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Citrus County chronicle
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Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02725
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 03-31-2012
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:02725

Full Text



Top 'Cat: Kentucky's Davis named AP's Player of the


I P L I I


CITRUS


COUNTY


TODAY & Sunday morning
HIGH Partly sunny with
83 scattered storms. Chance
LOW of rain 30 percent.
62 PAGE A4
MARCH 31, 2012


Medicaid mandate hits county coffers


Dean:Funds
available for
traffic light
State Sen. Charles
Dean (R-Inverness)
said Friday that the
new state trans-
portation budget in-
cluded $200,000 to
pay for a traffic sig-
nal at the intersec-
tion of State Road
44 and North Mead-
owcrest Boulevard in
Crystal River.
"This is a bad acci-
dent waiting to hap-
pen," Sen. Dean told
the Chronicle. "We
need to make this
light happen."
When the county
opened West Citrus
Government Center
in Meadowcrest ear-
lier this year, it was
aware increased traf-
fic would require traf-
fic signals at both
ends of North Mead-
owcrest Boulevard at
junctions with County
Road 486 and State
Road 44.
The county will in-
stall the traffic signal
at C.R. 486. But the
state was asked to
build the other as
S.R. 44 is a state
road.
Last month, the
Citrus County Board
of County Commis-
sioners (BOCC)
learned that the
Florida Department
of Transportation
(FDOT) said it was
not the state's prac-
tice to fund traffic sig-
nals at non-public
roadways, such as
North Meadowcrest
Boulevard.
Last week, BOCC
Chairman Winn
Webb said FDOT
would fund the traffic
signal if the county
owned only a small
part of the private
road, currently
owned by about
eight homeowners'
associations.
On Friday, Dean
said he met with the
Florida Secretary of
Transportation and
requested that fund-
ing be included for
the improvement.
Dean said the tax
collector's office at
the government cen-
ter just started offer-
ing driver's licenses
that has increased
traffic in the area.
Dean explained
that county govern-
ment must first se-
cure ownership of the
first 50 to 100 feet of
North Meadowcrest
Boulevard from its
private owners be-
cause the state can
make improvements
only if it owns the
right of way.
Chris Van Ormer

COMING TOMORROW:
Running dry
Low lake levels may be
good for limpkins, but
they make for bad fishing.
/Sunday


Comics . . . . .C9
Community . . . .C7
Crossword . . . .C8
Editorial . . . .A10
Entertainment . . .B6
Horoscope . . . .B6
Lottery Numbers . .B4
Lottery Payouts . . B6
Movies .......... C9
Obituaries ..... . A5
Classifieds . . . .C10
TV Listings ..... C8


6IEkIl l |U!!I| II1


State claims Citrus owes $844,000; will begin


CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff Writer
Gov Rick Scott signed into
law on Thursday changes to
Medicaid billing that will
make Florida's counties
pay about $325.5 million for
what the state said is past-
due fees for the health care
program for low-income
and disabled patients.


For Citrus County, the
state said the bill stands at
$844,000.
"We are deeply disap-
pointed because this is an-
other burden on counties
that are already strapped
for cash through the lower
property valuations," said
Brad Thorpe, Citrus County
administrator, who also said
the measure amounted to


deducting from sales tax beginning May 1


another unfunded mandate.
With the new law from
House Bill 5301, the county
could ask for an administra-
tive hearing to disagree about
the amount owed, but would
have to pay the full amount if
it were to lose. However, the
county can get a 15 percent
discount by agreeing to pay it
The sum of $844,000 includes
the 15 percent discount


The state would recoup
Citrus County's Medicaid
bills by withholding sales
tax revenue. Instead of giv-
ing Citrus County its share
of state sales tax, the state
would keep it until the
$844,000 is paid. On May 1,
the state will start deduct-
ing from the sales tax.
Each of the state's 67
counties has been billed for


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Nellie Cole, Cheyenne Badley and Alivia Davis, all 14-year-old eighth-graders from Crystal River Middle School,
hang on tight on the Rock and Roll ride at the Citrus County Fair during Student Day.




School's out, fair's in


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff Writer
INVERNESS
The Citrus County Fair opened
at 1 p.m. Friday and at 1:02
p.m. a line stretched from
the front gate into the parking lot.
That line soon shifted, almost en
masse, to the ticket booths that sold
$20 armbands for day-long rides.
It was school day at the fair,
where children were dismissed
from school early to attend the
county fair free until 5 p.m.
The fair attracts people for a va-
riety of reasons: community ex-
hibits, unusual food, livestock and
entertainment, such as Oscar the
roaming robot.
A reporter asked several stu-
dents Friday what they liked about
the fair. You'll notice a theme in
their answers.
And, sorry grownups, it's not the
booths that bring them back.
Lucas Craig, 17, Citrus High
School: "I love the Ferris wheel. I


* WHAT: Citrus County Fair.
* WHEN: Today, 10 a.m. to 10 p.m.
* WHERE: Citrus County Fair-
grounds on U.S. 41, Inverness.
ADMISSION: $7 general ad-
mission, ages 11 and older; $3
ages 5-10; free 4 and under.

just like to be alone, with a girl, you
know? The slight romance element.
I love all the rides."
Nikki Craig, 14, Citrus Springs
Middle School: "I like the rides, es-
pecially the Gravitron. It's just fun.
I like all of them."
Megan Delehanty, 14, CSMS: "I
like seeing the animals."
Christopher Curry, 9, Rock
Crusher Elementary, is showing a
pig at the fair. "It's a she, 7 months
old, weighs 295. Her name is Katie.
I come to ride rides, too. I like the
Ring of Fire, too. You go around a
circle and you go upside down."
Kendric Hall, 8, Inverness Pri-
mary School: "Ride the bumper


cars. They're fun."
Delaney Foy, 10, IPS: "The Fer-
ris wheel. It's the best ride here."
Eileen Dixon, 8, IPS, likes most
rides except: "Not the ones that are
so dizzy"
Audrey Dixon, 11, IPS: "The
merry go round. I've always been
on it. I also like to see the animals.
I like to look at the chickens be-
cause I have chickens."
Austin Bogart, 14, Inverness
Middle School: "All the rides, hang-
ing out with friends and family, en-
joying food. Ring of Fire. It's all
good."
Gavin Greer, 13, IMS: "The rides.
The Gravitron and Ring of Fire."
William Steadman, 13, IMS: "I
like the rides and the farm over
there, the petting zoo place. I've
been on all of them before. I like
the Gravitron and the Scorpion.
They've added some new stuff. It's
always been good."
Chronicle reporter Mike Wright
can be reached at 352-563-3228 or
mwright@chronicleonline.com.
The Ring of
Fire pauses upside
down at the cen-
ter of the midway.

CHS sophomores,
from left, Paige
Antonelli, 15,
Eileen Carroll-Cruz,
16, and Sarah
Stanley, 16,
react to a fast-
spinning ride Fri-
day at the Fair.
Riders
are lifted high
above the ground
while continually
spinning.


what the state said were
overdue Medicaid bills dat-
ing back to Nov 1, 2001.
Thorpe disputed Citrus
County's bill, saying the
amount was arrived at
through many billing errors,
such as multiple billing,
wrong rates and wrong
identities.


.Page A2


4PI


County

jobless

rate falls

to 10.6

percent

SHEMIR WILES
Staff Writer
The numbers are in for
February, and the unem-
ployment rate both region-
ally and in Citrus County
continues to fall as the num-
ber of people employed
grows and the labor force
expands.
According to data re-
leased Friday by the
Florida Department of Eco-
nomic Opportunity, the job-
less rate in February for the
region, which includes Cit-
rus, Marion and Levy coun-
ties, was 10.7, dropping 0.6
percent since January and
1.8 percentage points lower
than the same time last
year Workforce Connection
contends this is the first
time since December 2008
unemployment has been
below 11 percent in all
three counties.
In Citrus County, the job-
less rate dropped to 10.6
percent following two con-
secutive months at 11.3 per-
cent. The unemployment
rate in February 2011 was
12.2 percent.
In addition, the local
See Page A4


Americans

spend $1.5B

on shot at

jackpot

Associated Press

OMAHA, Neb. Lottery
ticket lines swelled as
Americans wagered nearly
$1.5 billion on the longest of
long shots: a less than 1 per-
cent chance to join the 1
percent Friday night as the
winner of a record $640 mil-
lion Mega Millions jackpot.
A cafe worker in Arizona
reported selling $2,600
worth of tickets to one
buyer, while a retired sol-
dier in Wisconsin doubled
his regular weekly ticket
spending to $55. But each
would have to put down
millions more to guarantee
winning what could be the
biggest single lotto payout
in the world.
"I feel like a fool throwing
that kind of money away,"
said Jesse Carter, who spent
the $55 and donated the last
two tickets he bought at a
Milwaukee store Friday to a
charity. "But it's a chance
you take in life, with any-
thing you do."
The jackpot, if taken as a
$462 million lump sum and
after federal tax withhold-
ing, works out to about $347
million. With the jackpot
odds at 1 in 176 million, it
would cost $176 million to
buy up every combination.
See PageA2





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Associated Press
The $1.46 billion that Americans are expected to spend on Mega Millions lottery tickets could buy: 26 trips to the International
Space Station on a Russian Soyuz spacecraft; more than 2.9 million new iPads at the starting price of $499; 12,000
Maserati GranTurismo sports cars; gasoline for 685,000 American households for a year; or a 73 percent share of the Los
Angeles Dodgers, based on the $2 billion Magic Johnson and other investors agreed to pay for the baseball franchise.


JACKPOT
Continued from Page Al

Under that scenario, the
strategy would win $171 mil-
lion -less if your state also
withholds taxes.
Laura Horsley, who does
communications and mar-
keting for a trade associa-
tion, bought $20 worth of
Quick Pick tickets at a
downtown Washington, D.C.,
liquor store Friday But
Horsley, who said she won't
buy a lottery ticket unless
the jackpot tops $100 mil-
lion, remained realistic.
"I don't actually think I'm
going to win, and I don't be-
lieve in superstitions or
numbers or anything like
that," she said. "I just fig-
ured it's right around the
corner. I'd be crazy not at
least to give it a shot."
Thousands of players -
who converged on conven-
ience stores in 42 states and
Washington, D.C., where
Mega Millions tickets are
sold agreed.
Kelly Cripe, a spokes-
woman for the Texas Lot-
tery Commission, said that
as of Tuesday, nationwide
sales for the Mega Millions
drawing totaled more than
$839 million. Officials pro-
jected an additional $618.5
million in sales ahead of
Friday's drawing, however,
for a projected total sales
figure of more than $1.46
billion.
"This is unprecedented,"
Cripe said Friday by email.
Some Indiana players
managed to get freebies, as
Hoosier Lottery officials
gave away one free Mega
Millions ticket to each of the
first 540 players at several
outlets around the state Fri-
day- a plan announced be-
fore the jackpot grew by
$100 million.
In Indianapolis, college
student Chris Stewart said
he showed up at the lot-
tery's headquarters at 6:30
a.m. to be first in a line.
"I've never seen a jackpot
like this before," said Stew-
art, who bought five addi-
tional tickets. "If I won I
mean wow! I just don't
know what I'd do. I'd really
have to think what I could


What $1.46B spent on

Mega Millions could buy
Associated Press

WASHINGTON -Americans are expected to spend
$1.46 billion on Mega Millions lottery tickets. So how
far does $1.46 billion go?
How much of the Los Angeles Dodgers would it buy?
How many trips into space? How much would it shrink
the federal budget gap?
With the money that's been spent pursuing the
record $640 million jackpot, you could:
* Feed 238,000 American families for a year.
* Buy a 73 percent share of the Los Angeles Dodgers,
based on the $2 billion that Magic Johnson and
other investors agreed to pay this week for the base-
ball franchise.
* Stock up on 228 tons of Beluga caviar.
* Trim this year's expected $1.3 trillion federal deficit
by just over one-tenth of 1 percent.
* Take 26 trips to the International Space Station on a
Russian Soyuz spacecraft.
* Buy 10 F-22 Raptor stealth fighter jets
* Treat 685,000 average U.S. households to gasoline
for a full year.
* Quadruple the $349 million that President Barack
Obama and his Republican challengers spent on
their presidential campaigns through February this
year.
* Pay for just under 3 1/2 hours' worth of federal
spending.
* Buy nearly 3 million new iPads at the starting price
of $499 almost as many as Apple has already
sold.
* Pay a year's worth of health care expenses for
462,000 American average families.
* Finance the making of the blockbuster movie "The
Hunger Games" 19 times over.
* Provide a week of unemployment benefits for nearly
40 percent of America's 12.8 million unemployed.


do with it."
The lines were out the
door at Rosie's Den cafe in
the rural northwestern Ari-
zona community of White
Hills, 72 miles southeast of
Las Vegas and one of the
closest points to Nevada -
which doesn't offer Mega
Millions for buyers to get
in the game.
Rosie's worker Christine
Millim said it's been non-
stop for four days.
"In one step I sold $2,600
worth so, that was one per-
son," she said.
Mike Catalano, chairman
of the mathematics depart-
ment at Dakota Wesleyan
University in Mitchell, S.D.,
concedes the math is clear:
The more tickets you buy,


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the better chances you have
of winning. Better long-shot
chances, of course.
"You are about 50 times as
likely to get struck by light-
ning as to win the lottery,
based on the 90 people a
year getting struck by light-
ning," Catalano said. "Of


course, if you buy 50 tickets,
you've equalized your
chances of winning the jack-
pot with getting struck by
lightning."
Based on other U.S. aver-
ages, you're about 8,000
times more likely to be
murdered than to win the
lottery, and about 20,000
times more likely to die in
a car crash than hit the
lucky numbers, Catalano
said.
For David Kramer, a
lawyer in Lincoln, Neb.,
buying his Mega Millions
ticket wasn't about "the re-
alistic opportunity to win."
"It's the fact that for three
days, the daydreaming time
about what I would do if I
won is great entertainment
and, frankly, a very nice re-
lease from a normal day," he
said.
Everett Eahmer, 80, of St
Paul, Minn., said he's been
playing the lottery "since
the beginning."
"If I win, the first thing
I'm going to do is buy a (Tim)
Tebow football shirt, and
I'm going to do the Tebow
pose," said Eahmer, who
bought five tickets Thurs-
day "I'm with him in honor-
ing a higher power."
Lottery officials are
happy to have Friday's
record Mega Millions jack-
pot fueling ticket sales, but
even they caution against
overspending.
"When people ask me, I
just tell them that the odds
of a lottery game make it a
game of fate," said Chuck
Strutt, executive director of
the Urbandale, Iowa-based
Multi-State Lottery Associa-
tion that oversees the Mega
Millions, Powerball and
other lotteries. "Just buy a
ticket, sit back and see if
fate points a finger at you
for that day"


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MEDICAID
Continued from Page Al

Thorpe said the county
would have to pay the
$884,000 in installments for
five years. It will have to
pay one-third of the sum
during the first year:
$295,000. For the next four
years, the county would
owe $147,250.
On Friday, Thorpe and
County Attorney Richard
Wesch held a conference
call with other counties
and the Florida Associa-
tion of Counties (FAC), a
county government advo-
cacy and education group.
Thorpe said the FAC and
attorneys would explore
the law to determine the
possibility of legal reme-
dies. Such options would
be presented at the April
10 meeting of the Citrus
County Board of County
Commissioners (BOCC).
During the past two
weeks, FAC's general coun-
sel Ginger Delegal met
with county attorneys from
across the state to discuss
the legal options available
to FAC and Florida's 67
counties. FAC announced
Friday it soon would call a
special board of directors
meeting to present a legal
analysis and decide on fu-
ture actions.
Scott signed the bill over
objections from county of-
ficials who had urged him
to veto it, including Citrus
County commissioners.
During Tuesday's BOCC
meeting, board members
approved a resolution to
send a letter to Scott ex-
pressing their objections to
the bill.
"All 67 counties said
'Don't do this,' but their
cries were not listened to,"
said Ken Frink, public
works director and assis-
tant county administrator.
Frink called the law "the
biggest unfunded mandate
ever in the state of
Florida."
BOCC Chairman Winn
Webb said, "It is what it is
and we'll just have to live
with it It's not the first time
we've had to make tough
decisions. I think we can
break it up over three
years at a quarter-million
each year."
Commissioner Dennis
Damato said he was disap-
pointed.
"It's not a good account-
ing of how the money has
been spent," Damato said.
"The biggest problem with
this is that the ledger is


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not clean. The state just
does a journal entry and
says that's what you owe.
If you have a billing dis-
pute with any other ven-
dor, you don't have to pay
it until the dispute is set-
tled. But the state can
claim the money from the
sales-tax distribution.
This is a huge inequity to
the people of the state of
Florida."
Commissioner Rebecca
Bays said the law claimed
disputed debt, not debt
Florida counties acknowl-
edge owing.
"In today's economy, the
federal level is pushing
costs to the state level and
the state is pushing it to the
local level," Bays said. "We
ask how much more our
people can take. How
much more can we ask
people to support? We
need to stop looking at the
dollars as being in separate
buckets; it's all coming
from one source."
Commissioner John "JJ"
Kenney called it making a
hard job harder
"It's withholding monies
that come back to the
county," Kenney said. "It's
been tough, but we've been
doing a good job. We got an
A-plus rating (from Fitch
Group) through the hard
work of county staff and
Cathy Taylor (county
budget director). Now
we've got more of a pinch. I
am really disappointed he
signed it."
Commissioner Joe Meek
said the measure would
have implications through-
out the state.
"We are reviewing the
specifics and trying to ad-
dress them as well as we
can," Meek said. "As a
county, we will be looking
at all our options."
Doug Smith, president
of the FAC, responded to
Scott's signing: "To say
that we're disappointed
would be an understate-
ment. This bill represents
the worst kind of body
blow to taxpayers. Rather
than correcting Tallahas-
see's error-ridden Medi-
caid billing system, HB
5301 codifies it and leaves
local taxpayers with the
bill."
Smith said HB 5301
makes the state's billing
errors the law of the
land, "leaving taxpayers
on the hook for Tallahas-
see's multimillion-dollar
accounting mess."
Chronicle reporter Chris
Van Ormer can be reached
at cvanormer@chronicle
online.com or 352-564-2916.



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Page A3-SATURDAY, MARCH 31, 2012



TATE&


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE



Old pics may be deceptive in shooting case


Dated photos helping shape public

perception of deadly Sanford shooting


Associated Press

WEST PALM BEACH When
he was shot, Trayvon Martin was
not the baby-faced boy in the photo
that has been on front pages across
the country And George Zimmer-
man wasn't the beefy-looking figure
in the widely published mugshot
Both photos are a few years old
and no longer entirely accurate.
Yet they may have helped shape
initial public perceptions of the
deadly shooting.
"When you have such a lopsided
visual comparison, it just stands to
reason that people would rush to
judgment," said Kenny Irby, who
teaches visual journalism at the


Poynter Institute, a journalism
think tank in St. Petersburg.
The most widely seen picture of
Martin, released by his family, was
evidently taken a few years ago
and shows a smiling, round-
cheeked youngster in a red T-shirt
But at his death, Martin was 17
years old, around 6 feet tall and,
according to his family's attorney,
about 140 pounds.
Zimmerman, 28, is best known
from a 7-year-old booking photo of
an apparently heavyset figure with
an imposing stare, pierced ear and
facial hair, the orange collar of his
jail uniform visible. The picture,
released by police following the
deadly shooting, was taken after


Associated Press
The photo of George Zimmerman,
in a recent photo at right, is in
sharp contrast to the widely used
2005 booking photo, at left, from
an arrest in Miami Dade County.

Zimmerman's 2005 arrest on an as-
sault-on-an-officer charge that was
eventually dropped.
In a police video made public
this week of Zimmerman being
brought in for questioning a half-
hour after the shooting, the 5-foot-
9 man appears much slimmer


In a case that has caused a na-
tionwide furor over race and the
laws of self-defense, Martin was
shot to death by Zimmerman in the
city of Sanford on Feb. 26 as the
unarmed black teenager was walk-
ing back from a convenience store.
Black leaders and others are
demanding Zimmerman's arrest
on murder or manslaughter
charges, but state and federal au-
thorities are still investigating.
Betsi Grabe, a professor at Indi-
ana University-Bloomington who
has studied the effect of news im-
ages on public opinion, said pho-
tos that gain the most traction play
into the desires of both journalists
and the public for a story with a
distinct victim and aggressor
'At the center of most stories we
tell in our society, cross-culturally
and across the centuries, is the
struggle between good and evil,"


she said. "If the ingredients are
there, that is what journalists will
grab onto and present."
Grabe said it is natural to pres-
ent the most innocent-looking
image of the person believed to be
the victim, and the most menacing
one of the suspect.
A more complex portrait of the
two figures has emerged since
then. A photo of a beaming Zim-
merman looking sharp in a jacket
and tie has come out, along with a
more recent picture of Martin, with
gold teeth and a white sleeveless
undershirt. At the same time, it was
learned that Martin had been sus-
pended from school for marijuana
residue in his backpack.
"Everyone's views seem to be gy-
rating back and forth with each
new scrap of evidence that comes
out," said David 0. Markus, a
prominent Miami defense attorney


Around
THE STATE

Citrus County

Occupy Citrus rally
today in Inverness
The Occupy Citrus 99% will
have a General Assembly
meeting at noon Saturday on
the front steps of the Old
Courthouse in Inverness, fol-
lowed by a rally. All citizens in
Citrus County are invited to at-
tend. For more information,
email occupycitrus@
gmail.com.

Pembroke Pines

Cash flies from fleeing
suspect's backpack
Authorities said South
Florida motorists chased after
cash that flew from a sus-
pected bank robber's back-
pack as he sped down
Interstate 75 on a motorcycle.
The South Florida Sun
Sentinel reported a Wells
Fargo bank branch in Pem-
broke Pines was robbed
Thursday by a man wearing
sunglasses, face paint and
an orange baseball cap.
As the suspect fled south-
bound on 1-75, the cash started
flying out of his backpack.
The FBI asked that anyone
who scooped up cash should
call Broward County Crime
Stoppers to return it.
Officials didn't say how
much money was taken in
the robbery.

Tallahassee

Senate redistricting
plan submitted to feds
The Florida Senate's revised
redistricting map is headed to
the U.S. Department of Justice
for preclearance under the fed-
eral Voting Rights Act.
State officials submitted the
plan on Friday although the
Florida Supreme Court has yet
to consider it. Submitting it be-
fore the court review will give
the Justice Department suffi-
cient time to act before candi-
date qualifying begins in June.
Federal preclearance is re-
quired due to past racial dis-
crimination in five Florida
counties.
Maps for the House and
Florida's 27 congressional
seats were submitted on
March 13. That was after the
Supreme Court approved the
House map but rejected the
Senate plan, forcing a do-over.
A Supreme Court review of
the congressional map isn't
required, but that plan is
being challenged in a Talla-
hassee trial court.
-From staff and wire reports


Correction
A caption for the photo
titled "Medical advice" on
page C4 of Friday's edition
misidentified the two men in
the photo. Ron Swick was
pictured on the left and Ben
Cannon was on the right.
Readers can alert The
Citrus County Chronicle to
any errors in news articles by
mailing dmann@chronicle
online.com or by calling 352-
563-5660.


New sand greets visitors to Fort Island Gulf Beach





-.-" ...- -
..-. -. -
-- -. a -


a









--
. .








DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Fort Island Gulf Beach has reopened to swimmers and sunbathers who are looking for the perfect place to bask in the sunshine and enjoy the
feel of fresh white beach sand between the toes. The beach recently received a facelift with the addition of 320,000 pounds of sand.





Church hopes to unite community


Service aims to honor the memory ofyouth slain last month in Sanford


MATTHEW BECK
Staff Writer
One local church will hold a serv-
ice with the intention of bringing
unity to the community as well as
the church in the wake of a 17-year-
old youth who was shot and killed
in Orlando last month.
The New Church Without Walls,
pastored by DougAlexander, is hold-
ing the service at 11 a.m. Sunday
"What we want to do is to show
how we can turn this situation into
a better one through the Word of
God," he said. "We need to learn
from this but we can't make judg-
ments. We can't judge the situation
because we don't know all of the
details."
Alexander said quite a few local
youths, even those from his church,
have attended rallies organized as


Doug
Alexander
New Church
Without Walls
pastor.
overtones.


a result of the
shooting that has
received interna-
tional attention.
Seventeen-year-
old Trayvon Martin
was shot Feb. 26 in
a Sanford neighbor-
hood by George
Zimmerman, a
neighborhood
watch volunteer,
creating a situation
ripe with racial


It has been reported that Martin,
a black teen, was unarmed at the
time he was shot by Zimmerman,
who is Hispanic.
Alexander said he has invited
members of the Citrus County Sher-
iff's Office, Citrus County Commis-
sion, the Inverness mayor, other


officials and those running for of-
fice to join the service.
He also said that while the serv-
ice isn't meant to judge anyone, it
will memorialize Martin's life.
"The young man is no longer with
us so we want to remember him,"
he said. "And if those attending
want to wear hoodies or hats, they
can feel free to do so."
Alexander, who is black, is a re-
tired 20-year military police offi-
cer, and was a deputy with the
Citrus County Sheriff's Office for
11 years.
He has heard that some in the
area believe a similar shooting
could happen here.
"That's what some people are
thinking but we want to think posi-
tive," Alexander said. "I worked
with the sheriff's office for many
years and have never seen any pro-


filing at all. Rest assured that isn't a
problem here."
He says the media scrutiny of the
shooting has forced some much-
needed dialogue.
"The Stand Your Ground law is
getting some attention," he said. "I
think it needs to be looked into and
to see if it can be corrected. We
don't know if the law was in effect
at the time, let's see if it was. It may
or may not apply Nobody should
prejudge because we weren't there
but everybody deserves due
process."
The New Church Without Walls is
at 3962 North Roscoe Road,
Hernando.
For more information call the
church as 352-344-2425.
Chronicle reporter Matthew Beck
can be reached at 352-564-2919 or
mbeck@chronicleonline. corn


Unsolved MYSTERIES


Authorities seeking clues in decades-old murder


MIKE KENNEDY
Special to the Chronicle
ames Norris was a resi-
dent of San Francisco,
Calif. On Oct. 3,1974, he
flew from San Francisco to
Miami, on an overnight com-
mercial flight. From Miami
he immediately headed
north to Citrus County to
meet contacts in the Inver-
ness and Floral City area.
Norris was traveling with a
large amount of cash and
was here to purchase
Columbian-grade mari-
juana. Norris' last contact
with his family was a post-
card dated the afternoon of
Oct. 4, 1974, from Inglis.
On April 16, 1976, skeletal
remains were found by a
heavy equipment operator
in northern Dixie County off
U.S. 19. The remains were


unidentified and held in ev-
idence for 35 years by the
Florida Department of Law
Enforcement. Through
DNA testing, the remains
were eventually identified
as Norris.
In April 2011, two of Norris'
sisters claimed his remains
and took them back to Cali-
fornia where he was buried.
The FDLE, Dixie County
Sheriff's Office and the Cit-
rus County Sheriff's Office
have an open and active
criminal investigation into
the death of Norris.
Many interviews in Citrus
County and elsewhere have
identified members of the
drug organization that Nor-
ris came here to purchase
marijuana from. This organ-
ization specialized in
Columbian marijuana.
The family of Norris has


established a web site,
www. whokilledJames
Norris.com, which includes
additional information.
Norris' parents both died
without knowing what hap-
pened to their son. Norris
has five siblings who
searched for him for 37
years. No family should
have to do that. The per-
son(s) who murdered
James Norris need to be
held accountable. Through
our investigation, we be-
lieve there are people in
Citrus County who have in-
formation concerning his
death.
Detectives need your help
in solving the murder of
James Norris. Any piece of
information, no matter how
insignificant, that you can
give may be the key to solv-
ing this homicide. Please


UNSOLVED MYSTERIES
OF CITRUS COUNTY
* VICTIM: James Norris.
* AGE: 24.
* CAUSE OF DEATH: Homocide.
* DESCRIPTION: White male, 5 feet
10 inches tall, 200 pounds, medium
build,black hair.


contact CrimeStoppers of
Citrus County by calling 888-
ANY-TIPS, texting the word
CITRUS plus your tip to
274637 or visiting crime
stopperscitrus.com. You may
be eligible to receive a cash
reward and you can remain
anonymous. The FDLE may
be contacted anonymously at
850-410-7450.

Special Agent Mike


Kennedy is with the
Florida Department of Law
Enforcement and is
assigned to the Violent
Crime Squad in the
Tallahassee Regional
Operations Center He has
17years of law
enforcement experience.
The Unsolved Mysteries
column will appear weekly
on Saturday highlighting a
cold case, unsolved
burglary or crime.


James
Norris


*






A4 SATURDAY, MARCH 31, 2012




Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Burglaries
A residential burglary oc-
curred at about 9:25 p.m. March
29 in the 2100 block of W. Riley
Drive, Citrus Springs.
A vehicle burglary occurred
at about 1:57 a.m. March 30 in
the 4000 block of N. Bloom
Point, Crystal River.
Thefts
A grand theft occurred at
about 8:38 a.m. March 29 in the


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


For the RECORD
20 block of N. Melbourne Street,
Beverly Hills.
A petit theft occurred at
about 10:01 a.m. March 29 in the
800 block of N.W. 2nd Avenue,
Crystal River.
A larceny petit theft occurred
at about 10:43 a.m. March 29 in
the 9700 block of W. Cranberry
Street, Crystal River.
A larceny petit theft occurred
at about 1:55 p.m. March 29
in the 1400 block of S. Ladena
Terrace.
A grand theft occurred at


about 6:37 p.m. March 29 in the
4500 block of S. CorbettAvenue,
Homosassa.
A larceny petit theft occurred
at about 10:38 p.m. March 29 in
the 5200 block of S. Cherokee
Way, Homosassa.
A petit theft occurred at
about 10:45 p.m. March 29 in the
7700 block of W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River.
A grand theft occurred at
about 2 a.m. March 30 in the
5400 block of N. Suncoast
Boulevard, Crystal River.


SNation/World BRIEFS


Bales' attorney: Government
'hiding evidence'
SEATTLE The attorney for the U.S. soldier
accused of killing 17 Afghan civilians said the U.S.
government is "hiding evidence" from the defense.
John Henry Browne told The Associated Press
on Friday that members of the defense team in
Afghanistan were told they would have access to
witnesses at a hospital, but later discovered the
people had been released. He also said the U.S.
government has not turned over files to the
lawyers defending Army Staff Sgt. Robert Bales.
The defense team said the prosecution is
withholding information while "witnesses scatter."
Bales has been charged with 17 counts of
premeditated murder and is being held at a U.S.
military prison at Fort Leavenworth, Kan.
Afghan police: Nine officers
killed by colleague
KABUL, Afghanistan -Afghan police say
nine village police officers have been shot dead
by a colleague in the eastern Paktika province.
The provincial police chief Dawlat Khan says
the incident occurred on Friday in Yayakhil town.
Bowal Khan, chief of Yayakhil district, identified
the gunman asAsadullah, who goes by one name.
He said Asadullah was assigned to a small com-
mand post when he woke up at 3 a.m. for guard
duty. He then used his assault rifle to kill the nine
men sleeping inside the post, took their weapons
and fled in a pickup truck.
Khan said the victims included one of his
brothers and the commander of the post, identified
as Mohammad Ramazan. He say two of the
dead were Ramazan's sons. He blamed the inci-
dent on the Taliban.


Man who wrote about
Alzheimer's kills wife, self
TREXLERTOWN, Pa. -A Pennsylvania man
who had recently written in The New York Times
about his love for his Alzheimer's-stricken wife
killed her and himself in what their family called
an act of "deep devotion."
The bodies of Charles Snelling and his wife,
Adrienne, both 81, were found Thursday in their
home in Trexlertown in eastern Pennsylvania.
"Our father ended our mother's life and then
took his own life as well," the family said in a
statement. "This is a total shock to everyone in
the family, but we know he acted out of deep de-
votion and profound love."
The coroner said Charles Snelling shot him-
self; autopsy results on his wife were pending.
Charles, prominent in local political circles, re-
sponded late last year to a call from Times colum-
nist David Brooks for people older than 70 to
evaluate accomplishments and lessons in their lives.
In an essay published online in December,
Snelling looked back on the turn his prosperous and
happy life had taken, mixing memories of the
young woman he fell in love with at first sight with
the challenge of caring for someone with dementia.
"The first year we were married, as summer
was approaching, I asked Adrienne 'where shall
we travel this summer?' 'What on earth are you
talking about,' she answered. 'Don't you travel in
the summer,' I asked. Her response: 'You are a
married man now; get a job you lazy bum.'"
He and Adrienne Snelling "were wonderful
parents and grandparents," the family said. "And
the love they shared during their 61-year mar-
riage was total and complete."
-From wire reports


UNEMPLOYMENT
Continued from Page Al

labor force expanded by 126 to 55,270, the
number of employed increased by 535 to
49,431 and those unemployed dropped by
409 to 5,839.
Rusty Skinner, Workforce Connection's
chief executive officer, said looking at the
big picture, the numbers
are showing that people Both Joh
are getting back to work and C
and heading into April, he and 0
is confident March's num- Commi
bers will continue to show
there is major job growth Joe Mee
in the region.
John Siefert, executive presided
director of the Citrus while the
County Economic Develop-
ment Council, said it's are movie
taken a long time to get to
the point where the unem- right dire
ployment figures are
declining. Still a far
Coupled with the aver- where thin
age median income in-
creasing by nearly $1,000 be in th
over the last 12 months,
Siefert said it's "all just positive, good
news," and he attributes that to the local
businesses who are taking the opportunity
to expand and hire new people.
"I see more of it as we move forward,"
he said. "I'm excited about it because it's
been a difficult last three years."
However, both Siefert and County Com-
missioner Joe Meek, EDC president, agree
while the numbers are moving in the right
direction, it's still a far cry from where
things should be in the county.
"Ten percent unemployment is nothing
to brag about," Siefert said.


Therefore, Meek said there has to be a
continued proactive approach to diversi-
fying the local economy.
"There's just a lot more work that needs
to be done," he said.
And there's no silver bullet that can turn
things around.
"It has to be a multi-faceted approach,"
he said.
By focusing on target industries like
medical, tourism and light manufacturing
and projects like the Inver-
n Siefert ness Airport Business
Park, Meek said it would
county help ensure the future of

ssioner the county.
Heading into the rest of

ek, EDC the year, Siefert expressed
confidence that the unem-
t, agree ployment rate could hit
numbers five percent over the next
24 months. However, to

ng in the have a clearer under-
standing of where the
action, it'S economy is heading, Skin-
ner said the summer
cry from months will bring seasonal

igs should unemployment in the form
of teachers, bus drivers
h county. and new high school and
college graduates that will
be in search of jobs.
If they can be absorbed into the work-
force without the unemployment rate tak-
ing a hit, then Skinner said they would be
able to have a better idea of "where we
will be in the long haul."
Florida's not seasonally adjusted unem-
ployment rate in February fell to 9.1 per-
cent, down 0.4 percent over the month.
The national unemployment rate fell
slightly to 8.7 percent.
Chronicle reporter Shemir Wiles can be
reached at (352) 564-2924 or swiles@
chronicleonline. com.


notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle




Department of


Planning and Development...C5


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


C I T R U S


C 0 U N TY


City
D.tivtori,i Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort M: eis
Gi inW ,Sv 1lle
Homestead
Jacksonville
- 'I" West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
ts

pc
pc
ts
pc
ts

ts
ts
ts


City
Miami

Ori land
P'in..aiolj
Sarasota
Tallahassee
T I [1j.I.
Vero Beach
W. Palm 3ich


MARINE OUTLOOK


HI LO PR H l LO PR
85 61 0 00 87 60 0.00

THREE DAY OUTLOOK o haby -
TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 83 Low: 62
SMostly cloudy: 5C chance of
showers
SUNDAY & MONDAY MORNING
High: 86 Low: 59
,i : l, IudLI, 10% chance of a shower


MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 87 Low: 56
Mostly sunny

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Friday 88/57
Record 89/38
Normal 80/52
Mean temp. 73
- ',: ri_'. from mean +7
PRECIPITATION*
Friday 0.00 in
Total for the month 0.63 in,
Total for the year 3.86 in,
Normal for the year 10.15 in.
'As of 6 p ma tInverness
UV INDEX: 10
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Friday at 3 p.m. 30.00 in.


DEW POINT
Friday at 3 p.m.
HUMIDITY
Friday at 3 p.m. 3
POLLEN COUNT**
Grasses and weeds were absent
Today's active pollen:
Oak, juniper, bayberry
Today's count: 8.4/12
Sunday's count: 9.6
Monday's count: 10.1
Friday was good with .11,iiiii.1
mainly particulates.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
i RMrilrlirl, (AFTERNOON)
3/31 SATURDAY 12:55 7:07 1:20 7:33
4/1 SUNDAY 1:43 7:55 2:08 8:20


S48 PM.

I .1 *:
.2'47 AM.


BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry al (352) 754-6777 For more
S.,,, ... 1.. I, n.i editions, please visid the Division of Forestry's Web site:
-'r. -I ,, r :. ,,, i : i wealhier/kbdi
WATERING RULES
One-day-per-week i']rl,-..n schedule as follows for addresses ending in:
0 or 1 Monday, 2 or 3 Tje -j a, 4 or 5 Wednesday, 6 or 7
- Thursday, 8 or 9 & subdivision common areas Friday. Before 8 a.m. or
. fTir i -' I '
Hand watering of non-grass areas can take place any day before 8 a.m. or
-.0-i F. p In
PLEASE CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL NEW PLANT MATERIAL. Citrus
.:.ur,!. WjrC- Resources can explain additional watering allowances for

Questions, concerns or reporting violations, please call Citrus .-uLIi;' at
352-527-7669, or email waterconservation@bocc.citrus.fl.us.
TIDES
"From mouths of rivers "At I.,r,..I Bay ""At Mason's Creek
Saturday Sunday
City High/Low High/Low High/Low High/Low
ChassahowLtZka' 1:54 p/8:41 a -- /832 p 12:41 a/10:01 a 304 p/10:07 p
Cystal River 12:15 pi6.03 a 11:02 'i 125 p7:23 a -- 7:29 p
Wittlacothee 10:02 a'3:51 a 8:49 p3:42 p 11:12 a 5:11 a 10.22 p,5:17 p
Homosassa'" 1-04 p!7.40 a 11-51 p(7.31 p 2.14 p9:00 a -- 9:06 p


West winds around 15 knots. S?, 2
feet. Bay and inland waters will have
a moderate chop. Partly rLii -1,' ','ii a
chance of iIliih -r'.lii O i1i Iti,.


F'cast

tpc
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
pc


Gulf water
temperature

74

Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Thu. Fri. Full
Winl i ,::: i-i at Holder 27.04 27.03 .35 5
Tsala Ap,)pk,-I-Hern.iind 33.4. 33.41 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 35.44 35.41 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 37.34 37.31 42.40
Levels reported n feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33 year food the mean
annual rlno[l which has a 43-prn cinr r;ioance o1 being reqale x or exceeded in airy one year This daita is
obtained trirm the Si)uEhwest Florida WateI Martagement Disrict aIjl is subr e to reason In no even
will uhe Oistlct or lthn Unrile States Gtolog cal Suirve I lhe iabl for tiny aEntages asking ill t oI 1he use ol
tIis data I1 you have a q leions you should cona "he Hyrological Daia S1clton il (352) 796-7211


THE NATION


9- -. ',- .' 'o o-. ,,
n i- I. 'a .1 -i'1 .9 . .... ,
4I 84 ., _-
57 a
SOS M- 1 lo..
an% ,'." os 'o0"S
I uo J" '" Lb. .I *

La gos do 70 ,


--'



City
Albany
Albuquerq[ue
Asheville
Atlanta
Allantic City
Austin
Baltimiore
Billings
Bifiingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burhlino0n, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotle
Crncinlati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus OH
Concord. N H.
Dallas
Denver
Des MoWies
Detroit
El Paso
EvansviIIe, IN
Harrisburg
Hartflord
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Las Vegas
ittle RockU


Friday Saturday
H L Pcp. Fcst H L


31
41
49
58
31
66
35
40
61
48 10
36
30
27
60
44 15
54
40 58
46 07
34 19
58
39 05
29
67
43
55
33 1,16
49
54
32
37
66
49 01
64 05
57
59Q


sh
s
pc
pc
sh
pc
sh
pc
is
sh
sh
pc
pc
Is
PC
PC
pc
s
pc
Is
sh
pC
s
pc
pc
s
s
pc
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pc
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CC


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SATURDAY

Friday Saturday
City H LPcp. Fcst H L
New Orleans 82 67 01 ts 86 68
New York City 56 40 sh 44 40
Norfolk 61 49 sh 76 49
Oklahoma City 79 59 s 88 61
Omaha 73 49 s 85 60
Palm Springs 87 59 s 85 53
Philadelphia 55 37 sh 52 39
Ploeimx 85 61 s 92 62
Pillsburgh 63 31 pc 53 40
PortaId, ME 45 29 pc 47 31
Portland, Ore 54 50 44 r 51 39
Providence, R.I, 52 37 sl 44 32
Raleigh 77 49 ts 61 53
Rapii Cily 74 36 s 81 58
Reno 64 45 i 61 32
Rochesler NY 44 28 I)C 44 37
SaIinamenlo 65 51 i 59 43
St LoeUI 80 57 pc 76 61
St Sle Maie 32 28 .02 pc 44 35
Sail Lake City 71 43 s 80 43
San Antonio 83 64 pc 90 68
San Diego 62 56 pc 62 54
San Francsco 61 54 r 58 46
Savannahi 86 55 Is 81 60
Seatlle 49 43 10 r 47 40
Spokane 47 41 26 sit 51 33
Syracuse 46 28 pc 49 36
Topeka 78 57 pc 85 63
Washington 54 43 sth 63 44
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 96 Dryden Texas LOW 18 Walertown.
NY.
WORLD CITIES


Los Angeles 61 55 pc 61 51 SATURDAY Lisbon
Louise 82 54 s 68 51 CITY H/LJSKY London
Memphis 73 63 .10 Is 82 66 Acapulco 87/75/pc Madrid
Milwakee 41 37 .36 pc 48 45 Amsterdam 50!37/sh Mexico City
Minneapos 47 39 p 71 50 Athens 66i/501s Montral
Moble 79 67 03 is 85 64 *, ,I 53/34/pC Moscow
Montgomerv 75 64 02 Is 82 64 Berlin 45/31/rs Paris
Nashvie 77 58 Is 78 55 Bermuda 71/64/c Rio
KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle; Cairo 77/66/pc Rome
f.fair: h.haz,. pc-partly cloudy r-rain; Calgary 52/28/sh Sydney
rs-rainusnow m'x; s-sunny: sh-showers, Havana 86."66/pc Tokyo
sn=snow; tsthunderstorms; w=windy. I.,u r.:.i 74/62/sh Toronto
02012 Weather Central, Madison, Wi. Jerusalem 62/50/pc Warsaw


53/36/c
71/42/1
44/31/S
35/25/c
55/36,'c
86,"7D/ts
71/50/pc
63/42/r
43/31/pc
451'32/rs


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To contact us regarding your service:

352-563-5655
Call for redelivery: 7 to 10 a.m. Monday to Friday
7 to 11 a.m. Saturday and Sunday
Questions: 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday to Friday
7 to 11 a.m. Saturday and Sunday

Main switchboard phone numbers:
Citrus County 352-563-6363
Citrus Springs, Dunnellon and Marion County
residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.
I want to place an ad:
To place a classified ad: Citrus 352-563-5966
Marion 888-852-2340
To place a display ad: 352-563-5592
Online display ad: 352-563-5592
I want to send information to the Chronicle:
MAIL: 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
FAX: Advertising 352-563-5665, Newsroom 352-563-3280
EMAIL: Advertising: advertising@chronicleonline.com
Newsroom: newsdesk@chronicleonline.com

Where to find us:
Meadowcrest
f4-4 office
Norvell Branri Hwi 1624 N.
Dunkentield Meadowcrest
D nkenlI r---Cannondale Dr taBlvd.
Ave Crystal River,
SM dowcrest FL 34429


i iInverness
S Courthouse office
To mpkins St. square
0 2 106W.Main
41 4 Inverness, FL
34450


Who's in charge:
G erry M u lliga n ............................................................................ P ub lish er, 5 6 3 -3 2 2 2
Trina Murphy ...................... Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232
C harlie B rennan ............................ .................................... Editor, 563-3 2 25
Tom Feeney .................................................... Production Director, 563-3275
Kathie Stewart .............................................. Circulation Director, 563-5655
John M urphy ........................ ............................ Online M manager, 563-3255
John M urphy.................................................... Classified M manager, 564-3255
Jeff Gordon .................................................. Business M manager, 564-2908
Mike Arnold.................................... Human Resources Director, 564-2910
Report a news tip:
Opinion page questions.................................. Charlie Brennan, 563-3225
To have a photo taken ........................................ Darlene Mann, 563-5660
News and feature stories ............................ Sandra Frederick, 564-2930
Community/wire service content.................... Sarah Gatling, 563-5660
Sports event coverage ...........................Jon-Michael Soracchi, 563-3261
S o u n d O ff ................................................................................................................ 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9
The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please
recycle your newspaper
www.chronicleonline.com
Published every Sunday through Saturday
By Citrus Publishing Inc.
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
Phone 352-563-6363
S POSTMASTER: Send address changes to:
Citrus County Chronicle
1624 N. MEADOWCREST BLVD., CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429

PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL
SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280


CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
S-SUNSETTONIGHT...............
SUNRISE TOMORROW
MOONHISE TODAY
APRIL 13 WAPRIL21 APHIL28 MOONSET TODAY ..


LOCAI/STATE


I





1








I1





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Richard
Crane, 84
INGLIS
Richard E Crane, 84, of
Inglis, Fla., went home to be
with the Lord on March 27,
2012. He was born October
30, 1927, in Homer, NY He
enlisted in the U.S. Navy,
serving during World War II,
and was employed by Don
Clark Inc. in Skaneateles,
NY, until retiring in 1989.
Dick loved racing, all
types of sports, woodwork-
ing, fishing and the out-
doors. Mostly, he loved his
family and friends.
He is survived by the love
of his life, wife Mary of 45
years; his daughters Dawn,
Diane, Connie (Kirby), Betty
(Ray), Ginny (Walt), Debbi
(Bob); his sons Rick
and Mike, eight grandchil-
dren; and two great-
grandchildren.
Memorial services will be
at 11 a.m. on Saturday, May
12, at Yankeetown Commu-
nity Church. Those wishing
to honor Dick are asked to
contribute to the building
fund at Yankeetown Com-
munity Church, PO. Box 88,
Yankeetown, FL 34498 or
your local Hospice, in mem-
ory of Dick.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.
Helen
Jackson, 90
FLORAL CITY
Helen Edna Jackson, 90,
of Floral City, died on
Wednesday, March 28,2012.
She is survived by her lov-
ing family
Turner Funeral Home
Brooksville Chapel, 352-796-
3588.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.


Peter
Kozachek, 90
HOMOSASSA
Peter Kozachek, 90, of Ho-
mosassa, FL, died Friday,
March 30, 2012, at his
residence.
He was
born in New
York City,
NY, and
moved to
Homosassa
in 1985 from
Fairfield,
Peter CT
Kozachek Peter was
a retired
flight engineer for Pan
American Airlines, Navy
veteran and a member of
the Pan American retire-
ment club.
He is survived by his wife
of 66 years, Dorothy B.
Kozachek, of Homosassa;
son Peter C. Kozachek and
wife, Theresa, of Franklin,
MA; daughter Joan Moore
and husband, Steven, of
Ridgefield, WA; and four
grandchildren, Samantha,
Joseph, Suzanne and
Catherine.
Private entombment will
be held at Fountains Memo-
rial Park. Condolences may
be given at wwwwilder
funeral.com.

OBITUARIES
Obituaries must be
verified with the funeral
home or society in
charge of
arrangements.
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear in
the next day's edition.
Email obits@chronicle
online.com or fax 352-
563-3280.
Phone 352-563-5660
for details.


Obituaries


BP argues feds must


turn over documents


State BRIEF

Report says
ALF rules unfair
Despite last year's reports
of deaths due to abuse and
neglect at Florida's assisted
living facilities, no legislation
resulted.
Now the Long-Term Care
Ombudsman Program is call-
ing for protection from arbi-
trary eviction for the state's
80,000 ALF residents.
State law allows ALF ad-
ministrators to evict residents
for almost any reason on 45
days notice, said Aubrey
Posey, the ombudsman's
legal advocate, but the resi-
dents who rent their units
can't challenge an eviction in
court.
The program investigated
75 inappropriate ALF eviction
complaints during 2010-11,
according to Jim Crochet, the
state ombudsman, as well as
72 complaints of fear of
retaliation.
Crochet said still more ar-
bitrary discharges may have
occurred but were not
reported.
Last year the Miami Herald
found that residents of
Florida's 3,000 ALFs were
dying of abuse and neglect
at a rate of nearly one per
month, while inspections by
the state Agency for Health
Care Administration had
dropped 33 percent over the
previous five years.
In July, Gov. Rick Scott
tapped the Governor's As-
sisted Living Facility Work-
group to investigate; the
panel recommended enact-
ing eviction protection for
ALF residents.
Several lawmakers also
sponsored measures based
on the recommendations.
During the 2012 legislative
session, two Senate bills in-
creasing residents' rights, in-
cluding eviction protection,
died in the House.
-From wire reports


Associated Press
NEW ORLEANS BP
PLC accuses the federal
government of improperly
withholding scientific doc-
uments that could show it
overestimated the amount
of oil that spewed into the
Gulf of Mexico from the
company's Macondo well.
Late Thursday, the oil
company asked U.S. Magis-
trate Sally Shushan in New
Orleans to order the gov-
ernment to turn over thou-
sands of documents that
appear to relate to "flow
rate issues" and the work of
scientists who served on
the government's "Flow
Rate Technical Group" fol-
lowing the 2010 spill.
On Friday, Shushan gave
the government until April
5 to reply to BP's argument.
She also ordered the par-
ties to meet and try to reach
an agreement on sharing
documents.
The government esti-
mates 4.9 million barrels of
oil spewed from the well off
the coast of Louisiana, but
the company says the tech-
nical group's earlier esti-
mates may have been
lower. BP faces penalties
based on how much oil
spilled.
BP argues the govern-
ment can't withhold more
than 10,000 documents on


flow-rate issues because
they concern factual issues,
not policy determinations.
The government can't in-
voke the "deliberative
process" privilege to pro-
tect those documents, the
company argues.
A Justice Department
spokesman said he couldn't
comment because it in-
volves pending litigation.
BP said the government's
4.9 million barrel estimate,
announced on Aug. 2, 2010,
was the fourth official esti-
mate released by the tech-
nical group. Its earlier
estimates "suggested a
lower measured flow rate,"
the company said.
"The challenged docu-
ments are central to this
case, and this factor also
weighs heavily in favor of
disclosure," BP attorneys
wrote in Thursday's court
filing. "All documents that
reflect data underlying, de-
bates over, criticism of, er-
rors in, or otherwise
elucidate flow rate facts
and estimates are highly
relevant to BP's defense of
this litigation."
On March 2, BP an-

A4

"Your Trusted Family-Own d
Funeral Home for 50 Years"



Burial
Cremation
Pre-Planning
Funeral Directors
C. Lyman Strickland & Tom L. Pace
1901 SE HwY. 19
CRYSTAL RIVER
352-795-2678
www.stricklandfuneralhome.com


eJoin us for Worship

Doa&VOP%&a U2%alA


ASApr K SUN



/ ^April 8th


VAY, ,


4


First Baptist Ch


550 Pleasant Grove Rd., Inverness, FL 34452
726-1252
fbcinverness.corn
Passover & Easter Services


April 4, 6:00 pm
Traditional Passover Seder


April 6, 6:00 pm
Good Friday
Service

M April 8
t 7:00 am Sunrise
e Service
9:00 am Sunday
Worship
Service
10:30 am Sunday
School
No evening Services


St. Timothy's
Crystal River
8:00am and
10:30am
795-5325


L


Good Shepherd
Hernando
7:00am, 8:30am,
and 11:00am
746-7161


Hope
Citrus Springs
7:00am Breakfast Following Sunrise
9:30am Worship
489-5511


nounced a multibillion dol-
lar settlement with plain-
tiffs' attorneys representing
more than 100,000 individ-
uals and businesses who
blame the spill for eco-
nomic losses. But the deal
doesn't resolve the Justice
Department's claims
against the company over
the blowout, which trig-
gered a deadly explosion
on the Deepwater Horizon
rig and spawned the na-
tion's worst offshore oil
spill.
BP says the government
is improperly withholding
many emails between
members of the technical
group.
"The (technical group)
had no agency policymak-
ing authority it was a
group of non-government
scientists charged with a
factual determination con-
cerning quantification of
flow during the spill," com-
pany lawyers wrote. "There
is therefore no basis for the
United States' claim that
communications that in-
clude (technical group)
members reflect internal
policymaking."

To Place Your
"'In Memory" ad,
Call Mike Snyder at 563-3273
msnyder@chronicleonline.com
or
Saralynne Schlumberger at 564-2917
sschlumberger@chronicleonline.com


C(A". E. Zaas,
Funeral Home With Crematory
MONTE L.BEDDO
Private Cremation Arrangements
MARY ROESCHEN
Service: Sunday 1:00pm
Victory Baptist Church
ELIZABETH FESTA
Private Cremation Arrangements
MILDRED ROWE
Arrangements Pending
726-8323 000AQKF


First Baptist Church
Of Hernando
Maundy Thursday Service,
April 5th, 6:30pm
Easter Sunday, April 8th:
8:00 am Early Service
8:45 am Breakfast
9:30 am Sunday School
10:45 am Worship Service
3790 E. Parson's Point Rd., Hernando, FL 34442
(Across from Post Office)
352-726-6734
Visit us on the Web at www.fbchernando.com
i l_______________________I t-


R T I RS O 46 Years of Bringing L
Christ to Inverness
LUTHERAN
CHURCH
Maundy Thursday (Commandment) Service
w/Holy Communion April 5th, 6:00 PM
Good Friday Tenebrae Service
April 6th, 6:00 PM
Sunrise Service 01
April 8th, 7:00 AM
Outside in the Prayer Garden .
Easter Celebration
w/Holy Communion, 10:00 AM
--! Easter Breakfast 8:00 9:30 AM '
1900 W. Hwy. 44, Inverness 726-1637
e e T B Missouri Synod
The Rev. Thomas Beaverson www.1stlutheran.net


All are invited to our

CELEBRATION

i SERVICE ,

': Sunday, April 8
S\\'i. ,i ll b I' in- aki at k at i AM \I
Service will begin at I 1:00 AM

New Hope Baptist Church
86 35 \\ Goodmaln Lane Homosassa
3 i -52 -95 5 \\''\\' nh bch corn


\ ELCA LUTHERAN CHURCHES
Mof Citrus County


invite you to celebrate

Easter with us!


I


SATURDAY, MARCH 31, 2012 A5


I .


- 0*'I.f





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


oin us for Worshi


EASTER SUNDAY,

April 8th
P YI


Hernando United Methodist Church*
April 5th 7:00 p.m.
Maundy Thursday Service
April 6th 8:00 a.m.
S'* "Walk the Cross" Walk
S" April 6th 12:00 NOON
Good Friday Service
SApril 7th 11:00 a.m. Open
Easter Egg Hunt and Lunch Hearts,
A 8 Ih Open
April 8th 7:00 a.m. inads,
Easter Sunrise Service Open
April 8th 10:00 a.m. Doors
Easter Worship Service
Pastor Tyler Montgomery
2125 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy (486)
(1 '/2 miles from Hwy 41)
For information call (352) 726-7245
:, www.hernandoumcfl.org ,A


E Hemando
Churchof
TheNazarene
A Place to Belong


*CHILDREN
*SINGLES


* YOUTH
* SENIORS


EASTER SUNDAY
APRIL 8, 2012


Sunrise Service...........7:30 A.M.
Breakfast ......................8:45 A.M .

Sunday School.............9:45 A.M.
Cantata Service......... 10:40 A.M.

Randy T. Hodges, Pastor
Nursery Provided
2101 N. Florida Ave. Hernando FL 726-6144




(ale


9o4& a4


Easter Sunday
Worship @ 8:30 & 11:00am
No PM Service
Communion will be observed
at both services.






Church of God Pastors Ronnie &
Sherry Reid

2180 NW 12th Avenue Crystal River
(352) 795-3079 0 www.crystalrivercog.com








ALLELUIA!


He Is Risen!


COME SHARE
EASTER'S JOY WITH US!
HOLY WEEK SERVICES
Palm Sunday April 1st 10:30 a.m.
Morning Worship
Maundy Thursday April 5th 7 p.m.
Tennabrae A Service of Light and
Darkness With Communion
Easter Sunday April 8 10:30 a.m.
Morning Worship
First Presbyterian Church of Crystal River
1501 SE Highway 19, Crystal River FL 34429
Phone: 352-795-2259 www.fpcofcrystalriver.com


SSt.
Scholastica
Catholic Church
4301 W. Homosassa Trail,
Hwy. 490 in Lecanto
352-746-9422


March 31/April 1
Palm Sunday
of the
Lord's Passion
Mass Times:
Saturday
at 4:00pm & 6:00pm
Sunday
at 9:00am & 11:30am
Good Friday.
April 6
Stations of
The Cross
at 12:00 Noon
Liturgy of the
Passion
at 3:00pmr


Wednesday.
April 4
Confessions
at 9:00am
(Following the
8:30am
Daily Mass)
Holy Saturday.
April 7
Blessing of Easter
Foods & Baskets
11:30am
Easter Vigil Mass
at 8:00pm


Thursday,
April 5
Mass of
the
Lord's Supper
at
7:00pm
Easter Sunday.
April 8
Masses at
7:30am,
9:00am,
10:30am,
and
12:00 Noon


L For more information go to stscholastica.org
. E. or call 352-746-9422 I


Crystal River United
Methodist Church
4801 N. Citrus Ave.
Crystal River, Fl 34428
352-795-3148
www.crumc.com

i Saturday, April 7(:..,
8:00 a.m.- 9:30 a.m.
Community Breakfast '
with the Easter Bunny1

9:30 a.m.- 11:00 an.m
Easter Egg Hunt

Sunday,April 8
6:00 a.m. Community Sunrise
Service
9:30 a.m. Contemporary
11:00 a.m. Traditional
W ^-- Worship


Faith Lutheran Church
44 and 490
in Crystal Glen Subdivision, Lecanto
BP.alwSa...........9:.30 AM HC
LM a'Tksrsday 7:00PM HC
o dM ........... 3:OOPM
o td".... 6:60PM HC
Easter satday Suarse, 7:ooAM
S Easter Swuday.......9:30AM HC
C = Holy communion is celebrated
Drftes Risen... He- Is Risen Iudeet!

Please call
527-3325 or visit
our web-site
faithlecanto.com '
for more
information.
Rev. Stephen Lane,
Pastor
L "A Heart.fro~ qod---A Heart/or Ot"ers


4 4First United
/ Methodist Church
S Homosassa

e Easter Worship
SServices:
8:00 am, 9:30 am,
11:00 am
4 Reverend Mark Whittaker Pastor
Everyoe 8831 W. Bradshaw St.,
BecomingA Homosassa, FL 34448
Disciple of 352-628-4083
www.lumc.org
OOOG Office Hours: 8:30 4:30 M-F


S www.genesiscommunitychurch.org I


-1 -


... 4


A6 SATURDAY, MARCH 31, 2012


ILAL CITY UNITED METHODIST C I M
Rev. Steven Riddle
MAUNDY THURSDAY Communion Service
6:30 PM, In Sanctuary
( EASTER SUNRISE SERVICE, 7:00 AM,
Floral City Park. Breakfast to follow, Hilton Hall
EASTER SERVICE 10:30 AM, In Sanctuary
344-1771
S'-,-'-. East Marvin St. (across from Floral Cit} 1. I
Website: floralcitychurch.com


HOL WEEK/Jj '
SCHEIDUTTTLE


. 4/5 MAUNDY THURSDAY
Dinner 6 pm, Worship Service, 7 pm m
0 4/6 GOOD FRIDAY m
0 Tenebrae Service of Darkness, 8 pm m
0 4/7 SATURDAY m
0 Breakfast with the Easter Bunny
0 and Easter Egg Hunt 10 am to 12 noon
0 4/8 EASTER SUNDAY
0 Sunrise Service and Breakfast, 6:30 am
0 Regular Worship, 8:00 9:30 11:00 am
0 Fellowship Breakfast 9:00 to 10:45 am
0 Hwy. 44 E. @ Church Office 637-0770
V Washington Ave., Inverness Pastor: Craig Davies
000AZ2D I


SShepherd
of the Hills
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Holy Monday, April 2
5:30pm Holy Eucharist
Holy Tuesday. April 3
5:30pm Holy Eucharist
Holy Wednesday, April 4
10:00am Healing Eucharist
7:30pm Tenebrae
Maundav Thursday, April 5
6:30pm Holy Eucharist with Foot Washing
and Stripping of the altar
Good Friday. April 6
12:00 noon Good Friday Liturgy
Holy Saturday, April 7
9:00am Holy Saturday Liturgy
Easter Vigil. April 7
7:30pm Great Vigil of Easter
Easter Sunday. April 8
8:00am Holy Eucharist
10:30am Holy Eucharist
Nursery Provided at 10:30am
The Rt. Rev. James Adams, Rector
2450 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy. www.sothec.org
(CR486), Lecanto, Florida
(4/10 mile east of CR 491) 527-0052



H e H ........


Risen .

Cornerstone Baptist Church
1100 W. Highland Blvd.
of Inverness, Florida 34452

Easter

Celebration

Services
Sunday, April 8th
9:00 & 10:30 AM
Nursery and Children's Church
provided through 5th Grade for both services
352-726-7335 www.cbcinverness.com


EENESIS
COMMUNITY CHURCH
invites
everyone to enjoy an



Sunrise Service
on Lake Hernando

April 8, 2012 7:00am
Rain or Shine
Light Refreshments and Snacks
Pastor Brian Baggs
"Come as you are"
500 yards North of 486 on Hwy. 41
3580 E. Lemon Drive, Hernando
Parking and facilities provided by Inverness Elks Lodge

For more information call 527-4253





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Defense takes new tack in sex caseWrsfind Ridden


A.B. SIDIBE make closing arguments net chats between Beck and


Staff Writer


INVERNESS In the
trial of Florida versus Glen
Beck, Friday brought a new
intensity and a new twist.
While prosecutor Rich
Buxman tried to go for the
jugular, the defense offered
up its star witness and tried
to declare another hostile.
Beck, 27, of Gainesville,
was one of 22 people ar-
rested in Operation Grim
Reaper who allegedly used
the Internet to solicit sex
from children and then trav-
eled to Citrus County with
the intention of engaging in
sexual activity with the sup-
posed minors. Several of the
defendants in the sting have
already been sentenced for
their roles in it.
However, Beck and his at-
torneys, Thomas Edwards
and Geoff Mason, argue the
ex-Marine got caught up in
a pretend, make-believe cyber
triangle and did not really
believe he was traveling to go
have sex with a 14-year-old,
as the prosecution alleges.
The jury trial which
began Thursday is set to go
another inning Saturday at
9 a.m. in Circuit Judge Ric
Howard's courtroom, when
both sides are expected to


and the case will be handed
to the jury.
The sting was conducted
in the fall of 2010 by the Cit-
rus County Sheriff's Office
as part of a larger initiative
with other sheriff's
offices, the Florida
Department of Law
Enforcement and
the Central Florida
Internet Crimes
Against Children .
Task Force.
During the sting,
undercover detec- Glen
tives posed either arrest
as juvenile males or conn
females, or as par- with O
ents of minors ac- Grim I
tively looking for an In
sexual instruction base
for their teens. crime


Buxman rested his case
Friday, but before doing so,
called up the man charged
with connecting the dots for
the prosecution.
Detective Chris Cornell of
the CCSO offered expert
testimony about how he got
a search warrant to access
Beck's digital world.
Cornell testified he re-
trieved instant message and
other data from Beck's com-
puter and cellphone, which
went to the core of the case.
The data included Inter-


ill


it
ne
p
R
te
id
S


sting decoy Detective Tom
Breedlove of the Hernando
County Sheriff's Office, who
was posting as the fictitious
mother of a 14-year-old girl
seeking sexual instruction
for her daughter.
Breedlove already
testified Thursday
Friday, defense
attorney Edwards
went after Cornell
for allegedly not
doing an expansive
search of his
Beck client's computer
ed in hard drive, which
action he noted would re-
eration veal his client did
.eaper, not have a history
ernet- of visiting child
sex pornography sites.
sting. Cornell, however,
said his searches were lim-
ited to the scope of his in-
vestigation, which was the
data relating to the current
case.
After Cornell left the stand,
Buxman rested his case.
Edwards called Detective
Dodi Pruitt as his first wit-
ness. Pruitt was the voice of
the mother in the sting and
was the one who conducted
a telephone conversation
with Beck. Pruitt is also Cor-
nell's partner at CCSO's In-
ternet Crimes unit.


