by activist groups. Companies such
as Nike Inc. and The Walt Disney Co. set spe-
cific standards in contracts with producers of
toys, athletic shoes and other goods sold
under their brands and send auditors to en-
force them.
"We mind our corporate social responsi-
bility and demand that our contract manu-
facturers strictly follow local as well as
international rules on labor and environ-
mental protection," said Henry Wang, public
relations director for Taiwan's Acer Inc., the
world's fourth-largest personal manufac-
turer
Acer's laptop computers are produced by
contractors in Kunshan, west of Shanghai,
and in Chongqing in the southwest
Wang said he didn't know whether the re-
port on Foxconn by the Fair Labor Associa-
tion, an American industry group, would lead
to changes at Acer He said suppliers already
are required to "strictly follow" rules on
wages and working conditions.
Higher wages will be easier for manufac-
turers to absorb if labor is a small portion of
their total costs.
Research firm IHS iSuppli estimates that
Apple pays $8 for the assembly of a 16-gigabyte
iPhone 4S and $188 for its components. iSup-
pli's figures suggest that if Apple were to


Page D2


Getting a handle on fictitious names


hat's your real
name?
Better let them
know it to be legal. If you
give your business a dif- MI
ferent name, other than
yours, it's called a "ficti- 1 :
tious name."
On the surface, ficti-
tious sound suspicious.
But Florida law requires Dr. Fr
all people in business to He
register their personal ASK 5
name and identity so it
can be legally attached to
the business or corporate name. By
doing this, it's perfectly OK to give
the business a "fictitious" name.
Read on.
The fictitious names statute ap-
plies to all businesses in Florida
and is a requirement under Florida
Statutes, Chapter 865.09. Noncom-
pliance can be subject to certain
criminal misdemeanor penalties.
Penalty for failure to comply:
Failure to comply has definite
penalties under the law. A most im-
portant action to take when starting
a business is to register your per-
sonal name and identity to the name
of your business or corporation.


e
r
S4


Begin by contacting
the Division of Corpora-
tions in Tallahassee.
The website is
www.sunbiz.org. The
website lists the require-
ments and one can re-
view the data base which
provides all registered
names and other perti-
derick nent information.
zog U Legal responsibility
CORE of a state: Why does any
state need to know who
owns and therefore is the
responsible person for a business in
their state? Simple answer: This
registration/disclosure requirement
fulfills states' obligation to protect
its' citizens.
All states have this basic duty. In
the event, somehow or in some way,
a business harms a citizen, a re-
sponsible person associated legally
with the business can be identified.
This registration provides the per-
son(s) harmed the opportunity to
legally seek resolution.
Why use a fictitious name: The
reason behind use of a fictitious
name for a business name is usually
marketing related, with the goal of


consumer recognition thrown in.
Think how much more under-
standable a simple name such as:
Emergency Medical Clinic or Guar-
anteed Safe Auto Brakes Company
is. These names state exactly what
the business does.
The marketing advantages rela-
tive to consumer recognition are
simple and direct. It's an effective
way to gain consumer recognition.
Advertising and branding a simple
name has great advantage.
Fictitious versus dba: The term
"fictitious" suggests a feeling of mis-
trust. Many states use the abbrevia-
tion dba, which stands for "doing
business as."
"Doing business as" (dba) ap-
pears on its face understandable
and less suspicious sounding. This
simpler abbreviation eliminates
any notion of distrust.
Naming a business is just one of
the many details of the startup
period.
Why not make it easy for your po-
tential customers to know what you
do by your business name?
More details and comments:
There are some additional details
relative to the fictitious name regis-


tration such as exemptions and re-
newal requirements, etc. The next
ASK SCORE column will cover the
balance of this law.
Special seminar: SCORE will
present a seminar on cyber thief/li-
ability on April 25.
A risk management expert will
explain how information stored in
business computers can be at risk if
not protected. The program will
take place at the College of Central
Florida.
Watch for more announcements
in the Chronicle and call SCORE
352-249-1236 for specific times and
location.
Citrus SCORE is on the College of
Central Florida campus in Lecanto.
Office hours are 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Tuesday through Thursday Call
352-249-1236. A large library of busi-
ness booklets is available at no
charge. If you call during non-
business hours, leave information
on how to contact you.

Dr. FrederickJ. Herzogis
chairman of Citrus County SCORE.
He can be reached via email:
therzog@tampabay.rrcom.


Why don't

people

want wills?
DEAR BRUCE: I
have a brother who
is a millionaire. He
and his wife had no chil-
dren of their own, but she
had two children. His wife
recently passed away, and
he has decided to remove
her name from his invest-
ments in hopes that noth-
ing will go to his
stepchildren if her name is
not on the accounts.
He has asked my advice
as to what to do. I keep
telling him he needs to
have a will, which he re-
fuses to do. What will hap-
pen to his money after his
demise? Who can claim the
money, and how do we get
it? Reader, via email
DEAR READER: I can't
imagine what possesses
people to think this way
You say your brother
doesn't have a will and
doesn't want one. Why?
Since his wife is not in
the picture, the next person
in line would be children
- not stepchildren, unless
they were legally adopted.
Since there seem to be no
heirs, I believe you would
be next in line, sharing
with any other siblings that
you and your brother may
have.
You might ask your
brother whom he wants to
take care of his final affairs.
You should explain to him
that a will simply directs,
without question, where
his monies will go. No one
can go to a court upon his
demise with a bogus claim
and say something like,
"Uncle Bob promised me
all his money"
If your brother is willing
to cast his assets to the
wind once he has passed
on, there's not much you
can do. If he has any sense
at all, he will consider writ-
ing a will that clearly ex-
presses his wishes.
DEAR BRUCE: What
are the procedures for get-
ting a spouse's name added
to a home title? My hus-
band and I purchased our
home four years ago, but
my credit was bad, so the
house was purchased in my
husband's name. I'm wor-
ried that if something were
to happen to my husband
and the house was not in
my name, I might lose it. -
S.B., Florida
DEAR S.B.: There are
many variables here. At the
time of purchase, the
lender gave credit only for
your husband's reputation,
income and assets.
Whether the lender would
agree to any change in the
title given your problems is
an open question.
Your husband's death
would not necessarily af-
fect your situation. In his
will, without question he
could leave his equity in
the home to you, his wife.
You would be responsible
for seeing that the mort-
gage was retired, but you
would not be homeless.
But if you still have many
debts in your name, leaving
the home to you may not be
a good idea. Although cred-
itors couldn't throw you out
of the house, you might not
be allowed to sell it without
retiring those obligations.
Before doing anything, I
would immediately go over
all of the various possibili-
ties with an attorney Death
can come at any time to any
of us.

Send questions to
bruce@brucewilliams.
corn or to Smart Money
PO. Box 2095, Elfers, FL
34680.





D2 SUNDAY, APRIL 1, 2012


Spring Fling set
at Winn-Dixie
Winn-Dixie at 6405 W. Gulf-
to-Lake Highway in Crystal
River plans its annual Spring
Fling from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sat-
urday, April 7.
Events will include an Easter
egg hunt for children, coloring
contest, samples of spring
foods, drawings, giveaways
and pictures with the Easter
Bunny.


Special to the Chronicle
Dr. Jim Kirkwood, certified
tennis pro at Plantation on
Crystal River, stands with
student Maddie Lewis.

Kirkwood attends
tennis symposium
Dr. Jim Kirkwood, certified
pro with the Professional Tennis
Registry and director of tennis
at Plantation on Crystal River,
attended the 2012 PTR Interna-
tional Tennis Symposium with
his wife, Shirley, from Feb. 23 to
28 at the Hyatt Regency Grand
Cypress Resort in Orlando.
The theme of the event was
'Your Education Vacation," with
each day covering a specific in-
terest: performance, coaching,
business/player development
and fitness/health, with special
classes for instruction in youth
groups ages 3 through 12.
PTR is the largest interna-
tional organization of certified
tennis instructors and coaches
in the world.
The Kirkwoods divided up
the daily seminars to take notes
and trade information. They
teach all ages daily at Planta-
tion courts. For information, call
352-795-8684.
Three certified as
cancer navigators
Nurses Carol Dolcemascolo,
R.N., and Jody Cradelbaugh,
R.N., along with medical social
worker Wendy Hall, LCSW, all
of Robert Boissoneault Oncol-
ogy Institute, recently became
certified as Cancer Navigators.
The goal of patient and can-


BUSINESS


cer navigation is to reduce can-
cer mortality by eliminating bar-
riers to cancer screening,
diagnosis, treatment and sup-
portive care.
What began as a pioneering
program at Harlem Hospital by
Harold Freeman, M.D., in 1990
was officially recognized in
2005 by then President George
W. Bush when he signed the
Patient Navigator Outreach and
Chronic Disease Prevention Act
(HR 1812). The success of pa-
tient navigation programs are in
helping patients navigate the
time of an abnormal finding
until resolution of the finding by
diagnosis and treatment.
Although this concept is new
to Citrus County, The American
College of Surgeons' Commis-
sion on Cancer has recently
mandated that cancer centers
offer patient navigation services
by 2015 as a condition for ac-
creditation. The Robert Bois-
soneault Oncology Institute is
proud to be the first medical
practice or organization in Cit-
rus County to offer this service.
For information regarding the
Cancer Navigation Program, or
for assistance if you have a
concern, call RBOI at 352-527-
0106, or visit www.rboi.com.
Workshops continue
at county libraries
OCALA- Workforce Con-
nection continues to offer com-
munity workshops at Citrus
County libraries to help job
seekers sharpen their employa-
bility skills and learn how to
compete in today's tough labor
market.
"Navigating the New World of
Work" will be held at the follow-
ing area library branches:
3:30 to 5:30 p.m. Monday,
April 9, at Coastal Region
Library, 8619 W. Crystal St.,
Crystal River.
4 to 6 p.m. Wednesday,
April 11, at Central Ridge Li-
brary, 425 W. Roosevelt Blvd.,
Beverly Hills.
2 to 4 p.m. Thursday, April
19, at Homosassa Library, 4100
S. Grandmarch Ave.,
Homosassa.
The workshops are designed
for job seekers who are unable
to attend the full two-day work-
shops at Workforce Connec-
tion's resource center in
Inverness. Participants will learn
why it's important to stand out in
today's new world of work;
strategies to effectively market
skills and qualifications; how to
develop targeted resumes; and
tools and tactics to help nail that
tough job interview. As with all
Workforce Connection pro-
grams and services, there is no
charge to participate.
To learn more or to sign up
for the community workshops,
call 352-291-9552 or 800-434-
5627, ext. 1410. Online regis-


Business DIGEST


tration is also available at www.
timecenter.com/wcworkshops.
Paugh named CF VP
for instruction
OCALA- Dr. Mark Paugh
has been named vice president
for Instructional Affairs for Col-
lege of Central Florida, a post
he has filled on a temporary
basis since July 2011.
"We appreciate his service in
an interim capacity over the last
nine months, during which he
has proven himself capable of
filling this role," said Dr. James
Henningsen, CF president. "He
is a valued team member, and
we look forward to his leader-
ship as we continue to serve
our community."
Paugh has been a member
of the CF family since January
2006, serving as dean of Health
and Human Services and asso-
ciate vice president for Liberal
Arts and Sciences. He came to
CF from Frederick Community
College in Maryland. Paugh
earned associate and bachelor
degrees at Columbia Union
College in Maryland, a master's
in public health from University
of Central Florida, and a doctor-
ate in adult education from
Florida State University.
In addition to his service at
the college, Paugh has served
the community through Hospice
of Marion County and was re-
cently elected chair of the
Board of Directors for 2012.
To learn more about CF, visit
www.CF.edu.
New faces at
Herry's Cafe
HOMOSASSA- Buddy
Olear has been named man-
ager of the Hospice Thrift & Gift
Shoppe, Herry's Cafe in Ho-
mosassa. He
is a native of
Florida and
moved to Cit-
rus County in
1980. He
trained under
"Top 100
Chef'" Edwin Buddy
Scholly and Budea
was formerly Herry's Caf6&
Executive
Chef at Sug-
armill Woods
Country Club.
Melissa
Pezzuti has
been named q, N
cafe coordi-
nator. She is
a native of Melissa
Florida and Pezzuti
most recently Herry's Caf6.
served as
food and beverage manager at
World Woods Golf & Country
Club in Brooksville.
Proceeds from Herry's Cafe
benefit the Hospice of Citrus


Jazzercise in-
structor Trina
Murphy with
the presti-
gious Presi-
dent's Club
Bronze
Award for her
performance
in the Jazzer-
cise interna-
tional fitness
franchise
business.


Trina
Murphy
Citrus County
Jazzercise.


The President's Club pro-
gram rewards successful fran-
chisees by giving back a
percentage of his/her franchise
fee based on four levels of
sales achievement.
The levels are determined
based on annual gross sales
revenues. Murphy's sales con-
tributed to Jazzercise Inc.'s
record $97 million in sys-
temwide sales in 2010-11.
Jazzercise ranks as the No. 1
fitness franchise, according to
the prestigious Entrepreneur
Magazine Franchise 500 list for
2012.
Overall, Jazzercise ranks No.
13 on the list, the company's
highest ranking ever.
This year, Jazzercise Inc. re-
warded President's Club recipi-
ents with more than $1.8 million
globally. Since this rebate pro-
gram was instituted in 1994,
Jazzercise has given back $20
million to its franchisees.
Murphy has been an instruc-
tor in Citrus County for eight
years and teaches Jazzercise
at the Keller Williams Plaza in
Lecanto, offering 26 classes
weekly in low-impact and regu-
lar formats.
For information, call Murphy
at 352-634-5661 or visit
www.citruscountyjazz.com.
Barbaron receives
recertification
LINCOLN, Neb. Continu-
ing its efforts to professionalize
the industry, the Golf Course
Builders Association of America
(GCBAA) is pleased to an-
nounce the recertifying of 30 of
its builder members, including
Barbaron Inc. of Crystal River.
"The GCBAA and its builder
members continue to set the
standard for golf course con-


County Inc. Herry's Kids Chil-
dren's Division, providing care
for children with life-threatening
illness and grief support for
those who have experienced a
loss.
Visit Hospice of Citrus
County on the web at www.
hospiceofcitruscounty.org.
Murphy received
Jazzercise award
Jazzercise, the world's lead-
ing dance fitness program, re-
cently honored Citrus County


struction, both at home in the
United States and abroad," said
Justin Apel, GCBAA executive
director.
The GCBAA has different lev-
els of membership, starting with
Builder & Irrigation Contractor
Applicants, followed by Associate
Builders or Associate Irrigation
Contractor, Builder, Renovation
Members or Irrigation Contractor
and Certified Builders.
Each level has a unique set
of requirements and qualifica-
tions designed to identify and
recognize members who con-
tinue to strive to improve their
professional standards and
customer satisfaction.
In addition to the member-
ship upgrades, 30 GCBAA
members were recertified at the
Certified Builder level. They in-
clude: ACC Golf Construction,
Littleton, Colo.; Aspen Corp.,
Daniels, W.V.; Barbaron Inc.,
Crystal River, Fla.; Course
Crafters Inc., Gainesville, Ga.;
Duininck Golf, Prinsburg, Minn.;
George E. Ley Co., Glenmoore,
Pa.; Glase Golf Inc., Bonita
Springs, Fla.; Golf Creations,
Marengo, Ill.; Golf Development
Construction, Louisville, Ky.;
Golf Works Inc., Austin, Texas;
Heritage Links, Houston, Texas;
Landirr Inc., Sanford, Fla.;
Landscapes Unlimited, Lincoln,
Neb.; Lepanto Golf Construc-
tion Inc., Pomona Park, Fla.;
MacCurrach Golf, Jacksonville,
Fla.; McDonald & Sons Inc.,
Jessup, Md.; Medalist Golf,
Inc., Cumming, Ga; Mid-Amer-
ica Golf & Landscape Inc. Lee's
Summit, Mo.; NMP Golf Con-
struction Corp., Williston, Vt.;
Oliphant Golf Construction Inc.,
Scottsdale, Ariz.; QGS Devel-
opment Inc., Lithia, Fla.; Ryan
Inc. Central, Janesville, Wis.;
Ryangolf Corp., Deerfield
Beach, Fla.; Shapemasters
Inc., Southport, N.C.; South-
eastern Golf Inc., Tifton, Ga.;
TDI International Inc., Stuart,
Fla.; Total Golf Construction
Inc., Vero Beach, Fla.; Total
Turf Services Inc., Bryn Athyn,
Pa.; United Golf, Tulsa, Okla.;
Wadsworth Golf Construction,
Plainfield, Ill.
Village market set
in Dunnellon
The Historic Village mer-
chants of Dunnellon invite
everyone to the First Saturday
Village Market, which runs from
9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, April
7. Stroll down West Pennsylva-
nia Avenue to Cedar Street and
then up to Walnut and Chestnut
streets.
This event feature vendors
selling their arts and crafts, as
well as people selling home-
made goodies. All of the shops
will be open for business as
usual.
For information, cal 352-
465-2225 or 352-465-7957.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

BUSINESS DIGEST
Submit information via
email to newsdesk@
chronicleonline.com or
fax to 352-563-3280,
attn: Business Digest.
The Chronicle reserves
the right to edit notices.
High-resolution photos
will be considered for
publication. Images
taken with most
cellphone cameras do
not reproduce well.
Publication on a
specific date or in color
cannot be guaranteed.
Submissions about
specific prices of
products or sales
events are considered
advertising and are not
eligible for Business
Digest.

Free workshop
in Spring Hill
CredAbility is one of the na-
tion's leading, nonprofit coun-
seling agencies. It provides
free, bilingual counseling serv-
ices, including foreclosure pre-
vention, confidential budget
and bankruptcy counseling,
and debt management pro-
grams.
In addition, CredAbility hosts
regular free, open-to-the-public
workshops, offering local resi-
dents the opportunity to gain
understanding on a variety of fi-
nancial wellness topics and is-
sues.
First-Time Home Buyers
Workshop 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Saturday, April 14, at Career
Central, 7361 Forest Oaks
Blvd., Spring Hill. Learn the ins
and outs and helpful tips for
buying your first home. Have
important questions answered
about securing a loan, available
tax credits and more. RSVP to
800-251-2227.
Networking
workshop at CF
There will be a networking
workshop from 4 to 6 p.m.
Wednesday, April 25, at the
College of Central Florida Cit-
rus Campus.
Networking can be one of the
most productive ways to invest
in your business and yourself,
or it can be a total waste of time
if not done well. What deter-
mines the value?
At this workshop, participants
will focus on how to approach
networking, how to accomplish
it in a variety of settings and
how to make it pay off.
The fee is $40 for Citrus
County Chamber of Commerce
members or Next Generation
Professionals.
For non-Chamber members,
the fee is $49. Call 352-249-
1210 to register.


ASSURANCE
Continued from Page Dl

absorb a Foxconn wage increase to
keep pay level and cut the work


week from 60 hours to 49, it would
pay less than $2 extra to have an
iPhone made. Other companies
earn smaller profits and might find
higher wages harder to pass on.
Higher costs in China already
have prompted some companies


in labor-intensive industries such
as shoes and textiles to migrate to
Vietnam and other lower-wage
economies.
Lin, the garment manufacturer,
said his company employs about
1,500 people in Guangdong


province near Hong Kong. He said
entry-level pay has more than
doubled in the past five years from
600 to 700 yuan ($95-$110) a month
to about 1,500 yuan ($240).
"Anything lower than that, you
wouldn't find the workers willing


to do it," he said.
AP Business Writers Kelvin
Chan in Hong Kong and Elaine
Kurtenbach in Tokyo and Associ-
ated Press writers Annie Huangin
Taipei, Taiwan and FosterKlugin
Seoul, South Korea contributed.


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35 plus years experience

In Pine View Plaza Shopping Center
Tim Faine,CPA 8012 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Crystal River, FL


I


LUINNcmE ,,UDiR,.lRY


For more

information

on adverti g

caff Afichael

I at 563-3273





Promotional information provided by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce


numberr connection
28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


tbamber Annul

Make reservations now for

April20 gala at Citrus Hills!
"Swing into the 1920s" 2012 annual Chamber -
Awards Dinner will be Friday, April 20, at Cit-
rus Hills Golf& Country Club. Tickets are $32
per person and sponsorship opportunities are
available. Please visit www.citruscount,
chamber.com and click "Register" to purchase
your tickets today! L
All proceeds will benefit Chamber programs
and scholarships. If you are interested in donatil n
an auction item, please call Tobey at the Crtlt.I


D3

SUNDAY
APRIL 1, 2012


awards Di m Ar

t' Oi i r Silent Auction will be available through
din ner: featuring donated goods and services
f oII ir Chamber members. Casino games, pho-
.' tographs and a raffle game will be featured,
so come prepared!
Reception and live entertainment will
start at 6 p.m., with the buffet dinner be-
ginning at 7 p.m. Our Awards Ceremony
will immediately follow dinner, and the
night will finish with a live auction.
A cash bar will be available throughout
the evening. Please call the Chamber of-
rice at 352-795-3149 for any questions or to ,. 4
discuss sponsorship opportunities. W


ikes In Bloom!


Citrus

County

Bass

Challenge

is April 28

The Citrus County Bass
Challenge will be April 28
on the Withlacoochee River
in Dunnellon to benefit the
Key Training
Center.
The entry fee for a two-
person team is $150, with
first prize receiving $1,500.
There are cash prizes for
the Top 10 teams.
The first 50 entries re-
ceive two raffle tickets. The
Anglers' Courtesy Tent is
compliments of Beef 'O'
Brady's of Crystal River
Applications are avail-
able in the Crystal River
Chamber office, or call 352-
795-5541 ext.
for

Nation.


This entry for Bikes in Bloom is displayed at SuGaBuG Kids in Crystal River's Heritage Village.


Vote for your favorite display now through May 9- awards May 11

The spring season has arrived, and our website www.citruscountychamber.com, in
Chamber of Commerce members are ready the Citrus County Chronicle or visit the In-
to show off their Bikes In Bloom! verness or Crystal River Chamber of-
Creativity and a little ingenuity have fices. Drop ballots in the flower -
been used to create displays of pot. Winners will be announced
seasonal beauty featuring on May 11 and '.
bikes or motorcycles, pl.ints will be featuredff
and flowers. A map will e 'J in the Chronicle. O) ^ c
available on March :31 While you are Wf O.
showing participating blisi- enjoying the -
nesses. We are asking the Bikes in Bloom 6 )
community to grab a rii.p I) across our county,
and travel the count.\. please visit these busi-
take some notes, K nesses and find out more
and decide which 'i about their products and ticipation and hope you enjoy your travels
"Bike in Bloom" is services. Our Chamber throughout the county!
your top choice! members are ready to For more information about Bikes in
Ballots will be work for you! Bloom 2012 and to see pictures, please visit
available on our We appreciate your par- our website or call 352-795-3149.




April 13: Chamber Membership Luncheon


The monthly Chamber Member-
ship Luncheon will be Friday, April
13, at Citrus Hills Golf & Country
Club.
This event is sponsored by Char-
itable Donations USA Inc. and net-


Bob Lane's Complete Accounting
& Tax Service Inverness, 352-
344-2888.
Brian Carlson, CPA, PA- Inver-
ness, 352-637-0437.
Christine C. Eck, CPA, PA- Crys-
tal River, 352-563-2522.
Edward J Serra, CPA PLLC -
Crystal River, 352-794-3879.
Hallmann Tax Group LLC Bev-
erly Hills, 352-4004800.
Humphrey & Saltmarsh, CPA- In-
verness, 352-341-3449.
Frederick Koehl, CPA PA- Crystal
River, 352-795-7966.
Michelle's Accounting and Tax
Service Hemando, 352-746-1855.
Oliver & Company Inverness,
352-746-1400.
Price & Company Crystal River,


working starts at 11:30 a.m., with
lunch immediately following.
For more information about
Charitable Donations USA, please
visit their website www.charitable
donationsusa.com or call John Pyle


at 352-699-0000.
Our guest speaker will be Aubrey
Brown, manager of Regional De-
velopment for CSX Transportation.
He will share the future plans
CSX has for our area, and will be


DON'T FORGET TAXES DUE APRIL 17
It's tax time please use a Chamber member to help with your tax
preparation and financial planning.


