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Citrus County chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02712
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 03-18-2012
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:02712

Full Text



Pull and save: Citrus County Fair guide /Inside M


TODAY & Monday morning
HIGH Mostly sunny with winds
86 at7Pmph.
LOW PAGE A4
56


MARCH 18, 2012 Florida's Best Communit


VOL


-UMI


CITRUwS 0 U N T Y l






Owww.chronicleonline.com


Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community $1


ih 26.31, 2012 ;i'.,-



Lfmv






lE 117 ISSUE 224
E 117 ISSUE 224


SO YOU KNOW
* Due to early
deadlines, some
lottery numbers
do not appear.
* Due to technical
failure, the
primary email
server for the
Citrus County
Chronicle is out of
service. In the
interim, those
wishing to email
the Chronicle
should use these
addresses for
the following
departments:
* Newsroom: news
deskchronicle
@gmail.com.
* Sports: chronicle.
sports@hotmail.
com.
* Circulation:
circulationchronicle
@gmail.com.
* Advertising:
advertising
chronicle@
gmail.com.
* The Chronicle
regrets the
inconvenience.






Pedestrian
struck, killed
in Hernando
A 37-year-old In-
verness man was hit
and killed in Her-
nando early Satur-
day morning.
According to a
preliminary report
from Florida High-
way Patrol, a 2004
Dodge Neon, driven
by Brittany Elizabeth
Cook, 23, of
Lecanto, was travel-
ing south around
midnight on North
Carl G. Rose High-
way near East
Wagon Trail when
the right front end of
the vehicle struck
Jesse Lynne Wiley.
Wiley was report-
edly either standing
or walking in the
southbound lane. He
died at the scene.
Cook was not
injured.
No charges have
been filed and ac-
cording to the report,
neither party was
under the influence
of alcohol.
The crash remains
under investigation.
-From staff reports


HOMEFRONT:


Airport spreads its wings


CRfacility's runway

expanding to reach 5,000feet


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff Writer
CRYSTAL RIVER The
upgrades and amenities are
coming fast and furious at
the county's two municipal
airports.
What is now being
dubbed as the airport's last
major operational project
on its master plan has offi-
cials set on stretching Crys-
tal River Airport's runway
an extra 445 feet to the


reach the magic number of
a 5,000-foot tarmac.
The county's other air-
port in Inverness con-
cluded a taxiway and
runway project in the fall of
2010, which made it the
county's first 5,000-foot
runway
"This will allow them to
accommodate more small-


and medium-sized
rate jets," said the c


owi ---. A -
ad^-^^~a- thr6


corpo- MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
county'ss Crystal River Airport has plans to expand its runway to 5,000 feet. The tarmac is currently
4,555 feet. The project is part of the airport's master plan, and it is expected to be finished
Page A5 sometime in 2015.


Celebrating Emerald-Isle style


Locals get festive

with parades,

strutting mutts,

all things green

SHEMIR WILES
Staff Writer
INVERNESS It was Erin go
Braugh or go home Saturday af-
ternoon in downtown Inverness
,as revelers dressed in their
finest green attire lined the
streets to watch
S the second an-
nual Inverness
St. Patrick's Day
Parade.
For more The Irish-
photos, click themed festivi-
on this story at ties throughout
www.chronicle the county
online.com. started early in
the day with a
costumed-dog parade courtesy of
Burke's of Ireland in downtown
Crystal River Later in the after-
noon, those looking for more St.
Patrick's Day fun had the option
of attending a St. Patrick's Day
program put on by the American
Irish Club.
But as the day wound down,
hundreds of people still in the
holiday sprit made their way to
Inverness to continue the cele-
bration into the evening.
Samantha Carter, a volunteer
with the Friends of the Citrus
County Animal Shelter (FOC-
CAS), manned the mutt strut reg-
istration station with other fellow
FOCCAS members.
Sporting a festive shamrock on
her cheek, Carter said it was the
second year FOCCAS has partic-


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Cole and Emma Van Alstyne have a street-angle view of all the dogs and Citrus County residents who turned
out for the fifth annual St. Patrick Day Dog Walk for Charity on Saturday at Burkes of Ireland in Crystal
River. Denise Burke, owner of Burkes of Ireland, said the number of people and dogs registered had doubled
over last year's parade. "And next year will be bigger and better." Money raised from the dog walk will be
donated to the Citrus County Animal Shelter.


ipated in the parade. In addition
to registering people who wanted
to walk their decked out pooches
in the parade, FOCCAS was also
doing a bit of fundraising and


raising awareness for the shelter
animals.
About 20 minutes before the
parade began, Carter said 17 dogs
already were registered and at


the end, they would be crowning
the best-dressed small and large
dogs.
See _Page A2


Marks of the past: Looking ahead, not back


Blue-eyed Iris
Also called blue-eyed
"grass," this iris is in
bloom now./Page E5


SERIES CONCLUSION:
Scarred
A woman talks about
losing her daughter and
husband in an accident
that left her legs
scarred for life./Monday

Annie's Mailbox ......A12
Classifieds ................D5
Crossword ..............A12
Editorial .................... C2
Entertainment ..........B6
Horoscope ................B6
Lottery Numbers ......B4
Lottery Payouts ........ B6
Movies ..........A16
O bituaries ................A6
Together..........A16


SI11|!|15 7 1 Io


The scars Faith
received from a car
accident at age 18
are the most
visible, such as her .
mangled foot
shown here, but
she also has -'. .
emotional scars
from years of '
domestic violence.
NANCY KENNEDY/Chronicle

Woman uses pain of past

abuse as ministry tool


"For I know the plans
Ihave foryou," declares
the LORD, "plans to
prosper you and not to
harm you, plans to give
you hope and a future"
(Jeremiah 29:11).
*Editor's note: To pro-
tect all parties involved,
we do not use real names
in domestic abuse stories.
NANCY KENNEDY
Staff Writer
As a devout Christian,


*Faith believes God
takes every pain and
sorrow, every evil meant
for harm, and uses it for
gonnrd


Tha
accide
crush
her w
the len
Tha
reject
Tha
ing r


SCARRED FOR LIFE
I//
Whether it's the pale spot on your leg or
chin from shaving too close, a jagged red
mark from a dog bite, the telltale "zipper"
down your torso from open-heart surgery
or any number of marks on your body we
call scars, each one has a story behind it.
Through Monday, the Chronicle will be
running a series of stories on scars that have
drastically changed lives.

'A betterperson for it'

NANCY KENNEDY
Staff Writer


t includes the car HOMOSASSA She knows it sounds
ent at age 18 that strange to say it, but all of Susan Mitchell's
ed her foot and left memories of being hit by a car are happy
,ith a scar running ones.
ith a scar running She doesn't even mind the scar down her
gth of her right leg. left leg that goes from her hip to her knee.
et includes being Her one big disappointment is that the
ed by her mother ambulance didn't use the siren on her ride
t includes witness- to the hos ital
repeatedd physical to the hospital.
epeated physical "It's not a bad memory for me at all," she
See Page A5 said, smiling. "I survived and I'm probably
a better person for it."


J


A k



Special to the Chronicle
Susan Mitchell is pictured after the accident
in 1971.
She had just turned 16. Itwas Nov 15,1971,
a beautiful, full-moon night in her small
Pennsylvania hometown. She and her friends
had just come from their Young Life meeting
and decided to walk home. Six of them
walked in pairs on the right-hand side of the
road. There was another larger group too.
Mitchell was in the middle of the group of six.
See Page A9


'.-





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Cole and Emma Van Alstyne and Joe and Jackson Meek
watch the dogs and Citrus County residents who turned out
for the dog walk in Crystal River.


Grace Biedzycki and Bob Ellis enjoy some corned beef and
cabbage Saturday from Dillon's Irish Pub in downtown In-
verness. The Pub went all out with Irish food starting at the
top of the morning with Eggs and Kegs, corned beef and cab-
bage and Guinness Cheese Soup served up with pints of
Green Cooter Lager.


STYLE
Continued from Page Al

Wearing a tiny sparkly
green hat and "Kiss me,
I'm Irish" shamrock anten-
nas, Cooper, a friendly
Dachshund, sipped on a bit
of water as his owner, Rick
Young, stood by.
Young, who attended last
year's parade, had regis-
tered for the mutt strut but
wasn't sure if Cooper
would be able to partici-
pate because he was a bit
overheated.
Young, who professed he
was Scotch-Irish, said the
best part of St. Patrick's
Day is getting together with
friends.
"And hopefully the love
will last the whole year
through," he said.
As the parade came
made it's way through the
downtown area, those rep-
resenting the city of Inver-
ness, including City
Manager Frank DiGio-
vanni, made a ruckus as
they amped up the crowd
in the name of St. Patrick.
However, the dogs in the
mutt strut draw the most
attention from spectators.
"I love the green dog-
gies," one onlooker
gushed.
Trooper Tod Cloud with
Florida Highway Patrol
along with others from the
Citrus County Sheriff's Of-


SO YOU KNOW
Adoptable pets
featured in the St.
Patrick's Day festivities
can be found at Citrus
County Animal
Services, 4030 S. Air-
port Road, Inverness.
Call 352-746-8400 for
more information or
visit www.citrus
critters.com.

fice and Citrus County Fire
Rescue were on hand par-
ticipating in the parade,
but also giving people a
friendly reminder not to
drink and drive.
The local Ancient Order
of Hibernians and Ameri-
can Irish Club brought the
true Irish spirit as Citrus
Memorial Health System
tossed beads, green plastic
derby bowler hats and
other items to the crowd.
The Citrus County Cham-
ber of Commerce, the Ro-
tary Club of Inverness,
Citrus Clowns, Nature
Coast Young Marines and a
host of other groups all got
into the St. Patrick's Day
spirit while marching in
the parade before things
wrapped up with the ap-
pearance of the old Crown
Hotel double-decker bus.
After the parade, Ashley
Bary said she loves St.
Patrick's Day because it's a
great day to hang out with


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DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
The Inverness St. Paddy's Day Parade got moving Saturday afternoon for fun, food and some Irish shamrock shaking. The
American Irish Club float had live traditional music with some members dancing an old Irish jig from the moving float.


family and friends, drink
and have a good time.
Tiffany Davenport and
her brother, Joey Daven-
port, walked around pass-
ing out beads, glow sticks,


stickers and "gold" coins.
Tiffany, who works at Beef
0' Brady's in Inverness,
said she recruited her
baby brother, who was
dressed as a leprechaun, to


help her.
For her, she said she en-
joys celebrating St.
Patrick's Day because
everyone gets to have fun.
"It gives you a reason to


be Irish," she said.
Chronicle reporter
Shemir Wiles can be
reached at 352-564-2924 or
swiles@chronicleonline.
comn.


SIntroducing the 2012 Winners of


"Partners With A Heart"


W\e celebrate our 11 erOCS iln recognition for)
providing outstanI(di ng suppI)ort &LC assistance
ill the areas of plrev'entioll, intervention
&. services for sulbstaInce abuse


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352-601-6620 352-586-7214
substancefreecitrus.com


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A2 SUNDAY, MARCH 18, 2012


LOCAL







Page A3 SUNDAY, MARCH 18, 2012



TATE&


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE




THE COUNTY BOCC supports Seagrass Resort


Renourishment
project to close beach
Starting Monday, March
19, Citrus County Parks and
Recreation will close Fort Is-
land Gulf Beach in Crystal
River for a renourishment
project. Cemex will bring in
approximately 1,600 tons of
sand to replenish the current
sand at the beach.
The county is waiting to
begin the project until after
Citrus County's spring break.
The project should be
completed on or before Fri-
day, March 30.
Call Parks and Recreation
at 352-527-7540.
Americans United for
Separation to meet
Americans United for Sep-
aration of Church and State
(Nature Coast Chapter) will
meet at 4 p.m. Tuesday,
March 20, at Lakes Region
Library, 1511 Druid Road,
Inverness.
The public is welcome.
For information, call Mara-
lyn at 352-726-9112 or email
naturecoastau@hotmail.com.
Advisory committee
to meet March 20
The Citrus CountyAfford-
able Housing Advisory Com-
mittee will meet Tuesday,
March 20, at 5 p.m. in the
Lecanto Government Build-
ing, Room 166.
On the agenda: Hardest
Hit; SHIP; CDBG; NSP;
NSP3; Section 8; Shelter Plus
Care; Homeless, and the
Emergency Shelter Grant.
This committee was formed
to improve the housing situa-
tion in Citrus County by study-
ing and developing projects,
coordinating with county staff
and by making recommenda-
tions to the Board of County
Commissioners.
The Affordable Housing
Advisory Committee meets at
5 p.m. every third Tuesday at
the Lecanto Government
Building.
Call 352-527-7532.
Oncology institute
seeks votes
Robert Boissoneault On-
cology Institute in Lecanto
has been selected as a can-
didate for the LIVESTRONG
Community Impact Project,
which was created to bring
proven cancer support pro-
grams to communities across
the United States.
Finalists will be determined
through an online voting cam-
paign ending at 5 p.m. Friday,
March 23. Applicants with the
top votes will receive financial
and educational support to
replicate and implement the
Pillars4Life program dedicated
to supporting families fighting
cancer. Pillars4Life is a pro-
gram that enhances quality of
life for those fadng cancer.
If selected, Boissoneault
will implement this program in
Citrus County and other serv-
ices areas in Central Florida.
To vote, visit www.RBOI.com
and click 'VOTE!" or go di-
rectly to http://vote.livestrong.
org/vote2012/regions/6/
168-robert-boissoneault-
oncology-institute.
-From staff reports


CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff Writer

A foreclosed resort in Homosassa
is on its way to being used and en-
joyed again.
After conducting a public hearing
on Tuesday, the Citrus County
Board of County Commissioners
(BOCC) requested the re-
designation of the Seagrass Resort
in Homosassa from mobile home
park to coastal and lakes commer-
cial to allow development.
Attorney Denise Diamond Lyn
spoke on behalf of the new owner of
the property, Basil Green.


"Mr Green purchased this prop-
erty from BB&T," Lyn said. "BB&T
reclaimed this property through a
foreclosure action. We closed on
this property on Oct. 31, 2010. Mr
Green saw a diamond in the rough,
so to speak, when he saw this prop-
erty and quickly amassed a team of
local professionals."
The team put together a plan of
major improvements for the site
and already cleaned up the
eyesores.
John Siefert, executive director
of the Citrus County Economic De-
velopment Council; Josh Wooten,
president of the Citrus County


Chamber of Commerce; and Randy
Winstead, a resident, spoke in favor
of the proposed project.
Commissioner Rebecca Bays re-
cused herself from the discussion
and voting on this request because
of a professional relationship with
the applicant. The motion to grant
the request was made by Commis-
sioner J.J. Kenney, seconded by
Commissioner Joe Meek and
passed by a 4-0 vote.
A public hearing was con-
ducted to assist the planning
process for Crystal Point Invest-
ments regarding about 74.9 acres of
land in the Citronelle area. The


board authorized staff to proceed
with terms for developing the site
with 190 single-family residential
units.
A public hearing was con-
ducted to assist the planning
process for WW Caruth Estate re-
garding about 70 acres of land lying
on West Foss Groves Path near In-
glis. The board authorized staff to
proceed with terms for developing
the site with 50 single-family resi-
dential units.
Chronicle reporter Chris Van
Ormer can be reached at
cvanormer@chronicleonline. corn
or 352-564-2916.


Seminole skirmish


Fort Cooper Days event

continues today

NECIA RATLIFF
For the Chronicle
The fog over the Fort Cooper lake Sat-
urday morning made for the perfect
setting for the 32nd annual re-
enactment of an episode in the Second
Seminole War at Fort Cooper
"It's more of a skirmish" said Park Ranger
Ken Hughes.
As the crowd gathered to watch the show,
behind the scenes the actors prepared for
the impending battle.
First there was a safety meeting led by Di-
anne Drye, park ranger and event coordina-
tor, to make sure everyone knew the rules.
No live ammo, no bayonets and remem-
ber, this is a re-enactment, folks.
Seminole Indians and the First Georgia
Battalion of volunteers dressed in their pe-
riod attire, many with authentic flintlock ri-
fles, eager to get this battle
started.
A soldier walked onto the
field to tell the story of Maj.
Mark Anthony Cooper
Cooper refused to surren-
For more der 3,000 pounds of bacon
photos, click and ham to his commander,
on this story at because he believed his
www.chronicle men earned it
online.com. A Seminole re-enactor ex-
plained to the crowd that the Seminoles
were never conquered. They fought for
their land and rights.
Seminoles did not want a war, the re-
enactor said, but were granted possession of
4 million acres in the center of the peninsula
for at least 20 years and less than 12 years
later the government was back, demanding
they give up their land and move West
Conflict seemed inevitable.
Tension built Saturday, as the crowd
began to notice movement in the surround-
ing woods. The soldiers stood ready, know-
ing at any time the Seminole Indians would
strike again. Shots fired, cannons boomed
and the audience was pulled back in time.
George Moore, a retired
Battles Army veteran, has played
will be Maj. Mark Anthony
Cooper at this event since
re-enacted 1996.
"We try to represent as
at 11 a.m. much factual and actual
nd 2 m history as to what hap-
and 2 p.m. opened Moore said. "I feel
today. that being a decorated
Army combat vet, I have a
different perspective on
the brutality of war but we try to keep the
gore stuff out for the families and kids."
After only four days of building the fort
made of pine logs and oak posts, the approx-
imately 380 soldiers and volunteers were
surrounded by 500 Seminole Indians.
Of the 16 days the soldiers were at Fort
Cooper, they fought for 13.
"It has been said that this is the longest
siege in American history until the Khe-


<_ *,sy _______ f... .. c..- --. ., *..'- -,.- .. .._- .. "- "+ .
-. -

DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
The battles of the Second Seminole War were fought in the Cove of the Withlacoochee where
Osceola, the most famous Seminole, lived. Some skirmishes that occurred between the U.S. gov-
ernment and the Seminoles took place at Fort Cooper. The two-week battle left 20 wounded,
with Col. Zadoc Cook being the only casualty of the government forces who fought there.


Sanh battle in Vietnam in 1968." Moore said.
Ironically, he said, only one of Maj. Cooper's
men was killed.
Earl DeBarry joked, "Where else can a
man my age play cowboys and Indians and
get away with it?"
Each re-enactor had his own reasons for
participating in the event.
"This keeps our heritage alive for not only
us but our families." said Steven Creamer.
Creamer carries a business card with the
line, "Not learning history, but living it."
Fort Cooper State Park is approximately
735 acres with a 100-acre lake. It offers a
four-site primitive tent camp and is part of
Citrus County's Great Florida Birding Trail
boasting one of the greatest varieties of
birds because of the different habitats
within the park.
Swimming is banned at the beach area
on the shore of Lake Holathlikaha due to


low water levels.
The fort is no longer standing, but Park
Manager Harry Mitchell revealed future
plans. "We have had the land surveyed and
know where the fort sat," Mitchell said. "We
hope in the future to build at least the cor-
ner posts."
Fort Cooper Days continues today, with
battles at 11 a.m. and 2 p.m.
There are arts, crafts and refreshments to
fill the day between battles. Vendors must
provide handmade products that resemble
authentic items of the 1830s.
Fort Cooper State Park is at 3100 S. Old
Floral City Road, off U.S. 41 south of Inver-
ness. The park is open from 8 a.m. to sun-
down daily Park admission is $3 per vehicle
or $2 for pedestrians or bicyclists. Pets are
welcome in parts of the park as long as they
are on a six-foot leash. Visit the website
www.floridastateparks.org/fortcooper.


Medicaid legislation hits governor's desk; decision due March 29


CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff Writer
TALLAHASSEE Gov Rick
Scott's office received a bill
Thursday that would force
Florida counties to pay $300 mil-
lion in disputed Medicaid bills.
Scott has 15 days to either sign
or veto the legislation, HB 5301. If
Scott does neither by the March 29
deadline, it becomes law
automatically
The state estimates that coun-
ties owe about $325.5 million in
back billing. Citrus County is
claimed to owe $844,000.
According to Lindsay Ubinas,
county spokeswoman, this amount
would have a drastic impact on the
county as the Citrus County Board
of County Commissioners (BOCC)
deals with challenges to balance the
budget with a declining tax base.
HB 5301 addresses a new and
disputed Medicaid billing system


overseen by the Agency for Health
Care Administration.
According to the Florida Asso-
ciation of Counties (FAC), the bill
represents "an unprecedented
Medicaid cost-shift that would
compel local taxpayers to pick up
the bill for millions in state ac-
counting errors."
"It's just plain wrong to ask local
taxpayers to pay for Tallahassee's
accounting errors," said Chris
Holley, FAC executive director.
"The governor has set the stan-
dard for efficient government; and
the best way to promote efficiency
and accountability to Florida's
taxpayers is to swiftly veto this
backdoor tax hike."
According to the website of the
FAC, a county government advo-
cacy and education group: "This
problem is complicated and has
been occurring for some time.
There are many past due bills that
are owed to the state for Medicaid


billing. Unfortunately, due to the
new Medicaid billing system,
many counties have been billed
incorrectly, double billed or had
other mistakes in establishing
proof of residency While FAC un-
derstands that many of these is-
sues are valid, the state feels
strongly that the money is still fun-
damentally owed to the state, re-
gardless of which county actually
owes the money"
FAC contends the bill strips
counties of revenue sharing to
cover 85 percent of their past dis-
puted bills or 100 percent of their
past disputed bills with hope for
an appeal through the Division of
Administrative Hearings. All fu-
ture Medicaid billings would have
been taken from county 1/2-cent
sales tax with no ability for coun-
ties to review the bills to ensure
accuracy prior to payment.
FAC stated that beyond bureau-
cratic red tape, the simple princi-


ple is that counties have a fiduci-
ary duty to review bills for accu-
racy before taxpayer dollars are
spent. It is encouraging counties
and taxpayers to ask Scott to veto
HB 5301.
A 60-second video-letter from
the FAC on Thursday urged Scott
to veto HB 5301.
"Countless counties, good gov-
ernment advocates and even Tea
Party activists have derided H.B.
5301 as the embodiment of gov-
ernment mismanagement and bu-
reaucratic blundering," according
to the FAC.
A detailed written letter outlin-
ing the myriad alleged redundan-
cies, inefficiencies and systemic
problems with HB 5301 accompa-
nied FAC's video letter. The letter
cites specific examples of local
taxpayers being sent Medicaid
bills for non-Florida residents,
residents of other counties and
even billed as much as 15 times for


the same hospital visit.
House Speaker Dean Cannon's
office said the measure is one ofthe
first bills to be forwarded to the gov-
ernor's office post-session because
of its widespread implications. Be-
ginning May 1, the Agency for
Health Care Administration must
begin generating monthly state-
ments outlining the amount each
county owes, and the Department of
Revenue will reduce revenue-
sharing distributions accordingly,
the Speaker's office said.
This issue will be discussed at
the next BOCC meeting at 1 p.m.
Tuesday, March 27, at the Citrus
County Courthouse, Room 100, 110
N. Apopka Ave., Inverness. Com-
missioners will be asked to submit
a letter to Scott requesting a veto
of the bill.
Chronicle reporter Chris Van
Ormer can be reached at
cvanormer@chronicleonline.corn
or 352-564-2916






A4 SUNDAY, MARCH 18, 2012


Man arrested




on burglary,



vandalism




charges


SHEMIR WILES
Staff Writer

CRYSTAL RIVER Mul-
tiple shoe- and fingerprints
at the scene of a burglary
lead to the arrest of a 21-
year-old Crystal River man
Friday afternoon on felony
charges.
Aaron Jacob Mills was
charged with criminal mis-
chief and burglary of an un-
occupied structure. He was
transported to the Citrus
County Detention Facility in
Lecanto where his bond was
set at $6,000.
While on patrol March 4,
a deputy with the Citrus
County Sheriff's Office no-
ticed one of the glass plate
window at the former BP
gas station on the corner of
State Road 44 and County
Road 486 had been broken,
according to Mills' arrest re-
port. The same deputy had
reportedly checked the
business the day before and
found everything to be
intact.
Inside the convenience
store, the deputy found a
substantial amount of items
broken, including glass dis-
play cases and cooler doors.
The owner estimated the
damages to be worth about
$10,000.
Law enforcement


processed the scene, finding
several shoe prints, latent
fingerprints and blood in-
side the store. On March 8,
investigators determined
the prints belonged to Mills,
whose fingerprints were on
file.
On Friday, Mills was taken
into custody at his home on
North Plum Point. Once at
the jail, Mills reportedly
stated he entered the busi-
ness through an already
broken window to look for
cigarettes because he had
no money to buy them.
When he didn't find any,
Mills claimed he left
through the same window.
He denied causing any dam-
age to the inside of the store,
stating the window had
been broken for weeks and
anyone could have vandal-
ized the property
However, when a detec-
tive informed Mills both a
deputy and the owner saw
the window in one piece the
day before the burglary and
vandalism occurred, Mills
only stated the detective
was wrong, and he was try-
ing to make Mills look like a
liar, the report stated.
Chronicle reporter
Shemir Wiles can be
reached at 352-564-2924 or
swiles@chronicleonline.
comn.


LOCAL


For the RECORD


Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
DUI arrest
Janet Messer Boin, 51, of
4321 Biscayne Drive, Hemando
Beach, at 10:21 p.m. Thursday
on a misdemeanor charge of
driving under the influence. Ac-
cording to the arrest report, Boin
was driving in the wrong direc-
tion on U.S. 19 and was at-
tempting to cross the median
when a deputy stopped to see
what was going on. Boin report-
edly had slurred speech, blood-
shot eyes and failed all field
sobriety tasks she was asked to
perform. Her blood alcohol con-
centrations were .200 percent
and .193 percent. The legal limit
in Florida is .080 percent. Bond
$500.
Other arrests
Gregory Allen Walker, 20,
of 305 N. Osceola Ave., Inver-
ness, at 7:53 p.m. Thursday on
a misdemeanor charge of pos-
session of cannabis (less than
20 grams. Bond $500.
William Chapnick, 55, of
1124 W. Bucknell Ave., Inver-
ness, at 12:12 a.m. Friday on an
active Hemando County war-
rant for a felony charge of bur-


ON THE NET

* For more information about arrests made by the
Citrus County Sheriff's Office, go to www.sheriff
citrus.org and click on the Public Information link,
then on Arrest Reports.
* Also under Public Information on the CCSO website,
click on Crime Mapping for a view of where each type
of crime occurs in Citrus County. Click on Offense Re-
ports to see lists of burglary, theft and vandalism.
* For the Record reports are also archived online at
www.chronicleonline.com.
* To volunteer for the Citrus County Sheriff's Office Vol-
unteer Unit, call Sgt. Chris Evan at 352-527-3701 or
email cevan@sheriffcitrus.org.


glary of an unoccupied resi-
dence. Bond $15,000.
Donald P. Knowlton Jr.,
34, of 22 Cypress Lane, Inglis,
at 12:19 p.m. Friday on an ac-
tive Citrus County warrant for a
violation of probation on original
felony charge of dealing in
stolen property and providing
false information to a pawnbro-
ker. No bond.
Candice Leann Bautista,
45, of 550 N. Independence
Highway, Inverness, at 12:23
p.m. Friday on a felony charge
of grand theft, a misdemeanor
charge of resisting a merchant


during or after a theft and a vio-
lation of probation on an original
felony charge of possession of
cocaine. According to the arrest
report, Bautista attempted to
steal more than $700 worth of
items from Bealls Department
Store in Inverness.
When the loss prevention of-
ficer attempted to stop Bautista,
she reportedly ran and tried to
escape the officer's hold when
he tried to restrain her. Law en-
forcement also found Bautista
was on probation, and her pro-
bation officer violated her based
on the new charge. No bond.


notices in.. today's Citrus County Chronicle


City of Inverness...........................................A14

Fictitious Name Notices... ........................D8
B id N otices ........................................................D 8

Meeting Notices....... .................................D8


Miscellaneous Notices.............................D....D8

Notice to Creditors/Administration..................D8

.......... Surplus Property..............................................D 8


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers

Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
pc
pc
s
pc
pc

PC
s
pc


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
pc
pc
s
PC

s

PC
PC


MARINE OUTLOOK


HI LO PR HI LO PR
87 57 NA NA NA NA

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Ex elusive daily
TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 86 Low: 56
Mostly sunny

MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 86 Low: 57
Mostly sunny

TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
High: 87 Low: 59
-.s -'. Sunny to partly cloudy

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 87/55
Record 91/37
Normal 78/50
Mean temp. 71
Departure from mean +7
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday 0.00 in.
Total for the month 0.56 in.
Total for the year 3.79 in.
Normal for the year 8.34 in.
*As of 6 po. at Inverness
UV INDEX: 9
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Saturday at 3 p.m. 30.18 in.


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 55
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 40%
POLLEN COUNT**
Grasses and weeds were absent and
Today's active pollen:
Oak, juniper, nettle
Today's count: 10.1/12
Monday's count: 10.8
Tuesday's count: 11.3
Saturday was good with pollutants
mainly ozone.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
3/18 SUNDAY 3:07 9:19 3:31 9:43
3/19 MONDAY 3:49 10:00 4:11 10:23
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
SUNSET TONIGHT 7:41 PM.

0 O O 0 4 MOONRISE TODAY ...................... 4:58 A.M.
MARCH22 MARCHSO APRIIB APRILt MOONSET TODAY.......... 4:21 PM.

BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777 For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.f idof.com/f re weather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
?iIr, i ', '. ;- i '. ... I :- Addresses ending in a 0 or 1: Monday;
,3j,- ,,- ,,j,,,, . T.. .11,, ,- I.ij;. I. .r 5: W wednesday; addresses
S : :L. -: -,, ,-, ; Hand-watering of plants other
than lawns may be done on any day, but is limited to the hours before 8 a.m. or after 6 p.m.
New lawns may be watered any day during the first 30 days. During days 31-60. they may be
watered approximately every other day. Even-numbered addresses may water on Tuesday,
Thursday and Saturday Odd-numbered addresses may be watered on Wednesday. Friday,
and Sunday Fountains and other aesthetic water features may only operate four hours
per day The regular hours of operation can be selected by the owner, but must be posted
(see list of exemptions such as water features that also provide aerification to koi ponds at
WaterMatters.orgi).
Car washing is limited to once per week on the designated watering day for the location.
Pressure washing is allowed for necessary purposes such as prior to painting or sealing, in
order to maintain a paint or material warranty, to address a health or safety hazard and to
comply with health laws. Questions, concerns or reporting violations, call 352-527-7669.


TIDES
*From mouths of rivers *At King's Bay
Sunday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 3:01 a/12:08 p 4:51 p/-
Crystal River 1:22 a/9:30 a 3:12 p/9 26 p
Withlacoochee* 1259 p/7:18 a -- /7:14 p
Homosassa"* 2:11 a/11:07 a 4:01 p/11:03 p


"'At Mason s Creek
Monday
High/Low High/Low
4:10 a/12:04 a 5:21 p/12:51 p
2:31 a/10:13 a 3:42 p/10:16 p
12:18 a/8:01 a 1:29 p/8:04 p
3:20 a/11:50 a 4:31 p/11:53 p


Si .owlI. I winds around 10 knots.
Seas 2 feet. Bay and inland waters will
have a ighi chop. Mostly sunny skies
today.


Gulf water
temperature


80
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 27.36 27.33 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 33.74 33.72 39.25
Tsala Apopka-Inverness 35.62 35.60 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 37.59 37.57 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or excedeed in any one year. This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision. In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211

THE NATION


/ ia 1mi,- _
131 Billings .

30s

s- aos



S -- 1
/ Fl PlW


, Gs*
/


City
Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington. VT
Charleston. SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, N.H
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville. IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
Nashville


gO~~

lOs


Saturday Sunday
H L Pcp. Fcst H L
63 44 s 69 50
74 38 sh 63 34
74 50 ts 76 49
83 61 trace pc 83 57
61 45 pc 55 47
79 66 ts 81 67
71 46 pc 65 51
73 43 c 67 36
86 60 pc 85 59
50 39 .31 rs 45 29
48 40 s 68 51
73 51 ts 71 55
60 38 s 73 53
85 56 ts 78 59
76 55 18 ts 77 55
81 54 ts 76 56
82 58 pc 79 62
76 51 ts 76 58
77 52 ts 69 54
84 58 ts 83 57
75 52 ts 74 57
52 29 s 73 44
78 65 ts 79 68
76 43 pc 69 34
82 63 pc 79 61
75 49 ts 69 53
84 52 pc 77 46
79 53 ts 81 59
72 44 pc 66 48
59 46 s 71 46
81 68 pc 82 72
76 54 ts 79 60
80 60 pc 85 61
65 59 sh 54 41
80 64 pc 81 63
57 52 38 sh 58 48
77 55 .78 ts 81 61
77 60 pc 82 64
74 58 pc 68 52
79 59 pc 79 61
83 55 pc 82 60
85 55 pc 87 57
79 54 03 ts 83 56


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
92012 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


M.n<.t~ i^r
, ** ,tlr
0 70s Chi)

... "3 "


70o


..r .


Mew"no Oi. BY5.'


FORECAST FOR 300 P.M.

FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY

Saturday Sunday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
New Orleans 84 65 pc 82 66
New York City 62 45 s 68 51
Norfolk 65 52 c 63 52
Oklahoma City 76 65 ts 75 60
Omaha 84 62 pc 79 60
Palm Springs 73 60 06 pc 59 46
Philadelphia 71 46 pc 65 50
Phoenix 81 58 sh 57 44
Pittsburgh 77 47 ts 73 53
Portland, ME 55 36 s 62 44
Portland, Ore 49 41 .17 sh 44 34
Providence, RI 54 39 s 64 45
Raleigh 79 58 ts 73 57
Rapid City 79 42 pc 75 42
Reno 44 33 .01 rs 42 26
Rochester, NY 71 48 ts 72 54
Sacramento 51 40 sh 56 38
St. Louis 80 59 1,34 pc 83 65
St. Ste Marie 65 43 pc 61 45
Salt Lake City 66 58 sh 50 30
San Antonio 77 66 ts 80 67
San Diego 58 55 34 sh 56 51
San Francisco 52 43 sh 54 43
Savannah 85 60 01 ts 81 58
Seattle 49 33 37 sh 44 31
Spokane 43 33 15 pc 44 25
Syracuse 68 46 s 71 52
Topeka 77 64 ts 77 62
Washington 75 52 c 67 53
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 90 Wink, Texas LOW 17 Fraser Colo

WORLD CITIES


SUNDAY
CITY HIL/SKY
Acapulco 88/73/pc
Amsterdam 48/34/sh
Athens 64/47/s
Beijing 42/29/pc
Berlin 58/40/sh
Bermuda 70/62/c
Cairo 65/48/s
Calgary 39/21/s
Havana 83/65/pc
Hong Kong 79/70/pc
Jerusalem 59/42/s


Lisbon
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Paris
Rio
Rome
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Warsaw


60/46/c
50/32/c
60/31/pc
74/49/sh
67/46/pc
39/33/sh
58/37/pc
82/67/sh
63/50/pc
71/61/pc
58/34/sh
69/52/pc
62/37/s


C I T R U S.


C 0 U N T Y


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


CHRONICLE
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


State BRIEF

FHP: Driver trying
to avoid dog
causes fatal crash
MERRITT ISLAND -Au-
thorities said a woman who
swerved to avoid a dog
caused a crash that killed a
central Florida man.
According to Florida High-
way Patrol, a dog ran out in
front of the woman's car Fri-
day night. Troopers said the
woman veered into the on-
coming lane as she attempted
to avoid hitting the dog.
FHP says the woman's car
struck the dog anyway, along
with the front of a pickup
truck driven by Sam Crane of
Merritt Island. Crane's truck
flipped over and came to rest
on its roof. Crane's 17-year-
old passenger suffered minor
injuries, as did the 69-year-
old woman driving the car.
FHP said Crane and the
dog both died at the scene.
According to an FHP report,
alcohol was not a factor in
the crash but charges are
pending.
-From wire reports


I-





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

State BRIEF

Proposed Senate
redistricting map
released
Senate Reapportionment
Committee Chairman Don
Gaetz proposed a new redistrict-
ing map for the 40-seat chamber
Saturday to fix constitutional
flaws that the Florida Supreme
Court cited when it kicked the
plan back to lawmakers.
The Niceville Republican pro-
posed new lines for eight dis-
tricts singled out by the high
court, including his own. He also
suggested the random selection
of district numbers, which would
be conducted in public with help
from the Florida Lottery.
One of the justices' criticisms
was that the Senate map, in-
cluding the district renumbering
scheme, intentionally favored in-
cumbents and the GOP major-
ity. That's prohibited by new Fair
Districts standards in the Florida
Constitution, which are aimed at
preventing gerrymandering.
Gaetz' proposed revision,
though, would continue to keep
nearly all incumbents from run-
ning against each other and
would maintain an overwhelm-
ing GOP majority, critics said.
-From wire reports



WINGS
Continued from Page Al

engineering project man-
ager Quincy Wylupek.
"For companies like
Progress Energy who fly
people into that airport
maybe a couple of times (a)
week, it will mean they can
add more people and things
to those planes," he said.
Wylupek said preliminary
environmental assessments
have not started yet, but if
all the funding mechanisms
are worked out, the $3 mil-
lion project probably will
begin in 2014 and be fin-
ished by 2015.
He expects the federal
government and the state to
come up with about 98 per-
cent of the cost, and the
county will handle the rest.
The expansion is also ex-
pected to move Golf Course
Drive eastward in spots, Wy-
lupek said.
Tom Davis, president of
Crystal Aero Group Inc.,
which has operated the
Crystal River Airport for
more than three decades,
said while it is difficult to
gauge the economic impact
of the extension, he be-
lieves the longer runway
will allow for "more pay-
load capacity" for the
planes that use the
airport.
"It will also increase our
fuel sales," Davis added.
In 2009, workers com-
pleted a $1.5 million taxi-


STATE/LOCAL


ABUSE
Continued from Page Al

abuse between her parents.
It even includes many
years of physical and verbal
abuse from an ex-husband
until she finally said "no
more."
Faith's scars, physical
and emotional, run deep.
However, they're no longer
a source of pain and shame.
Instead, they have become
a source of strength and
tools of ministry throughout
a career counseling victims
as well as perpetrators of
domestic violence.
"The accident happened
April 5,1964," Faith said. "I
was 18, married, with a
baby girl."
Her then-husband had
been up all night working on
the car he was taking to the
drag races the next day at a
nearby speedway They left
the baby with Grandma and
drove to the races, only to
discover it was rained out
On the way home they
stopped to eat Then Faith,
looking cute in her stretch
jeans, pink angora sweater
and suede coat, settled in
the front seat with a maga-
zine for the ride home, her
left leg curled under her

way project at the airport.
The taxiway was moved 76
feet north, allowing a 240-
foot span between the cen-
ter of the taxiway and the
center of the runway
Back in 1990, the airport's
3,000-foot runway was ex-
tended to its current 4,555-
foot length amid strenuous
opposition from homeown-
ers in the area.
But Davis said unfortu-
nately airports, by virtue of
their locations, are always
hemmed in by businesses
and residential
neighborhood.
"Things are that way be-
cause people seek conven-
ience and easy access to
airports," Davis said.
The airport is currently
building a 10-plane hangar
addition and two taxiways to
them and replaced an anti-
quated Automated Weather
Observation System
(AWOS).
Davis said all these up-
grades are helping solidify
the airport's position in the
flyers' market.
"We already are well-
known as an excellent
place to train pilots, we
have very good amenities
and now getting to the
magic number 5,000-foot
mark would let pilots know
we can handle more pay-
load capacity and our mar-
gin of safety goes up," Davis
noted.
Chronicle reporter A.B.
Sidibe can be reached at
352-564-2925 or asidibe@
chronicleonline. com.


As President for Citrus County, Kay leads a team
of local decision makers dedicated to meeting
your personal and business financial needs.
www.ccbg.com

MEMBER FDIC


and her right leg stretched
out
"I felt a jolt and that's all
I remember," she said. "I
came to about 10 days
later."
Her husband had been
thrown from the car, but he
survived. Faith had been
trapped and needed "Jaws
of Life" to remove her. She
had a concussion and skull
fracture she bent the
steering wheel with her
head broken ankle,
crushed right foot and leg.
They had hit an oak tree
head on.
While in the hospital, she
looked in the mirror -
head bandaged and her
face swollen and bruised,
cuts everywhere and be-
came hysterical.
"My face looked so horri-
ble; I was so ashamed," she
said. "I was afraid some-
body would think I'd been
beaten."
She had seen it with her
parents, she said. She had
seen her mother bruised
and swore she would never
end up that way
But that often happens.
"My first husband
smacked me only once, and
I left him," she said. "I was
not going to be my mother."
However, she went on to
marry a man who beat her


She had seen her
mother bruised
and swore she
would never end
up that way.

unmercifully
"He was a pro," she said.
"He hit me where it didn't
show, but I have deep emo-
tional scars."
One day she wasn't ironing
a shirt fast enough, and as
her husband was about to hit
her with the hot iron, her 6-
year-old son rushed in with
his B.B. gun and said, "If you
hurt my mommy one more
time, I'm going to kill you."
"That's when I realized I
was putting my children
through what I had lived
through," she said, and she
filed for divorce. She told
her husband, "If you ever
lay a hand on me again,
you're going to jail."
Fast-forward several
years. Faith had become a
Christian and said she ex-
perienced the love of God
healing all of her scars. She
started working at a local
counseling center where
she eventually became di-
rector for 15 years until
moving to Florida. She is


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now married to a man who
treats her kindly
At the counseling center,
Faith worked with abusers
who were court-ordered to
attend counseling sessions
as well as women who were
being abused. She used the
scars from her accident and
her own years of abuse to il-
lustrate the principles she
taught.
"When the accident first
happened, my scars were
hideous," she said. "I had a
deep, red, angry scar from
my hip to my knee, scars
across my knee and foot,
and I limped horribly My
face was scarred, and I was
ashamed.
"But over the years the
scars are now fine lines,"
she said. "I can touch them
and there's absolutely no
pain. But when I see them, I
will always remember what
I went through."
She said often people who
are emotionally damaged
try to hide their scars, stuff
their emotions, deny their
feelings, but the pain re-
mains. She tells her clients
the only way to heal is not to


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relive the experiences, but
acknowledge the truth of
what caused the scars.
"When you turn those
hurts over to Jesus, he will
heal them," she said.
Faith said for much of her
life she had a victim men-
tality, always asking, "Why
do bad things always hap-
pen to me?" But she's no
longer a victim, neither is
she a survivor, she said. In-
stead, she calls herself an
overcome and encourages
others to believe that about
themselves, too.
"When I started writing my
story," she said, "I'd sit at my
computer, looking at a pic-
ture of myself as a little girl
and weep for the child that I
was. But I don't weep for her
anymore. Now I rejoice for
the woman I've become.
"Our scars remind us of
where we've been and what
we've endured," she said.
"And there is victory when
we use our life story to help
others."
Chronicle reporter Nancy
Kennedy can be reached at
nkennedy@chronicle
online. com or 352-564-2927.


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A6 SUNDAY, MARCH 18, 2012



Gary Freund, 60
HOMOSASSA
Gary R. Freund, formerly
of Lake Ronkonkoma, NY,
passed suddenly on March
was a re-
tired mem-
ber of IBEW
Electrical
Union Local
25.
He is sur-
vived by his
Gary life partner,
Freund Virginia
Pero; father,
George W (Margaret) Fre-
und Jr, Beverly Hills, FL;
children, Meaghan, Kyle,
Christopher, Jesse Marie;
granddaughter, Izabella;
brother, George; sisters,
Cindy Steele, Linda Cata-
pano, Sharon Edwards.
He was a great man and
will be missed.
Visitation will be held on
Monday, March 19, 2012,
from 4 to 6 p.m. at New
Serenity Memorial Funeral
Home & Cremation Svcs.
Inc., 713 N.E. 5th Terrace,
Crystal River, FL. Profes-
sional services are en-
trusted to New Serenity
Memorial Funeral Home &
Cremation Svcs. Inc. 352-
563-1394.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.

SO YOU KNOW
The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits both free and
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352-563-5660 for
details and pricing
options.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries


Virginia
Janzen, 88
BEVERLY HILLS
Virginia L. Janzen, 88, of
Beverly Hills, died Monday,
February 27, 2012, peace-
fully at home.
She was born in Downers
Grove, IL, and was pre-
ceded in death by her
beloved husband, Gus, who
died February 27, 2005.
They came to Florida 26
years ago. She was a retired
administrative assistant for
Dun & Bradstreet in Oak
Brook, IL. She was a mem-
ber of Beverly Hills Com-
munity Church.
Survivors include a
daughter and son-in-law,
Paula and David McNamara
of St. Charles, IL; and
granddaughter Megan, a
student at University of IL,
Chicago.
Donations may be made
in her memory to East Cit-
rus Clinical Hospice, 326
Line Ave., Inverness, FL
34452.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.

OBITUARIES
Obituaries must be
verified with the funeral
home or society in
charge of
arrangements.
Paid obituaries are
printed as submitted by
funeral homes or
societies.


Theolinda
Johnson, 87
INVERNESS
The Service of Remem-
brance for Mrs. Theolinda T
Johnson, age 87, of Inver-
n e s s ,
Florida, will
be held 10
a.m. Tues-
day, March
1 920, 2012, at
the Inver-
ness Chapel
of Hooper
Funeral
Theolinda Homes with
Johnson F a t h e r
James John-
son officiating. Interment
will follow at Hills of Rest
Cemetery, Floral City,
Florida. The family will re-
ceive friends from 6 p.m.
until 8 p.m. Monday, March
19, 2012, at the Inverness
Chapel. Online condolences
may be sent to the family at
w w w. H o o p e r Funeral
Home.com.
Mrs. Johnson was born
June 8, 1924, in Seekonk,
MA, daughter of the late
Joseph and Rose (Monese)
Ladd. She died March 15,
2012, in Inverness, FL. Mrs.
Johnson worked as an as-
sembler for Raytheon Cor-
poration and moved to
Inverness, Florida, from Re-
hoboth, MA, in 1972. She
was a member of Our Lady
of Fatima Catholic Church,
Inverness.
Mrs. Johnson was pre-
ceded in death by her hus-
band, Earle Wesley
Johnson; and brother,


Joseph Ladd. Survivors in-
clude her son, Thomas E.
(Janice) Johnson; daughter,
Tiolinda Banks; sister, Tilly
Krasnianski; 6 grandchil-
dren; 6 great-grandchildren;
and 2 great-great-
grandchildren.




Joseph
Marousek
INVERNESS
Joseph Marousek, of In-
verness, Florida, born in
Dorf am Pram, Austria, said
his final auf wiedersehen
and passed away peacefully
on March 14, 2012, sur-
rounded by his loving family
and friends.
He is survived by his wife,
Roselouise; sister Mary
Marousek Lekich and
brother-in-law Frank; their
two sons Frederick and
Richard; daughter Susan;
daughters-in-law Maryann
and Karen; his grandchil-
dren James, William, An-
drew, Benjamin and Ariel.
Mr. Marousek served his
country bravely in the Viet-
nam War. Later, he went on
to be a man of many hats: a
fireman, a loving husband,
father and grandfather. A
bona fide family man, a role
he took the greatest pride
in. Oftentimes, Joseph had
the great quality of making
friends feel like they were
one of his own. He worked
for the town of Brookhaven


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as a foreman for 30 years.
Joseph enjoyed traveling,
photography and spending
time with his family and
friends. By far his greatest
accomplishment was his 44-
year marriage to his loving
wife, Roselouise. The love
they shared spanned across
four decades and spawned
not only a beautiful family
but a bond that they share
that can never be broken.
Mrs. Roselouise
Marousek and family re-
quests that you please send
all donations in his name to:
HPH Hospice, 3545 N.
Lecanto Hwy, Beverly Hills,
FL 34436. Private cremation
arrangements under the di-
rection of Chas. E. Davis Fu-
neral Home with
Crematory, Inverness,
Florida.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. com.

Deaths ELSEWHERE

Chaleo
Yoovidhya, 89
BANGKOK
State media in Thailand
say the self-made Thai bil-
lionaire who created the
renowned Red Bull energy
drink three decades ago has


died. He was 89.
Thai state television
broadcaster MCOT said
Chaleo Yoovidhya died of
natural causes Saturday
It cited an executive at
the Thai Beverage Industry
Association.
Chaleo founded T.C. Phar-
maceuticals.
In the 1970s, it formulated
an energy drink prototype
called Krathing Daeng, or
Red Bull in English.
It was popular among
Thai truck drivers and
laborers.
Chaleo then co-founded a
company in 1984 with an
Austrian partner who
helped turn Red Bull into a
global brand.
Forbes magazine has
ranked Chaleo among the
richest men in the world.
His assets are estimated
to be worth several billion
dollars.
-From wire reports


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Navy trains not just for


terrorists, but traffic


Weeklong

exercise begins

again Monday
BROCK VERGAKIS
Associated Press
NORFOLK, Va. When
the Navy trains for respond-
ing to a terrorist attack on
one of its U.S. bases, it's not
just explosives, gunmen and
suspicious fishing boats that
the service's top leaders are
concerned about. It's the
traffic.
That vulnerability was
highlighted in major Navy
ports like those in San
Diego, Mayport, Fla., and in
the Pacific Northwest dur-
ing last year's annual exer-
cise, when heightened
security at bases resulted in
severe gridlock. Navy offi-
cials say that traffic leaves
sailors waiting to get on
base vulnerable to attack
and can keep emergency ve-
hicles from being able to
quickly respond.
Navy officials are vowing
to fix the traffic problems
for this year's weeklong ex-
ercise, which begins Mon-
day and affects every Navy
installation in the continen-
tal U.S.
"Last year, the admiral
said, 'Well look, we need to
know what would happen in
the real world if this hap-
pened during rush hour.'
And so we did it, and we
found out that we had some
issues that needed to be ad-
dressed," said Capt.
Matthew Colburn, director
of fleet anti-terrorism at
U.S. Fleet Forces Command
in Norfolk.
Some people waiting to
get on base in already
traffic-snarled regions com-
plained of sitting in their
cars for hours as security
personnel thoroughly
checked IDs, inspected ve-
hicles and occasionally
used bomb-sniffing dogs.
One of the primary culprits
was people coming onto
base who didn't need to be
there.
Poor participation
Adm. John Harvey, com-
mander of U.S. Fleet Forces
Command, said security
conditions last year reached
a point that commanders
should have only required
essential personnel to re-
port to base.
"But very few across the
nation actually took this
step. This low rate of partic-
ipation works against the in-
tent of the exercise and
prevents us from accurately


simulating the conditions
that would be present and
operating during a real-
world threat," Harvey wrote
in a blog post leading up to
this year's exercise.
The Navy is encouraging
those who can telecommute
to do so, among other things.
The Navy says people
should still expect traffic
delays near bases, but
they're hoping they won't be
nearly as long this year.
The traffic wasn't a night-
mare for only sailors wait-
ing to get on base. It created
significant problems for
civilians, too. Commuters
were caught in the traffic,
and public transit was de-
layed. In some areas, chil-
dren riding school buses
showed up more than an
hour late to class and others
had long waits to be picked
up.
"I think everyone was af-
fected by it. It didn't matter
whether you worked on an
installation or if you were a
child on a school bus trying
to get from point A to point
B," said Capt Mary Jackson,
commander of Naval Sta-
tion Norfolk, the world's
largest naval base.
Lesson learned
One of the primary les-
sons learned from last year
was the importance of com-
munication. The Navy has
spent the past year working
with communities around
the country to ensure po-
lice, transportation officials
and school systems aren't
caught off-guard.
That kind of coordination
could be useful during other
emergencies, too, such as
hurricanes, Jackson said.
School days
In Virginia Beach, which
is home to the Navy's East
Coast master jet base, 24 of
the district's 85 schools had
children showing up late be-
cause buses were stuck in
traffic last year. The district
is the state's third-largest,
with nearly 70,000 students.
Nancy Soscia, a Virginia
Beach City Public Schools
spokeswoman, said the mil-
itary has made sure school
officials wouldn't be taken


by surprise again this year.
"They were actually very
apologetic and said we kind
of learned what happened
last year," she said. "... They
said it wasn't a pleasant cou-
ple of days for them, either."
The Navy said it has been
invited by the Virginia De-
partment of Transportation
to have a liaison at its traffic
command post where
cameras monitor roadways
- during the exercise as
well as in the event of any
emergencies. VDOT offi-
cials said they would work
closely with the Navy to ad-
dress traffic issues, but did
not specify how, citing secu-
rity concerns.
School systems have also
been told which days traffic
will be especially bad. Sos-
cia said that in a real catas-
trophe there may be little
the district could do to avoid
students getting stuck in
traffic, but that it could use
its emergency notification
system to let parents know
why their children are late.
While Navy officials are
working to address traffic
problems, they also ac-
knowledged there will still
be delays, particularly in
fleet concentration areas
like in southeastern Vir-
ginia and San Diego.
Those who live or travel
near bases may see more
emergency vehicles and pa-
trol boats with their lights
flashing than normal.
Colburn declined to offer
specific threats the Navy
will be responding to during
the exercise, but said they
could range from a Fort
Hood-style shooting to a
water-borne attack. In the
San Diego area, Navy offi-
cials have said this year's
exercise will involve the
Red Cross, the Marines and
city homeland security offi-
cials to provide additional
realism.
"We change the way we do
business based on the
change and the threat, and
that means we have to test
our procedures as they
change," he said.
Brock Vergakis can be
reached at www twittercom/
BrockVergakis.


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Tribe: Bald eagle permit a victory


Associated Press
CHEYENNE, Wyo. -A federal govern-
ment decision to allow a Wyoming tribe to
kill two bald eagles for a religious cere-
mony is a victory for American Indian sov-
ereignty as well as for long-suppressed
religious freedoms, the tribe says.
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
granted a permit March 9 to the Northern
Arapaho Tribe allowing it either to kill or
capture and release two bald eagles this
year.
While no one questions the religious
sincerity of Northern Arapaho tribal
members, spokesmen for some conserva-
tion and animal rights groups question
why the tribe can't meet its religious needs
without killing wild eagles. They say the
tribe could raise captive birds, or accept
eagle feathers or carcasses already avail-
able from a federal repository that collects
birds killed by power lines or other
causes.
The Northern Arapaho share the Wind
River Indian Reservation in central
Wyoming with the Eastern Shoshone


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Tribe. The Northern Arapaho decline to
say specifically what they will do with the
eagles the federal permit allows them to
kill.
"It has been since the beginning of time
with us, and we respectfully utilize the
eagle in our ceremonies," said Harvey
Spoonhunter, a tribal elder and former
chairman of the Northern Arapaho Busi-
ness Council. "We get to utilize the eagle,
which we consider a messenger to the
Creator"
Bald eagles were removed from the fed-
eral list of threatened species in 2007. The
birds remain protected under the federal
Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act.
Several Indian tribes have been allowed
permits to kill golden eagles for religious
purposes.
Reaction to the Northern Arapaho bald
eagle permit was muted among some non-
Indian groups.
"We hold bald eagles in great esteem as
well, and as a humane organization, we
don't want to see them killed," said Wayne
Pacelle, president of The Humane Society
of the United States.


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CITRUS COUNTY
HOSPITAL BOARD


Successful appointees to the Associate Board of
Trustees will serve in an advisory capacity to
the Citrus County Hospital Board for the
promotion and accomplishment of its goals and
objectives.


Associate board members will be invited to
serve for a 1 year term. Initial appointees will
serve until fiscal year ending September 30,
2012 with new appointees beginning a
1 year term on October 1, 2012.


All interested citizens of Citrus County are
welcome to apply. Please send a letter of
interest, along with a current resume, to the
attention of Vickie LaMarche, Chief Operating
Officer, Citrus County Hospital Board, P.O. Box
1030, Inverness, FL 34451, no later than March
28, 2012.


Applications can be downloaded at
www.citruscountyhospitalboard.com or obtained
from Citrus County Hospital Board Office at
123 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida.



Michael Smallridge
Chairman
Citrus County Hospital Board


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NATION


SUNDAY, MARCH 18, 2012 A7


WILDLIFE F





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Marchl9 to 23 MENUS


CITRUS COUNTY SCHOOLS
Elementary schools
Breakfast
Monday: MVP breakfast,
grits, cereal and toast, milk,
juice.
Tuesday: Sausage and egg
biscuit, tater tots, cereal and
toast, milk, juice.
Wednesday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, grits, cereal and
toast, milk, juice.
Thursday: Ultimate breakfast
round, cheese grits, tater tots,
cereal and toast, milk, juice.
Friday: Cinnamon bun, grits,
cereal and toast, milk, juice.
Lunch
Monday: Mozarella MaxStix,
fajita chicken and rice with Rip-
Stick, PB dippers, fresh baby
carrots, ranch pasta salad,
chilled applesauce, milk, juice.
Tuesday: Baked chicken
tenders, pepperoni pizza,
turkey super salad, yogurt par-
fait, garden salad, peas, sea-
soned rice, strawberry cup,
crackers, milk, juice.
Wednesday: Hot dog on
bun, macaroni and cheese, PB
dippers, fresh baby carrots,
steamed green beans, baked
beans, mixed fruit, milk, juice.
Thursday: Oven-baked
breaded chicken, turkey wrap,
apple chicken super salad
bowl, yogurt parfait, fresh gar-
den salad, roll, seasoned
mashed potatoes, peaches,
crackers, milk, juice.
Friday: Sausage pizza,
pasta with mozzarella meat
sauce, PB dipper, fresh baby
carrots, sweet corn, steamed
broccoli, chilled pineapple, milk,
juice.
Middle schools
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast sausage
pizza, MVP breakfast, grits, ce-
real and toast, milk, juice.
Tuesday: Sausage, egg and
cheese biscuit, ultra cinnamon
bun, tater tots, cereal and toast,
milk, juice.
Wednesday: Breakfast egg
and cheese wrap, MVP break-
fast, tater tots, cereal and toast,
milk, juice.
Thursday: Breakfast sand-
wich stuffer, ultimate breakfast
round, peach cup, grits, cereal
and toast, milk, juice.
Friday: Ham, egg and
cheese biscuit, ultra cinnamon
bun, tater tots, cereal and toast,
milk, juice.


Lunch
Monday: Sausage pizza,
breaded chicken sandwich, yo-
gurt parfait, fresh baby carrots,
Normandy-blend vegetables,
Italian pasta salad, strawberry
cup, fruit juice bar, milk, juice.
Tuesday: Crispy Mexican
tacos, fajita chicken and rice,
ham super salad, PB dippers,
garden salad, glazed carrots,
Mexicali corn, Spanish rice, ap-
plesauce, crackers, milk, juice.
Wednesday: Hamburger on
bun, baked chicken nuggets,
yogurt parfait, fresh baby car-
rots, green beans, colossal
crisp french fries, chilled
peaches, milk, juice.
Thursday: Oriental orange
chicken, mozzarella MaxStix,
chef super salad, PB dippers,
garden salad, sweet corn,
warm apple slices, Jell-O,
crackers, milk, juice.
Friday: Baked chicken ten-
ders, macaroni and cheese,
apple chicken super salad,
fresh baby carrots, broccoli,
seasoned rice, chilled mixed
fruit, crackers, milk, juice.
High schools
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast sausage
pizza, MVP breakfast, grits, ce-
real and toast, milk, juice.
Tuesday: Sausage, egg and
cheese biscuit, ultra cinnamon
bun, tater tots, cereal and toast,
milk, juice.
Wednesday: Breakfast egg
and cheese wrap, MVP break-
fast, tater tots, cereal and toast,
milk, juice.
Thursday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, ultimate break-
fast round, grits, peach cup, ce-
real and toast, milk, juice.
Friday: Breakfast sandwich
stuffer, ultra cinnamon bun,
tater tots, cereal and toast, milk,
juice.
Lunch
Monday: Fajita chicken and


Youth Ranches thrift store reopens
Special to the Chronicle
The Sheriffs Ranches Enterprises Thrift Store in
Crystal River will have a grand reopening celebration
Monday, March 19, at its new, larger location in King's
Bay Plaza, 200 S.E. U.S. 19.
The original store location opened in 1991. For more
than 20 years, the thrift store has resold items to raise
funds to help support the programs of the Florida Sher-
iffs Youth Ranches. Donations of gently used household
items and clothing are accepted for resale in one of four
locations around the state.
The mission of the Sheriffs Ranches Enterprises Inc.
is to provide financial support, goodwill and community
involvement for the boys and girls served by the Florida
Sheriffs Youth Ranches. Visit www.youthranches.org.


HES needs technology for classes
Special to the Chronicle
Hernando Elementary School is looking for donations
of working Kindles, Nooks, iPod Touches, iPads, Inter-
net tablets, digital cameras or digital recording devices
to be used by our students in the classroom.
If you have any used but working electronic devices
from the list above or would like to donate a new elec-
tronic device, call Heather Bone or Laura Manos at 352-
726-1833 Monday through Friday, between the hours of
8:15 a.m. to 4:15 p.m. To contact someone outside of
these hours, call Heather Bone at 352-462-4768.


rice, hamburger, pizza, fajita
chicken super salad, yogurt
parfait, fresh baby carrots, broc-
coli, french fries, juice bar,
crackers, crackers, milk.
Tuesday: Pasta with moz-
zarella and meat sauce,
chicken sandwich, pizza, ham
super salad, yogurt parfait, gar-
den salad, sweet corn, green
beans, french fries, peaches,
crackers, milk.
Wednesday: Baked chicken
tenders, pizza, hamburger,
turkey wrap, turkey super
salad, PB dippers, baby car-
rots, peas, pineapple, mashed
potatoes, baked beans, french
fries, crackers, milk.
Thursday: Cheesy chicken


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and rice burrito, chicken sand-
wich, pizza, apple chicken
super salad, yogurt parfait, gar-
den salad, green beans, sweet
corn, french fries, mixed fruit,
crackers, milk.


Friday: Creamy chicken al-
fredo, hamburger, pizza, ham
super salad, yogurt parfait,
fresh baby carrots, peas, baked
french fries, strawberry cup,
crackers, milk.
Lecanto High School lunch
Monday: Chicken tenders,
macaroni and cheese, ham-
burger, chicken sandwich, fajita
chicken super salad, pizza, yo-
gurt parfait, baby carrots, baked
beans, peas, baked chips, fruit
juice bar, french fries, milk.
Tuesday: Fajita chicken and
rice, pizza, turkey and gravy
over noodles, hamburger,
chicken sandwich, turkey salad,
yogurt parfait, garden salad,
sweet corn, green beans,
peaches, french fries, baked
chips, crackers, milk.
Wednesday: Turkey wrap,
chicken alfredo, hamburger,
chicken sandwich, pizza, ham
super salad, yogurt parfait,
baby carrots, ranch pasta
salad, broccoli, pineapple,
french fries, baked chips, crack-
ers, milk.
Thursday: Breaded chicken,
macaroni and cheese, ham-
burger, chicken sandwich,
pizza, turkey super salad, yo-
gurt parfait, garden salad, corn,
seasoned mashed potatoes,
mixed fruit, french fries, baked
chips, crackers, milk.
Friday: Crispy Mexican
tacos, hamburger, chicken


sandwich, pasta mozzarella
and meat sauce, apple chicken
salad, parfait, fresh baby car-
rots, peas, Spanish rice, straw-
berry cup, french fries, baked
chips, crackers, milk.
SENIOR DINING
Monday: Lasagna casse-
role, garlic spinach, Italian veg-
etable medley, peaches, slice
whole-grain wheat bread with
margarine, low-fat milk.
Tuesday: Barbecued pork ri-
blet, Lyonnaise potatoes, warm
cinnamon apples with raisins,
graham crackers, slice whole-
grain wheat bread with mar-
garine, low-fat milk.
Wednesday: Chef salad with
cheese, whole boiled egg and
tomato, French dressing, car-
rot-raisin salad, mixed fruit,
slice whole-grain wheat bread
with margarine, low-fat milk.
Thursday: Roast chicken
thigh with chicken gravy, green
beans, mashed potatoes, oat-
meal cookie, whole-grain roll
with margarine, low-fat milk.
Friday: Meatballs with brown
gravy, rice pilaf, mixed vegeta-
bles, fresh seasonal fruit, slice
whole-grain wheat bread with
margarine, low-fat milk.
Senior dining sites include:
Lecanto, East Citrus, Crystal
River, Homosassa Springs, In-
verness and South Dunnellon.
For information, call Support
Services at 352-527-5975.


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A8 SUNDAY, MARCH 18, 2012


LOCAL





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

BETTER
Continued from Page Al
The driver of the car that
hit her, a boy who had also
been at the Young Life
meeting, had swerved to
miss the larger group and
didn't see Mitchell's group.
"I don't remember being
hit," she said, "but I do re-
member the paramedics
and my parents getting
there and being in a tremen-
dous amount of pain and
bad words coming out of my
mouth."
The next thing she re-
members is feeling loopy
from pain medication and
seeing her family doctor at
the hospital.
"Hi! What's up, Doc?" she
remembers saying.
She had broken her left
leg in four places, skinned
one whole side of her body
and had a head injury that
required 13 stitches. After
surgery to put a pin in her
leg from hip to knee, she
stayed in the hospital for 28
days and had a blast.
A friend came every day
after school to spend time
with her. Her other friends
and even people she didn't
know came to visit or called.
She received scores of
cards, including one signed
by the Pittsburgh Pirates
baseball team, and a mural-
sized card with get well
wishes written all over it,
which she still has 40 years
later.
"The outpouring from a
small community was ab-
solutely incredible," she
said. "The scar I have from
it was a good catalyst in my
life. It showed me the differ-
ence people can make in a
person's life, how they can
rally around an individual
who's down and bring them
back up.
"Sure, I can sit here and
tell you bad things that also


LOCAL


The whole
thing
affirmed my faith
in humanity and
how people can
be helpful, and it's
guided my life in
being helpful to
others, helping
them to realize
that accidents
happen and it's
not intentional.
You can't place
blame all the
time. Sometimes
you're just in the
wrong place at
the wrong
time.
Susan Mitchell
injured when she was hit by
a car at 16 years of age.

happened during that time,
and I asked that question:
Why does God let bad things
happen to a good person?
But I choose to look at all
the wonderful things that
happened," she said.
Because her school had
stairs, she couldn't attend
classes, so she had a tutor-
and got exceptional grades.
She had to give up gymnas-
tics, but she joined the bowl-
ing team in her senior year
and got a trophy for Most
Improved Average.
"I started with a 24 and
finished with a 76," she said
laughing.
The most difficult part


SUNDAY, MARCH 18, 2012 A9


NANCY KENNEDY/Chronicle
At age 16, Susan Mitchell was hit by a car. She recalls that time as a "good catalyst" and the scar down her left leg is a
reminder of how her friends rallied around her. She is shown here with a giant card signed by dozens of well-wishers.


was the strained relation-
ship with the driver and his
family They had been
friends, and she knew it was
an accident and he hadn't
done it on purpose, but
things were never quite the
same. She said she has won-
dered at times if he carried


guilt. She has since reached
out to his family, to let them
know that she's absolutely
fine and always was.
She said her dad taught
her that there's always
something good that you can
take away from any situa-
tion and bring it into


the future.
"The whole thing af-
firmed my faith in human-
ity and how people can be
helpful, and it's guided my
life in being helpful to oth-
ers, helping them to realize
that accidents happen and
it's not intentional. You


can't place blame all the
time," she said. "Some-
times you're just in the
wrong place at the wrong
time."
Chronicle reporter Nancy
Kennedy can be reached at
n kennedy@ chronicle
online, corn or 352-564-2927.


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NATION


&


people in the United States
already are covered by
workplace plans or govern-
ment programs such as
Medicare. When the insur-
ance obligation kicks in, not
even two years from now,
most people won't need to
worry or buy anything new.
Nonetheless, Americans
don't like being told how to
spend their money, not even
if it would help solve the
problem of the nation's more
than 50 million uninsured.
Can the government re-
ally tell us what to buy?
Federal judges have come
down on both sides of the


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Nation BRIEFS Health care overhaul causes controversy

Go green


Associated Press
Dennis O'Mally, the self-
proclaimed "King of the
Leprechaun" cheers on
marchers Saturday as they
make their way up Fifth Av-
enue during the 251st an-
nual St. Patrick's Day
Parade in New York.


GOP, Dems ready
for budget battle
WASHINGTON -After a
few months of relative peace
on the budget front, Democ-
rats and Republicans are
readying for a party-defining,
election-year fight over trillion
dollar-plus deficits and what
to do about them.
The focus in the week
ahead will be on the conser-
vative-dominated House,
where the Budget Committee
chairman, Rep. Paul Ryan,
R-Wis., is fashioning a sequel
to last year's "Path to Pros-
perity" manifesto that ignited
a firestorm over Medicare.
The upcoming debate
gives Republicans a chance
to show how they would
tackle out-of-control budget
deficits and rein in the cost
and scope of government.
Those are top issues for the
conservative supporters
counted on by Republicans to
turn out in large numbers in
the fall to maintain the GOP's
control of the House.
President Barack Obama
played it safe when he re-
leased his spending blueprint
last month for the budget
year that begins Oct. 1. It
calls for tax increases on
wealthier earners and modest
spending curbs. But it would
not address the spiraling
costs of Medicare and Medi-
caid, the health care plan for
the poor and disabled.
Last year's GOP measure
proposed replacing Medicare
fee-for-service payments to
doctors and hospitals with a
voucher-like program in which
the government would subsi-
dize purchases of health in-
surance on the private market.

World BRIEF

Explosions


Associated Press
Syrian army soldiers and
security officers inspect
the blast area Saturday in
front of a damaged building
of the air intelligence
forces, which was at-
tacked by one of two ex-
plosions, in Damascus,
Syria.
Twin bombers
kill 27 in Syria
DAMASCUS Two sui-
cide bombers detonated cars
packed with explosives in
near-simultaneous attacks on
heavily guarded intelligence
and security buildings in the
Syrian capital of Damascus
Saturday, killing at least 27
people. There have been a
string of large-scale bomb-
ings against the regime in its
stronghold of Damascus that
suggest a dangerous, wild-
card element in the year-old
anti-government revolt.
-From wire reports


Associated Press
WASHINGTON Death,
taxes and now health insur-
ance? Having a medical
plan or else paying a fine is
about to become another
certainty of American life,
unless the Supreme Court
says no.
People are split over the
wisdom of President Barack
Obama's health care over-
haul, but they are nearly
united against its require-
ment that everybody have
insurance. The mandate is
intensely unpopular even
though more than 8 in 10


Associated Press
President Barack Obama
signs the health care bill
March 23, 2010, in the East
Room of the White House in
Washington. The Obama ad-
ministration Monday re-
leased a plan to match up
uninsured Americans with
coverage.

question, leaving it to the
Supreme Court to sort out.


The justices are allotting an
unusually long period, six
hours over three days, be-
ginning March 26,
to hear arguments challeng-
ing the law's
constitutionality.
Their ruling, expected in
June, is shaping up as a his-
toric moment in the
century-long quest by re-
formers to provide afford-
able health care for all.
Many critics and support-
ers alike see the insurance
requirement as the linchpin
of Obama's health care law:
Take away the mandate and
the wheels fall off.
Politically, it was a wobbly
construction from the start.
It seems half of Washington
has flip-flopped over man-
dating insurance.
One critic dismissed the


Suspect named


Soldier accused in

Afghan killings

was family man

Associated Press
LAKE TAPPS, Wash. On a
winding road of wood-frame homes
tucked amid towering trees, Robert
Bales was the father who joined
his two young children for playtime
in the yard, a career soldier who
greeted neighbors warmly but was
guarded when talking about the
years he spent away at war
"When I heard him talk, he said
.. 'Yeah, that's my job. That's what
I do,"' said Kassie Holland, a next-
door neighbor to the soldier who is
now suspected of killing 16 Afghan
civilians. "He never expressed a lot
of emotion toward it."
Speaking to his fellow soldiers,
though, Bales could exult in the
role. Plunged into battle in Iraq, he
told an interviewer for a base
newspaper in 2009 that he and his
comrades proved "the real differ-
ence between being an American
as opposed to being a bad guy"
As reporters swarmed Bales'
neighborhood late Friday, Holland
and other neighbors shook their
heads, trying but failing to reconcile
the man they thought they knew
with the allegations against him.
Military officials said that about
3 a.m. last Sunday, the 38-year-old
staff sergeant crept away from the
Army base where he was stationed
in southern Afghanistan, entered
two slumbering villages and un-
leashed a massacre, shooting his
victims and setting many of the
bodies on fire. Eleven of those
killed belonged to one family Nine
were children.
"I can't believe it was him," said
Holland, recalling a kind-hearted
neighbor who grew up in Ohio.
There, he was a "happy-go-
lucky" football player and a good
student at Norwood High School in
a mostly blue-collar Cincinnati
suburb of 20,000, said Jack
Bouldin, a retired Norwood High
School teacher who was Bales'
physical education teacher
Bales played alongside Marc Ed-
wards, who went on to be a star
running back at Notre Dame and
later NFL teams including the 2002
Super Bowl champion New Eng-
land Patriots. He had a part-time
job helping care for a youth with
special needs, said teammate Steve
Berling, who called him a "great
guy with a huge heart" Bales went


Associated Press
Staff Sgt. Robert Bales, left, 1st platoon sergeant, Blackhorse Company,
2nd Battalion, 3rd Infantry Regiment, 3rd Stryker Brigade Combat Team,
2nd Infantry Division, participates Aug. 23, 2011, in an exercise at the
National Training Center at Fort Irwin, Calif. On Friday a senior U.S. official
identified Bales as the man accused of killing 16 civilians in an attack on
Afghan villagers five days ago. The man at right is unidentified.


on to college at Ohio State Univer-
sity from 1993 to 1996 with a major
in economics, but didn't graduate,
according to the university.
Until Friday, military officials
had kept Bales' identity secret and
what little was known about him
remained sketchy, aside from the
fact he joined the military after the
Sept. 11, 2001, terror attacks,
served with the 3rd Stryker
Brigade stationed at Joint Base
Lewis-McChord and was dis-
patched to Iraq three times since
2003.
With the release of his name, a
still-incomplete portrait of the man
comes into focus. Part of it reveals
the father and husband neighbors
recall, and a soldier quietly proud
of his 11-year record of service. He
and his wife, Karilyn, had two
young children; she has worked
since last April as a project man-
ager at AMAXRA, a marketing and
public relations company in Red-
mond, Wash.
It also shows Bales had previous
brushes with trouble. In 2002,


records show, he was arrested at a
Tacoma, Wash., hotel for assault on
a girlfriend. Bales pleaded not
guilty and was required to undergo
20 hours of anger management
counseling, after which the case
was dismissed.
A separate hit-and-run charge
was dismissed in a nearby town's
municipal court three years ago,
according to records. It isn't clear
from court documents what Bales
hit; witnesses saw a man in a m
ilitary-style uniform, with a shaved
head and bleeding, running away
When deputies found him in the
woods, Bales told them he fell
asleep at the wheel. He paid about
$1,000 in fines and restitution and
the case was dismissed in October
2009.
Bales has not yet been charged
in the killings in Afghanistan. He
was flown Friday on an Air Force
cargo jet from Kuwait to the mili-
tary's only maximum-security
prison, at Fort Leavenworth, Kan.,
where he's being held alone in a
cell.


