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Citrus County chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02705
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 03-10-2012
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:02705

Full Text



Change the clocks: Daylight Saving Time starts early Sunday


I L I I -


CITRUS


COUNTY


TODAY & Sunday morning
HIGH Partly cloudy with a
82 20 percent chance of
LOW showers.
62 PAGE A4
MARCH 10, 2012


Spring forward
Don't forget to set

1one hour
10 at2 a.m.
9 3 Sunday.
8 -1 AP


SO YOU KNOW
U Due to early
deadlines, some
lottery numbers
do not appear.


Cleaning the bay


Students, community pitch in


Girl burned in
fire remains
hospitalized
Zara Clifford, a 5-
year-old girl badly
burned in a car fire in
Ozello Monday night,
remains in serious
but stable condition,
according to Ellen
Fiss, spokeswoman
for Tampa General.
Zara and her mother,
Brittany Hatfield, 22,
were airlifted to the
Tampa hospital after
their 1989 Jeep
caught fire on West
Ozello Trail. Hatfield
was released on
Tuesday; however,
Zara is still being
treated.
Stay granted
to CMH
Foundation
The First District
Court of Appeal
granted a stay Friday
afternoon to the Cit-
rus Memorial Health
Foundation, which
temporarily stops a
law from taking place
that shifts control of
the hospital to the
Citrus County Hospi-
tal Board of
Trustees.
In response to a
phone call seeking
comment from
CCHB attorney Bill
Grant, a woman in
Grant's office stated
he had left for the
day.
The hospital is-
sued a statement
calling for both sides
to reach an agree-
ment for "the public's
best interest."
"In this dispute
there are no winners,
and the people of
Citrus County are
losers as their hospi-
tal is hurt in this sad
tug of war," the state-
ment said. "Again we
ask, 'Can we drop
the rope and figure
out a way to serve
the people of Citrus
County?' before one
more penny is
spent."
In June, the foun-
dation filed a lawsuit
challenging a law,
which essentially
would turn over con-
trol of the hospital to
the trustees and pur-
portedly void a con-
tract between the
foundation and
CCHB.
Leon County Cir-
cuit Court Judge
Jackie Fulford then
issued a temporary
injunction.
On Feb. 15, Ful-
ford ruled the law
was constitutional,
which prompted the
foundation to file pa-
perwork appealing
See Page A9


Comics . . . . .C10
Community . . . .C8
Crossword . . . .C9
Editorial . . . . .A8
Entertainment . . .B6
Horoscope . . . .B6
Lottery Numbers . .B4
Lottery Payouts . .B6
Movies . . . . .C10
Obituaries ........ A5
Classifieds ...... Cll
TV Listings ...... C9


I6 l 8457 20021 Uu


MATTHEW BECK
Staff writer
CRYSTAL RIVER -The
beach in front of Hunters
Spring Park had its teeth
cleaned Friday morning.
At least that's how Kings
Bay Rotary service project
leader Art Jones describes
the ongoing, 5-year lyngbya
algae cleanup effort called
Save Kings Bay
"I refer to this as a project
like brushing your teeth,"
he said. "You have to stay on
it. You get it clean and sure,
it's gonna get dirty again,
but boy it was great when it
was clean!"
He said the removal of
the invasive lyngbya won't
last forever before more
takes its place. But the
group is patient and is fo-


caused on the long-term ef-
fect of repeated cleanup
projects.
"It'll last for a couple of
weeks. It really depends on
the winds," he said. "But
over time, there's less and
less and less. This is an in-
cremental type of cleanup.
We're not delusional about
it. We know this is a five-
See Page A2
MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Hillary Skowronski dumps a
rake full of lyngbya algae
onto a kayak Friday morning
at Hunters Spring Park in
Crystal River. The 20-year-
old Waynesburg University
student, along with more
than a dozen others from
the college, spent part of
Friday removing the
invasive algae.


The nature of learning


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service visitor services specialist Ivan Vincente, right, uses a screen to filter tiny organisms
for Homosassa Elementary School students to examine. The Chassahowitzka Salt Marsh Trails in Homosassa are
being used as an outdoor classroom for the children.

Elementary school students get lesson at salt marsh


MATTHEW BECK
Staff Writer
HOMOSASSA A new educa-
tional experience in Homosassa
is providing local elementary stu-
dents a firsthand
perspective into
a unique ecosys-
tem right in their
own backyard.
Wednesday
For more morning, fourth-
photos, click graders from the
on this story at Homosassa Ele-
www.chronicle mentary School
online.com. tramped through
numerous habitats along the
trails collecting invertebrates
from the salt marsh's waterline,
netting butterflies and scraping


bark from the trees to get a close-
up perspective of inhabitants of
the five habitats that make up the
salt marsh ecosystem.
"Many of these children don't
have the exposure to the outdoors
because of the computers and
video games so many of them have
today," Nature of Learning grant
writer Shirley Knudsen said.
"They don't even talk to each other
often anymore. If they are talking
to each other, it's through texting
one another Their environment is
in the classroom and video games
and they don't have outdoor op-
portunities like we did years ago."
The Friends of the Crystal
River National Wildlife Refuge
See Page A9


]Fire rava*


claims lil


SANDRA FREDERICK
Staff Writer
INVERNESS Betsy
Brian heard several soft
pops and then saw a thick
cloud of smoke coming
from a neighbor's house
Friday morning.
"It seems that within sec-
onds there were flames
leaping out of the garage
door windows, and within a
couple of minutes there
were 20-foot flames coming


Small microinvertebrates like these
isopods and this tiny blue crab are
specimens collected for examination
by Homosassa Elementary School
students.


ges home,


fe of dog
from the roof over the
garage," Brian said. "The
amount of black smoke was
horrifying, especially since
we were unsure if anyone
was hurt or at home."
Luckily the victim and her
son, whose names were un-
available at press time, were
sitting on the rear porch of
their Inverness Golf and
Country Club home when
they smelled the smoke.
See Page A9


2012 SESSION



Justices


Reject


-. Senate


map

House

redistricting

map upheld

Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE The
Florida Supreme Court is-
sued a split decision on leg-
islative redistricting Friday,
rejecting the Senate's plan
but upholding the House's
map.
The landmark decision
interpreted new anti-
gerrymandering standards
voters put into the Florida
Constitu-
SO YOU tion two
KNOW years ago.
The jus-
U See more tices said
on state the Sen-
Legislature ate map
happenings favored
on Page A5. incum-
bents and
the Republican majority.
The 5-2 ruling establishes
guidelines for a redo of the
Senate map as well as fu-
ture redistricting efforts.
"From this day forward,
our elected officials are on
notice that they cannot ig-
nore the constitution and
abuse the public trust by
drawing districts to favor
themselves," said Deirdre
Macnab, president of the
League of Women Voters of
Florida, part of a coalition
that backed the Fair Dis-
tricts amendment and chal-
lenged the Legislature's
maps.
It also means the Repub-
lican-controlled Legisla-
ture, which was wrapping
up its regular annual ses-
sion on Friday, must return
to Tallahassee to fix prob-
lems outlined in the 234-
page opinion.
In a dissent, ChiefJustice
Charles Canady and Justice
Ricky Polston said they
would have approved both
maps. The two most reliably
conservative justices said
the high court should have
shown deference to the
Legislature and conducted
only a limited review as it
has done in the past. That
echoed an argument made
by legislative lawyers.
The majority, though,
ruled the Fair Districts
amendment required a de-
tailed review and specific
findings to clarify what vot-
ers intended.
"The new constitutional
provisions seek to level the
playing field in how legisla-
tive districts are drawn,"
Justice Barbara Pariente
wrote for the majority
The 11th U.S. Circuit Court
of Appeals in Atlanta used
similar language when it re-
cently upheld a second Fair
Districts amendment for
congressional redistricting.
'"A failure to define these
constitutional imperatives
in a manner consistent with
the will of the voters would
frustrate the intended pur-
pose of this new amend-
ment," Pariente wrote.
See .Page A9


BETSY BRIAN/Special to the Chronicle
A fire tore through an Inverness home shortly before
noon on Monday causing $100,000 worth of damage.





