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Citrus County chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02711
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 03-17-2012
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:02711

Full Text






'I

TODAY & Sunday morning
HIGH Brief morning fog
83 then sunny and
LOW warm.
55 PAGE A4


Have a safe and happy St. Patricks Day


)RONICLE
www.chronicleS N TY online.com






www.chronicleonline.com


Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community 50* VOLUME 117 ISSUE 223


SO YOU KNOW
Due to early
deadlines, some
lottery numbers
do not appear.
Due to technical
failure, the pri-
mary e-mail server
for the Citrus
County Chronicle is
out of service. In
the interim, those
wishing to email
the Chronicle
should use the fol-
lowing addresses
for the following
departments:
Newsroom: news
deskchronicle
@gmail.com.
Sports: chronicle.
sports@hotmail.
com.
Circulation:
circulationchronicle
@gmail.com.
Advertising:
advertisingchroni-
cle@gmail.com.
The Chronicle
regrets the
inconvenience.





St. Patrick's
Day events
Annual cos-
tumed-dog parade,
10 a.m. Saturday,
March 17, at Burkes
of Ireland pub in
Crystal River. Dublin
Coddle, soda bread,
roasted potatoes,
onions, leeks,
sausage, bacon and
ham will be
S served at
Burkes.
St.
Patrick's
Day pro-
4 gram, featuring
The Shamrock
S & Heather
SShow, 2 to 6
p.m. Satur-
day, at American
4 Irish Club
4 Pavilion,
S4342 Ho-
mosassa
Trail (County
Road 490).
Included in
the program will
be The
a Tommy
Doyle Band;
Dianne
Dubock and her
School of
Scottish
Highland
Dancers;
Paddy
Noonan, Scot-
tish/Irish enter-
tainer, story
teller and ac-
Scordionist;
and The Cit-
rus County Scottish
4 Bagpipe
I Band. $10
tickets. 352-
S341-0100,
S352-419-
7914 or 352-
860-3548.
0 Second
annual In-
verness St.
SPatrick's
Day Parade,
5:30 p.m. Saturday,
March 17, in down-
town Inverness. 352-
726-2611.
-From staff reports



Comics . . . . .C8
Community . . . .C6
Crossword . . . .C7
Editorial . . . .A14
Entertainment . . .B6
Horoscope . . . .B6
Lottery Numbers . .B4
Lottery Payouts . .B6
Movies . . . . . .C8
Obituaries . . . .A6
Classifieds . . . .C10
TV Listings . . . .C7


6 184I78 200!2 U


Roadwork ahead


CR 486project heads to next

phase; expected completion in July


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
The final phase of upgrading and widening County Road
486 has started, covering the last three miles to State
Road 44 in Crystal River. "You will be seeing land clearing
along the Phase 4 project and that is from State Road 44
to the Black Diamond service road where Phase 3 ended,"
said Lindsay Ubinas, county spokeswoman.


CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff Writer
The long project is al-
most reaching the end of
the 12.7-mile road.
The west side of the
County Road 486 improve-
ment project is finalizing
Phase 3 and starting the
last step Phase 4.
"Phase 3 right now is
under way," Lindsay Ubi-
nas, spokeswoman for the
Citrus County Board of
County Commissioners,


said at a recent meeting of
the BOCC. "It's from the
Black Diamond service
road to Ottawa. It started
back in August 2010. And
its completion date right
now is scheduled for July
2012, but I will tell you that
some of the engineers in
the engineering depart-
ment have told me things
are progressing. We're
moving forward, so we
could end before July."
See Page A2


Scarred for life:

The best/worst thing

that ever happened '
NANCY KENNEDY L
Staff Writer I .
-HERNANDO .i/. .
"D on Dobrzynski's story begins ,, "
like a Charles Dickens
novel. l
"It was the best of times. It was ,
the worst of times."
His times began one morning in
New Jersey
He was 21, still living at home
with his parents, had a job driving a
truck, rode a '75 Harley Sportster
for fun.
One Saturday night he met a girl .
at a club and went home with her -
The next morning, a clear and
crisp, gorgeous mid-September
morning, he invited the girl for a
ride through the Poconos. But first, ,
he wanted to go home, clean up and
grab some cash those were the
days before ATMs.
"I was one block from home,
coming up to a stop sign that I know
is there," he said. "I go and hang
into my left hand turn and a guy
comes barreling down, doesn't
even hit the brakes, and broadsides
me. My foot's completely turned
around and there's bones sticking
out of my legs."
For the next three years, Do-
brzynski was in and out of the hos-
pital 12 surgeries and a number
of infections, bone grafts, skin
grafts, electrical stimulation treat-
ments, rods and pins and screws
trying to keep his bones together,
but nothing was working. His bones
wouldn't heal.
"I didn't walk for three years," he MATTHEW RFCK/Chronicle


said.


In many ways, the motorcycle accident that happened when Don Dobrzynski
See Page A2 was 21 has shaped his adult life.


NANCY KENNEDY/Chronicle
Gloria Darley believes the scar down the front of her chest
from open-heart surgery is a sign of life. Now she no longer
has to be afraid of her heart "going wacky." She also has
a scar where her right breast used to be. The one on her
chest runs down vertically, from below her clavicle to just
above her belly.


SCARRED FOR LIFE
//
Whether it's the pale spot on your leg or
chin from shaving too close, a jagged red
mark from a dog bite, the telltale "zipper"
down your torso from open-heart surgery
or any number of marks on your body we
call scars, each one has a story behind it.
Through Monday, the Chronicle will be
running a series of stories on scars that have
drastically changed lives.


Gloria Darley's


tell-tale marks


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff Writer
HOMOSASSA Un-
less Gloria Darley re-
moves her shirt, you
can't see her scars.
One is where her right
breast used to be. The
other one runs down her
chest vertically, from
below her clavicle to just
above her belly
Some call it a "zipper,"
the telltale sign of open-


heart surgery
At 61, Darley has had
three birthdays since her
first scar, one since her
second.
"Every birthday is a
blessing," she said.
Originally from St. Pe-
tersburg, she was living
in Colorado for 10 years,
returning to Florida in
2006 after suffering a
stroke.
See Page A2


TPO


chooses


familiar


face

TBARTA

director picked

tohelp

organization

CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff Writer
Seeking services to direct
it, the Citrus County Trans-
portation Planning Organi-
zation (TPO) on Thursday
looked at candidates and
chose one with a long asso-
ciation with the county:
TBARTA, or rather its exec-
utive director, Bob Clifford.
"To give you some back-
ground on Bob's history,
Bob was previously the
planning director for FDOT
District 7 for many years
and, in fact, if you go back
far enough, and I unfortu-
nately do, Bob actually
worked for Citrus County
for a while in our planning
department," said Gary
Maidhof, county operations
and projects officer, who is
a TPO support staff mem-
ber. "So he has a strong fa-
miliarity with Citrus
County"
The TPO board set a re-
quest for qualifications for
an individual or firm to
offer transportation plan-
ning and related manage-
ment services on a
month-to-month basis as it
develops. Just about 18
months old, the TPO, which
is tasked with providing
safe and secure transporta-
tion systems, has been sup-
ported administratively by
Maidhof, Crystal River City
Manager Andy Houston and
Inverness City Manager
Frank DiGiovanni. All three
have been serving in addi-
tion to their regular duties.
At Thursday's meeting,
three candidates made pub-
lic presentations: the
Tampa Bay Area Regional
Transportation Authority
(TBARTA), Kimley-Horne
and Associates Inc. and
Wade Trim Inc.
Each presentation was
given 15 minutes, and each
stayed within the limit.
Board members asked each
presenter similar questions
"It allowed everybody an
even playing field," Maid-
hof said.
As a professional cour-
tesy, the firms' representa-
tives waited in the lobby of
the Inverness Government
Center as each competitor
made the public presenta-
tion before the board.
"After the presentations
were done, they were all in-
vited back in," Maidhof
said. "The TPO board had a
good discussion on whether
they wished to go to the next
level and actually call a vote
and do a ranking."
Both Commissioner John
"JJ" Kenney, substituting for
Commissioner Rebecca
Bays, and Crystal River
Councilwoman Paula
Wheeler questioned
whether the candidates
would be prepared for the
next step, but were assured
the request for qualifica-
tions made clear the de-
sired services.
"At the end of that discus-
sion, they all agreed that,
yes, it was appropriate to
vote and so we handed out
ballots," Maidhof said.
The No. 1 team of rank
was TBARTA
"I think TBARTA was the
first choice of everyone,"
said Ron Kitchen, Crystal
River city councilman and
See Page A2





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


The County Road 486 project

ROAD
Continued from Page Al

Since 2005, the county
has been upgrading C.R.
486 from east to west, Her-
nando to Crystal River, U.S.
41 East to State Road 44,
one phase at a time. Phase
1 was finished in 2006. Only
recently, it moved through
the intersection with
County Road 491, the cen-
tral crossroads of the
county that is expected to
become an economic hub.
An application for a Wal-
mart store has been sub-
mitted for the southwest
corner property.
In June 2010, the BOCC
awarded the Phase 3 con-
tract to D.A.B. Constructors
on a $15.7-million bid by a
unanimous vote. Funding
for Phase 3 came from
county gas taxes and im-
pact fees, as well as a $4.9-
million grant from the
Florida Department of



TPO
Continued from Page Al

chairman of the TPO. "All
three of the presentations
were excellent."
Kitchen told the Chroni-
cle TBARTA would offer
consistent service.
"After every election,
people come and go off
these boards so it's impor-
tant to have the staff that's
been around for a while,"
Kitchen said.
Kitchen also wondered if
TBARTA would have a con-
flict with representing Cit-
rus County's interests
foremost within the region.
He said he was assured
TBARTA would advise the
TPO of any problems in ad-
vocating for the county.
Clifford said he would



MARKS
Continued from Page Al

On Sept. 25, 2008 she
said you never forget the
date she was diagnosed
with breast cancer and had
a radical mastectomy in
October
"Losing the breast was
anti-climactic after hearing
the diagnosis," she said.
"For months and months
and months and months I
wouldn't look at the scar.
You almost have to grieve
for it, for the breast, because
it's a part of your body that
you assume makes you you,
but it really isn't. If I had
kept it, I wouldn't be here
today"
She added, "Losing a


is expected to be completed in July.


Transportation.
C.R. 486 was considered
in "bad shape," according
to Commissioner Dennis
Damato, who said the time
had come to get the road
upgraded because the
paving cost had declined
with the weaker economy.
He said he expected to see
at least a 50-percent
savings.
As motorists know too
well, the county is perform-
ing several projects. Phase 3
was also part of work at an
intersection with C.R. 491,
which included four
drainage retention areas, a
new traffic signal, moving
power poles, a 12-foot-wide
multi-use parallel path
along the road, numerous
storm water pipes and the
installation of a sewer force
main to Meadowcrest Waste-
water Treatment Plant It in-
cluded installing traffic
signals at Pine Ridge subdi-
vision's main entrance.
Phase 3 is reaching the
end of the line.


serve as the primary con-
tact to the TPO.
As a not-for-profit corpo-
ration, TBARTA can offer
consulting, Maidhof said.
"To give some perspec-
tive, TBARTA has a similar
contract with the Chair Co-
ordinating Committee (of
the West Central Florida
Metropolitan Planning Or-
ganizations)," Maidhof said.
"They provide that service
to them. We're not breaking
new ground here."
After the ballots were
read into the record and
TBARTA announced as the
choice, the TPO designated
a team of Kitchen, Houston,
DiGiovanni and Maidhof to
begin negotiating the scope
of services in either a con-
tract or a letter of engage-
ment. Maidhof said as he
had been liaison to the
groups, he didn't feel it


breast is a hard thing, but
it's better to have a birthday
than a breast."
Even before she was diag-
nosed with cancer, she suf-
fered with a crazy
heartbeat, "A-fib," atrial
fibrillation.
If she was startled, if she
bent down, if she walked
too far or became winded,
if she was stressed, some-
times even if she wasn't
doing anything, her heart
would race and she would
fall over. She has even bro-
ken a few bones because
of it.
She had been scheduled
for a heart procedure to
treat the problem when she
was diagnosed with cancer,
so heart stuff was put on
hold.


"I had to finish the chemo
and heal first," she said.
Then last June Darley
had gone to visit her sister
who was on life support
after heart surgery in St. Pe-
tersburg. It was a Wednes-
day night. She came home
and her heart went into A-
fib.
"This time it was dramat-
ically different than what
I'd normally experience,
and it became painful," she
said.
Her friend, Maureen Cot-
noir, rushed her to the
emergency room at Seven
Rivers Regional Medical
Center and three days later
she had aortic valve re-
placement surgery at
Munroe Regional Medical
Center in Ocala.
Of her two scars, Darley


IIAZARI)O(IJS

Household Waste
I I



' I




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You are probably throwing away hazardous waste and you don't even realize
it. Lets get the facts and keep the really nasty stuff from contaminating our soil
and water. Make sure your hazardous waste does not end up in the landfill.
I Household Hazardous Waste Materials
Pesticides / Herbicides Latex Paint
Pool chemicals Oil Base Paint
I Aerosols Household cleaners
Paint Remover Solvents / degreasers
I Paint Thinner Fireworks / Flares
Stale gasoline Ammunition
SATURDAY DROP OFF SCHEDULE
I APR. 21, JUL. 28 & OCT. 27, 9AM 1PM
I For more information call 3I
Citrus County Solid Waste Management (352) 527-7670


SCAR
Continued from Page Al

At his cousin's urging, he
went to see a healer, Nell.
She put her hand on his
banged up leg and he felt a
warmness.
"I went to the doctor a
month later and I was com-
pletely healed," he said.
But his story doesn't end
there. In many ways, it had
only begun.
ME.
Imagine being 24 years
old in the early 1980s with a
windfall of $200,000, plus a
monthly disability check.
You didn't need to work. You
had no responsibilities. All
you needed to do was enjoy
life and not get yourself
killed.
That was Dobrzynski for
the next 10 years.
He invested the money -
that was back when the
stock market made people
rich. He bought a couple of
new cars, bought a house
and some land in the
Poconos. He and a friend
took off for a road trip
around the country
"We wound up in Colorado
Springs at a bar and saw a
sign for an arm wrestling
competition," she said. "I
had been on crutches for
three years and my arms
were bulked up. I got into the
final round and in comes
this guy- six-foot seven and
over 300 pounds ... and in
one second, my arm snapped
- it was noisy in the place,
but everyone heard it."
He had returned to New
Jersey and met his first wife,
who helped spend his
money By the time they di-
vorced a few years later,
most of the money was gone.
That's when he met his
current wife, Kathleen.
"I had $20,000 left and we
moved down to the Jersey
shore," he said. "We had a
great apartment on the
beach and lived some of the
happiest days of my life for
the next 10 years."

The fun stopped when the
money ran out and so did
his disability checks.
"Overnight my lifestyle
changed from living the
high life to falling behind on
my rent and eventually get-
ting evicted," he said.
For the next few years he
and his wife slept in their
car or on friends' couches.
His in-laws lived in Citrus
County, so they came here
and moved in with them. It
was only going to be tempo-
rary, until they could find
jobs, save some money and
buy a trailer and live hap-
pily ever after.


said there's a difference, al-
though she can't put into
words what the difference
is.
"They both saved my life,"
she said. "You wouldn't
think there's a difference,
but there is."
The "zipper" scar goes be-
yond "saving her life," to
giving her life, or putting
more life into her life.
"Since the heart surgery,
life is much better; now I
can do things I couldn't do
before," she said. I have


"They've done a very
good job of getting this
project moving and may
get it finished before the
July completion date, but
we're just going to stick
with July right now," Ubi-
nas said.
Work on the three miles
of Phase 4 has already
started. "You will be seeing
land clearing along the
Phase 4 project and that is
from State Road 44 to the
Black Diamond service
road where Phase 3
ended," Ubinas said. "So
we are now going into
Phase 4."
The final end is in sight
Ubinas said she was told
by Ken Cheek, former
county engineer who is now
director of the water re-
sources department, "Two
years from now, there will
be no (road) construction
on that side of the county."
Chronicle reporter Chris
Van Ormer can be reached
at cvanormer@chronicle
online.com or 352-564-2916.


would be appropriate for
him to be in the negotia-
tions. Although he will at-
tend negotiations, he asked
to be excused from active
involvement.
The talks will take place
in private, but will be
recorded. Clifford and
Houston will find an appro-
priate day to start them. It
is expected the talks will
outline a scope of services
to be presented at the next
meeting for formal review.
The idea is for TBARTA to
start management services
in April, but depending on
discussions it could be held
over to May
U The next meeting at
5:15 p.m. Thursday, April 19,
at the Inverness Govern-
ment Center, 212 W Main
St., Inverness, will be a
workshop ranking the
roadways.


more strength, more stam-
ina. I can breathe deeply
I have less fear. I don't have
to be afraid that something
will put me into A-fib and
give me a heart attack or
stroke."
She said the cancer gave
her a deeper appreciation
for birthdays hers is Jan.
31. But her heart problem
gave her a deeper apprecia-
tion for everything.
Recently, she and Cotnoir
went on a cruise. She walked
up and down stairs and all


over the ship. She got tired,
but "normal" tired, not "my-
heart's-not-working" tired.
She didn't feel dizzy; she
didn't feel faint.
"That might not mean
much to most people, but I
was excited," she said. "I
know my scars aren't pretty,
but I am here..I always say,
God is good, and I am a
survivor."
Chronicle reporter Nancy
Kennedy can be reached at
nkennedy@ chronicle
online, corn or 352-564-2927.


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A2 SATURDAY, MARCH 17, 2012


LOCAL


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Dobrzynski had 12 surgeries on his leg that was crushed in
a motorcycle accident decades ago.


My whole philosophy on life is yin
and yang, good and bad, peaks
and valleys ... you've got to enjoy the
peaks and endure the valleys.
Don Dobrzynski
injured in a motorcycle accident in 1975.

But things haven't turned shorter than the other.
out exactly as he had "My whole philosophy on
planned. Right now he lives life is yin and yang, good
alone in a trailer in Her- and bad, peaks and valleys. I
nando while his wife stays believe you've got to enjoy
with her mother, closer to the peaks and endure the
her job. (She doesn't drive.) valleys, and I've had the
Until recently, Dobrzynski highest peaks and the low-
also didn't drive because he est valleys," he said. "I'm a
couldn't afford the registra- musician. I've written songs
tion fee or insurance. He and played guitar It allowed
didn't have a phone or TV me to record demos and
although now he does. shop them around. I got a
He recently started col- record contract and toured.
lecting disability again. He "I don't know what
teaches guitar lessons and would've happened if I had-
has an old Jeep truck that n't had the accident," he
he'll soon be able to drive, said. "It enabled me to see
"I've had my problems the best of life and the worst
with alcoholism and pain of life."
killer addiction," he said. Chronicle reporter Nancy
"I'm in constant pain, and Kennedy can be reached at
notjust my leg. It's my back, nkennedy@ chronicle
too, because one leg is online.comn or352-564-2927.







Page A3 SATURDAY, MARCH 17,2012



TATE&


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE




THAro TE Revelers can get free tows home


Citrus County
Audubon Society
meets March 21
Citrus County Audubon
Society will have its regular
meeting at 7 p.m. Wednes-
day, March 21, at Unity
Church of Citrus County.
The guest speaker will be
Dr. Ken Meyer, director of the
Avian Research and Conser-
vation Institute. He will pres-
ent his latest research on
swallow-tailed kites.
All CCAS events are open
to the public. For more infor-
mation, visit CitrusCounty
Audubon.com.
Lake Beverly Fishing
Tournament canceled
The Lake Beverly Fishing
Tournament scheduled for
Saturday, March 31, has
been canceled due to low
water levels. The tournament
will be rescheduled once the
water levels rise to a suffi-
cient height.
20/20 directors
convene March 19
The Citrus 20/20 Board of
Directors will meet at 5:30
p.m., Monday, March 19, in
room 117, Lecanto Govern-
ment Building, 3600 W. Sov-
ereign Path, Lecanto.
All directors are asked to at-
tend. Interested persons or or-
ganizations are invited to attend.
For more information about
Citrus 20/20 Inc., visit the
website at www.citrus2020
.org or call 352-344-5955.
Republican club
meets today
The North Suncoast Re-
publican Club will have its
monthly meeting at 9 a.m.
today at the Sugarmill Woods
Country Club, Homosassa. A
forum for the Republican can-
didates for Citrus County
Commission seats will be
held. For more information,
call Bill Connery, president, at
352-392-0811, Bruce Bryn,
director, at 352-503-7375 or
visit the website www.
nsrc-gop.com.
Democrat convention
applications available
Delegate applications are
now available for the Florida
Democratic State Convention
June 1 to 3 in Tampa. Forms
for delegates are due to the
Citrus County Democratic Ex-
ecutive Committee (CCDEC)
by April 27. The election cau-
cus will be May 5. Forms can
be obtained from any county
leader or by going online at
www.fladems.com.

Tallahassee
Tampa senator admits
disclosure violations
State Sen. Jim Norman ad-
mitted to financial disclosure
violations in a proposed
Florida Ethics Commission
stipulation.
The panel released the
stipulation on Friday and will
consider it at a meeting
March 30 in Tallahassee.
The Tampa Republican
signed the document ac-
knowledging he failed to
timely disclose a $500,000 gift
to his wife from a local busi-
nessman. Norman also ad-
mits he failed to disclose his
interests in an Arkansas home
and two boat purchases.
-From staff and wire reports

Correction

Due to a reporter's error,
an arrest report on Page A4
of Friday's edition needs to
be corrected. Nicholas Isa-
iah Austin, 41, of Crystal
River, was issued a notice-
to-appear citation on a
charge of possession of
marijuana (less than 20
grams). The charge is a
misdemeanor.
The Chronicle regrets the
error.
Readers can alert The
Citrus County Chronicle to


any errors in news articles by
mailing dmann@chronicle
online.com or by calling 352-
563-5660.


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff Writer
The Florida Highway Pa-
trol has put revelers on no-
tice about their driving
choices during St. Patrick's
Day weekend festivities -
they will be watching you.
But, the nation's largest
automobile club, AAA, and
Budweiser are offering
those planning to party a


tow home.
FHP is participating in a
national campaign called
Drive Sober or Get Pulled
Over, which kicked off last
weekend and is expected to
run through this weekend.
"The Florida Highway
Patrol continues to make
DUI (Driving Under the In-
fluence) enforcement a pri-
ority," FHP Director Col.
David Brierton said in a


* WHAT: Free tow home
during St. Patrick's Day
weekend.
CONTACT: 800-AAA-
HELP (4357).

press release. "We have a
zero tolerance for impaired
driving. Having a desig-
nated driver and planning
ahead will make your trip
safer"


Scofield and Charles Reed owned
it, then sold it to Carl Ogden and
Carey Smoak in 1954, housing
their building construction and
concrete products business.
Its longest use was as "Smoak
& White," the general contracting
business owned by Carey Smoak
and Jack White from 1968 to 1997.
The Channell brothers, Tim
and John, bought the building,
renting it to "Accents By Grace"
from 1999 to 2006, until the busi-
ness moved to Main Street. Still
owned by the Channells, for the
past five years the building has
been the home of The Ice Cream
Doctor, owned by Donna DeHart


According to the FHP,
there were nearly 18,000
alcohol-related crashes in
Florida in 2010. Of that num-
ber, nearly 800 died and
more than 12,000 suffered
injuries.
AAA and Budweiser have
also activated their Tow to
Go program to help im-
paired people get home
safely According to AAA,
more than 18,000 drunk


and Josh Richardson.
At Friday's plaque unveiling,
DeHart told the crowd, "When we
walked in here five years ago, we
did not know the history this
building had. As a grocery store it
fed the people of the community.
As a post office it gave you the
mail every day As a funeral home
it laid our loved ones to rest, and
as a construction office it built
homes and houses. Presently, it's
The Ice Cream Doctor, and we are
privileged and honored to be
here and be a part of this city."
Also in attendance was Jack
White, who said when he first
came to Inverness, Apopka was a


drivers have been kept off
the roadways since the pro-
gram began in 1998.
Tow to Go provides a free
ride and tow home from any
bar or restaurant by calling
1-800-AAA-HELP (4357).
These services are available
throughout the state.
Chronicle reporter A.B.
Sidibe can be reached at
352-564-2925 or asidibe@
chronicleonline. com.


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Jean DeHart and Chris Roush look at the plaque placed Friday on the historic 106 N. Pine Street building currently occupied by the Ice Cream
Doctor. The building was constructed in 1912 and has been the home to many business.





Home to history


Pine Street building gets plaque commemorating its past residents


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff Writer


INVERNESS
Street.


106 N. Pine


The two-story, red clay brick
building built in 1912 was the cen-
ter of attention Friday as Inverness
city officials and residents met for
the unveiling of an historic plaque
marking it as one of the city's re-
searched historic buildings.
Originally a grocery store
owned by Frank and George
Dickenson, it served as the In-
verness Post Office where Mary
"Mollie" Pridgen and later
Joseph Savary were postmasters.
In 1937, the building, at least
the first floor, reverted to a gro-
cery store owned by George and
Edna Richburg. The Richburgs
lived upstairs from the store from
1939 to 1942, and then it was the
Conrad-Morris Funeral Home
from 1942 to 1945.
In 1946, the building changed
hands again. This time 0. Frank


"rock dirt road with one stoplight
and the Valerie Theatre" and that
he didn't think there were as many
people living in the whole city as
there were at the plaque unveil-
ing.
"It's a pleasure to be a part of
this history," he said.
The city of Inverness began its
Historic Plaque Program in 1999
as a way to promote and preserve
the historic qualities of Inver-
ness, said Debbie Davis, Inver-
ness city clerk.
A brochure maps out a "Walk
Through History" tour of some of
the marked historic structures in
the downtown area.
"We have researched approxi-
mately 27 downtown buildings,
homes and churches," Davis said.
"This is our 14th plaque."
Each plaque costs between
$1,000 and $1,300, paid for by
local civic groups and organiza-
tions, building owners or the city.
Davis said Friday's plaque is
being paid for with city funds.


Unsolved MYSTERIES


Detectives: Murdered woman knew her killer


N ew Year's
Day in
1989 was
the last day of
Tina Shaukat's s-.
life. Shortly after
3 p.m., the 21- -.
year-old store
clerk was found
lying in a pool of
blood on the Lee Ale
floor of her place UNSC
of employment. MYST
She was discov-
ered by a cus-
tomer at the Texaco station
at 7033 N. Florida Ave. in
Holder, where she worked
as a clerk. Emergency re-
sponders at the scene found
Shaukat had suffered a sin-
gle gunshot wound to the
head. She was rushed to the
hospital but died a few


I
e,


hours later
Shaukat, who
was married but
estranged from
her husband at
the time of her
c.i death, lived at
5910 Highland
Park Drive in
Hernando.
xander The initial in-
'LVED vestigation re-
ERIES vealed that
though the inci-
dent appeared
to possibly have been a rob-
bery attempt, no money was
taken. A review of the regis-
ter tape revealed that nu-
merous transactions had
taken place in the store
within the 15 minutes prior
to the discovery of the vic-
tim, so it is very likely that


one or more of these cus-
tomers may have seen the
suspectss. Shaukat had
only worked at the store for
about two months and was
scheduled to close the store
that day at 8 p.m. During
her employment, she had
made reference to certain
individuals whom she
feared due to their unusual
behavior
Detectives now believe
based on the information
gathered that Tina's killers)
was known to her and as a
result may have traveled in
the same circle of friends, or
may have been familiar to
the other regular customers
of the store.
Detectives need your
help in solving the murder
of Tina Shaukat. Any piece


UNSOLVED MYSTERIES
OF CITRUS COUNTY
* VICTIM: Tina Anne Shaukat.
* AGE: 21.
* CAUSE OF DEATH: Homicide gunshot wound
* DESCRIPTION: White female, 5 feet 5 inches tall, 127
pounds, medium build, black hair.


of information, no matter
how insignificant, that you
can give may be the key to
solving this homicide.
Please contact CrimeStop-
pers of Citrus County by
calling 1-888-ANY-TIPS, tex-
ting the word CITRUS plus
your tip to 274637 or visiting
crimestopperscitrus.com.
You may be eligible to re-
ceive a cash reward and you
can remain anonymous.


The Unsolved Mysteries
column will appear weekly
on Saturday highlighting a
cold case, unsolved bur-
glary or crime. The column
is submitted by the Citrus
County Sheriff's Office.
Retired Detective Lee
Alexander is a volunteer
with the CCSO Cold Case
Unit.


When we walked in here five years
ago we did not know the history this
building had.
Donna DeHart
one of the owners of The Ice Cream Doctor.






A4 SATURDAY, MARCH 17, 2012


Fishermen to rally in DC as industry struggles


Florida among

states to be

represented

Associated Press

BOSTON Fishermen
from California to New Eng-
land plan to rally for their
struggling industry in Wash-
ington next week with an
election year message for
Congress: Helping the fish-
ing industry will save jobs.
Organizers expect a ros-
ter of lawmakers to speak
before about 5,000 commer-
cial and recreational fish-
ermen in a park next to the
U.S. Capitol on Wednesday
The crowd is expected to
include fishermen from all
the Atlantic coast states
plus Alaska and California.
They represent diverse
interests who chase a mix of
species and haven't always
agreed. But Jim Donofrio,
head of the Recreational
Fishing Alliance, a rally or-
ganizer, says they share
concerns that federal regu-
lators are using flawed sci-
ence to make cutbacks that
are killing fishing jobs
around the country
In an election year when
jobs are a dominant issue,
Donofrio said he hopes the
rally's calls reach new cor-
ners on Capitol Hill and
prompt action on legisla-
tion fishermen believe can
help.
"This election is being
defined by jobs right now,
and this is a jobs issue,"
Donofrio said.
Sam Rauch, head of the
National Oceanic and At-
mospheric Administration
fisheries arm, agreed fish-


.- ... . .
--
--_ .
.. . -.-- _.- .. = _
-7. ~ --...

.- . 4 -- -.. . _-


Associated Press
Chris Melohusky fishes for steelhead Tuesday in Buffalo Creek during the warm winter
weather in Elma, N.Y. Fishermen from California to New England plan to rally for their
struggling industry in Washington next week.


ing jobs are a key concern.
But he said the recent num-
bers on fishing jobs show
progress. According to the
most recent statistics, the
number of fishing-related
jobs in the U.S. went from 1
million to 1.2 million be-
tween 2009 and 2010.
But Rauch said he knows
the growth hasn't been felt
everywhere. In New Eng-
land, for instance, fisher-
men are facing a possible
fishery collapse in 2013 be-
cause of the too-slow recov-
ery of cod in the Gulf of
Maine.
Rauch added he wel-
comes whatever views are
shared at the rally
"It's good to have a con-
stituency that cares so
much about the future of
fishing in this country," he
said.
The Recreational Fishing
Alliance helped host a sim-


ilar event in Washington
two years ago, which
Donofrio said increased the
visibility of key legislation
that can really help fisher-
men. This time, he said, he
hopes lawmakers can be
spurred to finally act on it.
He pointed to a bill by
U.S. Rep. Frank Pallone, D-
N.J., that's introduced regu-
larly but never goes
anywhere. The bill would
ease fish catch cutbacks by
giving fishermen more time
to rebuild struggling
species.
Jim Hutchinson, manag-
ing director of the Recre-
ational Fishing Alliance,
said it also contains under-
appreciated reforms, such
as allowing the U.S. Com-
merce secretary to suspend
tough catch limits on vari-
ous species, if the science
doesn't justify those limits.
Fishermen repeatedly


complain that wildly shift-
ing estimates of the health
of fish populations invari-
ably lead to huge cuts and
lost jobs. They say Gulf of
Maine cod, thought to be ro-
bust just four years ago, is
just the latest example.
"The arrogance becomes
astounding," said Tina
Brown, of the American Al-


liance of Fishermen and
their Communities.
"If this rally says anything,
it's to tell NOAA we're not
asking you to be accountable
anymore ... we're demand-
ing it," said Brown, who's or-
ganizing a busload of
fishermen from New Eng-
land to travel to Washington.
Donofrio said Massachu-
setts U.S. Sens. John Kerry,
a Democrat, and Scott
Brown, a Republican, and
New York Sen. Charles
Schumer, a Democrat, are
among a list of politicians
expected to speak, and
Speaker of the House John
Boehner has been invited.
Bob Jones, of the Florida-
based Southeastern Fish-
eries Association, which is
sending about 100 people to
the rally, said resistance
from groups such as the En-
vironmental Defense Fund
always makes it tough to
move stalled fisheries legis-
lation. But he thinks the
rally can help.
"If I wasn't an optimist, I
wouldn't stay in this busi-
ness," he said.
Johanna Thomas, of the
Environmental Defense
Fund, said better fisheries
science is needed but huge
changes in the law aren't.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


For the RECORD

Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Burglary
A vehicle burglary occurred
at about 7:51 p.m. March 15 in
the 1400 block of U.S. 41 North,
Inverness.
Theft
A grand theft occurred at
about 11:35 p.m. March 15 in the
900 block of W. Abner Place,
Dunnellon.
Vandalism
A vandalism occurred at
about 8:17 a.m. March 15 in the
60 block of S. Harrison Street,
Beverly Hills.


ON THE NET
For more information
about arrests made by
the Citrus County Sher-
iff's Office, go to
www.sheriffcitrus.org
and click on the Public
Information link, then
on Arrest Reports.
Also under Public Infor-
mation on the CCSO
website, click on Crime
Mapping for a view of
where each type of
crime occurs in Citrus
County. Click on
Offense Reports to see
lists of burglary, theft
and vandalism.


notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle





Surplus Property

S..................................... ..... C 13


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
HI LO PR HI LO PR I HI LO PR
88 56 NA 87 63 NA ,L- 84 55 NA


CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
SUNSET TONIGHT
SUNRISE TOMORROW
0 CO0 (1 MOONRISE TODAY.
MARC 22 MARCH30 APRI APRIL13 MOONSET TODAY ..


7:40

.4:17,
3:23


BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/f re_weather/kbdi
WATERING RULES


PM.
. 1
A.M.
PM.


. iII n I.IliI1 'l I- l'l,'- i l .-.. '- l- '- ,fI ') or 1: M o nday:
i.j I I T . 11 1.1 . i n i : addresses
.i- -1, :- i.-. ., i ,, of plants other
,- .- 11. ** ..-. . i, or after 6 p,m.
New lawns may be watered any day during the first 30 days. During days 31-60, they may be
T r... ..; ,j -., .; ... ,,,j ,r -,_ i ..... ri i ... .. Fre day,
and Sunday Fountains and other aesthetic water features may only operate four hours
per day Tr. ,,.... ..i 1~,. iin can be selected by the owner, but must be posted
(see ist .- -.- ii1, .. :,. --r features that also provide aerification to koi ponds at
WaterMatters.orgi).
Car washing is limited to once per week on the designated watering day for the location.
Pressure washing is allowed for necessary purposes such as prior to painting or sealing, in
order to maintain a paint or material warranty, to address a health or safety hazard and to
comply with health laws. Questions, concerns or reporting violations. call 352-527-7669.


TIDES
*From mouths of rivers *At King's Bay
Saturday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka' 1:31 a/11:10 a 4:12 p/10:56 p
Crystal River 2:33 p/8:32 a -- /8:18 p
Withlacoochee* 12:20 p/6:20 a 11:09 p/6:06 p
Homosassa'* 12:41 a/10:09 a 3:22 p/9:55 p


*"At Masons Creek
Sunday
High/Low High/Low
3:01 a/12:08 p 4:51 p/--
1:22 a/9:30 a 3.12 p/9:26 p
12:59 p/7:18 a -- 7:14 p
2:11 a/11:07 a 4:01 p/11:03 p


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
(C JIll>": '.I I ':'
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
pc
pc
pc


ts
pc
pc
pc


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
pc
pc
pc


ts
pc
pc


MARINE OUTLOOK


HI LO PR HI LO PR
85 58 NA 87 58 NA

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Exausive aly
forecast by:


TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 83 Low: 55
_ Brief -mirriinii fog, then sunny and
W warm.
................... SUNDAY & MONDAY MORNING
High: 82 Low: 54
Sunny and warm during the day, clear and cool
at night.
MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 81 Low: 56
More dry weather with plenty of daytime sunshir


ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Friday 88/55
Record 92/35
Normal 78/49
Mean temp. 72
Departure from mean +8
PRECIPITATION*
Friday 0.00 in.
Total for the month 0.56 in.
Total for the year 3.79 in.
Normal for the year 8.18 in.
'As ot 6 p.m at Inverness
UV INDEX: 8
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Friday at 3 p m. 30.06 in.


Si'1."i- : to southwest winds from 5
to 10 knots. Seas 1 to 2 feet. Bay and
inland waters will have a light chop.
Slight chance of -riunceri.l i'rii today.


Gulf water
temperature


82
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Thu. Fri. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 27.39 27.36 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 33.77 33.74 39.25
Tsala Apopka-Inverness 35.64 35.62 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 37.60 37.59 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year Hlood. the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision- in no event
will the Distric of the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If yo have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (3b2) 796-7211

THE NATION


ne.


DEW POINT
Friday at 3 p.m. 59
HUMIDITY
Friday at 3 p.m. 56%
POLLEN COUNT**
Grasses and weeds were absent and
Today's active pollen:
Oak, juniper, nettle
Today's count: 10.2/12
Sunday's count: 10.8
Monday's count: 11.0
Friday was good with pollutants
mainly ozone.


50s


B '


fg,
, ,Bii.. '


..- -
70- *
. .. -


70s
' ,,..


-log 205 '"
30S
/-
&I=h'E* ,.'"
.os a
is.


Friday Saturday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
Albany 49 43 12 s 65 46
Albuquerque 74 40 s 73 41
Asheville 76 50 19 Is 76 54
Atlanta 82 59 trace is 82 58
Atlantic City 59 48 s 53 46
Austin 80 68 c 80 67
Baltimore 63 50 s 69 48
Billings 69 44 c 68 44
Birmingham 84 58 pc 83 58
Boise 58 44 10 sh 48 32
Boston 45 37 .05 s 49 39
Buffalo 64 51 06 pc 68 50
Burlington. VT 48 43 .10 s 64 48
Charleston. SC 81 56 ts 79 59
Charleston. WV 71 51 03 Is 80 56
Charlotte 82 54 ts 80 61
Chicago 81 46 pc 79 58
Cincinnati 69 55 pc 77 60
Cleveland 71 56 30 s 71 54
Columbia, SC 86 60 ts 83 59
Columbus, OH 72 57 .14 pc 77 59
Concord, N.H. 41 34 12 s 60 37
Dallas 79 67 c 79 68
Denver 74 41 s 80 48
Des Moines 83 58 pc 78 60
Detroit 72 55 pc 72 54
El Paso 82 42 s 84 59
Evansville. IN 71 59 pc 81 59
Harrisburg 65 48 s 69 49
Hartford 49 41 02 s 63 39
Houston 81 65 pc 82 70
Indianapolis 77 54 pc 81 60
Jackson 83 58 pc 84 60
Las Vegas 75 62 r 72 51
Little Rock 80 64 pc 80 62
Los Angeles 59 54 r 60 46
Louisville 68 56 40 pc 82 60
Memphis 76 63 1 41 pc 82 64
Milwaukee 55 45 pc 63 50
Minneapolis 79 42 pc 78 60
Mobile 83 55 pc 82 61
Montgomery 85 58 pc 84 59
Nashville 73 55 26 pc 81 59
KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
2012 Weather Central, Madison, WI.


,,, .....
K, - V ', -



ouStfln iki-l

gos

FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SATURDAY


Friday Saturday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
New Orleans 83 65 pc 79 64
New York City 50 43 03 s 61 46
Norfolk 81 60 .04 pc 68 53
Oklahoma City 75 60 w 75 60
Omaha 80 52 pc 79 60
Palm Springs 85 56 r 65 50
Philadelphia 59 46 s 66 49
Phoenix 84 56 pc 82 55
Pittsburgh 70 55 .04 pc 76 54
Portland. ME 40 34 25 s 52 40
Portland. Ore 54 42 sh 48 38
Providence, R.I 43 35 s 59 39
Raleigh 79 58 ts 78 57
Rapid City 79 39 s 75 47
Reno 53 48 rs 42 26
Rochester, NY 66 53 04 s 72 52
Sacramento 58 54 32 sh 56 39
St Louis 77 58 22 ts 81 63
St. Ste. Marie 60 30 pc 58 50
Salt Lake City 66 55 ts 65 40
San Antonio 79 68 c 81 67
San Diego 61 55 r 59 52
San Francisco 57 55 14 sh 54 42
Savannah 84 57 ts 79 57
Seattle 48 39 28 sh 47 36
Spokane 47 34 13 rs 47 30
Syracuse 61 45 31 s 69 49
Topeka 80 60 c 80 61
Washington 59 51 .02 pc 73 50
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 89 Laredo, Texas LOW 14 Alamosa.
Colo,
WORLD CITIES


SATURDAY
CITY HIL/SKY
Acapulco 88/73/pc
Amsterdam 53/46/sh
Athens 61/47/s
Beijing 55/29/pc
Berlin 64/43/s
Bermuda 70/62/s
Cairo 64/46/s
Calgary 49/27/sh
Havana 82/61/sh
Hong Kong 75/67/pc
Jerusalem 50/34/s


Lisbon
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Paris
Rio
Rome
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Warsaw


59/50/c
48/36/sh
64/39/c
75/48/sh
60/43/pc
37/34/c
59/41/sh
83/69/ts
69/51/pc
71/64/sh
55/48/sh
66/48/pc
61/38/s


C I T R U S


C 0 U N TY


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
3/17 SATURDAY 2:22 8:34 2:47 9:00
3/18 SUNDAY 3:07 9:19 3:31 9:43


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S Courthouse office
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0 C 106 W. Main
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s-





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Spain: Hand over treasure


Associated Press
TAMPA A federal
judge was considering Fri-
day whether to force
Florida deep-sea explorers
to hand over to Spain the
last of the treasure they re-
covered from a 200-year-old
shipwreck.
Last month, Spanish mil-
itary planes flew home with
nearly 600,000 silver coins
and other artifacts after
prevailing in a five-year
legal battle over ownership
with Tampa-based Odyssey
Marine Exploration. Now,
Spain wants the rest of it -
specifically some artifacts
that Odyssey left behind in
Gibraltar when it flew the
coins to the United States
in May 2007.
The artifacts include at
least 100 silver coins, per-
sonal effects of sailors and
ship equipment, said James
Goold, a Washington attor-
ney who represents the
Spanish government.
In a federal court filing,
Spain has asked that
Odyssey be forced to hand
over the remainder of the
booty from the frigate
Nuestra Senora de Las
Mercedes, which was sunk
by British warships in 1804.
During a two-hour long
hearing in federal court
Friday morning, Goold
asked U.S. Magistrate
Judge James Pizzo to order
Odyssey to turn the treas-
ure in Gibraltar over to


Spain and for Odyssey to
pay for Spain's fees and
court costs over the issue.
The judge did not indicate
when he might rule on the
matter.
Goold also questioned
some alleged discrepancies
in the documented inven-
tory of what is in a storage
crate in Gibraltar. He said
the judge could hold
Odyssey in contempt of
court.
"Gibraltar has been used
to hide critical evidence in
this case," Goold said. "We
need to figure out what's
what."
But Odyssey's lawyer said
the explorers haven't been
hiding anything. Melinda
MacConnel said Odyssey
has not been able to prop-
erly inventory the storage
crate for years, in part be-
cause Spain intervened in
the case. MacConnel said
all of the treasure from
Nuesta Senora de Las Mer-
cedes was brought to
Gibraltar, and the bulk of it
then was sent to Florida -
all except the crate in ques-
tion, which contains the
coins and other miscella-
neous items.
Complicating matters,
MacConnel said, is that
people claiming to be the
descendants of the owners
of the silver aboard the ship
have sued in a court in
Gibraltar, saying they have
a right to the treasure.
Gibraltar officials are not


Associated Press
In this undated photo made available by Spain's Culture Ministry, a member of the Ministry technical crew displays some
of the 594,000 coins and other artifacts found in the Nuestra Senora de las Mercedes, a Spanish galleon sunk by British
warships in the Atlantic while sailing back from South America in 1804, in a warehouse in Tampa, Fla. A 17-ton trove of
silver coins recovered from the Spanish galleon was set to be flown Friday Feb. 24, 2012 from the United States to Spain,
concluding a nearly five-year legal struggle with Odyssey Marine Exploration, the Florida deep-sea explorers who found and
recovered it.


allowing the treasure to be Connel said. "Odyssey fully
moved, intends to comply."
"Nothing has been hid- During an earlier ruling,
den in this case," Mac- Pizzo ordered Odyssey to


turn over all the artifacts to dered whether Spain could
Spain, regardless of the negotiate directly with
items' location. Gibraltar over access to the
On Friday, Pizzo won- items.


Family of slain teen to Counties send
N-w '1 I I


hear 911 recordings


take over the investigation,
saying they no longer
trusted the local police de-
partment. The shooter's fa-
ther is defending his son,
saying he is not a racist and
did not provoke the alterca-
tion that led to the shooting.
Zimmerman's father de-
livered a letter to the Or-
lando Sentinel on Thursday
saying the way his son is
being depicted in the media
is cruel and misleading. He
also says his son has re-
ceived death threats and
moved out of his home.
George Zimmerman is His-
panic and grew up in a mul-
tiracial family, the
statement says.
"He would be the last to
discriminate for any reason
whatsoever ...," the letter
says. "The media portrayal
of George as a racist could
not be further from the
truth."
Sanford police Sgt. David
Morgenstern said the de-
partment stands by its in-
vestigation but welcomes
help from any outside
agency. FBI agent David
Couvertier said the agency
has been in contact with
Sanford police and is moni-
toring the case.
Several residents who
spoke to The Associated
Press Friday said they think
there would have been an
arrest already if the shooter
had been black and the de-
ceased had been white.
They said blacks and whites
in this city of 53,000 resi-
dents were pretty much in
agreement that an injustice
had been done with no one
arrested, and that there was


no racial divide in how the
case is being perceived. The
city is 57 percent white and
30 percent black. It has a
median household income
of almost $42,000.
"To me, I don't think it's
even a race issue, other than
for the people involved,"
Ladonna Williams, 38, who
is black, said as she shopped
at the Seminole Towne Cen-
ter shopping mall, more
than a mile where the shoot-
ing took place. "It's just
about ... to be able to take
somebody's life in 2012 and
not even go to jail for it, that
is just sad. No matter, for
any color. Not just black or
white. Any color."
Shopper Joanne Johnson
said she thought Sanford
police just wanted the mat-
ter to drop, saying it's a blot
on a community that has un-
dergone a renaissance in
the past decade. New art
galleries, antique shops,
bistros and cafes have
opened up in downtown
Sanford in recent years, giv-
ing vitality to a community
that often has been over-
shadowed by nearby Or-
lando.
"I think they want to make
it go away," said Johnson,
who is white. "It makes the
community look bad."
The shooting took place
about two miles from the
downtown restaurants and
galleries in a gated commu-
nity of townhomes nestled


Associated Press

SANFORD The family
of a black teenager fatally
shot by a white neighbor-
hood watch volunteer ar-
rived at Sanford City Hall
Friday evening to listen to
recordings of 911 calls po-
lice previously refused to
release.
Police agreed to release
the recordings earlier that
afternoon. Officials are al-
lowing the family of 17-year-
old Trayvon Martin to hear
the recordings before mak-
ing them public. Martin's
parents previously sued to
have the recordings re-
leased. A hearing for the case
was scheduled for Monday.
Martin was fatally shot
last month as he returned to
a Sanford home during a
visit from Miami. His par-
ents, Tracy Martin and Syb-
rina Fulton, accused
Sanford police of botching
the investigation and criti-
cized them for not arresting
28-year-old George Zimmer-
man, who says he shot
Trayvon Martin in self-de-
fense. Martin was not
armed. They say the police
department hasn't arrested
Zimmerman because he is
white and their son was
black.
"Do we really believe that
if Trayvon Martin would
have pulled the trigger, he
would not be arrested?" said
Benjamin Crump, their at-
torney "This is obviously a
cover-up, and we need a
sweeping overhaul of the
Sanford Police Department"
Earlier Friday, Martin's
parents called on the FBI to



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behind an elementary
school and a city park. A
white cross covered in flow-
ers was at the gate's en-
trance.
"I think most people here
are in agreement about it,
that there's a large possibil-
ity that it's a racist act," said
Sam Boylston, 19, who is
white and a salesman at
Tuned Up Music Center in
downtown. "You would
hope something like this
would bring people together
to seek justice."
No one disputes that Zim-
merman shot Martin on the
night of Feb. 26. Martin, who
was visiting from Miami,
was walking back to the
home of his father's fiancee
after going to the store to
buy candy for his little
brother and an iced tea for
himself. It was raining, and
Martin was walking with the
hood of his jacket pulled
over his head.
Zimmerman called 911
from his sport utility vehi-
cle, saying he had spotted a
suspicious person walking
in the multiracial neighbor-
hood. Officials said the dis-
patcher told him to stay in
his SUV and an officer
would be there momentar-
ily Zimmerman, for un-
known reasons, got out. He
and Martin fought, accord-
ing to witnesses. At some
point Zimmerman pulled a
gun and shot Martin, who
died at the scene.


Rick Scott



video letter



urging veto


Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE The
Florida Association of
Counties calls it a "video-let-
ter," but it looks and sounds
more like a campaign ad.
The 60-second message
urges Gov. Rick Scott to
veto a bill that would re-
quire counties to pay more
into the Medicaid system,
including about $300 mil-
lion in disputed past-due
payments the video blames
on state accounting errors.
Scott spokesman Lane
Wright said on Friday that
the governor hasn't yet
made a decision on the bill.
Wright was unsure whether
Scott, who was traveling Friday,
had seen the video letter, ap-
parently the first of its kind sent
to him.
The video, also posted on
the association's website,
opens by showing a couple
standing beside a foreclo-
sure sign in front of their
home and closes with the
word "VETO" in large cap-
ital letters.
A female announcer omi-
nously says the bill would
increase local taxes hun-
dreds of millions of dollars


by making counties pay for
mistakes by the state's elec-
tronic Medicaid billing sys-
tem. They include sending
the same bill 15 times and
charging for an out-of-state
patient, she says.
"It's politics as usual in
Tallahassee," the an-
nouncer states. "Veto the
politics."
Counties are required to
pay a share of the costs for
their residents who receive
health care through the
state-federal program that
covers low-income and dis-
abled patients.
Besides the video, the as-
sociation sent Scott a writ-
ten letter Thursday It says
the measure would bill
counties an extra $77 mil-
lion in the next budget year
as a result of the billing
errors.
"Without your veto, we
fear HB 5301 will serve little
more than a backdoor tax
hike on Florida taxpayers -
passing the costs of a grossly
inefficient billing system
onto Floridians in the form
of a newly unfunded man-
date," wrote Christopher
Holley, the association's ex-
ecutive director


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STATE


SATURDAY, MARCH 17, 2012 A5





CITRUS COUNT' (FL) CHRONICLE


Dognapped canine returns home


Stolen Fla. dog

recovered in Md.

after strange trip

LISA BROADT
Cecil Whig

CHESAPEAKE CITY, Md. Walk-
ing past the rows of forgotten animals
at the Cecil County SPCA, Debby
Stevens had a sickening thought:
What if, after weeks of worry and
more than a thousand miles of travel,
the dog being housed here was not, in
fact, her Brody?
Inside the indicated cage, a black
Labrador lay prostrate on the con-
crete floor.
"Brody?" Stevens asked.
The dog leapt up; Stevens began to
cry
"There was no doubt about it," re-
called the SPCA staff member who
took Stevens through the kennel.
"That dog just came alive."
Two weeks earlier, Debby Stevens
awoke in her Ponte Vedra Beach,
Fla., home and found that Brody, her
family's 9-year-old lab, had not re-
turned home. She knew something
was wrong.
Friendly and playful with big brown
eyes that expected nothing but hoped
for everything, Brody was a key mem-
ber of the Stevens family Every so
often the lab would nuzzle through the
screened-in porch and spend the af-
ternoon exploring, but he always re-
turned home by nightfall, Stevens said.
Except this time.
Sean Stevens, Debby's 25-year-old
son, plastered the neighborhood with
"Missing" flyers that afternoon, and
the family waited and hoped.
"We heard nothing at all on Thurs-
day," Stevens recalled. "But on Friday
a woman called. She said: 'I know
where your lab is."'
The anonymous caller reported
that a family relative had recently vis-
ited Florida with her three little boys.
While playing outside, the kids had
befriended the outgoing Brody When
the children asked their mother if
they could keep the dog, she agreed
they could. They loaded Brody in the
car and headed back to New York, the
caller said.
Stevens was shocked, but as the
caller continued, the story grew even
stranger.
While driving through Cecil County,
the woman was pulled over by police
and arrested for driving under the in-
fluence, the caller said. Her three
human passengers were sent to foster
care homes for the night, and the
Labrador traveling with her was sent
to the local pound.
The next morning, according to the
caller, the woman was released from
jail. The sequence of events following
her release were not exactly clear, but
at 12:35 a.m., the 37-year-old mother
was struck and killed by an Amtrak
train in Havre de Grace.
Stevens might want to try calling
some of the local animal shelters, the
caller suggested before hanging up.


Associated Press
Brody, a 9-year old black lab, was recovered recently at the Cecil County, Md.,
SPCA after he was dognapped from a neighborhood in Ponte Verde Beach, Fla.
Police had recovered the dog and brought it to the shelter.


"I was so grateful for her call, but I
just thought: Oh, my God. This is the
craziest thing how does this hap-
pen?" Stevens said. "How did they
even get so far in a day and a half?"
Sean and his younger brothers,
Trevor, 23, and Colin, 20, began call-
ing Maryland animal shelters. They
called 15 or 16 before getting a lead at
the Cecil County SPCA where a staff
member confirmed that a dog match-
ing Brody's description had been
brought in recently by police. The
family was thrilled.
Stevens, a special education
teacher, worried that she would not
have time to go up to Maryland to re-
trieve Brody But, on the suggestion of
a friend, she contacted a New Eng-
land animal rescue group, which in
turn, put her in touch with Martha's
Mutt Movers.
Martha Chandler, the director of
the group, coordinates the Mutt
Movers to help transport dogs from
shelters to rescues.
"I guess you could compare me to a
dispatcher at Roadway," Chandler ex-
plained. "People contact me ... and I
put together a run and send it out to
volunteer drivers along the route.
"I normally move dogs for rescues
that are pulling from shelters or
pounds in the areas where overpopu-
lation is great and euthanasia rates
are high."
While Brody's case was different
from most that Chandler handles, the
lab's story an elderly dog kid-
napped from his owners stuck a
chord with her. So she agreed to take
him on.
Stevens called the Cecil County
SPCA on Monday to tell them that
someone from Chandler's group
would be by soon to retrieve Brody
Not possible, the folks at the SPCA
told her. Stevens herself must posi-
tively identify and pick up Brody;
they could not release the dog to any-
one but the owner.
Although Team Brody understood
the SPCAs decision, they were un-
sure of their next move.


"Brody had enough going on if he
was truly Brody that he didn't need
to be pulled by someone that wasn't
truly his family," Chandler later said.
"The whole next week we were try-
ing to decide what to do. Finally, I de-
cided to fly up there," Stevens said.
She arrived in Philadelphia on
March 9 and was picked up by Mari-
anne Perry, a North East resident and
a volunteer with the Mutt Movers.
Perry took Stevens to the SPCA where
she made the positive identification,
and the group then headed back to
Perry's home.
Brody was, by all appearances, one
happy dog, Perry recalled.
"His huge tail waved the whole
ride, and I think it wagged all the time
he was at our house," she said with a
laugh.
The next morning, Stevens flew
back to Jacksonville while Brody, be-
cause of his advanced age, was trans-
ported home by the Mutt Movers who
had received his itinerary and de-
scription via email.
"Passenger: Brody; Age: 9 years
(they have had him since he was 3
years old!)," the email described him.
"Size/weight: 95 pounds (they clearly
love him!); General temperament:
Very sweet, loving, mellow and
friendly loves everyone and every-
thing; Reason for transport: Being re-
united with family after being
dognapped."
Perry took the lab as far as
Bethesda. He was then picked up by
another volunteer and relayed down
the East Coast by a total of 10 differ-
ent Mutt Movers.
At 9:30 p.m. on March 10, after a
two-and-a-half week adventure,
Brody arrived in Jacksonville and
was reunited with his family
"It was a stressful couple of weeks
- it felt like one of our family mem-
bers disappeared," Stevens said. "But
I have to give so much credit to
Martha's Mutt Movers, to strangers
who just volunteer to transport ani-
mals. Brody really is the luckiest -
the wonder dog."


State BRIEFS


Couple accused of
locking boy in cage
TITUSVILLE Police say a
Titusville couple charged with
child abuse kept an emaciated
13-year-old boy locked in a
cage.
Brevard County Jail records
show 38-year-old Michael Mar-
shal and 48-year-old Sharon
Glass were charged Thursday
with three counts of aggra-
vated child abuse. Both are
being held without bond pend-
ing a first appearance Friday
afternoon. It is not immediately
known if they have an attorney.
Officers searched the home
after a report about a child
being abused. Police said the
couple locked the boy in a
closet as punishment. They
also strapped him to a bed for
long periods of time.
The boy, who weighed just
40 pounds, was treated at a
hospital for malnutrition and
dehydration.
Child welfare officials are in-
vestigating. Other children at
the home have since been re-
moved.
Bear bites woman
as she walks dog
LONGWOOD Wildlife offi-
cials are investigating a report
of a woman bitten by a bear as
she walked her dog "in the
middle of bear world."
Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission
spokeswoman Joy Hill said the
woman was bitten Friday
morning in Seminole County.
The area is close to the
Wekiva River, which Hill said is
right on the edge of a state for-
est that was once bear habitat.
The 57-year-old woman was
walking her dog near a trash
bin when she was bitten in the
buttocks. Hill said the victim is
"going to be fine."


An investigator was on the
scene. No further information
has been released.
Deputy foils plan
to steal iPads
ORLANDO -A plot to rob a
shipment of Apple's newest
iPad from a central Florida
store was foiled by an Orange
County Sheriff's deputy.
The sheriff's office said 24-
year-old Jasmin Roman and
26-year-old Juan Carlos Ortiz
Valez bought guns, handcuffs,
black clothes and other items
to rob the Best Buy store near
Orlando's Florida Mall early
Thursday.
The Orlando Sentinel re-
ported the plot was foiled by a
deputy patrolling the area in an
unmarked vehicle. The deputy
became suspicious after spot-
ting a U-Haul. The couple
eventually told arriving
deputies of their plan.
Roman, a Best Buy em-
ployee, was arrested on
charges of conspiracy to com-
mit robbery and conspiracy to
commit kidnapping with a gun.
Valez, a former store em-
ployee, was arrested on a
count of conspiracy to commit
kidnapping with a gun.
Citrus farmers turn
to peach trees
BARTOW Move over,
Georgia: Florida's getting into
the peach farming business.
According to The Ledger,
the uncertainty caused by cit-
rus diseases and freezes is
causing some to turn to peach
farming.
The University of Florida is
now producing peach varieties
that can grow in Florida's sub-
tropical climate.
Growing peaches is usually
associated with Georgia,
where there are 12,000 acres


of trees. In the 1980s, Florida
had about 5,000 planted acres
of peach trees but a devastat-
ing freeze caused a drastic
drop to about 500 acres by the
end of that decade.
Today, there are more than
1,000 planted acres of peach
trees, mostly in central and
south-central Florida.
Shark bites man
off Jensen Beach
JENSEN BEACH -A man
was bitten in the arm by a
shark off Jensen Beach amid
several reports of sharks in the
water.
Martin County officials said a
bull shark bit the man multiple
times in the arm Thursday af-
ternoon. His injuries were not
life-threatening.
Lifeguards had called swim-
mers and surfers out of the
water at Jensen Public Beach
Thursday twice after
sharks were spotted in the
area. Beachgoers waited about
half an hour before returning to
the water.
Sharks have already been
spotted in other parts of Florida
this beach season. In Volusia
County, a teenage boy and a
young girl suffered bites within
five minutes of each other
Wednesday afternoon. In Bre-
vard County, a man was bitten
on the Canaveral National
Seashore earlier this month.

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MATT COOK
Service: Sat. 11:00 AM
JIM HOPKINS
Service: Sat. 3:00 PM Chapel
LAWRENCE GIANSANTI
Visitation: Sun. 12:00 2:00 PM
JOESPH MAROUSEK
Private Cremation Arrangements
CAROLYN GRAY
Service: Mon. 2:00 PM
Rutland Baptist Church
JACALENE BIRMINGHAM
Pending Arrangements
726-8323 000AQKR


Hazing panel wants
to meet in private
TALLAHASSEE -A panel
of experts brought together by
Florida A&M University to bat-
tle hazing said it can't do its job
in public.
FAMU created an anti-haz-
ing committee in the wake of
the November death of drum
major Robert Champion. The
committee includes a roster of
experts, including a band direc-
tor, a former federal prosecutor
and others who have studied
hazing in the United States.
During their inaugural meet-
ing, committee members
agreed to ask FAMU officials to
change the mission of the
committee in order to bypass
Florida's open meetings and
public records law.
The committee also an-
nounced that it would not in-
vestigate past incidents of
hazing at FAMU. Instead the
group plans to gather informa-
tion about hazing and how
other schools around the coun-
try have dealt with it.
-From wire reports





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Burial
Cremation
Pre-Planning
Funeral Directors
C. Lyman Strickland & Tom L Pace
1901 SE HwY. 19
CRYSTAL RIVER
352-795-2678
www.stricklandfuneralhome.com


David
Humphries Sr.
CITRUS SPRINGS
David Scott Humphries
Sr, of Citrus Springs, died
Feb. 19, 2012.
Services to be held in the
spring. Arrangements by
Dolby & Dorr Funeral
Chapel, Gorham, Maine.

Dr. Godofredo
'Fred'
Maldia, 83
HERNANDO
Godofredo "Fred" Maldia,
M.D., 83, of Hernando, FL,
died on March 15, 2012, at
Woodland Terrace in Her-
nando, FL.
God-
ofredo was
born on De-
d member 6,
1928, in
Santo
Tomas,
Batangas,
Godofredo Philippines,
Maldia the son of
Eustaqio and Aurora Mal-
dia. He received his Doctor-
ate in Medicine from the
University of Santo Tomas,
Manila, Philippines. He
served his residency at Mt.
Sinai in Milwaukee, WI,
Philadelphia General Hos-
pital in Philadelphia, PA,
and Roswell Park Memorial
Institute in Buffalo, NY He
completed a Research Fel-
lowship while at Roswell
Park Memorial Institute. He
had a private practice in
Manila, Philippines, for 2
years before moving his
practice to Fort Wayne, IN,
where he specialized in In-
ternal Medicine and Oncol-
ogy for 29 years. He retired
in 1995 to Glenn Lakes in
Weeki Wachee, FL, before
moving to Terra Vista in
2007.
Survivors include his
wife, Barbara Maldia;
daughter, Dawn Marie Mal-
dia Madsen; sons, Robert
Wayne Maldia, Mark Steven
Maldia, M.D., and Matthew
Jason Maldia; grandchil-
dren, Philip, Samuel,
Catherine, Isabella, Fred-
eric, Lillian and William.
A Mass of Christian Burial
for Dr. Maldia will be held
on Saturday, March 17,2012,
at 10 a.m. at Our Lady of
Grace Catholic Church in
Beverly Hills. Father
Avelino Garcia will preside.
In lieu of flowers, donations
may be given to Hospice of
Citrus County PO. Box
641270 Beverly Hills, FL
34464.
Heinz Funeral Home &
Cremation, Inverness, FL.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. com.

