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Citrus County chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02719
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 03-25-2012
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:02719

Full Text



Stunning loss: Gators blow lead, fall to Louisville


TODAY & Monday morning
HIGH Becoming mostly sunny.
78 West winds around 10
LOW mph. Clear tonight.
54 PAGE A4
MARCH 25, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY






www.chronicleonline.com
; Best Community kNewspaper Serving Florida's Best Community $1 VC


Man admits online sham involving teacher


Beach open
Fort Island Gulf Beach
in Crystal River is open
again after undergoing a
beach renourishment
project. A total of 1,625
tons of sand was deliv-
ered to the beach for a
material cost of $47,775,
ahead of schedule and
under budget.


COMMENTARY:


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff Writer
CRYSTAL RIVER She was the jilted
lover, stymied by a 10-month-long online re-
lationship that crumbled.
And Kristy Campbull was not going to go
away quietly
She threatened the other woman, a
schoolteacher, to take the affair public, in-
cluding sending incriminating photographs
to the teacher's employer and family
"I have nuthin to do after I finish this
modeling job this week, this will be my new
job, screwing around with her life, family,
work, etc.," Campbull wrote in an email to
the teacher's friend.
In February, Campbull sent emails with
a range of allegations to officials with the
Citrus County School District, the Citrus
County Chronicle and other news outlets.


James
Barker
Ohio man
faces charge of
extortion.


She said the teacher took
advantage of her and
Campbull wanted her
fired.
What Campbull did not
know was the teacher had
already contacted her su-
pervisors and the Citrus
County Sheriff's Office
about the relationship, say-
ing the other person was
threatening to send bogus
information to the authori-
ties and press.


Detectives traced the emails and a phone
number Campbull provided. And they
found Kristy wasn't Kristy at all.
She was actually James Barker, 39, a res-
ident of northern Ohio.
See Page A4


Teacher reprimanded for

role in e-mail incident


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff Writer
INVERNESS A Cit-
rus County schoolteacher
received a written repri-
mand for taking inappro-
priate photographs at
school that were emailed
to someone who authori-
ties say used them and
other photos to blackmail
her.
The teacher, whom the


Chronicle is not naming
because of the nature of
the case, sent several pho-
tographs of herself to
someone she thought was
Kristy Campbull of Den-
ver, Colo. The two became
Facebook friends and
later developed an online
relationship.
When the teacher broke
off the relationship,


Page A4


Stand ground
Columnist Susan Clary
believes there have been
too many deaths in the
name of self-defense.
/Page Cl
WEEK IN REVIEW:
New feature
Catch up on the local
stories you may have
missed this past
week./Page A2


HOMEFRONT:


Issues facing seniors


Choc crock
Antiques expert John
Sikorski writes about
the history of this
chocolate pot./Page E6


EXCURSIONS:


Vatican view
Columnist Neil Sawyer
explores the wonders of
the Vatican./Page A13
BUSINESS:


Jobless bias
Those who have been
unemployed longer find
it harder to get a new
job./Page D1


COMING TOMORROW:
Status update
How is the man shot by
a deputy doing now, and
how much does his
medical care cost the
county?/Monday


Annie's Mailbox ......A14
Classifieds ................D5
Crossword ..............A14
Editorial............. ..... C2
Entertainment ..........B6
Horoscope................ B6
Lottery Numbers ......B4
Lottery Payouts ........ B6
Movies .................. A14
O bituaries ................A6
Together................ A16


6 11||||84578 21007 oI


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Ruby Ziarniak, left, and Rita Curley enjoy a conversation recently at the Central Citrus Community Center. Citrus
County seniors get together for a hot lunch and the ability to spend time with friends and neighbors. Food is provided
at six locations in Citrus County and is paid for by a grant from the Department of Elder Affairs and the Citrus County
Commission. For some, this may be the only hot meal of the day.


Living on little
4.. .ma n.J: ^


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff Writer
At 78 and retired, Jo Smith is
torn between her desire to be
doing something, staying active,
and the necessity of working for
a living, albeit for 18 hours a
week.
And the hours of work are
limited because, by the rules of
Medicaid, she is only allowed to
make so much to supplement
her meager Social Security
check.
Smith, who works at one of the
Senior Community Centers op-
erated by the county, is part of a
burgeoning retired population,
subsisting often on small Social
Security checks, but needing to
work to put food on the table.


"I don't mind being here be-
cause I enjoy interacting with
the people and being out of the
house, but I worked all my life
and raised six children. So it
would have been nice at 78 to
be traveling or doing other
things, but I am here ..." she
said with a shrug.
"My advice to any young per-
son is save, save and save for
your retirement. It will give you ..
peace of mind when you get to
be my age," Smith said.
She makes $1,140 a month --
from Social Security and about
$400 or $500 from her extra MATTHEWBECK/Chronicle
work, but her expenses quickly Jo Smith works at the receptionist desk Friday at
swallow up most of her income, the Citrus County Community Center, earning
She lives in a senior housing extra money to help make ends meet. She has
worked through the Experience Works program,
See Page A8 which helps seniors return to the workforce.


CITRUS COUNTY

QUALTfY
UOFE
LIFFE



2012 Chronicle project


Senior meals

feed body

and soul
Editor's note: The
Chronicle offers a
monthly series on
quality-of-life issues in
Citrus County by focus-
ing on seniors.
NANCY KENNEDY
Staff Writer
-LECANTO
For Jerry Maltman,
the daily noon
meal every Mon-
day through Friday at
the Central Citrus Com-
munity Center means
the difference between
eating and not eating.
"I'm not embarrassed
to say it This is my main
meal every day," he said.
Maltman, 66, lives
alone and is battling an
incurable leukemia.
"I think a lot of people
come here for financial
reasons, even though
they might not say so,"
he said.
On Saturday, Malt-
man eats a meal at St
See Page A9

MORE INSIDE
Senior protests drug
costs./Page A5
Reverse mortgage:
When ends don't
meet./Page A10
Getting around
town./Page A10
The cost of late-life
love./Page All
Assisted living
provides more
choices./Page All


New festival kicks off in Old Homosassa


Rotary club starts new tradition

with Shrimpa Palooza


SHEMIR WILES
Staff Writer
HOMOSASSA Starting
off the festivities with a pa-
rade down Yulee Drive, the
inaugural Shrimpa Palooza
brought the spirit of Mardi
Gras to Homosassa with an
Old Florida twist.
Serving as the grand mar-


shal of the parade, County
Commissioner JJ Kenney
waved and flung beads to
the crowd as he made his
way by car down the parade
route.
Crystal River High
School's Golden Pirate
Band brought a bit of music
to the demonstration as
other groups such as the


Nature Coast Marines, We
Care Food Pantry and the
Old Homosassa Kart Cruis-
ers strutted their stuff down
to South Boulevard Drive,
where the parade ended.
Cassidy Struble, 4, and
Cody Struble, 6, cheered on
the procession and collected
beads from passers-by as
their mother, Stephanie
Struble, looked on.
When asked what
brought them out to
Shrimpa Palooza,
Stephanie Struble said her


son walked in the parade
with Nature Coast Young
Marines.
"And the kids love pa-
rades," she added.
On the Homosassa Civic
Club's property across from
the elementary school, ac-
tivity began to stir The lines
at both entrances to the fes-
tival stretched to the street
as people eagerly waited to
enter.
Sue Miller, who was en-
joying the music and the
smells of good cooking in


the eating area, said she's
lived in Homosassa for 20
years and was "as happy as
a lark" when she first heard
about Shrimpa Palooza.
"I think it's great," she
said. "(Old Homosassa)
needed something like
this."
Miller said she came to
Shrimpa Palooza with a
group of about 25 people
and everyone was having a
great time. It's her hope it
becomes a yearly affair.
See .Page A2


/B1










SUE 231





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


The Week IN REVIEW


Editor's note: From business
bigwigs gathering in Citrus
County to lurking coyotes and
cyber-extortion, the news of this
past week has been interesting.
Top local stories included:
She's a he and in trouble
A supposed woman who finagled a
local teacher into offering dicey and
compromising dialogue in online corre-
spondence is now facing felony extor-
tion charges. "She" burly and
bearded is Toledo, Ohio, area resi-
dent James Barker- and he was extra-
dited to Citrus and then released on a
$10,000 bond.
Out in the boondocks
Another sexual-in-nature arrest was
made in the boondocks of Citrus County.
The owner of Boondocks General Store
in Floral City was accused this past
week of sexual battery on a 15-year-old
girl for allegedly providing her with
drugs, alcohol and cigarettes in ex-
change for sexual favors. Authorities
were told Sanjaykumar Ramanbhai
Patez, 42, of Dade City, threatened the
child's life if she were to report the ac-
tivity to law enforcement.
Putting best foot forward
From the seamy to the significant,
Citrus County put out the welcome mat
for the state's elite business leaders,
hosting the Tampa Bay Partnership and
showing off some of the area's great
points of pride. The dignitaries wined
and dined in Terra Vista, golfed in Black
Diamond, toured the Progress Energy
complex and enjoyed the accommoda-
tions at The Plantation, where the
economic-development-based shindig
was headquartered. "It's a real water-
shed for Citrus County," local Economic


Development Council Executive Direc-
tor John Siefert said.
Crafty critters cause concern
While business leaders were looking
around the county, it is coyotes lurking
around the county that raised the con-
cerns of a Pine Ridge resident. "They
jump my 4-foot fence. They can clear a
6-foot fence. They jump in and out,"
said the resident, adding that he lost a
cat to the critters. A rancher from one
of Citrus County's pioneer families said
he has seen the numbers of coyotes
climb in recent decades.
Politics goes full circle
Coyotes aren't the only wily entity
making the headlines this past week.
Turned down in her legal effort to get on
the ballot to seek a seat in Congress, for-
mer state representative, state senator
and public service commissioner Nancy
Argenziano announced hopes to return
to the state House, challenging state
Rep. Jimmie T Smith. "He does not have
the knowledge, experience, or inde-
pendence to represent them the way
they deserve," the newfound Independ-
ent said of the Inverness Republican she
will challenge.
Renourishment at Fort Island
Residents wishing to avoid digni-
taries, perverts, politicians and
coyotes always have one option:
Head out to Fort Island Gulf Beach.
A whopping 320,000 pounds of sand
have been spread along the shoreline
as part of the periodic renourishment
of the park on the Gulf. While beachgo-
ers this weekend will appreciate
that the project was completed well
ahead of the anticipated March 31
deadline, seagulls won't, having lost
exclusive use of the facility. Beachgoers
beware.


. -. "









Stephanie Struble, takes photos Saturday during a parade that kicked off the inaugural
Shrimp Palooza festival in Old Homosassa.


SHRIMP
Continued from PageAl
The Rotary Club of Ho-
mosassa Springs the serv-
ice organization behind
Shrimpa Palooza hopes so,
too.
"It's amazing," said Tom
Feeney, who's a member of
the Rotary Club of Ho-


mosassa Springs. "We got a
lot of support from the com-
munity ... We're shocked at
how many people are here.
We have thousands of people
here right now."
Marybeth Nayfield, the
club's secretary, said there
were about six food vendors
plus more than 70 arts and
crafts vendors and nonprofit
groups on site.
"The place is packed. I'm


so excited," she said. "If it
stays like this all day, we'll be
fine."
Bill Dickerson, a vendor
who was selling a variety of
novelty signs, said the crowd
was holding steady, and he
was pleased to see so many
people in attendance.
"I see a real good possibil-
ity of this being annual. This
is a very good first-year
turnout," he said.


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000AS45


A2 SUNDAY, MARCH 25, 2012


LOCAL


q"s


som-







Page A3 SUNDAY, MARCH 25, 2012



TATE&


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE




THOTATE Seniors on board's agenda


Citrus County
Applications available
for convention
Delegate applications are
now available for the Florida
Democratic State Conven-
tion, which will take place
June 1-3 in Tampa. Forms for
delegates are due to the Cit-
rus County Democratic Exec-
utive Committee (CCDEC) by
April 27. Election caucus will
be held May 5.
Forms can be obtained
from any county leader or by
going online at
www.fladems.com.

Aloma

Post office evacuated
after chemical spill
Officials said a central
Florida post office had to be
evacuated after a chemical
spill sickened more than 20
people.
Orange County Fire Res-
cue spokeswoman
Genevieve Latham said
about 20 people reported
feeling ill Saturday morning
after the spill inside the
Aloma post office.
Latham said some people
were coughing but declined to
be treated at a hospital, and
no one was seriously injured.
Fire rescue officials said
the 2-foot-wide spill was in
the mail sorting facility. Fire-
fighters determined the
chemical was non-hazardous
and was most likely used as
a cleaning solution.
The post office resumed its
normal business once the
chemical was identified.

Miami
Officers attacked by
crash victim
MIAMI Miami police say
three officers had to be
treated at a hospital after a
hit-and-run crash victim at-
tacked them.
Police spokeswoman
Kenia Reyes said the officers
responded early Saturday to
a 911 call about a man who
had been hit by a taxi that
fled the scene.
Police said the bloodied,
partially naked man was
beating good Samaritans
who were trying to help him
before he became belligerent
and combative with officers
on the scene.
Reyes said three officers
were treated at a hospital for
their injuries. One officer had
a fractured arm and head
injuries.
The taxi has not been
found.

Panama City
Beach

Man on spring break
dies in condo fall
Police said a Wisconsin
man on spring break in the
Florida Panhandle has died
after falling from a condo-
minium balcony.
Panama City Beach Police
said 21-year-old Jacob M.
Winker of Menomonee Falls,
Wis., fell early Saturday from a
balcony on the seventh floor.
Police say the death is
under investigation but no
foul play is suspected. An au-
topsy is pending.

Key West
Man charged with
sex trafficking
A Key West man was
charged Saturday with sex
trafficking, and authorities
said it's the first such arrest in
Monroe County.
Derrick Wilson was
charged with coercing a North
Carolina woman into having
sex for money, said a sheriff's
office spokeswoman.
Jail records did not show
whether Wilson had an attorney.
The woman told detectives
she came to the Keys in Feb-


ruary with her boyfriend, but
they argued and she left the
boat where they were staying.
-From staff and wire reports


CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff Writer
The needs of older resi-
dents will be considered
under several agenda topics
at Tuesday's meeting of the
Citrus County Board of
County Commissioners
(BOCC).
Under grant-related
items, board members will
be asked to apply for fund-
ing for the Community
Care for the Elderly Pro-
gram, with funding antici-
pated at $383,211
requiring a county cash
match of $42,579; for fund-
ing for the Alzheimer's
Disease Initiative Pro-
gram, with funding antici-
pated at $59,188 and no
county match required;
and for funding for Home
Care for the Elderly Pro-
gram to encourage the
provision of care for eld-
ers in private homes.


At 2 p.m., the board will
acknowledge receipt of a
donation from the Friends
of Community Centers to
the Citrus County Support
Services Meals Program.
The board will be asked
to execute a certification
of local government ap-
proval for nonprofit organ-
izations submitted by
Mission in Citrus for its
emergency shelter grant
facilities program. It is
seeking funding from the
Florida Department of
Children and Families Of-
fice on Homelessness.
Also subject for approval
will be the sale of property
at 3474 E. Carey Place, In-
verness, under the Neigh-
borhood Stabilization
Program.
County administrative
regulations will be reviewed
and discussed. These have
been crafted or revised to
reflect current operations


SO YOU KNOW
WHAT: Citrus County
Board of County
Commissioners (BOCC)
meeting.
WHEN: 1 p.m. Tuesday,
March 27. Public
questions and
comments at 1:30 p.m.
WHERE: Citrus County
Courthouse, Room 100,
110 N. Apopka Ave.,
Inverness.
and policies. They cover
such topics as news re-
leases, non-sufficient funds
check policy, purchasing
policy, signage on private
roads, use of the Historic
County Courthouse
grounds, right of way uti-
lization and debt manage-
ment, among other subjects.
The board will be asked to
retire some outdated ad-
ministrative regulations. It


will be asked to approve
some organizational
changes in several
departments.
At 4 p.m., Betty Strifler,
clerk of courts, will be pre-
sented the award for "Cer-
tificate of Achievement For
Excellence in Financial Re-
porting," regarding the com-
prehensive annual financial
report
A public hearing will be
held at 5:01 p.m. to consider
an application by C.K. De-
velopers LLC to redesignate
a parcel of about 27.5 acres
of land from low-density
residential to commercial at
2630 W Gulf-to-Lake High-
way, Lecanto, which backs
up to Citrus County Deten-
tion Center
At a 5:15 p.m. public hear-
ing, the board will be asked
to change multiple land use
designations of the land de-
velopment code atlas for
consistency with the com-


prehensive plan.
At the request of the
Southwest Florida Water
Management Board, the
BOCC will proclaim the
month of April as water con-
servation month in Citrus
County
On the consent agenda,
the board will be asked to
agree to facilitate the
takeover of services of
NCRS Disposal by ED.S Dis-
posal; approve a bid of
$380,890 by Daly & Zilch Inc.
of Lecanto for a Meadow-
crest Lift Station improve-
ment project; approve a
purchase agreement to lo-
cate the Ozello booster sta-
tion on West Venable Street;
and receive Citrus Memorial
Health Foundation's finan-
cial statement and inde-
pendent auditors' report
Chronicle reporter Chris
Van Ormer can be reached
at cvanormer@chronicle
online. com or 352-564-2916.


Supporting the YMCA


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Citrus County residents got together Saturday evening for a fundraiser to support the Citrus County Branch of the YMCA of the Suncoast at
the Steve and Jewel Lamb Toy Barn in Crystal River. Participants from left are Joanna Castle, Jewel Lamb, Jeff Dawsy, Joe
Cappuccilli, Stan and Betty Olsen and Dondi Cappuccilli. The funds raised will go to support YMCA programs and to allow the organization
to offer financial assistance to families so programs can be made available to all children.


Supervisor of elections

announces qualifying

dates for candidates
Special to the Chronicle ness, FL 34450.
Candidates qualifying by
Citrus County Supervisor the petition method will
of Elections Susan Gill has need to have the required
announced candidate quali- 981 valid petition cards to


fying for State
Attorney, Pub- Offices
lic Defender,
and Judicial election
Offices for the
2012 election clerk
cycle begins at
noon Monday, circuit
April 16, and Sheriff,
ends noon Fri-
day, April 20. appraiS
Candidates
for Federal Of- collect
fice and Cir-
cuit-Level superin
Judicial Office of sc|
qualify with
the Division of
Elections, R.A.
Gray Building, Room 316,
500 S. Bronough St., Talla-
hassee, FL 32399-0250. Call
850-245-6200, or visit
http://election.dos.state.fl.us
for more information.
Qualifying for all other
candidates local, county,
multi-county, statewide, dis-
trict and non-partisan can-
didates (including write-in
candidates) will begin
noon Monday, June 4, and
end noon, Friday, June 8.
Qualifying will be in the Su-
pervisor of Elections Office,
120 N. Apopka Ave., Inver-


the Supervisor
Sup for of Elections
Sup for Office by noon
include on May 7.
County of-
of the fices up for
the 2012 elec-
court, tion are clerk
property of the circuit
court, sheriff,
5er, tax property ap-
praiser, tax
tor and collector, su-
perintendent
tendent of schools, su-
hools. pervisor of
elections,
board of
county com-
missioners Districts 1, 3,
and 5, school board member
Districts 2 and 4 and Ho-
mosassa Special Water Dis-
trict Seats 1, 3 and 5.
For information concern-
ing the elections for the
cities of Crystal River and
Inverness, please call their
respective City Clerk for
candidate information.
Call Elizabeth Atkinson,
qualifying officer, at 352-
341-6751 for further informa-
tion or visit the Supervisor of
Elections office website at
www.votecitrus.com.


Attorneys in Trayvon Martin

case make arguments


Associated Press
MIAMI Attorneys for
the family of Trayvon Mar-
tin and the Florida neigh-
borhood watch captain who
fatally shot the unarmed
teen joined the national
chorus of voices calling Sat-
urday for justice in the case.
As demonstrators took to
the streets in major cities
such as Washington and
Chicago to voice outrage
over Martin's death and the
local police investigation of
it, an attorney for the Mar-
tin family told board mem-
bers of the National
Association of Black Jour-
nalists that federal and
local officials have assured
the family that the case is a
priority.
Meanwhile, an attorney
representing the neighbor-
hood watch captain, 28-
year-old George
Zimmerman, broadly de-
fended his client and said
he believes evidence will
show that Florida's "Stand
Your Ground" law was
properly applied.
Zimmerman has not
been charged in the Feb. 26
shooting that has ignited
racial tensions and raised
questions about the San-
ford police's handling of
the case. Martin was black,
and Zimmerman's father is
white and his mother is
Hispanic.


Associated Press
Feriha Kaya attends a rally demanding justice for Trayvon
Martin on Saturday at Freedom Plaza in Washington. Mar-
tin, an unarmed young black teen, was fatally shot by a vol-
unteer neighborhood watchman.


"Is George a racist? The
answer is no, absolutely
not. He's not a racist," at-
torney Craig Sonner said
about his client "The inci-
dent that transpired is not
racially motivated or a hate
crime in any way It was
self-defense."
Sonner said he's spoken
with several of Zimmer-
man's friends, including
some who are African-
American.
"They only have good
things to say about him,"
Sonner said.
They're reluctant to
come forward, though, be-
cause they fear that the


backlash over the investi-
gation will make them and
their families targets, too,
Sonner said.
Sonner declined to detail
what transpired between
Zimmerman and the 17-
year-old Martin, but he said
he believes the case falls
under Florida's stand-your-
ground law, which dictates
that a person has the right
to stand his or her ground
and "meet force with force"
if attacked.
"I believe what the evi-
dence will show is that this
case does fall under that,"
Sonner said. "I believe we
have a good case."


I



I






A4 SUNDAY, MARCH 25, 2012


Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
DUI arrests
Patina Ann Slaughter,
50, of 402 W. Sugarmaple
Lane, Beverly Hills, at 10:42
p.m. Wednesday on a misde-
meanor charge of driving under
the influence. According to the
arrest report, Slaughter was
pulled over on State Road 200
for having an expired tag. Upon
contact with Slaughter, a deputy
noted she smelled of alcohol
and appeared under the influ-
ence of alcohol. She reportedly
failed all field sobriety tasks she
was asked to perform and re-
fused to submit to an approved
test of her breath. Bond $500.
Nadina Ann Spence, 50,
of 4968 E. Slough Court, Her-
nando, at midnight Thursday on
a misdemeanor charge of driv-
ing under the influence. Accord-
ing to the arrest report, Spence
was pulled over on County
Road 491 near the entrance to
Black Diamond after deputies
observed her tailing a car too
closely. Spence reportedly
smelled of alcohol and failed
most of the field sobriety tasks
she was asked to perform. Her




TEACHER
Continued from Page Al

"Kristy Campbull" retali-
ated by sending emails al-
leging wrongdoing on the
teacher's part to her super-
visors and the media. A
sheriff's office investigation
led to the arrest on an ex-
tortion charge of James
Barker, an Ohio man who
authorities said posed as
"Kristy Campbull."
The teacher's reprimand
is not specifically tied to the
online relationship, assis-
tant superintendent of
schools Mike Mullen said.


blood alcohol concentrations
were 0.136 percent and 0.146
percent. The legal limit in
Florida 0.08 percent. Bond
$500.
Frances Carlene Jessup,
47, of 2012 N. Twig Point, In-
verness, at 10:24 p.m. Thurs-
day on a misdemeanor charge
of driving under the influence.
According to the arrest report,
Jessup was stopped for speed-
ing on U.S. 41 in Inverness.
She reportedly appeared
under the influence of a con-
trolled substance and smelled
of alcohol. According to the re-
port, Jessup failed most of the
field sobriety tasks she was
asked to perform and her blood
alcohol concentrations were
0.094 percent and 0.101 per-
cent. The legal limit in Florida
0.08 percent. She also provided
a urine sample to be tested.
Bond $500.
Other arrest
Leroy Kasheem Holley,
32, of 8700 N. Meyer Square,
Dunnellon, at 2:34 p.m. Thurs-
day on a felony charge of driv-
ing with a suspended/revoked
license (habitual traffic offender)
Bond $2,000.


Rather, the teacher erred
by posing for two "inappro-
priate pictures" on school
board property, whether
they were emailed or not.
"It's not professional be-
havior," Mullen said.
Neither photo shows any-
thing explicit. Mullen said
students were not around
when the photos were taken.
The photos show the
teacher in a joking pose -
in one, painting a locker and
the other, inside a school
storage room.
Her principal said the
photos were not a joking
matter.
"This is a very serious of-
fense that cannot be toler-


For the RECORD


SHAM
Continued from Page Al

Authorities charged
Barker, of the Toledo-area
community of Swanton, with
extortion, a felony that car-
ries a maximum sentence of
15 years in prison.
He spent 11 days in the
Fulton County, Ohio, jail be-
fore being extradited March
16 to the Citrus County jail.
Barker quickly posted
$10,000 bond and drove
home to Ohio the next day
In interviews last week,
Barker admitted he took on
the Facebook identity of a
woman he knew in Colorado
and exchanged messages,
emails and even phone con-
versations with the teacher.
"I feel bad. I admit what I
did was wrong," Barker said
during a telephone conver-
sation with the Chronicle.
Citrus County Sheriff's
Office officials said Barker,
posing as Kristy Campbull,
had an online relationship
with the teacher.
They said when the
teacher wanted to end the
relationship, Barker as


ated," he wrote in her Feb.
28 reprimand letter. "As ed-
ucators and role models, we
must abstain from any con-
duct that would diminish or
hinder our effectiveness in
the school and the
community."
As for the online relation-
ship, Mullen said the dis-
trict's responsibilities with
employees stop at their per-
sonal use. He said none of the
teacher's online correspon-
dence occurred on school
grounds, with school equip-
ment or during school time.
Veteran school board
member Pat Deutschman
said the district cannot
meddle in an employee's


I made a mistake. I'm obviously

at fault. I've lost a $50,000-a-year

job; I may lose my house

over this. I may lose my

marriage over this.
James Barker
charged with extortion of a local teacher.


Campbull threatened to
ruin her life by alleging to
authorities and the media
that she had inappropriate
contact with a minor.
The teacher, whom the
Chronicle is not identifying
due to the nature of charges,
approached the CCSO and
her school district superiors
in mid-February to explain
about the relationship and
the threats. A few days later,
"Kristy Campbull" sent
emails to several school dis-
trict officials and the Chron-
icle alleging wrongdoing on
the teacher's part.
Barker would not say how
he met the teacher on Face-
book, why he disguised him-
self as a woman or why he
sent the threatening emails
after the teacher broke off
the relationship.


personal life.
"We are not entitled to
govern people's private
lives," she said. "We have


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Campbull." He said he has
been married about three
years but now believes the
marriage is in trouble be-
cause of his arrest. He said
he has no children.
"I made a mistake. I'm ob-
viously at fault," he said.
"I've lost a $50,000-a-year
job; I may lose my house
over this. I may lose my mar-
riage over this."
Barker said he intends to
write letters of apology to
the teacher and Citrus
County School District
officials.
Still, in a Friday inter-
view, Barker was incredu-
lous that the newspaper
wasn't identifying the
teacher.
"If my name is going to be
thrown out there, hers
should too," he said.
Barker said he doesn't de-
serve prison for what he's
done.
"Based on my back-
ground," he said, "I don't
think jail would be
appropriate."
Chronicle reporter Mike
Wright can be reached at
352-563-3228 or wright@
chronicleonline. com.


Chronicle reporter Mike
Wright can be reached at
352-563-3228 or mwright@
chronicleonline. com.


tegal notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle

Bid Notices...............................................D7

Meeting Notices.................................. D7
.- Miscellaneous Notices............................D7

Notice to Creditors/Administration........ D7

Self Storage Notices............................D7

.. Surplus Property......................................D7


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
SPR --HI LO PR |HI LO PR
0.00 85 64 trace -,J 84 60 0.00


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
pc
ts
ts
s
ts
pc
pc
pc
sh


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


L F'cast
67 ts
55 s
60 pc
58 s
61 ts
52 s
60 ts
58 ts
66 ts


MARINE OUTLOOK


Northwest winds around 15 knots.
Seas 2 to 4 feet. Bay and inland
waters will have a moderate chop.
Mostly sunny today.


84 64 0.00 83 64 0.00

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Exclusive aily
. TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
L High: 78 Low: 54
Early AM showers exit; clearing and
L breezy
1 MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 79 Low: 55
Sunny to partly cloudy

i B TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
High: 82 Low: 56
Partly cloudy

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 89/59
Record 92/31
Normal 79/51
Mean temp. 74
Departure from mean +9
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday 0.00 in.
Total for the month 0.60 in.
Total for the year 3.83 in.
Normal for the year 9.36 in.
*As of 6 p m at Inverness
UV INDEX: 9
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Saturday at 3 p.m. 29.96 in.


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 61
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 45%
POLLEN COUNT**
Grasses and weeds were absent and
Today's active pollen:
Oak, juniper, bayberry
Today's count: 8.4/12
Monday's count: 11.0
Tuesday's count: 10.9
Saturday was good with pollutants
mainly ozone.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
3/25 SUNDAY 8:10 1:58 8:32 2:21
3/26 MONDAY 9:01 2:49 9:24 3:12
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK


APRIL 13 APRIL 21
APRIL13 APRIL21


SUNSET TONIGHT 7:45 PM.
SUNRISE TOMORROW .....................7:27 A.M.
MOONRISE TODAY ...........................8:57 A.M.
MOONSET TODAY 10:40 PM.


BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof .com/fire weather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
One-day-per-week irrigation schedule as follows for addresses ending in:
0 or 1 Monday, 2 or 3 Tuesday, 4 or 5 Wednesday, 6 or 7
- Thursday, 8 or 9 & subdivision common areas Friday. Before 8 a.m. or
after 6 p.m.
Hand watering of non-grass areas can take place any day before 8 a.m. or
after 6 p.m.
PLEASE CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL NEW PLANT MATERIAL. Citrus
County Water Resources can explain additional watering allowances for
qualified plantings.
Questions, concerns or reporting violations, please call Citrus County at
352-527-7669, or email waterconservation@bocc.citrus.fl.us.


TIDES
*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Sunday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 8:13 a/3:52 a 7:48 p/3:44 p
Crystal River** 6:34 a/1:14 a 6:09 p/1:06 p
Withlacoochee* 4:21 a/10:54 a 3:56 p/11:34 p
Homosassa*** 7:23 a/2:51 a 6:58 p/2:43 p


***At Mason's Creek
Monday
High/Low High/Low
8:49a/4:24a 8:15 p/4:12 p
7:10 a/1:46 a 6:36 p/1:34 p
4:57 a/11:22 a 4:23 p/--
7:59 a/3:23 a 7:25 p/3:11 p


Gulf water
temperature


80
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 27.15 27.12 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 33.58 33.56 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lInverness 35.48 35.46 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 37.43 37.42 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211

THE NATION


Annog "anau


S 90s g ,
Houton
4orm'u'- --'

80s9 - ,
FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY


Saturday Sunday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
Albany 55 48 sh 57 38
Albuquerque 76 44 pc 81 47
Asheville 69 55 .01 sh 67 47
Atlanta 71 60 .01 pc 73 53
Atlantic City 61 53 .11 sh 58 50
Austin 82 46 s 85 57
Baltimore 61 55 .67 sh 67 53
Billings 46 32 s 69 43
Birmingham 73 54 pc 77 55
Boise 63 37 pc 71 43
Boston 58 47 sh 50 40
Buffalo 58 50 .17 sh 55 33
Burlington, VT 47 39 sh 53 29
Charleston, SC 82 62 .35 ts 76 55
Charleston, WV 66 56 .13 sh 67 47
Charlotte 78 62 .24 ts 74 52
Chicago 63 51 pc 67 37
Cincinnati 65 52 .25 pc 67 48
Cleveland 68 55 .06 s 59 40
Columbia, SC 81 63 .49 ts 75 52
Columbus, OH 65 57 .14 s 66 43
Concord, N.H. 56 48 sh 49 34
Dallas 81 51 s 87 60
Denver 72 42 s 80 49
Des Moines 74 53 s 76 53
Detroit 62 53 .01 s 63 37
El Paso 85 46 s 89 61
Evansville, IN 66 48 s 74 50
Harrisburg 63 53 .68 sh 67 46
Hartford 64 52 sh 55 41
Houston 84 57 s 85 63
Indianapolis 66 51 s 72 45
Jackson 75 50 s 81 57
Las Vegas 78 58 pc 77 56
Little Rock 78 49 s 82 53
Los Angeles 63 53 sh 63 49
Louisville 65 51 pc 70 52
Memphis 74 51 s 76 57
Milwaukee 60 46 s 57 37
Minneapolis 70 51 pc 62 43
Mobile 81 64 s 82 56
Montgomery 77 62 s 80 57
Nashville 61 52 .22 pc 73 51
KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02012 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


Saturday Sunday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
New Orleans 81 59 s 82 62
New York City 65 55 sh 62 48
Norfolk 75 62 .27 ts 73 55
Oklahoma City 78 47 s 83 57
Omaha 79 47 s 78 55
Palm Springs 83 58 pc 71 50
Philadelphia 61 52 .05 sh 65 49
Phoenix 88 59 pc 88 56
Pittsburgh 67 61 .21 sh 67 38
Portland, ME 52 42 sh 46 35
Portland, Ore 64 46 sh 54 40
Providence, R.I. 60 47 sh 53 41
Raleigh 71 64 .49 ts 68 55
Rapid City 60 44 pc 71 46
Reno 67 34 sh 53 33
Rochester, NY 61 50 .02 sh 58 34
Sacramento 53 47 sh 55 43
St. Louis 75 52 s 76 53
St. Ste. Marie 52 46 s 45 25
Salt Lake City 72 50 pc 77 48
San Antonio 80 56 .01 s 85 57
San Diego 61 53 sh 64 53
San Francisco 53 44 .32 sh 55 45
Savannah 86 65 .53 pc 76 56
Seattle 58 38 sh 56 45
Spokane 49 30 pc 61 42
Syracuse 57 48 .07 sh 60 34
Topeka 76 48 s 81 53
Washington 65 57 .10 sh 69 53
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 94 Laredo, Texas LOW 15 Stanley, Idaho

WORLD CITIES


SUNDAY Lisbon
CITY H/L/SKY London
Acapulco 89/72/s Madrid
Amsterdam 62/38/s Mexico City
Athens 68/48/pc Montreal
Beijing 54/42/s Moscow
Berlin 60/33/s Paris
Bermuda 72/67/s Rio
Cairo 75/51/s Rome
Calgary 41/31/c Sydney
Havana 85/65/pc Tokyo
Hong Kong 68/59/pc Toronto
Jerusalem 69/48/s Warsaw


72/50/c
63/35/pc
70/42/pc
74/48/sh
49/28/sh
28/19/sf
68/42/pc
85/72/sh
63/54/pc
73/58/pc
53/38/pc
61/26/pc
57/30/pc


C I T R U S.


C U N TY -


Barker acknowledged
having phone conversations
with the teacher. Asked if he
disguised his voice to sound
like a woman, as Citrus
County sheriff's officials al-
lege, Barker would not say
He said sheriff's detec-
tives were able to trace the
threats through his em-
ployer because Barker in-
cluded his work cellphone
number on an email.
Barker said all his corre-
spondence with the teacher,
either online or by phone,
occurred either at his work-
place or with work equip-
ment. Before losing his job,
Barker was a recruiter for a
shipping company
Barker said he has never
been in trouble before and
did not correspond with
anyone else as "Kristy


our limitations on morality
and education, but we can't
dictate to people who they
have relationships with."


CHRONICLE
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N ill

Inverness
Courthouse office
Tompkins St. s square
.0 n 106 W. Main
S41 44 Inverness, FL
^ .-N 34450


Who's in charge:
G erry M u lliga n ............................................................................ P ub lish er, 5 6 3 -3 2 2 2
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Tom Feeney .................................................... Production Director, 563-3275
Kathie Stewart .............................................. Circulation Director, 563-5655
John M urphy ........................ ............................ Online M manager, 563-3255
John M urphy.................................................... Classified M manager, 564-3255
Jeff Gordon .................................................. Business M manager, 564-2908
Mike Arnold.................................... Human Resources Director, 564-2910
Report a news tip:
Opinion page questions.................................. Charlie Brennan, 563-3225
To have a photo taken ........................................ Darlene Mann, 563-5660
News and feature stories ............................... Sandra Frederick, 564-2930
Community/wire service content.......................... Sarah Gatling, 563-5660
Sports event coverage ...........................Jon-Michael Soracchi, 563-3261
S o u n d O ff ............................................................... .......................................... 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9
The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please
recycle your newspaper
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Published every Sunday through Saturday
By Citrus Publishing Inc.
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PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL
SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280


MARCH 30


0
APRIL 0


I-





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Drug costs infuriate one senior


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff Writer
Cleitus Orlando Murray
has a beef with the U.S. gov-
ernment, pharmaceutical
companies and bureaucra-
cies in general.
Murray said MEDI
he served his ASSIS
country in the
Pacific Theater 0 To cont
during World SHINE,
War II, got his Elder H
lungs seared in a 800-96
gas attack during (800-9(
that warand was or ema
given less than informal
two years to live. elderafl
But the irasci- m To find
ble son of West Medica
Virginia coal 800-ME
miners said, or go tc
"they have been medical
unable to get rid CITRUS
of me yet."
However, now QUA
at 86, Murray's
breathing is la- '
bored and he and
his ailing wife
Margaret are liv-
ing on a monthly
income of $1,400.
They pay $300 a month for
supplemental insurance,
$900 a year for auto insur-
ance, nearly $500 in groceries
a month and spend nearly
$300 a month on medications
for his wife's ailments. The


Veterans Administration (VA)
takes care of his medications,
he concedes.
The Murrays do not qual-
ify for discount drugs be-
cause he said he has $35,000
in life savings in a trust he


CARE
TANCE
act
call the
elpline at
-ELDER
63-5337)
ition@
fairs.org.
out about
re, call
MEDICARE
re.gov.
COUNTY

YEA&


intends to use for
his funeral and
for his children's
inheritance.
Medicare and
Medicaid have
financial thresh-
olds in order to
qualify for free
or discounted
drugs.
And, to make
matters worse
for Murray, he
claims pharma-
ceutical retailers
are preying on
customers.
He said he
went to get pills
for his wife one
at one retailer
and the pharma-
cists told him,
'We got a deal for
you; it will cost
$90.' He said he
proceeded to an-


"Why can they be so heart-
less? Look you in the eye and
lie to you. And you know, this
is happening all over the
country and the government
will not do anything about
it," Murray said.


He said he doesn't know
how money he earned and
saved can preclude him get-
ting further assistance from
Medicare or Medicaid with
drugs.
Vidya Hogan, director of


consumer services of Elder
Options of Gainesville,
which houses a SHINE pro-
gram, said Murray should
contact one of its offices.
Hogan said SHINE helps
guide seniors through a por-


tion of Medicare called Part
D or prescription drug in-
surance by pointing them to-
ward free programs and
giving those who are seeking
See .Page A6


S e a, DISCOUNTS AT THIS STORE ONLY


Se r CRYSTAL RIVER
t. ._ ~1801 NW US Highway 19


other one and, with almost
with the same line, they told
him it was going to be $80.
Murray said he went to a
third place and the medica-
tion was $22.


"A SURE-FIRE

CROWD PLEASER!"
-The New York Times


PRESENTED BY UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA PERFORMING ARTS
Friday, March 30 @ 7:30 p.m.
Saturday, March 31 @ 2 & 7:30 p.m.
PHILLIPS CENTER

Tickets are available at the Phillips Center Box Office,
by calling (800) 905-2787 or Ticketmaster at (800) 745-3000,
at all Ticketmaster outlets and at ticketmaster.com.


www.stomponline.com


www.performingarts.ufl.edu


STORE FIXTURES, FURNITURE & EQUIPMENT FOR SALE!

ALL SALES FINAL NO REFUNDS OR EXCHANGES. OPEN DAILY REGULAR HOURS. WE ACCEPT VISA, MASTERCARD, DISCOVER, AMERICAN EXPRESS AND SEARS
CARDS. WE ACCEPT SEARS GIFT CARDS. DISCOUNTS DO NOT APPLY TO PREPAID GIFT CARDS. INVENTORY IS LIMITED TO STOCK ON HAND. THIS STORE IS NOT
PARTICIPATING IN CURRENT SEARS CIRCULARS. 10K GOLD JEWELRY UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED. THIS EVENT EXCLUDES ELECTROLUX.
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fee, or reduced fee services, examination, or treatment. Cosmetic dentistry is not recognized as a specialty area by the American Dental Association '
the Florida Board of Dentistry. Some restrictions may apply.


11 14 0 I11 14I 1


QUALITY OF LIFE


SUNDAY, MARCH 25, 2012 A5





A6 SUNDAY, MARCH 25, 2012


Top New


Zealand


scientist


dies at 64
Associated Press

WELLINGTON, New
Zealand Sir Paul
Callaghan, a top New
Zealand scientist who
gained international
recognition for his work
in molecular physics, has
died after a long battle
with bowel cancer. He
was 64.
"New Zealand has suf-
fered a tremendous loss,"
Sir Peter Gluckman,
Prime Minister John
Key's chief science ad-
viser, said in a statement
Saturday "Paul has been
our most distinguished
public scientist and in
the world of molecular
physics has been a giant."
Callaghan, who was di-
agnosed with cancer in
2008, was best known for
his work with magnetic
resonance, a field that has
practical applications in
everything from health
care to industrial produc-
tion. He was also known
for his work on
nanoscience, which in-
volves studying properties
of substances at the scale
of the individual atom.
Callaghan won numer-
ous accolades over his ca-
reer, and was elected a
Fellow to the Royal Soci-
ety of London.



COSTS
Continued from Page A5

enrollment in a pay pro-
gram unbiased informa-
tion about options.
She said SHINE volun-
teers also help seniors
query Medicare bills and
file appeals about deci-
sions handed down by
Medicare.
Medicare is a govern-
ment-run health insur-
ance program for seniors.
To qualify, you have to be
65 years with a couple of
exceptions. If you are 62
and retired, you will not
qualify for Medicare un-
less you meet a disability
criterion.
John Clardy, a local
elder care attorney, said it
would probably be advis-
able for someone in Mur-
ray's situation to enroll in
a Medicare Part D plan
where the monthly fee
may be lower than what
he is paying for
medications.
"Generally, I find that
most of my clients are
mostly happy with
Medicare," Clardy said.
He added, though, that
people who do not meet
the under-$5,000-in-assets
threshold have very little
recourse to get extra help
with medication.
"It is really the unfortu-
nate part about the way
things are and whenever
things need to be cut, it
seems those services are
the first to go," he said.
Chronicle reporterAB.
Sidibe can be reached at
352-564-2925 or asidibe@
chronicleonline. cornm.

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or
Saralynne Schlumberger at 564-2917
sschlumberger@chronicleonline.com

L i4 pi


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries


Leon 'Dran'
Griner, 81
FLORAL CITY
The Service of Remem-
brance for Mr. Leon 0.
Griner, age 81, of Floral City,
Florida, will be held 3 p.m.
Sunday, March 25, 2012, at
the Inverness Chapel of
Hooper Funeral Homes
with Friendship Masonic
Lodge No. 53 officiating.
The family will receive
friends from 2 p.m. until 3
p.m. Sunday at the Chapel.
The family requests expres-
sions of sympathy take the
form of memorial donations
to Hospice of Citrus County,
PO Box 641270, Beverly
Hills, FL 34464. Online con-
dolences may be sent to the
family at www.Hooper
FuneralHome.com.
On March 20, 2012, Leon
Olen "Dran" Griner left his
family and friends to join
our Lord and answer the
call of the Whippoorwill in
the comfort of his home.
Born September 13,1930, to
Clarence and Mattie Alma
Griner in Tifton, GA. He
moved to Floral City in the
late 1950's after returning
from the Korean War, where
he served in the 7th Calvary
in the U.S. Army and re-
ceived a Silver Star. Dran
worked as a guard at the
Floral City Prison Road
Camp. He retired as a Su-
pervisor for the State Road
Maintenance Division sta-
tioned in Floral City Mr.
Griner was a member of the
Friendship Masonic Lodge
No. 53, Fellowship, FL, for
55 years and the Floral City
VFW Post 7122. Being
taught to fish by his
Grandma Harris, Dran was
an avid fisherman and he
also loved his family. Leon
was a familiar face at the
Floral City Foods, where he
and lifelong friends would
exchange and share stories
of local history, fishing,
hunting and who received
the most hugs from the
ladies. He always had a
smile and loved to laugh.
Mr. Griner was preceded
in death by his wife of 36
years, Eva Ray Tooke; par-
ents; and sister Vivian
Richards. Survivors include
daughter Amanda (Gene)
Mullen; son George Tooke; 2
grandchildren, Teresa
Johns and Joshua (Katie)
Mullen; 2 great-
grandchildren, Gregory
Johns and Charlotte Rae
Mullen; brother-in-law, J.S
Richards; 3 nephews, Dale
and Dennis Busbin and
John Richards.
Arrangements are under
the direction of the Hooper
Funeral Homes &
Crematory

OBITUARIES
The Citrus County Chroni-
cle's policy permits both
free and paid obituaries.
Obituaries must be veri-
fied with the funeral
home or society in
charge of arrangements.


Marilyn
Emberley, 83
CRYSTAL RIVER
Marilyn A. Emberley, 83,
of Crystal River, FL, died on
March 23, 2012, at her home
under the loving care of her
family and Hospice of Cit-
rus County.
She was born on August
28, 1928, the daughter of
Lester and Helen Davis, in
Marlborough, MA. Marilyn
was the owner of B&M Ad-
justment Inc before retiring
to Citrus County with her
husband Bill in 1987. She
was the past President of
the Massachusetts Insur-
ance Women Assoc., a Certi-
fied Public Insurance
Woman and taught public
speaking under L.A.C.E of
which she had 7 partici-
pants go to the National
Conference and 3 of those
were awarded 1st Place.
Marilyn was an avid golfer
and a member of the Citrus
Hills Golf & Country Club
and the Ladies 18th Hole
Golf League. She was a
member of the Seven Rivers
Presbyterian Church.
Survivors include her
husband of 45 years, Bill
Emberley; son, Dwight Ma-
honey of Auburn, WA;
daughters, Marcia Costello
of Marlborough MA, Brenda
Bushey of Marlborough, MA
and Linda McClure of Bald-
winville, MA; 11 grandchil-
dren and 14 great-
grandchildren.
A memorial service for
Mrs. Emberley will be held
at 2:00 p.m. on Monday,
March 26, 2012, at the Seven
Rivers Presbyterian Church
in Lecanto. In lieu of flow-
ers, donations may be given
to the Seven Rivers Chris-
tian School, 4221 W Gulf To
Lake Hwy, Lecanto, FL
34461 or Hospice of Citrus
County, PO. Box 641270, Bev-
erly Hills, FL 34464. Heinz
Funeral Home & Crema-
tion, Inverness, FL.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. corn

* If websites, photos,
survivors, memorial
contributions or other
information are in-
cluded, this will be des-
ignated as a paid
obituary and a cost es-
timate provided to the
sender.
A flag will be included
for free for those who
served in the U.S. mili-
tary. (Please note this
service when submit-
ting a free obituary.)
Paid obituaries may in-
clude the information
permitted in the free
obituaries, as well as
date of birth; parents'
names; predeceased
and surviving family
members; year married
and spouse's name
(date of death, if pre-
deceased by spouse);
religious affiliation; bi-
ographical information,
including education,
employment, military
service, organizations
and hobbies; officiating
clergy; interment/in-
urnment; and memorial
contributions.


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Margaret
'Marge'
Dearborn
A private graveside serv-
ice was held at Greenlawn
Memorial Gardens in
Lafayette, Louisiana for
Margaret "Marge" Dear-
born, who passed away at
her residence on Sunday,
March 18, 2012.
Survivors include three
daughters,
." Kathleen
Michaud of
Salem, MA,
Barbara
i Weldon, and
her hus-
W band,
William, of
Margaret New Hope,
Dearborn PA, and Pa-
tricia Dickerson of Inver-
ness, FL; one son, Earl
Dearborn, II, and his wife,
Kay, of Lafayette, LA; six
grandchildren, Elizabeth
and Ryan Weldon, Jim and
Michelle Michaud, and
Richard and Diana Dear-
born; and five great-grand-
children, Amanda Michaud,
Kirk Dyer, Sophie Michaud,
and Jason and Joseph
Dearborn.
She was preceded in
death by her husband, Earl
H. Dearborn; her parents,
Julia and John Kuchta; one
brother, John Kenna; and
three sisters, Irene Plan-
char, Mary Lewis, and
Helen Harris.
Margaret battled cancer
for 26 years, fighting four
cancers, and was an eight
year survivor of the most re-
cent bout.
She was a member of the
Medical Auxiliary in Citrus
County, FL, which was re-
sponsible for the creation of
Hospice of Citrus County.
While in Citrus County she
was also an active member
of the United Way She was
involved with the Girl
Scouts in West Newton, MA,
and the YWCA in Ridge-
wood, NJ. She also served
as an active volunteer in
Lafayette, LA for Hospice of
Acadiana, and the Miles
Perret Center.
In her free time, she en-
joyed working in her yard,
gardening, counseling can-
cer patients through the
Miles Perret Center, and
spending time with her
friends and family
In lieu of flowers, the fam-
ily requests that donations
be made to Hospice of Cit-
rus County, 8471 W Periwin-
kle Lane, Homosassa,
Florida, 34446.
View the obituary and
sign the guestbook online at
www.waltersfh.com.
Walters Funeral Home,
(337) 706-8941, 2424 North
University Avenue in
Lafayette, was in charge of
funeral arrangements.







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Bettyann
Smerecki, 74
INVERNESS
Bettyann Smerecki, 74, of
Inverness, passed away
Thursday, March 22,2012, at
Citrus Memorial hospital,
Inverness. She was born on
July 7, 1937, in Staten Is-
land, NY, to the late Julius
and Lenora (Eagle) Del
Grosso.
Bettyann arrived in the
area in 1986, with her late
husband, Casimer, coming
from Perth Amboy, New Jer-
sey She was a homemaker
and loved spending time
with her family and grand-
children, and enjoyed play-
ing the slots at Hard Rock
Casino. Bettyann was a
Catholic and a member of
Our Lady of Fatima Catholic
Church in Inverness.
She is survived by two
sons, Randall (Denise)
Smerecki of Roanoke, Vir-
ginia, and Raymond (Ash-
ley) Smerecki of Inverness,
Florida; one brother,
George Del Grosso of Staten
Island, New York; three sis-
ters, Joyce Pidgeon of New
Jersey, Dolores Stryker and
Marie Baker, both of Staten
Island, New York; and four
grandchildren, Brandon,
Alicia, Logan, and Casey
A visitation for family and
friends is scheduled for
Tuesday, March 27, 2 p.m.
until 4 p.m., and 6 p.m. until
8 p.m., with the vigil service
at 3 p.m. at Chas. E. Davis
Funeral Home, Inverness,
Florida. Urn placement will
occur at Florida National
Cemetery, Bushnell, Florida
on Thursday, March 29,
2012, at 2:30 p.m. Chas. E.
Davis Funeral Home with
Crematory, Inverness,
Florida, is assisting the fam-
ily with arrangements.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. com.

* Additionally, all obituar-
ies will be posted online
at www.chronicle
online.com.
Paid obituaries are
printed as submitted by
funeral homes.
Area funeral homes
with established ac-
counts with the Chroni-
cle are charged $8.75
per column inch.
Non-local funeral
homes and those with-
out accounts are re-
quired to pay in
advance by credit card,
and the cost is $10 per
column inch.


HOMOSRSRASSA HERITAGE DAY

WILDLIFE PRFm HOMOSASSA HERITAGE DAY


Nathalie
White, 94
BEVERLY HILLS,
Nathalie Pearl White, age
94, passed away on March
10, 2012, at home in Beverly
Hills, FL.
The family will receive
friends from 4 until 6 p.m.
Saturday, March 31, 2012, at
the Beverly Hills Chapel of
Hooper Funeral Homes.
Nathalie
was born
August 11,
1917, in De-
troit, Michi-
gan, the
daughter of
Alexander
and Julia
Nathalie Dunal. She
White was a grad-
uate of Fordson High School
in Dearborn, MI. Nathalie
worked for many years as a
bank teller, and was a de-
voted mother and home-
maker. In 1983, upon
retirement, she and her hus-
band, William White, moved
to Beverly Hills, FL, where
she became a formidable
bridge player. Nathalie was
a member of the Unity
Church of Citrus County,
Lecanto.
Nathalie was preceded in
death by her parents, her
husband, daughter Susan
Lola Genna and sister Lola
Gerard. Survivors include
son, Dr. Russell (Suzanne)
LaBeau; 6 grandchildren;
and 8 great-grandchildren.
The family requests ex-
pressions of sympathy take
the form of memorial dona-
tions to Unity Church of Cit-
rus County, 2628 West
Woodview Lane, Lecanto,
FL 34461. Online condo-
lences may be sent to the
family at www.Hooper
FuneralHome.com.

* Non-local funeral
homes and those with-
out accounts are re-
quired to pay in
advance by credit card,
and the cost is $10 per
column inch.
Small photos of the de-
ceased's face can be in-
cluded for an additional
charge.
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear in
the next day's edition.
Email obits@chronicle
online.com or fax 352-
563-3280.
Phone 352-563-5660
for details.


Saturday. lMarch 31,2012
10:00 anil to 4:00 pin
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OBITUARIES


L-
,1


I





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Fire damages home

in Crystal River


SHEMIR WILES
Staff Writer

CRYSTAL RIVER A
home already scheduled for
demolition was damaged
after an alleged illegal burn
got out of control Saturday
morning.
Firefighters responded at
11:13 a.m. to 4545 N. Talla-
hassee Road after a call
came in to dispatch about a
reported structure fire. The
first unit from the Rock
Crusher fire station on
scene reportedly discovered
smoke coming from the
single-family residence's
attic and a large illegal burn
ablaze in the back of the
home.
Units from DeRosa, Bev-
erly Hills, Pine Ridge and
Citrus Springs stations as
well as firefighters from the


Crystal River Fire Depart-
ment assisted with putting
out the fire.
Responders were able to
contain the fire to the struc-
ture before it was com-
pletely extinguished.
According to a fire inci-
dent report, the home was
set to be destroyed and peo-
ple were cleaning up the
property and burning the
debris when the blaze
caught a nearby shed on
fire. The fire then spread to
the residence.
Division of Forestry was
called to further investigate
the fire, and the damage to
the house and its contents is
estimated at $25,000.
Chronicle reporter
Shemir Wiles can be
reached at 352-564-2924 or
swiles@chronicleonline.
comn.


SO YOU KNOW
* Citrus County Sheriff's Office/Fire Rescue Chief Larry
Morabito said the fire service is seeking volunteers to
serve alongside paid staff at all stations, including:
* Combat Firefighter engages in direct fire and res-
cue activities.
* Support Unit Firefighter operates outside of the
hazard zone to support other firefighters.
* Rehab Unit operates outside the hazard zone and
provides refreshments at scenes.
* Fire Safety House/Fire Marshal's Office This office
visits various locations such as schools and daycares
to teach children and adults about fire safety.
* Office details Various clerical-related duties.
* Approval to become a volunteer consists of a driver's
license check, criminal background check, drug
screening, medical examination and approval by the
Fire Chief. Processing an application takes four to six
weeks.
* Volunteer applications are available at the Citrus
County Fire Rescue administrative office at the
Lecanto Government Building, Suite 291, or download
the form from the Web page at http://www.sheriff
citrus.org/firerescue/fire_rescue.html.
* For more information, call John Beebe, volunteer coor-
dinator, at 352-527-5406.
* Read a PDF of frequently asked questions on the
sheriff's office website at http://www.sheriffcitrus.org/
firerescue/training/volunteer faq.pdf.


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DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Jim Brosey, left, thanks the firemen who came to put out a fire Saturday in one of the homes at 608 Mellon Terrace in
the older section of Inverness.


Fire threatens mobile home park


DAVE SIGLER
Staff Writer

Sirens wailed Saturday
as fire engines responded
to a fully engulfed mobile
home fire at 608 Mellon
Terrace in Leeson's Mobile
Home Park on Lake Hen-
derson in the old part of
Inverness.
The peace of the water-
front park was rocked when
the sound of an explosion
cracked Lois Girard's win-
dow while she was reading
a magazine at her kitchen
table.
"My cat jumped up and
ran under the couch," Gi-
rard said. "It sounded like
an explosion. Man, I didn't
know what it was."
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The first resident told her
to tell officials the fire was
on Mellon "right behind
me; I'm on Conrow," she
said because they forgot
to tell the operator the
street
Park manager Jim
Brosey had already started
fighting the fire.
"We were fighting it be-
fore they got here," Brosey
said. "I knew if it ever got
loose, I knew it (the park)
was gone."
Firefighters arrived and
manage to control the fire
in the home, manufactured
in the mid-1970s, before it
became totally involved.
According to Citrus
County Fire Services Capt.
Chris Dozier, it was a "nor-


mal response." Dozier said
emergency responders are
always concerned when a
mobile home park fire
happens.
Brosey praised the fire-
fighters, saying, "they made
good time getting here, or
we could have lost a lot of


trailers."
The resident of the home
was at work at the time and
no one was injured.
As firemen mopped up,
Ron Middleton, owner of
Leeson's Mobile Home
Park, documented the loss
with notes and photos.


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A8 SUNDAY, MARCH 25, 2012

CITRUS COUNTY SCHOOLS
Elementary schools
All meals include juice and milk.
Breakfast
Monday: Ultra cinnamon
bun, grits, cereal and toast.
Tuesday: Ham, egg and
cheese on warm flatbread, tater
tots, cereal and toast.
Wednesday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, grits, cereal and
toast.
Thursday: Breakfast egg
and cheese wrap, oatmeal with
fruit, tater tots, cereal and toast.
Friday: Pancake slider, grits,
cereal and toast.
Lunch
Monday: Baked chicken
nuggets, sausage pizza, PB
dippers, fresh garden salad,
sweet peas, seasoned rice,
mixed fruit.
Tuesday: Baked chicken
tenders, turkey super salad, yo-
gurt parfait, fresh baby carrots,
sweet corn, fruit juice bar,
crackers.
Wednesday: Pasta with
mozzarella and meat sauce,
mozzarella MaxStix, PB dip-
pers, fresh garden salad, green
beans, chilled applesauce.
Thursday: Hamburger on
bun, uncrusted PBJs, apple
chicken super salad, yogurt
parfait, fresh baby carrots,
ranch pasta salad, strawberry
cup, crackers.
Friday: HALF DAY: Breaded
chicken sandwich, tuna salad
sandwich, fresh baby carrots,
fruit juice bar.
Middle schools
All meals include juice and milk.
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast sausage
pizza, MVP breakfast, grits, ce-
real and toast.
Tuesday: Sausage, egg and
cheese biscuit, ultra cinnamon
bun, tater tots, cereal and toast.
Wednesday: Breakfast egg
and cheese wrap, MVP break-
fast, tater tots, cereal and toast.
Thursday: Breakfast sand-
wich stuffer, ultimate breakfast
round, peach cup, grits, cereal
and toast.
Friday: Ham, egg and
cheese biscuit, ultra cinnamon
bun, tater tots, cereal and toast.
Lunch
Monday: Oven-baked
breaded chicken, chicken al-
fredo, yogurt parfait, fresh baby


carrots, peas and carrots, sea-
soned mashed potatoes, corn-
bread, fruit juice bar.
Tuesday: Pasta with moz-
zarella and meat sauce, pep-
peroni pizza, ham super salad,
PB dippers, garden salad,
sweet corn, peas, warm apple
crisp, chilled pears, crackers.
Wednesday: Hamburger on
bun, turkey wrap, yogurt parfait,
fresh baby carrots, peas, ranch
pasta salad, colossal crisp
french fries, fruit juice bar.
Thursday: Stuffed-crust
cheese pizza, cheesy chicken
and rice burrito, chef super
salad, PB dippers, garden
salad, glazed carrots, apple-
sauce, Jell-O, crackers.
Friday: HALF DAY: Chicken
nuggets, tuna salad sandwich,
fresh baby carrots, juice bar.
High schools
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast sausage
pizza, MVP breakfast, grits, ce-
real and toast, milk, juice.
Tuesday: Sausage, egg and
cheese biscuit, ultra cinnamon
bun, tater tots, cereal and toast,
milk, juice.
Wednesday: Breakfast egg
and cheese wrap, MVP break-
fast, tater tots, cereal and toast,
milk, juice.
Thursday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, ultimate break-
fast round, grits, peach cup, ce-
real and toast, milk, juice.
Friday: Breakfast sandwich
stuffer, ultra cinnamon bun,
tater tots, cereal and toast, milk,
juice.
Lunch
Monday: Oriental orange
chicken, hamburger, pizza, fa-
jita chicken super salad, yogurt
parfait, baby carrots, green
beans, chilled peaches, french


fries, crackers, milk.
Tuesday: Turkey and gravy
over rice, chicken sandwich,
pizza, ham super salad, yogurt
parfait, fresh garden salad,
peas, baked french fries, warm
apples, crackers, milk.
Wednesday: Macaroni and
cheese, pizza, hamburger,
turkey wrap, turkey super
salad, PB dippers, baby car-
rots, baked beans, corn, mixed
fruit, cornbread, french fries,
crackers, milk.
Thursday: Crispy Mexican
tacos, chicken sandwich, pizza,
ham super salad, yogurt parfait,
garden salad, glazed carrots,
Spanish rice, applesauce,
french fries, crackers, milk.
Friday: HALF DAY: Ham-
burger, stuffed-crust cheese
pizza, pepperoni pizza, fresh
baby carrots, corn, baked
french fries, juice bar, milk.
Lecanto High School lunch
Monday: Hot ham and
cheese, macaroni and cheese,
hamburger, chicken sandwich,
fajita chicken super salad,
pizza, yogurt parfait, baby car-
rots, green beans, baked
beans, warm apples, french
fries, baked chips, crackers,
milk.
Tuesday: Oriental orange
chicken, hamburger, chicken
sandwich, turkey and gravy
over noodles, ham salad, yo-
gurt parfait, pizza, garden
salad, glazed carrots, french
fries, peas, strawberry cup,
baked chips, milk.
Wednesday: Brunch bowl,
chicken alfredo, hamburger,
chicken sandwich, pizza, turkey
super salad, yogurt parfait,
baby carrots, french fries, ranch
pasta salad, broccoli, tater tots,


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


March 26to 30 MENUS


mixed fruit, baked chips, crack-
ers, milk.
Thursday: Cheesy chicken
and rice burrito, hamburger,
chicken sandwich, macaroni
and cheese, pizza, ham super
salad, yogurt parfait, garden
salad, green beans, sweet
corn, applesauce, baked french
fries, crackers, milk.
Friday: HALF DAY: Ham-
burger, stuffed-crust cheese
pizza, pepperoni pizza, fresh
baby carrots, corn, baked
french fries, milk.
SENIOR DINING
Monday: Baked meatloaf
with mushroom gravy, mashed
potatoes, carrot coins, pineap-
ple, whole-grain roll with mar-
garine, low-fat milk.
Tuesday: Chicken Florentine
thigh, penne pasta with garlic
oil, Tuscan-blend vegetables
(squash, mixed vegetables),
tossed salad with Italian dress-
ing, fresh apple, slice whole-
grain bread with margarine,
low-fat milk.
Wednesday: Sweet and
sour pork, wild rice medley, Chi-
nese oriental vegetables (broc-
coli, carrots, bamboo shoots,
red pepper, bean sprouts),
peaches, slice whole-grain with
margarine, low-fat milk.
Thursday: Hamburger patty
with bun and ketchup and mus-
tard, baked beans, yellow corn
with diced tomato, mixed fruit,
low-fat milk.
Friday: Chicken salad, sliced
beet and onion salad, three-
bean salad, fresh orange, two
slices whole-wheat bread with
margarine, low-fat milk.
Senior dining sites include:
Lecanto, East Citrus, Crystal
River, Homosassa Springs, In-
verness and South Dunnellon.
For information, call Support
Services at 352-527-5975.