Edwards went back and
forth with Pruitt about the
search warrant's parame-
ters. Pruitt seemed to cor-
roborate what Cornell said
earlier about focusing on
the case at hand and not
looking for evidence of
other activities.
In a fit of frustration, Ed-
wards began to declare
Pruitt a hostile witness,
prompting Judge Howard to
call the attorneys aside and
ruling the court would not
accept such a designation.
Edwards then called Beck
to the stand, and the de-
fense strategy seemed to
morph a bit again.
Beck stuck to the de-
fense's line of pretend cyber
chats, but then offered that
he didn't back out of driving
to the sting house when he
could have because he
thought it was all about
prostitution, and that he
had asked prior to arriving
at the house whether the
police would be waiting for
him. The decoy told him she
would understand if he did-
n't proceed, but he traveled
anyway
Prosecutor Buxman
jumped on that issue during
cross-examination. He said
Beck had an out, and that
even if the jury bought his


new theory about his suspi-
cions regarding prostitu-
tion, which is also illegal, he
still risked going to the
house.
Buxman scoffed at the de-
fense's newest strategy and
went after Beck and his no-
tions about his belief that
the 14-year-old was actually
the alter ego of the sup-
posed mother.
"Why is it that you never,
ever, not even once in the in-
stant message chat, the tele-
phone conversation or the
text messaging mention any-
thing about the alter ego?"
Buxman asked Beck.
Buxman added that in-
stead, Beck kept pursuing the
issue of the teen in all his
chats and even sent images
of his genitals to be shown
not only to the mother, but to
the supposed minor.
Beck kept insisting it was
all about the alter ego role-
playing for him and the de-
sire for sex with what he
believed were either two
adults or one adult also pre-
tending to be a minor
The defense then rested.
Closing arguments are this
morning at 9 a.m.
Chronicle reporter A.B.
Sidibe can be reached at
352-564-2925 or asidibe@
chronicleonline. com.


St. Elizabeth
St. Elizabeth Ann Seton
Catholic Church
HOLY WE E I01


Holy Thursday, April 5th
Mass of the Lord's Supper
7:00 p.m.
Confessions before the Liturgy
Adoration in parish hall from
8:00 pm until 10:00pm
Holy Saturday, April 7th
Easter Vigil Mass 8:00 p.m.


Good Friday, April 6th
Liturgy of the Passion
and
Death of Our Lord
with Holy Communion
and
Veneration of the Cross
3:00 p.m.
Confessions before the Liturgy


Easter Sunday, April 8th
Masses at 8:30 a.m. and 11:00 a.m.
Confessions before each Liturgy
Country Club Blvd., Citrus Springs (West of US 41) 489-4889

Um


EASTER
CELEBRATION SERVICES
Good Friday Musical ~ April 6, 7pm
Easter Sunday Musical ~ April 8, 10 am
Christini C,'nteru Clhrch
7961 I\. Green Acres St., Hoimosassai
3.52-62S-5076


Savte, lJensfe^ feliicle


April 8th
Floral City Park
7:00 a.m.
Music, Preaching
and breakfast to follow.


EVERYONE
IS INVITED.


Bring your lawn chair
or a blanket to sit on.
In case of bad weather, service will be held
at First Baptist Church Floral City
Sponsored by: First Baptist Church Floral City,
Floral City United Methodist Church, Mount Carmel Methodist Church,
Grace Temple Church of the Living God, Covenant Church of God


Soin us for




~.EASTER S


Aprii


960 S. US Hwy. 41, Inverness
726-1480 www.calvarychapel.com
April 4, 7 pm
Worship in Upper Room
April 6th, 7 pm
Good Friday Service in Sanctuary
April 8th, 9 am
Easter Service
Sunday School 10 am
Ressurection Celebration



'JAITH BAPTIST

CHURCH
Rev. Chris Owens
6918 S. Spartan Ave. Homosassa
352-628-4793
www.comeandseefbc.org


Easter
7:00 AM
9:45 AM
11:00 AM


Sunday, April 8
Outdoor Sunrise Service
Sunday School
Morning Worship


Children's Spring Fling 4
Breakfast, games, I
crafts, story- se,
Easter egg !
Saturday, April 7
9:00 a.m. to 12:00


Come celebrate with u


Worships




UNPAY,j

8th


MAW


~mm'ig4


r ~ Come To r
ST. MARGARET'S
EPISCOPAL CHURCH Re,
/^^. The other Catholicc" church,
where everyone is welcome!
Holy Saturday Easter Vigil
S l 7:00 PM
Easter Sunday Services
8:00 AM & 10:30 AM

In Historic Downtown Inverness 1 Block N.W. of City Hall
114 N. Osceola Ave., Inverness, FL 34450
000AYL7 726-3153 '


The New Church /.

Without Walls
3962 N. Roscoe Rd. Hernando, FL
352-344-2425
www .newchurchwithoutwalls.com

Easter Sunday
Come And Experience
A Live Easter Play With
Children's Egg Hunt
Following Services



S Redemption

Christian Church

Easter Sunrise

Service

Sunday, April 8

6:30 A.M.

Bible School: 9:00 A.M.


Worship:


10:15 A.M.


Meeting at the East Citrus
Community Center
9907 East Gulf-to-Lake Hwy

For more information....
Call Pastor Todd 352-422-6535
or visit our website at: l
www.redemptionchristian.net


SATURDAY, MARCH 31, 2012 A7


treasure in mansion
ST. PETERSBURG, Russia
- For years, kopek-pinching
Soviets sat down in a cheap
restaurant in a former man-
sion of the nobility for plain
meals, unaware of the treas-
ure secreted away nearby.
Workers restoring the build-
ing this week finally found it,
in a storage space hidden
between two floors more
than 1,000 pieces of jewelry,
silver service sets, mirrors
and brushes. Many of them
were wrapped in newspapers
from the early months of
1917.
Friday's announcement of
the find excited the media
and sparked arguments over
who can claim the valuables.
The treasure tale touches on
two of Russia's most roman-
tic figures: Peter the Great
and Alexander Pushkin.
The mansion was purchased
in 1875 by Duke Vasily
Naryshkin, whose family in-
cluded Nataliya Naryshkina,
the second wife of Czar Alexis
and mother of Peter the Great.
The mansion was put together
by connecting two houses,
one of which belonged to
Pushkin's African grandfather
Abram Gannibal.
-From wire reports







A8 SATURDAY, MARCH 31, 2012


STOCKS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


THE M RKETIN RE IEWU


IHowTKs *I 'IEA H T I i W


MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) Here are the 825 most active stocks on the New York Stock Exchange, 765
Name Vol(00) Last Chg Name Vol(00) Last Chg Name Vol(00) Last Chg most active on the Nasdaq National Market and 116 most active on the Ameri-
BkofAm 2316038 9.57 +.04 CheniereEn 57608 14.98 +.52 SiriusXM 1063970 2.31 +.10 can Stock Exchange. Tables show name, price and net change.
S&P500ETF1188549140.81 +.58 NovaGldg 33363 7.18 +.07 RschMotn 831864 14.70 +.97 Name: Stocks appear alphabetically by the company's full name (not abbrevia-
SPDRFncl 582138 15.80 +.09 NwGoldg 22847 9.88 +.15 MicronT 497959 8.10 -.33 tion). Names consisting of initials appear at the beginning of each letter's list.
iShEMkts 454412 42.95 +.31 Rentech 22551 2.08 -.02 PwShs QQQ378777 67.55 -.13 Last: Price stock was trading at when exchange closed for the day.
BariPVix 424143 16.78 -.46 RareEleg 20844 6.28 -.29 Intel 358192 28.12 -.05 Chg: Loss or gain for the day. No change indicated by...

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) Stock Footnotes: cld Issue has been called for redempbon by company. d- New 52-week
low. dd Loss in last 12 mos. ec- Company formerly listed on the American Exchange's
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Cho %Cha Emerging Company Marketplace. h- temporary exmpt from Nasdaq capital and surplus list-
TrnsRty 2.41 +.47 +24.2 Bacterin 2.42 +.21 +9.5 SpanBrdrs 6.75 +2.04 +43.3 ing qualification. n- Stock was a new issue in the last year.The 52-week high and low fig-
XuedaEd 4.10 +.65 +18.8 ExeterRgs 2.74 +.23 +9.2 PrincNtl 3.69 +.75 +25.5 ures date only from the beginning of trading. pf- Preferredstockissue.pr- Preferences.pp-
LizClaib 13.36 +1.53 +12.9 CT Ptrs 6.64 +.54 +8.9 ZaZaEngy 4.67 +.76 +19.4 Holder owes installments of purchase price. rt- Right to buy security at a specified price. s-
Lubys 6.07 +.52 +9.4 EllieMaen 11.16 +.86 +8.3 CIFCCorp 6.20 +.84 +15.7 Stock has split by at least 20 percent within the last year. wi Trades will be settled when the
OwensCwtB 2.70 +.21 +8.4 GreenHntr 2.48 +.18 +7.8 SunesisPh 2.87 +.39 +15.7 stock is issued. wd When distributed. wt Warrant, allowing a purchase of a stock., u New
52-week high. un Unit, including more than one security. vj Company in bankruptcy or re-
LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) ceivership, or being reorganized under the bankruptcy law. Appears in front of the name.
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.
OiSA 15.90 -4.71 -22.9 AdmRsc 57.18 -7.10 -11.0 FinLine 21.22 -4.12 -16.3
Oi SAC 6.33 -1.23 -16.3 MGTCaprs 2.86 -.29 -9.2 BostPrvwt 3.37 -.61 -15.3
CascdeCp 50.12 -5.25 -9.5 AmDGEn 2.12 -.18 -7.8 Astealntl 3.35 -.58 -14.8


GlobPay 47.50 -4.73 -9.1 Aerosonic 2.46 -.16 -6.1 SmtHeatrs 2.73 -.33 -10.8
DrxlndiaBr 24.70 -2.18 -8.1 PernixTh 9.00 -.55 -5.8 Xyratex 15.91 -1.91 -10.7


1,750 Advanced
1,277 Declined
110 Unchanged
3,137 Total issues
115 New Highs
12 New Lows
3,555,752,067 Volume


271 Advanced
182 Declined
40 Unchanged
493 Total issues
7 New Highs
3 New Lows
73,674,130 Volume


DIARY


1,170
1,359
117
2,646
94
16
1,754,282,277


52-Week
High Low Name
13,289.08 10,404.49Dow Jones Industrials
5,627.85 3,950.66Dow Jones Transportation
467.64 381.99Dow Jones Utilities
8,718.25 6,414.89NYSE Composite
2,498.89 1,941.99Amex Index
3,134.17 2,298.89Nasdaq Composite
1,419.15 1,074.77S&P 500
14,940.48 11,208.42Wilshire 5000
868.57 601.71 Russell 2000


Last
13,212.04
5,253.16
458.93
8,206.93
2,405.92
3,091.57
1,408.47
14,805.55
830.30


I NYSE


Net % YTD % 52-wk
Chg Chg Chg %Chg
+66.22 +.50 +8.14 +6.75
-3.05 -.06 +4.65 -2.18
+2.89 +.63 -1.24+10.37
+40.56 +.50 +9.76 -3.10
+1.52 +.06 +5.60 +.38
-3.79 -.12+18.67 +10.82
+5.19 +.37+12.00 +5.71
+45.03 +.31 +12.25 +4.45
-1.92 -.23 +12.06 -1.95


Request stocks or mutual funds to be listed here by writing

the Chronicle, Attn: Stock Requests, 1624 N. Meadowcrest

Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429; or call 563-5660. Include

the name of the stock, market and ticker symbol. For mu-

tual funds, list parent company, symbol and the exact name

of the fund. Staff will not provide real-time quotes.


I NEWYORK STOKECAG


Name Last Chg BeoSantSA 7.67 +.08
BoSBrasil 9.17 -.22
BkofAm 9.57 +.04
BkAm wtB 1.05 +.06
ABB Ltd 20.41 +.41 BkMontg 59.42 -.03
ACELtd 73.20 +.10 BkNYMel 24.13 +.36
AES Corp 13.07 +.05 Barday 15.15 +.03
AFLAC 45.99 +.19 BariPVix 16.78 -.46
AGL Res 39.22 +.47 BarrickG 43.48 +.35
AKSteel 7.56 -.07 BasicEnSv 17.35 +.23
ASA Gold 25.77 +.44 Baxter 59.78 +.26
AT&T Inc 31.23 +.02 Beam Inc 58.57 +.45
AU Optron 4.56 -.08 BeazerHm 3.25 -.07
AbtLab 61.29 +.31 BectDck 77.65 +.55
AberFitc 49.61 -.12 BerkHaA121900.00 -590.00
Accenture 64.50 BerkH B 81.15 -.20
AdamsEx 10.98 +.07 BestBuy 23.68 -1.09
AMD 8.02 -.10 BBarrett 26.01 +.69
AdvSemi 5.13 +11 BioMedR 18.98 +.18
Aeroposfi 21.62 -.24 BIkHillsCp 33.53 -.07
Aetna 50.16 +.60 BlkDebtStr 4.14 -.11
Agilent 44.51 +.15 BlkEnhC&l 13.49 +.14
Agnieog 33.38 +.42 BlkGlbOp 15.35 +.21
AirProd 91.80 +.15 Blackstone 15.94 +.30
AlcatelLuc 2.27 -.04 BlockHR 16.47 -.23
Alcoa 10.02 -.01 Boeing 74.37 +.29
AllegTch 41.17 +.50 BostBeer 106.79 +.66
Allergan 95.43 +.52 BostProp 104.99 +1.13
Allete 41.49 BostnSci 5.98 -.02
AlliBGIbHi 15.02 -.11 BoydGm 7.84 -.19
AlliBInco 8.19 +.02 Brandyw 11.48 +.09
AlliBern 15.61 +.33 Brinker 27.55 -.13
Allstate 32.92 +.02 BrMySq 33.75 +.19
AlphaNRs 15.21 -.05 Brookdale 18.72 +.38
AIpAlerMLP 16.64 +11 BrkfldOfPr 17.45 +.24
Altria 30.87 +.28 Brunswick 25.75 +.06
AmBev 41.32 -.33 Buckeye 61.18 +.10
Ameren 32.58 +.44 BungeLt 68.44 +1.23
AMovilLs 24.83 +.14 CBREGrp 19.96 +.17
AmAxle 11.71 +.32 CBSB 33.91 +1.08
AEagleOut 17.19 -.26 CFInds 182.65 +3.15
AEP 38.58 +.30 CHEngy 66.73 -.24
AmExp 57.86 -.03 CMS Eng 22.00 +.09
AmlntGrp 30.83 +.89 CNOFind 7.78 -.08
AmSIP3 7.00 +.11 CSS Inds 19.46 -.23
AmTower 63.02 +.64 CSXs 21.52 -.07
Amerigas 40.52 -.06 CVS Care 44.80 +.51
Ameriprise 57.13 +.70 CblvsNYs 14.68 -.12
AmeriBrgn 39.66 +.46 CabotOGs 31.17 +.92
Anadarko 78.34 +1.01 CallGolf 6.76 -.12
AnalogDev 40.40 +.39 Calpine 17.21 +.19
AnglogldA 36.92 +.23 Camecog 21.49 -.07
ABInBev 72.72 +.72 Cameron 52.83 +.55
Annaly 15.82 +.08 CampSp 33.85 +.67
AonCorp 49.06 +.09 CdnNRsgs 33.18 +.61
Apache 100.44 +1.63 CapOne 55.74 -.69
AquaAm 22.29 -.06 CapifiSrce 6.60 -.07
ArcelorMit 19.13 +.08 CapMplB 14.58
ArchCoal 10.71 -.19 CardnlHIth 43.11 +.01
ArchDan 31.66 +.40 CareFusion 25.93 +.01
ArmosDorn 18.09 +.06 CarMax 34.65 +.46
ArmourRsd 6.75 +.07 Carnival 32.08 +.04
Ashland 61.06 ... Caterpillar 106.52 +.50
AsdEstat 16.34 +.30 Celanese 46.18 +.43
Assurant 40.50 +.14 Cemex 7.76 -.04
AssuredG 16.52 +.08 Cemigpf 23.78 -.10
AstraZen 44.49 -.01 CenterPnt 19.72 +.37
ATMOS 31.46 +.27 CenEIBras 9.36 -.17
AuRicog 8.87 +.17 CntryLink 38.65 +.01
Avon 19.36 +.18 Checkpnt 11.28 -.05
BB&TCp 31.39 -.08 ChesEng 23.17 -.04
BHPBilILt 72.40 +1.01 ChesUfi 41.12 -.24
BP PLC 45.00 +.65 Chevron 107.21 +.36
BRFBrasil 20.01 -.61 Chieos 15.10 -.26
BRT 6.99 -.01 Chimera 2.83 -.01
BakrHu 41.94 +1.15 ChinaUni 16.79 +.08
BallCorp 42.88 +.13 Chubb 69.11 +.24
BcBilVArg 7.99 +.14 Cigna 49.25 +.28
BeoBradpf 17.50 -.10 CindBell 4.02 -.03


Cifgrp rs 36.55 +.04
CleanH s 67.33 +.51
CliffsNRs 69.26 -1.44
Clorox 68.75 +.40
CloudPeak 15.93 -.19
Coach 77.28 +.02
CobaltlEn 30.03 +.44
CCFemsa 105.91 +2.22
CocaCola 74.01 +.20
CocaCE 28.60 +.45
CohStlnfra 17.60 +.32
ColgPal 97.78 +1.09
CollctvBrd 19.66 -.33
Comerica 32.36 +.03
CmclMfis 14.82 +.25
CmwREIT 18.62 +.40
CmtyHIt 22.24 -.04
CompSci 29.94 -.34
ComstkRs 15.83 -.28
Con-Way 32.61 -.21
ConAgra 26.26 -.01
ConocPhil 76.01 +.21
ConsolEngy 34.10 +.24
ConEd 58.42 +.42
ConstellA 23.59 -.03
Cnvrgys 13.35 -.08
Copel 23.51 +.67
Corning 14.08 +.05
CottCp 6.59 +.08
CoventryH 35.57 +.97
Covidien 54.68 +.75
Crane 48.50 +.81
CSVS2xVxS 7.23 -.08
CSVellVSts 12.27 +.29
CubeSmart 11.90 +.06
Cummins 120.04 +.38

DCTIndl 5.90 +.07
DDRCorp 14.60 +.06
DNPSelct 10.10 -.10
DR Horton 15.17 -.22
DSW Inc 54.77 +.06
DTE 55.03 +.17
DanaHIdg 15.50 -.18
Danaher 56.00 +.97
Darden 51.16 +.46
DeanFds 12.11 -.13
Deere 80.90 +.41
DelphiAun 31.60 -.17
DeltaAir 9.92 -.16
DenburyR 18.23 +.04
DBGoldDS 4.61 -.05
DevonE 71.12 +.51
DiamRk 10.29 +.20
DianaShip 8.95 +.35
DxFnBullrs 109.15 +1.20
DirSCBear 17.68 +.12
DirFnBear 20.65 -.24
DirDGIdBII 16.36 +.46
DrxEnBear 9.75 -.20
DirEMBear 12.68 -.28
DirxSCBull 62.40 -.55
DirxEnBull 51.32 +.99
Discover 33.34 +.39
Disney 43.78 +.77
DollarGen 46.20 -.07
DomRescs 51.21 +.43
DEmmett 22.81 +.29
Dover 62.94 +.72
DowChm 34.64 +.46
DrPepSnap 40.21 +.46
DuPont 52.90 +.15
DukeErgy 21.01 +.10
DukeRlty 14.34 +.03
Dynegy .56 -.02
E-CDarng 8.10 +.59
EMC Cp 29.88 +.30
EOG Res 111.10 +2.08


EastChms 51.69
Eaton 49.83
EVEnEq 11.06
BPasoCp 29.55
Ban 15.01
BdorGldg 13.74
EmersonEl 52.18
EmpDist 20.35
EnbrEPts 30.97
EnCanag 19.65
EngyTEq 40.30
EnPro 41.10


ENSCO 52.93
Entergy 67.20
EntPrPt 50.47
EqtyRsd 62.62
EsteeLdrs 61.94
ExeoRes 6.63
Exelisn 12.52
Exelon 39.21
ExxonMbl 86.73
FMC Tch s 50.42
FairchldS 14.70
FamilyDIr 63.28
FedExCp 91.96
FedSignl 5.56
Ferrellgs 15.08
Ferro 5.94
FibriaCelu 8.39
RdlNFin 18.03
FidNatlnfo 33.12
FstHorizon 10.38
FTActDiv 8.70
FtTrEnEq 12.08
FirstEngy 45.59
FootLockr 31.05
FordM 12.48
ForestLab 34.69
ForestOils 12.12
FranceTel 14.85
FMCG 38.04
Fronfline 7.69
Fusion-io n 28.41


GATX 40.30 -.33
GabelliET 5.75 -.03
GabHIthW 8.32 +.05
GabUlI 8.09 +.03
GafisaSA 4.72 -.14
GameStop 21.84 -.75
Gannett 15.33 +.19
Gap 26.14 +.04
GasLogn 12.41
GencoShip 6.36 -.02


GenDynam 73.38 +.73
GenElec 20.07 +.12
GenGrPrp 16.99 +.20
GenMills 39.45 +.33
GenMobtrs 25.65 +.34
GenOn En 2.08 -.03
Genworth 8.32 -.13
Gerdau 9.63 -.22
GlaxoSKIn 44.91 -.05
GlimchRt 10.22 +.19
GlobPay 47.50 -4.73
GoldFLtd 13.90 +.23
Goldcrpg 45.06 +.68
GoldmanS 124.37 +.61
Goodrich 125.44 +.19
Goodyear 11.22 -.16
GtPlainEn 20.27 +.03
Griffon 10.70 -.18
GpTelevisa 21.08 +.14
GuangRy 19.24 -.19
HCA Hldg 24.74 +.85
HCP Inc 39.46 -.10
HSBC 44.39 +.43
HSBCCap 26.14 -.04
Hallibrtn 33.19 +.42
HanJS 15.25 +.08
HanPrmDv 13.47 +.04
Hanesbrds 29.54 -.02
Hanoverlns 41.12 -.01
HarleyD 49.08 +.60
HarmonyG 10.93 +.10
HartldFn 21.08 +.05
HatterasF 27.90 -.13


HawaiiEl 25.35 -.05
HItCrREIT 54.96 +.55
HItMgmt 6.72 +.02
HIthcrRlty 22.00 +.07
Heckmann 4.31 -.08
HeclaM 4.62 +.06
Heinz 53.55 +.27
HeimPayne 53.95 +1.55
Hertz 15.04 +.13
Hess 58.95 +.52
HewlettP 23.83 +.32
HighwdPrp 33.32 +.30


HollyFrts 32.15
HomeDp 50.31
HonwIllnfi 61.05
Hospira 37.39
HospPT 26.47
HostHofis 16.42
HovnanE 2.45
Humana 92.48
Huntsmn 14.01
IAMGIdg 13.29
ICICIBk 34.87
ING 8.32
ION Geoph 6.45
iShGold 16.27
iSAsfia 23.51
iShBraz 64.66
iShGer 23.28
iSh HK 17.45
iShJapn 10.18
iSh Kor 59.54
iSMalas 14.60
iShMex 62.52
iShSing 12.89
iSTaiwn 13.42
iSh UK 17.30
iShSilver 31.38
iShChina25 36.67
iSSP500 141.21
iShEMkts 42.95
iShiBxB 115.63
iShB20T 112.20
iS Eafe 54.89


iShiBxHYB 90.72
iSR1KV 70.07
iSR1KG 66.08
iSRuslK 77.96
iSR2KV 72.97
iSR2KG 95.38
iShR2K 82.81
iShUSPfd 39.04
iShREst 62.30
iShDJHm 14.72
iShSPSm 76.31
iStar 7.25


ITTCps 22.94 +.23
Idacorp 41.12 -.03
ITW 57.12 +.32
Imafon 6.19 -.10
Inergy 16.37 +.24
IngerRd 41.35 +.18
IngrmM 18.56 -.01
IntegrysE 52.99 +.14
IntcnfiEx 137.42 +2.23
IBM 208.65 +.38
InfiGame 16.79 -.11
IntPap 35.10 -.06
InterOilg 51.41 -2.97
Interpublic 11.41 +.05
InvenSenn 18.10 -1.50
Invesco 26.67 +.54
IronMtn 28.80 +.07
ItauUnibH 19.19 -.31
if 574+16

JPMorgCh 45.98 +.31
JPMAJerian 39.14 +.25
Jabil 25.12 -.05
JacobsEng 44.37 -.48
Jaguar g 4.67 +.01
JanusCap 8.91 +.06
JohnJn 65.96 +.42
JohnsnCfi 32.48 +.21
JonesGrp 12.56 +.95
JoyGIbl 73.50 +.45
JnprNtwk 22.88 +.01


KB Home 8.90 -.14 Merck 38.40 +.39
KTCorp 13.69 -.03 MetLife 37.35 +.21
KCSouthn 71.69 +1.02 MetroPCS 9.02 -.22
Kaydons 25.51 -.18 MetroHIth 9.37 +.19
KA EngTR 27.48 +.21 MKors n 46.59 +.90
Kellogg 53.63 +.24 MidAApt 67.03 +1.25
KeyEngy 15.45 +.14 Midas 11.48 +.02
Keycorp 8.50 +.02 MillMdan 23.50 -1.50
KidBrands 2.70 +.02 MobileTele 18.34 +.21
KimbClk 73.89 +.05 MolsCoorB 45.25 +.26
Kimco 19.26 -.02 Molyeorp 33.83 -.67
KindME 82.75 +.43 MoneyG rs 18.00 -.28
KindMorg 38.65 -.36 Monsanto 79.76 +.85
Kinrossg 9.79 +.12 MonstrWw 9.75 +.01
KodiakOg 9.96 +.06 MorgStan 19.64 -.10
Kohls 50.03 +.25 MSEmMkt 14.63 +.07
Kraft 38.01 +.20 Mosaic 55.29 +.02
KrispKrm 7.30 -.09 MotrlaSolu 50.83 +.18
Kroger 24.23 +.01 MotrlaMob 39.24 -.01
LSICorp 8.68 +.12 NCRCorp 21.71 +.01
LTCPrp 32.00 +.68 NRG Egy 15.67 -.07
LaZBoy 14.96 -.16 NVEnergy 16.12 +.06
Laclede 39.02 -.06 NYSE Eur 30.01 +.47
LVSands 57.57 +.28 Nabors 17.49 +.33
LaSalleH 28.14 +.10 NatFuGas 48.12 +.28
LeggMason 27.93 +.42 NatGrid 50.48 +.20
LennarA 27.18 -.03 NOilVarco 79.47 +.81
Level3rs 25.73 -.71 NewAmHi 10.29 -.13
LbtyASG 4.35 +.03 NJRs 44.57 -.11
LibtProp 35.72 +.68 NYCmtyB 13.91 +.22
LillyEli 40.27 +.31 Newcastle 6.28 +.12
Limited 48.00 .29 NewellRub 17.81 -.07
LincNat 26.36 +.61 NewfidExp 34.68 +.61
Lindsay 66.27 +.30 NewmtM 51.27 -.07
Linkedln n 101.99 -.68 NewpkRes 8.19 +21
LionsGtg 13.92 -.28 Nexen g 18.35 +.31
LizClaib 13.36 +1.53 NextEraEn 61.08 +.48
LoclhdM 89.86 +.23 NiSource 2435 +.10
Lorillard 129.48 -1.85 NielsenH 30.14 +.59
LaPac 9.35 .22 NikeB 108.44 +.59
Lowes 31.38 +.17 NobleCorp 37.47 +.50
4.5 52 NokiaCp 5.49 +.07
h11S1iZ Nordstrm 55.72 +.45
M&TBk 86.88 +.31 NorfikSo 65.83 -.34
MBIA 9.80 -.15 NoestUt 37.12 -.09
MDU Res 22.39 +.06 NorthropG 61.08 +.19
MEMO 3.61 -.08 NStarRIt 5.41 +.02
MFA Fnd 7.47 -.08 Novarts 55.41 +.23
MCR 9.57 +.02 NSTAR 48.63 -.12
MGIC 4.96 +.02 Nucor 42.95 +.14
MGMRsts 13.62 -.23 NuvMuOpp 14.61 +.03
Macquarie 32.99 +.39 NvMulSI&G 8.88 -.04
Macys 39.73 -.20 NuvQPf2 8.62 -.11
MageiMPtr 72.34 +.45 OGEEngy 53.50 +.24
Magnalgs 47.74 -.04 OcciPet 95.23 +.80
MagHRes 6.41 +.01 OfficeDpt 3.45 -.20
Manitowoc 13.86 -.14 OfficeMax 5.72 -.15
Manulifeg 13.55 +.07 OldRepub 10.55 -.11
MarathnOs 31.70 -.05 Olin 21.75 -.08
MarathPn 43.36 +.12 OmegaHIt 21.26 +.17
MktVGold 49.54 +.48 Omncre 35.57 +.20
MVOilSvs 40.62 +.45 Omnicom 50.65 +.38
MktVRus 30.88 +.23 ONEOK 81.66 -.23
MktVJrGld 24.55 +.40 OneokPts 54.67 +1.02
MarlntA 37.85 +.21 OrientEH 10.20 +.10
MarshM 32.79 +.02 OshkoshCp 23.17 -.23
MStewrt 3.81 -.02 OwensCorn 36.03 +.32
Maseo 13.37 -.27 Owenslll 23.34 -.13
McDnlds 98.10 +.46
McGrwH 48.47 +.89 PG&ECp 43.41 +.42
McKesson 87.77 -.82 PNC 64.49 +.54
McMoRn 10.70 -.18 PNMRes 18.30 -.08
McEwenM 4.44 +.33 PPG 95.80 +.11
MeadWvco 31.59 +.13 PPLCorp 28.26 +.25
Mechel 8.98 -.12 PVH Corp 89.33 -.16
MedeoHIth 70.30 +.11 PallCorp 59.63 +.72
Medrnic 39.19 -.02 Pandorain 10.21 +.18
PatriotCoal 6.24 -.32


PeabdyE 28.96 -.66 RedHat 59.89 -1.54
Pengrthg 9.40 -.08 RegionsFn 6.59 +.07
PennVaRs 21.83 -1.08 Renren n 5.52
Penney 35.43 -.25 RepubSvc 30.56 +.27
Pentair 47.61 +.47 Revlon 17.25 -.58
PepBoy 14.92 +.01 ReynAmer 41.44 +.45
PepcoHold 18.89 +.02 Riointo 55.59 +1.15
PepsiCo 66.35 +.33 RiteAid 1.74 -.03
Prmian 22.87 -.04 RockwAut 79.70 -.13
PetrbrsA 25.56 +.08 RockColl 57.56 -.02
Petrobras 26.56 +.15 Roundysn 10.70 -.04
Pfizer 22.65 +.23 Rowan 32.93 +.35
PhilipMor 88.61 +1.96 RylCarb 29.43 +.12
PiedNG 31.07 +.02 RoyDShllA 70.13 -.05
PimcoStrat 11.06 +.07 Royce 13.89 -.03
PinndEnt 11.51 +.43 Royce pfB 25.54 +.08
PinWst 47.90 +.27 R1and 19.28 -.79
PioNtrl 111.59 +6.39
PitnyBw 17.58 -.19
PlainsEx 42.65 +.36 SAIC 13.20 -.01
PlumCrk 41.56 +.04 SAP AG 69.82 -.03
Polariss 72.15 -.17 SCANA 45.61 -.04
Polypore 35.16 +.05 SKTIcm 13.91 -.08
PostPrp 46.86 +.50 SLGreen 77.55 +.60
Potash 45.69 +.68 SpdrDJIA 131.80 +.67
PwshDB 28.80 +.32 SpdrGold 162.12 +.84
PSUSDBull 21.91 -.03 SPMid 180.71 -.15
Praxair 114.64 +.26 S&P500ETF140.81 +58
PrinFnd 29.51 +.50 SpdrHome 21.35 -.22
ProLogis 36.02 +.71 SpdrS&PBk 23.85 -.08
ProShtS&P 35.76 -.11 SpdrLehHY 39.37 -.13
PrUShS&P 15.09 -.11 SpdrS&PRB 28.47 -.12
ProUltQQQ 118.95 -.61 SpdrRetl 61.25 -.51
PrUShQQQ 30.28 +.11 SpdrOGEx 56.91 +.29
ProUltSP 58.36 +.45 SpdrMetM 49.72 +.04
ProUShL20 .45 +.66 STMicro 8.19 +.06
ProUltFin 62.82 +.39 Safeway 20.21 -.27
ProShtR2K 26.07 +.06 StJoe 19.01 +.07
ProUSSP500 9.06 -.11 Sude 44.31 +.36
PrUltSP500 84.79 +.76 Saks 11.61 -.14
PrUVxSTrs 14.56 -.82 Salesforce 154.51 -1.90
ProUSSilv 10.55 -.04 SJuanB 19.39 -.41
ProctGam 67.21 +.20 SandRdge 7.83 +.02
ProgrssEn 53.11 +.30 Sanofi 38.75 +.36
ProgsvCp 23.18 +16 SaraLee 21.53 +.10
ProUSR2K 29.62 +.09 Schlmbrg 69.93 +.79
PrudentD 63.39 +.63 Sdichwab 14.37 +.10
PSEG 30.61 +.36 SeadrillLtd 37.51 +.72
PubStrg 138.17 +.60 SealAir 19.31 -.15
PulteGrp 8.85 -.41 SempraEn 59.96 +.71
PPrIT 5.51 +.02 SenHous 22.05 -.06
QEP Res 30.50 +.78 Sensient 38.00 +.09
Qihoo360 24.45 -.48 SiderurNac 9.46 -.10
QuanexBld 17.63 -.22 SilvWhtng 33.20 +.14
QntmDSS 2.62 -.02 SimonProp 145.68 +.95
Questar 19.26 -.20 Skechers 12.72 -.09
QksilvRes 5.04 -.20 SmithAO 44.95 -.06
RAIT rs 4.97 -.06 Smucker 81.36 +.27
RPM 26.19 -.06 Soluta 27.94 +.13
Rackspace 57.79 +.69 SoJerlnd 50.04 -.11
RadianGrp 4.35 -.03 SouthnCo 44.93 +.09
RadioShk 6.22 -.09 SthnCopper 31.71 +.36
Ralcorp 74.09 +.41 SwstAirl 8.24 -.16
RangeRs 58.14 +1.18 SwstnEngy 30.60 +.25
RJamesFn 36.53 +.23 SpectraEn 31.55 +.01
Rayoniers 44.09 +.24 SprintNex 2.85 -.13
Raytheon 52.78 -.08 SP Mais 36.97 +.13
Rltylneo 38.73 +.04 SP HIthC 37.61 +.28




The remainder of the

NYSE listings can be

found on the next page.


IA EIA N 5 XCANE1


Name Last Chg


AbdAsPac 7.29 -.03
AbdnEMTel 19.37 +.28
AdmRsc 57.18 -7.10
Adventrx .69
AlexeoRg 6.98 +.04
AlldNevG 32.53 +.95
AmApparel .80 -.01
Anooraqg .42 +.01
AntaresP 3.23 +.03
Augustag 2.73 -.07
Aurizong 4.84 +.13
AvalnRare 2.99 -.04


Bacterin 2.42 +.21 ClaudeRg 1.10
Ballanty 5.32 +.06 ClghGlbOp 11.78 +.06
Banrog 4.62 +.14 CrSuislneo 3.73 -.01
BarcUBS36 42.32 +.55 CrSuiHiY 3.12
BarcGSOil 25.88 -.03
BrigusGg .77 +.02 DourEg .35 -.05
BritATob 101.22 -.27 DeourEg 1.35 .05
CAMACEn 1.00 -.01 DocuSec 3.02 -.03
Carderog 1.15 -.02 Dreams 2.90 +.03
CardiumTh .28 -.00 EVLtdDur 16.05 -.10
CelSd .48 +.01 EVMuni2 14.49 +.22
CFCdag 21.95 +.14 ElephTalk 2.25 -.02
CheniereEn 14.98 +.52 EllswthFd 7.35 +.03
CheniereE 21.30 -.06 EntGaming .45 +.05
ChinaShen 1.51 ... ExeterRgs 2.74 +.23


GSESy 2.38 +.01
GamGIdNR 16.16 +13
GascoEngy .26 -.00
Gastargrs 2.99 -.03
GenMoly 3.35 +.02
GoldenMin 8.43 +.18
GoldStkg 1.86 +.01
GIdFId .97 +.02
GranTrrag 6.29 +.45
GrtBasGg .68 +.00
GtPanSilvg 2.25 -.02
GreenHnt 2.48 +.18
HstnAEn 5.22 +.04


ImpOilgs 45.39 +.25
IndiaGC .49 +.01
InovioPhm .67 +.02
IntellgSys 1.45


KeeganRg 3.76 +.09
LadThalFn 1.78 -.01
LkShrGld 104 07

MadCatzg .62 +.01
Metalico 4.27 -.12
MdwGoldg 1.43 -.01
Minefndg 13.90 +.25


NaideaBio 3.28 -.06 PyramidOil 5.00 -.01 Tengsco 1.10 +.02
NeoStem .38 +.00 Quaterrag .53 +.04 Timminsg 2.24 -.12
NBRESec 4.28 +.07 Quepasa 4.44 +.21 Tompkins 40.06 -.59
Nevsung 3.68 +.01 QuestRMg 2.56 -.15 TrnsafiPet 1.30 +.06
NwGoldg 9.88 +.15 RareEleg 6.28 -.29 TravelCts 6.34 -.19
NAPallg 2.62 -.08 Rentedich 2.08 -.02 TriValley .17 -.01
NDynMng 6.08 +.12 RexahnPh .53 +.01 TriangPet 6.90 +.26
NthnO&G 20.74 -.12 Richmntg 7.78 +.10 Tueowsg 1.23 +.02
NovaGld g 7.18 +.07 Rubieon 3.26 US Geoth .52 +.04
NvDCmdt 23.08 -.07 Ur-Energy 1.22 -.01
"f ] ]Uranerz 2.52 +.02
SamsO&G 2.47 +.07 UraniumEn 3.90 -.01
ParaG&S 2.26 SeabGldg 20.09 +.18
PhrmAth 1.77 -.13 SinoHub .54 -.10
PionDrill 8.80 +.06 TanzRyg 5.13 +.10 VarngTotW 48.27 +.19
Protalix 6.37 +.11 Taseko 3.52 +.07 VantageDrl 1.60 -.02


VirnetX 23.93
VistaGold 3.14
VoyagerOG 2.43
Vringo 1.65
Walterlnv 22.55
WFAdvlnco 10.24
WidePoint .93
WizrdSftrs 2.34
XPOLogrs 16.80
YMBiog 1.86


IASD AQ AINL5AKT1


Name Last Chg


AMCNetn 44.63 +.40
ASMLHId 50.14 +.50
ATPO&G 7.35 -.15
AVI Bio 1.54 +.03
Aastrom 2.02
Abraxas 3.12
AcadaTc 41.74 +.36
AcadiaPh 2.15 +.02
Achillion 9.58 -.38
AcmePkt 27.52 +.76
AcfvePw h .78 -.05
AcfvsBliz 12.82 +.05
Acxiom 14.68 +.09
AdobeSy 34.31 -.17
Adtran 31.19 +.04
AdvEnld 13.12 +.12
AEternag 2.14 +.09
Aftymax 11.74 -.90
Afymetrix 4.27 -.03
Agenusrs 6.60 -.17
AkamaiT 36.70 -.22
Akorn 11.70 -.15
AlaskCom 3.08 -.01
Alexion s 92.86 +1.60
Alexzah .62 +.02
AlignTech 27.55 +.30
Alkermes 18.55 +.16
AllnceRes 60.10 -.99
AllosThera 1.48 +.01
AllotComm 23.25 +.32
AllscriptH 16.60 -.23
AlnylamP 11.07 -.20
AlteraCp If 39.82 +.58
AlterraCap 22.98 -.25
AmTrstFin 26.88 -.23
Amarin 11.32 +.01
Amazon 202.51 -2.10
Amedisys 14.46 +.06
ACapAgy 29.54 +.23
AmCapLd 8.68 +.05
ACapMign 21.77 +.06
ARItyCTn 10.27 +.04
AmSupr 4.12 +.02
Amrign 16.18 +.30
AmCasino 18.63 -.40
Amgen 67.97 +.65
AmicusTh 5.28 -.04
AmkorTIf 6.15 -.06
Amylin 24.96 +.16
Anadigc 2.37
Anlogic 67.54 -.54
Analystlnt 5.46 -.03
Ancestry 22.74 -.30
ArngiesLn 18.89 +.92
Ansys 65.02 -.19
A123Sys 1.12 -.04
ApolloGrp 38.64 -.40
Apollolnv 7.17 +.06
Applelnc 599.55 -10.31
ApldMafi 12.45 -.04
Approach 36.95 +.94
ApricusBio 2.82 +.18
ArQule 7.01
ArchCaps 37.24 -.02
ArchLearn 11.12 +.03
ArenaPhm 3.08 +.04
AresCap 16.35 +.06
AriadP 15.98 +.02
Ariba Inc 32.71 +.19
ArkBest 18.81 -.25
ArmHId 28.29 -.16
ArrayBio 3.41 +.09
Arris 11.30 +.18
ArubaNet 22.28 +.13
AscenaRb 44.32 +.04
AsialnfoL 12.60 -.01
AspenTech 20.53 -.20
AssodBanc 13.96 -.10
AstexPhm 1.86 +.02
AfiasAir 49.21 -.04
Atmel 9.87 -.13
Autodesk 42.32 +.28
AutoData 55.19 +.16
Auxilium 18.57 +.09


AvagoTch 38.97 +.63 ColdwtrCrk 1.16 +.03
AvanirPhm 3.42 -.03 ColumLb h .71 +.00
AvisBudg 14.15 +.22 Comcast 30.01 +.18
Aware 3.90 +.19 Comcspd 29.51 +.05
Axcelis 1.72 +.02 CommSys 13.13 -.30
BEAero 46.47 +.01 CommVIt 49.64 +.36
BGCPtrs 7.41 +.23 CmplGnom 2.82 +.01
BJsRest 50.35 +1.03 Compuwre 9.19 -.04
BMCSft 40.16 -.10 ComScore 21.39 -.37
Baidu 145.77 -.64 Comverse 6.87 +.10
Bazaarvcn 19.87 +.28 ConcurTch 57.38 -.23
BeasleyB 4.30 +.15 Conmed 29.87 -.24
BedBath 65.77 -.95 ConstantC 29.79 -.02
BioFuelEh .65 -.01 CopanoEn 35.70 +.14
Biogenldc 126.00 -.48 Coparts 26.07 -.17
BioMarin 34.25 ... CorinthC 4.14 -.11
BioMimefc 2.47 +.05 Cosi Inc 1.08 -.07
BioSanteh .68 -.02 CostPlus 17.90 +.20
BIkRKelso 9.82 -.21 Costeo 90.80 +.96
BobEvans 37.72 -.14 CowenGp 2.71 +.02
BonTon 9.25 -.12 Creelnc 31.63 +.27
BostPrv 9.91 +.02 CrimsnExp 4.15 +.23
BreitBurn 19.12 +.16 Crocs 20.92 +.31
Brightcvn 24.80 -.05 Ctrip.eom 21.64 +.36
Brightpnt 8.05 -.10 CubistPh 43.25 +.03
Broadcom 39.30 +.74 Curis 4.82 -.16
BroadSoft 38.25 +.06 Cybexlnfi 2.53 +.30
BroadVisn 28.46 +.08 CypSemi 15.63 -.18
BrcdeCm 5.75 -.09 CytRxh .40 +.01
BrukerCp 15.31 -.12 C o ri 2.49 -.03
BuffabloWW 90.69 -.95
BldrFstSrc 4.23 -.05
CA Inc 27.56 -.11 DeckrsOut 63.05 +.15
CBOE 28.42 -.15 DeerConsu 4.20 -.39
CH Robins 65.49 +.73 Dell Inc 16.60 -.01
CMEGrp 289.33 -.27 Dndreon 10.66 +.25
CTC Media 11.63 +.02 Dennys 4.04 -.13
CVBFnd 11.74 -.04 Dentsply 40.13 +.12
CadencePh 3.70 +.08 Depomed 6.26 -.11
Cadence 11.84 -.05 DexCom 10.43 -.07
Caesars n 14.74 +.90 DiamndFlf 22.82 -.35
CafePrssn 19.15 +.12 DigRiver 18.71 +.30
CdnSolar 3.18 +.11 DirecTVA 49.34 -.15
CapCtyBk 7.45 -.07 DiscCmA 50.60 +1.19
CapFedFn 11.88 ... DiscCmC 46.88 +.92
CpstnTrbh 1.02 -.01 DiscovLab 2.68 +.10
Cardiom g .71 -.02 DishNetwk 32.93 +.37
CareerEd 8.06 -.12 DollarTree 94.49 +.04
CaribouC 18.64 +.49 DonlleyRR 12.39 -.30
Carrizo 28.26 +.65 DrmWksA 18.45 +.10
CarverBrs 7.50 +.94 DryShips 3.48 +.14
CathayGen 17.70 -.25 Dunkinn 30.08 +.02
Cavium 30.94 -.41 DurectCp h .80 -.05
Celgene 77.52 ... Dynavax 5.03 +.13
CellTherrsh 1.32 +.01 E-Trade 10.95 +.05
CelldexTh 5.09 -.04 eBay 36.90 -.09
CentEuro 5.11 +.26 EagleBulk 1.94 -.01
CenGrdA If 9.63 +.26 EaglRkEn 9.89 +.01
CentAI 8.88 -.03 ErthLink 7.99 -.09
Cepheid 41.83 -.38 EstWstBcp 23.09 -.22
Cereplasth .62 -.01 EasyLkSInt 5.09 +.14
Cerners 76.16 +.01 EducMgmt 13.69 -.81
CerusCp 4.02 -.02 EducDev 4.95
ChrmSh 5.90 -.15 8x8 Inc 4.20 +.12
Chartlnds 73.33 -.14 ElectSd 15.01 -.08
CharterCm 63.45 +.34 ElectArts 16.49 -.01
ChkPoint 63.84 -.06 EmmisC h .82 -.02
Cheesecake 29.39 -.14 EndoPhrm 38.73 -.14
ChelseaTh 2.56 -.06 Endocyte 4.98 -.23
ChildPlace 51.67 -.62 Endobgix 14.65 +.41
ChinCEd h 4.24 -.20 EngyXXI 36.11 +1.03
ChHousLd 1.36 -.05 Enphasen 7.34
ChinaLodg 11.69 +.12 Entegris 9.34 -.03
ChiValve 2.27 +.18 EntropCom 5.83 -.05
ChrchllD 55.90 -1.09 EnzonPhar 6.84 -.13
CienaCorp 16.19 -.05 Equinix 157.45 +2.66
CinnFin 34.51 -.25 Ericsson 10.31 +.15
Cintas 39.12 +.09 Euronet 20.89 +.14
Cirrus 23.80 +.02 ExactScih 11.16 +.13
Cisco 21.15 +.12 Exelids 5.18 -.05
CitrixSys 78.91 +.53 EddeTc 3.13 +.06
CleanEngy 21.28 -.09 Expedias 33.44 +.19
Clearwire 2.28 +.06 Expdlni 46.51 +.22
ClevBioLh 2.46 -.23 ExpScripts 54.18 +1.02
CoffeeH 11.33 -.40 Ezcorp 32.46 -.10
CognizTech 76.95 +.65 F5Netwks 134.96 +.10
Cogo Grp 2.75 +.03 FLIRSys 25.31 -.03
Coinstar 63.55 +.47 FSI Infi 4.89 +.07


Fastenals 54.10 -.16 Informat 52.90 -.34
FifthStRn 9.76 +.09 Infosys 57.03 +.57
FifthThird 14.05 +.01 InsightEnt 21.93 -.51
FindEngin 22.36 +.10 IntgDv 7.15 -.04
Fndlnst 16.17 -.16 Intel 28.12 -.05
Finisar 20.15 -.01 InteractBrk 17.00
FinLine 21.22 -4.12 InterDig 34.86 -.78
FstCashFn 42.89 -.18 Intrface 13.95 +.34
FMidBc 11.98 -.26 InterMune 14.67 +.67
FstNiagara 9.84 -.12 InterNAP 7.36 -.05
FstSolar 25.05 -.07 InfiBcsh 21.15 -.32
FstMerit 16.86 -.29 InfiSpdw 27.75 +.44
Fiserv 69.39 -.20 Intersil 11.20 -.05
Flextrn 7.22 -.06 IntervalLs 17.40 -.04
FocusMda 25.12 +1.02 Intuit 60.16 +.33
ForcePro 5.55 ... IntSurg 541.75 -1.93
FormFac 5.58 +.01 InvRIEst 7.69 -.01
Forfnets 27.65 +.37 IridiumCm 8.76 -.08
Fossil Inc 131.98 -1.69 IronwdPh 13.31 +.28
FosterWhl 22.76 +.07 Isis 8.77 -.35
FriendFdn 1.36 -.28 IstaPh 9.01 -.01
FronterCm 4.17 +.09 Itron 45.41 -.10
FrozenFd 1.25 -.00 IvanhoeEn 1.05 +.04
FuelCell 1.57 +.09
FultonFncl 10.50 -.01
FushiCo 755 29 j2Global 28.68 -.32
JASolar 1.55 -.01
JDS Uniph 14.49 -.08
GSV Cap n 18.70 +.14 JacklnBox 23.97 -.20
GTAdvTc 8.27 +.15 JamesRiv 5.12 -.19
GTx Inc 3.85 +.06 JazzPhrm 48.47 +.65
GalenaBio 2.22 -.05 JetBlue 4.89 -.11
Garmin 46.98 -.36 JiveSoftn 27.16 +.57
GenComm 8.72 -.12 JosABank 50.41 -.69
Gentex 24.50 +.05 KIT Digitb 7.20
GeronCp 1.70 -.01 KLATnc 54.42 +.32
GileadSd 48.86 +1.09 KellySA 15.99 +.57
GIbSpcMet 14.87 -.03 KeryxBio 4.98 +.12
GluMobile 4.85 +.05 KratosDef 5.34 -.15
GolLNGLtd 38.05 +.02 Ku6Media 2.15 +.07
Google 641.24 -7.17 Kulicke 12.43 +.02
GrLkDrge 7.22 -.26 L&L Engy 2.45 +.14
GreenMtC 46.84 -1.34 LKQCorp 31.17 -.32
GrifolsSA n 7.71 -.06 LSI Ind If 7.33 -.04
Grouponn 18.38 +.68 LTX-Cred 7.19 +.19
GuanwRh .93 +.08 LamResrch 44.62 +.39
GulfportE 29.12 +.92 LamarAdv 32.41 +.92
HMN Fn 2.48 -.01 Lattice 6.43 -.05
HMS Hd s 31.21 -.43 Layne 22.25 +.63
HSN Inc 38.03 +.22 LeapWirlss 8.73 -.26
HackettGp 5.97 +.43 LedxPhrm 1.86 -.02
Halozyme 12.76 -.08 LibGlobA 50.08 -.05
HancHId 35.51 -.36 LibCapA 88.15 +1.26
HanmiFrs 10.12 -.02 LibtylntA 19.09 -.17
HansenMed 3.00 -.01 LifeTech 48.82 +.23
Harmonic 5.47 -.07 LimelghtN 3.29 -.10
Hasbro 36.72 -.42 Lincare 25.88 -.12
HawHold 5.23 -.07 LincElecs 45.35 +.40
HIthCSvc 21.27 -.25 LinearTch 33.70 +.40
HrfindEx 14.46 -.29 LinnEngy 38.15 +.26
HSchein 75.68 -.17 Liquidity 44.80 -.68
HercOffsh 4.73 ... LodgeNet 3.50 +.02
HercTGC 11.08 +.20 LogMeln 35.23 -.03
HlywdMda 1.07 +.08 LookSmart 1.11
Hologic 21.55 -.19 LoopNet 18.78 -.01
Home Inns 25.51 +.41 Lulkin 80.65 +3.06
HmLnSvcn 13.94 +.02 luuluemns 74.73 +1.58
HorizPhn 4.14 +.45
HorsehdH 11.39 +.01
HudsCity 7.32 -.07 MAP Phm 14.36 -.89
HumGen 8.24 +.34 MCG Cap 4.26 -.04
HuntJB 54.37 -.55 MGE 44.39 -.07
HuntBnk 6.45 +.05 MIPSTech 5.44 -.06
IAC Inter 49.09 +.20 MKS Inst 29.53 -.11
IdexxLabs 87.45 +.80 MTS 53.09 +.25
iShACWI 47.20 +.34 MSG 34.20 +.23
iShNsdqBio 123.30 +.51 MagicJcks 21.70 -1.49
IconixBr 17.38 -.19 MAKOSrg 42.15 +1.06
IdenixPh 9.79 -.12 MannKd 2.47 +.05
iGolnch .85 -.20 MarvellT 15.73 -.01
Illumina 52.61 +.21 Masimo 23.38 -.14
ImunoGn 14.39 +.65 Mattel 33.66 -.37
ImpaxLabs 24.58 +.56 Mattson 2.77 +.01
ImperlSgr 4.69 -.13 Madxmlntg 28.59 +.08
Incyte 19.30 -.57 MaxwIlT 18.33 -.07
Infinera 8.12 ... MedAssets 13.16 +.08
InfinityPh 11.96 -.12 MedicActn 5.72 -.12
InfoSpace 12.81 -.03 MediCo 20.07 +.01


Medivafon 74.72 ... PnnNGm 42.98 -.27
MeleoCrwn 13.64 +.36 PennantPk 10.40 -.11
MentorGr 14.86 -.12 PeopUtdF 13.23 +.07
MergeHIth 5.86 ... PeregrineP .54 +.04
Merrimkn 6.19 +.15 PerfectWd 16.18 +.43
Methanx 32.43 +.61 Perrigo 103.31 +.33
Microchp 37.20 +.46 PetSmart 57.22 +.10
MicronT 8.10 -.33 PetMed 12.38 +.05
MicroSemi 21.44 -.15 PetroDev 37.09 -.15
Microsoft 32.26 +.14 Pharmacyc 27.76 -.37
MicroStr 140.00 +1.20 PhotrIn 6.65 -.04
MillerHer 22.96 -.03 PlugPwrrs 1.31 -.03
Mindspeed 6.37 -.08 Polyomms 19.07 +.09
Misonix 2.02 +.03 Popular 2.05 +.01
MitekSys 11.60 -.35 Power-One 4.55 +.13
Molex 28.12 +.22 PwShsQQQ 67.55 -.13
Momenta 15.32 -.12 Powrwvrs 2.05 -.07
MonPwSys 19.67 +.11 Pozen 6.00 +.18
MonstrBvs 62.09 -.48 PremExhib 3.54 -.08
Motricity 1.10 -.03 Presstekh .58
Mylan 23.45 +.25 PriceTR 65.30 +1.20
MyriadG 23.66 +.09 priceline 717.50 -2.54
NIl HIdg 18.31 +.60 Primoris 16.06 +.10
NPS Phm 6.84 -.07 PrincNfi 3.69 +.75
NXP Semi 26.61 ... PrinctnR h .06 -.04
NasdOMX 25.90 +.08 PrivateB 15.17 -.12
Natlnstrm 28.52 +.40 PrUPShQQQ 10.79 +.06
NatPenn 8.85 -.10 PrUItPQQQ 119.64 -.84
NektarTh 7.92 -.30 ProceraN 22.36 -.44
NetApp 44.77 +.10 PrognicsPh 9.90 +.01
Netease 58.10 -.24 ProgrsSoft 23.62 -.12
Netfiix 115.04 -.01 ProspctCap 10.98 +.09
Neflist 3.54 -.05 PureCycle 2.24 +.06
NetSpend 7.76 -.08 QIAGEN 15.57 +.12
Neurcrine 7.97 +.20 QlikTech 32.00 -.01
NeurogXh .51 -.03 Qlogic 17.76 -.10
NewsCpA 19.71 +.27 Qualeom 68.06 +.13
NewsCpB 19.97 +.30 QualityS s 43.73 -.21
NobltyH If 7.75 +.26 QuantFuel .69 +.03
Nordson s 54.51 -.20 QuestSft 23.27 -.02
NorTrst 47.45 +.35 Questeor 37.62 +.15
NwstBcsh 12.70 -.09 QuinStreet 10.49 +.11
Novavax 1.26 -.03 RFMicD 4.98 +.05
Novlus 49.91 +.44 Rambus 6.45 -.04
NuVasive 16.84 -.18 Randgold 87.98 +.14
NuanceCm 25.58 +.23 RaptorPhm 6.76 -.03
NutriSyst 11.23 -.16 Regenrn 116.62 +1.98
Nvidia 15.40 +.17 RenewEnn 10.36 +.30
OCZTech 6.98 -.02 RentACt 37.75 -.39
OReillyAu 91.35 +.79 Replgn 5.90 +.01
Oclaro 3.94 -.24 RschMotn 14.70 +.97
OdysMar 3.11 -.01 ResConn 14.05 +.11
OldDomFrt 47.67 -.09 RetailOpp 12.04
OmniVisn 20.00 ... RexEnergy 10.68 -.04
OnAssign 17.47 -.05 RiverbedT 28.08 +.01
OnSmcnd 9.01 +.15 RosettaR 48.76 -1.23
Oneothyr 4.36 +.11 RossStrss 58.10 -.65
OnyxPh 37.68 -.23 Rovi Corp 32.55 +.86
OpenTxt 61.16 +.97 RoyGId 65.22 +.86
OpenTable 40.47 +.04 RoyaleEn 5.21 +.24
OpnwvSy 2.27 -.02 RubieonTc 10.43 +.14
Opnext 1.55 -.09 rue21 29.34 -.10
OpbmerPh 13.90 -.10
OpbBkrsh 3.52 -.38
Oracle 29.16 -.14 SBACom 50.81 +.23
OraSure 11.49 +.02 SEI Inv 20.69 -.07
Orexigen 4.10 -.44 SLMCp 15.76 -.09
OriginAg 2.46 +.09 STEC 9.44 -.01
Oritani 14.68 -.17 SVB FnGp 64.34 -.29
Orthfx 37.58 -.40 SXC HIth 74.96 +.80
OtterTail 21.70 -.02 SabaSoftw 9.81 -.13
Overstk 5.24 -.06 SalixPhm 52.50 -.10
SanDisk 49.59 -.63
Sanmina 11.45 +.01
PDL Bio 6.36 -.01 Sanofi rt 1.35 +.04
PFChng 39.52 -.15 Santarus 5.85 +.04
PMCSra 7.23 -.03 Sapient 12.45 -.06
PSS Wrld 25.34 -.36 Satcon h .36 -.03
Paccar 46.83 -.02 SavientPh 2.18 +.04
Pacerlnfi 6.32 +.13 Schnitzer 39.90 -.11
PacEthrs 1.10 ... Scholastc 35.28 -.01
PanASIv 22.06 +.38 SdClone 6.31 -.13
ParamTch 27.94 -.05 SdGames 11.66 +.09
Parexel 26.97 -.34 SeamoastBk 1.76 -.08
Patterson 33.40 +.46 SeagateT 26.96 -.14
PattUTI 17.29 +.20 SearsHIdgs 66.25 -1.30
Paychex 30.99 -.36 SeattGen 20.38 +.29
Pendrell 2.61 +.02 SeiCmfrt 32.39 -.04


Selectvlns 17.61
Semtech 28.46
Sequenom 4.07
SvcSource 15.48
SvArtsrsh .17
ShandaG s 5.20
Shire 94.75
ShuffiMstr 17.60
Shutterfly 31.33
SigaTech h 3.36
SigmaDsg 5.18
SigmaAld 73.06
SignatBk 63.04
Silinmlmg 5.88
SilicnMotn 19.37
Slcnware 6.04
SilvStdg 15.04
Sina 65.00
Sindair 11.06
SinoClnEn 2.69
SiriusXM 2.31
Skullcdyn 15.83
SkyWest 11.05
SkywksSol 27.65
SmithWes 7.75
SmithMicro 2.33
SodaStrm 33.68
Sohu.cm 55.17
SolarCap 22.07
Solazymen 14.63
SonicCorp 7.68
Sonus 2.90
SouMoBc 25.60
Sourcefire 48.13
SpanBrd rs 6.75
SpectPh 12.63
SpiritAirn 20.07
Spreadtrm 16.50
Staples 16.19
StarSdent 3.28
Starbucks 55.89
SiDynam 14.54
StemCedlrs 1.11
Stericyde 83.64
StewEnt 6.07
SunesisPh 2.87
SunPower 6.38
SusqBnc 9.88
SwisherHy 2.46
Symantec 18.70
Symetricm 5.77
Synaeorn 7.56
Synapfcs 36.51
Synchron 31.92
Synopsys 30.66
TDAmeritr 19.74
THQh .56
TICC Cap 9.74
TTMTCh 11.51
twteleeom 22.16
TakeTwo 15.39
TaleoA 45.93
Tangoen 18.81
Targacept 5.12
TASER 4.34
TechData 54.26
Telikh .14
Tellabs 4.05
TeslaMot 37.24
TesseraTch 17.25
TetraTc 26.36
TevaPhrm 45.06
Texlnst 33.61
TexRdhse 16.64
Theravnce 19.50
ThomasPrp 4.59
Thoratec 33.71
ThrshdPhm 8.80
TibcoSft 30.50
TibetPhrm 1.42
Tii NtwkT 1.45
TiVo Inc 11.99
Towerstm 4.75
TractSupp 90.56
TrimbleN 54.42
TripAdvn 35.67
TriQuint 6.90
TrueRelig 27.40


TrstNY 5.71 +.04
Trustmk 24.98 -.20
TudouH n 29.53 -.52
USA Tech h 1.28 -.02
UTStarcm 1.45 +.05
UTiWrldwd 17.23 +.03
Ubiquifi n 31.63 +.48
UltaSalon 92.89 +.06
Umpqua 13.56 -.09
Unilife 4.06 +.10
UtdNtrlF 46.66 -.71
UtdOnln 4.89 -.05
US Enr 3.16
UtdStatns 31.03 +.18
UtdTherap 47.13 -.31
UnivDisp 36.53 +.63
UnivFor 34.48 -.71
UranmRs h .91 -.01
UrbanOut 29.11 -.08


VCAAnt 23.21 +.26
VOXXIni 13.56 -.13
ValenceT h .81 -.00
ValueClick 19.74 -.46
VandaPhm 4.79 -.08
VanSTCpB 79.04 -.04
Veeeolnst 28.60 +.16
Velt 13.55 -.32
VBradley 30.19 +.77
Verenium 4.15 +.12
VerintSys 32.39 +.68
Verisign 38.35 -.19
Verisk 46.97 +.03
Vermillion 2.02 -.08
VertxPh 41.01 +.47
ViacomB 47.46 +.12
Vical 3.40 -.02
VirgnMdah 24.98 +.34
ViroPhrm 30.07 -.10
VistaPrt 38.65 -.06
Vivus 22.36 +1.08
Vodafone 27.67 -.34
Volcano 28.38 +.56
Volterra 34.42 +.50
WarnerCh 16.81 -.04
WaveSys 1.86 +.03
WebMD 25.58 -.15
Wendys Co 5.01 +.05
WernerEnt 24.86 -.43
Westmrld 11.17 -.05
Wstptlnng 40.92 +.10
WetSeal 3.45 +.03
WholeFd 83.20 +.59
WilshBcp 4.83 +.08
Windstrm 11.71 +.06
WisdomTr 8.37 +.16
WdHearth .28 +.00
Wynn 124.88 -.05
XOMA 2.77 +.09
Xflinx 36.48 +.19
Xyratex 15.91 -1.91
YRC rs 6.63 +.06
Yahoo 15.22 -.08
Yandexn 26.87 +1.52
Yongye 3.11 -.05
ZaZaEngy 4.67 +.76
Zagg 10.63 -.20
Zalicus 1.20 -.01
Zhongpin 11.25 -.02
Zllown 35.59 +1.44
ZonBcp 21.46 -.19
Zopharm 5.40 +.01
ZxCorp 2.91 -.08
Zogenix 2.00 -.08
ZollMed 92.63 +.04
Zoltek 11.32 -.02
Zumiez 36.11 -.24
Zyngan 13.15 +.31


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*Charge may vary at first transaction and at each vacation start.