352-795-6118.
Quickbooks-Assist Hemando,
410-207-3233.
Rita Weckesser, EA, PA- Beverly
Hills, 352-746-1705.
Schlumberger Accounting Services
Inc. Crystal River, 352-795-3691.
Tamara Young EA, Tax & Account-
ing Services Crystal River, 352-
795-2496.
Williams, McCranie, Wardlow, &
Cash Inverness, 352-726-8130;
Crystal River, 352-795-3212.
Ameriprise Financial Services Inc.
- Lecanto, 352-746-9006.


Edward Jones-Brian Fitzpatrick -
Inverness, 352-860-2839.
Edward Jones-Justin Rooks Ho-
mosassa, 352-628-3466.
Edward Jones Investments- An-
drew Breese Crystal River, 352-
795-1603.
The Hagar Group Crystal River-
352-795-2697; Inverness 352-
726-1691.
Insurance by George Inverness,
352-726-1403.
Investor's Choice Financial Group-
Candy Murphy Crystal River, 352-
563-0700.


able to answer questions from the
audience.
To make your reservation, please
visit www.citruscountychamber.
com or call the Crystal River Cham-
ber office at 352-795-3149.


Joseph Capital Management LLC
- Hemando, 352-7464460.
Merrill Lynch Weeki Wachee,
352-592-8912.
MorganStanleySmithBarney-Ellen
Zane- Ocala, 352401-3825.
Raymond James & Associates -
Crystal River, 352-795-6155.
Raymond James at The Shoppes
of Citrus Hills Hernando, 352-
527-3700.
Williams Wealth Management -
Floral City, 352-344-1003.
Calabro Financial Management -
Beverly Hills, 352-527-2866.
Jackson Hewitt Tax Service -
Crystal River, 888-282-1040.
Liberty Tax Service Crystal
River, 352-563-2777.


UPCOMING EVENTS
Phone 352-795-3149
for details about these
events:
* After Hours Business
Networking Mixer -
5 to 7 p.m. Tuesday,
April 17, at Off the Cuff
...And On the Fly, 539
N. Citrus Ave., Crystal
River.
* April Madness
Basketball Tournament
-April 21 and 22 at
Lecanto High School
Gymnasium, 3810 W.
Educational Path,
Lecanto, to benefit
United Way of Citrus
County. Advertisement
in the program is still
available and can be
made by calling the
United Way office at
352-795-5483. Ad
space starts at $50 for
a business card size ad
and goes up to a full
page ad for $200.
Community volunteers
are needed for the
event that Saturday and
Sunday.
* Next Generation
Professionals -
"Networking is More
than Handing Out Busi-
ness Cards" workshop,
4 to 5 p.m. Wednesday,
April 25, at College of
Central Florida, 3800 S.
Lecanto Highway,
Lecanto. Learn how to
approach networking,
how to accomplish it in
a variety of settings,
and how to make it pay
off for you. Call
352-249-1210 to
register. Refreshments
provided. Fee for
Chamber members is
$40; non member fee
is $49.
* After Hours Business
Networking Mixer In-
surance Resources and
Dr. Chaney, 5 to 7 p.m.
Thursday, April 25.


'160 kj.- I~






D4 SUNDAY,APRIL 1, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY




CHRONICLE

www.chronicleonline.com


BUSINESS HOURS:

MONDAY-FRIDAY

8:00 A.M. 5:00 P.M.

CLOSED SATURDAY/SUNDAY



WE GLADLY ACCEPT

=W^a


Classifieds


Classifieds In Print and Online All The Time!


Publication Days/Deadlines

Chronicle / Daily..................................... 1 PM, Daily
Homefront / Sunday...............................3 PM, Friday
Chronicle / Sunday.............................4...4 PM, Friday
Chronicle / Monday............................4...4 PM, Friday
Sumter County Times / Thursday............. 11 AM, Tuesday
Riverland News / Thursday.................2...2 PM, Monday
South Marion Citizen / Friday..............4...4 PM, Tuesday
West Marion Messenger / Wednesday.......4 PM, Friday


PROFESSIONAL
PEST CONTROL
EXP. SALES TECHS
Must have proven in
home Sales Record
Company Veh.
Hourly Pay
Commission
Benefits
APPLY 5882 Hwy 200
QUEEN SLEEP SOFA
Brown Leather, inc.
mattress & sheets,
exc. condition. $450
352-422-0267



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
Paid for Junk Vehicles,
J.W. 352-228-9645
$$ CASH PAID $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL
Appls. Riding Mowers,
Scrap Metal, AC Unit
cell -352-270-4087



5 male adult cats
nuet. 1 female kitten
Shepherd & lab mix
(352) 216-6668
Blue Ticket Hound
male, nuet. 5 yo. UTD
on shots, needs fence
he is a runner, owner
passed.(352) 795-3835
fertilizer/mulch horse ma-
nure mixed with pine
shavings. U load and
haul. 352-628-9624
FREE HORSE MANURE
GREAT FOR GARDENS
EASY ACCESS
Pine Ridge
746-3545
Free To Great Home
Wheaten Terrier
Mixed breed, male
801b Great farm dog.
(352) 345-3507
KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Savage Pays top $$$.
352-628-4144
taking all donations
clothing,baby
stuff, shoes, purses, ect,all
kinds of stuff please call
Jamie @ 586-9754



BORDER COLLIE
Female/ 401bs lost
in Floral City near
S.Turner Ave &
StageCoach rd.
(352) 220-2540
Driver's License
Richard Baker of
Dunnellon
(352) 795-9821
Lost Dog
Husky, white w/red tips
Near Gospel Is. & 44
(352) 586-8917
LOST DOGS
Fawn Male Boxer &
Female Pug
Lost on Springbreeze in
Homosassa, are family
pets 352-364-6178
Lost Large Cat
Male, gray and tan,
about 20 loobs, large
blue eyes, Name Blue
Lost on Ocean Dirve
Citrus Springs
$50 REWARD
(352) 586-3307
LOST
Long Haired Gray Cat
off Grover Cleveland
REWARD
(352) 628-0236
LOST OLD SEIKO DIVERS
WATCH, black rubber
strap, lost between 2:15
and 3:15pm on Sat.
March 24, 2012 during
prom picture taking at
Park, by Liberty walk.
Inverness. Reward.
Call (352) 586-0939







REWARD $1000.
No Questions ask.
Min Pin Female 10 lbs
name Zoey, Needs
meds. last seen Sun 8/7
Holiday Dr off Turkey
Oak Crystal River
(352)257-9546 400-1519


Found black and white
male cat in Beverly Hills
please call to Identity
231-597-6577 Thank
you he misses his
Mommy...




Huge discounts when
you buy 2 types of
advertising! 122
weekly newspapers,
32 websites, 25 daily
newspapers. Call
now to diversify your
advertising with Ad-
vertising Networks of
Florida
(866)742-1373




FRESH JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct.@ $5 per lb
Stone Crab@ $6 per Ib
delivered 727-771-7500



Wanted to Buy
Treadmill, basic is ok
call me with info
(352) 795-7206




Citrus Springs
Busy Salon Seeks

F.T. Exp. Nail Tech.
(352) 489-4477

Serenity Day Spa
Wanted Experienced
HAIR DESIGNER
We have clients wait-
ing for you
GUARANTEED $$$$
(352) 746-1156










Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





AVANTE
AT INVERNESS
is looking for a
Full time RN Wound
Care Nurse. Mon-Fri
And
Full time MDS
Coordinator must
be an RN Mon-Fri
PLEASE CONTACT
Jennifer Daves at
352-726-3141
Or apply online
Avantecenters.com

Avante
At Inverness
looking for a full time
Maintenance/
Housekeeper Director
To oversee and
direct the functioning
of the facility building
systems. Must be
knowledgeable of
Safety regulations
and National Fire
Protection in a health
care environment.
apply online at
Avantecenters.com
Or Fax Resume to
Mark Daniels
352-637-0330

C.N.A.s
Full Time & Part time
If you are ready to
brighten up your
career, join our c
aring, dedicated
team. Now hiring on
3-11 & 11-7 shifts with
excellent benefits
Applv in person at:
ARBOR TRAIL REHAB
611 Turner Camp Rd,
Inverness
An EEO/AA Employer
M/F/V/D

F/T Activities Ass't
Opportunity exists for
that very special
person to join a truly
unique, top-drawer
activities dept.I Our
team's qualities
include high energy,
boundless creativity,
keen interpersonal
skills and a genuine
compassion for the
elderly. Does that
sound like YOU?
Bring your experience
and resume' to
SHIRLEY LOCH,
Life Enrichment
Coordinator
Diamond Ridge
Health & Rehab Cntr.-
where our resident's
smiles are enhanced
every single day!
2730 W. Marc
Knighton Ct. Lecanto,
Florida 34461
352-746-9500 ext. 728


^CwH ^. |^jT









I 1
^^B~TOADVERTHISE CLL:881H8

352=563=5966^i 1r* j~ 1 TT^T~~iT^


OR LAC YOR D OLIN A

wwwachronicenin^o


#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)

CNA PART TIME
Sunday and Thursday
7AM-7PM in my home.
Call 352-637-5537.

Dental Recep-
tionist
FT/PT, For High Quali-
tyOral Surgery Office.
Experience a must.
excel.pay & benefits.
Email Resume To:
marvamoli@
vahoo com


IMMEDIATE
OPENINGS
LPN & RN's
for Correctional and
Hospice RN's for
Hospitals Med/Surg
and ICU
APPLY IN PERSON
2008 Hwy 44 W,
Inverness, Or Online
www.nurse-temps
.com, 352-344-9828


LPN's
Full & Part time
We are expanding
our Nursing Services
Looking for experi-
enced nurse leaders
to join our exciting
team. 7-3 & 11-7
shifts available
Excellent benefits
Applv in Person:
ARBOR TRAIL REHAB
611 Turner Camp Rd.
Inverness, FL Or email
resume to: atdon@
southernLTC.com
An EEO/AA Employer
M/F/V/D


MEDICAL BILLERS
& CODERS ARE IN
DEMAND
Train to become a
Medical Office Assis-
tant! No Experience
needed! Job Training
& Local Placement
assistance. HS
Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)374-7294


NURSING
OPPORTUNITIES
Life Care Center of
Citrus Co. in Lecanto

RN I LPN
PRN positions
are available for
all shifts for Florida-
licensed nurses.

CNA
Full-time and PRN
positions are availa-
ble for Florida- certi-
fied nursing assistants.
Hours for PRN shifts
are 3 p.m.-11 p.m.
Long-term care ex-
perience is preferred.
We offer great pay
and benefits to
full-time associates,
including medical
coverage, 401 (k) and
paid vacation, sick
days and holidays.
Hannah Mand
352-746-4434
352-746-6081 Fax
3325 W. Jerwayne Ln.
Lecanto, FL 34461
Visit us online at
LCCA.COM.
EOE/M/F/V/D 31136




Cm
Ci'a'.'-iy


CNA/HHA's
Apply At
HOME INSTEAD
SENIOR CARE
4224 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Lecanto

Medical Office
looking for
FT team member
w/eceptonist/scheduling/i
insurance exp
fax resume
352-746-5605

Part time Clerk
Must have good, ac-
curate computer
and clerical skills, and
be able to answer a
multi line telephone.
Apply in Person
NO PHONE CALLS
CYPRESS COVE
CARE CENTER
700 SE 8TH AVENUE
Crystal River EOE




BOOKKEEPER

Able to process A/P's,
A/R's, Bank Recs, and
J/E thru trial balance.
Proficient with
accounting/inventory
Software and MS Excel
a must. Needed Mon
thru Fri for a wholesale
plumbing store located
in Inverness, FL. Send
resume to:
jandjweathers@wind-
stream.net
CASE MANAGER
Bachelor's degree
from an accredited
college or university
in the field of coun-
seling, social work,
psychology, rehabili-
tation, special
education or in a re-
lated human services
field is preferred.
All interested
candidates, please
apply in person or
submit resume to
Cypress Creek, 2855
W Woodland Ridge
Dr. Lecanto, FL 34461

Commercial
CSR
Exp'd In all
commercial lines,
220 or 440
lic. req'd .fax resume
to 352-726-2363 or
email cflelds@
thehagargroup.com

Fleet Manage-
ment Director
Announcement
#12-19
Manages and
monitors the
complete operation
of the County vehicle
and equipment
maintenance
programs. Prepares
and administers the
fleet maintenance
budget. Minimum of
four years of responsi-
ble and related
fleet management
experience. Pay
range $1,912.02 -
$2,868.05 B/W, DOQ.
Excellent benefits.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE:
Please visit our
website at
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit one
of the local Libraries
or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461
to apply online.
This position
is open until filled.
EOE/ADA


INSURANCE
AGENTS

220 or 440 Licensed
Insurance Agents
needed Immediate
openings for Sales
Producer or Cus-
tomer Service Repre-
sentative. Full time or
Pt time possibilities.
Great Salary, bene's
& bonuses. Email
resume to Tracy Fero
tfero@feroinsurance.
com or call
352-422-2160


LIBRARIAN II
Announcement
# 12-18
Advanced profes-
sional work leading
and managing
branch libraries. Five
years of customer
service experience
with three years
direct management
or supervisory experi-
ence. MUST BE ABLE
TO WORK EVENINGS
AND SATURDAYS.
Starting Pay
$1,255.32 bi-weekly.
Excellent benefits.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE:
Please visit our
website at
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit one
of the local Libraries
or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461
to apply online by
Friday, April 13, 2012
EOE/ADA


STEEL DETAILER
for structural steel
fabricator in
Homosassa, must
have exp. with auto
cad, or other steel de-
tailing software and
have exp. stairs and
railings as well as
structural steel
Send Resume to:
352-628-2600






EXP. LINE COOK,
Needed for Inverness
Golf & Country Club.
Fax Resume to:
352-726-3559






Award Winning
Community
Sales!
Citrus Country's top
lifestyle community,
the Villages of Cltrus
Hills, seeking licensed
RE salespeople to joln
area's leading sales
team. Strong national
marketing support
and all new collec-
tion of model homes
makes this an Ideal
opportunity for those
Interested In strong
earning potential and
cashing In on
rebound In housing
market. Ideal
candidates
will offer 5+ years'
experience and
desire to affiliate with
developer with
over 50 years of
proven track record.
Email resume to
nancy@cltrushllls.com


PROFESSIONAL
PEST CONTROL
EXP. SALES TECHS
Must have proven in
home Sales Record
*Company Veh.
Hourly Pay
Commission
Benefits
APPLY 5882 Hwy 200

SALES
Guar. Salary + more,
NATIONAL CO.
ADVANCEMENT
BENEFITS
Call Barb
352-726-5600



AutoTechnician
Min. 5 years, exp.
with tools, Automotion,
Floral City 352-341-1881
CNC Machinest
Must be quality orien-
ted, 5 yrs. exp. pre-
ferred. May train the
right person Crystal
River Area 422-6086
DRIVERS
Hometime Choices:
Express lanes
Weekly, 7/ON-7/OFF,
14/ON-7/OFF. WEEKLY,
Full and Part time. Dry
and Refrigerated, New
Trucks! CDL-A, 3 months
recent experience re-
quired. Top Benefits!
(800)414-9569
www.drivekniaht.com
DRIVERS: RUN
5 STATES REGIONAL!
Get Home Weekends,
earn up to 39cent mile,
1 yr OTR Flatbed Exp.
required. SUNBELT
TRANSPORT, LLC
800-572-5489 X 227
DRIVERS: RUN
5 STATES REGIONAL!
Get Home Weekends,
earn up to 39cent mile,
1 yr OTR Flatbed Exp.
required. SUNBELT
TRANSPORT, LLC
800-572-5489 X 227
EAGL BUICK
GMC, Inc
Is in need of
experienced
automotive service
consultants/advisors.
One of the best deal-
ership pay plans in
the county. Minimum
2 yrs experience
preferred. Great
opportunity for one to
find a career path,
and earn a great
living. Very produc-
tive repair facility and
a professional
environment with
plenty of growth po-
tential in a growing
community. Benefits.
Drug Free Workplace.
Application Available
@ Eagle Buick GMC
Inc. Send Resume:
Fax (352) 417-0944
Email
robbcole@eagle
buickgmc.com




Youraorlid firt

Need ajhJ)ob
or a
qualified
employee?


This area's
#1
employment
source!


Classifieds
i -i ji~ujiii~jfi


If you're seeking more from your career... explore the fast-paced, exciting
opportunity at Florida Hospital Zephyrhills! Located just minutes north of
Tampa, FL we are East PascO County's leading healthcare provider. Our
state-of-the-art, 154-bed faith based hospital has continued to grow to
better serve the needs of our community. In an effort to obtain our goal of
"No Wait" far our Emergency patients, we are now seeking:


RN- Emrgen F /PR Varabl


* New Wage Scale
* Onsite Daycare


* Immediate Benefits
* Life Bonus Program


As partof the Adventist Health System, HealthGrades recognized the Florida h( V'
Hospital Emergency Department system its' ED Excellence Award in mE. a
2010. Under Florida Emergency Physicians (FEP) leadership, it's n award
that places them in the top 5% of emergency departments in the notion. 25 monitored reament roms


FLORIDA HOSPITAL 34,000 patients annually
ZEPHYRHILLS Chest Pain Accredited
The skill to heal. The spirit to care.

L M A PT-' Fl' S I '


Exp.Marine Parts &
Accessories Mgr.
Apply in Person
at
Homosassa
Marine
3120 S.
Suncoast Blvd
Homosassa, Fl.
34448

GLAZIERS
wanted for Crystal
River High School
Project. Experience
only need apply.
Background check
will be done on
all applicants.
Contact Ted Mathis @
(352) 316-5759
after 5 p.m. wkdays.
HIRING EXPERIENCE/
INEXPERIENCE TANKER
DRIVERS!
Great benefits and
Pay! New fleet Volvo
Tractors! 1 year OTR
Exp. Req.- Tanker Train-
ing Available. Call
Today: 877-882-6537
www.OaklevTransport
.com

IRRIGATION
LABORER
Clean Fla license. Exp
preferred. Drug Free
Work Place
352-746-4451
NEW TO TRUCKING?
Your new career starts
now! *0 Tuition Cost*No
Credit Check* Great
Pay & Benefits, Short
employment commit-
ment required
call (866)297-8916
www.ioinCRST.com

PIANO/
KEYBOARDIST
Needed at Hernando
United Methodist Ch.
Call 726-7245
For application.

STEEL DETAILER
for structural steel
fabricator in
Homosassa, must
have exp. with auto
cad, or other steel
detailing software
and have exp. stairs
and railings as well as
structural steel
Send Resume to:
352-628-2600


TOOLMAKER
NEED PANTOGRAPH
EXP. FORM GRINDER,
A/C SHOP, BENEFITS,
TURBINE BROACH CO.
(352) 795-1163




*CALL NOW*
Looking to fill
immediate
positions in the
CUSTOMER
RELATIONS
DEPARTMENT.
Training, 401(k),
Medical. No Exp.
Necessary. call
Michelle
352-436-4460


25 Driver Trainees
Needed Now!
at Schneider National
Earn $750 per week!
No experience
needed! Local CDL
Training! Job ready in
15 days!
(888)368-1964

Animal Services
Technician
Announcement
#12-21
Manual labor work
taking care of
impounded animals
at the Citrus County
animal shelter. Experi-
ence dealing with
the general public
desirable. Must have
sufficient physical
strength and agility to
handle or restrain
large or potentially
dangerous animals.
Must be euthanasia
certified within
6 months of hire
date. Must possess a
current valid Florida
Driver License.
Beginning pay
$8.45 hourly.
Excellent benefits.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE:
Please visit our
website at
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit one
of the local Libraries
or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461
to apply online by
Friday, April 6, 2012
(County buildings will
be closed on Friday,
April 6, 2012)
EOE/ADA

BOAT MANUF.
F/Tdependabbehardwoking
for gen. fiber-
glass work. & sanding,
table/jig saw use.
Exp.preferred. Apply in
person w/references.
131 Hwy. 19N-Inglis
Drivers Wanted: A-CDL
w/hazmat
Compay& 0/0's.
OTR/Regional Runs. Lots
of Freight to move! Call
(877)893-9645

Exp. Appt. Setters
Top Pay, Hrly. Clean
work enviontment
Barb (352) 726-1002

EXPERIENCED
SCREEN PRINTERS
starting pay $9 pr hr
(352) 794-5402


F/T ALUMINUM
SALES REP.
Send Resume To:
Citrus Co Chronicle
Blind Box 1762P... 1624
N. Meadowcrest Blvd.
Crystal River Fl. 34429

Great opportunity
Looking for
motivated team
player to join Optical
Dept. at Homosassa
Eye Clinic, will train,
excellent benefits.
Please Fax Resume
352-628-6377
or Email hec@
drsnewcomer.com


Laundry
Attendant.
Sewing exp. a plus
Apply in Person Only
118 S. Apopka Ave.
Inverness

LOOKING for
a F/T Employee
w/current knowledge
of floor covering busi-
ness. Must have exp. &
good work history.
valid D.L and reliable
transp. a must call
302-6123 for more info

MAINTENANCE
PERSON

Experienced
preferred.
Apply in person
Best Western
Crystal River

P/T Pool Cleaner
for Upscale Golf &
Country Club
Community
Apply in Person
@ Terra Vista
2125 W Skyview
Crossing, Hernando.




Library Aide
Announcement
#12-17
P/T working 20 hours
weekly on a flexible
schedule at the
Homosassa Public
Library. Must possess
excellent customer
service and tele-
phone etiquette skills.
Must be able to lift 20
pounds on occasion.
Graduation from H.S
or G.E.D. $8.45 hourly
to start.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: Please visit
our website at
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit one
of the local Libraries
or the
Human Resources
Department,
(County buildings will
be closed on April 6,
2012) 3600 W Sover-
eign Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461
to apply online by
Friday, April 6, 2012
(County buildings
will be closed on
Friday, April 6, 2012)
EOE/ADA

Summer Youth
Camp Counselor
Must be at least 16
years of age (revised)
Citrus County Parks
& Recreation
has casual temporary
summer positions
available.
Summer Youth Camp
Counselor,
$7.69 hr. 20-40 hours.
(15 positions
available) Casual La-
bor
employment
Applications may be
obtained on line at
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us
and must be
returned to the
Parks & Recreation
Office located
at the Citrus County
Resource Center,
2804 W Marc
Knighton Ct.
Room 149,
Lecanto, FL EOE/ADA


Team Delivery



Opportunity .


Would you like to

deliver newspapers

but don't want to

work 7 days a weeks


We are taking applications
for teams to contract a
route.

V Lead contractor must
be 18 yrs of age

V Must have valid driver's
license and insurance



MAKE EXTRA MONEY!