LIVING
Continued from Page Al

unit where she pays rent,
and then there are the auto
expenses. The prescription
drugs for her diabetes add
to those expenses.
"It is a very difficult way
to live," she said.
According to a survey by
the American Association
of Retired Persons (AARP),
one in five Floridians re-
ceived Social Security in
2010. For Floridians older
than 65, it is the only
source of income for one in
three residents.
"Thank God for Social
Security," John Clardy, an
elder law attorney in Cit-
rus County.
"I don't know what
would happen if that
money was not coming for
some of these folks. That's
why when there is talk on
the legislative end of things
about doing anything to So-
cial Security, it worries a
lot of people, especially the
seniors, and I hope they
stay tuned to it and stay ac-
tive in the political process
to make sure their voices
are heard," said Clardy,
who is also a member of a
network of elder care at-
torneys who do advocacy
on behalf of seniors.
Dottie Vacca, 83, volun-
teers at the senior center
Monday through Friday, but
she said access to that free
meal helps her tremen-
dously with her finances.
"Money is tight for every-
one, and it is always a treat
when I can go to Wendy's
and get a chicken sand-
wich. I try to do that maybe


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once a week," Vacca said.
For Vacca, Smith and a
legion of Citrus County
seniors, the senior center
lunches are life-savers, ac-
cording to Dorothy Deem
who was supervising activ-
ities at the senior center lo-
cation in Lecanto.
She said the menu al-
ways has the essentials to
keep the seniors sated,
even if that was the only
meal they had for that day
"For many, they come
here every day just to make
sure they have a good, solid
meal to eat," Deem added.
She said her work as-
sessing the needs of the
homebound seniors is even
more heartwrenching than
at the centers.
Deem said funding for
the free Meals on Wheels
program has dried up and
the waiting list is long. So
for those who are home-
bound, broke and barely
lucid, any meal taken to
them would cost $5 or they
don't eat.
"It's heartbreaking when
I have to tell them this,"
Deem said. Besides the
senior center in Lecanto,
the county has three other
facilities to help seniors in
the county, according Pat
Coles, operations supervi-
sor. The other centers are
in Homosassa and two in
Inverness. Meals are also
offered at the Annie John-
son Senior Center in Dun-
nellon, not a county-owned
facility, and Marina Del
Ray Apartments in Beverly
Hills.
For information about the
senior centers or to make
donations to the various
programs available to help
seniors, call 352-527-5975.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MEALS
Continued from Page Al

Anne's Episcopal Church in
Crystal River and on Sun-
days he fixes himself some-
thing from groceries he gets
from two area churches -
St. Elizabeth Ann Seton
Catholic Church in Citrus
Springs and Crystal River
Church of God.
"Without them, I wouldn't
eat," he said.
In February 2010, Feed-
ing America released its
fifth study of hunger in
America. The organization
found that 3.4 million Amer-
icans lived below the
poverty line and 2.3 million
households with seniors (7.9
percent) were "food
insecure."
The study also estimated
that by 2025, when the
youngest of the baby
boomer generation reaches
age 60, the number of food-
insecure seniors will have
increased by 50 percent.
Available at six locations
in Citrus County the
Annie Johnson Center in
Dunnellon, Central Citrus
Community Center in
Lecanto, West Citrus Com-
munity Center in Ho-
mosassa, Marina Del Ray
Apartments in Beverly Hills
and both East Citrus Com-
munity Center and Inver-
ness Community Center in
Inverness seniors age 60
and older (and younger
spouses) are eligible for a
daily hot meal Monday
through Friday


QUALITY OF LIFE


Although the meals are
served at no cost for seniors,
donations are encouraged.
Each meal costs the
county $5.55, which is 90
percent funded by a grant
from the Department of
Elder Affairs and 10 percent
by the Board of County
Commissioners. The cur-
rent annual budget is
$238,650.
"We serve about 250
meals a day at all the cen-
ters combined," said Pat
Coles, Citrus County senior
services operations supervi-
sor. "We probably have 400
people who come once a
week and about two-thirds
who come three to five
times a week.
"Socialization is the main
reason they come," Coles
said, "but there are a lot of
them who depend on this
for their food."
David Holbrook, 60, and
his wife Sylvia, 75, come on
Tuesday and Fridays. He
uses the computer in the
morning and she plays
bingo. Then they stay for
lunch.
"It helps," Mrs. Holbrook
said. "That's four lunches
we don't have to pay for each
week, and that adds up."
Loretta Sheedy, 81, comes
to the center to exercise and
also stays for lunch. On a
fixed income, she said the
senior dining meal is her
main meal each week day
and she has a light meal at
night.
On the menu in March,
some of the entrees served
included baked meatloaf,
chicken Florentine, Irish


SENIOR DINING PROGRAM
* The Senior Dining Program provides individuals aged
60 years and over with a hot meal in a group setting at
six different locations throughout Citrus County.


* The meals are prepared by
a caterer who specializes in
the Senior Dining Program.
* The program is funded
through the federal Older
Americans Act and also by
participant contributions.
Each meal costs Citrus
County Community Support
Services $5.55.
* To register, call the office at
352-527-5975 to determine
eligibility.


CITRUS COUNTY

QUALITY





2012 Chronicle project


* Senior dining menus for the week appear Sundays in
the Chronicle, along with school menus./Page A8


stew and hot dogs and
beans. Seniors received
low-fat milk to drink, fruit,
vegetables and cookies.
"The food they get here is
important to them," Coles
said. "They'll eat everything
that you give to them. For us,
knowing they're getting a
third of the RDA (Recom-
mended Daily Allowance)
here, if they go home and
have a bowl of ice cream at
night, that's OK. We know
they got that meal. They also

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Effective Jan. 1, Citrus
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first offenders of local
watering rules.
The county is issuing
citations that carry with
them a fine of $100.


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get nutrition education
here, and we have an exer-
cise program. So, this makes
them, I feel, live a lot longer
by coming to these centers."
For homebound seniors,
there's also a home-
delivered meal program.
When it started in 1979, they
brought a noon meal to 13
seniors. Today, about 400 re-
ceive meals at home, and
there's a waiting list


SUNDAY, MARCH 25, 2012 A9


For us, knowing they're getting
a third of the RDA (Recommended
Daily Allowance) here, if they go
home and have a bowl of ice cream
at night, that's OK. We know they
got that meal. They also get
nutrition education here, and we
have an exercise program.
Pat Coles
senior services operations supervisor.


In 2003, the home-
delivered meals program
added meals for pets after
learning about a man who
weighed about 100 pounds
sharing his meals with his
50-pound poodle.
Coles said that broke
their hearts.
Each home-delivered
meal costs the county $5.59.
The current annual budget
is $290,680.
This year, they inaugu-
rated a fundraising "Golf for
Meals" golf tournament,
March 24. From 5 to 8 p.m.


March 26 (Crystal River)
and March 28 (Inverness),
local Applebee's restau-
rants will donate 10 percent
of diners' bills to the Citrus
County home-delivered
meals program.
To sign up for Senior Din-
ing or home-delivered
meals, call 352-527-5975. De-
pending on where you live,
bus transportation to Senior
Dining is also available.
Chronicle reporter Nancy
Kennedy can be reached at
nkennedy@chronicleon-
line. com or 352-564-2927.


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When ends don't meet


CITRUS COUNTY


QUALITY








2012 Chronicle project


Reverse mortgage

makes sense for

some seniors

NANCY KENNEDY
Staff Writer
CRYSTAL RIVER
Like many seniors, 82-year-
old widower Clark Johnson
lives on a fixed income.
He owns a 38-year-old house, a
16-year-old car and has no
investments.
On the plus side, he can't lose
any money in the stock market,
but he can't make any, either.
In 2007, he took out a reverse
mortgage on his Crystal River
home and receives $500 a month.
It's not for everyone, he said,
but it was his best option at the
time.
"I came here 26 years ago from
Wisconsin," he said. "I had a 15-
year mortgage, to be paid off in
2000." He doesn't remember how
much he paid for the house.
After retiring from Kohler and
moving to Florida, Johnson had a
home-based business as a per-
sonal computer consultant.
"While I was in business, the
business was paying my mortgage
payment, $500 a month," he said.
Four years after his first wife
died, he remarried and refi-
nanced his house for another 15
years with a $150 monthly mort-
gage payment. He closed his
home business in 1997. For the
next 10 years, he lived on Social
Security and $91 monthly retire-
ment pension from Kohler.
"About three years after refi-
nancing, I analyzed my situation
and I had barely paid off the clos-
ing costs," Johnson said.
Before he went the reverse-
mortgage route, Johnson rolled
his mortgage balance onto credit
cards with introductory zero-per-
cent interest rates. Whenever the
interest rate went up, he rolled
the balance over to a new card.


MPA


I;


* You may qualify if:
* You are age 62 or older.
* Own your home outright or
have paid down a considerable
amount of your mortgage.
You live in the home.
Are not delinquent on any fed-
eral debt.
Your income, assets, monthly
living expenses and credit his-
tory can be verified.
How it works:
A reverse mortgage loan con-

"I was managing my debt," he
said.
A reverse mortgage enabled
him to stop juggling.
"With seniors, there's never
one right way to do things when it
comes to finances," said Tony


verts home equity into cash.
* Generally, funds are taken in a
lump sum, monthly payments
to you or a combination.
* Repayment is not required as
long as you live in the house.
* Once you leave, most often
through death or moving to as-
sisted living, the house is sold
and the proceeds from the
sale used to repay the loan
plus fees and interest.
* Homeowners must pay prop-
erty taxes and homeowners in-
surance or risk foreclosure.

Wahl, financial advisor and
owner of Integrity Financial Re-
source in Inverness. "It's all
about quality of life."
He said in dealing with seniors
about finances, he listens for
their anxieties. For example,


,;
fr


X\1


4


--


-~i


NANCY KENNEDY/Chronicle
Clark Johnson, 82, has lived in his Crystal River home for 26 years. In 2007, he took out a reverse mortgage to help him make ends meet.


some people may feel better tak-
ing an equity line of credit out on
their home rather than a reverse
mortgage.
When it comes to managing life
on a fixed income, Wahl said to
start with your debt and find
ways to pay it down.
"The people with the best qual-
ity of life are those with no debt,"
he said. "So, we focus heavily on
eliminating it"
He advised beginning with
credit-card debt.
"I used to say there's two kinds
of debt good debt and bad
debt. But now I say there's only
bad debt and worse debt," he
said.
He puts credit-card debt in the
"worse" category and said a line
of credit on your house is better.
Wahl said one way of paying
down debt is by selling things
like old jewelry, furniture and
collectibles.


Refinancing a house is also an
option, although Wahl said unless
you can improve your interest
rate by at least 2 percent, it may
not be worth it.
"When it comes to finances, the
most important thing is to get
wise counsel," he said, adding
there are a lot of companies that
are in business to sell investment
products to seniors, but not all
products are "one size fits all."
Wahl said seniors should find
wise people who are financially
savvy, whose advice you trust and
who have no financial gain in
their advice to you.
"Get you kids involved have
them meet or at least talk to your
financial planner," he said. "Ask
questions and don't jump into
decisions."
Chronicle reporter Nancy
Kennedy can be reached at
nkennedy@chronicleonline. corn
or 352-564-2927.


Getting around town can become a challenge


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff Writer

In Citrus County, transportation
has always been an issue, espe-
cially for seniors who don't drive.
It's not impossible to get around,
but it is challenging.
"I was glad to give up driving
when I moved here," said Ruby
Ziarniak, 89. Two years ago she
came to Beverly Hills from Buffalo,
N.Y.
"The roads here are too long and
I'm terrible with directions," she
said.
Ziarniak has companions who
drive her places, and on days she
goes to the senior center in
Lecanto, she rides bus transporta-
tion provided by the county.
The federal grant from the Older
Americans Act that funds the sen-
ior dining program at senior cen-
ters around the county also funds
bus transportation to the centers
(except the Annie Johnson Senior
Center in Dunnellon and the Ma-
rina Del Ray Apartments in Bev-
erly Hills).
"We have about 60 or 70 who ride
the bus here regularly," said Pat
Coles, Citrus County senior serv-
ices operations supervisor. "If we
didn't have bus transportation,
many of them probably wouldn't be
able to come here."
For seniors living at assisted liv-
ing facilities, bus transportation for
appointments, shopping and out-
ings is generally part of the package.


COUNTY BUS TRANSPORTATION
* For door-to-door service:
* Call 352-527-7630 for reservations two business days in advance.
* Cost: $1.50 one way within same area; $3 one area to another;
50 cents for pre-arranged additional stop.
* Orange Line:
* Buses run Monday through Friday, starting at 6 a.m. and run until
about 7 p.m. A complete circuit takes about two hours, making 26
scheduled stops from Lecanto to Beverly Hills and Inverness.
* Cost: 50 cents.
* Bus schedules are available at bus stops and in county buildings.
* For information, call 352-527-7630 or go to www.bocc.citrus.fl.us.
Under "Departments" click on "Fleet and Transportation" then
"Transportation."


Terry, a 72-year-old widow in In-
verness, didn't drive until she was
40 after her husband died. Seven
years ago when she started losing
her eyesight, she gave up driving
altogether.
However, she kept her car and
pays a neighbor to drive her to oc-
casional doctor's appointments in
Gainesville or to the airport. For
shorter, in-town errands a friend
drives her
"I always hated to drive anyway,"
she said.
Another transportation option,
which many seniors in Citrus
County take advantage of, is the
county bus system, both the door-
to-door service and the Orange
Line with a regular scheduled
route.
Lon Frey, interim Citrus County


Fleet and Transportation Manage-
ment director, said the door-to-door
bus service, which started in 1978,
provides about 31,000 door-to-door
trips annually
"Riders use our service for shop-
ping, medical appointments as well
as other destinations," he said,
adding, "we specialize in trans-
porting citizens with disabilities -
and all vehicles have wheel chair
accommodations.
"We're best known for the per-
sonal service that our drivers and
staff give our passengers and in
some cases, with frequent travelers,
we're an extension of their family"
The Orange Line, which started
in 2009, transports between 80 and
100 county residents daily
Frey said they hope to kick off a
fixed route bus service on the west


side of the county in August.
Beverly Hills senior Robert Mc-
Donald, 74, said he occasionally
takes the Orange Line bus that
stops at Winn-Dixie in Beverly
Hills around 8 a.m. to go to Wal-
Mart in Inverness.
However, his most commonly
used mode of transportation is his
two feet.
"I walk to Winn-Dixie, which is
only .9 of a mile from my house," he
said.
For McDonald, giving up driving
was more an economic decision
than anything else. His car needs
brakes, tires, a tune up and the left
bumper repaired and he doesn't
have the money, so he cancelled his
insurance and started walking.
"Sometimes I'll be walking and a
nice lady will stop and ask if I need
a ride," he said. "I tell them, 'Only if
I'm going the same way you're
going.' I don't want to take them out
of their way"
He added that when he's some-
place where he can chat with peo-
ple, they often offer to give him a
ride home.
On the mornings he has appoint-
ments at the VA. in Gainesville, Mc-
Donald gets up at 4 a.m. and sets
out at 5 to get to the county re-
source center by 5:50 to get the bus.
"I miss driving," he said. "My in-
dependence is gone."
Chronicle reporter Nancy
Kennedy can be reached at
nkennedy@chronicleonline.com or
352-564-2927.


SENIORS BY THE NUMBERS, ACCORDING TO 2010 US CENSUS


* Total U.S. population:
308,745,538
* Americans 65 and older:
40,136,920 (13 percent)
Florida:
* Total population: 18,801,310
* Citizens 65 and older:
3,252,627 (17.3 percent)
Citrus County:
* Total population: 141,236


* Citizens 65 and older: 45,054
(31.9 percent)
Marion County:
* Total population: 331,298
* Citizens 65 and older: 85,475
(25.8 percent)
Hernando County:
* Total population: 172,778
* Citizens 65 and older: 44,577


Sumter County:
* Total population: 93,420
* Citizens 65 and older: 40,544
(*43.4 percent)
Leon County:
* Total population: 275,487
* Citizens 65 and older: 25,896
(**9.4 percent)
* Alaska has the fewest number of
people age 65 and older.


* Total population: 710,231
* Citizens 65 and older: 54,688
(7.7 percent)
*highest percentage of citizens
age 65 and older in Florida
**lowest percentage of citizens
age 65 and older in Florida
compiled by Nancy Kennedy


NUMBERS YOU
MIGHT WANT TO
KNOW
* Citrus Alliance Against
Adult Abuse (C4A):
352-860-5083.
* Citrus County Hearing
Impaired Program
Services (CHIPS):
352-795-5000.
* Citrus County Transit:
352-527-7630.
* Citrus United Basket
(CUB): 352-344-2242.
* Community Legal Serv-
ices: 352-726-8512.
* Community Pharmacy:
352-249-9258.
* Family Resource
Center: 352-344-1001.
* Housing Services:
352-527-7520.
* Nature Coast Volunteer
Center: 352-527-5950.
* Senior Care Services:
352-527-5930.
* Senior Centers:
* Annie Johnson Senior
Center: 352-489-8021.
* Central Citrus
Community Center:
352-527-5993.
* East Citrus Community
Center: 352-344-9666.
* Inverness Community
Center: 352-726-1009.
* West Citrus Community
Center: 352-795-3831.
* Senior Crafters:
352-746-6622.
* Senior Happy Timers
Club: 352-637-3156.
* Senior Programs:
352-527-5975.
* Seniors Vs Crime:
352-249-9139.
* Vacation Security
Watch (free service
from Citrus County
Sheriff's Office):
352-726-1121.
* Veterans Service Office:
352-527-5915.


QUICK FACTS ON REVERSE MORTGAGES


A10 SUNDAY, MARCH 25, 2012


QUALITY OF LIFE


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


The cost of love found later


CITRUS COUNTY


QUALITY






UIFE
2012 Chronicle project


Choice for some:

Remarriage or

pension benefits?
NANCY KENNEDY
Staff Writer
-HERNANDO
After nearly 50 years of
marriage and seven
years of being a widow,
Sue Helm never consid-
ered getting married again.
"I didn't think I could ever love
anybody else," she said.
After losing his wife of almost
49 years to leukemia two years
ago, Harvey Helm thought he
would die of loneliness and
prayed for a wife.
"When Joan died, I sat in a
chair for three months feeling
sorry for myself," he said. "Then
someone said, 'Your wife died,
not you."'
Harvey and Sue met Jan. 21 of
last year, got engaged on Valen-
tine's Day a few weeks later,
bought their marriage license on
April Fool's Day and were married
on Good Friday, April 26,2011.
"We are so much in love," said
Harvey, wiping away a tear
Finding another person to love,
however, isn't necessarily the
issue for many widows and
widowers.
It's the remarrying without los-
ing a late spouse's pension and
medical benefits that causes cou-
ples to remain single.
Getting remarried often car-
ries a cost that seniors aren't will-
ing to pay But they're not willing
to give up on love either
According to U.S. census fig-
ures, the numbers of single peo-
ple age 65 and older who
cohabitate has tripled in the past
decade, from 193,000 in 2000 to
575,000 in 2010.


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Harvey and Sue Helms met in January 2011, were engaged by Valentine's Day and married Good Friday. The couple had both been married before
and never figured they would ever marry and one again. Harvey thought he would die of loneliness and prayed for a wife.


"We know of a few couples who
haven't gotten married, and we
can understand that," Helm, 75,
said. "Sometimes they both lose a
pension."
Mrs. Helm, 72, said she was
afraid she would have to give up
her late husband's Social Secu-
rity check, but she didn't
Widows or widowers are eligi-
ble to collect their deceased
spouse's Social Security benefits
at age 60. They cannot get sur-
vivor benefits if they remarry be-
fore age 60. If they remarry after
age 60 (or age 50 if they have a
disability) they can continue to
receive benefits based on their


late spouse's work record.
That's just Social Security
Some private pensions may have
stipulations whereby surviving
spouses stop receiving pension
checks upon remarriage.
The Helms said their situation
didn't cause any financial penal-
ties, for which they breathed a
sigh of relief-- but before they
tied the knot, they sat down with
a financial advisor and a lawyer.
Mrs. Helm's late husband re-
tired as a band director for Ohio
public schools. She receives his
pension and Social Security, plus
a disability payment.
Helm also taught school, retir-


ing as a public school industrial
arts instructor in Connecticut. He
draws his pension and a small
monthly Social Security payment.
The Citrus Hills home he and
Sue live in, Harvey bought six
years ago with his late wife, Joan,
who died in 2010.
They each have five children.
"Everything that was hers is
still hers, because otherwise you
get in trouble with the kids,"
Helm said. "My will is the same
as before. The only thing I own is
this house, and when I die she
can live in it the rest of her life
and then it reverts to my kids."
All of Mrs. Helm's income goes


into a savings account, which will
go to her children. The couple
lives solely off Helm's income.
"I have a friend who gets her
(late) husband's pension, and she
said if she ever got married
again, the guy would have to be
really rich," she said. "But we
don't have that problem. ... This is
a new chapter in our lives."
"We still love our first spouses,"
Mr. Helm said, "but this is a new
relationship. Every day I thank
God for her. I was so lonely"
Chronicle reporter Nancy
Kennedy can be reached at
nkennedy@chronicleonline. corn
or 352-564-2927.


Longer life assisted


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff Writer

LECANTO For nearly
30 years, Raul and Virginia
Johnson loved living in their
Citrus Springs home.
He had his rose garden;
she had her sewing room.
They hadn't considered
living anywhere else until,
as Mrs. Johnson described
it, "age crept up and jumped
at us."
As seniors are living
longer, more are facing the
question: When is it time to
give up our home and go
into something different,
whether a senior apartment
setting, independent or as-
sisted living facility or even
a nursing home?
"It was time for us when I
could no longer clean the
house or work in the gar-
den," Mrs. Johnson said.
"We were hiring people to
do our lawn, and that's hard
when you've done that all
your lives and you're
independent."
Three years ago, they put
their house up for sale and
moved into assisted living at
the Brentwood Retirement
Community off County Road
486 near Citrus Hills. Both
are in their 90s.


AVERAGE COSTS OF ASSISTED LIVING
* According to information from the Assisted Living
Federation of America, the 2011 average cost for a
private room in an assisted living community is
$3,270 a month or $39,240 annually.
* A private room in a skilled nursing facility cost the
resident an average of $235 a day or $85,775 annually.
* A semi-private apartment in a skilled nursing facility
cost the resident an average of $207 a day or $75,555
annually.


They have a small one-
bedroom apartment with a
kitchenette, can take walks,
have someone do their
housecleaning and laundry;
they're even served three
meals a day in a communal
dining room where they eat
with other residents.
"We don't drive anymore,
but they have a bus that
takes us where we need to
go, and I've seen more of the
area that way than I did
when I was driving," Mrs.
Johnson said. "We don't
worry here."
According to information
from the 2010 U.S. Census,
since 1980, the number of
Americans 90 and older has
nearly tripled, to 1.9 million
in 2010.
At the time of the census,
nearly 3 percent lived in as-
sisted living or other resi-


dential care facilities and
22.7 percent lived in some
form of institutionalized
setting.
For Ted and Betty San-
tana, both in their 80s, their
doctor approached them
about moving into assisted
living (although theirs is
called independent living,
also at Brentwood).
They had lived in their In-
verness Heatherwood Es-
tates home nearly 10 miles
from town for 32 years. Mrs.
Santana's health is failing
and their doctor, who is also
a personal friend from
church, was concerned
about them living so far
away
"We loved our home
where we could watch the
deer and the birds," Mrs.
Santana said. "But it was
time to make a change. I was


Raul and Virginia Johnson loved living in their Citrus Springs home. He had his rose garden;
she had her sewing room. The couple are both in their 90s and believe the amenities at Brent-
wood Retirement Community are just perfect, Mrs. Johnson said. "We don't worry here."


in the hospital when (our
doctor) drove Ted to several
places until they found this
place. They said I could
bring my dogs and that's
when I knew it would be OK.
"Here, Ted and I can be
together," she said.
Mary Alice Tillman, exec-
utive director of Brentwood
Retirement Community, ac-
knowledged that it's often a
difficult decision to make.


No one wants to give up
their home and what they
consider to be their
independence.
"When they get here, they
generally find that they're
more independent and
more secure," she said. "For
most, they're coming from a
much larger home and have
to pare down and decide
what they need to bring and
what they can't bring, and


that's hard. It's overwhelm-
ing at first."
Mrs. Santana said, "You
have to have the mindset
that it's a lifestyle change.
When people make this
move, sometimes they're
devastated. We didn't expect
to be treated so kindly"
Chronicle reporter Nancy
Kennedy can be reached at
nken nedy@ chronicle
online, corn or 352-564-2927.


Sheriff's office: There is help to fight scams


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff Writer

Opportunistic crimes targeting
one of the most vulnerable seg-
ments of society seniors are
legion.
And the head of the Citrus
County Sheriff's Office unit that
deals with such issues has a fairly
simple solution.
"Be suspicious of everything, I
mean everything. If a deal is too
good, it should be there tomorrow.
So do some checking before you
act," said Sgt. Chris Evan, head of


the CCSO Community Affairs unit
Evan said seniors should always
stall predators and call his office
at 352-527-4260 to either verify
claims by those who seek to rob
them of their money or to report
suspected scams.
"Obviously, if it is an emergency,
call 911, but for everything else,
call us. We are here to help," Evan
said.
Evan said most of the crimes
targeting seniors involve schemes
to gain access to their bank ac-
counts and defraud them.


Obviously, if it is an emergency,
call 911, but for everything else, call us.
We are here to help.

Sgt. Chris Evan
head of CCSO Community Affairs unit.


He said the latest scam making
the rounds is one involving the In-
ternal Revenue Service (IRS).
Evan said it goes like this: The
government has unveiled another
stimulus plan and you are eligible


for up to $8,000, but first they need
your bank account number to de-
posit the money
He said other scams involve
high-pressure sales tactics to over-
whelm seniors and others to ei-


their make unnecessary purchases
or turn over financial information.
Evan said seniors are also usu-
ally vulnerable to fake or unli-
censed repair people.
He encourages calling his office
to see whether a business is
legitimate.
CCSO has a Seniors versus
Crime program that is a collabo-
rative effort between the sheriff's
office, the community and the
state Attorney General's office to
help fight scams against seniors.
For more information about the
program, call 352-527-4260.


QUALITY OF LIFE


SUNDAY, MARCH 25, 2012 All











NATION


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


"Nat onfmFS Candidates continue battle


La. primary getting more

attention this year than in past


Associated Press


Associated Press
Charleston mayor Danny
Jones walks away from the
scene of a house fire
Saturday in Charleston,
W.Va. A fire tore through
the two-story home that
had no functioning smoke
detectors, killing eight
family members, including
six children, Jones said.
The cause is under
investigation.

Aide: Cheney had
heart transplant
WASHINGTON Former
Vice President Dick Cheney
had a heart transplant Satur-
day and is recovering at a Vir-
ginia hospital, his office said.
An aide to Cheney dis-
closed that the 71-year-old,
who has had a long history of
cardiovascular trouble includ-
ing numerous heart attacks,
had been waiting for a trans-
plant for more than 20 months.
"Although the former vice
president and his family do
not know the identity of the
donor, they will be forever
grateful for this lifesaving gift,"
aide Kara Ahern said in a
written statement that was
authenticated by several of
Cheney's close associates.
WorldBRIEFS

Visiting Pope


Associated Press
Pope Benedict XVI cele-
brates a Mass on Saturday
in Colegio de Miraflores in
Leon, Mexico. Benedict
arrived in Mexico on Friday
afternoon, a decade after
the late Pope John Paul II's
last visit, and will travel to
Cuba on Monday.

Parliament names
constitution panel
CAIRO Egypt's Is-
lamists looked poised Satur-
day to gain control of a key
lever of power that will help
steer the country's political
future as parliament se-
lected a panel to draw up
the country's new constitu-
tion. Liberal lawmakers de-
nounced the process as a
"farce" and walked out in
protest.
The constitution, which will
be written by the 100-mem-
ber committee, will determine
the balance of power be-
tween Egypt's previously all-
powerful president and
parliament, and define the
country's future identity, in-
cluding the role of religion
and minority rights. With so
much at stake, the question
of who should sit on the panel
has sparked fierce debate in
Egypt.
Many secular and liberal
Egyptians fear that the Is-
lamist parties that dominate
parliament will pack the panel
with their supporters and ig-
nore minority concerns.
Those fears have spiked over
the past week after parlia-
ment decided to allocate half
of the panel's seats to its own


members, and a
lamist deputy sa
try's most promii
democracy advc
hamed ElBarad<
likely not be inclh


leading Is-
aid the coun-
nent
locate, Mo-
ei, would
uded.
-From wire reports


NEW ORLEANS Sat-
urday's Republican presi-
dential primary in
Louisiana wasn't destined
to be a game changer -
only 20 of the state's 46 del-
egates were at stake but
with front-runner Mitt
Romney still facing persist-
ent challengers, it was at-
tracting more attention
than it has in past election
cycles.
Romney, Rick Santorum,
Newt Gingrich and Ron
Paul all campaigned in the
state on Friday and
Louisiana GOP chairman
Roger Villere said the win-


ner could claim to have mo-
mentum as the campaign
continues.
"It would be big news if
Romney wins a break-
through in the South,"
Villere said. "A Santorum
win would strengthen his
challenge. A Gingrich vic-
tory could be yet another
revival of his campaign.
"Newt could say 'I'm
back."'
Polls opened at 6 a.m.
and were to close at 8 p.m.
While the GOP primary was
the marquee issue on the
ballot, there also was a
Democratic presidential
primary President Barack
Obama faced three un-


SO YOU KNOW
See more on Saturday's
primary in tomorrow's
edition of the Chronicle.

knowns (Bob Ely of Illinois;
Darcy Richardson of
Florida and John Wolfe of
Tennessee). And there were
local elections scattered
about Louisiana.
In Mandeville, campaign
signs for local candidates
lined the streets where
Santorum had appeared at
a rally Wednesday There
were fewer visible shows
of support for the Republi-
can presidential
candidates.
Sue Ritchie, 69, arrived
at Mandeville's city hall in-
tending to cast a vote for
Romney But she turned


back once she realized she
wasn't ready to vote yet in
all the local races.
Ritchie said she would
vote with her head and not
her heart in the presiden-
tial primary She likes Gin-
grich but thinks Romney
has the best chance of beat-
ing Obama in the fall.
"He's got the organiza-
tion and the money," she
said of Romney "I love
Newt Gingrich. He's full of
good ideas, and I love to
hear him speak. I just don't
think he'll make it."
Also in Mandeville, Beth
Cleveland, 54, voted for
Santorum while her hus-
band, Ed, voted for Romney
"I think he's more con-
servative and representa-
tive of Christian ideals,"
Beth Cleveland said of
Santorum.


Embracing Iran


Associated Press
ABOVE: A video art work displays the Islamic Republic of Iran President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad as part of an art
exhibition called "Iran" at a gallery Thursday in Tel Aviv, Israel. BELOW: Graphic artist Roni Edri, left, and his wife,
Michal Tamir, are seen Thursday at their graphic arts school in Tel Aviv, Israel. Israelis have mounted an art exhi-
bition centered on Iran and built a web site in Farsi to provide news of Israeli society and daily life.

Amid war fears, some Israelis reaching out


Associated Press
JERUSALEM Ruthie Pliskin
didn't want Israel's threats of a pos-
sible military strike to be the only
message her country had for Iran.
So the doctoral student from Tel
Aviv posted a photo of herself and
her cat on Facebook, with a sign in
Farsi reading: "We love you, people
of Iran."
She says she received enthusias-
tic responses from Iranians when
she posted on an "Israel-Loves-
Iran" Facebook page who cor-
rected the sign's spelling and
returned warm wishes.
Pliskin is among a small but
growing number of Israelis trying
to reach out to Iranians, even as Is-
raeli politicians warn with growing
frequency and intensity that Israel
might strike to halt Tehran's sus-
pected nuclear weapons program.
Israelis mounted an art exhibit
in Tel Aviv centered on Iran, built a
website in Farsi with news of Is-
raeli daily life, and protested Sat-
urday against a potential strike on
Iranian nuclear installations. They
have also posted images endlessly
shared on Facebook against a war
with Iran.
Meir Javedanfar, an Israeli ex-
pert on Iran, said that this marks
the first time Israelis have reached
out in such a way to another nation
in the Middle East Has it had im-


pact in Iran so far? That's not clear
yet, though Israelis say Iranians
are responding positively to the In-
ternet outreach. But it appears un-
likely that any good will being
generated by civilians will sway
governments.
Israel's leaders say a nuclear-
armed Iran is an existential threat.
Iranian leaders often demonize Is-
rael. Israeli Defense Minister
Ehud Barak has said he's willing to
give sanctions and negotiations a
few more months to deter Iran
from trying to obtain nuclear
weapons, but suggests that, if ef-
forts fail, Israel could strike this
year Iran insists it is pursuing nu-


clear energy for peaceful purposes,
but warns it will strike back if at-
tacked.
In Israel, surveys show that a ma-
jority oppose a solo Israeli attack
on Iran without American military
cooperation.
Retired Israeli military and in-
telligence leaders have advised
against striking Iran, arguing that
Israel doesn't have enough bomb
shelters or gas masks to absorb a
possible Iranian counterattack.
"Despite all this, our prime min-
ister wants to take us to war," said
Tzvika Besor, a Tel Aviv marketing
agent who organized Saturday's
protest. "And we say no."


Sandusky called likely pedophile' in '98


Associated Press


STATE COLLEGE, Pa. -
A psychologist who looked
into a 1998 allegation
against former Penn State
assistant football coach
Jerry Sandusky told police
at the time that his behav-
ior fit the profile of a likely
pedophile, NBC News re-
ported Saturday
Yet Sandusky was not


criminally charged, nor
placed on a state registry of
suspected child abusers,
and prosecutors say he con-
tinued assaulting boys for
more than a decade until
his arrest in November.
NBC obtained a copy of
the campus police depart-
ment's investigatory report
on an encounter in which
Sandusky was accused of
having inappropriate con-


tact with an 11-year-old boy
with whom he had show-
ered naked on the Penn
State campus.
The police file includes
the report of State College
psychologist Alycia Cham-
bers, who interviewed and
provided counseling to the
boy
"My consultants agree
that the incidents meet all of
our definitions, based on ex-


perience and education, of a
likely pedophile's pattern of
building trust and gradual
introduction of physical
touch, within a context of a
'loving,' 'special' relation-
ship," Chambers wrote.
However, a second psy-
chologist, John Seasock,
concluded that Sandusky
had neither assaulted the
boy nor fit the profile of a
pedophile.


US says


soldier


split


killing


spree

Associated Press
WASHINGTON -U.S. in-
vestigators believe the U.S.
soldier accused of killing 17
Afghan civilians split the
slaughter into two episodes,
returning to his base after
the first attack and later
slipping away to kill again,
two American officials said
Saturday
This scenario seems to
support the U.S. govern-
ment's assertion con-
tested by some Afghans -
that the killings were done
by one person, since they
would have been perpe-
trated over a longer period
of time than assumed when
Army Staff Sgt Robert Bales
was detained March 11 out-
side his base in southern
Afghanistan.
But it also raises new
questions about how Bales,
who was formally charged
Friday with 17 counts of pre-
meditated murder and
other crimes, could have
carried out the nighttime at-
tacks without drawing at-
tention from any Americans
on the Kandahar province
base.
The two American offi-
cials who disclosed the in-
vestigators' finding spoke on
condition of anonymity be-
cause the politically sensi-
tive probe is ongoing.
Many details about the
killings, including a possible
motive, have not been made
public. The documents re-
leased by the U.S. military
Friday in connection with
the murder charges do not
include a timeline or a nar-
rative of what is alleged to
have happened.
Bales, 38, is accused of
killing nine Afghan children
and eight adults. The bodies
were found in Balandi and
Alkozai villages one north
and one south of the base, in
Kandahar's Panjwai dis-
trict.
Bales also was charged
with six counts of attempted
murder and six counts of as-
sault in the same case.
U.S. investigators now be-
lieve that Bales walked off
his base that night and
killed several people in one
of the villages, then went
back to the base. The Amer-
ican officials, who are privy
to some details of the inves-
tigation, said they do not
know why Bales returned,
how long he stayed or what
he did while there.
He then slipped off the
base a second time and
killed civilians in the sec-
ond village before again
heading back toward the
base. It was while he was re-
turning the second time that
a U.S. military search party
spotted him. He is reported
to have surrendered with-
out a struggle.
Bales is being held in a
military prison at Fort Leav-
enworth, Kan.
There have been previ-
ous suggestions that Bales
could have returned to base
after the first set of shoot-
ings, but the American offi-
cials who spoke to The
Associated Press on Satur-
day provided the first offi-
cial disclosure that U.S.
investigators have come to
this conclusion.
Members of the Afghan
delegation investigating the
killings said one Afghan
guard working from mid-
night to 2 a.m. on March 11
saw a U.S. soldier return to
the base around 1:30 a.m.
Another Afghan soldier who


replaced the first and
worked until 4 a.m. said he
saw a U.S. soldier leave the
base at 2:30 a.m. It's un-
known whether the two
Afghan guards saw the same
U.S. soldier.










EXCURRISIONS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE





Visiting the


* Veterans Notes can be found on Page A15 of ,
today's Chronicle.


Fatican


: The spiral staircase inside the Vatican Museum. Photographs are not allowed inside the museum galleries.
confusing when visitors are trying to find the most direct route to the museum.


NEIL SAWYER/Special to the Chronicle
Which way? Signs can be a bit


Splendor, ceremony, history greet travelers in heart of Rome


NEIL SAWYER
Special to the Chronicle

As we approached
the Vatican wall
there were
streams of people
running, yes, actually
running, toward the
entrance gate to St.
Peter's Square, adjacent
to the Vatican Museum.
However, we stayed true
to course on our way to
the museum, to arrive
early before the crowds
gathered. We were
cautioned the museum is
always crowded, so we
had made reservations.
There was a long line to the mu-
seum entrance, which opens at 9
a.m., but with our reservations in
hand we walked up to the entrance,
still anticipating
a wait. We were
ushered in, how-
ever, with hardly
a break in our
stride the time
was 8:30 a.m.
We were alone
in several of the
first galleries we
visited as we
Neil Sawyer stood in awe at
Neil Sawyer the most stun-
SPONTANEOUS ning art, sculp-
TRAVELER ture and tapestry
in the world.
"Where are the
people?" we murmured to each
other, often asking, "Where are the
crowds?"
After a leisurely and lonely stroll
through the museum, we went into
the adjacent Sistine Chapel where a
couple of pre-booked tours were
gathered. Despite warnings that we
would encounter elbow-to-elbow
crowds doing the "penguin shuffle,"
we had a pleasant surprise the
center of the chapel was clear of
people and the benches that line the
walls had ample seating space.
These seats, with your back to the
wall, are the best place from which
to view the events of creation, as de-
picted by Michelangelo.
We have heard that there are pil-
grimages to Rome for the sole pur-
pose of experiencing the Sistine
Chapel. Not surprising, knowing that
Michelangelo, at age 33, spent four
years on his back, on scaffolding four
stories high painting the ceiling. It
is said that he was constantly taunted
by Pope Julius II to "hurry up!"
The approximate hour that we


3. .-!-- .W
Pope Benedict XVI in his pope-mobile after blessing the crowd at St.
Peter's Square. The entrance to St. Peter's Basilica, as seen from St. Peter's Square.
An ornate museum monument at the Vatican Museum.


spent in the chapel left us wonder-
ing, "What did we miss?"
The events depicted in each of the
48 panels is fully worthy of an essay
or lecture in unraveling the myster-
ies of biblical history.
Our exit took us on a circuitous
route to St. Peter's Square where
Pope Benedict was ready to address
his audience of approximately 50,000
followers.
Prior to the Pope's message, and as
various groups were recognized, they
jumped up, cheering and waving
flags. We learned later that these
were the same people who were run-
ning to the square earlier in the day.
After the Pope's message he de-
parted the stage, amid more cheers
and flag waving, in his white, bullet-
proof pope-mobile.
In retrospect we were surprised
when entering St. Peter's Square at
the apparent lack of security, but did
spot heavy surveillance as we milled
about the crowd.
As the crowds cleared, we entered
St. Peter's Basilica where we were
free to roam and spend as much time
as we wished. There are an over-
whelming number of objects to see
and admire.
Every breathtaking adjective in
our vocabulary cannot possibly de-
scribe the feeling of the moment of
seeing the famous works of art,
sculpture and religious icons in the
museum and Basilica.
Our grand finale in a physical
sense was the 320-step climb to the
top of the dome of the Basilica, de-
signed by Michelangelo, and taking
120 years to build. One must pause
and ask, "How did they do that?"
A steady stream of thrill seekers
trudged troll-like up the steep and
narrowing passageways to the top
viewing platform that encircles the
very pinnacle of the dome.
Heavy breathing and sighs of relief
were heard amid the "high-fiving"
claims to this once-in-a-lifetime
achievement, as we were rewarded
with a 360-degree scan of the city of
Rome only achievable from the
dome of the Basilica.
We retreated from the top of the
dome in a bit more spritely manner
than when lumbering up, and in a
fraction of the time!
There was a celebratory feeling as
we departed knowing that we had
complied with, and been blessed, by
the rule: "When in Rome, do as the
Romans do."
With the Vatican wall to our backs,
as we were returning to our hotel, we
felt a sense of accomplishment and
gratification as we checked off one
more destination on our "go to" list.

Neil Sawyer is a 25-year Crystal River
resident and businessman. Traveling is
a hobby forNeil and his wife, Karyn.
They enjoy independent travel, small
ships and small-group guided tours.
Email him at
gobuddy@tampabay.rrcom.


DREAM
VACATIONS
A4a1 64 (r4e{


The Chronicle and The Accent Travel Group are If it's selected as a winner, it will be published Please avoid photos with dates on the print.
sponsoring a photo contest for readers of the in the Sunday Chronicle. Photos should be sent to the Chronicle at
newspaper. At the end of the year, a panel of judges will 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River,
Readers are invited to send a photograph from select the best photo during the year and that FL 34429 or dropped off at the Chronicle office
their Dream Vacation with a brief description of the photograph will win a prize, in Inverness, Crystal River or any
tri+n Accent Travel Office.






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Grad needs to


leave folks' home


SUNDAY EVENING MARCH 25, 2012 C:Comcast,Citrus B: Bright House D:Comcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
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S[WUFT PBS 5 5 5 41 Peter Blood Sugar Solution Finding Your Roots Finding Your Roots Steve Jobs-One MI-5'14' c
WF LA NBC 8 8 8 8 8 News Nightly Dateline NBC (N) (In Harry's Law "Search The Celebrity Apprentice The teams promote a News Paid
0 [WF NB 8 8 8 8 8 News Stereo) cN and Seize" (N) '14' drink with parties. (N) 'PG' c Program
o V ABC 20 20 20 News World America's Funniest Once Upon a Time "Hat Desperate Housewives GCB (N) (In Stereo) News Sports
0 WFT ABC 20 20 20 News Home Videos 'PG' Trick'(N) 'PG' (N) 14' 'PG' Night
2012 NCAA Basketball 60 Minutes (In Stereo) The Amazing Race (N) The Good Wife (N) (In CSI: Miami "Law & 10 News Paid
0 ] WT)CBS 10 10 10 10 10 Tournament (In Stereo) N Stereo)'14' Disorder" (N) '14' Program
WTVT FOX 13 13 13 13 FOX13 6:00 News The Cleveland The Bob's Family Guy American FOX13 10:00 News The Closer 'The Life"
0 FOX13 13 13 13 (N) N Simpsons Show Simpsons Burgers 14 Dad 14 (N) cm'14'm
ED WCiJBl ABC 11 11 4 News ABC Funny Home Videos Once Upon a Time Desp.-Wives GCB (N) 'PG' se News Brothers
WCLF IND 2 2 2 22 22 Brody File Stakel/ Coral Great Awakening Love a The Place for Miracles Daniel Jesse Pastor Great
E NWCI IND 2 2 2 22 22 Terror Ridge Hr Child G' Kolenda Duplantis Dayna Awaken
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I ABC 11 11 11 News Home Videos'PG' Trick'(N)'PG' (N) 14' cc 'PG' cc Anatomy
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The Comedy The Comedy Spy Crime Cold Squad '14' Da Vinci's Inquest (In Music Mix Music Mix The Cisco Black
S CWYi )FAM 16 16 16 15 Shop Shop Games Strike '14' (DVS) Stereo) '14' USA USA Kid 'G' Beauty
(i CWOX FOX 13 7 7 FOX 35 News at 6 Simpsons Cleveland Simpsons |Burgers Fam. Guy American FOX 35 News at 10 Big Bang Big Bang
' CWVEA UNI 15 15 15 15 14 Familia |Noticiero Parodiando'PG' Nuestra Belleza Latina (SS) Sal y Pimienta '14 Comned. Noticiero
I WXPX ION 17 *** "Bestin Show"2000) 'PG-13' ***"Bestin Show" 2000) 'PG-13' *** 'TheFugitive"(993) 'PG-13'
Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Breakout Kings "Cruz Breakout Kings "Cruz
A&EJ 54 48 54 25 27 Wars G' Wars PG' Wars PG Wars PG WarsPG Wars'PG WarsPG WarsPG Control"'14 Control"'14'
S*** "Ray" (2004, Biography) Jamie Foxx. Premiere. Ray Charles over- Mad Men "A Little Kiss" (Season Premiere) Pete Mad Men "A Little Kiss"
55 64 55 comes hardships to become a legend.'PG-13' and Roger butt heads. (N) 14 '14'
North Woods Law (In North Woods Law "Off Rattlesnake Republic Rattlesnake Republic Rattlesnake Republic Rattlesnake Republic
52 35 52 19 21 Stereo) 'PG' c Roadin"' PG' The Albino"'14' (N) (In Stereo) 14' (N) (In Stereo) 14 (In Stereo)'14'
"Video "35 & Ticking" (2011) Nicole Ari Parker. Friends try to Rip the Runway 2012 The Game Let's Stay Let's Stay Let's Stay
l 96 19 96 Girl"'R' figure out where their lives are heading. R' 'PG' c 14 Together Together Together
[BIRAVO0) 254 51 254 Housewives/OC Housewives/Atl. Housewives/Atl. Housewives/Atl. Shahs of Sunset (N) Happens Atlanta
S7 ** "Super Troopers" (2001, Comedy) Jay ** "The Goods: Live Hard. Sell Hard." (2009, "Jackass 2.5" (2007) South Park Tosh.O ac
i 27 61 27 33 Chandrasekhar, Kevin Heffernan. R' B Comedy) Jeremy Piven. 'R' c Johnny Knoxville. 'MA'
7 "Son-in-Law" "Whiskey Business" (2012, Comedy) Pauly *2 "Son-in-Law" (1993, Comedy) Pauly Shore, "Whiskey Business"
98 45 98 28 37 (1993) Pauly Shore. Shore. Premiere. (In Stereo) NR' Carla Gugino. (In Stereo) PG-13 (2012) Pauly Shore.
CNBC 43 42 43 Take It Paid Debt/Part |Wall St. Millions |Millions Biography on CNBC Big Mac: Inside Pepsi's Challenge
tWHJ 40 29 40 41 46 CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) Big Hits-Drms Piers Morgan CNN Newsroom (N) Big Hits-Drms
So Random! Shake It Austin & So Random! Austin & Shake It A.N.T Jessie Shake It Shake It A.N.T A.N.T
iSifi 46 40 46 6 5 G' Up! G' Ally 'G' G' Ally 'G' Up! G' Farm 'G' 'G' Up! 'G' Up! 'G' Farm 'G' Farm G'
LSPI) 33 27 33 21 17 SportsCenter (N) SportsCenter (N) NBA Basketball Miami Heat at Oklahoma City Thunder. NBA Basketball
(ESPN) 34 28 34 43 49 Wm. Basketball Women's College Basketball |College GameDay SportsCenter (N) SportsCenter (N)
(EWTNl 95 70 95 48 Ben. |Crossing Rosary |Pope Benedict XVI in Mexico and Cuba (N) |Rosary Lenten Symposium God |Bookmark
S** "The Notebook" *** "The Blind Side" (2009, Drama) Sandra Bullock. A well-to-do ** "Miss Congeniality" (2000 Comedy)
29 52 29 20 28 (2004) 'PG-13' white couple adopts a homeless black teen. PG-13 Sandra Bullock, Michael Caine. PG-13'
S 118 170 "The Core" (2003) Aaron Eckhart. *** "As Good as It Gets" (1997, Comedy-Drama) Jack ** 'The Crossing Guard" (1995)
X 118 170 Scientists travel to the center of the Earth. N Nicholson, Helen Hunt. (In Stereo)'PG-13' c Jack Nicholson.'R'N
FNC 44 37 44 32 Fox News Sunday FOX Report (N) Huckabee (N) Fox News Sunday Geraldo at Large (N) Huckabee
FOO) 26 56 26 Diners |Diners Worst Cooks Cupcake Wars (N) Worst Cooks Iron Chef America Restaurant Stakeout
FSNEL) 35 39 35 NHL Hockey |Panthers World PokerTour UFC Bad Blood |UFC World PokerTour
S*** "Zombieland" (2009, Comedy) Woody **2 "Twilight" (2008, Romance) Kristen Stewart. A teen is caught up in **2 "Twilight" (2008)
X) 30 60 30 51 Harrelson, Jesse Eisenberg. R' an unorthodox romance with a vampire. 'PG-13' 'PG-13'
GOLF 727 67 727 Golf Central (N) |LPGA Tour Golf Kia Classic, Final Round. |PGA Tour Golf Arnold Palmer Invitational, Final Round.
S"Chasing Leprechauns" (2012, Comedy- **"Personally Yours" (2000, Romance) Frasier 'PG Frasier 'PG Frasier 'PG' Frasier 'PG'
L 39 68 39 45 54 Drama) Adrian Pasdar, Amy Huberman. B Valerie Bertineli, Jeffrey Nordling. B
S"Sucker ** "Clash ofthe Titans"(2010, Action) Sam Game of Luck (Season Finale) Eastbound Life's Too Luck (In Stereo)'MA' c
302 201 302 2 2 Punch" Worthington. (In StereoPG-13' Thrones (N) 'MA' Short (N)
303 202 303 oBoxing Real Time With Bill Game of Thrones *** "Game Change"(2012, Docudrama) ** "Hereafter"
303 202Maher MA' "Baelor MA' Julianne Moore, Ed Harris. (In Stereo) a (2010) Matt Damon.
HGTV 23 57 23 42 52 House |Hunters Holmes on Homes Holmes on Homes Holmes Inspection Holmes Inspection Holmes on Homes
American Pickers Ax Men "Rygaard vs. Ax Men "Down & Dirty" Ax Men "Man Down" Full Metal Jousting (N) Full Metal Jousting '14,
(*i' 51 25 51 32 42 'PG' Rygaard"' 14 '14' (N)'14'B '14, L,V m L,V a
FoGr24 38 24 31t* FoolsGold" ** "P.S.I Love You" 2007, Romance) Hilary ArmyWives'True Coming Home"Hula ** "P.S. I Love You"
24 38 24 31 ,i:,. Swank, Gerard Butler. PG-13 Ic Colors" (N)'PG' Homecoming"'PG' (2007) 'PG-13'
(INi 50 119 S"Eight Days to Live" (2006, Drama) Kelly *** "Seventeen and Missing" (2007, Drama) "Like Dandelion Dust" (2009, Drama) Mira
U50 119 Rowan. 'NR' Deedee Pfeiffer. 'NR' c Sorvino, Barry Pepper. 'PG-13' .
1 *** "Inception" (2010) Leonardo DiCaprio. A thief enters "D.O.A.:Dead or Alive" (2006) n*** "Black Swan"(2010, Drama) Natalie
320 221 320 3 3 people's dreams and steals their secrets. Devon Aoki.'PG-13' m Portman. (In Stereo) 'R'
M(iSNBC) 42 41 42 -Caught on Camera [Caught on Camera |Caught on Camera ]Caught on Camera Deadly Game |Sex Slaves: Texas
( 109 65 Wild Justice "Killing for Explorer"Narco State" Inside Cocaine Cocaine Sub Hunt Wild Justice "Mile High Inside Cocaine
109 65 109 44 53 Cash"'14' 14' 1Submarines'14, V '14, L,V' Marijuana"'14' Submarines'14, V'
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[SPEED 732 112 732 Lane (N) Despain (N) _Academy (N) G
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S 37 43 37 27 36 Julie Benz. (In Stereo)'R' Island terrorists threaten to gas San Francisco. (In Stereo) R Digger Games
"30 ** "Man of the House" (2005, Comedy) *2 "Resident Evil:Afterlife" Spartacus: Vengeance *** "Apocalypto"
AIZ 370 271 370 Minutes" Tommy Lee Jones. (In Stereo) PG-13' (2010) Milla Jovovich. R'N c 'MA' c (2006) R' c
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36 31 36 Skins Animals'G' HEAT (Live) From Chesapeake Energy Arena in Oklahoma City. (Live) Derby
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51"I 31 59 31 26 29 Los" joins forces with Vikings to hunt his enemy R' a seemingly abandoned spacecraft. R'a a
(JBS) 49 23 49 16 19 ** "Yes Man" (2008) Jim Carrey. ** "Meetthe Fockers"(2004) Robert De Niro. |** "Meet the Fockers"
S*** "Niagara" (1953, Suspense) Marilyn *** "Night and the City" (1950, Crime t*** "Brute Force" (1947, Suspense) Burt
S 169 53 169 30 35 Monroe, Joseph Cotten.'NR' Drama) Richard Widmark'NR Lancaster, Hume Cronyn.'NR'
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53 34 53 24 26 bears battle for mates. 'PG' "Summer' (N) PG' Tape Island" (N) 'PG' "Fire and Ice"'PG' "Summer" PG'm
TI ) 50 46 50 29 30 Medium |Medium |Medium |Medium Medium |Medium Medium |Medium To Niecy To Niecy Medium |Medium
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350 261 350 Ford. (In Stereo) PG-13' Spacey (In Stereo) R'N Pierce Brosnan. (In Stereo) 'R N
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48 33 48 31 34 Supremacy" (2004) Julia Stiles, Joan Allen.'PG-13' cc Julia Stiles, Joan Allen.'PG-13' cm
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117 69 117 David Tutera David Tutera David Tutera David Tutera David Tutera David Tutera
WGNA 1 18 18 18 18 20 MLB Baseball 30Rock Mother Mother |Mother Mother |Mother News |Replay The Unit 'PG'


ear Annie: I gradu-
ated from college
last year. I have a
modest paying job in my
hometown and can afford
rent But since I am trying to
save money for graduate
school, I moved back in with
my parents. My folks agreed.
They are quite frugal and
would be disappointed if I
chose to spend the extra
money on rent
I have a solid relationship
with my parents
and actually
enjoy spending
time with them.
The problem is,
they have had a
rocky marriage
for as long as I can
remember. They
both struggle with
alcoholism, and I
suspect Dad (and
maybe Mom) has
gone through pe-
riods of depres- ANN
sion. The house is MAIL
far from town, and
they run their
businesses from home, so
they rarely leave the prem-
ises. As a result, they fight
constantly.
I hear them yelling no mat-
ter where I am. I often find
myself holed up in my bed-
room skipping meals because
I don't want to be in the mid-
dle of whatever argument
they are having. I have spo-
ken to them about the strain
this puts on me.
Even though they acknowl-
edge that it is not the best sit-
uation, they also say they
don't know how to fix it After
multiple bouts of counseling,
as a couple and independ-
ently, they have given up.
Annie, I am not trying to in-
terfere with their marriage.
They have made the decision
to stick it out. But I need to
protect my own sanity and


Today's MOVIES


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness;
637-3377
"The Hunger Games" (PG-13)
1 p.m., 1:30 p.m., 4:05 p.m.,
4:40 p.m., 7:20 p.m., 7:50 p.m.
"21 Jump Street" (R) ID required.
1:15 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
"John Carter" (PG-13) In Real
3D. 1:05 p.m., 4:15 p.m.,
7:15 p.m. No passes.
"Dr. Seuss' The Lorax" (PG) In
Real 3D. 1:45 p.m., 4:50 p.m.
No passes.
"Act of Valor" (R) ID required.
1:40 p.m., 4:45 p.m., 7 p.m.

Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"The Hunger Games" (PG-13)
12:30 p.m., 1 p.m., 1:30 p.m.,
4:10 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 6:50 p.m.,
7:20 p.m., 7:50 p.m.


"21 Jump Street" (R) ID required.
1:20 p.m., 5 p.m., 8 p.m.
"A Thousand Words" (PG-13)
1:10 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
"John Carter" (PG-13) In Real
3D. 12:45 p.m., 4 p.m., 7 p.m.
No passes.
"Dr. Seuss' The Lorax" (PG)
12:35 p.m., 4:55 p.m.
"Dr. Seuss' The Lorax" (PG)
In Real 3D. 2:45 p.m., 7:05 p.m.
No passes.
"Gone" (PG-13) 1:15 p.m.,
4:45 p.m., 7:40 p.m.
"Act of Valor" (R) ID required.
4:05 p.m.
"The Artist" (PG-13) 12:55 p.m.,
4:20 p.m., 7:15 p.m.
Visit www.chronicleonline.com
for area movie listings and
entertainment information.


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Reduced
6 Play for the stage
11 Twilight, poetically
16 Mine passage
21 Nimble
22 Architectural order
23 Arete
24 The Pentateuch
25 Satisfy, as thirst
26 Investor
in a business
28 Sharp
29 Drunkard
30 Knock
32 Idle or Bana
33 Contrite
35 Coffee or
chocolate
36 Actor McGregor
38 Note
41 Cauldron's
contents
43 Caustic substance
44 Bundle
45 Where Reykjavik is
48 Goofed
50 Tart
52 Hom on old cars
55 Anon
57 Root vegetable
58 Apportion
62 Broken-down horse
63 Estrangement
65 Gift of-
67 Stone
69 Loosen a certain way
70 Work unit
71 Sch. gp.
72 Wheel tooth
74 Burton and Allen
76 Pitcher
77 Taj Mahal city
79 and yang
81 Delicate
83 de grace
85 Palmas
86 Distributed cards
88 Spoon for a tureen
90 Plant secretion
92 Actress
Dietrich
94 Useless
96 Disapproving cry
97 Insane
99 Spike and
Robert E.
100 Discolored
103 Man at sea
105 Spring time


107 Noodles
110 Whack
111 Row
113 Belly
115 Enthusiast
117 Place for a patch
118 Inter-
120 Equipment
122 In addition
123 Massage
125 Cup handle
126 Duration
128 Came in first
130 Tiny colonist
132 Big sandwich
133 Lanka
134 Degas or Buchanan
135 Kiddie
137 Pierce with homes
139 Creamy dessert
141 Gratuity
143 Discard
145 Carry out
147 Pilfer
150 Legless creature
152 Border on
154 Wraparound
garment
155 "God's Little-"
159 Jima
160 Saber
162 Length times width
164 -de-France
166 Intention
167 Wetland
169 Hotel offering
(2 wds.)
173 Baja buddy
175 A Muse
176 Old garment
177 Type style
178 Fortune-telling card
179 Compact
180 Office worker
of old
181 Prize
182 Boutique

DOWN
1 Old-fashioned
2 Incandescent
3 Lariat
4 Moose
5 Stag
6 Drive off
7 Decompose
8 Literary collection
9 Wallace or Tyson
10 Bitter
11 Food market


-Abner
Concern of bettors
Ancient (hyph.)
Cheerful
Remain
Ad committee
Island near
Bonaire
Deadly
That place
Charter
Something
providing
comfort
Salesman
Veto
Schooner pole
Yoko -
Sandwich relative
Beautiful girl
Abbr. in bus
Canine
Give off
Singer Janis -
Work dough
Massive
Vexatious
Mother-of-pearl
Anarchy
Sea
Not at all wordy
Miss the mark
Feather scarf
A twitching
Regular
Booking
for a singer
Mummy
Jai -
Take suddenly
Parade attraction
Like gravy, perhaps
- school
Color
Speck
Spoil
Plumbing problem
Equine sound
Racket
Layered rock
Like some roofs
Poor grade
Furrow
In the company of
Enticement
Salty drops
Nest
Uncooked
Extinct bird
Hullabaloo


Playing marble
Mil. gp. on campus
Churl
Number prefix
Ibsen character
Summit
Greek goddess
Spicy sauce
In medias -
Thurman the
actress


Forefoot
Shoot
Unadulterated
Chum
Used a stopwatch
Cognizant
Sacred writings
Kinds
- firma
City in Egypt
Strictness


Act like a ham
Loafer
Finished
Admit openly
Diner sign
Paved ways (abbr.)
Time per.
"- Yankee Doodle..."
Jalopy
Doily


Puzzle answer is on Page A16.


2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick


still save enough money for
graduate school. They will be
angry and hurt if I move out,
but I have reached my break-
ing point What should I do?
- Putting a Price on Sanity
Dear Sanitry Move out You
say you can afford rent, so
consider a place with multi-
ple roommates to save
money It would be worth it to
have a measure of peace.
Look into student loans and
grants. Your parents may be
hurt and angry,
but they will un-
derstand your mo-
tivation and get
over it And if they
4 S are so eager to
help you save
money perhaps
they would be
willing to set aside
a little each month
to give you a hand
. with the tuition
when the time
IE'S comes.
.BOX Dear Annie:
-BOX When our middle
son was in high
school, he, too, wanted long
hair We came to an agree-
ment: He could grow his hair
long, but if it wasn't kept
clean, he'd wake up one
morning to find chewed gum
stuck in it A couple of years
later, he joined the Marines
and hasn't had long hair
since. That was 20 years ago.
Ralph (Proud Dad of a
Marine)


Annie's Mailbox is written
by Kathy Mitchell and
Marcy Sugar, longtime
editors of the Ann Landers
column. Email questions to
anniesmailbox@
comcast.net, or write to:
Annie's Mailbox,
c/o Creators Syndicate,
737 Third St., Hermosa
Beach, CA 90254.