Yesterday Pvs Day
Argent 4.3790 4.3775
Australia .9651 .9657
Bahrain .3770 .3769
Brazil 1.8249 1.8290
Britain 1.5998 1.5931
Canada .9973 .9985
Chile 485.75 488.75
China 6.2995 6.3105
Colombia 1792.30 1794.50
Czech Rep 18.59 18.63
Denmark 5.5800 5.5977
Dominican Rep 39.00 38.99
Egypt 6.0408 6.0405
Euro .7500 .7526
Hong Kong 7.7639 7.7643
Hungary 220.71 222.73
India 50.876 51.345
Indnsia 9164.00 9164.00
Israel 3.7074 3.7272
Japan 82.86 82.40
Jordan .7105 .7097
Lebanon 1504.50 1505.50
Malaysia 3.0635 3.0675
Mexico 12.8097 12.8235
N. Zealand 1.2208 1.2269
Norway 5.6944 5.7523
Peru 2.667 2.670
Poland 3.11 3.13
Russia 29.3385 29.4920
Singapore 1.2563 1.2598
So. Africa 7.6533 7.7375
So. Korea 1132.20 1139.50
Sweden 6.6168 6.6743
Switzerlnd .9029 .9074
Taiwan 29.51 29.62
Thailand 30.78 30.89
Turkey 1.7822 1.7846
U.A.E. 3.6732 3.6731
Uruguay 19.4999 19.3995
Venzuel 4.2927 4.2927


British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.



Yesterday Pvs Day

Prime Rate 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate 0.75 0.75
Federal Funds Rate .00-.25 .00-.25
Treasuries
3-month 0.07 0.07
6-month 0.14 0.14
5-year 1.04 1.08
10-year 2.21 2.23
30-year 3.33 3.30



FUTURES
Exch Contract Settle Chg
Lt Sweet Crude NYMX Jun 12 103.54 +.23
Corn CBOT May 12 644 +40
Wheat CBOT May12 6603/4 +4814
Soybeans CBOT May12 1403 +471/2
Cattle CME Jun 12 116.15 -2.32
Sugar (world) ICE May12 24.71 +.11
Orange Juice ICE May12 164.50 -2.60


SPOT
Yesterday Pvs Day
Gold (troy oz., spot) $1669.30 $1662.30
Silver (troy oz., spot) $32.469 $32.248
Copper (pound) $3.8240 $3.8095
Platinum (troy oz., spot)t1638.30 $1b2/.9U

NMER= NewYork Mercantile Exchange. CBOT=
Chicago Board of Trade. CMER = Chicago Mercantile Ex-
change. NCSE= New York Cotton, Sugar & Cocoa Ex-
change. NCTN = New York Cotton Exchange.


I AMEX


I NASDA


YTD YTD
Name Div YId PE Last Chg %Chg Name Div YId PE Last Chg %Chg
AKSteel .20 2.6 ... 7.56 -.07 -8.5 Microsoft .80 2.5 12 32.26 +.14 +24.2
AT&Tlnc 1.76 5.6 47 31.23 +.02 +3.3 MotrlaSolu .88 1.7 15 50.83 +.18 +9.8
Ametek .24 .5 20 48.51 +.17 +15.2 MotrlaMob ... ... ... 39.24 -.01 +1.1
ABInBev 1.16 1.6 ... 72.72 +.72 +19.2 NextEraEn 2.40 3.9 13 61.08 +.48 +.3
BkofAm .04 .4 ... 9.57 +.04 +72.1 Penney .80 2.3 22 35.43 -.25 +.8
CapCtyBk ... ... 26 7.45 -.07-22.0 PiedmOfc .80 4.5 14 17.75 -.16 +4.2
CntryLink 2.90 7.5 23 38.65 +.01 +3.9 ProgrssEn 2.48 4.7 27 53.11 +.30 -5.2
Citigrp rs .04 .1 10 36.55 +.04 +38.9 RegionsFn .04 .6 39 6.59 +.07 +53.3
CmwREIT 2.00 10.7 16 18.62 +.40 +11.9 SearsHIdgs .33 ... ... 66.25 -1.30+108.5
Disney .60 1.4 17 43.78 +.77 +16.7 Smucker 1.92 2.4 21 81.36 +.27 +4.1
EnterPT 3.00 6.5 26 46.38 +.17 +6.1 SprintNex ... ... ... 2.85 -.13 +21.8
ExxonMbI 1.88 2.2 10 86.73 +.65 +2.3 Texlnst .68 2.0 18 33.61 +.42 +15.5
FordM .20 1.6 7 12.48 +.03 +15.9 TimeWarn 1.04 2.8 14 37.75 +.61 +4.5
GenElec .68 3.4 16 20.07 +.12 +12.1 UniFirst .15 .2 15 61.55 -.14 +8.5
HomeDp 1.16 2.3 20 50.31 +.40 +19.7 VerizonCm 2.00 5.2 45 38.23 +.16 -4.7
Intel .84 3.0 12 28.12 -.05 +15.9 Vodafone 2.10 7.6 ... 27.67 -.34 -1.3
IBM 3.00 1.4 16208.65 +.38 +13.5 WalMart 1.59 2.6 14 61.20 +.38 +2.4
Lowes .56 1.8 22 31.38 +.17+23.6 Walgrn .90 2.7 11 33.49 -.44 +1.3
McDnlds 2.80 2.9 19 98.10 +.46 -2.2 YRCrs ......... 6.63 +.06 -33.5







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BUSINESS


SATURDAY, MARCH 31, 2012 A9


I MUTUALFUDSA I


Name NAV Chg Name NAV Chg
Advance Capital I: GrChinaAr 32.60 +.36
Balancp 16.90 +.02 HiYIdAp 6.42
RetInc 8.78 -.02 StratValA 29.74 +.15
Alger Funds B: TechGroA 36.32 -.10
SmCapGr 7.15 ... DreihsAcInc 10.59 +.01
AllianceBern A: Driehaus Funds:
BalanAp 16.86 +.03 EMktGr 28.98 +.23
GIbThGrAp 67.98 +.23 EVPTxMEmI 47.36 +.37
SmCpGrA 39.55 +.02 EatonVance A:
AllianceBern Adv: ChinaAp 17.04 +.10
LgCpGrAd 30.12 +.11 AMTFMuInc 9.99
AllianceBern B: MuIbCGrA 8.79
GIbThGrBt 58.50 +.18 InBosA 5.81 +.01
GrowthBt 28.08 +.07 LgCpVal 18.87 +.11
SCpGrBt 31.64 +.02 NatlMunlnc 9.87 +.01
AllianceBern C: SpEqtA 16.82 +.03
SCpGrCt 31.81 +.02 TradGvA 7.42
Allianz Fds Insti: Eaton Vance B:
NFJDvVI 12.48 +.05 HIthSBt 10.01 +.07
SmCpVi 31.22 ... NatlMuInc 9.87 +.02
Allianz Funds C: Eaton Vance C:
AGICGrthC 26.78 +.11 GovtC p 7.40 -.01
TargetCt 15.92 +05 NatMunlnc 9.87 +.01
Amer Beacon Insti: Eaton Vance I:
LgCaplnst 21.28 +09 FItgRt 9.00
Amer Beacon Inv: GblMacAbR 9.96
LgCaplnv 20.20 +09 LgCapVal 18.92 +.11
Ameri Century 1st: FBR Funds:
Growth 28.72 +.10 Focuslnvtn50.17 +.13
Amer Century Adv: FMI Funds:
EqGroAp 24.20 +.07 LgCappn 16.94 +.08
EqlncAp 7.69 +.03 FPA Funds:
Amer Century Inv: NwIlnc 10.70 +.01
AIICapGr 31.47 +.05 FPACres 28.56 +.13
Balanced 17.22 +.01 Fairholme 30.36 +.33
DivBnd 11.01 -.02 Federated A:
EqInc 7.69 +.03 MidGrStA 37.86 +.09
Growthl 28.48 +.10 MuSecA 10.42 -.01
Heritagel 23.11 +05 TtflRtBdp 11.40
IncGro 27.27 +.09 Federated Instl:
InfAdjBd 12.85 -.05 KaufmnR 5.53 +.02
IntDisc 9.78 +.12 TotRetBd 11.40
InfiGrol 10.79 +.10 StrValDvS 4.87 +.02
New Opp 8.37 ... Fidelity Adv FocT:
OneChAg 12.99 +.05 EnergyT 36.85 +.27
OneChMd 12.46 +.04 HItCarT 23.32 +.13
RealEstl 22.34 +.24 Fidelity Advisor A:
Ultra 26.48 +.08 Nwlnsghp 22.61 +.01
Valuelnv 6.23 +.03 StrnA 12.35
American Funds A: Fidelity Advisor C:
AmcpAp 21.24 +.06 Nwlnsghtn21.40 +.01
AMuiAp 27.62 +.12 Fidelity Advisor I:
BalAp 19.70 +.06 EqGrl n 66.70 +.02
BondAp 12.64 -.03 Eqlnin 25.56 +.12
CaplBAp 51.34 +.23 IntBdln 11.48 -.02
CapWGAp 35.57 +.27 Nwlnsgtl n 22.90 +.02
CapWAp 20.91 ... Fidelity AdvisorT:
EupacAp 39.47 +.27 BalancT 16.36 +.02
FdlnvAp 39.36 +.20 DivGrTp 13.24 +.05
GovtAp 14.34 -.03 EqGrTp 62.39 +.02
GwthAp 32.92 +15 EqInT 25.15 +.12
HI TrAp 11.07 ... GrOppT 42.50 +.02
IncoAp 17.49 +.05 HilnAdTp 9.92 +.01
IntBdAp 13.64 -.02 IntBdT 11.46 -.01
IntlGrlncAp 29.67 +19 MulncTp 13.40 -.01
ICAAp 29.96 +.15 OvrseaT 17.42 +.14
LtTEBAp 16.15 ... STFiT 9.29
NEcoAp 27.74 +.06 StSelAIICp 20.09 +.07
NPerAp 29.75 +15 Fidelity Freedom:
NwWrldA 51.81 +.31 FF2010n 13.99 +.02
STBFAp 10.08 -.01 FF2010K 12.93 +.02
SmCpAp 38.79 +.19 FF2015n 11.69 +.01
TxExAp 12.71 -.01 FF2015K 12.98 +.02
WshAp 30.42 +.13 FF2020n 14.16 +.03
Ariel Investments: FF2020K 13.42 +.03
Apprec 44.99 +18 FF2025n 11.81 +.04
Ariel 49.23 +.10 FF2025K 13.59 +.04
Artio Global Funds: FF2030n 14.07 +.04
IntflEqlIr 25.42 +18 FF2030K 13.75 +.04
IntEqll Ir 10.69 +.07 FF2035n 11.68 +.04
Artisan Funds: FF2035K 13.88 +.05
Intl 22.90 +.16 FF2040n 8.15 +.03
Intllnstl 23.03 +.17 FF2040K 13.93 +.05
InftlValir 27.92 +.19 FF2045n 9.65 +.04
MidCap 39.79 +.08 Incomen 11.60
MidCapVal 21.55 +02 Fidelity Invest:
SCapVal 16.41 -.05 AIISectEq 12.80 +.03
Baron Funds: AMgr50n 16.11 +.02
Asset 52.24 +.18 AMgr70rn 16.98 +.04
Growth 55.61 +.13 AMgr20rn 13.13
SmallCap 26.00 +.10 Balancn 19.85 +.02
Bernstein Fds: BalancedK 19.85 +.02
IntDur 13.83 -.03 BlueChGr n 50.38 +.04
DivMu 14.76 -.01 CAMunn 12.57 -.01
TxMgdlnt 13.97 +.10 Canadan 52.95 +.13
BlackRock A: CapAp n 28.89 -.06
EqtyDiv 19.60 +.08 CapDevOn 11.71 +.03
GIAIAr 19.63 +.06 Cplncrn 9.21 +.02
HiYInvA 7.73 ... ChinaRgr 27.89 +.15
InflOpAp 31.09 +.15 CngS 465.09
BlackRock B&C: CTMunrn 11.88 -.01
GIAICt 18.26 +.06 Contran 77.54 +.04
BlackRock Insti: ConraK 77.51 +.04
BaVIl 27.36 +.12 CnvScn 25.54 +.05
EquityDv 19.65 +08 DisEqn 24.24 +.09
GIbAllocr 19.73 +.07 DiscEqF 24.22 +.10
HiYldBd 7.73 Divlntin 28.74 +.18
Brinson Funds Y: DivrslntKr 28.70 +.18
HiYIdlY 6.17 DivStkOn 16.84 +.04
BruceFund396.28 -.47 DivGthn 30.10 +.11
Buffalo Funds: EmergAs r n28.32 +.18
SmCapn 28.54 EmrMkn 23.08 +.17
CGM Funds: Eqlncn 45.55 +.22
Focus n 29.86 -.09 EQIIn 19.06 +10
Muti n 28.16 -.06 ECapAp 17.58 +.16
Realty n 29.84 +.35 Europe 28.95 +.26
CRM Funds: Exch 323.88
MdCpVII 30.00 +.10 Exportn 23.45 +03
Calamos Funds: Fidel n 35.57 +.07
GrwthAp 54.12 +.01 Fiftyrn 19.73 +.04
Calvert Invest: FItRateHi r n 9.81
Incop 15.85 -.04 FrlnOnen 28.71 +.09
InqAp 13.66 +.11 GNMAn 11.81 -.01
SocialAp 30.38 Govtlnc 10.67 -.03
SocBdp 15.82 -.05 GroCon 98.01 +.06
SocELqAp 38.51 +.16 Groncn 20.69 +.07
TxF Lg p 16.06 GrowCoF 97.94 +.06
Cohen& Steers: GrowthCoK 97.95 +.06
Rtn sx 668 + .32 GrStratrn 21.24 +.12
RltyShrsx 66.82 +.32 Highlncr n 9.00
Columbia Class A: I1 nn 0
Acornt 30.74 +.01 ndepnn 25.65 +.02
DivEqlnc 10.50 +.04 ntBdn 10.90 -.02
DivrBd 5.09 -.01 ntGovn 10.91 .01
DivOpptyA 8.63 +.03 IntnMun 1049 -.01
LgCapGrAt 26.34 +.09 IntDiscn 3096 +.23
LgCorQAp 6.48 +.02 InfSCprn 20.20 +.14
MdCpGrOp 10.56 +.04 InvGrBdn 1169 -03
MidCVIOpp 8.16 +.03 InvGBn 7.74 -.01
PBModAp 11.12 +.02 Japanrn 122 + -01
TxEAo 13.88 +.01 JpnSm n 0. +.01
SelCommA49.95 .. n 8 .
FrontierA 11.35 +.0 LgCapVal 11.31 +.05
ronierA 23.7 +.501 LatAm 55.39 +.19
GlobTech 23.67 -.01 LevCoSkn 29.40 +.05
Columbia Cl ,T&G: LowP r n 4072 +.03
EmMktOp I n 8.45 +.07 LowPriKr 40.70 +.03
Columbia Class Z: Magellnn 73.28 +.12
AcornZ 31.83 +.01 MagellanK 73.22 +.12
AcornlntZ 39.48 +.39 MDMurn 11.42 -.01
DivlncoZ 14.65 +.08 MAMunn 12.45 -.01
ntBdZ 9.33 -.02 MegaCpStknll.59 +.04
IntTEBd 10.81 -.01 MIMunn 1233
LgCapGr 14.43 +.02 MidCap n 30.23 -.01
LgCpldxZ 27.32 +.10 MNMunn 11.87 -.01
MdCpldxZ 12.10 MtgSecn 11.21 -.01
MdCpVIZp 14.29 +.05 Munilncn 13.21
ValRestr 49.55 +.20 NJMunr n12.08 -.01
Credit Suisse Comm: NwMktrn 16.52 +.01
ComRett 8.26 +.11 NwMilln 32.64 +.02
DFA Funds: NYMunn 13.39 -.01
IntfCorEqn 10.43 +.07 OTCn 64.11 +.01
USCorEqln12.12 +.02 OhMunn 12.08 -.01
USCorEq2nl1.92 +.02 1001ndex 9.95 +.04
DWS Invest A: Ovrsea n 30.59 +.26
CommAp 18.11 +.03 PcBasn 24.40 +.05
DWS InvestS: PAMunr n 11.21 -.01
CoreEqtyS 18.16 +.05 Purialn 19.52 +.04
CorPlslnc 10.86 +.01 PuritanK 19.52 +.04
EmMkGrr 16.59 +.12 RealEn 30.81 +.32
EnhEmMk 10.41 ... SAIISecEqF 12.80 +03
EnhGlbBdr 10.01 +.02 SCmdtyStrtn9.02 +.11
GIbSmCGr 39.18 +.25 SCmdtyStrFn9.04 +11
GIblTem 22.88 +.15 SrEmrgMkt 16.49 +.10
Gold&Prc 14.93 +.11 SrslntGrw 11.43 +.08
HiYldTx 12.60 +.01 SerlntlGrF 11.45 +.08
IntTxAMT 11.89 -.01 SrslntVal 8.77 +.04
Intl FdS 41.66 +.38 SerlntlValF 8.79 +.04
LgCpFoGr 33.48 +.05 SrlnvGrdF 11.69 -.03
LatAmrEq 42.31 +.16 StlntMun 10.82
MgdMuniS 9.30 +.01 STBFn 8.53 -.01
MATFS 14.87 ... SmCapDiscn22.66 -.10
SP500S 18.73 +.07 SmllCpSrn 18.85 +.02
WorldDiv 23.50 +.10 SCpValur 15.65 -.08
Davis Funds A: STSelLCVrnll.37 +.05
NYVenA 36.26 +.22 SBSlcACapn27.82 +.10
Davis Funds B: SUtSelSmCp 20.21 .
NYVenB 34.63 +.20 Stratlncn 11.06 +.01
Davis Funds C: S.rReRtr 9.50 +.03
NYVenC 34.94 +.20 TotalBdn 10.97 -.03
Davis FundsY: Trendn 77.95 +.02
NYVenY 36.65 +.22 USBI n 11.74 -.03
Delaware Invest A: Utilityn 17.43 +.09
Diverlncp 9.19 -.02 ValStratn 28.87 +.02
SMIDCapG 25.89 ... Valuen 72.52 +.24
TxUSAp 11.84 ... Wrldwn 19.53 +.09
Delaware Invest B: Fidelity Selects:
SelGrBt 35.83 -.24 Aim 38.91 -.03
Dimensional Fds: Banking n 19.03
EmMCrEqnl9.84 +.17 Biotchn 103.26 +.44
EmMktV 30.01 +.29 Brokrn 48.73 +.16
IntSmVan 15.85 +.09 Chemn 112.41 +.85
LargeCo 11.11 +.05 ComEquipn25.40 +.09
TAUSCorE2n9.70 +.01 Compn 67.52 -.26
USLgVan 21.57 +.10 ConDisn 27.17 +.14
USMicron 14.84 -.08 ConsuFnn 13.40 -.02


USTgdVal 17.17 -.06 ConStapn 77.37 +.38
US Small n 23.11 -.08 CstHon 42.42 +.12
USSmVa 26.26 -.13 DfAern 86.10 +.26
IntflSmCon 15.83 +.12 Electrn 54.66 +.12
EmgMktn 27.01 +.23 Enrgyn 52.66 +.40
Fixd n 10.33 ... EngSvn 68.20 +.73
IntGFxlnn 12.80 -.03 EnvAltEnrnl6.42 +.07
IntVan 16.38 +.08 FinSvn 60.21 +.13
Glb5Fxlnc n 11l.07 Gold r n 40.77 +.38
TM USTgtV 22.63 -.07 Health n 136.70 +.80
2YGIFxdn 10.12 ... Insurn 48.83 +.09
DFARIEn 25.54 +.24 Leisrn 111.68 +.41
Dodge&Cox: Material n 69.22 +.33
Balanced 74.33 +.23 MedDI n 63.76 +.63
Income 13.56 -.02 MdEqSysn 28.90 +.16
IntlStk 32.96 +.23 Multmdn 49.95 +.55
Stock 114.63 +.54 NtGas n 31.49 +.27
DoubleUne Funds: Pharmn 14.48 +.04
TRBdI 11.24 Retail n 61.58 -.16
TRBd Np 11.24 Softwr n 93.45 -.23
Dreyfus: Techn 105.64 -.22
Aprec 44.50 +.22 Telcm n 46.61 -.05
CTA 12.13 Transn 53.74 -.04
CorVA 22.47 UtilGrn 53.45 +.28
Dreyfx 9.73 +.01 Wirelessn 7.85 +.02
DryMidr 29.36 -.01 Fidelity Spartan:
GNMA 16.01 -.02 ExtMkInn 40.57 +.01


Here are the 1,000 biggest mutual funds listed on Nasdaq. Tables show the fund name, sell
price or Net Asset Value (NAV) and daily net change.
Name: Name of mutual fund and family.
NAV: Net asset value.
Chg: Net change in price of NAYV
Data based on NAVs reported to Lipper by 6 p.m. Eastern.


Name NAV Chg
5001dxlnvn 50.08 +.18
5001dxl I 50.09 +.18
Infllnxlnvn 33.10 +.21
TotMktlnvn 40.78 +.13
USBondl 11.73 -.03
Fidelity Spart Adv:
ExMktAdrn 40.57 +.01
5001dxAdvn50.09 +.19
IntAd r n 33.11 +.22
TotMktAdrn40.78 +.12
First Eagle:
GIbIA 49.01 +.15
OverseasA 22.13 +.11
First Investors A
BlChpAp
GloblAp 6.79
GovtApp 11.55
GrolnAp 16.39
IncoAp 2.54
MATFAp 12.24
MITFAp 12.57
NJTFAp 13.48
NYTFA p 14.97
OppAp 29.77
PATFAp 13.47
SpSitA p 25.64
TxExAp 10.08
TotRtAp 16.61
ValueBp 7.58
Forum Funds:
AbsStrl r 11.07 +.01
Frank/Temp Frnk A:
AdjUS px 8.89
ALTFAp 11.64 -.01
AZTFAp 11.22 -.01
CallnsAp 12.52 -.01
CAIntAp 11.88 -.01
CalTFAp 7.31
COTFAp 12.16 -.01
CTTFAp 11.27
CvtScAp 15.11 +.05
Dbl TFA 12.17
DynTchA 34.17-.06
EqlncAp 18.07 +.08
Fedlntp 12.24 -.01
FedTFAp 12.37
FLTFAp 11.82
FoundAlp 10.72
GATFAp 12.38 -.01
GoldPrMA 35.23 +.22
GrwthAp 50.43 +.08
HYTFAp 10.54 -.01
HilncA 2.01
IncomAp 2.18 +.01
InsTFAp 12.28 -.01
NYITF p 11.65 -.01
LATFAp 11.76 -.01
LMGvScAx 10.38
MDTFAp 11.81
MATFAp 11.89 -.01
MITFAp 12.17
MNInsA 12.65 -.01
MOTFAp 12.49 -.01
NJTFAp 12.46 -.01
NYTFAp 11.94 -.01
NCTFAp 12.69 -.01
OhiolAp 12.81 -.02
ORTFAp 12.32 -.01
PATFAp 10.69 -.01
ReEScAp 16.28 +.15
RisDvAp 37.35 +.19
SMCpGrA 38.92 +.06
Stratlncpx 10.46 -.03
TtlRtnAp 10.19 -.02
USGovAp 6.89
UFIsAp 13.30 +.06
VATFAp 11.99 -.01
Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv:
GIbBdAdvn 13.10 +.05
IncmeAd 2.16
Frank/Temp Frnk C:
IncomC t 2.20 +.01
USGvCt 6.85
Frank/Temp Mtl A&B:
SharesA 21.64 +.10
Frank/Temp Temp A:
DvMktA p 23.57 +.22
ForgnAp 6.65 +.05
GIBdAp 13.13 +.04
GrwthAp 18.27 +.12
WorldAp 15.41 +.09
Frank/Temp Tmp Adv:
GrthAv 18.27 +.12
Frank/Temp Tmp B&C:
DevMktC 22.99 +.22
ForgnCp 6.51 +.05
GIBdCp 13.16 +.05
Franklin Mutual Ser:
QuestA 17.33 +.04
GE Elfun S&S:
S&S Inc 11.75 -.02
US Eqty 44.39 +.24
GMOTrust Ill:
CHIE 22.24 +.07
Quality 24.15 +.09
GMOTrust IV:
InftGrEq 23.06 +.11
Inftlntri 20.33 +.10
GMOTrust VI:
EmgMktsr 11.68 +.10
Quality 24.16 +.09
StrFxlnc 16.45
Gabelli Funds:
Asset 52.13 +.22
Goldman Sachs A:
MdCVAp 37.59 +.16
Goldman Sachs Inst:
GrOppt 25.85 +.09
HiYield 7.14
HYMuni 8.91
MidCapV 37.87 +.16
Harbor Funds:
Bondx 12.46
CapAplnst 43.94 +.01
Intllnvt 59.43 +.37
Intl r 60.01 +.38
Hartford Fds A:
CpAppAp 33.58 +.11
DivGthAp 20.70 +.14
IntOpAp 14.56 +.11
Hartford Fds Y:
CapAppIn 33.60 +.11
Hartford HLS IA:
CapApp 43.18 +.13
Div&Gr 21.34 +.14
Advisers 21.11 +.04
TotRetBd 11.81 -.03
Hennessy Funds:
CorGrllOrig
Hussman Funds:
StrTotRetrx 12.26 -.03
StrGrow l 11.60 -.01
ICON Fds:
EnergyS 19.00 +.13
HIltcareS 16.21 +.12
ISI Funds:
NoAm px 7.90 -.03
IVA Funds:
WCdwideAt 16.31 +.04
WidwideIr 16.32 +.04
Invesco Fds Invest:
DivrsDivp 13.03 +.04
Invesco Funds:
Energy 39.04
Utlibes 16.70 +.07
Invesco Funds A:
Chart p 17.74 +.09
CmstkA 17.10 +.10
ConstTp 24.95 +.09
EqlncA 8.95 +.03
GrlncAp 20.35 +.09
HilncMu p 7.95
HiYldp 4.22
HYMuA 9.68
InulGrow 27.82 +.19
MunilnA 13.55 .01
PATFA 16.53 -.01
US MortgA 13.01
Invesco Funds B:
CapDevt 14.80 +.07
MunilnB 13.53 -.01
US Mortg 12.95
Ivy Funds:
AssetSCt 24.67 +.13
AssetStAp 25.44 +.14
AssetSbi r 25.67 +.14
JPMorgan A Class:
CoreBdAx 11.85 -.05
JPMorgan C Class:
CoreBd px 11.90 -.05
JP Morgan Insth:
MdCpValn 26.39 +.14
JPMorgan R C:
CoreBond x nl .85 -.05
ShtDurBdx 10.97 -.02
JPMorgan Select:
USEquity x nl1.30 +.01
JPMorgan Sel CIs:
CoreBd xn 11.84 -.05
HighYldxn 7.89 -.04
lntmTFBdxnll.24 -.03
LgCpGr 25.05
ShtDurBdxnlO.97 -.02
USLCCrPIsn22.59 +.11
JanusT Shrs:
BalancdTx 26.65 -.08
ContrarnT 14.21 -.01
EnterprT 66.27 +.02
FIxBndT 10.67 -.01
GlUfeSciTr 28.67 +.12
GIbSelT 11.42 +.01
GITechTr 18.95 +.03
Grw&lncTx 34.09 +.05
JanusT 31.74 +.11
OvrseasTr 37.68 +.09
PrkMCValT 22.21 +.06


ResearchT 32.39 +.13
ShTmBdT 3.09
TwentyT 61.34 +.01
VentureT 59.34 +.07
WrldWTr 45.82 +.19
Jensen Funds:
QualGrthJn29.37 +.16
John Hancock A:
BondAp 15.76 -.04
RgBkA 14.44 -.03
SfrlnAp 6.59
John Hancock B:
StrlncB 6.59


Name NAV Chg
John Hancock Cl 1:
LSAggr 12.70 +.05
LSBalancx 13.25 -.02
LSConsrvx 13.09 -.08
LSGrwth 13.26 +.04
LSModerx 13.01 -.05
Lazard Instl:
EmgMktl 19.71 +.13
Lazard Open:
EmgMkOp 20.16 +.13
Legg Mason A:
CBAgGrp 125.65 +.80
CBApprp 15.31 +.07
CBLCGrp 23.41 +.10
GCIAIICOp 8.54 +.10
WAHilncAt 5.99
WAMgMup 16.69 -.02
Legg Mason B:
CBLgCGrt 21.35 +.09
Legg Mason C:
CMSplnvp 30.40 -.02
CMValTrp 42.50 +.18
Longleaf Partners:
Partners 30.09 +.11
SmCap 27.73 -.04
Loomis Sayles:
LSBondl 14.67 -.01
StrlncC 15.25
LSBondR 14.61 -.01
StrlncA 15.17 +.01
Loomis Sayles Inv:
InvGrBdAp 12.39 -.02
InvGrBdY 12.40 -.02
Lord Abbett A:
AffilApx 11.83 +.03
FundlEq 13.48 +.06
BdDebAp 7.94
ShDurlncAp 4.60
MidCpAp 17.58 +.05
Lord Abbett C:
ShDurlncC t 4.63
Lord Abbett F:
ShtDurlnco 4.60
MFS Funds A:
MITA 21.35 +.11
MIGA 17.61 +.06
EmGA 48.01 +.08
HilnA 3.47
MFLA
TotRAx 14.97 +.01
UtilAx 17.71 +.07
ValueA 25.08 +.13
MFS Funds B:
MIGBn 15.82 +.05
GvScBn 10.45 -.02
HilnBn 3.48
MulnBn 8.70
TotRBxn 14.98 +.02
MFS Funds I:
ReInT 15.25 +.08
Valuel 25.19 +.14
MFS Funds Instl:
IntlEqn 18.20 +.13
MainStay Funds A:
HiYIdBAx 5.93 -.03
MainStay Funds B:
ConvBtx 15.32 -.01
GovtBtx 8.88 -.03
HYIdBBtx 5.90 -.03
IncmBldrx 17.03 -.07
IntflEqB 10.62 +.09
MainStay Funds I:
ICAPSIEqx 38.00 +.09
Mairs & Power:
Growth n 81.39 +.23
Manning&Napier Fds:
WIdOppA 7.67 +.08
Matthews Asian:
AsianGllnv 16.73 +.10
Indialnvr 16.83 +.44
PacTgrlnv 22.55 +.21
MergerFdn 15.76
Meridian Funds:
Growth 46.97 +.14
Metro West Fds:
TotRetBd 10.56
TotRtBdl 10.56
Midas Funds:
Midas Fdt 3.36 +.05
Monetta Funds:
Monettan 15.92 +.03
Morgan Stanley B:
GlobStratB 15.71 +.06
MorganStanley Inst:
IntfEql 13.71 +.07
MCapGrl 38.72 +.17
Muhlenkn 57.30 +.26
Munder Funds A:
GwthOppA 29.46
Munder Funds Y:
MCpCGrYn32.13 +.08
Mutual Series:
BeacnZ 12.91 +.05
GblDiscA 29.14 +.16
GlbDiscZ 29.51 +.16
QuestZ 17.47 +.03
SharesZ 21.81 +.10
Neuberger&Berm Fds:
Focus 21.30 +.09
Geneslnst 49.60 +.13
Intl r 16.77 +.12
Partner 26.92 +.17
Neuberger&Berm Tr:
Genesis 51.45 +.13
Nicholas Group:
Hilnc I n 9.72 +.02
Nichn 47.85 +.05
Northern Funds:
Bondldx 10.89
HiYFxlnc 7.30
SmCpldx 9.19
Stkldx 17.39
Technly 17.14
Nuveen Cl A:
LtMBAp 11.15
Nuveen Cl R:
IntDMBd 9.20 -.01
HYMunBd 15.94 +.01
Nuveen Cl YV:
RealEstxn 20.86 +.03
Oak Assoc Fds:
WhitOkSG 44.03 +.23
Oakmark Funds I:
Eqtylncr 29.19 +.11
Globall 22.99 +.09
Intl r 19.33 +.11
Oakmark 47.71 +.10
Select 32.34 +.12
Old Westbury Fds:
GlobOpp 7.29 +.02
GIbSMdCap 15.23 +.07
LgCapStrat 9.92 +.05
Oppenheimer A:
AMTFMu 6.77 -.01
AMTFrNY 11.82
CAMuniAp 8.36
CapApAp 48.80 +.12
CaplncAp 8.87
ChmplncApx 1.82 +.01
DvMktAp 33.67 +.43
Discp 62.05
EquityA 9.54 +.03
GlobAp 61.52 +.65
GIbOppA 31.73 +.06
GblStrlncA 4.20
GoldNp 34.16 +.56
lntBdA px 6.33 +.01
LtdTmMu 14.84
MnStFdA 37.01 +.11
PAMuniAp 11.39
SenFltRtAx 8.25 +.01
USGv px 9.61 -.02
Oppenheimer B:
AMTFMu 6.74
AMTFrNY 11.83
CplncB t 8.69
ChmplncBtx 1.82 ...
EquityB 8.80 +.03
GblSfrlncB 4.22
Oppenheimer Roch:
LtdNYAp 3.36 ...
RoMuAp 16.55 +.01
RcNtMuA 7.20
Oppenheimer Y:
DevMktY 33.29 +.42
InEBdYx 6.33 +.01
IntGrowY 28.98 +.27
PIMCO Admin PIMS:
ShtTmAdp 9.80
TotRtAd 11.09 -.02
PIMCO Instl PIMS:
AlAsetAutr 10.63 +.02
AIIAsset 12.14 +.02
ComodRR 6.61
Divlnc 11.64 -.01
EmgMkCur 10.53 +.03
EmMkBd 11.67 +01
Fltlnc r 8.69 +.02
ForBdUnr 10.87
FrgnBd 10.75
HiYld 9.29
InvGrCp 10.60 -.03
LowDu 10.40 -.01
ModDur 10.74 -.01
RealRet 11.57
RealRtnl 12.00
ShortT 9.80
TotRt 11.09 -.02
TRII 10.70 -.02
TRIll 9.76 -.02
PIMCO Funds A:
AIIAstAutt 10.56 +.02
ComRRp 6.48
LwDurA 10.40 -.01
RealRtAp 12.00
TotRtA 11.09 -.02


PIMCO Funds C:
AllAstAutt 10.46 +.02
RealRtC p 12.00
TotRtCt 11.09 -.02
PIMCO Funds D:
TRtn p 11.09 -.02
PIMCO Funds P:
AstAIIlAuthP 10.62 +.02
TotRtnP 11.09 -.02
Parnassus Funds:
Eqtylnco x n28.28 -.02
Perm Port Funds:
Permannt 48.74 +.22


Name NAV Chg
Pioneer Funds A:
BondA p 9.67 -.01
IntiValA 19.03 +.11
PionFdAp 42.30 +.20
ValueAp 11.94 +.08
Pioneer Funds B:
HiYIdBt 10.19 +.01
Pioneer Funds C:
HiYIdC t 10.30 +.01
Pioneer FdsY:
CullenVY 18.68 +.11
Price Funds:
Balance 20.63 +.04
BIChip 45.90 +.03
CABond 11.20 -.01
CapApp 22.58 +.09
DivGro 25.62 +.13
EmMktB 13.40 +.01
EmEurop 18.89 +.21
EmMktS 32.13 +.31
Eqlnc 25.52 +.12
Eqlndex 37.96 +.13
Europe 15.13 +.14
GNMA 10.10
Growth 37.92
Gr&ln 22.27 +.12
HIthSci 38.45 +.21
HiYield 6.74
InsflCpG 19.26 -.01
InstHiYId 9.49 -.01
IntlBond 9.87 +.02
IntDis 43.74 +.43
Intl G&I 12.89 +.08
IntflStk 13.99 +.11
Japan 8.05 +.03
LatAm 43.82 -.05
MDShrt 5.23
MDBond 10.84
MidCap 59.70 +.03
MCapVal 23.84 +.05
NAmer 35.82
NAsia 15.85 +.15
New Era 44.58 +.37
N Horiz 35.99 +.09
N Inc 9.70 -.02
NYBond 11.55 -.01
OverSSF 8.18 +.05
PSInc 16.89 +.03
RealAssetr 11.13 +.08
RealEst 20.55 +.20
R2010n 16.21 +.03
R2015n 12.65 +.03
R2020n 17.56 +.04
R2025n 12.90 +.04
R2030n 18.57 +.06
R2035n 13.16 +.04
R2040n 18.74 +.06
R2045n 12.48 +.04
SciTecn 31.16 -.01
ShtBd 4.84
SmCpStk 35.46 -.04
SmCapVal 38.17 -.09
SpecGr 19.27 +.07
SpecIn 12.67
TFInc 10.27 -.01
TxFrH 11.33
TxFrSI 5.68
USTInt 6.16 -.02
USTLg 12.85 -.17
VABond 12.00 -.01
Valuen 25.32 +.12
Principal lnv:
LgCGI In 10.49 +.01
LT20201n 12.35 +.02
LT20301n 12.25 +.02
Prudential Fds A:
BlendA 18.68
HiYIdAp 5.53
MuHilncA 9.93 +.01
UtlityA 11.23 +.05
Prudential Fds B:
GrowthB 18.95
HiYIdBt 5.52
Putnam Funds A:
AmGvAp 9.13 -.02
AZTE 9.31 -.01
ConvSec 20.04 +.04
DvrlnAp 7.63 +.02
EqlnAp 16.75 +.07
EuEq 18.80
GeoBalA 12.91 +.03
GIbEqtyp 9.25
GrInAp 14.43 +.08
GIbIHItA 43.08 +.24
HiYdAp 7.62
HiYId In 5.93
IncmAp 6.85 -.01
IntGrlnp 9.13 +.04
InvAp 14.40 +.06
NJTxA p 9.64 -.01
MulICpGr 56.71 +.11
PATE 9.33 -.01
TxExA p 8.82 -.01
TFInA p 15.33 -.01
TFHYA 12.22 -.01
USGvAp 13.63
GIblUtilA 10.35 +.05
VoyAp 23.58 +.01
Putnam Funds B:
TaxFrlns 15.34 -.01
DvrlnBt 7.56 +.02
Eqlnct 16.61 +.06
EuEq 18.04
GeoBalB 12.78 +.04
GIbEqt 8.35
GINtRst 18.11
GrlnBt 14.18 +.07
GIbIHIthB 34.42 +.19
HiYIdBt 7.61
HYAdBt 5.81
IncmBt 6.79 -.01
IntGrln t 9.06 +.04
InitNopt 14.04 +.06
InvBt 12.97 +.05
NJTxB t 9.63 -.01
MuItCpGr 48.59 +.09
TxExBt 8.83
TFHYBt 12.24 -.01
USGvBt 13.56
GIblUtilB 10.32 +.05
VoyBt 19.85 +.01
RS Funds:
IntGrA 17.44 +.13
LgCAIphaA 42.42 +.23
Value 25.07 +.01
RidgeWorth Funds:
LCGrStkAp 11.96 +.01
Royce Funds:
LwPrSkSvr 15.96 +.08
MicroCapl 16.32 +.02
PennMulr 12.06 -.01
Premier r 20.68 +.03
TotRetl r 13.77 -.01
ValSvc t 12.11 +.02
Russell Funds S:
StratBd 11.08 -.02
Rydex Advisor:
NasdaqAdv 16.75
SSgA Funds:
EmgMkt 20.32 +.18
Schwab Funds:
HIllCare 19.12 +.06
0lOOOnvr 39.87 +.14
S&P Sel 22.02 +.08
SmCpSl 21.37 -.05
TSM Ser 25.50 +.07
Scout Funds:
Intl 31.77 +.20
Selected Funds:
AmShD 43.89 +.27
AmShSp 43.89 +.27
Sentinel Group:
ComSAp 34.64 +.19
Sequoia 161.15 +.36
Sit Funds:
LrgCpGr 48.00 +.13
SoSunSCInv t22.04 ...
St FarmAssoc:
Gwll 56.19 +.36
Stratton Funds:
Muld-Cap 36.77 +.10
RealEstate 29.86 +.25
SmCap 54.70 .12
SunAmerica Funds:
USGvBt 10.07 -.03
TCW Funds:
EmMktln 8.83
TotRetBdl 9.91
TIAA-CREF Funds:
Bdldxlnst 10.77 -.02
Eqldxlnst 10.72 +.04
Templeton Instit:
ForEqS 18.70 +.14
Third Avenue Fds:
IntlValnstr 16.17 +.04
REVallnstr 23.98 +.03
Valuelnst 45.52 -.18
Thornburg Fds:
IntValAp 26.68 +.15
IncBuildAt 18.64 +.06
IncBuildCp 18.64 +.07
IntValue I 27.26 +.15
LtTMul 14.53
Thrivent Fds A:
HiYldx 4.86
Incom x 8.93 -.02
Tocqueville Fds:
Goldtn 70.91 +.85
Transamerica A:
AegonHYBp 9.28
Flexlncp 9.04
Turner Funds:
SmlCpGrn 36.13 +.01
Tweedy Browne:
GblValue 23.79 +.12
US Global Investors:
AIIAm 25.26 +.03


Name NAV Chg
Inco 13.17 -.01
Int 24.64 +.21
NYBd 12.18 -.01
PrecMM 30.23 +.44
SciTech 14.67 -.01
ShtTBnd 9.18 -.01
SmCpStk 14.91 -.04
TxElt 13.41 -.01
TxELT 13.50 -.01
TxESh 10.80
VABd 11.40
WIdGr 20.26 +.17
VALIC:
MdCpldx 21.17 -.01
Stkldx 26.25 +.10
Value Line Fd:
LrgCon 19.72 +.07
Vanguard Admiral:
BalAdmlIn 23.35 +.02
CAITAdmn 11.48 -.01
CALTAdm n 11.64
CpOpAdl n 75.90 +.31
EMAdmrrn 36.09 +.31
Energyn 115.58 +.89
EqlnAdm n n49.40 +.24
EuroAdml n 57.50 +51
ExplAdml n 75.88 +.01
ExtdAdmn 45.02 +.01
500Adml n 129.78 +.48
GNMAAdn 11.01 -.03
GrwAdm n 36.54 +.09
HlthCr n 58.56 +.29
HiYldCp n 5.84
InfProAdn 27.84 -.12
ITBdAdml n 11.71 -.08
ITsryAdmlnll.51 -.10
IntGrAdm n 59.25 +.35
ITAdmln 14.09 -.01
ITGrAdmn 10.08 -.07
LtdTrAdn 11.14
LTGrAdml nl.18 -.15
LTAdmln 11.48 -.01
MCpAdmlnlOl.09 +.27
MorgAdmn 63.48 +.11
MuHYAdm nlO.91
NYLTAdn 11.48 -.01
PrmCap r n 70.70 +.23
PALTAdmn11.48
ReitAdm r n 90.22 +.82
STsyAdml n 10.75 -.02
STBdAdmlnlO.61 -.01
ShtTrAdn 15.93
STFdAdn 10.81 -.05
STIGrAdn 10.74
SmCAdm n 37.71 -.05
TxMCap r n 70.43 +.24
TtlBAdmln 10.94 -.04
TStkAdmn 35.19 +.10
ValAdmIn 22.50 +.10
WellslAdm n57.12 -.03
WelltnAdm n57.83 +.18
Windsor n 49.34 +.26
WdsrllAdn 51.42 +.25
Vanguard Fds:
CALTn 11.64
CapOppn 32.86 +.13
Convrtn 12.89 +.02
DivdGron 16.60 +.07
Energy n 61.56 +.47
Eqlncn 23.57 +.12
Explrn 81.54 +.01
FLLT n 11.90 -.01
GNMAn 11.01 -.03
GlobEqn 18.07 +.07
Grolncn 29.97 +.10
GrthEqn 12.61 +.02
HYCorpn 5.84
HlthCren 138.78 +.68
InflaPron 14.17 -.07
IntlExplrn 14.79 +.12
IntlGrn 18.63 +.11
IntlVaIln 29.89 +.16
ITIGraden 10.08 -.07
ITTsryCn 11.51 -.10
LifeConn 16.96 +.01
LifeGro n 23.23 +.07
Lifelncn 14.43 -.01
LifeMod n 20.60 +.03
LTIGraden 10.18 -.15
LTTsryn 12.33 -.33
Morg n 20.47 +.03
MuHYn 10.91
Mulntn 14.09 -.01
MuLtdn 11.14
MuLongn 11.48 -.01
MuShrtn 15.93
NJLTn 12.07
NYLTn 11.48 -.01
OHLTTE n 12.39
PALTn 11.48
PrecMtlsrn 19.28 +.25
PrmcpCorn 14.74 +.05
Prmcprn 68.14 +.22
SelValu r n 20.50 +.02
STARn 20.39 +.03
STIGraden 10.74
STFedn 10.81 -.05
STTsryn 10.75 -.02
StratEq n 20.94 +.04
TgtRetlncn 11.94 -.01
TgRe2010n23.72
TgtRe2015nl3.18 +.02
TgRe2020 n23.46 +.05
TgtRe2025 nl3.39 +.04
TgRe2030 n23.02 +.07
TgtRe2035 nl3.88 +.04
TgtRe204O0n22.82 +.08
TgtRe2050 n22.72 +.08
TgtRe2045 nl4.33 +.05
USGron 21.34
USValuen 11.40 +.04
Wellsly n 23.58 -.01
Welltnn 33.48 +.10
Wndsrn 14.62 +.08
Wndslln 28.97 +.15
Vanguard Idx Fds:
DvMklnPl r n97.84 +.58
MidCplstPlnl 10.14 +.31
TotlntAdm r r24.46 +.16
Totlntllnstrn97.82 +.65
TotlntllP r n 97.84 +.65
TotlntSig r n 29.34 +.19
500 n 129.78 +.48
Balancedn 23.35 +.02
EMktn 27.47 +.24
Europe n 24.69 +.22
Extend n 44.99 +.01
Growth n 36.54 +.09
LgCaplxn 26.03 +.09
LTBndn 13.43 -.19
MidCap n 22.27 +.06
Pacific 10.12 +.01
REITrtn 21.15 +.20
SmCap n 37.68 -.05
SmlCpGth n24.45 -.01
STBndn 10.61 -.01
TotBndn 10.94 -.04
Totllntl n 14.62 +.09
TotStkn 35.19 +.11
Value n 22.51 +.11
Vanguard Instl Fds:
Ballnstn 23.35 +.02
DevMklnstn 9.39 +.06
Extln n 45.01 +.01
FTAIIWIdl r n86.99 +.56
Grwthlstn 36.53 +.08
InfProlnstn 11.34 -.05
Instldxn 128.94 +.48
InsPIn 128.94 +.47
lnstTStldxn 31.85 +.10
lnsTStPlusrn31.85 +.10
MidCplstn 22.33 +.06
SCInstn 37.71 -.04
TBIstgn 10.94 -.04
TSInstkn 35.20 +.11
Valuelstn 22.50 +.11
Vanguard Signal:
500Sgln 107.20 +.39
GroSig n 33.83 +.08
ITBdSig n 11.71 -.08
MidCpldxn 31.90 +.09
STBdldxn 10.61 -.01
SmCpSig n 33.98 -.04
TotBdSgl n 10.94 -.04
TotStkSgln 33.97 +.11
Virtus Funds:
EmMktl 9.78 +.07
Virtus Funds A:
MulSStAp 4.85
Waddell & Reed Adv:
AssetS p 9.64 +.05
CorelnvA 6.52 +.04
DivOppAp 15.35 +.09
DivOppC t 15.20 +.09
Wasatch:
SmCpGr 43.18 +.07
Wells Fargo Adv A:
AstAIlAp 12.61
Wells Fargo Adv C:
AstAIICt 12.16
Wells Fargo Adv:
CmS slnv 21.31 -.02
Opptylnv 40.99 +.07
Wells Fargo Ad Ins:
UlStMulnc 4.82
Wells Fargo Admin:
Growth 42.78 +.10
Wells Fargo Insth:
UItSTMuA 4.82
Western Asset:
CorePlusl 11.26 -.02
William Blair N:
GrowthN 12.29
Yacktman Funds:
Fundpn 18.82 +.08
Focused n 20.05 +.09


ChinaReg 7.44 -.03
GIbRs 10.04 +.09
Gld&Mtls 12.36 +.18
WdPrcMn 13.26 +.16
USAA Group:
AgvGt 37.73 +.06
CABd 10.71 -.01
CrnstStr 22.52 +.06
GovSec 10.37 -.01
GrTxStr 14.27 +.02
Growth 16.38 +.03
Gr&lnc 16.44 +.05
IncStk 13.54 +.06


Stocks rise, extending




best start since 1998


Associated Press


Rising consumer spend-
ing boosted stocks on Friday,
and Wall Street closed its
best first quarter since 1998.
The Dow Jones industrial
average rose 66.22 points to
close at 13,212.04. The Stan-
dard & Poor's 500 index
rose 5.19 points to close at
1,408.47. The Nasdaq com-
posite barely moved, falling
3.79 points to close at
3,091.57.
For the quarter, the Dow
posted an 8 percent gain
and the S&P a 12 percent
gain, the best for those in-
dexes in 14 years. The gain
was 19 percent for the Nas-
daq, its best since 1991.
The Commerce Depart-
ment said consumer spend-
ing rose in February at the
fastest rate in seven months.
Strong hiring over the past
three months has added up
to the best jobs growth in
two years, putting more peo-
ple back to work.
Americans spent more
even though their income
has stagnated for two
months after taxes and in-
flation. Some of the in-
creased spending has gone
to gasoline, which is the
most expensive on record
for this time of year. Oil
prices rose again on Friday,
up 23 cents in New York to
$103.02 per barrel.
Nine out of 10 industry
groups in the S&P 500 rose.
The biggest-gaining cate-
gory was energy stocks, al-
though refiners fell because
of the higher oil prices.
Health care stocks rose, too,
with two of the biggest gain-
ers being health insurers


Market
March 30

Dow Jones
industrials


Nasdaq
composite


Standard &
Poor's 500

Russell
2000


NYSE
Advanced:

Declined:

Unchanged

Volume:

Nasdaq
Advanced:

Declined:

Unchanged

Volume:



UnitedHealth
and WellPoint
ogy stocks fellE
Some of the
be driven by
quarter efforts
agers to get int
that they have
ular again, saic
a regional inve
tor for US I
Management.
ual investors w
relying on bon
be getting back
ket, too, he sail
"We are very
see the retail
playing one
piano that
all the time," h
Apple fell


after a company that makes
watch its iPhones and iPads said it
, 2012 would effectively raise per-
+66.22 hour wages at its factories in
China, suggesting that man-
13,212.04 ufacturing prices could rise.
Shares of BlackBerry
maker Research in Motion
3,091.57 Ltd. rose 6.6 percent a day

+5.19 after the Canadian company
said it would return to fo-
1,408.47 causing on corporate cus-

-1.92 tomers and shake up its
830.30 management to try to get
profits growing again.
diary Corn prices surged 6.6
1,750 percent on news that sup-
1,277 pliers are tighter than pre-
1,277 viously thought Higher corn
: 110 plus higher oil prices points

3.6 b toward higher food prices.
Grocer stocks fell: Super-
diary valu Inc. was down 3.7 per-
1,170 cent, and Safeway Inc. fell

1,359 1.3 percent.
Best Buy closed down 4.4
J: 117 percent as investors contin-

1.8 b ued to digest its plan to cut
AP stores and staff as it shifts

toward smaller stores in an
Group Inc. effort to compete with on-
Inc. Technol- line retailers. Best Buy
slightly stock lost almost 7 percent
buying could on Thursday
end-of-the- Sports apparel maker
by fund man- Finish Line Inc. fell 16 per-
to stocks now cent after it predicted a
become pop- lower-than-expected first-
d Jim Russell, quarter profit.
stment direc- European markets
Bank Wealth bounced back after a rocky
And individ- week that included a na-
ho have been tional strike in Spain. On
ids appear to Friday, the country unveiled
into the mar- a draft 2012 budget that
d. seeks to cut the deficit by $36
heartened to billion through spending
investor stop cuts and a tax hike on large
key on the companies. But Spain also
is, all bonds, plans to cut government
.e said. ministry spending by an av-
1.7 percent erage of nearly 17 percent.


ALBANY, N.Y Whole Foods Market said Fri-
day that it will stop selling fish caught from depleted
waters or through ecologically damaging methods,
a move that comes as supermarkets nationwide try
to make their seafood selections more sustainable.
Starting Earth Day, April 22, the natural and
organic supermarket chain will no longer carry
wild-caught seafood that is "red-rated," a color
code that indicates it is either overfished or
caught in a way that harms other species. The
ratings are determined by the Blue Ocean Insti-
tute, an advocacy group, and the Monterey Bay
Aquarium in California.
Among the seafood disappearing from Whole
Foods shelves will be octopus, gray sole, skate, At-
lantic halibut and Atlantic cod caught by trawls,
which can destroy habitats. The company will stock
sustainable replacements like cod caught on lines.

Jump in US consumer

spending brightens outlook

WASHINGTON U.S. consumers boosted
their spending in February by the most in seven
months, raising expectations for stronger growth
rates at the start of the year.
Americans spent more even as their income
barely grew. To make up the difference, many
saved less.
-From wire reports


In Celebration of Easter and Passover

The Plantation on Crystal River will be closed from April 4-April 15, 2012 due
to a private function.

Please be aware that the public will not have access to the Dining Room, Bar,
Tiki Bar and Pool area until April 16, 2012.

Our championship golf course, Adventure Center/Dive Shop and Full Service
Aveda Spa will be open for your convenience during this time. We invite
you to stop in and play some golf, eat it the Pr. P. nr n.d Grill.,
rent a pontoon boat, schedule a ma:_ .ir... ..1 ,.[. br._ i ., HI.l"H-
a spa treatment and enjoy this great FI. 1.1 r ,. ir ,h

We look forward to seeing you soon'

For more information, call 352-795- -4' II








PLANTATION

0 on Cys River


www.PlantationOnCrystalRiver.com


Name Last Chg
SP CnSt 34.08 +.21
SP Consum 45.09 +.20
SP Engy 71.75 +.58
SPDR Fncl 15.80 +.09
SP Inds 37.42 +.17
SPTech 30.16 -.09
SP JUI 35.04 +.19
StdPac 4.46 -.16
Standex 41.19 +.63
StanBlkDk 76.96 -.90
StarwdHtl 56.41 -.17
StateSt 45.50 +.44
StatoilASA 27.11 +.45
Steris 31.62 +.02
Sterlite 8.54 +.08
StatHotels 6.58 +.18
Sbyker 55.48 +.40
SturmRug 49.10 +.75
SubPpne 43.00 +.42
SunCmts 43.33 +.19
Suncorgs 32.70 +.16
Sunoco 38.15 -.08
SunsnHtl 9.74 +.20
Suntedich 3.06 +.11
SunTrst 24.17 +.02
SupEnrgy 26.36 +.18
Supvalu 5.71 -.22
SwiftTrans 11.54 +.02
Synovus 2.05 -.02
Sysco 29.86 +.08


TCF Fncl 11.89
TE Connect 36.75
TECO 17.55
TIM Partn 32.26
TJXs 39.71
TRWAuto 46.45
TaewSemi 15.28
Talbots 3.03
TalismEg 12.60
Target 58.27
TataMotors 26.97
TeckResg 35.66
TeekayTnk 6.07
TelNorL 11.35
TelcmNZs 9.92
TelefBrasil 30.63
TelefEsp 16.41
TempurP 84.43
Tenaris 38.23
TenetHIth 5.31
Teradata 68.15
Teradyn 16.89
Terex 22.50
TerraNitro 250.80
Tesoro 26.84
TetraTech 9.42
Textron 27.83
Theragen 1.84
ThermoFis 56.38
ThmBet 71.91
ThomCrkg 6.76
3MCo 89.21


Tiffany 69.13
TimeWarn 37.75
Timken 50.74
TollBros 23.99
TorchEngy 1.97
Trchmrkks 49.85
TorDBkg 84.95
Total SA 51.12
TotalSys 23.07
Transom 54.70
Travelers 59.20
Tredgar 19.59
TriContI 15.92
TrinaSolar 7.13
Turkoell 12.60
TwoHrblnv 10.14
TycolntI 56.18
Tyson 19.15
UBSAG 14.02
UDR 26.71
UIL Hold 34.76
USAirwy 7.59
USG 17.20
UltraPtg 22.63
UniSrcEn 36.57
UniFirst 61.55
UnionPac 107.48
UtdContI 21.50
UtdMicro 2.45
UPSB 80.72
UtdRentals 42.89
US Bancrp 31.68


US NGs rs 15.92 -.29 WsteMInc 34.96
US OilFd 39.23 -.06 WatsnPh 67.06
USSteel 29.37 -.03 Weathflnfi 15.09
UtdTech 82.94 +.62 WeinRIt 26.43
UtdhlthGp 58.94 +.83 WellPoint 73.80
S2448 04 WellsFargo 34.14
M A ~WestarEn 27.93
WAstEMkt 14.28
VFCp 145.98 -2.48 WstAMgdHi 6.14
ValeSA 23.33 +.31 WAstlnfOpp 12.79
ValeSApf 22.69 +.21 WDigital 41.39
ValeroE 25.77 -.88 WstnRefin 18.82
VangREIT 63.65 +.52 WstnUnion 17.60
VangEmg 43.47 +.45 Weyerhsr 21.92
VangEAFE 34.03 +.28 Whrlpl 76.86
VarianMed 68.96 +.16 WhitngPet 54.30
Vectren 29.06 +.07 WmsCos 30.81
Ventas 57.10 +.22 WmsPtrs 56.59
VeoliaEnv 16.51 +.20 WmsSon 37.48
VeriFone 51.87 +.10 Winnbgo 9.80
VerizonCm 38.23 +.16 WiscEngy 35.18
Visa 118.00 -1.00 WT India 19.28
Vishaylnt 12.16 +.02 Worthgtn 19.18
VMware 112.37 -.09 Wyndham 46.51
Vonage 2.21 +.05 XLGrp 21.69
Vornado 84.20 +.75 XcelEngy 26.47
WGL Hold 40.70 +.07 Xerox 8.08
WPXEnn 18.01 -.15 Yamanag 15.62
Wabash 10.35 -.04 Yelpn 26.89
WalMart 61.20 +.38 YingliGrn 3.62
Walgrn 33.49 -.44 Youku 21.99
WalterEn 59.21 -1.04 YumBrnds 71.18


Business HIGHLIGHTS


MasterCard, Visa warn of Whole Foods to stop sale of

cardholder data breach unsustainable seafood


NEW YORK- MasterCard and Visa said Fri-
day that they had notified issuers of its credit
cards of a potential breach of the security of cus-
tomer accounts. The companies did not say how
many customers were affected.
Global Payments Inc., which processes credit
card transactions for stores, said it had detected
a breach of card data in early March. Breaches
of card data can lead to identity theft and unau-
thorized charges.
Global Payments said it had alerted federal
law enforcement and was investigating. Spokes-
woman Amy Corn would not say whether cards
besides Visa and MasterCard were affected.

Ford CEO Mulally made

$29.5 million in 2011

DEARBORN, Mich. The pay package for
Ford CEO Alan Mulally rose 11 percent last year
to $29.5 million, or a little more than $5 for every
vehicle sold.
Mulally earned $2 million in salary, up 43 per-
cent from 2010, and stock awards valued at $13.9
million, up 86 percent from the prior year. But his
performance bonus dropped 42 percent to $1.8
million because Ford fell short of its targets for
market share and quality in some areas. Mulally
also received $612,587 in perks and other com-
pensation for things like use of a personal jet.







Page A10 SATURDAY, MARCH 31, 2012



PINION


"All faults may be forgiven of him who
has perfect candor."
Walt Whitman, 1855


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan............. .................. publisher
Charlie Brennan ............... .................. editor
Mike Arnold ............. .................. HR director
Sandra Frederick............................. managing editor
Z...u Curt Ebitz................ .............citizen member
Founded Mac Harris ....... .................. citizen member
by Albert M.
Williamson Rebecca Martin ................................guest member
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


CAREFUL
CONSIDERATION NEEDED




Cost of suing



over bay rule



steep to city


During the last Crystal
River City Council
meeting, council mem-
bers vented their displeasure
with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife
Service's decision
to designate
King's Bay as a THE IS
manatee refuge Cryst
and to impose o ryst
new rules on boat- ponders I
ing in the bay King's
At the end of the
meeting, they de- OUR O0
cided to draft a Think long
letter of intent to before li
litigate and con-
sider it at their
next meeting, though they have
not yet decided if they will file
a lawsuit. Writing the letter of
intent would preserve the
city's right to sue should the of-
ficials decide to continue with
litigation.
The federal decision was a
compromise, and as in most
compromises, both sides gain
something and both sides lose
something. This often means
that neither side is fully satis-
fied with the decision.
Most everyone involved in
the King's Bay issue has some-
thing they dislike in the final
ruling, from the size of the
summer sports zone and the
top speed allowed in it to the
fact that manatee interaction is
still allowed in the new rules.
Some citizens not only don't
like the compromise, but have
a fundamental complaint with
the fact the federal govern-
ment made the entire bay a


Exemplary service
On St. Patrick's Day, the bride
and I decided on dinner at the
Outback in Inverness. Upon arriv-
ing, we were told that there would
be a 30- to 40-minute wait, so we
sat outside and waited. What a
pleasant surprise when Heather
came out, passed out snacks and
took orders for cold drinks. Hat's
off to management. Nice touch.
Don't reinvent wheel
I agree with the Sound
Off that says it's ridicu-
lous for the Citrus Board
of Trustees to spend
money for a county health
plan. That's what the
health department is and
that's why we already I
have money spent for A
health for our citizens.
Why do we recreate the CAL.
wheel? It's just ridiculous 5
and it's about politics and 563-
control and a way to
spend money, a way to have power.
Ten cents in a day
I don't know what's happening,
man. I went by the gas station
today and went by at 10 o'clock
last night and it was $3.79. Went
by at 7 o'clock this morning,
$3.89 up 10 cents in a day. I
don't get it. Ten cents, man.
What's happening? I checked the
news. I thought the world was
coming to a crisis. So I looked
around, couldn't find anything on
there. Just went back and forth
trying to find why gas prices would
go up 10 cents overnight. Can't fig-


S
al
la
Be

P
Ig
t


I

(


manatee protection area.
Due to the high level of emo-
tions that have been generated
by this controversy, it is possi-
ble that someone not satisfied
with the final rule
will end up suing
;SUE: regardless of what
River the city decides.
River Should such a suit
lawsuit on be filed, it would
ay rule. be a personal de-
cision and paid
INION: for by private
and hard funds.
igating. Ho we ver,
should the city de-
cide to file suit, it
would be doing it with public
money collected from all the
taxpayers in Crystal River.
This places a heavy burden on
city officials, particularly con-
sidering the city's own attorney
has advised that Crystal River
would face an uphill battle in
litigation with the federal
government.
It is easy to get into litigation,
particularly when driven by
the emotions of the moment.
However, it is both expensive
and time-consuming to get out
of a lawsuit once entered.
While we can appreciate the
frustration of city officials and
the pressure they are receiving
from some of their outraged
constituents, we urge restraint
and negotiation, and very de-
liberate consideration before
entering into litigation that
could drag on for a very long
time and cost residents money
for years to come.


ure anything out. Maybe it's be-
cause we ain't drilling nowhere,
shut down those platforms out
there in the Gulf and can't get any
oil here. But we're selling our ex-
cess oil whatever that is ex-
cess gasoline, we're selling it to
China. So I don't get it.
Bring back WPA
I'm an old woman and I can re-
member when Roosevelt was presi-
dent. I never was a fan of his, but I
can see now his WPA work program
was one of the best we
J|ND had in this country. And I
#JI think it's time we get back
flW to the WPA and put some
vrr of these people to work
p and do the things that
we're paying to have done
that the unions would
complain about. But we
would get the people out
and about, they wouldn't
) 579 be obese and they would
)579t be doing something for
their country.
Stop freebies
I thought it was very interesting
about Nancy Pelosi's daughter,
who interviewed people outside of
New York City's Welfare Depart-
ment. Able-bodied people (were)
saying that they will choose
Obama because of all the freebies
they get from him. And then you
have the heckler in Illinois who
said to Romney, "What about
birth control? I want free birth
control." Well, his answer was the
right answer; you want free
things, then vote for Obama. And
that's what I say to all of you.