A2 SATURDAY, MARCH 10, 2012


BAY
Continued from Page Al

year project and we're not
going to change it overnight
We're going to do these
cleanup all year long."
Jones said the cleanup ef-
forts are properly permitted
by the Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission.
Dr. Bob Knight, director
of the Florida Springs Insti-
tute in Gainesville, was on
hand for the clean up Fri-
day His group is a non-
profit organization that
focuses on protection and
restoration of springs in
Florida, he said.
Throughout the week, he
has been working with a
group of 14 college students
from Waynesburg Univer-
sity in Pennsylvania on a
separate service project.
They have been working
on an effort to improve
water quality in Kings Bay
That project is being con-
ducted adjacent to Parker
Island, south of Hunters
Spring Park.
Hillary Skowronski, 20, a
junior marine biology major
at Waynesburg, said han-
dling the less than appeal-
ing lyngbya didn't turn her
away from doing her part to
help.
"Doing anything that ben-
efits the environment and
the animals doesn't really
bother me," she said. "Peo-


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ple don't realize that you
can't help the animals with-
out going levels deeper in
the ecosystem. You have to
start with plants and go up
from there."
Classmate Samantha
Swab, 21, a senior and busi-
ness major at the university,
said she could see progress
being made in the removal
effort in just the couple of
hours she had been in the
water
"We were the first group
out here this morning and
now, a couple hours later,
you can really see the clean
bottom much farther out,"
she said, pointing toward
the deeper, spring-fed area
along the park's beach.
Along with the students,
dozens of community volun-
teers and Rotary volunteers
also pitched in.
Dr Knight, who has been
studying springs in Florida
since the 1970s, said the inva-
sive lyngbya creates a com-
plex set of problems in the
waterway
"When you look at the his-
tory of the springs, lyngbya
was in most of the springs in
the past," he explained. "It's
a natural component of
springs, but it wasn't a domi-
nant part of the plant
community."
He says the aquatic envi-
ronment has been altered by
stressors on the aquifer
"Now what's happened, as
we have changed the flow in
our springs by pumping out
water and using groundwa-


ter, we've worsened the water
quality of our springs by in-
creasing the nitrogen that's
leaking into the aquifer," he
said. "Those two in combina-
tion, I believe, are basically
reducing the populations of
higher plants like eel grass
that used to grow in Kings
Bay When that eel grass goes
out, you have more light
available for the algae and
the lyngbya takes off. Then
lyngbya, which was once a
small component of the ecol-
ogy of the springs, now is a
major component of more
and more of our springs."
Now that the invasive
species has become a major
component of Kings Bay, the
Kings Bay Rotary's project
is continuing to set it's sights
on removing as much of the
unsightly algae as possible.
The last major cleanup
project, a little over a month


ago, included dozens of stu-
dents from Barton College
in southwest Ga., and dozens
of community volunteers.
"We removed 12,000
pounds of lyngbya the last
time we had a big lyngbya
clean-up," Jones said.
The process of removing
the algae is laborious. Vol-
unteers incorporate long
rakes to scoop up the algae.
It is then placed onto sit-
atop kayaks or one of two
flat-top pontoon boats to be
transported to land.
Jones says that after the
algae is removed it will be
used as garden fertilizer.
"The lyngbya will be put
on a trailer and it will be
tilled into the soil in places
like Pine Ridge," he said.
Waynesburg University
microbiology professor
Chad Sethman explained
how his group became in-


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Sit-atop kayaks are used to shuttle lyngbya algae to shore
for disposal.
volved in the project pose here in the bay other
"We were looking for a va- that clogging it up. It's a
riety of activities to do down good project."
here and we thought this Chronicle staff writer
was necessary based on Matthew Beck can be
what we had been told," he reached at 352-564-2919 or
said. "Lyngbya is invasive mbeck@chronicleonline.
and it really serves no pur- com.


HEALTH


SCREENING

Friday, March 16

Vision Cataract Glaucoma
Blood Pressure Eyeglass Adjustments


Jay Newcomer, OD
352.746.0800
Beverly Hills Eye Clinic
3636 N. Lecanto Hwy.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465


In association with:


At, 1. CATARACT &
iq W LASER INSTITUTE
C/i' "Excellence.with love"
StLukesEye.com
THE PATIENT AND ANY OTHER PERSON RESPONSIBLE FOR PAYMENT HAS A RIGHT TO REFUSE TO PAY, CANCEL
PAYMENT, OR BE REIMBURSED FOR PAYMENT FOR ANY OTHER SERVICE, EXAMINATION, OR TREATMENT THAT IS
PERFORMED AS A RESULT OF AND WITHIN 72 HOURS OF RESPONDING TO THE ADVERTISEMENT FOR THE FREE,
DISCOUNTED FEE, OR REDUCED FEE SERVICE, EXAMINATION, OR TREATMENT.


"I

~


Sights & Symbols on display all month

inside the mall


a
,~ p
p 52
*, t~
/
.~, *w >*
~ U
~


Join Crystal River Mall
for Art Day on Saturday,
March 10th at 1pm for FREE arts & crafts.
face painting, bounce house
and live entertainment


CRYSTAI RI\LI<


------------mm--------m-mmmm-m----mI

0'0.o.o Citrus County now has

Single Stream Recycling
It takes less work to do the right thing!
All accepted materials are now recycled in a single container
IR The materials listed below will be accepted at all sites
I The Materials Include: (Please empty and rinse all containers before placing in bin)
E Newspapers & Advertising Inserts Plase
c Magazines, Catalogs & Telephone Books P1S
C Office Paper (White & Colored) & File Folders (0 -art
Junk Mail, Envelopes & Bagged Shredded Paper trash I
y Paperboard & Boxboard (like cereal, cracker boxes or
1 & paper beverage holders (please flatten)
C Corrugated Cardboard & Paper Bags (please flatten)
C Milk & Juice Cartons (please flatten)
Si A Juice Boxes & other Aseptic Containers
L Glass Food & Beverage Containers (lids removed)
I #1 through #7 Plastic Food, Beverage & Household Containers
(lids removed) Lids may be recycled after removal
_Metal (Steel, Tin & Bi-Metal) Food, Beverage Containers
N II A Metal Lids (separated from metal and glass containers)
S_ Aluminum Containers, Food Trays and Foils (balled)
C. Empty Aerosol Cans (Non-Hazardous Substances only, including
1 Food, Beauty, Fragrance & Household Products)
Please DO NOT place these items in the containers:
0 Styrofoam (Computer, furniture, appliances packing, unused EPS cups &
Polystyrene labeled #6 can be recycled at the Central Landfill Recycling Center)
0 Batteries (Recycle at the Central Landfill)
S0 Hard back books (Remove covers and recycle or donate)
0 Electronics (Recycle at the Central Landfill)
IlN 0 Ceramics or dishes
o 0 Yard waste or trash
0 Food waste
0 Motor oil /Anti-freeze containers
P 0 Hazardous waste containers
0 Light bulbs, window glass, mirrors, drinking
glasses & aquariums (Fluorescent bulbs may be recycled at the Central
Landfill first 6 free of charge)
0 Plastic grocery bags and plastic wrap (Bags may be recycled at your supermarket)
0 Miscellaneous: clothes, furniture, appliances, mattress / boxsprings, etc.
'0 (Donate usable clothes and furniture. Furniture, appliances, mattress /
boxsprings, carpet and padding from your home accepted free of charge
FI at the Central Landfill)
Contaminates in the bins may make the material unacceptable for sale thereby
F requiring landfill disposal and reducing the income for the centers sponsoring groups
Solid Waste Management (352) 527-7670 / landfillinfo@bocc.citrus.fl.us
L I-I-II-I-IIII I- --II IIIIIIII I


.-.. ..
Orys caI:"v r al
m.v"- its.you, oclert YuhAr ot


LOCAL


IM E







Page A3 SATURDAY, MARCH 10,2012



TATE&


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE




THE STATE Library offers new e-book service


Citrus County
Learn about mound at
museum presentation
As part of Florida Archae-
ology Month, "Tatham
Mound: Hernando de Soto in
Citrus County" and "Tatham
Mound Revisited: The Rest
of the Story," presentations
by Dr. Jeff Mitchem, archae-
ologist with the Arkansas Ar-
chaeological survey and
excavator of Tatham Mound,
will be free and open to the
public at 10:30 a.m. and 1
p.m. Saturday, March 10, at
the Old Courthouse
Museum.
Come see and hear the
highlights of the 1980s' ar-
chaeological excavations at
the prehistoric Tatham Mound
near Lake Tsala Apopka. At
10:30 a.m., Mitchem will dis-
cuss the background of the
Tatham Mound excavations
and the archaeological evi-
dence of the encounters) be-
tween native Floridians and
the Spanish expedition of
Hernando de Soto in 1539. At
1 p.m., he will bring the story
full circle with a second pres-
entation, discussing the older
burials and artifacts recov-
ered during excavations and
the story of the reburial of the
remains in their final resting
place.
For more information, call
352-341-6427 or visit the
website at www.cccourt
house.org/index.php.
River group to host
special speaker
Homosassa River Alliance
will host guest speaker Becky
Ayech, president of the Envi-
ronmental Confederation of
Southwest Florida
(ECOSWF), at 7 p.m. Thurs-
day, March 15, at the Ho-
mosassa Springs Wildlife
State Park.
Ayech is a policy consult-
ant for Florida Water Coali-
tion (FWC), whose members
include ECOSWF, Florida
Wildlife Federation, St. Johns
River Keepers, The Conser-
vancy of Southwest Florida
and Earthjustice. Florida
Water Coalition's goal is the
protection and preservation
of Florida waters.
All are welcome to hear
Ayech talk about toxic algae
in Florida waters, what has
happened to change our wa-
terways and what we can do
to reverse damage. For more
information, visit www.florida
watercoalition.org.
EMS slates sale to
benefit charities
Nature Coast EMS will
have its inaugural Treasures
and Treats Sale with pro-
ceeds benefitting CASA, (Cit-
rus Abuse Shelter
Association) and Blessings in
a Backpack from 7 a.m. to
noon Saturday, March 10, at
the Nature Coast EMS ad-
ministration building on Ho-
mosassa Trail, behind Crystal
Glen in Lecanto.
Both organizations are al-
ways in need of financial sup-
port. Call Nature Coast EMS
for a list of needed items or
for more information at 352-
249-4700.