DELIVERING



wwwchoMnieoniinecom

Email:
kstewart@chronicleonline.com
or come to
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River for an application.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Hardworkngdependable,
must pass back-
ground check, cus-
tomer oriented reliable
transportation
Call 302-6418 dfwp



#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-34 1-PREP (7737)
Drive 4 Melton Top
Pay & CSA Friendly
Equip 2 Mos. CDL
Class A Driving Exp
(877)258-8782www.me
Itontruck.com/
drive




AIRLINES ARE HIRING -
Train for hands on
Aviation Maintenance
Career. FAA approved
program.
Financial aid if qualified
Housing Available.
CALL Aviation Institute
Of Maintenance.
(866)314-3769
AIRLINES ARE HIRING -
Train for hands on
Aviation Maintenance
Career. FAA approved
program.
Financial aid if qualified
Housing Available.
CALL Aviation Institute
Of Maintenance.
(866)314-3769




"Can you Dig It?"
Heavy Equipment
School, 3 wk training
program. Backhoes,
Bulldozers, Trackhoes.
Local Job placement
asset. Start digging
dirt Now.
(877)994-9904

"Can you Dig It?"
Heavy Equipment
School, 3 wk training
program. Backhoes,
Bulldozers, Trackhoes.
Local Job placement
asset. Start digging
dirt Now.
(877)994-9904


Your World







CH-)0NICIE


#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)



TAYLORCOLLEGE



NE6 I .W


2 WEEK
PREP COURSES!
*ALF ADMINISTRATOR
$300.
*EKG TECH $475.
*NURSING ASST. $475.
*PHLEBOTOMY $475.
tavlorcolleae.edu
(352) 245-4119
FB, twitter, you tube




Antique Auction
Sat. March 31 @ IPM
View Fri. 9-5 & Sat10-1
811 SE US Hwy 19
Crystal River
Jewelry, Sterling,
Hummels & LLadros
Professional App & Liq
Fudge ab1131au1593
352-795-2061
charliefudge.com
13%BP (-3 for cash)
Cash/Cks/MC/VI


Collect ble


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday "
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





JACUZZI HOT TUB. 2-4
person swirled green and
white tub,wood
exterior,with cover,used
seldom.Kept
inside.Excellent
condition.$950.00.call
352-344-4635. phone


ESTATE
WASHER/DRYER SET
by Westinghouse, Xtra
Heavy Duty Lg Capacity,
EXCELLENT cond, white.
Value $800, yours for
$500 obo, til 4/8 only.
www.4saleinfl.com for
pix&more. 352-246-8736
GE Built In Micro wave
Black $100.Kenmore
gas dryer, like new $75.
(352) 382-2942
MICROWAVE
Whirlpool, over
range, 1000 watt
$75 (352) 522-1949
REFRIGERATOR
26 cu ft side by side GE
Profile, top of the line.
Water/Ice thru the door.
Great condition. $697.00
Call: 352-860-0419
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR, washers
dryers,FREE pick up
352-564-8179

YOU'LL THIS!
SMOOTH-TOP RANGE.
Like new. $400.00.
Frigidaire Elec. 30"
Slide-in range, 4 burn-
ers with self-cleaning
oven. Call:
352-628-5770
WANTED DEAD
OR ALIVE
Washers & Dryers
(352) 209-5135
WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 Each. Reliable,
like new, Excellent condi-
tion. Can deliver.
352 263-7398




Executive Office Chair
Black Vinyl
Excel. Cond. $40. obo
(352) 344-1953
FILE CABINET
Cole Steel, 3 drawer file
cabinet w/door and
combo safe inside
asking $100
(352) 382-1167




2 AUCTIONS
THURS. March 29
Estate Adventure
Auction -3PM
Antique prep week.
Loads of fun outside
From furn. to tools,
household & Plants
SSUN. APRIL 1
Antlaue & Collectible
Auction IPM
$4K + Silver coins,
Victorian to Eastlake
turn., Hummels, Minton,
Fossils. Always Irg.
selection. See webslte
for more Info.:
DudleysAuctlon.com
4000 S. Fla. Ave.
(US 41-S) Inverness
(352) 637-9588
AB1667-AU2246
12% BP-2% ca.disc


225 Amp. Lincoln
Welder, copper
armeture, fan cooled,
runs good $250.
Burning Torch, hose,
gauges, bottles & cart,
$150 (352) 344-0084
Black & Decker
power saw $50.
Shop master table saw
$150. (352) 628-5561
New Troybuilt
Generator,
5550 watts, 8550 start-
ing watts new $799 sell
$499.& misc tools
(352) 628-5561
Portable Generator
B&S 10HP, 5 gal tank,
8,58 50 starting watts,
5,550 Watts, New, 2 hrs.
use all paperwork
paid $640 asking $450
352-287-9670
Pressure Washer
Karcher Electric $100
Sears 10" Band Saw 3.5
opening $100
Sears 16" scroll saw
$100(352) 746-6369
Ryobi 14amps
COMPOUND Miter Saw
with laser & bag, 2
months old, new in box
$135 (352) 795-7513
Shopsmith w/ Band
Saw & Extra's
$600. (3) ladders,
8' step. $35. 8' ext
ladders $40. 6' step$20.
(352) 746-5739
Wood Midi Lathe Delta
Cast Iron bed extention
new belt, no access.
Exc cond. $250 firm
(352) 637-7248




COMPUTER
DELL Desktop, windows,
XP, office $100.
Compaq Laptop win-
dows XP $100/352
628-6806 228-0568
DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
HP Computer
w/tower $120.
Tower only $70.
(352)586-6891




HONDA ENGINE
New in Box. 5.5 h.p.
Vertical Shaft
$100 Firm
352-422-0201




Patio Set
9pcs Deluxe, like new
almond color $1200
new sell $200
(352) 476-7973


CLASSIFIED




5 PC SECTIONAL
W/2 END RECLINERS
neutral colors, good
condition $250
(352) 382-0005
8 ft, couch pillow back,
beige fabric, ends re-
cline, quick sale,
perfect cond. $100.
(352) 220-6823
BED Full size Mattress
& Box Spring. Excellent
cond. Clean-Non-Smoker
$85 352-400-0501
BEIGE VINYL
RECLINER Swivel vinyl
very clean. $75.00
352-257-5722 for details
Big Man Recliner
med brown, 3 mos old.
$275. TV Table pecan
woodholds up to 55"
LCD $180. (574)
242-2581/946-6286
Bookcase, solid cherry
wood, excel cond.
6fft tall, 6 shelves $125.
Small slant antique
desk, excel. cond. $75.
(352) 489-9986
CHINA HUTCH BY
LANE open top/closed
bottom; 5-quarters pine,
dark finish, Early Ameri-
can style. Matches dining
table & 4 chairs. $300.
352-634-4906
Dinette Table
4 chairs metal base,
glass top
matching wine rack
w/2 glass shelves $150.
(352) 527-0721
Dining Rm. Set, me-
dium oak, china hutch,
table with 7 chairs,
server table, rocker
and 2 bar stools, excel.
cond. $600
352-563-2493
DINING ROOM SET W/
EXT. Ashley Lattice Col-
lection, Cherry, 41x71",
2 back arm chairs, 4
bck side chairs $800
(352) 726-5379
DRESSER Powder blue
wood, matching mirror.
Satin nickel hardware.
Like new. $85 OBO
484-357-7150
DRESSERS
White Dresser w/mirror
$35, Pecan triple
dresser w/mirror $50
(352) 726-2572
Ethan Allen Book Case
Bottom Storage $100
Dark Solid Pine Hutch
$125 (352) 564-0955
Grandmothers clock,
works, excel. cond.,
$125.
Antique, chase lounge
w/ cushion for outside
$75. (352) 489-9986
KITCHEN TABLE & 4
CHAIRS Oval, beige, one
leaf. Fabric chairs on
casters. Very nice. $100
OBO 484-357-7150
Lazy Boy multi colored
Sofa & Love Seat
2 recliners in each
piece, excel. cond.
$380. obo
(352) 746-2149


SUNDAY,APRIL 1, 2012 D5


LADIES UPHOL-
STERED CHAIR Good
for LR/BR Tan
Good Cond.$40.00
352-422-0201
Lazy Boy Sofa, beige
tone, dual recliners,
$395 2 Lazy Boy Swivel
Rocker Chairs, $150 ea
All in Excellent Cond.
352-382-2836
Leather Recliner,
Tan
$150.
(352) 489-3457
MOVING SALE
Stearns and Foster
Queen size Sofa Bed
Like new $325
Pecan Dining Table 6
chairs w/fabric seats
$425 (352) 382-1167
OAK HUTCH
Leaded glass doors on
top, 2 drawers, & 2
doors on bottom,
40" W, 7ft High, $150
(352) 601-7363
PAUL'S FURNITURE
Open Tues.- Sat 9-2
628-2306 Homosassa
paulsfurnitureonline.com
Pedestal Dining
table(2) leafs, 4 chairs
custom padding
"quality" $325.more info
(352) 527-9982
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30,
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
352-628-0808
Queen Size
Sled bed ,head board
& foot board, box spr-
ing & mattress, Pd New
$1100 sell for $800 like
new(352) 527-2907
SOFA 96"Long x 40"
deep Klaussner sofa with
rolled arms. Burnt orange
microfiber with 7 pat-
terned throw pillows.
$500 352-637-6963
Sofa
Ethan Allen, very good
cond $200
Sugarmill Woods
(352) 382-4757
SOFA SLEEPER
& matching Love seat
Florida Style, exc cond
must sell $250 both obo
(484) 357-7150
Solid Oak Table,
made in Canada
$250. Ethan Allen China
Cabinet, 4 glass doors,
7'T,5'W 18'2" D$500
352-344-8886
SUGARMILL WOODS
Twin Bed, Dresser,
swivel rocker, 2 chests,
night stand, cherry ent.
center & Misc. 382-4557
Twin Size Day Bed
w/ mattress & match-
ing 6 drawer dresser w/
mirror. Excellent Cond.
$250obo (989)640-3419
Homosassa



CHICKEN
MANURE/FERTILIZER
Time to Fertilize!! 20 lb.
bag only $4.00. 25 avail.
352-563-1519


awn e gers, en-
gine, $45 ea. Riding
mower, 46" cut, $350
(352) 344-1310, 8am-12
GRASS SEEDS! GRASS
SEEDS! GRASS SEEDS!
American Farm & Feed
352-795-6013
HOSES (2) 25 ft, in
marine hoses, $5 ea.(1)
50 ft, /2 in coil hose.
$10, (1) 50 ft soaker $8.
All used once. 746-7355
REMINGTON PUSH
MOWER $75 Received 2
mowers,can't return.
NO gas/oil needed.
(352)746-3653
Sears Lawn Mower
$650
(352) 422-0942
Snapper Riding Mower
$400. Dixson 0 turn
riding mower $800.
(352) 746-7357
SOLD
IN 1 DAY
RIDING MOWER
CRAFTSMAN
42" ,21.5 HP
6 Speed $425
352-287-4116
TORO 6.5 Self Pro-
pelled, 22" cut, with
bag. Excellent condi-
tion! $160.00
352-563-1519



Jade plant, large,
beautiful and healthy.
about 3 feet tall by
4 feet wide.$25.00.
352-212-2051



#1 BIG SALE
1000 cook books, etc
all must go!! 719 N.
Maynard Ave on the
corner of hwy 44 '/2 mi
E. of Stokes Flea market
Fri Sat Sun 9a-5pm



Are U Moving? Estate?
In home liquidations?
MARTIN'S Estate &
Consign 352-209-4945



COMMUNION DRESS
Size 14 Worn two hours.
$40.00 352-344-3736
MENS CLOTHING
SHORTS, PANTS,
JEANS & SHIRTS 14
PIECES $25.00
352-613-0529



#1 BIG SALE
1000 cook books $5 pr
bag all must go!! 719 N
Maynard ave on the
corner of hwy 44,
1/2 ml E. of Stokes
Flea Market
Fri Sat Sun 9a-5p


2 POSITIONS OPEN
Housekeeper
& Bar Back

Weekends Mandatory
APPLY AT
5300 S CHEROKEE WAY
Homosassa Motel office
2 WHEELBARROWS 1
DEEP HARD PLASTIC
50.00 1 SHALLOW
METAL 25.00 464 0316
Antique Ranger
Wood Burning Stove,
$160.
(352) 364-3009
Leave message
AQUARIUM 25 GALLON
HIGH INCLUDES
STAND, LIGHT, FILTER
AND GRAVEL $75.00
352-613-0529
BAR STOOLS PLUSH
RUST COLORED
SEATS FAIR SHAPE
60.00 FOR BOTH
4640316
Collectors Print of
Robert E. Lee w/docs
$300.1adder $50. and
more @ Terra Vista
(352) 249-7630
COMFORTER SET HAN-
NAH MONTANA FULL
INCLUDES SHEETS &
PILLOW CASES $40
352-613-0529
DISNEY PRINT -cert.
no.838 of 2000-size
18"by 24" $100.00 more
info call 352-527-9982
DS GAMES for Nintendo
DS $10-$15.00
352-563-5206
FAN INDUSTRIAL
DRUM 24 IN. 1/3 hp in-
dustrial motor, 360 de-
gree tilt, 22 ga housing.
Like new. $75 746-7355
FURNITURE;Treadmill$170/ob
o, Tanning Bed
$300/obo, old tables
$75/obo, 6'x9' and
9'x12' florida rugs $160
both, @ Terra Vista @
352-249-7630
GRASS SEEDS! GRASS
SEEDS! GRASS SEEDS!
American Farm & Feed
352-795-6013
HANDI-CAP RAMP
Aluminum,Spring
loaded for van or
home ext to 7ft, folds
to 3ft, New $1600 sell
$800 obo 422-0868
(352) 746-0405
Jaguar Luggage
2 suit cases, 24h
17w 7d w/wheels
$100.(352) 746-6369
KENMORE HUMIDIFIER
Floor Model, works
great $25, 2 Lg Wall
Mirrors $30 ea.
(352) 382-1167
Noritake China
service for 8, includes 2
service pieces,
matching goblets,
$300 cash
(352) 503-7875


w't orig-
inal packaging $100.00
352-563-5206
P/T POOL
MAINTENANCE
Apply in person Mon.
April 2nd thru Friday,
April 6th at
Spruce Creek Preserve
SR 200 Dunnellon
9am 4pm
see Julie or Jorge
Port Generator
5550/8500 Watts, on
whls, + 25' 4 outlets
adapt cable $450
(812) 629-6538
SIEMANS OVER THE EAR
HEARING AID
Good Condition
Includes batteries
Paid $825. Asking $400
(352) 382-3879
TRAILER 4x8,
4.5 ft ramp. $500 or b/o
(352) 344-1953


Trndle bd w/2 mat-$150;
twn bdrm st 2bds w/mat,
hgh dres,w dres
w/mir-$500; cm curio
w/gls frnt-$200; 2
cmpt/offc tbls-$50 ea;
11'+ expnd comm
ladd-$200; Irg cuckoo
clock from Austria-$300;
call 352-270-8382 EVE
TWIN MATTRESS Frame
and box spring like new
$50.00. 352-563-5206
UPRIGHT FREEZER
frigidaire frost free.size
inside 45"h 23"w
excl.cond.$100.00 more
info call 352-746-0167
VEHICLE MAT for Ford
Expedition. $30.00
352-563-5206
WOOD FLOORING BY
BRUCE, Planks 3"x3/8"x
random Med Oak 25 sq ft
NEW in box $59 email pic
352-382-3650



4 WHEELED WALKER
WITH SEAT AND
BRAKES USED ONCE
80.00 464 0316
BEDSIDE COMMODE &
FOLDING ALUMINUM
WALKER ONLY 20.00
EACH 464 0316
Folding ALUMINUM
WALKER & PORTABLE
COMMODE-BOTH LIKE
NEW CONDITION
$20 obo 637-3636
MANUAL WHEELCHAIR
WITH FOOTRESTS
ONLY 100.00 464 0316
SCOOTER- GOLDEN
BUZZ AROUND, New
Battery, Used Little,
$300 obo
(352) 621-0672



BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We Also
Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676


h.sD e ac


ROB SCREENING
Repairs Rescreen, Front
Entries, Garage, Sliders
Free Est. 352-835-2020
SUBURBAN IND. INC.
Screen rms, Rescreens,
Siding, airports, rf.overs
wood decks, Fla. rooms
windows, garage scrns.
628-0562 (CBC1257141)







M N







How

To Make
Your

Dining

Room

Set

Disappear...

Simply advertise
in the Classifieds
and get results
quickly!




(352) 563-5966

C llI ) (:I.E
www.chronicleonline.com


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Washer &
Dryers, Free Pick Up
352-564-8179




Blind Factory
We custom make all
types. Best prices any-
where! Hwy 44 & CR
491. (352) 746-1998




ROGERS Construction
All Construction
sm jobs Free Est (352)
637-4373 CRC1326872




SHADY VIEW CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518




Clean Ups &
Clean Outs
(352) 220-9190




AFFORDABLE
COMPUTER SERV.
(352) 341-4150
DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469

NATURE COAST
COMPUTER Repairs
& Web Design
free insp 212-1551


Bianchi Concrete
inc.com ins.lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-
Sidewalks. Pool deck
repair/stain 257-0078

CURB APPEAL/ Lic
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River rock
reseals & repairs. 352
364-2120/410-7383

FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, staining &
Garage Firs. Recession
Prices! 352-527-1097




All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing,Hauling,
Site Prep, Driveways.
Lic. & Ins. 352- 795-5755




COUNTY WIDE DRY-
WALL -25 ys exp lic2875.
all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Pop Corn Removal
352-302-6838




BRIGHT ELECTRICAL
Res./Comm. Lic & Ins.
$50.hr. EC0001303
352-302-2366

DUN-RITE Elect
since '78/ Free Est.
licEC 13002699
352- 726-2907

Thomas Electric LLC
Generator maint &
repair. Guardian
Homestandby, &
Centurion. Cert. Tech.
Briggs Stratton 352-
621-1248 #ER00015377


A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002

BOB BROWN'S
Fence & Landscaping
352-795-0188/220-3194




ALUMINUM
STRUCTURES
5" & 6" Seamless Gutters
Free Estimates, Lic &
Ins. (352) 563-2977




Andrew Joehl
Handyman.
Gen/Maint/Repairs
Pressure cleaning.
Lawns/Gutters. No job
too small!Reli able ,ins.
0256271 352-465-9201

Affordable Handyman
V FAST
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
.100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100%Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
s FAST
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
.100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 k
Affordable Handyman
Ve FAST
AFFORDABLE
VE RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *


V THIS OUT!
AC & HEAT PUMPS
FREE Estimate & 2nd
Opinion, 10 yr. warr.
on ALL Parts, Great
prices, ALL the time.
352-400-4945
Lic #CAC027361




MAID TO ORDER
k House Cleaning *k
(352) 586-9125
Have Vacum Will Travel





The Tile Man
Bathroom remodel
Specializing in handi-
cap. Lic/Ins. #2441.
352-634-1584




#1 BOBCAT FOR HIRE
Light land clearing, site
work, grading, hauling.
NO JOB TOO SMALL!!!
Lic. & Ins. 352-400-0528
All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
All AROUND TRACTOR

352-795-5755


CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, curbing,
flocrete. River rock
reseals & repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
RIVENBARK LAWN &
LANDSCAPE.
Best Prices in town for
all your lawn care
needs!! (352) 464-3566



A + LAWN CARE
& LANDSCAPING
Affordable & Reliable
(352) 228-0421
BEVERLY HILLS
most yards $20.
Quick dependable,
352-422-5978
GRASS SEEDS! GRASS
SEEDS! GRASS SEEDS!
American Farm & Feed
352-795-6013
HALLOCK & SON
LAWN CARE ALL Your
lawn care needs. Detailed
Work. 400-1197, Lice/Ins.
JUSTIN LAWN CARE
Fast and Affordable.
and Friendly, Licensed.
(352) 476-3985
LAWN AND GARDEN
TRACTOR SUNSHADE
easy on/off, mesh
storage bag incl. never
used $38.00
(352) 382-3467



AT YOUR HOME
Mower, Parts Service &
Repair.Visit our store@
1332 SE Hy 19 220-4244



HIGH SPEED INTERNET
wherever you live,
starting @$29.99 per
mo.(352) 493-1327


A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs, trash,
lawn maint. furn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
ALL OF CITRUS
CLEAN UPS CLEAN OUTS
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790



Chris Satchell Painting
ASAP
30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST. (352) 586-2996
A-1 George Swedlige
Painting/press cleaning
Int/Ext. texture/drywall
repair (352) 794-0400
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998



Tim Herndon Plumbing
$10. off w/this ad
10 yrs serving Citrus Co
lic/ins CFC1428395
(352) 201-8237



CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST. (352) 586-2996
Pic PICARD'S Pressure
Cleaning & Painting
352-341-3300



Remodeling, kitchens
baths, ceramic tile &
tops. Decks, Garages
Handyman Services 40
Yrs Exp. crc058140
344-3536; 563-9768


Attention Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers are
required by state law
to include their state
license number in all
advertisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious that
you may be contact-
ing an unlicensed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For questions
about business
licensing, please call
your city or county gov-



LI ".' II I II sl t.


CHRONICLE


A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest Rates
Free est.(352)860-1452
DAVID'S
TREE SERVICE
(352) 302-5641
All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
DOUBLE J Tree Serv.
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
KING's Land Clearing &
Tree Serv. complete
tree & stump removal
hauling, demo& tractor
work 32 yrs. exp.
(352) 220-9819
R WRIGHT Tree Service
Tree removal & trimming.
Ins. & Lic.# 0256879
352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree Serv
Trim, Shape & Remove
Lic/Ins Free Est.
352-628-2825



344-2556, Richard
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


IDYE VEN CLANGI


WILL CONSTRUCTION
S352-628-2291
SPreventDryerFiresNow.com


BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Day,
We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over'Your Old One!
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!
Call now for a FREE
In-Home Estimate

1-866-585-8827
BATHFITTER.COM
000AECJ



REMODELIN


Ron's Affordable

Handyman Services
ALL Home
,.- Repairs
41 "-" Small Carpentry


clean Dryer

Affordable & Dependable
Expenence lifelong
3 52-344-0905






AAA ROOFING
Call the "A.ak6uste~ "
Free Written Estimate

:$100 OFF,
Any Re-Roof
Must present coupon at time contract is signed |

----


* Furniture Refinishing
Entryway Refinishing
STool/Knife Sharpening
PressureWashing
Lawn/Property Maintenance

Classical Custom
Services, Inc.
Mark McClendon

352-613-7934
Over 20YearsExperience Licensed&Insured






' j. "B Diamond Brite
---1 Florida Gem
Cr-. Marcite Decks F-
F i Pavers
FREE I .Tile -
ESTIMATES 3

GREG'S COMPLETE
GREG'S REMODEL

MARCITE, INC.
LICENSED 352-746-5200


* New Landscapes

* One Time Cuts

* Free Estimates


P- 10% OFF

R' Rivenbark Lawn
& Landscape
..... (352) 464-3566





GENERAL
Stand Alone I
Generator

Thomas Electric, LLC
Residential/Commercial Service
Generac Centurion
Guardian Generators
Factory Authorized Technicians
ER0015377

352621124


k tc I I t.:. I
Interior & Exterior
Pressure Washing
FREE ESTIMATES -

352-465-6631.





POOL-TEC
REPAIRS EQUIPMENT
PUMPS FILTERS
HEAT PUMPS
SALT SYSTEMS

RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL
32 YEARS EXPERIENCE

CALL ALAN 422-6956
STATE LICENSE #CPC051584


COPES POOL
AND PAVER LLC
YOUR INTERLOCKING BRICK PAVER SPECIALIST
Build your new pool now and
be ready for next summer!
Refinish your pool during the cooler months.

352-400-3188









* Lawncare
* Bush Trimming
* Debris Hauling' .
* Pressure Was g



g- ..