Mauritania arrests top Libyan sought by ICC


Associated Press
TRIPOLI, Libya-Mauri-
tania on Saturday arrested
Moammar Ghadafi's former
intelligence chief, accused
of attacking civilians during
the uprising in Libya last
year and the 1989 bombing
of a French airliner The In-
ternational Criminal Court,
France and Libya all said
they want to prosecute Ab-
dullah al-Senoussi.
Mauritania's state infor-
mation agency said in a
statement that al-Senoussi


was arrested at the airport
in the capital Nouakchott
upon arrival from the Mo-
roccan city of Casablanca. It
said he was carrying a fake
Malian passport.
A spokesman for Libya's
ruling National Transi-
tional Council, Mohammed
al-Hareiz confirmed that
the ex-intelligence chief
had been captured by Mau-
ritian officials.
As Gadhafi's regime
crumbled in the second half
of 2011 after more than four
decades of rule, many of the


dictator's inner circle fled
from advancing rebels to-
ward the Sahara, where the
regime had long cultivated
ties with desert groups both
in Libya and in neighboring
countries.
A Libyan military official
said al-Senoussi, who is
also Gadhafi's brother-in-
law, likely fled to Chad just
before the opposition cap-
tured the capital Tripoli in
October and passed
through Mali and Morocco
before heading to
Mauritania.


Associated Press
Abdullah al-Senoussi, head
of Libyan intelligence,
speaks Aug. 21, 2011, to
the press. Mauritania's offi-
cial information agency says
security officials there ar-
rested the former Libyan of-
ficial Saturday.


Supreme Court to hear

arguments starting March 26


though if someone wins
more than 50 percent of the
vote they'll receive all 20.


idea this way: "If things were
that easy, I could mandate
everybody to buy a house and
that would solve the problem
of homelessness." That was
Obama as a presidential can-
didate, who was against
health insurance mandates
before he was for them.
Once elected, Obama de-
cided a mandate could work
as part of a plan that helps
keep premiums down and
assists those who can't af-
ford them. To hear Republi-
cans rail against this attack
on personal freedom, you'd
never know the idea came
from them.
Its model was a Massa-
chusetts law signed in 2006
by Mitt Romney, now the
front-runner of the Republi-
can presidential race, when
he was governor.



Romney,


Santorum


head to

Illinois

Associated Press
BAYAMON, Puerto Rico
- Looking toward the criti-
cal primary in Illinois, Re-
publican presidential
front-runner Mitt Romney
wrapped up a shortened
campaign trip to Puerto
Rico on Saturday as he pre-
pared for more tough con-
tests against chief rival Rick
Santorum.
The former Massachu-
setts governor dramatically
curtailed his trip to the U.S.
territory, which holds its pri-
mary Sunday, in favor of
spending more time in Illi-
nois, where polls have
shown him slightly ahead of
Santorum.
Santorum left Puerto Rico
earlier this week and was
spending the morning in
Missouri, where he already
won a primary that awarded
no delegates. Missouri Re-
publicans were meeting in
county caucuses Saturday,
the first step toward choos-
ing delegates to the national
convention who are commit-
ted to specific candidates.
Santorum was headed to
Illinois Saturday night.
Romney campaigned Sat-
urday morning with Puerto
Rican Gov Luis Fortuno,
meeting with voters a day
after a massive, energetic
rally in San Juan celebrated
his arrival here.
"It was Ronald Reagan
who very famously in our
party said that it was impor-
tant for the people of Puerto
Rico to have the choice to
become a state, and if the
people of Puerto Rico
choose that path, I will be
happy to lead that effort in
Washington," Romney said
after the crowd began
chanting "Statehood now!
Statehood now!"
The island's political sta-
tus statehood, independ-
ence or no change is the
critical issue underlying
Sunday's primary Puerto
Ricans will vote on the is-
land's status in November.
Romney has support from
much of the establishment
here, including Fortuno,
who supports making the is-
land the fifty-first state, and
Romney is confident about
his prospects for winning
many of the island's 20 dele-
gates. Santorum cam-
paigned here earlier in the
week and said he would
support statehood if the No-
vember vote were decisive.
Santorum also spent days
explaining his comment
that English would have to
become the island's main
language for Puerto Rico to
realize statehood. That's an
emotional issue because
only a fraction of Puerto
Rico's residents speak Eng-
lish fluently
Puerto Rico's delegates
will be split proportionally
among the candidates,







EXS A11 Y, ARC 18,2012



EXCURSIONS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


* Veterans Notes can be
found on Page
A13 of
today's
Chronicle.


SUSAN BRIDENSTINE/Special to the Chronicle
A gazebo at Rainbow Springs State Park offers a great viewing spot right now for spring's blooming azaleas. TOP LEFT: Beautiful beds of colorful azaleas are plentiful.


Colors of nature, beauty of waters beckon visitors to park


SUSAN BRIDENSTINE
Special to the Chronicle


I studied a
colorful
landscape
painting by Thomas
Kinkade and wished you
could be in that perfectly
created setting? Just 30
minutes north of
Inverness, Rainbow
Springs State Park offers
such a haven for nature
lovers.
Gently swaying
azaleas beckon in
shades of pink,
white, red and pur-
ple, left as if a trail
of bread crumbs,
enticing you to fol-
low the road into
the park. You'll feel
a sense of anticipa-
Susan tion as you're
Bridenstine drawn by the fra-
MOONLIGHIT grance of blossom-
GYPSY ing trees and
flowers through the
woods, past aban-
doned phosphate pits and over the
railroad tracks. You are entering the
real Florida, its diverse history evi-
denced amid nature's stunning beauty
Rainbow Springs State Park was
named for the headsprings of the
Rainbow River, winding leisurely for
5.6 miles to join the Withlacoochee
River Fourth in Florida by volume,
the springs produce about 450 million
gallons of crystal-clear, 72-degree
water every day, making this a favorite


Visitors enjoy a cool, early season dip at 1
spot for canoeing, kayaking, tubing,
swimming and snorkeling so good, it's
like swimming in an aquarium. For
safety, a dive flag is required outside
the marked swim area.
The river's exceptional beauty has
earned it the designations of National
Natural Landmark and an Outstanding
Florida Water It is also an aquatic
preserve and home to turtles, fish, ot-
ters and alligators.
Nature Quest, a visitor service
provider, offers daily kayak and canoe
rentals. They also offer tube rental be-
ginning the first full weekend and
weekends only in April; daily from Me-


morial Day to Labor Day and again
weekends only during September
They provide a convenient shuttle
service for the approximate two-hour
float downriver Keep your tubing en-
trance receipt for admittance to the
headsprings afterward. For rental in-
formation and location, see Rain-
bowSpringsPark.com or call
352-465-3211.
At 1,472 acres, the state park is one
of Florida's largest and is situated on
three locations along the river The
park won the National Gold Medal and
is "America's first two-time winner"
Two picnic pavilions are available to


rent for reunions, weddings and get-to-
gethers, and two other pavilions are
on first-come, first-served basis. A re-
cent fire has necessitated closure of
the food concession, gift shop and visi-
tor center, so don't forget to bring your
picnic basket. Renovation is under
way.
The park provides a lovely setting
for weddings, which are often con-
ducted at one of two gorgeous water-
falls. A gazebo on a knoll overlooks
one of the waterfalls and the
surrounding area.
See SPRNG/Page A13


DREAM
VACATIONS


The Chronicle and The Accent Travel Group are If it's selected as a winner, it will be published Please avoid photos with dates on the print.
sponsoring a photo contest for readers of the in the Sunday Chronicle. Photos should be sent to the Chronicle at
newspaper. At the end of the year, a panel of judges will 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River,
Readers are invited to send a photograph from select the best photo during the year and that FL 34429 or dropped off at the Chronicle office
their Dream Vacation with a brief description of the photograph will win a prize, in Inverness, Crystal River or any
tri n Accent Travel Office.


spnngs
vvf w





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Wife is hurting



son by enabling


SUNDAY EVENING MARCH 18, 2012 C:Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House DII: Comcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
C B D/I F H 6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00611:30
O WESH NBC 19 19 News News Dateline NBC (N) Harry's Law (N) '14' The Celebrity Apprentice (N) 'PG' a News Access
Idina Menzel Live -- Les Miserables 25th Anniversary Concert at the 02 Silver anniversary of the musical. (In Stereo) 3 Steps to Incredible
SMWEDI PBS 3 3 14 6 Barefoot Symphony 'PG'B cHealth!Joel
S[WUFT PBS 5 5 5 41 Keep Up As Time... NOVA (In Stereo) 'G' |Masterpiece Classic 'PG' Masterpiece Classic 'PG' Austin City Limits
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WFTV ABC 20 20 20 News World America's Funniest Once Upon a Time (N) Desperate Housewives GCB "Love Is Patient" News Sports
ABC 20 20 20 News Home Videos 'PG' PG' (N) PG' c (N) 'PG' N Night
2012 NCAA Basketball 60 Minutes (In Stereo) The Amazing Race (N) The Good Wife (N) (In CSI: Miami "At Risk' 10 News, Paid
0D [WT] CBS 10 10 10 10 10 Tournament N (In Stereo) N Stereo) '14' s (N)'14'B 11pm (N) Program
FOX FOX13 6:00 News The Cleveland The Bob's Family Guy American FOX13 10:00 News The Closer "Maternal
0 WTT FOX 13 13 13 13 (N) N Simpsons Show Simpsons Burgers 14 Dad 14 (N) m Instincts"'14'B
D WCJBl ABC 11 11 4 News ABC Funny Home Videos Once Upon aTime Desp.-Wives GCB (N) 'PG' B News Brothers
Joseph Stakel/ Coral Great Awakening Love a The Place for Miracles Daniel Jesse Pastor Great
r iWCI IND 2 2 2 22 22 Prince 'G' Terror Ridge Hr Child G' Kolenda Duplantis Dayna Awaken
SWFTS ABC 11 11 11 News World America's Funniest Once Upon a Time (N) Desperate Housewives GCB "Love Is Patient" News Grey's
W ABC 11 11 11 News Home Videos'PG' 'PG'Bc(N) 'PG' Bm (N) 'PG' N Anatomy
Family Guy Family Guy Big Bang Big Bang Law & Order "Self- Law & Order "Prince of ** "The Fog"(2005, Horror) Tom Welling,
[WioR IND 12 12 16 114' 14 Theory Theory Defense" 'PG' Darkness" 'PG' Maggie Grace, Selma Blair. 'PG-13' c
] WTTA MNT 6 6 6 9 9 ** "Daredevil"(2003) Ben Affleck. 'R' Seinfeld Seinfeld Chris Chris Paid Whacked Born Ride Paid
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S W CW 4 4 4 12 12 Queens 'PG' Half Men Half Men Eyes Have It"'14' Vu"'PG'm Watch"'PG' Missing"'14 '
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n [WVEA UNI 15 15 15 15 14 Familia |Noticiero ParodiandoPG Nuestra Belleza Latina SS) Saly Pimienta '14 Comned. Noticiero
SWPX ION 17 *** "All" (2001, Biography) Will Smith. (In Stereo) 'R'*** "A Time to Kill"(1996) Sandra Bullock. (In Stereo) 'R'
Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storae Storage Storage Breakout Kings "Double Breakout Kings "Double
E 54 48 54 25 27 WarsG' WarsPG Wars WarsPG Wars WarsG Wars'PG' Wars'G Down"'14' Down"'14'
ni 55 64 lThe Walking Dead "18 The Walking Dead The Walking Dead The Walking Dead Talking Comic Book Men (N) N Walking
55 64 55 Miles Out"'14' '14'm c"Better Angels"'14' (N)'14' Dead'14' Dead
Wild Russia (In Stereo) Wild Russia (In Stereo) Frozen Planet (In Frozen Planet "Spring" River Monsters: Frozen Planet (In
52 35 52 19 21 'PG'* 'PG' Stereo)'PG' (N)'PG Unhooked 'PG' Stereo) 'PG'B
S1*** "The Brothers" (2001) Morris **+ "Notorious" (2009) Angela Bassett. Based on the life The Game Let's Stay Let's Stay Let's Stay
96 19 96 Chestnut. 'R' of slain rapper ChristopherWallace.'R'N '14 Together Together Together
[BiAV01 254 51 254 Housewives/OC Housewives/Atl. Housewives/Atl. Housewives/Atl. Shahs of Sunset (N) Housewives/Atl.
*2 "Delta Farce" (2007, Comedy) Larry the Jeff Dunham: Spark of Insanity Jeff Dunham: Controlled Chaos South Park Tosh.0
CIC 27 61 27 33 Cable Guy Bill Engvall.'PG-13'B 14' cc'14' *'MA' 14'
*** "Tombstone" (1993) Kurt Russell. Doc Holliday joins *** "Urban Cowboy" (1980, Drama) John Travolta, Debra Winger. A Texas oil
98 45 98 28 37 Wyatt Earp for the OK Corral showdown. 'R' c worker looks for love at a popular hononky-to (In Stereo) PG
CNBC 43 42 43 Take It |Paid Debt/Part |Wall St. Gold Lxry Bm. Marijuana: Industry Best Buy: Big Ultimate Fight.
(WHJ 40 29 40 41 46 CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) Ovrhlng HIthcr Piers Morgan CNN Newsroom (N) Ovrhlng HIthcr
So Random! Shake It Austin & Austin & Austin & Austin & A.N.T Jessie A.N.T A.N.T Shake It Shake It
(iSif) 46 40 46 6 5 G' Up! G' AllyG' Ally G Ally' G' AllyG' Farm'G' 'G' N Farm'G' Farm G' Up!G' Up! G'
(ESJl) 33 27 33 21 17 SportsCenter (N) NBA Basketball Orlando Magic at Miami Heat. (N) NBA Basketball: Trail Blazers at Thunder
E$PW2) 34 28 34 43 49 Women's College Basketball I Women's College Basketball Baseball Tonight (N) SportsCenter (N)
EWTN) 95 70 95 48 Ben. |Crossing |Sunday Night Prime |LivingThe IG.K. |Rosary Catholic Compass Saints Bookmark
*** "Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix" (2007, *** "Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince" (2009, Fantasy) Daniel Radcliffe.
(U i) 29 52 29 20 28 Fantasy) Daniel Radcliffe, Rupert Grint. PG-13' New dangers lurkfor Harry, Dumbledore and theirfriends. PG
"Serving ** "Dirty Dancing: Havana *** "The Italian Job" (2003) Mark Wahlberg. ** "The Hunted" (2003, Action) "Green
118 170 Sara" Nights" (2004) Diego Luna. N (In Stereo) 'PG-13' Tommy Lee Jones. R'c Mil"
Ij 44 37 44 32 Fox News Sunday FOX Report (N) Huckabee (N) Fox News Sunday Geraldo at Large (N) Huckabee
FOOD 26 56 26 Diners Diners Worst Cooks Cupcake Wars (N) Worst Cooks Iron Chef America Restaurant Stakeout
(SNFLJ 35 39 35 In Magic Magic NBA Basketball Orlando Magic at Miami Heat. (Live) IMagic UEFA UFC World PokerTour
51 **2 "Step Brothers" (2008, Comedy) Will *** "Superbad" (2007) Jonah Hill. Co-dependent teens *** "Superbad" (2007, Comedy)
30 60 30 51 Ferrell, John C. Reilly 'R' hope to score booze and babes at a party 'R' Jonah Hi'R'
GOLF 727 67 727 LPGATourGolf |Central IPGATourGolf IPGA Tour Golf TransitionsChampionship, Final Round.
L 39 68 39 45 54 ** "Falling in Love With the Girl Next Door" "Chasing Leprechauns" (2012, Comedy- Frasier 'PG Frasier 'PG Frasier 'PG' Frasier 'PG'
39 68 39 45 54 (2006) Patty Duke.'NR' c Drama) Adrian Pasdar, Amy Huberman. cc
3 Gullter s Travels"** "Green Lantern" (2011, Action) Ryan Luck (N) (In Stereo) Eastbound Life'sToo Luck (In Stereo) 'MA' c
S 302 201 302 2 2 ,_,,i, i:,Reynolds. (In Stereo) 'PG-13' 'MA' c Short (N)
Boxing Real Time With Bill Game of Thrones (In *** "Hanna" (2011 Action) Saoirse Ronan, ** "Lottery Ticket"
303 202 303 Maher'MA' c Stereo) 'MA' Eric Bana. (In Stereo)PG-13' (2010) c
HGTV 23 57 23 42 52 House Hunters Holmes on Homes Holmes on Homes Holmes Inspection Holmes Inspection Holmes on Homes
Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Ax Men "Out of Control" Ax Men "Rygaard vs. Ax Men "Down & Dirty" Full Metal Jousting (N) Top Shot "Swing Into
i* 51 25 51 32 42 PG PG '14' c Rygaard"'14' N (N)'14'B '14, L,V c Action"'PG'
"Home Invasion" *** "Cries in the Dark" (2006, Suspense) Army Wives "Learning Coming Home "Daddy's *** "Cries in the
24 38 24 31 (2011) Haylie Duff. Eva La Rue. 'NR' Curve" (N) PG' Girls" (N) PG' Dark" (2006)'NR
S"A Cry for Help: The TraceyThurman "Stolen Child"(2011, Suspense) Emmanuelle "The Perfect Child" (2007, Drama) Rebecca
50 119 Story"(1989) Nancy McKeon. N Vaugier. Premiere. NR' Budig, Lochlyn Munroe. NR' c
*** "X-Men: First Class" (2011, Action) ** "Hall Pass" 2011, Comedy) Owen Wilson, ** "Man on Fire" (2004) Denzel Washington.
320 221 320 3 3 James McAvoy (In Stereo) 'PG-13' cc Jason Sudeikis. (n Stereo) R' (In Stereo) 'R' c
CMSNBlC 42 41 42 Caught on Camera [Caught on Camera Caught on Camera |Conviction (N) Sex Slave-Teen IMinh's Story
Wild Justice "Shooting Explorer "24 Hours Nazi Scrapbooks From Finding the Lost Da Wild Justice "Killing for Nazi Scrapbooks From
(WB 109 65 109 44 53 Spree" 14' After Hiroshima"'14' Hell'14, V' Vinci (N) Cash" (N) 14 Hell 14, V'
tNiJ 28 36 28 35 25 Sponge. |Sponge. Sponge. |Sponge. 170s '70s MyWife |MyWife IGeorge IGeorge Friends |Friends
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XY 44 123 -Snapped'PG' Snapped'PG' c Snapped'PG' Snapped'PG' Snapped 'PG' Law Order: Cl
340 241 340 4 *** 'The Mask of Shameless (iTV Calilornication House of :iG,,.,-i- -. Great House of Caliornication Shameless "A Great
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I7n32 112 732 Invitational (Live) Despain (N) Academy (N)'G'
Auction Auction Auction Auction Auction Auction Auction Auction Auction Auction Auction Auction
(SPii 37 43 37 27 36 Hunters Hunters Hunters Hunters Hunters Hunters Hunters Hunters Hunters Hunters Hunters Hunters
*** "Friends With Benefits" (2011) Justin *** "The Other Guys" (2010, Comedy) Will Spartacus: Vengeance **+ "Takers" (2010)
(STARIZ) 370 271 370 Timberlake. (In Stereo) 'R' Ferrell. (In Stereo) 'PG-13' "Balance" MA Matt Dillon.
Reel Heat Live! INBA Basketball Orlando Magic at Miami Heat. From the Heat Live! Ship Srtsman Florida Fins &
J 36 31 36 Animals G' (Live) AmericanAirlines Arena in Mam i Heat. From the Live Shape TV Adv n Sport. Skins
1 *** "The Rocketeer" (1991, Fantasy) Bill ** "Angels & Demons" (2009, Suspense) Tom Hanks. Robert Langdon *2 "The Number 23"
31 59 31 26 29 Campbell, Jennifer Connelly PG' confronts an ancient brotherhood. PG-13 cc (2007) 'R'
(rjS1 49 23 49 16 19 "Men in Black 1l" |2012 NCAA BasketballTournament |2012 NCAA BasketballTournament
169 53 169 30 35*** "Charly" (1968, Fantasy) Cliff Robertson, *** "Born Free" (1966 Docudrama) Virginia *** "Ring of Bright Water" (1969, Adventure)
M 169 53 169 30 35 Claire Bloom, LiliaSkala.'PG McKenna, Bill Travers.'PG' cBill Travers. Premiere. G'
Bering Sea Gold "Bad Bering Sea Gold The Frozen Planet "The Ends of the Earth" Polar Unchained Reaction Frozen Planet (In
(M) 53 34 53 24 26 Vibrations"'14' Bittertnd" 14' bears battle for mates. 'PG' "Heavy vs. Light" Stereo) 'PG' c
TI ) 50 46 50 29 30 Untold Stories of ER Untold Stories of ER Frozen Planet'PG' |Frozen Planet 'PG' Addiction |Addiction Addiction Addiction
"Born *** "Buck"(2011, Documentary) ***2 "The King's Speech" (2010) Colin Firth. ** "Burke & Hare"(2010, "English
350 261 350 Romantic" (In Stereo) PG B (In Stereo) R' c Comedy) Simon Pegg. R' Patient"
2012 NCAA Basketball Tournament Third Round: Teams 2012 NCAA Basketball Tournament Third Round: Teams Falling Skies
(1D 48 33 48 31 34 TBA. (N) (Live) cc TBA. (N) (Live) cc"Sanctuary"'14'
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TRAV 9 54 9 44 The Layover'G' The Layover'PG' Extreme RExtreme RVs G Extreme RV's G' Extreme RV's 'G' Radical Rides 'G'
iiTVJ 25 55 25 98 55 Repo Repo Repo 2012 NCAA Basketball Tournament Pawn Pawn Forensic Forensic
TVL 32 49 32 34 24 M*A*S*H M*A*S*H M*A*S*H M*A*S*H M*A*S*H |M*A*S*H Raymond |Raymond Everybody-Raymond Raymond Raymond
47 17 Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special ** "The Break-Up"
^& 47 32 47 17 18 Victims Unit'14 Victims Unit'14 Victims Unit'14 Victims Unit'14 Victims Unit'14 (2006)'PG-13'
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117 69 117 David Tutera David Tutera David Tutera David Tutera David Tutera Knows Best?
(W 3Alj 18 18 18 18 20 Law Order: Cl 30 Rock Mother Mother |Mother Mother Mother News Replay The Unit'PG' c


Dear Annie: When I
married my wife last
summer, her son was
living in the basement with
no intention of getting a job.
"Terence" is 23 and not ex-
actly bright We tried offering
advice to help him move for-
ward with his life, but he
likes things his way My wife
excuses this, saying it's his
generation's lifestyle. She
told me her co-worker's
daughter moved back home
with her husband and baby,
and they accept it. I know
there are a lot of parents in
the same situation.
Terence has decided he
wants to move back to a town
where he used to
have friends, but
my wife still
wants to support
him. So she is
willing to con-
tinue paying for
his car insur-
ance, rent,
spending money
and trips to fast-
food restaurants.
He doesn't save
a nickel. As soon
as he gets money, ANNI
he spends it. MAILI
I get the im-
pression that my
wife doesn't want to cut the
apron strings. Terence likes
having his mother support
him. Money isn't the issue.
It's that we won't be around
forever, and at this rate, I
don't see him ever growing
up. He'll be the same when
he's 50.
Counseling seems useless.
I've been married with step-
kids before. They didn't want
me in their lives and acted
as if they knew everything.
Am I wrong to expect young
adults to be independent? I
love my wife, but she wants
me to be quiet and not say
anything. Perplexed and
Stifled
Dear Perplexed: Of course
Terence should be working,
paying rent and becoming
independent, but the person
you need to convince is your
wife. Please don't approach
Terence directly You have
been a part of his life for
only a short time, and
chances are, your comments
will be unwelcome and re-
sented by both him and his
mother This is counterpro-
ductive. Instead, work on
getting your wife to realize
how much she is hurting
Terence by being his en-
abler. That will make it eas-
ier for the two of you to
present a united front in
your efforts to get Terence to
become a responsible adult


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Savage one
6 Fad
11 Fathers and sons
16 Have on
20 Squabble
21 Earthling
22 Love intensely
23 Relative by
marriage (hyph.)
25 More rational
26 Surrounded by
27 Loop in a lasso
28 Frighten
29 Native of (suffix)
30 Aggie
32 Occurred
34 Wedding notice word
35 Snout
37 Liver secretion
38 Boop
of old comics
39 Caught
41 Kind of sale
43 Exclaims
44 Eisenhower's
first lady
46 Before now
49 Portion
50 Stop regulating
54 Carlin or Clooney
55 Oodles
56 Tiny bit
57 London's
Underground
58 Literary collection
59 Dreamy
60 Lid
61 Doctrine
62 "-- boy!"
64 Cruel remark
65 Turkic language
66 Salad plant
67 Observe
68 "Rule, Britannia!" com-
poser
69 Temptress
70 Chum
71 So-so grade
72 Quick
74 "-We Dance?"
75 Ornate
77 Sweltering
80 Toy-gun projectile
81 City on the Nile
82 Yearn


83 Pinnacle
87 Devonshire city
89 Deadly snake
90 Multitude
91 Frame of mind
92 Take it easy
93 Greek epic poet
94 Main artery
95 Peruke
96 Coloring agents
97 Perpetually
98 Shaver part
99 Stick
102 One of six at birth
105 Approaches
106 Flabbergasted
107 Opponent
108 Sentry
109 Fruity beverage
110 Beam of steel
113 Antitoxin
114 Morse or penal
115 Neck part
119 Tokyo, formerly
120 Purple gemstone
123 Ravenous
125 Grassland
126 Stair part
128 Rental contract
129 Stuff
130 Chimp's relative
132 A little wet
133 Rescuer
134 Something
of value
135 Flinch
136 Interlock
137 Abrasive material
138 Suspicious
139 Printer type

DOWN
1 Washbowl
2 One of the Muses
3 De Mille or
Moorehead
4 Beseech, formerly
5 Word
6 Alms
7 Heavy rolling sound
8 Soap plant
9 Writer Grey
10 School subj.
11 Sea cow
12 Takes on
13 Off, mentally


14 Gaelic
15 Perceived
16 Treat with
contempt
17 Business abbr.
18 Flavorless
19 Wraparound
garment
24 Dandelion, e.g.
31 Tolerate
32 Legatees
33 Sailors' saint
36 Pitcher
38 "The Bunch"
40 Earned as profit
42 Crone
43 Intone
44 Rhythm in verse
45 Maple genus
46 Once more
47 Slowly, in music
48 Sunday dinner fare
49 Tea cake
50 Sofa
51 Of old Germanic charac-
ters
52 Fat
53 River in Hades
55 Healthy
56 Place for
motorists
59 Ave -
60 Monte -
61 Soapstone
63 Gas (prefix)
64 Slender candle
65 Jeweled
headband
66 Stove
69 Cook, as eggs
70 Zoo animal
73 Summit
74 Cavalry sword
75 Strong point
76 Edible root
77 Animal groups
78 Kind of daisy
79 Fax predecessor
81 Santa's reindeer
82 House of-
84 Cringe
85 Ripple pattern
86 Moved very slowly
88 Sampled
89 Flock
90 Save for later


93 Steering
mechanism
94 Warning signal
98 Doozy
99 Certain tree
100 Deer
101 Trumpet
103 Bring to light
104 Salon service,
for short


Kind of school
Restless
Old Faithful, e.g.
Eel
Microbe
Verbal expression
- the Riveter
Cut closely
Malediction
Ladd and Alda


DearAnnie: I have several
friends who consistently and
regularly interrupt me. They
might ask a question, and
when I start to answer, they
talk over me nonstop. I have
tried to continue talking any-
way, but it is difficult. One
even had the audacity to
chastise me for interrupting
her when I interjected a
comment during a lull in the
conversation. After that, I
didn't speak to her for six
months.
Other than avoiding these
people whose general com-
pany I enjoy, how should I
handle these interruptions?
-Michigan
Dear Michigan:
Do they also inter-
rupt each other, or
only you? If they
are nondiscrimina-
3 tory in their behav-
ior, you have the
choice to avoid
them or accept
them as they are,
* meaning you are
the listener and
they are the talk-
ers. However, if
E'S several of them do
BOX this only to you, we
suggest you take a
hard look at your
conversational habits. Do
you dawdle over words? Re-
peat yourself? Take a long
time to get to your point? If
so, your friends are still ter-
ribly rude, but you might try
approaching them individu-
ally, explaining how much
you would appreciate it if
they could be patient.
DearAnnie: "Over-70 Atti-
tude" didn't like receiving
email Christmas and birth-
day greetings. I, too, am over
70 and recently stopped
sending birthday cards to
many on my list I also have
been encouraging others to
stop sending cards to me be-
cause of the rising cost of
purchasing those cards and
putting stamps on them.
I'd rather receive an email
wishing me a nice birthday
with a short personal mes-
sage than a pretty, fancy card
with nothing but a signature
on it. Over 70 in South
Dakota


Annie's Mailbox is
written by Kathy Mitchell
and Marcy Sugar, longtime
editors of the Ann Landers
column. Email questions to
anniesmailbox@
comcast.net, or write to:
Annie's Mailbox, c/o
Creators Syndicate,
737 Third St., Hermosa
Beach, CA 90254.


Pound parts
Avid
If not
Animals
in harness
Flexible pipe
Caterwaul
Curve shape
Lassie
Estuary


Puzzle answer is on Page A14.


@ 2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


A12 SUNDAY, MARCH 18, 2012


ENTERTAINMENT


II
[]





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Veterans NOTES


Due to space considera-
tions, the Veterans Notes
sometimes contain only basic
information regarding each
post. For more information
about scheduled activities,
meals and more for a specific
post, call or email that post at
the contact listed.
The Veterans Apprecia-
tion Week Ad Hoc Coordinat-
ing Committee will have its
initial planning meeting for Cit-
rus County's 20th annual Veter-
ans Appreciation Week at 1:30
p.m. Wednesday, March 21, in
the Conference Room of the
Citrus County Chronicle Build-
ing, 1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd., Crystal River.
All veterans' service organi-
zations are encouraged to send
representatives to participate in
the planning process. Individual
veterans are also welcome to
participate.
For more information, call
committee chairman Fred
Daniels at 352-422-2449.
HPH Hospice, as a part-
nering agency with the Depart-
ment of Veterans Affairs (VA),
provides tailored care for veter-
ans and their families. The pro-
gram is provided in private
homes, assisted living facilities
and nursing homes, and staff is
trained to provide Hospice care
specific to illnesses and condi-
tions unique to each military era
or war. It also provides care-
giver education and a recogni-
tion program to honor veterans'
services and sacrifices. HPH
Hospice care and programs do
not affect veterans' benefits.


For more information, call the
Citrus Team Office at 352-527-
4600.
Honor Flight of West
Central Florida (HFWCF)
needs people to serve as
guardians for the first flight of
2012, taking World War II veter-
ans to Washington, D.C., so the
veterans can see the memori-
als on the National Mall.
HFWCF has chartered a
plane from Allegiant Air to fly
approximately 75 elderly veter-
ans from St. Petersburg/Clear-
water International Airport to
Washington on a one-day trip.
The flight will leave at 7 a.m.,
Tuesday, April 3, and return at
7:30 p.m. to a public "Welcome
Home" parade.
While in Washington, stops
are planned at the Iwo Jima
and World War II Memorials,
and Arlington National Ceme-
tery. The veterans will also be
able to visit the Lincoln, Wash-
ington, Korea and Vietnam me-
morials. En route, the chartered
buses will pass the Navy, Air
Force and Jefferson memorials,
the U.S. Capitol, the Pentagon
and several other federal
buildings.
Each veteran will have a
"guardian angel" who will be re-
sponsible for pushing their
wheelchair and provide for their
safety.
In 2011, the West Central
Florida Honor Flight flew 241
veterans to Washington. This
first flight of 2012 is being made
possible by a donation from
Progress Energy Florida.
The veterans fly free; how-


ever, guardians are asked to
make a donation of at least
$400 to the operating fund of
HFWCF. All donations are tax
deductible.
Persons interested in serving
as a guardian can visit
www.honorflightwcf.org,
print the guardian application
and mail it to P.O. Box 55661,
St. Petersburg, FL 33732.
The U.S. Air Force is
looking for prior enlisted men
and women from all services in-
terested in both direct duty as-
signments in previously
obtained career fields or retrain-
ing into select career fields.
Some of the careers include
aircraft electronics/mechanical
areas, cyber operation fields,
and various other specialties.
Enlisted career openings that
include the opportunities to re-
train consist of special opera-
tions positions and unmanned
aerial vehicle.
Assignment locations are
based on Air Force needs. For
more information, call 352-
476-4915.
Citrus County Veterans
Coalition has a new building
holding freezers, refrigerators
and all necessary requirements
to provide food to veterans in
need. Food donations and vol-
unteers are always welcomed
and needed.
The CCVC is on the DAV
property in Inverness at the cor-
ner of Paul and Independence,
off U.S. 41 north. Hours of op-
eration are 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Tuesday and Thursday. Ap-
pointments are encouraged by


calling 352-400-8952.
CCVC general meetings are
at 10 a.m. the fourth Thursday
monthly at the DAV building in
Inverness. All active duty and
honorably discharged veterans,
their spouses, widows and wid-
owers, along with other veter-
ans' organizations and current
coalition members are wel-
come. Members are encour-
aged to attend general
meetings.
Annual membership donation
is $10 for a calendar year or
$25 for three years. The CCVC
is a nonprofit corporation, and
your donations are tax de-
ductible. Current members
should check their membership
card for expiration dates, and
renew with Gary Williamson at
352-527-4537, or at the meet-
ing. Visit www.ccvcfl.org.
H AMVETS William Crow
Post 447, Inglis, is on State
Road 40 East. Sons meeting is
at 5:30 p.m. first Monday; Rid-
ers meeting is at 5:30 p.m. first
Thursday; post meeting is at
5:30 p.m. second Thursday;
Ladies Auxiliary meeting is 5:30
p.m. third Thursday.
For more information about
the post and its activities, call
352-447-1816; email
Amvet447@comcast.net.
Blanton-Thompson
American Legion Post 155,
6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway,
Crystal River.
For information about the
post and its activities, call
Cmdr. Jay Conti Sr. at 352-
795-6526 or visit
www.postl55.org.


American Legion Auxil-
iary Unit 155 meets at 7:30
p.m. the fourth Tuesday of
every month at the post. The
American Legion Auxiliary is
the world's largest women's pa-
triotic service organization with
nearly 1 million members in
10,100 communities. The prin-
ciples of the American Legion
Auxiliary are to serve veterans,
their families and the commu-
nity.
Eligibility in the Auxiliary is
open to mothers, wives, sisters,
daughters, granddaughters,
great-granddaughters or grand-
mothers of members of the
American Legion and of de-
ceased veterans who served
during war time (also stepchil-
dren); stepchildren; and female
veterans who served during
war time. Call Unit President
Shawn Mikulas, 352-503-5325,
or membership chairman Bar-
bara Logan, 352-795-4233.
The Auxiliary will serve a
salmon cake and macaroni and
cheese dinner from 5 to 6:30
p.m. Wednesday, March 28, at
the post home, 6585 W. Gulf-
to-Lake Highway, Crystal River.
All members and the public
are welcome. All profits from
the dinner will go to support the
many programs of the Ameri-
can Legion Auxiliary.
0 H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post
10087, Beverly Hills, offers
meals, bingo, golf, karaoke and
pool. Review the monthly
newsletter for activities and up-
dates, and call the post at 352-
746-0440. The VFW Post
10087 is off County Road 491,


directly behind Superior Bank.
Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs,
352-465-4864. Wi Fi is now
available at the post; bring your
laptop or any other item that will
access the Internet and enjoy
the free service. The post is
now a nonsmoking facility;
smoking is allowed on the
porch.
Information regarding any
post events is available at the
post or call 352-465-4864.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Chapter No. 70 meets
at 2 p.m. the second Tuesday
monthly at the chapter hall,
1039 N. Paul Drive, Inverness,
at the intersection of Independ-
ence Highway and U.S. 41. The
chapter hall is on the corner of
Independence Highway and
Paul Drive.
We thank veterans for their
service and welcome any dis-
abled veteran to join us from 9
a.m. to 1 p.m. any Tuesday or
Thursday at the chapter hall.
This is also the time that we ac-
cept donated nonperishable
foods for our continuing food
drive.
Our main function is to assist
disabled veterans and their
families when we are able. Any-
one who knows a disabled vet-
eran or their family who
requires assistance is asked to
call Commander Richard Floyd
727-492-0290, Ken Stewart at
352-419-0207, or 352-
344-3464.

See VETERANS/Page A14


Greek Festival cruise winner


Special to the Chronicle
At the recent Greek Festival at Archangel Michael Greek Orthodox Church in Lecanto,
chances were sold for a Caribbean cruise for two as part of the fundraiser. Gerry Jones of
The Travel Club, left, presents the Royal Caribbean Bahamas cruise certificate to winners
Dionicio and Gladys Funez of Beverly Hills. The couple have never cruised before.


The Friends'Annual Fundraiser
At the Beautiful
Skyview at Terra Vista Country Club
2100 N. Terra Vista Blvd.
Hernando, FL 34442
5:00 8:00 PM
Have you ever seen a manatee in a tuxedo?
Or a whooping crane in an evening gown?
For these rare sightings -
join the Friends at this Elegant Event
Food Fun Music Silent Auction
Harpist Jazz Piano
Hors d'oeuvres and Multiple Chef-Served Food Stations Including:
Carving Station (New York Strip), Pasta Station, Grilling Station
and Flambeed to order Dessert Station Cash Bar

Special Red Carpet Touch
To enhance your elegant evening, there will be complimentary valet parking
upon your arrival! We hope you will be part of this very special evening.
A portion of the funds will support the education center at Three Sisters Springs
For tickets and info call:
Shirley Knudsen: 382-0525 Lace Blue-McLean: 201-0149
Email: shirleySEF@aol.com Email: LaceBlue@gmail.com
For information visit our website: www.friendsofchazz.org.
The Friends are a 501 (c) 3 Non-profit organization
The mission of the Friends of the Crystal River National Wildlife Refuge Complex, Inc. is to provide conservation
awareness and appreciation of the National Wildlife Refuges and to provide assistance to the mission andprograms
of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. 000AVJ2


IF YOU GO...
* HEADSPRINGS, 19158 S.W. 81st Place Road,
Dunnellon. Take 41 north of Dunnellon, east on
81st Place Road.
* CAMPGROUND, 18185 S.W. 94th St. Take 41
north, at Dunnellon County Road 484 east, north
on 180th Avenue southwest, west on 94th Street.

* TUBING, 10830 S.W. 180th Ave. Road. Take 41
north, at Dunnellon County Road 484 East, north
on 180th Avenue southwest.


SPRING
Continued from Page All

Guided activities are of-
fered at the park, such as
garden walks, canoe/kayak
trips and snorkeling trips.
Call or check the park web-
site for dates and times.
A full-facility camp-
ground is situated a mile
and a half downstream, ap-
proximately six miles' driv-
ing distance. Sites have
water, sewer hookup and
electric. Reservations, up to
11 months in advance, are
available through Re-
serveAmerica.com or 800-
326-3521.
As part of the Great
Florida Birding Trial,
boardwalks and nature
trails offer birders an op-
portunity to observe water-
fowl in addition to a variety
of other birds. Another in-
teresting area of the park is
the butterfly garden, which
is at its peak in late spring
and summer. In this area,
evidence of the spring's hey-
day is visible.
Decades ago, the spring
was a roadside attraction
with a monorail, tropical
birds, submarine boats, hon-
eymoon cabins, mermaids
and even a rodeo, but that
was before 1-75 and Disney


World. The attraction strug-
gled and closed in 1973. In
1990, the state bought the
property and volunteers
worked for two years to
open the park. Rainbow
Springs State Park opened
for daily operation in 1995
and has been a favorite
place to relax ever since.
You might visit these nos-
talgic sites: floridamem-
orycom and lostparks.com;
search Rainbow Springs on
both sites.
The charge is $2 for
adults; children 5 and
younger are free. Call 352-
465-8555 or see Florida
StateParks.org for more
information.


Susan Bridenstine lives in
Inverness. She has visited
every state in the
continental U.S. except
Vermont and has lived in
six Florida cities, Indiana,
Nevada, and Washington
state. Susan and her
husband, Kim, lived aboard
their sailboat for seven
years. Susan sailed and
drove during the night. She
earned the nickname
Moonlight Gypsy because
she enjoyed seeing the
world in the moonlight as
much as in the light of day.
You can reach her at
slbridenstine@gmail. com.


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TRAVEL & VETERANS


SUNDAY, MARCH 18, 2012 A13


I


i






A14 SUNDAY, MARCH 18, 2012


VETERANS
Continued from Page A13

Service Officer Joe McClister
is available to assist any vet-
eran or dependents with their
disability claim by appointment.
Call 352-344-3464 and leave a
message.
Ambulatory veterans who
wish to schedule an appoint-
ment for transportation to the
VA medical center in
Gainesville should call the vet-
erans' service office at 352-
527-5915. Mobility challenged
veterans who wish to schedule
an appointment for transporta-
tion to the VA medical center in
Gainesville may call the Citrus
County Transit office for wheel-
chair transportation; call 352-
527-7630.
For more information about
chapter activities, veterans'
benefits or membership, Call
Ken Stewart at 352-419-0207;
leave a message, if desired,
should the machine answer.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Auxiliary Unit No. 70
meets at 2 p.m. the second
Tuesday of the month at the
chapter hall, corner of U.S. 41
north, Independence Boulevard
and Paul Drive, Inverness.
The Auxiliary's next meeting
will be at 2 p.m. Tuesday, April
10.
The DAV Auxiliary has ongo-
ing projects to help needy vet-
erans. Members recently took
more than 150 lap robes, 200
ditty bags and more than 100
wheelchair and walker bags to
area nursing homes. Members
collect good, clean cotton mate-
rial, yarn and toiletry items to
make lap robes, wheelchair
and walker bags, and ditty bags
for veterans in nursing homes.
Membership has expanded
to include many more who are
eligible to join. For more infor-
mation or to donate items, call
Commander Linda Brice at
352-560-3867 or Adjutant Lynn
Armitage at 352-341-5334.
Eugene Quinn VFW Post
4337 and Ladies Auxiliary,
906 State Road 44 E.,
Inverness.
Call the post at 352-
344-3495 for information about
all weekly post activities, or visit
www.vfw4337.org.
The American Legion
Wall-Rives Post 58 and Auxil-
iary, 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnellon.
Dunnellon Young Marines
will meet at 6 p.m. Tuesday.
Free AARP tax services will
be available from 9 a.m. to 2
p.m. Wednesday through April
11. For more information, call
Wayne Sloan at 352-489-5066.
The public is welcome at
bingo at 6 p.m. Thursday.
For information about activi-
ties and the post, call Carl Boos
at 352-489-3544.
Rolling Thunder Chapter
7, a POW/MIA awareness
group, meets at 10 a.m. second
Saturday at the VFW Post
10087 in Beverly Hills. Call Bob
Bruno, secretary, at 352-
201-1228.
A Marine Corps League
Ladies Auxiliary Citrus Unit
meets at 1 p.m. the third Tues-
day monthly at the VFW in Bev-
erly Hills. New members are
welcome. Membership fee is
$30 a year. Female relatives
ages 16 or older who are a
wife, widow, mother, step-
mother, sister, daughter, step-
daughter, grandmother,
granddaughter, aunt or daugh-
ter-in-law of honorably dis-
charged Marines and FMF
Corpsmen are eligible to belong
to the Marine Corps League.
Female Marines (former, active


VETERANS


Special to the Chronicle
From left: Vernon Lawter, provost of College of Central Florida Citrus Campus; Cheryl Smith, C-1219; John Kaiser-
ian, V-1219; Tom Smith, V-1219; Lisa Lombardo, CF Citrus Campus director of development; Darlis Greene, V-
1219; and Henry Legros, V-1219.



40&8 supports nurses' training


Special to the Chronicle

Members of Citrus County Voiture
1219, the local chapter of the Forty
and Eight, met with representatives
of the College of Central Florida to
discuss its Nurses' Training Endow-
ment Fund that is administered by
the college.
In the eight years of its existence,
the endowment fund has granted
$3,800 in scholarships to students
enrolled in the school's nurses
training program. Voiture 1219 has
also given additional scholarships
from its general fund.
In 1955, the national organization
of the Forty and Eight, recognizing
the ever-growing shortage of trained


and reserves) and associate
members are eligible for MCLA
membership. Call President
Elaine Spikes at 352-860-2400
or Secretary/Treasurer Joan
Cecil at 352-726-0834 for
information.
Hunger and Homeless
Coalition -Anyone who
knows of a homeless veteran in
need of food, haircut, voter ID,
food stamps, medical assis-
tance or more blankets is asked
to call Ed Murphy at the Hunger
and Homeless Coalition at 352-
382-0876, or pass along this
phone number to the veteran.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW
Post 4252 and Ladies Auxil-
iary 3190 N. Carl G. Rose
Highway, State Road 200, Her-
nando; 352-726-3339. Send
emails to vfw4252@
tampabay.rr.com.
Everyone is welcome. Post
and auxiliary meet at 6:30 p.m.
every second Thursday.
Post honor guard is available
for funerals, flag raising and
nursing home visits.
The public is welcome to the
Friday night dinner and dance
at 5 p.m.
See our post activities:
Google us as VFW 4252,
Hernando.
Dumas-Hartson VFW
Post 8189 is on West Veterans
Drive, west of U.S. 19 between
Crystal River and Homosassa.


nurses in this country, decided to
begin a program that would provide
scholarships to deserving individu-
als who were willing to undergo for-
mal training and make a career in
the profession.
Since its inception, the National
Forty and Eight has granted in ex-
cess of $20,000,000 and assisted
close to 23,000 nursing students.
This past year, the national organi-
zation has helped 2,131 students
with $1,100,000 in scholarships. In
many cases, these scholarships are
the critical difference that allows
many of the recipients to pursue
their studies and then go on to re-
ceive a nursing degree. Without the
Forty and Eight, many would fall


Call 352-795-5012 for
information.
VFW membership is open to
men and women veterans who
have participated in an over-
seas campaign, including serv-
ice in Iraq and Afghanistan. The
Korean Campaign medal re-
mains open, as well. Call the
post at the phone number
above for information.
Joe Nic Barco Memorial
VFW Post 7122, 8191 S.
Florida Ave., Floral City. For in-
formation about the post and its
activities, call 352-637-0100.
Friday is AUCE fish or three-
piece chicken for $7.
American Legion, Bev-
erly Hills Memorial Post 237,
4077 N. Lecanto Highway, in
the Beverly Plaza, invites all eli-
gible veterans and their families


short of the funds necessary to con-
tinue their education.
Citrus County Voiture 1219 raises
the money to assist local nursing
students and to increase the value
of the endowment fund by having
various functions such as dinners
and dances, as well as through the
sale of the Forty and Eight National
Nurses Training Pin.
Anyone wishing to help can send
a check to the College of Central
Florida, Attn: Lisa Lombardo, 3001
S.W College Road, Ocala, FL 34474-
4415. Note for: "40 & 8 Albert Wood-
ington Endowed Scholarship."
For more information, call John
Kaiserian at 352-746-1959, or email
johnk40and8@yahoo. com.


to visit our post and consider
joining our Legion family: Amer-
ican Legion, Sons of the Ameri-
can Legion (SAL), or American
Legion Auxiliary (ALA). Color
Guard/Honor Guard accepting
volunteers.
Beverly Hills Memorial Amer-
ican Legion Post 237, by ap-
proval of its Executive Board on
Jan. 22, and by those members
present at the Jan. 26 general
membership meeting, has
changed its regular meeting
time to 7 p.m. on the fourth
Tuesday monthly. Contact the
post at 352-746-5018 for more
information.
American Legion Riders
Chapter now being formed.
Visit the post for printed sched-
ule or visit the website at
www.post237.org.


For information, call the post at
352-746-5018.
The Korean War Veter-
ans Association, Citrus
Chapter 192 meets at the VFW
Post 10087, Beverly Hills, at 1
p.m. the first Tuesday monthly.
Any veteran who has seen hon-
orable service in any of the
Armed Forces of the U.S. is eli-
gible for membership if said
service was within Korea, in-
cluding territorial waters and


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

airspace, at any time from Sept.
3,1945, to the present or if said
service was outside of Korea
from June 25, 1950, to Jan. 31,
1955. For information, call
Hank Butler at 352-563-2496,
Neville Anderson at 352-
344-2529 or Bob Hermanson at
352-489-0728.
Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 and Auxiliary
Unit 77 meet the first Thursday
monthly at the Inverness High-
lands Civic Center at 4375 Little
Al Point Road, Inverness. Call
Post Cmdr. Norman Brumett at
352-860-2981 or Auxiliary pres-
ident Marie Cain at
352-637-5915.
American Legion Auxiliary
Allen Rawls Unit 77 will host its
semi-annual Italian Extrava-
ganza Dinner from 5 to 7 p.m.
Saturday, March 24, at the
Highlands Civic Center, 4375
Little Al Point (off Arbor Street),
Inverness.
The menu will be traditional
lasagna, spinach lasagna,
stuffed shells, baked ziti, meat-
balls, Italian sausage with
green peppers and onions,
salad bar, garlic bread, dessert
bar, coffee, tea, lemonade and
soda. Entertainment will be by
Bernie at the keyboard. There
will be a Chinese auction, auc-
tion and a "share the wealth."
Proceeds will benefit veter-
ans' and their families' needs,
Paws for Patriots, seeing-eye
dogs for blind veterans and Op-
eration Military Kidds, a camp
for children of deployed
parent/parents.
call Alice at 352-860-2981 or
352-476-7001; on the day of
the dinner, call 352-726-0444..
U.S. Submarine Veterans
(USSVI)-Sturgeon Base meets
at 11 a.m. the first Saturday
monthly at the American Legion
Post 155, 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River. Visitors
and interested parties are al-
ways welcome. Call Base
Cmdr. Billy Wein at 352-
726-5926.
Members of the U.S. Subma-
rine Veterans who have earned
the designation "qualified in
Submarines" at least 50 years
ago, will be honored for their
service in a formal ceremony at
American Legion Post 155,
State Road 44, Crystal River, at
11 a.m. Saturday, April 7. The
public is invited to the
ceremony.
The Holland Club is named
after John P. Holland, designer
of the first U.S. Navy subma-
rine. It is an exclusive group
within the U.S. Submarine Vet-
erans organization consisting of
men who served in World War
II, through 1959 during the Cold
War period.
See VETERANS/Page A15


Sunday's PUZZLER

Puzzle is on Page A12.

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ME H EMERY Y L ERE Y LASER


3-18


2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


303-0318 SUCRN
BUDGET SUMMARY
CITY OF INVERNESS
2011/2012 FISCAL YEAR
THE PROPOSED OPERATING BUDGET EXPENDITURES OF THE CITY OF INVERNESS ARE .24% LESS THAN LAST YEAR'S TOTAL OPERATING EXPENDITURES
ROAD TOTAL BEFORE
GENERAL WHISPERING PINES IMPROVEMENT CAPITAL PROJECTS WATER & PENSION COMPONENT I.C.RJL TOTAL ALL
ESTIMATED REVENUES FUND PARK FUND FUND SEWER CEMETERY IMPACT FUND FUNDS UNIT TRUST FUND FUNDS
TAXES:
AD-VALOREM MILLAGE PER $1000 6.2159 2,165,44 2,165,464 2,165,464
AD-VALOREM MInquent Taxes 110,000 110,000 110,000
SALES AND USE TAXES 302,000 302,000 302,000
FRANCHISE FEES 742,000 742,000 742,000
UTILITY SERVICE TAXES 680,000 680,000 0,0 680,000
COMMUNICATIONS SERVICE TAX 433,517 433,517 433,517
LICENSES AND PERMITS 104,900 104,900 104,900
GRANTS AND LOCAL SHARED REVENUES 307,500 1,806,850 500,000 2,614,350 62,000 2,676,350
STATE SHARED REVENUES 658,100 658,100 658,100
CHARGES FOR SERVICES 306,763 116,350 2,650,950 3,074,063 3,074,063
FINES AND FORFEITURES 25,500 25,500 25,500
INTEREST EARNINGS 88,300 500 1,800 5,000 76,600 44,050 6,000 222,250 1,700 223,950
RENTS & ROYALTIES 10,785 10,785 10,785
SPECIAL ASSESSMENTS/IMPACT FEES 800 345,000 75,000 420,600 420,600
CONTRIBUTIONS/DONATIONS 10,800 10,800 10,800
SALE OF FIXED ASSETS 10,400 10,400 10,400
PENSION CONTRIBUTIONS 10.000 10,000 10,000
MISCELLANEOUS REVENUES 99,794 200 19,020 500 119,514 119,514
DEBT PROCEEDS
rrAL SURCES b,38,3 424, 1, 2,15,8 24, 4, ,000 1,00 11,14,24 3,I 11,/,43
tRANSFERS IN 340,000 442788 2.197650 3,094,377 53,018 6,127,833 58,610 6,186,443
FUND BALANCES/RESERVES/NET ASSETS 8,304,709 290,014 153,738 5,637,842 8,700,436 826,887 142,408 318,539 24,374,573 206,357 24,580,930
OTAL REVENUES, TRANSFERS & BALANCES 14,383,232 1,157,352 15i,538 9,992,342 15,041,383 93485 217,408 334,539 42,216,649 328,887 42,545,316
GENERALGOVERNMENTAL 1,950,009 2,649,120 43,500 4,642,629 4,642,629
PUBLICSAFETY 728,800 15,000 743,800 743,800
PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT 596,250 2,901,110 144,263 3,641,623 3,641,623
FRANSPORTATION 676,653 1,888,199 2,564,852 2,564,852
ECONOMIC ENVIRONMENT 200,285 103,400 303,685 27,995 331,680
CULTURE& RECREATION 369,607 813,410 1,892,017 3,075,034 3,075,034
DEBT SERVICES 350,638 1,236,959 1,587,597 1,587,597
TRANSFERS- OUT 2,400,048 51,500 3,496,877 56,518 6,004,943 181,500 6,186,443
FUND BALANCESNRESERVES/NET ASSETS 7,110,942 292,442 155,538 3,444,606 7,406,487 734,074 217,408 291,039 19,652,486 119,172 19,771,658
TOTAL APPROPRIATED EXPENDITURES, TRANSFERS,
RESERVES & BALANCES 14,383,232 1,157,352 15i5,538 ,992,342 15,041,A38 934,855 217,408 334,53S 25,657,429 328,667 42,545,316
THE PROPOSED BUDGET AMENDMENTS ARE ON FILE IN THE OFFICE OF THE ABOVE REFERENCED TAXING AUTHORITY ASA PUBLIC RECORD


304-0318 SUCRN

NOTICE OF BUDGET
HEARING
The City Council of the City of
Inverness will hold a public hearing on
Tuesday, March 20, 2012 at 5:30 p.m. at
the Inverness Government Center, 212
W. Main Street, Inverness, FL to
consider and finalize a resolution
amending the adopted budget for the
General Fund, Whispering Pines Park
Fund, and ICRA Fund for the fiscal year
commencing October 1, 2011 and ending
September 30, 2012.
O0AWOL


at The American Irish Club .r,..
4342 Homosassa Tr. (CR 490)
Lecanto, Florida

?.r'. pm to ': pm .
.+. : .." ,, ..


The Tomrin i)le Band
+' Dianne Dubock & her School of
Scottish Highland IDancers
01 Padd) \oonan-Scottish/Irish Entertaincr4
Stori Teller and Accordionistr
SThe Citrus Counm Scoilish Pipe Band

Come join us for a fun filled
afternoon of singing, dancing and
first class entertainment
-.'5 -,;



Ti;!vt* $10 00


F .-Radloff:
Irish Pub: . 100 0 :
S419-7914
)AW3Z





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Thanks for the lack of memories


After the news hit last year that
Navy SEAL Team 6 got Osama
bin Laden, the Twitterverse lit
up with 13-year-olds tweeting, "Who's
Osama bin Whatever? Was he in a
band?" And, really, how would they
know about something that hap-
pened when they were in diapers?
The sad thing is that they weren't
asking their parents who Osama was,
or Googling him, or look-
ing him up on Wikipedia,
or looking him up in their
history books.
They were asking those
infallible fonts of all
knowledge other 13-
year-olds, which is the
same place they get all
their answers about sex,
drugs and nutrition. What
could go wrong? AJI
I mention this only be-
cause it's easy to forget MUL
that with all the brain rot
on Facebook and Twitter, there's still
lots of room left on the Internet for
amazingly useful stuff.
I just enrolled in a free online class
in computer programming that prom-
ises I will be able to build my own
search engine after just seven weekly
classes.
You may ask, "Why on earth would
you want your own search engine?"
There is no good answer to that ex-
cept that I'm hoping to regain some
of the brain cells I lose every day by
using Facebook and Twitter and their
latest partner in time-sucking crime,
Pinterest.
By learning to build my own search


I


engine, I will also learn a lot about
basic programming. And someday,
because I took this free course, I may
end up inventing the next Facebook,
thus becoming the world's next (and
oldest) multibillionaire, which has
been a dream of mine since, oh, last
week.
Far-fetched as it may seem, my
chances of becoming an Internet bil-
lionaire are actually much
better than they are of win-
ning the jackpot in the
Powerball lottery. I know,
because I just Googled it.
And then I spent half an
hour online checking my
mail, my Twitter, my Face-
book and my Pinterest ac-
counts. I watched some
funny videos of cats my sis-
V| ter sent me and a few viral
videos, then got down to
LEN work.
Many college courses
and lectures are available for free
online. I've watched several lectures
from professors at Yale, MIT, Prince-
ton and Stanford, schools that cer-
tainly never would have let me in as
a paying student but don't mind me
watching their classes for free.
But I'm finding out the high-tech
world has made me a worse student,
not a better one. I'm finding out that
memory is a muscle, and if you don't
use it, you lose it.
When was the last time you memo-
rized something? A phone number. A
poem. A shopping list. Why bother? If
we need them, they are a click away.
I know a 90-year-old man who can


recite verse after verse of poems he
learned in grade school. I can't even
remember grade school, and I com-
pleted more than a few of the grades
twice.
So I watched the first lecture on
how to build my own search engine
and took all the quizzes and was
buzzing right along. Piece of cake -
until the homework.
"Write code that assigns to the vari-
able URL a string that is the value of
the first URL that appears in a link
tag in the string page."
I'm sorry, what? It was as if I could-
n't remember a word of a lecture I
had heard moments before. It
seemed so simple when the professor
wrote it on the whiteboard. "Of
course," I thought, "that makes per-
fect sense. Why, a child could do it."
Now that he was gone, it made no
sense at all.
How would I ever become the next
Mark Zuckerberg if I couldn't even do
the homework from the first of seven
lessons?
It was like singing along to the
radio in the car. The words come ef-
fortlessly
Now do the second verse, by your-
self, without hearing the song. Not so
simple, is it?
Let me tweet someone for help -
maybe a 13-year-old.

Jim Mullen's book "Now
in Paperback" is now in
paperback You can
reach him at
jimm ullenbooks. com.


Kids helping



their own

Teenstock benefits

Big Brothers Big Sisters


Special to the Chronicle
Teenstock "Kids Helping
Kids" is a family-friendly
event that highlights the
musically talented chil-
dren in Citrus County
while raising money for
Big Brothers Big Sisters.
The event will be Satur-
day, March 24, at the Mu-
seum Cafe, 10466 W Yulee
Drive in Homosassa. Gates
open at 11:30 a.m. follow-
ing the Shrimpaplooza pa-
rade that kicks off the day's
festivities at 10:30 a.m. in
Old Homosassa.
Teenstock youths will
march as a unit in the pa-
rade before settling down
at the Museum Cafe for
Teenstock.
The lineup of teen talent
includes Sophie Ro-
bitaille, Alexandria Hand,
Haley Schroeder, Zero
Gravity, Grounded 4 Life
and Tri Phi. "Kids Helping
Kids" is the theme of the
event. Nature Coast
Friends of Blues is host


* For more information
about how to help
sponsor or otherwise
get involved in the
annual Teenstock
concert, call Susan
Mitchell at 352-
503-3498.

and President Susan
Mitchell guides the teens,
helping them learn how to
plan an event, raise funds,
volunteer and support
each other.
Admission is $7 for
adults, $3 for teens and
children younger than 12
get in free. A silent auction
will also raise money for
Big Brothers Big Sisters,
and we are in need of more
items. Call Susan Mitchell
at 352-503-3498 to donate
items.
For more information
about Teenstock, call
Mitchell at 3562-503-3498,
or visit the Nature Coast
Friends of Blues Inc. web-
site at wwwncfblues.com.


VETERANS
Continued from Page A14

These men are justifiably
proud of their accomplish-
ments. They faithfully exe-
cuted their duty under difficult
circumstances. They represent
the living historical memory of
our rich submarine heritage.
We would not be where we
are today with our submarine
force without them.
United States Submarine
Veterans is a National Veter-
ans Fraternal Organization
chartered in 1964, with more
than 13,000 members and 150
chapters nationwide. It is the
largest organization of subma-
rine-qualified veterans in the
world. Visit www.ussvi.org or
call 352-563-1101 for
more information.
American Legion Post
166 meets 1:30 p.m., first Sat-
urday monthly at the Dumas-
Hartson VFW Post 8189
Ladies Auxiliary facility on Vet-
erans Drive, Homosassa, on
the west side of U.S. 19 at
Dixon's Auto Sales across
from Harley-Davidson. We
meet in the small building to
the left of the main building.
All former and current post
members, as well as all inter-
ested veterans, are cordially
invited to be a part of Ameri-
can Legion Post 166.
For information about the
post or the American Legion,
call and leave a message for
the post commander at 352-
697-1749. Your call will be re-
turned within 24 to 48 hours.
Seabee Veterans of
America (SVA) Island X-23
welcomes all Seabees and
Honeybees to its monthly
meeting at 10:30 a.m. the third


Tuesday monthly at Citrus
Hills Country Club, Rose and
Crown restaurant, Citrus Hills.
Call John Lowe at 352-344-
4702.
Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219
and Cabane 1219 conducts
its meetings at 7 p.m. the sec-
ond Thursday monthly at the
American Legion Post 155 on
State Road 44 in Crystal River
(6585 E. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way). For more information
about the 40/8, call the Chef
De Gare Tom Smith at 352-
601-3612; for the Cabane, call
La President Carol Kaiserian
at 352-746-1959; or visit us on
the Web at www.Postl55.org.
Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 Military Order of the
Purple Heart (MOPH) meets
at 2 p.m. the third Tuesday of
January, March, May, July,
September and November.
Chapter 776 Military Order of
the Purple Heart (MOPH) will
meet at 2 p.m., Tuesday,
March 20, at the Citrus County
Builders Association, 1196 S.
Lecanto Highway (County
Road 491), Lecanto, about 1
mile south of State Road 44
on the west side of C.R. 491.
All combat-wounded veter-
ans and parents, lineal de-
scendants, spouses and
siblings of living or deceased
Purple Heart recipients are in-
vited to attend and to become
a chapter 776 member.
To learn more about Aaron
A. Weaver Chapter 776
MOPH, visit the website at
www.citruspurpleheart.org or
call 352-382-3847.
Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment
1139 will conduct its regular
meeting at 7 p.m. the third
Wednesday monthly at DAV
Post 70 in Inverness at the in-
tersection of Independence


Highway and U.S. 41 North.
All Marines are welcome. Call
Jerry Cecil at 352-726-0834 or
Wayne Howard at 352-
634-5254.
Marine Corps League
Citrus Detachment 819
meets at 7 p.m. the last Thurs-
day monthly at VFW Post
10087 on Vet Lane in Beverly
Hills, behind Superior Bank.
Social hour follows. All
Marines and FMF Corpsmen
are welcome.
Meet new friends and dis-
cuss past glories. Call Morgan
Patterson at 352-746-1135,
Ted Archambault at 352-382-
0462 or Bion St. Bernard at
352-697-2389.
Gilley-Long-Osteen
VFW Post 8698 is at 520
State Road 40 E., Inglis, one
mile east of U.S. 19. The
Men's Auxiliary meets at 7
p.m. the second Monday.
LAVFW meets at 5 p.m. and
the membership meeting is at
6:30 p.m. the third Wednesday
at the post.
Call the post at 352-447-
3495 for information about the


Kah.lIer,
Eg c.-r, LPI


Introducing: Kenneth A. Son, MD
He completed his undergraduate education
at Boston University his medical training at
Hahnemann Medical College and his residency
in urology at Ohio State University With more
than 25 years of experience in private practice.
Dr Son will be a valued addition to the Citrus
County medical community

Accepting new patients
605 W Highland Blvd Inverness FL 34452
352 341 6338


post and its activities.
Fleet Reserve Associa-
tion, Branch 186 will meet at
3 p.m. the third Thursday
monthly at the DAV Building,
Independence Highway and
U.S. 41 North, Inverness. Call
Bob Huscher, secretary, at
352-344-0727.
American Legion Her-
bert Surber Post 225 meets
at 7 p.m. the third Thursday
monthly at the New Testament
Baptist Church of Floral City,
9850 S. Parkside Ave. adjoin-
ing Floral Park, southeast
side. All eligible veterans are
welcome to join.
Landing Ship Dock
(LSD) sailors meet at Denny's
in Crystal River at 2 p.m. the
fourth Thursday monthly. Call
Jimmie at 352-621-0617.
Suncoast U.S. Navy
Armed Guard and Merchant
Marine Veterans of World
War II meetings for 2012 will
be at 11:30 a.m. at Kally K's
restaurant in Spring Hill on the
following dates: April 14, May
12, Sept. 8, Oct. 13, Nov. 10
and Dec. 8.


Loo00 W at ,


utfOPPED Up!

CHRONICLE COUPON




NIGHT'
Present this coupon at
ticket booth for $2 off a
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Chronicle Night at the
) Citrus County Fair
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Urology Institute
or r I i i i I
ill. ,i


P~rn
I~ *1y-* *r'


Saturday
March 24th
1:00 PM

All proceeds benefit the
Kidney For Karen Fund

Citrus Hills Golf & Country Club
"The Meadows"

-Four person scramble
(field limited to first 144 players)
$60 per person
(includes golf, food, refreshments, door prizes, hole contests)
To be a hole sponsor, please make a
$100 donation to the Kidney for Karen Fund.
For addition information please contact:
Douglas Alexander: 352- 344-2425
Dennis Himmel: 352-634-5680

OOOASVN awwwchronn-lmecom


Come Pinch


A Little Tail

Saturday, March 24
Noon 10 pm
Old Homosassa, FL ,








MB Cash Prizes!!
MBO contact
Marybeth Nayfield
at 352-795-7297
Don't miss out on the Food, Fun and Live Music!
If you'd like to participate in the parade, be a vendor or would like
more information please call Tom Feeney at 352-201-2520, Marybeth
Nayfield at 352-795-7297 or E-mail C ..-.. I .. .. ..

Mardi Gras Homosassa Style
TEENSTOCK www.shrimpapalooza.com
"IDS HaELPuoNC KIDo" HK.s. copvr


Rotary Club of Homosassa Springs '-


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SUNDAY, MARCH 18, 2012 A15


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Dr. Douglas and Teresa
"Lady T" Alexander of
Hernando announce the
approaching marriage of
their daughter, Tiarra
Alexander, to Brandon
Heard, son of Sharon
Heard of Elberton, Ga.
The bride-elect is a 2005
graduate of Citrus High
School and a 2010 graduate
of the University of Central
Florida, with a Bachelor of
Arts degree in psychology
She will start graduate
school in the fall at The
Chicago School of Psychol-
ogy with a concentration in
behavior analysis and fam-
ily counseling.
Her fiance is a 2000 grad-
uate of Elberton County
High School. He is an en-
tertainment basketball
player and motivational


speaker.
Nuptial vows will be ex-
changed May 5, 2012, at
Black Diamond Ranch.
The couple will reside in
Ocala.


102nd BIRTHDAY

Ida Vanalstine


Ida Vanalstine, a resident
of Crystal River Health and
Rehab, turned 102 Sunday,
Feb. 26, 2012.
Mrs. Vanalstine was raised
in Iowa. She worked at Gen-
eral Mills Foods and mar-
ried and moved to
Homosassa. She always
loved to dance and danced
with Shirley Temple. Mrs.
Vanalstine loves cats, TV,
reading, socializing and gar-
dening.


'


~


Today'MOVIES
Today's MOVIES


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377
"21 Jump Street" (R) ID required. 1:10 p.m.
4:10 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
"John Carter" In Real 3D. 1 p.m., 4 p.m., 7 p.m.
No passes.
"Dr. Seuss' The Lorax" (PG) In Real 3D. 1:45 p.m.,
7:45 p.m. No passes.
"Dr. Seuss' The Lorax" (PG) 4:45 p.m.
"Act of Valor" (R) ID required. 1:20 p.m., 4:20 p.m.,
7:10 p.m.
"This Means War" (PG-13) 1:40 p.m., 4:40 p.m.,
7:40 p.m.
"Journey 2: The Mysterious Island" (PG) In
Real 3D. 1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m. No passes.
Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"21 Jump Street" (R) ID required. 1:40 p.m.,
4:40 p.m., 7:40 p.m.


Engagement

Alexander/Heard


"John Carter" In Real 3D. 1 p.m., 4 p.m., 4:30 p.m.,
7 p.m., 7:30 p.m. No passes.
"A Thousand Words" (PG-13) 1:25 p.m., 4:25 p.m.,
7:20 p.m.
"Project X" (R) ID required. 1:15 p.m., 4:15 p.m.,
7:55 p.m.
"Dr. Seuss' The Lorax" (PG) 1:05 p.m., 5:25 p.m.
"Dr. Seuss' The Lorax" (PG) In Real 3D. 3:15 p.m.,
7:35 p.m. No passes.
"Gone" (PG-13) 1:35 p.m., 4:45 p.m., 7:15 p.m.
"Act of Valor" (R) ID required. 1:45 p.m., 4:50 p.m.,
7:45 p.m.
"Journey 2: The Mysterious Island" (PG) In
Real 3D. 1:50 p.m. No passes.
"The Artist" (PG-13) 1:30 p.m., 4:05 p.m., 7:05 p.m.
Visit www.chronicleonline.com for area movie listings
and entertainment information.


'Bluegrass at the Blue Lodge'


In SERVICE

Andrew J.
Pelletier
Army Reserve Pfc. Andrew J.
Pelletier has graduated from
One Station Unit Training
(OSUT) at Fort Leonard Wood,
Waynesville, Mo., which in-
cluded basic military training
and advanced individual train-
ing (AIT).
During basic military training,
the trainee received instruction
in drill and ceremony, weapons
qualification, map reading, tac-
tics, military courtesy, military
justice, physical fitness, first
aid, and Army doctrine, history,
principles and traditions.
During AIT, the soldier com-
pleted the military police spe-
cialist course to acquire skills to
provide combat area support,
conduct battlefield circulation
control, area security, prisoner
of war operations, civilian in-
ternee operations, and law and
order operations.
The trainee performed as a
team member in support of bat-
tlefield operations, installation
law and order operations and
security of Army resources and
installations. Additional training
included providing peacetime
support to the military commu-
nity through security of re-
sources, crime prevention
programs, and preservation of
law and order.
Pelletier is the grandson of
Dave and Linda Shea of Bev-
erly Hills. The private first class
is a 2009 graduate of Crystal
River High School.

Send Together items
to community@
chronicleonline.com


barbecue featuring ribeye steaks with all
the trimmings: rolls, salads, desserts and
drink. Advance tickets are $10; $15 on the
day of the event. Two children younger
than 12 can eat for the price of one ticket.
Other bluegrass players are welcome to
participate. Mason Gunner Erickson said
the lodge would like to make it an every-
Saturday event.
For more information, call Erickson at
352-228-7666.


MISSING SOMETHING?
C I T R U S,' C 0 U N T Y


www.chronicleonline.com


AL VBlemFaM...tes


Get current TV listings,

features, movie descriptions,

games and more!!