A14 sUNDAY, MARCH 25, 2012


ENTERTAINMENT


4I
Ll





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Veterans NOTES


Due to space considera-
tions, the Veterans Notes some-
times contain only basic
information regarding each post.
For more information about
scheduled activities, meals and
more for a specific post, call or
email that post at the contact
listed.

The Red Tail Memorial
Chapter 136 of the Air Force As-
sociation will meet one week
early on April 12, the second
Thursday of the month, at 7 p.m.
at the Ocala Regional Airport Ad-
ministration Building, 750 S.W.
60th Ave., Ocala. For more infor-
mation, call Mike Emig at 352-
854-8328.
The U.S. Air Force is look-
ing for prior enlisted men and
women from all services inter-
ested in both direct duty assign-
ments in previously obtained
career fields or retraining into se-
lect career fields. Some of the
careers include aircraft electron-
ics/mechanical areas, cyber op-
eration fields, and various other
specialties. Enlisted career open-
ings that include the opportuni-
ties to retrain consist of special
operations positions and un-
manned aerial vehicle.
Assignment locations are
based on Air Force needs. For
more information, call 352-
476-4915.
Citrus County Veterans
Coalition has a new building
holding freezers, refrigerators
and all necessary requirements
to provide food to veterans in
need. Food donations and volun-
teers are always welcomed and
needed.
The CCVC is on the DAV
property in Inverness at the cor-
ner of Paul and Independence,
off U.S. 41 north. Hours of opera-
tion are 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tues-
day and Thursday. Appointments
are encouraged by calling 352-
400-8952.
CCVC general meetings are
at 10 a.m. the fourth Thursday
monthly at the DAV building in In-
verness. All active duty and hon-
orably discharged veterans, their
spouses, widows and widowers,
along with other veterans' organi-
zations and current coalition
members are welcome. Mem-
bers are encouraged to attend
general meetings.
Annual membership donation
is $10 for a calendar year or $25
for three years. The CCVC is a
nonprofit corporation, and your
donations are tax deductible.
Current members should check
their membership card for expira-
tion dates, and renew with Gary
Williamson at 352-527-4537,
or at the meeting. Visit online:
www.ccvcfl.org.
AMVETS William Crow
Post 447, Inglis, is on State
Road 40 East. Sons meeting is
at 5:30 p.m. first Monday; Riders
meeting is at 5:30 p.m. first
Thursday; post meeting is at 5:30
p.m. second Thursday; Ladies
Auxiliary meeting is 5:30 p.m.
third Thursday.
For more information about
the post and its activities, call
352-447-1816; email
Amvet447@comcast.net.
Blanton-Thompson
American Legion Post 155, is
at 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way, Crystal River.
The post invites members and
guests to celebrate the grand
opening of its new non-smoking
room on Friday, April 6.
Doors open at 4 p.m. with din-


ner available; entertainment
at 7 p.m.
For information about the post
and its activities, call Cmdr. Jay
Conti Sr. at 352-795-6526 or visit
www.postl55.org.
American Legion Riders Post
155 Crystal River will have its
sixth annual Mystery Poker Run
at 9 a.m. Saturday, March 31.
Proceeds will benefit veterans
served by Hospice of Citrus
County and Hospice of the
Nature Coast.
The Mystery Poker Run will
begin at the American Legion
Post 155, 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River. Registra-
tion begins at 9 a.m. with the last
bike out at 11 a.m. and last bike
in (at the final stop) at 4 p.m. The
final stop will feature a cash bar,
dinner, music, raffles, a 50/50
drawing and prizes for the Best
Hand and for the Joker.
The entry fee will be $10 per
rider. All vehicles are welcome.
For more information, call ride
chairperson Tom Voelz at 352-
795-2884 or Hospice of Citrus
County at 352-527-2020.
American Legion Auxil-
iary Unit 155 meets at 7:30 p.m.
the fourth Tuesday of every
month at the post. The American
Legion Auxiliary is the world's
largest women's patriotic service
organization with nearly 1 million
members in 10,100 communi-
ties. The principles of the Ameri-
can Legion Auxiliary are to serve
veterans, their families and the
community.
Eligibility in the Auxiliary is
open to mothers, wives, sisters,
daughters, granddaughters,
great-granddaughters or grand-
mothers of members of the
American Legion and of de-
ceased veterans who served
during war time (also stepchil-
dren); stepchildren; and female
veterans who served during war
time. Call Unit President Shawn
Mikulas, 352-503-5325, or mem-
bership chairman Barbara
Logan, 352-795-4233.
The Auxiliary will serve a
salmon cake and macaroni and
cheese dinner from 5 to 6:30
p.m. Wednesday, March 28, at
the post home, 6585 W. Gulf-to-
Lake Highway, Crystal River.
All members and the public
are welcome. All profits from the
dinner will go to support the
many programs of the American
Legion Auxiliary.
H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post
10087, Beverly Hills, offers
meals, bingo, golf, karaoke and
pool. Review the monthly
newsletter for activities and up-
dates, and call the post at 352-
746-0440. The VFW Post 10087
is off County Road 491, directly
behind Superior Bank.
Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs,
352-465-4864. Wi Fi is now
available at the post; bring your
laptop or any other item that will
access the Internet and enjoy the
free service. The post is now a
nonsmoking facility; smoking is
allowed on the porch.
All are welcome at the baked
pork chop dinner from 5 to 6:30
p.m. Friday, March 30, at the
post. Cost is $8.
Information regarding any post
events is available at the post or
call 352-465-4864.
Disabled American Veter-
ans Chapter No. 70 meets at 2
p.m. the second Tuesday
monthly at the chapter hall, 1039
N. Paul Drive, Inverness, at the


intersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41. The chap-
ter hall is on the corner of Inde-
pendence Highway and Paul
Drive.
We welcome any disabled vet-
eran to join us from 9 a.m. to 1
p.m. any Tuesday or Thursday at
the chapter hall. This is also the
time that we accept donated
nonperishable foods for our con-
tinuing food drive.
Our main function is to assist
disabled veterans and their fami-
lies when we are able. Anyone
who knows a disabled veteran or
their family who requires assis-
tance is asked to call Com-
mander Richard Floyd at
727-492-0290, Ken Stewart at
352-419-0207, or 352-344-3464.
Service Officer Joe McClister
is available to assist any veteran
or dependents with their disability
claim by appointment. Call 352-
344-3464 and leave a message.
Ambulatory veterans who wish
to schedule an appointment for
transportation to the VA medical
center in Gainesville should call
the veterans' service office at
352-527-5915. Mobility chal-
lenged veterans who wish to
schedule an appointment for
transportation to the VA medical
center in Gainesville may call the
Citrus County Transit office for
wheelchair transportation; call
352-527-7630.
For more information about
chapter activities, veterans' bene-
fits or membership, Call Ken
Stewart at 352-419-0207; leave
a message, if desired, should the
machine answer.
Disabled American Veter-
ans Auxiliary Unit No. 70 meets
at 2 p.m. the second Tuesday of
the month at the chapter hall,
comer of U.S. 41 north, Inde-
pendence Boulevard and Paul
Drive, Inverness.
The Auxiliary's next meeting
will be at 2 p.m. Tuesday,
April 10.
The DAV Auxiliary has ongo-
ing projects to help needy veter-
ans. Members recently took
more than 150 lap robes, 200
ditty bags and more than 100
wheelchair and walker bags to
area nursing homes. Members
collect good, clean cotton mate-
rial, yarn and toiletry items to
make lap robes, wheelchair and
walker and ditty bags for veter-
ans in nursing homes.
Membership has expanded to
include many more who are eligi-
ble to join. For more information
or to donate items, call Com-
mander Linda Brice at 352-560-
3867 or Adjutant Lynn Armitage
at 352-341-5334.
Eugene Quinn VFW Post
4337 and Ladies Auxiliary, is at
906 State Road 44 E., Inverness.
Call the post at 352-344-3495 for
information about all weekly post
activities, or visit www.
vfw4337.org.
The newly forming Men's Aux-
iliary to VFW Post 4337 will have
an organizational meeting at the
post home at 10 a.m. Saturday,
April 7. All members and
prospective members are urged
to attend.
The unit will be initiated; offi-
cers for 2012-13 will be elected
and installed. The new unit will
establish dues, meeting dates
and times.
Call 352-344-3495 for more
information.
The American Legion
Wall-Rives Post 58 and Auxil-
iary, 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnellon.
Dunnellon Young Marines will


meet at 6 p.m. Tuesday.
Free AARP tax services will be
available 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Wednesday through April 11.
For more information, call Wayne
Sloan at 352-489-5066.
The public is welcome at
bingo at 6 p.m. Thursday.
For information about activities
and the post, call Carl Boos at
352-489-3544.
Rolling Thunder Chapter
7, a POW/MIA awareness group,
meets at 10 a.m. second Satur-
day at the VFW Post 10087 in
Beverly Hills. Call Bob Bruno,
secretary, at 352-201-1228.
A Marine Corps League
Ladies Auxiliary Citrus Unit
meets at 1 p.m. the third Tues-
day monthly at the VFW in Bev-
erly Hills. New members are
welcome. Membership fee is $30
a year. Female relatives ages 16
or older who are a wife, widow,
mother, stepmother, sister,
daughter, stepdaughter, grand-
mother, granddaughter, aunt or
daughter-in-law of honorably dis-
charged Marines and FMF
Corpsmen are eligible to belong
to the Marine Corps League. Fe-
male Marines (former, active and
reserves) and associate mem-
bers are eligible for MCLA mem-
bership. Call President Elaine
Spikes at 352-860-2400 or Sec-
retary/Treasurer Joan Cecil at
352-726-0834 for information.
Hunger and Homeless
Coalition -Anyone who knows
of a homeless veteran in need of
food, haircut, voter ID, food
stamps, medical assistance or
more blankets is asked to call Ed
Murphy at the Hunger and
Homeless Coalition at 352-382-
0876, or pass along this phone
number to the veteran.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW Post
4252 and Ladies Auxiliary 3190
N. Carl G. Rose Highway, State
Road 200, Hernando; 352-
726-3339. Send emails to
vfw4252@tampabay.rr.com.
Everyone is welcome. Post
and auxiliary meet at 6:30 p.m.
every second Thursday.
Post honor guard is available
for funerals, flag raising and
nursing home visits.
The public is welcome to the
Friday night dinner and dance at
5p.m.
See our post activities: Google
us as VFW 4252, Hernando.
Dumas-Hartson VFW Post
8189 is on West Veterans Drive,
west of U.S. 19 between Crystal
River and Homosassa. Call 352-
795-5012 for information.
VFW membership is open to
men and women veterans who
have participated in an overseas
campaign, including service in
Iraq and Afghanistan. The Ko-
rean Campaign medal remains
open, as well. Call the post at
the phone number above
for information.
Joe Nic Barco Memorial
VFW Post 7122, 8191 S. Florida
Ave., Floral City. For information
about the post and its activities,
call 352-637-0100.
Friday is AUCE fish or three-
piece chicken for $7.
American Legion, Beverly
Hills Memorial Post 237,4077
N. Lecanto Highway, in the Bev-
erly Plaza, invites all eligible vet-
erans and their families to visit
our post and consider joining our
Legion family: American Legion,
Sons of the American Legion
(SAL), or American Legion Auxil-
iary (ALA). Color Guard/Honor
Guard accepting volunteers.


Beverly Hills Memorial Ameri-
can Legion Post 237, by ap-
proval of its Executive Board on
Jan. 22, and by those members
present at the Jan. 26 general
membership meeting, has
changed its regular meeting time
to 7 p.m. on the fourth Tuesday
monthly. Contact the post at 352-
746-5018 for more information.
The Korean War Veterans
Association, Citrus Chapter
192 meets at the VFW Post
10087, Beverly Hills, at 1 p.m.
the first Tuesday monthly. Any
veteran who has seen honorable
service in any of the Armed
Forces of the U.S. is eligible for
membership if said service was
within Korea, including territorial
waters and airspace, at any time
from Sept. 3, 1945, to the pres-
ent or if said service was outside
of Korea from June 25,1950, to
Jan. 31, 1955. For information,
call Hank Butler at 352-563-
2496, Neville Anderson at 352-
344-2529 or Bob Hermanson at
352-489-0728.
Allen-Rawls American Le-
gion Post 77 and Auxiliary Unit
77 meet the first Thursday
monthly at the Inverness High-
lands Civic Center at 4375 Little
Al Point Road, Inverness. Call
Post Cmdr. Norman Brumett at
352-860-2981, or Auxiliary presi-
dent Marie Cain at 352-
637-5915.
U.S. Submarine Veterans
(USSVI)-Sturgeon Base meets
at 11 a.m. the first Saturday
monthly at the American Legion
Post 155, 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River. Visitors
and interested parties are always
welcome. Call Base Cmdr. Billy
Wein at 352-726-5926.
Members of the U.S. Subma-
rine Veterans who have earned
the designation "qualified in Sub-
marines" at least 50 years ago
will be honored for their service in
a formal ceremony at American
Legion Post 155, State Road 44,
Crystal River, at 11 a.m. Satur-
day, April 7. The public is invited
to the ceremony.
The Holland Club is named
after John P. Holland, designer of
the first U.S. Navy submarine. It
is an exclusive group within the
U.S. Submarine Veterans organi-
zation consisting of men who
served in World War II, through
1959 during the Cold War period.
United States Submarine Vet-
erans is a National Veterans Fra-
ternal Organization chartered in
1964, with more than 13,000
members and 150 chapters na-
tionwide. It is the largest organi-
zation of submarine-qualified
veterans in the world. Visit
www.ussvi.org or call 352-563-
1101 for more information.
American Legion Post 166
meets 1:30 p.m., first Saturday
monthly at the Dumas-Hartson
VFW Post 8189 Ladies Auxiliary
facility on Veterans Drive, Ho-
mosassa, on the west side of
U.S. 19 at Dixon'sAuto Sales
across from Harley-Davidson.
We meet in the small building to
the left of the main building.
All former and current post
members, as well as all inter-
ested veterans, are cordially in-
vited to be part of our post. Call
and leave a message for the
post commander at 352-697-
1749. Your call will be returned.
Seabee Veterans of Amer-
ica (SVA) Island X-23 welcomes
all Seabees and Honeybees to
its monthly meeting at 10:30 a.m.
the third Tuesday monthly at Cit-
rus Hills Country Club, Rose and


Crown restaurant, Citrus Hills.
Call John Lowe at 352-
344-4702.
Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219
and Cabane 1219 conducts its
meetings at 7 p.m. the second
Thursday monthly at the Ameri-
can Legion Post 155 on State
Road 44 in Crystal River (6585
E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway). For
more information about the 40/8,
call the Chef De Gare Tom Smith
at 352-601-3612; for the Ca-
bane, call La Presidente Carol
Kaiserian at 352-746-1959; or
visit us on the Web at
www.Postl55.org.
Aaron A. Weaver Chapter
776 Military Order of the Pur-
ple Heart (MOPH) meets at 2
p.m. the third Tuesday of Janu-
ary, March, May, July, September
and November. All combat-
wounded veterans, lineal de-
scendants, next of kin, spouses
and siblings of Purple Heart re-
cipients are cordially invited to at-
tend and to join the ranks of
Chapter 776. To learn more
about Aaron A. Weaver Chapter
776 MOPH, visit the chapter's
website at www.citruspurple
heart.org or call 352-382-3847.
Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment
1139 will conduct its regular
meeting at 7 p.m. the third
Wednesday monthly at DAV
Post 70 in Inverness at the inter-
section of Independence High-
way and U.S. 41 North. All
Marines are welcome. Call Jerry
Cecil at 352-726-0834 or Wayne
Howard at 352-634-5254.
Marine Corps League Cit-
rus Detachment 819 meets at 7
p.m. the last Thursday monthly at
VFW Post 10087 on Vet Lane in
Beverly Hills, behind Superior
Bank. Social hour follows. All
Marines and FMF Corpsmen are
welcome. Meet new friends and
discuss past glories. Call Morgan
Patterson at 352-746-1135, Ted
Archambault at 352-382-0462 or
Bion St. Bernard at 352-
697-2389.
Gilley-Long-Osteen VFW
Post 8698 is at 520 State Road
40 E., Inglis, one mile east of
U.S. 19. The Men's Auxiliary
meets at 7 p.m. the second Mon-
day. LAVFW meets at 5 p.m. and
the membership meeting is at
6:30 p.m. the third Wednesday at
the post.
Call the post at 352-447-3495
for information about the post
and its activities.
Fleet Reserve Associa-
tion, Branch 186 will meet at 3
p.m. the third Thursday monthly
at the DAV Building, Independ-
ence Highway and U.S. 41
North, Inverness. Call Bob
Huscher, secretary, at
352-344-0727.
American Legion Herbert
Surber Post 225 meets at 7
p.m. the third Thursday monthly
at the New Testament Baptist
Church of Floral City, 9850 S.
Parkside Ave. adjoining Floral
Park, southeast side. All eligible
veterans are welcome to join.
Landing Ship Dock (LSD)
sailors meet at Denny's in Crystal
River at 2 p.m. the fourth Thurs-
day monthly. Call Jimmie at 352-
621-0617.
Suncoast U.S. Navy
Armed Guard and Merchant
Marine Veterans of World War
II meetings for 2012 will be at
11:30 a.m. at Kally K's restaurant
in Spring Hill on the following
dates: April 14, May 12, Sept. 8,
Oct. 13, Nov. 10 and Dec. 8.


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SUNDAY, MARCH 25, 2012 A15





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Is shopping really


that 'convenient'?


J was out of town yester-
day and stopped in an
unfamiliar mall to pick
up a few things. It was one
of those giant strip malls
with a Home Depot on one
end and a Target on the
other. I could see another
giant strip mall, with a
Lowe's at one end and a
Wal-Mart at the other,
across the superhighway.
On the third
corner was an
outlet mall, de-
signed to look
the way down-
towns used to
look before they
went out of
business be-
cause it was
easier to drive
to the mall than IAP
downtown. MUL
But now the
traffic around
malls is horrendous. For
the life of me, I could not
figure out how to get from
the mall with the Home
Depot to the mall with the
Lowe's by car, yet I could
see both stores. If it hadn't
been for the superhighway,
I could have walked from
one to the other. I ended
up in the fake downtown
mall by accident. It would
have been easier to drive
downtown.
All three malls were sur-
rounded by housing devel-
opments, some of them
just across the access road
and a short walk to the
mall. But no one was walk-
ing because, one, you'd
have to climb over a 16-
foot privacy fence.
Two, you'd be taking
your life in your hands to
walk across a mall parking
lot where normal traffic
laws don't apply. Cus-
tomers drive on the left,
they don't look in the
rearview mirror, and they
think stop signs are quaint
decorations of a bygone
era, like old-time street
lamps.
Three, if you bought
something, how would you
get it home on foot? You
could always wander away
with a shopping cart, but
what would the neighbors
think? So even if you live
across the street from a
giant mall, you have to
drive there. They've been
designed for cars, not peo-
ple.
I spent about $130 on
this trip not hard when
the replacement cartridge
for my printer costs $60.
When I got home, Sue was
too tired to cook, and I'm
not smart enough to cook,
so we ordered a pizza and
had it delivered With the


I


tip, it cost about $20. That's
when I started to wonder
what would happen if I
called the store where I
bought the $60 printer car-
tridge and asked that it be
delivered. Would the store
tell me to get lost? Or to
buy the cartridge online?
How is it that I can get
$10 of Chinese food deliv-
ered to my door at 8
o'clock at night,
but if I called the
closest big-box
store and said,
S "I'll take that
$3,000, 52-inch
HDTV that I was
looking at this af-
ternoon. Can you
have someone
drop it by the
I house?" they'd
LEN hang up on me?
Obviously, it's
not practical to
deliver some things, but
how did this cash-and-
carry system we have now
come to be? The first
words I hear out of a
cashier's mouth are usu-
ally, "Can I have your ZIP
code?" not, "Can we de-
liver this for you?" That's
because the store does
want to deliver "one" thing
to my house junk mail -
which you and I subsidize
because the store gets a
special rate.
Sure, a lot of people like
to shop; they like to touch
and feel things. But they
also like to have things de-
livered. All the brick-and-
mortar stores complain
about Amazon.com steal-
ing their business, but
don't the stores near us
have a big advantage over
Amazon? Amazon charges
an arm and a leg for next-
day delivery, while our
local stores could give us
same-day delivery, and it'd
be nice if they made it
free. My little local flower
shop can do it; why can't
multibillion-dollar corpo-
rations do it? And put
some unemployed kids to
work at the same time?
I'm sure I'm missing
something that business-
people will be happy to
point out to me for ex-
ample, if they have to hire
people to start delivering
things all over town, how
will their CEO be able to
buy his fifth home in
Switzerland so he can visit
his money without having
to stay in a hotel?

Jim Mullen's book "Now in
Paperback" is now in pa-
perback. You can reach
him via email at
jimm ullenbooks. com.


50th ANNIVERSARY

The Bafias


Walter and Barbara
Bafia celebrated their 50th
wedding anniversary on
Feb. 28, 2012.
The couple were united
in marriage at a ceremony
at Fourth Presbyterian
Church on Michigan Av-
enue in Chicago, Ill. Estab-
lished in 1871, Fourth
Church is one of the oldest
surviving structures on the
famous "Magnificent Mile"
north of the Chicago River.
Mrs. Bafia is retired, fol-
lowing a career as a regis-
tered nurse. Mr. Bafia is


retired after a career with
Hinckley-Big Rock Com-
munity School District 429.
They are active volunteers
at the English Congrega-
tional United Church of
Christ in Big Rock, Ill., and
golf enthusiasts.
The couple have three
children: Thomas (Laura)
Bafia, Paul (Vanessa) Bafia
and the late Leonard
(Janet) Bafia. They have
four grandchildren.
They reside in Sand-
wich, Ill., and Homosassa
Springs.


Linda Carroll and James
Bruce Agee, both of Ocala,
exchanged nuptial vows on
Valentine's Day, Feb. 14,
2012, at Homosassa
Springs Wildlife State
Park. Chaplain Donna
Viglione of The Wedding
Chapel in Inverness per-
formed the evening
ceremony
The bride is the daugh-
ter of Dennis and Pat Car-
roll of Inglis. She is
associated with Interim
HealthCare.
The groom is the son of
Mavis Allen of Greenfield,
Ind. He is associated with
Angel Heating & Cooling.
Jeremy Agee stood by as
the best man and Holden
Agee attended as grooms-
man. Maid of Honor was
Jennifer Herrin and
bridesmaids were Debbie


Marriages 3/12/12 to 3/18/12
Philip John Bullock,
Dunnellon/Corrie Leath Lovett,
Dunnellon
Michael Wayne Chitty,
Floral City/Amanda Kae
Rogstad, Floral City
George Roy Ericsen Jr.,
Inverness/Natasa Jevremovic,
Inverness
Timothy Samuel Fitzwater,
Yankeetown/Lisa Marie Smith,
Yankeetown
Michael Steven Malicoate,
Inverness/Megan Elizabeth
Stubstad, Inverness
Steven Eugene Morris,


L 11 1 1
Miller, Betty Ann Trahan
and Pat Carroll.
A reception followed the
wedding at the Pepper-
creek Inn, and the couple
took a honeymoon trip to
Nassau, the Bahamas.


Homosassa/Klaara Bartley,
Homosassa
Dewey Orville Name II,
Homosassa/Marcie Ann
White, Homosassa
Michael Lance Trevor
Rollen, Homosassa/Melissa
Ann Hala, Homosassa
Reggie Amador Salazar,
Gainesville/Theresa Ann
Anthony, Inverness
Levi Frank Stone, Floral
City/Dina Lee Demaris, Floral
City
Seth Alan Wood,
Inverness/Amy Lyn Bormann,
Inverness


Brittany Phillips and
Christopher Reeves ex-
changed nuptial vows Feb.
25, 2012 in Lecanto. Pastor
Dale Wolfe of Hernando
Seventh-day Adventist
Church officiated the cere-
mony and the bride was
given in marriage by
her parents.
The bride is the daugh-
ter of Candy Phillips of
Crystal River and Stephen
Phillips of Dunnellon. The
groom is the son of Carl
and May Reeves of
Hernando.
James Sudlow of Ho-
mosassa, a friend of the
couple, stood by as the best
man. Groomsmen were
Dustin Will of Citrus
Springs, brother-in-law of
the bride and groom; and
Jason Tsacrios of Citrus
Springs, a friend of the
bride and groom.
Allisha Will of Citrus
Springs attended her sister
as matron of honor. Brides-
maids were Tina Hill of
Plant City, cousin of the
bride; and Tanya Tsacrios
of Citrus Springs, a friend
of the couple.
The couple's daughter,
Kaitlynn Reeves, was
flower girl and their son,
Cooper-Cain Reeves,
served as ring-bearer
The bride wore an ivory


strapless gown embel-
lished with beaded pearls
and crystals. She carried a
bouquet of white and ivory
roses.
A reception followed the
ceremony at the RACC
Building.
Thoe live in Inver-
ness, where the bride is ad-
ministrator of EXIT Realty
Leaders and her husband
is a deputy for the Citrus
County Sheriff's Office.


FOR THE RECORD

U Divorces and marriages filed in the state of Florida
are a matter of public record, available from each
county's Clerk of the Courts Office. For Citrus
County, call the clerk at (352) 341-6400 or visit
www.clerk.citrus.fl.us/. For proceedings filed in
another county, contact the clerk in that area.



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Wedding

Phillps/Reeves


Wedding

Carroll/Agee


For the RECORD=


A16 SUNDAY, MARCH 25, 2012


TOGETHER











PORTS


Chipper Jones
will open the
season on the
disabled list./B3


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


0 NCAA tournament/B2
0 Auto racing/B2
0 MLB/B3
0 Sports briefs, golf/B4
0 TV, lottery/B4
0 NBA, NHL/B5
0 Dr. Ron Joseph/B5
0 Entertainment/B6


Woods holds scant advantage at Bay Hill


Tiger up one going

into last round of

PG A Tour event

Associated Press
ORLANDO One swing cost
Tiger Woods a comfortable lead
at Bay Hill. All that mattered to
J him was his name atop the
leaderboard at the end of the day,
leaving him one round away from
winning on the PGA Tour for the
first time in 30 months.
If anything, Saturday showed
Associated Press that it won't be easy in the Arnold
Tiger Woods hits out of a bunker on the 14th hole during the third round Palmer Invitational.
of the Arnold Palmer Invitational golf tournament Saturday at Bay Hill in In two holes, Woods went from
Orlando. Woods holds a single-shot lead heading into Sunday's final round. a four-shot lead to briefly tied


with Graeme McDowell after a
bizarre chain of events that fea-
tured a young man passing out
and a woman screaming, all in
the middle of Woods' swing on the
15th tee.
But he followed the double
bogey with a birdie from a fair-
way bunker on the par-5 16th to
restore his lead, and then hung
on for a 1-under 71 that gave him
a one-shot lead over McDowell
going into the final round.
McDowell didn't make a birdie
until the 17th hole, but he was
bogey-free on a tough day for a 71.
Woods is 37-2 when he has the
outright lead going into the final
round, and Sunday will show if
he has regained his status as the
most formidable closer in golf.
Woods, who was at 11-under
205, last won on the PGA Tour on


Sept. 13, 2009, at the BMW Cham-
pionship. That also was the last
time he had the outright lead at a
PGA Tour event after 54 holes.
He has never had a better
chance to end the drought than
now in the lead and on a
course where he has won a
record six times.
"I enjoy it," Woods said of his
place atop the leaderboard. "It
means I've played well to get
there. It's not like I'm slashing it
all over the place and happened
to be at 11-under par If you're in
the lead, you've done some good
things. That's how I've always
looked at it, and it's a nice posi-
tion to be in."
Woods has such control of his
golf ball that he went 38 consecu-
tive holes with a putter in his
See Page B4


Men's NCAA Tournament ELITE EIGHT


Slowly slips away

LA,_:7147M&


Associated Press
Florida players sit in the closing moments of their NCAA tournament West Regional final game against Louisville on Saturday in Phoenix.
Florida lost to Louisville 72-68 after holding a double-digit lead in the second half.

Despite 11-point lead in second half, Gators collapse in loss to Louisville


Associated Press
PHOENIX Once upon a
time, Billy Donovan took Rick
Pitino on an improbable ride
to the Final Four
Twenty-five years later,
Pitino is heading back after an-
other unbelievable run one
capped with an amazing late-
game rally that left his old pro-
tege wondering what the heck
happened.
Freshman forward Chane
Behanan made the go-ahead
basket with 1:06 left Saturday
and Pitino's fourth-seeded
Louisville Cardinals outscored
Florida by 15 points over the
final 10 minutes for a 72-68 vic-
tory in the West Regional final.
And all Pitino could think af-
terward was, "Hate to do that
to ya, kid."
"Tonight, it was very difficult


because of the way the game
ended, because they outplayed
us for 32 minutes," Pitino said.
'"And it really hurt inside. As
much as I felt like celebrating, it
really hurt because he did such
a masterful job of coaching."


Russ Smith,
who finished
with 19 points,
followed Be-
hanan's bucket
with a pair of
free throws and
then Florida


Siva, who fouled out.
Seventh-seeded Florida (26-
11) went out in the regional
final for the second straight
year, with Donovan falling to 0-
7 lifetime against the man who
coached him on that Final


NCAA results
* For the results of all
men's and women's
NCAA tournament games,
please see Page B2.


freshman Bradley Beal and
teammate Kenny Boynton
each missed chances to tie in
the final seconds.
Louisville made one more
free throw to seal the game
and reach its ninth Final Four,
the second under Pitino, de-
spite playing the final 3:58
without point guard Peyton


Four team at
Providence in
1987, hired him
as an assistant
at Kentucky a
few years later
and felt as
proud as a papa
when he


watched Donovan win his two
national titles in 2006 and 2007.
"I said this earlier, for my-
self, I don't think any of us like
losing," Donovan said. "But if
someone said to me, 'You have
to lose a game, who would it be
to?' I would say him."
Louisville will take an eight-


game winning streak on its trip
New Orleans. Awaiting is a
possible matchup with Pitino's
old school, Kentucky, which
will have to get by Baylor on
Sunday to set up a grudge
match to end them all.
"We think they're excellent.
We think they're great. I
coached there. It's great. Great
tradition," Pitino said. "But we
want to be Louisville. We have
a different mission. They have
a different mission. But we
both want to get to a Final Four
and win a championship."
This game had a much more
warm-and-fuzzy story line than
that possible Bluegrass State
matchup a meeting between
two men who say theirs is more
of a father-son relationship
than anything else.
But make no mistake. This
See Page B4


Orange


squeezed


by OSU

Buckeyes down

Syracuse 77-70

for Final 4 spot

Associated Press
BOSTON -Jared Sullinger
recovered from first-half foul
trouble to score 19 points and
grab seven rebounds, helping
Ohio State beat Syracuse 77-
70 on Saturday to advance to
the Final Four
It will be the Buckeyes' first
trip to the NCAA semifinals
since 2007.
Deshaun Thomas scored 14
with nine rebounds for No. 2
seed Ohio State (31-7), which
led by eight
points with 59
seconds to
play and held
on after the
Orange cut it
to three. The
Buckeyes
made 13 of 14
free throws in Jared
the final 68 Sullinger
seconds. Ohio State
Brandon forward scored
Triche scored 19 points.
15 points and
Baye Keita had 10 rebounds
for top-seeded Syracuse (34-3).
The Orange were hoping for a
return trip to New Orleans,
where they won their only na-
tional championship in 2003.
In a tightly officiated game
that left Sullinger on the
bench in foul trouble for most
of the first half and Syracuse
coach Jim Boeheim not-quite
muzzled after picking up a
technical foul, it came down to
free throws. Ohio State went
31 for 42 from the line in the
game despite playing against
Syracuse's usual 2-3 zone.
The Orange went to the line
25 times, making 20 foul shots.
The frequent whistles left
both teams struggling to get
into a groove in the first half
- there were only four bas-
kets in the last 9:30 of the first.
That seemed to be good news
for Ohio State, which man-
aged to stay with the No. 1
seed despite getting only 6
minutes from Sullinger, the
star of the Buckeyes' East Re-
gional semifinal win over
Cincinnati.


Young players dominate at inaugural Freedom Open


Saturday was the day of the half of the weekend available for
singles players at the inau- something else.
gural Freedom If the scores are any
Open at Crystal River indication, it could be
High School. The or- said singles is a young
ganizers had another. A players' game. On the
twist up their sleeves men's side, each divi-
for this new event, by sion was won by a jun-
splitting the tourna- ior player
ment into two halves. In the A division,
All singles divisions Rishi Gurnani won the
plus mixed doubles B final 7-5, 6-1. In the B
on the first day, with Eric van den division, the final was
all the regular doubles Hoogen a monster match be-
plus mixed doubles A ON COURT tween two juniors,
scheduled for Sunday. Sam Alford and
That meant players who only Michael Hetland. Players like
signed up for one event were these two young men are the fu-
done in a day and had the other ture ambassadors of tennis.


Both have a great attitude dur-
ing and after the match, regard-
less the outcome, but only one of
them could be the winner Sam
Alford eventually won with a
score of 6-2, 3-6, 6-2. L
The ladies singles was won by
Susan Goins in a round-robin
format.
The event benefits the youth
ministry of Inverness First
United Methodist Church and
NotForSaleCampaign.org.
The second-day action will ...
start up again, weather permit- Special to the Chronicle
ting, at 8:30 am. Sunday The singles players for the Freedom Open line up before the event at
First-day results were as Crystal River High School on Saturday. Sam Alford (second from left),
Rishi Gurnani (third from left) and Susan Goins (fourth from left) each
See Page B134 won singles titles.






B2 SUNDAY, MARCH 25, 2012

Men's NCAA
Tournament Glance
EAST REGIONAL
Second Round
Thursday, March 15
At The CONSOL Energy Center
Pittsburgh
Kansas State 70, Southern Mississippi 64
Syracuse 72, UNC Asheville 65
Gonzaga 77, West Virginia 54
Ohio State 78, Loyola (Md.) 59
At The Pit
Albuquerque, N.M.
Wisconsin 73, Montana 49
Vanderbilt 79, Harvard 70
Friday, March 16
At Bridgestone Arena
Nashville, Tenn.
Cincinnati 65, Texas 59
Florida State 66, St. Bonaventure 63
Third Round
Saturday, March 17
At The CONSOL Energy Center
Pittsburgh
Syracuse 75, Kansas State 59
Ohio State 73, Gonzaga 66
At The Pit
Albuquerque, N.M.
Wisconsin 60, Vanderbilt 57
Sunday, March 18
At Bridgestone Arena
Nashville, Tenn.
Cincinnati 62, Florida State 56
Regional Semifinals
At TD Garden
Boston
Thursday, March 22
Syracuse 64, Wisconsin 63
Ohio State 81, Cincinnati 66
Regional Championship
Saturday, March 24
Ohio State 77, Syracuse 70
SOUTH REGIONAL
Second Round
Thursday, March 15
At The KFCYum! Center
Louisville, Ky.
Kentucky 81, Western Kentucky 66
Iowa State 77, UConn 64
At The Pit
Albuquerque, N.M.
Baylor 68, South Dakota State 60
Colorado 68, UNLV 64
At The Rose Garden
Portland, Ore.
VCU 62, Wichita State 59
Indiana 79, New Mexico State 66
Friday, March 16
At Greensboro Coliseum
Greensboro, N.C.
Lehigh 75, Duke 70
Xavier 67, Notre Dame 63
Third Round
Saturday, March 17
At The KFC Yum! Center
Louisville, Ky.
Kentucky 87, Iowa State 71
At The Pit
Albuquerque, N.M.
Baylor 80, Colorado 63
At The Rose Garden
Portland, Ore.
Indiana 63 VCU 61
Sunday, March 18
At Greensboro Coliseum
Greensboro, N.C.
Xavier 70, Lehigh 58
Regional Semifinals
At The Georgia Dome
Atlanta
Friday, March 23
Baylor 75, Xavier 70
Kentucky 102, Indiana 90
Regional Championship
Sunday, March 25
Baylor (30-7) vs. Kentucky (35-2), 2:20 p.m.
MIDWEST REGIONAL
Second Round
Friday, March 16
At Greensboro Coliseum
Greensboro, N.C.
Creighton 58, Alabama 57
North Carolina 77, Vermont 58
At Nationwide Arena
Columbus, Ohio
N.C. State 79, San Diego State 65
Georgetown 74, Belmont 59
At Bridgestone Arena
Nashville, Tenn.
Ohio 65, Michigan 60
South Florida 58, Temple 44
At CenturyLink Center
Omaha, Neb.
Purdue 72, Saint Mary's (Calif.) 69
Kansas 65, Detroit 50
Third Round
Sunday, March 18
At Greensboro Coliseum
Greensboro, N.C.
North Carolina 87, Creighton 73
At Nationwide Arena
Columbus, Ohio
N.C. State 66, Georgetown 63
At Bridgestone Arena
Nashville, Tenn.
Ohio 62, South Florida 56
At CenturyLink Center
Omaha, Neb.
Kansas 63, Purdue 60
Regional Semifinals
At Edward Jones Dome
St. Louis
Friday, March 23
North Carolina 73, Ohio 65, OT
Kansas 60, N.C. State 57
Regional Championship
Sunday, March 25
UNC (32-5) vs. Kansas (30-6), 5:05 p.m.
WEST REGIONAL
Second Round
Thursday, March 15
At The KFC Yum! Center
Louisville, Ky.
Murray State 58, Colorado State 41
Marquette 88, BYU 68
At The Rose Garden
Portland, Ore.
Louisville 69, Davidson 62
New Mexico 75, Long Beach State 68
Friday, March 16
At Nationwide Arena
Columbus, Ohio
Saint Louis 61, Memphis 54
Michigan State 89, LIU 67
At CenturyLink Center
Omaha, Neb.
Florida 71, Virginia 45
Norfolk State 86, Missouri 84
Third Round
Saturday, March 17
At The KFCYum! Center
Louisville, Ky.
Marquette 62, Murray State 53
At The Rose Garden
Portland, Ore.
Louisville 59, New Mexico 56
Sunday, March 18
At Nationwide Arena
Columbus, Ohio


Michigan State 65, Saint Louis 61
At CenturyLink Center
Omaha, Neb.
Florida 84, Norfolk State 50
Regional Semifinals
Thursday, March 22
At US Airways Center
Phoenix
Louisville 57, Michigan State 44
Florida 68, Marquette 58
Regional Championship
Saturday, March 24
Louisville 72, Florida 68
FINAL FOUR
At The Superdome
New Orleans
National Semifinals
Saturday, March 31
Ohio State (31-7) vs. Midwest champion, 6 or
8:30 p.m.
South champion vs. Louisville (30-9), 6 or 8:30
p.m.
National Championship
Monday, April 2
Semifinal winners, 9 p.m.


SPORTS


Vols move on


Tennessee rallies


past Kansas; Baylor


dispatches Ga. Tech

Associated Press

DES MOINES, Iowa Meighan
Simmons scored 22 points off the
bench and Tennessee rallied past
11th-seeded Kansas 84-73 Saturday
and advanced to its second straight
regional final.
Glory Johnson added 18 points for
the second-seeded Lady Vols (27-8),
who'll meet the winner of Georgia
Tech-Baylor on Monday night for a
spot in the Final Four
The Lady Vols trailed by as many
as 14 points in the first half, but they
cut it to five by the break. Tennessee
took the lead for good with a 19-9 run
to open the second half, as Simmons
had 16 points in the final 20 minutes.
Angel Goodrich had a game-high
23 points and Aishah Sutherland had
19 for Kansas (21-13), which fell to 0-
3 in regional semifinals.
Tennessee couldn't do anything
right for the first 11 minutes, falling
behind 26-12 to a Kansas team that
finished below .500 in the Big 12.
But there's a reason the Lady Vols
are headed to their 25th regional
final in 31 years.
The Jayhawks found out why from
the moment the second half began, as
Tennessee's superior depth and ath-
leticism simply overwhelmed the un-
derdogs.
The Lady Vols finally took the lead,
44-42, thanks largely to back-to-back
3s from Ariel Massengale, and a pair
of free throws made it 53-46 Ten-
nessee with 11:07 to go.
Freshman post player Chelsea
Gardner did her best to keep the Jay-
hawks close with 14 points and 10 re-
bounds. But Simmons hit a layup off
a give-and-go from Baugh to give the
Lady Vols their first double-digit
lead, 63-53, with 7:07 left
Shekinna Stricklen had 16 points
and nine rebounds for Tennessee,
which shot 51. 5 percent in the sec-
ond half.
This looked like the ultimate mis-
match at the outset. Kansas was play-
ing in just its third regional
semifinal, while Tennessee was play-
ing in its 30th and shooting for a
record 19th Final Four.
But early on, the Jayhawks looked
like the only ones awake for the late
morning start.
Gardner bullied her way for four
inside buckets in the opening five
minutes, and back-to-back layups
through the paint by Goodrich gave
Kansas a surprising 18-10 lead. The
Lady Vols called timeout in an effort
to quell the run, but Goodrich and
Tania Jackson buried 3s to help push
the lead to as much as 26-12.


Associated Press
Tennessee's Meighan Simmons shoots past Kansas' Angel Goodrich in the
second half of an NCAA women's tournament regional semifinal game Satur-
day in Des Moines, Iowa. Tennessee won 84-73.


Baylor 83, Georgia Tech 68
DES MOINES, Iowa Brittney Griner
capped a sensational performance with a
two-handed dunk and Baylor stormed into
the NCAA regional finals for the third
straight year with an 83-68 rout of Geor-
gia Tech on Saturday.
Griner, who finished with 35 points, 10
rebounds and six blocks, got behind the
defense and threw down her slam with
6:29 left in yet another rout for the Lady
Bears swinging briefly on the rim for
good measure.
It was the second straight game in
which the 6-foot-8 All-American dunked
and the seventh slam of her college ca-
reer. She's now tied with former Ten-


nessee star Candace Parker, whose two
dunks in NCAA tournament play had
been the most.
Destiny Williams added 18 points on 9-
for-10 shooting for the top-seeded Lady
Bears (37-0), who'll play second-seeded
Tennessee in the regional final on Mon-
day night, the winner advancing to the
Final Four.
Baylor, the 2005 national champion, will
be seeking its third Final Four appearance
and second in three years. Tennessee,
which has won eight titles, will try to get to
the national semifinals for the 19th time.
The Lady Bears took control with a 20-0
first-half run and never gave fourth-seeded
Tech (26-9) a chance to answer back.


Logano wins on Nationwide


Associated Press
Joey Logano celebrates his victory with a burnout in the Nationwide Series'
Royal Purple 300 auto race Saturday in Fontana, Calif.


Driver now has 10 victories on circuit


Associated Press

FONTANA, Calif. Joey Logano
kept Joe Gibbs firmly entrenched in
Victory Lane at Auto Club
Speedway
Logano won the Nationwide Se-
ries race Saturday, holding off Ricky
Stenhouse Jr. and Brad Keselowski
in an entertaining finish to Joe
Gibbs Racing's eighth consecutive
Nationwide win at the track.
The youngest winner in Nation-
wide history three years ago now
has 10 victories at the ripe old age of
21. Logano is the first Sprint Cup Se-
ries driver to win a Nationwide race
this season, claiming his second ca-
reer win at Fontana.
After starting from the pole,
Logano reclaimed the lead after a
restart with 12 laps to go before stay-
ing in front of a tight pack that left
all of the leaders talking about the
thrill of racing.
"They had plenty of shots at me,"
Logano said. "The restarts were
hairy I was good for a few laps, then


I would fall off, and then my car
would come back. And then it was
awesome. ... It's good to finally be
back in victory lane, man. It means a
lot to win these things."
Logano was determined to get the
win for Gibbs, who has run only win-
ners here since Feb. 2008. Toyota's
headquarters also are nearby in
Long Beach and Costa Mesa.
"It's important to keep a streak
going," Logano said. "You don't want
to be the guy that didn't win it and
broke the streak. To keep a streak
going like that, that's important for
our whole company."
Gibbs is particularly proud of the
streak at a track with personal sig-
nificance. Although he's best known
for his accomplishments in
NASCAR and with the Washington
Redskins, the coach has spent much
of his life in Southern California,
graduating from high school in
nearby Santa Fe Springs, attending
San Diego State and working as an
assistant to Don Coryell with
the Chargers.


Nationwide Series
Royal Purple 300 Results
Saturday
At Auto Club Speedway
Fontana, Calif.
Lap length: 2 miles
(Start position in parentheses)
1. (1) Joey Logano, Toyota, 150 laps, 149 rating, 0 points,
$70,770.
2. (10) Ricky Stenhouse Jr, Ford, 150, 116.9, 43, $66,593.
3. (3) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 150, 125.3, 0, $40,750.
4. (7) Brian Scott, Toyota, 150, 108.5, 40, $40,233.
5. (4) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 150, 102.4, 39, $31,215.
6. (14) Brad Sweet, Chevrolet, 150, 87.9, 38, $28,883.
7. (6) Kenny Wallace, Toyota, 150, 92.9, 37, $26,633.
8. (15) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 150, 102.5, 0, $18,840.
9. (5) Elliott Sadler, Chevrolet, 150, 108.1, 36, $25,268.
10. (8) Brendan Gaughan, Chevrolet, 150, 100.7, 0, $25,983.
11. (16) Michael Annett, Ford, 150, 85.9, 33, $24,408.
12. (17) James Buescher, Chevrolet, 150, 86.8, 0, $24,158.
13. (11) Sam Hornish Jr., Dodge, 150, 91.1, 31, $24,008.
14. (9) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 150, 93.2, 31, $23,948.
15. (13) Jason Bowles, Toyota, 150, 79.7, 29, $24,863.
16. (22) Tayler Malsam, Toyota, 150, 72.5, 28, $23,578.
17. (18) Mike Bliss, Toyota, 150, 76.6, 27, $16,900.
18. (19) Mike Wallace, Chevrolet, 150, 72, 26, $23,233.
19. (20) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 149, 72.6, 25, $23,123.
20. (28) Jeremy Clements, Chevrolet, 148, 64.7, 24, $23,688.
21. (35) R. Richardson Jr., Chevrolet, 148, 58.9, 23, $16,435.
22. (33) Benny Gordon, Chevrolet, 148, 55.2, 22, $16,275.
23. (32) Joey Gase, Ford, 148, 50.9, 21, $22,658.
24. (31) Erik Darnell, Chevrolet, 147, 56.8, 20, $16,025.
25. (24) Blake Koch, Chevrolet, 147, 63.9, 19, $22,633.
26. (25) Eric McClure, Toyota, 146, 44.7, 18, $22,448.
27. (27)T.J. Bell, Chevrolet, 145, 47.1,17, $22,113.
28. (39) Daryl Harr, Chevrolet, 145, 44.9, 16, $21,993.
29. (34) Tim Schendel, Chevrolet, 145, 39.6, 15, $15,375.
30. (12) ColeWhitt, Chevrolet, accident, 142, 75,14, $22,033.
31. (40) David Green, Dodge, suspension, 139, 36.5, 13,
$21,623.
32. (2) Justin Allgaier, Chevy, engine, 112,104.4, 13, $22,563.
33. (38) Kevin Lepage, Chevy, rear gear, 82, 38.1,11, $21,403.
34. (37) M. Shepherd, Chevy, engine, 66, 47.2, 10, $14,825.
35. (21) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, engine, 63,59,9, $21,183.
36. (29) Tim Andrews, Ford, vibration, 22, 47.5, 8, $14,605.
37. (43) Scott Riggs, Chevrolet, rear gear, 9, 39.8, 0, $14,485.
38. (36) Chase Miller, Chevrolet, vibration, 8, 40, 6, $14,375.
39. (30) Josh Wise, Chevrolet, electrical, 6, 38.1,0, $14,115.
40. (41) Mike Harmon, Chevy, rear end, 5, 31.4, 4, $14,080.
41. (23) Scott Speed, Chevrolet, vibration, 4, 34, 0, $14,020.
42. (42) John Jackson, Toyota, fuel pump, 3, 30.9, 2, $13,940.
43. (26) Jeff Green, Toyota, vibration, 2, 29.3, 1, $13,907.
Race Statistics
Average Speed of Race Winner: 142.330 mph.
Time of Race: 2 hours, 6 minutes, 28 seconds.
Margin of Victory: 1.066 seconds.
Caution Flags: 4 for 18 laps.
Lead Changes: 15 among 7 drivers.
Lap Leaders: J.Logano 1-26; B.Keselowski 27-59; J.Logano
60-62; E.Sadler 63-64; J.Logano 65-68; J.Allgaier 69; J.Logano
70-77; J.Allgaier 78; J.Logano 79-101; R.Stenhouse Jr. 102;
J.Logano 103-111; K.Busch 112-124; B.Keselowski 125-128;
J.Logano 129-135; TBayne 136-138; J.Logano 139-150.
Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps Led): J.Logano, 8
times for 92 laps; B.Keselowski, 2 times for 37 laps; K.Busch,
1 time for 13 laps; TBayne, 1 time for 3 laps; E.Sadler, 1 time
for 2 laps; J.Allgaier, 2 times for 2 laps; R.Stenhouse Jr, 1 time
for 1 lap.
Top 10 in Points: 1. E.Sadler,214; 2. R.Stenhouse Jr., 196; 3.
ADillon, 187; 4.TBayne, 180; 5. S.Hornish Jr., 160; 6. C.Whitt,
151; 7. M.Annett, 148; 8.T.Malsam, 144; 9. J.Allgaier, 126; 10.
M.Bliss, 119.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Women's NCAA
Tournament Glance
DES MOINES REGIONAL
First Round
Saturday, March 17
At Allstate Arena
Rosemont, Ill.
Tennessee 72, UT Martin 49
DePaul 59, BYU 55
Sunday, March 18
At Stroh Center
Bowling Green, Ohio
Florida 70, Ohio State 65
Baylor 81, UC Santa Barbara 40
At Carmichael Arena
Chapel Hill, N.C.
Georgetown 61, Fresno State 56
Georgia Tech 76, Sacred Heart 50
At Jack Stephens Center
Little Rock, Ark.
Delaware 73, UALR 42
Kansas 57, Nebraska 49
Second Round
Monday, March 19
At Allstate Arena
Rosemont, III.
Tennessee 63, DePaul 48
Tuesday, March 20
At Stroh Center
Bowling Green, Ohio
Baylor 76, Florida 57
At Carmichael Arena
Chapel Hill, N.C.
Georgia Tech 76, Georgetown 64
At Jack Stephens Center
Little Rock, Ark.
Kansas 70, Delaware 64
Regional Semifinals
At Wells Fargo Arena
Des Moines, Iowa
Saturday, March 24
Tennessee 84, Kansas 73
Baylor 83, Georgia Tech 68
Regional Championship
Monday, March 26
Tennessee (27-8) vs. Baylor (37-0), 7 p.m.
FRESNO REGIONAL
First Round
Saturday, March 17
At Ted Constant Convocation Center
Norfolk, Va.
West Virginia 68, Texas 55
Stanford 73, Hampton 51
At Mackey Arena
West Lafayette, Ind.
South Carolina 80, Eastern Michigan 48
Purdue 83, South Dakota State 68
Sunday, March 18
At Lloyd Noble Center
Norman, Okla.
St. John's 69, Creighton 67
Oklahoma 88, Michigan 67
At Memorial Gymnasium
Nashville, Tenn.
Vanderbilt 60, Middle Tennessee 46
Duke 82, Samford 47
Second Round
Monday, March 19
At Ted Constant Convocation Center
Norfolk, Va.
Stanford 72, West Virginia 55
At Mackey Arena
West Lafayette, Ind.
South Carolina 72, Purdue 61
Tuesday, March 20
At Lloyd Noble Center
Norman, Okla.
St. John's 74, Oklahoma 70
At Memorial Gymnasium
Nashville, Tenn.
Duke 96, Vanderbilt 80
Regional Semifinals
At Save Mart Center
Fresno, Calif.
Saturday, March 24
St. John's (24-9) vs. Duke (26-5), late
Stanford (33-1) vs. South Carolina (25-9), late
Regional Championship
Monday, March 26
Semifinal winners, 9Rp.m.
RALEIGH REGIONAL
First Round
Saturday, March 17
At Reed Arena
College Station, Texas
Arkansas 72, Dayton 55
Texas A&M 69, Albany (NY) 47
At Comcast Center
College Park, Md.
Maryland 59, Navy 44
Louisville 67, Michigan State 55
Sunday, March 18
At Joyce Center
Notre Dame, Ind.
California 84, Iowa 74
Notre Dame 74, Liberty 43
At Donald L.Tucker Center
Tallahassee, Fla.
Marist 76, Georgia 70
St. Bonaventure 72, Florida Gulf Coast 65,
OT
Second Round
Monday, March 19
At Reed Arena
College Station, Texas
Texas A&M 61, Arkansas 59
At Comcast Center
College Park, Md.
Maryland 72, Louisville 68
Tuesday, March 20
At Joyce Center
Notre Dame, Ind.
Notre Dame 73, California 62
At Donald L.Tucker Center
Tallahassee, Fla.
St. Bonaventure 66, Marist 63
Regional Semifinals
At PNC Arena
Raleigh, N.C.
Sunday, March 25
Texas A&M (24-10) vs. Maryland (30-4),
Noon
Notre Dame (32-3) vs. St. Bonaventure (31-
3), 2:30 p.m.
Tuesday, March 27
Regional Championship
Semifinal winners, 9p.m.
KINGSTON REGIONAL
First Round
Saturday, March 17
At Webster Bank Arena
Bridgeport, Conn.
Kansas State 67, Princeton 64
UConn 83, Prairie View 47
At McCarthey Athletic Center
Spokane, Wash.
Gonzaga 86, Rutgers 73
Miami 70, Idaho State 42
At Hilton Coliseum
Ames, Iowa
Kentucky 68, McNeese State 62
Green Bay 71, Iowa State 57
Sunday, March 18
At Maravich Center
Baton Rouge, La.
Penn State 85, UTEP 77
LSU 64, San Diego State 56
Second Round
Monday, March 19
At Webster Bank Arena
Bridgeport, Conn.
UConn 72, Kansas State 26
At McCarthey Athletic Center
Spokane,Wash.
Gonzaga 65, Miami 54
At Hilton Coliseum


Ames, Iowa
Kentucky 65, Green Bay 62
Tuesday, March 20
At Maravich Center
Baton Rouge, La.
Penn State 90, LSU 80
Regional Semifinals
At The Ryan Center
Kingston, R.I.
Sunday, March 25
UConn (31-4) vs. Penn State (26-6), 4:34
p.m.
Gonzaga (28-5) vs. Kentucky (27-6), 7 p.m.
Regional Championship
Tuesday, March 27
Semifinal winners, 7 p.m.
FINAL FOUR
At Pepsi Center
Denver
National Semifinals
Sunday, April 1
Des Moines champion vs. Fresno champion,
6:30 or 9 p.m.
Raleigh champion vs. Kingston champion,
6:30 or 9 p.m.
National Championship
Tuesday, April 3
Semifinal winners, 8:30 p.m.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Phillies' HRs bomb Red Sox


Rays can't stop

Twins from scoring

19 runs in loss

Associated Press
FORT MYERS, Fla. Cole
Hamels allowed two runs and four
hits in four innings, and the
Philadelphia Phillies beat a
Boston Red Sox split squad 10-5
Saturday.
Hamels struck out three and
walked two.
Alfredo Aceves, contending for
one of two open spots in Boston's
rotation, gave up nine runs and 10
hits in three innings. He allowed
solo home runs to Pete Orr, Freddy
Galvis and Carlos Ruiz, and also
had a walk, a wild pitch and a hit
batter
Twins 19, Rays 4
FORT MYERS, Fla. Justin
Morneau hit his first two homers of
spring training and the Minnesota
Twins connected five times in a rout of
the Tampa Bay Rays.
Morneau, who has only played 150
games the past two seasons because
of several injuries, had five RBIs as
the designated hitter.
Rookie of the Year winner Jeremy
Hellickson gave up 10 runs and 11
hits, including three home runs.
Infielder Luke Hughes, J.R. Towles
and Chris Parmelee also homered for
the Twins. Hughes went 5 for 5.
Astros 5, Pirates 4,
10 innings
BRADENTON, Fla. James Mc-
Donald held Houston hitless into the
sixth inning, but the Astros scored an
unearned run in the 10th to beat
Pittsburgh.
McDonald retired 16 of the first 17
batters he faced Juan Castro
reached on an error in the third inning
- until Travis Buck sent a broken-bat
single into shallow center field with
one out in the fifth.
In his longest outing this spring, Mc-
Donald gave up a run on two hits and
struck out three over seven innings.
Houston's Scott Moore hit a three-
run homer off Ryota Igarashi to tie it. A
fielding error by shortstop Josh Ro-
driguez allowed Buck to score the win-
ning run in the 10th.
Mets 6, Cardinals 6,
10 innings
PORT ST. LUCIE, Fla. Ike Davis
and Lucas Duda each hit home runs
as the New York Mets' tied the St.
Louis Cardinals.
It was the first homer for Davis, who
was diagnosed earlier in spring train-
ing with what is likely valley fever,
which can cause extreme fatigue.


Philadelphia Phillies starter Cole Hamels delivers to Boston Red Sox batter Kevin Youkilis during the first inning Saturday in Sarasota.


Davis hit a three-run shot off Lance
Lynn in the first.
Mets starter Mike Pelfrey allowed
five runs four earned and eight
hits in six innings. It was the fourth
consecutive start in which the right-
hander has given up at least four runs.
Yankees 4, Tigers 2,
10 innings
LAKELAND, Fla. Raul Ibanez hit
his first home run with the Yankees,
Freddy Garcia pitched into the fifth in-
ning and New York beat Detroit.
Ibanez had two hits to raise his av-
erage to .075. He hit a two-run shot off
Tigers starter Max Scherzer in the
seventh inning.
Garcia, vying for the fifth spot in the
Yankees rotation, was making his first
since bruising his hand 10 days ago.
He went 4 1-3 innings and allowed one
hit and two walks. He struck out four.
Red Sox (ss) 4, Marlins 1
JUPITER, Fla. Felix Doubrant al-
lowed one run and five hits over six in-
nings in his fourth spring training
appearance, helping a Boston split
squad beat Miami.
Doubrant struck out two and walked
one, throwing 53 of 78 pitches for
strikes. He lowered his ERA to 2.70.
Trying to each a bench spot with the
Marlins, Austin Kearns homered in the
second. He leads the team with three
homers and seven RBIs.


Miami left-hander Wade LeBlanc
gave up three runs and five hits in five
innings.
Orioles 12, Nationals 3
SARASOTA, Fla. Matt Wieters
had a three-run homer among his four
hits and drove in six runs, Adam Jones
and Robert Andino each added three
hits and Jake Arrieta worked five solid
innings as Baltimore beat Washington.
Wieters had just four hits in 12
games and was batting .129 coming
in. He homered in the third off Edwin
Jackson.
Jones has five hits in his last six
at-bats.
Jackson allowed 10 runs seven
earned and 11 hits in 3 2-3 innings. In
his last three starts, he has allowed 13
earned runs and 23 hits in 11 innings.
Blue Jays 9, Braves 0
DUNEDIN, Fla. -Adam Lind
homered, tripled and had four RBIs off
Randall Delgado, and Toronto beat
Atlanta.
Competing for the last spot in the
Braves' starting rotation, Delgado al-
lowed eight runs five earned and
10 hits in four innings.
Henderson Alvarez allowed one hit
in five scoreless innings, struck out
four and walked none.
White Sox 6, Brewers 4
PHOENIX--Alex Gonzalez and
Aramis Ramirez each homered as Mil-


waukee built a four-run lead for Randy
Wolf but the Chicago White Sox rallied
for a 6-4 victory over the Brewers.
Tyler Saladino drove in a run with a
triple in a two-run seventh inning and
had an RBI single in the ninth.
Chris Sale gave up eight hits, in-
cluding the two home runs, and four
runs three earned.
Angels 3, Rangers 2
SURPRISE, Ariz. Ervin Santana
held the Rangers to a run over five in-
nings and the Los Angeles Angels
beat Texas 3-2.
Kendrys Morales went 1 for 3 with
an RBI single and Alexi Amarista
added a run-scoring double for the
Angels.
lan Kinsler and Brad Hawpe home-
red for the Rangers. The Rangers are
1-10 at Surprise Stadium this spring.
Santana gave up five hits, walked
two and struck out two.
Texas starter Greg Reynolds al-
lowed one unearned run on two hits
and struck out three in place of Matt
Harrison, who started a minor league
game.
Padres (ss) 5, Cubs 1
MESA, Ariz. Will Venable had
two hits and two RBIs, Anthony Bass
continued his bid to make the open-
ing-day roster with another strong out-
ing and a San Diego Padres split
squad beat the Chicago Cubs 5-1.


Venable had a two-run double off
reliever Trever Miller in the fourth in-
ning to erase a 1-0 deficit.
Bass, who could be San Diego's
long man out of the pen, gave up one
run and one hit with a strikeout in his
four innings to improve to 2-0.
Travis Wood gave up three runs in 3
2-3 innings on five hits. He struck out
one.
Reds (ss) 6, Padres (ss) 0
PEORIA, Ariz. Aroldis Chapman
had his best outing of spring training,
giving up four hits over five innings to
lead the Cincinnati Reds to a 6-0 vic-
tory over the San Diego Padres in a
game between split squads.
With a fastball that reached 98 mph,
Chapman struck out five. He walked
one in a 78-pitch effort.
Jay Bruce, Miguel Cairo and Paul
Janish each had two hits. Cairo and
Janish had RBIs.
Padres starter Clayton Richard al-
lowed five runs three earned and
seven hits in 4 2-3 innings.
Dodgers 5, Indians 4
GLENDALE, Ariz. Dee Gordon
had two hits and scored a run as the
Los Angeles Dodgers beat the Cleve-
land Indians 5-4.
Gordon led off the first with a bunt
single. He was timed racing down the
first base line in 3.79 seconds. A time
of 4.0 seconds is considered very fast.