D6 SUNDAY,APRIL 1, 2012


F L








"NEW" ACOUSTIC
GUITAR PRO SERIES
GOLD GROVERS
GIGBAG&EXTRAS $100
352-601-6625
ORGAN
Kimball Superstar
Electronic Entertainer
has bench & books
good condition $125
(352) 382-1167
PIANO Henry Miller
upright. Great shape
$500 464-0443
RECORDING KING LAP
STEEL GUITAR
W/GIGBAG & EXTRAS
"BETTER THAN NEW"
$100 352-601-6625



AB LOUNGER TIME TO
WORK IT OFF ONLY
40.00 352 464 0316
Exercise Bike
like new $65. obo
(352) 726-7397
MANUAL TREADMILL
LOSE THAT WEIGHT
WORKS GREAT NEEDS
A HOME YOURS 75.00
464 0316
RECUMBANT EXER-
CISE BIKE NORDIC
TRACK ALL ELECTRON-
ICS ONLY 100.00
464 0316




12x 12 canopy
EASY POP-UP never
used $185
(352) 322-6456
40 Acres/Levy Co.
Hunting Property
Camper, Pond, Feed-
ers, Plots, Stands Blinds
$75,000. (352) 593-0335
CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pond,
ATV trails $165K obo
352 795-2027/ 634-4745
CLUB CAR
'06 $1,500
with charger
352-344-8516
Combo
Bumper, Pool, & Card
table, oak finish
$800
(352) 465-2928
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238

GOLF CLUBS Adams
A20S irons. Right hand,
senior flex. 4 thru 7 hy-
brid. 8 thru SW. Recent
new grips. 2 Aces from
these clubs. $150. Call
352 637 1842.
GOLF DRIVER Nike
Sasquatch Sumo 10.5 R
Diamana Graphite Std loft
and lie Exc Cond+HC
$50. Dunnellon 465-8495
M 1 GRAND STOCK
SETS:
M1 GI stock set. DOD
cartouche & circle P on
wrist. Ex. Condition.
$145.00. No metal
Boyd's replacement set.
Ex condition. $100.00.
No metal
352-634-1120
| WE BUY GUNS
On Site Gun Smithing
(352) 726-5238





EZ PULL TRAILERS,
New & Used

Utility & Enclosed
BUY, SELL, TRADE
Custom Built, Parts,
Tires, Whls, Repairs,
Trailer Hitches

New6x 12 open
utility w/ramp $935

Trailer Tires from
$34.49

Hwy 44 Crystal River
352-564-1299

GULF TO LAKE
TRAILER SALES

Largest Selection &
Lowest Prices.
Offering New & Used
Cargo & utility trailers

Triple Crown Utility TRL
6x 12 w/new spare
$1050.
6 x 12 Enclosed w/
V nose, rear ramp
door, $1995.

Trailer Tires
starting at $69.95

352-527-0555
Hwy 44, Lecanto




JUMPEROO $25 CAR
SEAT WINNIE POOH $
25 bounce bear $15
walker $15 352-777-1256
SWING $45 MUSICAL
CAR SEAT $30
BOUNCE $25 musical
excellent condition
352-777-1256
SWING MUSICAL EX-
CELLENT CONDITION
AND CAR SEAT $45
each BOUNCE MUSICAL
$25 352-777-1256
Toddler's Bed
w/frame mattress
Dora/Sponge Bob
sheet sets misc $125
(352) 628-0562
Offrin Ne & se


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966


SELL FOR $40 OR
TRADE FOR 6FT ALUM.
LADDER 634-2004









JUNK MOTORCYCLES
WANTED Will Pay up to
$200 for Unwanted Mo-
torcycle 352-942-3492
WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area.
Condition or Situation.
Call (352) 726-9369



3 YR OLD ORANGE
TABBY CAT
Free to good home: At-
tention starved spayed
female,front declaw in-
door cat. 352-795-2362
Bryan
Chihuahua
Tiny male 9 wks old
black w/brown,
no papers
(352) 344-4635
CHIHUAHUAS
2 adorable, fluffy
females, 8 wks old
gorgeous father
$250 ea. (352) 795-5531
DOWNSIZING
Koi and Gold Fish
FOR SALE, Even Better
Prices, ALL sizes
(352) 634-1783
GOLDEN RETRIEVERS
Pure breed pups, light
colors, 3fem 3 males,
shots & h/c. Parents on
Prem.. $400-450. ea
352-628-6050
Poodles, Mini Pups,
2 black males, 2 black
females, AKC reg.
beautiful & well social-
ized. Champion Sired
$300obo. 352-527-1920
YORKIE PUPPIES
FOR SALE, AKC
will have shots and
health cert $700ea
(352) 726-5217



DOG HOUSE
FOR LARGE DOG
never used $45
(352) 382-3467
Large Dog Cage
Collapsible, 26" w, 28"
high, 42" long, w/ tray
$48 (352) 382-3467



HAY, SADDLES, TACK,
AND FEED (FRM) Ask
About our Free Delivery
American Farm & Feed
(352) 795-6013
Mini Donkeys, Horses &
Ponies, used & new
saddles and tack,
Diamond P Farm
352-873-6033

Livestock


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966


MALE PIGMY GOAT
lyr old $50, Male goats
4 mo's old, $40 ea.
(352) 628-4750




EVINRUDE 89
40HP
Power T &T, w/controls
completely tuned/new
paint $1500
(352) 564-1324





2004 ALUMACRAFT
JON BOAT
14 Jon Boat w/15hp
Johnson.Asking
$1900obo352-302-5993

CAROLINA SKIFF
2001 Skiff 19 foot excel-
lent condition 90 hp
Yamaha, bimini top, ra-
dio, depth finder. Includes
trailer with new tires.
$7500 obo 352-895-2382

KEY WEST 19.9
Bay Reef, 150 hp
Honda, 651b 24 volt trol-
ling motor, hvy duty
trailer(352) 726-4325

LUND
1978 15 FOOT BASS
BOAT W/TRAILER.
Fiberglass, wide beam.
1990 30HP Johnson.
Console Steering. Heavy
Duty 12V trolling motor
w/foot pedal. New Marine
Battery w/warrantee.
Runs Great & Ready to
Fish. $1895.
352-341-0447

Palm Beach 99
201 white cap C.C. '99
150hp merc. v. low hrs.
hydro steering, hi end
2 rail T-Top, elect box,
T bag, alum trailer, radial
tires, outrigger, down
rigger ready. True
off/Inshore boat 8'5"
30" free board & more
exc cond.Steal $8995
(352) 563-5628

PALM COAST
'00, 16 ft, CC, 3 batter-
ies, 50HP John, elect.
mtr. & trlr. depth find.
$3,000 (352) 249-7994

PROLINE
21' Cuddy, full transom,
w/brack, 150 HP Yam.,
Bimini, VHF, porta pot,
dep. finder, trailer $5K
firm (352) 382-3298

Stamas 22'
cuddy rebuilt 225 hp
OB. galv trailer, new
tanks, windless, trim
tabs, bimini, cushions,
steering $3800 or trade
(352) 447-5655

TROLLER 85
14' 9.9 Yamaha 4 stroke
electric start trolling
motor, hummingbird
fishfinder w/trailer
$1900 bo 352-344-5993

WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LAKE
MARINE
We Pay CASH For Used
Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck & Fishing
Boats (352)527-0555
boatsupercenter.com


WEN
BOAT
SOLATNO EE


WORD IDE


G3, 90 hp Yam. jack
plate. camo interior.
trailer blade prop
$10,500 352 489-1403
YACHTSMAN
24' Pontoon, 70 HP Ev.
T/T, cust. trlr, bimini top,
stored inside $3500 incls
all gear (231) 852-0061




Bounder
Fleetwood 32' 1994
454 engine, loaded,
self contained, $9,750
352-795-6736
GULF STREAM 08
32' 3 slides, rear. kit.
K bed,50amp, like new
extras $31,500
(352) 726-1906
HITCHHIKER II LS
2008, 3 slides, excel
cond. heat pump, de-
luxe pkg. too many ex-
tras to list $32,000.
Dodge Truck also avail
(636) 209-0308
Holiday Rambler
'98 38' 7.5 gen.super
slide, air lever, a/c susp.
loaded call for details
$41 K (352) 746-9211
I Buy RV'S, Steve
Henry, RV World of
Hudson Inc.Since
1974. (888) 674-8376
(727) 514-8875
JAYCO '04
36' 5th whi toy hauler,
generator. slide, fuel
station $17,400. like new
Truck Avail For Sale
Local (502) 345-0285
RV SUPPLIES
Misc. Supplies, pig tails,
Sewer hoses,
patio sun scrn ETC.
$150 cash for all
(352) 503-7875




APACHE
Pop up camper, sleeps
6, stove, sink, alum.
windows, good cond.
$950 (352) 637-5755
CAMPER/TRAILER
2010, Sportsman KZ
Hybrid, 19ft, like new
air, full kitch, bath
$8750 (352) 249-6098
COLEMAN CAMPER
1997, 8FT
may need tires
$850 o/b/o
(352) 746-6393 Iv msg
GULF STREAM
Coach 25' model
24RBL, sips upto 6 gas &
elect appls & heat,
shower/toliet $6900
(352) 341-1714
I BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
call me 352-201-6945
SUNNYBROOK
2005 36ft, 5th whl,2
slides, kg bed,like
newheated tks, 60
amp service oak cab
$33,400 352-382-3298



4 Good Year
Wrangler NTR Kevlar
Side Tread w/ center
cover LT285 75 R 16,
mounted and
balanced on 8 lug
Ford Factory Rims
$395. (352) 628-5222
Are Dodge Truck
topper white fiberglass,
short bed,sliding front
window, full length side
windows, ladder rack
$350(352) 726-9251
CHEVROLET
1999 corvette L&R side
mufflers and tailpipes.
New condition. Replaced
with Z06 set in 2001.
$300 for both or offer.
5000 miles on originals.
1-352-503-6548
ENGINE -Challenger 7
318, 4 barrel w/rebuilt
trans, runs perfect un-
der 100K still in car
can hear run $400
352-613-0393


CLASSIFIED



$$ CASH PAID $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$

BIG SALE!
Consignment USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
AUTOS' FROM $1,500.
US 19 BY AIRPORT
US 44, BY NAPA
Low Payments *k
461-4518 & 795-4440
consignmentusa.org
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not
CASH PAID $300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars Trucks
& Vans, For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES,
Hwy 19... 352 564-8333
CASH PAID FOR JUNK
CARS Any Condition
Up to $500., Free
Towing 352-445-3909
KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Salvage Pays top $$$
for your autos.
352-628-4144

WANTED TO RENT
Class C or Class A
Motor home, travel-
ing to Maine & back
to Florida
approx 3 wks in July
2012 352-794-3272

WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
Perfect Cond. or Not
Titled,No title,
No problem. Paying up
to $25K any make,
any model Call A.J.
813-335-3794/531-4298




'08 Chrysler
Sebring Touring
Convertible,34k miles,
loaded, $13,500firm
352-897-4520

AFFORDABLE
AUTOS & VANS
Everybody Rides
$495 DOWN
$49 PER WEEK
BUY HERE PAY
HERE..
Lots of clean-safe-
dependable rides.
CALL DAN TODAY
(352) 5 6 3 -1 902
"WE BUYS CARS
DEAD OR ALIVE"
1675 Suncoast Hwy.
Homosassa Fl.

BIG SALE!
Consignment USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
AUTOS' FROM $1,500.
US 19 BY AIRPORT
US 44, BY NAPA
Low Payments *
461-4518 & 795-4440
consignmentusa.org

BUICK 08
Lucerne CXI.Jewel Red
w/tan canvas top
Lo miles, lots of extra's
$18,900 "Eye Catching"
(352) 726-7765
CADILLAC 04
DeVllle 66k mi, garaged
Champagne, w/top +
Gold Cream leather
$8,995, 352-341-4949
CADILLAC
1993 Allante Nstar. Soft
& hardtop auto
low miles black mint
$16KObo 352-563-1915
Camaro 97
Z28, 97K mis. T-tops,
exc cond. White with
orang strips $8K obo
352-302-7204
CHEVY
'07, Impala, V6, auto,
ice cold AC, non smok-
ers 100K mi $7,500
(352) 726-3093
Chrysler Maserati
1989 runs good,
removable hard top,
$2,900.
(352) 419-5219


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


KAWASAKI '82
11,662K ,mis. LTD 550
lots of extras
great cond $1000 obo
(352) 228-1897
LINCOLN
'97, Town Car, Cartier
custom, very well main-
tained, all records,
V-good cond. Must See
No calls after 6pm
(352) 860-0688
MERCEDES '99
S420, blue book $11,500
sell $10K FIRM
1729 W. Gulf to lake
Hwy, Lecanto
MERCURY
'97 Grand Marquis, ex-
cellent shape
Must See
$2,500., 352-344-8516

Sold 1 day
NISSAN ALTIMA
2011 exc. condition
low miles, fully loaded
$18,500 firm
TOYOTA CAMRY LE
V6, 99, very good
condition, non smokers,
72.7 k, $6900 obo
(352) 726-6479




AUTO SWAP/
Corral CAR SHOW
Sumter County
Fairgrounds
SUMTER
SWAP MEETS
APRIL 1. 2012
1-800-438-8559

CHEVROLET '01
Camaro, Z28, Org. 9000
miles, Pristine show car
frozen in time. Loaded
black/black leather
Flawless rare find!
$15,750 (352) 513-4257





1 *** i ^ A- ^ "A

Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966

TORONADO '92
Olds. White Diamond
red leather, 124K ms
FWD 3800 tuned port
injection V6, 18 city,
28 hwy. Meticulously
maint/garaged
$5K(352) 527-3291




BIG SALE!
Consignment USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
AUTOS' FROM $1,500.
US 19 BY AIRPORT
US 44, BY NAPA
k Low Payments *
461-4518 & 795-4440
consignmentusa.org

DODGE
2007 Ram 1500 Truck,
HEMI, Quad Cab, Dk
Blue, 92K mi, bedliner,
running boards, new tires
& brakes, mechanically
perfect, very good condi-
tion, $14,995.
352-572-6732
Dodge Ram' 11
1500, Big Horn,4 dr. 11K
miles, blue teeth, 10
way power seat, run-
ningboards, Show room
Cond. New $37,511.sell
$24K (352) 419-5836
Ford 02
F150, Ext Cab,
fair cond, runs good
166Kmis. $6kobo
352-302-7204


(3s52) 563-5966 /


FORD '06
F250 Super Duty, 4 x 4,
6.0, Lariat Pkg. Off Rd.
Pkg., Hard Bed Cover
$21,500 (352) 586-8576

FORD
2010 F150 Platinum
Supercrew, 4x4, 22200
miles, black, leather, nav-
igation, rear view camera,
tow package, excellent
condition, $12900
wary@netscape.com

FORD F350
87 Stake Body Diesel
standard shlft,GREAT
work truck $3k
(813) 417-6024




JEEP
1989 Wrangler SAHARA
$1999 automatic
68493 miles
4x4 runs great
863-968-6502


DODGE GRAND
CARVAN 01
Maroon, 151k miles, 3.3L
V6, cold AC, good cond. -
$3,250. 527-3894
FORD 94
Econoline, handicap lift
Van, 46K miles.
$3K obo(352) 228-0955




Harley 00
Roadking Classic, all
gear 17K miles 11K
obo.(352) 489-0873
HARLEY DAVIDSON
08 Night Train, flat blk,
11,500 mis. lots of extra's
$14K obo Jeff
(407) 712-0803
HARLEY-
DAVIDSON
2005 FLTRX Road Glide
Custom Oversized
Windshield, King/Queen
seat, Backrest, 24k miles,
$12K 352-257-3130


JUNK MOTORCYCLES
WANTED Will Pay up to
$200 for Unwanted Mo-
torcycle 352-942-3492

KAWASAKI
2006 Vulcan 1600 No-
mad Excellent condi-
tion, well serviced. 14k
miles. Newer tires and
battery. Bike jack,
Cycleshell, lots of ac-
cessories. Pix available.
$6495 352-601-7460










ROADSTER
SILVERADO 04
Garage kept, very well
maint, lots of extras ask
$6k obo (352) 214-9800
ROADS-LTAR^^L^^


311-0401 SUCRN
4/11 Sale- Personal Mini Storage-Dunnellon
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
Personal Property of the following Tenants will be sold for cash to satisfy rental liens in
accordance with Florida Statutes, Self Storage Facility Act, Sections 83-806 and
83-807: PERSONAL MINI STORAGE- DUNNELLON
Unit #00009Cherylyn Morgan #00029 Peter Fenton, Jr. #00049 James Kephart
#00100 Deborah Ziegler #00131 James Fisher #00141 Rita Wilkins
#00228 Roosevelt Cannon #00237 Cinda S. Seibert #00248 Holly M Johnson
#00258 Sandra Uzialko
Contents may include kitchen, ehusehold items, bedding, luggage, toys, games,
packed cartons, furniture, tools, clothing, trucks, cars, etc. There's no Title for vehicles
sold at Lien Sale. Owners reserve the right to Bid on Units. line Sale to be held on the
premises April 11, 2012 @ 2:00 p.m. Viewing will be at the time of the sale only.
Personal Mini Storage Dunnellon, 11955 N. Florida Ave., (Hwy. 41) Dunnellon, FL 34434
(352) 489-6878
March 25 and April 1,2012.


316-0401 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF FINAL AGENCY ACTION BY
THE SOUTHWEST FLORIDA WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICT
Notice is given that the District's Final Agency Action is approval of the application
for a Water Use Permit to serve Public Supply Use activities. The total authorized with-
drawal is 4,597,000 GPD, Peak Month is 6,574,000 GPD, and Maximum is (N/A) GPD.
The project is located in Citrus County, Section(s) 25, Township 18 South, Range 18
East. The permit applicant is the BOCC of Citrus County, a political subdivision of the
state of Florida,
Attention: Ken Cheek, P.E., whose address is 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Suite 291,
Lecanto, FL 34461.
The Permit No. is 20007121.006.
The file(s) pertaining to the project referred to above is available for inspection Mon-
day through Friday except for legal holidays, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., at the Southwest
Florida Water Management District, 2379 Broad Street, Brooksville, FL 34604.
NOTICE OF RIGHTS
Any person whose substantial interests are affected by the District's action regarding
this matter may request an administrative hearing in accordance with Sections
120.569 and 120.57, Florida Statutes (F.S.), and Chapter 28-106, Florida Administrative
Code (F.A.C.), of the Uniform Rules of Procedure. A request for hearing must (1) ex-
plain how the substantial interests of each person requesting the hearing will be af-
fected by the District's action, or proposed action; (2) state all material facts dis-
puted by each person requesting the hearing or state that there are no disputed
facts; and (3) otherwise comply with Chapter 28-106, F.A.C. A request for hearing
must be filed with and received by the Agency Clerk of the District at the District's
Brooksville address, 2379 Broad Street, Brooksville, FL 34604-6899 within 21 days of
publication of this notice. Failure to file a request for hearing within this time period
shall constitute a waiver of any right such person may have to request a hearing un-
der Sections 120.569 and 120.57, F.S.
Because the administrative hearing process is designed to formulate final agency
action, the filing of the petition means that the District's final action may be different
from the position taken by it in this notice of agency action. Persons whose substan-
tial interests will be affected by any such final decision of the District in this matter
have the right to petition to become a party to the proceeding, in accordance with
the requirements set forth above.
Mediation pursuant to Section 120.573, F.S., to settle an administrative dispute re-
garding the District's action in this matter is not available prior to the filing of a re-
quest for hearing.
April 1,2012.


319-0401 MCRN
April Sales
PUBLIC NOTICE
PUBLIC AUCTION
The following vehicles will
be sold at PUBLIC AUC-
TION on the property of
SCALLY'S LUBE & GO TOW-
ING AND RECOVERY, 1185
N. Paul Drive, Inverness, FL
34453; 352-860-0550; in
accordance with Florida
Statute 713.78. Auction
Date as Follows: All Sales
will begin at 8:00 AM, Ve-
hicle may be viewed 30
minutes before sale. For
details call 352-860-0550.
1) 1987 CHEVY S-10
COLOR: WHITE VIN#


Meeting^f
Notice


1GCBS14E6H8161853
Auction Date: 4/11/2012
2) 1992 BUICK CENTURY
COLOR: WHITE VIN#
1 G4L54N4N647340 1
Auction Date: 4/23/2012
3) 1981 SKI B BOAT
COLOR: WHITE VIN#
SKB 2 0 3 9 7 M 8 1 1
Auction Date: 4/23/2012
4) 1988 AUDI 5000
COLOR: GRAY VIN#
WAUFC0442JN022713
Auction Date: 4/23/2012
5) 1997 CHEVY CAVALIER
COLOR: BROWN VIN#
1 G1JC1246V7198219


Mee^tingB
Notices


Auction Date: 4/23/2012
6) 1998 KIA SPORTAGE
COLOR: RED VIN#
KNDJA7234W5568894
Auction Date: 4/23/2012
7) 2009 HONDA ACCORD
COLOR: SILVER VIN#
1HGCP26819A008828
Auction Date: 4/24/2012
8) 1998 HYUNDAI TIBURON
COLOR: GREEN VIN#
KMHJG34FOWU 112553
Auction Date: 4/27/2012
Scally's Lube and Go re-
serves the right to bid on
all vehicles in Auction. All
sales are final at 9:00 AM
Pub: April 1,2012.

Meeting^f
Notices


317-0401 SUCRN
4/11 Regular Meeting CC Tourist Development Council
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the CITRUS COUNTY TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL
will hold a regular meeting on Wednesday, April 11, 2012 at 9:00 a.m. at the Lecanto
Government Building, Room 166, Lecanto, FL 34461.
Any person desiring further information regarding this meeting may contact the
Executive Offices of the Board of County Commissioners, 110 N. Apopka Avenue,
Inverness, Florida, 34450 (352) 341-6560.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office, 110
N. Apopka Avenue, Room 102, Inverness, Florida, 34450 (352) 341-6560, at least one
day before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD tele-
phone (352) 341-6580.
WINN WEBB, CHAIRMAN
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC: Any person who decides to appeal any decision of the
Governing Body with respect to any matter considered at this meeting will need a
record of the proceedings and for such purpose may need to provide that a verba-
tim record of the proceeding is made, which record includes testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal is to be based (Section 286.0101, Florida Statute).
April 1,2012.


318-0401 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
INVITATION TO BID
ITB No. 018-12
Roadway Resurfacing Program
Fiscal Year 2011/2012
Solicitation Overview
Citrus County Board of County Commissioners invites interested parties to submit a
Bid to provide roadway resurfacing services for various roadways throughout Citrus
County Florida. The work includes, but is not limited to, furnishing all equipment, la-
bor and material for the placement of Type SP 9.5 (Fine) Asphalt for leveling and re-
surfacing as specified under current Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT)
Standard Specifications for Road and Bridge Construction and its supplements in-
cluding, but not limited to, milling, exposing, and cleaning edge of existing pave-
ment, temporary and permanent striping, redressing, filling and sodding areas adja-
cent to the pavement, striping and other items as specified in the Contract Docu-
ments for approximately 24 miles of roadway in Citrus County, Florida.
Minimum Reauirements For Submittina A Bid
Bidders must be pre-qualified by the Florida Department of Transportation and sub-
mit a copy of such at the time of Bid Submittal.
Awarded CONTRACTOR shall indemnify, defend, save and hold harmless the Florida
Department of Transportation and all of its officers, agents or employees from all
suits, actions, claims, demands, liability of any nature whatsoever arising out of, be-
cause of, or due to any negligent act of occurrence of omission or commission of
the awarded CONTRACTOR, its officers, agents or employees. Neither the awarded
CONTRACTOR, nor any of its officers, agents or employees will be liable under this
section for damages arising out of injury or damage.
SEALED Bids are to be submitted on or before April 24, 2012 @ 2:00 PM to Wendy
Crawford, Office of Management & Budget, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Suite 266,
Lecanto, FL 34461.
Bidders must include with their Bid a Bid Bond, Certified Check or Cashier's Check in
the amount of five percent (5%) of the total amount of their Bid. The Bid Security shall
be payable to Citrus County Board of County Commissioners. Performance and
Payment Bonds will be required for this project each in the amount of one hundred
percent (100%) of the Contract Amount. The budget for this Project is $2.7 million.
A Public Opening of the Bids is scheduled for April 24, 2012@ 2:15 PM at 3600 West
Sovereign Path, Room 280, Lecanto, Florida 34461.
Anyone requiring reasonable accommodations at the Public Opening because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the Office of Management &
Budget at (352) 527-5457 at least two days before the meeting. If you are hearing or
speech impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 527-5312.
To obtain a copy of the Bid Documents for this announcement, please visit the Citrus
County Website at www.bocc.citrus.fl.us and select "PURCHASING/BIDS" on the left
hand side of the Home Page. Or, call the Office of Management &
Budget/Purchasing at (352) 527-5413.
CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
Winn Webb, Chairman
April 1,2012.