Serena
McCammon, 77
Serena C. McCammon, 77,
died Thursday, March 15,
2012, at Seven Rivers Re-
gional Medical Center in
Crystal River.
Heinz Funeral Home &
Cremation, Inverness, FL.





Frank
Wilkinson, 77
FLORAL CITY
Frank Currie Wilkinson,
77, Floral City and Gaylord,
MI, died Thursday, March
15, 2012, at Citrus Memorial
Health System.
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory is in
charge of private cremation
arrangements.


Jose
Moreno, 72
HOMOSASSA
Jose I. Moreno, 72, of Ho-
mosassa, died Friday, March
16, 2012, at Woodland Ter-
race in Hernando.
Heinz Funeral Home &
Cremation, Inverness.

Iris Wolf, 56
DUNNELLON
Iris R. Wolf, 56, of Dunnel-
lon, died Wednesday, March
14, 2012.

Jean
Peterson, 88
HERNANDO
Jean E. Peterson, 88, of
Hernando, died Thursday,
March 15,2012. Visitation at
1 p.m. Sunday, March 18,
2012, with a memorial
chapel service following at 2
p.m. at Fero Funeral Home.
Cremation arrangements
entrusted to Fero Funeral
Home.

Agnes
Spivey, 95
CRYSTAL RIVER
Agnes B. Spivey, 95, of
Crystal River and St Peters-
burg, passed away Tuesday,
March 13, 2012, in St. Pe-
tersburg.
She was a member of the
First Bap-
tist Church
of Crystal
River and a
.. t, past mem-
.- g ber of the
Order of the
'.w"' Eastern
SStar and
Agnes ABWA. She
Spivey retired from
the City of St. Petersburg,
where she was an Executive
Assistant.
She is survived by a son,
Kent Wilson (Emily) of Cler-
mont, FL; 3 daughters,
Sheron Givan (Jim) of
Yakima, WA, Sandra Beck
(David) and Judy Wilson,
both of St. Petersburg; 5
grandchildren, Anthony
Wilson (Laura), Tim Wilson
(Rita), Cynthia Garcia, Jim
Givan, and Kristin Beck; 7
great-grandchildren, Law-
ton, Chase, Rhett, Joseph,
Natalie, Nico and Olivia.
A memorial service will
be held at 10:30 a.m. on
Tuesday, March 20, 2012, at
Westminster Palms, 830
North Shore Drive NE. St.
Petersburg, FL. The Rev.
Janel Miller-Evans will be
officiating.
www.mossfeasterclear
water.com


OBITUARIES
The Citrus County Chron-
icle's policy permits
both free and paid obit-
uaries.
Obituaries must be
submitted by the fu-
neral home or society
in charge of arrange-
ments.
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear in
the next day's edition.
Email obits@chronicle
online.com or fax 352-
563-3280.
Phone 352-563-5660
for details.
The national database
Legacy.com maintains
the Chronicle's obituar-
ies and guest books.
Per Legacy policy, all
guest book comments
are screened by its
staff for appropriate
content before being
placed online. Allow 24
hours for review of
guest book entries.


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EVENT HOURS: THUR 8:30AM-7PM FRI 8:30AM-7PM SAT 9AM-6PM


1 S.B I I.l. 2 7 h 43 C z v7g d


EXCLUDES TAX, TAG, AND TITLE AND DEALER FEE OF $599.50. INCLUDES ALL REBATES AND INCENTIVES, NOT EVERYONE WILL QUALIFY. EXAMPLE 2012 NISSAN VERSA 1.6 *1 CENT DOWN WITH APPROVED CREDIT .1 CENT FILLS
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SATURDAY, MARCH 17, 2012 A7




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


March 15th
Through (
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937 S. Suncoast Blvd Homosassa, FL 34448
fALL PRICES EXCLUDE TAX, TAG, TITLE AND DEALER FEE OF $599.50 WITH APPROVED CREDIT. INCLUDES OWNER LOYALTY REBATES, NOT ALL WILL QUALIFY. PICTURES ARE FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY. PRIOR SALES MAY RESTRICT
STOCK *1 CENT DOWN WITH APPROVED CREDIT. 1 CENT FILLS THE TANK WITH PURCHASE. 1 CENT PAYMENT ON SELECT YEARS, MAKES, MODELS UNTIL JULY 4TH WITH APPROVED CREDIT, NOT EVERYONE WILL QUALIFY THEN ASSUME PAY-
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00AQA9


A8 SATURDAY, MARCH 17, 2012




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


2012 CHEVROLET
CRUZE


MEE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE
Wn INFO AND PRICING
1-800-584-8755 Ext.1108


16,800


2012 CHEVROLET
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1035 S. Suncoast Blvd Homosassa, FL 34448


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STOCK. *1 CENT DOWN WITH APPROVED CREDIT 1 CENT FILLS THE TANK WITH PURCHASE. 1 CENT PAYMENT ON SELECT YEARS, MAKES, MODELS UNTIL JULY 4TH WITH APPROVED CREDIT, NOT EVERYONE WILL QUALIFY THEN ASSUME PAYMENTS
OF $16.90 PER $1,000 FINANCED FOR 84 MONTHS @ 3.99% APR WITH APPROVED CREDIT EXCLUDES TAX, TAG, AND DEALER FEE OF $599.50. ** FOR SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS.
000AQA8


1


i


SATURDAY, MARCH 17, 2012 A9




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


2012 CHRYSLER
200


ME 24 HR ECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFO A PRICING
1-800-584-8755 EXt.3102


2012 CHRYSLER
300



ME 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE
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Payments until July 4th. $16.40 per $1,000 financed after July 4th


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ents until July 4th. $16.40 per $1,000 financed after July 4th


2012 JEEP
WRANGLER


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WITH INFO AND SPRING
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SALES MAY RESTRICT STOCK *1 CENT DOWN WITH APPROVED CREDIT. 1 CENT FILLS THE TANK WITH PURCHASE. 1 CENT PAYMENT ON SELECT YEARS, MAKES, MODELS UNTIL JULY 4TH WITH APPROVED CREDIT, NOT EVERYONE
WILL QUALIFY THEN ASSUME PAYMENTS OF $16.90 PER $1,000 FINANCED FOR 84 MONTHS @ 3.99% APR WITH APPROVED CREDIT EXCLUDES TAX, TAG, AND DEALER FEE OF $599.50. ** FOR SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS.
000AQM


I


A10 SATURDAY, MARCH 17, 2012





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Pedal power
I was calling about the
high gas prices we've been
experiencing lately. I have
found a method of getting
around them. I sold my van
in July last year and I've
been (riding) my bicycle to
and from work and the
store, wherever I had to go,
ever since. In addition to
saving money on gas, I'm
helping make gas cheaper
for all the rest of you be-
cause that leaves more for
all of you. That's the way
economics is supposed to
work. I know it's not getting
any cheaper, but I'm trying,
doing my part.
Tests for all
I think the idea to drug
test people who receive gov-
ernment money is a won-
derful idea, but only if it's
expanded to include all gov-
ernment workers and espe-
cially politicians.
Cut purse strings
There was an accidental
burning of the Quran in
Afghanistan, and the
Afghanistanians refused to
accept our apology for that
incident. Let's not insult
them any further by contin-
uing to send American
money to Afghanistan.
Bring the troops home.
Stop the money flow.
Pizza buffet
Now that ABC Pizza is
gone, is there anyplace in
Homosassa or Crystal River
that has a pizza with a buf-
fet? We sure would like to
know.
Think, then vote
Thank you for the article
by Ralph Outzen. Everybody
needs to think before they
vote, no matter what party
they are. We need better
economy and health care.
Religion and personal is-
sues are not the govern-
ment's business.
No more subsidies
I don't think Planned Par-
enthood deserves to get tax-
payer money anymore.
There's a lot of things that
taxpayers are paying for
that are just worthless and
erroneous. And I don't feel
like we should be paying for
public broadcasting when
there's such a liberal slant.
And I don't think, there's
just so many things that our
government is into that they
need to get out of.
Bah!
We, the people, would like
to see the Child Protective
Services stay with the Citrus
County Sheriff's Office. And
as far as you, Mr. Dean and
Mr. Webb, bah humbug to
both of you.
Rays' schedule
It would be nice if you put
the season calendar in the
paper for the Tampa Bay
Rays like they do in the
(Tampa Bay) Times. We sure
would appreciate it.
Bad vibes
Hey, you damaged my car
in the parking lot, the Pon-
tiac Vibe. You know who you
are. Shame on you. It
makes me feel so sad.
Buzzard battle
I've lived in Citrus Springs
for over 25 years on the
same block. The turkey buz-
zards congregate across the
street from my house and
they have never bothered
anything on my property, in-
cluding my cars. My new
neighbor around the corner
is obsessed by turkey buz-
zards. Not only has he killed
two already and hung them
up from his house so the
other buzzards are deterred
from going on his lawn, but
now he's got a flare-type
gun device that makes a
loud sound. I hear this
sound almost 15 times a
day. Somebody please help
me. How can I stop this guy
from making this sound
every time he sees a turkey
buzzard in the sky?


Clean house
Yes, you're right, Richard
Rose of Inverness. Congress
did steal our money and
wrote us IOUs for it. We do
need to clean house and we
need to do that every four
years. They will not vote in
term limits, so let's vote
them out. We'll make our
own term limits.
Scattered septics
There's so many things
written about polluting the
rivers, especially the Ho-
mosassa River. And I totally
agree that this should be


stopped, but what about all
of the houses up by the
Blue Waters? There must be
50 houses up near the Blue
Waters and I'm willing to
bet not one of those houses
is connected to sewers. I
would think that's a major
polluter of the river and I'd
like to see something done
about that.
Floral City labyrinth
In Feb. 26's newspaper
the HomeFront section,
there's an article on get lost
in quiet reflection in the
labyrinth in Delaware Art
Museum in Wilmington. Per-
haps a lot of people don't
know that Floral City has its
own labyrinth. It's there be-
tween the Masonic Lodge
and the new library. Per-
haps they'd like to check
that out.
Good fences...
I know that us Northern
people don't know very
much, but after reading
your paper, I solved the
problem of the people at
Three Sisters Springs. If
you don't want eyes looking
in your back yard, do what I
do. I just built a fence.
Women's rights fight
Is it just me or are the ul-
traconservative Republicans
starting to sound just a little
bit like the Taliban when it
comes to women's rights?
Economic effects
Will higher gas prices de-
rail the economy? Anybody in
this country would say yes.
What a foolish question to
ask. It started affecting the
economy about three years
ago. Just look at anything on
the market. Look at the price
of food. Look at the price of
this. Look at how the housing
market has fallen. Everything
is a disaster.
Thanks, all
Special Olympics wants
to thank everyone that
helped with the fundraising
dinner and all the people
that donated things to make
us a success and all the
money that goes to help our
athletes. Thank you again,
Irene.
What can we do?
The Citrus County Chroni-
cle's article on homeless-
ness is the best article I've
read in 20 years. Now that
we know what the problem
is and we're talking about it
and we recognize it, how
can we help?
Spend it here
I'm calling the Chronicle
in reference to all those
Obama lovers out there. In-
stead of him giving $1.2 bil-
lion to Egypt for democracy
reasons, why don't he turn
around and give that money
to our country and our
economy, especially the
people out West who had all
those twisters. We could use
the money. The people of
the United States could use
the money. Let Egypt fend
for themselves. So much for
all you Obama lovers. Why
don't you go to Egypt?
Danish fable
A national TV announcer
stated there's an old Danish
fable relating to leap year.
On Feb. 29, a single woman
could ask a man to marry
her. If he said "no," he had
to buy her 12 pairs of
gloves so she had a different
pair to wear each month to
cover her embarrassment
of not wearing a ring on her
left hand.


OPINION


Home-school logistics
How do parents home
school children, as one
politician is touting, when
both of them have to work
to put food on the table,
clothes on the back and a
roof over the head of these
children? It just proves how
out of touch with reality
some politicians espe-
cially the rich ones are.
Stoplight needed
Well, it's almost hap-
pened again. I've seen it
several times where there's
almost a wreck every single
day right in front of the new
Nissan car dealership and
the new Key Thrift Training
Center on (U.S.) 19. High-
land Avenue needs a stop-
light. It needs it badly.
There's forever people just
holding up traffic, sitting in
the middle lane trying to
make a turn and they don't
know what's going on and
they don't know how to use
a turn lane. One guy was
trying to make a U-turn yes-
terday and would not move
when he blocked traffic
from both sides forever. This
is stupid. We need a light
there with all this business
going on now. We need it
badly. We want it badly and
if another person gets in
another wreck and I see it
again, I'm calling FHP, DOT
or whoever I have to call.
Please, Citrus County, help
us.
Thankful Republican
I'm so grateful I'm a Re-
publican. I'm so grateful I
believe in Jesus. I read
some of these assertions
the Democrats try to put
through in the Senate and
the House and with this
president. Thank God I'm a
Republican and thank God I
believe in God. God help
this nation and this elec-
tion. May everybody step
up, take a look in the mirror
and decide what's right and
wrong and get these De-
mocrats out while we still
have the United States of
America.
Coyote attacks
This is in response to
"Know facts," that was an
article in the paper for
March 2. If he gets on the
Internet, type in "coyote at-
tacks," a Taylor Mitchell was
killed by coyotes in an area
that it shouldn't happen in.
Several attack stories on the
Internet. I hope this never
happens in Pine Ridge, but
it could.
Mind the bikes
Yes, it will be nice if they
put some signs on U.S. 19
saying that bikes share the
roadway. I ride it all the
time. I got a lot of close
calls on that. Might want to
give people a warning that
we do ride the same road
they drive on.
Christie's call
This is in reference to the
article that I read this morn-
ing about "Slap in the face."
The governor of that state
has the authority to make
that call. Nowhere does it
state you have to be a vet-
eran, police officer, fire-
fighter or politician in order
to have the flag lowered to
half-staff. Also, the com-
ment on being a druggie or
a dopey; my parents always
taught me if you cannot say
anything good about a per-
son, don't say anything at
all. Who knows? You may


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have one in your family. By
the way, this happened in
New Jersey. I assume you
live in Florida. Please try to
think before you speak.
Festival success
Floral City Strawberry Fes-
tival: Our community would
like to thank all the people
who attended our festival,
including the policemen,
musicians, bus drivers and
vendors. Thank you for mak-
ing our festival a success.
Thank you.
Deplorable state
The financial state of
Florida is deplorable. Politi-
cians cry, "We are going
broke." Just a couple of
years ago, the registration
fees for every vehicle, boat,
etc., were doubled. It
sounds like a phenomenal
amount of money was
raised. Does the Chronicle
know how much additional
money it provided the state
of Florida and where it
went?
Rolling fun
This is regarding Sun-
day's Manatee Car Show at
the Crystal Dodge dealer-
ship. Wow, did I enjoy see-
ing what I would call my
"youth on wheels." The Cit-
rus County Cruisers did
such a fine job for our com-
munity. I just can't wait 'til
next year's show. Roll on.
Taking down coyote
Speaking of Pine Ridge, if
I had a critter that a coyote
had hold of, or if a coyote
challenged me, I ain't worry-
ing about no bird sanctuary.
I'm taking him down.
Beautiful cars
As a spectator at the
Manatee Car Show, I felt I
was at a state fair for old
cars. Highly organized, food
vendors, auctions, prizes,
and, of course, beautiful old
cars. Great for a small-town
event.
Martin show online
For the person who's look-
ing for the Gene Martin
show that's not on the radio
anymore: It's online. You
can go on your computer
and get thegenemartinshow.
com. And he transmits the
music all day long, all night
long and it's new shows and
Bruce is on there, too.
Response wonderful
In letters to the editor,
"Trooper just doing his job,"
was the title in Sunday's
paper (March 4) and it was
written by Roger B. Krieger
of Beverly Hills. It's in refer-
ence to an article that was
written a while ago by C.
Carlis Harman about the
problem with the Ho-
mosassa intersection and
the trooper down there
who's giving out tickets for
people not having seatbelts,
and also those people
speeding through Waldo
and Lawtey. I just want to
commend Roger Krieger. He
did a wonderful job re-
sponding back to Mr. Har-


SoundOFF


man's article. I think he hit
the nail on the head. If
you're doing the speed limit
through there, you don't
have to worry and if you've
got your seatbelt on in Ho-
mosassa, you don't have to
worry, either. Thank you, Mr.
Krieger.
Don't read it
I just read in today's
paper (March 5) Monday
and somebody complaining
again in Sound Off about
"Kit 'N' Carlyle" and I keep
wondering why don't they
quit complaining and just
not read "Kit 'N' Carlyle."
I'm a dog person myself. I
prefer dogs to cats, but I
don't hate them and I wish
that they'd just read some-
thing else or not pay atten-
tion. But why complain so
much and want to change
things? Leave "Kit 'N' Car-
lyle" in. I enjoy a little cute
joke once in a while and
enjoy it.
Do what you gotta
I'm calling the Chronicle
in reference to, I just read in
the New York Post where it
shows President Obama
and the prime minister from
Israel where President
Obama requests the prime
minister of Israel not to
bomb Iran's nuclear missile
or whatever it is underneath
the ground 'til after the No-
vember election. This is lu-
dicrous. They're not making
electricity with the nuclear
because it's 300 feet under-
ground. All our reactors are
above ground. So why do
you have to wait 'til Novem-
ber? If they're going to take
military action, do it and get
it over with. Why does Presi-
dent Obama got to wait 'til
elections to do something?
Let Israel do what they got
to do. Mind your own
business.
Coyotes not native
This is for coyote lovers
out there: Check out Florida
coyotes online. Coyotes are
not native to Florida. Coy-
otes will eat small pets and
have done so in my neigh-
borhood. Coyotes will eat all
small native animals, rab-
bits, squirrels turkeys and
their eggs. Since coyotes in-
vaded our area, rabbits and
turkeys are rarely seen, un-
like a few years ago when
they were everywhere. So if
you are defending coyotes,
you're really doing an injus-
tice to our native animals
that really belong here.
Sad sight
This is regarding child
protection. It's really sad
that a senior senator has to
use the safety of children in
his political fight with the
sheriff instead of being
man enough to make
amends. I hope this is re-
membered come election
time.
Sad state
In regards to this children
protection: Sounds like the
Senate is in sad shape when
Sen. Negron understands
the sheriff's office is doing a
great job with child protec-


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ASKA :OUi AY


SATURDAY, MARCH 17, 2012 All

tion, but he has to go with
what Dean tells him to.
What a world
Gee whiz, what a world
we live in. Rush Limbaugh
has to apologize and he
should have for calling a
woman a name; a 30-year-
old student, by the way, an
activist who's been involved
in several things. Anyway,
the justification was an
apology was justified and
he did it. But here, people
like Nancy Pelosi can call
well-respected general, Gen.
Petraeus, "he betrayed us."
Barney Frank can run ram-
pant on the House floor...
Extended vacation
Some states have unem-
ployment benefits of up to
99 weeks. We all believe in
giving the unemployed a
chance of finding a decent
job, but sometimes it be-
comes an extended vacation
if the benefits are too
generous.
Hands unclean
I'm dismayed to hear on
the TV news that the British
Olympic Committee has
bowed to pressure and will
allow their athletes to shake
hands at the Olympics.
Bowed? Yeah, maybe they
should bow instead because
shaking hands is unhealthy.
That's how germs are
spread. All the health pro-
grams say that; doctors say
it. Of course as soon as you
step in their office, who's
ready to shake your hand
but your doctor? Why does
the human race refuse to
learn? Why do we insist on
being ignorant or avoiding,
denying knowledge we
know, like cigarette smoking
is bad for you? We keep
denying, denying, denying,
like ostriches with heads
buried in the sand.
Hospice angels
I just want to say that I
think Hospice are the most
wonderful organization.
They took care of my hus-
band and I think they are
angels and they need to be
commended on the care
that they take with our sick
patients. I just can't say
enough about them. They
are just positively wonderful.
Citizens' academy
Before you sign up and
vote for the sheriff's depart-
ment, sign up for the police
academy by Dawsy. Go to
school. Learn what you have
and what you will lose if you
get one of the Republicans
in. I happen to be a staunch
Republican, and, believe
me, Dawsy gets my vote
every time.
Build shelters
In today's economy,
bringing the homeless out
of the cycle of homeless-
ness is pie in the sky. The
number of shelters and the
capacity of shelters in the
county are limited. We need
sturdy structures to replace
the flimsy tents in the
woods. There are many
empty buildings in the
county and we could do it.


.







A12 SATURDAY, MARCH 17, 2012


STOCKS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


TH ARK TI R VEU


I HWTO "READTHEMARETINR


MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) Here are the 825 most active stocks on the New York Stock Exchange, 765
Name Vol(00) Last Chg Name Vol(00) Last Chg Name Vol(00) Last Chg most active on the Nasdaq National Market and 116 most active on the Ameri-
BkofAm 5490765 9.80 +.56 Rentech 106880 2.00 ... Microsoft 633130 32.60 -.25 can Stock Exchange. Tables show name, price and net change.
S&P500ETF1306919140.30 +.19 TanzRyg 72177 4.64 +.18 PwShsQQQ484116 66.52 -.05 Name: Stocks appear alphabetically by the company's full name (not abbrevia-
SPDRFncl 798150 15.72 +.06 Minefndg 67302 13.60 -.10 Intel 461826 27.73 -.02 tion). Names consisting of initials appear at the beginning of each letter's list.
FordM 751673 12.51 -.39 NwGoldg 63446 9.56 +.02 Cisco 388231 20.03 +.12 Last: Price stock was trading at when exchange closed for the day.
GenElec 751171 20.20 +.04 CheniereEn 57549 15.88 +.17 MicronT 322054 8.82 -.01 Chg: Loss or gain for the day. No change indicated by...

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) Stock Footnotes: cld Issue has been called for redemption by company d New 52-week
ae s GAI NERS CGA IR S low. dd Loss in last 12 mos. ec- Company formerly listed on the American Exchange's
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Ch +%Cha Emerging Company Marketplace. h- temporary exmpt from Nasdaq capital and surplus list-
AtlasResn 28.30 +6.79 +31.6 HstnAEn 6.97 +1.55 +28.6 CogoGrp 3.10 +1.16 +59.8 ing qualifcabon. n-Stock was a new issue in the last year.The 52-week high and low fig-
Frontline 7.65 +1.47 +23.8 AvalonHId 4.29 +.90 +26.5 PerfectWId 16.01 +3.46 +27.6 ures date only from the beginning of trading. pf- Preferred stock issue. pr- Preferences. pp-
AtlasEngy 32.87 +6.25 +23.5 AvinoSG g 2.28 +.21 +10.1 JAlexandr 8.58 +1.68 +24.3 Holder owes installments of purchase price. rt- Right to buy security at a specified price. s-
Demndw n 27.00 +3.41 +14.5 HMG 4.30 +.34 +8.6 CarverB rs 8.06 +1.29 +19.0 Stock has split by at least 20 percent within the last year. wi Trades will be settled when the
ReneSola 2.81 +.35 +14.2 Gastargrs 2.95 +.22 +8.1 Amarin 10.52 +1.61 +18.1 stock is issued., wd- When distributed., wt- Warrant, allowing a purchase of a stock. u New
52-week high. un Unit, including more than one security. vj Company in bankruptcy or re-
LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) ceivership, or being reorganized under the bankruptcy law. Appears in front of the name.
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.
iPSXR1K 15.29 -3.38 -18.1 Timminsg 2.31 -.26 -10.1 PrimoWtr 2.06 -.86 -29.5
GettyRIty 14.25 -1.71 -10.7 OrientPap 4.13 -.40 -8.8 OncoGenex3.81 -3.62 -20.8
KidBrands 2.70 -.26 -8.8 Medgenicn 4.87 -.41 -7.8 DiscovLab 2.85 -.65 -18.6
GramrcyC 2.74 -.26 -8.7 InvCapHId 3.57 -.27 -7.0 SocketMob 2.91 -.43 -12.9 52-Week Net % YT[
FordM wt 3.58 -.32 -8.2 ContMatls 19.07 -1.33 -6.5 MTRGam 4.02 -.55 -12.0 High Low Name Last Chg Chg Ch


DIARY


1,388 Advanced
1,655 Declined
89 Unchanged
3,132 Total issues
117 New Highs
8 New Lows
4,815,548,864 Volume


DIARY


204 Advanced
254 Declined
34 Unchanged
492 Total issues
17 New Highs
5 New Lows
134,074,781 Volume


1,241
1,304
108
2,653
146
14
1,920,546,321


13,253.51 10,404.49Dow Jones Industrials
5,627.85 3,950.66Dow Jones Transportation
467.64 381.99Dow Jones Utilities
8,718.25 6,414.89NYSE Composite
2,498.89 1,941.99Amex Index
3,059.81 2,298.89Nasdaq Composite
1,402.63 1,074.77S&P 500
14,763.50 11,208.42Wilshire 5000
868.57 601.71 Russell 2000


I NYSE


D % 52-wk
hg % Chg


13,232.62 -20.14 -.15 +8.31 +11.59
5,351.32 +1.58 +.03 +6.61 +5.84
453.60 -1.06 -.23 -2.38+13.35
8,270.41 +23.69 +.29+10.61 +1.90
2,423.89 +8.53 +.35 +6.39 +6.67
3,055.26 -1.11 -.04 +17.28 +15.57
1,404.17 +1.57 +.11 +11.65 +9.77
14,774.45 +11.09 +.08+12.01 +8.95
830.18 -1.28 -.15+12.05 +4.47


Request stocks or mutual funds to be listed here by writing

the Chronicle, Attn: Stock Requests, 1624 N. Meadowcrest

Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429; or call 563-5660. Include

the name of the stock, market and ticker symbol. For mu-

tual funds, list parent company, symbol and the exact name

of the fund. Staff will not provide real-time quotes.


I NEWYORK STOKECAG


Name Last Chg BkofAm 9.80 +.56
Bklreld rs 7.76 +.46
BkMontg 59.59 +.22
BkNYMel 24.14 -.14
ABB Ltd 20.88 -.12 Barclay 16.16 +.36
ACE Ltd 72.27 -1.10 BariPVix 21.56 -.06
AESCorp 13.17 +.02 BarnesNob 14.05 -.13
AFLAC 46.87 -.63 BarrickG 43.95 +.10
AGL Res 39.06 -.32 Baxter 59.81 +.03
AK Steel 8.20 +.30 Beam Inc 56.82 -.58
ASA Gold 26.27 -.08 BeazerHm 3.66 -.02
AT&TInc 31.59 -.05 BectDck 78.11 +.02
AbtLab 59.42 +.31 BerkHaA122190.00 +190.00
AberFitc 52.47 -.40 BerkH B 81.07 -.27
Accenture 63.62 -.01 BestBuy 25.52 +.32
AdamsEx 11.00 +.02 BIkHillsCp 33.05 -.58
Adecaogro 11.05 +.35 BlIkDebtStr 4.13 +.04
AMD 8.20 -.05 BlkEnhC&l 13.53 -.05
AdvSemi 4.85 -.15 BlkGlbOp 15.12 -.01
Aeropostf 20.42 -.91 Blackstone 15.30 -.04
Aetna 46.50 +.54 BlockHR 16.91 +.17
Agilent 45.62 -.24 Boeing 75.20 -.23
Agnicog 33.79 +.32 BostBeer 99.87 -1.14
Agriumg 86.07 +2.92 BostProp 105.94 +1.20
AlcatelLuc 2.43 +.02 BostonSd 6.12 +.12
Alcoa 10.54 +.19 BoydGm 8.21 -.10
AllegTch 43.49 +.64 BrMySq 33.18 -.05
Allergan 93.00 -1.18 Brookdale 19.47 +.76
Allete 41.49 +.11 Brunswick 26.30 -.40
AlliBGIbHi 14.92 -.09 Buckeye 61.75 +.66
AlliBlnco 8.09 -.01 Buenavent 38.97 +.20
AlliBern 15.00 -.03 C&J Egyn 18.29 +.40
AllisonTn 24.55 +1.15 CBLAsc 18.64 +.24
Allstate 32.68 +.09 CBREGrp 20.83 +.15
AlphaNRs 17.36 +.68 CBSB 31.59 +.07
Altria 30.03 CFInds 184.21 +3.06
AmBev 40.87 -.13 CH Engy 66.44 -.59
Ameren 31.46 -.18 CMS Eng 21.65 -.20
AMovilLs 24.20 +.40 CSS Inds 18.82 -.29
AEagleOut 16.43 -.26 CSXs 22.25 +.33
AEP 38.73 +.32 CVR Engy 27.07 +.27
AmExp 56.55 -.17 CVSCare 45.28 +.40
AmnlntGrp 28.03 -.05 CYS Invest 13.54 -.13
AmISIP3 6.81 -.03 CblvsNYs 14.65 -.20
AmTower 63.34 +.17 CabotOGs 33.42 +.38
Amerigas 40.00 -1.25 CallGolf 7.22 +.24
Ameriprise 57.72 -.30 Calpine 17.58 +.47
AmeriBrgn 38.32 +.41 Camecog 23.19 +.12
Anadarko 84.68 +.78 Cameron 52.94 +.42
AnalogDev 39.70 -.09 CampSp 32.80 -.24
AnglogldA 38.58 +.16 CdnNRsgs 35.41 +.85
ABInBev 72.34 +.94 CapOne 54.50 +.87
Annaly 16.14 -.08 CapiiSrce 6.92 +.04
Aon Corp 48.97 -.06 CapM pfB 14.77 -.05
Apache 108.98 +2.01 CardnlHIth 41.59 -.11
AquaAm 22.04 -.04 CareFusion 25.71 -.24
ArcelorMit 20.76 +.16 Carnival 32.32 -.07
Ardchoal 12.40 +.06 Caterpillar 113.58 +.13
ArdchDan 31.80 -.02 Celanese 47.33 -.14
ArcosDorn 18.58 -.07 Cemex 7.58 -.31
ArmourRsd 6.65 -.09 Cemigpf 23.29 -.33
Ashland 62.37 -.83 CenterPnt 19.07 -.15
AsdEstat 15.81 +.04 CnryLink 39.08 -.13
Assurant 39.88 -.97 Checkpnt 11.46 -.12
AtlasEngy 32.87 +6.25 Chemtura 17.64 +1.78
ATMOS 30.71 -.11 ChesEng 25.06 +.62
AuRicog 8.69 -.11 ChesUtl 41.94 -.27
Avon 18.95 -.09 Chevron 110.28 +.25
BB&TCp 31.06 -.14 Chicos 15.08 -.12
BHP BillLt 74.69 +.33 Chimera 2.95 -.09
BP PLC 46.83 +.14 ChinaUni 17.66 -.44
BPZRes 4.11 +.06 Chubb 68.39 -.26
BRFBrasil 21.40 -.06 Cigna 46.82 +.01
BRT 6.90 +.40 CinciBell 4.02 +.02
BakrHu 48.95 +1.36 Cifgrp rs 36.69 +.42
BallCorp 41.39 +.76 CleanH s 68.95 -.01
BcoBrad pf 18.46 +.09 CliffsNRs 72.03 +.03
BcoSantSA 8.33 +.11 Clorox 68.21 -.54
BcoSBrasil 10.31 +.03 Coach 77.84 -.35


CobaltlEn 32.41 +2.10
CCFemsa 100.60 -1.10
CocaCola 70.16 -.17
CocaCE 27.81 +.02
Coeur 24.22 -.12
CohStlnfra 17.53 -.12
ColgPal 94.79 -.63
CollctvBrd 17.98 -.27
Comerica 33.20 -.37
CmwREIT 18.55 +.20
CmtyHIt 24.45 +.37
CompSci 31.60 -.50
ComstkRs 16.57 +.54
Con-Way 33.72 -.07
ConAgra 26.43 -.15
ConocPhil 77.18 +.55
ConsolEngy 34.05 +1.67
ConEd 57.62 -.46
ConstellA 22.77 +.08
Cnvrgys 12.85 -.05
Corning 14.33 +.13
Cosan Ltd 14.89 -.03
CottCp 6.52 +11
CoventryH 33.79 +.05
Covidien 53.92 -.80
Crane 47.94 -.78
CSVS2xVxS 14.81 +.62
CSVellVSts 9.96 +.01
CredSuiss 29.62 +.42
CrwnCsfie 52.23 -.32
CubeSmart 11.85 +.04
Cummins 127.54 +.55

DCTInd 5.81 +.04
DDRCorp 14.90 +18
DHT HIdgs 1.25 +.09
DNPSelct 11.11 -.03
DR Horton 16.03 -.29
DSWInc 55.50 -1.05
DTE 55.04 +.32
DanaHIdg 16.20 +.14
Danaher 55.00 +.05
Darden 52.51 -.52
DeanFds 12.01 -.25
Deere 83.22 +1.58
DelphiAu n 32.00 +.28
DeltaAir 9.21 -.42
DenburyR 19.61 +.44
DeutschBk 51.04 +.57
DevonE 73.73 +1.19
Dex One h 1.49 +.04
DiaOffs 72.43 +2.89
DiamRk 9.85 -.11
DxFnBull rs 108.20 +.80
DirSCBear 17.90 +.07
DirFnBear 21.00 -.16
DrxEnBear 8.81 -.34
DirxSCBull 62.40 -.32
DirxEnBull 57.56 +2.06
Discover 32.05 +.03
Disney 43.19 -.28
DoleFood 11.13 +1.16
DomRescs 50.32 -.16
DowChm 35.30 +.30
DrPepSnap 38.55 +.10
DuPont 53.38 -.18
DukeErgy 21.07 -.06
DukeRlty 14.60 +.20
Dynegy .89 +.26
E-CDarg 7.61 +.05
EMCCp 28.89 -.12
EOGRes 116.78 +1.15
EQT Corp 50.18 +.05
EastChm s 52.03 +.08
Eaton 51.02 +.37
EV EnEq 11.23 -.02
Ecolab 60.07 +.25
Edisonlnt 42.64 -.36


ElPasoCp 29.10
Elan 14.54
EldorGkdg 13.35
EmersonEl 52.37
EmpDist 20.14
EnbrEPts 31.43
EnCanag 20.45
EngyTEq 43.96
EnPro 37.92
ENSCO 57.65
Entergy 67.87
EntPrPt 50.57
EqtyRsd 59.97


EsteeLdrs 63.67
ExcelM 2.10
ExooRes 7.81
Exelisn 12.30
Exelon 38.86
Express 25.42
ExterranH 14.14
ExxonMbl 86.44
FMCTchs 52.34
FedExCp 94.34
FedSignl 5.89
Fedlnvst 22.80
Ferrelgs 15.25
Ferro 6.15
FibriaCelu 8.36
FidlNFin 17.37
FidNatlnfo 33.00
FstHorizon 10.71
FMajSilvg 16.93
FTActDiv 8.78
FtTrEnEq 12.24
FirstEngy 44.50
FlagstBch .98
Flotek 12.32
Fluor 62.68
FootLockr 29.73
FordM 12.51
ForestLab 33.55
ForestOils 13.55
FBHmScn 21.41
FMCG 38.56


GATX 44.18 +.12
GMX Rs 1.52 +.02
GNC n 33.71 +.42
GabelliET 5.70 -.09
GabHIthW 8.08 -.01
GabUlI 8.14 +.04
GafisaSA 5.63 -.07
GameStop 23.56 -.25
Gannett 15.21 -.07
Gap 25.39 -.25
GencoShip 6.80 +.20


GenDynam 72.90
GenElec 20.20
GenGrPrp 16.91
GenMills 38.83
GenMotors 25.57
GenOn En 2.62
Genworth 9.15
Gerdau 10.67
GlaxoSKIn 45.18
GlimdichRt 9.95
GoldFLd 14.06
Goldcrpg 44.09
GoldmanS 122.93
Goodridich 125.97
Goodyear 12.16
GtPlainEn 20.07
Griflon 10.79
GuarngRy 18.92
Guess 32.53
HCA Hdg 25.44
HCP Inc 40.21
HSBC 45.87
HSBC Cap 26.54
Hallibrtn 34.54
HanJS 15.13
HanPrmDv 13.48
Hanesbrds 28.73
Hanoverlns 40.56
HarleyD 49.39
HarmonyG 10.89
HartfdFn 21.83


Fronsine 7.65 +1.47 HarvNRes 7.80
Fusion-ion 30.85 -.08 HatterasF 28.70


HawaiiEl 25.30
HItCrREIT 54.81
HItMgmt 7.03
HIthcrRlty 21.00
Heckmann 4.68
HeclaM 4.53
Heinz 53.43
Hertz 15.08
Hess 62.55
HewlettP 24.49
HighwdPrp 32.69
HollyFrts 35.93
HomeDp 49.05


HonwIllIni 60.37
Hospira 37.13
HospPT 25.81
HostHofis 15.99
HovnanE 2.91
Humana 86.64
Huntsmn 14.07
Hyperdyn 1.40
IAMGIdg 13.29
ICICI Bk 37.31
ING 9.47
ION Geoph 6.40
iShGold 16.19
iSAsfia 23.62
iShBraz 67.56
iShGer 23.66
iShHK 18.18
iShJapn 10.10
iSh Kor 60.46
iShMex 61.06
iSTaiwn 13.56
iSh UK 17.69
iShSilver 31.59
iShDJDf 56.26
iShChina25 38.76
iSSP500 141.41
iShEMkts 44.09
iShiBxB 114.57
iShB20T 111.43
iShBl-3T 84.28
iS Eafe 55.51
iShiBxHYB 90.49
iSR2KG 95.55


iShR2K 83.00
iShREst 62.20
iShDJHm 15.21
iStar 7.25
ITTCps 22.97
Idacorp 40.79
ITW 57.91
Imafon 6.14
IngerRd 41.08
IngrmM 18.49
IntegrysE 53.00
InterXion 15.90
IntnmfEx 139.00


IBM 206.01 +.01
IniGame 16.46 -.12
IntPap 35.57 -.37
Interpublic 11.80 -.03
InvenSenn 20.10 -.79
Invesco 26.14 -.23
InvMigCap 18.23 -.11
IronMtn 29.19 +.08
ItauUnibH 21.46 +.08


JPMorgCh 44.57 -.13
JPMAlerian 39.71 +.05
Jabil 26.82 -.21
JanusCap 9.39 +.01
Jefferies 19.18 -.04
JohrJn 65.12 +.05
JohnsnCi 32.66 -.25
JoyGlbl 80.25 +1.68
JnprNtwk 21.43 +.10
KB Home 12.76 -.30
KTCorp 14.06 +.08
KCSouthn 74.67 +1.16
Kaydon 37.33 -.27
KA ErngTR 27.76 -.31
Kellogg 52.62 -.30
KeyErgy 16.83 +.19
Keyoorp 8.54
KimbClk 72.92
Kimco 19.61 +15
KindME 82.51 +.26
KindMorg 36.85 +.60


Kinross g 9.97 +.06 Moodys 42.60 +.57
KodiakOg 10.36 +.25 MorgStan 19.53 +.02
Kohls 50.37 -.75 MSEmMkt 14.89 -.01
Kraft 38.38 +.08 Mosaic 57.51 +2.25
KrispKrm 8.19 -.04 MotrlaSolu 50.53 +.01
Kroger 24.37 -.04 MotrlaMob 39.32 -.28
LDK Solar 4.90 +.23 MuellerWat 3.34 +.04
LSICorp 8.80 -.15 MurphO 58.67 +.40
LTC Prp 30.76 +.09 NCRCorp 21.26 -.19
LaZBoy 14.83 -.30 NRG Egy 16.77 +.36
Laclede 39.77 -.37 NV Energy 15.79 +.02
LVSands 56.60 -.66 NYSEEur 29.61 -.12
LeggMason 29.12 -.19 Nabors 20.82 +.35
LeggPlat 23.26 +.03 NatFuGas 49.99 +.68
LennarA 26.57 -.32 NatGrid 50.99 +.03
Level3rs 26.50 -.10 NOilVarco 83.56 +3.33
Lexmark 35.06 -.51 NewAmHi 10.81 -.09
LbtyASG 4.34 +.01 NJ Rscs 44.56 -.06
LillyEli 40.20 -.08 NYCmtyB 13.91 +.36
Limited 46.93 -.60 NY Times 6.80 +.01
LincNat 26.77 -.52 Newcastle 6.57 +.03
Lindsay 64.13 +.41 NewellRub 18.47 -.25
LinkedIlnn 91.02 -1.38 NewfidExp 36.27 +.27
LionsGtg 13.21 -.09 NewmtM 53.75 -.09
LizClaib 12.20 -.13 NewpkRes 8.03 +.08
LloydBkg 2.35 +.07 Nexeng 19.34 -.26
LockhdM 89.32 -.98 NextEraEn 60.16 -.09
LaPac 9.93 +.21 NiSource 23.61 -.29
Lowes 30.41 -.28 NikeB 111.22 +.49
NobleCorp 41.25 +1.90
NobleEn 99.69 +.63
NoldaCp 5.33 +.11
M&TBk 85.69 +.74 NordicAm 15.29 +.88
MBIA 10.01 -.13 Nordstrm 54.88 -.17
MDU Res 22.22 -.09 NorfikSo 68.98 +.45
MEMC 4.14 +.12 NoestUt 36.43 -.28
MFA Fnd 7.34 -.01 NorthropG 61.99 +.02
MCR 9.47 -.06 Novarfs 54.79 +.48
MGIC 4.86 -.05 NSTAR 47.77 -.29
MGM Rsts 14.42 -.29 Nucor 44.23 +.78
Macquarie 32.65 +.64 NuvMuOpp 14.12 -.25
Macys 39.73 -.04 NvMulSI&G 8.75 +.08
MagelMPtr 70.58 -.34 NuvQPf2 8.57 -.04
Magnalgs 48.52 +.18 OGEEngy 52.96 +.02
MagHRes 7.09 +.42 OcdPet 100.58 +1.68
Manitowoc 15.72 -.12 OcwenFn 15.93 -.28
Manulifeg 13.80 -.07 OfficeDpt 3.52 +.03
MarathnOs 34.61 +.96 OfficeMax 5.66 +.16
MarathP n 44.19 +.29 OldRepub 10.77 -.33
MktVGold 49.93 -.21 Olin 21.67 -.14
MVOilSvs 43.82 +1.15 OmegaHIt 21.18 +.06
MktVRus 32.62 -.31 Omncre 33.68 -.56
MktVJrGld 25.28 -.21 Omnicom 50.01 +.18
MarlntA 38.14 -.24 ONEOK 82.85 -.72
MarshM 32.96 -.35 OneokPts 56.94 +.14
MStewrt 3.96 -.15 OpkoHlth 4.93 -.06
Masco 13.38 -.21 OshkoshCp 23.80 +.11
McDrmlnt 13.45 -.13 OvShip 12.75 +1.41
McDnlds 97.66 -.38 OwensCorn 3691 -.07
McGrwH 47.54 +.52
McMoRn 1340 +.31
McEwenM 4.03 -.19 PG&ECp 43.29 +.04
Mechel 10.88 +.17 PNC 63.42 +.42
MedcoHIth 70.29 -.14 PNM Res 18.22 -.22
MedProp 9.63 +.12 PPG 93.59 -.05
Medtnic 39.68 +.31 PPLCorp 28.31 +.13
Merck 38.03 -.03 PallCorp 60.02 -.07
Meritor 7.81 +.26 Pandora n 10.32 -.13
MetLife 38.38 -.03 PatriotCoal 7.17 +.61
MetroPCS 10.10 +.16 PeabdyE 33.25 +1.54
MetroHlth 8.85 +.07 Perngrthg 10.12 +.17
MidAApt 64.71 +.12 PennVa 5.01 -.02
Midas 11.46 +.01 PennVaRs 24.89 +.11
MitsuUFJ 5.22 +.08 Penney 36.24 -.75
MobileTele 18.89 +.30 PepBoy 14.99 -.04
Molycorp 28.82 -.10 PepcoHold 19.13 +.11
MoneyG rs 18.79 +.59 PepsiCo 64.47 +.30
Monsanto 78.81 -.49 Prmian 22.66 -.04
MonstrWw 9.54 +.10 PetrbrsA 26.85 -.08


Petrobras 27.81 -.13
PtroqstE 6.57 +.24
Pfizer 21.94 +.03
PhilipMor 85.81 -.09
PiedNG 31.54 -.18
Pier1 17.48 -.62
PilgrimsP 7.73 +.29
PimcoStrat 11.57 -.18
PinWst 47.02 +.12
PioNtrl 110.01 +3.46
PitnyBw 18.15 -.23
PlainsEx 46.30 +1.39
PlumCrk 41.43 -.01
Polaris s 66.60 -1.36
PostPrp 45.18 +.17
Potash 45.91 +3.04
PS USDBull 22.18 -.15
Praxair 110.72 +.24
PrecDrill 10.89 +.01
PrinFncl 29.17 -.47
ProLogis 35.26 +.26
ProShtS&P 35.86 -.07
PrUShS&P 15.20 -.06
ProUltQQQ 115.36 -.19
PrUShQQQ 31.32 +.05
ProUltSP 58.18 +.23
ProUShL20 .83 -.06
ProUltFin 62.54 +.29
ProSht20Tr 33.51 -.07
ProUSSP500 9.17 -.05
PrUltSP500 84.39 +.55
PrUVxSTrs 24.77 -.09
ProUSSilv 10.51 -.03
ProUltSlv s 55.36 +.06
ProUShEuro 19.48 -.24
ProctGam 67.25 -.43
ProgrssEn 53.60 -.05
ProgsvCp 22.59 -.33
Prudently 63.71 +.47
PSEG 30.12 -.01
PubStrg 136.52 +2.70
PulteGrp 9.29 -.32
PPrlT 5.45 -.11
QEP Res 31.91 +.44
Qihoo360 n 22.45 +.15
QuanexBd 17.02 -.27
QuantaSvc 21.94 +.05
QntmDSS 2.60 +.07
Questar 19.60 -.09
QksilvRes 5.75 +.14
RPCs 10.64 +.46
RPM 25.20 -.24
Rackspace 56.42 -.13
RadianGrp 4.17 -.22
RadioShk 6.62 -.15
Ralcorp 74.48 -.35
RangeRs 62.31 +1.72
RFJamesFn 37.16 +.13
Rayonier s 44.71 +.02
Raytheon 52.12 -.15
Rtylnco 37.93 -.04
RedHat 50.64 -.09
RegalEnt 13.98
RegionsFn 6.41 -.03
ReneSola 2.81 +.35
Renren n 5.29 -.08
ResoluteEn 11.24 +.37
Revlon 16.61 +.18


ReynAmer 41.35 +.04
RioTinto 56.82 +.86
RiteAid 2.00 +.01
RockTen 68.53 -2.88
RockwlAut 83.71 -.59
RockColl 58.74 -.16
Rowan 37.03 +1.14
RyCarb 30.58 +.65
RoyDShllIA 71.48 +.02
Royce 13.96 -.03
Ro e B 25.56 +14

SAIC 13.16
SCANA 44.69 -.19
SKTIcm 13.57 -.02
SpdrDJIA 132.05 -.11
SpdrGold 161.30 +.22
SPMid 181.74 -.26
S&P500ETF140.30 +.19
SpdrHome 21.51 -.28
SpdrS&PBk 24.24 +.13
SpdrLehHY 39.57 -.05
SpdrS&P RB 28.83 +.10
SpdrRefl 61.00 -.62
SpdrOGEx 60.64 +1.27
SpdrMetM 50.95 +.63
Safeway 22.17
StJoe 19.83 +.04
SUJude 42.87 +.11
Saks 11.49 -.13
Salesforce 151.39 -1.04
SJuanB 19.38 +.36
SandRdge 8.47 +.16
Sanofi 38.90 +.07
SaraLee 21.39 +13
Schlmbrg 76.76 +1.84
Schwab 15.32 +.02
SeadrillLtd 38.78 +.77
SealAir 20.32 +.25
Sensient 37.16 +.08
ServiceCp 11.14 -.01
ShipFin 15.66 +1.45
SiderurNac 10.73 +.04
SivWhtng 33.18 -.31
SimonProp 141.90 +.70
Skedichers 13.54 +.06
SmithAO 45.69 -.10
SmithfF 22.86 +.13
Smucker 78.08 +.32
Soluta 27.96 +.01
SonyCp 21.81 +.06
SoJerInd 50.96 -.06
SouthnCo 44.34 -.53
SthnCopper 31.86 +.32
SoUnCo 43.99 -.06
SwstAirl 8.31 -.14
SwstnErgy 34.54 +.98
SpectraEn 32.06 -.03
SprintNex 2.89 +.09
SP Mais 37.10 +.07
SP HIthC 36.85
SPCnSt 33.60 -.02
SPConsum 44.35 -.14
SP Engy 74.80 +1.01
SPDR Fncl 15.72 +.06
SP Inds 37.98 +.02
SPTech 29.88 -.01


IA EIA N SOC5 CANE1


Name Last Chg BarcUBS36 43.70
BarcGSOil 27.16
SBlkMunvst 10.07
AbdAsPac 7.63 +.05 BrigusG g .82
AbdnEMTel 19.40 CAMAC En .77
AdmRsc 55.83 +3.83 CardiumTh .28
Adventrx .64 +.05 CelSd .41
AlexcoRg 7.05 -.11 CFCdag 21.91
AlldNevG 31.54 -.80 CheniereEn 15.88
AmApparel .92 +.05 CheniereE 24.20
AntaresP 2.82 +.06 ChiMarFd 1.40
Aurizong 4.62 +.18 ClaudeRg 1.15
AvalnRare 2.79 ... ClghGlbOp 11.78
Bacterin 3.13 -.11 CmtyBkTr 1.73
Banrog 5.01 -.03 ComstkMn 2.00


Contango 63.06 +2.00
CrSuiHiY 3.10 -.04
CubicEnSv .57 +.01

DejourEg .42 -.00
DenisnM g 1.55 -.03
EVLtdDur 15.94 -.07
EVMuniBd 12.44 -.23
EVMuni2 14.04 -.05
ElephTalk 2.30 -.05
EllieMaen 10.15 +.06
EllswthFd 7.32
EntGaming .41 +.02
ExeterRgs 2.71 -.12
FrkStPrp 10.60 -.02


GSESy 2.40 +.13
GamGIdNR 16.15 +.20
GascoEngy .29
Gastargrs 2.95 +.22
GenMol 3.28 -.08
GoldResrc 23.75 +.05
GoldenMin 7.32 +.35
GoldStrg 1.73 +.02
GormanRs 30.69 +.54
GranTrrag 5.98 -.10
GrtBasGg .69 -.02
GtPanSilvg 2.28 +.02
GreenHntr 2.72 +.12


HstnAEn 6.97 +1.55
ImpOilgs 46.37 +.33
IndiaGC .49 -.02
InovioPhm .58 -.02
IntellgSys 1.50
IntTowerg 4.40
InvVKAdv2 12.44 -.10

KeeganRg 4.00 -.03
LadThalFn 2.01 +.04
LkShrGld g 1.26 -.03
LoMadCatzg .56 +.0

MadCatzg .56 +.00


Metalico 4.07
MdwGold g 1.43
MincoG g .67
Minefndg 13.60
NavideaBio 3.15
NeoStem .61
Nevsung 3.39
NwGoldg 9.56
NA Pall g 2.68
NDynMng 6.00
NthnO&G 22.13
NovaGldg 7.02
NuvDiv3 14.41
NvDivAdv 14.47
NMuHiOp 12.17


OrientPap 4.13 -.40
OionEnc 2.62 +.17
SamsO&G 2.59 +.01
ParaG&S 2.25 -.07 SeabGld g 20.05 +.11
PhrmAth 1.47 -.02 SilverBull .61 +.01
PionDrill 8.99 +.04 TanzRyg 4.64 +.18
PlatGpMet 1.66 +.18 Taseko 3.69 +.14
PolyMetg 1.32 +.09 Timminsg 2.31 -.26
Protalix 5.65 -.21 TrnsafiPet 1.29 +.01
PyramidOil 5.19 +.21 TravelCtrs 6.20 +.12
Quepasa 3.92 +.25 TriValley .18 +.01
RareBeg 6.12 -.04 TriangPet 6.95 -.01
Rentech 2.00 ... Tucowsg 1.01
Richmntg 8.97 +.26 Univ Insur 4.08 -.08
Rubicon g 3.38 -.05 Ur-Energy 1.20 -.04


Uranerz 2.46
+.01
UraniumEn 3.94


VantageDrl 1.70
+.17
VirnetX 24.15
.17
VistaGold 3.04 -
.11
VoyagerOG 2.94
.06
Vringo 1.52
.12


IASD AQ N A O AL AKT1


Name Last Chg


ACIWwde 39.63 +.04
AMCNetn 43.80 -.20
ASML Hid 48.05 -.11
ATP O&G 8.56 +.36
AVI Bio 1.38 +.02
AXT Inc 6.53 +.38
Abiomed 22.53 +.57
Abraxas 3.27 -.25
AcadiaPh 1.87 -.05
Accuray 6.91 +.10
Achillbn 10.54 -.26
AcmePkt 27.55 +.14
AcordaTh 26.85 +.50
AcfvePwh .81 +.02
AcfvsBliz 12.65 +.19
Actuate 6.14 -.06
AdobeSy 33.82 -.35
Adtran 30.60 -1.70
AdvEnld 13.00 +.07
Aegion 18.62 -.68
AEternag 1.87 +.15
Affymax 11.18 -.21
Affymetrix 4.44 -.01
AkamaiT 37.36 +.01
Akorn 12.54 +.42
AlaskCom 3.33 +.10
Alexions 89.01 -.51
Alexzah .62 +.03
AlgnTech 27.07 -.12
Alkermes 16.74 -.15
AlbsThera 1.51 -.07
AlbtComm 20.82 -.29
AllscriptH 17.96 -.09
AlnylamP 11.59 -.41
AlteraCp If 39.51 +.05
AlterraCap 23.00 -.49
Amarin 10.52 +1.61
Amazon 185.05 +.62
Amedisys 14.37 +.19
ACapAgy 29.34 -.11
AmCapLd 9.11 -.04
ACapMign 21.58 -.07
ARItyCTn 10.38 -.02
AmSupr 4.36 +.11
Amrign 16.55 -.97
AmCasino 20.60 -.42
Amgen 67.38 -.88
AmkorTIf 6.36 +.03
Amylin 15.65 -.04
Amyris 5.27 +.02
Anadigc 2.67
Anlogic 64.57 -.42
Analystlnt 5.57 -.21
Ancestry 22.19 -.30
Ansys 65.55 +.03
AntheraPh 3.17 +.05
A123Sys 1.64 -.01
ApolloGrp 42.59
Apollolnv 7.07 -.07
Apple Inc 585.57 +.01
ApldMab 12.82 +.03
AMCC 6.99 -.03
Approach 36.80 +.77
ArQule 7.55 +.27
ArdeaBo 21.31 +.94
ArenaPhm 1.76 -.03
AresCap 16.11 -.23
AriadP 15.41 -.04
Ariba Inc 32.17 -.29
ArmHId 27.31 +.31
ArrayBio 3.16 -.04
Arris 11.23 +.10
ArubaNet 23.62 +.14
AscenaRi 43.44 -.41
AsialnfoL 13.75 +.29
AssodBanc 14.44 +.16
AstexPhm 1.78 -.04
athenahlth 75.01 -.47
AfiasAir 47.93 +.28
Amel 9.97 +.21
Autodesk 40.90 +.82
AutoData 55.10 -.28
Auxilium 19.12 -.37
AvagoTch 37.90 +.14


AvanirPhm 3.15 +.03
AVEO Ph 12.74 +.05
AviatNetw 2.97 +.21
AvisBudg 14.29 +.14
Aware 4.07 -.02
Axcelis 1.66 +.01
BBCNBcp 11.20 +.14
BEAero 48.06 +.18
BGCPtrs 7.41 -.39
BMCSft 38.60 +.33
Baidu 136.09 -.25
BkOzarkss 31.24 +.17
BeasleyB 4.00 +.12
BedBath 66.03 +.48
Biocryst 5.37 +.14
BioFuelEh .69 +.04
Biogenldc 120.04 -1.01
BioMarin 34.67 +.22
BioSanteh .72 -.01
BIkRKelso 9.88 -.19
BlueNile 33.58 -.31
BobEvans 37.96 -.58
BostPrv 10.33 -.10
BreitBurn 19.61 +.35
Brightcvn 21.12 +1.26
Brightpnt 8.47 -.16
Broadcom 37.81 +.06
Broadwd h .52 +.00
BrcdeCm 5.73 -.02
BrMneB 9.52 +.02
BrooksAuto 12.07 +.01
BrukerCp 15.77 +.09
BuffaloWW 86.33 -3.10
BldrFstSrc 4.00 +.15
CA Inc 27.23 -.34
CBOE 28.02
CEVA Inc 23.01 +.25
CH Robins 65.67 +.32
CMEGrp 289.45 +3.20
CTC Media 11.09 -.02
CVB Fncl 11.41 +.05
CadencePh 3.71 +.17
Cadence 12.33 -.07
Caesars n 12.99 +.47
CdnSolar 3.48 +.15
CapCtyBk 7.72 -.05
CapFedFn 11.99 +.05
CpstnTrbh 1.06 +.03
CareerEd 8.54 +.10
Carrizo 30.00 +.32
CarverBrs 8.06 +1.29
CathayGen 18.03 -.03
Cavium 33.30 +.18
Celgene 75.60 -.53
CellTher rsh 1.34 +.03
CelldexTh 4.48 +.06
Celsion 1.69 -.02
CentEuro 5.26 +.26
CEurMed 7.32 +.07
CentAl 9.55 +.52
Cepheid 42.48 +.60
Cerners 76.93 -.45
CerusCp 4.12 +.16
Changyou 27.59 +1.85
ChrmSh 5.63 -.28
Chartlnds 74.40 +.79
ChkPoint 61.74 -1.16
Cheesecake 31.19 -.09
ChelseaT 3.51 -.06
ChildPlace 50.49 -1.25
ChinCEd h 4.44 -.30
ChipMOS 16.70 +.25
ChrchllD 55.58 -.44
CienaCorp 15.99 +.07
CinnFin 35.54 -.44
Cintas 40.21 +.24
Cirrus 24.25 -.25
Cisco 20.03 +.12
CitzRpBrs 15.22 +.23
CitrixSys 78.20 -.99
CleanDsl 4.30 +.01
CleanEngy 21.05 +1.06
Clearwire 2.27 +.12
CoffeeH 14.00 +.32
CognizTech 76.91 +.65
CogoGrp 3.10 +1.16
Coinstar 61.83 -.89
ColdwtrCrk 1.22 +.08


ColBnkg 22.76 +.19
ColumLb h .68 +.01
Comcast 29.50 -.30
Comcspd 29.01 -.20
CmcBMO 40.68 +.28
CommSys 13.26 +.16
CommVIt 50.51 -.85
CmplGnom 2.91 +.05
Compuwre 9.42 -.12
Comverge 1.71 +.07
Comverse 6.21 +.04
ConcurTch 59.55 -.42
Conmed 29.41 +.01
ConsolWtr 7.63 -.24
CopanoEn 35.20 +.38
Copart 52.94 -.06
Corcept 4.03 -.08
CorinthC 4.46 +.07
CorOnDem 20.46 -.54
Cosilnc 1.11 -.01
Costoo 90.44 -1.02
CowenGp 2.71 -.04
Cree Inc 30.81 +.35
Crocs 19.07 -.56
CrosstexE 14.36 +.21
Ctrip.com 24.68 +1.26
CubistPh 43.81 +.21
Curis 4.58 -.05
CypSemi 15.72 -.04
CytRxh .33 +.01
Cytoldnet 1.20 -.01
Cori 3. +30

DeckrsOut 67.91 +.33
DeerConsu 3.25 -.37
Delcath 3.10 -.10
Dell Inc 17.30 -.05
Dndreon 10.15 -.19
Dentsply 39.73 -.02
Depomed 6.00 -.03
DiamndFlf 25.34 +.18
DigRiver 17.80 +.45
DirecTVA 47.47 +.13
DiscCmA 47.93 +.06
DiscovLab 2.85 -.65
DishNetwk 31.51 -.32
DollarTree 93.28 -.23
DonlleyRR 13.14 +.27
DrmWksA 18.30 +.68
DryShips 3.64 +.25
Dunldnn 31.91 -.13
DurectCp h .78 -.01
DyaxCp 1.57 +.03
Dynavax 4.49 +.10
E-Trade 11.04 +.09
eBay 37.69 +.86
EagleBulk 1.76 +.16
ErthLink 7.77 -.02
EstWstBcp 23.76 -.46
Ebixlnc 23.11 -.12
EchoStar 28.77 +.03
EducDev 4.88 -.06
8x8 Inc 3.90 -.06
ElectSd 14.49 -.10
ElectArts 17.46 +.75
Emcorers 4.37 +.28
EndoPhrm 36.27 +.26
Endocyte 5.21 -.12
Endologix 14.17 +.13
EnerNOC 7.73 +.18
EnrgyRec 2.28 +.09
ErngyXXI 36.99 +.76
Entegris 9.41 -.09
EntropCom 6.17 -.23
EnzonPhar 6.98 -.01
Equinix 141.76 +.27
Ericsson 10.01 +.04
ExactSci h 9.96 -.06
Exelids 5.64 +.18
EddeTc 3.14 +.10
Expedias 33.61 +.34
Expdlnfi 45.81 +1.26
ExpScripts 54.34 +.04
ExterranP 23.99 +.60
ExtrmNet 3.64 -.14
EZchip 44.63 +1.71
F5Netwks 131.91 -.40


