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Citrus County chronicle
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Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02718
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 03-24-2012
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:02718

Full Text






-

*-:
TODAY & Sunday morning
HIGH Warm and breezy with a
85 40 percent chance of
LOW p.m. showers.
64 PAGE A4


It's time for a spring home and garden makeover /Inside
VIRarnwwIu IMU I%


CITRCU.S COUNT Y






www.chronicleonline.com


MARCH 24, 2012 Florida's Best Communit


Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community 50* VOLUME 117 ISSUE 230


Region sees jump in jobs


Shrmpa Palooza
Shrimp, food, beer, arts
and crafts and more
today from 10:30 a.m.
to 10 p.m. on Yulee
Drive and Mason Creek
Road in Old Homosassa.




Beach open
this weekend
Citrus County
Parks and Recre-
ation will open Fort
Island Gulf Beach in
Crystal River this
Saturday morning,
March 24, after com-
pleting a beach re-
nourishment project.
Maintenance
crews have finished
ahead of schedule
and under budget.
The original comple-
tion date was Friday,
March 30.
A total of 1,625
tons of sand was de-
livered to the beach
for a material cost of
$47,775.
Labor and equip-
ment cost have been
reduced by finishing
ahead of schedule.
Beach renourish-
ment is a common
shore protection
measure that pre-
serves beach
resources.
For more informa-
tion, contact Parks
and Recreation at
352-527-7540.
-From staff reports



OPINION:
If a
coyote is a
nuisance, it
can be shot or
trapped legally
where
permissible.




TOMORROW:
CITRUS COUNTY


LJOF7'E
LIFE

2012 Ch,-lcle project

Senior life
This Sunday, the
Chronicle's monthly
series covers issues
from remarriage to
living on a fixed income.
/Sunday


Com ics ........ C8
Community ...... .C6
Crossword ....... .C7
Editorial ........ .A8
Entertainment . . .B6
Horoscope . . . .B6
Lottery Numbers . .B4
Lottery Payouts . .B6
Movies . . . . . .C8
Obituaries . . . .A5
Classifieds . . . .C9
TV Listings . . . .C7


II6lIII 8478 2002!


SHEMIR WILES
Staff Writer

CRYSTAL RIVER -
While the Tampa Bay re-
gion added 15,500 jobs this
past year, it still remains in
fifth place for the fourth
time in a row among six
comparison regions, ac-
cording to the 12th edition
of the Tampa Bay Regional
Economic Scorecard re-


leased recently by the
Tampa Bay Partnership.
The partnership dis-
cussed the latest scorecard
in addition to an assort-
ment of other issues Thurs-
day morning during their
bimonthly board of direc-
tors meeting, which took
place in Citrus County for
the first time at the Planta-
tion on Crystal River in
Crystal River.


The scorecard measures
six economic driver cate-
gories: employment and
workforce; income and
productivity; housing; in-
novation; education; and
transportation. The re-
gion's economic perform-
ance is then compared to
six other similar areas: At-
lanta, Charlotte, Dallas,
Jacksonville and Raleigh-
Durham.


Though the ranking re-
mains low for the Tampa
Bay area, Stuart Rogel,
CEO and president of
Tampa Bay Partnership,
said Thursday that the
bright spot is significant
job growth coming back to
the region. In the score-
card, Tampa Bay moved up
to second place in job
See Page A2


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff Writer
HERNANDO Bob Pender-
gast thought he had it all figured
out.
He had moved his Mango Grill
& Wine Bar from Citrus Springs
to a larger, more visual location
on County Road 486 just east of
Citrus Hills.
But when Pendergast went to
obtain a state liquor license, he
learned he couldn't because of a
law so obscure it took Citrus
County officials a few days to find
it
He knew state liquor laws
would allow the issue of licenses
based on square footage and seat-
ing capacity.
What he didn't know was that,
in 1984, Citrus and Alachua coun-
ties were specifically set aside
with a provision that placed him
in a bind.
The law states that to be eligi-
ble for a liquor license, Mango
Grill would literally need the
number of seats of the restau-
rant's seating capacity.
"We didn't know about this lit-
tle problem," he said. "That


would stop anybody from getting
a license."
The Mango Grill's seating ca-
pacity is 160. To provide room for
a dance floor and space between
the tables, Pendergast's restau-
rant actually seats 108.
Pendergast, who's been in the
restaurant business for 35 years,
wasn't sure what to do. He said
the law makes it difficult for
small restaurants like his to com-
pete against the chains, such as


Applebee's and Olive Garden.
So last November, Pendergast
approached the Citrus County
legislative delegation and ex-
plained his problem. The only fix,
he told lawmakers, was to change
the law.
So they did.
State Rep. Jimmie T Smith, R-
Inverness and Sen. Charlie Dean,
R-Inverness, each sponsored


Page A2


Short stretch to S.R. 44 traffic signal in CR

Webb:WCounty

does not need to

I own all ofroad

CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff Writer
CRYSTAL RIVER County gov-
ernment has a new plan to get the
state to install a traffic light near its
new government center in Crystal
"--- -River It needs to own only part of a
private road.
When the county opened West
Citrus Government Center in
DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle Meadowcrest, Crystal River, earlier
Citrus County officials are attempting to get a traffic light at the Intersection of this year, it was aware increased
State Road 44 and Meadowcrest Boulevard in Crystal River. With the addition of traffic would require traffic signals
county offices and the new Family Dollar, the intersection has become
somewhat difficult to navigate. See Page A2


In T ODAI Y Ir


Page A4


Second draught


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Mango Grill owners Bob Pendergast and Paula Kerins recently moved their restaurant and bar to Hernando
near Citrus Hills. The restaurateurs experienced a problem when they tried to obtain a liquor license.


New liquor law gives local restaurant a boost


Mango Grill & Wine Bar is on County Road 486.


Army


sergeant


charged


in case of


Afghan


massacre

Associated Press
WASHINGTON
Charges filed Friday against
Army Staff Sgt. Robert
Bales reflect the horror of
the crime: 17 counts of pre-
meditated murder, more
than half of them children,
during a shooting rampage
in southern Afghanistan.
But while Afghans are call-
ing for swift and severe
punishment, it will likely be
months, even years, before
the public ever sees Bales
in a courtroom.
One only has to look at
two recent and similarly
high-profile cases to see
that the wheels of military
justice turn slowly
It's been nearly 29
months since an Army psy-
chiatrist, Maj. Nidal Hasan,
allegedly killed 13 and in-
jured two dozen more at
Fort Hood, Texas. His trial
is scheduled to begin in
June. And it's been 21
months since the military
charged intelligence ana-
lyst Bradley Manning with
leaking hundreds of thou-
sands of pages of classified
information. It took nine
months before he was
deemed competent to stand
trial.
The Bales case is likely to
be equally complex, involv-
ing questions of his mental
state and the role that the
stresses of war and possible
previous head injuries may
have played in his alleged
actions. Most of the eyewit-
nesses are the Afghan vil-
lagers and survivors who
may be brought in for the
trial.
The military on Friday
charged Bales with 17
counts of murder, six counts
of attempted murder and
six counts of assault in the
March 11 pre-dawn mas-
sacre in two southern
Afghanistan villages near
his base. The father of two
from Lake Tapps, Wash.,
was officially informed of
the 29 charges just before
noon at the U.S. military
prison at Fort Leavenworth,
Kan., where he is confined.
The maximum punish-
ment for a premeditated
murder conviction is death,
dishonorable discharge
from the armed forces, re-
duction to the lowest en-
listed grade and total
forfeiture of pay and al-
lowances, according to Col.
Gary Kolb, a spokesman for
U.S. forces in Afghanistan.
The mandatory minimum
sentence is life imprison-
ment with the chance of pa-
role.
The charges offered few
details of what happened
that night. But the 38-year-
old soldier is accused of
walking off his base with his
9mm pistol and M-4 rifle,
which was outfitted with a
grenade launcher, killing
four men, four women, two
boys and seven girls and
burning some of the bodies.
The ages of the children
were not disclosed.
In the most detailed de-
scriptions of the shootings
to date, the charges say
Bales shot a young girl in
the head, a young boy in the
thigh, a man in the neck and
a woman in the chest and
groin. The documents also
say that he "shot at" another
girl and boy, but apparently
did not hit them.
The attack occurred in





A2 SATURDAY, MARCH 24, 2012


LOCAL


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Accidents at the intersection of State Road 44 and Meadowcrest are usually caused by a
driver turning in front of westbound traffic. This accident happened Thursday afternoon
around 5 p.m. and involved a Ford Econoline van traveling westbound and a Ford SUV mak-
ing a left turn into the Meadowcrest area. The people involved in this accident refused med-
ical treatment at the scene and the westbound lane was temporarily closed for cleanup of


debris.

SIGNAL
Continued from Page Al

at both ends of North Mead-
owcrest Boulevard at junc-
tions with County Road 486
and State Road 44.
The county will install the
traffic signal at C.R. 486. But
the state was asked to build
the other as it is a state road.
Last month, the Citrus
County Board of County
Commissioners (BOCC)
learned that the Florida De-
partment of Transportation
(FDOT) did a traffic study
and did not think a traffic
signal was needed at Mead-
owcrest and S.R. 44. FDOT
also said it was not the
state's practice to fund traf-
fic signals at non-public
roadways, such as North
Meadowcrest Boulevard.
BOCC Chairman Winn



DRAUGHT
Continued from Page Al

identical bills that changed
language to clarify that the
number of actual seats in
the restaurant need not be
held to the seating capacity.
The bill, which Gov Rick
Scott signed into law Fri-
day, takes effect July 1. It
also allows 10 percent of
the seating capacity be set
aside as a bar
"It was hard to compete
with the chains and there
are more chains coming to
this area," Pendergast
said.
He especially appreci-
ated the leadership of
Smith's office. He said
Smith's staff kept him in-
formed throughout the
process and Smith called
him two weeks ago to say
the bill had passed the
Legislature.
"His office was unbeliev-
able," Pendergast said. "He
was 90 percent of the


Webb on Wednesday told
the Chronicle editorial
board the county does not
need to own all of North
Meadowcrest Boulevard,
just a small part of it.
"We've got people on
board trying to help us with
the funding," Webb said.
"I've talked with individuals
in Tallahassee and they say
the money is there if we can
just get a piece of this road."
The road is owned by
about eight homeowners'
associations, which would
have to agree to give the
county a short stretch of it
"If we can just get the
groups to get together and
get us to the first stop sign,
the state will pay for that
stop light," Webb said. "Ac-
tually, it doesn't matter
about the first stop sign. If
we can get to the first drive-
way, it will give us the tool to
get the traffic light."

process. He and his staff
solved it."
Smith said the law
change only made sense.
"Because it's a local law
there was no real conflict
with the rest of the state,"
Smith said.
The Mango Grill will
mark one year at its Her-
nando site on March 28.


Webb said the BOCC did
not want to take over the
whole road.
"What do we need another
road for?" Webb asked. "If
they want to keep their road,
I'm perfectly happy They
are doing a good job of main-
taining it. It looks nice."
Ken Frink, assistant
county administrator and
public works director, said
he was in correspondence
with the state to build the
traffic signal. Road stan-
dards would have to be
brought up to code.
"We would be able to get
money from Tallahassee if
we owned a piece of it,"
Frink said. "The question is:
Does the community want
us to own a piece of it in ex-
change for the traffic light?"
Chronicle reporter Chris
Van Ormer can be reached
at cvanormer@chronicle
online.com or 352-564-2916.

Pendergast, who employs
15 people, said the new law
will help the Citrus County
economy because smaller
restaurants will be allowed
to grow.
"It'll put more people to
work," he said. "I know I'm
going to have to hire a cou-
ple experienced
bartenders."


JOBS
Continued from Page Al

creation coming only be-
hind Dallas.
"So our economy is be-
ginning to come back," he
said.
In addition, Rogel said
Tampa Bay comes in first
place when it comes to
transportation. According
to the scorecard, this cate-
gory is comprised of five
components: congestion;
commute time; vehicle
miles traveled per capital;
transit ridership as a per-
cent of population; and
transportation investment
per capital.
Without taking into con-
sideration other economic
factors such as insurance
and gas prices, Rogel ad-
mitted the numbers could
be a little skewed. As a re-
sult, he said the partner-
ship wants to look at a new
metric for the scorecard.
Vincent Dolan, president
and CEO of Progress En-
ergy, as well as the current
chairman of the partner-
ship, supported revamping
the scorecard, stating how
it's important to have as
much information as possi-
ble so Tampa Bay under-
stands where it stands and
the region can better align
itself with what's happen-
ing on a state level.
John Schueler, president
of Media General and
chairman of the partner-
ship's regional business
plan effort, spoke briefly
about the Tampa Bay Re-
gional Business Plan,
which identifies the re-
gion's economic strengths
and weaknesses while also
highlighting where the op-
portunities for job cre-
ation and economic
growth and diversification
lie.
It originates from re-
search gathered by SRI In-


international. From the se-
ries of analyses, four target
industries of the future for
the region were identified:
Applied medicine and
human performance; high-
tech electronics and instru-
ments; business, financial
and data services; and ma-
rine and environmental ac-
tivities
If the business plan is
successfully implemented,
Schueler said the Tampa
Bay Regional Council esti-
mates it would create
500,000 jobs in the Tampa
Bay region.
Right now, Schueler said
his group is in the process
of walking through the re-
search so they can learn the
best way to execute the ini-
tiatives laid out in the
report.
Before ending the meet-
ing, Rogel revealed a new
marketing initiative called
Front Row Tampa Bay,
which will be launched in
conjunction with the Re-
publican National Conven-
tion set to come to Tampa
in August.
Front Row Tampa Bay
will be an opportunity for
key business leaders to tell
their stories and share with
a national audience what
business opportunities
exist in Tampa Bay
An anticipated 45,000 are
expected to be in town for
the convention. Of the
45,000, an estimated 15,000
will be media, which is
nearly twice as much as


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

what showed up for the
Super Bowl, Rogel said.
Therefore, the question be-
comes, he added, what are
they going to say about us?
It's the perfect chance to
highlight the best of the
best in Tampa Bay, Rogel
stated, and capitalize from
the buzz that will take from
the area during the four-
day event
Stageworks Theatre in
downtown Tampa will be
converted into a live televi-
sion studio and will be-
come a media hub for
one-on-one interviews,
panel discussion, breaking
news and other news items.
It will be aired before a live
audience and on the Web.
Currently, Rogel said it is
important to start finding
content and securing spon-
sorships for the $400,000
project. Florida Trend
magazine is already the
first media sponsor, he said.
Barry Alpert, managing
director of investment
banking with Raymond
James Financial, suggested
giving each county involved
with the Tampa Bay Part-
nership equal weight in
this endeavor. He said
county leaders should go to
their local businesses to
see if each county could
raise $50,000 so the
fundraising is spread
evenly
For more information
about the Tampa Bay Part-
nership, visit www.
tampabayorg.


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Page A3-SATURDAY, MARCH 24, 2012



TATE&


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Around
THE STATE

Clearwater

Teen convicted in
slaying of cop
A teen has been convicted
of first-degree murder in the
slaying of a St. Petersburg
police officer last year.
Ajury deliberated four
hours Friday before finding
17-year-old Nicholas Lindsey
guilty in the shooting death of
Officer David Crawford on
Feb. 21, 2011.
Lindsey's attorneys did not
deny that he killed Crawford.
Rather, they claimed he fired
at the officer out of panic and
should have been convicted
of manslaughter instead.
That way, he would be eligi-
ble for a 30-year prison sen-
tence instead of a life
sentence without possibility
of early release.


Man gets 8 years in Internet sex sting


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff Writer

INVERNESS -An Orlando man
described by the prosecution as
having two personalities was en-
snared in a sex sting last July and
met his fate in court Friday
Circuit Judge Ric Howard sen-
tenced Andrew Howard Schrank to
eight years in prison and two years
probation for answering an ad on
the Internet to supposedly help a
mother teach her 8-year-old daugh-
ter about sex. Schrank, 29, was also
labeled a sexual predator by
Howard. He is barred from being
around children under 12 years old
unsupervised except for his own
son, and in the event he goes back to
being a chef, in a restaurant setting.
Schrank's attorney, Eric Evilsizer,
asked for leniency for his client who
he said was going through "marital
issues" and had just become unem-
ployed at the time of his arrest.
Evilsizer also noted his client suf-


fered from ADHD
and has bipolar dis-
order and thought a
S"mental health
0 treatment will be
i more beneficial for
him." He asked for
a 40-month sen-
Andrew tence.
Schrank Schrank's par-
labeled a ents also made an
sexual emotional plea to
predator. the judge for a re-
duced sentence and
his mother Susan Schrank prom-
ised the judge his son "will never do
this again. He has never done this
before."
She worried about her son's
safety in prison with a conviction
for a child sex crime.
Schrank also begged the judge on
his own behalf to be reunited with
his 2-year-old son.
But prosecutor Brian Trehy said
the persona Schrank was exhibiting
in court and with his family is starkly


different from the calculating child
predator he presented to the Citrus
County Sheriff's Office decoy
Trehy also added Schrank was
charged with interfering with the
suppression system in the jail "be-
cause he didn't like the cell he was
in." Trehy said jail officials have
Schrank on video taunting them in
an effeminate voice.
To buttress his case for a maxi-
mum sentence (10 years), Trehy
called the decoy in the sting, Det.
Dodi Pruitt, to the stand. She re-
cited a disturbing account of how
Schrank got caught up in the sting.
Pruitt said investigators deliber-
ately lowered the age of the sup-
posed victim from the usual 12 or 13
years to 8 years to see who would
respond. Almost immediately,
Pruitt said Schrank responded and
wrote with relish and in graphic de-
tail his extensive experience with
children and a relative in particu-
lar Pruitt said to make matters
worse, he was extremely eager to


set up a meeting.
"The next day, after I told him we
live in Inverness and contacted
him, he was already in Wildwood
waiting for an address," Pruitt said.
The defense dismissed his asser-
tions in the emails as made up
grandiosity.
Howard heard enough and
swiftly sentenced Schrank.
In July 2011, Schrank was one of
18 people caught in a CCSO sting
called "Operation Cyber Guardian"
in which a pretend young mother
would seek men to come teach her
teen daughter how to please men.
The operation was the second in
so many months that CCSO use to
snare people they thought were in-
volved in preying on young children.
The previous operation was called
"Grim Reaper" and that caught
nearly two dozen people from all
over the state and in all walks of life.
Chronicle reporter AB. Sidibe
can be reached at 352-564-2925 or
asidibe@chronicleonline. corn


Miami


Judge orders autism
Medicaid coverage
A federal judge has or-
dered that the agency that
administers Medicaid in
Florida cover an autism treat-
ment it had previously
rejected.
U.S. Judge Joan Lenard
ruled Friday that applied be-
havioral analysis be covered
by Medicaid. The Florida
Agency for Health Care Ad-
ministration had refused to
cover ABA for three plaintiffs,
claiming it was an "unproven
treatment."
Lenard held that ABA was
a proven and highly effective
treatment of children with
autism.

Tallahassee

Gov. Scott signs
school voucher bill
Gov. Rick Scott has signed
bills that would expand a
Florida school voucher pro-
gram and ban new forms of
synthetic drugs.
The voucher bill (HB 859)
will expand a program that
lets students from low-
income families attend pri-
vate schools at public ex-
pense. Businesses get
credits against state taxes for
contributions to the program.
The bill would raise its cap by
$10.25 million to a total of
$229 million in the next
school year.
The synthetic drug (HB
1175) bill will revise an exist-
ing ban to keep up with de-
signers who change formulas
to get around the law. The
drugs often are called "bath
salts," "K2" or "spice."

Citrus County

Grads sought for
section inclusion
The Chronicle wants to in-
clude graduating home-
schooled seniors from Citrus
County in the upcoming grad-
uation tab section for 2012.
Also welcome are graduating
seniors from out-of-county
schools who reside in Citrus
County.
Send the graduate's name
and a photo to the Chronicle
at 1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd., Crystal River, FL
34429, or email community
@chronicleonline.com no
later than Friday, April 27, with
the photo as an attachment.
Information and photos
can also be dropped off at
the Meadowcrest office. For
more information, call Sarah
Gatling at 352-563-5660.
Democrats JFK/FDR
dinner tonight
The Citrus County Demo-
cratic Executive Committee is
having its annual JFK/FDR
Dinner today at Elk's Lodge
No. 2693, 7890 W. Grover
Cleveland Blvd, Homosassa.
Cocktails are at 6 p.m., din-
ner follows. The guest
speaker will be Joyce Hamil-
ton Henry, director of the mid-
Florida regional ACLU Office.
Tickets are $40 per person.
For tickets or more informa-
tion, call Roz Odell at 352-
746-1588.
-From staff and wire reports


Protesters demand justice at rally for slain youth


Associated Press
Michael M. Krop Senior High School students carry signs and chant Friday during a rally demanding justice for Trayvon Martin in Miami Gar-
dens. Martin was slain in Sanford Feb. 26 in a shooting that has set off a nationwide furor over race and justice. Neighborhood crime-watch
captain George Zimmerman claimed self-defense and has not been arrested, though state and federal authorities are still investigating.


Slain teen described as 'not confrontational'

President Obama calls shooting a tragedy, vows to get to bottom of case


Associated Press
MIAMI Wearing a
hoodie. Listening to music
and talking on his cell-
phone. Picking up Skittles
for his soon-to-be step-
brother Friends say that's
how they would have imag-
ined 17-year-old Trayvon
Martin on a Sunday
Starting a fight? Possi-
bly high on drugs and up
to no good? No, friends
say that description of
Martin from the neighbor-
hood crime-watch volun-
teer who shot and killed
the unarmed black
teenager doesn't match
the young man they knew.


"There's no way
I can believe that,
because he's not a
confrontational
kid," said Jerome
Horton, who was
one of Martin's
former football
coaches and knew Tra,
him since he was Ma
about 5. "It just slair
wouldn't happen. mo
That's just not that
kid."
Martin was slain in the
town of Sanford on Feb. 26
in a shooting that has set
off a nationwide furor
over race and justice.
Neighborhood crime-
watch captain George


Z immerman,
whose father is
white and mother
is Hispanic,
claims self-
defense and has
not been arrested,
though state and
yvon federal authori-
artin ties are still inves-
n last tigating.
rnth. Since his death,
Martin's name and
photographs in football
jerseys, smiling alongside
a baby, and staring into the
camera in a gray hoodie -
have been held up by civil
rights leaders and at ral-
lies stretching from Miami
to New York demanding


Zimmerman's arrest.
On Friday, President
Barack Obama called the
shooting a tragedy, vowed
to get to the bottom of the
case, and added: "When I
think about this boy, I
think about my own kids."
Since the slaying, a por-
trait has emerged of Mar-
tin as a laid-back young
man who loved sports,
was extremely close to his
father, liked to crack jokes
with friends and, accord-
ing to a lawyer for his fam-
ily, had never been in
trouble with the law.
The son of divorced par-
ents, he grew up in work-
ing-class neighborhoods


north of downtown Miami.
He and his father, a truck
driver, were active in the
Miramar Optimist Club,
an organization that runs
sports and academic pro-
grams for youths. Tracy
Martin, the teen's father,
coached his son's football
team.
The boy was a swift ath-
lete, according to a friend,
and played a range of po-
sitions up to age 14. After
he stopped playing, he re-
mained active in the or-
ganization, volunteering
six days a week from June
through November of last
year to help run the
team's concession stand.


SUnsolved: MYSTERIES


Officials looking for juvenile missing since 2010


On Oct. 23, 2010, Holly
Ireland was reported as
a missing juvenile to the
Citrus County Sheriff's
Office. Ireland, who was
17 at the time, was last
seen at her residence in
Crystal River. She had
run away multiple times
before, but had always
been found or had re-
turned home.
Through investigation
it is believed that Holly


Juan So
UNSO
MYSTIC


might be in the Orlando area.
On Jan. 7, 2011, a tip was re-
ceived that Holly attempted to rent
a room at the Ambassador Hotel on
West Colonial Drive in Orlando.
On Jan. 17, 2011, information
was received that Holly was seen at
the Chevron Gas Station on Rio
Grande Avenue in Orlando.
Information was also received
that Holly was seen at the 7-Eleven


on Orange Blossom Trail
in Orlando.
Detectives believe Ire-
land has dramatically
changed her appear-
ance since she first ran
away Holly is 5 feet, 7
inches tall, 130 pounds,
with black hair and
brown eyes.
antiago We need your help in
'LVED locating Holly Ireland. If
ERIES you have any informa-
__ tion, please contact De-
tective Juan Santiago at
352-726-4488, or contact CrimeStop-
pers of Citrus County at 888-ANY-
TIPS, or text the word
CITRUS plus your tip to 274637 or
visiting crimestopperscitrus.com.
You may be eligible to receive a
cash reward and you can remain
anonymous.
-- -


UNSOLVED MYSTERIES OF CITRUS COUNTY

* WHAT: Missing juvenile. [% e -


* VICTIM: Holly Ireland.
* WHEN: Oct. 23, 2010.
* Contact: Detective Juan Santiago a
352-726-4488, or Crimestoppers
of Citrus County at 888-ANYTIPS,
or text the word CITRUS plus your
tip to 274637.
ON THE WEB: crimestoppers
citrus.com.

Detective Juan Santiago is the
Gang/Intelligence/Missing Persons
Detective. He is responsible for
monitoring gang activity and miss-
ing person investigations. Juan
holds a bachelor's degree in public
safety administration from St. Pe-
tersburg College and is in his eighth


Holly
Ireland
missing since
Oct. 23, 2010.


--

Holly
Ireland
what officials
believe she
looks like now.


year serving with the Citrus County
Sheriff's Office.
The Unsolved Mysteries column
will appear weekly on Saturdays
highlighting a cold case, unsolved
burglary or crime.
The column is submitted by the
Citrus County Sheriff's Office.






A4 SATURDAY, MARCH 24, 2012


CHARGED
Continued from Page Al

the Panjwai district of
Kandahar Province, the
spiritual birthplace of the
Taliban. The dead bodies
were found in Balandi and
Alkozai villages one
north and one south of the
base.
Members of the Afghan
delegation investigating the
killings said one Afghan
guard working from mid-
night to 2 a.m. saw a U.S. sol-
dier return to the base
around 1:30 a.m. Another
Afghan soldier who re-
placed the first and worked
until 4 a.m. said he saw a
U.S. soldier leaving the base
at 2:30 a.m. It's unknown
whether the Afghan guards
saw the same U.S. soldier If
the gunman acted alone, in-
formation from the Afghan
guards would suggest that he
returned to base in between
the shooting rampages.
It also is not known
whether the suspect used
grenades, Kolb said. The
grenade launcher attach-
ment is added to the stan-
dard issue M-4 rifle for
some soldiers but not all, he
said. Bales was assigned to
provide force protection at
the base.
The case against him is
the worst allegation of
killing of civilians by an
American in Afghanistan
and has severely strained
U.S.-Afghan ties at a critical
time in the decade-old war.
Not addressed in the
charges are suggestions
that Bales may have been
drinking. On Friday, a sen-
ior U.S. defense official
said Bales was drinking in
the hours before the attack
on Afghan villagers, violat-
ing a U.S. military order
banning alcohol in war
zones. The official spoke on


condition of anonymity to
discuss the charges before
they were filed.
U.S. officials, however,
have said that additional
charges could be filed as
time goes on. Bales' civilian
attorney, John Henry
Browne, said Friday the gov-
ernment will have a hard
time proving its case and
that his client's mental state
will be an important issue.
Bales was on his fourth tour
of duty, having served three
tours in Iraq, where he suf-
fered head and foot injuries.
The charges set in motion
what will likely be a lengthy
military justice process.
"Usually in military and
civilian criminal cases,
delay accrues to the benefit
of the accused. So there will
be some maneuvering to
put it off a while," said Gary
Solis, retired Marine prose-
cutor and adjunct law pro-
fessor at Georgetown
University. "I think it's
many months before we're
going to see this thing go to
trial, if it ever goes to trial."
Bales may face what the
military calls a "sanity
board," to determine his
mental state at the time,
and whether he is compe-
tent to stand trial.
Since Bales was assigned
to a unit based at Joint Base
Lewis-McChord in Washing-
ton state- the 2nd Battalion,
3rd Infantry Regiment of the
3rd Stryker Brigade Combat
Team of the 2nd Infantry Di-
vision the charges were
sent Friday to a special
court-martial convening au-
thority, the 17th Fires
Brigade, an artillery unit at
the post Lewis-McChord
spokesman Lt. Col. Gary
Dangerfield said officials at
the post will have the legal
responsibility of trying and
managing the case against
Bales, but it was not clear
where the proceedings
would actually take place.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Maj. Christopher
Ophardt at Lewis-McChord
said the preliminary hear-
ing may not take place for a
few months and it would
likely be several more
months after that before a
trial would begin per-
haps two years from now
depending on motions and
other pretrial actions.
JeffreyAddicott, who pre-
viously served as the senior
legal adviser to the U.S.
Army's Special Forces, said
the military justice system
typically moves faster than
civilian courts. But he said
the international political
implications may cause this
case to drag on for years.
"When we have these
high-publicity cases, the
military becomes like a
deer in the headlights. They
have just one speed: ex-
tremely slow," Addicott
said, adding that he expects
the defense team to use all
tactics to slow the process.
According to military
lawyers and experts, now
that the charges have been
filed, the next step is for the
military is to decide whether
there is enough evidence to
refer the charges to a pre-
liminary hearing. That hear-


ing, what the military calls
an Article 32, would deter-
mine whether there's prob-
able cause to believe a crime
was committed and that the
person charged did it
Once the Article 32 is
over, the hearing officer
recommends to a general
officer whether or not the
case should go to trial. That
general officer then de-
cides whether the case
should go to a court-martial
in front of a military judge.
Throughout the proceed-
ings, the lawyers will be
able to file a wide range of
motions, including requests
for more time to review
evidence.
Browne said he thinks
the U.S. government will
have difficulty proving its
case against Bales because
"there is no crime scene"
and a lack of important
physical evidence like fin-
gerprints. And he has said
he wants to visit
Afghanistan.
Prosecutors, meanwhile,
will rely on evidence col-
lected from the villages, in-
cluding any statements by
witnesses and Afghan civil-
ians who were injured that
night.


Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Burglaries
A commercial burglary oc-
curred at about 7:55 a.m. March
22 in the 1800 block of W. Gulf-
to-Lake Highway, Lecanto.
A vehicle burglary occurred
at about 11:46 a.m. March 22 in
the 6100 block of W. Nielsen
Court, Homosassa.
A residential burglary oc-
curred at about 12:58 p.m.
March 22 in the 400 block of N.
Elmwood Point, Crystal River.
A residential burglary oc-
curred at about 7:46 p.m. March
22 in the 10 block of N. Jackson
Street, Beverly Hills.
Thefts
A grand theft occurred at
about 2:09 a.m. March 22 in the
1000 block of S.E. U.S. 19, Crys-
tal River.
A grand theft occurred at
about 10:04 a.m. March 22 at
Utah Street, Beverly Hills.
A petit theft occurred at
about 10:21 a.m. March 22 in the
8100 block of N. Sarazen Drive,
Citrus Springs.
A larceny petit theft occurred
at about 12:13 p.m. March 22 in
the 800 block of W. Main Street,
Inverness.


ON THE NET
For more information
about arrests made by
the Citrus County Sher-
iff's Office, go to
www.sheriffcitrus.org
and click on the Public
Information link, then
on Arrest Reports.
Click on Crime Mapping
for a view of where each
type of crime occurs in
Citrus County. Click on
Offense Reports to see
lists of burglary, theft
and vandalism.


A grand theft occurred at
about 12:19 p.m. March 22 in the
2800 block of N. Carl G. Rose
Highway, Hemando.
A grand theft occurred at
about 12:40 p.m. March 22 in the
6700 block of W. Rosedale
Drive, Homosassa.
A larceny petit theft occurred
at about 4:06 p.m. March 22 in
the 3600 block of S. Alabama Av-
enue, Homosassa.
A petit theft occurred at
about 10:39 a.m. March 23 in the
4900 block of W. Dingus Court,
Homosassa.


degal notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle





B jBid Notices......................C12





f ~ Surplus Property.............C12


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES
City H L FIcast City H
Daytona Bch. 83 64 ts Miami 84
Ft. Lauderdale 83 72 pc Ocala 84
Fort Myers 87 67 pc Orlando 86
Gainesville 83 61 ts Pensacola 79
Homestead 84 67 pc Sarasota 82
Jacksonville 83 61 ts Tallahassee 80
Key West 82 71 pc Tampa 84
Lakeland 87 63 ts Vero Beach 85
Melbourne 84 66 ts W. Palm Bch. 84


MARINE OUTLOOK


HI LO PR| HI LU PH
86 67 0.00 87 65 0.00

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Excluse daily
i-ir- u i TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 85 Low: 64
Warm and breezy. A 40'. chance of PM
showers, an iso. thunderslorm possible.
l.!!!!! ,"i, SUNDAY & MONDAY MORNING
)y, High: 80 Low: 54
Showers ending in hie morning. Decreasing
clouds, breezy and cooler by evening.
MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
S) I 1High: 82 Low: 55
Sunny and mild, clear and cool at night.

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Friday 91/64
Record 94/40
Normal 79/51
Mean temp. 78
Departure from mean +13
PRECIPITATION*
Friday 0.00 in.
Total for the month 0.60 in.
Total for the year 3.83 in.
Normal for the year 9.23 in.
As olf 6 p.m. at Inverness
UV INDEX: 9
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Friday at 3 p.m. 30.08 in.


DEW POINT
Friday at 3 p.m.
HUMIDITY
Friday at 3 p.m. 5
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Oak, juniper, nettle
Today's count: 9.3/12
Sunday's count: 10.5
Monday's count: 10.7
Friday was good with poluilanis
mainly particulates.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
3/24 SATUPDAr' 7:21 1:09 7:43 1:32
3.25 SUNDAY 8:10 1:58 8:32 2:21


CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
S SUNSET TONIGHT............................7:44 P.M.
SUNRISE TOMORROW.................... 728 A.M.
MOONRISE TODAY..........................8:21 A.M.
AP 13 MA21 MOONSET TODAY ...... ....... 9:47 PM.


BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.
For more Inlormation call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
htp://flame.fl-dofcom/lireweatherldbdi
WATERING RULES
One-day-per-week rngai.on schedule as follows for addresses ending in:
0 or 1 Monday 2 or 3 -Tuesday, 4 or 5 -Wednesday, 6 or 7
- Thursday, 8 or 9 & subdivision common areas Friday. Before 8 a.m. or
after 6 p.m.
Hand watering of non-grass areas can take place any day before 8 a.m. or
after 6 p.m.
PLEASE CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL NEW PLANT MATERIAL. Citrus
County Waler Resources can explain additional watering allowances for
qualified plantings.
Questions, concerns or reporting violations, please call Citrus County at
352-527-7669, or e-mail waterconservation@bocc.citrus.fl.us.
TIDES
*From mouths of rivers *At King's Bay "'At Mason's Creek
Saturday Sunday
City High/Low High/Low High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 7:38 a3:20 a 7:23 p/3:18 p 8:13 a/3:52 a 7:48 p/3:44 p
Crystal River" 5:59 a/12:42 a 5 44 12 40 r 6:34 a/1:14 a 6:09 p/1:06 p
Withlacoochete* 3:46 al/10:28 a 3:31 :. 11 p 4:21 a/10:54 a : 56 p 11 p
Homosassa-" 6:48 a/2:19 a 23 ?p 7:23 a/2:51 a 6:58 p/2:43 p


Southwest winds around 15 knots.
Seas 2 feet. Bay and inland waters will
have a moderate chop. Mostly cloudy
with showers and thunderstorms
today.


C I T R U S


F'cast
pc
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
pc
pc


Gulf water
temperature


82
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Thu. Fri. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 27.19 27.15 35.52
Tsala ApopkU -Hernanoo 33.60 33.58 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 35.50 35.48 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 37.46 37.43 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level. Flood stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year flood. the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year, This data is
obtained from the Southwest Flanda Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will Ihe District or the United Slates Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use ol
this data. If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211.

THE NATION


City
Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Austin
Ballimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Bulfalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord. NH.
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrlsburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Las Vegas


Friday Saturday
H LPcp. FcstH L


58
40
55 .45
65 trace
50
44
53
36
64 77
37 01
58
55
48
59
55 .13
60 .05
57 1 25
61 ,65
54
61
59 27
57
46
36
49
60
54
60 27
51 .01
56
54
61 .55
59
60


c
s
Is
pc
sh
s
Is
pc
pc
pc
c
sh
c
Is
Is
Is
sh
Is


c
s
s
PC
pc
sh
s
Is
sh
s
Is
pc
s


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SATURDAY

Friday Saturday
City H L Pcp. Fcst H L
New Orleans 83 68 1.56 pc 81 63
New York City 76 62 sh 62 50
Norfolk 84 62 ts 78 57
Oklahoma City 69 42 .98 s 80 53
Omaha 72 47 s 76 51
Palm Springs 84 56 s 81 53
Philadelphia 80 53 sh 65 51
Phoenix 87 58 s 87 61
Pittsburgh 81 52 ts 70 52
Portland, ME 70 55 c 53 39
Portland, Ore 56 33 .01 pc 55 39
Providence, R.I. 70 58 c 60 44
Raleigh 83 60 ts 78 57
Rapid City 72 35 s 69 44
Reno 60 42 pc 64 38
Rochester, NY 64 53 sh 67 48
Sacramento 60 40 sh 55 42
St, Louis 67 52 .03 ts 71 54
St, Ste. Marie 55 50 .06 c 57 38
Salt Lake Cily 72 55 s 73 52
San Antonio 82 49 s 85 58
San Diego 61 55 pc 63 53
San Francisco 59 42 sh 51 41
Savannah 79 61 trace ts 79 58
Seattle 52 33 pc 57 40
Spokane 43 28 c 51 36
Syracuse 71 52 sh 66 50
Topeka 66 51 s 77 49
Washington 83 59 ts 68 56
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 94 Laredo. Texas LOW 15 Alamosa.
Colo.
WORLD CITIES


Little Rock 70 53 .08 pc 77 54
Los Angeles 63 53 pc 66 52 SATURDAY Lisbon
Louisville 75 63 1.13 IS 65 51 CITY H/LJSKY London
Memphis 68 59 Is 73 57 Acapulco 88f73/pc Madrid
Milwaukee 56 46 72 sh 54 47 Amsterdam 63/37/pc Mexico City
Minneapolis 72 59 c 70 44 Athens 69/51/pc Montreal
Mobile 77 69 71 Is 82 55 5-l,""', 53/38/S MOSCOW
Montgomery 75 64 82 pc 78 55 Berlin 63/38/pc Paris
Nashville 79 61 02 Is 66 50 Bermuda 69/64/sh Rio
KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr'drlfe u Cairo 74/51/s Rome
f=fair; h=hary; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain Calgary 36/21/pc S,,ane,
rs=raindsnow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers: Havana 85/67/pc Tokyo
sn=snow; tIsthunderstorms: w-=wndy. Hong Kong 71/60/c Toronto
02012 Weather Central, Madison, Wi. Jerusalem 72/51/s Warsaw


73/51/pc
66/38/s
69/41/pc
76/48/sh
54/41/sh
27/1 8/c
68/421s
84f172/ts
64/49/c
71/56/s
58/43/sh
60/48/sh
55/351pc


For the RECORD


C 0 U N TY


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APRIL


Mk. r





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries


Adolph
Lemberger, 89
CRYSTAL RIVER
Adolph W Lemberger, age
89, Crystal River, died
March 22, 2012, under the
loving care of the staff of
Cedar CreekAssisted Living
Facility and Hospice of Cit-
rus County
Adolph was born on No-
vember 12, 1922, in Camden,
N.J., to the late Adolph and
Katherine (Hornung) Lem-
berger He served our coun-
try proudly in the United
States Army during WWII,
was awarded a Purple
Heart Medal with duty in
England, Wales, France,
Luxembourg, Belgium, Hol-
land and Germany Adolph
was employed by Budd
Company for over 42 years
as an engineer He was an
avid woodworker, fashion-
ing fabulous items for his
family and friends. He also
enjoyed gardening and
playing the organ.
Survivors include two
sons, Robert and his wife,
Elizabeth Lemberger, Bev-
erly Hills, FL, and David
Lemberger and his compan-
ion Paula Storck, Marlton,
NJ; a deceased son, William,
who is survived by his life
partner Mike Meyer; sister-
in-law Helen Lemberger,
Williamstown, NJ; grand-
daughter, Kelly; and two
nieces, Kathy Taggart and
Jannette Alston. He was
preceded in death by his
wife of 58 years, Elizabeth,
on January 24, 2012, and a
grandson, Christopher
A graveside committal
service with military honors
will be announced at a later
date at the Florida National
Cemetery in Bushnell. Chas.
E. Davis Funeral Home with
Crematory is in charge of
arrangements. The family
requests donations to Hos-
pice of Citrus County, PO.
Box 641270, Beverly Hills,
FL 34464 in lieu of flowers.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.

Mildred
Monsen, 91
BEVERLY HILLS
Mrs. Mildred B. Monsen,
age 91, of Beverly Hills,
Florida, died at her home
on Friday, March 23,2012, in
Beverly Hills, FL.
She was born July 24,
1920, in Cicero, IL, daughter
of the late James and Mary
Kudrna. She worked as a
Secretary for Sears & Roe-
buck and was a Teachers
Aide within the Chicago
public school system. She
moved to Beverly Hills,
Florida from Chicago, IL, in
1984. Her hobbies included
golf, bowling and playing
cards. Mrs. Monsen was a
member of Good Shepherd
Lutheran Church, Her-
nando, FL.
Mrs. Monsen was pre-
ceded in death by her son,
Robert Monsen. Survivors
include husband, Raymond
Monsen of Beverly Hills, FL;
daughter, Karen Monsen of
New Port Richey, FL; grand-
son, John Zacharewich; and
granddaughter, Danielle
Zacharewich.
Online condolences may
be sent to the family at
www. HooperFuneral-
Home.com. Arrangements
by the Beverly Hills Chapel
of Hooper Funeral Homes &
Crematory

OBITUARIES
The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy per-
mits both free and paid
obituaries.
Obituaries must be
submitted by the
funeral home in charge
of arrangements.
Free obituaries, run one
day, can include: full
name of deceased;
age; hometown/state;
date of death; place of
death; date, time and
place of visitation and
funeral services.


Maxine
Tillman, 80
BUSHNELL
Maxine Tillman, 80, of
Bushnell, Florida, died Fri-
day, March 23,2012, in Bush-
nell, FL.
She was born August 16,
1931, in Bushnell, Florida.
Ms. Tillman was a lifelong
resident of Sumter County
She was a retired Technical
Service Specialist at SECO.
Ms. Tillman was a lifelong
member of the First Baptist
Church of Wahoo, Bushnell,
FL. She was a dedicated
Christian and Prayer
Warrior.
She is survived by her
sons, Robert Knight (Linda)
Tillman Jr. of Byron, GA,
and Thomas Lance (Mar-
lene) Tillman of
Zephyrhills, FL; daughters,
Susan Callihan of Bushnell,
FL, Teresa (John) Cannon of
Vero Beach, FL, Pat (Gary)
Burchfield of Bushnell, FL,
and Maude (Ed) White of
Bushnell, FL; sisters, Nancy
Fobb, and Bonnie Mims of
Bushnell, FL; 16 grandchil-
dren; and many nieces and
nephews. Visitation will be
at the Purcell Funeral
Home Chapel, Bushnell,
FL, on Monday, March 26,
2012, from 6 to 8 p.m. Serv-
ices will be at the First Bap-
tist Church of Wahoo,
Bushnell, FL, on Tuesday,
March 27, 2012, at 2 p.m.
Pastor Billy Ready and Pas-
tor Paul Alonso will preside.
Interment will follow at
Pleasant Hill Baptist
Church, Bushnell, FL. On-
line condolences may be left
at www.purcellfuneral-
home.com. Arrangements
entrusted to Purcell Fu-
neral Home, Bushnell, FL.






Thellie
Simmons Jr., 98
CRYSTAL RIVER
Funeral services for Thel-
lie Simmons Jr, 98, of Crys-
tal River, will be held at 11
a.m. Monday, March 26, at
Wilder Fu-
neral
Home, Ho-
mosassa
Springs,
with burial
to follow at
Fero Memo-
rial Gar-
Thellie dens in
Simmons Jr. B e v e r l y
Hills. Visitation will be Mon-
day from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m.
Mr Simmons died Tues-
day, March 20, 2012, at his
residence. He was born in
Forest, MS, on August 22,
1913, to Thellie Simmons Sr
and Lenora Hoover
Simmons.
Thellie attended Missis-
sippi State University be-
fore joining the military He
was an Army veteran of WW
II, stationed in the Pacific as
a radar operator Before re-
tiring, Mr Simmons worked
as a plumber, serving many
areas of Florida. He was a
member of the First Baptist
Church of Crystal River,
Springs Masonic Lodge No.
378, Ocala Scottish Rite, life
member of Broward County
DAV Chapter 35 of Miami,
and a member and past
president of Plumber's
Union No. 519 of Miami. He
was recently honored with
an award for his 45 years of
service as a Mason.
Preceding him in death
were his parents, wife Lois
and only son Lee.
He is survived by his
nephews Al Simmons and
wife Terri and Karl Sim-
mons and wife Ester; nieces
Diane York and husband
Rick, Linda Renfro and hus-
band Larry and Ann Cruse;
as well as many great
nephews and nieces and
cousins.
In lieu of flowers, please
send memorials to the In-
debtedness Fund at First
Baptist Church of Crystal
River
Sign the guest book at
ww.chronicleonline. cornm.


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Paul Warner, 82
HOMOSASSA
Paul A. Warner of Ho-
mosassa, Florida, formerly
of the Cadillac area, passed
away Tuesday morning,
March 20, 2012, at Hospice
of Citrus County at Citrus
Memorial hospital in Inver-
ness, Florida. He was 82.
Survivors include his
daughters, Pauline (James)
Bishop of Tennessee,
Rhonda (Frank) Cramer of
North Carolina and Deanna
(Ed) Markiewicz of Jackson,
Michigan; several grand-
children and great-grand-
children as well as several
stepchildren, step grand-
children and step great-
grandchildren; sisters, Jean
Phillips of Big Rapids,
Louise (Keith) Christensen
of Coral, Patricia (Kirt) Den-
man of Marne, Sharon
(Garry) Wortman ofJenison,
Bonnie (Frank) Spieker of
Oklahoma; many nieces and
nephews and his special
friend, Cora Surkamer
Funeral services will be
held 11:00 a.m. Saturday,
March 24,2012, at the Peter-
son Funeral Home in Cadil-
lac. Burial will be at Maple
Hill Cemetery in Leroy
Friends may meet the fam-
ily from 10:00 a.m. until
services on Saturday Me-
morial contributions may be
made to the American
Heart Association. On on-
line guestbook is available
at www.petersonfh.com.





Jerry
Wineberger, 66
HOMOSASSA
Jerry Curtis Wineberger,
66, of Homosassa, died
Tuesday, Mar 20, 2012, at his
residence. He was born in
Charlotte, NC, and moved to
this area in
1998 from
Mooresville,
NC. Jerry
was a for-
.. m e r
owner/oper-
ator of over-
the-road
Jerry trucking. He
Wineberger was a Chris-
tian and an Army veteran.
He was preceded in death
by his parents J. C.
Wineberger and Mary
(Turner) Wineberger, and
son Curtis D. Wineberger
Jerry is survived by his
wife, Deborah C.
Wineberger, of Homosassa;
sons Rusty T Wineberger
and his wife Carrera, of
Jacksonville, NC, Matthew
A. Wineberger of Ho-
mosassa and Andrew R.
Curd of Homosassa; daugh-
ters Chelene Gonzales and
husband Frank, of Frost
Proof, FL, and Shelly
Turner of Lumberton, NC;
brother Earl Wineberger
and wife Kathy, of Tampa,
FL; sister, Alice Moye, of
Tampa; grandchildren Josh,
Colton, Weston, Crista,
Lacey, Amber and Kimber;
and four great-grand-
children.
Funeral services with full
military honors will be at 3
p.m. Monday, March 26,
2012, at Wilder Funeral
Home, Homosassa Springs.
Condolence may be given at
www.wilderfuneral.com.

OBITUARIES
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear in
the next day's edition.
Email obits@chronicle
online.com or fax 352-
563-3280.


Florida Internet cafes to


keep fighting local ban

Associated Press


TALLAHASSEE A
lawyer for the Coalition of
Florida's Internet Cafes
said Friday that a recent
legal setback won't stop a
lawsuit against Seminole
County's ban on businesses
that offer electronic sweep-
stakes simulating roulette,
slot machines and other
forms of gambling.
Adam Regar said the
next step is a trial set for
January 2013 in a case that
has statewide implications.
Hundreds of the store-
front businesses are oper-
ating across Florida, and
several other local govern-
ments have similar
ordinances.
The state House passed a
bill that would have put
them out of business, but it
died in the Senate without a
vote during the regular leg-
islative session that ended
March 9. A Senate bill,
which also did not pass,
would have regulated rather
than banned Internet cafes.
The 11th U.S. Circuit
Court of Appeals in Atlanta
affirmed a federal district
judge's decision to let
Seminole County enforce
its ordinance pending trial.
A three-judge appellate
panel said in an unpub-
lished opinion that it didn't
have enough information
yet to decide whether the
ban may violate the free
speech rights of the Internet
cafes as they are claiming.
"What we do now is move


What we do now is move
forward and build a
record.

Adam Regar
lawyer for the Coalition of Florida's Internet Caf6s .


tention they are in compli-
ance with the ordinance
because it prohibits simu-
lated gambling devices that
can be connected with an
object such as a swipe card.
The Seminole County
businesses, though, don't use
swipe cards or other physi-
cal means to activate the
computers. Regar said cus-
tomers, instead, log on to
what he facetiously called
"this evil device" by typing in
a user name and password.
No Florida appellate
court has ruled on whether
electronic sweepstakes vio-
late existing state gambling
laws, including a ban on
slot machines. Attempts to
use those laws against In-
ternet caf6s have had
mixed results. That in-
cludes at least one not
guilty verdict, a dismissal
for lack of evidence and
several guilty pleas to rack-
eteering charges in agree-
ments between prosecutors
and defendants, according
to a House staff analysis.
The Alabama and Missis-
sippi supreme courts have
ruled that Internet caf6
computers used for elec-
tronic sweepstakes are ille-
gal slot machines.


forward and build a
record," Regar said in a
telephone interview from
his Jacksonville office.
The lower court denied a
preliminary injunction
Regar had sought. The
judge ruled the ban affects
conduct rather than speech.
Sweepstakes themselves
are legal and can be used
as promotional devices by
businesses. For example,
customers at fast-food
restaurants might he
handed scratch-off tickets,
giving them a chance to win
a free burger.
Businesses or charitable
organizations running
sweepstakes cannot charge
a fee for participating. The
Internet cafes contend they
are charging, instead, for
time on computers that can
be used to view sweepstakes
results in a format that mim-
ics casino-style games.
Regar said the appellate
court's ruling may have no
practical effect because the
county so far has not at-
tempted to enforce the ban.
He noted it could face dam-
ages if the ordinance is
struck down.
Another issue in the law-
suit is his clients' con-


New home sales fell last month


Housing

market

remains weak

Associated Press

WASHINGTON Sales
of U.S. new homes fell in
February for the second
straight month, a reminder
that the depressed housing
market remains weak de-
spite some improvement
The Commerce Depart-
ment said Friday that new-
home sales dropped 1.6
percent last month to a sea-
sonally adjusted annual
rate of 313,000 homes. Sales
have fallen nearly 7 per-
cent since December
While a mild winter and
three months of strong job
growth have lifted re-sales,
those conditions haven't
benefited the new-home
market The current pace is
less than half the 700,000
that economists consider to
be healthy
There were some posi-
tive signs in the report.
The government revised
December's sales figures
up to show an annual rate
of 336,000, the best sales
pace in a year
And the median sales
price for new homes
surged in February more
than 8 percent, to $233,700.
That's the highest median
price since June and could
suggest builders are antic-
ipating more sales in the


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Saralynne Schlumberger at 564-2917
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Foreclosure activity surged in
February across half of U.S. states.


months to come.
Still, economists caution
that the housing market is a
long way from fully
recovering.
Though new-home sales
represent less than 10 per-
cent of the housing market,
they have an outsize impact
on the economy Each home
built creates an average of
three jobs for a year and
generates about $90,000 in
tax revenue, according to
the National Association of
Home Builders.
Builders are growing
more confident after seeing
a growing number of people
express interest in buying
this year They've re-
sponded by requesting the
most permits to build sin-
gle-family homes and apart-
ments since October 2008.
Sales of previously occu-
pied homes have risen
more than 13 percent since
July And January and Feb-
ruary made up the best


winter for re-sales in five
years, when the housing
crisis began.
A key reason for the dis-
mal sales in the new-home
market is that builders
must compete with foreclo-
sures and short sales -
when lenders accept less
for a house than what is
owed on the mortgage.
Foreclosure activity
surged in February across
half of U.S. states. The pace
of foreclosures is increas-
ing now that states have
reached a settlement with
the nation's five biggest
mortgage lenders over fore-
closure abuses.
Builders have also
stopped working on many
projects because it's been
hard for them to get financ-
ing or to compete with
cheaper resale homes. For
many Americans, buying a
home remains too big a risk
more than four years after
the housing bubble burst.


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SATURDAY, MARCH 24, 2012 A5










ASSAURAY MRCT2,H01 SMOCKSEiuCUTY IN)ECHRONICL


IHowToS E'THEMRTINEI


MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) Here are the 825 most active stocks on the New York Stock Exchange, 765
Name Vol(00) Last Chg Name Vol(00) Last Chg Name Vol(00) Last Chg most active on the Nasdaq National Market and 116 most active on the Ameri-
BkofAm 2731255 9.85 +.25 NovaGld g 77077 7.01 +.27 MicronT 440810 8.40 -.31 can Stock Exchange. Tables show name, price and net change.
S&P500ETF1086975139.65 +.45 CheniereEn 35828 14.39 -.13 PwShs QQQ416281 66.94 -.04 Name: Stocks appear alphabetically by the company's full name (not abbrevia-
SPDRFncl 714465 15.73 +.14 NwGoldg 28448 9.38 +.27 Oracle 350634 28.55 -.08 tion). Names consisting of initials appear at the beginning of each letter's list.
BariPVix 651369 17.30 -1.28 Rentech 24400 2.10 +.04 Microsoft 338862 32.01 +.01 Last: Price stock was trading at when exchange closed for the day.
AT&Tlnc 578696 31.52 -.19 AntaresP 24216 3.27 +.25 Delllnc 268598 16.48 -.55 Chg: Loss or gain for the day. No change indicated by...

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) Stock Footnotes: cld Issue has been called for redempbon by company. d- New 52-week
low. dd Loss in last 12 mos. ec- Company formerly listed on the American Exchange's
Nam e Last Ch 0C h 9Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Ch %Cha Emerging Company Marketplace. h- temporary exmpt from Nasdaq capital and surplus list-
Esterline 75.20 +6.93 +10.2 PernixTh 9.45 +.90 +10.5 TearLab 3.62 +.72 +24.8 ing qualification. n- Stock was a new issue in the last year.The 52-week high and low fig-
McEwenM 4.12 +.38 +10.2 Nevsun g 3.54 +.29 +8.9 IntegEllf 3.90 +.74 +23.4 ures date only from the beginning of trading. pf- Preferred stockissue.pr- Preferences.pp-
TRC Cos 6.12 +.56 +10.1 AntaresP 3.27 +.25 +8.3 GluMobile 4.85 +.85 +21.3 Holder owes installments of purchase price. rt- Right to buy security at a specified price. s-
SandRdge 8.29 +.66 +8.7 SaratogaRs 6.95 +.51 +7.9 ReadglntB 6.00 +1.04 +21.0 Stock has split by at least 20 percent within the last year. wi- Trades will be settled when the
Cameltlnfo 3.32 +.25 +8.1 ExeterR gs 2.76 +.18 +7.0 ArenaPhm 2.41 +.37 +18.1 stock is issued. wd When distributed. wt Warrant, allowing a purchase of a stock., u New
52-week high. un Unit, including more than one security. vj Company in bankruptcy or re-
LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) ceivership, or being reorganized under the bankruptcy law. Appears in front of the name.
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.
CSVS2xVxS 7.16 -3.04 -29.8 Bacterin 2.50 -.87 -25.8 Galectin rs 4.45 -1.49 -25.1
iPSXR1K 14.52 -2.93 -16.8 AvinoSGg 2.12 -.17 -7.4 KITDigitl 6.33 -1.82 -22.3
PrUVxSTrs15.66 -2.51 -13.8 DocuSec 3.56 -.25 -6.6 Amertnspf 2.10 -.39 -15.6


IndiaFdwd 17.85 -2.41 -11.9 MastechH 5.33 -.31 -5.5 OverldStrg 2.00 -.30 -13.0
Nortellnv 19.80 -2.21 -10.0 NewConcEn 2.87 -.15 -5.0 StanlFrn 4.39 -.36 -7.6


2,143 Advanced
874 Declined
112 Unchanged
3,129 Total issues
61 New Highs
10 New Lows
3,340,057,231 Volume


289 Advanced
167 Declined
30 Unchanged
486 Total issues
8 New Highs
3 New Lows
77,137,319 Volume


DIARY


1,664
824
132
2,620
71
19
1,391,356,699


52-Week
High Low Name
13,289.08 10,404.49Dow Jones Industrials
5,627.85 3,950.66Dow Jones Transportation
467.64 381.99Dow Jones Utilities
8,718.25 6,414.89NYSE Composite
2,498.89 1,941.99Amex Index
3,090.08 2,298.89Nasdaq Composite
1,414.00 1,074.77S&P 500
14,888.88 11,208.42Wilshire 5000
868.57 601.71 Russell 2000


Last
13,080.73
5,217.82
452.76
8,180.06
2,407.11
3,067.92
1,397.11
14,707.74
830.03


I NYSE


Net % YTD % 52-wk
Chg Chg Chg %Chg
+34.59 +.27 +7.07 +7.04
-2.99 -.06 +3.95 +.20
-.03 -.01 -2.57 +10.95
+38.73 +.48 +9.40 -1.70
+17.91 +.75 +5.65 +3.52
+4.60 +.15+17.76 +11.84
+4.33 +.31 +11.09 +6.34
+57.68 +.39+11.51 +5.44
+8.59 +1.05+12.03 +.75


Request stocks or mutual funds to be listed here by writing

the Chronicle, Attn: Stock Requests, 1624 N. Meadowcrest

Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429; or call 563-5660. Include

the name of the stock, market and ticker symbol. For mu-

tual funds, list parent company, symbol and the exact name

of the fund. Staff will not provide real-time quotes.