I Misc. Nod


I Misc. Nod


I Misc. No


I ^^Bi oc


I ^^Bi oc


I ^^Bi oc






Section E-SUNDAY, APRIL 1,2012


____ _ME rRONI
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE REAL ESTATE GUIDE


fl Sikorski's
L 7Attic
PAGE E6


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A small sunroom is
shown. A few simple
guidelines can turn
a small space from
Dilemma to De-Lovely.
Better Homes and Gardens/
Associated Press


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E2 SUNDA'I~ APRIL 1, 2012 Cimus Couivn' (FL) CHRONICLE


NO FOOLIHG!! BRING THE HORSES!!
- ALMOST 10ACRES -OPEN PASTURES
SHuge Screened Pool 20x36 Barn

























CTARETHUSIASTS DRSIEAM!!
* X Garage Great Room *Fully Fenced w/Gate


















* 1,800d Sqg Ftksh Nc lae Lots fSoae
* Spli Pln31edFoidroom wom/Horet Tubch
GREAT PRICE VERY PEACEFUL!!









KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997
E-MAIL: elliesuI~nnen~e










TARENTHUSIOW BUSINESS!!
* 3-Bay Garage w/E Fenced Yard
*800 Sece F. Wksa N Lots of Storage
* Two Bedroom Home Great Porch
Close to Hwy. 41 ,-A Must See..
KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536
ELLIE SUTTOH 352-287-3997
www.Florid__slinglnnIo.com


mr






CAR ENTHUSIASTS DREAM!!
:4.77 Acres COU NTRY SETTI NG
I12X25 Garage .9,000 lb. Lift
-1,800 Sq. Ft. Wkahp Nice Cleared Lot
-Split Plan 3/2 .Florida Room w/Hot Tub
KELLY GODDARD 352-476-83 ii:JI
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997
E.MAIL kellyg, im nenn nnel


11]9b N. UULUkNUALt AVk.
DUNNELLON, FL
* Furnished Doublewide 1 Acre Lot Near Boat Ramp
*2BD/2BA w/3-Car Detached Garage/Workshop
* Utility Shed w/Elect Plus 30'x50' Steel Carort
PETER & MARVIA KOROL
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875


ou4 PALMAi btnA P 1.
LANDINGS AT INVERNESS
* 2BD/2BA/2CG+Dock 1,524 SF Living Area
* Updated Kitchen and Baths Wood & Tile Floors
* Florida Room
PETER & MARVIA KOROL _
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875


*2BR/2BA/2CG Terra Vista Villa
SOpen Kitchen w/Breakfast Bar
SDen/Office Built-in Entertainment Center
SScreened Lanai Private Backyard
Maintenance-Free
LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611
Email: lenplmer@remax.net


iHow much
home can I
comfortably
afford?
For more Information call:
Ben Branch
352.564.2250
N'JMLS ID: 432391
Bankof America 9 Home Loans
ml, U p.i ,.'b l"Y,- :, J ,... ,t N4.. P-,n .-i an.. i_,
".,. IM '. r 1 i.,n . hr .. e *,I na.. .i
ma".i~f, MM z i~n~i. Vo|- o *in ^rttg


30 W. IPSWICH LANE, HERNANDO
* Gorgeous 3BR/2BA/2CG Hampton Hills Home
* Gourmet Kitchen wlGranite Countertops Gas Fireplace
* Stainless Steel Appliances
* Lg. Screened Tiled Lanai
* 1 Acre Landscaped Corner Lot
LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611
Email: lenpalmer@remax.net


(352) 637 ,2 8
DEnter houaSe #1240


Exquisite Black Diamond Ranch Home 3/3 -
2,699 sq ft of living area, located on 08
acres on the 5 of the Quarry Course This
home has been completely remodeled Cherry
cabinetry, marble flooring, granite throughout,
large screened patio 52x23 New roof, A/C
and water heater in past 3 years
KEVIN & KAREN CUNNINGHAM
(352) 637-6200
Email kcunningham@remax.net


ELEGANCE AND BEAUTY

Don't miss this gorgeous home.

Call me for your private showing. Priced to sell.


#3 ,5 ..,


S Custom Built 4/3/2
2,932 Sq. Ft. L/A
Custom Built-Ins in Living Room
STiled Thru-Out All TrafficAreas
Plush Carpet in Bedroom, Office, Great Room & Dining
U Master Suite w/Walk-Ins, Jetted Tub, Double Sinks
SGourmet Kitchen w/Morning Room
Formal Dining
SOutside Summer Kitchen
.* Plus Too Many Upgrades to Mention Here

CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555
Email: cnadal@remax.net


Great location on one acre. 3BR/
2BA with a total of 2,584 sq. ft.
under roof. Outbuildings, newer roof,
caged heated pool, eat-in kitchen with
tile floors. 2-car garage, split plan,
and much more.
BARBARA MILLS (352) 637-6200 I[
Email: barbaramills@eorthlink.net


Owner says "bring me an offerll" Over 700 ft of
waterfront on the beautiful Withlacoochee River
Private retreat is situated on three lots with a
covered bridge leading to property Future
development is possible The home is a 3/2 with
recent updated including bath, kitchen and living
spaces Huge sliders open to riverside deck
Multiple outbuildings, dock, garden area and
enclosed screen room
DAVID IVORY 352-613-4460
Email: davidsivory@holmail.com


e I o IM1 DUlIL OI/ IZ unII .1/ Mo u
* Hardwood Floors Throughout Home
* Large Master Suites *Split Floor Plan
* Security System Fully Enclosed Screen
* Room for Pool and More
* Close to Schools Must See!!!
CHERYL LAMBERT 352-637-6200
Email: cheryllamberl@remax.net


242 N. Lec i Hw. eel il 2-82w wRMXco 0 .Mi ,Ivres6760
837 S. Iucos BldHro*s 2-80w wHlr~nielsuecm54N w.1,Cy lRvr7524


4232 N. DECKWOOD DR., PINE RIDGE
* 3/3/3 Plus Office 15x30 Solar Heated Pool
* Rusaw Custom Built 2,600+ Sq. Ft. Energy Efficient
* Awesome Master Suite Park-like Setting with Privacy
* Crown Molding & Designer Lighting
* Irrigation Well Plus Gardens
GEILA 'gala' ENGLISH 352-249-6961
Email: g.english@remax.net
www.sellingcitruscountyhomes.com


8921 W. WAUCHULA DR., CRYSTAL RIVER
Over 2,200 sq. ft. home w/pool sitting on 2.5
acres with a 54'x31' 4-bay garage and attached
R/V carport. Come on out, you won't be
disappointed!
DIR 19N to R on Citrus Ave, to L on Emerald Oaks,
to R on Myaka to L on Wauchula

LEO SMITH 352-697-2771 (
Email: leosmith@remax.net


INVERNESS HIGHLANDS
MOVE-IN READY! Beautiful 1,588 SF
2 bed, 2 bath home in perfect condition.
Lrg. living room, huge den & Florida
room. Fenced backyard in convenient
location to all area amenities. All
appliances included. MOTIVATED
SELLER CAN CLOSE QUICKLY! oa
MONICA SALDARRIAGA (352) 476-8695 DIRECT
Email: monicasaldarriaga@remax.net


E2 SUNDAY, APRIL 1, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Seal air leaks




to save energy


BERT HENDERSON
Special to the Chronicle

Air sealing is the process recom-
mended by energy efficiency and
building scientists to increase the
comfort and energy efficiency of your
home. Air sealing improves the enve-
lope or shell, i.e., the outer walls, ceil-
ings, windows, doors, and (in some
cases) floors in your home to work to-
gether to prevent moisture and reduce
unwanted airflow into your home.
Air leaks can make your home un-
comfortable, from leaky doors and
windows with no or minimal weather-
stripping and cold walls or ceilings be-
cause of little or no insulation. Air
leakage and inadequate insulation are
the leading causes of energy waste in
most buildings, according to the U.S.
Department of Energy (DOE). Insula-
tion not only saves money, but also can
make a home or building more com-
fortable by maintaining more uniform
room temperatures.
In addition, air leakage, or infiltra-
tion, is outside air entering a home un-
controllably through cracks and
openings. We cannot depend on air
leakage for ventilation. During cold or
windy weather, too much air may
enter the house, and during warm
tranquil weather, too little. Here in
Florida, that warm, moist summer air,
when allowed inside, can cause un-
healthy mold and mildew problems.
What's the best strategy in Florida
homes? Reducing the uncontrolled air
leakage and providing controlled ven-
tilation as needed is the best strategy.
For many situations in a simple house
design, effective spot ventilation like
a kitchen or bathroom fan exhausted
to the outside of the building might be
adequate. When using a whole-house
system, heat recovery, moisture con-
trol or air filtering may be incorpo-
rated to improve efficiencies and
reduce costs.
What are the major benefits of seal-
ing a home to infiltration? Air infiltra-
tion can account for 30 to 40 percent
or more of a home's heating and cool-
ing costs. Air leakage can also con-
tribute to serious problems of
moisture intrusion, environmental
noise, dust and the entry of pollutants,
insects and rodents. Annual cooling
and heating cost can be significantly


reduced; building durability can be
improved and create a healthier in-
door environment, according to DOE.
With a tight home, you can also down-
size the heating and cooling equip-
ment, saving additional upfront
construction costs. To reduce air leak-
age in new homes, as required by the
Florida Building Code, typically costs
less than $200.
What is an air barrier? The ceilings,
walls, and floor/foundation separating
the inside conditioned space from the
outside or unconditioned space form
the air barrier and the insulation bar-
rier for a home. The differences in
these barriers are the materials. Seal-
ing any holes, cracks or openings in
the barriers to create a continuous air
barrier is critical.
What are the priorities for air seal-
ing? We've already mentioned the win-
dows, doors, and exterior walls
contribute to air leakage, but the
largest holes, usually hidden from view
and connecting the home to the attic or
crawlspace, should also be sealed.
Identify those areas during the design
process and assign responsibility to
someone for sealing the holes, and
check to ensure the air sealing was
done effectively Prioritize the process
by sealing all the big holes first, then
the large cracks and penetrations, and
finally the smaller cracks and seams.
Where are the major leakage sites?
Many times unseen holes or pathways
called bypasses occur at key junctions
in the framing, permitting large quan-
tities of air to leak in and out of the
building. Dropped ceilings, kitchen
soffits, ductwork, plumbing chases,
attic accesses and pull-down stairs, re-
cessed light fixtures, holes in mechan-
ical room closets, and wiring
penetrations through the top plates of
walls are major connections between
the attic and conditioned space. You
can find major leak sites in the floor
around tub drains and exterior
sheathing.
Air sealing materials
Caulk can seal gaps of less than a
half-inch.
Spray foam can fill large cracks
and small holes. Do not use near com-
bustion equipment.


Real Estate DIGEST


Rector and team
have new home
Debbie Rector is proud to an-
nounce she
has opened
Top Per-
formance -
Real Estate
Consult- -
ants. Her
team, con-
sisting of
Kathy
Appie and Debbie
Marie Rector's Team
Toomey, Top Performance
has made Real Estate
the move Consultants.
with Debbie.
Their new location is at the cor-
ner of County Road 486 and North
Prospect Avenue, and they can be
reached at 352-746-9924.
ERA Realtors earn
national recognition
Local real estate broker C.J.
Dixon was recently recognized as
one of the nation's top ERA bro-
kers by ERA Franchise Systems
LLC. Dixon accepted the Presi-
dent's Circle designation for supe-
rior performance on behalf of ERA
American/Suncoast Realty at
ERA's recent International Busi-


Steve Latiff
ERA Suncoast
Realty.


Jackie Davis
ERA American
Realty.


C.J. Dixon
ERA
Realty.


Lou Miele
ERA American
Realty.


ness Conference in New Orleans.
The President's Circle is an elite
group of ERA-branded companies
that rank among the top 50 in both
number of residential sales com-
pleted and total amount of com-
pleted sales in the ERA network.
These companies set the standard
for both ERA and the industry as a
whole.
Steve Latiff of ERA Suncoast
Realty and Jackie Davis and Lou
Miele of ERAAmerican Realty


were also recently named among
the top producers recognized for
excellence in real estate sales by
ERA Franchise Systems LLC. Lat-
iff, Davis and Miele will participate
in the company's annual "Beyond
Excellence" conference, an invita-
tion-only event honoring its most
successful sales associates.
To qualify for this year's event,
ERA sales associates must have
achieved 45 total units closed or
$100,000 in adjusted gross com-
mission in 2011. Associate or bro-
ker teams who generated 67.5
total units or $150,000 in AGC are
also invited to participate in the
program.

GOT A NEWS TIP?
The Chronicle welcomes
tips from readers about
breaking news. Call the
newsroom at 352-563-
5660, and be prepared
to give your name, num-
ber, and the address of
the news event.
To submit story ideas for
feature sections, call
352-563-5660 and ask
for Nancy Kennedy.
Again, be prepared to
leave a detailed message.


See SEALS/Page E4


SUNDAY, APRIL 1, 2012 E3







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


GET THE WORD OUT
* Nonprofit organizations are invited to submit news releases about community events.
* Write the name of the event, who sponsors it, when and where it will take place and other de-
tails. Include a contact name and phone number to be printed in the paper. Call 352-563-
5660 for details.


1.m 1. T LUUO a/ L OWN MIMID 3/
IN FANTASTIC
BROOKRIDGE! CONTEMPORARY BUILT OWNED 3/2/2
il,- haRd part has TWO STORY CONDO w,, 1400 LIVING
t e. ,,,, home has I .....I. i L.- I Ali I. .1 o the well
.. ........ and ready for .... .. ( ,,,, (M, I ... .............. V.. . gated
-".. ...I.I to m ake he ,,,, ,, .- ill- ... ., ,.- ..............r, iof Sterling
home! 2/2 home features fencing, attached carport and side *." ..... ,,,.1 ,I .- .1. l.,I, i. in.Ill .. .i -, i i .I' In,, .- i.., .. 1i ,,, .1 I.,,,,,I i ...i m s, form al dining, inside
porch. Brookridge Community features a community pool, tennis courts, heater, master bedroom on main floor with a walk in closet and laundry, pantry, breakfast bar, recess lighting, eat-in kitchen,
dubhouse, shuffleboard and going! $24,500. MIS #354540 Tomika private bathroom. $57,000. MLS #354531. Tomika Spires- blinds, and more. $79,900. MLS #354357. Tomika Spires-
Spire-Hanssen 352-586 -5263/Kim Fuller 352-212-5752. Hanssen 352-586-5263/Kim Fuller 352-212-5752. Hanssen 352-586-5263/Kim Fuller 352-212-5752.

AWAITS YOU HERE! CITRUS HILLS BUY! 2/2/2
2003 3/2/2 hon. ,MEDITERRANEAN
2201 living for ONLY VILLA NESTLED IN
,,,, I f ..... "$179,9001 O m n i THE LANDINGS!
.. I ..-. topical getaway Home located in a breathtaking
y. professionally designed water garden on the screen enclosed lanai lakefront community minutes
home/in-law suite with a full kitchen, 3 car detached garage, fully Home boasts a split floor plan, cathedral & tray ceilings, formal to downtown fun and shopping! Home boasts a rear screened
fenced, corn counters, split and open floor plan, inside laundry, dining, covered lanai, corian counters & wood cabinets, interior porch, split floor plan, vaulted ceilings. Home has received an
fireplace, and more. In need of some TLC.handyman's haven! Only laundry finished garage with tons of storage, rounded corners, updated roof, AC, appliances.Take a peek quick! 512 Palma.
$95,900. 7412 SW 199th, Dunn. MLS #354395. Tomika Spires- plant shelving MLS #354230 Tomika Spires-Hanssen ONLY $129,900. MLS #354212. Tomika Spires-Hanssen
Hanssen 352-586-5263/Kim Fuller 352-212-5752. 352- 586-5263 im Fuller 352-212-5752. 352-586-5263/Kim Fuller 352-212-5752.
INVERNESS 2 '1 u pu
WATERFRONT HOME N TH MARK
H i HAS UNIOUE WRITTEN O HI l !
ALL OVER IT! CHEAP AS DIRT .. LOOKS LIKE DIRT!
...... I Bank owned 2/2 on .60 acres (MOL) located in
,, I..i. ,II. h.... i .., Hernando. Home features enclosed porch,
SUPER CHEAP BANK OWNED ...,...i ,,,,, ,i hu. I .. m upunpdr hu....... a inu. ,u l living room, detached shed, carport, and more.
Home features living room, covered porch w/privacy appliances TLC. Property includes partial fencing, screened porch, shed, ONLY $50400. 5190 N. Dewey Way.
breakfast bar, and more! ONLY, ONLY, ONLY $18,000. possible 3rdbdrm (no closet) fireplace. $78,400.565 Tuck. o ir-ans 5-56
MLS #352665. 8704 Moonrise. Tomika Spires-Hanssen MLS #354352. Tomika Spires-Hanssen 352-586-5263/ Tomika Spires-Hanssen 352-586-5263
352-586-5263/Km Fuller 352-212-5752. Kim Fuller 352-212-5752. or Kim Fuller 352-212-5752


All about Live Oaks


The Live Oak tree, cuercus vir-
giniana, gets its name because it
never sheds all of its
leaves at one time. It is
never totally bare, and
keeps green leaves on it at
all times. r
The Live Oak, in my opin-
ion, is the most beautiful
species of all oaks. Some
Live Oaks in Florida live
more than 300 years.
They are living monu-
ments. The National Cham- Kerry
pion Live Oak is in TI
Louisiana, and stands ARB
about 56 feet tall, with a
canopy 130 feet wide. The
Florida State champion is in Alachua
County, near Gainesville.
Live Oaks are generally younger
than they look. The tunnel of Live
Oaks on Orange Avenue in Floral City
may look hundreds of years old, but in
facts they are a little over 100 years
old. They are capable of growing an
inch or more a year, if conditions are
favorable.
Like any other tree, care must be
taken to develop a strong branch
structure in the early years of the Live
Oak's life. It takes as long to establish
good structure in a Live Oak as it does


SEALS
Continued from Page E3

Gaskets are placed under the bot-
tom plate before an exterior wall is
raised or used to seal drywall to fram-
ing instead of caulk or adhesive.
House wrap is installed over ex-
terior sheathing; it resists water but is
not a vapor barrier.
Sheet goods like plywood, dry-
wall, and rigid foam insulation are
also used for sealing.
Sheet metal is used with high tem-
perature caulk for sealing high tem-
perature components like flues and
chimneys to framing.
Weatherstripping is used to seal
movable components like doors, win-
dows, and attic accesses.
Mastic is used to seal air handlers
and all duct connections and joints.
Vapor and air retarders relate to the
interaction of temperature and mois-
ture in and around the building enve-
lope. In Florida, vapor and air
retarders are installed on the exterior
side of the exterior wall. Installing ma-
terials like vinyl wallpaper on the in-
terior side of the exterior wall causes


K
H
O


to raise a child about 25 years.
Without pruning, this tree often de-
velops included bark in the
crotches or the main
branches, making the tree
susceptible to the struc-
tural failure (breakage)
under certain circum-
stances. Never allow
branches with included
bark to grow large. This is
best accomplished by re-
moving some secondary
reider branches (especially those
IE toward the edge of the
RIST canopy). Proper pruning
will allow light to penetrate
the interior foliage and
keep the interior branches alive. This
also increases the taper of the main
branches, making them stronger.
Proper pruning by a qualified ar-
borist will set your trees apart from all
the rest.


KerryKreideris a practicing arborist
and a member of the International
Society ofArboriculture, a tree
preservationist and president ofAc-
tion Tree Service. You can reach him
at 352-726-9724 or actionpro
arborist@yahoo. com.

the movement of moisture to cease,
causing serious mold and mildew
problems in a short period of time.
In Florida, an important building
issue is to seal air leaks in the home for
comfort and energy efficiency, and to
maintain a quality indoor environ-
ment.
If you have questions or want addi-
tional information, contact your local
extension office, utility, energy rater,
or HVAC contractor.


Bert Henderson, M.Ed., is a consult-
ant for sustainability, renewable en-
ergies, and is involved in cutting
edge "green" building product re-
search with AZS Consulting in
Gainesville. He is also a national
speaker in sustainability and writes
and delivers professional training
programs in sustainability, renew-
able energies, energy efficient de-
sign, and "green" construction. He is
a Sugarmill Woods resident for 23
years, a Florida resident for 53 years,
and is a retired faculty member with
the Programs for Resource Efficient
Communities at the University of
Florida and building science faculty
for the Bushnell Center for


E4 SUNDAY, APRIL 1, 2012







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Unused diapers


can be donated


Dear Sara: I have a
few disposable baby
diapers left over and
was wondering if you had
any ideas on a frugal way to
use them. -Kathy P, West
Virginia
Dear Kathy:
Rather than find-
ing a second use
for them, I'd do-
nate them. Dia-
pers are
expensive, and
donating them
for their in-
tended use would
be far more bene- Sara
ficial to a strug-
gling family than FRU
to find ways to LIVI
reuse them
around your home. You can
give them to places such as
a shelter, church nursery or
child care center. Also,
please consider checking
for a diaper bank in your
area. They accept diapers
and distribute them to fam-
ilies in need. For more in-
formation, visit
DiaperBankNetwork.org.
Dear Sara: I have 30 min-
utes for a shower and break-
fast before I have to be out
the door in the morning. I
don't like eggs. Any sugges-
tions for something else I
can fix quickly? Brenda,
Midwest
Dear Brenda: I'd make
breakfast more of a priority


I


Wake up earlier or shower
the night before. A few quick
breakfast ideas are cereal,
oatmeal, toast, bagel, Eng-
lish muffin, rice cake,
smoothie, quick bread/
muffins (only occasionally),
yogurt with gra-
nola or fruit. You
can make pan-
cakes, waffles or
French toast
ahead of time and
reheat them, too.
Dear Sara: I
have been think-
ing of switching
Noel to washing my
laundry by hand
GAL for a while now
NG and was wonder-
ing if you have
any tips or advice. For the
past year, we have been
using homemade detergent
and have been hanging our
clothes to dry Over the last
few months, I have been
downsizing all of our clothes
and getting everyone to
wear their clothes again if
the clothes are still clean.
They used to wear it once
and then wanted it washed,
even if it didn't need it or if
they had worn it for a short
period of time. Also won-
dering if you have any ideas
to keep the clothes from get-
ting stiff when they are line
dried. I heard that if you hit

See FRUGALUPage E7


a Jackie Gaffney Jason Gaffney F
Realtor, A HOUSE Realtor
302.3179 soL Na'o 287.9022
WEEKS REALTY, 5 BEVERLY HILLS BLVD.
The Golden Girl 746.6700 .....
MOVE RIGHT INTO THIS 2 OR
S 32,.2 GOLF COURSE HOME!
S II. d..I,, hl..,, d, .,,,..I d, l d, ... d, I h
..I n ,. I.. .I I ..I ., ..... ., ..I 'p ., k hI .
J I,,, I,
.- il . .I ..I . ., . .. .,, .,, 1. .. I

3855 N. GRAPEFERN WAY
BEVERLY HILLS
S, i:,, I.- -I rl I.- ,, ,I h,
lH H .. .....- .. i ....... .
i.I.- .-,,nI ~ ~ .- ,-.[., ..,,.- "".h,. ,,. i...