Fair trade, not free trade


BY DOUGLAS COHN
AND ELEANOR CLIFT
WASHINGTON
ince World War II, free
trade has been an accepted
political mantra. It is time
to change that to fair trade.
For more than 100 years, the
nation received most of its in-
come from tariffs placed on im-
ported goods, but it was never
equitable. With each change in
the political makeup of Congress,
tariffs would be altered to favor
different constituent regions.
This finally came to a head with
passage of the Smoot-Hawley tar-
iff in 1930. Unlike earlier tariffs,
Smoot-Hawley managed to hurt
everyone by starting a trade war
with Europe just as the Great De-
pression was beginning. Indeed,
some historians claim that
Smoot-Hawley is what turned a
stock market crash and recession
into a depression.
Ever since then, there has been
a continuing movement toward
free trade, with the average tariff
dropping from 35 percent in 1935
to less than two percent today
Smoot-Hawley gave tariffs a bad
name.
The problem is that following
World War II, one emerging na-
tion after another was able to
undermine American manufac-
turers with cheap goods pro-
duced with cheap labor In the
1950s, it was Japan, and a "Made
in Japan" label connoted cheap
in both cost and quality But once
Japan emerged into an industrial
powerhouse, everything from
cars to computers became noted
for their increased prices and
high quality, and importers
looked elsewhere for cheap-labor
goods.
In each case the scenario was
the same. Any emerging country


Other VOICES


with a skilled labor force could
play Outside capital would pro-
vide the machinery and the initial
management skills if needed. And
unlike natural resources, labor is
renewable, so claims of exploita-
tion were misplaced. Despite in-
stances of child, convict, and slave
labor, each exporting country wit-
nessed a rise in its standard of liv-
ing as it was pressed by its own
prosperity to meet higher and
higher wage demands.
After Japan, there was Taiwan,
South Korea, India, and even an-
other former foe, Vietnam. But
the output of all these was
dwarfed by China, a nation that
has not been America's friend
since the Communist takeover in
1949. From the hot war in Korea
to the Cold War to the post-Cold
War, China has been America's
foe. Now American consumers
are feeding Chinese prosperity
and a consequent military
buildup. The one promising de-
velopment is that China is going
through the same metamorphosis
as Japan, Taiwan, and the others
did. China's prosperity is begin-
ning to eliminate its reservoir of
cheap labor
In a modern economy, tariffs
should be used both as a revenue
source and a stabilizing tool, and
this requires economic astute-
ness rather than knee-jerk reac-
tions based upon outdated
aphorisms. Much as the Federal
Reserve adjusts interest rates
and money supply to address liq-
uidity and inflation, tariffs should
be used to maintain an equitable
balance that helps America's
trading partners grow without
gutting U.S. industries.
The problem is not limited to
trade with China. Even that hall-


mark to free trade, NAFTA
(North American Free Trade
Agreement), has exposed the pit-
falls of an improperly supervised
import-export arrangement.
Medical products are one exam-
ple. The U.S. treats Canadian
medical products certified by
Health Canada the same as U.S.
products certified by the U.S.
Food and Drug Administration,
but the reverse is not true. In that
field, free trade is a one-way
street.
Whether it is the Department
of Commerce's International
Trade Administration or the Of-
fice of the United States Trade
Representative in the Executive
Office of the President, or any
other federal office, there needs
to be one entity such as the Fed-
eral Reserve that is capable of
monitoring international trade
practices on a regular basis and
making tariff adjustments ac-
cordingly This would require
congressional authorization and
should be subject to quarterly re-
view by Congress. In this way,
America could keep pace with
the fast-changing global economy
There is no need to return to the
1800s or the 1930s, nor color the
issue in the black-and-whites of
free trade vs. protectionism.
America simply needs to imple-
ment a policy of fair trade that
recognizes the needs and con-
cerns of trading partners without
neglecting America's workers
and industrial base.
--In--
Douglas Cohn and Eleanor
Clift write the Washington
Merry-Go-Round column,
founded in 1932 by Drew
Pearson.


_ LETTERS to the Editor


No more taxes
This little letter has to do with
(Brad) Thorpe's suggestion of
raising tax (millage).
If you (Mr Thorpe) and the
BOCC had not been so free with
our tax dollars, you would have
plenty of money for raises, al-
though I don't think raises are
needed while you are laying
people off and eliminating jobs
or positions in this economy
Here are a few examples:
$2 million or $3 million for Ot-
tawa and the cut-through from
(County Road) 486 to (State
Road) 44.
Thousands of dollars for con-
sultants to tell us how to spend
our tax dollars ... isn't that what
the BOCC does?
Hundreds if not thousands of
dollars spent on trips to Port
Manatee and surrounding coun-
ties at a mileage rate of 46 cents
a mile. This included the BOCC
and county administrator's nu-
merous trips.
Thousands more being spent
trying to find out if the port is
feasible.
As far as Citrus County govern-
ment employees are concerned,
if we taxpayers are paying for
medical insurance, life insur-
ance, dental insurance, optical
insurance, retirement, 401(k) or
anything but wages, that should
be renegotiated for the county
employee to pay at least 25 to 50
percent of the cost. Taxpayers


should not pay the br
expenses for county e
You, Mr Thorpe, ha
new mouth. Gee, I thin
the BOCC could take c
public information yo
and save money and b
I also see that Mosq
trol has purchased the
next to them on (Cour
491 for $250,000. How
other properties have
chased at our expense
I am sure I could go
am sure you get the gi
concerns. No more ta:


Women not s
What makes Republ
lators think this country
women who are willing
any lengths, even claim
cest, to get an abortion
think abortions are wh
girls aspire to do in the
that it is such a fun pro
women vie for the opp
This idea is so ludic
tempted to think it's a
the Draconian legisla
passed in so many sta
women's rights is no j
One example is Sena
Leader Chuck Winder
who will not accept a v
word for rape or incest
parently police record
quires doctors question
marital relationships b


unt of the
employees.
ve hired a
nk you or
care of
ourselves
benefits .
uito Con-
e property
ity Road)
manv


forming abortions. The state has
concluded women are liars.
The state also believes women
are stupid. Since many state leg-
islatures are passing laws re-
quiring women undergo one and
sometimes two invasive ultra-
sound examinations, as in Iowa,
with no exception for a medical
emergency


..... These laws assume women are
been pur- so stupid doctors must prove to
e? women they are indeed preg-
on, but I nant and what being pregnant
st of my means by showing them pictures
xes! and explaining the pictures in
R. Thomas detail. This demonstrates a
Lecanto shocking ignorance of the ardu-
ous decision to terminate a
stupid pregnancy
The prevailing impression is
ican legis- women have abortions for the
y is full of fun of it Abortions are talked
g to go to about as some prize that women
i rape or in- aspire to achieve. Even more ap-
? Do they palling are the women who sup-
at little port these unenlightened,
eir lives, regressive ideas.
lcedure that Women happen to be in the
ortunity? majority in this country and it is
crous one is time we organize in self-defense.
joke. But Are Republicans so desperate to
tion being keep women out of the public
tes to limit sphere they are resorting to legis-
oke. lating against abortions and con-
ate Majority traceptives? Will the next law
of Idaho, Republican legislatures pass
voman's make it illegal to sell women
, nor ap- shoes?


s, and re-
n women's
beforee per-


Jo Darling
Lecanto


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Table manners
After reading the various Sound
Off calls regarding tipping and be-
cause I have been in the hospitality
and gastronomic industries for more
than 20 years, I feel I may input a
few thoughts on the issue.
Most of the bad situations with tip-
ping arise from the fact when a
restaurant official tells the waiter or
server applicant that they can make
a lot of tips because of the high
sales. This is leading the applicant
to believe that they are entitled to
the tip no matter what.
Restaurant officials use this line
of language to attract applicants be-
cause they need bodies to serve and
many restaurants do not have the
proper tools for training.
A tip must be earned by giving
good service and not otherwise, but
before punishing the server (as they
are called these days) for bad serv-
ice, we must figure whether the
problem is the kitchen and, if so, the
server should not be punished. A
word with the owner or manager is
the best way
Now, one thing that I see wrong,
and this is our fault, is the fact
that many people do not like to tip
and use every excuse possible not
to do so.
For example: If you go to a restau-
rant with a coupon and the meal, in-
stead of being $30 before tax, is now
$20 because of the coupon, one
should tip on the $30 and not on the
$20 providing you have received
good service, because it is not the
server's fault that the house decided
to issue coupons to boost sales.
Finally, I must say that if you want
to eat out and avoid tipping, just go
to a fast-food restaurant where you
do not get table service and tipping
is not expected.
Roberto Rodriguez
Inverness

Don't follow the money
Unlike Charlie Dean, Brad King,
Dick Locke, Brad Thorpe and
Bernie Levin, who switched from
Democrat to Republican, Nancy Ar-
genziano is heading in the other di-
rection. It's no secret that the
Democratic Party has less money to
attract candidates, and decades ago
moderate Republican Everett Dirk-
son said "Money is the mothers' milk
of politics."
Let's hope Nancy can wean local
legislative hopefuls from the
political pap.
Mary B. Gregory
Homosassa


Letters to THE EDITOR

OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in Chronicle
editorials are the opinions of the news-
paper's editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political car-
toons, columns or letters do not neces-
sarily represent the opinion of the
editorial board.
Groups or individuals are invited
to express their opinions in a letter
to the editor.
Persons wishing to address the edito-
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ing letters sent via email. Names and
hometowns will be printed; phone num-
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We reserve the right to edit letters for
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Letters must be no longer than 350
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three letters per month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor, 1624
N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL
34429. Or, fax to 352-563-3280, or
email to letters@chronicleonline.com.

A year of growth
Florida's economy is looking up
this spring. Employers are hiring,
consumers are spending and the en-
gines of growth are revving up.
Our state leaders in Tallahassee
are doing their part, so we ought to
give some credit where it is due as
we look back on the legislative ses-
sion that was completed this month.
Gov Rick Scott is fulfilling his
commitment to create jobs in Florida
by advancing job-creating legislation
that will have a direct impact on put-
ting Floridians back to work.
In particular, we would like to
highlight the important changes
made this year to Florida's unem-
ployment compensation system,
which will be more appropriately
called "re-employment assistance"
under House Bill 7027, which Gov.
Scott has signed. Under this bill,
which Gov Scott made one of his top
priorities, unemployed workers will
receive the skills assessment and
training they need to help them find
a productive place in Florida's
workforce.
Just as important, Florida's em-
ployers are getting relief from a mas-
sive tax increase that would have
curtailed our job growth. Florida
law had triggered an assessment to
replenish the state's depleted unem-
ployment compensation fund with a
fund balance of $2 billion, driving a
huge tax increase for 2012 of
approximately $100 per employee
for employers.
With the assistance of Gov Scott
and the incoming legislative leader-
ship, Speaker Designate Rep. Will
Weatherford (R-Wesley Chapel) and


Senate President Designate Sen.
Don Gaetz (R- Niceville), the tax in-
crease was reduced by $197 million
in 2012 and approximately $350 mil-
lion in 2013. From the perspective of
Florida's employers, we appreciate
their leadership in helping us make
2012 another year of growth in Florida.
Rick McAllister
President/CEO, Florida
Retail Federation
Tallahassee

No more Pitts
Please stop printing the "Other
Voices" commentary articles by
Leonard Pitts. This man is racist and
obnoxious! How can the Chronicle
stoop to this level? I will not read
the Opinion page any longer if his
columns appear there. I may give up
the newspaper altogether and just
get my news online from other
sources. This man should not be al-
lowed to commentate on anything!
Sally van Osdell
Inverness

Praise for EDC, Chamber
Congratulations to the Economic
Development Council and Chamber
of Commerce of Citrus County for
hosting the very first Citrus County
meeting of the Tampa Bay Partner-
ship Board of Directors on March 22.
With the Republican National
Convention to take place in August
of this year, it is a great time to join
forces in bringing exposure to the
Citrus County/Tampa Bay area that
includes opportunities for business,
with tourism in the Nature Coast,
Three Sisters Springs, agriculture
and the many varied business oppor-
tunities of this area.
According to the Chronicle of
March 23: "... 50 of Florida's top
CEOs and business leaders attended
the meeting that took place for the
first time in Citrus County since it
became an economic development
partner with the Tampa Bay Partner-
ship in 2010." There were represen-
tatives of Sweet Bay Supermarkets,
AT&T, Progress Energy, SunTrust
and many others!
As president of the Ronald Rea-
gan Republican Assembly for the
West Central Florida region, and as
a member of both of the hosting or-
ganizations, I am proud of all of the
businesspersons of this area and
their past and future success, since
the furtherance of private and free
enterprise in Citrus County is a part
of our mission!
Renee Christopher-McPheeters
Crystal River


Now I'm blue
What's Citrus County
coming to when you go out
for St. Paddy's Day and no-
body's got green beer? No-
body had green beer. I thought
it was awful for St. Paddy's
Day not to have green beer.
Don't feed wildlife
Now the people of Pine
Ridge are getting all nervous
and excited about coyotes.
They've been around here for
the past several years, except
nobody sees them (because)
they're night feeders and
they're nocturnal. But the
problem that we're having
with them isn't because of
the animals. I know of two or
three instances here where
people are feeding raw meats
and stuff out in the wooded
areas to feed animals. They
think it's a great attraction
to do that. What they're
doing is, they're in-
troducing the foxes 01
and all sorts of
other animals that
come in. (If) you
start feeding them
raw meat, they're
going to come in
and stay in be-
cause that's their
source of diet. You CAL
don't feed animals 563-
like wild animals
like that. You leave
them alone and when
there's no food, they'll leave.
But these people that are
doing it, I don't understand
where they're coming from.
Nostalgic note
In regards to Wednesday,
March 21's Opinion in the
Commentary section in re-
gards to the Encyclopedia
Britannica: I still have the
1959 volumes of the Ency-
clopedia Britannica. And,
yes, it is housed in its own
bookcase and still in pretty
good condition and I have
still have most of the books
of the year and both of the
dictionaries, also. Anyway, it
was good nostalgia reading
about it in the paper today.
Thank you.
Extend turn lane
While doing the repaving
and construction on (State
Road) 44, why don't they
make a longer turn lane at
(S.R.) 44 and (County Road)
491 when you're heading
north or west toward Citrus
County to turn north?
There's one little lane.
They've got two from the
other direction going south
and one jutting north, and a
lot of us from Beverly Hills
come through here. Right
now there's nobody in the
turn lane because nobody
can get to it. It's ridiculous. It
holds maybe four cars. They
need to expand that turn
lane, at least lengthen it.
No more reality TV
Wow, my stomach turned
when I read your article
about "Oprah's OWN TV
programming needs" -
that is, according to Robert
Thompson of Syracuse Uni-
versity. He says it doesn't
seem she's willing to put the
kinds of shows on that they
need. And what they need is
"Jersey Shore," "Real
Housewives?" Is he insane?
Who needs more of that?
No thanks. To me, OWN
equals quality shows. No, I
don't watch it all the time,
but I do know where to go
for quality shows besides
PBS. There's a lot of choices
out there and OWN should
be one of the choices. More
people should be watching
OWN for quality programs.


I


OPINION


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SATURDAY, MARCH 31, 2012 All

Malia in Mexico
I just heard that President
Obama's eldest daughter,
the 13-year-old, was in Mex-
ico during the earthquake
that they had there, along
with her class that was on
spring break, with 23 Secret
Service men. Did not see it
in the paper, had not seen it
on the local news. Is there
something fishy going on
there? Just wondering.
Editor's note: According to
the White House, Malia
Obama was indeed in Oaxaca
on a school trip when the 7.4-
magnitude earthquake struck,
though the White House puts
the number of Secret Service
agents at 25. The scarcity of
media coverage may have
had to do with a standing re-
quest by the administration
that media outlets not report
the whereabouts of the presi-
dent's children.

JND Great VA
Just had my
ol yearly visit to the
VA clinic in
Lecanto. And
again, I must say
how fortunate we
veterans are to
*t have such a great
local clinic. Kudos
)579 to the entire staff,
guard, receptionist,
lab technicians,
nurses and doctors. Just a
fine group of courteous pro-
fessionals. Thank you so
much. A 77-year-old U.S.
Marine Corps veteran of the
Korean War.
Turn light around
Down at Fishbowl Drive
where the people come into
where the attraction is, across
the street there, the lights
are all facing the street.
There's none facing for the
people on the sidewalks. If
the center light was turned
the way it used to be, they
would know when they have
the light and when to cross
the street. Could somebody
look into that, please?
Don't dump diesel
Regarding the suggestion
that pouring diesel fuel on
saw palmettos will kill
them: While that may kill
them, the fuel will make its
way into the ground to our
water table, which is not
very deep in this area, and
will contaminate it. Then
we'll all be drinking your
diesel fuel in our water from
private wells and commu-
nity wells. So don't do it.
Eyeing eagles
I'd like to know when the
next eagle spotting is going
to be at the dump.
Find another way
To the person who's saying
to use diesel fuel to kill the
palmetto palms: I certainly
hope that I do not live near
you and your two acres that
you've been dumping diesel
fuel on to ruin the aquifer
that many people have to
drink their water from their
well. If they're shallow wells,
God help them. If it is not il-
legal to dump diesel fuel to
kill plants in your yard, it
should be illegal. Whoever
the person is having prob-
lems with the palmettos,
please don't dump diesel
fuel into our grounds to end
up in our drinking water.
Free bait, and great
To all fishermen, espe-
cially freshwater: Those lub-
bers are great bait from the
time they're born until the
time they're grown. They're
real good bait for fish.












NATION


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


NatnBEFS Obama still planning Iran sanctions

Farewell


Global oil market deep enough

to keep up economic pressure


Associated Press
U.S. Army Pfc. Richard
Middaugh talks with his
wife, Ashley, following a de-
ployment ceremony Friday
at Joint Base Lewis Mc-
Chord in Washington state,
for more than 4,000 mem-
bers of the 2nd Stryker
Brigade Combat Team who
will soon be deploying for a
nine-month tour of duty in
Afghanistan. The Mid-
daughs have been married
for eight months and this
will be the first deployment
for Richard Middaugh.


High-tech tools
nab elk poachers
CARSON CITY, Nev. -
Guilty pleas from a father and
son for poaching two bull elk
near the Nevada-Idaho line
closed a yearlong investiga-
tion involving wildlife agen-
cies from three states and
high-tech forensics on frozen
meat and blood splotches.
Larry and Marty Hall
pleaded guilty March 19 to
killing a bull elk without a tag.
Each paid thousands of dol-
lars in fines.
The case began Nov. 6,
2010, when game wardens
say both men shot trophy-
sized elk without a hunting
tag and left one animal to rot.
Other hunters saw what
happened and called authori-
ties.
DNA analysis of frozen elk
meat stored in household
freezers and a blood sample
lifted from a tire at Larry Hall's
home in Colorado helped
solve the case.
Three others involved
pleaded to lesser offenses
and also were fined.

World BRIEFS

Unknown


Associated Press
Pakistani Said Jamal, 62,
whose brother went miss-
ing in January 2005, poses
for a portrait during a
protest Friday in a camp
set up by families of miss-
ing people in Islamabad,
Pakistan. The Pakistani
Supreme Court has now
given the families a meas-
ure of hope by bringing a
landmark case against the
Inter-Services Intelligence
agency, the country's most
feared spy network and
suspected to be behind
most of the abductions.

Aung San Suu Kyi
determined to win
YANGON, Myanmar-
Opposition leader Aung San
Suu Kyi said Friday that
Myanmar's weekend elec-
tions will be neither free nor
fair because of widespread ir-
regularities, but vowed to con-
tinue her candidacy for the
sake of the long-repressed
nation. During a news confer-
ence, the 66-year-old Nobel
Peace Prize laureate said
government officials were in-
volved in some of the irregu-
larities and that they go
"beyond what is acceptable
for democratic elections."
-From wire reports


Associated Press
WASHINGTON Presi-
dent Barack Obama said
Friday he was plowing
ahead with potential sanc-
tions against countries that
keep buying oil from Iran,
including allies of the
United States, in a deepen-
ing campaign to starve Iran
of money for its disputed
nuclear program.
The world oil market is
tight, but deep enough to
keep the squeeze on Iran,
Obama ruled.
The sanctions aim to fur-
ther isolate Iran's central
bank, which processes
nearly all of Iran's oil pur-
chases, from the global econ-


omy Obama's move clears
the way for the U.S. to penal-
ize foreign financial institu-
tions that do oil business with
Iran by barring them from
having a U.S.-based affiliate
or doing business here.
Obama's goal is to tighten
the pressure on Iran, not al-
lies, and already the admin-
istration exempted 10
European Union countries
and Japan from the threat of
sanctions because they cut
their oil purchases from
Iran. Other nations have
about three months to sig-
nificantly reduce such im-
ports before sanctions
would kick in.
Still, administration offi-
cials said that Obama is


ready to slap sanctions on
U.S. partners and that his
action on Friday was an-
other signal.
At issue for Obama was
ruling, by Friday, whether
oil supplies were sufficient
to keep demanding that na-
tions cut off Iran not an
insignificant matter in a
time of high election-year
gas prices at home.
Obama gave his OK after
considering available re-
serves, increased oil pro-
duction by some countries
and global economic condi-
tions. The White House em-
phasized that he would
continue to keep an eye on
the oil market to make sure
that it and its consumers
- could withstand shrink-
ing purchases out of Iran.
With oil prices already ris-
ing this year amid rising ten-
sions over the nuclear
dispute between Iran and


the West, U.S. officials have
sought assurances that push-
ing countries to stop buying
from Iran would not cause a
further spike in prices. The
U.S. sanctions are set to take
effect on June 28. A Euro-
pean oil embargo, approved
in January, starts in July
Put together, Obama ad-
ministration officials con-
tend Iran is about to face its
most severe economic pres-
sure ever The United States
imports no oil from Iran.
The main importers of
Iranian oil that have not re-
ceived exemptions from the
U.S. are China, India,
Turkey, South Africa and
South Korea. The adminis-
tration would be loath to hit
a close friend like South
Korea or India, or a NATO
ally like Turkey, with sanc-
tions, and is working with
those countries to reduce
their imports.


Heartbreaking battle


Associated Press
Doctor Catalin Cirstoveanu, right, checks a newborn baby March 22 before transport to Italy for heart surgery
from the intensive care unit of the Marie Curie children's hospital in Bucharest, Romania.

Doctor saves babies caught in Romanian corruption, bribery


Associated Press
BUCHAREST, Romania Dr
Catalin Cirstoveanu runs a cardio
unit with state-of-the-art equip-
ment at a Bucharest children's hos-
pital. But not a single child has
been treated in the year and a half
since it opened.
The reason?
Medical staff he needs to bring in
to run the machinery would have
expected bribes.
So Cirstoveanu has launched a
lonely crusade to save babies who
come to him for care: He flies them
to Western Europe on budget flights
so they can be treated by doctors
who don't demand kickbacks.
That's what Cirstoveanu did last
week for 13-day-old Catalin, who
needed heart surgery Cirstoveanu
packed a small bag, slipped emer-
gency breathing equipment into
the baby carrier and caught a
cheap flight to Italy, where doctors
were waiting to perform the sur-
gery
The operation was successful.
Two days later, though, a 3-week-
old baby that Cirstoveanu whisked
away to the same clinic in north-
western Italy- with tubes piercing
her tiny frame died before she
was able to have lymph


gland surgery
"I was very worried it wouldn't
work," said Cirstoveanu. "But in
Romania, she would have died
anyway"
The soft-spoken Cirstoveanu is
fighting an exhausting and largely
solitary battle against a culture of
corruption that's so embedded in
Romania that surgeons demand
bribes to save infants' lives and it's
even necessary to slip cash to a
nurse to get your sheets changed.
It's one of the reasons why the
country's infant mortality rate is
more than double the European
Union average, with one in 100
children not reaching their first
birthday
"To be honest, it's so deeply
rooted into our system that it's re-
ally difficult to eliminate," Health
Minister Ladislau Ritli said in an
interview with The Associated
Press.
Officially, the new cardio unit
that Cirstoveanu runs at the Marie
Curie children's hospital isn't func-
tioning because jobs have not been
filled. The real reason appears to
be that Cirstoveanu has banned
staff from taking bribes. That
means that high-tech machinery
lies idle because qualified experts
do not bother to apply for jobs, as-


they know they cannot supplement
their incomes with bribes.
The zero-tolerance policy to cor-
ruption makes for a grueling work
schedule for Cirstoveanu, who
needs to shuttle babies abroad for
surgery- and take care of them on
the flight. During the two-hour
flight with the girl who died,
Cirstoveanu fixed tubes, sedated
her and hand-pumped oxygen to
keep her alive.
In the less than 24 hours
Cirstoveanu had in Bucharest be-
tween returning from Catalin's trip
and departing with the little girl,
he even squeezed in a shift at the
Marie Curie clinic.
Patients in Romania routinely
discuss the "stock market" rate for
bribes. Surgeons can get hundreds
of dollars and upward for an oper-
ation, while anesthetists get
roughly a third of that, depending
also on what a patient can afford.
Nurses receive a few dollars from
patients each time they administer
medications or put in drips. Get-
ting a certificate stamped to have
an operation abroad can easily cost
hundreds, if not thousands of dol-
lars if you ask the wrong doctor
While the Romanian state ap-
pears unwilling to do anything, it
often ends up footing the bill.


Immigrants ordered deported may be released in US


Associated Press


SAN FRANCISCO -The
case of a Vietnamese ex-con
accused of brutally slaying
five people in a San Fran-
cisco home has shed harsh
light on Supreme Court rul-
ings that have allowed the
release of thousands of
criminal immigrants into
U.S. communities because
their own countries refused


to take them back.
After Binh Thai Luc, 35,
spent years behind bars in
San Quentin for an armed
robbery, an immigration
judge ordered him de-
ported six years ago. In-
stead, he resumed his old
life in a quiet San Francisco
neighborhood because his
native Vietnam never pro-
vided the travel documents
required for his return.


While Luc's case is a par-
ticularly striking one, it is far
from uncommon. From 2009
through the spring of last
year, records show about
8,740 immigrants were or-
dered to leave the country
after serving time in prison,
but Immigration and Cus-
toms Enforcement officials
let them go because their na-
tive countries wouldn't take
them back by the time they


had to be released from an
immigration jail.
Two Supreme Court rul-
ings have established that
immigrants who have com-
mitted a broad range of
criminal offenses can't be
locked up in detention in-
definitely while they await
deportation, and should be
released after 180 days un-
less they are likely to be de-
ported soon.


Associated Press
President Barack Obama
speaks March 26 in Seoul,
South Korea. The president
is moving ahead with tough
new sanctions aimed at
squeezing Iran's oil exports
after determining there is
enough crude on world mar-
kets to take the step without
harming U.S. allies.



Stocks


start 2012


with


bullish


climb
Associated Press
NEW YORK The bulls
weren't bullish enough.
The stock market just had
its best first quarter in 14
years. The surge has sent
Wall Street analysts, some of
whose forecasts seemed too
sunny three months ago,
scrambling to raise their es-
timates for the year
"That it's up isn't surpris-
ing. It's the magnitude," says
Robert Doll, the chief equity
investment manager at
BlackRock, the world's
biggest money manager
Doll says stocks could rise
10 percent more before the
end of the year That would
be enough to push the Dow
Jones industrial average to
an all-time high and the
Standard & Poor's 500 close
to a record. For the first
three months of the year, the
Dow was up 8 percent and
the S&P 12 percent, in each
case the best start since the
great bull market of the
1990s. The Nasdaq compos-
ite index, made up of tech-
nology stocks, has had an
even more remarkable run
- up 19 percent for the year,
its best start since 1991.
"I don't think anyone could
have predicted this," says
Chip Cobb, a senior vice pres-
ident at Bryn Mawr Trust
Asset Management For these
gains, he says, "I thought it
would take all year"
The jump gives money
managers like Cobb hope
that ordinary folks burned
by two deep bear markets in
a decade will start buying
again, propelling the in-
dexes even higher
In a remarkable act of
self-restraint or foolish-
ness, depending on your
view they have mostly
stayed out of the market.
One reason they may jump
in now is that fear of loom-
ing disasters, like a full-
blown debt crisis in Europe
or a second recession in the
United States, has faded.
Bulls say investors will
turn their attention to the
only thing that really matters
for stock prices in the long
run corporate profits.
Another hopeful sign for
gains is that those who have
been buying stocks appear
to be taking bigger risks
than before, suggesting
growing confidence.
Last year, investors put
much of their money into so-
called defensive stocks, such
as utilities and health care
companies, which make
money in bad times as well as
good. This year, it's the risky
fare that's being scooped up.
Financial stocks are up 22
percent, the best among the
10 industry groups within
the S&P Technology compa-
nies are up 21 percent.











SPORTS


Florida basketball
player Erving Walker
charged with stealing
a taco and evading
police./B4

CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


" Adult recreation/B2
" NBA, NHL, golf/B3
" Sports briefs/B4
" TV, lottery/B4
" NCAA tournament/B5
0 MLB/B5
" Entertainment/B6


UK's Davis crowned AP Player of the Year


Missouri's Haith

earns Coach of

the Year award

Associated Press
NEW ORLEANS Anthony
Davis was busier than any of the
other players in the Final Four
The Kentucky freshman had to
make the circuit of Player of the
Year presentations Friday, not
that he was complaining.
"There were a lot of awards
yesterday and today," Davis said
with a big smile. "It's a great feel-
ing, especially as a freshman. I've
been working hard and now it's
rewarding."


Davis became the first Ken-
tucky player and second freshman
to be selected The Associated
Press' Player of the Year He


picked up his latest tro-
phy along with Coach of
the Year Frank Haith of
Missouri.
It was Davis' second
ceremony of the day,
and he had to make a
quick exit to get to
practice, part of the
preparations for the
national semifinal
matchup against
Louisville on Saturday


More c
baske
* For the
Tournar
bracket
news or
Final Fo
please
Page B!


"This is great to be here and
hopefully we can win the national
championship and accomplish
our goal," he said. "Even if we
come up short we still had a great
season."


The 6-foot-10 Davis sure did.
He averaged 14.3 points on a
team with six double-figure scor-
ers 10.0 rebounds and 4.6
blocks while shooting
college 64.2 percent from the
tball field. His block total is a
school record and
NCAA third-best ever for a
ment freshman. He was the
s and Southeastern Confer-
n the ence's Player, Fresh-
'ur, man and Defensive
see Player of the Year
5. "My expectations
were nothing like this; I
wasn't planning on any
awards," he said of how he ap-
proached his first and what
many project will be his only -
season in college basketball.
See Page B4


Six-foot-10 Kentucky forward Anthony Davis averaged 14.3 points, 10
rebounds and 4.6 blocks while shooting 64.2 percent from the field. For
those accomplishments, Davis is the AP's Player of the Year.


RENAISSANCE


AN


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Lecanto senior Skylar Summers has been on two district-winning teams for the Panthers in golf and basketball, and now Summers is
trying to make it three as a member of the school's baseball team. Summers plays three sports while maintaining a high GPA.

Lecanto senior Summers seems to win no matter what sports he's playing


SEAN ARNOLD
Correspondent
Skylar Summers is a Renais-
sance man of student-athletes.
While carrying a 4.1 GPA, he's
captured a district title in golf
and basketball during his sen-
ior year at Lecanto, and now
he's enjoying a batting average
of around .550 near midway
through the baseball season as
he bats third and plays center
field for the Panthers.
To compete in sports with lit-
tle in common, and with sched-
ules that often overlap, it's
impressive enough to just re-
main competent, let alone
excel, between them. But Sum-
mers is comfortable making
the switch within compressed
windows of preparation.


"It doesn't take long," he said
recently on changing sports.
"I've been doing it all my life,
since Little League, Junior
Panther basketball camp, and
junior golf, so it just comes nat-
urally I take about a week to
get back into the groove of
things."
Summer I've
was already
making con- it my who
tributions on
the diamond Sk
this season Lecanto senior on h
before he
hung up his
green high-
tops, picking up an RBI and a
run in his club's 13-5 season-
opening victory over Nature
Coast as the Panther basket-
ball squad awaited the arrival


b
le
yl
is
to


of Gainesville in the regional
round of the state playoffs.
More recently, he's vaulted
from fifth to third in the batting
order, and he had a single, dou-
ble, and triple against 8A Coral
Gables while most of his fellow
county pupils were enjoying
spring break.
een doing Panthers
Baseball
life. coach David
Logue calls
ar Summers Summers a
transition from sport quiet leader
sport each season. "He's a
laid-back guy
but he does
everything the way I want it
done, and he leaves everything
on the field," Logue said of the
senior's character and abili-
ties. "He's been a great addi-


tion to the team these last two
years, and he's producing big
time right now.
"He's very aware of his body
and what you ask him to do
concerning it," Logue added.
"If I tell him to try something
while he's in the batting cage,
he'll have it down within a
swing or two. He's what we
want our players to be like and
what most of our players are.
You couldn't ask for a better
teammate and ballplayer"
Earlier in the school year,
Summers' golf swing sustained
a 39.8 scoring average per nine
holes before he finished sec-
ond overall with an even-par
72 to help his squad win the
district tournament at Country


Reversal


of their


fortunes

Panthers hand

Eagles first

district loss
SEAN ARNOLD
Correspondent
LECANTO After strug-
gling offensively in mid-week
contests for two straight
weeks, the Lecanto baseball
team has bounced back to find
success within its district
these past couple of Fridays.
The Panthers were especially
convincing Friday night as
senior ace Sheldon Baxter
struck out 11, walked none,
and limited Springstead to
four hits in seven innings
while his club handed the Ea-
gles their first league loss in a
7-3 defeat.
Lecanto's bats provided
Baxter with plenty of support,
getting seven hits including
a solo home
run by soph-
omore third
baseman
Levi O'S-
teen -
while draw-
ing five walks.
It was apparent there was
an added spark to the Panther
offense after the first two in-
nings. Senior center fielder
Skylar Summers bounced a
double over the left-field
fence in the first before scor-
ing off a sacrifice fly by senior
catcher Gary Levengood to
help Lecanto to a 1-0 lead.
Springstead (9-4 overall, 5-1 in
District 6A-6) answered with
two runs in the top of the sec-
ond off doubles by senior
catcher Trey Scott and junior
designated hitter Trent
Wyzykowski, but O'Steen
evened it back up when he
belted a line drive over the
center field wall.
The Panthers (7-9, 4-3)
added two more runs in the
third with the aid of an RBI
double to left by senior short-
stop Jacob "Bucky" Sims (two
hits, two runs), and three


. Page B4


. Page B4


Payton, two others plan to appeal NFL suspensions


GM, assistant coach

alsoplan to fight

punishment

Associated Press
NEW ORLEANS Saints coach
Sean Payton is appealing his season-
long suspension from the NFL for his
role in New Orleans' bounty system.
New Orleans Saints head coach Sean
Payton, left, is one of three members
of the organization who've decided to
appeal their suspensions to the NFL.
Associated Press


And he's not the only one looking for
a little relief from the penalties
handed down by Commissioner
Roger Goodell.
General manager Mickey Loomis,
assistant coach Joe Vitt and the
Saints organization each decided to
appeal on Friday
Payton will also ask Goodell for guid-
ance on the parameters of the suspen-
sion, which runs through next year's
Super Bowl, a person familiar with the
situation told The Associated Press,
speaking on condition of anonymity be-
cause the league and the Saints did not
announce Payton's plan to appeal.
Saints spokesman Greg Bensel did
confirm that Loomis was appealing
his eight-game suspension and, sepa-
rately, the team would challenge its


$500,000 fine and loss of second-round
draft picks this year and in 2013.
Vitt, suspended for six games, is
doing the same. David Cornwell, rep-
resenting Vitt as head of the NFL
Coaches Association, confirmed the
decision in an email to the AP
Goodell last week announced the
suspension of Payton, starting Sun-
day, for his role in connection with
New Orleans' bounty system, which
offered improper cash bonuses for
big hits that either knocked oppo-
nents out of games or left them need-
ing help off of the field.
Former defensive coordinator
Gregg Williams, who left the Saints
after last season to join the St Louis


See Page B4
















CITRUS COUNTY SP


CITRUS COUNTY'S RECREATIONAL GUIDE TO ADULT SPORTS

a LL.a
(A

0 z


EEDWAY


HITTING THE LINKS OUTDOORS


IN


THE


jAME


Standing alone


can improve


your health


Just stand up! Did you
know just standing up
more frequently during
the day will reduce your
chances of dying in the next
three years?
It's amazing that just get-
ting off the couch or your
chair and standing up at
your workstation, desk, job
or wherever you are, can
statistically extend your life
for the next three years
even if you are already
physically active. While ex-
ercise is crucial, standing
more frequently during the
day is simple
and easy to do.
This is proba-
bly the reason
people attribute
playing Nin-
tendo Wii, the
video game sys- *
tem, to their pos-
itive physical
fitness. It doesn't Dr. Ron
seem like much DOCT
exercise but it is
not sitting. ORD
Standing is a
life-saver. There are so
many questions and so few
answers but now there is
light to shed on the benefit
of just standing up during
the day
Adults sitting for 11 or
more hours per day had a 40
percent increased risk of
dying in the next three years
compared with those who
sat for fewer than four hours
a day Men who sit for more
than six hours each day had
a 20 percent higher death
rate than those who sat for
three hours or less.
In reality, sitting shortens
a person's life by several
years. One study showed
that men who sat for 23 or
more hours a week had a 64
percent greater chance of
dying from heart disease
than those who sat for 11
hours per week or less.
Some of the greatest
leaders and thinkers of our
time worked at desks at
which they stood. Stand-up
desks were in vogue long
before Silicon Valley en-
hanced their popularity
Standing desks have actu-
ally been a secret of great
men for centuries.
Donald Rumsfeld, a for-
mer Secretary of Defense,
touted how beneficial his
standing desk was to his
health in contributing to a
sense of well-being in spite
of a lack of physical activity
due to his busy schedule.
Thomas Jefferson is the
most famous user of the
stand-up desk. Jefferson
used the standing desk to
draw up the architectural
blueprints of the Virginia
State Capitol and our coun-
try's founding documents.
Prussian Prime Minister
Otto von Bismarck used a
standing desk and, by five in
the morning, was standing
at it, ready to sort through
the proposals and business


I
n
T,
31


of the day Even Winston
Churchill liked to use an up-
right desk. Ernest Heming-
way is said to have
discovered the standing
desk from his editor at
Charles Scribner's Sons.
Taking into account their
physical activity, being over-
weight and their question-
able health status, maybe
this is the reason several of
these historic figures lived
reasonably long and very
productive lives without
overt exercise ...they stood
up to work.
Standing as
opposed to sit-
ting is associated
with more calo-
ries burned and
improved pos-
ture attributed
to strengthening
the abdominal
core muscles.
Joseph While this is not
'OR'S equivalent to
sets of abdomi-
ERS nal crunches,
standing allows
for constant core muscle
contraction to maintain
balance.
Most importantly, stand-
ing allows the chest cavity,
specifically the lungs, to
more fully expand and the
heart and surrounding ves-
sels to not be impeded. The
results are more oxygen to
your brain, being less
drowsy and thus more alert.
Currently in our world,
our kids rarely walk to
school, no longer have PE.
several times a week or
don't play after school for
hours on end as we used to.
We as adults frequently
don't take that morning trip
to the gym, walk or run.
While it is still necessary to
vigorously work out, in fact
crucial to do so, it is also im-
portant to avoid prolonged
sitting in school or at work.
Common sense tells us
that the amount of time
spent sitting, whether at
home, work, school or in the
car should be reduced by
standing. In other words, get
up and stand. There is no
question walking, hiking,
jogging or running would be
greatly more beneficial.
What has increased expo-
nentially has been watching
TV, using computers and
video games. This occupies
a huge part of leisure time
and involves prolonged sit-
ting. Statistically, we know
that people who spend less
time sitting have better
health than those who
spend too much time on the
couch.
It is all very logical. Hu-
mans were never designed
to spend 40 plus hours per
week sitting.
Ron Joseph, M.D., a hand
and shoulder orthopedic
specialist, can be reached
at rbjhand@cox.net or
352-212-5359.


Send us your submissions
* If you have a recreation event that you would like
announced, please send any information to our email
at: sports@chronicleonline.com
* Try to keep each brief no longer than 3-to-4
paragraphs and include contact information so we can
reach you back if there are any questions about the
information submitted.


Golf classic coming


Special to the Chronicle

The 14th Annual Super-
intendent's Golf Classic is
set to tee off at 8:30 a.m. Sat-
urday, April 28 at Sugarmill
Woods Golf Club.
There is a $55 registra-
tion fee and the event will
be a shotgun start.
There will be food, door
prizes, hole-in-one prizes
and a 50/50 drawing.
Also available is the
chance to sponsor a hole,
for either $100 or $1,000.
For more information,
contact Jack Brady or
Jonny Bishop at 726-2241 or
Bruce Sheffield at 726-1931.
Tennis courts
closed temporarily
The tennis courts at Whis-
pering Pines Park in Inverness
will be closed through April 12
for light retrofitting.
For more information, call
the city of Inverness Parks &
Recreation Department at
352-726-3913.
Adult Rec. Softball
Leagues to start
The team managers' organi-
zational meeting for both
Men's and Co-ed softball
leagues will be at 6 p.m. Tues-
day, April 6, at the Recreational
Building in Whispering Pines
Park, Inverness, to discuss
league rules and changes.
For more information, call
Shaun Miracle at 352-726-
2611, ext. 1311 or email
smiracle@inverness-fl.gov.
For more information about
programs and/or classes, call
Whispering Pines Park admin-
istration office at 352-726-3913
or email parks@
inverness-fl.gov.
Aerobathon to benefit
Relay For Life
The Inverness Relay For
Life DynaBody Team will have
an Aerobathon fundraiser on
from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday,
April 7, at Dynabody behind
the 2250 building off State
Road 44, Inverness.
Classes will be offered all
day for a donation of $5 or
more per class. There will be
classes for everybody includ-
ing: spinning, Zumba, Pilates,
kickbox, X Pump, aqua, step,
self-defense and Silver Sneak-
ers. Call Dynabody at
352-344-3553 for details.
Zumbathon to benefit
Inverness Relay
Inverness Relay For Life
Team Zumba will have its an-
nual Zumbathon from 3 to 5
p.m. Sunday, April 15, at Cen-
tral Ridge Community Center
in Beverly Hills.
Tickets are available now for
$10, or can be purchased at
the door from 2 to 3 p.m. that
day. For more information, call
Anna Olivero at 352-613-6215
or Marilynne Denison at
352-726-6790.
Citrus Y expands
group exercise
The Citrus County YMCA
now offers its Group Exercise
program at First United
Methodist Church in Ho-
mosassa, the Y's westside
venue for health and well-
ness classes.
Currently, there are Pilates,
cardio interval, and stability
and strength classes offered at
these locations. The regular
schedule is:


ADAM WARD/For the Chronicle
Kerri Kitchen (right), who is sponsored by River Ventures Manatee Tours, recently ran in
the Alzheimer's Pasco Half Marathon Challenge and the Citrus 10 Miler, and came in first
in her age group in both races.


Monday: Cardio interval
from 9:30 to 10:15 a.m., stabil-
ity and strength from 10:30 to
11:15 a.m.
Wednesday: Pilates from
9:30 to 10:15 a.m., stability
and strength from 10:30 to
11:15 a.m.
Friday: Pilates from 9:30
to 10:15 a.m., cardio interval
from 10:30 to 11:15 a.m.
For more information about
the YMCA Group Exercise pro-
gram, call the office at 352-
637-0132. Financial assistance
is available to all those who
qualify. The YMCA office is in
Beverly Hills at 3909 N.
Lecanto Highway, and is open
noon to 5:30 p.m. Monday
through Friday.
Park offers
tennis lessons
Whispering Pines Park of-
fers tennis lessons with Lind-
say Rodriquez. Pre-registration
and pre-payment are required
at the park office.
Fee for lessons is $100 for
four hours, or $30 per hour.
Times are arranged with the
instructor.
Call 352-726-3913 for regis-
tration and information. Whis-
pering Pines also offers
racquetball lessons. Call for
information.
Zumba Gold
at rec center
The public is welcome to
Zumba Gold exercise classes
at the Beverly Hills Recreation
Center, 77 Civic Circle, Beverly
Hills, every Tuesday and
Thursday at 3 p.m.
Zumba Gold is an innovative,
fun and exciting program for the
active senior adult, true begin-
ner and people who are new to
exercising. Dances are easy to
follow and are performed at low
intensity, including the salsa,
cha-cha, Cambia, flamenco,
tango and more. Fae Johnson,
certified Zumba instructor, leads
the group.
Classes are free for mem-
bers of the association; non-
members pay $3 per class.
Registration not necessary.
For more information, call
the office at 352-746-4882
from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Monday to Friday. Bring a
sweat towel and water and
wear comfortable clothing and
tennis shoes.
Learn to stretch
with Parks & Rec
Citrus County Parks &


Recreation offers a new low-
impact stretching class. This
on-going class will be from 10
to 11 a.m. at Citrus Springs
Community Center. Cost is
$5 per class.
The low-impact class is
easy, fun with good benefits.
Stretching helps to make you
more flexible and regular
stretching will help mobility and
balance. This helps to slow
down the onset of common de-
generative conditions, such as
osteoarthritis.
Stretching increases physi-
cal and mental relaxation and
reduces the risk of joint sprain,
muscle strain or back prob-
lems. Low-impact exercises
can improve health and fitness
without harming weight-bear-
ing joints. Research suggests
that moderate-intensity, low-
impact activity is just as effec-
tive as high-impact activity in
lowering the risk of heart
disease.
For more information, visit
www.citruscountyparks.com
and click on instructional
classes, or call 352-465-7007.
Jazzercise at
community center
Citrus County Parks &
Recreation will offer Jazzercise
at West Citrus Community
Center. The 60-minute class
includes a warm-up, high-en-
ergy aerobic routines, muscle
toning and cool-down stretch
segment.
One-hour classes are of-
fered at 5:30 p.m. Monday,
Tuesday and Thursdays. Un-
limited monthly ticket is $25.
Call 352-465-7007 or visit
www.citruscountyparks.com.
Zumba at
Citrus Springs
Citrus County Parks &
Recreation offers Zumba
classes with instructor Lynn
DaSilva at Citrus Springs Com-
munity Center. Zumba is a fit-
ness program designed with
exciting Latin and international
dance rhythms. No member-
ship or contracts.
Ongoing classes are: 11:30
a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Monday;
6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Tuesday;
and 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Thurs-
days. Cost is $5.
For more information, visit
www.citruscountyparks.com
or call 352-465-7007.
Zumba offered at
Dunnellon church
Zumba, the Latin-inspired


dance-fitness class, is offered
at 4:30 p.m. Monday and
Thursday afternoons at Dun-
nellon Presbyterian Church,
20641 Chestnut St.
Call 352-489-3021.
Club offers
Zumba lessons
Yankeetown/Inglis Woman's
Club is offering Zumba classes
in air-conditioned comfort from
5:30 to 6:30 p.m. Monday and
Wednesday.
Everyone is welcome. For
information, call 352-447-2057.
Yoga at canning center
Citrus County Parks &
Recreation offers yoga with
Laura Boetto from 10 and 11
a.m. Tuesday and Fridays at
the Canning Center in
Lecanto. Yoga improves flexi-
bility and balance, increases
energy, strengthens and tones
muscles and reduces stress.
Cost is $6 per class; $20
monthly. No pre-registration
required.
For more information, visit
www.citruscountyparks.com or
call 352-465-7007.
CF Citrus offers
birding classes
Saturday in April are for the
birds at the College of Central
Florida Citrus Campus in
Lecanto.
Learn about the abundant
bird life in Citrus County from
Beverly Overa, Florida master
naturalist and ambassador with
the National Wildlife Federation.
Backyard Birding runs from
10 a.m. to noon Saturdays,
April 7 and 14, to teach resi-
dents how to provide the best
habitat for local and wintering
feathered friends, while learn-
ing about native birds. En-
lighten yourself about how to
attract birds with feeders,
baths and native plantings.
More Birding, Beyond Ba-
sics runs from 10 a.m. to noon
Saturday, April 21 and 28.
This class focuses on the art of
bird watching and identifica-
tion. What are field marks?
Aside from the back yard,
where are other great birding
places in Citrus County? Are
you curious about the Audubon
Society and what they do?
Both classes are oriented to-
ward true beginners and all
ages are welcome. Some ma-
terials will be provided by the
instructor.
Cost for each class is $35.
To enroll, call 352-746-6721.


Bowling RESULTS


Parkview Lanes
weekly news
SUMMER LEAGUE MEETINGS:
Monday Summer Special Monday, April 30,
7pm Phil Ciquera, sec'y 489-6933.
SunCoast Seniors NoTap Tuesday, May 1,
12:30pm Anna Dooley, sec'y- 352-344-8581.
Adult/Youth Tuesday, May 15, 7pm John
Saltmarsh, sec'y 352-344-0365.
Wednesday Match -Play Scratch Sunday,
April 1, 5pm Peggy Nevels, sec'y- 465-0757.


Summer Owls Friday, May 18, 7pm Phil Ci-
quera, sec'y-489-6933.
League and tournament scores for the week
ending March 27, 2012:
MONDAY NIGHT SPECIAL: Handicap: Joe
Brooks 282; Wes Foley 281; Bryan Craig 720;
Sean Fugere 715; Dorine Fugere 286,762;
Sandy LePree 279; Terry Brown 726. Scratch:
Sean Fugere 268,703; Joe Brooks 268; Wes
Foley 267; Marc Grasso 658; Dorine Fugere
267,705; Sandy LePree 234; Terry Brown 627;
Lori Ciquera 610; Stephanie Flory 604.
PRESERVE PINBUSTERS: Handicap: Chuck


Keaton 251,672; Sonny Temple 245; Nick Bello
666; Lorraine Guay 248,642; Cindy Cotter
246,663. Scratch: Larry Kirk 219; Chuck
Keaton 211,552; Emile Guay 549; Lorraine
Guay 176; Wanda Schroeder 174,445; Betty
Noland 451.
SUNCOAST SENIORS: Handicap: Jerry Ness
246,727; Murphy Combs 245; Jack Connell
683; Helen Simonson 226; Sharon Hoagland
222,634; Wanda Klik 611. Scratch: Jerry Ness
235,694; Murphy Combs 227,554; Pat Combs
160; Marylou Halovich 156,432; Wanda Klik
156,431.


LADIES' CLASSIC: Handicap: Judy Hind-
baugh 253; Peg Hess 253; Diana Plevell 243;
Peggy Nevels 692; Kathy Serocki 678.
Scratch: Judy Hindbaugh 181,446; Diana Plev-
ell 171,450.
LATE STARTERS: Handicap: Tom Chris-
tensen 270,631; Art Trebon 252; Bob Biggs
619; Ruth Ann Radford 233; Bunny Jackson
230; Joan Cothern 623; Rosemarie Marcucci
622. Scratch: Tom Christensen 225; Art Tre-
bon 211; Ted Rafanan 602; Skip George 539;
Fran Barlow 188,534; Bunny Jackson 181;


Rosemarie Marcucci 184.
WEDNESDAY NIGHT MEN: Handicap: Mike
Dudziak 309,846; Bob Eldridge 296; Larry Fritz
717. Scratch: Mark Smith 279; Charlie Stein
279; Mike Dudziak 268,723; Larry Fritz 717.
PARKVIEW LANES WOMEN'S TRIO: Handi-
cap: Carolyn Woodward 247,682; Terri Moor-
beck 244,676. Scratch: Terri Moorbeck
192,520; Mary Briscoe 188; Fran Barlow 496.
GOODTIME BOWLERS: Handicap: Ken Mc-
Nally 235; Gaynor Stone 229,655; Bob Craver
644; Pat Stoner 233,624; Liz Letchworth 230;


Sharon Hughes 634. Scratch: Ken McNally
183,469; Rocky Sincore 169,454; Pat Stoner
179,462; Janet Murray 177,468.
PARKVIEW OWLS: Handicap: Ray Colon
294,794; David Rogers 287; Wes Foley 813;
Betty Wood 288; Maggie Savarese 282,788;
Toni Mills-Smith 775. Scratch: Sam Bass
247,705; Wes Foley 245,693; Maggie
Savarese 204,554; Dorine Fugere 194,557.
BOWLERS OF THE WEEK: Dorine Fugere,
111 pins over her average, and Mike Dudziak,
171 pins over his average.


ET





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Magic falter late


Nowitzki's shot

leads Dallas

past Orlando

Associated Press
ORLANDO Dirk Now-
itzki banked in a jumper
with 5.9 seconds left and
scored a game-high 28
points to lead the Dallas
Mavericks to a 100-98 vic-
tory over the Orlando Magic
on Friday night.
Jameer Nelson scored 24
points to lead Orlando.
Ryan Anderson added 21
and Dwight Howard fin-
ished with 19 points and 15
rebounds.
The Mavericks trailed by
15 points in the third quarter
before rallying in the final
period, aided by a plethora of
turnovers by the Magic. Jason
Terry had 10 points in the
quarter and 17 in the game.
Delonte West and Shawn
Marion each added 15.
Heat 113, Raptors 101
TORONTO Dwyane
Wade and Chris Bosh scored
30 points each and the Miami
Heat beat Toronto 113-101,
their seventh straight win over
the Raptors.
LeBron James had 26 points
and nine assists and Mario
Chalmers added 14 points as
the Heat won for the second
time in two nights after beating
Dallas at home on Thursday.
DeMar DeRozan scored 28
points and Andrea Bargnani had
27 for Toronto. Amir Johnson
had 12 points and 12 rebounds
and Jose Calderon had 16 as-
sists, one shy of his season
high, but the Raptors lost for the
sixth time in eight games.
Hawks 100, Knicks 90
ATLANTA Joe Johnson
scored 28 points and Willie
Green carried the Hawks in
the fourth quarter, leading At-
lanta to a 100-90 victory over
Mike Woodson and the New
York Knicks.
Green scored 15 of his 20
points in the final period, includ-
ing a 3-pointer from the corner
that stretched Atlanta's lead to
94-84.
Carmelo Anthony led the
Knicks with 36 points and rookie
Iman Shumpert matched his ca-
reer high with 25. Still, the Knicks
lost for only the second time in
10 games under Woodson.
Wizards 97, 76ers 76
WASHINGTON Cartier
Martin tied a career high with
20 points in his second game
under a 10-day contract, and
the Washington Wizards built a
big lead and held on to it for a


Associated Press
The Orlando Magic's Dwight Howard shoots past Dallas Mavericks center Brendan
Haywood during the first half Friday in Orlando.


change, breaking a five-game
losing streak with a 97-76 win
over the Philadelphia 76ers.
The loss knocked Philadel-
phia out of first place in the At-
lantic Division, following
Boston's 100-79 win Friday.
The 76ers began the day tied
with the Celtics.
Lou Williams and Thaddeus
Young scored 14 apiece for the
76ers, who have lost six of
nine.
Nuggets 99, Bobcats 88
CHARLOTTE, N.C.- Arron
Afflalo scored 12 of his team-
high 19 points in the second
half and added 11 rebounds as
the Denver Nuggets held off the
Charlotte Bobcats 99-88.
The Nuggets entered in a
three-way tie for seventh place in
the Western Conference stand-
ings with Houston and Utah and
in need of a victory against the
worst team in the league.
They got it behind a bal-
anced effort as Ty Lawson had
14 points and 10 assists, while
Corey Brewer added 17 points
off the bench on 7-for-11
shooting, and Kenneth Faried
had 12 points.
Bucks 121, Cavs 84
CLEVELAND- Brandon
Jennings scored 28 points and
the Milwaukee Bucks routed the


Cleveland Cavaliers 121-84.
Ersan Ilyasova, who missed
Tuesday's game because of
back spasms, scored 20 points
while Mike Dunleavy added 16
and shot 4 for 5 on 3-pointers.
Jennings and Ilyasova didn't
play in the fourth quarter.
Rookie Kyrie Irving scored
29 points to lead Cleveland be-
fore leaving in the fourth quarter
with a sprained right shoulder.
Irving was 11 for 20 from the
field, including 6 for 6 on 3s.
Milwaukee, which trailed
New York by 2 1/2 games for
the East's final playoff spot
coming in, took the lead for
good early in the first quarter.
Celtics 100, T-wolves 79
MINNEAPOLIS Kevin
Garnett had 24 points, 10 re-
bounds and four assists in his
return to Target Center and the
Boston Celtics outmuscled
Kevin Love and the Timber-
wolves in a 100-79 victory.
Paul Pierce had 21 points
and nine rebounds, and Rajon
Rondo had 17 assists for the
Celtics, who have won four in a
row and six of their last seven.
Love had 22 points and 11
rebounds but succumbed to
Garnett's physical defense in a
battle between the face of the
Timberwolves past and present.


Bulls 83, Pistons 71
CHICAGO Luol Deng
scored 20 points, Joakim Noah
added 19 points and 12 re-
bounds, and the Chicago Bulls
beat the Detroit Pistons 83-71.
The Bulls scored the final
eight points after the Pistons
closed within four with just
under 5 minutes left and came
away with their 14th straight
win against Detroit. In the
process, they improved their
league-best record to 42-11
even though star Derrick Rose
and Richard Hamilton remained
sidelined by injuries.
Luol Deng came through
again after scoring 22 inin a
lopsided win over Atlanta on
Wednesday and Noah was his
usual relentless self.
Rockets 98, Grizzlies 89
HOUSTON Goran Dragic
scored a season-high 25 points
and Courtney Lee added 17 as
the Houston Rockets beat the
Memphis Grizzlies 98-89.
The victory was the Rockets'
12th straight at home against
Memphis, which hasn't won in
Houston since April 2006.
Houston led by six with 1:22
remaining before Marcus
Camby made two baskets
sandwiched around a layup by
Rudy Gay to extend the lead to
97-89 about a minute later.


Blue Jackets


sting Panthers


Associated Press
COLUMBUS, Ohio-- De-
fenseman Nikita Nikitin
scored twice and had an
assist, R.J. Umberger also
had two goals, and Allen
York made 30 saves in the
Columbus Blue Jackets' 4-1
victory over the Florida
Panthers on Friday night.
Nikitin followed a two-
assist game in a victory
over Detroit on Wednesday
night with goals in the sec-
ond and third periods. Um-
berger scored in the first
and added an empty-netter
with 47 seconds to play
Tomas Kopecky spoiled
York's shutout bid, scoring
off a rebound with 7:57 left
in the third.
Penguins 5, Sabres 3
BUFFALO, N.Y. Sore
nose and all, Sidney Crosby
had a goal and three assists to
help the Pittsburgh Penguins
snap a mini-slump with a 4-3
victory over Buffalo that slowed
the Sabres' late-season surge.
It was Crosby's third four-
point game in a season in
which concussion troubles
have limited him to 18 games.
And it came after he was held
without a point in his past two
outings and a day after his
nose was bloodied by a puck
in a 5-3 loss at the New York
Islanders.
Steve Sullivan had a goal
and two assists, Evgeni Malkin
had a goal and assist, and
Pascal Dupuis set up two to
extend his points streak to an
NHL season-best 13 games.
Pittsburgh (48-24-6) re-
bounded from two straight
losses to the Islanders and
moved four points ahead of
fifth-place Philadelphia in the
Eastern Conference standings.
Predators 4,
Red Wings 1
DETROIT-- Gabriel
Bourque and Francis Bouillon
scored in the second period and


Pekka Rinne made 26 saves to
help the Nashville Predators
beat the Detroit Red Wings 4-1
for coach Barry Trotz's 500th
victory with the franchise.
Nashville moved a point
ahead of Detroit with four
games left in the regular sea-
son to be the fourth-seeded
team with home-ice advan-
tage in the first round of the
Western Conference playoffs.
The Red Wings were held
scoreless on three power
plays in the second period in
part because Rinne made a
sprawling glove save to pre-
vent Henrik Zetterberg from
scoring off a rebound.
Jets 4,
Hurricanes 3, OT
RALEIGH, N.C. -Andrew
Ladd scored 16 seconds into
overtime and the Winnipeg
Jets beat Carolina 4-3 to elimi-
nate the Hurricanes from play-
off contention.
Kyle Wellwood scored the
tying goal with 4:47 left in regu-
lation and added an assist,
while Jim Slater scored and Nik
Antropov added a goal in his
return to the lineup for the Jets.
Eric Staal scored his 250th
career goal and Derek Joslin
and Brandon Sutter added
goals for the Hurricanes.
Chris Mason stopped 30
shots for the Jets. Ward fin-
ished with 31 saves.
Rangers 4,
Canadiens 1
NEW YORK- Marian Ga-
borik and Brad Richards
scored early, and defenseman
Michael Del Zotto had two
goals in the third period as the
New York Rangers won their
fourth in a row and moved
closer to securing the top seed
in the Eastern Conference
playoffs with a 4-1 victory over
the Montreal Canadiens.
Henrik Lundqvist was steady
throughout in winning for the
third straight game and for the
sixth time in seven.


Associated Press
Florida's Tomas Fleischmann and Columbus' Dalton Prout
chase after the puck during the first period Friday in
Columbus, Ohio.