-From staff reports

Correction

Due to incorrect informa-
tion provided to the
Chronicle, a photo caption on
page A3 Wednesday, "Club
to host national tournament,"
should say the Beverly Hills
Horseshoe Club National
Horseshoe Pitching Tourna-
ment is played every second
week of each month from
September through April. The
club meets every Wednesday
at 9 a.m. for league play,
which is handicapped. Any-
one who would like to join the
club may contact Ron Fair,
club president, at 352-746-
3924 or rfair@tampabay.
rr.com.
Readers can alert The
Citrus County Chronicle to
any errors in news articles by
mailing dmann@chronicle
online.com or by calling 352-
563-5660.


SHEMIR WILES
Staff Writer

There's no surprise the
number of people purchas-
ing e-book readers contin-
ues to grow drastically as
more and more people seek
the convenience of having
access to a wealth of books
at one's fingertips.
According to the Pew Re-
search Center, the number
of adults in the United
States who own an e-book
reader doubled to 12 per-
cent in May 2011 from 6 per-
cent in November 2010. And
by 2015, PCWorld magazine
reported e-book sales will
reach $3 billion.
While many think the
popularity of e-book readers


means places like the tradi-
tional neighborhood library
will be left in the antiquated
dust, the Citrus County Li-
brary System is instead
choosing to embrace the
new technology by offering
a new e-book service.
Sabrina Smith, communi-
cations facilitator for the
Citrus County Library Sys-
tem, said the new service
started Feb. 15, and the lat-
est statistics show there are
already 500 active users
who have checked out 1,000
different titles.
'And they're already ask-
ing for more e-books," she
said. "Our patrons are really
enjoying it."
To provide this service, the
library system has partnered


TOP: Stud
LEFT: Abr


with OverDrive, which is the
leading digital distributor of
e-books, audiobooks and
other digital content to li-
braries. It provides access
through special software,
which supports most of the
major e-reader devices on
the market such as the
Barnes & Noble Nook, the
Amazon Kindle, iPad and
Sony Reader
Though Smith said not all
titles are available as e-
books, since Random House
and Harper Collins are the
only participating publish-
ing companies. The indus-
try is forever evolving, so
more titles could become
available in the future. In
addition, she said they
would begin offering audio-


books through the e-book
service starting in May
To enroll in the service,
Smith said people must
have a valid and current li-
brary card. Library cards
are free for all Citrus County
residents. Those interested
in having the service must
also have a compatible de-
vice and access to a home
desktop computer or laptop
to transfer the e-book files to
the device.
To find out which devices
are compatible with the
service, visit OverDrive's
Device Resource Center at
www. overdrive. comm/
resources/drc or stop by a
local library branch.
For device-specific in-
structions and more infor-


mation, visit citrus
libraries, org/download-
ables/help.
Smith said the library
would also offer classes in
April on e-books and e-read-
ers at Tech Talk, the library
system's monthly technol-
ogy topics class.
Tech Talk classes are at
each of the five library
branches duringApril. For
specific days and times, visit
the library calendars at
citruslibraries.org or call
352-746-9077 for more infor-
mation. Preregistration is
encouraged to ensure a seat.
Chronicle reporter
Shemir Wiles can be
reached at 352-564-2924 or
swiles@chronicleonline.
com.


View life duringthe 1800s

/ during interactive event

\ .Staff report
~j he 15th annual Nature Coast Civil War Re-
| enactment is Saturday and Sunday at the
\ Holcim Mine property on U.S. 19 seven
miles north of Crystal River Gates open at 9 a.m.
/both days, with a battle scheduled for 2 p.m. each
4jj Vday
Visitors may tour the shops and eating estab-
lishments, talk to the re-enactors and visit the in-
teractive Confederate and Union encampments.
lents look at the displays. The cost is a $5 donation for adults and a $2 do-
nation for students 8 to 18. Children younger than
aham Lincoln talks to students. 8 are admitted free.



Unsolved MYSTERIES


Sheriff's office looks for leads on four burglaries


In one
month's
time, four
different areas
in Crystal River
were burglar-
ized. The Citrus K -
County Sheriff's
Office needs
your help in
catching the Corey
culprit(s). UNSC
On January 19, MYST
a vehicle was
burglarized in the
driveway at 1409 S.E. Fourth
Ave. in Crystal River The sus-
pect unlawfully entered the
vehicle and stole a purse.
Around the same date
and time, another vehicle
was burglarized at 1010 S.E.
Third Ave. in Crystal River
This time, the suspect stole
a Taurus firearm. It is be-
lieved these burglaries are
connected due to their close
proximity and same time


)


frames.
In the evening
or late morning
hours of Feb. 10,
a suspect unlaw-
Sfully entered
Coast Dental at
9030 W Fort Is-
land Trail in
Crystal River, al-
Sharpe though nothing
LVED was taken. Wit-
ERIES nesses reported
seeing an eld-
erly white tran-
sient male at around
11 p.m., using the hose at the
office to clean himself. The
man is described as being
approximately 60 years old,
6 feet tall, with bushy grey
hair and a big belly He was
carrying a large backpack.
On Feb. 22, in the late
evening or early morning, a
suspect unlawfully entered
Yai Yai Hair Salon at 530 N.
Suncoast Blvd. in Crystal


River During the burglary
an unspecified amount of
cash was taken.
You are the key to solving
these crimes. If you have any
information, contact Det.
Corey Sharpe or Deputy
Brian Coleman at 352-795-
4241. Or contact Crime Stop-
pers at 888-ANY-TIPS, text
the word CITRUS plus your
tip to 274637 or visit
crimesstopperscitrus.com.
You may be eligible to re-
ceive a cash reward and you
can remain anonymous.

Det. Corey Sharpe is the
Community Crimes Detec-
tive assigned to the City of
Crystal River and is respon-
sible for property crime
case investigations. Det.
Sharpe has 23 years in law
enforcement, four of those
with the Citrus County Sher-
iff's Office. Prior to employ-


UNSOLVED MYSTERIES
OF CITRUS COUNTY
* Victim: Multiple victims.
* Crimes: Burglary and criminal mischief.
* City: Crystal River.


* An unspecified amount of cash was taken from the Yai
Yai Hair Salon during a Feb. 22 burglary.


ment with the sheriff's of-
fice, he served 19 years as a
Detective with the Crystal
River Police Department.
The Unsolved Mysteries
column will appear weekly


on Saturday highlighting a
cold case, unsolved burglary
or crime.
The column is submitted
by the Citrus County Sher-
iff's Office.


Re-enacting the past for an educational history lesson


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Citrus County residents Lydia Lytle, left, demonstrates some of the tools used in the 1860s kitchen Friday during Education Day at the
Nature Coast Civil War Re-enactment.


-mm
mmm=






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Showing appreciation


Special to the Chronicle
As refreshments are served, Sheriff Jeff Dawsy shares a word with Nancy Chandler, a volunteer with Community Patrol 2.


Sheriffs office says 'thank you' to volunteers with Lecanto event


GAIL TIERNEY
Special to the Chronicle

For something new and
completely upbeat, this
year's volunteer apprecia-
tion program on Thursday
featured Keith Barany, who
the New York Post calls
"one of the wittiest comics
working today"
The Los Angeles-based co-
median has written material
for such TV shows as
"Seinfeld", "Politically Incor-
rect" and the 2004 Emmys.


ONLINE

To see sheriff's office
volunteer statistics for
2011, click on this
story at www.chronicle
online.com.


Barany also has traveled
multiple times to entertain
U.S. Armed Fbrces abroad.
The show took place at
Curtis Peterson Audito-
rium in the Lecanto school
complex off County Road


491. A reception with light
refreshments was offered
to the crowd of 550 guests
in the school's cafeteria
area.
Each year, Sheriff Jeff
Dawsy joins members of the
Citrus County Sheriff's Of-
fice to recognize the nearly
800 community-minded citi-
zens who volunteer their
time and expertise in
nearly every facet of the
agency's day-to-day
operations.
From community patrol


drivers, public service offi-
cers and volunteer bailiffs
to those who provide finger-
printing services, staff the
agency's community re-
source offices and perform
clerical duties and data
entry, the Sheriff's Office
couldn't offer all the out-
reach services it provides
without the help of its dedi-
cated, hard-working
volunteers.
Gail Tierney is a spokes-
woman for the Citrus
County Sheriff's Office.