Jones to miss start of farewell season with injury


Atlanta star

has meniscus

tear in knee

Associated Press

DUNEDIN, Fla. At-
lanta Braves third baseman
Chipper Jones will miss the
start of his farewell season.
Two days after Jones an-
nounced this will be his
final year, the Braves said
Saturday that Jones needs
arthroscopic surgery to re-
pair torn meniscus in his
left knee.
The procedure will be
performed Monday The 39-
year-old Jones will open
the season on the disabled
list, but the team expects
him to miss only the first six
games. General manager
Frank Wren said Jones
should return in time for


the April 13 home opener.
Martin Prado, normally
the team's starting left
fielder, will move to the in-
field until Jones returns.
Wren said he's not looking
to make a trade for help at
third base or in the
outfield.
Manager Fredi Gonzalez
said he'll be cautious not to
rush Jones back.
"I'm thinking, just being
common sense, that this
may take a little longer,"
Gonzalez said after a spring
training game against the
Toronto Blue Jays. "We've
got to get him back in shape
and swinging the bat."
Jones missed about 2 1/2
weeks last season after hav-
ing arthroscopic surgery to
repair torn cartilage in his
right knee. This is just the
latest in a string of injuries
that persuaded him to re-
tire after one more season.
He turns 40 next month.
"The last time he had


Associated Press
Atlanta Braves third baseman Chipper Jones is expected to
miss at least the first six games of the regular season with
a torn meniscus in his left knee.


surgery ... it took only about
17 days to get him back on
the field. Of course, that
being said, he had played
for 2 1/2 months. He wasn't
that far out of rhythm or out
of shape," Gonzalez said.
"But knowing him, If it's not
right onl7 days, it may be
21. He knows his body. He


doesn't take very long to get
his rhythm going at the
plate."


,*


.. &


With Prado starting the
season at third base, the
Braves could turn to Matt
Diaz or Eric Hinske in left
field. Jones' injury also
could create an opportunity
for Jose Constanza or Jor-
dan Parraz.
None are likely to match
Jones' numbers. Last sea-
son, he hit .275 with 18
homers and 70 RBIs.
"He's a big presence on
the field and in the lineup
(but) we've got plenty of
guys who can pick up the
slack," Gonzalez said.
Jones, who has spent his
entire 18-year career with
Atlanta, actually planned to
retire after the 2010 season,
only to change his mind. As
he battled leg issues this


spring, he openly wondered
if he'd be able to make it
through the season.
"I have fulfilled every-
thing," Jones said Thursday
during a news conference
at the team's spring train-
ing stadium in Kissimmee,
flanked by his family and
teammates. "There's noth-
ing left for me to do."
Jones won the NL MVP
award in 1999, captured the
league batting title in 2008
and is a seven-time All-Star.
No matter what happens in
his final season, he will go
down as one of the game's
greatest switch-hitters, a
player who could hit for av-
erage (.304 in his career)
and power (454 homers and
1,561 RBIs).


Bluegrass

at the

Blue Lodge
Featuring


Lonesome

Pine Band


Saturday March 31st
starting at 2pm

Rib-Eye Steak with all the trimmings
5060 S. Memorial Dr. Homosassa, FL

$10 in advance or
$15 day of event

Contact 352-228-7666
for more information.

CHRNILE


March 31,2012

CLEA

%A MILES.

Call
637-2475
for
information


To register, 0
please visit
www.cleanairride.com


I


SPORTS


SUNDAY, MARCH 25, 2012 B3


)0.,41






B4 SUNDAY, MARCH 25, 2012



Sprint Cup

Auto Club 400 Lineup
After Friday qualifying; race Sunday
At Auto Club Speedway
Fontana, Calif.
Lap length: 2 miles
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 186.403 mph.
2. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 185.534.
3. (55) Mark Martin, Toyota, 185.534.
4. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 185.51.
5. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 185.51.
6. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 185.328.
7. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 185.199.
8. (20) Joey Logano, Toyota, 185.195.
9. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 185.185.
10. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 185.123.
11. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 185.052.
12. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 185.
13. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 184.724.
14. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr, Chevrolet, 184.53.
15. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 184.322.
16. (1) Jamie McMurray Chevrolet, 184.068.
17. (2) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 184.044.
18. (10) David Reutimann, Chevrolet, 183.913.
19. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 183.744.
20. (30) David Stremme, Toyota, 183.397.
21. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 183.379.
22. (78) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 183.052.
23. (51) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 182.681.
24. (42) J. Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 182.56.
25. (22) AJ Allmendinger, Dodge, 182.542.
26. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 182.445.
27. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 182.366.
28. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 182.094.
29. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 182.007.
30. (26) Josh Wise, Ford, 181.087.
31. (83) Landon Cassill, Toyota, 180.85.
32. (98) Michael McDowell, Ford, 180.61.
33. (13) Casey Mears, Ford, 180.542.
34. (36) Dave Blaney Chevrolet, 180.433.
35. (23) Scott Riggs, Chevrolet, 180.356.
36. (49) J.J.Yeley Chevrolet, 180.297.
37. (33) B. Gaughan, Chevrolet, 179.609.
38. (34) David Ragan, Ford, 179.466.
39. (19) Mike Bliss, Toyota, 179.296.
40. (93) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, 178.864.
41. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 178.602.
42. (32) Ken Schrader, Ford, Owner Points.
43. (74) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, 179.131.
Failed to Qualify
44. (7) Robby Gordon, Dodge, 178.47.
45. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 178.443.
46. (37) Timmy Hill, Ford, 177.936.



Spring training glance
AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L Pct
Toronto 18 4 .818
Detroit 14 4 .778
Oakland 14 5 .737
Los Angeles 13 8 .619
Seattle 12 8 .600
New York 13 9 .591
Kansas City 12 9 .571
Minnesota 13 10 .565
Boston 10 9 .526
Baltimore 9 9 .500
Chicago 9 12 .429
Cleveland 6 13 .316
Tampa Bay 6 13 .316
Texas 6 15 .286
NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L Pct
St. Louis 12 6 .667
San Francisco 13 8 .619
Los Angeles 11 7 .611
San Diego 14 10 .583
Houston 11 9 .550
Colorado 10 10 .500
Philadelphia 10 11 .476
Chicago 10 13 .435
Cincinnati 10 13 .435
Miami 7 10 .412
Arizona 8 12 .400
Milwaukee 7 12 .368
Pittsburgh 7 13 .350
Atlanta 7 14 .333
NewYork 5 13 .278
Washington 5 13 .278
NOTE: Split-squad games count in the stand-
ings; games against non-major league teams
do not.
Friday's Games
Detroit 7, Pittsburgh 2
Atlanta 9, N.Y Mets 4
N.Y Yankees (ss) 5, Philadelphia 3
N.Y Yankees (ss) 6, Minnesota 4
Baltimore 6, Boston 5
St. Louis 2, Miami 1
Houston 5, Washington 1
L.A. Angels (ss) 6, Milwaukee 3
L.A. Dodgers 17, Chicago White Sox 4
Kansas City 2, L.A. Dodgers 0
Chicago Cubs 10, Colorado 8
Toronto 7, Tampa Bay 5
L.A. Angels (ss) 4, Cleveland 1
Texas 4, San Francisco 1
Chicago White Sox 6, Arizona 3
San Diego 5, Cincinnati 2
Saturday's Games
Houston 5, Pittsburgh 4, 10 innings
Toronto 9, Atlanta 0
Baltimore 12, Washington 3
N.Y Yankees 4, Detroit 2, 10 innings
Boston (ss) 4, Miami 1
N.Y Mets 6, St. Louis 6, tie, 10 innings
Philadelphia 10, Boston (ss) 5
Minnesota 19, Tampa Bay 4
Cincinnati (ss) 6, San Diego (ss) 0
Chicago White Sox 6, Milwaukee 4
San Diego (ss) 5, Chicago Cubs 1
L.A. Dodgers 5, Cleveland 4
San Francisco (ss) 6, Cincinnati (ss) 4
L.A. Angels 3, Texas 2
Colorado vs. San Francisco (ss), late
Kansas City vs. Arizona, late
Sunday's Games
N.Y Mets vs. Washington atViera, Fla., 1:05 p.m.
Baltimore vs. Philadelphia (ss) at Clearwater,
Fla., 1:05 p.m.
Houston (ss) vs. Atlanta at Kissimmee, Fla.,
1:05 p.m.
Minnesota vs. St. Louis at Jupiter Fla., 1:05p.m.
Boston vs.Toronto at Dunedin, Fla., 1:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh vs. Houston (ss) at Kissimmee,
Fla., 1:05 p.m.
Miami vs. Tampa Bay at Port Charlotte, Fla.,
1:05 p.m.
Philadelphia (ss) vs. Detroit (ss) at Lakeland,
Fla., 1:05 p.m.
Detroit (ss) vs. N.Y Yankees at Tampa, Fla.,
1:05 p.m.
Milwaukee (ss) vs. Kansas City at Surprise,
Ariz., 4:05 p.m.
Chicago Cubs vs. Cleveland at Goodyear,
Ariz., 4:05 p.m.
Arizona vs. San Diego at Peoria, Ariz., 4:05 p.m.
Texas vs. L.A. Angels atTempe, Ariz., 4:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers vs. Milwaukee (ss) at Phoenix,
4:05 p.m.


San Francisco vs. Chicago White Sox at
Glendale, Ariz., 4:05 p.m.
Cincinnati vs. Colorado at Scottsdale, Ariz.,
4:10 p.m.
Monday's Games
Boston vs. Philadelphia at Clearwater, Fla.,
1:05 p.m.
Houston vs.Washington atViera, Fla., 1:05 p.m.
Miami vs. Detroit at Lakeland, Fla., 1:05 p.m.
N.Y Mets vs. St. Louis at Jupiter, Fla., 1:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay vs. Minnesota at Fort Myers, Fla.,
1:05 p.m.
Kansas City vs. San Francisco at Scottsdale,
Ariz., 4:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox vs. L.A. Dodgers at Glen-
dale, Ariz., 4:05 p.m.
Milwaukee vs. Cleveland at Goodyear, Ariz.,
4:05 p.m.
San Diego vs. Chicago Cubs (ss) at Mesa,
Ariz., 4:05 p.m.
Colorado vs. LA.Angels atTempe, Ariz., 4:05p.m.
Chicago Cubs (ss) vs. Arizona at Scottsdale,
Ariz., 4:10 p.m.
Baltimore vs. Pittsburgh at Bradenton, Fla.,
7:05 p.m.
Cincinnati vs.Texas at Surprise, Ariz., 9:05 p.m.


FOr the record


F== lorida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Saturday in the Florida Lottery:
CASH 3 (early)
9-9-2
CASH 3 (late)
0 o-0-1

B PLAY 4 (early)
6-9-3-2
PLAY 4 (late)
0-2-1-7

FANTASY 5
Floriday 1-6-11-34-36

POWERBALL LOTTERY
1-15-35-37-47 1-12-25-33-35-42
POWER BALL XTRA
8 3



On the AIRWAVES


TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
12:30 p.m. (ABC) IndyCar: Honda Grand Prix of St. Petersburg
2:30 p.m. (FOX) Sprint Cup: Auto Club 400 race
COLLEGE BASEBALL
1 p.m. (FSNFL) East Carolina at Central Florida
MLB
1 p.m. (SUN) Miami Marlins at Tampa Bay Rays
4 p.m. (WGN-A) Chicago Cubs at Cleveland Indians
BASKETBALL
COLLEGE MEN
NCAA TOURNAMENT- REGIONAL FINALS
2 p.m. (CBS) Kentucky vs. Baylor
4:30 p.m. (CBS) Kansas vs. North Carolina
COLLEGE WOMEN
NCAA TOURNAMENT REGIONAL SEMIFINALS
12 p.m. (ESPN) Texas A&M vs. Maryland
2:30 p.m. (ESPN2) St. Bonaventure vs. Notre Dame
4:30 p.m. (ESPN2) Penn State vs. Connecticut
6:30 p.m. (ESPN2) Gonzaga vs. Kentucky
NBA
8 p.m. (ESPN, SUN) Miami Heat at Oklahoma City Thunder
10:30 p.m. (ESPN) Memphis Grizzlies at Los Angeles Lakers
2:30 a.m. (ESPN2) Memphis Grizzlies at Los Angeles Lakers
(Same-day Tape)
BICYCLING
11 p.m. (NBCSPT) Criterium International (Taped)
BOWLING
2:30 p.m. (ESPN) PBA: Mark Roth-Marshall Holman
Doubles Championship (Taped)
GOLF
12:30 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: Arnold Palmer Invitational
2:30 p.m. (NBC) PGA Tour: Arnold Palmer Invitational
2:30 p.m. (GOLF) Champions Tour: Mississippi Gulf Resort
Classic
7 p.m. (GOLF) LPGA Tour: Kia Classic
1 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour: Trophee Hassan II
(Same-day Tape)
HOCKEY
5 p.m. (FSNFL) New York Islanders at Florida Panthers
5 p.m. (NBCSPT) Minnesota Wild at Washington Capitals
7:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) Nashville Predators at Chicago
Blackhawks
RODEO
12 p.m. (CBS) Bull Riding PBR Built Ford Tough Series
(Taped)
RUGBY
2:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) Sevens World Series (Same-day Tape)
SOCCER
4 p.m. (ESPN) Colorado Rapids at New York Red Bulls

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.





Tseng still in front



at Kia Classic


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Panthers softball team ends
tournament on high note
The Lecanto girls softball team scored a com-
bined 28 runs in two games Saturday, defeating
Central 14-3 before downing Nature Coast 14-6
at the Leopard Jam in Brooksville.
The following statistics are for both games.
For Lecanto, Paige Richards went a combined
4 for 6 with five runs, four RBIs and a triple. Lily
Parrish added four runs and three RBIs while
Andrea Coutu went 3 for 9 with two runs and


Associated Press

CARLSBAD, Calif. -
Top-ranked Yani Tseng re-
mained in position for her
second straight LPGA Tour
title and third in five events
this year, shooting a bogey-
free 3-under 69 to take a
three-stroke lead into the
final round of the Kia
Classic.
Tseng missed a 5-foot
birdie try on the par-5 17th,
then saved par with an 8-
foot putt on the par-4 18th
to finish at 12-under 204 on
La Costa's Legends Course
The 23-year-old Tai-
wanese star won the LPGA
Founders Cup last week in
Phoenix for her 14th LPGA
Tour title, and also won the
LPGA Thailand in Febru-
ary. She led the tour last
season with seven victories
- including major victo-
ries in the LPGA Champi-
onship and Women's
British Open and fin-
ished the year with 12
worldwide titles.
South Korea's Jiyai Shin
was second after a 68.
Champions Tour
SAUCIER, Miss. Jeff
Sluman shot an 8-under 64 to
climb into a tie with Fred Cou-
ples for the second-round lead
in the Mississippi Gulf Resort
Classic.
Sluman birdied five of his
final seven holes in his bogey-
free round to reach 11 under
at Fallen Oak. Couples birdied
all six holes Saturday morning
in the completion of the sus-
pended first round for a
course-record 63, then shot a


70 in the second round.
Jim Thorpe will join Sluman
and Couples in the final group
Sunday. The 63-year-old
Thorpe, two strokes back after
a 65, is winless on the Cham-
pions Tour since 2007.
European Tour
AGADIR, Morocco Italian
teenager Matteo Manassero
stayed in the running for a
spot in the Masters, moving
within a stroke of lead before
darkness ended third-round
play in the Hassan II Trophy.
Ireland's Damien McGrane
topped the leaderboard at 12
under after 10 holes. The 18-
year-old Manassero completed
16 at Golfdu Palais Royal. He
must win to move into the top
50 and earn a position at Au-
gusta National. Spain's Jose
Manuel Lara also was a stroke
back through 10 holes.
Only 29 players completed
the third round.
Father-Son Challenge
returns to golf calendar
ORLANDO The Father-
Son Challenge is returning to
golf this year.
Arnold Palmer will serve as
the ambassador and PNC
Bank will be the title sponsor of
the tournament that features
major champions teaming up
with their sons in a 36-hole
tournament.
The tournament has not
been played since 2008, when
it lost sponsorship during the
economic downturn. The Fa-
ther-Son Challenge will be
played Dec. 15-16 at The Ritz-
Carlton Club at Grand Lakes
Resort in Orlando.


FREEDOM
Continued from Page B1

follows:
Men's Singles: Donnie
Simmons def. Sam Alford, 6-
2, 64; Rishi Gurnani def. AJ
Glenn, 6-0, 6-0; Dave God-
dard def. David Stoltz, 6-0, 6-
1; Michael Hetland def. Paul
Alford, 6-3, 7-5.
Men's A final: Risha Tur-



BAY HILL
Continued from Page B1

hand for a birdie attempt.
The last time Woods and
McDowell played in the
final group of any tourna-
ment, McDowell rallied
from four shots behind and
beat Woods in a playoff in
the Chevron World Chal-
lenge at the end of 2010.
"The golf course is going
to be the main competitor
tomorrow," McDowell said.
Indeed, it might not be
just them.
Ernie Els rekindled his
hopes of getting into the
Masters with six birdies in
a round of 67 that left him



GATORS
Continued from Page B1

was no heartwarmer
Donovan got under
Pitino's skin early in the sec-
ond half during a timeout
when he worked over the of-
ficials, who promptly called
a foul against the Cardinals
(30-9) when play resumed.
"He called that," Pitino
shouted to the ref. "Why
don't you just give him a
whistle?"
Pitino couldn't get a break
for a while after that and
when Siva picked up his
fourth foul, the coach
stomped onto the court and
got hit with a technical. Erv-
ing Walker made four
straight free throws and the
Gators led by 11, setting the
stage for what could've been
Donovan's fourth trip to the
Final Four
But the team that went 8
for 11 from 3-point range in
the first half went cold re-
ally cold not hitting any of


Arnold Palmer Invite
Saturday
At Bay Hill Club & Lodge, Orlando
Purse: $6 million
Yardage: 7,419, Par: 72
Third Round


TigerWoods
Graeme McDowell
Ernie Els
lan Poulter
Charles Howell III
Johnson Wagner
Kevin Na
Charlie Wi
Bud Cauley
Sean O'Hair
Zach Johnson
Chris Stroud
Bubba Watson
Webb Simpson
Justin Rose
Jason Dufner
Seung-Yul Noh
Tim Herron
Brian Davis
Gary Woodland
Trevor Immelman
Ryan Moore
K.J. Choi
Marc Leishman
Greg Owen
Josh Teater
Jim Furyk
John Rollins
Martin Laird
Sergio Garcia
Vijay Singh
Henrik Stenson
Jeff Overton
Phil Mickelson
Anthony Kim
Kevin Chappell
Daniel Summerhays
Chad Campbell
D.J. Trahan
Brian Gay
Hunter Mahan
Kris Blanks
Camilo Villegas
Davis Love III
Brian Harman
Lee Janzen
Matt Every
Bill Haas
Jimmy Walker
MarkWilson
Ryo Ishikawa
Boo Weekley
Michael Thompson
George McNeill
Rod Pampling
Justin Leonard
Robert Allenby
Charley Hoffman
Dicky Pride
Martin Flores
Skip Kendall
Fredrik Jacobson


69-65-71
72-63-71
71-70-67
71-69-68.
73-68-68.
71-69-69.
73-68-69
66-68-76
70-73-68.
69-72-70.
71-68-72.
70-69-72.
69-70-72.
73-66-73.
69-69-74.
66-69-77.
73-73-67.
74-71-68.
70-73-70.
75-68-70.
73-69-71
71-71-71
69-72-72-
70-71-72-
73-74-67
74-73-67
72-72-70.
71-72-71
72-68-74-
72-67-75
71-68-75
72-74-69-
76-70-69-
73-71-71
69-74-72
73-69-73-
72-70-73-
71-76-69
76-70-70
72-73-71
72-73-71
71-72-73-
73-69-74-
70-72-74-
77-69-71
74-72-71
73-72-72-
73-72-72-
69-72-76-
77-70-71
73-74-71
74-72-72.
74-72-72.
73-72-73.
75-70-73
75-70-73
72-75-72.
76-71-72.
74-73-72.
74-72-73.
71-73-75.
77-70-73.


Andres Romero
J.B. Holmes
Nick Watney
John Huh
Bobby Gates
Scott Stallings
Billy Hurley III
Colt Knost
Brandt Snedeker
Chez Reavie
William McGirt
Tom Gillis
Jhonattan Vegas
Kia i
S
At La Costa Res
Course, C
Purse
Yardage
Th
Yani Tseng
Jiyai Shin
Sun Young Yoo
Caroline Hedwall
Se Ri Pak
Chella Choi
Inbee Park
Jodi Ewart
Alison Walshe
Meena Lee
Ai Miyazato
Shanshan Feng
Suzann Pettersen
Karrie Webb
Jennifer Johnson
Brittany Lincicome
NaYeon Choi
Mina Harigae
Azahara Munoz
Sandra Gal
Vicky Hurst
Sydnee Michaels
Catriona Matthew
Silvia Cavalleri
Eun-HeeJi
Cristie Kerr
Hannah Yun
Lizette Salas
Nicole Castrale
Kris Tamulis
Amy Yang
Ha-Neul Kim
Brittany Lang
Haeji Kang
Jenny Shin
Lindsey Wright
Stacy Lewis
Jin Young Pak
Lexi Thompson
Hee-Won Han
Been Mozo
Beatriz Recari
Morgan Pressel
Angela Stanford
Stephanie Sherlock
Julieta Granada
M.J. Hur
1.K. Kim


three RBIs.
The Panthers'Amber Atkinson doubled, scored
three times and drove in three runs while team-
mate Sidney Holstein four runs and four RBIs.
Rachel Wilkins (two runs), Mariah Hines (two
runs, four RBIs), Amber Russo (three runs) and
Kelsey Lilley (three runs, RBI)
Starting pitcher Danielle Yant pitched 13 total
innings, picking up the win in each contest.
Lecanto (12-3) plays Thursday at Zephyrhills.
From staff reports


nani def. Donnie Simmons, 7-
5,6-1.
Men's B second round:
Michael Hetland def. AJ
Glenn, 6-2, 6-1; Sam Alford
def. Dave Goddard, 6-0, 6-0.
Men's B final: Sam Alford
def. Michael Hetland, 6-2, 3-
6, 6-2.
Men's B consolation final:
Paul Alford def. David Stoltz,
6-1,6-0.
Ladies Singles: Susan
Goins def. Jamie Elmhirst, 6-

only three shots behind.
Ian Poulter had a 68 and
also was tied for third,
while Charles Howell III
(68) and Sony Open winner
Johnson Wagner (69) were
four behind.
Els played the opening
two rounds with Woods and
didn't get much out of his
game. That changed Satur-
day during a strong run up
the leaderboard that at
least gave him a reason-
able chance to get into the
Masters and possibly
win Bay Hill for the third
time.
The Big Easy is at No. 62
in the world and needs to
crack the top 50 after Sun-
day to get an invitation to
Augusta. He could get


nine attempts from beyond
the arc in the second.
The Gators missed six
shots and committed one
turnover over the last 2:30.
They didn't score after
Boynton's layup gave them a
68-66 lead with 2:39 left.
They finished with 14
turnovers to six for
Louisville probably the
difference in a game in
which they still outshot
Louisville 50 percent to 45.
"What happens is, you
can't lose confidence," Pitino
said. "I kept telling our guys
we're going to the Final
Four Win the Big East tour-
nament, we're going to the
Final Four And they did."
They did it with a team
pretty much void of stars.
But the game's best fresh-
man on this day wasn't Beal,
but rather Behanan, who
was far less heralded than
the Florida star coming out
of high school, but outplayed
him down the stretch when
the trip to New Orleans was
on the line.
The freshman from


3,6-3; Susan Goins def. Linda
Martin, 6-2, 6-3.
Mixed Doubles B: Lynn
Finman/Wayne Finman def.
Gerlinda Valante/Bob Valante,
6-1, 6-0; Lisa Steed/Wayne
Steed def. Gerlinda
Valante/Bob Valante, 6-0, 6-2;
Lisa Steed/Wayne Steed def.
Lynn Finman/Wayne Finman,
6-4,7-5.
Lisa Steed/Wayne Steed
win the mixed B in a round
robin format.

there by finishing alone in
third place provided
Matteo Manassero doesn't
win in Morocco on the Eu-
ropean Tour, or Howell
doesn't finish alone in sec-
ond place at Bay Hill.
It gets complicated with
the world ranking, even
without a calculator Els
hasn't even bothered to do
the math.
"I know I've got to finish
... really, almost winning.
I've got to almost win, or
something like that," Els
said. "But if I'm in, I'm in.
And if I'm not, I'm just glad
my game is coming around.
Whatever happens, I feel
like I can have a good year
now. I feel like the hard
work is starting to pay off."


Cincinnati scored 13 of his
17 points in the second half,
including nine over the last
8:02 and Louisville's last two
field goals both after Siva
had fouled out with nine
points and eight assists.
Beal, meanwhile,
matched Erik Murphy with a
team-high 14 points and con-
trolled this game for the first
37 minutes.
But over the last 3, he
tried twice to take the ball to
the hoop, only to get denied
by 6-foot-10 center Gorgui
Dieng. Beal missed the des-
peration 3 in the waning sec-
onds and also got called for
traveling after stealing a
wild pass from Smith while
Louisville was nursing a
one-point lead with 18 sec-
onds left.
The Gators came into the
tournament losing four of
five but won their first two
games in the NCAAs by an
average of 30. They looked
as though they'd be playing
in the Superdome next
weekend, but then they fell
apart.


73-74-73 220 +4
71-75-74 220 +4
68-73-79 220 +4
77-70-74 221 +5
74-72-75 221 +5
74-72-75 221 +5
75-72-75 222 +6
76-71-76 223 +7
73-73-77 223 +7
73-74-77- 224 +
73-74-77 224 +8
79-66-79 224 +8
76-70-79 225 +!
Classic
Saturday
sort and Spa, Legends
:arlsbad, Calif.
: $1.7 million
e: 6,490, Par: 72
ird Round
67-68-69 204 -1
68-71-68 207 -!
69-73-67 209 -7
67-72-70 209 -
71-66-73-210 -I
71-71-70 212 -4
72-70-70-212 -4
70-69-73 212 -4
73-66-73-212 -4
73-70-70 213 -3
72-70-71- 213 -
72-71-71 -214 -;
68-75-71 214 -;
73-70-71 214 -;
68-73-73 214 -;
68-73-73- 214 -
7373-769 -215 -
71-73-71 -215 -
71-73-71 -215 -
72-76-68-216 E
73-74-69 -216 E
72-74-70- 216 E
79-70-68 217 +1
75-71-71 -217 +
76-70-71-217 +1
72-74-71 217 +1
74-72-71 217 +1
71-74-72 217 +1
73-71-73-217 +1
71-73-73 -217 +
69-73-75 -217 +
74-75-69 -218 +;
73-76-69-218 +;
71-77-70 218 +;
73-74-71 218 +;
72-74-73 219 +3
72-73-74 219 +3
72-72-75 -219 +3
74-70-75-219 +3
71-72-76 -219 +3
70-73-76 -219 +
74-74-72 220 +4
72-75-73 220 +4
72-75-73 220 +4
69-77-74 220 +4
74-75-72 221 +5
75-74-72 221 +5
74-75-72 221 +5


SoYeon Ryu 71-78-72 -221 +5
Stephanie Louden 74-74-73 221 +5
Hee Young Park 70-78-73- 221 +5
Christel Boeljon 72-73-76 221 +5
Natalie Gulbis 72-73-76 221 +5
Ji Young Oh 67-76-78 -221 +5
Wendy Doolan 73-76-73 222 +6
Mo Martin 73-76-73 -222 +6
Pornanong Phatlum 75-74-73 -222 +6
Numa Gulyanamitta 71-77-74-222 +6
3 Anna Nordqvist 73-75-74 222 +6
Sophie Gustafson 72-75-75 222 +6
Stacy Prammanasudh 73-74-75 222 +6
Hee Kyung Seo 72-72-78 222 +6
Amanda Blumenherst 77-72-74 223 +7
Gerina Piller 74-74-75 223 +7
Paula Creamer 72-75-76 223 +7
Ilhee Lee 76-70-77- 223 +7
Sarah Jane Smith 74-75-75 224 +8
Minea Blomqvist 72-76-76 224 +8
Seon Hwa Lee 70-77-77 224 +8
Dewi Claire Schreefel 72-74-78 224 +8
Na On Min 75-74-76 225 +9
Ayaka Kaneko 75-73-77- 225 +9
Jennifer Gleason 75-74-77- 226 +10
Amy Hung 78-71-77-226 +10
Pat Hurst 72-76-81 -229 +13
Miss. Gulf Resort Classic
Saturday
At Fallen Oak Country Club, Saucier, Miss.
3 Purse: $1.6 million
Yardage: 7,119, Par: 72
Second Round
Jeff Sluman 69-64 -133 -11
Fred Couples 63-70- 133 -11
Jim Thorpe 70-65-135 -9
Chien Soon Lu 67-69- 136 -8
John Huston 67-69-136 -8
Bobby Clampett 67-69- 136 -8
Michael Allen 68-69-137 -7
Peter Senior 67-70-137 -7
Tom Pernice Jr. 64-73-137 -7
BobTway 69-69-138 -6
BillGlasson 68-70-138 -6
Jim Carter 67-71 -138 -6
JohnRoss 71-68- 139 -5
Joey Sindelar 70-69-139 -5
Chip Beck 69-70- 139 -5
Fred Funk 69-70-139 -5
Dick Mast 68-72-140 -4
Brad Bryant 68-72 -140 -4
Joel Edwards 67-73-140 -4
Hal Sutton 71-70-141 -3
Jim Rutledge 70-71 -141 -3
MarkWiebe 70-71 -141 -3
Jerry Pate 71-71 -142 -2
Mark Brooks 71-71 -142 -2
3 Jay Haas 73-69-142 -2
MikeGoodes 70-72-142 -2
Vicente Fernandez 70-72-142 -2
John Cook 68-74-142 -2
CoreyPavin 71-72-143 -1
STom Purtzer 71-72-143 -1
Bernhard Langer 72-71-143 -1
Sonny Skinner 70-73-143 -1
PH. Horgan III 72-71 -143 -1
Tom Lehman 70-73-143 -1
Wayne Levi 70-73-143 -1
David Eger 66-77-143 -1


Sports BRIEFS


Golf SCORES


SCOREBOARD





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



NHL standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
x-N.Y Rangers 74 4621 7 99202 165
x-Pittsburgh 74 4622 6 98248 193
x-Philadelphia 75 44 23 8 96238 208
New Jersey 75 4227 6 90204 195
N.Y Islanders 74 3033 11 71177 222
Northeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Boston 73 4228 3 87237 180
Ottawa 76 3828 10 86230 223
Buffalo 76 3729 10 84197 209
Toronto 75 3334 8 74214 235
Montreal 76 2934 13 71197 211
Southeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Florida 74 3624 14 86184 203
Washington 75 3730 8 82202 214
Winnipeg 75 3532 8 78201 217
Tampa Bay 74 34 33 7 75209 252
Carolina 76 3031 15 75202 228
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT PtsGF GA
x-St. Louis 75 4620 9101192 147


Detroit 75 45 25 5
Nashville 75 43 24 8
Chicago 75 4225 8
Columbus 74 2443 7
Northwest Division
GPW LOT
y-Vancouver 74 44 21 9
Colorado 76 40 31 5
Calgary 76 3427 15
Minnesota 74 31 33 10
Edmonton 75 30 36 9
Pacific Division
GPW LOT
Dallas 75 41 29 5
LosAngeles 74 3725 12
Phoenix 75 3726 12
San Jose 74 3727 10
Anaheim 75 3232 11


95230 185
94213 198
92229 214
55172 237
Pts GF GA
97226 185
85198 199
83186 208
72159 204
69200 220
Pts GF GA
87198 198
86173 160
86197 194
84201 192
75189 209


NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over-
time loss.
x-clinched playoff spot, y-clinched division
Saturday's Games
Dallas 4, Calgary 1
Buffalo 3, Minnesota 1
Ottawa 8, Pittsburgh 4
Philadelphia 4, Montreal 1
Tampa Bay 4, N.Y Islanders 3
Detroit 5, Carolina 4
Nashville 3, Winnipeg 1
N.Y. Rangers at Toronto, late, not reflected in
standings
Boston at Los Angeles, late
Vancouver at Colorado, late
Phoenix at San Jose, late
Sunday's Games
Edmonton at Columbus, 3 p.m.
Minnesota at Washington, 5 p.m.
N.Y Islanders at Florida, 5 p.m.
New Jersey at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m.
Nashville at Chicago, 7:30 p.m.
Boston at Anaheim, 8 p.m.
St. Louis at Phoenix, 9 p.m.



NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
Philadelphia 27 21 .563 -
Boston 25 22 .532 1V2
NewYork 24 25 .490 312
Toronto 16 32 .333 11
New Jersey 16 34 .320 12
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 35 11 .761 -
Orlando 31 18 .633 5Y2
Atlanta 29 20 .592 7Y2
Washington 11 36 .234 24Y2
Charlotte 7 39 .152 28
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Chicago 39 10 .796 -
Indiana 27 19 .587 1012
Milwaukee 22 25 .468 16
Cleveland 17 28 .378 20
Detroit 16 32 .333 2212
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 32 14 .696 -
Dallas 27 22 .551 612
Memphis 25 21 .543 7
Houston 26 22 .542 7
New Orleans 12 36 .250 21
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 36 12 .750 -
Utah 26 22 .542 10
Denver 26 22 .542 10
Minnesota 23 26 .469 1312
Portland 22 26 .458 14
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
L.A. Lakers 30 18 .625 -
L.A. Clippers 27 21 .563 3
Phoenix 24 24 .500 6
Golden State 19 26 .422 912
Sacramento 17 30 .362 1212
Saturday's Games
L.A. Clippers 101, Memphis 85
Atlanta 95, Washington 92
New Jersey 102, Charlotte 89
New York 101, Detroit 79
San Antonio 89, New Orleans 86
Toronto at Chicago, late
Dallas at Houston, late
Indiana at Milwaukee, late
Sacramento at Golden State, late
Sunday's Games
Phoenix at Cleveland, 3 p.m.
Denver at Minnesota, 3:30 p.m.
Utah at Atlanta, 6 p.m.
Washington at Boston, 6 p.m.
Philadelphia at San Antonio, 7 p.m.
Miami at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
Golden State at Portland, 9 p.m.
Memphis at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 p.m.


SPORTS


SUNDAY, MARCH 25, 2012 B5


Stamkos ties TB record for goals


Center now has

52 scores on season

Associated Press

TAMPA Steven Stamkos
scored twice to tie the Lightning
record with 52 goals this season,
and Tampa Bay beat the New York
Islanders 4-3 on Saturday night.
Stamkos gave the Lightning a 2-0
lead with his second of the night
and tied Vincent Lecavalier's club
record 1:46 into the second.
Stamkos also assisted on Tim Wal-
lace's goal that gave Tampa Bay a
4-3 edge at 12:10 of the third.
Red Wings 5, Hurricanes 4
DETROIT Drew Miller scored with
8:25 left and the Detroit Red Wings ral-
lied from three goals down to beat the
Carolina Hurricanes 5-4, snapping a
six-game losing streak.
Carolina led 4-1 until Henrik Zetter-
berg cut the Red Wings' deficit to two
goals with 3:02 left in the second period.
Zetterberg scored twice, and Jiri
Hudler netted the tying goal midway
through the third period.
Sabres 3, Wild 1
BUFFALO, N.Y. Rookie Marcus
Foligno scored a power-play goal 1:45
into the third period, and the Buffalo
Sabres continued their late-season
surge into playoff contention with a 3-1
win over the Minnesota Wild.
Cody Hodgson had a goal and as-
sist, while Thomas Vanek scored his
first goal in eight games for Buffalo


Associated Press
Tampa Bay Lightning's Steven Stamkos, center, celebrates his goal with
Martin St. Louis, left, and Teddy Purcell during the second period Saturday
against the New York Islanders in Tampa.


which overcame a slow start to improve
to 6-0-2 in its past eight and 18-5-5 in
its past 28. Ryan Miller stopped 24
shots in helping the Sabres (37-29-10).
Flyers 4, Canadiens 1
PHILADELPHIA- Danny Briere
scored a pair of goals, Ilya Bryzgalov
made 23 saves and the Philadelphia
Flyers clinched a playoff berth with a 4-
1 win over the Montreal Canadiens.
Three of Philadelphia's four goals
came on the power play, upping the
Flyers' league-leading total to 61.
Briere's second goal put the Flyers
up 3-1 with 2:20 left in the second pe-
riod. Jaromir Jagr took a long outlet
pass from Bryzgalov at the Flyers' blue
line and flicked it on to Briere, who got
one-on-one with Canadiens goalie
Peter Budaj and roofed a forehand shot
from in close.


Predators 3, Jets 1
NASHVILLE, Tenn. Pekka Rinne
made 24 saves to lead the Nashville
Predators to a 3-1 victory over the
Winnipeg Jets.
Matt Halischuk, Gabriel Bourque and
Shea Weber scored for Nashville,
which snapped a two-game losing
streak.
Tim Stapleton had the lone goal for
the Jets, who have lost three of their
last four. One night after rallying back
from a three goal-deficit and winning in
overtime in Washington, the Jets lost
their 21 st road game of the season.
Senators 8, Penguins 4
OTTAWA- Daniel Alfredsson had
two goals and two assists, and the Ot-
tawa Senators dealt Pittsburgh its first
regulation loss in 15 games, beating
the Penguins 8-4.


Sidney Crosby scored his first goal in
six games since making his second
comeback of the season, but it wasn't
enough as Pittsburgh fell to 13-1-1
since a 6-2 loss in Buffalo on Feb. 19.
Crosby, who made a spectacular
pass to set up one of Matt Cooke's two
goals, beat Craig Anderson with a shot
into the top right corner 11:43 into the
third to draw Pittsburgh within 5-4.
Stars 4, Flames 1
DALLAS Jamie Benn scored
twice, Kari Lehtonen made 35 saves,
and the Dallas Stars beat the Calgary
Flames 4-1 in a matchup of Western
Conference playoff contenders.
Michael Ryder also scored for the
Stars, who improved to 87 points and are
in the middle of a six-team scramble
along with the Flames (83 points) for one
of the final two playoff spots.
The Stars had moved into the Pacific
Division lead with a 10-0-1 run, but
they'd lost three of their previous four to
tumble out of the top spot in the division
and hurt their playoff hopes.
Rangers 4, Maple Leafs 3, SO
TORONTO Ryan Callahan's
shootout goal gave New York a 4-3 vic-
tory over the Toronto Maple Leafs and
lifted the Rangers into a tie atop the
NHL standings.
The Rangers captain moved in on
goalie Jonas Gustavsson and wired a
shot top corner in the third round to
clinch it. Brad Richards also scored for
New York in the shootout. Tim Connolly
had Toronto's lone goal in the tiebreaker.
Marian Gaborik, with two goals, and
Brandon Dubinsky scored in regulation
for New York (47-21-7).


Knicks blast Pistons


Clippers fly past

Grizzlies 101-85

Associated Press

NEW YORK Tyson Chan-
dler had 15 points and tied a
season high with 17 rebounds,
and the New York Knicks re-
bounded from their first loss
under Mike Woodson by routing
the Detroit Pistons for the third
time this season, 101-79.
Amare Stoudemire scored 17
points for the Knicks, who are 6-1
since Mike D'Antoni resigned.
They lost 96-79 on Friday night in
Toronto, but had no trouble with
Detroit for the third time in three
meetings this season.
Carmelo Anthony finally got his
shot to fall in the third quarter
and finished with 15 points, while
Jeremy Lin had 13.
Clippers 101, Grizzles 85
LOS ANGELES Blake Griffin
had 20 points and 10 rebounds, Chris
Paul added 19 points and 13 assists,
and Los Angeles beat Memphis to
end its first three-game losing streak
of the season.
Randy Foye had 18 points to help
the Clippers, playing the first of five
home games in eight days, move
within three games of the Lakers for
the Pacific Division lead.
Zach Randolph had 14 points and
eight rebounds for Memphis.
Hawks 95, Wizards 92
WASHINGTON Joe Johnson
scored nine of his 16 points in the
fourth quarter, including a go-ahead
3-pointer in the final minute, and At-
lanta erased a 16-point deficit to beat
Washington.
Josh Smith added 20 points and
nine rebounds to help the Hawks win
their third consecutive game.
Nene led the Wizards with 21


points and 11 rebounds for his 80th
career double-double, and Jordan
Crawford scored 20 points.
Nets 102, Bobcats 89
NEWARK, N.J. Deron Williams
had 19 points and matched his sea-
son high with 14 assists and New Jer-
sey beat Charlotte to snap a
five-game losing streak.
Kris Humphries added 20 points
and 16 rebounds, and former Bobcat
Gerald Wallace had 15 points to help
the Nets sweep the four-game sea-
son series with the woeful Bobcats.
Backup center Byron Mullens had
17 points to lead the Bobcats, who
were coached by assistant coach
Stephen Silas.
Spurs 89, Hornets 86
NEW ORLEANS DeJuan Blair
scored 23 points and Tim Duncan had
four key points down the stretch as
the San Antonio Spurs beat the short-
handed Hornets 89-86.
The Spurs, chasing the Oklahoma
City Thunder for the best record in the
Western Conference, trailed by a
point twice in the final two minutes.
Duncan responded each time, aton-
ing for a lackluster game by making
two free throws and tipping in a
missed shot with 1:19 left to give San
Antonio the lead for good.
Duncan finished with 13 points and
seven rebounds but was only 4 of 11
from the field.
Mavs 101, Rockets 99, OT
HOUSTON Dirk Nowitzki scored
31 points, Jason Terry added 24 and
Brandan Wright had a career-high
seven blocks to help the Dallas Maver-
icks beat the Houston Rockets 101-99
in overtime.
Shawn Marion had 12 points and a
season-high 15 rebounds for the Mav-
ericks, who beat Houston for the fifth
straight time.
Goran Dragic scored 24 points, and
Luis Scola added 19 for the Rockets.


Associated Press
New York Knicks guard J.R. Smith drives past the Detroit Pistons' Greg
Monroe during the first half on Saturday in New York.
Pacers 125, Bucks 104 bound from a home loss to Phoenix.


MILWAUKEE George Hill scored
a season-high 24 points coming off the
bench and the Indiana Pacers beat the
Milwaukee Bucks 125-104.
Roy Hibbert added 16 points and
nine rebounds to help the Pacers re-


Ersan Ilyasova had 22 points and eight
rebounds for the Bucks. Monta Ellis, Mil-
waukee's recent trade acquisition, scored
11 points, struggling after scoring nine in
the first quarter. Ellis sat most of the
fourth with the game well out of hand.


Building relationships through exercise works


We rarely hear about
the mental health
and family-bonding
value of sports and exercise.
I remember the days not
too long ago raising four
teenagers and trying to com-
municate with them, which
was often next to
impossible. I
was frustrated at
the answer to
how their day
was or what did
they do in
school? Usually,
the answer was
nothing or ok, if
one came at all! Dr. Ron
Trying to ad- DOCT
vise them, let
alone get their ORD
attention to lis-
ten to advice, was mind-al-
tering until I made a huge
discovery I call it walk a lit-
tle, talk a little. Through the
beauty of sports, a relation-
ship can be born with your
children, parents or spouse.


This relationship can last a
lifetime.
To this day, the best time
and talks my oldest son (an
ex-NCAA Ivy League ski
racer, Marine and know-it-
all attorney in Washington
D.C.) and I have are when


Joseph
rOR'S
ERS


we go on a run or
hike.
Not only are
you getting in
shape, but your
child is also. It is
a stage for per-
sonal time with
your kids that al-
lows discussion
because the
main distraction
is trying to put
one foot in front
of the other and


breathe. It is difficult to
argue walking down the
fairway on a beautiful
Florida day
The concept is sneaky, so
don't let them read this.
Every time I got my teenage


boys and pre-teen daughter
to walk, run, mountain bike
or ski with me, they started
talking a lot..
Usually, endorphins gen-
erated by exercise provide a
somewhat distracting and
calming value to the gregar-
ious teenage soul.
Mind you, this means you
have to stop talking! It is a
process that, once started,
lends itself to many differ-
ent sports. The difficult task
is not giving an opinion.
Listening and not talking
is easy when exercising or
working out. Usually, when
working out with my wife or
kids, I am so out of breath I
can't talk and have to listen.
That's step number one:
work out hard enough so
you can't talk.
In no way am I talking
about the commute to soc-
cer, basketball, karate or
any of those group or club
activities that are done by
your child and passively re-


viewed by you. I am speak-
ing to the really difficult
task of doing a sport one-on-
one with your child. It may
not be the exercise or sport
you choose.
I started by getting my
pre-teen daughter to walk
for an ice cream cone that
was conveniently a mile
away Not only is there a re-
ward at the end of the tun-
nel, there a period of time
between only you and your
child that is timeless and
priceless. She eventually
picked up running and it be-
came her sport and our time
together
With a couple of the boys,
I showed up one day at the
skateboard park half-pipe,
completely armored with
helmet, elbow and knee
pads and 'dropped in' to the
half-pipe with fear and trep-
idation.
There was dad mingling
with the kids. It was years
before they finally stopped


telling me about the tricks
they were doing or trying to
include me in their activi-
ties and they talked inces-
santly about everything.
This does not have to be
only between kids and par-
ents but can be between
spouses or between grand-
parents and grandchildren.
When we moved to Citrus
County a few years ago, I no-
ticed a number of grandpar-
ents raising tweens and
teens.
You may not be able play
with the kids, i.e. skate-
board, but you can manipu-
late them into walk a little
and talk a little. Work on lis-
tening to just a few of their
comments, set up a sched-
ule to walk ... bribes work if
needed.
The other major observa-
tion moving to Crystal River
was the great number of
parents who took their kids
hunting, fishing, off-roading
and boating. Do this one-on-


one and you will be amazed
at the progress you can
make in establishing or
nourishing a relationship.
A friend of ours used surf-
ing with their kids to gain a
better relationship and they
continue to do so as adults.
Our neighbors, a husband
and wife, walk several miles
every night to get exercise
but also to talk over the
problems of the world and
the business day
You can see by now it is
not just walking. It is spend-
ing the time through sport
or exercise with your loved
ones. Can you do it? If I can,
you can.
Don't let the need to listen
hold you back. Just think
about the nice moment in
time you are having "walking
a little and talking a little.
Ron Joseph, M.D., a hand
and shoulder orthopedic
specialist can be reached
atrbjhand@cox.net or
352-212-5359.












ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE

Churches, sets for
Charles, Camilla
COPENHAGEN, Den-
mark Britain's Prince
Charles and his wife
Camilla, the Duchess of
Cornwall, arrived in
Copenhagen on Saturday
on the third and final leg
of their Scandinavia tour,
with plans to visit

the film
set of a
popular
Danish
TV show
and sus-
tainable
energy
Prince projects.
Charles The
couple
was greeted by Danish
Crown Prince Frederik
and his Australian-born
wife, Crown Princess
Mary, at the airport in a
sunny Copenhagen.
After almost a week of
visits, starting off in Oslo
on Tues-
day,
where
1 they met
with of
survivors
of last
year's
Norwe-
CamillaN
the gian ter-
Dutchess ror
of Cornwall attacks,
and con-
tinuing on to Stockholm
on Thursday, the British
royals had cleared their
schedule for Saturday
evening to dedicate their
time to private activities.
As in Sweden, this is
their first official trip to
Denmark, although the
Prince of Wales was
there for an unofficial
visit in 2009.
According to the Royal
Danish Court, the Scandi-
navia tour is a warm-up
to Queen Elizabeth II's
Diamond Jubilee, which
ends with a celebration
in London in early June.
In Denmark, Prince
Charles and Camilla will
attend a church service,
lay a wreath at the na-
tional monument, and
meet with Danish sol-
diers who have served in
Afghanistan.
On Monday, they will
dine with Denmark's
Queen Margrethe and
her husband, The Prince
Consort Henrik

Teen, Gaga get
GLAAD award


NEW YORK
teenager who'
ing to make it
children to sec
mentary abou
among the win
year's Gay and
Alliance Again
tion Media Aw
ABC's "Danc
The Stars," La(
the producers
"Smash" also Y
honorees reco
urday in New"
Seventeen-y
Katy Butler of
Mich., got a spi
She's launched
petition drive t
Motion Picture
tion ofAmeric
its R rating for
mentary "Bulls
MPAA said the
flects language
The awards
accurate and i
representation
gay, bisexual a
gender people


'Survivor' to governor?


Rupert Boneham, from the television show "Survivor," pumps up the crowd before a race May 27, 2007, at
Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Indianapolis. Libertarian Party members are set to nominate the former
television reality series star as their candidate for Indiana governor during its state convention on Saturday in
Indianapolis.

Reality show star nominated for Indiana gubernatorial race


Associated Press


INDIANAPOLIS Former real-
ity TV star Rupert Boneham said he
thinks he has a real shot at becom-
ing Indiana's next governor after
being nominated as a third-party
choice Saturday
The fan favorite from 2004's "Sur-
vivor: All-Stars" was unopposed for
the Libertarian Party's nomination,
which came during the party's state
convention in Indianapolis.
"My aim, honestly, is to win gov-
ernor," Boneham said in a phone
interview afterward. "I really feel I
have a strong chance of pulling not
just the Libertarian vote, but the in-
dependent vote, the undecided
vote, and maybe even some votes
from Democrats and Republicans."
He will face Republican Mike
Pence and Democrat John Gregg in
November's gubernatorial election.
Current Indiana Gov Mitch Daniels
is limited to two terms and cannot
run again.
"We have a governor's candidate


Rupert Boneham will
face Republican Mike
Pence and Democrat
John Gregg in the
upcoming election.

in Rupert Boneham that can reach
out to the 70 percent of the popula-
tion that does not vote, and bring
them into the process," state chair-
man Sam Goldstein said in a state-
ment. "He brings a level of name ID
that our previous candidates have
not had, which is important in
politics."
The tie-dye wearing Boneham
won $1 million on the "Survivor"
series and donated some of the
prize to his Rupert's Kids charity,
which provides mentoring and job
training to at-risk youths.
Boneham said he's been a Liber-
tarian for more than 20 years, but
didn't become active in the party


until this year. He said he wants less
government intrusion at the state
level, especially in education.
Libertarian 2008 gubernatorial
nominee Andy Homing, a former
Republican who also has run for
Congress and mayor of Indianapo-
lis, was unopposed for the party's
U.S. Senate nomination.
"My job is to be in place if people
should ever have an epiphany," he
said. "The two-party system is just a
crazy crony network."
But despite polls showing high
levels of voter dissatisfaction and a
contested Republican senatorial
primary, Homing saw the odds as
being against an epiphany this year
"We've all heard this before. Every
election, everybody's fed up," he
said.
The party also is fielding candi-
dates for five of Indiana's nine con-
gressional seats.
The convention also featured a de-
bate and straw poll among the party's
four candidates for president


Theater REVIEW


Boozy moonlit confessions spark first-rate 'Moon'


JENNIFER FARRAR
Associated Press


NEW YORK A girl's


gotta do what a girl's gotta do
--A to win her man. Esteemed
s campaign- American playwright Eu-
easier for gene O'Neill, winner of four
e a docu- Pulitzer Prizes and the
t bullying is Nobel Prize for Literature,
miners of this created a fierce literary
I Lesbian heroine who does just that
ist Defama- in his 1943 tragedy, 'A Moon
yards for the Misbegotten."
cing With O'Neill's famous pair of
dy Gaga and awkward, star-crossed
of NBC's lovers, who face their great-
were among est hopes and fears in an
gnized Sat- iconic moonlight scene, are
York. well-served by The Pearl
ear-old Theatre Company's grip-
Ann Arbor, ping, current off-Broadway
ecial award. revival at New York City
d an online Center Stage II.
to press the J.R. Sullivan has staged
e Associa- the lengthy production with
a to lower sensitivity and a light touch.
-the docu- Set in 1923 Connecticut on a
y" The humble tenant farm, "Moon"f
rating re- is the story of single, rough-
e in the film. hewn farmer's daughter,
honor fair, Josie Hogan, (an outstanding
Snclusive Kim Martin-Cotten), and her
n of lesbian, secret love for her landlord,
d trans- Jim Tyrone Jr, a would-be
e. actor and haunted, abject al-
-From wire reports coholic (a fine portrayal by


Today's birthday The year ahead should be an ex-
tremely active one for you both socially and in terms of
business. You are likely to make lots of new friends who will
introduce some exciting experiences into your life.
Aries (March 21-April 19) If you think you are entitled to
specific consideration from certain people, speak up. Oth-
ers' minds aren't always operating on the same wavelength.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Use the same methods that
previously brought you success in tackling something very
similar to what you're now facing. What worked before
should work again, with perhaps a few minor changes.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) Without realizing it, you have
won the confidence of someone who has been studying
you closely. This person is looking for a person to confide in
and believes you're the one.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Several wonderful, worth-
while ideas are likely to spring from some casual discus-


Associated Press
In this theater image released by the Pearl Theatre Co., Kim
Martin-Cotten, left, and Andrew May are shown in a scene
from Eugene O'Neill's "A Moon for the Misbegotten," cur-
rently performing off-Broadway at New York City Center
Stage II in New York.


Andrew May.)
Onstage the entire time,
Martin-Cotten is a life-force
to reckon with, luminous yet
earthy, fierce and genuine.
She strides confidently
around the set as Josie ini-
tially bosses around her prig-
gish youngest brother, Mike
(Pearl regular Sean McNall).
Josie then argues, jokes
and schemes with her comi-
cal, conniving father, Phil,
with boisterous Irish humor,


and joins him in a tri-
umphant but ill-advised
prank against their much-
disliked neighbor, T Sted-
man Harder (a nice turn by
Kern McFadden.)
Dan Daily does a yeoman
job as Phil Hogan, making
him truly "a wicked old tick,
as crooked as a corkscrew."
Blustery in the first half,
Daily becomes more nu-
anced as the play pro-
gresses and he can show


Today's HOROSCOPE

sions you'll be having with others. Funny how the best
schemes pop up when you're not looking.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Don't hesitate to act in harmony
with your thoughts and/or inspirations. Certain ideas that
enter your head concerning ways to further your ambitions
could be very worthwhile.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Gains you acquire are likely to
come about in a circuitous fashion. You'll be able to under-
stand what's happening, but others will miss the point, al-
lowing you to take advantage of them.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) The credit will belong to you
when several people who have strong emotional ties pull
together for a common cause. It will be due to you knowing
how to get everyone working collectively.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) This is an especially good
day to have a frank discussion regarding an important
issue that needs resolving. Solutions can be found that will


Phil's caring side.
The Hogans devise a com-
plicated plot to get Jim to sell
them their rented farm prop-
erty, or else trick him into
marrying Josie. Their inno-
cent scheming sets up the
second half of the play and
the famous nocturnal ren-
dezvous scene between Josie
and Jim, where she'll finally
learn whether she has any
hope of a future with him.
May is an understated,
emotionally exhausted and
movingly dissipated Jim.
Drinking what seems like
buckets of bourbon, he
droops and mumbles con-
fusedly to himself, while
wretchedly trying to explain
to Josie the guilt and despair
that are driving him to an
early, booze-addled death.
Both actors have a gift for
revealing the inner emo-
tions beneath their charac-
ters' false masks of cheer
Martin-Cotten is most
wrenching as Josie seizes
her final chance at happi-
ness, desperately trying to
comprehend and possibly
save the man she loves, sadly
describing him as being like
"a dead man walking slow
behind his own coffin."


benefit all parties involved.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) If you put your mind to it,
ways can be developed that'll enhance your earning capac-
ity. The improvements you come up with might not make
you rich, but they could sweeten the pot.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -As time passes and you
open up, you're likely to become more and more sociable.
If you haven't made plans for the day, it might prove worth-
while to join some friends who have.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) You're apt to be surprised
by some candid comments made by someone whose con-
fidence you didn't know you enjoyed. What occurs indi-
cates closer bonds can be formed.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Social activities that empha-
size the mental rather than the physical are likely to be the
most appealing for you. Seek out chatty friends rather than
your jogging buddies to pass the time.


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

FRIDAY, MARCH 23
Mega Money: 2- 11 17 -31
Mega Ball: 6
4-of-4 MB 1 winner $$2 million
4-of-4 9 $2,356.50
3-of-4 MB 60 $773
3-of-4 1,438 $96
2-of-4 MB 1,787 $54.50
1-of-4 MB 14,894 $6.50
2-of-4 42,068 $3.50
Fantasy 5:19 23 31 32 33
5-of-5 2 winners $122,523.93
4-of-5 333 $118.50
3-of-5 9,906 $11
THURSDAY, MARCH 22
Fantasy 5: 8 18 20 23 29
5-of-5 2 winners $111,980.06
4-of-5 287 $125.50
3-of-5 9,657 $10

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num-
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call 850-487-7777.

Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, March 25,
the 85th day of 2012. There
are 281 days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On March 25, 1776, Gen.
George Washington, com-
mander of the Continental
Army, was awarded the first
Congressional Gold Medal
by the Continental Congress
for leading the liberation of
Boston from British troops
during the Revolutionary War.
On this date:
In 1306, Robert the Bruce
was crowned the King of
Scots.
In 1911, 146 people,
mostly young female immi-
grants, were killed when fire
broke out at the Triangle
Shirtwaist Co. in New York.
In 1947, a coal mine explo-
sion in Centralia, Ill., claimed
111 lives.
In 1957, the Treaty of
Rome established the Euro-
pean Economic Community.
In 1960, the U.S. Court of
Appeals for the Second Cir-
cuit in New York ruled that
the D.H. Lawrence novel
"Lady Chatterley's Lover"
was not obscene and could
be sent through the mails.
In 1965, the Rev. Martin
Luther King Jr. led 25,000
marchers to the state capitol
in Montgomery, Ala., to
protest the denial of voting
rights to blacks.
Ten years ago: A powerful
earthquake rocked
Afghanistan and northwest-
ern Pakistan, killing some
1,000 people.
Five years ago: Iran an-
nounced it was partially sus-
pending cooperation with the
U.N. nuclear watchdog
agency, citing what it called
"illegal and bullying" Security
Council sanctions imposed
on the country for its refusal
to stop enriching uranium.
One year ago: Canadian
opposition parties brought
down the Conservative gov-
ernment in a no-confidence
vote, triggering an election that
gave Prime Minister Stephen
Harper a clear Conservative
majority in Parliament.
Today's Birthdays: Mod-
eling agency founder Eileen
Ford is 90. Feminist activist
and author Gloria Steinem is
78. Singer Anita Bryant is 72.
Singer Aretha Franklin is 70.
Singer Elton John is 65. Au-
thor Kate DiCamillo is 48.
Former MLB All-Star pitcher
Tom Glavine is 46. Olympic
bronze medal figure skater
Debi Thomas, M.D., is 45.
Singer Melanie Blatt (All
Saints) is 37. Actor Lee Pace
is 33. Actor Sean Faris is 30.
Auto racer Danica Patrick is


30. Singer Katharine McPhee
is 28. Singer Jason Castro
("American Idol") is 25
Thought for Today: "Un-
interpreted truth is as useless
as buried gold." Lytton
Strachey, English biographer
(1880-1932).












COMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


Little
Tommy
Tucker
teaches
about
drinking.
/Page C4


Stand your ground


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


Associated Press
Thousands attend a rally Thursday, March 22, for Trayvon Martin, the teen shot by George Michael Zimmerman while on Neighborhood Watch
patrol in Sanford. Zimmerman's claim of shooting the teen in self-defense has been questioned by community leaders.


Too many deaths in

name of self-defense

sleep over the vote they cast that
day in 2005. In the past month,
they have watched silently as the
small community of Sanford the
entire nation, really- has been torn apart by
the consequences of a law they supported.
I am talking about the 39 state senators and
94 state House mem-
bers who voted for the
"stand your ground"
law.
The law was a prior-
ity of the National Rifle
Association, a powerful
force in politics. The
law authorizes a per-
son to kill another in
Susan Clary self-defense anywhere
and any time he feels in
FLORIDA danger It removed the
VOICES obligation to retreat. If
you shoot in self-de-
fense, you're immune
from criminal prosecution and civil liability.
Touted as a law to protect innocents, it has
instead led to killings during heated argu-
ments and cases of mistaken identity. In the
most recent case, 17-year-old Trayvon Martin
was shot and killed by George Zimmerman, a
neighborhood watch volunteer who followed
him against the advice of a 911 operator.
Zimmerman's story of self-defense seems
so implausible that people across the coun-
try are crying racism and demanding justice.
Late Thursday, Gov. Rick Scott said he would
appoint a task force to take testimony and
recommend changes. He's also appointed an
outside prosecutor to take a second look.
It's hard to comprehend how what Zim-
merman did fits the law's legal limits. But
tracking Martin through the neighborhood
was not illegal. Getting out of the vehicle to
approach him was not illegal. What hap-
pened next is unknown, a version told only by
the person with a self-interest in the out-
come: Zimmerman.
If you wonder why Zimmerman hasn't been
charged, it's because police didn't find
enough evidence to dispute his story, even
with the 911 calls and eyewitness accounts.
The state attorney agreed.
"Stand your ground" is problematic be-
cause it eliminates the prosecutor's role in
determining whether a person's account is
reasonable. In Zimmerman's case, if he said
he felt his life was in imminent danger, it pre-
sumes his actions were justified.
It is not possible to say how many people
have successfully used the law to defend
themselves in murder cases because Florida
does not collect data that way. But in the
seven years since its passage, it's been in-
voked at least 93 times, with 65 deaths, ac-
cording to the Tampa Bay Times.
It's gotten out of hand.
Consider:
0 Two men argue whether a teenager
should be allowed to skateboard in a Tampa
park. The fight ends with one man shooting
the other dead in front of his 8-year-old
daughter.


Sybrina Fulton stands Thursday with the Rev. Al Sharpton at a rally for her son, Trayvon Martin.


A 15-year-old died after two gangs
brawled in Tallahassee, leaving no one ac-
countable for his death.
A man shot and killed
two people during an alter-
cation aboard a 35-foot sail-
boat anchored near Riviera
Beach.
A driver attacked and
killed another with an ice
pick during a road rage
incident.
The owner of a towing Trayvon
company killed a man he Martin
claimed tried to run him over shot and killed
while retrieving his car from Feb. 26, shown
an impound lot. in an undated
A car salesman shot an-
other man in a barroom argument over
cigarettes.
A decorated Army veteran and father of
two was killed outside his elderly mother's
Cape Coral home after a neighbor mistook
him for a thief.
A drunken Land 0' Lakes man was shot,
but not killed, after he mistakenly tried the
door at the wrong house in his neighborhood.
A man chased and killed a burglar in
Miami and successfully claimed self-defense,
though he shot the man in the back.
The stories go on. How many are needed to
admit this law is a grave mistake?
The Trayvon Martin case may become an-
other miscarriage of justice, but don't fault
the Sanford police chief, the Sanford mayor
or the state attorney
This legacy belongs squarely on the shoul-
ders of former Gov Jeb Bush and the 133
state lawmakers who ignored the advice of
public safety experts for fear of crossing the
NRA.

Formerly a reporter for the Tampa Bay
Times and Orlando Sentinel, Susan Clary is
a freelance writer in Orlando. She maybe
reached at sclary@floridavoices.com.