53-OOOAP9F3295


Central Citrus Rotary club's 21 st Annual Blood screening


affordable BLOOD TESTING


FOR YOUR GOOD HEALTH!
ok Central
1o 4X i jogvL + CITRUS MEMORIAL
+ + oJiNiE yp +


Comprehensive Testing at
DRASTICALLY REDUCED PRICES
SOnly $75.00*
Rotary Blood Screening Profile
(Includes: CBC, Lipid Panel, and Chemistry Profiles
including liver enzymes, glucose, and potassium, etc.)

Additional $60.00


ONE DAY ONLY
Sat., April 14, 2012
6:30am to 9:30am
at the
Forest Ridge Elementary School
in Hernando


PSA TEST (men only) Test for Prostate Cancer DO NOT EAT OR DRINK BEFORE YOUR TEST
o ...0nothing to eat or drink for 12 hours before
Sand up to the test. Complimentary coffee.
Additional $60.00 juice and donuts will be served after the test.


Thyroid Panels T4, T3 uptake & TSH testing

Additional $60.00
Cardiac C.R.P. TEST Used to help predict
if a person is likely to have heart disease.
Medicare does NOT cover a full screening. If you
don't have medical coverage, this is your chance
to afford a complete blood screening.


"Over $475 Value/!/
Blood drawn by Citrus Memorial Health System
licensed phlebotomists and results reviewed by
Vladimir Vicko, D.O., Board Certified in Family Practice.
Please understand that you should discuss the
results of your tests) with your personal physician.


CUT HERE KEEP UPPER HALF AS A REMINDER -
D NES LOWER HALF WITH YOUR CHECK


PRE-REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED:
Pre-registration is required no later than April 11, 2012.
Complete this form and return bottom
half with your check payable to:
Rotary Club of Central Citrus
c/o Ed Serra, CPA
6118 West Corporate Oaks Dr.
Crystal River, FL 34429


> Central Citrus County Rotary Club's
21st Annual Blood Screening

Use ONE REGISTRATION FORM per person please.
(Make photocopies if needed.)


x YOU MUST SIGN BELOW
Name:
FIRST MIDDLE INITIAL


l ; Social Secunty #
71 Blood Screening Test............$75.00 $ Address:
7 Optional PSA- (men only)....$60.00 +$___ ity:.
0 Optional Thyroid Panels.......$60,00 +$_ Telephone: (
D Optional Cardiac C.R.P........$60.00 +$____


State: Zip


Birthnnate: / / Age. IVIMALE EMALE
TOTAL $__
The patient identified above consents to the procedures which may be
performed on an outpatient basis; limited to laboratory procedures.
The undersigned certifies that he/she has read the foregoing and is the patient, the patient's legal representative,
or is duly authorized by the patient as the patients general agent to execute the above and accept its terms.
PLEASE READ A SIGN FORE SENDING IN.
NO RESERVATIONS.
FIRST COME, FIRST SERVED. -X
Patient/Parent/Guardian/Conservator/Responsible Party Date
If other than patient, indicate relationship Witness Signature Date
f\Wrtness Signature Date


Special to the Chronicle
The Lonesome Pine Band, a group of
bluegrass-pickin' snowbird musicians out
of Wildwood, will be hosts and emcees at
the inaugural Bluegrass at the Blue Lodge
event slated to begin at 2 p.m. Saturday,
March 31, at the Ridge Masonic Lodge,
5060 S. Memorial Drive, Homosassa.
The family-friendly event will include
an afternoon of bluegrass music and a


A16 SUNDAY, MARCH 18, 2012


TOGETHER


I C iN U VTHEE-KEEP VI MYUPPER HAL A R NDR


LAST


f ^-- F-I K ^ A P: r-I rraAI F


Z











SPORTS


SO YOU KNOW
* Due to early
deadlines, some
lottery numbers
were unavailable.


0 March Madness/B2, B3
0 NBA/B2
0 NHL/B3
0 Golf/B4
0 TV, lottery/B4
0 MLB, auto racing/B5
0 Entertainment/B6


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


St. Pat's 'Moving Day' belongs to Hendrick


Golfer holds two-stroke lead over three

others heading into final round of event


C.J. RISAK
Correspondent
INVERNESS Some rise, some
fall. That's the nature of the tourna-
ment golf beast.
Except for Dr Tom ...
Hendrick. The long-
time Inverness Golf
and Country Club
member did some
things a bit better on
his home course Saturday in the sec-
ond day of the 50th anniversary St.
Pat's Tournament. But the fact is, he
didn't have to correct that much from


Fo
ph
w


the first day
Hendrick, playing in the first flight,
was the tournament leader after two
rounds with a two-over par 146. His
total was two strokes better than the
score of 148 shared by
r more Berger Warner, Pre-
hotos, click ston Knox and Denny
n this story at Allen.
ww.chronicle Hendrick, who won
nline.com. the St. Pat's Tourna-
ment in 2000 and
2002, followed his opening round of
74 on Friday with an even-par 72 on
Saturday, the second-best score of
the day (the best belonged to Mike


Downing, a one-under 71 for a two-
day total of 152).
"I hit it real well," Hendrick said.
"I just played the same. I made a few
birdies and I made a few bogeys
today Yesterday I had mostly pars."
Hendrick referred to his overall
steady play as the major factor in his
rise to the top: "I played it probably
about the same (each day). I'm hitting
it solid, and I'm hitting it pretty
straight."
Although Hendrick has been
steady if not spectacular, his formula
See Page B4
Berger Warner, a seven-time St.
Pat's Invitational champion, is in a
three-way tie for second place head-
ing into Sunday's final round.
DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle


Chronicle Boys Basketball Player of the Year: ADAM GAGE


0o


Dll


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Seven Rivers Christian sophomore Adam Gage is the Chronicle's Boys Basketball Player of the Year after averaging more than 18 points
and five rebounds per game while leading the Warriors to an 18-win season in 2011-12. Gage also added about two steals and two blocks
per contest and played well against Citrus County competition with 24.3 points in three games against Citrus, Crystal River and Lecanto.

Seven Rivers Christian's Gage grows into area's best player in 2011-12


SEAN ARNOLD
Correspondent
With the loss of such players
as Andrew Gage and point
guard Miles Kauffman, Seven
Rivers Christian sophomore
Adam Gage was given an op-
portunity for a more upfront
role this past season thanks to
his size, off-season improve-
ments, and a variety of talents
with the basketball.
The 6-foot-3 guard responded
by averaging 18.3 points, two
blocks, two steals and more
than five rebounds per game,
contributing to his selection as
the Chronicle's Boys Basketball
Player of the Year
Even better, the sopho-


more's production was directly
proportional to the difficulty of
the challenge before him, as
he posted his best numbers
against the most formidable
opponents.
Overall, Gage contributed 27
percent of the scoring for a
squad that went 18-5 while fac-
ing 11 schools, mostly away,
above its 2A classification. He
helped lead his Warriors to road
triumphs against 2A regional fi-
nalist Academy at the Lakes and
Tampa's Carrollwood Day High
(16-8), and was brilliant in con-
vincing victories against Citrus
and Crystal River
"Adam really played his best
against the better teams,"
Seven Rivers coach Jim Ervin


said. "In some games where
we had bigger leads, he
wanted to defer more to his
teammates. That's really the
kind of young man he is. He's
very unselfish."
Gage's 24 points against 4A
state regional finalist Williston
helped his squad play even
with the district champion Red
Devils for three quarters before
it succumbed to a 70-61 loss.
In a thrilling 85-81 loss at
Lecanto, winner of the 6A-6
conference, the Panthers
needed to overcome a six-
point deficit in the fourth pe-
riod after Gage's nine-point
burst in the third quarter The
sophomore finished with a
game-high 28 points before


getting 26 points-another
game-high-and six blocks to
help defeat the 'Canes by 14
the ensuing night in Lecanto's
holiday tournament.
In his team's 21-pointvictory
in the Pirates' gym for its regu-
lar-season finale, Gage totaled
19 points and four blocks. He
also grabbed six rebounds and
collected multiple steals in
each of the county contests.
"Playing all three county
teams was a fun experience,"
Gage said. "I really wish we
could have won all three, but
we left it out there."
Inside the district, Seven
Rivers finished the regular
See Page B3


Carver


takes


Shamrock


Scamper


Rich wins overall

title as best finisher
LARRY BUGG
Correspondent
INVERNESS On St.
Patrick's Day, a woman from the
"Show Me" State showed local
residents a thing or two.
Cindy Carver, 44, of Spring-
field, Mo., trailed Citrus High
School freshman Alyssa Weber
for much of the Shamrock Scam-
per 5K. In the end, Carver, now
wintering at Lake Panasoffkee,
passed the 15-year-old Weber to
take the woman's title in the
race. Carver finished with a
time of 19:26.
Weber, the Chronicle's Female
Cross Country Runner of the
year in 2011, was 10th, right be-
hind Carver, with a time of 19:38.
"It was a really nice race,"
Carver said. "It was a nice tem-
perature. I had a girl running
ahead of me (Weber). She is an
awesome runner
We had the morning free and
decided to come up to Inver-
ness," Carver continued. "It's a
nice course. It's kind of cool out
here. The weather has been a lot
nicer than in Missouri."
Weber is running track and
was one of the few teenage run-
ners on the course.
"I wanted to run a 5K," Weber
said. "I can train better It took
my breath away It was nice and
cool out."
Weber was gasping for air
shortly after the race. Later, she
recovered and was spotted mak-
ing dance moves as the Village
People's "YMCA"' blasted over
the loud speakers.
Gainesville's Joel Rich won
the overall race with a time of
17:19. Weeki Wachee resident
Jesse Laurenti was second with
a clocking of 17:45.
Rich normally competes in
triathlons but enjoyed Satur-
day's race.
"Real nice course," Rich said.
"It's a good time for this time of
year I used to be a distance run-
ner but switched to triathlons."


Page B4


M UF wants to end Cinderella story


- -. v w -715
Associated Press
Florida forward Patric Young (dunking) will be tasked with containing
Norfolk State's Kyle O'Quinn in the teams' match-up Sunday.


Gators set to take

on No. 15 seed

Norfolk State

Associated Press
OMAHA, Neb. Kyle O'Quinn
has long been a known commod-
ity in the after-thought of a con-
ference in which he plays.
Now everybody seems to know
his name.
The gregarious 6-foot-10, 240-
pound center is the face of the
15th-seeded Norfolk State Spar-
tans. That's the lovable little en-
gine of a team that shocked
second-seeded Missouri in the
NCAA tournament Friday and, as


O'Quinn said in the afterglow,
messed up a lot of folks' brackets
- and, he jokingly added, even
his own.
They've captured the imagina-
tion of the nation, and everyone
wants to know if
O'Quinn and Nor- West R
folk State (26-9) West R
can do it again No. 7 Fl
Sunday against No. 15 No
the tournament-
tested Florida 0 TIME: 6 p.
Gators (24-10). 0 TV: TNT
A No. 15 seed
has never made it
to the round of 16.
"When you've made history
and continue to try to make his-
tory, it's kind of hard to refocus,"
O'Quinn said Saturday "We know
what's on the line. We know what


we can do. We know the good feel-
ing we had last night. We don't
want it to end."
Florida has made the NCAA
tournament 12 times in coach
Billy Donovan's 16 years as coach,


Regional
orida vs.
rfolk State
m. Sunday


won a couple na-
tional titles and
reached a regional
final a year ago.
The Gators, who
beat Virginia 71-45
on Friday, have
seen this story be-
fore and know
Norfolk State is


going to have a home-court advan-
tage at the CenturyLink Center
"Everyone loves the Cinderella
story, underdog stories. Even if
you're neutral, you just love those
See Page B2


9


(B






B2 SUNDAY, MARCH 18, 2012


BASKETBALL


Orange into Sweet 16


No. 2 seed OSU

hold off Gonzaga

Associated Press

PITTSBURGH Scoop Jardine
had 16 points and eight assists to
lead top-seeded Syracuse to a 75-
59 victory over eighth-seeded
Kansas State on Saturday in the
third round of the East Regional.
James Southerland added 15
points for the Orange (33-2), who
didn't wait until the final minutes
to seal the win as they did in the
second round against 16th-seeded
North Carolina-Asheville.
Syracuse plays Vanderbilt or
Wisconsin in Boston on Thursday
night in the regional semifinals.
Rodney McGruder had 15 points
for the Wildcats (22-11), who strug-
gled from the field against Syra-
cuse's 2-3 zone defense.
East Regional

No. 2 Ohio State 73,
No. 7 Gonzaga 66
Jared Sullinger scored 18 points, in-
cluding two big baskets in the final 3
minutes to lead Ohio State past Gon-
zaga and into the round of 16 for the
third straight year.
DeShaun Thomas also scored 18 for
the Buckeyes (29-7), while Aaron Craft
added 17 points and 10 assists. Ohio
State will play Florida State or Cincin-
nati in the East Regional semifinals
Thursday in Boston.
Gary Bell Jr. led Gonzaga (26-7) with
18 points, but the Bulldogs were unable
to become the third team to knock off a
No. 2 seed in less than 24 hours.
No. 4 Wisconsin 60,
No. 5 Vanderbilt 57
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. Ryan
Evans scored 11 points and grabbed a
crucial rebound in the closing seconds,
helping Wisconsin hold off Vanderbilt
60-57 to advance to the round of 16 in
the NCAA tournament.
John Jenkins took a 3-pointer that
would have given the Commodores the
lead, but it bounced high off the rim
and Evans pulled down the rebound
and was fouled with 2.1 seconds left.
He made the first free throw to make
it a three-point game. After a Vanderbilt
timeout, he missed the second and the
Commodores called time with 1.3 sec-
onds remaining. But Jared Berggren
contested the inbounds pass and got
his right hand on Lance Goulbourne's
overhand heave.


Associated Press
Syracuse's Rakeem Christmas dunks late in a 75-59 win over Kansas State in an NCAA tournament third-round
game Saturday in Pittsburgh.


West Regional
No. 3 Marquette 62,
No. 6 Murray State 53
LOUISVILLE, Ky. Jae Crowder
scored 12 of his 17 points in the sec-
ond half, and Marquette used a late
run to overcome Murray State 62-53,
sending the Golden Eagles to the West
Regional semifinals.
Trailing 46-41 with 7:43 to play, Mar-
quette went on a 14-2 run. While
Crowder and Davante Gardner took
care of the offense, scoring all but two
points during the spurt, the Golden Ea-
gles used their size and strength to
wear down the pesky Racers.
Isaiah Canaan scored 16 for Murray
State, (31-2) which is still looking to get
out of the first weekend of the NCAA
tournament. It's the second time in
three years Murray State has fallen
short of the regional semifinals.
Marquette (27-7) plays the winner of


Norfolk State-Florida next Thursday in
Phoenix.
South Regional
No. 4 Indiana 63,
No. 12 VCU 61
PORTLAND, Ore.- Will Sheehey
made a 15-footer from the baseline
with 12.7 seconds left after a shot was
blocked right to him and No. 4 seed In-
diana rallied to beat VCU 63-61 in the
third round of the NCAA tournament.
Rob Brandenberg got a great look at a
potential winning 3-pointer but it rimmed
off at the buzzer, ending the Rams' bid
for another surprising March run.
Indiana advanced to the round of 16
for the first time in a decade and just
four years after Tom Crean inherited a
decimated program.
Christian Watford led Indiana (27-8)
with 16 points and Cody Zeller added 14.
Bradford Burgess scored 12 of his
15 points in the first half for VCU (29-7).


No. 1 Kentucky 87,
No. 8 Iowa State 71
LOUISVILLE, Ky. Freshman Mar-
quis Teague scored a career-high 24
points and top seed Kentucky put to-
gether another complete performance
with a dominating second-half run in an
87-71 victory over Iowa State in the
third round of the NCAA tournament.
Freshman Anthony Davis had 15
points and 12 rebounds, senior Darius
Miller added 19 points and Doron
Lamb finished with 16. The Wildcats
(34-2) move on to South Regional
semifinals in Atlanta and will face
fourth-seeded Indiana on Friday.
Royce White scored 23 points and
had nine rebounds before fouling out
with 4:32 left for Iowa State (23-11),
which beat defending national cham-
pion Connecticut on Thursday night.
But the Cyclones couldn't contend with
Kentucky's overwhelming offense and
smothering defense.


Lin, Knicks on three-game winning streak


Clippers sneak

past Rockets

Associated Press

INDIANAPOLIS Je-
remy Lin scored 19 points
to help the New York
Knicks defeat the Indiana
Pacers 102-88 and improve
to 3-0 under interim coach
Mike Woodson.
Lin also had seven re-
bounds and six assists.
Carmelo Anthony and
Amar'e Stoudemire each
scored 16 points and J.R.
Smith added 11 for the
Knicks, who won on the



GATORS
Continued from Page B1

stories," said Florida center
Patric Young. "They love to
see the underdogs like
George Mason and VCU
make runs to the Final Four.
We'd like to be the team to
stop that run and not be a
part of that run."
O'Quinn plays, and em-
braces, the starring role for
the Spartans.
Until Friday the senior was
a virtual unknown outside
the Mid-Eastern Athletic
Conference, where he's
player of the year and two-
time defensive player of the
year
He introduced himself to
college basketball fandom at
large with his 26 points and
14 rebounds against Mis-
souri. It was his 20th double-
double of the season and 39th
in 67 games.
"He completely dominated
the game on the glass," said
Young, who will guard
O'Quinn. "When I finally saw
him on film, I saw how skilled
and talented he is, and he's a
really good defender, really
physical. He overpowers a lot
of guys he goes up against"
Adding to O'Quinn's appeal
were those postgame quips


road for just the eighth
time this season.
The Knicks have won all
three games by an average
of 23.7 points since Wood-
son took over for Mike
D'Antoni. New York de-
feated the Pacers 115-100 on
Friday night in New York
Clippers 95,
Rockets 91
LOS ANGELES Chris
Paul scored 12 of his 23 points
in the final 2:42, including a go-
ahead layup with 24.6 seconds
left, leading the Los Angeles
Clippers to a 95-91 victory over
the Houston Rockets.
Blake Griffin had 18 points
and eight rebounds before
fouling out with 4.9 seconds


where he talked about
bracket busting, President
Obama's mistake in picking
against the Spartans and
even how he watched cheer-
leaders dance during time-
outs.
Two or three hours after
the upset of Missouri,
O'Quinn said, he had accu-
mulated about 2,100 new
Twitter followers to more
than double his total.
"Once in a lifetime feel-
ing," he said. 'A win has
never brought so much joy to
a player, to a family"
The New York native's
start in the game was inaus-
picious.
He showed up at Campus
Magnet High in Queens as a
5-foot-ll ninth-grader and
grew 11 inches the next three
years. He was coaxed into
going out for basketball his
junior year, and he mostly
warmed the bench.
Campus Magnet coach
Charles Granby said O'Quinn
could be such a goofball that
he almost kicked him off the
team.
"He just looked at me, and
that made me even madder,"
Granby said Saturday "'All he
was doing was having fun. I
got so angry with him be-
cause he was 6-10 and not
doing what he could do. I told
him he could make money at


remaining.
Bobcats 107,
Raptors 103
CHARLOTTE, N.C. D.J.
Augustin scored 23 points and
had 11 assists and the Char-
lotte Bobcats held off the
Toronto Raptors 107-103.
Gerald Henderson added
24 points, Corey Maggette had
21 and Tyrus Thomas had 11
or the Bobcats, who overcame
a 15-point deficit in the second
quarter to win for the second
time in their past four games.
Hornets 102, Nets 94
NEWARK, N.J. Chris
Kaman scored 20 points, in-
cluding a key 23-foot jumper


with a second left on the shot
clock and 45 seconds left in
the game, giving the New Or-
leans Hornets a 102-94 win
over the New Jersey Nets.
With the Hornets leading
95-94, Kaman made his
jumper and then Marco Be-
linelli sealed the win with a fall-
away 3-pointer with 16.8
seconds left, also with the shot
clock down to a second.
Belinelli also scored 20
points for the Hornets.
Deron Williams had 20
points and 12 assists for the
Nets. They also got 20 points
from Anthony Morrow and 16
from Gerald Green.
Gerald Wallace, making his
debut with the Nets after being


this someday Finally, the
light bulb went on."
O'Quinn averaged 20
points, 12 rebounds and three
blocks his last year in high
school, but no colleges
showed interest O'Quinn
didn't seem to care, either
"You've got to understand
- Kyle was a middle-class
kid with mom and dad at
home," Granby said. "There
was always money in his
pocket The girls loved him;
the kids loved him. He didn't
have to sweat about anything.
He wasn't worried about get-
ting a scholarship to college."
The only scholarship offer
came after Spartans coach
Anthony Evans went to Cam-
pus Magnet to look at a point
guard. But the big O'Quinn is
the one who caught his eye.
O'Quinn visited campus
and signed a letter of intent
on the spot He's one of eight
New Yorkers on the roster,
along with Evans and assis-
tant coach Robert Jones.
Evans, like Granby, said
O'Quinn could be frustrating
at first
"We had to rein him in a lit-
tle bit because he wanted to
be a class clown," Evans said.
"You'd be running practice,
and he'd be off to the side try-
ing to tell jokes or pouring
water down somebody's
back"


acquired in a trade with Port-
land before Thursday's dead-
line, scored 11 points.
Bulls 89, 76ers 80
CHICAGO C.J. Watson
scored 20 points and Joakim
Noah added 13 points and 11
rebounds to lead the Chicago
Bulls to a 89-80 win over the
Philadelphia 76ers.
The Bulls overcame an
early 14-point deficit without
Derrick Rose, who missed his
third straight game with a
strained groin. Even with the
reigning MVP missing 13
games this season, the Bulls
still have the best record in the
NBAat 37-10. The Bulls are 9-
4 without Rose.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

NCAA Toumament
EAST REGIONAL
Second Round
Thursday, March 15
AtThe CONSOL Energy Center
Pittsburgh
Kansas State 70, Southern Mississippi 64
Syracuse 72, UNC Asheville 65
Gonzaga 77, West Virginia 54
Ohio State 78, Loyola (Md.) 59
At The Pit
Albuquerque, N.M.
Wisconsin 73, Montana 49
Vanderbilt 79, Harvard 70
Friday, March 16
At Bridgestone Arena
Nashville,Tenn.
Cincinnati 65, Texas 59
Florida State 66, St. Bonaventure 63
Third Round
Saturday, March 17
AtThe CONSOL Energy Center
Pittsburgh
Syracuse 75, Kansas State 59
Ohio State 73, Gonzaga 66
At The Pit
Albuquerque, N.M.
Wisconsin 60, Vanderbilt 57
Sunday, March 18
At Bridgestone Arena
Nashville,Tenn.
FSU (25-9) vs. Cincinnati (24-10), 9:30 p.m.
SOUTH REGIONAL
Second Round
Thursday, March 15
AtThe KFCYum! Center
Louisville, Ky.
Kentucky 81, Western Kentucky 66
Iowa State 77, UConn 64
At The Pit
Albuquerque, N.M.
Baylor 68, South Dakota State 60
Colorado 68, UNLV 64
At The Rose Garden
Portland, Ore.
VCU 62, Wichita State 59
Indiana 79, New Mexico State 66
Friday, March 16
At Greensboro Coliseum
Greensboro, N.C.
Lehigh 75, Duke 70
Xavier 67, Notre Dame 63
Third Round
Saturday, March 17
At The KFCYum! Center
Louisville, Ky.
Kentucky 87, Iowa State 71
At The Pit
Albuquerque, N.M.
Baylor (28-7) vs. Colorado (24-11), late
At The Rose Garden
Portland, Ore.
Indiana 63, VCU 61
Sunday, March 18
At Greensboro Coliseum
Greensboro, N.C.
Lehigh (27-7) vs. Xavier (22-12), 7:30 p.m.
MIDWEST REGIONAL
Second Round
Friday, March 16
At Greensboro Coliseum
Greensboro, N.C.
Creighton 58, Alabama 57
North Carolina 77, Vermont 58
At Nationwide Arena
Columbus, Ohio
N.C. State 79, San Diego State 65
Georgetown 74, Belmont 59
At Bridgestone Arena
Nashville,Tenn.
Ohio 65, Michigan 60
South Florida 58, Temple 44
At CenturyLink Center
Omaha, Neb.
Purdue 72, Saint Mary's (Calif.) 69
Kansas 65, Detroit 50
Third Round
Sunday, March 18
At Greensboro Coliseum
Greensboro, N.C.
North Carolina (30-5) vs. Creighton (29-5), 5 p.m.
At Nationwide Arena
Columbus, Ohio
Georgetown (24-8) vs. N.C. State (23-12), 12 p.m.
At Bridgestone Arena
Nashville,Tenn.
Ohio (28-7) vs. South Florida (22-13), 7 p.m.
At CenturyLink Center
Omaha, Neb.
Kansas (28-6) vs. Purdue (22-12), 8:30 p.m.
WEST REGIONAL
Second Round
Thursday, March 15
At The KFCYum! Center
Louisville, Ky.
Murray State 58, Colorado State 41
Marquette 88, BYU 68
At The Rose Garden
Portland, Ore.
Louisville 69, Davidson 62
New Mexico 75, Long Beach State 68
Friday, March 16
At Nationwide Arena
Columbus, Ohio
Saint Louis 61, Memphis 54
Michigan State 89, LIU 67
At CenturyLink Center
Omaha, Neb.
Florida 71, Virginia 45
Norfolk State 86, Missouri 84
Third Round
Saturday, March 17
At The KFCYum! Center
Louisville, Ky.
Marquette 62, Murray State 53
At The Rose Garden
Portland, Ore.
Louisville (27-9) vs. New Mexico (28-6), late
Sunday, March 18
At Nationwide Arena
Columbus, Ohio
Michigan State (28-7) vs. St. Louis (26-7), 2:45 p.m.
At CenturyLink Center
Omaha, Neb.
Norfolk State (26-9)vs. Florida (24-10), 6:10p.m.


CHRONICLE
S ewww.chronicleonline.com
000APTG To enter visit www.chronicleonline.com





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Top seed UConn rom


Associated Press

BRIDGEPORT, Conn. -
Kaleena Mosqueda-Lewis
scored 21 points to help top-
seeded Connecticut beat
Prairie View A&M 83-47 on
Saturday in the opening
round of the NCAA women's
basketball tournament
Mo squeda-Lewis
matched the school record
set by Jamelle Elliott in
1993 for points by a Huskies
player in her first tourna-
ment game.
Bria Hartley added 18
points and Stefanie Dolson
had all 15 of her points in
the first half for the
Huskies (30-4), who will
face eighth-seeded Kansas
State in the second round
of the Kingston Regional on
Monday night.
Latia Williams scored 20
points to lead Prairie View
(17-16).
Bridgeport Regional
No. 8 Kansas State 67,
No. 9 Princeton 64 conn
A&M
Branshea Brown scored a ca- tourn
reer-high 22 points and grabbed
seven rebounds to lead Kansas jah Ru
State past Princeton. I
Janala Childs added 15 No.
points for the Wildcats (20-13). SP,
Niveen Rasheed had 20 Sheni
points, and Lauren Edwards points
and Devona Allgood each Thir
scored 15 for Princeton (24-5). will pl
The Tigers lost for the first timenight,
in 18 games and for the third night,
consecutive year in the first Ash
round of the tournament. State
No. 2 Kentucky 68, The 1
No. 15 McNeese St. 62 were
AMES, Iowa Keyla Snow- Confe
den scored 11 points, Azia Mia
Bishop added 10 and Kentucky WCCC
squeaked by McNeese State in whod
its NCAA tournament opener. Spoki
SEC Player of the YearA'dia team
Mathies had just six points for Des
the Wildcats (26-6), who strug- No
gled to put away the Cowgirls
until late in the second half. Mc- No.
Neese State got within 63-57 on RO
two free throws by Martika Hull Simm
with 40 seconds left, but the Tenne
Cowgirls couldn't get any closer. Sumn
Caitlyn Baggett had 22 school
points and Hull scored 20 with Glo
13 rebounds for McNeese points
State (26-8). nesse
No. 7 Green Bay 71, the se
No. 10 Iowa State 57 set up
on Mo
AMES, Iowa Lydia Bauer Final F
and Sarah Eichler each scored chami
16 points. Ten
Adrian Ritchie added 15 for back t
the Phoenix (31-1), who'll take NCAA
on second-seeded Kentucky in shook
the second round Monday night. nounc
Green Bay blitzed through has ea
the Cyclones in their own gym, Alzhei
running out to a 42-23 halftime
lead and barely looking back.
Hallie Christofferson led five
in double figures with 12 points RO
for Iowa State (18-13). Martirn
No. 11 Gonzaga 86, BYI
No. 6 Rutgers 73 a late
SPOKANE, Wash. Kayla had a
Standish scored 23 points to second
lift Gonzaga over Rutgers. Steed
Playing before a big crowd Paul (
on its home floor, Gonzaga Steed
(27-5) mostly handled Rutgers' Hyr
press and used a 3-point bar- and cl
rage in the second half to hold Kathe
off the Scarlet Knights. Haiden Penny
Palmer added 21 points for the Jen
Bulldogs. points
Gonzaga, in the tournament Riley l
field with an at-large bid for the R
first time, took control early and
held off every Rutgers charge. N
Erica Wheeler had 28 points
for Rutgers (22-10), and Khadi- CO


GAGE
Continued from Page B1

season 7-1 before losing a coin flip
to First Academy over district
tournament seeding, forcing the
Warriors to travel to Leesburg
where they fell to St. John
Lutheran, a team that went on to
claim the district title before ad-
vancing to the state regional semi-
final round.
Gage had 24 points, five re-
bounds, and four assists in the
semifinal game.
"It was tough, especially realiz-
ing it was the last time we'd ever
play basketball together," Gage
said of the loss. "Winning 18 games


as a 2A school, and beating some
county schools and other big
schools is really a great accom-
plishment. Those achievements
and having the fellowship are the
definite high points I've had with
this team," he added.
A dunk at The Villages counts
among the guard's favorite per-
sonal moments of the season.


second-half run.
The Great Danes (23-10)
had scored six straight points
to tie it early in the second half
before A&M used a 17-4 run to
take a 49-36 lead with about
13 minutes remaining.
The Aggies (23-10) were
making their school-record
seventh straight tournament
appearance and Albany was in
the tournament for the first
time.


-qir- 1


\ .. Fresno Regional
- No. 1 Stanford 73,
le No. 16 Hampton 51


ZaA1
Associated Press
ecticut's Bria Hartley is guarded by Prairie View
's Latia Williams during the second half of an NCAA
ament first-round game Saturday in Bridgeport, Conn.


ushdan added 14.
No. 3 Miami 70,
14 Idaho State 41
OKANE, Wash. -
se Johnson scored 20
and added four assists.
rd-seeded Miami (26-5)
ay Gonzaga on Monday
with the winner advanc-
the round of 16.
hleigh Vella led Idaho
(24-8) with 12 points.
4th-seeded Bengals
winners of the Big Sky
rence tournament.
ami played without All-
guard Riquna Williams,
id not make the trip to
mane for an unspecified
violation.
s Moines Regional
. 2 Tennessee 72,
15 Tenn.-Martin 49
SEMONT, Ill. Meighan
ons scored 20 points and
essee gave coach Pat
mitt a victory over the
l where she played.
ry Johnson added 14
and 12 rebounds as Ten-
e (25-8) pulled away in
cond half. The Lady Vols
p a meeting with DePaul
nday, hoping for their first
Four run since winning the
pionship in 2008.
nessee vowed to get
here and win a ninth
title for Summitt, who
the sport with her an-
;ement in August that she
early onset dementia,
imer's type.
No. 7 DePaul,
No. 10 BYU
SEMONT, Ill. -Anna
filed a balanced attack
7 points.
J (26-7) fought back from
eight-point deficit and
chance to tie with 2.8
nds to play. But Haley
's 3 point try missed, De-
23-10) rebounded and
fouled Brittany Hrynko.
nko added a free throw
osed with 15 points while
rine Harry and Jasmine
y had 12 each.
inifer Hamson had 21
for BYU and Kristen
had 10 and 12 rebounds.
qaleigh Regional
o. 2 Maryland 59,
No. 15 Navy 44
LLEGE PARK, Md. -


Alyssa Thomas had 17 points
and 10 rebounds to lead No. 2
seed Maryland past in-state
foe Navy.
Laurin Mincy scored 14 for
Maryland (29-4), which pulled
away after leading 31-23 at
halftime. The Terrapins will
play No. 7 seed Louisville on
Monday night.
Jade Geif led Navy (18-14)
with 14 points.
No. 7 Louisville 67,
No. 10 Michigan St. 55
COLLEGE PARK, Md. -
Becky Burke scored 14
points and Shawnta' Dyer
had 13 to help Louisville beat
Michigan State.
The Cardinals (23-9) rattled
the Spartans (20-12) with
speed and defense, forcing 14
turnovers and pulling away with
a 16-2 run late in the first half.
The game marked the return
of Louisville coach Jeff Walz to
College Park. Walz was an as-
sistant on the Terrapins' na-
tional title team in 2006 before
taking the top job with the Car-
dinals in 2007.
No. 6 Arkansas 72,
No. 11 Dayton 55
COLLEGE STATION, Texas
- Quistelle Williams scored 15
points, Keira Peak and Lynd-
say Harris added 14 apiece
and Arkansas rallied from an
early double-digit deficit to de-
feat Dayton.
C'eira Ricketts had 13 points
and five assists for the Razor-
backs (24-8), who finished the
game with a 20-2 run after
trailing by as many as 14 in the
first half.
Andrea Hoover scored 16
and Justine Raterman added
14 for the Flyers (23-7), who
went the final 12 minutes with-
out a field goal, missing 18
consecutive shots.
No. 3 Texas A&M 69,
No. 14 Albany 47
COLLEGE STATION, Texas
- Tyra White scored 18
points in her return from injury
and defending national cham-
pion Texas A&M used a big
second half run to pull away
from Albany.
White had missed the last
three games with a left foot
injury. She got going early,
scoring 12 points in the first
half, and added four points
and a steal in a decisive


More than anything, he loves to
shoot, in any capacity, but he still
often frustrated his coaches by
opting to share the wealth a little
too much for their tastes.
"My coaches always say, 'when
you're open, you've got to shoot it,'
but I just can't help it, I love to
pass the ball and give other guys a
chance to score."
Despite playing guard, Gage
knows it falls on him and his for-
midable size to make big contri-
butions inside, an area he hopes
to improve in for future seasons.
"Being one of the tallest players
out there, I have to get better on
the boards, with boxing out, and
getting rebounds."
It was only Gage's second year
on the team, but the sophomore is
plenty familiar with the coaching
staff, led by Ervin, having spent
years under their tutelage in vari-
ous camps and settings. Gage also
appreciates the influence and sup-
port he's received from his par-
ents, school, and religious faith.
"My parents cart me around and
are always there for me," he said.
"Of course, my Lord is always a big


*z-^


part of my life, and I'm so happy I
get to go to this school. It's just a
great blessing to let me play this
game and do so many other things."
Gage reserves a special place,
both in his thoughts and on his at-
tire, for his grandfather, Jesse Hart-
line, who died five years ago.
"It's really hit me how much my
grandpa has inspired me," he
said. "I have his initials on my
shoe, and I try to play for him and
put him in my life."
All-Chronicle Boys
Basketball team
Sam Jones, Seven Rivers
Christian, senior guard: Jones was
the best ball-handler in the county this
year despite being new to the point.
His high assist average of 6.3 didn't
stop him from averaging 16 points per
game while shooting for a combined
52 percent on field goals to help his
squad finish 18-5.
The 5-10 senior also found time to
average 5.1 steals and 5.3 boards per
game.
Ryan Labrador, Citrus, senior
forward: If you're wondering how
valuable the returning Chronicle


Player of the Year was this season,
you can take a peek at how the
'Canes performed without him.
The senior finished with 14 points
and a game-high 18 rebounds in a
late-January upset of visiting Lecanto
despite suffering a season-ending
ankle injury in the game. Without
Labrador, who posted the second-best
scoring average in the county with
17.4 points per game while remaining
a force in every aspect of play, Citrus
lost four of five to end the year. "Lab"
also averaged eight rebounds and 3.5
assists per game.
Ty Reynolds, Crystal River,
sophomore guard: Reynolds led his
Pirates in scoring in 16 of their 23
games, accounting for more than 32
percent of the team's scoring, while
averaging 14.7 points, 6.1 rebounds,
3.1 assists and 2.5 steals per game.
He averaged 18.5 points in five
county games, and he capped the
season with 28 points, six rebounds,
four assists, and three steals in a four-
point district tournament road loss to
Tavares.
Richie Rizzolo, Lecanto, junior
guard/forward: On a 21-7 team that


Associated Press

TAMPA Jaroslav Halak
made 22 saves, Jaden
Schwartz scored his first NHL
goal, and the St Louis Blues
beat the Tampa Bay Lightning
3-1 on Saturday night
Halak had an in-close
stop on league goals leader
Steven Stamkos in the first,
and made a glove save on
Brett Connolly during a sec-
ond-period breakaway
Schwartz, taken 14th
overall in the 2010 entry
draft and making his NHL
debut, put St. Louis up 2-0
from just outside the crease
on the power play with 35.5
seconds left in the first
Patrik Berglund and
David Perron also scored for
the Blues, who became the
first NHL team (46-19-8) to
reach 100 points this season.
Brendan Mikkelson got a
late third-period goal for
Tampa Bay, which is seven
points behind eighth-place
Washington in the Eastern
Conference.
Avalanche 3, Rangers 1
NEW YORK Colorado
rookie Gabriel Landeskog broke
a second-period tie, and Se-
myon Varlamov made 41 saves
to lift the Avalanche over the
sliding New York Rangers 3-1.
Landeskog gave Ava-
lanche the lead, and Varlamov
made it stand up as playoff-
hopeful Colorado finished a 2-
0-1 Eastern road trip.
The Rangers' once seemingly
comfortable lead in the Eastern
Conference is nearly gone with
11 games remaining. New York
lost its second straight, and fifth
in seven games, as surging
Pittsburgh closes in. The Pen-
guins, who beat New Jersey
earlier Saturday to close within
two points, can get even with
the Rangers with a win Sunday
in Philadelphia.
Bruins 3, Flyers 2 SO
BOSTON Tim Thomas
stopped Danny Briere on the
final shot after the first five
skaters in the shootout all
scored, and the Boston Bruins
snapped a four-game losing
streak by beating the Philadel-
phia Flyers 3-2.
Chris Kelly and Tyler Seguin
scored for Boston, and Thomas
made 27 saves in regulation
and the five-minute overtime.
Thomas, the reigning Vezina
Trophy winner, is 6-0 in
shootouts this season.
Ilya Bryzgalov made 31 saves
for the Flyers, who lost for just
the second time in nine games.


Matt Read and Jakub Voracek
scored for Philadelphia.
The Bruins passed Ottawa
and took over first place in the
Northeast Division and the No.
2 seed in the Eastern Confer-
ence heading into the Senators'
game against Toronto.
Penguins 5, Devils 2
NEWARK, N.J Matt
Cooke scored two goals,
Evgeni Malkin had one and
Sidney Crosby added three as-
sists to lead the Pittsburgh Pen-
guins to their 11th straight win,
5-2 over the New Jersey Devils.
With the surge, the Penguins
have 93 points and are two be-
hind the Eastern Conference-
leading New York Rangers.
Their winning streak is the
longest in the NHL this season
Crosby came through with a
strong effort in the second
game of his comeback from re-
curring concussion symptoms.
Hurricanes 5, Wild 3
ST. PAUL, Minn.- Tim
Brent and Brandon Sutter
scored in a 48-second span of
the third period and the Car-
olina Hurricanes rallied past the
Minnesota Wild 5-3.
Drayson Bowman scored
twice and recorded an assist for
the Hurricanes. Goaltender
Brian Boucher made 21 saves
and recorded his first win of the
season.
Kyle Brodziak had a goal and
two assists for Minnesota. Nick
Johnson and Erik Christensen
also scored for the Wild, who
have lost eight of nine games.
Maple Leafs 3,
Senators 1
OTTAWA- Phil Kessel had
a goal and an assist and James
Reimer made 29 saves to help
the Toronto Maple Leafs beat
the Ottawa Senators 3-1.
Tim Connolly and Dion Pha-
neuf also scored for Toronto.
Reimer won his second straight
to improve to 4-0 at Scotiabank
Place, allowing only Colin
Greening's goal.
Ben Bishop, making his sixth
straight start, faced just 18
shots in his first regulation loss.
Panthers 3,
Sabres 2, SO
SUNRISE Dmitry Kulikov
returned from a knee injury and
scored the winning shootout
goal as the Florida Panthers
beat the Buffalo Sabres 3-2.
John Madden and Mikael
Samuelsson scored in regula-
tion for the Panthers.


saw seven players average at least six
points per game, Rizzolo still stood out
with a team-leading 13 points a con-
test, even while spending time on the
bench late during big-margin victories.
Rizzolo shot for 37 percent on 3s,
59 percent on 2-pointers, and 80 per-
cent at the foul line during a schedule
that included five non-district games
against playoff teams and no losses
to teams classified below 6A. He also
averaged a couple of assists and 3.5
rebounds per game.
Clayton Roessler, Lecanto
Panthers, senior forward: Roessler
was the best all-around post player in
the county this season, as well as the
most steady presence on his Panther
squad, averaging 11 points and 7.7
rebounds per game to help his team
to a district championship and a 5-1
county record.
He also averaged more than 11 re-
bounds per game against county oppo-
nents, and was the most accurate
county player among big men at the
foul line (57 percent). The senior culmi-
nated an impressive prep career by
shooting for 60 percent on two-pointers.


Lightning blasted


3-1 by St. Louis


NORFOLK, Va. Nnemkadi
Ogwumike scored 22 of her 28
points in the first half and Stan-
ford pulled away before halftime
to beat Hampton.
Joslyn Tinkle added 16
points as the Cardinal (32-1)
extended their school-record
winning streak to 29. Stanford
will face eighth-seeded West
Virginia in the second round
Monday night.
Alyssa Bennett scored 19
points to lead Hampton (26-5),
which set a school record for
victories in a season and was
playing about 11 miles from its
campus. But the Pirates hadn't
seen anything like the athleti-
cism of Ogwumike, or the effi-
ciency of the Cardinal.
No. 8 West Virginia 68,
No. 9 Texas 55
NORFOLK, Va. Taylor
Palmer scored 13 of her 18
points in the second half and
West Virginia held on against
Texas after squandering most
of a 15-point lead.
The Mountaineers (24-9) led
48-33 with 10 minutes to play
before the Longhorns closed to
51-48 with 512 minutes to go.
But after West Virginia went al-
most 5 minutes without a bas-
ket, Palmer swished a
3-pointer from the right wing.
Ashley Gayle scored 11
points and Ashleigh Fontenette
10 to lead Texas (18-14).
No. 4 Purdue 83,
No. 13 S. Dakota St. 68
WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. -
Courtney Moses scored 29
points and set a first-round
NCAA women's tournament
record by making nine 3-point-
ers, helping Purdue pull away
from pesky South Dakota State.
It sure wasn't easy.
The Boilermakers (25-8)
thought they had taken control
midway through the second half
with a 16-point lead, but it took
a late 12-3 run to put it away.
Jill Young had 19 points and
Jennie Sunnarborg finished
with 17 as Summit League
champion South Dakota State
(24-9) lost again in the first
round.
No. 5 S. Carolina 80,
No. 12 E. Michigan 48
WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind.-
Markeshia Grant scored 12
points and Charenee Stephens
added 11 to lead South Car-
olina past Eastern Michigan.
The Gamecocks (24-9) will
face fourth-seeded Purdue, the
site host, on Monday night in
the second round.
Tavelyn James, the nation's
No. 2 scorer, had 11 points to
finish her career with 2,461.
But she was held 13 points
below her average and didn't
have enough help as the Mid-
American Conference cham-
pion Eagles (24-9) fell to 0-2 in
NCAA tournament play.


SPORTS


SUNDAY, MARCH 18, 2012 B3


Associated Press
Tampa Bay Lightning defenseman Brendan Mikkelson
celebrates his goal during the third period Saturday against
the St. Louis Blues in Tampa.






B4 SUNDAY, MARCH 18, 2012



BASEBALL
American League
BOSTON RED SOX Released RHP Car-
los Silva.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
CLEVELAND CAVALIERS Waived F
Jason Kapono. Signed G Manny Harris for the
remainder of the season.
GOLDEN STATE WARRIORS-Released G
T.J. Ford.
NEW YORK KNICKS Named Jim Todd
and Darrell Walker assistant coaches.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
CINCINNATI BENGALS-Signed G Travelle
Wharton.
INDIANAPOLIS COLTS Signed S Tom
Zbikowski.
KANSAS CITY CHIEFS-Signed OT Eric
Winston. Agreed to terms with QB Brady Quinn.
NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS-Signed WR
Anthony Gonzalez.
PHILADELPHIA EAGLES Agreed to
terms with G Evan Mathis on a five-year con-
tract.
SAN DIEGO CHARGERS-Agreed to terms
with TW Randy McMichael on a two-year con-
tract.
SEATTLE SEAHAWKS Agreed to terms
with DT Jason Jones.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
NHL Fined Winnipeg D Mark Stuart
$2,500 for his late hit on Washington F Marcus
Johansson during Friday's game.
BOSTON BRUINS Reassigned D Zach
McKelvie from Reading (ECHL) to Providence
(AHL).
CHICAGO BLACKHAWKS Assigned G
Carter Hutton to Rockford (AHL).
NEW YORK RANGERS Recalled D Tim
Erixon from Connecticut (AHL).
TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING Recalled F
Trevor Smith from Norfolk (AHL).



NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
Philadelphia 25 20 .556 -
Boston 23 20 .535 1
NewYork 21 24 .467 4
Toronto 15 30 .333 10
New Jersey 15 31 .326 10Y2
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 32 11 .744 -
Orlando 29 16 .644 4
Atlanta 25 19 .568 712
Washington 10 33 .233 22
Charlotte 7 36 .163 25
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Chicago 37 10 .787 -
Indiana 25 18 .581 10
Milwaukee 20 24 .455 1512
Cleveland 16 25 .390 18
Detroit 16 28 .364 1912
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 29 13 .690 -
Memphis 24 18 .571 5
Dallas 25 20 .556 512
Houston 24 21 .533 6/2
New Orleans 11 34 .244 1912
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 33 11 .750 -
Denver 24 20 .545 9
Minnesota 22 23 .489 111Y2
Utah 21 22 .488 111Y2
Portland 21 23 .477 12
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
L.A. Lakers 28 16 .636 -
L.A. Clippers 25 18 .581 212
Phoenix 22 22 .500 6
Golden State 18 23 .439 812
Sacramento 15 29 .341 13
Saturday's Games
L.A. Clippers 95, Houston 91
Charlotte 107, Toronto 103
New York 102, Indiana 88
Chicago 89, Philadelphia 80
New Orleans 102, New Jersey 94
Boston at Denver, late
Golden State at Utah, late
San Antonio at Dallas, late
Sunday's Games
Atlanta at Cleveland, 3 p.m.
Detroit at L.A. Clippers, 3:30 p.m.
Minnesota at Sacramento, 6 p.m.
Washington at Memphis, 6 p.m.
Orlando at Miami, 7 p.m.
Houston at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
Utah at L.A. Lakers, 9:30 p.m.
Portland at Oklahoma City, 9:30 p.m.
Monday's Games
Philadelphia at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Boston at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
Cleveland at New Jersey, 7:30 p.m.
Chicago at Orlando, 8 p.m.
Minnesota at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.
Dallas at Denver, 10:30 p.m.



NHL standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT PtsGF GA
N.Y Rangers 71 4420 7 95195 158
Pittsburgh 70 4421 5 93229 177
Philadelphia 71 41 22 8 90228 202
New Jersey 72 4126 5 87198 187
N.Y Islanders 72 2932 11 69169 216
Northeast Division
GP W LOT PtsGF GA
Boston 71 41 27 3 85228 178
Ottawa 73 3726 10 84221 213
Buffalo 72 3329 10 76180 204
Toronto 72 3232 8 72208 219
Montreal 73 2832 13 69191 203
Southeast Division
GP W LOT PtsGF GA
Florida 71 3523 13 83180 197
Washington 71 3629 6 78191 200
Winnipeg 71 3429 8 76189 199
Tampa Bay 71 32 32 7 71199 240
Carolina 72 2829 15 71190 214
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT PtsGF GA
x-St. Louis 73 4619 8 100189 142
Detroit 71 4424 3 91219 171
Nashville 70 41 21 8 90201 181
Chicago 72 3925 8 86217 210
Columbus 70 2241 7 51161 226


Northwest Division
GP W LOT PtsGF GA
Vancouver 70 4220 8 92219 177
Colorado 74 3930 5 83194 195
Calgary 72 3426 12 80181 197
Minnesota 71 2932 10 68153 199
Edmonton 71 2836 7 63188 210
Pacific Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Dallas 72 3928 5 83189 192
Phoenix 72 3526 11 81188 186
San Jose 70 3525 10 80191 179
Los Angeles 71 3425 12 80163 156
Anaheim 72 3031 11 71179 200
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over-
time loss.
x-clinched playoff spot
Saturday's Games
Boston 3, Philadelphia 2, SO
N.Y Islanders 3, Montreal 2, SO
Florida 3, Buffalo 2, SO
Pittsburgh 5, New Jersey 2
Carolina 5, Minnesota 3
Toronto 3, Ottawa 1


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FOr the record


== lorida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Saturday in the Florida Lottery:
CASH 3 (early)
;-- *9-5-3
CASH 3 (late)
.: 7 7-9-2

PLAY 4 (early)

PLAY 4 (late)
6-1-3-3

Because of early deadlines, Fantasy 5,
Powerball and Lottery numbers were
unavailable. Please see Monday's
Entertainment page.



On the AIRWAVES


TODAY'S SPORTS
SUNDAY
AUTO RACING
12:30 p.m. (FOX) Sprint Cup: Food City 500
BASEBALL
1 p.m. (FSNFL) Vanderbilt at Florida
1 p.m. (SUN) Boston Red Sox at Tampa Bay Rays
BASKETBALL
COLLEGE MEN
NIT, SECOND ROUND
11 a.m. (ESPN) Northern Iowa at Drexel
NCAA TOURNAMENT
12 p.m. (CBS) North Carolina State vs. Georgetown
2:30 p.m. (CBS) St. Louis vs. Michigan State
5 p.m. (CBS) North Carolina vs. Creighton
6 p.m. (TNT) Florida vs. Norfolk State
7 p.m. (TBS) South Florida vs. Ohio
7:30 p.m. (TRUTV) Lehigh vs. Xavier
8:30 p.m. (TNT) Kansas vs. Purdue
9:30 p.m. (TBS) Florida State vs. Cincinnati
COLLEGE WOMEN
NCAA TOURNAMENT, FIRST ROUND
12 p.m. (ESPN2) Whip-around coverage includes: Florida
vs. Ohio State or Fresno State vs. Georgetown or Iowa vs.
California or Marist vs. Georgia
2:30 p.m. (ESPN2) Whip-around coverage includes: Florida
Gulf Coast vs. St. Bonaventure or Liberty vs. Notre Dame or
Sacred Heart vs. Georgia Tech or UC Santa Barbara vs. Baylor
5 p.m. (ESPN2) Whip-around coverage includes: Arkansas-
Little Rock vs. Delaware or Creighton vs. St. John's or Middle
Tennessee State vs. Vanderbilt or Texas-El Paso vs. Penn State
7:30 p.m. (ESPN2) Whip-around coverage includes:
Kansas vs. Nebraska or Michigan vs. Oklahoma or Samford
vs. Duke or San Diego State vs. LSU
NBA
7 p.m. (ESPN, FSNFL, SUN) Orlando Magic at Miami Heat
9:30 p.m. (ESPN) Portland Trail Blazers at Oklahoma City
Thunder
BILLIARDS
1:30 p.m. (ESPN) WPBA Masters (Taped)
GOLF
9 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour: Open de Andalucia
1:30 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: Transitions Championship
3 p.m. (NBC) PGATour: Transitions Championship
4 p.m. (GOLF) LPGA Tour: RR Donnelley Founders Cup
7:30 p.m. (GOLF) Champions Tour: Toshiba Classic
(Same-day Tape)
HOCKEY
12:30 p.m. (NBC) Pittsburgh Penguins at Philadelphia Flyers
7 p.m. (NBCSPT) Washington Capitals at Chicago Blackhawks
SOCCER
4 p.m. (NBCSPT) Colorado Rapids at Philadelphia Union
TENNIS
2 p.m. (ABC) ATP BNP Paribas Open: Men's and Women's
Finals

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


Colorado 3, N.Y. Rangers 1
St. Louis 3, Tampa Bay 1
Columbus at Vancouver, late
Nashville at Los Angeles, late
Detroit at San Jose, late
Sunday's Games
Pittsburgh at Philadelphia, 12:30 p.m.
Washington at Chicago, 7 p.m.
Columbus at Calgary 8 p.m.
Phoenix at Edmonton, 8 p.m.
Nashville at Anaheim, 8 p.m.
Carolina at Winnipeg, 8:30 p.m.
Monday's Games
Toronto at Boston, 7 p.m.
New Jersey at N.Y. Rangers, 7:30 p.m.
Buffalo at Tampa Bay 7:30 p.m.
Washington at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Vancouver at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Anaheim at San Jose, 10 p.m.



Spring Training Glance
AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L Pct
Detroit 11 1 .917
Oakland 12 4 .750
Toronto 12 4 .750
Boston 8 4 .667
Seattle 11 6 .647
Los Angeles 9 6 .600
Kansas City 8 6 .571
Minnesota 9 8 .529
New York 8 8 .500
Baltimore 5 7 .417
Cleveland 4 9 .308
Tampa Bay 4 9 .308
Chicago 4 10 .286
Texas 4 10 .286
NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L Pct
San Francisco 11 4 .733
Los Angeles 8 4 .667
Miami 7 5 .583
Colorado 8 7 .533
Houston 7 7 .500
St. Louis 6 6 .500
Philadelphia 7 8 .467
San Diego 7 8 .467
Cincinnati 7 9 .438
Pittsburgh 6 8 .429
Washington 5 7 .417
Arizona 6 9 .400
Milwaukee 6 9 .400
Chicago 6 10 .375
Atlanta 5 11 .313
New York 3 10 .231
NOTE: Split-squad games count in the stand-
ings; games against non-major league teams
do not.
Saturday's Games
Minnesota 5, Miami (ss) 2
Atlanta (ss) 5, Toronto (ss) 3
Baltimore (ss) 3, Boston (ss) 3, tie, 10 innings
N.Y. Yankees 6, Houston 3
Detroit 10, St. Louis 3
Tampa Bay 2, Pittsburgh 1


Philadelphia 4, Toronto (ss) 3, 10 innings
Washington 1, Miami (ss) 1, tie
Atlanta (ss) 3, N.Y. Mets 2
Boston (ss) 7, Baltimore (ss) 4
Chicago White Sox 5, Seattle 0
L.A. Angels 8, Milwaukee 1
Oakland (ss) 4, Chicago Cubs (ss) 3
Cincinnati 9, Cleveland 2
Arizona 8, Texas (ss) 6
San Francisco (ss) 7, Oakland (ss) 2
Texas (ss) 12, Chicago Cubs (ss) 7
Colorado 8, L.A. Dodgers (ss) 6
San Francisco (ss) vs. L.A. Dodgers (ss), late
Kansas City vs. San Diego, late
Sunday's Games
Philadelphia vs. Toronto at Dunedin, Fla.,
1:05 p.m.
N.Y Mets vs. Houston at Kissimmee, Fla.,
1:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh vs. Minnesota at Fort Myers, Fla.,
1:05 p.m.
Detroit vs. Washington at Viera, Fla., 1:05
p.m.
Miami vs. St. Louis at Jupiter, Fla., 1:05 p.m.
Baltimore (ss) vs. Atlanta at Kissimmee, Fla.,
1:05 p.m.
Boston vs.Tampa Bay at Port Charlotte, Fla.,
1:05 p.m.
Texas (ss) vs. Milwaukee at Phoenix, 4:05
p.m.
Colorado (ss) vs. San Diego (ss) at Peoria,
Ariz., 4:05 p.m.
Texas (ss) vs. Chicago Cubs (ss) at Las
Vegas, Nev., 4:05 p.m.
Colorado (ss) vs. Seattle at Peoria, Ariz., 4:05
p.m.
Chicago White Sox vs. Chicago Cubs (ss) at
Mesa, Ariz., 4:05 p.m.
Arizona (ss) vs. Cincinnati at Goodyear, Ariz.,
4:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels vs. L.A. Dodgers at Glendale,
Ariz., 4:05 p.m.
San Diego (ss) vs. San Francisco at Scotts-
dale, Ariz., 4:05 p.m.
Cleveland vs. Kansas City at Surprise, Ariz.,
4:05 p.m.
Oakland vs. Arizona (ss) at Scottsdale, Ariz.,
4:10 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees vs. Baltimore (ss) at Sarasota,
Fla., 7:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
Detroit vs. Philadelphia at Clearwater, Fla.,
1:05 p.m.
Houston vs. Miami at Jupiter, Fla., 1:05 p.m.
St. Louis vs. Atlanta at Kissimmee, Fla., 1:05
p.m.
Minnesota vs. Boston at Fort Myers, Fla.,
1:35 p.m.
Milwaukee vs. Texas at Surprise, Ariz., 4:05
p.m.
Chicago Cubs vs. Seattle at Peoria, Ariz.,
4:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers vs. Cleveland at Goodyear,
Ariz., 4:05 p.m.
Arizona vs. Oakland at Phoenix, 4:05 p.m.
Cincinnati vs. Chicago White Sox at Glen-
dale, Ariz., 4:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels vs. Colorado at Scottsdale, Ariz.,
4:10 p.m.


Goosen, Furyk tied for



PGA Transitions lead


Associated Press

PALM HARBOR Retief
Goosen felt so much pain in
his lower back that he de-
cided to pull out of next
week's tournament and get
treatment. One day later, he
found himself atop the
leaderboard in the Transi-
tions Championship.
Goosen ran off three
straight birdies late in his
round Saturday for a 6-
under 65, giving him a share
of the lead with Jim Furyk
with more than just another
PGA Tour victory at stake.
Sunday is Goosen's last
chance to qualify for the
Masters.
Furyk, coming off his
worst season since he was a
rookie, hit a 6-iron to 3 feet
for birdie on the par-3 15th
hole and had the lead to
himself until a three-putt
bogey up a steep slope on
the 18th. He had a 66.
The two past champions
at Innisbrook were at 11-
under 202, with plenty of
others behind them.
Goosen started the third
round five shots behind
Jason Dufner, who had a 70.
Going into the final round,
there were 26 players
within five shots of the lead
on a Copperhead course
that allows birdies early,
and demands close to per-
fection down the stretch.
Sang-moon Bae found
that out the hard way
Bae, a rookie from South
Korea, had the lead to him-
self for most of the back
nine until Furyk caught him
at the 15th. On the next hole,
Bae drove into the trees to
avoid the water running
down the right side of the
fairway, pitched out, then
flew the green and three-
putted for a triple bogey He
birdied the 17th and sal-


Transitions Champ.
Saturday
At Innisbrook Resort (Copperhead
Course), Palm Harbor
Purse: $5.5 million
Yardage: 7,340, Par: 71
Third Round


Retief Goosen
Jim Furyk
Sang-Moon Bae
Jason Dufner
John Mallinger
Ken Duke
Chez Reavie
Ernie Els
Luke Donald
Shaun Micheel
David Toms
Will Claxton
Kevin Streelman
Jamie Lovemark
Jeff Overton
Webb Simpson
Chris DiMarco
Sergio Garcia
John Senden
Padraig Harrington
Charley Hoffman


69-68-65-
66-70-66
69-66-68
66-66-71
72-66-66.
68-67-69
68-70-67
70-67-68.
67-68-70.
71-69-66
67-72-67
64-74-68.
68-69-69.
70-67-69.
68-69-69.
68-69-69.
70-67-69.
68-68-70.
66-70-70.
61-73-72
69-71-67


ST. PAT'S
Continued from Page BI

can't guarantee success. Too
many others including
Warner, a seven-time tour-
ney titlist are poised
within striking distance of
the lead.
"I'm surprised the scores
aren't lower," Hendrick
said. "This is not a safe lead,
not at all."
Hendrick has played in
the tournament since 1988,
and he said the weather is
better this year than ever
before. That factor alone
had many convinced much
lower scores would be
registered.



SHAMROCK
Continued from Page B1


One of Citrus County's
newest and most enthusias-
tic runners, Laura Wingate,
was 68th with a time of
24:29.5. The Crystal River
High School teacher is plan-
ning on running a marathon
in June in her hometown of
Luddington, Mich.
"It was competitive and
fast," said Wingate of the
Scamper. "It was great. The
last turn at the end is a good
one. I have been enjoying
the tris but I like the 5Ks. I
will run my first marathon
in Michigan. I'm excited. I
am doing the Ozello Adven-
ture Race."
Paul Dorey, 72, of
Hernando, just keeps on
motoring.
Dorey started running
when his doctor recom-
mended that Dorey run to
strengthen his heart. Dorey


Associated Press
Retief Goosen follows his shot from the seventh fairway
during the third round of the Transitions golf tournament
Saturday in Palm Harbor.


vaged a 68. He was one shot
behind, along with Dufner
LPGA Founders Cup
PHOENIX -Ai Miyazato
birdied three straight holes on
the back nine and finished with
a 6-under 66 for a share of the
lead with Yani Tseng in the
LPGA Founders Cup.
Miyazato, the ninth-ranked
Japanese player who has seven
LPGA Tour victories, birdied
Nos. 14-16 and closed with two
pars for a bogey-free round in
partly cloudy, breezy conditions
at Wildfire Golf Club. The
weather is expected to a big fac-
tor Sunday, with the temperature
plunging into the 50s and rain
and strong wind forecast.
Tseng had a chance to take
the outright lead on the par-4
18th after hitting to 10 feet out
of the right fairway bunker, but
her birdie putt rolled just past
the left edge. The top-ranked
Taiwanese star settled for a 67
to match Miyazato at 14 under.
Tseng successfully defended


Robert Garrigus
Gary Woodland
Bo Van Pelt
Cameron Tringale
Jason Bohn
George McNeill
William McGirt
Brandt Snedeker
Jason Day
Arjun Atwal
Greg Chalmers
Bud Cauley
Kevin Na
Kyle Reifers
Jerry Kelly
Kenny Perry
Chris Couch
Louis Oosthuizen
Bill Lunde
Greg Owen
Matt Kuchar
Brian Davis
Michael Thompson
Robert Allenby
Geoff Ogilvy
Troy Matteson
Jimmy Walker
Scott Piercy


67-72-68
68-71-68-
70-68-69-
66-71-70-
66-71-70-
67-68-72
66-68-73-
69-72-67-
69-72-67-
71-70-67-
70-70-68
68-71-69-
71-68-69-
70-68-70
69-68-71 -
66-70-72
67-68-73-
73-68-68-
68-73-68
70-70-69-
73-67-69
69-71-69-
68-70-71 -
69-72-69-
72-68-70
70-69-71 -
70-69-71 -
69-68-73


However, Friday's fron-
trunners Chris Bernhard
(championship flight) and
Andy Padova (first flight) -
could not keep the momen-
tum going. Bernhard shot a
second-round 77 for a 150
two-day total, leaving him
four strokes off the pace.
Padova had an 80 to go with
his 73 for a 153 total.
Allen shot a 73 Saturday
for a 148 total that left him
in the running, while
Warner carded identical
rounds of 74 to put him in
the same position. Knox
matched Allen's scores to
stay in the hunt, and Ken
Godwin pooled 75-74 scores
for a 149, just three shots
back. Allen is playing first
flight together with Hen-


had suffered from heart at-
tacks in the past but is
healthy and strong today as
well as an inspiration to all.
"Right now, I'm tired but
pretty good," Dorey said. "I
have been running these
races for 14 years. My heart
is stronger. It's a little
warmer than I like. I had a
time around 34 (minutes).
The legs are okay but the
wind doesn't hold up. I
enjoy the fun of running."
There were about 350
signed up for the race, many
of them youngsters and the
race director enjoyed the
race.
"It's nice having the
Shamrock Scamper on St.
Patty's Day," said race di-
rector Chris Moling. "It all
comes together. Everybody
is showing the spirit.
Everybody seems to have
fun. We got a great turnout
today. The weather was
beautiful. You couldn't ask
for a better day."


her LPGA Thailand title in Feb-
ruary for her 13th LPGA Tour
victory. She led the tour last
season with seven victories -
including major victories in the
LPGA Championship and
Women's British Open and
finished the year with 12 world-
wide titles.
Toshiba Classic
NEWPORT BEACH, Calif. -
Mark Calcavecchia shot his
second straight 4-under 67 in
rainy conditions to take a two-
stroke lead in the Champions
Tour's Toshiba Classic.
Calcavecchia, the 13-time
PGA Tour winner who won the
Boeing Classic last year for his
lone victory on the 50-and-over
tour, had six birdies and two bo-
geys on the Newport Beach
Country Club course.
Fred Couples, the 2010 win-
ner, was a stroke back along
with Loren Roberts. Couples
shot a 69 in the round delayed
about two hours because of the
rain. Roberts had a 70.


Kris Blanks
Nick Watney
MarkWilson
Pat Perez
John Daly
Joe Ogilvie
Zach Johnson
Justin Leonard
Bryce Molder
Tom Gillis
Marc Leishman
Sunghoon Kang
Rory Sabbatini
Brian Gay
Justin Rose
Vijay Singh
Stewart Cink
James Driscoll
Andres Romero
Kevin Chappell
Charlie Wi
J.J. Henry
D.A. Points
K.J. Choi
Michael Bradley
Peter Hanson
Jesper Parnevik
Jonathan Byrd


73-68-70
69-72-70
71-70-70
71-70-70
69-72-70
67-73-71
71-68-72
69-70-72
67-71-73
72-69-71
71-70-71
68-73-71
68-72-72
70-70-72
67-70-75
71-70-72
67-74-72
70-70-73
70-68-75
69-69-75
70-71-73
70-71-73
69-72-73
71-70-73
71-70-74
70-70-75
69-72-75
72-69-76


drick; the rest are champi-
onship flight golfers.
Leaders in the second
flight are Alan Chatman
with a 75-80-155; Bobby
Shoemaker with an 80-77-
157; and Jason Ross (81-77)
and Mike Ross (79-79) at 158.
Atop third flight is Dexter
Elsemore at 76-83-159, fol-
lowed by John Martin (81-
82-163) and Mike Kemp
(81-83-164), with Dan Wilson
claiming the top spot in
fourth flight with an 83-83-
166. Hoyt Hamilton (75-95)
and Tom Grimsley (81-89)
are tied for second at 170.
Today's shotgun start for
the final round remains the
same: 8:30 a.m. in the morn-
ing, 1:30 p.m. in the
afternoon.


Top Finishers at
14th Annual 5K
Shamrock Scamper
Men's overall winner Joel
Rich, Gainesville, 17:19.9.
Men's masters overall win-
ner Erik Smith, Beverly Hills,
19:26.6.
Women's overall winner -
Cindy Carver, Lake Panasoffke,
19:26.9
Women's masters overall
winner- Connie James, Lake
Panasoffke, 23:54.4
Top Ten Finishers
1. Joel Rich, Gainesville
17:19.9; 2. Jesse Laurenti,
Weeki Wachee 17:45; 3.
Cameron Grant, Inverness
18:37; 4. Corbin Clarke, Inver-
ness 19:02.9; 5. Thomas C.
Buday, Inverness 19:20.3; 6.
David Denick, Beverly Hills
19:25; 7. Martin C. Lyth, Inver-
ness 19:26.2; 8. Erik Smith,
Beverly Hills 19:26.6; 9. Cindy
Carver, Lake Panasoffkee
19:26.9; 10. Alyssa Weber,
Inverness 19:38.6.


SCOREBOARD





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Shields sharp in Rays' win


Tampa Bay clips

Pirates by 2-1 score

Associated Press

BRADENTON -James Shields
struck out seven in six innings and
allowed his first earned run of
spring training as the Tampa Bay
Rays beat the Pittsburgh Pirates
2-1 Saturday
Tampa Bay's scheduled open-
ing-day starter, Shields allowed
four hits and walked none, throw-
ing 46 of 67 pitches for strikes.
Luke Scott, coming off offseason
shoulder surgery, homered in the
fifth off Jeff Karstens. Carlos Pena
tripled off Joel Hanrahan in the
sixth, Pena's first hit of spring train-
ing and Hanrahan's first hit al-
lowed. Pena scored on a wild pitch.
Braves (ss) 5, Blue Jays (ss) 3
KISSIMMEE Brandon Beachy al-
lowed two hits while striking out six
over four innings and Dan Uggla
homered as the Atlanta Braves beat
the Toronto Blue Jays 5-3 in a split-
squad game.
Uggla, who didn't play Friday,
homered in his third straight game. He
connected with a man on in the sixth
inning off Blue Jays prospect Deck
McGuire.
Chipper Jones and Michael Bourn
each had two hits for the Braves. Tyler
Pastornicky drove in a pair of runs.
Braves (ss) 3, Mets 2
PORT ST. LUCIE David Ross hit
a go-ahead, two-run double in a three-
run eighth inning that led an Atlanta
Braves' split-squad over the New York
Mets 3-2.
Mets starter Jonathon Niese al-
lowed six hits all singles in 5 1-3
scoreless innings with three strikeouts
and no walks.
Atlanta starter Kris Medlin gave up
one hit in four shutout innings, struck
out four and walked one.
Marlins (ss) 1, Nationals 1
VIERA- Jordan Zimmermann
threw four scoreless innings in his
third start of spring training and the
Washington Nationals tied a Miami
Marlins split squad 1-1.
Zimmermann, who gave up four runs
on seven hits in his previous outing,
struck out three and gave up six hits.
Chad Tracy grounded out with the
bases loaded in the first inning for
Washington's run.
Twins 5, Marlins (ss) 2
JUPITER Hanley Ramirez hit his


Associated Press
Atlanta Braves pitcher Kris Medlen throws against the New York Mets in the second inning Saturday in Port
St. Lucie. Atlanta won 3-2.


second home run and Ricky Nolasco
pitched five solid innings Saturday but
a Miami Marlins split squad lost to the
Minnesota Twins 5-2.
The Marlins trailed 1-0 when
Ramirez connected off Carl Pavano
for a long two-run home run to left-
center with two outs in the fifth.
Ramirez, who also drew two walks,
is hitting .474 this spring after slump-
ing to .243 last season.
Yankees 6, Astros 3
TAMPA- Yankees closer Mariano
Rivera threw his third consecutive
scoreless inning in New York's 6-3 win
over the Houston Astros.
New York's Hiroki Kuroda allowed
one run and three hits in four innings,
throwing 49 of 59 pitches for strikes.
Robinson Cano hit a three-run
homer off Bud Norris for a 5-0 lead in
the second.
Tigers 10, Cardinals 3
LAKELAND Ryan Raburn hit his
fifth home run this spring and Delmon
Young homered and doubled, leading
the Detroit Tigers over the St. Louis
Cardinals 10-3.
Prince Fielder went 3 for 3 with a
standup triple and Young raised his
exhibition batting average to .519.
Matt Holliday homered for the
Cardinals.
Red Sox (ss) 7, Orioles (ss) 4
FORT MYERS Josh Beckett gave


up one run in five solid innings and the
Boston Red Sox beat the Baltimore
Orioles 7-4 in a split-squad game.
Beckett started a double play, struck
out two and walked one. He allowed
two hits.
Orioles starter Armando Galarraga
gave up four runs and six hits in four
inning.
Red Sox (ss) 3,
Orioles (ss) 3, 10 innings
SARASOTA- Wei-Yin Chen be-
came the first Baltimore pitcher to
throw five innings this spring and the
Orioles tied Boston 3-all in 10 innings
in a game of split squads.
Chen also displayed a nifty pickoff
move that nabbed two runners.
Making his third spring start, Chen
blanked Boston until the fifth when
Ryan Lavarnway and Pedro Ciriaco
singled and Nate Spears hit a three-
run homer.
Phillies 4, Blue Jays (ss) 3,
10 innings
CLEARWATER Hector Luna's
RBI single in the 10th inning lifted the
Philadelphia Phillies over a Toronto
Blue Jays split squad 4-3.
Brian Bocock hit a go-ahead solo
homer in the top of the ninth, but
Freddy Galvis answered with a solo
shot in the bottom half.
Third baseman Placido Polanco left
the game after injuring his left ring fin-


ger diving back into first base on a
pickoff attempt.
White Sox 5, Mariners 0
GLENDALE, Ariz. Jake Peavy
threw five hitless innings in his
best outing of the spring and the
Chicago White Sox beat the Seattle
Mariners 5-0.
Peavy struck out five and walked
one. The right-hander had allowed
nine runs in 4 1-3 innings in his previ-
ous two starts.
Eduardo Escobar, a candidate for a
reserve role, hit a three-run homer off
Hong-Chih Kuo to give the White Sox
a 4-0 lead in the fifth inning.
Giants (ss) 7, A's (ss) 2
SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. Tim Lince-
cum pitched six effective innings,
Pablo Sandoval homered and the San
Francisco Giants beat the Oakland
Athletics 7-2 in a split-squad game.
Ryan Theriot and Angel Pagan also
connected for San Francisco.
Lincecum allowed five extra-base
hits and six overall, but limited the A's
to just one run.
D'backs 8, Rangers (ss) 6
SURPRISE, Ariz. Jason Kubel
homered twice, tripled and drove in
three runs as the Arizona Diamond-
backs beat a Texas Rangers' split
squad 8-6.
Kubel had a solo drive in the fourth


off Scott Feldman that hit a promo-
tional tent far behind the right-field
fence, then hit a two-run drive in the
fifth against Koji Uehara.
Diamondbacks starter Joe Saun-
ders, who lasted only 10 pitches in his
previous outing after taking a line
drive off his left shin, gave up three
runs and eight hits in three innings.
A's (ss) 4, Cubs (ss) 3
PHOENIX Seth Smith had a
two-run double among his three hits,
and the Oakland Athletics scored
three unearned runs off Paul Maholm
in the first inning and beat the
Chicago Cubs 4-3 in a game
between split squads.
Cubs catcher Geovany Soto, play-
ing in just his fifth game of the spring,
homered on the first pitch of the fourth
inning, and former Oakland outfielder
David DeJesus tripled and scored in
the first.
Reds 9, Indians 2
GOODYEAR, Ariz. Ubaldo
Jimenez gave up six runs in less than
four innings, including a long leadoff
homer by Brandon Phillips, and the
Cincinnati Reds beat the Cleveland
Indians 9-2.
Phillips drove the fifth pitch of the
game out of the ballpark and into the
Arizona desert. The shot far beyond
the left-field fence was tracked down
by a youngster in a stretch of sand
near a roadway.
Angels 8, Brewers 1
TEMPE, Ariz. -Angels ace Jered
Weaver rebounded from a rough start
with four strong innings and the Los
Angeles Angels' beat the Milwaukee
Brewers 8-1.
Weaver allowed two hits and a run.
In his previous outing he was tagged
by the Dodgers for three runs in 1 1-3
innings.
Rangers (ss) 12, Cubs (ss) 7
LAS VEGAS Derek Holland al-
lowed one hit in four scoreless in-
nings, and the Texas Rangers beat
the Chicago Cubs 12-7 in a split-
squad game at Cashman Field.
Holland struck out two and walked
none, and Mike Adams struck out the
side in the fifth.
Rockies 8, Dodgers (ss) 6
SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. Tim
Wheeler had a game-ending two-run
homer after the Dodgers scored four
in the top of the ninth to tie it, leading
the Colorado Rockies to an 8-6 win
over a Los Angeles split squad.
Tyler Colvin Colvin hit a two-run
shot in the eighth and Andrew Brown
homered and had an RBI double for
the Rockies.