FLIRSys 26.24 -.01 iShACWI 47.48 +.09
Fastenals 52.22 -.33 iShNsdqBio 121.01 -.06
FifthStFin 9.91 -.09 lconixBr 17.51 -.39
FifthThird 14.33 -.14 IdenixPh 11.09 -.41
Fncllnst 16.68 -.26 Illumina 49.93 -.04
Finisar 18.63 -.24 ImunoGn 13.63 +.17
FinLine 24.05 -.19 ImpaxLabs 23.34 -.38
FstCashFn 44.02 -.65 ImperlSgr 4.97 -.16
FFndOH 17.42 +.21 Incyte 18.08 +.62
FMidBc 12.49 +.11 Infinera 7.69 -.17
FstNiagara 10.23 +.23 InfoSpace 13.33 -.35
FstSolar 29.08 +1.24 Informat 51.63 -.19
FstMerit 17.21 +.16 Infosys 58.77 -.29
Fiserv 69.17 -.27 IntgDv 7.22 -.13
Flextrn 7.39 -.03 Intel 27.73 -.02
Fbwlnt 4.09 -.03 InteractBrk 16.86 +.12
FocusMda 27.44 +1.10 InterDig 35.86 -.48
ForcePro 5.55 ... Intrface 12.71 -.04
FormFac 5.67 +.19 InterMune 15.43 -.02
Forninets 27.12 -.31 InfiBcsh 20.72 +.07
Fossil Inc 125.62 -2.03 InftSpdw 25.82 -.18
FosterWhl 23.72 +.24 Intersil 11.26 +.04
Francescn 30.72 +.59 Intuit 60.14 -.04
FredsInc 14.02 -.04 InvBncp 14.94 +.02
FreightCar 23.90 -2.07 InvRIEst 7.75
FronfterCm 4.33 +.07 IridiumCm 9.32 +.22
FuelSysSol 25.84 +.03 IronwdPh 13.56 -.39
FuelCell 1.84 -.06 Isis 8.54 +.14
FultonFnd 10.63 +.07 IstaPh 8.48 -.10
Itron 44.65 -2.28
IvanhoeEn .97 -.04
GTAdvTc 8.40 -.02 Ida 12.66 -75
GalenaBio 1.61 +.16
Garmin 46.89 -.22
GenProbe 67.13 +.21 JA Solar 1.91 +.08
Gentex 25.51 -.05 JDASoft 26.95 -.03
Genfivah 8.35 +.18 JDS Uniph 14.21 +.06
GeoEye 23.72 -.01 JackHenry 33.83 -.32
Geores 34.65 +1.40 JacklnBox 23.94 -.15
GeronCp 1.79 +.08 Jamba 2.21 +.04
GigaMedia 1.39 -.03 JamesRiv 6.11 +.18
GileadSci 46.73 -.43 JazzPhrm 46.58 -.18
GlacierBc 15.50 +.18 JetBlue 5.15 -.22
Gleacher 1.35 +.03 JiveSoftn 26.01 +.46
GIbSpcMet 15.84 +.51 JoeJeansh 1.08 +.05
GluMobile 3.96 +.02 KIT Digitl 8.75 +.24
GolLNGLtd 40.40 +.15 KLATnc 51.99 +.11
Google 625.04 +3.91 KeryxBio 4.49 +.37
GrLkDrge 7.27 +.02 KirngldJwl 1.73 -.08
GrWfRes 5.38 -.06 KnightT 14.77 +.38
GreenMtC 51.39 +.46 Kulicke 11.91 +.01
GrifolsSAn 7.29 -.03 LKQCorp 31.17 -.13
Grouponn 18.02 +.18 LSI Indlf 7.21 +.07
GulfRes 2.51 -.06 LamResrch 43.28 -.02
GulfportE 33.01 +.54 Landstar 57.51 -.54
HMN Fn 2.05 Lattce 6.24 -.13
HMS HId s 30.74 -.03 LeapWirlss 10.10 +.36
HSN Inc 37.11 -.30 LexiPhrm 1.82 +.09
HalconRrs 10.11 +.12 LibGlobA 50.68 -.24
Halozyme 11.96 -.25 LibCapA 87.08 -.32
HancHId 35.76 -.38 LibtylntA 19.59 +.42
HanmiFrs 10.40 +.32 LifeTech 46.75 +.25
HansenMed 3.06 +.08 LimelghtN 3.62 -.16
HanwhaSol 1.51 +.07 Lincare 27.18 +.14
Harmonic 5.33 -.02 LincBecs 47.00 -.32
Hasbro 35.45 -.06 LinearTch 33.79 -.16
HawHold 5.10 -.12 LinnEngy 38.49 +.28
HIthStrm 23.00 +.33 Lionbrdg 2.71 +.01
HSchdein 76.27 -.12 LodgeNet 3.49 -.01
HercOffsh 5.22 +.30 LookSmart 1.42 +.03
HercTGC 10.53 -.18 lululemngs 72.04 -2.20
HimaxTch 2.00 +.26 Luminex 22.09 -.53
HiSoftTedich 15.61 -.19
Hologic 21.55 +.29
Home Inns 26.05 -.34 MAPPhm 14.49 -.77
HomeAwn 26.22 -.06 MBFnd 21.42 +.37
HorsehdH 11.56 +.25 MCG Cap 4.41 -.02
HotTopic 9.69 -.20 MGE 44.91 -.44
HudsCity 7.49 +.07 MIPSTech 5.45
HumGen 7.89 +.17 MKS Inst 29.60 -.37
HuntJB 54.64 -.01 MTS 51.45 -.43
HuntBnk 6.43 -.02 MSG 33.02 +.10
IAC Inter 49.73 +.91 MagicJcks 25.45 +1.26
ICG Grp 8.70 -.05 Majesco 2.61 -.02
IPG Photon 55.47 -.38 MAKOSrg 38.49 +.38
iPass 2.52 +.04 MannKd 2.33 +.09
iRobot 27.32 -.42 MktAxess 35.94 +.74
iShAsiaexJ 57.88 +.06 MarvellT 15.38 -.25


Masimo 21.89 +.12
Mattel 33.06 -.30
Madmlntg 28.62 -.05
MaxwllT 18.65 -.12
MedAssets 13.61 -.32
MedicAcin 5.30 -.06
MediCo 20.60 -.50
Medivafton 71.21 -.35
MelcoCrwn 13.72 -.18
MEMSIC 5.20 +.25
MentorGr 15.15 -.35
Methanx 32.57
Microchp 36.48 -.41
MicronT 8.82 -.01
MicrosSys 55.29 -.16
MicroSemi 21.47 -.22
Microsoft 32.60 -.25
MillerHer 21.50
Misonix 2.14 +.02
Mitcham 21.25 -.46
MitekSys 12.14 +.20
Molex 27.83 -.12
Momenta 15.59 +.09
MonstrBvs 59.54 -.17
Motridty 1.20 -.01
Mylan 22.89 -.08
MyriadG 25.37 +.42
NIl HIdg 17.47 +.76
NPS Phm 6.72 -.18
NXP Semi 26.27 +.65
NasdOMX 26.61 -.14
Natlnstrm 27.62
NatPenn 9.14 -.05
NektarTh 7.55 -.07
NetApp 43.39 +.06
Netease 54.93 +.92
Netflb 109.96 -.21
NtScout 20.24 -.49
NetSolTh .40
NetSpend 7.68 -.27
NeurMtxrs .78 +.06
Neurcrine 8.51 +.01
NewsCpA 20.01 -.18
NewsCpB 20.29 -.14
NobltyH If 7.49 -.51
Nordsons 55.84 -.17
NorTrst 47.27 +.07
NwstBcsh 12.75
NwstPipelf 21.58 +.06
NoviWrls 3.31 +.07
Novavax 1.38 -.01
Novlus 48.35 -.08
NuVasive 16.70 +.09
NuanceCm 26.15 -.16
NuPathe 4.84 +.03
NutriSyst 11.43 -.13
Nvidia 14.60 +.02
NxStageMd 19.13 +.38
OCZTech 8.21 -.17
OCharleys 9.84 +.01
OReillyAu 89.04 -1.17
Odaro 4.68 +.07
OdysMar 3.12 -.12
OldDomFrt 47.71 -1.46
Omnicell 14.49 -.15
OmniVisn 18.88 +.39
OnAssign 14.00 +.42
OnSmcnd 9.09 +.01
OncoGenex 13.81 -3.62
Oncothyr 4.97 +.17
OnyxPh 37.62 +.21
OpenTable 40.39 -.40
OpnwvSy 2.46 +.09
Opnext 1.09 -.01
OptfmerPh 13.00 -.06
Orade 29.74 -.32
OraSure 10.33 +.20
Oredxgen 4.80 +.14
Oritani 13.65 +.17
Orthfx 39.90 -.28
OtterTail 21.91 +.07
Overstk 5.43 +.03

PDL Bb 6.26 -.06
PFChng 40.68 -.59
PMCSra 7.04 -.10
PSSWrld 24.97 -.31


Paccar 47.37 -.38
PacEth rs 1.17 +.03
PacSunwr 1.87 +.01
PanASIv 21.29 -.46
PaneraBrd 161.43 -3.28
ParamTch 27.88 -.43
Parexel 26.37 -.26
ParkStrlg 4.84 -.02
Parlux 5.60 -.02
Patterson 32.36 +.09
PattUTI 18.87 +.62
Paychex 31.83 +.06
Pendrell 2.50
PennantPk 11.12 -.02
PeopUtdF 13.30 +.02
PeregrineP .58 -.02
PerfectWd 16.01 +3.46
Perrigo 101.29 -1.31
PetSmart 57.01 -.48
PetroDev 39.57 +.32
Pharmacyc 25.43 -.01
PhotrIn 6.49 +.09
Polycoms 18.65 +.62
Popular 2.24 +.05
Power-One 4.69 +.31
PwShs QQQ 66.52 -.05
Powrwvrs 2.04 -.02
Presstekh .59 -.02
PriceTR 64.77 +.06
priceline 675.50 +18.25
PrimoWtr 2.06 -.86
PrivateB 15.11 +.03
PrUPShQQQ 11.34 +.02
PrUltPQQQ 114.39 -.25
PrognicsPh 9.48 +.09
ProgrsSoft 23.75 -.34
ProspctCap 10.77 -.07
PureCyde 2.11 -.01
QIAGEN 15.01 -.07
QlikTech 30.01 -1.00
Qlogic 17.35 -.17
Qualcom 65.41 +.20
QuantFuel .77 -.23
QuestSft 24.50 +.50
Questcor 36.97 -.03
QuinStreet 9.74 +.29
RFMicD 4.79 +.05
Radvisn 11.70
Rambus 6.82 +.08
Randgold 101.49 -2.52
RealPage 20.38 -.84
Regenrn 115.33 -.42
RentACt 34.06 -.40
RschMotn 14.38 +.93
ResConn 12.88 +.16
Respnsysn 11.19 +.14
RetailOpp 12.09 +.06
RexEnergy 10.86 +.33
RigelPh 8.43 -.10
RiverbedT 27.63 +.13
RosettaR 53.54 +2.16
RossStrss 55.79 -.56
Rovi Corp 33.91 -.03
RoyGId 63.57 -.67
RoyaleEn 5.70 +.17
RubiconTc 10.65 -.92

SBACom 49.94 +.29
SEI Inv 21.37 +.06
SLMCp 16.27 +.12
SMFEngy 1.47 -1.40
SS&C Tech 22.28 -.03
STEC 9.34 -.06
SVBFnGp 66.17 +.06
SXCHIth 72.00 -1.14
SabraHItc 16.85 +.61
SalixPhm 51.99 +.02
SanderFm 54.10 -.13
SanDisk 50.25 +.55
Sanmina 11.52 -.06
Sapient 12.51 +.03
Satcon h .44
SavientPh 2.00 +.02
Schnitzer 41.98 -.25
Scholastc 36.05 -.31
SdClone 6.19 -.03
SdGames 10.93 -.13


SeagateT 26.71
SearsHIdgs 82.55
SeattGen 19.57
SelCmfrt 31.67
Selectvlns 17.57
Semtech 28.46
Sequenom 4.00
SvcSourcn 15.95
SvArtsrsh .18
Shire 102.91
ShoreTel 5.23
ShuffiMstr 17.83
Shutterfly 32.87
SigaTech h 2.76
SigmaAld 73.41
SignatBk 64.43
SilicGrln 8.50
Silicnlmg 6.00
SilicnMotn 19.90
Slcnware 5.84
SilvStdg 14.66
Sina 74.60
Sinclair 11.66
SinoClnEn 2.57
SiriusXM 2.26
SkyWest 11.10
SkywksSol 28.05
SmartTcg 3.07
SmithWes 6.74
SmithMicro 2.65
SodaStrm 37.19
Sohu.cm 53.88
SolarCap 22.52
Solazymen 15.55
SonicCorp 8.00
Sonus 2.92
SouMoBc 25.38
SpectPh 13.05
Spreadtrm 14.66
Staples 16.42
StarBulk 1.01
StarScient 3.80
Starbucks 53.21
StateBkFn 16.65
SiDynam 15.03
StemCell rs 1.10
Stericyde 86.88
SunHIlth 6.72
SunesisPh 2.51
SunPower 7.81
SusqBnc 10.07
Symantec 18.17
Symetricm 5.69
Synapfcs 35.99
Synopsys 30.35
SyntaPhm 4.78
Syntrolm h 1.09
TDAmeritr 20.10
THQh .58
TICCCap 10.09
TTM TCh 11.85
twtelecom 22.20
TakeTwo 16.03
TaleoA 45.92
Tangoen 18.00
Targacept 7.36
TASER 4.05
TechData 54.00
TICmSys 2.82
Telikh .15
Tellabs 3.95
TeslaMot 35.32
TetraTc 24.00
TevaPhrm 43.08
Texlnst 33.02
TexRdhse 16.71
Theravnce 18.75
TheStreet 2.16
Thoratec 34.22
ThrshdPhm 6.99
TibcoSft 30.52
TibetPhrm 1.38
TiVoInc 11.55
Toplmage 4.30
TowerGrp 22.60
Towerstm 3.97
TownSports 11.50
TractSupp 85.81


+.13 TransceptP 9.17 +.33
-.88 TrimbleN 54.39 -.14
+.36 TripAdv n 34.00 +1.53
-1.53 TriQuint 6.61 -.05
-.06 TrueRelig 25.71 -.31
+.02 TrstNY 5.54 -.04
-.05 Trustmk 25.02 +.09
+.04 UMB Fn 45.83 +.23
+1.52 UTStarcm 1.48 -.04
-.11 UTiWrldwd 16.11 +.34
+.60 UltaSalon 88.58 -.79
-.01 Umpqua 13.27 +.13
+.10 UBWV 30.30 -.27
+.51
+.15 UtdOnln 4.84 +.10
+.04 USEnr 3.10 -.12
+.56 UtdStatns 30.10 +.16
+.08 UtdTherap 47.87 +.37
-.17 UnivDisp 40.54 -1.35
+.04 UnivFor 34.41 -.76
+.48 UranmRs h .93 -.03
-.19 UrbanOut 27.98
.02
-.02
-.43 VCAAnt 22.42 -.18
-.02 VOXXInD 13.15 -.30
-.18 ValVisA 2.00 +.17
ValueClick 20.21 -.07
+.73 VandaPhm 5.11 +.28
+2.83 Veecolnst 32.93 -.47
-.06 Veli 13.40 +.34
-.30 VBradley 33.05 -.53
+.14 Verisign 38.47 +.49
+.03 Vermillion 1.72 +.14
+.20 VertxPh 42.94 +.13
-.19 ViaSat 46.30 +.73
-.07 ViacomB 47.62 +.52
+.07 Vical 3.29 -.01
-.05 VirgnMdah 24.18 -.31
+.14 ViroPhrm 29.42 -.10
+.14 VistaPrt 40.07 +.28
+.02 Vivus 20.25 +.11
+.44 Vocus 13.04
+.48 Vodafobne 26.41 +.12
+.08 Volcano 29.00 -.04
+.50 WarnerCh 16.94 -.28
+.08 WarrenRs 3.53 -.07
-.02 WashFed 17.05 +.21
-.29 WaveSys 1.69 -.06
-.67 Web.com 14.99 +.38
-.42
WebMD 25.61 +.16
+.05 Websense 20.30 +.59
-.37 WendysCo 5.04 +.13
+.01 WernerEnt 25.48 -.26
-.34 Westmrld 12.07 -.11
+.01 Wstptlnng 47.27 +.37
+.08 WetSeal 3.36 -.07
+.10 WholeFd 85.15 -.34
.0 WlshBcp 477 .01
-.12 Wndstrm 12.09 -.05
-.02 Wintrust 35.38 +.23
-.81 Woodward 43.81 -.55
Wynn 126.96 -1.04
-.00 XOMA 2.30 +.18
+.01 Xilinx 37.27 +.39
+.32 Xyratex 16.23 +.16
-.13 YRCrs 8.57 +.34
+.24 Yahoo 15.18 +.29
-.06 Yandexn 24.68 +.71
+.35 Yongye 3.85 +.28
+.09 Zagg 10.00 -.05
-.59 Zalicus 1.01 -.02
+.26 ZeIlqAes n 6.65 -.35
-.01 Zhongpin 8.29 -.02
-.07 ZionBcp 22.28 +.15
-.06
+.18 Ziopharm 5.14 +.10
+.09 Zipcar n 14.30 +.22
+.27 Zogenix 1.93 -.01
+.23 ZollMed 92.70 -.03
-1.47 Zyngan 13.03 -.03


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Yesterday Pvs Day
Argent 4.3510 4.3510
Australia .9446 .9485
Bahrain .3770 .3770
Brazil 1.8007 1.8031
Britain 1.5832 1.5723
Canada .9916 .9913
Chile 482.75 482.48
China 6.3239 6.3300
Colombia 1760.50 1762.50
Czech Rep 18.61 18.73
Denmark 5.6455 5.6767
Dominican Rep 39.02 39.00
Egypt 6.0345 6.0373
Euro .7592 .7635
Hong Kong 7.7628 7.7617
Hungary 219.66 222.31
India 50.135 50.285
Indnsia 9125.00 9173.00
Israel 3.7533 3.7704
Japan 83.36 83.38
Jordan .7095 .7095
Lebanon 1503.50 1504.50
Malaysia 3.0575 3.0570
Mexico 12.6706 12.6462
N. Zealand 1.2137 1.2179
Norway 5.7279 5.7725
Peru 2.674 2.674
Poland 3.13 3.15
Russia 29.2505 29.3625
Singapore 1.2575 1.2620
So. Africa 7.5798 7.6194
So. Korea 1125.85 1125.66
Sweden 6.7477 6.7811
Switzerlnd .9158 .9215
Taiwan 29.52 29.55
Thailand 30.70 30.74
Turkey 1.7951 1.7969
U.A.E. 3.6732 3.6731
Uruguay 19.5199 19.5199
Venzuel 4.2927 4.2949


British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.



Yesterday Pvs Day

Prime Rate 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate 0.75 0.75
Federal Funds Rate .00-.25 .00-.25
Treasuries
3-month 0.08 0.08
6-month 0.14 0.13
5-year 1.12 0.90
10-year 2.29 2.03
30-year 3.40 3.18



FUTURES
Exch Contract Settle Chg

Lt Sweet Crude NYMX Apr 12 107.06 +1.95
Corn CBOT May 12 673 +4
Wheat CBOT May12 672 +71/4
Soybeans CBOT May 12 1374 +5
Cattle CME Apr 12 125.30 -.27
Sugar (world) ICE May12 25.41 -.09
Orange Juice ICE May12 186.90 -.70



SPOT
Yesterday Pvs Day
Gold (troy oz., spot) $1655.50 $1710.90
Silver (troy oz., spot) $32.b/3 $34.1/0
Copper (pound) $3.8/40 $3.8b2b
Platinum (troy oz., spot)1b6/b.b0 $1684.90

NMER = New York Mercantile Exchange. CBOT=
Chicago Board of Trade. CMER = Chicago Mercantile Ex-
change. NCSE = New York Cotton, Sugar & Cocoa Ex-
change. NCTN = New York Cotton Exchange.


I AMEX


I NASDA


YTD YTD
Name Div YId PE Last Chg %Chg Name Div YId PE Last Chg %Chg
AKSteel .20 2.4 ... 8.20 +.30 -.7 Microsoft .80 2.5 12 32.60 -.25 +25.6
AT&Tlnc 1.76 5.6 48 31.59 -.05 +4.5 MotrlaSolu .88 1.7 15 50.53 +.01 +9.2
Ametek .24 .5 21 48.65 -.06 +15.6 MotrlaMob ... ... ... 39.32 -.28 +1.3
ABInBev 1.16 1.6 ... 72.34 +.94 +18.6 NextEraEn 2.40 4.0 13 60.16 -.09 -1.2
BkofAm .04 .4 ... 9.80 +.56 +76.3 Penney .80 2.2 22 36.24 -.75 +3.1
CapCtyBk ...... 27 7.72 -.05-19.2 PiedmOfc .80 4.5 14 17.68 +.14 +3.8
CntryLink 2.90 7.4 23 39.08 -.13 +5.1 ProgrssEn 2.48 4.6 27 53.60 -.05 -4.3
Citigrp rs .04 .1 10 36.69 +.42 +39.5 RegionsFn .04 .6 38 6.41 -.03 +49.1
CmwREIT 2.00 10.8 16 18.55 +.20 +11.5 SearsHIdgs .33 82.55 -.88+159.8
Disney .60 1.4 16 43.19 -.28 +15.2 Smucker 1.92 2.5 20 78.08 +.32 -.1
EnterPT 3.00 6.5 26 46.14 +.11 +5.6 SprintNex ... ... 2.89 +.09 +23.5
ExxonMbI 1.88 2.2 10 86.44 +.35 +2.0 Texlnst .68 2.1 18 33.02 +.24 +13.4
FordM .20 1.6 7 12.51 -.39 +16.3 TimeWarn 1.04 2.9 13 35.91 +.07 -.6
GenElec .68 3.4 16 20.20 +.04 +12.8 UniFirst .15 .3 15 59.67 -.61 +5.2
HomeDp 1.16 2.4 20 49.05 -.15 +16.7 VerizonCm 2.00 5.1 47 39.57 +.03 -1.4
Intel .84 3.0 12 27.73 -.02 +14.4 Vodafone 2.10 8.0 26.41 +.12 -5.8
IBM 3.00 1.5 16206.01 +.01 +12.0 WalMart 1.59 2.6 13 60.84 -.39 +1.8
Lowes .56 1.8 21 30.41 -.28 +19.8 Walgrn .90 2.6 12 34.21 +.44 +3.5
McDnlds 2.80 2.9 19 97.66 -.38 -2.7 YRCrs 8.57 +34-14.0







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I MUTUALFUDSS I


Name NAV Chg
Advance Capital I:
Balancp 16.91 +.01
Retlnc 8.75
Alger Funds B:
SmCapGr 7.19 -.01
AllianceBern A:
BalanApx 16.85 -.03
GIbThGrAp 68.40 +.33
SmCpGrA 39.46 -.15
AllianceBern Adv:
LgCpGrAd 29.89 +.03
AllianceBern B:
GlbThGrBt 58.89 +.28
GrowthBt 27.76 +.03
SCpGrBt 31.58 -.11
AllianceBern C:
SCpGrCt 31.74 -.12
Allianz Fds Insti:
NFJDvVI 12.66 +.01
SmCpVi 31.50 -.01
Allianz Funds C:
AGICGrthC 26.61 +.03
TargetC t 15.99 +.02
Amer Beacon Insti:
LgCaplnst 21.27 +.04
Amer Beacon Inv:
LgCaplnv 20.19 +.04
Ameri Century 1 st:
Growth 28.55
Amer Century Adv:
EqGroAp 24.14
EqlncAp 7.68 -.01
Amer Century Inv:
AIICapGr 31.21 +.02
Balanced 17.18 +.01
DivBnd 10.98
Eqlnc 7.68 -.01
Growthl 28.30 -.01
Heritagel 23.08
IncGro 27.19 -.02
InfAdjBd 12.87 +.02
IntDisc 9.82 +.06
InfiGrol 10.83 +.08
New Opp 8.39
OneChAg 12.97 +.01
OneChMd 12.47 +.01
RealEstl 22.01 +.11
Ultra 26.24 +.04
Valuelnv 6.24 +.01
American Funds A:
AmcpAp 21.23 +.01
AMuiAp 27.62 -.03
BalApx 19.65 -.08
BondAp 12.62 +.01
CaplBApx 51.27 -.41
CapWGApx 35.76 -.07
CapWAp 20.92 +.03
EupacAp 39.95 +.15
FdlnvApx 39.41 -.03
GovtApp 14.31
GwthAp 32.84 +.06
HI TrAp 11.09 +.01
IncoApx 17.49 -.15
IntBdAp 13.63
InfiGrlncA px 29.93 -.01
ICAAp 30.01 +.02
LtTEBAp 16.13 -.02
NEcoAp 27.59 +.04
NPerAp 29.73 +.07
NwWrldA 52.35 +.11
STBFAp 10.08
SmCpAp 38.80 +.10
TxExAp 12.68 -.03
WshAp 30.65 +.02
Ariel Investments:
Apprec 45.23 -.04
Ariel 49.73 -.04
Artio Global Funds:
InDEql r 25.77 +.17
IntEqll I r 10.86 +.07
Artisan Funds:
Intl 23.03 +.12
Intlnst 23.16 +.12
InfiValr 28.08 +.14
MidCap 39.72 -.07
MidCapVal 21.72 -.07
SCapVal 16.46 -.02
Baron Funds:
Asset 51.98 +.11
Growth 55.89 +.09
SmallCap 25.97 +.03
Bernstein Fds:
IntDur 13.79
DivMu 14.73 -.02
TxMgdlnt 14.21 +.12
BlackRock A:
EqtyDiv 19.60
GIAIAr 19.69 +.04
HiYlnvA 7.75
InflOpAp 31.50 +.11
BlackRock B&C:
GIAICt 18.32 +.04
BlackRock Instl:
BaVII 27.51 +.06
EquityDv 19.65
GIbAllocr 19.78 +.04
HiYldBd 7.75
Brinson Funds Y:
HiYldlY 6.20
BruceFund 396.91 +.92
Buffalo Funds:
SmCapn 28.09 -.15
CGM Funds:
Focus n 30.38 -.10
MutI n 28.22
Realty n 29.43 +.09
CRM Funds:
MdCpVII 29.79 -.03
Calamos Funds:
GrwthAp 53.79 +.13
Calvert Invest:
Incop 15.81 +.01
InfEqAp 13.82 +.11
SocialAp 30.26 +.03
SocBdp 15.79 +.01
SocEqAp 38.05 +.05
TxFLgp 16.05 -.03
Cohen & Steers:
RltyShrs 66.12 +.39
Columbia Class A:
Acorn t 30.78 -.01
DivEqlnc 10.56 +.01
DivrBd 5.09 +.01
DivOpptyA 8.70 +.01
LgCapGrA t26.14 +.03
LgCorQAp 6.46
MdCpGrOp 10.58 +.04
MidCVlOpp 8.22 -.01
PBModAp 11.19 +.02
TxEAp 13.83 -.02
SelCommA49.40 -.12
FrontierA 11.33 +.01
GlobTech 23.37 -.05
Columbia Cl 1,T&G:
EmMktOp I n 8.54 -.02
Columbia Class Z:
Acorn Z 31.87 -.01
AcornlntZ 39.25 +.12
DivlncoZ 14.67
IntBdZ 9.33 +.01
lntTEBd 10.79 -.02
LgCapGr 14.21 -.01
LgCpldxZ 27.23 +.03
MdCpldxZ 12.17 -.01
MdCpVIZ p 14.42
ValRestr 50.00 +.16
Credit Suisse Comm:
ComRett 8.49 +.03
DFA Funds:
InflCorEqn 10.55 +.08
USCorEql n12.13
USCorEq2nll.97 +.01
DWS Invest A:
CommAp 17.86 +.02
DWS Invest S:
CorPlslnc 10.88 +.01
EmMkGrr 16.96 -.07
EnhEmMk 10.64
EnhGlbBdr 10.03 +.02
GIbSmCGr 39.25 +.07
GIbliem 22.99 +.10
Gold&Prc 15.19 -.06
GrolncS 18.19
HiYldTx 12.56 -.02
IntTxAMT 11.86 -.03
InflFdS 41.67 +.21
LgCpFoGr 33.48
LatAmrEq 42.99
MgdMuniS 9.28 -.01
MATFS 14.84 -.03
SP500S 18.73 +.02
WorldDiv 23.65 +.10
Davis Funds A:
NYVenA 36.42 +.07
Davis Funds B:
NYVenB 34.80 +.06
Davis Funds C:
NYVenC 35.11 +.06
Davis Funds Y:
NYVenY 36.81 +.07
Delaware Invest A:
Diverlncp 9.17
SMIDCapG 25.98 +.07
TxUSAp 11.79 -.02
Delaware Invest B:
SelGrBt 35.91 +.10
Dimensional Fds:
EmMCrEqn20.31 -.06
EmMktV 31.08 -.10
IntSmVan 16.02 +.13
LargeCo 11.07 +.02
TAUSCorE2 n9.74
USLgVan 21.82 +.10
US Micron 14.78 -.03
USTgdVal 17.30 -.03
US Small n 23.09 -.05


USSmVa 26.36 -.01
InttSmCon 15.87 +.12
EmgMktn 27.48 -.08
Fixd n 10.33
IntGFxlnn 12.72 -.01
IntVa n 16.67 +.13
Glb5Fxlncnll.02
TM USTgtV 22.76 -.03
2YGIFxdn 10.11
DFARIEn 25.15 +.14
Dodge&Cox:
Balanced 75.06 +.19
Income 13.65 +.01
IntStk 33.42 +.24
Stock 115.80 +.37
DoubleUne Funds:
TRBdl 11.18
TRBdNp 11.18
Dreyfus:
Aprec 44.40 +.06
CTA 12.09 -.03
CorVA 22.47
Dreyf 9.74 +.01
DryMid r 29.55 -.03
GNMA 15.99 +.02


Name NAV Chg
GrChinaAr 33.42 -.12
HiYIdA p 6.44
StratValA 29.84 +.04
TechGroA 35.62 +.04
DreihsAclnc 10.67
Driehaus Funds:
EMktGr 29.39 +.01
EVPTxMEmI 47.72 -.03
Eaton Vance A:
ChinaAp 17.35 -.10
AMTFMuInc 9.96 -.03
MuIDCGrA 8.77
InBosA 5.83
LgCpVal 18.86 +.01
NatlMunlnc 9.90 -.02
SpEqtA 16.95 +.03
TradGvA 7.42 +.01
Eaton Vance B:
HlthSBt 9.74 +.02
NatlMulnc 9.90 -.02
Eaton Vance C:
GovtC p 7.40
NatMunInc 9.90 -.02
Eaton Vance I:
FltgRt 8.98
GblMacAbR 10.00 -.01
LgCapVal 18.91 +.01
FBR Funds:
Focuslnvtn 49.86 -.27
FMI Funds:
LgCappn 16.92 -.01
FPA Funds:
Nwlnc 10.68 -.01
FPACres 28.60 +.06
Fairholme 30.50 +.18
Federated A:
MidGrStA 38.17
MuSecA 10.39 -.02
TDRtBdp 11.37 +.01
Federated Instl:
KaufmnR 5.49 +.01
TotRetBd 11.37 +.01
StrValDvlS 4.88
Fidelity Adv FocT:
EnergyT 38.84 +.61
HItCarT 22.96 -.01
Fidelity Advisor A:
Nwlnsghp 22.39 +.01
StrlnA 12.35 +.01
Fidelity Advisor C:
Nwlnsghtn 21.20 +.01
Fidelity Advisor I:
EqGrln 66.19 +.06
EqlnIln 25.52
IntBdlIn 11.45
Nwlnsgtl n 22.67 +.01
Fidelity AdvisorT:
BalancT 16.33 +.01
DivGrTp 13.32 +.03
EqGrT p 61.92 +.05
EqInT 25.12
GrOppT 41.87 +.01
HilnAdTp 9.95 +.01
IntBdT 11.42 -.01
MulncTp 13.33 -.03
OvrseaT 17.70 +.16
STFiT 9.28
StkSelAIICp 20.13 +.02
Fidelity Freedom:
FF2010n 14.00 +.01
FF2010K 12.94 +.01
FF2015n 11.71 +.02
FF2015K 13.00 +.02
FF2020n 14.18 +.02
FF2020K 13.43 +.01
FF2025n 11.83 +.02
FF2025K 13.61 +.02
FF2030n 14.09 +.02
FF2030K 13.77 +.02
FF2035n 11.71 +.02
FF2035K 13.91 +.02
FF2040n 8.17 +.01
FF2040K 13.97 +.03
FF2045 n 9.68 +.02
Incomen 11.60 +.01
Fidelity Invest:
AIISectEq 12.79 +.02
AMgr50On 16.14 +.02
AMgr70rn 17.03 +.03
AMgr20rn 13.13 +.01
Balancn 19.82 +.02
BalancedK 19.82 +.02
BlueChGr n 50.03 +.03
CAMunn 12.53 -.02
Canada n 53.29 +.07
CapApn 28.63 -.10
CapDevOn 11.70 +.01
Cplncrn 9.23
ChinaRg r 28.75 -.05
CngS 465.09
CTMunrn 11.84 -.02
Contra n 76.78 +.05
ContraK 76.74 +.05
CnvSc n 25.75 -.02
DisEqn 24.19 +.03
DiscEqF 24.16 +.03
Divlntln 28.95 +.18
DivrslntKr 28.91 +.18
DivStkOn 16.79
DivGth n 30.28 +.07
EmergAs r n28.81 -.09
EmrMkn 23.35 -.06
Eq Incn 45.48
EQII n 19.00 -.02
ECapAp 17.96 +.20
Europe 29.58 +.33
Exch 323.88
Exportn 23.38 +.02
Fidel n 35.45 -.02
Fifty rn 19.69 -.03
FItRateHi r n 9.80
FrlnOnen 28.74 +.08
GNMAn 11.80
Govtlnc 10.64
GroCon 96.53 -.06
Grolncn 20.61 +.01
GrowCoF 96.46 -.05
GrowthCoK 96.47 -.05
GrStratrn 21.48 +.08
Highlncr n 9.01
Indepn n 25.66 -.01
InProBdn 12.89 +.01
IntBdn 10.87 -.01
IntGovn 10.88
IntmMun 10.45 -.02
InftDiscn 31.23 +.21
InDSCprn 20.11 +.16
InvGrBdn 11.67 +.01
InvGBn 7.72 +.01
Japanr 10.14 +.04
JpnSm n 8.86 +.04
LgCapVal 11.32
LatAm 55.87 +.12
LevCoSt n 29.65 -.04
LowPrn 40.71 +.06
LowPriKr 40.69 +.06
Magellnn 73.14 +.07
MagellanK 73.08 +.08
MDMurn 11.38 -.02
MAMunn 12.41 -.02
MegaCpStknl11.52 +.01
MIMunn 12.29 -.02
MidCap n 30.33 -.01
MNMunn 11.84 -.02
MtgSec n 11.19
Munilncn 13.14 -.03
NJ Munrpn 12.04 -.02
NwMktr n 16.65 -.01
NwMilln 32.52 -.03
NYMunn 13.35 -.03
OTCn 64.05 +.18
OhMunn 12.04 -.03
1lOOndex 9.90 +.01
Ovrsea n 30.84 +.25
PcBas n 24.41 +.06
PAMunrn 11.17 -.01
Purihin 19.45
PuritanK 19.45
RealEn 30.33 +.18
SAIISecEqF 12.79 +.01
SCmdtyStrtn 9.31 +.06
SCmdtyStrF n9.33 +.06
SrEmrgMkt 16.77 -.04
SrslntGrw 11.50 +.07
SerlnuGrF 11.52 +.07
SrslntVal 8.86 +.05
SerlnfiValF 8.88 +.05
SrlnvGrdF 11.67 +.01
StlntMu n 10.80 -.01
STBF n 8.53
SmCapDisc n22.91 -.04
SmllCpSrn 18.81 -.04
SCpValu r 15.86 -.04
SllSelLCVrnll.41 +.01
SllSlcACap n27.86 +.03
SllSelSmCp 20.26 -.02
Sfratlncn 11.05
SfrReRtr 9.55 +.03
TotalBdn 10.95
Trend n 77.80 +.02
USBIn 11.71
Utilityn 17.46 +.02
ValStratn 29.07 -.01
Value n 72.79 +.07
Wrldwn 19.58 +.04
Fidelity Selects:
Air n 38.22 -.32
Banking n 19.08 +.01
Biotchn 100.52 -.08
Brokrn 49.17 -.03
Chemn 112.59 +.47
ComEquip n24.72 +.09
Comp n 66.64 -.02
ConDisn 26.68 -.14
ConsuFnn 13.33 +.02
ConStapn 76.40 +.10
CstHon 42.27 -.13
DfAer n 86.72 -.41


Elecr'n 54.17 +.14
Enrgy n 55.48 +.87
EngSvn 72.56 +1.61
EnvAltEnrnl6.58 +.01
FinSv n 60.31 +.03
Goldurn 41.39 -.20
Healthn 134.54 -.04
Insur n 48.64 -.27
Leisr n 110.12 -.47
Material 69.59 +.12
MedDI n 62.31
MdEqSysn 28.68 +.03
Mulfdn 49.07 -.12
NtGas n 32.71 +.25
Pharmn 14.30 +.01
Retail n 59.97 -.16
Softwrn 92.80 -.14
Techn 104.79 -.11
Telcm n 47.20 +.15
Trans n 53.96 -.24
UtilGr n 53.31 +.03
Wireless n 7.80 +.04
Fidelity Spartan:
ExtMklnn 40.60 -.03


I:L;p^ ;r-.Bin'l I;:1Tff iB^B'
Here are the 1,000 biggest mutual funds listed on Nasdaq. Tables show the fund name, sell
price or Net Asset Value (NAV) and daily net change.
Name: Name of mutual fund and family
NAV: Net asset value.
Chg: Net change in price of NAV
Data based on NAVs reported to Lipper by 6 p.m. Eastern.


Name NAV Chg
5001dxlnvn 49.91 +.06
5001dx I 49.92 +.06
Infllnxlnvn 33.52 +.28
TotMktlnvn 40.67 +.03
USBondI 11.71
Fidelity Spart Adv:
ExMktAdrn 40.61 -.02
5001dxAdvn49.91 +.05
IntAd r n 33.53 +.28
TotMktAd r n40.68 +.04
First Eagle:
GIbIA 49.15 +.02
OverseasA 22.21 +.03
First Investors A
BIChpAp
GloblA p 6.86 +.03
GovtAp 11.53 +.01
GrolnAp 16.41
IncoAp 2.55
MATFAp 12.24 -.01
MITFAp 12.54 -.03
NJTFAp 13.44 -.03
NYTFAp 14.94 -.04
OppA p 29.87 +.03
PATFAp 13.44 -.03
SpSitAp 25.68
TxExA p 10.05 -.02
TotRtAp 16.57
ValueBp 7.62 +.01
Forum Funds:
AbsStrlr 11.02 -.01
Frank/Temp Frnk A:
AdjUS p 8.88
ALTFAp 11.61 -.02
AZTFAp 11.19 -.02
CallnsAp 12.48 -.02
CAIntAp 11.81 -.03
CalTFAp 7.26 -.02
COTFAp 12.13 -.02
CTTFAp 11.25 -.02
CvtScAp 15.18 +.01
DblTFA 12.16 -.03
DynTchA 33.66 +.05
EqlncAp 18.06
Fedlntp 12.16 -.03
FedTFAp 12.31 -.03
FLTFAp 11.78 -.02
FoundAlp 10.84 +.04
GATFAp 12.36 -.02
GoldPrMA 36.52 -.06
GrwthAp 50.30 -.02
HYTFA p 10.49 -.03
HilncA 2.01
IncomAp 2.18
InsTFAp 12.25-.03
NYITFp 11.58 -.03
LATFAp 11.73 -.03
LMGvScA 10.37 -.01
MDTFAp 11.77 -.02
MATFAp 11.87 -.02

MITFAp 12.14 -.02
MNInsA 12.60 -.04
MOTFAp 12.46 -.03
NJTFAp 12.42 -.02
NYTFAp 11.91 -.02
NCTFAp 12.65 -.02
OhiolAp 12.79 -.02
ORTFAp 12.29 -.03
PATFAp 10.67 -.02
ReEScAp 16.05 +.08
RisDvAp 37.01 -.06
SMCpGrA 39.10
Stratlncp 10.50 +.01
TtlRtnAp 10.19 +.01
USGovAp 6.88 +.01
UfIsAp 13.18 -.02
VATFAp 11.96 -.03
Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv:
GlbBdAdvn l3.19 +.02
IncmeAd 2.17 +.01
Frank/Temp Frnk C:
IncomC t 2.20
USGvCt 6.83
Frank/Temp Mtl A&B:
SharesA 21.69 +.03
Frank/Temp Temp A:
DvMktAp 24.04 -.04
ForgnA p 6.81 +.05
GIBdAp 13.23 +.02
GrwthAp 18.58 +.09
WorldAp 15.70 +.07
Frank/Temp Tmp Adv:
GrthAv 18.57 +.08
Frank/Temp Tmp B&C:
DevMktC 23.45 -.04
ForgnC p 6.67 +.05
GIBdCp 13.25 +.01
Franklin Mutual Ser:
QuestA 17.35
GE Elfun S&S:
S&S Inc 11.72 +.01
US Eqty 44.11
GMOTrust Ill:
CHIE 22.63 +.05
Quality 23.89 +.01
GMOTrust IV:
IniGrEq 23.10 +.13
IntlntrVl 20.66 +.16
GMOTrustVI:
EmgMktsr 11.97
Quality 23.90 +.01
StrFxInc 16.35
Gabelli Funds:
Asset 52.13 +.07
Goldman Sachs A:
MdCVAp 37.59 +.07
Goldman Sachs Inst:
GrOppt 25.72 +.03
HiYield 7.15 -.01
HYMuni n 8.85 -.02
MidCapV 37.87 +.07
Harbor Funds:
Bond 12.44
CapAplnst 43.50 +.01
IntlInv t 60.63 +.41
Int r 61.21 +.41
Hartford Fds A:
CpAppAp 33.67 +.01
DivGthAp 20.74 +.02
IntOpAp 14.69 +.09
Hartford FdsY:
CapAppl n 33.68 +.01
Hartford HLS IA:
CapApp 43.31 +.09
Div&Gr 21.31 +.03
Advisers 21.00 +.01
TotRetBd 11.77
Hennessy Funds:
CorGrllOrig
Hussman Funds:
StrTotRetr 12.25
StrGrowth 11.59 -.03
ICON Fds:
EnergyS 19.96 +.27
HlthcareS 15.84 -.02
ISI Funds:
NoAmp 7.90 -.01
IVA Funds:
WldwideAt 16.42 +.02
WSdwideIr 16.43 +.03
Invesco Fds Invest:
DivrsDivp 12.96 -.01
Invesco Funds:
Energy 41.76 +.72
Utliies 16.68
Invesco Funds A:
Chart p 17.79 +.03
CmstkA 17.14 +.05
Constp 24.82 +.04
EqIncA 8.93 +.01
GrIncAp 20.34 +.03
HilncMu p 7.92 -.01
HiYldp 4.23
HYMuA 9.65 -.01
InfiGrow 27.85 +.12
MunilnA 13.51 -.03
PATFA 16.49 -.02
US MortgA 12.99
Invesco Funds B:
CapDevt 14.80 +.02
MunilnB 13.49 -.02
US Mortg 12.92
Ivy Funds:
AssetSCt 24.93 +.10
AssetStAp 25.70 +.11
AssetSkI r 25.92 +.10
JPMorgan A Class:
CoreBdA 11.83
JPMorgan C Class:
CoreBdp 11.89
JP Morgan Insth:
MdCpVal n 26.26 -.06
JPMorgan R C:
CoreBond nil.83
ShtDurBd 10.97
JPMorgan Select:
USEquityn 11.29 +.01
JPMorgan Sel CIs:
CoreBdn 11.82
HighYld n 7.93 +.01
lnfrTFBd n 11.23 -.02
LgCpGr 24.78 +.03
ShtDurBd n 10.97
USLCCrPIs n22.50 +.02
JanusT Shrs:
BalancdT 26.76 +.03
ContrarnT 14.36 +.07
EnterprT 66.51 +.19
FIxBndT 10.64
GlUfeSciTr 27.99 -.03
GIbSelT 11.69 +.07
GITechTr 18.72 +.02
Grw&lncT 34.12 +.04
JanusT 31.75 +.03
OvrseasTr 39.28 -.14


PrkMCValT 22.35 +.06
ResearchT 32.40
ShTmBdT 3.08
TwentyT 61.66 -.01
VentureT 58.67 -.05
WrldWTr 46.57 +.11
Jensen Funds:
QualGrthJn29.31 -.03
John Hancock A:
BondAp 15.74
RgBkA 14.43 +.05
SWlnAp 6.60


Name NAV Chg
John Hancock B:
StrlncB 6.60
John Hancock CI 1:
LSAggr 12.75 +.02
LSBalanc 13.30 +.01
LSConsrv 13.14 +.01
LSGrwth 13.29 +.02
LSModer 13.05
Lazard Instl:
EmgMktl 19.92 -.01
Lazard Open:
EmgMkOp 20.39
Legg Mason A:
CBAgGrp 125.16 +.34
CBApprp 15.23
CBLCGrp 23.25 +.06
GCIAIICOp 8.60 +.08
WAHilncAt 6.00
WAMgMup 16.62 -.04
Legg Mason B:
CBLgCGrt 21.21 +.05
Legg Mason C:
CMSplnvp 30.31 -.11
CMValTrp 42.02 -.03
Longleaf Partners:
Partners 30.37
SmCap 28.14 -.01
Loomis Sayles:
LSBondl 14.67 +.01
StrlncC 15.25 +.01
LSBondR 14.61 +.01
StrlncA 15.17 +.01
Loomis Sayles Inv:
InvGrBdAp 12.34 +.01
InvGrBdY 12.35 +.02
Lord Abbett A:
AffilAp 11.88 +.01
FundlEq 13.54
BdDebAp 7.96
ShDurlncAp 4.60
MidCpAp 17.72 +.01
Lord Abbett C:
ShDurlncC t 4.63
Lord Abbett F:
ShtDurlnco 4.59
MFS Funds A:
MITA 21.26
MIGA 17.57 +.01
EmGA 47.57 +.01
HilnA 3.48
MFLA 9.65
TotRA 14.96 +.01
UtilA 17.71 +.01
ValueA 25.05 -.01
MFS Funds B:
MIGBn 15.79
GvScBn 10.43
HilnBn 3.48 -.01
MulnBn 8.67 -.02
TotRBn 14.96 +.01
MFS Funds I:
ReInT 15.40 +.10
Valuel 25.17 -.01
MFS Funds InstI:
InDEqn 18.35 +.13
MainStay Funds A:
HiYIdBA 5.96
MainStay Funds B:
ConvBt 15.46 +.06
GovtBt 8.87
HYIdBBt 5.93
IncmBldr 17.18 +.01
InDEqB 10.59 +.05
MainStay Funds I:
ICAPSIEq 37.88 +.05
Mairs & Power:
Growth n 80.03 -.18
Manning&Napier Fds:
WIdOppA 7.73 +.07
Matthews Asian:
AsianGllnv 16.65 +.06
Indialnvr 17.00 -.08
PacTgrlnv 22.71 -.01
MergerFdn 15.81 +.02
Meridian Funds:
Growth 46.83 -.08
Metro West Fds:
TotRetBd 10.50
TotRtBdl 10.50 +.01
Midas Funds:
Midas Fdt 3.54 -.02
Monetta Funds:
Monettan 16.03 +.11
Morgan Stanley B:
GlobStratB 15.78 +.05
MorganStanley Inst:
IniEql 13.87 +.11
MCapGrl 38.39 +.05
Muhlenkn 57.09 -.15
Munder Funds A:
GwthOppA 29.30 +.05
Munder Funds Y:
MCpCGrYn32.19 +.01
Mutual Series:
BeacnZ 12.99 +.03
GblDiscA 29.42 +.01
GlbDiscZ 29.80 +.01
QuestZ 17.50
SharesZ 21.87 +.04
Neuberger&Berm Fds:
Focus 21.31
Geneslnst 49.63 +.03
Int r 16.72 +.16
Partner 26.96 +.06
Neuberger&Berm Tr:
Genesis 51.49 +.03
Nicholas Group:
HilncaIn 9.71 +.01
Nichn 47.92 -.13
Northern Funds:
Bondldx 10.83
HiYFxlnc 7.32
SmCpld 9.17
Stldx 17.45
Technly 16.79
Nuveen Cl A:
LtMBAp 11.14 -.02
Nuveen Cl R:
lntDMBd 9.19 -.01
HYMunBd 15.86 -.02
Nuveen Cl Y:
RealEstn 20.66 +.10
Oak Assoc Fds:
WhitOkSG 43.23 +.05
Oakmark Funds I:
Eqtylncr 29.22 +.09
Global 23.24 +.02
Intl r 19.82 +.15
Oakmark 47.70 +.12
Select 32.37 +.23
Old Westbury Fds:
GlobOpp 7.28
GIbSMdCap 15.28 +.02
LgCapStrat 9.93 +.04
Oppenheimer A:
AMTFMu 6.75 -.01
AMTFrNY 11.80 -.02
CAMuniAp 8.28 -.01
CapApAp 48.80 +.10
CaplncAp 8.90 +.01
ChmplncAp 1.82
DvMktAp 33.90 +.23
Discp 61.69 -.20
EquityA 9.54
GlobAp 61.37 +.29
GIbOppA 31.64 +.13
GblStfrlncA 4.21
Gold p 34.42 -.23
IntBdA p 6.32
LtdTmMu 14.82 -.01
MnStFdA 36.60 +.10
PAMuniAp 11.34 -.02
SenFltRtA 8.24
USGv p 9.58
Oppenheimer B:
AMTFMu 6.71 -.01
AMTFrNY 11.80 -.03
CplncB t 8.71 +.01
ChmplncBt 1.82
EquityB 8.80
GblSfrlncB 4.23
Oppenheimer Roch:
LtdNYAp 3.36
RoMuAp 16.46 -.03
RcNtMuA 7.17 -.01
Oppenheimer Y:
DevMktY 33.53 +.24
InfiBdY 6.32
IntGrowY 28.99 +.24
PIMCO Admin PIMS:
ShtTmAd p 9.78
TotRtAd 11.05
PIMCO Instl PIMS:
AlAsetAutr 10.74
AIIAsset 12.26
ComodRR 6.94 +.03
Divlnc 11.61
EmgMkCur 10.53 +.03
EmMkBd 11.69
Fltlnc r 8.71 +.01
ForBdUnr 10.63 +.01
FrgnBd 10.61 -.04
HiYld 9.31
InvGrCp 10.56
LowDu 10.38
ModDur 10.71
RealRet 11.51 +.03
RealRhil 11.95 +.01
ShortT 9.78
TotRt 11.05
TRII 10.67
TRIll 9.74
PIMCO Funds A:
AIIAstAutt 10.67
ComRRp 6.79 +.02
LwDurA 10.38


RealRtAp 11.95 +.01
TotRtA 11.05
PIMCO Funds C:
AllAstAut t 10.55
RealRtCp 11.95 +.01
TotRtCt 11.05
PIMCO Funds D:
TRtnp 11.05
PIMCO Funds P:
AstAIIAuthP 10.73
TotRtnP 11.05
Parnassus Funds:
Eqtylnco n 28.26


Name NAV Chg
Perm Port Funds:
Permanent 48.81 +.09
Pioneer Funds A:
BondA p 9.64
InflVaIA 19.40 +.09
PionFdAp 42.66 +.05
ValueAp 11.91 +.01
Pioneer Funds B:
HiYIdBt 10.23
Pioneer Funds C:
HiYIdC t 10.34
Pioneer Fds Y:
CullenVY 18.70 -.06
Price Funds:
Balance 20.70 +.05
BIChip n 45.27 +.08
CABondn 11.18 -.02
CapAppnn 22.56 +.01
DivGron 25.59 +.01
EmMktB n 13.49
EmEurop 19.52 +.07
EmMktS n 32.80 +.03
Eqlncn 25.67
Eqlndexn 37.99 +.05
Europen 15.31 +.16
GNMAn 10.09
Growth n 37.41 +.08
Gr&lncn 22.18 +.01
HlthSci n 37.77 +.01
HiYield n 6.76 -.01
InsDCpG 18.96 +.06
InstHiYld n 9.52 -.01
IntfBond n 9.76 +.03
IntDisn 43.44 +.27
Intl G&l 13.04 +.10
InpStksn 14.17 +.10
Japan n 7.93 +.01
LatAm n 45.39 +.07
MDShrtn 5.23 -.01
MDBondn 10.82 -.01
MidCapn 59.87 +.04
MCapVal n 23.98
NAmern 35.81 +.03
N Asian 15.92 -.03
New Eran 46.51 +.68
N Horiz n 35.89 -.08
N Incn 9.68
NYBondn 11.53 -.03
OverS SFn 8.27 +.06
PSIncn 16.96 +.02
RealAssetrn11.35 +.08
RealEstn 20.32 +.13
R2010n 16.22 +.03
R2015n 12.65 +.02
R2020n 17.57 +.03
R2025 n 12.91 +.03
R2030n 18.58 +.04
R2035n 13.17 +.03
R2040n 18.76 +.04
R2045n 12.49 +.03
SciTecn 30.78 +.09
ShtBd n 4.84
SmCpStk n 35.53 -.07
SmCapVal n38.20 -.08
SpecGrn 19.28 +.05
Speclnn 12.67
TFIncn 10.25 -.02
TxFrHn 11.28 -.01
TxFrSI n 5.68 -.01
USTIntn 6.14 -.01
USTLgn 12.78 +.01
VABondn 11.98 -.02
Value n 25.37 +.03
Principal Inv:
LgCGIllIn 10.40 +.03
LT20201n 12.35 +.02
LT20301n 12.26 +.02
Prudential Fds A:
BlendA 18.74 +.03
HiYIdAp 5.54
MuHilncA 9.91 -.01
UblityA 11.32 +.02
Prudential Fds B:
GrowthB 18.76
HiYldBt 5.54
Putnam Funds A:
AmGvApx 9.02 -.09
AZ TE 9.28 -.02
ConvSec 20.19 +.01
DvrlnAp 7.66 +.01
EqlnAp 16.87
EuEq 19.00
GeoBalA 12.87
GIbEqtyp 9.27
GrlnAp 14.47 +.03
GIblHIthA 42.11 +.07
HiYdAp 7.67
HiYId In 5.96
IncmAp 6.83
IntGrln p 9.23 +.06
InvAp 14.34
NJTxA p 9.62 -.01
MulDCpGr 56.51 +.13
PATE 9.31 -.02
TxExA p 8.80 -.01
TFInAp 15.28 -.03
TFHYA 12.17 -.02
USGvAp 13.53
GIblUtilA 10.37 +.03
VoyAp 23.81 +.04
Putnam Funds B:
TaxFrlns 15.29 -.03
DvrlnBt 7.60 +.01
Eqlnct 16.71
EuEq 18.24
GeoBaIB 12.74
GIbEq t 8.38
GINtRst 18.63
GrInBt 14.22 +.02
GIbIHIthB 33.65 +.05
HiYldBt 7.65
HYAdBt 5.85
IncmBt 6.77
IntGrlnt 9.16 +.06
InfiNopt 14.13 +.11
InvBt 12.92 +.01
NJTxBpt 9.61 -.01
Mul2CpGr 48.44 +.11
TxExB t 8.80 -.01
TFHYBt 12.19 -.02
USGvBt 13.46
GlblUtilB 10.33 +.03
VoyBt 20.05 +.03
RS Funds:
IntGrA 17.67 +.12
LgCAIphaA 42.69 +.04
Value 25.49 +.10
RidgeWorth Funds:
LCGrStkAp 11.84 +.01
Royce Funds:
LwPrSkSvr 16.19 +.02
MicroCapl 16.33 -.03
PennMulr 12.14 -.02
Premierl r 21.00 -.05
TotRetl r 13.84 -.02
ValSvc t 12.36
Russell Funds S:
StratBd 11.03 +.01
Rydex Advisor:
NasdaqAdv 16.45 -.02
SSgA Funds:
EmgMkt 20.72 -.02
Schwab Funds:
HlthCare 18.88
1OOOInvr 39.77 +.04
S&P Sel 21.95 +.03
SmCpSI 21.35 -.03
TSMISeilr 25.44 +.02
Scout Funds:
Inl 31.83 +.17
Selected Funds:
AmShD 44.11 +.08
AmShSp 44.11 +.07
Sentinel Group:
ComSAp 34.67 +.03
Sequoia 160.03 .63
Sit Funds:
LrgCpGr 47.68 +.04
SoSunSCInv t22.53 ...
St FarmAssoc:
Gwth 56.37 +.10
Stratton Funds:
Mulf-Cap 37.32 +.16
RealEstate 29.38 +.05
SmCap 55.09 -.14
SunAmerica Funds:
USGvBt 10.03
TCW Funds:
EmMktln 8.84 -.01
TotRetBdl 9.83
TIAA-CREF Funds:
Bdldxlnst 10.73
Eqldxlnst 10.69 +.01
Templeton Instit:
ForEqS 19.06 +.08
Third Avenue Fds:
InflValnstr 16.55 +.08
REVallnstr 24.37 +.01
Valuelnst 47.10 -.07
Thornburg Fds:
IntValAp 27.15 +.20
IncBuildAt 18.77 +.01
IncBuildCp 18.77 +.01
IntValue I 27.77 +.20
LtTMul 14.52 -.02
Thrivent Fds A:
HiYld 4.87
Income 8.90
Tocqueville Fds:
Goldtn 71.82 -.57
Transamerica A:
AegonHYBp 9.30 +.01
Flexlncp 9.02
Turner Funds:
SmlCpGrn 36.29 -.05
Tweedy Browne:
GblValue 23.98 +.04


US Global Investors:
AIIAm 25.29 +.04
ChinaReg 7.90
GIbRs 10.27 +.04
Gld&Mtls 12.50 -.11
WdPrcMn 13.66 -.07
USAA Group:
AgvGt 37.39 +.04
CABd 10.70 -.02
CrnstStr 22.53
GovSec 10.36 +.01
GrTxStr 14.30 -.01
Grwth 16.29 +.01


Name NAV Chg
Gr&lnc 16.44 +.02
IncStk 13.52
Inco 13.16
Intl 24.88 +.19
NYBd 12.16 -.02
PrecMM 30.34 -.14
SciTech 14.34 -.01
ShtTBnd 9.17
SmCpStk 14.92 -.02
TxElt 13.38 -.02
TxELT 13.47 -.02
TxESh 10.81
VABd 11.37 -.02
WldGr 20.26 +.07
VALIC:
MdCpldx 21.30 -.02
Stkldx 26.16 +.03
Value Line Fd:
LrgCon 19.55 +.01
Vanguard Admiral:
BalAdmln 23.39 +.01
CAITAdm n 11.46 -.02
CALTAdmnll.61 -.02
CpOpAdln 75.58 +.11
EMAdmr r n 36.83 -.08
Energyn 122.80 +1.40
EqlnAdm n n49.57 -.02
EuroAdml n 58.61 +.57
ExplAdml n 76.04 -.07
ExtdAdm n 45.11 -.02
50Admldn 129.90 +.15
GNMAAdn 11.02 +.01
GrwAdm n 36.41 +.04
HlthCr n 57.65 +.01
HiYldCp n 5.86
InfProAdn 27.96 +.02
ITBdAdml n 11.70
ITsryAdml n 11.53 -.01
IntGrAdm n 60.13 +.41
ITAdmlIn 14.06 -.03
ITGrAdmrn 10.10
LtdTrAdn 11.15 -.01
LTGrAdml n10.16 +.02
LTAdmln 11.45 -.02
MCpAdml n101.47 +.04
MorgAdm n 62.95 +.04
MuHYAdmnnlO.88 -.02
NYLTAdn 11.46 -.02
PrmCap r n 70.58 +.08
PALTAd n 11.46 -.01
ReitAdm r n 89.56 +.48
STsyAdml n 10.76
STBdAdml niO.60
ShtTrAdn 15.93
STFdAdn 10.83
STIGrAdn 10.73
SmCAdm n 37.76 -.04
TxMCap r n 70.32 +.07
TUBAdmln 10.92
TStkAdm n 35.26 +.03
ValAdmlIn 22.65 +.02
WellslAdm n57.37 +.04
WelltnAdm n58.14 +.08
Windsor n 49.21 +.06
WdsrllAdn 51.23 +.09
Vanguard Fds:
CALTn 11.61 -.02
CapOppn 32.72 +.04
Convrtn 13.02 +.01
DivdGron 16.52 -.03
Energy n 65.40 +.74
Eqlnc n 23.64 -.01
Explrn 81.71 -.09
FLLTn 11.87 -.02
GNMAn 11.02 +.01
GlobEqn 18.17 +.04
Grolncn 29.83 +.03
GrthEqnn 12.49
HYCorpn 5.86
HlthCren 136.62 +.02
InflaPron 14.23 +.01
InlExplrn 14.83 +.07
IntGr n 18.90 +.13
InflVaIn 30.39 +.18
ITIGraden 10.10
ITTsryn 11.53 -.01
LifeConn 17.01 +.01
LifeGro n 23.25 +.04
Lifelncn 14.47 +.01
LifeMod n 20.60 +.03
LTIGraden 10.16 +.02
LTTsryn 12.40 +.01
Morg n 20.30 +.01
MuHYn 10.88 -.02
Mulntn 14.06 -.03
MuLtdn 11.15 -.01
MuLongn 11.45 -.02
MuShrtn 15.93
NJLTn 12.03 -.03
NYLTn 11.46 -.02
OHLTTE n 12.36 -.02
PALTn 11.46 -.01
PrecMtls r n 20.41 +.07
PrmcpCorn 14.75 +.03
Prmcp r n 68.02 +.07
SelValu r n 20.57 -.03
STARn 20.39 +.05
STIGraden 10.73
STFedn 10.83
STTsryn 10.76
StratEqn 20.97 -.04
TgtRetlncn 11.97 +.01
TgRe2010n23.71 +.02
TgtRe2015nl3.17 +.01
TgRe2020 n23.46 +.04
TgtRe2025 nl3.39 +.02
TgRe2030 n23.04 +.04
TgtRe2035 nl3.90 +.02
TgtRe2040 n22.86 +.04
TgtRe2050 n22.76 +.04
TgtRe2045 nl4.35 +.02
USGron 21.26 +.06
USValuen 11.39 -.01
Wellslyn 23.68 +.02
Welltn n 33.66 +.05
Wndsrn 14.58 +.01
Wndsll n 28.86 +.05
Vanguard Idx Fds:
DvMklnPl r n99.06 +.80
MidCplstPIl n10.54 +.04
TotlntAdm r rn24.80 +.14
Totlntllnstr n99.16 +.53
TotlntllPrn 99.18 +.53
TotlntSig r n 29.74 +.15
500 n 129.87 +.15
Balancedn 23.39 +.02
EMktn 28.04 -.05
Europen 25.16 +.24
Extend n 45.09 -.02
Growth n 36.41 +.04
LgCaplxn 26.07 +.03
LTBndtn 13.39 +.02
MidCapsn 22.36 +.01
Pacificun 10.12 +.05
REITrdn 20.98 +.11
SmCap n 37.73 -.04
SmlCpGth n24.41 -.04
STBnd n 10.60
TotBnd n 10.92
Totllntl n 14.82 +.07
TotStkgn 35.24 +.03
Value n 22.65 +.03
Vanguard Instl Fds:
Ballnstn 23.39 +.01
DevMklnstn 9.51 +.08
Extlnn 45.10 -.02
FTAIIWIdl r n88.26 +.44
Grwthlstn 36.41 +.04
InfProlnstn 11.39 +.01
Instldxn 129.06 +.15
InsPIn 129.07 +.15
lnstTStldxn 31.92 +.03
lnsTStPlus n31.92 +.02
MidCplstn 22.41 +.01
SCInstn 37.75 -.05
TBIstn 10.92
TSInstn 35.26 +.02
Valuelstn 22.65 +.02
Vanguard Signal:
500Sgln 107.30 +.12
GroSig n 33.72 +.04
ITBdSig n 11.70
MidCpldvn 32.02 +.01
STBdldpn 10.60
SmCpSig n 34.02 -.04
TotBdSgl n 10.92
TotStkSgl n 34.03 +.03
Virtus Funds:
EmMktl 9.72
Virtus Funds A:
MulSStAp 4.85
Waddell & Reed Adv:
AssetS p 9.74 +.04
CorelnvA 6.47 +.01
DivOppAp 15.43 +.05
DivOppC t 15.29 +.05
Wasatch:
SmCpGr 43.01 -.11
Wells Fargo Adv A:
AstAIlAp 12.65
Wells Fargo Adv C:
AstAIICt 12.20
Wells Fargo Adv:
CmStlnv 21.34
Opptylnv 41.20 +.05
Wells Fargo Ad Ins:
UlStMulnc 4.82
Wells Fargo Admin:
Growth 42.36 +.05
Wells Fargo Insth:
UItSTMuA 4.82
Western Asset:
CorePlusl 11.23 +.01
William Blair N:
GrowthN 12.32 +.04
Yacktman Funds:
Fundpn 18.71 +.02


Focusedn 19.95 -.01


US stocks waver,






end day mixed


Associated Press


NEW YORK It was a
mundane end to an electrify-
ing week on the stock market
Stock indexes wavered in-
decisively between small
gains and losses Friday be-
fore closing mixed. Earlier in
the week, the Standard &
Poor's 500 and the Nasdaq
composite index were on a
tear, hitting levels that hadn't
been reached in years.
On Friday, the Dow Jones
industrial average and the
Nasdaq both ended the day
down. The Dow fell 20.14
points to 13,232.62. The Nas-
daq fell 1.11 points to
3,055.26. The broader S&P
500 index edged up 1.57
points to 1,404.17.
Despite Friday's losses,
the three major indexes
were all still up more than 2
percent for the week. The
Dow had its first down day
after seven straight gains,
ending its longest winning
streak since February 2011.
Investors were weighing
competing reports about the
health of the U.S. economy
A key measure of consumer
sentiment came in lower
than expected, and high gas
prices continued to weigh
down hopes about a recov-
ery On the plus side, prices
for other goods, including
food, stabilized.
Telly Zachariades, a part-
ner at The Valence Group
investment bank, said the
market appears to be on the
upswing, even if it's marred
by a few off-days. "It's al-
most like today was a spring
training game that ended up
getting rained out," he said.
Others think the market's
rise earlier this week only
masks underlying problems
in the economy's fundamen-
tals, like uncertainty over
oil prices and tax policies


Market watch
March 16, 2012

Dow Jones -20.14
industrials 13,232.62


Nasdaq
composite


Standard &
Poor's 500

Russell
2000


-1.11

3,055.26

+1.57

1,404.17

-1.28

830.18


NYSE diary
Advanced: 1,388

Declined: 1,655

Unchanged: 89

Volume: 4.8 b

Nasdaq diary
Advanced: 1,239

Declined: 1,306

Unchanged: 107

Volume: 1.8 b
AP


and the country's burgeon-
ing deficit
"The market is giving us a
free pass on our unsustain-
able fiscal positions through
the presidential election,"
said Barry Knapp, of equity
strategies at Barclays Capi-
tal. "But in 2013, we're going
to have to deal with this."
"What we've seen today,"
Knapp added, "is a little bit
of a warning sign."
The market's back-and-
forth pattern this week was
caused partly by conflicting
news about the economy
The University of Michi-
gan's closely watched con-
sumer sentiment index
came in below analysts' ex-
pectations, driven by wor-
ries about rising gas prices.
The Labor Department also
noted that gas prices soared
6 percent in February
Many analysts think the


higher gas prices will crimp
the U.S. economy by shrink-
ing the amount of money
that people have to spend
on discretionary purchases.
Gas is currently selling for
an average of $3.83 per gal-
lon in the U.S., 31 cents
more than a month ago.
The price of gas has spiked
as Iran's nuclear program
sows tension in the Middle
East Some analysts also
blame the Federal Reserve,
which has pumped cheap
money into the economy in
an attempt to help it recover.
That has also put pressure
on the U.S. dollar When the
dollar falls in value, it takes
more of them to buy the same
amount of oil.
The Labor Department
also noted that inflation in
other sectors seemed under
control. Food prices, which
have been rising, were un-
changed for the first time in
19 months.
Positive signs from bonds
and the European markets
added to the confusion about
where the market was going.
The yield on the 10-year
Treasury continued to rise,
reaching 2.30 percent late
Friday compared with 2.03
percent the week before.
That's the highest level since
October and a sign that in-
vestors are more confident
in the economy Markets in
Europe also finished higher.
The earlier part of the
week was an exhilarating
ride for the stock market.
Both the Nasdaq and the
S&P 500 crossed key mile-
stones. The Nasdaq closed
above 3,000 for the first time
since December 2000; The
S&P closed above 1,400 for
the first time since June
2008. On Tuesday, the Dow,
the Nasdaq and the S&P 500
all recorded their biggest
percentage gains of the year.