ON THE NET
* Florida's "stand your ground" law sum-
mary: http://laws.flrules.org/files
/Ch_2005-027.pdf
* To access lists of how the 2005 state
lawmakers voted on this bill, click on
this story at www.chronicleonline.com.
2005 LOCAL VOTES
Citrus County lawmakers in 2005
voted in favor of CS/CS/SB 436 -
Protection of Persons/Use of Force:
* Sen. Nancy Argenziano yes, one of
28 co-sponsors in Senate.
* Sen. Mike Fasano- yes, one of 28
co-sponsors in Senate.
* Rep. Charlie Dean yes, not among 84
co-sponsors in House.
* Rep. Marco Rubio yes, one of 84
co-sponsors in House.
All Senate votes: 40 total possible
* Yea 39
* Nay-0
* Did not vote 1
All House votes: 120 total possible
* Yea 94
* Nay-- 20
* Did not vote 6
Source: www.myfloridahouse.gov


FLORIDA VOICES
* Florida Voices is a feature carried
periodically in the Citrus County
Chronicle. Florida Voices is a new media
company at the intersection of opinion
journalism, public affairs and
government. It provides a roundtable
forum regarding what influential people
think about key issues facing Florida
from differing perspectives.


Argenziano

returns

home to

Citrus
Nancy Argenziano,
one of the most ac-
complished
elected officials from our
area, has announced a re-
turn to politics in Citrus
County
As reported Thursday in
the Chronicle, Argenziano
is going to run against state
Rep. Jimmie Smith, R-
Inverness, in the Novem-
ber elections. She will run
as an Independent.
This is like former major-
league star Mike Hampton
announcing he's going to
return and pitch for Crystal
River High School.
For many years, Argen-
ziano has been playing in
the big leagues with gover-
nors, utility CEOs and Sen-
ate presidents. Now she is
going to come back to
where it all started.
She was first elected in
Citrus County to the
Florida House of Repre-
sentatives. She later went
on to serve in the Florida
Senate and was then ap-
pointed to the Public Serv-
ice Commission by Gov
Charlie Crist
She was frequently on
the front page of every
daily newspaper in the
state as she battled for
lower power costs and for
more controls over nursing
homes.
She was a Republican,
but she battled with many
of her own party's leaders.
When she left the Florida
Senate to take on the PSC
role, the leadership of her
own party was pretty
darned happy to see her go.
Seems she kept trying to
hold the GOP leadership
accountable and they did-
n't like that too much.
Sen. Charles Dean, R-
Inverness, took over her
seat in the Senate.
Argenziano felt the GOP
leadership was corrupted
by the special interests of
Tallahassee. When Gov
Crist lost his bid for the
GOP U.S. Senate nomina-
tion to Marco Rubio, Ar-
genziano's position on the
PSC was immediately in
jeopardy The new GOP ad-
ministration in Tallahassee
did not reappoint her
In the world of party pol-
itics, Argenziano has never
been one to go along to get
along. Fighting to the death
for her causes is more her
style.
The Brooklyn native first
got into politics because
she was concerned state
politicians were selling out
the water resources of
North Florida to satisfy the
growing need of some of
the fast-growing urban
centers.
When she first got
elected she championed
"Local Sources First" legis-
lation that made it much
more difficult for urban
politicians to grab water
from less-powerful small
counties.
She made news across
the nation when she had 25
pounds of cow manure de-
livered to an abrasive lob-
byist who scuttled one of
her bills. Instead of getting
criticized for the cow ma-
nure delivery Argenziano
won the admiration of
many Floridians for her
willingness to fight back
against the lobbyists and
power brokers.
She also infuriated a lot
ofpowerful people who felt
she made them look bad.
She stumbled recently


Page C4







Page C2 SUNDAY, MARCH 25, 2012



PINION


"Of the faults traditionally attributed to the democracy
one only is fairly chargeable on the United States ... the
disposition to be lax in enforcing laws disliked by any
large part of the population."
James Bryce, 1838-1922


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


UTRUS NTY U-MLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan............. .................. publisher
Charlie Brennan ............... .................. editor
Mike Arnold ............. .................. HR director
Sandra Frederick....................... managing editor
J Curt Ebitz............... .............. citizen member
Founded Mac Harris ............... ............citizen member
by Albert M.
Williamson Rebecca Martin ...........................guest member
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


GOOD NEWS/BAD NEWS




Compromise



'rule' finds a



middle ground


he U.S. Fish and Wildlife rules
Service backed off the safety
most controversial pro- the sou
posal on Crystal River's King's for th
Bay, but the compromise it ap- crafte(
proved still may not be enough proact
to avoid litigation, dates
Fish and Wildlife announced while
recently that a
new "rule" for
King's Bay was THE ISSUE:
going to be imple- The new "rule" fc
mented, but it King's Bay.
would not com-
pletely ban speed OUR OPINION
boats during the OUR OPINIOR
summer months A compromise.
as was originally
proposed. In-
stead, the new rule creates a manat
shorter 10-week sports zone has be
season and decreases the CE
speed maximum to 25 mph. ties to
The actions were imple- prohib
mented by the federal govern- An
ment because of growing the hi
concern for the safety of the banne
manatee population in King's *
Bay. When the originally pro- areas
posed restrictive regulations ing ver
were floated last summer, local L
reaction was strongly opposed exist
to the federal government's those 2
reach. A nonprofit opposition Whil
group called Save Crystal compr
River was formed and support both s
was won from the city of Crys- brate,i
tal River, the Citrus County the coi
Commission and the Florida The1
Legislature. Eventually the de- is still
bate went all the way to the becau,
Congress where Florida repre- rulema
sentatives argued that Fish ernme
and Wildlife was going too far. local a
The "rule" released March not co
15 showed that Fish and Man
Wildlife did react to the public are als
and official opposition. That's of the
the good news. permit
Protecting the manatees is with
important to all residents of CountN
Citrus County (and the nation), activity
but locals know that we have manat.
done more in this community also 1
than any place in Florida to sports
adopt rules and protect the an- cause
imal. Statistics show that the popul
local rules adopted to protect summE
the manatees have been suc- As n
cessful. is thai
In announcing the change to react t
the proposed "rule," Fish and back i1
Wildlife officials said they took and tt
seriously the local complaints again.
that abolishing the sports zone did ch.
during the summer would cre- The
ate safety issues for boaters compr
who tried to water ski in the will c
more narrow boundaries of the both in
Crystal River, and p
Admitting that the original Florid


Ceiling tiles ies. Are
You did great getting
garbage burners and OUND
eggs. Now I need to find
the old-fashioned 12-by- FF
12-inch ceiling tiles -
the type you staple to the
wood braces.
Live free or die
I believe it is foolish for CA
anyone to drive without a p 057
seatbelt on, especially in 563-0579
Citrus County. But a per-
sonal decision should not
be regulated by the government, ways he
Now some men in government ers. It is
want to tell women what they can again,J
and can't do with their own bod- day.


would have created a
problem, Cindy Dohner,
itheast regional director
ie agency, said: "We
d a common sense ap-
h that better accommo-
safe recreational use
also substantially reduc-
ing the risk of col-
lisions between
boats and mana-
:or tees."
The "rule" also
stipulates:
*i U The seven ex-
isting sanctuaries
will be main-
tained.
A year-round
ee refuge in King's Bay
en declared.
certain harassing activi-
the manatees will be
)ited.
ichorage of watercraft in
gh speed zone will be
d.
Temporary "no-entry"
will be designated dur-
ry cold weather.
limited exceptions will
for property owners in
zones.
.e the Fish and Wildlife
omise appears to give
ides something to cele-
it also doesn't mitigate all
ncerns of either side.
Save Crystal River group
contemplating a lawsuit
se members believe any
making by the federal gov-
nt that does not include
nd state agencies is just
institutional.
atee protection groups
o unhappy with portions
"rule" because it still
ts human interaction
the manatees. Citrus
y is the only place such
ies are permitted. The
ee protection groups are
unhappy the summer
zone will still exist be-
they claim the manatee
nation is growing in the
er months.
noted, the good news here
1 Fish and Wildlife did
o the very negative feed-
t got from Citrus County
hen analyzed the facts
After doing so, officials
ange their plan.
bad news, as with any
omise, is that this issue
continue to be debated
the halls of government
possibly the courts of
a in the months and


we turning into a Middle
East nation? We, as
Americans, need to take
back our country. Please
vote. No incumbents
should be left in power.
Thanks, ladies
I am calling to thank
the ladies from Citrus
Springs Mahjong, Judy
and Dee. Thanks to you, I
have found a lovely won-
derful group of ladies to
play mahjong with. They
are just great and we al-
ave enough to do for play-
s so wonderful. Thanks
Judy and Dee. Have a great


Obamacare's contract problem


On Monday the Supreme
Court begins three days of
oral arguments concerning
possible actually, probable and
various constitutional infirmi-
ties in Obamacare. The justices


have received many am-
icus briefs, one of which
merits special attention
because of the elegant
scholarship and logic
with which it addresses
an issue that has not
been as central to the
debate as it should be.
Hitherto, most atten-
tion has been given to
whether Congress,
under its constitutional
power to regulate inter-
state commerce, may co-
erce individuals into


Contracts to be binding must not be
made under any restraint or fear of
their persons, otherwise they are
void." Throughout the life of this
nation it has been understood that
for a contract to be valid, the par-


George Will
OTHER
VOICES


engaging in commerce by buying
health insurance. Now the Insti-
tute for Justice, a libertarian pub-
lic interest law firm, has focused
on this fact: The individual man-
date is incompatible with cen-
turies of contract law. This is so
because a compulsory contract is
an oxymoron.
The brief, the primary authors of
which are IJ's Elizabeth Price
Foley and Steve Simpson, states
Obamacare is the first time Con-
gress has used its power to regu-
late commerce to produce a law
"from which there is no escape."
And "coercing commercial trans-
actions" compelling individuals
to sign contracts with insurance
companies -"is antithetical to the
foundational principle of mutual
assent that permeated the com-
mon law of contracts at the time of
the founding and continues to do
so today"
In 1799, South Carolina's highest
court held: "So cautiously does the
law watch over all contracts, that it
will not permit any to be binding
but such as are made by persons
perfectly free, and at full liberty to
make or refuse such contracts. ...


ties to it must mutually
assent to its terms -
without duress.
In addition to duress,
contracts are voidable
for reasons of fraud
upon, or the mistake or
incapacity of, a party to
the contract This un-
derscores the central-
ity of the concept of
meaningful consent in
contract law. To be
meaningful, consent
must be informed and
must not be coerced


Under Obamacare, the govern-
ment will compel individuals to
enter into contractual relations
with insurance companies under
threat of penalty
Also, the Supreme Court in Com-
merce Clause cases has repeatedly
recognized, and Congress has
never before ignored, the differ-
ence between the regulation and
the coercion of commerce. And in
its 10th Amendment cases ("The
powers not delegated to the United
States by the Constitution, nor pro-
hibited by it to the states, are re-
served to the states respectively, or
to the people") the court has
specifically forbidden government
to compel contracts.
In 1992, the court held unconsti-
tutional a law compelling states to
"take title to" radioactive waste.
The court said this would be in-
distinguishable from "a congres-
sionally compelled subsidy from
state governments" to those who
produced the radioactive waste.
Such commandeering of states is,
the court held, incompatible with
federalism.
IJ argues: The 10th Amendment
forbids Congress from exercising


its commerce power to compel
states to enter into contractual re-
lations by effectively forcing states
to "buy" radioactive waste. Hence
"the power to regulate commerce
does not include the power to com-
pel a party to take title to goods or
services against its will." And if it
is beyond Congress' power to com-
mandeer the states by compelling
them to enter into contracts, it
must likewise be beyond Congress'
power to commandeer individuals
by requiring them to purchase in-
surance. Again, the 10th Amend-
ment declares that any powers not
given to the federal government
are reserved to the states or to the
people.
Furthermore, although the Con-
stitution permits Congress to make
laws "necessary and proper" for
executing its enumerated powers,
such as the power to regulate in-
terstate commerce, it cannot, IJ ar-
gues, be proper to exercise that
regulatory power in ways that
eviscerate "the very essence of
legally binding contracts." Under
Obamacare, Congress asserted the
improper power to compel com-
mercial contracts. It did so on the
spurious ground that this power is
necessary to solve a problem Con-
gress created when, by forbidding
insurance companies to deny cov-
erage to individuals because of
pre-existing conditions, it pro-
duced the problem of "adverse se-
lection" people not buying
insurance until they need medical
care.
IJ correctly says that if the court
were to ratify Congress' disregard
for settled contract law, Congress'
"power to compel contractual re-
lations would have no logical stop-
ping point" Which is why this case
is the last exit ramp on the road to
unlimited government
--in--
George Will's email address is
georgewill@washpost. com.



ZolW3



INOP8 BL!


_ LETTERS to the Editor


Thanks for support
The second annual Love Your
Library Evening was an enor-
mous success! Over 300 library
supporters joined together for
an enchanted evening among
the stacks at the Central Ridge
library branch and helped raise
a record $7,900 for the Citrus
County Library System, more
than doubling last year's total.
The Citrus County Library Sys-
tem and the Love Your Library
Planning Committee, including
representatives from various
Friends of the Library groups
and the Library Advisory Board,
would like to thank the commu-
nity for its enthusiastic support.
The committee would also like to
thank the tremendous efforts of
volunteers and staff that helped
to make the evening so enjoyable
for everyone.
Special thanks go out to the in-
dividuals, organizations, and
local businesses that sponsored
the event: "Page Master" spon-
sor, the Friends of the Central
Ridge Library; "Scholar" spon-
sors, the Friends of the Floral
City Library, Barnes & Noble,
the Beverly Hills Garden Club,
the Citrus County Chronicle,
Lemire Clinic and Walmart of
Inverness; "Editor" sponsors,
Citrus County Sheriff's Office,
Citrus Dental of Inverness, Excel
Printing, the Friends of the
Coastal Region, Homosassa, and
Lakes Region libraries, the
Hagar Group, the Law Office of


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in Chroni-
cle editorials are the opinions of
the newspaper's editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Groups or individuals are invited
to express their opinions in a let-
ter to the editor.
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at 352-563-5660.
All letters must be signed and in-
clude a phone number and home-
town, including letters sent via
email. Names and hometowns will
be printed; phone numbers will
not be published or given out.
We reserve the right to edit let-
ters for length, libel, fairness and
good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
350 words, and writers will be
limited to three letters per month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to
352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

Grant & Dozier, Leslie and Ken
Fraze, Michael D. Bays Insur-
ance Agency, New England Cafe
and Quest Wealth Management;
"Bookworm" sponsors, the Afro-
American Club of Citrus County,
Becky's Travel Store, Edward
Jones Investments, Scott Lee,
Justin Rooks; Sharon E & Ken-
neth D. Thompson, Stacy L. Wit-
fill, DPM, Dunnellon Podiatry
Center; VanAllen-Clifford Insur-


ance Agency; and Winn-Dixie of
Homosassa.
Without these sponsors who
believe in the library's mission of
community education, this event
would not have been possible. By
supporting this event, these indi-
viduals, organizations, and local
businesses have made concrete
contributions to benefit our com-
munity by promoting literacy
reading, and education for all.
Save the date and join us next
year on Feb. 15, 2013, for another
enchanted evening.
Eric C. Head
director, Citrus County
Library System

Bailout cost
The auto bailout has hurt mil-
lions of retirees to buy union
votes. These old people were
good-faith purchasers of the Gen-
eral Motors common stock and
corporate bonds prior to the bank-
ruptcy and had their investments
wiped out when Obama rewarded
UAW by stealing our ownership.
Furthermore, the American
taxpayers should be aware of
the fact that GM still owes them
$27 billion of bailout money yet
pays its union workers and offi-
cers very large bonuses and buys
million-dollar ads for the Super
Bowl. Just look at the Volt and
how much it has cost us while
being a failure.
Claude Strass
Homosassa


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Cruise calls for international diplomacy


On Feb. 4, Cheryl and I em- actually, a very specific recent
barked in San Francisco event that left a huge cruise ship
with Sydney as the ultimate on its side off the coast of Italy -
destination, but the voyage would we paid very close attention and


take almost a month
and there would be
many stops in between.
Upon boarding a
ship, there are a num-
ber of things to do to
make your trip as
pleasant and as safe as
possible.
As always, the first
thing we did was find
our cabin. We checked
out the accommoda-
tions to make sure they
were as we had booked


Fred Br
A SL
OF L


and to be sure we knew which was
the hot and which was the cold
water, as well as how to obtain the
correct voltage for our electrical
gadgets.
Within the first hour, we were
given safety instructions and par-
ticipated in a lifeboat drill. I used
to consider this an unnecessary
bother, but with recent events -


made sure we knew
precisely what to do
.4 and where to go if it
became necessary
Then, sort of like
moving into a new
neighborhood, we
began a tour to find all
of the shops, restau-
rants, lounges and
rannen clubs that would be a
-ICE part of our world for
IFE the next few weeks -
including, just in case,
finding the infirmary
It took only a few short hours to
become familiar with our sur-
roundings, but it would take a lit-
tle bit longer to get to know our
fellow passengers.
I failed to get an absolute count
by nationality, but an educated
guess is that the passenger list was
comprised of many, many differ-
ent nationalities, with the British,


Americans and Canadians in
that order making up at least 80
percent. Australians and New
Zealanders were also well repre-
sented; I met many who had flown
to San Francisco and were enjoy-
ing their extended holiday by sail-
ing home aboard this luxury liner,
the Queen Elizabeth.
Getting acquainted in this envi-
ronment is very much like it is in
any other you find yourself
standing in line or sitting in a
lounge and strike up a conversa-
tion. I think this is always a little
bit more interesting for me than
most folks; virtually no one ever
recognizes my accent as being that
of a native-born Florida cracker.
The Brits and Canucks usually
know right away that I'm not a
"Yank," but after that, they're
stumped. On this trip, however, I
had a couple of memorable en-
counters.
While talking with another
American, who was obviously in-
trigued by my Southern accent, he
teasingly asked, "What part of


Minnesota are you from?" Not to
be outdone, I replied, "The south-
ern part," and then explained my
heritage.
Even talking about the weather
was a challenge. Early one morn-
ing, a rather chatty lady from New
Zealand began to brief me on the
weather conditions outside. She
was talking away about the tem-
perature as measured in Celsius
- I don't get all that happy about
21 degrees and I was mentally
translating that into 70 degrees
Fahrenheit. I suppose I took too
long to respond and she asked,
"Do you speak English?" I replied,
"Yes, of a sort, but I speak Fahren-
heit, not Celsius, and had to do a
conversion before I knew whether
or not I agreed with your assess-
ment of the weather."
One of the more dramatic parts
of beginning any cruise is meeting
your tablemates those with
whom you will share your evening
meals. These individuals will be
an intimate part of your life
aboard ship and can either en-


hance or detract from the overall
experience. Cheryl and I have al-
ways been seated with folks we've
learned to enjoy, and this time was
no different. David and Kathryn
were fellow Americans from
Rhode Island and Bill and Mau-
reen were Canadians. No doubt
about it as a group we had our
eclectic eccentricities, but it did-
n't matter; we enjoyed ourselves
and each other. Personally, I be-
lieve my Cheryl has a gift for mak-
ing people feel welcome and her
friendliness is contagious.
It would take five days to reach
our first port, Honolulu. By that
time, though the weather was a bit
rough and the ship was, as the
captain put it, "taking a lumpy
ride," we had established that
both the accommodations and the
community bode well for smooth
sailing.


Fred Brannen is an
Inverness resident and a
Chronicle columnist.


Put plug in



regulatory overreach

"nor shall private property be taken for septic systems must be discouraged, but not
public use, without just compensation." prohibited, in favor of central wastewater
So reads, in part, the 5th Amendment to utilities. Runoff from roads and lots must
our Constitution. be collected and treated. Because we can-
M not, we ought not try to solve this problem
Our county commissioners and the overnight. It will require many years and
Chronicle Editorial Board, as well, major changes to how we use water
might benefit from contemplating Laws requiring costly septic inspections
the full meaning of the 5th Amendment at five-year intervals, supported by the
when they demand that private citizens pay Chronicle board, ignore the high costs to
to have legal septic systems re- private citizens for providing
moved for the "public use" of minimal benefits to the "envi-
protecting water quality. ronment" and the general pub-
The diminished quality of our lic. They take private property
ground water is the result of the for public use without just com-
tripling of population in Citrus pensation. The only certain ben-
County over the past 35 years. We eficiaries are companies that
could have predicted the effect J provide inspection services.
growth would have on our wa- When the county demands the
ters, had we given it some removal of legal, functioning
thought But, county commission- septic systems, in hopes that 10
ers 30 years ago would not have Dr. William Dixon years from now there might be
demanded of developers sewage OTHER some (most likely negligible)
systems be built locally or that VOICES benefit in water quality, it im-
developers and new home own- poses high costs on individuals
ers pay an impact fee great who are little impacted by water
enough to cover expansion of pubic waste- quality and who will not benefit from the
water facilities. They would have been con- costs imposed upon them. If the county can
cerned that doing so would price the county prove that removing a few dozen septics in
out of the market for new developments. the coastal area will have a measurable im-
That our waters are tainted and murky, pact on water quality, and that this is a ben-
clogged with foul algae blooms, reflects the efit to all the citizens, then all the citizens
pollution generated at least 15 years ago should pay for the removals. To do other-
when the county had 40,000 fewer resi- wise is to take private property from one
dents. Much more contaminated water is group of citizens, without just compensa-
on the way It cannot be halted no matter tion, in order to benefit another small
what measures we take today group of citizens who live near or utilize the
Increasingly contaminated water may waterways. This seems to be prohibited by
have a small impact on citizens served by the 5th Amendment, should anyone care.
water utilities as the costs to process Well-intended regulatory overreaching
ground water for drinking increase. Those such as this is symptomatic of what ails our
operating their own wells may need to add country today We should not sacrifice our
a filter to eliminate some contaminants. A constitutional rights for the sake of the en-
very small minority of citizens using the wa- vironment or anything else. We can find a
terways for recreation, for business or own- better way to attend to our needs.
ing property on the waterways will
experience a major impact from changes in
the water quality of rivers, lakes and the William Dixon graduated from Columbia
bay Loss of tourist revenue and related College in New York City, from New York
jobs as water quality declines would result Medical College and from the College of
in very small tax increase on all. For the Business Administration at the University
great majority of citizens, the cost of con- of South Florida. He was an assistant
taminated ground water is limited, professor at the University of Georgia and
To minimize continuing contamination of he has worked in the Veterans
ground waters, the residential use of fertil- Administration system. He served 11
izers containing nitrates and phosphates years in the Army as a surgeon and as
must be curtailed slowly, allowing time for special forces officer, achieving the rank
citizens to change the composition of their of lieutenant colonel. Dr Dixon can be
lawns and reduce watering. Use of private reached at Wdixonl6@yahoo.com.

Letters to the EDITOR


Scandinavia's support
My letter about Kathy Dobronyi's praise
of social justice and the welfare states of
Scandinavia has brought a reply letter not
about my attack on the evils of social justice
and wealth and income redistribution, but a
history lesson of World War II. Kathy takes
issue with my statement that "twice in the
20th century, the U.S. military was there to
defend them." She states that is simply not
true. Of course, she's dead wrong about that,
just as she is in her admiration of socialism.
In December 1941, America was called
not just to defend the countries of Scandi-
navia, but the entire world. Japan had been
on a rampage in China for four years and in
Europe, the British had been ejected from
the continent at Dunkirk. German forces
were within 17 kilometers of Moscow. The
Scandinavian countries had been under
subjugation for two years and had settled
into what might be called a state of collabo-
ration, Denmark and Norway openly and
Sweden covertly, to attempt to maintain
their "neutrality." Sweden allowed Ger-
many the use of its rail system during the
war to move troops, and provided it with
coal from start to finish. To suggest that the
Scandinavian countries arose and threw off
the Nazi yoke is ludicrous. When Germany
signed an unconditional surrender treaty
four years later, the Scandinavian countries
were liberated. America came to their de-
fense by defeating Nazi Germany
World War II was an American war We
had allies, but they were in dire circum-
stances in December of 1941 when we en-
tered the war That is why I devoted the


space to detail just how bad things were. I
submit that if America had not entered the
war, the Scandinavian countries would be
speaking German today If you want a frus-
trating experience, war-game World War II
without American participation.
During the Cold War, the Scandinavian
countries sat securely and safely under
America's nuclear umbrella, spent little on
their defense budgets and pursued social
welfare programs that would make a wel-
fare queen blush. They spent their national
treasure to enslave their citizens to the wel-
fare state.
Harley Lawrence
Homosassa

Legislative session
As a native of Florida, I must say I am sur-
prised by the lack of outrage here in Citrus
County for the actions taken this past leg-
islative session.
A $101 million slush fund for the governor
with no accountability? $800 million tax
credit for banks with no benefit to tax pay-
ers? A new university and we are cutting ed-
ucation statewide? Unfunded mandates to
counties, which are forced to raise taxes to
meet them? Wholesale environmental de-
struction which costs millions to fix? No fix
for the Progress Energy mess? No ethics re-
form? No homeowners insurance reform?
Cheap health insurance for themselves?
Government interference in private and
family matters? We should demand better
governance from our elected leaders.
Wayne B. Pass
Homosassa


Runway hit
The Runway for Rescues Fashion Show
held Feb. 25 at the Citrus County Re-
source Center was a huge success. The
winner of the $400 getaway package was
Terri Hartman. Citrus County Animal
Services Special Needs Fund received a
check from the fundraiser for $3,526.31.
A special thank-you from all the spe-
cial-needs animals that will be helped by
the proceeds from this fundraiser: Citrus
County Animal Services; New Concepts
Hair Salon; Citrus County Chronicle;
Coastal Trophy and Sign Company; Coun-
tryside Animal Clinic; Florida Pest Con-
trol; Friends of Citrus County Animal
Services; Homosassa Printing; Goin'
Postal Sugarmill; Kim's Kandy Kreations;
Plantation Animal Clinic; Sally Smith-
Adams Trio; TLC Animal Hospital; Val's
Boutique; Havana House Grill; Carol
Kobayashi; Janice Griffin; Lorraine
Clark; Margie Harper; Mary Clark; Mary
Sue Rice; Pati Valentine; Commissioner
Rebecca Bays; Commissioner John "'JJ3"
Kenney; Commissioner Winn Webb;
Suzanne Webb; Pauline Thomson; Debra
Stack; Cathy Pearson; Patty Amon; Chris
Vanerka; Sue Sphuler; Debi Shields;
Diane Preismeyer; Alma Parks; Brenda
Kenney; Terri Hartman; Trish Enberg;
Sharon and Dale Malm; Marty Landsei-
del; Carla Nicklas; Lois Thomas; Leslie
Martineau; Sue Schirmer; Lucy Ann
Wines; Helen Lefave; Pat Sheridan; Kim
Gaines; Babs Rice; Debbie Butler; Kathy
Lawson; Michele Roberts; Thomas Mott;
Mission in Citrus; Citrus County Parks
and Recreation; Cathy Farley; Carolyn
Moody; Shirley Jones; Chris Hornaday;
Joanne Peters; Larry Pearson; Chuck
Vanerka; Janet and Mike Sepella; Larry
Leons; Dylan Mason and Kriss Hornaday
You are the best!
Mary Lee Johnson and Joan Mott
fundraiser co-chairs


Obama in control
In reply to "GOP no bet-
ter": Where is this person
coming from? The Republi-
cans are not in power. It's
Obama and his minions
who will not allow us to
drill for oil we have in this
country.

Filibuster
This is regarding the call-
in (from) the person (who)
called March 22 saying this
person disputes the fact
that everything Obama has
tried to do for the past
three years has been
stopped by the Republican-
controlled Congress. Actu-
ally, everything Obama has
tried to do has been
stopped by the Republi-
cans. Yes, the Democrats
could get things through
the House, but the Republi-
cans in the Senate used
something known as the fil-
ibuster, whereby every sin-
gle Democrat and some
Republicans would have to
vote for what President


Thanks from Corvair club
The Nature Coast Corvair Club would
like to thank the Citrus County Chroni-
cle; Pati Smith with the city of Inverness
and the city's administrators and em-
ployees; the Citrus County Sheriff's of-
fice, especially Michelle Tewell and her
helpers; the Kiwanis Club of Inverness;
Citrus High School Key Club members
and their advisor Ms. "B"; the partici-
pants, club members; and the following
merchants and individuals for making
our 9th Annual Car Show on March 10,
2012, a great success: Advance Auto
Parts, Advanced Waste Solutions, Ad-
vantage Print & Designs, B & W Drugs,
B & W Restaurant, Bob and Barbara
Kinsman, Carter's Auto Recycling,
Charles E. Davis Funeral Home, Chil-
son's Garage, Cinnamon Sticks Restau-
rant & Bakery, Citrus County Cruisers,
Citrus High School photo teacher Ms.
Boudreau, Citrus Sod, city of Inverness,
Clark's Corvair, Collision Tech, Convert-
ible Top Specialists Inc., CTA Audio,
Chronicle photographer Dave Sigler,
Dave and Sylvia Langdon, Dynamic Per-
formance Coatings, Earnest Mail Con-
sulting Corp., Heinz Funeral Home,
Hooper Funeral Homes and Crematory,
Larry Brooks, Ice Cream D.R., Joe's
Deli, John and Karen Saxe, John
Zezuski and family, Kiwanis of Inver-
ness, Larry and Crestina Vaught, Mac-
donald Top Line Specialists Inc.,
McPherson Archery & Outdoor,
Michael's Floor Covering, Mike and
Linda Schlaudraff, Nick Nicholas Ford,
Ridgeline Tire & Service, Rustic Ranch
Restaurant, Savanna Boudreau, our
"Runner," Thumb Area Kids & Critters
4-H and U-Kill 'Em.
If I have forgotten anyone, please for-
give me and accept our thank you!
Kathy Neumann
treasurer, Nature Coast Corvair Club


Obama wanted. So they ef-
fectively stopped every sin-
gle thing that Obama
wanted to do.
Heart of issues
I'd like to say I enjoyed
very much "Lawmakers
chicken out," written by
Carl Hiaasen. It's very in-
formative not just this
one, but all of his articles.
We all know there's racism
in the world. We know
there's some bad white
people. We don't need to
read that every week from
a certain columnist (who)
writes in about such. This
is something we can use.
This is something that's
true. This is something
people need to know. The
Republicans are for every-
thing for somebody else.
They want to do away with
Medicare, but they want to
keep it for themselves. So I
know this, but not everyone
knows this. There wouldn't
be as many Republicans if
people really know what
they are at heart.


Not the GOP
I want to talk about
somebody (who) wrote in
about the Republicans
being the ones (who) put
down the oil pipeline. That
is totally incorrect. It's the
Republicans (who) voted for
it. It's Obama and the De-
mocrats (who) voted
against it. Obama even
called in the Senate, all the
Democrats, to tell them to
vote against it. So it was
not the Republicans.
Pious Democrats
In regards to "Thankful
Republican" in the Sound
Off on March 17: Someone
should inform her that a lot
of Democrats believe in
Jesus.
Christian Dem
To the Republican Chris-
tian in Saturday's (March
17) Sound Off: You make it
sound like there aren't any
Democratic Christians in
this country. I am a Democ-
rat and I am a Christian.


Thank-You LETTERS


= Hot Corner: REPUBLICANS


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, MARCH 25, 2012 C3






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Letter to the EDITOR


I LThTTOMYTUCKER BY TOMyRGER


County-wide broadband
Back in the '60s or '70s, maybe it made
sense that you needed a dedicated radio
network for county employees, but with
everyone having cell phones it may not
make sense today
Additionally, I challenge that the
county has embraced a technology that
requires expensive infrastructure that
would not be used directly by most
county residents. Possibly their choices
are driven by other historic decisions or
equipment, but I believe their thinking


limits the results. I challenge that a dif-
ferent county-wide system could be built
for the same price but would result in
county-wide broadband service available
to all. The suits need to think differently
I'm betting that reliable communica-
tion for emergency personnel is the fore-
most requirement, and a county-owned
network could be constructed that stays
on during storms and would be utilized
by all citizens.

William D. Holland
Homosassa


Hot Corner: ARGENZIANO


Vote for Argenziano
I want to welcome Nancy (Argenziano)
back to Citrus County. Wish she would run
against Charlie Dean. He's our sore thumb
right now. ... But whoever she runs
against, I'll vote for her.

Job hunting
Looks like Nancy Argenziano is looking
for a job any job she thinks she can get.
She's showing her true colors. She just
needs a job.


For the people
We'd like to say thanks to Nancy and
welcome her back into the political
roundup again. Hope she runs against
Charlie Dean. It would be nice to have
somebody to get the children back under
the sheriff if it's at all possible; somebody
(who's) for the people instead of for them-
selves and for their own Republican back-
ground instead of other things. And again,
welcome back and I thank you and you
got a vote.


Tommy Tucker is a Citrus County "Super Hero" who will guide you to a healthier lifestyle.
He is also the spokesperson against the abuse of alcohol, tobacco and prescription drugs.


WINDOW
Continued from Page C1

when she tried to run for a U.S.
Congressional seat in North
Florida. She left the GOP to run and
seek the Democratic nomination,
but she was stopped from doing that
because she had mistakenly regis-
tered as an Independent Party
member as opposed to a no-party-
affiliation candidate. She tried to


switch to the Democratic the GOP primary He has
Party, but had missed the been learning the ropes in
deadline and a lawsuit Tallahassee over the past
failed to win support two years.
Even though she is going The GOP is certainly the
to run as an Independent strongest organization in
in the local House race, Citrus County, but Nancy
she will be a formidable Argenziano has a mystique
candidate against the first- Nancy all her own. She will at-
term incumbent. Rep. Jim- Argenziano tract Independents, angry
mie Smith shocked the Republicans, tea-party
local political scene two years ago supporters and Democrats.
when he defeated veteran state I spoke with Rep. Smith on the
Rep. Ron Schultz, R-Homosassa, in night that Argenziano announced


The 2012 Citrus

County election

season just got a lot

more interesting.

and he was surprised and some-
what fatalistic about the coming
election. He said he was just fine
before he got elected to the Legis-
lature and would be fine if voters
made another selection this year.


It has got to be a daunting chal-
lenge for the freshman because
everyone familiar with local poli-
tics knows that Nancy Argenziano
has never lost an election.
The 2012 Citrus County election
season just got a lot more
interesting.
[]

Gerry Mulligan is the publisher
of the Chronicle. His email
address is gmulligan@
chronicleonline. com.


tospnsLrKBWnI thatmkor111


25
8th Annual Spring Concert
Citrus Community Concert Choir


Bluegrass Festival


26
Spring Book Sale


27
Spring Book Sale


28


29


30
8th Annual Spring Concert
Citrus Community Concert Choir


ACT: Dr. Cook's Garden


31
ACT: Dr. Cook's Garden

3.- 1 -. I!.. ail W I F1. ri
Sugarmill Woods Food Drive


Clean Air Bike Ride

Bluegrass @ The Blue Lodge




1 2 3 4 5 6 7
ACT: Dr. Cook's Garden Jazz Spring Concert ACT: Dr. Cook's Garden ACT: Dr. Cook's Garden

8th Annual Spring Concert Movies in the Park Hop
Citrus Community Concert Choir
Inverness Rotary Golf Tournament
Citrus Jazz Jam





8 9 10 11 12 13 14 Taste of Inverness
Music Festival
ACT: Dr. Cook's Garden ACT: Dr. Cook's Garden ACT: Dr. Cook's Garden
Camp Good Hope Golf Tourney
Relay For Life Crystal River Mel Tillis Fishing Tournament
Floral City Garden Club
Citrus Has Talent Plant Sale
K of C Annual Charity Ball
Starring Citrus County
Blood Screening


JANUARY
* Citrus Jazz Society Jam
SManatee Festival
Keys to Fashion West Citrus Ladies Elks
* Truck and Tractor Pull
A Winter Wonderland
SCRWC Shotime
Music in the Park
Beatles Tribute
SBook Festival
Concert at the Old Courthouse, The Porch Dogs
SEarly Childhood Expo
* West Citrus Elks Fashion Show
* ACT The Kids Left, The Dog Died, Now What?
James Roges Concert
SMusic in the Park Southern Sounds
* Light Shine The Ashley Gang Folk Songs & Florida

FEBRUARY
* Citrus Jazz Jam
* Taekwondo Women's Defense Class
* Mow It Dinner Beverly Hills Lions Club
* Best Friend Fest Citrus County Animal Services
* 2012 Festival of Books
* Rotary of Inverness Online and TV Auction
* Country Diamonds Show Beverly Hills Civic Assoc.
Jr. Achiement Bowl-A-Thon
SLight Shine
Dollars for Scholars Doo Wop
SFitness in Citrus begins
* Jazz Valentine Concert
* Crystal Oaks Military Card Party
* Cattle Barons' Ball American Cancer Society
* Yoga Day USA
* CF Performing Arts Series Cooking With
The Calamari Sisters
* Bartershoppers Singing Valentines
Citrus Springs Library Book Sale
SLove Your Library Evening
* ACT Moonlight and Magnolias
SSt. PatricWks Day Dinner Dance
SConcerned Citizen Commendation Award and Dinner
SWest Citrus Elks Book Sale and Flea Market
SKiwanis Concert Live
* Ozello Chili Cook Off and Craft Show
* Tricky Tray, CCW of St. Scholasica
* Purple Heart Ceremony
* Citrus Watercolor Show & Sale
* German American Club Celebrate Spring
* Celebrity Bartenders & Silent Auction
* Greek Festival
* Runway For Rescues
* Fashion Sweethearts
* Spring Fling Citrus County Craft Council
* Seminarian Dinner & Dance Knights of Columbus
* 8th Annual Kids Fishing Clinic Parks & Recreation
* Blessings in a Backpack
* Academy of Environmental Science Dinner
* Oscar Night 2012 "Promoting Literacy' SMW Rotary
* African American Read In
* 'School'astic Golf Tournament
* Chet Cole Casino Night

MARCH
* Luminary Art Nights
* Strawberry Festival
* Red Ribbon Tour of Homes
* Tricky Tray Crystal Oaks Civic
* Movies in the Park Kung Fu Panda 2
* Manatee Car & Truck Show
* Citrus Jazz Jam
* Tampa Bay Lightning vs. Ottawa Senators
* Habitat for Humanity Building Dreams
* Encore Ensemble The Last Dance of Dr. Disco
* Trivia Night -Kiwanis Central Ridge/Crystal River


* Will McLean Music Festival
* Friends of the Library Spring Book Sale
* Jim Blackshear Golf Tournament
* Nature Coast Corvair Car & Truck Show
* Dublin City Ramblers
* B&G 20th Anniversary Birthday Bash/Steak & Steak
* Homosassa Heritage Day
* Nature Coast Civil War Reenactment
* Benefit for Karen Dinner, Dancing, Entertainment
* Military Card Party Beverly Hills Recreation Assoc.
* Concert at the Old Courthouse, Jimmy Crowley
* St. Palrick's Day Dinner Dance
* Blood Drive Honor Larry Nestor
* Fort Cooper Days
* Inverness St Patrick's Day Parade
* Crystal River St. Patrick's Day Parade
Nature Coast Dragon Boat Festival
SMutt Strutt Parade
* St. Palrick's Day Golf Classic
St. Paddy's Pot of Gold Card Party and Luncheon
* All Mopar Car Show
* Crystal River Music in the Park
* Inverness Sertoma Club Golf Tournament
* Spring Book Sale Friends of Homosassa Library
* Scope it Out 5K
* Tampa Bay Lightening vs. NY Islanders
STeen Stock
SSwing into Spring Fashion Show
International Food & Ads Festival
Golf for Meals Citrus County Resource Center
SSteppin Out in Style
* Shrimpa-Palooza
* Withlacoochee Wildemess Canoe and Kayak Rally & Race
* Lakeside Craft Show
* Bluegrass Festival in Hemando
* Citrus County Fair
* ACT Dr. Cook's Garden
* 3rd Annual Spring "Eggsiravaganza
Sugarmill Woods Food Drive
SSugarmill Chorale
* We Care Food Pantry Golf Tournament
Floral City Library Friends March Book Sale
SClean Air Bike Ride
SBluegrass @ The Blue Lodge

APRIL
* ACT Dr. Cook's Garden
* Jazz Spring Concert
* Movies in the Park Hop
I* nverness Rotary Golf Tournament
SHomosassa Springs Easter Egg Hunt
* Citrus Jazz Jam
* Crystal River Relay For Life
* Citrus Has Talent
* Bluegrass & Oldlyme Music Festival
STaste of Inverness
SCamp Good Hope Golf Tournament
* Mel Tillis Fishing Tournament
* Floral City Garden Club Annual Plant Sale
* Annual Charity Ball Knights of Columbus
* Starring Citrus County Homosassa Elementary
* Central Citrus Rotary Blood Screening
* CF Performing Arts Ballet Folkorico
* Inverness Relay For Life
SWhen Elvis Came to Town
* Red Eagle Lodge Intertribal Pow-Wow
* American Irish Club Golf Tournament
*2012 Ram Truck Drawing We Care Food Pantry
* April Madness Basketball Tournament
* Ozello Adventure Race
* Citrus County Bass Challenge
* Sheriffs Summer Safety Expo
SVolunteer Fair
* Central Citrus Rotary Golf Classic
* United Way Spirit of the Community Awards Luncheon
* Letter Carriers Food Drive
* Cattlemen's Fish Fry


MAY
* Citrus Hills Information Fiesta
* Lecanto Relay For Life
* Cars in the Canyon
* Movies in the Park- Tangled
* Citrus County Gator Club Golf Tournament
* Sports Banquet
* Spring Ring Dinner Dance
*ACT Moon Over Buffalo
* Stamp Out Hunger
* World's Greatest Baby Shower
* Golden Citrus Scholar Awards
* Concert at the Old Courthouse, Spring Finale
* Winds, Rains or Flames All Hazards Expo
* 832 K-9 Deputy Dogs Golf Tournament
* Uons Spring Craft Fair
*ALLEGRO
* Wish Upon a Child Golf Tournament
* Covenant Children's Home Charity Fish Fry
* Light Shine
* Law Enforcement and FiRrst Responder Appreciation BBQ
* Music in the Park
JUNE
*Cobla Big Fish Tournament
SHomosassa Rreworks & Poker Run
*Fl Rag Day at Fort Cooper
* Rolling Thunder Independence Day Golf Tournament
* Music on the Square
*Citrus Jazz Jam
* Next Generation Professional Networking
*Rays vs. Red Sox Trip
*Red Kettle Bar-B-Q
* Concerts at the Courthouse
* Encore Ensemble Theater My Big Fat Italian Funeral
*Teen Stock
* Citrus Memorial "We Care" Golf Tournament
* Jim Blackshear Memorial Golf Tournament
* 832 K-9's Deputy Dog's Annual Golf Tournament
*Veterans Serving Veterans
* EncoreEnsemble The Pajama Party Murders
* Movies in the Park Happy Feet 2

JULY
* Patriotic Evening
* RFireworks over Kings Bay
* Key Training Center Celebrity Auction
* Key Run For the Money
* Key Center Telethon
* Family Fun Day Kings Bay Park
* Firecracker 5K
* Beverly Hills Recreation Military Card Party
* Uncle Sam's Scallop Jam
* Citrus Community Concert Choir Great Music
for Your Summer Enjoyment
* Movies in the Park Madagascar 2
* Chronicle Political Forum
AUGUST
* Rotary Club of Sugarmill Woods Arts and Crafts
* Pregnancy and Family Life Center Military Card Party
* So You Think You Can Dance Like A Star
* Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Fundraiser Golf Tourney
* Gator Club Kick Off
* Concert at the Courhouse Back 2 School Bash
* Citrus Community Concert Choir Great Music
for Your Summer Enjoyment
*The Other Volumn
* OC5K
* Movies in the Park Shark Tale
SEPTEMBER
* Harvest Moon Craft Show
* Veterans Golf Tournament


* Jazz Society Jam Session
* Citrus 20/20 Fundraiser
* Save our Waters Week
* Christmas in September
* United Way Kick Off
* Business Women's Alliance Health & Fitness Expo
* Industry Appreciation Luncheon
* Industry Appreciation Week EDC Barbecue
* 832 K-9's Deputy Dog Fundraiser
* VFW Post 10087 Golf Outing
* Friends of the Library Fall Book Sale
* Music on the Square
SCF Professional Development Series
* Two Good Soles
* Maltt Curley Memorial Blood Drive
* Barbecue Blast
Under One Roof Campaign Auction
SPage it Fomrward
* Sunset Festival
* Country Western Hoedown Cruise
SBeat the Sheriff Race
* Movies in the Park G-Force
OCTOBER
SSertoma Oktobedest
* Okloberfest German American
* Bikes and BBQ
Habitat For Humanity Golf Tournament
SJazz Jam
Rails to Trails Bike Ride
SArtisans Boutique
SGreat American Cooler Festival
SDay of Caring/Make a Difference Day Food Drive
* National Wildlife Refuge Week
* Scarecrow Festival
* West Citrus Elks Arts & Crafts Show
* Cooter Blast
* Harvest Time Festival
* Haunted Tram Ride
SCooterween
Greek Festival
Spike Fitzpatick Memorial Golf Tourney
SHaunted Halloween
SHernando Heritage Days
Comedy Night at Citrus Springs
SSwing for a Cure
* Nerieds Military Card Party
SLakeside Craft Show
SChamber Business Expo
* Nature Coast All Veterans Reunion
* Citrus Garden Club Shades of Autumn
* Fr. Willie Classic Golf Memorial
*2nd Annual Ford Car & Truck Show
* Car Show for Charity
* We Care Golf Tournament
SA Night at the Museum
SCitrus Springs Memorial Library Fall Book Sale
* Jazz Goes to Movies
* Nature Coast Fine Arts and True Crafts Show
* Citrus "Haunted" Hills 5K
* Page it Forward
* Make a Difference Day
Authors Fair
SRobby Brown Memorial Golf Tournament
CASI Chili Cook Off
* Movie on the Square
* Ladies of the West Citrus Elks Fall Card Party
* Light Shine
* Art Fair and Auction
* Halloween Scramble for Hospice
* Candlelight Vigil
SFall Ring
SHealth & Wellness Fair
* Political Forum

NOVEMBER
* BH Lions Foundation Craft Fair


* InglislYankeetown Arts and Seafood Festival
* Festival of The ArtMs
* Jazz Society Jam
* Rotary Blood Screening
* Blues & Bar-B-Que
* Veterans Fair
* Veterans Day Parade/Memorial Service
* Veterans Appreciation Show
* Stone Crab Jam
* CCBA Home & Outdoors Show
* Carth Camp Challenge
* Parade of Trees
* Citrus Stampede Rodeo
* Winter Wonderland Craft Show
* Ozello Arts & Crafts Festival
* Jazz Concert
SFriends of the Homosassa Library Book Sale
SSOS Golf Tournament
* Festival of the Arts Wine Tasting
* Veteran's Appreciation Week
* Annual Christmas Toy Run
* King's Bay 5K Run
* Hospice Tree of Remembrance
* Concert at the Old Courthouse, Jim Hurst
* Inverness Fall Classic
* BFF Society Fashion Show
* Light Shine Dunnellon Concert Singers
Silver Jubilee Fashion Show
SPrecious Paws Fundraiser
Recycle Day
Never Forget 5K RunfWalk
* Kiwanis Pancake Breakfast
* Cooking for a Cause
* Wish Upon a Child Golf Tournament
* K-9 Kamival
* Cut-a-thon
* Citrus Community Concert Choir's Messiah
* Music in the Park
* Encore Ensemble Win, Lose or Die
DECEMBER
SFather Christmas Ball
Fort Cooper State Park Nights of Lights
SFloral City Heritage Days
Beverly Hills Christmas Parade
SChristmas Craft Show
*CRWC Silver Bells
* Crystal River Christmas Parade
* Jazz Holiday Concert
* Jazz Jam
* Inverness Christmas Parade
* Homosassa Boat Parade
SSugasmill Chorale Chrisnmas Concert
* Airboat Christmas Parade
* Citrus Springs Holiday Parade
* Nutcracker Ballet
* Celebration of Lights
* ACT Richard Gilewitz
* Inverness Winter Celebration
* ACT- Halvan Youth Theatre
SFrusty's Winter Wonderland
* Annual Holiday Party
* Suncoast Business Masters Auction
* Rotary of Sugarmill Woods Golf Tournament
* Beverly Hills Recreation Center Military Card Party
* Citrus Springs Rockin the Holiday
* Citrus Springs New Year's Eve Ball
* Send Them To Serve Golf Tournament
* IOTATV and Online Auction
* Citrus Community Concert Choir's Messiah
* Make a Smile Happen
* Music in the Park
* Adopt a Christmas Tree
* Elvis & Friends
* Encore Ensemble Win, Lose or Die


C4 SUNDAY, MARCH 25, 2012


COMMENTARY












BUSINESS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Unemployed woes


Hiring bias

rears its head
STEPHEN SINGER
Associated Press

HARTFORD, Conn.
Few job seekers who
fail to get an inter-
view know the rea-
son, but Michelle
Chesney-Offutt said a re-
cruiter told her why she
lost the chance to pitch for
an information technology
position.
The 54-year-old, who had
been laid off from her IT
job in Illinois, said the re-
cruiter who responded to
her online resume two
years ago liked her qualifi-
cations and was set to
schedule an interview. But
he backed away, she said,
when he learned she had
been out of work for 13
months.
The employer he repre-
sented would not consider
applicants who were un-
employed for more than
six months, she said.
"What they don't con-
sider is that these are not
normal times," said
Chesney-Offutt, who was
unemployed for nearly
three years before landing
a job.
As high unemployment
persists more than four
years after the start of the
Great Recession and
nearly three years after it
was officially declared
over many who have
struggled for years without
work say they face discrim-
ination. Nearly 13 million
Americans, or 8.3 percent,
were unemployed in Feb-
ruary, the U.S. Department
of Labor says.
As of January, California,
Connecticut, Florida, Iowa,
Michigan, Minnesota, Ne-
braska, New York, Ohio,
Pennsylvania, South
Dakota and Tennessee
were considering legisla-
tion to prohibit employers
from discriminating
against the unemployed in
help-wanted ads or in di-
rect hiring or in screenings
by employment agencies,
according to the National
Conference of State
Legislatures.
Employers typically
would face fines if found
violating the law. The Ore-
gon Legislature, for exam-
ple, voted last month to
fine employers $1,000 if
they post a job ad telling
unemployed workers to not
apply The bill is awaiting
action by the governor.
Some personnel man-
agers say evidence of dis-
crimination is sketchy and


Bruce Williams
SMART
MONEY


Associated Press
Michelle Chesney-Offutt poses in her home Thursday, March 22, before leaving for work as an insurance customer
service representative in Sandwich, III. Chesney-Offutt, who was unemployed for nearly three years before landing a job,
said a recruiter who responded to her online resume two years ago liked her qualifications and was set to schedule an
interview. But he backed away, she said, when he learned she had been out of work for 13 months.


that hiring decisions are
based on a host of subjec-
tive reasons that defy
remedies imposed by laws.
"There's much more
subliminal discrimination
against the unemployed
that's hard to document,"
said Lynne Sarikas, direc-
tor of the MBA Career
Center at Northeastern
University's College of
Business Administration.
"Hiring is an art, not a sci-
ence. You rely on a gut
reaction."
For example, employers
may suspect that an unem-
ployed applicant is seeking
an available job for the
wrong reasons, she said.
"A manager is going to
get the vibe that they'll
take anything to get a job
and if something better
comes along they're out the
door," Sarikas said.
Also, some long-term un-
employed applicants may
come across as too urgent
for work, "and desperation
doesn't translate well in an
interview," she said.
Terri Michaels, who
manages a Hartford em-
ployment firm that prima-
rily staffs temporary
employees, criticized hir-
ing practices that screen
out unemployed job seek-
ers. Despite the policies of
small staffing companies
such as hers, some large
employers have an unspo-
ken policy against hiring
applicants who've been out
of work for two years or
more because they want
workers with a stable job


history and recent refer-
ences, she said.
"They won't be able to
say it but they'll act on it,"
said Michaels, manager of
Stewart Staffing Solutions.
Employers generally ex-
pect job candidates even
while unemployed to
show they did some work
such as volunteering or
working temporary jobs,
she said.
"People who did not
work in any capacity, didn't
do anything are not as de-
sirable to prospective em-
ployers," Michaels said.
"One has to question, is
that discriminatory? I don't
know."
Michaels said employers
may use unemployment to
weed out applicants for no
other reason than to cut
down a huge number of re-
sumes for coveted job
openings.
"When you have 14 mil-
lion unemployed, every-
one is applying for
everything," she said. "You
have to be somewhat dis-
criminating."
A New Jersey lawmaker
who co-sponsored the na-
tion's only law barring ads
that restrict applicants to
those already with a job,
agrees that job hunters
need to show they've been
active, even in
unemployment
"Don't sit at home. Make
yourself available to your
community," said Assem-
blywoman Celeste M. Riley
Still, she said she backed
the legislation after col-


leagues showed her em-
ployment ads specifying
that the unemployed
should not bother applying.
"I found that absolutely
reprehensible," Riley said.
"When you apply for a job,
you should be viewed
based on your skill level,
not whether you have a job
or not."
Connecticut lawmakers
are proposing legislation
that would ban discrimina-
tory job ads, but may back
off from a more far-
reaching provision that
would permit unemployed
job seekers who claim dis-
crimination to file a com-
plaint with the state's
human rights commission
or sue in court.
The largest business
group in the state, the Con-
necticut Business & Indus-
try Association, sees a ban
on discriminatory job ads
as reasonable, but lobbyist
Kia Murrell said busi-
nesses will fight efforts to
give workers the right to
sue over claims of
discrimination.
"You as the employer
will be shaking in fear of a
claim of unemployment
discrimination," she said.
The state's human rights
commission told lawmak-
ers that substantiating bias
in hiring would be difficult
and could require its staff
to be nearly doubled if just
a small fraction of Con-
necticut's 150,000 unem-
ployed were to file a
discrimination claim.
State Sen. Edith Prague


and Rep. Bruce Zalaski,
who head the legislature's
Labor and Public Employ-
ees Committee, said they
may drop the provision al-
lowing claims of
discrimination.
"It's not our intent that
everyone can be sued,"
Zalaski said.
The National Employ-
ment Law Project, based
in New York, wants states
to add laws that do more
than ban discriminatory
ads. Laws should explicitly
prohibit employers and
employment agencies from
eliminating from consider-
ation candidates who are
unemployed, the advocacy
group says.
"You want to tell em-
ployers they can't screen
workers out of the process
because they're unem-
ployed," said George Went-
worth, a lawyer for the
group.
Chesney-Offutt, of Sand-
wich, Ill., said she took a 4-
hour-a-week job teaching
voice lessons so she could
tell prospective employers
she was employed.
"They didn't care I was
unemployed," she said.
"They just wanted to know
if I could teach voice
lessons."
The strategy worked and
she eventually got a job in
insurance customer serv-
ice, taking calls from cus-
tomers reporting claims. It
doesn't allow her to use
her information technol-
ogy skills, but she's glad to
be working.


Use the power of networking to help net work


couple of months ago we
talked about the upcoming
Sources of Hire survey con-
ducted each January for
the past decade by Ca-
reerXroads. The survey
provides a snapshot of
how large, highly-
competitive firms find
their employees. The
idea is that tracking and
monitoring the sources
of hire not only tells com- f
panies where to dedicate
their hiring resources Laura
but it also tells job seek- WORK
ers how to focus their CONNI
efforts.
In 2009 and again in
2010, half the hires among compa-
nies such as PepsiCo, Dell, Hilton,
GE and Lockheed Martin were
made through internal promotions
or other staff movement.
But in 2011, according to the re-
port released late last month, inter-
nal hires dropped to 41 percent.
That means that for the first time
since the Great Recession, corpora-
tions are looking outside to fill the
majority of their job openings.
The survey looked at the hiring
practices of 36 top companies with a
combined workforce of 1.23 million,
of which 213,375 employees were
added to the payrolls last year


B

IF
I
E


Of those, 28 percent came from
referrals.
While no one source is mutually
exclusive, referrals have
remained the leading
source of external hires
since the survey's incep-
tion, even while other
sources' popularity have
waxed and waned, re-
gardless of the vagaries
of the economy
Referral by any other
rnes name is simply a word-
3yrnes of-mouth endorsement or
FORCE recommendation we
CTION make countless times
every year, profession-
ally and socially Think
about it. How many times have you
told someone they should check out
a new car or vacation spot, attend a
workshop, try a new recipe or
smartphone, watch a TV show, read
the latest bestseller or view a
YouTube video?
We do this third-party testimonial
all the time with colleagues,
friends, employees, family mem-
bers, vendors, customers/clients,
alumni, neighbors, the cashier at
our favorite grocery, even total
strangers. Simply put, we're net-
working. Sure there's an art to it,
but it's not rocket science.
Why is networking important


If you can't think of anyone this time around,
then please share the information whenever
and wherever you may, whether it is at the
office, in line at the supermarket, at your kid's
Little League game, after church, waiting for a
dentist appointment ... you get the idea.


here in Citrus County or indeed in
Workforce Connection's three-
county region? It's important for the
same reasons we belong to our
chambers of commerce, are mem-
bers of professional organizations
and attend business events. Be-
cause those interactions develop
into relationships which in turn be-
come supportive networks that can
help make things happen.
It is said it takes a village to raise
a child. Part of that is the simple
truth that raising a child isn't easy
and after all, it is also said that
many hands make light work. There
is also the recognition that each of
us has the power to influence who
that child grows up to be and ulti-
mately what they accomplish.
Lastly, there is the hope that once
we've made our contributions, once
we've led by example be it by
paying school taxes, mentoring,
coaching, teaching that child will


pay it forward by giving back to
their community In short, members
of the "village" have a vested, sym-
biotic interest in its children, even
if not their own.
In much the same light, as we all
have a stake in the economic well-
being of our communities, we can
all have a hand in making that hap-
pen. It may be easier than you think
because all you have to do is tap
into the power of referral. This
week, Workforce Connection
launched NetWorker, an e-bulletin
we're sending to our partners and
local influencers. Each NetWorker
highlights a handful of jobs, pro-
vides mini-resumes of qualified job
candidates and profiles a local em-
ployer who benefited from one of
Workforce's business development
services.
All we ask is that if you know


Page D4


Only



way



out?

DEAR BRUCE: I am
55 years old, and in
2010 I was di-
vorced after 22 years of
marriage. I had to sell my
4,000-square-foot home in
a short sale, my business
of 20 years closed, I had a
$420,000 deficiency as a
result of a short sale on a
piece of commercial
rental property I had for
15 years, and two other
commercial rental prop-
erties went as deeds in
lieu of foreclosure.
I am $35,000 in debt on
personal credit cards, and
I have a $15,000 auto loan.
I have a $41,000 business
line of credit-I signed as
personal guarantor, and
the final judgment was
filed against both my ex-
husband and me. For the
$420,000 short sale, the de-
ficiency final judgment
was filed against me as
sole guarantor. I owe the
IRS $10,000 (negotiated
down from $50,000 since I
closed the business) and
$7,800 to the Florida De-
partment of Revenue.
For five months last
year, I took a temporary
job doing lease abstract-
ing and a part-time book-
keeping job I still have,
and I work on commission
in upholstery sales as an
independent contractor
My goal right now is to
pay the IRS first, then the
Florida Department of
Revenue. Next would be
to negotiate down my
credit card debt to 25
cents on the dollar. With
the two judgments, I can
either attempt to negoti-
ate them and pay tax on
1099-C income, or I can't
own anything for 20 years
and they will go away, but
I would be at risk for gar-
nishing of my bank ac-
count or wages (if
applicable).
I've been to two bank-
ruptcy attorneys and have
already lost a $500 deposit
... but I can't bring myself
to do it. I've always had
stellar credit and am a
very responsible person.
My credit score is 658.
(The business real estate
loan is not on the credit
report yet, and the two
deeds in lieu of foreclo-
sure were with a private
investor and won't report)
What do you advise? -
J.M., Tampa, Fla.
DEAR J.M.: It's hard to
imagine things crumbled
as quickly as they did. I'm
not sure about the reasons
for all the problems, and,
frankly, at this point it
doesn't matter much.
You mentioned you
went to two different
bankruptcy attorneys and
put down a deposit but
then couldn't bring your-
self to do it. I understand
you have always been a
responsible person, but
the reality is that given
your age and situation, I
don't see how in the world
you are ever going to dig
yourself out of this one un-
less lightning strikes.
When you see the next
bankruptcy attorney, sit
and listen to what he or
she has to say Obviously,
we're talking about Chap-
ter 7 on your business and
personal life rather than
any sort of reorganization
(Chapter 11). Your credit
score is in the toilet.
See Page D4





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Business DIGEST

Realtors Association of Citrus County


Special to the Chronicle
The 2012 Board of Directors for the Realtors Association of Citrus County, from left, are: Isaac Baylon, Greg Younger,
Debbie Rector and Gary Baxley, directors; Rob Tessmer Jr., secretary; Sherri Orendorf, director; Sarah Spencer, presi-
dent; Dennis Pilon, past president; Bonnie Rosenberger, executive officer; John Maisel, director; Cheryl Lambert, pres-
ident elect; and Dennis Loger, treasurer.


Special to the Chronicle
From left are lymphedema-trained therapists Mary Agnew-
Geraca (physical therapist assistant), Wilbert Anoos (phys-
ical therapist) and Janice Lambert (occupational therapist).