GolfBRIEFS


Tseng storms to
Kraft Nabisco lead
RANCHO MIRAGE, Calif. -
Top-ranked Yani Tseng shot her
second straight 68 at the Kraft
Nabisco Championship on Fri-
day, taking a one-stroke lead
over Haeji Kang after the sec-
ond round of the LPGA Tour's
first major of the year.
Lindsey Wright and Sun
Young Yoo are third at 6 under,
while Hall of Famer Se Ri Pak
is three strokes back in fifth
midway through the only major
she has never won.
Tseng extended her thorough
domination of the women's
game with another relentless
round of long drives and steady
putting. After finishing the open-
ing round two strokes back,
she's leading for the ninth time in


the LPGA Tour's last 10 rounds.
Davis, Oosthuizen
share top spot in Texas
HUMBLE, Texas Brian
Davis and Louis Oosthuizen
shared the lead at 11 under
after two days of play in the
rain-delayed Houston Open.
The second round was sus-
pended due to darkness at 7:36
p.m. Friday with 70 players still
on the course.
Houston resident Jeff Mag-
gert was at 10 under, but he
had eight holes left to play in
his second round. Defending
champion Phil Mickelson (70),
J.B. Holmes (67), Tommy
Gainey (67), and Greg Owen
(69) finished their second
rounds and were two shots be-
hind the leaders at 9 under.
Athunderstorm dumped 1 1/4


inches of rain Thursday, causing
the backup. The players en-
joyed sunny and calm condi-
tions Friday, but the fairways
were damp, and players were
permitted to lift, clean and place
their golf balls in the fairways.
Daly shoots 5-under 67
to challenge leaders
SCIACCA, Sicily John
Daly had five birdies and an
eagle for a 5-under 67, finishing
two shots off the leaders at the
Sicilian Open on Friday.
The 46-year-old Daly trailed
six players, including first-round
leader Peter Lawrie, who shot a
72. Lawrie was joined at 8
under by Jamie Donaldson
(71), David Lynn (69), Pelle Ed-
berg (66), Maarten Lafeber (68)
and Simon Wakefield (67).
From wire reports


MISSING SOMETHING
CITRUS' COUNTY
CHRONI-iE

www.chronicleonline.com


h &AkAm VIBM


Get current TV listings

features, movie descriptions,

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OOOAP9F 563-3295


SPORTS


SATURDAY, MARCH 31, 2012 B3






B4 SATURDAY, MARCH 31, 2012



Houston Open
Play suspended by darkness
with 70 golfers still on the course
Friday
At Redstone Golf Club (Tournament
Course), HumbleTexas
Purse: $6 million
Yardage: 7,457, Par: 72
Partial Second Round


Brian Davis 68-65
Louis Oosthuizen 67-66
Tommy Gainey 68-67
Greg Owen 66-69
Phil Mickelson 65-70
J.B. Holmes 68-67
John Huh 66-70
Jonas Blixt 70-66
Brandt Jobe 68-69
John Senden 72-65
Henrik Stenson 69-68
Kyle Reifers 68-69
Harris English 69-68
Blake Adams 67-71
Hunter Haas 73-65
Erik Compton 71-67
Cameron Tringale 69-70
Ernie Els 70-69
Lucas Glover 73-66
Jeff Overton 69-70
Tommy Biershenk 72-67
Brendon de Jonge 70-70
Joe Ogilvie 71-69
Robert Allenby 72-68
Fred Couples 67-73
Bryce Molder 70-70
Bill Lunde 69-71
Roberto Castro 71-69
Jason Bohn 69-72
Kris Blanks 69-72
Daniel Summerhays 72-69
Mark Anderson 71-70
Tim Herron 74-68
Kevin Stadler 73-69
Jimmy Walker 72-70
Troy Matteson 73-69
Duffy Waldorf 71-71
Mathew Goggin 70-72
Kyle Stanley 73-69
Charley Hoffman 74-68
Padraig Harrington 69-73
Rod Pampling 73-69
Colt Knost 69-73
William McGirt 70-72
Ted Potter, Jr. 74-68
Shawn Stefani 71-71
D.J. Trahan 74-69
Charl Schwartzel 69-74
Russell Knox 72-71
Darren Clarke 72-71
CamiloVillegas 71-72
Arjun Atwal 73-70
Martin Flores 72-71
Richard H. Lee 70-73
Heath Slocum 74-70
Tom Pernice Jr. 74-70
Gavin Coles 72-72
Peter Hanson 71-73
Bobby Gates 74-70
Ben Curtis 71-74
David Hearn 71-74
Kevin Kisner 72-73
Ryuji Imada 71-75
Aaron Baddeley 74-72
John Rollins 75-71
J.J. Henry 73-73
J.J. Killeen 75-71
Harrison Frazar 72-76
Billy Hurley III 72-82
Lonny Alexander 82-78
Leaderboard


THRU
1. Brian Davis
1. Louis Oosthuizen
3. Jeff Maggert
4. Tommy Gainey
4. Greg Owen
4. Phil Mickelson
4. J.B. Holmes
4. James Driscoll
9. John Huh
9. Jonas Blixt
9. Angel Cabrera
12. Brandt Jobe
12. John Senden
12. HenrikStenson
12. Kyle Reifers
12. Harris English
12. Carl Pettersson


-133 -11
-133 -11
-135 -9
-135 -9
-135 -9
-135 -9
-136 -8
-136 -8
-137 -7
-137 -7
-137 -7
-137 -7
-137 -7
-138 -6
-138 -6
-138 -6
-139 -5
-139 -5
-139 -5
-139 -5
-139 -5
-140 -4
-140 -4
-140 -4
-140 -4
-140 -4
-140 -4
-140 -4
-141 -3
-141 -3
-141 -3
-141 -3
-142 -2
-142 -2
-142 -2
-142 -2
-142 -2
-142 -2
-142 -2
-142 -2
-142 -2
-142 -2
-142 -2
-142 -2
-142 -2
-142 -2
-143 -1
-143 -1
-143 -1
-143 -1
-143 -1
-143 -1
-143 -1
-143 -1
-144 E
-144 E
-144 E
-144 E
-144 E
-145 +1
-145 +1
-145 +1
-146 +2
-146 +2
-146 +2
-146 +2
-146 +2
-148 +4
-154 +10
-160 +16


SCORE


Spring training glance
AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L Pct
Toronto 22 5 .815
Oakland 14 5 .737
Detroit 16 7 .696
Los Angeles 17 10 .630
Seattle 12 8 .600
Minnesota 17 13 .567
New York 14 11 .560
Boston 13 11 .542
Kansas City 14 13 .519
Baltimore 11 12 .478
Chicago 12 15 .444
Texas 9 17 .346
Tampa Bay 8 16 .333
Cleveland 6 20 .231
NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L Pct
St. Louis 15 8 .652
San Diego 18 12 .600
San Francisco 16 11 .593
Colorado 15 11 .577
Los Angeles 13 12 .520
Houston 14 14 .500
Chicago 14 16 .467
Milwaukee 12 14 .462
Miami 10 12 .455
Cincinnati 13 16 .448
Philadelphia 12 15 .444
Washington 11 14 .440
Arizona 11 16 .407
Atlanta 10 16 .385
Pittsburgh 8 17 .320
New York 7 17 .292
NOTE: Split-squad games count in the stand-
ings; games against non-major league teams
do not.
Thursday's Games
Minnesota 11, Pittsburgh 6
Washington (ss) 6, Atlanta 3
Miami 3, St. Louis 1
Philadelphia 2, Tampa Bay 1
Toronto 3, Boston 2
L.A. Angels 11, Kansas City 8
Cincinnati 9, Milwaukee 3
Colorado 6, Cleveland (ss) 3
Chicago White Sox 3, L.A. Dodgers 1
San Diego 12, Chicago Cubs 11
Arizona 5, Cleveland (ss) 4
Washington (ss) 5, Detroit 3
N.Y Mets 9, Houston 1
Baltimore 4, N.Y.Yankees 3
San Francisco 6, Texas 2
Friday's Games
St. Louis 4, N.Y Mets 3
Minnesota (ss) 4, Toronto 1
Boston 9, Minnesota (ss) 7
Pittsburgh 3, Tampa Bay 3, tie
Detroit 6, Baltimore 3
L.A. Angels 9, Arizona 2
Milwaukee 9, L.A. Dodgers (ss) 4
L.A. Dodgers (ss) 6, Chicago Cubs 3
Cincinnati 6, Cleveland 5
Washington 3, Miami 2
Atlanta (ss) 3, Houston (ss) 1
N.Y Yankees 13, Philadelphia 9
Houston (ss) 5, Atlanta (ss) 1
Chicago White Sox vs. Kansas City, late
San Francisco vs. San Diego, late
Texas vs. Colorado, late
Saturday's Games
Toronto vs. Philadelphia at Clearwater, Fla.,
1:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh (ss) vs. Minnesota at Fort Myers,
Fla., 1:05 p.m.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FrO, the record


== lorida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Friday in the Florida Lottery:
-_ CASH 3 (early)
r-' .' q : 3-7-7
CASH 3 (late)
.B /^ -- 1 -1-5-5
PLAY 4 (early)
K : 66-1-5-9
PLAY 4 (late)
8-5-2-9
FANTASY 5
3-14-17-21-23
MEGA MONEY
4-6-9-37
Fl"i Lottery MEGA BALL
9



On the AIRWAVES=


TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
4 p.m. (NBCSPT) IndyCar: Honda Indy Grand Prix of
Alabama qualifying
7:30 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRA: SummitRacing.com Nationals
qualifying (Same-day Tape)
COLLEGE BASEBALL
1 p.m. (FSNFL) Duke at Georgia Tech
4 p.m. (FSNFL) Kentucky at Georgia
MLB
1 p.m. (SUN) Preseason: Boston Red Sox at Tampa Bay Rays
BASKETBALL
MEN'S NCAA FINAL FOUR
1 p.m. (TRUTV) Reese College All Star Game (Taped)
6 p.m. (CBS) Louisville vs. Kentucky
8:30 p.m. (CBS) Kansas vs. Ohio State
HIGH SCHOOL BASKETBALL
12 p.m. (ESPN2) Girls National Invitational final
2 p.m. (ESPN) Boys National Invitational final
NBA
5 a.m. (ESPN2) Dallas Mavericks at Orlando Magic
(Same-day Tape)
HORSE RACING
5 p.m. (NBCSPT) Florida Derby
GOLF
7 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour: Sicilian Open
1 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: Shell Houston Open
3 p.m. (NBC) PGATour: Shell Houston Open
4:30 p.m. (GOLF) LPGA Tour: Kraft Nabisco Championship
HOCKEY
7 p.m. (SUN) Winnipeg Jets at Tampa Bay Lightning
SOCCER
9:55 a.m. (ESPN2) English Premier League: Manchester
City vs. Sunderland
7:30 p.m. (FSNFL) UEFA Champions League Quarterfinal:
Benfica vs. Chelsea (Same-day Tape)
9 p.m. (NBCSPT) CONCACAF Olympic Qualifier: Mexico
vs. Canada
11 p.m. (NBCSPT) MLS: New England Revolution at Los
Angeles Galaxy
COLLEGE SOFTBALL
4:30 p.m. (SUN) Baylor at Missouri
TENNIS
12:30 p.m. (CBS) ATP Sony Ericsson Open women's final
SKIING
6 p.m. (NBCSPT) Visa U.S. Freeskiing Grand Prix (Taped)
7 p.m. (NBCSPT) Sprint U.S. Freestyle Championships
(Taped)

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.



Prep CALENDAR


TODAY'S PREP SPORTS
TRACKAND FIELD
9 a.m. Citrus, CR at West Port Relays


Baltimore vs. Pittsburgh (ss) at Brade
Fla., 1:05 p.m.
St. Louis vs. Washington at Viera, Fla.,
p.m.
Detroit vs. Atlanta at Kissimmee, Fla.,
p.m.
N.Y Yankees vs. Houston at Kissimmee
1:05 p.m.
Boston vs. Tampa Bay at Port Charlotte
1:05 p.m.
N.Y Mets vs. Miami at Jupiter, Fla., 1:05
Milwaukee vs. San Diego (ss) at Peoria,
3:05 p.m.
Arizona (ss) vs. Kansas City at Surl
Ariz., 4:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels vs. Chicago Cubs at Mesa,
4:05 p.m.
Colorado vs. Chicago White Sox at Gler
Ariz., 4:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers vs. Arizona (ss) at Scotts
Ariz., 4:10 p.m.
Cincinnati vs. San Francisco at Scotts
Ariz., 6:05 p.m.
San Diego (ss) vs. Seattle at Peoria,
9:05 p.m.
Texas vs. Cleveland at Goodyear, Ariz.,
p.m.
Sunday's Games
Tampa Bay vs. Baltimore at Sarasota,
1:05 p.m.
Houston vs. Detroit (ss) at Lakeland,
1:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh vs. Toronto at Dunedin, Fla.,
p.m.
Philadelphia vs. Atlanta at Kissimmee,
1:05 p.m.
Detroit (ss) vs. N.Y. Mets at Port St.
Fla., 1:10 p.m.
N.Y.Yankees at Miami, 1:10 p.m.
Minnesota vs. Boston at Fort Myers,
1:35 p.m.
Chicago Cubs vs. L.A. Angels at Te
Ariz., 4:05 p.m.
San Francisco vs. Milwaukee at Pho
4:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox vs. Cincinna
Goodyear, Ariz., 4:05 p.m.
San Diego vs. Texas at Surprise, Ariz.
p.m.
Arizona vs. L.A. Dodgers at Glendale,
4:05 p.m.
Kansas City vs. Seattle at Peoria, Ariz.
p.m.
Cleveland vs. Colorado at Scottsdale,
4:10 p.m.



NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct
Boston 29 22 .569
Philadelphia 28 23 .549
New York 26 26 .500
New Jersey 17 35 .327
Toronto 17 35 .327


Southeast Division


Miami
Orlando
Atlanta
Washington
Charlotte


x-Chicago
Indiana
Milwaukee
Detroit
Cleveland


W L Pct
37 13 .740
32 20 .615
31 22 .585
12 39 .235
7 42 .143
Central Division
W L Pct
42 11 .792
30 20 .600
24 27 .471
18 33 .353
17 32 .347


WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct
San Antonio 35 14 .714
Dallas 30 23 .566
Memphis 27 22 .551
Houston 28 24 .538
New Orleans 13 38 .255
Northwest Division
W L Pct
Oklahoma City 39 12 .765


Denver
Utah
Minnesota
Portland


L.A. Lakers
L.A. Clippers
Phoenix
Golden State
Sacramento


28 24 .538
27 24 .529
25 28 .472
24 27 .471
Pacific Division
W L Pct
31 20 .608
29 21 .580
25 26 .490
20 29 .408
17 33 .340


Lucie, x-clinched playoff spot
Thursday's Games
Indiana 93, Washington 89
Fla., Miami 106, Dallas 85
Portland 99, New Orleans 93
empe, Oklahoma City 102, L.A. Lakers 93
Friday's Games
oenix, Denver 99, Charlotte 88
Miami 113, Toronto 101
ti at Washington 97, Philadelphia 76
Atlanta 100, New York 90
4:05 Milwaukee 121, Cleveland 84
Chicago 83, Detroit 71
Ariz Houston 98, Memphis 89
Boston 100, Minnesota 79
Dallas 100, Orlando 98
4:05 Sacramento at Utah, late
New Jersey at Golden State, late
Ariz., Portland at L.A. Clippers, late
Saturday's Games
New Orleans at L.A. Lakers, 3:30 p.m.
Charlotte at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Cleveland at NewYork, 7:30 p.m.
Atlanta at Philadelphia, 7:30 p.m.
Indiana at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.
Memphis at Milwaukee, 8:30 p.m.
New Jersey at Sacramento, 10 p.m.
GB Utah at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.
-- Sunday's Games
1 Chicago at Oklahoma City, 1 p.m.
3Y2 Miami at Boston, 3:30 p.m.
12Y2 Washington at Toronto, 6 p.m.
12Y2 Denver at Orlando, 6 p.m.


Indiana at Houston, 7 p.m.
Minnesota at Portland, 9 p.m.
New Orleans at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
Golden State at L.A. Lakers, 9:30 p.m.



NHL standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W LOT PtsGF GA
x-N.Y. Rangers 78 5021 7 107217 173
x-Pittsburgh 78 4824 6 102264 208
x-Philadelphia 77 4524 8 98248 214
New Jersey 78 4428 6 94214 205
N.Y. Islanders 77 3333 11 77190 230


Boston
Ottawa
Buffalo
Toronto
Montreal


Florida
Washington
Winnipeg
Carolina


Northeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
77 4528 4 94251 189
77 3928 10 88236 227
78 3830 10 86205 215
78 3336 9 75218 249
78 2935 14 72200 218
Southeast Division
GP W LOT PtsGF GA
78 3725 16 90192 215
78 3931 8 86209 221
78 3634 8 80211 230
78 31 31 16 78208 232


Tampa Bay 77 35 35 7 77220 266
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
x-St. Louis 78 4820 10 106202 151
x-Nashville 78 4525 8 98223 203
x-Detroit 78 4627 5 97240 195
Chicago 78 4326 9 95235 225
Columbus 78 2645 7 59185 253
Northwest Division
GP W LOT PtsGF GA
y-Vancouver 77 4721 9 103231 187
Colorado 79 4033 6 86201 208
Calgary 78 3528 15 85191 215
Minnesota 77 3235 10 74164 212
Edmonton 77 31 37 9 71207 226
Pacific Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Dallas 77 4230 5 89205 204
Phoenix 78 3827 13 89202 202
Los Angeles 77 3827 12 88178 165
San Jose 78 3929 10 88211 201
Anaheim 77 3333 11 77194 213
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over-
time loss.
x-clinched playoff spot, y-clinched division
Thursday's Games
Washington 3, Boston 2, SO
Chicago 4, St. Louis 3, SO
Philadelphia 7, Toronto 1
New Jersey 6, Tampa Bay 4
N.Y. Islanders 5, Pittsburgh 3
Minnesota 3, Florida 2, OT
Phoenix 2, San Jose 0
Friday's Games
Winnipeg 4, Carolina 3, OT
Columbus 4, Florida 1
N.Y. Rangers 4, Montreal 1
Pittsburgh 5, Buffalo 3
Nashville 4, Detroit 1
Colorado at Calgary, late
Los Angeles at Edmonton, late
Dallas at Vancouver, late
Saturday's Games
Boston at N.Y Islanders, 1 p.m.
Ottawa at Philadelphia, 1 p.m.
Buffalo at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Montreal at Washington, 7 p.m.
New Jersey at Carolina, 7 p.m.
Winnipeg at Tampa Bay 7 p.m.
Columbus at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Chicago at Nashville, 8 p.m.
Los Angeles at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Anaheim at Phoenix, 9p.m.
Calgary at Vancouver, 10 p.m.
Dallas at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Philadelphia at Pittsburgh, 12:30 p.m.
Ottawa at N.Y. Islanders, 3 p.m.
Florida at Detroit, 4p.m.
Boston at N.Y Rangers, 7 p.m.
Minnesota at Chicago, 7 p.m.
Edmonton at Anaheim, 8 p.m.



Friday's Sports Transactions
BASEBALL
COMMISSIONER'S OFFICE-Suspended
free agent minor league LHP Lary Vasquez 50
games after testing positive for metabolites of
Stanozolol in violation of the Minor League Drug
Prevention and Treatment Program, effective
upon signing with a major league organization.
American League
CLEVELAND INDIANS-Optioned LHP Nick
Hagadone and INF Russ Canzlerto Columbus
(IL). Reassigned C Luke Carlin, INF Andy
LaRoche, LHP Chris Seddon, RHP Chris Ray
and RHP Robinson Tejeda to minor league
camp. Placed RHP Matt Bush on the restricted
list.
KANSAS CITY ROYALS-Agreed to terms
with OF Alex Gordon on a four-year contract.
LOS ANGELES ANGELS-Selected the con-
tract of RHP Jason Isringhausen from Salt Lake
(PCL). Optioned OF Mike Trout to Salt Lake.
NEW YORK YANKEES-Released INF Rus-
sell Branyan from his minor league contract,
then re-signed him to a new minor league con-
tract. Assigned C CraigTatum outright to Scran-
ton/Wilkes-Barre (IL).
National League
ATLANTA BRAVES-Agreed to terms with
RHP Livan Hernandez on a one-year contract.
HOUSTON ASTROS-Released RHP Livan
Hernandez.
PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES-Traded INF/OF
Matt Rizzotti to Minnesota for cash considera-
tions.
PITTSBURGH PIRATES-Traded RHP Ryota
Igarashi to Toronto for a player to be named or
cash considerations.
SAN DIEGO PADRES-Agree to terms with
RHP Cory Luebke on a contract extension.
SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS-Released INF
Mike Fontenot. Placed 2B Freddy Sanchez,
RHP Ryan Vogelsong, LHP Eric Surkamp and
LHP Dan Runzler on the 15-day DL; Sanchez,
Surkamp and Runzler retroactive to March 26,
and Vogelsong to March 27.
WASHINGTON NATIONALS-Selected the
contract of OF RickAnkiel from Syracuse (IL).
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
NBA-Fined L.A. Clippers F Reggie Evans
$25,000 for making an obscene gesture during
Monday's game against New Orleans.
CLEVELAND CAVALIERS-Signed G Lester
Hudson to a 10-day contract.
HOUSTON ROCKETS-Assigned F Malcolm
Thomas to Rio Grande Valley (NBADL).
NEW JERSEY NETS-Signed F Dennis
Horner to a 10-day contract.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
NFL-Suspended N.Y. Giants RB Andre
Brown four games for violating the league pol-
icy on performance enhancing substances.
CAROLINA PANTHERS-Traded RB Mike
Goodson to Oakland for OT Bruce Campbell.
CINCINNATI BENGALS-Agreed to terms
with LB Manny Lawson.
NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS- Re-signedWR
Deion Branch. Signed FB Tony Fiammetta and
FB Spencer Larsen.
SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS-Waived WR
Dontavia Bogan.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
BOSTON BRUINS-Reassigned D Zach
McKelvie to Reading (ECHL) from Providence
(AHL).
CHICAGO BLACKHAWKS-Assigned F
Phillip Danault to Rockford (AHL).
EDMONTON OILERS-Recalled LW Magnus
Paajarvi from Oklahoma City (AHL) and then re-
turned him to Ohlahoma City.
NEWYORK ISLANDERS-Returned G Kevin
Poulin to Bridgeport (AHL).
SAN JOSE SHARKS-Signed C Travis Olek-
sukto an entry-level contract.


Florida's Walker charged
with stealing taco
GAINESVILLE, Fla. -
Florida guard Erving Walker
has been charged with stealing
a taco and running from police.
Walker, a senior who ranks
first in school history in assists,
was arrested and given a notice
to appear in court early Friday.
He was charged with petty theft
and resisting an officer without
violence, both misdemeanors.
He was not taken to jail.
Gainesville Police say
Walker ordered a $3 taco from
a street vendor, got the food
and ran away without paying.
When a police officer caught up
with him and told him stop,
Walker kept going, according to
the police report.
When officers finally caught
Walker with help from "several
marked patrol cars," he told
them he was "just playing
around," the report said.
Walker is scheduled to
appear in court April 19.
Weiand throws
no-hitter in SRCS win
The Seven Rivers Christian
Warriors baseball team split its
series with Ocala Christian,
coming back from a Thursday
loss to drub the Crusaders 12-0.
Pitcher Cory Weiand took
care of defense for the War-
riors, striking out 12 en route to
a no-hitter. Weiand also pro-
vided some offense, going 2 for
4 with a single and a triple.
Lance Mosier went 3 for 4 at
the plate, and Adam Gage went
2 for 4 and drove in three runs
The win takes the Warriors to
3-3 on the season.

Hurricanes blown
away right at end
The Citrus baseball team al-



AP
Continued from Page BI

"I have to thank my team-
mates for those lob passes
for easy baskets and for them
getting beat off the dribble
for all those blocked shots.
Without them there are no
awards."



SAINTS
Continued from Page BI

Rams, ran the bounty pro-
gram and has been sus-
pended indefinitely



REVERSAL
Continued from Page BI


more with two outs off three
base hits in the fifth.
Lecanto coach David
Logue hopes the confidence
his team feels when Baxter
is on the mound becomes
contagious.
"I know this team is going
to come to play when Shel-
don pitches," Logue said.
"We have to come in with
that mindframe all the time,
like we're the best and
we're not going to lose.
We've only been like that
when Sheldon pitches.
"But I've seen a change in
a couple of the guys," he
added. "I've been telling
them to be more aggressive
early in the count on the
first strike they see, and we
didn't take too many fast-
balls tonight.
"I hope we get on a roll to-
ward the end like we did
last year. We fought through
a little adversity recently,
and hopefully it'll bring us
together and make us




SUMMERS
Continued from Page B1


Club at Silver Springs Shores
by34 strokes. He also tied for
third with a round of 79 to aid
the Panthers to a county title
at Southern Woods Golf Club
in Homosassa.
Shortly after those per-
formances, he impressed
Lecanto basketball coaches


Eddie Buckley and Frank Vi-
lardi by offering to move
from the wing to point guard
in order to make room for an
abundance of perimeter
scoring threats for the
Panthers.
"He volunteered to move
to point, knowing he would
score less, because he
thought we would be a better
team," Vilardi said. "This
move was the difference in
our season.
"He was our unquestion-
able leader and our best de-


lowed the winning run to score
on a wild pitch in the bottom of
the seventh en route to a 5-4
loss at Williston on Friday night.
Offensively, Hayden Kelly's 1
for 3 night included a two-run
home run, three RBIs and two
runs to pace the Hurricanes.
Senior pitcher Pat Martin got
a no decision after tossing 6 1/3
innings and giving up just two
earned runs. Martin allowed six
hits and two walks while striking
out three.
Citrus (9-8) hosts Spring-
stead on Tuesday.
Pirates drop to second
in district after loss
The Crystal River softball
team dropped a 4-3 contest in
nine innings at Tavares on Fri-
day night, propelling the hosts
into sole possession of first
place in District 5A-7.
Rachel Roe tossed a com-
plete game, allowing 10 hits
and two earned runs.
Crystal River tied the game
in the top of the seventh on
Marissa Pool's two-run double.
Emily Laga also went 2 for 4 for
the Pirates.
Crystal River (11-5) hosts
Eustis on Monday.
Warriors narrowly
lose at OCA
The Seven Rivers Christian
softball team fell 6-3 at Ocala
Christian Academy on Friday.
Offensively for the Warriors,
Milena Kacer tripled and
walked, Katie Fenton had two
hits and Allison Green went 1
for 3 with a walk and two RBIs.
Seven Rivers pitcher Milena
Kacer went the distance in a
solid complete-game effort.
The Warriors (1-11) host
Trenton on Monday.
From staff, wire reports

No Kentucky player had
won the award which started
in 1961, and the only other
freshman to win it was Kevin
Durant of Texas in 2007.
"I'm surprised because
you've had a lot of great play-
ers from Kentucky," Davis
said. "Hopefully I'm starting
something, and a lot of Ken-
tucky players will win this
award."

The commissioner has
said since the unprece-
dented penalties were
announced that the Saints'
coach would likely be
allowed to continue
working as his appeal was
resolved.


stronger as we face some
good teams next week.
Sims described the begin-
ning of Lecanto's momen-
tum at the plate as well as
the club's better success off
hard-throwing starter Joe
Siegfried in the senior
pitcher's second go against
the Panthers this season.
"It all started when Skylar
got that double in the first
inning," Sims said. "We kind
of fed off that. We were just
seeing the pitches and hit-
ting them well. The first
time we faced Siegfried, we
didn't hit him at all. Today
we were sitting on the fast-
ball and driving it.
"Once we got the 7-2 lead,
I thought, 'Yeah, Sheldon's
closing the door,"' Sims
added.
The Eagles tacked on one
more run in their final at-
bat off two Panther errors
and another double by
Wyzykowski.
Junior Brandon Brasher
struck out three Lecanto
batters in one inning of re-
lief for Springstead.
Lecanto hosts Trinity
Catholic on Tuesday



fender," Vilardi added.
Summers, who started for
three years on the court for
Lecanto, went on to lead his
team with five assists per
game.
"We had a bunch of scor-
ers, like Richie Rizzolo and
Mikey Makros, who could
shoot the ball, but we needed
a good passer," Summers
said.
"So I decided to be the as-
sists leader," he added,


smiling.
Summers is awaiting word
on his applications to
Florida State University, the
University of Central
Florida and the University
of South Florida, but his
main focus is trying to help
his school bring home an-
other championship.
"Those two we've won are
great, and now I'm just look-
ing to win a district in base-
ball," he said. "I'm trying to
get all three for my senior
year"


Sports BRIEFS


SPORTS






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Rays, Pirates end game in a tie


Associated Press

BRADENTON, Fla. Casey
McGehee and Matt Hague each
homered Friday for the Pittsburgh
Pirates in a 3-3 tie with the Tampa
Bay Rays.
McGehee hit a solo shot in the
fourth inning. Hague had a two-
run homer in the seventh.
Hague, who's competing for the
final bench spot on the Pirates'
opening-day roster, went 2 for 3.
He has 13 hits in his past 31 at-bats
and leads the team with five
homers this spring.
The Pirates used five relievers
instead of a starter. Brad Lincoln,
who has a chance to make the
team as a long reliever, worked
two innings and gave up Jose
Molina's three-run double.
Left-hander Matt Moore, who
appears to have won a spot in the
Rays' starting rotation, worked six
innings and allowed one run on
three hits. He walked one and
struck out three.
Astros (ss) 5, Braves (ss) 1
KISSIMMEE, Fla. Bud Norris al-
lowed one run in six innings and a
Houston Astros split squad beat an At-
lanta Braves split squad 5-1.
Chris Johnson's two-run single
highlighlighted a four-run fourth inning for
the Astros off Atlanta starter Randall
Delgado, who took the loss.
Norris gave up three hits and no
walks.
Jason Castro had two of the Astros'
six hits.
Delgado pitched 4 2/3 innings, giv-
ing up six hits and five runs.
Cardinals 4, Mets 3
JUPITER, Fla. Kyle Lohse al-
lowed an unearned run and three hits
in six innings and singled in a run to
lead the St. Louis Cardinals to a 4-3
victory over the New York Mets.
Lohse did receive a scare, though.
Omar Quintanilla's well-struck
grounder in the third inning hit Lohse
in the hand. After the play, the trainer
came out to check on Lohse, who said
he simply needed a few moments to
let the tingling in his ring and pinkie fin-
gers subside.
Lohse was given an error on the
play the Cardinals' second consec-
utive error and the run scored by
Mike Nickeas was unearned. Lohse
stayed in the game, allowing only one
more hit and walking one through the
final three innings.
The Cardinals took the lead for
good in the fourth, with Lohse driving
in the go-ahead run.


Associated Press
Atlanta Braves starting pitcher Jair Jurrjens competes against the Houston Astros on Friday in Kissimmee.


The Mets' Dillion Gee gave up 10
hits and four runs in six innings.
Red Sox 9, Twins (ss) 7
FORT MYERS, Fla. Daniel Bard
made his final case for a rotation spot,
allowing three runs and four hits in six
innings as the Boston Red Sox beat a
Minnesota Twins' split squad 9-7.
Bard, who struck out seven and
walked three, is competing with Alfredo
Aceves, Felix Doubront and Aaron
Cook for the final two starting berths.
Cody Ross homered twice for
Boston, raising his spring training total
to six.
Twins starter Nick Blackburn gave
up two runs and five hits in five innings.
Minnesota's Joe Mauer singled
twice, raising his spring-training aver-
age to .367 after an injury filled season
that saw him his a career-low .287.
Twins (ss) 4, Blue Jays 1
DUNEDIN, Fla. Ben Revere fol-
lowed Aaron Hicks' fifth-inning double
with a triple, and a Minnesota Twins split
squad beat the Toronto Blue Jays 4-1.
Chris Parmalee homered in the sixth
off Blue Jays starter Aaron Laffey.
Liam Hendriks, a candidate to open
the season in the Twins' starting rota-
tion, held Toronto to one hit over five
innings.
Dodgers (ss) 6, Cubs 3
MESA, Ariz. Dee Gordon had a


two-run triple in the seventh inning,
leading a Los Angeles Dodgers split
squad past the Chicago Cubs 6-3.
Gordon, who went 1 for 3 with a
walk, drove in his first runs of spring.
The Dodgers leadoff hitter is batting
.381 with 15 runs and 10 stolen bases.
lan Stewart homered off Dodgers
starter Fernando Nieve. Alfonso Sori-
ano had an RBI double in the eighth
inning for the Cubs.
Chicago starter Ryan Dempster
pitched 4 2-3 innings his final start be-
fore opening day. He allowed a run
and four hits. He walked three and
struck out three.
Angels 9, Diamondbacks 2
TEMPE, Ariz. -Albert Pujols
homered and C.J. Wilson had another
strong start, and the Angels' pair of
new stars led Los Angeles to a 9-2 vic-
tory over the Arizona Diamondbacks.
Pujols hit his fifth spring homer off
Diamondbacks starter Josh Coll-
menter. The Angels got to Collmenter
for four runs in the first, two coming in
on Howie Kendrick's fourth homer and
two more runs coming on Bobby
Abreu's single.
Wilson worked 6 1-3 innings and al-
lowed five hits and one run Justin
Upton's fourth homer in the first. Wil-
son lowered his spring ERA to 1.33
after five outings.
Collmenter continued to struggle, al-


lowing 10 hits and eight runs. His
spring ERA soared to 11.81.
Reds 6, Indians 5
GOODYEAR, Ariz. Todd Frazier,
Juan Francisco and Ryan LaMarre
homered in a five-run eighth inning off
reliever Dan Wheeler and the Cincin-
nati Reds rallied for a 6-5 win over the
Cleveland Indians.
With one out, Frazier and Fran-
cisco homered. Willie Harris singled
and scored on Ryan Ludwick's dou-
ble. LaMarre's two-run homer capped
the rally.
Carlos Santana and Asdrubal Cabr-
era homered off Reds opening day
starter Johnny Cueto. Cueto went six
innings, allowing two runs and four hits
in his last start before opening day.
Jeanmar Gomez left the game with
a mildly strained hip after 3 2/3 innings.
The Cleveland pitcher stretched for
a return throw from shortstop Cabrera
to complete a double play in the bot-
tom of the fourth inning.
Gomez is the third Indians pitcher to
get hurt in two days. Derek Lowe left
his start Thursday with a sore back
and David Huff injured his hamstring
later in that game.
Huff and Gomez were in the mix for
the fifth starter job.
Tigers 6, Orioles 4
SARASOTA, Fla. Tony Plagman


hit a tiebreaking, two-run triple off Jim
Johnson in the ninth inning to give the
Detroit Tigers a 6-4 victory over the
Baltimore Orioles.
Johnson walked Curt Casali and
Daniel Fields before Plagman hit a two-
out liner to right-center. Johnson, who
is dueling with Kevin Gregg for the
closer's job, has a 7.71 ERA this
spring.
Jai Miller doubled with two outs in
the bottom of the sixth to score pinch-
runner Glynn Davis and put the Ori-
oles ahead 4-3. Miller snapped an
0-for-18 slump.
The Tigers tied the game in the
seventh on Plagman's home run off
reliever Luis Ayala.
Brian Matusz, expected to be
named the Orioles' fifth starter, al-
lowed three runs and five hits, walked
one and struck out four in five innings.
Nationals 3, Marlins 2
VIERA, Fla. Giancarlo Stanton
and Logan Morrison returned to the
lineup for the Florida Marlins, who lost
to the Washington Nationals 3-2.
Stanton, who had not played since
March 11 because of wrist and knee
injuries, went 0 for 2 with a walk. Mor-
rison was out with troublesome knee
since March 13. He had an RBI single
in three at-bats.
lan Desmond homered to left on
the first pitch by Miami starter Josh
Johnson. Johnson struck out nine in 5
2-3 innings.
Ross Detwiler made his first start of
the spring for Washington and al-
lowed one run on three hits over five
innings. He struck out five. Detwiler
threw 50 of 69 pitches for strikes.
Brewers 9, Dodgers (ss) 4
GLENDALE, Ariz. Chris Ca-
puano pitched six innings in his final
preparation for his new spot as the
Dodgers' No. 3 starter and caused a
stir by throwing behind Ryan Braun in
a Los Angeles split squad's 9-4 loss to
the Milwaukee Brewers.
Dodgers manager Don Mattingly
said before the game starter Ted Lilly
will start the season on the disabled
list. Slowed by a stiff neck, Lilly
pitched a bullpen session for the first
time since March 21.
Capuano threw 83 pitches, includ-
ing one in the top of the sixth that
went behind Braun. First-base umpire
Bill Miller acted quickly to prevent any
chance of a confrontation. Miller
alerted home-plate umpire Michael
Lusky who warned both dugouts.
Braun hit a towering home run in
the first.


UK-UL a grudge match


Associated Press

NEW ORLEANS Ken-
tucky coach John Calipari
likes to say there are no ri-
valry games at this point in
the season.
Try telling that to the
Bluegrass State, where bas-
ketball's version of the civil
war Kentucky vs.
Louisville, winner plays for
the NCAA title has so di-
vided the small state that
senior citizens have actually
come to fisticuffs.
"The fans take it as, who-
ever loses, it's their funeral,
really," Louisville senior
guard Chris Smith said. "It's
really cut-throat, I would say."
The game Saturday is the
fifth time top-seeded Ken-
tucky (36-2) and fourth-
seeded Louisville (30-9) have
met in the NCAA tourna-
ment They split the previ-
ous four meetings.
Basketball purists may
argue Duke-North Carolina


or Kansas-Missouri are the
game's biggest, most intense
rivalries. But those are like
quaint tea parties compared
with the animosity between
Kentucky and Louisville,
which required government
intervention to get them to
schedule each other
No, think Auburn-
Alabama on the hardcourt,
and you get the idea.
"We get along with most of
them," Kentucky fan Pat Stahl
said of Louisville fans, "as
long as they don't talk to you."
Or, heaven forbid, say
something at a dialysis ap-
pointment. A 71-year-old
Louisville fan punched a 68-
year-old Kentucky fan ear-
lier this week after their
discussion over Saturday
night's game got out of hand.
To be fair, police say the
Kentucky fan did flip off the
Louisville fan.
"It all started with the
racial lines in Kentucky,"
Louisville coach Rick Pitino


said of the rivalry "Now (it's)
no longer racially motivated.
It's just pure hatred."
It's a given that Louisville
and Kentucky would be ri-
vals, their campuses a mere
70 miles apart in a state
where basketball is king. To
hear fans of both schools tell
it, however, the programs
might as well be on different
planets.
Kentucky is a college bas-
ketball blue blood, its seven
national titles second only to
UCLA, while Louisville has
a nice little tradition going
with two national titles.
Big Blue counts most of
the state among its fan base,
too, while Louisville isn't
necessarily even No. 1 in its
own city.
In fact, about the only
thing the two schools have in
common is Pitino, who led
the Wildcats to one national
title and two other Final
Four appearances in eight
years at Kentucky.


Welcome to 'The Other Game'


Associated Press

NEW ORLEANS Wel-
come to "The Other Game"
at the Final Four.
OK, so, the Ohio State-
Kansas matchup may not
have the fantastic fresh-
men, the outspoken
coaches or blood-feud story
line of the opening semifi-
nal between Kentucky and
Louisville. But this one still
should be worth a two-hour
investment in front of the
TV set Saturday night.
Besides the chance to
watch two top-line teams
play for a spot in the na-
tional title game, the Buck-
eyes-Jayhawks game offers
a rare opportunity to see
two All-Americans going at
it with everything on the
line.
Ohio State is led by Jared
Sullinger, the sophomore
forward who missed the
first matchup between


these teams with a bad
back. Kansas' best player is
Thomas Robinson, who
had 21 points and seven re-
bounds in the Jayhawks' 78-
67 win on Dec. 10.
"In my eyes, he's the col-
lege player of the year,"
Sullinger said of Robinson.
"I know some think differ-
ent. But with his season,
the way he took his team to
the top, you've just got to
give it to him."
In fact, it's Kentucky's
Anthony Davis who took
player of the year awards
from The Associated Press
and college basketball writ-
ers Friday But while Davis
is a story of an ultra-
talented freshman trying to
lead his team to a champi-
onship in what likely will
be his only year with the
Wildcats, Sullinger and
Robinson approach college
in a different way


At one point last season,
Sullinger was viewed as a
surefire lottery pick, a one-
and-done prospect with
nothing much left to prove
in college. He never saw it
that way, however, and
when Ohio State was elimi-
nated from last year's tour-
nament as a No. 1 seed, the
6-foot-9 forward committed
to staying in college.
"I wanted to make a
statement, that not every-
body is using college bas-
ketball as a pit stop to go
the next level," he said.
"That there's more than
money and endorsements.
There's championships
that you've got to win at
every level. That's what I
pride myself on. I've won a
championship all the way
from elementary to now. I
pride myself on winning.
That's the biggest thing.
That's why I came back."


Second Round


Third Round


Men's Division I
Sweet 16 Basketball Championship


1 Michigan St 89
-6LUBoky- 7 1 Michigan St 65
16 LIU Brooklyn 67 | -----,----
8 Memphis 54 1 Mich St 44
B Lous 671 9 St Louis 61
9 St Louis 61L
c 4 Louisville 72
5 New Mexico 75
------- |5 New Mexico 56
12 Long Beach St 68 New Mexico 6
5614Louis574Lus5
4 Louisville 69 I I
9 St Loudso 61 4 Louisville 59
13Davdson62 WEST 4
6 MurraySt 58 Phoenix
16 Murray St 53
11 Colorado St 41 3 Marquette 58
3 Marquette 88 ----
14-B-U-68 I3 Marquette 62
14 BYU 68
--- '-7 Flonda 68
7 Florida 71
1 7 Florida 84
10 Virginia 457 Flonda 687o 6
-------- 5 Flnd 68o t 8 loi a8

2 Missouri 84 ---
------ 115 Norfolk St 50
15 Norfolk St 86 "15 Norfolk St 50 /



W(
First Round Second Round Sweet 16 Bask
= Baylorr81
----6UCSB40 1 Baylor 761Byo7
16 UCSB 40 --------
--r7 1 Baylor 83
8 Ohio St 65 ]----- Elite Eight
-- --------- 9 Florida 57 March 2627
9 Flonda 70
r-- 61 Baylor 7
5 Georgetown 61 Georgetown 64
-- ------- 5 Georgetown 641 o
12 FresnoST56 4Ga Tech 68
4 Georgia Tech 76
13 Sacred Heart 50 aTeh76
soe-ea 5 4 Ga Tech 76
Des Moines 'Ba
6 Nebraska 49
11 Kansas57 11 Kansas70
l---Kansas-7311 Kansas 73
3 Delaware 73 ---
----------- 1 3 Delaware 64
414AR42 ___ ------
2 Tenn 58
7 DePacl 59
7Dau59 7 DePaul 48
10 BYU 55 2en8
1 -5-UT-Mrtin-g4 2 Tenn 84
2 Tennessee 72 ]2Tnese6
2 Tennessee 63
15 aTMatn4------


FI-iI


S Stanford 73 I
16 Hampton 51 1 Stanford 72
9 Te Stanford 817
7' Stanfard 76
5 South Carolina 80
-- 5 So Carolina 72
12 Eastern Mich 48 --------
4 Purdue 83 5 S C 60 Mon,
13 So DakotaSt 68 4 Purdue 61 9

Fresno 1It
6 Oklahoma 88
6 --------- 6 Oklahoma 70
SMichig, an 67 i-,4
3 St John's 69 47
3 -St -John's-69 3 St John's 74
14 Creghton 67 J
g 37S t74 Johs D 2 Duke 74
7 Vanderbilt 60
7Vanderbilt 80
10 Middle Tenn 46 7nb02
2 Duke 82 2 Duke 96
5 d 2 Duke 96
15Samford 47 /


Sweet 16


Third Round


Second Round


S1 N Carolina 77
1 N Carolina 87--V
1 March 31 1 N Cam 73 6Vemon 58
8 30 p m.-- 8 Creighton 58
8Creighton 73
9 Aabama 57
1 N Caro 67 ----5
1Naro67 5 Temple 44
12 S Flonda 56
12 S Florida 58
13 Ohio 65 L- -12 --------H
4 Michigan 60
13 Ohio 62 3
ie 2 Kansas MIDWEST 3-Thio65
St Louis NC Stat 6 San Diego St 65
SN C Sta C Stat66 e 79
11NCSt57
3 Georgetown 74
All times EDT 3 Georgetown 63 3 Georgetown 74
14 Belmont 59
2 Kansas 80
7 Saint Mary's 69
I0Purdue 60
2Kansas 60 10 Purdue 72
2 Kansas 60
2 Kansas 65
2 Kansas 63 I
2 Kansas 63 ,15 Detroit 50
AP


Vomen's Division I
oetball Championship



1IN Dar

Final Four es
April 1 9pm
aylor 1 Notre Dame Rn


National
Championship
SApril 3I


Sweet 16 Second Round First Round
1 Notre Dame 74
1 Notre Dame 73--
1 Notre Dame 79 6 Lberty 43
ght 8 Calhfomna 84
27 8 Californa 62
9 Iowa 74
me 80
5 St Bonaventure72
5 St Bona 66
1 -- 12 Fla Gd Coast 65
5 St Bona 35 [ -
4 Georgia 70
3 Manst 63
n ------- 13Manst 76


alei g h 6 Arkansas 72
6 Arkansas 59
3TexasA&M 74 -r Is|1 Dayton55
3 Texas A&M 69
3TexasA&M 613Tes& 6
414Albany47
49
7 Louisville 67
7 Louisvlle 68
2 Maryland 81 10 Michigan St 55
2 Maryland 72 2 Maryland59
|5 Navy 44


16 MVSU 58 14 BYU 78 16 Lamar 59 12 Calfornia54
16W Kentcky 59 14 ona 72 First Round 1166 Vrmont 71 12 S Flonda 65


Z"WEW rlMlSi


SPORTS


SATURDAY, MARCH 31, 2012 B5


March 3
6pm





4 LoulsMllE


rl


12 M 4


Stanford












ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE

Salsa star honors
Lionel Richie
NEW YORK-Long
before he became a salsa
sensation, Marc Anthony
listened
to the
likes of
Lionel
Richie.
Now he'll
honor the
pop leg-
end as
Marc part of
Anthony the Acad-
emy of
Country Music's tribute
to Richie next week.
This week, Richie re-
leased a collection of his
classics performed with
top country acts, and is
set to appear at Sunday's
ACM Awards. The next
day, he'll be feted at an
all-star concert.
Anthony is scheduled
to perform Richie's song
"Endless Love" with Sara
Evans during the CBS
special, which will air
April 13 at 9 p.m. In a
statement released Fri-
day, Anthony said Richie
was "one of the sound-
tracks of my life growing
up." He also called
Richie an icon and said
he was honored to be a
part of the tribute.

George Jones
still in hospital
NASHVILLE, Tenn. -
A publicist for country
star George Jones is
knocking
down a
rumor
that he is
suffering
from
pneumo-
S nia.
Kirt
George Webster
Jones said Fri-
day night
that Jones remains hospi-
talized in Nashville with
an upper respiratory in-
fection. He is receiving
antibiotics and doctors
expect him to stay until
Tuesday The 80-year-old
singer was admitted
Thursday
Jones released a state-
ment saying "thanks to
all my fans and friends
for their prayers and sup-
port during this time."
The Saratoga, Texas,
native is known for sev-
eral classic country hits,
including "White Light-
ning" and "He Stopped
Loving Her Today"


Woman
tussle wit]
NEW YORK
say a woman 1
ported that sh









Jackie
Mason

Friday that a'
companion" h
the allegation:
Mason.
The comedy
been charged.
the alleged alt
stemmed from
Kelly said ti
was still trying
the situation o


Potter fan nirvana


Studio tour

opens near London

Associated Press

WATFORD, England Hogwarts
Castle is ready to welcome the Mug-
gle multitudes.
Here, on a film studio sound stage
near London, stands the real Hog-
warts or at least a monumental
model of the fictional wizarding
school, the very one used in the
eight "Harry Potter" movies.
The minutely detailed castle now
forms the climax of "The Making of
Harry Potter," a behind-the-scenes
studio tour based at the Warner
Bros.' facility where the films were
made between 2000 and 2010.
It may only be a model, but for
Potter fans it's already a place of
pilgrimage.
"I had to literally stand there for
10 minutes and just absorb it," said
Cee Anatole, who works for a fan
website and had a preview ahead of
Saturday's grand opening. "The at-
tention to detail it was just
amazing."
Warner Bros. hopes the general
public will be equally enthusiastic.
The studio expects 5,000 people a
day to visit the attraction, which is
selling itself on its authenticity- it
features real sets, models, props
and costumes from the films, on the
original studio site.
The first, and most spectacular,
set visitors encounter is the Great
Hall of Hogwarts School, complete
with stone floor, Gothic arches, gar-
goyles and huge fireplace. Later
come the dormitory where the
young wizard slept, the office of
headmaster Albus Dumbledore, the
giant Hagrid's Hut and Diagon
Alley, the magical shopping street
that's home to Ollivander's wand
shop and Weasley's Wizard
Wheezes.
The tour is an almost overwhelm-
ing feast of detail.
Displays range from Mrs.
Weasley's self-knitting sweater to
boxes of Cheery Owls cereal, po-
tions bottles filled with plastic
newts and real animal bones and
17,000 individually painted wand
boxes.
It's nirvana for Potter fans and
for film geeks, who can watch de-
signers talk about their work in
short films, ride a broomstick in the
green-screen effects room and see
how makeup, prosthetics and ani-
matronics brought hundreds of
magical creatures to life.


Associated Press
A model of Hogwarts castle from the Harry Potter film series is unveiled
March 1 at the Warner Bros. Studio Tour, Watford, London. The Hogwarts
castle model was built for the first film, "Harry Potter and the Philosopher's
Stone." It was created for aerial photography and was digitally scanned for
CGI scenes. It took 86 artists and crew members to construct, it measures
over 50 feet in diameter and has more than 2,500 fiber optic lights.


The goal is to pay tribute to the
hundreds of unsung technicians
and craftspeople who reinvented
author J.K. Rowling's magical uni-
verse for the big screen.
"There's so much work that you
couldn't see, so much work that just
became part of the film," said David
Heyman, a producer on all the Pot-
ter films.
"This is a tour for Harry Potter
fans, but it's also a tour for people
who are not necessarily Harry Pot-
ter fans," he said. "It's such a good
insight into the making of a film ...
basically a how-to."
Warner Bros. is clearly proud of


its new attraction. One of the cre-
ators' few regrets is that trains to
Watford, which will carry many of
the site's visitors, leave from Lon-
don's Euston station, rather than
nearby King's Cross, whose imagi-
nary platform 9 3/4 was the termi-
nus of the Hogwarts Express.
Rearranging the railways is beyond
even Harry Potter's powers.
The attraction is part of Warner
Bros.' 100 million pound ($160 mil-
lion) redevelopment of Leavesden
Studios, a former World War II air-
drome 20 miles northwest of Lon-
don, into Europe's largest
filmmaking complex.


'Tequila,' Kenny Chesney the toast of ACM Awards


Associated Press


NASHVILLE Tenn -


Kenny Chesney has relent-
claims lessly churned out hit after
h Mason hit, won accolade after ac-
colade and sold more con-
- Police cert tickets than most
has re- performers regardless of
e was genre. Still, few things have
roughed affected him like "You and
up by co- Tequila," his artful and un-
median likely duet with Grace Pot-
Jackie ter that he considers "a gift
Mason. from God."
New Chesney is up for nine
York Po- Academy of Country Music
lice De- Awards on Sunday on the
apartment strength of a song that's
Commis- been a life-changing experi-
sioner ence for just about every-
Raymond body involved from
Kelly said songwriters Matraca Berg
female and Deana Carter to Potter
ad made and even Chesney
s against "That song's been
around for a while," Ches-
an has not ney said. "To me it just
Kelly said goes to show you that a
ercation great song has to some ex-
adispute, tent an infinite life and
he NYPD good songs never go out of
g tosort out style. And this one surely
n Friday hasn't, thank God."
-From wire reports Chesney is seeking a


Birthday You won't let more work or larger responsibili-
ties in the year ahead intimidate you. You'll realize that the
bigger the jobs are, the more significant the returns are
likely to be.
Aries (March 21-April 19) Keep your disagreements
with your mate or special someone to yourself when out in
public. You won't feel any better if you let things rip in
fact, you might find yourself being frowned upon.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Be understanding, not critical,
when someone is trying to help you, even if he or she is
going about it all wrong. If the person feels you don't appre-
ciate the help, it'll never be offered again.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) If you're not careful, extrava-
gance could get the better of you, leaving you with inade-
quate resources to acquire something that you really need.
Put necessity ahead of desire.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Stick to matters that are ma-


fifth win of the
academy's top
honor, entertainer
of the year. Most of
his nominations
come from "You
and Tequila" from
his career-redefin-
ing album "Hem- Ken
ingway's Whiskey," Ches
up for album of the
year. "Tequila," nominated
for song, single and vocal
event of the year, embodies
everything Chesney is trying
to become as he evolves
from a young firebrand
rocking arenas and stadi-
ums to the kind of artist who
can cause all those fans to
hush and listen quietly as he
reaches for something
more.
It shows Chesney in a far
different light than when he
broke onto the scene in the
mid-1990s. While the 44-
year-old certainly could
have sung "You and
Tequila" at any point in his
career, he's not sure the
younger versions of himself
would have chosen it And if
they did, they might not
have taken the same ap-


proach.
"I look at myself
as more of an inter-
Spreter," Chesney
said. "That's what
makes people con-
nect. And that's
what I'm trying to
ny get better at"
.ney Chesney first
heard the song
nearly a decade ago when
Carter recorded it Berg and
Carter wrote it after a me-
morial service for Berg's
friend Harlan Howard in
2002. She noted the leg-
endary songwriter bought
her first shot of tequila.
"And for the rest of the
night his kids sent me shots
of tequila and I thought,
'Well, Harlan, I'm going to
do it for you,"' Berg said.
"And I was still sick two
days later."
The song had already
been around for a while
when Chesney heard singer
Tim Krekel's version. Some-
thing in the way Krekel han-
dled the material inspired
the singer, but he thought it
needed something more, a
"ghost" in the background


who added a layer of depth
to the vibe.
Around the same time,
Chesney heard Potter sing
for the first time. A mutual
friend of theirs stuck a
Grace Potter and The Noc-
turnals CD in Chesney's pile
of music where it sat for a
year. During this period,
Chesney was thinking about
singers he might pull in to
make "You and Tequila"
into a duet and one day Pot-
ter's song "Apologies" mate-
rialized out of an iTunes
shuffle.
"He made a couple of calls
and I got this bizarre email
in my inbox -'Who wants to
do what with what?"' Potter
said with a laugh.
A child of the rock world,
Potter didn't really know
much about Chesney be-
yond a few general basics:
"You know, he was the 'She
thinks my tractor's sexy'
guy" But as soon as she
heard the demo for the
song, she understood the
possibilities and was in.
"I just said, 'Well, this is
magic,"' the 28-year-old
singer said.


seek out accolades and endorsement, yet not necessarily
want to do anything to earn them.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) If you're not getting the
best results by using traditional techniques, experiment
with some new procedures. It may be time for a change.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Forming an association for
the wrong reasons might drag you down instead of making
your position stronger. Make sure any big move you make
has a legitimate purpose.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Before making any impul-
sive promises to an old friend, you should think twice. Your
good intentions could go by the board when you realize it's
an inconvenience.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) When taking on a job or
performing a service for another, be absolutely certain you
estimate the cost accurately. Any oversight will come out of
your pocket, not the client's.


I


n
Is


Today's HOROSCOPE
terially meaningful, which you are exceptionally good at
handling, and leave the social concerns where you
could bomb up to someone else.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Most limitations you experience
will be the result of your own negative thinking and/or be-
havior. If you want to succeed, you must have an expan-
sive, optimistic outlook.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Giving is a two-way street.
People will treat you kindly if you're equally as generous
with them as they are with you that can mean with your
time as well as with your possessions.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) It might not be too smart to re-
quest a business favor from someone you know purely on
a social basis. Once you cross that line, it could chill the
relationship.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Unfortunately, thinking and
doing are not one and the same thing. You might simply


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

THURSDAY, MARCH 29
Fantasy 5:5 6 19 28 30
5-of-5 2 winners $113,327.32
4-of-5 372 $98
3-of-5 10,156 $10
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 28
Powerball: 11 16 29 50 58
Powerball: 33
5-of-5 PB No winner
5-of-5 3 winners $1 million
No Florida winner
Lotto: 13- 18-24-33-37-50
6-of-6 No winner
5-of-6 33 $4,651
4-of-6 1,571 $78.50
3-of-6 33,322 $5
Fantasy 5:10 -19 27- 31 34
5-of-5 2 winners $126,844.71
4-of-5 316 $129
3-of-5 10,250 $11
TUESDAY, MARCH 27
Mega Money: 12 29 30 40
Mega Ball: 5
4-of-4 MB 1 winner $500,000
4-of-4 2 $3,950.50

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num-
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call 850-487-7777.


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Saturday, March
31, the 91st day of 2012.
There are 275 days left in the
year.
Today's Highlight:
On March 31, 1932, Ford
Motor Co. publicly unveiled
its powerful flathead V8 en-
gine; while not the first eight-
cylinder engine, it was the
first to be affordable to the
general public, and proved
very popular.
On this date:
In 1889, French engineer
Gustave Eiffel unfurled the
French tricolor from atop the
Eiffel Tower, officially marking
its completion.
In 1943, the Rodgers and
Hammerstein musical "Okla-
homa!" opened on Broadway.
In 1949, Newfoundland
(now called Newfoundland
and Labrador) entered con-
federation as Canada's tenth
province.
Ten years ago: Israeli
Prime Minister Ariel Sharon
vowed to smash Palestinian
militants in a broadcast
speech that came the same
day as a suicide bombing in
Haifa that killed 15 Israelis.
Pope John Paul II used his
Easter message to call for an
end to violence in the Holy
Land.
Five years ago: President
Bush again came to the de-
fense of Attorney General Al-
berto Gonzales, under
criticism for his role in the fir-
ing of federal prosecutors,
calling him "honorable and
honest."
One year ago: Moammar
Gadhafi struck a defiant
stance after two high-profile
defections from his regime,
saying the Western leaders
who had decimated his mili-
tary with airstrikes should re-
sign immediately not him.
(Gadhafi's message was in
the form of a scroll across the
bottom of state TV as he re-
mained out of sight.)
Today's Birthdays: Ac-
tress Peggy Rea is 91. Actor
William Daniels is 85. Actor
Richard Chamberlain is 78.
Actress Shirley Jones is 78.
Country singer-songwriter
John D. Loudermilk is 78.
Musician Herb Alpert is 77.
Actor Christopher Walken is
69. Comedian Gabe Kaplan
is 67. Former Vice President
Al Gore is 64. Actress Rhea
Perlman is 64. Rock musi-
cian Angus Young (AC/DC) is
57.


Thought for Today: "An
optimist may see a light
where there is none, but why
must the pessimist always
run to blow it out?" Rene
Descartes, French philoso-
pher (born this date in 1596,
died 1650).











RELIGION _
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Sacred makeover


KEITH KING/Traverse City Record-Eagle
Workers remove the Crucifix at the Monastery of the Infant Jesus of Prague in Traverse City, Mich. Renovations will be taking place at the
monastery with the Crucifix being taken to the St. Mary's Cathedral in Gaylord.


Chapel for nuns

JAMES RUSSELL
Traverse City Record-Eagle
TRAVERSE CITY, Mich.
C change does not come easy
to a group of women who
have dedicated their lives
to their faith.
Nuns have lived in cloistered
quiet, separate from modern
distractions, at the Carmelite
Monastery in Traverse City for
nearly 50 years.
The secluded, hilltop site is a
place for the women to live, pray
and worship. Now their austere
chapel is due for a renovation,
and an architect renowned for
re-imagining sacred spaces will
help the sisters.
"We want to make it more
beautiful so the mind is lifted up
to heaven," Mother Mary of
Jesus, the monastery's prioress,
told the Traverse City Record-
Eagle. "We've learned that a
thing can be simple and poor
and beautiful, rather than sim-
ple and poor and ugly"
Duncan Stroik, of South Bend,
Ind., specializes in sacred archi-
tecture. He said the nature of
the Carmelite religious commu-
nity attracted him to the project.
"It's pretty exotic to live in a
cloister and in seclusion. It's a
very beautiful and a very chal-
lenging life," Stroik said. "For a
religious community where they
don't leave except for medical
reasons, architecture is even
more important because it's
their home."
Stroik worked on renovations
to famous chapels and churches
across the country, including the
Chapel of St Thomas Aquinas
College in Santa Paula, Calif.,
and St. Joseph Cathedral in
Sioux Falls, S.D.


Holy week
St. Paul's Lutheran
Church, at 6150 N. Lecanto
Highway, Beverly Hills, begins
Holy Week with services at 8
and 10:30 a.m. Palm Sunday.
St. Paul's School students and
adult choir will sing together at
the latter service. Bible class
and Sunday school will begin at
9:15 a.m. Maundy Thursday
service is at 6:30 p.m. Good
Friday service is at 6:30 p.m.
Easter Sunday services are at
8 and 10:30 a.m. with Easter
breakfast served at 9:15 a.m.
Call 352-489-3027.
First Presbyterian
Church will celebrate
Palm/Passion Sunday with wor-
ship beginning at 10:30 a.m.
and a sermon by the Rev. Jack
Alwood, titled, "Preparers of the
Way." Maundy Thursday Tene-
brae service is at 7 p.m. in the
sanctuary with the Lord's Sup-


undergoing renovation; noted architect will help project


KEITH KING/Traverse City Record-Eagle
The Monastery of the Infant Jesus of Prague is seen Feb. 12 in Traverse City, Mich. The chapel is central
to the nuns, who spend their days in private and liturgical prayer. They don't leave the monastery except
for rare occasions such as doctor appointments or emergencies. A metal grille separates the nuns' chapel
area from the public space.


Mother Mary knew of his work
but had no idea someone of his
caliber would help with the
project A mutual friend con-
nected the two.
"His name was vaguely famil-
iar because we get different
Catholic magazines, and we had
seen the chapel at St. Thomas
Aquinas College, which is just
breathtaking," she said. "When
we saw his portfolio, we said,


per and sacred music by the
choir. Easter Sunday services
begin at 10:30 a.m.
Shepherd of the Hills
Episcopal Church in Lecanto
will celebrate Palm Sunday with
Holy Eucharist services at 5
p.m. today and 8 and 10:30
a.m. Sunday. Adult Christian
Formation is at 9:15 a.m. Sun-
day with Sunday school at 10
a.m. and nursery at 10:30 a.m.
Healing service and Eucharist
at 10 a.m. Wednesday is fol-
lowed by Bible study and sack
lunch. SOS at Good Shepherd
Lutheran Church from 9 a.m. to
noon Thursday. Evening Bible
study is at 7 Thursday in the
parish hall. Holy Week and
Easter schedule: Holy Monday
and Tuesday Holy Eucharist
at 5:30 p.m.; Holy Wednesday
- Healing Eucharist at 10 a.m.
and Tenebrae at 7:30 p.m.;
Maundy Thursday Liturgy
with Vigil at 6:30 p.m. until


'Oh, my goodness, that's who
that guy is.' It feels like this defi-
nitely was God's hand at work
here. We would never have
dreamed of approaching him."
The chapel is central to the
nuns, who spend their days in
private and liturgical prayer
They don't leave the monastery
except for rare occasions such
as doctor appointments or emer-
gencies. A metal grille separates


Religion NOTES
Good Friday Liturgy; Good Fri-
day Liturgy at noon with Sta-
tions of the Cross at 5:30 p.m.;
Holy Saturday Prayer Serv-
ice at 9 a.m. and Great Vigil of
Easter at 7:30 p.m.; Easter Day
services at 8 and 10:30 a.m.
Celebrate Palm Sunday at
Faith Lutheran Church in
Crystal Glen Subdivision off
State Road 44 and County
Road 490. Services are at 6
p.m. today and 9:30 a.m. Sun-
day. Pastor Lane's sermon is ti-
tled "A False Spring," from John
12:12-19. Following the Sunday
service is fellowship, Bible study
and Sunday school at 11 a.m.
Maundy Thursday service with
Holy Communion is at 7 p.m.
and Good Friday service is at 3
p.m. Easter Saturday and Sun-
day services include a 7 a.m.
"Sonrise" service followed by a
continental breakfast and the
9:30 a.m. service. Call 352-527-
3325 or visit faithlecanto.com.


St. Anne's Anglican
Church is on Fort Island Trail
West, Crystal River. St. Anne's
celebrates Palm Sunday serv-
ices at 8 and 10:15 a.m. St.
Anne's will host "Our Fathers
Table" today from 11:30 a.m. to
12:30 p.m. Overeaters Anony-
mous meets Wednesdays at
10:30 a.m. in the parish library.
Recovering From Food Addic-
tion meets at 1 p.m. Thursday
in the parish library. Alcoholics
Anonymous meets at 8 p.m.
Friday and Monday in the
parish library. Join St. Anne's at
6 p.m. the fourth Sunday
monthly for a Bluegrass Gospel
sing-along. Annie and Tim's
United Bluegrass Gospel Band
will perform. All are welcome.
First Presbyterian
Church of Inverness is at 206
Washington Ave. Sunday wor-
ship schedule: Traditional serv-
ices at 8 and 11 a.m., casual
service at 9:30 a.m., Sunday


the nuns' chapel area from the
public space.
Design plans call for elevating
the altar, marble flooring, classi-
cal ornamentation to mask the
dated architecture, and Psalm
quotations on the walls. The sis-
ters saved some money for the
renovation and also are seeking
donations from supporters.
See Page C6


school hour at 9:30 a.m., and
coffee hour from 9 to 11 a.m.
For Palm Sunday, the Rev.
Craig S. Davies will preach on
"The Blindness of No Humility,"
with text from Mark 11:1-10.
Holy Week activities: Maundy
Thursday worship service with
Communion at 7 p.m. with the
chancel choir's cantata, "We
Remember Calvary."
Good Friday community
service from noon to 3 p.m. at
St. Margaret's Episcopal
Church. Good Friday Tenebrae
service of Darkness at 8 p.m.
Praise Kids breakfast with the
Easter Bunny and Easter egg
hunt from 10 to 11:30 a.m. Sat-
urday, April 7.
Easter Sunday sunrise serv-
ice at 6:30 a.m. followed by
continental breakfast, and wor-
ship services at 8, 9:30 and 11
a.m. Call 352-637-0770.

See Page C2


Nancy Kennedy
GRACE
NOTES


Letter


from


Lisa
Sometimes I get let-
ters or emails from
people that make
me want to spit tacks.
I'm not talking about
critical letters. (Those
make me want to hide
under my covers, suck my
thumb and cry)
I'm talking about letters
from people, from fellow
Christians, who are sure
God isn't pleased with
them and who are desper-
ate for a how-to to help
them get back on track, to
finally be faithful to God.
They beg for advice, for
wisdom, for some secret to
get them back into God's
good graces, to win back
his smile and approval so
he won't order them to get
out of his sight.
Lisa in Louisiana writes
me every so often, sending
her letters to me in care of
my church. I think she
found me through one of
my books.
Her most recent letter
made me crazy angry Not
at her! Rather, at whoever
has been telling her that
she has to be v-e-r-y

See Page C6


Lenten


art-


with


tattoos
he graphic tattoos
that cover the bod-
ies of millions of
Russian prisoners sym-
bolize their sins and
crimes, their pain and
suffering.
Some of the tattoos are
beautiful and hint at re-
demption. Others are dis-
gusting, especially those
etched involuntarily into
the faces of victims by
other prisoners as punish-
ment for especially
shameful crimes behind
bars or on the outside.
Put all of these images
together, said artist Scott
Erickson, and they tell the
stories of broken people.
That's the big idea that
gripped him as he studied
tattoo culture while creat-
ing a set of "Stations of the
Cross" images for a
Lenten art exhibit at Ec-
clesia Church in the hip,
edgy Montrose neighbor-
hood near downtown
Houston.
For many young Ameri-
cans, it's impossible to
talk about their tattoos
without needing to can-
didly describe the peaks
See Page C5


Terry Mattingly
ON
RELIGION





C2 SATURDAY, MARCH 31, 2012


NOTES
Continued from Page C1

St. Margaret's Episcopal
Church's Palm Sunday serv-
ices include the Holy Eucharist
Rite 1 service at 8 a.m. and
Holy Eucharist Rite 2 service at
10:30 a.m. Adult Sunday school
begins at 9:30 a.m. Family Eu-
charist service is at 10:30 a.m.
Feed My Sheep, a feeding pro-
gram for people in need is at
11:30 a.m. Wednesday, fol-
lowed by a Holy Eucharist and
healing service at 12:30 p.m.
Community Good Friday serv-
ice from noon to 3 p.m.
Pastor David Rawls con-
tinues a series of sermons
about the "24 hours that
changed the world" at Crystal
River United Methodist
Church, 4801 N. Citrus Ave.
The Palm Sunday sermon will
be based on Mark 15:25-39.
Pastor Rawls' sermons are ac-
centuated with film clips. Tradi-
tional services are at 8 and 11
a.m. and a contemporary serv-
ice is at 9:30 a.m. The chancel
choir will present an Easter
cantata, "Amazing Love," at 4
p.m. Sunday in the sanctuary.
The film, "Passion of the
Cross," will be shown at 7 p.m.
Wednesday. A Seder meal will
be served at 6 p.m. Maundy
Thursday (reservations re-
quired by Tuesday; cost is $10
per person). Good Friday Tene-
brae service will be celebrated
at 7 p.m. Easter Sunday sun-
rise service is at 6 a.m. with a
contemporary service at 9 a.m.
and a traditional service at 11
a.m. Call 795-3148.
Good Shepherd
Lutheran Church invites the
public to worship services at
8:30 and 11 a.m. Sunday. A cof-
fee hour follows both services.
The church is barrier free and
offers a free tape ministry and


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Grand Prix


large-print service helps and
hearing devices. A nursery at-
tendant is available for children
ages 3 and younger. All are
welcome. Holy Week events in-
clude: Maundy Thursday with
Holy Communion at 7 p.m.;
Good Friday Tenebrae services
at noon and 7 p.m.; Easter Vigil
at 8 p.m. Saturday, April 7;
Easter Sunday sunrise service
at 7 a.m. and festive celebra-
tion of Holy Communion at 8:30
and 11 a.m. April 8. The church
is on County Road 486, oppo-
site Citrus Hills Boulevard in
Hernando. Call the church for
more information at 352-
746-7161.
NorthRidge Church in-
vites the community to Palm
Sunday worship services at 9
a.m., followed by fellowship and
coffee. Pastor Kennie Berger
will be welcomed home from a
mission trip to Honduras, where
a home is being constructed for
a local missionary in Rio Viejo.
The church meets at the Inver-
ness Woman's Club, 1715 For-
est Ridge Drive, across from
the Whispering Pines Park en-
trance. "Faith Lessons" home
group meets from 6:16 to 8:30
p.m. the second and fourth


Wednesday monthly b
with a potluck dinner,
by a study of the Biblic
culture and text of the
tures from the video s
Ray Vander Laan in c
with "Focus on the Fa
details and location, c
Berger at 352-302-58
The Holy Week s
at Joy Lutheran Chu
follows: Maundy Thur
ship service at 6:45 p.
Joy choir will present
tata "The Shadow of t
at 2 p.m. Good Friday
Vigil service at 6:45 p.
day, April 7. Easter Su
door service at 6:30 a
Memorial Garden (we
mitting), with the mess
"Quiet Love at Dawn.'
Sunday services follow
and 10:30 a.m. in the
sanctuary. The bell an
choirs will perform at t
two services. All are w
The church is at 7045
83rd Place at State Ro
Ocala. For more inform
call 352-854-4509, Ex
Schedule for Hol
worship services at Pe
Lutheran Church: Ma
Thursday at 7 p.m. -


LEFT: Matt Widener, leader at North
Oak Baptist Church's AWANA Program,
lets the cars fly at the Grand Prix Race
on Sunday, Feb. 26. Approximately 40
children entered cars they had made
and designed themselves. Dennis Ja-
cobson, youth pastor, cheers them on
while Al Henry, right, watches as the
white car takes the lead. AWANA is for
children two years of age through fifth
grade and meets at 6:10 p.m. Wednes-
days. RIGHT: Braelynn Sloane is excited
about the trophy she won at the
AWANA Grand Prix. She won third place
for speed in her age group. Children of
all ages entered cars in the race in com-
petition for categories including fastest,
best design, and most creative.
Special to the Chronicle

beginning Night When He Was Betrayed,"
followed 1 Corinthians 11:23-32; Good
cal sites, Friday at 7 p.m. "It Is Fin-
scrip- ished," John 19:30; Easter Sun-
eries by day at 8 a.m. "Don't Seek
conjunction the Living Among the Dead,"
mily." For Luke 24:1-6. On Easter Sun-
all Kennie day, a breakfast (freewill offer-
13. ing) will be served after the
schedule worship service, at 9:30 a.m.,
rch is as and an egg hunt for the children
sday wor- will follow. The church is at
.m. The 7201 S. U.S. 41, five miles
the can- north of Dunnellon. Call 352-
he Cross" 489-5881 or visit www. Peace
. Easter LutheranOnline.org.
.m. Satur- 0 Easter events at Her-
inday out- nando United Methodist
.m. in the Church: Maundy Thursday at 7
father per- p.m.; "Walk the Cross" walk at 8
sage a.m. Friday, and Good Friday
'Easter worship service at noon con-
w at 8:30 ducted by the Rev. Tyler Mont-
church gomery; Easter egg hunt and
id vocal lunch for children at 11 a.m.
the last Saturday, April 7 (free and open
welcome. to the community); Easter sun-
S.W. rise service at 7 a.m. April 8 led
oad 200, by the Rev. Doctor Yoon and
nation Easter worship service at 10
Kt. 221. a.m. by the Rev. Tyler Mont-
y Week gomery. The church is at 2125
eace E. Norvell Bryant Highway, Her-
aundy nando. Call 726-7245 or visit
"On the www.hernandoumcfl.org.