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CITRUS COUNT V





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56OOOAP9F3-3295


Name Last Chg
SP UIl 34.78 -.03
StdPac 4.72 +.01
Standex 39.40 +45
StanBlkDk 80.21 -1.13
StarwdHf 56.03 -.04
StarwdPT 21.42 +.27
StateSr 45.76 -.08
Steris 32.11 -.06
Sterlite 9.34 -.25
S IlwtrM 13.22 +.19
StratHotels 6.47 +.08
Skyker 54.90 -.10
SturmRug 42.94 -.88
SubPpne 41.77 -.61
SummitHf 7.53 -.03
SunCmts 43.11 -.13
SunCoken 13.88 -.10
Suncorgs 33.34 +.14
Sunooo 40.31 +.08
Suntech 3.15 -.05
SunTrst 24.38 -.11
SupEnrgy 28.63 +.18
Supvalu 6.33 -.02
SwiftTrans 12.45 +.35
Synovus 2.08 -.06
Sysco 29.63 -.06
TCFFncI 12.25 +.28
TE Connect 37.23 +.40
TECO 17.75
TJXs 37.91 -.28


TawSemi 14.79
TalismEg 13.56
Target 58.41
TataMotors 28.78
TeckResg 37.12
Teekay 32.62
TeekayTnk 5.24
TelcmNZs 10.16
TelefEsp 16.86
Tenaris 42.00
TenetHlth 5.58
Teradyn 17.05
Terex 25.82
TerraNitro 227.26
Tesoro 29.63
TetraTech 9.38
Textron 27.48
Theragen 1.75
ThermoFis 57.91
ThmBet 72.01
3M Co 89.56
Tidwtr 55.77
Tiffany 68.03
TWCable 79.31
TimeWarn 35.91
Timken 54.13
TitanMet 14.02
TollBros 24.70
TorchEngy 2.21
Trdichmrks 50.55
TorDBkg 84.29
Total SA 55.35


TotalSys 22.83
Transom 58.70
Travelers 59.20
Tredgar 20.62
TriConfi 16.01
TrinaSolar 8.13
TwoHrblnv 10.47
Tycolnfi 53.62
Tyson 19.86
UBSAG 14.44
UDR 25.81
UIL Hold 34.01
USAirwy 7.15
USEC 1.30
USG 17.35
UlhraPtg 24.90
UniSrcEn 36.32
UniFirst 59.67
UnilevNV 34.20
UnionPac 113.15
Unisys 21.43
UtdConfi 19.95
UtdMicro 2.62
UPSB 78.41
UtdRentals 42.58
USBancrp 31.65
USNGsrs 18.40
USOilFd 41.03
USSteel 29.75
UtdTedh 85.48
UtdhlthGp 55.59
UnumGrp 24.44


VaalooE 8.81 +.20
ValerSA 23.76 +.09
ValeSApf 23.14 +.13
ValeroE 27.99 -.03
ViyNBcp 13.08 +.18
VangREIT 63.18 +.36
VangEmg 44.45 -.02
VarianMed 70.57 -.23
Vecten 28.72 -.35
Ventas 56.97 -.22
VeoliaEnv 16.92 +.95
VeriFone 49.47 -1.10
VerizonCm 39.57 +.03
VimpelCm 11.04 -.38
Visa 116.68 -.32
Vonage 2.30 -.05
Vornado 83.82 +.35
WGL Hold 40.43 -.33
WPXEnn 19.48 +.26
Wabash 10.38 -.13
WalMart 60.84 -.39
Walgrn 34.21 +.44
WalterEn 62.46 +.91
WsteMInc 34.84 +.19
WeathflntI 17.54 +.75
WeinRIt 26.36 +.55
WellPoint 67.33 +.39
WellsFargo 33.89 -.18
WestarEn 27.67 +.05


WAstEMkt 14.58
WstAMgdHi 6.34
WAstlnfOpp 12.80
WDigital 38.26
WstnRefin 20.01
WstnUnion 18.05
Weyerhsr 22.01
Whrlpl 76.84
WhitngPet 59.35
WmsCos 30.46
WmsPtrs 60.53
WmsSon 37.12
WillisGp 35.87
Winnbgo 10.06
WiscEngy 34.53
WT India 19.90
Worthgtn 18.00
Wyndham 45.24
XL Grp 21.87
XcelEngy 26.40
Xerox 8.32
Yamanag 15.53
YingliGrn 4.03
Youku 27.06
YumBrnds 68.40
Zimmer 64.10
ZweigTI 3.17


BUSINESS


SATURDAY, MARCH 17, 2012 A13







Page A14. SATURDAY, MARCH 17,2012



PINION


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan............. .................. publisher
Charlie Brennan ............... .................. editor
Mike Arnold ............. .................. HR director
Sandra Frederick....................... managing editor
J Curt Ebitz............... .............. citizen member
Founded Mac Harris ............... ............citizen member
by Albert M.
Williamson Rebecca Martin ...........................guest member
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus

CONDONED DEGRADATION




Lawmakers



hand setback



to environment


To protect Florida's springs
and groundwater, the state
Legislature in 2010 took
an important water quality step
forward with the passage of SB
550, which required statewide
septic tank inspections every
five years by 2016.
However, in response to a
backlash by lobbyists and rural
residents in the Florida Panhan-
dle, the Legislature during its
November 2010
special session
passed a bill to THE IS
delay implementa-
tion of the septic Repeal(
tank inspection tank insp
law. Fearing then-
Gov Charlie Crist OUR 01
would veto the A de fact
measure, the Legis- pol
lature did not send
it to the governor's
desk until Gov. Scott assumed the
office, upon which he allowed
the delay to become law without
his signature.
Supporters of the septic tank
inspection law were concerned
that delayed implementation
was nothing more than political
subterfuge aimed at ultimately
repealing it. Their concern was
realized during the waning min-
utes of the recently concluded
legislative session when the
House voted to repeal the law as
part of the Florida Department
of Health reorganization bill,
HB 1263.
Supported by powerful spe-
cial interests such as the Florida
Onsite Wastewater Association
and Associated Industries of
Florida, HB 1263's repeal of
statewide septic tank inspec-
tions in favor of setting parame-
ters for a local inspection
program raises the specter of
Florida's springs and ground-
water going from bad to worse.
While the bill calls for counties
with first-magnitude springs to


S
of
e

P
)I
Ilu


adopt the parameters for a local
inspection program, it allows
them to opt out by a 60 percent
vote of the county commission.
As for those counties without
first-magnitude springs, they are
free to opt in or opt out.
Additionally, HB 1263 places
restrictions on local septic tank
inspection programs and pro-
hibits local governments from
inspecting septic tanks when a
home is being sold.
Further, it defines
;SUE: a system failure as
only occurring if
f septic sewage flows onto
action law. the ground, into a
surface water or
INION: backs up into a
license to house.
ute. As noted by the
Environmental
Protection Agency,
septic tanks are the second great-
est contributor to groundwater
contamination. Therefore, with
more than half of Florida's 2.6
million septic tanks more than 30
years old, and less than 1 percent
of those that fail being actively
maintained, HB 1263 is a signifi-
cant step backward for water
quality because it is akin to a de
facto license to pollute.
This de facto license to pollute
our springs and groundwater will
be exacerbated by future growth
since sewers are neither avail-
able nor planned for many unde-
veloped lots throughout Florida.
Also, state and federal grants to
assist with the cost of extending
sewer lines will be scarce for the
foreseeable future.
Given the present and future
threat of leeching septic tanks
into our springs and groundwa-
ter, the successful political ma-
neuvering by those septic tank
owners, legislators and special
interests favoring repeal of
statewide septic tank inspections
promises to be a Pyrrhic victory.


No raises
I would like to make a comment
about Brad Thorpe wanting to
raise the taxes, wanting the peo-
ple to get a raise. Is he crazy? At a
time like this? I'm a widow strug-
gling to pay my property tax and
he wants me to pay for someone
to get a raise? Is he crazy?
Take pay cut
Once again, Citrus County citi-
zens got it stuck in their back. Now
Brad Thorpe's raising taxes. I have
an idea: Why don't all the politi-
cians, high muckety-mucks, the
commissioners, the school board,
all politicians, take a pay cut....
Be happy to work
I just read in the Chronicle that
the Citrus County commissioners
are looking to raise everybody's
property taxes by about $46, de-
ciding they need to do this in order
to keep public services. I think this
is ridiculous. In a situation where
property values continue to fall
and the residents are struggling
with this bad economy, that is
ridiculous. He also further states
that the employees have to be
compensated and get some kind
of a raise, which is also ridiculous.
At a time when jobs are scarce,
those people who work for the
county should be happy to have a
job, never mind getting a raise. If


anything, they should have a raise
freeze. These county commission-
ers were elected by the public. If
they dare to raise our property
taxes, remember in the next elec-
tion who we have to vote out.
Services not needed
As I read about the Citrus
County Commission wanting to
raise our taxes, I become a little
red in the face. It's not the govern-
ment's job to be providing serv-
ices. You protect the people and
that's what you're supposed to do.
I do not want a tax increase of 5
cents. And it says the commis-
sioners dismissed Thorpe's other
two options, both of which pro-
vided no tax increase. If there is a
tax increase, then I'm just going to
have to vote to dismiss the com-
missioners. I don't want a tax in-
crease. I don't want your services.
Keep cutting
Brad Thorpe should be ashamed
of himself for even thinking of pro-
posing a tax increase. You need to
treat the county budget as the
county residents treat their own
budgets. You cut back and only
spend what you earn. When that's
not enough, you cut back some
more. The BOCC is paid to make
the hard decisions to get rid of the
non-necessities. If the library
closes early, so be it. If the pool
closes, so be it. It's not forever....


"Never does nature say one thing and
wisdom another."
Juvenal, 60? to 140 AD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Do lawmakers know no illness, elderly, shame?


trange, strange,
strange.
Florida may be
the elderly mecca of
America, but appar-
ently most members of
the state House haven't
noticed.
Elderly people get
sick. A majority of state
House members ap-
parently have never
heard of this.
The families of the
sick elderly are often


Mary Jo Melone
FLORIDA
VOICES


overwhelmed by their needs and
can't care for them. The same is
true for the families of the se-
verely mentally ill. But those
House members must lead
charmed lives to not have been af-
fected by this anguish and misery
It's hard to tell if these people
are clueless or cruel.
They turned their backs on the
woman in one assisted living fa-
cility who was chewed to death by
an alligator Another woman in
an ALF drowned in a shallow
pool. A man in another facility
plunged to his death from a third-
floor balcony And one woman
was restrained so tightly that the
restraints cut her legs, caused a
blood clot, and led to her death.
All of this approximately a


death a month since
2002 was revealed
last year in a Miami
Herald series on
Florida's assisted liv-
ing facilities. Appro-
priate outrage ensued.
Advocates for the resi-
dents of ALFs saw a
chance, finally, for re-
form. A task force was
established. A grand
jury was empaneled.
As a result, the Senate
approved a bill that


would have required more in-
spections of ALFs and the clo-
sure of the worst of them.
But along came ALF operators
and lobbyists, who have handed
over more than $200,000 in con-
tributions to key legislative play-
ers in the last five years.
Magically, in the last hours of
the session last week, the House
wouldn't agree to the Senate plan
and came up with a weaker
measure of its own.
And somehow, although he had
once advocated stiff reform, Gov
Rick Scott sat on his hands.
Let's see:
They can pass $150 million in
tax cuts and other breaks for
business.
They can whack away at the


state's universities.
They can threaten Planned
Parenthood.
They can force welfare recipi-
ents and state workers to take
drug tests.
But they cannot manage to pro-
tect some of the most vulnerable
people in the state.
This is one of those clarifying
moments when you realize that
many elected officials live in
such cocoons that they have no
idea how they look to the ordi-
nary rest of us.
Shame, shame, you could say,
but those no-voters in the House
will not be moved because they
have no shame.
This might be a more powerful
motivator:
Let them, one by one, each
alone, spend a few weeks in an
ALE Let them be restrained on
beds, left to lie in their own
waste, filled with tranquilizers,
given baths in scalding water Let
no one answer their cries for
help.
Then, when they return to Talla-
hassee, let them take another vote.
--In--
Mary Jo Melone, former
columnist with the Tampa Bay
Times, is a writer in Tampa.


_ LETTERS to the Editor


Political decision
Sen. Dean's reasoning that
Child Protective Investigations
is a "budget issue" and that
these services are "an agency
role" is completely rooted in pol-
itics, and not decided for the
benefit of our less fortunate chil-
dren, those that need a strong
defender and protector To re-
turn this oversight to the Depart-
ment of Children and Families
shows how politics and power,
more often than not, continue to
corrupt the already corrupted
system even more. Decisions
such as this one only help to ce-
ment the distrust citizens have
for their government and their
decision-making processes. This
is political machination at its
finest.
Sheriff Dawsy should be com-
mended for his valiant fight to
keep this important function
where it belongs, and Sen. Dean
should be called out for using
his position of power to push
forth his own personal vendetta
against Sheriff Dawsy This
should not be tolerated.
It's no secret that Sen. Dean
wants Sheriff Dawsy out for po-
litical reasons, but to conceiv-
ably sacrifice the safety of our
children in the process is
shameful, deceptive and irre-
sponsible. This is not about the
budget because no reduction
will be forthcoming; this is not
about performance since there
is no other sheriff's office in the
state that comes close to Sheriff
Dawsy's commitment to keeping
our children safe. This is com-
ing across as a power play, plain
and simple, where our children
are the losers.
What I find even more disturb-
ing is the highfalutin' attitude
that Sen. Dean has embraced.
Does he really believe he can
dismiss this issue by simply re-
fusing to answer any questions?
Does he really believe he can
dismiss his constituents? If he
does, then he is deluding himself
and he may find himself out of a
job come November


This is a perfect exai
what can happen when
ment runs amok. Gove
does not have all the an
even though they think
know best. When our le
fuse to listen to reason,
message is clear it is
replace them.
Anyone interested in
for senator?
Ed


Fixing Citr
Having road infrastri
job and business creati
be addressed by sitting
county commissioners
1. U.S. 41 from InverT
Hernando: At certain ti
day the road is blocked
Middle School north to
alley or south to post of
2. Suncoast Parkway:
could take a lot of press
(U.S.) 19 and (State Roa
present and future traf


mple of
govern-
rnment


projects that will follow.
3. Commissioners should per-
sonally lobby for road infrastruc-
ture to state officials instead of
hiring lobbyists. You may be sur-
prised at the money saved and
the reception and respect you
may get for making this your per-
sonal job.
4. When four out of five com-
missioners get so involved in a
certain project publicly, it drops
the morale of a lot of local small-
business owners and taxpayers
because of the perception it is
given. Most of these people don't
have the time to be in certain
clubs or go to board meetings be-
cause they are just trying to sur-
vive and pay taxes. This is
probably the majority of Citrus
County, young and old.
Maybe if the commissioners
truly start working on address-
ing and helping build the confi-
dence up of these people, you
would see a more agreeable,
progressive future attitude of
most in Citrus County
Scott Adams
Inverness

Do the math


,ns, I just received notice that I am
that they allowed to water my lawn once a
waders re- week due to the water shortage.
then the I don't mind giving up this privi-
time to lege when the aquifers are low
all over Florida.
running I do object to the 23 bottling
na Mattos companies across our great state
na Mattos that bottle and send to other
Hernando cities, states and countries with-
out a thought of replenishing it.
US They pay a one-time fee of $150
ucture for to bottle our precious water at a
on should rate of 500,000 gallons per day at
or new which time no recovery can be
first, given. The tax rate is zero for the
ness to privilege of taking from the peo-
imes of ple of Florida their most-needed
from commodity Where are our legis-
bowling lators, and what are they doing
office. about it?
: This Do the math, folks. We're get-
sure off ting "hosed" again!


ad) 44 for
fic and


Joan Barrett
Sugarmill Woods


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


S IT'S AN OUTRAGE!
TH1Y WANT MY HEALTH
INSURANCE To PAY FoR
CONTRACEPTION!


Trooper doing good
My first thought after reading Mr Har-
man's column in the Feb. 27 Chronicle was
that Mr Harman could have placed the life
of the state trooper in jeopardy If the car
the trooper had pulled over contained a
felon who did not wish to be returned to
the justice system, the interruption created
by Mr Harman could have produced the
distraction needed for the felon to pull a
weapon and injure or kill Trooper
Cloud! Mr Harman should be glad SOI
when he returned for the second 0
time he did not end up in hand-
cuffs in the back of the trooper's g
vehicle, charged with obstruction.
My wife and I very much appreciate
Trooper Cloud and his efforts to enforce
Florida law. I am sure being proactive
helps keep our insurance rates lower by
showing the state is actively enforcing the
seat-belt law. Seat belts reduce injuries in
accidents and help to keep our insurance
rates lower. We can only imagine how
many other violations Trooper Cloud must
find doing seat belt enforcement: expired
licenses, no insurance, no registration and
active arrest warrants. The intersections
the trooper works U.S. 19 and Grover
Cleveland Boulevard and the almost adja-
cent intersection with U.S. 19 and the Ho-
mosassa Trail are two of the inter-
sections in Citrus County with the highest
number of accidents. Hopefully drivers
seeing a state trooper there will have the
effect of lowering the accident rate.
I very often see in the Sound Off com-
plaints about lack of enforcement of vari-
ous items: headlights in rain, speed, stop
signs, stop lights, etc., but I believe this is
the first time I have seen a complaint
about law enforcement doing their job.
Unless the state of Florida is willing to
change its TV commercials from "Click it
or ticket" to "Do whatever you want, who
cares?" please keep state Trooper Tod
Cloud on the job here in Homosassa. He is
doing a good and needed function.


Wil


Delaying inevitab
In addition to Mr Harry Coope
on analysis of March 3,1 I would li.
the following:
Removing Obama is an absolut
but we also need a change in the
administration to get back on tra'
undo the harm already done. It w
mistake to think that this will hap
meaningful way, with any of the c
GOP candidates.
The truth is the parties have los
identities and are now opposite si
the same corrupt counterfeit gove
coin. The establishment GOP is ju
much "big government" as the so-
position. Its members have loyalti
ferent special interests, but it's no
that "We the people" are one of th
The best that can happen, if on
candidates gets elected, is a dela;
pace at which we go over the cliff
D.


Dean's true color
Charlie Dean has shown that h
been in the Senate too long to ser
people's best interests. He only si
himself and other vested interest
fight with Sheriff Dawsy shows hi
nature. He again has let his person
ings override the best outcome fo
people of Citrus County. He and I
have allowed their personal feeli
overcome what is best for the chi
this county Even the Department
dren and Families has clearly sta
iff Dawsy's office has done a very
and wishes to continue his service
Mr. Dean's statement that "this
a budget issue" is pure political h
It is nothing more than his person
like for the sheriff. To use his fee
decision factor that affects the ou
children is about as low as you ca
far as I'm concerned. He has no e
tion that is viable, and there shou
doubt as to what the reasons wer
decision. Mr Webb's statement at
cent commission meeting says it;
Dean surely should come and ad(
commission and the citizens of C:
County about why he really voted
the funds to help children receive
help available.
One only need read the newspa
see that the children's agency is t
lacking in good skills to investiga
abuse issues. They have proven i:
past to be total failures at such w
However, I do know the sheriff ai


liam Garvin
Homosassa


le
r's sonnt-


crew will thoroughly investigate any is-
sues dealing with children. I'm sure the
money issue cannot be reversed, but when
it comes time for a vote, we can surely re-
solve the real issue.
It's time to put in some new people in
Tallahassee. It's time to go for Charlie
Dean! It's really a service issue!
John Cassell
Homosassa


UND
FF=


Fund protection


Many thanks to a majority of our
ge All Republican County commission-
ers who abandoned the 2009-12
partisan politics and supported
our Sheriff Jeff Dawsy in his effort to re-
tain state funding for Child Protective
Services with Citrus County I'm grateful
they sent a resolution to the state senate
to allow the direct funding. Apparently,
former Democrat/Sheriff Charlie Dean,
now our Republican state senator be-
lieves Citrus County does not deserve the
funds directly even though no attempt was
made to change the direct funding of six
other Florida counties in spite of re-
peated requests from Sheriff Dawsy It
could be that he favors other counties in
his district or that he is following the de-
mands of Governor Scott or Senate leader
Mike Haridopolos, letting some counties
suffer during the difficult economic times.
In any event, Senator Dean is not repre-
senting us well.
George Harbin
Homosassa

Contraceptives and freedom


Roman Catholic bishops and others are
claiming a proposed regulation, sched-
uled to take effect on Aug. 1, that would
require every health-insurance plan in
the United States to cover sterilizations
and all FDA-approved contraceptives
without charging any co-pay, is morally
wrong and would go against their Consti-
tutional rights to freedom of religion.
This is so wrong in so many ways. First,
can anyone seriously consider that the
bishops who colluded in the cover-up of
child sexual abuse to be on the moral high
ground?


* to add Could we consider the religious free-
dom, health and financial concerns not to
mention the Constitutional rights of
e must, women to be treated equally under the
following law? Don't even get into the argument that
ck and women can pay for their contraception if
ould be a they want it. One word: Viagra covered
pen, in a
parentt by insurance, of course.
Also it appears that the U.S. Constitu-
tion does not require religious considera-
i their tion in legislation if the intent of the
des nof legislation is not to persecute a religion.
rnmental So the complaints of Catholic bishops and
st as other religious spokespersons who object
called op- what amounts to equal insurance cover-
es to likely age of women's health do not rise to a
'lem. question of religious freedom. However,
em. religious accommodation is permitted.
e of the This is exactly what President Obama did
y in the by requiring the insurance companies to
f. pay for women's contraception.
S. Skuce Conservative Republicans have also
Inverness jumped on this opposition to women's ac-
cess to health procedures bandwagon. A
.S controversy over women's contraception
plays right into their attempt to return to
e has the male authoritarian rule supported by
rve the the collusion of church and state.
erves Jo Darling
ts. His Jo Darling
is true Lecanto
onal feel-
)r the Governor, use your veto
Mr Webb Fortunately in this state the governor
ngs to has the power to veto line items in the
ldren of state budget. Gov Scott should veto the
t of Chil- creation of the unwanted separation of
ited Sher- the Lakeland Campus of USF into a new
good job university He should also veto the funds
'es. for the unneeded highway around this
is strictly campus. Both items take away money
hogwash. from more pressing financial needs.
nal dis- Judith O'Gorman
lings as a
itcome to Homosassa
in go as
*xplana- Don't pay for immorality
Ald be no Miss Sandra Fluke thinks that we should
e for his pay for her unsafe and unprotected sex in-
t the re- stead of using free condoms that provide
all. Mr. protective sex. President Obama supports
dress the her even though she could spread VD and
itrus AIDS. Whose health is this protecting?
Against Obama didn't call his appointed general in
e the best the Middle East war for more than six
months, but calls this woman in support of
apers to her immorality within minutes. What is
totally wrong with this picture? Where are the
te child- priorities in our country? Why should we
n the pay for immorality?
ork! Claude Strass
nd his Homosassa


K



I


annha cribed in 60 dayS 52 week pre-paid only.
W AD PRIces. cask aor code HP
*NewsAAN Asf


CITRUS COUNTY


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Letters to the EDITOR


I


OPINION


SATURDAY, MARCH 17, 2012 A15


REALLY?
YoU HAVE HEALTH
IRSURAMCE?


i











NATION


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


NationBRIEFS

Charged


Afghan leader blasts US over probe


Associated Press
Thomas Miller, Western EV
fleet sales manager for Mit-
subishi Motors North Amer-
ica, demonstrates a
fast-charger connection on
a Mitsubichi i car Friday in
Central Point, Ore. This is
one of eight new fast-
charging stations that
allow electric cars to
cruise from the California
border to Eugene, Ore.,
recharging in about 20 min-
utes when the batteries
get low. It is the first major
section of what will even-
tually be an Electric High-
way allowing electric cars
to drive from Canada to
Mexico on Interstate 5.


Student guilty for
webcam spying
NEW BRUNSWICK, N.J -
A former Rutgers University
student convicted Friday in
the webcam spying episode
that ended in his gay room-
mate's suicide could be
headed off to prison in a case
experts say stands as a tragic
lesson for young people
about casual cruelties and
unintended consequences in
the Internet age.
Dharun Ravi was found
guilty of all 15 charges
against him, including inva-
sion of privacy and anti-gay
intimidation. The jury decided
that he not only spied on
Tyler Clementi and another
man as they were kissing but
also singled out Clementi be-
cause he was gay.
Ravi, 20, could get up to 10
years in prison by some esti-
mates and could be deported
to his native India even
though he has lived legally in
the U.S. since he was a little
boy.

World BRIEFS

Rainbow


Associated Press
The Global Rainbow is pro-
jected into the night sky
Friday from Scrabo Tower,
Newtownards, Northern Ire-
land. The large-scale out-
door laser projection
created by New York artist
Yvette Mattern, signals
100 days to go until the
opening of the London
2012 Festival.


Nazi-seized art
ordered returned
BERLIN -A Berlin mu-
seum must return thousands
of rare posters to an Ameri-
can man, part of his Jewish
father's unique collection that
had been seized by the
Nazis, Germany's top federal
appeals court ruled Friday.
The Federal Court of Jus-
tice in Karlsruhe confirmed
Peter Sachs, 74, was the
rightful owner of the posters
collected by his father Hans
and ruled he is entitled to re-
ceive them back from the
German Historical Museum.
The ruling ended seven
years of legal battles over a
vast collection dating back to
the late 19th century that is now
believed to be worth between
$6 million and $21 million.
-From wire reports


Karzai complains

information about

shooting not shared

Associated Press

KABUL, Afghanistan Warn-
ing he's at the "end of the rope"
over civilian casualties,
Afghanistan's President Hamid
Karzai angrily accused the U.S. of
not sharing information about
how an American soldier al-


legedly shot and killed 16 tigation. American officials
Afghans in two villages. had previously refused to
The incident has rever- release his name, saying it
berated through the already is military policy to publicly
complicated relations be- name a suspect only after
tween the U.S. and 1 he has been charged with
Afghanistan, endangering an offense.
talks over a long-term rela- Bales has not yet been
tionship after most U.S. and Hamid charged. He was being
NATO combat troops with- Karzai flown Friday from Kuwait
draw by the end of 2014. Afghanistan to a military detention cen-
A senior U.S. official on president upset ter in the U.S.
Friday said the soldier ac- with U.S. In an emotional meeting
caused in the killings is Army with relatives of the shoot-
Staff Sgt. Robert Bales. The official ing victims, Karzai said the vil-
spoke on condition of anonymity be- lagers' accounts of the massacre
cause of the sensitivity of the inves- were widely different from the sce-


Winds unleashed


Associated Press
Busch's grocery store manager Gary Winters pushes a cart with water in it around the Huron Farms neighbor-
hood Friday, after a tornado hit Dexter, Mich., Thursday evening.

Storm sirens spare villagers from serious injuries after twister


Associated Press
DEXTER, Mich. The twister
that took aim at this Michigan vil-
lage unleashed winds of 135 mph
and lingered on the ground for a
full half-hour, plowing a path of de-
struction that stretched for 10
miles.
But after the tornado melted
back into the clouds, townspeople
emerged to a remarkable surprise:
Not a single person was seriously
hurt. Authorities credited storm
sirens that provided more than 20
minutes of warning.
The twister damaged more than
100 homes and destroyed 13. Yet
everyone emerged unscathed.
"When you look at the path and
you look at the physical destruc-
tion ... it's amazing," Washtenaw
County Sheriff Jerry Clayton said
Friday
Sometime after Thursday
evening's tornado, Deputy Ray Yee
was surveying the rubble when a
solitary hand rose from debris. He
reached for it and pulled out an


elderly man who was shaken but
able to walk.
"That's the best part," Yee said.
"Every place I went to, I would
have thought I would have found
somebody laying there deceased
or whatever. But, knock on wood,
everybody was OK."
By midday Friday, authorities
had accounted for the entire popu-
lation of nearly 4,000.
"We're confident that we're not
missing anybody," Fire Chief Loren
Yates said.
The tornado was part of a slow-
moving system that also brought
large hail, heavy rain and high
winds. Gusts downed power lines,
sparking fires.
Two sirens went off at 5:09 p.m.
Thursday The twister touched
down at 5:33 p.m., giving many fam-
ilies enough time to get to safety
Jack Davidson was watching TV
when he heard the sirens. He and
his wife dashed to the basement.
When they emerged, they didn't
see much damage at first and
thought the storm had spared the


area. But one glance across the
street revealed a different reality:
a self-serve car wash had been flat-
tened.
"It's bad," Davidson said. "The
pizza shop's bad. But the worst
damage is to the car wash."
Two blocks away, the twister did-
n't even touch down.
"I guess we were just lucky we
were in the right spot," Davidson
said.
Perry Samson, an atmospheric
science professor at the University
of Michigan, said it's "relatively
rare" to have such a powerful tor-
nado in the state at this time of
year. In January 2008, with temper-
atures in the 60s, tornadoes devel-
oped in southeastern Wisconsin.
Temperatures topped 70 on Thurs-
day in Michigan.
"Extra moisture and extra heat
certainly contributed to the insta-
bility that we had.... We didn't see
this coming," Samson said Friday
from the Ann Arbor campus, 10
miles from Dexter. "We're still
scratching our heads."


Mexico prepares for pope, millions of visitors


Associated Press
LEON, Mexico One
hundred fifty-thousand
communion wafers? Check.
Campsites for 350,000?
Check.
Three hand-embroidered
papal souvenir sombreros?
Check.
Official song? Check.
It takes a lot to prepare
for the coming of the pope
and the 3 million people
the host Archdiocese of
Leon says he is expected to
draw.
The visit of Pope Bene-
dict XVI, his first to Span-
ish-speaking Latin America,
begins in just a week in
Mexico's central state of
Guanajuato, where he will
spend three days and give
an outdoor Mass for some
300,000 people before head-
ing to Cuba on March 26.
In the Bicentennial Park


nearby San Francisco del
Rincon is overseeing the
stitching and stretching of
faux suede and velvet on
three artisanal sombreros
that will be given to Bene-
dict. Each took three weeks
to decorate by hand. One
has an embroidered face of
Benedict inside the cap and
features a map of Mexico
on the brim. Another shows
the Virgin of Guadalupe,
Mexico's patron saint.
She said the whole com-
munity, a suburb home to
tennis shoe factories and
makers of the black, span-
gled sombreros sold in air-
ports and tourist stalls,
wants to chip in.
"Even to make the boxes
to pack the sombreros,"
said Yepez, whose 55-year-
old family business, Som-
breros Salazar Yepez, made
the signature Mexican hats
for popes Paul VI and John
Paul II as well.


in nearby Silao, hammers
and heavy equipment
pound out the contours of a
massive stage large enough
for a Madonna concert. The
religious order of the Ca-
puchin Poor Clares in San
Isidro is making 150,000


Frisbee-sized hosts for the
Mass, though it won't re-
quire vats of wine. While
the masses eat bread, only
the officiates will sip a
mere 2.5 gallons of conse-
crated wine on stage.
Maria de la Luz Yepez of


o depicted by U.S. military offi-
s. The relatives and villagers in-
ed that it was impossible for one
man to kill nine children, four
and three women in three
ses of two villages near a U.S.
bat outpost in southern
lanistan.
arzai pointed to one of the vil-
rs from Panjwai district of Kan-
ar province and said:
n his family, in four rooms peo-
were killed children and
nen were killed and then they
e all brought together in one
n and then set on fire. That, one
cannot do."





Alaska



city



eyes



snow



record


Associated Press
ANCHORAGE, Alaska -
Even by Alaska standards,
this winter is unusual for
the hardy residents of the
state's largest city.
Near-record snowfall
buried Anchorage neighbor-
hoods, turning streets into
canyons with walls of snow
on each side. The snow's
weight collapsed the roofs
of some buildings. Moose
are fleeing into the city to
get away from too-deep
snow.
And the city dumps are
close to overflowing with
snow that may not melt en-
tirely before next winter.
Love or hate it, some resi-
dents are hoping for more,
at least another 3.3 inches.
Then they could say they
made it through the winter
when the nearly 60-year
record of 132.6 inches was
broken.
"I want it destroyed," res-
ident Melissa Blair said. "I
want to see another foot and
knock that record out of the
park."
The extreme weather has
not just struck Alaska this
winter. It has also hit the
Lower 48.
The first three months of
2012 have seen twice the
normal number of torna-
does. And 36 states set daily
high temperature records
Thursday The Lower 48 had
its fourth warmest winter on
record, while Alaska had its
coldest January on record.
Two different weather
phenomena La Nina and
its northern cousin the Arc-
tic Oscillation are mostly
to blame, meteorologists say
Global warming could also
be a factor because it is sup-
posed to increase weather
extremes, climate scientists
say
"When you start to see the
extreme events become
more common, that's when
you can say that it is a con-
sequence of global warm-
ing," University of Victoria
climate scientist Andrew
Weaver said.
Nearly 11 feet of snow has
fallen on Anchorage this
winter, forcing the city to
haul away at least 250,000
tons of snow or around
500 million pounds to its
six snow disposal sites.
The sites are close to
overflowing. State and city
crews are working around
the clock to clear almost
2,500 miles of roads.
City street maintenance
superintendent Dan
Southard said the 125,000
truckloads of snow hauled
by city crews would stack up
to almost 1,200 feet if they
were dumped onto a foot-


ball field surrounded by
walls.


Associated Press
Maria de la Luz Yepes shows one of the sombreros that
will be given to Pope Benedict XVI, at her sombrero shop
in the town of San Francisco del Rincon, near Leon,
Mexico.











SPORTS


SO YOU KNOW
U Due to early
deadlines, some
lottery numbers
were unavailable.


* Adult recreation/B2
* March Madness/B3
* Prep sports/B3
* NHL, NBA/B4
* Sports briefs/B4
* TV, lottery/B4
* MLB, golf/B5
* Entertainment/B6


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Associated Press
Florida's Mike Rosario is sand-
wiched between Virginia's Paul
Jesperson, left, and Joe Harris
in the first half of an NCAA
tournament second-round
game Friday at CenturyLink
Center in Omaha, Neb.


Second


half


surge


No. 7 seed UF

pulls away from

Virginia late

Associated Press
OMAHA, Neb. With his
1.5-point scoring average,
Casey Prather surely wasn't a
big part of Virginia's scouting
report on Florida.
You can bet any team that
plays Florida the rest of the
NCAA tournament will know
who he is.
Prather scored a career-
high 14 points on a rare day
Florida's 3-point shooters
went cold, and the Gators had
no trouble beating the Cava-
liers 71-45 Friday in the NCAA
West Regional.
"On a big stage like this, he
was probably a very unlikely
candidate to step up and do
what he did for us tonight,"
Florida coach Billy Donovan
said. "I'm happy for him, be-
cause he's a great kid."
Prather made 6 of 7 shots in
a season-high 22 minutes,
See Page B5


Associated Press
Florida State guard lan Miller
(30) drives against St.
Bonaventure defender Youssou
Ndoye in the first half of a sec-
ond-round NCAA tournament
game Friday in Nashville, Tenn.


FSU holds


on against


St. Bonnie

Associated Press
NASHVILLE, Tenn. -
Florida State beat North Car-
olina twice this season. Did
the same to Duke, too.
The Seminoles were a
trendy Final Four pick enter-
ing the NCAA tournament,
and they were nearly sent
home by little St. Bonaventure
in their opening game.
Bernard James scored 19
points and Florida State
barely avoided a big upset,
rallying to beat the 14th-
seeded Bonnies 66-63 on Fri-
day in a game that left the
Seminoles physically and
mentally spent.
"That was one of the
See Page B5


St. Pat's off to rousing start


Bernhard, Padova share first-day lead

during 50th iteration ofamateur event i


C.J. RISK
Correspondent
INVERNESS Both frontrun-
ners in Friday's first round of the
50th anniversary St Pat's Tourna-
ment were not entirely unfamiliar
with the notoriety attached. They'd
experienced it before, albeit in
slightly different circumstances.
Chris Bernhard and
Andy Padova each posted ...
a 73 to share first-day
honors in the three-day I
affair, hosted by Inver-
ness Golf and Country
Club. Dr. Tom Hendrick, For mo
Charles Kelly and Berger photos
Warner shared the next on this
best score at 74. www.d
Kelly and Hendrick online.
joined Padova playing in
the first flight. Berger, a seven-
time tournament champion, was
in the championship flight.
"I could have shot a lot better,"
said Bernhard, a member at Inver-
ness. "I hit the ball solid. A 69 or 70
is what the course should have
played at They made it playable, it
was there for the taking."
Berhard has been there for the
taking of the crown himself. He's
played the St. Pat's tourney six
times, yet it was the first that's
difficult to forget
"My first year I was three shots


I


hr
c(


back, and I finished birdie-birdie-
eagle-bogey," he said, remember-
ing the 2006 tournament. "I lost
by one stroke. Rick Powers won."
For Padova, his name is often as-
sociated with those in front of a
tournament Indeed, last year a
Padova won the St. Pat's Tourna-
ment his son Austin Padova,
then a high school student at Hud-
son who was playing a jun-
ior tournament this
weekend and therefore
could not defend his title.
So far, his dad's doing
pretty well.
e "I played well," Andy
click Padova said, "at least until
tory at the last three holes, when I
onicle was three-over (par)."
om. Padova said this is his
third year playing the tour-
nament, but in his past appear-
ances he has "not done that well.
I'm not normally the one who's
going to be leading."
Not that it was unfamiliar terri-
tory "It's not uncommon for
See I Page B4
Chris Bernhard putts during the
first round of the St. Pat's Invita-
tional at Inverness Golf & Country
Club on Friday. Bernhard is the
leader after the opening 18 holes.
DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle


3..-- :
- ---- -- -


Chronicle Girls Basketball Player of the Year: PAIGE GARVIN





?1K 7~) Tl ^(i 0 l i


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Citrus senior post player Paige Garvin is the Chronicle's Girls Basketball Player of the Year after averaging 13 points and 12 rebounds per
game during the 2011-12 season. The Hurricanes were a force to be reckoned with, compiling a 24-4 record.


Garvin's prosperity in the post helped lead Citrus to stellar regular season


JUSTIN PLANTE
Correspondent
Player of the year is a title
celebrating an outstanding sea-
son by a player that exudes
leadership, is the outcome of
hard work, and the epitome of
what a student-athlete should
be. And for all of these reasons
and more, this year's Chronicle
Girls Basketball Player of the
Year is Citrus High School's
Paige Garvin.
To put it bluntly: Garvin was
dominant. The paint was her
territory, and she knew it too.
Her tenacity on the boards
matched her offensive output,
as she was the only player in
the county to average a double-
double, posting 13 points and 12
rebounds per game.
In a conversation with
Garvin, it was easy to see why
Garvin was so successful: love
of the game.
"It feels good," Garvin said of


receiving the award. "I just love
basketball, you know, so I don't
really expect anything. I just
play my hardest and have fun.
But I definitely feel honored."
Citrus girls basketball coach
Brian Lattin was just as excited


to have Garvin
honored.
"Obviously,
I feel like it's
been an
honor and a
privilege to
coach Paige,"
he said.
"She's a hard
worker, and is
a prime ex-


vows to always put her academ-
ics first, even when pursuing
basketball at the next level.
"If I got any offers, of course
I'd love to play," Garvin said.
"Academics will always come
first though, but I love basket-


I think she's gotten
better fundamentally
every single year.

Brian Lattin
Citrus girls basketball coach on Chronicle
Player of the Year Paige Garvin.


ample of what hard work could
lead to. She's the epitome of a
student-athlete; great student,
great athlete."
Garvin, like Lattin stated,
epitomizes the student-athlete
label. Her GPA stands above a
4.0, and as much as she loves
the game of basketball, she


ball, and if I
get the
chance I'll
definitely
play"
For Lattin,
it's been a
great three-
year run with
Garvin, and
he's watched
her grow not


only as a person, but as a player
as well.
"I think she's gotten better
fundamentally every single
year," he said. "That comes with
the hard work she's put in, and
she's continued to improve.
And with every year, you get
new opportunities and chal-


lenges, and Paige just em-
braced the challenges and re-
ally just ran with them."
The challenges this year
came in abundance, but Garvin
and her Citrus teammates
pushed each other, and perse-
vered through the tough games
on their way to a winning
streaking of 21 straight games to
begin the season.
The win streak gave way to
some very memorable games. A
personal favorite of Garvin's
was the Lecanto Holiday Tour-
nament game between traveling
River Ridge and Citrus. It was a
game that showcased the expe-
rience and poise that Garvin ex-
uded even in the preseason
game earlier in the season.
Reliving that game, Garvin
expressed her feelings after
her last-second bucket gave
Citrus the 46-44 win.
"I was so excited," she said.
"It was overwhelming, because
See Page B4
















CITRUS COUNTY SP


CITRUS COUNTY'S RECREATIONAL GUIDE TO ADULT SPORTS

a LL.a
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EEDWAY


HITTING THE LINKS OUTDOORS


IN


THE


jAME


Inverness softball leagues ready


Special to the Chronicle
Adult Slow-Pitch Softball action
takes place at Whispering Pines
Park in Inverness every Tuesday
and Thursday evening at 6:30 and
7:45pm.
The Spring League consists of
four teams. It's midway through
the season, but one team, Pub-
lix/Mike Scott Plumbing, came
roaring out of the gates with six
straight wins.
The other, more evenly-
matched teams are looking to
close the gap on MSP/Publix with
seven games remaining before
playoff competition. There is still
a lot of ball left to play Come out
and cheer your favorite players to
victory
League Standings as of March
12 are:
1. Publix/Mike Scott Plumbing
(7-1)
2.Mike Camp Construction (6-3)
3.Evilsizer Law (3-5)
4.ABC Pawn (1-8)
If you'd like more information,
please call Shaun Miracle at: 352-
726-3913 ext. 1311 or email: smira-
cle@inverness-fl.gov
Inverness men's & co-ed
leagues forming now
Join us for another action-packed
season of men's and co-ed softball.
Whether you're almost pro or aver-
age Joe, there's a league for you!
The team managers' organizational
meeting for both men & co-ed soft-
ball will take place on Tuesday, April
6 at 6 p.m. at the Recreational Build-
ing in Whispering Pines Park to dis-
cuss league rules and changes.
Come join the fun!
For more information, please con-
tact Shaun Miracle at 352-726-2611
ext.1311 or email: smiracle@
inverness-fl.gov
Golf For Kids tourney
on March 23
The Inverness Sertoma Club's 26th
annual Golf For Kids' Tournament will
take place Friday, March 23, at Inver-
ness Golf and Country Club.
Registration begins at 7 a.m. with a
shotgun start at 8 a.m. The format is a
"Four-Person Best Ball Scramble."
Cost is $60 per player and $100 for
hole sponsors. Entry fee includes
greens fee, cart, lunch, beverages and


door prizes. Mulligan tickets will be
available one for $5 or three for $10.
Prizes awarded for closest to the pin,
longest drive, hole-in-one, sponsored
by Love Honda.
Proceeds will benefit speech-and
hearing-impaired children, through the
All Children's Citrus Sertoma Speech
& Hearing Clinic in Lecanto. Sertoma's
primary service project is assisting the
more than 50 million people with
speech, hearing and language disor-
ders. Proceeds will also benefit other
Inverness Sertoma projects.
Golf classic for 'Kidney
for Karen' effort
The Kidney for Karen Golf Classic
will begin at 1 p.m. Saturday, March
24, at Citrus Hills Golf & Country Club.
The four-person scramble has a lim-
ited field of 144 players. Cost is $60,
which includes golf, refreshments,
door prizes and hole contests. There
will be three divisions based on team
handicap. Each division will be
awarded first-, second- and third-place
prizes. Scoring will be based on team
handicap and gross score.
Hole sponsors are needed for a
$100 donation.
For more information, call Douglas
Alexander at 352-344-2425, or Dennis
Himmel at 352-634-5680.
'Golf for Meals'
tourney in March
Citrus County Home Delivered
Meals Program will host Golf for Meals
fundraising golf tournament Saturday,
March 24, at Seven Rivers Golf and
Country Club, Crystal River.
The event will begin at 9 a.m. Busi-
ness owners and organizations are in-
vited to sponsor the event with a
variety of advertising platforms. You
can show your support by sponsoring
a hole, providing items for gift bags, or
by donating prizes that can be given
away or raffled off for additional funds.
There are several different levels of
corporate sponsorship:
To become a corporate sponsor, call
352-527-5975. March for Meals is a
nationwide campaign sponsored by
the Meals on Wheels Association of
America.
Good Hope Scramble
benefits Hospice
The fourth annual Camp Good
Hope Golf Scramble will begin at 8:30


Special to the Chronicle
Citrus Wrestling Club members Casey Beardon Barker, left, and Zachary Collins each won state championships
at the Florida Amateur Wrestling Association (FAWA) State Tournament for Folkstyle wrestling on March 3 and
4 in Kissimmee at the Silver Spurs Arena. Barker won his title in the Cadet 160 pound weight class while
Collins was crowned champion in the Junior 220 pound class. Jacob Nolen also had a second-place finish for
the Club. Also competing for the Citrus Wrestling Club that weekend were Andrew Dow and Johnny Rodriguez.


a.m. Saturday, April 14, at Southern
Woods Golf & Country Club, 1501
Corkwood Blvd., Homosassa.
The tournament supports Hospice
of Citrus County bereavement camps
- Camp Good Hope and Teen En-
counter. The camps are presented
twice annually and provide a safe
place for kids to talk openly about loss
and improve their ability to cope.
Entry fee for the event is $60. Hole
sponsorships are $100. Entry fee in-
cludes lunch, first- through third-place
prizes, special hole prizes and a
golfer gift bag. Registration deadline
is April 7.
For more information or to register,
call Hospice of Citrus County at 352-
527-2020.
Jazzercise at
community center
Citrus County Parks & Recreation
will offer Jazzercise at West Citrus
Community Center. The 60-minute
class includes a warm-up, high-energy
aerobic routines, muscle toning and
cool-down stretch segment.
One-hour classes are offered at
5:30 p.m. Monday, Tuesdays and
Thursday. Unlimited monthly ticket
is $25.


Call 352-465-7007 or visit www.citr-
uscountyparks.com.
Zumba at Citrus Springs
Citrus County Parks & Recreation
offers Zumba classes with instructor
Lynn DaSilva at Citrus Springs Com-
munity Center. Zumba is a fitness pro-
gram designed with exciting Latin and
international dance rhythms. No mem-
bership or contracts.
Ongoing classes are: 11:30 a.m. to
12:30 p.m. Monday; 6:30 to 7:30 p.m.
Tuesday; and 6:30 to 7:30 p.m.
Thursday. Cost is $5.
For more information, visit www.citr-
uscountyparks.com or call 352-465-
7007.
Zumba offered at
Dunnellon church
Zumba, the Latin-inspired dance-fit-
ness class, is offered at 4:30 p.m.
Monday and Thursday afternoons at
Dunnellon Presbyterian Church,
20641 Chestnut St.
Call 352-489-3021.
Club offers Zumba lessons
Yankeetown/Inglis Woman's Club is
offering Zumba classes in air-condi-
tioned comfort from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m.
Monday and Wednesdays.


Everyone is welcome. For informa-
tion, call 352-447-2057.
Yoga at canning center
Citrus County Parks & Recreation
offers yoga with Laura Boetto from 10
and 11 a.m. Tuesday and Fridays at
the Canning Center in Lecanto. Yoga
improves flexibility and balance, in-
creases energy, strengthens and
tones muscles and reduces stress.
Cost is $6 per class; $20 monthly.
No pre-registration required.
For more information, visit www.citr-
uscountyparks.com or call 352-465-
7007.
Shuffleboard Club
invites public
Floral City Shuffleboard Club plays
at 9:30 a.m. Tuesday and Fridays
and at 1 p.m. Wednesday at Floral
Park in Floral City.
It is a great opportunity to meet peo-
ple in the community, and get some
light exercise. We welcome all new-
comers. Yearly dues are $3 per per-
son, and there is no need to purchase
any equipment.
Call the vice president of the Floral
City Shuffleboard Club, Dana Bause,
at 352-726-0670.


Watch out for ticks; they can cause disease


I was running one of Crys-
tal River's many pre-
serves last week with
some friends and discov-
ered that we have bypassed
spring and gone directly
into summer.
Two things U.S.
Fish and
Wildlife cannot
control are the
sun and ticks.
We were on
our long run for I _
the week way
out in the woods
and had no sun-
screen, little Dr. Ron
water and no DOCT
bug repellent for ORD
the hoard of
mosquitoes and
no-see-ums, let alone ticks.
Of course, this makes you
run faster.
After the run, one of my
running friends called and
said he had found ticks on
his leg. What was odd is
that we had stayed on the
trails and not gone through
high grass. Due to the warm
winter, however, the ticks
and biting bugs have come
out in droves.
The point to be made is as
summer descends on us, we
have to start thinking about
problems specific to the sea-
son and protect ourselves.
Lyme disease, for exam-
ple, is a wicked disease that
can cause severe perma-
nent rashes, arthritis, heart
and nervous system abnor-
malities. Ticks carrying bac-
teria found on deer cause it.
The deer deposit the ticks
on shrubs, high grass and


bushes. As people hike
through and rub up against
the high grass or bushes, the
ticks get on your skin. When
they bite, they deposit the
bacteria that causes Lyme
disease to enter
the body
Ticks are es-
pecially danger-
ous in the spring
because people
are not aware
they are out in
numbers. Also,
many people are
not aware that
Joseph deer ticks, the
OR'S carrier of Lyme
ERS disease bacteria,
are prevalent in
Florida.
Lyme disease is reported
most commonly in the
northeastern U.S., Maine to
Maryland, in the Midwest
and is very common in New
York and Connecticut
The name comes from the
first diagnosis in Lyme, Con-
necticut in 1975. Lyme dis-
ease is caused by a bacteria
known as Borrelia burgdor-
feri and is transmitted to
people through the bite of
an infected black-legged
tick in the southeastern U.S.
and Florida ... yuck!
In Florida, there is an av-
erage of 55 cases reported
per year. Of these, most are
acquired in Florida and
the others while a person
was traveling in another
state. Over half the cases
were females and the ma-
jority of cases were white
and non-Hispanic, accord-
ing to the Florida Depart-


ment of Health.
The majority of infections
acquired in Florida were
reported in the northern
and central counties. The
number of cases increases
during the summer and
peak in July, though cases
are reported in Florida
year-round.
Most people develop a
red, bull's-eye rash three
days to one month after
being bitten by the infected
tick. This rash does not al-
ways appear at the site of
the bite, and may occur on
another part of the body
Furthermore, not all people
develop a rash.
Other symptoms include
muscle and joint aches,
fever, headache, chills, fa-
tigue or a stiff neck. The late
stage symptoms may not ap-
pear until months or years
after the bite. Late stage in-
cludes problems with the
brain, heart, joints and mus-
cles. Patients treated with
antibiotics early after the
infection usually recover
quickly and completely
Patients diagnosed in the
later stages, may have per-
sistent or recurrent symp-
toms and frequently benefit
from a second course of an-
tibiotic therapy Some prob-
lems are permanent and
dreadful.
Prevention is the key and
key in prevention is repel-
lent containing DEET I
often hear how bad this stuff
is for you. Really! What's
worse is developing the per-
manent heart, arthritis and
neurologic complications of


Lyme disease. In this case,
put on the repellent, espe-
cially on the kids.
DEET can be applied di-
rectly to the skin and offers
several hours of protection.
Repellents containing per-
methrin can be applied to
clothing and shoes, lasting
through several washings.
Secondary prevention is
the usual. Wear white or
light-colored clothing so you
can see the little guys crawl-
ing on your clothes. Wear
long pants and long-sleeved
shirts when in areas where
ticks are likely to be pres-
ent. Tuck your pants legs
into your socks so that ticks


cannot crawl up the inside
of your pants.
Check your body and your
child's body for ticks. Show-
ering within two hours of
coming indoors will reduce
your risk of a tick bite. Pay
special attention to feet and
legs, as some ticks are small
enough to crawl through
socks and into shoes. If you
find any ticks, remove them
immediately Also, check
your pets. Ticks can come
into the house on pets as well.
So when you go hunting
or a hike or run or the kids
go out to play this summer,
make sure to check your
legs (and especially the


groin area) for ticks.
If you or your kids have
been outdoors and a red
bull's-eye rash starts or if
your joints and muscles
start aching and you de-
velop chills and fever, see a
doctor immediately Think
about Lyme disease. Antibi-
otics, started promptly, will
prevent the severe
complications.

Ron Joseph, M.D., is a
hand and shoulder
orthopedic specialist who
can be reached at
rbjhand@cox.net or
352-212-5359.


11
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Unlucky number 2


Tigers, Blue Devils

are just 5th, 6th

No. 2 seeds to lose

Associated Press

OMAHA, Neb. Kyle O'Quinn
had 26 points and 14 rebounds,
making several key plays in the
closing minutes, and No. 15 seed
Norfolk State held on to stun sec-
ond-seeded Missouri 86-84 on Fri-
day in the West Regional.
Pendarvis Williams and Chris
McEachin each added 20 points for
the MEAC champion Spartans (26-
9), who made their first trip to the
NCAA tournament a memorable
one. They became the fifth No. 15
seed to beat a No. 2 and the first
since fellow conference member
Hampton in 2001.
O'Quinn had a chance to take
some of the drama out of the finish
when he went to the free throw line
with 3.8 seconds to go, but the 70-per-
cent foul shooter missed both tries.
Missouri coach Frank Haith
called a timeout with 2.9 seconds
left to set up a final play, and the
ball wound up in the hands of Phil
Pressey He took a couple of hard
dribbles and let loose a 3-pointer
from the wing that clanked off the
back iron as the buzzer sounded.
Michael Dixon led Big 12 tourna-
ment champion Missouri (30-5) with
22 points, and Pressey and fellow
guard Marcus Denmon finished
with 20 points each. Pressey also
had eight assists.
South Regional
No. 15 Lehigh 75,
No. 2 Duke 70
GREENSBORO, N.C. C.J. McCol-
lum scored 30 points and Lehigh upset
Duke 75-70 in the second round of the
NCAA tournament.
Lehigh became the sixth No. 15 seed
to beat a No. 2 and the first since Nor-
folk State pulled off the trick earlier in
the day.
Duke dropped its first tournament
game for only the second time in the
past 16 years, and this one occurred
just 55 miles from its campus.
The Blue Devils had no answer for
McCollum, a speedy guard who's a two-
time Patriot League player of the year
and the nation's fifth-leading scorer.
It didn't help that the Blue Devils hit
just 6 of 26 shots from 3-point range.
Lehigh (27-7) led most of the game,
drawing support from North Carolina
fans who borrowed brown signs from
Mountain Hawks supporters that read
"Go Lehigh" to root against their rivals.
East Regional
No. 6 Cincinnati 65,
No. 11 Texas 59
NASHVILLE, Tenn. Yancy Gates
had 15 points and 10 rebounds as
Cincinnati started strong and then with-
stood a late rally by Texas.
The Bearcats (25-10) jumped out to a
16-2 lead while Texas opened the game
1 of 14 from the field and shot 16 percent
for the first half. After trailing 31-17 at half-
time, the Longhorns attacked, hitting five
of their first seven from 3-point range.
With 3:44 to play, Texas' Jonathan
Holmes made a layup to tie it at 52, but
the Longhorns never took the lead.
Gates hit a shot over Clint Chapman
with 1:11 remaining to give Cincinnati a
58-52 cushion, and the Bearcats hit five
free throws in the final 36 seconds.
J'Covan Brown led Texas (20-14) with


19 points. Chapman had 10 points and
14 rebounds.
Midwest Regional
No. 1 North Carolina 77,
No. 16 Vermont 58
GREENSBORO, N.C. Tyler Zeller
had 17 points and 15 rebounds to help
North Carolina beat Vermont in its
NCAA tournament opener despite play-
ing without injured starter John Henson.
Freshman forward James Michael
McAdoo added a season-high 17
points for the Tar Heels (30-5), who
pushed ahead by double figures late in
the first half and then broke the game
open after halftime. They improved to
30-1 in NCAA tournament games
played in their home state.
Sandro Carissimo had 11 points for
the Catamounts (24-12), who beat
Lamar in one of Wednesday's First Four
games. That earned them a trip to
Greensboro to face the Tar Heels in
front of a home-state crowd wearing
plenty of light blue.
The Tar Heels didn't turn in a rousing
performance, but they had a danger-
free afternoon and advanced to play
eighth-seeded Creighton on Sunday.
They also bought Henson another two
days to recover from that sprained left
wrist. The 6-foot-10 junior was hurt dur-
ing last week's Atlantic Coast Confer-
ence tournament and missed the last
two games in Atlanta.
No. 8 Creighton 58,
No. 9 Alabama 57
GREENSBORO, N.C. Doug Mc-
Dermott scored 16 points and Creighton
overcame an 11-point deficit in the sec-
ond half to beat Alabama for its first
NCAA tournament victory in 10 years.
Alabama had a chance to win during
the frantic final seconds, but Josh Jones
blocked Trevor Releford's 3-point attempt
from the top of the key as time expired.
McDermott, the MVP of the Missouri
Valley Conference and the nation's
third-leading scorer at 23.2 points per
game, was held scoreless for more than
14 minutes but then scored nine points
down the stretch for the Bluejays (29-5).
It was Creighton's first tournament
victory since Terrell Taylor drilled a 3-
pointer with 0.2 seconds left in double
overtime to lift the Bluejays to an upset
win over Florida in 2002.
Releford led Alabama (21-12) with 14
points and Trevor Lacey added 13.
No. 3 Georgetown 74,
No. 14 Belmont 59
COLUMBUS, Ohio- Jason Clark
scored 21 points, Otto Porter added 16
and Georgetown's ruthless defense
bottled up Belmont's shooters, sending
the Hoyas into the next round of the
NCAA tournament after early exits the
past two years.
Henry Sims had 15 points for the
Hoyas (24-8), who shot 62 percent from
the floor and will play No. 11 seed North
Carolina State in the third round Sunday.
The Bruins (27-8) had their 14-game
winning streak stopped and fell to 0-5 in
NCAA appearances.
No. 11 North Carolina St. 79,
No. 6 San Diego State 65
COLUMBUS, Ohio Richard Howell
scored 22 points, double his season av-
erage, and North Carolina State used its
muscle inside and sticky defense to
beat San Diego State.
Lorenzo Brown added 17 points
and C.J. Leslie 15 for the Wolfpack
(23-12), who improved to 12-5 in
NCAA tournament openers. N.C.
State has won at least one game in
seven of its last eight trips.
Jamaal Franklin had 23 points and


Associated Press
Norfolk State's Kyle O'Quinn (10) celebrates after defeating Missouri 86-84
in an NCAA tournament second-round game Friday at CenturyLink Center in


Omaha, Neb.
Chase Tapley 19 for the Aztecs (26-8),
regular-season champions of the Moun-
tain West Conference.
No. 13 Ohio 65,
No. 4 Michigan 60
NASHVILLE, Tenn. Walter Offutt
grabbed a loose ball, was fouled by
Evan Smotrycz and sank both of his
free throws with 6.8 seconds left to pre-
serve Ohio's 65-60 upset of Michigan in
the second round of the NCAA tourna-
ment's Midwest Regional.
The 13th-seeded Bobcats (28-7) had
the Wolverines on their heels through-
out the game, but Michigan's Trey Burke
hit a 3 with 4:12 left to cut it to 63-60.
But the Wolverines missed their final
five shots, four by Burke.
Fourth-seeded Michigan (24-10) got
the rebound on Burke's third miss, a 3-
point shot with 22 seconds left, but
Smotrycz lost control of the ball, and Of-
futt grabbed it.
Ohio shot 51.2 percent and held
Michigan to 40.7 percent shooting, in-
cluding 7 for 23 from 3-point range, typi-
cally the Wolverines' comfort zone.
D.J. Cooper led the Bobcats with 21
points on 7-of-1l shooting.
Burke finished with 16 points.
No. 10 Purdue 72,
No. 7 Saint Mary's 69
OMAHA, Neb. Lewis Jackson
made the go-ahead free throws with
22.8 seconds left after Saint Mary's had
rallied from 11 points down late to take
its first lead, and the Boilermakers de-
feated the Gaels 72-69 in the Midwest
Regional on Friday night.