Sadler snags second victory


Win is driver's

second in three

weeks racing

Associated Press

BRISTOL, Tenn. El-
liott Sadler went 14 years
without a victory in the Na-
tionwide Series. Now, he
has two in the last three
weeks.
Sadler picked up his sec-
ond victory of the season
Saturday when his crew
chief left him out on the
track on old tires during the
final caution at Bristol
Motor Speedway
The call put Sadler in the
lead on the final restart, with
28 laps remaining, and he
easily held off Kasey Kahne
and Brad Keselowski.
Prior to his win two
weeks ago at Phoenix,


Associated Press
Elliott Sadler races during the NASCAR Nationwide Series
300 auto race Saturday in Bristol, Tenn.


Sadler had not won in the
Nationwide Series since
Oct. 31, 1998, at Rocking-
ham. That also was the last
season he won multiple
races in the Nationwide Se-
ries, and the year he scored
his only other win at Bristol
in the second-tier series.
"To win two of the first
four races is awesome, and


we've got to keep adding to
them. There's blood in the
water," said Sadler, the Na-
tionwide Series points
leader
"After what I've been
through the last couple of
years in racing, this damn
sure feels good."
Sadler raced to his first
career Sprint Cup victory at


Kurt Busch in unfamiliar

tan
IRacerhoping tote
in
snap streak of W
bad re
bad luck 01r
Squ
Associated Press pr
in
BRISTOL, Tenn. If Kurt m
Busch had any doubt he's stuck ch
in a run of bad luck, it was prob- le
ably confirmed when he hit a la
bird in one of the final practices wi
for the Daytona 500.
Alas, there was more to come t
for Busch, who suffered through
a horrendous SpeedWeeks at
Daytona. tha
He was wrecked in practice
for the exhibition opening race, w
Kurt Busch waits on pit road Lz
during practice for NASCAR di
Food City 500 auto race el
Saturday in Bristol, Tenn. w
Associated Press O0


Bristol in 2001, when he
stayed out on old tires and
pulled off an improbable
victory
Crew chief Luke Lambert
was a senior in high school
watching that 2001 race
from the grandstands, and
decided Saturday to bor-
row that strategy.
Kyle Busch brought out
the final caution of the race
with 38 laps to go, and most
everyone headed to the
pits. Lambert left Sadler on
the track, even as Sadler
protested the decision.
"That was a great call by
Luke. He reminded me I
won a race here in 2001 by
doing the same thing, stay-
ing out," Sadler said. "I
wanted this one worse than
anything because I love this
race track so much."
Kahne finished second
and was followed by Ke-
selowski, who praised
Sadler's Richard Childress
Racing car



territory

i his new Phoenix Racing
m had to thrash to put a seat
his backup car. The backup
s then wrecked with two laps
gaining in the race.
Ie was flagged for speeding
pit road in the Daytona 500
alifying race, hit the bird in
ictice the day before the race
a collision that caused so
ich damage his team had to
range the engine, and was
ding when he was part of the
t-lap wreck in the Nation-
le Series race.
'hen, after sitting through
36-hour rain delay for the
in event, he was caught in an
cident on the second lap of
Daytona 500.
'he next race at Phoenix
sn't so bad, but last week in
s Vegas, his hometown, was a
aster: Busch had four differ-
t issues and his race ended
th a hard crash after he ran
er debris on the track.


Sprint Cup
Food City 500 Lineup
After Friday qualifying; race Sunday
At Bristol Motor Speedway
Bristol, Tenn.
Lap length: .533 miles
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 125.215.
2. (22) AJ Allmendinger, Dodge, 125.207.
3. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 125.158.
4. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 125.085.
5. (2) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 124.865.
6. (78) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 124.816.
7. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 124.719.
8. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 124.686.
9. (20) Joey Logano, Toyota, 124.662.
10. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 124.355.
11. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 124.339.
12. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 124.331.
13. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 124.178.
14. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 124.106.
15. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 124.106.
16. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 124.002.
17. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 123.953.
18. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr, Chevrolet, 123.865.
19. (10) David Reutimann, Chevrolet, 123.865.
20. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 123.833.
21. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 123.666.
22. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 123.539.
23. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 123.467.
24. (13) Casey Mears, Ford, 123.419.
25. (55) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 123.419.
26. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 123.269.
27. (51) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 123.182.
28. (30) David Stremme, Toyota, 123.087.
29. (83) Landon Cassill, Toyota, 123.047.
30. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet,
122.992.
31. (34) David Ragan, Ford, 122.968.
32. (33) Brendan Gaughan, Chevrolet, 122.866.
33. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 122.78.
34. (93) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, 122.701.
35. (36) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, 122.638.
36. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 122.623.
37. (26) Josh Wise, Ford, 122.38.
38. (74) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, 122.287.
39. (98) Michael McDowell, Ford, 121.968.
40. (49) J.J. Yeley, Toyota, 121.829.
41. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 121.713.
42. (32) Ken Schrader, Ford, Owner Points.
43. (23) Scott Riggs, Chevrolet, 121.374.
Failed to Qualify
44. (37) Timmy Hill, Ford, 120.278.
Nationwide
Ford 300 Results
Saturday
At Bristol Motor Speedway
Bristol, Tenn.
Lap length: .533 miles
(Start position in parentheses)
1. (4) Elliott Sadler, Chevrolet, 300 laps, 128.4
rating, 47 points, $54,518.
2. (12) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 300, 102.4, 0,
$32,275.
3. (7) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 300, 115.8, 0,
$26,225.
4. (1) Joey Logano, Toyota, 300, 128.5, 0,
$32,700.
5. (16) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 300,
102.8, 0, $25,375.
6. (3) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 300, 118.3, 39,
$29,268.
7. (10) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 300, 101, 37,
$26,603.
8. (2) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 300, 120.7, 37,
$26,463.
9. (6) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 300, 107.5, 0,
$19,800.
10. (15) Ryan Truex, Toyota, 300, 90.1, 34,
$26,993.
11. (21) Michael Annett, Ford, 300, 82.6, 33,


$25,918.
12. (9) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 300, 90.2, 32,
$20,150.
13. (23) Sam Hornish Jr, Dodge, 300, 80.8, 31,
$25,518.
14. (11) James Buescher, Chevrolet, 299, 82.8,
0, $25,468.
15. (13) Mike Bliss, Toyota, 299, 77.4, 29,
$19,900.
16. (14) Cole Whitt, Chevrolet, 299, 78.4, 28,
$25,343.
17. (8) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 299, 98.1, 0,
$19,025.
18. (18) Tayler Malsam, Toyota, 298, 69.5, 26,
$25,243.
19. (27) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 298, 67.6,
25, $25,168.
20. (25) Jeremy Clements, Chevrolet, 297, 67.6,
24, $25,793.
21. (29) Erik Darnell, Chevrolet, 297, 63.2, 23,
$18,575.
22. (36) Jamie Dick, Chevrolet, 296, 57.1, 22,
$24,993.
23. (37) Mike Wallace, Chevrolet, 296, 55.9, 21,
$24,943.
24. (31) Benny Gordon, Chevrolet, 294, 57.5,
20, $21,025.
25. (34) Jason Bowles, Dodge, 293, 53.7, 19,
$25,318.
26. (32) Jeffrey Earnhardt, Ford, 293, 52.1, 18,
$18,300.
27. (40) Eric McClure, Toyota, 292, 41.4, 17,
$24,718.
28. (20) Kyle Fowler, Ford, 292, 48.6, 16,
$18,175.
29. (24) Johanna Long, Chevrolet, 291, 42.7,
15, $24,593.
30. (30) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 291, 53.8, 14,
$24,343.
31. (42) Kevin Lepage, Chevrolet, 291, 35.4,13,
$23,838.
32. (41) Brad Teague, Chevrolet, 284, 33.5, 12,
$23,703.
33. (17) Kenny Wallace, Toyota, engine, 201, 73,
11, $23,593.
34. (33)T.J. Bell, Chevrolet, accident, 186, 42.3,
10, $23,558.
35. (5) Brian Scott, Toyota, clutch, 183, 76, 9,
$23,528.
36. (38) Joey Gase, Ford, handling, 123, 39.1,
8, $23,493.
37. (39) Tim Schendel, Chevrolet, suspension,
119, 36.2, 7, $16,990.
38. (19) Blake Koch, Ford, engine, 117, 60.9, 6,
$23,399.
39. (43) J.J. Yeley, Ford, brakes, 15, 38.9, 0,
$16,830.
40. (26) Chase Miller, Chevrolet, brakes, 7, 34,
4, $16,805.
41. (22) Scott Speed, Chevrolet, vibration, 6,
33.1, 0, $16,775.
42. (28) Jeff Green, Toyota, vibration, 3, 30.4,
2, $16,725.
43. (35) Josh Wise, Chevrolet, electrical, 3,
28.8, 0, $16,668.
Race Statistics
Average Speed of Race Winner: 94.740 mph.
Time of Race: 1 hour, 41 minutes, 16 seconds.
Margin of Victory: 1.159 seconds.
Caution Flags: 4 for 30 laps.
Lead Changes: 5 among 5 drivers.
Lap Leaders: J.Logano 1-66; K.Busch 67-106;
J.Logano 107-159; T.Bayne 160-223; R.Sten-
house Jr. 224-264; E.Sadler 265-300.
Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps
Led): J.Logano, 2 times for 119 laps; TBayne, 1
time for 64 laps; R.Stenhouse Jr., 1 time for 41
laps; K.Busch, 1 time for 40 laps; E.Sadler, 1
time for 36 laps.
Top 10 in Points: 1. E.Sadler, 178; 2. R.Sten-
house Jr., 153; 3.TBayne, 149; 4. A.Dillon, 148;
5. C.Whitt, 137; 6. S.Hornish Jr., 129;7.T.Mal-
sam, 116; 8. M.Annett, 115; 9. J.AIIgaier, 113;
10. M.Bliss, 92.


SPORTS


SUNDAY, MARCH 18, 2012 B5












ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE

OWN network
axes 'Rosie Show'
NEW YORK-Oprah
Winfrey's OWN network
is pulling the curtain on
"The
Rosie
Show"
after five
o e months
on the air
The
show
hosted by
Rosie Rosie
O'Donnell O'Donnell
pre-
miered in October to
about 500,000 viewers but
lost about half that audi-
ence within days of its
debut.
Recently, it changed
the format from taping
before a studio audience
to a one-on-one interview
setting with celebrities
such as Kathy Griffin,
Chelsea Handler and for-
mer Illinois first lady
Patti Blagojevich.
In a statement released
by OWN, Winfrey
thanked O'Donnell. She
called O'Donnell "an in-
credible partner" who
worked to put on the best
show "every single day"
The final episode will
air March 30.

Gallagher still
in medical coma
LEWISVILLE, Texas -
Doctors have decided to
wait before bringing the
comedian Gallagher out
of the medically induced
coma he was put in after
his heart attack last week
in Texas.
Doctors had planned to
wake the 65-year-old co-
median Saturday But his
promotional manager,
Christine Scherrer, said
he was trying to wake on
his own. Doctors are
keeping him sedated be-
cause they want to wake
him slowly She said they
may try Sunday
He had a minor heart
attack last March after
collapsing while perform-
ing in Minnesota. His full
name is Leo Anthony Gal-
lagher, and he's best
known for smashing wa-
termelons with a
sledgehammer.

Lil Wayne told
to cut his grass
KENNER, La. Lil
Wayne has been told to
cut his grass.
The Times-Picayune
reported the rapper was
cited for high grass and
weeds at
his
10,000-
square-
foot
mansion
in a gated
subdivi-
sion in
Lil Wayne Kenner,
La., a sub-
urb of New Orleans.
The Code Enforcement
Department issued the
ticket to Dwayne Carter,
the New Orleans-born
singer's given name,
sometime between Feb.
26 and March 2, accord-
ing to a list released by
the city
The home is on sale for
$1.7 million. Listed as a
"celebrity" mansion, the
house has five bedrooms,
five bathrooms, two half
baths and a "beautiful,
spacious open floor
plan."
-From wire reports


Small screen to big


Associated Press
In this image released by Columbia Pictures, Channing Tatum, left, and Jonah Hill are shown in a scene from the
film "21 Jump Street."

Review: '21 Jump Street' update manages some laughs


DAVID GERMAIN
AP Movie Writer


The TV show that made Johnny
Depp a star is little more than a
jumping-off point for the big-screen
"21 Jump Street," a rowdy, raunchy
update that aims for laughs over ac-
tion and delivers them intermittently
Jonah Hill and Channing Tatum
are surprisingly amusing together
in a mismatched pairing of newbie
cops sent undercover as high school
kids to root out a drug ring. A couple
of guest appearances from the TV
show almost make the movie worth
seeing on their own (the identity of
the cameo perps has been widely
reported, but we won't name names
here; even if you've read about
them, the way they pop up will be a
nice surprise).
The R-rated gross-out humor, lan-
guage and violence don't add up to
the "21 Jump Street" you might
fondly remember. But then, other
than Depp's presence, how many
people fondly remember the show,
anyway?
This is not a property requiring
respect and devotion to the source
material to satisfy longtime fans, so
the filmmakers wisely make a "21
Jump Street" all their own. They
dump the idea on its head, poke
not-so-polite fun at the original and
offer a spot-on summation of Holly-
wood's vapid approach to remakes,
couching the commentary in cop


Film REVIEW


jabber about reviving LA's mori-
bund program that places youthful-
looking police moles in high
schools.
Two of the recruits are Hill's Mor-
ton Schmidt and Tatum's Greg
Jenko. A brisk, clever prologue
spells out their back-story, Schmidt
as a high school uber-geek, Jenko as
a dopey stud, with the two becom-
ing unlikely best buddies years
later at the police academy
Sent back to school as undercover
brothers, the two flash back on old
teen anxieties and encounter
plenty of new ones as they struggle
to fit in, while tracing the source of
a dangerous new hallucinogen that
erodes users' inhibitions in in-
sanely comical fashion.
Hill shares story credit with
screenwriter Michael Bacall, but
what little actual story is here
serves only as the setup for an any-
thing-goes approach by the cast and
directors Phil Lord and Christo-
pher Miller (making their live-ac-
tion debut after collaborating on
the animated hit "Cloudy with a
Chance of Meatballs").
Everything about the movie -
the car chases, the shootouts, the
teen kegger, the goofy idiocy of the
characters is pushed to the ex-
treme. Some of the absurd violence
is funny, some is pointlessly mean


and nasty enough to jar viewers out
of the action now and then.
Ice Cube pops in occasionally
with some foul-mouthed fun as
Schmidt and Jenko's perpetually
seething police captain, while Brie
Larson is adorably fetching as the
high-school hottie Schmidt might
actually have a shot with this time
around.
Hill and Tatum's odd-couple act
is the best thing about "21 Jump
Street," both playing the straight
man yet managing to make their
partnership much funnier than the
hit-and-miss jokes and action really
are.
The movie's nimble pacing also
helps, sneaking in some slick, wily
tidbits and powering through the
many gags that would fall flat if you
had another second or two to think
about them.
It doesn't work all of the time, or
even most of the time, but it does
work enough of the time to make
"21 Jump Street" more enjoyable
than most of Hollywood's unimagi-
native remakes and updates.
"21 Jump Street," released by
Sony's Columbia Pictures, is rated
R for crude and sexual content, per-
vasive language, drug material,
teen drinking and some violence.
Running time: 109 minutes. Two
and a half stars out of four.


Book REVIEW


'American Way of Eating' reveals few surprises


DINESH RAMDE
Associated Press


"The American Way of Eat-
ing: Undercover at Walmart,
Applebee's, Farm Fields and
the Dinner Table" (Scribner),
by Tracie McMillan: An au-
thor who writes about going
"undercover" at Wal-Mart or
a migrant farm sets up ex-
pectations that she's about to
reveal a scandal or, at the
least, juicy secrets. But few of
the revelations in Tracie
McMillan's new book are all
that surprising.
McMillan spent nearly a
year working in California
farm fields, as a Wal-Mart
produce handler and as an
Applebee's kitchen worker.
She chronicled her adven-
tures in a book with the in-
tention of explaining why
it's so difficult for people to
get access to cheap, nutri-


Birthday Because people will be luckier for you in the
future then they've ever been in the past, the months
ahead are likely to hold some very unique and pleasant
surprises. Make the most of what is being offered.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) If you get an unusual offer
to do something different, you'll surprisingly be prepared to
make a quick decision. You may not realize that you've
been looking for something unique.
Aries (March 21-April 19) Even if you're inclined to act
on impulse, you'll nevertheless operate at a high level of
accuracy and with a definite purpose in mind, even when
juggling several jobs.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Don't treat your hunches in-
differently. They are likely to stem from knowledge that
you've acquired in the past, and will point you in the right
direction.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) Something might develop


tious food.
All the book ends up doing
is confirming things that peo-
ple might have suspected
about the food industry
The book is titled, "The
American Way of Eating: Un-
dercover at Walmart, Apple-
bee's, Farm Fields and the
Dinner Table." It traces the
months McMillan spent in
2009 picking grapes, stocking
shelves and assembling
restaurant meals.
A 30-something white
woman, McMillan drew
stares when she joined Mex-
ican laborers to harvest Cal-
ifornia grapes, peaches and
garlic. But her fellow work-
ers quickly accepted her, and
fed her even when they had
trouble putting food on their
own tables.
She describes hours of
backbreaking labor in
scorching temperatures,


and she develops a serious
repetitive-stress injury As
awful as the experience
sounds, though, the details
are largely what one might
expect
McMillan has easier ac-
cess to hospitals than her
poverty-stricken co-workers
do, and because she's a U.S.
citizen she can file a disabil-
ity claim or otherwise com-
plain when her bosses play
accounting games with her
paychecks. The other work-
ers can't, but we hear about
their plight only in passing.
Certainly the author has a
right to focus on her own sit-
uation, but it leaves a feeling
of a missed opportunity a
lost chance to teach about a
population of workers other-
wise hidden from the world.
Instead McMillan heads to
Michigan, where she lands a
Wal-Mart job that doesn't


Today's HOROSCOPE
that allows you to show the world what a good friend you
really are. It's likely to be an incident quite out of the ordi-
nary, but right up your alley.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Chances are you will be in-
clined to coast unless you are faced with a disruptive devel-
opment that should be attended to immediately. You'll be
up to doing what you must, if it comes to it.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Either due to a causal comment
that's made in your presence or something that you make
an effort to discover, a profitable concept might flash
through your mind. It behooves you to put it to the test.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -Although you might be sud-
denly subjected to some changes brought about by outside
factors, you'll welcome them. They're apt to be exactly what
you need.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Most of your snap judgments
could turn out to be far better than any you'd have made


sound like much fun. She
stocks shelves and tosses out
moldy fruit, and is given far
more responsibilities than it
seems one person can han-
dle. She does include anec-
dotes about alleged training
violations and a bureaucracy
that lacks compassion, but
there's nothing all that scan-
dalous or unusual.
It's the same story at Ap-
plebee's, where she de-
scribes the food as frozen or
prepackaged and her job as
nearly unmanageable during
dinner rushes. Again, the
story is interesting but not
much of a surprise.
To be sure, McMillan is a
talented writer whose deft
writing and unusual adven-
tures keep the pages turning.
She meets interesting people
and she gamely ventures into
a world many of us see, but
know little about


after an exhaustive study. It's one of those days when your
first thoughts will be the best ones.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Give a little thought in ad-
vance to some timesaving procedures that you could take
in order to have more hours to devote to pleasurable
pursuits.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -Any activity that is a de-
parture from your usual devices should prove to be very re-
freshing and enjoyable, especially if undertaken with
friends. Do something different; you won't regret it.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Because you possess the
requirements for success, you'll have a yen for accomplish-
ing something worthwhile. Be persevering and you'll ac-
complish something impressive.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Put your mind to solving
problems, and chances are you'll find an immediate solu-
tion to something that has long eluded you.


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

FRIDAY, MARCH 16
Mega Money: 2 12 16 18
Mega Ball: 15
4-of-4 MB No winner
4-of-4 6 $3,043.50
3-of-4 MB 56 $713
3-of-4 1,493 $79.50
2-of-4 MB 1,908 $44
1-of-4 MB 15,090 $5.50
2-of-4 41,210 $3
Fantasy 5:1 11 18- 19-27
5-of-5 2 winners $125,441.19
4-of-5 383 $105.50
3-of-5 12,182 $9
THURSDAY, MARCH 15
Fantasy 5: 5 9 24 29 34
5-of-5 3 winners $75,062.26
4-of-5 311 $116.50
3-of-5 9,513 $10.50

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num-
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call 850-487-7777.

Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, March
18, the 78th day of 2012.
There are 288 days left in the
year.
Today's Highlight:
On March 18, 1962,
France and Algerian rebels
signed the Evian Accords, a
cease-fire agreement which
took effect the next day,
ending the Algerian War
after more than seven years
and leading to Algeria's
independence.
On this date:
In 1766, Britain repealed
the Stamp Act of 1765.
In 1922, 12-year-old
rabbi's daughter Judith Ka-
plan became the first Ameri-
can Bat Mitzvah in a
ceremony at the Society for
the Advancement of Judaism
in New York City.
In 1965, the first space-
walk took place as Soviet
cosmonaut Alexei Leonov
went outside his Voskhod 2
capsule, secured by a tether.
In 1990, thieves made off
with 13 works of art from the
Isabella Stewart Gardner Mu-
seum in Boston (the crime re-
mains unsolved).
Ten years ago: Brittanie
Cecil died two days short of
her 14th birthday after being
hit in the head by a puck at a
game between the host
Columbus Blue Jackets and
Calgary Flames; it was ap-
parently the first such fan fa-
tality in NHL history.
Five years ago: Pak-
istan's national cricket team
coach, Bob Woolmer, 58,
was found dead in his hotel
room in Kingston, Jamaica,
during cricket's World Cup
tournament.
Today's Birthdays: Com-
poser John Kander
("Chicago") is 85. Nobel
peace laureate and former
South African president F.W.
de Klerk is 76. Country singer
Charley Pride is 74. Actor
Kevin Dobson is 69. Actor
Brad Dourif is 62. Singer
Irene Cara is 53. Movie
writer-director Luc Besson is
53. Actor Thomas lan Griffith
is 50. Singer-songwriter
James McMurtry is 50.
Singer-actress Vanessa L.
Williams is 49. Olympic gold
medal speedskater Bonnie
Blair is 48. Rapper-actress-
talk show host Queen Latifah
is 42. Republican National
Committee Chairman Reince
Priebus is 40. Actor-come-
dian Dane Cook is 40. Rock
musician Stuart Zender is 38.
Singers Evan and Jaron
Lowenstein are 38. Singer
Devin Lima (LFO) is 35. Rock
singer Adam Levine (Maroon
5) is 33. Actor Adam Pally is
30.


Thought for Today: "No
man has a right in America to
treat any other man toler-
antly, for tolerance is the as-
sumption of superiority." -
Wendell Willkie, American
politician (1892-1944).











COMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


minute by minute


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


Associated Press
The tally board shows the 20-vote tie on the parental triggering bill Friday, March 9, which resulted in its failure during Senate session in Tallahassee.


A look inside Florida Senate regular session's last day March 9 in Tallahassee


To help chronicle my final year in the
Florida Legislature, I kept a journal of
the session's last day, both in my notes
and live on Twitter. We were supposed to start
at 8:30 a.m. and finish at 6 p.m., but we ended
closer to midnight after
passing the budget, 31
conforming bills, seven
local bills, 62 bills on spe-
cial order and six bills on -
third reading. Hope you
enjoy a glimpse inside
the Senate Chamber. ._
8:30: Senators gather
as session is supposed to
start.
9:00: Session gets Paula Dockery
started late, and mem- FLORIDA
bers still have not been VOICES
given copies of the 570
pages of amendments to
the 29 conforming bills they expect us to vote
on today ... this should be interesting. I'm mul-
titasking voting on bills that are up while
reading almost 600 pages of 29 conforming bills
whose language just became available. And I'm
tweeting.
10:00: We learn the Florida Supreme Court
has thrown out the Senate redistrict-
ing maps passed early in the session. The court
found a "number of districts that are clearly
less compact than other districts, with visually
bizarre and unusual shapes." All of the "lead-
ership team" disappears from the Senate floor
11:00: HB 7087 comes over as an orphan
House Bill. An orphan bill has no Senate com-
panion and has not been heard in any Senate
committee. This is very odd. The bill has a $77
million impact the first year and $110 million
the following year. It offers a hodgepodge of tax
breaks. 46 pages. Much like a conforming bill,
but they are handling it like a regular bill. I will
support, but don't like the process or lack
thereof.
11:30: Going through bills quickly... bill after
bill.
Noon: The highly controversial Parent Trig-
ger Bill (SB1718,) which would allow private
corporations to convert low-performing public
schools into private charter schools if a major-
ity of parents signed petitions, is brought up on
third reading. We spent a couple of hours on it
last night on second reading. They've allotted
30 minutes for questions and one hour for de-
bate. My role: to make sure the votes are there,
our people are in their seats and have the info
they need, and be prepared for any procedural


Sen. Paula Dockery, R-Lakeland, right, confers Friday, March 9, with Sen. Dennis Jones, R-Semi-
nole during the final day of the regular Senate session in Tallahassee.


antics. Similar to the night before, just as this
bill comes up, leadership brings food to the
members' lounge to distract hungry opponents.
(No break for lunch.)
12:30: Still on Parent Trigger bill. I ask some
questions, but the answers I receive are totally
unacceptable and inaccurate.
1:30: Parent Trigger Bill drags on. Excellent
debate against the bill by many senators, in-
cluding Nancy Detert, Dennis Jones, Arthenia
Joyner, Evelyn Lynn, Maria Sachs, Nan Rich
and Bill Montford.
2:00: Sen. Benacquisto, the sponsor, begins to
close on the parent trigger bill.
2:11: Board is open, members vote, the cham-
ber is silent as vote is announced. Bill is de-
feated on a 20-20 tie, despite leadership
pressure to support it. Twelve Democrats are
joined by eight Republicans in opposition.
Media and supporters look surprised. Oppo-
nents celebrate a hard-fought victory Hugs are
exchanged.


2:15: Rumors circulate about an effort to
switch a vote and reconsider the parent trigger
bill. Senators are lobbied. Phone calls are
made to Sen. Alan Hays, our sleeper vote. We
are ready. We have another potential sleeper
vote.
3:00: Senate goes into five-minute recess be-
cause the budget chairman does not know
when the Senate is allowed to take up the
budget or the conforming bills. Rules
Chair John Thrasher is at the rostrum and also
is not sure. Staff is scrambling. Momentary con-
fusion.
3:30: Florida Polytech Conforming bill, to
make USF's Lakeland campus an independent
university, comes up (SB 1994). Passes 36-
4. Questions allowed. Sens. Steve Oelrich, Mike
Fasano and I ask several each. No debate al-
lowed. No one looks happy about voting for it,
but it is the Budget Committee chairman's top
priority.
See Page C4


Book looks at intricate negotiations with Iran


'A Single Roll of the Dice:
Obama's Diplomacy with Iran" by
Trita Parsi (Yale University Press,
2012) -$27.50.
MEN
MICHAEL FRANCIS
Special to the Chronicle
wo dark, historical events are
the background to today's
troubled U.S.-Iran relation-
ship. First the CIA overthrew the
popularly elected Iranian govern-
ment in 1953 and put the Shah in
power until he was overthrown 34
years later. Then in the aftermath of
the Shah's exile, the new govern-
ment headed by Ayatollah Khome-
ini held captive a group of U.S.
Embassy employees for 444 days,
and only released them when
Jimmy Carter left power.
This new book is written by Trita


Book REVIEW


Parsi, an Iranian with a Ph.D. in in-
ternational politics. He has written
widely on U.S./Iranian relations
and heads an exile organization
that is critical of the current gov-
ernment in Tehran.
In recent years, Iran has insisted
it needs to develop its nuclear
power capability because oil re-
serves are not inexhaustible. So it
has started a project to enrich ura-
nium. But this stimulated fear on
the part of several countries in the
area (including Israel but also
Saudi Arabia) that Iran wanted ul-
timately to build a nuclear weapon
- an action that would have sub-
stantially changed the balance of
power in the Middle East. This trig-
gered efforts by the United Nation's


International Atomic Energy
Agency to demand the right to visit
the Iranian nuclear facilities. Were
the projects intended to produce
electricity or nuclear weapons?
When the inspectors were denied
access, a round of economic sanc-
tions was levied on Tehran. This
book explains all this, but primarily
focuses on the second round of sanc-
tion negotiations last year and the
talks between the Iranian govern-
ment and the European Union, Rus-
sia and the United States, which
wanted Tehran to allow inspections.
The Iranians have claimed their ac-
tivities were simply to enrich ura-
nium for use in nuclear power
facilities not for bombs.
These negotiations have been ex-


traordinarily complicated, in part
because it was difficult to get a con-
sensus bargaining position among
the European countries, Russia and
Washington. On the other side, Iran
complained about the economic
pain of the sanctions. These nego-
tiations were mind-numbingly com-
plicated. Throw into this difficult
mixture Iranian President Mah-
moud Ahmadinejad, a Holocaust
denier (among other things) who
continually makes charges against
the west that seem slightly de-
ranged to many There are, by the
way, indications in recent weeks
that Ahmadinejad's authority is
being weakened by Ayatollah Ali
Khameini, who has the final say in
political and religious matters in
Iran.

See Page C03


Progress


in


Crystal


River
here is progress
being made in Crys-
tal River.
Inverness has long had
the reputation as the city
that gets things done in
Citrus County. As home to
the county seat, and under
the strong leadership of
City Manager Frank Di-
Giovanni, Inverness has
spent the last 20 years
going through a substan-
tial face-lift.
Two decades ago, half of
Inverness was boarded up
and the county seat ap-
peared to be a city in de-
cline. But DiGiovanni led
a resurgence and we've
seen the Old Courthouse
saved, the downtown revi-
talized and businesses
thriving.
Progress breeds activity
and attracts consumers
and tourists.
Crystal River, the only
other city in Citrus
County, seemed stuck in
the quicksand of indeci-
sion. When the Crystal
River City Council was ac-
cused of not showing any
leadership, council mem-
bers would get together
and fire their city man-
ager, confusing that with
decision-making.
But things appear to be
changing in the quirky city
on the bay
The purchase of Three
Sisters Springs, through a
combined effort of all lev-
els of government and lots
of private donations from
individuals, organizations
and foundations, was a
bellwether of things to
come. People in Crystal
River had finally taken a
position on something
positive and managed not
to talk themselves out of it.
More than $11 million
was pulled together
through different sources
to secure the Three Sis-
ters Springs site as a
recreation, tourism and
preservation landmark.
Just this past week, the
city council, acting as the
Community Redevelop-
ment Agency, added to
that momentum by en-
dorsing the long-planned
Riverwalk project along
King's Bay
The city voted to pur-
chase property on First
Avenue for downtown and
Riverwalk parking and
endorsed a chamber of
commerce-led effort to
push forward with the
Riverwalk.
The Plantation Inn has
been re-energized with
new ownership and lead-
ership and they have ren-
ovated the county's largest
resort into something
folks feel good about. This
week, business and gov-
ernment leaders from
throughout Tampa will
converge on the Planta-
tion Inn as the Tampa Bay
Partnership holds its an-
nual gathering at the Crys-
tal River facility The top
CEOs from this part of
Florida will all be in at-
tendance.
The city has also been
taking an aggressive role in
reinvigorating its parks.
The Third Street Park will
eventually become the an-
chor of the Riverwalk
along King's Bay A band
shell is going to be con-
structed at the park for mu-
sical programs on the bay
See PageC3







Page C2 SUNDAY, MARCH 18, 2012



PINION


"Why does a slight tax increase cost you
two hundred dollars and a substantial
tax cut save you thirty cents?"
Peg Bracken, 1918-2007


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan............. .................. publisher
Charlie Brennan ............... .................. editor
Mike Arnold ............. .................. HR director
Sandra Frederick............................. managing editor
Curt Ebitz................ .............citizen member
Founded Mac Harris ...................................... citizen m em ber
by Albert M.
Williamson Rebecca Martin ..........................guest member
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


TOUGH TIMES





Budget





tweaking





necessary


Faced with a continuing
decline in property val-
ues the base on which
taxes that support most serv-
ices of county government are
assessed Citrus County com-
missioners face tough choices
as they put together next year's
budget.
During a recent THE I
workshop, County
Administrator County cc
Brad Thorpe told consider
commissioners millag
the county has
three choices to OUR 01
balance the next Hold spe
budget: raise the Hold e
tax millage rate, and get r
cut reserves, or revenue
cut services to cit- both va
izens. mill
The millage rate
is the level of taxes charged on
each dollar of taxable property.
The level of taxes the county
collects is determined by ap-
plying the millage rate to the
value of taxable property. Rais-
ing or lowering either of these
affects the level of taxes levied.
According to county budget
director Cathy Taylor, the mill-
age rate has remained constant
since 2008, but continuing de-
clines in property values have
meant that for the last three
years, the county has not col-
lected as much in taxes as it
has spent. With property val-
ues expected to decline again
this year, the projection is for
the trend to continue.
Thorpe told commissioners
the county has been cutting ex-
penses, reducing staffing and
using surpluses accumulated
during the boom years to make
up the shortfall in revenue, but
at this point, the county has
limited options.
Commissioners rejected the
option of reducing reserves be-
cause this would leave the
county with limited ability to
respond to an emergency such
as a hurricane, and could im-
pact the county's credit score
and ability to borrow money at
low rates. We agree with this
decision, because while it is
fiscally conservative to not
raise spending levels, it is also
fiscally conservative to not
spend reserves necessary to
maintain financial stability.
Although commissioners
said they wanted to review
what services would have to be


No means no
This call goes out to
the (person) who decided 0 O
to come up my dirt drive-
way and nearly got stuck
and while he was turning
around, just decided to
tear up my driveway. Was
there some part of the j
"No trespassing Keep
out" sign that you didn't CAL
understand? If you have
a problem, come on up 563-
to the house and I'll ex-
plain it to you.


S


ge

P
n
ne

li
a


I

0


cut if the millage is not in-
creased and this option is
still on the table there was a
consensus that the most viable
path forward is to raise the
millage rate enough to produce
in the next fiscal year the same
amount of revenue produced
by property tax
;SUE: this year
We believe the
emission commission is on
s raising the right path in
e rate. holding the line on
expenses and
INION: looking at a mod-
din flat est increase in the
dingflat village rate.
necessary While some critics
y using may label this an
ues and increase in taxes,
age. the goal of the in-
creased millage is
not to increase the total amount
of taxes collected, but rather to
raise approximately the same
level of revenue by adjusting
one part of the tax level for-
mula (the millage rate) to com-
pensate for a lowering of the
other part (property values).
The impact on individual
taxpayers would depend on
how much their property val-
ues decline, and whether they
are under the Save Our Homes
amendment cap. Homeowners
whose taxable value has been
held below market value by the
amendment would see an in-
crease regardless of whether
the millage rate is increased.
Governing is about making
choices. It is also about ex-
plaining why the choices have
been made. In a tough eco-
nomic climate, if the millage
rate is increased, it should be
part of a clearly articulated
plan for meeting county needs,
and the county needs to ex-
plain to citizens how this in-
crease fits into that plan.
The county made the right
decision to cut the millage rate
when property values soared
and taxes generated more rev-
enue than the county was
spending. For the same reason,
with declining property values,
dwindling reserves and facing
a choice of either cutting serv-
ices or raising the millage rate,
the fiscally responsible deci-
sion is to hold the line on ex-
penses, but also use both sides
of the revenue equation and
make a modest adjustment in
the millage rate.


Health care help
Thanks to the Affordable
JND Care Act, which the Re-
F publicans like to call Oba-
macare, my husband has
finally been able to get in-
surance. Previously, he
had a pre-existing condi-
tion high blood pres-
sure and diabetes. He has
been able to get a knee re-
579 f placement thanks to Pres-
579u ident Obama, who made it
possible for him to be cov-
ered with insurance.


High-flying corporate welfare


S allie James was born in
Australia on July 4, 1976,
which suggests that Provi-
dence planned what happened 30
years later: She moved
to Washington. She -
studies trade policy at
the libertarian Cato In-
stitute and her report
"Time to X Out the Ex- (
Im Bank" illustrates
how corporate welfare /
metastasizes as gov-
ernment tries to rectify
the inevitable in-
equities of its con- Georg
stantly multiplying OTI
favoritisms. And while VOI
picking American win-
ners, the Export-Im-
port Bank creates American
losers.
The bank, whose current reau-
thorization expires May 31, and
which two months before that
might hit the $100 billion cap on
its loan exposure, subsidizes myr-
iad export transactions with
guaranteed loans to make U.S.
exports cheaper Mission creep is
a metabolic urge of government
agencies, but there may be mis-
sion gallop at the bank as it tries
to correct the collateral damage
it does to some U.S. companies,
and as it is pushed to further
politicize credit markets by mir-
roring the market-distorting poli-
cies of foreign governments.
The bank's website says it
helps "to level the playing field
for U.S. exporters by matching
the financing that other govern-
ments provide to their ex-
porters." But a leveler's work is
never done.
There is a reason critics have
called Ex-Im "Boeing's bank."
America's biggest exporter is by
far the biggest beneficiary of the
bank's activities. But when the
bank's interventions in financing
help Boeing sell planes to China,
India and other nations, it en-
hances the ability of those nations'
airlines to compete often using
discounted excess capacity -


H
(


with U.S. international carriers.
The bank is only lightly con-
strained by the law that suppos-
edly leashes it. The bank is
required to consider
'"any serious adverse
effect" on U.S. compa-
nies before supporting
S foreign purchasers in
order to help other
U.S. companies. But
Richard B. Hirst, gen-
eral counsel of Delta
Air Lines, charges that
the bank exempts 99.8
e Will percent of its transac-
IER tions from this require-
DES ment.
Hirst says that from
2005 to 2010, the bank
"financed or guaranteed the fi-
nancing for purchases of 634 Boe-
ing aircraft" and in 2011 it
"authorized over $11.4 billion in
financing for foreign airlines to
purchase Boeing aircraft." Be-
cause airlines are capital inten-
sive, subsidized loans give
foreign carriers a competitive ad-
vantage over U.S. international
carriers.
Hirst says that if Delta had
been eligible for similar subsi-
dies, "it could have saved ap-
proximately $100 million a year
in financing costs," and could
have used that money to hire
more workers "or even purchase
additional aircraft from Boeing."
To which Washington's likely
response will be: Fine, let's ex-
pand the bank's mandate. Speak-
ing last month at a Boeing plant in
Everett, Wash., President Obama
pledged "to give American com-
panies a fair shot by matching the
unfair export financing that their
competitors receive from other
countries." This looks like a
promise to compound market dis-
tortions by further politicizing
credit markets, while enunciating
no limiting principle.
Obama is directing the bank to
offer United Airlines a subsidy to
match any subsidy Canada offers
to persuade United to choose the


Montreal-made Bombardier as
United chooses between it, Boe-
ing and Airbus. So American tax-
payers will subsidize United to
subsidize Boeing, which is al-
ready being subsidized in ways
injurious to Delta and others.
There is an understandable
urge to counter the subsidies that
foreign governments give to com-
panies competing with U.S. com-
panies. The result, however, is an
increasingly mercantilist world.
And as Hirst's argument indi-
cates, it is difficult to prove that
the net effect is to increase em-
ployment rather than just redis-
tribute employment to different
- and, inevitably, politically as-
tute companies and sectors.
As Sallie James says, public
choice theory teaches that gov-
ernment favors flow to the politi-
cally connected. And
favor-dispensing institutions
such as the Export-Import Bank
are dispensing incentives for pri-
vate interests to develop lucra-
tive political connections.
What next? Look for proposals
to authorize the bank to subsidize
U.S. manufacturers competing
with foreign imports that have
price advantages because of gov-
ernment subsidies. And so it goes,
subsidies begetting counter-sub-
sidies, as U.S. trade policy is in-
creasingly set by foreign
governments.
Politicians, however, enjoy
being drawn into largesse sweep-
stakes, which pretty much define
the political profession today So
expect the bank to survive and
even thrive, with its cap raised
from $100 billion to $140 billion.
Congress' normal reaction to
wayward institutions is to extend
their lives, expand their man-
dates and increase their money.
In Washington, the penalty for
slipping the leash of law is a
longer leash and a larger purse.
--In--
George Will's email address is
georgewill@washpost. com.


L E V7TH I cTiM.


_LETTERS to the Editor r


Port questions
A port sounds great, but are
we thinking it out? Ports on the
east coast of Florida have access
to the open Atlantic, and the
southern half of Florida handles
a myriad of small island
freighters daily from the Ba-
hamas and the Caribbean.
Where would our traffic come
from? Large ships would go to
Tampa, New Orleans and sev-
eral Texas ports. We couldn't
even get the big ships in here
without dredging a deep, wide,
relatively straight channel out
for 25 miles. If we are not inter-
ested in the big ships, then who
are we hoping to lure into our
port? Barges! I doubt we could
attract many small island
freighters from the Caribbean.
The logistics are much better
in Miami and Fort Lauderdale,
and we don't even have a logistics
system here. Can it be a worth-
while investment to haul aggre-
gate out? What do we haul in?
David Zeiher
Crystal River

Preventing shootings
Stahler's cartoon of March 2


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in Chroni-
cle editorials are the opinions of
the newspaper's editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Groups or individuals are invited
to express their opinions in a let-
ter to the editor.
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at 352-563-5660.
All letters must be signed and in-
clude a phone number and home-
town, including letters sent via
e-mail. Names and hometowns will
be printed; phone numbers will
not be published or given out.
We reserve the right to edit let-
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good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
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limited to three letters per month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to
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hints at some potential reasons
why there seemingly are so
many armed assaults in our
country While the Second


Amendment is settled law in that
private ownership of firearms is
constitutional, misguided or
nonexistent legislation regulat-
ing the sale and ownership of
firearms has served to make
guns more easily accessible. "No
restrictions!" one might say, but
consider their outcry following
another senseless shooting over
guns being in the "wrong" hands.
Would it not save lives to ensure
they are in the "right" hands?
Certainly there are no restric-
tions in the Second Amendment,
but common sense suggests rea-
sonable restrictions such as reg-
istration and the type of arms
one can own would limit such
tragedies. Properly written,
these could pass constitutional
muster Else there can be no
limit on what type of weapon
one could acquire in the future
or who could own such weapons.
Just as we have moved from
muskets to AK-47s and beyond,
there will be ever newer
weaponry created that will be
available and ultimately used on
our fellow man. We will need to
confront this dilemma either
sooner or later
Wayne Logsdon
Hernando


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Adventures in paradise: Sailing the South Pacific


Back during the late 1950s, television
brought us "Adventures in Para-
dise," a show that detailed the ex-
ploits of one Captain Adam Troy as he
guided his 80-foot
schooner, the Tiki
III, from adventure "
to adventure, sailing
from island to islandnd
in the paradise that
was Polynesia.
I watched the
show religiously;
and, as any adoles-
cent boy might I fan- Fred Brannen
tasized about being A SLICE
in such a place, es- OF LIFE
pecially with all of O LI
the beautiful young
women Captain Troy always seemed to find
wherever he went.
Most recently, my fantasy was fulfilled,
including a beautiful woman ... but I didn't
find her on an island; she came with me.
On Feb. 4, Cheryl and I set out we
sailed the high seas of the south Pacific
smack dab through the middle of Polynesia.
But we didn't do it aboard an 80-foot
schooner; no, we chose a more substantial
craft: a modern cruise ship, the Queen Eliz-
abeth, which is some 964 feet long and has
at least 12 decks.
We flew from Tampa to San Francisco to
begin the voyage; then, ultimately, on Feb.
29, we disembarked in Sydney, Australia,
for a short stay there before flying back
home.


WINDOW
Continued from Page Cl

Meetings have just started
on a renovation of Hunter
Springs Park the only
public swimming location
on the Crystal River
Citrus Avenue has been re-
vitalized by a combination of
the Community Redevelop-
ment Agency and gutsy pri-
vate business people. New
restaurants and shops have
popped up along both sides
of Citrus Avenue even as we
have struggled through these
difficult economic times.
The street is now the
home of the annual county
Manatee Festival, Stone
Crab Jam and Scallop Jam.
Next month, the new wine
shop on Citrus Avenue is
planning a wine festival, and
the area restaurants and
shops are all participating.
For the past 20 years, it
seemed like Laura Lou Fitz-
patrick was the only constant
business person fighting to
make Citrus Avenue happen.
Now there's more than a
score of active businesses
and some of the best restau-
rants in the county.
And as was proven on St.
Patrick's Day on Saturday,
Burke's Irish Bar is the cen-
ter of activity for many Es-
pecially those lucky enough
to be Irish.
While the visual activity
of new restaurants and
shops is important, there
are other things going on as
well. After more than a
decade of talking and com-
plaining about it, the city
and the county finally
moved together to expand
the sewer system and take
polluting septic tanks off the
west side of U.S. 19.
And along comes Art
Jones, a Rotarian and com-
munity activist, and he gets
tired of just hearing people
talk about stopping pollu-
tion. Art and his friends
jumped in the water and
started pulling out the dis-
gusting lyngbya. At first, it
was just Art and a few of his
friends. Now dozens of peo-
ple join with him each time
they hit the water.
State Sen. Charlie Dean, R-
Inverness, has jumped in the
game and secured $100,000 in
state dollars to help support
the cleanup effort



REVIEW
Continued from Page Cl

The author also analyzes
the political pressure on
Obama from the out-of-
power Republicans and the
intense lobbying by Israel
and its interest groups in
Washington. Because Iran is
China's second-largest
source of imported oil, Bei-
jing has largely criticized
sanctions.
Late last year talks broke
off, which opened the door
to further sanctions. But at
the last minute Turkey and
Brazil (two rising middle-
level powers) asked if they
could step in and try to bro-
ker an agreement. Here the
story gets complicated:
Turkey/Brazil produced a
compromise that seemed to
bring the two sides into


On Feb. 4, Cheryl and I
set out we sailed the
high seas of the south
Pacific smack dab through
the middle of Polynesia on
the Queen Elizabeth
cruise ship.

The ship first headed west-southwest to
Honolulu. After leaving our 50th state, she
took a generally southerly course to Pago
Pago (believe it or not, it's pronounced
"pango-pango") on the island of American
Samoa. Continuing south, the next stop was
Fiji with its British influence; then staying
on her course, the ship headed to New
Zealand before turning back to the north-
northwest toward Australia.
All-in-all our journey, including the re-
turn flight, took almost a month and cov-
ered more than 20,000 miles.
While aboard ship, we made many fasci-
nating port stops and enjoyed to the max
the relaxation of the sea days. Not only that,
we met people individuals, but, also,
groups of people from other cultures.
We crossed the equator and we crossed
the International Date Line.
I became totally confused about the time
of day and the date as well as the seasons of
the year, but no matter; my Cheryl and I
certainly enjoyed seeing God's creation at


Good things are
happening in
Crystal River,
and I have a the-
ory on how it got
started. It was
about five years
ago that Crystal
River settled
down and hired
Andy Houston as
city manager.

Good things are happen-
ing in Crystal River, and I
have a theory on how it got
started. It was about five
years ago that Crystal River
settled down and hired Andy
Houston as city manager.
It was Houston who led
the coalition with Lace
Blue-McLean and K C. Nay-
field to purchase the Three
Sisters Springs property
And Houston has been at
the forefront of most of the
other community improve-
ment projects along the way
One important trait that
Houston brings to the table is
that he is humble. He never
fights to get credit for any-
thing and he takes his public
lumps in silence when the
notoriously opinionated res-
idents of Crystal River take
turns thumping him on the
head at public forums.
In my view, Crystal River
has found its Frank DiGio-
vanni. There have always
been plenty of good ideas
floating around Crystal
River just like in Inver-
ness. But it often takes the
right mix of leadership, vi-
sion and teamwork to actu-
ally get things done.
Things are getting done in
Crystal River and there's a
lot of credit to go around.
And you will find Andy
Houston standing in the
background most of the time.
It's not a coincidence.

Editor's note: In the name
of full disclosure, Publisher
Gerry Mulligan is a
member of the Citrus
County Chamber of
Commerce board and its
area council.


agreement. However, the
U.S. and Europe declined
the deal an action the au-
thor criticizes. Various offi-
cials claim the agreement
was good for both sides, but
the author suggests the frus-
tration of the process led to
Washington's decision not to
reopen the talks. It is hard
to evaluate whether the new
agreement matched what
the Americans wanted. The
author thinks Obama turned
his back on the new agree-
ment due to pressure from
Republicans and Congress,
and from the Israeli lobby
and various Middle Eastern
countries.
This leaves the future of
finding a consensus unclear
Europe, the U.S. and some
others are increasing the
pain of the sanctions. These
have seriously harmed the
economy of Iran leading to a
50 percent devaluation of its


Google Maps/Chronicle illustration
Cheryl and Fred's route: San Francisco to Sydney, Feb. 4 to March 1.
its very best. I share some of our very own adventures in
And even though our experiences might paradise.
not have been as exciting as those of Cap- -
tain Troy, during the next few weeks, I trust Fred Brannen is an Inverness resident
that you dear readers will bear with me as and a Chronicle columnist


A letter to Sen. Charles Dean


Editor's note: The following was
written to state Sen. Charlie Dean, R-
Inverness, with the request it be pub-
lished in the Chronicle.
CHRISTINE WElDER
Special to the Chronicle

I have lived in Citrus County since
2005 when my husband and I re-
located from Broward County.
Unfortunately, I found myself wid-
owed within a year and a half.
Fast forward to the time when real-
ity set in and my once-secure finan-
cial future was in jeopardy because of
a rapidly declining economy and not
paying attention to what my financial
planner was doing.
Having been with the sheriff's of-
fice as a volunteer, I asked Lt. David
Wyllie what the requirements were to
become a Child Protective Investiga-
tor and I was enrolled in the next pre-
certification class with the
understanding that there was no job
guarantee.
Unfortunately, finishing No. 1 in my
class did not get me a job with Citrus
County Sheriff's Office (CCSO); but I
was hired by the Department of Chil-
dren and Family Services (DCF) in a
neighboring county where I worked
for approximately 10 weeks.
I was hired by CCSO in September
of 2010. My name is Christine Weider
and I am a Child Protective Investi-
gator, and want you and my commu-
nity to know the emotional roller
coaster you have not only put me on,
but all those I am fortunate enough to
call my co-workers.
Sen. Charles Dean: You are messing
with my livelihood and, having just
turned 60 years old, I am not in a po-
sition to start all over again. I am hear-
ing time and again that the returning
Child Protective Investigations to the
Department of Children and Families
is a result of a long-term feud between
you and our sheriff, Jeff Dawsy
Mr. Dean, I don't personally care
about a feud between you and Sheriff
Dawsy You are both grown men and
can work out your differences in an-
other forum. I would like to address
several things that are concerning
me:
1. My understanding is that Jeff
Dawsy, our current sheriff, came up
in the ranks under your leadership.
Seems to me that would be a feather
in your cap that one of your guys who
was good enough to be promoted up
through the ranks went on to become
sheriff.
2. The Department of Children and
Families has gone on record as not


Guest COLUMN


I was hired by CCSO in
September of 2010.
My name is Christine
Weider and I am a
Child Protective
Investigator, and want
you and my community
to know the emotional
roller coaster you have
not only put me on,
but all those I am
fortunate enough to
call my co-workers.

wanting to take back the Child Pro-
tective Services contract from Citrus
County
3. There are seven sheriff's offices
that are currently providing Child
Protective Services to their respec-
tive counties. Why are we, here in Cit-
rus County, being singled out? If you
were collecting facts and data, then
you would know that our CPI unit is
among the leaders in the state of
Florida and, judging from our last
peer review, I believe we were No. 3
among sheriff's offices and No. 4
statewide. So it is not a performance
issue.
4. I have worked for both DCF and
for the CCSO and will tell you that I
am better trained, have more tech-
nology at my disposal, have a greater
understanding of investigation tech-
niques and tools and have my skills
continuously honed to be able to pro-
tect the children in this county and to
provide the services necessary to
keep families together When I am as-
signed a case that needs to be com-
menced sometimes in the middle of
the night, I don't have to wait for up to
an hour for a deputy to assist me. I
also do not have to wait for 24 to 48
hours for background checks prior to
my going out. I know before I go who
I can expect to find in a home and
what type of background they have.
Safety of our children as well as our-
selves are No. 1 at all times.
5. Correct me if I am wrong, but I
haven't seen anywhere in the media
any of the reasons why you have
worked so hard to return Child Pro-
tective Services to DCF only in Cit-


This volume makes for slow and
complicated reading. But that is
exactly what these talks have been
- slow and complicated. There are
few studies that go into such detail
on the sanctions.


currency and all sorts of
shortages. Of course the gov-
ernment in Tehran blames
this all on Washington and
the power of the Israeli
lobbyists.
In recent weeks, negotia-
tions have re-opened and
Tehran has said it would
allow inspections to take
place; but in the past, Iran
has put severe limits on
what could be inspected.
This process could drag out
and end in futility. Mean-
while, Israel wants the


United States to agree to
support the military de-
struction of Iran's nuclear
centers. Obama and the Eu-
ropean countries are reluc-
tant to give Israel a blank
check. Some experts argue
that even if the Iranians had
the bomb, they would be
foolish to use it because of
the inevitable nuclear retal-
iation from Israel and the
United States.
Others doubt that Iran is
not close to building an ef-
fective nuclear weapon. It is


the consensus view ofAmer-
ica's 16 intelligence agen-
cies that there is no hard
evidence Iran has decided
to build a nuclear weapon
(of course, these are the
same agencies that claimed
Saddam Hussein had nu-
clear weapons).
The current Ayatollah has
consistently said flatly that
the bomb is against the
teachings of Islam, and
hence his country would
never build it
Although author Parsi
praises President Obama, in
the final chapter of the book
he criticizes both sides for
not sufficiently wanting to
reach a resolution, for re-
fusing the good-will efforts
on the part of the other side,
for constantly seeing the
other side as evil and un-
trustworthy. Negotiating
when each side believes the
other is lying is not going to


rus County. I am hearing you and our
illustrious legislators are throwing
some incentives to DCF to take it
back. Again correct me if I am wrong,
Mr Dean, but are those my tax dollars
you are using to put me out of work?
Have you considered the cost to the
taxpayers to transition the unit back
to Department of Children and Fam-
ilies? Has anyone put a price tag on
the transition?
6. I understand you are the type of
guy who likes to keep things simple.
If that is the case, why are you trying
to fix something that's not broken?
Couldn't your time be better used to
serve the needs of your constituents
- like getting jobs in our community?
Do you not represent the people of
your constituency? Why are you not
listening to the commissioners, the
editorial pages of the Chronicle?
Why?
7. If all this is really a result of you
and our sheriff not being able to get
along, shame on you for bringing in-
nocent people in on your feud. Why
should I and the rest of our hard-
working Child Protective Investiga-
tors have to be collateral damage to
the feud? And at the end of the day,
aren't we all about the safety and wel-
fare of the children of our county?
This unit, under the leadership of Lt.
David Wyllie, has risen above and be-
yond since the initial contract was
awarded to CCSO in 2007. The entire
unit over the last year and a half has
continued to maintain the high stan-
dards set and keep our children safe
in this county, all the while wonder-
ing if we will have jobs. Frankly, Mr.
Dean, there is enough stress out there
without the added stress of knowing
your financial security is at risk.
Mr Dean, I challenge you to come
and spend several days in Inverness
and experience firsthand the day-to-
day workings of our unit. I want you
to go out in the field with our person-
nel and witness firsthand the dedica-
tion and commitment our unit has
first to the children and then to com-
munity, all the while keeping to strict
state-mandated time constraints. I
would then suggest you spend a cou-
ple of days in a county served by DCF
I am certain that you, as previous law
enforcement, would conclude Child
Protective Services will be better
served right where it is with the
Citrus County Sheriff's Office.


Christine Weider is a Citrus Springs
resident.


succeed.
This volume makes for
slow and complicated read-
ing. But that is exactly what
these talks have been -
slow and complicated.
There are few studies that
go into such detail on the
sanctions.
'"A Single Roll of the Dice"
helps us understand how
complex international
diplomacy actually is. It is
easy to suggest policy or
point to problems, but much
more difficult to construct a
stable balance of interests
that both sides can agree
upon.
------
Michael Francis is a
Sugarmill Woods resident
who taught international
politics and US. foreign
policy at the University of
Notre Dame for 39 years
prior to retiring


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, MARCH 18, 2012 C3






C4 SUNDAY, MARCH 18, 2012



VOICES
Continued from Page C1

4:00: Local bill calendar
comes up with seven bills
and my Lake County Hospi-
tal District is one of them.
Sen. Hays was holding it up,
but decided to release it, for
which I was grateful.
4:08: Thought I passed my
local bill, but as my aide was
writing a press release, it
came to light that even
though Sen. Hays had
agreed to withdraw his five
hostile amendments, when
the Secretary's staff took up
the calendar today, without
saying anything, they
adopted all the amend-
ments. So now we have to
reconsider the vote by
which the bill passed, bring
the bill back up, remove the
amendments and vote it out,
again. Insanity.
4:25: The Senate spends
more time on amendments
relating to dyeing baby
chicks and bunnies, Sen.
Bogdanoff's issue. More
bills heard and voted on.
4:44: My local bill actually
passes. WOO HOO. Had al-
ready passed the House be-
fore the debacle, so now it
will go to the governor
5:00: Senate takes up a
bill (SB824/HB599) and
throws many questionable
amendments on it, includ-
ing language to give Amtrak
immunity from liability on
state-owned tracks.
5:27: We've been in recess
now for some time as lead-


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ership tries to work mem-
bers on the PIP bill, which
reduces soft-tissue injury
services (such as chiroprac-
tic care and massages) in an
effort to reduce costs for
mandatory no-fault auto in-
surance. The lieutenant gov-
ernor is in the back of the
Senate Chamber trying to
convince senators to support
the House version instead of
the Senate version that
unanimously passed the
night before. The governor
is working it as well. At this
time, the votes are not there.
6:37: We are flying through
conforming bills. Members
don't know what's in them
because they were just re-
leased the night before and
never went through Senate
committees. I'm getting tons
of calls, tweets, emails and
Facebook messages from
people thanking me for my
vote against the parent trig-
ger bill.
6:58: I hear SB 1998 being
read and realize there is a
bunch of transportation pol-
icy being created in this
conforming bill. I start ask-
ing questions. The bill is
TP'd, or temporarily post-
poned, and may or may not
come back up.
8:10: The Senate takes up
the PIP bill after hours of
behind-the-scenes arm-
twisting on the part of the
governor and lieutenant
governor What does this
have to do with job cre-
ation? Being told the House
is waiting to pass the Poly-
tech conforming bill until
after the Senate passes the


House version of the PIP
Reform bill. A trade in the
works?
8:48: The Polytech bill
passes the House, 86-31. The
Senate is still debating the
House version of the PIP
Reform bill.
9:20: Senators are tired
and hungry after 12 hours
on the Senate floor. Styro-
foam cups start appearing
throughout the chamber.
Coffee perhaps?
9:40: The House version
of PIP passes, 21-19. The
governor appears on the
Senate floor to celebrate.
He thanks President Mike
Haridopolos and other
members who voted yes.
9:51: House Bill 5009 is
up. It is a confusing bill that
some claim is a sweetheart
deal for UF as reward for
supporting the budget chair
in the USF Poly independ-
ence negotiations. The bill
dies. It's brought back to life
in a motion to recon-
sider after the budget chair
scrambles to get Sen. Mike
Bennett to change his vote.
10:50: HB 787 has become
a train (amendment after
amendment offered) and
restlessness begins. I start
wandering the floor
11:03: Just now taking up
the budget, the one and only
bill we must pass. We're
winding down. Bet budget
goes fast I'll be voting "No,"
given its many turkeys and
painful cuts.
11:10: Sen. Oelrich deliv-
ering great debate against
all the turkeys. Budget de-
bate by Sen. Larcenia


MIND) WANERIN6...


Bullard? More like second
goodbye speech! Thanking
everyone... slowing things
down a bit
11:19: Budget passes after
16 minutes with little ques-
tion, debate or fanfare. A
couple more bills and re-
turning messages from the
House are voted out. Our
work is done.
11:42: Sen. Don Gaetz
gives update on court rul-
ing and says we will be back
in session for redistricting
on Wednesday, March 14.
11:50: We wait for the
House to finish its business.
We Sine Die, marking the
end of the regular session.


The ceremonial white han-
kies are dropped by the ser-
geants of the House and
Senate. Our 15 1/2-hour day
is almost over.
12:00: Senators, House
members, the governor and
lieutenant governor, staff,
lobbyists and the media
gather in the Capitol ro-
tunda for a brief speech by
the governor Lots of cele-
brating and goodbyes.
-

Paula Dockery is a term-
limited Republican senator
from Lakeland who is
chronicling her final year
in the Florida Senate. She


UmIR.
UN~f~l UCICK.
2102


FLORIDA VOICES
Florida Voices is a fea-
ture carried periodically
in the Citrus County
Chronicle. Florida
Voices is a new media
company at the inter-
section of opinion jour-
nalism, public affairs
and government. It pro-
vides a roundtable
forum regarding what
influential people think
about key issues facing
Florida from differing
perspectives.


can be reached atpdockery
@floridavoices. com.


21


22


23


Inverness Sertoma Club
Golf Tournament

Crystal River Garden Club
Flower Show and Plant Sale

St. Scholastica Open House


24 Stepping Out in Style
Shrimpa-Palooza
Spring Book Sale
Lakeside Craft Show
Scope it Out 5K
Tampa Bay Lightning vs. NY Islanders
Teen Stock
Swing Into Spring Fashion Show
Golf Tournament Golf for Meals
Withlacoochee Wilderness
Canoe Kayak Rally & Race
Golf Classic Kidney for Karen Fund


I A. I A. I A.


25
8th Annual Spring Concert
Citrus Community Concert Choir


Bluegrass Festival


27
Spring Book Sale


28


29


__-CI -SCUNYFI


8th Annual Spring Concert
Citrus Community Concert Choir


Jazz Spring Concert


30
8th Annual Spring Concert
Citrus Community Concert Choir


ACT: Dr. Cook's Garden


31
ACT: Dr. Cook's Garden
3Su -.ill Woods Food Drive
Sugarmill Woods Food Drive


Movies in the Park Hop


Inverness Rotary Golf Tournameni


Homosassa Springs Wildlife State
Park Easter Egg Hunt
___________________ ___________________I ___________________ I___________________ __________________


JANUARY
* Citrus Jazz Society Jam
* Manatee Festival
* Keys to Fashion West Citrus Ladies Elks
* Truck and TractorPull
* AWinter Wonderland
* CRWC Showtlime
* Music in the Park
* Beatles Tribute
SBook Festival
Concert at the Old Courthouse, The Porch Dogs
SEarly Childhood Expo
SWest Cirus Elks Fashion Show
ACT The Kids Left, The Dog Died, Now What?
James Rogers Concert
SMusic in the Park- Southern Sounds
* Light Shine The Ashley Gang Folk Songs & Florida
FEBRUARY
* Citrus Jazz Jam
STaekwondo Women's Defense Class
* Mow It Dinner Beverly Hills Lions Club
* Best Friend Fest Citrus County Animal Services
* 2012 Festival of Books
* Rotary of Inverness Online and TV Auction
* Country Diamonds Show Beverly Hills Civic Assoc.
* Jr. Achienent Bowl-A-Thon
* Light Shine
* Dollars for Scholars Doo Wop
* Finess in Citrus begins
* Jazz Valentine Concert
SCrystal Oaks Military Card Party
* Cattle Barons' Ball American Cancer Society
SYoga Day USA
* CF Performing Arts Series Cooking With
The Calamari Sisters
* Bartershoppers Singing Valentines
* Citrus Springs Library Book Sale
* Love Your Library Evening
* ACT Moonlight and Magnolias
SSt. Patrick's Day Dinner Dance
Concerned Citizen Commendation Award and Dinner
* West Citrus Elks Book Sale and Flea Market
* Kiwanis Concert Live
* Ozello Chili Cook Off and Craft Show
STricky Tray, CCW of St. Scholastica
* Purple Heart Ceremony
* Citrus Watercolor Show & Sale
SGerman American Club Celebrate Spring
SCelebrity Bartenders & Silent Auction
* Greek Festival
* Runway For Rescues
* Fashion Sweethearts
* Spring Fling Citrus County Craft Council
* Seminarian Dinner & Dance Knights of Columbus
S8th Annual Kids Fishing Clinic Parks & Recreation
* Blessings in a Backpack
* Academy of Environmental Science Dinner
* Oscar Night 2012 'Promoting Literacy" SMW Rotary
SAfican American Read In
'School'astic Golf Tournament
Chet Cole Casino Night

MARCH
* Luminary Art Nights
SStrawberry Festival
* Red Ribbon Tour of Homes
STricky Tray Crystal Oaks Civic
* Movies in the Park Kung Fu Panda 2
* Manatee Car & Truck Show
* Citrus Jazz Jam
Tampa Bay Ughtning vs. Ottawa Senators
Habitat for Humanity Building Dreams
SEncore Ensemble The Last Dance of Dr. Disco


STrivia Night Kiwanis Central Ridge/Crystal River
* Will McLean Music Festival
* Friends of the Library Spring Book Sale
* Jim Blackshear Golf Tournament
* Nature Coast Corvair Car & Truck Show
* Dublin City Ramblers
* B&G 20th Anniversary Birthday BashlSteak & Steak
* Homosassa Heritage Day
* Nature Coast Civil War Reenactment
* Benefit for Karen Dinner, Dancing, Entertainment
SMilitary Card Party Beverly Hills Recreation Assoc.
Concert at the Old Courthouse, Jimmy Crowley
SSt. Pabtrick's Day Dinner Dance
SBlood Drive Honor Larry Nestor
SFort Cooper Days
SInverness SL Patick's Day Parade
Crystal River St Patrick's Day Parade
* Nature Coast Dragon Boat Festival
SMutt Strutt Parade
St. Pabick's Day Golf Classic
SSt. Paddy's Pot of Gold Card Party and Luncheon
SAll Moper Car Show
* Crystal River Music in the Park
* Inverness Sertoma Club Golf Tournament
* Spring Book Sale Friends of Homosassa Library
* Scope it Out 5K
STampa Bay Lightening vs. NY Islanders
STeen Stock
* Swing into Spring Fashion Show
* International Food & Ars Festival
* Golf for Meals Citrus County Resource Center
Steppin Out in Style
* Shrimpa-Palooza
* Withlacoochee Wilderness Canoe and Kayak Rally & Race
* Lakeside Craft Show
* Bluegrass Festival in Hemando
* Citrus County Fair
* ACT Dr. Cook's Garden
S3rd Annual Spring "Eggsiravaganza
* Sugarmill Woods Food Drive
* Sugamnnill Chorale
SWe Care Food Pantry Golf Tournament
Floral City Library Friends March Book Sale
APRIL
* ACT Dr. Cook's Garden
* Jazz Spring Concert
* Movies in the Park Hop
* Inverness Rotary Golf Toumament
* Homosasse Springs Easter Egg Hunt
SCitrus Jazz Jam
* Crystal River Relay For Life
* Bluegrass & Oldtyme Music Festival
STaste of Inverness
* Camp Good Hope Golf Tournament
* Mel Tillis Fishing Tournament
* Floral City Garden Club Annual Plant Sale
* Annual Charity Ball Knights of Columbus
* Starring Citrus County Homosassa Elementary
* Central Citrus Rotary Blood Screening
* CF Performing Arts Ballet Folkorico
* Inverness Relay For Life
* When EMs Came to Town
* Red Eagle Lodge Intertribal Pow-Wow
SAmerican Irish Club Golf Tournament
*2012 Ram Truck Drawing We Care Food Pantry
* April Madness Basketball Tournament
* Ozello Adventure Race
* Citrus County Bass Challenge
* Sheriffs Summer Safety Expo
* Volunteer Fair
* Central Citrus Rotary Golf Classic
* United Way Spirit of the Community Awards Luncheon
Letter Carriers Food Drive
SCattlemen's Fish Fry


MAY
* Citrus Hills Information Fiesta
* Lecanto Relay For Life
* Cars in the Canyon
* Movies in the Park- Tangled
* Citrus County Gator Club Golf Tournament
* Spring Fling Dinner Dance
* ACT Moon Over Buffalo
* Stamp Out Hunger
* Worid's Greatest Baby Shower
* Concert at the Old Courthouse, Spring Finale
* Winds, Rains or Flames All Hazards Expo
* 832 K-9 Deputy Dogs Golf Tournament
* ULions Spring Craft Fair
*ALLEGRO
* Wish Upon a Child Golf Tournament
* Covenant Children's Home Charity Fish Fry
* Light Shine
* Law Enforcement and First Responder Appreciation BBQ
* Music in the Park
JUNE
* Cobia Big Fish Tournament
* Homosassa Fireworks & Poker Run
* Flag Day at Fort Cooper
* Rolling Thunder Independence Day Golf Tournament
* Music on the Square
* Citus Jazz Jam
* Next Generation Professional Networking
* Rays vs. Red Sox Trip
* Red Ketlile Bar-B-Q
* Concerts at the Courthouse
* Encore Ensemble Theater My Big Fat Italian Funeral
* Teen Stock
* Citrus Memorial "We Care" Golf Tournament
* Jim Blackshear Memorial Golf Tournament
* 832 K-9's Deputy Dog's Annual Golf Tournament
* Veterans Serving Veterans
* Encore Ensemble The PajamaParty Murders
* Movies in the Park Happy Feet 2
JULY
* Patriotic Evening
SFireworks over Kings Bay
* Key Training Center Celebrity Auction
*Key Run For the Money
*Key Center Telethon
* Family Fun Day Kings Bay Park
* Firecracker 5K
* Beverly Hills Recreation Military Card Party
* Uncle Sam's Scallop Jam
* Cirus Community Concert Choir Great Music
for Your Summer Enjoyment
* Movies in the Park- Madagascar 2
* Chronicle Political Forum
AUGUST
* Rotary Club of Sugarmill Woods Arts and Crafts
* Pregnancy and Family Life Center Military Card Party
*So You Think You Can Dance Like AStar
* Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Fundraiser Golf Tourney
* Gator Club Kick Off
* Concert at the Courhiouse Back 2 School Bash
* Citrus Community Concert Choir Great Music
for Your Summer Enjoyment
*The Other Volumn
* OC5K
* Movies in the Park Shark Tale
SEPTEMBER
* Harvest Moon Craft Show
*Veterans Golf Tournament
* Jazz Society Jam Session
* Citrus 20120 Fundraiser


* Save our Waters Week
* Christmas in September
* United Way Jick Off
* Business Women's Alliance Health & Fitness Expo
* Industry Appreciation Luncheon
* Industry Appreciation Week EDC Barbecue
* 832 K-9's Deputy Dog Fundraiser
* VFW Post 10087 Golf Outing
* Friends of the Library Fall Book Sale
* Music on the Square
* CF Professional Development Series
STwo Good Soles
SMatt Curley Memorial Blood Drive
SBarbecue Blast
Under One Roof Campaign Auction
Page it Forward
SSunset Festival
* Country Western Hoedown Cruise
SBeat the Sheriff Race
SMovies in the Park- G-Force

OCTOBER
* Sertoma Oktoberfest
* Oktoberfest German American
* Bikes and BBQ
* Habitat For Humanity Golf Tournament
* Jazz Jam
* Rails to Trails Bike Ride
Artisans Boutique
* Great American Cooler Festival
* Day of CaringlMake a Difference Day Food Drive
* National Wildlife Refuge Week
* Scarecrow Festival
* West Citrus Elks Arts & Crafts Show
* Cooler Blast
* Harvest lime Festival
* Haunted Tram Ride
* Cooterween
* Greek Festival
* Spike Fitzpatrick Memorial Golf Tourney
* Haunted Halloween
SHemrnando Heritage Days
SComedy Night at Citrus Springs
* Swing for a Cure
* Nerieds Military Card Party
* Lakeside Craft Show
* Chamber Business Expo
* Nature Coast All Veterans Reunion
* Citrus Garden Club Shades of Autumn
* Fr. Willie Classic Golf Memorial
S2nd Annual Ford Car & Truck Show
* Car Show for Charity
* We Care Golf Tournament
* A Night at the Museum
* Citrus Springs Memorial Library Fall Book Sale
* Jazz Goes to Movies
* Nature Coast Fine Ms and True Crafts Show
SCitrus "Haunted" Hills 5K
* Page it Forward
* Make a Difference Day
Authors Fair
* Robby Brown Memorial Golf Tournament
* CASI Chili Cook Off
* Movie on the Square
* Ladies of the West Citrus Elks Fall Card Party
* Light Shine
SArt Fair and Auction
* Halloween Scramble for Hospice
* Candlelight Vigil
* Fall Fling
* Health & Wellness Fair

NOVEMBER
* BH Lions Foundation Craft Fair
* InglisiYankeetown Arts and Seafood Festival


* Festival of The Atls
* Jazz Society Jam
* Rotary Blood Screening
* Blues & Bar-B-Que
* Veterans Fair
* Veterans Day Parade/Memorial Service
* Veterans Appreciation Show
* Stone Crab Jam
* CCBA Home & Outdoors Show
SCaruth Camp Challenge
SParade of Trees
Citrus Stampede Rodeo
SWinter Wonderland Craft Show
SOzello Arts & Crafts Festival
Jazz Concert
Friends of the Homosassa Library Book Sale
SSOS Golf Tournament
* Festival of the Arts Wine Tasting
SVeteran's Appreciation Week
Annual Christmas Toy Run
* King's Bay 5K Run
* Hospice Tree of Remembrance
* Concert at the Old Courthouse, Jim Hurst
* Inverness Fall Classic
* BFF Society Fashion Show
* Light Shine Dunnellon Concert Singers
* Silver Jubilee Fashion Show
* Precious Paws Fundraiser
*Recycle Day
* Never Forget SK RunIWalk
* Kiwanis Pancake Breakfast
* Cooking for a Cause
* Wish Upon a Child Golf Tournament
* K-9 Kamival
* Cut-a-thon
* Citrus Community Concert Choir's Messiah
* Music in the Park
* Encore Ensemble Win, Lose or Die
DECEMBER
* Father Christmas Ball
SFort Cooper State Park Nights of Lights
SFloral City Heritage Days
* Beverly Hills Christmas Parade
* Christmas Craft Show
SCRWC Silver Bells
* Crystal River Christmas Parade
* Jazz Holiday Concert
* Jazz Jam
* Inverness Christmas Parade
* Homosassa Boat Parade
* Sugarmill Chorale Christmas Concert
* Airboat Christmas Parade
* Citrus Springs Holiday Parade
* Nutcracker Ballet
* Celebration of Lights
* ACT Richard Gilewitz
* Inverness Winter Celebration
* ACT Halvan Youth Theatre
* Frosty's Winter Wonderland
* Annual Holiday Party
* Suncoast Business Masters Auction
* Rotary of Sugarmill Woods Golf Tournament
* Beverly Hills Recreation Center Military Card Party
* Citrus Springs Rockin the Holiday
* Citrus Springs New Year's Eve Ball
* Send Them To Serve Golf Toumament
* IOTATV and Online Auction
* Citrus Community Concert Choir's Messiah
* Make a Smile Happen
* Music in the Park
* Adopt a Christmas Tree
* Elvis & Friends
* Encore Ensemble Win, Lose or Die


18


Ft. Cooper Days


19


20


26


Spring Book Sale


tof~iBifi spnsrevnt ha1mk1or1omuit ret


COMMENTARY











BUSINESS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Prices up because of higher gas


Associated Press
WASHINGTON -A sharp jump
in gas prices drove a measure of
U.S. consumer costs up in Febru-
ary But outside higher pump
prices, inflation stayed mild.
The Labor Department said Fri-
day that the consumer price index
rose 0.4 percent in February, the
largest increase in 10 months. Gas
prices rose 6 percent to account for
most of the gain.
Food prices were unchanged for
the first time in 19 months. And ex-
cluding food and energy, so-called
"core" prices rose just 0.1 percent.
Mild inflation allows the Fed to
maintain its low interest-rate
policy
"Not much to stew about on the
inflation front," Robert Kavcic, an
economist at BMO Capital Markets,
wrote in a note to clients.
Most economists expect inflation
to remain in check this year The
prices of agricultural commodities
such as corn and cotton have come
down. And while more Americans


Associated Press
NEW YORK-- It's the Goldilocks market.
Stocks are up, but they may have room to
rally further, at least if you believe a popu-
lar gauge of their value. Companies are sell-
ing more bonds than ever, but not so much to
send prices tumbling and end their remark-
able run.
Even indebted Europe is offering investors


are working, few are getting big pay
raises. That has limited retailers'
ability to charge more.
In the past 12 months, consumer
prices have risen 2.9 percent, the
same year-over-year change as last
month. Core prices have increased
2.2 percent over the same period.
That's lower than January's year-
over-year figure.
Still, gas prices keep rising. The
jump at the pump could slow
growth if consumers are forced to
cut back on other purchases. The
average price for a gallon of gas on
Friday was $3.83, according to AAA
That's 32 cents higher than a
month ago.
The Fed noted the increase
Tuesday after its one-day policy
meeting. Fed policymakers said
they expect rising energy prices to
temporarily boost inflation but
longer-term inflation should re-
main stable. The Fed also reiter-
ated its plan to keep its short-term
interest rates near zero until at
least 2014.
Consumers are seeing relief


big profits lately Stocks are at eight-month
highs in Germany and France and are up 12.4
percent this year in Greece, of all places.
Credit a delicate balance when the econ-
omy is neither too hot nor too cold. Prices of
myriad assets that might otherwise be mov-
ing in opposite directions are nearly all
moving up.
"People are upbeat," says Martin Fridson,
global credit strategist at BNP Paribas In-


vestment Partners. "The glass is half-full."
For investors who own stocks and bonds,
half-full is exactly what they need. If the
economy were roaring ahead, stocks might
rise, but maybe not bonds. Fear of inflation
in a hot economy can lead investors to sell
bonds and push prices down fast.
Not this year, though.
See Page D2


Ask SCORE: Ethics matter Part 2


he Feb. 19 Ask
SCORE column ad-
dressed the SCORE
Volunteer Code
of Ethical Con-
duct (part one).
Here is part
two, with the --
concluding ele-
ments. As a mat-
ter of necessity,
all nonprofit or-
ganization vol-
unteers should Dr. Fr
adhere to an
honorable level HeT
of personal ASK S
conduct.
The words
and actions of a volunteer
represent, in the eyes and
ears of the public, the or-
ganization and what it
stands for
Volunteers should be
mindful they are responsi-
ble for the impact of their
behavior on others.


ed
rz(


Personal conduct
Central to any ethical
code of volunteer
behavior is their
personal conduct
Volunteer mem-
bers should sub-
scribe to a
principled level of
personal conduct
In some unusual
cases, however,
there may be ex-
lerick ceptions or vari-
og ances to strict
"ORE observance of this
code.
This is espe-
cially true when to do so
would injure them or the
client. Variances from the
SCORE code are permit-
ted. But these exceptions
have a lengthy process es-
tablished to protect the
client, SCORE and the SBA
from wrongdoing on the


part of the volunteer
SCORE Ethical
Code of Conduct
As long as a volunteer is
part of SCORE, they are re-
sponsible to:
1. Participate in chapter
activities as agreed.
2. Be responsible for
staying current and rele-
vant with respect to ad-
vances in business and
technical developments.
3. Not discriminate in
any manner whatsoever in
violation of or inconsis-
tent with federal, state or
local laws, as set forth.
4. Not make public state-
ments that appear to asso-
ciate SCORE with their
own personal opinions,
critical of SCORE or its
sponsors.
5. Not make statements
that appear to identify


SCORE with a political
party or candidate for fed-
eral, state or local office.
6. Conduct themselves, at
all times, in the perform-
ance of their duties in such
a manner as to not dis-
credit themselves, SCORE
or the SBA.
7. Not engage in acts of
sexual harassment of any
kind, whatsoever, or in any
form of harassment that is
illegal as promulgated
under the law.
8. Seek, in advance, ad-
vice about the appropriate-
ness of any action or
inaction they have reason
to believe may be or may
lead to a violation of the
SCORE Code of Ethics and
Conduct
Commitment to
the code
SCORE volunteers shall


be fully aware of the Code of
Ethics and Conduct. When
they apply for membership
and sign the application,
they agree to abide by this
code and declare they have
read and understand it. At
the beginning of each year,
all volunteers re-read and
re-commit to the code.
High expectations?
Do these seem to be high
expectations? They are!
After reading the above,
have you thought to your-
self, "all of this seems to be
over the top"?! Well, think
again. Put yourself in this
situation: You confide in a
mentor only to discover
later your confidentiality
has been breached. The
counselor, in casual con-
versation, shares your good
idea with another person.