2 sentenced for



violating probation


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff Writer

Two men who violated
the conditions of their pro-
bations cut deals with pros-
ecutors Friday and were
sentenced to prison terms.
Circuit Judge Ric
Howard sentenced
Thymithy Boroff, 21, to 9.5
years in prison with credit
for time served, and Dallas
M. St. Denis, 18, got 7.5
years for his violation.
Boroff was initially ar-
rested in 2008 and charged
with more than a dozen
burglaries, some of them
armed.
Because of the armed
portion of the charges, Bo-
roff could have gotten life
in prison according to state
law, said Howard.
He said the fact that this
was Boroff's introduction
into the Florida penal sys-
tem and that he was able to
work something out with
the prosecution helped re-


SO YOU KNOW

U For the past few
weeks, arrest details
on the Citrus County
Sheriff's Office website
have been unavailable.


duce his sentence.
St Denis was one of two
people arrested in January
in a Lecanto home inva-
sion case. Those charges
were later dropped.
In 2009, St. Denis
pleaded no contest to bur-
glary and grand theft
charges and was sentenced
to 2 years in jail and four
years probation.
At the end of last year, St.
Denis and another man al-
legedly knocked on a door
of a home in Lecanto and
when a woman answered
the door, they barged in.
They reportedly strug-
gled with an elderly occu-
pant of the home and one
of their masks came off
during scuffle. They were
later identified in a photo
lineup.
The case was later
dropped.
Chronicle reporter A.B.
Sidibe can be reached at
352-564-2925 or asidibe@
chronicleonline. com.


* For information about
arrests made by the
CCSO during this time,
go to www.sheriffc-
itrus.org and click on
the Public Information
link, then on Arrest
Reports.


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CHKONiCLE
Florida's Best Communlty Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community

To start your subscription:
Call now for home delivery by our carriers:
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Tom Feeney .................................................... Production Director, 563-3275
Kathie Stewart .............................................. Circulation Director, 563-5655
John M urphy ........................ ............................ Online M manager, 563-3255
John M urphy.................................................... Classified M manager, 564-3255
Jeff Gordon .................................................. Business M manager, 564-2908
Mike Arnold.................................... Human Resources Director, 564-2910
Report a news tip:
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S o u n d O ff ............................................................. .......................................... 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9
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Published every Sunday through Saturday
By Citrus Publishing Inc.
1624 N. Meadowerest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
Phone 352-563-6363
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HI LO
81 63


DEW POINTy

HUMIITY
1 .. '(i A n 1 Ift
POLLEN COUNT"

Today's active pollen:
Oak, juniper, nettle
Today's count: 11.0/12
Sunday's count: 11.6
Monday's count: 11.5

i- nl iF li liir


CELESTIAL



nils I. I m taul ill


A4 SATURDAY, MARCH 10, 2012


LOCAL


i*>||.


*J. -.. |





CimRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Lawrence
'Termite'
Buchner, 71
HERNANDO
The Service of Remem-
brance for Mr. Lawrence W
"Termite" Buchner, age 71,
of Hernando, Florida, will
be held at 3 p.m. Monday,
March 12, 2012, at the Inver-
ness Chapel of Hooper Fu-
neral Homes with Citrus
Masonic Lodge No. 118, In-
verness, and Pastor Mark
Gabb officiating. Cremation
will be under the direction
of Hooper Crematory, Inver-
ness, Florida. The family
will receive friends from 3
until 5 p.m., Sunday at the
chapel. The family requests
expressions of sympathy
take the form of memorial
donations to the American
Cancer Society, Citrus
County Unit, PO. Box 1902,
Inverness, FL 34451 or Hos-
pice of Citrus County, PO.
Box 641270, Beverly Hills,
FL 34464. Online condo-
lences may be sent to the
family at www.HooperFu-
neralHome.com.
Mr. Buchner was born De-
cember 4, 1940, in Niagara
Falls, NY, son of the late
Lester and Joyce (Anderson)
Buchner. He died March 7,
2012, in Inverness, FL. Mr.
Buchner was a Navy vet-
eran and moved to Her-
nando from Ransomville,
NY in 1975. He worked as a
Parts Manager for Chick
Chitty Ford/Citrus Ford, Cit-
rus Tire and later, retired
from Citrus County Fleet
Management. His hobbies
included woodworking,
yard work and working on
cars. Mr. Buchner was a
member of Citrus Masonic
Lodge No. 118 F&AM, In-
verness and St. Margaret's
Episcopal Church,
Inverness.
Survivors include wife,
Judy C. Buchner, of Her-
nando, FL; two daughters,
Lynda (Pat) O'Keefe of
Youngstown, NY, and Tricia
(Shawn) Turner, of Her-
nando, FL; brother, Dennis
(Pat) Buchner of
Youngstown, NY; four
grandsons, Brendon
O'Keefe, James K. Turner
Jr, Corey O'Keefe and John
Turner; and many nieces
and nephews.

SO YOU KNOW
The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits both free and
paid obituaries. Email
obits@chronicle
online.com or phone
352-563-5660 for info.


1 a86 ,8. 9b.
Funeral Home With Crematory
HILDA SOLOMON
Service: Sat- 100 PM
First Assembly of God Church
ELLEN O'DWYER
Service: Sat- 4:00 PM Chapel
JIM HOPKINS
Sat. 3:00 PM Chapel (3/17)
MARY E. HALL
Visit: Sun. 4-6 PM
Service: Mon. 12:30 PM Chapel
SHIRLEY LOGAN
Service: Mon. 10:00 AM
Florida National Cemetery
BILLY EVANS
Private Cremation Arrangements
DOMINICK DEFALCO
Private Cremation Arrangements
726-8323 000AQKR

To Place Your

"In Memory" ad,
Call Mike Snyder at 563-3273
msnyder@chronicleonlineLcom
or
Saralyinne Schlumberger at 564-2917
sschlumberger @ chronicleonline.com


Mickey Wright
7/31/28 3/10/05
Mickey's golfing with the
angels now. Hit it good, darlin'.
Jack
ODOAQD1


John
Flynn Jr., 84
LONG ISLAND,
N.Y.
John J. Flynn, Jr, 84, of
Long Island, NY, died
March 9, 2012, at the Her-
nando Pasco Hospice Care
Center in Inverness. Heinz
Funeral Home & Crema-
tion, Inverness, FL.

Dennis Lund, 72
INVERNESS
Dennis Edmond Lund, 72,
of Inverness, died March 8,
2012, at Citrus Memorial
hospital in Inverness.
McGan Cremation Service
LLC, Hernando, Fla.

Diane
Noack, 74
HOMOSASSA
Diane Noack, 74, Ho-
mosassa, died March 8,
2012, at Seven Rivers hospi-
tal. Cremation arrange-
ments with Chas. E. Davis
Funeral Home With
Crematory

Death ELSEWHERE


Harry
Wendelstedt,
73
LONGTIME MLB
UMPIRE
NEW YORK Longtime
big league umpire Harry
Wendelstedt died after an
extended illness. He was 73.
Major League Baseball
said Wendelstedt died Fri-
day in Ormond Beach, Fla.
He had been diagnosed sev-
eral years ago with a brain
tumor.
Wendelstedt worked five
World Series and four All-
Star games during his ca-
reer from 1966-98. His son,
Hunter, is a big league
umpire.
In 1968, Wendelstedt was
involved in one of baseball's
most disputed plays. Don
Drysdale was on his way to
setting a record of 58 2-3
scoreless innings when he
threw a pitch that hit San
Francisco's Dick Dietz with
the bases loaded.
Wendelstedt was the plate
umpire and immediately
ruled that Dietz made no at-
tempt to get out of the way
Drysdale wound up pitching
a shutout
-From wire reports


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State BRIEFS


Senate bogs down
in PIP debate
TALLAHASSEE Legisla-
tion pushed by Gov. Rick Scott
to toughen Florida's mandatory
no-fault automobile insurance
known as personal injury pro-
tection (PIP) has bogged down
in the Florida Senate.
Lawmakers were heading
for another late evening Friday
as the Senate debated the bill
(HB 119). The newest version
does not spell out any savings
for insurance consumers.
Sen. Dennis Jones urged his
colleagues to defeat the latest
version, calling it an insurance
bailout and that the Senate
should not cave in to Gov. Rick
Scott's drive to get his top pri-
ority passed.
The House passed its ver-
sion with several changes after
an hour-and-a-half of debate
through the dinner hour before
returning it to the Senate.
Legislature passes
public notice bill
TALLAHASSEE Florida
lawmakers have passed legisla-
tion that would require the online
posting of legal notices but keep
them in printed newspapers.