Places of worship that



offer love, peace and



harmony to all.


Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!!

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF CRYSTAL RIVER AND HOMOSASSA


Crystal River
CHURCH OF
CHRIST
A Friendly Church
With A Bible Message.
Corner of U.S. 19 & 44 East
Sunday Services
10:00 A.M.' 11:00 A.M.' 6:00 P.M.
Wednesday
7:00 P.M.
Come Worship With Us!
Bible Questions Please Call
Ev. George Hickman
795-8883 746-1239


t St. Timothy t
Lutheran Church
ELCA
Saturday Informal Worship
w/Communion 5:00 PM
Sunday Early Service
w/Communion 8:00 AM
Sunday School
All Ages 9:30 AM
(Coffee Fellowship hour@ 9:00 AM)
Sunday Traditional Service
w/Communion 10:30 AM


Special services are announced.
Nursery provided.
1070 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River
For more information call
795-5325
www.sttimothylutherancrystalriver.com
Rev. David S. Bradford, Pastor


jM St. Benedict
SCrystal 1,~ver Catholic Church
Church of God U.S. 19 at Ozello Rd.
MASSES-
Church Phone -iMi 5:00p
795-3079 Vigil: 5:00pm
Sun.: 8:30 & 10:30am
Sunday Morning
Adult & Children's Worship DAILY MASSES
8:30 & 11:00 AM
Sunday School 9:45 AM Mon. Fri.: 8:00am
Evening Service 6:00 PM
Wednesday HOLY DAYS
Life Application Service As Announced
Jam Session Youth Ministries & Teen
Kid (ages 4-11) 7:00 PM CONFESSION
2180 N.W. Old Tallahassee Rd. Sat.: 3:30 4:30pm
(12th Ave.) I
Nursery 795-4479
_Provided 7


THE D ST. THOMAS
SALVATION CATHOLIC
ARMY CORP. CHURCH
SUNDAY: .., ., ,,, ,: ,
Sunday School 9:45 A.M.
Morning Worship Hour MASSES:
11:00 A.M. ii it


TUESDAY:
Home League 11:30 A.M.
Lt. Vanessa Miller

621 5 5 2 I..


luIulUaay 4:.JU P.M.
sunday 8:00 A.M.
10:30 A.M.
6I I' -' r l ....it .r it
, ,: I] II .[ H . ., .,
UM~iVS^
^^----------^^


ST. ANNE'S
CHURCH
A Parish in the
Anglican Communion
Rector: Fr. Kevin G. Holsapple
To be one in Christ in our
service, as His servants,
by proclaiming His love.
Sunday Masses: 8:00 a.m.
10:15 a.m.
Morning Prayer & Daily Masses
4th Sunday 6:00p.m.
Gospel Sing Along
9870 West Fort Island Trail
Crystal River 1 mile west of Plantation Inn
352-795-2176
www.stannescr.org



Homosassa
First United
Methodist
Church
4 Everyone
Becoming
A Disciple
of Christ

Sunday Worship
8:00 am,9:30 am, 11:00 am
Sunday School
9:30 am & 10:45 am

Reverend
Mark Whittaker
Pastor
8831 W. Bradshaw St.
Homosassa, FL 34448
352-628-4083
www.lumc.org
Office Hours:
8:30 4:30 M-F
Open Hearts
Open Minds
Open Doors
___Hn iuilmY.


First Baptist
Church of
Homosassa
"Come Worship with Us"
10540 W. Yulee Drive Homosassa
628-3858
Rev. J. Alan Ritter
Rev. Steve Gerhart, Assoc. Pastor
Sunday
9:00 am Sunday School (AII Age Groups)
10:30 am Worship Celebration
Choir / Special Music / "Kidz Worship"
Sunday Night
6 pm Worship Celebration
Wednesday Night
6:30 pm Worship Celebration
Children's Awanas Group
Youth Activities
www.fbchomosassa.org


West
Sc\Citrus
mtr t oni i U'. L.L IND


r..r,,t., y -LL ri FI' II,
A CA ING FAMILY
IN CHIST! II


C KYTXL
RIVCK
VJNITED
AETHODIST
CHURCH
4801 N. Citrus Ave.
(2 Mi. N Of US 19)

795-3148
www.crumc.com
Rev. David Rawls, Pastor
Sunday Worship
8:00 Early Communion
9:30 Praise & Worship
11:00 Traditional
Bible Study
At 9:30 & 11:00 For all ages.
Wednesday 6:30
Nursery available at all services.
Youth Fellowship
Sunday 4:30
Wednesday 6:30
Bright Beginnings
Preschool
6 Weeks-VPK
Mon. Fri. 6:30a.m.-6pm.
795-1240
SA Stephen Ministry Provider:


Church of Christ
9592 W. Deep Woods Dr.
Crystal River, FL 34465
352-564-8565
www.westcitruscoc.com
W. Deep Woods Dr.





US Hwy. 19
!1~^C P


SERVICES
Sunday AM
Bible Study 9:30
Worship 10:30
Sunday PM
Worship 6:00
Wednesday
PM
Bible Study 7:00

EVANGELIST
VBob Dickey


For the 11th consecutive
year, St. Margaret's Episcopal
Church, 114 N. Osceola Ave.,
Inverness, will offer a Good Fri-
day community service from
noon to 3 p.m. featuring the
Seven Last Words of Christ.
Seven local pastors will offer
homilies and reflections on the
seven Scriptural passages re-
garding Christ's final words
from the cross. Proceeds from
a freewill offering will be do-
nated to the Citrus Christian
Clergy Association. Call the
church office at 352-726-3153.
St. Raphael Church will
have Holy Week services for
Orthodox Christians as follows:
Palm Sunday, April 8 Divine
Liturgy at 10 a.m.; Monday,
April 9 Bridegroom Matins at
7 p.m.; Tuesday, April 10 -
Bridegroom Matins at 7 p.m.;
Wednesday, April 11 Holy
Unction Healing Service at 5
p.m.; Thursday, April 12 -
Matins of Holy Friday with read-
ing of 12 Gospels at 7 p.m.; Fri-
day, April 13 Vespers with
Burial Service at 3 p.m., includ-
ing procession with the
Plaschenitza (Holy Shroud) to
represent the journey with
Christ's body to the tomb, and


# Temple
Beth David
13158 Antelope St.
Spring Hill, FL 34609
352-686-7034
Rabbi
Lenny Sarko
Services
Friday 8PM
Saturday 10AM
Religious School
Sunday
9AM-Noon


RELIGION


Matins of Holy Saturday at 7
p.m.; Saturday, April 14 Ves-
peral Divine Liturgy at 9:30 a.m.
with Nocturne and Matins of
Pascha at 7 p.m. and proces-
sion to depict the journey of the
three women to the tomb to find
that Christ has risen; Sunday,
April 15 Pascha-Divine
Liturgy at 10 a.m. with Agape
meal of blessed foods to follow
Liturgy. Call 352-726-4777 or
visit www.straphaelchurch.org.
Egg hunts
The public is invited to a
community pancake break-
fast and Easter egg hunt from
8 to 11 a.m. Saturday, April 7, at
Crystal River United Methodist
Church, 4801 N. Citrus Ave.,
Crystal River. All-you-can-eat
pancake breakfast with the
Easter Bunny is from 8 to 9:30
a.m. with a cost of $4 for adults
and $2 for children. The free
Easter egg hunt follows from
9:30 to 11 a.m. Egg hunts for
toddlers, preschoolers and ele-
mentary school-aged children.
Free Easter Bunny photos,
cupcake decorating, relay
games, a bouncy house, movie

See NOTES/Page C3




.
















S Crystal
D River
Foursquare
Gospel Church
1160 N. Dunkenfield Ave.
795-6720

A FULL GOSPEL
FELLOWSHIP
Sunday 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday "Christian Ed"
7:00 P.M.
Prayer Sat. 4-6pm
Pastor John Hager




Come -
grow
with us!

The First Assembly
of God Family
WELCOMES YOU!

Pastor

Richard
Hart

Schedule of Services:
Sunday:
9:00 a.m.
Adult Bible Study
Youth and Children's
Classes
10:00 a.m.
Spirit Filled Worship Service
Inspiring Message
Youth and Children's
Ministries
6:00 p.m
Youth Ministries
Wednesday 7:00 p.m
Praise andWorship
In-Depth Bible Study
Youth and Children's
Nursery Provided Every Service


I I





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NOTES
Continued from Page C2

and more. RSVP for the break-
fast with the Easter Bunny on-
line at www.crumc.com or call
the church office at 352-795-
3148 by Thursday.
First Presbyterian Church
of Inverness will sponsor its an-
nual "Breakfast With the
Easter Bunny and Easter Egg
Hunt" from 10 a.m. to noon
Saturday, April 7. Children up to
and including fifth grade may
participate in the egg hunt.
There will be special Easter
crafts, a light breakfast and
"Easter Discovery" stations.
The Easter Bunny will make a
special appearance at the
breakfast. There is no charge
for this event and all are invited.
Make reservations in advance
by calling 352-637-0770.
Reflections Church will
host an "Easter Family Day"
from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Satur-
day, April 7, at Citrus Springs
Middle School. Celebrate the
Easter season with inflatables,
crafts, food and an Easter egg
hunt or two. Students will sell
concessions to help fund their
Atlanta mission project.


RELIGION


Hernando United
Methodist Church will host an
Easter egg hunt and lunch
for children at 11 a.m. Satur-
day, April 7. The event is free
and open to the community.
The church is at 2125 E.
Norvell Bryant Highway, Her-
nando. Call 726-7245 or visit
www.hernandoumcfl.org.
Easter
Everyone is invited to a
time of rejoicing and praise at
10:45 a.m. Easter Sunday at
Victory Baptist Church, 5040 E.
Shady Acres Drive, Inverness.
The message title is "When I
Remember," with special praise
and worship music. A gift to
mark this special day will be
given to all with a very special
Easter gift for children. Come
join us for "The Lord's Supper"
under the shadow of a 12-foot
cross. Call 352-726-9719 or
352-465-8866.
In celebration of Easter,
the beautiful and historic paint-
ing by Leonardo DaVinci, "The
Last Supper" will come to life
in a dramatic presentation at
North Oak Baptist Church in
Citrus Springs at 7 p.m. today
and 10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Sun-
day at North Oak Baptist
Church at the intersection of N.


SOUL


Special to the Chronicle
Four young singers on a
teaching tour of the United
States stopped by the Nature
Coast Unitarian Universalists
on a recent Sunday to pres-
ent songs of their native
lands. The a capella quartet,
dubbed SOUL, promotes in-
ternational and cultural rela-
tionships through vocal
music. Pictured is Virgil Se-
queira, a baritone from India.

Elkcam Blvd. and N. Citrus
Springs Blvd. in Citrus Springs.
Admission is free. Call 352-
489-1688 or 352-756-1500.
Everyone is welcome to
begin their Easter weekend by
attending a historical portrayal
of the Last Supper. First Baptist
Church of Floral City will per-


form the reenactment of the
Last Supper in the play "The
Twelve Soliloquies" at 7 p.m.
Thursday and Friday. This
drama portrays the scenes
which occurred in the Upper
Room in Jerusalem the night
before Christ was crucified. Fol-
lowing the service, light refresh-
ments will be served in the
fellowship hall. The church is at
8545 E. Magnolia St. Call the
office at 352-827-4296 or visit
www.fbcfloralcity.org.
Celebrate Easter Vigil Tri-
dentine Mass in traditional
Latin at 4 p.m. Saturday, April 7,
at Queen of Peace Roman
Catholic Church, 6455 S.W.
State Road 200, Ocala.
Genesis Community
Church, led by Pastor Brian
Baggs, will have its fourth an-
nual Easter sunrise service
April 8 on the lake behind the
Elks Club on Lemon Street in
Hernando. Coffee and refresh-
ments served prior to and fol-
lowing services. The public is
invited. The church will host a
potluck family picnic at noon
Saturday, April 28, in the pavil-
ion at Whispering Pines Park in
Inverness (hotdogs and ham-
burgers furnished). This nonde-
nominational church has
services at the Knights of


Columbus building on County
Road 486 in Lecanto. Bible
studies are at 8:30 a.m. Sunday
prior to the 10 a.m. service.
Children's ministries meet Sun-
day mornings in the annex
building.
First Christian Church of
Homosassa Springs, 7030 W.
Grover Cleveland Blvd. in Ho-
mosassa, will have an Easter
Sunday sunrise service at 7
a.m. Pastor Richard Aldret will
bring the message. A continen-
tal breakfast will be served after
the early service, followed by
Sunday school at 9:30 a.m. The
regular morning worship serv-
ice is at 10:30 and the message
will be brought by Pastor Ross
Pepper. All are welcome to at-
tend. Nursery provided.
First Baptist Church of


SATURDAY, MARCH 31, 2012 C3

Hernando will celebrate Easter
with an early service at 8 a.m.,
breakfast at 8:45 a.m., Sunday
school at 9:30 a.m., and morn-
ing worship service at 10:45
with the choir's Easter cantata.
Sale away
The United Methodist
Women of Crystal River United
Methodist Church will continue
their annual "Trash and Treas-
ure" sale today at the outdoor
tabernacle area, 4801 N. Citrus
Ave.
Holidaze Crafters of Her-
nando United Methodist Church
will host their spring craft
show from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
today. Vendors from around the
county will offer a wide variety

See NOTES/Page C4


First Church of God -
5510 Jasmine Lane tt
726-8986
Fun...Fellowship...Food...Free!
If you or your group would like to participate,
Come Prepared and Join In.


Places of worship that


offer love, peace


and harmony to all.


Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!!

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF HERNANDO, LECANTO, FLORAL CITY, HOMOSASSA SPRINGS


First Baptist
Church
of Floral City
Lift i (! Up Jesus
8545 Magnolia
726-4296

Sunday Schedule
8:30 AM Blended Worship Service
9:45 AM Sunday School
11:00 AM Traditional Worship
6:00 PM Worship
Wednesday
6:30 PM
Music, Youth, Fellowship
A warm, friendly Church
Nursery Available
www.fbcfloralcity.org


Glory to Glory
Ministries
i A Family
United by
The Love Of Jesus!
Non-Denominational
Spirit Filled Worship
Family Friendly
Sunday 10:30 a.m.
Wednesday 7:00 p.m.
Bible Study
(352) 566-6613
www.G2GCares.org
Pastor Brian Gulledge
| 1274 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy,
Hernando,FL




Grace Bible
Church






Sunday
9:30 AM.................. Discovery Time
11:00 AM................Praise & Worship
6:00 PM..................Evening Service
Monday
6:15 PM ...................Teens
Tuesday
6:15 PM.......Awana (Sept.- Apr.)
Wednesday
7:00 PM.................. Bible Study &
Prayer Meeting
Pastor:
Rev. Ray Herriman
(352) 628-5631
Men & Ladies Bible Studies, TOPS,
Infant & Toddler Nursery
y2 mi.eastofUS.19
6382 W. Green Acres St.
P.O. Box 1067
Homosassa, FL. 34447-1067
www.gracebiblehomosassa.org
email: gbc@tampabay.rr.com


Come as you are!
GENESIS
COMMUNITY CHURCH
r" -V- v.1V-


PASTOR BRIAN AND
KATHY BAGGS
Worship Service &
Children's Church 10:00 AM
Meeting at Knights of Columbus Bldg. y
County Rd. 486, Lecanto
(352) 527-4253







VI t . e b





lIWM


St. Scholastica
Roman Catholic
Church
Masses:
SATURDAY VIGIL
4:00 p.m. and 6:00 p.m.
SUNDAY
9:00 a.m. and
11:30 a.m.

Daily Mass:
8:30 a.m. Mon. Fri.
Confessions:
Saturday 2:45 3:30 p.m.
4301 W. Homosassa Trail
Lecanto, Florida 34461
(352)746-9422
www.stscholastica.org
Located one mile south of
Hwy 44 on SR 490 adjacent
to Pope John Paul II
Catholic School


__ Floral City
United Methodist
Church
8478 East Marvin St.
(across from Floral City School)
Sunday School
9:05 A.M.
Sunday Worship Service
10:30 A.M. Sanctuary
8:00 A.M. Service in the 1884 Church
Bible Study
Tuesday 10:00 A.M.
Wednesday 6:00 P.M.
"We strive to make
newcomers feel at home."
Wheel Chair Access
Nursery Available
Rev. Steven Todd Riddle
Church 344-1771
WEBSITE: floralcitychurch.com







K ^ h^sn^q^U







Pastor Dale Woliufe i
www^^^yihernandoadventist^co


Shepherd

of the Hills
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Our mission is to be
a beacon of faith known
for engaging all persons
in the love and truth
of Jesus Christ.
Bishop Jim Adams, Rector
527-0052
Services:
Saturday
5:00 pm
Sunday
8:00 & 10:30 am
Christian Formation
9:15 am
Sunday School 10:00 am
Nursery 10:30 am
Healing Service
Wednesday
10:00 am
2540 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
(CR 486)
Lecanto, Florida
(4/10 mile east of CR 491)
www.SOTHEC.org


COME
Worship With The
Church of Christ
Floral City, Florida
Located at Marvin &
Church streets.
Established in 33 A.D. in
Jerusalem by Jesus Christ.
A warm welcome always
awaits you where we teach
the true New Testament
Christian Faith.
Sunday Bible Study
9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship
10:30 a.m. & 6:00 p.m.

Wed./Eve. Bible Study
6:00 p.m.
Steve Heneghan, Minister
CHURCH OF CHRIST
.00A5H7 Floral City, FL.


4. ryfor Children and Families"
2125 E.Norvel Bryant Hwy. (486)
(1'2 miles from Hwy. 41)
For information call
(352) 726-7245
www.hernandoumcfl .org
Reverend
Tyler Montgomery
Sunday School
8:45 AM 9:30 AM
Fellowship
9:30 AM
Worship Service
10:00 AM
Individual Hearing Devices
Ministries and Activities for all Ages.


2101 N. Florida Ave,
Hernando FL

726-6144
Nursery Provided

*CHILDREN

*YOUTH

*SENIORS

Sunday School
9:45 A.M.
Praise & Worship
10:40 A.M.
Praise Service
6:00 P.M.
Praise & Prayer
(Wed.) 7:00 P.M

Randy T. Hodges, Pastor
www.hernandonazarene.org


Good

Shepherd

Lutheran

Church
ELCA









Worship

8:30 am

11:00 am
* Fellowship After Worship
Weekly Communion
Sunday School 9:45am
Nursery Provided

Reverend
Kenneth C. Blyth
Pastor
439 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, Florida
Building is Barrier-Free
gshernando.org


Come, Fellowship &
Grow With Us In Jesus
5863 W. Cardinal St.
Homosassa Springs, FL 34446
Telephone: (352) 628-7950
Pastor Dale Wolfe
Tuesday
Mid-Week Meeting 7:00 pm
Sabbath-Saturday Services
Sabbath School 9:30 am
Worship 10:45 am
www.homosassaadventist.com


''*i- *^ -


Rev. Stephen Lane

Faith
Lutheran

Church(LC)
935 S. Crystal Glen Dr., Lecanto
Crystal Glen Subdivision
Hwy. 44 just E. of 490
527-3325

COME
WORSHIP
WITH US
Sunday Service
9:30 A.M.
Sunday Bible Study
& Children's Sunday
School 11 A.M.
Saturday Service
6:00 P.M.
Weekly Communion
Fellowship after Sunday Worship
Calendar of events Audio
of sermons available at
www.faithlecanto.com
^tffie^^rwmotl. I





C4 SATURDAY, MARCH 31, 2012


NOTES
Continued from Page C3

of items. Holidaze crafters will
also have their country store.
The United Methodist women
will sell their cookbooks and
homemade baked goods. The
Friendship Cafe will have
homemade vegetable soup,
chicken salad sandwiches and
cherry dump cake. The church
is at 2125 E. Norvell Bryant
Highway (County Road 486),
Hernando. Call Robin Baker at
352-445-1487 or email
jabker2051 @tampabay.rr.com.
First Assembly of God
Women's Ministry will have a
yard sale from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Saturday, April 14, at the
church, 5735 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway (State Road 44), Crys-
tal River. The sale is open to
the public. Rent a table for a
donation of $10 and bring your
items to sell. Table donations
will go to the church's overseas
missionaries. Call 352-
795-2594.
Helping Hands Thrift
Store, a ministry of Our Lady of
Fatima Catholic Church, is
open from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Monday through Saturday at
604 U.S. 41 South. Proceeds
fund the food pantry. The store
is accepting donations of
household items, clothing and
small appliances. Estate dona-
tions are also accepted. Pick-
up is available for larger
donations. Items donated are
tax deductible and a form is
provided from Helping Hands.
Call 352-726-1707.
Food & fellowship
There will be an ice cream
social from 3 to 5 p.m. today at
Yankeetown Community
Church on State Road 40 West
in Yankeetown, two miles west
of traffic light in Inglis on U.S.
19. All-you-can-eat homemade
apple pie ala mode, banana
splits, sundaes, homemade
Belgian waffles, brownies,


RELIGION


cookies, strawberries, and root
beer floats for $5 per adult and
$3 per child younger than 10.
The last chicken and bis-
cuit dinner for the year is from
3:30 to 6 p.m. today at Floral
City United Methodist Church,
8478 E. Marvin St., across from
the elementary school. Meal in-
cludes chicken and biscuit,
mashed potatoes and gravy,
green beans, salad, dessert
and beverage for a donation of
$7.50. Takeouts are available.
After eating, everyone is invited
to join in a hymn sing in the
1884 church building. Call 352-
344-1771 for more information.
"Third Saturday Supper"
is from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Satur-
day, April 21, in the Dewain Far-
ris Fellowship Hall at
Community Congregational
Christian Church, 9220 N. Cit-
rus Springs Blvd., Citrus
Springs. Menu includes chicken
and rice casserole, vegetable,
coleslaw, cake, coffee and tea
for $10 for adults and $5 for
children. Tickets can be pur-
chased at the door. Takeouts
available. Call the church at
352-489-1260.
Beverly Hills Community
Church spaghetti suppers are
from 4 to 6 p.m. the third Friday
monthly in the Jack Steele Hall,
82 Civic Circle, Beverly Hills.
Donation of $7 per person in-
cludes salad, spaghetti with
meat sauce, Italian bread, cof-
fee or tea, and dessert. Come
and enjoy a delicious meal.
Tickets are available at the
door.
All-you-can-eat pancake
breakfasts, with sausage, cof-
fee and orange juice, are
served from 8 to 10 a.m. the
second Saturday monthly at
First United Methodist Church,
8831 W. Bradshaw St.,
Homosassa.
Music & more
Hernando Church of the
Nazarene will present its or-
chestra and choir, "Celebra-
tion Sounds," at 10:40 a.m.
Sunday, April 8. This is a holy


celebration to treasure.
"Grace Harmony" will ap-
pear at 7 p.m. Wednesday,
April 11, at First Christian
Church of Homosassa Springs,
7030 W. Grover Cleveland
Blvd., Homosassa. Mike and
Sue Filisky are singers/song-
writers and have been singing
for Jesus since they were
young children. In 2001 they
began singing as "Grace Har-
mony" in a ministerial capacity,
offering hope and encourage-
ment to others. Call the church
at 352-628-5556. All are wel-
come. Nursery provided.
Arbor Lakes Chorus will
present its spring concert, "As
American As Apple Pie," under
the direction of Cory Stroup and
accompanied by Harry Hershey
on the keyboard, at 7 p.m. Fri-
day, April 13, at Hernando
United Methodist Church, 2125
E. Norvell Bryant Highway
(County Road 486), Hernando.
Free admission. Love offering
accepted.
University of South Florida
music professor John Robison
will present a program of solo
music for the Renaissance lute
and the Baroque archlute at 3
p.m. Sunday, April 15, at First
Lutheran Church, 1900 W.
State Road 44, Inverness. Ro-
bison will be joined by soprano
Maggie Coleman for several
sets of English and Italian lute
songs.
Special events
The United Methodist
Women of Inverness will have
their 6th annual "Sunny Sat-
urday" Charity Golf Tourna-
ment (in memory of Ruby
Moore) today at Inverness Golf
and Country Club, 3150 S.
Country Club Drive, Inverness.
The event starts at 7:30 a.m.
with a continental breakfast fol-
lowed by an 8:30 a.m. shotgun
start, four-person scramble, full
18 holes, followed by a hot
lunch prepared by the restau-
rant staff. Grand prize drawing
of a $100 Visa gift card, door
prizes, drawings, Chinese auc-


tion. Proceeds go to local chari-
ties. Call 352-726-2522.
A benefit program for
Marion Carl Boatwright Sr.
will take place at 7 tonight at
Mount Zion AME Church in
Hernando. Call Margaret Sim-
mons at 352-726-6344.
Temple Beth David will ob-
serve Passover with a tradi-
tional Seder at 6 p.m.
Saturday, April 7, at the Temple,
13158 Antelope St., Spring Hill.
Rabbi Lenny Sarko will lead the
Haggadah service, followed by
a sit-down dinner of gefilte fish,
matzo ball soup, brisket
(chicken on request), potato,
vegetable, dessert, coffee and
iced tea. Cost for member
adults (13 and older) is $20;
children 12 and younger are $7.
A member family package for
two adults and all children
younger than 12 is $50. The
cost for nonmember adults is
$25; children 12 and younger is
$8. A nonmember family pack-
age is $55. Deadline for reser-
vations is today. Call
352-686-7034 or visit
www.tbdfl.org.
Hernando United
Methodist Church's 6th annual
car, truck and tractor show is
from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday,
April 14. Registration of vehi-
cles to be judged is at 8 a.m. at
a cost of $10 per vehicle. For all
others, there is no admission
charge. Children are welcome
to come and vote for their fa-
vorite. Awards will be given out
at 1 p.m. Breakfast and lunch
available, including pulled-pork
sandwiches. The church is at
2125 E. Norvell Bryant High-
way (County Road 486), Her-
nando. Call352-726-7245 or
352-726-0398 in the evening.
The public is invited to an
Interfaith Holocaust Remem-
brance Event at 4 p.m. Thurs-
day, April 19, at the Church on
the Square, The Villages -
Spanish Springs. Doors open
at 3:30 p.m. Special guest
speaker Dr. Raanan Gissin,
Ph.D., Syracuse University,
N.Y., and former Senior Adviser


to Israeli Prime Minister Ariel
Sharon, will speak on "Genoci-
dal Anti-Semitism: New Threats
in Western Democracies."
Nationally known Gospel-
singing ventriloquist team David
& Rusty will conduct a family
revival at 6 p.m. Sunday, April
22, and 7 p.m. Monday through
Wednesday, April 23-25, at
House of Power Church on the
corner of Dawson Drive and
County Road 491, Hernando.
Pastor George Dehn welcomes
everyone to enjoy the comedy
of David & Rusty, along with
David and Jill's Southern
Gospel-style singing, Gospel il-
lustrations, Bible messages,
family fun and more. Call 352-
344-9454.
Alan Shawn Feinstein will
add money to donations given
to the Beverly Hills Commu-
nity Church's Food Pantry.
Donations must be received
through April 30, and can in-
clude cash, checks, and/or food
items. The more donations
made to the food pantry, the
more Feinstein money will be
added to the donation. The next
food distribution is from 11 a.m.
to noon and 6 to 7 p.m. Tues-
day, April 24. To qualify for as-
sistance, you must be a Beverly
Hills resident with identification.
The church office needs to be
notified at least a week ahead
of time, if requiring food, to in-
sure its availability. Call the
church office at 352-746-3620,
or stop by to make a reserva-
tion before April 19. There is an
initial registration for each
recipient.
A five-night Carnival
cruise to benefit Serving Our
Savior (SOS) Food Pantry will
travel to Cozumel and Grand
Cayman on the Carnival Para-
dise on April 30. Funds raised
will benefit the needy in Citrus
County. All categories of cabins
are available. Prices include
cruise, port charges, all taxes
and fees, donations to Serving
Our Savior pantry, round-trip
bus to Tampa, round-trip bus
driver tips and one-way porter


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

tips. Cancellation insurance
available. Call Lenore Deck at
352-270-8658 or fax her at 352-
270-8665 or email her at
cruiselady@tampabay.rr.com,
or call Barbara Johnson at 352-
270-3391.
Join with women of Citrus
County who share in the desire
to serve their community.
Women In Christ (WIC) meet
at 3 p.m. the third Wednesday
monthly at First Christian
Church of Inverness, 2018
Colonade, Inverness. Call Bon-
nie at 352-726-2854 for more
information. Planning in
progress for local mission proj-
ects. All women are welcome.
Worship
The public is invited to
good old-fashioned church
services with friendly people
and good old-fashioned wor-
ship at Trinity Independent
Baptist Church, 2840 E.
Hayes St. (on the corner of
Croft and Hayes), Hernando.
For service times, call 352-726-
0100.
A come-as-you-are service
with communion will take place
at 5 p.m. today at St. Timothy
Lutheran Church, 1070 N.
Suncoast Blvd. (U.S..19), Crys-
tal River. Sunday worship serv-
ices include the early service
with communion at 8 a.m., Sun-
day school classes for all ages
at 9:30 a.m. with coffee fellow-
ship hour at 9 a.m., and tradi-
tional service with communion
at 10:30 a.m. Special services
are announced. Nursery pro-
vided. Call 352-795-5325 or
visit www.sttimothylutheran
crystalriver.com.
First Baptist Church of
Inverness offers the following
Sunday activities: SONrise
Sunday school class at 7:45
a.m., blended worship service
at 9 a.m., "Kid's Church" for
ages 4 through fourth grade
during the 9 a.m. service featur-
ing Bible stories, skits, music
and group activities; Sunday

See NOTES/Page C5


All are invited to our

Healing

Services
First Church of Christ,
Scientist
Inverness
224 N. Osceola Ave.
Sunday Services 10:30 AM
Sunday School 10:30 AM
Wed. Testimony Meeting 5:00 PM
352-726-4033







Beverly Hills
Community Church
82 Civic Circle, Beverly Hills, Florida
(352) 746-3620
Pastor Stewart R. Jamison, III
Email: bhcchurch@embarqmail.com

Wednesday Bible Study 6 p.m.
Sunday Coffee/Conversation 8:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship Service 10 a.m.
Communion 1st Sunday, Monthly
Where Christ is Proclaimed!

COMMUNITY
CONGREGATIONAL
CHRISTIAN CHURCH


Fait.


/ou J6 f'lwwhp
SUNDAY 10:00 AM
Dr. Jeff Timm
9220 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
352-489-1260
==MCA3EE


+ CCl
o "First For Christ"...John 1:41
000A4L7
FIRST _
CHRISTIAN
CHURCH OF
INVERNESS |
We welcome you and invite you
to worship with our family.
John A. Scott, Minister
Sunday:
9:00 A.M. Sunday School
10:15 A.M. Worship Service
Wednesday:
6:00 P M. Bible Study




Mission Possible
MINISTRIES
O Dan Sturgill '
Senior Pastor |J
9921 N. Deltona Boulevard
(352) 489-3886
www.missionpossibleministries.com
SSundays
W orship ...................10:30 am
Spanish Translation Provided
(Nursery Care & Children's Church Provided)
Wednesday
Youth Group, Bible Study &
Kid's Programs................7 pm
(Nursery Care Provided)
ARMS OF MERCY FOOD PANTRY
1st & 3rd Tuesday of the month.
8:00 am-11:00 am


Hope Evangelical
Lutheran Church,
ELCA
Pastor Lynn Fonfara
9425 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
Citrus Spnngs
Sunday Worship
9:30 a.m.
Sunday School 8:30 a.m.
Communion Every Sunday

Information:
489-5511
Go To Our Web Page
hopelutheranelca.com


BAPTIST CHURCH

Independent
SOME THINGS SHOULDN'T CHANGE
Do you miss sound Bible teaching, the
beloved hymns & gospel songs, an Eve-
ning Service, and being part of a caring,
Christian family? Find them at Grace!
2672 W. Edison PI. at Elkcam Blvd.
Citrus Springs, FL
S.S. 9:45 am, Services 11:00 am & 6:00 pm
Wed. Bible Study & Prayer 7:00 pm
Directions, mp3 sermons & more at
www.gracebapchurch.org
Phone (352) 249.7211





FIND
US AND
YE SHALL


SEEK.

f you're searching for a
spiritual home where
questions are as welcome
as answers, find us. We
are a loving, open-minded
religious community that
encourages you to seek your
own path, wherever it leads. To
nurture your spirit and find your
own truth and meaning.
Welcome to Unitarian Universalism.

nature Coast

Unitarian Universalists
SUNDAY SERVICES
10:30 A.M.





WHERE REASON & RELIGION MEET
GLBT WELCOME
7633 N. Florida Ave.
(Route 41)
Citrus Springs
465-4225
WWW.NATURECOASTUU.ORG


SUNDAY
Bible School...............9:00
W orship................... 10:15
WEDNESDAY
Bible School..............6:30
Currently meeting at
East Citrus Community Center
9907 East Gulf-to-Lake Highway
(At The Flashing Light)
For more
information call .
352-422-6535 .
Pastor
Todd F
Langdon -










* Hwy.44 E @
0 Washington Ave., Inverness
S Sunday Services
Traditional
11:00 AM
S Contemporary
9:30 AM
* 11:00 AM Service
* Tapes & CD's Available
* Sunday School for all ages'
* 9:30 AM
Nursery Provided
Fellowship & Youth Group.
5 to 7 PM 0
m 24-Hour Prayer Line 0
0 563-3639 0
" Web Site: www.fpcinv.org0
" Podcast: FPC inv.com

P 0I
0 Pastor Craig Davies m


Places of worship that


offer love, peace and


harmony to all.

Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!! .

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF CITRUS SPRINGS, BEVERLY HILLS, BROOKSVILLE, DUNNELLON, INVERNESS


INVERNESS
CHURCH
OF GOD
R .1 R .,.rr% P,,"r,
Senior Pastor
Sunday Services:
Traditional Service....................8:30 AM
Sunday School.......................9:30 AM
Contemporary Service...........10:30 AM
Evening Service........................6:00 PM
Wednesday Night:
Adult Classes....................7:00 -m
Boys and Girls Brigade.....7:00
Teens.............................. 7:15 m
"Welcome Home"
Located at 416 Hwy. 41 South
in Inverness Just Past Burger King
Church Office 726 4524
Also on Site "Little Friends Daycare
and Learning Center"


VIGIL MASSES:
4:00 P.M. &6:00 P.M.
*** **** *** *
SUNDAY MASSES:
8:00 A.M. &10:30 A.M.

SPANISH MASS:
12:30 P..


CONFESSIONS:
2:30 P.M. to 3:30 P.M. Sat.
orByAppointment


WEEKDAY MASSES:
8:00 A.M.

6 Roosevelt Blvd.,
Beverly Hills
746-2144
(1 Block East of S.R. 491)
www.ourladyofgracefl
.catholicweb.com .





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NOTES adult class
and 106 a
rr. The youth
Continued from Page C4 ity," meets
the Youth
school classes for all ages at with Youth
10:30 a.m. A nursery is avail- The church
able for all services except the South, Inv
7:45 a.m. class. Evening fellow- church at
ship is at 6 with various services 0 First
during summer months. On Inverness
Wednesday at 6 p.m. is a worship ai
prayer meeting, "Women in the school isa
Life Of Jesus" study, 'Youth Ig- ship servi
nite," "Praise Kids" and a nurs- Wednesde
ery for age 3 and younger. Call ginning at
the office at 352-726-1252. The lowed by (
church is at 550 Pleasant Grove prayer anc
Road, Inverness. The website is The meals
www.fbcinverness.com. $1.50 force
Floral City United 12. Call th
Methodist Church conducts 1908, eme
Sunday services at 8 a.m. in or visit ww
the 1884 church and 10:30 church ise
a.m. in the main sanctuary. 0 Peac
Bible studies are at 10 a.m. has Sunde
Tuesday and 6 p.m. Wednes- classes fo
days. Call the church office at at 9. Adult
352-344-1771. also meet
Inverness Church of God and 10 a.r
Sunday worship services are at Wednesd;
8:30 and 10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. area are v
Children's church is during the morning w
10:30 a.m. worship service in 10. Peace
Room 102. Sunday school be- "The Chur
gins at 9:30 a.m. with classes five miles
for everyone. The church has the junctic
many Christian education op- State Roa
portunities at 7 p.m. Wednes- office at 3E
days. Missionettes and Royal www.Peac
Rangers Clubs meet for chil- 0 First
dren from the age of 3. The Hernandc


TATTOOS
Continued from Page C1

and valleys of their own lives. The tat-
toos are like emotional maps that are
hard to hide.
"We have lots of people who have
tattoos. Some members of our church
have criminal records. Some have
been shamed and abused. Some have
struggled with drugs," explained Er-
ickson, who serves as "artist in resi-
dence" at Ecclesia.
'A lot of these people thought they
needed to cover up their tattoos when
they started coming to church. They
weren't sure that they wanted to share
those parts of their lives with others,"
he said. "What we're trying to do is tell
them that their tattoos are part of who
they are and now we want to talk
about who they are becoming."
Thus, the leaders of Ecclesia
Church created in 1999 by a coali-
tion of Southern Baptists, Presbyteri-
ans and others have raised
eyebrows and inspired headlines by
embracing tattoos as the artistic
medium for their eighth annual art ex-
hibit during the 40-day season that
leads to Easter. The title is "Crucifor-
mity: Stations of the Cross on Skin."
The plan, explained the Rev Chris
Seay, was for 10 members to have Er-
ickson's images permanently tattooed


s meets in rooms 105
t 7 p.m. Wednesday.
group, "Define Grav-
at 7 p.m. Friday in
Ministries Building
i Pastor Jon Uncle.
h is at 416 U.S. 41
'erness. Call the
352-726-4524.
Christian Church of
s invites everyone to
nd fellowship. Sunday
at 9 a.m. and the wor-
ce is at 10:15 a.m.
ay evening meals, be-
4:45 p.m., are fol-
choir practice at 5 and
d Bible study at 6 p.m.
s are $3 for adults and
children under age
he church at 352-344-
ail fccinv@yahoo.com
w.fccinv.com. The
at 2018 Colonade St.
e Lutheran Church
ay morning Bible
r children and youths
Bible study groups
at 9 a.m. Sunday
m. and 6:30 p.m.
ay. All residents of the
welcome. Sunday
worship service is at
e Lutheran Church,
*ch On The Hill," is
north of Dunnellon at
on of U.S. 41 and
d 40. Call the church
52-489-5881 or visit
ceLutheranOnline.org.
Baptist Church of
o Sunday school be-


gins at 9:30 a.m., following fel-
lowship, coffee and goodies.
The morning service begins at
10:45. Sunday evening services
begin at 6. Church Council
meet at 5:15 p.m. Sunday.
Maundy Thursday service is at
6:30 p.m. No Wednesday mid-
week services. Second quarter
business meeting at 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday, April 11. The
church is on East Parsons Point
Road in Hernando (across from
the Hernando Post Office).
At New Testament Bap-
tist Church, Pastor Helms will
continue preaching a series of
messages on prayer during the
morning service this Sunday.
Sunday school is at 9:45 a.m.
with classes for all ages. Sun-
day church services are at 11
a.m. and 6 p.m. with special
children's classes during the
morning service. A nursery is
provided for all services. Every-
one is welcome to attend. The
church is at 9850 S. Parkside
Ave. in Floral City, just south of
Floral Park. Call 352-726-0360
for more information.
Find a church home at
Faith Baptist Church, 6918 S.
Spartan Ave. (one mile from
U.S. 19, off Cardinal Street).
Visit comeandseefbc.org. Serv-
ices are interpreted for the deaf.
Sunday school classes at 9:45
a.m. with Sunday worship at 11
a.m. and 6 p.m. "King's Kids"
and "Flyers" for K-5 grades
from 6 to 7:15 p.m. Sunday.


onto their bodies shortly before Ash
Wednesday. These volunteers would
stand in the church's gallery on the
first night of Lent, surrounded by pho-
tos of their tattoos photos that
would then remain on display
throughout the season.
Instead, at least 60 members of the
church have visited one of the dozen
or so nearby tattoo studios to mix
blood, sweat and ink and another
dozen have scheduled appointments.
Seay said as many as 150 may end up
taking part, out of a flock averaging
about 1,500 worshippers in five week-
end services.
"I have spent way more time than I
ever expected trying to talk some peo-
ple out of doing this," he said. "People
need to give this decision some seri-
ous thought. ... It's also good to seek
the permission of your spouse."
The pastor decided to cover his
right upper arm with an image of a
tree growing out of an empty coffin -
Erickson's symbol for Jesus rising
from the dead. Seay had a tattoo artist
inscribe a tribute on the trunk in
honor of his grandfather, a prominent
Southern Baptist pastor who died this
past year
"I was a bit worried at first," he said,
"but my grandmother said she thought
it was beautiful."
One church member, who works
with cancer patients, had the "Jesus is
Laid in the Tomb" image a rose in a


coffin


Wednesday Bible study and
prayer meeting at 7 p.m. with
"Warriors" for grades 6 through
12 from 6:30 to 8 p.m. Call 352-
628-4793.
Reflections Church
meets at Citrus Springs Middle
School. Sunday morning wor-
ship service begins at 10:17
a.m. Children's church and
nursery is available. Bible study
is at 8:45 a.m. for adults.
First Church of God of In-
verness, a nondenominational
church which meets at 5510 E.
Jasmine Lane, invites the public
to Sunday morning worship
services at 10:30 and an old-
fashioned Sunday evening serv-
ice at 6 filled with singing,
testimonies and the Word, in-
cluding a Christian education
hour for children. The ladies
"Joy-Belles" meet the second
Tuesday monthly. A men's
breakfast is enjoyed the last Sat-
urday monthly and at 6 p.m. the
last Saturday monthly is "The
Saturday Night Gospel Jubilee"
(with groups from the area par-
ticipating). Refreshments and
fellowship follow and there is no
charge. The church has a once-
monthly fellowship carry-in meal,
followed by "theme-planned"
programs. Bible study and
prayer time is at 6 p.m. Wednes-
days. Call 352-344-3700.
St. Raphael Orthodox
Church, 1277 N. Paul Drive,
Inverness, welcomes everyone
to worship at Divine Liturgy on

tattooed on one foot and


plans to add the resurrection image on
her other foot. One mother selected
the "Jesus Meets His Mother" image,
which is a rose surrounded by symbols
of suffering. Another member, with his
wife's blessing, plans to have all 10 im-
ages tattooed onto his body
The project has already created
buzz in the tattooing community, said
Erickson.
But the key is not that some mem-
bers of this church decided get tat-
toos. The key is that more than half of
its members already had tattoos -
like 36 percent of Americans between
18 and 25, according to a Pew Forum
study
"Our invitation to do this was not for
everybody," said Erickson. "We're not
creating a tribe, here. You don't have
to have a tattoo to come to this church.
... But we already have so many peo-
ple here who do have tattoos and
those images are part of their stories.
We're telling them that it's good for
them, that it's normal, to add Chris-
tian symbols into that mix. They
get it."

Terry Mattingly is the director of the
Washington Journalism Center at the
Council for Christian Colleges and
Universities and leads the GetReli-
gion. org project to study religion
and the news.


Sunday mornings at 10 and
Saturday evening for Vespers
at 5. A coffee hour/fellowship
gathering takes place after Di-
vine Liturgy every Sunday. The
church appreciates donations
of canned goods and other
nonperishable items, which are
donated regularly to the Citrus
County Resource Center. Visit


RELIGION


213-0331 SACRN

NOTICE OF
CANCELLATION
The following applications scheduled for the Citrus
County Planning and Development Commission on
April 5, 2012 at 9:00 AM have been cancelled.
CPA-11-11 -Comprehensive Plan Text Amendment of
the Citrus County Comprehensive Plan (Ord. No. 89-04)
to add Chapter 17, Port Element and Appendix K, Florida
Ports to the Citrus County Comprehensive Plan.
CPA/AA/PDO-11-15 Clark A Stillwell for R & B. Inc. is
requesting a Planned Development Overlay from the
Citrus County Land Development Code to establish a
master plan of development to establish the Outpost
Shooting Range. The property is located in Sections 18
and 19, Township 19 South. Ranae 18 East. Further
described as Frasure Hull Peach Orchards, Block 1A000,
Lots 38, 45, and 46 and Block 2B000, Lots 27, 28 and 29
whose addresses are 2946, 3090, and 3196 S. Legette Pt.,
Lecanto and 3193 S. Race Avenue, Lecanto. A complete
legal description of the properties is on file in the
Geographic Resources and Community Planning Division.
CPA-11-16 Department of Development Services is
requesting a Comprehensive Plan Amendment to change
the land use designation on multiple parcels of land on the
Generalized Future Land Use Map.
Property Location: Area 1: Section 36, Township 17
South. Ranae 16 East. Further described as Parcel 12240,
whose address is 12000 W Lancelot Court, Crystal River,
FL (Red Level Cemetery property). Redesignation from
CL, Low Intensity Coastal and Lakes, to PSI, Public, Semi-
Public, Institutional, on the Generalized Future Land Use
Map.
Property Location: Area 2: Section 8, Township 19
South. Ranae 18 East. Further described as the NW 1/4
of the NE 1/4 of the SW 1/4, whose address is 4625 W.
Homosassa Trail, Lecanto, FL. Redesignation from IND,
Industrial to LDR, Low Density Residential on the
Generalized Future Land Use Map.
Property Location: Area 3: Section 27, Township 19
South, Range 17 East. Further described as Spring
Gardens Unit 2, Block H, Lots 1 and 25, whose addresses
are 8172 and 8190 W. Periwinkle Lane, Homosassa, FL.
Redesignation from MDR, Medium Density Residential to
REC, Recreation on the Generalized Future Land Use
Map.
Property Location: Area 4: Section 36, Township 20
South, Range 19 East the SW 1/4 and Section 1, Township
21 South. Ranae 19 East the NW 1/4 Whose addresses
are 11440 and 11750 S. Pleasant Grove Road, Floral City,
FL. Redesignation from EXT, Extractive to AGR,
Agriculture on the Generalized Future Land Use Map.
A complete legal description of the properties is on file in
the Geographic Resources and Community Planning
Division.
For more information about these applications please
contact the Department of Development and Planning,
Geographic Resources and Community Planning Division,
(352) 527-5544.
Chairman
Planning and Development Commission
Citrus County, Florida
IOBW


Wednesday 6:00 P.M.
Bible Study & Prayer
726-8986
"Church Like It Used To Be"
Saturday Night Gospel Jubilee"
6:00 PM.
(Last Saturday of month)
Children's Church School Weekly
5510 E. Jasmine Ln.
Phone: 726-8986
ALL ARE WELCOME

S43 Years of
|IRST Bringing Christ
F IR I I to Inverness
LUTHERAN

CHURCH
Holy Communion
Every Sunday at
7:45am & 10:00am
Sunday School
& Bible Class
8:45 AM.
726-1637
Missouri Synod
www.1stlutheran.net
1900 W. Hwy. 44, Inverness
The Rev. Thomas Beaverson


"o PRIMERA IGLESIA
HISPANA
DE CITRUS COUNTY
Asambleas de Dios
Inverness, Florida
ORDEN DE SERVICIOS:
DOMINGOS:
9:30 AM Escuela Biblica
Dominical
10:30 AM Adoraion y
Pr6dica
MARTES:
7:00 PM Culto de Oraci6n
JUEVES:
7:00 PM Estudios Biblicos
Les Esperamos!
David Pinero, Pastor
1370 N. Croft Ave. Inverness, FL 34451
Tel6fono: (352) 341-1711


harmony to all.


Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!!


SERVICING THE CITY OF INVERNESS U U *


Our Lady of

Fatima

CATHOLIC CHURCH
U.S. Hwy. 41 South, Inverness,
Florida
Sunday Masses
7:30 A.M., 9:00 A.M. & 11:00 A.M.
Saturday Vigil
4:00 P.M.
Weekdays 8:00A.M.
Confessions 2:30 3:30 P.M.

726-1670

Come To
ST.
MARGARET'S
EPISCOPAL
CHURCH
where everyone is still welcome!
In Historic Downtown Inverness
1 Block N.W. Of City Hall
114 N. Osceola Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
726-3153
www.stmaggie.org
Services:
Sun. Worship 8 & 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday 12:30 P.M.
Morning Prayer
9:00 A.M. Mon- Fri
Fr Gene Reuman, Pastor


W First

Assembly

of God
4201 So. Pleasant Grove Rd.
(Hwy. 581 So.) Inverness, FL 34452

Pastor,
S. Dairold

Bettye
Rushing
rIwa 1


I OFFICE: (352) 726-1107


^T '~First United

Vic ory Methodist


.Vi of IvChurch


tof Inverness


3896 S. Pleasant Grove Rd.
Inverness, FL 34452
(2 mi. so. ofApplebee's)
Come as you are.
(352) 726-2522
TONY ROSENBERGER
Senior Pastor



8:30 AM
Traditional Worship
with Holy
Communion

9:45 AM
Sunday School

11:00 AM
Contemporary
SPraise & Worship


At
Victory

Baptist Church
General Conference

Sunday School 9:45 AM
Worship 10:45 AM
Si",id.,, Evening 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 PM
Choir Practice 8:00 PM

Quality Child Care
Pastor Gary Beehler
352-465-8866
5040 N Shady Acres Dr.
726-9719
Highway 41 North, turn at
Sportsman Pt.
"A place to belong.A place to become."


i'road


tist


rch
5335 E. Jasmine Lane,
Inverness
4 Miles North Of K-Mart Off 41
North (Formally Calvary Bible
Church Location)

You're invited
to our Services
Sunday School
10:00 AM
Sunday
10:45 AM & 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 PM
Independent
Fundamental
Pastor
Terry Roberts
Ph: 726-0201


INVERNESS
Mn Places of worship that




Sunday"" offer love, peace and
10:30 AM.& 6:00 PA. V


I


SATURDAY, MARCH 31, 2012 C5

www.straphaelchurch.org.
Church of Christ services
at 304 N.E. 5th St., Crystal
River. Bible classes at 10 a.m.
Sunday, 7 p.m. Wednesday
and by appointment. Worship
services at 11 a.m. Sunday.
Everyone invited. Call 352-795-
4943 or 352-563-0056 for
information.





C6 SATURDAY, MARCH 31, 2012


CHAPEL
Continued from Page C1

"The chapel is a little
foretaste of heaven," Stroik
said. "It doesn't have to be
the same as the cells where
they sleep or the dining
room, but instead an intima-
tion of heaven and eternal
life."
The local chapel played
an important part in the
Rev Daniel Barron's path to
the priesthood. Barron now
serves in Denver, but for
decades the Carmelite
Monastery was his second
home.
In middle school, the sis-
ters gave him a job doing
gardening and maintenance
around the property. Soon
after, he helped with Mass
in the chapel an early
calling to the Catholic faith
that ultimately carried him
to the seminary
"I used to pray many
hours there in that chapel.
The sisters, one of the rea-
sons they offered me the
job, they could see that I had
a calling," Barron said. "The
chapel is very much home


GRACE
Continued from Page C1

careful of what she does,
thinks and says, that there's
a point she can't cross (al-
though no one will tell her
what that point is) or she
risks losing her salvation.
She's depressed, worried,
fearful. She wants to know
how to pray, how to be "on
fire for God." She confessed
to me that she's not and that
when she goes to church she
feels she has to hide how
she really feels (and, there-
fore, who she really is).
She said she's living a lie
at church, that "mostly
everyone thinks I'm doing
good."
"Plus," she said, "I am not
into God, but I want to be."
She added, "I don't want
to backslide again because I
don't want to go to hell."
She feels alone in her
faith and is afraid to talk to
anyone in her church, so
she wrote to me, a stranger
900 miles away
While I'm honored and
humbled, I'm also angry
She should be talking to her
friends at her church or
her pastor. What does it say
about a church where its
members are afraid to be
themselves, to be honest
about their lack of zeal and
their need for encourage-
ment?
What does that say about
the leadership, the pastors
and teachers, when the peo-
ple feel condemned con-
demned by God?
"There is, therefore, no
condemnation for those


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


for me and part of my own
spiritual history"
Barron described the
chapel as austere, with a
dated layout. Stroik hopes
the renovations create a
timeless space.
"That's my goal ... to do
something that doesn't go
out of style," Stroik said.
Anne Dezelski and her
husband, Leonard, are
working to become mem-
bers of the Third Order, a
group of lay people associ-
ated with the Carmelites.
The couple have attended
Mass at the chapel for
nearly 30 years and are
"thrilled" with the new de-
sign.
"Architecture back in
1960s and '70s was what
Mother Mary describes as
'less than transcendent,"'
Dezelski said. "It will cer-
tainly help us all lift our
hearts and minds to God
like we're supposed to in
prayer."
Mother Mary said the
changes excite the sisters,
but the nuns continue to de-
bate with Stroik about how
to renovate without sacrific-
ing their strong beliefs.
"He's firm about telling

who are in Christ Jesus"
(Romans 8:1). Can it be any
clearer? No condemnation.
None. Zero.
We take something so sim-
ple as "For God so loved the
world, that he gave his only
begotten Son, that whoever
believes in Him shall not
perish, but have eternal
life" (John 3:16) and we add
caveats and stipulations,
fine print at the bottom of
the page, exceptions and
rules, hurdles to jump over,
hoops to jump through.
We take God's gifts of
grace and mercy and rest
and peace and turn them
into a strategic system of
rules and regulations. In
some churches, the people
care more about the length
of a woman's skirt than her
struggle with understanding
the concept of "no condem-
nation."
In some churches, the ap-
pearance of holiness is
more important than show-
ing mercy to one another,
and gathering knowledge is
superior to serving one an-
other with kindness.
In some churches (not all
or even most, but some),
women like Lisa from
Louisiana feel they have
nowhere to go with their
questions and fear, so they
hide their secret shameful
feelings of unworthiness as
a Christian, afraid that
God's grace has a limit.
Church becomes a place
of condemnation not re-
demption, and this makes
me furious. It shouldn't be
that way That's not what
God had in mind when he
created the church.
Church should be a safe


Come spin the wheel and take


us what is best, what's most
beautiful, and I've asked
him to keep challenging us
to look beyond what's famil-
iar to us," Mother Mary
said. "At times, the sisters
were so used to what we
have that it's difficult for
them to disassociate beauty
with things they think are
too nice for a Carmelite.
They say, 'Oh, no, that's too
fancy' That's been a chal-
lenge for us."
The renovation marks a
bittersweet transition for
the sisters. A cherished,
life-size crucifix the
chapel's focal point for
years was removed. Its
large size didn't fit with
Stroik's vision for the re-
designed chapel. The sis-
ters are donating the
crucifix to St. Mary's Cathe-
dral in Gaylord. Mother
Mary said it's a sacrifice,
but one that will pay off
with chapel improvements.
The sisters have only one
other concern about the
renovation work.
"We're not looking for-
ward to all the noise," she
said. "We live in silence, and
this is not going to be a fun
three or four months."

place, a soft place. I'm not
talking about a place where
sin is affirmed and cele-
brated, but where sinners
are accepted and loved, and
even where it's famously
taught that everyone, from
those in the pews to those
who preach from the pulpit,
are sinners, too.
That's the only way the
church will be a healing
place for people like Lisa
from Louisiana people
like you, people like me.
There truly is therefore
no condemnation for those
who are in Christ Jesus.
That's where the healing
starts. It begins with believ-
ing that if God says we are
right with him, then we are.
If Jesus said no one can
snatch us from his hand,
then we are safe and
secure.
Imagine what the local
church would be like if all
sermons started with that.
There might be fewer peo-
ple writing desperate letters
to strangers for help and
more people offering hope
to those sitting next to them
in the pew.
People outside the church
would notice. They already
notice whatever we do, es-
pecially when we get it
wrong.

Nancy Kennedy is the au-
thor of "Move Over, Victoria
--I Know the Real Secret,"
"Girl on a Swing," and her
latest book, "Lipstick
Grace." She can be reached
at 352-564-2927, Monday
through Thursday, or via
email atnkennedy@
chronicleonline. com.


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RELIGION







Page C7 SATURDAY, MARCH 31, 2012



COMMUNITY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


News NOTES

Judges to review op on over o un
members' photos


On Thursday, April 5, the
Camera Club's two judges,
Lawrence Munne and Paul
Simison, will offer a friendly
assist to members. They are
the judges for the club's
photo competitions, but on
this night they will review
members' photos.
The two will discuss how
members can improve their
photos and therefore achieve
better scores in future com-
petitions. Munne has been a
wedding photographer for
many years and Simison has
spent many years traveling
and photographing wildlife.
The workshop begins at 7
p.m. at the Citrus County Art
Center, 2644 N. Annapolis
Ave, Hernando, just north of
County Road 486. Visitors
are welcome.
Choir to do final
spring concert
Citrus Community Concert
Choir will present the last of
its eighth annual Spring Con-
certs under the direction of
Jacki Doxey-Scott with ac-
companist Sally Smith. The
chorus will perform two
works: "The Creation," an
Oratorio by Joseph Haydn,
and "Missa Americana," by
Ed Lojeski.
The remaining perform-
ance will be Sunday, April 1,
at 3 p.m. at Faith Lutheran
Church, 935 S. Crystal Glen,
Lecanto.
Adult admission will be
$10; children 12 and younger
are admitted for free. For in-
formation, call 352-382-7071
or visit www.citruschoir.com.
Jam with Jazz
Society April 1
Citrus Jazz Society will
host its monthly open jam
session from 1:30 to 4 p.m.
Sunday, April 1, at the Citrus
Catholic Charity Community
Center (formerly the Knights
of Columbus Hall, Ho-
mosassa Springs).
The jam session features
local and visiting musicians
playing old favorites of jazz,
swing and Dixieland for lis-
tening and dancing pleasure.
The public is invited; admis-
sion at the door is $7 for non-
members. Bring
refreshments.
Musicians interested in
playing may call Tony Caruso
at 352-942-9399.
Masons to serve
fried fish dinner
Floral City Masonic Lodge
No. 133 invites everyone to
its fish fry from 4 to 7 p.m.
Friday, April 6, at the lodge.
Donation is $8.50. Call
352-726-5108 for more
information.

Humanitarians
OF FLORIDA

Katniss











Special to the Chronicle
Katniss is an adorable 13-
week-old kitty girl. This un-
usual kitten is all white
with one blue eye and one
yellow. Katniss and her sis-
ter, Primrose, are both
looking for a forever home.
Visitors are welcome from
10 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 2 to
4 p.m. Monday through
Saturday at the Humanitar-
ians' Manchester House on
the corner of State Road
44 and Conant Avenue,
east of Crystal River. Call
the Humanitarians at 352-
613-1629 for adoptions, or
view most of the Hardin
Haven's felines online at
www.petfinder.com/
shelters/fl186.html.


Park Friends to host Easter event April 7


Special to the Chronicle

The Florida Department of Envi-
ronmental Protection's Friends of Ho-
mosassa Springs Wildlife Park Inc.
will have a big Easter egg hunt begin-
ning at 9 a.m. Saturday, April 7, at the
Wildlife Park, on the green behind the
parking area at the park's Visitor Cen-
ter and main entrance on U.S. 19.
Families should arrive by 8:30 a.m.


to prepare. The children will be di-
vided into three age groups: children
ages 1 through 4 years; children ages 5
through 8 years; and children 9
through 12 years.
Parents should bring baskets for
their children for collecting eggs.
There will be thousands of plastic eggs
in different colors to be found and re-
deemed for a variety of Easter candy
There will be special prizes for find-


ing the gold and silver eggs in each age
group. Costumed characters will be on
hand to greet children and for photos,
including the Easter Bunny.
The Friends of Homosassa Springs
Wildlife Park is a citizen support or-
ganization for the park that helps raise
funds for park projects through spe-
cial events and activities, and works in
the community to increase the public's
awareness of the park.
Other sponsors for the event include
the Wal-Mart of Homosassa Springs
and Publix of Homosassa Springs.


Sweetbay award to CRHS


_i I .. *. ... .


! IK. l l^Hf .,


Special to the Chronicle
Sweetbay Supermarket recently presented Crystal River High School with a $6,272 check as part of a storewide school
fundraising initiative. The school won second place out of 625 schools during the program. First place was awarded to
Plant City High School with $12,020, and third place was awarded to Springstead High School (Spring Hill) with $4,116.
Crystal River High School received the award as the result of a two-month, storewide Sweetbay fundraising initiative in
partnership with the Florida Dairy Council. From September through November, Sweetbay invited local schools to pur-
chase select products where a portion of each sale was donated to the designated school for the purchase and support
of health and wellness items, including field trips and sports equipment. Sweetbay donated more than $140,000 to 625
schools in the markets they serve in Florida. From left are: Joseph Engerman, Crystal River Sweetbay customer service
associate; Wayne Dupler, Crystal River Sweetbay store manager; Mark McLoy, principal of Crystal River High School;
Kit Humbaugh, assistant principal of Crystal River High School; Charles Brooks, assistant principal of Crystal River High
School; and Vivian Delgado of Sweetbay corporate.