I NEWYORK STOKECAG


Name Last Chg BkNYMel 23.95 +.25
Barday 15.82 +.66
BariPVix 17.30 -1.28
BarrickG 43.76 +.68
ABBLtd 20.34 +.25 BasicEnSv 17.98 +1.12
AES Corp 12.92 +.06 Baxter 59.31 +.07
AFLAC 45.72 +.12 Beam Inc 58.24 -.04
AGCO 48.59 +1.75 BeazerHm 3.37 -.17
AGL Res 38.76 +.16 BectDck 76.40 -.48
AK Steel 7.92 -.01 BerkHaA122170.00 +691.00
AOL 18.49 +.72 BerkH B 81.38 +.45
ASA Gold 25.77 +.45 BestBuy 27.51 +.55
AT&TInc 31.52 -.19 BBarrett 27.84 +.73
AU Optron 4.91 -.10 BIkHillsCp 33.25 +.08
AbtLab 60.40 +.29 BlkDebtStr 4.20 +.10
AberFitc 51.23 -.74 BlkEnhC&l 13.29 -.05
AboveNet 83.11 -.29 BIkGlbOp 15.11 -.03
Accenture 64.88 +1.36 Blackstone 15.35 -.19
AdamsEx 10.91 +.05 BlockHR 16.80 -.08
AMD 8.09 +.06 Boeing 73.97 +.05
Aeropostf 21.15 +.44 Boise Inc 8.38 +.26
Aetna 45.60 -.90 BostBeer 103.23 +2.24
Agilent 44.30 +.59 BostProp 104.01 +.63
Agniomg 33.61 +.81 BostonSci 5.97 -.03
AlcatelLuc 2.31 +.01 BoydGm 8.01 +.26
Alcoa 10.11 +10 Brinker 28.08 -.12
AllegTch 42.00 +.42 BrMySq 32.96 +.06
Allete 40.87 -.10 Brunswick 25.49 +.20
AlliBGIbHi 15.13 +.15 Buckeye 61.95 -.15
AlliBInco 8.28 +.10 CBLAsc 18.69 +.06
AlliBern 15.42 +.64 CBREGrp 20.48 +.08
Allstate 32.51 +.17 CBSB 31.84 +.41
AlphaNRs 15.98 -.05 CF Inds 188.76 +6.32
AIpAlerMLP 16.77 -.03 CH Engy 66.75 +.09
Altria 30.40 +.26 CMS Eng 21.91 +.09
AmBev 42.71 +.35 CSS Inds 19.90 +.40
Ameren 31.77 ... CSXs 21.17 +.15
AMovilLs 23.95 +.12 CVSCare 45.14 +.39
AEagleOut 17.13 -.03 CYS Invest 12.89 -.06
AEP 38.48 +.18 CblvsNYs 14.70 -.03
AmExp 57.25 -.04 CabotOGs 32.52 +1.00
AmlntGrp 28.27 +.29 CallGolf 6.92 +.02
AmSIP3 6.88 ... Calpine 17.23 +.23
AmTower 61.75 -.23 Camecog 22.69 +.07
Amerigas 40.25 +.46 Cameitlnfo 3.32 +.25
Ameriprise 57.10 +.61 Cameron 51.78 +1.43
AmeriBrgn 38.96 +.67 CampSp 32.88 +.07
Anadarko 79.41 +1.18 CdnNRsgs 33.67
AnalogDev 39.92 +.10 CapOne 55.74 +1.32
AnglogldA 37.66 +.51 CapifiSrce 6.82 -.24
ABInBev 72.15 -.47 CapMplB 14.57 -.02
Annaly 16.29 +.11 CardnlHIth 42.18 +.65
Apache 101.76 +.86 CarMax 34.15 -.07
AquaAm 22.12 +.27 Carnival 31.91 +.05
ArcelorMit 19.78 +.36 Caterpillar 107.83 +1.40
ArchCoal 11.66 +.03 Celanese 44.30 +1.32
ArchDan 31.86 +.12 Cemex 7.97 +.06
ArmourRsd 6.69 +.03 Cemigpf 22.93 -.19
Ashland 61.27 +.73 CenterPnt 19.31 +.01
AsdEstat 15.76 +.17 CntryLink 38.96 -.14
AssuredG 16.30 +.01 Cenveo 3.43 +.05
AstaZen 45.18 -.12 Checkpnt 11.21 +.04
ATMOS 30.80 +.19 ChesEng 24.66 +.23
Avon 19.09 +.25 ChesUfi 41.64 +.45
BB&TCp 30.99 +.16 Chevron 106.36 +1.01
BHP BilILt 71.58 +.88 Chicos 15.55 +.07
BP PLC 45.59 +.29 Chimera 2.96 +.02
BPZRes 4.08 +17 ChinaUni 17.02 +.69
BRFBrasil 19.99 -.31 Chubb 67.76 -.12
BRT 6.78 -.13 Cigna 45.84 +.28
BakrHu 43.71 +.49 CindBell 4.09 +.04
BallCorp 41.09 +.26 Cifgrprs 37.13 +.24
BcBilVArg 8.28 -.04 CleanHs 68.26 +.01
BcoBradpf 18.08 +.32 CliffsNRs 70.78 +1.73
BomSantSA 8.01 ... Clorox 67.99 -.22
BcoSBrasil 9.61 +.04 Coach 77.09 -1.28
BkofAm 9.85 +.25 CobaltlEn 30.59 -.07
Bklreldrs 6.99 +.31 CCFemsa 102.30 +1.95
BkMontg 59.31 +.46 CocaCola 71.49 +.07


Name Last Chg


AMCNetn 44.66 -.09
ASML HId 47.77 -.03
ATP O&G 8.14 +.03
AVI Bio 1.54 +.11
Aastrom 1.91 -.01
Abiomed 23.00 +.01
Abraxas 3.36 +.25
AcadaTc 40.98 +1.06
AcadiaPh 2.18 -.09
Accuray 7.01 +.07
Achdiillion 9.92 -.01
AcmePkt 26.88 -.16
AomrdaTh 26.54 -.03
AcfvePw h .88
AcfvsBliz 12.71 -.03
Acxiom 14.45 +.01
AdobeSy 33.82 +.11
Adtran 30.38
AdvEnlId 13.23 +.18
AEternag 1.95 +.02
Affymax 13.42 +.98
Affymetrix 4.25 -.14
Agenus rs 5.64 -.20
AkamaiT 36.62 +.16
Akorn 12.27 -.07
AlaskCom 3.36
AlbnyMIc 2.84 +.13
Alexions 93.82 -.20
Alexzah .62 +.00
AlignTech 26.80 +.67
AlimeraSci 3.66 +.17
Alkermes 16.48 -.10
AllotComm 21.28 -.13
AllscriptH 17.64 +.09
AlnylamP 11.34 +.04
AlteraCp If 38.79 -.11
Amarin 11.73 -.18
Amazon 195.04 +2.64
ACapAgy 29.29 -.01
AmCapLtd 8.94 +.06
ARItyCTn 10.36 -.04
AmSupr 4.09 -.06
AmCasino 19.15 -.35
Amgen 66.66 +.04
AmkorTIf 6.24 -.02
Amylin 15.52 +.11
Anlogic 66.01 +.85
Analystlnt 5.47
Ancestry 22.01 +1.06
AntheraPh 2.34 -.15
A123Sys 1.70 +.02
ApolloGrp 42.41 -.58
Apollolnv 6.87 +.03
Apple Inc 596.05 -3.29
ApldMatf 12.69 +.04
AMCC 6.92 +.06
Approach 37.73 +1.97
ApricusBio 2.93 -.01
ArQule 7.21
ArchCap s 36.50 +.37
ArenaPhm 2.41 +.37
AresCap 16.21 +.10
AriadP 15.72 +.04
Ariba Inc 32.19 +.30
ArmHId 28.23 +.12
ArrayBio 3.24 -.01
Arris 10.94 -.01
ArubaNet 23.94 +.24
AscenaRb 44.02 -.04
AsiaEntRs 6.66 +.64
AsialnfoL 13.10 -.20
AspenTech 20.44 +.04
AssodBanc 14.04 +.05
athenahlth 75.70 +.58
Atmel 10.26 +.03
Autodesk 41.08 -.02
AutoData 54.99 -.06
Auxilium 18.50 +.03
AvagoTch 38.10 +.15
AvanirPhm 3.40 +.08
AvisBudg 14.15 -.31
Aware 3.93 -.15
Axcelis 1.78 -.01
BBCNBcp 10.85 -.03


CocaCE 28.30 +.05
Coeur 23.97 +.58
CohStlnfra 17.24 +.05
ColgPal 95.94 -.34
CollctvBrd 18.35 +.09
Comerica 32.29 +.10
CmwREIT 18.29 -.01
CmtyHIt 22.48 -.01
CompSci 30.69 +.28
ComstkRs 17.24 +1.23
Con-Way 33.22 +.47
ConAgra 26.05 -.16
ConchoRes 99.92 +2.63
ConocPhil 76.51 +.62
ConsolEngy 33.76 +.82
ConEd 57.13 -.13
ConstellA 23.53 +.16
Cnvrgys 13.63 -.39
Corning 14.02 +.16
CottCp 6.53 +.02
CovenryH 32.29 +.08
Covidien 54.13 +.52
Crane 46.70 -.18
CSVS2xVxS 7.16 -3.04
CSVellIVSts 12.24 +.83
CredSuiss 29.21 +.71
CrwnCsfie 53.20 +.18
CubeSmart 11.98 +.15
Cummins 121.52 +1.40

DCTIndl 5.71 +.02
DDRCorp 14.73 +.12
DHT HIdgs 1.03 +.02
DNPSelct 10.81 +.21
DR Horton 15.43 +.01
DSW Inc 54.74 -.23
DTE 54.66 +.48
Danaher 54.37 -.08
Darden 50.92 -.91
DeanFds 12.24 +.29
Deere 80.84 +.41
DeltaAir 9.62 +.09
DenburyR 18.32 +.11
DeutschBk 50.93 +.74
DevonE 72.04 +1.19
DiaOffs 69.03 +.53
DiamRk 9.89 +.11
DicksSptg 49.15 +.71
DxFnBullrs 108.00 +2.67
DirSCBear 17.84 -.55
DirFnBear 20.97 -.53
DirLCBear 20.63 -.22
DirDGIdBII 16.62 +.91
DrxEnBear 9.55 -.31
DirEMBear 12.78 -.27
DirxSCBull 62.29 +1.80
DirxEnBull 52.60 +1.60
Discover 33.83 +1.34
Disney 43.65 +.36
DollarGen 47.13 +.99
DomRescs 50.28 -.14
Dover 62.53 +.90
DowChm 35.02 +.55
DrPepSnap 38.77 -.18
DuPont 52.63 +.41
DukeErgy 20.79 -.08
DukeRlty 14.18 -.02
EMCCp 29.15 +.02
ENI 47.29 -.03
EOGRes 111.73 +1.38
EastChmis 51.22 +.40
Eaton 49.30 +.63
EatnVan 28.79 +.72
EVEnEq 11.04 -.03
Ecolab 60.27 +.25
EdisonInt 42.67 -.02
EIPasoCp 30.18 +.62
Elan 14.77 -.10


BEAero 46.92 +.28 ColSprtw 47.75 -.49
BGCPtrs 7.27 -.13 Comcast 29.99 +.10
BJsRest 47.24 -.61 Comcspd 29.57 +.09
BMCSft 39.19 -.08 CmcBMO 40.10 +.02
Baidu 144.33 +.61 CommSys 13.15 +.05
BallardPw 1.49 -.02 CommVIt 51.23 +.53
BeacnRfg 25.59 +.28 CmplGnom 2.77 +.04
BeasleyB 4.39 +.46 Compuwre 9.31 +.12
BedBath 66.11 +.38 Comverge 1.88 +.12
Biodelh .64 +.03 Comverse 6.66 +.18
BioFuelEh .66 +.02 ConcurTch 58.00 +.31
Biogenldc 120.96 +.25 Conmed 29.62 -.04
BioMarin 34.30 -.35 ConstantC 28.92 +.20
BioSanteh .72 +.01 Corcept 4.05 +.01
BiostarP h .78 +.03 CorinthC 4.34 +.05
BIkRKelso 9.96 +.26 CostPlus 18.66 +2.64
BobEvans 37.06 -.46 Costom 90.27 -.23
Boingon 12.50 +1.17 Creelnc 31.15 +.67
BonTon 8.89 +.26 Crocs 20.33 -.40
BostPrv 9.99 -.01 Ctrip.omm 22.83 +.13
BreitBurn 19.22 -.01 CubistPh 43.84 +.23
Brightpnt 8.21 -.06 Curis 4.52 -.05
Broadcom 38.47 +.38 Cyberonics 37.75 -.36
BroadVisn 33.13 -.57 CypSemi 15.67 +.39
Broadwdh .51 +.01 CytRxh .39 -.00
BrcdeCm 5.65 -.01 Cytoldnet 1.16 -.01
BrooksAuto 12.18 +.15 Ctori 2.62 -.03
BrukerCp 15.18 +.18
BuffabWW 88.04 -.06
BldrFstSrc 4.15 +.19 DFCGIbl 17.80 +.30
CA Inc 27.35 +.25 DeckrsOut 66.41 -.34
CBOE 29.51 +.49 Delcath 3.17 +.03
CEVA Inc 22.25 +.08 Dell Inc 16.48 -.55
CH Robins 64.42 -.08 Dndreon 10.05 +.22
CMEGrp 296.01 +.26 Dentsply 39.22 +.12
CTC Media 11.98 +.29 Depomed 6.48 +.27
CVBFnd 11.59 +.10 DexCom 10.35 +.08
CadencePh 3.58 +.04 Dialogic h 1.36 +.64
Cadence 12.02 -.10 DiamndFlf 23.68 -.10
CaesarStnn 11.01 -.10 DigRiver 17.59 +.10
CdnSolar 3.33 DirecTVA 48.07 +.04
CapCtyBk 7.54 +.04 DiscCmA 48.40 +.22
CapProd 8.01 +.27 DiscCm C 46.41 +.56
CapFedFn 11.86 -.02 DiscovLab 2.78 -.03
CpstnTrbh 1.12 +.04 DishNetwk 32.80 -.10
Cardiom g .80 ... DollarTree 94.74 -.30
CareerEd 8.54 -.12 DonlleyRR 12.70 -.04
CaribouC 17.31 +.99 DrmWksA 18.41 -.17
Carrizo 30.25 +1.20 DryShips 3.38 +.05
CarverB rs 7.79 +.07 Dunkin n 30.74 -.35
CatalystH 62.70 -.26 DurectCp h .82 +.04
Cavium 32.44 -.45 Dynavax 4.64 -.05
Celgene 76.83 +.66 E-Trade 11.27 +.24
CellTherrsh 1.32 +.04 eBay 37.09 -.53
CelldexTh 4.96 +.12 EDAPTMS 1.97 -.35
CentEuro 5.39 +.09 eResrch 7.65 +.34
CEurMed 7.13 -.09 EVEngy 69.45 +.13
CentAI 9.21 +.10 EagleBulk 1.80 +.12
Cepheid 42.28 -.20 EaglRkEn 10.46 -.07
Cerners 76.71 +.10 ErthLink 7.88 -.01
CerusCp 4.15 -.06 EstWstBcp 23.42 -.03
ChrmSh 5.97 +.08 EchoStar 28.65 +.29
Chartlnds 73.43 +.60 EducDev 4.95
CharterCm 64.91 +.28 8x8 Inc 3.97 +.21
ChkPoint 62.62 +.62 ElectSd 14.82 +.34
Cheesecake 29.84 -.34 ElectArts 16.86 -.10
ChelseaTh 3.62 +.30 EndoPhrm 37.85 +1.16
ChildPlace 51.83 +.20 Endocyte 5.33 -.06
ChinBAKh .99 +.17 EngyXXI 35.55 +.50
ChinCEd h 4.29 -.21 Entegris 9.56 +.28
ChinaLodg 12.51 -.19 EntropCom 6.07 -.04
ChipMOS 17.65 +.11 Equinix 147.28 +1.20
ChrchllD 57.25 +.17 Ericsson 9.99 +.09
CienaCorp 15.88 +.19 ExactScih 9.82 +.12
CinnFin 34.78 +.02 Exelids 5.54 +.05
Cintas 39.38 -.22 EddeTc 3.15 +.10
Cirrus 24.43 +.10 Expedias 34.14 -.08
Cisco 20.53 +.15 Expdlni 46.26 -.13
CitrixSys 77.68 -.78 ExpScripts 52.71 -.32
CleanDsl 3.95 +.04 ExtrmNet 3.93 +.08
CleanEngy 22.82 -.45 EZchip 44.44 -.78
Clearwire 2.40 +.07 F5Netwks 132.13 -.34
CoffeeH 12.84 +.26 FEICo 47.17 +1.60
CognizTech 76.38 +.01 FLIRSys 25.50 -.03
Cogo Grp 2.83 +.01 FSI Inf 5.20 +.23
Coinstar 60.88 -.12 FXEner 5.92 +.24
ColdwtrCrk 1.16 -.03 Fastenals 53.64 -.07
ColumLb h .74 -.02 FifthStFin 9.74 +.08


BdorGldg 13.40 +.52
EmersonEl 51.21 -.79
EmpDist 20.17 +.15
EnbrEPts 31.05 -.09
EnCanag 20.49 +.30
EndvSilvg 9.85 +.36
EnPro 39.01 +.50
ENSCO 54.45 +1.08
Entergy 66.83 +.10
EntPrPt 50.88 -.47
EqtyRsd 60.15 +.65
EsteeLdrs 62.25 -.13


Esterline 75.20 +6.93
ExactTgt n 26.32 +1.21
ExomRes 7.03 +.02
Exelon 38.84 -.15
ExterranH 14.01 +.64
ExxonMbl 85.55 +.22
FMCTchs 48.45 +.19
FedExCp 92.38 -.12
FedSignl 5.34 -.04
Fedlnvst 22.81 -.22
Ferrellgs 14.62 +.24
Ferro 6.23 +.28
RdlNFin 17.39 +.11
RdNatlnfo 32.96 +.02
FstHorizon 10.47 +.07
FMajSilvg 16.88 +.72
FTActDiv 8.69 +.03
FtTrEnEq 11.96 +.04
RFirstEngy 44.72 +.10
Ruor 60.76 +1.20
FootLockr 30.98 -.21
FordM 12.32
ForestLab 34.16 +.20
ForestOil s 12.64 +.30
FBHmScn 21.33 +.04
FMCG 38.48 +.15
Fronfline 7.14 +.34
Fusion-ion 30.15 +1.09

GATX 42.06 +.49
GNCn 34.63 +.09


GabelliET 5.80 +.13
GabHIthW 8.14 +.07
GabUlI 8.08 +.09
GafisaSA 5.26 +.06
GameSbtp 23.62 +.46
Gannett 15.52 +.15
Gap 26.46 +.22
GardDenv 64.18 +.83
GencoShip 6.46 +.20
GenDynam 72.78 +.53
GenElec 19.78 -.07
GenGrPrp 16.63 +.25


GenMills 38.85 +.24
GenMobtrs 25.17 +.12
GenesisEn 31.35 -.61
GenOn En 2.36 -.07
Genworth 8.71 -.03
Gerdau 10.23 +.34
GlaxoSKIn 45.12 -.16
GlimchRt 10.07 +.12
GoldFLtd 13.83 +.14
Goldcrpg 44.55 +.73
GoldmanS 126.18 +1.44
Goodrich 124.95 -.15
Goodyear 11.91 +.14
GtPlainEn 19.97 -.11
Griffon 10.61 +.15
GuangRy 18.60 +.12
Guess 32.04 -.42
HCA Hldg 25.05 +.27
HCP Inc 39.53 +.03
HSBC 44.40 -.18
HSBC Cap 26.80 +.05
Hallibrtn 33.42 +.44
HanJS 14.95 -.06
HanPrmDv 13.25 +.07
Hanesbrds 29.11 -.04
Hanoverlns 40.35 +.43
HarleyD 49.06 +.15
HarmonyG 10.97 +.10
HartfdFn 21.41 +.11
HawaiiEl 25.14 +.05
HItCrREIT 54.08 +.43
HItMgmt 6.66 -.07


FifthThird 14.14 +.05 ImunoGn 13.90 -.09
Fndlnst 16.64 +.77 Imunmd 3.60 +.10
Finisar 18.82 +.46 ImpaxLabs 23.85 +.33
FinLine 24.69 +.51 ImperlSgr 5.06 -.08
FstCashFn 43.40 +.55 Incyte 19.80 +.25
FMidBc 12.09 +.15 Infinera 7.63 -.11
FstNiagara 9.89 -.01 InfinityPh 12.02 +.81
FstSolar 26.11 -.84 Informat 51.66 +.02
FstMerit 16.87 +.16 Infosys 57.03 +.56
Fiserv 69.26 +.26 Insulet 18.89 -.19
Flextrn 7.04 -.05 IntgDv 7.21 +.11
FocusMda 28.64 +.35 Intel 27.88 -.02
Fonar 2.61 +.02 InteractBrk 16.94 -.03
ForcePro 5.55 ... InterDig 35.98 +.79
Forfnets 27.03 +.44 Intrface 13.25 -.03
Fossil Inc 133.17 +.05 InterMune 14.43 -.17
FosterWhl 22.71 +.08 InflBcsh 21.12 +.57
Francescn 32.47 +.24 InftSpdw 26.00 +.19
FredsInc 14.56 +.12 Intersil 11.29 -.04
FreshMkt 48.11 +1.26 Intuit 57.71 -.02
FronterCm 4.19 -.08 InvRIEst 7.57 +.03
FuelSysSol 27.42 +.46 IronwdPh 13.29 +.39
FuelCell 1.56 +.01 Isis 8.57 +.03
FultonFncl 10.45 +.04 IvanhoeEn 1.02 +.04
bIa 12.20
GSI Group 12.15 +.08
GSVCapn 19.42 +.20 j2Global 30.22 -.11
GTAdvTc 7.92 +.08 JA Solar 1.77 +.05
G-11 28.22 -.14 JDS Uniph 13.88 +.11
Galecfinun 9.00 ... JacklnBox 23.51 +.19
GalenaBio 2.26 -.05 Jamba 2.02
Garmin 47.63 +.10 JamesRiv 5.89 +.40
Gentex 24.56 -.06 JazzPhrm 48.17 +.84
GeoEye 24.60 +.27 JetBlue 5.09 +.03
GeronCp 1.80 ... JiveSoftn 26.78 +.79
GigaMedia 1.31 -.15 JoeJeansh 1.30 +.10
GileadSd 46.85 +.22 JonesSdah .47 -.01
GladerBc 14.83 +.05 JosABank 54.37 +.48
Globalstrh .75 +.02 KIT Digit 6.33 -1.82
GIbSpcMet 15.09 +.22 KLATnc 52.88 +.60
GluMobile 4.85 +.85 KeryxBio 4.97 +.19
GolLNGLtd 38.09 +.21 KiORn 11.24 +.48
Google 642.59 -3.46 KopinCp 3.75 +.22
GravityCo 2.94 +.29 Ku6Media 1.99 -.06
GrLkDrge 7.09 +.04 Kulicke 12.37 +.18
GrWfRes 5.59 +.07 LCA Vis 6.29 -.36
GreenMtC 53.51 -.61 LKQ Corp 31.35 +.20
GreenPlns 10.91 +.17
GrifolsSA n 7.52 +.11 LPL Inv 37.21 +.01
Grouponn 16.89 ... LSI IndIf 7.35 +.21
GpAeroCN 16.00 -.11 LamResrch 43.82 +.37
GulfportE 31.28 +.98 LamarAdv 32.98 -.22
HMN Fn 2.20 +.17 Landstar 57.37 -.30
HMS Hd s 31.33 +.20 Lattce 6.41 +.08
HackettGp 5.13 -.10 Layne 21.96 -.47
HainCel 43.32 +.58 LeapWirlss 9.76 -.01
HalomnRrs 10.68 +.11 LedxPhrm 1.87 +.03
Halozyme 12.00 +.07 LibGlobA 50.27 +.38
HancHId 35.50 +.19 LibCapA 88.26 +1.26
HanmiFrs 10.03 +.02 LibtylntA 19.15 -.09
HansenMed 2.98 +.02 LifeTech 48.07 +.98
HanwhaSol 1.41 -.07 LimelghtN 3.42 +.05
Harmonic 5.44 -.04 Lincare 26.98 -.07
Hasbro 36.38 +.45 LincElecs 45.05 +.28
HawHold 5.25 +.14 LinearTch 33.22 -.18
Healthwys 7.41 -.04 LinnEngy 37.96 +.21
HrfindEx 14.67 -.03 LodgeNet 3.62 -.06
HercOffsh 5.07 -.14 LogMeln 35.09 +1.13
HercTGC 11.05 +.24 LookSmart 1.10 -.07
HimaxTch 2.17 +10 Lulkin 76.17 +1.93
Hittte 53.95 +.94 lululemnos 75.88 -.07
Hologic 21.09 -.20
HomeAw n 25.00 -.07
HotTopic 10.29 +.08 MAP Phm 16.03 -.73
HubGroup 35.50 +.19 MBFncl 21.17 -.05
HudsCity 7.30 +.10 MGE 44.30 +.10
HumGen 7.85 +.28 MIPSTech 5.38 +.06
HuntJB 53.69 +.08 MKS Inst 29.68 +.61
HuntBnk 6.30 -.05 MTS 52.65 +.60
IAC Inter 49.40 +.30 MSG 33.99 +.41
iPass 2.70 +.19 MagicJcks 25.47 -.98
iRobot 27.74 +.26 MaidenH 9.11 +.19
iShACWI 46.92 +.22 Majesom 2.58 -.01
iShsSOX 59.19 +.12 MAKOSrg 43.75 +1.17
IconixBr 17.61 -.18 MannKd 2.33 -.03
IdenixPh 10.01 -.15 MarvellT 15.84 +.06
Illumina 50.46 +.24 Masimo 22.10 +.19


HIthcrRlty 21.74 +.09
Heckmann 4.50 +.05
HeclaM 4.61 +.16
Heinz 52.77 -.16
Herbalifes 70.74 +.47
Hertz 15.19 +.03
Hess 59.86 +.64
HewlettP 23.63 +.60
HighwdPrp 32.57 +.28
HollyFrts 34.45 +.50
HomeDp 49.54 -.14
Honwlllni 60.16 +.41


Hospira 36.70 -.32
HospPT 25.54 +.09
HostHofis 16.20 +.10
HovnanE 2.68 -.03
Humana 85.91 +.61
Huntsmn 14.23 +.14
Hyperdyn 1.38 +.10
IAMGIdg 13.22 +.03
ICICIBk 35.81 +.19
ING 8.78 +.08
ION Geoph 6.55 +.34
iShGold 16.20 +.19
iSAsfia 23.20 +.32
iShBraz 65.81 +.40
iSCan 28.37 +.26
iShGer 23.29 +.25
iSh HK 17.54 -.04
iShJapn 9.99
iSh Kor 59.37 +.36
iShMex 60.89 +.24
iShSing 12.75 +.15
iSTaiwn 13.52 +.13
iShSilver 31.24 +.70
iShDJDv 55.99 +.20
iShChina25 36.92 +.03
iSSP500 140.81 +.48
iShEMkts 42.90 +.32
iShiBxB 114.76 +.09
iShB20T 113.21 +1.06
iS Eafe 54.78 +.38
iSRusMCV 47.92 +.26
iShiBxHYB 90.50 -.19


iSR1KG
iSRuslK
iSR2KV
iShR2K
iShREst
iShDJHm
iShSPSm
iStar
ITT Cp s
Idacorp
ITW
Imafon


Imax Corp 25.78 -.05
IngerRd 40.43 -.03
IntegrysE 52.70 +.10
InterXbn 18.10 +1.14
IntcnfEx 139.48 -.17
IBM 205.48 -.01
InfiGame 16.70 +.40
IntPap 35.19 +.14
Interpublic 11.37 -.05
InvenSenn 21.41 +1.14
Invesco 26.29 +.51
InvMtgCap 17.50 +.01
InVKSrInc 4.88 +.10
IronMtn 28.51 -.14
ItauUnibH 20.10 -.02


JPMorgCh 45.16 +.51
JPMAlerian 39.65 -.10
Jabil 25.50 -.01
Jaguar g 5.04 -.07
JanusCap 9.54 +.25
Jefferies 19.29 +.56
JohnJn 64.55 +.09
JohnsnCfi 32.08 +.42
JournalCm 5.33 -.13
JoyGIbl 75.19 +.59
JnprNtwk 21.11 +16
KB Home 10.29 -.95
KKR 14.51 +.33
KTCorp 14.07 -.25


Mattel 33.76 +.12 PaneraBrd 160.73 -1.12
Maximlntg 28.62 +.13 ParamTch 27.66 +.21
MaxwlT 17.73 -.62 Parexel 26.81 +.03
MedAssets 13.52 +.20 ParkerVs h 1.04 -.09
MedicAcIn 5.40 +.12 Patterson 31.75 -.05
MediCo 20.00 +.15 PattUTI 17.89 +.29
Medidata 27.51 +2.61 Paychex 31.74 -.24
Medivafton 73.27 -.14 PeetsCfeT 76.23 +3.99
MeloCrwn 13.73 -.14 Pendrell 2.49 +.03
MentorGr 15.32 +.36 PnnNGm 44.04 -.63
MercadoL 97.26 +.78 PennantPk 10.57 -.03
MergeHIth 6.39 +.17 PeopUtdF 13.29 +.10
MeridBio 18.58 +.31 PeregrineP .57 -.02
Methanx 32.13 -.32 PerfectWd 16.28 +.31
Micrel 10.29 -.02 PermFix 1.62 +.01
Microchp 36.57 -.13 Perrigo 102.58 -.96
MicronT 8.40 -.31 PerryEllis 17.88 -.55
Microsoft 32.01 +.01 PetSmart 57.32 -.37
MillerHer 22.60 -.29 PetMed 11.81 -.10
Misonix 1.98 +.01 PetroDev 38.34 +1.46
MitekSys 11.62 +.26 PFSweb 4.20 +.31
Molex 27.65 +.09 Pharmacyc 28.10 +.04
MonstrBvs 60.53 -.31 PhotrIn 6.60
Motricity 1.13 +.04 PlugPwrrs 1.40 -.01
Movers 9.77 +.28 Polyomms 19.39 +.15
MultmGm 11.38 +.11 Popular 2.09 -.01
Mylan 22.98 -.09 Power-One 4.64 +.13
MyriadG 22.78 -.19 PwShs QQQ 66.94 -.04
NCI Inc 6.40 -.30 Powrwvrs 2.15 +.03
NETgear 37.75 +.55 Pozen 5.33 +.11
NIl HIdg 18.05 -.10 Presstekh .58
NPS Phm 6.65 +.22 PriceTR 64.02 +.08
NXPSemi 26.97 +.70 priceline 714.99 +3.00
Nanosphere 1.70 ... PrimoWtr 2.04 +.07
NasdOMX 26.64 -.24 PrivateB 14.93 +.14
NatPenn 9.00 -.09 PrUPShQQQ11.11 +.01
NektarTh 7.62 +.02 PrUltPQQQ 116.61 -.16
NetApp 45.62 +.43 PrognicsPh 9.50 +.09
Netease 59.71 +1.34 ProgrsSoft 24.19 +.54
Netfix 120.19 +1.46 ProspctCap 10.73 +.01
NetSolT h .37 -.02 PureBio h .29 -.01
Neurcrine 9.01 +.18 PureCycle 2.24
NewsCpA 19.79 +.07 QIAGEN 15.00 +.14
NewsCpB 20.04 +.06 QlikTech 30.07 +.34
NobltyHIf 8.27 ... Qlogic 17.70 +.01
Nordsons 53.74 +.12 Qualomm 66.69 +.40
NorTrst 47.26 +.31 QualityS s 42.58 -.14
NwstBcsh 12.80 +.09 QuantFuel .74 -.02
Novavax 1.34 +.02 QuestSft 24.02 -.03
Novlus 48.86 +.34 Questomr 38.45 +.74
NuVasive 16.36 -.11 QuinStreet 10.10 +.36
NuanceCm 25.81 -.19 RFMicD 4.82 +.03
NutriSyst 10.81 -.07 Rambus 6.63 +.10
Nvidia 14.55 +.11 Randgold 91.32 +.72
OCZTech 7.30 -.19 RGSolar 1.45 +.04
OCharleys 9.84 ... RealPage 18.64 -.02
OReillyAu 90.04 -.32 ReconTh 2.96 +.05
Oclaro 4.53 +.01 Regenrn 119.18 +1.18
OmniVisn 19.26 +.19 RentACt 35.42 +.01
OnAssign 17.09 +.03 RschMotn 13.66 -.12
OnSmcnd 8.94 -.06 Respnsysn 12.30 +.32
Onoothyr 4.47 +.13 RexEnergy 10.73 +.45
OnyxPh 37.26 +.16 RiverbedT 27.56 +.14
OpenTable 40.56 -.73 RosettaR 51.53 +1.77
OpnwvSy 2.27 -.06 RossStrss 57.11 -.12
OptfmerPh 13.51 +.08 RoviCorp 32.45 -.28
Oracle 28.55 -.08 RoyGId 63.84 +.64
OraSure 10.71 -.12 RoyaleEn 5.50 +.25
Orbcomm 3.77 +.15 RubiomnTc 11.23 +.44
Orexigen 4.89 ... rue21 27.40 -.27
OriginAg 2.58 -.17 anair 3468 42
Oritani 14.53 +.26
Orthfx 38.42 -.18
OtterTail 21.62 +.15 SBACom 50.42 -.29
OverldStrg 2.00 -.30 SEI Inv 21.04 +.08
Overstk 5.54 -.08 SLMCp 16.12 +.09
STEC 9.55 +.20
SVB FnGp 66.32 +.90
PDLBio 6.34 +.05 SabraHItc 16.08 +.12
PFChng 39.78 -.01 SalixPhm 52.83 +.23
PMC Sra 7.03 +.01 SanderFm 53.81 +.29
PSSWrld 25.28 -.11 SanDisk 49.40 -1.50
Paccar 46.45 +.23 Sanmina 11.07
Pacerlnfi 5.96 +.03 Santarus 5.61 +.27
PacBiosci 3.93 +.25 Sapient 12.28 +.21
PacEth rs 1.08 -.02 Satcon h .43 +.00
PacSunwr 1.73 -.02 SavientPh 2.13
PanASlv 21.64 +.41 Schnitzer 40.86 +.53


KCSouthn 70.45 -.73 MetroHlth 9.15 +.05 Prmian 22.82 +.22 RegalEnt 14.14 +.08
Kaydon 35.59 +.11 MKorsn 47.00 -1.72 PetrbrsA 26.20 +.09 RegionsFn 6.43 -.01
KA EngTR 27.56 +.20 MidAApt 64.53 +.45 Petrobras 26.96 +.29 Renren n 5.30
Kellogg 52.41 -.14 Midas 11.45 -.02 Pfizer 21.82 +.09 RepubSvc 30.24 -.12
KeyEngy 15.98 +.59 MobileTele 18.36 +.40 PhilipMor 86.83 -.01 Revlon 17.38 +.42
Keycorp 8.36 +.01 MolsCoorB 43.96 +.47 PiedNG 31.17 +.12 ReynAmer 41.00 -.30
KimbClk 73.13 -.23 Molyomrp 29.92 +.54 Pier 1 18.29 +.03 RioTnto 53.74 +1.11
Kimco 19.20 +.03 MoneyGrs 18.12 -.04 PimoStrat 11.36 +.08 RiteAid 1.79 +.01
KindME 83.66 +.37 Monsanto 78.44 +.07 PinWst 47.24 +.16 RockwAut 80.29 -.13
KindMorg 38.60 +1.22 MonstrWw 10.22 +.73 PioNtrl 101.75 +1.06 RockColl 57.55 +.26
Kinross g 10.03 +.09 MorgStan 20.33 +.74 PitnyBw 17.99 -.14 Rowan 33.52 +.10
KodiakOg 10.55 +.42 MSEmMkt 14.56 +.11 PlainsEx 44.39 +.89 RylCarb 29.37 -.04
Kohls 48.10 +.05 Mosaic 57.70 +1.43 PlumCrk 41.20 -.16 RoyDShllA 70.56 +.28
Kraft 38.25 +.04 MotrlaSolu 50.67 +.35 Polariss 70.54 +3.56 Royce 13.72 +.05
KrispKrm 7.18 +.02 MotrlaMob 39.26 -.01 Polypore 36.89 +1.24 RoycepfB 25.51 +.08
Kroger 24.44 +.44 MurphO 57.17 +1.35 PostPrp 45.13 +.67 Rand 19.55 -19
LSICorp 8.66 -.02 NCRCorp 20.96 +.14 Potash 45.52 +.08 A
LTCPrp 30.86 +.32 NRG Egy 16.71 +.06 PwshDB 29.15 +.28
LaZBoy 14.62 -.02 NVEnergy 15.75 -.01 PSUSDBull 22.02 -.12 SAIC 13.32 +.11
LabCp 89.47 -.61 NYSEEur 29.57 -.24 Praxair 112.17 +1.31 SCANA 44.61 +.07
Ladede 39.00 +.24 Nabors 19.27 +.75 PrecDrill 10.32 +.02 SKTlcm 13.90 -.16
LVSands 57.53 -.05 NatFuGas 49.44 +.67 PrinFnd 29.12 +.23 SpdrDJIA 130.60 +.43
LeggPlat 22.40 -.21 NatGrid 50.69 +.08 ProLogis 35.20 +.17 SpdrGold 161.53 +1.96
LennarA 25.86 -.26 NOilVarco 80.58 +1.64 ProShtS&P 36.03 -.12 SPMid 180.14 +1.17
Level3rs 26.61 -.02 Navistar 40.89 -.26 PrUShS&P 15.33 -.11 S&P500ETF139.65 +.45
LexRItyTr 8.81 .15 NewAmHi 10.80 +27 PrUlShDow 13.07 -.09 SpdrDiv 56.15 +.10
LbtyASG 430 +01 NJRscs 4460 +34 ProUltQQQ 116.99 -.03 SpdrHome 21.23 -.10
LillyEli 39.87 +.06 NYCmtyB 13.63 +.07 PrUShQQQ 30.88 ... SpdrS&PBk 23.95 +.11
Limited 48.55 -.46 NewellRub 18.12 +.16 ProUIltSP 57.47 +.37 SpdrLehHY 39.41 -.13
LincNat 26.45 +.41 NewfidExp 35.80 +1.25 PrUShtFin 40.84 -.69 SpdrS&P RB 28.44 +.12
Lindsay 65.59 +1.60 NewmtM 53.32 +.91 ProUShL20 20.14 -.37 SpdrRetl 61.59 +.10
Linkedlnn 99.50 -1.03 NewpkRes 8.16 +.41 ProUltFin 62.28 +1.04 SpdrOGEx 58.78 +1.25
LionsGtg 14.53 -.02 Nexeng 18.70 -.02 ProUltR2K 43.72 +.86 SpdrMetM 49.89 +.75
LizClaib 11.95 -.05 NextEraEn 60.40 +.11 ProUSSP5009.28 -.10 STMicro 8.45 +.22
LloydBkg 2.24 +.05 NiSource 24.02 +.08 PrUltSP500 83.06 +.81 Safeway 21.13 +.27
LodddM 89.77 +.37 NielsenH 30.43 +.33 PrUVxSTrs 15.66 -2.51 StJoe 19.09 -.07
LaPac 9.40 -.33 NikeB 107.42 -3.57 ProUSSilv 10.71 -.53 Suude 43.47 +.14
Lowes 30.74 -.22 NobleCorp 38.36 +.27 PrUltCrude 46.09 +1.17 Saks 11.44 +.04
Lo s 3425 2 91 NokiaCop 5.29 +.04 PrUShCrde 32.84 -.93 Salesforce 153.90 +1.06
52 1 NorfikSo 64.45 -.25 ProUltSIvs 54.13 +2.41 SJuanB 19.66 +.31
NoestUt 36.74 +.36 ProUShEuro 19.18 -.24 SandRdge 8.29 +.66
M&TBk 85.86 +.87 NorthropG 60.57 -.40 ProctGam 67.43 -.09 Sanofi 38.31 -.14
MBIA 9.49 +.15 Novarfs 55.26 +.01 ProgrssEn 52.31 -.29 SaraLee 21.45 -.16
MDC 25.76 +15 NSTAR 48.06 +.48 ProgsvCp 22.81 +.22 Sdilmbrg 73.18 +1.20
MDU Res 22.12 +13 Nucor 43.15 +.26 ProUSR2K 29.78 -.55 Sdichwab 15.02 +14
MEMC 3.91 +.11 NuvMuOpp 1441 -.09 Prudent 62.99 +.11 SeadrillLtd 37.61 +.64
MFA Fnd 7.44 +.07 NvMulSI&G 8.88 +.09 PSEG 29.67 -.14 SealAir 19.56 -.10
MCR 9.62 +04 NuvQPf2 8.58 +06 PubStrg 137.07 +1.57 SempraEn 58.13 -.17
MGIC 4.90 +.20 OGE Egy 52.47 +.66 PulteGrp 8.88 -.24 Sensient 36.36 +.14
MGMRsts 1420 +0 isP 3090 +93 PPrT 5.44 -.05 SiderurNac 9.99 +.07
Macquarie 32.38 -.22 OcciPet 97.62 +1.87 QEPRes 30.45 ... Siemens 102.40 .37
Macys 39.84 -.22 OfficeDpt 3.54 -.08 Qio360 n 24.87 +.57 SilvWhtng 33.61 +1.63
MageiMPtr 72.66 +.21 OfficeMax 5.86 +.13 QuanexBld 16.72 +.32 SilvrcpMg 6.99 +41
Magnalgs 47.41 +40 OldRepub 10.61 +.13 QstDiag 59.17 -.78 SimonProp 143.62 +.85
MagHRes 7.14 +.01 Olin 21.38 +.48 Questar 19.36 +.04 Skechers 13.98 -.06
MagHiowes oc 1445 +.01 Oin 21.38 +.48 QksilvRes 5.40 +.10 SmithAO 43.91 -.42
Manitwoc 14.4 +.26 OmegaHt 21.19 +.19 RPM 25.22 +.08 SmithfF 22.35 +.13
Manulifeg 13.68 +.11 Omniom 850.18 +.02 RSCHIdgs 22.22 -.02 Smucker 80.00 +.50
MarathnOs 32.46 +.24 ONEOK 82.18 +.66 Rackspace 57.00 +1.06 Soluba 27.81 +.08
MktVGold 49.0076 +1.6301 OneokPts 55.95 RadianGrp 4.42 -.03 SoJerInd 50.71 +.29
MVGold 49.76 +1.01 OshkoshCp 22.07 -.10 RadioShk 6.50 +.04 SouthnCo 44.12 +.05
MVOilSvs 41.65 +.63 OwensCorn 35.81 -22 Rcorp 73.21 +.42 SthnCopper 30.96 +.10
MktVRus 31.3465 +.52 Owensll 23.35 -.06 RangeRs 59.03 +.13 SwstAirl 8.23 +.04
M r d 5ntA 3772 +.6 RJamesFn 37.43 +.60 SwsthEngy 32.38 +.72
MashM 32.50 +.14 PG&ECp 43.39 +.06 Rayonier 44.26 +35 SpecaEn 31.64 .10
MStewrt 3.80 .06 PNC 63.36 +.76 Raytheon 52.16 +.20 SprintNex 2.74
Mas 13.58 -.16 PNM Res 18.40 +.18 Rltylno 38.15 +19 SPMats 36.91 +.39
i7Ont 1.8 2,6 PPC DDG 9'.5 +,69 RedHat 51.87 +.33 SP HIthC 36.62 +.11


McDnlds 95.55 -.25 PPL Corp 27.67
McGrwH 47.18 +.77 PallCorp 59.31
McKesson 86.38 +.20 Pandoran 10.56
McMoRn 12.64 -.07 PatriotCoal 6.67
McEwenM 4.12 +.38 PeabdyE 30.19
Mechel 9.81 -.02 Pengrthg 9.76
MedcoHlth 68.49 -.35 PennVaRs 24.65
Medrnic 38.70 -.16 Penney 36.05
Merck 38.01 +.41 PepBoy 14.93
MetLife 37.64 +.50 PepoHold 18.88
MetroPCS 9.60 -.15 PepsiCo 65.30


IA EIA N 5 XCANE1


Name Last Chg


AbdAsPac 7.26 -.16
AbdnEMTel 19.19 +.07
AdmRsc 62.97 +4.07
Adventrx .69 -.02
AlexcoRg 7.05 +14
AlldNevG 31.25 +.59
AlphaPro 1.56 +.09
AmApparel .86 +.01
AntaresP 3.27 +.25
Augustag 2.83 +.18
Aurizong 4.79 +.11
AvalnRare 2.93 +.01


Bacterin 2.50 -.87 CrSuislnom 3.75 -.02
Banrog 4.72 +.17 CrSuiHiY 3.10 +.02
BarcUBS36 42.92 +.31
BarcGSOil 26.90 +.36
BrigusGg .79 +.06 D ourEg .41 +.00
BritATob 101.45 -.29 DenisnM g 1.59 +.01
DocuSec 3.56 -.25
CAMACEn .85 +.06 EVLtdDur 16.12 +.05
CardiumTh .28 EVMuniBd 12.62 .06
CelSd .53 -.04 EVMuni2 14.38 -.10
CFCdag 21.75 +.43 ElephTalk 2.20
CheniereEn 14.39 -.13 EllswthFd 7.33 +.07
CheniereE 23.01 -.52 EntGaming .52 +.04
ClaudeRg 1.08 ... ExeterRgs 2.76 +.18
ClghGlbOp 11.69 +.01 FrkStPrp 10.68 +.12
CmtyBkTr 2.15 +.05 FredHolly .29 -.04


GamGldNR 16.07 +.26
GascoEngy .29 +.01
Gastar grs 3.07 -.02
GenMoly 3.41 +.13
GIblScape 2.00 -.38
Glowpoint 2.63 +.05
GoldenMin 7.85 +.35
GoldStrg 1.77 +.09
GranTrrag 6.03 +.14
GrtBasGg .68 -.05
GtPanSilvg 2.26 +.14
Hemisphrx .37 +.00
HstnAEn 5.55 +.06


iBb 1.15 +.13
ImpOilgs 45.46 +1.19
IndiaGC .53 -.04
InovioPhm .61
Intellichk 1.65 +.13
IntellgSys 1.50 -.05
IntTowerg 4.10 -.06


KeeganRg 3.85 +.20
LadThalFn 1.90 +.05
LkShrGld g 1.24 +.04
LongweiPI 1.72 +.01
LucasEngy 2.48 +.04


- --


MadCatzg .65
Metaliom 4.40
MdwGoldg 1.45
Minefndg 13.67
NavideaBio 3.45
NeoStem .59
Nevsun g 3.54
NwGoldg 9.38
NA Pall g 2.68
NthnO&G 21.63
NovaBayP 1.35
NovaGldg 7.01


PalafnTch .70 +.06 SamsO&G 2.52
ParaG&S 2.42 +.12 SeabGldg 20.20
ParkCity 3.05 +.01 SilverBull .59
PhrmAth 1.48 -.01 SynergyRs 3.51
PbnDrill 8.85 +.41 SynthBiol 2.32
Protalix 6.10 +.17 TanzRyg 5.05
PyramidOil 5.29 +.33 Taseko 3.53
Quaterrag .53 +.06 Tengsco 1.07
Quepasa 4.20 +.14 ThaiCap 11.50
RareEleg 6.01 -.07 TrnsafiPet 1.29
Rentech 2.10 +.04 TravelCts 6.40
Richmntg 8.90 +.28 TriValley .17
Rubiong 3.35 +.07 TriangPet 7.24


Tuomwsg 1.17 +.03
Univ Insur 4.20 +.07
Ur-Energy 1.23 +.05
Uranerz 2.40 -.03
UraniumEn 3.72

VangTotW 48.10 +.37
VantageDrl 1.64 -.02
VirnetX 25.00 +.01
VistaGold 3.21 +.19
VoyagerOG 2.80 -.02
Vringo 1.66 +.01
WFAdvlnco 10.33 +.06
XPOLogrs 16.36 -.59
YMBiog 1.91


The remainder of the

NYSE listings can be

found on the next page.





Yesterday Pvs Day
Argent 4.3700 4.3660
Australia .9561 .9636
Bahrain .3770 .3770
Brazil 1.8141 1.8233
Britain 1.5871 1.5817
Canada .9985 1.0004
Chile 489.25 488.55
China 6.3086 6.3004
Colombia 1760.50 1760.50
Czech Rep 18.56 18.78
Denmark 5.6066 5.6406
Dominican Rep 39.02 39.05
Egypt 6.0389 6.0375
Euro .7540 .7586
Hong Kong 7.7680 7.7663
Hungary 221.58 222.72
India 51.220 51.285
Indnsia 9183.00 9155.00
Israel 3.7285 3.7507
Japan 82.49 82.59
Jordan .7085 .7095
Lebanon 1504.50 1504.00
Malaysia 3.0770 3.0820
Mexico 12.7618 12.8227
N. Zealand 1.2230 1.2372
Norway 5.7572 5.7965
Peru 2.670 2.673
Poland 3.13 3.16
Russia 29.2736 29.4405
Singapore 1.2615 1.2663
So. Africa 7.6907 7.7114
So. Korea 1135.45 1131.05
Sweden 6.7395 6.7864
Switzerlnd .9086 .9147
Taiwan 29.57 29.56
Thailand 30.69 30.81
Turkey 1.8001 1.8092
U.A.E. 3.6732 3.6733
Uruguay 19.4999 19.4999
Venzuel 4.2951 4.2927


British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.



Yesterday Pvs Day

Prime Rate 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate 0.75 0.75
Federal Funds Rate .00-.25 .00-.25
Treasuries
3-month 0.073 0.08
6-month 0.14 0.14
5-year 1.08 1.12
10-year 2.23 2.29
30-year 3.30 3.40



FUTURES
Exch Contract Settle Chg
Lt Sweet Crude NYMX May 12 106.87 +1.52
Corn CBOT May12 6461/2 +2
Wheat CBOT May12 65414 +8
Soybeans CBOT May12 13653/4 +1614
Cattle CME Jun 12 121.10 -1.07
Sugar (world) ICE May12 25.63 -.28
Orange Juice ICE May12 166.20 -.20


SPOT
Yesterday Pvs Day
Gold (troy oz., spot) $1662.30 $1655.00
Silver (troy oz., spot) $32.248 $32.5/3
Copper (pound) $3.8095 $3.8/4O
Platinum (troy oz., spot)l162/.90 $16/b.b
NMER= New York Mercantile Exchange. CBOT=
Chicago Board of Trade. CMER = Chicago Mercantile Ex-
change. NCSE = New York Cotton, Sugar & Cocoa Ex-
change. NCTN = New York Cotton Exchange.


Scholastc 37.51
SciGames 11.47
SeagateT 27.96
SearsHIdgs 72.36
SeattGen 19.43
SelCmfrt 32.13
Selectvlns 17.67
Semtech 28.70
Sequenom 4.00
SvcSourcn 15.42
SvArtsrsh .19
ShandaG s 5.22
ShoeCarn 32.98
ShoreTe 5.65
ShuffiMstr 17.36
Shutterfly 33.12
SifyTech 3.41
SigmaAld 72.54
SignatBk 63.34
SilicGrln 10.05
Silicnlmg 5.94
SilicnMotn 21.34
Slcnware 5.80
SilvStdg 14.94
Sina 69.03
Sindair 11.68
SinoClnEn 2.36
SiriusXM 2.26
Skullcdyn 15.56
SkyWest 11.06
SkywksSol 28.16
SmithWes 7.79
SmithMicro 2.48
SodaStrm 34.52
Sohu.cm 54.88
SolarCap 22.15
Solazymen 15.02
SonicCorp 7.49
Sonus 2.89
SouMoBc 25.25
Sourcefire 48.98
SpectPh 13.33
SpiritAirn 19.65
Spreadtrm 16.28
Staples 16.58
StarSdent 3.60
Starbucks 55.35
SiDynam 14.67
StemCel rs 1.05
Stericyde 84.66
SMaddens 43.68
StewEnt 6.00
SunHIth 6.35
SunPower 6.80
SusqBnc 9.99
SwisherHy 3.15
Symantec 18.20
Symetricm 5.70
Synaorn 7.62
Synapfcs 35.42
SynrgyP rs 4.01
Synopsys 30.20
TDAmeritr 19.92
THQh .61
TICC Cap 9.85
TTMTch 11.72
tw telecom 22.20
TakeTwo 15.81
TaleoA 45.93
Tangoen 18.87
Targacept 5.34
TASER 4.34
TearLab 3.62
TechData 54.13
Tellabs 3.91
TeslaMot 34.08
TesseraTch 17.07
TetraTc 25.24
TevaPhrm 43.07
TxCapBsh 35.63
Texlnst 33.35
TexRdhse 16.62
Theravnce 19.47
Thoratec 33.75
ThrshdPhm 7.34
TibcoSft 31.06
TiVo Inc 12.09
TowerSm h .87


+.01 Towerstm 4.08 +.15
+.18 TractSupp 86.04 -1.71
+.03 Travelzoo 23.22 +.08
-1.33 TrimbleN 54.04 +.02
-.12 TripAdvn 33.27 +.02
+.2506 TriQuint 6.51 +.10
-.10 TrstNY 5.50 +.06
+.03 Trustmk 25.36 +.56
-.18 TudouHn 33.30 -.46
+.01 21Vianetn 11.85 +.44
+.37 USAutoPts 3.57 +.05
+.87 UTStarcm 1.45 +.04
+.10 UTIWrldwd 17.70 +.66
-.05 Ubiquiftn 30.38 +1.66
+1.19 UltaSalon 93.55 -.04
-.1165 Ultrapetrol 2.14 +.01
-.21 Umpqua 13.39 +.13
+.42 UBWV 29.53 -.11
+.01 UtdOnln 4.96 +.03
+.72 US Enr 3.02 +.17
... UtdTherap 47.68 -.14
+.51 UnivDisp 36.62 -.59
-1.12 UnivFor 33.92 -.54
+.46 UranmRs h .93 -.01
+10 UrbanOut 29.37 +.32
-.01
+.49
+.25
-.24 VCA Ant 22.39 +.42
+.11 VOXX)In 13.85 +.22
-.14 ValVisA 2.36 +.05
+.01 ValueClick 20.35 +.16
+.12 Veeomlnst 30.35 +.93
+.12 VelD 12.95 +.46
+.07 VBradley 30.83 -.26
-.05 VerintSys 29.93 +.54
-.01 Verisign 38.14 -.33
+1.90 Verisk 46.00 -.09
+.22 VertxPh 41.34 +.70
-.01 ViaSat 47.39 +1.37
+.91 ViacomB 46.64 -.04
-.16 Vical 3.09 +.07
+.14 VirgnMdah 23.98 -.15
+.14 ViroPhrm 30.00 +.06
+.38 VisnChina 1.58 -.02
-.01 Vivus 21.31 +.50
-.78 Vocus 12.91 +.59
+.10 Vodafbne 27.65 -.09
-.05 Volcano 28.30 +.05
-.05 Volterra 32.68 +.79
+.09 WarnerCh 16.14 +.09
+.14 WaveSys 1.69 +.02
WebMD 25.71 +.05
+.14 Websense 20.96 +.06
+.25 Wendys Co 4.93 -.07
+.35 WernerEnt 25.62 +.24
-.10 Westmrld 11.70 +.31
-.11 Wstptlnng 44.37 -1.49
-.01 WetSeal 3.28 -.27
+.02 WholeFd 83.45 +.50
-.08 Windstrm 11.91 -.06
-.15 WisdomTr 8.50 +.22
Wowjointh .60 +.02
+.01 Wowjntwt .03 +.01
-.26 WrightM 18.85 +.07
22 +.31 Wynn 126.57 -.24
+.72 XOMA 2.19 -.03
+.13 XenoPort 4.50 +.12
+.04 X)linx 36.07 -.16
-.32 YRC rs 7.79 -.05
+.51 Yahoo 15.39 -.10
+.37 Yandexn 24.01 +.26
-.08 Yongye 3.17 +.00
+.90 Zagg 10.83 +.20
-.08 Zalicus 1.04 -.01
-.13 ZelfqAesn 5.71 -.08
-.02 Zhongpin 9.60 +.55
+.28 ZonBcp 21.73 +.25
+.76 Zogenix 1.96 +.15
+.20 ZollMed 92.75 +.02
-.02 Zyngan 13.40 -.36


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I AMEX


I NASDA


YTD YTD
Name Div YId PE Last Chg %Chg Name Div YId PE Last Chg %Chg
AK Steel .20 2.5 ... 7.92 -.01 -4.1 Microsoft .80 2.5 12 32.01 +.01 +23.3
AT&Tlnc 1.76 5.6 48 31.52 -.19 +4.2 MotrlaSolu .88 1.7 15 50.67 +.35 +9.5
Ametek .24 .5 20 47.76 +.08 +13.4 MotrlaMob ... ... ... 39.26 -.01 +1.2
ABInBev 1.16 1.6 ... 72.15 -.47 +18.3 NextEraEn 2.40 4.0 13 60.40 +.11 -.8
BkofAm .04 .4 ... 9.85 +.25 +77.2 Penney .80 2.2 22 36.05 -.58 +2.6
CapCtyBk ... ... 26 7.54 +.04-21.0 PiedmOfc .80 4.5 14 17.68 -.02 +3.8
CntryLink 2.90 7.4 23 38.96 -.14 +4.7 ProgrssEn 2.48 4.7 27 52.31 -.29 -6.6
Citigrprs .04 .1 10 37.13 +.24 +41.1 RegionsFn .04 .6 38 6.43 -.01 +49.5
CmwREIT 2.00 10.9 16 18.29 -.01 +9.9 SearsHIdgs .33 ... ... 72.36 -1.33+127.7
Disney .60 1.4 17 43.65 +.36 +16.4 Smucker 1.92 2.4 20 80.00 +.50 +2.3
EnterPT 3.00 6.5 26 46.40 +.44 +6.2 SprintNex ... ... ... 2.74 ... +17.1
ExxonMbI 1.88 2.2 10 85.55 +.22 +.9 Texlnst .68 2.0 18 33.35 -.08 +14.6
FordM .20 1.6 7 12.32 ... +14.5 TimeWarn 1.04 2.8 14 37.08 +1.32 +2.6
GenElec .68 3.4 16 19.78 -.07 +10.4 UniFirst .15 .2 15 60.03 +.43 +5.8
HomeDp 1.16 2.3 20 49.54 -.14 +17.8 VerizonCm 2.00 5.1 46 39.42 -.24 -1.7
Intel .84 3.0 12 27.88 -.02 +14.9 Vodafone 2.10 7.6 ... 27.65 -.09 -1.4
IBM 3.00 1.5 16205.48 -.01 +11.7 WalMart 1.59 2.6 13 60.75 +.10 +1.7
Lowes .56 1.8 21 30.74 -.22+21.1 Walgrn .90 2.7 11 33.56 +.18 +1.5
McDnlds 2.80 2.9 18 95.55 -.25 -4.8 YRC rs ... ... ... 7.79 -.05 -21.9