The public no-
tice bill (HB 937)
was approved by
the Senate and
House and sent
on Friday to Gov.
Rick Scott for his
signature.
The measure


2012 SESSION


requires legal no-
tices to be placed
on a newspaper's website the
same day as in the paper at no
extra charge. Newspapers that
charge for online access would
have to provide a free 'link' to
view legal notices.
Public notices across the
state will also be aggregated at
www.floridapublicnotices.com.
They can be searched and
read there at no charge.
Virtual learning bill
goes to Scott
TALLAHASSEE -A bill that
expands online learning oppor-
tunities to Florida's elementary
school-age children is going to
Gov. Rick Scott.
The bill (HB 7063) received
final passage Friday in the Sen-
ate on a 36-3 roll call. It passed
in the House on Tuesday.
The Florida Virtual School
would be allowed to expand


part-time course
offerings to chil-
dren in kinder-
garten through
third grade.
The bill also re-
moves a require-
ment that public
school students


spend at least a
year in public
school before they can enroll in
Virtual School classes.
Supporters say it will pro-
mote school choice and sup-
port homeschooled children.
Parental 'trigger'
bill dies in Senate
TALLAHASSEE -A bill that
would have let parents "trigger"
turnaround plans for failing
public schools through a peti-
tion drive died Friday on the
floor of the Florida Senate.
The "Parent Empowerment
in Education Act" (SB 1718)
failed for lack of a majority in a
20-20 vote. With Friday as the
last day of the legislative ses-
sion, the issue must wait for re-
vival till next year.
The measure had engendered
hurt feelings and bitter debate in
the session's waning days.
Supporters said it would en-


courage parents to get involved in
school affairs. Its critics counted
both Republicans and Democrats
alike. They said it was a back-
door way to give public schools to
private, for-profit educational
companies.
Claims bill receives
final passage
TALLAHASSEE A claims
bill that would pay $2.4 million
to the parents of murdered po-
lice informant Rachel Hoffman
is going to Gov. Rick Scott.
The measure (HB 7131) re-
ceived final passage Friday.
It will allow the city of Tallahas-
see to compensate Irving Hoff-
man and Marjorie Weiss for the
death of their 23-year-old daugh-
ter during a botched drug sting.
They watched from the
gallery as the Senate passed
the bill 33-3.
Weiss said it's a relief be-
cause they can stop rehashing
her death.
The city agreed to settle for
$2.6 million as a lawsuit was
set to go to trial in January.
The most that could be paid
under Florida law, though, was
$200,000 without passage of a
claims bill.
-From wire reports


More than 1,200 'Move Over' citations issued


SGT. STEVE GASKINS
Special to the Chronicle

During February, the
Florida Highway Patrol
sponsored an awareness
campaign for the state's
Move Over state law. During
the 29-day period, the pa-
trol placed heavy emphasis
on getting drivers to move
over for stopped emergency
vehicles on roadways.
Troopers issued more
than 69,000 traffic citations
and made 620 arrests for
driving under the influence
of alcohol or drugs. They
cited nearly 24,000 drivers
for speeding, and citations
for failure to move over
topped 1,200.
"Law enforcement offi-
cers are out there every day
working to reduce traffic
crashes and fatalities. Mo-
torists need to know the
rules of the road, such as
the Move Over law, and
abide by them," said Col.
David Brierton, director of
the Florida Highway Pa-
trol. "Over the past two
months, three of our troop-
ers have been struck by mo-


PRELIMINARY
ENFORCEMENT
RESULTS FOR
FEB. 1-29
Move Over Citations:
1,266.
DUI Arrests: 620.
Speeding Citations:
23,500.
Motorist Assists:
17,375.
Total Citations:
69,029.

tourists while working on our
highways."
Trooper Richard Guz-
man's vehicle was struck
on Jan. 4, in Hillsborough
County Vehicles also hit
Trooper David Rodriguez
on Jan. 26 in Orange
County and Trooper
Daniel Morley on Feb. 23 in
Palm Beach County
The members of the
Florida Highway Patrol
remind everyone that the
law requires drivers to
move over one lane or
slow down to 20 miles per


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hour below the speed
limit when approaching
any authorized emergency
vehicle or wrecker dis-
playing rotating or flash-
ing lights stopped on the
side of a roadway. Also,
motorists should remem-
ber that *FHP (*347) di-
aled from a cellphone
contacts FHP when they
need to report an aggres-
sive driver or require
roadside assistance.
The Florida Depart-
ment of Highway Safety
and Motor Vehicles pro-
vides highway safety and
security through excel-
lence in service, educa-


ir~


tion and enforcement. The
Department is leading the
way to a safer Florida
through the efficient and
professional execution of
its core mission: the is-
suance of driver licenses,
vehicle tags and titles and
operation of the Florida
Highway Patrol. To learn
more about DHSMV and
the services offered, visit
www.flhsmv.gov or follow
us on Twitter @FDHSMV
You can also find them on
Facebook.
Sgt. Steve Gaskinsis the
public affairs officer for
Florida Highway Patrol of-
fice in Tampa.


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l


0 1


SATURDAY, MARCH 10, 2012 A5


I


4










ASSAURAY MRCT1,H01 SMOCKSEiuCUTY IN)ECHRONICL


IHowToS E'THEMRTINEI


MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) Here are the 825 most active stocks on the New York Stock Exchange, 765
Name Vol(00) Last Chg Name Vol(00) Last Chg Name Vol(00) Last Chg most active on the Nasdaq National Market and 116 most active on the Ameri-
BkofAm 1870789 8.05 -.01 RareEle g 50398 6.15 +1.04 SiriusXM 622532 2.35 +.06 can Stock Exchange. Tables show name, price and net change.
SprintNex 1381010 2.78 +.18 CheniereEn 47700 16.20 -.30 PwShs QQQ392064 65.02 +.27 Name: Stocks appear alphabetically by the company's full name (not abbrevia-
S&P500ETF1043765137.57 +.53 DenisnMg 30358 1.56 -.16 Microsoft 336468 31.99 -.02 tion). Names consisting of initials appear at the beginning of each letter's list.
SPDR Fncl 706193 14.89 +.12 VantageDrl 29948 1.53 +.10 Oracle 298163 30.13 +.06 Last: Price stock was trading at when exchange closed for the day.
iShR2K 553265 81.60 +1.09 Rentech 29712 1.86 +.13 Intel 286164 27.07 +.23 Chg: Loss or gain for the day. No change indicated by...

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) Stock Footnotes: cld Issue has been called for redempbon by company. d- New 52-week
low. dd Loss in last 12 mos. ec- Company formerly listed on the American Exchange's
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Emerging Company Marketplace. h temporary exmpt from Nasdaq capital and surplus list-
VersoPap 2.50 +.45 +22.0 TasmanMg 2.61 +.52 +24.9 CoffeeH 10.60 +2.75 +35.0 ing qualification. n- Stock was a new issue in the last year.The 52-week high and low fig-
Molycorp 30.89 +4.91 +18.9 GSE Sy 2.24 +.41 +22.4 QuestSft 24.07 +4.67 +24.1 ures date only from the beginning of trading. pf- Preferred stock issue. pr- Preferences. pp-
DaqoNwEn 2.99 +.39 +15.0 RareEle g 6.15 +1.04 +20.4 SmithWes 6.95 +1.29 +22.8 Holder owes installments of purchase price. rt-Right to buy security at a specifiedprice. s-
OwensC wtB 2.44 +.25 +11.4 QuestRM g 3.00 +.50 +20.0 Aastrom 2.20 +.38 +20.9 Stock has split by at least 20 percent within the last year. wi Trades will be settled when the
MolycppfA 69.84 +6.89 +10.9 ContMatls 17.90 +2.21 +14.1 DehaierMd 2.94 +.48 +19.5 stock is issued. wd When distributed. wt Warrant, allowing a purchase of a stock.u New
52-week high. un Unit, including more than one security. vj Company in bankruptcy or re-
LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) ceivership, or being reorganized under the bankruptcy law. Appears in front of the name.
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.
iPBetaNGs 27.21 -3.17 -10.4 Crexendo 3.55 -.35 -9.0 Zogenix 2.03 -.46 -18.5
OmegaP 7.65 -.87 -10.2 GastarpfA 19.72 -1.87 -8.7 GreenMtC 52.59 -9.81 -15.7 iT__ _'_
Heckmann 4.78 -.51 -9.6 AdcareHIt 4.30 -.35 -7.5 Delcath 3.49 -.36 -9.4


NBGrcers 3.26 -.29 -8.2 GreenHntr 2.74 -.20 -6.8 CmplGnom 3.49 -.34 -8.9
iP SER2K 26.30 -2.11 -7.4 WizrdSftrs 2.27 -.13 -5.4 CambLrng 2.81 -.24 -7.9


2,110 Advanced
898 Declined
121 Unchanged
3,129 Total issues
157 New Highs
4 New Lows
3,528,411,180 Volume