Attract butterflies this spring


Master gardener clinics are free


Special to the Chronicle

Don't you love to see big,
beautiful, bold, butterflies!
Do you want to attract them
to your yard?
Come to one of the free
Citrus County Cooperative
Extension Service's Master
Gardener Plant Clinics. The
April topic will be butter-
flies and how to garden for


them.
Come to learn the differ-
ence between butterflies
and moths. Hate weeds?
Come to learn how properly
placed "weeds" can attract
butterflies. Come to learn
how useful butterflies are.
The schedule for April is:
Wednesday, April 4, 2
p.m. at Floral City Library
Tuesday, April 10,1 p.m.


at Lakes Region Library, In-
verness.
Wednesday, April 11,
1:30 p.m. at Central Ridge
Library, Beverly Hills.
Wednesday, April 18, 1
p.m. at Citrus Springs Li-
brary
Friday, April 20, 1:30
p.m. at Coastal Region Li-
brary, Crystal River.
Tuesday, April 24,2 p.m.
at Homosassa Library
Note the day change for
the clinic in Crystal River.


The day was changed for
this month from the second
Friday to the third Friday
(April 20) due to a schedul-
ing conflict.
Bring any samples, ques-
tions or information con-
cerning your gardening
experiences. Master gar-
dener volunteers will be
available to respond with
University of Florida-based
research and answers.
Call 352- 527-5700 for
more information.


Barbershopper of the Year


Special to the Chronicle
Each year, the Citrus Chapter of the Barbershop Harmony Society, from the Chorus of the Highlands presents the Bar-
bershopper of the Year award and votes on an outstanding member of the chapter who has given service to the commu-
nity and to the chapter. The award reads: "In the year 2011, the chapter honors (the member) for his outstanding
contribution to the preservation and encouragement of barbershop harmony." The 2011 recipient was Dr. Howard Christ
of Dunnellon. Christ has served as chapter treasurer, sung in special event quartets, served on the chapter board and helped
with a large donation recently presented by the chapter to the Citrus Art League. He has been a faithful member, joining
after hearing a Citrus chapter quartet sing in "Music Man" at the Art League. Men who like to sing and have fun are in-
vited to visit with the group at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday at First United Methodist Church in Inverness on Pleasant Grove Road.
For more information, call 352-382-0336.


News NOTES

Future Builders
postpone car wash
Citrus County Future
Builders of America club
(FBA) has postponed its
fundraising car wash origi-
nally scheduled for Saturday,
March 31, at the Citrus
County School District office
building parking lot in Inver-
ness. A new date for the
event will be announced
later.
For more information
about opportunities to sup-
port Future Builders of Amer-
ica, visit www.citrusbuilders.
com/FBA.php, or call the Cit-
rus County Builders Associa-
tion at 352-746-9028.
Trunk show on tap
for quilters
Creative Quilters plan an
Eleanor Burns Quilt-In-A-Day
Trunk Show, featuring Pat
Knoechel, from 10 a.m. to
noon Monday, April 16, at
First Baptist Church of Crys-
tal River, 705 Citrus Ave.
Lunch will follow at 12:30 p.m.
Knoechel will demonstrate
techniques from the newest
Eleanor Burns publications.
Cost is $12. To reserve a
spot, send a check to Mary
Redrick, P.O. Box 202,
Lecanto, FL 34460-0202 by
Monday, April 9. Checks
should be made out to First
Baptist Church.
For more information, call
Mary Redrick at 352-
746-2722, or email
jredrick@tampabay.rr.com or
call Patsy Jenkins at 352-
746-9204 or email
pjenkin7@tampabay.rr.com.
Tickets available
for Elvis play
The weekend of April 19 to
22 brings the original stage
production "When Elvis
Came to Town" to the Old
Courthouse Heritage Mu-
seum for a second run. Tick-
ets are still available for the
original play/musical, staged
in the historic courtroom
where Elvis filmed the cli-
mactic scene in the movie
"Follow That Dream."
"When Elvis Came to
Town" brings to life the six
weeks when Elvis came to
Citrus County. The play is
based on hours of taped in-
terviews and reminiscences
with movie cast members,
extras and townspeople.
The play will open Friday,
April 20, and run through
Sunday with the following
dates and times: 7:30 p.m.
Friday, April 20; 2 and 7:30
p.m. Saturday, April 21; and
2 p.m. Sunday, April 22. Tick-
ets are $25.
For more information,
call 352-341-6427 or 352-
341-6488.
Free memory
screening available
HPH Hospice, in partner-
ship with the Alzheimer's As-
sociation Florida Gulf Coast
Chapter, will provide free
memory screenings from 10
a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday, April
9, at HPH Hospice Adminis-
trative Offices, 3545 N.
Lecanto Highway (Winn
Dixie Shopping Plaza), Bev-
erly Hills.
Adults age 50 and older
concerned about memory
impairment are invited to
take advantage of the 20-
minute screening, provided
by the Alzheimer's Associa-
tion of Gulfcoast Florida.
Reservations are required.
Call HPH Hospice at 352-
527-4600 to register.
Support group
helps grands
Grandparents Raising
Grandchildren Support
Group will meet from 10 a.m.
to noon Monday, April 2, at
the Citrus County Resource
Center.
Pam Hall from Kids Cen-
tral Inc. will facilitate the
meeting. Citrus County Re-
source Center is at 2804 W


Marc Knighton Court in
Lecanto. For information, call
Pam at 352-387-3540.


* Submit information at least two weeks before the event. 0 Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
* Early submission of timely material is appreciated, but Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
multiple publications cannot be guaranteed. community@chronicleonline.com.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be guaranteed.
* Expect notes to run no more than once.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


5% THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
V by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words. .
I DRAYT I ,


SATURDAY EVENING MARCH 31, 2012 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D/A:Comcast, Dunnellon & lnglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
C B D/I F H 6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30
o WESH NBC 19 19 News News Entertainment 'Night Escape Routes The Firm (N)'14' Law & Order: SVU News SNL
Priceless Great The Lawrence Welk AreYou Keeping As Time As Time Waiting for Yes Globe Trekker "South
8 WE ) PBS 3 3 14 6 Antiques Romances Show'G' Served? Up Goes By Goes By God MinisterPG' Atlantic"'G'
0 WUFT PBS 5 5 5 41 Lawrence Welk Griffith |Griffith *** "Hoosiers"(1986 Gene Hackman. Austin City Limits Artists Den
SNBC 8 8 8 8 8 News Nightly Entertainment Tonight Escape Routes (Series The Firm "Chapter Law & Order: Special News Saturday
W NBC 8 8 8 8 8 News (N) 'PG' E Premiere) (N) Twelve" (N) '14 Victims Unit '14 Night Live
_ rW. _i_ ABC 20 20 20 News World Jeopardy! Wheel of Wipeout (In Stereo) 20/20 "My Extreme Affliction" (N) (In Stereo) cc News Hot Topics
SWFTVABC 20 20 20 News 'G' c Fortune 'PG' 'PG'
2012 NCAA Basketball Tournament First Semifinal: Teams 2012 NCAA Basketball Tournament Second Semifinal: 10 News Paid
o (WTSP CBS 10 10 10 10 10 TBA. (N) (Live) x Teams TBA. (N) (Live) cc 11pm (NJ Program
FOX13 6:00 News TMZ (N) (In Stereo) iQ'Viva! The Chosen "Episode Five" FOX13 10:00 News Alcatraz "Webb Porter"
0 FOX 13 13 13 13 (N) c 'PG' c Performances in Los Angeles. 'PG' s (N)E a'14' c
D WCJB ABC 11 11 4 News |ABC Entertainment 'Night Wipeout 'PG' c 20/20 "My Extreme Affliction" (N) cc News Crook
Cornerstone With John JackVan PaulWhite In Touch With Dr. Leslie Hale cc Abundant All Over Freedom Pure
SWCLF IND 2 2 2 22 22 Hagee'G' Impe Charles Stanley'G' Life the World Today Passion
ABC Action World Men's Wheel of Wipeout (In Stereo) 20/20 "My Extreme Affliction" (N) (In Stereo) ca News Grey's
S(WFSABC 11 11 11 News News Health Fortune 'PG'E Anatomy
WMORIND 12 12 16 i Family Guy Family Guy Big Bang Big Bang House Patient cannot House Caregiver's col- Movie'14'
S (W I)ND 12 12 16'14' 14' Theory Theory communicate.'14' lapse.'PG'E
D iWTTAi MNT 6 6 6 9 9 Scoop Paid Ring of Honor Wrest. '70s '70s Futurama Futurama Ring of Honor Wrest. Bones'14' cc
B WACX) TBN 21 21 The Faith Summit Variety Life Center Church Endtime H Lindsey 40 Days Fowler [Variety Chosen |St Luke
King of 'Til Death Two and Two and Criminal Minds Cold Case "Forever NUMB3RS "When The Unit A bomb in an
QIM G cW 4 4 4 12 12 Queens 'PG' Half Men Half Men "Limelight"'14' Blue"'14'x cWorlds Collide"'PG' Atlanta bank.'PG'
Ford-Fast To Be I Spy'Y' Cold Squad '14' c Da Vinci's Inquest (In Music Mix Music Mix The Cisco Black
EIWY EFAM 16 16 16 15Lane Announced (DVS) Stereo)'14' c USA USA Kid'G' Beauty
S(WOGX) FOX 13 7 7 TMZ'PG' c Big Bang |Big Bang Q'Viva! The Chosen "Episode Five"'PG' News Alcatraz '14' Ec
rB WVEA UNI 15 15 15 15 14 Corned. |Noticiero Q'Viva! The Chosen Sabado Gigante (N)'PG'(SS) Comed. |Noticiero
m WXPX ION 17 Psych 'PG'x Psych 'PG'x Psych'PG'x Psych 'PG'n Psych'PG'n Psych'PG' x
A&E 5 4 2 rkikin Parkin Parkin Parkin Parkin Parkin Parkin Parking Parking Parkin Parkiny Parkin
54 48 54 25 27 Wars'G' Wars' G' Wars'PG' Wars' G' Wars'PG' WarsPG' Wars'G' Wars PG Wars'PG' Wars' G' Wars'PG' Wars PG
CSI: Miami "Recoil" (In CSI: Miami "Permanent CSI: Miami "Bombshell" CSI: Miami "Die by the CSI: Miami "Time CSI: Miami "Stoned
55 64 55 Stereo)'14'x Vacation"'14' '14' Sword"'14' Bomb"'14'E Cold"'14'4E
My Cat From Hell "Cat My Cat From Hell (In Must Love Cats (N) (In Too Cute! "Pool Too Cute! "Super Fluffy Too Cute! "Pool Puppies"
52 35 52 19 21 Fight!"'PG' Stereo) 'PG' Stereo)'PG' Puppies" (N)'PG' Puppies"'PG' In Stereo)'PG'
) 96 19 96 The Game The Game The Game The Game *** "Dreamgirls" (2006, Musical)Jamie Foxx, Eddie Murphy Three **Y "Why Did lGet
S96 19 96 4' 4' 1' 14' singers learn that fame has a high price. 'PG-13' S Married?" (2007)
LiKAl 254 51 254 The Celebrity Apprentice 'PG'E cHousewives/Atl. ** "National Treasure: Book of Secrets"(2007) 'PG' Treasure
** "AlongCame **l "Office Space" (1999, Comedy) Ron ** "Jackass: Number Two" Gabriel Iglesias: Hot Kevin Hart
27 61 27 33 Polly" (2004)'PG-13' Livingston, Jennifer Aniston. 'R' (2006) Johnny Knoxville. and Fluffy '14' c
Bayou Bayou Bayou Bayou Bayou Bayou Bayou My Big Redneck Southern Nights (N) Bayo
LI 98 45 98 28 37 Bilion Bilion Bil ion Bilron Biliion Blion Bilion Vacation (N) Bion
ECNIC) 43 42 43 Paid Paid Money in Debt/Part Fat & Fatter Suze Orman Show Debt/Part Princess Fat & Fatter
fl 40 29 40 41 46 Situation Room CNN Newsroom (N) Big Hits-Drms Piers Morgan CNN Newsroom (N) Big Hits-Drms
Austin & Shake It Jessie Jessie Jessie Jessie Jessie Jessie A.N.T Good- Jessie Austin &
Wi$KJ 46 40 46 6 5 Ally'G' Up! 'G' 'G' a 'G' c 'G' a 'G' c 'G' c 'G' Farm'G' Charlie 'G' Ally 'G'
ESPiF 33 27 33 21 17 SportsCenter(N) E:60(N) E:60 (N) Sports. E:60 (N) Baseball Tonight (N) (Live) a SportsCenter (N)
[ESPN2J 34 28 34 43 49 SportsCenter (N) (Live) ca NHRA Drag Racing 30 for 30 a |The Real Rocky |An
EEWINJ 95 70 95 48 Life |Fathers |Angelica Live The Way to Life |Alter Angelica Living Right |The Journey Home
*** 29 52 29 20 28 "The Blind Side" (2009, Drama) Sandra **** "Toy Story" (1995, Comedy) Voices of **** "Toy Story 2"(1999, Comedy) Voices of
29 52 29 20 28 Bullock, Tim McGraw.'PG-13' Tom Hanks, Tim Alen.'G' Tom Hanks, Tim Alen.'G'
118 170 "Undis ** "Dirty Dancing: Havana *** "The Italian Job" (2003) Mark Wahlberg. ** "Bandits" (2001, Comedy) BruceWillis. (In
118 170 covered" Nights" 2004 Diego Luna. cc (In Stereo)'PG-13' cc Stereo) 'PG-13' c
EFNCJ 44 37 44 32 America's News HQ FOX Report (N) Huckabee(N) Justice With Jeanine The Five Jour. |News
[FD) 26 56 26 Restaurant Stakeout Restaurant: Im. Restaurant: Im. Restaurant: Im. Restaurant: Im. Iron Chef America
[FSIFL 35 39 35 College Baseball Marlins |UEFA Champions League Soccer Boxing Dyah Ali Davis vs. Francisco Sierra.
**l2 "X-Men Origins: Wolverine"(2009, *** "Iron Man" (2008, Action) Robert Downey Jr., Terrence Howard, Gwyneth Archer'MA'
X 30 60 30 51 Action) HughJacman, will.i.am'PG-13' Paltrow Abillionairedonsanarmoredsuittofightcriminals.'PG-13'
GOLF 727 67 727 LPGA Tour Golf ICentral PGA Tour Golf Shell Houston Open, Third Round. Central
** "A Walton Easter" (1997, Drama) Richard A Decade of the Waltons Memorable moments. ** "A Walton Easter"(1997, Drama) Richard
39 68 39 45 54 Thomas, Ralph Waite. a 'G' c Thomas, Ralph Waite. cc
** "Green Lantern"(2011, Action) Ryan *** "Bridesmaids" (2011 Comedy) Kristen Luck Two prized colts go head-to- "Brides
302 201 302 2 2 Reynolds. (In Stereo) 'PG-13' cs Wiig. Premiere. (In Stereo) 'R'I head. (In Stereo) 'MA' c maids"
B **l "Just Wright" *,l "Big Mommas: Like Father, Like Son" Eastbound Enlightened True Blood (In Stereo) Curb Real/Bill
l 2 303 202 303 (2010)'PG' (2011) Martin Lawrence. 'PG-13' m 'MA'Ec Enthusiasm Maher
HGTV) 23 57 23 42 52 House |Hunters Clean Freaks (N)'G' Candice IDear Color Spl. Interiors House |Hunters House Hunters
fi 51 25 51 32 42 Time Machine'PG'Ec To Be Announced To Be Announced To Be Announced
E**l2 "The Secret Life of Bees"(2008, Drama) **Y "My Sister's Keeper" (2009, Drama) ** "August Rush" (2007, Drama) Freddie
24 38 24 31 Queen Latifah.'PG-13'x cCameron Diaz.'PG-13 cc Highmore, Keri Russell. 'PG'
** "Suburban Madness" (2004, Docudrama) "A Trusted Man" (2011) Charisma Carpenter. "Murder on Pleasant Drive" (2006,
50 119 Sela Ward, Elizabeth Pena. R' s A mysterious stalker torments a woman. Docudrama) Kelli Williams, Adam Arkin. ca
S 320 221 320 3 3** "Robin Hood" (2010, Adventure) Russell ** "Knightand Day" (2010, Action) Tom **l "The Adjustment Bureau" Girl's
CiV1) 320 221 320 3 3 Crowe. (In Stereo) 'PG-13' c Cruise. (In Stereo) 'P-13' c (2011) Matt Damon. ca Guide
MSNBC 42 41 42 Documentary Documentary Documentary Documentary Documentary Documentary
F) 109 65 109 44 53 Jesus: ne van uoomsaay Preppers uoomsaay hreppers uoomsaay hreppers uoomsaay hreppers uoomsaay Vreppers
S1 6 44 '14' 14' 14' 14' 14'
NICK 28 36 28 35 25 iCarly'G' |iCarly'G' Victorious |Victorious Kids'Choice Awards |iCarly'G' Friends |Friends Friends Friends
OWN 103 62 103 Sweetie Pie's Sweetie Pie's Sweetie Pie's |Sweetie Pie's Beverly's Full House To Niecy To Niecy
WXYJ 44 123 *** "Freaky Friday"(2003) 'PG' cc **' "Legally Blonde" 2001) 'PG-13' *** "Frea kyFriday"(2003) 'PG' cc
** "The Tempest" *, "Push" (2009) Chris Evans. Rogue psychics "All Good Things" (2010) Ryan "Big Money Rustlas" (2010,
(SHOW) 340 241 340 4 (2010) Helen Mirren. battle a covert government agency Gosling. (In Stereo) 'R' c Comedy) Violent J.'R'
n 732 112 732 Auto Racing SPEED On the NASCAR Racing Sprint Cup: NCWTS NASCAR Racing Camping World Truck Series:
732 112 732 Center (N) Edge (N) Martinsville, Qualifying. Setup Martinsville.
7 7 **** "Star Wars IV: A New Hope"(1977) **** "Star Wars V: The Empire Strikes Back"(1980, Science Fiction) American American
SPikE 37 43 37 27 36 Mark Hamill. (In Stereo) 'PG' Mark Hamill, Harrison Ford, Carrie Fisher. (In Stereo)'PG' Digger Digger
"Little BIk Starz ** "The Green Hornet" (2011, Action) Seth ***Y "Midnight in Paris" (2011) **Y "Pirates of the Caribbean:
370 271 370 Book" Studios Rogen. (In Stereo) 'PG-13 x Owen Wilson.'PG-13' On Stranger Tides" (2011)
College Lightning NHL Hockey Winnipeg Jets at Tampa Bay Lightning. From Lightning MLB Preseason Baseball Boston Red Sox at
36 31 36 Softball Live! the St. Pete Times Forum in Tampa, Fla. (Live) Live! (N) Tampa Bay Rays.
Cate ory 7: The End of Category 7: The End of the World Massive "Seattle Superstorm"(2012) Esai Morales. A **Y "Polar Storm"
31 59 31 26 29 the Worrd storms wreak havoc. (Part 2 of 2)'14, L,S,V' scientist investigates cataclysmic weather. (2009) cc
fIBS) 49 23 49 16 19 Friends [Friends Seinfeld |Seinfeld Big Bang |Big Bang Big Bang |BigBang **l2 "The Longest Yard" (2005) cc
M**,5 6 "The Natural" 1984, Drama) Robert **** "Sunrise"(1927, Drama) George *** "Hallelujah" (1929, Musical) Daniel L.
169 53 169 30 35 Redford, Robert Duval.'PG' c O'Brien, Janet Gaynor.'NR' Haynes, Nina MaeMcKinney'NR
American Chopper (In American Chopper (In American Chopper (In Sons of Guns American Chopper (In Sons of Guns
00 53 34 53 24 26 Stereo) 'PG' c Stereo) 'PG' s Stereo) 'PG' s "Kamikaze Cannon"'14' Stereo) 'PG'I "Kamikaze Cannon"'14'
WSJ 50 46 50 29 30 Dateline: Real Life 48 Hours: Hard Evid. 48 Hours: Hard Evid. 48 Hours: Hard Evid. 48 Hours: Hard Evid. 48 Hours: Hard Evid.
"The Green" (2011) *** "Down and Out in Beverly Hills" (1986) "Grave Encounters" (2010, "After..." (2006) Daniel
B 350 261 350 Jason Butler Harner. Nick Nolte. (In Stereo) 'R' Horror) Sean Rogerson. 'NR' s Caltagirone. (In Stereo) 'NR' c
N 48 33 48 31 34** "The Da Vinci Code" (2006, Mystery) Tom "Hornet's Nest" (2012 Mystery) Sherry "Hornet's Nest" (2012, Mystery) Sherry
48 33 48 31 34 Hanks, lan McKellen. 'PG-13'c Stringfield. Premiere. 'NR' c Stringfield, Virginia Madsen.'NR' c
fiiDiF 38 58 38 33 Adven |Adven ** "Space Jam"(1996) Michael Jordan. God Devil |King/Hill King/Hill |Fam. Guy Aqua |Metal
FijI) 9 54 9 44 Extreme Pools'G' Extreme Restaurants Ghost Adventures Ghost Adventures Ghost Adventures Ghost Adventures
tiiLYJ 25 55 25 98 55 Most Shocking'14' Repo Repo Repo Repo Repo Repo Repo Repo Repo Madness
TWl 32 49 32 34 24 M*A*S*H |M*A*S*H Homel m Home m Homelm Homelm Raymond |Raymond Raymond |Raymond Raymond King
47 NCIS "Knockout" (In NCIS The death of a NCIS A Navy pilot is NCIS Gibbs'former NCIS "Patriot Down" (In *** "Casino Royale"
(USA) 47 32 47 17 18 Stereo)'PG'x Marine.'14'x found dead.'PG' mother-in-law.'14' Stereo)'14'x (2006)'PG-13'
Ghost Whisperer Ghost Whisperer Ghost Whisperer Ghost Whisperer (In Ghost Whisperer (In Ghost Whisperer (In
117 69 117 "Voices" 'PG "Ghost Bride"'PG' Reunite. 'PG' c Stereo) 'PG' c Stereo) 'PG' c Stereo) 'PG cc
1WiEA 18 18 18 18 20 Law Order: Cl Funny Home Videos Funny Home Videos Funny Home Videos WGN News at Nine 30 Rock |Scrubs


North


4 4
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East


West


4 2
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South


03-31-12


4 KQJ109876
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4 J 10 6
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4 A 5 3
VA
SA
AKQJ10983

Dealer: East
Vulnerable: East-West
South West North East
44


64


Pass Pass


Pass


Opening lead: 4 2


34 Brownie Answer to Previous Puzzle
morsels
36 HBO receivers | MA L
37 Candy bars BOA MSG MAG
39 Mall booth URN O WEDM B ELL
41 Mauna- L C D S 0 A R A R GO
42 -Wiout(relax) BAYBEERR Y S3 AM


48 APeron A DA EY S 0 CAR
49 In better NE WER NAP E V E
52 Summit RINSE REED
53 Feline BUNNY RAE
response J ANE MAINSAIL
MissMuffet's ARCS PL AN L AO
fare MELT HALE EGG
56 UPS units -
57 Boastful AD ISS CEOE
knight 3 Fundraiser, 8 Knuckle
often under
DOWN 4 Video game 9 Mournful cry
1 Dried fruit pioneer 10 Rock's
2 Skunk's 5 Also not -- Leppard
efonse 6 Invoice no. 12 Locust tree
defense 7 Brag (2 wds.) 15 S&L protector
fant more puzzles? 18 Instant lawn
Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books 20 Lie down
t QuillDriverBooks.com 21 Wall Street
4 5 6 7 8 9 10 deg.
22 Goofs up
D NV m13 23 Horse color
16 l25 Golden Rule
word
A 26 Dallas cagers
29 "Puppy Love"
20 -singer
31 Disapproving
24 26 cluck
12533 Nonsense
29 30 31 35 Kabob stick

S36 40 Operatic
3Diaprince
3 043 No -c luck!
4N44 Reputations

47 47 Vaccines
49 50 51 48 Beard site
50e49 Pfc.'s
53 54 superior
53 350 Axle end
56 --751 Singer
Orbison


Dear Annie: My wife and I
have been married 42
years, and she plans to re-
tire in a few months. I
am unemployed, can-
not find a job and con-
sider myself retired
already
I do the grocery
shopping and have
dinner on the table by
the time my wife re-
turns from work, ex-
cept two days a week
when we go out to eat.
However, my wife
won't let me touch the AN N
laundry, the dishes, MAIL
the hardwood floors,
the bathrooms or the
vacuuming. It's hands off, her
way or no way I know I need
some training. I certainly don't
want to use the wrong cleaners
on a $5,000 floor But my wife re-
fuses to teach me and argues
when I ask. Our friends often
comment on how spotless our
house is. I ask my wife all the
time what she wants me to do, but
she won't say Am I supposed to
read her mind?
I have even asked her to please
leave me notes, and the answer is
"no." So my wife has decided to
resolve our arguments by sleep-
ing by herself. I don't feel this
helps matters at all. Any sugges-
tions? -Jim in Peoria
Dear Jim: First, please know
how refreshing it is to hear from
a man who actually wants to do
more housework. The problem,
of course, is that your wife con-
siders this her "territory," and
she is reluctant to give up control.
She believes if you can do what
she does, it makes her less valu-


able and necessary. There is no
reason to fight over this. Do what
you can and ignore the rest. If she
doesn't like it, let her
complain. We suspect
she enjoys doing that
Dear Annie: I am a
60-year-old man, di-
vorced for one year
and living alone. I re-
cently joined a dating
website and corre-
Ss sponded with a num-
ber of women. Then,
out of the blue, I got an
email from a 24-year-
IE'S old Russian girl who
BOX happens to have a visa
to travel to the United
States.
I responded to her, and now,
after 10 days, I have received nu-
merous long letters and many
risque pictures. She is a beauty. I
so much wanted to believe she is
real, even though every ounce of
brain matter told me this is a
scam. Today, I received a letter,
and as I suspected, she needs
money because of an unexpected
mishap. She wrote, "Only $5,000
is needed and I will be in your
arms in a few days." I will not be
writing her back except to say,
"No way"
I realize now that in her entic-
ing letters, she never referred di-
rectly to anything I wrote to her.
This is because these letters have
been copied and pasted. She (or
he) probably devotes many hours
to working on ways to relieve me
and other lonely fools of their life
savings.
Warn men to keep their savings
in the bank and meet real women
our own age here at home. If it
sounds too good to be true, it


probably is. Lonely Old Fobol
Dear Lonely: You are not a
fool. You are lonely, yes, and
hopeful of finding love again. But
you are also smart enough to rec-
ognize a scam when you see one.
We wish you the best of luck in
finding someone who will truly
make you happy
Dear Annie: I understand why
"Over-Seventy Attitude" doesn't
care for email cards. Here's an
even more egregious etiquette
error
After attending the wedding of
a relative, we received a pre-
printed card saying, "Thanks for
sharing in our day and for your
gift, Love (names)." Not even a
personal signature, never mind
an acknowledgement of the ac-
tual (generous) gift. We would
have opted for a personal email
any day.- Baffled


Annie's Mailbox is written by
Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar,
longtime editors of the Ann Lan-
ders column. Please email your
questions to
anniesmailbox@comcast.net, or
write to: Annie's Mailbox, c/o
Creators Syndicate, 737 3rd
Street, Hermosa Beach, CA
90254. To find out more about
Annie's Mailbox and read fea-
tures by other Creators Syndi-
cate writers and cartoonists,
visit the Creators Syndicate Web
page at www.creators.com.


KABEST
JI THE ORIOL-E BOUGHT A
I MANOR IN BALTIMORE,
MARYL-AN, BECAU5E
TCANIT HWA THIS.
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
T l -- suggested by the above cartoon.
Ans: AN IL
(Answers Monday)
Yesterday's Jumbles: AWARE WHILE BEAUTY GATHER
Answer: Helen Hunt was anxious to star in "Twister"
after the script BLEW HER AWAY


SBridge

PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

Once every 10 years or so, I bring this deal out of
mothballs. It causes much consternation, with the
right play not being spotted until a mulligan (a do-
over). Each time, though, one student has quickly
seen the right play and made the contract. This
year, it was Peggy Wolcott of Vero Beach, Fla.
How did she play in six clubs after West led the
spade two to her ace?
When East opened four spades, usually showing
a good eight-card suit with offensive, not defen-
sive, values, South had a problem. But she knew
that in spades either the dummy would be short or
West wouldn't have one to lead. This made six
clubs a logical gamble. It was all North's fault: A
decent partner would have had a trump or two!
West's opening lead confirmed the 8-1 spade
break. (If West had begun with two spades, he
would have led the higher one.) But how could de-
clarer avoid two spade losers? How could she get
into the dummy to cash those red-suit kings?
Wolcott saw the only way She cashed two rounds
of trumps, learning that West had begun with four.
Next she took a third top trump and both red-suit
aces. Then she led the club three. West took the
trick with his seven and had to lead a red card, giv-
ing declarer access to the dummy
As you probably spotted, though, West could
have been the genius, dropping his five, six and
seven of clubs under South's ace, king and queen.
Then he would have underplayed declarer's club
three with his two, leaving South to lose two spade
tricks at the end. However, no one has ever found
that defense.


ACROSS
1 Low-lying
clouds
4 Santa
winds
7 Common
amphibian
11 Ms. Lupino
12 Quark's home
13 Type of
seaman
14 Duffer's rental
(2 wds.)
16 Lettuce piece
17 Air traffic gear
18 The the
limit!
19 Here, for
monsieur
20 Crack safes
21 Maurice's
thanks
24 Monotony
27 A sib
28 Pleased sighs
30 Annoying
insect
32 Graceful
steed


2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


C8 SATURDAY, MARCH 31, 2012


ENTERTAINMENT


y






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Garfield


IM A ) THERE I
( hELP
MOOSE

For Better or For Worse





For Better or For Worse


WHAT WAS
IT LIKE
LIVING IN









Sally Forth -


TERE WERE#fMAMY9
(PHOGE, OU If WAG
ALlAYA A LIVE A VER(Z
0 THE OTHER, EAUDT


WERE
T1ERs IZO. \
MowKEYr? WR -
EVERYONE
WORE HATG
6ACKTKE!N.


',-7,f,- >


"TELL ME ONE GOOD
"T-HING RaOLrlHE-K
S BEIZONHF!RRE.
K RELATioNSHlP.'


Beetle Bailey


Dilbert
I I-rl


I SPENT FOUR MONTHS
CREATING THIS APP,
MOM. I THINK I CAN
SELL A MILLION OF
THEM FOR P3.99.







The Born Loser


I SAW SEVEN APPS
JUST LIKE THIS IN
THE APP STORE AND
FIVE OF THEM LJERE
FREE.


Kit 'N' Carlyle Rubes


The Grizzwells


Blondie
--AGWOOD! THERE ARE I CAN'T BELIEVE IT! SO WHY OON'T I BELIEVE THAT?'
WO SLICES OF PIZZ THOSE .J 5 -
S MISSING F;or.' a lT : [I NiE-'

I ') -r_ - / "^ -" F ANOTHE ,.
.- PIECE IG 9, .
-.' "^ -' I ~/* ..--=1 NOW! ,'- .
J I -- r.- _'- I. *--- PLL EEEZ 1 , .


-- '*, .- -, -'-

Dennis the Menace The Family Circus


"Poor Mommy. When she was little
she had to lick her stamps."


Doonesbury Flashback

I HAP TO HIRE SC 1Et
POP, WHILE- YOU COLLEGE KIPs TO ,
SXWERE OFF BABY- PIE BAHRAIN 1H,. 4
SITTING, THINGS I FOCUSEP Or1
JUST EXPL OPEP YEMEN... I
AROUND HERE... .


S"J ,--


Big Nate

PLAYING ON THE
SAME TEAM WILL
BE THE MOST TIME
WE'VE SPENT TO-
GETHER SINCE WE
BROKE UP.
WHA-? HOLD IT'





Arlo and Janis -


WE NEVER "BROKE UP,"
KIM, BECAUSE WE
WERE NEVER GOING
OUT IN THE FIRST
PLACE! WAKE UP
To REALITY!


IT'5 BEEN INTENSE. WHO 6;A5 600SE
KNEW SO MANY OF OUR IN. CHOC
ATTENTION AL AT ONC? ESK. \ YOU AT
SNN '






F' >~I^F ^


SO WHAT I JUST
HEARD YOU SAY WAS:
WE NEVER. BROKE UP.
/V----


CRIPES. OUR LOVE IS
A RED-HOT
I. FLAME THAT
CAN NEVER BE
EXTINGUISHED.
W ^nOWZA!'


Betty


Frank & Ernest


Today's MOVIES


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377
"Wrath of the Titans" (PG-13) In real 3D. 1:50 p.m.,
4:50 p.m., 7:50 p.m., 10:35 p.m. No passes.
"Mirror Mirror" (PG) 1:20 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m.,
10:30 p.m.
"The Hunger Games" (PG-13) 1 p.m., 1:30 p.m.,
4:05 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7:10 p.m., 7:40 p.m., 10:15
p.m., 10:40 p.m. No passes.
"21 Jump Street" (R) ID required. 1:05 p.m., 4:20
p.m., 7:15 p.m., 10:25 p.m.
"Dr. Seuss' The Lorax" (PG) In Real 3D. 2 p.m.,
4:15 p.m., 7 p.m., 9:15 p.m. No passes.

Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Wrath of the Titans" (PG-13) In real 3D. 1:50 p.m.,
4:20 p.m., 4:50 p.m., 7:20 p.m., 7:50 p.m., 9:50 p.m.,
10:20 p.m. No passes.
"Mirror Mirror" (PG) 1:10 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:10 p.m.,


9:45 p.m.
"The Hunger Games" (PG-13) 1 p.m., 1:30 p.m., 4
p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 10:10 p.m., 10:40
p.m. No passes.
"21 Jump Street" (R) ID required. 1:55 p.m., 4:55
p.m., 7:55 p.m., 10:25 p.m.
"A Thousand Words" (PG-13) 1:40 p.m., 4:40 p.m.,
7:40 p.m., 10 p.m.
"John Carter" (PG-13) In Real 3D. 1:20 p.m. No
passes.
"Dr. Seuss' The Lorax" (PG) 4:05 p.m., 9:40 p.m.
"Dr. Seuss' The Lorax" (PG) In Real 3D. 1:05 p.m.,
7:05 p.m. No passes.
"Gone" (PG-13) 2 p.m., 5 p.m., 8 p.m., 10:15 p.m.

Visit www.chronicleonline.com for area movie listings
and entertainment information.


Times subject to change; call ahead.


WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious
WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Contemp.
WXOF-FM 96.3 Adult Mix
WEKJ FM 96.7, 103.9 Religious


Local RADIO WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk
WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WSKY 97.3 FM News Talk WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s, '60s, '70s
WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WRZN-AM 720 Adult Standards


Peanuts


Pickles


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: 1. slenbe S


"K PHOR YKX FKX ZRKMX YTMR UMTY


K UTTZHON CEROSHTX SNKX K UTTZ


FKX ZRKMX UMTY K PHOR KXOPRM."


AMEFR ZRR

Previous Solution: "Love is a special word, and I use it only when I mean it. You say
the word too much and it becomes cheap." Ray Charles
(c) 2012 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 3-31


COMICS


SATURDAY, MARCH 31, 2012 C9















CI CITRUSCUY)COUNTY CR L





CH ONICLE Classifieds

www.chronicleonline.com Classifieds In Print and Online All The Time!


BUSINESS HOURS:

MONDAY-FRIDAY

8:00 A.M. 5:00 P.M.

CLOSED SATURDAY/SUNDAY



WE GLADLY ACCEPT

VI"SA^-J~ f


Publication Days/Deadlines

Chronicle / Daily.................................... 1 PM, Daily
Homefront / Sunday...............................3 PM, Friday
Chronicle / Sunday.............................4...4 PM, Friday
Chronicle / Monday............................4...4 PM, Friday
Sumter County Times / Thursday............ 11 AM, Tuesday
Riverland News / Thursday.....................2 PM, Monday
South Marion Citizen / Friday..................4 PM, Tuesday
West Marion Messenger / Wednesday.......4 PM, Friday


5 PC SECTIONAL
W/ 2 END RECLINERS
neutral colors, good
condition $250
(352) 382-0005

APACHE
Pop up camper, sleeps
6, stove, sink, alum.
windows, good cond.
$950 (352) 637-5755
CHINA HUTCH BY
LANE open top/closed
bottom; 5-quarters pine,
dark finish, Early Ameri-
can style. Matches dining
table & 4 chairs. $300.
352-634-4906
Combo
Bumper, Pool, & Card
table, oak finish
$800
(352) 465-2928
DINING TABLE &
4 CHAIRS BY LANE
5-quarters pine, dark fin-
ish, Early American style.
Great condition! $330.
352-634-4906

Homos/Cinn.RidgeH
uge Sale
Sat Sun 9-3
5905 WAllspice PI in

INVERNESS
Saturday 31st, 8am
GREAT STUFF*
7686 E. SHORE DRIVE

LECANTO
SAT. 31 10a-5:30p
BIG SALE *
719 S. Otis Avenue
(352) 422-3043

Noritake China
service for 8, includes 2
service pieces,
matching goblets,
$300 cash
(352) 503-7875
RV SUPPLIES
Misc. Supplies, pig tails,
Sewer hoses,
patio sun scrn ETC.
$150 cash for all
(352) 503-7875
Solid Oak Table,
made in Canada
$250. Ethan Allen China
Cabinet, 4 glass doors,
7T, 5'W, 18/2' D$500
352-344-8886
SUGARMILL WOODS
Twin Bed, Dresser,
swivel rocker, 2 chests,
night stand, cherry ent.
center & Misc. 382-4557




$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
Paid for Junk Vehicles,
J.W. 352-228-9645
$$ CASH PAID $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$

$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not*
CASH PAID $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191




5 male adult cats
nuet. 1 female kitten
Shepherd & lab mix
(352) 216-6668

Blue Ticket Hound
male, nuet. 5 yo. UTD
on shots, needs fence
he is a runner, owner
passed.(352) 795-3835


Free Cocker Spaniel
7 months old. female
(352) 257-9786
Free Dog
to good home
6 yrs, mixed, female
(352) 586-7797
FREE HORSE MANURE
GREAT FOR GARDENS
EASY ACCESS
Pine Ridge
746-3545
FREE HORSE MANURE.
Pine Ridge area. Call my
cell 516-635-7082. Tim
Free Jacuzzi
4-5 person
In pretty good shape
Needs motor
(352) 302-1690
Free To Great Home
Wheaten Terrier
Mixed breed, male
801b Great farm dog.
(352) 345-3507
Fresh cut palm logs 12"
diameter 6' in length,
good for carving etc -
Crystal River
(352) 795-8800
KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Savage Pays top $$$.
352-628-4144
PUPPIES
PITBULL MIX
8 wks old, black &
white, to good home
(352) 476-2099
taking all donations
clothing,baby
stuff,shoes,purses,ect,all
kinds of stuff please call
Jamie @ 586-9754
Who says.."There's No
Such Thing As A Free
Lunch"? They're Wrong!
Adults, need to eat or
need fellowship?
Teens, want Free Food
and Fun?
FREE LUNCH Saturday
from 11am-1pm
Uth Center Open
1:00-4:00pm
Come As You Are!(But
Expect To Be Changed!)
Living Water Ministries
1 Beverly Hills Blvd.
(Cor. RTE 491)
Beverly Hills, FL 34465



BORDER COLLIE
Female/ 40l1bs lost
in Floral City near
S.Turner Ave &
StageCoach rd.
(352) 220-2540
Driver's License
Richard Baker of
Dunnellon
(352) 795-9821
Family Antique
Cameo Ring
Inverness Area
REWARD
(352) 419-5549
Lost Dog
Husky, white w/red tips
Near Gospel Is. & 44
(352) 586-8917
LOST DOG,
White Chihuahua,
black marking, I eye,
needs asthma meds
REWARD
West Riverbend area,
(352) 220-6272







REWARD $1000.
No Questions ask.
Min Pin Female 10 Ibs
name Zoey, Needs
meds. last seen Sun 8/7
Holiday Dr off Turkey
Oak Crystal River
(352)257-9546400-1519


Long Haired Gray Cat
off Grover Cleveland
REWARD
(352) 628-0236
LOST OLD SEIKO DIVERS
WATCH, black rubber
strap, lost between 2:15
and 3:15pm on Sat.
March 24, 2012 during
prom picture taking at
Park, by Liberty walk.
Inverness. Reward.
Call (352) 586-0939



Found black and white
male cat in Beverly Hills
please call to Identity
231-597-6577 Thank
you he misses his
Mommy...




Huge discounts when
you buy 2 types of
advertising! 122
weekly newspapers,
32 websites, 25 daily
newspapers. Call
now to diversify your
advertising with Ad-
vertising Networks of
Florida
(866)742-1373

PRAYER TO THE
BLESSED VIRGIN
(Never known to fail)
0 most beautiful
flower of Mt. Cara-
mel, fruitful vine,
splendor of heaven.
Blessed Mother of
the Son of God,
Immaculate Virgin,
assist me in my
necessity. 0 Star of
the Sea, help me and
show me here you
are my motherO 0
Holy Mary, Mother of
God, Queen of
Heaven and Earth, I
humbly beseech you
from the bottom of
my heart to secure
me in my necessity.
(Make request).
There are none that
can withstand your
power. O Mary, con-
ceived without sin,
pray for us who have
recourse to thee.
(3 times). Holy Mary,
I place this causein
your hands (3 times).
Say this prayer for 3
consecutive days
and then you must
publish and it will be
granted to you.
LH,




FRESH JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct.@ $5 per lb
Stone Crab@ $6 per lb
delivered 727-771-7500



Wanted to Buy
Treadmill, basic is ok
call me with info
(352) 795-7206




Citrus Springs
Busy Salon Seeks

F.T. Exp. Nail Tech.
(352) 489-4477

Serenity Day Spa
Wanted Experienced
HAIR DESIGNER
We have clients wait-
ing for you
GUARANTEED $$$$
(352) 746-1156


O00AN34

Sudoku ****** 4puz.como


83 6


4 9 8


1 57


9 6 5


5 _4


1 2 7


64 5


_3 __9 6


-5 1 84

Fill in the squares so that each row, column, and
3-by-3 box contain the numbers 1 through 9.


BATTERIES: BATTERY REBUILD SERVICES:
Laptop / GPS Cordless Power Tools
Cell / Cordless Phone U.P.S. Backup
Camera I Camcorder Cordless Vacuums
- Watch I Electronics Custom Battery Rebuild
-Wheelchair / Scooter _, I,
Rechargeables / Chargers I ate1
AirsoftlRC I tC.

3850 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy, Inverness

New Store Hours: Mon.-Fri. gam-5pm, Saturday 10am-5pm & Closed Sunday

L (352) 344-1962 Mention this coupon get a free LED flashlight


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aelvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)

AVANTE
AT INVERNESS
is looking for a
Full time RN Wound
Care Nurse. Mon-Fri
And
Full time MDS
Coordinator must
be an RN Mon-Fri
PLEASE CONTACT
Jennifer Daves at
352-726-3141
Or apply online
Avantecenters.com

Avante
At Inverness
looking for a full time
Maintenance/
Housekeeper Director
To oversee and
direct the functioning
of the facility building
systems. Must be
knowledgeable of
Safety regulations
and National Fire
Protection in a health
care environment.
apply online at
Avantecenters.com
Or Fax Resume to
Mark Daniels
352-637-0330

C.N.A.s
Full Time & Part time
If you are ready to
brighten up your
career, join our c
aring, dedicated
team. Now hiring on
3-11 & 11-7 shifts with
excellent benefits
Applyv in person at:
ARBOR TRAIL REHAB
611 Turner Camp Rd,
Inverness
An EEO/AA Employer
M/F/V/D

CNA PART TIME
Sunday and Thursday
7AM-7PM in my home.
Call 352-637-5537.


F/T Activities Ass't
Opportunity exists for
that very special
person to join a truly
unique, top-drawer
activities dept.! Our
team's qualities
include high energy,
boundless creativity,
keen interpersonal
skills and a genuine
compassion for the
elderly. Does that
sound like YOU?
Bring your experience
and resume' to
SHIRLEY LOCH,
Life Inrichment
Coordinator
Diamond Ridge
Health & Rehab Cntr
where our resident's
smiles are enhanced
every single day!
2730 W. Marc
Knighton Ct. Lecanto,
Florida 34461
352-746-9500 ext. 728

IMMEDIATE
OPENINGS
LPN & RN's
for Correctional and
Hospice RN's for
Hospitals Med/Surg
and ICU
APPLY IN PERSON
2008 Hwy 44 W,
Inverness, Or Online
www.nurse-temps
.com, 352-344-9828

LPN's
Full & Part time
We are expanding
our Nursing Services
Looking for experi-
enced nurse leaders
to join our exciting
team. 7-3 & 11-7
shifts available
Excellent benefits
Applyv in Person:
ARBOR TRAIL REHAB
611 Turner Camp Rd.
Inverness, FL Or email
resume to: atdon@
southernLTC.com
An EEO/AA Employer
M/F/V/D


CNA/HHA's
Apply At
HOME INSTEAD
SENIOR CARE
4224 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Lecanto

MEDICAL BILLERS
& CODERS ARE IN
DEMAND
Train to become a
Medical Office Assis-
tant! No Experience
needed! Job Training
& Local Placement
assistance. HS
Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)374-7294

Medical Office
looking for
FT team member
w/receptiont/scheduling/i
nsurance exp
fax resume
352-746-5605

Part time Clerk
Must have good, ac-
curate computer
and clerical skills, and
be able to answer a
multi line telephone.
Apply in Person
NO PHONE CALLS
CYPRESS COVE
CARE CENTER
700 SE 8TH AVENUE
Crystal River FOE




BOOKKEEPER

Able to process A/P's,
A/R's, Bank Recs, and
J/E thru trial balance.
Proficient with
accounting/inventory
Software and MS Excel
a must. Needed Mon
thru Fri for a wholesale
plumbing store located
in Inverness, FL. Send
resume to:
jandjweathers@wind-
stream.net
CASE MANAGER
Bachelor's degree
from an accredited
college or university
in the field of coun-
seling, social work,
psychology, rehabili-
tation, special
education or in a re-
lated human services
field is preferred.
All interested
candidates, please
apply in person or
submit resume to
Cypress Creek, 2855
W Woodland Ridge
Dr. Lecanto, FL 34461

Commercial
CSR
Exp'd in all
commercial lines,
220 or 440
lic. req'd .fax resume
to 352-726-2363 or
email fields@
thehagergroup.com

INSURANCE
AGENTS

220 or 440 Licensed
Insurance Agents
needed Immediate
openings for Sales
Producer or Cus-
tomer Service Repre-
sentative. Full time or
Pt time possibilities.
Great Salary, bene's
& bonuses. Email
resume to Tracy Fero
tfero@feroinsurance.
com or call
352-422-2160

STEEL DETAILER

for structural steel
fabricator in
Homosassa, must
have exp. with auto
cad, or other steel de-
tailing software and
have exp. stairs and
railings as well as
structural steel
Send Resume to:
352-628-2600




EXP. LINE COOK,
Needed for Inverness
Golf & Country Club.
Fax Resume to:
352-726-3559

Experienced Chef
With Line Experience
Parttime Friday Nights
Mandatory Contact
George Kanaris @
352-464-4216 or Call
Bill @ 727-856-7302




AC SALES
Will train right person,
easy six figure income
Must have val. fl. DL,
Barb 352-726-1002




DRIVERS
Hometime Choices:
Express lanes
Weekly, 7/ON-7/OFF,
14/ON-7/OFF. WEEKLY
Full and Parttime. Dry
and Refrigerated, New
Trucks! CDL-A 3 months
recent experience re-
quired. Top Benefits!
(800)414-9569
www.driveknight.com


CNC Machinest
Must be quality orien-
ted, 5 yrs. exp. pre-
ferred. May train the
right person Crystal
River Area 422-6086
DRIVERS: RUN
5 STATES REGIONAL!
Get Home Weekends,
earn up to 39cent mile,
1 yr OTR Flatbed Exp.
required. SUNBELT
TRANSPORT, LLC
800-572-5489 X 227
DRIVERS: RUN
5 STATES REGIONAL!
Get Home Weekends,
earn up to 39cent mile,
1 yr OTR Flatbed Exp.
required. SUNBELT
TRANSPORT, LLC
800-572-5489 X 227
EAGL BUICK
GMC, Inc
Is in need of
experienced
automotive service
consultants/advisors.
One of the best deal-
ership pay plans in
the county. Minimum
2 yrs experience
preferred. Great
opportunity for one to
find a career path,
and earn a great
living. Very produc-
tive repair facility and
a professional
environment with
plenty of growth po-
tential in a growing
community. Benefits.
Drug Free Workplace.
Application Available
@ Eagle Buick GMC
Inc. Send Resume:
Fax (352) 417-0944
Email
robbcole@eagle
buickgmc.com

EXP. MECHANIC
Clean Drivers License
Tools a Plus.
Apply in Person:
WALLY'S
806 NE US19 Cry Riv.
Exp.Marine Parts &
Accessories Mgr.
Apply in Person
at
Homosassa
Marine
3120 S.
Suncoast Blvd
Homosassa, Fl.
34448
GLAZIERS
wanted for Crystal
River High School
Project. Experience
only need apply.
Background check
will be done on
all applicants.
Contact Ted Mathis @
(352) 316-5759
after 5 p.m. wkdays.
HIRING EXPERIENCE/
INEXPERIENCE TANKER
DRIVERS!
Great benefits and
Pay! New fleet Volvo
Tractors! 1 year OTR
Exp. Req.- Tanker Train-
ing Available. Call
Today: 877-882-6537
www.OaklevTransport
.com


AutoTechnician
Min. 5 years, exp.
with tools, Automotion,
Floral City 352-341-1881

IRRIGATION
LABORER
Clean Fla license. Exp
preferred. Drug Free
Work Place
352-746-4451
NEW TO TRUCKING?
Your new career starts
now! *0 Tuition Cost*No
Credit Check* Great
Pay & Benefits, Short
employment commit-
ment required
call (866)297-8916
www.ioinCRST.com
PIANO/
KEYBOARDIST
Needed at Hernando
United Methodist Ch.
Call 726-7245
For application.

STEEL DETAILER
for structural steel
fabricator in
Homosassa, must
have exp. with auto
cad, or other steel
detailing software
and have exp. stairs
and railings as well as
structural steel
Send Resume to:
352-628-2600








TOOLMAKER
NEED PANTOGRAPH
EXP. FORM GRINDER,
A/C SHOP, BENEFITS,
TURBINE BROACH CO.
(352) 795-1163




$$$$$$
$$$$$$$$
Money is available
with this great part
time job! 7 days a
week, 4-5 hours per
day, early morning
hours, delivering
newspapers to
homes. Must be 18
years old and have
valid driver's license
and insurance. Email
kstewart@chroni-
cleonline.com.

25 Driver Trainees
Needed Now!
at Schneider National
Earn $750 per week!
No experience
needed! Local CDL
Training! Job ready in
15 days!
(888)368-1964

BOAT MANUF.
F/fdependabl,hardworkng
for gen. fiber-
glass work. & sanding,
table/jig saw use.
Exp.preferred. Apply in
person w/references.
131 Hwy. 19N-lnglis


8 3 5 S1 1 8 7 2 |


162573498
9 2 6 4 5 7a 83 1
751832649
3 84 9 162 5 7
2 9 8 7 6 4 3 1 5
54 73 819226
61 32 95784


Drivers Wanted: A-CDL
w/hazmat
Compay& 0/0's.
OTR/Regional Runs. Lots
of Freight to move! Call
(877)893-9645

Exp. AC Installers
Own Tools & Truck,
TOP PAY, Call Barb
(352) 726-1002

Exp. Appt. Setters
Top Pay, Hrly. Clean
work enviontment
Barb (352) 726-1002


***AA******
F/T ALUMINUM
SALES REP.
Send Resume To:
Citrus Co Chronicle
Blind Box 1762P... 1624
N. Meadowcrest Blvd.
Crystal River Fl. 34429

Great opportunity
Looking for
motivated team
player to join Optical
Dept. at Homosassa
Eye Clinic, will train,
excellent benefits.
Please Fax Resume
352-628-6377
or Email hec@
drsnewcomer.com

Laundry
Attendant.
Sewing exp. a plus
Apply in Person Only
118 S. Apopka Ave.
Inverness

LOOKING for
a F/T Employee
w/current knowledge
of floor covering busi-
ness. Must have exp. &
good work history.
valid D.L and reliable
transp. a must call
302-6123 for more info

MAINTENANCE
PERSON

Experienced
preferred.
Apply in person
Best Western
Crystal River

P/T Pool Cleaner
for Upscale Golf &
Country Club
Community
Apply in Person
@ Terra Vista
2125 W Skyview
Crossing, Hernando.


SCREEN PRINTERS
starting pay $9 pr hr
(352) 794-5402



#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)
Drive 4 Melton Top
Pay & CSA Friendly
Equip 2 Mos. CDL
Class A Driving Exp
(877)258-8782www.me
Itontruck.com/
drive



AIRLINES ARE HIRING -
Train for hands on
Aviation Maintenance
Career. FAA approved
program.
Financial aid if qualified
- Housing Available.
CALL Aviation Institute
Of Maintenance.
(866)314-3769
AIRLINES ARE HIRING -
Train for hands on
Aviation Maintenance
Career. FAA approved
program.
Financial aid if qualified
- Housing Available.
CALL Aviation Institute
Of Maintenance.
(866)314-3769



"Can you Dig It?"
Heavy Equipment
School, 3 wk training
program. Backhoes,
Bulldozers, Trackhoes.
Local Job placement
asset. Start digging
dirt Now.
(877)994-9904



TAYLOR COLLEGE


NE W


2 WEEK
PREP COURSES!
*ALF ADMINISTRATOR
$300.
*EKG TECH $475.
*NURSING ASST. $475.
*PHLEBOTOMY $475.
tavlorcolleae.edu
(352) 245-4119
FB, twitter, you tube


Team Delivery



Opportunity v



Would you like to

deliver newspapers

but don't want to

work 7 days a week? :



We are taking applications

for teams to contract a

route.

V Lead contractor must

be 18 yrs of age

V Must have valid driver's

license and insurance




MAKE EXTRA MONEY!

DELIVERING
cl . ... .r y

I HRONICle
% www.chronicleontine.com


Email:
kstewart@chronicleonline.com
or come to
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River for an application.


~ I
kvA^^ll I k'd^o]JJ :B
TO AD^VERTIS CALL


352m5P 63lm5f9l6l6i^^

OR PLA CE YOUR AD ONLr| j INE1 ATTTriiB


www^hronclenlin^co


(ONETIG HERIH


C 10 SATURDAY, MLARCH 31, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED












CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


"Can you Dig It?"
Heavy Equipment
School, 3 wk training
program. Backhoes,
Bulldozers, Trackhoes.
Local Job placement
asset. Start digging
dirt Now.
(877)994-9904

#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aefvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)
r NOW O

ENROLLING
I FOR SPRING
| 2012 CLASSES
-'BARBER
COSMETOLOGY
wI FULL SPECIALTY
* TRAINING
rIMANICURE/Nail Ext
wrMASSAGE THERAPY

BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
NEWPORT RICHEY
/SPRING HILL
727-848-8415
352-263-2744





Antique Auction
Sat. March 31 @ 1PM
View Fri. 9-5 & Sat10-1
811 SE US Hwy 19
Crystal River
Jewelry, Sterling,
Hummels & LLadros
Professional App & Liq
Fudge ab1131au1593
352-795-2061
charliefudge.com
13%BP(-3forcash)
Cash/Cks/MC/VI


Colectble


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





JACUZZI HOT TUB. 2-4
person swirled green and
white tub,wood
exterior,with cover,used
seldom.Kept
inside.Excellent
condition.$950.00.call
352-344-4635. phone


ESTATE
WASHER/DRYER SET
by Westinghouse, Xtra
Heavy Duty Lg Capacity,
EXCELLENT cond, white.
Value $800, yours for
$500 obo, til 4/8 only.
www.4saleinfl.com for
pix&more. 352-246-8736
GE Built In Micro wave
Black $100.Kenmore
gas dryer, like new $75.
(352) 382-2942
MICROWAVE
Whirlpool, over
range, 1000 watt
$75 (352) 522-1949
MINI FRIDGE magic chef
black and grey looks and
works great 30.00
352-503-7365 dennis
REFRIGERATOR
26 cu ft side by side GE
Profile, top of the line.
Water/Ice thru the door.
Great condition. $697.00
Call: 352-860-0419
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR, washers
dryers,FREE pick up
352-564-8179

YOU'LL v THIS!
SMOOTH-TOP RANGE.
Like new. $400.00.
Frigidaire Elec. 30"
Slide-in range, 4 burn-
ers with self-cleaning
oven. Call:
352-628-5770
WANTED DEAD
OR ALIVE
Washers & Dryers
(352) 209-5135
WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 Each. Reliable,
like new, Excellent condi-
tion. Can deliver.
352 263-7398




Executive Office Chair
Black Vinyl
Excel. Cond. $40. obo
(352) 344-1953
FILE CABINET
Cole Steel, 3 drawer file
cabinet w/door and
combo safe inside
asking $100
(352) 382-1167
SENTRY FIREPROOF
SAFE Survivor 1, Inside
12x10x4 inches,
With 1 key.Can email
photo. $15 352-726-9983




2 AUCTIONS
THURS. March 29
Estate Adventure
Auction -3PM
Antique prep week.
Loads of fun outside
From furn. to tools,
household & Plants
SUN. APRIL 1
Antique & Collectible
Auction 1PM
$4K + Silver coins,
Victorian to Eastlake
furn., Hummels, Minton,
Fossils. Always Irg.
selection. See website
for more info.:
DudleysAuction.com
4000 S. Fla. Ave.
(US 41-S) Inverness
(352) 637-9588
AB1667-AU2246
12% BP-2/ ca.disc


225 Amp. Lincoln
armeture fan cooled,
runs good $250.
Burning Torch, hose,
gauges bottles & cart,
$150 (352) 344-0084
Black & Decker
power saw $50.
Shop master table saw
$150.(352) 628-5561
New Troybuilt
Generator,
5550 watts, 8550 start-
ing watts new $799 sell
$499.& misc tools
(352) 628-5561
Portable Generator
B&S 10HP 5 gal tank,
8,550 starting watts,
5,550 Watts, New, 2 hrs.
use all paper work



Sears 10" Band Saw 3.5
opening $100
Sears 16" scroll saw
$100(352) 746-6369
Ryobi 14amps
COMPOUND Miter Saw
with laser & bag, 2
months old, new in box
$135 (352) 795-7513
Shopsmith w/ Band
Saw & Extra's
$600. (3) ladders
8' step. $35. 8' ext
ladders $40. 6' step$20.
(352) 746-5739
Wood Midi Lathe Delta
Cast Iron bed extention
new belt, no access.
Exc cond. $250 firm
(352) 637-7248



AUTO POWER CON-
VERTER Cyber Power,
12 volts DC to 120 volts
AC up to 140 watts. Like
new $25 352 726 9983
COMPUTER
DELL Desktop, windows,
XP, office $100.
Compaq Laptop win-
dows XP $100/352
628-6806 228-0568
DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469


DIGITAL PICTURE
FRAME 7 inch with re-
mote and SD photo card.
Like new $25 Can email
photo. 352 726 9983
HP Computer
w/tower $120.
Tower only $70.
(352)586-6891



HONDA ENGINE
New in Box. 5.5 h.p.
Vertical Shaft
$100 Firm
352-422-0201



7 Piece Cast
Aluminum Patio Set
Tempered glass table,
2 swivel & 4 cushion
chairs, like new $350.
(352) 344-5250
PATIO COFFEE TABLE
WICKER LOOK
W/GLASS TOP AND
LOWER SHELF $30
634-2004
Patio Set
9pcs Deluxe, like new
almond color $1200
new sell $200
(352) 476-7973



****DINING TABLE****
42" ROUND BLACK
GLOSS PAINT $45
634-2004
5 PC SECTIONAL
W/ 2 END RECLINERS
neutral colors, good
condition $250
(352) 382-0005
8 ft, couch pillow back,
beige fabric, ends re-
cline, quick sale,
perfect cond. $100.
(352) 220-6823
92" Sofa, Dark Wood
w/ light tan fabric
5 pillows included
$300
(352) 503-2413
Bassett Ent Center
3pcs. W/ 9' perf. cond.
beautiful wood $600
Sofa, pwr reclining both
ends, ultra suede, sage
color 2/2 y.o. $450
Bakers Rack hvy, dk
grn. metal wood shelf
$100.(352) 795-6767
BED Full size Mattress
& Box Spring. Excellent
cond. Clean-Non-Smoker
$85 352-400-0501
BEIGE VINYL
RECLINER Swivel vinyl
very clean. $75.00
352-257-5722 for details
Big Man Recliner
med brown, 3 mos old.
$275. TV Table pecan
wood,holds up to 55"
LCD $180. (574)
242-2581/946-6286
Bookcase, solid cherry
woodexcelcond.
6ft, tall, 6 shelves $125.
Small slant antique
desk, excel. cond. $75.
(352) 489-9986
CHINA HUTCH BY
LANE open top/closed
bottom; 5-quarters pine,
dark finish, Early Ameri-
can style. Matches dining
table & 4 chairs. $300.
352-634-4906


CLASSIFIED













COMFORTS OF
HOME
USED FURNITURE
www. com-
fortsofhomeused
furniture.com. 795-0121
Dinette Table
4 chairs metal base,
glass top
matching wine rack
w/2 glass shelves $150.
(352) 527-0721
Dining Rm. Set, me-
dium oak, china hutch,
table with 7 chairs,
server table, rocker
and 2 bar stools, excel.
cond. $600
352-563-2493
DINING ROOM SET W/
EXT. Ashley Lattice Col-
lection, Cherry, 41x71 ",
2 back arm chairs, 4
bck side chairs $800
(352) 726-5379
DRESSER Powder blue
wood, matching mirror.
Satin nickel hardware.
Like new. $85 OBO
484-357-7150
DRESSERS
White Dresser w/mirror
$35, Pecan triple
dresser w/mirror $50
(352) 726-2572
Ethan Allen Book Case
Bottom Storage $100
Dark Solid Pine Hutch
$125 (352) 564-0955
Grandmothers clock,
works, excel. cond.,
$125.
Antique, chase lounge
w/ cushion for outside
$75. (352) 489-9986
KITCHEN TABLE & 4
CHAIRS Oval, beige, one
leaf. Fabric chairs on
casters. Very nice. $100
OBO 484-357-7150
LADIES UPHOL-
STERED CHAIR Good
for LR/BR Tan
Good Cond.$40.00
352-422-0201
Lazy Boy multi colored
Sofa & Love Seat
2 recliners in each
piece, excel. cond.
$380. obo
(352) 746-2149
Leather Recliner,
Tan
$150.
(352) 489-3457
MOVING SALE
Stearns and Foster
Queen size Sofa Bed
Like new $325
Pecan Dining Table 6
chairs w/fabric seats
$425 (352) 382-1167
OAK HUTCH
Leaded glass doors on
top, 2 drawers, & 2
doors on bottom,
40" W 7ft High, $150
(352) 601-7363
PAUL'S FURNITURE
Open Tues.- Sat 9-2
628-2306 Homosassa
paulsfurnitureonline.com
Pedestal Dining
table(2) leafs, 4 chairs
custom padding
"quality" $325.more info
(352) 527-9982


SATURDAY, MARCH 31, 2012 Cll


Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
352-628-0808
Queen Size
Sled bed ,head board
& foot board, box spr-
ing & mattress, Pd New
$1100 sell for $800 like
new(352) 527-2907
SOFA 96"Long x 40"
deep Klaussner sofa with
rolled arms. Burnt orange
microfiber with 7 pat-
terned throw pillows.
$500 352-637-6963
Sofa
Ethan Allen, very good
cond $200
Sugarmill Woods
(352) 382-4757
SOFA SLEEPER
& matching Love seat
Florida Style, exc cond
must sell $250 both obo
(484) 357-7150
Solid Oak Table,
made in Canada
$250. Ethan Allen China
Cabinet, 4 glass doors,
7'T 5'W, 181/" D $500
352-344-8886
SUGARMILL WOODS
Twin Bed, Dresser,
swivel rocker, 2 chests,
night stand, cherry ent.
center & Misc. 382-4557
Twin Size Day Bed
w/ mattress & match-
ing 6 drawer dresser w/
mirror. Excellent Cond.
$250obo (989)640-3419
Homosassa
WOOD CHAIR SMALL
1940'S STYLE CHAIR,
GREAT REFINISH
PROJECT $10 634-2004



2 lawn edgers, B&S en-
gine, $45 ea. Riding
mower, 46" cut, $350
(352) 344-1310, 8am-12
CHICKEN
MANURE/FERTILIZER
Time to Fertilize!! 20 lb.
bag only $4.00. 25 avail.
352-563-1519
GRASS SEEDS! GRASS
SEEDS! GRASS SEEDS!
American Farm & Feed
352-795-6013
HOSES (2) 25 ft, %/ in
marine hoses, $5 ea.(1)
50 ft, %/2 in coil hose.
$10, (1) 50 ft soaker $8.
All used once. 746-7355
Power Pro Riding
Mower 42" deck
4x8 utility trailer -
$400.
(352) 746-7357
REMINGTON PUSH
MOWER $75 Received 2
mowers,can't return.
NO gas/oil needed.
(352)746-3653
Sears Lawn Mower
$650
(352) 422-0942
Snapper Riding Mower
$400. Dixson 0 turn
riding mower $800.
(352) 746-7357
SOLD
IN 1 DAY
RIDING MOWER
CRAFTSMAN
42", 21.5 HP
6 Speed $425
352-287-4116
TORO 6.5 Self Pro-
pelled, 22" cut, with
bag. Excellent condi-
tion! $160.00
352-563-1519


3-31 LaughingStock International Inc, Dist by Universal UCIick for UFS, 2012

"I'm sorry, but a snapshot of you at
Niagara Falls is not proper identification."