A6 SATURDAY, MARCH 24, 2012


STOCKS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BUSINESS


SATURDAY, MARCH 24, 2012 A7


I MUTUALFUDSA I


Name NAV Chg Name NAV Chg
Advance Capital I: GrChinaAr 32.53 -.14
Balancp 16.83 +.05 HiYIdAp 6.42 -.01
Retlnc 8.76 +.01 StratValA 29.51 +.17
Alger Funds B: TechGroA 35.97
SmCapGr 7.14 +.06 DreihsAcInc 10.57
AllianceBern A: Driehaus Funds:
BalanAp 16.76 +.07 EMktGr 28.78 +.05
GIbThGrAp 67.59 +.45 EVPTxMEmI 47.18 +.29
SmCpGrA 39.28 +.27 Eaton Vance A:
AllianceBern Adv: ChinaAp 17.03 +.03
LgCpGrAd 29.84 +.09 AMTFMuInc 9.97 +.02
AllianceBern B: MuIDCGrA 8.73 +.02
GIbThGrBt 58.18 +.39 InBosA 5.81
GrowthBt 27.72 +.04 LgCpVal 18.66 +.06
SCpGrBt 31.43 +.22 NatlMunlnc 9.86 +.01
AllianceBern C: SpEqtA 16.79 +.06
SCpGrCt 31.59 +.22 TradGvA 7.41
Allianz Fds Insti: Eaton Vance B:
NFJDvVI 12.47 +05 HIthSBt 9.80 +.04
SmCpVl 31.23 +.27 NatlMuInc 9.85
Allianz Funds C: Eaton Vance C:
AGICGrthC 26.54 +.06 GovtC p 7.40
TargetCt 15.91 +.06 NatMunlnc 9.86 +.01
Amer Beacon Insti: Eaton Vance I:
LgCaplnst 21.16 +.11 FItgRt 8.99
Amer Beacon Inv: GblMacAbR 9.97
LgCaplnv 20.08 +10 LgCapVal 18.71 +.07
Ameri Century 1st: FBR Funds:
Growth 28.46 +.08 Focuslnvtn49.83 +.10
Amer Century Adv: FMI Funds:
EqGroAp 24.06 +09 LgCappn 16.88 +.06
EqlncAp 7.64 +.01 FPA Funds:
Amer Century Inv: NwIlnc 10.69
AIICapGr 31.32 +10 FPACres 28.45 +.10
Balanced 17.15 +.04 Fairholme 29.75 +.16
DivBnd 11.00 +01 Federated A:
Eqlnc 7.64 +.01 MidGrStA 37.81 +.21
Growthl 28.22 +08 MuSecA 10.40 +.02
Heritagel 23.11 +.11 TtlRtBdp 11.38 +.02
IncGro 27.07 +.11 Federated Instl:
InfAdjBd 12.88 +.05 KaufmnR 5.46 +.02
IntDisc 9.67 +.04 TotRetBd 11.38 +.02
InfitlGrol 10.70 +.05 StrValDvIS 4.87
NewOpp 8.37 +.09 Fidelity Adv FocT:
OneChAg 12.92 +.05 EnergyT 37.33 +.46
OneChMd 12.43 +.04 HItCarT 22.83 +.04
RealEstl 21.93 +.14 Fidelity Advisor A:
Ultra 26.26 +.03 Nwlnsghp 22.41 +.04
Valuelnv 6.18 +.02 StrlnA 12.34 +.01
American Funds A: Fidelity Advisor C:
AmcpAp 21.12 +.07 Nwlnsghtn21.21 +.04
AMuiAp 27.45 +.05 Fidelity Advisor I:
BalAp 19.57 +.05 EqGrIn 66.16 +.11
BondAp 12.64 +.02 EqInin 25.38 +.11
CaplBAp 51.15 +.11 IntBdln 11.46 +.01
CapWGAp 35.42 +.10 NwlnsgtIn 22.70 +.05
CapWAp 21.00 +.06 Fidelity AdvisorT:
EupacAp 39.43 +.11 BalancT 16.29 +.04
FdlnvAp 39.12 +.19 DivGrTp 13.20 +.08
GovtAp 14.33 +.01 EqGrTp 61.89 +.10
GwthAp 32.66 +.10 EqInT 24.97 +.10
HITrAp 11.06 -.01 GrOppT 42.07 +.13
IncoAp 17.43 +.04 HilnAdTp 9.90 -.01
IntBdAp 13.63 +.01 IntBdT 11.44 +.01
InflGrIncAp29.61 +08 MulncTp 13.35 +.02
ICAAp 29.80 +.09 OvrseaT 17.41 +.06
LtTEBAp 16.12 +.02 STFiT 9.28
NEcoAp 27.54 +.06 StSeAIICp 19.98 +.08
NPerAp 29.57 +.07 Fidelity Freedom:
NwWrIdA 51.60 +.15 FF2010n 13.96 +.04
STBFAp 10.08 ... FF2010K 12.90 +.04
SmCpAp 38.55 +.20 FF2015n 11.67 +.04
TxExAp 12.69 +.02 FF2015K 12.96 +.04
WshApx 30.17 -.11 FF2020n 14.13 +.05
Ariel Investments: FF2020K 13.39 +.05
Apprec 44.83 +.20 FF2025n 11.78 +.05
Ariel 49.28 +.36 FF2025K 13.55 +.05
Artio Global Funds: FF2030n 14.03 +.06
IntlEqlIr 25.39 +.12 FF2030K 13.71 +.05
IntEqlllr 10.68 +.04 FF2035n 11.65 +.05
Artisan Funds: FF2035K 13.84 +.06
Intl 22.73 +.08 FF2040n 8.13 +.04
IntllnstI 22.86 +.08 FF2040K 13.89 +.06
InftVal r 27.82 +.11 FF2045 n 9.62 +.04
MidCap 39.70 +.15 Incomen 11.59 +.02
MidCapVal 21.48 +.12 Fidelity Invest:
SCapVal 16.41 +.16 AIISectEq 12.73 +.04
Baron Funds: AMgr50n 16.07 +.04
Asset 52.03 +.20 AMgr70rn 16.93 +.06
Growth 55.48 +.30 AMgr20rn 13.11 +.02
SmallCap 25.86 +.12 Balancn 19.77 +.05
Bernstein Fds: BalancedK 19.77 +.05
IntDur 13.82 +.02 BlueChGrn 50.07 +.13
DivMu 14.74 +.03 CAMunn 12.55 +.02
TxMgdlnt 13.95 +.09 Canadan 52.94 +.40
BlackRock A: CapApn 28.70 +.12
EqtyDiv 19.46 +.06 CapDevOn 11.68 +.08
GIAIAr 19.55 +.07 Cplncrn 9.20
HiYInvA 7.74 ... ChinaRgr 27.90 -.11
InflOpAp 31.06 +.15 CngS 465.09
BlackRock B&C: CTMunrn 11.85 +.02
GIAICt 18.19 +.06 Contran 76.85 +.15
BlackRock Insti: ContraK 76.82 +.16
BaVIl 27.18 +.11 CnvScn 25.51 +.03
EquityDv 19.51 +.06 DisEqn 24.01 +.18
GIbAIIocr 19.65 +.07 DiscEqF 23.99 +.19
HiYldBd 7.74 Divlntin 28.62 +.11
Brinson FundsY: DivrslntKr 28.59 +.12
HiYldlYx 6.16 DivStkOn 16.74 +.08
BruceFund 397.57 +2.01 DivGthn 30.01 +.19
Buffalo Funds: EmergAs r n28.24 -.06
SmCapn 28.12 +.30 EmrMkn 22.92 +.05
CGM Funds: Eqlncn 45.22 +.18
Focusn 30.14 +.28 EQIIn 18.87 +.05
Mutin 28.22 +.18 ECapAp 17.66 +.10
Realtyn 29.38 +19 Europe 29.09 +.18
CRM Funds: Exch 323.88
MdCpVII 29.63 +.12 Exportn 23.24 +05
Calamos Funds: Fideln 35.31 +12
GrwthAp 53.81 +.30 Fiftyrn 19.56 +.10
Calvert Invest: FItRateHi r n 9.80
Incop 15.86 +.02 FrlnOnen 28.56 +.11
IntlEqAp 13.61 +.04 GNMAn 11.80
SocialAp 30.20 +.06 Govtlnc 10.66 +.01
SocBdp 15.84 +.03 GroCon 97.02 +.32
SocEqAp 38.04 +.08 Grolncn 20.51 +.07
TxF Lg p 16.07 +.03 GrowCoF 96.95 +.32
hen & Sters GrowtlCoK 96.96 +.32
Coen & eers +.44 GrStratrn 21.16 +.04
RltyShrs 65.95 +.44 Highlncr n 9.00
Columbia Class A: Incr n 9.00 .
Acornt 30.57 +.15 lndepnrn 25.56 +.11
vn Irnxn 12n89 +03
DivEqlncx 10.43 +.01 ntBdn 10.89 +.02
DivrBd 5.10 +.01 ntGovn 10.89 +.01
DivOpptyAx 8.60 -.02 InnMu n 1046 +02
LgCapGrAt26.09 +.09 IntDicn 30.83 +.14
LgCorQAp 6.44 +.03 InflSCprn 19.95 +.09
MdCpGrOp 10.50 +.05 InvGrBdn 11.69 +.02
MidCVIOpp 8.12 +.04 InvGBn 7.73 +.01
PBModAp 11.14 +02 Japanr 10 -.03
TxEAp 13.84 +.02 Jpn1m0n 8.02 .03
SelComm A 49.48 +.11 Lgpn al 11.2
FrontierA 11.29 +.09 LgCapVal 11.25 +07
Tch 23.42 +.05 LatAm 55.19 +.30
GlobTech 23.42 +.05 LevCoStkn 29.35 +.18
Columbia Cl l,T&G: LowP r n 40.52 +.23
EmMktOp I n 8.41 +.04 LowPriKr 40.50 +.23
Columbia Class Z: Magellnn 72.82 +.24
AcornZ 31.65 +.15 MagellanK 72.76 +.24
AcornlntZ 39.00 +.23 MDMurn 11.40 +.03
DivlncoZx 14.52 -.04 MAMunn 12.43 +.03
IntBdZ 9.34 +01 MegaCpStknll.48 +.05
IntTEBd 10.79 +.02 MIMunn 12.30 +.02
LgCapGr 14.37 +.01 MidCapn 30.15 +.12
LgCpldxZ 27.09 +08 MNMunn 11.85 +.02
MdCpldxZ 12.05 +.07 MtgSecn 11.19
MdCpVlZpx 14.24 +.06 Munilncn 13.16 +.02
ValRestrx 49.15 +.32 NJMunrn 12.06 +.02
Credit Suisse Comm: NwMktr n 16.53 -.01
ComRett 8.37 +.06 NwMilln 32.49 +.16
DFA Funds: NYMunn 13.38 +.03
InflCorEqn 10.41 +.08 OTCn 64.24 +14
USCorEql n12.06 +.06 OhMunn 12.06 +.03
USCorEq2nl11.88 +.07 1001ndex 9.86 +.02
DWS Invest A: Ovrsea n 30.45 +.18
CommApx 18.10 +.07 PcBasn 24.14 -.01
DWS InvestS: PAMunrn 11.19 +.03
CoreEqtySx 18.05 +.05 Puritnn 19.40 +04
CorPlslncx 10.86 -.02 PuritanK 19.40 +.04
EmMkGrr 16.67 +.11 RealEn 30.23 +.21
EnhEmMkx 10.45 -.12 SAIISecEqF12.73 +04
EnhGlbBdrx 10.02 +.02 SCmdtyStrtn9.16 +.07
GIbSmCGr 38.99 +.38 SCmdtyStrFn9.18 +.07
GIbliem 22.85 +.19 SrEmrgMkt 16.54 +09
Gold&Prc 14.99 +.28 SrslntGrw 11.36 +.06
HiYldTx 12.58 +.02 SerlnlGrF 11.38 +.06
IntTxAMT 11.87 +.02 SrslntVal 8.77 +.03
Intl FdS 41.17 +.21 SerlntlValF 8.78 +.03
LgCpFoGr 33.29 +08 SrlnvGrdF 11.69 +02
LatAmrEq 42.31 +.36 StlntMun 10.80 +.01
MgdMuniS 9.28 +.01 STBFn 8.53
MATFS 14.85 +03 SmCapDiscn22.67 +15
SPh00SX 18.57 -.01 SmllCpSrn 18.68 +.15
WorldDivx 23.44 +.06 SCpValu r 15.66 +.07
Davis Funds A: StkSelLCVrn11.31 +.06
NYVenA 36.13 +.15 StkSlcACapn27.66 +.11
Davis Funds B: S.1 SelSmCp 20.22 +17
NYVenB 34.52 +.15 Sfratlncn 11.05 +.01
Davis Funds C: SfrReRtr 9.51 +.03
NYVenC 34.83 +.15 TotalBdn 10.97 +.01
Davis Funds Y: Trendn 77.47 +.21
NYVenY 36.52 +.15 USBI n 11.73 +.01
Delaware Invest A: Utilityn 17.38
Diverlncp 9.18 +.01 ValStratn 28.77 +.18
SMIDCapG 26.04 +.06 Valuen 72.18 +.46
TxUSAp 11.81 +.02 Wrldwn 19.40 +.08
Delaware Invest B: Fidelity Selects:
SelGrBt 36.15 +.11 Aim 38.46 +.37
DimensionalFds: Bankingn 18.95 +.12
EmMCrEqnl9.90 +.11 Biotchn 101.39 +.74
EmMktV 30.30 +.16 Brokrn 49.22 +.40
IntSmVan 15.83 +.14 Chemn 111.84 +1.30
LargeCo 11.01 +.03 ComEquipn24.88 +.15
TAUSCorE2n9.67 +.06 Compn 67.10 +.03
USLgVan 21.52 +.12 ConDisn 26.88 +.02
USMicron 14.84 +.17 ConsuFnn 13.39 +.12


USTgdVal 17.18 +.15 ConStapn 76.69 +.13
US Small n 23.09 +.22 CstHon 41.90 +.06
USSmVa 26.30 +.28 DfAern 85.59 +.68
IntlSmCon 15.73 +.13 Electrn 54.35 +.15
EmgMktn 26.99 +.15 Enrgyn 53.34 +.66
Fixdn 10.33 ... EngSvn 69.39 +1.01
IntGFxIlnn 12.78 +.04 EnvAItEnrn16.31 +.04
IntVan 16.44 +.12 FinSvn 60.20 +.35
Glb5Fxlnc nll.05 +.01 Goldrn 40.85 +.65
TM USTgtV22.64 +.21 Health n 133.83 +.24
2YGIFxdn 10.12 +.01 Insurn 48.38 +.26
DFARIEn 25.07 +.16 Leisrn 110.70 -.09
Dodge&Cox: Material n 68.97 +.72
Balanced 74.57 +.38 MedDI n 61.14 +.05
Income 13.68 +.02 MdEqSysn 28.43 +.06
IntflStk 32.87 +09 Mulndn 49.52 +.38
Stock 114.75 +.73 NtGasn 31.67 +.26
DoubleUne Funds: Pharmn 14.35 +.03
TRBdIn 11.22 +.02 Retailn 61.24 +.03
TRBdNpn 11.21 +.01 Softwrn 92.89 +.33
Dreyfus: Techn 104.75 +.18
Aprec 44.15 +.13 Telcm n 47.20 -.10
CTA 12.11 +.02 Transn 53.51 +.06
CorVA 22.47 UtilGrn 52.95 +.08
Dreyf 9.68 +03 Wireless n 7.82 +.01
DryMidr 29.27 +.18 Fidelity Spartan:
GNMA 15.99 ExtMkInn 40.43 +.31


Here are the 1,000 biggest mutual funds listed on Nasdaq. Tables show the fund name, sell
price or Net Asset Value (NAV) and daily net change.
Name: Name of mutual fund and family.
NAV: Net asset value.
Chg: Net change in price of NAV
Data based on NAVs reported to Lipper by 6 p.m. Eastern.


Name NAV Chg
5001dxlnvn 49.66 +.15
5001dx I 49.67 +.15
Infllnxlnvn 33.04 +.15
TotMktInvn 40.48 +.16
USBondl 11.73 +.02
Fidelity Spart Adv:
ExMktAd r n40.44 +.32
5001dxAdvn49.67 +.16
IntAd rn 33.05 +.15
TotMktAdrn40.48 +.16
First Eagle:
GIbIA 48.81 +.08
OverseasA 22.04 +.04
First Investors A
BIChpAp
GloblAp 6.78 +.02
GovtApp 11.53 -.01
GrolnAp 16.32 +.08
IncoAp 2.54
MATFAp 12.23 +.02
MITFAp 12.55 +.02
NJTFAp 13.46 +.03
NYTFAp 14.95 +.02
OppAp 29.76 +.23
PATFAp 13.45 +.02
SpSitAp 25.60 +.17
TxExAp 10.06 +.02
TotRtAp 16.54 +.06
ValueBp 7.57 +.03
Forum Funds:
AbsStrlr 11.05 -.02
Frank/Temp Frnk A:
AdjUSp 8.88
ALTFAp 11.62 +.01
AZTFAp 11.22 +.02
CallnsAp 12.50 +.02
CAIntAp 11.84 +.03
CalTFAp 7.28 +.01
COTFAp 12.15 +.01
CTTFAp 11.26 +.01
CvtScAp 15.08 +.01
DbITFA 12.16 +.01
DynTchA 33.76 +.13
EqlncAp 17.96 +.04
Fedlntp 12.20 +.05
FedTFAp 12.34 +.02
FLTFAp 11.81 +.02
FoundAlp 10.75 +.02
GATFAp 12.37 +.01
GoldPrMA 35.55 +.56
GrwthAp 49.92 +.10
HYTFAp 10.53 +.02
HilncA 2.01
IncomAp 2.18 +.01
InsTFAp 12.27 +.01
NYITF p 11.62 +.05
LATFAp 11.75 +.02
LMGvScA 10.38 +.01
MDTFAp 11.80 +.03
MATFAp 11.88 +.01
MITFAp 12.15 +.01
MNInsA 12.63 +.03
MOTFAp 12.48 +.01
NJTFAp 12.44 +.01
NYTFAp 11.93 +.01
NCTFAp 12.67 +.01
OhiolAp 12.81 +.02
ORTFAp 12.31 +.02
PATFAp 10.69 +.02
ReEScAp 16.01 +.10
RisDvAp 36.68 +.05
SMCpGrA 38.83 +.21
Stratlncp 10.48 +.01
TtlRtnAp 10.19 +.02
USGovAp 6.88
UDIsAp 13.15 +.01
VATFAp 11.98 +.02
Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv:
GIbBdAdv n 13.06 +.02
IncmeAd 2.16
Frank/Temp Frnk C:
IncomC t 2.20 +.01
USGvC t 6.83 -.01
Frank/Temp Mtl A&B:
SharesA 21.54 +.07
Frank/Temp Temp A:
DvMktAp 23.59 +.11
ForgnA p 6.69 +.03
GIBdAp 13.10 +.03
GrwthAp 18.33 +.08
WorldAp 15.48 +.05
Frank/Temp Tmp Adv:
GrthAv 18.33 +.08
Frank/Temp Tmp B&C:
DevMktC 23.01 +.11
ForgnC p 6.55 +.03
GIBdCp 13.12 +.02
Franklin Mutual Ser:
QuestA 17.32 +.04
GE Elfun S&S:
S&S nc 11.74 +.01
US Eqty 44.00 +.18
GMOTrust Ill:
CHIE 22.33 -.01
Quality 23.81 +.03
GMOTrust IV:
InflGrEq 22.92 +.09
IntllnftrVl 20.46 +.09
GMOTrustVI:
EmgMktsr 11.69 +.07
Quality 23.82 +.03
StrFxInc 16.36 +.01
Gabelli Funds:
Asset 51.73 +.28
Goldman Sachs A:
MdCVAp 37.20 +.18
Goldman Sachs Inst:
GrOppt 25.60 +.16
HiYield 7.14
HYMuni n 8.88 +.02
MidCapV 37.48 +.18
Harbor Funds:
Bond 12.46 +.02
CapAplnst 43.62 +.07
Intllnvt 59.27 +.28
Intl r 59.84 +.28
Hartford Fds A:
CpAppAp 33.38 +.15
DivGthAp 20.62 +.08
IntOpA p 14.47 +.09
Hartford Fds Y:
CapAppln 33.39 +.14
Hartford HLS IA:
CapApp 42.93 +.19
Div&Gr 21.18 +.08
Advisers 20.98 +.07
TotRetBd 11.80 +.02
Hennessy Funds:
CorGrllOrig
Hussman Funds:
SrTotRetr 12.27 +.02
StrGrowth 11.57 -.04
ICON Fds:
EnergyS 19.26 +.24
HIltcareS 15.83 +.04
ISI Funds:
NoAm p 7.90 +.01
IVA Funds:
WCdwideAt 16.30 +.02
WIdwideIr 16.31 +.03
Invesco Fds Invest:
DivrsDivp 12.90 +.04
Invesco Funds:
Energy 40.05 +.52
UtliIes 16.59 +.02
Invesco Funds A:
Chart p 17.66 +.06
CmstkA 17.01 +.08
Constap 24.73 +.06
EqIncA 8.89 +.03
GrlncAp 20.18 +.08
HilncMu p 7.93 +.01
HiYldp 4.22
HYMuA 9.66 +.01
IntlGrow 27.63 +.15
MunilnA 13.53 +.02
PATFA 16.51 +.02
USMortgA 13.00 +01
Invesco Funds B:
CapDevt 14.74 +.06
MunilnB 13.50 +.02
US Mortg 12.93
Ivy Funds:
AssetSC t 24.61 +.07
AssetStA p 25.37 +.08
AssetSbl r 25.59 +.07
JPMorgan A Class:
CoreBdA 11.86 +.02
JPMorgan C Class:
CoreBdp 11.92 +.02
JP Morgan Insth:
MdCpValn 26.11 +.09
JPMorgan R C:
CoreBond nil.86 +.02
ShtDurBd 10.98 +.01
JPMorgan Select:
USEquityn 11.23 +.05
JPMorgan Sel CIs:
CoreBdn 11.85 +.02
HighYld n 7.92
lntmTFBd n 11.24 +.02
LgCpGr 24.83 +.07
ShtDurBdn 10.98 +.01
USLCCrPIsn22.36 +.11
JanusT Shrs:
BalancdT 26.67 +.05
ContrarnT 14.18 +.08
EnterprT 66.32 +.26
FIxBndT 10.65 +.01
GlUfeSciTr 28.11 +.10
GIbSelT 11.49 +.02
GITechTr 18.77 +.02
Grw&lncT 33.93 +.06
JanusT 31.56 +.01
OvrseasTr 38.38 +.26
PrkMCValT22.13 +.11


ResearchT 32.18 +.05
ShTmBdT 3.08
TwentyT 61.16 -.16
VentureT 59.13 +.50
WrldWTr 45.96 +.23
Jensen Funds:
QualGrthJn28.94 -.05
John Hancock A:
BondAp 15.76 +.01
RgBkA 14.40 +.14
StrlnAp 6.59
John Hancock B:
StrlncB 6.59


Name NAV Chg
John Hancock ClI1:
LSAggr 12.65 +.05
LSBalanc 13.25 +.04
LSConsrv 13.14 +.02
LSGrwth 13.21 +.05
LSModer 13.03 +.02
Lazard Instl:
EmgMktl 19.61 +.06
Lazard Open:
EmgMkOp 20.06 +.05
Legg Mason A:
CBAgGrp 123.88 +.42
CBApprp 15.16 +.03
CBLCGrp 23.20 +.06
GCIAIICOp 8.46 +.05
WAHilncAt 5.99
WAMgMup 16.67 +.03
Legg Mason B:
CBLgCGrt 21.16 +.06
Legg Mason C:
CMSplnvp 30.05 +.10
CMValTrp 41.86 +.12
Longleaf Partners:
Partners 30.08 -.02
SmCap 28.02 +.04
Loomis Sayles:
LSBondlx 14.63 -.02
StrlncCx 15.22 -.01
LSBondRx 14.57 -.02
StrlncAx 15.13 -.02
Loomis Sayles Inv:
InvGrBdAp 12.37 +.04
InvGrBdY 12.38 +.04
Lord Abbett A:
AffilAp 11.80 +.07
FundlEq 13.37 +.07
BdDebAp 7.95 +.01
ShDurlncAp 4.60
MidCpAp 17.49 +.10
Lord Abbett C:
ShDurlncCt 4.63 +.01
Lord Abbett F:
ShtDurlnco 4.59
MFS Funds A:
MITA 21.12 +.07
MIGA 17.45 +.04
EmGA 47.56 +.13
HilnA 3.47
MFLA
TotRA 14.90 +.05
UtilA 17.68 +.05
ValueA 24.83 +.11
MFS Funds B:
MIGBn 15.68 +.03
GvScBn 10.45 +.02
HilnBn 3.48
MulnBn 8.69 +.02
TotRBn 14.90 +.05
MFS Funds I:
ReInT 15.19 +.09
Valuel 24.94 +.11
MFS Funds Instl:
IntlEqn 18.11 +.11
MainStay Funds A:
HiYIdBA 5.96
MainStay Funds B:
ConvBt 15.39 +.06
GovtBt 8.88 +.01
HYIdBBt 5.93
IncmBldr 17.14 +.03
IntlEqB 10.55 +.08
MainStay Funds I:
ICAPSIEq 37.81 +.25
Mairs & Power:
Growth n 79.52 +.22
Manning&Napier Fds:
WIdOppA 7.65 +.06
Matthews Asian:
AsianGllnv 16.52 +.05
Indialnvr 16.68 +.19
PacTgrlnv 22.38 +.10
MergerFdn 15.77
Meridian Funds:
Growth 46.51 +.07
Metro West Fds:
TotRetBd 10.54 +.02
TotRtBdl 10.53 +.01
Midas Funds:
Midas Fdt 3.40 +.05
Monetta Funds:
Monettan 15.94 +.10
Morgan Stanley B:
GlobStratB 15.68 +.04
MorganStanley Inst:
IntflEql 13.68 +.05
MCapGrl 38.33 +.02
Muhlenkn 56.76 +.23
Munder Funds A:
GwthOppA 29.24 +.06
Munder Funds Y:
MCpCGrYn31.95 +.15
Mutual Series:
BeacnZ 12.91 +.04
GblDiscA 29.11 +.07
GIbDiscZ 29.48 +.07
QuestZ 17.47 +.05
SharesZ 21.71 +.07
Neuberger&Berm Fds:
Focus 21.20 +.08
Geneslnst 49.16 +.47
Intl r 16.59 +.10
Partner 26.76 +.17
Neuberger&Berm Tr:
Genesis 51.00 +.48
Nicholas Group:
HilncIn 9.71 +.01
Nichn 47.61 +.24
Northern Funds:
Bondldx 10.86 +.02
HiYFxlnc 7.31
SmCpldx 9.16 +.10
Stkldx 17.39 +.06
Technly 16.87 +.05
Nuveen Cl A:
LtMBAp 11.14 +.01
Nuveen Cl R:
IntDMBd 9.19 +.02
HYMunBd 15.90 +.03
Nuveen Cl Y:
RealEstn 20.62 +.13
Oak Assoc Fds:
WhitOkSG 43.29 +.21
Oakmark Funds I:
Eqtylncr 28.93 +.07
Global 22.85 +.04
Intl I r 19.42 +.06
Oakmark 47.50 +.16
Select 32.23 +.15
Old Westbury Fds:
GlobOpp 7.27 +.02
GIbSMdCap 15.14 +.10
LgCapStrat 9.87 +.05
Oppenheimer A:
AMTFMu 6.76 +.01
AMTFrNY 11.82 +.02
CAMuniAp 8.29 +.01
CapApAp 48.45 +.06
CaplncApx 8.83 -.05
ChmplncAp 1.82
DvMktAp 33.38 +.22
Discp 61.86 +.50
EquityA 9.45 +.02
GlobAp 60.66 +.18
GIbOppA 31.59 +.27
GblStrlncA 4.21 +.01
Gold p 34.03 +.72
IntBdA p 6.32 +.01
LtdTmMu 14.83 +.02
MnStFdA 36.53 +.11
PAMuniAp 11.36 +.02
SenFltRtA 8.23
USGv p 9.60 +.01
Oppenheimer B:
AMTFMu 6.72 +.01
AMTFrNY 11.83 +.02
CplncB tx 8.66 -.03
ChmplncBt 1.82 ...
EquityB 8.72 +.02
GblSfrlncB 4.22
Oppenheimer Roch:
LtdNYAp 3.36 +.01
RoMuAp 16.50 +.03
RcNtMuA 7.19 +.02
Oppenheimer Y:
DevMktY 33.01 +.22
IntlBdY 6.32 +.01
IntGrowY 28.75 +.27
PIMCO Admin PIMS:
ShtTmAdp 9.80 +01
TotRtAd 11.07 +.02
PIMCO Instl PIMS:
AIAsetAutr 10.62 +.03
AIIAsset 12.13 +.03
ComodRR 6.78 +.06
Divlnc 11.63 +.01
EmgMkCur 10.50 +.05
EmMkBd 11.65
Fltlnc r 8.70 -.01
ForBdUnr 10.81 +.05
FrgnBd 10.71 +.01
HiYId 9.29 -.01
InvGrCp 10.60 +.02
LowDu 10.38
ModDur 10.72 +.01
RealRet 11.55 +.08
RealRtnIl 11.98 +.04
ShortT 9.80 +.01
TotRt 11.07 +.02
TRII 10.68 +02
TRIll 9.75 +.01
PIMCO Funds A:
AIIAstAutt 10.56 +.04
ComRRp 6.65 +.07
LwDurA 10.38
RealRtAp 11.98 +.04
TotRtA 11.07 +.02


PIMCO Funds C:
AllAstAutt 10.45 +.03
RealRtCp 11.98 +.04
TotRtCt 11.07 +.02
PIMCO Funds D:
TRtnp 11.07 +.02
PIMCO Funds P:
AstAIIlAuthP 10.61 +.03
TotRtnP 11.07 +.02
Parnassus Funds:
Eqtylncon 28.18 +.07
Perm Port Funds:
Permannt 48.62 +.34


Name NAV Chg
Pioneer Funds A:
BondA p 9.66 +.01
IntiValA 19.07 +.13
PionFdAp 41.96 +.16
ValueAp 11.82 +.08
Pioneer Funds B:
HiYldBt 10.19 +.01
Pioneer Funds C:
HiYIdC t 10.30 +.02
Pioneer FdsY:
CullenVY 18.57 +.08
Price Funds:
Balance n 20.63 +.07
BIChip n 45.49 +.09
CABondn 11.19 +.02
CapApp n 22.44 +.03
DivGron 25.46 +.11
EmMktBn 13.41
EmEurop 19.04 +.24
EmMktSn 32.15 +.24
Eqlncn 25.49 +.11
Eqlndexn 37.80 +.12
Europen 15.06 +.10
GNMAn 10.09
Growth n 37.60 +.08
Gr&ln n 22.08 +.08
HIthSci n 37.92 +.14
HiYield n 6.74 -.01
InsflCpG 19.07 +.03
InstHiYId n 9.50
IntlBond n 9.84 +.04
IntDisn 43.17 +.32
Intl G&l 12.86 +.07
InlSltkn 13.99 +.10
Japann 7.91 +.01
LatAm n 44.23 +.34
MDShrtn 5.23
MDBondn 10.83 +.02
MidCapn 59.49 +.32
MCapValn 23.83 +.13
NAmern 35.67 +.13
N Asian 15.75 +.08
New Era n 44.94 +.47
NHorizn 35.85 +.20
NIncn 9.69 +.01
NYBondn 11.55 +.02
OverSSFn 8.17 +.05
PSlncn 16.93 +.05
RealAssetr nl1.11 +.10
RealEstn 20.28 +.12
R2010n 16.16 +.06
R2015n 12.60 +.04
R2020n 17.49 +.06
R2025n 12.84 +.05
R2030n 18.49 +.08
R2035n 13.10 +.06
R2040n 18.66 +.09
R2045n 12.42 +.06
SciTecn 30.84 -.04
ShtBd n 4.84
SmCpStkn 35.38 +.29
SmCapValn38.18 +.40
SpecGrn 19.17 +.09
Speclnn 12.66 +.02
TFIncn 10.26 +.01
TxFrHn 11.31 +.02
TxFrSIn 5.68
USTIntn 6.15 +.01
USTLgn 12.93 +.09
VABondn 11.99 +.02
Valuen 25.17 +.13
Principal Inv:
LgCGI In 10.40 +.02
LT20201n 12.31 +.04
LT20301n 12.20 +.04
Prudential Fds A:
BlendA 18.63 +.10
HiYldAp 5.53
MuHilncA 9.91 +.01
UtlityAx 11.16 -.03
Prudential Fds B:
GrowthB 18.81 +.02
HiYIdBt 5.52 -.01
Putnam Funds A:
AmGvAp 9.13 +.03
AZ TE 9.30 +.02
ConvSec 20.12 +.04
DvrlnAp 7.63 -.01
EqlnAp 16.72 +.08
EuEq 18.84
GeoBalA 12.84 +.04
GIbEqtyp 9.18
GrInAp 14.35 +.08
GIblHIthA 42.16 +.19
HiYdApx 7.62
HiYld In 5.92 -.01
IncmA p 6.84 +.01
IntGrlnp 9.12 +.06
InvAp 14.27 +.06
NJTxA p 9.63 +.01
MultCpGr 56.30 +.23
PATE 9.33 +.02
TxExAp 8.81 +.01
TFInAp 15.31 +.03
TFHYA 12.21 +.02
USGvAp 13.57
GIblUtilA 10.34 +.03
VoyAp 23.58 +.14
Putnam Funds B:
TaxFrlns 15.32 +.03
DvrlnBt 7.56 -.01
Eqlnct 16.55 +.07
EuEq 18.08
GeoBaIB 12.71 +.04
GIbEqt 8.29
GINtRst 18.15
GrlnBt 14.10 +.08
GIbIHIthB 33.69 +.15
HiYIdBtx 7.61
HYAdBt 5.81
IncmBt 6.78 +.01
IntGrln t 9.05 +.06
IntNop t 13.98 +.09
InvBt 12.86 +.06
NJTxB t 9.62 +.01
MultCpGr 48.25 +.20
TxExBt 8.81 +.01
TFHYBt 12.23 +.02
USGvBt 13.51
GIblUtilB 10.29 +.02
VoyBt 19.85 +.11
RS Funds:
IntGrA 17.44 +.13
LgCAIphaA 42.32 +.21
Value 25.14 +.18
RidgeWorth Funds:
LCGrStkAp 11.88 +.02
Royce Funds:
LwPrSkSvr 15.92 +.19
MicroCapl 16.31 +.18
PennMulr 12.04 +.11
Premierlr 20.67 +.19
TotRetlr 13.76 +.10
ValSvct 12.17 +.13
Russell Funds S:
StratBd 11.07 +.02
Rydex Advisor:
NasdaqAdv 16.55 -.02
SSgA Funds:
EmgMkt 20.31 +.04
Schwab Funds:
HIltCare 18.83 +.03
0lOOOnvr 39.56 +.14
S&PSel 21.84 +.07
SmCpSl 21.36 +.23
TSMSelr 25.31 +.10
Scout Funds:
Intl 31.53 +.19
Selected Funds:
AmShD 43.74 +.18
AmShSp 43.74 +.18
Sentinel Group:
ComSAp 34.34 +.12
Sequoia 160.19 +.44
Sit Funds:
LrgCpGr 47.60 +.14
SoSunSCInvt21.81 ...
St FarmAssoc:
Gwltl 55.72 +.24
Stratton Funds:
MulD-Cap 36.82 +21
RealEstate 29.27 +.13
SmCap 54.76 +.41
SunAmerica Funds:
USGvBt 10.07 +.02
TCW Funds:
EmMktln 8.82 -.01
TotRetBdl 9.89 +.02
TIAA-CREF Funds:
Bdldxlnst 10.76 +.02
Eqldxlnst 10.64 +.05
Templeton Instit:
ForEqS 18.78 +.05
Third Avenue Fds:
IntlValnstr 16.25 +.03
REVallnstr 23.86 -.07
Valuelnst 45.53 -.34
Thornburg Fds:
IntValAp 26.75 +.02
IncBuildAt 18.65 +.03
IncBuildCp 18.65 +.03
IntValue I 27.36 +.02
LtTMul 14.51 +.01
Thrivent Fds A:
HiYld 4.86
Incom 8.93 +.01
Tocqueville Fds:
Goldtn 71.11 +1.37
Transamerica A:
AegonHYBp 9.27 -.01
Flexlncp 9.02
Turner Funds:
SmlCpGrn 36.07 +.30
Tweedy Browne:
GblValue 23.78 +.02
US Global Investors:
AIIAm 25.20 +.08


Name NAV Chg
Inco 13.18 +.01
Inl 24.54 +.08
NYBd 12.16 +.02
PrecMM 30.15 +.49
SciTech 14.39 +.03
ShtTBnd 9.18
SmCpStk 14.87 +.13
TxElt 13.38 +.02
TxELT 13.49 +.02
TxESh 10.80
VABd 11.38 +.01
WIdGr 20.07 +.08
VALIC :
MdCpldx 21.09 +.12
Stkldx 26.03 +.08
Value Line Fd:
LrgCo n 19.52 +.04
Vanguard Admiral:
BalAdmlIn 23.35 +.07
CAITAdmn 11.46 +.02
CALTAdmn11.62 +.02
CpOpAdln 74.97 +.12
EMAdmrrn 36.09 +.21
Energyn 117.12 +1.14
EqlnAdm n n49.28 +.14
EuroAdml n 57.70 +.41
ExplAdml n 75.64 +.53
ExtdAdm n 44.87 +.35
500Admln 128.69 -.17
GNMA Ad n 11.02
GrwAdm n 36.21 -.02
HlthCr n 57.32 +.10
HiYldCp n 5.84
InfProAdnn 27.99 +.09
ITBdAdml n 11.73 +.03
ITsryAdml n 11.55 +.02
IntGrAdm n 59.18 +.32
ITAdmI n 14.07 +.02
ITGrAdmn 10.12 +.02
LtdTrAdn 11.14 +.01
LTGrAdmln 10.27 +.06
LTAdmln 11.46 +.01
MCpAdml nl00.66 +.40
MorgAdmn 62.84 +.15
MuHYAdm nlO.89 +.02
NYLTAdn 11.47 +.02
PrmCaprn 69.97 +.12
PALTAdmn11.46 +.01
ReitAdm rn 88.58 -.12
STsyAdmln 10.76
STBdAdmlnlO.60
ShtTrAdn 15.92
STFdAdn 10.84
STIGrAdn 10.73
SmCAdm n 37.58 +.32
TxMCaprnn 69.87 +.26
TlBAdml n 10.95 +.02
TStkAdmn 34.93 -.02
ValAdmI n 22.35 -.03
WellslAdm n57.40 +.14
WelltnAdm n57.94 +.20
Windsor n 48.75 +.25
WdsrllAd n 50.93 +.23
Vanguard Fds:
CALTn 11.62 +.02
CapOppn 32.46 +.05
Convrtn 12.94
DivdGron 16.43 +.03
Energy n 62.38 +.60
Eqlncn 23.50 +.06
Explrn 81.29 +.58
FLLTn 11.88 +.02
GNMAn 11.02
GlobEqn 17.99 +.09
Grolncn 29.71 +.10
GrthEqn 12.46 +.01
HYCorpn 5.84
HlthCren 135.86 +.24
InflaPron 14.25 +.05
IntlExplrn 14.68 +.14
IntlGr n 18.60 +.10
IntlValn 29.88 +.14
ITIGraden 10.12 +.02
ITTsryn 11.55 +.02
LifeConn 16.99 +.05
LifeGron 23.12 +.10
Lifelncn 14.48 +.04
LifeMod n 20.53 +.08
LTIGraden 10.27 +.06
LTTsryn 12.56 +.10
Morg n 20.27 +.05
MuHYn 10.89 +.02
Mulntn 14.07 +.02
MuLtdn 11.14 +.01
MuLongn 11.46 +.01
MuShrtn 15.92
NJLTn 12.04 +.02
NYLTn 11.47 +.02
OHLTTE n 12.37 +.03
PALTn 11.46 +.01
PrecMtlsrn 19.40 +.30
PrmcpCorn 14.61 +.02
Prmcprn 67.44 +.12
SelValurn 20.37 +.12
STAR n 20.31 +.07
STIGraden 10.73
STFedn 10.84
STTsryn 10.76
StratEqn 20.88 +.15
TgtRetlncn 11.96 +.03
TgRe2010n23.66 +.08
TgtRe2015nnl3.13 +.05
TgRe2020 n23.36 +.08
TgtRe2025 nl3.33 +.05
TgRe2030 n22.91 +.09
TgtRe2035 nl3.81 +.06
TgtRe2040 n22.71 +.10
TgtRe2050 n22.60 +.10
TgtRe2045 nl4.26 +.07
USGron 21.29 +.04
USValuen 11.31 +.05
Wellslyn 23.69 +.06
Welltnn 33.54 +.11
Wndsrn 14.45 +.08
Wndslln 28.69 +.12
Vanguard Idx Fds:
DvMklnPl r n97.64 +.53
MidCplstPl n109.66 +.43
TotlntAdm r rn4.42 +.14
Totlntllnst r n97.67 +.58
TotlntllP r n 97.69 +.58
TotlntSig r n 29.30 +.18
500 n 128.69 -.14
Balancedn 23.34 +.07
EMktn 27.47 +.16
Europen 24.77 +.18
Extend n 44.85 +.35
Growth n 36.21 -.01
LgCaplxn 25.83 -.02
LTBndn 13.54 +.09
MidCapn 22.18 +.09
Pacific n 10.00 +.03
REITr n 20.76 -.02
SmCapn 37.55 +.32
SmlCpGth n24.35 +.21
STBndn 10.60
TotBndn 10.95 +.02
Totllnt n 14.60 +.09
TotStk n 34.93
Value n 22.35 -.03
Vanguard Instl Fds:
Ballnstn 23.35 +.07
DevMklnstn 9.37 +.05
Extln n 44.87 +.35
FTAIIWIdl r n86.90 +.50
Grwthlstn 36.21 -.02
InfProlnstn 11.40 +.03
Instldxn 128.42 +.40
InsPIn 128.43 +.40
InstTStldxn 31.76 +.13
InsTStPlusrn31.76 +.12
MidCplstn 22.24 +.09
SCInstn 37.58 +.32
TBIstn 10.95 +.02
TSInstn 34.94 -.01
Valuelstn 22.35 -.03
Vanguard Signal:
500Sgln 106.30 -.14
GroSig n 33.53 -.02
ITBdSig n 11.73 +.03
MidCpldxn 31.76 +.12
STBdldxn 10.60
SmCpSig n 33.86 +.29
TotBdSgl n 10.95 +.02
TotStkSgl n 33.72 -.01
Virtus Funds:
EmMktl 9.65 +.02
Virtus Funds A:
MulSStAp 4.85
Waddell & Reed Adv:
AssetS p 9.61 +.02
CorelnvA 6.46 +02
DivOppAp 15.26 +.06
DivOppCt 15.11 +.06
Wasatch:
SmCpGr 43.00 +.34
Wells Fargo Adv A:
AstAIAap 12.58
Wells Fargo Adv C:
AstAIICt 12.13
Wells Fargo Adv:
CmStklnv 21.16 +.08
Opptylnv 40.90 +.22
Wells Fargo Ad Ins:
UIStMulnc 4.82
Wells Fargo Admin:
Growth 42.41 +.14
Wells Fargo Instl:
UltSTMuA 4.82
Western Asset:
CorePlusl 11.26 +.01
William Blair N:
GrowthN 12.26 +.03
Yacktman Funds:
Fundpn 18.67 +.04
Focusedn 19.90 +.02


ChinaReg 7.55 -.06
GIbRs 10.04 +.09
Gld&Mtls 12.40 +.20
WdPrcMn 13.38 +.19
USAA Group:
AgvGt 37.33 +.06
CABd 10.70 +.01
CrnstStr 22.46 +.06
GovSec 10.36
GrTxStr 14.29 +.04
Grwth 16.25 +.04
Gr&lnc 16.34 +.08
IncStk 13.42 +.02


Stocks edge up but global



economic worries linger


Associated Press


NEW YORK Stocks
eked out a small gain at the
end of a rough week in
which the market was
weighed down by prospects
of a global economic slow-
down.
The Dow on Friday closed
up 34.59 points, or 0.3 per-
cent, at 13,080.73. Financial
stocks performed well, led
by a 2.6 percent gain for
Bank of America.
For the week, the Dow
Jones industrial average
was off 152 points, the worst
in a month despite reports
of strengthening in the U.S.
jobs market and better cor-
porate profits. Investors
were worried about a slow-
down in Asia and Europe
and the impact of higher oil
prices on consumer
spending.
Home builders and home
improvement stocks fell Fri-
day after the Commerce De-
partment said sales of new
homes fell 1.6 percent last
month. PulteGroup fell 2.6
percent and Lennar de-
clined 1 percent, while
Lowe's and Home Depot fell
a little less than 1 percent.
In other trading, the Stan-
dard & Poor's 500 index
inched up 4.33 points, or 0.3
percent, to 1,397.11 and the
Nasdaq composite rose 4.6
points, or 0.1 percent, to
3,067.92.
A wide range of compa-
nies including Nike, Oracle,
FedEx, and Tiffany have re-
ported stellar earnings this


Market
March 23

Dow Jones
industrials


Nasdaq
composite

Standard &
Poor's 500

Russell
2000

NYSE
Advanced:

Declined:

Unchanged

Volume:

Nasdaq
Advanced:

Declined:

Unchanged

Volume:



week. Howev
complishment
marred by wor
fect of a slow
and Europe or
nies that rel
sales. Reports
Europe earlier
pointed to a lik
in those econo:
Nike was off
FedEx down le
cent and Tiffai
percent.
"Investors a
they're seeing
empty rather
half full," sai(


president at Cabot Money
watch Management.
, 2012 American consumers,
who drive two-thirds of the
+34.59 economy, are spending

13,080.73 more in stores and restau-
rants. But investors are wor-
+4.60 tried about how long that
3,067.92 will last if oil prices con-

+4.33 tinue to rise.
1,397.11 Darden Restaurants,
which operates Olive Gar-
+8.59 den and Red Lobster, beat
830.03 Wall Street forecasts with an
8.5 percent increase in prof-
diary its after warm weather
2,143 brought more people to its
874 restaurants. But Darden
----12 stock fell 1.7 percent
1: 112 Crude oil rose 1.4 percent

3.3 b after a brief downturn
Thursday. Gasoline has
diary risen 59 cents per gallon
1,664 since Jan. 1 and the average

824 price nationwide is above $4

: 132 in at least eight states, plus
the District of Columbia.
1.4 b AP And then there is China
and Europe. New surveys
showed a contraction in the
er, those ac- manufacturing sector in
s were China, a bellwether for
ries of the ef- world demand as it pro-
down in Asia duces and exports a huge
n the compa- amount of consumer goods.
y on global In Europe, Ireland dipped
in China and back into recession.
r in the week However, Lutts believe
ely slowdown the worries are overblown.
mies. "Though China is slowing,
f 3.2 percent, I'm not that worried be-
ss than 1 per- cause the government will
ny was off 1.4 do all it can to get growth
back on track," he said.
re scared so Treasury prices and gold
a glass half rose. The yield on the
than a glass benchmark 10-year Treas-
d Rob Lutts, ury note fell to 2.23 percent.


Business HIGHLIGHTS


Facebook warns employers not

to demand passwords

NEW YORK Facebook is warning employ-
ers not to demand the passwords of job appli-
cants, saying that it's an invasion of privacy that
opens companies to legal liabilities.
The social networking company is also threat-
ening legal action.
An Associated Press story this week docu-
mented cases of job applicants who are being
asked during hiring interviews to reveal their
Facebook passwords to prospective employers
who want to check their backgrounds.
In a post on Friday, Facebook's chief privacy
officer cautions that if an employer discovers that
a job applicant is a member of a protected
group, the employer may open itself up to claims
of discrimination if it doesn't hire that person.

For long-unemployed,

hiring bias rears its head

HARTFORD, Conn. Few job seekers who
fail to get an interview know the reason, but
Michelle Chesney-Offutt said a recruiter told her
why she lost the chance to pitch for an informa-
tion technology position.
The 54-year-old, who had been laid off from
her IT job in Illinois, said the recruiter who re-
sponded to her online resume two years ago liked
her qualifications and was set to schedule an in-
terview. But he backed away, she said, when he
learned she had been out of work for 13 months.
The employer he represented would not con-
sider applicants who were unemployed for more
than six months, she said.

Bernanke says crisis exposed

global economic vulnerabilities

WASHINGTON Chairman Ben Bernanke
said Friday that the slow recovery from the Great
Recession and 2008 financial crisis illustrates
how vulnerable the global economy is. He urged


economic policymakers to learn from that lesson.
The Federal Reserve chairman noted the ex-
traordinary steps taken by the Federal Reserve
and other central banks around the world to sta-
bilize financial systems, during a two-day confer-
ence on the crisis

Bank of America starts

foreclosure rental program

WASHINGTON Bank of America has
launched a pilot program that will let some
homeowners at risk of foreclosure become
renters and stay in their homes.
Fewer than 1,000 borrowers in Arizona, Ne-
vada and New York will be enrolled in the test
program, which began this week. Those selected
will transfer the title of their homes back to Bank
of America and have their mortgage debt for-
given.
The homeowners can rent the homes for up to
three years at or below their area's market rental
rate. The rental payments will be less than the
borrowers' mortgage payments, the bank said.
And they will not have to pay property taxes or
homeowner's insurance.

Stuck with high gas prices,

drivers just pump less

Americans have pumped less gas every week
for the past year.
During those 52 weeks, gasoline consumption
dropped by 4.2 billion gallons, or 3 percent, ac-
cording to MasterCard SpendingPulse. The de-
cline is longer than a 51-week slide during the
recession.
The main reason is higher gas prices. The na-
tional average for a gallon of gas is $3.89, the
highest ever for this time of year, and experts
say it could reach $4.25 by late April. As a result,
Americans are taking fewer trips to restaurants
and shopping malls. When they take a vacation,
they're staying closer to home.
-From wire reports


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NEKWYORK STOCjECHNGE


Name Last Chg
SP CnSt 33.76 +.08
SP Consum 44.65 +.05
SP Engy 72.26 +.78
SPDRFncl 15.73 +.14
SP Inds 37.16 +.06
SPTech 29.99 -.01
SP UIl 34.60 +.01
StdPac 4.41 -.11
Standex 39.55 +.70
StanBlkDk 78.20 +.35
StarwdHtl 57.56 +.31
StateStr 45.63 +.62
Statoil ASA 27.49 +.56
Steelcse 9.08 -.21
Steris 31.20 -.15
SIIwtrM 12.85 +.25
Sbyker 54.44 +.22
SturmRug 48.07 +.14
SubPpne 42.29 -.14
SunCmts 42.93 -.01
Suncorgs 32.82 +.46
Sunoco 39.09 +.29
Suntech 3.19 +.03
SunTrst 23.73 +.10
SupEnrgy 27.03 +1.12
Supvalu 6.12 +.02
Synovus 2.10 +.01
Sysco 29.84 -.03
TCF Fncl 12.09 +.03
TE Connect 36.38 -.13


TECO 17.53
TIM Partn 31.42
TJXs 38.63
ThawSemi 14.99
TalismEg 13.12
Target 58.19
TataMotors 26.64
TeckResg 35.12
TeekayTnk 5.24
TelNorL 12.02
TelcmNZs 9.67
TelefBrasil 29.90
TelefEsp 16.86
TenetHlth 5.25
Teradyn 16.82
Terex 23.99
TerraNitro 234.55
Tesoro 28.52
TetraTech 9.42
Textron 27.14
Theragen 1.78
ThermoFis 56.75
ThmBet 71.65
ThomsonR 29.63
3M CO 88.46
Tiffany 71.45
TWCable 80.86
TimeWarn 37.08
Timken 51.19
TitanMet 13.64
TollBros 23.60
TorchEngy 2.10


Trchmrks 49.56
TorDBkg 84.80
Total SA 54.06
TotalSys 22.77
Transom 55.87
Travelers 58.20
Tredgar 19.64
TriContf 15.93
TrinaSolar 8.09
TwoHrblnv 10.19
TycolntI 52.86
Tyson 19.48
UBSAG 14.24
UDR 25.61
UIL Hold 34.45
USAirwy 7.55
USG 18.06
UltraPtg 23.29
Ultrapar 22.00
UniSrcEn 36.47
UniFirst 60.03
UnilevNV 33.70
UnionPac 108.89
UtdContl 20.55
UtdMicro 2.69
UPSB 79.71
UtdRentals 41.39
US Bancrp 31.70
USNGsrs 17.83
USOilFd 40.69
USSteel 29.74
UtdTech 81.80


UtdhlthGp 53.66 -.22 WatsnPh 65.23
UnumGr 23.95 +.11 Weathflnti 16.63
.VWtWatch 78.84
WelnRlt 25.89
VFCp 147.00 -1.99 WellPoint 66.68
VaalcoE 9.44 +.64 WellsFargo 33.53
ValeSA 22.85 +.11 WestarEn 27.52
ValeSApf 22.31 +.07 WAstEMkt 14.45
ValeroE 26.69 +.25 WstAMgdHi 6.49
VangTSM 72.11 +.29 WAstlnfOpp 12.76
VangREIT 62.96 +.39 WDigital 42.44
VangDivAp 58.13 +.08 WstRefin 19.66
VangEmg 43.32 +.32 WstnUnion 17.93
VangEAFE 33.93 +.21 Weyerhsr 21.87
Vanbvn 19.70 +.20 Whrlpl 76.78
VarianMed 68.97 -.23 WhibngPet 56.22
Vectren 28.93 +.01 Whibngll n 24.46
Ventas 56.20 +.20 WmsCos 30.18
VeoliaEnv 16.26 +.03 WmsPtrs 56.00
VeriFone 50.67 +.27 WmsSon 38.54
VerizonCm 39.42 -.24 Winnbgo 9.67
VimpelCm 11.17 -.06 WiscEngy 34.50
Vipshop n 5.50 ... WT LCD 52.77
Visa 118.78 +1.50 WT India 19.12
Vornado 83.43 +.04 Worthgtn 17.96
WGL Hold 40.33 +.17 Wyndham 44.64
WPXEnn 19.03 +.34 XLGrp 21.13
Wabash 9.61 +.10 XcelEngy 26.18
WalMart 60.75 +.10 Xerox 8.22
Walgrn 33.56 +.18 Yamanag 15.92
WalterEn 62.72 +2.06 YingliGrn 3.91
WsteMInc 34.95 +.01 Youku 24.70







Page A8 SATURDAY, MARCH 24, 2012



PINION


"He who will not reason, is a bigot; he
who cannot is a fool; and he who
dares not is a slave."
Sir William Drummond (1585-1649)


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


UTRUS NTY (UMLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan............. .................. publisher
Charlie Brennan ............... .................. editor
Mike Arnold ............. .................. HR director
Sandra Frederick....................... managing editor
.wJJ-ll Curt Ebitz................ .............citizen member
Founded Mac Harris ....... .................. citizen member
by Albert M.
Williamson Rebecca Martin ...........................guest member
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


LURKING CRITTERS




Coyotes are



just a part of



Citrus life


or many people, coyotes
are an animal from the
Southwest, or perhaps
the cartoon character Wile E.
Coyote who was constantly
chasing Road Runner, but for a
growing number
in Citrus County,
they're some-
where between a THE IS
nuisance and a Resid
threat, concern
Although some coyn
coyotes are re-
ported to have OUR OI
been introduced
into the state for Not likely
hunting almost but do
100 years ago, the char
current coyote
presence seems to
be primarily a
natural extension ON TH
of their range as
they have spread 0 An inform
across the coun- on coyotes
try. Coyotes are tial areas
now found from at http://r
Costa Rica to ifas.ufl.ed
northern Alaska, coyote-faq
and throughout
the state of Florida. The ex-
pansion of their habitat has oc-
curred largely as a result of
development and hunting driv-
ing out their natural predators
such as wolves, bears and pan-
thers.
In addition, coyotes are in-
telligent animals that can live
almost anywhere, will eat al-
most anything and have large
litters. The Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation Commis-
sion refers to them as "oppor-
tunistic omnivores, meaning
that they eat whatever animal
and plant material is most
abundant," including snakes,
rats, grain, fruit, feral hogs,
garbage, and unfortunately,
small dogs and cats.
While they may look intimi-
dating, coyotes are generally
shy animals that are afraid of
people, and instances of coy-
otes attacking people are rela-
tively infrequent. A study by Dr
Robert Timm (University of
California) reported that coy-
otes bit 89 people in the U.S.
during a 15-year period (1988-
2003), mostly in California. Ac-
cording to a University of


S
d
e
o

P

n
in


I4
a
s
is
m

:.


Florida Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences report,
domestic dog bites are much
more common, with about 4.7
million bites from domestic
dogs annually in the U.S.
Experts believe
if coyotes are fed
by people, they
;SUE: lose their fear of
ents humans and bites
d about are more likely.
tes. For this reason,
never feed coy-
INION: otes. Also, pet food
should not be left
to bite, outside, garbage
't take cans should be
ces. tightly closed, and
food scraps
should not be
thrown out where
E NET they can attract
coyotes.
itive paper While coyote at-
in residen- tacks are rare,
s available they do occur. If
manatee. coyotes are sus-
/pdfs/ pected of being
pdf around, small chil-
dren should not
play outside without supervi-
sion, and authorities recom-
mend keeping pets confined
and walking them on a leash,
particularly at dusk or dawn.
Also, avoid walking pets near
brushy areas where a coyote
might hide. When walking a
pet, or simply taking a walk
where there might be coyotes,
take along something such as a
golf club for protection.
If a coyote is a nuisance, it
can be shot or trapped legally
where permissible, but it is il-
legal in Florida to poison a coy-
ote or any animal other than a
rat. For homeowners who do
not want to deal directly with a
problem animal, a professional
trapper can be called.
With coyotes now being a part
of state wildlife and not likely
to go away, the best advice is to
try to not attract them, and if
you see them, treat them as you
would treat another Florida
native predator- the alligator
While the odds are against
being bitten by either, coyotes
and alligators are both wild an-
imals, and the safest path is to
avoid tangling with them.


= Hot Corner: TRAYVON MARTIN -


Florida law
I'm ex-law enforcement and
when I went to the acad-
emy, it was my under-
standing ... that you can 0
only use deadly force if
you fear your life is
threatened (and) endan-
gered. Now this person
(who) shot this kid never
mentioned on the phone
he's in fear of his life, so
he had no right to shoot CAL
this kid. He just should 56
have stayed in his truck O63-
until the police arrived.
This man should be arrested and
should go to trial for murder.
Not black, white issue
On one page of the paper, a
young man is on trial for murder-
ing a police officer. On the next
page, there's an article of a young
man shot by a community patrol


officer. In the second case, there's
a protest and an individual from
upstate New York is protesting be-
cause of racism. Myself,
|ND as a Vietnam vet, I never
saw Mr. Sharpton on the
E front line telling the North
Vietnamese they were
3 killing too many black
people. I think it's time for
all Americans to wake up.
It's not black or white, it's
multicolor. Get along.
Carrying a weapon
0 79 Neighborhood Watch
program volunteers -
they are the eyes and ears of the
police department. If he had a
gun permit, this was no time to
have (a) gun in his possession. He
was told to stay in (the) vehicle.
He should have been charged by
now. Let's hope no other neigh-
borhood watch volunteers carry
guns.


The man behind the curtain


N ine months ago, Polk
County was united in its
support for USF Polytech-
nic, satisfied that the University of
South Florida branch campus,
which has served Polk students for
23 years, had financial autonomy
and a smart new empha-
sis on science, engineer-
ing and technology
Then, with very little
public discussion, a
"Community Letter"
was sent to the chair-
woman of the Board of ,
Governors, urging her
to make Polytechnic a
separate university -
Florida's 12th. Media Paula:
accounts portrayed a FLO
grassroots effort of VOI
community leaders in-
troducing the idea to
state Sen. J.D. Alexander, who
then offered his support.
But just how did this so-called
"Community Letter" come
about? Enter Wayne Watters, a
seemingly mild-mannered Talla-
hassee lobbyist and ally of
Alexander's, who has gained a
reputation as the senator's "en-
forcer" on important matters. In
return, Watters is able to repre-
sent his clients before an influen-
tial senator who chairs the
Senate Budget Committee.
Former state Sen. Rick Dant-
zler, who initially signed the
"community" letter, said Watters
pushed for his signature. Later,
Dantzler withdrew his support
after seeing how divisive the
push had become. Several others
also quietly expressed regret for
having signed the letter
According to the Lobbyist Reg-
istration Office, Watters repre-
sents 13 clients in Tallahassee. Of
the 28 local businessmen who
signed the letter, he was the lob-
byist for nine.
Some of the signers have inter-
esting ties to USF Poly, some fi-
nancial and some aspirational.
Wesley Beck ofAspyre Properties
had leases with the university for
laboratory space. Carl "Bud"
Strang of 6/10 Corp. similarly had
leases with Polytech. Steve


Scruggs, executive director of the
Lakeland Economic Develop-
ment Council, collects $5,000 in
dues from USF Poly and another
$10,000 in dues for the High
Skills/High Wage Group. A few
are officers of hospitals that
would like a presence
on the new campus.
Several have ex-
pressed interest in
S serving on the Board
of Trustees, where
they would determine
how tens of millions of
dollars will be spent.
Events were
scripted to provide
Dockery the appearance of a
RIDA grassroots effort. In
CES reality, the community
push was an impres-
sive and carefully
crafted narrative that Alexander
spun to the Board of Governors
and on the Senate floor
In the plot to make USF Poly
independent, many local groups
were played as pawns. Often,
Alexander would show up at
community meetings to drum up
support. When he couldn't make
it, Watters, who lives in Winter
Haven, would appear
Watters pushed the Polk County
Commission and the Central
Florida Development Council, of
which he is a member, to make
Poly independent. Then he lob-
bied the Polk County Builders As-
sociation. According to a
(Lakeland) Ledger article from
Oct. 29, Watters and Jack Myers
gave a 45-minute presentation in
support of a resolution for inde-
pendence. Roger Atherton, the as-
sociation's president, said the two
were there on behalf of Alexan-
der
The next step was to manufac-
ture a crisis, or rather, a series of
crises, a strategy that continues
today
Alexander made the first move,
telling the Board of Governors
that USF President Judy Genshaft
was starving USF Poly, when in
reality, Chancellor Marshall Good-
man had financial autonomy to
hire faculty and recruit students.


After five years of extravagant
spending and accomplishing very
little, USF dismissed Goodman in
December
Then, Watters is said to have
encouraged members of the USF
Poly board to resign one at a time
to keep things stirred up. Four
out of five resigned, pointing the
finger at USF for having dis-
missed Goodman, the big
spender Next, Alexander used
his budget position to announce
disproportionate cuts to USF, the
leverage he needed to negotiate
Poly's independence.
This week, fearing a veto by
Gov Rick Scott, Alexander's lat-
est manufactured crisis is scaring
folks into believing that if the bill
gets vetoed, there will be no fund-
ing for Polytech or the 1,300 USF
students who want to complete
their degrees in Polk. He is urg-
ing people to send resolutions to
the governor asking him to sign
SB 1994. The first pawn was the
Lakeland Chamber of Com-
merce, whose board members in-
clude several Polytech Board of
Trustee wannabes.
One interesting coincidence,
during recent budget negotia-
tions, is an issue about govern-
ment leases at Tallahassee's
Koger Center that kept popping
up. A company run by a former
Board of Governors member, who
sided with Alexander, wanted to
take over the leases. The Koger
center is managed by Hall Invest-
ments, Ltd. The company's lobby-
ist: Wayne Watters.
Watters is a nice enough feller,
but one has to ask, why is he so re-
lentless in his push for an inde-
pendent university? Because of
his love for our university system?
Out of the goodness of his heart?
Or maybe, just maybe, because
his clients have a lot to gain. Just
follow the yellow brick road.

Paula Dockeryis a term-limited
Republican senator from
Lakeland who is chronicling her
final year in the Florida Senate.
She can be reached at
pdockery@floridavoices., com.


_ LETTERS to the Editor


Can't legislate morality
Can morality be legislated? It
seems some politicians continue
to try to regulate their morality
Why do they continue to try to
stop or impede females from
having an abortion?
The old saying that still holds
true is, moral people can create
legislation, but you cannot legis-
late morality
Which one of us has the right
to tell a pregnant female she
cannot have an abortion or she
has to meet certain conditions
before she can have an abor-
tion? The female who is in that
situation and has made that hor-
rific decision certainly does not
need any interference from any-
one for any reason. The govern-
ment's obligation is to make sure
the location is properly staffed
and sanitary, period.
But all these people who have
these moral ideas have an op-
tion they can and should pursue.
They have the option of getting
together and forming a corpora-
tion to offer a choice to any fe-
male considering an abortion.
This would take time and money,
but it can be done.
To form a "children's aid and
adoption society" would take
time, money and a cadre of dedi-
cated anti-abortion people. The
question is who will this group of
people be? Will it be the heads
of the churches in the county?
Will other people with legal and
financial experience volunteer


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in Chroni-
cle editorials are the opinions of
the newspaper's editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at 352-563-5660.
We reserve the right to edit let-
ters for length, libel, fairness and
good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
350 words, and writers will be
limited to three letters per month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
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352-563-3280, or email to
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to serve? Would people opposed
to abortion as well as others be
willing to contribute money to
get this agency established?
I hope somehow the leaders of
all the churches in the county
could have an ecumenical meet-
ing and discuss this subject and
get the program started. This
could be a very important and
worthwhile project with great
benefits for all concerned, espe-
cially the children who would be
saved.
Now that I have thrown down
the gauntlet I surely hope that
someone will pick it up.
Alfred Mason
Crystal River


Proud of beliefs
I'm a progressive Democrat and
very proud of it I believe in good
government that supports the en-
tire population. I believe in rea-
sonable federal and state taxes on
all wage, salary and investment
earners on a sliding-scale basis
for those whose income is above
poverty levels. I would welcome a
10 percent increase in my federal
taxes to reduce the deficit and na-
tional debt!
I believe in a government
health program that covers all
our citizens much the same as in
many other more progressive
countries. I believe in Medicare
and Medicaid benefits we've had
for years. I believe in Social Se-
curity benefits that we've had for
years with future funding pro-
tected, even though I receive
none. I believe in increased
oversight ensuring minimal
fraud in Medicare and Social Se-
curity I believe in a strong na-
tional defense with increasing
reliance, strengthened diplo-
macy with others, and signifi-
cant reduction in defense
funding. And finally I believe,
with public support, the need to
end the vitriol between the Re-
publican and Democratic state
and federal legislatures, and
provide a government for the
people rather than for private
interests.
George Harbin
Homosassa


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


IF





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Ilk

Associated Press
Pat Denzer waves the U.S. and Texas flags Friday in front of San Fernando Cathedral during
a protest in downtown San Antonio. The group says the U.S. Department of Health and
Human Services' mandate under the Affordable Care Act violates religious freedom.