See Page D2


Bruce Williams
SMART
MONEY


Associated Press
Michael Morris replaces the nozzle after putting gas in his car Feb. 24 in
Philadelphia. A sharp jump in gas prices drove a measure of U.S. consumer
costs up in February. But outside higher pump prices, inflation stayed mild.

elsewhere. sumers paid less last month for
Grocery store prices appear to vegetables, dairy products, and
be leveling off after increasing for
most of the past two years. Con- See Page D2


Tough



to sell



a time



share
DEAR BRUCE: We
have a time share
we want to get rid
of. It has been a horrible
mistake for us. It was a
high-pressure sales job
with lots of promises. We
have received a lot of
phone calls about renting
or selling it. We tried twice
but lost our money on it.
We want to get rid of the
time share and have been
unable to find any infor-
mation on how to go about
selling it. M.S.,
Huntsville, Ala.
DEAR M.S.: You are
finding out the hard way
that selling and some-
times giving away a
time share is virtually im-
possible. Unless the cir-
cumstances are very
unusual, you can start
with the premise you're
going to take a financial
hit and will not get back
what you paid for your
unit.
Your observation about
a high-pressure sales job
with lots of promises cer-
tainly fits many (not all)
time-share proposals. I
have attended several and
can speak from experi-
ence. These guys are very
good at what they do. This
is also why a significant
amount of the purchase
price of the time share is
eaten up by advertising
and commissions.
You say you tried twice
to rent or sell. I'm assum-
ing you went for one of the
pitches, generally made
over the phone, in which
the company wants to list
your time share for a $300
to $400 fee (sometimes
more). But then nothing
came of it, which is not
unusual. Renting may be a
different matter, and you
may be able to rent it if
you make the effort your-
self. That means advertis-
ing it online, in print
media, etc. If your time
share is in the warmer
part of the country, adver-
tising in the colder parts
of the country often has
results. You can easily re-
search the area and find
out what similar proper-
ties rent for
There are sales organi-
zations that might be
worth your while to con-
tact. They are generally
located near where your
time share is located. Stop
in and see what they have
to offer Under no circum-
stances would I advise
you to pay upfront fees to
these sales organizations.
If you don't get any ac-
tion in selling or renting
the time share and you de-
cide to abandon it, first get
good legal advice as to
what the time-share com-
pany will likely do. Some
make a lot of noise but
then let the time share re-
vert back to them. Others
will go to court. In most
cases, the contract you
signed demands that if the
matter goes to court, it be
settled in the court where
the company is headquar-
tered, not where you live.
That can result in more
expense.
I have been warning
people about time shares


Page D5


Goldilocks market


Associated Press
Traders crow the posts for the IPOs of Allison Transmission and Demandware on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange on Thursday. Stocks
are up, but they may have room to rally further, at least if you believe a popular gauge of their value.

Companies selling more bonds than ever, but not sending prices tumbling





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Business DIGEST


Nottage attends
Thera-Band class
Joye Nottage, P.T., center
manager of Select Physical
Therapy in Beverly Hills, at-
tended "Evidence-Based Active
Care for Today's Therapist."
Andre Labbe, P.T., MOMT,
LMT, was the primary instructor
of this course. He presented re-
search that supports the use of
Thera-Bands for resistance in
strength training and using un-
stable surfaces and resistance
to promote sensory motor train-
ing and to progressively
strengthen muscle groups.
Labbe reviewed the effect of
textured surfaces and postural
stability, discussing the de-
crease in postural sway with in-
crease in proprioceptive input
with texture.
Contact Nottage at Select
Physical Therapy at 3400 N.
Lecanto Highway, Suite B, Bev-


early Hills, or call 352-527-8489
with any questions or for a free
screening.

SECO annual
meeting March 24
SUMTERVILLE Sumter
Electric Cooperative (SECO)
will conduct its annual meeting
of the membership Saturday,
March 24. The meeting will take
place on the grounds of the Co-
op's headquarters compound in
Sumterville.
This year, SECO marks its
74th anniversary, and the
theme for the meeting is energy
efficiency. Members will be able
to see many practical ways
they can reduce their electric
bills and save energy at the
same time.
"Our annual meeting is at-
tended by many members from
all across our service territory
and is always a great event,"


SO YOU KNOW
* Because of problems with the Chronicle's email
server this weekend, some news notes submitted for
Business Digest were inaccessible at press time.
BUSINESS DIGEST
* Submit information via email to newsdesk@
chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-563-3280, attn:
Business Digest.
* The Chronicle reserves the right to edit notices.
* High-resolution photos will be considered for
publication. Images taken with most cellphone
cameras do not reproduce well.
* Publication on a specific date or in color cannot be
guaranteed.
* Submissions about specific prices of products or
sales events are considered advertising and are not
eligible for Business Digest.


said SECO CEO Jim Duncan.
Those attending will be
treated to refreshments and en-
tertainment featuring Margo
Rochelle & Rodeo Drive. In
SECO's Technology and Con-


servation Tent, members will
see a wide range of displays
about conserving energy.
Each registered member re-
ceives a free gift and is eligible
for the big raffle at the end of


the business meeting. Top
prizes include a refurbished
Dodge Dakota, extended cab,
4x4 pick-up truck, one $1,500,
one $1,000 and two $500 cash
awards. There is also a host of
other major prizes that will be
given away during the drawing.
Registration for the event be-
gins at 8:30 a.m. Saturday and
continues until the business
meeting starts at 10:30 a.m.
"The annual meeting is one
of the things that distinguish
electric cooperatives from other
types of utilities. Aside from
having a lot of fun and learning
more about their Co-op, mem-
bers get to interact one-on-one
with the employees who work
on their behalf all through the
year," Duncan said.
SECO is a member-owned,
not-for-profit utility serving
176,000 members and their
families in parts of Marion,
Lake, Citrus, Sumter, Pasco,


Hernando and Levy counties.
Networking
workshop at CF
There will be a networking
workshop from 4 to 6 p.m.
Wednesday, April 25, at the
College of Central Florida Cit-
rus Campus.
Networking can be one of the
most productive ways to invest
in your business and yourself,
or it can be a total waste of time
if not done well. What deter-
mines the value?
At this workshop, participants
will focus on how to approach
networking, how to accomplish
it in a variety of settings and
how to make it pay off.
The fee is $40 for Citrus
County Chamber of Commerce
members or Next Generation
Professionals. For non-Cham-
ber members, the fee is $49.
Call 352-249-1210 to register.


SCORE
Continued from Page Dl

Months later, after making an initial
investment in your new business, you
discover someone has started a busi-
ness exactly like the one you de-
scribed to your SCORE mentor.
To your further disappointment,
your research indicated only one such


MARKET
Continued from Page D1

The Dow Jones industrial
average is up 8.3 percent
this year. Bonds of various
kinds are rallying, too -
municipals issued by cities
and states, junk bonds from
the riskiest of companies,
and even that once most
hated and destructive of
Wall Street products, mort-
gage-backed securities.
They've eked out a 0.36 per-
cent gain so far this year, ac-
cording to Barclays Capital.
If you suspect it's too good
to be true, you may be right.
Some worrisome signs:
Profits may not be grow-
ing: Companies in the Stan-
dard & Poor's 500 stock
index are expected to earn
0.5 percent less than they
did a year ago for the first
three months this year, ac-
cording to FactSet, a data
provider.
Insiders are selling:
Corporate executives are
selling 14 times more of
their own companies' stock
than they are buying, ac-
cording to Trim Tabs. The
normal rate is eight times.
IPOs are still anemic:
Companies aren't going
public at a pace associated
with a bull market. So far
this year, companies have
raised $3.4 billion in IPOs,
down 78 percent from a year
ago, according to Renais-
sance Capital.
Then there was the scare
this week that inflation


business can survive financially in
your community and competition is up
and running already
QUESTION: How does all of the
above make you feel?
ANSWER: A strong Code of Ethics
should be followed by all volunteers.
SCORE is on the campus of the Col-
lege of Central Florida. For information,
free business literature and counseling,
call 352-249-1236. Office hours are 10
a.m. to 1 p.m. Tuesday through Thurs-


might be looming at last.
Treasury prices fell, and
their yields, which move in
the opposite direction, rose
fast The yield on the 10-year
Treasury note closed Friday
at 2.3 percent, the highest
since October and up nearly
a third of a point in five days.
The 10-year helps set
rates for everything from
mortgages to credit cards to
auto loans, and a rise can
sometimes scare investors
into selling bonds issued by
companies.
But in a land where the
porridge is at the perfect
temperature and the beds
are just firm enough, in-
vestors shrugged off the
Treasury scare. Instead of
falling, junk bonds issued by
heavily indebted companies
rose. So far this year, they
have returned 5.4 percent,
including interest.
Those fears from last
summer of another U.S. re-
cession? A distant memory
Investors have poured a
record $17 billion into mu-
tual funds that buy junk
bonds in 2012, according to
Lipper Inc., a financial data
provider.
There was plenty of good
news this week. Unemploy-
ment claims fell to 351,000,
matching a four-year low.
The Federal Reserve sig-
naled that the economic re-
covery was gaining steam.
Apple rose 7 percent just
this week and closed Friday
at $585. Just a year and a
half ago, it was trading at
half that price. And the Nas-
daq broke through 3,000 for


day. If calling during non-office hours,
leave information so we can call you
back Please remember, SCORE is also
dedicated to coaching existing busi-
nesses to grow and diversity their prod-
uct line or service program.


Dr Frederick J.Herzogis chairman
of Citrus SCORE. He can be reached
via email at
therzog@tampabay.rrcom.


the first time since the dot-
com days more than a
decade ago.
Jack Ablin, chief invest-
ment officer of Harris Pri-
vate Bank, is optimistic
stocks will keep climbing.
Still, he plans to start selling
when the S&P 500 hits 1,450,
less than 4 percent higher.
He noted that individual
investors, as opposed to
pension funds and other in-
stitutions, have been pulling
money out of the market,
and that worries him.
"I'd rather leave a little
cash on the table than get
caught in a downdraft," he
said. "I don't know where
these gains are coming
from."
One place to look is cen-
tral banks around the world.
They have kept rates at
record lows, lent to banks or
bought government bonds or
other securities. That has
put cash in the hands of the
sellers, who can turn around
and buy stocks and other as-
sets. As it has bought over
the past 3 1/2 years, the bal-


ance sheet of the U.S. Fed-
eral Reserve has tripled to
nearly $3 trillion.
Critics say all the new
cash from central banks has
led to wild speculation in all
manner of assets stocks,
bonds, oil, corn. And just
looking at the prices, it's
hard to argue with that.
Then again, after the
deepest economic down-
turn since the Great De-
pression, prices should be
rising fast if the economy is
truly recovering, right?
Fridson of BNP Paribas
says the rise in Treasury
yields this week is a good
sign that the economy is in-
deed bouncing back. And he
doesn't seem troubled that
companies are issuing debt
now at record levels $380
billion so far this year
Still, he said some compa-
nies are trying "to sell bonds
that don't fully reflect the
risk," so he thinks investors
should be cautious. Always
good advice in fairy tales.
"You have to be on your
toes," he said.


PRICES
Continued from Page Dl

meat, fish and eggs.
Clothing costs dropped
by the most in more than
five years in February and
airfares dipped.
And natural gas prices
dropped sharply last
month and have declined
nearly 10 percent in the
past year.
That offset some of the
increase in gas costs. Mild
winter weather has cut de-
mand, at the same time
that supplies have risen as
companies extract more
natural gas from shale
rock.
But other items cost
more. Consumers paid
more for prescription
drugs, hotel rooms, and
new cars.
Rental costs rose 0.2 per-
cent for the fourth straight
month.
A separate report from
the Labor Department
showed that average
hourly pay, adjusted for in-
flation, fell 1.1 percent in
the 12 months ended in
February
A report Wednesday in-
dicated that inflation pres-
sures also aren't increasing
much at the wholesale
level.
The producer price
index, which measures
price changes before they


Consumer prices
Consumer prices rose in
February, the largest
increase in 10 months.
0 .6 ..............................................
0.5 0.4%
0.4
0.3
0.2
0.1

MAMJ JASONDJ F
'11 '12
NOTE: Seasonally adjusted figures
SOURCE: Bureau AP
of Labor Statistics

reach the consumer, rose
0.4 percent.
The gain was largely be-
cause of higher gas prices.
Excluding food and gas,
core wholesale prices rose
just 0.2 percent
A small amount of infla-
tion can be good for the
economy It encourages
businesses and consumers
to spend and invest money
sooner rather than later,
before inflation erodes its
value.
Lower price growth also
leaves more money in con-
sumers' pockets, boosting
their buying power and
supporting economic
growth.
The jump in gas and food
prices early last year lim-
ited Americans' ability to
buy other goods, slowing
the economy


GAS-SAVING TIPS
Tips to spend less on gas from www.fueleconomy.gov:
* Drive sensibly Aggressive driving (speeding, rapid
acceleration and braking) wastes gas. It can lower your
gas mileage by 33 percent at highway speeds and by 5
percent around town. Sensible driving is also safer for
you and others, so you may save more than gas money.
* Observe the speed limit While each vehicle reaches
its optimal fuel economy at a different speed (or range
of speeds), gas mileage usually decreases rapidly at
speeds above 60 mph. You can assume that each 5
mph you drive over 60 mph is like paying an additional
$0.30 per gallon for gas. Observing the speed limit is
also safer.
* Remove excess weight Avoid keeping unnecessary
items in your vehicle, especially heavy ones. An extra
100 pounds in your vehicle could reduce your MPG by
up to 2 percent. The reduction is based on the percent-
age of extra weight relative to the vehicle's weight and
affects smaller vehicles more than larger ones.
* Combine errands Several short trips taken from a
cold start can use twice as much fuel as one trip cover-
ing the same distance when the engine is warm.
* Avoid excessive idling Idling can use a quarter to a
half gallon of fuel per hour, depending on engine size
and air conditioner (AC) use. Turn off your engine when
your vehicle is parked. It only takes a few seconds worth
of fuel to restart your vehicle. Turning your engine on
and off excessively, however, may increase starter wear.
* Use cruise control Using cruise control on the high-
way helps you maintain a constant speed and, in most
cases, will save gas.
* Use overdrive gears When you use overdrive gearing,
your car's engine speed goes down. This saves gas and
reduces engine wear.
* Keep your engine properly tuned Fixing a car that is
noticeably out of tune or has failed an emissions test
can improve its gas mileage by an average of 4 per-
cent, though results vary based on the kind of repair
and how well it is done. Fixing a serious maintenance
problem, such as a faulty oxygen sensor, can improve
your mileage by as much as 40 percent.
* Keep tires properly inflated You can improve your
gas mileage by up to 3.3 percent by keeping your tires
inflated to the proper pressure.


Christine C. Eck, CPA, PA
910 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River, FL 563-2522
Certified Public Accountant Member: Florida Institute of CPAs


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I


.INCOME TX DRRErO


D2 SUNDAY, MARCH 18, 2012


BUSINESS


For more

information

on advertising

call Michael

I at 563-3273


000AAZC






Promotional information provided by the Citrus County Builders Association






Builder's connection


D3

SUNDAY
MARCH 18, 2012


Gold Crest Homes


= February v.I.P. =

Michael Gilbert

a busy builder

Michael Gilbert began his career in
the building industry in 1998 and
served in several capacities with Gold
Crest Homes prior to joining the pres-
tigious Citrus Hills construction team
in 2005.
Michael completed his licensing
classes in 2009, passing the state exam
with high percentiles in the latter part
of the year. As a state-certified build-
ing contractor, Michael became the
qualified licenseholder for Gold Crest
Homes in May 2010, when he and his
wife Kathy, formerly vice president of
Gold Crest Homes, acquired owner-
ship of the company
With their history in the company
it's easy to see why Michael and Kathy
are a perfect team to carry on the tra-
dition of fine custom homes building


-1


Michael Gilbert


standards that Gold Crest Homes has
become noted for, since that time;
Michael Gilbert has immersed himself
in several aspects of the construction
industry, including his membership in


the Citrus County Builders
Association.
Michael serves on the CCBA Gov-
ernmental affairs Committee, is the
Co-Chair of the Parade of Homes Com-
mittee, sits on the Building and
Grounds committee and was elected to
the CCBA Board of Directors in August
2010.
Not one to slow down, Michael also
took on the role of President on the
Board of Citrus Builders Care the
501c3 nonprofit company that was es-
tablished by the Citrus County
Builders Association in 2006.
When Michael is not building he en-
joys spending time with his wife and
their family attending the many ex-
tracurricular events of their 14
grandchildren.
For more information about Gold
Crest home, Michael can be contacted
at 352-527-1040 or you can visit them at
their new office on Pine Ridge Boule-
vard and also at their brand-new
model during the 2012 Spring Parade
of Homes that will begin on March 17,
2012.


Gold Crest Homes took home the Bodacious Beef, Best of Show and People's Choice awards at the third annual Bull &
BBQ. From left are FHBA President Dave Carter, Melissa Keesling, holding Mikayla Keesling, and Anjela Wright of Gold
Crest Homes and CCBA President Wayne Bardsley.


BULL & BBO


Ken Lindquist Corporation won Choicest Chicken. From left
are FHBA President Dave Carter, Ken Lindquist and Lance
Peavy of Ken Lindquist Corporation and Wayne Bardsley of
Quality Crafted Builders.


Larder & Sons Construction won Primest Pork. From left are
FHBA President Dave Carter, CCBA President Elect Bill
Larder of Larder & Sons Construction and CCBA President
Wayne Bardsley.


ABOVE: AAA Roofing won Magnificent Mystery Meat. From
left are FHBA President Dave Carter, Lori Haussy of AAA
Roofing and Wayne Bardsley of Quality Crafted Builders.
LEFT: Honorable Mention went to Erin Ray of F.D.S. Disposal
Inc., pictured with FHBA President Dave Carter and Presi-
dent Wayne Bardsley.


2012 First Place, from left: The CenterState Bank Team;
Bart Bennett of CenterState Bank with Mike Deem of
Deem Cabinets and Joe Bell of Surfaces Flooring (also of
Mike & Joe in the Morning). Not pictured, Paul LaChance
of CenterState Bank.


Golf Outing a

perennial favorite


The 2012 Jim Blackshear
Memorial Golf Outing,
sponsored by Spires Con-
tracting Corporation, was
Saturday, March 10, 2012 at
the Inverness Golf & Coun-
try Club. 60 players came
out to play the great game
of golf. While Mother Na-
ture did not offer much
sunshine, the weather was
fair, the game was good and
the food and prizes were
even better. Pictured
above is first-place team
CenterState Bank with sec-
ond-place going to the
Spires Contracting Team:
Greg Covino, Jeremiah
Champion, Nate Connors
and Butch Spires. The
Here for the Beer Award
went to Team Crosley; Jim
Crosley, Bob Crowley, Tom
McMurray and Paul
Wiegel.
The Golf Outing Commit-
tee is pleased to announce
that a donation of more
than $200 will be made to
Jessie's Place. CCBA
would like to take this time
to thank the following for
making our Golf Outing a
tremendous success:
Corporate Sponsor -
Spires Contracting Corpo-
ration.
Beverage Cart Spon-
sors Bonded Builders
Home Warranty, Bright
House Networks and Gold
Crest Homes Inc.
Golf Towel Sponsor -
Ro-mac Lumber & Supply
Green and Tee Spon-
sors Citrus County
Chronicle, Gulf Coast
Ready Mix, Jeff Dawsy
Campaign, Porter's Lock-


smithing, Quality Crafted
Builders, Ron Kitchen
Campaign, Sandra "Sam"
Himmel Campaign, Sher-
win Williams, Steven
Burch Campaign and The
Villages of Citrus Hills.
Prize Sponsors -
Blackshears II Aluminum,
CenterState Bank, Crystal
River Firestone, Lecanto
Veterinary Hospital,
Porter's Locksmithing,
Sherwin Williams.
Goodie Bag Sponsors
- 2-10 Home Buyers War-
ranty, AAA Roofing, Bright
House Networks, Brannen
Bank, CenterState Bank,
Citrus County Chronicle,
Curry's Roofing, Dream
Custom Homes, Florida
Pest Control, Franklin Re-
alty Consultants, Porter's
Locksmithing, Progress
Energy, Re/max Realty
One, Select Physical Ther-
apy, SunTrust and Tropi-
cal Window.
Special thanks to Inver-
ness Golf & Country Club
and to the following com-
mittee members and volun-
teers: Chairman Dan Kern
of Gulf Coast Ready Mix,
Co-Chair Wayne Bardsley
of Quality Crafted Builders,
Rich Gelfand of Sherwin
Williams, John and Dusty
Porter of Porter's Lock-
smithing, Kevin Blackshear
of Blackshears II Alu-
minum, Mark Schroder of
Kings Bay Engineering, An-
jela Wright and Melissa
Keesling of Gold Crest
Homes, Walt Stachowicz of
Conservation Plus and
James Panetti, event pho-
tographer


UPCOMING EVENTS
2012 Spring Parade of Homes
* The 2012 Spring Parade of Homes, presented by
Platinum Sponsor Florida Public Utilities, will begin
March 17 and run until April 1, in its traditional
scattered-site format with 11 entries throughout
Citrus and Hernando counties.
* The Spring Parade of Homes is a fantastic
opportunity, for those who are considering moving to
our beautiful Nature Coast, to check out all of their
future home options.
* For more information on the 2012 Spring Parade of
Homes and a map to the models, please visit the
official Parade of Homes website at www.Citrus
ParadeofHomes.com or call 352-746-9028.
Future Builders of America car wash
* The Future Builders of America will host a
fundraising car wash from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
March 31 at the Citrus County School District
Building at 1007 W. Main St. in Inverness during the
Spring Yard Sale at WTI next door.
* Car washes are a $5 donation, with tickets available
for presale at the CCBA from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Monday through Thursday.
* Funds raised help pay education field trips in the
construction industry such as the University of
Florida College of Planning, Design & Construction,
the Construction School at Santa Fe College and
many others.


Future
Builders of
America
cane County C hWpters
Citnus Hgh Zdhool
Crystal Riner High chod
Leatao Hgh Sdhool
Withlacoodee Technia Instaitute


MARCH 31,2012
10AM 2PM
Citrus County School Board
District Office (next to WT)
1007 W Main Street
Inverness, FL 34450


Cost s5.00
To pre-purchase tickets call 746-9028
Thanks for supporting the
Future Builders of America!
www.dciusbudlers.com!FBA.php









D4

SUNDAY
MARCH 18, 2012


Promotional information provided by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce


numberr Connection
28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


Mingle in magnificence


Chamber After-Hours Networking

Mixer coming up Thursday, March 29


Please join us Thursday, March
29, at Sandy Oaks RV Resort for a
Chamber After-Hours Networking
Mixer from 5 to 7 p.m.
At 6760 N. Lecanto Highway in
Beverly Hills, Sandy Oaks RV Re-
sort is a roomy, quiet RV resort sit-


ting on 40 acres with 150 active full
hookup sites. They offer a 3,200-
square-foot clubhouse with big-
screen TV large fireplace and
kitchen, a large heated pool adja-
cent to the clubhouse with more
than 5,000 square feet of furnished


sun deck surrounding the pool
and clubhouse. Free cable TV for
nightly and weekly stays and free
WiFi throughout the park.
Bring your business cards and
mingle with business profession-
als like yourself!
For information about Sandy
Oaks RV Resort, visit their website
at www. sandyoaksrvresort.com
For more information about this
event, please call the Chamber at
352-795-3149.


CITRUS COUNTY
Chamber of Commerce


New Image Award presented at March Membership Luncheon


p


L.


Crystal River Healthcare & Rehab, at 136 N.E. 12th Ave. in Crystal River, was awarded the New Image Award at the March Chamber Mem-
bership Luncheon. Please call 352-795-5044 for more information on the services they provide or visit their website at www.crystalriver
healthandrehab.com. Pictured with the Crystal River Healthcare & Rehab staff are Chamber Director and Board Secretary Ken Frink; Cham-
ber Ambassador Rhonda Lestinsky, Nature Coast Bank; and Chamber CEO Josh Wooten.



Vote for your favorite Bike In Bloom at area businesses


The spring season has arrived,
and our Chamber of Commerce
members are ready to show off
their Bikes In Bloom!
Creativity and a little ingenuity
have been used to create displays
of seasonal beauty featuring bikes
or motorcycles, plants and flowers.
A map will be available March 31
showing participating businesses.
We are asking the community to


grab a map and travel the county,
take some notes, and decide which
"Bike In Bloom" is your top choice!
Ballots will be available on our
website, wwwcitruscounty
chamber.com, in the Citrus County
Chronicle offices or visit the Inver-
ness or Crystal River Chamber
offices.
Drop ballots in the flower pot.
Winners will be announced May


11 and will be featured in the
Chronicle.
While you are enjoying the Bikes
in Bloom across our county, please
visit these businesses and find out
more about their products and
services. Our Chamber members
are ready to work for you!
We appreciate your participation
and hope you enjoy your travels
throughout the county For more in-


formation about Bikes In Bloom
2012 and to see pictures, please visit
our website or call 352-795-3149.
If you are a Chamber member in-
terested in participating in Bikes
In Bloom 2012, please download an
application from our website
www.citruscountychamber.com.
Business/Individual Chamber
member: $15, Nonprofit organiza-
tion Chamber member: $5.


Chamber Annual

Awards Dinner

Make your reservations now!


"Swing into the A
1920s" 2012 Annual
Cha ilber .AWrd' s
Dinner \ ill he FrI-
da.. Alprl 20. at Cit-
rus Hills Golf & \
Coiluntrl.\ Chil)
Tickets are .'
$32 per per-
son and l
sponsor-
ship op- i
po01rtinities
arej\laible
Please \i it ii
w r\ citr 11 i s
coI nt\ ( ha i1
berl:ni and
click -ReLIS-
ter to pii i
chase "I. '
tickets todll.'.^\
All pI)ro:eeds
will benefits
Cha ilber pro-
graiIS ajnd
scholia rshIIps
If ioI are in-
ter.ested in do-
natinL In
au i: C 11t 1
i t e Ill ,:


be available through
dinner. featurin. do-
nlat ed '.oods and serv-
Chainler i.eiiibers
Casin: ajiiies. photo-
' ?lhrjphs and a riftle
S,;, aie \ ill be fea-
, Ired. so co me
pi*|rep)ired'
SRe~i: option


and liie enter-
t inilent l illl
start l t il p I11.,
l ith the buffet
dinner eILiIn-
nni At 7 ) 111
SOur A\'ards
( Ceremoni \. ill
SiiIiiied lately
t foll dinner,
and the niLlit
\% 1i1 fi nish
\th a hli ive

a \ a i I h I e
e eeni1i
P I e e
Iall lihe


please C h a 11 1
i all Tole\ her offIce at .
a t the Cr.\stA I 352-7915-3 1 for
S -. Rixer Chailber an.\ q: eesti:,ns Ir '
S office, to discuss the van-
Our Silent ous sponsorship
Auction will opportunities.


ServiceSource has received the high-
est level of accreditation by CARF the
Commission on Accreditation of Rehabil-
itation Facilities. The three-year accred-
itation extends through 2015, and is a
reflection of the organization's dedication
and commitment to improving the qual-
ity of lives of the individuals they serve,
as well as an indication of excellence in
service delivery and outcomes.
The ServiceSource Florida Regional
Office has been accredited for a range of
services, including job development, job
supports, job-site training and compre-
hensive vocational evaluation services.
While the nonprofit organization re-
ceived accolades for its many programs
and services for individuals with disabil-
ities, it received an exemplary confor-
mance to standards report for its Warrior
Bridge program.
Surveyors recognized ServiceSource
for being one of the first organizations of


its kind in the United States to recognize
and address the needs of returning vet-
erans with disabilities.
The Warrior Bridge was recognized for
its impact in providing employment serv-
ices and supports to wounded veterans.
The ServiceSource Florida Regional
Office is a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit corpora-
tion based in Clearwater. Established in
1959, ServiceSource provides employ-
ment, housing, training and other support
services to people with disabilities.
ServiceSource's North Central Florida
offices are at 2071 N. Lecanto Highway in
Lecanto and serves clients in Citrus, Mar-
ion, Levy, Lake, Sumter and Hernando
counties.
To learn more about services the North
Central Florida offices provides, call
Tammy Adams at 352-527-3722, ext. 105.
For more information about Service-
Source, please visit the website at
www.servicesource.org.


Social Media Strategies and Live Tutorial


Join the Citrus County Business Re-
source Alliance from 6 to 8 p.m. Tuesday,
March 20, at the College of Central Florida
when Gina Smith, marketing strategist with
Casto Communications and SBRN Con-
sultant Network, discusses social media
strategies designed to enhance awareness
of your business and drive more customers
to your doorstep or online store.
Sponsored by Comfort Keepers and
Canadian Meds, the workshop will be di-
vided into two sections.
Part One, "Effectively Utilizing Social
Media," addresses how your business can
utilize social media as a marketing tool,
how to ensure your marketing message is
communicated effectively and whether


your message stands out amongst the
hundreds of other daily messages.
Part Two, Don't have a Facebook page?
"Live Facebook Tutorial" will take you
step-by-step through the process of build-
ing a company Facebook page and utiliz-
ing it to engage your customers and
potential customers. Learn how to use
Like, Share, Newsfeed, Comment and
Events to take your message viral.
The cost of the workshop is $15 per per-
son for members of the Chamber of Com-
merce, EDC, SBDC and SCORE; $20 per
person for general public. Please register
online at www.citruscountychamber.com,
call Cindi Fein at 352-795-3149, or email
cindi@citruscountychamber.com.


Rhonda Lestinsky


Ambassador

Spotlight

Rhonda Lestinsky is First
Vice President at Nature
Coast Bank and has been a
Chamber Ambassador since
2004.
A lifelong resident of Cit-
rus County, Rhonda and her
husband Don have one son,
Travis, and three grandchil-
dren, Preston, Landon and
Lilly Anne.
She enjoys snorkeling,
fishing, hunting and reading
in her spare time.
Rhonda's fun personality
comes out when she puts on
goofy costumes for her fam-
ily's Annual Family Fall
Cookout!


CMHS

awarded

recertification

from Joint

Commission

Hospital

maintains

certified

primary stroke

center status
After undergoing an on-
site evaluation and demon-
strating compliance with
nationally developed stan-
dards for stroke care, Citrus
Memorial Health System
has earned The Joint Com-
mission's Gold Seal of Ap-
proval for certification as a
Primary Stroke Center
Each year, about 795,000
people experience a new or
recurrent stroke, which is
the nation's third leading
cause of death. On average,
someone suffers a stroke
every 40 seconds and some-
one dies of a stroke every 3.1
minutes. Stroke is a leading
cause of serious, long-term
disability in the United
States, with about 4.7 mil-
lion stroke survivors alive
today
The Joint Commission's
Primary Stroke Center Cer-
tification is based on the
recommendations for pri-
mary stroke centers pub-
lished by the Brain Attack
Coalition and the American
Stroke Association's state-
ments and guidelines for
stroke care. The Joint Com-
mission launched the pro-
gram the nation's first -
in 2003. A list of programs
certified by The Joint Com-
mission is available at
www. qualitycheck. org.
Learn more about Citrus
Memorial at wwwcitrusmh.
com.


ServiceSource secures highest

level of CARF accreditation


L f






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



MONEY
Continued from Page Dl

for more than 30 years. It's
absolutely amazing they are
still being peddled.
DEAR BRUCE: I am the
first of four children. Our fa-
ther passed away in Sep-
tember. He had about
$14,000 in the bank, a pickup
truck and a home on a little
piece of property He had no
debt. We have an older will
showing a brother as execu-
tor, but the newest will,
which we can't find, shows
our little sister as executor.
Since my father's death,
my niece has been living in
his home. She is unem-
ployed, and my sister has
been paying all the bills
with what Daddy had left in
the bank. She is co-owner of
his bank account, so she can
legally spend his money I
don't mind my niece living
there, but I don't like the
fact she is getting my inher-
itance and I am getting
nothing and not being asked
anything.
My sister has decided to
do this on her own, and she
is still grieving for our dad.
She was closest to him,
helping him to pay bills and
taking care of him. His
death has really thrown her
for a loop, and she is not
ready to start making any
decisions regarding his es-
tate. She is a little spitfire
and no one wants to make
her mad, but I am afraid it is
heading down that road if
she doesn't get it together
and start making some deci-
sions. I have no idea what to
do or where to start. -
Reader, via email
DEAR READER: There
are several things we have
to deal with.
First, if you can't find the
"newest" will, then it does-
n't exist, and the will that
named your brother execu-
tor is the most current one.
You should tell your
brother he has an obligation
to file the will for probate. If
he doesn't want to do that,
you can apply to the Probate
Court, saying the will exists
but is in the hands of a
brother who does not wish to
probate it The Surrogates
Court then can start the me-


BUSINESS


chanics of having someone
else appointed administrator
Your brother may fight it
or your sister may fight it,
and that's going to create
even more problems. The
surrogate, I believe, has the
authority to go to the sister
who is handling things and
tell her she must collect a
reasonable amount of rent
because assets are being de-
pleted and, in truth, she has
no legal standing.
I can sympathize with
your sister's grief; however,
your dad passed away six
months ago. The fact she is a
"spitfire" and nobody wants
to make her mad is fine, but
somebody is going to have to
either step in or step away
Otherwise, it won't take long
for the value of the estate to
be depleted altogether.
There is going to be acri-
mony, and I don't know how
you are going to avoid that.
Even if the new will shows
up, your sister still has the
authority and she's sitting
back, doing nothing positive.
I would get all of the in-
terested parties together
and see if you can work out
a reasonable compromise.
This is one of those situa-
tions in which, if the assets
are relatively modest, it
probably doesn't pay to fight
it. That's bad news for you.
If you are willing to take
the responsibility, tell your
siblings that if everyone
agrees, you will allow the
surrogate to appoint you ad-
ministrator, but you must
have the ability to make the
decision that is best for the
benefit of the estate. If they
won't agree and if the value
of the estate is relatively
small, it will probably be
best for you to step back and
watch it decay
DEAR BRUCE: About
four years ago, a major bank
called us about refinancing
our mortgage. We agreed,
and the bank qualified us
for a loan of $1,960 per
month. We are on a fixed in-
come pension and Social
Security for my husband
and me for a total of
about $4,200 per month.
The bank qualified us by
"grossing up" our Social Se-
curity benefits, which added
about $800 to our income.
The irony is, we don't have
income taxes taken out, and


that $800 is an illusion. The
bank did not offer escrow
with the loan, so we are re-
sponsible for taxes and
insurance.
Three years ago we did a
three-year modification, re-
ducing our payment to
$1,390 per month. Still, no
escrow for taxes.
Today we are behind
three years in our property
taxes, our house payment is
going back to $1,960 and we
are in a mess. We've talked
to a bankruptcy lawyer, who
recommends Chapter 13
with a payback of three
years. I am worried about
our house payment, which
is about 44 percent of our in-
come. Is bankruptcy our
best option, or should we try
to work with the bank for a
solution to the house pay-
ment and back taxes? -
D.G., via email
DEAR D.G.: I am having a
problem with a couple of
things.
First, when the bank
would not establish an es-
crow account, which is no
big deal, why did you not
open your own escrow ac-
count? This would be a sep-
arate account where every
month you would deposit
money to pay your home-
owners insurance and real
estate taxes. That would
have accomplished the same
thing as a bank escrow ac-
count You put yourself into
this problem by not taking
the responsibility to do that
In manipulating the mort-
gage to reduce your monthly
payment, you had the advan-
tage of paying less but did not
look ahead to when your
mortgage would have to re-
turn to its previous rate.
You've tried to finance your
way to solvency through a
back door, and that just isn't
in the cards. I'm not trying to
pick on you, but those are ob-
vious mistakes you made that
you don't want to make again.
In considering bank-
ruptcy, you have to discuss
what option would be best
for you. A Chapter 7 bank-
ruptcy is absolute: The
house gets sold and almost
all of your debts are dis-
charged. Chapter 13, which
you state is what your attor-
ney recommends, is simply
a reorganization that gives
you time to get back on your


feet. While neither is really
desirable in terms of credit,
Chapter 13 would allow you
some breathing room.
I don't think trying to refi-
nance with the bank to get
yourself out of debt is the
way to go. That whole busi-
ness right now is so screwed
up, I would stay away from
it if I possibly could.
Another question to you:
Is it absolutely necessary for
you to maintain the home
you are in now? If not, is the
market in your part of the
world starting to recover? In
other words, if you could
sell the house and use the
equity you have to buy a
much smaller place or get
into the rental market, that
might be a viable solution
for you. Make sure you go
over all of your options with
your attorney
DEAR BRUCE: I signed
up for an airline rewards
credit card a few years ago,
reasoning that not only do I
get points for the money I
spend, but also for the miles
I travel. I got one free flight
(out of two) in the last two
years but paid $79 per year
for the privilege of having
the card. I probably spend
about $20,000 on the card
each year, using it as much
as I can and paying off the
balance each month.
Recently, when I tried to
make a reservation for a
flight six months out, I was
told all of the free seats on
all of the flights were al-
ready gone. So I tried for
one year out (my regular
visit to the grandkids in De-
cember NOT over the
Christmas blackout dates),
and was told it was too far
out to book the return trip.
When I called back a few
days later, again there were
no seats, plus the airline
had almost doubled the
points needed for a flight.
So now I apparently have to
spend $40,000 on my credit
card AND pay $158 and
MAYBE I'll get a free flight
every two years.
I have other credit cards
that will pay me 1 percent
back, so I could make $400
in those two years AND I
wouldn't be constrained to
using that one airline.
My plan is to accumulate
points and keep trying until
I get one more free flight,


then cancel the card so I can
stop paying the yearly fee. I
am still registered as a fre-
quent flier and will earn the
points when I fly, but the
most compelling reason to
do this is I am appalled by
the airline's advertising -
free flights for only 25,000
points! Yeah, try to get one.
Is my strategy sound? -
J.D., Lehigh Valley, Pa.
DEAR J.D.: I sympathize
with your frustration over
having no seats available,
etc. You must understand
airlines allocate only so
many "free" seats even
fewer to popular destina-
tions and during popular
travel times and they can
disappear quickly There are
cards, however, that adver-
tise they have no blackouts.
For the little bit of flying
you do and the relatively
modest amount of money
you spend each year, I think
you're getting all excited
about very little. Unless you
can make some major pur-
chases to bump up your
point accumulation for that
last trip, I would just forget
about the points you have
accumulated and write it off
as a bad deal. It is not worth
the frustration.
Stay registered in the fre-
quent flier program; it costs
you nothing. If you continue
to fly with this airline and
accumulate miles, that's
OK. And there's no reason
for you to have to pay an an-
nual fee. How much does it
cost you to have your 1 per-
cent cash-back credit cards
in play?
You mentioned "free
flights for only 25,000 points
... try and get one." You re-
ally can, but your timing has
to be good, and you need to
be persistent. Airlines are
always releasing seats that
can be purchased with
miles not every day, but it
does happen. The window
for catching these seats is
small. Additionally, a couple
of days before departure,
airlines will make seats
available for frequent fliers
if any are still available.
I have accumulated a
number of frequent flier
points with my years of trav-
eling, and there are times
when I can't find what I'm
looking for, so I wind up pur-
chasing a ticket.


SUNDAY, MARCH 18, 2012 D5

DEAR BRUCE: I have a
question regarding your re-
cent article about annuities.
If you are not keen on annu-
ities, what is your sugges-
tion for a replacement after
reaching the 70 1/2 manda-
tory withdrawal age, when
it's important to hold on to
all the money for "old age"?
- Reader, via email
DEAR READER: I think
what you're asking is, where
do I reinvest the money I
must withdraw from my IRA
at age 70 1/2? While you say
you have to hold onto the
money for "old age," sooner
or later the taxes have to be
paid. There's nothing to pre-
vent you from investing the
residual amount of the
mandatory withdrawal in
any investment you choose.
You could invest in the mar-
ketplace, where there's a
decent possibility of a re-
turn (a loss is also possible),
or in interest-bearing vehi-
cles that pay almost nothing.
Another variable is how
much money you are re-
quired to withdraw. That, of
course, is determined by the
amounts you have shel-
tered. The more money
sheltered, the more you
have to withdraw at 70 1/2.
I wouldn't lose a lot of
sleep over this if I were you.
You haven't mentioned how
much the sheltered money is
earning. It's possible it would
be better to take out more of
your retirement money, pay
the taxes and then invest it in
large, well-established com-
panies that pay decent divi-
dends as much as 3.5
percent to 4 percent.
Even taking into consider-
ation the money you are re-
quired to withdraw, the
money is earning so little as
currently invested that the
residual can earn more
money once the taxes have
been paid, and you can use it
at your discretion in your
"old age." I wish you well,
and I hope you have this tax
problem for the next 30 years.


Send questions to
bruce@brucewilliams. corn
or to Smart Money, PO. Box
2095, Elfers, FL 34680.
Questions of general inter-
est will be answered in fu-
ture columns. Personal
replies cannot be provided.


CITRUS COUNTY




CH ONICLE Classifieds
www.chronicleonline.com Classifieds In Print and Online All The Time!


BUSINESS HOURS:

MONDAY-FRIDAY
8:00 A.M. 5:00 P.M.
CLOSED SATURDAY/SUNDAY


WE GLADLY ACCEPT


Publication Days/Deadlines

Chronicle / Daily.................................... 1 PM, Daily
Homefront / Sunday...............................3 PM, Friday
Chronicle / Sunday.............................4...4 PM, Friday
Chronicle / Monday............................4...4 PM, Friday
Sumter County Times / Thursday............ 11 AM, Tuesday
Riverland News / Thursday.....................2 PM, Monday
South Marion Citizen / Friday..............4...4 PM, Tuesday
West Marion Messenger / Wednesday.......4 PM, Friday


Kenmore
Washer & Dryer
$75.
Good Running Cond.
(352) 697-2195


$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
Paid for Junk Vehicles,
J.W. 352-228-9645
$$ CASH PAID $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL
Appls. Riding Mowers,
Scrap Metal, AC Unit
cell -352-270-4087


BORDER COLL IE MIX
8 yr old spayed female,
short, hair, healthy,
gentle loves kids
(352) 220-0974




oiurof'ld first

Need a joh
or a
qualified
employee?


This area's
#1
employment
source!


ti ijijoij -oi-ij~ f i


fertilizer horse manure
mixed with pine shavings
great for gardens or
mulch. 352-628-9624
Free Horse Manure
and shavings
for garden
(352) 746-7044
FREE MINIATURE
JACK RUSSELL
352-423-0819
Gold Colored
Australian Shepherd
Pure bred, Ex television
performer, Looking for
Retirement home as
pet only, UTD on shots,
and spayed
(352) 422-5622
KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Savage Pays top $$$.
352-628-4144
LLASA APSO POODLE
4 yr old healthy male
gray w/white face &
chest, loves kids
(352) 220-0974
Need free baby items,
please. Anything
will be appreciated.
(352) 201-2980
taking donations of all
kinds,clothing,shoes,dothes of all
sizes and baby
stuff,ect call jamie @
352-586-9754.


and read
Chihuahua 10" 7#
Black dog with Nar-
row white blaze on
throat down sternum.
Blue Collar with gold
bell. Name Pierre an-
swers to Inky-dink.
Lost @ 34446, 1 mile
east of Texaco off
Grover Cleveland.
Chipped and regis-
tered with PetLink.
If you find me, please
report it on
http://www.petlink.net/u
s
or call 1-877-PETLINK
(1-877-738-5465)


is
1TO ADVERTISE CALL:

352yM563EI5966^

OR PLACE YOURAD OLINE ATB^
wwwTATA.ch. 1 1ron rjiceonl :-ine~jcom^


(ONN(TIN THERIGH

BUYRSWIH OU MSSG


Jack Russel Terrier
White and Brown, 20#
12" 34446 area. Scar
in right side of snoot
and Hole in right side
of lip caused by
snake bite. Name
LUCY, Dug under
fence, 1 mile east of
Texaco off Grover
Cleveland. Chipped
and registered with
PetLink.
If you find me, please
report it on
http://www.petlink.net/u
s
or call 1-877-PETLINK
(1-877-738-5465).
Mini Schnauzer
salt pepper Female off
Waldron Ct. in the vic of
Hwy 488 & Hwy 495
Please call owner she
has had her since a
pups (352) 270-1444





REWARD $1000.
No Questions ask.
Min Pin Female 10 lbs
name Zoey, Needs
meds. last seen Sun 8/7
Holiday Dr off Turkey
Oak Crystal River
(352)257-9546400-1519
Tan & White Corgi mix
female last seen
979 S Rooks Av
Inverness on Sat 3/10th
(352) 476-0719476-2790
Yorkie, female
Lost Seven River
Hospital Paking Lot
Name Chrissie
(352) 422-5693


Your World





CHk( )Nl I-E


Found Black & White,
Medium Size young
Male Dog, found Near
Mama Sally's across
from Crystal River Mall
(352) 958-8882
Found Canoe
on Withlacoochee
3/14
Call to identify
(352) 228-7663



Huge discounts when
you buy 2 types of
advertising! 122
weekly newspapers,
32 websites, 25 daily
newspapers. Call
now to diversify your
advertising with Ad-
vertising Networks of
Florida
(866)742-1373



MOVING OR DE-
CLUTTERING OR LEFT
OVER YARD SALE
ITEMS ? Will pick up your
donations. Proceeds for
rescue puppy surgery.
Thank U352-270-3909
Room Mate $385/mo
incls all. priv room &
bath, electric, etc
(352) 341-4449





EXECUTIVE/
ADMINISTRATIVE
ASSISTANT
Looking for a qualified
Executive/Adminstrabve
AssslantMandatory.
must be proficient in Mi-
crosoft Office Suite, Mi-
crosoft Excel. Possess
great social skills and
be extremely profes-
sional. Qualified candi-
dates should send
applications to
rooddept@gmail.com


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966




#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)
#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-34 1-PREP (7737)
F/T Ophthalmic
Assistant/Scribe
Prior experience
preferred in eye care
field performing
patient workups,
history, and
documentation.
Apply in person
West Coast Eye
Institute
240 N Lecanto Hwy,
Lecanto FL 34461
352 746 2246 x834

MEDICAL BILLING
TRAINEES NEEDED
Train to become a
Medical Office Assis-
tant! No Experience
needed! Job Training
& Local Placement
assistance. HS
Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)374-7294


CNA/HHA's
Apply At
HOME INSTEAD
SENIOR CARE
4224 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Lecanto

MEDICAL
COLLECTIONS/
ADMINISTRATIVE
ASSISTANT
TMC, A company
committed to service
excellence, has a full
time position
available for a
Medical Collections
Administrative
Assistant at our
Homosassa/Sugarmill
location.
Candidate should
have 1 + yrs medical
collections experi-
ence. Medicare bill-
ing, electronic, paper
claims processing
and DDE a plus.
Please apply online
at
www.therapymgmt.co
m


R.N.'S
*SEVEN RIVERS

RN Opportunities
in the following areas
* Comp Rehab
SCritical Care
* Med Surg Telemetry
Emergency services
SCardiac Cath Lab
* Charge Nurse ICU
SER Charge Nurse
APPLY IN PERSON
or online to:
Stephanie Arduser
Employment Coor.
6201 N. Suncoast Blv
Crystal River
Phone 352-795-8462
Fax: 352-795-8464
www.srrmc.com
6sk L.% R|i LI,
EOE/Drug/Tabaco
Free Workplace


You can earn at least $800 per month
delivering the


Independent contractors delivering the Citrus County
Chronicle can earn as much as $1,000 a month
working only 3-4 early morning hours per day. The
Chronicle is a permanent part of Citrus County with
an excellent reputation. To find out more, call
and speak to one of our district managers or leave
your name and phone number and we will get right
back with you!


563-3201







D6 SUNDAY, MARCH 18, 2012


NOW HIRING

RN's
All Units, with Hospital
Experience
Apply on Line: www.
nurse-temps.comrn
(352) 344-9828

P/T MEDICAL
ASSISTANT
Experience needed.
Please send resume
to P.O. Box 3087
Homosassa Springs,
Florida 34447

Senior HR
Representative
TMC, a company
committed to service
excellence, is seek-
ing an experienced
Senior HR Represent-
ative for a FT position
located in
Homosassa, FL. 3+
years of related HR
exp, HR certification
preferred. Must be
team player, results
oriented. ADP and
OneNote experience
preferred Competi-
tive salary, excellent
benefits and 401K.
Please apply online
at www.therapymgmt
.com

ULTRASOUND
SONOGRAPHER
NEEDED
Registered
sonographer needed
for busy Mobile X-ray
Company.
Triple registry
preferred.
Must have a good
driving record
Fax resume to
:352-372-2386





CUST. SERVICE
REP/or 220 Agent

Needed for busy
Insurance office.
Apply in person
9am-12N
SHELDON PALMES
INSURANCE
8469 W Grover Cleve-
land, Homosassa


ALL EXTERIOR
ALUMINUM
6" Seamless Gutters
Lic & Ins 352-621-0881
ROB SCREENING
Repairs Rescreen, Front
Entries, Garage, Sliders
Free Est. 352-835-2020
SUBURBAN IND. INC.
Screen rms, Rescreens,
Siding, airports, rf.overs
wood decks, Fla. rooms
windows, garage scrns.
628-0562 (CBC1257141)



SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Washer &
Dryers, Free Pick Up
352-564-8179



Blind Factory
We custom make all
types. Best prices any-
where! Hwy 44 & CR
491. (352) 746-1998




V THIS OUT!
PHIL'S MOBILE MARINE
Repairs & Consignment
30 yrs Cert. Best Prices
& Guar 352-220-9435



ROGERS Construction
All Construction
sm jobs Free Est (352)
637-4373 CRC1326872




SHADY VIEW CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
Repairs. 352 613-2518





'o1r \\olld first.
EvjI) Da)




Classifieds


PET RESORT TECH
FOR UPSCALE PET
RESORT IN LECANTO
Must be personable,
hard wking, reliable,
exp w/dogs in an
open setting. Must be
willing to learn & be
flexible to work holi-
days and weekends.
Reliable transp,
office, computer
exp. helpful. Able to
pass back ground &
drug test. Email
teejaal@yahoo.com
NO WALK INS




LOLLYGAGGERS
Sports Pub & Grill
Now Hirlng
ALL POSITIONS
Experience Req'd
Apply wlthln
744 SE US HWy 19
(next to Mr B's
carwash) Cry Rlv.

SERVERS
Must be 18 or older.
Apply Fisherman's
Restaurant
12311 E Gulf to Lake
(352) 637-5888




AC SALES
Will train right person,
easy six figure income
Must have val. fl. DL,
Barb 352-726-1002

Manager Needed
Openings in mgt. Exp.
Pref'd but not req'd
Training & Benefits
$650 $850. Call Ms.
Watson 352-436-4460

SALES
NEED A GOOD JOB?
We have the best one
Guar. salary Benefits,
advancement.
Call Mrs. Charlton
352-726-5600

Lf'. ljrI." '
Y, 1. *l I IJ rst.



Classifieds


AFFORDABLE
COMPUTER SERV.
(352) 341-4150
DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469




Bianchi Concrete
inc.com ins.lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-
Sidewalks. Pool deck
repair/stain 257-0078
CURB APPEAL/ Lic
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River rock
reseals & repairs. 352
364-2120/410-7383
FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, staining &
Garage Firs. Recession
Prices! 352-527-1097
ROB'S MASONRY
& CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs Tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554




All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing,Hauling,
Site Prep, Driveways.
Lic. & Ins. 352- 795-5755




COUNTYWIDE DRY-
WALL 25 years exp.
For all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Lic/ins. 352-302-6838




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Plasma TV installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
ANNIE'S ELECTRIC
Husband & Wife
Team.(352) 341-5952
EC-13002696
Thomas Electric LLC
Generator main &
rear. Guardian
Homestandby, &
Centurion. Cert. Tech.
Briggs Stratton 352-
621-1248 #ER00015377


Code
Compliance
Officer
Announcement
# 12-16
This is specialized
technical and cleri-
cal work enforcing
County codes,
primarily the Land
Development Code,
Nuisance Abatement
section of the County
Code of Ordinance.
and assist with water
enforcement. Must
possess a valid Florida
Driver License with a
good driving record.
Florida Association of
Code Enforcement
training/certification
preferred. Full time
Starting pay
$14.56 hourly.
Excellent benefits.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE:
Please visit our
website at
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 West Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, Fl. 34461
to apply online by
by Friday, March 23,
2012 EOE/ADA.


LOCAL TOWER
SERVICE CO.
Looking for
Individual capable of
ascending & servic-
ing tall broadcasting
towers. (will train)
Electronlcelectrical
Travel required
throughout the
Southeast.
Company Vehicle,
fuel, hotel provided
for travel. Good
Pay,Health
Beneflts,Per Diem.
Vacation / Bonuses!
Background Check.
NEED CLEAN FL
DRIVER'S LICENSE!
Apply In person at:
Hillghts Inc.
4177 N. Citrus Ave.
Crystal River, FI
(352) 564-8830
rsobol@
hlllahtslnc.com


BRIGHT ELECTRICAL
Res./Comm. Lic & Ins.
$50.hr. EC0001303
352-302-2366




A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002

BOB BROWN'S
Fence & Landscaping
352-795-0188/220-3194
ROCKY'S FENCING
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
S352 422-7279




ALL EXTERIOR
ALUMINUM
6" Seamless Gutters
Lic & Ins 352-621-0881
ALUMINUM
STRUCTURES
5" & 6" Seamless Gutters
Free Estimates, Lic &
Ins. (352) 563-2977



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Plasma TV installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
Andrew Joehl
Handyman.
Gen/Maint/Repairs
Pressure cleaning.
Lawns/Gutters. No job
too small!Reli able ,ins.
0256271 352-465-9201

Affordable Handyman
V FAST
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST
V AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
.100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handyman
V FAST
AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
.100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *


DRIVERS
Hometime Choices:
Express lanes
Weekly, 7/ON-7/OFF,
14/ON-7/OFF. WEEKLY,
Full and Part time. Dry
and Refrigerated, New
Trucks! CDL-A, 3 months
recent experience re-
quired. Top Benefits!
(800)414-9569
www.drivekniaht.com
DRIVERS: RUN
5 STATES REGIONAL!
Get Home Weekends,
earn up to 39cent mile,
1 yr OTR Flatbed Exp.
required. SUNBELT
TRANSPORT, LLC
800-572-5489 X 227
-S---
SSERVICE
PLUMBERS
Must have driver's
llcense352-621-0671


TOOLMAKER
NEED PANTOGRAPH
EXP. FORM GRINDER,
A/C SHOP, BENEFITS,
TURBINE BROACH CO.
(352) 795-1163





$$$$$$$
Money is available!
We are seeking
individuals to
manage rack and
store delivery of the
Citrus County
Chronicle
and other
publications.
Must be at least 18
years of age and
possess a valid
driver's license and
insurance. Routes
are 7 days a week,
early morning hours.
Earning potential is
unlimited! Email
kstewart@chronicle
online.com or bring
resume to 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd. in
Crystal River.


ABC Painting & Handy
man All your needs at
recession prices Dale
352-586-8129
Affordable Handyman
FAST
V AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
.100% Guar. .Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *






HOME CARE
Lawn & Handyman
Services. Sprinkler
Repair 352-212-4935





V THIS OUT!
AC & HEAT PUMPS
FREE Estimate & 2nd
Opinion, 10 yr. warr
on ALL Parts, Great
prices, ALL the time.
352-400-4945
Lic #CAC027361




MAID TO ORDER
House Cleaning *
(352) 586-9125
Have Vacum Will Travel
H-I



HOUSE SITTER
For SMW, Will watch
your home for Summer
Frank (352) 382-3878



*** ****
The Tile Man
Bathroom remodel
Specializing in
handicap. Lie/Ins.
#2441. 352-634-1584



#1 BOBCAT FOR HIRE
Light land clearing, site
work, grading, hauling.
NO JOB TOO SMALL!!!
Lic. & Ins. 352-400-0528


CLASSIFIED



Engineering
Director
Announcement
# 12-15
Professional manage-
ment position
supervising a division
consisting of four
distinct sections and
approximately 19
employees. Repre-
sents the department
in meetings with the
public, engineering
consultants, County
management staff,
state agencies, etc.
Oversees the design
and construction of
multi-million dollar
roadway construc-
tion projects.
Prepares and
manages the County
roadway capital im-
provement program.
Requirements are
graduation from a
four year college or
university with a
degree in civil
engineering, consid-
erable experience in
professional engi-
neering and registra-
tion as a PE in the
State of Florida or
able to obtain Florida
Registration within six
months of employ-
ment. Pay range
$2,297.23 to $3,445.80
Bi-Weekly DOQ.
Excellent benefits.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE:
Please visit our
website at
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 West Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, Fl. 34461

to apply online by
Friday, March 30,
2012 EOE/ADA.


All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
All AROUND TRACTOR
- I I I H l. : -I. :
352-795-5755
TRACTOR WORK
Sm Job Specialist
$30 + $30 per hr
352-270-6800







flocrete. River rock
reseals & repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
RIVENBARK LAWN &
LANDSCAPE.
Best Prices in town for
all your lawn care
needs!! (352) 464-3566




BEVERLY HILLS
most yards $20.
Quick dependable,
352-422-5978
GOT LEAVES?
Ask about leaf vac
system, Free est.
Winter Clean up +
Hauling 352 344-9273
cell 352-201-9371

GRASS SEEDS! GRASS
SEEDS! GRASS SEEDS!
American Farm & Feed
352-795-6013


25 Driver Trainees
Needed!
Learn to drive for
TMCTransportation
Earn $750 per week!
No experience
needed! local CDL
Training! Job ready in
3 weeks!
(888)368-1964

American Farm
& Feed
Looking for Someone
Knowledgeable with
Animals & Animal
Care. Must have an
outgoing personality.
Heavy lifting, clean
drivers. Lic. required.
Fax Resume to
352-795-1750

APPOINTMENT
SETTERS NEEDED
Seniors Welcome
No nights, No wknds.
Apply at
6421 W. Homosassa
Trail, Homosassa FI

CASA IS HIRING

Advocate for a
full time position
11 pm to 7 am,
Mon through Fri.
CASA is smoke free
work place. Apply at
outreach at 1100
Turner Camp Rd.
Inverness, Fl. 34453

DRIVER
$0 TUITION
CDL(A) Training &
JOB! Top Industry Pay,
Quality Training, Sta-
bility & Miles! *Short
employment com-
mitment required.
(800)326-2778
www. JoinCRST.com

Freight Up
= More $ 2 Mos.
CDL Class A
Driving Exp
(877)258-8782
www. melton
truck.com/drive

Part time
Delivery Position

Mon. Thurs. 8:30-3p
Approximate
Must have clean
Florida Driver. Lic.
GOLDEN X PLUMBING
(352) 726-9349


HALLOCK & SON
LAWN CARE -ALL Your
lawn care needs. Detailed
Work. 400-1197, Lic/Ins.
HOME CARE
Lawn & Handyman
Services. Sprinkler
Repair 352-212-4935
JUSTIN LAWN CARE
Fast and Affordable.
and Friendly, Licensed.
(352) 476-3985



AT YOUR HOME
Mower, Parts Service &
Repair.Visit our store@
1332 SE Hwy 19
352-220-4244



A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs, trash,
lawn maint. furn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
ALL OF CITRUS
CLEAN UPS CLEAN OUTS
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790



Chris Satchell Painting
ASAP
30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
A- George Swedlige
Painting/press cleaning
Int/Ext. texture/drywall
repair (352) 794-0400


BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Day,
We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over"Your Old One!!!
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!
Call now for a FREE
In-Home Estimate

1-866-585-8827
BATHFITTER.COM
000AECJ


PRE SCHOOL
TEACHER
experience req'd
(352) 795-6890
WILL TRAIN

Willing to work long
hours,and some
Saturday's Must be
physically fit for
position in well drilling
operation & pump
repair. Must be 20
years or older.
Must have clean
driving record.
No phone Calls,
Apply in Person
after 8am @
CITRUS WELL DRILLING
2820 E Norvell Bryant
Hwy. Hernando




#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)



AIRLINES ARE HIRING -
Train for hands on
Aviation Maintenance
Career. FAA approved
program.
Financial aid if qualified
Housing Available.
CALL Aviation Institute
Of Maintenance.
(866)314-3769




"Can you Dig It?"
Heavy Equipment
School, 3 wk training
program. Backhoes,
Bulldozers, Trackhoes.
Local Job placement
asset. Start digging
dirt Now.
(877)994-9904

Attend College
Online from Home
*Medical, *Business,
*Paralegal,
*Accounting,
*Criminal Justice. Job
placement assis-
tance. Computer
available. Financial
Aid if qualified.
SCHEV certified. Call
(877)206-5165
www.CenturaOnline
.com


ABC Painting LLC
All your painting needs
@ recession prices. Call
Dale 352-586-8129
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998




Tim Herndon Plumbing
$10. off w/this ad
10 yrs serving Citrus Co
lic/insCFC1428395
(352) 201-8237




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST. (352) 586-2996
ABC Press. Cleaning.
All your cleaning needs
at recession prices.
Free Est .Dale 586-8129
JOHN GRAY
*DRIVEWAYS $55.
-HOUSE $75/POOL $85
(352) 270-8310
Pic PICARD'S Pressure
Cleaning & Painting
352-341-3300




Remodeling, kitchens
baths, ceramic tile &
tops. Decks, Garages
Handyman Services 40
Yrs Exp. crc058140
344-3536; 563-9768


Ron's Affordable
Handyman Services
,' All Home
S Repairs
A -* Small Carpentry
Fencing
-* Screening
S* Ctean Dryer
S Vents
Affordable & Dependable
Experience lifelong
352.344-0905
o J cell: 400-1722


#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)



TAYLO LLEGE



NE6If.W


2 WEEK
PREP COURSES!
*ALF ADMINISTRATOR
$300.
*EKG TECH $475.
*NURSING ASST. $475.
*PHLEBOTOMY $475.
tavlorcolleae.edu
(352) 245-4119
FB, twitter, you tube

NOW

ENROLLING
FOR SPRING
2012 CLASSES
u-BARBER
ICOSMETOLOGY
i*FACIAL
.*FULL SPECIALTY
I NSTRUCTOR
*wTRAINING
I MANICURE/Nall Ext


BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
NEW PORT RICHEY
/SPRING HILL
727-848-8415
352-263-2744
---I---IJ





8 MOBILE HOMES
12 AC., Good Income
Lots of Possibilities
(352) 212-6182




"HUGE OPPORTUNITY"
NEW CO. COMING
TO THE AREA, LOOK-
ING FOR (3) PROFES-
SIONAL SALES PEO-
PLE W/MANAGEMENT
SKILLS... SIX FIGURE
INCOME CALL:
(302)497-0330 LV MSG


Attention Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers are
required by state law
to include their state
license number in all
advertisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious that
you may be contact-
ing an unlicensed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For questions
about business
licensing, please call
your city or county gov-
ernment offices.






Now $80 Bahia Pallets
U-Pick Up. Special
Spring Pricing. Call
Now!! 352-400-2221




HOME CARE
Lawn & Handyman
Services. Sprinkler
Repair 352-212-4935


2 Old English brass
Carriage Lamps
Lamps $200.
(352) 563-2555
Early 1900's
solid wood Amoire &
vanity $375 ea.
(352) 476-0563




10 Different U.S.
Government sealed,
Proof sets, all $100.
(352)476-6885













Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





BROAN RANGE HOOD
WHITE CLEAN 25.00
SHARP MICROWAVE
BLACK 25.00
352-419-4429
GE ELECT. RANGE
COIL BURNERS, LIKE
NEW $250 634-2004
HOTPOINT DRYER
white looks good works
great 100.00 dennis
352-503-7365
Kenmore Dryer
White $129. Hotpoint
electric stove, nice
cond $149.
(352) 382-1617
Kenmore refrigerator,
2 door, good cond.,
$100 Water cooler, $10
(352) 220-1692
Kenmore Washer
Like New
$350
386-547-8855


A Cutting Edge
Tile Jobs Showers
Firs .Safety Bars. ETC
352-422-2019
Lic. #2713, Insured.