TRACTOR WORK

$30 + $30/hr Mowing, Grading,

Lite Loader, Tree Work,

Cleanup, and Wood Fences

Licensed and Insured


352-270-6800


C RYSTAI RIVER
United Methodist
Women
"Trash N Teasure Sale
Fri Sat 8am
@4801 N Citrus Av.

CITRUS SPRINGS
Huge Yard Sale
Fri Sat & Sun 8-3p
antiques, pwr tool etc
3957 W. Ponciana S
W. Paradisea, I mi. N.
of C.S Blvd (cor ner)

/J:


Citrus Springs/3 family
Fr Sat Sun 8 a- 3p.
hsehld, tools, decor,
music.8920 N Barbados
Way. Citrus Spr.Blvd off
Boulton Rd.



CRYSTAL RIVER
MULTI-FAMILY
YARD SALE
Boating Community Yard
Sale: Saturday, March
31; 8:00 AM till 1:00 PM.
Hwy 19to NW 19th
Street, turn left and follow
the signs. LOTS OF
GOODIES!!


CITRUS SPRINGS
Sat9-4 Sun 9-2p furn.
misc.8509 N Titleist Dr.
Crystal River North
Sat. & Sun.9A-5P.M.
5597 Tirana Lane
Off Dunklin

NEIGHBORHOOD
SALE

FAIRVIEW

ESTATES
Sat, March 31st, 8 -1
28 Families
Ig appls, furn, electron-
ics, ofc, linens, clothes,
yard stuff, more
get map/list on
N. Annapolis Av @
Fairview Entrance
FLORAL CITY
Community Garage
Sale. Duval Island,
Crescent Lp, great
stuff, Don't miss this
one. Fri & Sat, March
30th, 31st 8am-2pm


MOVItG
S A L, E

Hernando
Sat 8-2p 3580 E. Onyx PI


Jade plant, large,
beautiful and healthy.
about 3 feet tall by
4 feet wide.$25.00.
352-212-2051





#1 BIG SALE
1000 cook books, etc
all must go!! 719 N.
Maynard Ave on the
corner of hwy 44 /2 mi
E. of Stokes Flea market
Fri Sat Sun 9a-5pm





(Yard & Garage Sale)
HOMOSASSA
Fri. & Sat. 8a-3p
Kenwood Oaks
5236 South Forest Terr

BEVERLY HILLS
Thurs Fri. 9-4p Sat 9-12
dolls, craft supplies,
finished crafts, me n's
pants 40 -42, women's
ex Ig petite, lots of lace
& trims, craft books, pa-
per backs, toaster oven
993 W. Catbrier Lane


SRVOUCHER


$5,000^^y1 WINNER?^1^^^^^^^


L BRING IN THIIS AD AND SEE -1


21


[4 IDY OLY 328m3I]


2200Stat'Rod 20]inrcal


I [e] CalJZ l 80Lr04 42I4 008,[,,JilZ !,ZIII I~




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


S SSSS


S S SS S S S Sa


Das Auto.


V.lkswuge nof0calabPesentSth











How much are gas prices these days?
At Volkswagen of Ocala we're giving gas away for
one year with the purchase of any New Volkswagen!


Carefree Maintenance!


3 Years or 36,000 Miles of No-Charge Scheduled Maintenance. Whichever occurs first. Some restrictions. See dealer or program for details. 1 year of gasoline based on EPA highway MPG estimate on 10K miles per year at $3.70
per gallon. 36 month leases, $1999 due at signing including $0 security deposit. Plus tax, tag, title and dealer fee. With approved credit. Three years or 36 thousand mile no-charge scheduled maintenance.
Some restrictions apply. *For a limited term on select models with approved credit. ltnterest accrues from date of purchase. See dealer for details. Offers expire 3/31/2012.


Volkswagen


3949 SW College Rd. Ocala
On SW College Road, Just West of 1-75
HOURS: Monday Friday: 8:30am-7pm Saturday: 9am-6pm


C12 SATURDAY, MARCH 31, 2012












CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




iW 0Open Tues-Sat 9a-5p frigidaire frost free.size A2OS irons. Right hand,
Homos/ Sugarm.Woods Furn, Appliances, tools, inside 45"h 23"w senior flex. 4 thru 7 hy-
Sat 8-1 p urn, hsehld, clothing, misc. Items, excl.cond.$100.00 more bnd. 8 thru SW. Recent
tools, generator & @ N. Maynard & Hwy 44 info call 352-746-0167 new grips. 2 Aces from
more 23 Bumelia Ct 1/4 mi E. of Stokes FLea VEHICLE MAT for Ford these clubs. $150. Call
Homos/Cinn.RidgeH Antique Ranger Expedition. $30.00 352 637 1842.
uge Sale Wood Burning Stove, 352-563-5206 GOLF DRIVER Nike
Satun 93 $160. WOOD FLOORING BY Sasquatch Sumo 10.5 R
5905W AllspicePl in (352) 364-3009 BRUCE, Planks 3 x3/8"x Diamana Graphite Std loft
5905W Allspice PI_ in Leave message random Med Oak 25 sq ft and lie Exc Cond+HC
HOMOSASSA AQUARIUM 25 GALLON NEW in box $59 email pic $50. Dunnellon 465-8495
5841 W Nobis Circle HIGH INCLUDES 352-382-3650 M 1 GRAND STOCK
HUGE Yard Sale! STAND, LIGHT, FILTER SETS:
Fri & Sat 8am 2pm AND GRAVEL $75.00 M1 GI stock set. DOD
TONS of Baby Clothes & 352-613-0529 cartouche & circle P on
Gear, Coke & Nascar
Collectibles, Princess BAR STOOLS PLUSH wnst. Ex. Condition.
House, Tools & MUCH RUST COLORED 4 WHEELED WALKER $145.00. No metal
more! SEATS FAIR SHAPE WITH SEAT AND Boyd's replacement set.
60.00 FOR BOTH BRAKES USED ONCE Ex condition. $100.00.
HOMOSASSA 464 0316 80.00 464 0316 No metal
INSIDE SALE Collectors Print of BEDSIDE COMMODE & 352-634-1120
Fri Sat 9-5 Antiques, Robert E. Lee w/docs FOLDING ALUMINUM I
collectibles & furniture $300.ladder $50. and WALKER ONLY 20.00 WE BUY GUNS
11707 W Bright Water Ct more @ Terra Vista EACH 464 0316 On Site Gun Smithing
HOMOSASSA (352) 249-7630 Folding ALUMINUM (352) 726-5238
Sat. 31, 9am-3pm COMFORTER SET HAN- WALKER & PORTABLE
Estate Sale! Must Sell! NAH MONTANA FULL COMMODE-BOTH LIKE ultlity
Executive cherry desk INCLUDES SHEETS & NEW CONDITION
incl'd sideboard, PILLOW CASES $40 $20 obo 637-3636
2 bookcases & cre- 352-613-0529 MANUAL WHEELCHAIR EZ PULL TRAILERS
denza, Sofas Lamps DISNEY PRINT -cert. WITH FOOTRESTS U
tools, golf & fish equip. no.838 of 2000-size ONLY 100.00 464 0316 New & Used
All kinds of Hshld items 18"by 24" $100.00 more SCOOTER- GOLDEN
7 Byrsonima Loop W. info call 352-527-9982 BUZZ AROUND, New Utility & Enclosed
Sugarmill Woods DS GAMES for Nintendo Battery, Used Little, BUY, SELL, TRADE
"DS $10-$15.00 $300 obo Custom Built, Parts,
352-563-5206 (352) 621-0672 Tires, Whls, Repairs,
FAN INDUSTRIAL -Trailer Hitches
DRUM 24 IN. 1/3 hp in- New 6 x 12 open
Inverness dustrial motor, 360 de- utility w/ramp $935
Fri Sat 8-3p Elvis gree tilt, 22 ga housing.
collectibles, hsehld & Like new. $75 746-7355 BUYING US COINS Trailer Tires from
misc. 1540 N. Paul Dr. FREE LUNCH Top $$$$ Paid. We Also $34.49
FREE LUNCH Buy Gold Jewelry
INVERNESS Adults, Teens, Kids Beating ALL Written
GFWC Woman's Club Saturday 11AM -1PM Offersting 2287676 Hwy44 Crystal River
Fri. 8-4, Sat 8-2 record Living Water Ministries Offers. (352) 228-7676 352-564-1299
player, tv's, sewing ma- 1 Beverly Hills Blvd. S -
chine w/cab, comput- FURNITURE;Treadmill$170/ob GULF TO LAKE
ers, scanners, bedding, o, Tanning Bed TRAILER SALES
quilts, Clothes, $300/obo, old tables
213 Hiawatha $75/obo, 6'x9' and Largest Selection &
INVERNESS 9'x12'florida rugs $160 Lowest Prices.
both, @ Terra Vista @ Offering New & Used
KIDNEY for Karen 352-249-7630 Cargo & utility trailers
Fund Raiser GRASS SEEDS! GRASS
SEEDS! GRASS SEEDS! Triple Crown Utility TRL
American Farm & Feed "NEW" ACOUSTIC 6 x 12 w/new spare
A Little Bit of 352-795-6013 GUITAR PRO SERIES $1050.
Everything GOLD GROVERS 6 x 12 Enclosed w/
HANDI- CAP RAMP GIGBAG&EXTRAS $100 V nose, rear ramp
March Sat 31st 9a to? Spring loaded, for van 352-601-6625 door, $1995.
Chubby's Art Studio or home, ext to 7ft,
1065 N Paul Dr folds to 3ft, New $1600 ORGAN Trailer Tires
sell $800. 422-0868 Kimball Superstar starting at $69.95
INVERNESS (352) 746-0405 Electronic Entertainer
Saturday 31st 7am-? HI-TEC MAGNUM SWAT has bench & books 352-527-0555
1120 W. Main Street BOOTS Size 11.5, worn good condition $125 Hwy 44, Lecanto2
*INVEoNlS only a few times. $40 (352) 382-1167 Hwy 44, Lecanto
INVERNESS 860-2475 PIANO Henry Miller
Saturday 31st, 8am upright. Great shape B aby ,Ite m
GREAT STUFF464 Jaguar Luggage
7686 E. SHORE DRIVE 2 suit cases 24h $500 464-0443
17w 7d w/wheels RECORDING KING LAP
S$100.(352) 746-6369 STEEL GUITAR JUMPEROO $25 CAR
SKENMORE HUMIDIFIER W/GIGBAG & EXTRAS SEAT WINNIE POOH $
KENMORE HUMIDIFIER "BETTER THAN NEW" 25 bounce bear $15
---- Floor Model, works 1 walker $15 352-777-1256
great $25, 2 Lg Wall $100 352-601-6625- Waler$15 32-7-15
INVERNESS Mirrors $30 ea. SWING $45 MUSICAL
Thurs, Fri, Sat 8 to 2 (352) 382-1167 CAR SEAT $30
tools, fishing, household New Tent in Box BOUNCE $25 musical
items, nearly sales 2 PTerson $40i excellent condition
1575 S Canary, Ter New Charcoal Grill KITCHEN VALENCES 352-777-1256
LECANTO in Box $160 Ladies 26" BLACK/BEIGE CHECK SWING MUSICAL EX-
SAT. 31 10a-5:30p 3 speed bike $40. 8"X60" 5 PANELS $20 CELLENT CONDITION
BIG SALE b (352) 489-3511 FOR ALL 634-2004 AND CAR SEAT $45
719 S. Otis Avenue NINTENDO DSI with orig-$25 each BOUNCE MUSICAL
(352) 422-3043 final packaging $100.00 uipme $25 352-777-1256
352-563-5206 ll Toddler's Bed
Noritake China AB LOUNGER TIME TO w/frame mattress
YAD CAFE service for 8, includes 2 WORK IT OFF ONLY Dora/Sponge Bob
service pieces, 40.00 352 464 0316 (352) 628-0562
SAT, 3/31 8:30 -2:30 matching goblets Exercise Bike (352) 628-0562
Lots of Good Stuff $300 cash like new $65. obo
5597 West Pine Circle (352) 503-7875 (352) 726-7397
P/T POOL MANUAL TREADMILL
MAINTENANCE LOSE THAT WEIGHT 8 FT LADDER ALUM.
Apply in person Mon. WORKS GREAT NEEDS SELL FOR $40 OR
April 2nd thru Friday, A HOME YOURS 75.00 TRADE FOR 6FT ALUM.
Are U Moving? Estate? April 6th at 464 0316 LADDER 634-2004
In home liquidations? Spruce Creek Preserve RECUMBANT EXER-
MARTIN'S Estate & SR 200 Dunnellon CISE BIKE NORDIC "
Consign 352-209-4945 9am 4pm TRAC ALL ELECTRON-
C see Julie or Jorge ICS ONLY 100.00
Port Generator 464 0316
5550/8500 Watts, on
whls, + 25 4 outlets S aing
COMMUNION DRESS adapt cable $450
Size 14 Worn two hours. (812) 629-6538 *
$40.00 352-344-3736 82 6 3
PRECIOUS MOMENTS. 12 x 12 canopy
MENS CLOTHING Large assortment of Pre- EASY POP-UP never
SHORTS, PANTS, clous Moments figurines. used, $185
JEANS & SHIRTS 14 $12.00 each. Please call (352) 322-6456
PIECES $25.00 726 5753 40 Acres/Levy Co. *
352-613-0529 40 Acres/Levy Co. .A # ,A-
S352-613-0529 SIEMANS OVER THE EAR Hunting Property T th
HEARING AID Camper, Pond, Feed- Tell that special
Good Condition ers, Plots, Stands Blinds person
Includes batteries $75,000. (352) 593-0335 Happy Birthday"
#1 BIG SALE Paid $825. Asking $400 CABIN ON 40 ACRES with a classified ad
1000 cook books, etc (352)382-3879 Hunting recreational under Happy
all must go!! 719 N TRAILER 4x8, in Gulf Hammock Mgt.. Only $28.50
Maynard ave on the 4.5 ft ramp. $500 or b/o Area, well, pondludesa hoto
corner of hwy 44, (352) 344-1953 ATV trails $165K obo includes a photo
1/2 mi E. of Stokes 352 795-2027/ 6344745 Call our Classified
Flea Market 1s a,- CLUB CAR Dept for details
Fri Sat Sun 9a-5p Trndle bd w/2 mat-$150; '06 $1,500 352-563-5966
2 POSITIONS OPEN twn bdrm st 2bds w/mat, with charger * * * *
Housekeeper hgh dres,w dres 352-344-8516
& Bar Back w/mir-$500; cm cuno Combo
w/gls frnt-$200; 2 Bumper, Pool, & Card
Weekends Mandatory cmptloffc tbls-$50 ea; table, oak finish
APPLY AT 11'+ expand comm $800
5300 S CHEROKEE WAY ladd-$200; Irg cuckoo (352) 465-2928
Homosassa Motel office clock from Austna-$300;
2 WHEELBARROWS 1 call 352-270-8382 EVE Concealed Weapons
DEEP HARD PLASTIC TWIN MATTRESS Frame Permit Course
50.00 1 SHALLOW and box spring like new DANS GUN ROOM-
METAL 25.00 464 0316 $50.00. 352-563-5206 (352) 726-5238








bn hm n hm


CLASSIFIED



JUNK MOTORCYCLES
WANTED Will Pay up to
$200 for Unwanted Mo-
torcycle 352-942-3492
WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation.
Call (352) 726-9369



3 YR OLD ORANGE
TABBY CAT
Free to good home: At-
tention starved spayed
female,front declaw in-
door cat. 352-795-2362
Bryan
BABY NUBIAN GOATS
PETS Boys/Girls, $75 ea
I will mow your lawn.
(352) 560-0370
Chihuahua
Tiny male 9 wks old
black w/brown,
no papers
(352) 344-4635
DOWNSIZING
Koi and Gold Fish
FOR SALE, Even Better
Prices, ALL sizes
(352) 634-1783
GOLDEN RETRIEVERS
Pure breed pups, light
colors, 3fem 3 males,
shots & h/c. Parents on
Prem. $400-450. ea
352-628-6050
LABRADOODLE PUPS
F2 Full of bounce!
Several colors & coat
textures, 2 boys, 4 girls,
ready 3/23, shots, h/c
$500. 352-410-0080


LABRADOR PUPPIES
Yellow or black, male and
female. 1 rare mismarked
female. Very healthy with
shots and health certifi-
cates. Not kennel bred.
$350 352-344-4811


.6-


Poodles, Mini Pups,
2 black males, 2 black
females, AKC reg.
beautiful & well social-
ized. Champion Sired
$300obo. 352-527-1920
PUPPIES
CHIHUHUA /
DACHSHUND MIX
8 wks old, shots
and health certificate
$300 (352) 465-4711
YORKIE PUPPIES
FOR SALE, AKC
will have shots and
health cert $700ea
(352) 726-5217



DOG HOUSE
FOR LARGE DOG
never used $45
(352) 382-3467
Large Dog Cage
Collapsible, 26" w, 28"
high, 42" long, w/ tray
$48 (352) 382-3467




Mini Donkeys, Horses &
Ponies, used & new
saddles and tack,
Diamond P Farm
352-873-6033

Livestock


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966


BABY NUBIAN GOATS
PETS Boys/Girls, $75 ea
I will mow your lawn.
(352) 560-0370

MALE PIGMY GOAT
lyr old $50, Male goats
4 mo's old, $40 ea.
(352) 628-4750





C.R/Homosassa
1& 2 Br. furn, quiet park
Util. Incl. clean, shrt/long
term 352 220-2077

CRYSTAL RIVER
2brm 1 ba Fridge stove
W&D wat-Trsh $495mo
813-317-6525




& g




FREE MOBILE
HOMES
To Handy Individuals
Offer includes:
Home, water, sewer,
trash, wifi, use of
pool new clubhouse
& park-like setting
w/ hammocks
and gazebos
All for just $295. mo.


RV'S WELCOME
and RV Storage
Space Avail.

Homes for Sale
w/ Owner Financing

Call for Details
AURORA Acres
11240 N. Northwood
Drive Inglis, Fl. 34449
(352) 447-2759
Crystal River Primary
bus stop located in
front of park
auroraacresfl.com


HERNANDO/INV.
2/1,Close in, lease, no
pet $425+sec. 726-7319

HOMOSASSA
55 + Park across from
Super Walmart, 2/1
$550. Mo 352-464-3159

HOMOSASSA
Dble Wd., 2Bed 2Bath,
No Cats $500 mo., Ist.,
Ist & Sec.(320) 282-3061

INVERNESS
RENT SPECIAL: 55+ park
on the water w/5 piers
for fishing and enjoy-
ment, clubhouse, onsite
shuffleboard, & much
more! 1 BR home $325
2BR home $450,
includes H20. 2 BR, 1.5
bath, Park Model $500.
1/1 furn. w/CH/A, on the
water, $600.
Section 8 accepted.
(352) 476-4964


2 BEDROOM MOBILE
HOME FOR SALE 14x60
2 bedroom. 1 bath. Sin-
gle wide mobile home,
with all aluminum wheel
chair ramp, covered
screen porch and a car-
port.Very nice quiet
comm. Centrally lo-
cated close to the mall
Crystal River.
SELL PRICE;;;
$11,200.00 or OBO
Comes with
Washer/Dryer
Stove and Refrigerator.
Part Furnished
lot rent $235.00
Located in a Adult com-
munity age 55 or older
Pets allowed no more
than 20 pounds.
CALL 352-897-6766
BY APPOINTMENT
ONLY
SERIOUS BUYERS
ONLY.


SATURDAY, MARCH 31, 2012 C13




yy~ G U R vBY TRICKY RICKY KANE0AN
1. Beach task (1) Every answer is a rhyming
1. Beach task (1) pair of words (like FAT CAT

Sand DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
2. Spoiled kid's tiny flying pests (1) they will fit in the letter
- - -_ --- |- squares. The number after the
definition tells you how many
3. Fictional Finn's black-tie wear (1) syllables in each word.
I 2012UFS,Dist.obyUnivUclickforUFS
4. Tilted angle of a potted growth (1)


5. Porgy's woman's wild stabs (2)


6. Lithe twosome (2)


7. Rolexes' discolorations (2)


SH3H1O'I SHIIVMA 'L 1dfl 03 iddlS '9 SSSSHEi9 SSSa "s
INVIS iKVKId *' XIII SxIfliH SIVNO SiVHl '*g 3110110 3 HS "1
3-31-12 SMS3SNV

















35-6-58o 5-7*2* -035


28 x 56, 2BD, 2BA,
LR, DR, Eat in Kit,
community Pool
Nice Condition
$30,000 (352) 400-8270
ATTENTION
LAND OWNERS
JACOBSEN NEW 2012
5 yr. warranty, 3/2,
2 x 6 construction,
upgrade insulation,
appliance pkg.
Delivered & set up
with A/C & heat,
steps & skirting only
$279.19./mo.W.A.C.
Includes first year
on homeowner Ins.
Call 352-621-9181

AWESOME DEALS
Financing Available
$500/dn
1/1 remod, shed $5k
1/lscrnrm/carprt $6k
2/1 carprt/rf.over $7k
furn, move-in ready
55+ park, clean quiet
CR/Homossasa area
Owner 352-220-2077

Bank foreclosures
USED HOMES/REPO'S
Bank authorized
liquidator.We Always
have new inventory,
Call 352-621-9183
or come by
Taylor Made Homes
Homes from
$1,000 up!
BEAUTIFUL 1 OWNER,
older Doublewide,
Home in Forestview
Park new appl's, new
roof and AC, Priced to
Sell! (352) 503-2154
LAND-N-HOME
FLORAL CITY
BIG HOME!
The Entertainer,
over 2000 sq. ft., 4/2,
large family room.
Home in great shape
on quiet paved road
near chain of lakes
ONLY $59, 900. or
$2,250 down &
395/mo. W.A.C.
Call 352-621-3807




Your World


CHRONICLE


MOBILE HOME
w/acreage ready to
move in, great for pets
Lots of space for the
price, 3 Br, 2Ba, Serious
offers only, no renters
(850)308-6473
Palm Harbor Homes
New 2012 Models
$15K off All Homes
800-622-2832 x 210




Beverly Hills
55 + park 2/2 fully
remodeled, & furnished
Ig screen lanaicarport,
shedurndrynadscape & irri-
gation all appli-
ances, Club house ac-
tivities, Heated pool.Lot
rent $258,... $33K obo
Call 352-422-0927




BEST OF THE BEST
New 2012 Jacobsen
Custom 28 x 52, 3/2
big eat in kitchen,
2x6 construction, OSB
wrap, 5 yr. warranty,
elongated toilet,
china sinks, storm
door. Large rooms.
Must see before you
buy anything else.
Only $46,900 or
$1,800 down
$298.89/mo W.A.C.
Call 352-621-9181
HOMOSASSA
3/2, 1,800 Sq Ft,
Fenced Yard,new
flooring $5000 down
$525 (352) 302-9217
Lecanto
881 N. Maynard Av
DWMH 2/2, deck,
Fixer Upper
$15K (352) 746-7952
OWNER FINANCING
3/2, Completely
Remodeled in & out,
on 171 Ac. off School
Ave. $40,000
(352) 302-7451
PRICE REDUCED-
NW Citrus Cty SWMH on
1 Acre, 2/1.5 paved rd,
screen porch, appliances
$39,900, Owner Fi-
nancing 352-795-9908




AWESOME DEALS
Financing Available
$500/dn
1/1 remod, shed $5k
1/I scrnrm/carprt $6k
2/1 carprt/rf.over $7k
furn, move-in ready
55+ park, clean quiet
CR/Homossasa area
Owner 352-220-2077


Beverly Hills
55 + park 2/2 fully
remodeled, & furnished
Ig screen lanai,carport,
shed,lbundry,lndscape & irri-
gation all appli-
ances, Club house ac-
tivities, Heated pool.Lot
rent $258... $33K obo
Call 352-422-0927

Crys Rver Village
55+, DWHome of Merit
2/2/1 carport, com-
pletely furnish all new &
appls. Must See
$39K for appt /details
(704) 489-0523
574-946-6286

FLORAL CITY
1992 34FT Park Model,
furn., w/2 slides &
screen rm, Exc. cond.
Moonrise Resort, $3,500.
352-419-6894
606-521-3916

Floral City Singing
Forest DW, 2/2, 2 Car-
ports, screen porch
Completely furn & re-
modeled, Lot Rent $176
$19,500 344-2420



LISTINGS
Homosassa 2 bedroom.
2 bath. 55+double wide
mobile home in park
14,900.New wooden
floors very clean. Closed
in front and back porch.2
car carport.Club
house,community swim-
ming pool,exercise
room.Pool table.Close to
shopping area. call 352
7946601

Homosassa
Turtle Creek
1/1 park model
w/screen porch
$16K (352) 628-3351

HOMOSASSA'S
Best Housing Value
Modern homes from
$8,400 or Lease to Own
from $139/mo.
$800.down + Lot rent at
Evanridge Community
an exceptional 55+Park
352 628-5977

INVERNESS
55+ Park on the water
w/5 piers for fishing &
enjoyment, clubhouse,
onsite shuffleboard, and
much more! 2 BR 1.5 BA
or $2900. 352-476-4964

Lake Henderson
$7,500. 55+ Waterfront
Park, Boat Dock &
Storage, Pool.
2/1,Carport, appli-
ances, Large combi-
nation LR/FI. rm.
(352) 476-8364


ROB SCREENING
Repairs Rescreen, Front
Entries, Garage, Sliders
Free Est. 352-835-2020
SUBURBAN IND. INC.
Screen rms, Rescreens,
Siding, airports, rf.overs
wood decks, Fla. rooms
windows, garage scrns.
628-0562 (CBC1257141)



SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Washer &
Dryers, Free Pick Up
352-564-8179



Blind Factory
We custom make all
types. Best prices any-
where! Hwy 44 & CR
491. (352) 746-1998



ROGERS Construction
All Construction
sm jobs Free Est (352)
637-4373 CRC1326872




SHADY VIEW CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
Repairs. 352 613-2518




Clean Ups &
Clean Outs
(352) 220-9190


AFFORDABLE
COMPUTER SERV.
(352) 341-4150

DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469

NATURE COAST
COMPUTER Repairs
& Web Design
free insp 212-1551




Bianchi Concrete
inc.com ins.lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-
Sidewalks. Pool deck
repair/stain 257-0078

CURB APPEAL/ Lic
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River rock
reseals & repairs. 352
364-2120/410-7383

FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, staining &
Garage Firs. Recession
Prices! 352-527-1097

ROB'S MASONRY

Lic. #1476, 726-6554




All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing,Hauling,
Site Prep, Driveways.
Lic. & Ins. 352- 795-5755


COUNTY WIDE DRY-
WALL -25 ys exp lic2875.
all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Pop Corn Removal
352-302-6838




BRIGHT ELECTRICAL
Res./Comm. Lic & Ins.
$50.hr. EC0001303
352-302-2366
DUN-RITE Elect
since '78/ Free Est.
licEC 13002699
352- 726-2907
Thomas Electric LLC
Generator main &
repair. Guardian
Homestandby, &
Centurion. Cert. Tech.
Briggs Stratton 352-
621-1248 #ER00015377




A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002

BOB BROWN'S
Fence & Landscaping
352-795-0188/220-3194
ROCKY'S FENCING
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
*k 352 422-7279 k




ALUMINUM
STRUCTURES
5" & 6" Seamless Gutters
Free Estimates, Lic &
Ins. (352) 563-2977


Andrew Joehl
Handyman.
GenlMaint/Repairs
Pressure cleaning.
Lawns/Gutters. No job
too small!Reli able ,ins.
0256271 352-465-9201


Affordable Handyman
V FAST
V AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *

Affordable Handyman
V FAST
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *

Affordable Handyman
V FAST
AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *

Affordable Handyman
V FAST
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *


V THIS OUT!
AC & HEAT PUMPS
FREE Estimate & 2nd
Opinion, 10yr warr.
on ALL Parts, Great
prices, ALL the time.
352-400-4945
Lic #CAC027361





MAID TO ORDER
House Cleaning "*
(352) 586-9125
Have Vacum Will Travel






The Tile Man
Bathroom remodel
Specializing in handi-
cap. Lie/Ins. #2441.
352-634-1584





#1 BOBCAT FOR HIRE
Light land clearing, site
work, grading, hauling.
NO JOB TOO SMALL!!!
Lic. & Ins. 352-400-0528

All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955

All AROUND TRACTOR
L 3 H.. ,, ,.
352-795-5755


CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, curbing,
flocrete. River rock
reseals & repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
RIVENBARK LAWN &
LANDSCAPE.
Best Prices in town for
all your lawn care
needs!! (352) 464-3566



A + LAWN CARE
& LANDSCAPING
Affordable & Reliable
(352) 228-0421
BEVERLY HILLS
most yards $20.
Quick dependable,
352-422-5978
GRASS SEEDS! GRASS
SEEDS! GRASS SEEDS!
American Farm & Feed
352-795-6013
HALLOCK & SON
LAWN CARE ALL Your
lawn care needs. Detailed
Work. 400-1197, Lic/Ins.
JUSTIN LAWN CARE
Fast and Affordable.
and Friendly, Licensed.
(352) 476-3985
LAWN AND GARDEN
TRACTOR SUNSHADE
easy on/off, mesh
storage bag incl. never
used $38.00
(352) 382-3467



AT YOUR HOME
Mower, Parts Service &
Repair.Visit our store@
1332 SE Hy 19 220-4244


HIGH SPEED INTERNET
wherever you live,
starting @$29.99 per
mo.(352) 493-1327




A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs, trash,
lawn maint. furn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767

ALL OF CITRUS
CLEAN UPS CLEAN OUTS
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790




Chris Satchell Painting
ASAP
30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-464-1397

CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996

A-I George Swedlige
Painting/press cleaning
Int/Ext. texture/drywall
repair (352) 794-0400

INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998




Tim Herndon Plumbing
$10. off w/this ad
10 yrs serving Citrus Co
lic/ins CFC1428395
(352) 201-8237


CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
Pic PICARD'S Pressure
Cleaning & Painting
352-341-3300




Remodeling, kitchens
baths, ceramic tile &
tops. Decks, Garages
Handyman Services 40
Yrs Exp. crc058140
344-3536; 563-9768



Attention Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers are
required by state law
to include their state
license number in all
advertisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious that
you may be contact-
ing an unlicensed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For questions
about business
licensing, please call
your city or county gov-
ernment offices.


A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest Rates
Free est.(352)860-1452
DAVID'S
TREE SERVICE
(352) 302-5641
All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
DOUBLE J Tree Serv.
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
KING's Land Clearing &
Tree Serv. complete
tree & stump removal
hauling, demo& tractor
work 32 yrs. exp.
(352) 220-9819
R WRIGHT Tree Service
Tree removal & trimming.
Ins. & Lic.# 0256879
352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree Serv
Trim, Shape & Remove
Lic/Ins. Free Est.
352-628-2825



344-2556, Richard
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!




tW i e-.


.












C14 SATURDAY, MARCH 31, 2012


Inverness/Oak Pond 55+,
well maintained 2/2, fur-
nished, screened lanai,
shed, Ig lot, xtra long cov-
ered carport, lots of stor-
age 352-344-1632 or
937-545-3413
Lecanto 3 bedroom. 2
bath. Senior Park 14x66
S/W, Screened Porch,
Furnished. Very clean.
Call 815-535-7958
Lecanto 55 +
Comm.2 bd 1 ba
screened porch
$11,500
(352) 746-4648
Lecanto 55 Park
3 bed 2 bath. SWEET!
Ig. carport,2 porchesroof
over and shed w/electrc.
httpJ/mobilhome.shutlerfiy.com/
$15,000
724-312-6563


Inverness FL 2 bedroom.
2 bath. 14x60 Fully Fur-
nished Manatee Mobile
Home. Carport, Screen
room, and Shed. Has
roof over and remodelled
kitchen and baths. Virtu-
ally everything furnished.
Parking behind M/H for
trailer or boat. Excellent
Shape. Great low rent
park. $ 12000. Call
815 986 4510 or cell
815 298 2964.
On Lake Rousseau 2
bedroom. 2 bath.
14x60MH, 8x20 FL
room, 8x10 shed, 2-stall
carport, Withlacoochee
Backwaters MHP,
$8500. 352-219-2240
Stoneridge Landing
55+ Comm. Resales
starting @$13,500
Financing avail
1-800-779-1226
(352) 637-1400
WESTWIND VILLAGE 55+
Park. Updated 2/2 DW's
for sale. Reasonable
(352) 628-2090












FREE MOBILE
HOMES
To Handy Individuals
Offer includes:
Home, water, sewer,
trash, wifi, use of
pool new clubhouse
& park-like setting
w/ hammocks
and gazebos
All for just $295. mo.

Permanent
RV'S WELCOME
and RV Storage
Space Avail.

Homes for Sale
w/ Owner Financing

Call for Details
AURORA Acres
11240 N. Northwood
Drive Inglis, Fl. 34449
(352) 447-2759
Crystal River Primary
bus stop located in
front of park
auroraacresfl.com




LECANTO 55+
*FOR RENT OR SALE*
1/1, Furnished $525.
2/2, Furnished $550.
352-287-9175, 746- 1189













835 NE Hwy 19
Crystal River, Fl
(352) 795-0021
View our website
C21 NatureCoast.com




4 Utah, BeverliyHills
2/2/1 House, nice condition
&nice neighborhood!

$650mo.

CHASSAHOWITZKA
3/2 Wtrfront DW, $600.
3/2 Furnished DW., $600
Agent (352) 382-1000



CRYSTAL RIVER
2 BR. $550. 3BR House
$800., 352-563-9857
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025
HOMOSASSA
IBR, Scrn. Porch, Boat
Dock, Stove, refrig. W&D,
cable, util. incld. $700.
mo.+ sec., 352-628-6537




Alexander Real Estate
(352) 795-6633

Crystal River Apts
2 BR/1 BA $375-$500
FLORAL CITY
FREE Use of boat ramp,
fishing dock, canoe &
Jon boat rentals. 1 BR
$450/$200 dp. incls Sat
TV electric, walk to river
Trails End Camp, A
Friendly Place to Live
352-726-3699
INVERNESS
1/1 $4002/1.. $500.
near hosp352-422-2393
LECANTO
Nice 1 Bedrm $500
352-613-6000.216-0012
(352) 746-5238



CRYSTAL RIVER
Comm. Storefront, very
clean 1000 SF, exc. loc.
Hwy 19 Downtown
$795/mo 352-634-2528
FLORAL CITY
STOREFRONT 1000 Sq Ft
Ideal location, corner
Hwy 41 & 48. $595 mo.
813-310-5391


Citrus Hills 2/2.5/1
$850/mo HOA is incl'd
$850 dep. 239-595-9439
INVERNESS
LANDINGS 2/1.5 clean
roomy, great location
$525/mo F/L/S No smke
No pets (352) 341-1847



CITRUS HILLS 2/2/1
Beautiful $750 Maint
Free(352) 613-5655
Citrus Springs
3/2/1 car $650/mo
352-746-7990
HOMOSASSA
1/1 Non-smoker. $425
Fst/Sec. Pets? 795-0207




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225

Ret al
Houses


Debe Johns
Brkr/Assoc/PRM

Coldwell Banker Next
Generation Realty
Property Manager
(352) 382-2700 www.
coldwellbankernext
aeneration.com

See what a
Professional
Residential Manager
can do for you.




INVERNESS
2/2/2 furn $700, unfurn
$625, 1st & last no pets,
(978) 979-1375
(352) 556-5976
INVERNESS
East Cove Waterfront,
turn., 2/2, C/A carport,
shed, $650
352-476-4964
Sugarmill Woods
3/2/2 large closets
$750/m (352)613-0843






Si


Kristi Bortz
Let our property
management team
help you with your
short or long term
rentals.
See all our rentals in
Citrus Co.
www.olantation
rentals
352-795-0782 or
866-795-0784




BEVERLY HILLS
3Bed, 2Bath, 2 Car Gar.
$750.352-464-2514
BEVERYL HILLS
Real Nice Section 2/1,
screen rm. extra clean,
back yd. overlook Park,
47 S. Lucille St. $600.
352-461-4518
CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/2, $850 mo. 1st last
sec. references pref.
(352) 249-7033
FLORAL CITY
1 br. 1 ba. On
Withlapopka Isl, 900 sq ft,
fenced yard. $425 rent,
$125 for H20, Elec and
Cable. 1st and last month
due on move in. call 813
731-5347 for appt.
HOMOSASSA
2/1 CHA, No pets
$600.mo. 1st + sec
(352) 628-4210
HOMOSASSA
2/1 home 3/2 DW no
pets(352) 637-1142
LECANTO
1/1 dirt road, $375+sec
BEVERLY HILLS
3/1/1, $550 + sec.
KEN (352) 220-2958




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225
INVERNESS
East Cove Waterfront,
furn., 2/2, C/A carport,
shed, $650
352-476-4964
OLD HOMOSASSA
Lrg 1/1, Iv&fam rm,
scr prch, lots of stor-
age,, dock w/access
to gulf. $750, no pets
smoke 352-628-2261




C.R/Homosassa
1& 2 Br. furn, quiet park
Util. incl. clean, shrt/long
term 352 220-2077



DOCKAGE SPACE
WANTED
For A Sail Boat
in Crystal River
(352) 344-2066




FARMS, LAND,
COMMERCIAL
UNIQUE &
HISTORIC HOMES,
SMALL TOWN
COUNTRY LIFESTYLE
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989






"LIFE IS BETTER
WITH A PORCH"

crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.


For Sale %,

Forest Ridge 2 bedroom.
2 bath. This updated villa
is totally move in ready
and maintenance free!
This beautiful 2/2/2 is
located on a private lot
and includes an optional
membership to Citrus
Hills Golf and Country
Club. The home includes
all appliances, an eat in
kitchen, a fully tiled great
room, and a sun barrier
paneled lanai. Home is
within walking distance to
the pool and club house.
This property is a must
see!! $95,900
352-746-0002









FREE MOBILE
HOMES
To Handy Individuals
Offer includes:
Home, water, sewer,
trash, wifi, use of
pool new clubhouse
& park-like setting
w/ hammocks
and gazebos
All for just $295. mo.

Permanent
RV'S WELCOME
and RV Storage
Space Avail.

Homes for Sale
w/ Owner Financing
Call for Details
AURORA Acres
11240 N. Northwood
Drive Inglis, Fl. 34449
(352) 447-2759
Crystal River Primary
bus stop located in
front of park
auroraacresfl.com

PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ille-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discriminationn"
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY

Specializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches &
Commercial








Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com





BANK

ORDERED

AUCTION



Sat. April 14th
11:00 am.


3867 North
Caledonia Dr.
Beverly Hills,
Florida 34465


HURRY!!!


Never Been
Lived In !!!!

Surprising 4 Bedroom,
3 Bath Home, Situated
on 1.23 Acre
Corner Lot.
Many Amenities:
Kitchen Corian
Counter Tops,
Center Island and
Pantry Master
bedroom with
Walk-in Closets,
Dual Bathroom
Sinks and Garden Tub
with Separate
Walk-in Shower.

SAVE $$$

800-262-3050


www.auction
worldusa.com

Auction World
USA,LLC.
Lic R.E. Broker




Meadowview
of Citrus Hills..
SUN. Open House 1 -3p
2/2/1 Newly remodeled
Villa, many upgrades,
all new appls. never
smoked in. over 1900 sf
UR. $99,900 .
2338 N. Alachua Pt.
(352) 476-5401


3BR, 2-1/2BA, 2-car
garage, pool, jacuzzi,
new carpet & paint
Must see extraordinary
interior, 6560 N.
Deltona, off Lecanto
Rd., Reduced price
$199,000 to $159,000
(830) 534-1918
For Sale Or Rent
3/2/2 furn for rent
$800/mo or buy
(352) 445-5218
352-445-5260



Lot For Sale Pine Ridge
sub. 3620 N. Stirrup Dr.,
2.78 ac, horse trail on
back side, wooded, for
sale by owner. Google it!
Make offer
bill@agairupdate.com
478.957.0211

Blac
Damond '


3 Bedroom, 2 Bath
Double carport,
fenced yd. new roof,
1,100 sf, $55,500
(352) 464-0641
(239) 298-0076

BANK

ORDERED

AUCTION



Sat. April 14th
11:00 am


3867 North
Caledonia Dr.
Beverly Hills,
Florida 34465


HURRY !!!


Never Been
Lived In II!!!!

Surprising 4 Bedroom,
3 Bath Home, Situated
on 1.23 Acre
Corner Lot.
Many Amenities:
Kitchen Corian
Counter Tops,
Center Island and
Pantry Master
bedroom with
Walk-in Closets,
Dual Bathroom
Sinks and Garden Tub
with Separate
Walk-in Shower.

SAVE $$$
800-262-3050
www.auction
worldusa.com

Auction World
USA,LLC.
Lic R.E. Broker




3/3/2
2,355 sq. ft.
screen lanai, 2 Acres
$135,000.
(352) 628-5272



3/2, Shed, Mfg. Home
on 1.38 Acres, new
flooring & upgraded
appliances.
Paved Road
$54,900. (352) 302-4057
ARBOR LAKES
55+ Comm. 3/2/2 +
Lg enclosed a/c porch,
most pvt. location,
Upgrades $169,900
(352) 726-7952



2/2/1
HIGHLANDS AREA
Lots of Upgrades
Move In Ready
Keller Williams Realty
352-746-7113
3/2/2, I.G. &C.C.
3k sf. new kit. Ig closets,
CHA, firepl. on golf
course $129K make of-
fer, norealtors 726-0652
HIGHLANDS
Lrg.2/2- 4 car garage
pool, game room,
mud room, on triple lot
fenced, price to sell
$65,500 (352) 564-4598
Lakefront Gospel
Island Location
Spacious 3/2/2
3/4 acre $750/m for
sale neg908-322-6529
Zero Down Assumable
Loan Nice 3/2/2,
In Foxwood Estate
Need proof of income
and excel credit.
Serious Inauiries Only
(352) 341-8479




Recently Foreclosed
*Special Fnancing*
Available, Any Credit,
Any Income,
3BD, 2BTH located at,
8009 E. Partridge Lane
Floral City, $29,900.
Visit www.
roselandco.com\A5BDrive
by then Call
(866) 249-0680.





-*-e
9690 W Green Ln 3 bed-
room. 2 bath. Energy
wise, move in ready,
garage, fenced back
w/playhouse.
352-563-1341


CLASSIFIED




3/2/2 Built 1986, On
/2 Acre, Remodeled
above ground pool
w/deck BY OWNER
4141 S. Journey Point
$180,000 352-342-0602

Homosassa/Riverhaven
On water, Grand canal
3BR, 2+BA, 2+ CG
Formal. Living Rm.
Formal Din. Rm., Lanai
front & rear. River View
Room. Dock, many
Upgrades, $255,000
forsalebvowner.com
Listing 23023708 or
Call 352-628-9647

Recently Foreclosed
*Special Financing*
Available, Any Credit,
Any Income
3BD 2BTH, located at,
4268 S. Arrowhead Dr
Homosassa, $39,900.
Visit: www.roseland
co.com\A5C
Drive by then call
(866) 249-0680.

Water Access
2/2, 6 car garage
w/apt. ove, extra Lot
$200.K 352-302-7204


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work For You!

BETTY HUNT,
REALTOR
ERA KEY 1 Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.


Condo for Sale
2/2, 1,850 sq. ft.
35 Beech Street
(352) 503-3294


DEB INFANTINE

4 HOMES SOLD
Closing in April
I Need Listings!

Real Estate!...
it's what I do.

ERA American
Realty
Phone:(352) 726-5855
Cell:(352) 302-8046
Fax:(352) 726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.comrn


FREE MOBILE
HOMES
To Handy Individuals
Offer includes:
Home, water, sewer,
trash, wifi, use of
pool new clubhouse
& park-like setting
w/ hammocks
and gazebos
All for just $295. mo.
Permanent
RV'S WELCOME
and RV Storage
Space Avail.

Homes for Sale
w/ Owner Financing

Call for Details
AURORA Acres
11240 N. Northwood
Drive Inglis, Fl. 34449
(352) 447-2759
Crystal River Primary
bus stop located in
front of park
auroraacresfl.com


Michele Rose, Realtor
Simply put I 'II work
harder 352-212-5097
isellcitruscountv()
yahoo.corn
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515







PINE RIDGE, 3/3/2
4645 W. CASPER LANE
1.75 Acres, 14 x 18
barn, pool and
heated spa, large
kitchen, each room
overlooking pool
and pasture, large
master with his and
her closets, & sinks.
Many extras.
Visit Today Call Joe
352-302-0910


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Cmpes


U


bedroom. 2 bath. Jacob-
sen Mobile Home (DW)
on 5 ACRES. Owner Fi-
nancing with $20,000
down Low interest. Mas-
ter Bedroom 14x20
w/carpet & Lg. walk-in
closet, has Master Bath
10x15 w/double vanity,
jetted tub, separate toilet
& shower. 2 other bed-
rooms 12x14 w/carpet
and walk-in closets. Liv-
ing Rm. 14x16 w/laminate
wood flooring and open
concept to Dining Room
14x1 2w/bar sink
&Cabinetss w/sliding
glass doors which lead to
10x24 pressure treated 2
level deck. Lg. Kitchen
16xl16w/38 cabinets, is-
land cook top, wall oven
& tile flooring. Sunken
Family Room w/fireplace
15x14 tiled flooring. Laun-
dry Rm. w/cabinets which
lead to rear access to
deck. LOW PROPERTY
TAXES $660.00. 2 stor-
age bidgs 12x24 &
10x14, Carport 22x25.
$135k (561) 714-6024.













FREE MOBILE
HOMES
To Handy Individuals
Offer includes:
Home, water, sewer,
trash, wifi, use of
pool new clubhouse
& park-like setting
w/ hammocks
and gazebos
All for just $295. mo.

Permanent
RV'S WELCOME
and RV Storage
Space Avail.

Homes for Sale
w/ Owner Financing

Call for Details
AURORA Acres
11240 N. Northwood
Drive Inglis, Fl. 34449
(352) 447-2759
Crystal River Primary
bus stop located in
front of park
auroraacresfl.com






INVERNESS
Nice 2/2/1 new carpet
tile & paint. Whispering
Pines Villas furnished
$69,900(352) 726-8712





FREE foreclosure
and short sale lists


Office Open
7 Days a Week

Lisa VanDeboe
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com

Crystal River Indian
Waters Waterfront home
on deep wide canal. 3
BR/2BA with Lanai over-
looking canal. Recently
remodeled split floor plan
with fenced yard, garage,
sea wall and dock.
Easy access to both
Kings Bay and Gulf.
Serious buyers
please.....Appointment
with owner. $275,000.
678-357-9873





CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pond,
ATV trails $165Kobo
352 795-2027/ 634-4745

CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pond,
ATV trails $165K obo
352 795-2027/ 634-4745





5 ACRES, FLORAL CITY
3 sides fenced, paved
road, private drive
through woods. Leads
to 4 Acre Pasture
$44,900. (352) 897-4586


I Dunnello


trash to list $32,000.
Dodge Truck also avail
(636) 209-0308
Holiday Rambler
'98 38' 7.5 gen.super
slide, air lever, a/c susp.
loaded call for details
$41K (352) 746-9211
I Buy RV'S, Steve
Henry, RV World of
Hudson Inc.Since
1974. (888) 674-8376
(727) 514-8875
JAYCO '04
36', 5th whl toy hauler,
generator, slide, fuel
station $17,400. like new
Truck Avail For Sale
Local (502) 345-0285
RV SUPPLIES
Misc. Supplies, pig tails,
Sewer hoses,
patio sun scrn ETC.
$150 cash for all
(352) 503-7875


CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pond,
ATV trails $165Kdobo
352 795-2027/ 634-4745



48 lots 14W.F. 1 gulf
access, 5 SMW's lots
3 lots impact fees pd.
$425K, = less than $9K
per lot (732) 996-3785
89 x 165 MOL, LOT
Lucky Hills, Nice
Residential Area
$19,000/Offer
Owner FiNance
(352) 422-1916
HOMOSASSA
Wooded Lot on
Lee Woods Drive,
112 x114ft River access,
but not on river $7,000.
352-621-1664










LOTS FOR

SALE!
6 Citrus Springs Lots
Available, Owner Fin.
or Cash Discounts
Provided. Great
Investment Opprty.
803-403-9555
803-403-9557




EVINRUDE 89
40HP
Power T &T, w/controls
completely tuned/new
paint $1500
(352) 564-1324



2004 ALUMACRAFT
JON BOAT
14 Jon Boat w/15hp
Johnson.Asking
$1900obo352-302-5993
CAROLINA SKIFF
2001 Skiff 19 foot excel-
lent condition 90 hp
Yamaha, bimini top, ra-
dio, depth finder. Includes
trailer with new tires.
$7500 obo 352-895-2382
KEY WEST 19.9
Bay Reef, 150 hp
Honda, 651b 24 volt trol-
ling motor, hvy duty
trailer(352) 726-4325
LUND
1978 15 FOOT BASS
BOAT W/TRAILER.
Fiberglass, wide beam.
1990 30HP Johnson.
Console Steering. Heavy
Duty 12V trolling motor
w/foot pedal. New Marine
Battery w/warrantee.
Runs Great & Ready to
Fish. $1895.
352-341-0447
PALM COAST
'00, 16 ft, CC, 3 batter-
ies, 50HP John, elect.
mtr. & trlr. depth find.
$3,000 (352) 249-7994
PONTOON
2003, 22 ft, Super sport,
2004 Mtr 90HP Johns,
Tandem axle galv. trlr.
$13,500 (352) 795-8941
or (352) 422-1569
PROLINE
21' Cuddy, full transom,
w/brack, 150 HP Yam.,
Bimini, VHF, porta pot,
dep. finder, trailer $5K
firm (352) 382-3298
Stamas 22'
cuddy, rebuilt 225 hp
OB. galv trailer, new
tanks, windless, trim
tabs, bimini, cushions,
steering $3800 or trade
(352) 447-5655
TROLLER 85
14' 9.9 Yamaha 4 stroke
electric start,trolling
motor, hummingbird
fishfinder w/trailer
$1900 bo 352-344-5993
TUNNEL HULL '05
G3, 90 hp Yam. jack
plate. camo interior.
trailer blade prop
$10,500 352 489-1403
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LAKE
MARINE
We Pay CASH For Used
Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck & Fishing
Boats (352)527-0555
boatsupercenter.com




















YACHTSMAN
24' Pontoon 70 HP Ev.
T/T, cust. trlr` bimini top,
stored inside $3500 incls
all gear (231) 852-0061



Bounder
Fleetwood 32' 1994
454 engine, loaded,
self contained $9,750
352-795-6736
GULF STREAM 08
32 3 slides, rear. kit.
K bed,50amp, like new
extras $31,500
(352) 726-1906
HITCHHIKER II LS
2008 3 slides excel
cond. heat pump de-
luxe pkg. too many ex-


Z28, 97K mis. T-tops,
exc cond. White with
orang strips $8K obo
352-302-7204
CHEVY
'07, Impala, V6, auto,
ice cold AC, non smok-
ers 100K mi $7,500
(352) 726-3093
Chrysler Maserati
1989 runs good,
removable hard top,
$2,900.
(352) 419-5219
KAWASAKI '82
11,662K,mis. LTD 550
lots of extras
great cond $1000 obo
(352) 228-1897


APACHE
Pop up camper, sleeps
6, stove, sink, alum.
windows, good cond.
$950 (352) 637-5755
CAMPER/TRAILER
2010, Sportsman KZ
Hybrid, 19ft, like new
air, full kitch, bath
$8750 (352) 249-6098
COLEMAN CAMPER
1997, 8FT
may need tires
$850 o/b/o
(352) 746-6393 Iv msg
GULF STREAM
Coach 25' model
24RBL, sips upto 6 gas &
elect appis & heat,
shower/toliet $6900
(352) 341-1714
I BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
call me 352-201-6945
SUNNYBROOK
2005 36ft, 5th whl, 2
slides, kg bedlike
new,heated tks, 60
amp service oak cab
$33,400 352-382-3298




4 Good Year
Wrangler NTR Kevlar
Side Tread w/ center
cover LT285 75 R 16,
mounted and
balanced on 8 lug
Ford Factory Rims
$395. (352) 628-5222
Are Dodge Truck
topper white fiberglass,
short bed,sliding front
window, full length side
windows, ladder rack
$350(352) 726-9251
Challenger '72
318,4 barrel w/rebuilt
trans, runs perfect un-
der 100K still in car
can hear run $400
352-613-0393
CHEVROLET
1999 corvette L&R side
mufflers and tailpipes.
New condition. Replaced
with Z06 set in 2001.
$300 for both or offer.
5000 miles on originals.
1-352-503-6548




$$ CASH PAID $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$

BIG SALE!
Consignment USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
AUTOS' FROM $1,500.
US 19 BY AIRPORT
US 44, BY NAPA
Low Payments *
461-4518 & 795-4440
consignmentusa.org
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID $300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars Trucks
& Vans, For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES,
Hwy 19... 352 564-8333
CASH PAID FOR JUNK
CARS Any Condition
Up to $500., Free
Towing 352-445-3909
KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Salvage Pays top $$$
for your autos.
352-628-4144
WANTED
GEO TRACKER
1995 or 1996
Dead or Running
(352) 726-7764

WANTED TO RENT
Class C or Class A
Motor home, travel-
ing to Maine & back
to Florida
approx 3 wks in July
2012 352-794-3272

WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
Perfect Cond. or Not
TitledNo title,
No problem. Paying up
to $25K any make,
any model Call A.J.
813-335-3794/531-4298




'08 Chrysler
Sebring Touring
Convertible,34k miles,
loaded, $13,500firm
352-897-4520

AFFORDABLE
AUTOS & VANS
Everybod y Rides
$495 DOWN
$49 PER WEEK
BUY HERE PAY
HERE..
Lots of clean-safe-
dependable rides.
CALL DAN TODAY
(352) 5 6 3 -I 902
"WE BUYS CARS
DEAD OR ALIVE"
1675Suncoast Hwy.
Homosassa Fl.

BIG SALE!
Consignment USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
AUTOS FROM $1,500.
US 19 BY AIRPORT
US 44, BY NAPA
Low Payments
461-4518 & 795-4440
consignmentusa.org

BUICK 08
Lucerne CXI.Jewel Red
w/tan canvas top
Lo miles, lots of extra's
$18,900 "Eye Catching"
(352) 726-7765
CADILLAC 04
DeVille 66k mi, garaged
Champagne, w/top +
Gold Cream leather
$8,995,352-341-4949
CADILLAC
1993 Allante Nstar. Soft
& hardtop auto
low miles black mint
$16KObo 352-563-1915
Camaro 97


battery. Bike jack,
Cycleshell, lots of ac-
cessories. Pix available.
$6495 352-601-7460








ROADSTAR
SILVERADO 04
Garage kept, very well
maint, lots of extras ask
$6k obo (352) 214-9800


'97, Town Car, Cartier
custom, very well main-
tained, all records,
V-good cond. Must See
No calls after 6pm
(352) 860-0688
MERCEDES '99
S420, blue book $11,500
sell $10K FIRM
1729 W. Gulf to lake
Hwy, Lecanto
MERCURY
'97 Grand Marquis, ex-
cellent shape
Must See
$2,500., 352-344-8516

Sold 1 day
NISSAN ALTIMA
2011 exc. condition
low miles, fully loaded
$18,500 firm
TOYOTA CAMRY LE
V6, 99, very good
condition, non smokers,
72.7 k, $6900 obo
(352) 726-6479




AUTO SWAP/
Corral CAR SHOW
Sumter County
Fairgrounds
SUMTER
SWAP MEETS
APRIL 1. 2012
1-800-438-8559
CHEVROLET '01
Camaro, Z28, Org. 9000
miles, Pristine show car
frozen in time. Loaded
black/black leather
Flawless rare find!
$15,750 (352) 513-4257







Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday "
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966

TORONADO '92
Olds. White Diamond
red leather, 124K ms
FWD 3800 tuned port
injection V6,18 city,
28 hwy. Meticulously
maint/garaged
$5K(352) 527-3291




BIG SALE!
Consignment USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
AUTOS' FROM $1,500.
US 19 BY AIRPORT
US 44, BY NAPA
Low Payments *
461-4518 & 795-4440
consignmentusa.org
DODGE
2007 Ram 1500 Truck,
HEMI, Quad Cab, Dk
Blue, 92K mi, bedliner,
running boards, new tires
& brakes, mechanically
perfect, very good condi-
tion, $14,995.
352-572-6732
Dodge Ram' 11
1500, Big Horn, 4 dr. 11K
miles, blue teeth, 10
way power seat, run-
ningboards, Show room
Cond. New $37,511.sell
$24K (352) 419-5836
Ford 02
F150, Ext Cab,
fair cond, runs good
166Kmis. $6kobo
352-302-7204
FORD '06
F250 Super Duty, 4 x 4,
6.0, Lariat Pkg. Off Rd.
Pkg., Hard Bed Cover
$21,500 (352) 586-8576
FORD
2010 F150 Platinum
Supercrew, 4x4, 22200
miles, black, leather, nav-
igation, rear view camera,
tow package, excellent
condition, $12900
wary@netscape.com
FORD F350
87 Stake Body Diesel
standard shift,GREAT
work truck $3k
(813) 417-6024



JEEP
1989 Wrangler SAHARA
$1999 automatic
68493 miles
4x4 runs great
863-968-6502



DODGE GRAND
CARVAN 01
Maroon, 151k miles, 3.3L
V6, cold AC, good cond. -
$3,250. 527-3894
FORD 94
Econoline, handicap lift
Van, 46K miles.
$3K obo(352) 228-0955



Harley 00
Roadking Classic, all
gear 17K miles 11K
obo.(352) 489-0873
HARLEY DAVIDSON
08 Night Train, flat blk,
11 ,500 mis. lots of extra's
$14K obo Jeff
(407) 712-0803
HARLEY-
DAVIDSON
2005 FLTRX Road Glide
Custom Oversized
Windshield, King/Queen
seat, Backrest, 24k miles,
$12K 352-257-3130
JUNK MOTORCYCLES
WANTED Will Pay up to
$200 for Unwanted Mo-
torcycle 352-942-3492
KAWASAKI
2006 Vulcan 1600 No-
mad Excellent condi-
tion, well serviced. 14k
miles. Newer tires and




....VY(r("L) CJRONIcLE


n heardo-f Savin gS

Buy any new Kia in stock
for factory invoice...
and the invoices are
all on the wall.


:ee


00


0


Now is the time and


CITR US


is the


KIA


place!


352-564-8668
Mon Fri: 9:00am 7:00pm Sat 9:00am 6:00pm Sunday Noon 5:00pm
1850 S.E. Hwy. 19, Crystal River, FL
At Citrus Kia, "We just don't close car deals, we open relationships"
Shop from Home @ www.citruskia.com


SATURDAY MARCH 31


$A




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


IlHM,


I//


II


HIl,


ill"


yI I


2012 NISSAN
,j


OR11 QQ 139
9 1v I PER MO.
With $2999 cash or trade equity and $500 Nissan Lease Loyalty


2012 NISSAN ALTIMA


;lA11M tolR139
5mVi PER MO.
With $1,330 lease cash, 31,000 lease loyalty, and $500 college graduate.


2012 NISSAN SENTRA


1 t $o109
S PERMO.
With $500 lease loyalty, and $500 college graduate.


2012 NISSAN ROGUE


1 A4OoR$ N149
| 9840V I PER MO.
With $1,000 lease cash, $1,000 lease loyalty, and $500 college graduate.


2012 NISSAN FRONTIER
, .Na___


1,itAOR$159
I 4 0 VI PER MO.
With $500 lease loyalty, and S500 college graduate.


2012 NISSAN I


23,990o1269
Wth 32 lPER MO.alt
With 32.000 lease loyalY.


CALL THE INSTANT APPRAISAL LINE: 800-440-9054


crystalnissan.com

352-564-1971
937 S. Suncoast Blvd Homosassa, FL 34448


C16 SATURDAY, MARCH 31, 2012


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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2012 CHEVROLET CRUZE


2012 CHEVROLET MALIBU


1R ftnO$169
SI PER MO.
WITH $1999 CASH OR TRADE.


2012 CHEVROLET IMPALA


228OoG. 299
i228 0 R $ PER MO.
WITH $2999 CASH OR TRADE.


2012 CHEVROLET TAHOE


9,OR 269
TI 9 82W I PER MO.
WITH $2999 CASH OR TRADE.


2012 CHEVROLET EQUINOX


291 OOR 269
2190 PER MO.
WITH $2999 CASH OR TRADE.


2012


;35, Wo'R299
WITH $2999 CASHI PER MO.
WITH $2999 CASH OR TRADE.


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Irm


\ CALL THE INSTANT APPRAISAL LINE: 800-440-9054


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,ET SILVERADO

17 R,


SAVE
$6000


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CRYSTAL crystalautos.com
CHEVROLET 352-564-1971
C H E V R L E T 1035 S. Suncoast Blvd Homosassa, FL 34448


SATURDAY, MARCH 31, 2012 C17




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


2012 Mazda3i Sport

o


at the
,PyrOnid


2012


ELANTRA
kk All-New


THIS WEEK


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111


itt['JI 1 LYJitiA'


Lease
For


$17936 Mo.
1 y Leaset


! Eiiicrn i'.y xlj one."' nJ] a fte, i u p' e I t. r Td.I .ld ,.no i it o. ttI te tLrfiied "E\tpareJ r*" I. tar .r..,, ldr. lp .iui iu.ru j trr.Iu eue i.-. *an depctd*n, ,g
r.n) ,.*u dr.lc i.d m. L.r.L2. \,ur nrerRh e r .i h It de iLi. P' r.O r. *lu SI. D r: p.u l. r e pl )- ord. d-e.,-ed rdi e hI,* d l I pr tci r nie i. .uh l LO
. "... ...r... r.Ih r.a e .. hn r.r..:. ri I ..r. .. M..i.ir F.r. .r..r. ho -. ~1.l. .l. tt L.e .1 .eri ..r .1I ..I,


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ACURA
Safest Vehicle Lineup In America!
with Highest Expected Residual Value Among Luxury Brands zq {)Q

A" I OI2012 TSX
SE


nCLI2F6C W
TSX Lease: $259 mo x 36 months.
$2,899 Due At Signing
Includes Security Deposit, Down Payment; Excludes Tax & Tag,
WiLh Approved Credit $
STOp $2 5 9/month"
Safety Rating Safety Pick
NHTSA fillS
* Star ratings are part of the U.S. Department of Transportation's Safercar.gov program (www.safercar.gov). Models tested with standard side-impact airbags (SABs). t
Basea on ALG's 2009 and 2010 Residual Value Awards for a Luxury Brand. Subject to limited availability. Through April 30th, 2012, to approved lessees by Acura Financial
Services, DBA of American Honda Finance Corp. Closed-end lease for 2012 TSX SE 5 Speed Automatic (Model CU2F6CJW). MSRP $33,195. Actual net capitalize cost
S28 134.04. Total monthly payments $9,324. Option to purchase at lease end $21,172. Additional lease terms for well-qualified lessees. Not all leases will qualify. Higher lease
rates apply for lessees with lower credit ratings or In different regions. Dealer participation may affect actual payment. MSRPs Include destination; taxes, license, title fees,
options and Insurance extra. Security deposit waived. Lessee responsible for maintenance, excessive wear/tear and 15/#ml. over 10,000 miles/year for vehicles with MSRP
less Ihan $30,000, but for vehicles with MSRP of $30,000 or more, mileage cost is 200/mi. over 10,000 miles/year. Sea dealer for complete details. Available on 2010 TL with


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C18 SATURDAY, MARCH 31, 2012


; lI,






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SATURDAY, MARCH 31, 2012 C19




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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2012 CHRYSLER 200





I7OR$189
$17 I PER MO.
With $2999 cash or trade equity
2012 CHRYSLER 300





E24,0o'01299
2A, 8 O |PER MO.
With $2999 cash or trade equity
2012 JEEP WRANGLER





o98OR$299
I PER MO.
With $2999 cash or trade eouitv


2012 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY


4;
A"
y^.mp


-a $2W asPER MO.
With $2999 cash or hide equity


2012 RAM


CAB


17


25,888fORR299
2 8I ~PER MO.
With $2999 cash or trade equity
2012 JEEP GRAN CHEROKEE



*x~i F l


PER MO.
With $2999 cash or trade euitvy


\ CALL THE INSTANT APPRAISAL LINE: 800-440-9054


oo.csW Jeep 1
BROOKSVILLE HOMOSASSA
INVERNESS


FA


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S


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C20 SATURDAY, MARCH 31, 2012


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