In health care case,

many possible outcomes


Associated Press
WASHINGTON The Supreme Court
has several options in ruling on President
Barack Obama's health care overhaul, from
upholding the law to striking it down in its
entirety The court also could avoid deciding
the law's constitutionality at all, if it finds the
lawsuits challenging the law are premature.
Here is a look at six potential outcomes,
from the simplest to the most complicated
possible rulings:
Q: What if the Supreme Court upholds
the law and finds Congress was within its
authority to require most people to have
health insurance or pay a penalty?
A: A decision in favor of the law would
end the legal fight and allow the adminis-
tration to push forward with implementing
its provisions over the next few years, in-
cluding the insurance requirement, an ex-
pansion of Medicaid and a ban on private
insurers' denying coverage to people with
pre-existing health problems.
The political wrangling, however, proba-
bly would continue as Republican candi-
dates for president and lesser offices are
calling for repeal of the law.
Q: What if, on the other hand, the court
strikes down the entire law?
A: That would kill a costly new federal
entitlement before it has a chance to take
root and develop a constituency of benefi-
ciaries and supporters, namely more than
30 million people who are supposed to wind
up with health insurance because of the law.
In addition, some parts of the law already
are in effect and would be rolled back.
But there's no escaping America's double-
barreled problem of excruciatingly high
health care costs and many uninsured peo-
ple, more than 50 million according to the
latest estimates. Whether it's dealing with
the federal deficit, retirement security for
seniors or even the Pentagon budget,
elected officials would still have to confront
health care at nearly every turn.
Q: What happens if the court strikes
down the individual insurance require-
ment, but leaves the rest of the Affordable
Care Act in place?
A: Knocking out the requirement that
Americans carry insurance would not be the
end of Obama's health care overhaul. There's
a lot more in the 900-plus pages of the law.
But it would make the complicated legis-
lation a lot harder to carry out, risking more
complications for a U.S. health care system
already seen as wasteful, unaffordable and
unable to deliver consistently high quality
Many fewer uninsured people would get
covered. Ten million to 15 million people
intended to get coverage under the law
could be left out.


The cost of individually purchased pri-
vate health insurance would jump. That
would make it more expensive for the gov-
ernment to subsidize premiums, although
millions of middle-class people would still
be entitled to such assistance under the
law's remaining provisions.
If the individual mandate is struck down,
the law's Medicaid expansion would still
cover millions more low-income people,
mainly childless adults.
And a host of other mandates would stay
in place. Starting in 2014, medium-sized
and large employers would be hit with fines
for not providing coverage to their workers.
Insurance companies would be required
to accept people with pre-existing medical
problems, no longer allowed to cherry-pick
the healthy to keep costs down. They would
also be forbidden from imposing higher
premiums on people in poor health, and
limited in what they could charge older
adults.
Q: What if the court strikes down the
mandate, and invalidates the parts of the
law requiring insurance companies to cover
people regardless of medical problems and
limit what they can charge older people?
A: Many fewer people would get covered,
but the health insurance industry would
avoid a dire financial hit.
Insurers would be able to keep screening
out people with a history of medical prob-
lems, such as diabetes patients or cancer
survivors.
That would prevent a sudden jump in
premiums. But it would leave consumers
with no assurance that they can get health
insurance when they need it, a major prob-
lem the law was intended to fix.
A related requirement limits premiums
charged to older adults. Currently people
in their late 50s and early 60s can face pre-
miums as much as six or seven times higher
than those charged to 20-year-olds. The law
says insurers may charge older adults no
more than three times what they charge
younger ones.
Q: What happens if the court decides that
the constitutional challenge is premature?
A: The wild card, and least conclusive
outcome in the case, involves the court's
consideration of a technical issue. The fed-
eral appeals court in Richmond, Va., held
that the challenge to the insurance re-
quirement has to wait until people start
paying the penalty for not purchasing in-
surance. The appeals court said it was
bound by the federal Anti-Injunction Act,
which is intended to facilitate tax collec-
tions and keep the government operating.
That law says federal courts may not hear
challenges to taxes, or anything that looks
like a tax, until after they are paid.


I FO S SI' m'R NI


at
$3.40


a.ter
to
w r


Car Washes From Oil Changes From
Mobil D

MR. 'S aan Lube Express
CAR WASH
750 S.E. HWY. 19 1050 SE US Highway 19
Crystal River, FL 34429 Crystal River, FL 34429
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Y CHRONICLE


SaionBRs"pe Pope decries violence, urges change
Season sapped

Associated Press The comment, in re- __ I
sponse to questions from a
ABOARA D THE PAPAL journalist was as blunt CAsa h &--


Associated Press
Maple sap drips from a tap
Wednesday in Calais, Vt.
Many maple-syrup produc-
ers in the Midwest and
Northeast have had their
harvests cut short by warm
weather, a setback that
could affect consumers
later in the year.

Exec pleads guilty to
tomato price-fixing
SACRAMENTO, Calif.-A
former California food company
owner pleaded guilty to rack-
eteering Thursday in a tomato
price-fixing plot that authori-
ties said drove up costs to
consumers across the nation.
Frederick Scott Salyer, 56,
was charged with bribing pur-
chasing managers at food gi-
ants including Kraft Foods
Inc. and Frito-Lay to buy
tomato products from his
company, Monterey-based
SK Foods. Prosecutors said
he and his co-conspirators
fixed prices and rigged bids
for the sale of tomato products
to McCain Foods USA Inc.,
ConAgra Foods Inc. and Kraft.
Salyer pleaded guilty in
federal court in Sacramento
to two charges: racketeering
and price fixing. Under a plea
agreement, Salyer is expected
to face four to seven years
behind bars. He remains under
house arrest at his Pebble
Beach estate on $6 million bail
until his sentencing, which is
scheduled for July 10.
Salyer also admitted SK
Foods routinely falsified lab
test results for its tomato paste
and that he ordered former
employees to falsify informa-
tion including the product's mold
content, production date and
whether it qualified as "organic."
Buyers from Kraft, PepsiCo
Inc.'s Frito-Lay unit, Safeway
Inc. and B&G Foods Inc. have
pleaded guilty to accepting
bribes in the case. As part of
Friday's plea, Salyer agreed
to forfeit at least $3.25 million
in foreign bank accounts
-1, -, 1,


where prosecute
moved funds aft
filed for bankrup

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searches for cl
Mohamed Me
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France. Merah,
of killing seven
shot in the he
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gunfight wi
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Exxon Vali
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trial and discar(


PLANE Pope Benedict
XVI set off on a pilgrimage
to the New World on Friday,
calling on Mexicans to con-
quer an "idolatry of money"
that feeds drug violence and
urging Cuba to leave behind
a Marxism that "no longer
responds to reality."
Benedict spoke to re-
porters aboard a special Al-
italia flight carrying him to
central Mexico, where a
swelling crowd gathered along
the route he would take
from the airport later in the
day The pope said a lust for
money was behind the drug
violence that has claimed
more than 47,000 lives in the
country since a government
crackdown began in 2006.
On Monday, Benedict will
head for Cuba, and said it is
"evident that Marxist ideol-
ogy as it was conceived no
longer responds to reality."


anything his predecessor,
John Paul II, said during his
groundbreaking 1998 trip to
Cuba, though the earlier
pope is widely credited with
helping bring down social-
ism in eastern Europe.
Benedict cautioned "this
process requires patience
and also decisiveness."
Asked about reports that
dissidents in Cuba are still
routinely harassed and ar-
rested, Benedict said the
church wants "to help in the
spirit of dialogue to avoid
trauma and to help bring
about a just and fraternal
society, as we want in the
whole world."
Benedict said John Paul's
visit to Cuba ushered in a
slow process of dialogue and
cooperation between church
and state on the island.
During that trip, John
Paul made a clear if cautious


Associated Press
A street vendor sells images of Pope Benedict XVI on Friday
as he walks by people lining the street awaiting the pope's
arrival in Leon, Mexico. Benedict's weeklong trip to Mexico
and Cuba is his first to both countries.


call for then-President Fidel
Castro to open up Cuban so-
ciety, take steady if gradual
steps toward democracy
and give the church a
greater voice.
In Mexico, Benedict said,
violence is destroying the
nation's young.


The "great responsibility
of the church is to educate
the conscience, teach moral
responsibility and strip off
the mask (from) the idolatry
of money that enslaves
mankind, and unmask the
false promise, this lie that
is behind" the drug culture,


World Trade Center rising


Associated Press
Ironworkers connect steel beams Friday above the 93rd floor of One World Trade Center in New York. The tower,
formerly known as the Freedom Tower, will reach 104 floors and is scheduled for completion in 2013.




Obama makes surprise pick for World Bank


ors say ne WASHINGTON Pass-
er SK Foods ing over better-known can-
tcy. didates, President Barack
Obama on Friday nominated
RIEFS global health expert and
Dartmouth College Presi-
or clues dent Jim Yong Kim to lead
the World Bank. It was a
surprise pick aimed in part
at fending off challenges
from developing nations
eager to end the U.S. mo-
nopoly of the top job at the
international institution.
I Obama's appointment all
S but guarantees that Kim, a
52-year-old physician and
pioneer in treating
HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis
i in the developing world,
will take over at the helm of
the World Bank. Though he
was born in South Korea,
he will extend a tradition of
Associated Press American presidents dating
police officer back to the organization's
ues Friday at founding in 1944.
rah's apart- As Obama announced
in Toulouse, Kim's nomination from the
who boasted White House Rose Garden
i people, was on Friday morning, he tried
ad by police to make the case that an
I out of his American with a unique
ter a fierce background and broad in-
th police, ternational experience
d. would be a committed rep-
resentative of the develop-
dez sold, ing world's interests.
"Jim has truly global ex-
scrapped perience. He has worked
- The notori- from Asia to Africa to the
ez tanker, Americas, from capitals to
one of the small villages," Obama said.
U.S. history "His personal story exem-
o, has been plifies the great diversity to
dian company our country."
The World Bank's 25-
o be scrapped member executive board
spare parts. will officially select a new
d. would not president next month. But
e or purpose given that the U.S., as the
but it buys old world's largest economy,
ismantle has the largest percentage
vageable ma- of the votes, Kim is ex-
d the rest. pected to prevail.
-From wire reports An American has always


Associated Press
President Barack Obama walks Friday with Jim Yong Kim,
his nominee to be the next World Bank president, Secretary
of State Hillary Rodham Clinton and Treasury Secretary
Timothy Geithner in the Rose Garden of the White House.


led the Washington-based
World Bank under an un-
written agreement in place
since its creation in 1944. A
European has always led its
sister organization, the In-
ternational Monetary Fund.
Here is a closer look at
the agency and the man
nominated to lead it:
Q: What is the World Bank?
A: Despite its name, it's
not actually a bank. Rather,
the World Bank is an inter-
national development or-
ganization with 187 member
countries dedicated to
fighting poverty The bank
raises money from its mem-
bers and sells bonds on in-
ternational financial markets.
It uses the money to pro-
vide low-interest loans to
developing countries.
Q: How does it carry out
its mission?
A: Last year, the World
Bank issued $57.3 billion in
loans, grants and loan guar-
antees. It is involved in
1,800 projects, from road
maintenance in Vietnam to
raising AIDS-prevention
awareness in Guinea to
helping rebuild Haiti after
that country's devastating
2010 earthquake. From its
base in Washington, the


World Bank oversees 10,000
employees, including 3,000
outside the United States.
Its overseas staff includes
engineers, environmental
scientists and financial
analysts.
Q: How much money
does the United States
contribute?
A: The United States
boosted its contribution in
recent years as the World
Bank stepped up its lending
after the financial crisis
and global recession. Con-
gress approved $1.9 billion
this year, up from $1.2 bil-
lion in 2009.
Q: Who chooses the
bank's president?
A: The World Bank's 25-
member executive board
makes the formal decision.
It's expected to make its se-
lection by late April, when
the bank and the IMF hold
their annual spring meet-
ings in Washington. But the
United States is the largest
donor and controls the
largest share of votes on the
board nearly 16 percent.
The tradition by which an
American runs the World
Bank and a European the
IMF dates to the waning
days of World War II.


Q: Who is Jim Yong Kim?
A: Kim is president of
Dartmouth College and a
former chair of the global
health department at Har-
vard Medical School. He co-
founded Partners in Health
in 1987, which provides
health care to poor resi-
dents of Haiti and in five
other countries. Previous
World Bank presidents
have been mostly former
high-profile U.S. govern-
ment officials with deep in-
ternational experience.
The outgoing president,
Robert Zoellick, who will
step down in June, was
President George W Bush's
trade representative and
deputy secretary of state.
He was preceded by Paul
Wolfowitz, who was Bush's
deputy secretary of defense.
Q: Why did Obama
choose Kim?
A: Part of the reason is
that by nominating an Asian-
born development expert,
rather than an American-
born U.S. political figure,
the White House may take
some of the sting out of its
effort to keep an American
in the top spot. In announc-
ing his choice, Obama also
said Kim has spent "two
decades working to improve
conditions in developing
countries around the world."
His nomination has already
been endorsed by one leader
of a developing country:
Paul Kagame, the president
of Rwanda.
He was widely praised by
officials in the U.S. and
overseas. Former President
Bill Clinton said in a state-
ment that the nominee was
"an inspired and outstand-
ing choice." Rwandan Pres-
ident Paul Kagame said
Kim was "a true friend of
Africa" and "a leader who
knows what it takes to ad-
dress poverty."


in Cuba

he said.
It is a message Enrique
Abundes, one of thousands
lining the papal route, was
waiting to hear The 46-year-
old shoe-factory worker and
father of five said he believed
Benedict would inspire
Mexicans to keep their chil-
dren away from the tempta-
tions of organized crime.
The weeklong trip to Mex-
ico and Cuba, Benedict's first
to both countries, will be a
test of stamina for the pope,
who turns 85 next month. At
the airport on Friday in
Rome, the pope used a
cane, apparently for the first
time in public, as he walked
about 100 yards to the air-
liner's steps.
Papal aides, speaking on
condition of anonymity, said
Benedict has been using the
cane in private for about
two months because it
makes him feel more se-
cure, not for any medical
reason.



Would you

brake for

greenbacks?

Associated Press
HAGERSTOWN, Md. -
You're cruising along the
highway when you see a
bunch of green bills flutter-
ing around like flakes in a
snow globe. You get closer
and you realize it's cash.
Other drivers are pulling
over to snatch what they
can. What do you do?
Some drivers in Maryland
faced that choice Friday
when two plastic bags con-
taining about $5,700 in bills
and coins fell from an un-
latched door on an armored
truck and spilled onto Inter-
state 270 about 35 miles
northwest of Washington.
Imagine having your com-
mute turn into a morality play
What's your first reaction?
The answers from several
people who spoke to The
Associated Press on Friday
offer a glimpse into the minds
of Americans trying to jug-
gle doing the right thing and
getting by in a tough economy
where even a few unexpected
dollars can be a blessing.
It wasn't hypothetical for
attorney Heather Kelly, who
was driving to her office in
Frederick when she passed
through the surreal scene.
She didn't see the armored
truck but noticed the two clear
plastic bags of currency
along the road and people
snatching the $1 to $50 bills
wafting through the air and
skittering along the highway
"It was in the traffic lanes
and on the shoulders and just
generally kind of like a snow
globe of cash," she said.
"Some people had fists full
of money, fists full of dollars,
and other people were just
still trying to collect."
Kelly decided it was too
risky to stop. She said she
wouldn't have stopped even
if it was a two-lane road
with no other traffic.
The truck belonged to
Garda World Security Serv-
ices Corp., a Montreal-based
security and cash logistics
company, spokesman Joe
Gavaghan said.
Maryland State Police
urged people to return the
money to the agency's bar-
racks in Rockville, with no
questions asked and no
charges filed. As of Monday
afternoon, no one had.
So what would you do?
Chicago billing clerk
Stephany Harris, 53, didn't
miss a beat.
"Of course I would," she
said. "If the armored car
had been in an accident of
something, I'd make sure
the drivers were OK and I'd
call 911. But I'd put as much
money in my pockets (as I
could) and run."
But what if her kids were


there? "I absolutely would
not take any money," she an-
swered again without hesi-
tation. "I wouldn't want them
to get the message that grab-
bing money that is not yours
is the right thing to do."


Associated Press











SPORTS


Ohio gave UNC
all it could han-
dle Friday night
in the Sweet 16
of the NCAA
tournament./B3

CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


0 Recreation briefs/B2
0 Golf/B2
0 NCAA tournament/B3
0 NBA, NHL/B3
. Sports briefs/B4
0 MLB, football/B5
0 Auto racing/B5
0 Entertainment/B6


UF's Donovan will face off against mentor


Gators back in

Elite Eight vs.

Pitino, Louisville

Associated Press
PHOENIX Billy Donovan
knew a bad idea when he heard
one.
Put on this cowboy hat and
these spurs and we'll take a pic-
ture of you, his coach told him.
Maybe we'll even put it on the
front of the team program.
"I was not happy about doing
that," Donovan said.
Rick Pitino rarely steered him
wrong, though. A quarter-century


since that fateful photo, "Billy
The Kid" has become a champi-
onship coach with a legacy, and
the guy who made him dress up
that day isn't doing so bad himself.
On Saturday, they meet on op-
posite sides of the court-
Pitino trying to make his
sixth trip to the Final Four
and second at Louisville
and Donovan going for a
fourth Final Four with the
Florida Gators.
Pitino is 6-0 in the head-
to-head matchups, almost
all those results explained
because he had the better talent
when the two met None, however,
have come with the stakes this
high or the emotions so mixed.
"Not only did we have success
together, but we really, truly love


F


each other," Pitino said. "Billy is
like a son to me."
So much of the relationship be-
tween coach and pupil has been
documented over the years -
every time there's an anniversary
and, especially, as Dono-
van's stature rose with his
two national titles. After
the first one, Donovan cel-
ebrated by waving Pitino
down onto the court.
"I started crying,"
Pitino said. "I felt better
itino about him winning it than
when I won it."
Nearly two decades before
that, Donovan was the overweight
guard, a marginal Big East player,
and Pitino was fresh on the scene
See Page B4


Associated Press
Florida coach Billy Donovan is 0-6 coaching in games against mentor
Rick Pitino, who is the Louisville head coach.


Just good enough


S.
q
4,7 La.

^ '*.1. -*^ -\. '
Z 4.
I.IS


. .*.. - *" r,-- "- --- -. --" ; *.. ": ..- -
L -,* - ^ ^-. .." -- t " a .. r.-- - .
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DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Citrus infielder Cody Bogart controlled the ball but Lecanto High School's Scott Stearns was able to steal second base Friday night in the
eighth inning at Citrus High School. Stearns scored the go-ahead run in the Panthers' 6-5 victory.

Lecanto's baseball team overcomes big Citrus rally to win 6-5 in extra frames

SEAN ARNOLD
Correspondent
INVERNESS The Lecanto baseball club 4
avenged a one-run, district-opening loss to Cit- Y
rus as senior shortstop Jacob "Bucky" Sims
drove in junior right fielder Scott Stearns with --
a hard grounder near third base to lift the Pan- -...
others to a 6-5 victory in eight innings on Friday.
Lecanto (6-7) dominated early, getting a 5-1
lead in the fourth with the help of superb
pitching by senior Sheldon Baxter Baxter 1
struck out the side in the first inning, and he -
allowed three hits and one earned run over the -
course of the four innings.
Citrus (8-6) bounced back in the fifth inning ,_


. Page B4


Lecanto baseball players celebrate after hanging
on to beat Citrus 6-5 in eight innings on Friday
night. The Panthers had a 5-1 lead before the
Hurricanes rallied with four runs to tie the score
and send the game to the eighth.


Rays aim

for playoffs

TB welcomes

heightened

expectations

Associated Press
ST. PETERSBURG Go
ahead, pencil the Tampa Bay
Rays into the playoffs again.
You certainly won't upset Joe
Maddon's confident bunch.
There may be teams with
more star power and money,
but none enters 2012 with
loftier expectations than the
Rays, who have earned post-
season berths three of the past
four seasons
despite one of
the major
leagues' low-
est payrolls.
Maddon
and his play-
ers have
proven they
can go toe-to- Evan
toe with the Longoria
big-spending Rays star set
New York to lead team.
Yankees and Boston Red Sox
in the rugged AL East, and
they believe they have every-
thing it takes superior
pitching, strong defense and
an improved offense to win
it all this year.
"Expectations should be the
fuel that we need to get this
done," said Maddon, who
guided Tampa Bay to division
titles in 2008 and 2010 before
erasing a nine-game deficit
last September to edge the
Red Sox for the AL wild-card
spot on the final night of the
regular season.
After reaching their first
World Series, where they lost
to the Philadelphia Phillies
four years ago, the Rays were
eliminated by the Texas
Rangers in the opening round
of the playoffs in each of the
past two seasons.
With a projected starting ro-
tation of James Shields, David
See Page B5

Rays schedule
For the entire 2012
regular-season schedule
for the Tampa Bay Rays,
please see Page B4.


Jets creating potential QB mess with Sanchez, Tebow


Associated Press
New York Jets quarterback Mark Sanchez, left, will have
to deal with the hype surrounding the arrival of backup
Tim Tebow.


Associated Press
NEW YORK- The quar-
terback hierarchy has been
clearly set by the New York
Jets.
Mark Sanchez is No. 1.
Tim Tebow is No. 2.
But how long will it last?
In acquiring the popular
and electrifying Tebow
from Denver, the Jets have
created the potential for a
really messy situation. Sure,
things will be fine when
Sanchez, who's expected to
show significant progress
this season, has his good
moments. But whenever he
struggles and Tebow comes
in and gets the offense mov-
ing, the inevitable question


will be: Are the Jets better
with Tebow in there all the
time?
That's something Sanchez,
Tebow, coach Rex Ryan and
general manager Mike Tan-
nenbaum must be prepared
to address. Because there
will be a quarterback contro-
versy just ask Kyle Orton
how Tebow worked out for
him in Denver.
"Personally, you look at
this situation, I think for the
Jets, this is a disaster," for-
mer NFL offensive lineman
Mark Schlereth said on
ESPN after the deal. "You
already have a quarterback
in New York that's fragile,
that's mentally beat up, that
didn't play well last season.


What happens Week 1 when
Mark Sanchez throws two
picks? You can't stop the
fans from chanting, 'Tebow!
Tebow!' You can't stop the
pressure as to what's going
to happen to you as a fran-
chise. You can act like
you're not listening. You can
think you're plugging your
ears, but it is deafening."
And there's already
plenty of noise.
The trade was done late
Wednesday, hung up for
eight hours because of a
contract issue, and it won't
be official until Saturday
because of a technicality
that requires Tebow to sign
a rewritten deal. That gives
the New York-area tabloids


and sports radio hosts
plenty of time to embrace
Tebowmania and speculate
about the effect it will have
on Sanchez and the Jets -
before the team even intro-
duces Tebow on Monday
In acquiring Tebow, the
Jets struck marketing gold.
They've been the talk of the
town since making the
trade, with fans and media
decidedly split on whether
it was a good football move.
From a public relations
standpoint, owner Woody
Johnson probably couldn't
be more thrilled. His team
is selling merchandise like
hotcakes, with an


Page B3






B2 SATURDAY, MARCH 24, 2012



PGA Tour --Bay Hill
Friday
At Bay Hill Club and Lodge Course,
Orlando
Purse: $6 million
Yardage: 7,419, Par: 72
(a-amateur)
Second Round
Tiger Woods 69-65-134 -10
Charlie Wi 66-68-134 -10
Jason Dufner 66-69-135 -9
Graeme McDowell 72-63-135 -9
Justin Rose 69-69-138 -6
Bubba Watson 69-70- 139 -5
Sergio Garcia 72-67-139 -5
Vijay Singh 71-68-139 -5
Chris Stroud 70-69-139 -5
Webb Simpson 73-66-139 -5
Zach Johnson 71-68-139 -5
lan Poulter 71-69-140 -4
Johnson Wagner 71-69-140 -4
Martin Laird 72-68-140 -4
Marc Leishman 70-71 -141 -3
Kevin Na 73-68-141 -3
Charles Howell III 73-68-141 -3
Jimmy Walker 69-72-141 -3
Ernie Els 71-70-141 -3
NickWatney 68-73-141 -3
K.J. Choi 69-72-141 -3
Sean O'Hair 69-72-141 -3
Ryan Moore 71-71 -142 -2
Davis Love III 70-72-142 -2
Trevor Immelman 73-69-142 -2
CamiloVillegas 73-69-142 -2
Kevin Chappell 73-69-142 -2
Daniel Summerhays 72-70-142 -2
Kris Blanks 71-72-143 -1
Gary Woodland 75-68-143 -1
John Rollins 71-72-143 -1
BudCauley 70-73-143 -1
Anthony Kim 69-74-143 -1
Brian Davis 70-73-143 -1
Jim Furyk 72-72-144 E
Phil Mickelson 73-71 -144 E
Skip Kendall 71-73-144 E
Bill Haas 73-72-145 +1
Justin Leonard 75-70-145 +1
Tim Herron 74-71 -145 +1
Matt Every 73-72-145 +1
Tom Gillis 79-66-145 +1
Rod Pampling 75-70-145 +1
Hunter Mahan 72-73-145 +1
George McNeill 73-72-145 +1
Brian Gay 72-73-145 +1
D.J.Trahan 76-70-146 +2
Jeff Overton 76-70- 146 +2
Lee Janzen 74-72- 146 +2
Michael Thompson 74-72-146 +2
Brandt Snedeker 73-73-146 +2
Boo Weekley 74-72-146 +2
Henrik Stenson 72-74-146 +2
J.B. Holmes 71-75-146 +2
Martin Flores 74-72- 146 +2
Brian Harman 77-69-146 +2
Seung-YulNoh 73-73-146 +2
Scott Stallings 74-72 -146 +2
JhonattanVegas 76-70-146 +2
Bobby Gates 74-72- 146 +2
Dicky Pride 74-73-147 +3
Andres Romero 73-74 147 +3
Josh Teater 74-73 -147 +3
FredrikJacobson 77-70-147 +3
William McGirt 73-74-147 +3
Billy Hurley III 75-72-147 +3
Chez Reavie 73-74- 147 +3
GregOwen 73-74-147 +3
Ryo Ishikawa 73-74-147 +3
Charley Hoffman 76-71 -147 +3
John Huh 77-70-147 +3
MarkWilson 77-70- 147 +3
Robert Allenby 72-75- 147 +3
Chad Campbell 71-76 -147 +3
Colt Knost 76-71 -147 +3
Failed to qualify
Ben Crane 78-70- 148 +4
Scott Piercy 75-73-148 +4
Ryan Palmer 73-75-148 +4
John Mallinger 74-74-148 +4
Brendon de Jonge 75-73- 148 +4
Cameron Tringale 79-69-148 +4
Robert Garrigus 73-75- 148 +4
David Toms 74-74 -148 +4
Brandt Jobe 75-73- 148 +4
Daniel Chopra 77-72-149 +5
Jonathan Byrd 76-73- 149 +5
Sang-Moon Bae 74-75- 149 +5
Gary Christian 74-75-149 +5
Robert Damron 76-73-149 +5
Pat Perez 72-77-149 +5
Mike Weir 77-72-149 +5
Rocco Mediate 76-73- 149 +5
Jeff Maggert 72-78- 150 +6
Ken Duke 77-73-150 +6
Kyle Reifers 76-74 -150 +6
Harrison Frazar 74-76- 150 +6
Rory Sabbatini 75-76-151 +7
Carl Pettersson 78-73-151 +7
Greg Chalmers 75-76-151 +7
Robert Gamez 76-75- 151 +7
David Duval 74-78 152 +8
Sam Saunders 76-76 152 +8
Jason Kokrak 77-75- 152 +8
Jerry Kelly 79-73-152 +8
Stewart Cink 76-77-153 +9
D.A. Points 75-78 -153 +9
Brendon Todd 78-75-153 +9
Tommy Gainey 76-77-153 +9
Harris English 76-77-153 +9
Scott McCarron 76-78 -154 +10
Erik Compton 80-74 -154 +10
J.J. Killeen 79-76-155 +11
Brendan Steele 81-75-156 +12
Spencer Levin 81-75-156 +12
Ted Potter, Jr. 76-80-156 +12
Ricky Barnes 82-77-159 +15
Kelly Kraft 77-82 -159 +15
David Damesworth 82-85 167 +23


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Woods back atop leaderboard


Golfer shares lead

with Wi after

second round

Associated Press

ORLANDO Tiger Woods is in
a place he hasn't been in 30 months
- atop the leaderboard on the PGA
Tour going into the weekend.
With alarming control, Woods
putted for birdie on every hole and
made short work of the par 5s Fri-
day at Bay Hill for a 7-under 65, giv-
ing him a share of the lead with
Charlie Wi after two rounds of the
Arnold Palmer Invitational.
"A lot of positives today," Woods
said.
Wi, the 54-hole leader at Pebble
Beach this year, rolled in a 25-foot
birdie putt on his last hole for a 68
to join Woods at 10-under 134.
Former U.S. Open champion
Graeme McDowell had an eagle-
par-birdie finish for a 63, while
Jason Dufner extended his solid
play on the Florida swing with a 69.
They were one shot behind at 135.
Woods last had the 36-hole lead
in any tour event at the Australian
Open in November, and he tied for
third. On the PGA Tour, go all the
way back to the Tour Champi-
onship in September 2009 to find
the last time he was atop the
leaderboard going into the
weekend.
It looks even more ominous at
Bay Hill, where Woods is a six-time
winner.
"I want to win. Yes, absolutely,"
he said. "We've got a long way to go.
It's not like it's over right now.
We've got 36 holes to go."
Woods at least is in better shape
than he was two weeks ago. His fu-
ture looked as muddled as ever
when Woods was taken off the golf
course in a cart at Doral because of
soreness and swelling in his left
Achilles tendon, the same injury
that forced him to miss three
months and two majors a year ago.
One week later, he was practicing
at Augusta National. Now, he's the
player everyone is chasing on the
weekend.
"I saw him on television at Doral
and didn't look good there," said
Ernie Els, who played with Woods
at Bay Hill, and played with him
when Woods shot 62 on the last day
of the Honda Classic. "Today he
was on, and today was the same as
I saw at the Honda -very on."
Woods only had a couple of nerv-
ous moments.
He ran off four straight birdies
on the front nine to quickly get into
the mix, and then couldn't decide
how to play his tee shot on the 10th.
It didn't help that earlier in the
round, he looked over at adjacent
first tee and saw Nick Watney af-
fectionately known as "Rube" -
pipe his tee shot out-of-bounds to
the right.
"I got over there and for some
reason I'm thinking, 'You know, I
probably really shouldn't hit this
driver; I'll take something off of it,
and just hit a little softy out there.'
And bailed on it, because I didn't
want to hit it right out-of-bounds,"
Woods said. "And I chalked that up
to just not listening to my instincts
of hitting a 3-iron down there or
just chipping a 5-wood or not
watching Ruby hit that shot."
Yani Tseng takes
2-stroke lead in Kia Classic
CARLSBAD, Calif. Top-ranked
Yani Tseng shot a 4-under 68 on Friday
to open a two-stroke lead over Se Ri


Associated Press
Tiger Woods tees off on the 15th hole during the second round of the Arnold Palmer Invitational golf tournament
Friday at Bay Hill in Orlando.


Pak after the second round of the Kia
Classic.
Tseng, tied for the first-round lead
after a 67, had a 9-under 135 total on
La Costa's Legends Course.
The 23-year-old Taiwanese star won
the LPGA Founders Cup on Sunday in
Phoenix for her 14th LPGA Tour title
and second in four events this year.
She led the tour last season with seven
victories including major victories in
the LPGA Championship and Women's
British Open and finished the year
with 12 worldwide titles.
Pak had a 66. Jiyai Shin, Alison Wal-
she, Jodi Ewart and Caroline Hedwall
were 5 under. Walshe shot 66, Ewart
69, Shin 71, and Hedwall 72.
Michelle Wie missed the cut with
rounds of 77 and 79.
Pernice Jr. off to strong
start at Fallen Oak
SAUCIER, Miss. Tom Pernice Jr.


is off to a terrific start in soggy condi-
tions at the Mississippi Gulf Resort
Classic.
In his first Champions Tour event this
year, Pernice was 7 under through 12
holes before play was suspended be-
cause of darkness. The 52-year-old
Pernice has played eight PGA Tour
events this season.
Chien Soon Lu and David Eger -
who won the inaugural tournament in
2010 are one stroke back. Lu played
16 holes, and Eger completed 15.
Only a handful of players com-
pleted their rounds because the start
of the tournament was delayed more
than four hours after more than 9
inches of rain fell on Fallen Oak in
36 hours.
Fred Couples was 3 under through
12 holes.
Defending champion Tom Lehman
was even par through 11.


Wales' Price leads Morocco
golf after long delay
AGADIR, Morocco Phillip Price of
Wales is leading the Hassan II Trophy
in Morocco by a stroke after strong
wind and thunder delayed the start of
the second round by 5 1/2 hours.
Price's last victory came at the 2003
European Open in Ireland.
He shot a 6-under 66 Friday that in-
cluded six birdies, making three straight
starting with his sixth hole. He is at 10-
under 134, with Spain's Jose Manuel
Lara at 9 under after a 65. Sweden's
Joakim Sjolholm had a 66, leaving him
at 8 under.
Play did not begin until 1 p.m. Price
had been due to tee off in the first
group at 7:30 a.m. He ended his round
20 minutes before first-round leader
Damien McGrane began. McGrane fin-
ished just five holes when poor light
halted play. He stayed at 7 under.


Recreation BRIEFS


Tennis courts
closing temporarily
The tennis courts at Whis-
pering Pines Park in Inverness
will be closed through April 12
for light retrofitting.
For more information, call the
city of Inverness Parks &
Recreation Department at 352-
726-3913.
Sales benefit
Special Olympics
Plant and yard sales slated
for 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday,
March 31, at the parking lot at
Pooch Parlor in Homosassa,
will benefit Special Olympics.
The Pooch Parlor is on U.S.
19 near the Harley-Davidson
dealership. For more informa-
tion, call Irene LaBarbar at 352-
795-5896.
Jazzercise for
Relay effort
Citrus County Jazzercise will
have a two-hour Relay For Life
fundraising class for their Relay
team the Jazzercise Junkies
- beginning at 9 a.m. Satur-
day, March 31.
New students may join in on
the special class for a donation to
Relay For Life. Raffle tickets will
be sold and tickets will be drawn
for dozens of donated prizes, all
to benefit Relay For Life.


The class will be taught in
both low-impact and regular for-
mat so students can modify the
moves to fit their individual
body's needs. For more infor-
mation, call 352-634-5661 or
visit the website at
www.jazzercise.com.
Adult recreational
softball leagues to start
The team managers' organi-
zational meeting for both Men's
and Co-ed softball leagues will
be at 6 p.m. Tuesday, April 6, at
the Recreational Building in
Whispering Pines Park, Inver-
ness, to discuss league rules
and changes.
For more information, call
Shaun Miracle at 352-726-
2611, ext. 1311 or email
smiracle@inverness-fl.gov.
For more information
bout programs and/or classes,
call Whispering Pines Park
administration office at
352-726-3913 or email
parks@inverness-fl.gov.
Aerobathon to
benefit Relay For Life
The Inverness Relay For Life
DynaBody Team will have an
Aerobathon fundraiser on from
8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, April
7, at Dynabody behind the
2250 building off State Road


44, Inverness.
Classes will be offered all
day for a donation of $5 or
more per class. There will be
classes for everybody includ-
ing: spinning, Zumba, Pilates,
kickbox, X Pump, aqua, step,
self-defense and Silver Sneak-
ers. Call Dynabody at 352-344-
3553 for details.


Zumbathon to benefit
Inverness Relay
Inverness Relay For Life
Team Zumba will have its an-
nual Zumbathon from 3 to 5
p.m. Sunday, April 15, at Cen-
tral Ridge Community Center in
Beverly Hills.
Tickets are available now for
$10, or can be purchased at the
door from 2 to 3 p.m. that day.
For more information, call Anna
Olivero at 352-613-6215 or Mari-
lynne Denison at 352-726-6790.
Good Hope Scramble
benefits Hospice
The fourth annual Camp
Good Hope Golf Scramble will
begin at 8:30 a.m. Saturday,
April 14, at Southern Woods
Golf & Country Club, 1501
Corkwood Blvd., Homosassa.
The tournament supports
Hospice of Citrus County be-
reavement camps Camp
Good Hope and Teen En-


counter. The camps are pre-
sented twice annually and pro-
vide a safe place for kids to talk
openly about loss and improve
their ability to cope.
Entry fee for the event is $60.
Hole sponsorships are $100.
Entry fee includes lunch, first-
through third-place prizes, spe-
cial hole prizes and a golfer gift
bag. Registration deadline is
April 7.
For more information or to
register, call Hospice of Citrus
County at 352-527-2020.
AIC to host golf
tournament
The American Irish Club (AIC)
will host its 11th annual golf tour-
nament Saturday, April 21, at
Seven Rivers Golf and Country
Club, 7395 W. Pinebrook St. (off
Venable and Dunkenfield Road),
Crystal River.
Sign-in is at 11:15 a.m. with a
shotgun start at 12:30 p.m. The
tournament format will be
"Scramble-Best Ball," and
golfers will be divided into two
flights. FlightAwill be all-men
foursomes while Flight B will be
all-women or mixed foursomes.
Prizes will be awarded for
longest drive in the fairway on
Hole No. 4 for both men and
women. The prize for a hole-in-
one on Hole No. 11 is $500.


There will be an option Pot-of-
Gold contest for the person
closest to the pin on Hole No.
5. Prizes will also be awarded
to the winning teams in Flights
A and B.
Cost of $55 per person in-
cludes golf, cart, lunch and
prizes. There will be a social
hour with cash bar during the
awarding of prizes at the end of
the tournament.
Proceeds will benefit the AIC
local scholarship program and
Citrus County organizations
supported by the club.
For information and signup,
call Dave Horsman at 352-897-
1398 or Russ Doring at 352-
795-4548 by April 17.
Flotilla 15-4 meeting
to be April 3
Homosassa Flotilla 15-4 of
the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary
will meet at 7 p.m. Tuesday,
April 3, at the West Citrus Com-
munity Center, 8940 W. Veter-
ans Drive, Homosassa. Visitors
are welcome.
The auxiliary is active in as-
sisting the Coast Guard with
promoting homeland security,
public instruction of safe boat-
ing, vessel safety exams, safety
patrols on the rivers and
coastal waters, search/rescue
and law enforcement air patrols


and many other activities.
For more information, call
Bob Currie at 352-232-1516, or
email rgcurrie@bellsouth.net.
Annual benefit bike ride
ready to roll on trail
The annual Clean Air Bike
Ride on the Withlacoochee
State Trail to benefit the Key
Training Center will take place
on Saturday, March 31.
Registration is $25 for adults;
children 12 and younger are
$12, which includes a continen-
tal breakfast for all entrants,
lunch served at the Inverness
Trailhead from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
and an event T-shirt. Riders
who complete the 100-mile
route will receive a special
commemorative Century Fin-
isher Medallion.
There is no mass start, allow-
ing participants to commence
their 14-, 28-, 48- or 100-mile
treks from 7 to 9 a.m. from the
Inverness Trailhead on North
Apopka Avenue.
Registrations may be made
online or registration forms can
be downloaded and checks
mailed prior to the event,
payable to: Citrus County
Roadrunners, P.O. Box 94, In-
verness, FL 34451-0094.
For more information, visit
cleanairride.com.


SPORTS





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Baylor, UNC on to Elite Eight


No. 1 Tar Heels

need OTto down

Ohio 73-65

Associated Press

ST LOUIS Awful all night,
Harrison Barnes came through
when North Carolina needed him
most.
Barnes scored five of his 12
points in overtime and the top-
seeded Tar Heels escaped a huge
upset with a 73-65 victory over 13th-
seeded Ohio on Friday night in the
Midwest Regional semifinals.
Ohio, trying to become the first
team seeded 13th or worse to
make the regional finals since the
tournament expanded in 1985,
had a chance to convert a three-
point play that would have given
the Bobcats the lead with 25 sec-
onds left in regulation. Walter Of-
futt missed from the line,
however, and Ohio went 0 for 6
from the field in the first
overtime of this year's NCAA
tournament.


Tyler Zeller finished with 20
points and a career-high 22 re-
bounds for North Carolina, lead-
ing four scorers in double figures.
Offutt led the Bobcats (29-8) with
26 points, including 18 from 3-
point range, and Nick Kellogg
added 14. But D.J. Cooper, who
had averaged 20 points in the first
two tournament games, finished
with just 10 on 3-of-20 shooting.
North Carolina (32-5), which has
won 11 straight in the regional
semifinals, plays the winner of
North Carolina State-Kansas on
Sunday afternoon.
The Tar Heels were playing
without dazzling point guard
Kendall Marshall, perhaps their
most irreplaceable player and the
steadying hand behind their fast-
paced attack, and his absence
clearly showed. The Tar Heels
were sloppy, turning the ball over
a season-high 24 times, and they
could never get a handle on the
smaller, quicker Bobcats.
After trailing by as many as 15 in
the first half, Ohio got hot from
long range in the second half. The
Bobcats were 8 of 13 from beyond
the arc in the second period, with
Offutt doing most of the damage.


No. 3 Baylor 75,
No. 10 Xavier 70
ATLANTA- Quincy Acy, the only
senior in Baylor's starting lineup, had a
double-double to help the Bears hold
off Xavier 75-70 and advance to its
second regional final in three years.
Baylor will face the Kentucky-
Indiana winner in Sunday's South
Regional final.
Acy had 20 points and 15 rebounds.
He sank two free throws with 31 sec-
onds remaining after Xavier cut the
Bears' lead to six points.
Baylor, wearing bright neon-green
uniforms, never trailed and led by 18
points less than 8 minutes into the
game.
Xavier played from behind all night,
but never quit. The Musketeers cut the
lead to just three, 71-68, with 22 sec-
onds remaining.
Pierre Jackson had 16 and Perry
Jones III had 14 for the Bears (30-7).
Tu Holloway led Xavier with 22 points.
Xavier was hurt by poor shooting,
especially from beyond the arc. The
Musketeers were 0-for-11 on 3-pointers
before Justin Martin ended the drought
with 2 minutes remaining. He added
another 3 40 seconds later, and Hol-


-l
Associated Press
Ohio Bobcats guard D.J. Cooper drives around the North Carolina Tar
Heels' Justin Watts as T.J. Hall looks on during the first half of an
NCAA tournament Midwest Regional semifinal Friday in St. Louis.


loway's 3 with 22 seconds remaining
cut the lead the 71-68.
Holloway added another basket, but
Baylor's Brady Heslip made four con-
secutive free throws in the final 17 sec-
onds to protect the lead.
Heslip, coming off his career-high 27
points on nine 3-pointers against Col-
orado, had only one against Xavier


and finished with 11 points.
Baylor also won three NCAA tourna-
ment games in 2010 before losing to
eventual national champion Duke.
Xavier (23-13) couldn't advance
after making the round of 16 for the
fourth time in five years.
Kenny Frease had 18 points and
Mark Lyons had 16 for the Musketeers.


Lc overcome fouls, Cavs Pahers i 3e-2 S
Panthers in 3-2 SO


Associated Press


ORLANDO Ryan An-
derson scored 17 points,
Dwight Howard added 16
points and 13 rebounds, and
the Orlando Magic held off
the Cleveland Cavaliers 93-
80 on Friday night.
All five Magic players
scored in double figures as
they sizzled shooting the
ball early before having to
fight off a Cleveland charge
in third quarter. They im-
proved to 18-3 when all their
starters reach double digits.
Antawn Jamison scored
16 points and had nine re-
bounds to lead Cleveland.
Tristan Thompson added 15
points and 11 boards, and
Kyrie Irving had 13 points.
Heat 88, Pistons 73
AUBURN HILLS, Mich.-
LeBron James had 17 points
and 10 assists to lead the
Miami Heat to their fourth
straight victory, 88-73 over the
Detroit Pistons.
Dwyane Wade added 24
points for the Heat, who posed
for a photo earlier in the day
wearing team-logo hoodies.
Players were speaking out fol-
lowing the death of Trayvon Mar-
tin, the unarmed black teenager
wearing a hooded sweatshirt
who was shot by a neighbor-
hood crime-watch volunteer last
month in a suburb of Orlando.
Several Heat players, includ-
ing Wade and James, took the
floor with messages such as
"RIP Trayvon Martin" and "We
want justice" scrawled on their
sneakers.
Brandon Knight scored 18
points for the Pistons, who
have lost five of six.
Raptors 96, Knicks 79
TORONTO DeMar
DeRozan scored 30 points be-
fore leaving with an injury, An-
drea Bargnani had 21 and the
Toronto Raptors routed the
Knicks 96-79, snapping New
York's five-game winning streak.
The Raptors, who had lost
seven of 10 coming in, never
trailed and led by as many as 22.
Gary Forbes scored 19
points, one shy of his career-
high, and Jose Calderon had
10 assists as Toronto snapped
a three-game skid and handed
New York its first defeat under
coach Mike Woodson.



TEBOW
Continued from Page B1

overwhelming desire for
green-and-white No. 15
Tebow jerseys.
Tebow is a rock star, a
celebrity unlike any other in
New York right now. He has
a huge following from his
days at the University of
Florida, and his Christian
beliefs have made him a role
model. But remember, it
wasn't long ago when
Sanchez was being com-
pared to Joe Namath as a
New York football-playing
matinee idol.
The Jets certainly showed
their confidence in Sanchez
by recently giving him a
three-year, $40.5 million con-
tract extension. Because that
deal includes $20.5 million


Associated Press
Orlando Magic center Dwight Howard defends against the Cleveland Cavaliers' Manny
Harris during the first half Friday in Orlando. Despite foul trouble by Howard, the Magic won.


Amare Stoudemire scored 17
points, Steve Novak had 15
and Carmelo Anthony 12 for
the Knicks, who came in having
won six of seven against the
Raptors, including three straight
in Toronto.
Suns 113, Pacers 111
INDIANAPOLIS Marcin
Gortat had 23 points and eight
rebounds, Steve Nash added
12 points and tied his season
high with 17 assists, and the
Phoenix Suns beat the Indiana
Pacers 113-111.
Grant Hill scored 22 points
for the Suns.
Danny Granger had 28 points
and Roy Hibbert finished with
19 points and seven rebounds
for the Pacers, who played their
second game in a series of
three games in three days.
Bucks 112, Bobcats 92
CHARLOTTE, N.C. Luc
Mbah a Moute scored 13 of his


guaranteed, it's unlikely the
Jets would be able to trade
Sanchez even if he's un-
happy about his new team-
mate.
Instead, the Jets are bank-
ing on Sanchez being able to
handle the pressure, thrive
and prove he is indeed "the
guy"
For now, the game plan is
to have Sanchez start games
and then bring Tebow in in
certain key situations: wild-
cat packages, third-and-long,
fourth-and-goal.
"If our offense is sputter-
ing," Tannenbaum said dur-
ing a radio interview, "we
have three straight three-
and-outs, and we roll (the
wildcat) out there, who
knows?"
But that means Sanchez
will have to come off the
field at points during the
game, and that's something


20 points in the second half and
the Milwaukee Bucks had 72
points inside the paint in a 112-
92 rout of the Charlotte Bobcats.
Ersan Ilyasova had 15 points
and Drew Goodson added 14
points and 12 rebounds as six
Bucks players scored in double
digits. Monta Ellis chipped in
with 13 points and Brandon Jen-
nings added 12 for Milwaukee.
Hawks 93, Nets 84
ATLANTA-- Josh Smith
had 30 points and 12 re-
bounds to lead the Atlanta
Hawks to a 93-84 victory over
the New Jersey Nets.
Jeff Teague had 17 points
and six assists, Joe Johnson
scored 16 and Kirk Hinrich
added 14 for the Hawks.
Deron Williams scored 20
points and Kris Humphries
added 17 for New Jersey,
which has lost five straight and
seven of eight.


he has never been a fan of-
even in practice. He was an-
gered when Ryan put in 41-
year-old Mark Brunell to
take a few snaps, and the
coach acknowledged he did
it to fire up his young quar-
terback.
The knock on Sanchez is
that during his first three
seasons, he never had a
backup who would keep him
in check, make him wonder
about his job security In
Sanchez's rookie season, it
was Kellen Clemens a guy
once regarded as the fran-
chise's quarterback of the fu-
ture who never panned out
The past two seasons, it was
Brunell, who was more a
coach and big brother than a
true threat to his job.
Tebow now becomes the
first quarterback who will
offer Sanchez some serious
competition for playing time.


76ers 99, Celtics 86
PHILADELPHIA- Elton
Brand scored 20 points, and
Spencer Hawes had 12 points
and 10 rebounds to help the
Philadelphia 76ers remain in
first place in the Atlantic Divi-
sion with a 99-86 victory over
the Boston Celtics.
The Celtics would have
grabbed first with a win, knock-
ing out a Sixers team that has
held that spot for all but a few
days this season. The Sixers
outscored Boston by 20 points in
the third quarter to take control.
There was a serious scare
when Celtics guard Mickael
Pietrus left on a stretcher and
was hospitalized after an awk-
ward collision late in the first
half. He was listed as having a
questionable closed head in-
jury. Pietrus landed hard on his
tailbone and his head nearly
smacked the court.


Associated Press

SUNRISE, Fla. Ryan
Nugent-Hopkins scored
the deciding goal in the
fourth round of a shootout
to give the Edmonton Oil-
ers a 2-1 victory over the
Florida Panthers on Friday
night
Nugent-Hopkins' goal
was the only score in the
shootout.
Ryan Jones scored in
regulation for the Oilers,
and Devan Dubnyk made
26 saves.
Jason Garrison scored
for the Panthers, and Jose
Theodore stopped 20 shots.
The Panthers had a
chance to win in the final
seconds of overtime. Kris
Versteeg had a shot from in
front, but Dubnyk stopped
the puck against the post
with his left skate.
Sabres 4, Rangers 1
NEW YORK Travis Turn-
bull scored his first NHL goal,
with some help from the
Rangers, and the Buffalo
Sabres earned another big
win in their playoff quest by
beating New York 4-1.
Drew Stafford had goals in
the second and third periods,
Tyler Ennis added one in the
third, and Ryan Miller made
26 saves for Buffalo, which is
12-2-4 in its last 18 games.
The Sabres began the night in
ninth place in the Eastern
Conference, one point below
the postseason cutoff.
Maple Leafs 4,
Devils 3, SO
NEWARK, N.J. -James
Reimer made 43 saves and all
three Toronto players scored
in the shootout to lead the
Maple Leafs to a 4-3 victory
over the New Jersey Devils.
Tyler Bozak Tim Connolly
and Nazam Kadri tallied
against Martin Brodeur in the
shootout. The Maple Leafs
blew a two-goal lead in the
third period before winning for
only the fifth time in 22 games
(5-15-2).
Ilya Kovalchuk and Zach
Parise scored against Reimer
on the Devils' first two
shootout shots, but Reimer
made a pad save on Patrik
Elias, and Kadri got the winner
with a spectacular side to side


move against Brodeur.
Canadiens 5,
Senators 1
MONTREAL Erik Cole
scored three goals in the first
5:41 and the Montreal Cana-
diens beat the Ottawa Sena-
tors 5-1.
Cole has 30 goals this sea-
son. Patteri Nokelainen also
scored in the first period, and
Lars Eller added one in the
third for Montreal, 4-0-2
against Ottawa.
Jason Spezza, playing his
600th NHL game, scored for
Ottawa to reach 30 goals for
the fourth time in his career and
the first time since 2008-09.
Blue Jackets 5,
Hurricanes 1
COLUMBUS, Ohio-- R.J.
Umberger had three goals for
the third time in his career and
Steve Mason stopped 39
shots to lead the Columbus
Blue Jackets to a 5-1 victory
over Carolina, dealing a criti-
cal loss to the Hurricanes' di-
minishing playoff hopes.
The Hurricanes, who had
won their last four games,
came in six points behind
eighth-place Washington in
the Eastern Conference play-
off race with eight games
remaining.
Jets 4, Capitals 3, OT
WASHINGTON -Tim Sta-
pleton scored 2:37 into over-
time, and the Winnipeg Jets
rallied from three goals down
and kept themselves in the
playoff hunt with a 4-3 victory
over the rope-a-dope Wash-
ington Capitals.
Spencer Machacek scored
his first NHL goal with 3:45 re-
maining in regulation to tie it
as the Jets broke a two-game
losing streak and pulled within
four points of the final post-
season spot in the Eastern
Conference.
Alex Ovechkin scored two
goals for the Capitals, who
had been 22-0-0 when leading
after two. But this time they
took protecting the lead to the
extreme, hunkering in their
own end for nearly the entire
third period.
Washington is tied on points
with Buffalo for eighth place.


SPORTS


SATURDAY, MARCH 24, 2012 B3






B4 SATURDAY, MARCH 24, 2012



2012 Tampa Bay Rays
regular season schedule
All Times EDT
April 6 N.Y Yankees, 3:10 p.m.
April 7 N.Y Yankees, 7:10 p.m.
April 8 N.Y Yankees, 1:40 p.m.
April 10 at Detroit, 1:05 p.m.
April 11 at Detroit, 1:05 p.m.
April 12 at Detroit, 1:05 p.m.
April 13 at Boston, 2:05 p.m.
April 14 at Boston, 4:05 p.m.
April 15 at Boston, 1:35 p.m.
April 16 at Boston, 11:05 a.m.
April 17 at Toronto, 7:07 p.m.
April18 at Toronto, 7:07 p.m.
April 19 at Toronto, 7:07 p.m.
April 20 Minnesota, 7:10 p.m.
April 21 Minnesota, 7:10 p.m.
April 22 Minnesota, 1:40 p.m.
April 24 L.A. Angels, 7:10 p.m.
April25 L.A. Angels, 7:10 p.m.
April26 L.A. Angels, 1:10 p.m.
April 27 at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
April 28 at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
April 29 at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
April 30 Seattle, 7:10 p.m.
May 1 Seattle, 7:10 p.m.
May 2 Seattle, 7:10 p.m.
May 3 Seattle, 1:10p.m.
May 4 Oakland, 7:10 p.m.
May 5 Oakland, 7:10 p.m.
May 6 Oakland, 1:40 p.m.
May 8 at N.Y Yankees, 7:05 p.m.
May 9 at N.Y Yankees, 7:05 p.m.
May 10 at N.Y Yankees, 7:05 p.m.
May 11 at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m.
May 12 at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m.
May 13 at Baltimore, 1:35 p.m.
May 14 at Toronto, 7:07 p.m.
May 15 at Toronto, 7:07 p.m.
May 16 Boston, 7:10 p.m.
May 17 Boston, 7:10 p.m.
May 18 Atlanta, 7:10 p.m.
May 19 Atlanta, 4:10 p.m.
May 20 Atlanta, 1:40 p.m.
May 21 Toronto, 7:10 p.m.
May 22 Toronto, 7:10 p.m.
May 23 Toronto, 1:10 p.m.
May 25 at Boston, 7:10 p.m.
May 26 at Boston, 7:15 p.m.
May 27 at Boston, 1:35 p.m.
May 28 Chicago White Sox, 3:10 p.m.
May 29 Chicago White Sox, 7:10 p.m.
May 30 Chicago White Sox, 1:10 p.m.
June 1 Baltimore, 7:10 p.m.
June 2 Baltimore, 4:10 p.m.
June 3 Baltimore, 1:40 p.m.
June 5 at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 p.m.
June 6 at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 p.m.
June 7 at N.Y.Yankees, 7:05 p.m.
June 8 at Miami, 7:10 p.m.
June 9 at Miami, 7:15 p.m.
June 10 at Miami, 1:10 p.m.
June 12 N.Y Mets, 7:10 p.m.
June 13 N.Y Mets, 7:10 p.m.
June14 N.Y. Mets, 1:10 p.m.
June 15 Miami, 7:10 p.m.
June 16 Miami, 7:10 p.m.
June 17 Miami, 1:40 p.m.
June 19 at Washington, 7:05 p.m.
June 20 at Washington, 7:05 p.m.
June 21 atWashington, 7:05 p.m.
June 22 at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m.
June 23 at Philadelphia, 4:05 p.m.
June 24 at Philadelphia, 1:35 p.m.
June 25 at Kansas City 8:10 p.m.
June 26 at Kansas City 8:10 p.m.
June 27 at Kansas City 2:10 p.m.
June 28 Detroit, 7:10 p.m.
June 29 Detroit, 7:10 p.m.
June 30 Detroit, 7:15 p.m.
July 1 Detroit, 1:40 p.m.
July 2 N.Y Yankees, 7:10 p.m.
July 3 N.Y Yankees, 7:10 p.m.
July 4 N.Y Yankees, 3:10 p.m.
July 5 at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m.
July 6 at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m.
July 7 at Cleveland, TBA
July 8 at Cleveland, 1:05 p.m.
July 13 Boston, 7:10 p.m.
July 14 Boston, 7:10 p.m.
July 15 Boston, 1:40 p.m.
July 16 Cleveland, 7:10 p.m.
July 17 Cleveland, 7:10 p.m.
July 18 Cleveland, 7:10 p.m.
July 19 Cleveland, 12:10 p.m.
July 20 Seattle, 7:10 p.m.
July 21 Seattle, 7:10 p.m.
July 22 Seattle, 1:40 p.m.
July 24 at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m.
July 25 at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m.
July 26 at Baltimore, 12:35 p.m.
July 27 at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m.
July 28 at L.A. Angels, 9:05 p.m.
July 29 at L.A. Angels, 3:35 p.m.
July 30 at Oakland, 10:07 p.m.
July 31 at Oakland, 10:07 p.m.
Aug. 1 at Oakland, 3:37 p.m.
Aug. 3 Baltimore, 7:10 p.m.
Aug. 4 Baltimore, 7:10 p.m.
Aug. 5 Baltimore, 1:40 p.m.
Aug. 7Toronto, 7:10 p.m.
Aug. 8Toronto, 7:10 p.m.
Aug. 9 Toronto, 1:10 p.m.
Aug.10 at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m.
Aug. 11 at Minnesota, 7:10 p.m.
Aug. 12 at Minnesota, 2:10 p.m.
Aug.13 at Seattle, 10:10p.m.
Aug.14 atSeattle, 10:10p.m.
Aug. 15 at Seattle, 3:40 p.m.
Aug. 16 at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m.
Aug. 17 at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m.
Aug.18 at L.A. Angels, 9:05 p.m.
Aug.19 at L.A. Angels, 3:35 p.m.
Aug. 20 Kansas City 7:10p.m.
Aug. 21 Kansas City 7:10p.m.
Aug.22 Kansas City 1:10p.m.
Aug. 23 Oakland, 7:10 p.m.
Aug. 24 Oakland, 7:10 p.m.
Aug. 25 Oakland, 1:10p.m.
Aug. 27 at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
Aug.28 at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
Aug.29 at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
Aug. 30 at Toronto, 7:07 p.m.
Aug. 31 at Toronto, 7:07 p.m.
Sept. 1 at Toronto, 1:07 p.m.
Sept. 2 at Toronto, 1:07 p.m.
Sept. 3 N.Y.Yankees, 1:10 p.m.
Sept. 4 N.Y.Yankees, 7:10 p.m.
Sept. 5 N.Y.Yankees, 7:10 p.m.
Sept. 7Texas, 7:10 p.m.
Sept. 8 Texas, 7:10 p.m.