Life Care Center offers

lymphedema services


Free workshop
in Spring Hill
CredAbility is one of the na-
tion's leading, nonprofit coun-
seling agencies. It provides
free, bilingual counseling serv-
ices, including foreclosure pre-
vention, confidential budget and
bankruptcy counseling, and
debt management programs.
In addition, CredAbility hosts
regular free, open-to-the-public
workshops, offering local resi-
dents the opportunity to gain
understanding on a variety of
financial wellness topics and
issues.
First-Time Home Buyers
Workshop 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Saturday, April 14, at Career
Central, 7361 Forest Oaks
Blvd., Spring Hill. Learn the ins
and outs and helpful tips for
buying your first home. Have
important questions answered
about securing a loan, avail-
able tax credits and more.
RSVP to 800-251-2227.
Village market set
in Dunnellon
The Historic Village mer-
chants of Dunnellon invite
everyone to the First Saturday
Village Market, which runs
from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday,
April 7. Stroll down West Penn-
sylvania Avenue to Cedar
Street and then up to Walnut
and Chestnut streets. This
event features vendors selling
their arts and crafts, as well as
people selling homemade
goodies. All of the shops will be
open for business as usual.
For information, call 352-
465-2225 or 352-465-7957.
Pharmacist joins
advocacy group
Local pharmacist Richard
Hoffmann and his wife, Mar-
garet, recently joined the
Parkinson's Disease Founda-
tion's national network of
Parkinson's Advocates in Re-
search. Parkinson's Advocates
in Research is a growing net-
work of 156 specially trained
people from 36 states who


work to influence research and
speed the development of new
treatments for Parkinson's


disease.
These
people (re-
ferred to as
PDF Re-
search Advo-
cates) are
actively col-
laborating
with re-
search pro-
fessionals,
government
agencies
and private
industry to


Richard
Hoffmann
doctor of
pharmacy and
Chronicle
columnist.


ensure that the unique per-
spectives of people touched by
Parkinson's disease are in-
cluded in research decisions
and implementation.
From March 7 to 10, the Hoff-
manns joined 23 other people
representing the Southern re-
gion of the United States in
Stone Mountain, Ga., to com-
plete an intensive three-day
training program focusing on the
science of Parkinson's disease
and the process that brings new
treatments to market.
The faculty included national
experts from Emory University,
the University of Alabama and
Baylor College of Medicine.
This diverse group of educa-
tors, nurses, former military
personnel and other profes-
sionals all people with
Parkinson's and their care part-
ners were chosen through a
competitive application process
open to those from 14 states in
the Southern region and
Puerto Rico.
Parkinson's disease is a pro-
gressive neurological disorder
that affects nearly one million
people in the United States. Al-
though promising research is
being conducted, there is cur-
rently no cure for Parkinson's.
Hospital's parent
company honored
For the third year in a row,
Hospital Corporation of Amer-
ica (HCA), the parent company


of Pasco/Hernando County
hospitals, Medical Center of
Trinity, Oak Hill Hospital and
Regional Medical Center Bayo-
net Point, has been recognized
by the Ethisphere Institute as
one of the 2012 World's Most
Ethical Companies. This is the
sixth year Ethisphere, a think-
tank dedicated to the creation,
advancement and sharing of
best practices in business
ethics, corporate social respon-
sibility, anti-corruption and sus-
tainability, has published the
World's Most Ethical Compa-
nies rankings, which appear in
Ethisphere Magazine's Q1
issue.
HCA's long-standing, indus-
try-leading ethics and compli-
ance program has served as a
model for others. "This recogni-
tion from the Ethisphere Insti-
tute is particularly meaningful
to all of us at HCA because it is
based on the totality of our or-
ganization's efforts and per-
formance," said Alan Yuspeh,
HCA's senior vice president
and chief ethics and compli-
ance officer.
"It reflects not only an ener-
getic ethics and compliance
program, but also our dedica-
tion to patients, our support for
communities we serve, our
generosity of spirit in providing
charity care, our focus on sus-
tainability, and our culture of
integrity."
The 2012 list is the largest
since the award's inception in
2007. Through in-depth re-
search and a multi-step analy-
sis, Ethisphere reviewed
nominations from companies in
more than 100 countries and
36 industries.
The methodology for the
World's Most Ethical Compa-
nies includes reviewing codes
of ethics, litigation and regula-
tory infraction histories; evalu-
ating the investment in
innovation and sustainable
business practices; looking at
activities designed to improve
corporate citizenship; and
studying nominations from
senior executives, industry


Special to the Chronicle
peers, suppliers and
customers. LECANTO Life Care
"Each year, the competition Center of Citrus County, a
for World's Most Ethical Compa- skilled nursing and rehab
nies intensifies as the number of facility in Lecanto, is now
nominations submitted for con- offering lymphedema ther-
sideration grows," said Alex This is the area's first lym-
Brigham, executive director of phedema treatment pro-
Ethisphere. "This year's winners gram managed by
know that a strong ethics pro- lymphedema-certified ther-
gram is a key component to a apists. Lymphedema, the
successful business model, and swelling of a body part
they continue to scrutinize their caused by an excess of pro-
ethical standards to keep up tein-rich fluid in the af-
with an ever-changing regula- fected area, can occur in the
tory environment." face, neck, abdomen or
The methodology for the groin, as well as the most
WME ranking includes review- common areas, the arms
ing codes of ethics, litigation and legs.
and regulatory infraction histo- "Lymphedema currently
ries; evaluating the investment has no cure," shared Janice
in innovation and sustainable Lambert, occupational ther-
business practices; looking at apist and one of the three
activities designed to improve lymphedema-certified ther-
corporate citizenship; and apists at the facility "With
studying nominations from sen- complete decongestive ther-
ior executives, industry peers, apy, it can be managed with
up iversndcustreers return to its latency stage. As
suppliers and customers. a lymphedema therapist, I
Read about the methodol- can help people who have
ogy and view the complete list this disease achieve a signif-
of the 2012 World's Most Ethi- icantly higher quality of life."
cal Companies at http://ethi- The facility's program in-
sphere.com/wme/. cludes manual lymph
drainage, multi-layered
See Page D4 bandaging, patient educa-


tion on skin and nail care,
remedial exercises and
compression garment appli-
cation.
Lambert and her col-
leagues, Mary Agnew-Ger-
aca, a physical therapist
assistant, and Wilbert
Anoos, a physical therapist,
treat inpatients and outpa-
tients.
To receive lymphedema
therapy, patients must ob-
tain a physician's prescrip-
tion for the program.
For more information
about the lymphedema pro-
gram at Life Care Center of
Citrus County, call the rehab
department at 352-249-4523.
Life Care Center of Citrus
County, at 3325 W Jerwayne
Lane, is one of 21 skilled
nursing and rehab centers
in Florida operated or man-
aged by Life Care Centers of
America.
Founded in 1976, Life
Care is a nationwide health
care company With head-
quarters in Cleveland,
Tenn., Life Care operates or
manages more than 220
nursing, post-acute and
Alzheimer's centers in 28
states. For information
about Life Care, visit
http://lcca.com.


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BUSINESS





Promotional information provided by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce


numberr connection
28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


D3

SUNDAY
MARCH 25, 2012


Chamber After-Hours Networking Mixer March 29


Please join us Thursday,
March 29, at Sandy Oaks RV
Resort for a Chamber After-
Hours Networking Mixer from
5 to 7 p.m.
At 6760 N. Lecanto Highway
in Beverly Hills north of Del-
tona Boulevard, Sandy Oaks RV


Resort is a roomy, quiet RV Re-
sort sitting on 40 acres with 150
active full hookup sites.
They offer a 3,200-sqare-foot
clubhouse with big-screen TV,
large fireplace and kitchen, a
large heated pool adjacent to
the clubhouse with more than


5,000 square feet of furnished
sun deck surrounding the pool
and clubhouse.
Free cable TV for nightly and
weekly stays and free WiFi
throughout the park.
Bring your business cards
and mingle with business pro-


fessionals like yourself!
For additional information
about Sandy Oaks RV Resort,
visit their website at
www.sandyoaksrvresort.com
For more information about
this event, please call the
Chamber at 352-795-3149.


Winning Enterprise


Local success
story featured
in national
newsletter
T he America's Small I
Business Develop-
ment Center
(ASBDC) Network
recently featured
an article highlighting the
success of a local business
that is part of the Citrus
County Economic Develop-
ment Council's Citrus Enter-
prise Center in Homosassa.
Cassidy's Transport has oc-
cupied a space at the Enter-
prise Center since the
beginning of the year.
"Even though I had years
of experience in freight bro- .;B
kerage and felt that I would
succeed in my own venture
in the same field," said
Kelly Burdett, "I wanted
some objective advice and
direction to achieve the mo-
mentum I wanted for my
own business that's ex-
actly what I got from Mike
Orlito, SBDC at UNF's Cit-
rus County representative."
Kelly Burdett has 25 years
of experience in the freight
brokerage industry, having
initially begun as a freight
dispatcher in a family busi-
ness growing to assume nomic Development Council
responsibility for billing, ac- and the Chamber of Com-
counts receivable, accounts merce. After learning about
payable and payroll. the features and benefits of
Ultimately, Ms. Burdett this facility, we became in-
assumed 50 percent owner- terested in becoming ten-
ship of the family business ants of the new incubator
and directed operations for project. Mike walked us
two years prior to leaving to through every step of the
form her own company in application process includ-
2011. ing developing a business
"Mike initially put us on plan and financial projec-
the trail toward expanding tions."
our business with some Cassidy's Transport was
thoughtful advice on net- approved in November 2011
working, sales and market- as the first tenant of the Cit-
ing techniques to grow our rus Enterprise Center, Ho-
customer base and ways to mosassa office. The firm
organize outreach to our ex- created two new jobs as
isting and past customers." they became located in the
Continuing, Kelly said, center in January 2012.
"Later, Mike suggested that Cassidy's Transport
we visit the newly renovated makes the process of secur-
Citrus Enterprise Center, a ing a shipper quite easy
business incubator project with one-stop shopping.
of the Citrus County Eco- Though a freight broker



April 13:


Chamber

Membership


Luncheon


Don't miss our
guest speaker! ,
The monthly Chamber Membership
Luncheon will be Friday, April 13, at Cit-
rus Hills Golf & Country Club.
This event is sponsored by Charitable
Donations USA Inc. and networking starts
at 11:30 a.m., with lunch immediately fol-
lowing.
For more information about Charitable
Donations USA, please visit their website
www.charitabledonationsusa.com or call
John Pyle at 352-699-0000.
Our guest speaker will be Aubrey
Brown, manager of Regional Develop-
ment for CSX Transportation. He will
share the future plans CSX has for our
area, and will be able to answer questions
from the audience.
To make your reservation, please visit
www.citruscountychamber.com or call
352-795-3149.


plays an important role in
the movement of cargo, the
broker doesn't function as a
shipper or a carrier. In-
stead, a freight broker
works to determine the
needs of a shipper and con-
nects that shipper with a
carrier willing to transport
the items at an acceptable
price.
Cassidy's Transport is a
full-service freight broker,
offering ground, sea and air
freight transportation
throughout the continental
U.S., including service to
Mexico and Canada.
Through an extensive net-
work of carriers and ware-
houses, Cassidy's Transport
is able to offer customers
premium service at compet-
itive rates and provide serv-
ice to clients throughout the
U.S. and beyond from their


Citrus County location.
Cassidy's Transport is a
member of the Transporta-
tion Intermediaries Associa-
tion (TIA).
TIA is the premier organi-
zation for third-party logis-
tics professionals doing
business in North America.
TIA provides resources, ed-
ucation, information, advo-
cacy and connections to
establish, maintain and ex-
pand ethical, profitable and
growing businesses in serv-
ice to their customers.
For more information
about Cassidy's Transport
Inc., please visit www.
cassidytransport.com or call
352-503-2017.
For more information
about the Citrus Enterprise
Center, please call 352-
726-2801 or visit www.
citrusedc.com.


Vote for your favorite

SBike In Bloom!

> Apply to show your own bike
The spring season has arrived and our Chamber of
Commerce members are ready to show off their Bikes
In Bloom!
S l.. Creativity and a little ingenuity have
been used to create displays of seasonal
beauty featuring bikes or motorcycles, plants
d nd flowers. A map will be available on March 31
showing participating businesses. We are asking
the community to grab a map and travel the county,
i t.ke some notes, and decide which "Bike in
Blo om" is your top choice!
Ballots will be available on our website www.
Sitruscountychamber.com, in the Citrus County
Chronicle or visit the Inverness or Crystal River
Cl.mber offices. Drop ballots in the flower pot.
Wi \\ miners will be announced on May 11 and will be fea-
t red in the Chronicle.
j While you are enjoying the Bikes in Bloom across
our county, please visit these businesses and find out
more about their products and services. Our Cham-
ber members are ready to work for you!
We appreciate your participation and hope you
enjoy your travels throughout the county! For more
information about Bikes in Bloom 2012 and to see
pictures, please visit our website or call 352-
795-3149.
If you are a Chamber member interested in
participating in Bikes In Bloom 2012, please
download an application from our website
www.citruscountychamber.com. Business/in-
dividual Chamber member: $15; nonprofit or-
ganization Chamber member: $5.


Chamber


Annual


Awards


Dinner

Make your reservations
now for April 20 gala!
"Swing into the 1920s" 2012 annual
Chamber Awards Dinner will be Friday,
April 20, at Citrus Hills Golf & Country
Club. Tickets are $32 per person and spon-
sorship opportunities are available. Please
visit www.citruscountychamber.com and
click "Register" to pur-
chase your tickets today! Our Silent
All proceeds will ben- Auction
efit Chamber programs Auction
and scholarships. If you will be
are interested in donat-
ing an auction item, available
please call Tobey at the
Crystal River Chamber through
office. dinn,
Our Silent Auction "inner,
will be available featuring
through dinner, featur-
ing donated goods and donated
services from our Cham-
ber members. Casino goods and
games, photographs and service
a raffle game will be fea- SerVICS
tured, so come pre- from our
pared!
Reception and live en- Chamber
tertainment will start at
6 p.m., with the buffet members.
dinner beginning at 7
p.m. Our Awards Ceremony will immedi-
ately follow dinner, and the night will fin-
ish with a live auction.
A cash bar will be available throughout
the evening. Please call the Chamber office
at 352-795-3149 for any questions or to dis-
cuss sponsorship opportunities.


wf


i'


Citrus County

Bass Challenge

slated April 28

The Citrus County Bass Challenge will be
April 28 on the Withlacoochee River in
Dunnellon to benefit the Key Training
Center.
The entry fee for a two-person team is
$150, with first prize receiving $1,500.
There are cash prizes for the Top 10 teams.
First 50 entries receive two raffle tickets.
The Anglers' Courtesy Tent is compliments
of Beef '0' Brady's of Crystal River
Applications are available in the Crystal
River Chamber office, or
1: ll 352-795-5541
ex-t 311 for
im re infor-
-mnation.





D4 SUNDAY, MARCH 25, 2012


WORKFORCE
Continued from Page Dl

somebody who might be ideal for
one of the jobs, or if you know of
an open position one of the job
candidates might fill, please let us
know. If you can't think of anyone
this time around, then please
share the information whenever


BUSINESS


and wherever you may, whether it
is at the office, in line at the su-
permarket, at your kid's Little
League game, after church, wait-
ing for a dentist appointment ...
you get the idea.
NetWorker goes out bi-weekly If
you'd like a copy sent directly to
your inbox, please contact me and
we'll make sure you get special
delivery. You may also find it on
our website at www.clmwork


force.com by going to the Re-
sources drop-down menu on the
Employers page.
Together we can connect em-
ployers with the right job candi-
dates, help put people back to
work and grow local businesses.
Use your networking skills to help
your community net work for
those who need it.
Workforce Connection is a
member of the Employ Florida


network of workforce services and
resources. Workforce Connection
is an equal opportunity
employer/program. Auxiliary aids
and services are available upon
request to individuals with dis-
abilities. All voice telephone num-
bers listed above may be reached
by persons using TTY/TDD equip-
ment via the Florida Relay Serv-
ice at 711. If you need
accommodations, call 352-840-


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

5700, ext. 7878 or email accommo
dations@clmworkforce.com.
Make requests at least three busi-
ness days in advance.
--In--
Laura Byrnes, APR is a Certified
Workforce Professional and
communications manager at
Workforce Connection. Contact
her at 800-434-5627, ext. 1234, or
lbyrnes@clm workforce., com.


MONEY
Continued from Page D1

I don't see any credit flow-
ing your way anytime soon,
and I don't know that you're
going to want any
Chapter 7, absolute bank-
ruptcy, gives someone like
you a fresh start. Without
that fresh start, you're going
to be in this swamp until the
end of your days, and that
serves no purpose for your
creditors or you. Swallow
hard; once you get all of this
behind you (the IRS is going
to have to be paid; that debt
cannot be discharged in
most cases), you can get on
with your life.
DEAR BRUCE: Where
can I establish a low-cost or
no-cost brokerage account
to consolidate a small num-
ber of various company
shares, reinvest the divi-
dends and make additional
purchases from time to




DIGEST
Continued from Page D2

Free workshop
helps professionals
OCALA- Workforce Con-
nection of Citrus, Levy and
Marion counties will offer a "Re-
tooling and Refueling for Suc-
cess" workshop designed to
arm unemployed professionals
with the updated skills they
need to find a job in today's
tough marketplace.
The workshop takes place
March 27 to 29 at the College
of Central Florida's Lecanto
campus. The three-day work-
shop features instruction and
career tools to help participants
develop strategies and maintain
focus during career transitions.
Retooling and Refueling work-
shops are offered at no charge
to participants.
The Retooling and Refueling
program helps professionals
explore talent and career op-
tions, prepare a targeted re-
sume, sharpen interview skills
and develop strategic career
campaigns.
To be eligible for the pro-
gram, participants must:
Have a work history of
making more than $30,000 a
year.
Possess a specific skill for
at least five years.
Hold a Bachelor's degree
or higher.
Be displaced from the
workforce.
All job seekers are also re-
quired to fully register with the
Employ Florida Marketplace,
the state's premier online job
bank, at www.EmployFlorida.
com. Registration may be done
from any computer or at a
Workforce Connection Center
in Ocala, Inverness or
Chiefland.
For more details about the
"Retooling and Refueling for
Success" workshop, call 352-
237-2223 or 800-434-JOBS
(5627) to speak with a Work-


time? KS., Drexel Hill,
Pa.
DEAR KS.: I don't know
where you're going to find a
"no-cost" broker, but the
low-cost brokers advertise
widely Consult your local
newspaper or the advertise-
ments you see on the finan-
cial channels on TV Many
discount brokers that adver-
tise there do exactly what
you're looking for.
DEAR BRUCE: I've been
listening to you since I was
in my early 20s (1980s). Your
advice always resonated
with me, and I would love to
have some help on investing.
In July I will have approx-
imately $500,000 to invest.
I don't need immediate
access to most of it, so I'm
trying to find the best, most
secure place to put the
money to work.
Between my IRA ($1.5 mil-
lion) and some farm/ranch
land (1,000 acres), I believe
I'm set for retirement, which
may begin as early as 2014. I


force representative.
Citrus Memorial
gets certification
Citrus Memorial Health Sys-
tem has earned The Joint Com-
mission's Gold Seal of Approval
for its Joint Replacement Pro-
gram by demonstrating compli-
ance with The Joint
Commission's national stan-
dards for health care quality
and safety in disease-specific
care. The certification award
recognizes Citrus Memorial's
dedication to continuous com-
pliance with The Joint Commis-
sion's state-of-the-art
standards.
Citrus Memorial underwent a
rigorous on-site survey in Janu-
ary 2012. A Joint Commission
expert surveyor evaluated
CMHS for compliance with
standards of care specific to the
needs of patients and families,
including infection prevention
and control, leadership and
medication management.
"In achieving Joint Commis-
sion certification, Citrus Memo-
rial Health System has
demonstrated its commitment
to the highest level of care for
its hip and knee replacement
patients," said Jean Range,
M.S., R.N., CPHQ executive di-
rector, Disease-Specific Care
Certification, The Joint Com-
mission. "Certification is a vol-
untary process and I commend
Citrus Memorial for successfully
undertaking this challenge to el-
evate its standard of care and
instill confidence in the commu-
nity it serves."
"With Joint Commission certi-
fication, we are making a signif-
icant investment in quality on a
day-to-day basis from the top
down. Joint Commission ac-
creditation provides us a frame-
work to take our organization to
the next level and helps create
a culture of excellence," said
Linda McCarthy, Citrus Memo-
rial chief nursing officer.
"Achieving Joint Commission
certification in Joint Replace-
ment, for our organization, is a
major step toward maintaining


have long-term care insur-
ance for my wife and me,
and I believe my life insur-
ance is adequate for passing
on as inheritance to my son
and daughter. T.W, via
email
DEAR T.W: Thanks for
the kind words. I am de-
lighted we have been to-
gether for so long.
You have asked a ques-
tion with very troubling con-
ditions. You say you want the
"best, most secure" place to
put your money to work.
Well, I'd like to know where
that is myself, because "best,
most secure" is an oxy-
moron; those words just
don't go together
Every time you take more
security, you give up return.
In today's world, the very se-
cure investments CDs,
FDIC-insured accounts,
government bonds, etc. -
are paying so little return as
to not even be worth
considering.
It would seem you have


excellence and continually im-
proving the care we provide."
The Joint Commission's Dis-
ease-Specific Care Certification
Program, launched in 2002, is
designed to evaluate clinical
programs across the continuum
of care. Certification require-
ments address three core
areas: compliance with consen-
sus-based national standards;
effective use of evidence-based
clinical practice guidelines to
manage and optimize care; and
an organized approach to per-
formance measurement and
improvement activities.
Parade of Homes
award winners
The Citrus County Builders
Association presents the 2012
award winners, by judge's vote,
for the Spring Parade of Homes
for Citrus and Hernando coun-
ties, presented by Exclusive
Platinum Sponsor Florida Pub-
lic Utilities.


done very well, and I have to
believe this indicates a cer-
tain degree of sophistication
when it comes to investing.
If you were in your early 20s
in 1980, you are still a very
young man, and you are in-
telligent enough to find in-
vestments that, over a
reasonable period of time,
will do well for you.
I would look for solid com-
panies that have been
around awhile. Even though
they may take a hit, they will
still be around. I wouldn't
get involved in real estate
investment trusts (REITs) or
things of that nature. Good,
solid, productive companies
are out there that, over a pe-
riod of time, will show
growth of 4 percent to 6 per-
cent a year and dividends
from about 3 percent to as
much as 6 percent.
This isn't going to happen
automatically or overnight.
Following this type of in-
vestment schedule, keeping
some of your $500,000 in


Category A
First Place Dream Cus-
tom Homes "Don Calais"
Second Place Gold
Crest Homes "The Glory"
Category B
First Place Rusaw
Homes by Pinecrest "The
Tradition"
Second Place Sweet-
water Homes of Citrus
"Driftwood"
Category C
First Place -Alexander
Custom Homes "Goya"
Second Place Dream
Custom Homes "Don Valencia
with Cabana"
Third Place Dream
Custom Homes "Don Mercado"
Category D
First Place The Villages
of Citrus Hills "Whitney"
Second Place The Vil-
lages of Citrus Hills "Dali"
Third Place The Vil-
lages of Citrus Hills "St. Moritz"


cash, I think you will do just
fine.
DEAR BRUCE: I have too
many credit cards. I've writ-
ten requesting that several
be canceled, but the compa-
nies just continue to send
new ones. What can I do to
cancel them, and will it help
my credit score if I do so? -
C.E., via email
DEAR C.E.: You men-
tioned you've written and
requested that your cards be
canceled. Write again, this
time by certified mail, and
enclose the cards that have
been cut in half. Tell the
companies you wish to dis-
continue your relationship
and you appreciate their
business over the years.
Will this help your credit
score? Not likely As a mat-
ter of fact, it will probably
bring your score down a few
points, but that will return
relatively quickly Unless
you are contemplating ap-
plying for a mortgage in the
next few months or a large


The Citrus Green Building
Committee Energy Efficiency
Award (an opt-in category)
Category A: Gold Crest
Homes "The Glory"
Category B: Rusaw
Homes by Pinecrest Building
Corp "The Tradition"
0 Category C: Alexander
Custom Homes "Goya"
Category D: The Villages
of Citrus Hills "Whitney"
WOW Awards (by unani-
mous judges vote)
Alexander Custom Homes
"Goya" Master Suite
Dream Custom Homes
"Don Calais" Family Room
Dream Custom Homes
"Don Mercado" Entry Way
0 Dream Custom Homes
"Don Valencia" Living Area
Gold Crest Homes "The
Glory" Dining & Kitchen Area
0 Rusaw Homes by
Pinecrest Building Corp "the
Tradition" Curb Appeal


loan for some business rea-
son, I would do as I've
described.
If another card comes, cut
it in half and put it in an en-
velope, along with a copy of
the letter you sent the first
time. It's not automatic, but
the companies will get the
message sooner or later. Un-
fortunately, many times your
letters are going to a ma-
chine that just automatically
issues a new card. That's our
wonderful computer age.


"The Bruce Williams
Show" is coming to the
Internet, and Bruce needs
your help. Learn more at
GetMoreBruce.com. Send
questions to bruce@
brucewilliams.com or to
Smart Money, PO. Box 2095,
Elfers, FL 34680. Questions
ofgeneral interest will be
answered in future
columns. Owing to the vol-
ume of mail, personal
replies cannot be provided.


Sweetwater Homes of Cit-
rus "Driftwood" Master Bath
The Villages of Citrus Hills
"Dali" Pool Area
The Villages of Citrus Hills
"St. Moritz" Kitchen
The Villages of Citrus Hills
"Whitney" Master Bath
The Citrus County Builders
Association thanks Exclusive
Platinum Sponsor Florida Pub-
lic Utilities and Print Media
Sponsor Tampa Bay Times for
helping to make this event pos-
sible. To learn more about
these award-winning builders
and their products, visit the
2012 Spring Parade of Homes.
There is no cost to attend,
and models are open from 10
a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through
Saturday and noon to 5 p.m.
Sunday through April 1.
For more information on the
Parade of Homes and its partic-
ipants and sponsors as well as
an interactive map to the mod-
els, visit www.CitrusParade
ofHomes.com or call 352-
746-9028. Maps can be picked
up at the Citrus County Builders
Association, 1196 S. Lecanto
Highway, Lecanto. Office hours
are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday
through Thursday.
Networking
workshop at CF
There will be a networking
workshop from 4 to 6 p.m.
Wednesday, April 25, at the
College of Central Florida Cit-
rus Campus.
Networking can be one of the
most productive ways to invest
in your business and yourself,
or it can be a total waste of time
if not done well. What deter-
mines the value?
At this workshop, participants
will focus on how to approach
networking, how to accomplish
it in a variety of settings and
how to make it pay off. The fee
is $40 for Citrus County Cham-
ber of Commerce members or
Next Generation Professionals.
For non-Chamber members,
the fee is $49. Call 352-249-
1210 to register.


Villages Services hosts seminars


Special to the Chronicle
Villages Services, a full-service property management company in Hernando, recently con-
ducted a seminar for property owners associations and condominium communities. The
seminar covered the following topics: community security systems, documentation, sub-
contractors qualifications and board member state certification. Villages Services also an-
nounced that its third annual vendor expo/buffet will be April 18 at the Citrus Hills Lodge.
For more information, call Geri Obrien at 352-746-6770.


ART CENTER OF CITRUS COUNTY
Art Center Theatre
PPES ErEJTS

Dr. Cook's Garden
by Ira Levine
Directed by Jeff Collom















March 30th April 15th

Tickets: $18
Show times: 7:30 pm Fri & Sat, 2:00 pm Sundays

Box office: Hours 1-4pm Mon. through Fri.
www.artcenter.cc






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


C CITRUS COUNTY




CHRONICLE

www.chronicleonline.com


BUSINESS HOURS:

MONDAY-FRIDAY

8:00 A.M. 5:00 P.M.

CLOSED SATURDAY/SUNDAY



WE GLADLY ACCEPT

VISA .
^^ ^^ ^


Classifieds


Classifieds In Print and Online All The Time!


Publication Days/Deadlines

Chronicle / Daily.................................... 1 PM, Daily
Homefront / Sunday...............................3 PM, Friday
Chronicle / Sunday.............................4...4 PM, Friday
Chronicle / Monday............................4...4 PM, Friday
Sumter County Times / Thursday............ 11 AM, Tuesday
Riverland News / Thursday.................2...2 PM, Monday
South Marion Citizen / Friday..............4...4 PM, Tuesday
West Marion Messenger / Wednesday.......4 PM, Friday


AC SALES
Will train right person,
easy six figure income
Must have val. fl. DL,
Barb 352-726-1002

Bookcase, solid cherry
wood, excel cond.
6ft tall, 6 shelves $125.
Small slant antique
desk, excel. cond. $75.
(352) 489-9986
CRYSTAL RIVER
2brm 1ba Fridge stove
W&D wat-Trsh $495mo
813-317-6525

Exp. AC Installers
Own Tools & Truck,
TOP PAY, Call Barb
(352) 726-1002

Grandmothers clock,
works, excel, cond.,
$125.
Antique, chase lounge
w/ cushion for outside
$75. (352) 489-9986

GUN SHOW
LEESBURG NAT'L GRD
ARMORY
400 West Meadow St,
Leesburg, Fl 34748
Sat, 9-5, Sun, 9-4
Concealed Weapons
Classes Daily
GunTraders is now
buying GOLD
Bring your GUNS &
GOLD to sell or trade.
Free Safety Class
at 10 & 1
GunTrader
GunShows.com
352-359-0134

TOTAL GYM
little used w/instruction
manual $100 exercise
bike, recumbant seat,
electric meter $100
(352) 344-5740




$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
Paid for Junk Vehicles
J.W. 352-228-9645
$$ CASH PAID $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$

$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not
CASH PAID $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL
Appls. Riding Mowers,
Scrap Metal, AC Unit
cell -352-270-4087




FREE HORSE
MANURE
352-249-6235


Free Horse manure
Dunnellon area
(352) 804-0121
KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Savage Pays top $$$.
352-628-4144
Several Beds Full size &
King box springs and
mattress, no frames.
Free if you need them
Helping Hands Ministry
(352) 503-2054
352-628-7444



Lost Black Back Pack
Bike Trail
Between Turner Camp
& down Inverness
REWARD
(352)2419-7003






REWARD $1000.
No Questions ask.
Min Pin Female 10 lbs
name Zoey, Needs
meds. last seen Sun 8/7
Holiday Dr off Turkey
Oak Crystal River
(352)257-9546400-1519
REWARD
Two 8 Week Old
Pomeranian Puppies
Male silver/black
Female/Apricot
Bella Oasis Motel
Downtown Homosassa
(269) 370-8390


SAMMY
Male, 5 yrs old,
declawed Tan,
Cream & Charcoal
Missing since 3/6/12
Windy Ave. Inverness
Please call 341-2456
Tan & White
Pitt Bull Mix, Female
Pink Bull Mixed
Citronella Area
(352) 302-0710
Tortoiseshell Cat
1/2 mouth gold, female
lost Sugarmill Woods
(352) 382-3975



Found Dark Brown
Brindle Pitt Bull Type
Found on Dunkinfield
Crystal River
(352) 257-4680
Shih Tzu male
fawn & white, found
Homosassa Area 3
weeks ago. Citrus Co
animal, we want him to
found his home.
(352) 746-8400


Huge discounts when
you buy 2 types of
advertising! 122
weekly newspapers,
32 websites, 25 daily
newspapers. Call
now to diversify your
advertising with Ad-
vertising Networks of
Florida
(866)742-1373



FRESH JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct.@ $5 per lb
Stone Crab@ $6 per Ib
delivered 727-771-7500



Attn Snowbirds
Cleaning & Lawncare
Service. avail w/
exc.ref's (386) 956-8128
WANTED TO RENT
Class C or Class A
Motor home,
traveling to Maine &
back to Florida
approx 3 wks in July
2012 352-794-3272




Executive
Assistant to the
Board
Announcement
# 12-20
Highly responsible
and advanced
secretarial work
which involves
administrative re-
sponsibilities for the
Citrus County Board
of County Commis
sioners. Minimum of
seven to ten years re-
sponsible secretarial
experience. Basic
accounting skills
preferred. Starting
pay $1,164.52 B/W
Excellent benefits.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE:
Please visit our
website at
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit one
of the local Libraries
or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461
to apply online by
Friday, March 30,
2012 EOE/ADA

FIT Administrative
Asst./Secretary

For Large property
Owers Assoc. Citrus
County Must be pro-
fessional computer
literate and a team
player. Home owners
assoc.exp. helpful
Fax Resume To:
(352) 746-0875.


You've Got It!






Somebody







Wants






It!


S C I T R U S C OU N T Y







(352) 563-5966


www.chronicleonline.com
__________________________________________________________64 0 9 8 0 B


HAIRSTYLIST
& BARBER
w/clientele preferred
(352)795-2511










Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)


Come Join Our Team
LPN FT 3-11
Mon. Fri.
Leadership Skills
Required. Health Ins
available and
benefits. Please
apply within at:
Cedar Creek
Assisted Living
352-564-2446

Exp. Optical
Dispenser
For Busy Optometrist
Office Mon thru Fri.
No nights or wkends
Please Fax Resume
352-628-6377
or Email hec@
drsnewcomer.com

Full time Positions
AVAILABLE,
Fast Paced
Pediatric, internal
medicine office
Medical Assistant
Medical Records
Front Desk
Email Resume
info@pedimhealth
care.com
or fax 527-8818

IMMEDIATE
OPENINGS
LPN & RN's
for Correctional and
Hospice RN's for
Hospitals Med/Surg
and ICU
APPLY IN PERSON
2008 Hwy 44 W,
Inverness, Or Online
www.nurse-temps
.corn, 352-344-9828

MEDICAL BILLERS
& CODERS ARE IN
DEMAND

Train to become a
Medical Office Assis-
tant! No Experience
needed! Job Training
& Local Placement
assistance. HS
Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)374-7294

NURSING
ASSISTANT
Looking for strong
energetic people
willing to become
part of a family. Team
work a plus. Nursing
exp. helpful. Apply at
Emeitus At Barrington
Place 2341 W. Norvell
Bryant Hwy, Lecanto
EOE/DFWP

RN/LPN
Full-Time
We are expanding
our Nursing Services
Looking for experi-
enced nurse leaders
to join our exciting
team
We offer excellent
benefits: 401 K/
Health/Dental/Vision/
Vacation/Sick/CEUs
Apply in person:
Arbor Trail Rehab
611 Turner Camp Rd.
Inverness, FL
Or email resume to:
atdon@
southernLTC.com
An EEO/AA Employer
M/F/V/D


Medical office
looking for
FT BILLING
high energy
individual with
billing/general exp
Fax resume to
352-746-5605

P/T MEDICAL
ASSISTANT
Experience needed.











I HOSPICE
of Citrus County
of the Nature Coast
uensesed 1rs5m

Chaplain
Responsible for
providing the delivery
of spiritual care,
counseling and inter-
vention for Hospice
patients and family
members. Master's
degree in ministry
from a college or
divinity school.
Previous Hospice or
Healthcare exp is
preferred.
Job summaries
and application:
www. hospice
ofcitruscounty.org
HOSPICE OF
CITRUS COUNTY
P.O. Box 641270
Beverly Hills, FI 34464
DFWP/EOE


COLLEGE of
CENTRAL
FLORIDA

Instructional
Opportunities
-Accounting
Technology
- Engineering
Technology
*Practical Nursing
*Adjuncts for fall 2012
Commitment to the
college objective of
providing instruction
for a diverse student
population.
View detailed job
requirements on the
CF website
www.CF.edu.
How to apply: Go to
www.CF.edu, click on
Quick Links then
Employment at CF.
Submit unofficial
transcripts with the
online application
at time of submission.
Alternatively
fax transcripts to
352-873-5885.
3001 SW College Rd.
Ocala, FL 34474
CF is an Equal
Opportunity Employer

INSURANCE
AGENTS

220 or 440 Licensed
Insurance Agents
needed Immediate
openings for Sales
Producer or Cus-
tomer Service Repre-
sentative. Full time or
Pt time possibilities.
Great Salary, bene's
& bonuses. Email
resume to Tracy Fero
tfero@feroinsurance.
com or call
352-422-2160

Key Training
Center
has P/T on-call
positions available in
group home setting.
Assist adults with
disabilities in daily
living. HS Diploma/
GED required.
Apply in person at
5399 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy., Lecanto FL
34461 *E.O.E.*


Looking for
Commercial/Personal
Insurance Agents
Lic. 220 OR 440
Please fax Resume
489-0384 or email
birdins@bellsouth.net


Marketing
Coordinator
Seeking very
organized person to
coordinate
marketing programs
for major area
country club.
Includes website,
email and print
activities for
restaurants, golf and
show events.
Graphic design and
Adobe software
experience prefera-
ble. Forward resume
sleeman@citrushills
.com


MARKETING/
COLLECTIONS
Exp. preferred, Email
resume to: telecollect
@hotmail.com or
Fax to 866-588-3604
NO CALLS





EXP. COOKS
& SERVERS
High volume, good
shifts. Apply in person
Mon-Fri. 9am-11am
COACH'S
114W. Main St., Inv.
11582 N. W lliams St.
Dunnellon EOE


EXP. LINE COOK,
Needed for Inverness
Golf & Country Club.
Fax Resume to:
352-726-3559


Experienced Chef
With Line Experience
Parttime Friday Nights
Mandatory Contact
George Kanaris @
352-464-4216 or Call
Bill @ 727-856-7302


LOLLYGAGGERS
Sports Pub & Grill
Now Hirlng
ALL POSITIONS
Experience Req'd
Apply wlthln
744 SE US HWy 19
(next to Mr B's
carwash) Cry Rlv.


SERVERS
Must be 18 or older.
Apply Fisherman's
Restaurant
12311 E Gulf to Lake
(352) 637-5888





Award Winning
Community
Sales!
Citrus Country's top
lifestyle community,
the Villages of Cltrus
Hills, seeking licensed
RE salespeople to joln
area's leading sales
team. Strong national
marketing support
and all new collec-
tion of model homes
makes this an Ideal
opportunity for those
Interested In strong
earning potential and
cashing In on
rebound In housing
market. Ideal
candidates
will offer 5+ years'
experience and
desire to affiliate with
developer with
over 50 years of
proven track record.
Email resume to
nancy@cltrushllls.com


AC SALES
Will train right person,
easy six figure income
Must have val. fl. DL,
Barb 352-726-1002

NATIONAL NUTRITION
COMPANY
seeking local reps for
placement of Im-
mune Health News-
papers in high traffic
locations. Excellent
income potential
with residuals. Call
today (800)808-5767





Apply Now
12 Drivers Needed
Top 5% Pay 2 Mos.
CDL Class A Driving Exp.
(877)258-8782
www.meltontruck.com/dr
Ive

Drivers -
DAILY PAY!
up to $.42/mile
plus $.02/mile
quarterly safety bonus -
New trucks-Van and
Refrigerated CDL -A
,3 months recent expe-
rience required
(800) 414-9569
www.driveknight cornn

DRIVERS: RUN
5 STATES REGIONAL!
Get Home Weekends,
earn up to 39cent mile,
1 yr OTR Flatbed Exp.
required. SUNBELT
TRANSPORT, LLC
800-572-5489 X 227

Eagle Buick
GMC, Inc
Is in need of
experienced
automotive service
consultants/advisors.
One of the best deal-
ership pay plans in
the county. Minimum
2 yrs experience
preferred. Great
opportunity for one to
find a career path,
and earn a great
living. Very produc-
tive repair facility and
a professional
environment with
plenty of growth po-
tential in a growing
community. Benefits.
Drug Free Workplace.
Application Available
@ Eagle Buick GMC
Inc. Send Resume:
Fax (352) 417-0944
Email
robbcole@eagle
buickgmc.com

EXP. A/C TECH
Installer
Apply at AirFx
1840 Hwy 44 Inv
from 8-9am daily

EXP. MECHANIC
Clean Drivers License
Tools a Plus.
Apply In Person:
WALLY'S
806 NE US19Cry Riv.

HIRING EXPERIENCE/
INEXPERIENCE TANKER
DRIVERS!
Great benefits and
Pay! New fleet Volvo
Tractors! 1 year OTR
Exp. Req.- Tanker Train-
ing Available. Call
Today: 877-882-6537
www.OaklevTransoort
.com


MAINTENANCE
WORKER
Condo seeks person w/
lawn care, irrigation,
painting, & light carpen-
try skills. F/T, long-term
temp. w/ possible per-
manent. Must be over
18, drug-free, &
English-speaking. Ex-
perience pref. but will
train. 352-400-3231
M-F 7-4.
NEW TO TRUCKING?
Your new career starts
now! *0 Tuition Cost*No
Credit Check* Great
Pay & Benefits, Short
employment commit-
ment required
call (866)297-8916
www.ioinCRST.com
NEW TO TRUCKING?
Your new career starts
now! *0 Tuition Cost*No
Credit Check* Great
Pay & Benefits, Short
employment commit-
ment required
call (866)297-8916
www.ioinCRST.com

SERVICE
PLUMBERS
I eI
I Must have driver's I
license352-621-0671

TCG
is seeking motivated
candidates to fill
positions in our
Inventory, e-Test, and
e-Marketing Depart-
ments. Knowledge of
MS Word/Excel/
Outlook, excellent
verbal/written
communication, and
attention to detail a
must. E-Marketing
position requires
experience using
digital camera.
Work is performed
in warehouse setting,
some heavy lifting is
required. Drug Test &
Background Check
Required/ EOE Drug
Free Workplace.
Candidates may
apply in person at
Technology
Conservation Group,
Inc 705 S. Easy Street,
Lecanto
Mon- Fri, 8am- 4pm.
Reference Job ID # FL
INV 1014, FL ETST 1015,
FL EMKT 1016
on your application.


\IF

0


TOOLMAKER
NEED PANTOGRAPH
EXP. FORM GRINDER,
A/C SHOP, BENEFITS,
TURBINE BROACH CO.
(352) 795-1163

General
Help


Money is available
with this great part
time job! 7 days a
week, 4-5 hours per
day, early morning
hours, delivering
newspapers to
homes. Must be 18
years old and have
valid driver's license
and insurance. Email
kstew-
art@chronicleonline.c


B
25 Driver Trainees
Needed Now!
at Schneider National
Earn $700 per week!
No experience
needed! Local CDL
Training! Job ready in
15 days!
(888)368-1964


Sheriffs
Ranches
Enterprises

Customer Service
Representative I
HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA
OR GED REQUIRED
$7.50 per hour
Part-Time 18 hrs/wk
CONTACT:


COUNTER HELP
& VOLUNTEER
Apply In Person
CITRUS SPRINGS
Golf &Country Club
8690 N. Golfvlew Dr.
(352) 489-5045

CUSTOMER
RELATIONS
*Call Now!* Looking
to fill immediate
positions. Training,
401(k), medical.
No exp. necessary.
$550-$800 a week.
Call Karen
352-436-4460

Exp. AC Installers
Own Tools & Truck,
TOP PAY, Call Barb
(352) 726-1002

Front Desk
Supervisor
Holiday Inn Express
Crystal River,
is seeking goal
oriented individual
proficient in
MS Office. Ability as
supervisor required.
Walk In or send your
resume to: hr.crystal
rlver@gmall.com

Instructors Needed
Scrap Booking,
Stamping, One stroke
painting, Art
(352) 586-3504




#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aeftourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)




AIRLINES ARE HIRING -
Train for hands on
Aviation Maintenance
Career. FAA approved
program.
Financial aid if qualified
Housing Available.
CALL Aviation Institute
Of Maintenance.
(866)314-3769


Team Delivery



Opportunity ,


Would you like to

deliver newspapers

but don't want to

work 7 days a week?


We are taking applications
for teams to contract a
route.

V Lead contractor must
be 18 yrs of age

V Must have valid driver's
license and insurance



MAKE EXTRA MONEY!

DELIVERING



-\ www chronicleonhinecorn


Email:
kstewart@chronicleonline.com
or come to
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River for an application.


(ONETING TH T RIGB

BUES WITH YOUR MESSAGE
^^ 'TTi*a 11 ^. 1r|r~ 1rT^lrjT


^^. ^^

K*T* *


CLASSIFIED


SUNDAY, MARCH 25, 2012 D5







D6 SUNDAY, MARCH 25, 2012


AIRLINES ARE HIRING -
Train for hands on
Aviation Maintenance
Career. FAA approved
program.
Financial aid if qualified
Housing Available.
CALL Aviation Institute
Of Maintenance.
(866)314-3769




"Can you Dig It?"
Heavy Equipment
School, 3 wk training
program. Backhoes,
Bulldozers, Trackhoes.
Local Job placement
asset. Start digging
dirt Now.
(877)994-9904

"Can you Dig It?"
Heavy Equipment
School, 3 wk training
program. Backhoes,
Bulldozers, Trackhoes.
Local Job placement
asset. Start digging
dirt Now.
(877)994-9904

#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)

Attend College
Online from Home
*Medical, *Business,
*Paralegal,
*Accounting,
*Criminal Justice. Job
placement assis-
tance. Computer
available. Financial
Aid if qualified. SHEV
certified. Call
(877) 206-5165
www.CenturaOnline
.cam




TAYLO.COLLEGE


NE6RAiW


2 WEEK
PREP COURSES!
*ALF ADMINISTRATOR
$300.
*EKG TECH $475.
*NURSING ASST. $475.
*PHLEBOTOMY $475.
tavlorcolleae.edu
(352) 245-4119
FB, twitter, you tube


r-- -N- Eu

ENROLLING
FOR SPRING
I 2012 CLASSES
-BARBER
-COSMETOLOGY
O FACIAL
SwFULL SPECIALTY
INSTRUCTOR
lIRAINING
m MANICURE/Nall Ext
uWMASSAGE THERAPY

BENE'S
International
School of Beauty i
NEW PORT RICHEY
/SPRING HILL
727-848-8415
352-263-2744






8 MOBILE HOMES
12 AC., Good Income
Lots of Possibilities
(352) 212-6182





Early 1900's
solid wood Amoire &
vanity $375 ea.
(352) 476-0563





Haviland
hand-painted
turkey platter, $40
(352) 563-9614


I


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
** *A A **^ *


KEWPIE DOLLS collec-
tion of Kewpie dolls ,
10 for $30.00 513-4473
SOURING EAGLE 12 in
high/Was 59.95/selling
for 20.00 Linda 341-4449
Teddy bear, 85 yrs. old
and 85 yr. old Baby hair
brush, make offer
(352) 563-9614
Waterford crystal
6 stemmed cordial
glasses, $40
(352) 563-9614



APARTMENT SIZE RE-
FRIGERATOR good con-
dition $75 Walter @
352-364-2583
FRIGIDAIRE
Commercial Deep
Chest Freezer
15 cubic ft like new
$125 (989) 763-6810
GE ELECT. RANGE
COIL BURNERS, LIKE
NEW $250 634-2004
Kenmore Dryer
White $129. Hotpoint
electric stove, nice
cond $149.
(352) 382-1617
Maytag Hvy duty
natural gas dryer
exc cond $150
(352) 270-8215
MINI FRIDGE magic chef
19.5 in. tall by 17.5 in.
wide looks good works
great 25.00 dennis @
352-220-2519
REFRIGERATOR
FRIGIDAIRE S/S
stainless steel, 1 yr old
$750 neg, Washer &
Dryer Kenmore, white
good cond, 2yrold
$300pr (352) 201-1806
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR, washers
dryers,FREE pick up
352-564-8179

YOU'LL v THIS!
SMOOTH-TOP RANGE.
Like new. $400.00.
Frigidaire Elec. 30"
Slide-in range, 4 burn-
ers with self-cleaning
oven. Call:
352-628-5770
WANTED DEAD
OR ALIVE
Washers & Dryers
(352) 209-5135



DESK CHAIR Swivel with
arm rests, smaller size,
very good condition. $15
Can email photo.
352 726 9983


SKIL BAND SAW porta-
ble 10 inch used needs
blade electric.$35.00,also
work table $20.00
352-513-4473




DIGITAL PHOTO FRAME
7 Inch with remote and
SD photo card. Like new
$25. Can email photo.
352 726 9983
SMALL DISH ANTENNA
small dish antenna with
roof mount.$99.00 phone
352-637-7152




FREE WINDOWS
4-38x55, 1 38x53
Great for shed or project
352-489-3914 after
11am
Pine Rough Sawn,
Lengths to 20 ft. Widths
to 15", $1 BF
(352) 447-5560
USED PVC PIPE many
lengths of used white pvc
pipe. $99.
352-637-7152




DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469

HP Computer
w/tower $120.
Tower only $70.
(352)586-6891
MOBILE POWER ADAP-
TOR CYBER POWER,
12 volt DC to 120 AC,
140 Watts, Like new. $30
352 726 9983




(4) Black Wrought Iron
Patio Chairs w/full pad-
ding, never usedgreen
cushions $125.
(352) 419-5326
7 Piece Cast
Aluminum Patio Set
Tempered glass table,
2 swivel & 4 cushion
chairs, like new $350.
(352) 344-5250
PATIO FURNITURE PVC
Table 4 cushioned chairs
1 chaise lounge,
wheeled cart.$100
phone:795-7474


CLASSIFIEDS



2 CHEST OF DRAWERS
$20 each Walter @
352-364-2583
4 Caster Kitchen
Chairs
pastel cloth padded
$25. ea.
(352) 382-3159
6 PC.BEDROOM SET,
MAPLE
great cond, 6 mos old
queen, pd $1800, ask-
ing $800, SENTRY
SAFE,5ft tall, 16" deep
21"long pd $600, asking
$300 (352) 201-1806
92" Sofa, Dark Wood
w/ light tan fabric
5 pillows included
$300
(352) 503-2413
Bassett Ent Center
3pcs. W/ 9' perf. cond.
beautiful wood $600
Sofa, pwr reclining both
ends, ultra suede, sage
color 2/2 y.o. $450
Bakers Rack hvy, dk
grn. metal wood shelf
$100.(352) 795-6767
Bookcase, solid cherry
wood, excel cond.
6ft, tall, 6 shelves $125.
Small slant antique
desk, excel. cond. $75.
(352) 489-9986
BROYHIL FLORAL
COUCH comfy and in
Excellent condition asking
$85.00 352-527-1399
BROYHIL FLORAL
COUCH in excellent con-
dition asking $85.00
352-527-1399
Color TV with DVD
PAUL'S FURNITURE
628-2306 Homosassa
paulsftureonline.com










COMFORTS OF
HOME
USED FURNITURE
www. com-
fortsofhomeused
furniture.com. 795-0121
COMPUTER
DESK/SMALL fair
condition/10.00 Linda
341-4449
Couch
1/2 circle, tan new $500
4 kit chairs blk wrought
iron $120. Glass top
table $120. obo
(646) 963-5829


OUCLazy6oy
7 ft long recliner on
each side,
almost new $150.
(352) 382-0042
COUCH
white, pull-out
$25 (352) 201-1806
Dining Rm. Set, early
american medium oak,
china hutch, table with
7 chairs, server table,
rocker and 2 bar stools,
excel, cond. $600
Bedroom Set, king size
bed, dark walnut,
dresser, 2 mirrors, 2
night stands, head-
board, mattress &
boxspring almost new
$350. 352-563-2493
DVD/VIDEO RACK 5
Shelf rack.
45"H X 14"W X 6"D
Light wood laminate.
$6.00 Call 746-1017
Grandmothers clock,
works, excel. cond.,
$125.
Antique, chase lounge
w/ cushion for outside
$75. (352) 489-9986
King Size Headboard,
Mattress and boxspring
$125.
(352) 382-2379
Kitchen table
white w/ oak top
& 4 chairs $75
352-563-2493
Large Glass top dining
rm table w/ 6 chairs
$600 obo
3 pc. Entertainment
Center $200
(352) 503-7379
Lazy Boy Sleeper Sofa
Nice Condition
$165.
(352) 726-3221
LAZY-BOY QUEEN
SOFABED OR RECLIN-
ING LOVESEAT $200.00
EACH OR $350.00 FOR
BOTH 352-726-0686
MICROWAVE CART
White:bought new,one
door on bottom loose.$20
(352) 344-3472
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
352-628-0808
Roll Top Desk
$100
Entertainment Center
$150 obo
(352) 489-3511
Twin Size Day Bed
w/ mattress & match-
ing 6 drawer dresser w/
mirror. Excellent Cond.
$250obo (989)640-3419
Homosassa
Twin Size Sofa Bed
Asking $200
3 Glass Top Living Room
Tables $150.
(352) 503-7379


THOMASVILLE TABLES
Beautiful oak end tables.
Pristine condition.$ 99.00
each 352-726-9132



CHICKEN
MANURE/FERTILIZER
THE TIME IS NOW! 25
avail. 201b bags $4.oo00
per bag. 352-563-1519
Gas Weed Eater
$25. obo
(352) 697-5214
GRASS SEEDS! GRASS
SEEDS! GRASS SEEDS!
American Farm & Feed
352-795-6013
Lesco Viper
commercial zero turn
lawn mower, 60" deck
Clean, $2,000
(352) 634-4439
Power Pro Riding
Mower 42" deck
4x8 utility trailer
$400.
(352) 746-7357
SNAPPER RIDER MOWER
14.5 horsepower
38" cut, good condition
$300 or best offer
(352) 503-2472





YARD SALE
Crystal River
Sat Sun 8-? tools,
motorcycle parts &
more 8651 Candy Ln
acroos from High
Ocatane Bar Hwy 19

GUN SHOW
LEESBURG NAT'L GRD
ARMORY
400 West Meadow St,
Leesburg, Fl 34748
Sat, 9-5, Sun, 9-4
Concealed Weapons
Classes Daily
GunTraders is now
buying GOLD
Bring your GUNS &
GOLD to sell or trade.
Free Safety Class
at 10 & 1
GunTrader
GunShows.com
352-359-0134

HERRY'S
MARKET DAY
FREE VENDOR SPACE!
Outdoor Flea Market
held on the grounds
8471 W Periwinkle Ln
HOMOSASSA
(behind Wendy's)
Last Saturday Every
Month 8am -noon
Saturday, March 31
Call Caroline at
352-527-2020


LECANTO
Sun. 25th One Day Only
7am-12 MOVING SALE
Furniture, Harley David-
son Motor Cycle parts,
MUCH MORE, Everyth-
ing Must Go! Cheap!
2493 N. Brentwood Cir




Are U Moving? Estate?
In home liquidations?
MARTIN'S Estate &
Consign 352-209-4945




NEW WEDDING DRESS
SIZE 10 Beaded halter
top. Ordered wrong size,
(could not return) $50.00
352-637-4916
PLUS SIZE WOMEN'S
CLOTHING 3X Assorted
women's clothing Erika,
George,Liz $2.00 each
piece 352 634-2737




!!!!! 33X12.50 R15!!!!!
Good tread!!!! Only
asking $100 for the
pair!! (352)551-1810
-***275/60 R20-*
Nice tread!! Like new!!
Only asking $80 for the
pair!! (352)551-1810
----185/65 R15----
Like new!!! High tread!!
Only asking $70 for the
pair!! (352)551-1810
2 PLASTIC TOOL
BOXES for pick up trucks
$10 each Walter @
352-364-2583
12 x 12 canopy
EASY POP-UP never
used, $195
(352) 322-6456
Antique Ranger
Wood Burning Stove,
$160.
(352) 364-3009
Leave message
Arctic King 2 Window
A/C's, 5200 BTU. new in
box $150 for both
(352) 419-5326
CIRCULAR SAW
$25 or best offer
MEN'S DESK CHAIR
$35 or best offer
(352) 382-1885
Collectors Print of
Robert E. Lee w/docs
$300.1adder $50. and
more @ Terra Vista
(352) 249-7630


e uxe eec rice
Twin size $ 175.
Upright Kenmore Kero-
sene Heater Used once
$50.
(920) 224-2513
FREE YORKIE /JACK
RUSSEL MIX approx 1
year old; great with kids;
long hair; white
352-637-3636
FURNITURE;Treadmill$170/ob
o, Tanning Bed
$300/obo, old tables
$75/obo, 6'x9' and
9'x12' florida rugs $160
both, @ Terra Vista @
352-249-7630
GRASS SEEDS! GRASS
SEEDS! GRASS SEEDS!
American Farm & Feed
352-795-6013

GUN SHOW
LEESBURG NAT'L GRD
ARMORY
400 West Meadow St,
Leesburg, Fl 34748
Sat, 9-5, Sun, 9-4
Concealed Weapons
Classes Daily
GunTraders is now
buying GOLD
Bring your GUNS &
GOLD to sell or trade.
Free Safety Class
at 10 & 1
GunTrader
GunShows.com
352-359-0134
HAMSTER HABITAT
hamster cage and many,
many tunnels. $30.00
please call 726 5753
Home Made Quilt Top
$25.
HD Whirlpool Dryer
$175
(352) 795-7254
Kinetico
Water Softner, 2 tanks &
1 salt tqank $160.
(352) 637-2735
LUGGAGE 3
pice,w/wheelsetraabble han-
dlesWll separate
$60.00 Please call
352-726-0040
MOVING SALE
Recliner Chairs, BBQ,
5 pc. patio set, china
closet, 6 pc din rm.
tble, 3 ends & coffee
table microwave oven
(352) 860-1397
New Tent in Box
2 Person $40
New Charcoal Grill
in Box $160 Ladies 26"
3 speed bike $40.
(352)489-3511
NEW WALLPAPER 3
DOUBLE ROLLS $30
165 SQ FT CAN E-MAIL
PHOTO 419-5981

Old Franklin
Heat Stove
Good Cond. $325.
(352) 586-9498


h.wo 0


ALL EXTERIOR
ALUMINUM
6" Seamless Gutters
Lic & Ins 352-621-0881
ROB SCREENING
Repairs Rescreen, Front
Entries, Garage, Sliders
Free Est. 352-835-2020
SUBURBAN IND. INC.
Screen rms, Rescreens,
Siding, airports, rf.overs
wood decks, Fla. rooms
windows, garage scrns.
628-0562 (CBC1257141)




SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Washer &
Dryers, Free Pick Up
352-564-8179




Blind Factory
We custom make all
types. Best prices any-
where! Hwy 44 & CR
491. (352) 746-1998





e' THIS OUT!
PHIL'S MOBILE MARINE
Repairs & Consignment
30 yrs Cert. Best Prices
& Guar 352-220-9435


ROGERS Construction
All Construction
sm jobs Free Est (352)
637-4373 CRC1326872





SHADY VIEW CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
Repairs. 352 613-2518





AFFORDABLE
COMPUTER SERV.
(352) 341-4150

DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469

NATURE COAST
COMPUTER Repairs
Free home inspection
352-212-1551





Bianchi Concrete
inc.com ins.lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-
Sidewalks. Pool deck
repair/stain 257-0078


I REMODE


CURB APPEAL/ Lic
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River rock
reseals & repairs. 352
364-2120/410-7383
FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, staining &
Garage Firs. Recession
Prices! 352-527-1097
ROB'S MASONRY
& CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs Tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554



All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing,Hauling,
Site Prep, Driveways.
Lic. & Ins. 352- 795-5755



COUNTY WIDE DRY-
WALL -25 ys exp lic2875.
all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Pop Corn Removal
352-302-6838



BRIGHT ELECTRICAL
Res./Comm. Lic & Ins.
$50.hr. EC0001303
352-302-2366
DUN-RITE Elect
since '78/ Free Est.
licEC 13002699
352- 726-2907


AAA ROOFING

Call the 4e6a h te9s"
Free Written Estimate

:*100 OFF:
Any Re-Roof
SMust present coupon at time contract is signed
Lic./Ins. CCC057537 000APNI


Thomas Electric LLC
Generator main &
repair. Guardian
Homestandby, &
Centurion. Cert. Tech.
Briggs Stratton 352-
621-1248 #ER00015377




A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002

BOB BROWN'S
Fence & Landscaping
352-795-0188/220-3194
ROCKY'S FENCING
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
k 352 422-7279 k




Seasoned Split Oak
You Haul
$45. Face Cord
(920) 224-2513




ALL EXTERIOR
ALUMINUM
6" Seamless Gutters
Lic & Ins 352-621-0881
ALUMINUM
STRUCTURES
5" & 6" Seamless Gutters
Free Estimates, Lic &
Ins. (352) 563-2977


Andrew Joehl
Handyman.
Gen/Maint/Repairs
Pressure cleaning.
Lawns/Gutters. No job
too small!Reli able ,ins.
0256271 352-465-9201

Affordable Handvman
FAST
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *A
Affordable Handyman
V FAST
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
.100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *A
Affordable Handyman
V FAST
V AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
. 100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST
V AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
. 100% Guar. *Free Est
*k 352-257-9508 k


*V THIS OUT!
AC & HEAT PUMPS
FREE Estimate & 2nd
Opinion, 10 yr. warr.
on ALL Parts, Great
prices, ALL the time.
352-400-4945
Lic #CAC027361




MAID TO ORDER
House Cleaning *
(352) 586-9125
Have Vacum Will Travel



****** *
The Tile Man
Bathroom remodel
Specializing in handi-
cap. Lic/Ins. #2441.
352-634-1584



#1 BOBCAT FOR HIRE
Light land clearing, site
work, grading, hauling.
NO JOB TOO SMALLI!
Lic. & Ins. 352-400-0528
All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
All AROUND TRACTOR
L i. ,, I, ,.
352-795-5755
TRACTOR WORK
Sm Job Specialist
$30 + $30 per hr
352-270-6800






CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, curbing,
flocrete. River rock
reseals & repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
RIVENBARK LAWN &
LANDSCAPE.
Best Prices in town for
all your lawn care
needs!! (352) 464-3566


A + LAWN CARE
& LANDSCAPING
Affordable & Reliable
(352) 228-0421
BEVERLY HILLS
most yards $20.
Quick dependable,
352-422-5978
GOT LEAVES?
Ask about leaf vac
system, Free est.
Winter Clean up +
Hauling 352 344-9273
cell 352-201-9371

GRASS SEEDS! GRASS
SEEDS! GRASS SEEDS!
American Farm & Feed
352-795-6013
HALLOCK & SON
LAWN CARE ALL Your
lawn care needs. Detailed
Work. 400-1197, Lie/Ins.
JUSTIN LAWN CARE
Fast and Affordable.
and Friendly, Licensed.
(352) 476-3985




AT YOUR HOME
Mower, Parts Service &
Repair.Visit our store@
1332 SE Hy 19 220-244




A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs, trash,
lawn maint. furn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
ALL OF CITRUS
CLEAN UPS CLEAN OUTS
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790




Chris Satchell Painting
ASAP
30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
A-1 George Swedlige
Painting/press cleaning
Int/Ext. texture/drywall
repair (352) 794-0400


INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998



Tim Herndon Plumbing
$10. off w/this ad
10 yrs serving Citrus Co
lic/insCFC1428395
(352) 201-8237



CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST. (352) 586-2996
Pic PICARD'S Pressure
Cleaning & Painting
352-341-3300



Remodeling, kitchens
baths, ceramic tile &
tops. Decks, Garages
Handyman Services 40
Yrs Exp. crc058140
344-3536; 563-9768



Attention Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers are
required by state law
to include their state
license number in all
advertisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious that
you may be contact-
ing an unlicensed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For questions
about business
licensing, please call
your city or county gov-
ernment offices.


A Cutting Edge
Tile Jobs Showers
Firs .Safety Bars. ETC
352-422-2019
Lic. #2713, Insured.




A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest Rates
Free est.(352)860-1452

DAVID'S
TREE SERVICE
(352)302-5641

All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
DOUBLE J Tree Serv.
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, licl/ins 302-8852
KING's Land Clearing &
Tree Serv. complete
tree & stump removal
hauling, demo& tractor
work 32 yrs. exp.
(352) 220-9819
R WRIGHT Tree Service
Tree removal & trimming.
Ins. & Lic.# 0256879
352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree Serv
Trim, Shape & Remove
Lic/Ins Free Est.
352-628-2825
Sharp Cut Tree Serv.
LET me cut your Tree
not YOUR WALLET.
Full Tree Service
Alicia (352) 942-0455




344-2556, Richard
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


-- *i Diamond Brite
---- Florida Gem
Marcite Decks F'
Pavers
FREE J *Tile
ESTIMATES
GREG'S COMPLETE
GREG'S REMODEL

MARCITE, INC.
,iENSED 352-746-5200





GENERAC 43A
Stand Alone
Generator

Thomas Electric, LLC
Residential/Commercial Service
Generac Centurion
Guardian Generators
Factory Authorized Technicians
ER0015377

352-621-124


IHNDYMAN


iDRYE VN CLAINGI


Serving Citrus County Ron's Affordable

Since 1995 Handyman Services
Mowing Trimming Edging A Home
Mulch. FertiIihIatIn \/ _. Repairs
Mulch Fertilallon* w Small Carpentry
: ''_: Tr -T'. LI,.-IJ:: ::" i Fencing
I-1- :,IL IIII L ., ,rIr 1E P 1 L
PE T E P l .111111 1*Screening .
lF'I.ETE ,E P' i .i'Jl .i i. I, C lean Dryer

Affordable & Dependable WILL CONSTRUCTION
E x p e i e n c e l i f e l o n g 3 5 2 6 2 8 2 2 91CT I O
- 1,44-0905 352-628-2291.
ceLL: 400-1722 PreventDryerFiresNow.comU


COPES POOL
AND PAVER LLC
YOUR INTERLOCKING BRICK PAVER SPECIALIST
Build your new pool now and
be ready for next summer!
Refinish your pool during the cooler months.