DIARY


293 Advanced
173 Declined
30 Unchanged
496 Total issues
12 New Highs
1 New Lows
83,491,036 Volume


1,798
718
108
2,624
119
21
1,548,971,288


52-Week
High Low Name
13,055.75 10,404.49Dow Jones Industrials
5,627.85 3,950.66Dow Jones Transportation
467.64 381.99Dow Jones Utilities
8,718.25 6,414.89NYSE Composite
2,498.89 1,941.99Amex Index
3,000.11 2,298.89Nasdaq Composite
1,378.04 1,074.77S&P 500
14,562.01 11,208.42Wilshire 5000
868.57 601.71 Russell 2000


Last
12,922.02
5,161.93
454.95
8,102.10
2,422.57
2,988.34
1,370.87
14,459.45
817.00


I NYSE


Net % YTD % 52-wk
Chg Chg Chg % Chg
+14.08 +.11 +5.77 +7.29
+15.99 +.31 +2.83 +.68
+1.75 +.39 -2.09 +8.84
+19.74 +.24 +8.36 -1.78
+9.21 +.38 +6.33 +5.03
+17.92 +.60+14.71 +10.04
+4.96 +.36 +9.01 +5.11
+69.76 +.48 +9.62 +4.72
+10.66 +1.32+10.27 +1.77


Request stocks or mutual funds to be listed here by writing

the Chronicle, Attn: Stock Requests, 1624 N. Meadowcrest

Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429; or call 563-5660. Include

the name of the stock, market and ticker symbol. For mu-

tual funds, list parent company, symbol and the exact name

of the fund. Staff will not provide real-time quotes.


I NEWYORK STOKECAG


Name Last Chg BkofAm 8.05 -.01
BkAm wtA 4.02 +.07
Bklreddrs 7.12 -.30
BkMontg 58.44 +.42
ABBLtd 20.24 -.04 BkNYMel 22.42 +.08
ACELtd 71.68 +.19 Barday 15.15 -.22
AESCorp 13.19 +.01 BariPVix 23.34 -.46
AFLAC 45.16 +.40 BarrickG 45.81 -.24
AGL Res 39.38 +.07 Baxter 58.89 -.11
AKSteel 7.32 +.29 Beam Inc 56.15 +1.01
ASA Gold 27.54 -.05 BeazerHm 3.48 +.08
AT&TInc 31.18 +.18 BectDck 76.82 +.22
AUOptron 5.42 +.14 BerkHaAll9065.00+635.00
AbtLab 57.95 +.46 BerkH B 79.41 +.54
AberFitc 50.79 +1.31 BestBuy 24.77 +.22
Accenture 60.86 +.59 BBarrett 29.17 +.71
AdamsEx 10.77 +01 BIkHillsCp 33.69 +.17
AMD 7.58 +.11 BlkDebtStr 4.12 -.06
Aeropostf 19.55 +.60 BlkEnhC&l 13.66 -.03
Aetna 46.86 +.55 BlkGlbOp 15.06 -.06
Agilent 44.55 +.27 Blackstone 15.12 +.02
Agnio g 36.36 +.33 BlockHR 15.90 -.07
AlcatelLuc 2.38 -.05 Boeing 73.29 -.88
Alcoa 9.81 +.04 BostBeer 102.14 +2.04
Allergan 91.87 -.46 BostProp 102.31 +.40
Allete 41.91 +.51 BostonSci 5.95 +.02
AlliBGIbHi 15.18 -.11 BoydGm 7.86 +.08
AlliBInco 8.35 +.02 Brandyw 10.97 -.02
AlliBern 15.50 +19 BrMySq 32.91 +.13
Allstate 31.66 +.42 Brunswick 23.94 +.50
AlphaNRs 16.43 +.37 Buckeye 60.87 +.56
AIpAlerMLP 16.96 +.05 Buenavent 40.02 +.26
Altria 30.46 ... CBREGrp 19.19 +.70
AmBev 41.01 +.29 CBS B 30.81 +.27
Ameren 31.92 +01 CF Inds 178.73 -4.27
AMovilL s 23.56 -.17 CH Engy 66.95 +.01
AmAxle 11.52 +.01 CMSEng 21.89 +.20
AEagleOut 16.10 +.35 CSS Inds 19.07 +.02
AEP 38.21 +.02 CSXs 20.90 +.01
AmExp 53.20 +.25 CVREngy 27.57 +1.56
AmlntGrp 28.25 -.06 CVS Care 45.64 +.43
AmSIP3 6.85 ... CYS Invest 13.60 +.01
AmTower 62.22 -.22 CblvsNYs 14.41 +.18
Amerigas 45.52 +.12 CabotOGs 34.91 -.14
Ameriprise 56.08 +.76 CalDive 3.64 +.33
AmeriBrgn 37.86 +.41 CallGolf 7.00 -.01
Anadarko 85.25 +1.64 Calpine 16.89 +.47
AnalogDev 38.89 +.31 Camecog 23.57 +.23
AnglogldA 39.99 -.29 Cameron 54.26 +.40
ABInBev 69.56 ... CampSp 32.83 +.04
Ann Inc 27.41 +1.60 CdnNRsgs 35.77 +.16
Annaly 16.16 +01 CapOne 49.82 +.39
Anworth 6.56 -.01 CapifiSrce 6.84 +.05
Aon Corp 48.07 +.55 CapMpB 14.87 +.04
Apadche 107.45 -.05 CardnlHIth 42.22 +.47
AquaAm 22.22 +.19 CarMax 33.67 +.09
ArcelorMit 19.71 -.08 Carnival 3057 -38
ArdchCoal 12.08 +.21 Caterpillar 110.22 -.06
ArchDan 31.13 +.02 Celanese 46.09 +.23
ArosDorsn 19.50 -.70 Cemex 8.04 +.03
ArmourRsd 6.90 -.21 Cemigpf 23.13 +.31
Ashland 61.73 +.38 CenterPnt 19.26 -.16
AsdEstat 15.25 +.22 Cntlyink 39.02 +.30
ATMOS 31.09 +.17 Checkpnt 11.08 +.02
AuRicog 9.52 +.03 ChesEng 24.55 -.03
AutoNatn 34.14 -.35 ChesUfi 42.04 +.44
AvalonBay 137.80 +3.80 Chevron 109.57 -.46
Avon 18.57 +.32 Chioos 15.43 +.30
BB&T Cp 29.46 +.36 Chimera 3.02 +.04
BHPBiILt 74.14 +.13 ChinaMble 55.35 +2.76
BP PLC 46.69 -.42 Chubb 67.23 -.12
BPZRes 3.40 +.16 Cigna 45.18 +1.06
BRFBrasil 20.58 -.02 CindBell 4.03 +.05
BRT 6.61 +.06 Cifgrp rs 34.20 +.20
BakrHu 48.79 +.04 CleanH s 69.52 +.33
BallCorp 39.72 -.15 CliffsNRs 63.99 +2.38
BcoBrades 18.24 +.02 Clorox 67.91 +.10
BcoSantSA 8.05 -.15 Coach 77.31 +.52
BcoSBrasil 10.43 -.17 CobaltlEn 29.91 -.40


CCFemsa 101.25 +.21
CocaCola 69.51 +.24
CocaCE 27.51 +.36
Coeur 26.33 +.21
CohStlnfra 17.76 +.11
ColgPal 93.98 +.04
CollctvBrd 18.22 +.30
Comerica 30.44 +.40
CmwREIT 18.13 +.19
CmtyHIt 23.88 +.40
ComstkRs 15.25 -.19
Con-Way 31.44 +.71
ConAgra 26.17 -.05
ConocPhil 77.16 -.06
ConsolEngy 33.37 +.47
ConEd 58.39 +.07
ConstellA 22.34 +.13
ConstellEn 36.15 +.49
Cnvrgys 12.52 +.17
CooperCo 81.96 +3.03
CoreLogic 15.96 +.44
Corning 13.29 -.12
CottCp 6.48 +.03
Covidien 52.39 +1.17
Crane 48.01 +.61
CSVS2xVxS 14.89 -.23
CSVellVSts 9.26 +.17
CredSuiss 26.53 -.55
CrwnCsfie 54.43 +.69
CrownHold 36.24 -.10
Cummins 118.93 -1.05
CurEuro 130.59 -1.49