Container gardening with vegetables


BARBARA PLEASANT
Mother Earth News

The most personal way to forge a
connection with delicious food crops
- from arugula to tomatoes is to
grow them up close in containers.
Special methods are needed to pro-
duce high-quality food crops in con-
tainers, because most vegetables and
herbs grow best when planted in the
ground. Stable soil temperatures and
constant access to water, nutrients
and microscopic soil allies give in-
ground crops a clear advantage.
But if growing edibles in the ground
is not an option due to a lack of back-
yard space, destructive pets or home-
owner association rules, then growing
some crops in containers on your
porch, patio or fire escape may be the
solution. Also, if you have problems
with your site or soil that prevent in-
ground gardening, then container
gardening may allow you to avoid


some of these problems:
Shade from buildings and trees
can be minimized by moving con-
tainer-grown vegetables to your sun-
niest spots, which change with the
seasons.
Soil pH barriers can be overcome
by using custom soil mixes to grow
plants that need more or less acidic
soil conditions than are common in
your area.
Protection from soilborne pests,
from nematodes to voles, and greatly
reduced weed problems are natural
benefits of container gardening.
Contaminated soil from toxic
lead in old paint, termite pesticides
applied to your home's foundation,
chemicals that have leached from
treated wood, and other hazards,
should not be a problem as long as
you use good quality soil mix. (These
concerns are especially relevant on
urban and reclaimed lots.)
Then there's the convenience fac-


tor. If you live in an apartment or
condo with no yard, you can still have
a summer's worth of veggies right at
your fingertips.
One big difference between in-
ground and container-grown vegeta-
bles is root temperature. In summer,
warm daytime temperatures will
cause plant roots in containers to
warm up by 15 degrees Fahrenheit or
more (this never happens 4 inches
below ground). And dark containers
accumulate solar heat, which intensi-
fies this effect. Warm roots can be
your enemy or your friend, depending
on the season and the crop. You can't
control the weather, but you can min-
imize soil temperature swings by
using the largest containers possible
and choosing light-colored containers
when appropriate.
If you're a new gardener, stick with
the container-grown vegetables listed

See CONTAINERS/Page Ell


rk %hN RDIGL1I R1EAL


Amanda & Johnson Tom Balfour Ul Avenus & Hal Steiner ArtPaty
BROER / ASSOC. G REALTOR EALTO BROKER REALTOR


746-9000


I wv wctu batu-o I


1238 E. TRIPLE CROWN LRP
4/3/3 353329 $385,000


3427 PINE RIDGE BLVD. 9005 N. C
3/3/2 354267 $245,000 4/3/




6396 N. EARLSHIRE 2450 N.
4/2/2 350R02 $129,900 2/2/2 2




CORTLAND DR. 4144 N MAE WEST


I 2/2/1 352984 $91,500 1 | 3/2/2 353982 $89,900 1 I 2/2/2 352002$74,500 I I 3/2/2 351560 $86,900 I I 3/2/2 354514 $89,900 I I 2/2/2 351656 $59,900




7768 N. SARAZEN 101 S. BARBOUR ST. 44 S. JACKSON 15 S. FILLMORE 45 S. MELBOURNE 9570 N. CITRUS SPRINGS
3 354564 $144,900 2 354334 $64900 2/1 354360 $49,900 2/2 354359 $54,900 354341 $84,900 $176,900
3521 N. LECANTO HWY., BEVERLY HILLS, FL 34465 1-888-789-7100


SUNDAY, APRIL 1, 2012 E5






E6 SUNDAY, APRIL 1, 2012



HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information........352-563-5592
..................................... .............. advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information........................352-563-5966
News information................................................ 352-563-5660
....................................... ............. newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listing............www.ChronicleHomeFinder.com
"The market leader in real estate information"

CinONIcIIE

HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-563-
3280, attention HomeFront.
News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront.
Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes for
space and/or clarity.
For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


Insect growth cycles


ll insects go through some form of
metamorphosis to reach maturity De-
pending on the insect, it will go
through what is called a "simple" or a "com-
plete" metamorphosis.
The three stages of simple
metamorphosis are the egg,
nymph, and adult, with the
nymph stage looking similar to
the adult, only smaller and
without wings. Most insects *
with piercing or sucking mouth-
parts, such as scales, aphids, or
chinch bugs (with grasshoppers
being the exception) go through
simple metamorphosis. Matt Le
The four stages of complete CITR
metamorphosis are the egg, lar-
vae, pupa, and adult In this form EXTEN
of metamorphosis, the larvae of
moths are caterpillars, and the larvae of
beetles are grubs. Most insects with chew-
ing mouthparts (such as caterpillars and
grubs) go through complete metamorphosis.
For example, the tussock moth caterpil-
lar, which is commonly found chewing on
our trees and shrubs this time of year, is in
its larval stage. The larval, or immature
stage of the tussock moth caterpillar is
when most of the destruction occurs, fol-
lowed by their transformation to the non-
destructive adult moth.
For more on this subject or other garden-


ing issues, contact the UF/IFAS Citrus
County Extension office at 352-527-5700, or
stop by the Master Gardener plant clinic
consultation desk 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday
through Friday We are located in
S the Lecanto government com-
plex at 3650 W Sovereign Path,
Suite 1, Lecanto, FL 34461.
,. ^ The hot and humid weather
approaching is perfect for plant
pathogens. I will be offering a
- class called "Turf and Ornamen-
i tal Disease Identification and
Management" at 9:30 a.m. Wed-
nesday, April 18 at the UF/IFAS
nhardt Citrus County Extension office.
us Class cost is $5. Pre-registration
and pre-payment required.
ISION Citrus County Extension links
the public with the University of
Florida/IFAS' knowledge, research, and re-
sources to address youth, family, community,
and agricultural needs. All programs and re-
lated activities sponsored for, or assisted by,
the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sci-
ences are open to all persons without dis-
crimination with respect to race, creed,
color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual ori-
entation, marital status, national origin, po-
litical opinions or affiliations, genetic
information and veteran status as protected
under the Vietnam Era Veterans' Readjust-
ment Assistance Act


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Inside...


Scrunching in style
PAGE E8
Real Estate Digest
PAGE E3
For current property transac-
tions, use the search features on
the website for the Citrus County
Property Appraiser's Office,
www.pa.citrus.fl.us.


Pearl Harbor paper is a reprint; an old clock still works


Dear John: This is my first time
writing to you. I enjoy reading
your articles every Sunday in the
Chronicle; you seem to have a nice fol-
lowing of people
writing in. Some
things lay around
for years and
years, we hope q
they are valuable,
sometimes they
are not; we call
them our treasures
and heirlooms and
we put them back John Sikorski
in the same place
where we found SIKORSK'S
them. ATTIC
I am enclosing
one picture of The Honolulu Star Bul-
letin, Dec. 7, 1941, about the Japanese
bombing of Oahu. My husband passed
away 12 years ago and he told me some
day some person might be interested in
collecting it.
The next photo is of a dining room
table with two leaves. When open it is 40
by 64 inches. It is marked "White."
As for the ice cream table, my hus-


band's mother had it in the 1930s, then
she gave it to a relative, and then my hus-
band inherited it. The hardware looks
very very old. The two chairs are differ-
ent in design. There is no writing on any
of it. -J.E., Crystal River
Dear J.E.: The initial report of the
bombing of Pearl Harbor by the Hon-
olulu Star-Bulletin was reprinted by the
Bulletin approximately one week after
the bombing and used as an insert to the
paper. At the upper right corner on your
newspaper are the words "1st Extra" -
this indicates it is an insert It is a nice
heirloom piece, but has very little dollar
value.
The game table that opens to a dining
table was manufactured in America

See ATTIC/Page E7
This copy of the Honolulu Star-Bulletin
announcing the Japanese attack on
Pearl Harbor is actually a reprint from
approximately a week after the actual
attack the tag in the upper right hand
corner which reads "1st Extra" indicates
that it's a reprint.
Special to the Chronicle


no1tatutur-l il ltti EXTRA
A A ,cllanted PreS by Tr.npeldflc T4*1I6in
SAN FRANCISCO, Dec. 7.-Pres-
Iident Roosevelt announced this
morning that Japanese planes had
attacked Manila and Pearl Harbor.



7 @AMU-BOMBED BY



JP ANESE PLANES
SIX KNOWN DEAD, 21 INJURED, AT EMERGENCY io9PIT-XL
-. O..( R.t OFF SI.In.*NTI*IRCRAT GUN to
Attack Made ,; Hundreds See
On Island's ."..P..- '1- City Bombed


H







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ATTIC
Continued from Page E6

after World War II. The style
and look is that of an early
19th century English Hep-
plewhite game table. The
overall quality appears to be
good. Potential dollar value
is $250 to $500.
The iron ice cream table
and chairs were likely pro-
duced about 100 years ago.
The two chairs are worth
about $25 to $50 each and
the table from $75 to $150.
Dear John: These pic-
tures are of a plate that has
been in my family for some
time. I love it and am curi-
ous about its value. Any ad-
vice is certainly
appreciated. S., Internet
Dear S.: Your wall plaque
was made in Germany, likely
between World War I and II.
The raised relief scene de-
picts an early 19th century
city with a stagecoach de-
parting a tavern. These dec-
orative wall plaques were
produced in large quantities
for export. Potential dollar
value is $25 to $50.
Dear John: I am retired
and my wife retired about
three weeks ago, which
means we no longer had an
excuse to put off the
dreaded chore of cleaning
out the attic and going

F*iiT^irIM ri ii


SUNDAY, APRIL 1, 2012 E7


through storage boxes.
One of the items we found
was an old clock, a GE
model AB-712. My wife
looked it up on the computer
and found it was known as
the "alarm lite," since it was
one of the very first clocks to
have a light inside and was
made from 1931 to 1936.
I am sure we got it from my
mother many years ago. We
had two surprises. First,
when plugged it in it started
right away, and we placed it
next to an atomic clock After
four days it had kept perfect
time. But the biggest sur-
prise was when we turned
on the light, it worked in all
three settings low,
medium, and high. As far as I
know, it is all original. The
only price mention we could
find was in 2007 for $91 for a
"restored" model, whatever
that means. Any idea as to
the present value, if any? -
F & G.C., Inverness
Dear F & G.C.: What a sur-
prise; one never knows what
is waiting to be discovered in
an attic or an old trunk, and
memories can come flooding
up in an instant In the clock-
collecting world, your clock
is low on the totem pole of
collector interest. Since it
was made in the 1930s, if the
case style is Art Deco, it
would be of more interest to
an Art Deco collector. If you
like, send a couple of good,

VMrJl1I"IU


I IU L. Kellier Lt., Hernando
Citrus Hills Oaks Golf Course
Located on the 8th green of the Oaks Golf Course, this comfortable
and elegant home is perfect for relaxing and entertaining. This
contemporary Mediterranean style home sits in harmony with the
land. The open design allows light and natural beauty to pervade.
Throughout the home your line of vision is drawn towards the
pool and golf course. The outdoor gathering areas, the
landscaping, the brick pavers and the beautiful Oaks Golf Course
views transform this attractive house into a beautiful home.
Citrus Hills Membership Available. MLS#35Z985 $299,000

Edward Russell Johnston, Inc.
General Contractor
State Certified CGC06Z630
531 North Citrus Avenue, Crystal River, FL 344Z8
(352) 795-2200
www.erj.net


clear photographs and per-
haps I can help further


John Sikorski has been a
professional in the an-
tiques business for 30
years. He hosts a call-in
radio show, Sikorski's Attic,
on WJUF (90.1 FM) Satur-
days from noon to 1 p.m.
Send questions to Siko-
rski's Attic, c/o The Citrus
County Chronicle, 1624 N.
Meadowerest Blvd., Crystal
River, FL 34429 or
asksikorski@aol. com.


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E5

them with a stick a few
times while they are drying
that is supposed to help,
but I haven't tried it yet. -
Danni, Canada
Dear Danni: I would use
a 5-gallon bucket (or even
your bath tub) and a
plunger (cut three holes in
the plunger to avoid
messes) to wash by hand. To
help soften the clothes, you


can switch to Charlie's
Soap, which leaves less
residue on clothing, or add
vinegar to your wash water
to work as a fabric softener.
Most clothing softens if
there's a good breeze, if you
give them a good snap
when they come off the
line, or after an hour of
wear. You can hand-smooth
clothes by spritzing them
with a fine mist of water
and smoothing out the
wrinkles with your hands.
You can also use wrinkle
release to get wrinkles out


before you hang them or
after they're dry


Sara Noel is the owner of
Frugal Village (www.frugal
village.com), a website that
offers practical, money-
saving strategies for every-
day living. To send tips,
comments or questions,
write to Sara Noel, c/o
Universal Uclick,
1130 Walnut Street,
Kansas City MO 64106,
or email sara@frugal
village. com.


PINE- RIDGE & C1 H1 [F1ICE


PINE RIDGE
1481 Pine Ridge Blvd.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465
(352) 527-1820


*j Prudential

Florida Showcase

Properties


CITRUS HILLS
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Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 746-0744


OPEN HOUSE SUN. 1-3 OPEN HOUSE SUN. 1-3 NEW LISTING NEW LISTING



.ji, 535 E. Charleston Ct. L 4 9ie oo 2528 N. Brentwood Cir.
MLS #342358 $299,900 MLS #351513 $114,900
4/3/3 home w/2975 sf of living 3/2/2 w/no detail overlooked H c C 2219 N. Brentwood Cir. M" ae 789 W. Toucan Lp.
Directions: Rte 486 to south on Annapolis, to Directions: Rte 486 to the Brentwood Entrance, to MLS #354592 $124,900 i MLS #354519 $88,500
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P 2011 Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities. An independently owned and operated broker member of Prudential Real Estate Affiliates, Inc., a Prudential Financial company. Prudential, the A
Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are service marks of Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities, registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Used under license. Equal Housing Opportunity.







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


1I


Lack ofsquare footage doesn

mean you can't live large


KIM COOK
For The Associated Press

mall may be in when
it comes to homes,
but that doesn't
mean it's easy to
decorate.
A few simple guide-
lines, however, can turn a
small space from
Dilemma to De-Lovely
Maxwell Gillingham-
Ryan, founder of the
decor blog Apartment
Therapy and author of
"The Big Book of Small,
Cool Spaces" (Clarkson
Potter, 2010), thinks it's
all about light.
"The single most pow-
erful influence in a
room is the lighting," he
says.
Every room should
have three sources of il-
lumination, which will
bounce off walls and cre-
ate a visual expanse,
Gillingham-Ryan says.


Track lighting is a good
alternative to free-stand-
ing fixtures if space is a
problem.
"Track has really im-
proved in the past few
years. You don't have to
buy a big section with
large lights; there are
many smaller, attractive
options," he says.
Rather than buy ad-
justable furniture for a
multi-purpose small
space, "it's better to find
good pieces that do what
they're supposed to," he
says. For example, in-
stead of an ottoman with
a lid that flips into a tray,
buy a great ottoman and
a great tray "You'll ap-
preciate both pieces so
much more."
Gillingham-Ryan sug-
gests limiting the color
palette of a small room.
He likes off-white in all
See Page E10


Carefully coordinated trunks and cushions add cozy
touches to a small sunroom.
Better Homes and Gardens/Associated Press


Es SUNDAY, APRIL 1, 2012







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Tips for growing lush, colorful Verbena


Verbena is a half-hardy perennial heavy flowering. In my garden, I put
or seed-grown biennial com- three plants from 6-inch pots on the
only bought as an east side of the house,
annual bedding plant and I where they get afternoon
often used as a trailing I. shade and are protected
plant overflowing from from winter frost by the
patio planters. Originating proximity to the building.
in Europe, tropical and sub- They remained evergreen
tropical Americas, most of as a ground cover through
the popular varieties came the past two winters.
from South America. His- No top mulch is used, as
torically, European Ver- the trailing plants readily
bena was used as a medical put down roots all along the
herb. The common syn- Jane Weber stems at the leaf nodes.
onym "Vervain" is probably JANE'S Once the stems are well-
from the Celtic word fer, rooted, snip the new plant
meaning to remove, and GARDEN from its parent and care-
faen, stone, as this plant fully dig it up to pot up, or
was useful in treating bladder stones. start a colony elsewhere in the garden.
There are some 250 species in the After 18 months and two winters, the
genus. original three plants spread 5 feet
Plant verbena in full sun for the
longest flowering season and the most See Page E10



REALTY GROUP www.Terr__ stoe_ tou _o
r~ i .,.-- I ..I


JANE WEBER/Special to the Chronicle
Verbena is a nectar-rich butterfly and hummingbird attractant. Most garden verbenas sold in Florida
are sterile hybrids, Verbena X hybrida, such as this variety known as "Homestead Purple." Plant ver-
bena in full sun for the longest flowering season and the most heavy flowering.


MEET AND GREET
* Clubs are invited to submit in-
formation about regular meet-
ings for publication on the
Community page each weekday.
* Send in information attn: Com-
munity Page Editor, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal
River, FL 34429, or fax to 352-
563-3280, attn: Club meetings.
* E-mail to community@
chronicleonline.com. Include
"Club Meetings" in the subject
line.
* For special events or fundrais-
ers, submit a separate news
release.


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SUNDAY, APRIL 1, 2012 E9


1 .- ,







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Bring in the bees


Pollinators are key to gardening success


MARY PELLERITO
From GRIT magazine

Growing fruits and vegetables takes
more than quality soil, well-timed
moisture, and sufficiently mild tem-
peratures. The unsung heroes of the
garden patch are the pollinators that
help ensure proper fruit development
and that precious crop of viable seed
for next year Put it all together and
you have a self-perpetuating system
that will supply you with good food
into the future and look great to boot
For those who share a love and
passion for gardening or crop farm-
ing, sowing a diverse group of plants
is the quickest way to entice pollina-
tors and ensure successful bounties
for years to come.


meM


Investors Realty
of Citrus County, Inc.
Visit my website at: www.myflorida-house.c


UA


Pollinators
When we first think of pollinators,
it's easy to think of bees and, in par-
ticular, honeybees, though honeybees
are not native to North America. Eu-
ropean settlers brought the honeybee
to the New World around the turn of
the 17th century, along with a bevy of
plants that the "white man's fly" (so
called by Native Americans) polli-
nated.
Bumblebees also do their fair
share of pollinating, as do digger
bees, mining bees, orchard bees and
a host of other natives.
Although these native bees don't
produce and store honey, they are

See POLLEN/Page E11


GITTA BARTH
REALTOR
(352) 220-0466
om gbarth@nmyflorida-house.comrn


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SMALL
Continued from Page E8

its iterations, with bright
white on ceilings. "Keep
floors dark they're
calming and grounding,
and will make the walls
seem higher," he says.
Use accessories, such as
a great rug, to add color
"You can't change your
square footage, but you
can change the way the
space feels," he says.
Elaine Griffin, a New
York-based designer and
author of "Design Rules"
(Gotham, 2009), says a wel-
coming foyer is near the
top of her list for small
spaces.
"It's an important part of
the psychological experi-
ence of coming home. I
like to create a 'faux foyer'
by sitting a decorative
cube or box adjacent to the
door with a tray for mail,
and perhaps a shelf above
for keys, a flower and a fra-
grant candle. Mount a mir-
ror above the shelf," she
says.
In the living area, "avoid
the temptation to put your
sofa on the long wall. Put it
on the short wall, and
you'll have more room to
create d6cor zones," Grif-
fin says. Loveseats pop-
ular purchases for small
apartments are "a no-
no. Truthfully, they only sit
one. Go for the better-pro-
portioned 72-to-76-inch
'apartment-sized' sofa."


In tiny bathrooms, Grif-
fin says, "I'm a big fan of
wall-mountable, square
mini-shelves, which I sta-
tion in multiples behind
the door Save the most vis-
ible space above the toilet
for art."
Janice Simonson,
IKEAs design spokesper-
son, seconds that ap-
proach. "Often people only
look at the 'footprint' of
the room," she says. "Look
for space on the verticals
- railings, hooks and
shelves on doors and walls
can hold baskets and
clothing, and serve as dry-
ing areas for laundry"
She thinks many people
err by buying too much
storage, ending up with
more stuff that takes
space.
"Take the time to plan;
don't buy anything till
you've moved in and un-
packed, to see what's
needed," she says.
Some other general tips:
Downsize. What do
you need and what can you
live without? Rip all your
CDs to a hard drive, then
sell or donate them. Get
rid of anything you rarely
use.
Sight lines are impor-
tant Benches, open
shelves, furniture with
legs, light materials -
these help the eye per-
ceive a room as more
spacious.
Mobilize. Rolling ta-
bles and carts can serve as
dining, work or play
pieces.


KE aY1 "Always There For You"
rEI Y GAIL COOPER
HmU '1o Multi-Million Dollar Realtor
EHI q.Ied Cell: (352) 634-4346
rr_ OFFICE : (352) 382-1700x309 i
I E-mail me: homes4u3@mindspring.com


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#345957 $358,900


JANE
Continued from Page E9

wide and 15 feet long to cover the en-
tire foundation bed.
Amend sandy soil with organic veg-
etable humus or fine screened mulch,
available free from the Central Land-
fill on State Road 44, east of Lecanto.
The sand promotes drainage, as Ver-
bena does not like wet, soggy soil. The
decaying humus contains nutrients
and soil organisms necessary for
plant growth.
The humus between the grains of
sand retains moisture. An application
of moisture manager a natural sac-
charin will attract moisture from
the air and deliver it the soil. Gar-
deners can sprinkle a pre-emergent
herbicide such as Ronstar or Free
Hand to kill weed seedlings as they
germinate without harming any green
growing plant material. Granule se-
lective pre-emergents last up to three
months. Apply in mid-February to
prevent the first weeds of spring and
immediately after planting or dis-
turbing the soil surface. Repeat ap-
plications after three months or
before leaving for the summer
up north.
The small, dark green leaves are
opposite along the stems, often lobed
with teeth along the margins. Broken
stems have a spicy fragrance. The
plant can withstand light, occasional
footsteps but it is better to add step-
ping stones if regular foot traffic is
needed. Height is under 6 inches as
the plant trails along the ground or
over a patio pot rim.
Flowering starts in March and lasts
through to late fall. To increase plant
business, cut flowers often. Use
flowers for indoor arrangements.
Bright vibrant colors range from scar-
let red, orange, hot pinks to royal
purple.
Individual flowers are about a
quarter of an inch long, with five
petals joined in a half-inch long tubu-
lar stem. Verbena is a nectar-rich but-
terfly and hummingbird attractant.
Most garden verbenas sold in Florida
are sterile hybrids, Verbena X hy-
brida, with a variety name such as
"Homestead Purple." These hybrids
rarely set seed and any seed pro-
duced will invariably be sterile.


Jane Weber is a Professional Gar-
dener and Consultant Semi-retired,
she grows thousands of native plants.
Visitors are welcome to her Dunnel-
lon, Marion County garden. For an
appointment call 352-249-6899 or con-
tact JWeberl2385@gmail.com.