Sept. 9 Texas, 1:40 p.m.
Sept. 11 at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m.
Sept. 12 at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m.
Sept. 13 at Baltimore, 12:35 p.m.
Sept. 14 at N.Y Yankees, 7:05 p.m.
Sept. 15 at N.Y Yankees, 4:05 p.m.
Sept. 16 at N.Y Yankees, TBA
Sept. 17 Boston, 7:10 p.m.
Sept. 18 Boston, 7:10 p.m.
Sept. 19 Boston, 7:10 p.m.
Sept. 20 Boston, 7:10 p.m.
Sept. 21 Toronto, 7:10 p.m.
Sept. 22 Toronto, 7:10 p.m.
Sept. 23 Toronto, 1:40 p.m.
Sept. 25 at Boston, 7:10 p.m.
Sept. 26 at Boston, 7:10 p.m.
Sept. 27 at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 p.m.
Sept. 28 at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 p.m.
Sept. 29 at Chicago White Sox, 7:10 p.m.
Sept. 30 at Chicago White Sox, 2:10 p.m.
Oct. 1 Baltimore, 7:10 p.m.
Oct. 2 Baltimore, 7:10 p.m.
Oct. 3 Baltimore, 7:10 p.m.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


For the record


== lorida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Friday in the Florida Lottery:
i_ CASH 3 (early)
- -, "--' - 1-1-0
CASH 3 (late)
0-0-2
S*PLAY 4 (early)
6-2-4-7
PLAY 4 (late)


Fantasy 5 and Mega
Money numbers were
F 1t -unavailable at press time.




On the AIRWAVES


TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
12 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRA Lucas Oil Series (Taped)
1:30 p.m. (ESPN2) Nationwide Series: Royal Purple 300
qualifying
5:30 p.m. (ESPN) Nationwide Series: Royal Purple 300 race
4 a.m. (ESPN2) Nationwide Series: Royal Purple 300 race
(Same-day Tape)
BASEBALL
1 p.m. (SUN) North Carolina State at North Carolina
4 p.m. (WGN-A) Preseason: San Diego Padres at Chicago
Cubs
BASKETBALL
COLLEGE MEN
NCAA TOURNAMENT ELITE EIGHT
4:20 p.m. (CBS) Florida vs. Louisville
6:40 p.m. (CBS) Ohio State vs. Syracuse
DIVISION II FINAL
1 p.m. (CBS) Montevallo vs. Western Washington
COLLEGE WOMEN
NCAA TOURNAMENT
12 p.m. (ESPN) Kansas vs. Tennessee
2 p.m. (ESPN) Georgia Tech vs. Baylor
9 p.m. (ESPN) St. John's vs. Duke
11 p.m. (ESPN2) South Carolina vs. Stanford
NBA
5 a.m. (ESPN2) Denver Nuggets at Utah Jazz
(Same-day Tape)
8 p.m. (WGN-A) Toronto Raptors at Chicago Bulls
BOXING
10 p.m. (HBO) Danny Garcia vs. Erik Morales
10 p.m. (NBCSPT) Zab Judah vs. Vernon Paris
GOLF
9 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour: Trophee Hassan II
12:30 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: Arnold Palmer Invitational
2:30 p.m. (NBC) PGA Tour: Arnold Palmer Invitational
2:30 p.m. (GOLF) Champions Tour: Mississippi Gulf Resort
Classic
6:30 p.m. (GOLF) LPGA Tour: Kia Classic
HOCKEY
7 p.m. (SUN) New York Islanders at Tampa Bay Lightning
RUGBY
6:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) Sevens World Series: Hong Kong
(Same-day Tape)
SOCCER
8:30 a.m. (ESPN2) English Premier League: Chelsea vs.
Tottenham Hotspur
SNOWMOBILE RACING
4 p.m. (NBCSPT)Amsoil Championship Series (Taped)

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.




Prep CALENDAR


TODAY'S PREP SPORTS
SOFTBALL
11 a.m. Crystal River, Lecanto in Hernando High tournament


Spring training glance
AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L Pct
Detroit 14 3 .824
Toronto 17 4 .810
Oakland 14 5 .737
Seattle 12 8 .600
Los Angeles 11 8 .579
Kansas City 12 9 .571
New York 12 9 .571
Minnesota 12 10 .545
Boston 9 8 .529
Baltimore 8 9 .471
Chicago 7 12 .368
Cleveland 6 11 .353
Tampa Bay 6 12 .333
Texas 5 14 .263
NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L Pct
St. Louis 12 6 .667
San Francisco 12 7 .632
Los Angeles 10 7 .588
San Diego 12 9 .571
Houston 10 9 .526
Colorado 10 10 .500
Chicago 10 12 .455
Cincinnati 9 11 .450
Philadelphia 9 11 .450
Miami 7 9 .438
Arizona 8 11 .421
Milwaukee 7 11 .389
Pittsburgh 7 12 .368
Atlanta 7 13 .350
Washington 5 12 .294
New York 5 13 .278
NOTE: Split-squad games count in the stand-
ings; games against non-major league teams
do not.
Friday's Games
N.Y.Yankees (ss) 6, Minnesota 4
Baltimore 6, Boston 5
St. Louis 2, Miami 1
N.Y.Yankees (ss) 5, Philadelphia 3
Atlanta 9, N.Y Mets 4
Detroit 7, Pittsburgh 2
Houston 5, Washington 1
L.A. Dodgers (ss) 17, Chicago White Sox (ss) 4
L.A. Angels (ss) 6, Milwaukee 3
Kansas City 2, L.A. Dodgers (ss) 0
Chicago Cubs 10, Colorado 8
Toronto 7, Tampa Bay 5
Arizona vs. Chicago White Sox (ss), late
Cincinnati vs. San Diego, late
L.A. Angels (ss) vs. Cleveland, late
Texas vs. San Francisco, late
Saturday's Games
Atlanta vs.Toronto at Dunedin, Fla., 1:05 p.m.
Houston vs. Pittsburgh at Bradenton, Fla.,
1:05 p.m.
Boston (ss)vs. Miami at Jupiter, Fla., 1:05 p.m.
Washington vs. Baltimore at Sarasota, Fla.,
1:05 p.m.
N.Y Yankees vs. Detroit at Lakeland, Fla.,
1:05 p.m.
St. Louis vs. N.Y Mets at Port St. Lucie, Fla.,
1:10 p.m.


Philadelphia vs. Boston (ss) at Fort Myers,
Fla., 1:35 p.m.
Tampa Bay vs. Minnesota at Fort Myers, Fla.,
3:05 p.m.
San Francisco (ss) vs. Cincinnati (ss) at
Goodyear, Ariz., 4:05 p.m.
Colorado vs. San Francisco (ss) at Scotts-
dale, Ariz., 4:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels vs. Texas at Surprise, Ariz., 4:05
p.m.
Cleveland vs. L.A. Dodgers at Glendale, Ariz.,
4:05 p.m.
Cincinnati (ss) vs. San Diego (ss) at Peoria,
Ariz., 4:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox vs. Milwaukee at Phoenix,
4:05 p.m.
San Diego (ss) vs. Chicago Cubs at Mesa,
Ariz., 4:05 p.m.
Kansas City vs. Arizona at Scottsdale, Ariz.,
10:10 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Minnesota vs. St. Louis at Jupiter, Fla., 1:05p.m.
Baltimore vs. Philadelphia (ss) at Clearwater,
Fla., 1:05 p.m.
Miami vs. Tampa Bay at Port Charlotte, Fla.,
1:05 p.m.
Boston vs.Toronto at Dunedin, Fla., 1:05 p.m.
Philadelphia (ss) vs. Detroit (ss) at Lakeland,
Fla., 1:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets vs. Washington at Viera, Fla., 1:05
p.m.
Pittsburgh vs. Houston (ss) at Kissimmee,
Fla., 1:05 p.m.
Detroit (ss) vs. N.Y Yankees at Tampa, Fla.,
1:05 p.m.
Houston (ss) vs. Atlanta at Kissimmee, Fla.,
1:05 p.m.
San Francisco vs. Chicago White Sox at
Glendale, Ariz., 4:05 p.m.
Arizona vs. San Diego at Peoria, Ariz., 4:05 p.m.
Chicago Cubs vs. Cleveland at Goodyear,
Ariz., 4:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers vs. Milwaukee (ss) at Phoenix,
4:05 p.m.
Milwaukee (ss) vs. Kansas City at Surprise,
Ariz., 4:05 p.m.
Texas vs. L.A. Angels at Tempe, Ariz., 4:05 p.m.
Cincinnati vs. Colorado at Scottsdale, Ariz.,
4:10 p.m.



NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
Philadelphia 27 21 .563 -
Boston 25 22 .532 1 Y2
New York 23 25 .479 4
Toronto 16 32 .333 11
New Jersey 15 34 .306 12Y2
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 35 11 .761 -
Orlando 31 18 .633 5Y2


Atlanta 28 20 .583 8
Washington 11 35 .239 24
Charlotte 7 38 .156 2712
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Chicago 39 10 .796 -
Indiana 27 19 .587 1012
Milwaukee 22 25 .468 16
Cleveland 17 28 .378 20
Detroit 16 31 .340 22
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 31 14 .689 -
Memphis 25 20 .556 6
Dallas 27 22 .551 6
Houston 26 22 .542 612
New Orleans 12 35 .255 20
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 36 12 .750 -
Denver 26 21 .553 912
Utah 25 22 .532 1012
Minnesota 23 26 .469 1312
Portland 22 25 .468 1312
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
L.A. Lakers 29 18 .617 -
L.A. Clippers 26 21 .553 3
Phoenix 24 24 .500 512
Golden State 19 26 .422 9
Sacramento 17 30 .362 12
Friday's Games
Milwaukee 112, Charlotte 92
Phoenix 113, Indiana 111
Toronto 96, New York 79
Orlando 93, Cleveland 80
Atlanta 93, New Jersey 84
Miami 88, Detroit 73
Oklahoma City 149, Minnesota 140,20T
Philadelphia 99, Boston 86
San Antonio 104, Dallas 87
Portland at L.A. Lakers, late
Denver at Utah, late
Saturday's Games
Memphis at L.A. Clippers, 3 p.m.
Atlanta at Washington, 7 p.m.
Charlotte at New Jersey, 7:30 p.m.
Detroit at New York, 7:30 p.m.
Toronto at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Dallas at Houston, 8 p.m.
San Antonio at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Indiana at Milwaukee, 8:30 p.m.
Sacramento at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Phoenix at Cleveland, 3 p.m.
Denver at Minnesota, 3:30 p.m.
Utah at Atlanta, 6 p.m.
Washington at Boston, 6 p.m.
Philadelphia at San Antonio, 7 p.m.
Miami at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
Golden State at Portland, 9 p.m.
Memphis at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 p.m.



NHL standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT PtsGF GA
x-N.Y Rangers 74 4621 7 99202 165
x-Pittsburgh 73 4621 6 98244 185
Philadelphia 74 4323 8 94234 207
New Jersey 75 4227 6 90204 195
N.Y Islanders 73 3032 11 71174 218
Northeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Boston 73 4228 3 87237 180
Ottawa 75 3728 10 84222 219
Buffalo 75 3629 10 82194 208
Toronto 75 3334 8 74214 235
Montreal 75 2933 13 71196 207
Southeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Florida 74 3624 14 86184 203
Washington 75 3730 8 82202 214
Winnipeg 74 3531 8 78200 214
Carolina 75 3030 15 75198 223
Tampa Bay 73 3333 7 73205 249
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
x-St. Louis 75 4620 9 101192 147
Detroit 74 4425 5 93225 181
Nashville 74 4224 8 92210 197
Chicago 75 4225 8 92229 214
Columbus 74 2443 7 55172 237
Northwest Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Vancouver 74 4421 9 97226 185
Colorado 76 4031 5 85198 199
Calgary 75 3426 15 83185 204
Minnesota 73 31 32 10 72158 201
Edmonton 75 3036 9 69200 220
Pacific Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Los Angeles 74 3725 12 86173 160
Phoenix 75 3726 12 86197 194
Dallas 74 4029 5 85194 197
San Jose 74 3727 10 84201 192
Anaheim 75 3232 11 75189 209
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over-
time loss.
x-clinched playoff spot
Friday's Games
Toronto 4, New Jersey 3, SO
Edmonton 2, Florida 1, SO
Buffalo 4, N.Y. Rangers 1
Winnipeg 4, Washington 3, OT
Columbus 5, Carolina 1
Montreal 5, Ottawa 1
Saturday's Games
Calgary at Dallas, 2 p.m.
Minnesota at Buffalo, 7 p.m.
N.Y Rangers at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Ottawa, 7 p.m.
Montreal at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
N.Y Islanders at Tampa Bay 7 p.m.
Carolina at Detroit, 7 p.m.
Winnipeg at Nashville, 7 p.m.
Boston at Los Angeles, 9 p.m.
Vancouver at Colorado, 10 p.m.
Phoenix at San Jose, 10p.m.
Sunday's Games
Edmonton at Columbus, 3 p.m.
Minnesota at Washington, 5 p.m.
N.Y Islanders at Florida, 5 p.m.
New Jersey at Pittsburgh, 7p.m.
Nashville at Chicago, 7:30 p.m.
Boston at Anaheim, 8 p.m.
St. Louis at Phoenix, 9 p.m.


FOOTBALL
National Football League
ARIZONA CARDINALS-Agreed to terms
with K Jay Feely on a two-year contract. Re-
signed OL D'Anthony Batiste on a one-year
contract.
ATLANTA FALCONS-Signed DT Vance
Walker his tender as a restricted free agent. Re-
signed LS Joe Zelenka.
BALTIMORE RAVENS-Agreed to terms
with LB Brendon Ayanbadejo on a three-year
contract, CB Corey Graham on a two-year con-
tract and S Snean Considine on a one-year con-
tract. Re-signed LB Jameel McClain.
CHICAGO BEARS-Announced the retire-


ment of RB Marion Barber.
CINCINNATI BENGALS-Named Robert
Livingston and Steven Radicevic scouts. Re-
signed CB Adam Jones and OT Anthony
Collins. Signed DE Derrick Harvey.
DALLAS COWBOYS-Signed WR Kevin
Ogletree to a one-year contract.
DENVER BRONCOS-Agreed to terms with
TE Joel Dreessen and TE Jacob Tamme.
GREEN BAY PACKERS-Agreed to terms
with C Jeff Saturday on a two-year contract.
INDIANAPOLIS COLTS-OL Ryan Diem an-
nounced his retirement.
NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS-Signed WR
Donte' Stallworth and QB Brian Hoyer.
NEW ORLEANS SAINTS-Signed LB Chris
Chamberlain.
NEW YORK JETS-Traded QB Drew Stan-
ton and a 2012 seventh-round draft pick to In-
dianapolis for a 2012 sixth-round draft pick.
SEATTLE SEAHAWKS-Agreed to terms
with RB Kregg Lumpkin.


Panthers can't hold
back Sunlake
Despite holding a 7-5 lead in
the fifth inning, the Lecanto
softball team suffered a 17-7
loss in six innings to Sunlake in
the first round of Hernando
High School's Leopard Softball
Jam.
For Lecanto, Paige Richards
went 2 for 4 with a double and
two runs while Amber Atkinson
was 2 for 2 with a double and
two RBIs.
Other Panther contributors
included Lily Parrish (2 for 3,
run, RBI), Andrea Coutu (1 for
3, two runs) and Amber Russo
(1 for 3, run, two RBIs, double).
Lecanto (10-3) plays 11 a.m.
Saturday against Central, then
again at 5 p.m. against an un-
determined opponent.
Lady Hurricanes
withstand Columbia
The Citrus girls tennis team
took a narrow 4-3 victory over
Lake City Columbia in
Gainesville on Friday.
Winners for the Hurricanes
are as follows:
Singles
No. 2: Melanie Dodd won 8-2.



UF
Continued from Page BI

at Providence a school
that had been last or next-
to-last in the conference in
every season since its in-
ception in 1979.
Having trouble getting off
the bench before Pitino ar-
rived, Donovan told his new
coach he was considering
transferring. Pitino looked
into it and couldn't get a
sniff but didn't want to
break that news to Dono-
van. But instead of giving
up on the player, Pitino
urged him to get in shape.
As luck had it, the 3-point
line was being introduced
to college basketball, and
while many coaches were
fighting the new trend,
Pitino was embracing it.
A few months later, the
Friars were on their im-
probable run to the Final
Four, and Donovan had
learned his first lesson
about how to build a
program.
"I realized, because I ex-
perienced it, how impor-
tant it was to raise a
player's self-esteem,"
Donovan said. "My self-es-
teem was obviously very,
very low when he came in
there. I was sitting on the
bench. And I think that be-
lief and commitment by a
coach in a player can really
take a player to a different
level."
Given his size, among
other issues, Donovan's star
turn at Providence didn't
make him NBA material for




BASEBALL
Continued from Page B1


when senior center fielder
John Smith helped ignite a
four-run, two-out rally with
a two-run home run his
third homer of the week -
over the right-center field
fence. The 'Canes amassed
five hits in the inning to knot
the game up at 5.
Despite the 'Canes' surge,
Panthers coach David Logue
stuck with his senior ace,
who was relatively low in his
pitch count and was still
finding the plate. Baxter fin-
ished out the game, surren-
dering just two more hits in
the remaining three innings
for the win as his defense
was error-free for the night.
"When he says he's good,
I'm going to leave him in,"
Logue said. "I was getting
ready to bring (sophomore)
Levi O'Steen in the last in-
ning but Sheldon said, 'I'm
good, I'm want to finish it,' so
I let him finish it. I have that
kind of confidence in our
seniors.
"We've played these kinds
of games the last two sea-
sons with them, where we
battle," he added. "It was
kind of a reverse of our first


game this year in terms of
errors."
Both teams are now 3-2 in
District 6A-6.
The Panthers offense was
improved from recent
games, totaling seven hits in
the contest after drawing a
pair of walks that led to runs
in the first inning.
"We worked hard on our
hitting in practice since
Tuesday, and you could see
our hitters gaining confi-
dence," Logue said. "We cut
down on our strikeouts, and


No. 3: Jackie Ear won 8-3.
No. 5: Taylor Jordan won 8-3.
Doubles
No. 2: Dodd/Ear won 8-2.
Citrus, now 10-1 overall,
plays Tuesday at Vanguard.
Pirates bounce past
Nature Coast
The Crystal River girls tennis
team took a 6-1 victory at
Brooksville's Nature Coast
Technical School on Thursday.
Results for the Pirates are as
follows:
Singles
No. 1: Kayla Papp (CR) def.
Delanie McCabe 6-3, 6-2.
No. 2: Mallorie Pickersgill
def. Ashley Allen (CR) 6-0, 6-1.
No. 3: Nikki Moynihan (CR)
def. Christine Niffen 6-3, 7-6 (8-
6).
No. 4: Jessica Reynolds
(CR) def. Katie Viola 6-4, 6-3.
No. 5: Veronica Williams
(CR) def. Sam Hagland 4-6, 6-
3, third set tiebreak of 10-5.
Doubles
No. 1: Papp/Allen (CR) def.
McCabe/Pickersgill 8-6.
No. 2: Moynihan/Reynolds
(CR) def. Viola/Sniffen 8-5.
From staff reports

long. After an un-notewor-
thy season with the New
York Knicks, he took a job
on Wall Street. Not a good
fit. "It just was not for me at
all," he said.
At first, Pitino urged him
not to quit but later saw
how miserable he was and
hired him on as a graduate
assistant at Kentucky The
rest, they might say, is his-
tory, except both coaches
are still making it.
Donovan is in his 16th
year with the Gators and is
back on an upward swing
after a few down years fol-
lowing the titles. His most
talented player this sea-
son? That would be fresh-
man Bradley Beal, who
scored 21 points Thursday
in the win over Marquette
that moved the Gators to
this point.
"He didn't guarantee me
anything when I came in,"
said Beal, a national high
school player of the year.
"That's really what drew
me into this school and this
program is that he really
didn't guarantee me any-
thing, and I had to work for
it all."
Donovan learned that
part the part about not
anointing players before
they even put on a uniform
- from Pitino, as well.
And as much as the up-
and-down style, the pres-
sure defense and the
reliance on the 3-pointer
that Pitino has always
taught, Donovan says he's
learned about the commit-
ment it takes for a coach to
connect with a player.


everybody was producing
tonight"
Citrus bettered the Pan-
thers with eight hits of its
own, but were unable to
cluster enough offense in in-
nings outside the fifth. Sen-
ior catcher Cameron Copas
knocked in senior first base-
man Hayden Kelly with a
double down the left-field
line in the fourth to give the
'Canes their other run.
Copas (three hits) also had a
two-run double in the fifth.
Baxter (three runs), Pan-
thers junior third baseman
Patrick Colletti and Citrus
senior left fielder Zach Guf-
ford each had a pair of hits.
'Canes senior pitcher
Mark Pullen yielded one
earned run and struck out
five in four innings. He was
relieved by senior third
baseman Patrick Martin,
who didn't allow an earned
run for the remainder. Cit-
rus committed seven errors.
A frustrated Brady Bog-
art, Citrus' head coach, said
the loss was symptomatic of
his team's mental stamina.
"What we did in the fifth
inning, offensively, we as
coaches expect them to do
in the first inning, and we
haven't done that all year,"
Bogart said. "We're not
there yet and we're far from


it.
"When you're not focused,
it doesn't matter who you
play, you're going to lose,"
Bogart added. "We've tried
as coaches to focus them
and they've tried to focus
themselves, but right now
we can't focus for any kind
of stretch."
Both teams stay in the dis-
trict for each of their next
games Tuesday, with
Lecanto going to West Port
while Citrus travels to
Central.


Sports BRIEFS


SCOREBOARD





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Liriano roughed up in loss to Yankees


Wainright stellar

in Cards'win over

Miami Marlins

Associated Press

TAMPA Francisco Liriano
gave up four hits over five shutout
innings in the Minnesota Twins' 6-
4 loss to a New York Yankees split
squad on Friday.
Coming off five hitless innings
against Pittsburgh last Sunday, Liri-
ano struck out five and walked one.
Yankees shortstop Derek Jeter
had a hit and made a nice defen-
sive play in his return from a stiff
left calf. The team captain didn't
play for eight days.
Ivan Nova retired 12 in a row
before allowing a leadoff double
to Justin Morneau and Josh Will-
ingham's two-run homer to start
the fifth.
Yankees (ss) 5, Phillies 3
CLEARWATER, Fla. Hiroki
Kuroda pitched well into the sixth in-
ning and Robinson Cano got three hits
as a split squad of New York Yankees
beat the Philadelphia Phillies.
Kuroda gave up one run and six hits
in 5 2-3 innings of his fourth exhibition
outing.
Cano doubled twice, including a two-
run liner in the first inning. Vance Wor-
ley had thrown eight straight scoreless
innings before the Yankees started the
game with four hard hits in a row.
Cardinals 2, Marlins 1
JUPITER, Fla. -Adam Wainwright
pitched five shutout innings and St.
Louis beat Miami, overcoming Jose
Reyes' first home run for the Marlins.
Wainwright, who missed last sea-
son following elbow surgery, allowed
three hits and struck out five. He has
given up just an unearned run in 14 in-
nings this spring.
Marlins starter Carlos Zambrano
looked rusty, allowing two runs and


Associated Press
Philadelphia Phillies outfielder Hunter Pence is safe stealing second as New York Yankees second baseman
Doug Bernier fields the throw during the sixth inning Friday at Brighthouse Field in Clearwater. The Yankees'
split squad earned a 5-3 victory.


five hits, including three doubles, in 4
1-3 innings. He walked four and
struck out one.
Astros 5, Nationals 1
KISSIMMEE, Fla. Bud Norris and
Lucas Harrell each pitched three hit-
less innings and Chris Johnson home-
red for Houston in a win over
Washington.
Johnson's third spring homer came
off Tyler Clippard in the sixth inning.
Jordan Zimmermann pitched five in-
nings for the Nationals. He gave up
four runs and eight hits with a walk
and three strikeouts.
Orioles 6, Red Sox 5
SARASOTA, Fla. Clay Buch-
holz allowed five runs over five in-
nings in a shaky outing and Boston


lost to Baltimore.
Projected as Boston's third starter,
Buchholz gave up two-run homers to
Adam Jones in the first and Nick
Markakis in the third. It was Jones'
third home run of the spring, and
Markakis' first.
Buchholz gave up seven hits and
walked one while striking out three.
Braves 9, Mets 4
KISSIMMEE, Fla. Dan Uggla hit
his fifth home run of the spring and
drove in three runs, leading Atlanta
over the New York Mets.
Uggla, who hit a career-high 36
homers last season, broke a 4-all tie
with his two-out shot to left field in the
fifth.
Mike Minor had his 14-inning score-
less streak snapped when he gave up


an unearned run in the first.
Chipper Jones, who announced
Thursday that he will retire at the end
of the season, had the day off and did
not play.
Tigers 7, Pirates 2
BRADENTON, Fla. Doug Fister
left his start in the fifth inning of De-
troit's victory over Pittsburgh because
of soreness in his right middle finger.
Fister was scheduled to throw 75
pitches but came out after 4 1-3 in-
nings. The right-hander struck out four.
Pirates starter Charlie Morton
pitched four scoreless innings, allow-
ing two hits and striking out two.
Royals 2, Dodgers (ss) 0
SURPRISE, Ariz. Luke Hochevar
pitched three-hit ball for six innings


and struck out eight as Kansas City
defeated a Los Angeles split squad.
Hochevar, the first player selected
in the 2006 amateur draft, is 3-1 with a
1.29 ERA in four exhibition starts.
Jason Bourgeois, acquired by the
Royals in a trade with Houston on Tues-
day, singled home Mike Moustakas,
who had doubled, in the second inning.
Angels 6, Brewers 3
PHOENIX Mark Trumbo hit his
third home run and Dan Haren al-
lowed two runs in five innings to help
Los Angeles beat Milwaukee.
Haren gave up five hits and a walk
with three strikeouts. The right-hander
entered with only one earned run al-
lowed in 10 previous innings.
Brewers starter Zack Greinke was
even more impressive, allowing only
two hits over 5 1-3 scoreless innings
with nine strikeouts. Ryan Braun sin-
gled to improve to 2 for 19 this spring.
Cubs 10, Rockies 8
SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. Geovany
Soto homered twice and drove in five
runs, sending Chicago to a victory
over Colorado.
Soto had three hits, including a pair
of two-run homers off Rockies starter
Tyler Chatwood.
Colorado slugger Carlos Gonzalez
drove in five runs as well, with a
bases-loaded double and a two-run
single. He also made a diving catch
near the left-field line.
Dodgers 14 (ss),
White Sox (ss) 7
TUCSON, Ariz. Matt Kemp
homered among his three hits and had
four RBIs, and Dee Gordon also had
three hits as Los Angeles routed
Chicago in a split-squad game.
The game was played in Tucson to
raise money for the fund set up to
honor Christina-Taylor Green, the
daughter of Dodgers scout John
Green. Christina was one of the vic-
tims of the shooting on Jan. 8, 2011, in
which former Arizona Rep. Gabrielle
Giffords was wounded.


Hamlin takes pole


Associated Press
Denny Hamlin makes his way around the track Friday during qualifying for Sunday's Sprint
Cup Series Auto Club 400 race in Fontana, Calif. Hamlin finished qualifying with the
fastest time to take the pole.

Fast driver will be out front for Sprint Cup race


Associated Press

FONTANA, Calif. -
Denny Hamlin went low
when most drivers went
high at Auto Club Speed-
way, and he ended up in
pole position for Sunday's
race.
Hamlin won his 10th ca-
reer pole in Friday's quali-
fying session, and
teammate Kyle Busch
joined him in the top two
spots in Fontana.
Hamlin turned a lap of
186.403 mph in his Joe
Gibbs Racing Toyota by
picking a lower line than
Busch and most of their
competitors. Mark Martin,


who finished third in a Toy-
ota for Michael Waltrip
Racing, went straight down
the middle.
"Everyone had a differ-
ent way of doing it," Ham-
lin said. "It seemed like
there were some guys that
were five lanes up, and
some that worked their way
down. We were one of the
few cars that ran all the
way on the bottom."
Hamlin earned his first
top-10 start this season,
along with qualification for
next year's Shootout at
Daytona. Hamlin, who pre-
viously won the pole in
Fontana in October 2009,
welcomed the strong start


after winning once last sea-
son and changing crew
chiefs.
"Even though we've ran
sub-par these last couple
weeks, everyone is still in
a good mood and still
happy about where we're
at and where we're head-
ing," Hamlin said. "That's
something that we did lose
in 2011."
Busch and Martin fin-
ished with the exact same
time and speed, but Busch
took second in a
tiebreaker based on own-
ers' points. Busch hopes
the strong lap leads to bet-
ter results after his own
slow start to the season.


Sprint Cup
Auto Club 400 Lineup
After Friday qualifying; race Sunday
At Auto Club Speedway
Fontana, Calif.
Lap length: 2 miles
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 186.403 mph.
2. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 185.534.
3. (55) Mark Martin, Toyota, 185.534.
4. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 185.51.
5. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 185.51.
6. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 185.328.
7. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 185.199.
8. (20) Joey Logano, Toyota, 185.195.
9. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 185.185.
10. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 185.123.
11. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 185.052.
12. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 185.
13. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 184.724.
14. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr, Chevrolet, 184.53.
15. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 184.322.
16. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 184.068.
17. (2) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 184.044.
18. (10) David Reutimann, Chevrolet, 183.913.
19. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 183.744.
20. (30) David Stremme, Toyota, 183.397.
21. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 183.379.
22. (78) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 183.052.
23. (51) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 182.681.
24. (42) J. Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 182.56.
25. (22) A J Allmendinger, Dodge, 182.542.
26. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 182.445.
27. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 182.366.
28. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 182.094.
29. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 182.007.
30. (26) Josh Wise, Ford, 181.087.
31. (83) Landon Cassill, Toyota, 180.85.
32. (98) Michael McDowell, Ford, 180.61.
33. (13) Casey Mears, Ford, 180.542.
34. (36) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, 180.433.
35. (23) Scott Riggs, Chevrolet, 180.356.
36. (49) J.J.Yeley Chevrolet, 180.297.
37. (33) B. Gaughan, Chevrolet, 179.609.
38. (34) David Ragan, Ford, 179.466.
39. (19) Mike Bliss, Toyota, 179.296.
40. (93) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, 178.864.
41. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 178.602.
42. (32) Ken Schrader, Ford, Owner Points.
43. (74) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, 179.131.
Failed to Qualify
44. (7) Robby Gordon, Dodge, 178.47.
45. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 178.443.
46. (37) Timmy Hill, Ford, 177.936.


Payton apologizes


for role in bounties


Coach tak

blamefot

Saints scant

Associated Press

METAIRIE, La. -
Payton apologized F
for the bounty s
under which Saints p
were offered payou
big hits on opponent
ing he takes "full res
ability" for the program:
operated for three
under his watch.
"I share and fully
support the league's
concerns and goals
on player safety," the
New Orleans coach
said in a written
statement released
by the team. "It is,
and should be
paramount
"Respecting our
great game and the
shield is extremely i
tant to me," Payton i
referring to the league
mous logo.
NFL Commis:
Roger Goodell on W(
day suspended Payt(
the 2012 season, eff
April 1, one of sever
precedented penalty
issued against the Sai
Payton said that, as
coach, he should tal
responsibility for an o
tion which the NFL s
fered improper
bonuses for blows ti


other knocked targeted star
eS players out of the game or
left them needing help off
r the field.
The NFL has said Pay-
n/ ton initially lied to NFL in-
vestigators about the
program, at first denying
Is its existence, and also in-
structed his defensive as-
Sean sistants to lie. The league
Friday also slapped an eight-
system game suspension on gen-
layers eral manager Mickey
ts for Loomis and a six-game
s, say- suspension on assistant
ponsi- head coach Joe Vitt, who
m that also coaches linebackers.
years Former defensive coordi-
nator Gregg Williams, who
left the Saints after
last season to join
the St. Louis Rams,
ran the bounty pro-
gram and has been
suspended indefi-
nitely. Goodell also
fined the Saints
Sean $500,000 and took
Payton away second-round
draft choices in 2012
NFL and 2013.
]mpor- The NFL has said the
added, bounty program started in
ae's fa- 2009, Williams' first season,
when the Saints also won
sioner their only Super Bowl. The
ednes- league also found that the
on for program continued through
ective 2011even after NFL officials
al un- told the Saints to check into
ies he it and put a stop to it if they
ints. found anything improper
s head was going on.
ke full Payton issued one earlier
opera- written apology a few days
ays of- after the NFL first released
cash the findings of its probe on
hat ei- March 2.


RAYS
Continued from Page BI

Price, Jeremy Hellickson, Jeff
Niemann and rookie Matt Moore,
and a lineup built around three-
time All-Star Evan Longoria and
bolstered by the offseason acqui-
sitions of sluggers Carlos Pena
and Luke Scott, Maddon and his
players concede it would be a
major disappointment to not play
deep into October
"We have all the necessary tools
and pieces in place to really make
an impact," said Pena, the fran-
chise career home-run leader,
who returns after spending last
season with the Chicago Cubs.
"I love the idea of raised expec-
tations. ... It's nothing to run away
from, it's a good thing," Maddon
said.
Executive vice president of


baseball operations Andrew
Friedman, who boosted the pay-
roll by more than 50 percent to
about $65 million, is comfortable
with the attention the team has re-
ceived from national media, too.
"I think our guys have gotten to
the point with the culture that Joe
has created in the clubhouse with
our coaching staff that it's not an
impediment and it's not an issue,"
Friedman said. "It's not a risk fac-
tor that I think it might be other
places."
Maddon said a talented nucleus
that includes B.J. Upton, Ben Zo-
brist, Matt Joyce and Desmond
Jennings has the work ethic, ma-
turity and resolve to not allow all
the good things that are being said
go to their heads.
Maddon was impressed with
the number of players who partic-
ipated in offseason workouts at
Tropicana Field this winter and
senses a commitment to do what-


ever it takes to "get to the last
game of the year and win it."
"Nobody just shows up any
more. It is about winning," said
Maddon, who's entering his sev-
enth season with Tampa Bay, a
perennial last-place team before
his arrival in 2006. He signed a $6
million, three-year contract ex-
tension this winter that could
keep him in the Rays dugout
through 2015.
"I'm talking about a self-moti-
vated group of people. It's at the
point now, I believe and this is
the optimal point to be where
everybody does their job," Mad-
don added. "You walk in the door
I don't have to worry about moti-
vating so and so and so and so.
They're self-starters, they're self-
motivators. That's the way it
should be."
Despite struggling to score
runs, the Rays won 91 games a
year ago. Pitching and defense


were the key, and that doesn't fig-
ure to change this season.
Shields was a first-time All-Star
who finished with a team-best 16
victories and 11 complete games.
Price suffered from a lack of run
support and went 12-13 with a 3.49
ERA after winning 19 games in
2010, but Hellickson took up the
slack by going 13-10 with 2.95 ERA
to capture AL rookie of the year
honors.
"We place high expectations on
ourselves, but we don't really
worry about what everyone's say-
ing. We just go out there and do
our thing," Shields said.
Tampa Bay got more than 1,000
innings out of its rotation a year
ago, and Maddon is confident an-
other 1,000-plus innings season
would give the Rays an excellent
opportunity to reach the playoffs
again.
"Of course, they're high-end
guys that can win a lot of games


and pitch to a low ERA, but
there's a lot of luck involved
sometimes that you really can't
calculate," the manager said. "I
like the idea of making the goal
to pitch 'X' number of innings as
a group. If they do, then that re-
ally takes a lot of heat off the
bullpen, which makes the
bullpen better."
Tampa Bay took advantage of
Boston's monumental collapse
last year to overcome a slow start
in April and May to slip past the
Red Sox for a postseason spot.
When the Rays assembled for
spring training in February, Mad-
don stressed the importance of
getting off to a better start this
season.
"We prove to ourselves that we
can come from behind and win ...
but it's much better to do it from
the other side," Maddon said. "I
think that's going to be
paramount."


SPORTS


SATURDAY, MARCH 24, 2012 B5












ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE

Store covers up
pregnant Simpson
PHOENIX-A preg-
nant Jessica Simpson on
the cover of Elle magazine
was apparently too much
for some customers of a
Tucson Safeway store,
where a worker covered
it with cardboard.
The April edition fea-
tures the photo of the
singer/actress/fashion de-
signer with one hand
,.. over her
SI breast
'4 and an-
other
^ -* wrapped
around
her nude
belly.
The
Jessica Arizona
Simpson Daily
Star reported the man-
ager of the store received
multiple complaints,
prompting a worker to
cover the image with
cardboard.
Elle Magazine released
a statement Friday
"We've received an
overwhelmingly positive
response to Jessica Simp-
son's cover," it said. "She's
celebrating her body dur-
ing this joyous time in
her life and we couldn't
be happier for her"

Spelling announces
fourth pregnancy
NEW YORK-- Hope-
fully she didn't pack away
her maternity clothes.
Reality TV star, actress
and author Tori Spelling
is pregnant again.
Spelling and her hus-
band, Dean McDermott,
have three children to-
gether,
includ-
ing a
S daughter,
Hattie,
1' born in
October.
They
have an-
Tori other
Spelling daughter,
Stella, and a son, Liam.
McDermott also has a
son from a previous
marriage.
The 38-year-old
Spelling made the an-
nouncement on her web-
site Friday by saying:
"Baby makes 6!" and her
family is "beyond
thrilled" to announce
"another little McDer-
mott is on the way!"

Houston's full report
expected in weeks
LOS ANGELES -
Whitney Houston's full
autopsy report may offer
more clues about
whether the singer suf-
fered a heart attack be-
fore her drowning death,
officials said Friday
The full report, which
is expected to be re-
leased in a few weeks,
may include test results
and physical descrip-
tions of the singer's heart
that will show whether
she suffered a heart at-
tack, Assistant Chief
Coroner Ed Winter said.
The report is being com-
piled and Winter said he
did not have access to its
findings, which might
show whether there were
any obvious signs such as
discoloration of her
heart that would suggest
Houston had a heart at-
tack before slipping un-
derwater in a bathtub at
the Beverly Hilton Hotel
on Feb. 11.
-From wire reports


Associated Press
Doc McStuffins is shown with Stuff in a scene from Disney Junior's animated series "Doc McStuffins." The show,
about a 6-year-old girl who runs and operates a clinic for broken toys and worn out stuffed animals out of the play-
house in her backyard, debuted Friday on the new 24-hour Disney Junior channel.





Diagnosis: Cute


Animated show tells kids be healthy, don't worry


LYNN ELBER
Associated Press

LOS ANGELES
Many TV shows have dispas-
sionate origins, recycling a
well-worn format or piggy-
backing on a trend. But the roots of
"Doc McStuffins," an animated
program for children ages 2 to 7,
are downright maternal.
Chris Nee, creator of the series
debuting Friday on the Disney
Channel and on the new 24-hour
Disney Junior channel, wanted to
ease her toddler son's experience
with doctors and hospitals after he
was diagnosed with asthma.
"It was me as a mom, more than
as a writer first, saying, 'What can I
do to make this better for him?"'
Nee recalled.
The result is a fanciful, music-
filled show ("Wash Your Hands" is
among the original songs) about
Doc (voiced by Kiara Muhammad),


a girl who converses with her
stuffed animals and toys and treats
their scratches, sniffles and what-
ever ails them.
Doc and her pals share tips
about staying healthy and offering
care and compassion to others. The
show also attempts to demystify what
happens in a doctor's office to make
visits less scary for its audience.
Among those in the cast: Loretta
Devine as a reliably competent
plush hippo named Hallie. Ty Bur-
rell ("Modern Family") is a guest
actor in the debut episode, voicing
a jack-in-the-box dad who takes his
son for a checkup.
Nee, who received a prestigious
Humanitas Award for an episode of
Bill Cosby's Daytime EmmyAward-
winning "Little Bill," intends "Doc
McStuffins" to be spirited as well
as heartfelt.
"It's got a different flavor than
usual in the (TV) preschool world,"
she said, offering kid-friendly


humor with a touch of sophistica-
tion and bold characters that Nee
said harken back to those that she
enjoyed on "Sesame Street" as a
child.
There is, for instance, a snow-
man who's a hypochondriac on the
series (produced by Dublin-based
Brown Bag Films and the Disney
Channel).
"Kids love that character. They
don't understand the full implica-
tions but they find it really funny,"
said Nee, who sees value in aiming
a bit over a young viewer's head.
"We know kids are watching
shows over and over again. Trying
to create shows so that a kid gets
every moment on the first viewing
is shortchanging them," she said.
What does her muse, son
Theodore, now 5, think of "Doc
McStuffins"?
"He calls it his show. I'm at least
trying to get him to use 'ours,"' Nee
said.


'Hunger Games'fills midnight cravings


Film pulls in

$19.7M


Associated Press

LOS ANGELES Fans
are eating up "The Hunger
Games," which has opened
strongly with $19.7 million
domestically from overnight
shows that started after
midnight.
That's the seventh-best
midnight total ever and puts
the movie well on the way
toward a blockbuster open-
ing weekend.
The top six midnight draws


come from two other teen-
based franchises three
movies each from the "Harry
Potter" and "Twilight" series.
Last year's "Harry Potter
and the Deathly Hallows:
Part 2" leads the list with
$43.5 million from midnight
shows.
The most recent three
"Twilight" movies and the
two previous "Harry Potter"
flicks make up the rest of
the top six with midnight
grosses ranging from $22.2
million to $30.3 million.
"The Hunger Games"
stars Jennifer Lawrence as a
teen forced into a televised
death match with other youths.


Associated Press
Fans line up Thursday to see the midnight showings of
"The Hunger Games" at the 34th Street Loews AMC
Theatre in New York.


Fox's Rivera: Teen's hoodie had role in death


Associated Press


NEW YORK Fox News Channel
commentator Geraldo Rivera said Fri-
day that the hoodie an unarmed black
teenager wore when he was killed in
Florida is as much responsible for his
death as the man who shot him.
The veteran TV personality, speak-
ing on "Fox & Friends," waded in with
an opinion on the shooting of Trayvon
Martin, a story that has attracted na-
tional attention over the past month.
He later acknowledged that his com-
ments were "politically incorrect."
People wearing hooded sweatshirts
are often going to be perceived as a
menace, Rivera said.
"I'll bet you money that if he didn't


Birthday Some very unusual conditions are likely to de-
velop for you in the year ahead; they could suddenly get
you started off in a new, promising direction. You may need
a little push from a friend to recognize the opportune mo-
ment to start branching out.
Aries (March 21-April 19) -A matter that you've had no
control over could suddenly be placed in your hands, to
take care of as you wish. You'll quickly make the necessary
changes.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) You're particularly good at ex-
perimenting with novel situations, so don't hesitate to take
on something that you've never tried before. You should do
better than you think.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) Don't hesitate to compete
against another if it involves something you're knowledge-
able about or skilled in. Have faith in yourself.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) This is an excellent day to make


have that hoodie on, that nutty neigh-
borhood watch guy wouldn't have re-
sponded in that violent and aggressive
way," Rivera said.
The unarmed 17-year-old Martin
was killed Feb. 26 in Sanford. He was
wearing a hoodie and returning from a
trip to a convenience store when
George Zimmerman started following
him, telling police dispatchers he
looked suspicious. Zimmerman hasn't
been charged and says he shot Martin
in self-defense.
Of Martin, Rivera said, "God bless
him, he was an innocent kid, a won-
derful kid." But he said the case should
be a warning to parents to watch what
their children should wear.
"If you dress like a hoodlum eventu-


Today's HOROSCOPE
an outline for a big presentation to someone who has the
resources to help you. Just don't go through subordinates.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Give free rein to your curiosity
and ask questions about information that has been privy
only to a few people. You might be surprised about what
will be told to you.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Do what you can to make an
ally of an associate who hasn't always been as friendly as
you've wished. You might be surprised at how receptive he
or she is when approached.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Don't allow yourself to get too
entrenched in a habit just because it's comfortable. There is
so much more progress to be made if you're adventurous
enough to break out of your rut.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) There's a big chance that
something very pleasurable is in store for you. It's likely to
come about through someone with whom you share a


ally some schmuck is going to take you
at your word," he wrote in a commen-
tary posted Friday on the website Fox
News Latino.
Hundreds of people had posted
messages on Rivera's Facebook page
by Friday afternoon, the overwhelm-
ing majority of them negative.
Rivera compared his own comments
to those of Juan Williams, who was
fired by National Public Radio in 2010
for saying on Fox he gets nervous when
he sees people on a plane with cloth-
ing that identifies them as Muslim.
"No one ... can honestly tell me that
seeing a kid of color with a hood
pulled over his head doesn't generate
a certain reaction sometimes scorn,
often menace," Rivera wrote.


social interest.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) With a little freshly ap-
plied ingenuity, you could find a new way to get something
you'd very much like to have, which up until now you've
been unable to swing.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) You have a sharp faculty
for picking up valuable information that would go right over
the heads of other listeners. You will wisely know how to
use these nuggets, as well.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -A financial opportunity
might develop, but you will have to be sharp enough to rec-
ognize it in order to take advantage. It might come about in
a rather curious fashion.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) It's important not to let any
grass grow under your feet when it comes to advancing
your personal interests. If you are effectively assertive,
good things can happen.


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

THURSDAY, MARCH 22
Fantasy 5: 8 18 20 23 29
5-of-5 2 winners $111,980.06
4-of-5 287 $125.50
3-of-5 9,657 $10
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 21
Powerball: 32 43 53 55 56
Powerball: 6
5-of-5 PB 1 winner $40 million
5-of-5 1 winner $1 million
No Florida winner
Lotto: 2-3-4- 10- 18-26
6-of-6 No winner
Fantasy 5:3 6 18 30 34
5-of-5 1 winner $255,828.43

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num-
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call 850-487-7777.

Today in
HISTORY
Today is Saturday, March 24,
the 84th day of 2012. There
are 282 days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On March 24, 1765, Britain
enacted the Quartering Act,
requiring American colonists
to provide temporary housing
to British soldiers.
On this date:
In 1832, a mob in Hiram,
Ohio, attacked, tarred and
feathered Mormon leaders
Joseph Smith Jr. and Sidney
Rigdon.
In 1882, German scientist
Robert Koch announced in
Berlin that he had discovered
the bacillus responsible for
tuberculosis.
In 1932, in a first, radio sta-
tion WJZ (later WABC) broad-
cast a variety program from a
moving train in Maryland.
In 1934, President Franklin
D. Roosevelt signed a bill
granting future independence
to the Philippines.
In 1944, in occupied Rome,
the Nazis executed more
than 300 civilians in reprisal
for an attack by Italian parti-
sans the day before that had
killed 32 German soldiers.
In 1980, one of El Salvador's
most respected Roman
Catholic Church leaders,
Archbishop Oscar Arnulfo
Romero, was shot to death
by a sniper as he celebrated
Mass in San Salvador.
In 1989, the supertanker
Exxon Valdez ran aground on
a reef in Alaska's Prince
William Sound and began
leaking 11 million gallons of
crude oil.
In 1995, after 20 years,
British soldiers stopped rou-
tine patrols in Belfast, North-
ern Ireland.
In 1999, NATO launched
airstrikes against Yugoslavia,
marking the first time in its
50-year existence it ever at-
tacked a sovereign country.
Ten years ago: President
George W. Bush, during a
six-hour visit to El Salvador,
held out the promise of ex-
panded trade to Central
American nations.
Five years ago: The U.N.
Security Council unanimously
voted to impose new sanctions
against Iran for its refusal to
stop enriching uranium.
One year ago: The Census
Bureau released its first set
of national-level findings from
the 2010 count on race and
migration, showing that His-
panics accounted for more
than half of the U.S. popula-
tion increase over the previ-
ous decade, exceeding
estimates in most states as
they crossed a new census
milestone: 50 million, or 1 in
6 Americans.
Today's birthdays: Actor
R. Lee Ermey is 68. Come-
dian Louie Anderson is 59.
Actor Robert Carradine is 58.
Actress Alyson Hannigan is
38. NFL quarterback Peyton
Manning is 36.


Thought for Today: "Either
you think, or else others have
to think for you and take
power from you, pervert and
discipline your natural tastes,
civilize and sterilize you." -
F. Scott Fitzgerald, American
author (1896-1940).











CITRUSELIGION COUNTY CHRONICLE
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Nancy Kennedy
GRACE
NOTES


Where


is God?
very time Inverness
has an event that
draws a lot of peo-
ple, from a Saturday's
farmer's market to a festi-
val or parade, local pastor
Troy Sheppard and mem-
bers of Citrus Missionary
Baptist Church are there,
handing out gospel tracts.
Last week Brother Troy
was at the St. Patrick's
Day parade, on the comer,
handing out tracts.
The one he gave me had
an I.Q. test on the front
with only one question.
"GODISNOWHERE -
What does this say?"
People either see "God
is nowhere" or "God is
now here."
People either believe
God is nowhere, or at least
unimportant to their lives,
or they believe God is now
here, that he is alive and
actively incarnates him-
self into the lives of
people.
If God is nowhere, then
I am just a random collec-
tion of cells, without a des-
tiny or a reason for
existence, without a cre-
ator and director If God is
nowhere, my pain or sor-
rows don't have a purpose
and my prayers have no
direction. When I cry, I'm
crying into the ether and
See Page C4


Terry Mattingly
ON
RELIGION


MEGHAN BARR
Associated Press
NEW YORK
The stern warning issued from the pulpit
was directed at the tourists most of
whom had arrived late a sea of white
faces with guidebooks in hand. They out-
numbered the congregation itself: a handful
of elderly black men and women wearing
suits and dresses and old-fashioned pillbox
hats.
"We're hoping that you will remain in
place during the preaching of the Gospel," a
church member said over the microphone
at this Harlem church on a recent Sunday
morning. "But if you have to go, go now. Go
before the preacher stands to preach."
No one left then. But halfway through the
sermon, a group of French girls made their
way toward the velvet ropes that blocked
the exit An usher shook his head firmly, but
they ignored him and walked out.
The clash between tourists and congre-
gants plays out every Sunday at Mother
African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church,
the oldest black church in New York state.
It's one of many Harlem churches that have
become tourist attractions for visitors from
all over the world who want to listen to soul-
ful gospel music at a black church service.
With a record number of tourists descend-
ing upon New York City last year, the
crowds of foreigners are becoming a source
of irritation among faithful churchgoers.
To preserve the sanctity of the service,
pastors struggle to enforce strict rules of
conduct But the reality is that these visitors
are often filling church pews that would
otherwise remain empty and filling the
collection basket with precious dollar bills.
"Our building is in need of repair,"
church member Paul Henderson said after
the service. "We need assistance. They're


SETH WENIG/Associated Press
Tourists surreptitiously record video and photos during a church service at the Mother AME Zion
Church in New York, Sunday, Feb. 26. New York City's Harlem churches have become popular
tourist attractions for visitors from all over the world who want to listen to soulful gospel music
at a black church service.


helping to sustain us."
The rules are simple enough: No photog-
raphy, no flip-flops, no exiting during the
sermon. They are printed on pamphlets and
multilingual signs and announced at the
start of every service. But they are often ig-
nored. Ushers roamed the pews like secu-
rity guards, stopping more than one person
from filming on digital cameras.
"I understand that you're visiting and you
want to have a memory of it," said Carlos
Smith-Ramsay, who joined the church sev-


eral years ago. "But when we ask you to stop
and you continue to do so after the fact,
that's disrespectful."
Some pastors quietly manage the crowds
by requiring a written confirmation of
guests from tour operators, refusing walk-in
visitors. Some churches provide assigned
seating for tourists, while others demand a
list specifying which countries the tourists
are from and whether they speak English.


Page C4


Rise of


'secular


Catholics'
s a rule, opinion
polls are not as im-
portant to bishops
as they are to politicians.
Nevertheless, CNN an-
chor Kyra Phillips re-
cently asked Bishop
Joseph Malone of Maine if
he realized just how out of
step he is with current
doctrinal trends in his
own flock.
"So, bishop, times are
changing," she said.
"Views are changing. ...
So, why not get on board
with the 43 percent of
Catholics?"
The puzzled bishop
replied: "The 43 percent
who?"
"Who have no problem
with gay marriage," said
Phillips.
"Well, their thinking is
outside the realm of
Catholic teaching for 2,000
years," the bishop re-
sponded.
The bishop, of course,
was talking about how tra-
ditional Catholics wrestle
with moral issues, while
the CNN anchor was de-
scribing views now com-
mon with a completely
different kind of Catholic.
But in the polls, these
days, a Catholic is a
Catholic.
"I don't know of anyone
who thinks religious iden-
tity should be based on
See Page C5





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Special to the Chronicle
Based on the beautiful and historic painting by Leonardo DaVinci, "The Last Supper" will come to life in a dramatic presentation at North Oak Baptist Church in Citrus Springs. From
left are: Brian Ledford as Nathaniel (Bartholomew); Matt Widener as James the Lesser; Parker Longacre as Andrew; Alan Parker as Judas Iscariot; Luther Willis as Peter; Scott Jacobson
as John the Beloved Disciple; Bruce Sheldon, portraying Jesus Christ; Dennis Jacobson as Thomas; Lloyd Newman as James the Elder; Jared Bogart as Philip; Randall Sanders as Matthew,
the tax collector; Brandon Sheldon standing in for Robert Veeder, who plays Thaddeus; and Steven Cochran as Simon the Zealot.


North Oak Baptist Church to re-create 'The Last Supper'


Special to the Chronicle
Leonardo DaVinci's famous
painting comes to life in a dra-
matic presentation by the men of
North Oak Baptist Church. The
special moments between Jesus
Christ and his disciples in the


upper room are captured in a
beautiful way as the characters
come to life and share their inner-
most thoughts and feelings.
Not understanding the real
meaning of what is to take place
just days later, the disciples share
this last supper with their savior


and he begins to prepare them for
what is to come.
This group of thirteen men have
been practicing since early Octo-
ber, and the enactment promises
to be heart-stirring and thought-
provoking. Directed by Brenda
Sheldon, the drama will take


place at 6 p.m. Thursday, March 29
and Saturday, March 31 and 10:45
a.m. and 6 p.m. Sunday, April 1.
Saturday will be a special night
for parents with small children.
Activities on that night will be
available for children.
Child care will be available at


all performances
North Oak Baptist Church is lo-
cated at the intersection of North
Elkcam Boulevard and North
Citrus Springs Boulevard in Cit-
rus Springs. Admission is free to
all. Call 352-489-1688 or 352-
756-1500.


Religion NOTES


Special events
Join with women of Citrus
County who share in the desire
to serve their community.
Women In Christ (WIC) meet
at 3 p.m. the third Wednesday
monthly at First Christian
Church of Inverness, 2018
Colonnade, Inverness. Call
Bonnie at 352-726-2854 for
more information. Planning in
progress for local mission proj-
ects. All women are welcome.
The public is invited to an
Interfaith Holocaust Remem-


brance Event at 4 p.m. Thurs-
day, April 19, at the Church on
the Square, The Villages -
Spanish Springs. Doors open
at 3:30 p.m. Special guest
speaker Dr. Raanan Gissin,
Ph.D., Syracuse University,
N.Y., and former senior adviser
to Israeli Prime MinisterAriel
Sharon, will speak on "Genoci-
dal Anti-Semitism: New Threats
in Western Democracies."
Summer day camp for
children ages 6 through 12
starts June 1 and continues all
summer from 6:30 a.m. to 6:30


p.m. Monday through Friday at
First United Methodist Church
of Inverness, 3896 S. Pleasant
Grove Road, Inverness. Camp
will include activities and trips
- not just babysitting in a
safe, accredited setting. Break-
fast, lunch and an afternoon
snack served daily. Cost is $50
per week. For information
and/or reservations, call Pam at
352-344-4331. Space is limited.
Sale away
The Agape House
Fundraising Sale continues


from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. today at
First Baptist Church, 700 N. Cit-
rus Avenue, Crystal River. Free
admission. Funds are used to
purchase Bibles, toiletries, and
other miscellaneous items. The
Agape House is an all-volun-
teer ministry of First Baptist
Church of Crystal River for the
area where everything is do-
nated and everything is free for
people in need. This includes
clothing and shoes for each
family member, Bibles, toiletries
and if needed, household items
such as dishes, silverware, pots


and pans, small appliances;
bed and bath linens, blankets,
etc. We not only help people
with their material needs but
also talk with each family about
their spiritual needs and pray
with them. We need and appre-
ciate financial support from our
community. Call the Agape
House on Wednesdays at 352-
795-7064 or First Baptist
Church at 352-795-3367.
The Council of Catholic
Women of Our Lady of Grace
Church will host a "Trash'n
Treasures Fund Raiser," from


Places of worship that


offer love, peace and


harmony to all.


Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!!

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF CRYSTAL RIVER AND HOMOSASSA


8 a.m. to 2 p.m. today in the
Parish Life Center, 6 Roosevelt
Blvd., Beverly Hills. Sale items
include household items, cloth-
ing, books, jewelry, plants,
tools, small furniture, toys,
knickknacks and white elephant
items. Proceeds go to needed
items for the church and chari-
table contributions. Call Anna
Panasik at 352-527-3226. Our
Lady of Grace monthly flea
market is from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.
the fourth Saturday monthly will

See NOTES/Page C3


ST. THOMAS
CATHOLIC
CHURCH


MASSES:
aturday 4:30 P.M.
Sunday 8:00 A.M.
10:30 A.M.
628 I'-' ll-. iti r w- t

,,-I. ,, i
^^BH BB^ g


t St. Timothy t
Lutheran Church
ELCA
Saturday Informal Worship
w/Communion 5:00 PM
Sunday Early Service
w/Communion 8:00 AM
Sunday School
AllAges 9:30 AM
(Coffee Fellowship hour@ 9:00 AM)
Sunday Traditional Service
w/Communion 10:30 AM
Special services are announced.
Nursery provided.
1070 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River
For more information call
795-5325
www.sttimothylutherancrystalriver.com
Rev. David S. Bradford, Pastor


Crystal Diver
Church of God
Church Phone
795-3079
Sunday Morning
Adult & Children's Worship
8:30 & 11:00 AM
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Evening Service 6:00 PM
Wednesday
Life Application Service
Jam Session Youth Ministries & Teen
Kid (ages 4-11) 7:00 PM
2180 N.W. Old Tallahassee Rd.
(12th Ave.) Nurser
Provided

St. Benedict
Catholic Church
U.S. 19 at Ozello Rd.
MASSES --
Vigil: 5:00pm
Sun.: 8:30 & 10:30am
DAILY MASSES
Mon. Fri.: 8:00am
HOLY DAYS
As Announced
CONFESSION
Sat.: 3:30 4:30pm
795-4479


First Baptist
Church of
Homosassa
"Come Worship with Us"
10540 W. Yulee Drive Homosassa
628-3858
Rev. J. Alan Ritter
Rev. Steve Gerhart, Assoc. Pastor
Sunday
9:00 am Sunday School (AIIAge Groups)
10:30 am Worship Celebration
Choir / Special Music / "Kidz Worship"
Sunday Night
6 pm Worship Celebration
Wednesday Night
6:30 pm Worship Celebration
Children's Awanas Group
Youth Activities
www.fbchomosassa.org


THE Homosassa
SALVATION First United

ARMY CITRCOUNS. Methodist
SUNDAY: Church


Sunday School 9:45 A.M.
Morning Worship Hour
11:00 A.M.

TUESDAY:
Home League 11:30 A.M.
Lt. Vanessa Miller


Crystal River
CHURCH OF
CHRIST
A Friendly Church
With A Bible Message.
Corner of U.S. 19 & 44 East
Sunday Services
10:00 A.M.* 11:00 A.M.' 6:00 P.M.
Wednesday i
7:00 P.M.
Come Worship With Us!
Bible Questions Please Call
Ev. George Hickman
795-8883 746-1239


4 BEveryone
Becoming
A Disciple
of Christ

Sunday Worship
8:00 am,9:30 am, 11:00 am
Sunday School
9:30 am & 10:45 am

Reverend
Mark Whittaker
Pastor
8831 W. Bradshaw St.
Homosassa, FL 34448
352-628-4083
www.lumc.org
Office Hours:
8:30 4:30 M-F
Open Hearts
Open Minds
Open Doors

_my


B r Crystal |t Temple
River I Beth David


Foursquare
Gospel Church
1160 N. Dunkenfield Ave.
795-6720

A FULL GOSPEL
FELLOWSHIP
Sunday 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday "Christian Ed"
7:00 P.M.
Prayer Sat. 4-6pm
Pastor John Hager


r West :0 :
Citrus
Church of Christ HCKE, YOU'LL FIND
A CAKING FAMILY
9592 W. Deep Woods Dr. IN CH KIST
Crystal River, FL 34465-C-YST-L
352.564.8565 C STXL
www.westcitruscoc.com RIVCK
W. Deep Woods Dr. VNITD
;o ~~ ETHODIST
[w' n CHUKCH

I 4801 N. Citrus Ave.
w (2 Mi. N Of US 19)
MR Hwv 19.f E4 n A A 0


SERVICES
Sunday AM
Bible Study 9:30
Worship 10:30
Sunday PM
Worship 6:00
Wednesday
PM
Bible Study 7:00
EVANGELIST |
Bob Dickey


I O-3J 1 40
www.crumc.com
Rev. David Rawls, Pastor
Sunday Worship
8:00 Early Communion
9:30 Praise & Worship
11:00 Traditional
Bible Study
At 9:30 & 11:00 For all ages.
Wednesday 6:30
Nursery available at all services.
Youth Fellowship
Sunday 4:30
Wednesday 6:30
Bright Beginnings
Preschool
6 Weeks-VPK
Mon. Fri. 6:30a.m.-6pm.
795-1240
* A Stephen Ministry Provider


1


13158 Antelope St.
Spring Hill, FL 34609
352-686-7034
Rabbi
Lenny Sarko
Services
Friday 8PM
Saturday 10AM
Religious School
Sunday
9AM-Noon
000A93J


GOB


Come
grow
with us!


The First Assembly
of God Family
WELCOMES YOU!