352-400-3188


* Furniture Refinishing
* Entryway Refinishing
* Tool/Knife Sharpening
* Pressure Washing
* Lawn/Property Maintenance

Classical Custom
Services, Inc.
Mark McClendon

352-613-7934
Over 20 Years Experience Licensed& Insured


* New Landscapes

* One Time Cuts

* Free Estimates




'" Rivenbark Lawn
& Landscape
(352) 464-3566






POOL-TEC
REPAIRS EQUIPMENT
PUMPS FILTERS
HEAT PUMPS
SALT SYSTEMS

RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL
32 YEARS EXPERIENCE

y CALL ALAN 422-6956
STATE LICENSE #CPCO51584


BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Day,
We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over"Your Old One!!!
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!
Call now for a FREE
In-Home Estimate

1-866-585-8827
BATHFITTER.COM
000AECJ


0f o Lawn Mowers
0 Trimmers
0 Chain Saws
0 Blowers
Pl-?..i.ilr- \V Th-I-r.



FREE ESTIMATES


I )OR RENTAL.
OPEN 7 DAYS 795-5600
8081 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Crystal River


0 Decorative Mulch
NEW & Stones
zOCMI, 0' Top Soil
DELIVERYAVAILABLE
WE HAVE SPECIAL
PRICES AVAILABLE!
g4.'NSH jm
NURSERY
6658 W. GULF To LAKE HWY.
CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429
(352) 302-6436


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


|. i! d I! L, FAL, 1







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


crate, heavy duty w/ bot-
tom tray. 17 1/2"W X
24"LX 20 1/2 H. $15.00
Call 746-1017
Port Generator
5550/8500 Watts, on
whls, + 25' 4 outlets
adapt cable $450
(812) 629-6538
SEWING MACHINE New
Home. In cabinet with at-
tachments. $25.00
563-2121
Siemans Over the Ear
Hearing Aid
Good Condition
Includes battery
Paid $825. Asking $400
(352) 382-3879
TELEPHONE ANSWER-
ING MACHINE $10 LIKE
NEW E-MAIL PHOTO
419-5981
Wrought iron patio
furniture, 8pc., $300 for
all. Elec. Guitar & amp,
$125 for both.
(352) 586-9498



BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We Also
Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676










BABY GRAND
Antique Piano
needs tune-up
$800 or best offer
(352) 489-9266
PIANO Henry Miller
upright. Great shape
$500 464-0443
PIANO, GUITAR
Fender Rhodes, Mark 1,
88 keys, grt cond $500
SLAMMER BZ4 Base
Guitar, Brand new,
Cobalt $200
(352) 527-2759



FLOOR TILES 12 x 12's
/118 piecies/25.00 Linda
341-4449
KITCHEN TABLE & 4
CHAIRS. Oval formica
top, 1 leaf. Chairs cloth,
swivel casters. $100
OBO 484-357-7150
ROCK SALT
1&1/2 bags. $4.
Call 527-6425
ROTISSERIE BY SUN-
BEAM $55 CAROUSEL
STYLE-EASY TO
USE-CAN E-MAIL
PHOTO 419-5981
SEWING MACHINE
Electronic,multi stitch,
heavy duty, cost $350,
bargain $95 In box,as
new, 563 1915



TOTAL GYM
little used w/instruction
manual $100 exercise
bike, recumbant seat,
electric meter $100
(352) 344-5740
WEIDER PRO 4100
WEIGHT SYSTEM
2 station complete body
work out.5 yrs.$90.00
352-527-0324




40 Acres/Levy Co.
Hunting Property
Camper, Pond, Feed-
ers, Plots, Stands Blinds
$75,000. (352) 593-0335
CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pond,
ATV trails $165Kobo
352 795-2027/ 634-4745
CLUB CAR
'06 $1,500
with charger
352-344-8516
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
DOWNRIGGER Cannon
EASI-TROLL like new
with weight. $50
352400-0141
Full Set Men's &
Women's Golf Clubs
w/ shoes, bags, Also
Third set of clubs & bag
All for $125. obo
(989)965-1915
GOLF CLUBS Ladies
11 piece matched clubs -
woods, irons, putter, PW,
rescue wood, bag, head
covers, pull cart, umbrella
and 1 doz+ balls. $100.
352/513-4536
GOLF DRIVER Nike
Sasquatch Sumo 10.5R
Diamana graphite std loft
and lie exc cond + HC
$50. Dunnellon 465.8495

GUN SHOW
LEESBURG NAT'L GRD
ARMORY
400 West Meadow St,
Leesburg FI 34748
Sat, 9-5, Sun, 9-4
Concealed Weapons
Classes Daily
GunTraders is now
buying GOLD
Bring your GUNS &
GOLD to sell or trade.
Free Safety Class
at 10 & 1
GunTrader
GunShows.com
352-359-0134
OCALA GOLF
CART SUPER CENTER
12 Club Car Precedent
$5295, 09 $4595, All Col-
ors, Warranty- Battery
Sale 352-291-7626
POOL TABLE
SMALL $50.
fold up Ping-Pong
Table $75.


(352) 527-1747
WE BUY GUNS
On Site Gun Smithing
(352) 726-5238




EZ PULL TRAILERS,
New & Used

Utility & Enclosed
BUY, SELL, TRADE
Custom Built, Parts,
Tires, Whis, Repairs,
Trailer Hitches

New6x 12 open
utility w/ramp $935

Trailer Tires from
$34.49

Hwy 44 Crystal River
352-564-1299


GULF TO LAKE
TRAILER SALES

Largest Selection &
Lowest Prices.
Offering New & Used
Cargo & utility trailers

Triple Crown Utility TRL
6 x 12 w/new spare
$1050.
6 x 12 Enclosed w/
V nose, rear ramp
door, $1995.

Trailer Tires
starting at $69.95

352-527-0555
Hwy 44, Lecanto



Sell r Swa


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966






CASH For Silver, Decoys
Antiques, Paintings,
Furnitures Cameras, &
Pottery (352) 503-2843








WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area.
Condition or Situation.
Call (352) 726-9369





AKC,ENGLISH BULLDOG
PUPS, chubby, healthy
10 wks 5 male I fern
parents on premises,
h/c shots $1200 Connie
or Jim (352) 341-7732
cell 352-613-3778

BABY NUBIAN GOATS
PETS Boys/Girls, $75 ea
I will mow your lawn.
(352) 560-0370






DOG OBEDIENCE
CLASSES STARTING
March 31 In Lecanto
352-794-6314


DOWNSIZING
Koi and Gold Fish
FOR SALE, Even Better
Prices, ALL sizes
(352) 634-1783

LABRADOODLE PUPS
F2 Full of bounce!
Several colors & coat
textures, 2 boys, 4 girls,
ready 3/23, shots, h/c
$500. 352-410-0080


Yellow or black, male and
female. 1 rare mismarked
female. Very healthy with
shots and health certifi-
cates. Not kennel bred.
$350 3O5 224 4-11


Poodles, Mini Pups,
2 black males, 2 black
females, AKC reg.
beautiful & well social-
ized. Champion Sired
$400. (352) 527-1920

PUPPIES
CHIHUHUA/
DACHSHUND MIX
8 wks old, shots
and health certificate
$300 (352) 465-4711





Electric Dog fence
Hidden, all parts + 2000'
wire w/instructions $45.
(352) 382-3467





Mini Donkeys, Horses &
Ponies, used & new
saddles and tack,
Diamond P Farm
352-873-6033


Livestock


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
AifAfiAArA


BABY NUBIAN GOATS
PETS Boys/Girls, $75 ea
I will mow your lawn.
(352) 560-0370




EVINRUDE 89
40HP
Power T &T, w/controls
completely tuned/new
paint $1500
(352) 564-1324




2004 ALUMACRAFT
JON BOAT
14 Jon Boat w/15hp
Johnson.Asking
$1900obo352-302-5993

CAROLINA SKIFF
2001 Skiff 19 foot -excel-
lent condition 90 hp
Yamaha, bimini top, ra-
dio, depth finder. Includes
trailer with new tires.
$7500 obo 352-895-2382


CHRIS CRAFT
1984 Scorpion 230 This
23' boat is ready to run.
Full Electronics, spare
starter, engine belts,
shore electric cables, all
weather standup cockpit
cover with windows, head
and galley with refriger-
ator and stove. New
throttle cables. 2 spare
props and 2 new batter-
ies. 2 USCG approved
pfd's and more. $4900.00
352-344-2821

CRAFTSMAN 10FT
Aluminum flat bottom
new oars, extras, lic to
2012 for motor $ 275
(352) 465-7506

CREST
2003, 22 ft, Super sport,
2004 Mtr 90HP Johns,
Tandem axle galv. trlr.
$13,500 (352) 795-8941
or (352) 422-1569

KEY WEST 19.9
Bay Reef, 150 hp
Honda, 651b 24 volt trol-
ling motor, hvy duty
trailer(352) 726-4325

LUND
1978 15' FIBERGLASS
Bass Boat w/Trailer. 30
horse Johnson. 60beam.
Console Steer. 50# Troll-
ing motor. Only needs
new battery to run. First
$1750 (firm) takes it.
352-341-0447.

MONTEREY
1996 Bow Rider 20 ft 135
HP I/O Bimini top. Trailer
w/spare. Good cond
$4000. 352-419-5605

PACECRAFT
'89, 16 ft. Flats Boat 50
Merc, polling platform,
rerigged & painted 2005
$6,200 352-447-5560

PALM COAST
'00, 16 ft, CC, 3 batter-
ies, 50HP John, elect.
mtr. & trlr. depth find.
$3,000 (352) 249-7994

PROLINE
21' Cuddy, full transom,
w/brack, 150 HP Yam.,
Bimini, VHF, porta pot,
dep. finder, trailer $5K
firm (352) 382-3298

Stamas 22'
cuddy rebuilt 225 hp
OB. galv trailer, new
tanks, windless, trim
tabs, bimini, cushions,
steering $3800 or trade
(352) 447-5655

WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LAKE
MARINE
We Pay CASH For Used
Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck & Fishing
Boats (352)527-0555
boatsupercenter.com






















YACHTSMAN
24' Pontoon, 70 HP Ev.
T/T, cust. trlr, bimini top,
stored inside $3500 incls
all gear (231) 852-0061




Bounder
Fleetwood 32 1994
454 engine, loaded.
self contained $9,750
352-795-6736

CAMPER 5TH WHEEL
1991 Terry Resort
good condition, ready
to camp $2500
(603) 731-6070

GULF STREAM 08
32' 3 slides, rear. kit.
K bed,50amp, like new
extras $31,500
(352) 726-1906

HITCHHIKER II LS
2008, 3 slides, excel
cond. heat pump, de-
luxe pkg. too many ex-
tras to list $32,000.
Dodge Truck also avail
(636) 209-0308

Holiday Rambler
98 ,38 7.5 gen.super
slide, air lever, a/c susp.
loaded call for details
$41K (352) 746-9211

I Buy RV'S, Steve
Henry, RV World of
Hudson Inc.Since
1974. (888) 674-8376
(727) 514-8875

JAYCO
'04, 36 foot, 5th wheel
toy hauler, generator.
slide, fuel station $18,500
Truck Avail For Sale
Local (502) 345-0285


GULF STREAM
Coach 25' model
24RBL, sips upto 6 gas &
elect appls & heat,
shower/toliet $6900
(352) 341-1714
I BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
call me 352-201-6945
SUNNYBROOK
2005 36ft, 5th whl,2
slides, kg bed,like
newheated tks, 60
amp service oak cab
$33,400 352-382-3298



4 Good Year
Wrangler NTR Kevlar
Side Tread w/ center
cover LT285 75 R 16,
mounted and
balanced on 8 lug
Ford Factory Rims
$395. (352) 628-5222
CHEVROLET
1999 corvette L&R side
mufflers and tailpipes.
New condition. Replaced
with Z06 set in
2001 .$650 for both or of-
fer. 5000 miles on origi-
nals. 1-352-503-6548



$$ CASH PAID $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
BIG SALE!
Consignment USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
AUTOS' FROM $1,500.
US 19 BY AIRPORT
US 44, BY NAPA
Low Payments *
461-4518 & 795-4440
consignmentusa.org
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not*
CASH PAID $300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars Trucks
& Vans, For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES,
Hwy 19... 352 564-8333
CASH PAID FOR JUNK
CARS Any Condition
Up to $500., Free
Towing 352-445-3909
KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Salvage Pays top $$$
for your autos.
352-628-4144
WANTED
GEO TRACKER
0505
(352) 726-7764
WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
Perfect Cond. or Not
TItled,No title,
No problem. Paying up
to $25K any make,
any model Call A.J.
813-335-3794/531-4298




'08 Chrysler
Sebring Touring
Convertible,34k miles,
loaded, $14,250firm
352-897-4520
AFFORDABLE
AUTOS & VANS
Everybody Rides
$495 DOWN
$49 PER WEEK
BUY HERE PAY
HERE..
Lots of clean-safe-
dependable rides.
CALL DAN TODAY
(352)563 -1902
"WE BUYS CARS
DEAD OR ALIVE"
1675 Suncoast Hwy.
Homosassa Fl.

BIG SALE!
Consignment USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
AUTOS' FROM $1,500.
US 19 BY AIRPORT
US 44, BY NAPA
Low Payments -k
461-4518 & 795-4440
consignmentusa.org
CADILLAC 04
DeVIlle 66k mi, garaged
Champagne, w/top +
Gold Cream leather
$8,995, 352-341-4949
CADILLAC
1993 Allante Nstar. Soft
& hardtop auto
low miles black mint
$16KObo 352-563-1915
CAMARO '11
CONV. RED, 3K miles
$28,500 (352) 419-6768


CLASSIFIED




Camaro 97
Z28, 97K mis. T-tops,
exc cond. White with
orang strips $8K obo
352-302-7204
CHEVY
'07, Impala, V6, auto,
ice cold AC, non smok-
ers 100K mi $7,500
(352) 726-3093
KAWASAKI '82
11,662K mis. LTD 550
lots of extras
great cond $1000 obo
(352) 228-1897
LINCOLN
2006 Towncar,
seabreeze green,
extra nice, $10,500
(830) 534-1918
LINCOLN
'97, Town Car, Cartier
custom, very well main-
tained, all records,
V-good cond. Must See
No calls after 6pm
(352) 860-0688
MAZDA
2003 Miata MX5 5-speed,
silver, convertible.
Very good condition.
49000 miles.
$10,500. (352)419-5605
MERCEDES '99
S420, blue book $11,500
sell $10K FIRM
1729 W. Gulf to lake
Hwy, Lecanto
MERCURY
'97 Grand Marquis, ex-
cellent shape
Must See
$2,500., 352-344-8516
MERCURY
'97, Grand Marquis, LS
Forest Green, 4 DR.
86,500 mi. org. own
$3,200 (352) 382-2238
TOYOTA
2001 Camry LE, loaded
with leather, 4-cyl,
auto. $3,800
(352) 746-2932




Volkswaaen
2003 Beetle
Convertible, Like New
Low Miles $6,995
Chrysler
2008 Sebring,
One Owner Great
MPG $10,988
Honda
2008 Civic, Won't Last
at this Price $10,998
Buick
2007 Lucerne,
Showroom Condition
$12,998
Chevrolet
2009 Impala,
Not One Nicer Call
for Details $12,998
Buick
2007 Rendezvous
CXL, Loaded with
Toys Take over Pay-
ments @ $259 WAC
Cadillac
2006 SRX, Too Many
Options to List Take
over Payments @
$279 WAC
Ford
2010 Edge
Limited, Call for
Equipment Take Over
Payments @ $349
Honda
2010 Pilot EXL,
Honda Certified
Take over Payments
@ $399 WAC
Chevrolet
2011 Silverado 2500
HD, Ready to Haul
Take over Payments
@ $399 WAC
888-874-5524




BUICK RIVIERA 90
All Options, Moon Roof
68k miles, A true classic
Immac.Cond$6700 obo
(352)634-3806
C hevy 81
El Camino reg V6, 3 spd
stick runs & looks great
$4250 (518) 755-0677
Floral City, Florida







Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966


SUNDAY, MARCH 25, 2012 D7


CHEVROLET '01
Camaro, Z28, Org. 9000
miles, Pristine show car
frozen in time. Loaded
black/black leather
Flawless rare find!
$15,750 (352) 513-4257
TORONADO '92
Olds. White Diamond
red leather, 124K ms
FWD 3800 tuned port
injection V6, 18 city,
28 hwy. Meticulously
maint/garaged
$5K(352) 527-3291




BIG SALE!
Consignment USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
AUTOS' FROM $1,500.
US 19 BY AIRPORT
US 44, BY NAPA
Low Payments *
461-4518 & 795-4440
consignmentusa.org

Ford 02
F150, Ext Cab,
fair cond, runs good
166K mis. $6k obo
352-302-7204
FORD '06
F250 Super Duty, 4 x 4,
6.0, Lariat Pkg. Off Rd.
Pkg., Hard Bed Cover
$21,500 (352) 586-8576
FORD 93
F150- 4x4 FLT, 250K mi.
don't let that scare you
runs great, new tires
cold a/c $3K 795-1015
FORD
'97, F150 XLT, reg. cab,
8ft, 124k, loaded, great
condition $3,500 firm
(352) 344-4157




FORD F350 87
Stake Body Diesel
standard shift,
GREAT work truck
(813) 417-6024
ISUZU TROOPER 02
silverone owner, great
family suv, 124k miles
(813)417-6024




CHEVY
'95, Astro Van 7 Pass.,
loaded w/ front & rear
AC & heat, very clean
inside & out
$2,800 (269) 806-5438




Harley 00
Roadking Classic, all
gear 17K miles 11K
obo.(352) 489-0873
Harley Davidson
02 Heritage soft tail
26K mis. Lots of extra's
Health Forces Sale
$8500 (352) 527-3024
HARLEY DAVIDSON
08 Night Train, flat blk,
11,500 mis. lots of extra's
$14K obo Jeff
(407) 712-0803
HARLEY-
DAVIDSON
2005 FLTRX Road Glide
Custom Oversized
Windshield, King/Queen
seat, Backrest, 24k miles,
$12K 352-257-3130
KAWASAKI
2006 Vulcan 1600 No-
mad Excellent condi-
tion, well serviced. 14k
miles. Newer tires and
battery. Bike jack,
Cycleshell, lots of ac-
cessories. Pix available.
$6495 352-601-7460











main lots of extras ask
$6k obo (352) 214-9800





908-0330 DAILY CRN
Surplus Prop.
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County Board
of County Commissioners
will be selling surplus prop-
erty and equipment via
the internet at
govdeals.com, March 1
until March 30, 2012.
Pub:March 1 thru 30, 2012


311-0401 SUCRN
4/11 Sale- Personal Mini Storage-Dunnellon
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
Personal Property of the following Tenants will be sold for cash to satisfy rental liens in
accordance with Florida Statutes, Self Storage Facility Act, Sections 83-806 and
83-807: PERSONAL MINI STORAGE- DUNNELLON
Unit #00009Cherylyn Morgan #00029 Peter Fenton, Jr. #00049 James Kephart
#00100 Deborah Ziegler #00131 James Fisher #00141 Rita Wilkins
#00228 Roosevelt Cannon #00237 Cinda S. Seibert #00248 Holly M Johnson
#00258 Sandra Uzialko
Contents may include kitchen, household items, bedding, luggage, toys, games,
packed cartons, furniture, tools, clothing, trucks, cars, etc. There's no Title for vehicles
sold at Lien Sale. Owners reserve the right to Bid on Units. Line Sale to be held on the
premises April 11, 2012 @ 2:00 p.m. Viewing will be at the time of the sale only.
Personal Mini Storage Dunnellon, 11955 N. Florida Ave., (Hwy. 41) Dunnellon, FL 34434
(352) 489-6878
March 25 and April 1,2012.


I I I l


AdinistatonII


Noices o .CIdiI


306-0325 SUCRN
Vs, Horton, Harry Eugene 2011 CP 000831 Notice to Cred,
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO.: 2011 CP 000831
IN RE: ESTATE OF HARRY EUGENE HORTON
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS (Summary Administration)
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE:
You are hereby notified that an Order of Summary Administration and Order to De-
termine Homestead Status are pending in the estate of Harry Eugene Horton, de-
ceased, File Number 2011-CP-000831, by the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of which is 110 N. Apopka Ave., Inverness, FL
34450-4231; that the decedent's date of death was 11/29/10; that the total value of
the estate is $52,358.24 and that the names and addresses of those to whom it has
been assigned by such order are:
Name Address
Sharon Horton 125 San Souci Blvd., Panama City, FL 32413
Joyce Blakeman 3907 Red Leaf Court, Point of Rocks, MD 21777
Eugene Horton 126 St. John's Street, Central Islip, NY 11722
Harry Horton, Jr. 1039 Red Robin Lane, Chattanooga, TN 37241
Melody MacCrone 5045 Forest Creek Road, Pace, FL 32571
Lorraine Roos 346 Floyd Drive, Panama City, FL 32444
Michelle Horton 236 Surrey Drive, Bonita, CA 91902
Steven Horton 110 East End Avenue, Apt. PHG, New York, NY 10028
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the estate of the decedent and persons having claims or demands
against the estate of the decedent other than those for whom provision for full pay-
ment was made in the Order of Summary Administration must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA
PROBATE CODE.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER APPLICABLE TIME PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is March 18, 2012.
Petitioners:
/s/ Harry Horton, Jr.
1039 Red Robin Lane, Chattanooga, TN 37241
/s/ Eugene Horton
126 St. John's Street, Central Islip, NY 11722
Attorney for Petitioners:
/s/ Bruce A. McDonald bamcdonald@pensacolalaw.com Florida Bar No. 263311
McDonald Fleming Moorhead dba Statewide Probate 25 W. Government Street,
Pensacola, FL 32502 Phone: (850) 477-0660
March 18 and 25, 2012.


309-0325 SUCRN
Naidhig, Albert M. 2011-CP-852 Notice to Cred.
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File No.: 2011-CP-852
IN RE: ESTATE OF ALBERT M. NAIDHIG
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of the estate of Albert M. Naidhig, deceased,
whose date of death was June 16, 2011; is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus
County, Florida, Probate Division, File Number 2011-CP-852; the address of which is
110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450. The names and addresses of the
personal representative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth be-
low.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, and
who have been served a copy of this notice, must file their claims with this Court
WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims
must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this notice is March 18, 2012.
Personal Representative:
/s/ Janet D. Reghetti
c/o Robert A. Stermer, Esq., 7480 SW Hwy. 200, Ocala, Florida 34476
Attorney for Personal Representative:
Robert A. Stermer, Florida Bar No. 827967 7480 SW Hwy. 200, Ocala, Florida 34476
March 18 and 25 2012.


313-0325 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS
Professional Real Estate Brokerage Services
RFP #013-12
Citrus County Neighborhood Stabilization Programs (NSPI and NSP3)
Citrus County Board of County Commissioners invites interested parties to submit a
Proposal to provide real estate brokerage services for its Neighborhood Stabilization
Program (NSP) which includes NSP1 and NSP3. The NSP was established under the
Housing and Economic Recovery Act of 2008 and additionally funding to support
the NSP was provided for under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of
2009 and the Dodd-Frank Act. Citrus County received approximately $3.9 million un-
der NSP1 and NSP3. Funding under both programs is primarily used to acquire fore-
closed properties, provide rehabilitation and resale or rent properties to eligible par-
ticipants.
In an effort to expedite expenditure of program funds and sale of the properties, the
County is soliciting the services of a professional real estate brokerage firm to assist
with the acquisition and sale of properties under these programs. The services will in-
volve but will not be limited to assisting the County in acquiring eligible properties by
offering professional brokerage opinions using market data, facilitating acquisition
closings in accordance with the NSP parameters and coordinating the sale of the
properties to income eligible homebuyers. Eligible properties can only be acquired
in the following areas of Citrus County: Beverly Hills, Citrus Springs and Inverness
Highlands. More information concerning this can be found in the Scope of Services
Section of this Request for Proposal.
The Successful Proposer or Proposers will work in tandem with the County to identify
NSP eligible single family properties and perform the due diligence required to allow
the County to decide as to whether or not to provide financing for such properties.
Once a purchase decision has been made, the Successful Proposer will facilitate ac-
quisition price negotiations and bring the properties to closing. After the property has
been acquired and rehabilitated, the Successful Proposer will facilitate the sale of
the property to an eligible buyer under the NSP program. The Successful Proposer
will represent the County in all real estate transactions and shall provide its expertise
throughout the County's acquisition phase as well as the homebuyer acquisition
phase.
SEALED Proposals are to be submitted on or before April 25, 2012@ 2:00 PM to Wendy
Crawford, Office of Management & Budget, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Suite 266,
Lecanto, Florida 34461.
A Public Opening of the Proposals is scheduled for April 25, 2012 @ 2:15 PM at 3600
West Sovereign Path, Room 280, Lecanto, Florida 34461. The only information con-
veyed at the public opening will be the names of the companies who submitted
Proposals.
Anyone requiring reasonable accommodations to the public opening because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the Office of Management &
Budget at (352) 527-5457 at least two days before the meetings. If you are hearing
or speech impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 527-5312.
To obtain a copy of the Request for Proposal Document for this announcement,
please visit the Citrus County Website at www.bocc.citrus.fl.us and select
"BIDS/PURCHASING" on the left hand side of the Home Page. Or, call the Office of
Management & Budget/Purchasing at (352) 527-5457.
CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
Winn Webb, Chairman
March 25, 2012.


314-0325 SUCRN
3/26 Audit Workshop City of Crystal River
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN by the City Council of the City of Crystal River, Florida that
an AUDIT WORKSHOP has been scheduled for Monday, March 26, 2011 @ 6:00 p.m. in
the Council Chambers at City Hall, 123 N.W. Highway 19, Crystal River, Florida.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the City of Crystal River, City Manag-
er's Office, 123 NW Highway 19, Crystal River, FL 34428, (352) 795-4216, at least two
(2) days before the meeting.
March 25, 2012.

315-0325 SUCRN
3/26 & 4/9 CRA meetings cancelled City of Crystal River
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN by the Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA) of the
City of Crystal River Florida that two meetings have been cancelled:
March 26, 2012 Meeting scheduled for 6:30 p.m.
April 9, 2012 Meeting scheduled for 6:30 p.m.
The next CRA Meeting is scheduled for April 23, 2012 @ 6:30 p.m.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the City of Crystal River, City Manag-
er's Office, 123 NW Highway 19, Crystal River, FL 34428, (352) 795-4216, at least two
(2) days before the meeting.
March 25, 2012.


310-0325 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
CITRUS COUNTYCONSTRUCTION
LICENSING AND APPEALS BOARD AGENDA
WEDNESDAY March 28, 2012 2:00 P.M.
Lecanto Government Complex
3600 W. Sovereign Path, Lecanto, Florida 34461
DAVID HUTCHINS, CHAIRMAN JAMES WHITE WILLIAM L. WINKEL
LEONARD FRESHMAN GERRY GAUDETTE ROBERT CABLE
(1) CALL TO ORDER
(2) PLEDGE ALLEGIANCE
(3) PROOF OF PUBLICATION
(4) APPROVAL OF MINUTES
(5) SCHEDULED TO MEET THE BOARD:
1. THOMASAL GIROUARD:TO MEET THE BOARD FOR AN ACTIVE IRRIGATION
CONTRACTOR COMPETENCY CARD.
2. ALAN STEWART:TO MEET THE BOARD FOR APPROVAL TO TAKE EXAM FOR TILE.
3. DENNIS M. BAILEY:TO MEET THE BOARD FOR APPROVAL TO TAKE EXAM FOR
ELECTRICAL.
(6) CITATIONS:
A. DAVID ENGLISH Citation # 0023 Commence or perform work for which a
building permit is required, pursuant to an adopted state minimum building
code, without such permit being in effect.
(7) SCHEDULED DISCUSSION:
1. Organizational meeting to select and appoint a chairman and vice
chairman.
2. Assistant County Attorney to give a refresher on the Sunshine Law.
ANY PERSON WHO DECIDES TO APPEAL A DECISION MADE BY THE CONSTRUC-
TIONLICENSING & APPEALS BOARD WITH RESPECT TO ANY MATTER CONSIDERED AT
THIS PUBLIC HEARING WILL NEED TO INSURE THAT A VERBATIM RECORD OF THE PRO-
CEEDING IS MADE, WHICH RECORD SHALL INCLUDE THE TESTIMONY AND EVIDENCE
UPON WHICH THE APPEAL IS TO BE BASED. (SECTION 286.0101, FL. STATUTES.)
ANY PERSON REQUIRING REASONABLE ACCOMMODATION AT THIS MEETING BECAUSE
OF A DISABILITY OR PHYSICAL IMPAIRMENT SHOULD CONTACT THE COUNTY ADMINIS-
TRATOR'S OFFICE, 110 NORTH APOPKA, INVERNESS, FL 34450, (352) 341-6560 AT LEAST
TWO DAYS BEFORE THE MEETING. IF YOU ARE HEARING OR SPEECH IMPAIRED, USE THE
TTY TELEPHONE (352-341-6580) OR LECANTO GOVERNMENT BUILDING (352-527-5350).
March 25, 2012.


312-0325 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE TO BID
The Citrus County Mosquito Control District is offering the following equipment thru
Sealed Bids.
2001 MAX II 500 T (16 hp) ATV 6x6 needs transmission good engine and tires
1982 Ariens Riding Lawn Mower poor condition
2000 Fiberglass Transport Tank 270 gallon good condition
All items sold in "as is, where is" condition without representation or warranty. Any
potential purchaser may inspect and examine the condition of these vehicles prior
to submitting any bid. Successful bidder will be required to sign a release form trans-
ferring all liability of the item. Winning bidder has 24 hours to pick up and remove
item from the property, after which the next highest bidder will be awarded the
item.
These items may be seen Monday thru Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Bid sheets are
available at the District Headquarters, 968 N. Lecanto Hwy, Lecanto, Fl. 34461. All
bids must be received by 4:00 p.m. on April 6, 2012.
Bids will be awarded at the regular Board Meeting on April 12, 2012 at 3:45 p.m.
Further information may be obtained by contacting the office at (352) 527-7478.
The Board reserves the right to reject any and all bids and to waive any and all for-
malities. By order of the Board of Commissioners of the Citrus County Mosquito Con-
trol District.
Robert Milan
Chairman of the Board
Any person who wishes to appeal any decision made by the Board, Agency or
Commission with respect to any matter considered at such meeting or hearing, will
need a record of the proceedings, and that for such purpose, may need to ensure
that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes testimony
and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.
March 25, 2012.


Noie toCeios


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I Ntics


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CRYSTAL


N


SSAN


15 YEAR / 150.000 MILE


LIMITED WARRANTY


2012 NISSAN VERSA


2012


NISSAN SENTRA


731


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND PRICING
1-800-584-8755 Ext.6112
$11,990R $19
With $2999 cash or trade equity
and $500 Nissan Lease Loyalty


B FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND PRICING
1-800-584-8755 Ext.6109
$1 250oR$169
O1PER MO.
Wih $2999 cash or trade equity
and $500 Nissan Lease Loyalty


2012


NISSAN ALTIMA


2012 NISSAN ROGUE


%L


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND PRICING
1-800-584-8755 Ext.6101

SPER MO.
With $2999 cash or trade equity
and $1000 Nissan Lease Lovalty


24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND PRICING
100-584-8755 Ext.6116


PER MO.
With $2999 cash or trade equity
and $1000 Nissan Lease Loyalty


2012


21W


NISSAN FRONTIER


2012 NISSAN


Mw


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND PRICING
1-800-584-8755 Ext.6103


'FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND PRICING
1-800-584-8755 Ext.6108


PER MO.
With $2999 cash or trade equity
and $500 Nissan Lease Loyalty


PER MO.
With $2999 cash or trade equity
and $2000 Nissan Lease Loyalty


N CALL THE INSTANT APPRAISAL LINE

800-440-9054

crystalnissan.com

352-564-1971
937 5. Suncoast Blvd Homosassa, FL 34448


ST


D8 SUNDAY, MARCH 25, 2012




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Honda rA K


REALLY







SALES EVENT
REAL DEALS. BIG INVENTORY.


Come See What LOVE
Can Do For You!!!

VE19 r
Fi--- lA


On approved credit. Must finance with AHFC. 1.36 Month closed end lease 12,000 miles per year with approved credit, plus tax, tag, 1st payment,$4000 cash or trade equity and lease fees excess milage penalty is 20
cents per mile. Limited to in stock vehicles only, all options are at additional price. Residual values: Civic $12043.50, Accord $13081.50, Pilot $16689.60. Pictures for illustration purposes only, all prices plus tax, tag, state
fees and $499 administrative fee. Dealer installed options additional cost, in stock units only. All vehicles subject to prior sale. Applies to in stock units. Offers expire on date of publication.
000AT93


2012 HONDA
FIT
Model GE8H3CEXW, with AUMMATIC, A/C,
Cruise Control, Power Pkg & Much More!
MSRP ........................... $16,745
DISCOUNT ......................... $414
PRICE ........................... $16,331
CASH OR TR"Z .......... $4,000

41ito"01


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SUNDAY, MARCH 25, 2012 D9


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


V


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'04 FRONTIER


'06 HHR


TI-


'08 F150


'08 MALIBU


$6,999 $6,999* $7999 s$7,999
OR$1 M13O OR$l13M. IOR$129MK. OR$129EM.


'09 COBALT


'06 SANTE FE


'04 TITAN


'07 PACIFICA


$7,999 $9,999 | $9,999 $9,999
OR$129 o.OR$161 1. oR$161 E Mo.R$161Mo.


'08 LIBERTY


'07 CRV
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'06 WRANGLER


'08 ALTIMA


$10,999 $10,999 $10,999 $12,999
OR$17 MOIR OR$ 177 OR.I 177 OR. 209 .


'09 CIVIC


'08 LUCERNE

tiM^I-j


'09 CAMRY


'09 TOWN AND COUNTRY


$12,999 $12,999 $13,999 $13,999
OR$209 OR$209 sgO0R$225 .IOR$225 M!





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H Section E SUNDAY, MARCH 25, 2012


OMEFRONI
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE REAL ESTATE GUIDE


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E2 SUNDA~~ MARCH 25, 2012 Cimus Cou2wrY (FL) CHRONICLE


3565 E. COVE PARK TRAIL
This marvelous home features a 1 4x48
screened lanai to just devour. When it's
time to come inside you'll have a master
bedroom with a large walk-in closet and
a tiled bathroom. Open floor plan for
those evenings of entertaining.
GARY ALTMAN (352) 795-2441
Email: garyallman@remax.net l


LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611
Email: lenpalmer@remax.netl


LOCATION, LOCATION, LOCATION!! CHASSAHOWITZKA RETS. l 4BR/2BA POOL HOME... BIG REDUCTION on this roomy, light and
Plenty of Cabinets Kit w/Eat-In Nook MOVE-IN READY!! 3BR/2BA GATED COMMUNITY bright 2004 Nobility 3/2 situated on a nicely
Lovely Mbr.w/Walk-In Updated AC+ HW Heater Fleetwood situated on double lot 1,500 Island kitchen, elegant master suite, manicured lot in a great little neighborhood.
vey r.w/a-n ,pdated + SF, open floor plan, propane FP, newer solar-heated pool, office/4th BR, formal
*Separate DR + FR Inside Laundry appliances, walk-in closets in all BR, living and dining. The kitchen opens on Open, split floor plan with living/dining, large
Brick FacadeOverCB *MinutestoGulf/Rivers Grt. Rm., formal DR, breakfast nook, 3 |' t to large family room and overlooks the kitchen, separate laundry, covered attached
KELL GODDARD 35247853(2) storage sheds. Home furnishings avail. p large lanai and pool enclosure. Call to carport. Hurry before this is scooped up!!
ELLIEY GODDARD 352-287-3997 (2) adj lots 4-sale. F7 see this today
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3007 I t ion is
c, .iM LOU HALLEY (352) 257-9016 i or [, ai WAYNE HEMMERICH (352) 302-8575 CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555
E .MAIL kellg leml nel Emaih iounalley@tampbay.rr.com Email: Wayne@WayneHemmerich.com Email: cnadal@remax.net

21 IWITHLACOOCHEE


COTTAGE
S.. m2006 built 3/2
with 1 -CAR GARAGE/
#WORKSHOP ON
CRYSTAL RIVER 5770 S. BEAVER POINT, HOMOSASSA INVERNESS HIGHLANDS 1 .1 3 ACRES. 1995 Year Built 3/2/2 on .75 Acre
& shows like a model. Fe atures includebrght The perfect waterfront location, close to MOVE-IN READY! Beautiful 1,588 SF 2 DOCKS. Call for HardwoodFrsThroughoutHome
open floor plan, split bedroom, vaulted ceilings, everything. Very roomy 1,566 sq. ft. 2 bed, 2 bed, 2 bath home in perfect condition.
iots of ceramic tile. eat-in kitchen w/breakfast 2 bath on one of the nicest waterfront locations Lrg. living room, huge den & Florida your best deal today. Large Master Suites Split Floor Plan
bar, superior grade appliances, Ig. master bath
w/dual vanities, garden tub, walk-in sh.oer & you can imagine. Large in-ground pool deep room. Fenced backyard in convenient Security System Fully Enclosed Screen
closets, Ig. screened lanai. New roof 2009, canal. 10-minute boat ride to everything, location to all area amenities. All $ 179 900 r S Fl o
new A/ 2012 A feel of country but close to Dr to left on Masn appliances included. MOTIVATED Room for Pool and More
town. Move-in condition! See it today! DIR Take Yulee Dr, to left on Mason reL CAN CLOSE QUIKLY! ose to Schools Must See
MARTHA SATHER (352)212-3929 right on Pan.followgns LUCY BARNES (352) 634-2103lose to chools Mustee!!!
Emlal milha sulhei :,eina. nel JEFF STONE 352-650-2378 MONICA SALDARRIAGA (352) 476-8695 DIRECI Email ulucybarnes remax net CHERYL LAMBERT 352-637-6200
VIRTUAL TOURS Il ,m, Inaha salhei lenma coin .LJ Email: thestonesmn@yahoo.com Emai monicasoldarriasi a@remnx.net Visual Tours: www.cryslalriveril.com Email: cheryllamber @remax.net


2421 N. Le i Hw. Beel Hil 2-82Iw.EA~o I 10W anS. Ivres6760


518 W. RAYMOND PATH
LAUREL RIDGE VILLA
* Elegant Villa Outside Maintenance
* Corian Counters Enclosed Patio
* Built in 2008 Upgraded Appliances
* Greenside Location
PETER & MARVIA KOROL
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875


E2 SUNDAY, MARCH 25, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Wake up your


foliage for spring


It is time to wake up
your trees, shrubs and
bushes. Winter is on its
way out (hopefully) and
spring has arrived.
Like bears, many trees
go into a semi-
dormant sleep
for the fall and
winter months.
In the South, the f
sleep is not as
long or deep as .
those trees up
north. However,
it does still -
happen.
Let's get these Kerry
sleeping beauties TI
back to work ARB(
shading our
property and
neighborhoods. Fbeding our
trees in early spring wakes
up the foliage and roots. It is
tough convincing some
homeowners of the fact that
it is necessary to feed large
trees as well as smaller ones.
But all trees benefit from an
early spring feeding.
The first spring you feed
a large mature tree, it will
put on a foot or more of
new growth. The foliage
color will be darker or
deeper and the layer of
canopy will be thicker and
more vigorous.
By feeding smaller trees,


I
O


the benefits are even greater
The ideal time to feed trees,
shrubs and bushes is March,
June and September It cre-
ates a stable benefit to trees
to get them on a regular
feeding program.
A well-fed tree is
more likely to
overcome some
S problems or
stress-related fac-
tors than one
. without the an-
nual feeding
program.
Keep your
Kreider trees happy and
iE healthy and they
IRIST will do the same
for you. The old
saying "you only
get back what you give" ap-
plies here. Spring is also a
good time to trim your trees
before the big windstorms
and hurricane season ap-
proaches. Early preparation
may save your prized trees.

Kerry Kreider is a practic-
ing arborist and a member
of the International Soci-
ety ofArboriculture, a tree
preserve tionist and presi-
dent ofAction Tree Serv-
ice. You can reach us at
352-726-9724 or actionpro
arborist@yahoo. com.


Fight rising



food prices


Food prices are rising.
Packages are shrink-
ing. Some people
aren't overly con-
cerned over the
price hikes. But
frugal families do
watch their food
budget closely,
because every
dollar and cent
counts, right?
Here are a few
ways to help: Sara
Use it up: You
paid for it, so you FRU
might as well get LIV
every bit out of it.
One example: A rubber
spatula is your friend. Use
one to scrape the last bit of
product from your jars. One
reader, Franny from the Pa-
cific Northwest, shares: "I
use long-handled plastic
iced tea spoons I bought at
the dollar store to clean out
my jars."
Use less: It's easy to waste
food by using too much. This
is especially true with
pourable products and
those in squeezable con-
tainers. Try to use less or
measure so you don't use
more than is necessary For
example, use less salad
dressing. Mix your salad


and dressing (by holding a
plate over the top of the
bowl, using a container with
a lid or shaking
them in a plastic
bag) to disperse
the dressing
evenly
Shop around:
You can shop eth-
nic markets, bak-
ery outlets, dollar
stores, pharma-
Noel cies, warehouse
clubs or discount
GAL grocery stores
ING such as Aldi. For
state-by-state list-
ings of salvage grocery
stores, visit frugalvillage.
com/forums/discount-
stores/97055-salvage-
grocery-list-state.html. Visit
brightdsl.netV-fwo/index.ht
ml and check the "Known
Produce Auctions" section
to start your search for any
produce auctions that might
be in your area.
Keep a price book to track
the costs of the items you
buy frequently Take advan-
tage of price matching
whenever possible. Another
reader, Joshin from
Washington, shares: "What


Real Estate DIGEST
Ivory, Mills table accomplish-
hit new highs ment.
Realtor Barbara
at RE/MAX : Mills has qualified for
The associates and the million dollar club.
staff of RE/MAX Re- She joins a small
alty One are proud to group of agents who
recognize Alan Ivory. A have qualified for this
Alan has qualified for Alan prestigious club this
the prestigious 2012 Ivory year.
multimillion dollar RE/MAX Barbara has been
club. Just a handful of Realty One. a very active worker
agents qualify for this in her efforts to honor
club each year. our soldiers and vet-
Alan has done it in e erans of war. She
less than three loves helping these
months. He is an heroes get the recog-
agent in the Crystal nation and apprecia-
River office of tion they deserve.
RE/MAX located on She's also a very
U.S. 19. He special- Barbara talented Realtor who
izes in distressed Mills works out of the In-
property sales and RE/MAX verness RE/MAX Re-
has earned several Realty One. alty One office. Her
professional designa- co-workers congratu-
tions. The brokers of RE/MAX late Barbara on her continued
congratulate Alan on this no- success.

U The Chronicle has forms available for wedding and
engagement announcements, anniversaries, birth
announcements and first birthdays.


See FRUGAL/Page E4


KELLER WILLIAMS.
R E A L T Y


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CRYSTAL RIVER DUPLEX!
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NEW roof, appliances, cabinets, flooring and paint
inside and out! Private backyard backs up to state
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A GREAT INVESTMENT mis # 343731
OOOAYQ1 Call Dan Hoffman 352-601-3627


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NEW HOMES, VILLAS, REMODELS & COMMERCIAL


Building
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SUNDAY, MARCH 25, 2012 E3


(
l


a







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E3

fruits and vegetables we don't grow,
we purchase in the form of a huge
fruits and veggies basket from Bounti-
ful Baskets (BountifulBaskets.org), a
produce co-op available in several
states. The $15 basket is available
weekly, but you only buy-in when you
want. We buy flour, sugar and pasta in
bulk at a restaurant supply store for a
fraction of what it costs elsewhere. We
buy meat in bulk directly from a
butcher and freeze it. We only pur-
chase beef once a year this way I also
rarely make meat main dishes and in-
stead use 1/4 to 1/2 pound as an ingre-
dient or topping in other types of
meals. We buy no junk food or
prepackaged food, with the exception
of dry pasta. I make desserts and
snacks from scratch. We even brew our
own beer and ginger ale."
Grow your own: Plant fruit trees,
berries, herbs and vegetables. You can
freeze, can or dehydrate to have less
expensive food to enjoy throughout
the year Try growing sprouts, for only
pennies per serving. Another reader,
Karen in Kansas, shares: "Sprouts are
the perfect little 'kitchen garden in a
jar.' They're some of the most nutri-
tious and least expensive vegetables
you can grow yourself, no matter
where you live. Suggested reading:
'The Sprouting Book' by Ann
Wigmore."
Wild-food foraging: Look for books
or websites on wild-food foraging and
edible plants. Contact farmers, gro-
cery stores, u-pick farms or your
neighbors and ask if you can glean
their excess. Fallen fruit and unhar-
vested vegetables rot and can be a
chore to clean up, so they might be
more than happy to give it away Offer
to volunteer some time if necessary to
help them in exchange for food. You
can place an ad in your local newspa-
per or on Craigslist.org or
Freecycle.org, too.
MEU
You can reuse a plastic coffee can-
ister or ice cream tub in your kitchen
for scraps and when it's full, dump it
into a larger compost container or
pile. You can make a kitchen compost
pail from an empty kitty litter pail, too.
Visit frugalvillage.com/forums/make-
yourself/93448-homemade-kitchen-
compost-pail.html for directions and
photos.
The first reader tip shares a way to
make a backyard compost bin:
DIY compost bin: Use screws to fas-
ten four pallets together to make a
square, or use 10 pallets to make a
See FRUGAL/Page E11


Guide to latest showerhead lingo


Q I want to install a
showerhead and
have been trying
to choose a new one. But it
seems that
everyone I talk to
has a different

erhead, and
there's a lot of
choices. Please
explain the cor-
rect terms. This
way I'll sound
like an expert Ed Del
the next time I ASK
talk to a sales-
person! Jeff, PLU
Rhode Island
A: Changing a shower-
head is one of those jobs that
most do-it-yourselfers want
to try The key is to be prop-
erly prepared right from the
start. With that in mind,
here's a basic list of the most
popular types of showers:
Single-function show-
erhead This is your basic
showerhead that attaches
to the chrome shower arm
sticking out of the wall.
Multifunction shower-
head Installs the same
as the single-function, but
will have different spray
settings, like wide, narrow
and/or massage.


Rain showerhead -
Usually requires a special
installation. This is a wide
head designed to be
mounted higher
r Body
shower spray -
Usually requires
a special instal-
lation. The head
is mounted
lower on the
wall, and sprays
out horizontally
Grande U Personal
THE shower At-
taches to the
aBER shower arm with
a special hanger/
bracket It has a hose so the
shower can also be used as a
hand-held spray
Bottom line: If you use
these terms when asking
about your new shower-
head, you'll no longer be
speaking with "watered
down" information!


Master plumber Ed Del
Grande is the author of
"Ed Del Grande's House
Call," the host of TV and
Internet shows, and a
LEED green associate.
Visit eddelgrande.com or
write eadelg@cs.com.


110 E. Keller Ct., tlernando
Citrus Hills Oaks Golf Course
Located on the 8th green of the Oaks Golf Course, this comfortable
and elegant home is perfect for relaxing and entertaining. This
contemporary Mediterranean style home sits in harmony with the
land. The open design allows light and natural beauty to pervade.
Throughout the home your line of vision is drawn towards the
pool and golf course. The outdoor gathering areas, the
landscaping, the brick pavers and the beautiful Oaks Golf Course
views transform this attractive house into a beautiful home.
Citrus Hills Membership Available. MLS#35Z985 $Z99,000

Edward Russell Johnston, Inc.
General Contractor
State Certified CGC06Z630
531 North Citrus Avenue, Crystal River, FL 344Z8
(352)795-2200
www.erj.net


Knowing the types and functions of various showerheads is important.


eAiS


Investors Realty
of Citrus County, Inc.
Visit my website at: www.myflorida-house.c
71[ l


38 HAWTHORNE
CYPRESS VILLAGE
Fabulous Sweetwater 3/2/2 home on cul-
de-sac! Move-in ready condition. All
neutral colors and sparkling clean!
Conveniently located to the new 1. , :...
center and Suncoast Parkway.
MLS 353832 $149,000


GITTA BARTH I
REALTOR@
(352) 220-0466
:om gbarth@myflorida-house.com

- I So A4"t71


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community on Lake Tsala Apopk-. *r r '--"n4 'v/exquisite taste, attention to
floor plan, vaulted ceilings, tile :1 i i..i I. quality & craftsmanship shows
. .. i .. ... 1. .. 1 .has room throughout the 3 bed, 2 5 bath, 4-car garage
I I home Fenced paddock w/water & shelter
MLS #353089 $116,000 MLS #349970 $415,000


ziz *r d^^r^.z7].


3560 N WOODCATE DR. -. 4 -.1,
THE CLEN 1432 SEATTLE SLEW
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large greenbelt yours wwwmycountrydreamhome corn
LS #350097 $54,000 LS #351012 $215,000 MLS# 350369.$565,000


115 N. LEGION TERR.
CITRUS HILLS 7080 DUVAL ISLAND DR.
.., ....... ...... 1. . .. FLO RAL CITY
nice landscaping in beautiful Citrus Hills!! LIVING ON THE WATER! Incredible Vistas open waterfront on
Situated on a one acre corner lot, this This classic contemporary pool home is Lake Tsala Apopka, beautiful landscaped
r" 1- 1..... 1 ..I ,, 1 ... 1 ,, right setting for living the Florida yard with waterfall and pond, a dock for
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want!! Everything is very well maintained, shutters diffusing the sunlight. 190 ft. of home on 05 acre offers the lifestyle and
New roof 5/2009. Just bring your suitcase seawall gives you plenty of room you deserve. It can be your
and move right in! .11 . .... , 11 0' .. .
MLS #346203 $175,000 11 $489,000 MLS #351008 $239,000


E4SUNDAY, MARCH 25, 2012


(

VI







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


A doghouse designed by


... Frank Lloyd Wright?


Associated Press
Jim Berger poses next to a doghouse designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in
Glendale, Calif.


Associated Press

SAN FRANCISCO The Solomon
R. Guggenheim Museum in New York
City The Fallingwater home in south-
western Pennsylvania. But a child's
doghouse?
Frank Lloyd Wright designed hun-
dreds of landmark buildings and
homes during a prolific career that
spanned more than seven decades.
But in what is widely considered a
first and only for the famed architect,
Wright indulged a young boy's humble
request for a dog house in 1956 and
sent him designs for the structure.
"I was probably his youngest client
and poorest client," Jim Berger, now
68, said during a recent phone i
interview.
Berger rebuilt the doghouse last
year with his brother, using the origi-
nal plans. It was featured in a docu-
mentary film and will be displayed
during screenings starting this month.
Wright designed Berger's family's


manda & rk Johnson Tom Balfour Ul Averms & Hal Steile Art Paty 7 4 6 9 0 0 0
BROKER/ASSOC. REALTOR, C REALTOR EALTOR- BROKER REALTOR







238 E. TRIPLE CROWN L 5984 N. ROSEWOOD 3427 PINE RIDGE BLVD. 9005 N. CITRUS SPRINGS BLVD. 44 CHICKAPIN CIRCLE
$229900 3/3/2 354267 $245,000 4/3/3 353901 $169,900 3/2/2 354378 $169,900





7170 N. GRACKLE 2173 W. TACOMA 6396 N. EARLSHIRE 510 W. PLAYER PATH 290 N. STAFF PT.





9870. E3N $9 90L H LLS $4
822 W.9870 N. CORTLAND DR. 4144 N. MAE WEST 9469 W. HEREFORD LN 21 TRUMAN BLVD.
3/2/2 353982 $89,900 2/2/2 352002 $74,500 3/2/2 351560 $86,900 3/2 354145 $69,000 2/2/2 351656 $59,900




JjL.9 i J.AL 2LL_ j-IJ j
101 BARBOUR ST. 44 S. JACKSON 15 S. FILLMORE 45 S. MELBOURNE 9570 N. CITRUS SPRINGS
2//2 354334 $64,900 21 354360 $49,900 354359 $54,900 $84 900348850 $176,900
3521 N. LECANTO HWY., BEVERLY HILLS, FL 34465 1-888-789-7100


home in the Marin County town of San
Anselmo, prompting the then-12 year-
old Berger to ask his dad if Wright
would design a home for his black
Labrador, Eddie.
Berger's dad said he didn't know, so
Berger decided to write to the great
architect himself.
"I would appreciate it if you would
design me a doghouse, which would
be easy to build, but would go with our
house...," read the letter dated June
19, 1956. "(My dog) is two and a half
feet high and three feet long. The rea-
sons I would like this doghouse is for
the winters mainly"

See WRIGHT/Page Ell


l< Jackie Gaffney Jason Gaffney
Realtori A HOUSE Realtor'.'
302.3179 soL an' 287.9022
WEEKS REALTY, 5 BEVERLY HILLS BLVD.
The Golden Girl 746.6700
4124 N. DAVIS ST.
BEVERLY HILLS

I 1 I 1 ,, 1 I .I
II I II i i ni ..lh ,, l ...ll .I,,, I,,, .... I"
lI' "J


3540 N. WOODGATE DR.
BEVERLY HILLS
SCute as a button, move-in ready, 2/2/1,
S' easy living 55+ community, new carpet &
interior paint, furniture is negotiable with
. i sale. Home is sold AS-IS with right to inspect.


EXIT Realty Leaders
Crystal River 352-795-0888 0
L M -- Beverly Hills 352-527-1112 I
11, J J0 =1- J I I':' ,
4020 N PONY DR., PINE RIDGE
Custom built home in prime Equestrian area of Pine Ridge
Fenced 1-1/2 acre paddock w/12x24 feed & tack room w/
water & electric Two 12x12 stalls, & gate to 28 miles of
private riding trails Features include pool, spa & waterfalls
with natural stone, master bedroom w/fireplace, bath w/

Directions:" PineRidg Richard De VIra Cell 352 601-S273
Pony Dr., House on right. Nancy Lee Ayres Broker Associate Cell 352-279-5058

91 W. FOREST OAK PL, BEVERLY HILLS
OAK RIDGE Come see this very well kept 3 BR 2 5 s( i
heated pool and spa home with summer kitchen ir
I I r ,1 -,,

Directions 491 North to right onto Whispering
Look (1st entrance to Oak Ridge) Left on N Misty
Ter Right on Forest Oak Place
Lili Garcia 352-302-9129
SPECTACULAR FOUR BEDROOM HOME
in lovely Crystal Oaks subdivision. Inviting,
?, open floor plan with a view of the pool
from nearly every room! This home has
been lovingly maintained and is move in
| ... "' ready! Come live the Florida lifestyle!
S-_ .! 9354406
-.,+.:'. ^ ~Visit www.467NTurkeyPineLoop.info
; for more details 888-303-6405 code 9415
Gene Wade


SUNDAY, MARCH 25, 2012 E5







E6 SUNDAY, MARCH 25, 2012



HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information........352-563-5592
.................................................. advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information........................352-563-5966
News information................................................ 352-563-5660
....................................... ............. newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listing............www.ChronicleHomeFinder.com
"The market leader in real estate information"

Ci ikoNiCLE


HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-563-
3280, attention HomeFront.
News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront.
Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes for
space and/or clarity.
For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


Study shows benefits of


youth livestock shows

ST'now farmers, know food," is a accountable, engaged, and will have a bet-
play on words that the Agricul- ter understanding of life than a young per-
l.X.tural Alliance has son who has not had similar
on their bumper stickers. Not experiences. The purpose of or-
only does it strike me as funny I ganizations like 4-H and FFA is
but also quite truthful. Having a ] to develop leadership, citizen-
reliable source of food is some- i ship and life skills among
thing we take for granted here -members.
in America. Farmers who are A study conducted at Texas
involved in agricultural food Tech University was aimed at
production are very important, l validating the perceived bene-
unsung heroes. With the aver- fits of competitive youth live-
age age of today's rancher stock exhibition. The results of
around 60 years old, the ques- the study produced a number of
tion arises: Who are the future Amy Duncan surprises. The most common
agricultural producers? YOUNG benefit that most people men-
Livestock projects that have tion about livestock exhibition
been raised by Citrus County IDEAS is the responsibility the young
youths will be on display this person gains from raising and
week from March 25 to 31 at the Citrus showing an animal. However, responsibil-
County Fair Nearly 160 4-H club members ity was not the strongest theme to emerge
are registered in livestock 4-H projects in- in the study
cluding rabbits, poultry, steer, heifers and The following are themes generated
swine. from this study and are listed in order of
The purpose of these livestock projects popularity:
is not only to expose youth to the livestock Social Relationships: The development
industry, but also to develop important life of social relationships though the
skills. When a young person has to care for
land or animals, they are going to be more See STUDY/Page E14


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Inside...


Real Estate Digest
PAGE E3
For current property transac-
tions, use the search features on
the website for the Citrus County
Property Appraiser's Office,
www.pa.citrus.fl.us.


Heirloom painting was done by recognized Ohio artist


Dear John: I have a painting that
has been in my mother's family
for as long as I can remember,
and I am 70 years
old. It hung in my
grandmother's
home and I have '
no idea where she R 1
got it from, or
whether she got it
from one of her
parents. I have at-
tached photos that
you can enlarge to John Sikorski
see detail if need SIKORSKI'S
be. Some pictures
may be out of ATTIC
focus. Can you give
me your opinion? -D.M., Internet
Dear D.M.: I am glad you sent a sepa-
rate photograph of the signature on your
painting. The name Jirouch is quite
clear Frank Jirouch, 1878-1970, was born
in Cleveland, Ohio. He was a painter,
etcher, and notable sculptor Jirouch at-
tended the Philadelphia Academy of
Fine Art and studied in Paris. He is
listed with more info in the Encyclope-
dia of Cleveland History. He is best


known for some two dozen sculptures in
Cleveland's Cultural Gardens. His paint-
ings sell below the $1,000 level currently
Dear John: I enjoy your reviews. Here
is a photo of a painting I have had for
many years. She is so pretty. It is an oil
painting but not signed anywhere. Can
you help me with any information at all?
-JH., Beverly Hills
Dear J.H.: I am 99 percent sure you
have a paint by numbers picture. Poten-
tial dollar value is catch-as-catch-can.
DearJohn: I was told by a friend to ask
you if you would know the value and any-
thing else about this Mickey Mantle
signed card I have. I am attaching a
photo of the card. My partner kept this
for years after he was on a private plane
with Mickey and had this signed by him.
Mickey signed it to Bruce's daughters.
See ATTIC/Page E7
This painting was produced by Frank
Jirouch, 1878-1970, an artist from
Cleveland, Ohio, who is best known for a
series of sculptures he did for Cleve-
land's Cultural Gardens. Jirouch's paint-
ings sell in the sub-$1,000 range.
Special to the Chronicle







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Careful pruning can give old plants new flair


LEE REICH
For The Associated Press

A desire to tidy up the gar-
den and do something out-
doors even before
anything much is really hap-
pening there yet, garden-
wise drives many of us
out to prune now.
Good.
March is a fine time for
pruning from the perspec-
tive of most plants. Certain
pruning questions pre-
dictably pop up this time of
year.
A lilac makeover
Lilac sometimes get over-
grown with neglect. Can a
tangled mass of stems with
awkward posture and few
flowers be brought back to
its former glory?
Yes, it can. There are two
options in "renovation
pruning" such a shrub.
The first is the drastic one:
merely lop the whole plant to
within 1 foot of the ground.
Now. The renovated lilac will
hardly be worth looking at


ATTIC
Continued from Page E6

Is this worth anything,
and would it be worth more
if it was not signed directly
to Bruce's daughters? R.,
Internet
Dear R: I think it is safe to
say that everyone reading
this column recognizes
Mickey Mantle as one of the
great names in baseball.
Mickey Mantle autographs
and signed baseballs, photo-
graphs, hats, magazine covers
and more generally sell in the
low hundreds of dollars.
Yes, the personalization
on the card is a negative to
collectors. As a family heir-
loom, it is wonderful for the
heirs. To have it authenti-
cated would be a wise idea
for future generations to
come. Contact www
psacard.com; they special-
ize in authenticating sports
memorabilia.
Dear John: I think this is


for a year, perhaps two. A few
vigorous shoots will grow this
season, fueled by an estab-
lished root system. Late next
winter, thin out some of those
stems, and you're on your
way to a "new" shrub, full of
blossoms and with a graceful
growth habit You will soon
have what amounts to a
whole new plant from the
ground up.
The second option is to
renovate the shrub over a
period of four or five years.
Although this takes more
time, the plant will look de-
cent and flower throughout
the recovery period.
Exercise this option by
cutting two or three of the
oldest stems to ground level
or to vigorous branches low
on the plant each year in
late winter. At the same
time, thin out some of the
youngest sprouts growing
from ground level, making
sure to leave a few as re-
placement shoots for the old
wood you are removing.
After a few years how
many depends on how long

a Chinese coffeepot. It
stands about 9 inches high.
Is it of any value? I have at-
tached photos of the cof-
feepot and mark. J.G.R.,
Internet
Dear J.G.R.: You have a
porcelain chocolate pot.
Drinking chocolate was a
popular social pastime as
early as the 17th century
Chocolate pots are a cate-
gory of collecting. Your pot
was likely produced prior to
World War II in China. It
would likely sell for less
than $50.