Jorden Page made a 3-pointer with
44.2 seconds left to finish a 14-2 run
that brought the Gaels back from a 66-
55 deficit with 4:24 to play.
Purdue's Terone Johnson and Saint
Mary's Clint Steindl were called for trav-
eling before Jackson made his free
throws. Page badly missed what would
have been a go-ahead 3 with 10 sec-
onds left, and Robbie Hummel made
two free throws for a three-point lead.
Rob Jones, who had 23 points,
missed a 3 at the buzzer for the sev-
enth-seeded Gaels (27-6).
Johnson had 21 points, Jackson 18
and Hummel and Anthony Johnson
scored 10 apiece for the 10th-seeded
Boilermakers (22-12).
West Regional
No. 9 Saint Louis 61,
No. 8 Memphis 54
COLUMBUS, Ohio Kwamain
Mitchell scored 22 points, including
three big 3-pointers, and Saint Louis
rode its gritty defense to a 61-54 victory
over Memphis in a West Regional sec-
ond-round game.
Mitchell closed the first half by bank-
ing in a 3, then nailed two others to help
the ninth-seeded Billikens (26-7) over-
turn an eight-point second-half deficit.
They'll move on to play the winner of
LIU Brooklyn and top-seeded Michigan
State on Sunday.
Brian Conklin added 16 points, includ-
ing five free throws in the final minute to
salt the game away.
Will Barton had 16 points for the
eighth-seeded Tigers (26-9), who had
won 20 of their last 23 games.


SPORTS


Panthers' errors doom effort


SEAN ARNOLD
Correspondent

LECANTO -Coral Gables
High exploited a pair of Pan-
ther errors for a five-run
third inning en route to a 9-3
victory over Lecanto on
Thursday.
Cavaliers senior second
baseman Dillon Maya and
junior first baseman Kelvin
Nunez hit back-to-back two-
run singles with two outs in
the third after the Panthers
failed to field a bunt earlier
in the inning. Moments later,
Coral Gables catcher Carlos
Perez scored Nunez on an-
other infield error by
Lecanto. The Cavaliers
added another run in the
fifth, two more in the sixth
and one more in the sev-
enth. Their final three runs
were also enabled by Pan-
ther errors.
Coral Gables ((7-5-1) senior
Luke Sorensen, a 6-foot-7
overpowering lefty, struck
out nine Panther batters,
walked none, and surren-
dered no earned runs in five
innings to get the win. He
was relieved by junior
Christopher Viera, who
struck out two in the final


couple of innings.
Centerfielder Skylar Sum-
mers and catcher Gary Lev-
engood, both seniors,
accounted for all five of
Lecanto's hits on just three
at-bats apiece, with Sum-
mers coming a home run
short of hitting for the cycle.
Panthers senior Sheldon
Baxter pitched a complete
game, yielding just one
earned run while striking out
three and walking none.
Panthers coach David
Logue lamented his club's
approaches at the plate as
well as its base-running and
fielding woes. Lecanto (5-6)
totaled four errors and was
caught stealing four times,
hurting its odds against a for-
midable 8A opponent while
the Panthers were missing
multiple starters due to
spring break.
"When you strike out 11
times five looking off a
guy that's throwing 95-per-
cent fastballs because he
can't get the curveball over,
that's pretty much unac-
ceptable to me," Logue said.
"I'm really disappointed in
that effort. I hope we keep
trying to work hard and get
better at it, but halfway


through the year we should-
n't be doing that.
"Coral Gables is a good
team, but I didn't have the
feeling they were that much
better than good teams
around here," he added.
"But good teams are going to
make you pay for mistakes
every time. We definitely
had a chance to win this
game if we made a play here
or there and hit the ball a lit-
tle better The bottom line is,
we gave them more than
three outs an inning two or
three times, and our offense
isn't good enough to make up
for it right now."
Lecanto responded to the
Cavaliers third-inning rally,
getting two runs, one each by
Baxter and sophomore third
baseman Levi O'Steen, off a
couple of Coral Gables errors
and a Summers base hit in
the bottom-half of the inning.
Summers scored his
team's final run in the sixth
when he was knocked in on a
sacrifice fly to center by jun-
ior first baseman Patrick Col-
letti after the senior reached
on a double to deep left field.
Lecanto plays at home
against South Sumter on
Tuesday.


C C' I "K O N. c.. f, E

CHR ONICoLE

0APGTo enter visit www.chronicleonline.com


SATURDAY, MARCH 17, 2012 B3

NCAA Tournament
EAST REGIONAL
Second Round
Thursday, March 15
At The CONSOL Energy Center
Pittsburgh
Kansas State 70, Southern Mississippi 64
Syracuse 72, UNC Asheville 65
Gonzaga 77, West Virginia 54
Ohio State 78, Loyola (Md.) 59
At The Pit
Albuquerque, N.M.
Wisconsin 73, Montana 49
Vanderbilt 79, Harvard 70
Friday, March 16
At Bridgestone Arena
Nashville,Tenn.
Cincinnati 65, Texas 59
Florida State 66, St. Bonaventure 63
Third Round
Saturday, March 17
At The CONSOL Energy Center
Pittsburgh
Syracuse (32-2) vs. Kansas State (22-10),
12:15p.m.
Ohio State (28-7) vs. Gonzaga (26-6), 30
minutes following
At The Pit
Albuquerque, N.M.
Wisconsin (25-9) vs.Vanderbilt (25-10), 6:10
Sunday, March 18
At Bridgestone Arena
Nashville,Tenn.
FSU (25-9) vs. Cincinnati-Texas winner, TBA
SOUTH REGIONAL
Second Round
Thursday, March 15
AtThe KFCYum! Center
Louisville, Ky.
Kentucky 81, Western Kentucky 66
Iowa State 77, UConn 64
At The Pit
Albuquerque, N.M.
Baylor 68, South Dakota State 60
Colorado 68, UNLV 64
At The Rose Garden
Portland, Ore.
VCU 62, Wichita State 59
Indiana 79, New Mexico State 66
Friday, March 16
At Greensboro Coliseum
Greensboro, N.C.
Lehigh 75, Duke 70
Notre Dame (22-11) vs. Xavier (21-12), 30
minutes following
Third Round
Saturday, March 17
AtThe KFCYum! Center
Louisville, Ky.
Kentucky (33-2) vs. Iowa State (23-10), 7:45
At The Pit
Albuquerque, N.M.
Baylor (28-7) vs. Colorado (24-11), 8:40 p.m.
At The Rose Garden
Portland, Ore.
Indiana (26-8) vs.VCU (29-6), 7:10 p.m.
Sunday, March 18
At Greensboro Coliseum
Greensboro, N.C.
Lehigh (27-7)vs. Notre Dame-Xavierwinner
MIDWEST REGIONAL
Second Round
Friday, March 16
At Greensboro Coliseum
Greensboro, N.C.
Creighton 58, Alabama 57
North Carolina 77, Vermont 58
At Nationwide Arena
Columbus, Ohio
N.C. State 79, San Diego State 65
Georgetown 74, Belmont 59
At Bridgestone Arena
Nashville, Tenn.
Ohio 65, Michigan 60
Temple (24-7) vs. South Florida (21-13), 30
minutes following
At CenturyLink Center
Omaha, Neb.
Purdue 72, Saint Mary's (Calif.) 69
Kansas (27-6) vs. Detroit (22-13), 30 minutes
following
Third Round
Sunday, March 18
At Greensboro Coliseum
Greensboro, N.C.
North Carolina (30-5) vs. Creighton (29-5)
At Nationwide Arena
Columbus, Ohio
Georgetown (24-8) vs. N.C. State (23-12)
At Bridgestone Arena
Nashville, Tenn.
Ohio (28-7) vs.Temple-South Florida winner
At CenturyLink Center
Omaha, Neb.
Kansas-Detroit winners. Purdue (22-12)
WEST REGIONAL
Second Round
Thursday, March 15
AtThe KFCYum! Center
Louisville, Ky.
Murray State 58, Colorado State 41
Marquette 88, BYU 68
At The Rose Garden
Portland, Ore.
Louisville 69, Davidson 62
New Mexico 75, Long Beach State 68
Friday, March 16
At Nationwide Arena
Columbus, Ohio
Saint Louis 61, Memphis 54
Michigan State (27-7) vs. LIU (25-8), 30 min-
utes following
At CenturyLink Center
Omaha, Neb.
Florida 71, Virginia 45
Norfolk State 86, Missouri 84
Third Round
Saturday, March 17
AtThe KFCYum! Center
Louisville, Ky.
Marquette (26-7) vs. Murray State (31-1),
5:15 p.m.
At The Rose Garden
Portland, Ore.
Louisville (27-9) vs. New Mexico (28-6), 9:40
Sunday, March 18
At Nationwide Arena
Columbus, Ohio
Michigan State-LIU winner vs. Saint Louis
(26-7),TBA
At CenturyLink Center
Omaha, Neb.
Norfolk State (26-9) vs. Florida (24-10), TBA






B4 SATURDAY, MARCH 17, 2012



NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
Philadelphia 25 19 .568 -
Boston 23 19 .548 1
NewYork 20 24 .455 5
New Jersey 15 30 .333 10Y2
Toronto 14 29 .326 10Y2
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 32 11 .744 -
Orlando 29 16 .644 4
Atlanta 25 19 .568 7V2
Washington 10 33 .233 22
Charlotte 6 36 .143 2512
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Chicago 36 10 .783 -
Indiana 25 17 .595 9
Milwaukee 19 24 .442 15Y2
Cleveland 16 25 .390 17Y2
Detroit 16 27 .372 18Y2
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 28 13 .683 -
Memphis 24 17 .585 4
Dallas 25 20 .556 5
Houston 24 20 .545 512
New Orleans 10 34 .227 1912
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 33 10 .767 -
Denver 24 20 .545 9Y2
Minnesota 22 22 .500 11 Y2
Utah 21 22 .488 12
Portland 21 23 .477 1212
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
L.A. Lakers 27 16 .628 -
L.A. Clippers 24 18 .571 212
Phoenix 21 22 .488 6
Golden State 18 22 .450 712
Sacramento 14 29 .326 13
Thursday's Games
Washington 99, New Orleans 89
Dallas 101, Charlotte 96
Oklahoma City 103, Denver 90
Utah 111, Minnesota 105, OT
Phoenix 91, L.A. Clippers 87
Friday's Games
Orlando 86, New Jersey 70
Miami 84, Philadelphia 78
Atlanta 102, Washington 88
NewYork 115, Indiana 100
Portland 100, Chicago 89
Toronto at Memphis, late
San Antonio at Oklahoma City, late
Boston at Sacramento, late
Detroit at Phoenix, late
Milwaukee at Golden State, late
Minnesota at L.A. Lakers, late
Saturday's Games
Houston at L.A. Clippers, 3:30 p.m.
Toronto at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
New York at Indiana, 7 p.m.
Philadelphia at Chicago, 8 p.m.
New Orleans at New Jersey, 8 p.m.
Boston at Denver, 9 p.m.
Golden State at Utah, 9 p.m.
San Antonio at Dallas, 9 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Atlanta at Cleveland, 3 p.m.
Detroit at L.A. Clippers, 3:30 p.m.
Minnesota at Sacramento, 6 p.m.
Washington at Memphis, 6 p.m.
Orlando at Miami, 7p.m.
Houston at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
Utah at L.A. Lakers, 9:30 p.m.
Portland at Oklahoma City, 9:30 p.m.



NHL standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
N.Y Rangers 70 4419 7 95194 155
Pittsburgh 69 4321 5 91224 175
Philadelphia 70 41 22 7 89226 199
New Jersey 71 41 25 5 87196 182
N.Y Islanders 71 2832 11 67166 214
Northeast Division
GP W L OT PtsGF GA
Ottawa 72 3725 10 84220 210
Boston 70 4027 3 83225 176
Buffalo 71 3329 9 75178 201
Toronto 71 31 32 8 70205 218
Montreal 72 2832 12 68189 200
Southeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Florida 70 3423 13 81177 195
Washington 70 3628 6 78189 197
Winnipeg 70 3329 8 74186 197
TampaBay 70 3231 7 71198 237
Carolina 71 2729 15 69185 211
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W LOT PtsGF GA
St. Louis 72 4519 8 98186 141
Detroit 71 4424 3 91219 171
Nashville 70 41 21 8 90201 181
Chicago 71 3825 8 84213 209
Columbus 70 2241 7 51161 226
Northwest Division
GP W LOT Pts GF GA
Vancouver 70 4220 8 92219 177
Colorado 73 3830 5 81191 194
Calgary 71 3425 12 80180 194
Minnesota 70 2931 10 68150 194
Edmonton 70 2736 7 61185 209
Pacific Division
GP W LOT PtsGF GA
Dallas 71 3927 5 83188 188
Phoenix 72 3526 11 81188 186
San Jose 70 3525 10 80191 179
LosAngeles 70 3325 12 78159 154
Anaheim 71 3030 11 71177 196
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over-
time loss.
Thursday's Games
New Jersey 1, Colorado 0, SO
San Jose 2, Nashville 1, SO
Philadelphia 3, N.Y Islanders 2


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FOr the record


== lorida LOTTERY

Here are the winning numbers selected
Thursday in the Florida Lottery:
-_ CASH 3 (early)
0-8-8
CASH 3 (late)
7-7-7

PLAY 4 (early)
2-8-3-8
PLAY 4 (late)
1-7-1-0

Because of early deadlines, Fantasy 5
and Mega Ball numbers were
unavailable. Please see Saturday's
K Entertainment page.



On the AIRWAVES

TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
2 p.m. (ESPN) Nationwide Series: Ford EcoBoost 300
4 a.m. (ESPN2) Nationwide Series: Ford EcoBoost 300
(Same-day Tape)
BASKETBALL
COLLEGE MEN
NIT
11 a.m. (ESPN) Massachusetts at Seton Hall
NCAA TOURNAMENT, THIRD ROUND
12 p.m. (CBS) Kansas State vs. Syracuse
2:30 p.m. (CBS) Gonzaga vs. Ohio State
5 p.m. (CBS) Murray State vs. Marquette
6 p.m. (TNT) Vanderbilt vs. Wisconsin
7 p.m. (TBS) Virginia Commonwealth vs. Indiana
7:30 p.m. (CBS) Iowa State vs. Kentucky
8:30 p.m. (TNT) Colorado vs. Baylor
9:30 p.m. (TBS) New Mexico vs. Louisville
COLLEGE WOMEN
NCAA TOURNAMENT, FIRST ROUND
11 a.m. (ESPN2) Whip-around coverage includes: Eastern
Michigan vs. South Carolina or Navy vs. Maryland or
Princeton vs. Kansas State or Texas vs. West Virginia
1 p.m. (ESPN2) Whip-around coverage includes: Hampton
vs. Stanford or Michigan State vs. Louisville or Prairie View
A&M vs. Connecticut or South Dakota State vs. Purdue
3:30 p.m. (ESPN2) Whip-around coverage includes:
Dayton vs. Arkansas or Gonzaga vs. Rutgers or McNeese
State vs. Kentucky or UT-Martin vs. Tennessee
6 p.m. (ESPN2) Whip-around coverage includes: Albany
(N.Y.) vs. Texas A&M or BYU vs. DePaul or Idaho State vs.
Miami or Iowa State vs. Green Bay
NBA
5 a.m. (ESPN2) San Antonio Spurs at Oklahoma City
Thunder (Same-day Tape)
8 p.m. (WGN-A) Philadelphia 76ers at Chicago Bulls
BOXING
10 p.m. (HBO) Matthew Macklin vs. Sergio Martinez:
Middleweights
GOLF
9 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour: Open de Andalucia
1:30 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: Transitions Championship
3 p.m. (NBC) PGATour: Transitions Championship
4 p.m. (GOLF) LPGA Tour: RR Donnelley Founders Cup
7:30 p.m. (GOLF) Champions Tour: Toshiba Classic
(Same-day Tape)
GYMNASTICS
1 p.m. (NBC) 2012 Pacific Rim Championships (Taped)
HOCKEY
7 p.m. (SUN) St. Louis Blues at Tampa Bay Lightning
7:30 p.m. (FSNFL) Buffalo Sabres at Florida Panthers
8 p.m. (NBCSPT) Hockey East Final
10:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) Detroit Red Wings at San Jose
Sharks
SOFTBALL
1 p.m. (SUN) South Carolina at Florida
TENNIS
2 p.m. (ABC) ATP BNP Paribas Open: Men's Semifinals
SNOWBOARDING
3 p.m. (NBCSPT) Sprint U.S. Grand Prix SB HP (Taped)
4 p.m. (NBCSPT) Paul Mitchell Progression Session
(Taped)
COLLEGE WRESTLING
7:30 p.m. (ESPN) NCAA Championship final

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


Pittsburgh 5, N.Y. Rangers 2
Carolina 2, St. Louis 0
Toronto 3, Tampa Bay 1
Florida 6, Boston 2
Calgary 4, Phoenix 1
Friday's Games
Ottawa 2, Montreal 1, OT
Washington at Winnipeg, late
Chicago at Dallas, late
Calgary at Edmonton, late
Los Angeles at Anaheim, late
Saturday's Games
Philadelphia at Boston, 1 p.m.
Pittsburgh at New Jersey 1 p.m.
Carolina at Minnesota, 2 p.m.


N.Y. Islanders at Montreal, 7 p.m.
Toronto at Ottawa, 7 p.m.
Colorado at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m.
St. Louis atTampa Bay, 7p.m.
Buffalo at Florida, 7:30 p.m.
Columbus at Vancouver, 10 p.m.
Nashville at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.
Detroit at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Pittsburgh at Philadelphia, 12:30 p.m.
Washington at Chicago, 7 p.m.
Columbus at Calgary, 8p.m.
Phoenix at Edmonton, 8 p.m.
Nashville at Anaheim, 8 p.m.
Carolina at Winnipeg, 8:30 p.m.


UF football practice underwhelms


Driske, Brissett

settle in for QB

competition

Associated Press

GAINESVILLE
Florida's first quarterback
competition in nearly eight
years has no front-runner
Jeff Driskel and Jacoby
Brissett shared repetitions
with the first-team offense
Friday as the Gators held
their first open practice in
nearly two years.
The sophomores looked a
lot like they did last season,
making errant throws, lack-
ing pocket presence and fail-
ing to complete many deep
passes.
That's not a good sign for
Florida. Sure, the Gators are
just two practices into spring
and have almost six months


before their next meaningful
game. But they need Driskel
or Brissett, or even both, to
make huge strides in their
second season.
"Any time you get any ex-
perience, you're going to be
a lot more comfortable,"
Driskel said. "I came in not
knowing too much last
spring. I had no idea what I
was doing, kind of just
throwing the ball around.
(Nowadays) I feel a lot more
comfortable. I missed some
throws, but I felt more com-
fortable. As spring goes
along, the whole offense will
be getting more comfortable
just as I am."
Driskel appears to be tak-
ing the first snaps, a poten-
tial sign of who's ahead. But
that could change from day
to day
Driskel was the backup to
John Brantley going into last
season and got thrown into a
game against eventual na-
tional champion Alabama


when John Brantley was in-
jured.
"I was a little nervous, and
being the quarterback at
Florida, you can't be nerv-
ous," Driskel said. "You have
to be prepared, and by being
prepared, you're going to go
play and not think."
Driskel injured his ankle
against the Tide, and Bris-
sett started the next two
games. His first career start
came on the road at then-No.
1 LSU.
"It's a lot different in prac-
tice," Brissett said. "It was a
great experience to get that
under my belt, but I feel like
it went good."
Not really
Brissett completed 46.2
percent of his passes for 206
yards, with two touchdowns
and four interceptions.
Driskel wasn't any better,
completing 47.1 percent of
his passes for 148 yards, with
no touchdowns and two
interceptions.


Magic dismiss Nets


Associated Press

ORLANDO Dwight
Howard scored 18 points,
Jameer Nelson and Glen
Davis each had 13 and the
Orlando Magic easily beat
the New Jersey Nets 86-70
Friday night.
Ryan Anderson added 12
points and 11 rebounds for
the Magic, who built a 20-
point lead and cruised from
there. Orlando won for the
fourth time in five games
and extended its winning
streak against the Nets to 10.
Reserve Gerald Green
scored 15 points to lead the
Nets. DeShawn Stevenson,
who scored 11 points, was
the only New Jersey starter
to reach double figures.
Hawks 102, Wizards 88
ATLANTA- Joe Johnson
matched his season high with
34 points, including the first two
baskets of a decisive 11-0 run
in the fourth quarter, and the At-
lanta Hawks beat the Washing-
ton Wizards 102-88.
Josh Smith had 23 points,
eight assists and seven re-
bounds for the Hawks.
Trevor Booker scored 18
points for the Wizards, who



Top-ranked Tseng leads
LPGA Founders Cup
PHOENIX Top-ranked
Yani Tseng shot a 2-under 70
on Friday to take a one-stroke
over five players after the sec-
ond round of the LPGA
Founders Cup.
A day after playing a seven-
hole stretch on the back nine in
7 under, the Taiwanese star
opened with nine pars on the
same nine. She had three
birdies and a bogey on her final
nine to reach 9-under 135 on
another perfect 80-degree day
at Wildfire Golf Club.
Second-ranked Na Yeon
Choi was second along with fel-
low South Korean players I.K.
Kim and Meena Lee and
Japan's Ai Miyazato and Mika
Miyazato. Kim had a 66, Lee
and Mika Miyazato shot 67, Ai
Miyazato had a 68, and Choi



ST. PAT'S
Continued from Page BI

(Austin) to lead," he said.
"When I'm leading, the
world's out of kilt"
While Berhard felt he
might have done even bet-
ter twice he hit his ball
behind trees, only to pitch
out and manage to salvage
par Padova was pleased
overall with his
performance.
"I did everything well,"
he said. "At least I did
everything well until those
last three holes. I didn't
make any major mistakes.
And my putts fell."
What happens next is
what counts. In the two
flights playing from the blue
tees, the championship and
first, there were seven other
golfers within three strokes



GARVIN
Continued from Page BI

we just stayed in it and
never gave up. That last-sec-
ond shot, that proves that
you should never give up. I
mean, a last-second shot?
That's not giving up."
And as much as she'd like
to say it was a team effort,
it's hard not to see where
the team poise comes from.
All season long, Garvin
never broke character, save
for the last minute bucket
and the sheer bliss that
came afterwards. She re-
mained calm and collected,
even in the face of defeat.
"We just took it one game
at a time," Garvin said. "I
never really thought about
the pressure or anything
like that We never made it a
point to think about the
wins, and when it was over,
it was over I just went in to
each game, ready for that
game, and played every


game as hard as I could."
Garvin was also invited to
participate in the Florida
Athletic Coaches Associa-
tion annual All-Star game
later in March, held at In-
dian River State College in
Ft. Pierce.
It's another huge honor
for the senior center, who is
ecstatic at the opportunity.
"I'm really excited," she
said. "I'm going to be intro-


have lost eight straight in At-
lanta since 2008.
Heat 84, 76ers 78
PHILADELPHIA- LeBron
James scored 29 points,
Dwyane Wade had 12 points
and 10 rebounds and the Miami
Heat held on to beat the
Philadelphia 76ers 84-78.
The Heat almost had an epic
collapse after leading by 29
points in the third quarter. Led
by a hard-charging Lou
Williams and Evan Turner, the
Sixers sliced Miami's lead to
four points.
James, though, refused to let
the lead completely slip away.
He hit a pull-up jumper and
sank a pair of free throws in the
final 90 seconds to help the
Heat end a four-game road los-
ing streak. The Heat had lost
two straight games overall.
Turner had 13 points,
Williams 12, and Andre Iguodala
had 11 points and 10 rebounds.
T. Blazers 100, Bulls 89
CHICAGO LaMarcus
Aldridge scored 21 points and
Wesley Matthews added 18
and the revamped Portland
Trail Blazers defeated the
Chicago Bulls 100-89.

Sports BRIEFS
shot a 69.
Tseng successfully defended
her LPGA Thailand title in Febru-
ary for her 13th LPGA Tour vic-
tory. She led the tour last season
with seven victories including
major victories in the LPGA
Championship and Women's
British Open and finished the
year with 12 worldwide titles.
Kuba leads Senators
past Canadiens 2-1
OTTAWA- Filip Kuba scored
3:07 into overtime Friday night
as the Ottawa Senators moved
into first place in the Northeast
Division with a 2-1 victory over
the Montreal Canadiens.
After taking a pass from
Daniel Alfredsson, Kuba beat
Carey Price with a slap shot
from the top of the left faceoff
circle. Erik Karlsson assisted on
Kuba's winner, giving him four

of the lead.
"We'll see what happens
from here," noted Bern-
hard. "Can't have any more
errors. If you can see the
pin, you can get to it."
In the championship
flight, Ken Godwin, Preston
Knox and David Resovsky
each had a 75 and Austin
Connors shot a 76 to stay
close to the top of the
leaderboard. Next best in
first flight behind Padova,
Hendrick and Kelly were
Bobby Cooper and Curt
Madson at 78.
In the second flight, Scott
Toumbalston's 77 was tops,
with Paul Kobel second at
78 and Nathan Connor and
Mike Russ tied for third at
78. In first in the third flight
was Dexter Elsemore with
a 76, followed by Jody
Byers with an 80 and Mike
Kemp and John Martin,
each with 81.


duced to new players and
new plays, and I'm just re-
ally excited to play I'm
pumped."
Unfortunately, as with all
high school careers, it all
ends when you cross that
stage and accept that
diploma, and Garvin is on
the verge of doing just that
at the end of the semester.
Coach Lattin, like all
coaches in his position, is
sad to see such a shining
star leave.
"I just feel so lucky to
have been around Paige,
and to have coached her,"
he said. "She is just such a
good kid. She's so coach-
able, and I'm definitely
going to miss that It'll be ex-
tremely hard to replace her,
not only with her basketball
ability But her character in
the locker room, and all of
the things that go into team
success. She really embod-
ied everything that was suc-
cessful about our team."
All-Chronicle Girls


Basketball team
Kayleigh Kiernan, PG,
Seven Rivers: Kieman's savvy
went without question throughout
the season, as she showed her
experience and intelligence
through her stellar court pres-
ence. Her average of 9 assists
per game was the highest in the
county, and her leadership shone
brightly through Seven River's
district win and playoff run.


After an emotional victory
against the Heat without Der-
rick Rose on Wednesday, the
Bulls were unable to win a sec-
ond straight game with the
reigning MVP sitting on the
bench with a strained groin.
One day after trading starters
Gerald Wallace and Marcus
Camby then firing head coach
Nate McMillan, the Blazers
hung with the Bulls through
three quarters then pulled away
in the fourth quarter.
Knicks 115, Pacers 100
NEW YORK Tyson Chan-
dler scored 16 points, Jeremy
Lin had 13, and the New York
Knicks rolled to their second
straight dominant victory under
Mike Woodson, beating the In-
diana Pacers 115-100.
Reserves JR Smith (16
points) and Steve Novak (12)
had big games again for the
Knicks in the opener of a home-
and-home series. Two nights
after beating Portland by 42 on
the day Mike D'Antoni resigned,
New York led this one by as
much as 32 and shut down
Pacers star Danny Granger,
who had angered them by say-
ing Friday and Saturday were
two "very winnable games."



points in his last three games
and 71 points in 71 games on
the season.
Pettitte signs deal
with Yankees
TAMPA- Pitcher Andy Pet-
titte is making a comeback with
the New York Yankees.
The Yankees announced Fri-
day that Pettitte had signed a
minor league deal with the
team with an invitation to big
league spring training.
The 39-year-old Pettitte last
played in 2010. The left-hander
sat out last season, but was
with the Yankees in camp this
spring as an instructor. He re-
cently threw batting practice for
the team.
Pettitte is 240-138 lifetime. In
his last season with the Yankees,
he was an All-Star and went 11-3.
From staff reports

The fourth flight leader
was Hoyt Hamilton with a
75. Tom Grimsley's 81 put
him second, with Dan Wil-
son third with an 83. Greg
Govino led in the fifth flight
with an 80, with Mitch Her-
tig second at 87, and in the
sixth flight, Frank Fama's 86
was best followed by Gary
Bennett, Vinnie George, Jim
Jacobs and Shearl Moore
each at 88.
Shane Fitzpatrick's 87
was atop the seventh flight,
followed by Barney Arse-
nault and Brad St. Clair at
89, and in the eighth flight
Jack Sasso's 90 was tops fol-
lowed by Larry Wood's 92.
The ninth flight, scored by
most points, had Ralph
Trowbridge in first with 62
and Joe Martindale second
with 61.
The second round contin-
ues today with 8:30 a.m. and
1:30 p.m. shotgun starts.


Andrea Zachar, C, Seven
Rivers: Zachar's gift of height
(being 6-foot-1) helped her on
the boards, as she nabbed 9
rebounds a game. But her
shooting range helped her to 13
points a game and her defen-
sive pressure pushed her to 3
steals a game. She was a key
proponent in Seven Rivers' dis-
trict win, and run into the Sweet
Sixteen.
Lindsay Connors, SG,
Citrus: Connors led Citrus' of-
fensive output, averaging 14
points a game while leading the
team in three pointers made,
and came in second on the
team with 5 assists per game.
Her defensive potency is not to
be forgotten either, as she aver-
aged just under 3 steals a
game, and held her own
against the other top scorers in
the county.
Paige Richards, PG,
Lecanto: One of the most ath-
letic guards in the county,
Richards commanded atten-
tion, whether she had the ball in


her hands or not. Her determi-
nation fueled the team to a 15-
10 record and a district
tournament berth.
Katelyn Hannigan, PG,
Crystal River: Another young
point guard making a name for
herself in the county is Hanni-
gan. Crystal River ran with a
young lineup, fueled by Hanni-
gan's court presence, and saw
its first winning record in three
years.


SCOREBOARD





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Rays can't figure out Blue Jays


Associated Press

DUNEDIN Ricky Romero
pitched four hitless innings and
Toronto beat Tampa Bay 5-0.
Jeff Niemann, in the three-way
scramble for one of the last two
spots in Tampa Bay's rotation, gave
up four runs in 3 1-3 innings. Nie-
mann had allowed just two hits and
no runs over five innings in two
previous starts, but he gave up
eight hits this time, including a pair
of RBI singles to J.P Arencibia.
Cardinals 5, Marlins 0
JUPITER Marlins newcomer Mark
Buehrle was tagged for five runs in 2 1-
3 innings and the St. Louis Cardinals
defeated Miami 5-0 Friday.
Buehrle allowed six hits and walked
two in his second spring training start.
He threw 70 pitches against what could
be the Cardinals' opening day lineup.
Tigers 9, Mets 0
PORT ST. LUCIE New York Mets
ace Johan Santana struggled for the
first t his spring and was pulled in
the third inningof a loss to Detroit.
Out of the majors last year while re-
covering from shoulder surgery, Santana
had not allowed a run in his first two exhi-
bition starts. But the two-time Cy Young
gave up five runs four earned on
four hits and two walks in 2 2-3 innings.
Orioles 3, Twins 1
FORT MYERS Nick Blackburn
had another impressive start, striking
out three and allowing just one hit in
four scoreless innings for a Minnesota
Twins split squad in a loss to Baltimore.
The right-hander, who is coming off
an inconsistent, injury-slowed 7-10 sea-
son, has given up four hits and no runs
through seven innings this spring.
Pirates 3, Phillies 2
BRADENTON Cliff Lee allowed
two home runs in 4 2-3 innings and was
out pitched by Kevin Correia, who gave


Dufner takes the
lead in Tampa
PALM HARBOR Padraig
Harrington was 12 shots worse
without feeling as though he
played that badly.
Harrington followed his
course-record 61 with a 2-over
73 on Friday in the Transitions
Championship. He fell two



UF
Continued from Page B1

using a cool spin move to get
to the basket for a baseline
layup in the middle of the
second half. But his best shot
came late when he dunked
off Erving Walker's alley-oop
pass.
"I woke up trying to be fo-
cused on the game and what I
could do to help the team,"
the sophomore reserve said.
Prather had played more
than 10 minutes in a game
just twice since mid-Decem-
ber and hadn't scored more
than six points in any previ-
ous game this season. In his
last 16 games he had scored a
total of 15 points.
"He gave them a great lift,"
Virginia coach Tony Bennett
said. "When you look at
someone off the bench to give
you a spark I don't want to
say you weren't counting on
him but that is a pleasant
surprise, and he was that for
them."
Bradley Beal also had 14
points and 11 rebounds and
Patric Young had 13 points on
6-for-6 shooting with three
dunks.
Those efforts were enough


FSU
Continued from Page B1

toughest games we've
played all season, and that's
all the credit to their team,"
Florida State senior Luke
Loucks said. "They came out
first swinging, and we really
didn't hit back until about 10
minutes to go in the second
half. Again, all the credit to
them, we really, really had to
fight to win that game."
Florida State coach
Leonard Hamilton cau-
tioned against thinking his
Seminoles took St Bonaven-
ture lightly Not with NBA
prospect Andrew Nicholson
on the roster
"They were well pre-
pared. They're loaded with
talent. They executed very
well," Hamilton said. "We're
very fortunate to come away
with the victory They won
their league. Some teams
from the Atlantic 10 have
done really well in the NCAA
tournament"
The third-seeded Semi-


Mariners (ss) 6,
Brewers (ss) 1
TUCSON, Ariz. Felix Hernandez
limited Milwaukee to one hit in six
scoreless innings in his second-to-last
outing before Seattle leaves for Japan,
helping the Mariners beat the Brewers
6-1 in a split-squad game.
Hemandez threw 80 pitches, 50 for
strikes. He struck out six and walked one.
Padres 8, Angels (ss) 7
PEORIA, Ariz. Tim Stauffer gave
up five runs in 2 2-3 innings, but
Cameron Maybin had an RBI double in
an eight-run seventh inning as the San
Diego Padres rallied for an 8-7 win over
a Los Angeles Angels split squad.
Angels third baseman Alberto
Callaspo and catcher Hank Conger
each had three hits.
Royals 9, Brewers (ss) 4
SURPRISE, Ariz. Luis Mendoza
held Milwaukee's split squad hitless
until the fifth inning and the Kansas City
Royals beat the Brewers 9-4.
Mendoza struck out seven in 4 2-3
innings. He allowed one run on two hits
without a walk.
Braves 9, Astros 5
KISSIMMEE Jason Heyward hit
a grand slam off Wandy Rodriguez for
his second homer in three games and
Michael Bourn hit a two-run shot as
the Atlanta Braves beat the Houston
Astros 9-5.
Tommy Hanson, making his spring
debut after having his first start cut shot
by rain, pitched three innings and gave
up two runs, including a homer by
Travis Buck.
Twins (ss) 2, Red Sox 1
FORT MYERS Joe Mauer made
his first spring training start at first base
for a Minnesota Twins split squad in a
2-1 win over the Boston Red Sox.


holes, and Browne also birdied
the par-5 18th.
Loren Roberts, Tom Kite,
Steve Pate, Bill Glasson and
David Eger were a stroke back.
Fred Couples, the 2010 win-
ner, had a 67.
Defending champion Nick
Price shot a 70. He opened
with a career-best 60 last year.
From wire reports


up one hit in four scoreless and led
Pittsburgh to a win over Philadelphia.
Starling Marte took Lee deep in the
first and later singled against the former
Cy Young winner. Lee allowed three runs
on five hits and a walk. He struck out five.
Yankees 4, Nationals 3,
10 innings
TAMPA- Gio Gonzalez pitched into
the fourth inning and allowed one run
for Washington in a loss to the New
York Yankees on Friday.
Gonzalez gave up two hits and
three walk in 3 1-3 innings. He had six
strikeouts.
Alex Rodriguez hit a two-run homer
for the Yankees.
The Yankees announced Andy Pet-
titte has come out of retirement, signing
a minor league contract with the team.
Giants 3, Cubs 2
MESA, Ariz. Eric Surkamp pitched
four effective innings and the San Fran-


shots behind Jason Dufner,
who had another 66 and has
gone two rounds at Innisbrook
without making a bogey.
Dufner is 0-for-159 on the
PGA Tour, the only player
among the top 50 in the world
without a win on any tour. But
he feels as though he is getting
close, and he has given him-
self another shot this week.


to offset the Gators' 4-for-23
shooting on 3-pointers. They
entered the game averaging a
nation-leading 9.9 a game but
missed their first 13 attempts.
No. 7 seed Florida (24-10)
pierced Virginia's vaunted
defense the Cavaliers
were giving up just 53.7
points a game to get to the
boards for second-chance
baskets. The press also gen-
erated some easy buckets for
the Gators, helping them go
24 of 30 from inside the arc.
"We were struggling to
score in the beginning,"
Walker said. "The press had
a huge effect on the game. It
got us in our offensive
rhythm."
The Gators finished the
first half on a 17-4 run to
shake off a slow start and get
out to a 30-22 lead. They shot
70 percent in the second half
and pushed their advantage
to more than 20 points with 8
minutes left
Mike Scott had 15 points
for Virginia (22-10), which
was in the tournament for
the first time since 2007.
"We came out with a lot of
energy and executed on de-
fense, got what we wanted on
offense," Scott said. "But
they made their run, and
they just came out in the sec-

noles (25-9) shook off a slow
start and won their sixth
straight game, including
their run to the Atlantic
Coast Conference champi-
onship last week. They will
play sixth-seeded Cincinnati
on Sunday in the third round
of the East Regional.
"We just kept saying over
and over again we don't
want to go home," Loucks
said. "We don't want to
watch the rest of this tour-
nament from our couches.
In the midst of that, B.J. kept
screaming at me, 'Get me the
ball. I'm going to finish.'
When a 6-foot-10 ... Air Force
vet is screaming at you, you
listen."
James scored 11 in the
second half, perhaps none
bigger than his dunk off a
missed fast-break layup by
Loucks that tied it at 52.
The 27-year-old senior for-
ward said he thought Loucks
would lob the ball to him, so
he kept running.
"I chased it down and was
able to dunk it," James said.
"I think that was a pretty big
momentum swing for us."


cisco Giants beat the Chicago Cubs 3-2.
Surkamp, who went 2-2 in six starts
for San Francisco as a rookie last sea-
son, is a long shot to make the rotation
this year.
D'backs 4, White Sox 2
SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. Paul Gold-
schmidt hit a two-run triple and Geoff
Blum drove in two runs, leading the Ari-
zona Diamondbacks to a 4-2 win over
the Chicago White Sox.
Diamondbacks starter Daniel Hud-
son allowed two runs and two hits in
four innings. He walked one, hit a batter
and struck out six.
Angels (ss) 7, Indians 0
TEMPE, Ariz. -Albert Pujols hit his
third home run of the spring and Garrett
Richards kept up his push for the fifth
spot in the Los Angeles Angels' rotation
in a 7-0 split-squad win over Cleveland.
Erick Aybar hit a leadoff homer in the
first inning for the Angels.


Go BRIEFS EF
He was at 10-under 132, two
ahead of Harrington and
William McGirt, who had a 68.
Luke Donald, who could go
back to No. 1 with a win this
week, had a 68 and was three
shots behind.
Langer, Clampett,
Browne share lead
NEWPORT BEACH, Calif.


ond half very strong."
The teams' second all-time
meeting, and first since the
1992 NIT semifinals, was
billed as a clash between
Virginia's pack-line defense
and Florida's up-tempo of-
fense.
It took a bit for the Gators
to adjust to the pack-line,
which essentially is a man-
to-man system that starts
with each Virginia player
stationed along an imagi-
nary arc about 16 feet from
the basket A defender does-
n't cross the line unless his
man gets the ball. When the
ball is passed, the defender
goes back to the pack and a
different defender goes out
to cover his man.
If the ball penetrates the
pack, defenders collapse on
the player with the ball and
work to force a turnover
That's what happened on
Florida's first possession,
with Young getting called for
traveling as the defense col-
lapsed on him.
The Gators turned over
the ball four times in the first
5 1/2 minutes, then just three
times the rest of the half.
Ten of their first 19 points
came on second chances as
they knifed through for
putbacks.

Nicholson scored 20
points and Demetrius Con-
ger had 14 for St. Bonaven-
ture (20-12), which was trying
to win an NCAA tournament
game for the first time since
1970.
"We didn't come here to
get moral victories," St
Bonaventure coach Mark
Schmidt said. "We wanted to
win. I am as proud of our
guys as I've ever been with
the team that I've coached.
They've done everything
we've asked. They fought We
just came up a bucket short"
Florida State used a 16-2
run to take its first lead with
5:15 left on a 3-pointer by Ian
Miller The Seminoles led as
much as 60-52 on a dunk by
Okaro White with 2:47 left.
The Bonnies hit three 3-
pointers in the final 1:43 to
stay close. They had the ball
down by three in the closing
seconds but couldn't get a
decent look from beyond the
arc. Da'Quan Cook had his
short jumper blocked by
White, and the Seminoles
ran out the clock for a huge
sigh of relief.


- Bernhard Langer birdied the
final hole for a 6-under 65 and
a share of the first-round lead
Friday with Bobby Clampett
and Olin Browne in the Cham-
pions Tour's Toshiba Classic.
Langer, the 2008 winner, ea-
gled the par-4 sixth hole in his
bogey-free round at Newport
Beach Country Club. Clampett
birdied three of the last four


SPORTS


Ken Duke
Jim Furyk
John Senden
Sergio Garcia
Kenny Perry
Chris DiMarco
Jason Bohn
Webb Simpson
Justin Rose
Jamie Lovemark
Jeff Overton
Cameron Tringale
Kevin Streelman
Ernie Els
Retief Goosen
Jerry Kelly
Scott Piercy
Kevin Chappell
Bryce Molder
John Mallinger
Bo Van Pelt
Andres Romero
Chez Reavie
Michael Thompson
Kyle Reifers
Will Claxton
Jimmy Walker
Gary Woodland
Kevin Na
Robert Garrigus
Justin Leonard
Bud Cauley
Troy Matteson
Zach Johnson
David Toms
Shaun Micheel
Greg Chalmers
Brian Gay


70-67-137
68-69 -137
66-71 -137
68-69 -137


70-68-138
68-70 -138
68-70 -138


Charley Hoffman 69-71-140 -2
James Driscoll 70-70-140 -2
Brian Davis 69-71 -140 -2
Peter Hanson 70-70-140 -2
Geoff Ogilvy 72-68-140 -2
Matt Kuchar 73-67-140 -2
Rory Sabbatini 68-72-140 -2
Joe Ogilvie 67-73-140 -2
Greg Owen 70-70-140 -2
Pat Perez 71-70 -141 -1
John Daly 69-72-141 -1
Sunghoon Kang 68-73-141 -1
MarkWilson 71-70-141 -1
NickWatney 69-72-141 -1
K.J. Choi 71-70- 141 -1
Michael Bradley 71-70-141 -1
ArjunAtwal 71-70-141 -1
Marc Leishman 71-70- 141 -1
Kris Blanks 73-68-141 -1
Tom Gillis 72-69-141 -1
Stewart Cink 67-74 -141 -1
Jason Day 69-72-141 -1
Jonathan Byrd 72-69-141 -1
Brandt Snedeker 69-72- 141 -1
D.A. Points 69-72-141 -1
Vijay Singh 71-70-141 -1
Bill Lunde 68-73-141 -1
Robert Allenby 69-72-141 -1
Louis Oosthuizen 73-68-141 -1
J.J. Henry 70-71 -141 -1
Jesper Parnevik 69-72-141 -1
Charlie Wi 70-71 -141 -1


THINK YOU


KNOW


SPRO

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...... .......
Associated Press
Miami Marlins starting pitcher Mark Buehrle throws during a spring
training game Friday against the St. Louis Cardinals in Jupiter.


SATURDAY, MARCH 17, 2012 B5



Transitions Champ.
Friday
At Innisbrook Resort and Golf Club,
Copperhead Course, Palm Harbor
Purse: $5.5 million
Yardage: 7,340, Par 71
Second Round
Jason Dufner 66-66-132 -10
Padraig Harrington 61-73-134 -8
William McGirt 66-68-134 -8
Chris Couch 67-68-135 -7
George McNeill 67-68-135 -7
Luke Donald 67-68-135 -7
Sang-Moon Bae 69-66-135 -7












ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE

Gallagher being
taken out of coma
LEWISVILLE, Texas-
The comedian Gallagher
is expected to be out of a

induced
coma by
Saturday
after suf-
fering a
heart at-
tack in a
suburban
Gallagher Dallas
bar.
Gallagher's promo-
tional manager, Christine
Scherrer, said Friday
that the 65-year-old is
being slowly taken out of
sedation. She says he had
two stents replaced after
collapsing Wednesday
night at Coach Joe's Hat
Tricks in Lewisville.
Last March, the come-
dian best known for
smashing watermelons
suffered a minor heart at-
tack after collapsing dur-
ing a performance in
Minnesota.

Monroe photos hit
auction block
LOS ANGELES -A
collection
ofnever-
S before-
A seen
photos of
Marilyn
Monroe
and
their ac-
Marilyn company-
Monroe ing
copy-
rights are going up for
auction.
Celebrity auctioneer
Darren Julien says more
than 100 images of Mon-
roe will be sold the high-
est bidders later this
month. The photos come
from the estate of Allan
"Whitey" Snyder, Mon-
roe's personal makeup
artist for 15 years.

Clooney arrested
in Sudan protest
WASHINGTON -
George Clooney and his
father were arrested Fri-
day during a protest out-
side the
Sudanese
Embassy,
and the
actor said
She has
asked
President
Barack
George Obama to
Clooney engage
China on
stopping a humanitarian
crisis in northern Africa.
The protesters accuse
Sudanese President
Omar al-Bashir of pro-
voking a humanitarian
crisis and blocking food
and aid from entering the
Nuba Mountains in the
county's border region
with South Sudan.
Clooney, his father,
Nick Clooney, and others
were arrested after being
warned three times not to
cross a police line outside
the embassy. Those taken
into custody included
NAACP President Ben
Jealous, Martin Luther
King III, and actor and
comedian Dick Gregory.
The arrests came after
Clooney met this week
with Obama, testified in
the Senate and attended
a state dinner for British
Prime Minister David
Cameron.
From wire reports


Backpedalling


Associated Press
Mike Daisey is shown in a scene from "The Agony and The Ecstasy of Steve Jobs," in New York. Daisey, whose
latest show has been being credited with sparking probes into how Apple's high-tech devices are made, is finding
himself under fire for distorting the truth. The public radio show "This American Life" retracted a story Friday that
it broadcast in January about what Daisey said he saw while visiting a factory in China where iPads and iPhones
are made.


Radio's 'This American Life' retracts Apple story


Associated Press

CHICAGO The public radio
program "This American Life" on
Friday retracted a story about the
harrowing tale of what an artist said
he found while investigating Apple
operations in China, citing "numer-
ous fabrications."
The show's weekend broadcast
details inconsistencies in the highly
popular Jan. 6 episode that was an
excerpt from writer Mike Daisey's
critically acclaimed one-man show
"The Agony and the Ecstasy of
Steve Jobs," which currently is at
the Public Theater in New York.
"We're retracting the story be-
cause we can't vouch for its truth,"
Ira Glass, host of "This American
Life," said in a letter posted on the
show's website.
The New York Times said later
Friday that it also had removed a
questionable paragraph from the
online archive of an op-ed piece
Daisey wrote for the newspaper in
October Daisey also twisted the


truth about his time in China dur-
ing an interview with The Associ-
ated Press late last year
In his monologue, Daisey de-
scribes meeting very young workers
who put in very long hours and
were forced to do crippling, repeti-
tive motions at factories that make
Apple products in China. Some he
claimed had been poisoned by a
chemical called hexane.
But "This American Life" says
Rob Schmitz, a China correspon-
dent for the public radio show "Mar-
ketplace," located and interviewed
Daisey's Chinese interpreter, who
disputed much of the artist's claims.
Daisey, under questioning from
Glass, admitted in Friday's broad-
cast that he didn't meet any poi-
soned workers and guessed at the
ages of some of the workers he met.
"This American Life" said in its
statement that staffers asked Daisey
for his interpreter's contact infor-
mation while fact-checking the story
and he said the cellphone number
he had for her didn't work anymore


and he had no way to reach her
"At that point, we should've killed
the story," Glass said. "But other
things Daisey told us about Apple's
operations in China checked out,
and we saw no reason to doubt him."
Daisey posted on his web site Fri-
day that he stands by his work and
that what he does is theater, not
journalism.
"'This American Life' is essen-
tially a journalistic not a theatri-
cal enterprise, and as such it
operates under a different set of
rules and expectations. But this is
my only regret," Daisey's letter said.
Daisey spokesman Philip Rinaldi
said Friday his client was "not speak-
ing to anyone about this right now."
Apple has been rebutting Daisey's
allegations for months, to little effect
The Times also wrote an investiga-
tive series in January on dangerous
working and living conditions for
people who make Apple products in
China, including explosions inside
factories making iPads where four
people were killed and 77 injured.


Iron Lady faced test of mettle in West End farce


Associated Press


CAMBRIDGE, England
- She went to war with Ar-
gentina over the Falkland
Islands and faced down the
powerful National Union of
Mineworkers. But one of the
hardest things Margaret
Thatcher ever did, accord-
ing to newly released per-
sonal papers, was attend a
West End farce with herself
as the central character
The excruciating evening
spent watching "Anyone for
Denis" is one of several be-
hind-the-scenes episodes
described in the files that
reveal a softer side of the
British leader nicknamed
"The Iron Lady"
Papers from 1981, re-
leased Saturday by the Mar-
garet Thatcher archive at
Cambridge University, in-
clude arrangements for the
then-prime minister and
her husband Denis to attend
a charity performance of the
play, which subjected them
to mockery
Thatcher even agreed to
hold a reception for the
cast and several dozen oth-


Birthday: In coming months, many new channels that
might lead to advancement in your chosen field of en-
deavor could unexpectedly open up. When the dam
breaks, it could do so in a sudden manner. Be ready to
make your move.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) One of your very best assets
is the ability to see value in things that others totally over-
look. Keep an eye peeled for these kinds of opportunities.
Aries (March 21-April 19) Get your duties out of the
way as early as possible, because you are going to want
some time to have fun with your friends. You deserve it.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) The trends and tides of time
will start shifting in a favorable direction, making it possible
for you to achieve a huge objective that you never thought
would be possible.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) If possible, avoid involve-
ments with friends who are too deeply immersed in tradi-


ers at her official residence
at 10 Downing St. though
she did not go along with
all the organizers' sugges-
tions. On a list of questions
- Would she be paying for
her tickets? Would she
agree to wear the same out-
fit as the play's star, Angela
Thorne? Thatcher
scrawled: "No no no no
no."
The files do not record
Thatcher's verdict on the
play, but historian Chris
Collins of the Margaret
Thatcher Foundation said
the prime minister "hated
every minute of it"
"She was genuinely nice
to the cast, probably en-
joyed the party," he said.
"(But) sitting there, watch-
ing someone portray her on
the stage, Denis a complete
buffoon no, thank you
very much."
After the ordeal, the
play's star wrote expressing
sympathy for the prime min-
ister's plight.
"It must have been two
hours of agony for you with
the press watching your
every move," Thorne wrote.


Thatcher's reply was gra-
cious: "I think we both got
through rather well!"
The play, later filmed for
television, clearly made a
strong impression, on
Thatcher, who is now 86.
The newly released docu-
ments include voluminous
files about plans for the 1981
Downing St Christmas card,
which show that Thatcher
tried to reject the suggested
photo of her and Denis sit-
ting in front of a fireplace.
'Alas this won't do at all,"
she wrote. "DT and I were
both dressed in black. And
after Anyone for Denis' this
will be seen as a carica-
ture!"
It was a perceptive com-
ment though the picture
was eventually used on the
card.
Among the recipients -
who ranged from friends, em-
ployees and political col-
leagues to heads of state
including Libyan leader
Moammar Gadhafi and Iraqi
dictator Saddam Hussein -
was leftist London govern-
ment leader Ken Livingstone.
Livingstone, one of


Today's HOROSCOPE
tion. There's nothing wrong with it, but your benefits will
come through more progressive interests.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Don't discount a unique idea
that dominates your thinking just because it happens to be
a departure from your usual conceptions. Being different
can be good at times.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Listen attentively when others
speak, whether or not you consider the orator to be smart.
Valuable information or a brilliant idea could come from
someone whom you'd least expect.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Don't be hesitant to experi-
ment with a new procedure or technique involving your
work or an independent project. What you develop might
be a time-saver and could increase productivity.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) While your associates are try-
ing to articulate the problem, you'll have effectively ana-
lyzed the issue and already come up with the answer. Don't


Thatcher's fiercest political
foes, showed the card to a
newspaper
"I thought it was a joke at
first," he told the Daily Ex-
press. "In the picture they
look so much like John
Wells and Angela Thorne in
'Anyone for Denis?"'
Known for her steely po-
litical resolve once fa-
mously proclaiming "the
lady's not for turning" -
Thatcher emerges in the pa-
pers as diligent and often
generous.
As prime minister be-
tween 1979 and 1990, she re-
ceived 2,000 to 3,000 letters
a week, and according to
Collins answered many of
them personally
The files include the
prime minister's reply to a
young girl who had written,
upset, because her parents
were divorcing.
Thatcher faced with
riots, a struggling economy
and scheming rivals within
her Conservative Party -
took the time to reply at
length, expressing sympathy
and regret that she could
not solve the problem.


wait for them move ahead on your own.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) It's a good thing that you'll be
resourceful enough to squeeze things in under the wire, be-
cause you're inclined to let important duties go until the last
minute. Don't make it a habit.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Try to keep your sched-
ule as flexible as possible, because there is a strong possi-
bility that an enticing situation will manifest itself. Find time
for fun as well.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) When it comes to anything
financial, both chance and circumstances are likely to favor
you. Something opportune is in the making, and you should
be a part of it.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Because associates have
considerable respect for your judgment, they are likely to
support an endeavor that you're developing. Take help
where you find it.


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

THURSDAY, MARCH 15
Fantasy 5: 5 9 24 29 34
5-of-5 3 winners $75,062.26
4-of-5 311 $116.50
3-of-5 9,513 $10.50
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 14
Powerball: 1 8 41 46 59
Powerball: 24
5-of-5 PB No winner $50 million
5-of-5 1 winner $1 million
No Florida winner
Lotto: 1 -10 -17 -19 -22 -31
6-of-6 1 winner 6 million
5-of-6 47 $3,042.50
4-of-6 2,579 $47.50
3-of-6 46,268 $5
Fantasy 5: 10- 12- 13- 14-25
5-of-5 2 winners $129,182.73
4-of-5 438 $95
3-of-5 11,730 $9.50
TUESDAY, MARCH 13
Mega Money: 18 26 31 40
Mega Ball: 17
4-of-4 MB No winner
4-of-4 7 $1,234
3-of-4 MB 46 $411.50
INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num-
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call 850-487-7777.

Today in
HISTORY

Today is Saturday, March
17, the 77th day of 2012.
There are 289 days left in the
year. This is St. Patrick's Day.
Today's Highlight:
On March 17, 1912, the
Camp Fire Girls organization
was incorporated in Wash-
ington, D.C., two years to the
day after it was founded in
Thetford, Vt. (The group is
now known as Camp Fire
USA.)
On this date:
In A.D. 461 (orA.D. 493,
depending on sources), St.
Patrick, the patron saint of
Ireland, died in Saul.
In 1762, New York's first
St. Patrick's Day parade took
place.
In 1910, the U.S. National
Museum, a precursor to the
National Museum of Natural
History, opened in Washing-
ton, D.C.
In 1942, six days after de-
parting the Philippines during
World War II, Gen. Douglas
MacArthur declared, "I came
through and I shall return" as
he arrived in Australia to be-
come supreme commander
of Allied forces in the south-
west Pacific theater.
Ten years ago: A grenade
attack on a Protestant church
in Islamabad, Pakistan, killed
five people, including a U.S.
Embassy employee and her
17-year-old daughter.
Five years ago: John
Backus, the developer of For-
tran, a programming lan-
guage that changed how
people interacted with com-
puters, died in Ashland, Ore.,
at age 82.
One year ago: The U.N.
Security Council paved the
way for international air
strikes against Moammar
Gadhafi's forces, voting to
authorize military action to
protect civilians and impose a
no-fly zone over Libya.
Today's Birthdays: Rock
musician Paul Kantner is 71.
Singer-songwriter Jim
Weatherly is 69. Rock musi-
cian Harold Brown (War;
Lowrider Band) is 66. Actor
Patrick Duffy is 63. Actor Kurt
Russell is 61. Actress Lesley-
Anne Down is 58. Actor Gary
Sinise is 57. Actor Christian
Clemenson is 54. Actor Rob
Lowe is 48. Rock singer Billy
Corgan is 45. Rock musician
Van Conner (Screaming
Trees) is 45. Soccer player
Mia Hamm is 40. Rock musi-
cian Caroline Corr (The


Corrs) is 39. Rapper Swifty
(D12) is 37.
Thought for Today: "It is
my rule never to lose me
temper till it would be detri-
mental to keep it." Sean
O'Casey, Irish playwright
(1880-1964).











RELIGION


MAI fJ


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Catb d brat


in rtsiS


Battered by

quake, costs for

preservation

top $50M

BRETT ZONGKER
Associated Press
WASHINGTON
t's where the nation's
capital gathers to
mourn, to pray and to
seek comfort during
tragedies. Now the Wash-
ington National Cathedral
needs help weathering its
own financial emergency
The church has long
been a spiritual center for
the nation, drawing hun-
dreds of thousands of visi-
tors and worshippers each
year It's the burial site of
President Woodrow Wilson
and for Helen Keller It's
hosted funeral services for
Gerald Ford, Ronald Rea-
gan and other presidents.
And during ordeals such as
the Sept 11 attacks, it's
been a place for interfaith
reflection.
But the Episcopal cathe-
dral is facing one of the
worst financial binds of its
105-year-old history An
earthquake in August se-
verely damaged its intri-
cate stone work and-
architecture, with repair
costs estimated at $20 mil- -
lion. Aside from that dam-
age, the structure faces $30
million in preexisting "-
preservation needs. --
Even before the earth-
quake, a financial crisis :
forced the cathedral to
slash its operating budget .
from $27 million to as little
as $13 million in recent
years and cut paid staff
from 170 full-time employ-
ees to 70. The church relies
heavily on donations to
fund its operations.
Still, cathedral officials I
say the financial problems J. SCOTT APPLEWHITE/Associated Press
won't close the church. The In this Aug. 24, 2011, file photo, an angel carved from Indiana limestone, lies shattered among other damage
building is stable, and re- on the roof of the Washington National Cathedral in Washington after an earthquake. It's the place where Wash-
pairs will be made as funds ington gathers to mourn, to pray and to celebrate a new presidency. An earthquake last August severely dam-
are available, aged its intricate stone work and architecture, with repairs now estimated to cost $20 million. Even before the
earthquake, though, a financial crisis forced the cathedral to slash its budget from $27 million to $13 million in
See Page C5 recent years and cut its paid staff by more than half from 170 full-time employees to 70.




Homosassa church to mark 100 years


FUMC mission fair slated today


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff Writer
HOMOSASSA One hundred
years ago, with a dollar's worth of land
and $500 cash from George Loen-
necker Jr, who operated the general
store, the First United Methodist
Church of Homosassa was begun.
According to church history,
there was no electricity in the town
at that time as the men gathered at
night after their regular jobs to
build the church, using kerosene
lamps to see what they were doing.
In the 1940s, a large bell from a
railroad coal engine was donated
and placed in the belfry


In the 1960s, the ladies of the
church sold box suppers and ice
cream to buy an upright piano.
The original church, on Cherokee
Street in Old Homosassa, was even-
tually sold to the Citrus County
School Board and torn down to cre-
ate a parking lot for school buses.
The church moved to its current
location on Bradshaw Street off
Yulee Drive. Today, the church is a
multi-building campus, housing
dozens of active ministries and
community outreach programs.
They've come a long way in 100
years.
Beginning at 10 a.m. through 2
p.m. today, Saturday, March 17, the


church invites the public to its first
mission fair as part of its centennial
celebration.
In addition to free food and kids'
activities such as clowns and
bounce houses, there will be oppor-
tunities for door prizes, including a
flat screen TV and a laptop com-
puter
Church members will be on hand
with information about every min-
istry at the church.
On Friday, March 23, award-win-
ning actor Roger Nelson will pres-
ent "The Man from Aldersgate," a
one-man, two-act play portraying
John Wesley, the founder of the
Methodist Church.
Tickets for the 6 p.m. dinner show
are sold out, but tickets for the noon
lunch show are available for $20. Call


the church office at 352-628-4083.
On Sunday, March 25, two wor-
ship services at8 and 10:30 a.m. will
continue the celebration with spe-
cial music from the choir, handbells
and a quartet, plus sacred dance
and clowns. A reception will take
place between services.
Guest speaker Bishop Timothy
Whitaker will deliver the message,
and a 10-minute DVD presentation
of the church's first 100 years will
be shown and each family given a
copy to take home.
The church is at 8831 W Brad-
shaw St., Homosassa. Visit online at
www.lumc.org.
Chronicle reporter Nancy
Kennedy can be reached at
nkennedy@chronicleonline.com or
352-564-2927.