Pastor
Richard
Hart

Schedule of Services:
Sunday:
9:00 a.m.
Adult Bible Study
Youth and Children's
Classes
10:00 a.m.
Spirit Filled Worship Service
Inspiring Message
Youth and Children's
Ministries
6:00 p.m
Youth Ministries
Wednesday 7:00 p.m
Praise and Worship
In-Depth Bible Study
Youth and Children's
Ministries
Nursery Provided Every Service

CrsalRveFlrd
(352795259
htp:/w w~rytarierssm y0 rg


ST. ANNE'S
CHURCH
A Parish in the
Anglican Communion
Rector: Fr. Kevin G. Holsapple
To be one in Christ in our
service, as His servants,
by proclaiming His love.
Sunday Masses: 8:00 a.m.
10:15 a.m.
Morning Prayer & Daily Masses
4th Sunday 6:00p.m.
Gospel Sing Along
9870 West Fort Island Trail
Crystal River 1 mile west of Plantation Inn
352-795-2176
www.stannescr.org


I


C2 SATURDAY, MARCH 24, 2012


RELIGION


u n Hwy. I





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NOTES
Continued from Page C2

take place in concert with
"Trash 'n Treasures."
The United Methodist
Women of Crystal River United
Methodist Church will have
their annual "Trash and Treas-
ure" sale on Friday and Satur-
day, March 30 and 31, at the
outdoor tabernacle area, 4801
N. Citrus Ave.
Holidaze Crafters of Her-
nando United Methodist Church
will host their spring craft
show from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Saturday, March 31. Vendors
from around the county will
offer a wide variety of items.
Holidaze crafters will also have
their country store. The United
Methodist women will sell their
cookbooks and homemade
baked goods. The Friendship
Cafe will have homemade veg-
etable soup, chicken salad
sandwiches and cherry dump
cake. The church is at 2125 E.
Norvell Bryant Highway
(County Road 486), Hernando.
Call Robin Baker at 352-445-
1487 or email jabker2051 @
tampabay.rr.com.
First Assembly of God


Good

Shepherd

Lutheran

Church
ELCA









Worship

8:30 am

11:00 am
* Fellowship After Worship
Weekly Communion
Sunday School 9:45am
Nursery Provided

Reverend
Kenneth C. Blyth
Pastor
439 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, Florida
Building is Barrier-Free
gshernando.org

35-4676


i.



























QHernando
Churchor
TheNazarene
A. Place lto w ,i

2101 NM Florida Ave,
Hernando FL

726-6144
Nursery Provided

*CHILDREN

*YOUTH

*SENIORS

Sunday School
9:45 A.M.
Praise & Worship
10:40 A.M.
Praise Service

6:00 P.M.
Praise & Prayer
(Wed.) 7:00 P.M

Randy T. Hodges, Pastor
www.hernandonazarene.org


Floral City
United Methodist
Church
8478 East Marvin St.
(across from Floral City School)
Sunday School
9:05 A.M.
Sunday Worship Service
10:30 A.M. Sanctuary
8:00 A.M. Service in the 1884 Church
Bible Study
Tuesday 10:00 A.M.
Wednesday 6:00 P.M.
"We strive to make
newcomers feel at home."
Wheel Chair Access
Nursery Available
Rev. Steven Todd Riddle
Church 344-1771
WEBSITE: floralcitychurch.com


First Baptist
Church
of Floral City
Lifting. Up Jesus
8545 Magnolia
726-4296

Sunday Schedule
8:30 AM Blended Worship Service
9:45 AM Sunday School
11:00 AM Traditional Worship
6:00 PM Worship
Wednesday
6:30 PM
Music, Youth, Fellowship
A warm, friendly Church
Nursery Available
wwwfbefloralcity.org










St. Scholastica
Roman Catholic
Church
Masses:
SATURDAY VIGIL
4:00 p.m. and 6:00 p.m.
SUNDAY
9:00 a.m. and
11:30 a.m.

Daily Mass:
8:30 a.m. Mon. Fri.
Confessions:
Saturday 2:45 3:30 p.m.
4301 W. Homosassa Trail
Lecanto, Florida 34461
(352)746-9422
www.stscholastica.org
Located one mile south of
Hwy 44 on SR 490 adjacent
to Pope John Paul II
Catholic School


RELIGION


Women's Ministry will have a
yard sale from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Saturday, April 14, at the
church, 5735 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway (State Road 44), Crys-
tal River. The sale is open to
the public. Rent a table for a
donation of $10 and bring your
items to sell. Table donations
will go to the church's overseas
missionaries. Call 352-
795-2594.
Helping Hands Thrift
Store, a ministry of Our Lady of
Fatima Catholic Church, is
open from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Monday through Saturday at
604 U.S. 41 South. Proceeds
fund the food pantry. The store
is accepting donations of
household items, clothing and
small appliances. Estate dona-
tions are also accepted. Pick-
up is available for larger
donations. Items donated are
tax deductible and a form is
provided from Helping Hands.
Call 352-726-1707.
Food & fellowship
E Afundraising banquet for
the Sanctuary Mission will take
place at 6 p.m. Thursday at Ho-
mosassa United Methodist
Church, 8831 W. Bradshaw St.
Tickets are $35 for singles or $60
for couples. Call 352-697-1373.


There will be an ice cream
social from 3 to 5 p.m. Satur-
day, March 31, at Yankeetown
Community Church on State
Road 40 West in Yankeetown,
two miles west of traffic light in
Inglis on U.S. 19. All-you-can-
eat homemade apple pie ala
mode, banana splits, sundaes,
homemade Belgian waffles,
brownies, cookies, strawber-
ries, and root beer floats for $5
per adult and $3 per child
younger than 10.
The last chicken and bis-
cuit dinner for the year is from
3:30 to 6 p.m. Saturday, March
31, at Floral City United
Methodist Church, 8478 E Mar-
vin St., across from the elemen-
tary school.
Meal includes chicken and
biscuit, mashed potatoes and
gravy, green beans, salad,
dessert and beverage for a do-
nation of $7.50. Takeouts are
available. After eating, every-
one is invited to join in a hymn
sing in the 1884 church build-
ing. Call 352-344-1771 for more
information.
Community pancake
breakfast and Easter egg
hunt from 8 to 11 a.m. Satur-
day, April 7, at Crystal River
United Methodist Church, 4801
N. Citrus Ave., Crystal River.


All-you-can-eat pancake break-
fast with the Easter Bunny is
from 8 to 9:30 a.m. with a cost
of $4 for adults and $2 for chil-
dren. The free Easter egg hunt
follows from 9:30 to 11 a.m.
Egg hunts for toddlers,
preschoolers and elementary
school-aged children. Free
Easter Bunny photos, cupcake
decorating, relay games, a
bounce house, movie and
more. RSVP for the breakfast
with the Easter Bunny online at
www.crumc.com or call the
church office at 352-795-3148
by Thursday, April 5.
St. John the Baptist
Catholic Church, on the corner
of U.S. 41 and State Road 40
East in Dunnellon, has a fish
fry from 4 to 6 p.m. Friday
during Lent. Cost is $7 for
adults and students and $3.50
for children ages 6 through 12.
The fish fry is open to the public
and takes place in the church
pavilion.
Beverly Hills Community
Church spaghetti suppers are
from 4 to 6 p.m. the third Friday
monthly in the Jack Steele Hall,
82 Civic Circle, Beverly Hills.
Donation of $7 per person in-
cludes salad, spaghetti with
meat sauce, Italian bread, cof-
fee or tea, and dessert. Come


and enjoy a delicious meal.
Tickets are available at the
door.
All-you-can-eat pancake
breakfasts, with sausage, cof-
fee and orange juice, are
served from 8 to 10 a.m. the
second Saturday monthly at
First United Methodist Church,
8831 W. Bradshaw St.,
Homosassa.
Music & more
The Nature Coast Unitar-
ian Universalists will host
S.O.U.L. (Singers of United
Lands) a touring group of
four professional singers from
four different continents at
10:30 a.m. Sunday at 7633 N.
Florida Ave., Citrus Springs.
S.O.U.L. provides workshops,
presentations, performances
and lessons for audiences of all
ages during a six-month tour
throughout the United States
and Canada. Call 352-465-
4225 or visit naturecoastuu.org.
Floral City United
Methodist Church will host a
hymn sing and more at 2 p.m.
Sunday at the 1884 church. Jim
King, an accomplished saxo-
phonist, and his wife Linda, a
gifted singer, will add their tal-
ents to the event. The audience
will have the opportunity to


Come as you are!
GENESIS
COMMUNITY CHURCH
a f--w, r *-


PASTOR BRIAN AND
KATHY BAGGS
Worship Service &
Children's Church 10:00 AM
Meeting at Knights of Columbus Bldg.
County Rd. 486, Lecanto
(352) 527-4253



' ACE City Rcoad
Old FlOra
S .3 of a mile north of SR 48
at 7431 Old Floral City Rd.
Come & Fellowship
Service Times:
Sunday School. 9:30am
Sunday Worship.....11:00am
Wed-Night Awesome
Bible Study................ 7:00 pm
Call 352-726-0501
(0 e-- Lo

, d t_- i
c


Grace Bible
Church


Sunday
9:30 AM..................Discovery Time
11:00 AM................Praise & Worship
6:00 PM.................. Evening Service
Monday
6:15 PM ...................Teens
Tuesday
6:15 PM.......Awana (Sept. Apr.)
Wednesday
7:00 PM.................. Bible Study &
Prayer Meeting
Pastor:
Rev. Ray Herriman
(352) 628-5631
Men & Ladies Bible Studies, TOPS,
Infant & Toddler Nursery
/2 mi.eastofUS.19
6382 W. Green Acres St.
P.O. Box 1067
Homosassa, FL. 34447-1067
www.gracebiblehomosassa.org
email: gbc@tampabay.rr.com


Shepherd

of the Hills
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Our mission is to be
a beacon offaith known
for engaging all persons
in the love and truth
of Jesus Christ.
Bishop Jim Adams, Rector
527-0052
Services:
Saturday
5:00 pm
Sunday
8:00 & 10:30 am
Christian Formation
9:15 am
Sunday School 10:00 am
Nursery 10:30 am
Healina Service
Wednesday
10:00 am
2540 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
(CR 486)
Lecanto, Florida
(4/10 mile east of CR 491)
wwwSOTHEC.org

--.", -


HERNANDO
United
Methodist
Church

OPe




OPM


S .. . ryfor Children and Families"
2125 E.Norvel Bryant Hwy. (486)
(1' miles from Hwy. 41)
For information call
(352) 726-7245
www.hernandoumcfl.org
Reverend
Tyler Montgomery
Sunday School
8:45 AM 9:30 AM
Fellowship
9:30 AM
Worship Service
10:00 AM
Individual Hearing Devices


SATURDAY, MARCH 24, 2012 C3

choose the hymns to be sung.
The church is at 8478 E. Marvin
St., Floral City, across from the
elementary school. A freewill of-
fering will be collected to help
pay for painting the exterior of
the church. A handicap en-
trance is available in the back of
the church. Call 352-344-1771.
The University of Florida
Cello students, conducted by
Steven Thomas, DMA, will pres-
ent a concert at 3 p.m. Sunday
at Dunnellon Presbyterian
Church, 20641 Chestnut St.,
Dunnellon. This presentation
takes in 350 years of musical
styles from the Renaissance and
Baroque works by Gabrieli,
Gesualdo and Handel, to the
Romantic period by Buckner and
Popper, concluding with Brazil-
ian works by Villa-Lobos. A love
offering will be collected at the
end of the concert with all pro-
ceeds going to the performers.
St. Timothy Lutheran
Church will host Dry Branch
Fire Squad at 7 p.m. Sunday.
Bring family and friends for en-
joyable evenings of music. For
tickets and information, call 352-
795-5325. The church is at 1070
N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River.
Suggested donation is $10.

See NOTES/Page C4

Glory to Glory
Ministries
SA Family
United by
The Love Of Jesus!
Non-Denominational
Spirit Filled Worship 1
Family Friendly
Sunday 10:30 a.m.
Wednesday 7:00 p.m.
Bible Study
(352) 566-6613
www.G2GCares.org
Pastor Brian Gulledge
S 1274 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy,
Hernando, FL






Rev. Stephen Lane


Lutheran

Church(L.C.)
935 S. Crystal Glen Dr., Lecanto
Crystal Glen Subdivision
Hwy. 44 just E. of 490
527-3325

COME
WORSHIP
WITH US
Sunday Service
9:30 A.M.
Sunday Bible Study
& Children's Sunday
School 11 A.M.
Saturday Service
6:00 P.M.
Weekly Communion
Fellowship after Sunday Worship
Calendar of events Audio
of sermons available at
www.faithlecanto.com

{9aKt ^For t(e~w.


COME
Worship With The
Church of Christ
Floral City, Florida
Located at Marvin &
Church streets.
Established in 33 A.D. in
Jerusalem by Jesus Christ.
A warm welcome always
awaits you where we teach
the true New Testament
Christian Faith.
Sunday Bible Study
9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship
10:30 a.m. & 6:00 p.m.

Wed./Eve. Bible Study
6:00 p.m.
Steve Heneghan, Minister
CHURCH OF CHRIST
Floral City, FL.


Places of worship that


offer love, peace


and harmony to all.


Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!! A '

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF HERNANDO, LECANTO, FLORAL CITY, HOMOSASSA SPRINGS


Come, Fellowship &
Grow With Us In Jesus
5863 W. Cardinal St.
Homosassa Springs, FL 34446
Telephone: (352) 628-7950
Pastor Dale Wolfe
Tuesday
Mid-Week Meeting 7:00 pm
Sabbath-Saturday Services
Sabbath School 9:30 am
Worship 10:45 am
www. homosassaadventist.com





C4 SATURDAY, MARCH 24, 2012


GRACE
Continued from Page Cl

no one greater than I hears
or has the power to do any-
thing about it.
If God is nowhere, then
there is no such thing as
justice. There's no such
thing as evil; nothing is
good because there is no
ultimate, universal stan-
dard, not if we are merely
random beings.
If God is nowhere, then
atrocities aren't atrocious,
because who's to say geno-
cide or slavery or sexual
exploitation of children
are wrong?
If God is nowhere, then
what is hope and where
does that notion come
from? What causes people
who are oppressed to sing?
Why would anyone sing at
all, or dream or laugh?
If God is nowhere, then
what do I do with my guilt
and my shame where
did they even come from?
If God is nowhere, the
thought of death holds only
paralyzing fear and dread,
inconsolable sorrow. If God
is nowhere, there's no com-
fort for the dying. Seventy
or 80 or 90 years and
then what? Ashes scattered
on the ground, blown into
the wind or stuffed inside
an urn?
If God is nowhere, the te-
diousness of life has no in-
trinsic or lasting joy, only
fleeting moments of pleas-
ure and escape. If God is
nowhere, life is merely
marking time, a countdown
of days and hours until it's
over
However, if God is now
here, everything changes.
If you talk to most Chris-
tians, they can usually pin-
point a time, often even the
date and place, when they
knew that not only is God
now here, but God, in the
person of Jesus, is now
here for them.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Some call it "getting
saved" or being "born
again." I call it the moment
Jesus came.
It's the walking from
darkness into the light,
from chaos to order, mean-
inglessness to purpose,
soul-death to spiritual life,
finite into forever.
God is now here!
It's gasping and grasping
at the implications. God is
now here I'm forgiven.
God is now here I'm
not alone, even when I'm
lonely
God is now here I have
a champion, someone who
thinks I'm lovely and worth
loving, someone who knows
me, someone who will
carry me, hold on to me,
fight and even die for me.
God is now here my
life, even if it's a small life,
still has purpose, a big pur-
pose, because it's God's
purpose. My joys are God's
joys; he takes delight in
what delights me.
God is now here the
pull of sin, while not gone,
is lessened. There's great
joy in saying no to it,
greater joy in saying yes to
God's laws.
The whole GODIS-
NOWHERE thing suppos-
edly started in 1995 with a
sign outside a tent at the
People's Fair in Denver.
It's gimmicky, but it got
people's attention, spark-
ing conversation and caus-
ing people to think.
Either God is nowhere or
God is now here.
There can only be one
option.

Nancy Kennedy is the au-
thor of "Move Over, Victo-
ria I Know the Real
Secret," "Girl on a Swing,"
and her latest book, "Lip-
stick Grace." She can be
reached at 352-564-2927,
Monday through Thurs-
day, or via email at
nkennedy@chronicle
online, com.


TOURISTS
Continued from Page C1

And still more forbid the tour compa-
nies from advertising which churches
are on the tour in hopes of curbing the
number of unwanted visitors.
The Rev Gregory Robeson Smith,
Mother AME Zion's pastor, refuses to
work with tour operators. He doesn't
even like to use the word "tourist,"
preferring instead to call them part of
his "international congregation." And
he won't turn anyone away
"I refuse to commercialize the
church worship experience," he said.
"You don't pay people to experience
the Lord, to come and pray I think
that's unconscionable."
Yet the tourists' presence is unde-
niable. At Mother AME Zion, there
were nearly 200 of them, overwhelm-
ing the congregation by at least 5 to 1.
"They want to see what they've
seen on television," said Larcelia
Kebe, president of Harlem Your Way!
Tours Unlimited. "They want to see
what they've seen in the movies."
The gospel tour industry has ex-
ploded since it was born in the early
1980s. On a busy summer Sunday,
Harlem Spirituals, one of the oldest
and largest tour operators, might run
15 full buses, said Erika Elisabeth, a
company vice president
Ticket prices but can cost up to $55.
Most churches get a cut of the profit.
Others, like Mother AME Zion, make
money by encouraging visitors to
drop a suggested donation into the
collection basket.
"Some of the tour operators really
have made this whole thing about
money," Kebe said. "It's created a
problem. Because many of them are
getting a lot of money from the tourists
in order to get into a church. And there
may be people in the church who are
making a little money on the side."
During his sermon, Smith appealed
to the congregation to help pay for re-
pairs to the church's aging organ.
"We've got about $1,200 worth of
work that needs to be done," he said.
"I need 12 people to give me $100."
Without the tourists' wallets, the
organ might never get fixed. Mother
AME Zion's congregation is dying off,
and there are very few young people
left to fill the generation gap.
That's not the case everywhere.


Just around the corner is the thriving
Abyssinian Baptist Church, arguably
the neighborhood's most popular
tourist magnet, where visitors are
often turned away because the pews
are too full.
Celeste Lejeune, 16, from Paris,
didn't know anything about Mother
AME Zion's history as a stop on the
Underground Railroad, or that its
congregants once included Frederick
Douglass and Harriet Tubman.
"I would like to just hear voices of
people who live in Harlem, and see
the atmosphere," she said. "We don't
have music like this in France."
That is precisely the sort of outlook
that disheartens the congregation,
who would like to believe the tourists
have come to listen to the word of
God, to be transformed by the power
of Scripture.
"Within this site that's meant to be
sacred, you have, maybe to some of
the members, this invasion of the sec-
ular and profane," said Margarita
Simon Guillory, an assistant professor
of religion at the University of
Rochester in Rochester, N.Y "You're
going to have a certain amount of ten-
sion in that space."
Longtime congregation member
Dabney Montgomery, 88, a Tuskegee
Airman during World War II and a civil
rights activist, believes the tourists
walk away richer for the experience.
"In listening to the Gospel, they get
something out that they didn't ex-
pect," he said. "The word of God."
But most of them are there to see a
show and a show they got. The pas-
tor gave a dramatic sermon filled with
historical and political overtones, his
voice slowing to a low growl and then
rising back up, cracking with the ef-
fort The choir sang hymn after joyful
hymn as the congregation clapped in
time with the music. One woman gave
a beautiful soprano solo.
If nothing else, the tourists got to
step back in time for an hour or two. A
time when ladies wore dresses and
stockings to church and ushers with
immaculate white gloves guided peo-
ple to their seats. A time when the
church was the center of social life,
the place to see and be seen.
At least with the tourists around,
the place feels a little less empty on
Sunday mornings.
"They're not tourists," Smith said.
"They're people of faith. In Christ,
there is no East, no West."


NOTES
Continued from Page C3

Southern Sound Quartet, a South-
ern Gospel group, will be in concert
Wednesday at Hernando Church of the
Nazarene, 2101 N. Florida Ave., Her-
nando. Celebration Sounds Choir & Or-
chestra will open the concert at 6:45 p.m.
The public is invited to enjoy this free con-
cert. A love offering will be collected. Call
the church office at 352-726-6144.
Mark and Andrea Forester will be in
concert at 7 p.m. Friday at Heritage Bap-
tist Church, 2 Civic Circle, Beverly Hills.
Join us for a mix of southern and tradi-
tional gospel music. Light refreshments
will follow. The concert is free; a love offer-
ing will be collected.
"Grace Harmony" will appear at 7
p.m. Wednesday, April 11, at First Chris-
tian Church of Homosassa Springs, 7030
W. Grover Cleveland Blvd., Homosassa.
Mike and Sue Filisky are singers/songwrit-
ers and have been singing for Jesus since
they were young children. In 2001 they
began singing as "Grace Harmony" in a
ministerial capacity, offering hope and en-
couragement to others. Call the church at
352-628-5556. All are welcome. Nursery
provided.
Arbor Lakes Chorus will present its
spring concert, "As American as Apple
Pie," under the direction of Cory Stroup
and accompanied by Harry Hershey on
the keyboard, at 7 p.m. Friday, April 13, at
Hernando United Methodist Church, 2125
E. Norvell Bryant Highway (County Road
486), Hernando. Free admission. Love of-
fering accepted.
Special events
All ladies are invited to a "SeaSide
Escape Women's Retreat" today at First
Presbyterian Church of Inverness, 206
Washington Ave., Inverness. Registration
begins at 8:30 a.m. and the program fol-
lows from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. The cost of
$10 includes lunch and materials. Call
Denise Lay at 352-637-0770 or Tanya
Jaros at 352-637-0260 or email: christan
ed@embarqmail.com. Child care
available.
The youths of Crystal River United
Methodist Church will host a '50s-style
Sock Hop at 6 p.m. today. DJ Sebastian

See GRACE/Page C5


Our Lady of

Fatima

CATHOLIC CHURCH
U.S. Hwy. 41 South, Inverness,
Florida
Sunday Masses
7:30 A.M., 9:00 A.M. & 11:00 A.M.
Saturday Vigil
4:00 P.M.
Weekdays 8:00 A.M.
Confessions 2:30 3:30 P.M.

726-1670


Redemption

(hristian (Church
SUNDAY
Bible School..............9:00
W orship.....................10:15
WEDNESDAY
Bible School...............6:30
Currently meeting at
East Citrus Community Center
9907 East Gulf-to-Lake Highway
(At The Flashing Light)
For more
352-422-6535
Pastor
Todd
Langdon


Mission Possible
MINISTRIES
O Dan Sturgill
Senior Pastor
9921 N. Deltona Boulevard
(352) 489-3886
www.missionpossibleministries.com
| Sundays
Worship ................ 10:30 am
Spanish Translation Provided
(Nursery Care & Children's Church Provided)
Wednesday I
Youth Group, Bible Study &
Kid's Programs................7 pm
(Nursery Care Provided)
ARMS OF MERCY FOOD PANTRY
1st & 3rd Tuesday of the month.
8:00 am-11:00 am


PRIMERA IGLESIA
HISPANA
DE CITRUS COUNTY
Asambleas de Dios
Inverness, Florida
ORDEN DE SERVICIOS:
DOMINGOS:
9:30 AM Escuela Biblica
Dominical
10:30 AM Adoraci6n y
Pr6dica
MARTES:
7:00 PM Culto de Oraci6n
JUEVES:
7:00 PM Estudios Bfblicos
Les Esperamos!
David Pinero, Pastor
1370 N. Croft Ave. Inverness, FL 34451
Tel6fono: (352) 341-1711



FIND
US AND
YE SHALL


SEEK.
f you're searching for a
spiritual home where
questions are as welcome
as answers, find us. We
are a loving,open-minded
religious community that
encourages you to seek your
own path,wherever it leads. To
nurture your spirit and find your
own truth and meaning.
Welcome to Unitarian Universalism.

naturee Coast

Unitarian Universalists
SUNDAY SERVICES
10:30 A.M.




WHERE REASON & RELIGION MEET
GLBT WELCOME
7633 N. Florida Ave.
(Route 41)
Citrus Springs
465-4225
WWW.NATURECOASTUU.ORG


INVERNESS
First CHURCH OF GOD
Niin
I nii .niin liin.I
.. , ,
Sunday
10:30 AM.& 6:00 PM.
Wednesday 6:00 P.M.
Bible Study & Prayer
726-8986
"Church Like It Used To Be"
Saturday Night Gospel Jubilee"
6:00 PM.
(Last Saturday of month)
Children's Church School Weekly
5510 E. Jasmine Ln.
Phone: 726-8986
ALLARE WELCOME


Methodist


SChurch
of Inverness
3896 S. Pleasant Grove Rd.
Inverness, FL 34452
(2 mi. so. ofApplebee's)
Come as you are.
(352) 726-2522
TONY ROSENBERGER
Senior Pastor



8:30 AM
Traditional Worship
with Holy
Communion

9:45 AM
Sunday School

11:00 AM
Contemporary
Praise & Worship5


COMMUNITY
CONGREGATIONAL
CHRISTIAN CHURCH



i V






SUNDAY 10:00 AM
Dr. Jeff Timm
9220 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
352-489-1260












VIGIL MASSES:
4:00 P.M. 6:00 P.M.

SUNDAY MASSES:
8:00 A.M. &10:30 A.M.

SPANISH MASS:
12:30 P..

CONFESSIONS:
2:30 P. to 3:30 P.M. Sat.
orByAppointment


WEEKDAY MASSES:
8:00 A.M.

6 Roosevelt Blvd.,
Beverly Hills
746-2144
(1 Block East of S.R. 491)
www.ourladyofgracefl
.catholicweb.com .


GRACE
BAPTIST CHURCH

Independent
SOME THINGS SHOULDN'T CHANGE
Do you miss sound Bible teaching, the
beloved hymns & gospel songs, an Eve-
ning Service, and being part of a caring,
Christian family? Find them at Grace!
2672 W. Edison PI. at Elkcam Blvd.
Citrus Springs, FL
S.S. 9:45 am, Services 11:00 am & 6:00 pm
Wed. Bible Study & Prayer 7:00 pm
Directions, mp3 sermons & more at
www.gracebapchurch.org
Phone (352) 249-7211


Fis


Places of worship that


offer love, peace and


harmony to all.

Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!!

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF CITRUS SPRINGS, BEVERLY HILLS, BROOKSVILLE, DUNNELLON, INVERNESS


Hope Evangelical
Lutheran Church
ELCA
Pastor Lynn Fonfara
9425 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
Citrus Springs
Sunday Worship
9:30 a.m.
Sunday School 8:30 a.m.
Communion Every Sunday
Information:
489-5511
Go To Our Web Page
hopelutheranelca.com


RELIGION





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NOTES
Continued from Page C4

Hawes will provide music. Free
child care on the premises. Re-
freshments for sale. Tickets are
$6 per person or $10 per cou-
ple. Tickets will be available at
the door or may be reserved at
the church, 4801 N. Citrus Ave.,
on Sunday morning. Money
raised for the event will be used
toward the annual mission trip
the youths take part in.
Abundant Life will host
Chuck and Joan Dewing during
Sunday morning's worship
service at 10:30.The Dewings
have served as missionaries in
Asia and the Mediterranean
and are reaching seafarers
globally.
They minister to the millions
of men and women who serve
on cruise ships, tankers,
freighters and container ships,
as well as those who are fisher-


SECULAR
Continued from Page Cl

polling," said theologian
Tom Beaudoin, who teaches
at the Jesuit-run Fordham
University in New York City
Nevertheless, he said, it's
time to note what re-
searchers are learning
about the lives and beliefs of
what he called "secular
Catholics." For starters,
bishops need to admit that
they exist and that some of
them want to stay in the
church while practicing
their own personalized ap-
proaches to faith.
"Secular Catholics are
people who were baptized
as Catholics, but they find it
impossible to make Catholi-
cism the center of their
lives, by which I mean
Catholicism as defined by
the official teachings of the
church," said Beaudoin. For
these believers, there are
"things that they learned
about faith from Catholi-
cism. Then there are things
they learned from their
jobs, from school experi-
ences, from their music and
from their favorite movies.
"They are hybrid believ-
ers and their faith comes
from all over the place," he
said.
This is precisely the audi-
ence of "liberal" and "nom-
inal" Catholics who were
targeted recently with a
blunt New York Times ad-
vertisement that urged
them to quit the Catholic
church altogether
"If you imagine you can


RELIGION


men and serve in the world's
navies.
The public is invited to come
and hear about their exciting
work. Missionary groups from
the area are especially in-
vited.
The church is at 4515 N. Tal-
lahassee Road, Crystal River.
Call the church at 352-
795-LIFE or visit www.
abundantlifecitrus.org.
A workshop facilitated by
Thrivent Financial for Lutherans
representatives, titled "Estate
Strategy Essentials," will take
place at 6 p.m. Monday at First
Lutheran Church, 1900 State
Road 44 West, Inverness. The
community is invited. When
does a "will" become a "won't"?
Find out at this workshop. Wills
and other essential legal docu-
ments, such as power of attor-
ney and medical directives, will
be explained in a way that will
motivate you to take steps to
protect your estate.
Dinner provided. Presented

change the church from
within get it to lighten up
on birth control, gay rights,
marriage equality, embry-
onic stem-cell research -
you're deluding yourself,"
argued leaders of the Free-
dom From Religion Founda-
tion. "By remaining a 'good
Catholic,' you are doing
'bad' to women's rights. ...
Apparently, you're like the
battered woman who, after
being beaten down every
Sunday, feels she has no
place else to go."
This advertisement prob-
ably says more about critics
of Catholicism than it does
about Catholic life, noted
Beaudoin. Still, it could in-
spire constructive conversa-
tions about how
"deconversions" are affect-
ing church life. After all, a
2009 survey from the Pew
Forum on Religion and Pub-
lic Life found that one in 10
American adults have left
the Catholic faith. Four
Americans exit Catholicism
for every one who converts
into the faith.
These numbers matter,
said Beaudoin, but it's more
important to see the larger
picture, which is the grow-
ing number of Catholics
who are living their spiri-
tual lives in a kind of tense
Catholic limbo. Some never
go to Mass, while others do
so occasionally The vast
majority of them have no
idea what they would con-
fess, if they ever went to
confession, because they
disagree with church au-
thorities on what constitutes
sin in the modern world.
In the end, it's impossible


by DeAnna Edwards, financial
consultant, and David Edwards,
financial associate. Call Terry at
352-527-2706.
Alan Shawn Feinstein will
add money to donations given
to the Beverly Hills Community
Church's Food Pantry. Dona-
tions must be received through
April 30, and can include cash,
checks, and/or food items. The
more donations made to the
food pantry, the more Feinstein
money will be added to the
donation.
The next food distribution
at the church is from 11 a.m. to
noon and 6 to 7 p.m. Tuesday.
To qualify for assistance, you
must be a Beverly Hills resident
with identification. The church
office needs to be notified at
least a week ahead of time, if
requiring food, to ensure its
availability. Call the church of-
fice at 352-746-3620, or stop
by, to make a reservation be-
fore Tuesday.
There is an initial registration

to ignore this mass of "secu-
lar Catholics" because it's
such a large chunk of
today's church, he said. In
some parts of America, var-
ious kinds of "secular
Catholics" now constitute a
clear majority, while those
who affirm traditional dog-
mas and doctrines are a
minority
Some of these "secular
Catholics" eventually leave
the church. Others choose to
remain on membership
rolls, on their own terms, be-
cause they find it hard to
walk away, said Beaudoin.
After all, there are parts of
Catholicism that they affirm
and they know they can ig-
nore the parts that they re-
ject. They have changed the
church for themselves.
From his perspective,
Beaudoin said it's impor-
tant to believe that this
trend is "not the result of
lethargy, laziness, rela-
tivism, heresy or apostasy...
There will be Catholics who
insist on saying that these
secular Catholics are falling
away from traditional
Catholic norms. But I think
it would be more helpful to
talk about them not as hav-
ing fallen away from the
Catholic faith, but as having
created new, evolving spiri-
tual lives for themselves."

Terry Mattingly is the di-
rector of the Washington
Journalism Center at the
Council for Christian Col-
leges and Universities and
leads the GetReligion.org
project to study religion
and the news.


for each recipient.
The Sisterhood of Temple
Beth David will celebrate the
women of Passover and Jewish
history with a Seder for and by
women at 6 p.m. Wednesday


at the temple, 13158 Antelope
St., Spring Hill. Admission of
$18 includes a full meal. Call
352-686-7034.
James Williams leads the
Stations of the Cross at noon


FERRIS BEEF


FAI




WE


R


SATURDAY, MARCH 24, 2012 C5

Friday during Lent at Holy
Faith Episcopal Church in Blue
Cove, Dunnellon, off East
Pennsylvania Avenue. The last
presentation is March 30.
Everyone is welcome.


STOP BY AFTER THE FAIR!
I Fresh Strawberry
Milkshakes
I Homemade Strawberry
Pies 8 Tarts
I Cheesecake with \
Strawberry Topping
1 Strawberry Shortcake .

25 011 SELECTED ITEMS


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STILL SHIPPING FRESH FLORIDA
VALENCIA (JUICE) ORANGES

NOW OPEN SUNDAYS 12-5pm


k FERRIS


GROVES
H I -.[ 1. 111 w w1 1llll l 1j l 1 I _1 ', I H VIV,. 4 1 '[. H 4 1

r (352) 860-0366 800-872-7318
M- www.ferrisgroves.com ir i' i I. I


Places of worship that


offer love, peace and


harmony to all.


Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!!

SERVICING THE CITY OF INVERNESS


S oT Bringing Christ
to hnverness
LUTHERAN
CHURCH
Holy Communion
Every Sunday at
7:45am & 10:00am
Sunday School
& Bible Class
8:45 A.M.
726-1637
Missouri Synod
www.1stlutheran.net
1900 W. Hwy. 44, Inverness
The Rev. Thomas Beaverson


tpvci
00 Frst For Christ"...John 1:41
FIRST |||
CHRISTIAN
CHURCH OF
INVERNESS 1
We welcome you and invite you
to worship with our family.
John A. Scott, Minister
Sunday:
9:00 A.M. Sunday School
10:15 A.M. Worship Service
Wednesday:
6:00 P M. Bible Study


Come To
ST.
MARGARET'S
EPISCOPAL
CHURCH
where everyone is still welcome!
In Historic Downtown Inverness
1 Block N.W. Of City Hall
114 N. Osceola Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
726-3153
www.stmaggie.org
Services:
Sun. Worship 8 & 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday 12:30 P.M.
Morning Prayer
9:00 A.M. Mon- Fri
Fr Gene Reuman, Pastor

SINVERNESS
CHURCH
OF GOD
Rev. Larry Powers
Senior Pastor
Sunday Services:
Traditional Service... ............. 8:30 A.
Sunday School.........................r9:30 A
Contemporary Service...........10:30 AM
Evening Service........................6:00 P
Wednesday Night:
Adult Classes....................7:00 -
Boys and Girls Brigade.....7:00
Teens............................. 7:15
"Welcome Home"
Located at 416 Hwy. 41 South i
in Inverness Just Past Burger King
Church Office 726 4524
Also on Site "Little Friends Daycare
and Learning Center"


Beverly Hills
Community Church
82 Civic Circle, Beverly Hills, Florida
(352) 746-3620
Pastor Stewart R. Jamison, III
Email: bhcchurch@embarqmail.com

Wednesday Bible Study 6 p.m.
Sunday Coffee/Conversation 8:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship Service 10 a.m.
Communion 1st Sunday, Monthly
Where Christ is Proclaimed!






All are invited to our
Healing

Services
First Church of Christ,
Scientist
Inverness
224 N. Osceola Ave.
Sunday Services 10:30 AM
Sunday School 10:30 AM
Wed. Testimony Meeting 5:00 PM
352-726-4033


road

6g 1st

ch
5335 E. Jasmine Lane,
Inverness
X Miles North Of K-Mart Off 41
North (Formally Calvary Bible
Church Location)

You're invited
to our Services
Sunday School
10:00 AM
Sunday
10:45 AM & 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 PM
Independent
Fundamental
Pastor
Terry Roberts
Ph: 726-0201


It's Only


Neltural!t





C e le bra ti n g


"Where everyone is special!"
"Jesus Christ-central theme
of our worship"
Sunday School
9:30 a.m.

Sunday Worship
10:30 a.m & 6:00 p.m.

Wednesday Worship
7:00 p.m.
"Ministries for all ages"
Nursery Available


S *,







Page C6 SATURDAY, MARCH 24, 2012



COMMUNITY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


News NOTES

Naber Kids
collectors gather
Friends and collectors of
Naber Kids dolls will meet at
2 p.m. today, March 24, at
the Naber Doll Studios, 8915
S. Suncoast Blvd.
This day marks the 20th
anniversary of the traditional
event for doll collectors from
all across the United States.
Harald Naber will be pres-
ent to sign his new book,
"Ugly Dolls," the Naber Kids
story. There will be live
music. The event is free and
all are welcome.
Call 352-346-0479 for
more information.
Train show on tap
at Lions Club
All are welcome to the
model train show beginning
at 10 a.m. today, March 24,
at Homosassa Lions Club,
8393 W. Homosassa Trail,
Homosassa.
There will be many ven-
dors and model layouts. For
more information, email Joe
atjschramm@
tampabay.rr.com.
Safety Patrol
needs sponsors
Pope John Paul II school's
Safety Patrol is seeking
sponsors to advertise on the
backs of T-shirts members
plan to wear on a trip to
Washington, D.C., soon.
Donation request is $25
per line. Call Beverly Isabelle,
Safety Patrol parent coordi-
nator, at 352-613-0632.
The Safety Patrol will have
a fundraising booth set up
today, March 24, at Howard's
Flea Market in
Homosassa.
Lions to serve
pancakes Sunday
Beverly Hills Lions Club,
72 Civic Circle Drive, will
have its pancake breakfast
from 7:30 a.m. to noon Sun-
day, March 25. Cost is $4 for
adults; children younger than
12 eat for $2.
Menu includes all-you-can-
eat pancakes, choice of
bacon or sausage or combo,
orange juice and coffee or
tea. For more information,
call Janet at 352-527-0962.
Auxiliary to serve
salmon cake meal
Blanton-Thompson Ameri-
can Legion Auxiliary Unit
155, Crystal River, will serve
a salmon cake and macaroni
and cheese dinner from 5 to
6:30 p.m. Wednesday, March
28, at the post home, 6585
W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway,
Crystal River.
All members and the public
are welcome. All profits from
the dinner will go to support
the many programs of the
American Legion Auxiliary.
For more information, call
Unit President Shawn
Mikulas at 352-503-5325.

Humanitarians
OF FLORIDA


Simone


Special to the Chronicle
Simone, sweet and soft, is
a young mom now looking
for a human family. This
14-month-young diluted
tortie is ready to make
someone's home more
comfy. Visitors are wel-
come from 10 a.m. to 1
p.m. and 2 to 4 p.m. Mon-
day through Saturday at
the Humanitarians' Man-
chester House on the cor-
ner of State Road 44 and
Conant Avenue, east of
Crystal River. Call 352-
613-1629, or view our fe-
lines online at www.pet
finder.com/shelters/fl186.
html.


Kick back with bluegrass


Take the whole family to Historic Hernando School Sunday ...


Special to the Chronicle

A Family Day of Blue-
grass "Pickin' and Grin-
nin' Goin' on Here" will
take place from 11 a.m. to 5
p.m. Sunday, March 25, at
Historic Hernando School
at the corner of North
Florida Avenue and Par-


sons Point Road in Her-
nando. Along with four
bands, there will be food
from several vendors all day
long.
Tickets are $10. Families
of four can purchase tickets
for $20. Bring lawn chairs
and/or blankets.
VIP tickets for $40 each


include seating, snacks and
beverages.
Money from the
fundraiser will be used to
renovate the school build-
ing and move the Hernando
Heritage Council closer to
opening its museum with
the history of Hernando and
Citrus County, as well as a


multifunctional community
center to be used for meet-
ings, educational seminars,
theater, entertainments and
other activities.
For tickets and more in-
formation, call Mary Sue
Rife at 352-302-1429, Doug
Naylor at 352-302-5565 or
Susie Shipp at 352-476-2453.


... then head to Ridge Masonic Lodge March 31 for more fan


Special to the Chronicle

The Lonesome Pine Band, a group
of bluegrass-pickin' snowbird musi-
cians out of Wildwood, will be hosts
and emcees at the inaugural Blue-
grass at the Blue Lodge event slated to


begin at 2 p.m. Saturday, March 31, at
the Ridge Masonic Lodge, 5060 S. Me-
morial Drive, Homosassa.
The family-friendly event will in-
clude an afternoon of bluegrass music
and a barbecue featuring ribeye
steaks with all the trimmings: rolls,


salads, desserts and drink. Advance
tickets are $10; $15 on the day of the
event.
Two children younger than 12 can
eat for the price of one ticket.
For more information, call Gunnar
Erickson at 352-228-7666.


Special to the Chronicle

Hospice of Citrus County
will provide orientation
training for individuals who
are interested in learning
more about hospice and
various hospice volunteer
opportunities.
The class will be from 1 to
3 p.m. Thursday, March 29,


at the Lakes Region Library,
1511 Druid Road, Inverness.
The class provides an
overview of hospice philos-
ophy and history. Partici-
pants will become
acquainted with services
provided by Hospice of Cit-
rus County for patients and
families.
They will also become fa-


miliar with the concept of
palliative care and learn the
importance of confidential-
ity Attendees will also re-
ceive information regarding
volunteering in several dif-
ferent areas.
Teens and high school
students are encouraged to
attend. Volunteering for
Hospice of Citrus County


will provide community
service hours for the Bright
Futures Scholarship and
other academic needs.
To register or to request
training for a group, call Vol-
unteer Services Manager
Debbie McManamy at 352-
527-2020 or email DMc-
Manamy@hospiceof
citruscounty org.


Citrus County Shooting Club


Special to the Chronicle
Citrus County Shooting Club had its annual installation luncheon on Feb. 3 at La Casa di Norma restaurant in Crystal
River. From left are: Ron Goodenow, Future Outpost Shooting Range; Mike Bugman, board member; Jean Clark, secretary;
Chuck Taylor, vice president; Bud High, president; John De Andrea, board member; and Tom Barnum, treasurer. The club
was formed 27 years ago and has been active in the sport of safe fiream training for home and at the range. The club has
NRA instructors and range officers to teach new members in firearm safety. Goodenow has a work in progress building a
new state-of-the-art shooting range in Citrus County. The club gives scholarship money to students of Citrus County going
to college to study some form of law enforcement, or a law-related career. For more information, visit the website at
ccs.us or call Bud High at 352-746-5217.


News NOTES

Brits, Yanks get
together March 26
The British American So-
cial Club will meet at 7 p.m.
Monday, March 26, at the
Holiday Inn Express, 903 E.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Inver-
ness. Following a short busi-
ness meeting and the
opportunity to socialize, there
will be a photo/slideshow
presentation of a visit to
Switzerland and Lake
Lucerne.
The club meets the fourth
Monday monthly and wel-
comes all who have a con-
nection, association or
interest in British and Com-
monwealth culture and his-
tory. Refreshments are
available.
There is a full program of
events and visits throughout
the year. For more informa-
tion, visit the website at
www.britamclub.com or call
Judi Matthews at 352-527-
2561 or Dave Jones at 352-
382-3418.
College to offer
writing courses
Do you have an idea for a
novel, short story, or nonfic-
tion book? Would you like to
document some period/
events in your life to help
someone else benefit or
leave a legacy for the family?
How to Write and Publish
Your Own Book will be pre-
sented from 6 to 8 p.m. Mon-
days, April 9, 16 and 23.
The six-hour course will
cover all the specifics, details,
advantages and disadvan-
tages of writing and publish-
ing. Fee is $49 and includes
handouts.
Writing Your Memoirs is a
one-day class from 6 to 8
p.m. Monday, March 26. Fee
is $25.
Instructor is Claudine Der-
vaes, author-publisher of 15
books, who founded her
company, Solitaire Publishing
Inc., 31 years ago. Her travel
writing appears in the "Travel
Talk" column of the Ocala
Star Banner and Gainesville
Sun.
For more information and
registration, call the College
of Central Florida at 352-249-
1210 or 352-746-6721, or go
online to CFltraining.cf.edu.
Coin Club to meet
in Beverly Hills
Beverly Hills Coin Club will
meet at 5:30 p.m. Monday,
March 26, at the Central
Ridge Library. All interested
persons are welcome.
There are no dues. The
club's purpose is to bring
local coin collectors together
and provide numismatic edu-
cation. For details, call Joe at
352-527-2868.
Fish fry, musical
extravaganza
Camp E-Nini-Hassee, a
nonprofit organization for at-
risk girls, will host its annual
Fish Fry & Musical Extrava-
ganza from 4 to 7 p.m. Thurs-
day, March 29, at the camp,
7027 E. Stage Coach Trail,
Floral City.
Donation is $8, which in-
cludes fried fish, coleslaw,
hush puppies, grits, baked
beans, dessert and iced tea.
Call 352-726-3883 for more
information.
Deadline nears for
club's scholarship
Citrus Garden Club is ac-
cepting applications for its an-
nual $500 Environmental
Scholarship to be awarded to
a senior graduate from Citrus
High School, Crystal River
High School, Lecanto High
School and the Academy of
Environmental Science.
The scholarship will be
awarded to a senior planning
to continue his or her educa-
tion in an environmental field.
Applications can be obtained
from school guidance coun-
selors' departments. Dead-
line to apply is March 31.


For more information, call
Lucy Murphy at 352-527-
4239.


* Submit information at least two weeks before the event. 0 Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
* Early submission of timely material is appreciated, but Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
multiple publications cannot be guaranteed. community@chronicleonline.com.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be guaranteed.
* Expect notes to run no more than once.


Clowning around in Tallahassee


Special to the Chronicle
Citrus Clowns performing group, sponsored by Mary K. Hall, recently performed for the Florida Department of Elder Affairs
Ambassadors for Aging Day Celebration in Tallahassee at the Capitol building. The annual state event in honor and ap-
preciation of Florida's senior citizens and volunteers was hosted by the Florida Sports Foundation, sponsored by the DOEA
and corporate sponsors. All clowning services were donated for the event. Seniors enjoyed the day of singing and danc-
ing by senior stage entertainment groups, while Citrus Clowns continuously performed, strolling and interacting with the
crowd. Florida state agencies and corporate exhibitors supplied senior information handouts and free treats. The state pro-
vided free barbecue lunch, served on the Capitol grounds. Citrus Clowns, from left, are: Clown Yar, aka Ray Thompson;
Clown Zani Bandani, aka Debra Boydston; Jewels the Clown, aka Mary K. Hall; and Clown Sunny, aka Vicky lozzia, with
puppets Big Sunny and Little Sunny.




Hospice schedules orientation


Volunteers can learn about opportunities to help patients, families





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SATURDAY EVENING MARCH 24, 201 2 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D/: Comcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
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169 53 169 30 35 Kelly Stewart Granger. NR' a Dreyfuss, Marsha Mason. 'PG' c Comedy) Jack Lemmon. 'NR' a
53 Wild Pacific (In Stereo) Wild Pacific (In Stereo) Wild Pacific (In Stereo) Frozen Planet (In Frozen Planet (In Frozen Planet (In
S 53 34 53 24 26 c Stereo) 'PG' c Stereo) 'PG' c Stereo) 'PG' c
WSJ 50 46 50 29 30 20/20 on TLC '14' 48 Hours: Hard Evid. 48 Hours: Hard Evid. 48 Hours: Hard Evid. 48 Hours: Hard Evid. 48 Hours: Hard Evid.
S**1 "Burke & Hare"(2010, *l, "Scary Movie 2" (2001) Shawn *l, "The Bone Snatcher" (2003) "The Violent Kind" (2010) Cory
350 261 350 Comedy) Simon Pegg. R Wayans. (In Stereo)'R' Scott Bairstow. 'R' Knauf. (In Stereo) 'R'
"Collateral" **1/ "Shooter"(2007 Mark Wahlberg. A wounded sniper **1, "The International" (2009) Clive Owen. One of the Leverage
( 48 33 48 31 34 'R' plots revenge against hose who betrayed him. world's most-powerful ban s finances terrorists. 'PG'
[iDON) 38 58 38 33 Adven **** "The Wizard of Oz" (1939) Judy Garland. G' God Devil |King/Hill King/Hill |Fam. Guy Aqua Metal
Fij]I 9 54 9 44 Jw-Drpng RntIs Legends-Ozarks Ghost Adventures Ghost Adventures Ghost Adventures Ghost Adventures
fiIVJ 25 55 25 98 55 Most Shocking'14' Tow Tow Tow Tow Tow Tow Tow |Tow Forensic Forensic
(LVL 32 49 32 34 24 M*A*S*H |M*A*S*H Home lm Home lm Home lm Home lm Raymond Raymond Everybody-Raymond Raymond Raymond
1 -7* "G.I. Joe: The Rise of Cobra" (2009, ** "Fast & Furious" (2009, Action) Vin Diesel, *1, "G.I. Joe: The Rise of Cobra" (2009,
47 32 47 17 18 Action) Channing Tatum. 'PG-13' cc Paul Walker. 'PG-13' cc Action) Channing Tatum. 'PG-13'
Ghost Whisperer (In Ghost Whisperer "On Ghost Whisperer "Dead Ghost Whisperer Aiden Ghost Whisperer Ghost Whisperer "Dead
117 69 117 Stereo) 'PG 'c Thin Ice" 'PG' Eye" 'PG' is in danger. 'PG' "Blood Money" 'PG' Ringer" 'PG
1W1Ni 1 18 18 18 18 20 MLB Baseball Funny Home Videos Funny Home Videos Funny Home Videos WGN News at Nine 30 Rock |Scrubs


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
LRICE

@2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc
AllJ Righls Reserved
EHANY



UETATM



GBREIG
U IV "I I~^ I~


A: THE LU II L 1 1
(Answers Monday)
Yesterday's Jumbles: FLOOD SHOWN ENGINE ACCUSE
Answer: Breaking NHL records was this to Wayne
Gretzky ONE OF HIS GOALS


Bridge

PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

There was a smaller number of entries than
usual this year, although it was again multina-
tional, with submissions from Canada, India, Is-
rael and the United States. Perhaps the
single-dummy (declarer-play) problem was too
hard.
Perfect answers came from Darryl Depew, Hen-
derson, Nev; William Gibbs, Staunton, Va.; and
Jim Ritts, Knoxville, Tenn.
Other entrants who got the play problems right
but tripped up on one or more of the bidding ques-
tions were John Harvey, Mount Hope, Ontario;
Richard Walker, Mansfield, Pa.; and Murray Wolf.
In today's deal, South does not like to open one
no-trump with two unstopped suits, but it de-
scribes his hand as well as possible. North, with a
singleton, uses Stayman to uncover the spade fit.
(If South opens one club, North responds one
spade, South raises to three spades, and North
bids four spades, getting to the contract from the
better side. Nothing works all the time.)
West leads the heart queen, the defenders taking
three tricks in the suit, then shifting to a diamond
to South's ace. How should declarer continue?
He has to play trumps without loss. This re-
quires finding West with the king-jack-doubleton
or -tripleton.
Declarer must lead a spade to dummy's 10.
When it holds the trick, he returns to his hand with
a club, plays a spade to dummy's queen (unless
West tries a sneaky king, hoping South isn't watch-
ing carefully!), cashes the spade ace, and claims.

North 03-24-12
4 A Q 10 4
V K5 2
S7
SQ 9 8 6 3
West East
4 KJ 8 497
VQJ109 V A 6 4
10 854 J9632
*7 2 4 10 5 4
South
4 6532
V 8 7 3
+ AKQ
AKJ

Dealer: South
Vulnerable: East-West
South West North East
1 NT Pass 24 Pass
2 4 Pass 4 4 All pass


Opening lead: V Q


ACROSS
1 Ancient tale
5 Sand deposit
9 Eggs
12 Des Moines
locale
13 Kind of
tradition
14 Head, slangily
15 Onion
covering
16 Computer
memory unit
18 Sour
20 Vetoed
21 Mme.'s
daughter
22 Banned
pesticide
23 Organic
compound
26 Pith helmet
30 Hidden
microphone
33 Not hard
34 Clapton of
"Layla"
35 AAA
suggestions


37 Meadow
plaints
39 Custodian's
need
10 Rod's
companion
11 Yield slightly
13 Lowell or Tan
45 Antacid brand
18 Not watertight
51 Break loose
53 Patent seeker
56 Lie in the
weeds
57 Alley Oop's
kingdom
58 The younger
Guthrie
59 fixe
30 Possess
31 Foam
32 Lockbox
document

DOWN
1 Catchall abbr.
2 Daisy Mae,
finally


Answer to Previous Puzzle


Gyrate
Take care of
Curved roof
Ending for fail
or cult
Pester


Spiral-horned
antelope
Black
gemstone
Ballot
Still snoozing
Please, to
Fritz
- majeste
Wood nymph
Brindled cat
Genesis
hunter
Sitcom planet
Bakery item
Reserved
Wintry cry
Ouray, e.g.
Golly!
Assuage
Cpls.' bosses
Father of
geometry
Chatty pets
Bea Arthur
sitcom
Wild time
Luxury car
Sufficient, in
verse
Bard's river
Love god
Barely
scraped by
Capote's
nickname
Prehistoric


Dear Annie: I'm 16 years
old, and I have two best
friends, "Krystina" and
"Tayler," who mean
the world to me.
Lately, Krystina has
been full of drama.
She often says she
feels left out and hurt.
But, Annie, we never
do anything without
including her.
Recently, she's been
pulling this whole "you
guys never tell me any-
thing until two weeks
later" thing. But I usu- AN N
ally tell her everything MAIL
at the same time I tell
Tayler. She even
knows stuff about me that Tayler
doesn't. But she claims that
Tayler tells me personal things
that she doesn't repeat That's not
true, and Tayler confirmed that
the three of us learn everything
at the same time. If we miss
something, it's because it's so
unimportant that we forget.
But I will admit that sometimes
I withhold things because I know
Krystina will judge me and make
me feel bad when I need her sup-
port the most. Still, those times
are rare, and I always tell her rel-
atively soon. Yet when I say this
to her, it's like we have two dif-
ferent versions of reality.
I don't know what to do. I don't
want to lose Krystina's friend-
ship. I feel terrible that she's
hurting over this, but I have no
idea how to change it. I can't text
her every time I dye my hair or
buy a hamburger, and neither can
Tayler. But then, neither does
Krystina. So what do we do? -
Stuck in the Middle


Dear Stuck: Three-way friend-
ships are sometimes hard to nav-
igate, particularly in high school,
when hormones are
running rampant and
emotions are harder
Sto control. Krystina's
reality actually is a lit-
tle different, and we
suspect she feels she
is competing for your
affection. The best you
can do is frequently
reassure her that you
value her friendship,
think she's a great per-
lE'S son and want to stay
BOX close. Try not to ex-
clude her, and address
her lack of support
with honesty at the time it hap-
pens. The rest is up to her.
Dear Annie: I am married to
the greatest woman in the world.
Several years ago, while still in
my 20s, I discovered I have a
heart condition that requires a
lot of medications. I will be deal-
ing with it my entire life.
The problem is that lately my
libido seems to be almost not
there. My wife takes the brunt of
my failure in the bedroom and
often remarks that I don't find
her attractive. But I do. I am
more in love with her now than
when we married.
We want children, and obvi-
ously, this hampers my ability to
reproduce. I've been thinking
about adoption. With my limita-
tions, how do I make my wife feel
as amazing as she is? Want To
Feel YoungAgain
Dear Want: Please make an ap-
pointment to see your doctor, and
ask about changing your medica-
tions. Sometimes a little tweak-


ing can work wonders. More im-
portantly, take your wife with you
so the doctor can explain how
certain medications might inter-
fere with your sex life. There is
no reason for her to take this so
personally Frank and frequent
communication is the best way to
handle it, and work on other ways
to make your wife feel amazing in
the bedroom.
Dear Annie: Like "Undecided
Mom," I have boxes of childhood
memorabilia for my grown chil-
dren, who now have children of
their own. Instead of continuing
to store their stuff, I've been "gift-
ing" them with a year's worth of
their childhood at a time.
When my daughter's first baby
was born, I gave her everything
I'd saved from her own first year.
I loved looking through it When
that first grandchild entered 4th
grade last fall, he thought it was
great to see his mom's old report
cards, projects and pictures from
when she was his age. We've
shared a lot of laughs and memo-
ries this way Memory Lane
Traveler


Annie's Mailbox is written by
Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar,
longtime editors of the Ann Lan-
ders column. Email anniesmail-
box@comcastnet, or write to:
Annie's Mailbox, c/o Creators
Syndicate, 737 Third St., Her-
mosa Beach, CA 90254. To find
out more aboutAnnie's Mailbox
and read features by other Cre-
ators Syndicate writers and car-
toonists, visit the Creators
Syndicate Web page at
www creators. com.


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
I'm happy to tell
you that you've
Seen approved
,i for your business
loan.
"







HE WAS ALE- TO START HIS
TRAFFIC SIeNAL R)SINESS
AFTER HI5 BANKER
GAVE HIM THIS,
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


3-24


2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


HOOF V ON MAN
INERT Il E VA
STRA W STEAMER
N I KE CHOR D
VXE C O HE MHE
IRE GG DEAL
BONE ARIA DIS
EXAM NEED AKA
EIlSiSNEHRU
CABLE K EPI
I LLEGAL TRE KS
NEV ANE SERGE
Q E D L YE DnE BT


ENTERTAINMENT


SATURDAY, MARCH 24, 2012 C7


y





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Peanuts


Garfield


Pickles


For Better or For Worse


/ QwCs Y cQ!uite 7JC 1p o
T'"E I1 VE OM E Ct IIM qooSROLMLr 1EAT
MAVER, UP ALM! A OO I tmORA GE 11 /14
EARL? 00o APWE- OW'




K^ \'\j\ '^ "^ "
/W (-& ^ -^ --; 6
I Ki p i ,^ ii
;^i Lt /- _^*^ ,,1 -_a^ ^=e


FIGURE OUT WITH A WHISPER AT
HOW TO FIRST, AND THEN
START THE FULL-FLEDGED
PANIC. ANARCHY.
GOING
BACK TO
WORK.
r ~ ~ : I ) -
/ b';b


WJE DVoNT WAiNT- T
UPSET- DRDV/, LIZ-.IE
-SO "THRT-F LITE
TROUBLE. J U EJ-
HRD WI-lfHTHE
CRA-ToDAY
weIeL-e BE ae -
OUR SECetl





Beetle Bailey -


The Grizzwells


The Born Loser

DFOWOU P\TCA WELL IRC 'OU PTC- GREAT WE
FR5T 5P4ING WOUL4> -EWON..J


Kit 'N' Carlyle Rubes


"How odd. I just had the sudden urge to
coin a cliched parental warning."


Doonesbury Flashback


Big Nate
HEAPIN& HOME, NATE ?
NO,
GORPIE,
THERE
WORK
TO BE
AONE.





Arlo and Janis -


5fft UM SO MET AIZlYOU pOSTIV1.
I THINK PA sNTS dOT
vRe %a PROB ouru F ore t r ('
':AV, TO t66 M YOURy vMyFa-Kj5 ^- (Wii/ IT - -
W/ILL BU CIIHbN YOU
rs'BACKYARP. COOL wITH MOV BACK -
TH TV
~L
^^-Y) \r,.r- ''' ** v(i^^-:l'

^^ _^^ L .^',,.^-;


Blondie


NOW iF YOU'LL EXCUSE ME, I AVE
STO GO SCRAMBLE YOUR ONNR



(- -


Dennis the Menace The Family Circus


I'KNOWV W 'AT'S COOLJ0E? ON A FARM
NOLI CAN GET MILK IN N BOTTLE AND ON TAR"
Betty


"Know what, when I'm old enough
to be a person..."


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377
"The Hunger Games" (PG-13) 1 p.m., 1:30 p.m.,
4:05 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7:20 p.m., 7:50 p.m., 10:20
p.m., 10:50 p.m.
"21 Jump Street" (R) ID required. 1:15 p.m., 7:30
p.m., 10:40 p.m.
"John Carter" (PG-13) In Real 3D. 1:05 p.m., 4:15
p.m., 7:15 p.m., 10:25 p.m. No passes.
"Dr. Seuss'The Lorax" (PG) In Real 3D. 1:45 p.m.,
4:50 p.m. No passes.
"Act of Valor" (R) ID required. 1:40 p.m., 4:45 p.m.,
7 p.m., 10:30 p.m.

Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"The Hunger Games" (PG-13) 12:30 p.m., 1 p.m.,
1:30 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 6:50 p.m., 7:20 p.m.,
7:50 p.m., 9:50 p.m., 10:20 p.m., 10:50 p.m.


"21 Jump Street" (R) ID required. 1:20 p.m., 5 p.m.,
8 p.m., 10:30 p.m.
"A Thousand Words" (PG-13) 1:10 p.m., 4:30 p.m.,
7:30 p.m., 9:55 p.m.
"John Carter" (PG-13) In Real 3D. 12:45 p.m., 4
p.m., 7 p.m., 10 p.m. No passes.
"Dr. Seuss' The Lorax" (PG) 12:35 p.m., 4:55 p.m.,
9:40 p.m.
"Dr. Seuss' The Lorax" (PG) In Real 3D. 2:45 p.m.,
7:05 p.m. No passes.
"Gone" (PG-13) 1:15 p.m., 4:45 p.m., 7:40 p.m.,
10:10 p.m.
"Act of Valor" (R) ID required. 4:05 p.m.
"The Artist" (PG-13) 12:55 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:15
p.m., 9:45 p.m.
Visit www.chronicleonline.com for area movie listings
and entertainment information.