A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest Rates
Free est.(352)860-1452

DAVID'S
TREE SERVICE
(352) 302-5641

All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
DOUBLE J Tree Serv.
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
R WRIGHT Tree Service
Tree removal & trimming.
Ins. & Lic.# 0256879
352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree Serv
Trim, Shape & Remove
Lic/Ins Free Est.
352-628-2825
Sharp Cut Tree Serv.
LET me cut your Tree
not YOUR WALLET.
Full Tree Service
Alicia (352) 942-0455




344-2556, Richard
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


Furniture Refinishing
Entryway Refinishing
Tool/Knife Sharpening
PressureWashing
Lawn/Property Maintenance

Classical Custom
Services, Inc.
Mark McClendon

352-613-7934
Over 20YearsExperience Licensed& Insured



DRERVETCLANN


-F-


WILL CONSTRUCTION ..
352-628-2291 s|
PE reventDryerFiresNow.com


* New Landscapes

* One Time Cuts

* Free Estimates




.^ 1 Rivenbark Lawn
S & Landscape
(5.. (352) 464-3566


AAA ROOFING
all the "A akusten"
Free Written Estimate

$100 OFF:
Any Re-Roof
SMust present coupon at time contract is signed
Lic./ins. CCC057537 000APNs


v U Decorative Mulch
SNEW & Stones
A110%1- U Top S o il
DELIVERY AVAILABLE
WE HAVE SPECIAL
PRICES AVAILABLE!


NURSERY
6658 W. GULF To LAKE HWY.
CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429
(352) 302-6436


"Repaint a COPES POOL
Spcciuihst AND PAVER LLC
Interior & Exterior YOUR INTERLOCKING BRICK PAVER SPECIALIST
Pressure Washing Build your new pool now and
be ready for next summer!
- FREE ESTIMATES Refinish your pool during the cooler months.
52-465-6631 352-400-3188


Serving Citrus County Lawn Mowers
Since 1995 U Chain Saws
Mowing Trimming Edging I'lowers

:F : -T *.,:" : i Il H. l: ,,,Ii I,:l

-I IL -rll IL C. rr l IEi:', IL FREE ESTIMATES


OR NIAYLOR RENTAL

OPEN 7 DAYS 795-5600
8081 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Crystal River


POOL-TEC
REPAIRS EQUIPMENT
PUMPS FILTERS
HEAT PUMPS
SALT SYSTEMS

RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL
32 YEARS EXPERIENCE

_ CALL ALAN 422-6956
STATE LICENSE #CPCO51584


S-7 IA Diamond Brite
Florida Gem
, Marcite Decks -
'i Pavers
FREE Tile
ESTIMATES.

GREG'S COMPLETE
GREG REMODEL

MARCITE, INC.
.INSUED 352-746-5200





GENERAL
Stand Alone
Generator

Thomas Electric, LLC
Residential/Commercial Service
Generac Centurion
Guardian Generators
Factory Authorized Technicians
ER0015377

352621124


CITRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


e Ak4.


.REMODEL


mI SMAL NINE REPAIR







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CH





natural gas dryer
exc cond $150
(352) 270-8215
REFRIGERATOR GEN-
ERAL ELECTRIC TOP
FREEZER ALMOND
352419-4429
REFRIGERATOR
KENMORE 18 CU FT,
WHITE,5 YEARS OLD,
GREAT CONDITION
$275 634-2004
REFRIGERATOR
WHITE FRIGIDAIRE
TOP FREEZER $100.00
352419-4429
Refrigerator, Amana
bone,2 door
good condition.$75
Stove, Kennmore ,bone
good condition $75
352-503-7423
Side by Side
Kitchenaid Refrigerator
& Washer & Dryer
$600 for All
Like New 746-1867
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR, washers
dryers,FREE pick up
352-564-8179
WANTED DEAD
OR ALIVE
Washers & Dryers
(352) 209-5135
WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 Each. Reliable,
like new, excellent
condition,clean. Can de-
liver 352 263-7398

m-I

2 DRAWER FILE CABI-
NET PreOwned Com-
mercial Metal Lateral
28"x30"x18" Graphite
Color $45 727-463-4411
COMPUTER DESK
Computer desk pull out
keyboard drawer. $25.00
352-628-7619
COMPUTER DESKS (4)
Formica Top 3ftx24in with
2 Drawer File Cabinet
Attached $25 each
727-463-4411
COMPUTER OR DESK
CHAIR Smaller, swivel
with arm rests, very good
condition $20 Can e-mail
photo 352-726-9983
Computer table
w/draws, 2 bkcases
6ff x 28 in,
1 bkcase 3ftx30in,
2 drawer filing cab,
bone/white$145 all
(352) 746-6456
DESK CHARS Commer-
cial PreOwned Fabric
Covered and Adjustable
$45 727-4634411
LATERAL FILE CABINET
3 Drawer Commercial
Metal PreOwned
40"x36"x18" $65
72746-4411
PREOWNED DESK
CHAIRS (4) Commercial
Dark Gray Fabric $25
each 727463-4411
Professional Office
partitions, new condi-
tion w/hardware.
Enough for 4 offices
$300 obo
(352) 563-1033




BANDSAW Craftsman 12
inch band saw $ 75.00
352 726 9708




27" MAGNAVOX COLOR
TV Works Like New Dig-
ital Cable Ready Seldom
Used. $75 7274634411
SANYO 26" COLOR TV
Older Model Digital Cable
Ready Works Like New
$75 727-463-4411
SONY TV
63inch Floor Model
Projection Screen
exc. cond. $275.00
(352) 746-6456




DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
DIGITAL PICTURE
FRAME 7 Inch with re-
mote and SD Photo card.
Like new $35 Can e-mail
photo 352 726 9983




DECOR CLAY URN
18"WX25"H NICE FOR
PATIO OR FRONT EN-
TRANCE DECOR $25
634-2004
GAS GRILL Char Broil
All accessories. Propane
tank and grill cover
included. $50 OBO
484-357-7150
PORCH ROCKERS set
of 2 white porch rock-
ers similar to the style
at Cracker Barrel res-
taurants. Like new con-
dition. $40 each or of-
fer. 1-352-503-6548




2 WOOD CHAIRS
W/UPHOLSTERED
SEATS, GOOD REFIN-
ISH PROJECTOLD
$20EACH 634-2004
36" SQUARE TABLE
PreOwned Rugged Gray
Formica Top Sturdy Steel
Frame $65 727-463-4411
ASHLEY
COUCH,LOVESEAT,
OTTOMAN tan leather
couch with matching
loveseat and ottoman
$450.00 352-726-9964
BROYHILL FLORAL
COUCH very
good-excellent condition
asking $85.00
352-527-1399
CHERYWOOD FRAME


CHAIRS (2)Fabric Up-
holstery with Arms
PreOwned $35 each
727-787-4411


IRONICLE




frame twin size with mat-
tresses $75 Walter @
352-364-2583







A',11


COMFORTS OF
HOME
USED FURNITURE
www. com-
fortsofhomeused
furniture.com. 795-0121
COMFY FLORAL SOFA
VERY CLEAN, VERY
COMFYOLD FLORAL
PRINT $50 634-2004
Couch
1/2 circle, tan new $500
4 kit chairs blk wrought
iron $120. Glass top
table $120. obo
(646) 963-5829
Couch, Loveseat, chair
and table set + recliner
florida style, good cond.
$325.
(352) 344-5822
DINING TABLE GLOSS
BLACK PEDESTAL
42"ROUND
NO CHAIRS, $50
352-634-2004
DOUBLE HEADBOARD
BRASS LOOK
HEADBOARD, $40
634-2004
DRESSER AND CHEST
$25 each Walter @
352-364-2583
FOLDING BANQUET
TABLES (3) 6 Foot Long
Wood Grain Tops
PreOwned $35 each
727-463-4411
FREE STANDING
CHERRYWOOD BOOK-
CASE 3 Shelves
48"x36"x12" PreOwned
$65 727-7874411
KING SIZE BED King
size bed Frame, mat-
tress, box springs, black
tubing head board.
$150.00 352-795-5491
Large Glass top dining
rm table w/ 6 chairs
$600 obo
3 pc. Entertainment
Center $200
(352) 503-7379
MATTRESS AND BOX
SPRING, DOUBLE,
INNERSPRING,WITH
FRAME,CLEAN $50
634-2004
Memory Foam Mattress
for Sale, King Size
$475.
Call Walter 527-3552
MICROWAVE CART
White wood,wheels,one
door loose on bottom.
$30 352-344-3472
MOVING SALE
White TV cab $20.
Exc Roll top desk $150
Exc desk chair blk $25.
Ladies roll top desk
$100. 2 Recliners multi-
color $100 eas.maple
deacon bench $75.
Hutch base maple$50.
good stuff352-382-4912
PEDESTAL TABLE
36"DIA. 6 SIDED TOP,
NICE GAME TABLE OR
REFINISH PROJECT.
$40 634-2004
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
352-628-0808
ROCKER RECLINER
Catnapper, tan in good
condition. $50 Can email
photo 352 726 9983
ROUND TABLE 36" Like
New Rugged Yellow
Formica Top Sturdy Steel
Pedestal $65
727463-4411
STACKABLE CHAIRS (4)
with Black Metal Framed
Arms Fabrc Covered
Your Choice of Color $10
each 727463-4411
STACKABLE CHAIRS (4)
with Black Metal Framed
Arms Fabric Covered
Your Choice of Color $10
each 727463-4411
TRUNDLE BED
PAUL'S FURNITURE
628-2306 Homosassa
paulsfurnitureonline.com
TWIN LOFT BED SYS-
TEM twin loft bed with at-
tached vertical dresser
$100 firm 697-3222
Twin Size Sofa Bed
Asking $200
3 Glass Top Living Room
Tables $150.
(352) 503-7379



(2) STACKABLE CHAIRS
PreOwned Fabric Cov-
ered Commercial Sturdy
Metl Frame with Arms 2
for $35 727-463-4411
CHICKEN
MANURE/FERTILIZER
Time to FERTILIZE!! (25
avail)201b bag, $4.00
352-563-1519
GRASS SEEDS! GRASS
SEEDS! GRASS SEEDS!
American Farm & Feed
352-795-6013
Murray riding mower
40" cut, good cond.,
$350 or best offer.
(352) 637-4718





aMOVIrG
SALE
Beverly Hills
Hsehld, Furniture
Everything must go by
3/27(352) 746-1151



2 Chain Saws
Craftman &
Remmington $20 for
both(352) 628-1723
2 Ladders
18 alum extension $20.
8' fiberglass HUsky step
ladder $50.
(352) 382-4912


ARMSTRONG COM-
MERCIAL VINYL TILE
45 Square Foot per Box
White/Multi Color $25
each 727-787-4411
CHANDELIER FIVE
LIGHT, BRONZE
METAL, UMBER COL-
ORED GLASS, $90
727.857.6583

COLEMAN GENERATOR
6250 watt, 2 yrs old, like
new $$500 4'x8' High
Wall Trailer $250
all prices firm
(352) 628-6515
DVD Home Theater
Sound System
6 speakers
$150
(812) 629-6538
Easy Pop up
12 x 12 tent,
waterproof,
never used, $215
(352) 322-6456
FOLD A CART
HOLDS 6 CU.FT. FOLDS
FLAT 4 STORAGE.
EXCEL CON $75
727.857.6583
Foot Bath plus
massager-heated, like
new $15. in box
Microsoft Scanner, new
w/PS & CD $10.
New white golf shoes
size 10 new $30.
(352) 382-3357
GRASS SEEDS! GRASS
SEEDS! GRASS SEEDS!
American Farm & Feed
352-795-6013
HAYWARD POWER
Flow IX Pump 3/4 hp
w/basket filter Hay-
ward Star clear + filter-
ing system w/2 heppa


Home Made Quilt Top
$25.
HD Whirlpool Dryer
$175
(352) 795-7254
HONDA CRF 100
Dirt Bike
excellent condition
$900
(352) 400-1251

must sell!
Maytag washer and dryer
$400 obo, Kirby Vacuum
with attatchments $400
obo, 2 rockers $30, 2
dressers $25 ea, 2 TVs
32" and 19"/DVD/VHS
352-293-7059
New Aluminum
Storage Shed 8 x 10
one door & window
includes tie downs
$1,500
(989)965-1915
NEW EYEGLASS
FRAMES FROM OP-
TOMETRIST rectangular,
gray, $20 860-2475

Old Franklin
Heat Stove
Good Cond. $325.
(352) 586-9498
PARROTLETS Young
male and female 75.00
each very pretty call
637-6967 if no answer
leave message
playstaion;Spiderman2,&memor
card
352-344-3472 also
P.Station2:Socome3&moto
coss mania.&5 each

Portable
Generator
5550 Watts, 4 outlets


CLASSIFIED



AQUARIUM 20 gallon
aquarium, only $12.00
Call 746-1017
PVC PATIO TABLE
w/4 chairs & 2 gliders
$300.
Hitachi 50" projection
color TV $250.
(352) 726-2278
REPTILE TANK 24 X 24
reptile tank with screen
top and heater. $30.00
Call 746-1017
RIDING BOOTS
w/spurs $15.
(352) 382-3357
Counter-Top Jewelry
box w/ 2 drawers & mir-
ror. Store rings, neck-
lace, pins & misc. jew-
elry (352) 382-3357
ROTISSERIE SUNBEAM
$55 SET TIMER-SHUTS
OFF AUTOMATICALLY
CAN E-MAIL PHOTO
419-5981
Seats for Town &
Country Van
captain seat $30.
Bench Seat $45,
Gray excel cond.
(352) 344-4192
Tony Little Gazelle
hvy duty 350# imot 5
DVD's $125.
Circle Glide never used
$100 workout DVD
(352) 795-0622
VERTICAL BLINDS
118" x 79" VALANCE,
TRACK, ALL hARD-
WARD, EXCEL CON.
$75 727.857.6583
WOOD FLOORING BY
BRUCE, Planks 3"x3/8"x
random Med Oak 25 sq ft
NEW in box $59 email pic
352-382-3650
Wrought iron patio
furniture, 8pc., $300 for
all. Elec. Guitar & amp,
t 125 for bot


RESTAURANT EQUIP.
6 burner stove, 6' deli
case, 3 dr cooler, 3' flat
gas grill, 30 uphols.
dining chairs, bar stools
many table tops &
bases (352) 447-5655
True Model T5SU-27-8
Sandwich and Salad
Refrigerator
NSF approved 8 trays
27/2" Wide, 30" H, 37"
High at sub bar, Like
New 7 years old, 100%
complete and working
no rust no corrosion
$700 obo
Stainless Steel Table 36"
W, 23" p 36" H, 2 shelves
$200 .(352) 344-4408




Siemans Over the Ear
Hearing Aid
Good Condition
Includes battery
Paid $825. Asking $400
(352) 382-3879
Transport Wheel Chair
Nearly new $75.
(352) 795-5570
WANTED TO BUY
AC/DC Portable
Concentrator
with battery
(352) 621-5498




1 Roll mixed dates
Indian head cents.
All $100 352-476-6885
3 Morgan Silver Dollars
nice condition, $100
352-476-6885
3 U.S. Peace Dollars
nice condition $100


25-Rolls mixed date
Lincoln wheat cents
All $50.352-476-6885
BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We Also
Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676










ACOUSTIC GUITAR
"NEW" IN BOX,
W/GROVERS,SOLID
SPRUCE TOP,$90
352-601-6625
BABY GRAND
Antique Piano
needs tune-up
$800 or best offer
(352) 489-9266




DRAPES LIGHT NEU-
TRAL 5'-1WAY DRAW
FOR SLIDING DOOR,
6'SPLIT DRAW, $40 SET
634-2004
KITCHEN VALANCES
5-BLACK/BEIGE CHECK
8"X60"JCP HOME
$20 FOR THE SET
634-2004
MATTRESS & BOX
SPRING SET Queen
size mattress & box
spring set. Like new. $40
OBO 484-357-7150
PINCH PLEAT SHEERS
84"L X 168"W FOR TRI-
PLE DOOR/WINDOW
PEACH,SPLIT CENTER


SUNDAY, MARCH 18, 2012 D7




AMMO 5.56/223 Wolf WE BUY GUNS
performance 75gr hp, On Site Gun Smithing
multi purpose tactical. (352) 726-5238
200 rounds/10 boxes
$65. cell 352-586-4022
CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pond, 20 ft Enclosed
ATV trails $165K obo Trailer 2006
352 795-2027/ 634-4745 like new, front & rear
CLUB CAR ramps, plywood fin-
CLUB CAR ished interior $6500
06 $1,500, 352-634-4547
with charger
352-344-8516 EZ PULL TRAILERS,

Concealed Weapons New & Used
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM Utility & Enclosed
(352) 726-5238 BUY, SELL, TRADE
S Custom Built, Parts,
FOOTBALL TABLE Tires, WhIs, Repairs,
Football table 24x48 Trailer Hitches
$50.00 352-628-7619
Full Set Men's & New 6 x 12 open
Women's Golf Clubs utility w/ramp $935
w/ shoes, bags, Also Trailer Tires from
Third set of clubs & bag
All for $125. obo $34.49
(989)965-1915 Hwy 44 Crystal River
Ladies Clubs 352-564-1299
Irons & 4 woods, putter
& excellent bag.$85. GULF TO LAKE
(352) 746-7047 TRAILER SALES
OCALA GOLF
CART SUPER CENTER Largest Selection &
Sell, buy, Trade, Service Lowest Prices.
Sale on Trojan Batteries Offering New & Used
352-291-7626 Cargo & utility trailers
Ping Golf Clubs Triple Crown Utility TRL
compl set of irons, 6 x 12 w/new spare
putter & chipper $1050.
woods # 1,3,5,7 metal 6 x 12 Enclosed w/
driver 10.5 bag, glove V nose, rear ramp
pull golf cart $150. door, $1995.
(352) 563-2555
POOL TABLE Trailer Tires
SMALL $50. starting at $69.95
fold up Ping-Pong
Table $75. 352-527-0555
........... 7Hwv 44. Locanto


I :I tlA I I I 1I



There are immediate opportunities for independent contractors to manage


and grow single copy newspaper routes in Citrus and Marion Counties


Be at least 18 years of age. Possess a valid driver's license.

Possess proof of liability insurance.

c.. .s .cou. Tv Routes are 7 days a week, early morning hours.



O"O\.A ww.chronic eonline.com Email: mgaouette@chronicleonline.com or bring resume to 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River







D8 SUNDAY, MARCH 18, 2012


x ulrai er
$400.
(352) 746-7357


Sel orS


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





CASH For Silver, Decoys
Antiques, Paintings,
Furnitures Cameras, &
Pottery (352) 503-2843


BS-



JUNK MOTORCYCLES
WANTED Will Pay up to
$200 for Unwanted Mo-
torcycle 352-942-3492
WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area.


A4M.,eiNGLISrn DULLUUD
PUPS, chubby, healthy
10 wks 5 male I fern
parents on premises,
h/c shots $1200 Connie
or Jim (352) 341-7732
cell 352-613-3778
DOWNSIZING
Koi and Gold Fish
FOR SALE, Even Better
Prices, ALL sizes
(352) 634-1783




Mini Donkeys, Horses &
Ponies, used & new
saddles and tack,
Diamond P Farm
352-873-6033


Livestock


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





BOAT TRAILER
Fits up to 19 ft
Bunk and roller, New
lights, wheels, and
break a way tongue for
easy storage $500.
352-341-2149
New 6 gal Plastic
gas tank $35.
Ft Island Marine Supply
9683 W. Ft Lsland Trailer
(352) 436 4179




CRAFTSMAN 10FT
Aluminum flat bottom
new oars, extras, lic to
2012 for motor $ 275
(352) 465-7506
DURACRAFT
16', aluminum Boat
Good Shape, plus
extras $1,000 obo
(352) 464-1302, or 1304
HOUSE BOAT
30 ft fiberglass, hrd
wood firs, & more
Live Aboard or eniov
weekends in Paradise
$12,800 (423) 320-3008
LUND
1978 15' FIBERGLASS
Bass Boat w/Trailer. 30
horse Johnson. 60beam.
Console Steer. 50# Troll-
ing motor. Only needs
new battery to run. First
$1750 (firm) takes it.
352-341-0447.
PATHFINDER 99
15' flats boat, 40hp
Nissan bimini top,
jacket plate, push pole,
dp findertrailer $3500
(352) 564-0144
PONTOON
'99, Bennlngton, 22 it, w/
potty, tilt trlr., 40 HP,
Yamaha, motor, cover
Runs Good $4,800
(989) 965-1915
PROLINE 20 CC
T-Top VHF, elect. New
135 Honda,4S, new EZ
Load trir. $11,400 Extras
(352) 257-1161
PROLINE
21' Cuddy, full transom,
w/brack, 150 HP Yam.,
Bimini, VHF, porta pot,
dep. finder, trailer $5K
firm (352) 382-3298






WEoE ED
IIOA=lTSll


STARCRAFT
1995 Starcraft 20 Foot
Pontoon with trailer. 75
Hp Mariner. Like new
motor,cushions,bimini,steering
and battery. $6750
(352) 794-3391
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LAKE
MARINE
We Pay CASH For Used
Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck & Fishing
Boats (352)527-0555
boatsupercenter.com
YACHTSMAN
24' Pontoon, 70 HP Ev.
T/T, cust. trir, bimini top,
stored inside $3500 incis
all gear (231) 852-0061



Bounder
Fleetwood 32' 1994
454 engine, loaded,
self contained, $9,750
352-795-6736
BUSHNELL RV
SHOW..
March 14th-23rd
Across frm Walmart
866-888-8941
GULF STREAM 08
32' 3 slides, rear. kit.
K bed,50amp, like new
extras $31,500
(352) 726-1906
HITCHHIKER II LS
2008, 3 slides, excel
cond. heat pump, de-
luxe pkg. too many ex-
tras to list $32,000.
Dodge Truck also avail
(636) 209-0308
Holiday Rambler
'98 38' 7.5 gen.super
slide, air lever, a/c susp.
loaded call for details
$41 K (352) 746-9211
I Buy RV'S Steve
Henry, RV World of
Hudson Inc.Since
1974. (888) 674-8376
(727) 514-8875
JAYCO
'04, 36 foot, 5th wheel
toy hauler, generator.
slide, fuel station $18,500
Truck avail For sale
Local (502) 345-0285
SUNSEEKER '05
29 ft. Class. C., nearly
all options, generator,
needs awning fabric,
no smoke,33k mi.
Reduce $24K, 464-0316



05 SUNNYBROOK 36'
5th whl,2 slides,king
bed,like new,heated
tks, 60 amp service
oak cab $33,400
352-382-3298
Aliner '04
Columbian Northwest,
sleeps 3. complete
kitchen $5990
(352) 637-5075
GULF STREAM
Coach 25' model
24RBL, sips upto 6 gas &
elect appls & heat,
shower/toliet $6900
(352) 341-1714
I BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
call me 352-201-6945




CHEVROLET
1999 corvette L&R side
mufflers and tailpipes.
New condition. Replaced
with Z06 set in
2001 .$650 for both or of-
fer. 5000 miles on origi-
nals. 1-352-503-6548



$$ CASH PAID $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
BIG SALE!
Consignment USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
AUTOS' FROM $1,500.
US 19 BY AIRPORT
US 44, BY NAPA
Low Payments *
461-4518 & 795-4440
consignmentusa.org
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not
CASH PAID $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars Trucks
& Vans, For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES,
Hwy 19... 352 564-8333
CASH PAID FOR JUNK
CARS Any Condition
Up to $500., Free

KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Salvage Pays top $$$
for your autos.
352-628-4144
WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
Perfect Cond. or Not
Titled,No title,
No problem. Paying up
to $25K any make,
any model Call A.J.
813-335-3794/531-4298







ACURA
2004, TSX only 27k
miles Just Traded In!
Call for Details
BUICK
2008, Lucerne
Low Miles $12,595
BUICK
2007, Rendevous CXL
One Owner Beauty!
Take Over Pyts at
$249.00 WAC
CHEVROLET
2011 Aveo Gas Sip-


per! Take over pyts at
$179.00 WAC
HONDA
2000, CRV Low Miles,
One Owner
$5,995.00
HONDA
2007, Odyssey
Ready for the Family
$12,795.00
NISSAN
2011, Versa
Save Money on Gas!
Take over pyts at
$189.00 WAC
HONDA
2004, Accord Coupe,
Like New!
$5,9951
GMC
2010, Terrain SLT, Why
Buy New! Loaded!
Take Over Pyts at
$379.00 WAC
CHRYSLER
2007, PT Cruiser, Low
Miles Garaged Kept!
$7,495.00
888-874-5524


'08 Chrysler
Sebring Touring
Convertible,34k miles,
loaded, $14,250firm
352-897-4520

AFFORDABLE
AUTOS & VANS
Everybody Rides
$495 DOWN
$49 PER WEEK
BUY HERE PAY
HERE..
Lots of clean-safe-
dependable rides.
CALL DAN TODAY
(352)563 -1902
"WE BUYS CARS
DEAD OR ALIVE"
1675 Suncoast Hwy.
Homosassa Fl.

BIG SALE!
Consignment USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
AUTOS' FROM $1,500.
US 19 BY AIRPORT
US 44, BY NAPA
Low Payments *-
461-4518 & 795-4440
consignmentusa.org

BUICK 94
Station wagon, garage
kept, Sunroof, Tan &
wood grain 165K mis
$2500(352) 563-2555
CAMARO '11
CONV. RED, $3K miles
$28,500(352) 419-6768
CHEVY
'07, Impala, V6, auto,
ice cold AC, non smok-
ers 100K mi $7,500
(352) 726-3093
CHRYSLER 06
Sebring, Touring conv.
45K mi. newer tires,
6 cyl. white, tan top,
loaded, mint, Sr owned
$8,200 (352) 513-4257
Citrus Sale Center
We buy/sell/trade
clean pre-owned
vehicles!


02 Ford Quad CabTruck
F-150 Cab$4,999
02 Mazda Milllenia
$5,400,
00, Ford Explorer
4 DR $3,800,
06 Grand Marquis
$13,200 low miles
Call 352-400-1038
LINCOLN
2006 Towncar,
seabreeze green,
extra nice, $10,500
(830) 534-1918
MERCEDES '99
S420, blue book $11,500
sell $10K FIRM
1729 W. Gulf to lake
Hwy, Lecanto
MERCURY
'03, Sable, Station
Wagon, V6, silver,
very good cond
64K mi., Serious Only
$5,100. (352) 270-4224
PLYMOUTH
2000 Neon 152,734 mi-
les. New battery, tires,
belts, and recently
tuned-up. $700 obo.
352-746-2476 or
352-601-0134(cell)
PONTIAC SOLSTICE
cony. 2006
mint con, loaded
metallic green, blk int &
top, std, 22k mi $15k
(352) 795-6436eve's
TOYOTA P/U 1983
excellent mechanical
condition, has topper,
new tires $1500 firm
(352) 628-6515




CHEVROLET '01
Camaro, Z28, Org. 9000
miles, Pristine show car
frozen in time. Loaded
black/black leather
Flawless rare find!
$15,750 (352) 513-4257







Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





BIG SALE!
Consignment USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
AUTOS' FROM $1,500.
US 19 BY AIRPORT
US 44, BY NAPA
Low Payments *
461-4518 & 795-4440
consignmentusa.org

CHEVY
'01, Silverado 1500,
Ext. Cab, 8 ft. bed
$3,600. 352-220-4545,
352-503-7752
CHEVY
'04, 2500 HD,
Ext. Cab, w/8 ft. bed
$6,200. 352-220-4545,
352-503-7752
Citrus Sale Center
We buy/sell/trade
clean pre-owned
vehicles!


02 Ford QuadCab F-150
Truck $4999
07 Nissan Murano
$14,900
06 Chrysler PT Cruiser
$6,499
06 Grand Marquis
$13,200 low miles
Call 352-400-1038


FORD '06
F250 Super Duty, 4 x 4,
6.0, Lariat Pkg. Off Rd.
Pkg. Hard Bed Cover
$21,500 (352) 586-8576
FORD 450
2003, 4 X 4,
new flatbed w/ boxes,
6 speed, $9,500 firm
(352) 422-3171
FORD 93
F150- 4x4 FLT, 250K mi.
don't let that scare you
runs great, new tires
cold a/c $3K 795-1015




FORD
'01, Windstar, LX Van,
white/gray, 88,400 mi.
non smoker, serve.
records $5,995
(352) 382-1167


Harley Davidson
'02 FAT BOY, 15,357. mi-
les, loaded w/extra's
asking $12K
(352) 270-8488
Harley Davidson
02 Heritage soft tail
26K mis. Lots of extra's
Health Forces Sale
$8500 (352) 527-3024


i ,t ,, I I1 I lllSt.
L _, L'J

CHR-PNiCLE
Classifieds


CLASSIFIED



Harley 00
Roadking Classic, all
gear 17K miles 11K
obo.(352) 489-0873
HARLEY DAVIDSON
08 Night Train, flat blk,
11,500 mis. lots of extra's
$14K obo Jeff
(407) 712-0803
JUNK MOTORCYCLES
WANTED Will Pay up to
$200 for Unwanted Mo-
torcycle352-942-3492
ROADSTAR
SILVERADO 04
Garage kept, very well
maint, lots of extras ask
$6k obo (352) 214-9800


908-0330 DAILY CRN
Surplus Prop.
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County Board
of County Commissioners
will be selling surplus prop-
erty and equipment via
the internet at
govdeals.com, March 1
until March 30, 2012.
Pub:March 1 thru 30,2012



0.-


306-0325 SUCRN
Vs, Horton, Harry Eugene 2011 CP 000831 Notice to Cred.
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO.: 2011 CP 000831
IN RE: ESTATE OF HARRY EUGENE HORTON
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS (Summary Administration)
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE:
You are hereby notified that an Order of Summary Administration and Order to De-
termine Homestead Status are pending in the estate of Harry Eugne Horton, de-
ceased, File Number 2001-CP-000831, by the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of which is 110 N. Apopka Ave., Inverness, FL
34450-4231; that the decedent's date of death was 11/29/10; that the total value of
the estate is $52,358.24 and that the names and addresses of those to whom it has
been assigned by such order are:
Name Address
Sharon Horton 125 San Souci Blvd., Panama City, FL 32413
Joyce Blakeman 3907 Red Leaf Court, Point of Rocks, MD 21777
Euene Horton 126 St. John's Street, Central Islip, NY 11722
Harry Horton, Jr. 1039 Red Robin Lane, Chattanooga, TN 37241
Melody MacCrone 5045 Forest Creek Road, Pace, FL 32571
Lorraine Roos 346 Floyd Drive, Panama City, FL 32444
Michelle Horton 236 Surrey Drive, Bonita, CA 91902
Steven Horton 110 East End Avenue, Apt. PHG, New York, NY 10028
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the estate of the decedent and persons having claims or demands
against the estate of the decedent other than those for whom provision for full pay-
ment was made in the Order of Summary Administration must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA
PROBATE CODE.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER APPLICABLE TIME PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is March 18, 2012.
Petitioners:
/s/ Harry Horton, Jr.
1039 Red Robin Lane, Chattanooga, TN 37241
/s/ Eugene Horton
126 St. John's Street, Central Islip, NY 11722
Attorney for Petitioners:
/s/ Bruce A. McDonald bamcdonald@pensacolalaw.com Florida Bar No. 13763
McDonald Fleming Moorhead dba Statewide Probate 25 W. Government Street,
Pensacola, FL 32502 Phone: (850) 477-0660
March 18 and 25, 2012.


309-0325 SUCRN
Naidhig, Albert M. 2011-CP-852 Notice to Cred.
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File No.: 2011-CP-852
IN RE: ESTATE OF ALBERT M. NAIDHIG
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of the estate of Albert M. Naidhig, deceased,
whose date of death was June 16, 2011; is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus
County, Florida, Probate Division, File Number 2011-CP-852; the address of which is
110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450. The names and addresses of the
personal representative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth be-
low.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, and
who have been served a copy of this notice, must file their claims with this Court
WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims
must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this notice is March 18, 2012.
Personal Representative:
/s/ Janet D. Reghetti
c/o Robert A. Stermer, Esq., 7480 SW Hwy. 200, Ocala, Florida 34476
Attorney for Personal Representative:
Robert A. Stermer, Florida Bar No. 827967 7480 SW Hwy. 200, Ocala, Florida 34476
March 18 and 25, 2012.


398-0318 SUCRN
Bramlett, Waldo T. 2012-CP-129 Notice to Creditors (Summ. Admin.)
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File No.: 2012-CP-129 Division: Probate
IN RE: ESTATE OF WALDO T. BRAMLETT
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS (Summary Administration)
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE:
You are hereby notified that an Order of Summary Administration has been en-
tered in the estate of Waldo T. Bramlett, deceased, File Number 2012-CP-129, by the
Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 110
N. Apopka Ave., Inverness, FL 34450; that the decedent's date of death was Dec. 7,
2011; that the total value of the estate is $6,000.00 and that the names and ad-
dresses of those to whom it has been assigned by such order are: Sarah E. Bramlett,
3559 W. Cypress Dr., Dunnellon, Florida 34433.
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the estate of the decedent and persons having claims or demands
against the estate of the decedent other than those for whom provision for full pay-
ment was made in the Order of Summary Administration must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA
PROBATE CODE.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER APPLICABLE TIME PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT' S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is March 11, 2012.
Person Giving Notice:
Sarah E. Bramlett
3559 W. Cypress Dr., Dunnellon, Florida 34433
Attorney for Person Giving Notice:
H. Michael Evans, Esq., Attorney Florida Bar No. 251674 20702 W. Pennsylvania Ave.,
Dunnellon, FL 34431 Telephone: (352) 489-2889 Fax: (352) 489-0852
E-Mail: hmichaelevanspa@yahoo.com
March 11 and 18, 2012.


307-0318 SUCRN
3/21 Special Master Hearing
PUBLIC NOTICE
The public is hereby notified that Citrus County Code Compliance will conduct its
monthly Special Master Hearing on Wednesday, March 21, 2012 @ 9:00AM in the
Lecanto Government Building, Multi-purpose Room 166, 3600 West Sovereign Path,
Lecanto, Florida 34461, at which time and place any and all persons interested are
invited to attend. The following cases) will be heard by the Code Compliance Spe-
cial Master; however cases may abate prior to hearing date. If you have questions,
contact Code Compliance at (352) 527-5350.
Alzate, Juan & Villegas, Fanny
5140 W Oaklawn St, Homosassa, FI 34446-
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20-31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Furniture, mattresses, household trash, piles of garbage
bags, boxes, containers, misc. junk and debris all over the property.
Bass, Douglas A.
10014 W Oliver St, Homosassa, FI 34448-
Violation of the Land Development Code Section 2020; Construction without a De-
velopment Order.
Bostick, Kenty & Gates, Beverly
1574 W Nat Turner Ln, Dunnellon, FI 34434-
Failure to connect to an available sewage treatment utility within a specified period
of time after receiving written notification of the utility's availability, pursuant to Sec-
tion 42-163 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
Carithers, Bernadette P. & Wilder, Joseph
10909 W Grybek Dr, Homosassa, Fl 34448-
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20-31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Clothing, old stairs, furniture, mattresses, lumber and
misc. junk.
Carithers, Bernadette P. & Wilder, Joseph
10909 W Grybek Dr, Homosassa, Fl 34448-
Violation of the Land Development Code Section 4420A; Accessory uses are not
permitted on lots that do not contain a principal structure.
Comtois, June Anne
100 S Adams St, Beverly Hills, Fl 34465-
It shall be unlawful for anyone owning, leasing, occupying or having control of any
property subject to the provisions of this article to maintain weeds, grass and under-
growth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of vegetative matter pursuant
to Article VI Section 20-61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
Dabney, Archie W.
8501 W Oak St, Crystal River, Fl 34428-
Violation of the Land Development Code Section 4420, Paragraph A; Accessory
uses are not permitted on lots that do not contain a principal use or structure. To Wit:
There is an animal pen on the property that does not contain a principal use struc-
ture.
Dean, Matthew C.
7196 W Pompey Ln, Homosassa, FI 34446-
Failed driveway apron inspection: Citrus County Land Development Code Section
4221(J) "(Driveway) aprons shall be constructed pursuant to the standards of Appen-
dix A. Section 6 of Appendix A: "any damage to the County right-of-way as a result
of apron constructions shall be repaired in conjunction with the permit, prior to final
release." This includes restoration of sod and other vegetation to pre-construction
condition.
Dudley, Christine
4247 N Trapper Ter, Hernando, FI 34442-
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have


thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20-31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Multiple bags of household garbage piled up against
the right side of the residence and other miscellaneous trash and debris.
Hamilton, Allen David
7915 W Laura St, Dunnellon, Fl 34433-
Violation of the Land Development Code Section 2020; Failure to obtain a Develop-
ment Order. To Wit: There is a mobile home being demolished on the property with-
out a Development Order (permit).
LaBarbara, Philip & Irene
7992 W Cyprian Ct, Homosassa, FI 34448-
Violation of the Land Development Code Section 2020; Failure to obtain a Develop-
ment Order for swimming pool and screen enclosure.
Mumford, Stuart R. *REPEAT VIOLATION"
1016 Carnegie Dr, Inverness, FI 34450-
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20-31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Tires, furniture, household items and miscellaneous
junk.
Plummer, Danielle D.
6975 N Lecanto Hwy, Beverly Hills, Fl 34465-
It shall be a violation of this article for any person, firm or corporation to keep, dump,
store, place or deposit abandoned, unlicensed, inoperable, junked, disabled,
wrecked, discarded or otherwise unused vehicles on any property, street, or high-
way; pursuant to Article IV Section 20-41 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
To Wit: There is an unlicensed car on the property.
Roesler, Kenneth & Brenda
3005 N Aquaview Ter, Hernando, FI 34442-
It shall be a violation of this article for any person, firm or corporation to keep, dump,
store, place or deposit abandoned, unlicensed, inoperable, junked, disabled,
wrecked, discarded or otherwise unused vehicles on any property, street, or high-
way; pursuant to Article IV Section 20-41 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
To Wit: One (1) Avion travel trailer and one (1) EMC motorhome.
Schweighart, Gregory S. & Stella M. *REPEAT VIOLATION"
7408 W Turkeyneck Ct, Homosassa, Fl 34448-
All buildings served by on-site potable water systems, except approved community
water systems as defined in F.A.C. 62-550.200(7), developed under the provisions of
law & administrative rules, must connect to & utilize potable water from a publicly
owned or investor owned permitted central water system within 365 days after notifi-
cation by the publicly owned or investor owned water system that such a system is
available, pursuant to Section 42-39(b) of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
Snipes, Rodney T. & Linda D.
32 5 Little John Ave, Inverness, FI 34450-
Violation of the Land Development Code Section 2020; Failure to comply with the
conditions of the Development Order (40 x 60 detached garage with electric).
Steinhauer, Philip
580 W Kuhns Ln, Lecanto, FI 34461-
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20-31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Rubble and miscellaneous junk left from the fire and
demolition of the structure.
Steinhauer, Philip
580 W Kuhns Ln, Lecanto, FI 34461-
It shall be a violation of this article for any person, firm or corporation to keep, dump,
store, place or deposit abandoned, unlicensed, inoperable, junked, disabled,
wrecked, discarded or otherwise unused vehicles on any property, street, or high-
way; pursuant to Article IV Section 20-41 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
To Wit: Dodge SUV, a silver sedan and a boat and trailer.
VanEtten, Ricard
9291 E Riverbluff Ct, Inverness, FI 34453-
Violation of the Land Development Code Section 4420; Storage on a vacant parcel.
Accessory uses are not permitted on lots that do not contain a principal use or struc-
ture.
Warren, Charles & Sue
8024 W Purvis Ct, Crystal River, Fl 34428-
Violation of the Land Development Code Section 2020; Failure to obtain a Develop-
ment Order. To Wit: There is a storage building/garage on the property that was
built without a Development Order (permit).
NOTE: If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Code Compliance
Special Master with respect to any matter considered at this public hearing, he/she
will need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made which record
shall include the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office, Cit-
rus County Court House, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, phone:
(352) 341-6560, at least two days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech
impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 341-6580.
MICHELE LIEBERMAN, SPECIAL MASTER
CITRUS COUNTY CODE COMPLIANCE
March 18, 2012.


302-0318 SUCRN
3/27 Citrus County Port Authority meeting
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Citrus County Port Authority will meet on Tuesday,
March 27, 2012 at 10:00 AM at the Citrus County Courthouse, Room 100 Board
Chambers, 110 N. Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL 34450, to discuss the business of the
Port Authority.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the Citrus County Administrator's Of-
fice, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL 34450, (352) 341-6560, at least two (2)
days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD Tele-
phone (352) 341-6580.
If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Port Authority with re-
spect to any matter considered at this meeting, he/she will need to ensure that a
verbatim record of the proceedings is made which record shall include the testi-
mony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.
BY: Dennis Damato, Chairman
March 18, 2012.


305-0318 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
INVITATION TO BID
ITB 015-12
CDBG Housing Rehabilitation Program
CDBG 11DB-L4-05-19-01-H18
Housing Rehabilitation Services
Citrus County Board of County Commissioners invites interested parties to submit a
Bid to furnish all labor and materials to demolish and replace three (3) single family
homes for its Community Development Block Grant Program. The three (3) homes
are as follows:
4572 Tumbleweed Trail, Hernando, FL 34442
9481 N Ulysses Way, Crystal River, FL 34428
5859 S. Oldfield Ave. Homosassa, FL 34446
The scope of the work for the above shall be provided to potential Bidders at the
mandatory pre-bid conference scheduled for April 5, 2012. Additional information
concerning the pre-bid conference is provided below. All prices shall include all la-
bor, supervision, materials, equipment and services necessary to complete a work-
man like job. No contractor or subcontractor may participate in this work if ineligible
to receive federal or state funded contracts. Financing of the work will be provided,
in whole or in part by the Neighborhood Stabilization Program. Citrus County and
their agent will act as agent for the owner in preparing contract documents, in-
specting, and issuing payments. However, the contract will be between the owner
and contractor. Bids, work performed and payments must be approved by the
owner and the agent.
All Bidders must complete an application, submit such to the County's consultant,
Guardian CRM, Inc., and be pre-approved by them prior to bid submittal. Contact
Guardian CRM, Inc., Phone (863) 899-6695 or Fax (863) 774-2114 for an application.
A Mandatory Pre-Bid Conference: A Pre-Bid Conference will be held on April 5, 2012
at 10:00 am at the Lecanto Government Building in Room 280 located at 3600 W.
Sovereign Path, Lecanto, Florida 34461, this meeting will be followed by a Mandatory
Walk through of each location.
SEALED Bids are to be submitted on or before April 20, 2012 @ 2:00 PM to Wendy
Crawford, Office of Management & Budget, 3600 West Sovereign Path: Suite 266:
Lecanto, FL 34461.
A Public Opening of the Bids is scheduled for April 20, 2012 @ 2:15 PM at 3600 West
Sovereign Path, Room 280, Lecanto, Florida 34461.
Anyone requiring reasonable accommodations at these meetings because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the Office of Management & Budget
at (352) 527-5457 at least two days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech
impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 527-5312.
To obtain a copy of the Bid Documents for this announcement, please visit the Citrus
County Website at www.bocc.citrus.fl.us and select "PURCHASING/BIDS" on the left
hand side of the Home Page then select "BIDS". Or, call the Office of Management
& Budget/Purchasing at (352) 527-5457.
Winn Webb, Chairman
CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
March 18, 2012.


304-0318 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Fictitious Name
Notice under Fictitious
Name Law. pursuant to
Section 865-09, Florida
Statutes. NOTICE IS
HEREBY GIVEN that the
undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under
the fictitious name of:
Fullers Automotive
located at 6680 N.
Lecanto Hwy., Beverly
Hills, FL 34465, in the
County of Citrus, intends
to register the said name
with the Division of Cor-


portions of the Florida
Department of State,
Tallahassee, FL.
Dated at Beverly Hills, FL,
this 14th day of March,
2012.
William Fuller
Owner
March 18, 2012.

308-0318 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Fictitious Name
Notice under Fictitious
Name Law. pursuant to
Section 865.09, Florida
Statutes. NOTICE IS
HEREBY GIVEN that the


undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under
the fictitious name of:
Ole Cotton Mill Primitives
located at 943 Hwy. 41
South, Plaza Bldg. A, In-
verness, FL 34450, in the
County of Citrus, intends
to register the said name
with the Division of Cor-
porations of the Florida
Department of State, Tal-
lahassee, FL.
Dated at Inverness, FL,
this 15 day of March,2012.
/s/ Gloria Woodard
Owner
March 18, 2012.


CITRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


IMisc. Nod


IMisc. Nod


isc. otice


Meeting
I Notices I


MeeingH^f
I Ntiesj


Meeting
I Ntics


I ^^Bi oc


I ^^Bi oc


I ^^Bi oc


I Misc. Nod


I Misc. Noti


I Misc. Noti




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CUTOERAPPECATODAS
VOLT .me IAD
e'e et e S r A __ * ** ~Alm

$ a)
r -- 4
LethrAuoPweOE c eFE a oys E"!
*.*IBU *Ee|a QUINOXLT




i~K94^MW'M~i
MI








Vic-7-7T*V "~l 4I c77^1JPP '
00 ~0 0 I 0 0 0

cco xw-352e34 e001


LOVEEYSL~eO
Allno cr riesOncuE T$ 50 cs rtaeeut.Alofr A. Allotosa elrrti, iie oi0tc eile ny l rcsado
py etplstxtiltg9sttfesDeri installed iosadcesries adiinlcs.Vhce ujc op io sl Apistoi tc
I un it.feexi rei o dtI opbi cation.


Honda rj

REALLY
a uA a...... ............................. .................


SALES EVENT
REAL DEALS. BIG INVENTORY.


Lr,


Come See What LOVE
Can Do For You!!!


19)^^^^
t ^l^. ^^^t^^


1,.yJtMole)


On approved credit. Must finance with AHFC. 1.36 Month closed end lease 12,000 miles per year with approved credit, plus tax, tag, 1st payment,$4000 cash or trade equity and lease fees excess milage penalty is 20
cents per mile. Limited to in stock vehicles only, all options are at additional price. Residual values: Civic $12043.50, Accord $13081.50, Pilot $16689.60. Pictures for illustration purposes only, all prices plus tax, tag, state
fees and $499 administrative fee. Dealer installed options additional cost, in stock units only. All vehicles subject to prior sale. Applies to in stock units. Offers expire on date of publication.
OOOAT8P


5 0 1
4-. j


SUNDAY, MARCH 18, 2012 D9


- .' -. :,.........




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


III


- a


.4. -


HI


Gold is
High! ELL
Broken, Unwante
Any Karat Gold


d,
&


New or Used,
Silver Coins


We Buy Anylhing


Don't Be Fooled
By Other Ads
Stating They
Pay More
Money...
Because
, They Don't!


AND PAY MORE FOR IT!


MW


fv l1


I I


I II


Buying & Paying A Premium For:
Any Gold Coins Silver Coins 19I4 & helore
* Silver Dollars Silver Bars Sleling Silver, Flaware
Ue BuyI nythint GOLD or SILV(R
Any Carat, Broken, Unwanted -


2502 Highway 44, Inverness
726-7780


1 block from Independence & 44
* 726-7781


Hors Mon.-Sat[*^w~


D10 SUNDAY, MARCH 18, 2012






Section E SUNDAY, MARCH 18,2012


ITRUS OUNTY HRO NICLE REAL ESTATE UIDE
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE REAL ESTATE GUIDE


_jj / J rj

JJ,',5J 'JJJJ JJjj:




i Jii iir 'l'Ji:i











The foot-spa
option

Ask the Plumber
PAGE E3
Blue-eyed
Irises

Jane's Garden
PAGE E5


B Sikorski's
K. 7Attic
PAGE E6










E2 SUNDA'I~ MARCH 18, 2012 Cimus Couivn' (FL) CHRONICLE


UAIt u UummumI III !
* Over 2,000 SQ. FT 3/2/2 Car + Office
* Soaring Ceilings GR DR Area + Nook
* Huge Heated Pool Gorgeous Master Suite
* Great Community -You will say WOW!!
KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997 -
www.FloridaListinglnfo.com


*3/2/2 + Den or 4th BR Cathedral Ceilings
* Kitchen Has Pantry In-Wall Pest Tubes
* Neutral Tones Great Lot Elevation
* Golf, Tennis or Biking Minutes to Gulf/Rivers
KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997
EMAIL kelly J ] ilema Inel l


3BR, 2BA, home in Sugarmill Woods boasts a contemporary kitchen wth
Nood (maple) cabinets, pantry, under counter lhts and a large breakfast nook
,n open floor plan has the kd overlooking a bg & bngt fam n rw/corner fpl
rhe master BR suite features a wood vanity with dual sinks, jetted tub, a
separate shower, and 2 walk-in closets Formal LR & DR, double door front
entry abundant closets, oversized 2 car gar, tile roof new AC in 05
Directions: Main Entrance to Sugarmill Wds (Cypress Blvdw)
lo first left on Douglas St. House on left on comer of Douglas
and Rebecca
TONY VIGGIANO (352) 586-5772
TonyViggiano@gmail.com Tony Viggiano.com


2987 N. BRENTWOOD CIR.
LECANTO
* 3BD/2BA/2CG Maint. Free Villa
* On the Golf Course Screened patio
* Almost 1700 SF Living Social Membership
PETER & MARVIA KOROL
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875


(352) 72828
niter house T .8


5849 N. DURANGO TERR.
PINE RIDGE ESTATES
* 4BD/3BA/3CC Custom Situated on 1 acre
* Stainless Appliances and Granite Counters
* Many upgrades, solar panel, 3464 sf living
PETER & MARVIA KOROL
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875


FAIRVIEW ESTATES OF CITRUS HILLS
A prestigious address brings you to this
3BR, 2BA home on an acre. Caged
inground pool is solar heated. Pass through
to kit. for entertaining. Fpl. in living room.
Side entry oversized 2 car gar.
IENNIFER STOLTZ (352) 637-6200 A
Email: Info@CitrusCountyHomes.com
www.CitrusCountyHomes.com



(Hosted by John Holloway, Sr.)
m1lm NEW LISTING WITH ACREAGE!
7706 E. GOSPEL ISLAND RD.
Family room with fpl. & two gar garage.
MLS #354234 ONLY $82,900
Directions: Take Gospel Island Rd. Just across
from Archwood Dr. Watch for signs).
NEW LISTING IN CITY LIMITS!
1:3-3PIA 710 MAYFLOWER
Large home on a great street.
MLS #354342 ONLY $71,900
Directions: From the old Courthouse take
Apopka south to right on Peony and left on
Mayflower. Watch for signs).
JOHN HOLLOWAY SR. (352) 212-6002
ORS, GRI, ABR, e-PRO
Email: johnHolloway@tampaboy.rr.com
www.TheHollowayTeam.com


LncE UUI inc DLUCDrnnicEl Anu
STRAWBERRIES IN THIS METICULOUS YARD
Spacious 3/2/3 with den and pool Huge lanai,
granite countertops in a gourmet kitchen. Master
bedroom has 2 walk in closets and whirlpool
tub. Come see this beauty today!
Directions: Pine Ridge Blvd. to North on
Bronco, to Left on Yuma, to Left
on Fort Drum U
LEO SMITH 352-697-2771
Email: leosmith@remax.net


-as







REALTY ONE


24/7 INFO LINE

637-2828

HERE'S HOW:

S1 Buyer calls exclusive
24/7 Info Line
637-2828


2 Buyer enters house
number when
prompted


S 3 Buyer listens to
property
presentation in
i__ English or Spanish




BEAUTIFUL MOVE IN READY
3/2/21 POOL HOME
Sugarmill Woods. $153,000
Directions: 19 to Cypress Blvd., R on Pine
Street, to R on Greentree, to R on Hawthorne
Ct. House #36.

3/2/2 COMPLETELY REMODELED
GOLF COURSE HOME
Sugarmill Woods $129,900
Directions: 19 to Cypress Blvd., to L on Douglas
Street, to R on Viburnum Ct. House #11

RON MCEVOY (352) 586-2663
www.ronmcevoy.remax.com
Certified Distressed Property Expert


b0l 1 W. HIViH 'tNU HU., UUNNtLLUN
* 2BR/1 BN1 CG Home w/Beautiful View of Lake Rousseau
* Lg. Updated Kitchen Wood-Burning Fireplace
* Double Lot Solar Heated Inground Caged Pool
*24 x 20 Detached Garage/Workshop
* Covered Boat Slip/Dock
* Nice Deck Overlooking Lake
LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611
Email: lenpalmer@remax.net


UUUD 5. PINEUHANCH PL
HOMOSASSA WATERFRONT HOME
* 2BR/2BA Den
* Heated pool 205 Ft. waterfront
* 2 Car gar. Fireplace

BARBARA MILLS (352) 637-6200 l
Email barbarajmils@earthink.net L _


dU W. IP5WIt H LAN, Hl:NIANIUU
* Gorgeous 3BR/2BA/2CG Hampton Hills Home
* Gourmet Kitchen w/Granite Countertops
* Stainless Steel Appliances
* Gas Fireplace
* Lg. Screened Tiled Lanai
* 1 Acre Landscaped Corner Lot
LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611
Email: lenpualmer@remax.net


* 199b Year Built 3/2/2 on ./b Acre
* Hardwood Floors Throughout Home
* Large Master Suites Split Floor Plan
* Security System Fully Enclosed Screen
* Room for Pool and More
* Close to Schools Must See!!!
CHERYL LAMBERT 352-637-6200
Email: cheryllambert@remax.net


241N Leaia Hw. Bevrl Hil 2-8210*.Mi ,Ivres6760
8375 S. Sucos Bld. Ionssa6870 w.oueos~a~flecm54N w.1,C lRvr7524


E2 SUNDAY, MARCH 18, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Foot spa can be nice and pricey


Q I enjoy my visits
to the local spa,
and the best part
for me is the foot bath. The
spa has a foot tub built into
the floor, complete with
water jets, custom lounge
chair and a hand shower.
Since I'm planning a new
bathroom, I'm wondering if
I can have a foot bath in-
stalled in my own home.
Any information will be
welcome. -Linda, Florida


Ed Del Grande
ASK THE
PLUMBER


A: Wow, this is a new one for me, but
it is a good question. First, the product
you mention is called a "pedicure spa,"
and just like the name says, it's usually
found in professional spa settings.
However, even though it's basically a
commercial fixture, it's still a plumbing
fixture. So if you have a high-end
budget and local building codes allow,
there should be no reason why you can't
have one installed in your bathroom.


Keep in mind, though,
that these foot baths are ba-
sically mini-whirlpool tubs,
complete with all the ex-
pensive bells and whistles.
Also, just like a full-sized
whirlpool, extra labor to
frame in and hook up the
tub can be costly as well.
Bottom line: If you want
to jump in with both feet
and spend a lot of money
for a little whirlpool, then a
built-in foot bath can turn


an ordinary bathroom into your own
personal pedicure spa.

Master plumber Ed Del Grande is the
author of "Ed Del Grande's House
Call," the host of TV and Internet
shows, and a LEED green associate.
Visit eddelgrande.com or write
eadelg@s.com. Always consult local
contractors and codes.


Amanda & kk Johnson Tom Balfour ll Avenus & Hal Steiner Art Paty
BROKR/ASSOC. TOR G REACTOR RLTOR BROER REALTOR


Preparation


saves money

in long run

P people stock-
pile for vari-
ous reas-
ons, whether it's
to take advantage
of a sale or to
stock up in case of
emergencies, un-
planned extra ex-
penses, distance Sara Noel
from stores, bad FRUGAL
weather, natural
catastrophes or LIVING
lean times.
The majority of frugal people who
are stocking up or prepping aren't
extremists or hoarders like you see


See FRUGAL/Page E4


746-9000

0sbyo 00


SHNS photo courtesy Kohler
If you want to spend a lot of money for a little whirlpool, then
a built-in foot bath can turn an ordinary bathroom into your
own personal pedicure spa.

I Jackie Gaffney Jason Gaffney
i T Realtonr^ A HnOUSE Realtor E S
j U302.3179 soiLNn' 287.9022
The Gole G l WEEKS REALTY, 5 BEVERLY HILLS BLVD.
The Golden Girl 76.67001


B'iEVERY HLL

IR MFINANIN


SUNDAY, MARCH 18, 2012 E3







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Real Estate DIGEST


Barnes, Broom hit
new highs for 2012
Lucy Barnes has qualified
for the prestigious multimillion
dollar club in just a little over
two months this year.
With over $2 million in
closed sale volume, she joins
a very small group of agents
who have passed this mark
already this year. Lucy is a


veteran Realtor with RE/MAX
Realty One. She works out of
their Crystal River office on
U.S. 19.
The brokers and staff of
RE/MAX would like to con-
gratulate Lucy for her well
earned success.
The associates and staff of
RE/MAX Realty One are also
pleased to recognize Jody
Broom for exceeding the $1


million mark in sales volume.
Jody is one of a few agents to
have qualified for the million
dollar club so far this year.
She has been with RE/MAX
for more than 15 years and a
Realtor for three decades.
Broom works in the Crystal
River office of RE/MAX and
specializes in Riverhaven Vil-
lage and the Homosassa
area.


-

/-~




Lucy Jody
Barnes Broom
RE/MAX RE/MAX
Realty One. Realty One.


PINE I & CRUS HIL OFFICES


SandraOlear




Brian Murray




Dick Hildebrandt




Florence Clear,




Helen Forte




Jane 0. Gwynn


NEW LISTING


.ra ( (/ll,,, '1"e ..M,...:.< ,

IVI LWb4Z I $Z Z4,Ouuu
Spacious 3/2/2 with newly surfaced solar-heated
pool.
PENDING
Matt Robinson .


Tami Mayer


liTs %...f .:. ., 1. .
M LS#351173 $398,000
Large 4/3/3 home in prestigious Hampton Hills.


CITRUS HILLS
20 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 746-0744


Joy Holland




LoriNickerson


'sI


OPEN HOUSE SUN. 1-3 OPEN HOUSE SUN. 1-3

MikeMcHale

MLS#351513 $119 900 MLS#354092 119.900
Bright & Cheery 3/2/2 in move-in condition. Stunning 2/2/2 on corner lot in quite neighborhood.
Directions: Rte 486to Breniwood entrance to right on Directions: Forest Ridge Blvd. to Sugarbeny to home on
Brentwood Cir to home on right comer of Passion Flower
Jo Ann Martin 352-613-2238 Jo Ann Martin 352-613-2238
OPEN HOUSE SUN. 1-3 NEW LISTING Phil Phillips
w,- LM f


MLS#347068 $78,900
Lovely furnished 2 story townhouse.
Directions: Rte 4S6 to Citrus Hills Blvd to right on Glassboro to
left at Bldg 18.
Florence Cleary 352-634-5523
NEW LISTING


.* N f-, r .., I.. .. **
MLS#354233 $115,000
One owner 3/2/2 home on a private lot.


783 E Falconry Ct
MLS#354203 $234,900
"New 2012 construction" 3/2/3 stunning home on
the "Meadows Golf.


Steve Dobbyn


NEW LISTING

Teresa Boozer
q"..
MLS#354239 $64,900
Bright & sleek ground floor unit.
PENDINGanns
_ ,. ^_ ^Joann Condit


340 E Glassboro Ct 19-3A
MLS#353703 $67.888
"Updated" furnished groundfloor unit..


ni
BarryCook


S2011 Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities. An independently owned and operated broker member of Prudential Real Estate Affiliates, Inc., a Prudential Financial company -.....i-. .. .I I ,
M""N Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are service marks of Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities, registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Used under license. Equal Housing Oppuiiuiiuly. '-


Dealing with



condensation



near fireplace


Q My fireplace is in
the basement and
the chimney is on
the wall between the house
and attached
garage. In the ,-
summer when it
is very humid
outside, the glass
doors on my fire-
place sweat and '
the condensation ,
pools on the floor
in front of the
fireplace hearth.
We keep our Dwight
home cool (67 de- H
grees) at night in MAINT
the summer. If I MAINT!
open the glass
doors, the condensation
does not occur.
I would like to put an
electric fireplace insert in,
but I am concerned about
the condensation. The in-
sert resembles a flat-screen
TV in appearance.
Any condensation could


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E3

on television, clearing off
grocery shelves. Many were
raised to be prepared or
have mastered a stream-
lined, frugal way to shop. It's
typically done over time,
based on what items their
family will use. Some pre-
serve food from their gar-
dens and consider that part
of their stockpile. Some are
avid coupon and rebate
shoppers, too.
Whatever your motiva-
tion, here are a few ways to
work on your own pre-
paredness at home:
Start slow: To begin your
stockpile, I suggest you buy a
few extras each shopping
trip if an item you use is on
sale. If you have coupons,


E


damage the insert. I have
only one fireplace and it is
the only thing that vents
through the chimney
I have thought
about inserting
insulation into
the top of my
chimney and cap-
ping it, but I am
concerned that
the walls of the
flue could create
condensation
during the humid
Barnett summer days. Do
VIE you have any rec-
ommendations?
NANCE A: Condensa-
tion in the home
is the process where mois-
ture, which is present in the
conditioned air, is trans-
formed from a gas to a liq-
uid. This process is most
often noticed in the winter
when moisture forms on the

See FIREPLACE/Page E10

you'll save even more. You
can accommodate the extra
expense by cutting some-
thing else from your grocery
list or budgeting a few bucks
more for your groceries.
With that extra money, look
for a sale item you typically
use. Maybe you'll find a buy-
one-get-one-free deal and
you can buy four. The follow-
ing trip, use the money you
saved from the first sale to
take advantage of the next
sale. You'll build enough sav-
ings so that instead of buying
a couple of extra when an
item is on sale, you can buy
more. Eventually, you won't
be paying full price on much
of anything. You'll have a de-
cent stockpile, too.
Emergency prepared-
ness: Have supplies handy
such as a generator, water,


See FRUGAL/Page E9


( Prudential

Florida Showcase
Properties


PINE RIDGE
1481 Pine Ridge Blvd.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465
(352) 527-1820


OPEN HOUSE SUN. 2-4
AA 4.-9 .'- 6.
1 le
,

' e MLS #351544$172,000
Lovely 3/2 pool home on a one acre lot.
Directions: Rte 491 to Pine Ridge Blvd to right on Elkcam to
home on left.
Teresa Boozer 352-634-0213
OPEN HOUSE SUN. 1-3



f1 thIi I| 1 II .....
Completely remodeled 2/2/2 in nice location.
Directions: Rte 486 to Brentwood entrance to straight on
Brentwood Cir to right on Jena to home on left.
Dick Hildebrandt 352-586-0478


For a Visual Tour or Multiple Photos,

Go to

www.floridashowcaseproperties.com


E4SUNDAY, MARCH 18, 2012












Blue-eyed Iris adds a splash of spring color


After winter, homeowners look
forward to spring flowers in the
garden. A favorite in Florida is
Blue-eyed Iris, Sisyrinchium species.
Commonly called blue-eyed "grass,"
sisyrinchium irises have the flattened
leaves and stems typical of all true
irises. There are some 90 species orig-


inating in the
Americas. Mar-
ginally to fully
frost hardy,
some are rhi-
zome-spreading
perennial ever-
greens while
others are an-
nual seeders.
Leaf color is a
bright emerald
green, easily dif-
ferentiated from
lawn grasses by
the flat leaves


Blue-eyed Iris makes an attractive specimen
plant, but the spring flowers are pure delight. Lo-
cally, it flowers from March to April. Flowers less
than half an inch in diameter are borne at the tips
of flat, winged stalks. Color ranges from pale blue
to deep purple. Center throats may be bright yel-
low. Prominent stamens tipped with yellow pollen
attract insects.
JANE WEBER/Special to the Chronicle


Jane Weber
JANE'S
GARDEN


and neat rounded clumps. Seedlings
are easily dug up and transplant well
into 4-inch pots. Water well and set in
the shade until roots show out the bot-
tom in about four to six weeks, then set
them out in the garden. Blue-eyed Iris
makes a lush, evergreen border plant
to flank a path. In six months, the
spreading plant will be about 8 inches
in diameter. After 18 months, a clump
will reach 18 inches across and over a
foot tall.
There are about six species native
to Florida. S. graminoides, formerly
named S. angustifolia, is the most pop-
ular species grown for sale in 4-inch
pots. Costing 50 cents from a state-li-
censed grower like me to about a dol-
lar, Blue-eyed Iris is readily available
at native and big-box nurseries. It
ranges naturally from Central Florida
northward and westerly in the South-
eastern states in Zones 3 to 10. Habi-
tats include roadsides, disturbed
fields, woodland edges and cultivated
gardens.
The clump makes an attractive
specimen plant, but the spring flowers
are pure delight. Locally, it flowers
from March to April. Flowers less than
half an inch in diameter are borne at
the tips of flat, winged stalks. Color
ranges from pale blue to deep purple.
Center throats may be bright yellow.
Prominent stamens tipped with yel-
low pollen attract insects.
Soil can be nutrient-poor and sandy
to moderately humus-rich garden
beds. Exposure needs to be full sun to
light, high-dappled shade for best


See JANE/Page E12


110 E. Keller Ct., tiernando
Citrus Hills Oaks Golf Course
Located on the 8th green of the Oaks Golf Course, this comfortable
and elegant home is perfect for relaxing and entertaining. This
contemporary Mediterranean style home sits in harmony with the
land. The open design allows light and natural beauty to pervade.
Throughout the home your line of vision is drawn towards the
pool and golf course. The outdoor gathering areas, the
landscaping, the brick pavers and the beautiful Oaks Golf Course
views transform this attractive house into a beautiful home.
Citrus Hills Membership Available. MLS#35Z985 $Z99,000

Edward Russell Johnston, Inc.
General Contractor
State Certified CGC06Z630
531 North Citrus Avenue, Crystal River, FL 344Z8
(352) 795-2200
www.erj.net


Min:iTS rK u rIti:!
This custom built home has the livability for
everyday life & the elegance & upgrades for
any buyer. Located in Citrus Hills on a
gorgeous one-acre landscaped lot. The formal
living room opens to the lanai, which has
beautiful tongue & groove ceilings. Features
include an office with custom built-ins, formal
diningroom, kitchen with granite counters &
wood cabinets, free form pool with waterfall,
media/game room with projection theater,
paved courtyard with fireplace & a completely
insulated 3 car garage. One of a kind!
Visit
WWW.3765NTYRONEAVE.COM
or Call 888-303-6405
MLS 353155
Code: 9414 for more details.


ELEGANT HOME
on a beautiful mature landscaped lot located
in a quiet subdivision close to 7 Rivers Golf &
Country Club &just minutes from shopping &
amenities. This lovingly maintained home has
vaulted ceilings with a beautiful fireplace in
the spacious living room. You will enjoy the
beauty & natural light that fill this home. The
floor plan is open & flows well. Light & bright
updated kitchen with a breakfast bar that will
keep you involved when entertaining. Come
take a look to appreciate all that this home
offer. #352793
Visit
WWW.809NVENTURIAVECRYSTALRIVERFL.INFO
or Call
888-303-6405 Code: 9413


Gene Wade 352-794-0888
EXIT Realty Leaders _
352-795-0888
352-527-1112


SUNDAY, MARCH 18, 2012 E5


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE






E6 SUNDAY, MARCH 18, 2012



HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information........352-563-5592
.................................................. advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information........................352-563-5966
News information................................................ 352-563-5660
....................................... ............. newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listing............www.ChronicleHomeFinder.com
"The market leader in real estate information"

CitONfILE

HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-563-
3280, attention HomeFront.
News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront.
Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes for
space and/or clarity.
For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


Diagnosing potassium


nutrient deficiencies

Proper use offertilizer can address plant woes

T roubleshooting problems in the Potassium deficiency on palms is also
landscape can be difficult. Often, common. It will also appear on the older
many factors need to be leaves, however when held
considered when identifying up to light, they will typically
the cause or causes of turf and "- have a translucent, yellow-spot-
ornamental problems. When ted appearance. If a deficiency
starting a diagnosis, ask your- f -* is suspected, a soil and pH test
self, could it be a nutrient defi- is recommended to help iden-
ciency, herbicide or insect tify which nutrient is deficient.
damage, fungal disease or even Hopefully, a good ornamental
mechanical injury? fertilizer with macro and micro
Potassium deficiencies can .- nutrients will be the solution to
be confused with fungal disease the problem.
or even drought conditions. Ac- Matt Lenhardt To learn more about fertiliza-
cording to the University of tion, and how to apply the cor-
Florida, potassium is needed CITRUS rect amounts of fertilizer to
for several plant functions, EXTENSION your lawn, I will be offering a
such as starch formation and class called "Fertilizer Basics"
cell growth. In addition, nutri- at 9:30 a.m. Thursday, March 22.
ent-deficient plants may exhibit different Class cost is $5. I will also be offering a
symptoms, depending on the plant class called "Insect Identification and
species. Typically, the outer edges of older Management" on at 9:30 a.m. Wednesday,
leaves will curl and/or have a March 28. Class cost is $5 and includes
purple/brownish appearance. Yellowing "Mac's Field Guide" to help identify good
between the leaf veins is also a common
symptom of potassium deficiencies. See POTASSIUM/Page E10


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Inside...


Kill the clutter
PAGE E8
Real Estate Digest
PAGE E4
For current property transac-
tions, use the search features on
the website for the Citrus County
Property Appraiser's Office,
www.pa.citrus.fl.us.


Family treasures rescued from Chicago-area mansion


DearJohn: I enjoy your column in
the Citrus County Chronicle.
Recently I picked up some fam-
ily items in Chicago; most were not
well-cared for My
mother disliked
old furniture, be-
cause she was"
raised in her
grandparent's
home. I adore
character pieces.
I am mailing
some digital pho-
tos. My interest is John Sikorski
to find a qualified
person to restore SIKORSKI'S
and clean the oil ATTIC
painting. I have
no interest in selling. These items were
from my great-grandparent's large
home in North Chicago near Belmont
Harbor The home had 12-foot ceilings,
speaking tubes to the kitchen for serv-
ice from each of six bedrooms, and
most had a beautiful sink, china or
paisley It was my home in 1939, where
See ATTIC/Page E12


Special to the Chronicle
ABOVE: The glass dome for this antique
clock is gone, but many collectors
wouldn't necessarily mind. If this is an
authentic 19th-century piece, it could
potentially sell for between $250 and
$500. RIGHT: Painting such as this,
which shows a game bird after a hunt,
were popular in the 19th century. A
cleaning could bring out the color.







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY; MARCH 18, 2012 E7


A&M ERA Keyl Realty, Inc.
H e 8015 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa, FL
ERA 352-382-1700
REAL ESTATE


ugaood W


Located on U.S. 19
Just North of 1iM 1
Sugarmill Woods Entrance -TUNIT


. '. ^:


1 NEMESIA CT. E.
* 4/3/2 Extras immaculate
$219,900 MLS #340879


I-11 GINGERWOOD DRIVE
S4/3/2 Pool Family room FP
$ 280,000 MLS #339779
I Al
ft -~if l ^ ** ^


* i


12 LEMINGTON COURT 129 LINDER DRIVE
1/2/2 Family room Granite Golf course Pool 3/2/2
$179.900 MLS #347493 $219.000 MLS #348238


5 COCOPLUM CT. NORTH 12 QUAILWOOD PATH 13 SCHEFFLERA COURT
L & Spa Cul-de-Sac Hardwood Floors Southern Woods GC home 3/3/3 4/2/2 Family room Built 2005
$229,500 MLS #349266 $359,000 MLS #349630 $159,900 MLS #350062

-1ii11M

gill


44 LINDER DRIVE
Pool Office Privacy 3/2/2
$213,000 MLS #350094
PW "A'


53-34 DOUGLAS
Everything is NEW! No r


ET 1 JUNGLEPLUM CT. W 5
iance!! I 2/2/2 Pool Family room FP 3/2/2
I $128,900 MLS #351629 $2


MAYFLOWER CT. E
* Fireplace SS appliances
p29,000 MLS #352014


30 LINDER STREET 30 DEERWOOD DR.
2006 Thermopane Windows Gorgeous Kitchen *3/2/2 Pool Golf course view Hardwood flooring
$189,900 MLS #352187 $199,900 MLS #352998
1 ss92da'm i MOM~


I 6 CALENDULA CT. E 75 OAK VILLAGE BLVD.
3/2/2* Immaculate w/pool 20'4x30' garage 3+office/2/2 Heated pool corner fireplace
$227.500 MLS #353972 I $179.900 MLS #354001


. .........- ...


14 IMPATIENS CT.
* 3/2/2 Pool New paint/carpeting
$199,900 MLS #352388 1


66 BYRSONIMA LP. W
3/2/2 Hammocks Golf Course Villa 1900+sf.* Many amenities
$148.500 MLS #348349


I I


35 BEECH STREET #25 4 GINGERWOOD DR.
All Updated Upstairs Privacy Golf View Southern Woods GC home *
$87,000 MLS #353215 $249,900 MLS #35370


32 HIGHWOOD PATH
Best Buy on So. Woods 3/2/2/Den
$184.500 MLS #354282


* 3/2/3
1


3 FAIRWOODS COURT
2/2/2 1,900+ ft. Updated
$112.500 #354314


SUNDAY, MARCH 18, 2012 E7


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


--bd


,. ;,^







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


seriously Organized/Associated Press
A cluttered closet of Christmas decorations is shown prior to an organ-
izing project. A redesigned closet utilizing new shelving and storage bins.
Nikki Havens of Seriously Organized in Bloomington, Minn., recommends starting
with your entry hall closet. Small closet or walk-in, it's important to use the most
convenient spot in your home to your advantage.