They're not all young men on bicycles


: -- ]" Retiree couple serving as Mormon missionaries


ANTHONY WAHL/The Monroe limes
Wyoming natives Marie and Dan Wilkes are spending a volun-
teer service year in Monroe, Wis., with the Church of Jesus Christ
of Latter-day Saints. They never got the chance in their late teens
or early 20s to participate in the customary missionary work
many Mormons do, so they're doing it as retirees.


KATJUSA CISAR
The Monroe Times
MONROE, Wis. Dan
and Marie Wilkes are not
your typical Mormon mis-
sionaries.
Many Mormons, espe-
cially young men, travel to
a new community for a
year or two of service and
proselytizing when they're
in their late teens or early
20s.
The couple, married 46
years, with four daughters
and 10 grandkids, never
got the chance when they
were young despite a
lifelong membership in


the Church of Jesus Christ
of Latter-day Saints (LDS
for short, though members
commonly refer to them-
selves as "Mormons," after
the testament they follow
alongside the Bible.)
When they were in the
typical age-range for going
on mission trips, Dan was
caring for his sick mother
'"And then the time kind
of passes," said Marie, 65.
Now they're seizing the
chance. The couple is
spending a service year at
the Monroe LDS branch at
714 24th St. They arrived
here in October from Star
Valley, Wyo., a town Marie


describes as "a place peo-
ple come from, not that
that they go to."
Mission trips like theirs
are part of a growing push
from the Utah-based
church to encourage par-
ticipation from retirees in
mission travel.
"They call us 'senior
couples.' That's a kind
word for old," joked Marie.
She closed down her
quilt shop in 2010, and her
husband Dan, 66, retired
the same year from a ca-
reer at the local gas-elec-
tric utility. They wanted to
See Page C5


Nancy Kennedy
GRACE
NOTES


Scars



of life

ll this past week I've
been talking to peo-
ple with scars for a
series of stories that's run-
ning in the Chronicle
through Monday (See
today through Monday's A
section for stories.)
I got the idea from a
photographer I heard on
the radio, talking about a
series of photos he had
done of people's scars.
He said that every scar
tells a story
When I was 9, I bent
down to say "hi" to Sam
Lang's Basset hound and
it jumped up and bit my
face, tearing a hole from
the right edge of my lip to
my chin.
You can barely see the
scar all these years later,
but it's there. I'm not sure
if that scar and the cir-
cumstances of how I got it
altered my life in any sig-
nificant way other than I
don't stick my face near a
strange dog's mouth. Acne
scars on my cheeks have
affected me more, I think.
But the photographer
was right. Every scar tells
a story, and last week I
met with eight people who
told me their stories and
showed me their scars.
See Page C5


Judi Siegal
JUDI'S
JOURNAL


Jews


and the


Civil War
My husband and I
are history buffs.
When the kids
were small, we went to
just about every fort on
the East Coast. I remem-
ber my daughter pleading
with us: "Why can't we go
to theme parks like the
other families"? I would
just smile and hand her a
guidebook for yet another
historical site. Did it sur-
prise me that my son mi-
nored in history in
college?
I still like visiting his-
torical spots, Gettysburg
being always a high point
on my list. Here, the Civil
War is the whole town. On
any given day, re-enactors
can be seen parading
down Steinwehr Avenue
in period dress ladies
in hoop-skirted dresses
and picture hats, men
with stovepipe hats, white
shirts and gray pants. I
only want to follow that
crowd down the street
brandishing a parasol and
wide skirt that floats as
you walk.
The whole Civil War era
has given me fuel for
thought. What did the
Jews do in the Civil War
and what was the impact
of the conflict on the small
minority, which num-
bered about 150,000 at the
time? As with other events
See Page C5





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Religion NOTES


Sale away
First Christian Church of
Chassahowitzka will continue
its annual rummage sale from
9 a.m. to 3 p.m. today at the
church, 11275 S. Riviera Drive.
The sale features all kinds of
items; the public is welcome.
Call 352-382-2557.
The Agape House Fund
Raising Sale is from 8 a.m. to
1 p.m. Friday and 8 a.m. to 1
p.m. Saturday, March 24, at
First Baptist Church, 700 N. Cit-
rus Avenue, Crystal River. Free
admission. Funds are used to
purchase Bibles, toiletries, and
other miscellaneous items. The
Agape House is an all-volun-
teer ministry of First Baptist
Church of Crystal River for the
area where everything is do-
nated and everything is free for
people in need. This includes
clothing and shoes for each
family member, Bibles, toiletries
and if needed, household items
such as dishes, silverware, pots
and pans, small appliances;
bed and bath linens, blankets,
etc. We not only help people
with their material needs but
also talk with each family about
their spiritual needs and pray
with them. We need and appre-
ciate financial support from our
community. Call the Agape
House on Wednesdays at 352-
795-7064 or First Baptist
Church at 352-795-3367.
The Council of Catholic
Women of Our Lady of Grace
Church will host a "Trash 'n
Treasures Fundraiser," from 9
a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday, March 23,
and 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday,
March 24, in the Parish Life
Center, 6 Roosevelt Blvd., Bev-
erly Hills. Sale items include
household items, clothing,
books, jewelry, plants, tools,
small furniture, toys, knick-
knacks and white elephant
items. Proceeds go to needed


items for the church and chari-
table contributions. Call Anna
Panasik at 352-527-3226. Our
Lady of Grace monthly flea
market is from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.
the fourth Saturday monthly will
take place in concert with
"Trash'n Treasures."
The United Methodist
Women of Crystal River United
Methodist Church will have
their annual "Trash and Treas-
ure" sale on Friday and Satur-
day, March 30 and 31, at the
outdoor tabernacle area, 4801
N. Citrus Ave.
First Assembly of God
Women's Ministry will have a
yard sale from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Saturday, April 14, at the
church, 5735 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway (State Road 44), Crys-
tal River. The sale is open to
the public. Rent a table for a
donation of $10 and bring your
items to sell. Table donations
will go to the church's overseas
missionaries. Call 352-
795-2594.
Helping Hands Thrift
Store, a ministry of Our Lady of
Fatima Catholic Church, is
open from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Monday through Saturday at
604 U.S. 41 South. Proceeds
fund the food pantry. The store
is accepting donations of
household items, clothing and
small appliances. Estate dona-
tions are also accepted. Pick-
up is available for larger
donations. Items donated are
tax deductible and a form is
provided from Helping Hands.
Call 352-726-1707.
Food & fellowship
"Third Saturday Supper"
is from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. today
in the Dewain Farris Fellowship
Hall at Community Congrega-
tional Christian Church, 9220
N. Citrus Springs Blvd., Citrus
Springs. Menu includes corned
beef and cabbage, apple crisp,


coffee and tea for $10 for adults
and $5 for children. Tickets can
be purchased at the door. Take-
outs available. Call the church
at 352-489-1260.
The last chicken and bis-
cuit dinner for the year is from
3:30 to 6 p.m. Saturday, March
31, at Floral City United
Methodist Church, 8478 E.
Marvin St., across from the ele-
mentary school. Meal includes
chicken and biscuit, mashed
potatoes and gravy, green
beans, salad, dessert and bev-
erage for a donation of $7.50.
Takeouts are available. After
eating, everyone is invited to
join in a hymn sing in the 1884
church building. Call 352-344-
1771 for more information.
Community pancake
breakfast and Easter egg
hunt from 8 to 11 a.m. Satur-
day, April 7, at Crystal River
United Methodist Church, 4801
N. CitrusAve., Crystal River.
All-you-can-eat pancake break-
fast with the Easter Bunny is
from 8 to 9:30 a.m. with a cost
of $4 for adults and $2 for chil-
dren. The free Easter egg hunt
follows from 9:30 to 11 a.m.
Egg hunts for toddlers,
preschoolers and elementary
school-aged children. Free
Easter Bunny photos, cupcake
decorating, relay games, a
bouncy house, movie and
more. RSVP for the breakfast
with the Easter Bunny online at
www.crumc.com or call the
church office at 352-795-3148
by Thursday, April 5.
St. John the Baptist
Catholic Church, on the corner
of U.S. 41 and State Road 40
East in Dunnellon, has a fish
fry from 4 to 6 p.m. Friday
during Lent. Cost is $7 for
adults and students and $3.50
for children ages 6 through 12.
The fish fry is open to the public
and takes place in the church
pavilion.


Women's Day


Special to the Chronicle
Barbara Surian of Ocala recently gave a rousing inspirational
talk to 100 people attending an International Women's Day
celebration at the Nature Coast Unitarian Universalist Fel-


lowship in Citrus Springs.

Beverly Hills Community
Church spaghetti suppers are
from 4 to 6 p.m. the third Friday
monthly in the Jack Steele Hall,
82 Civic Circle, Beverly Hills.
Donation of $7 per person in-
cludes salad, spaghetti with
meat sauce, Italian bread, cof-
fee or tea, and dessert. Come
and enjoy a delicious meal.
Tickets are available at the
door.
All-you-can-eat pancake


breakfasts, with sausage, cof-
fee and orange juice, are
served from 8 to 10 a.m. the
second Saturday monthly at
First United Methodist Church,
8831 W. Bradshaw St., Ho-
mosassa.
Music & more
Never Fade Bluegrass
Gospel Band will be in concert
from 1 to 3 p.m. today on the
lawn at Suncoast Baptist


Places of worship that

offer love, peace and

harmony to all.

Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!! i
SRFRVICING THF C1MMINITIFS OF CRYS5TAI RIVFR ANn l-inMnAA H M


4 Homosassa
"Come Worship with Us"
10540 W. Yulee Drive Homosassa
628-3858
Rev. J. Alan Ritter
Rev. Steve Gerhart, Assoc. Pastor
Sunday
9:00 am Sunday School (AIIAge Groups)
10:30 am Worship Celebration
Choir / Special Music / "Kidz Worship"
Sunday Night
6 pm Worship Celebration
Wednesday Night
6:30 pm Worship Celebration
Children's Awanas Group
Youth Activities


www.fbchomosassa.org




t St. Timothy t
Lutheran Church
ELCA
Saturday Informal Worship
w/Communion 5:00 PM
Sunday Early Service
w/Communion 8:00 AM
Sunday School
All Ages 9:30AM
(Coffee Fellowship hour @ 9:00 AM)
Sunday Traditional Service
w/Communion 10:30 AM
Special services are announced.
Nursery provided.
1070 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River
For more information call
795-5325
www.sttimothylutherancrystalriver.com
Rev. David S. Bradford, Pastor


ST. THOMAS

CATHOLIC
CHURCH


MASSES:
saturday 4:30 P.M.
sunday 8:00 A.M.
10:30 A.M.
UL I I' H- ....ti .r tI
, i l l 1 [ -l . . .


- 62i8


THE
SALVATION
ARMV CITRUSCOUNTY
A IRMY CORPS.
SUNDAY:
Sunday School 9:45 A.M.
Morning Worship Hour
11:00 A.M.

TUESDAY:
Home League 11:30 A.M.
Lt. Vanessa Miller







Crystal River
CHURCH OF

CHRIST
A Friendly Church
With A Bible Message.
Corner of U.S. 19 & 44 East
Sunday Services
10:00 A.M.* 11:00 A.M.- 6:00 P.M.
Wednesday i
7:00 P.M.
Come Worship With Us!
Bible Questions Please Call
Ev. George Hickman
795-8883 746-1239


0 I ASSEMUE5 OF GOD
Come
grow
with us!

The First Assembly
of God Family
WELCOMES YOU!


Pastor
Richard
Hart


Schedule of Services:
Sunday:
9:00 a.m.
Adult Bible Study
Youth and Children's
Classes
10:00 a.m.
Spirit Filled Worship Service
Inspiring Message
Youth and Children's
Ministries
6:00 p.m
Youth Ministries
Wednesday 7:00 p.m
Praise and Worship
In-Depth Bible Study
Youth and Children's
Ministries
Nursery Provided Every Service
LocatBioamn:^^^


0D Crystal iver
Church of God
Church Phone
795-3079
Sunday Morning
Adult & Children's Worship
8:30 & 11:00 AM
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Evening Service 6:00 PM
Wednesday
Life Application Service
Jam Session Youth Ministries & Teen
Kid (ages 4-11) 7:00 PM
2180 N.W. Old Tallahassee Rd.
(1 2th Ave,) Nursery
Provided


": West

Citrus
H-KE, YOU'LL FIND Church of Christ
A CAKING FAMILY
IN CH Kain 9592 W. Deep Woods Dr.


C KYSTXL
RIVCK
VJNITD
M ETHODIST
CHU CH
4801 N. Citrus Ave.
(2 Mi. N Of US 19)

795-3148
www.crumc.com
Rev. David Rawls, Pastor
Sunday Worship
8:00 Early Communion
9:30 Praise & Worship
11:00 Traditional
Bible Study
At 9:30 & 11:00 For all ages.
Wednesday 6:30
Nursery available at all services.
Youth Fellowship
Sunday 4:30
Wednesday 6:30
Bright Beginnings
Preschool
6 Weeks-VPK
Mon. Fri. 6:30a.m.-6pm.
795-1240
* Stephen Ministry Provider:


Crystal River, FL 34465
352.564.8565
www.westcitruscoc.com
W. Deep Woods Dr.






US Hwy. 19 D


SERVICES
Sunday AM
Bible Study 9:30
Worship 10:30
Sunday PM
Worship 6:00
Wednesday
PM
Bible Study 7:00


EVANGELIST


SBob Dickey


Church. Bring your chairs and
coolers and enjoy an afternoon
of Bluegrass Gospel music. A
love offering will be collected.
A "Gospel Sing," hosted
by the Sunny South Trio featur-
ing The Puffers, will take place
at 6 p.m. today at Gulf Ridge
Park Baptist Church, 20200
Manacke Road, Brooksville.
Call 813-469-0623.
Kristin Taylor will be in
concert at 6 p.m. St. Patrick's
Day, today, at St. John the Bap-
tist Catholic Church, 7525 S.
U.S. 41, Dunnellon. Taylor is a
mother of 12 who has written
eight CDs and is the founder of
THORN Ministries (Thankfully
Helping Others Real Needs). All
are invited. A love offering will
be received. Call 352-489-
3166.
Beacon Award-winning trio
"Heirs of Grace" will present
the Gospel through music at 6
p.m. Sunday at First Baptist
Church Homosassa, 10540 W.
Yulee Drive, Homosassa.
Floral City United
Methodist Church will host a
hymn sing and more at 2 p.m.
Sunday, March 25, at the 1884
church. Jim King, an accom-
plished saxophonist, and his
wife Linda, a gifted singer, will
add their talents to the event.
The audience will have the op-
portunity to choose the hymns
to be sung. The church is at
8478 E. Marvin St., Floral City,
across from the elementary
school. A freewill offering will be
collected to help pay for paint-
ing the exterior of the church. A
handicap entrance is available
in the back of the church. Call
352-344-1771.
The University of Florida
Cello students, conducted by
Steven Thomas, DMA, will
present a concert at 3 p.m.
Sunday, March 25, at

See NOTES/Page C3


O MCrystal
10 River

Foursquare

Gospel Church
1160 N. Dunkenfield Ave.
795-6720

A FULL GOSPEL
FELLOWSHIP
Sunday 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday "Christian Ed"
7:00 P.M.
Prayer Sat. 4-6pm
Pastor John Hager


X Temple
Beth David
13158 Antelope St.
Spring Hill, FL 34609
352-686-7034
Rabbi
Lenny Sarko
Services
Friday 8PM
Saturday 10AM
Religious School
Sunday
9AM-Noon


Homosassa
First United
Methodist
Church
| Everyone
Becoming
A Disciple
of Christ

Sunday Worship
8:00 am, 9:30 am, 11:00 am
Sunday School
9:30 am & 10:45 am

Reverend
Mark Whittaker
Pastor
8831 W. Bradshaw St.


Homosassa, FL 34448
352-628-4083
www.lumc.org
Office Hours:
8:30 4:30 M-F
Open Hearts
Open Minds
Open Doors


1 STEPHEN MINISTRY
lIt(^


*


ST. ANNE'S
T CHURCH
A Parish in the
Anglican Communion
Rector: Fr. Kevin G. Holsapple
Celebrating 50 Years of
Serving God and the Community
Sunday Masses: 8:00 a.m.
10:15 a.m.
Morning Prayer & Daily Masses
4th Sunday 6:00p.m.
Gospel Sing Along

9870 West Fort Island Trail
Crystal River 1 mile west of Plantation Inn
352-795-2176
www.stannescr.org


St. Benedict
Catholic Church
U.S. 19 at Ozello Rd.
- MASSES -
Vigil: 5:00pm
Sun.: 8:30 & 10:30am
DAILY MASSES
Mon. Fri.: 8:00am
HOLY DAYS
As Announced
CONFESSION
Sat.: 3:30 4:30pm
795-4479


I I


C2 SATURDAY, MARCH 17, 2012





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NOTES
Continued from Page C2

Dunellon Presbyterian Church,
20641 Chestnut St., Dunnellon.
This presentation takes in 350
years of musical styles from the
Renaissance and Baroque
works by Gabrieli, Gesualdo
and Handel, to the Romantic
period works by Buckner and
Popper, concluding with Brazil-
ian works by Villa-Lobos. A love
offering will be collected at the
end of the concert, with all pro-
ceeds going to the performers.
St. Timothy Lutheran
Church will host Dry Branch
Fire Squad at 7 p.m. Sunday,
March 25. Bring family and
friends for an enjoyable
evening of music. For tickets
and information, call 352-795-
5325. The church is at 1070 N.
Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River.
Suggested donation is $10.
Southern Sound Quartet,
a Southern Gospel group, will
be in concert Wednesday,
March 28, at Hernando Church
of the Nazarene, 2101 N.
Florida Ave., Hernando. Cele-
bration Sounds Choir & Or-
chestra will open the concert at
6:45 p.m. The public is invited
to enjoy this free concert. A love


SERVICING THE


U Floral City
United Methodist
4 Church s
8478 East Marvin St.
(across from Floral City School)
Sunday School
9:05 A.M.
Sunday Worship Service
10:30 A.M. Sanctuary
8:00 A.M. Service in the 1884 Church
Bible Study
Tuesday 10:00 A.M.
Wednesday 6:00 P.M.
"We strive to make
newcomers feel at home."
Wheel Chair Access
Nursery Available
Rev. Steven Todd Riddle
Church 344-1771
WEBSITE: floralcitychurch.com



Churchof
8 H S ernean neC
TheNazarcnc
A Place to Belong

2101 N, Florida Ave,
Hernando FL

726-6144
Nursery Provided

*CHILDREN

*YOUTH

*SENIORS

Sunday School
9:45 A.M.
Praise & Worship
10:40 A.M.
Praise Service
6:00 P.M.
Praise & Prayer
(Wed.) 7:00 P.M

Randy T. Hodges, Pastor
www.hernandonazarene.org


RELIGION


offering will be collected. Call
the church office at 352-
726-6144.
"Grace Harmony" will ap-
pear at 7 p.m. Wednesday,
April 11, at First Christian
Church of Homosassa Springs,
7030 W. Grover Cleveland
Blvd., Homosassa. Mike and
Sue Filisky are singers/song-
writers and have been singing
for Jesus since they were
young children. In 2001 they
began singing as "Grace Har-
mony" in a ministerial capacity,
offering hope and encourage-
ment to others. Call the church
at 352-628-5556. All are wel-
come. Nursery provided.
Special events
First Baptist Church of Rut-
land will host a free food and
clothing giveaway from 9 a.m.
to noon today to help those in
the community who are having
a hard time making ends meet.
No vendors take part in this.
The church is on State Road 44
east of the Withlacoochee River
Bridge and west of 1-75. Call
352-793-3340.
Come for coffee and re-
freshments and participate in
a mystery created by Christian
suspense authors Diane and
David Munson at 10 a.m. today
at First Baptist Church, 550


Pleasant Grove Road, Inver-
ness. They are authors of six
thrillers, inspired by their excit-
ing and dangerous careers -
David, a former NCIS special
agent, and Diane, a former fed-
eral prosecutor. Tickets are $5
per person. Call the church at
352-726-1252.
The St. Benedict Council
of Catholic Women will have a
bakeless cake sale all month.
Send checks to St. Benedict
Council of Catholic Women. St.
Patrick's Day corned beef and
cabbage dinner served at 6
p.m. today. Donation is $10.
Tickets available at church or in
the office.
First Baptist Church of Bev-
erly Hills will host a "Friend and
Family Day" immediately after
the 11 a.m. service Sunday with
lunch at 12:30 p.m. and a pro-
gram at 3 p.m. featuring Chil-
dren and High Ministry, soloists
from Marion County, and other
spiritual entertainment.
All ladies are invited to a
"SeaSide Escape Women's
Retreat" on Saturday, March
24, at First Presbyterian Church
of Inverness, 206 Washington
Ave., Inverness. Registration
begins at 8:30 a.m. and the
program follows from 9 a.m. to
3:30 p.m. The cost of $10 in-
cludes lunch and materials. Call


Denise Lay at 352-637-0770 or
Tanya Jaros at 352-637-0260
or email: christaned@embarq-
mail.com. Childcare available.
The youths of Crystal
River United Methodist Church
will host a '50s-style Sock Hop
at 6 p.m. Saturday, March 24.
DJ Sebastian Hawes will pro-
vide music. Free childcare on
the premises. Refreshments for
sale. Tickets are $6 per person
or $10 per couple. Tickets will
be available at the door or may
be reserved at the church, 4801
N. Citrus Ave., on Sunday
morning. Money raised for the
event will be used toward the
annual mission trip the youths
take part in.
A workshop facilitated by
Thrivent Financial for Lutherans
representatives, titled "Estate
Strategy Essentials," will take
place at 6 p.m. Monday, March
26, at First Lutheran Church,
1900 State Road 44 West, In-
verness. The community is in-
vited. When does a "will"
become a "won't"? Find out at
this workshop. Wills and other
essential legal documents,
such as power of attorney and
medical directives, will be ex-
plained in a way that will moti-
vate you to take steps to
protect your estate. Dinner pro-
vided. Presented by DeAnna


Edwards, financial consultant,
and David Edwards, financial
associate. Reservations re-
quired by Tuesday. Call Terry at
352-527-2706.
Alan Shawn Feinstein will
add money to donations given
to the Beverly Hills Community
Church's Food Pantry. Dona-
tions must be received through
April 30, and can include cash,
checks, and/or food items. The
more donations made to the
food pantry, the more Feinstein
money will be added to the do-
nation. The next food distribu-
tion at the church is from 11
a.m. to noon and 6 to 7 p.m.
Tuesday, March 27. To qualify
for assistance, you must be a
Beverly Hills resident with iden-
tification. The church office
needs to be notified at least a
week ahead of time, if requiring
food, to ensure its availability.
Call the church office at 352-
746-3620, or stop by, to make a
reservation before Tuesday.
There is an initial registration
for each recipient.
James Williams leads the
Stations of the Cross at noon
Friday during Lent at Holy
Faith Episcopal Church in Blue
Cove, Dunnellon, off East
Pennsylvania Avenue. The last
presentation is March 30.
Everyone is welcome.


COMMUNITIES OF HERNANDO, LECANTO, FLORAL CITY, HOMOSASSA SPRINGS


First Baptist
Church
of Floral City
Liftri Up Jesus
8545 Magnolia
726-4296

Sunday Schedule
8:30 AM Blended Worship Service
9:45 AM Sunday School
11:00 AM Traditional Worship
6:00 PM Worship
Wednesday
6:30 PM
Music, Youth, Fellowship
A warm, friendly Church
Nursery Available
L www.fbcfloralcity.org


Come, Fellowship &
Grow With Us In Jesus
5863 W. Cardinal St.
Homosassa Springs, FL 34446
Telephone: (352) 628-7950
Pastor Dale Wolfe
Tuesday
Mid-Week Meeting 7:00 pm
Sabbath-Saturday Services
Sabbath School 9:30 am
Worship 10:45 am
www. homosassaadventist.com











St. Scholastica
Roman Catholic
Church
Masses:
SATURDAY VIGIL
4:00 p.m. and 6:00 p.m.
SUNDAY
9:00 a.m. and
11:30 a.m.

Daily Mass:
8:30 a.m. Mon.- Fri.
Confessions:
Saturday 2:45 3:30 p.m.
4301 W. Homosassa Trail
Lecanto, Florida 34461
(352)746-9422
www.stscholastica.org
Located one mile south of
Hwy 44 on SR 490 adjacent
to Pope John Paul II
Catholic School


.3 of a mile north of SR 48d
at 7431 Old Floral City Rd.

Come & Fellowship
Service Times
Sunday School.........9:30am

Wed-Night Awesome
Bible Study............... 7:00 p


it says,
but what
it does.















:30 AM Discovery Tie
11:00 AM ePraise & Worship
6:00 PM & Todlvenng Service
Chcfh mileastofUS.1 4









Monday
9 :15 PM-yScol.........Dis r Teens


Tuesday
6:15 PM.......Awana (Sept.- Apr.)
Wednesday
7:00 PM..................ible Study &
Prayer Meeting
Pastor:
Rev. Ray Herriman
(352) 628-5631
Men & Ladies Bible Studies, TOPS,
Infant & Toddler Nursery
P/ mi.east of US.19
6382 W. Green Acres St.
P.O.Box 1067
Homosassa,FL.34447-1067
www.gracebiblehomosassa.org
e-mail: gbc@tampabay.rr.com


COME
Worship With The
Church of Christ
Floral City, Florida
Located at Marvin &
Church streets.
Established in 33 A.D. in
Jerusalem by Jesus Christ.
A warm welcome always
awaits you where we teach
the true New Testament
Christian Faith.

Sunday Bible Study
9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship
10:30 a.m. & 6:00 p.m.

Wed./Eve. Bible Study
6:00 p.m.
Steve Heneghan, Minister
CHURCH OF CHRIST
.00A5H7 Floral City, FL.


HERNANDO
United
Methodist
Church

oPM

Op M
mn, k



Vows

S .. ryfor Children and Families
2125 ENorvell Bryant Hwy. (486)
(12 miles from Hwy. 41)
For information call
(352) 726-7245
www.hernandoumcfl .org
Reverend
Tyler Montgomery
Sunday School
8:45 AM 9:30 AM
Fellowship
9:30 AM
Worship Service
10:00 AM
Individual Hearing Devices


Shepherd

of the Hills
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Our mission is to be
a beacon offaith known
for engaging all persons
in the love and truth
of Jesus Christ.
Bishop Jim Adams, Rector
527-0052
Services:
Saturday
5:00 pm
Sunday
8:00 & 10:30 am
Christian Formation
9:15 am
Sunday School 10:00 am
Nursery 10:30 am
Healing Service
Wednesday
10:00 am
2540 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
(CR 486)
Lecanto, Florida
(4/10 mile east of CR 491)
www.SOTHEC.org


--- --.. ..


A Faith
Lutheran

Church (.C.)
935 S. Crystal Glen Dr., Lecanto
Crystal Glen Subdivision
Hwy. 44 just E. of 490
527-3325

COME
WORSHIP
WITH US
Sunday Service
9:30 A.M.
Sunday Bible Study
& Children's Sunday
School 11 A.M.
Saturday Service
6:00 P.M.
Weekly Communion
Fellowship after Sunday Worship
Calendar of events Audio
of sermons available at
www.faithlecanto.com
&,tfte rom ,eow..


SATURDAY, MARCH 17, 2012 C3

The United Methodist
Women of Inverness will have
their 6th annual "Sunny Sat-
urday" Charity Golf Tourna-
ment (in memory of Ruby
Moore) on Saturday, March 31,
at Inverness Golf and Country
Club, 3150 S. Country Club
Drive, Inverness. The event
starts at 7:30 a.m. with a conti-
nental breakfast followed by an
8:30 a.m. shotgun start, four-
person scramble, full 18 holes,
followed by a hot lunch pre-
pared by the restaurant staff.
Grand prize drawing of a $100
Visa gift card, door prizes,
drawings, Chinese auction.
Entry is $50 per golfer. To spon-
sor a hole costs $100. Pro-
ceeds go to local charities. For
information or to register, call
352-726-2522. Register by
March 23.
The Holy Week schedule at
Joy Lutheran Church is as fol-
lows: Maundy Thursday wor-
ship service at 6:45 p.m. April 5.
The Joy choir will present the
cantata "The Shadow of the
Cross" at 2 p.m. Good Friday,
April 6. Easter Vigil service at
6:45 p.m. Saturday, April 7.
Easter Sunday outdoor service
at 6:30 a.m. in the Memorial
Garden (weather permitting),

See NOTES/Page C4

Come as you are!
COMMUNITY CHURCH
COMMUNITY CHURCH


PASTOR BRIAN AND
KATHY BAGGS
Worship Service &
Children's Church 10:00 AM
Meeting at Knights of Columbus Bldg.
County Rd. 486, Lecanto
(352) 527-4253



Glory to Glory
Ministries
SA Family
United by
The Love Of Jesus!
Non-Denominational
Spirit Filled Worship I
Family Friendly
Sunday 10:30 a.m.
Wednesday 7:00 p.m.
Bible Study
(352) 566-6613
www.G2GCares.org
Pastor Brian Gulledge
| 1274 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy,
Hernando, FL


0


Good

Shepherd

Lutheran

Church
ELCA









Worship

8:30 am

11:00 am
* Fellowship After Worship
Weekly Communion
Sunday School 9:45am
Nursery Provided

Reverend
Kenneth C. Blyth
Pastor
439 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, Florida
Building is Barrier-Free
gshernando.org

35-76-16


Places of worship that

offer love, peace

and harmony to all.

Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!! :!





C4 SATURDAY, MARCH 17, 2012


NOTES
Continued from Page C3

with the message "Quiet Love
at Dawn." Easter Sunday serv-
ices follow at 8:30 and 10:30
a.m. in the church sanctuary.
The bell and vocal choirs will
perform at the last two services.
All are welcome. The church is
at 7045 S.W. 83rd Place at
State Road 200, Ocala. For
more information call 352-854-
4509, ext. 221.
Every Friday during Lent,


RELIGION


Stations of the Cross are
walked at noon at St. Mar-
garet's Episcopal Church, 114
N. Osceola Ave., Inverness. A
"Souper Lunch" will follow. On
Good Friday, April 6, Stations of
the Cross will be walked at 11
a.m., followed by a community
service from noon to 3 p.m.
Stations of the Cross will also
be offered at 7 p.m. Good Fri-
day. A sign-up sheet is available
in the parish hall, or call the
church office at 352-726-3153.
A five-night Carnival
cruise to benefit Serving Our
Savior (SOS) Food Pantry will


travel to Cozumel and Grand
Cayman on the Carnival Para-
dise on April 30. Funds raised
will benefit the needy in Citrus
County. All categories of cabins
are available.
Prices include cruise, port
charges, all taxes and fees, do-
nations to Serving Our Savior
pantry, round-trip bus to Tampa,
round-trip bus driver tips and
one-way porter tips. Cancella-
tion insurance available. Call
Lenore Deck at 352-270-8658
or fax her at 352-270-8665 or
email her at cruiselady@
tampabay.rr.com, or call Bar-


bara Johnson at 352-270-3391.
Peace Lutheran Church
is at 7201 S. U.S. 41, five miles
north of Dunnellon. For Lent,
Pastor McKee is using Luther's
Catechisms for the midweek
and Holy Week theme. Mid-
week services are at 7 p.m.
Wednesday, preceded by a
potluck meal at 6:15 pm. Call
the church office at 352-489-
5881 or visit www.Peace
LutheranOnline.org.
Worship
First Presbyterian
Church has Sunday worship at


10:30 a.m. with adult Bible
studies at 9 a.m. weekly. This
week's sermon is "God So
Loved the World," by the Rev.
Dr. Jack Alwood. New mem-
bers will be welcomed after the
service. Today and after Sun-
day services, they will host an
Arts and Crafts Exhibit from 10
a.m. to 2 p.m. in Webster Hall
with creations by church mem-
bers and friends. The public is
invited to attend this free ex-
hibit. Call 352-797-2259 or visit
www.fpcofcrystalriver.com.
The public is invited to
good old-fashioned church


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

services with friendly people
and good old-fashioned wor-
ship at Trinity Independent
Baptist Church, 2840 E.
Hayes St. (on the corner of
Croft and Hayes), Hernando.
For service times, call 352-
726-0100.
The First Baptist Church
of Hernando Youth/Children's
Ministry's annual Bike Rally
starts at 10 a.m. today. Cyclists
will ride the Withlacoochee Trail
from Wallace Brooks Park (In-
verness) to Hernando, and
See NOTES/Page C5


Places of worship that

offer love, peace and

harmony to all.

Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted! :'

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF CITRUS SPRINGS, BEVERLY HILLS, BROOKSVILLE, DUNNELLON, INVERNESS


IS 43 Years of
Bringing Christ
FIRST to Inverness
LUTHERAN
CHURCH
Holy Communion
Every Sunday at
7:45am & 10:00am
Sunday School
& Bible Class
8:45 AM.
726-1637
Missouri Synod
www.1stlutheran.net
1900 W. Hwy. 44, Inverness
The Rev. Thomas Beaverson


First

Assembly

of God
4201 So. Pleasant Grove Rd.
(Hwy. 581 So.) Inverness, FL 34452

Pastor,
S Dairold

Bettye
^^H^"^r


Come To
ST.
MARGARET'S
EPISCOPAL
CHURCH
where everyone is still welcome!
In Historic Downtown Inverness
1 Block N.W. Of City Hall
114 N. Osceola Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
726-3153
www.stmaggie.org
Services:
Sun. Worship 8 & 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday 12:30 P.M.
Morning Prayer
9:00 A.M. Mon- Fri
Fr. Gene Reuman, Pastor



PRIMERA IGLESIA
HISPANA
DE CITRUS COUNTY
Asambleas de Dios
Inverness, Florida
ORDEN DE SERVICIOS:
DOMINGOS:
9:30 AM Escuela Biblica
Dominical
10:30 AM Adoraci6n y
Pr6dica
MARTES:
7:00 PM Culto de Oraci6n
JUEVES:
7:00 PM Estudios Bfblicos
Les Esperamos!
David Pinero, Pastor
1370 N. Croft Ave. Inverness, FL 34451
Te91fono: (352) 341-1711


You're invited
to our Services
Sunday School
10:00 AM
Sunday
10:45 AM & 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 PM
Independent
Fundamental
Pastor
Terry Roberts
Ph: 726-0201


0^


All are invited to our

Healing

Services
First Church of Christ,
Scientist
Inverness
224 N. Osceola Ave.
Sunday Services 10:30AM
Sunday School 10:30 AM
Wed. Testimony Meeting 5:00 PM
352-726-4033


Mission Possible
MINISTRIES
Dan Sturgill
Senior Pastor
9921 N. Deltona Boulevard
(352) 489-3886
www.missionpossibleministries.com
I Sundays
W orship ...................10:30 am
Spanish Translation Provided
(Nursery Care & Children's Church Provided)
| Wednesday
Youth Group, Bible Study &
Kid's Programs.................7 pm
(Nursery Care Provided)
ARMS OF MERCY FOOD PANTRY
1st & 3rd Tuesday of the month.
8:00 am-11:00 am



GRACE
BAPTIST CHURCH

Independent
SOME THINGS SHOULDN'T CHANGE
Do you miss sound Bible teaching, the
beloved hymns & gospel songs, an Eve-
ning Service, and being part of a caring,
Christian family? Find them at Grace!
2672 W. Edison PI. at Elkcam Blvd.
Citrus Springs, FL
S.S. 9:45 am, Services 11:00 am & 6:00 pm
Wed. Bible Study & Prayer 7:00 pm
Directions, mp3 sermons & more at
www.gracebapchurch.org
Phone (352) 249-7211
000AOKH









Hwy. 44E@
0 Washington Ave., Inverness
Sunday Services
Traditional
* 11:00 AM
S Contemporary
9:30 AM
* 11:00 AM Service
* Tapes & CD's Available
Sunday School for all ages
9:30 AM
Nursery Provided
*Fellowship & Youth Group.
5 to 7 PM 0
m 24-Hour Prayer Line 0
0 563-3639 0
" Web Site: www.fpcinv.org
" Podcast: FPC inv.com 0
" Church Office 637-0770
S Pastor Craig Da
0 Pastor Craig Davies m


000A4L7 rst For Christ"...John 1:41
FIRST I
CHRISTIAN
CHURCH OF
INVERNESS
We welcome you and invite you
to worship with our family.
John A. Scott, Minister
Sunday:
9:00 A.M. Sunday School
10:15 A.M. Worship Service
Wednesday:
6:00 P M. Bible Study

www~fcinv~co


Beverly Hills
Community Church
82 Civic Circle, Beverly Hills, Florida
(352) 746-3620
Pastor Stewart R.Jamison, III
Email: bhcchurch@embarqmail.com

Wednesday Bible Study 6p.m.
Sunday CoffeelConversation 8:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship Service 10 a.m.
Communion 1st Sunday, Monthly
Where Christ is Proclaimed!


Hope Evangelical
Lutheran Church
ELCA
Pastor Lynn Fonfara
9425 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
Citrus Springs
Sunday Worship
9:30 a.m.
Sunday School 8:30 a.m.
Communion Every Sunday
Information:
489-5511
Go To Our Web Page
hopelutheranelca.com



* "








VIGIL MASSES:
4:00 P.M. & 6:00 P.M.

SUNDAY MASSES:
8:00 A.M. &10:30 A.M.

SPANISH MASS:
12:30 Pm..

CONFESSIONS:
2:30 Pr to 3:30 P.M. Sat.
or ByAppointment

WEEKDAY MASSES:
8:00 A.M.

6 Roosevelt Blvd.,
Beverly Hills
746-2144
(1 Block East of S.R. 491)
www-ourlayofgracefl
:. .catholicweb.com .A


Our Lady of

Fatima

CATHOLIC CHURCH
U.S. Hwy, 41 South, Inverness,
Florida
Sunday Masses
7:30 A.M., 9:00 A.M. & 11:00 A.M.
Saturday Vigil
4:00 P.M.
Weekdays 8:00 A.M.
Confessions 2:30 3:30 P.M

726-1670


3esUs

At
Victory

Baptist Church
General Conference

Sunday School 9:45 AM
Worship 10:45 AM
Sind.i., Evening 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 PM
Choir Practice 8:00 PM

Quality Child Care
Pastor Gary Beehler
352-465-8866
5040 N Shady Acres Dr.
726-9719
Highway 41 North, turn at
Sportsman Pt.
I 1 .fi, to belong.Aplace to become."





FIND
US AND
YE SHALL

SEEK.
If you're searching for a
spiritual home where
questions are as welcome
as answers, find us. We
are a loving, open-minded
religious community that
encourages you to seek your
own path, wherever it leads. To
nurture your spirit and find your
own truth and meaning.
Welcome to Unitarian Universalism.

nature Coast

Unitarian Universalists
SUNDAY SERVICES
10:30 A.M.


WHERE REASON & RELIGION MEET
GLBT WELCOME
7633 N. Florida Ave.
(Route 41)
Citrus Springs
465-4225
WWW.NATURECOASTUU.ORG


INVERNESS
CHURCH
OF GOD
Rev. Larry Powers
Senior Pastor


Sunday Services:
Traditional Service ... ............. 8:30
Sunday School.........................9:30
Contemporary Service...........10:30 M
Evening Service........................6:00 M
Wednesday Night:
Adult Classes.................. 7:00 m
Boys and Girls Brigade.....7:00 m
Teens........................... 7:15 m
"Welcome Home"
Located at 416 Hwy. 41 South
in Inverness Just Past Burger King
Church Office 726-4524
Also on Site "Little Friends Daycare
and Learning Center"


Redemption

Christian Church
SUNDAY
Bible School..............9:00
W orship .....................10:15
WEDNESDAY
Bible School ..............6:30
Currently meeting at
East Citrus Community Center
9907 East Gulf-to-Lake Highway
(At The Flashing Light)
For more
information call 5
352-422-6535 ,
Pastor
Todd
Langdon




First United

Methodist


tChurch
of Inverness
3896 S. Pleasant Grove Rd.
Inverness, FL 34452
(2 mi. so. ofApplebee's)
Come as you are.
(352) 726-2522
TONY ROSENBERGER
Senior Pastor


8:30 AM
Traditional Worship
with Holy
Communion
9:45 AM
Sunday School

11:00 AM
Contemporary
Praise & Worship 0
AK Ig


INVERNESS
First CHURCH OF GOD
NMn
I ) nimninaiI iiin.il
i. ., ,
Sunday
10:30 AM. & 6:00 PM.
Wednesday 6:00 P.M.
Bible Study & Prayer
726-8986
"Church Like It Used To Be"
Saturday Night Gospel Jubilee"
6:00 PM.
(Last Saturday of month)
Children's Church School Weekly
5510 E. Jasmine Ln.
Phone: 726-8986
ALLARE WELCOME


I OFFICE: (352) 726-1107


I ciImj. iniI |'n. rlgi i |'j [i j Ij ri '


0





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NOTES
Continued from Page C4

regroup at FBCH for a picnic. Sunday will
start with a "juice & java fellowship" from 9
to 9:20 a.m. in the fellowship hall, followed
by Sunday school classes from 9:30 to
10:30 a.m., with worship services at 10:45
a.m. and 6 p.m. Midweek worship activities
begin at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday. Church
members will work in the Nature Coast
Baptist Association's booth at the Citrus
County Fair from 1 to 5 p.m. Friday, March
30. The church's monthly "Work Day" is
from 8 to 11 a.m. Saturday, March 31. Call
352-726-6734.
Shepherd of the Hills Episcopal
Church in Lecanto will celebrate the fourth
Sunday in Lent with Holy Eucharist serv-
ices at 5 p.m. today and 8 and 10:30 a.m.
Sunday. Adult Christian Formation is at
9:15 a.m. Sunday with Sunday school at
10 a.m. and nursery at 10:30 a.m. Healing
service and Eucharist at 10 a.m. Wednes-
day is followed by Bible study and sack
lunch. SOS at Good Shepherd Lutheran
Church from 9 a.m. to noon Thursday.
Evening Bible study is at 7 Thursday in the
parish hall. Stations of the Cross are
walked at 5:30 p.m. Friday through Lent
followed by a soup and bread supper and
discussion.
Faith Lutheran Church, in Crystal

CRA E her store
GRACE from a
ended w
Continued from Page Cl scars fro
mestic v
The first woman I talked time of
with called her scars, about her moth
six in all, her "badges of For mi
courage," the most promi- had felt'
nent one being a rebuilt lip different
made from the skin and tis- n't until
sue from her inner forearm. about Je
She had lip cancer, began to
As she told her story she She
used words like "grateful" brought
and "thankful." She praised Jesus, h
God for his goodness to her. them cle
Her scars remind her whole."
that, when we suffer, God is One of
there with us, taking care of the Chri
those who trust in him. Jesus wa
Looking back, she can transgre
trace God's grace to her at crushed
every step. No detail es- the p
caped his orchestration. He brought
was right there with her, him (at t
holding her hand, calming wounds
her fears. (Isaiah 5:
She said God doesn't al- It's the
ways take away the pain, but An old
he makes the pain bearable were his
and then makes something on cruel
beautiful from it. cross he 1
Another woman began but the;


COUPLE
Continued from Page C1

keep being productive members of so-
ciety and "not just sit around and
play," she said.
"We always thought we'd do this,"
she added. "You don't just want to be a
taker all your life. We want to be con-
tributors and givers."
Their mission president assigned
them to Monroe, and they soon discov-
ered a personal connection. Dan grew
up in Bedford, Wyo., and remembers
when a local company imported in a
cheesemaker from Wisconsin to help
with the local dairy industry operations.
"I love the cheese and the Swiss
heritage," he said.
They've been occupying their days
here by helping out at the church -


WAR
Continued from Page C1

in history, both here and
abroad, there were wide-
spread events that did in-
deed shape the history of
the Jews.
The Civil War provided an
opportunity for Jews to par-
ticipate in the conflict as
equal citizens, rising
through the ranks to officer
status. Few armies at the
time allowed this. The war
also was a time for Jews to
identify with their neigh-
bors, the Southern Jews
with the South, the North-
ern Jews with the North. As
such, they took on the views
of the areas in which they
lived. While today we think
of Jews as being liberal and
for civil rights, even in the
North, the Jewish popula-
tion was divided on the
issue while in the South,
there were some Jewish
slave owners. The Secretary
of State for the Confederacy
was aJew,Judah Benjamin,
and is often referred to as
"The Brains of the Confed-
eracy" Whether they fought
for the North or the South,
the Jews felt comfortable
and accepted by their neigh-
bors and so demonstrated
their loyalty by fighting side
by side with them.
The War Between the
States also afforded the
Jews a chance to fight for
their rights. As the blacks
were slighted and segre-
gated in the Second War, so
too did the Jews confront


Glen Subdivision, Lecanto, off State Road
44 and County Road 490, has weekly serv-
ices at 6 p.m. today and at 9:30 a.m. Sun-
day. Following the Sunday service is a time
of fellowship. Bible study and Sunday
school begin at 11 a.m. This week, Pastor
Stephen Lane will preach from John 3:14-
21, "Lift High the Serpent." Midweek
Lenten service is at 5 p.m. Wednesday
with the continued themes of "Lies of Lent"
followed by a covered-dish supper. Every-
one is invited. Call 352-527-3325 or visit
faithlecanto.com
First Baptist Church of Inverness
offers the following Sunday activities: SON-
rise Sunday school class at 7:45 a.m.,
blended worship service at 9 a.m., "Kid's
Church" for ages 4 through fourth grade
during the 9 a.m. service featuring Bible
stories, skits, music and group activities;
Sunday school classes for all ages at
10:30 a.m.
A nursery is available for all services ex-
cept the 7:45 a.m. class. Evening fellow-
ship is at 6 with various services during
summer months. On Wednesdays at 6
p.m. is a prayer meeting, "Women in the
Life Of Jesus" study, "Youth Ignite," "Praise
Kids" and a nursery for age 3 and younger.
Call the office at 352-726-1252. The
church is at 550 Pleasant Grove Road, In-
verness. The website is www.fbc
inverness.com.
St. Paul's Lutheran Church, at 6150
N. Lecanto Highway in Beverly Hills, has


*y with her scars
car accident and
vith her emotional
om a decade of do-
iolence and a life-
being rejected by
her.
uch of her life she
'dirty, damaged and
t," she said. It was-
someone told her
esus that her scars
heal.
said when she
her wounds to
is blood "washed
ean and made me

' the basic tenets of
stian faith is that
as "pierced for our
ssions, he was
for our iniquities;
punishment that
us peace was upon
he Cross), and by his
we are healed."
3:5).
crux of the gospel.
hymn starts, "Deep
s wounds, and red,
Calvary, as on the
bled in bitter agony;
y whom sin has


Sunday worship at 8 and 10:30 a.m. Bible
class/Sunday school is at 9:15 a.m. Mid-
week Lenten services are at 4 and 6:30
p.m. Wednesday. Visitors are always wel-
come to services. "Bible Information Class"
is at 6 p.m. Monday in the fellowship room.
Choir rehearsal is at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday.
On Thursday at 2 p.m., the Senior Fellow-
ship Group will include a movie, "The Year-
ling," with an ice cream social immediately
following the movie. Bring a favorite top-
ping to share; ice cream provided. St.
Paul's School and Precious Lambs Pre-
school is now open for re-enrollment in the
new school year. Scholarship applications
must be submitted by the end of March.
"Pasta for Pennies" donations are ac-
cepted until Friday for children's cancer re-
search. Call 352-489-3027.
St. Anne's Anglican Church is on
Fort Island Trail West, Crystal River. St.
Anne's celebrates the fourth Sunday in
Lent with services at 8 and 10:15 a.m. St.
Anne's will host "Our Fathers Table" today
from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Overeaters
Anonymous meets Wednesdays at 10:30
a.m. in the parish library.
Recovering from food addiction meets at
1 p.m. Thursday in the parish library. Alco-
holics Anonymous meets at 8 p.m. Friday
and Monday in the parish library. Everyone
is invited to St. Anne's for a Bluegrass
gospel sing-along at 6 p.m. Sunday, March
25. Annie and Tim's United Bluegrass
Band will perform.


wounded sore, find healing
in the wounds he bore."
Christ's death not only
took away the penalty of sin,
but his sufferings his
beatings, the humiliation of
people spitting at him and
jeering, his being stripped
naked in public and being
abandoned by his friends -
God somehow uses for our
soul's healing.
It's one of those hard-to-
explain faith things that's
difficult to understand by
trying to intellectualize it.
It's best understood by ex-
perience, by bringing your
scarred and broken life to
Jesus and standing amazed
as he turns your ugliness to
beauty.
For the woman who had
been beaten by a husband
and rejected by her own
mother, Jesus took her scars
and gave her a ministry to
other broken and abused
women (and to the men who
abused them), telling them
of the power of Christ's scars
to transform and heal theirs.
Not only that, God gave
her another husband, gen-


speaking during the Sunday worship
meeting, leading activities, supporting
other members -, as well as volun-
teering in the community at the Green
County Family YMCA, and Pleasant
View Nursing Home.
"They're fabulous," said Jenn Stol-
lenwerk, life enrichment supervisor at
Pleasant View. The Wilkes lead hymn-
singing hours, play games, read stories
and visit with residents one-on-one.
Pastors often come to Pleasant View,
she said, but the Wilkes will visit with
residents regardless of church affilia-
tion and "that's where they're just
phenomenal."
The YMCA sports program director,
Chad Shelton, also glowed about the
couple's volunteer work. Mormon mis-
sionaries have helped out at the rec
center before, usually two young guys,
he said, but the Wilkes are the first re-
tired couple.


prejudice. As the war began,
the military chaplaincy was
restricted to those of the
Christian faith. This re-
stricting legislation was
overturned, and Jewish
chaplains joined the ranks
alongside their Christian
counterparts. And in De-
cember 1862, they demon-
strated at the White House
against General Grant's no-
torious General Orders No.
11, expelling Jews as a class
from his war zone. The
order was rescinded, but
such an act was certainly a
black mark against the gen-
eral and the American mili-
tary as a whole. It took a
man ironically named Abra-
ham to overturn this act and
expose it for the anti-Semi-
tism it espoused. President
Lincoln, to his credit, over-
turned this order because
he did not believe in con-
demning a whole group of
people for a few sinners.
And of course, Jefferson
Davis, president of the Con-
federacy, also repudiated
anti-Semitism because of
his close association with
Judah Benjamin.
An interesting footnote to
Jewish involvement in the
Civil War is a cemetery in
Richmond, VA. Called the
Hebrew Confederate Ceme-
tery, it is the only Jewish
military burial ground in
the world outside of the
State of Israel. Here lie the
remains of Confederate sol-
diers denied burial in Con-
federate cemeteries
because of their Jewish her-
itage. These soldiers were
casualties of the battles of


tle, kind and caring, and in
the year before her mother
died she heard the words
she had ached to hear: "I'm
sorry I love you. Please for-
give me."
Some people have scars
that never heal. They hold on
to bitterness and regret, curs-
ing the people or the circum-
stances that caused their
scars. They relive their in-
juries, picking at their scabs,
taking perverse pleasure in
keeping the pain alive.
But for others, for those
who trust that God cries
when they cry and that it's
with tears he allows pain to
alter their lives, their scars
actually become their
source of strength.


Nancy Kennedy is the au-
thor of "Move Over, Victoria
-I Know the Real Secret,"
"Girl on a Swing," and her
latest book, "Lipstick
Grace. "She can be reached
at 352-564-2927, Monday
through Thursday, or via
email atnkennedy@
chronicleonline. com.


"It's been great. Being retired,
they've seen a lot and done a lot,"
Shelton said.
In their free time, they enjoy walk-
ing around Monroe and looking at the
older homes, hiking in the New Glarus
Woods State Park and sharing meals at
restaurants around town or at home
with members of their church.
Marie leads a quilting workshop on
the first Saturday of the month at 10
a.m. at the church, open to anyone and
to all sewing abilities.
"The biggest part of quilting is so-
cial," she said. "I tell 'em, don't expect
perfection."
In October they head back to
Wyoming, where their house will have
sat empty for a year.
"It'll probably be kind of weedy,"
Marie said. But the weeds may flour-
ish again soon enough: "We'd like to
do this again."


Fredericksburg, Chancel-
lorsville and the Wilder-
ness. The bodies were
buried on Shockroe Hill and
after the war, the care of the
graves was presided over by
the Hebrew Ladies Memo-
rial Association, who
erected an ornamental iron
fence depicting muskets,
crossed swords and a Con-
federate cap.
In the 1930s, the crum-
bling gravestones were re-
placed by a bronze plaque
that reads: "To the glory of
God and in memory of the
Hebrew Confederate sol-
diers resting in this hal-
lowed spot." Not all Jewish
Confederate soldiers are
buried in this spot; some
have been interred in fam-
ily plots. It would also seem
plausible that like their


Northern brethren, they
would be buried in syna-
gogue-sponsored plots. Con-
gregation Beth Ahabah
today maintains the ceme-
tery
As for that hoop-skirted
dress I wanted, I have de-
cided, in true Scarlett
O'Hara style, to simply say:
"Fiddle Dee Dee!" It just
would have been a bit too
cumbersome getting in and
out of my Mazda!
Information from this col-
umn came from the Con-
necticut Jewish Ledger.


Judi Siegal is a retired
teacher and Jewish educa-
tor She lives in Ocala with
her husband, Phil. She can
be reached at
niejudis@yahoo. com.


CRISIS
Continued from Page C1

"It may take five years. It
may take 10 years. It might
take 20 years. But we will
do this, with God's help,"
said Andrew Hullinger,
senior director of finance
and administration.
Cathedral officials tell
The Associated Press they
are partnering with the
National Trust for Historic
Preservation to boost its
national marketing and
fundraising efforts, while
they also pursue efforts of
their own to increase visi-
tor traffic and donations.
The formation of the part-
nership helps offset the
news that a request for re-
pair money was recently
rejected by the Federal
Emergency Management
Agency
The National Trust is
designating the cathedral a
"national treasure" that is
critically threatened. The
trust expects to donate
hundreds of thousands of
dollars in staff time for
consulting and technical
expertise.
"So many people see the
cathedral as the landmark
in Washington that it is in
the nation's daily life, but
they don't often think about
what it takes to preserve a
place like that," said David
Brown, the trust's execu-
tive vice president.
Since the earthquake,
fundraising for operations
has outpaced donations for
repairs. Officials recently
announced they had raised
$2 million for earthquake
repairs and $5 million for
the annual operating
budget, inching toward re-
covery
Months after the 5.8-
magnitude earthquake,
scaffolding remains atop
the 330-foot central tower
- a reminder of the pinna-
cles and hand-carved
stonework that cracked
and crashed onto the roof.
Much of the damage oc-
curred on older parts of the
gothic church built in sec-
tions over 83 years, begin-
ning in 1907.
The resident head stone-
mason, Joseph Alonso, has
called it "one big piece of
sculpture" because of its
hand-carved architectural
details. Uniquely Ameri-
can touches include a
moon rock showcased in a
stain glass window and a
sculpture of Darth Vader,
designed by a child.
More than 2 tons of
stonework have been re-
moved from the highest
tower to be repaired or
replicated. Major cracks
also formed during the
earthquake, and mortar
rained down from the 100-
foot-high ceiling inside.
Safety nets still stretch
overhead even as services
have resumed.
Mayor Vincent Gray re-
quested $15 million in
FEMA funds under a disas-
ter declaration, but cathe-
dral officials learned the
request was rejected last
week because FEMA's reg-
ulations generally bar aid
to religious institutions.
Even before the earth-
quake, mortar was crack-
ing in the oldest sections.
Repointing the building
will likely cost at least $5
million. Interior preserva-
tion work is needed on
doors, metalwork and
stained-glass windows. Me-
chanical and plumbing sys-
tems need repairs.
Refurbishing the massive
organ could cost as much
as $15 million.
"The dollars are big ...
this cathedral was built on
that kind of effort," said


RELIGION


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ST TIMOTHY LUTHERAN aGII-RCjI
1070 N SUNCOAST BLVD CRYSTAL RIVER FL M44*9
GCETS AND GENERAL INFO 352-795-5325 OR 352-634-288
CAl. [tU ADiVAiCE Fi.ORRi fl ES LUMITEDSEAIDIG
, FOR MORE INFO VISIN
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Tired of worrying?
Looking for Peace and Direction?

"Spiritual Solutions for

Difficult Situations"
A Free Lecture by;
Lorenzo Rodriguez,
international speaker, practitioner and teacher of
Christian Science healing

Saturday, March 17,2012 at 2pm
Coastal Region Library
8619 W. Crystal St.
Crystal River, FL

This free lecture sponsored by
First Church of Christ, Scientist, Inverness, FL.
For more information please call:
352-726-4033 or Bob Hylen 352-746-0464 00OALHT


SATURDAY, MARCH 17, 2012 C5

Kathleen Cox, the cathe-
dral's chief operating offi-
cer. "It's just one foot in
front of the other, and you
keep going."
There is no steady
stream of revenue from the
government or the Episco-
pal Church for the church
that draws about 200,000
visitors and 300,000 wor-
shippers a year It has long
relied on donors for its an-
nual budget, along with in-
terest from a modest
endowment. This year, it
must raise $10 million for
its operating fund.
The cathedral, first envi-
sioned by President
George Washington and ar-
chitect Pierre L'Enfant,
was built on one of the
city's highest points.
Episcopalians took in
donations from around the
country to fund construc-
tion. At one point, the Na-
tional Cathedral
Association had nearly
35,000 members. But in the
1990s and early 2000s, the
cathedral was considered
complete, and the associa-
tion was disbanded.
Leaders had built a ded-
icated congregation and
felt the finances were
strong enough to incur
some financial risk, Cox
said. For example, the
cathedral agreed with the
schools that share its prop-
erty to finance and build a
$34 million garage that was
completed in 2007. They
expected to recoup most or
all of the construction costs
with parking fees over 30
years.
Then came the Great Re-
cession, and the garage
debt became a drag. The
cathedral is devoting more
than $500,000 a year in its
budget to the garage, set-
ting aside some funds to
prepare for higher princi-
pal payments that will
come due in 2017.
Declines in the endow-
ment and in donor support
as the stock market tum-
bled also led the church to
cut back on growth and re-
focus on core services in
2008 and 2009. Dozens
were laid off.
Since the financial cri-
sis, the cathedral has
begun rebuilding its donor
base, said Cox, who was
formerly CEO of the Cor-
poration for Public Broad-
casting. Officials have
restarted the National
Cathedral Association,
which now includes about
5,000 members.
To help fund a 10th an-
niversary commemoration
of Sept. 11, the cathedral
sought a corporate sponsor,
Lockheed Martin, for the
first time.
Since it reopened in No-
vember following the
earthquake, visitors en-
counter a new experience.
A new welcome counter
lists fees for $10 audio
tours and specialty tours
focused on its stained
glass, gargoyles and other
features. Visitors are asked
for a contribution of at
least $5 for a basic tour, re-
placing a single donation
box.
So far, visitors are giving
an average of about $3 per
person, nearly double what
the box elicited. Cox said
visitors have responded
positively to the new ap-
proach to contributions.
It also hopes its partner-
ship with the trust will help
it tap donations from foun-
dations focused on historic
sites.
The earthquake simply
crystalized the need, Cox
said, "to be taking fairly
dramatic and aggressive
steps to find a way to fund
this cathedral for the
future and for its
preservation."







Page C6 SATURDAY, MARCH 17, 2012



IMMUNITY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


NesNOTES Seeking good 'stuff'
Festival off, but
open house on


Citrus County Parks &
Recreation has canceled the
International Food & Arts
Festival scheduled for
Saturday, March 24.
The grand re-opening and
open house of the Central
Ridge Community Center at
Beverly Hills will still take
place from 10 a.m. to noon
that day. All are welcome to
stop by and see the facility
and available services.
For more information, call
352-746-4882.
Youth Ranches
thrift store reopens
The Sheriffs Ranches En-
terprises Thrift Store in Crys-
tal River will have a grand
reopening celebration Mon-
day, March 19, at its new,
larger location in King's Bay
Plaza, 200 S.E. U.S. 19.
The original store location
opened in 1991. For more
than 20 years, the thrift store
has resold items to raise
funds to help support the pro-
grams of the Florida Sheriffs
Youth Ranches. Donations of
gently used household items
and clothing are accepted for
resale in one of four locations
around the state.
The mission of the Sheriffs
Ranches Enterprises Inc. is
to provide financial support,
goodwill and community in-
volvement for the boys and
girls served by the Florida
Sheriffs Youth Ranches.
For more information, visit
www.youthranches.org.
Retired nurses to
meet March 26
OCALA- Citrus Marion
Chapter of the Registered
Nurses Retired (RNR) will
meet Monday, March 26, at
the West Marion Medical
Building, room 24. Sign-in for
the meeting starts at 11 a.m.,
with lunch at noon and the
speaker follows at 12:30.
Speaker will be Denise
Matthias, RCP, manager of
Cardio Pulmonary Depart-
ment at Marion Regional
Medical Center. Her topic will
be sleep disorders. The char-
ity will be Marion County
Blessings in a Backpack pro-
gram, and a cash donation
can be made.
Retired registered nurses
wishing to attend should call
Gladys at 352-854-2677 or
Mary Jane at 352-726-6882
by Thursday, March 22.


Humanitarians
OF FLORIDA


Halo


It's about time to submit 2012 fair entries


Special to the Chronicle

In just a few days, it will be time to
enter items in the 2012 Citrus County
Fair Enter your homemade or home-
grown items in
many categories. n '
Some categories, t
in addition to the
regular ones, in-
clude: rubber
stamping, themed
table settings, col-
lections and home-
made wine. Again
this year will be
The Country Crit-
ters Competition
for youths.
Entries in all categories will be ac-
cepted from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Friday,


March 23, and 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Satur-
day, March 24. Baked goods and agri-
cultural products only will be
accepted from 8 to 10 a.m. Monday,
March 26.
Youths must enter
their own exhibits,
O5 ill out with the exception of
I --lnl V the Monday entries
of baked goods and
agriculture. These
I[N s l may be entered by
RIENlWU an adult.
IU I M It's not too late to
frame a picture, cro-
S 2 chet an item, or
show off prize
houseplants or veg-
etables just coming in. Perhaps enter
a page from a homemade scrapbook of
a grandchild, wedding, or just a


glimpse of "life." And, the category of
themed table settings continues to
grow.
New this year are cash awards for
the Best Pound Cake, Best Sweet Pick-
les and Best Barbecue Sauce. Each
winner will be awarded $50. The
awards are sponsored by the Earl
Stokes family
Ribbons will be awarded in all cate-
gories; cash and ribbons will be
awarded in the youth division. Youth
entrants are also eligible to apply for
scholarships.
Rules are simple and are available
online at www.citruscountyfair.com -
click on Competitive Exhibit Rules.
They are also available at the fair of-
fice on in the official fair book to be in
the Sunday, March 18, Citrus County
Chronicle.
For more information, visit www.
citruscountyfair.com or call 352-
726-2993.