Times subject to change; call ahead.


WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public Local RADIO WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Contemp. WSKY 97.3 FM News Talk WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WXOF-FM 96.3 Adult Mix WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s, '60s, '70s
WEKJ FM 96.7, 103.9 Religious WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WRZN-AM 720 Adult Standards

CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: A slenba 3


"MLG FHGJM JOGHAKJR RNEGP LJC


RNM NRPZ JPHGJXZ SGGR VHAMMGR, AM


LJC JPHGJXZ SGGR


HGTGKMGX."


V. CNOGHCGM OJWFLJO

Previous Solution: "Country music fans are extremely supportive. Once they're with
you, they're with you for life." Faith Hill
(c) 2012 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 3-24


Sally Forth


WoE'RE GOING-
"-To FOG6ET
S ARLL BOTrI IT.
PRETEHNMD l-
DIDNT HAPPEN
-UNDERSR1Nt


: "211 i .2
s Ji -- -I-
( L!-^ HHij


Dilbert


(FINE, AG6WOOD...I GIVE UPI YOU
WIN THE ARGUMENT!






--
A- ." v- ..--...


/MAYBE I DON'T REALLY
WIN THAT ONE'


MY BASEBALL TEAM
NEEDS A SPONSOR,
AND I WON'T REST
UNTIL I FIND ONE !


Frank & Ernest


Today's MOVIES


C8 SATURDAY, MARCH 24, 2012


COMICS











CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SATURDAY, MARCH 24, 2012 C9


CITRUS COUNTY




H ONICL Classifieds

www.chronicleonline.com Classifieds in Print and Online AI The Time!


BUSINESS HOURS:

MONDAY-FRIDAY
8:00 A.M. 5:00 P.M.

CLOSED SATURDAY/SUNDAY



WE GLADLY ACCEPT

S E=. -


PLUS SIZE WOMEN'S
CLOTHING 3XAssorted
women's clothing Erika,
George,Liz $2.00 each
piece 352 634-2737



6 PC.BEDROOM SET,
MAPLE
great cond, 6 mos old
queen, pd $1800 ask-
ing $800, SENTRY
SAFE,5ft tall, 16" deep
21"long pd $600, asking
$300 (352) 201-1806
BUICK RIVIERA 90
All Options, Moon Roof
68k miles, A true classic
Immac. Con. $6700 obo
(352)634-3806
BUILDING SUPPLY
Pine Rough Sawn,
Lengths to 20 ft.
Widths to 15", $1 BF
(352) 447-5560
CADILLAC
1993 Allante Nstar. Soft
& hardtop auto
low miles black mint
$16KObo 352-563-1915
CREST
2003, 22 ft, Super sport,
2004 Mtr 90HP Johns,
Tandem axle galv. trlr.
$13,500 (352) 795-8941
or (352) 422-1569

YARDSALE
Crystal River
Village
ANNUAL
YARD SALE
3/24,Sat 8a -I p
New Location
First Presbyterian
Church 1501 SE
Hwy 19 Parking Lot,
Crystal River
EVINRUDE 89
40HP
Power T &T, w/controls
completely tuned/new
paint $1500
(352) 564-1324
FORD
'97, F150 XLT, reg. cab,
8ft, 124k, loaded, great
condition $3,500 firm
(352) 344-4157

GUN SHOW
LEESBURG NAT'L GRD
ARMORY
400 West Meadow St,
Leesburg, Fl 34748
Sat, 9-5, Sun, 9-4
Concealed Weapons
Classes Daily
GunTraders is now
buying GOLD
Bring your GUNS &
GOLD to sell or trade.
Free Safety Class
at 10 & 1
GunTrader
GunShows.com
352-359-0134
HERNANDO
2/1, $400 Mo. No Pets.
(352) 344-1476
HERNANDO
ESTATE MOVING
SALE
5028 North Tanglewood
HUGE Estate Moving
Sale! Sunday, March
25th 8am-2ish
PACECRAFT
'89,16 ft. Flats Boat 50
Merc, polling platform,
rerigged & painted 2005
$6,200 352-447-5560




,,.. er ,


Fast and Affordable.
and Friendly, Licensed.
(352) 476-3985
PALM COAST
'00, 16 ft, CC, 3 batter-
ies, 50HP John, elect.
mtr. & trlr. depth find.
$3,000 (352) 249-7994
PINE RIDGE
Saturday 24th, 6a-lp
5096 N. Persimmon Dr
POMERANIAN PUPPIES
Adorable pomeranian
babies male and female
$500.00 Vet checked,
shots, and health certif-
icate included.
352-400-8196
REFRIGERATOR
FRIGIDAIRE S/S
stainless steel, 1 yr old
$750 neg, Washer &
Dryer Kenmore, white
good cond, 2 yr old
$300pr (352) 201-1806
SALE 50% Off Mnf. Price
Pontoon Boat Reuphol.
Sale Tops & Covers
Repairs 352-563-0066
SEWING MACHINE
Electronic,multi stitch,
heavy duty, cost $350,
bargain $95 In box,as
new, 563 1915

YOU'LL v THIS!
SMOOTH-TOP RANGE.
Like new. $400.00.
Frigidaire Elec. 30"
Slide-in range, 4 burn-
ers with self-cleaning
oven. Call:
352-628-5770
TOYOTA
2001 Camry LE, loaded
with leather, 4-cyl,
auto. $3,800
(352) 746-2932



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
Paid for Junk Vehicles
J.W. 352-228-964
$$ CASH PAID $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL
Appls. Riding Mowers,
Scrap Metal, AC Unit
cell -352-270-4087



FREE FIREWOOD
(352) 726-3221
FREE HORSE
MANURE
352-249-6235
Free Horse manure
Dunnellon area
(352) 804-0121
KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Savage Pays top $$$.
352-628-4144
Several Beds Full size &
King box springs and
mattress, no frames.
Free if you need them
Helping Hands Ministry
(352) 503-2054
352-628-7444
Yorkie Male,
7 years Old
Free to good home




Lost Black Back Pack
Bike Trail
Between Turne Camp
& down Inverness
REWARD
(352) 419-7003


** REWARD**
3 yrs. old Tabby, dark &
Strips, green eyes, Lost
Near Seabreeze Apt.
(727) 235-9332






REWARD $1000.
No Questions ask.
Min Pin Female 10 lbs
name Zoey, Needs
meds. last seen Sun 8/7
Holiday Dr off Turkey
Oak Crystal River
(352)257-9546 400-1519
REWARD
Two 8 Week Old
Pomeranian Puppies
Male silver/black
Female/Apricot
Bella Oasis Motel
Downtown Homosassa
(269) 370-8390


SAMMY
Male, 5 yrs old,
declawed Tan,
Cream & Charcoal
Missing since 3/6/12
Windy Ave. Inverness
Please call 341-2456
Tan & White
Pitt Bull Mix, Female
Pink Bull Mixed
Citronella Area
(352) 302-0710
Tortoiseshell Cat
1/2 mouth gold, female
lost Sugarmill Woods
(352) 382-3975



Found Dark Brown
Brindle Pitt Bull Type
Found on Dunkinfield
Crystal River
(352) 257-4680
Shih Tzu male
fawn & white, found
Homosassa Area 3
weeks ago. Citrus Co
animal, we want him to
found his home.
(352) 746-8400



Huge discounts when
you buy 2 types of
advertising! 122
weekly newspapers,
32 websites, 25 daily
newspapers. Call
now to diversify your
advertising with Ad-
vertising Networks of
Florida
(866)742-1373



FRESH JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct.@ $5 per lb
Stone Crab@ $6 per Ib
delivered 727-771-7500



Attn Snowbirds
Cleaning & Lawncare
Service, avail w/
exc.refs (386) 956-8128
WANTED TO RENT
Class C or Class A
Motor home,
traveling to Maine &
back to Florida
approx 3 wks in July
2012 352-794-3272


000AN34

Sudoku ****** 4puz.com

3 1


4 86 9


58 4


6 7


8 3 5_ 9

4 2


9 1_ 8


5 _13 6


6 4

Fill in the squares so that each row, column, and
3-by-3 box contain the numbers 1 through 9.


BATTERIES: BATTERY REBUILD SERVICES:
Laptop / GPS Cordless Power Tools
Cell / Cordless Phone U.P.S. Backup
Camera I Camcorder Cordless Vacuums
Watch I Electronics Custom Battery Rebuild
Wheelchair / Scooter
Rechargeables / Chargers i
Airsoft/RC etC

3850 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy, Inverness
New Store Hours: Mon.-Fri. g9am-5pm, Saturday 10am-5pm & Closed Sunday
, (352) 344-1962 Mention this coupon geta free LED flashlight.


FIT Administrative
Asst./Secretary

For Large property
Owers Assoc. Citrus
County Must be pro-
fessional computer
literate and a team
player. Home owners
assoc.exp. helpful
Fax Resume To:
(352) 746-0875.



HAIRSTYLIST
& BARBER
w/clientele preferred
(352)795-2511









Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966




#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aevourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)
Avante
At Inverness
Open Position
DIETARY AID
Full time, Hours and
days will vary. Please
apply online At
Avantecenters.com

Come Join Our Team
LPN FT 3-11
Mon. Fri.
Leadership Skills
Required. Health Ins
available and
benefits. Please
apply within at:
Cedar Creek
Assisted Living
352-564-2446

Exp. Optical
Dispenser
For Busy Optometrist
Office Mon thru Fri.
No nights or wkends
Please Fax Resume
352-628-6377
or Email hec@
drsnewcomer.com

Full time Positions
AVAILABLE,
Fast Paced
Pediatric, internal
medicine office
Medical Assistant
Medical Records
Front Desk
Email Resume
info@pedimhealth
care.com
or fax 527-8818

Immediate
Openings

LPN & RN's
for Correctional and
Hospice RN's for
Hospitals Med/Surg
and ICU


CNA/HHA's
Apply At
HOME INSTEAD
SENIOR CARE
4224 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Lecanto
MEDICAL BILLERS
& CODERS ARE IN
DEMAND
Train to become a
Medical Office Assis-
tant! No Experience
needed! Job Training
& Local Placement
assistance. HS
Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)374-7294
Medical office
looking for
FT BILLING
high energy
individual with
billing/general exp
Fax resume to
352-746-5605

NURSING
ASSISTANT
Looking for strong
energetic people
willing to become
part of a family. Team
work a plus. Nursing
exp. helpful. Apply at
Emeitus At Barrington
Place 2341 W. Norvell
Bryant Hwy, Lecanto
EOE/DFWP

P/T MEDICAL
ASSISTANT
Experience needed.
Please send resume
to P.O. Box 3087
Homosassa Springs,
Florida 34447




INSURANCE
AGENTS

220 or 440 Licensed
Insurance Agents
needed Immediate
openings for Sales
Producer or Cus-
tomer Service Repre-
sentative. Full time or
Pt time possibilities.
Great Salary, bene's
& bonuses. Email
resume to Tracy Fero
tfero@feroinsurance.
com or call
352-422-2160

Key Training
Center
has P/T on-call
positions available in
group home setting.
Assist adults with
disabilities in daily
living. HS Diploma/
GED required.
Apply in person at
5399 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy., Lecanto FL
34461 *E.O.E.*

Looking for
Commercial/Personal
Insurance Agents
Lic. 220 OR 440
Please fax Resume
489-0384 or email
birdins@bellsouth net

MARKETING/
COLLECTIONS
Exp. preferred, Email
resume to: telecollect
@hotmail.com or
Fax to 866-588-3604
NO CALLS




EXP. COOKS
& SERVERS
High volume, good
shifts. Apply in person
Mon-Fri. 9am-11am
COACH'S
114 W. Main St., Inv.
11582 N. Williams St.
Dunnellon EOE


Publication Days/Deadlines

Chronicle / Daily.................................... 1 PM, Daily
Homefront / Sunday...............................3 PM, Friday
Chronicle / Sunday.............................4...4 PM, Friday
Chronicle / Monday............................4...4 PM, Friday
Sumter County Times / Thursday............. 1 AM, Tuesday
Riverland News / Thursday.....................2 PM, Monday
South Marion Citizen / Friday..................4 PM, Tuesday
West Marion Messenger / Wednesday.......4 PM, Friday


EXP. LINE COOK,
Needed for Inverness
Golf & Country Club.
Fax Resume to:
352-726-3559

Experienced Chef
With Line Experience
Parttime Friday Nights
Mandatory Contact
George Kanaris @
352-464-4216 or Call
Bill @ 727-856-7302

LOLLYGAGGERS
Sports Pub & Grill
Now Hiring
ALL POSITIONS
Experience Req'd
Apply within
744 SE US HWy 19
(next to Mr B's
carwash) Cry Riv.

SERVERS
Must be 18 or older.
Apply Fisherman's
Restaurant
12311 E Gulf to Lake
(352) 637-5888




NATIONAL NUTRITION
COMPANY
seeking local reps for
placement of Im-
mune Health News-
papers in high traffic
locations. Excellent
income potential
with residuals. Call
today (800)808-5767




Apply Now
12 Drivers Needed
Top 5% Pay 2 Mos.
CDL Class A Driving Exp.
(877)258-8782
www.meltontruck.com/dr
ive
Drivers -
DAILY PAY!
up to $.42/mile
plus $.02/mile
quarterly safety bonus -
New trucks-Van and
Refrigerated CDL -A
3 months recent expe-
rience required
(800) 414-9569
www.driveknight .com
DRIVERS: RUN
5 STATES REGIONAL!
Get Home Weekends,
earn up to 39cent mile,
1 yr OTR Flatbed Exp.
required. SUNBELT
TRANSPORT, LLC
800-572-5489 X 227

Eagle Buick
GMC, Inc
Is in need of
experienced
automotive service
consultants/advisors.
One of the best deal-
ership pay plans in
the county. Minimum
2 yrs experience
preferred. Great
opportunity for one to
find a career path,
and earn a great
living. Very produc-
tive repair facility and
a professional
environment with
plenty of growth po-
tential in a growing
community. Benefits.
Drug Free Workplace.
Application Available
@ Eagle Buick GMC
Inc. Send Resume:
Fax (352) 417-0944
Email
robbcole@eagle
buickgmc.com

EXP. A/C TECH
Installer
Apply at AirFx
1840 Hwy 44 Inv
from 8-9am daily


Fk Your tDrw mHori


EXP. MECHANIC
Clean Drivers License
Tools a Plus.
Applvyin Person:
WALLY'S
806 NE US19CryRiv.

HIRING EXPERIENCE/
INEXPERIENCE TANKER
DRIVERS!
Great benefits and
Pay! New fleet Volvo
Tractors! 1 year OTR
Exp. Req.- Tanker Train-
ing Available. Call
Today: 877-882-6537
www.OaklevTransport
.com
MAINTENANCE
WORKER
Condo seeks person w/
lawn care, irrigation,
painting, & light carpen-
try skills. FIT, long-term
temp. w/ possible per-
manent. Must be over
18, drug-free, &
English-speaking. Ex-
perience pref. but will
train. 352-400-3231
M-F 7-4.
NEW TO TRUCKING?
Your new career starts
now! *0 Tuition Cost*No
Credit Check* Great
Pay & Benefits, Short
employment commit-
ment required
call (866)297-8916
www.ioinCRST.com
NEW TO TRUCKING?
Your new career starts
now! *0 Tuition Cost*No
Credit Check* Great
Pay & Benefits, Short
employment commit-
ment required
call (866)297-8916
www.ioinCRST.com


PLUMBERS
Must have driver's
license352-621-0671






A NY

TOOLMAKER
NEED PANTOGRAPH
EXP. FORM GRINDER,
A/C SHOP, BENEFITS,
TURBINE BROACH CO.
(352) 795-1163

VEHICLE DETAIL

Full Time
Valid Drivers
License needed
Weekends, no experi-
ence needed for
right person, drug
free workplace
CITRUSKIA

^K^^E/


Money is available
with this great part
time job! 7 days a
week, 4-5 hours per
day, early morning
hours, delivering
newspapers to
homes. Must be 18
years old and have
valid driver's license
and insurance. Email
kstewart@chroni-
cleonline.com.


25 Driver Trainees
Needed Now!
at Schneider National
Earn $700 per week!
No experience
needed! Local CDL
Training! Job ready in
15 days!
(888)368-1964

Sheriffs
Ranches
Enterprises

Customer Service
Representative I
HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA
OH GEO REQUIRED
$7.50 per hour
Part-Time 18 hrs/wk
CONTACT
Shern ll Cordero
Thrif Store in Crystal over
2CITRUS HW19SPRINGS
Crystal &Countver, FL 3442ub
(352) 489-5045
EIE/DFWP

APPOINTMENT
SETTERS NEEDED
Seniors Welcome
No nights, No wknds.
Apply at
Trail, Homosassa Frt

COUNTER HELP

Apply in Person
Golf &Country Club
8690 N. Golfview Dr.
(352) 489-5045
Instructors Needed
Scrap Booking,
Stamping, One stroke
(352) 586-3504



#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvouicna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)



AIRLINES ARE HIRING -
Train for hands on
Aviation Maintenance
Career. FAA approved
program.
Financial aid if qualified
- Housing Available.
CALL Aviation Institute
Of Maintenance.
(866)314-3769



Y, ul 'i Il l I est.




Classifieds


"Can you Dig It?"
Heavy Equipment
School, 3 wk training
program. Backhoes,
Bulldozers, Trackhoes.
Local Job placement
asset. Start digging
dirt Now.
(877)994-9904

"Can you Dig It?"
Heavy Equipment
School, 3 wk training
program. Backhoes,
Bulldozers, Trackhoes.
Local Job placement
asset. Start digging
dirt Now.
(877)994-9904

#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)

Attend College
Online from Home
*Medical, *Business,
*Paralegal,
*Accounting,
*Criminal Justice. Job
placement assis-
tance. Computer
available. Financial
Aid if qualified. SHEV
certified. Call
(877) 206-5165
www.CenturaOnline
.cam




TAYLORCOLLEGE





2 WEEK
PREP COURSES!
*ALF ADMINISTRATOR
$300.
*EKG TECH $475.
*NURSING ASST. $475.
*PHLEBOTOMY $475.
taylorcollege.edu
(352) 245-4119
FB, twitter, you tube


NOW
ENROLLING
FOR SPRING
2012 CLASSES
COSMETOLOGY
FACIAL
i FULL SPECIALTY
i -INSTRUCTOR
wMANICURE/Nail Ext

BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
NEW PORT RICHEY
/SPRING HILL
727-848-8415
352-263-2744
I m Il


Team Delivery



Opportunity


Would you like to

deliver newspapers

but don't want to

work 7 days a week?


We are taking applications
for teams to contract a
route.

V Lead contractor must
be 18 yrs of age J

V Must have valid driver's
license and insurance



MAKE EXTRA MONEY!

DELIVERING



= www c)oro eonnli.corm

Email:
kstewart@chronicleonline.com
or come to
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River for an application.


U

I 67934 1825~


^C jH^*^ T* T^

TOB ADVERTISE CALL:

3m*1 r3 *1




OPLCYO ADOLNA
wwB croiceolie^o


4 3 2 5 8 6 7 9 19
58 12 7 9 693 4
195863472
8234 1 7569
7,4,6 69 2 5 1 8
964752318
2 5 7 1 38 9 46
3 1 86 94 2 5 7


Trades
Skills^


CLASSIFIED


I I I I I I I I .












CI0 SATURDAY, MARCH 24, 2012


8 MOBILE HOMES
12 AC., Good Income
Lots of Possibilities
(352) 212-6182




2 Old English brass
Carriage Lamps
Lamps $200.
(352) 563-2555
Early 1900's
solid wood Amoire &
vanity $375 ea.
(352) 476-0563




Haviland
hand-painted
turkey platter, $40
(352) 563-9614
KEWPIE DOLLS collec-
tion of Kewpie dolls,
10 for $30.00 513-4473
SOURING EAGLE 12 in
high/Was 59.95/selling
for 20.00 Linda 341-4449
Teddy bear, 85 yrs. old
and 85 yr. old Baby hair
brush, make offer
(352) 563-9614


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966

Waterford crystal
6 stemmed cordial
glasses, $40
(352) 563-9614




APARTMENT SIZE RE-
FRIGERATOR good con-
dition $75 Walter @
352-364-2583
FRIGIDAIRE
Commercial Deep
Chest Freezer
15 cubic ft, like new
$125 (989) 763-6810
GE ELECT. RANGE
COIL BURNERS, LIKE
NEW $250 634-2004
Kenmore Dryer
White $129. Hotpoint
electric stove, nice
cond $149.
(352) 382-1617
Maytag Hvy duty
natural gas dryer
exc cond $150
(352) 270-8215
REFRIGERATOR
FRIGIDAIRE S/S
stainless steel, 1 yr old
$750 neg, Washer &
Dryer Kenmore, white
good cond, 2 yr old
$300pr (352) 201-1806
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR, washers
dryers,FREE pick up
352-564-8179

YOU'LL v THIS!
SMOOTH-TOP RANGE.
Like new. $400.00.
Frigidaire Elec. 30"
Slide-in range, 4 burn-
ers with self-cleaning
oven. Call:
352-628-5770
WANTED DEAD
OR ALIVE
Washers & Dryers
(352) 209-5135




DESK CHAIR Swivel with
arm rests, smaller size,
very good condition. $15
Can email photo.
352 726 9983


SKIL BAND SAW porta-
ble 10 inch used needs
blade electnc.$35.00,also
work table $20.00
352-513-4473



DIGITAL PHOTO FRAME
7 Inch with remote and
SD photo card. Like new
$25. Can email photo.
352 726 9983
SMALL DISH ANTENNA
small dish antenna with
roof mount.$99.00 phone
352-637-7152



FREE WINDOWS
4-38x55, 1 38x53
Great for shed or project
352-489-3914 after
11am
Pine Rough Sawn,
Lengths to 20 ft. Widths
to 15", $1 BF
(352) 447-5560
PVC PIPE 10' x 6"
around. $10.00 Ruth
352-382-1000
STORM DOOR WHITE
W/GLASS AND SCREEN
GOOD CONDITION $45
634-2004
USED PVC PIPE many
lengths of used white pvc
pipe. $99.
352-637-7152



DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
HP Computer
w/tower $120.
Tower only $70.
(352)586-6891
MOBILE POWER ADAP-
TOR CYBER POWER,
12 volt DC to 120 AC,
140 Watts, Like new. $30
352 726 9983



7 Piece Cast
Aluminum Patio Set
Tempered glass table,
2 swivel & 4 cushion
chairs, like new $350.
(352) 344-5250
PATIO FURNITURE PVC
Table 4 cushioned chairs
1 chaise lounge,
wheeled cart.$100
phone:795-7474



2 CHEST OF DRAWERS
$20 each Walter @
352-364-2583
4 Caster Kitchen
Chairs
pastel cloth padded
$25. ea.
(352) 382-3159
6 PC.BEDROOM SET,
MAPLE
great cond, 6 mos old
queen, pd $1800, ask-
ing $800, SENTRY
SAFE,5ft tall, 16" deep
21 "long pd $600 asking
$300 (352) 201-1806
92" Sofa, Dark Wood
w/ light tan fabric
5 pillows included
$300
(352) 503-2413
ASHLEY
COUCH,LOVESEAT,
OTTOMAN tan leather
couch with matching
loveseat and ottoman
$450.00 352-726-9964
Bassett Ent Center
3pcs. W/ 9' perf. cond.
beautiful wood $600
Sofa, pwr reclining both
ends, ultra suede, sage
color 2/2 y.o. $450
Bakers Rack hvy, dk
grn. metal wood shelf
$100.(352) 795-6767
Bookcase, solid cherry
wood, excel cond.
6ft, tall, 6 shelves $125.
Small slant antique
desk, excel. cond. $75.
(352) 489-9986
BROYHIL FLORAL
COUCH comfy and in
Excellent condition asking
$85.00 352-527-1399
BROYHIL FLORAL
COUCH in excellent con-
dition asking $85.00
352-527-1399
Color TV with DVD
PAUL'S FURNITURE
628-2306 Homosassa
paulsfurnitureonline.com


V11



COMFORTS OF
HOME
USED FURNITURE
www. com-
fortsofhomeused
furniture.comr 795-0121
COMPUTER
DESK/SMALL fair
condition/10.00 Linda
341-4449
Couch
1/2 circle, tan new $500
4 kit chairs blk wrought
iron $120. Glass top
table $120. obo
(646) 963-5829
Couch Lazy Boy
7 ft long recliner on
each side,
almost new $150.
(352) 382-0042
COUCH
white, pull-out
$25 (352) 201-1806
Dining Rm. Set, early
american medium oak,
china hutch, table with
7 chairs, server table,
rocker and 2 bar stools,
excel. cond. $600
Bedroom Set, king size
bed, dark walnut,
dresser, 2 mirrors, 2
night stands, head-
board, mattress &
boxspring almost new
$350. 352-563-2493
DVDNIDEO RACK 5
Shelf rack.
45"H X 14"W X 6"D
Light wood laminate.
$6.00 Call 746-1017
King Size Headboard,
Mattress and boxspring
$125.
(352) 382-2379
Kitchen table
white w/ oak top
& 4 chairs $75
352-563-2493
Large Glass top dining
rm table w/ 6 chairs
$600 obo
3 pc. Entertainment
Center $200
(352) 503-7379
Lazy Boy Sleeper Sofa
Nice Condition
$165.
(352) 726-3221
LAZY-BOY QUEEN
SOFABED OR RECLIN-
ING LOVESEAT $200.00
EACH OR $350.00 FOR
BOTH 352-726-0686
MICROWAVE CART
White:bought new,one
door on bottom loose.$20
(352) 344-3472
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
352-628-0808
Roll Top Desk
$100
Entertainment Center
$150 obo
(352) 489-3511
THOMASVILLE TABLES
Beautiful oak end tables.
Pristine condition.$ 99.00
each 352-726-9132
Twin Size Day Bed
w/ mattress & match-
ing 6 drawer dresser w/
mirror Excellent Cond.
$250obo (989)640-3419
Homosassa
Twin Size Sofa Bed
Asking $200
3 Glass Top Living Room
Tables $150.
(352) 503-7379




CHICKEN
MANURE/FERTILIZER
THE TIME IS NOW! 25
avail. 201b bags $4.oo
per bag. 352-563-1519
Gas Weed Eater
$25. obo
(352) 697-5214
GRASS SEEDS! GRASS
SEEDS! GRASS SEEDS!
American Farm & Feed
352-795-6013
LAWN CART,
32"x41"and16" deep with
bicycle tires. Easier to
use than a wheel barrow.
$65 phone 527 1245
Lesco Viper
commercial zero turn
lawn mower, 60" deck
Clean, $2,000
(352) 634-4439


Power Pro Riding
Mower 42" deck
4x8 utility trailer -
$400.
(352) 746-7357
SNAPPER RIDER MOWER
14.5 horsepower
38" cut, good condition
$300 or best offer
(352) 503-2472







Sugarmill

Woods
Sat 8a-12
tools, minlota camera
furn. pictures, hsehld
items, men's s clothes
& much more !!
54 Cypress Blvd W.

BEVERLY HILLS
Fri. 23 & Sat. 24, 8a-4p
*MOVING SALE *
Everything Must Go!
3194 N. Tamarisk Ave.

BEVERLY HILLS
OUR LADY OF
GRACE CHURCH
FLEA MARKET!
SAT. Mar. 24th
8AM to 2PM.
6 Roosevelt Blvd.

CITRUS HILLS
134W. Liberty St. Fnday
Saturday 9Am-2PM
Household,Tools, Kids,
Bikes,Fishing,Golf
CRYSTAL RIVER
Fri., Sat. & Sun. 8am
Antiques, pictures,
Hshd Items & MORE
3855 N. Turkey Oak Dr.

YAD ,SALEt

Crystal River
Heritage ANTIQUES
Sat 9a-5p old & new
Items 103 N.W Hwy 19

The
t_ AGAPE
| HOUSE
F eOPLE NEED


CRYSTAL RIVER
HUGE INDOOR
Fundraising Sale
Fri. 3/23, Sat. 24
8a.-1p.
1st Baptist Church
700 N. Citrus Ave.
TO BENEFIT
AGAPE HOUSE
A MINISTRY FOR
PEOPLE IN NEED


YAR SALE
Crystal River
Sat Sun 8-? tools,
motorcycle parts &
more 8651 Candy Ln
acroos from High
Ocatane Bar Hwy 19


YARDSALE

CRYSTAL RIVER
UPSCALE SALE
Friday. & Sat 8a -3p
Collectible Glass,
furniture, jewelry some
antiques, coins etc,
Airport Storage Units,
80 & 81, behind Olive
Tree Restaurant Hwy 19


YA RDSALE

Crystal River
Village
ANNUAL
YARD SALE
3/24,Sat 8a -1 p
New Location
First Presbyterian
Church 1501 SE
Hwy 19 Parking Lot,
Crystal River
FLORAL CITY
Sat. 9am-3pm Clearing
Out 50+ years accu-
mulation. Yard tools,
hardware, household.
S. 41, E. Floral Park,
9926 S.Arabian
FOREST RIDGE
VILLAGE ANNUAL
SALE
Saturday the 24th, 8-5
**6 houses Forest
Ridge Blvd--off Rt 486


CLASSIFIED




GUN SHOW
LEESBURG NAT'L GRD
ARMORY
400 West Meadow St,
Leesburq, Fl 34748
Sat, 9-5, Sun, 9-4
Concealed Weapons
Classes Daily
GunTraders is now
buying GOLD
Bring your GUNS &
GOLD to sell or trade.
Free Safety Class
at 10 & 1
GunTrader
GunShows.com
352-359-0134

HOMOSASSA
Fri. 23 & Sat. 24 10a-3p
YARD SALE, Blankets,
Chairs Hsehold Goods
6656 W. Hilger Ct.
HOMOSASSA
Fri. 23 & Sat. 24, 8:AM-til
MULTI-FAMILY SALE
Antique, tools, collecti-
bles, furniture, large
variety of Misc. Items
10361 S. McClung Loop
HOMOSASSA
WALDEN WOODS
Community Yard/Bake
Sale Sat. Mar. 24 -8a-Ip
1 mi. S .of US 19 & 98
HOMOSSASA
SATURDAY 8-4 Corner
Silk flowers, vases,
printer, tools, & MORE!
of Hancock/Rooks Ct.
INVERNESS
8618 East Gospel Island
Rd Harbor Lights Com-
munity Sale. Sat. March
24th 9:00am to 2:00pm.
Big & Tall men's
clothes,tools, furniture,
women's clothes and
much more.

INVERNESS
Community Yard Sale
15 homes, Fri. 23 &
Sat. 24 8-3 The
Ranches off 581,
Antiques, silver, coins,
tools. Corvette's, furn.
Elvis banks & knives &
1000's of other items.
Additional homes on
Sat. 24

INVERNESS
Fri. 23 & Sat. 24 9A-2P.
LOTS Of PLANTS
4135 S. Big Al Point



Inverness
Sat 9-6p
Something For
Everyone.
505 Oak St


YARDSALE

INVERNESS
Thurs. Fri., Sat. 8am-?
Lots of Tools, & Misc.
1104 Trailridge Ave

LECANTO
Kensington Est.
232 East Reehill St
BLOW OUT
MOVING/GARAGE
SALE ALL ITEMS TO
GO FRI/SAT 8 TO 4
LECANTO
Saturday 24, 9am-3-pm
* HUGE SALE,* Tools,
Tarps, Furniture, & Misc.
TY'S AUTOMOTIVE
1899 N. Lecanto Hwy.
LECANTO
Sun. 25th One Day Only
7am-12 MOVING SALE
Furniture, Harley David-
son Motor Cycle parts,
MUCH MORE, Everyth-
ing Must Go! Cheap!
2493 N. Brentwood Cir


YARDSALE

PINE RIDGE
Sat 8- 1
Multi-Family
3221 W Blossom Dr

PINE RIDGE
Saturday 24th, 6a-lp
5096 N. Persimmon Dr





CRYSTAL

RIVER
Middle School
"for Relay For Life"
Sat Today 8a-3p
HUGE Rummage Sale
Tons to choose from.
344 N.E. Crystal St.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Sugarmill Woods
Sat 8-4 Reduced Prices,
offers considered,
198 Pine St SMW'S
Homosa 352 382-1167



Are U Moving? Estate?
In home liquidations?
MARTIN'S Estate &
Consign 352-209-4945



Beautiful Communion
Dress, size 14,$30.00
worn two hours 344-3736
DANCE COSTUMES
Different sizes, all in great
shape. $75 Would like to
sell all together.
352-476-8744
NEW WEDDING DRESS
SIZE 10 Beaded halter
top. Ordered wrong size,
(could not return) $50.00
352-637-4916



!!!!! 33X12.50 R15!!!!!
Good tread!!!! Only
asking $100 for the
pair!! (352)551-1810
******275/60 R20*****
Nice tread!! Like new!!
Only asking $80 for the
pair!! (352)551-1810
----185/65 R15----
Like new!!! High tread!!
Only asking $70 for the
pair!! (352)551-1810
2 BAR STOOLS RUST
COLORED SEATS FAIR
CONDITION 60.00 FOR
BOTH 464 0316
2 PLASTIC TOOL
BOXES for pick up trucks
$10 each Walter@
352-364-2583
2 WHEELBARROWS
1-DEEP PLASTIC-50.00
1-SHALLOW METAL
30.00 464 0316
4 BISTRO HEIGHT
PATIO CHAIRS,
swivel rockers. EXC Con-
dition.$100.00 for all four
Call 352-489-3820
12 x 12 canopy
EASY POP-UP never
used, $195
(352) 322-6456
2nd Hand Store
Open Tues-Sat 9a-5p
Furn, Appliances, tools,
clothing, misc. Items,
@ N. Maynard & Hwy 44
1/4 mi E. of Stokes FLea
ANTIQUE FROGS
2 glass,1 caged
$10.00 all 352-527-8287
Antique Ranger
Wood Burning Stove,
$160.
(352) 364-3009
Leave message
ARTISTS SUPPLIES Ink
Inco Co/Branden Sulphin
Co/Cleveland Printing Co
$10.00 352-527-8287
ARTISTS SUPPLIES
Oil Paint
Brera-ltaly/Permalba
-USA
$20.00 352-527-8287
BRATZ DOLLS & Bratz
Babies Great condition.
All for $30.00
352-563-5206
BRATZ Rock Angel
Stage with 3 Dolls "In the
Band" $35.00
352-563-5206
CIRCULAR SAW
$25 or best offer
MEN'S DESK CHAIR
$35 or best offer
(352) 382-1885
Collectors Print of
Robert E. Lee w/docs
$300.1adder $50. and
more @ Terra Vista
(352) 249-7630
Deluxe electric Bed
Twin size $175.
Upright Kenmore Kero-
sene Heater Used once
$50.
(920) 224-2513
FORD CARGO MAT
EXPEDITION $30.00
352-563-5206
FREE YORKIE /JACK
RUSSEL MIX approx 1
year old; great with kids;
long hair; white
352-637-3636
FURNITURE;Treadmill$170/ob
o, Tanning Bed
$300/obo, old tables
$75/obo, 6'x9' and
9'x12' florida rugs $160
both, @ Terra Vista @
352-249-7630


3-24 C Laughingstock International Inc, Dist by Universal UCick, 2012


"When you go to the bank tomorrow,
you should find an extra $50,000
in your savings account."



TRACTOR WORK


$30 + $30/hr Mowing, Grading,

Lite Loader, Tree Work,

Cleanup, and Wood Fences

Licensed and Insured


352-270-6800


GRASS SEEDS! GRASS
SEEDS! GRASS SEEDS!
American Farm & Feed
352-795-6013

GUN SHOW
LEESBURG NAT'L GRD
ARMORY
400 West Meadow St,
Leesburg, Fl 34748
Sat, 9-5, Sun, 9-4
Concealed Weapons
Classes Daily
GunTraders is now
buying GOLD
Bring your GUNS &
GOLD to sell or trade.
Free Safety Class
at 10& 1
GunTrader
GunShows.com
352-359-0134
Home Made Quilt Top
$25.
HD Whirlpool Dryer
$175
(352) 795-7254
Kinetico
Water Softner, 2 tanks &
1 salt tqank $160.
(352) 637-2735
LUGGAGE 3
pece,w/heels/retractable han-
dlesMfll separate
$60.00 Please call
352-726-0040
MAGNAVOX STEREO
SYSTEM 3 CD changer
and cassette player &
Like new. $30.00
352-563-5206
MOVING SALE
Recliner Chairs, BBQ,
5 pc. patio set, china
closet, 6 pc din rm.
tble, 3 ends & coffee
table microwave oven
(352) 860-1397
New Tent in Box
2 Person $40
New Charcoal Grill
in Box $160 Ladies 26"
3 speed bike $40.
(352) 489-3511
NEW WALLPAPER 3
DOUBLE ROLLS $30
165 SQ OFT- CAN E-MAIL
PHOTO 419-5981
NINTENDO DSI GAMES
$10 TO $15.00
352-563-5206

Old Franklin
Heat Stove
Good Cond. $325.
(352) 586-9498
PET LODGE Small dog
crate, heavy duty w/ bot-
tom tray. 17 1/2"W X
24"LX20 1/2 H. $15.00
Call 746-1017


NINTENDO DSI WITH
ORIGINAL PACKAGING
$100.00 352-563-5206
Port Generator
5550/8500 Watts, on
whls, + 25' 4 outlets
adapt cable $450
(812) 629-6538
PRINTS Robert Furbert
January and July Flower
of the month prints
$10.00 each
352-527-8287
SEWING MACHINE New
Home. In cabinet with at-
tachments. $25.00
563-2121
Siemans Over the Ear
Hearing Aid
Good Condition
Includes battery
Paid $825. Asking $400
(352) 382-3879
SILVER
German bowl and lace
cut dish
Italian relish pot
$20.00 352-527-8287
Singer Sewing
Machine, good cond.
$60.(352) 465-1262
STEM WARE
Miscellaneous Stem ware
$10.00 all 352-527-8287
STORM DOOR WHITE
W/GLASS AND SCREEN
GOOD CONDITION $45
634-2004
TELEPHONE ANSWER-
ING MACHINE $10 LIKE
NEW- E-MAIL PHOTO
419-5981
TONGS Aluminum bird
claw tongs
$5.00 352-527-8287
Wrought iron patio
furniture, 8pc., $300 for
all. Elec. Guitar & amp,
$125 for both.
(352) 586-9498




BEDSIDE COMMODE &
FOLDING ALUMINUM
WALKER ONLY 20.00
EACH 464 0316
MANUAL WHEELCHAIR
MEDIUM SIZE WITH
FOOT RESTS GOOD
SHAPE 100.00 464 0316
TOILET SEAT EXTENT
ION 4 INCH RISER
WITH HANDLES ONLY
20.00 464 0316
TRAVELING FOLD UP
WHEELCHAIR SMALL
SIZE FAIR CONDITION
60.00 464 0316


BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We Also
Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676











"NEW" PRO MODEL
ACOUSTIC GUITAR
W/GIGBAG,TUNER,STRA
PSTRINGS,PICKS&DVD
$100 352-601-6625
ACCORDION
VERY OLD NEEDS
RESTORATION ONLY
80.00 OBO 464 0316
Acoustic Electric
Guitar Gold Grovers
Fishman Pre amp Pro
features $100
(352) 601-6625
BABY GRAND
Antique Piano
needs tune-up
$800 or best offer
(352) 489-9266
CASIO LK-33 KEY-
BOARD In great shape.
Preprogrammed and light
up keyboard. $75
352-476-8744
LAP STEEL GUITAR,
CUSTOMIZED,BETTER
THAN NEW! EASY TO
LEARN $100
352-601-6625
PIANO Henry Miller
upright. Great shape
$500 464-0443
PIANO, GUITAR
Fender Rhodes, Mark 1,
88 keys, grt cond $500
SLAMMER BZ4 Base
Guitar, Brand new,
Cobalt $200
(352) 527-2759
PRACTICE AMP
10W-20W,OVERDRIVE
W/SEPERATE VOLUME
"NEW" $15
352-601-6625




FLOOR TILES 12x 12's
/118 piecies/25.00 Linda
341-4449


dnas Diwee ory


ALL EXTERIOR
ALUMINUM
6" Seamless Gutters
Lic & Ins 352-621-0881
ROB SCREENING
Repairs Rescreen, Front
Entries, Garage, Sliders
Free Est. 352-835-2020
SUBURBAN IND. INC.
Screen rms, Rescreens,
Siding, airports, rf.overs
wood decks, Fla. rooms








352-564-8179




We cuindows, garagke alls
types. Best prices any-
where! Hwy 44 & CR
491. (352) 746-1998



SMTHIS OUT!P


Repairs & Consignment
Dr30 yrs Cert. Bestee Pick Ues








& Guar 352-220-9435

Your World


30 yrs Cer. Best Prices




CUi

ROGERS Construction
All Construction
sm jobs Free Est (352)
637-4373 CRC1326872




SHADY VIEW CANVAS 1
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
Repairs. 352 613-2518




AFFORDABLE
COMPUTER SERV.
(352) 341-4150
DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469

NATURE COAST
COMPUTER Repairs
Free home inspection
352-212-1551




Bianchi Concrete
inc.com ins.lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-
Sidewalks. Pool deck
repair/stain 257-0078
CURB APPEAL/ Lic
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River rock
reseals & repairs. 352
364-2120/410-7383
FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, staining &
Garage Firs. Recession
Prices! 352-527-1097
ROB'S MASONRY
& CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs Tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554


All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling,
Site Prep, Driveways.
Lic. & Ins. 352- 795-5755



COUNTY WIDE DRY-
WALL -25 ys exp lic2875.
all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Pop Corn Removal
352-302-6838



BRIGHT ELECTRICAL
Res./Comm. Lic & Ins.
$50.hr. EC0001303
352-302-2366
DUN-RITE Elect
since '781 Free Est.
licEC 13002699
352- 726-2907
Thomas Electric LLC
Generator main &
repair. Guardian
Homestandby, &
Centurion. Cert. Tech.
Briggs Stratton 352-
621-1248 #ER00015377




A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002
BOB BROWN'S
Fence & Landscaping
352-795-0188/220-3194
ROCKY'S FENCING
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
352 422-7279 *




Seasoned Split Oak
You Haul
$45. Face Cord
(920) 224-2513


ALL EXTERIOR
ALUMINUM
6" Seamless Gutters
Lic & Ins 352-621-0881

ALUMINUM
STRUCTURES
5" & 6" Seamless Gutters
Free Estimates, Lic &
Ins. (352) 563-2977





Andrew Joehl
Handyman.
Gen/Maint/Repairs
Pressure cleaning.
Lawns/Gutters. No job
too small!Reli able ins.
0256271 352-465-9201

Affordable Handvman
V FAST
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *

Affordable Handvman
V FAST
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *

Affordable Handyman
V FAST
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *

Affordable Handyman
V FAST
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *A


' THIS OUT!
AC & HEAT PUMPS
FREE Estimate & 2nd
Opinion, 10 yr warr.
on ALL Parts, Great
prices, ALL the time.
352-400-4945
Lic #CAC027361





MAID TO ORDER
House Cleaning *
(352) 586-9125
Have Vacum Will Travel





The Tile Man
Bathroom remodel
Specializing in handi-
cap. Lic/Ins. #2441.
352-634-1584





#1 BOBCAT FOR HIRE
Light land clearing, site
work, grading, hauling.
NO JOB TOO SMALL!!!
Lic. & Ins. 352-400-0528

All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955


All AROUND TRACTOR
L .- H
352-795-5755
TRACTOR WORK
Sm Job Specialist
$30 + $30 per hr
352-270-6800






CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, curbing,
flocrete. River rock
reseals & repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
RIVENBARK LAWN &
LANDSCAPE.
Best Prices in town for
all your lawn care
needs!! (352) 464-3566




A + LAWN CARE
& LANDSCAPING
Affordable & Reliable
(352) 228-0421
BEVERLY HILLS
most yards $20.
Quick dependable,
352-422-5978
GOT LEAVES?
Ask about leaf vac
system, Free est.
Winter Clean up +
Hauling 352 344-9273
cell 352-201-9371
GRASS SEEDS! GRASS
SEEDS! GRASS SEEDS!
American Farm & Feed
352-795-6013
HALLOCK & SON
LAWN CARE -ALL Your
lawn care needs. Detailed
Work. 400-1197, Lie/Ins.
JUSTIN LAWN CARE
Fast and Affordable.
and Friendly, Licensed.
(352) 476-3985


AT YOUR HOME
Mower, Parts Service &
Repair.Visit our store@
1332 SE Hy 19 220-4244




A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs, trash,
lawn maint. furn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
ALL OF CITRUS
CLEAN UPS CLEAN OUTS
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790




Chris Satchell Painting
ASAP
30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST. (352) 586-2996
A-I George Swedlige
Painting/press cleaning
Int/Ext. texture/drywall
repair (352) 794-0400
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998




Tim Herndon Plumbing
$10. off w/this ad
10 yrs serving Citrus Co
lic/insCFC 1428395
(352) 201-8237




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST. (352) 586-2996


Pressure
Cleaning & Painting
352-341-3300



Remodeling, kitchens
baths, ceramic tile &
tops. Decks, Garages
Handyman Services 40
Yrs Exp. crc058140
344-3536; 563-9768




Attention Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers are
required by state law
to include their state
license number in all
advertisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious that
you may be contact-
ing an unlicensed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For questions
about business
licensing, please call
your city or county gov-


LeQk
Now $80 Bahia Pallets
U-Pick Up. Special
Spring Pricing. Call
Now!! 352-400-2221


A Cutting Edg
Tile Jobs Showers.
Firs .Safety Bars. ETC
352-422-2019
Lic. #2713, Insured.




A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest Rates
Free est.(352)860-1452
All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
DOUBLE J Tree Serv.
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
KING's Land Clearing &
Tree Serv. complete
tree & stump removal
hauling, demo& tractor
work 32 yrs. exp.
(352) 220-9819
R WRIGHT Tree Service
Tree removal & trimming.
Ins. & Lic.# 0256879
352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree Serv
Trim, Shape & Remove
Lic/Ins Free Est.
352-628-2825
Sharp Cut Tree Serv.
LET me cut your Tree
not YOUR WALLET.
Full Tree Service
Alicia (352) 942-0455



344-2556, Richard
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


















WORDY GURDY BY TRICKY RICKY KANE
1. Actor Sean's last name doubled letters (1) Every answer is a rhyming
----_ pair of words (like FAT CAT
0 and DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
2. Peruse anthropologist Margaret's work (1) they will fit in the letter
squares. The number after the
definition tells you how many
3. Laud mantas (1) syllables in each word.


@ 2012 UFS, Dist by Univ Uclick for UFS


4. Wicked boll insect (2)
1 T 1 1T I


5. Picnic holder in Dracula's "bedroom" (2)


6. Very infrequently in an equitable way (2)


7. Looking over a soup factory operation (2)
1F1 TI TI I T 0


9NINNVO DNINNVS 'L ALHIVa ATHIVa *9 JHNxSVI 1~MSVJ *s
IIAaAM LIAa*" SSAVH 3SIVId 1VIaI V3H H 'g SN SNNHd 'I
SI3gASNV


Owe Fnncn.. 0% w.. *% n.. 0 R


KITCHEN TABLE & 4
CHAIRS. Oval formica
top, 1 leaf. Chairs cloth,
swivel casters. $100
OBO 484-357-7150
ROCK SALT
1&1/2 bags. $4.
Call 527-6425
ROTISSERIE BY SUN-
BEAM $55 CAROUSEL
STYLE-EASY TO
USE-CAN E-MAIL
PHOTO 419-5981
SEWING MACHINE
Electronic,multi stitch,
heavy duty, cost $350,
bargain $95 In box,as
new, 563 1915




AB LOUNGER TIME TO
WORK IT OFF ONLY
40.00 464 0316
MANUAL TREADMILL
LOSE THAT
WEIGHT!!!!!WORKS
GREAT NEEDS A HOME
YOURS 75.00 464 0316
RECUMBENT
EXERCISE BIKE
WORKS GREAT ALL
ELECTRONICS ONLY
100.00 464 0316
TORSOTRACK Never
been used. Still in box.
$50 352-476-8744
WElDER PRO 4100
WEIGHT SYSTEM
2 station complete body
work out.5 yrs.$90.00
352-527-0324




40 Acres/Levy Co.
Hunting Property
Camper, Pond, Feed-
ers, Plots, Stands Blinds
$75,000. (352) 593-0335
CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pond,
ATV trails $165K obo
352 795-2027/ 634-4745
CLUB CAR
'06 $1,500
with charger
352-344-8516
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
DOWNRIGGER Cannon
EASI-TROLL like new
with weight. $50
352-400-0141
Full Set Men's &
Women's Golf Clubs
w/ shoes, bags, Also
Third set of clubs & bag
All for $125. obo
(989) 965-1915
GOLF CLUBS Ladies
11 piece matched clubs -
woods, irons, putter, PW,
rescue wood, bag, head
covers, pull cart, umbrella
and 1 doz+ balls. $100.
352/513-4536
GOLF DRIVER Nike
Sasquatch Sumo 10.5R
Diamana graphite std loft
and lie exc cond + HC
$50. Dunnellon 465.8495

GUN SHOW
LEESBURG NAT'L GRD
ARMORY
400 West Meadow St,
Leesburg, FI 34748
Sat, 9-5, Sun, 9-4
Concealed Weapons
Classes Daily
GunTraders is now
buying GOLD
Bring your GUNS &
GOLD to sell or trade.
Free Safety Class
at 10 & 1
GunTrader
GunShows.com
352-359-0134

Ladies Clubs
Irons & 4 woods, putter
& excellent bag.$85.
(352) 746-7047
OCALA GOLF
CART SUPER CENTER
12 Club Car Precedent
$5295, 09 $4595, All Col-
ors, Warranty- Battery
Sale 352-291-7626
POOL TABLE
SMALL $50.
fold up Ping-Pong
Table $75.
(352) 527-1747

WE BUY GUNS
On Site Gun Smithing
(352) 726-5238




EZ PULL TRAILERS,
New & Used

Utility & Enclosed
BUY, SELL, TRADE
Custom Built, Parts,
Tires, Whis, Repairs,
Trailer Hitches

New 6 x 12 open
utility w/ramp $935
Trailer Tires from
$34.49

Hwy 44 Crystal River
352-564-1299


GULF TO LAKE
TRAILER SALES

Largest Selection &
Lowest Prices.
Offering New & Used
Cargo & utility trailers

Triple Crown Utility TRL
6 x 12 w/new spare
$1050.
6 x 12 Enclosed w/
V nose, rear ramp
door, $1995.

Trailer Tires
starting at $69.95
352-527-0555
Hwy 44, Lecanto





CAR SEAT APPLE PINK
AND BROWN $35 swing
musical pink and brown
$45 excellent condition
352-777-1256

CAR SEAT WINNIE P
$25 2 bounces one
musical the deluxe $25
bear $15 good cond
352-777-1256



Sell r Swa


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966













JUNK MOTORCYCLES
WANTED Will Pay up to
$200 for Unwanted Mo-
torcycle 352-942-3492

WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation.
Call (352) 726-9369


LABRADOODLE PUPS
F2 Full of bounce!
Several colors & coat
textures, 2 boys, 4 girls,
ready 3/23, shots, h/c
$500. 352-410-0080
Poodles, Mini Pups,
2 black males, 2 black
females, AKC reg.
beautiful & well social-
ized. Champion Sired
$400. (352) 527-1920
PUPPIES
CHIHUHUA /
DACHSHUND MIX
8 wks old, shots
and health certificate
$300 (352) 465-4711



Electric Dog fence
Hidden, all parts + 2000'
wire w/instructions $45.
(352) 382-3467




Mini Donkeys, Horses &
Ponies, used & new
saddles and tack,
Diamond P Farm
352-873-6033



BABY NUBIAN GOATS
PETS Boys/Girls, $75 ea
I will mow your lawn.
(352) 560-0370


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





C.R/Homosassa
1& 2 Br. furn, quiet park
Util. Incl. clean, shrt/long
term 352 220-2077
CRYSTAL RIVER
Nice 2/1, close to
everything. $500. +
Sec. price reduced
(352)446-3933
352-794-3323
DUNNELLON
HWY 488, 2/1 new
carpet & ac, Ig lot
$475+ deposit
(352) 795-6970









g
FREE MOBILE
HOMES
To Handy Individuals
Offer includes:
Home, water, sewer,
trash, wifi, use of
pool new clubhouse
& park-like setting
w/ hammocks
and gazebos
All for just $295. mo.

Permanent
RV'S WELCOME
and RV Storage
Space Avail.

Homes for Sale
w/ Owner Financing

Call for Details
AURORA Acres
11240 N. Northwood
Drive Inglis, Fl. 34449
(352) 447-2759
Crystal River Primary
bus stop located in
front of park
auroraacresfl.com

HERNANDO
2/1, $400 Mo. No Pets.
(352) 344-1476
HERNANDO/INV.
2/1,Close in, lease, no
pet $425+sec. 726-7319
HOMOSASSA
3/2 -D/W $700 mo.,
1st, last, sec. Very nice
home. Ask for Walter
(561) 248-4200
INVERNESS
55+ Park on the water
w/5 piers for fishing &
enjoyment, clubhouse,
onsite shuffleboard
and much more!
Furnished, 1BR home
with central A/C $600.
352-476-4964


HOMOSASSA
3/2 cha, $600.m $600
dp.352-503-6747
(352) 628-1928
INVERNESS
RENT SPECIAL: Sec. dep,
pro-rated over 3 mo.
period. 55+ park on the
water w/5 piers for fish-
ing and enjoyment,
clubhouse, onsite
shuffleboard, & much
more! 1 BR home $325
plus. 2BR home $450,
includes H20. 2 BR, 1.5
bath, Park Model $500.
Pets considered.
Section 8 accepted.
(352) 476-4964


2 BEDROOM MOBILE
HOME FOR SALE 14x60
2 bedroom. 1 bath. Sin-
gle wide mobile home,
with all aluminum wheel
chair ramp, covered
screen porch and a car-
port.Very nice quiet
comm. Centrally lo-
cated close to the mall
Crystal River.
SELL PRICE;;;
$11,200.00 or OBO
Comes with
Washer/Dryer
Stove and Refrigerator.
Part Furnished
lot rent $235.00
Located in a Adult com-
munity age 55 or older
Pets allowed no more
than 20 pounds.
CALL 352-897-6766
BY APPOINTMENT
ONLY
SERIOUS BUYERS
ONLY.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SATURDAY, MARCH 24, 2012 Cll


CLASSIFIED




28 x 56, 2BD, 2BA,
LR, DR, Eat in Kit
community Pool
Nice Condition
$30,000 (352) 400-8270
ATTENTION
LAND OWNERS
JACOBSEN NEW 2012
5 yr. warranty, 3/2,
2 x 6 construction,
upgrade insulation,
appliance pkg.
Delivered & set up
with A/C & heat,
steps & skirting only
$279.19./mo. W.A.C.
Includes first year
on homeowner Ins.
Call 352-621-9181

AWESOME DEALS
Financing Available
$500/dn
1/1 remod, shed $5k
1/lscrnrm/carprt $6k
2/1 carprt/rf.over $7k
furn, move-in ready
55+ park, clean quiet
CR/Homossasa area
Owner 352-220-2077






Your'world first


Need a job

or a

qualified

employee?


This area's

#1

employment

source!

SO .C i l

( el l l i


Bank foreclosures
USED HOMES/REPO'S
Bank authorized
liquidator.We Always
have new inventory,
Call 352-621-9183
or come by
Taylor Made Homes
Homes from
$1,000 up!
BEAUTIFUL 1 OWNER,
older Doublewide,
Home in Forestview
Park new appl's, new
roof and AC, Priced to
Sell! (352) 503-2154

,' THIS OUT!
Homosassa 3 bedroom.
2 bath. 29,900
Double-wide, completely
remodeled in 2008. New
well pump 2011. On
paved road,.33 acre with
landscaped yard, in-
cludes hot tub and 10x14
metal shed. Call
352-503-7366 or
352-476-0904
INVERNESS
55+ Park on the water
w/5 piers for fishing &
enjoyment, clubhouse,
onsite shuffleboard
and much more!
Single wide 1 & 2 BR,
starting @ $6,900. Lot
rent $276/mo. H20
included. 3 mo. free
rent with purchase.
352-476-4964

LAND-N-HOME
FLORAL CITY
BIG HOME!
The Entertainer,
over 2000 sq. ft., 4/2,
large family room.
Home in great shape
on quiet paved road
near chain of lakes
ONLY $59, 900. or
$2,250 down &
395/mo. W.A.C.
Call 352-621-3807

Palm Harbor Homes
NEW HOME STIMULUS
$5k for your used
Mobile Home any
condition
800-622-2832 x 210


kklkk




HOMOSASSA
2/2 carport nicely furn
MH on Homosassa River
w/dock, shed f/l/s
sht/long term $850
352-220-2077




Beverly Hills
55 + park 2/2 fully
remodeled, & furnished
Ig screen lanai,carport,
shed,laundry,landscape & iri-
gation all appli-
ances, Club house ac-
tivities, Heated pool.Lot
rent $258... $33K obo
Call 352-422-0927
FLORAL CITY
2/2 carport on canal,
2 sheds,, furnished scr
patio $44,900. Poss.
Own Fin 440-225-8618




BEST OF THE BEST
New 2012 Jacobsen
Custom 28 x 52, 3/2
big eat in kitchen,
2x6 construction, OSB
wrap, 5 yr. warranty,
elongated toilet,
china sinks, storm
door. Large rooms.
Must see before you
buy anything else.
Only $46,900 or
$1,800 down
$298.89/mo W.A.C.
Call 352-621-9181

INVERNESS
Move in neat 2 bath
SW w/extra rooms, nice
area, fenced $32, 500
Owner (352) 341-1569
Lecanto
881 N. Maynard Av
DWMH 2/2, deck,
Fixer Upper
$15K (352) 746-7952


PRICE REDUCED-
NW Citrus Cty SWMH on
1 Acre, 2/1.5 -paved rd,
screen porch, appliances
$39,900, Owner Fi-
nancing 352-795-9908




2/2 on Lake Rousseau.
NOW $17,500
Low Lot Rent $240/m
2003 Mobile Home.
Used Seasonally
Owner bought a house,
(352) 817-1987,
(207) 546-6115

AWESOME DEALS
Financing Available
$500/dn
1/1 remod, shed $5k
I/I scrnrm/carprt $6k
2/1 carprt/rf.over $7k
furn, move-in ready
55+ park, clean quiet
CR/Homossasa area
Owner 352-220-2077

Beverly Hills
55 + park 2/2 fully
remodeled, & furnished
Ig screen lanai,carport,
shed,laundry,landscape & iri-
gatiobn all appli-
ances, Club house ac-
tivities, Heated pool.Lot
rent $258,... $33K obo
Call 352-422-0927

Crys Rver Village
55+, DWHome of Merit
2/2/1 carport, com-
pletely furnish all new &
appls. Must See
$39K for appt /details
(704) 489-0523
574-946-6286

FLORAL CITY
1992 34FT Park Model,
furn., w/2 slides &
screen rm, Exc. cond.
Moonrise Resort, $3,500.
352-419-6894
606-521-3916
Floral City Singing
Forest DW, 2/2, 2 Car-
ports, screen porch
Completely furn & re-
modeled, Lot Rent$176
$19,500 344-2420


uasis IvblOne niome PrarK,
Inverness FL 2 bedroom.
2 bath. 14x60 Fully Fur-
nished Manatee Mobile
Home. Carport, Screen
room, and Shed. Has
roof over and remodelled
kitchen and baths. Virtu-
ally everything furnished.
Parking behind M/H for
trailer or boat. Excellent
Shape. Great low rent
park. $ 12000. Call
815 986 4510 or cell
815 298 2964.


vi


OOOnXHB


For more information on how to reach
Citrus County readers call
352-563-5592.