E10 SUNDAY, APRIL 1, 2012


co owe"


See Vm,.irta or w.resalehomes.i~iu.c..m


A 101







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


POLLEN
Continued from Page E5

invaluable to our food sup-
ply be it pollinating a
1,000-acre monoculture or
a quarter-acre backyard
garden. Native bees in New
Jersey and Pennsylvania
have been known to effec-
tively pollinate watermelon
farms, without the help of
honeybees. Native bees
also are efficient pollina-
tors of pumpkins, tomatoes,
apples and berries.
Butterflies and moths
are better at pollinating
wildflowers than food
crops, but they are still a
welcome addition to a gar-
den; after all, anything that
leads to a more diverse
group of flowers will help
biodiversity and pollina-
tion. Not to mention, bee-
keepers should especially
welcome butterflies and
moths, since the flavor of
wildflowers add that spe-
cial flavor to honey
Bats and hummingbirds
also can be effective polli-
nators for the garden.
You also may see other
more traditional birds,
predatory beetles such
as ladybugs and lightning
bugs lacewings and par-
asitic wasps in your gar-
den. They might not focus
solely on pollination, but
they do feed on crop pests.
To attract these pollina-
tors and beneficial insects
to a backyard garden, it is
essential to provide a di-
verse plant habitat in
which all can thrive.
With bees being your
best pollinator, it's good to
know they require pollen
and nectar in order to live.
Nectar is composed of
sugars and water, and it
provides adult bees with
the energy they need to fly,
build nests, collect pollen,
and lay eggs. Pollen pro-
vides the protein necessary
for the growth of young
bees into adults, as well as
brooding a new queen.
But not all flowers pro-
vide the pollen and nectar
that bees need. When se-
lecting flowers for your
garden, use heirloom or
native flowering plants.


SUNDAY, APRIL 1, 2012 Ell


Hybridized plants may be
sterile, and sterile plants
are often useless to bees.
And avoid pollenlesss"
varieties of sunflowers and
other flowers.
Some families of plants
that typically are great for
attracting bees are the rose
family (Rosaceae), mint
family (Lamiaceae), and the
aster family (Asteraceae).
It might surprise those
long-removed from biology
class that the rose family
means a heck of a lot more
than the pretty red rose
young and hopefully
older lads pick for the
women they adore. The
largest genus of the rose
family is Prunus, with in-
cludes plums, cherries,
peaches, apricots and al-
monds, among a multitude
of others.
Strawberries and many
of the fruits in the family
are edible, so do some tax-
onomic homework and find
plants that suit you to help
attract those bees.
Mint family plants that
attract effective pollinators
include some favorite culi-
nary herbs: basil, rose-
mary, sage, savory,
marjoram, oregano, thyme,
lavender and obviously
mint. Hyssop is another
good herb.
As a lot of what you plant
to attract pollinators is re-
gion-specific, you can learn
what pollinator-friendly
plants grow in your part of
the country from the North
American Pollinator Pro-
tection Campaign (NAPPC,
http ://Pollinator. org/nappc
/index.html) and the Polli-
nator Partnership (Pollina
tororg).
Plant a diverse group of
flowers, herbs, shrubs,
trees, and other common
plants in your area, as well
as install a little extra
cover and structures, and
you'll sustain your resident
pollinator population that
will, in turn, sustain your
vegetable garden.
Excerpted from GRIT,
CelebratingRural America
Since 1882. To read more
articles from GRIT please
visit www.Grit.com or call
866-624-9388 to subscribe.
Copyright 2011 by Ogden
Publications Inc.


CONTAINERS
Continued from Page E5

below at first to build on your skills. Remember, plants
grown in containers will be totally dependent on you for
water, feeding and adequate accommodations for their
roots. By midsummer, herbs and vegetables in containers
may need water twice a day and liquid fertilizer twice a
week. Think of container gardening as an intensive form of
the food gardener's art.
Any pot or planter with a drainage hole in the bottom can
be used to grow vegetables. Bigger is better, because large
containers will hold more soil, roots and water, which will
help the plants produce a larger and healthier crop. Two
of the most popular pots for vegetables are plastic buckets
and storage bins, refashioned into self-watering containers.
Note that though they're commonly called "self-watering"
containers, you still have to provide the water. However,
thanks to a water reservoir area under the soil, these
planters can hold a lot more water than regular planters.
One of the simplest self-watering containers, the double
bucket, consists of one bucket or 5-gallon pail nested inside
another The bottom bucket is watertight except for a
drainage hole drilled in its side at just below the bottom of
the top bucket, when they are nested together Several roomy
drainage holes are made in the bottom of the top bucket,
which serves as the planter Roots eventually grow through
these holes and into the reservoir in the bottom bucket.
You can turn a single plastic storage bin into a roomy
self-watering container by trimming the lid until it fits
down inside the bin, about 2 inches from the bottom. Use
lightweight spacers, such as empty soup cans, to keep this
floor (with drainage holes poked in it) from collapsing
when the bin becomes heavy with soil and roots. Add a side
hole so you can check the water level in the reservoir and
fill as needed.
Any container is only as good as what you put into it Veg-
etables grown in the ground live in soil made up of at least 50
percent mineral particles, but container culture calls for a
much lighter mix that will hold moisture well. Two inert sub-


Lou Miele Realtor
A ALWAYS THERE FOR YOU6
, Cell: (352) 697-1685


a- AMERICAN
EA REALTY & INVESTMENTS
4511 N. Lecato Hwy.
Beverly Hi FL 34465
Office: 352-746-3600


stances made from expanded rock-vermiculite and perlite
- help give container mixes a light texture and greatly en-
hance the way the mixture handles water The first time you
fill your planting containers, use a packaged potting soil that
contains an abundance of either material or some of both.
Even if you use the greatest potting soil in the world,
amended with excellent fertilizer, after a month or so you
should start feeding your plants with liquid fertilizers. Fish
emulsion/kelp mixtures are popular among organic gar-
deners, or you can make your own liquid fertilizers (see
Free, Homemade Liquid Fertilizers). Whenever a con-
tainer-grown vegetable looks unhappy, drenching it with a
diluted liquid fertilizer is the first remedy to try From mid-
summer on, I usually feed my container vegetables every
other time I water.
In summer, the edible container garden becomes a fab-
ulous outdoor room. Vigorous pole beans can form vibrant
"walls," while snake gourds rambling over a pergola can
create a green ceiling. Vines in general, from snow peas to
asparagus beans, are often simple to grow in containers
because their needs are easy to understand. Every vine
wants "head in the sun, feet in the shade," so you can
please them by simply finding the perfect spot.
Excerpted from MOTHER EARTH NEWS, the Original
Guide to Living Wisely. To read more articles from
MOTHER EARTH NEWS, please visit www.MotherEarth
News.com or call 800-234-3368 to subscribe. Copyright2011
by Ogden Publications Inc.


OOB100


HL


REAL ESTATE, INC.
5569 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY.
CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429
OFFICE: (352) 795-6633
WWW ALEXRE.COM E-MAIL: SALES@ALEXRE.COM


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TERRA VISTA
S- o Beautiful "Windward"
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MLS #352882
$224,900


THIS WEEWS
FEATURED LISTINGS











The ultimate in real estate: A private island


CAMMY CLARK
The Miami Herald

EAST SISTER ROCK IS-
LAND, Fla. For a prop-
erty with a $12 million price
tag, you would probably ex-
pect luxury even in the
pricey Florida Keys. Think
again.
Owner Bob Williford de-


scribes his 1.4-acre estate
with a three-bedroom, two-
bath Bahamian style home
and one-bedroom guest-
house as "a rustic vacation
place where you can come
and charge up your batter-
ies. It's not fancy like staying
at Trump Plaza, but it is a
place where you can get
away from everything."


Jackie & Bob Davis
American Realty & Investments
dh 117 S. Hwy 41 Inverness, FL
(352) 634-2371 Cell (800) 476-2590 Toll Free
RE RXA bob@bjdavis.com
For a Visual Tour of our listings and all MLS: bidavis.com


439 W. Hillwood Path
2 Bedrooms, 2 baths
Eat-in kitchen
m '* Interior laundry
Screened lanai
S- On the 9th tee
Lawn care provided
S j 'j J f L-Ji $99,750 MLS 353490
Directions: 486W, R on Forest Ridge, R into Laurel Ridge (Hollow Ridge),
L on Crestline, L on Hillwood.
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Multi-million dollar status

properties pose unique sales

challenges for agents


BANK OWNED-HOMOSASSA, FL
Handyman doublewide on corner lot with
detached 2 story garage. $37,900
.- . a *


Actress Delta Burke has
stayed there. Nineteen
Cubans in a yellow banana
boat have landed there. Vis-
iting manatees, spiny lob-
sters, nurse sharks and four
iguanas find it paradise.
And even though the Mon-
roe County Property Ap-
praiser determined the
property's total market
value for 2011 was only
$1,017,392, Realtor Marvin
Arrieta with Century 21 Pre-
mier Elite Realty in Coral
Gables said $12 million is
the "right price to start on
this sell." The main reason:
It's a private island.
"The ocean is all around
you," Arrieta said of East
Sister Rock Island, which is
a three-minute boat ride
from Marathon. "This is a
very unique property. We
need a unique buyer."
Chris Krolow, CEO of
Toronto-based Private Is-
lands Inc., said there are
only about 550 private is-
lands for sale around the
world right now, and only 60
percent of them can be pur-
chased outright. The others
are in the "leasehold cate-
gory" which means a
buyer purchases permission
to use an island from the
government.
"But that does not fit in
with the typical island buyer
who wants an island to show
off," Krolow said. "This is
my island."


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Most island buyers are en-
trepreneurs and Americans,
Krolow said. But Patricia
Delinois, CEO of Century 21
Premier Elite Realty and
2012 President of the Miami
Association of Realtors, said
East Sister Rock Island has
been receiving a lot of inter-
est internationally. In-
quiries have come from
people in China, India, Eu-
rope and South America.
Island inventory always is
at a premium. There are
1,700-plus islands that make
up the Florida Keys, but
most are pristine. And with
today's strict environmental
laws, new development per-
mits are unlikely for most.
Only 34 offshore properties
have houses; nine of those
have just one house, says
Monroe County Property
Appraiser Karl Borglum.
The worldwide recession
took a toll on the private is-
land market, but a rebound
is now taking place, Krolow
said. In the Keys, eight pri-
vate islands are now on the
market. Asking prices range
from $995,000 for tiny Dol-
phin Jump Key or even
tinier Charlie's Island to
$18.5 million for a property
that comprises 14.5 acres on
four islands in the Lower
Keys.
Charlie's Island, all .32
acres of it, doesn't have a
house but comes with a 38-
foot Holiday Mansion sea-


worthy houseboat that
sleeps 4-5 people. Sea Shell
Key, also known as Pretty
Joe Rock, is even smaller at
.25 acres, but has a quaint
house and is a favorite of
migrating birds. It is going
for $1.35 million.
The 1.7-acre Fanny Key,
just offshore of Marathon, is
for sale for $8 million by
Thomas Palumbo, founder
and CEO of Satellite Beach-
based Islands International
Realty In 1987, Palumbo's
New York-based real estate
development company, Mas-
car Holding Corp., bought
the island from a lobster
fisherman for $500,000. A
few years later, he person-
ally paid $1 million to own it
and make it his homestead.
The main building was
just a shell when Palumbo
turned it into a five-bed-
room, 3/2-bath home with a
pool and roof deck that has
360-degree views of the Gulf
of Mexico. And unlike most
private islands, he is hooked
up to city water and elec-
tricity. He's in the process of
getting hooked up to the city
sewer.
"If somebody came along
and wrote a check for $4
million, I might take it," he
said. "But I don't have to sell
it. I love the place. It's my
home. I've got Jet skis and
boats and a big catamaran."
A lot of extra effort and lo-
gistics goes into developing
a property that is not acces-
sible by road. One man
bought a $200,000 barge just
to transport building sup-
plies. Island owners tend to
figure the added aggrava-
tion into their asking prices,
Krolow said. "Still, at the
end of the day, there are a
lot of overpriced islands, "
he said. "But we once sold
an island to a man who
bought it sight unseen be-
cause it had the name of his
wife. It is an interesting
business."
To show Ragged Key No. 3
- an island southeast of
Miami that takes 45 minutes
to reach by boat and was
once used by the CIA to
monitor Fidel Castro -


See ISLAND/Rage E15


Miami broker Audrey Ross
had to rent a boat and
captain.
The island with a four
bedroom, four bathroom
house had been part of a
package with a grand main-
land house, also used by the
CIA, for $22 million. But the
island eventually was listed
by itself for $5 million and
sold before the house in
July 2009 for $1,770,000 to
Dayne and Angela
Tomasetti.
After all, who hasn't fan-
tasized about living on their
own tropical island? No
noisy or nosey neighbors.
Just a tranquil place to
relax, swinging in a ham-
mock on a breeze-cooled ve-
randa with spectacular
views of sunrises and sun-
sets over turquoise and dark
blue waters.
In advertising, Century 21
Premier Elite Realty has
touted East Sister Rock Is-
land as "the perfect gift for
Valentine's: A symbol of
feelings deeper than words
can convey"
A few months ago, rumors
swirled that singer Beyonc6
Knowles was going to get
just such a gift. Rapper and
record producer Jay-Z, who
has a net worth of about
$450 million, was said to
have paid $20 million to buy
the 12.5-acre Hopkins Is-
land offshore of Big Pine
Key for his wife. It was the
same island Gloria Estefan
once was reported to have
toured.
The sale hasn't occurred.
Over the past 10 years, only
eight private islands in the
Keys sold for more than $1
million, Borglum said.
The highest price paid
was $2.55 million by then-
single rock star Nick
Hexum of the alternative
rock band 311. He bought
Money Key with its octago-
nal wood house in 2003,
after renting it for a vaca-
tion. He legally changed its
name to Melody Key
Then, along came the real
estate craze, with prices


E12 SUNDAY, APRIL 1, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


m









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


C.R/Homosassa
1& 2 Br. furn, quiet park
Util. incl. clean, shrt/long
term 352 220-2077
CRYSTAL RIVER
2brm 1ba Fridge stove
W&D wat-Trsh $495mo
813-317-6525








FREE MOBILE
HOMES
To Handy Individuals
Offer includes:
Home, water, sewer,
trash, wifi, use of
pool new clubhouse
& park-like setting
w/ hammocks
and gazebos
All for just $295. mo.

Permanent
RV'S WELCOME
and RV Storage
Space Avail.

Homes for Sale
w/ Owner Financing
Call for Details
AURORA Acres
11240 N. Northwood
Drive Inglis, Fl. 34449
(352) 447-2759
Crystal River Primary
bus stop located in
front of park
auroraacresfl.com

HERNANDO/INV.
2/1,Close in, lease, no
pet $425+sec. 726-7319
HOMOSASSA
55 + Park across from
Super Walmart, 2/1
$550. Mo 352-464-3159
HOMOSASSA
Dble Wd. 2Bed 2Bath,
No Cats $500 mo., Ist.,
Ist & Sec.(320) 282-3061

INVERNESS
RENT SPECIAL: 55+ park
on the water w/5 piers
for fishing and
enjoyment, clubhouse,
onsite shuffleboard, &
much more! 1 BR home
$325 2BR home $450,
includes H20. 2 BR, 1.5
bath, Park Model $500.
1/1 furn. w/CH/A,
on the water, $600.
Section 8 accepted.
(352) 476-4964


2 BEDROOM MOBILE
HOME FOR SALE 14x60
2 bedroom. 1 bath. Sin-
gle wide mobile home,
with all aluminum wheel
chair ramp, covered
screen porch and a car-
port.Very nice quiet
comm. Centrally lo-
cated close to the mall
Crystal River.
SELL PRICE;;;
$11,200.00 or OBO
Comes with
Washer/Dryer
Stove and Refrigerator.
Part Furnished
lot rent $235.00
Located in a Adult com-
munity age 55 or older
Pets allowed no more
than 20 pounds.
CALL 352-897-6766
BY APPOINTMENT
ONLY
SERIOUS BUYERS
ONLY.

1995, Doublewide,
28 x 56, 2BD, 2BA,
LR, DR, Eat in Kit,
community Pool
Nice Condition
$30,000 (352) 400-8270

AWESOME DEALS
Financing Available
$500/dn
1/1 remod, shed $5k
1/1 scrnrm/carprt $6k
2/1 carprt/rf.over $7k
furn, move-in ready
55+ park, clean quiet
CR/Homossasa area
Owner 352-220-2077

BEAUTIFUL 1 OWNER,
older Doublewide,
Home in Forestview
Park new appl's, new
roof and AC, Priced to
Sell! (352) 503-2154

kklkk

MOBILE HOME
w/acreage ready to
move in, great for pets
Lots of space for the
price, 3 Br, 2Ba, Serious
offers only, no renters
(850)308-6473


HUGE SALE
Going On Now!!!
New 2012 Jacobsen
Homes starting at
$33,900 Land home
packages and
financing available
with $500 down for
land owners. Rates as
low as 3.75% Stop by
Taylor Made Homes
and see what makes
us Best Of The Best.
352-621-9182

JACOBSEN
NEW 3/2 HOME
With 10 yr. extended
warranty. Highest
quality construction
and best value
available. Includes
appliance pkg.
delivery and set up.
Several models to
choose from as low
as $34 900 or 5%
down $315/mo WAC
CALL 352-621-9181

NEW DEALER REPO
Beautiful 3/2 with
over 1600 sq. ft.
Includes appliance
pkg, delivery & set up
ONLY $59,900 or
5% down & $454/mo.
WAC 352-621-3807

Palm Harbor Homes
New 2012 Models
$15K off All Homes
800-622-2832 x 210

SAVE SS NOW
On a NEW 4/2 HOME
and receive an
extended warranty.
Highest quality
construction. Includes
appliance pkg., de-
livery & set up. Only
$62,900 or 5% down
&$469/mo. WAC
Only 1 unity left at this
special offer. CALL
352-621-9181 NOW

USED HOME 2/2
Like new, delivered
to your lot and set up
with AC & heat,
Only $21,900
Call 352-401-2979


Get

Results in

the

homefront

declassified!


To place an ad, call 5635966

-.-" :-. Classifleds

In Print

and

Online
All

SThe Time


Beverly Hills
55 + park 2/2 fully
remodeled, & furnished
Ig screen lanai,carport,
shedJaundryJandscape & ir-
gatbon all appl-
ances, Club house ac-
tivities, Heated pool.Lot
rent $258,... $33K obo
Call 352-422-0927



HOMOSASSA
3/2, 1,800 Sq Ft,
Fenced Yard,new
flooring $5000 down
$525 (352) 302-9217
OWNER FINANCING
3/2, Completely
Remodeled in & out,
on 172 Ac. off School
Ave. $40,000
(352) 302-7451
PRICE REDUCED-
NW Citrus Cty SWMH on
1 Acre, 2/1.5 paved rd,
screen porch, appliances
$39,900, Owner Fi-
nancing 352-795-9908




AWESOME DEALS
Financing Available
$500/dn
1/1 remod, shed $5k
1/lscrnrm/carprt $6k
2/1 carprt/rf.over $7k
furn, move-in ready
55+ park, clean quiet
CR/Homossasa area
Owner 352-220-2077
Beverly Hills
55 + park 2/2 fully
remodeled, & furnished
Ig screen lanaicarport,
shedJaundryJandscape & ir-
gatbon all appli-
ances, Club house ac-
tivities, Heated pool.Lot
rent $258... $33K obo
Call 352-422-0927
Crys Rver Village
55+ DW,Home of Merit
2/2/1 carport, com-
pletely furnish all new &
appls. Must See
$39K for appt /details
(704) 489-0523
574-946-6286
FLORAL CITY
1992 34FT Park Model,
furn., w/2 slides &
screen rm, Exc. cond.
Moonrise Resort, $3,500.
352-419-6894
606-521-3916
Homosassa
Turtle Creek
1/1 park model
w/screen porch
$16K (352) 628-3351


Floral City Singing
Forest DW, 2/2, 2 Car-
ports, screen porch
Completely furn & re-
modeled, Lot Rent $176
$19,500 344-2420


LISTINGS
Homosassa 2 bedroom.
2 bath. 55+double wide
mobile home in park
14,900.New wooden
floors very clean. Closed
in front and back porch.2
car carport.Club
house,community swim-
ming pool,exercise
room.Pool table.Close to
shopping area. call 352
7946601
HOMOSASSA'S
Best Housing Value
Modern homes from
$8,400 or Lease to Own
from $139/mo.
$800.down + Lot rent at
Evanridge Community
an exceptional 55+Park
352 628-5977
INVERNESS
55+ Park on the water
w/5 piers for fishing &
enjoyment, clubhouse,
onsite shuffleboard, and
much more! 2 BR 1.5 BA
LmAZ2f. 352-476-4964
Inverness/Oak Pond 55+,
well maintained 2/2, fur-
nished, screened lanai,
shed, Ig lot, xtra long cov-
ered carport, lots of stor-
age 352-344-1632 or
937-545-3413
Lake Henderson
$7,500.55+ Waterfront
Park, Boat Dock &
Storage, Pool.
2/ ,Carport, appli-
ances, Large combi-
nation LR/FI. rm.
(352) 476-8364
Lecanto 3 bedroom. 2
bath. Senior Park 14x66
S/W, Screened Porch,
Furnished. Very clean.
Call 815-535-7958
Lecanto 55 +
Comm.2 bd 1 ba
screened porch
$11,500
(352) 746-4648
Lecanto 55 Park
3 bed 2 bath. SWEET!
Ig. carport,2 porches,roof
over and shed w/electric.
http://mobilhome.shutterfy.com/r
$15,000
724-312-6563
Stoneridge Landing
55+ Comm. Resales
starting @$13,500
Financing avail
1-800-779-1226
(352) 637-1400


Oasis Mobile Home Park,
Inverness FL 2 bedroom.
2 bath. 14x60 Fully Fur-
nished Manatee Mobile
Home. Carport, Screen
room, and Shed. Has
roof over and remodelled
kitchen and baths. Virtu-
ally everything furnished.
Parking behind M/H for
trailer or boat. Excellent
Shape. Great low rent
park. $ 12000. Call
815 986 4510 or cell
815 298 2964.


WESTWIND VILLAGE 55+
Park. Updated 2/2 DW's
for sale. Reasonable
(352) 628-2090















FREE MOBILE
HOMES
To Handy Individuals
Offer includes:
Home, water, sewer,
trash, wifi, use of
pool new clubhouse
& park-like setting
w/ hammocks
and gazebos
All for just $295. mo.

Permanent
RV'S WELCOME
and RV Storage
Space Avail.

Homes for Sale
w/ Owner Financing
Call for Details
AURORA Acres
11240 N. Northwood
Drive Inglis, Fl. 34449
(352) 447-2759
Crystal River Primary
bus stop located in
front of park
auroraacresfl.com


Fax:~~ ~ ~ ~ 132 66356 I. Tol-e 88 5-301Eal lsilescrnceniecm Iwbie w~ho~ oln~

MobileHmAMbl om oieHms atrrn oieHo oieHms


835 NE Hwy 19
Crystal River, Fl
(352) 795-0021
View our website
C21NatureCoast.com






4 Utah, Beverli Hills







AcTION -
RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REAL2 INC.
352-795-7368

336W. Marie
Citrus Springs
$750
3/2/1
6139 S. Royal Dr., Homosassa
$1,000
2/2/2 Canal side.
4199 S. Winding Oaks Dr.
Homosassa
$795
3/2/2 House, Kenwood N.
1101 W. Clearwater Ct.
Homosassa
$950
2/2/2 D-wide MH on water






J.W. MORTON
REAL ESTATE, INC.
1645 W. MAIN ST
INVERNESS, FL
Property Management


Need a Good Tenant?
Bring us your vacant home
and watch us work for you!