DCT Indl 5.65 -.03
DDR Corp 14.20 +.04
DNPSelct 11.24 +.09
DR Horton 15.47 +.91
DSW Inc 55.39 +.42
DTE 55.38 +.35
DanaHIdg 16.31 +.57
Danaher 53.35 +.34
Darden 51.46 +.07
DaVita 86.22 -1.58
DeanFds 12.01 +.09
Deere 80.17 -.21
DeltaAir 9.37 -.10
DenburyR 19.19 +.06
DeutschBk 46.19 -.98
DBGoldDS 4.39 -.04
DevonE 71.81 -.34
DexOneh 1.62 -.09
DicksSptg 47.45 +.39
DigitalGIb 12.87 +.74
DxFnBull rs 93.64 +2.05
DirSCBear 18.88 -.80
DirFnBear 24.61 -.57
DirLCBear 21.86 -.30
DirEMBear 12.15 +.02
DirxSCBull 59.46 +2.31
DirxEnBull 55.66 -.07
Discover 30.61 +.23
Disney 42.24 +.22
DollarGen 44.21 +.83
DomRescs 50.76 +.16
DEmmett 21.73 -.13
Dover 63.14 +.80
DowChm 34.06 +.20
DrPepSnap 38.09 +.39
DuPont 51.50 +.42
DuPFabros 22.16 -.04
DukeErgy 21.15
DukeRlty 13.88
Dynegy .76 -.42
E-CDang 6.47 -.03
EMC Cp 29.01 +.49
EOG Res 114.98 +.57
EQT Corp 51.88 -.91
EastChm s 52.08 -.39


Eaton 49.01
EatnVan 28.13
EVEnEq 11.10
Ecolab 59.71
Edisonlnt 42.82
EdwLfSci 68.92
BPasoCp 29.40
Ban 12.89
BdorGldg 14.21
EmersonEl 49.99
EmpDist 20.50
EnbrEPts 31.94
EnCanag 19.87


EndvSilvg 9.95
EnPro 36.82
ENSCO 56.07
Entergy 67.87
EntPrPt 51.50
EqtyRsd 59.31
EsteeLdr s 59.07
ExogRes 6.95
Exelis n 12.05
Exelon 38.91
Express 25.56
ExxonMbl 84.30
FMCTchs 51.84
FairchldS 13.53
FedExCp 91.79
FedSignl 4.43
Fedlnvst 20.53
Ferrellgs 16.69
Ferro 5.69
FibriaCelu 8.87
FidNatlnfo 31.68
FstHorizon 10.09
FTActDiv 8.63
FtTrEnEq 12.09
FirstEngy 44.71
RagstBch 1.04
Hotek 12.34
FootLockr 30.26
FordM 12.58
ForestLab 33.45
ForestOil s 12.69
FranceTel 14.71
FMCG 38.78


Fusion-ion 31.59 -.06

GATX 43.58 +.03
GNCn 31.54 -.26
GabelliET 5.84 +.09
GabHIthW 8.00 +.10
GabUlI 8.04 +.14
GafisaSA 5.84 -.06
GameStop 23.90 -.31
Gannett 14.34 -.04
Gap 25.00 +.11
GenDynam 71.78 -.23


GenElec 19.04
GenGrPrp 16.36
GenMills 38.58
GenMotbrs 25.62
GenOn En 2.55
Genworth 8.90
Gerdau 9.96
GlaxoSKIn 44.59
GolLinhas 8.11
GoldFLtd 14.56
Goldcrpg 47.29
GoldmanS 117.29
Goodrich 126.05
GoodrPet 18.35
Goodyear 12.38
GrafTedich 12.14
GtPlainEn 19.89
Griffon 10.26
GuangRy 19.15
HCA Hldg 25.62
HCP Inc 39.03
HSBC 43.72
HSBC Cap 26.48
Hallibrtn 34.88
HanJS 15.20
HanPrmDv 14.06
Hanesbrds 28.60
Hanoverlns 40.30
HarleyD 46.88
HarmonyG 11.90
HartfdFn 20.07
HawaiiEl 25.35


HItCrREIT 54.35 +.42
HItMgmt 6.73 -.12
HIthcrRlty 20.68 +.15
Heckmann 4.78 -.51
HeclaM 4.95 +.15
Heinz 53.06 +.09
HelixEn 18.48 +.33
Herbalifes 69.29 +2.41
Hertz 14.82 +.20
Hess 63.04 -1.52
HewlettP 24.18 -.46
HighwdPrp 31.38 +.03
HollyFrts 35.88 +.52


HomeDp 48.10 +.28
HonwIllnfi 59.78 +.29
Hospira 35.94 +.68
HospPT 25.14 +.08
HostHofis 15.55 +.21
HovnanE 2.86 +.07
Humana 87.06 -.74
Huntsmn 14.03 +.33
Hyperdyn 1.36 -.04
IAMGIdg 14.43 -.03
ICICIlBk 37.14 +1.88
ING 8.77 -.32
iShGold 16.68 +.11
iSAsfia 23.15 -.05
iShBraz 67.26 -.76
iShGer 22.74 -.13
iSh HK 17.86
iShJapn 10.08 +.04
iSh Kor 59.71
iShMex 60.26 +.01
iShSing 12.72 -.04
iSTaiwn 13.46 -.02
iSh UK 17.27 -.05
iShSilver 33.22 +.37
iShChina25 39.03 +.22
iSSP500 138.05 +.54
iShEMkts 43.79 -.02
iShiBxB 116.58 -.06
iShB20T 115.97 +.23
iS Eafe 54.36 -.18
iShiBxHYB 90.70 +.10
iSR2KV 71.66 +.98
iShR2K 81.60 +1.09


iShREst 60.51
iShDJHm 14.57
iStar 7.07
ITTCps 22.88
Idacorp 41.14
ITW 55.44
Imafon 6.05
IngerRd 39.24
IntegrysE 53.53
IntcnfEx 141.82
IBM 200.62
InfiGame 15.65
IntPap 35.23


Interpublic 11.80 +.03
IntraLinks 5.16 +.10
InvenSenn 17.79 +.49
Invesco 24.87 +.27
InvMtgCap 17.76 +.28
IronMtn 28.78 -.06
ItauUnibH 21.46 -.05


JPMorgCh 41.03 +.59
Jabil 26.16 +.61
JanusCap 8.85 +.26
Jarden 39.59 +1.69
Jefferies 17.29 +.50
JohnJn 64.74 -.11
JohnsnCfi 32.31 +.35
JonesGrp 10.75 +.39
JoyGlbl 80.31 -.73
JnprNtwk 21.42 -.01
KB Home 11.82 +.16
KT Corp 14.26 -.16
KCSouthn 69.25 -.77
Kaydon 36.75 +.43
KAEngTR 29.10 +.17
Kelbgg 52.44 +.02
KeyEngy 17.50 +.41
Keycorp 8.02 +.08
KimbClk 71.77 -.02
Kimco 18.17 -.01
KindME 87.44 -.33
KindMorg 37.52 +.79
Kinrossg 11.06 +.15