CITRUS COUNTY


CHRONICLE
www.chronicleonline.com
Cladtas2010: Primelocation: Rodda/Scarbomugh 2010


LISTINGS
Homosassa 2 bedroom.
2 bath. 55+double wide
mobile home in park
14,900.New wooden
floors very clean. Closed
in front and back porch.2
car carport.Club
house,community swim-
ming pool,exercise
room.Pool table.Close to
shopping area. call 352
7946601
HOMOSASSA'S
Best Housing Value
Modern homes from
$8,400 or Lease to Own
from $139/mo.
$800.down + Lot rent at
Evanridge Community
an exceptional 55+Park
352 628-5977
INVERNESS
55+ Park on the water
w/5 piers for fishing &
enjoyment, clubhouse,
onsite shuffleboard, and
much more! 2 BR 1.5 BA
or $2000. must be
approved 352-476-4964
Inverness/Oak Pond 55+,
well maintained 2/2, fur-
nished, screened lanai,
shed, Ig lot, xtra long cov-
ered carport, lots of stor-
age 352-344-1632 or
937-545-3413

EN ,' Wl


3-24-12












C12 SATURDAY, MARCH 24, 2012


Turtle Creek
1/1 park model
w/screen porch
$16K (352) 628-3351
Lecanto 3 bedroom. 2
bath. Senior Park 14x66
S/W, Screened Porch,
Furnished. Very clean.
Call 815-535-7958
Lecanto 55 +
Comm.2 bd 1 ba
screened porch
$11,500
(352) 746-4648
On Lake Rousseau 2
bedroom. 2 bath.
14x60MH, 8x20 FL
room, 8x10 shed, 2-stall
carport, Withlacoochee
Backwaters MHP,
$8500. 352-219-2240
Stoneridge Landing
55+ Comm. Resales
starting @$13,500
Financing avail
1-800-779-1226
(352) 637-1400
StoneridgeLanding
55+. 1993 26x56, Move
in Cond.2/2 upgrades
$39K, view pics@
mhvillage.com/493361
(352) 344-0888
WESTWIND VILLAGE 55+
Park. Updated 2/2 DW's
for sale. Reasonable
(352) 628-2090

BII IB~
Bk iS


FREE MOBILE
HOMES
To Handy Individuals
Offer includes:
Home, water, sewer,
trash, wifi, use of
pool new clubhouse
& park-like setting
w/ hammocks
and gazebos
All for just $295. mo.

Permanent
RV'S WELCOME
and RV Storage
Space Avail.

Homes for Sale
w/ Owner Financing

Call for Details
AURORA Acres
11240 N. Northwood
Drive Inglis, Fl. 34449
(352) 447-2759
Crystal River Primary
bus stop located in
front of park
auroraacresf.com




LECANTO 55+
* FOR RENT OR SALE *
1/1, Furnished $525.
2/2, Furnished $550.
352-287-9175, 746-1189













835 NE Hwy 19
Crystal River, Fl
(352) 795-0021
View our website
C21 NatureCoast.com




11435iDliie Shores
Crystal River, 3/1/1 Stilt
house w/dock, water access.
Fantastic roof top views!

900 Mo.

CHASSAHOWITZKA
3/2 Wtrfront DW, $600.
3/2 Furnished DW., $600
Agent (352) 382-1000




CRYSTAL RIVER
2 BR. $550. 3BR House
$800., 352-563-9857
CRYSTAL RIVER
Completely furn., Pool,
boat dock, Wash/Dry
(352) 302-5972
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025




Alexander Real Estate
(352) 795-6633

Crystal River Apts
2 BR/1 BA $375-$500
FLORAL CITY
FREE Use of boat ramp,
fishing dock, canoe &
Jon boat rentals. 1 BR
$450/$200 dp. incls Sat
TV electric, walk to river
Trails End Camp, A
Friendly Place to Live
352-726-3699
INVERNESS
1/1 $4002/1.. $500.
near hosp352-422-2393
LECANTO
Nice 1 Bedrm $500
352-613-6000.216-0012
(352) 746-5238
SEVEN RIVERS
APTS

A Beautiful place
to come home too.
35 units on private
street, situated on 10
wooded acres, near
Crystal River &
7 Rivers Hosp. fish-
ing, walking, trails,
shopping near by.
Old Florida setting,
quite, clean well
maint. central
laundry room.
352-795-3719
Directions:
Hwy 19 turn W. at
Days Inn, first right
onto Tallahassee Rd



EQUAL HOUSING





CRYSTAL RIVER
Comm. Storefront, very
clean 1000 SF, exc. loc.
Hwy 19 Downtown
$795/mo 352-634-2528
FLORAL CITY
STOREFRONT 1000 Sq Ft
Ideal location, corner
Hwy 41 & 48. $595 mo.
813-310-5391


Citrus Hills 2/2.5/1
$850/mo HOA is incl'd
$850 dep. 239-595-9439
CRYSTAL RIVER
Completely turn., Pool,
boat dock, Wash/Dry
(352) 302-5972




CITRUS HILLS 2/2/1
Beautiful $750 Maint
Free(352) 613-5655
Citrus Springs
3/2/1 car $650/mo
352-746-7990
HOMOSASSA
New 1/1, H20/garb.
incl.d, non-smoker.
$425 Fst/Sec., pets ?
(352) 795-0207

OPEN HOUSE
Saturday 24th, 1 la-2p
6794 Mable Lane
DUNNELLON
Call (352) 422-6999




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




INVERNESS
1/1, CH/A, furn/unfurn
$450 352-637-4021
Specializing in
Sugarmill Woods
Rentals


Debe Johns
Brkr/Assoc/PRM

Coldwell Banker Next
Generation Realty
Property Manager
(352) 382-2700 www.
coldwellbankernext
aeneration.com

See what a
Professional
Residential Manager
can do for you.




Sugarmill Woods
3/2/2 large closets
$750/m (352)613-0843













Kristi Bortz
Let our property
management team
help you with your
short or long term
rentals.
See all our rentals in
Citrus Co.
www.plantation
rentals
352-795-0782 or
866-795-0784




BEVERLY HILLS
2/1, C/H/A, $600/m
(352) 422-7794
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/1, Cen Air, Remod-
eled like new Sec. &1st.,
$625 mo. 352-228-3454
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/2/2, $750. mo + sec.
850-371-1568
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 Clean, $800 mo.
795-6299 364-2073
HOMOSASSA
3/2 Scrn. Porch, Quiet
dead end st. $650 mo.
(207) 212-9804




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225

HOMOSASSA
2/2 carport nicely furn
MH on Homosassa River
w/dock, shed f/l/s
sht/long term $850
352-220-2077
OLD HOMOSASSA
Lrg 1/1, Iv&fam rm,
scr prch, lots of stor-
age ,,dockw/access
to gulf. $750 no pets
smoke 352-628-2261




C.R/Homosassa
1& 2 Br. furn, quiet park
Util. incl.clean, shrt/long
term 352 220-2077




FARMS, LAND,
COMMERCIAL
UNIQUE &
HISTORIC HOMES,
SMALL TOWN
COUNTRY LIFESTYLE
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989







"LIFE IS BETTER
WITH A PORCH"
WWW.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.

For Sale %,,
Forest Ridge 2 bedroom.
2 bath. This updated villa
is totally move in ready
and maintenance free!
This beautiful 2/2/2 is
located on a private lot
and includes an optional
membership to Citrus
Hills Golf and Country
Club. The home includes
all appliances, an eat in
kitchen, a fully tiled great
room, and a sun barrier
paneled lanai. Home is
within walking distance to
the pool and club house.
This property is a must
see!! $95,900
352-746-0002


FREE MOBILE
HOMES
To Handy Individuals
Offer includes:
Home, water, sewer,
trash, wifi use of
pool new clubhouse
& park-like setting
w/ hammocks
and gazebos
All for just $295. mo.

Permanent
RV'S WELCOME
and RV Storage
Space Avail.

Homes for Sale
w/ Owner Financing

Call for Details
AURORA Acres
11240 N. Northwood
Drive Inglis, Fl. 34449
(352) 447-2759
Crystal River Primary
bus stop located in
front of park
auroraacresfl.com


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ile-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national ongin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination."
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people secunng
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.


-
EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY


Specializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches &
Commercial








Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com






Auction: Spinal Surgical
Center Inventory
Sells Regardless of
Price, March 29, 10am
100 Coy Burgess Loop,
DeFuniak Springs
13% BP. Ewald Realty &
Auction,
AB2473/AU1340
(407)275-6853 www.
EwaldAuctions.com



Open House


Located on the 8th green of the Oaks
Golf Course, this comfortable and
elegant home is perfect for relaxing
and entertaining This contemporary
Mediterranean style home sits in

to pervade Throughout the home your
line of vision is drawn towards the
pool and golf course The outdoor
gathering areas, the landscaping, the
brick pavers and the beautiful Oaks
Golf Course views transform this



[dward Russell Johnston, inc.
General Contractor
Sta C-,t fied CGC062630
$800/m51 North Citrus Avenue
Crystal River. FL 34 28
(352) 795-5218
w ww.erj.net






For Sale Or Rent
3/2/2 turn for rent
$800/mo or buy
(352) 445-5218
352-445-5260





Lot For Sale Pine Ridge
sub. 3620 N. Stirrup Dr.,
2.78 ac, horse trail on
back side, wooded, for
sale by owner. Google it!
Make offer
bill@agairupdate.com
478.957.0211






LECANTO
Black Diamond
Ranch







Owner Financing
3/2/2.5 car garage
SS appls, custom
flooring, new outdoor
kit. w covered lanai.
Price to sell. $185K.
(352) 527-0456


Rleal


DEB INFANTINE

4 HOMES SOLD
Closing in April
I Need Listings!

Real Estate!...
it's what I do.

ERA American
Realty
Phone:(352) 726-5855
Cell:(352) 302-8046
Fax:(352) 726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com


3/3/2,
2,355 sq. ft.
screen lanai, 2 Acres
$135,000.
(352) 628-5272
TERRA VISTA
2+ /2/2 Maint Free,
Open plan, up grades,
,Beautiful Sunsets,
Owner Financ Avail
$259 K (352) 746-6050




3/2, Shed, Mfg. Home
on 1.38 Acres, new
flooring & upgraded
appliances.
Paved Road
$54,900. (352) 302-4057
ARBOR LAKES
55+ Comm. 3/2/2 +
Lg enclosed a/c porch,
most pvt. location,
Upgrades $169,900
(352) 726-7952




2/2/1
HIGHLANDS AREA
Lots of Upgrades
Move In Ready
Keller Williams Realty
352-746-7113
3/2/2, I.G.&C.C.
3k sf. new kit. Ig closets,
CHA, firepl. on golf
course $129K make of-
fer, norealtors 726-0652
HIGHLANDS
Lrg.2/2- 4 car garage
pool, game room,
mud room, on triple lot
fenced, price to sell
$65,500 (352) 564-4598
INVERNESS
55+ Park on the water
w/5 piers for fishing &
enjoyment, clubhouse,
onsite shuffleboard
and much more!
Single wide 1 & 2 BR,
starting @ $6,900. Lot
rent $276/mo. H20
included. 3 mo. free
rent with purchase.
352-476-4964

Lakefront Gospel
Island Location
Spacious 3/2/2
for rent $800/m or for
sale..... 908-322-6529

Recently Foreclosed
*Special Financing*
Available, Any
Credit, Any Income,
2BD, 1BTH, located
at, 7901 Stump Lane,
Inverness, $23,900.
Visit www.roselandco.
com/A4F,
Drive by then Call
(866) 249-0680

Zero Down Assumable
Loan Nice 3/2/2,
In Foxwood Estate
Need proof of income
and excel credit.
No Gimmicks,
(352) 341-8479




Recently Foreclosed
*Special Financing-*
Available, Any Credit,
Any Income,
3BD, 2BTH located at,
8009 E. Partridge Lane
Floral City, $29,900.
Visit www.
roselandco.com\A5BDrive
by then Call
(866) 249-0680.






9690 W Green Ln 3 bed-
room. 2 bath. Energy
wise, move in ready,
garage, fenced back
w/playhouse.
352-563-1341




3/2/2 Built 1986, On
/2 Acre, Remodeled
above ground pool
w/deck BY OWNER
4141 S. Journey Point
$180,000 813-477-6006
Homosassa/Riverhaven
On water, Grand canal
3BR, 2+BA, 2+ CG
Formal. Living Rm.
Formal Din. Rm., Lanai
front & rear. River View
Room. Dock, many
Upgrades, $255,000
forsalebvowner.com
Listing 23023708 or
Call 352-628-9647
Water Access
2/2, 6 car garage
w/apt. ove, extra Lot
$200.K 352-302-7204














Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work For You!
BETTY HUNT,
REALTOR
ERA KEY 1 Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.

Condo for Sale
2/2, 1,850 sq. ft.
35 Beech Street
(352) 503-3294


O5 V W. ulnIIlin S t3
bedroom. 2 bath. Jacob-
sen Mobile Home (DW)
on 5 ACRES. Owner Fi-
nancing with $20,000
down Low interest. Mas-
ter Bedroom 14x20
w/carpet & Lg. walk-in
closet, has Master Bath
10x15 w/double vanity,
jetted tub, separate toilet
& shower. 2 other bed-
rooms 12x14 w/carpet
and walk-in closets. Liv-
ing Rm. 14x16 w/laminate
wood flooring and open
concept to Dining Room
14x1 2w/bar sink
&Cabinetss w/sliding
glass doors doorswhich lead to
10x24 pressure treated 2
level deck. Lg. Kitchen
16xl16w/38 cabinets, is-
land cook top, wall oven
& tile floonng. Sunken
Family Room w/fireplace
15x14 tiled flooring. Laun-
dry Rm. w/cabinets which
lead to rear access to
deck. LOW PROPERTY
TAXES $660.00. 2 stor-
age bldgs 12x24 &
10x14, Carport 22x25.
$135k (561) 714-6024.







I ,






FREE MOBILE
HOMES
To Handy Individuals
Offer includes:
Home, water, sewer,
trash, wifi, use of
pool new clubhouse
& park-like setting
w/ hammocks
and gazebos
All for just $295. mo.

Permanent
RV'S WELCOME
and RV Storage
Space Avail.

Homes for Sale
w/ Owner Financing

Call for Details
AURORA Acres
11240 N. Northwood
Drive Inglis, Fl. 34449
(352) 447-2759
Crystal River Primary
bus stop located in
front of park
auroraacresfl.com


"FREE foreclosure
and short sale lists


CLASSIFIED













Best Time To Buy!
I have lease options,
owner financing
Waterfront and
foreclosures
call Phyllis Strickland
(352) 613-3503
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.






k so



FREE MOBILE
HOMES
To Handy Individuals
Offer includes:
Home water, sewer,
trash, wifi, use of
pool new clubhouse
& park-like setting
w/hammocks
and gazebos
All for just $295. mo.

Permanent
RV'S WELCOME
and RV Storage
Space Avail.

Homes for Sale
w/ Owner Financing

Call for Details
AURORA Acres
11240 N. Northwood
Drive Inglis, Fl. 34449
(352) 447-2759
Crystal River Primary
bus stop located in
front of park
auroraacresfl.com














Michele Rose. Realtor
Simply put I 'II work
harder 352-212-5097
isellcitruscountv@y
yahoo.comn
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515



Dunnellon


CHRIS CRAFT
1984 Scorpion 230 This
23' boat is ready to run.
Full Electronics, spare
starter, engine belts,
shore electric cables, all
weather standup cockpit
cover with windows, head
and galley with refriger-
ator and stove. New
throttle cables. 2 spare
props and 2 new batter-
ies. 2 USCG approved
pfd's and more. $4900.00
352-344-2821
CRAFTSMAN 10FT
Aluminum flat bottom
new oars, extras, lic to
2012 for motor $ 275
(352) 465-7506













How To
Make
Your
Car Disappear...
Simply advertise in the
Classifieds and get results
quickly


(352) 563-5966

Cii i' ISi.E
www.chronicleonline.com


Office Open
7 Days a Week

Lisa VanDeboe
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com
Crystal River Indian
Waters Waterfront home
on deep wide canal. 3
BR/2BA with Lanai over-
looking canal. Recently
remodeled split floor plan
with fenced yard, garage,
sea wall and dock.
Easy access to both
Kings Bay and Gulf.
Serious buyers
please..Appointment
with owner. $275,000.
678-357-9873



CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pond,
ATV trails $165Kobo
352 795-2027/ 634-4745
CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pond,
ATV trails $165K obo
352 795-2027/ 634-4745



5 ACRES, FLORAL CITY
3 sides fenced, paved
road, private drive
through woods. Leads
to 4 Acre Pasture
$44,900. (352) 897-4586



CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pond,
ATV trails $165Kobo
352 795-2027/ 634-4745



48 lots 14W.F. 1 gulf
access, 5 SMW's lots
3 lots impact fees pd.
$425K, = less than $9K
per lot (732) 996-3785
89 x 165 MOL, LOT
Lucky Hills, Nice
Residential Area
$19,000/Offer
Owner FiNance
(352) 422-1916
HOMOSASSA
Wooded Lot on
Lee Woods Drive,
112 xl14ft River access,
but not on river $7,000.
352-621-1664










LOTS FOR

SALE!
6 Citrus Springs Lots
Available, Owner Fin.
or Cash Discounts
Provided. Great
Investment Opprty.
803-403-9555
803-403-9557
SUGARMILL
WOODS. BUILDING LOT
ON OAK VILLAGE
$20K firm 43 Vinca St
(352) 726-9587



EVINRUDE 89
40HP
Power T &T, w/controls
completely tuned/new
paint $1500
(352) 564-1324



2004 ALUMACRAFT
JON BOAT
14 Jon Boat w/15hp
Johnson.Asking
$1900obo352-302-5993
CAROLINA SKIFF
2001 Skiff 19 foot excel-
lent condition 90 hp
Yamaha, bimini top, ra-
dio, depth finder. Includes
trailer with new tires.


908-0330 DAILY CRN
Surplus Prop.
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County Board


^^^^^-I


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



-a
Vehicles^


CREST
2003, 22 ft, Super sport,
2004 Mtr 90HP Johns,
Tandem axle galv. trlr.
$13,500 (352) 795-8941
or (352) 422-1569
KEY WEST 19.9
Bay Reef, 150 hp
Honda, 651b 24 volt trol-
ling motor, hvy duty
trailer(352) 726-4325
LUND
1978 15'FIBERGLASS
Bass Boat w/Trailer. 30
horse Johnson. 60beam.
Console Steer. 50# Troll-
ing motor. Only needs
new battery to run. First
$1750 (firm) takes it.
352-341-0447.
MONTEREY
1996 Bow Rider 20 ft 135
HP I/O Bimini top. Trailer
w/spare. Good cond
$4000. 352-419-5605
PACECRAFT
'89, 16 ft. Flats Boat 50
Merc, polling platform,
rerigged & painted 2005
$6,200 352-447-5560
PALM COAST
'00, 16 ft, CC 3 batter-
ies, 50HP John, elect.
mtr. & trlr. depth find.
$3,000 (352) 249-7994
PROLINE
21' Cuddy, full transom,
w/brack, 150 HP Yam.,
Bimini, VHF, porta pot,
dep. finder, trailer $5K
firm (352) 382-3298
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LAKE
MARINE
We Pay CASH For Used
Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck & Fishing
Boats (352)527-0555
boatsupercenter.com







SITCH I IKIILS













YACHTSMAN
24' Pontoon, 70 HP Ev.
T/T cust. trlr bimini top,
stored inside $3500 incls
all gear (231) 852-0061




Bounder
Fleetwood 32' 1994
454 engine, loaded.
self contained $9,750
352-795-6736
CAMPER 5TH WHEEL
1991 Terry Resort


(603) 731-6070
GULF STREAM 08
32' 3 slides, rear. kit.
K bed50amp, like new
extras $31,500
(352) 726-1 906
HITCHHIKER II LS
2008, 3 slides, excel
cond. heat pumpn de-
luxe pkg. too many ex-
tras to list $32,000.
Dodge Truck also avail
(636) 209-0308
Holiday Rambler
'98 38 7.5 gen.super
slide, air lever, a/c susp.
loaded call for details
$41K (352) 746-9211

I Buy RV'S, Steve
Henry, RV World of
Hudson Inc.Since
1974. (888) 674-8376
(727) 514-8875

JAYCO
'04, 36 foot, 5th wheel
toy hauler, generator
slide, fuel station $18500
Truck Avail For Sale






Coach 25' model
24RBL, sips upto 6 gas &
elect appls & heat,
shower/toliet $6900
(352) 341-1714
I BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
call me 352-201-6945
SUNNYBROOK
2005 36ft, 5th whl2
slides, kg bed,like
newaheated tks, 60
amp service oak cab
$33,400 352)382-3298




4 Good Year
Wrangler NTR Kevlar




$395. (352) 628-5222
CHEVROLET
1999 corvette L&R side
mufflers and tailpipes.

with Z06 set in
2001 .$650 for both or of-
fer. 5000 miles on orngi-
nals. 1-352-503-6548




$$ CASH PAID $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$

BIG SALE!
Consignment USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
AUTOS' FROM $1500.
US 19 BY AIRPORT
US 44, BY NAPA
Low Payments *9
461-4518& 795-4440
consignmentusa.org


of County Commissioners
will be selling surplus prop-
erty and equipment via
the internet at


^^^^^I


BUYINlG JUNKi LAK
Running or Not -
CASH PAID $300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars Trucks
& Vans, For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES,
Hwy 19... 352 564-8333
CASH PAID FOR JUNK
CARS Any Condition
Up to $500, Free
Towing 352-445-3909
WANTED
GEO TRACKER
0505
(352) 726-7764
WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
Perfect Cond. or Not
TitledNo title,
No problem. Paying up
to $25K any make,
any model Call A.J.
813-335-3794/531-4298




'08 Chrysler
Sebring Touring
Convertible,34k miles,
loaded, $14,250firm
352-897-4520
AFFORDABLE
AUTOS & VANS
Everybody Rides

$49 PER WEEK
BUY HERE PAY
HERE..
Lots of clean-safe-
dependable rides.
CALL DAN TODAY
(352) 5 6 3 -1 902
"WE BUYS CARS
DEAD OR ALIVE"
1675 Suncoast Hwy.
Homosassa Fl.

BIG SALE!
Consignment USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
AUTOS' FROM $1,500.
US 19 BY AIRPORT
US 44, BY NAPA
Low Payments *
461-4518 & 795-4440
consignmentusa.org
CADILLAC 04
DeVille 66k mi, garaged
Champagne, w/top +
Gold Cream leather
$8,995, 352-341-4949
CADILLAC
1993 Allante Nstar. Soft
& hardtop auto
low miles black mint
$16KObo 352-563-1915
CAMARO '11
CONV. RED, 3K miles
$28,500 (352) 419-6768
Camaro 97
Z28, 97K mis. T-tops,
exc cond. White with
orang strips $8K obo
352-302-7204
CHEVY
'07, Impala, V6, auto,
ice cold AC, non smok-
ers 100K mi $7,500
(352) 726-3093
Citrus Sale Center
We buy/sell/trade
clean pre-owned
vehicles!


02 Ford Quad CabTruck
F-150 Cab$4,999
02 Mazda Milllenia
$5,400,
00, Ford Explorer
4 DR $3,800,
06 Grand Marquis
$13,200 low miles
Call 352-400-1038
KAWASAKI '82
11,662K ,mis. LTD 550
lots of extras
great cond $1000 obo
(352) 228-1897
LINCOLN
2006 Towncar,
seabreeze green,
extra nice, $10,500
(830) 534-1918
LINCOLN
'97, Town Car, Cartier
custom, very well main-
tained, all records,
V-good cond. Must See
No calls after 6pm
(352) 860-0688
MAZDA
2003 Miata MX5 5-speed,
silver, convertible.
Very good condition.
49000 miles.
$10,500. (352)419-5605
MERCEDES '99
S420, blue book $11,500
sell $10K FIRM
1729 W. Gulf to lake
Hwy, Lecanto
MERCURY
'97 Grand Marquis, ex-
cellent shape
Must See
$2,500., 352-344-8516




Volkswagen
2003 Beetle
Convertible, Like New
Low Miles $6,995
Chrysler
2008 Sebring,
One Owner Great
MPG $10,988
Honda
2008 Civic, Won't Last
at this Price $10,998
Buick
2007 Lucerne,
Showroom Condition
$12,998
Chevrolet
2009 Impala,
Not One Nicer Call
for Details $12,998
Buick
2007 Rendezvous
CXL, Loaded with
Toys Take over Pay-
ments @ $259 WAC
Cadillac
2006 SRX, Too Many
Options to List Take
over Payments @
$279 WAC
Ford
2010 Edge
Limited, Call for
Equipment Take Over
Payments @ $349
Honda
2010 Pilot EXL,
Honda Certified
Take over Payments
@ $399 WAC
Chevrolet
2011 Silverado 2500
HD, Ready to Haul
Take over Payments
@ $399 WAC


govdeals.com, March 1
until March 30,2012.
Pub:March 1 thru 30, 2012


^^^^^-I


909-0324 F/SACRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County School Board will accept sealed bids for:
Bid #2012-52 SHREDDED MULCH
VendorBid website; Automated Vendor Application & Bidder
Notification System: www.vendorbid.net/citrus/
Sandra "Sam" Himmel
Superintendent, Citrus County School Board
March 23 and 24, 2012.


IVIl:K(_UKIl
'97, Grand Marquis, LS
Forest Green, 4 DR.
86,500 mi. org. own
$3,200 (352) 382-2238
TOYOTA
2001 Camry LE, loaded
with leather, 4-cyl,
auto. $3,800
(352) 746-2932




Chevy 81
El Camino reg V6, 3 spd
stick runs & looks great
$4250 (518) 755-0677
Floral City, Florida
CHEVROLET '01
Camaro, Z28, Org. 9000
miles, Pristine show car
frozen in time. Loaded
black/black leather
Flawless rare find!
$15,750 (352) 513-4257







Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966

TORONADO '92
Olds. White Diamond
red leather, 124K ms
FWD 3800 tuned port
injection V6, 18 city,
28 hwy. Meticulously
maint/garaged
$5K(352) 527-3291




BIG SALE!
Consignment USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
AUTOS' FROM $1,500.
US 19 BY AIRPORT
US 44, BY NAPA
Low Payments k
461-4518& 795-4440
consignmentusa.org
Citrus Sale Center
We buy/sell/trade
clean pre-owned
vehicles!


02 Ford QuadCab F-150
Truck $4999
07 Nissan Murano
$14,900
06 Chrysler PT Cruiser
$6,499
06 Grand Marquis
$13,200 low miles
Call 352-400-1038
Ford 02
F150, Ext Cab,
fair cond, runs good
166K mis. $6k obo
352-302-7204
FORD '06
F250 Super Duty, 4 x 4,
6.0, Lariat Pkg. Off Rd.
Pkg., Hard Bed Cover
$21,500 (352) 586-8576
FORD 93
F150-4x4 FLT 250K mi.
don't let that scare you
runs great, new tires
cold a/c $3K 795-1015
FORD
'97, F150 XLT, reg. cab,
8ft, 124k, loaded, great
condition $3,500 firm
(352) 344-4157




FORD F350 87
Stake Body Diesel
standard shift
GREAT work truck
(813) 417-6024
ISUZU TROOPER 02
silver,one owner, great
family suv, 124k miles
(813)417-6024




CHEVY
'95, Astro Van 7 Pass.,
loaded w/ front & rear
AC & heat, very clean
inside & out
$2,800 (269) 806-5438




Harley 00
Roadking Classic, all
gear 17K miles 11K
obo.(352) 489-0873
Harley Davidson
02 Heritage soft tail
26K mis. Lots of extra's
Health Forces Sale
$8500 (352) 527-3024
HARLEY DAVIDSON
08 Night Train, flat blk,
11 500 mis. lots of extra's
$14K obo Jeff
(407) 712-0803
HARLEY-
DAVIDSON
2005 FLTRX Road Glide
Custom Oversized
Windshield, King/Queen
seat, Backrest, 24k miles,
$12K 352-257-3130
JUNK MOTORCYCLES
WANTED Will Pay up to
$200 for Unwanted Mo-
torcycle 352-942-3492
KAWASAKI
2006 Vulcan 1600 No-
mad Excellent condi-
tion, well serviced. 14k
miles. Newer tires and
battery. Bike jack,
Cycleshell, lots of ac-
cessories. Pix available.
$6495 352-601-7460








ROADSTAR
SILVERADO 04
Garage kept, very well
maint lots of extras ask
$6k obo (352) 214-9800




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


*J I \


CRYSTAL


Y liw,


C


HEVRO LET


2012 CHEVROLET
CRUZE


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WWIn INFO AND PRICING
1-800-584-8755 Ext.1108


2012 CHEVROLET
MALIBU


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND PRICING
1-800-584-8755 Ext.1116


WITH $1999 CASH OR TRADE.
2012 CHEVROLET
IMPALA


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WTHI INFO AND PRICING
1-800-584-8755 Ext.1114


WITH $2999 CASH OR TRADE.
2012 CHEVROLET
TAHOE
_^^^Bpcw 4ab
^rlm\


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WnI INFO AND PRICING
1-800-584-8755 Ext.1125


I35,800


OR
I


$499m
WITH $2999 CASH OR TRADE.


2012 CHEVROLET
EQUINOX


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND PRICING
1-800-584-8755 Ext.1109


WITH $2999 CASH OR TRADE.
2012 CHEVROLET
SILVERADO


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND PRICING
1-800-584-8155 Ext.1120
22,800 SAVEO6000


U" CALL THE INSTANT APPRAISAL LINE:
800-440-9054


CRYSTAL crystalautos.com
ICHEVROLET 352-564-1971
SH E V L E1035 5. Suncoast Blvd Homosassa, FL 34448


'LEASE PAYMENTS R ASH OR TRADE. 39-MONTHS WITH 39K MILES FOR THE LIFE OF THE LEASE AND $.15 PER I
FEES MAY APPLY ATLEASE TERMINATION. PRICES EXCLUDE TAX, TAG, TITLE, REGISTRATION AND DEALER FEE OF $59950.. fl
" PRICES EXCLUDES TAX. TAG, TITLE, REGISTRATION AND DEALER FEE OF $599.00. LEASE PAYMENTS REFLECT1',999 DOM'I
ARE FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY PRIOR.AL ES


SATURDAY, MARCH 24, 2012 C13




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


S MM S S S MUM t


M M M MMMM a


Das Auto.


Vjlksgagqfen(0caliAesetb.





0* %ffI I I d I 111


How much are gas prices these days?
At Volkswagen of Ocala we're giving gas away for
one year with the purchase of any New Volkswagen!


l1%6 FINJAIUMCINIi*j

^BA~ivi~rtiisimyjsiit
JiYTS A Al
I ME'M RI7IL HA


COMPLIMENT
MiL Bj Sprin
Training Tic
ToaAnyonejWhojT
&Testjcive!


I3if,


29 MPG
Based on EPA estimates.


: l I ll ll:I


31 MPG
Based on EPA estimates.


l:4ul ill:il :


Carefree Maintenance


3 Years or 36,000 Miles of No-Charge Scheduled Maintenance. Whichever occurs first. Some restrictions. See dealer or program for details. 1 year of gasoline based on EPA highway MPG estimate on 10K miles per year at $3.70
per gallon. 36 month leases, $1999 due at signing including $0 security deposit. Plus tax, tag, title and dealer fee. With approved credit. Three years or 36 thousand mile no-charge scheduled maintenance. Some restrictions
apply. *For a limited term on select models with approved credit. interest accrues from date of purchase. AMust test drive a new vehicle. While supplies last. Limit 2 per family. See dealer for details. Offers expire 3/24/2012.


Volkswagen


3949 SW College Rd. Ocala
On SW College Road, Just West of 1-75
HOURS: Monday Friday: 8:30am-7pm Saturday: 9am-6pm


of Ocala


877-209-5199


C14 SATURDAY, MARCH 24, 2012


&q~i




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


$12,4950 HS


S2007 HYUNDAI SANTA FE


SATURDAY, MARCH 24, 2012 C15




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


A&
, ......I ._"-l ,J^
L Ifc^ "-ga.-_.._,,


2012 FIESTA


MSRP
Dealer Discount
Retail Customer Cash


'14,:) r


201W r2 FOCUS SE
2012 FOCUS SE


15,090
-91
-500


9


MSRP
Special Discount
Dealer Discount
Retail Customer Cash


9


r:3,


9


9


19,720
-35
-986
-2,000
*
L2


2012 ESCAPE XLT



24 month Red Carpet Lease
$2,715 due at signing.
Security deposit waived.
Excludes tax, title and license fees.


2004 HONDA PILOT EX 2004 FORD FI50 4X4 SUPER CAB 2008 CHRYSLER TOWN &COUNTRY TOURING 2007 TOYOTA PRIUS HYBRID
Four wheeling & n todrive. N1T372M Extra extra clean. N1T484D Lookng for a new home& loves kds.N2T055A Think green. N2C130A
$16,668 $16,968 $17,668 $17,968
....BS!-^^ M


2008 CHRYSLER SEBRING LIMITED 2006 FORD EXPLORER 4X4 E. BAUER 2011 JEEP PATRIOT SPORT
Only 17k miles. NP5635 Low miles and like new. NP5582 Only4k mileson thiscream puff.N2T110A
$19,968 $19,992 $19,968


2008 FORD RANGERILT SUPERCAB 2007 FORD EDGE SEL 2009 GMC SIERRA C1500 EXT CAB 2009 NISSAN ROGUE SL 2007 110YOACOMAP1i1HIRA1CiSS (AB
Only 25k miles on this 4x4 N1T441D Affordable cross over. N1T310A Only 9k miles on this local trade N1TO14D A must to drive. N1 T257A One local owned trade. N1T476A
$20,968 $20,968 $21,668 $21,668 $21,968
""MOM --'


12008 BUICK ENCLAVE CX 2009 SUBARU FORRESTER LL BEAN 2006 FORD F150 LARIAT 44 SUPER CREW 2008 LINCOLN MKX 2010 FORD F150 XILT 4X4 CREW CAB
Reallydifferentin a goodway N1T210A This all wheel drive vehicle is real cool. NP5600 Only 21k miles and like new. NP5677 The luxury cross over. NP5663 One owner local trade. N1T492A
| 25x968 $26,968 $26,968 $28,968 $29,968


2008 FORD EDGE SEL 20 FORD E250 VAN
A great cross over N 1 C 181A A real work horse. NP5649
$22,668 $22,968
eW ____ L -A ,-.. I


2009 LINCOLN MKS 2010 FORD FI50 RAPTOR 4X4 EXT CAB
Believe it or not itfs really a lincoln. NP5667 Loaded raptor with nav and sun roof. N2T113A
$29,968 $41,668


-Inglis Dunnellon
:6 [ EBeverly Hills
SLH RMnFi8St805Crystal
SRivero ""'Y 4"S
Floral City
HomosaEPEsACEsOFMI Nick Nicholas ,
BHomosass
a Springs Hwy. 98
,ON I N7 Spring Hwy. 50
kn -ic afoBlasf Hill Brooksville


C16 SATURDAY, MARCH 24, 2012




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


2012 Mazda3i Sport


m


M
DOWN-U
FISo OT
DUso SINIG


at te
,*d


2012


-s-wi


;:111


1112111 IT 'J&UT'


Lease 36 Mo.
For 1 Leaset


\II pnr-n Ift QI.. L.A L.tC .ird arttc in-c .-e .i\ e.'er *r..*Ia!!ed .'pL.&fl nafl .rncI.. .11 -'a*'~I"e '*..*.di-r.IC reh.e. .\ ifl-e"riic. I Iec J>Ta ,k' T.e'. [ r.Ifq.,.rcn..r.I
. ElIr.rr-. i^~r \II *np.clcr .d\ ;.pII.hIfflI- *rM,'i m-i nfl- cIn'."i he aI.-r.Th.r.cd *E~tnd'ip.lJ *i'gLi i~II rr,*I Jn'>.r* t>Iu Cr..d *Tkqc l..jcI- Ir t 1( 'in d>.p--Jri)c
diL.*tud*c A.riJ InruiULr,~r I.,,r *etr~ic *Scc .. iF tr ial.' Prt'tr*-auc k-r .iJ-u..rior. Lftrp..-ct oiJ\ XJ~enj-cxd 'crLk- '.x~ie.l I. pr~or -dae P'rfc.in--t'uie~i La


I ii


TSX Lease: $259 mo x 36 months.
$2,899 Due At Signing
Includes Security Deposit, Down Payment; Excludes Tax & Tag,
With Approved Credit 5
$2-11 To 1 25 9/month"
Safety Rating Safety Pick
NHTSA IIHS
Siar ratings am part of the U.S. Department of Transportation's Safercar.gov program (www.safercar.gov). Models tested with standard side-impact airbags (SABa). t
Based on ALG's 2009 and 2010 Residual Value Awards for a Luxury Brand. Subject to limited availability. Through April 30th, 2012, to approved lessees by Acura Financial
Services, DBA of American Honda Finance Corp. Closed-end lease for 2012 TSX SE 5 Speed Automatic (Model CU2F6CJW). MSRP $33,195. Actual net capitalize cost
S28.132.04. Total monthly payments $9,324. Option to purchase at lease end $21,172. Additional lease terms for well-qualified lessees. Not all losses will qualify. Higher lease
'raes apply for lessees with lower credit ratings or in different regions. Dealer participation may affect actual payment. MSRPs include destination; taxes, license, title fees,
oplions and insurance extra. Security deposit waived. Lessee responsible for maintenance, excessive wear/taar and 15l/mi. over 10,000 mileslyear for vehicles with MSRP
less Inan $30,000, but for vehicles with MSRP of $30,000 or more, mileage cost is 20g/mi. over 10,000 mileasyear. See dealer for complete details. Available on 2010 TL. with


SI IMI*


rl


SATURDAY, MARCH 24, 2012 C17


fi




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


A


THEl 201i

SIOWAS EE-L1.


2012 CHRYSLER 200





17,885 oR$189
17 I PER MO.
With $2999 cash or trade equity


2012 CHR


300


SADDORo $299
$24, 1I |PER MO.
With $2999 cash or trade equity
2012 JEEP WRANGLER




22, 888oR299
12Wi MI PER MO.
With $2999 cash or trade equity


2012 CHRYSL


TOWN & COUNTRY


2 7,888OR299
Wit $29 I PER MO.
With $2999 cash or trade equity


2012


CAB


25, 888OR$299
25, PER MO.
With $2999 cash or trade equity
2012 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE

1ll e

I =Lei: *5A 0 =e'71*Ac
mu E3


PER MO.
With $2999 cash or trade equity


CALL THE INSTANT APPRAISAL LINE: 800-440-9054


o--~7/ Jeep ..
BROOKSVILLE HOMOSASSA
INVERNESS


0


FA


C18 SATURDAY, MARCH 24, 2012


RYS




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Honda TE

REALLY T





SALES EVENT
REAL DEALS. BIG INVENTORY.


I X iiBW^"! V-A g MCome See What LOVE
Ti Can Do For You!!!







On approved credit. Must finance with AHFC. 1. 36 Month closed end lease 12,000 miles per year with approved credit, plus tax, tag, 1st payment,$4000 cash or trade equity and lease fees excess milage penalty is 20
cents per mile. Limited to in stock vehicles only, all options are at additional price. Residual values: Civic $12043.50, Accord $13081.50, Pilot $16689.60. Pictures for illustration purposes only, all prices plus tax, tag, state
fees and $499 administrative fee. Dealer installed options additional cost, in stock units only. All vehicles subject to prior sale. Applies to in stock units. Offers expire on date of publication.
00DAT93


202HOD
dFIT


SATURDAY, MARCH 24, 2012 C19




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


V


0


'04 FRONTIER


'06 HHR


TI-


'08 F150


'08 MALIBU


$6,999 $6,999* $7999 s$7,999
OR$1 13M. OR$l13M. OR.$129M. OR.$129EM.


'09 COBALT


'06 SANTE FE


'04 TITAN


'07 PACIFICA


$7,999 $9,999 | $9,999 $9,999
OR$129 o.OR$161 1. oR$161 E Mo.R$161Mo.


'08 LIBERTY


'07 CRV
^^TiBSB/


'06 WRANGLER


'08 ALTIMA


$10,999 $10,999 $10,999 $12,999
OR$17 MOIR OR$ 177 OR.I 177 OR. 209 .


'09 CIVIC


'08 LUCERNE

tiM^I-j


'09 CAMRY


'09 TOWN AND COUNTRY


$12,999 $12,999 $13,999 $13,999
OR$209 OR$209 sgO0R$225 .IOR$225 M!





1 \CALL THE INSTANT APPRAISAL LINE:


0


0


*


*


|RE24!R R lDED EERWHINFD D R AI lCIN
1-8005M-855 ExA203


FRE 4HR!IIECi, DD ESAE rH FDM SEIAL PRIN
1l80051"75:E^=3222


C20 SATURDAY, MARCH 24, 2012


w


FRE2 R EOOOMESAEWrHIFOM SEILWN


C.9 I


RE24HR ROiMEDJ ^MESAEWTHIFO DVEXPRCN
:^:KV"55B:^ M6i


lFIM 4H IEOMMSA GE rr NF M SPCKPRIIN
1-80058"75 Ed5741


FRE 2 H RCDEDNESAG W IF M SK MC
1-8005M-875 E :.528


lRIEE24HRRMED 'MBW WTHIFO MDOURMC
180-58 755b:^ M2:8


F^IE 4 iR EOREDMESGEWHINF =SPCIL IN
1-800-58"75 Ext.6216


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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G2 Saturday, March 24, 2012


HOME AND GARDEN





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE HOME AND GARDEN Saturday March 24, 2012 G3


HOME OF


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Saturday March 24, 2012 G3


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


HOME AND GARDEN






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


What's inside


Remodeling is Edible landscapes
still popular is a new trend

Page 5 Page 6


SALES SERVICE INSTALLATION
Serving Citrus County since 1961
Existing Homes Yearly Maintenance
New Construction Preventative Maintenance
Owner/Builder Uniformed Technicians
Servicing all makes and models Weekend service available.
F ----------------- ---
I Spring Service Call L $ F
I Includes 1" Standard Filter |
Free on Additional Charge.
S Expires 4/30/12 ...i J
Leeper Air Conditioning
& Heating
740 N. Lecanto Hwy., Lecanto, FL 352-746-2223
CA-C058467 www.leeperairconditioning.com


Go native for
healthier lawns

Page 8


Tips for giving Turn bathroom
kitchen warm look into spa oasis


- Page 10


- Page 12


There are plenty of
flooring options


- Page 14


Gerry Mulligan Publisher
Ken Melton Community Affairs Editor
Cindy Connolly Community Affairs Graphic Artist
Sarah Gatling Community Editor
Trista Stokes -Advertising Sales Manager


Citrus Publishing
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.
Crystal River, FL 34429
352-563-6363
www.chronicleonline.com


G4 Saturday, March 24, 2012


HOME AND GARDEN






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Remodeling 9



remains hot


FAMILIES STAYING IN
HOUSES, MAKING
THEM BETTER


ftci the housing crisis
,i 21108, many Amer-
iian, have decided to
stay put in their existing
homes rather than moving.
It's a decision that makes
both financial and emotional
sense. Instead of going to all
the expense of moving to a
new house every couple of
years, more families are de-
ciding to stay where they are
and upgrade their existing
space rather than moving
somewhere new.
That's why remodeling
continues to be a popular op-
tion for many families. They
can turn their existing house
into a more useful place,
adding value, style and func-
tionality all at the same time.
Here are three trends that
remain popular in remodel-
ing.
Families adding suites
Today's families are living
differently than they did a
decade ago. There are more
families today choosing to
live with more than one gen-
eration under one roof,
whether it's the adult children
who have returned home
after college or elderly par-
ents moving in with their
kids.
That's why adding a suite
- often called the "mother-
in-law suite" remains a
common addition.
These separate suites
allow both privacy and liv-
ability within the home, let-
ting families share one roof
but remaining separated
enough to stay sane.


It's common to add a sepa-
rate area with its own bed-
room, bathroom and often a
small, compact kitchen space
to create an apartment-like
zone that's separated from the
rest of the home. This lets
families combine their lives
while still maintaining some
independence and privacy.
Outdoor havens
Turning your yard into an
extension of the home is one
of the most popular ways to
upgrade your home.
When done properly, it
feels like you've just added
square footage to your home
without having to knock out
any walls.
With upgraded patio
areas, outdoor fire pits and
barbecue grills, covered
awnings and high-class seat-
ing, today's outdoor living
spaces are as luxurious as
they are relaxing.


They can also make great
entertainment areas..
Custom kitchens
The kitchen is one room
in the house where families
tend to spend the most time
together, and many people
are choosing to upgrade their
kitchen to make it more func-
tional, spacious and stylish.
Granite and stone-look
countertops are some of the
hottest kitchen upgrades, as
they have been for years, and
integrating appliances with
the cabinetry is gaining in
popularity.
This idea has been popu-
lar in Europe for years, but
it's starting to catch on more
in America as homeowners
use custom panels to conceal
and beautify their refrigerator
and dishwasher, along with
adding new features such as
wine racks and hidden stor-
age solutions.


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Saturday March 24, 2012 G5


HOME AND GARDEN


NEW LOCATION'.
(1/4 mile east Publix, Hwy. 44, Crystal River)

I .is


I ,






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Landscaping



you can eat

A NEW TREND:
BRINGING YOUR GARDEN
TO THE FRONT DOOR


PHOTO: DLEONIS / YAYMICRO.COM
Edible landscaping combines gardening with landscape design, creating a tasty and beautiful style in many modern lawns.


ardening and land-
Ic.pinii have histori-
call been two very
different disciplines. Gar-
dening involves growing
things for the dinner table,
and landscaping is strictly
ornamental.
You can combine the
two, though, in a new home
improvement trend called
edible landscaping.


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With an edible land-
scape, your goal is to create
a space that is just as wel-
coming and visually pleas-
ing as a traditional
landscape, only with the
added benefit of vegetables,
fruits and herbs that you can
use to cook a meal.
Limited space
A big reason edible land-
scaping has become popular
is that it takes up much less
space than a traditional gar-
den.
If you have a little space
between the shrubs by your
front door, you could plant
some herbs during the
growing season. It doesn't
take up much room, and
there's no rule that says gar-
deners have to separate their
landscaping from their edi-
bles. Just be careful what
you harvest, because many
landscaping plants are not
edible.
Convenience
While a traditional veg-
etable garden is usually
planted away from the
house, edible landscaping
can be planted right outside
your door. That makes it
easy to step outside and
pick some rosemary or pull
a piece of fruit from a tree,
making it easier to put your
garden to use.
It's also popular to use


see Edible Page 7


HARDWOOD 00
FLOORING On.
INSTALLED sq. ft.
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G6 Saturday, March 24, 2012


HOME AND GARDEN






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


'a


Edible
from Page 6
containers as part of an edible
landscape. There are many
varieties of dwarf citrus trees,
for example, that are perfect
for container gardening.
Beauty
Finally, edible landscaping
can be just as beautiful as tra-
ditional, non-edible landscap-
ing.
You have plenty of choices
for edible plants that are also
suitable for the landscape -
including varieties of persim-
mons, pecans, citrus trees and
peach trees that are as tasty
as they are good looking.
When you choose edible
plants for your landscaping,
you're freeing up more space
in your vegetable garden for
other plants. You're also put-
ting your gardening skills on
full display, letting visitors get
an up-close look at the bounty
you're growing rather than
hiding it in a faraway back-
yard garden.


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Saturday March 24, 2012 G7


HOME AND GARDEN


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Gs Saturday, March 24, 2012


HOME AND GARDEN


Beautify your landscape

NATIVE PLANTS
BETTER FOR
ENVIRONMENT --
EASIER ON THE
HOMEOWNER 1 ..
,r centuries, a major .
part of gardening has in-
', olved importing exotic
and interesting plants from
other parts of the world.
Flowers, shrubs and ornamen-
tal grasses that are native in
faraway lands are grown, pot-
ted and shipped to just about
anywhere many miles
from where nature intended
them to grow.
This has been good for in-
creasing the variety of plants
PHOTO: ELENATHEWISE / YAYMICRO.COM
see Landscape Page 9 Native plants require far less watering than imported varieties that aren't suited to your local climate.


1 5TI:






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Landscape
from Page 8
available for your landscape,
but it's also created a big
problem: many of those im-
ported plants simply aren't
suited for where you live.
Even plants that are hardy
in your area's temperatures
may not be ideal in your city
because of soil conditions,
rainfall, wind or other factors.
That means they require more
watering, more fertilizer,
more care and more time to
keep them thriving in an area
where they don't belong natu-
rally.
There's a solution, though.
Many landscapers are turning
to native plants rather than
imported varieties, and here's
why.

Less watering
An obvious advantage to
using native plants is that
they're naturally suited to your
area's rainfall levels.
Hot, dry climates will only


support native plants that sur-
vive those conditions. The
same goes for cold, wet cli-
mates.
Choosing plants that grow
naturally in your area makes
more sense. Picking plants
that require more or less rain-
fall than what you receive is a
sure recipe to create stress for
your landscaping, which re-
sults in more disease, wilting
and rotting.
Ideally, native plants will
never need to be watered be-
cause nature takes care of
them. When they do need
extra water because of
drought or other temporary
weather conditions, it won't
require nearly as much as
plants that are imported from
other areas.

Match nature
Another advantage of na-
tive plants is that they will al-
ways match your area's
natural beauty.
Native plants can be found
all around where you live.


The trees, shrubs and flowers
that grow wild in and around
your city create an easy way
for your home to complement
its surroundings.
They also give your home
a sense of place.Your lawn
and landscape will perfectly
match where you live, which
is a pleasing feeling.

Less upkeep
Native plants grow wild


without any special care in
your area.
If you're the type of person
who doesn't have much time
to spend tending their land-
scaping, or if you simply don't
enjoy gardening, then native
plants are a perfect solution.
If you pick the right ones
and plant them properly to get
them off of the right foot, they
can provide years of trouble-
free care.


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HOME AND GARDEN


Saturday March 24, 2012 G9


Blackshears 11
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Free Estima tes.6. www.b6lacks h.com






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SIII W1111 w , ,BEST P



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In Stock Now SF Available

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*Floor Prep & Trims at Additional Cost. Min. labor charges may apply. All Prior
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776 N. Enterprise Pt., Lecanto
9 746-7830 341-0355
Next to Stokes Flea Market on Hwy. 44
FOLLOW US ON
rACEBOOK! Visit us at www.cashcarpetandtile.com


The new modern kitchen

IDEAS FOR GIVING YOUR KITCHEN A WARM LOOK


ichlicns are the heart
tIr "lie home, and
tihl.y's most popular
designs take that into ac-
count. Open-concept, fam-
ily-friendly layouts with
islands and lots of counter-
top space are becoming the
status quo for today's newly
designed kitchens.
Modem styling continues
to be a popular trend, al-
though it's developing a
twist lately.
Instead of the cold, in-
dustrial, metal style that
many people associate with
the modem look, the new
modem is warmer and more
inviting. It uses elegant
woods and natural materials
in a clean, ornament-free
design to combine the best


in modem design and old-
world craftsmanship.
Streamlined design
The streamlined look
continues to be in for
kitchens. Influenced heavily
by the midcentury style, in-
cluding straight lines and
simple, Scandinavian-in-
spired wood fixtures, today's
streamlined kitchens use
glass and clean lines for a
thoroughly modem appear-
ance.
It's especially notable in
the style of cabinets that are
popular this year. Glass door
fronts whether frosted or
clear continue to be pop-
ular, along with simple
frames and straight brushed
metal handles.


Designers have to be
careful not to make this style
look too cold and urban,
though. There's a fine line
between a fashionable
kitchen and an over-the-top,
industrial urban loft kitchen,
and it's important not to
cross it unless that's the look
you're aiming for.
Mixed materials
The biggest trend in the
new modern style is mixing
different materials together
- typically metal with nat-
ural materials, like stone
and wood.
Stainless steel appli-
ances and fixtures remain
the top sellers, but they're
being paired with more
old-world materials and


colors. Natural stone tiles
and backsplashes are espe-
cially popular, along with
cork floors and rich wood
cabinets.
One new trend in cabi-
nets is using more than one
stain or color to create con-
trast. The old rule of al-
ways using matching
cabinets has been thrown
out the window in favor of
more visual interest and
unique combinations of
colors and materials.
For a low-cost
makeover, consider refin-
ishing your cabinet doors.
Sanding and re-staining
your cabinets, or perhaps
just painting over them in
see Kitchen Page 11


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13 2 26 3 416 24 Pine Springs Plaza, just North of Beverly Hills
352m-634 625 10Corner of Hampshire Blvd. & CR 491


A


G10 Saturday March 24, 2012


HOME AND GARDEN


I l "Jll 1 1 l lkl I 1 [ I I I I lf |llll


U


I







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Kitchen
from Page 10
Tuscan-inspired colors, can be a quick
and easy way to give your kitchen a
whole new look.

Qualify wood accessories
Finally, high-quality accessories -
especially wooden accessories are
coming back into style.
People want a sense of quality in
their home at a time when cheap plastic
kitchen tools are wearing out and being
replaced far too often.
Thick wooden bowls, hand-carved
dishes and other long-lasting acces-
sories are popular this year. As the
economy recovers, people are wanting
to invest in materials that withstand the
test of time, and well-built wooden
structures are doing the trick.
They fit the new modem design
while adding the warmth that makes
your house feel like home.


Many people think
of modern design
as having a cold, in-
dustrial look, but
that's not always
the case.
PHOTO: LUNAMARINA/
YAYMICRO.COM


S AL _EJ9


ujamrwa * ue~~
~^g~c~ge ~SAL rE.^


r ,. Made in the USA
| Galley kitchen, all wood maple
i I cabinets with dove tail, soft
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* Kitchen & Baths
* Closet Systems
* Entertainment Centers
* Granite & Solid Surface
Counter Tops
Custom cabinets by Wellborn
Forest & Showplace Wood


KU 352-302-2865
7449 W. Gulf to Lake, Crystal River, FL
lAlll Plll I iJ I.Il J.i .1 S., l, i. &-1 [ I .


SPRINGTIME SPECIALS








We Also Have Outdoor Pressure Cleaning Available.
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C al f or ri OW NER DOES THE W ORK
Servicing All Of Citrus & Marion
County For 25 Years


COPES POOL

AND PAVER LLC
YOUR INTERLOCKING BRICK PAVER SPECIALIST
Refinish your pool during the cooler months.
352-400-3188


Saturday, March 24, 2012 G11il


HOME AND GARDEN






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Bathroom therapy

TURN YOUR ORDINARY ROOM INTO AN OASIS


'N


athrooms used to be
small, cramped rooms,
but not anymore.
Today's bathrooms are becom-
ing integral parts of the living
space of a home, with plenty of
room and amenities for relax-
ation.
One major trend in home
improvement is making bath-
rooms into spa-like spaces,
turning them into an oasis
where you can unwind and re-
lieve pressure.
From the decor to the func-


tionality of the space, here are
three popular ideas for making
your bathroom a more relaxing
place to spend time.
Steam showers
Imagine coming home from
work after a stressful day. You
step into the shower and are in-
stantly immersed in a cloud of
hot, peppermint-scented steam
that melts your troubles away.
This used to require a trip to
the spa, but with steam showers
growing in popularity, more


homeowners are opting to
recreate the full spa experience
in their own bathroom.
A steam shower uses a de-
vice called a steam generator to
boil water and gently emit it in
a cloud of steam, all at safe
temperatures. They typically in-
clude a way for you to add nat-
ural oils such as eucalyptus
or mint to make it an aro-
matherapy experience, too.
see Baths Page 13


PHOO:YURI RUR




PHOTO:YURI ARCURS/YAYMICRO.COM


Bob Brown's
Fence &
Landscaping


4651100 "' I
S-_ -: I. -


TRI-COUNTY

Overhead

Door Sales


1110 E. Amberjack Dr., Hernando, FL
Hernando 352-726-0072
Ocala 352-351-1423


G12 Saturday March 24, 2012


HOME AND GARDEN






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Baths
from Page 12
A steam shower requires
professional installation, in-
cluding custom electrical and
plumbing work, but the end
result can be worth the ex-
pense. It's also more cost ef-
fective than building a
traditional sauna in your
home, so you're adding a re-
laxing, luxurious experience
right in your existing shower.
Soaker tubs
Traditional bathtubs are





I I


around 14 inches deep, which
is perfect for bathing children
or for adults laying flat in the
tub, but they're not ideal for
sitting up with a book and un-
winding.
That's where soaker tubs
come in.
Unlike the shallow tradi-
tional tubs, which are usually
rectangular, soaker tubs are
shorter, taller, oval-shaped
tubs designed to better im-
merse the body while leaning
back. They let you cover your
entire body more like a swim-
ming pool than a normal shal-


low bathtub.
Soaker tubs are usually in-
stalled on their own, without a
shower head, often in the cen-
ter of a bathroom wall
And because of their oval
shape and shorter overall di-
mensions designed for sitting,
rather than laying, they usu-
ally use less water to fill up.
Pricing starts around
$1,000 for an inexpensive
soaker tub and can range up to
$5,000 or more for tubs with
natural finishes and high-end
features.
It's a great way to make


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your bathing experience more
relaxing.
Colored LED lighting
Everyone knows that light-
ing can have a big impact on
the mood of a room. From
cool blues to warm oranges
and reds, the "temperature" of
the lighting in a room can add
drama and create a theatrical
feeling.
The same thing can happen
in your bathroom. Colored
LED lighting is becoming a
popular addition to bathrooms
for owners who want to use
lighting to help them relax.
New systems are being
sold that will automatically
change the color of lighting in
your shower or bathroom to
create light therapy, using dif-
ferent shades and brightnesses
to help you unwind.
Some can be installed in
faucets, others in showerheads
or in the overhead bathroom
lights, but the overall goal is
the same: making your bath-
room a place to get away from
it all.


I .

I:


Ii


The Garden Shed
LOUISE WILLIAMS, OWNER
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Pottery, Plants, Gifts
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352-503-7063
2423 S. Rockcrusher Road
Homosassa
THURSDAY-SATURDAY 8-4





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Come be inspired by HGTV home flooring by Shaw!

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located 5 mi. west of 1-75
(352) 854-3939 ,
castlecarpelseaaol.com
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Granite, Marble & Quartz
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Professional Installation
Residential & Commercial
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lanatee Lanes) **

CRYSTAL RIVER 352-220-2822
782 NE 5th St.


INVERNESS + 352-344-2160
5009 S. Florida Ave.


Saturday, March 24, 2012 G13


HOME AND GARDEN


q






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


TO00 COLD.. TO00 HOT?

WE'LL MAKE IT JUST RIGHT!!












Where we sell windows!
Call for a free in-home estimate.
1731 S. Suncoast Blvd. (US 19), Homosassa
352-795-4226 www.SeeTropical.com







Lawn Maintenance
Lawn & Shrub Spraying
S* Termite Treatments
In-Home Pest Control
Mulch Installed
I Mole & Gopher Treatments
352-527-9373 FREE INSPECTION FREE ESTIMATE

I ''r r gR ceiveL. o"ff
ur first service when you join our
family of satisfied customers.

E' 1. ..,
L- -ai FL 4 r. .


~LA~


.'2 ~


Trade out




your carpet


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Liminiiile floors
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,lp li ll I i.llilln.ih ll ,i|llin,' Ih '
see Floors Page 15


G14 Saturday March 24, 2012


HOME AND GARDEN


:, .I! ,S -






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Floors
from Page 14
quickly grown as one of the
most popular floor surfaces
in today's homes because it's
easy to install and comes
close to matching the beauty
of real wood.
Laminate floors are not
the same as wood floors,
though. They are typically
thinner and manufactured to
look like wood or other natu-
ral materials, but they're ac-
tually just a printed pattern
that looks natural. It doesn't
have the same variability and
stainability of true wood
flooring.
Look closely at the floor's
warranty before you buy it.
You'll want to pick the best
quality flooring you can af-
ford.
Hardwood floors
One option that has long
been popular is hardwood
flooring. Made from real


HOME AND GARDEN


trees cut down into planks,
hardwood flooring is avail-
able in all the variety that na-
ture provides.
Hardwood floors are typi-
cally more expensive than
laminate floors, but they also
look better, with a natural
texture and grain-
ing that can be
stained in thou- Tile f
sands of different
options. has p(
Many hard- the m
woods are avail-
able pre-finished ran(
with durable
coatings, so they choiceG
can have the market
same longevity
and wear resist-
ance of laminate floors,
along with the ease of instal-
lation.
Tile floors
Tile flooring has perhaps
the widest range of choices
on the market today.
It's available from very


cheap ceramic tiles to very
expensive natural stones im-
ported from around the
world.
The big advantage of tile
flooring is that it can have
natural beauty, much like
hardwood floors, but is also
water resistant. It's
often used in
ooring kitchens and bath-
rooms for that rea-
rhaps son, although
dest more and more
homeowners are
e of getting comfort-
able putting tile
on the and stone floors in
today. their living areas,
too.
Tile is also
great for designers because
it's available in a wide vari-
ety of colors and textures.
Whether manmade like
ceramics or cut straight from
a quarry, like marble or sand-
stone, tile can provide the
durability and natural style
that matches today's lifestyle.


Saturday, March 24, 2012 G15


Hc




YOUR















H1 IiMOSASSA 352-628-9663 6970 WEST


)ME IS WHERE


HE HEART IS.
FLOORS ADD HEART TO YOUR HOME!!


Best Selection...
Best Installment...
Best Prices...


I
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* Free In Home Estimates
* Great Selection of -
Custom Designs

IT'S No ORDINARY ,
FLOOR... THAT'S A
SURFACES FLOOR!
GROVER CLEVELAND BLVD. -


CAP lIt l,,, l .,.. .I.TILE LAIr. .TE


----------
Columbia
Traditional Clicette
Flooring

4.50 sq. ft.
INSTALLED

Laminate or
Hardwood Flooring
S5OOO Limit one
discount per

O FF i .51 . ft.


|
e
vi

s1
t





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


655 R _4- .r .sta l."ive







1, i .





l l .,lSpecial EZFlM1INAN G Available.


A osf ht sas6565 W. SR 44, Crystal River







352-563-5944
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK CALL FOR HOURS. SAME OWNER, SAME LOCATION FOR 30 YEARS.


G16 Saturday March 24, 2012


HOME AND GARDEN