2/2/2 Water View... $700
2/2/1 ................ $650
2/2/2 Pool Home... $900
2/1.5/1 Waterfront.. $625

2/2.................. $500

2/1.5/1 ........ $625
Jennifer Fudge,
Property Manager
Cheryl Scruggs,
Realtor-Associate
352-726-9010


CHASSAHOWITZKA
3/2 Wtrfront DW, $600.
3/2 Furnished DW., $600
Agent (352) 382-1000


HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




Specializing in
Sugarmill Woods
Rentals


-I




CRYSTAL RIVER
2 BR. $550., 3BR House
$800., 352-563-9857
HOMOSASSA
1BR, Scrn. Porch, Boat
Dock, Stove, refrig. W&D,
cable, util. incld. $700.
mo.+ sec., 352-628-6537




Alexander Real Estate
(352) 795-6633
Crystal River Apts
2 BR/1 BA $375-$500
CRYSTAL RIVER 1/1
Handicap Ramp, Small
Pet OK. (352) 628-2815
FLORAL CITY
FREE Use of boat ramp,
fishing dock, canoe &
Jon boat rentals. 1 BR
$450/$200 dp. incis Sat
TV electric, walk to river
Trails End Camp, A
Friendly Place to Live
352-726-3699
INVERNESS
1/1 $400 2/1.. $500.
near hosp352-422-2393
LECANTO
Nice 1 Bedrm $500
352-613-6000. 216-0012
(352) 746-5238




CRYSTAL RIVER
Comm. Storefront, very
clean 1000 SF, exc. loc.
Hwy 19 Downtown
$795/mo 352-634-2528
FLORAL CITY
STOREFRONT 1000 Sq Ft
Ideal location, corner
Hwy 41 & 48. $595 mo.
813-310-5391




Citrus Hills 2/2.5/1
$850/mo HOA is incl'd
$850 dep. 239-595-9439
INVERNESS
LANDINGS 2/1.5 clean
roomy, great location
$525/mo F/L/S No smke
No pets (352) 341-1847




CITRUS HILLS 2/2/1
Beautiful $750 Maint
Free(352) 613-5655
Citrus Springs
3/2/1 car $650/mo
352-746-7990
HOMOSASSA
1/1 Non-smoker. $425
Fst/Sec. Pets? 795-0207


Kristi Bortz
Let our property
management team
help you with your
short or long term
rentals.
See all our rentals in
Citrus Co.
www.plantation
rentals
352-795-0782 or
866-795-0784




BEVERLY HILLS
3Bed, 2Bath, 2 Car Gar.
$750.352-464-2514
BEVERLY HILLS
Cozy Neat Home 1/1/1,
w/ Fm. Rm. $550 mo
F/L/D (352) 527-3509
(352) 287-0755
CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/2, $850 mo. 1st last
sec. references pref.
(352) 249-7033


Debe Johns
Brkr/Assoc/PRM

Coldwell Banker Next
Generation Realty
Property Manager
(352) 382-2700 www.
coldwellbankernext
generation.com
See what a
Professional
Residential Manager
can do for you.




INVERNESS
2/2/2 furn $700, unfurn
$625, 1st & last no pets,
(978) 979-1375
(352) 556-5976
INVERNESS
East Cove Waterfront,
turn., 2/2, C/A carport,
shed, $650
352-476-4964
Sugarmill Woods
3/2/2 large closets
$750/m (352)613-0843


SUNDAY, APRIL 1, 2012 E13








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BEVERYL HILLS
Real Nice Section 2/1,
screen rm. extra clean,
back yd. overlook Park,
47 S. Lucille St. $600.
352-461-4518
DUNNELLON
3/2/2 Fabulous Home
Accross City Beach
2 Fire Plces, wooden firs
www.rublesrentals.com
(561) 575-1718
(561) 719-8787
FLORAL CITY
1 br. 1 ba. On
Withlapopka Isl, 900 sq ft,
fenced yard. $425 rent,
$125 for H20, Elec and
Cable. 1st and last month
due on move in. call 813
731-5347 for appt.
HOMOSASSA
2/1 CHA, No pets
$600.mo. 1st + sec
(352) 628-4210
HOMOSASSA
2/1 home 3/2 DW no
pets(352) 637-1142
LECANTO
1/1 dirt road, $375+sec
BEVERLY HILLS
3/1/1, $550 + sec.
KEN (352) 220-2958




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225
INVERNESS
East Cove Waterfront,
turn., 2/2, C/A carport,
shed, $650
352-476-4964
OLD HOMOSASSA
Lrg 1/1, Iv & fam rm,
scr prch, lots of stor-
age,, dock w/access
to gulf. $750 no pets
smoke 352-628-2261




C.R/Homosassa
1& 2 Br. furn, quiet park
Util. incl. clean, shrt/long
term 352 220-2077


-I
DOCKAGE SPACE
WANTED
For A Sail Boat
in Crystal River
(352) 344-2066




FARMS, LAND,
COMMERCIAL
UNIQUE &
HISTORIC HOMES,
SMALL TOWN
COUNTRY LIFESTYLE
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989

..%-




"LIFE IS BETTER
WITH A PORCH"
WWW.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.


FREE MOBILE
HOMES
To Handy Individuals
Offer includes:
Home, water, sewer,
trash, wifi, use of
pool new clubhouse
& park-like setting
w/ hammocks
and gazebos
All for just $295. mo.
Permanent
RV'S WELCOME
and RV Storage
Space Avail.

Homes for Sale
w/ Owner Financing
Call for Details
AURORA Acres
11240 N. Northwood
Drive Inglis, F. 34449
(352) 447-2759
Crystal River Primary
bus stop located in
front of park
auroraacresfl.com

PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ille-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination. "
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



112t
OPPORTUNITY


Get

Results in

the

homefront

classified!


Specializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches &
Commercial


Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com





BANK

ORDERED

AUCTION



Sat. April 14th
11:00 am.

3867 North
Caledonia Dr.
Beverly Hills,
Florida 34465

HURRY !!!


Never Been
Lived In !!!!

Surprising 4 Bedroom,
3 Bath Home, Situated
on 1.23 Acre
Corner Lot.
Many Amenities:
Kitchen Corian
Counter Tops,
Center Island and
Pantry, Master
bedroom with
Walk-in Closets,
Dual Bathroom
Sinks and Garden Tub
with Separate
Walk-in Shower.

SAVE $$$

800-262-3050
www.auction
worldusa.com

Auction World
USALLC.
Lic R.E. Broker




Meadowview
of Citrus Hills..
SUN. Open House 1-3p
2/2/1 Newly remodeled
Villa, many upgrades,
all new appls. never
smoked in. over 1900 sf
UR. $99,900.
2338 N. Alachua Pt.
(352) 476-5401


3BR, 2-1/2BA, 2-car
garage, pool, jacuzzi,
new carpet & paint
Must see extraordinary
interior, 6560 N.
Deltona, off Lecanto
Rd., Reduced price
$199,000 to $159,000
(830) 534-1918
For Sale Or Rent
3/2/2 furn for rent
$800/mo or buy
(352)445-5218
352-445-5260



Lot For Sale Pine Ridge
sub. 3620 N. Stirrup Dr.,
2.78 ac, horse trail on
back side, wooded, for
sale by owner. Google it!
Make offer
bill@agairupdate.com
478.957.0211



LECANTO
Black Diamond
Ranch
-/





Owner Financing or
Lease Option
3/2/2.5 car garage
SS appliances,
custom flooring, new
outdoor kit. with
covered lanai. Price
to sell. $185K. incls
Social Memebership
for 1 year
(352) 527-0456



3 Bedroom, 2 Bath
Double carport,
fenced yd. new roof,
1,100 sf, $55,500
(352) 464-0641
(239) 298-0076














b.


BANK

ORDERED

AUCTION



Sat. April 14th
11:00 am

3867 North
Caledonia Dr.
Beverly Hills,
Florida 34465


HURRY !!!


Never Been
Lived In !!!!

Surprising 4 Bedroom,
3 Bath Home, Situated
on 1.23 Acre
Corner Lot.
Many Amenities:
Kitchen Corian
Counter Tops,
Center Island and
Pantry, Master
bedroom with
Walk-in Closets,
Dual Bathroom
Sinks and Garden Tub
with Separate
Walk-in Shower.

SAVE $$$
800-262-3050
www.auction
worldusa.com

Auction World
USALLC.
Lic R.E. Broker




3/3/2
2,355 sq. ft.
screen lanai, 2 Acres
$135,000.
(352) 628-5272
TERRA VISTA
2+ /2/2 Maint Free,
Open plan, up grades,
,Beautiful Sunsets,
Owner Financ Avail
$259 K (352) 746-6050



3/2, Shed, Mfg. Home
on 1.38 Acres, new
flooring & upgraded
appliances.
Paved Road
$54,900. (352) 302-4057
ARBOR LAKES
55+ Comm. 3/2/2 +
Lg enclosed a/c porch,
most pvt. location,
Upgrades $169,900
(352) 726-7952




3/2/2, I.G. &C.C.
3k sf. new kit. Ig closets
CHA firepl. on golf
course $129K make of-
fer norealtors 726-0652


2/2/1
HIGHLANDS AREA
Lots of Upgrades
Move In Ready
Keller Williams Realty
352-746-7113
HIGHLANDS
Lrg.2/2- 4 car garage
pool, game room,
mud room, on triple lot
fenced, price to sell
$65,500 (352) 564-4598
Lakefront Gospel
Island Location
Spacious 3/2/2
3/4 acre $750/m for
sale neg908-322-6529
Zero Down Assumable
Loan Nice 3/2/2,
In Foxwood Estate
Need proof of income
and excel credit.
Serious Inauiries Only
(352)341-8479



Recently Foreclosed
*Special Financing*
Available, Any Credit,
Any Income,
3BD, 2BTH located at,
8009 E. Partridge Lane
Floral City, $29,900.
Visit www.
ioselandco.com\A5BDrive
bytien Cali
(866) 249-0680.





9690 W Green Ln 3 bed-
room. 2 bath. Energy
wise, move in ready,
garage, fenced back
w/playhouse.
352-563-1341



3/2/2 Built 1986, On
12 Acre, Remodeled
above ground pool
w/deck BY OWNER
4141 S. Journey Point
$180,000 352-342-0602
Homosassa/Riverhaven
On water, Grand canal
3BR, 2+BA, 2+ CG
Formal. Living Rm.
Formal Din. Rm., Lanai
front & rear. River View
Room. Dock, many
Upgrades, $255,000
forsalebvowner.com
Listing 23023708 or
Call 352-628-9647
Recently Foreclosed
*Special Financing*
Available, Any Credit,
Any Income
3BD 2BTH, located at,
4268 S. Arrowhead Dr
Homosassa, $39,900.
Visit: www.roseland
co.com\A5C
Drive by then call
(866) 249-0680.
Water Access
2/2, 6 car garage
w/apt. ove, extra Lot
$200.K 352-302-7204




Condo for Sale
2/2, 1,850 sq. ft.,
35 Beech Street
(352) 503-3294


-Sami
ood. _1


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work For You!
BETTY HUNT,
REALTOR
ERA KEY 1 Realty Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.


Best Time To Buy!
I have lease options,
owner financing
Waterfront and
foreclosures
call Phyllis Strickland
(352) 613-3503
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.


FREE MOBILE
HOMES
To Handy Individuals
Offer includes:
Home, water, sewer,
trash, wifi, use of
pool new clubhouse
& park-like setting
w/ hammocks
and gazebos
All for just $295. mo.

Permanent
RV'S WELCOME
and RV Storage
Space Avail.

Homes for Sale
w/ Owner Financing
Call for Details
AURORA Acres
11240 N. Northwood
Drive Inglis Fl. 34449
(352) 447-2759
Crystal River Primary
bus stop located in
front of park
auroraacresfl.com






PINE RIDGE, 3/3/2
4645 W. CASPER LANE
1.75 Acres, 14x 18
barn, pool and
heated spa, large
kitchen, each room
overlooking pool
and pasture, large
master with his and
her closets, & sinks.
Many extras.
Visit Today, Call Joe
352-302-0910


ObZt vV. uunKlin St j
bedroom. 2 bath. Jacob-
sen Mobile Home (DW)
on 5 ACRES. Owner Fi-
nancing with $20,000
down Low interest. Mas-
ter Bedroom 14x20
w/carpet & Lg. walk-in
closet, has Master Bath
10x15 w/double vanity,
jetted tub, separate toilet
& shower. 2 other bed-
rooms 12x14 w/carpet
and walk-in closets. Liv-
ing Rm. 14x16 w/laminate
wood flooring and open
concept to Dining Room
14x12 w/bar sink
&Cabinetss w/sliding
glass doors which lead to
10x24 pressure treated 2
level deck. Lg. Kitchen
16x16 w/38 cabinets, is-
land cook top, wall oven
& tile flooring. Sunken
Family Room w/fireplace
15x14 tiled flooring. Laun-
dry Rm. w/cabinets which
lead to rear access to
deck. LOW PROPERTY
TAXES $660.00. 2 stor-
age bldgs 12x24 &
10x14, Carport 22x25.
$135k (561) 714-6024.


Fiia Yomr Dream,& Hbmtc-
Search Hundreds of Local Usbngs
www.ch roi ceh oefinder.corn


E14 SUNDAY, APRIL 1, 2012


I -


Dunnellon







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ISLAND
Continued from Page E12

skyrocketing to absurd
prices in the Keys during
the mid 2000s. While he did-
n't really want to sell, he was
willing to part with it for
$10?million.
Realtor Brett Newman of
Coldwell Banker Schmitt
Real Estate said he thought
it was a "no-brainer" to take
on the listing. But after
years of effort and "$12,000


SUNDAY, APRIL 1, 2012 E15


just in Google ad work,"
Newman said he thinks he
"maybe" broke even on the
sale last year to Jason
Kennedy of England. The
Brit bought it sight unseen
for $2.3 million.
"Even with the recession
and the BP oil spill, I was
surprised it took so long to
sell," Newman said. "I
looked at a lot of islands for
sale and thought it was the
crown jewel of the Keys. But
a lot of high-end buyers
came to look and thought it
was too rustic for them."


He figured some were
turned off by the sanitary
system which used peat
moss. "Somebody has to go
in and stir it to activate it,"
Newman said. "That's not
what somebody wants to do
for $10 million."
And there also was the
issue of where to dock those
100-foot yachts. The waters
around the island are too
shallow.
Hexum became a moti-
vated seller once he got
married and became a dad,
Newman said.


Williford and his wife,
Elena, still love their island,
which was a regularly used
vacation home when their
four kids were young. But
the family doesn't use it
much these days now that
the children are busy with
high school and college on
the mainland. Now, the is-
land mostly is used as rental
income starting at $5,000
per week.
Williford bought the place
for $715,000 in 1995 from
Klaus Meckler, a gastroen-
terologist from New Jersey


Meckler built the island by
digging a moat from the
coral rock and creating a 15-
foot-high plateau. The con-
crete poured house rests on
75 pilings drilled into the
coral rock done in the
'70s before strict environ-
mental laws were put in
place.
Williford has made the
place green, with solar pan-
els and a wind turbine.
Water is supplied by cap-
tured rainwater that is fil-
tered before being stored in
a large cistern. The main


house has 19 sliding glass
doors to showcase the view
and spacious veranda.
There's an above-ground
pool, helicopter launch pad,
two docks and a boat for
making the quarter mile trip
to and from mainland
Marathon. And, unlike most
offshore islands, it does not
have a mosquito problem.
However, it can get hit by
storms, such as 2005's Hur-
ricane Wilma. "We lost part
of our roof," he said. "But
it's just a price you have to
pay for owning an island."


OAK RIDGE A meticulously cared for home in a park like
setting. Rich wood floors in living/dinning room and neutral large
size tile throughout the home, a 3 bedroom, 2 bath home with
over 2,000 sf has expanded screened in lanai, new roof, driveway
and heat pump. Community features clubhouse, swimming pool,
billiard room and lighted tennis court. Listed at $160,000
Directions: Hwy. 491 N, Right on Whispering Oak Loop (Main
Ent) Left on Misty Oak to home on right.
Call Lili Garcia For Showings At 352-302-9129


Mark Stone/Scoff Bender
Your "HOME" town Agents!

KELLER WILLIAMS 352.476.7996
R f A C it u y 1v sellingcitrus@gmail.com
of Citrus County www.sellingcitrus.com


UPDATED FAMILY HOME
CLOSE TO PARK
2/2 with Family room and
Florida room, Fenced Backyard
Eat-in kitchen with updated
cabinets, 2 Blocks to
community park with ball fields
MLS# 353667 $64,900


ATTACHED VILLA IN
GATED COMMUNITY
55+ community of Tarawood
Located 1/2 way between Inverness
and Brooksville. Community
Amenities clubhouse, pool,
spa, exercise room, library, banquet
hall. 2/2 with open floor plan.
MLS# 354573 $99,500


NEW HOME & HOMESITE IN SUGARMILL WOODS


aSAMC


criplete Packae

Si99,800


'4'


D, BEST,,

HOMEBUILDER


Hwy. 19, 4% miles south of Homosassa Springs. 8016 S. Suncoast Blvd.
352-382-4888 www.sweetwaterhomes.com swhsales@tampabay.rr.com
NEW HOMES, VILLAS, REMODELS & COMMERCIAL


Building
Custom Homes
throughout the
Nature Coast


^ Of Citrus
S01 CBC049056
91^~ N __


I!I


m

k 1



FREE MOBILE
HOMES
To Handy Individuals
Offer includes:
Home, water, sewer,
trash, wifi, use of
pool new clubhouse
& park-like setting
w/ hammocks
and gazebos
All for just $295. mo.
Permanent
RV'S WELCOME
and RV Storage
Space Avail.
Homes for Sale
w/ Owner Financing
Call for Details
AURORA Acres
11240 N. Northwood
Drive Inglis, Fl. 34449
(352) 447-2759
Crystal River Primary
bus stop located in
front of park
auroraacresfl.com


INVERNESS
Nice 2/2/1 new carpet
tile & paint. Whispering
Pines Villas furnished
$69,900(352) 726-8712



I "FREE foreclosure
and short sale lists


Office Open
7 Days a Week
Lisa VanDeboe
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com


Crystal River Indian
Waters Waterfront home
on deep wide canal. 3
BR/2BA with Lanai over-
looking canal. Recently
remodeled split floor plan
with fenced yard, garage,
sea wall and dock.
Easy access to both
Kings Bay and Gulf.
Serious buyers
please.....Appointment
with owner. $275,000.
678-357-9873



CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pond,
ATV trails $165K obo
352 795-2027/ 634-4745
CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pond,
ATV trails $165K obo
352 795-2027/ 634-4745


3 sides fenced, paved
road, private drive
through woods. Leads
to 4 Acre Pasture
$44,900. (352) 897-4586


CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pond,
ATV trails $165Kobo
352 795-2027/ 634-4745


48 lots 14W.F. 1 gulf
access, 5 SMW's lots
3 lots impact fees pd.
$425K, = less than $9K
per lot (732) 996-3785
89 x 165 MOL, LOT
Lucky Hills, Nice
Residential Area
$19,000/Offer
Owner FiNance
(352) 422-1916
HOMOSASSA
Wooded Lot on
Lee Woods Drive,
112 x114ft River access,
but not on river $7,000.
352-621-1664


LOTS FOR
SALE!
6 Citrus Springs Lots
Available, Owner Fin.
or Cash Discounts
Provided. Great
Investment Opprty.
803-403-9555
803-403-9557


Home Finder
www.chroniclehomefinder.com


F&(Z Yowr twrw*. Hom&
Search Hundreds of Local Listings
www.chroniclehomefinder.com


osF S







Twee


Get Results

In The Homefront

Classifieds!


LmsF


LmsF


LmsF









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


LIVED-IN 3/2/21




$89,000
Call Ouade Feesei 352 302 1699


lNl i.. l i 1.l n l U .in I l inii .. li. I III
N_ iI I l..i .l. l d..l e ]l l I ... 1 1 l l 1:1.11I

,if lI i l..n il. 1hi 1 1 11111. I al l .

$265,000
Call Elias G. (irallah 1 352 400 2635
--- - - --


HEIMMNUO:
WOW Seller Says Sell!!!

Ju i .)u.:.) ,.:. ..-.. I i .. 1 111. I I i. I I

1i.1.1 .*-a II. .1.-. 1. I. ..I.- a Ii. I. ... -. .

.I' : -1.-i1 $35.000
Deb Thompson 352 634 2656








KENSINGTON ESTATES
3 lO N F I L L AU RF H IM F1 Ij T ( ,,r n, -, i,,

f I l ""J .. I pp'i q 1.h r l.s i. I 1-. 1.l



Mi', =.".. ASKING $154,900
Pal Davis (3521212 7280
Viti, Lisling I-' 1,iAi1 c21palda lIs cor


JUST WHAT YOU NEED!
r ... ..... Ia'.1' ..i i ..... ' ll ii [ ii ii' ij a
; ....., ..... 1 ...-, ..i, r....... h_....,, r..



Nl.1 = .1 $94,500
Ask loi Malilyn Boolh 1 352 126 6668


* rljijiL Nijivirt l" llii
* CF. a:ll 'i .ai l.ai.all I_,,:l,: ,
* Pi ..I.:i f... 1l $.1. I BEST DEAL IN TOWN
* I h.d.n. I_.)1 I h VV,.I I c. ' ..i I ..n I1.h Hiinaim .. 13Il h .ih .
M i = -' ":' : $114,500 h, .' ,,,: i ,,,, ,::,,,, ir ,,,hl|
Willaid Pickiel 352 2019871 Asking $67,900
inanity CitrusCountlSold com Call Rulh Fiederick 1 352 563 6866


SHORT SALE INVERNESS MUn
* .. l31 i,,.. i,,,,, i i .2 -n Lake He ilerl s.:.n in
* 6...J......- I 1h ni.i I ..-h J .,'..J i: nin1 m11ilvy selling AlM I..sI nei1r h.nile
* I *i'i I..1, 1 oI i I I IL, I_.. t u Call l:.,lav I". preview
hMi_ = :.: 'ONLY $30,000 1i_ = -.. :l $139,900
www.sellinqcilruscounlyllhomes.com Call Maltha Snj'dei 352 476 8727
Call Nancy Jenks 352 400 8012 /oi details. Ask loi file =352412.


$69,900

I .. 11 ", d 4 Ih,, 1 I'l',
I 1 i I ll ll II1 lii- Ih I "ll l


Eas, Io SEt Call lodav'
Maiv Paisons 352 634,1213


LECANTO 2/2/4 7.8 ACRES
H .il .J .. .I I. f 1,.i .V h .l il ..1
,l.'..J J..ll .. r.. .. 1. 6 J l.w 1 n ]

:.l ,l i ,:j oli ... I
Mi = 3' "36. $229,900
Call Ndda Cano 352270 0202


COUNTRY LIVING
AT ITS BEST!


?. .11.. .I h .) l.,:l l..il .. : 1 ..

$289,000
Call Ouade Feesei 352 302 1699


5 ACRES FENCED X-FENCED
* : .:.l ii. ~.o A I

* l _l-l 'll| I & i [illl K iL
* C.a iiil -l, l _i, r hnlrir I .il
* PI-I I ,, I .
= 3i:iii $110,000
Jeanne B 11/ilaid Pickiel 352 212 3410
nitri' CitrusCount'ySold com


E16 SUNDAY, APRIL 1, 2012