John Sikorski has been a
professional in the an-
tiques business for 30
years. He hosts a call-in
radio show, Sikorski's Attic,
on WJUF (90.1 FM) Satur-
days from noon to 1 p.m.
Send questions to Siko-
rski's Attic, c/o The Citrus
County Chronicle, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal
River, FL 34429 or ask
sikorski@aol. com.


the shrub has been neg-
lected you will have cut
away all the old wood and
replaced it with new wood.
This "new" shrub will be
shapely and bear abundant,
fragrant blossoms.
Old and new
Old apple trees similarly
often suffer neglect. Such


OPEN HOUSE SUN. 1-3



Ss 580 E. Keller Ct.
+WrttJ MLS #354108 $199,900
Private 3/2/2 Oaks Golf Course Location
Directions: Rte 486 to south on Citrus Hills
Blvd., to right on Ireland, to home on right.
Dick Hildebrandt 352-586-0478


S 1284 N. Lombardo Ave.
MLS #354074 $159,000
Value excels in this spacious 3/2/2
Mark Casper 352-476-8136


REDUCED
="-W ZL


227
MLS #3
2/2/1 PATIO VILLA in a be
Florence Cleary 352


PENDING


craggy, old trees do have a
rustic charm, but too many
of their fruits are pest-rid-
den, lacking flavor and high
out of reach. Can the plant
be returned to its former
glory?
Again, the answer is yes,
with, again, renovation
pruning.
But before you pick up


PENDING


your pruning tools, ask
yourself whether your ef-
forts will be justified. Is the
tree of a particularly good
variety? Do you really want
a tree where that tree is?
Some young trees could
already be bearing in the
time it would take to restore
this one, so before beginning
renovation pruning, con-


sider "pruning" the tree with
a saw at ground level.
If you do decide to reno-
vate the old tree, now is a
good time to start. First
make some large cuts low in
the tree to thin it out and, if
you want, to lower it and
limit its spread.

See PRUNING/Page E14


ii- PN RIDG &-CITRUS H .OFFICE


PINE RIDGE
1481 Pine Ridge Blvd.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465
(352) 527-1820


( Prudential

Florida Showcase

Properties


CITRUS HILLS
20 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 746-0744


NEW LISTING


..1,i1 3796 N. Blazingstar Way +4 W MLS #352131 $74,900
44't MLS #353921 $79,900 Beautiful 2 bedroom, 2 bath, 2 car garage
I, i 1..1i ii i h .1. II . home, located on corner lot
D ,.r. f.... ktr '. ... F... -.,r FR..rI, BIi' Directions: Rte 486 to right on Forest Ridge Blvd., to
to right on Honeylocust Dr., to left on Blazingstar right on Camomile, to home on corner of Hollyfern.
Jo Ann Martin 352-613-2238 Jo Ann Martin 352-613-2238
NEW LISTING NEW LISTING




624W. Diamond Bird Lp.
llaUle 781 W. Stariasmine PI. 64 WMLS #354309 $89,900
MLS #354323 $113,900 Very nice 2/2/1 fully furnished
Bright, open 2/2/1 pool home maintenance free villa
Tami Mayer 352-476-1507 Jo Ann Martin 352-613-2238


i.ll 165 E. Ireland Ct.
4-ti MLS #354308 $199,000
A "WOW" home, 3/2/2 +den w/new tile
Mike McHale 352-302-3203


210 E. Glassboro C. 155a
MLS #354463 $68,700
Totally furnished 2/2/ condo with carport
Matt Robinson 352-746-0744


1923 W. Jena CI.
I i. :: -4 SII15.900
Completely remodeled 2/2/2
including new front door
Dick Hildebrandt 352-586-0478


PENDING PENDING


IBIP KlE -w I Tw : ........ :1.. as 1-_-----44i- !M
ril 8354 N. Saxon Way 45 EW1 H lW9b 3 3591 N. Honeylocusl Dr. - I 7 ---
S 8354 N. Saxon Way e I 15 E.Har rd 9b vlLS 35142o $79,900 J 101 S. Harrison SI.
MLS #353344 $89,900 MLS #350261 $86,900 Beautiful 2/2/2 one owner home in MLS #353214 $65,000
Newer 3/2/2 home w/fenced yard Partially furnished 2/2/1 spacious Townhome quiet neighborhood Imperial Executive II 2/2/2 with lots of storage
Teresa Boozer 352-634-0213 Dick Hildebrandt 352-586-0478 Jo Ann Martin 352-613-2238 Jo Ann Martin 352-613-2238
P 2011 Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities. An independently owned and operated broker member of Prudential Real Estate Affiliates, Inc., a Prudential Financial company. Prudential, the
." Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are service marks of Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities, registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Used under license. Equal Housing Opportunity.


FoS Virtul T ourS orMS ultipl PSots ,
www.flor-idashowcasepropertiescom


7K PENDING PENDING




N. Volusia PI. 1551 N. Marlborough Lp. 2285 N. Annapolis Ave.
53010 $105,000 MLS #352023 $149,000 MLS #354047 $139,000
autiful setting 3/2/2 one owner home exceptionally clean 2/2/2 Once a Model home w/Florida room
-634-5523 Jane O'Gwynn 352-302-1926 Sandra Olear352-212-4058


SUNDAY, MARCH 25, 2012 E7







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Cheery hue is hottest

new color for spring

SARAH WOLFE
For The Associated Press

old, dramatic and in-
vigorating, Tangerine
Tango is dancing its
way into home decor

punch of reddish-or-
ange panache.
The hue is a vivacious
alternative to last year's cheery
honeysuckle, and design experts say
it's easy to incorporate into any
home.
Pillows, bedspreads and tabletop
accessories in this high-impact color
,: an add spice to any room. Or add
tangerine appliances and personal
electronics for an unexpected pop of
color, says Leatrice Eiseman, execu-
tive director of the Pantone Institute,
the research arm of the Carlstadt,
N.J.-based Pantone Inc., which sets
(olor standards for the home and
fashion industries.
"It's the perfect color to move us
out of the dull and dreary winter
Months and into spring," says Sab-
rinna Soto, host of HGTV's "The High
Low Project"
Paint/Wallpaper
One easy and inexpensive way to
brighten up your home and stay on
top of the trends is to paint an accent
wall in this hot hue.
A bit gun-shy of a tangerine living
room? Secondary rooms, such as
powder rooms and entryways, are
perfect places to experiment with
bold colors, Soto says.
"Surprise your guests with walls
that pop," she says.
Wallpaper by Pennsylvania-based
York Wallcoverings dives head-first
rito the tangerine trend with a vari-
ety of luminescent, metallic gold pat-
terns set against spicy orange
backgrounds.
New Jersey-based Thibaut Design
offers wallpaper in ornate, intricate,
Jacobean paisleys and fanciful
plumed birds in this year's color, as
well as less dramatic florals set
against a cream background.
Furniture
A lacquered side table or club
chair and ottoman are small yet pow-
erful ways to pop this color into a
room through furniture.
"Sometimes the most subtle of ges-
tures are the most outstanding," says
Laura Dailey, vice president of
See Page E15


E8SUNDAY, MARCH 25, 2012












Spring is coming, plants are flowering


C i trus
County,
U S D A
plant hardiness
Zone 9A, is in the
northern part of
Central Florida.
Nearby water
bodies create
slightly warmer
microclimates
where plants
adapted to
warmer Zones 9B
and 10 may sur-


Jane
JAN
GAR


vive winter. Levy and Mar-
ion counties, a few miles
north of the Withlacoochee
and Rainbow Rivers, are
considered North Florida,
where winters average 5 de-
grees Fahrenheit cooler in
Zone 8B. March frosts often


occur in 8B and
occasionally in
9A.
The tri-county
area is in Zone 10
for heat toler-
ance, indicating
that northern
plants such as
tulip, snowdrop
Weber and crocus spring
flowering bulbs
E'S and northern gar-
DEN den perennials
like hostas, pe-
onies and lilac will not sur-
vive Central Florida's hot,
wet summers. These north-
ern plants need more chill
hours in winter too.
In Florida, some plants

See Page E15


JANE WEBER/Special to the Chronicle
Patented 'Encore' azaleas flower for about six months each year, making them worth the more expensive price.


00AYX0


i


REAL ESTATE, INC.
5569 W. GULF TO LAKE HwY.
CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429
oFME: (352) 795-6633
WWW ALEXRE COM E-MAIL: SALES @ALEXRE COM


AGENT ONDSEVEN DAYSAWEEK


'~a- a amFI


MEET AND GREET
* Clubs are invited to submit information about regu-
lar meetings for publication on the Community page
each weekday.
* Include the name of the organization, the time, day
and place of the meeting, whether it meets weekly,
biweekly or monthly, and whom to call for details.
* Send in information attn: Community Page Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL
34429, or fax to 352-563-3280, attention: Club
meetings.
* E-mail to community@ chronicleonline.com.
Include "Club Meetings" in the subject line.
* For special events or fundraisers, submit a separate
news release.


BANK OWNED-HOMOSASSA, FL OPEN LAKE COTTAGE-FLORAL CITY, FL
Handyman doublewide on corner lot with 2BR/1 BA updated cottage situated on tree shaded 1
detached 2 story garage. $37,900 acre of open lake front. $174,900 MLS#349699


ACRE ISLAND ESTATE-INVERNESS, FL BANK BUILDING-INVERNESS, FL
Lake Henderson. $695,900 MLS#351372 sq. ft situated on 100 x 212 lot. $495,000
CALL Roy Bass TODAY (352)726-2471
Email: roybass@fampabay.rr.com www.allcitrusrealty.com After Hours 352)302-6714


F4l -


Realor


SUNDAY, MARCH 25, 2012 E9


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Contaminated



crawlspace



needs cleaning


Q I have an older home with a
bothersome smell. After ma-
neuvering into the dirt
crawlspace under the house, a broken
pipe was discovered. It had probably
been leaking sewage for one or two
months. We had the pipe repaired
thinking this would solve
the smell problem. It did
not. We discovered that -
thick plastic had been laid
on top of a muddy compost-
ing mess. My husband re-
moved the plastic and dug
out several inches of
sewage/mud. He also laid
oyster shells on top of the
damp ground to help neu-
tralize the smell. He then
opened all foundation Dwight
vents and placed a fan to HO
blow the air out from under MAINTE
the house. So long as the
fan is blowing, the smell does not drift
up through the wood floor and stink
up the house. You have suggested
charcoal. Should we put open bags of
charcoal on top of the dirt/mud under
the house? What else can we do?
A. Raw sewage in a cellar, basement
or crawlspace can be a serious health
concern for the occupants of the
home. According to an article pub-
lished by americanrivers.org:
"The most common pathogens in
sewage are bacteria, parasites and
viruses. They cause a wide variety of
acute illnesses including diarrhea and
infections. These illnesses can be vio-
lent and unpleasant, but mostly pass
after several days or weeks with no
lasting effects. In some cases, however,
pathogens can cause serious long-
term illnesses or even death."
The sewage and contaminated soils
under the home should be removed by
professionals who have the experi-
ence and proper equipment to work in
such hazardous conditions.


Once the area has been decontami-
nated, a layer of 6-mil plastic vapor
barrier can be installed.
If you are a determined DIYer,
though, make sure you wear a long-
sleeved shirt, rubber gloves, eye pro-
tection and a half-facemask respirator
Use a sled or piece of ply-
wood as a skid with a rope
S attached so that a helper can
pull the buckets of soil out
and a second rope attached
so that you can retrieve the
empty buckets without hav-
W ing to go in and out with each
load. Once the area has been
cleaned, spread hydrated
lime to reduce the odors and
to dry the soils. Cover the en-
Barnett tire dirt floor with a 6-mil
VIE vapor barrier Discard the
NANCE rubber gloves, clean your
tools with a mild bleach-and-
water solution and launder your work
clothes immediately
In a basement, use a wet/dry vac-
uum to clean the spill, emptying the
canister into a toilet. Any contami-
nated material including carpeting
and wall coverings should be dis-
carded. Place smaller items in plastic
garbage bags and set outside for
proper disposal.
Woodwork and wood furniture can
be washed using 1 cup household
bleach to 1 gallon of warm water Vent-
ing the basement using fans will help
to remove odors and speed the drying
process.

Dwight Barnett is a certified master
inspector with the American Society
of Home Inspectors. Write to him
with home improvement questions at
C. Dwight Barnett, Evansville
Courier & Press, PO. Box 268,
Evansville, IN 47702 or email him at
d.Barnett@insightbb. com.


GOT A NEWS TIP?
* The Chronicle welcomes tips from readers about breaking news. Call the newsroom at 352-
563-5660, and be prepared to give your name, phone number, and the address of the event.
* To submit story ideas for feature sections, call 352-563-5660 and ask for Nancy Kennedy.
Again, be prepared to leave a detailed message.


S A 311 W. Main St., Inverness
LANDMARK 352-726-5263
S L www.landmarkinverness.com


LARGEST SELECTION OF FORECLOSURES IN CITRUS COUNTY


E10 SUNDAY, MARCH 25, 2012


I







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E4

three-bin system. I don't
recommend putting a pal-
let on the bottom. Pallets
make a great bin because
the wood is fencelike (if
you assemble the bin with
the slats running vertically)
and it weathers nicely Best
of all, pallets can be ac-
quired for free or at low
cost, and it only takes a few
screws or a small amount
of bailing wire to hold them
together. Marcia,
Wisconsin
Tiki bottle torch: I got
this idea from a catalog
featuring lots of fancy, ex-
pensive outdoor items.
This mini Tiki torch was
very easy to make.
1. Use your favorite glass
beer, wine or soda pop bot-
tle. Make sure it is clean
and dry
2. Drill a hole in the lid of
the bottle just large enough
to insert a Tiki wick.
3. Fill the bottle with Tiki
oil and gently pop or screw
the cap back on.
4. You now have your
own Tiki torch.
I put a few coats of
polyurethane on the label
for protection. If you de-


SUNDAY, MARCH 25, 2012 Ell


cide to make these, please
use common sense with
your materials and note
that Tiki oil is for outdoor
use only Carrie,
Maryland
Keep cold out: I pur-
chased white blankets
from the dollar store. They
have a texture very similar
to felt I cut them to fit be-
hind the thin curtains I al-
ready had up. To hang
them, I used rings that
have a small clip on them,
which allows them to hold
the blanket and curtain at
the same time. Since the
sliding glass door and win-
dow have blinds, no one
can tell that I have blankets
in my windows. I keep
them up year-round, since
they also help to keep the
heat out during summer. -
Shoiji, New Jersey
Stopping cold sores:
After spending time in the
sun last week, I felt those
first few tinglings that tell
you you'll have a cold sore
soon. So I got an ordinary
green-tea bag, wet it and
put it on the tingling spot
for about 10 minutes. That
night, before I went to bed,
I wet the tea bag again and
applied it for 10 minutes.
The cold sore didn't


See FRUGAL/Page E14


WRIGHT
Continued from Page E5

Berger explained that he would pay
Wright from the money he made from
his paper route.
'"A house for Eddie is an opportu-
nity," Wright wrote back. But he said
he was too busy at the time (construc-
tion on the Guggenheim began in 1956)
and asked that Berger write him back
in November.
Berger did so on the first of the
month, and the plan for the doghouse
followed at no charge.
"The story of a 12-year-old kid hav-
ing the chutzpah to write a letter to the
greatest architect of all time and hav-
ing him design something as modest as
a doghouse ... I just knew it was a great
story," said Michael Miner, who pro-
duced and directed the documentary,
"Romanza," which features the dog-
house and other structures Wright de-
signed in California.
The Dallas, Texas, filmmaker is
scheduled to screen the documentary
at the Illinois State Museum in Spring-
field, Ill. on March 25, according to his
website, designedbyfranklloyd-
wright.com. Screenings are scheduled
to follow in Iowa, Georgia, Florida,
New Jersey and New Hampshire. The
doghouse will be on hand.
Berger said the original doghouse
was not built until about 10 years after
he received the designs.
Since Eddie had died by then,
Berger's father and brother built their


house for another family dog.
That doghouse, however, later
ended up in the dump because Berger
said his mother did not have a dog,
and did not see much other value in it.
He rebuilt it for the documentary last
year, working off Wright's original
plan, which said, "Plan of Eddie's
house."
"When I wrote him originally to de-
sign the doghouse, I specified that it
be real easy to build," said Berger, who
became a cabinet maker. "It was a
nightmare."
The roughly 3-foot wide-by-5-foot
long-by 3-feet high doghouse has a
sharp triangular shape, with a sloping
shingled roof. It is made of Philippine
mahogany and weighs about 250
pounds.
"It's definitely in the master's
hand," Oskar Munoz, assistant direc-
tor of archives at the Frank Lloyd
Wright Foundation, said of the design
for the doghouse.
Munoz said Berger's is believed to
be the only doghouse Wright designed.
Wright likely sketched it out and then


IN THE DOGHOUSE
Florida screenings of "Romanza":
April 15, Jacksonville The
Sun-Ray Cinema, time TBA;
www.sunraycinema.com.
7 p.m. April 17, Gainesville -The
Hippodrome; thehipp.org.

handed it to a draftsman in his studio
who turned it into a working drawing,
he said.
Wright was past 80 and likely busy
with dozens of projects at the time,
Munoz said, so for him to take the time
to make the sketch was unusual.
Wright died in Phoenix in 1959.
Berger, who now lives in the Sacra-
mento area and has three rescue bea-
gles, said he's not sure what he will do
with the doghouse.
Although his beagles are worthy of
it, he said they would probably prefer
to stay in the house.
"My feeling is that I'd like it to go to
a museum because it is a historical
monument," he said.


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2Bd/2.5Bath/Den/2Car Pointe Vista
refined architectural detailing Each with its own charming character and handsomely 3Bd+office space/2Bath/2Car Terra Vista
This beautiful home features an open floor plan with ceramic tile,
carpet, blinds, vaulted ceiling, decorator lights, formal dining
room, den/office and a great room
MLS#353663 $415,000 MLS 354402 $330,000


i.. .i. ..1. .. i .... 1.. .. i.i...... ii.. ... ... .1. I 3Bd/2Bath/2Car Terra Vista Hom e
.. ... .... ... I I ... I I ,1 . ,,,, i ,, I ,, ,, ,,I
bedrooms and so much more i. .1. ... .. ....
MLS 354420 $529,900 MLS 354400 $199,000
Terra ...!.'. V.. :.....o -.e ...
Trs- *6 Moth orMr oilMmesi nlddwt l etl


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(352) 746-6121 (800) 323-7703


Detached Villa/2BdI2Bath/2Car/Brentwood Villa
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Open floor plan with lots of space Formal Dining area, breakfast
nook and Den Social Club Membership Included
#1230 $1,100


Office in the
Terra Vista I
Welcome Center 3









E12 SUNDAY, MARCH 25, 2012



ghoncl


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


To place an ad, call 563-5966



Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


- The Time


Fo Ren Fo Ren Fo Sal Fo Sal e I) Par In Par Lot Fo Sae FrRn

I 1
EMM3^^ WWW3^^ W^i^3^^ HWW3^^ HWME^ST ^^^^^^ ^^WER^ HM ML^I^^^^


C.R/Homosassa
1& 2 Br. furn, quiet park
Util. incl. clean, shrt/long
term 352 220-2077
CRYSTAL RIVER
2brm 1 ba Fridge stove
W&D wat-Trsh $495mo
813-317-6525
CRYSTAL RIVER
Nice 2/1, close to
everything. $500. +
Sec. price reduced
(352)446-3933
352-794-3323
DUNNELLON
HWY 488, 2/1 new
carpet & ac, Ig lot
$475+ deposit
(352) 795-6970








FREE MOBILE
HOMES
To Handy Individuals
Offer includes:
Home, water, sewer,
trash, wifi use of
pool new clubhouse
& park-like setting
w/ hammocks
and gazebos
All for just $295. mo.

Permanent
RV'S WELCOME
and RV Storage
Space Avail.

Homes for Sale
w/ Owner Financing
Call for Details
AURORA Acres
11240 N. Northwood
Drive Inglis, Fl. 34449
(352) 447-2759
Crystal River Primary
bus stop located in
front of park
auroraacresfl.com

HERNANDO
2/1, $400 Mo. No Pets.
(352) 344-1476

HERNANDO/INV.
2/1,Close in lease, no
pet $425+sec. 726-7319


HOMOSASSA
3/2 -D/W $700 mo.,
1st, last, sec. Very nice
home. Ask for Walter
(561) 248-4200
HOMOSASSA
3/2, cha, $600.m $600
dp.352-503-6747
(352) 628-1928
INVERNESS
55+ Park on the water
w/5 piers for fishing &
enjoyment, clubhouse,
onsite shuffleboard
and much more!
Furnished, 1BR home
with central A/C $600.
352-476-4964
INVERNESS
RENT SPECIAL: Sec. dep,
pro-rated over 3 mo.
period. 55+ park on the
water w/5 piers for fish-
ing and enjoyment,
clubhouse, onsite
shuffleboard, & much
more! 1 BR home $325
plus. 2BR home $450,
includes H20. 2 BR, 1.5
bath, Park Model $500.
Pets considered.
Section 8 accepted.
(352) 476-4964




1995, Doublewide,
28 x 56, 2BD, 2BA,
LR, DR, Eat in Kit,
community Pool
Nice Condition
$30,000 (352) 400-8270

ATTENTION
LAND OWNERS
JACOBSEN NEW 2012
5 yr. warranty, 3/2,
2 x 6 construction,
upgrade insulation,
appliance pkg.
Delivered & set up
with A/C & heat,
steps & skirting only
$279.19./mo. W.A.C.
Includes first year
on homeowner Ins.
Call 352-621-9181
BEAUTIFUL 1 OWNER,
older Doublewide,
Home in Forestview
Park new appl's, new
roof and AC, Priced to
Sell! (352) 503-2154

S kklkk


2 BEDROOM MOBILE
HOME FOR SALE 14x60
2 bedroom. 1 bath. Sin-
gle wide mobile home,
with all aluminum wheel
chair ramp, covered
screen porch and a car-
port.Very nice quiet
comm. Centrally lo-
cated close to the mall
Crystal River.
SELL PRICE;;;
$11,200.00 or OBO
Comes with
Washer/Dryer
Stove and Refrigerator.
Part Furnished
lot rent $235.00
Located in aAdult com-
munity age 55 or older
Pets allowed no more
than 20 pounds.
CALL 352-897-6766
BY APPOINTMENT
ONLY
SERIOUS BUYERS
ONLY.



AWESOME DEALS
Financing Available
$500/dn
1/1 remod, shed $5k
1/1 scrnrm/carprt $6k
2/1 carprt/rf.over $7k
furn, move-in ready
55+ park, clean quiet
CR/Homossasa area
Owner 352-220-2077




Bank foreclosures
USED HOMES/REPO'S
Bank authorized
liquidator.We Always
have new inventory,
Call 352-621-9183
or come by
Taylor Made Homes
Homes from
$1,000 up!


V THIS OUT!
Homosassa 3 bedroom.
2 bath. 29,900
Double-wide, completely
remodeled in 2008. New
well pump 2011. On
paved road,.33 acre with
landscaped yard, in-
cludes hot tub and 10x14
metal shed. Call
352-503-7366 or
352-476-0904


INVERNESS
55+ Park on the water
w/5 piers for fishing &
enjoyment, clubhouse,
onsite shuffleboard
and much more!
Single wide 1 & 2 BR,
starting @ $6,900. Lot
rent $276/mo. H20
included. 3 mo. free
rent with purchase.
352-476-4964



LAND-N-HOME
FLORAL CITY
BIG HOME!
The Entertainer,
over 2000 sq. ft., 4/2,
large family room.
Home in great shape
on quiet paved road
near chain of lakes
ONLY $59, 900. or
$2,250 down &
395/mo. W.A.C.
Call 352-621-3807



Palm Harbor Homes
NEW HOME STIMULUS
$5k for your used
Mobile Home any
condition
800-622-2832 x 210







HOMOSASSA
2/2 carport nicely turn
MH on Homosassa River
w/dock, shed f/l/s
sht/long term $850
352-220-2077


Beverly Hills
55 + park 2/2 fully
remodeled, & furnished
Ig screen lanai,carport,
shedJundryJandscape & ii-
gafion all appli-
ances, Club house ac-
tivities, Heated pool.Lot
rent $258,... $33K obo
Call 352-422-0927




BEST OF THE BEST
New 2012 Jacobsen
Custom 28 x 52,3/2
big eat in kitchen,
2x6 construction, OSB
wrap, 5 yr. warranty,
elongated toilet,
china sinks, storm
door. Large rooms.
Must see before you
buy anything else.
Only $46,900 or
$1,800 down
$298.89/mo W.A.C.
Call 352-621-9181
INVERNESS
Move in neat 2 bath
SW w/extra rooms, nice
area, fenced $32, 500
Owner (352) 341-1569
Lecanto
881 N. Maynard Av
DWMH 2/2, deck,
Fixer Upper
$15K (352) 746-7952
PRICE REDUCED-
NW Citrus Cty SWMH on
1 Acre, 2/1.5 paved rd,
screen porch, appliances
$39,900, Owner Fi-
nancing 352-795-9908



2/2 on Lake Rousseau.
NOW $17,500
Low Lot Rent $240/m
2003 Mobile Home.
Used Seasonally
Owner bought a house,
(352) 817-1987,
(207) 546-6115
Beverly Hills
55 + park 2/2 fully
remodeled, & furnished
Ig screen lanaicarport,
shedJaundlyJandscape & ii-
gation all appli-
ances, Club house ac-
tivities, Heated pool.Lot
rent $258... $33K obo
Call 352-422-0927


AWESOME DEALS
Financing Available
$500/dn
1/1 remod, shed $5k
1/lscrnrm/carprt $6k
2/1 carprt/rf.over $7k
furn, move-in ready
55+ park, clean quiet
CR/Homossasa area
Owner 352-220-2077

Crys Rver Village
55+ DWHome of Merit
2/2/1 carport, com-
pletely furnish all new &
appls. Must See
$39K for appt /details
(704) 489-0523
574-946-6286
FLORAL CITY
1992 34FT Park Model,
furn., w/2 slides &
screen rm, Exc. cond.
Moonrise Resort, $3,500.
352-419-6894
606-521-3916
Floral City Singing
Forest DW, 2/2, 2 Car-
ports, screen porch
Completely furn & re-
modeled, Lot Rent $176
$19,500 344-2420


LlSTINGS
Homosassa 2 bedroom.
2 bath. 55+double wide
mobile home in park
14,900.New wooden
floors very clean. Closed
in front and back porch.2
car carport.Club
house,community swim-
ming pool,exercise
room.Pool table.Close to
shopping area. call 352
7946601
Homosassa
Turtle Creek
1/1 park model
w/screen porch
$16K (352) 628-3351
HOMOSASSA'S
Best Housing Value
Modern homes from
$8,400 or Lease to Own
from $139/mo.
$800.down + Lot rent at
Evanridge Community
an exceptional 55+Park
352 628-5977
Lecanto 3 bedroom. 2
bath. Senior Park 14x66
S/W, Screened Porch,
Furnished. Very clean.
Call 815-535-7958


INVERNESS
55+ Park on the water
w/5 piers for fishing &
enjoyment, clubhouse,
onsite shuffleboard, and
much more! 2 BR 1.5 BA
for $2.000. must be
approved 352-476-4964
Inverness/Oak Pond 55+,
well maintained 2/2, fur-
nished, screened lanai,
shed, Ig lot, xtra long cov-
ered carport, lots of stor-
age 352-344-1632 or
937-545-3413
Lecanto 55 +
Comm.2 bd 1 ba
screened porch
$11,500
(352) 746-4648







Oasis Mobile Home Park,
Inverness FL 2 bedroom.
2 bath. 14x60 Fully Fur-
nished Manatee Mobile
Home. Carport, Screen
room, and Shed. Has
roof over and remodelled
kitchen and baths. Virtu-
ally everything furnished.
Parking behind M/H for
trailer or boat. Excellent
Shape. Great low rent
park. $ 12000. Call
815 986 4510 or cell
815 298 2964.
On Lake Rousseau 2
bedroom. 2 bath.
14x60MH, 8x20 FL
room, 8x10 shed, 2-stall
carport, Withlacoochee
Backwaters MHP,
$8500. 352-219-2240
Stoneridge Landing
55+ Comm. Resales
starting @$13,500
Financing avail
1-800-779-1226
(352) 637-1400
StoneridgeLanding
55+. 1993 26x56, Move
in Cond.2/2 upgrades
$39K, view pics @
mhvillage.com/493361
(352) 344-0888

WESTWIND VILLAGE 55+
Park. Updated 2/2 DW's
for sale. Reasonable
(352) 628-2090


-rM






FREE MOBILE
HOMES
To Handy Individuals
Offer includes:
Home, water, sewer,
trash, wifi, use of
pool new clubhouse
& park-like setting
w/ hammocks
and gazebos
All for just $295. mo.

Permanent
RV'S WELCOME
and RV Storage
Space Avail.

Homes for Sale
w/ Owner Financing
Call tfor Details
AURORA Acres
11240 N. Northwood
Drive Inglis, Fl. 34449
(352) 447-2759
Crystal River Primary
bus stop located in
front of park
auroraacresfl.com




LECANTO 55+
* FOR RENT OR SALE *
1/1, Furnished $525.
2/2, Furnished $550.
352-287-9175, 746-1189







11435Diie Shores
Crystal River. 3/1/1 Stilt
house w/dock, water aces.
Fantastic roof top views.
s900Mo.

CHASSAHOWITZKA
3/2 Wtrfront DW, $600.
3/2 Furnished DW., $600
Agent (352) 382-1000


835 NE Hwy 19
Crystal River, FI
(352) 795-0021
View our website
C21NatureCoast.com







J.W. MORTON
REAL ESTATE, INC.
1645 W. MAIN ST
INVERNESS, FL
Property Management


Need a Good Tenant?
Bring us your vacant home
and watch us work for you!

3/2/1 Fenced Back Yard. $750
2/1.5/1 Waterfront....... $625
2/2/1The Highlands ..... $650
2/2/2 Water Access...... $700
1 Bedroo00m Apts starting at. $375

2/1.5/1, Available April... $625
Jennifer Fudge,
Property Manager
Cheryl Scruggs,
Realtor-Associate
352-726-9010


CATORAT









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


-ACTIO--
RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REALTY, INC.
352-795-7368


1650 W. Homosassa Trail
$500
2/1 Duplex, nice and clean,
outside sto. Has well/no pets.
4 Utah Street, Beverly Hills
$650
2/2/1 House in nice condition
and good neighborhood.
ll01W, (lerwitrt,i( omosissi
$950
2/2/2 D-wide MH on water in
Riverview Estates
5i8 presss (ove (t, Inverness
$650
2/2.5 TH on lake, Great view,
2 decks, open floor.




CRYSTAL RIVER
2 BR. $550., 3BR House
$800., 352-563-9857
CRYSTAL RIVER
Completely furn., Pool,
boat dock, Wash/Dry
(352) 302-5972
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025




Alexander Real Estate
(352) 795-6633
Crystal River Apts
2 BR/1 BA $375-$500
FLORAL CITY
FREE Use of boat ramp,
fishing dock, canoe &
Jon boat rentals. 1 BR
$450/$200 dp. incis Sat
TV electric, walk to river
Trails End Camp, A
Friendly Place to Live
352-726-3699
INVERNESS
1/1 $400 2/1.. $500.
near hosp352-422-2393
LECANTO
Nice 1 Bedrm $500
352-613-6000. 216-0012
(352) 746-5238

SEVEN RIVERS
APTS
A Beautiful place
to come home too.
35 units on private
street, situated on 10
wooded acres, near
Crystal River &
7 Rivers Hosp. fish-
ing, walking, trails,
shopping near by.
Old Florida setting,
quite, clean well
maint. central
laundry room.
352-795-3719
Directions:
Hwy 19 turn W. at
Days Inn, first right
onto Tallahassee Rd



EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY


CRYSTAL RIVER
Comm. Storefront, very
clean 1000 SF exc. loc.
Hwy 19 Downtown
$795/mo 352-634-2528
FLORAL CITY
STOREFRONT 1000 Sq Ft
Ideal location, corner
Hwy41 & 48. $595 mo.
813-310-5391




Citrus Hills 2/2.5/1
$850/mo HOA is incI'd
$850 dep. 239-595-9439
CRYSTAL RIVER
Completely furn., Pool,
boat dock, Wash/Dry
(352) 302-5972
INVERNESS
LANDINGS 2/1.5 clean
roomy, great location
$525/mo F/L/S No smke
No pets (352) 341-1847




CITRUS HILLS 2/2/1
Beautiful $750 Maint
Free(352) 613-5655
Citrus Springs
3/2/1 car $650/mo
352-746-7990
HOMOSASSA
New 1/1, H20/garb.
incl.d, non-smoker.
$425 Fst/Sec., pets ?
(352) 795-0207




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




INVERNESS
1/1, CH/A, furn/unfurn
$450 352-637-4021
Specializing in
Sugarmill Woods
Rentals


Debe Johns
Brkr/Assoc/PRM

Coldwell Banker Next
Generation Realty
Property Manager
(352) 382-2700 www.
coldwellbankernext
aeneration.com
See what a
Professional
Residential Manager
can do for you.




Sugarmill Woods
3/2/2 large closets
$750/m (352)613-0843


BEVERLY HILLS
2/1, C/H/A, $600/m
(352) 422-7794
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/1, Cen Air, Remod-
eled like new Sec. &1st.,
$625 mo. 352-228-3454
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/2/2, $750. mo + sec.
850-371-1568
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 Clean, $800 mo.
795-6299 364-2073
HOMOSASSA
3/2 Scrn. Porch, Quiet
dead end st. $650 mo.
(207) 212-9804
INVERNESS
3/2.5/2.5 Super clean
Irg split plan,
3/4 ac. Great area.
$800 352-476-4896




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225
HOMOSASSA
2/2 carport nicely furn
MH on Homosassa River
w/dock, shed f/l/s
sht/long term $850
352-220-2077
OLD HOMOSASSA
Lrg 1/1, Iv & fam rm,
scr prch, lots of stor-
age,, dock w/access
to gulf. $50, no pets
smoke 352-628-2261




C.R/Homosassa
1& 2 Br. furn, quiet park
Util. incl. clean, shrt/long
term 352 220-2077




AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number

REALTY ONEM
REALTY ONE


FARMS, LAND,
COMMERCIAL
UNIQUE &
HISTORIC HOMES,
SMALL TOWN
COUNTRY LIFESTYLE
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989


"LIFE IS BETTER
WITH A PORCH"
WWW.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.

For Sale R f
Forest Ridge 2 bedroom.
2 bath. This updated villa
is totally move in ready
and maintenance free!
This beautiful 2/2/2 is
located on a private lot
and includes an optional
membership to Citrus
Hills Golf and Country
Club. The home includes
all appliances, an eat in
kitchen, a fully tiled great
room, and a sun barrier
paneled lanai. Home is
within walking distance to
the pool and club house.
This property is a must
see!! $95,900
352-746-0002








FREE MOBILE
HOMES
To Handy Individuals
Offer includes:
Home, water, sewer,
trash, wifi, use of
pool new clubhouse
& park-like setting
w/ hammocks
and gazebos
All for just $295. mo.

Permanent
RV'S WELCOME
and RV Storage
Space Avail.

Homes for Sale
w/ Owner Financing
Call for Details
AURORA Acres
11240 N. Northwood
Drive Inglis, Fl. 34449
(352) 447-2759
Crystal River Primary
bus stop located in
front of park
auroraacresfl.com







I Employment


RetHoss


For Sale Or Rent
3/2/2 furn for rent
$800/mo or buy
(352) 445-5218
352-445-5260


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ille-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination. "
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



EQUAL HOUSE ING
OPPORTUNITY


Specializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches &
Commercial








Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com






Auction: Spinal Surgical
Center Inventory
Sells Regardless of
Price, March 29, 10am
100 Coy Burgess Loop,
DeFuniak Springs
13% BP. Ewald Realty &
Auction,
AB2473/AU1340
(407)275-6853 www.
EwaldAuctions.com


Lot For Sale Pine Ridge
sub. 3620 N. Stirrup Dr.,
2.78 ac, horse trail on
back side, wooded, for
sale by owner. Google it!
Make offer
bill@agairupdate.com
478.957.0211
PINE RIDGE 3/3/2
4645 W. CASPER LANE
1.75 acres, 14x 18 barn,
pool and heated spa,
open kitchen serves
breakfast area over-
looking pool and pas-
ture, large master with
his and her everything,
lots olf extras.
Open House. Vist today
CALL JOE 352-746-5912




LECANTO
Black Diamond
Ranch
a ,<





Owner Financing
3/2/2.5 car garage
SS appis, custom
flooring, new outdoor
kit. w covered lanai.
Price to sell. $185K.
(352) 527-0456




3/3/2,
2,355 sq. ft.
screen lanai, 2 Acres
$135,000.
(352) 628-5272
TERRA VISTA
2+ /2/2 Maint Free,
Open plan, up grades,
,Beautiful Sunsets,
Owner Financ Avail
$259 K (352) 746-6050




3/2, Shed, Mfg. Home
on 1.38 Acres, new
flooring & upgraded
appliances.
Paved Road
$54,900. (352) 302-4057
ARBOR LAKES
55+ Comm. 3/2/2 +
Lg enclosed a/c porch,
most pvt. location,
Upgrades $169,900
(352) 726-7952




2/2/1
HIGHLANDS AREA
Lots of Upgrades
Move In Ready
Keller Williams Realty
352-746-7113
3/2/2, I.G. &C.C.
3k sf. new kit. Ig closets,
CHA, firepl. on golf
course $129K make of-
fer, norealtors 726-0652

HIGHLANDS
Lrg.2/2- 4 car garage
pool, game room,
mud room, on triple lot
fenced, price to sell
$65,500 (352) 564-4598


INVERNESS
55+ Park on the water
w/5 piers for fishing &
enjoyment, clubhouse,
onsite shuffleboard
and much more!
Single wide 1 & 2 BR,
starting @ $6,900. Lot
rent $276/mo. H20
included. 3 mo. free
rent with purchase.
352-476-4964
Lakefront Gospel
Island Location
Spacious 3/2/2
for rent $800/m or for
sale..... 908-322-6529

Recently Foreclosed
*Special Financing*
Available, Any
Credit, Any Income ,
2BD, 1BTH, located
at, 7901 Stump Lane,
Inverness, $23,900.
Visit www.roselandco.
com/A4F,
Drive by then Call
(866) 249-0680
Zero Down Assumable
Loan Nice 3/2/2,
In Foxwood Estate
Need proof of income
and excel credit.
No Gimmicks,
(352) 341-8479




Recently Foreclosed
*Special Financing*
Available. Any Credit,
Any Income,
3BD, 2BTH located at,
8009 E. Partridge Lane
Floral City, $29,900.
Visit www.
roselandco.com\A5BDive
bytlien Cal
(866) 249-0680.






9690 W Green Ln 3 bed-
room. 2 bath. Energy
wise, move in ready,
garage, fenced back
w/playhouse.
352-563-1341
AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number

RF/M
REALTY ONE




3/2/2 Built 1986, On
'2 Acre, Remodeled
above ground pool
w/deck BY OWNER
4141 S. Journey Point
$180,000 813-477-6006

AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work For You!
BETTY HUNT,
REALTOR
ERA KEY 1 Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.


Condo for Sale
2/2, 1,850 sq. ft.
35 Beech Street
(352) 503-3294


Best Time To Buy!
I have lease options,
owner financing
Waterfront and
foreclosures
call Phyllis Strickland
(352) 613-3503
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.


Michele Rose. Realtor
Simply put I 'II work
harder 352-212-5097
isellcitruscountyv(
vahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515


Homosassa/Riverhaven
On water, Grand canal
3BR, 2+BA, 2+ CG
Formal. Living Rm.
Formal Din. Rm., Lanai
front & rear. River View
Room. Dock, many
Upgrades, $255,000
forsalebvowner.com
Busting 23023708 or
Call 352-628-9647

Water Access
2/2, 6 car garage
w/apt. ove, extra Lot
$200.K 352-302-7204


^S=11m~


DEB INFANTINE
4 HOMES SOLD
Closing in April
I Need Listings!
Real EstateL...
it's what I do.
ERA American
Realty
Phone:(352) 726-5855
Cell:(352) 302-8046
Fax:(352) 726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com








FREE MOBILE
HOMES
To Handy Individuals
Offer includes:
Home, water, sewer,
trash, wifi, use of
pool new clubhouse
& park-like setting
w/ hammocks
and gazebos
All for just $295. mo.
Permanent
RV'S WELCOME
and RV Storage
Space Avail.

Homes for Sale
w/ Owner Financing
Call for Details
AURORA Acres
11240 N. Northwood
Drive Inglis, Fl. 34449
(352) 447-2759
Crystal River Primary
bus stop located in
front of park
auroraacresfl.com














Te


CirsCut


SUNDAY, MARCH 25, 2012 E13







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FRUGAL
Continued from Page Ell

develop. L-lysine supplements help,
too. -Bethany forums
No deodorants: Much can be ac-
complished with chlorophyll, which
you can get as a supplement in liquid
or capsule form or by eating massive
amounts of green veggies. Chlorophyll
deodorizes the sweat, urine, etc. that
comes out of our bodies.
I tend to forget this until I start
noticing a different smell, and then I
head to the health food store for
some more. It won't make you sweat
less, but it will make you smell better,
and it tends to make you less tasty to
ants and mosquitoes, too! Edna,
Texas
Stretch a wardrobe: I use layering to
stretch my son's summer wardrobe
into fall. It's a popular look right now,
and it only takes a handful of white
long-sleeved T-shirts I just put his
short-sleeved shirts right over them.


STU family vr
ported a:
stock sho
Continued from Page E7 that par
phasis o01
activities associated with the fami
the livestock shows was the activities
strongest theme reported. Exposi
Participants emphasized was imp
the importance of building exhibitor
friendships and social sire rep
contacts. need to
Belonging the building petitive
of meaningful relationships ability to
with adults and peers is erly deal
one of the essential ele- and losit
ments 4-H provides. importar
Character building: This Knowl
was the second theme of the animals
study, including responsibil- that eme
ity, confidence, sportsman- raising 1
ship, and how to deal with Particip;
loss. Youth felt that charac- knowled
ter developed through ex- especial]
hibiting livestock promoted future ca
growth from a child into a Having
successful adult, ships as
Family togetherness and benefit c



PRUNING
Continued from Page E7

Cut one or two major limbs back to
their origin or to sturdy side branches.
If more major limbs need cutting back,
wait a year, and if still more must go,
hold off for yet another year. If you cut
too much in one year, there is the risk
of sunburn on once-shaded bark.


He gets to look cool, and I get to avoid
buying lots of seasonal clothing! -
Nichole, Iowa
MEN
Dear Sara: How much coffee do you
put in your Keurig My K-Cup? I'd like
to start using ours, but I've read hor-
ror stories from those who have over-
filled and under-filled their cups. -
Libby, Canada
Dear Libby: I didn't like the My K-
Cup, but I've been happy with the
Solofill reusable filter (Solofill.com).
My experience with the My K-cup was
that the brewed coffee would spew,
leaving me with grounds in my coffee
and three pieces to clean afterward.
The coffee was too weak for my liking,
and it overflowed once as well. I didn't
have that problem when I used the
Solofill filter. I like my coffee strong,
so I fill the Solofill filter to the fill line.
I don't feel the need to tap it like I did
with the My K-cup, because the lid
presses the grounds down. It's not that
I want the grounds completely
packed; I just want to make sure there
aren't any stray grounds close to the


blues were also re-
s a product of live-
ws. It was apparent
ticipants put em-
i the importance of
ly participating in
Together
ure to competition
ortant to livestock
rs. There was a de-
orted to satisfy a
participate in com-
events. Also, the
learn how to prop-
with both winning
ig was reported as
it.
edge and care of
was the final theme
rged as a benefit of
ivestock for show.
ants felt that this
ge was important,
ly if it relates to a
reer.
g social relation-
the number one
developed through


livestock exhibition
and FFA youth w;
prising result of th
Yet, because the a
have and build so(
tionships is necess
aids in the develop]
person, it is consi
important life skill.
That being said
you will come out ti
this week and see
derful results of th
hard work exhibit
livestock shows. Yo
rabbits at noon Moi
heifers at 7 p.m.
At 7 p.m. Tues
swine exhibitors v
their hogs into the
At 7 p.m. Wedne
steer exhibitors v
their turn to lead th
ects before the aud
Poultry will join
on Thursday and
state their showm;
2 p.m., followed by


This summer, new sprouts may grow
near some of your pruning cuts. Some
of these sprouts, especially those of
moderate vigor, might be in good posi-
tions to make permanent new limbs.
Save those and cut away the others,
especially when many are clustered
near a pruning cut.
With major cuts out of the way for
now, progress to more detailed prun-
ing, using a small pruning saw and
lopper. Look over the stems and cut


top that might escape and make it into
my coffee cup. The lid is attached and
the filter is built-in, so there's only one
piece to clean. I just give it a little
whack on the counter near my sink
and the grounds are removed easily
Dear Sara: How do you get all of that
glue off of mayonnaise, pickle and
other jars? I can't get some of it off, no
matter how hard I scrub, even under
scalding hot water. Also, I'd like to
make a bunch of gift jars out of them,
but I can't seem to get the odor out.
What do you use to make sure all of
the smell is gone? Carol, Nevada
Dear Carol: Label removal is easier
if you score the label and soak the jars
in hot water, then use vinegar, baby oil
or vegetable oil and a plastic scrubbie
to remove it. To remove the pickle
smell, soak the jars overnight in a so-
lution made of vinegar, baking soda, a
couple squirts of dishwashing liquid
and very hot water. Afterward, run it
through your dishwasher. If it still has
an odor, put crumpled newspaper and

See FRUGAL/Page E15


n by 4-H auction at 7 p.m.
as a sur- Swine will be auctioned
[is study at 7 p.m. Friday
ability to The final animal show
cial rela- will be horse showmanship
sary and at 10 a.m. Saturday
mentofa For information about
lered an how to start or join a club in
your area, contact your Cit-
, I hope rus County Extension's 4-H
o the fair Office by calling 352-527-
the won- 5712 or email Amy Duncan,
e youths' the 4-H agent, at amydun-
ng in the can@bocc.citrus.fl.us.
uth show Citrus County Extension
nday and connects the public with the
University of Florida/IFAS's
day, the knowledge, research and re-
Till drive sources to address youth,
arena. family, community and agri-
sday, the cultural needs.
uill have Programs and activities
reirproj- offered by the Extension
ience. Service are available to all
the fair persons without regard to
demon- race, color, handicap,
anship at sex, religion or national
the steer origin.

back to sound wood any that are dis-
eased, dead or broken. Also remove
stems that are overcrowded or weak.
Cut back any drooping stem to a
branch near the place where the stem
starts drooping.
Finally, stand back and admire your
work.
Cleaned up, an old fruit tree can
look even more charming than it did
when it was neglected and overgrown.
Now give your tree a hug.


Ui


ll v. V. UUII IIII OL J
bedroom. 2 bath. Jacob-
sen Mobile Home (DW)
on 5 ACRES. Owner Fi-
nancing with $20,000
down Low interest. Mas-
ter Bedroom 14x20
w/carpet & Lg. walk-in
closet, has Master Bath
10x15 w/double vanity,
jetted tub, separate toilet
& shower. 2 other bed-
rooms 12x14 w/carpet
and walk-in closets. Liv-
ing Rm. 14x16 w/laminate
wood flooring and open
concept to Dining Room
14x12 w/bar sink
&Cabinetss w/sliding
glass doors which lead to
10x24 pressure treated 2
level deck. Lg. Kitchen
16x16 w/38 cabinets, is-
land cook top, wall oven
& tile flooring. Sunken
Family Room w/fireplace
15x14 tiled flooring. Laun-
dry Rm. w/cabinets which
lead to rear access to
deck. LOW PROPERTY
TAXES $660.00. 2 stor-
age bldgs 12x24 &
10x14, Carport 22x25.
$135k (561) 714-6024.



Get


Results in


the


homefron


c/assifiedsI


, -I


Office Open
7 Days a Week


Lisa VanDeboe
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com

Crystal River Indian
Waters Waterfront home
on deep wide canal. 3
BR/2BAwith Lanai over-
looking canal. Recently
remodeled split floor plan
with fenced yard, garage,
sea wall and dock.
Easy access to both
Kings Bay and Gulf.
Serious buyers
please.....Appointment
with owner. $275,000.
678-357-9873

Vacant-


H ome



FREE MOBILE
HOMES
To Handy Individuals
Offer includes:
Home water, sewer,
trash, wifi, use of
pool new clubhouse
& park-like setting
w/ hammocks
and gazebos
All for just $295. mo.
Permanent
RV'S WELCOME
and RV Storage
Space Avail.
Homes for Sale
w/ Owner Financing
Call for Details
AURORA Acres
11240 N. Northwood
Drive Inglis, Fl. 34449
(352) 447-2759
Crystal River Primary
bus stop located in
front of park
auroraacresfl.com


Watefron
Homes


CABIN ON 40 ACRES a
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pond,
ATV trails $165K obo
352 795-2027/ 634-4745


CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pond,
ATVtrails $165Kobo
352 795-2027/ 634-4745


5 ACRES, FLORAL CITY
3 sides fenced, paved
road, private drive
through woods. Leads
to 4 Acre Pasture
$44,900. (352) 897-4586


CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pond,
ATVtrails $165Kobo
352 795-2027/ 634-4745


48 lots 14W.F. 1 gulf
access, 5 SMW's lots
3 lots impact fees pd.
$425K, = less than $9K
per lot (732) 996-3785
89 x 165 MOL, LOT
Lucky Hills, Nice
Residential Area
$19,000/Offer
Owner FiNance
(352) 422-1916
HOMOSASSA
Wooded Lot on
Lee Woods Drive,
112 x114ft River access,
but not on river $7,000.
352-621-1664








LOTS FOR
SALE!
6 Citrus Springs Lots
Available, Owner Fin.
or Cash Discounts
Provided. Great
Investment Opprty.
803-403-9555
803-403-9557
SUGARMILL
WOODS. BUILDING LOT
ON OAK VILLAGE
$20K firm 43 Vinca St
(352) 726-9587


E14 SUNDAY, MARCH 25, 2012







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


JANE
Continued from Page E9

that flower in March include trees
such as Flowering Dogwood,
Cherry Laurel, Winged Elm and
Red buckeye. The exotic repeat-
blooming 'Encore' azaleas lost
bloom in winter freezes but now
continue to flower until April.
Patented 'Encore' azaleas flower
for about six months each year,
making them worth the more ex-
pensive price. Some varieties of
Japanese Camellias are late-sea-
son flowering for about four
weeks from February into March.
Chinese Camellia reticulata flow-
ers bloom as late as April.
Prune 'Encores,' standard four-
week azaleas and camellias for
height and shape immediately
after flowering stops. Patented
'Knock-Out' rose hybrids should
have been pruned back hard in
mid-winter before new leaves
emerged. They will flower well
through spring and summer
through to the first frosts of early
winter
Flowering shrubs like pink Chi-
nese Loropetalum fringe flowers
and Indian Hawthorn are among
the most popular landscape
plants.
Loropetalum is a repeat
bloomer, but Indian Hawthorn
blossoms only in March.
Along the roadsides, pretty pink
and white phlox, Phlox dru-
mondii, bloom in March. Let them
go to seed and self-sow before cut-
ting the lawn grass. Many of
Florida's native orchids like grass
pinks and ladies' tresses start to
flower this month. Blue Spider-
wort, Tradescantia virginiana,


SUNDAY, MARCH 25, 2012 E15


has evergreen foliage and a heavy
flush of morning flowers starting
in March. It continues to flower
through summer up until late fall.
On hot afternoons the flowers
close and fade. They last longer in
summer afternoon shade. Florida
violets, a shade-loving perennial
evergreen native, continues
spring flowering until mid-March.
In full sun Red or Tropical Sage,
Salvia coccinea, sprouts and be-
gins flowering. Exotic impatiens
seedlings also start their long
flowering season from March
until the first frost.
These annual flowers readily
spread by self-sown seed. Prick
out some crowded seedlings in
spring. Group and plant several in
small pots full of humus-rich gar-
den soil. Place them where they
will get afternoon shade. Sprinkle
frequently until they are estab-
lished and can fend for them-
selves. After three or four weeks,
when roots creep out of the holes
at the bottom of the pot, it is time
to set the new annual plants out in
the garden.
Deadhead or pick off spent
flower heads to limit self-seeding.
A layer of decorative top mulch
like pine needles will prevent
sprouting seeds from reaching the
soil and taking root. Flowering
plants make a garden more at-
tractive than a monochromatic
green landscape.


Jane Weber is a Professional
Gardener and Consultant Semi-
retired, she grows thousands of
native plants. Visitors are wel-
come to her Dunnellon, Marion
County garden. For an appoint-
ment call 352-249-6899 or contact
JWeberl2385@gmail. com.


TANGO
Continued from Page E8

merchandising with Atlanta-
based Ballard Designs. "Use it on
a smaller piece of furniture ... it's
like what a tie does to a suit, that
stand-alone piece that makes
such a grand statement."
A dark reddish orange, tanger-
ine goes well with neutrals like
grays and beiges, as well as with
distressed wood finishes, and can
be worked into virtually any era,
from Arts and Crafts to modern
minimalism.
Designer Suzanne Kasler, who
partners with Ballard, used a
heavy tangerine linen from the
European-inspired home furnish-
ings retailer to upholster a pair of
tufted slipper chairs that are pic-
tured with nautical accents in-
cluding a seashell-lined mirror,
rattan baskets and large glass
lanterns.


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E14

a sprinkling of baking soda in-
side the jar and let it sit
overnight.
Dear Sara: I'd like to grow
turnips in my garden, but I'm hav-
ing trouble finding turnips in my
canning books. One states that it's
not recommended.
What do I do with the turnips
if I can't can them? ED.,
Virginia
Dear ED.: I've never canned
turnips, but you can freeze them.
Wash, peel and cut the turnips


A similar tufted chair can be
found on Ballard's site starting at
$199 (www.ballarddesigns.com).
CB2 makes a parlor chair in
"atomic orange" (www.cb2.com)
for $699, as well as a blood orange
"knitted pouf" that Soto likes as a
small seat or ottoman.
She also recommends West
Elm's cast-aluminum Martini side
table that retails for $123
(www.westelm.com) and can dou-
ble as a coffee table when paired
in twos or threes.
Accents
Persian rugs, dishtowels, can-
dlesticks and vases are all fun, in-
expensive ways to bring tangerine
into your home through accent
pieces.
"Try some fresh new towels in
your bathroom," Soto says. "This
fun color is the perfect contrast to
white tile and porcelain."
She also likes an orange-and-
cream stoneware vase from Tar-
get at $24.99 (www.target.com),

into roughly 1/2-inch cubes. Boil
water and blanch the cubes for
two minutes. Don't overcook
them. After they've been
blanched, plunge them into a
bowl of ice water. Allow them to
cool, then place them in freezer
storage bags.
You can also cook them en-
tirely, then mash and freeze them
(must be consumed within six
months).
You can dehydrate turnips,
too. Frugal Village member
Robin, from Oregon, shares: "To
dehydrate turnips, peel and slice
them 1/2 to 1/4-inch thick, blanch
3 to 5 minutes and then dry to a
very tough to brittle state (125


and orange porcelain mini bowls
from Crate and Barrel (www crate
andbarrel.com) for a pop of color
in the kitchen at $1.95 each.
For lighting, Anthropologie of-
fers a stacked glass table lamp
($298) a la 1970s kitsch in citrus
shades (www.anthropologie.com),
while a more modern shape can
be found in the orange dome pen-
dant by Kartell, for $263 (www.lu-
mens. com).
Throw pillows in a variety of
tangerine-esque shades are
everywhere, including traditional
stores like Linens 'N Things, for
$69.99 (www.lnt.com) and more
untraditional ones like specialty
lighting retailer Lamps Plus, for
$78.91 (www.lampsplus.com).
Soto reminds homeowners not
to forget simple touches like a
bouquet of fresh orange tiger
lilies or gerbera daisies.
'A glossy, lacquered, red-orange
serving tray can be the perfect
punch of color for your ottoman
or coffee table," she says.

degrees). To use in soups or
stews, rehydrate and mash. Add
1/2 teaspoon sugar per cup of re-
hydrating water to improve fla-
vor." They make a great snack
when dried, too (think: potato
chip).


Sara Noel is the owner of Frugal
Village (wwwfrugalvillage. com),
a website that offers practical,
money-saving strategies for
everyday living. To send tips,
comments or questions, write to
Sara Noel, c/o Universal Uclick,
1130 Walnut Street, Kansas City
MO 64106, or email sara@
frugalvillage. com.


KEY0 "Always There For You"
4L GAIL COOPER
%HUE Multi-Million Dollar Realtor
!. Cell: (352) 634-4346
OFFICE : (352) 382-1700x309
I I E-mail me: homes4u3@mindspring.com


COMFORT FOR SALE!
* 3+ office/2/3 2154 living
* Corian 42" cabinetry pantry
* Neutral carpeting 18" tile
* Separate wall 3rd bay for storage
* Impressive 10' double entry doors
* Nicely wooded private greenbelt
#353023 $189,700


TWO MASTER SUITES!
Unique 3/3/3 Cabana home
* Lanai overlooks butterfly garden
* Corian wood cabinetry
* Central vacuum newer paint
* Cabana has adjacent Great Room
* Perfect for an in-law suite
#352049 $155,000


S WATER AND
S3 Bed / 2 CAR
$ Includes Extra Lo
$93,5
ake my virtual


"Nancy Knows Sugarmill Woods"'

NANCY Direct: 352-634-4225
PONTICOS sarnweeds 0
Multi-Million $$$ Producer -- KEY 1 REALTY INC. 0
t 8015 Suncoas Blvd Homosassa, FL 382-1700








GOLF COURSE VIEWS! TERRIFIC LOCATION! HEATED POOL! (0
Garage Moven Ready Double CuldeSac Lots *
t to Side for Added Privacy Brick Paver Lana & Entry Double Pane Windows


0

*


0 MLS#354421 $210,000 MLS#344943
ono ISS


Robert & Holly Jones AMERICAN
* 352-287-5020 REALTY & INVESTMENTS
"Always There For You"
Shollyjones@tampabay.rr.com ays F
A R11 I I II r-n.nwv 7rlv i.ll 1 2 .CR 12r


SSpacious Golf Course Home Priced To Buy!
S 3/2/2 Pool & Lanai, 1927/2809 sq. ft. with a popular floor plan.
- Take CR 486 to Essex to Eureka to end on tight, 410 E Eureka Court, Hernando, FL 34442
|_______________y_000_AXN7I
S S~ii.^ nj Sii Si* Sj~~~i. Sj*iiii. S S mi


J


I eeVitalTus @ vvMw^rsaeoe^s^ucmI









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


KENSINGTON ESTATES
I ii H.ill I H l H f HIill'- T I: ..f .I~ I

f .fui I'. ..I.... .I lr .. h m..'...] (nmmHUC
. 11. .. .. '-.J ..I ,u' r r. h.I buIl I" I'.,I I f,.I
.I RV b. 6.. i 1 A.J.J.h. .i'f,:l .J. l,: h...J

i lt = i..iii ASKING $154,900
Pal Dadis (3521212 7280
Viti, Lisling -, imnonm c21paldalIs corn


TREASURE IN THE TREES


u .iH .l U I l..I .1' a .6 :.I ]. l .. .I I .:


Mi1 = S')iih $145,000
Call Rulh Frederick 1 352 563 6866


VERY NICE
UPDATED 2/2 MOBILE!
.i.d. .d.c.H l y i l ilh 1 T l.. p .l ,lh l ,' I *
i... l ... : i; .il Pl.. .l h .. i:l ll
$34,888
Call Ouade Feeser 352 302 1699


FLORAL CITY
I' i i .i l ilI I I.-.i I.-.. ii. .1.1

i I ... .- i u . ....

h ': := $54.900
Deb Thompson 352 634 2656


LOOK AT THIS BARELY
LIVED-IN 3/2/2!

i Cal .~.l ii id li il 2 il ii: i ll...6


Call Ouade Feeser 352 302 1699


NO LOT RENT NEEDED
IN THIS MOBILE HOME PARK
l |||J ii.'ll'l n e l n| Ml.'Ill'l l: .J _' .'n V llll .:lil,,,l l*hi .Jl
,:.iJ ull p.jl 1 v inJ..v i i..J l.' b v III... aI li. ..l i .,l i
.I . h al. AlI l h..rII .. : .~ :. h..l...I.- .

l ais =i 32342. $30.900
Call DenIs Mmn 3N2 422 4621 Ic.ll Il mn.l Inlk


EuO.L rinjIV urmsU I LE
P l .i il . I h .ai I .ai l
Pun.v,. I-a-i.. .1 ,. 1pal
I .:. ll I ..i Ph .I.n VV.ila l
= ',"q '"$124,500
illaid Pickiel 3522019871
aitmt, CitusCountlySold comn


2 DUPLEXES
Ii I-u a,1 I I i l ,' 1, I i l ii ,, \I 11 I I .,l a I. f

=iU' .$80,500
=. i6 $90,000
Call Emfd lupu lot i tleng
352-302 1713


MI = ; .IIIII I.I $74,900
Call Chailes Hellf 352 4222387










TROUBLES BEGONE!





AMl =m B 3 $115,000
Ask loi MadlllVn Boolh I 352 726 6668


LOCATION, LOCATION

IH 1 n I.) a .1.. l fil.,J1 I' .. aI 7 1n f. In.-"

IHA VA I1 DA I-,0i v 11.1: 111 . HIiIA Ii'i'
I.V p.aJ I l . I:
MilL = i.11. $78,900
Pal Davis (3521 212 7280
Vita Lisling I' immfmIfI c21paldalis corn


LECANTO


r:( I. .." I Il. lui d h . .J I: n


,:1'ij Iljil. IHN.I. J
$120,000
David Kurilz
Cell 954 383 8786 Ollice 352 726 6668


$69,900
I I 1. I l, I I I d I
l HI-Il.lIh I I II l iI i l ,,1 hi ,
I I ,, I II II 1 1 ,I N1,

,, ,,
East In SEt Call lodav'
Mail Paisons 352 634,1213


2/2 WATERFRONT COTTAGE



ONLY $49,900
Call Donis Mineir 1- 352 422 46217 (cell)
loi more inlormalion


" I. *.I i ., . ._'I. .hih a*




Mi 5 = u F d LI:k $69,900
Call Rulh Firederck 1 352 563 6866


'.' = :.: O~$i 21.000
Deb Thompson 352 634 2656








NEW TO MARKET
HI 1I I I dI a, I I I .
H i ll. I ,l illl l .ifi il : ,i i .. l l 6,,.i liiii



ASKING $163,850
Call Maitha Snidet 352 476-8727
lo details. Ask lot file =354029.


INVERNESS GOLF & CC AREA
* Ba-.1 ....r. . i. i .Ih. .
* I_,iIi.- l.a-. ,l.i.,,i i i, Ii.i.- .l. .


Mti i-= 3 'ill ONLY $89,500
Call Chailes Kelly 3524222387


ASKING $149,900
Call Maitha Snydei 352 476 8727
lot details. Ask lot ile =352412.


CRYSTAL RIVER

* 4 .Ji..iii lh ..i iii i hI

-1c. 3 1:' ONLY $112,000
Miw.sellinacilruscounlyllhom s.com
Call Nancy Jenks 352 400 80/2


5 ACRES FENCED X-FENCED
* $ _l.h .l ,j l. A I

* I hi I i iiqi,: iii li
* ll ,: l l ul .-.l .1.1 .i

* h-i IiII.il
= .:II $110,000
Jeanne B Willaid Pickiel3522123410
iatii CitusCounlySold com


E16 sUNDAY, MARCH 25, 2012