Three spring projects to quickly kill clutter


CEDAR BURNETT
For The Associated Press

If, like me, you spent
this winter hiber-
nating and eating
baked goods, your home
may have paid the
price. Maybe it got a lit-
tle disorganized, or is
starting to look like an
episode of "Hoarders."
Spring is a great time
to shake off that winter
sluggishness and free
yourself from clutter
But where to begin?


Spring cleaning can feel
overwhelming if your
to-do list is more like a
to-do novel.
Never fear: Three
professional organizers
are here to offer three
projects you can do in
an afternoon each:
Hall closet
Nikki Havens of Seri-
ously Organized in
Bloomington, Minn.,
recommends starting
with your entry hall
closet Small closet or


walk-in, use the most
convenient spot in your
home to your advan-
tage. First, identify the
coats you actually wear
and pull out anything
you don't, along with
outerwear that's wrong
for the season.
"If you have too much
stuff, you can't find any-
thing," Havens says.
After culling your
coat collection, she sug-
gests using the floor for

See Page E9


E8 SUNDAY, MARCH 18, 2012







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLUTTER
Continued from Page E8

frequently used shoes, and adding
two shelves directly above them. Buy
two color-coded bins for each family
member and label them with names.
(Don't forget the dog, who comes with
its own clutter.)
Place the first set of bins on the
bottom shelf. These baskets should
be used for seasonal accessories, like
hats and gloves in the winter or gog-
gles in the summer
"If you don't use it a couple of
times a week, it shouldn't be there,"
Havens says. "Keep two pairs of
gloves you don't need eight."
Use the second shelf of bins for
what Havens calls the "clutter con-
trol center." From hairbands to fin-
ger-painting masterpieces, these tubs
are the place to throw odds and ends
as you come in the door.
Finally, Havens recommends re-
moving the hanging bar and in-
stalling hooks in a diamond-shaped
pattern for coats and bags. Kids can
take the lower hooks while adults
claim the top ones.
Bedroom closet
Once you've mastered the hall
closet, Brooke Butin and Heather
Perrilliat of HeatherBrookes in Los
Angeles have a plan for tackling your
bedroom closet.
The first thing to do is purge, Butin
says. Create a donate pile, a consign-
ment pile and a give-to-friends pile.
Perrilliat suggests trying on any-
thing you haven't worn in a while.
You could even invite a friend and
turn the chore into a fashion show.
"Not everyone has the budget to buy
new clothes," Butin says. "Look for
clothes that could get new life from an
alteration -you could save a couple


hundred dollars by spending 20."
Once you've cleared out the old,
take stock of what's left Seasonal
clothes should be boxed up and put
in storage. The rest should be placed
on matching hangers facing the same
direction and categorized by type -
i.e., shirts, pants, dresses.
"You have to make your closet
function for you," Perrilliat says. "If
you're a jeans and T-shirt person,
keep those toward the front."
After you've categorized, organize
your clothes by color within each cate-
gory Use closet tab dividers between
categories if you want to go the extra
mile. These can be particularly help-
ful with look-alike items no more
struggling to distinguish skinny jeans
from bootcut at 6 in the morning.
Butin advises utilizing vertical
space for accessories and shoes. The
shelf above the hanging bar can
house hat boxes and shoes stored in
clear plastic boxes. Side walls can
hold hooks for handbags, and a cork-
board can display jewelry Belts get
messy quickly, she warns, so rolling
them and placing them in a basket is
your best bet. You can also keep your
go-to shoes in a basket on the floor.
Files
With your closets in order, the last,
oft-dreaded task is at hand: organiz-
ing files. Most of us would rather
clean toilets than take on this proj-
ect, but it's probably the most impor-
tant. Luckily, you can kill two
anxiety-causing birds with one stone
by pulling your tax files as you go.
If you have a filing system in place,
Mia Carpiniello of Organizing Philly
in Philadelphia suggests pulling out
every file and seeing what you can get
rid of or consolidate. Consult with an
attorney about legal documents, but in
general, you can recycle or shred any
items you haven't looked at in a year
Receipts and manuals for items


you no longer own and any regular
bill statements you don't need for tax
or legal reasons should also get the
heave-ho. Pull out any tax-related
files from the previous year and keep
them in a separate pile.
Organize files into long-term refer-
ence and temporary action files (i.e.,
invitations and bills). Long-term ref-
erence files should live in the file
cabinet, whereas temporary files
should be stored on your desk and
categorized into actions, such as "To
pay" or "To respond."
To keep your desk clutter-free,
Carpiniello recommends an inbox
where you can keep paperwork until
you have time to deal with it. Alpha-
betizing or color-coding files is a per-
sonal choice, but all your files should
have tabs on the left side instead of in
multiple locations all that scanning
from side to side is hard on the eyes.
For all three projects, take stock of
how you're doing after three months.
"If you're not keeping it up, it isn't
working," Carpiniello says. "Reevalu-
ate your system or move your system.
Eventually, you'll find the right one."


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E4

money, clothing, firewood,
oil lamps, hand-crank
radio, cook stove, first-aid
supplies (including med-
ication), blanket, nonper-
ishable foods, tools and
batteries, to name a few.
Each family member
should have his or her own
emergency bag, and it
should be easily accessible.
Keep a kit outside of your
home in a shed, garage or
your car, too. One reader,
EW from Michigan, shares:
"Military surplus stores
carry disposable rescue
blankets that fold small
and reflect heat well. I
keep a small stockpile of
lighters and matches, too.
It's best to keep emergency
supplies in several places
in the house; for example,


SUNDAY, MARCH 18, 2012 E9

don't store all the candles
in the dark basement, in
case of a power outage."
Container storage: You
can stock larger quantities
of pantry staples such as
flour or sugar. Reader Jan
B. from Missouri shares:
"I'm trying to prepare be-
cause I believe that it is my
job to make sure my family
is fed and taken care of, no
matter what the situation
is. Most recently I bought
brown and powdered sugar
for 75 percent off. I used
four food-grade buckets
(frosting buckets from the
bakery, which sells them
for $1.50 each) and packed
25 16-ounce bags in each
bucket. The lids have a
rubber seal, so ants can't
get to my sugar."
Preserving: While some
people freeze produce to
preserve it, dehydrating


See Page E10


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E9

and home canning are other
options to increase your stock-
pile. This is especially helpful
if you don't have a free-stand-
ing freezer for extra food
storage.
Organizing and learning:
Know what you have in stock,
and more importantly, use it as
needed and rotate your inven-
tory so it doesn't expire and go
to waste. If you have time,
learn more ways to be self-re-
liant through books, classes or
online. Another reader, Marie
H. from the Midwest, shares: "I
am consolidating all of my
pantry excess onto a shelving
unit in the basement. From
this, I'll create an inventory
sheet of what I have. My goal is
ultimately to have a one-year
supply of food and health and


919E


beauty items. I attended a fas-
cinating program on aquapon-
ics last month, and right now
I'm attending a class on raising
backyard chickens. I will be
starting garden seeds next
week."
If you'd like to learn more
about prepping and stockpil-
ing, visit frugalvillage.com/
forums/stockpiling.
mEN
Cook meat and poultry, stick
it in the freezer and pull it out
for quick meals. For example,
chicken can be roasted and
shredded for sandwiches, que-
sadillas, soups or casseroles.
The first reader tip shares her
method of freezing ground
beef:
Pre-cook ground beef:
Freeze browned hamburger in
meal-sized portions. I freeze it
in pint jars, which works in any
recipe that calls for a pound of
hamburger, and I throw in
onions, bell peppers, celery,


G


Investors Realty
of Citrus County, Inc. (
Visit my website at: www.myflorida-house.com



k t l^L A_


etc. depending on what I need
to use up at the time. It helps
the meat go further and adds
flavor It's a big time-saver be-
cause you can thaw and use it
in so many recipes without
having to fry it up and then
clean up the mess after S.D.,
Minnesota
Note from Sara: Do not fill
the jar to the top when freezing
in canning jars, to avoid break-
age. Leave room for expansion
and use straight wide-mouthed
jars rather than jars with
curved "shoulders. "Many wide-
mouthed canning jars have a fill
line marked on the jar Plastic
freezer storage jars from Ball
are an option, too. Also, you can
boil ground beef To learn more
about boiling ground beef
rather than frying it, visit: www
frugalvillage. com/2007/01/04/
thrifty-thursday-question-
hamburger-crumbles.

See Rage E15


ITTA BARTH
REALTOR@
[352) 220-0466


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30AWGM



fc


FIREPLACE
Continued from Page E4

cold glass surfaces of windows. It's a
simple fact that cold air cannot hold or
retain as much moisture as warm air,
and when the two meet, the warm air
starts to cool, releasing some of its
moisture as condensation. Homes
with high humidity levels will often
have condensation forming on the in-
terior side of windows in colder
weather When the humidity levels are
too high, mold and mildew can be-
come a problem. A normal and com-
fortable level of humidity inside the
home would be anywhere between 30
percent and 60 percent at 65 degrees.
Humidity levels below 30 percent can
result in dry skin, nosebleeds and
static electric buildup, whereas higher
moisture levels lead to the aforemen-
tioned mold and mildew.
A hygrometer, a device that meas-
ures humidity levels, can be pur-
chased for under $20 and will give you


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OFFICE: (352) 795-6633
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an accurate reading. Only when you
know you have a humidity problem
can you correct it.
As you know, if you plug the top of
the chimney above the fireplace, the
flue-liner condensation will trickle
down to the fireplace. You will need to
protect the insert from moisture prob-
lems. According to one manufac-
turer's recommendation, "Insulation
and vapor barrier should be placed a
minimum of 2 inches from the unit."
This means you can use rigid foam
insulation behind some inserts to con-
trol temperatures and airflow and a
vapor barrier to protect the insert
from moisture, but first read and fol-
low all installation instructions.


Dwight Barnett is a certified master
inspector with the American Society
of Home Inspectors. Write to him
with home improvement questions at
C. Dwight Barnett, Evansville
Courier & Press, PO. Box 268,
Evansville, IN 47702 or email him at
d.Barnett@nsightbb.com.


POTASSIUM
Continued from Page E6

and bad bugs in the garden. Pre-regis-
tration and pre-payment required.
Both classes will be held at the Cit-
rus County Extension office. For more
information on this subject or other
gardening issues, please contact the
Citrus County Extension office at 352-
527-5700, or stop by the Master Gar-
dener Volunteers plant clinic
consultation desk 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mon-
day through Friday in the Lecanto gov-
ernment complex at 3650 W Sovereign
Path, Ste. 1, Lecanto, FL 34461.
Citrus County Extension links the
public with the University of
Florida/IFAS' knowledge, research
and resources to address youth, fam-
ily, community and agricultural needs.
All programs and related activities
sponsored for, or assisted by, the Insti-
tute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
are open to all persons without dis-
crimination with respect to race,
creed, color, religion, age, disability,
sex, sexual orientation, marital status,
national origin, political opinions or
affiliations, genetic information and
veteran status as protected under the
Vietnam Era Veterans' Readjustment
Assistance Act.

U The Chronicle has forms available
for wedding and engagement an-
nouncements, anniversaries,
birth announcements and first
birthdays.


coLowe,,L
BANKeRO


I 9SS oarm, 2


E10 SUNDAY, MARCH 18, 2012







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Proper timing requires


reading nature's cues


GOT A NEWS TIP?
* The Chronicle welcomes tips from readers about breaking news. Call the newsroom at 352-
563-5660, and be prepared to give your name, phone number, and the address of the event.
* To submit story ideas for feature sections, call 352-563-5660 and ask for Nancy Kennedy.
Again, be prepared to leave a detailed message.


Associated Press
Iris blooms are shown in this photo taken in New Market, Va. Phenology is "the
science of appearances," or knowing which plants can tell you when to begin
weeding, pruning or fighting insects.


Phenology can help

DEAN FOSDICK
For The Associated Press

Phenology is the science of appear-
ances, or knowing which plants can
tell you when to start weeding, plant-
ing, fighting insects or tackling any
other gardening priority.
Once the forsythia begins to bloom,
for instance, it's time to renew your
war against crabgrass.
When to fertilize the lawn? Think
apple blossoms falling. Time to set out
tomatoes? Yes, if dogwood trees are in
flower.
"Phenology makes us more aware of
our environment," said Robert Polom-
ski, a horticulturist and arborist at
Clemson University in Clemson, S.C.
'"Associating gardening tasks with
flowering times is a neat way to look at
how nature really functions."
Forsythia grows most everywhere in
Zones 5-8. Its yellow blossoms are
among the most recognizable signs of
early spring, making this member of
the olive family one of the best sea-
sonal indicators for gardeners. Turf
grass specialists often use the bloom
time of forsythia as a bellwether for
scattering pre-emergent herbicides on
crabgrass-prone lawns.


crack seasonal codes

'"A garden weed preventer or pre-
emergent kills the seeds before they
can grow into seedlings," Polomski
said.
Phenology blends science with leg-
end. It charts plant and animal devel-
opment, and how those are influenced
by climate change over long periods of
time.
It also includes the observations of
people who have worked the ground
for generations.
Scientists know, for instance, that
soil temperatures must reach at least
35 degrees before onion and lettuce
seeds will germinate. But Felder
Rushing, a former extension horticul-
turist, 10th-generation American gar-
dener and folklorist from Jackson,
Miss., puts it in a more homespun and
equally correct way: "When fishermen
are sitting on the riverbank instead of
on their bait buckets, the soil is warm
enough to plant."
Some other reliable natural mark-
ers compiled by University of Wiscon-
sin-Extension:
Plant potatoes as the first dande-
lions bloom, and peas when the daf-
fodils flower


See CUES/Page E12


NEW ON THE MA "KET"' . I.. NEw TO THE MA RETI I I ...... I ,,,I......... il
, IIh II 1 O ,L 1 I. 1.1....1 ...I1...... 1 .I l , I I, I .. . ..1i,,,I I. I . . ... I . h.... l .. l... I
... lll o1 . .. 1.1.....1. . ... o n S s oo 1 i.. . 1.... .....ll.... .. .
It, , h ... .1. 1 d .. J ,,, ,,,,,,I ,, , ,


SUNDAY, MARCH 18, 2012 Ell







E12 SUNDAY, MARCH 18, 2012


ATTIC
Continued from Page E6

four generations lived. We visited
grandma on most every holiday after
we moved to Michigan.
The family had a well-known Ger-
man restaurant for 60 years on North
Wells street, where the literary critics
would gather for lunch. It had dark
paneling and was lighted by gas
lamps. Any history and dates, espe-
cially on the oil painting, would be
important. As a child I found it curi-
ous a "dead bird" painting hung
prominently in the dining room.
The oil painting is signed E or J.
Hearst and is undated. It is approxi-
mately 31 by 47.5 inches. The digital
photo shows it brighter than it actu-
ally is, after hanging in sooty Chicago
for many years.
The clock needs repair; it is missing
the faceplate and dome. It sat on the
mantel in the second parlor It might
possibly have been wound too tight.


The samovar is silver and needs re-
pair from electrolysis deterioration of
some type. I also have a four-piece
cruet condiment set in a silver holder,
broken with all the pieces. I wonder
how to go about finding restoration
for the items.
I have always collected old linen,
white or ecru, and use it for special
occasions. Thank you for any infor-
mation you may impart. When the
home was sold in the late1950s, many
items were just tossed. No one in the
family appreciated or wanted large
furniture, preferring limed oak or
chrome. KB., Inverness
Dear KB.: There is no track record
of sales or any biographical informa-
tion about the artist J. Hearst. Oil on
canvas paintings depicting game
birds displayed in a sumptuous man-
ner after the hunt were a popular
subject matter during the Victorian
era. Your painting may need cleaning,
which is not unusual for paintings
from the 19th century and earlier pe-
riods; often the colors come back to
life.


REALTY GROUP


7-
2l .

Single Family/4Bd/2.5 Bath/3Car/Woodside
Spectacular Cordova model loaded with including Granite
countertops in your beautiful Gourmet custom window


MLS"353844 ................................... 359,000


Detached V la3d/2ath2Car/Southgate Villas
SHORT SALE Lovely Lantana model with popul ar open floor plan I
Nice tile and Coan counter tops situated on a large corner lot in
MLS#352530...................................$203,700


I think the samovar was made dur-
ing the early 20th century It looks like
it is silver-plated, not sterling silver;
if it is sterling, it will be marked ap-
propriately If there are no marks, it
is plated. For restoration, contact Re-
placements Ltd. in Greensboro, N.C.,
at 800-REPLACE (737-5223) or by e-
mail at www.replacements.com.
The clock was likely made in
France during the late 19th century.
The style is French Empire and the
case material is either marble or al-
abaster The clock face never had a
face cover, since it was designed to be
under a glass dome. You did not in-
clude the dimensions of the clock; it
looks fairly tall and wide. Finding a
glass dome may be difficult and could
cost more than the clock is worth. If
the clock dates from the late 19th cen-
tury, potential dollar value is $250 to
$500. Most collectors just accept that
the dome is no longer with the clock.
Dear John: I recently bought these
chairs and a round table for $200. I
feel I paid too much, I just plain made
a mistake. I have very little eyesight
and did not see it enough to judge on
my own exactly what I was getting.
The person with me was a younger
person who was not knowledgeable
enough to be much help. The chairs
and the table are not a set. So, I may
end up selling the chairs and keeping
the table.
I am enclosing pictures of the
chairs in hopes you will be able to tell
me about approximate age, what style
they might be, etc. He was told when
he bought them at a secondhand shop
that the chairs were thought to be ap-
proximately 45 years old. What say
you? -J- W, Internet
Dear J.W: The style of your chairs
is often called sabre leg and was first
produced in England during the late
18th to early 19th century Your re-
production chairs were likely made
in America after World War II. I sus-
pect if you get more than $25 each, it
will be a lucky day


John Sikorski has been a profes-
sional in the antiques business for 30
years. He hosts a call-in radio show,
Sikorski's Attic, on WJUF (90.1 FM)
Saturday from noon to 1 p.m. Send
questions to Sikorski's Attic, c/o The
Citrus County Chronicle, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River,
FL 34429 or asksikorski@aol. com.


JANE
Continued from Page E5

flowering. This iris does
well under the shade of de-
ciduous Turkey Oaks as
Blue-eyed Iris buds set, and
it flowers mainly before
these native trees leaf out in
late March.
Flowed stems and associ-
ated leaves die off after
seeds mature. Older, large
clumps can be divided in
summer during the rainy
season. Dig up the whole
clump and gently tease the
roots apart with as little
damage as possible. Replant
a handful in the same spot.
Gently cover the roots with
soil and water well to settle
the soil around the roots. Do
not tamp or stamp on the
delicate roots. Roots anchor
plants and are the only way
a plant has to take up water
and minerals from the soil.
Damaged roots are a main
cause of plants failing to es-


CUES
Continued from Page Ell

Transplant eggplant,
melons and peppers when
the irises bloom.
Start looking for trouble
from squash vine borers
when chicory flowers open.
Put seed corn in the
ground when oak leaves are
about the size of a squirrel's
ear
The time is right for
planting tomatoes when lily-
of-the-valley is in full bloom.
Seed morning glories as
soon as the maple trees leaf
out.
Grasshopper eggs hatch
roughly at the same time
that lilacs bloom.
Prune roses when cro-
cuses begin to flower.
Gardeners aren't the only
ones who read signs of the
seasons for practical rea-
sons. Bird watchers use them


Wondrftulfully furnshed' 2 bedroom with den ready for ve in Townhome/S31
Tastefully decorated with an extended lanai Features many Spacious unfurnm
Includes the Citrus Hills Social of Terra Vista wit
land Fitness Cent
#1288...................................................$1400 #1149 .........
Terra Vista Realty Group, LLC
2400 North Terra Vista Blvd., Hernando, Florida 34442
(352) 746-6121 (800) 323-7703


Office in the .
Terra Vista F
Welcome Center


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

tablish after transplanting.
Water sparingly only if
leaves show signs of wilt.
Overwatering can rot roots
and cause death in plants.
Pot up the remaining
irises and let them recover
from their transplant shock.
Place in the shade until
roots poke out the drainage
holes, then plant as desired
in the garden.
These native Blue-eyed
Irises make good gifts for
neighbors and fellow gar-
deners who may be un-
knowingly growing exotic
invasive plants that disrupt
so many of Florida's natural
ecosystems.


Jane Weber is a Profes-
sional Gardener and Con-
sultant. Semi-retired, she
grows thousands of native
plants. Visitors are wel-
come to her Dunnellon,
Marion County garden. For
an appointment call 352-
249-6899 or contact
JWeberl2385@gmail. com.

for timing migrations, fly
fishermen for signaling the
insect hatch and farmers as
clues in weather forecasting.
Phenologists monitor one
species as a reliable way to
track changes in another.
Birds head north, for in-
stance, just as the insects
begin to appear in their
summer breeding grounds.
Insect populations build
when their host plants pro-
duce leaves.
Native tribes in British Co-
lumbia used the arrival of
buds and blooms from cer-
tain berry-producing shrubs
to signal when it was time to
fish for halibut or spawning
salmon. That gave them a
competitive leg up over other
animals consuming the
same, often limited resource.
"People good at observing
things can often predict
when the purple martins
start arriving," Rushing
said. "It becomes part of the
local lore."


* Nonprofit organizations are invited to submit news releases about upcoming community
events. Write the name of the event, who sponsors it, when and where it will take place and
other details. Include a contact name and phone number to be printed in the paper.
* News releases are subject to editing. Call 352-563-5660 for details.


2Bd/2.5Bath/Den/2CarlPointe Vista
Nestled in the heart of Terra Vista you'll find a uniquely private enclave ,
called Pointe Vista This impressive collection of 12 caretf
homes are highlighted by striking design and refined
Detached Villa/3Bd/2Bath/2Car/Hillside Villas
Terra Vista Maintenance Free Vlla Popular Lantana Model Open
S bedroom can be used Driveway finished with
private club amenities and active lifestyle pavers for nice curb appeal Well maintained
MLS#353660..................................$415,000 MLS#353077................................. $219,000
.erra Via &
Tr s- 63 Motso oeSca-ebrhi nlddwt l etl








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE






SReal Estate


SUNDAY, MARCH 18, 2012 E13


To place an ad, call 563-5966

-- -"----" -Class ifieds


In Print

.a- and




All

The Time


C.R/Homosassa INVERNESS ATTENTION HOMOSASSA 2/2 on Lake Rousseau. INVERNESS CASTR REL
1 & 2 Br. turn, quiet park RENT SPECIAL: Sec. dep, 2/2 carport nicely furn NOW $17,500 55+ Park on the water a Poe
Util. incl. clean, shrt/long pro-rated over 3 mo. LAND OWNERS MH on Homosassa River Low Lot Rent $240/m w/5 piers for fishing &
term 352 220-2077 period. 55+ park on the JACOBSEN NEW 2012 w/dock no pet f/l/s 2003 Mobile Home. enjoyment, clubhouse, M I I
DUNNELLON water w/5 piers for fish- 5 yr. warranty, 3/2, sht/long term $850 Used Seasonally onsite shuffleboard, and 11701W. Clearwater Ct. I
5159 W. Disney Ln 2/2, ing and enjoyment, 2 x 6 construction, 352-220-2077 Owner bought a house, much more! 2 BR. 1.5 BA Homosassa I F
New AC Lrg. Lot clubhouse, onsite upgrade insulation, (352) 817-1987, for $2,000. must be 2/2/2 on watering
$400/m $400 dp shuffleboard, & much appliance pkg. (207) 546-6115 approved 352-476-4964 Riverview Estates. U
(727) 480-5512 more! 1 BR home $325 Delivered & set up I 55 *950...
plus. 2BR home $450, with A/C & heat, AWESOME DEALS Lecanto 55 + REEEALE
Sm \ 2 es s n YCFmmn Mbd1abl coa FREE MOBILE I 50...
FLORAL CITY includes H20. 2 BR, 1.5 steps & skirting onlyFinancing Available
3/1 fl rm. fncd yd sm. bath, Park Model $500. $279.19./mo. W.A.C. H$500/dn screened porch HOMES
pet ok $550., 726-5062 Pets considered. Includes first year Beverly Hills 1 / remod, shed $5k $11,500 To Handy Individuals
Section 8 accepted. on homeowner Ins. 55 + park 2/2 fully 1/Iscrnrm/carp $6k (352) 746-4648 Offer includes: _AC lON --
C, 11" Ll -3 I 1 i9 1 remodeled & furnished 1 /1crnrmcarprt$6k (5 74 ,,. ..


FREE MOBILE
HOMES
To Handy Individuals
Offer includes:
Home, water, sewer,
trash, wifi, use of
pool new clubhouse
& park-like setting
w/ hammocks
and gazebos
All for just $295. mo.
Permanent
RV'S WELCOME
and RV Storage
Space Avail.

Homes for Sale
w/ Owner Financing
Call for Details
AURORA Acres
11240 N. Northwood
Drive Inglis, Fl. 34449
(352) 447-2759
Crystal River Primary
bus stop located in
front of park
auroraacresfl.com

HERNANDO/INV.
2/1, Close in lease, no
pet $425+sec. 726-7319
INVERNESS
55+ Park on the water
w/5 piers for fishing &
enjoyment, clubhouse,
onsite shuffleboard
and much more!
Furnished, 1 BR home
with central A/C $600.
352-476-4964

Get
Results in
the
homefront
classic fields!


(32 6476-74)643

- oie om


2 BEDROOM MOBILE
HOME FOR SALE 2
bedroom. 1 bath. Single
wide mobile home, with
all aluminum wheel
chair ramp, covered
screen porch and a car-
port.
Very nice quiet commu-
nity. Centrally located
close to the mall in
Crystal River.
SELL PRICE;;;
$11,200.00 or OBO
Comes with
Washer/Dryer
Stove and Refrigerator.
Fully Furnished
lot rent $235.00
Located in a Adult com-
munity age 55 or older
Pets allowed no more
than 20 pounds.
CALL 352-897-6766
BY APPOINTMENT
ONLY
SERIOUS BUYERS
ONLY.
1995, Doublewide,
28 x 56, 2BD, 2BA,
LR, DR, Eat in Kit,
community Pool
Nice Condition
$30,000 (352) 400-8270

BEAUTIFUL 1 OWNER,
older Doublewide
Home in Forestview
Park new appl's, new
roof and AC, Priced to
Sell! (352) 503-2154


AWESOME DEALS
Financing Available
$500/dn
1/1 remod shed $5k
/1 scrnrm/carprt $6k
2/1 carprt/rf.over $7k
furn, move-in ready
55+ park, clean quiet
CR/Homossasa area
Owner 352-220-2077

Bank foreclosures
USED HOMES/REPO'S
Bank authorized
liquidator.We Always
have new inventory,
Call 352-621-9183
or come by
Taylor Made Homes
Homes from
$1,000 up!

INVERNESS
55+ Park on the water
w/5 piers for fishing &
enjoyment, clubhouse,
onsite shuffleboard
and much more!
Single wide 1 & 2 BR,
starting @ $6,900. Lot
rent $276/mo. H20
included. 3 mo. free
rent with purchase.
352-476-4964

LAND-N-HOME
FLORAL CITY
BIG HOME!
The Entertainer,
over 2000 sq. ft., 4/2,
large family room.
Home in great shape
on quiet paved road
near chain of lakes
ONLY $59, 900. or
$2,250 down &
395/mo. W.A.C.
Call 352-621-3807


Palm Harbor Homes
RED TAG SALE
Over 10 stock units
MUST GO!! Save
up to $35K!
800-622-2832


Ig screen lanai,carport,
shedJaundryJandscape& ini-
gatbn all appli-
ances, Club house ac-
tivities, Heated pool.Lot
rent $2582... $33K obo
Call 352-422-0927
FLORAL CITY
2/2 carport on canal,
2 sheds,, furnished scr
patio $44,900. Poss.
Own Fin 440-225-8618




3/2, 1,800 Sq Ft,
Fenced Yard,
$5,000 down $525. mo
HOMOSASSA
(352) 302-9217

BEST OF THE BEST
New 2012 Jacobsen
Custom 28 x 52, 3/2
big eat in kitchen,
2x6 construction, OSB
wrap, 5 yr. warranty,
elongated toilet,
china sinks, storm
door. Large rooms.
Must see before you
buy anything else.
Only $46,900 or
$1,800 down
$298.89/mo W.A.C.
Call 352-621-9181

INVERNESS
Move in neat 2 bath
SW w/extra rooms, nice
area, fenced $32 500
Owner (352) 341-1569

Lecanto
881 N. Maynard Av
DWMH 2/2, deck,
Fixer Upper
$15K (352) 746-7952

Northwest Citrus
County 2 bedroom. 1.5
bath. Mobile Home on
1 acre, high and dry,
shaded lot, shed, paved
road $44,900 or make
offer. Possible owner fi-
nancing. 352-795-9908


z/1 carprT/rf.over 7/K
furn, move-in ready
55+ park, clean quiet
CR/Homossasa area
Owner 352-220-2077

Beverly Hills
55 + park 2/2 fully
remodeled, & furnished
Ig screen lanai,carport,
shedJaundryJandscape & iri-
gatbn all appli-
ances, Club house ac-
tivities, Heated pool.Lot
rent $258,... $33K obo
Call 352-422-0927
Crys Rver Village
55+, DWHome of Merit
2/2/1 carport, com-
pletely furnish all new &
appls. Must See
$39K for appt /details
(704) 489-0523
574-946-6286


LISTINGS
Homosassa 2 bedroom.
2 bath. 55+double wide
mobile home in park
14,900.New wooden
floors very clean. Closed
in front and back porch.2
car carport.Club
house,community swim-
ming pool,exercise
room.Pool table.Close to
shopping area. call 352
7946601
Homosassa
Turtle Creek
1/1 park model
w/screen porch
$16K (352) 628-3351
HOMOSASSA'S
Best Housing Value
Modern homes from
$8,400 or Lease to Own
from $139/mo.
$800.down + Lot rent at
Evanridge Community
an exceptional 55+Park
352 628-5977
Lecanto 3 bedroom. 2
bath. Senior Park 14x66
S/W, Screened Porch,
Furnished. Very clean.
Call 815-535-7958


Oasis Mobile Home Park,
Inverness FL 2 bedroom.
2 bath. 14x60 Fully Fur-
nished Manatee Mobile
Home. Carport, Screen
room, and Shed. Has
roof over and remodelled
kitchen and baths. Virtu-
ally everything furnished.
Parking behind M/H for
trailer or boat. Excellent
Shape. Great low rent
park. $ 12000. Call
815 986 4510 or cell
815 298 2964.
On Lake Rousseau 2
bedroom. 2 bath.
14x60MH, 8x20 FL
room, 8x10 shed, 2-stall
carport, Withlacoochee
Backwaters MHP,
$8500. 352-219-2240
Stoneridge Landing
55+ Comm. Resales
starting @$13,500
Financing avail
1-800-779-1226
(352) 637-1400
StoneridgeLanding
55+. 1993 26x56, Move
in Cond.2/2 upgrades
$39K, view pics @
mhvillage.com/493361
(352) 344-0888
WESTWIND VILLAGE 55+
Park. Updated 2/2 DW's
for sale. Reasonable
(352) 628-2090


Get

Results in

the

homefront

classified!


Home, waTer, sewer,
trash, wifi, use of
pool new clubhouse
& park-like setting
w/ hammocks
and gazebos
All for just $295. mo.

Permanent
RV'S WELCOME
and RV Storage
Space Avail.

Homes for Sale
w/ Owner Financing
Call for Details
AURORA Acres
11240 N. Northwood
Drive Inglis, Fl. 34449
(352) 447-2759
Crystal River Primary
bus stop located in
front of park
auroraacresfl.com




LECANTO 55+
* FOR RENT OR SALE*
1/1, Furnished $525.
2/2, Furnished $550.
352-287-9175, 746-1189












835 NE Hwy 19
Crystal River, FI
(352) 795-0021
View our website
C21 NatureCoast.com

CHASSAHOWITZKA
3/2 Wtrfront DW, $600.
3/2 Furnished DW., $600
Agent (352) 382-1000


RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REALTY, INC.
352-795-RENT
352-795-7368
www.(itr[sCootHo m ont ls.con

6139 S. Royal Dr., lomosassa
$1000
2/2/2 Canal side, with lanai
and porch. 1,060+ sq ft.
99 S Wi Oakis Dromosasa
$800
3/2/2 House w/nice carpet, Kenwood N.
Screen porch and yard. 1,389 sq. ft.
1863[lidetibeLryn, Inverness
$695
2/2/1 Condo. Pretty place in nice
complex/clubhouse/pool/trash puu.
959 sq. ft.
1lZ Cftprss(ove(t,, Ineress
$650
2/2.5 TH Open floor plan, roomy
nice location, 1,230 sq. ft.






J.W. MORTON
REAL ESTATE, INC.
1645 W. MAIN ST
INVERNESS, FL
Property Management


Need a Good Tenant?
Bring us your vacant home
and watch us work for you!

3/2/1 Fenced Back Yard. $750
2/1.5/1 Waterfront....... $625
2/2/1 The Highlands..... $650
2/2/2 Water Access...... $700
1Bedroo00 Apts startingat. $375

2/1.5/1, Available April... $625
Jennifer Fudge,
Property Manager
Cheryl Scruggs,
Realtor-Associate
352-726-9010


-p rt e ts-

CRYSTAL RIVER
2 BR. $550., 3BR House
$800., 352-563-9857
CRYSTAL RIVER
Completely turn., Pool,
boat dock, Wash/Dry
(352) 302-5972
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025
INVERNESS
1/1 $400 2/1.. $500.
near hosp352-422-2393
INVERNESS
VILLA, 1BDRM,1CAR
GARAGE, DEED RE-
STRICTED 55+, POOL.
NON SMOKING NO
PETS, QUIET ADULT
COMMUNITY ADJ. TO
STATE PARK, $650/MO.
SEC.DEP/REF RQ.
727-862-3264 LV. MSG.




Alexander Real Estate
(352) 795-6633
Crystal River Apts
2 BR/1 BA $375-$500

CRYSTAL RIVER 1/1
Handicap Ramp, Small
Pet OK. (352) 628-2815
FLORAL CITY
FREE Use of boat ramp,
fishing dock, canoe &
Jon boat rentals. 1 BR
$450/$200 dp. incls Sat
TV electric, walk to river
Trails End Camp, A
Friendly Place to Live
352-726-3699

LECANTO
Nice 1 Bedrm $500
352-613-6000. 216-0012
(352) 746-5238


M L- 415








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


INVERNESS
1 BR & 2 BR Garden
& Townhouse Apts.
NOW AVAILABLE *
$512 to $559 a mo
water included
small pets welcome
Park like setting
must see to appreci-
ate Occassionally
Barrier Free Available
GATEHOUSE APTS
(352) 726-6466
Equal Housing
Opportunity

SEVEN RIVERS
APTS
A Beautiful place
to come home too.
35 units on private
street, situated on 10
wooded acres, near
Crystal River &
7 Rivers Hosp. fish-
ing, walking, trails,
shopping near by.
Old Florida setting,
quite, clean well
maint. central
laundry room.
352-795-3719
Directions:
Hwy 19 turn W. at
Days Inn, first right
onto Tallahassee Rd


EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY





FLORAL CITY
STOREFRONT 1000 Sq Ft
Ideal location, corner
Hwy 41 & 48. $595 mo.
813-310-5391




CRYSTAL RIVER
Completely furn., Pool,
boat dock, Wash/Dry
(352) 302-5972

INVERNESS
LANDINGS 2/1.5 clean
roomy, great location
$550/mo F/L/S
No smoke/No pets
(352) 341-1847




Citrus Springs
3/2/1 car $650/mo
352-746-7990





HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225





CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1 Cute cottage Max.
two. 1st/last/sec $500 per
mo. 628-1062


BERVERLY HILLS
2bed, bath, C/H/A
1st Mo FREE $650/m
(352) 422-7794
BEVERLY HILLS
$550. MO. 2/1, C/H/A,
W/D Hkup., 382-1344
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/1, $600. mo.
382-1162, 795-1878
BEVERLY HILLS
2/2, CHA, $550. mo. +
$300 Sec. 352-422-0139
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/2/2, $750. mo + sec.
850-371-1568
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 Clean, $800 mo.
795-6299 364-2073

YOU'LL W THIS!
DUNNELLON 3/2/2
RENT TO OWN
Close to Rainbow River
RUBLESRENTALS.COM
(561) 719-8787
(561) 575-1718 affr 7pm
FLORAL CITY
3/1'/2, 6 Acres, wooded
$700. 352-212-2264
HERNANDO 312/2
Rent to Own $850 mo
www.rickybobs.com
352-613-5818


Renta


HOMOSASSA
2/1, water & sewer, W/D
incl'd., Lg. Yard. $550.
mo. 239-272-9230
Sugarmill Woods
Upscale Ctry Club
Brand New Deluxe
Villa 2/2/2 Fam Rm +
Lanai, most until's paid.
Just $800/mo Owner:
352-382-1132




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225
HOMOSASSA
2/2 carport nicely turn
MH on Homosassa River
w/dock no pet f/l/s
sht/long term $850
352-220-2077
INVERNESS
2/1 $600 mo., Canal to
River. scrn. porc. gar-
age, carport 726-5994



C.R/Homosassa
1& 2 Br. turn, quiet park
Util. incl. clean, shrt/long
term 352 220-2077




AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number

RWMR1
REALTY ONE

FARMS, LAND,
COMMERCIAL
UNIQUE &
HISTORIC HOMES,
SMALL TOWN
COUNTRY LIFESTYLE
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989






"LIFE IS BETTER
WITH A PORCH"
WWW.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.


For Sale
Forest Ridge 2 bedroom.
2 bath. This updated villa
is totally move in ready
and maintenance free!
This beautiful 2/2/2 is
located on a private lot
and includes an optional
membership to Citrus
Hills Golf and Country
Club. The home includes
all appliances, an eat in
kitchen, a fully tiled great
room, and a sun barrier
paneled lanai. Home is
within walking distance to
the pool and club house.
This property is a must
see!! $95,900
352-746-0002


FREE MOBILE
HOMES
To Handy Individuals
Offer includes:
Home, water, sewer,
trash, wifi, use of
pool new clubhouse
& park-like setting
w/ hammocks
and gazebos
All for just $295. mo.
Permanent
RV'S WELCOME
and RV Storage
Space Avail.

Homes for Sale
w/ Owner Financing
Call for Details
AURORA Acres
11240 N. Northwood
Drive Inglis, Fl. 34449
(352) 447-2759
Crystal River Primary
bus stop located in
front of park
auroraacresfl.com

PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ille-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination. "
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY


Get

Results in

the

homefront

classifieds!


Specializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches &
Commercial








Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com




Lot For Sale Pine Ridge
sub. 3620 N. Stirrup Dr.,
2.78 ac, horse trail on
back side, wooded, for
sale by owner. Google it!
Make offer
bill@agairupdate.com
478.957.0211



Black Diamond/Lecant
Owner Financing
3/2/2.5 SS appls
custom flooring,Hot Tub
new outdoor kit. w cov-
ered lanai. Price to sell.
$185K. (352) 527-3501




3/3/2,
2,355 sq. ft.
screen lanai, 2 Acres
$135,000.
(352) 628-5272
TERRA VISTA
2+ /2/2 Maint Free,
Open plan, up grades,
,Beautiful Sunsets,
Owner Financ Avail
$259 K (352) 746-6050



3/2, Shed, Mfg. Home
on 1.38 Acres, new
flooring & upgraded
appliances.
Paved Road
$54,900. (352) 302-4057
ARBOR LAKES
55+ Comm. 3/2/2 +
Lg enclosed a/c porch,
most pvt. location,
Upgrades $169,900
(352) 726-7952
HERNANDO 3/2/2
Rent to Own $850 mo
www.rickybobs.com
352-613-5818



HIGHLANDS
Lrg.2/2- 4 car garage
pool, game room,
mud room, on triple lot
fenced, price to sell
$65,500 (352) 564-4598

Lakefront Gospel
Island Location
Spacious 3/2/2
for rent $800/m or for
sale..... 908-322-6529


INVERNESS
55+ Park on the water
w/5 piers for fishing &
enjoyment, clubhouse,
onsite shuffleboard
and much more!
Single wide 1 & 2 BR,
starting @ $6,900. Lot
rent $276/mo. H20
included. 3 mo. free
rent with purchase.
352-476-4964
Recently Foreclosed
*Special Financing*
Available, Any
Credit, Any Income ,
2BD, 1 BTH, located
at, 7901 Stump Lane,
Inverness, $23,900.
Visit www.roselandco.
com/A4F,
Drive by then Call
(866) 249-0680
Zero Down Assumable
Loan Nice 3/2/2,
In Foxwood Estate
Need proof of income
and excel credit.
No Gimmicks,
(352) 341-8479




AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE



3/2/2 Built 1986, On
12 Acre, Remodeled
above ground pool
w/deck BY OWNER
4141 S. Journey Point
$180,000 813-477-6006
3/2/2, Built 2007
Newly Remodeled
$88,000
100% Financing Avail.
(352) 400-0230
AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE




Condo for Sale
2/2,1,850 sq. ft.
35 Beech Street
(352) 503-3294



Get

Results in

the

homefront

classif ieds!


Best Time To Buy!
I have lease options,
owner financing
Waterfront and
foreclosures
call Phyllis Strickland
(352) 613-3503
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.


DEB INFANTINE
4 HOMES SOLD
Closing in April
I Need Listings!
Real Estate!..
it's what I do.
ERA American
Realty
Phone:(352) 726-5855
Cell:(352) 302-8046
Fax:(352) 726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com


Michele Rose, Realtor
Simply put I '11 work
harder 352-212-5097
isellcitruscountv(,
vahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515


FREE MOBILE
HOMES
To Handy Individuals
Offer includes:
Home, water, sewer,
trash, wifi, use of
pool new clubhouse
& park-like setting
w/ hammocks
and gazebos
All for just $295. mo.
Permanent
RV'S WELCOME
and RV Storage
Space Avail.

Homes for Sale
w/ Owner Financing
Call for Details
AURORA Acres
11240 N. Northwood
Drive Inglis, Fl. 34449
(352) 447-2759
Crystal River Primary
bus stop located in
front of park
auroraacresfl.com




INVERNESS 2/2/1
Superbly maintained,
1381 Sqft, Oak floors,
Florida room, dining
room, extra pantries, par-
tially furnished. Pictures
avail 631 Whispering
Pines Blvd.
352-726-9983
INVERNESS
Nice 2/2/1 new carpet
tile & paint. Whispering
Pines Villas furnished
$69,900(352) 726-8712




"FREE foreclosure
and short sale lists


Office Open
7 Days a Week

Lisa VanDeboe
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com


Get
Results in
the
homefront
classified!


Crystal River Indian
Waters Waterfront home
on deep wide canal. 3
BR/2BA with Lanai over-
looking canal. Recently
remodeled split floor plan
with fenced yard, garage,
sea wall and dock.
Easy access to both
Kings Bay and Gulf.
Serious buyers
please.....Appointment
with owner. $275,000.
678-357-9873


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work For You!
BETTY HUNT,
REALTOR
ERA KEY 1 Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www. bettyhunts
homes.com.


PERFECT
FLORIDA COTTAGE
ON the MAIN LAKE,
near the BIKE trail &
downtown Inverness
1368 SQ FT renovated
2/2/2 720 Edgewater
$189,500
www.crosslandrealty.c
om 352 726 6644




CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pond,
ATV trails $165K obo
352 795-2027/ 634-4745




5 ACRES, FLORAL CITY
3 sides fenced, paved
road, private drive
through woods. Leads
to 4 Acre Pasture
$44,900. (352) 897-4586




CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pond,
ATV trails $165K obo
352 795-2027/ 634-4745




48 lots 14W.F. 1 gulf
access, 5 SMW's lots
3 lots impact fees pd.
$425K, = less than $9K
per lot (732) 996-3785
89 x 165 MOL, LOT
Lucky Hills, Nice
Residential Area
$19,000/Offer
Owner FiNance
(352) 422-1916
Homosassa
1.6 Acres on Hwy 19
Wet Lands, next to
Bowling Alley, $15,000
Owner Finance
352-621-1664
HOMOSASSA
Wooded Lot on
Lee Woods Drive,
112 x114ft River access,
but not on river $7,000.
352-621-1664

SUGARMILL
WOODS. BUILDING LOT
ON OAK VILLAGE
$20K firm 43 Vinca St
(352) 726-9587


Rent: Houses
Furnished I


E14 SUNDAY, MARCH 18, 2012







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E10

Small welding repair: For
small welding jobs, check
your local hardware store
for a product called J-B
Weld. It comes with two in-
gredients that, when mixed
together, form a clay-like
ball that hardens after you
make the repairs. We fixed
my daughter's iron bed with
it. It works great and looks
like metal when it cures. -
Gert, email
Reuse sheet packaging: I
just read your recent col-
umn about other uses for
the small fabric bag Wal-
Mart sheets are packaged
in. I am a saver, so it never
crosses my mind to toss
something. I travel for work
and I use the sheet bags to
hold undergarments, impor-
tant paperwork that needs
to be kept clean (copy of
passport, car rental agree-
ment, etc.), a small clock and
a nightlight. I have different
colored bags, which makes
the items easy to find in my
luggage. Sue F, email
Free garbage bags, plus
mulch: Every fall, people
around my neighborhood
set out garbage bags full of
leaves to be picked up.
When I tap on their door
and ask if I may have their


bags of leaves for my gar-
den, they are usually de-
lighted to see them go! I
don't have to buy garbage
bags all winter, and I just
mow/mulch the leaves into
my garden. Suzan, New
York
Weekly school clothes
plan: I have a great system
for making sure my kids'
school clothes are ready
each week. I put all of their
clothes for the week in their
own laundry basket, socks
and all. Just a few minutes
of preparation on Sunday
saves valuable time before
school each day Stacia,
forums
Easy baked potato: Here's
a faster way to make a
baked potato. First, wash
the potato and rub it with oil
and salt. Next, cook the po-
tato in the microwave for
about 5 to 10 minutes (de-
pending on the size of the
potato), making sure to poke
holes in it first, which
speeds up the cooking. Then
put it in the oven for about
five minutes to make the
skin crispy Takes a lot less
time, and tastes no differ-
ent. Shana, email
Eggshells, and the ani-
mals that love them: I saved
up eggshells two years ago,
then crushed and scattered
them around my green pep-
per plants. The next day all
of the plants had been dug


up and were laying on the
ground. Turns out we had a
skunk living under our shed,
and skunks love eggshells!
She dug up every plant near
them. Needless to say, I
won't be using eggshells in
my garden again. PT,
Colorado
Eggshells in chicken feed:
When we had chickens, we
would feed them eggshells
for extra calcium. We
learned the hard way, how-
ever, that if you aren't care-
ful in your preparation, the
chickens will acquire a taste
for eggs. It's a very frustrat-
ing problem, having to deal
with egg-eating chickens. To
avoid the trouble, dry the
eggshells, grind them up
and add them to the chick-
ens' mash. Jo S., forums
NOE
Dear Sara: I'm looking for
a homemade polish for my
kitchen cabinets. My cabi-
nets are dated, so I'm sure
most anything is better than
the way they look now. Any
suggestions? Lisa H.,
North Carolina
Dear Lisa: Here's a tried-
and-true recipe from a fel-
low reader, Donna from
California:
"My kitchen cabinets are
old, old, old, and they look
their age, so I didn't mind
experimenting on them. I
tried a recipe for furniture
polish that is one part white


vinegar to four parts olive
oil. I made up a very small
batch of 1/4 cup of oil and 2
tablespoons of vinegar. I
dabbed a clean, soft cloth
into the mixture, then
rubbed it into my cabinets.
After applying only a small
amount, the polished door
looked glossy and lustrous."
You can clean with Murphy
Oil Soap before applying the
above polish.
Dear Sara: Does wheat
flour go bad? I purchased a
big package of wheat flour
not too long ago and it tastes
rather bitter. I tried a differ-
ent brand and it doesn't
have a bitter taste at all. I
ended up throwing out the
first bag because it's horri-
ble. Cheri, Indiana
Dear Cheri: Wheat flour
can go rancid because of the
oil content. It has a shorter
shelf life than white flour.
Rancidity can make it smell
and taste funny You can
store it in your refrigerator
for up to six months or in
your freezer for up to a year
to extend the typical shelf
life of one or two months at
room temperature.
Dear Sara: Do you have a
body wash recipe? Re-
becca, email
Dear Rebecca: Baby
shampoo works well for hair
and skin for all ages. You can
use it as a makeup remover,
too. Here are three home-


made body wash recipes:
2 cups Tom's of Maine
moisturizing bar soap or Dr
Bronner's Castile soap
(grated).
1/2 gallon distilled
water.
2 tablespoons vegetable
glycerin.
H 15 drops skin-safe fra-
grance or essential oil.
Mix grated soap, water
and glycerin together in a
large pan. Warm on the stove
using low heat. Stir until the
soap dissolves. Add essential
oil and mix well. Transfer to
a jar with a tight lid.
One reader, Tracy Q. from
New York, shares: "I make
homemade body wash from
cheap shampoo. Use one
cup of Suave shampoo (in
your favorite scent), 1/2 cup
water and 3 tablespoons of
Epsom salt. Combine all the
ingredients together and
whisk the mixture until it's
frothy Pour it into a recycled
liquid soap container and
you have instant body wash
at a fraction of the cost!"
Another reader, Constance
from New Jersey, shares her
recipe: "Grate two bars of
soap (I used 4.25-ounce Olay


SUNDAY, MARCH 18, 2012 E15
Shea Butter bars) with a fine
cheese grater Pour grated
soap and 2 cups of water into
a saucepan. Heat over
medium-low heat until soap
is dissolved, about five min-
utes. Cool slightly The soap
should have the consistency
of whole milk at this point.
Pour into bottles. You can top
off your bottles with more
water if you want Cool
overnight The bodywash
should have the consistency
of melted ice cream when
cooled. Use a nickel-sized
dollop on your bath sponge
and lather up! I'm going to get
a year of use out of two bars
of soap. I also replaced myfa-
cial cleanser with this. It even
works well for shaving!"


Sara Noel is the owner of
Frugal Village (www.
frugalvillage. com), a web-
site that offers practical,
money-saving strategies for
everyday living. To send
tips, comments or ques-
tions, write to Sara Noel,
c/o Universal Uclick, 1130
Walnut Street, Kansas City,
MO 64106, or email
sara@frugalvillage. com.


BANK OWNED-HOMOSASSA, FL OPEN LAKE FRONT-FLORAL CITY, FL
Handyman doublewide on corner lot with Wooded 1 acre tract on Hampton Lake. Central
detached 2 story garage. $37,900 water. $74,900 MLS#353902


I CALL Roy Bass TODAY (352) 726-2471
Email: roybassfampabay.rr.com www.allcitrusrealty.com After Hours 302-6714


;U11JI.S FEATURED.I!I.I.S









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


GOSPEL ISLAND
* P-iI.(II M, .Ii 1a .1l
* I:i 'h A L:'.Il Il A

* ,irplhi. ,J II A.I,
= h.11., $149,900
Jeanne I Willaid Pickiel 212 3410
Iti' i',. Cil usCounlySold. corn








CAMBRIDGE GREENS -
WONDERFUL 1 OWNER HOME

* I. I I.. I I L.pl Ii.,1, 1' lll I,,iJlh


$163,850
Call Mariha Snydei 352 416 8121
and ask loi lile =354029


Mi = II OIlI I $74,900
Call Chailes Hellr 352 422 2387


10 ACRES ON THE RIVER!
A ii l .if ,n in. l ;i p l I. ) 1.. ; II

$165,000
Call Ouade Feeser 352 302 1699


SMALL RESTAURANT LOCATED ON
BUSY STREET IN CRYSTAL RIVER
I I.; I No i mil ll liiil ll i

$223,900
Call Isaac Baylon 352 69172493


I s- . .- ., .
CRYSTAL RIVER

. I- .,:jl I_.... :Jh..'. e .i i ,:J: . I .i l .
* .lJ.l v ll, : I l..J I l ... 1

Mil. = :- ONLY $112,000
www.sellinqcilruscounlyllhomes.com
Call Nancy Jenks 352 400 8072


.i ,l. jll U .l .J I r 1 .... h in ull..

, .. II.... p. .q. h 1. .1 I


iii = I '114 ASKING $238,900
Pal Dais (3521212 7280
VitiW, Lisling i, intMm c21paldadls com


GREAT LOCATION GREAT PRICE
MOVE-IN CONDITION
IIRV ,0 .1r.l ....I, ........ j ... I.. j.g, .."'" Tr.I

-....... .l iI. ..-. i l.. i ir,, ,,i w im l I-i i Ii l i l ii

$39,800 MlN = 5l '
Pal Dais (3521212 7280
Vit~n Lisling Onlint inmmA c21paldaIs corn


TREASURE IN THE TREES
li , _ l ll h. l f I,,,, ),,,, m ,,),,,,

pjll l lp l I pl.i l .;i l i I.j.-I i II. f
1 1 i .nl& 1, &llll 1 ,6
Mi 1.= i' i h $145,000
Call Rulh Frederick 1 352 563 6866


i-
2/2 WATERFRONT COTTAGE

I. I I' I lh .irra..l I B 1, ll I,jilll.,ljl

ONLY $49,900
Call Doris Mineir 1 352 422 4621 (cell)
loi more inloirmalion


ImnVEmNEU InUTa.L UMKlll`
., 1. i. i ,,, ll.,,R .I. h,,,.



i. = . $79,900
Call me Inda. lor Iour s hoi ing
Deb Thompson 634 2666


B .] r..IJ. h... .s. i.j .J I.. h W .lhl,......r.h"

u lj i hJ ..J i ,J i n.i ii h i i N i l l ,if ,i ..I h .i i
l .1 (..h ..i . H; 'i n l l In.1.....i

$46,000
David Kuilz
Cell 954 383 8786 01lice 352 126 6668


PRICE REDUCED BELOW TAX VALUE


_ I i l.-.i al, :' l 'P l .a .i all .I i.ai.'I.,ni.. l.i
$29,900
Call Marilha Snydei 352 416 8121
and ask lo lile =349225


l WATHENFHONT COTTAIGn
I. lIII IhI1 m "_''11"1 11 ,:1 .I.I. l i n u. .
., I .a l I.d l IIll.li iI .a.i: l hrr l a


Mi = -.'I.II: $69,900
Call Rulh Frederick 1 3520563 6866


PRICED TO SELL QUICK $79,000
M t i = : .:
Call Ouade Feeser 352 302 1699


NO LOT RENT NEEDED
IN THIS MOBILE HOME PARK
,:.-j lully v n.Jl ., I :.JIVI ...i I-.ll ,il | ,i l *h:

Ili.h. i Ai 11 .li .. .. rj.. l .l:,j \l:, .l *h ..i .l.. .

M1i_. =: ,71.. $30,900
Call DIis Min 352422462 1(c Illi. mlnr inlo


$59,900 WATERFRONT!
InSuld I all, Inm d,,I h, ih m I I I, m I-1n

, I h 1, I ,, ,I e l,,, Im, i1', I1" -
a IS, h I,,, ,, n, c Il p lh n,, mI lull' ,

Eas, Io st, call Ioda, Mai, Paisons 634-1213


lowl a. nCu .L rin., imVcniicoo
Pf. _"PA p.ool p, i ,.
* I i,, I .|..,.l A i,I

Mt 5 =~,_,_\ $150,000
Jeanne Pickiel 212 3410
It'i'Wi. Cil usCounl Sold. corn


* B k B_ ,il, ,. i.-i
* ,:, I ,: ,,, ,,, I III T ,i V.,I

* Ii- l.il, l. .| |I ll.I H n.i .i .. i 'l .l
Mti = ? I,_. $165,000
Jeanne a Willaid Pich/el 212 3410
i'it,'i. CilusCounl Sold. comn


E16 SUNDAY, MARCH 18, 2012




March 26. 31, 2012
3


IT's ALL ABOUT
FAMILY
FRIENDS & FUN


u,.


4t


SA f.


1 *S a u N


*w chron timo'ino coni


eInM


..i


,:4




Page H2 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle March 18, 2012


b I,


tII1


Ill


[till


OtOTT tl


Ill


1-tv-


^I t )f,


l. ti


I V:i L




March 18, 2012 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Page H3


SI I Ill k I I


:IM:


lI HIl'MI


p..'
K


9(atao/ke


THURSDAY, MARCH 29
7PM IN THE AUDITORIUM
5Bring your own Karaoke CD!
,Cash Prizes: Adult $100 Youth $50


m1%


S3IK




Page H4 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle March 18, 2012


IT'S ALL ABOUT FAMILY, FRIENDS & FUN

Welcome to the


Citrus County Fair


It's all about Family, Friends
and Fun! Just bring your family
and friends; we will provide the
FUN!
Welcome to the Citrus County
Fair running March 26 through
31, 2012, at 3600 South Florida
Avenue in Inverness.
Again, on Monday we will not
have the midway on site. At 5
p.m., our gates will open and we
will kick off the week with two
special concerts by Confederate
Railroad at 6 and 8 p.m. This
concert is free of charge with
your gate admission. You can
also stroll through the exhibit
buildings, enjoy your favorite fair
cuisine or pass through the live-
stock barn to get a glimpse of
the rabbit or heifer shows
brought to you by our 4-H and
FFA exhibitors. We have plenty
for your entertainment pleasure.
Tuesday, we will open up at 5
p.m. with the midway in full
swing! Wednesday will again be
our senior (55 and up) and Mili-
tary Appreciation day; these
folks will be admitted at a re-
duced rate. We will continue to
have armband and gate spe-
cials through out the week! Be
sure to check out our schedule
before you make your plans with
your family and friends!
As always, this would not be a
true county fair without your
handmade items! Impress your
family and friends by bringing in
your baked goods, canned
goods, crafts, sewing, wood


carvings, paintings and your
plants or home-grown vegeta-
bles. Adults will find a few
"cash" incentives sure to entice
your interest to enter your items
in competitive exhibits. Take a
peek at the contents of this
brochure to see if we have a
category to fit your talent!
We proudly bring to you our
livestock shows and sales from
our Eloise VanNess Livestock
Pavilion. You are invited to at-
tend any of the youth programs
where you will be impressed by
the total commitment these ex-
hibitors have toward their proj-
ects and you will easily see why
"Grandmother" or "Aunt Eloise"
was dedicated to the youth of
our county.


Come and enjoy our shows,
the competitive exhibits, visit
our vendors, enjoy the great
fare they have to offer! Just
when you think you have had all
the FUN you can handle in a
week there is more! We pres-
ent to you our new Bonus Mid-
way Only Day on April 1, 2012
from 2 to 7 p.m. There will be no
gate fee. You can ride unlimited
rides with the purchase of an
armband!
The Citrus County Fair Board
of Directors, Staff and our Vol-
unteers invite you, your family
and your friends to join us for
some FUN times!