Celebrity golf tourney


w


Special to the Chronicle
Team HOPE's second annual Relay Fore Life Celebrity Golf Tournament was Feb. 18 at Juliette Falls Golf Course in Dun-
nellon. The total raised for the American Cancer Society was $9,505.44. Front, from left, are: James Winborne, Michele
Snellings, Lori McSherry, David Lewis and Joe Fielding. Back, from left, are: Bud Nelson, Ed Snellings and Rick Rogers.
Other team volunteers not pictured are: Rene Rogers, Desiree Fielding, Zeke and Barbara Zannini, James Reed, Lauren
Snellings, Ann Deneau, Barbara Martinuzzi, Nick Maltese and Randy Carr. Crystal River's Relay For Life will be April 13
and 14 at Crystal River High School.



Drive benefits We Care Food Pantry


Tax collector collecting food, too


Special to the Chronicle

The Citrus County Tax
Collector's Office is spon-
soring a food drive during
March to collect nonperish-
able foods for We Care Food
Pantry
Collection boxes are lo-
cated at both offices in In-


verness and Crystal River:
Courthouse Annex, 201 N.
Apopka Ave. in Inverness, or
the West Citrus Government
Center, 1540 N. Meadow-
crest Blvd. in Crystal River
The public is invited to do-
nate canned goods and non-
perishable food when
coming to register a car, ob-


Register now for


dementia seminars

Hospice to offer two sessions


Special to the Chronicle
Halo is a sweet, pretty
brown and white tabby girl
that's everything you could
want in an 8-week-old kit-
ten. She and her three sib-
lings are looking for their
forever homes. All Humani-
tarians' felines are
neutered, microchipped,
vaccinated and free of fe-
line leukemia, AIDS and
heartworms. Visitors are
welcome from 10 a.m. to 4
p.m. Monday through Sat-
urday at the Humanitari-
ans' Manchester House on
the corner of State Road
44 and Conant Avenue,
east of Crystal River. Call
the Humanitarians at 352-
613-1629 for adoptions, or
view most of the Hardin
Haven's felines online at
www.petfinder.com/
shelters/fl186.html.


Special to the Chronicle

HPH Hospice, in part-
nership with the
Alzheimer's Association
Florida Gulf Coast Chapter,
will host two seminars to
provide information and
assist community members
who are caring for a loved
one with Alzheimer's dis-
ease and related dementia.
These diseases can grad-
ually diminish a person's
ability to communicate,
and make them act in dif-
ferent and unpredictable
ways. Two free seminars
will be offered at HPH
Hospice Administrative Of-
fices, 3545 N. Lecanto
Highway (Winn Dixie
Shopping Plaza) in Beverly
Hills to help educate any-
one interested in learning
more about Alzheimer's
disease.
Jerry Fisher from the
Alzheimer's Association
will present "Changes in
Communication" from 2 to


Register by calling
HPH Hospice at
352-527-4600.
Seating is limited.

3:30 p.m. Thursday, March
22. He will share tips and
communication skills to
help exchange ideas,
wishes and feelings.
From 2 to 3:30 p.m. Tues-
day, March 27, Fisher will
present "Solutions for Dif-
ficult Behaviors." He will
discuss how Alzheimer's
and related dementia pa-
tients can become anxious
or aggressive and some-
times misinterpret what
they hear. He will share
ways to identify those be-
haviors and explore possi-
ble solutions to help.
These free seminars re-
quire pre-registration be-
cause seating is limited.
Call HPH Hospice at 352-
527-4600 to register for one
or both seminars.


tain a driver's license or
conduct business with any
of the offices at either site.
The demand on Citrus' local
food pantries has never
been higher
The outreach is being
done in conjunction with
the Agriculture Council of
America's celebration of
Agriculture Awareness in
March.
To spotlight agriculture's


contribution to Citrus
County, a display that show-
cases what makes up Citrus
County agriculture and
where our food actually
comes from is located at the
tax collector's office in the
Meadowcrest West Citrus
Government Center.
The tax collector's office
is open from 8:30 a.m. to 5
p.m. Monday through
Friday


Family of the Month


Special to the Chronicle
Pat and Tom Pomahac are the Knights of Columbus Council
6168 February Family of the Month. Tom, whose hobby is
growing roses, has been the council's treasurer since 2002.
Both are products of Illinois: Tom was born and raised in
Cicero and Pat in Berwyn. He quit public high school to serve
3 1/2 years in the Navy aboard the destroyer escort, USS
Parle (DE 708) during the Korean War. He earned his GED
and went to work in production and inventory control. He re-
tired as a materials manager for Duo-Fast, a manufacturer of
pneumatic staplers, nailers, etc., in May 1997. Tom has
served as an Extraordinary Minister of the Eucharist for more
than 20 years, first in Illinois and now at St. Scholastica
Catholic Church in Lecanto, where they attend Mass. He
also takes Communion to the homebound. Pat makes and
donates quilts to the pregnancy center in Inverness and lap
robes to a nursing home. The Pomahacs live off Croft
Avenue near Inverness. They will have been married for 52
years in April. They have two daughters, a son and eight
grandchildren.


News NOTES

Parade of Homes
continues to April 1
The 2012 Spring Parade
of Homes for Citrus and Her-
nando counties, presented
by exclusive platinum spon-
sor Florida Public Utilities,
will begin March 17 and end
April 1.
The 2012 Parade of
Homes features 11 entries at
scattered sites throughout
Citrus and Hernando coun-
ties. Models will be open
from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mon-
day through Saturday and
noon to 5 p.m. Sunday.
Official Parade of Homes
guides can be obtained from
the 2012 print media sponsor
Tampa Bay Times on Satur-
day, March 17, or from the
Citrus County Chronicle on
Sunday, March 25, or the
current edition of the Nature
Coast Real Estate magazine.
Official guides can also be
picked up at the Citrus
County Builders Association,
1196 S. Lecanto Highway,
Lecanto, from 9 a.m. to
5 p.m. Monday through
Thursday.
For more information and
an interactive map, visit
www.CitrusParadeof
Homes.com or call 352-
746-9028.
Legion slates
Italian dinner
American Legion Auxiliary
Allen Rawls Unit 77 will host
its semi-annual Italian Extrav-
aganza Dinner from 5 to 7
p.m. Saturday, March 24, at
the Highlands Civic Center,
4375 Little Al Point (off Arbor
Street), Inverness.
The menu will be tradi-
tional lasagna, spinach
lasagna, stuffed shells,
baked ziti, meatballs, Italian
sausage with green peppers
and onions, salad bar, garlic
bread, dessert bar, coffee,
tea, lemonade and soda. En-
tertainment will be by Bernie
at the keyboard. There will be
a Chinese auction, auction
and a "share the wealth."
Proceeds will benefit veter-
ans' and their families'
needs, Paws for Patriots,
seeing-eye dogs for blind
veterans and Operation Mili-
tary Kidds, a camp for chil-
dren of deployed
parent/parents.
Call Alice at 352-860-2981
or 352-476-7001; on the day
of the dinner, call 352-
726-0444.
Timeshare owners
to convene
SARASOTA- Florida
Timeshare Owners Group
spring meeting will be 1 to 5
p.m. March 18 at the Palm
Aire Country Club, 5601
Country Club Way, Sarasota.
Industry representatives
will provide advice on buying
and selling a timeshare, dis-
tinguishing between an initial
purchase and a resale and
using a licensed resale bro-
ker to avoid up-front fees be-
fore a sale is completed.
The meeting will include a
round-table discussion on in-
dustry issues, vacation expe-
riences and exchange
companies. Copies of the
2012 Member's Resort Di-
rectory will be provided to all
members attending.
The meeting is open to all
Florida timeshare owners,
with a $10 door charge and
reservations required. Call
Frank Debar at 941-351-
1384 or email fdebar433
@gmail.com.
Gotta grip on
good gumbo?
Do you make great shrimp
gumbo? Prove it by entering
the Homosassa Rotary's
Shrimp Gumbo contest dur-
ing Shrimpa-Palooza on
March 24.
Cash prizes will be
awarded to the top three
cooks in this People's Choice
contest. Call Marybeth Nay-


field at 352-422-0265 or go
to www.shrimpapalooza.com
for more details and an entry
form.


* Submit information at least two weeks before the event.
* Early submission of timely material is appreciated, but
multiple publications cannot be guaranteed.


* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
community@chronicleonline.com.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be guaranteed.
* Expect notes to run no more than once.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SATURDAY EVENING MARCH 17, 201 2 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D/l: Comcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
C B D/I F H 6:006 6:30 7:00 I 7:30 8:00 I 8:30 9:00 I 9:30 10:00110:30 11:00 11:30
SIWESH NBC 19 19 News News Entertainment 'Night Harry's Law xa The Firm (N)'14' Law & Order: SVU News SNL
S PBS 3 3 14 6 II Volo Takes Flight (In Lawrence Welk's Big Band Splash Big Band Celtic Thunder Voyage The group performs Superstars of Seventies
I WED PBS 3 3 14 6 Stereo) 'G' c music from the 1920s-1950s.'G' favorites. (In Stereo) G' c Soul Live
g WUF PBS 5 5 5 41 Lawrence Welk Griffith |Griffith Movie'MA' Austin City Limits Artists Den
News Nightly Entertainment Tonight Harry's Law (In Stereo) The Firm "Chapter Law & Order: Special News Saturday
S (WFA) NBC 8 8 8 8 8 News (N)'PG' c cc Eleven" (N) '14 Victims Unit'14 Night Live
SWFV ABC 20 20 20 News World Jeopardy! Wheel of Wipeout (In Stereo) 20/20 "My Extreme Affliction" (N) (In Stereo) xc News Hot Topics
w [* ABC 20 20 20 News 'G' Fortune 'PG'c 'PG'
2012 NCAA Basketball Tournament 2012 NCAA Basketball Tournament Third Round: Teams 48 Hours Mystery (In 10 News Paid
S(WSP) CBS 10 10 10 10 10 Third Round: Teams TBA. TBA. (N) (Live) xc Stereo)'PG' 11pm (N) Program
WTVT F ox 13 13 13 13FOX13 6:00 News TMZ (N) (In Stereo) QViva! The Chosen "Episode Three" A percus- FOX13 10:00 News Alcatraz A violent man
SFOX 13 13 13 13(N) x'PG'Ec sion group in Argentina. (N) 'PG' (N)E returns. x
S WCJB ABC 11 11 4 News |ABC Entertainment 'Night Wipeout 'PG'E 20/20 "My Extreme Affliction" (N) xE News Crook
Cornerstone With John JackVan PaulWhite In Touch With Dr. Leslie Hale xc Abundant All Over Freedom Pure
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0 (WF5) ABC 11 11 11 News News Fortune 'G' Mc 'PG'X Anatomy
Family Guy Family Guy Big Bang Big Bang House "Unfaithful" (In House "The Softer *** "Glory Road" (2006) Josh Lucas. A coach
ED W IND 12 12 16 '14' '14' Theory Theory Stereo) '14' x Side" '14' E leads the first all-black NCAA team.
ED WTTAI MNT 6 6 6 9 9 Scoop Paid Ring of Honor Wrest. 70s Show '70s Futurama Futurama Ring of Honor Wrest. Bones'14' cc
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B WVEA UNI 15 15 15 15 14 Familia |Noticiero Q'Viva! The Chosen Sabado Gigante Programa de entretenimiento. (N)'PG'(SS) Aguila |Noticiero
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Parking Parking Parking Parking Parking Parking Parking Parking Parking Parking Parking Parkin
A&E) 54 48 54 25 27 Wars'PG' Wars'PG' Wars'PG' Wars'PG' Wars'PG' Wars'PG' Wars'PG' Wars'PG' Wars'PG' Wars'PG' Wars'PG' Wars'PG'
*** "Die Hard With a Vengeance"(1995, ***l "Die Hard" (1988, Action) Bruce Willis. A New York policeman *** "Die Hard 2"
55 64 55 Action) Bruce Willis.'R' a outwits foreign thugs in an L.A. high-rise.'R' c (1990) Bruce Willis.
Finding Bifoot (In Must Love Cats "Cat Must Love Cats (N) (In Too Cute! "Kitten Tanked "Brett Takes a Too Cute! "Kitten
S 52 35 52 19 21Stereo) PG Crazy in Japan"'PG' Stereo)'PG' Cottonballs" (N)'PG' Dive"'PG' Cottonballs"'PG'
"Like Mike ** "Fat Albert" (2004 Comedy) Kenan *** "The Brothers" (2001, Comedy-Drama) **l "Notorious" (2009) Angela
96 19 96 2" Thompson, Kyla Pratt.'PG' []Morris Chestnut.'R' x __' Bassett.'R'Ex
!iiAVi) 254 51 254 The Celebrity Apprentice 'PG' c Housewives/Atl. ** "The Game Plan"(2007) Premiere. 'PG' s Game
Always Always Always Always Always Always Always Always The Comedy Central Roast Actor Tosh.0
27 61 27 33 Sunny Sunny Sunny Sunny Sunny Sunny Sunny Sunny Charlie Sheen.'14' c '14'X
miL 98 **4 "RoadHouse" (1989, Action) Patrick Swayze, Kelly Lynch. A leg- Bayou My Big Redneck Bayou My Big Redneck
98 45 98 28 37 endary bouncer agrees to tame a notorious gin mill. 'R' Billion Vacation (N) Billion Vacation
CNBC1 43 42 43 Paid |Paid Money in |Debt/Part American Greed Suze Orman Show Debt/Part Princess American Greed
tCil 40 29 40 41 46 Situation Room CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Presents a Piers Morgan CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Presents E
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(E$PF 33 27 33 21 17 SportsCenter (N) (Live) a |College Wrestling NCAA Championship, Final. From St. Louis. (N) SportsCenter (N) (Live) a
[ESPJ 34 28 34 43 49 Women's College Basketball Basket |The Fab Five xa College GameDay SEC Storied
fEWIN) 95 70 95 48 Saints |Fathers |Angelica Live |*** "Th6rse"(1986)NR' Therese Living Right The Journey Home
A 29 52 29 20 28 *** "Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire" (2005) Daniel Radcliffe. *** "Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix" (2007) Daniel
Voldemort [ays a trap for Harry at the Triwizard Tournament. Radcliffe. Harry prepares a group of students to fight Voldemort.
"Mystery I**Y "Scenes From a Mall" (1990) *** "As Good as It Gets"(1997, Comedy-Drama) Jack *Y "Up Close & Personal" (1996)
118 170 Da(te" Bette Midler.'R'Ec Nicholson, Helen Hunt. (In Stereo)'PG-13' c Robert Redford.'PG-13'
(iT ) 44 37 44 32 America's News HQ FOX Report (N) Huckabee (N) Justice With Jeanine The Five iJour. |News
[F 26 56 26 Restaurant Stakeout Diners Diners Diners |Diners IDiners |Diners Diners Diners Iron Chef America
[iL) 35 39 35 Boxing IPanthers NHL Hockey Buffalo Sabres at Florida Panthers. (Live) Panthers Bad IPanthers |UFC
E**ln "Hancock" (2008, Action) Will Smith, **Y "Step Brothers" (2008, Comedy) Will *** "Role Models" (2008, Comedy) Seann
X) 30 60 30 51 Charlize Theron.'PG-13' Ferrell, John C. Reilly 'R' iWilliam Scott, Paul Rudd.'R'
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"Lt 39 Honeymoon for One" (2011, Romance) "Chasing Leprechauns" (2012, Comedy- "Chasing Leprechauns" (2012, Comedy-
39 68 39 45 54 Nicollete Sheridan, Greg Wise.'NR'Ec Drama) Adrian Pasdar. Premiere. cc Drama) Adrian Pasdar, Amy Huberman. cc
302 201 302 2 2 ** "Percy Jackson & the Olympians: The ** "Green Lantern"(2011, Action) Ryan Boxing Matthew Macklin vs. Sergio Martinez,
302 201 302 2 2 Lightning Thief" (2010) Logan Lerman. Reynolds. Premiere. (In Stereo) 'PG-13 cc Middleweights. (N) c
"TheX- **Y "Hereafter" (2010) Matt Damon. Death touches three Eastbound Enlightened Bored to Make- Curb Entourage
303 202 303 Files" people in different ways.'PG-13'E Death America Enthusiasm'MA'
JiliTJ 23 57 23 42 52 House Hunters House |Hunters Dream IDear Color Spl. Interiors House Hunters House Hunters
S 51 25 51 32 42Swamp People "Gator Swamp People "No Swamp People "Divide Swamp People 'PG' c Swamp People 'PG' c Swamp People 'PG' E
51 25 51 32 42 Gold Rush"'PG' Guts, No Gator"'PG' to Conquer"'PG'
___ **l "Trapped"(2002, Suspense) Charlize "Home Invasion"(2011, Suspense) Haylie *** "Abducted"(2007, Drama) Sarah Wynter,
LIFE) 24 38 24 31 Theron, Courtney Love. R' c Duff, Lisa Sheridan. Premiere. NR' Andrew Walker. R'
"* "Widow on the Hill" (2005, Drama) Natasha "Deadly Honeymoon" (2010, Drama) "Homecoming" (2009, Horror) Mischa Barton,
[LM 50 119 Henstridge, James Brolin. c Summer Glau, Chris Carmack. cc Matt Long, Jessica Stroup.'R' c
"Cop Out" ** "Housesitter" (1992, *** "Big Stan" (2007, Action) Rob Schneider. ** "Hall Pass" (2011, Comedy) Girl's
(iA 320 221 320 3 3 R' Comedy) Steve Martin. PG' b (In Stereo) 'R' Owen Wilson. 'R' Guide
MSNBC 42 41 42 Documentary j Documentary Documentary Documentary Documentary Documentary
S 109 65 109 44 53 Insio e tne vietnam war veterans accounts ana cSip. 14, L,b,v uoomsaay 'reppers vviia Justice noting vvIJustice born to
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OWN 103 62 103 Unfaithful: Stories Unfaithful: Stories Unfaithful: Stories Unfaithful: Stories Strange Strange Unfaithful: Stories
fOXY) 44 123 "Good Luck Chuck" (2007) Dane Cook. ** "Sweet Home Alabama" (2002) 'PG-13' xc ** "Sweet Home Alabama"
f* Y2 "The Heart Specialist" (2006, Romance- **Y "The Switch" (2010) Jennifer Aniston. iTV. ** "Drive AnTry"(2011, Action) Shameless
340 241 340 4 Comedy) Wood Harris. iTV 'R' (In Stereo) 'PG-13' E Nicolas Cage. R' I MA'
sEDi 732 112 732 Monster Jam (N) SPEED AMA Supercross Racing Indianapolis. (N) (Live) NASCAR Performance Dumbest
7 1 7 Center (N) Stuff
S**7 3 "Jurassic Park III" (2001, Adventure) Sam *** "The Rock" (1996, Action) Sean Connery. Premiere. Alcatraz *** "The Rock"
37 43 37 27 36 Neill. (In Stereo)'PG-13' Island terrorists threaten to gas San Francisco. (In Stereo) 'R' (1996) Sean Connery.
"Pirates of the ** "Just Go With It" (2011) Adam Sandier, *** "Friends With Benefits" (2011) Justin ** "How Do You
370 271 370 Caribbean" Nicole Kidman. (In Stereo) 'PG-13' c Timberlake. Premiere. (In Stereo)'R'x Know" (2010) 'PG-13'
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(Lli) 36 31 36 Lightning Live! the St. Pete Times Forum in Tampa, Fla. (Live) Live! (N) Lightning Championship Boxing 'PG'
S 1 "Leprechaun 2" "Leprechaun 3" (1995, Horror) Warwick "Leprechaun's Revenge" (2012, Horror) Billy ** "Leprechaun"
31 59 31 26 29 (1994) R'x Davis, John Gatins, Lee Armstrong.'R'x IZane, William Devane. Premiere. NR' (1992) ''Ex
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TCM 169 53 169 30 35 Taylor, Maggle Smith. NR x Katharine Hepburn.'NR'x Ambersons"(1942) Joseph Cotten. Lily"
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cii) 53 34 53 24 26 "Shipwrecked"'14'X Plains"'PG' Frontier'14'X Frontier'14' X Frontier'14'x Frontier'14'x
fTiE 50 46 50 29 30 Dateline: Real Life Dateline: Real Life Dateline: Real Life Dateline: Real Life Dateline: Real Life Dateline: Real Life
S**Y2 "Holy Rollers" (2010) Jesse ** "Peep World" (2010) Michael "Spike" (2008) Edward Gusts. "Albino Farm"(2009) Chris
350 261 350 Eisenberg.'R'x C. Hall. (rn Stereo) R' Premiere. (In Stereo) 'R' c Jericho. (In Stereo) 'R'
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(liiiiJ 25 55 25 98 55 Most Shocking '14' World's Dumbest... Most Shocking World's Dumbest... World's Dumbest... Forensic
(19L 32 49 32 34 24 M*A*S*H |M*A*S*H Home |Home Home |Home Raymond |Raymond Everybody-Raymond Raymond Raymond
NCIS "Left for Dead" (In NCIS "Eye Spy" (In NCIS The severed leg NCIS "One Shot, One NCIS Naval officers CSI: Crime Scene
47 32 47 17 18 Stereo) 'PG' c Stereo) PG'cx of a corpse.'PG' Kill"'PG' a targeted.'PG' c Investigation'14'
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(WGN-AJ 18 18 18 18 20 Law Order: CI Funny Home Videos Funny Home Videos Funny Home Videos WGN News at Nine 30 Rock |Scrubs


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
HYONE 'E

A2012 Tibune MedaSe rices, Inc
KAll Righs ROs d
KKISO



SOMLBY



FRACTY


Answer here: U 11
(Answers Monday)
Yesterday's Jumbles: AFOOT LAUGH RADIAL AFFORD
I Answer: When James Watt talked about his steam engine,
some people thought he was FULL OF HOT AIR


Bridge

PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

The Senior Life Master was ready to start a new
season of lessons, now that the snow had melted.
"Bridge contains so many suit combinations that
no one knows them all. Let's start with one that in-
experienced players often get wrong."
The SLM asked his students to study the first de-
clarer-play problem on the sheets he had handed
out. (They were looking at only the North and
South hands in today's diagram.)
South (the SLM continued) is in four spades.
West cashes two diamond tricks, then shifts to the
club jack. How should South plan the play?
While they were thinking, the SLM discussed
the bidding.
Note South's sequence. A simple overcall, espe-
cially in spades, has an upper limit of about 17
high-card points. With 18 to 20 points, South makes
a takeout double, then bids his suit on the second
round. North, who might have jumped to two
hearts, immediately raises to game.
South can afford one trump loser but not two.
And, interestingly, the right play is the same even
when the opponents have not bid.
South has 18 points and the dummy eight That
leaves 14 for the opponents. West surely has the
spade king. The best play is to cash the spade ace
first. Here, the king drops and South can gain an
overtrick. But if the ace collects only the two and
five, South should cross to dummy with a club and
lead toward his spade queen, basing his play on
East's. If East plays the jack, cover with the queen.
If he wins with the king, play low. And if he shows
out, groan because you could not have made the
contract.


West
4AK
V 9 8 2
+ A K Q 7 3
% J 10 8 7


North 03-17-12
4 9763
VJ 7 5 4
+ J 2
* A Q 5
East
t J 5 2
V 10 6 3
10 8 6 5
S9 4 2
South
4 A Q 10 8 2
VAK Q
. 94
* K63


Dealer: West
Vulnerable: Neither


South West North
1 Pass
Dbl. Pass 1 V
1 Pass 44


Opening lead: + A


East
Pass
Pass
All pass


ACROSS
1 Singer -
Home
5 Fold-up
mattress
10 Volcanic rock
12 Harley rival
13 Ink shooters
14 Slanted print
15 "- me up,
Scotty!"
16 Road guide
18 Maj.'s
superior
19 Arctic floater
23 Electrical unit
26 Ground
breaker
27 Strong and
healthy
30 Chiffonier
32 Song
words
34 Trip to
the top
35 Fossil resins
36 Ocean fish
37 Nay opposite


38 Protein
source
39 Farthest behind
42 Crumple up
45 Ex-GI
46 Wanes
50 Apollo's
priestess
53 Stuffed corn
husk
55 Garage
squirter
56 de corps
57 Final word
(hyph.)
58 Pile

DOWN
1 Delicate fabric
2 Is, to Pedro
3 Supermodel


Answer to Previous Puzzle


C|L I M|B Ll I IM I T
PONIES BODICE
RODENT ARETHA
SER RDS
BAD DOVES AHA
OUR IBID TRES
TRANCES MAMAS
TIBET UNAWARE
OG LE BAIT DEN
MA Y FALSE ART
TEL SRSN
F INITE ATIR|BAG
ADORED NATURE
RAVES LATIN


Campbell 9 Table salt in
4 Peak for Heidi the lab
5 Like some cats 10 Hope or
6 Ms. Thurman Newhart
7 Bath powder 11 Short
8 Buckeye State break
12 Holy cow!


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


17 "Honest"
fellow
20 Last name in
perfumes
21 Jingles
22 Apparel
23 Wall Street
deg.
24 Quit talking
25 Killer whale
28 Mortgage, e.g.
29 Pantyhose
color
31 Cartoon
shrieks
32 Baby shower
gift
33 Fast flier of
yore
37 Stun
40 Part of the
range
41 Fiesta Bowl
site
42 Romances
43 Diva's melody
44 "What's My
Line?" host
47 Silents vamp
Theda -
48 Object on
radar
49 Collection
51 Vaccine amts.
52 Thai neighbor
54 Fire residue


D ear Annie: Ten years ago,
I fell in love with "Bran-
don" and had the two hap-
piest years of my life.
Then he changed. We
broke up, and I found
out he had been hav-
ing sex with another
coed. His deception
and harsh words put a
stop to any fantasies of
reconciliation. I soon
began a relationship
with "Travis," and we
remain together. We've
had our ups and
downs, but I know he AN N
loves me and our val- MAIL
ues align. Despite
everything, however, I
have never been able to get over
Brandon. I know it's absurd.
Brandon and I have been in
sporadic contact through mutual
friends. He married the coed, a
manipulative type who has made
it clear she doesn't want to hear
my name. The life he leads now
is not one I would want for my-
self.
I've been told that Brandon
would like to see me, just as a
friend, but he has made no move
to initiate contact. I ought to
know better than to believe it, but
I feel a pain at the core of my
body whenever I think of him.
Tears come to my eyes when I re-
call the joy we had together
I love Travis, but I don't feel for
him what I felt for Brandon.
Travis doesn't deserve such di-
vided affections. Am I doing a
disservice to him by ignoring
these persistent feelings? Is it re-
alistic to want that joy again? -
Hopelessly Unhealed
Dear Hopeless: You have an


idealized version of Brandon
based on the two years of bliss
you had together. But that person
doesn't exist (and
maybe never really
did), and the relation-
ship is dead. You need
to mourn its loss, move
forward and force
yourself to stop ro-
manticizing and cling-
ing to the past. Young
4t. love, especially first
love, has an aura that
cannot be duplicated,
but it doesn't mean
IE'S you cannot find some-
BOX thing equally wonder-
ful if you are open to
it. If Travis isn't the
right guy, it would be a kindness
to set him free. But don't do it be-
cause you dream of reconnecting
with Brandon. You'd only be set-
ting yourself up for disappoint-
ment.
Dear Annie: My 96-year-old
widowed mother has been in a
nursing home for six years. Her
mind is sharp, but she has a hard
time taking care of herself. Mom
has made many friends at the
home and is loved by all who
meet her. My siblings and I visit
as often as we can, and Mom is al-
ways happy to see us. The prob-
lem is her grandchildren. They
claim they are too busy or can't
bear to see Grandma in a home.
But they don't even phone. The
same goes for her many nieces
and nephews. My siblings and I
have told them how much it
would mean if they visited, but it
doesn't help.
Why do people find time to go
to a funeral, but can't manage a
visit when the person is still


alive? I worry they will someday
realize what a huge mistake they
are making by ignoring Mom in
her final years.
Please tell your readers to visit
someone in a nursing home. I
hope and pray that when I get
old, my children and grandchil-
dren find some time to spend
with me. My Heart Is Aching
for Lonely Seniors
Dear Heart: Sadly, those who
don't make time to be in touch
with a loved one will certainly
have regrets. We hope your letter
will be a wakeup call. Feel free to
send a copy to all the offenders.
Annie's Snippet for St.
Patrick's Day:
Always remember to forget the
things that made you sad.
But never forget to remember
the things that made you glad.
Always remember to forget the
friends that proved untrue.
But never forget to remember
those that have stuck by you.
Always remember to forget the
troubles that passed away
But never forget to remember
the blessings that come each day


Annie's Mailbox is written by
Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar,
longtime editors of the Ann Lan-
ders column. Please email your
questions to
anniesmailbox@comcast.net, or
write to: Annie's Mailbox, c/o
Creators Syndicate, 7373rd
Street, Hermosa Beach, CA
90254. To find out more about
Annie's Mailbox and read fea-
tures by other Creators Syndi-
cate writers and cartoonists,
visit the Creators Syndicate Web
page at www.creators.com.


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
H- app, SI P 4ty's Day!
/6.:, ir-o he's the
YOU L aq .


/l" .. ..

nio- -

hey don't
I-"*, t / ....sound



WHAT THEY ALLEP
THDE AP IRISH
TRIbUTF= ANV.
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


ENTERTAINMENT


SATURDAY, MARCH 17, 2012 C7


I






CITRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Peanuts


Garfield


Pickles


Sally Forth


For Better or For Worse

SIC-H. I'VE GOT LINES I'M GF-TING SAGGV
RFROLND MY EE.., RROUNDTHE. MIDDLE.
MV CHEe=KS RfE. I'M GFFSiNG
k.. UNKF-N.. OLD.,El-Ly. /





Be ..aEy.
.0


Beetle Bailey


The Grizzwells


BUT THAT SOUNDS
SELFISH, SO WE'LL ISSUE
A PRESS RELEASE SAYING
THE NEW LAWJ WOULD
IMPINGE FREEDOM OF
SPEECH.


SO...
WE'RE
SELFISH
LIARS?


YOU CAN'T
GET MORE
FREE THAN
THAT!


The Born Loser

'UE07SS Wl1kANT7 ?TN\S COl6 W N OU A, \JP4 ,ou k -. \ 1 e IN 6EO PE t
TO CELE-KWT. ST. PST IC1<5 IkT( M 5P Wm CIAE OPJFt A-.7
[ m'-iZ( Wus!,r-1 V-i-.--<-.K^\ I LTR W


Kit 'N' Carlyle Rubes


G. Reaper's Cut-Rate Fortunetelling:
Not big on details but always spot on


Doonesbury


-' -_ dfli.i-% I




^i^ "" -' Q





Big Nate

WELCOME TO CHANNEL
12! How MAY I
HELP YOU ?
CAN YOU
GIVE THIS To
THE STATION
MANAGER'





Arlo and Janis -


EASIER SAIP THAN
POA(E, MYFRE1P!
TAKE IT FROM THIS
6UY HER, IT's ... FOUMP
\ HER.

1~a 7



N'L


MY GOODNESS,
WHAT A LOT
OF SIGNATURES!
YUP' FIVE
HUNDREDS
P EOP L E!


...180 OF
WHOM HAVE
IDENTICAL
HAND- / T'
WRITING A VERY
CLOSE
F NEIG&H-
BORHOOD.


Blondie


Dennis the Menace The Family Circus


O0U 6LsKE FOOLEP MOm\ LAST TIME You WERE
HRE. SHE THOUt1 YOU WOULPN/EVER LE.AV.E
Betty


www bm igyc icus com
"...but the only blouses I have are
apple, emerald and avocado."


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377
"21 Jump Street" (R) ID required. 1:10 p.m., 4:10
p.m., 7:20 p.m., 9:55 p.m.
"John Carter" In Real 3D. 1 p.m., 4 p.m., 7 p.m., 10
p.m. No passes.
"Dr. Seuss' The Lorax" (PG) In Real 3D. 1:45 p.m.,
7:45 p.m. No passes.
"Dr. Seuss' The Lorax" (PG) 4:45 p.m., 10:05 p.m.
"Act of Valor" (R) ID required. 1:20 p.m., 4:20 p.m.,
7:10 p.m., 9:55 p.m.
"This Means War" (PG-13) 1:40 p.m., 4:40 p.m.,
7:40 p.m., 10 p.m.
"Journey 2: The Mysterious Island" (PG) In Real
3D. 1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 10:05 p.m. No
passes.
Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"21 Jump Street" (R) ID required. 1:40 p.m., 4:40
p.m., 7:40 p.m., 10:10 p.m.


"John Carter" In Real 3D. 1 p.m., 4 p.m., 4:30 p.m.,
7 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 10 p.m., 10:30 p.m. No passes.
"A Thousand Words" (PG-13) 1:25 p.m., 4:25 p.m.,
7:20 p.m., 9:45 p.m.
"Project X" (R) ID required. 1:15 p.m., 4:15 p.m.,
7:55 p.m., 10:05 p.m.
"Dr. Seuss' The Lorax" (PG) 1:05 p.m., 5:25 p.m.,
9:50 p.m.
"Dr. Seuss' The Lorax" (PG) In Real 3D. 3:15 p.m.,
7:35 p.m. No passes.
"Gone" (PG-13) 1:35 p.m., 4:45 p.m., 7:15 p.m.,
9:55 p.m.
"Act of Valor" (R) ID required. 1:45 p.m., 4:50 p.m.,
7:45 p.m., 10:20 p.m.
"Journey 2: The Mysterious Island" (PG) In Real
3D. 1:50 p.m. No passes.
"The Artist" (PG-13) 1:30 p.m., 4:05 p.m., 7:05
p.m., 9:40 p.m.


Times subject to change; call ahead.


WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public Local RADIO WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Contemp. WSKY 97.3 FM News Talk WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WXOF-FM 96.3 Adult Mix WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s, '60s, '70s
WEKJ FM 96.7, 103.9 Religious WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WRZN-AM 720 Adult Standards


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: M sjnlbe n


"RGHRXWNPKTWAAD, KXGAWOZ KY W


BGZKJB-YKEGZ XJXWA KYAWOZ SPWS KY


YAHUAD LJS YSGWZKAD LGKOR


THOYJBGZ LD YPGGN." ZWCG LWXXD

Previous Solution: "Capital isn't scarce; vision is." Sam Walton
"Wal-Mart ... do they like make walls there?" Paris Hilton
(c) 2012 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 3-17


Dilbert


OUR COMPANY OPPOSES
PASSAGE OF THE NEW
INTERNET LAW BECAUSE
IT WOULD BE BAD FOR
OUR BUSINESS.


Frank & Ernest


Today's MOVIES


C8 SATURDAY, MARCH 17, 2012


COMICS




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


- ERA Keyl Realty, Inc. Located on U.S. 19 i
E 8015 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa, FL Sugarmill Woods Entranceth o ORu
ERA 352-382-1700 oo trance
R EA L ESTATE ^^ ^ ^ S ^ ^^^ B^B


IgarmiH


10 BALSAM CT S. 10 PORTULACA CT. 40 CORKWOOD BLVD.
3* +office/2/2 Golf course views X-large garage 3+office/3.5/2 2 landscaped lots heated pool 4/3/2 Granite w/stainless Safe room w/AC
$198,000 MLS #353186 $349,000 MLS #353255 $219,900 MLS #353262 |


IgarmiH


Op


I~4 ....
5 COCOPLUM CT. NORTH 12 QUAILWOOD PATH
POOL & Spa Cul-de-Sac Hardwood Floors Southern Woods GC home 3/3/3
$229.500 MLS #349266 $359.000 MLS #349630


53-34 DOUGLAS STREET 1 JUNGLEPLUM CT. W 5 MAYFLOWER CT. E
Everything is NEW! No Maintenance!! 2/2/2 Pool Family room FP 3/2/2 Fireplace SS appliances
$70,000 MLS #350251 $128,900 MLS #351629 $229,000 MLS #352014
.--- ... .......


SATURDAY, MARCH 17, 2012 C9







CIO SATURDAY, MARCH 17, 2012


S CITRUS COUNTY





H.ONICLE

www.chronicleonline.com


Classifieds


Classifieds In Print and Online All The Time!


BUSINESS HOURS: Publication I

MONDAY-FRIDAY aEM W Chronicle / Daily...............

8:00 A.M. 5:00 P.M. Homefronicle / Sunday...........

CLOSED SATURDAY/SUNDAY Chronicle / Monday ..........

Sumter County Times / Thui

WE GLADLY ACCEPT Riverland News / Thursday
..- South Marion Citizen / Frid
ViSWest Marion Messenger /


0 . , A ...

VEHC T YrCASH PAID $500 REWARD ,. o ,n #1 Affordable


'01,Silverado 1500,
Ext. Cab, 8 ft. bed
$3,600. 352-220-4545,
352-503-7752
CHEVY
'04, 2500 HD,
Ext. Cab, w/8 ft. bed
$6,200. 352-220-4545,
352-503-7752
FORD
'01, Windstar, LX Van,
white/gray, 88,400 mi.
non smoker, serv.
records $5,995
(352) 382-1167
GE ELECT. RANGE
COIL BURNERS, LIKE
NEW $250 634-2004
INVERNESS
VILLA, 1BDRM,1CAR
GARAGE, DEED RE-
STRICTED 55+, POOL.
NON SMOKING, NO
PETS, QUIET ADULT
COMMUNITY ADJ. TO
STATE PARK, $650/MO.
SEC.DEP/REF RQ.
727-862-3264 LV. MSG.
Large Glass top dining
rm table w/ 6 chairs
$600 obo
3 pc. Entertainment
Center $200
(352) 503-7379


Oadsl IVIUUIIe nUlIle Iarlk,
Inverness FL 2 bedroom.
2 bath. 14x60 Fully Fur-
nished Manatee Mobile
Home. Carport, Screen
room, and Shed. Has
roof over and remodelled
kitchen and baths. Virtu-
ally everything furnished.
Parking behind M/H for
trailer or boat. Excellent
Shape. Great low rent
park. $ 12000. Call
815 986 4510 or cell
815 298 2964.
REFRIGERATOR
KENMORE 18 CU FT,
WHITE,5 YEARS OLD,
GREAT CONDITION
$275 634-2004
Refrigerator, Amana
bone,2 door
good condition.$75
Stove, Kennmore ,bone
good condition $75
352-503-7423
SUGARMILL
WOODS
HOMOSASSA
207 Linder Dr Moving
Sale Sat only! Furniture,
freezer, generator,
household items. 9 -2.
Twin Size Sofa Bed
Asking $200
3 Glass Top Living Room
Tables $150.
(352) 503-7379
Zero Down Assumable
Loan Nice 3/2/2,
In Foxwood Estate
Need proof of income
and excel credit.
No Gimmicks,
(352) 341-8479



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
Paid for Junk Vehicles,
J.W. 352-228-9645


For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not
CASH PAID $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL
Appls. Riding Mowers,
Scrap Metal, AC Unit
cell -352-270-4087



fertilizer horse manure
mixed with pine shavings
great for gardens or
mulch. 352-628-9624
Free Horse Manure
and shavings
for garden
(352) 746-7044
FREE MINIATURE
JACK RUSSELL
352-423-0819
Gold Colored
Australian Shepherd
Pure bred, Ex television
performer, Looking for
Retirement home as
pet only, UTD on shots,
and spayed
(352) 422-5622
KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Savage Pays top $$$.
352-628-4144
Lab & Lab a Doodle
mix puppies
Free to a good
responsible home.
(352) 201-1464
Need free baby items,
please. Anything
will be appreciated.
(352) 201-2980
Several Beds Full size &
King box springs and
mattress, no frames.
Free if you need them
Helping Hands Ministry
(352) 503-2054
352-628-7444
taking donations of all
kinds,cblthing,shoes,cbothes of all
sizes and baby
stuff,ect call jamie @
352-586-9754.





fO and read
Chihuahua 10" 7#
Black dog with Nar-
row white blaze on
throat down sternum.
Blue Collar with gold
bell. Name Pierre an-
swers to Inky-dink.
Lost @ 34446, 1 mile
east of Texaco off
Grover Cleveland.
Chipped and regis-
tered with PetLink.
If you find me, please
report it on
http://www.petlink.net/u
s
or call 1-877-PETLINK
(1-877-738-5465)

Jack Russel Terrier
White and Brown, 20#
12" 34446 area. Scar
in right side of snoot
and Hole in right side
of lip caused by
snake bite. Name
LUCY, Dug under
fence, 1 mile east of
Texaco off Grover
Cleveland. Chipped
and registered with
PetLink.
If you find me, please
report it on
http://www.petlink.net/u
s
or call 1-877-PETLINK
(1-877-738-5465).


For Information leading
to the recovery of
triple crown utility Trailer
Black w/ ramp & new
spare tire
(352) 228-3599
Mini Schnauzer
salt pepper Female off
Waldron Ct. in the vic of
Hwy 488 & Hwy 495
Please call owner she
has had her since a
pups (352) 270-1444







REWARD $1000.
No Questions ask.
Min Pin Female 10 lbs
name Zoey, Needs
meds. last seen Sun 8/7
Holiday Dr off Turkey
Oak Crystal River
(352)257-9546 400-1519
Tan & White Corgi mix
female last seen
979 S Rooks Av
Inverness on Sat3/10th
(352) 476-0719 476-2790
Yorkie, female
Lost Seven River
Hospital Paking Lot
Name Chrissie
(352) 422-5693




Found Black & White,
Medium Size young
Male Dog, found Near
Mama Sally's across
from Crystal River Mall
(352) 958-8882
Found Canoe
on Withlacoochee
3/14
Call to identify
(352) 228-7663
Found sump pump on
Ray St. Call to identify.
352 302 9917




Huge discounts when
you buy 2 types of
advertising! 122
weekly newspapers,
32 websites, 25 daily
newspapers. Call
now to diversify your
advertising with Ad-
vertising Networks of
Florida
(866)742-1373





HAPPY
50TH
BIRTHDAY


LESLEE
MIGHELL









Lots of Love,
Your Family

Heather, Jeremy,
Tyler, Breanna,
Dayna, Ron,
Wanda and Bill


000AN34

Sudoku ****** 4puz.comr


65 34 9


7 69 8





9 7


5 7 8 2


1 6





2 _41_ 5


4 3 5 __68

Fill in the squares so that each row, column, and
3-by-3 box contain the numbers 1 through 9.


BATTERIES: BATTERY REBUILD SERVICES:
Laptop / GPS Cordless Power Tools
Cell / Cordless Phone U.P.S. Backup
Camera I Camcorder Cordless Vacuums
Watch /IElectronics Custom Battery Rebuild
Wheelchair / Scooter 7 I
Rechargeables / Chargers I i atterl i
Airsoft/RC I t I

3850 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy, Inverness
New Store Hours: Mon.-Fri. 9am-5pm, Saturday 10am-5pm & Closed Sunday
(352) 344-1962 Menton this coupon geta free pack of batteries.


IMOVIVNG OR DE-uc-
CLUTTERING OR LEFT
OVER YARD SALE
ITEMS ? Will pick up your
donations. Proceeds for
rescue puppy surgery.
Thank U352-270-3909
Room Mate $385/mo
incls all. priv room &
bath, electric, etc
(352) 341-4449






EXECUTIVE/
ADMINISTRATIVE
ASSISTANT
Looking for a qualified
ExecuLive/Administatve
Assistant rlandatory
must be proficient in Mi-
crosoft Office Suite, Mi-
crosoft Excel. Possess
great social skills and
be extremely profes-
sional. Qualified candi-
dates should send
applications to
rooddept@gmailcom











Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





CNA/HHA's
Apply At
HOME INSTEAD
SENIOR CARE
4224 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Lecanto

F/T Ophthalmic
Assistant/Scribe
Prior experience
preferred in eye care
field performing
patient workups,
history, and
documentation.
Apply in person
West Coast Eye
Institute
240 N Lecanto Hwy,
Lecanto FL 34461
352 746 2246 x834

MEDICAL BILLING
TRAINEES NEEDED

Train to become a
Medical Office Assis-
tant! No Experience
needed! Job Training
& Local Placement
assistance. HS
Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)374-7294

MEDICAL
COLLECTIONS/
ADMINISTRATIVE
ASSISTANT
TMC, A company
committed to service
excellence, has a full
time position
available for a
Medical Collections
Administrative
Assistant at our
Homosassa/Sugarmill
location.
Candidate should
have 1 + yrs medical
collections experi-
ence. Medicare bill-
ing, electronic, paper
claims processing
and DDE a plus.
Please apply online
at
www.therapymgmt.co
m

NOW HIRING

RN's
All Units, with Hospital
Experience
Apply on Line: www.
nurse-temps.corn
(352) 344-9828

P/T MEDICAL
ASSISTANT

Experience needed.
Please send resume
to P.O. Box 3087
Homosassa Springs,
Florida 34447

Senior HR
Representative
TMC, a company
committed to service
excellence, is seek-
ing an experienced
Senior HR Represent-
ative for a FT position
located in
Homosassa, FL. 3+
years of related HR
exp, HR certification
preferred. Must be
team player, results
oriented. ADP and
OneNote experience
preferred Competi-
tive salary, excellent
benefits and 401K.
Please apply online
at www.therapymgmt
.corn


CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)




CUST. SERVICE
REP/or 220 Agent

Needed for busy
Insurance office.
Apply in person
9am-12N
SHELDON PALMES
INSURANCE
8469 W Grover Cleve-
land, Homosassa




LOLLYGAGGERS
Sports Pub & Grill
Now Hirlng
ALL POSITIONS
Experience Req'd
Apply within
744 SE US HWy 19
(next to Mr B's
carwash) Cry RIv.

SERVERS
Must be 18 or older.
Apply Fisherman's
Restaurant
12311 E Gulf to Lake
(352) 637-5888




AC SALES
Will train right person,
easy six figure income
Must have val. fl. DL,
Barb 352-726-1002

PROFESSIONAL
PEST CONTROL
EXP. SALES TECHS
Must have proven in
home Sales Record
Company Veh.
Hourly Pay
Commission
Benefits
APPLY 5882 Hwv 200




DRIVERS
Hometime Choices:
Express lanes
Weekly, 7/ON-7/OFF,
14/ON-7/OFF. WEEKLY,
Full and Part time. Dry
and Refrigerated, New
Trucks! CDL-A, 3 months
recent experience re-
quired. Top Benefits!
(800)414-9569
www.drivekniaht.com
DRIVERS: RUN
5 STATES REGIONAL!
Get Home Weekends,
earn up to 39cent mile,
1 yr OTR Flatbed Exp.
required. SUNBELT
TRANSPORT, LLC
800-572-5489 X 227
LOCAL TOWER
SERVICE CO.
Looking for
Individual capable of
ascending & servic-
Ing tall broadcasting
towers. (will train)
Electronlc,electrical
Travel required
throughout the
Southeast.
Company Vehicle,
fuel, hotel provided
for travel. Good
Pay,Health
Benefilts,Per Diem.
Vacation / Bonuses!
Background Check.
NEED CLEAN FL
DRIVER'S LICENSE!
Apply In person at:
Hillghts Inc.
4177 N. Citrus Ave.
Crystal River, FI
(352) 564-8830
rsobol@
hlllahtslnc.com
r-7- - E
r SERVICE 1
I PLUMBERS I
I I
I Must have driver's
llcense352-621-0671
&-----.1








TOOLMAKER
NEED PANTOGRAPH
EXP. FORM GRINDER,
A/C SHOP, BENEFITS,
TURBINE BROACH CO.
(352) 795-1163




$$$$$$$
Money is available!
We are seeking
individuals to
manage rack and
store delivery of the
Citrus County
Chronicle
and other
publications.
Must be at least 18
years of age and
possess a valid
driver's license and
insurance. Routes
are 7 days a week,
early morning hours.
Earning potential is
unlimited Email
kstewart@chronicle
online.corn or bring
resume to 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd. in
Crystal River.


25 Driver Trainees
Needed!
Learn to drive for
TMCTransportation
Earn $750 per week!
No experience
needed! local CDL
Training! Job ready in
3 weeks!
(888)368-1964


APPOINTMENT
SETTERS NEEDED
Seniors Welcome
No nights, No wknds.
Apply at
6421 W. Homosassa
Trail, Homosassa FI


CASA IS HIRING

Advocate for a
full time position
11 pm to 7 am,
Mon through Fri.
CASA is smoke free
work place. Apply at
outreach at 1100
Turner Camp Rd.
Inverness, Fl. 34453


DRIVER
$0 TUITION
CDL(A) Training &
JOB! Top Industry Pay,
Quality Training, Sta-
bility & Miles! *Short
employment com-
mitment required.
(800)326-2778
www. JoinCRST.com


Freight Up
= More $ 2 Mos.
CDL Class A
Driving Exp
(877)258-8782
www. melton
truck.com/drive


Part time
Delivery Position

Mon. Thurs. 8:30-3p
Approximate
Must have clean
Florida Driver. Lic.
GOLDEN X PLUMBING
(352) 726-9349

PRE SCHOOL
TEACHER
experience req'd
(352) 795-6890





#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)





AIRLINES ARE HIRING -
Train for hands on
Aviation Maintenance
Career. FAA approved
program.
Financial aid if qualified
Housing Available.
CALL Aviation Institute
Of Maintenance.
(866)314-3769





"Can you Dig It?"
Heavy Equipment
School, 3 wk training
program. Backhoes,
Bulldozers, Trackhoes.
Local Job placement
asset. Start digging
dirt Now.
(877)994-9904

#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetfvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)




TAY10BCOLLEGE


NE fW


2 WEEK
PREP COURSES!
*ALF ADMINISTRATOR
$300.
*EKG TECH $475.
NURSING ASSET. $475.
*PHLEBOTOMY $475.

tavlorcolleae.edu
(352) 245-4119






I 2012 CLASSES I
I ooBARBERI
I *COSMETOLOGY I
*FACIAL
R-FULL SPECIALTY
TRAINING
i -MANICURE/Nall Ext
'eMASSAGE THERAPY

BENE'S
International I
School of Beauty I
NEW PORT RICHEY
/SPRING HILL
727-848-8415
352-263-2744
L_____l


Attend College
Online from Home
*Medical, *Business,
*Paralegal,
*Accounting,
*Criminal Justice. Job
placement assis-
tance. Computer
available. Financial
Aid if qualified.
SCHEV certified. Call
(877)206-5165
www.CenturaOnline
.com


8 MOBILE HOMES
12 AC., Good Income
Lots of Possibilities
(352) 212-6182




"HUGE OPPORTUNITY"
NEW CO. COMING
TO THE AREA, LOOK-
ING FOR (3) PROFES-
SIONAL SALES PEO-
PLE W/MANAGEMENT
SKILLS... SIX FIGURE
INCOME CALL:
(302)497-0330 LV MSG




2 Old English brass
Carriage Lamps
Lamps $200.
(352) 563-2555
Early 1900's
solid wood Amoire &
vanity $375 ea.
(352) 476-0563




10 Different U.S.
Government sealed,
Proof sets, all $100.
(352)476-6885
SAT.. MARCH 17
SPORTS MEMORABILIA
AUCTION
Prev: 11 -Auction 1PM
Lifelong Collection of
signed caps, balls, bats,
photos, programs +
thousands of cards
DudleysAuctlon.com
4000 S. Fla. Ave.
(US 41-S) Inverness
(352) 637-9588
AB1667-AU2246
12% BP-2% ca.disc


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966


Days/Deadlines

........................1 PM, Daily
........................3 PM, Friday
........................4 PM, Friday
........................4 PM, Friday
rsday............ 11 AM, Tuesday
........................2 PM, Monday

ay..................4 PM, Tuesday
Wednesday.......4 PM, Friday





194287536
289463751
536718942
471529683
315876429
862941375

947352 168


CHAIRS VERY OLD and
sturdy dark wood in nice
condition. $25.each Pine
Ridge 352-270-3909
COMPUTER DESK
Computer desk pull out
keyboard drawer. $25.00
352-628-7619
COMPUTER DESKS (4)
Formica Top 3ftx24in with
2 Drawer File Cabinet
Attached $25 each
727-463-4411
COMPUTER OR DESK
CHAIR Smaller, swivel
with arm rests, very good
condition $20 Can email
photo 352-726-9983
Computer table
w/draws, 2 bkcases
6ft x 28 in,
1 bkcase 3ftx30in,
2 drawer filing cab,
bone/whiteS145 all
(352) 746-6456
DESK CHARS Commer-
cial PreOwned Fabric
Covered and Adjustable
$45 727-463-4411
LATERAL FILE CABINET
3 Drawer Commercial
Metal PreOwned
40"x36"x18" $65
727-46-4411
OFFICE CHAIR Solid oak
antique on casters Nice
Condition. Own a piece of
history! $100.
352-270-3909
PREOWNED DESK
CHAIRS (4) Commercial
Dark Gray Fabric $25
each 727-463-4411
Professional Office
partitions, new condi-
tion w/hardware.
Enough for 4 offices
$300 obo
(352) 563-1033




2 BIG AUCTIONS
THIS WEEK
-THURS. March 15
Estate Auction
Prev:12-Auctlon 3-Full!
Riding yard machine,
fresh hl-end estate furn.,
frig., DW, 30" flat screen,
Viking Surger, tools &
hshid galore!
SSAT.. March 17
SPORTS MEM.
AUCTIONw/YANKEES
Prev: 11 Auction 1 pm
HUGE coil. of signed
memor. Incl. Marino,
Roily Fingers, Yogi
Berra+++ 1000's of
sports cars sold by the
piles Incl. 1950's to now
DudleysAuctlon.com
4000 S. Fla. Ave.
(US 41-S) Inverness
(352) 637-9588
AB1667-AU2246
12% BP-2% ca.disc


You can earn at least $800 per month
delivering the


Independent contractors delivering the Citrus County
Chronicle can earn as much as $1,000 a month
working only 3-4 early morning hours per day. The
Chronicle is a permanent part of Citrus County with
an excellent reputation. To find out more, call
and speak to one of our district managers or leave
your name and phone number and we will get right
back with you!


BROAN RANGE HOOD
WHITE CLEAN 25.00
SHARP MICROWAVE
BLACK 25.00
352-419-4429
DISHWASHER White
Kitchenaid Looks nice
Works good $50.You
load & haul. Pine Ridge
352-270-3909
GE ELECT. RANGE
COIL BURNERS, LIKE
NEW $250 634-2004
HOTPOINT DRYER
white looks good works
great 100.00 dennis
352-503-7365
Kenmore Dryer
White $129. Hotpoint
electric stove, nice
cond $149.
(352) 382-1617
Kenmore refrigerator,
2 door, good cond.,
$100 Water cooler, $10
(352) 220-1692
Kenmore Washer
Like New
$350
386-547-8855
Maytag Hvy duty
natural gas dryer
exc cond $150
(352) 270-8215
REFRIGERATOR GEN-
ERAL ELECTRIC TOP
FREEZER ALMOND
352-419-4429
REFRIGERATOR
KENMORE 18 CU FT,
WHITE,5 YEARS OLD,
GREAT CONDITION
$275 634-2004
REFRIGERATOR
WHITE FRIGIDAIRE
TOP FREEZER $100.00
352-419-4429
Refrigerator, Amana
bone,2 door
good condition.$75
Stove, Kennmore ,bone
good condition $75
352-503-7423
Side by Side
Kitchenaid Refrigerator
& Washer & Dryer
$600 for All
Like New 746-1867
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR, washers
dryers,FREE pick up
352-564-8179
WANTED DEAD
OR ALIVE
Washers & Dryers
(352) 209-5135
WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 Each. Reliable,
like new, excellent
condition,clean. Can de-
liver 352 263-7398



2 DRAWER FILE CABI-
NET PreOwned Com-
mercial Metal Lateral
28"x30"x18" Graphite
Color $45 727-463-4411


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BANDSAW Craftsman 12
inch band saw $ 75.00
352 726 9708
DIA PLATE TOOLBOX
Mopar working locks
w/key 5'X20X12
fits small trk $50
249-6293
GENERATOR
POWERMATE 5HP
BRIGGS 110VOLT GAS
RAN WHEN PUT UP
100.00 464 0316



27" MAGNAVOX COLOR
TV Works Like New Dig-
ital Cable Ready Seldom
Used. $75 727-4634411
SANYO 26" COLOR TV
Older Model Digital Cable
Ready Works Like New
$75 727-463-4411
SONY T V
63inch Floor Model
Projection Screen
exc. cond. $275.00
(352) 746-6456




DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
DIGITAL PICTURE
FRAME 7 Inch with re-
mote and SD Photo card.
Like new $35 Can email
photo 352 726 9983



DECOR CLAY URN
18"WX25"H NICE FOR
PATIO OR FRONT EN-
TRANCE DECOR $25
634-2004
GAS GRILL Char Broil
All accessories. Propane
tank and grill cover
included. $50 OBO
484-357-7150
PORCH ROCKERS set
of 2 white porch rock-
ers similar to the style
at Cracker Barrel res-
taurants. Like new con-
dition. $40 each or of-
fer. 1-352-503-6548



2 WOOD CHAIRS
W/UPHOLSTERED
SEATS, GOOD REFIN-
ISH PROJECTOLD
$20EACH 634-2004
36" SQUARE TABLE
PreOwned Rugged Gray
Formica Top Sturdy Steel
Frame $65 727463-4411
ASHLEY
COUCH,LOVESEAT,
OTTOMAN tan leather
couch with matching
loveseat and ottoman
$450.00 352-726-9964
BROYHILL FLORAL
COUCH very
good-excellent condition
asking $85.00
352-527-1399
BUNK BED blue metal
frame twin size with mat-
tresses $75 Walter @
352-364-2583
CHAIR Rose color wing
back chair-NEW-$75
Phone number
352-249-9111





AT1




COMFORTS OF
HOME
USED FURNITURE
www. cam-
fortsofhomeused
furniture.com. 795-0121



Your World

9=ewt "e &,et


Ci loicILE


CHERYWOOD FRAME
CHAIRS (2)Fabric Up-
holstery with Arms
PreOwned $35 each
727-7874411
COMFY FLORAL SOFA
VERY CLEAN, VERY
COMFY,OLD FLORAL
PRINT $50 634-2004
Couch
1/2 circle, tan new $500
4 kit chairs blk wrought
iron $120. Glass top
table $120. obo
(646) 963-5829
Couch, Loveseat, chair
and table set + recliner
florida style, good cond.
$325.
(352) 344-5822
DINING TABLE GLOSS
BLACK PEDESTAL
42"ROUND
NO CHAIRS, $50
352-634-2004
DOUBLE HEADBOARD
BRASS LOOK
HEADBOARD, $40
634-2004
DRESSER AND CHEST
$25 each Walter @
352-364-2583
FOLDING BANQUET
TABLES (3) 6 Foot Long
Wood Grain Tops
PreOwned $35 each
727-463-4411
FREE STANDING
CHERRYWOOD BOOK-
CASE 3 Shelves
48"x36"x12" PreOwned
$65 727-787-4411
KING SIZE BED King
size bed Frame, mat-
tress, box springs, black
tubing head board.
$150.00 352-795-5491
Large Glass top dining
rm table w/ 6 chairs
$600 obo
3 pc. Entertainment
Center $200
(352) 503-7379
MATTRESS AND BOX
SPRING, DOUBLE,
INNERSPRING,WITH
FRAME,CLEAN $50
634-2004
MATTRESS Sealy King
Size Not pillow top.
$75.00 Excellent condi-
tion 352-637-5331 or
352-476-5603
Memory Foam Mattress
for Sale, King Size
$475.
Call Walter 527-3552
MICROWAVE CART
White wood,wheels,one
door loose on bottom.
$30 352-344-3472
MOVING SALE
White TV cab $20.
Exc Roll top desk $150
Exc desk chair blk $25.
Ladies roll top desk
$100.2 Recliners multi-
color $100 eas.maple
deacon bench $75.
Hutch base maple$50.
good stuff352-382-4912
PEDESTAL TABLE
36"DIA. 6 SIDED TOP,
NICE GAME TABLE OR
REFINISH PROJECT.
$40 634-2004
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
352-628-0808
ROCKER RECLINER
Catnapper, tan in good
condition. $50 Can email
photo 352 726 9983
ROUND TABLE 36" Like
New Rugged Yellow
Formica Top Sturdy Steel
Pedestal $65
7274634411
Sofa & Love Seat
$350.
Red Mahogany end
tables & coffee table
$200.
(352) 228-1325
SOFA & LOVE SEAT
greenish Blue $150
Dinette set 4 swivel
chairs light wood
octagon shape 5'x3,5'
includes 18" leaf$150
352-344-8652
STACKABLE CHAIRS (4)
with Black Metal Framed
Arms Fabrc Covered
Your Choice of Color $10
each 7274634411
STACKABLE CHAIRS (4)
with Black Metal Framed
Arms Fabric Covered
Your Choice of Color $10
each 7274634411
THOMASVILLE TABLE
Beautiful end tables.
Pristine condition! 99.00
each 352-726-9132
TRUNDLE BED
PAUL'S FURNITURE
628-2306 Homosassa
paulsfurnitureonline.com


TWIN LOFT BED SYS-
TEM twin loft bed with at-
tached vertical dresser
$100 firm 697-3222
Twin Size Sofa Bed
Asking $200
3 Glass Top Living Room
Tables $150.
(352) 503-7379



(2) STACKABLE CHAIRS
PreOwned Fabric Cov-
ered Commercial Sturdy
Metl Frame with Arms 2
for $35 727-463-4411
CHICKEN
MANURE/FERTILIZER
Time to FERTILIZE!! (25
avail)201b bag, $4.00
352-563-1519
Murray riding mower
40" cut, good cond.,
$350 or best offer.
(352) 637-4718



5' HOLLY TREES Ever-
green. delivery available
$50. call 352-257-3870
9' LITTLE GEM MAGNO-
LIA TREES Evergreen
and great price $75.
Delivery available.
352-257-3870





& Yard..Sat 7am?
Citrus Hills
2395 N. Annnapolis Av
1st hse on So. of 486
(352) 527-2085
ANNUAL CHURCH
Rummage Sale
Fri Sat 9am to 3pm
A lot of everything
First Christian Church of
Chassahowitza
11275 S. River Dr.

YARD SALE
BEVERLY HILLS
72 Regina Blvd HUGE
YARD SALE
Guitars,Tools,
DVDs,Glassware, Video
Games, and so much
more. Fr,Sat,Sun

MOVIt1G
SALE
Beverly Hills
Hsehld, Furniture
Everything must go by
3/27 (352) 746-1151

YARDISALR
CITRUS SPRINGS
Sat only 8 to 2
sml utility trailer, air
compressor, truck tpr,
odds & ends
2061 W. Doral Ct.
CRYSTAL OAKS
Huge Yard/Bake
Sale
Sat 7:30-12:30
Maps at clubhouse
CRYSTAL RIVER
FOR MISSIONS TRIP
Sat. 17th, 8am, 5360 N.
Tumblewood Drive

YA RDSALE
CRYSTAL RIVER
UPSCALE SALE
Friday. & Sat 8a -3p
Collectible Glass,
furniture, jewelry some
antiques, coins etc,
Airport Storage Units,
80 & 81, behind Olive
Tree Restaurant Hwy 19
FLORAL CITY
6401 S Kik Point
Friday and Saturday
March 16 &17.8 a to 2 p.
96 HD fat boy, boats and
a vast assortment of
household furnishings.
Something for
everyone. Follow signs
from Moonrise.




Hernando
Fri Sat 8:30 2p Lots of
stuff. 2100 N. Page Av
HERNANDO
Friday. & Sat. 8a-4p
Antique tables & toys.
Rolltop desk, dbl. bed,
upscale accessories
1971 Cloverdale Terr.
(352) 341-1709


CRYSTAL RIVER
Fri Sat 8a-3p
3162 Amphibian Pt.

HERNANDO
THE NEW CHURCH
WITHOUT WALLS
Fri. 16, Sat. 17, 9-4p
HUGE SALE,
MANY ITEMS
Held at Sunshine
Llquldators, 3255 N.
Carl G. Rose Hwy.

HOMOSASSA
Estate Sat/Sun 10-4
7340 S Greengate Pt
Quality items, watch
parts, craftsman tools,
riding mower, household
HOMOSASSA
Sat. 8am-1pm Wood
chipper, treadmill, more
6210 S. Gross Ave.

HOMOSASSA
Thurs 15 thru Sat.17
NEIGHBORHOOD *
SALE
2171 Melanie Drive

INVERNESS
Fri & Sat. 8a-2p Saddle,
nintendo, clothes, toys,
hsehold items & ETC.
4383 S. William Ave.
INVERNESS
Fri. & Sat. 9am-5pm
Depression glass,
marble knives, etc.
S. 581, Bow N Arrow
Loop, 4700 & 4702
INVERNESS
Garage sale, Sat. 3/17
8a-3p 8331 E. Fairway
Loop, Inverness
Golf & CC
INVERNESS
HUGE SALE Thurs. March
15th to Sat. 17th,
8am-5pm Furn., TV's,
freezer, video games,
drum set, hshold, lots
more stuff! 2245 W.
Main St., (Behind
Inverness Car Wash)


CLASSIFIED



INVERNESS
Fri Sat 8a-4p tools,
& too much to list
1370 Reed Terr


Oak Village SMW's
Fri Sat 9a-2p..twin
bedrm set. TV's, lovely
dining room table &
2 china cabs. roll top
desk, unusual hand
made chess set, ent
centers & lots of kit &
garage items & much
more, the contents of a
beautiful home 25
Candytuft Ct(off 98)
PINE RIDGE
Fri Sat 8A./4P.
collectibles, vintage
baby cradle, night
stand, wicker table,
tools, much morell!
4134 N.Candlewood Dr.

MOVI4G0
SALE
SUGARMILL WOODS
Fri Sat 9-3p
5 Eugenia Ct W.
Homosassa
SUGARMILL
WOODS
HOMOSASSA
207 Linder Dr Moving
Sale Sat only! Furniture,
freezer, generator,
household items. 9 2.


Sugarmill Woods
Sat 8am Sun 11am
Everything in this home
is in like new condition
& priced to sale !!!
36 Byrsonima Ct. S.
Homosassa



Sugarmill Woods
Estate Sale Sat. & Sun.
8-5, 198 PINE STREET


Chronicle

Classifieds

In Print

& Online


2 Chain Saws
Craftman &
Remmington $20 for
both(352) 628-1723
2 Ladders
18' alum extention $20.
8' fiberglass HUsky step
ladder $50.
(352) 382-4912
5 person hot tub, you
move, $400.
Old Franklin heat stove,
good cond., $325.
(352) 586-9498
2010 Kenmore Elite
water filter, used 6 mos.
New $600 sell $400 obo
cell (917) 721-1287
401-447-9222

2nd Hand Store
Open Tues-Sat 9a-5p
Furn, Appliances, tools,
clothing, misc. Items,
@ N. Maynard & Hwy 44
1/4 ml E. of Stokes FLea
AIR RIFLE Daisy
Multi-Pump air rifle with
scope.Used vey little. $50
352-628-3418
ARMSTRONG COM-
MERCIAL VINYL TILE
45 Square Foot per Box
White/Multi Color $25
each 727-787-4411
CHANDELIER FIVE
LIGHT, BRONZE
METAL, UMBER COL-
ORED GLASS, $90
727.857.6583

COLEMAN GENERATOR
6250 watt, 2 yrs old, like
new $$500 4'x8' High
Wall Trailer $250
all prices firm
(352) 628-6515
DEEP DEEP WHEEL-
BARROW TRUE TEM-
PER HARDLY USED
ONLY 50.00 David
352 464 0316


h44


ALL EXTERIOR
ALUMINUM
6" Seamless Gutters
Lic & Ins 352-621-0881
ROB SCREENING
Repairs Rescreen, Front
Entries, Garage, Sliders
Free Est. 352-835-2020
SUBURBAN IND. INC.
Screen rms, Rescreens,
Siding, airports, rf.overs
wood decks, Fla. rooms
windows, garage scrns.
628-0562 (CBC1257141)



SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Washer &
Dryers, Free Pick Up
352-564-8179



Blind Factory
We custom make all
types. Best prices any-
where! Hwy 44 & CR
491. (352) 746-1998




* THIS OUT!
PHIL'S MOBILE MARINE
Repairs & Consignment
30 yrs Cert. Best Prices
& Guar 352-220-9435



ROGERS Construction
All Construction
sm jobs Free Est (352)
637-4373 CRC1326872


S1.11 I ldlI I II St.
L, Lii,


Classifieds


SHADY VIEW CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
Repairs. 352 613-2518




AFFORDABLE
COMPUTER SERV.
(352) 341-4150
DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469



Bianchi Concrete
inc.com ins.lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-
Sidewalks. Pool deck
repair/stain 257-0078
CURB APPEAL/ Lic
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River rock
reseals & repairs. 352
364-2120/410-7383
FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, staining &
Garage Firs. Recession
Prices! 352-527-1097
ROB'S MASONRY
& CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs Tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554



All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing,Hauling,
Site Prep, Driveways.
Lic. & Ins. 352- 795-5755



COUNTYWIDE DRY-
WALL 25 years exp.
For all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Lic/ins. 352-302-6838


#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Plasma TV installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
ANNIE'S ELECTRIC
Husband & Wife
Team.(352) 341-5952
EC-13002696
BRIGHT ELECTRICAL
Res./Comm. Lic & Ins.
$50.hr. EC0001303
352-302-2366
Thomas Electric LLC
Generator maint &
repair. Guardian
Homestandby, &
Centurion. Cert. Tech.
Briggs Stratton 352-
621-1248 #ER00015377




A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002
BOB BROWN'S
Fence & Landscaping
352-795-0188/220-3194
ROCKY'S FENCING
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
k 352 422-7279 *k



ALL EXTERIOR
ALUMINUM
6" Seamless Gutters
Lic & Ins 352-621-0881
ALUMINUM
STRUCTURES
5" & 6" Seamless Gutters
Free Estimates, Lic &
Ins. (352) 563-2977




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Plasma TV installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777


Andrew Joehl
Handyman.
Gen/Maint/Repairs
Pressure cleaning.
Lawns/Gutters. No job
too small!Reli able ,ins.
0256271 352-465-9201

ABC Painting & Handy
man All your needs at
recession prices Dale
352-586-8129
Affordable Handyman
e FAST
e AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handyman
V FAST
V AFFORDABLE
eV RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handyman
FAST
AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
k 352-257-9508 k
Affordable Handyman
V FAST
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *t






HOME CARE
Lawn & Handyman
Services. Sprinkler
Repair 352-212-4935
Remodeling, Additions,
Doors, Windows, Tile
work. Lic.#CRC1330081
Free Est. (352)949-2292


V THIS OUT!
AC & HEAT PUMPS
FREE Estimate & 2nd
Opinion, 10 yr. warr.
on ALL Parts, Great
prices, ALL the time.
352-400-4945
Lic #CAC027361




MAID TO ORDER
House Cleaning *
(352) 586-9125
Have Vacum Will Travel



HOUSE SITTER
For SMW, Will watch
your home for Summer
Frank (352) 382-3878




The Tile Man
Bathroom remodel
Specializing in
handicap. Lic/Ins.
#2441. 352-634-1584



#1 BOBCAT FOR HIRE
Light land clearing, site
work, grading, hauling.
NO JOB TOO SMALL!!!
Lic. & Ins. 352-400-0528
All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing,HaulingSite
Prep, Driveways Lic/Ins
352-795-5755
TRACTOR WORK
Sm Job Specialist
$30 + $30 per hr
352-270-6800


CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, curbing,
flocrete. River rock
reseals & repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
RIVENBARK LAWN &
LANDSCAPE.
Best Prices in town for
all your lawn care
needs!! (352) 464-3566



BEVERLY HILLS
most yards $20.
Quick dependable,
352-422-5978
GOT LEAVES?
Ask about leaf vac
system, Free est.
Winter Clean up +
Hauling 352 344-9273
cell 352-201-9371
GRASS SEEDS! GRASS
SEEDS! GRASS SEEDS!
American Farm & Feed
352-795-6013
HALLOCK & SON
LAWN CARE ALL Your
lawn care needs. Detailed
Work. 400-1197, Lic/Ins.
HOME CARE
Lawn & Handyman
Services. Sprinkler
Repair 352-212-4935
JUSTIN LAWN CARE
Fast and Affordable.
and Friendly, Licensed.
(352) 476-3985
LAWN CARE 'N" More
Spring Clean up, beds,
haul, brush leaves
(352) 726-9570



AT YOUR HOME
Mower, Parts Service &
Repair.Visit our store@
1332 SE Hwy 19
352-220-4244


A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs, trash,
lawn maint. furn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
ALL OF CITRUS
CLEAN UPS CLEAN OUTS
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790



Chris Satchell Painting
ASAP
30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
A-I George Swedlige
Painting/press cleaning
Int/Ext. texture/drywall
repair (352) 794-0400
ABC Painting LLC
All your painting needs
@ recession prices. Call
Dale 352-586-8129
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998



Tim Herndon Plumbing
$10. off w/this ad
10 yrs serving Citrus Co
lic/insCFC1428395
(352) 201-8237



CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
ABC Press. Cleaning.
All your cleaning needs
at recession prices.
Free Est Dale 586-8129
JOHN GRAY
w*DRIVEWAYS $55.
*HOUSE $75/POOL $85
(352) 270-8310


Pic PICARD'S Pressure
Cleaning & Painting
352-341-3300




Remodeling, kitchens
baths, ceramic tile &
tops. Decks, Garages
Handyman Services 40
Yrs Exp. crc058140
344-3536; 563-9768




Attention Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers are
required by state law
to include their state
license number in all
advertisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious that
you may be contact-
ing an unlicensed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For questions
about business
licensing, please call
your city or county gov-
ernment offices.






Now $80 Bahia Pallets
U-Pick Up. Special
Spring Pricing. Call
Now!! 352-400-2221


HOME CARE
Lawn & Handyman
Services. Sprinkler
Repair 352-212-4935




A Cutting Edge
Tile Jobs Showers.
Firs .Safety Bars. ETC
352-422-2019
Lic. #2713, Insured.




A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest Rates
Free est.(352)860-1452

DAVID'S
TREE SERVICE
(352) 302-5641

All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
DOUBLE J Tree Serv.
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
R WRIGHT Tree Service
Tree removal & trimming.
Ins. & Lic.# 0256879
352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree Serv
Trim, Shape & Remove
Lic/Ins Free Est.
352-628-2825
Sharp Cut Tree Serv.
LET me cut your Tree
not YOUR WALLET.
Full Tree Service
Alicia (352) 942-0455




344-2556, Richard
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


SATURDAY, MARCH 17, 2012 C-L-L


3-17 LaughingStock International Inc, Dist by Universal UClick, 2012

"That's fine!"





TRACTOR WORK

$30 + $30/hr Mowing, Grading,

Lite Loader, Tree Work,

Cleanup, and Wood Fences

Licensed and Insured


352-270-6800


HowMo


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(352)563m5966


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C12 SATURDAY, MARCH 17, 2012


[WORDY GURD......AN3


W BR Y TRICKY RICKY KANE
1. St. Pat's Day color viewed (1) Every answer is a rhyming
D ZEZIZ ~ pair of words (like FAT CAT
and DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
2. Wipe motes off a type of statue (1) they will fit in the letter
Squares. The number after the
definition tells you how many
3. Social error made by a baby cow (1) syllables in each word.

I 1 2012 UFS, Dist. by Univ. Ucick for UFS
4. Escorted actress Shields (1)


5. Catholic father wrinkled (1)


6. Crush and deform a stiff bracelet (2)


7. Afternoon sleeper's ensnarers (2)


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352-64-208 r 35-726035


AQUARIUM 20 gallon
aquarium, only $12.00
Call 746-1017
DELUXE JUMPER $30
and baby bounce musical
$25 bouncer bear $15
Excellent condition
352-777-1256
DVD Home Theater
Sound System
6 speakers
$150
(812) 629-6538
Easy Pop up
12x 12 tent,
waterproof,
never used, $215
(352) 322-6456
FOLD -A -CART
HOLDS 6 CU.FT. FOLDS
FLAT 4 STORAGE.
EXCEL CON $75
727.857.6583
Foot Bath plus
massager-heated, like
new $15. in box
Microsoft Scanner, new
w/PS & CD $10.
New white golf shoes
size 10 new $30.
(352) 382-3357
HAYWARD POWER
Flow IX Pump 3/4 hp
w/basket filter Hay-
ward Star clear + filter-
ing system w/2 heppa
filters incls 20" hose
$500 obo352) 489-2823
Home Made Quilt Top
$25.
HD Whirlpool Dryer
$175
(352) 795-7254
HONDA CRF 100
Dirt Bike
excellent condition
$900
(352) 400-1251

must sell!
Maytag washer and dryer
$400 obo, Kirby Vacuum
with attatchments $400
obo, 2 rockers $30, 2
dressers $25 ea, 2 TVs
32" and 19"/DVD/VHS
352-293-7059
New Aluminum
Storage Shed 8 x 10
one door & window
includes tie downs
$1,500
(989) 965-1915
NEW EYEGLASS
FRAMES FROM OP-
TOMETRIST rectangular,
gray, $20 860-2475
NIKON
D40, DSLR Camera
used,18 to 55 lens
battery & charger
$350 excel.Camera
(352) 621-6606
PARROTLETS Young
male and female 75.00
each very pretty call
637-6967 if no answer
leave message
playstaton;Spiderman2,&memor
card
352-344-3472 also
P.Station2:Socome3&moto-
coss mania.&5 each
Portable
Generator
5550 Watts, 4 outlets
$500
(812) 629-6538
PVC PATIO TABLE
w/4 chairs & 2 gliders
$300.
Hitachi 50" projection
color TV $250.
(352) 726-2278
REPTILE TANK 24 X 24
reptile tank with screen
top and heater. $30.00
Call 746-1017
RIDING BOOTS
w/spurs $15.
(352) 382-3357
Counter-Top Jewelry
box w/ 2 drawers & mir-
ror. Store rings, neck-
lace, pins & misc. jew-
elry (352) 382-3357
ROTISSERIE SUNBEAM
$55 SET TIMER-SHUTS
OFF AUTOMATICALLY
CAN E-MAIL PHOTO
419-5981
Seats for Town &
Country Van
captain seat $30.
Bench Seat $45,
Gray excel cond.
(352) 344-4192
Tony Little Gazelle
hvy duty 350# ,imot 5
DVD's $125.
Circle Glide never used
$100 workout DVD
(352) 795-0622


118" x 79" VALANCE,
TRACK, ALL hARD-
WARD, EXCEL CON.
$75 727.857.6583
WALL PAPER $30 NEW
3 DOUBLE ROLLS
PREPASTED VINYL 165
SQ FT CAN E-MAIL
PHOTO 419-5981
WOOD CHIPS U HAUL
AS MUCH AS YOU CAN
GET INTO YOUR PICK
UP ONLY 20.00
464 0316
WOOD FLOORING BY
BRUCE, Planks 3"x3/8"x
random Med Oak 25 sq ft
NEW in box $59 email pic
352-382-3650
Wrought iron patio
furniture, 8pc., $300 for
all. Elec. Guitar & amp,
$125 for both.
(352) 586-9498



RESTAURANT EQUIP.
6 burner stove, 6' deli
case, 3 dr cooler, 3' flat
gas grill, 30 uphols.
dining chairs, bar stools
many table tops &
bases (352) 447-5655
True Model T5SU-27-8
Sandwich and Salad
Refrigerator
NSF approved 8 trays
2772" Wide, 30" H, 37"
High at sub bar, Like
New 7 years old, 100%
complete and working
no rust no corrosion
$700 obo
Stainless Steel Table 36"
W, 23" p 36" H, 2 shelves
$200 .(352) 344-4408



BEDSIDE COMMODE &
ALUMINUM FOLD UP
WALKER ONLY 20.00
EACH 464 0316
Transport Wheel Chair
Nearly new $75.
(352) 795-5570
WANTED TO BUY
AC/DC Portable
Concentrator
with battery
(352) 621-5498



1 Roll mixed dates
Indian head cents.
All $100 352-476-6885
3 Morgan Silver Dollars
nice condition, $100
352-476-6885
3 U.S. Peace Dollars
nice condition $100
352-476-6885
25-Rolls mixed date
Lincoln wheat cents
All $50.352-476-6885
BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We Also
Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676










ACOUSTIC GUITAR
"NEW" IN BOX,
W/GROVERS,SOLID
SPRUCE TOP,$90
352-601-6625
BABY GRAND
Antique Piano
needs tune-up
$800 or best offer
(352) 489-9266




DRAPES LIGHT NEU-
TRAL 5'-1WAY DRAW
FOR SLIDING DOOR,
6'SPLIT DRAW, $40 SET
634-2004
KITCHEN VALANCES
5-BLACK/BEIGE CHECK
8"X60"JCP HOME
$20 FOR THE SET
634-2004
MATTRESS & BOX
SPRING SET Queen
size mattress & box
spring set. Like new. $40
OBO 484-357-7150


MATTRESS Sealy King
Not a pillow top. Excellent
$75.00
352-637-5331 or
352-476-5603
PINCH PLEAT SHEERS
84"L X 168"W FOR TRI-
PLE DOOR/WINDOW
PEACH,SPLIT CENTER
$60 634-2004




ELECTRIC TREADMILL
FOLDS UP FOR EASY
STORAGE ALL ELEC-
TRONICS ONLY 100.00
464 0316
TREADMILL Lifestrider,
variable speed, variable
height, very good condi-
tion. $65 Can email
photo. 352 726 9983




AMMO 5.56/223 Wolf
performance 75gr hp,
multi purpose tactical.
200 rounds/10 boxes
$65. cell 352-586-4022
CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pond,
ATVtrails $165Kobo
352 795-2027/ 634-4745
CLUB CAR
'06 $1,500,
with charger
352-344-8516
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
DESANTIS 1911 BELT
HOLSTER Brand new,
made for CCW. Leather
with thumb break. $75
860-2475
FED .357 MAG JHP
SELF-DEFENSE AMMO
1 box $65. Hernando.
864-283-5797
FOOTBALL TABLE
Foosball table 24x48
$50.00 352-628-7619
Full Set Men's &
Women's Golf Clubs
w/ shoes, bags, Also
Third set of clubs & bag
All for $125. obo
(989) 965-1915
Ladies Clubs
Irons & 4 woods, putter
& excellent bag.$85.
(352) 746-7047
OCALA GOLF
CART SUPER CENTER
Sell, buy, Trade, Service
Sale on Trojan Batteries
352-291-7626
ONE NEW BOX OF 45
ACP FMJ $20, Hernando
1-864-283-5797
Ping Golf Clubs
comply set of irons,
putter & chipper
woods # 1,3,5,7 metal
driver 10.5 bag, glove
pull golf cart $150.
(352) 563-2555
POOL TABLE
SMALL $50.
fold up Ping-Pong
Table $75.
(352) 527-1747
SAT.. MARCH 17
SPORTS MEMORABILIA
AUCTION
Prev: 11-Auction IPM
Lifelong Collection of
signed caps, balls, bats,
photos, programs +
thousands of cards
DudleysAuction.com
4000 S. Fla. Ave.
(US 41-S) Inverness
(352) 637-9588
AB1667-AU2246
12% BP-2% ca.disc

SWE BUY GUNS
On Site Gun Smithing
(352) 726-5238




20 ft Enclosed
Trailer 2006
like new, front & rear
ramps, plywood fin-
ished interior $6500
352-634-4547
4x8 utility trailer
$400.
(352) 746-7357


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


EZ PULL TRAILERS,
New & Used

Utility & Enclosed
BUY, SELL, TRADE
Custom Built, Parts,
Tires, Whis, Repairs,
Trailer Hitches

New 6 x 12 open
utility w/ramp $935

Trailer Tires from
$34.49

Hwy 44 Crystal River
352-564-1299

GULF TO LAKE
TRAILER SALES

Largest Selection &
Lowest Prices.
Offering New & Used
Cargo & utility trailers

Triple Crown Utility TRL
6 x 12 w/new spare
$1050.
6 x 12 Enclosed w/
V nose, rear ramp
door, $1995.

Trailer Tires
starting at $69.95

352-527-0555
Hwy 44, Lecanto




2 GYM FOR BABY ONE
FOR GIRL AND ONE
FOR BOY $15 EACH,
WALKER $20 ANIMAL
352-777-1256
3 CAR SEAT FOR IN-
FANT EXCELLENT
CONDITION $ 25 each
352-777-1256
SWING MOTION FOR
GIRL PINK AND
BROWN THE FLOWER
EXCELLENT CONDI-
TION $45 352-7771256
TRAVEL BASSINET EX-
CELLENT CONDITION
BLUE $30 car
seat,bouncer,swing
352-7771256


Sell r Swa


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966











JUNK MOTORCYCLES
WANTED Will Pay up to
$200 for Unwanted Mo-
torcycle 352-942-3492
WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area.
Condition or Situation.
Call (352) 726-9369



AKC,ENGLISH BULLDOG
PUPS, chubby, healthy
10 wks 5 male I fern
parents on premises,
h/c shots $1200 Connie
or Jim (352) 341-7732
cell 352-613-3778
DOWNSIZING
Koi and Gold Fish
FOR SALE, Even Better
Prices, ALL sizes
(352) 634-1783




Mini Donkeys, Horses &
Ponies, used & new
saddles and tack,
Diamond P Farm
352-873-6033




FRM
Feeds for all your
Animals, American
Farm & Feed 795-6013


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





C.R/Homosassa
1& 2 Br. furn, quiet park
Util. incl. clean, shrt/long
term 352 220-2077


CLASSIFIED



DUNNELLON
5159 W. Disney Ln 2/2,
New AC, Lrg. Lot
$400/m $400 dp
(727) 480-5512
FLORAL CITY
3/1 fl rm. fncd yd sm.
pet ok $550., 726-5062









FREE MOBILE
HOMES
To Handy Individuals
Offer includes:
Home, water, sewer,
trash, wifi, use of
pool new clubhouse
& park-like setting
w/ hammocks
and gazebos
All for just $295. mo.

Permanent
RV'S WELCOME
and RV Storage
Space Avail.

Homes for Sale
w/ Owner Financing

Call for Details
AURORA Acres
11240 N. Northwood
Drive Inglis, Fl. 34449
(352) 447-2759
Crystal River Primary
bus stop located in
front of park
auroraacresfl.com

HERNANDO/INV.
2/1,Close in lease, no
pet $425+sec. 726-7319
INVERNESS
55+ Park on the water
w/5 piers for fishing &
enjoyment, clubhouse,
onslte shuffleboard
and much more!
Furnished, IBR home
with central A/C $600.
352-476-4964
INVERNESS
RENT SPECIAL: Sec. dep,
pro-rated over 3 mo.
period. 55+ park on the
water w/5 piers for fish-
Ing and enjoyment,
clubhouse, onslte
shuffleboard, & much
more! 1 BR home $325
plus. 2BR home $450,
Includes H20. 2 BR, 1.5
bath, Park Model $500.
Pets considered.
Section 8 accepted.
(352) 476-4964

i~fI..~flH


2 BEDROOM MOBILE
HOME FOR SALE 2
bedroom. 1 bath. Single
wide mobile home, with
all aluminum wheel
chair ramp, covered
screen porch and a car-
port.
Very nice quiet commu-
nity. Centrally located
close to the mail in
Crystal River.
SELL PRICE;;;
$11,200.00 or OBO
Comes with
Washer/Dryer
Stove and Refrigerator.
Fully Furnished
lot rent $235.00
Located in a Adult com-
munity age 55 or older
Pets allowed no more
than 20 pounds.
CALL 352-897-6766
BY APPOINTMENT
ONLY
SERIOUS BUYERS
ONLY.
1995, Doublewide,
28 x 56, 2BD, 2BA,
LR, DR, Eat in Kit,
community Pool
Nice Condition
$30,000 (352) 400-8270

ATTENTION
LAND OWNERS
JACOBSEN NEW 2012
5 yr. warranty, 3/2,
2 x 6 construction,
upgrade insulation,
appliance pkg.
Delivered & set up
with A/C & heat,
steps & skirting only
$279.19./mo. W.A.C.
Includes first year
on homeowner Ins.
Call 352-621-9181

AWESOME DEALS
Financing Available
$500/dn
1/1 remod, shed $5k
1/lscrnrm/carprt $6k
2/1 carprt/rf.over $7k
furn, move-in ready
55+ park, clean quiet
CR/Homossasa area
Owner 352-220-2077

Bank foreclosures
USED HOMES/REPO'S
Bank authorized
liquidator.We Always
have new inventory,
Call 352-621-9183
or come by
Taylor Made Homes
Homes from
$1,000 up!
BEAUTIFUL 1 OWNER,
older Doublewide,
Home in Forestview
Park new appl's, new
roof and AC, Priced to
Sell! (352) 503-2154
INVERNESS
55+ Park on the water
w/5 piers for fishing &
enjoyment, clubhouse,
onslte shuffleboard
and much more!
Single wide 1 & 2 BR,
starting @ $6,900. Lot
rent $276/mo. H20
Included. 3 mo. free
rent with purchase.
352-476-4964


LAND-N-HOME
FLORAL CITY
BIG HOME!
The Entertainer,
over 2000 sq. ft., 4/2,
large family room.
Home in great shape
on quiet paved road
near chain of lakes
ONLY $59, 900. or
$2,250 down &
395/mo. W.A.C.
Call 352-621-3807

Palm Harbor Homes
RED TAG SALE
Over 10 stock units
MUST GO!! Save
up to $35K!
800-622-2832

Why Pay Rent When
You can own this
32x60 3/2 w/family
room & corner firepl.
$359.mo W.A.C.
call 352-490-7422 or
877-372-4941




HOMOSASSA
2/2 carport nicely furn
MH on Homosassa River
w/dock no pet f/l/s
sht/long term $850
352-220-2077
HOMOSASSA
2/2 carport nicely furn
MH on Homosassa River
w/dock no pet f/I/s
sht/long term $850
352-220-2077




Beverly Hills
55 + park 2/2 fully
remodeled, & furnished
Ig screen lanaicarport,
shedJaundryJandscape & ii-
gation all appli-
ances, Club house ac-
tivities, Heated pool.Lot
rent $258 .. $33K obo
Call 352-422-0927
FLORAL CITY
2/2 carport on canal,
2 sheds,, furnished scr
patio $44,900. Poss.
Own Fin 440-225 8618




3/2, 1,800 Sq Ft,
Fenced Yard,
$5,000 down $525. mo
HOMOSASSA
(352) 302-9217
BEST OF THE BEST
New 2012 Jacobsen
Custom 28 x 52, 3/2
big eat in kitchen,
2x6 construction, OSB
wrap, 5 yr. warranty,
elongated toilet,
china sinks, storm
door. Large rooms.
Must see before you
buy anything else.
Only $46,900 or
$1,800 down
$298.89/mo W.A.C.
Call 352-621-9181
Crystal River
Rent to Own ? 2/1
DW, remodeled, clean
& private, 1/2 ac. trees
price neg.352 795-0898
INVERNESS
Move in neat 2 bath
SW w/extra rooms, nice
area, fenced $32,500
Owner (352) 341-1569
Lecanto
881 N. Maynard Av
DWMH 2/2, deck,
Fixer Upper
$15K (352) 746-7952
Northwest Citrus
County 2 bedroom. 1.5
bath. Mobile Home on
1 acre, high and dry,
shaded lot, shed, paved
road $44,900 or make
offer. Possible owner fi-
nancing. 352-795-9908



2/2 on Lake Rousseau.
NOW $17,500
Low Lot Rent $240/m
2003 Mobile Home.
Used Seasonally
Owner bought a house,
(352) 817-1987,
(207) 546-6115
AWESOME DEALS
Financing Available
$500/dn
1/1 remod, shed $5k
I/Ilscrnrm/carprt $6k
2/1 carprt/rf.over $7k
furn, move-in ready
55+ park, clean quiet
CR/Homossasa area
Owner 352-220-2077
Beverly Hills
55 + park 2/2 fully
remodeled, & furnished
Ig screen lanaicarport,
shedJaundrylandscape & ii-
gaion all appli-
ances, Club house ac-
tivities, Heated pool.Lot
rent $258... $33K obo
Call 352-422-0927
Crys Rver Village
55+ DWHome of Merit
2/2/1 carport, com-
pletely furnish all new &
appls. Must See
$39K for appt /details
(704) 489-0523
574-946-6286



Homosassa 2 bedroom.
2 bath. 55+double wide
mobile home in park
14,900.New wooden
floors very clean. Closed
in front and back porch.2
car carport.Club
house,community swim-
ming poolexercise
room.Pool table.Close to
shopping area. call 352
7946601
Homosassa
Turtle Creek
1/1 park model
w/screen porch
$16K (352) 628-3351
HOMOSASSA'S
Best Housing Value
Modern homes from
$8,400 or Lease to Own
from $139/mo.
$800.down + Lot rent at
Evanrldge Community


an exceptional 55+Park
352 628-5977


INVERNESS
55+ Park on the water
w/5 piers for fishing &
enjoyment, clubhouse,
onslte shuffleboard, and
much more! 2 BR 1.5 BA
for $2.000. must be
approved 352-476-4964
Lecanto 3 bedroom. 2
bath. Senior Park 14x66
S/W, Screened Porch,
Furnished. Very clean.
Call 815-535-7958
Lecanto 55 +
Comm.2 bd 1 ba
screened porch
$11,500
(352) 746-4648

almo m-,-, M


Oasis Mobile Home Park,
Inverness FL 2 bedroom.
2 bath. 14x60 Fully Fur-
nished Manatee Mobile
Home. Carport, Screen
room, and Shed. Has
roof over and remodelled
kitchen and baths. Virtu-
ally everything furnished.
Parking behind M/H for
trailer or boat. Excellent
Shape. Great low rent
park. $12000. Call
815 986 4510 or cell
815 298 2964.
On Lake Rousseau 2
bedroom. 2 bath.
14x60MH, 8x20 FL
room, 8x10 shed, 2-stall
carport, Withlacoochee
Backwaters MHP,
$8500. 352-219-2240
Stoneridge Landing
55+ Comm. Resales
starting @$13,500
Financing avail
1-800-779-1226
(352) 637-1400
StoneridgeLanding
55+. 1993 26x56, Move
in Cond.2/2 upgrades
$39K, view pics @
mhvillage.com/493361
(352) 344-0888
WESTWIND VILLAGE 55+
Park. Updated 2/2 DW's
for sale. Reasonable
(352) 628-2090


Los o Sl


FREE MOBILE
HOMES
To Handy Individuals
Offer includes:
Home, water, sewer,
trash, wifi, use of
pool new clubhouse
& park-like setting
w/ hammocks
and gazebos
All for just $295. mo.

Permanent
RV'S WELCOME
and RV Storage
Space Avail.

Homes for Sale
w/ Owner Financing

Call for Details
AURORA Acres
11240 N. Northwood
Drive Inglis, Fl. 34449
(352) 447-2759
Crystal River Primary
bus stop located in
front of park
auroraacresfl.com




LECANTO 55+
*FOR RENT OR SALE*
1/1, Furnished $525.
2/2, Furnished $550.
352-287-9175, 746-1189













835 NE Hwy 19
Crystal River, Fl
(352) 795-0021
View our website
C21NatureCoast.com






21212 on wate in



CHASSAHOWITZKA
3/2 Wtrfront DW, $600.
3/2 Furnished DW., $600
Agent (352) 382-1000




CRYSTAL RIVER
2 BR. $550. 3BR House
$800., 352-563-9857
CRYSTAL RIVER
Completely furn., Pool,
boat dock, Wash/Dry
(352) 302-5972
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025
INVERNESS
1/1 $400 2/1.. $500.
near hosp352-422-2393




Alexander Real Estate
(352) 795-6633

Crystal River Apts
2 BR/1 BA $375-$500


CRYSTAL RIVER 1/1
Handicap Ramp, Small
Pet OK. (352) 628-2815
FLORAL CITY
FREE Use of boat ramp,
fishing dock, canoe &
Jon boat rentals. I BR
$450/$200 dp. incis Sat
TV electric, walk to river
Trails End Camp, A
Friendly Place to Live
352-726-3699

INVERNESS
1 BR & 2 BR Garden
& Townhouse Apts.
NOW AVAILABLE *
$512 to $559 a mo
water included
small pets welcome
Park like setting
must see to appreci-
ate Occassionally
Barrier Free Available
GATEHOUSE APTS
(352) 726-6466
Equal Housing
Opportunity

LECANTO
Nice 1 Bedrm $500
352-613-6000. 216-0012
(352) 746-5238

SEVEN RIVERS
APTS

A Beautiful place
to come home too.
35 units on private
street, situated on 10
wooded acres, near
Crystal River &
7 Rivers Hosp. fish-
Ing, walking, trails,
shopping near by.
Old Florida setting,
quite, clean well
malnt. central
laundry room.
352-795-3719
Directions:
Hwy 19 turn W. at
Days Inn, first right
onto Tallahassee Rd


1 &
EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY





FLORAL CITY
STOREFRONT 1000 Sq Ft
Ideal location, corner
Hwy 41 & 48. $595 mo.
813-310-5391




CRYSTAL RIVER
Completely furn., Pool,
boat dock, Wash/Dry
(352) 302-5972
INVERNESS
LANDINGS 2/1.5 clean
roomy, great location
$550/mo F/L/S
No smoke/No pets
(352) 341-1847




Citrus Springs
3/2/1 car $650/mo
352-746-7990




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1 Cute cottage Max.
two. 1st/last/sec $500 per
mo. 628-1062

Specializing in
Sugarmill Woods
Rentals


Debe Johns
Brkr/Assoc/PRM

Coldwell Banker Next
Generation Realty
Property Manager
(352) 382-2700 www.
coldwellbankernext
aeneration.com

See what a
Professional
Residential Manager
can do for you.

Rent Hoses
Furnishe


Kristi Bortz
Let our property
management team
help you with your
short or long term
rentals.
See all our rentals in
Citrus Co.
www.plantation
rentals
352-795-0782 or
866-795-0784




BERVERLY HILLS
2bed, bath, C/H/A
Ist Mo FREE $650/m
(352) 422-7794
BEVERLY HILLS
$550. MO. 2/1, C/H/A,
W/D Hkup., 382-1344
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/1, $600. mo.
382-1162, 795-1878


BEVERLY HILLS
2/2, CHA, $550. mo. +
$300 Sec. 352-422-0139
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/2/2, $750. mo + sec.
850-371-1568
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 Clean, $800 mo.
795-6299 364-2073

YOU'LL 4 THIS!

DUNNELLON 3/2/2
RENT TO OWN
Close to Rainbow River
RUBLESRENTALS.COM
(561) 719-8787
(561) 575-1718 aftr 7pm
FLORAL CITY
3/11/2, 6 Acres, wooded
$700. 352-212-2264
HERNANDO 312/2
Rent to wn $850 mo
www.rickybobs.com
352-613-5818
HOMOSASSA
2/1, water & sewer, W/D
incl'd., Lg. Yard. $550.
mo. 239-272-9230

Sugarmill Woods
Upscale Ctry Club
Brand New Deluxe
Villa 2/2/2 Fam Rm +
Lanai, most until's paid.
Just $800/mo Owner:
352-382-1132




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225

HOMOSASSA
2/2 carport nicely furn
MH on Homosassa River
w/dock no pet f/Il/s
sht/long term $850
352-220-2077
INVERNESS
2/1 $600 mo., Canal to
River. scrn. porc. gar-
age, carport 726-5994




C.R/Homosassa
1& 2 Br. furn, quiet park
Util. incl. clean, shrt/long
term 352 220-2077




FARMS, LAND,
COMMERCIAL
UNIQUE &
HISTORIC HOMES,
SMALL TOWN
COUNTRY LIFESTYLE
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989


"LIFE IS BETTER
WITH A PORCH"
WWW.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.

For Saleu
Forest Ridge 2 bedroom.
2 bath. This updated villa
is totally move in ready
and maintenance free!
This beautiful 2/2/2 is
located on a private lot
and includes an optional
membership to Citrus
Hills Golf and Country
Club. The home includes
all appliances, an eat in
kitchen, a fully tiled great
room, and a sun barrier
paneled lanai. Home is
within walking distance to
the pool and club house.
This property is a must
see!! $95,900
352-746-0002

PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ille-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination. "
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY

Specializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches &
Commercial








Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com


I 1 I I tI I



There are immediate opportunities for independent contractors to manage


and grow single copy newspaper routes in Citrus and Marion Counties


Be at least 18 years of age. Possess a valid driver's license.

Possess proof of liability insurance.

ca..IR... fUS ,..... vRoutes are 7 days a week, early morning hours.



i. www.chronicleonline.com Email: mgaouette@chronicleonline.com or bring resume to 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


10 Keller t., Hernando
Located on the 8th green of the Oaks



line of i e i drwn towards the

ck pavers anth m tad i ble and
S o I.. r l








hdward Russell Johnston. Inc
to perade Th Congout the oreyour
Stne of Csnon is draw n tow ardts the







gthe531 North trs, Avene
Crystal River. FL34428
(35)195 -2200
www erj.net




Lot For Sale Pine Ridge
sub. 3620 N. Stirrup Dr.,
2.78 ac, horse trail on
back side, wooded, for
sale by owner. Google it!
Make offer
bill@agairupdate.com
478.957.0211




Black Diamond/Lecant
Owner Financing
3/2/2.5 SS appls
custom flooring,Hot Tub
new outdoor kit. w cov-
ered lanai. Price to sell.
$185K. (352) 527-3501




3/3/2,
2,355 sq. ft.
screen lanai, 2 Acres
$135,000.
(352) 628-5272
TERRA VISTA
2+ /2/2 Maint Free,
Open plan, up grades,
,Beautiful Sunsets,
Owner Financ Avail
$259 K (352) 746-6050




3/2, Shed, Mfg. Home
on 1.38 Acres, new
flooring & upgraded
appliances.
Paved Road
$54,900. (352) 302-4057
ARBOR LAKES
55+ Comm. 3/2/2 +
Lg enclosed a/c porch,
most pvt. location,
Upgrades $169,900
(352) 726-7952
HERNANDO 31212
Rent to Own $850 mo
www.rlckybobs.com
352-613-5818




HIGHLANDS
Lrg.2/2- 4 car garage
pool, game room,
mud room, on triple lot
fenced, price to sell
$65,500 (352) 564-4598
INVERNESS
55+ Park on the water
w/5 piers for fishing &
enjoyment, clubhouse,
onslte shuffleboard
and much more!
Single wide I & 2 BR,
starting @ $6,900. Lot
rent $276/mo. H20
Included. 3 mo. free
rent with purchase.
352-476-4964

Lakefront Gospel
Island Location
Spacious 3/2/2
for rent $800/m or for
sale..... 908-322-6529

Recently Foreclosed
*Special Financing*
Available, Any
Credit, Any Income ,
2BD, 1BTH, located
at, 7901 Stump Lane,
Inverness, $23,900.
Visit www.roselandco.
com/A4F,
Drive by then Call
(866) 249-0680

Zero Down Assumable
Loan Nice 3/2/2,
In Foxwood Estate
Need proof of income
and excel credit.
No Gimmicks,
(352) 341-8479




3/2/2 Built 1986, On
V2 Acre, Remodeled
above ground pool
w/ deck BY OWNER
4141 S. Journey Point
$180,000 813-477-6006
312/2, Built 2007
Newly Remodeled
$88,000
100% Financing Avail.
(352) 400-0230


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work For You!

BETTY HUNT,
REALTOR
ERA KEY 1 Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.

Condo for Sale
2/2, 1,850sq. ft.
35 Beech Street
(352) 503-3294













Best Time To Buy!
I have lease options,
owner financing
Waterfront and
foreclosures
call Phyllis Strickland
(352) 613-3503
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.


DEB INFANTINE

4 HOMES SOLD
Closing in April
I Need Listings!

Real Estate!..
it's what I do.

ERA American
Realty
Phone:(352) 726-5855
CeIl:(352) 302-8046
Fax:(352) 726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com


FREE MOBILE
HOMES
To Handy Individuals
Offer includes:
Home, water, sewer,
trash, wifi, use of
pool new clubhouse
& park-like setting
w/ hammocks
and gazebos
All for just $295. mo.

Permanent
RV'S WELCOME
and RV Storage
Space Avail.

Homes for Sale
w/ Owner Financing

Call for Details
AURORA Acres
11240 N. Northwood
Drive Inglis, Fl. 34449
(352) 447-2759
Crystal River Primary
bus stop located in
front of park
auroraacresfi.com


Michele Rose, Realtor
Simply put I 'll work
harder 352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty v)
yahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515





INVERNESS 2/2/1
Superbly maintained,
1381 Sqft, Oak floors,
Florida room, dining
room, extra pantries, par-
tially furnished. Pictures
avail 631 Whispering
Pines Blvd.
352-726-9983

INVERNESS
Nice 2/2/1 new carpet
tile & paint. Whispering
Pines Villas furnished
$69,900(352) 726-8712





"FREE foreclosure
and short sale lists


Office Open
7 Days a Week


Lisa VanDeboe
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com

Crystal River Indian
Waters Waterfront home
on deep wide canal. 3
BR/2BAwith Lanai over-
looking canal. Recently
remodeled split floor plan
with fenced yard, garage,
sea wall and dock.
Easy access to both
Kings Bay and Gulf.
Serious buyers
please.....Appointment
with owner. $275,000.
678-357-9873
---I


PERFECT
FLORIDA COTTAGE
ON the MAIN LAKE,
near the BIKE trail &
downtown Inverness
1368 SQ FT renovated
2/2/2 720 Edgewater
$189,500
www.crosslandrealty.c
om 352 726 6644





CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pond,
ATV trails $165Kobo
352 795-2027/ 634-4745





5 ACRES, FLORAL CITY
3 sides fenced, paved
road, private drive
through woods. Leads
to 4 Acre Pasture
$44,900. (352) 897-4586





CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pond,
ATV trails $165Kobo
352 795-2027/ 634-4745


Citrus C u
Homj~~illih


luxe pkg. too many ex-
tras to list $32,000.
Dodge Truck also avail
(636) 209-0308
Holiday Rambler
'98 38' 7.5 gen.super
slide, air lever, a/c susp.
loaded call for details
$41K (352) 746-9211
I Buy RV'S Steve
Henry, RV World of
Hudson Inc.Since
1974. (888) 674-8376
(727) 514-8875

JAYCO
'04, 36 foot, 5th wheel
toy hauler, generator.
slide, fuel station $18,500
Truck avail For sale
Local (502) 345-0285
SUNSEEKER '05
29ft. Class. C., nearly
all options, generator,
needs awning fabric,
no smoke,33k mi.
Reduce $24K, 464-0316


48 lots 14W.F. 1 gulf
access, 5 SMW's lots
3 lots impact fees pd.
$425K, = less than $9K
per lot (732) 996-3785
89 x 165 MOL, LOT
Lucky Hills, Nice
Residential Area
$19,000/Offer
Owner FiNance
(352) 422-1916
Homosassa
1.6 Acres on Hwy 19
Wet Lands, next to
Bowling Alley, $15,000
Owner Finance
352-621-1664
HOMOSASSA
Wooded Lot on
Lee Woods Drive,
112 x114ft River access,
but not on river $7,000.
352-621-1664
SUGARMILL
WOODS. BUILDING LOT
ON OAK VILLAGE
$20K firm 43 Vinca St
(352) 726-9587




BOAT TRAILER
Fits up to 19ff
Bunk and roller, New
lights, wheels, and
break a way tongue for
easy storage $500.
352-341-2149
New 6 gal Plastic
gas tank $35.
Ft Island Marine Supply
9683 W. Ft Lsland Trailer
(352) 436-4179




CRAFTSMAN 10FT
Aluminum flat bottom
new oars, extras, lic to
2012 for motor $275
(352) 465-7506
DURACRAFT
16', aluminum Boat
Good Shape, plus
extras $1,000 obo
(352) 464-1302, or 1304
HOUSE BOAT
30 ft fiberglass, hrd
wood firs, & more
Live Aboard or eniov
weekends in Paradise
$12,800 (423) 320-3008
HURRICANE
'92, Deck Boat,
22 ft., 130 HP Yamaha,
$3,800
(304) 677-5747 Cell
Kayak 12'
fiberglass weight 221bs.
open cock pit w/cover
new paddles & life
jacket New $1700
sell $475.(352) 637-4760
LUND
1978 15' FIBERGLASS
Bass Boat w/Trailer. 30
horse Johnson. 60beam.
Console Steer. 50# Troll-
ing motor. Only needs
new battery to run. First
$1750 (firm) takes it.
352-341-0447.
PATHFINDER 99
15' flats boat, 40hp
Nissan bimini top,
jacket plate, push pole,
dp findertrailer $3500
(352) 564-0144
PONTOON
'99, Bennington, 22 ft, w/
potty, tilt trlr., 40 HP,
Yamaha, motor, cover
Runs Good $4,800
(989) 965-1915
PROLINE 20 CC
T-Top VHF, elect. New
135 Honda, 4S, newEZ
Load trlr. $11,400 Extras
(352) 257-1161
PROLINE
21' Cuddy, full transom,
w/brack, 150 HP Yam.,
Bimini, VHF, porta pot,
dep. finder, trailer $5K
firm (352) 382-3298
STARCRAFT
1995 Starcraft 20 Foot
Pontoon with trailer. 75
Hp Mariner. Like new
motor,cushbns,bimini,steerng
and battery $6750
(352) 794-3391
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LAKE
MARINE
We Pay CASH For Used
Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck & Fishing
Boats (352)527-0555
boatsupercenter.com





















YACHTSMAN
24' Pontoon, 70 HP Ev.
T/T, cust. trlr, bimini top,
stored inside $3500 incls
all gear (231) 852-0061




Bounder
Fleetwood 32 1994
454 engine, loaded,
self contained, $9,750
352-795-6736
BUSHNELL RV
SHOW..
March 14th-23rd
Across frm Walmart
866-888-8941
GULF STREAM 08
32 3 slides, rear. kit.
K bed,50amp, like new
extras $31,500
(352) 726-1906
HITCHHIKER II LS
2008, 3 slides, excel
cond. heat pump, de-


05 SUNNYBROOK 36'
5th whl,2 slides,king
bed,like new,heated
tks, 60 amp service
oak cab $33,400
352-382-3298
Aliner '04
Columbian Northwest,
sleeps 3. complete
kitchen $5990
(352) 637-5075
GULF STREAM
Coach 25' model
24RBL, sips upto 6 gas &
elect appls & heat,
shower/toliet $6900
(352) 341-1714
I BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
call me 352-201-6945



CHEVROLET
1999 corvette L&R side
mufflers and tailpipes.
New condition. Replaced
with ZO06 set in
2001.$650 for both or of-
fer. 5000 miles on origi-
nals. 1-352-503-6548



$$ CASH PAID $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
BIG SALE!
Consignment USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
AUTOS' FROM $1,500.
US 19 BY AIRPORT
US 44, BY NAPA
Low Payments *
461-4518 & 795-4440
consignmentusa.org
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not*
CASH PAID $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars Trucks
& Vans, For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES,
Hwy 19... 352 564-8333
CASH PAID FOR JUNK
CARS Any Condition
Up to $500., Free
Towing 352-445-3909


SATURDAY, MARCH 17, 2012 Cl03


Csck f


CLASSIFIED




KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Salvage Pays top $$$
for your autos.
352-628-4144

WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
Perfect Cond. or Not
Titled,No title,
No problem. Paying up
to $25K any make,
any model Call A.J.
813-335-3794/531-4298









ACURA
2004, TSX only 27k
miles Just Traded In!
Call for Details
BUICK
2008, Lucerne
Low Miles $12,595
BUICK
2007, Rendevous CXL
One Owner Beauty!
Take Over Pyts at
$249.00 WAC
CHEVROLET
2011 Aveo GasSip-
per! Take over pyts at
$179.00 WAC
HONDA
2000, CRV Low Miles,
One Owner
$5,995.00
HONDA
2007, Odyssey
Ready for the Family
$12,795.00
NISSAN
2011, Versa
Save Money on Gas!
Take over pyts at
$189.00 WAC
HONDA
2004, Accord Coupe,
Like New!
$5,9951
GMC
2010, Terrain SLT, Why
Buy New! Loaded!
Take Over Pyts at
$379.00 WAC
CHRYSLER
2007, PT Cruiser, Low
Miles Garaged Kept!
$7,495.00
888-874-5524


Sebring Touring
Convertible,34k miles,
loaded, $14,250firm
352-897-4520
AFFORDABLE
AUTOS & VANS
Everybody Rides
$495 DOWN
$49 PER WEEK
BUY HERE PAY
HERE..
Lots of clean-safe-
dependable rides.
CALL DAN TODAY
(352) 5 6 3 -1 9 02
"WE BUYS CARS
DEAD OR ALIVE"
1675 Suncoast Hwy.
Homosassa Fl.

BIG SALE!
Consignment USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
AUTOS' FROM $1,500.
US 19 BY AIRPORT
US 44, BY NAPA
Low Payments *
461-4518 & 795-4440
consignmentusa.org
BUICK 94
Station wagon, garage
kept, Sunroof, Tan &
wood grain 165K mis
$2500(352) 563-2555
CAMARO'11
CONV. RED, $3K miles
$28,500(352) 419-6768
CHEVY
'07, Impala, V6, auto,
ice cold AC, non smok-
ers 100K mi $7,500
(352) 726-3093


Sebring, Touring cony.
45K mi. newer tires,
6 cyl. white, tan top,
loaded, mint, Sr owned
$8,200 (352) 513-4257
Citrus Sale Center
We buy/sell/trade
clean pre-owned
vehicles!


02 Ford Quad CabTruck
F-150 Cab$4,999
02 Mazda Milllenia
$5,400,
00, Ford Explorer
4 DR $3,800,
06 Grand Marquis
$13,200 low miles
Call 352-400-1038
LINCOLN
2006 Towncar,
seabreeze green,
extra nice, $10,500
(830) 534-1918
MERCEDES '99
S420, blue book $11,500
sell $10K FIRM
1729 W. Gulf to lake
Hwy, Lecanto
MERCURY
'03, Sable, Station
Wagon, V6, silver,
very good cond
64K mi., Serious Only
$5,100. (352) 270-4224
PLYMOUTH
2000 Neon 152,734 mi-
les. New battery, tires,
belts, and recently
tuned-up. $700 obo.
352-746-2476 or
352-601-0134(cell)
PONTIAC SOLSTICE
cony. 2006
mint con, loaded
metallic green, blk int &
top, std, 22k mi $15k
(352) 795-6436eve's
TOYOTA P/U 1983
excellent mechanical
condition, has topper,
new tires $1500 firm
(352) 628-6515




CHEVROLET '01
Camaro, Z28, Org. 9000
miles, Pristine show car
frozen in time. Loaded
black/black leather
Flawless rare find!
$15,750 (352) 513-4257


Tell that special
person
"Happy Birthday "
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





BIG SALE!
Consignment USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
AUTOS' FROM $1,500.
US 19 BY AIRPORT
US 44, BY NAPA
Low Payments *
461-4518 & 795-4440
consignmentusa.org

CHEVY
'01,Silverado 1500,
Ext. Cab, 8 ft. bed
$3,600. 352-220-4545,
352-503-7752
CHEVY
'04, 2500 HD,
Ext. Cab, w/ 8 ft. bed
$6,200. 352-220-4545,
352-503-7752
Citrus Sale Center
We buy/sell/trade
clean pre-owned
vehicles!


02 Ford QuadCab F-150
Truck $4999
07 Nissan Murano
$14,900
06 Chrysler PT Cruiser
$6499
06 Grand Marquis
$13,200 low miles
Call 352-400-1038
FORD '06
F250 Super Duty, 4 x 4,
6.0, Lariat Pkg. Off Rd.
Pkg., Hard Bed Cover
$21,500 (352) 586-8576


.4
* -. I
-- f r n
p. J


For more information on how to reach
'Citrus County readers calr
352-563-5592.


OOOBXHD


CITRUS COUNTY



www.chronicleonline.com
Rorida Fish andWidlifeConservationCommission;
http//tlnyur com/http-myfwc-custhelp-com-app


2003, 4 X 4,
new flatbed w/ boxes,
6 speed, $9,500 firm
(352) 422-3171
FORD 93
F150- 4x4 FLT, 250K mi.
don't let that scare you
runs great, new tires
cold a/c $3K 795-1015



FORD
01, Windstar, LX Van,
white/gray, 88,400 mi.
non smoker, serv.
records $5,995
(352) 382-1167




Harley 00
Roadking Classic, all
gear 17K miles 11K
obo.(352) 489-0873
Harley Davidson
'02 FAT BOY, 15,357. mi-
les, loaded w/extra's
asking $12K
(352) 270-8488
Harley Davidson
02 Heritage soft tail
26K mis. Lots of extra's
Health Forces Sale
$8500 (352) 527-3024
HARLEY DAVIDSON
08 Night Train, flat blk,
11,500 mis. lots of extra's
$14K obo Jeff
(407) 712-0803
JUNK MOTORCYCLES
WANTED Will Pay up to
$200 for Unwanted Mo-
torcycle352-942-3492
ROADSTAR
SILVERADO 04
Garage kept, very well
maint, lots of extras ask
$6k obo (352) 214-9800



908-0330 DAILY CRN
Surplus Prop.
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County Board
of County Commissioners
will be selling surplus prop-
erty and equipment via
the internet at
govdeals.com, March 1
until March 30, 2012.
Pub:March 1 thru 30, 2012




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


2012 Mazda3i Sport


R


at 'N
PY'Ze


2012


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:1111


r4 I


Lease s17 36 Mo.
For 9 Leaset


3du pTk'e' jIe pli I d a~+ll l'Lr u- .' to LiI;T uLLjj. ,jjel] ,aLI]re ljj-1u dcie nii]]o u o n iQi de I u l1 aaihc ialluidrurcT rei?^' A. u-.L'eQd e, r Lea-'e J>:.T, p^\ e100 reiiumrt~ajedl
t .I El i..r Ir tV.. \ >,.d .tC 't, .'e .Jp kdpr<, L. dkd 'kCJ .i .rid ,,-.rr_. t >:d.ni l t i..Tih.rJie d "E. pi. ii'k ratl, it ...F.T.J-. dpA ->. ut'r ,, a LudJ .T.ik-ufrC '.J, ai'. Ji-pCre..rrc 0.c
t.u.. i,..u -r.-. ..rld L rlLiiD \i-ui *cti 'lw See u, lur J te d, P ltui.' .tn ltr Pllu, trorr,..rlpurp. i r., \.rjr'.d-.rt i n.-ed dl r ,i'.l pt r.r A. F1 .i i- I."Iie I..i


ImIlI


ACURA
Safest Vehicle Lineup In America!
with Highest Expected Residual Value Among Luxury Brands t 4

612012 TSX


nCu2F6CJ*
TSX Lease: $259 mo x 36 months.
$2,899 Due At Signing
Includes Security Deposit, Down Payment; Excludes Tax & Tag,
WiLh Approved Credit
i Ao A A 25 9/month-
Safety Rating Safety Pick n
NHTSA IIHS
* Star ratings are part of the U.S. Department of Transportation's Safercar.gov program (www.safercar.gov). Models tested with standard aide-impact airbags (SABs). t
Based on ALG's 2009 and 2010 Residual Value Awards for a Luxury Brand. Subject to limited availability. Through April 30th, 2012, to approved lessees by Acura Financial
Services, DBA of American Honda Finance Corp. Closed-end lease for 2012 TSX SE 5 Speed Automatic (Model CU2F6CJW). MSRP $33,195. Actual net capitalize cost
528.134.04. Total monthly payments $9,324. Option to purchase at lease end $21,172. Additional lease terms for well-qualified lessees. Not all losses will qualify. Higher lease
raias apply for lessees with lower credit ratings or in different regions. Dealer participation may affect actual payment. MSRPs include destination; taxes, license, title fees,
options and insurance extra. Security deposit waived. Lessee responsible for maintenance, excessive wear/tear and 15glmi. over 10,000 milesayearfor vehicles with MSRP
less man $30,000, but for vehicles with MSRP of $30,000 or more, mileage cost Is 20/iml. over 10,000 mileslyear. See dealer for complete details. Available on 2010 TL with


C14 SATURDAY, MARCH 17, 2012


:^ K




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CUTOERAPPECATODAS
VOLT .me IAD
e'e et e S r A __ * ** ~Alm

$ a)
r -- 4
Leather, Auto, Power Windows^c, O Electr^^ ic Charge! YOU FA ... Ext.Cab, Aut, Air V8, Kyless6E"
*.*IBU *Ee|a QUINOXLT





i~K94^MW'M~i
MI








Vic-7-7T *V "~l 4I c77^1J PP '
00 ~0 0 I 0 0 0

cco xw-352e34 e001


LOVEEYSL~eO
Allno cr riesOncuE T$ 50 cs rtaeeut.Alofr A. Allotosa elrrti, iie oi0tc eile ny l rcsado
py etplstxtiltg9sttfesDeri installed iosadcesries adiinlcs.Vhce ujc op io sl Apistoi tc
I un it.feexi rei o dtI opbi cation.


Honda rj

REALLY
a uA a...... ............................. .................


SALES EVENT


REAL DEALS.


BIG INVENTORY.


Lr,


Come See What LOVE
Can Do For You!!!


19)^^^^
t ^l^. ^^^t^^


1,.yJtMole)


On approved credit. Must finance with AHFC. 1.36 Month closed end lease 12,000 miles per year with approved credit, plus tax, tag, 1st payment,$4000 cash or trade equity and lease fees excess milage penalty is 20
cents per mile. Limited to in stock vehicles only, all options are at additional price. Residual values: Civic $12043.50, Accord $13081.50, Pilot $16689.60. Pictures for illustration purposes only, all prices plus tax, tag, state
fees and $499 administrative fee. Dealer installed options additional cost, in stock units only. All vehicles subject to prior sale. Applies to in stock units. Offers expire on date of publication.
OOOAT8P


5 0 1
4-. j


SATURDAY, MARCH 17, 2012 C15


. ...-. :,.-. ..:. '.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Our 2012 lineup of fuel-efficient cars,
trucks, SUVs and crossovers is here.
Get into the Ford you want with
great offers that make it easy for you to
get behind the wheel.
Come in today. And start the new year
in a brand-new Ford. You'll know why
Ford is the best-selling brand1 out there.
Get out of the old and into the new
at Nick Nicholas Ford Lincoln today.


Start the new year in

a brand-new Ford.


2012 FUSION SE 2012 TAURUS SEL 2012 ESCAPE XLT


$24,915
-2,000
-500
$500


MSRP
Retail Customer Cash
Trade In Cash
Ford Credit Cash


SALE PRICE

1,9152


$29,250
-300
-2,000
-500


MSRP
Nick Nicholas Ford Lincoln Discount
Retail Customer Cash
Ford Credit Cash


SALE PRICE

$26,450


$26,235
-300
-2,000
-500
-500


MSRP
Nick Nicholas Ford Lincoln Discount
Retail Customer Cash
Trade In Cash
Retail Bonus Cash


SALE PRICE

$22,935


1111 1111 S A p S Iiiijliliil


'01 BUICK CENTURY CUSTOM '05 FORD EXPLORER '07 FORD FOCUS ZX4
47000 miles $9,95

L~~J L~J d 6


'05 GRAND MARQUIS LS '07 TOYOTA CAMRY LE
39,000 miles
$11,950 $12,950
Frift-27-m miikfML -1


'08 NISSAN ALTIMA 2.5 S '08 FORD FUSION SEL
28,000 miles
$15,950 $16,950


kDO '08 FORD FOCUS SE '05 FORD FREESTYLE SEL
One owner 1 owner, 61,000 miles
$10,950 $11,950
66--


'07 GRAND MARQUIS LS '09 GRAND MARQUIS LS '06 CHRYSLER 300 HEMI C
9 Loaded
$13,950 $15,950 $15,950


'10 FORD FOCUS SE '10 FORD FUSION SE '07 PONTIAC 66 H2 CONYT GT '09 BUICK LUCERNE CXL '08 TOYOTA 4-RUNNER SR5
22,000 miles
$16,950 $17,950 $17,950 $18,950 $19,950


'10 FORD E-350 CLUB WAGON '09 FORD FLEX LIMITED '10 FORD FUSION HYBRID
XLT, 12passenger 1 owner 40 MPG
$19,950 $19,950 $21,950


'08 HYUNDAI SANTA FE
All Wheel Drive, loaded.
$21,950


'09 FORD EDGE SEL '08 TOYOTA SIENNA XLE '08 F-150 XLTCREWCAB 4X4
Loaded 1 owner, 46,000 miles
$22,950 $23,950 $24,950
I a - 11111 5-.1...o.: 7 7-,_ M


Nick


KS '1 MUSTANG GTCS CONVT '08 SHELBY GT 500 '09 F.150 CREW CAB 4X4 200
loaded 44,000 miles, like new, loaded Lariat
a $29,950 $31,950 $32,950


Nicholas


C


rysta


River


Hwy. 19 N. 795-7371
1Based on CYTD sales, 11/11. 2Prices and payments include all incentives and Ford Factory
rebates with approved credit. Plus tax, tag, title and administrative fee of $399. Ford Credit
Financing required. Not all buyers will qualify. See dealer for details. Dealer is not responsible
for typographical errors. Pictures are for illustration purposes only. Prices and payments good
through 2/29/12.


Call Toll Free
877-795-7371
or Visit Us Online
www.nicknicholasfordLINCOLN.com


LINCOLN


t RiverMi


C16 SATURDAY, MARCH 17, 2012