Larry Rooks, President
Hal Porter, CCFA Fair Manager




March 18, 2012 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Page H5


IT'S ALL ABOUT FAMILY, FRIENDS & FUN

~~~~~~~~ What's Inside~ ~~~~~~


Welcome to the Citrus County Fair................. 4
Letter from Commissioner of Agriculture ................6
Fair O officers ...................................................... .7.....
F a ir D ire cto rs .......................................................... 7
H onorary D directors .................................................. 7
O office S taff .........................................................7.....
Individual Memberships ........................... .....8....
Fam ily M em berships ..............................................9
Fair C om m ittees ................................................... 10
Livestock Committee and Superintendents ..........10
Past Presidents 1947-2012 .................... 11
Fair Managers 1974-2012 ..................................11
Fair Association Directors 1947-2012 ................12
V endors .......................................................... 13
Livestock Schedule .............................................. 14
How you can help the Youth Sale
A nim al Exhibitors ..............................................15
2011 Sw ine Buyers................................................ 15
2011 Poultry Pen of Meat Buyers........................16
2011 Rabbit Pen of Meat Buyers ........................16
Fair Map and Midway Specials ............18-19
2011 Steer Buyers........................................... 20-21
Youth Poultry Trophy Sponsors .................. 22
Youth Poultry Belt Buckle Sponsors............... 22
Pen of Meat Poultry Belt Buckle Sponsors ..........22
Open Poultry Trophy Sponsors .................. 23
Youth Rabbit Trophy Sponsors.................. 24
Youth Rabbit Belt Buckle Sponsors .............. 24
Pen of Meat Rabbit Belt Buckle Sponsors ............24
Open Rabbit Trophy Sponsors................... 24
Horse Trophy Sponsors ......................................25
Swine Trophy Sponsors ......................................26
Swine Belt Buckle Sponsors ..............................26
Swine Skill-A-Thon Placement Sponsors........... 26
Open Heifer Trophy Sponsors .................. 27
Open Heifer Belt Buckle Sponsors......................27


Youth Heifer Trophy Sponsors .................. 28
Youth Heifer Belt Buckle Sponsors................ 28
Steer Trophy Sponsors........................................30
Steer Belt Buckle Sponsors ................................30
Youth Poultry Exhibitors ......................................31
Open Poultry Exhibitors ......................................31
Pen of Meat Poultry Exhibitors................... 32
Youth Rabbit Exhibitors ...................... 32
Open Rabbit Exhibitors ......................................32
Pen of Meat Rabbit Exhibitors .................. 32
Swine Exhibitors................................................ 33
Youth Heifer Exhibitors........................................34
Open Heifer Exhibitors ........................................34
Steer Exhibitors ................................................. 35
Horse Exhibitors ................................................ 38
Fair S schedule ..................................................39-44
Fair at a Glance ................................................. 45
History of the Citrus County Fair..................... 46-49
Entertainm ent ..................................................50-56
Country Critter Registration Form ......................57
Country Critter Rules .........................58
Country Critter Frame Cut List .................. 59
Competitive Exhibit Rules, Entry Times ...... 60-70




Page H6 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle March 18, 2012


IT'S ALL ABOUT FAMILY, FRIENDS & FUN



OFFICE OF THE COMMISSIONER THE CAPITOL
1850) 488-3022 400 SOUTH MONROE STREET
TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA 32399-0800


FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AND CONSUMER SERVICES
COMMISSIONER ADAM H. PUTNAM


Dear Friends,

Welcome to the Citrus County Fair!

As a fellow member of 4-H and Florida FFA, I am especially
proud of programs and events like the Citrus County Fair that
provide valuable opportunities for youth to celebrate Florida's .
agricultural heritage. As Florida's Commission of Agriculture,
I have a profound appreciation for the positive impact fairs
and livestock shows have on the agriculture industry.

Local fairs around our state provide an excellent platform
for the agriculture industry to showcase the finest Fresh from
Florida produce, livestock and poultry our state has to offer, as
well as demonstrate the latest technological innovations in
agriculture. While other industries have suffered during the re-
cent tough economic times, Florida's agriculture industry has
emerged as the state's economic leader. Continued momentum
will likely depend on our youth, and our fairs are a great way
to cultivate the next generation of leaders.

Recalling my days as a youth fair participant, I still share the
enthusiasm as I did at age 8 when I showed my homed Hereford bull, Georgia Boy. While you're visiting
the fair today, I hope you will take the opportunity to enjoy the delicious food, entertainment, contests and
competitive exhibits, but most importantly, experience Florida's true agricultural roots a symbol of the
history of this great state and the opportunities that lie ahead.


Sincerely,






Adam H. Putnam
Commissioner of Agriculture




March 18, 2012 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Page H7


IT'S ALL ABOUT FAMILY,

FRIENDS & FUN

Citrus County
Fair Association
2011-2012
Officers and Directors

OFFICERS:
President ........................................Larry Rooks
Vice President.................................. Tom W olf
Secretary .................................. Nancy Rooks
Treasurer...................................... Bob Iverson
Past President .......................... Nell Mayberry


DIRECTORS:
Neale Brennan Jaret Lubowiecki
C.L. Calloway Paul McPherson
Lyle Davis Kandi McPherson
Laura Dixon Debbie Parker
Dr. Ron Dumas Sherri Sanders
Shawn Fitzpatrick Charles Simmons
Doris Graska Irma Stokes
Bill Hoppert Lee Earl Stokes
Albert Jordan Mary Williams
Travis LaPerle David Wilson
Joe Law

-- HONORARY DIRECTORS:
Wilma Anderson Charles Davis
Wilbur Langley Dick Locke
Valentine and Francis Rooks

OFFICE STAFF:
Hal Porter .................................. Fair Manager
Saundra Wilson ..........Secretary/Bookkeeper
Marlene Law .................................... Secretary




Page H8 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle March 18, 2012


IT'S ALL ABOUT FAMILY, FRIENDS & FUN


2012 Individual Membership

As of February 22, 2012


Abbot, John
Adams, James
Akers, Jim and Julie
Anderson, Wilma
Bailey, Ronald, Cheryl and Christine
Bracewell, Kathy and Dan
Bradshaw, Joan
Brennan, Neale
Brooks, Larry and Lynn
Brown, John and Jennie
Brumett, Norm and Alice
Bunting, William and Tammy
Cain, John and Marie
Clark, Fredrick and Louise
Cook, Morgan
Corbin, Lori and Carol
Davis, Charles
Davis, Lyle and Louise
Dean, Charles and Judy
Dimona, Nick
Dixon, Laura
Drawdy, Dewey and Louise
Dumas, Dr Ron and Marie
Duncan, Amy
English, Lee
Fitzpatrick, Shawn and Brittany
Fredrick, Bryan and Debra
Freund/Lambert, Andrew and Julie
Gelin, Granada and John
Graska, Doris
Hagaman Robert and Nancy
Hagar Margaret
Hedberg, Edwin and Susan
Hedberg, John
Henson, Pat
Hodge, Dave
Hoppert, Bill
Hunt, Alva and Sonny
Iverson, Bob and Mabel
Jablonski, Adam
Jenkins, Claire
Jones, Pam
Jordan, Albert and Marilyn
Kaufman, Bruce and Lisa
Langlais, Ted
Langley, Wilbur
LaPerle, Travis
Law, Joe and Marlene
Lott, Stead
Lubowiecki, Jaret
Maffet, Darrel


Marsh, Virgil
Mattingly, Anthony and Kimberly
Mayberry, Tom and Nell
McCallum, Pete and Jolene
McFarlin, Rick
Melton, David
Ortega, Marlene and Jesus
Owen, Alfred and Libby
Parker, Daniel and Debbie
Parsons, Edith
Philipps, Elsie
Porter, Hal, Bill, Ginger
Ressler, Tom and Debbie
Roberts, Kevin and Tara
Roddenberry, Charles, Nadine, Charlie
Roddenberry, Margaret
Rooks, Valentine and Frances
Rooks, Larry and Nancy
Rooks, Marjorie
Russell Michelle
Ryals, Laci, Eric
Sanders, Sherri and Irma Stokes
Schweitzer, Mary
Scott, Joe
Seijas, Johnnie Sue
Short, Dan
Shuba, Daisy
Simmons, Charlie, Deanne
Smith, Gene and Tomi
Smith, Livia
Smith, Clayton
Snipes, Hillary, Tracy
Stokes, Lee
Sundberg, Kason
Taggart, Lawrence
Taylor, Frank
Thomas, David
Thorne, Dora
VanNess, Carol
Waters, Colby
Welch, Brad, Dot
Wheeler, John, Erin, Zachary
Whitton, Casey
Williams, Mary
Wilson, David, Saundra
Wilson, Florence
Wilson, Jeff, Doris, Jeffrey Jr
Wilson, Russ and Karolyn
Wyman, Gail and Robert
Young, Patrick and Ruth




March 18, 2012 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Page H9


IT'S ALL ABOUT FAMILY, FRIENDS & FUN

2012 Family Memberships
As of February 22, 2012


Allen/Radford: John, Jennifer, John, Andrew,
Dayanara, Logan, Faith, Shelby
Anderson: Mike, Beth, Nathan
Baker: Greg, Danielle, Brianna
Barco/Casto: Keith, Rebecca, Jennifer, Caitlyn
Barlow: Arthur, Karen, Brianna, Aaron,
Rebekah, Isaac
Brown: Sunniva, Keith, Chalise
Carpenter: Michael, Denise, Travis, Kacie
Cobb: Gregory, Penelope
Copeland: Randall, Cecila, Layton, Colton
Downing: Greg, Laura, Kacey, Gregory
Ellis: Kelli, Tim, Madison, Dalton, Kaiden, Brent
Flanders: Dan, Kris, Katelin
Grow: JJ Jennifer, Hannah, Hillary, Hadley
Harrell: Shane, Arnitha, David, Alexandra
Indelicato: Joseph, Kathleen, Alicia, Daniel
Jimenez: Elba, Jordan, Justin, Victor
Kanawall/Ruzycki: Linda, David, Bobby,
Samantha, Dominic
Lancon: AI, Jill, Amadou, Domenique, Bryce
Leturno: Marcus, Margie, Tanner, Elise, Evan
Mayes: Larry, Shelly, Tori, Casey
McPherson: Paul, Kandi, Hunter
Meeks: David, Cara, David, Nathan
Nichols: Chris, Shannon, Abigail
Parker/Bremer: Lori, Dusty, Samie, Kyle
Philipps: Tim, Stephanie, Kylie, Lauren,
Lyndsee
Poliseno: Charles, Debbie, Amanda
Pospiech: Richard, Holly, Hunter, Grey
Poss: Don, Tammi, Cody, Kayla, Hanna
Quintanilla: Carolyn, Rick
Remley: James, Chrystell, Colton, Mykenzie,
Will


Roe: Mitch, Missy, Rachel, Rebecca
Saltmarsh: Kenneth, Brenda, Brianna
Sharrone: Tim, Suzanne, Travis, Kelsey
Shoemaker: Dawn, Greg, Guy, Gregory, Grant
Stanton: Angie, Hunter, Johnathon, Alexus
Strickland: David, Kim, Alexis, Chelsea
Thomas: Sam, Therese, Kelly, Sam
Tomczak: Meagan, David, Kody, Makenzie
Uzar: Lance, Patricia, Christina, Peter
Venero: Vincent, Paula, Anna
Waller: Danny, Christina
Ward: Bill, Marnie, Diana, Will, Grace
Wayman: Larry, Cheryl, Morgan, Jasmine
Whitton: Carl, Kim, Kailey, Karlie

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Group Dog Training
Doggie Day Care
Dental Care Program

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Page H10 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle March 18, 2012


IT'S ALL ABOUT FAMILY, FRIENDS & FUN


Citrus County Fair 2011-2012 Committees

Committee: Chairman: Co-Chairman:
Adm missions ................... ....................... Laura Dixon ........................ Bob Iverson
Budget and Finance ................................Bob Iverson ........................Laura Dixon
Building and Grounds..............................C.L. Calloway ....................Lyle Davis, Albert Jordan
By-Laws and Standing Rules ..................Dr. Ron Dumas .................S...hawn Fitzpatrick, Nell Mayberry
Commercial Exhibits................................Charlie Simmons ...............S...herri Sanders, Travis LaPerle
Com petitive Exhibits................................ Irma Stokes ........................ Debbie Parker
Fine Arts ..................... ....................... Jaret Lubow iecki ................ Joe Law
Horticulture ................... ....................... Joe Law .............................. Jaret Lubow iecki
Flea Market .................. ....................... Bill Hoppert ........................ Tom W olf, David W ilson
Historian ..................... ....................... Doris Graska ...................... Dr. Ron Dumas, Neale Brennan
Insurance ................... ......................S... hawn Fitzpatrick .............. Larry Rooks
Livestock ................... .......................Kandi McPherson ..............Debbie Parker, Nancy Rooks, Sherri Sanders
M em bership .................. ....................... Tom W olf ............................ Bill Hoppert
M idway ....................... ....................... Nell Mayberry .................... Bob Iverson, Tom W olf
Baby Pageants ........................................ Nancy Rooks ...................... Mary W illiams
Publicity and Premium Book ..................Neale Brennan....................Joe Law
Race Track ................... ....................... Albert Jordan ...................... C.L. Calloway, David W ilson
Snack Bar.................... ....................... Mary W illiams .................... Lee Earl Stokes, Irma Stokes
Special Events ........................................ David W ilson ...................... Jaret Lubow iecki
Tractor Pull ................... ....................... Lyle Davis .......................... Travis LaPerle, Paul M cPherson,
Charlie Simmons
Tractor Pull Sponsorship/Advertising ........Lee Stokes.........................S...herri Sanders
Trophies ..................... ....................... Paul McPherson ................ Kandi McPherson




Citrus County Fair 2012 Livestock Committee

Chairperson Kandi McPherson

Co-Chairpersons Debbie Parker Nancy Rooks Sherri Sanders

Superintendents Co-Superintendents
Rabbit ....................... ................ Daw n Shoem aker.................................. Paula Rudder
H eifers .................. .................... A rnie H arrell ........................ ............... S hane H arrell
Swine ........................ ............... M argaret Roddenberry .......................... Dora Thorne
Steer................... ...................... S lick C oncidine...................................... Larry R ooks
Poultry ............... .... .............. Rick M cFarlin ...................................... Stephanie Philipps
Horses .................. .................... A m y D uncan ................... .................... Patricia Uzar
Sales................... ...................... Nancy Rooks ........................................ Larry Rooks, Kim W hitton, Libby Jones
Add-O ns ...................................... M arlene Law .................... .................... M argaret Roddenberry
Carcass ...................................... Pat Henson
Dr. Dumas Scholarship................Hal Porter




March 18, 2012 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Page Hll

IT'S ALL ABOUT FAMILY, FRIENDS & FUN

Past Presidents 1947-2012


1947-1948 ......................James E. Rooks, Sr.
1948-1957..........................Norman P. Savory
1957- 1958 ............................Doug Stephens
1958-1963 ................................ Harley Levins
1963-1965 ...................................... Earl W elty
1965-1967 .................................. Horace Allen
1967-1968 ...................................... Earl W elty
1968-1969 ................................ Carroll Cason
1969-1977 .............................. W ilbur Langley
1977-1979 .................................... Curtis Rich
1979-1980 .............................. Quentin Medlin
1980-1981 ............................Catherine Rooks




Fair Managers
1974
Quentin Medlin, County Agent

1974-1976
Art Alston, County Agent

1977-1978
Gene Pyle, Fair Manager

1978-2006
Jean Grant, C.F.E.

2001-2002
Doris Graska, Assistant Manager

2006-Present
Hal Porter, Fair Manager


1981-1984 .......................................Otto Allen
1984-1987 .................................David LaPerle
1987-1989 .......................................Hal Porter
1989-1991 .................................Nell Mayberry
1991-1992 .......................................Hal Porter
1992-1994 .................................David LaPerle
1994-1995 .......................................Hal Porter
1995-1996 .................................Nell Mayberry
1996-1998 .................................C.L. Calloway
1998-2000...................................Doris Graska
2000-2012 .................................Nell Mayberry


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Page H12 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle March 18, 2012


IT'S ALL ABOUT FAMILY, FRIENDS & FUN



Citrus County Fair Association Directors


1947-2012


Bernie Adkins
Ervin A. Adler
Horace Allen
Otto Allen
John Alligood
Art Alston
David Anderson
Wilma F. Anderson
Gene Barbour
Sybil Barco
Bette Barga
Marge Barker
G.O. Barnes
John T. Barnes
Ella Barnes
Mrs. Oscar Barnes
Don Bartlett
Betty Bauer
Mrs. Ray Baxter
Marcia Beasley
Audrey Bellamy
Beverly Bender
Kenny Bender Jr.
Murray Bennett
C.A. Bertine
Brandy Blanton
Cynthia Blanton
Mike Blanton
Eleanor Bonifield
Denver Boston
Desso Bowen
Harold Braaksma
T.O. Brackeen
Neale Brennan
Estelle Brass
Mrs. C.P. Breckenridge
Solon Brown
Alta Bunts
W.J. Bunts
Bert Burnham
Clyde Byrd
C.L. Calloway
Henry Campbell
Mrs. Henry Campbell
"Jocky" Cason
J.E. Cason
Ruth Cason
Pat Cassidy
James Cato
Carlton Chappell
L.C. Chappell


Pat Chitty
Dale Collett
B.J. Collins
James E. Connor
DeWitt Crawford
Joyce Creel
C.W. Croft
Mrs. Ben Croft
Dawn Crawley
Rosella Crummie
Book Cunningham
Frank Cuyler
Doris Dabney
Leonard Damron
F.E. Daniels
Charles E. Davis
Lyle Davis
Lorene Detmer
Laura Dixon
Mary Dixon
Brown Dumas
Dr. Ron Dumas
Brandel Eldridge
Pat Eldridge
E.L. Ellis
Bob England
David English
Steve Evans
Kevin Fitzpatrick
Shawn Fitzpatrick
"Spike" Fitzpatrick
Bruce Flaig
Allen Fort
Andrew Freund
Mike Friddle
Sue Ellen Friddle
Paula Gilbert
Mary Nell Gillen
Bob Gilstrap
Jane Glover
Patrick Grady
George Grant
Jean Grant
Doris Graska
Alex Griffin
Elmer Grover
"Monkey" Hagar
Margie Haley
Gerta Hansen
Clifford Harman
Cyril Harrington


L.W. Harris
Hilda Hatcher
Rocky Hensley
George Herkomer
Tim Hess
Scy Hibbard
Sam Himmel
John Hodgkins
Dixie Hollins
Leff Holloway
Ruth Hooper
Bill Hoppert
Jack Hunnicutt
Helen Hutchinson
Bob Iverson
Jake Jacobs
Frank Jerkins
Karen Johnson
Paula Stanley Johnson
Gary Johnston
Turner C. Jones
Albert Jordan
Norma Jordan
Wayne Jordan
Dick Kaufman
Richard Kelly
Mary Sue Kennington
B..A. King
Mary Knox
Sue Koon
Brenda LaPerle
David LaPerle
Travis LaPerle
Bell Land
David Langer
Alida Langley
Wilbur Langley
Katie Lashley
Joe Law
Harley Levins
Dick Locke
H.J. Locklear
Mrs. Julian Locklear
Jaret Lubowiecki
Dr. Charles Magill
O.M. Maines Jr.
Nell Mayberry
Annette Maynard
M.R. McCullough
Guy McKettrick
Kandi McPherson


Paul McPherson
Quentin Medlin
Baker Miley
Dennis Miller
Linda Miller
Louise Mills
Marie Morris
John Morrison
Dorothy Nelson
Candy Newman
Mrs. George Ogden
Al Owens
Debbie Parker
John Pelham
Mary Perrin
John Polter
Billy Porter
Hal Porter
Linda Powers
Jim H. Priest
W.C. Priest
Barbara Renney
Curtis Rich
Doc Richards
Shirley Richards
Ellis Roberts
Carol Rockman
Catherine Rooks
Doris Rooks
James E. Rooks
James E. Rooks Jr.
Karla Rooks
Larry Rooks
Margaret Rooks
Nancy Rooks
Robin Rooks
Valentine Rooks
Andy Rose
Charles Rowland
Sherri Sanders
Ellen Schneider
M.C. Scofield
Cookie Scott
Helen Sells
Thelma Sheffield
Don Sheppard
Bud Sigmon
Charlie Simmons
Ben Simon
Joe Smith
King Smith


Maggie Smith
Marlys Spiegel
W.P. Spivey
Fred Spooner
A.G. Spratt
Wilma V. Stephen
Owen Stephenson
Irma Stokes
Lee Earl Stokes
Bobby Strickland
Dick Strickland
Ruth Strickland
Vickie Strickland
Ray Tallent
Jesse R. Thomas
Linda Thomas
Mrs. W.A. Thomas
Cliff Travis
Doris Turner
Mrs. Ruben Turner
Kelly Tyler
Eloise VanNess
Mike VanNess
Herbert VanNess
Ed L. Watkins
Kathy Wear
Mrs. W.W. Webb
Dot Welch
Rick Welch
Earl Welty
John West
Patricia White
Willie White
L.J. Whittingham
Buster Whitton
Lucky Whitton
Skeeter Whitton
Will Whitton
Gloria Wilcox
Clyde Wilcox
Herbert Williams
Mrs. John Williams
Mary King Williams
Royce C. Williams
David Wilson
Thomas Wolf
Mae Woodford
Red Wright
E.A. Zellner




March 18, 2012 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Page H13


IT'S ALL ABOUT FAMILY, FRIENDS & FUN


2012 Vendors
As of February 23, 2012


2012 Main Gate Building
Fine Arts Exhibits Citrus County Fair

2012 Miley Vendors
Adult & Youth World Competitive Exhibit
Country Critter Display
Rigatoni Bread Booth
Wood Cravers Exhibit

2012 Rigg's Vendors
Agricultural Alliance of Citrus County
Angelic Air
BR's Feed & Western
Citrus County Cattlemen's
Citrus Historical Society
Citrus Kia
Citrus United Soccer
D & B Sheds
Edwards Jones Investments
FDS Disposal, Inc.
Great American Realty & Investments
Inverness Church of God
Mike Scott Plumbing, Inc.
Nature Coast Screen Printing
Powers Protection, Inc.
Pro H20
Rock Solid Creations
Sentrell of Florida
Tinsley Electric Co. Inc.
Williams Fence Construction

2012 Food Vendor's
Angel's Kiss, Inc.
B&C Pork Rinds
Bianco's Quality Foods, Inc.
Bite Me Southern Fried Catfish
Chinese Gourmet
Cotton Candy
Fried Veggies
Greek Corner
Hot Wisconsin Cheese
Jenks Concessions (2)
Lance Dotson Concession's
McGinnis Concession
Over The Fence BBQ
PaPa John's Kettle Corn
Rudy's Inc.
Sirloin Tips


2012 Outside Vendors
Advanced Aluminum
Airbrush Tattoos
Alachua Baptist Association
Eagle Buick GMC
Gunner's Paint Ball Blast
Liliana's Diva Depot
Need for Speed
Sketch Monger Caricatures
Uncle Fred's Photos
We Care Food Pantry

2012 Jacob's Vendors
AAAAuto Club Group
Aaron Weaver Wall
Air Fix, Inc.
Allen Rawls American Legion Post 77
Amazing Grace Mission
American General Life and Accident
Audible Hearing Centers
Barbara Mills/Remax
Bath Fitter
BB &T
Benco Aico Acquisition
Citrus County Chronicle
Citrus County Democratic Committee
Citrus County Lions Club
Citrus County Republican Party
Citrus County Right to Life
Citrus County School Board
Citrus County Sheriff's Office
Citrus County Solid Waste Mgt/KCCB
Citrus Shrine Club
Classic Landscape Curbing
Family Adventure Camp
Gideon's International
Nature Coast clinical Research
Partners for a Substance Free Citrus, Inc.
Suncoast Business Masters
Supervisor of Elections
TNT Metal Buildings
United Health Care

2012 Levin's Vendors
Adult and Youth Horticulture Exhibit
Citrus County Fair History Exhibit
Florida Forest Service
UF / IFAS CC Extension Service
WREC




Page H14 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle March 18, 2012


IT'S ALL ABOUT FAMILY, FRIENDS & FUN


2012 Citrus County Fair Livestock Schedule


Sunday, March 25:
Enter Open and Youth Heifers .................... 7 10 a.m.
Enter Rabbits........................................ 10 a.m Noon
Rabbit Skill-A-Thon ............................ 11 a.m. 1 p.m.
Open Heifer Show and Showmanship................2 p.m.
Open Heifers will be allowed to leave after being
excused by the Superintendent (Once the Barn has
been cleaned)

Monday, March 26:
Enter Sw ine .......................... ................... 8 10 a.m .
(Use airport road entrance, behind race track)
Swine Skill-A-Thon ...................................... 8 11 a.m .
Open Rabbit Show and Showmanship ..............9 a.m.
Youth and POM Rabbit Show and Showmanship..Noon
Open, POM and Youth Rabbit Awards................4 p.m.
Youth Heifer Show and Showmanship...............7... p.m.
Youth Heifers Leave....................... ................ 10 p.m .

Tuesday, March 27:
E nter Steers ............................................... 8 10 a.m .
(Use airport road entrance, behind race track)
Steer Skill-A-Thon ...................................... 8 11 a.m .
Sw ine S how ........................... ......................7... p.m .

Wednesday, March 28:
Youth Steer Show .................. ....................... 7 p.m .
R abbits Leave ........................... .................... 10 p.m .
(All Rabbit Thank You letters must be turned in to the
Superintendent before checking out and removing your
animal)

Thursday, March 29:
Enter Poultry .................. ....................... 8 10 a.m .
Poultry Skill-A-Thon .................................... 9 11 a.m .
Youth Swine Showmanship .............................. 11 a.m.
Open, POM and Youth Poultry Showmanship ......2 p.m.
Open, POM and Youth Poultry Awards ..............3 p.m.
Pen of Meat Rabbit Silent Auction ...................... 5 p.m.
Pen of Meat Rabbit Auction
(Grand and Reserve Only).................................7... p.m .
Youth Steer Auction .................. ....................... 7 p.m .

Friday, March 30:
Youth Steer Showmanship.................................. 1 p.m.
Pen of Meat Poultry Silent Auction...................... 5 p.m.
Pen of Meat Poultry Auction
(Grand and Reserve Only).................................. 7 p.m .
Youth Sw ine Auction ................. ...................... 7 p.m .


Saturday, March 31:
Horses C heck In ........................................ 8 10 a.m .
(Use airport road entrance, behind race track)
Youth Horse Showmanship .............................. 10 a.m.
Auction items for Dr. Dumas/
Barn Renovation Auction to Livestock Trailer ........Noon
Dr. Dumas/Barn Renovation Auction
w ith Aw ards to follow .......................................... 3 p.m .
All Rabbit, Poultry, Steer and Swine Leave ........10 p.m.
(All Poultry Thank You letters must be turned in to the
Superintendent before checking out and removing your
animal)

Saturday, April 14:
Mandatory Barn Clean Up -
Refer to General Rule #22.................................. 9 a.m.
All Thank You letters (Buyer, Trophy and Add-ons) are
due in the Fair office by Friday April 13, 2012 by 5 p.m.
or at Barn Clean Up Saturday, April 14, 2012. Please
turn your letters in ASAP to avoid missing the deadline.




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March 18, 2012 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Page H15


IT'S ALL ABOUT FAMILY, FRIENDS & FUN


How you can help the Youth Sale Animal Exhibitors

Anyone can participate in this youth program!
Here is how you can help the Youth Animal Exhibitors
* You can purchase a steer or swine and keep the meat
* Make joint purchases and split the carcasses as well as the cost
* We will have meat processors on hand to assist you with your purchase (if needed)
* We will offer a return to the floor option at market price in the event that you do not want to keep
your purchase (you would pay the difference in your bid amount per pound and the market price)
* You can donate your purchase to a charitable organization (you would pay the entire bid price)
* You can also help the exhibitors by placing an add-on amount to their total sale price. (You would
not receive anything in return except the joy of helping a child and their gratitude)
* Come early at 5 p.m. on sale nights for pre-registration and have the opportunity to meet the
exhibitors and let them show you their projects, they are eager to share their accomplishments!
* Brannen Banks will once again provide the services for us to honor your Visa and MasterCard
,* Any questions? Please call the Citrus County Fair Office at 726-2993


Grand Champion:
Inverness Kiwanis

Reserve Champion:
Suregrip Farm -
Janet Horne


Ace Septic
Arvana Farms (3)
Bonded Septic Tank
BR's Feed & Western
Pam and Wayne Burns
Caldwell Construction Co. LLC (2)
Charles E. Davis Funeral Home
Chet's Septic Tank Service (2)
Coldwell Banker Next Generation
Curry's Roofing, Jim and Mike Curry
D & B Enterprise/LaPerle Memorials


2011 Swine Buyers

Patrick and Sarah Dillard
Dr. John Gelin
Eagle Lake Farm
Ferris Farm
From Head to Toe Beauty Salon
JJ and Jennifer Grow (3)
Dr. Paul & Connie Hellstern (2)
Richard Heymer
Hidden Acres Ranch
Homosassa Office of
Edward Jones Co.
Inverness Kiwanis
Kidder Orthopedic Labs Inc.
Kings Land Clearing & Services LLC
Knights Farm Fresh Feed (4)
Jill and Al Lancon
LeeperAC & Heating
Mike Scott Plumbing (4)
Dr. Michael Mikowsky
Mitch Duncan & Son Plumbing


Mr. Auto Insurance -
Bill and Rachael Langley
Patricia Duffy, CRNA
Pospiech Contracting, Inc. (2)
Powers Protection Inc.
Publix Super Mkts, Inc. (4)
Don and Martha Pullian
Steven and Regina Epple, ARNP
Suregrip Farm Janet Horne
Jimmy and Michele Rose with
Craven Realty
Schlabach Security & Sound, Inc.
Seijas Plastering, Inc.
Jeff Senules
Linda A. Thorpe
Turbine Broach Company (2)
Kelly and Jackie Tyler
VanAllen Clifford Insurance
VanNess Auto Parts (2)
Mark and Melissa Winder




Page H16 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle March 18, 2012
IT'S ALL ABOUT FAMILY,
FRIENDS & FUN


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Suregrip Farm Janet Home
JJ and Jenifer Grow


2011 Rabbit
Pen of Meat
Buyers:


Grand and Reserve
Champion
P.E.T./C.T. Svc of Florida
Diagnostic Imaging
Marcus and Margie Leturno




March 18, 2012 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Page H17


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For Appointment Call Toll Free
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Page H18 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle March 18, 2012


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March 18, 2012 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Page H19


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Page H20 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle March 18, 2012


IT'S ALL ABOUT FAMILY, FRIENDS & FUN


2011 Steer Buyers


Grand Champion:
Pospiech Contracting, Inc.
and Chet's Septic Tank Service

Reserve Champion:
Charles E. Davis Funeral Home


Advanced Waste Solutions
Mike and Rebecca Bays
Boulerice Roofing & Supply (2)
Brannen Bank
BR's Feed & Western
Burch Automotive
Caldwell Construction Co. LLC
Charles E. Davis Funeral Home


Chet's Septic Tank Services
Citrus Sod Inc.
Citrus Well Drilling
Gene and DeAnna Davis
Don Poss Roofing (2)
Dr. John Gelin
Edward Jones Co. Wann Robinson
Enersol LLC
Ferris Farm
Ferris Groves Store
Floral City Airboat
Flynn Builders Inc
Tom Gates
JJ and Jennifer Grow (2)
Hometown Athletics -
Bill, Sharon, Brian and Penny DeBusk


continued on next page





IT'S ALL ABOUT FAMILY,

FRIENDS & FUN

2011 Steer Buyers
continued from previous page
ICC David Ziebarth, Connie Hooker and Mike Reynolds
John Pepe Insurance
Knights Farm Fresh Feed (4)
Anthony Kosierowski
Wanda Law
Lora L Wilson LLC
Mike Scott Plumbing (2)
Doug and Monica Moyer
Tim and Kari Nash
Nature Coast Insurance Agency
Nick's Residential & Business Maint.
Pat's Pawn
Patricia Duffy, CRNA
Darren Pillsbury
Charles and Debbie Poliseno (2)
Pospiech Contracting, Inc.
Powers Protection Inc.
Publix Super Mkts, Inc. (3)
Don and Martha Pullian
Steven and Regina Epple, ARNP (2)
Jimmy and Michele Rose with Craven Realty
Jenny Rowand
Scarlett Acres Ranch
Schlabach Security & Sound, Inc.
Small Haullers Inc.
SMG, Inc. (2)
Spires Contracting (2)
Stanley Steemer Carpet Cleaner
Dr. Julie Sudduth
Sumter Co Farmers Market
Sumter Electric
Morgan Cook and Kason Sundberg
Sunflower Springs ALF
The Shamrock Inn
Turbine Broach Company (2)
Danny and Christine Waller
Wheeler Construction
Mark and Melissa Winder
Z2F Citrus & Cattle


March 18, 2012 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Page H21



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Page H22 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle March 18, 2012

IT'S ALL ABOUT FAMILY, FRIENDS & FUN


2012 Youth Poultry Trophy Sponsors

Grand Champion POM ..................... ........................D&B Enterprises "In Memory Of David and Brenda LaPerle"
Reserve G rand C ham pion PO M .............................................................. ..........................C itrus Dental of Inverness
Youth G rand C ham pion ................................................. ............................................................ Floral C ity H ardw are
Youth R reserve G rand C ham pion ....................................................... .................................................. R & L Poultry
M modern Bantam ........................................................ ................................................... State Senator C harles D ean
S ingle C om b C lean Legged Bantam ...................................................... ................................................. Pat H enson
Rose Comb Clean Legged Bantam ........................................................................ Swampwater Farm
All Other Standard Breed ............................ ............................................................... Tow nsend Constructors, Inc.
Feather Legged Bantam ......................................................... .................................................... Sw am pw after Farm
A m e rica n ...................................................................................................................................... Joyce's C o urtsid e P ub
A siatic ..................... ............................................................................ ........................ .. B R 'S Feed & W western
M editerranean ........................................................ ...................................................C itrus C county Fair A association
E english .......................................................................................................... ................ . Lyle and Louise D avis
C ontinental.................................................. ............................................................... C itrus C county Fair A association
W after Fow l ................................................................. .......................................................... C roft C o ntracting Inc.
P reduction .................................................. ............................................................... C itrus C county Fair A association
Jr. Showmanship ....... ..................................................Rebecca Bays Insurance Resources Risk Management
Int.Show m anship .......................................................................................................... .. Barco Farm s
S r. S how m anship ................................................ ........................................ ................... C itrus C county Fair
Youth H erdsm an ................................................................................ ..................................... Lyle and Louise D avis
Jr. 4-H Record Book ......................................... .......................... Agricultural Alliance of Citrus County
Int. 4-H R record Book................................................. .............................................................. Kane's A ce H ardw are
S r. 4-H R record Book ................................................. ............................................................ Bob and M abel Iverson
Jr. FFA Record Book ........ .................... ........................Rebecca Bays Insurance Resources Risk Management
Sr. FFA Record Book ..................................................... ................................................ A ce Hardw are of Hernando
Pen of Meat Record Book ........................................ .......................... Rustic Ranch Restaurant & Bakery




2012 Youth Poultry Belt Buckle Sponsors
G rand C ham pion ................................................. .............................................................. D an and Kathy B race ell
R reserve G rand C ham pion ...................................................... ................................................. W indm ill Self Storage




2012 Pen of Meat Poultry Belt Buckle Sponsors

G rand C ham pion .............................................................................. ..................................... Joyce's C outside P ub
Reserve G rand C ham pion ..................... ............................................................................. Hooper Funeral Hom es




March 18, 2012 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Page H23
IT'S ALL ABOUT FAMILY, FRIENDS & FUN

2012 Open Poultry Trophy Sponsors
Grand Cham pion ......................................... ...................Fam ily Headquarters Barber Shop, Inc.
Reserve Grand Champion ............................................................State Senator Charles Dean
A m erican ...............................................................................................C het's S eptic S service, Inc.
E ng lish ....................................................................................................................... .................. B o R o o ks
C continental ............................................................................................ . . ..... ................... E arl D ixon
Asiatic .......................................................................................................................... Tow nsend Constructors, Inc.
M editerranean ..........................................................................................M ike Bays Health & W ellcare Services of FL
All Other Clean Legged Bantam ....................................................................Citrus County Fair Association
A ll O their S standard ............................................................................................................. Bob and M abel Iverson
G am e M modern Bantam .............................. ............................................................................C arey Bantam s
S C C L B a nta m ................................................................................................. ........................ C a ndy a nd Lo u ie Lott
RCCL Bantam ................................................. C.L. and Melba Calloway
Feather Legged B antam ..........................................................................................................Top H at Inc. P est C control
W after Fow l ....................................................... ................................................... Farm er Tree Service & Law n C are
T urkey .......................................................................................................................... C het's S e ptic S e rvice Inc.
G uinea ............................................................................ C itrus County Fair Association
P rod uctio n ..................................................... ............. ............................. . . .. .... ..... ................... B o R oo ks
Showmanship ........ ..........................................Eagle Lake Farm "In Memory of Major and Audrey Bellamy"


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www.blackshears.com '
*TTT AluminumTTTTTTTT




Page H24 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle March 18, 2012


IT'S ALL ABOUT FAMILY, FRIENDS & FUN


2012 Youth Rabbit Trophy Sponsors


Grand Champion
Pen of Meat .... Marlene and Joe Law dba Travelisfun.us
Reserve Grand Champion
Pen of Meat............................ Michael's Floor Covering
Grand Champion .............. State Senator Charles Dean
Reserve Grand Champion ....Atkinson Construction Inc.
Netherland Dwarf .............................. Ferris Farms, Inc.
Velveteen ....................................... Ferris Farms, Inc.
R ex....................................... ....................... Pat H enson
Flemish Giant.............................. Kelly and Jackie Tyler
Mini Rex ................................ Just Horse'n Around, Inc.
Commercial ...................................... Ferris Farms, Inc.
Holland Lop.......................... Chet's Septic Service, Inc.
English Lop ...................................... Jaret Lubowiecki


M ini Lop ....................... ................ Jim and Julie Akers
Thrianta............................Hidden In the Oaks Rabbitry,
Gregory Shoemaker
Jr. Showmanship ........................Kelly and Jackie Tyler
Intermediate
Showmanship ....................Danny and Christine Waller
Sr. Showmanship..................Brad and Rachel Sanders
Jr. 4-H Record Book ..........................Eagle Lake Farm
Intermediate 4-H Record Book......Chet's Septic Service
Sr. 4-H Record Book......................................Bo Rooks
Jr. FFA Record Book................Southeast Elevator, Inc.
Sr. FFA Record Book ..........Precious Cargo Preschool
Pen of Meat Record Book..............................Bo Rooks
Herdsman....................................Kelly and Jackie Tyler


2012 Youth Rabbit Belt Buckle Sponsors
G rand C ham pion .......................................................................................................... ............................ S tead Lott
Reserve Grand Champion ............................. .............................................................. Lee and Mary Nell Stokes




2012 Pen of Meat Rabbit Belt Buckle Sponsors
G rand C ham pion .......................................................................................................... ............................ S tead Lott
Reserve Grand Champion ........................................... Hernando Citrus Co. Farm Bureau


2012 Open Rabbit Trophy Sponsors


Grand Champion Rabbit ............................ProLine Tile
Reserve Grand
Champion Rabbit............................Citrus Hills Dental -
"In Memory of Dr. Christian"
Netherland Dwarf ................Home Instead Senior Care
Angora ..........................Top Hat Inc. Chimney Sweeps
English Lop ..........Law office of Joseph Indelicato, P.A.
Havanna ......................Citrus County Historical Society
M ini R ex ........................... ....................... Stead Lott


Dutch........................................ Midway Animal Hospital
Flemish Giant .............................. CCSB School Nurses
Holland Lop .................... Hidden in the Oaks Rabbitry -
Gregory Shoemaker
Polish................................ Quality Crafted Builders, Inc.
Mini Lop.................. Rustic Ranch Restaurant & Bakery
Rex ...................................... Chet's Septic Service, Inc.
Britannia Petite .................. Tony and Susan Williamson
Open Showmanship ........................Inverness Sertoma




March 18, 2012 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Page H25


IT'S ALL ABOUT FAMILY, FRIENDS & FUN


2012 Horse Trophy Sponsors
Jr. S how m anship ............................................................................ .................................... Lance and Patricia U zar
Interm ediate Show m anship.............................................................. ...........................Pro Line Tile of C itrus County
Sr. Showmanship ............................................................................... Just Horse'n Around, Inc.


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Page H26 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle March 18, 2012


IT'S ALL ABOUT FAMILY, FRIENDS & FUN


2012 Swine Trophy Sponsors


Grand Champion ..........John Thomas Spreader Service
Reserve Grand Champion ............VanNess Auto Parts
Division I .......................... Townsend Constructors, Inc.
Division II....................LaPerle Granite & Marble Works
"In Memory of David and Brenda LaPerle"
D division III ....... ............... ......................... S tead Lott
Division IV ................................ American Farm & Feed
Division V ............Law office of Joseph Indelicato, P.A.
Division VI .................................. Kane's Ace Hardware
Division VII ....................... ................ W indham Ranch
Division VIII ................................ Marlene and Joe Law
dba: Travelisfun.us
Jr. Showmanship ........................Candy and Louie Lott
Intermediate Showmanship..................Chuck Everidge
State Farm Insurance




2012 Swine Belt
Grand Cham pion....................... ................ Lori Corbin
Reserve Grand Champion ..........Marlene and Joe Law
dba: Travel is Fun.us
Jr. Showmanship .................................... The Hay Barn


Sr. Showmanship ............Pro Line Tile of Citrus County
Jr. 4-H Record Book ...................................... Hal Porter
Intermediate
4-H Record Book..............Townsend Constructors, Inc.
Sr. 4-H Record Book ..........Inverness Elks Lodge 2522
Jr. FFA Record Book...................................... SMG, Inc.
Sr. FFA Record Book......Spires Contracting Corporation
Individual Herdsman........................ LaPerle Memorials
"In Memory of David and Brenda LaPerle"
Skeeter Whitton Memorial ............Livestock Committee
Premier Breeder ......Rustic Ranch Restaurant & Bakery
Best Decorated Swine ............................ Mary Williams
Group Herdsmen..................Good Guy Termite Control
Grand Champion Carcass ..................D&B Enterprises
"In Memory of David and Brenda LaPerle"




Buckle Sponsors
Int. Showmanship........................ BR's Feed & Western
Sr. Showmanship .................................... The Hay Barn
Herdsman .................................. Mike and Kara Coover
Love my Pig Award .................... The Concidine Family


2012 Swine Skill-A-Thon Placement Sponsors


Cloverbuds
First place .................................... Croft Contracting, Inc.
Second place................................ Croft Contracting, Inc.
Third place.................................... Croft Contracting, Inc.
Fourth place ................... ....................... Ginger Bryant
Fifth place .................... ........................ Ginger Bryant
Sixth place ............................ Waid and Tammy Robison

Jr.
First place .................. ....................... The Photo Ranch
Second place ................................ Dr. Mario Mendizabal
Third place .......................... Margie and Marcus Leturno
Fourth place .......................... Gary and Theresa Godwin
Fifth place ...................................... Tad and Libby Jones
Sixth place ............................ Waid and Tammy Robison


Int.
First place.............................. Home Instead Senior Care
Second place .........................................Garage Logic
Third place .......................................Al and Jill Lancon
Fourth place ...................................... Halfpint Taxidermy
Fifth place ....................................... Halfpint Taxidermy
Sixth place........................................ Halfpint Taxidermy

Sr.
First place .................................... BR'S Feed & Western
Second place .................................... Halfpint Taxidermy
Third place....................................... Don Poss Roofing
Fourth place............................ Dick and Frances Dolbow
Fifth place ....................... ....................... B ill M cH ugh
Sixth place.................... ....................... C aitlin Johnston




March 18, 2012 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Page H27


IT'S ALL ABOUT FAMILY, FRIENDS & FUN


2012 Open Heifer
Jr. Grand Champion ........Chas. E. Davis Funeral Home
Jr. Reserve
Grand Champion ...................... Tom and Nell Mayberry
Sr. Grand Champion ................American Farm & Feed
Sr. Reserve
Grand Champion ..............Townsend Constructors, Inc.
Cow Grand Champion........Townsend Constructors, Inc.
Cow Reserve
Grand Champion ................................ Eagle Lake Farm
Division I .................. .................... John's G reenhouse
Division II .......................... Lecanto Veterinary Hospital
Division III..................................... Crystal River Firestone


Trophy Sponsors
D division IV .................... ........................ Scarlett A cres
Division V ..............Rustic Ranch Restaurant & Bakery
Division VI ....................Spires Contracting Corporation
Division VII ........................ Lecanto Veterinary Hospital
D division V III ........ ........... ........................ Stead Lott
Showmanship......................David and Saundra Wilson
"In Memory of Lorene Detmer"
Jr. Premier Breeder ........Spires Contracting Corporation
Sr. Premier Breeder....................Withlachoochee River
Electric Cooperative
Cow Premier Breeder......Countryside Animal Clinic, Inc.


2012 Open Heifer Belt Buckle Sponsors
S uprem e G rand C ham pion ..................................................... ............................................... F.D .S D disposal, Inc.


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Page H28 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle March 18, 2012


IT'S ALL ABOUT FAMILY, FRIENDS & FUN


2012 Youth Heifer
Jr. Grand Champion ........................F.D.S. Disposal, Inc.
Jr. Reserve Grand Champion ................LaPerle Crane
"In Memory of David and Brenda LaPerle"
Sr. Grand Champion......Knights Farm Fresh Feeds, Inc.
Sr. Reserve Grand Champion........Dick and Janet Yant -
Nature Coast Charters
Cow Grand Champion ..................F.D.S. Disposal, Inc.
Cow Reserve
Grand Champion....................Winkel Construction, Inc.
D division I ..................... ....................... S carlett A cres
Division II ........................ Pro Line Tile of Citrus County
D division III .................. ....................... LaPerle C rane
"In Memory of David and Brenda LaPerle"
Division IV.................................... Candy and Louie Lott
D division V ......................... ....................... H al Porter


Trophy Sponsors
Division VI ........................ Townsend Constructors, Inc.
Division VII .............................. Chassahowitzka Hotel -
David and Kim Strickland
Division VIII Post Oak Ranch -
"In Memory of Naomi Cunningham"
Jr. Show m anship................... ...................... Bo Rooks
Int. Showmanship ............................ Citrus County Fair
"In Memory of Eloise VanNess"
Sr. Showmanship .................... Ricky and Janet Tuggle
Individual Herdsman ......Spires Contracting Corporation
Jr. 4-H Record Book .................... Candy and Louie Lott
Int. 4-H Record Book.......................... Eagle Lake Farm
Sr. 4-H Record Book..........Ginny Celano, 4-H Secretary
Jr. FFA Record Book ..........David and Saundra Wilson
"In Memory of Jean Grant"
Sr. FFA Record Book..........Townsend Constructors, Inc.
Jr. Premier Breeder ............................ Eagle Lake Farm
Sr. Premier Breeder.......................... Citrus County Fair
"In Memory of Thayer Fair"
Cow Premier Breeder ............Michael's Floor Covering
Harold Braaksma
Memorial Award ........................ Mike and Jerry Brewer
Harold Braaksma Plaque ..........Mike and Jerry Brewer
Dr. Dumas
Sportsmanship Award ........Home Instead Senior Care -
The Quintanilla Family


2012 Youth Heifer Belt Buckle Sponsors

Supreme
Grand Champion................... Bill and Rachael Langley
Jr. Showmanship ......................Shane and Arnie Harrell
Int. Showmanship ................................Diamond M Farm
Sr. Showmanship..........................Bruce Kaufman, Inc. -
.................................. ........... Bruce and Lisa Kaufm an
Dr. Dumas I
Sportsmanship....................Home Instead Senior Care -
...................................... .......... T he Q uintanilla Fam ily




March 18, 2012 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Page H29


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Page H30 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle March 18, 2012


IT'S ALL ABOUT FAMILY, FRIENDS & FUN


2012 Steer Trophy Sponsors


Grand Champion ........................BR'S Feed & Western
Reserve Grand
Champion....................Knights Farm Fresh Feeds, Inc.
D division I ....................... ....................... Pat H enson
Division II ..........................Lecanto Veterinary Hospital
D ivisio n III ......................... ......................H... al P o rter
Division IV..........................Lecanto Veterinary Hospital
Division V ................................Top Hat Inc, Lawn Care
Division V I ................... ....................... Barco Farm s
Division VII ........................Inverness Elks Lodge 2522
D division V III ........ ............. ....................... Stead Lott
Division IX ................................Larry and Nancy Rooks
Jr. Showmanship ................................Post Oak Ranch,
"In Memory of L.E. Book Cunningham"
Intermediate
Showmanship ............................BR'S Feed & Western
Sr. Showmanship......................Val and Frances Rooks
Kyle Pratt
Memorial Award ......................The Family of Kyle Pratt


Keven D. VanNess
Memorial........................................Ken Fair and Family
Premier Breeder..................Atkinson Construction, Inc.
Gain In Weight..................Fitzpatrick & Fitzpatrick, P.A.
Individual Herdsman....................Candy and Louie Lott
Jeff Barco Memorial ..........George and Cindy Brannen


Jr. 4-H Record Book ................Val and Frances Rooks
Intermediate
4-H Record Book................................ Croft Contracting
Sr. 4-H Record Book ................Joseph Indelicato, P.A.
Jr. FFA Record Book...................................... Hal Porter
Sr. FFA Record Book..........Ace Hardware of Inverness
Howard E. Cunningham
Memorial, (C.V.P.D.A.) ........................ Post Oak Ranch
Grand Champion
Carcass ...................................... D&B Enterprises, Inc.
In Memory of David and Brenda LaPerle
Best Decorated Steer..........Venero's Appliance Center
Group Herdsmen ........................................ Pat Henson
Dr. Dumas Scholarship ................Livestock Committee


2012 Steer Belt Buckle Sponsors


Grand Cham pion .................................... Pro Line Tile -
Dennis and Gail Jenkins
Reserve
Grand Champion....................................Garage Logic -
Kevin and Cathy DuBois
Jr. Showmanship ............................The Roberts Family


Intermediate
Showmanship ............Service Master of Citrus County
Sr. Showmanship .................... Chassahowitzka Hotel -
David and Kim Strickland
Individual Herdsman ..........Danny and Christine Waller




March 18, 2012 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Page H31


IT'S ALL ABOUT FAMILY, FRIENDS & FUN


2012 Youth Poultry Exhibitors


Andrew Brown
CHS FFA Chapter
Danny Dunn
Mary Ellis
Rachel Ferguson
Cheyenne Goodman




David Ashby
Donna Ashby
Sarah Bessler
Monique Bridges
Darin Copeland
Deven Copeland
James Copeland
Margaret Copeland
Daniel Dunn
Ryan Dunn
Sherry Dunn
Rachel Ferguson
Cheyenne Goodman


Abigail Graham
Tegan Henick
Tori Henick
Emily Huckabee
Katie Jones


2012 Open
Abigail Graham
Christine Graham
Trenton Henick
Emily Huckabee
Mackenzie Ifft
Katie Jones
Christian Lawson
Kaitlyn Lee
Kyle Lee
Elise Leturno
Evan Leturno
Tanner Leturno
Ashley Lucas


Logan Mantor
Lacie McFarlin
Allison Phillips
Kylie Philipps
Jessica Sumlin


Diana Ward
Maleah Williamson
Dakota Wills
Cheyenne Worth
Justin Worth


Poultry Exhibitors
Logan Mantor Brent Summers
Donna Matser Brock Summers
Hannah Mattingly Brody Summers
Lacie McFarlin Rainie Grace Summers
Kylie Philipps Amanda Thomashunis
Lauren Philipps Ethan Turner
Lyndsee Philipps Macie Waller
Stephanie Philipps Taylor Waller
Coy Phillips Grace Ward
Jennah Kay Phillips Will Ward
Samuel Rogers Amaya Williamson
Jessica Sumlin Dakota Wills


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Page H32 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle March 18, 2012


IT'S ALL ABOUT FAMILY, FRIENDS & FUN


2012 Pen of Meat Poultry Exhibitors


Tegan Henick
Tanner Leturno


Allison Phillips
Jencye Quintanilla


Jordan Quintanilla
Maleah Williamson


Cheyenne Worth
Justin Worth


2012 Youth Rabbit Exhibitors


Alexandria Couch
Dustin Danback
Jonas Duncan
Buddy Garvin
Jacquelin Garvin
Tegan Henick
Tori Henick
LMS FFA Chapter
Elizabeth Ladkani
Abigale Mattingly
Dora Meador
Lyndsee Philipps


Rebecca Roe
Hannah Rowe
Brianna Saltmarsh
Madison Seijas
Haylee Shiminski
Grant Shoemaker
Gregory Shoemaker
Diana Ward
Dakota Willis
Patrick Young
Maleah Williamson


2012 Open Rabbit Exhibitors


David Ashby
Donna Ashby
Charlie Butt
Nicole Butt
Samantha Butt
Colton Copeland
Sierra Davis
Kaiden Ellis


Buddy Garvin
Caitlin Gustafson
Colton Gustafson
Trenten Henick
Kaitlyn Lee
Kyle Lee
Tanner Leturno
Abigale Mattingly


Rebekah McDaniel
Lyndsee Philipps
Brianna Saltmarsh
John Shears
Ronald Shears
Payton Sowell
Cooper Stewart
Veronica Tumminia


Macie Waller
Taylor Waller
Grace Ward
Amaya Williamson
Cason Williamson
Paisley Williamson
Waylon Williamson


2012 Pen of Meat Rabbit

Exhibitors


LMS FFA Chapter
Elizabeth Ladkani
Rebecca Roe
Hannah Rowe


Brianna Saltmarsh
Grant Shoemaker
Gregory Shoemaker
Maleah Williamson


WE HAVE MANY PROPERTIES TO CHOOSE FROM
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March 18, 2012 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Page H33


IT'S ALL ABOUT FAMILY, FRIENDS & FUN


2012 Swine Exhibitors


Kaleb Beckner
Sarah Bessler
Brandon Bronk
Jessica Bunting
Nicole Cassell
Darin Copeland
Deven Copeland
Layton Copeland
Margaret Copeland
Christopher Curry
Kloey Curry
Cody Dillon
Hunter Dillon
Michael Faron
Michelle Faron
Arysa Friends
Dakota Gruzdas
Alyssa Hamilton
Abigail Hinkle


Dakota Homan
Emily Huckabee
Mackenzie Ifft
IMS FFA Chapter
Deanna Kersey
Lecanto Levi's 4-H Club
LMS FFA Chapter
Emmett Lee
Owen Lee
Kelsey Lilley
Tucker Mantor
Zachary Mattaway
Charlie Mattingly
Katie Mattingly
Kenny Mattingly
William Mattingly
Jenna McClain
Madison McClain
Morgan McElhaney


Lacie McFarlin
Nathan Meeks
Devon Montefusco-Smith
Zane Mueller
Amera Peterson
Kylie Philipps
Lyndsee Philipps
Coy Phillips
Amanda Poliseno
Amber Poteet
Jencye Quintanilla
Jordan Quintanilla
Richard Redding
Hannah Roddenberry
Hannah Schmidt
Hillary Schmidt
Kelsey Sharrone
Johnathan Shears
Michaela Smith


Nathan Snipes
Olivia Snipes
Morgan Sowell
Amadou Speach
Domenique Speach
Jocelynn Standard
Scott Standard
Brittany Swain
Kody Tomczak
Makenzie Tomczak
Morgan Trotter
Robyn Tyler
Anna Venero
Shyanne Waller
Jasmine Wayman
Morgan Wayman
Sarah Welch
Brandy White
Rachel Zabinski


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Page H34 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle March 18, 2012

IT'S ALL ABOUT FAMILY,

FRIENDS & FUN


2012 Youth

Heifer Exhibitors


Brianna Baker
Sydney Bodden
Bradley Carroll
Cheyenne Concidine
Alexandra Cooley
James Corbin
Eagle High 4-H Club
Katelin Flanders
Cheyenne Goodman
Rebecca Gray
Alexandra Harrell
Victoria Hedberg
LMS FFA Chapter
Tanner Leturno


Samantha Matos
Jenna McClain
Madison McClain
Bailey Miller
Shyanna Miller
Samantha Parker
Lauren Philipps
Lyndsee Philipps
Michelle Phillips
Jencye Quintanilla
Hannah Roddenberry
Michaela Smith
Morgan Sowell
Erin Wheeler


2012 Open

Heifer Exhibitors


Brianna Baker
Tyler Bass
Sydney Boden
Tara Bucko
Clay Cooper
James Corbin
Eagle High 4-H Club
Katelin Flanders
Foggy Bottom Ranch
Bobbi Jean Frazier
Alexandra Harrell
Victoria Hedberg
David Houseknecht
Paula Houseknecht
Mackenzie Ifft
LMS FFA Chapter


Angie Leclerc
Samantha Matos
Abigale Mattingly
Kelsie Maynard
Shelbi McCall
Jenna McClain
Madison McClain
Bailey Miller
Shyanna Miller
Payton Nelson
Lyndsee Philipps
QuinRo Farms
Morgan Sowell
Taylor Waller
Erin Wheeler


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March 18, 2012 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Page H35


IT'S ALL ABOUT FAMILY,

FRIENDS & FUN


2012 Steer Exhibitors


Bryan Albert
Brianna Baker
CRHS FFA Chapter
Kacie Carpenter
Travis Carpenter
Maggie Cobb
Cheyenne Concidine
Meg Coover
Michael Coover
James Corbin
Jessica Couch
Jessica Curl
Kristen DeWitt
Kacey Dowing
Ease's Rough Riders
4-H Club
Brittany English-Troxtell
Rebecca Gray
David Harrell
Victoria Hedberg
Shiann Henderson
Corey Hicks
Amber Huckabee
IMS FFA Chapter
Alicia Indelicato
Samantha Jenkins
Kaitlin Jones
Kelsey Jones
LHS FFA Chapter
LMS FFA Chapter
Christian Lawson
Lecanto Levi's 4-H Club
Shayla Lisenby
Donna Matser


Tori Mayes
Amber Maynard
Miranda McElhaney
Hunter McPherson
David Meeks
Shyanna Miller
Christopher Ortega
Samantha Parker
Colton Remley
Austin Roberts
Kaylin Roddenberry
Christopher Rooks
Austin Rosengrant
Hannah Rowe
Haleigh Rowland
Brianna Saltmarsh
Tanner Sanders
Carly Sanders
Gregory Shoemaker
Savannah Smith
Caitlyn Smolensky
Jennifer Smolensky
Leah Stanley
Kyle Steen
Alexis Strickland
Larra Taylor
Kelly Thomas
Veronica Tumminia
Peter Uzar
Erin Wheeler
Kailey Whitton
Karlie Whitton
Lindsey Wyman


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Page H36 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle March 18, 2012


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Page H38 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle March 18, 2012

IT'S ALL ABOUT FAMILY,

FRIENDS & FUN


2012 Horse Exhibitors


Devan Arroyo
Aubrey Beckner
Sarah Bessler
Grace Brown
Jordan Conley
Emily Dampman
Kristen DeWitt
Bailey Durham
Brittany English-Troxtell
Katelin Flanders
Katherine Frank
Cheyenne Goodman
Rebecca Gray
Abigail Hinkle
Heather Hofstetter
Mackenzie Ifft
Alicia Indelicato
Jayna Joslin
Sydney Kofmehl
Tristyn Landerer
Martina Malphurs
Lydia Monday


Sabrina Morris
Taylor Nast
Samantha Parker
Hannah Pitalo
Mattie Roberts
Brianna Saltmarsh
Amanda Sanders
Ashley Skiff
Miranda Slingerland
Diana Smith
Natalie Smith
Caroline Specht
Nathaniel Squires
Makenzie Tomczak
Bryce Uzzolino
Allie Williams
MaleahWilliamson
Chase Wilson
Cheyenne Worth
Justin Worth
Lindsey Wyman
Tiffany Young


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March 18, 2012 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Page H39


IT'S ALL ABOUT FAMILY, FRIENDS & FUN

2012 Citrus County Fair Schedule


Monday, March 26, 2012
Fair opens at 5 p.m.
$5 General Admission ages 11 and older,
$3 ages 5 10, ages 4 and under Free
Free Parking
5 p.m.


Opening of the Fair
Exhibit Buildings Open
Citrus Railroad Exhibit Otto Allen Building U.S. 41
Citrus Shrine Club Jacobs Building
Eudora Farms "Animals from around the World"/Camel & Pony Rides
Charles & Yvonne Viet Organ Grinder
Oscar the Robot Strolling
5:15 p.m.
Robinson's Racing Pigs & Paddling Porkers Main Gate Stage
Tall Tex Strolling
6 p.m.
Confederate Railroad Concert Auditorium
Scott's Crazy Magic Show Strolling
6:30 p.m.
Robinson's Racing Pigs & Paddling Porkers Main Gate Stage
7 p.m.
Tall Tex Strolling


Tall Tex Strolling


Exhibit Buildings Close


Youth Heifer Show & Showmanship Livestock Complex
7:45 p.m.
Scott's Crazy Magic Show Strolling
8p.m.
Confederate Railroad Concert Auditorium
Oscar the Robot Strolling
8:30 p.m.
Robinson's Racing Pigs & Paddling Porkers -
Main Gate Stage
Scott's Crazy Magic Show Strolling
9p.m.


10 p.m.


Pre-Opening Events (Enter South Gate ONLY)
8a.m.
Swine Skill-A-Thon
9a.m.
Open Rabbit Show & Showmanship Indoor Arena
Noon
Pen of Meat & Youth Rabbit Show & Showmanship Indoor Arena
4p.m.
Open, POM & Youth Rabbit Awards Indoor Arena


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Page H40 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle March 18, 2012


IT'S ALL ABOUT FAMILY, FRIENDS & FUN


2012 Citrus County Fair Schedule


Tuesday, March 27, 2012
Fair opens at 5 p.m.
All Gates Adm. $1 "Dollar Night"
ALL RIDES $1 STARTING AT 5 p.m.
Free Parking
5p.m.
Opening of the Fair
Exhibit Buildings Open
Citrus Shrine Club Jacobs Building
Citrus Railroad Exhibit Otto Allen Building U.S. 41
Eudora Farms "Animals from around the World"/ Camel & Pony Rides
Charles & Yvonne Viet Organ Grinder
Belle City Midway Opens
Oscar the Robot Strolling
5:15 p.m.
Tall Tex Strolling
Robinson's Racing Pigs & Paddling Porkers Main Gate Stage
6p.m.
Strutt Band Auditorium
Scott's Crazy Magic Show Strolling
6:30 p.m.
Robinson's Racing Pigs & Paddling Porkers Main Gate Stage
7p.m.
Youth Swine Show Livestock Complex
Tall Tex Strolling
7:45 p.m.
Scott's Crazy Magic Show Strolling
8p.m.
Oscar the Robot Strolling
8:30 p.m.
Robinson's Racing Pigs & Paddling Porkers Main Gate Stage
Scott's Crazy Magic Show Strolling
Strutt Band Auditorium
Tall Tex Strolling
10 p.m.
Exhibit Buildings Close

Pre-Opening Events (Enter South Gate ONLY)
8a.m.
Steer Skill-A-Thon Auditorium

Wednesday, March 28, 2012
Fair opens at 1 p.m.
"Senior & Military Day"
Senior & Military prices for 55 and older $4 for the entire day
$7 General Adm. ages 11 and older,
$3 ages 5 10, ages 4 and under Free
Free Parking


1 p.m.
Opening of the Fair
Exhibit Buildings Open
Citrus Shrine Club Jacobs Building
Citrus Railroad Exhibit Otto Allen Building U.S. 41
Eudora Farms "Animals from around the World"/Camel & Pony Rides
Charles &Yvonne Viet Organ Grinder
Oscar the Robot Strolling
1:15 p.m.
James and Linda King Gospel Music, Auditorium
1:30 p.m.
Robinson's Racing Pigs & Paddling Porkers Main Gate Stage
2 p.m.
Tall Tex Strolling
3 p.m.
Scott's Crazy Magic Show Strolling
Robinson's Racing Pigs & Paddling Porkers Main Gate Stage
James and Linda King Variety of Music, Auditorium


Tall Tex Strolling
Oscar the Robot Strolling


4 p.m.


5 p.m.


Belle City Midway Opens
Robinson's Racing Pigs & Paddling Porkers Main Gate Stage
Scott's Crazy Magic Show Strolling
5- 10 p.m.
Citrus County Chronicle Midway Special
Unlimited Rides Midway Armband ($18) with Chronicle coupon
Regular price $20
6 p.m.
Strutt Band Auditorium
6:45 p.m.
Scott's Crazy Magic Show Strolling
7 p.m.
Youth Steer Show Livestock Complex
Robinson's Racing Pigs & Paddling Porkers Main Gate Stage
Tall Tex Strolling
Oscar the Robot Strolling
8:30 p.m.
Scott's Crazy Magic Show Strolling
Strutt Band Auditorium
10 p.m.
Exhibit Buildings Close


CN IC LE:I NI G

5-1 P.M ARBN SPECIAL
REG.~~~~ PRC 2 WCUO 1




March 18, 2012 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Page H41


IT'S ALL ABOUT FAMILY, FRIENDS & FUN

2012 Citrus County Fair Schedule


Thursday, March 29, 2012
Fair opens at 5 p.m.
$7 General Adm. ages 11 and older,
$3 ages 5 10, ages 4 and under Free
Free Parking
5p.m.
Opening of the Fair
Exhibit Buildings Open
Citrus Railroad Exhibit Otto Allen Building U.S. 41
Citrus Shrine Club Jacobs Building
Eudora Farms "Animals from around the World"/Camel & Pony Rides
Charles & Yvonne Viet Organ Grinder
Belle City Midway Opens
Pen of Meat Rabbit Silent Auction Livestock Complex
Oscar the Robot Strolling
5:15 p.m.
Tall Tex Strolling
Robinson's Racing Pigs & Paddling Porkers Main Gate Stage
6p.m.
Karaoke Registration Auditorium
Scott's Crazy Magic Show Strolling
6:30 p.m.
Robinson's Racing Pigs & Paddling Porkers Main Gate Stage


7 p.m.
Pen of Meat Rabbit Auction Livestock Complex
Youth Steer Auction Livestock Complex
Karaoke Contest Bring your Karaoke CD's Cash prizes Auditorium
Tall Tex Strolling
7:45 p.m.
Scott's Crazy Magic Show Strolling
8 p.m.
Oscar the Robot Strolling
8 p.m. -1 a.m.
Midnight Magic Armband Unlimited rides $20
8:30 p.m.
Robinson's Racing Pigs & Paddling Porkers Main Gate Stage
Scott's Crazy Magic Show Strolling
THURSDAY SCHEDULE continued on next page


Vote To Select The

Winner For This Year's

Sticker Shock Campaign.
The sticker shock entries are submitted by home
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Page H42 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle March 18, 2012


IT'S ALL ABOUT FAMILY, FRIENDS & FUN


2012 Citrus County Fair Schedule


THURSDAY SCHEDULE continued prom previous page






9p.m.


Tall Tex Strolling

Exhibit Buildings Close


10 p.m.


Pre-Opening Events (Enter South Gate ONLY)
9a.m.
Poultry Skill-A-Thon Auditorium
11 a.m.
Youth Swine Showmanship Livestock Complex
2p.m.
Open, POM & Youth Poultry Showmanship Indoor Arena
3p.m.
Open, POM &Youth Poultry Awards Indoor Arena


Friday, March 30, 2012
Fair opens at 1 p.m.
School Day Students FREE till 5 p.m.
$7 General Adm. ages 11 and older,
$3 ages 5 10, ages 4 and under Free
Free Parking










1 p.m.
Opening of the Fair
Exhibit Buildings Open
Citrus Shrine Club Jacobs Building
Citrus Railroad Exhibit Otto Allen Building U.S. 41
Eudora Farms "Animals from around the World"/Camel & Pony Rides
Charles & Yvonne Viet Organ Grinder
Belle City Midway Opens
Youth Steer Showmanship Livestock Complex
Oscar the Robot Strolling

1 -5 p.m.
Midway School Day Special Armband Unlimited rides $20
1:30 p.m.
Robert Ward, Country Singer Auditorium
Robinson's Racing Pigs & Paddling Porkers Main Gate Stage


2 p.m.
Tall Tex Strolling
3 p.m.
Breez' Auditorium
Robinson's Racing Pigs & Paddling Porkers Main Gate Stage
Scott's Crazy Magic Show Strolling
4 p.m.
Tall Tex Strolling
Oscar the Robot Strolling
5 p.m.
Pen of Meat Poultry Silent Auction Livestock Complex
The Broken Home Children, Blue Grass Band Auditorium
Robinson's Racing Pigs & Paddling Porkers Main Gate Stage
Scott's Crazy Magic Show Strolling
6 p.m.
Strutt Band Auditorium











6-11 p.m.
Friday Night Magic Armband Unlimited rides $20
6:45 p.m.
Scott's Crazy Magic Show Strolling
7 p.m.
Robinson's Racing Pigs & Paddling Porkers Main Gate Stage
Tall Tex Strolling
Oscar the Robot Strolling
Pen of Meat Poultry Auction Livestock Complex
Youth Swine Auction Livestock Complex
8:30 p.m.
Scott's Crazy Magic Show Strolling
Strutt Band Auditorium
10 p.m.
Exhibit Buildings Close




March 18, 2012 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Page H43


IT'S ALL ABOUT FAMILY, FRIENDS & FUN


2012 Citrus County Fair Schedule


Saturday, March 31, 2012
Fair opens at 10 a.m.
$7 General Admission ages 11 and older,
$3 ages 5 10, ages 4 and under Free
Free Parking


10 a.m.
Opening of the Fair
Exhibit Buildings Open
Citrus Railroad Exhibit Otto Allen Building
Citrus Shrine Club Jacobs Building
Charles & Yvonne Viet Organ Grinder
Eudora Farms "Animals from around the World"/Camel & Pony Rides
10 a.m.
Youth Horse Showmanship Livestock Complex
Scott's Crazy Magic Show Strolling
10:15 a.m.
Tall Tex Strolling
10:30 a.m.
Craig Jaworski, Guitarist Auditorium
11 a.m.
Belle City Midway Opens
Robinson's Racing Pigs & Paddling Porkers Main Gate Stage
Scott's Crazy Magic Show Strolling
Cross Cut Saw Contest Livestock Complex









11 a.m.- 4 p.m.
Daytime Magic Armband Unlimited rides $20
Noon
Craig Jaworski, Guitarist Auditorium
Tall Tex Strolling
1 p.m.
Sophie Robitaille, Singer Auditorium
Robinson's Racing Pigs & Paddling Porkers Main Gate Stage
Oscar the Robot Strolling
2p.m.
Scott's Crazy Magic Show Strolling
2:15 p.m.
Grounded 4 Life Band Auditorium


3 p.m.
Special Auction & Awards Livestock Complex
3:45 p.m.
Grounded 4 Life Band Auditorium
4 p.m.
Robinson's Racing Pigs & Paddling Porkers Main Gate Stage
Oscar the Robot Strolling
5 p.m.
Scott's Crazy Magic Show Strolling Strolling
Taylor Harrison, Singer Auditorium


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Page H44 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle March 18, 2012

IT'S ALL ABOUT FAMILY, FRIENDS & FUN

2012 Citrus County Fair Schedule
10 p.m.
sI WjEND OF THE 2012 FAIR


6- 10 p.m.
Saturday Night Magic Armband Unlimited rides $20
6p.m.
Robinson's Racing Pigs & Paddling Porkers
Tall Tex Strolling
Foggy Creek Band Auditorium
7p.m.
Oscar the Robot Strolling
7:30 p.m.
Scott's Crazy Magic Show Strolling
8p.m.
Robinson's Racing Pigs & Paddling Porkers
8:30 p.m.
Foggy Creek Band Auditorium


SUNDAY APRIL 1: J;
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2U PM

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Main A Gaeetac




March 18, 2012 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Page H45


IT'S ALL ABOUT FAMILY, FRIENDS & FUN


2012 Citrus County Fair at a Glance


2012 Midway Specials
Monday, March 26
5 p.m. 10 p.m.
Midway Not Open Today
Tuesday, March 27
5 p.m. 10 p.m.
"Dollar Night" All rides $1 starting at 5 p.m.
Wednesday, March 28
1 p.m. 10 p.m.
Senior & Military Day (Seniors 55 and Older)
Admission is $4 for the entire day
5 p.m. 10 p.m.
Chronicle Night (Discount on Armband with coupon)
Midway opens at 5 p.m.
Regular Price $20 With coupon $18*
Thursday, March 29
8 p.m. 1 a.m.
Midnight Magic $ 20 Armband Special*
Friday, March 30
1 p.m. 5 p.m.
School Day Students free until 5 p.m.
$20 Armband Special*
6 p.m. -11 p.m.
Friday Night Magic $20 Armband Special*
Saturday, March 31
11 a.m. -4 p.m.
Daytime Magic $20 Armband Special*
6 p.m. 10 p.m.
Saturday Night Magic $20 Armband Special*

Sunday, April 1
2 p.m. 7 p.m.
Midway Bonus Main Gate Only, No Gate Admission
$22 Armband Only No single tickets sold
Ride Safety Restrictions Apply *


Fair Highlights Auditorium
Sunday, March 25
1 p.m. Pre Teen Citrus County, Little Miss/Mr. Pageant
3 p.m. Beautiful Baby Pageant
3:30 p.m. Decorated Baby Pageant
Monday, March 26
6 and 8 p.m. Confederate Railroad Concert
Thursday, March 29
7 p.m. Karaoke Contest Bring your Karaoke CD
Cash Prizes Adult $100/Youth $50
Saturday, March 31
6 and 8:30 p.m. Foggy Creek Band Blue Grass
All Week Featuring the Strutt Band and Local Entertainment


Livestock Pre-Opening Events
(Enter South Gate ONLY)
Sunday, March 25
11 a.m. Rabbit Skill-A-Thon
2 p.m. Open Heifer Show & Showmanship

Monday, March 26
8 a.m. Swine Skill-A-Thon
9 a.m. Open Rabbit Show & Showmanship
Noon POM & Youth Rabbit Show & Showmanship
4 p.m. Open, POM & Youth Rabbit Awards

Tuesday, March 27
8 a.m. Steer Skill-A-Thon

Thursday, March 29
9 a.m. Poultry Skill-A-Thon
11 a.m. Youth Swine Showmanship
2 p.m. Open, POM & Youth Poultry Showmanship
3 p.m. Open, POM & Youth Poultry Awards


Visit Our Fair Booth
In The Jacobs Building
Primary Election General Election
August 14, 2012 November 6, 2012
Register by July 16, 2012 Register by October 9, 2012
* Register to Vote
* Poll Worker Information
* Update Your Registration
* Voting System Demonstration
* Voter Resource Materials
* Vote By Mail & Early Vote Information



Suasa Gill a




Page H46 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle March 18, 2012


IT'S ALL ABOUT FAMILY, FRIENDS & FUN


History of the Citrus County Fair


The first reference to the
Citrus County Fair is found
in the minutes from a meet-
ing of the Board of County
Commissioners dated Octo-
ber 5, 1920. Mr. Dorsett, Cit-
rus County Extension Agent,
was advising the Board of
County Commissioners of a
change in fair dates to the
14th and 15th of December,
1920. This county fair began
as an outgrowth of several
previous 4-H exhibits organ-
ized by the County Agent and
the Home Demonstration
Agent.
These 4-H shows had pre-
viously been held in a tin
building in Lecanto.
On February 1, 1926, the
Board of County Commis-
sioners went on record as fa-
voring an annual fair. Later,
the Board of County Com-
missioners adopted a resolu-
tion declaring January 21,
1927, as a legal holiday due
to the fair and West Coast
Highway Association meet-
ings in Crystal River. A re-
quest was made for business
houses and public business to
be suspended for that day.
The fair was held in Lecanto
until 1928, at which the time
the Florida land bubble burst.
Records are unclear of the lo-
cation of the fair from 1928
through 1947.
In June 1933, a motion was
made by the Board of County
Commissioners not to move
any more material from
Lecanto without the Citrus
County Fair Association and
Board of County Commis-
sioners approval. It was dur-
ing this period that the Board
of County Commissioners ap-
proved that citizens would


serve as directors of the Fair
Association, with some of the
commissioners also serving
on the board. Small accounts
of tax money were allocated
to the assistant running the
fair; however, this is no
longer the case.
The first Miss Citrus
County Beauty Pageant was
organized in 1930. This pag-
eant qualified our contestants
to participate in the Miss
Florida and Miss America
pageants. In 1985, we
changed the pageants to
scholarship pageants which
allow us to give scholarship
prize money directly to the
pageant participants. This
change no longer made the
pageants qualifiers for the
Miss Florida and Miss Amer-
ica pageants; therefore, the
pageant names were changed
to the Miss Citrus County
Scholarship Pageant and Miss
Teen Citrus County Scholar-
ship Pageant. The Little Miss
and Little Mister Pageants,
Decorated Diaper, and Pre-
Teen pageants are also held
on a Sunday, either directly
before the fair or during the
fair.
In 1947, a school day was
set aside whereby students
were bused to the fairgrounds
on Friday. While the busing
is no longer in operation, the
day is still recognized by the
Fair Association and the Cit-
rus County School Board.
The first fair was held in
Inverness on the football field
at Citrus High School in Jan-
uary 1947. At this point, tents
loaned to the Citrus County
Fair by the carnival company
were used to house exhibits.
On the second night of the


fair in 1947, a windstorm
blew down the main exhibit
tent, destroying all of the ex-
hibits. Shortly after this dis-
aster, a Fair Association was
chartered.
After the formation of the
Citrus County Fair Associa-
tion, the Board of County
Commissioners donated land
to the association. This land,
which is located one-half
mile south of Inverness on
U.S. 41, covered approxi-
mately 45 acres and is the lo-
cation of our current
fairgrounds, which is now
only 28 acres. The first fair
held on these grounds was in
1948.
Belle City Amusements, a
Florida Midway, owned by
the Charles Panacek family,
was the first midway on the
new grounds and continues to
operate the midway to the
present day. Midnight Mad-
ness, later changed to Mid-
night Magic, was started on
Thursday nights from 9 p.m.
to 1 a.m. giving fairgoers un-
limited rides for one price.
Several additional one price
opportunities have been
added over the years for vari-
ous times and days.
Most of the pioneer fami-
lies of Citrus County were
represented on the original
Board of Directors. Many of
these people serve for years
donating their time, labor and
money.
Growth in the early years
was painfully slow due to
limited funds and a small
population.
Therefore, in an attempt to
gain funds so that the fair
could continue to grow, some
of these original members of


the Board of Directors loaned
money to the Fair Association
on a long term basis, taking a
low rate of interest. James E.
Rooks, Sr., was the first pres-
ident of the Citrus County
Fair Association serving from
1942 to 1948.
Bonds were floated to start
building and the first concrete
block building, the Levins
Building, was erected imme-
diately. Director Harley
Levins spent many hours on
this building. The tin building
from the 4-H site in Lecanto
was moved to the new
grounds.
In 1955, a request was
made to build a quarter-mile
dirt race track, which the
Board of Directors of the Fair
Association ran for several
years before it was leased to
Leonard Damron. The track
was later paved with asphalt
and has been repaved periodi-
cally. After a short time, the
Board of Directors renegoti-
ated the lease and the bid
went to the West Coast Rac-
ing Association, with im-
provements and operated by
various promoters, the race
track has grown over the
years. Grandstand boxes were
later constructed on the pit
side of the track. The Citrus
County Speedway is still in
operation with races every
Saturday night from February
until November, with prac-
tices taking place on Thurs-
day nights. Several statewide
special races have been held
at the Speedway, including
NASCAR-sanctioned truck
races.
In 1966, Paula Stanley

continued on page 47




March 18, 2012 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Page H47


IT'S ALL ABOUT FAMILY, FRIENDS & FUN


continued from page 46
Johnson, Quentin Medlin,
Wilbur and Helen Langley
traveled the state looking for
a steel building to be used as
an auditorium. The current
auditorium was built in 1967.
The auditorium was turned
over to the county in the
early 1970s for operational
services due to the fact that
the Fair Association did not
have any permanent employ-
ees. The Fair Association re-
tained ownership of the
parking lot and has full use
of the auditorium during the
fair, the annual meeting, and
the volunteer appreciation
dinner.
In 1965, the Jacobs Build-
ing was erected. This was
named after Charles Jake Ja-
cobs, a volunteer who was an
old carney or carnival
worker. Jake taught us how
to count joints (midway con-
cession stands and games)
and make collections.
In 1975, the Baker Miley
Building was built between
the Levins Building and the
Jacobs Building. Baker Miley
was a past director of the Fair
Association who made many
contributions during his
tenure. The Baker Miley
Building included a snack
bar where civic associations
put on dinners during the fair.
After that, the homemakers
baked bread there and sold it
for 25 cents a loaf. The smell
of the bread baking drew
people to the building where
the competitive exhibits were
held. The bread baking was
later taken over by churches.
In 1977, a 12' x 60' trailer
was purchased as a point of
coordinating all fair business
and was later used as the


headquarters for the Live-
stock Committee. That same
year, Mrs. Jean Grant was
hired as the first fair man-
ager. Prior to her hiring, the
previous managers were
County Extension Agents.
In 1979, the Riggs Build-
ing was built on the other
side of the Jacobs Building.
This began as a red steel
clear span building and was
later painted gray to match
the rest of the buildings. The
building was named for Inez
and Raymond Riggs who ran
the flea market for several
years. In the late 1970s,
Helen Langley took over
management of the flea mar-
ket and ran it until 2008. She
and her husband, Wilbur, an
honorary life director, also
ran the snack bar in the
Miley Building on Saturdays.
In 2009, the flea market man-
agement contract was
awarded to Cathy Johnson
and the hours were expanded
to include Fridays.
The flea market closes dur-
ing August of each year.
In 1980, the building at the
main entrance was built and
named after Eleanor
Bonifield who was in
charge of the horticulture ex-
hibits for many years.
In the early 1980s, a grant
was received from the State
of Florida with the help of
State Representative Dick
Locke and the first part of a
new barn was built and a few
years later a swine barn was
added. The livestock com-
plex is named for Quentin
Medlin, a County Agent for
many years. In those days,
the county agent also served
as the fair manager. Mr.
Medlin served in the early
1970s followed by Art Alson


and Gene Pyle. The building
known as The Little Red
Schoolhouse was moved onto
the grounds in 1983 after
buying it from the School
Board for $6,000. Otto Allen
was President at that time
and the building was later
named in his honor. It was
later voted to allow the Citrus
County Railroad Club full
use of the building to show
their model railroads and
they would be open during
flea market hours and during
the fair. The railroad club has
made many improvements to
the building and with the
help of the Fair Association,
installed central air condi-
tioning and a new ceiling.
The Fair Association built
a new office in 1986 at the
rear of the Levins Building.


New restrooms were built
on the east side of the fair-
grounds adjacent to The Lit-
tle Red Schoolhouse which
has now also been painted
gray to match the rest of the
buildings.
In 1986, Jean Grant be-
came President of the Florida
Federation of Fairs and Live-
stock Shows, Inc., and served
until 1987.
1988 was our first effort to
have a nine day fair. After the
nine day fair it was decided
by the Board of Directors to
return to a six day fair in
1989. The three extra days
were not as profitable as ex-
pected, in addition to the
wear on a small staff and vol-
unteers.

continued on page 48


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Page H48 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle March 18, 2012


IT'S ALL ABOUT FAMILY, FRIENDS & FUN


continued from page 47
In the late 1980s and early
1990s, the Citrus County Fair
Association, in cooperation
with the Citrus County Com-
mission, provided a county
exhibit at the State Fair in
Tampa.
Several first place ribbons
were received, as well as a
district first place award.
In 1990, new restrooms
were built at the main en-
trance and restrooms with
showers were built at the
racetrack/midway area.
In 1990, the Dr. Dumas
Scholarship was established
in honor of Dr. Ron Dumas
for his many contributions to
the livestock program. Dr.
Dumas continues to serve as a
member of the Fair Associa-
tion to this date.
In 1992, due to overcrowd-
ing of the Citrus County Jail,
Judge Edwards ordered that
the Citrus County Auditorium
be converted into a temporary
jail. A chain link fence went
down the middle of the walk-
way between the jail and the
fair office. During the time
the auditorium was used as a
temporary jail, the pageants
had to be moved to the Curtis
Peterson Auditorium in
Lecanto and a tent was rented
to provide entertainment in
the area of the horse arena.
On March 13, 1993, prior
to the opening of the fair, the
No Name storm blew the
huge tent down and also
topped one of the large rides
belonging to Belle City
Amusements.
In 1997, Jean Grant was
elected to the Florida Federa-
tion of Fairs Hall of Fame.
In 1999, the horse arena
was named for Eloise Van-


MISSION STATEMENT

The Citrus County Fair Association is an organization of
volunteers united to showcase the talent of the youth of
Citrus County; to provide scholarship and scholarship op-
portunities; provide the community with agricultural, edu-
cation, and cultural pursuits, thereby added to the quality
of life for its residents.
Exhibits at the annual Citrus County Fair consist of Agri-
culture, Horticulture, Livestock, 4-H, FFA, Fine Arts, Ex-
tension Homemakers, local churches and civic groups, plus
business people exhibiting their wares. Handcrafted items
by men, women and children and school exhibits are also
on review. In addition to the exhibits, there is a midway
with rides, sideshows and games. Entertainment is fur-
nished by local, as well as professional entertainers who
come from other counties or out of state.
Food, such as popcorn, ice cream, sandwiches, pizza or
complete meals can be purchased. This is considered a time
to have good clean fun which is geared to entertain a per-
son or entire families.
The fairgrounds and buildings are rented for various ac-
tivities in order to support our non-profit fair, to continue to
be self-supporting without receiving any county, state or


federal operational funding.



Ness. Eloise was a director
for many years and was in-
volved in horse shows and 4-
H. An announcer's stand was
later added to the arena.
In 1999, Hal Porter, Direc-
tor and Past President, was
voted Florida's most out-
standing 4-H Alumni Mem-
ber. Hal continues his many
years of service to the Fair
Association by serving as the
current Fair Manager, which
he has done since 2006.
In January 2000, the An-
nual Antique Tractor Show &
Pull was started as a two-day
event. On the first day of the
tractor pull, a ceremony was
held to raise the flag. A large
concrete pole was installed
near the fair office courtesy of
David and Brenda LaPerle.
The flag and ropes were do-


nated by C.L. Calloway and
Withlacoochee Electric. In
2001, it was changed to a
three-day event on the last
weekend in January. The
event was so successful that
three new scholarships were
awarded in the Youth Exhibit
Division. An essay was re-
quired stating why the student
exhibited at the fair. In 2001
there were nine entries and
three $500 scholarships were
awarded. Since then, scholar-
ships have been added and
awarded in memory of David
LaPerle. The first year equip-
ment was rented or borrowed,
the next year a sled was pur-
chased and a scale. Antique
tractors were phased out as
exhibitors, though many still
pull. In 2010, the pull was
dedicated to the memory of


David LaPerle (1948-2009)
who was one of the organiz-
ers and later chairman of the
event. David also served as
Past President of the Associa-
tion from 1984-1987 and
1992-1994.
In 2000, courtesy of Sumter
Electric, the electrical service
on the midway was buried,
eliminating poles and increas-
ing safety. The same year, a
cart path was established and
all golf carts or other vehicles
were eliminated from the
grounds, including the mid-
way.
In July, we were hosts for
the first time of the Florida
Federation of Fairs Summer
Workshop. Over 100 people
were in attendance from all
over the state of Florida. The
first Volunteer Appreciation
Dinner was held in 2000 in
the Riggs Building.
New air conditioned gate
houses were constructed for
the main gate, exhibitor gate,
and livestock gate and an in-
formation booth was placed
near the flag pole.
In the summer of 2001, a
truck pull was held which,
though profitable, was dis-
continued and trucks became
part of the annual tractor pull.
In 2001, the Florida Federa-
tion of Fairs established the
Blue Ribbon program which
judged and awarded fairs on
their merit. The Citrus County
Fair Association was a recipi-
ent of a blue ribbon award
that first year and has re-
ceived a blue ribbon award
every year since.
In 2002, prior to the open-
ing of the fair, the lone tree on
the midway disappeared with-
out a trace.

continued on page 49