KodiakOg 10.06 +.50 MorgStan 18.37 +.19 PimoStrat 11.94
Kohls 50.24 +1.19 MSEmMkt 14.70 -.07 PinWst 47.45
Kraft 37.95 +.04 Mosaic 55.53 -.04 PioNtrl 108.55
KrispKrm 8.21 +.13 MotrlaSolu 50.74 -1.02 PitnyBw 17.86
Kroger 24.32 -.02 MotrlaMob 39.75 ... PlainsEx 45.53
LDK Solar 4.94 -.06 MuellerWat 3.36 -.09 PlumCrk 40.20
LSICorp 8.73 +.20 NCRCorp 21.41 +.32 Polariss 67.16
LTCPrp 30.51 +.14 NRG Egy 16.73 +.04 PostPrp 44.58
LaZBoy 14.16 +.21 NVEnergy 15.80 -.05 Potash 44.02
Ladede 40.95 +.35 NYSE Eur 29.27 +.23 PwshDB 29.31
LVSands 54.83 -.46 Nabors 20.11 -.16 PS USDBull 22.26
LeggMason 27.48 +.37 NBGrcers 3.26 -.29 PSKBWBk 23.44
LeggPlat 22.42 +.16 NatFuGas 50.90 +.77 PSSrLoan 24.53
LenderPS 23.69 +1.27 NatGrid 51.10 -.07 PShEMSov 28.31
LennarA 25.45 +.76 NOilVarco 81.38 -.12 Praxair 109.68
Level3rs 24.06 -.41 Nafionstrn 14.60 +.40 PrecDrill 11.76
LbtyASG 4.28 ... Navistar 39.38 +.11 PrinFnd 27.14
LillyEli 39.56 +.37 NewAmHi 10.86 +.01 ProLogis 34.14
Limited 46.74 +.60 NJRscs 45.56 -.15 ProShtS&P 36.77
LincNat 24.70 +.49 NYCmtyB 12.99 +.13 PrUShS&P 15.98
Lindsay 61.78 +.45 NewellRub 17.92 -.03 PrUIShDow 13.43
Linkedlnn 90.13 -.27 NewfidEx 35.55 -.01 ProUltQQQ 109.99
LionsGtg 13.54 +.17 NewmtM 56.88 -.07 PrUShQQQ 32.95
LizClaib 11.89 +.13 NewpkRes 7.79 +.05 ProUltSP 55.42
LockhdM 88.91 +.53 Nexeng 20.07 +.32 ProUShL20 19.27
LaPac 8.63 +.36 NextEraEn 60.01 +.25 PrUPShR2K 9.40
Lowes 29.77 +.41 NiSource 24.11 +.21 ProUltR2K 42.38
L BA 4214 58 NikeB 109.98 +2.08 ProUSSP500 9.88
NobleCorp 39.19 +.10 PrUItSP500 78.49
NobleEn 96.53 +1.08 PrUVxSTrs 29.29
M&TBk 81.35 +.68 NokiaCp 5.06 -.02 ProUSSilv 9.51
MBIA 9.61 -.06 NorfkSo 66.48 -.29 ProUtSI s 61.41
MDU Res 22.07 +.01 NoestUt 36.84 +.16 ProUShEuro 19.64
MEMC 3.87 +.02 NorthropG 60.18 -.19 ProctGam 66.93
MFAFnd 7.30 -.05 Novais 5443 +.30 ProgrssEn 53.60
MCR 9.66 -.04 NSTAR 48.29 +.26 ProgsvCp 21.65
MGIC 4.60 +.22 Nucor 42.25 +.60 ProUSR2K 30.89
MGMRsts 13.71 -.09 NuvMuOpp 15.10 +.03 Prudent 61.97
Macquarie 31.29 -.21 NvMulSl&G 8.82 -.09 PSEG 30.29
Macys 39.67 +.37 NuvQPf2 8.74 -.04 PubStrg 130.72
MageiMPtr 72.36 +.50 OGEEngy 52.64 +.38 PulteGrp 9.02
Magnalgs 47.65 +1.02 OcciPet 100.70 -.16 PPrIT 5.56
MagHRes 6.87 +.21 OfficeDpt 3.26 +.07 QEP Res 31.99
Manitowoc 14.72 +.16 OfficeMax 5.16 +.12 Qihoo360n 22.04
Manulifeg 12.33 +.22 Olin 21.72 +.09 QuanexBId 16.39
MarathnOs 33.34 -.19 OmegaHIt 20.61 +.15 QuantaSvc 21.66
MarathPn 43.90 +.26 Omncre 33.84 -.10 Questar 19.70
MktVGold 53.24 -.08 ONEOK 83.26 +.66 QksilvRes 5.44
MVOilSvs 43.10 +.03 OneokPts 57.19 +.16 Quiksilvr 4.26
MktVRus 32.72 +.06 OpkoHlth 4.93 +.10 RPC 15.71
MktVJrGId 26.70 -.28 OshkoshCp 22.83 +.47 RPM 24.77
MarlntA 37.54 +.80 OwensCorn 33.42 +.92 Rackspace 53.63
M shM 32.25RadianGrp 3.92
MStewrt 4.43 +.05 RadioShk 7.00
Masco 12.11 +.13 PG&ECp 42.84 +.57 Ralcorp 73.91
McDrmlnt 14.21 +.40 PHH Corp 14.22 +.38 RangeRs 63.51
McDnlds 96.84 -.12 PNC 59.40 +.67 RJamesFn 35.45
McKesson 86.40 +.84 PNM Res 18.63 +.13 Rayoniers 45.04
McMoRn 13.79 +.51 PPG 92.77 -.17 Raytheon 51.83
McEwenM 5.02 +.08 PPL Corp 28.26 +.18 Rltylno 36.96
Mechel 10.30 +.10 PallCorp 59.30 -1.90 RedHat 50.57
MedoHIth 68.56 +.91 Pandoran 11.50 +.77 RegalEnt 14.18
MedProp 9.60 +.11 PatiotCoal 6.53 +.23 RegionsFn 5.80
Medids 36.66 +1.14 PeabdyE 31.20 +.35 Renren n 5.40
Medtnic 37.67 -.46 Pengrthg 9.96 +.22 RepubSvc 30.55
Merck 37.60 +.21 PennVa 4.79 +.24 Revlon 16.07
MetLife 38.42 +.33 PennVaRs 24.72 +58 ReynAmer 42.08
MeroPCS 10.17 +.20 PennWstg 20.91 +.29
MetoHlth 8.62 +.22 Penney 37.66 -.96
MKorsan 49.59 +2.51 PepBoy 15.06 +.02
MidAApt 64.49 +1.39 PepcoHold 19.44 +.04
Midas 8.85 -.18 PepsiCo 63.15 +.20
MitsuUFJ 5.15 +.04 Prmian 22.85 +.10 The rer
MobileTele 18.06 +.13 PetrbrsA 26.61 -.70 r
MolinaH s 33.37 +.17 Petrobras 27.93 -.59 N S
Molycorp 30.89 +4.91 Pfizer 21.48 +.03 NYSE Ii
MoneyGrs 17.68 -.21 PhilipMor 84.61 -.01 found o
Monsanto 79.29 -.46 PiedNG 32.32 -.09 un
MonstrWw 9.11 +.50 Pier1 17.15 -.05


+.04 RiteAid 1.84 +.07
+.33 RockwAut 80.71 +.06
+.85 RockColl 58.85 +.21
+.29 Rowan 35.58 -.46
-.59 RylCarb 27.38 -.53
+.41 RoyDShllA 71.49 -1.26
+.26 Royce 13.88 +.10
+.45 Royce pfB 25.50 +.00
+.30 Rand 19.12 +.76
+.08
+.21
+.24 SAIC 12.62 +.06
+.04 SCANA 44.85 +.26
+.01 SKTIcm 13.79 -.03
-.27 SpdrDJIA 129.15 +.23
-.14 SpdrGold 166.38 +1.10
+56 SPMid 179.26 +1.72
+.54 S&P500ETF137.57 +.53
-.15 SpdrHome 20.61 +.40
-.12 SpdrS&PBk 22.47 +.29
-.05 SpdrLehHY 39.59
+.92 SpdrS&P RB 27.18 +.43
-.26 SpdrRefi 60.82 +.71
+.41 SpdrOGEx 59.64 +.39
-.07 SpdrMetM 50.54 +1.16
-.40 STMicro 7.58 +.13
+1.15 Safeway 21.76 +.25
-.11 StJoe 18.60 +.97
+.87 Sude 41.80 +.65
-1.22 Saks 11.69 +.11
-.23 Salesforce 147.43 +1.35
+1.34 SaelyBty 25.59 +.64
+.44 SJuanB 18.91 +.14
+.03 SandRdge 8.18 -.01
-.03 Sanofi 38.08 -.07
+.27 SaraLee 21.38 -.36
-.83 Schlmbrg 75.84 +.02
+.09 Schwab 14.13 +.21
-.23 SeadrillLtd 38.77 +.47
+1.38 SealAir 19.50 +.04
+.10 SempraEn 59.17 +.72
-.05 SenHous 21.42 -.10
-.33 Sensient 36.80 +.23
-93 SiderurNac 10.03 -.04
+.33 SilvWhthng 35.49 -.48
+.24 SilvrcpMg 7.25 +.23
+.16 SimonProp 136.45 -1.79
+.27 Skechers 12.62 +.50
-.34 SmithAO 44.73 +.25
+.51 SmithfF 22.87 +50
+.27 Smucker 75.44 -.13
-.20 SolarWinds 37.41 +.22
+.12 Soluna 27.90 -.01
-.04 SonyCp 21.26 +.84
+.36 SoJerInd 51.59 +.26
-.78 SouthnCo 45.11 +.34
+.50 SthnCopper 31.39 +.15
+.50 SoUnCo 43.74 -.01
+.11 SwstAirl 8.48 -.02
+.06 SwstnErgy 33.52 -.25
-.10 SpectaEn 31.55 -.13
+.12 SpiritAero 25.63 +50
+.01 SprintNex 2.78 +.18
+.05 SP Mais 36.64 +.01
+53 SP HIthC 36.47 +.15
+.37 SP CnSt 33.47 +.11
-.09 SP Consum 43.98 +.25
-.15 SPEngy 74.19 -.07




nainder of the

listings can be

n the next page.


IA EIA N 5 XCANE1


Name Last Chg


AbdAsPac 7.60 -.05
AbdnEMTel 19.40 +.09
AdmRsc 44.75 -.10
AdcareHIt 4.30 -.35
Advenox .60 -.08
AlexoRg 7.64 +.10
AlldNevG 34.41 +.92
AlmadnMg 2.89 +.09
AntaresP 2.94 -.03
Argan 14.67 -.08
Armour wt .01 -.01
Aurizong 5.02 +.07


AvalnRare 2.88 +.11 CornerstSt 7.64 +.12
Bacterin 3.37 -.01 CrSuislnco 3.80 +.01
Banrog 5.45 +.16 CrSuiHiY 3.13 +.01
BarcUBS36 43.45 +.30
BarcGSOil 27.26 +.20 DourEg 44 +.01
BrigusGg 88 -.01 DenisnMg 1.56 -.16
Carderog 1.31 DocuSec 4.12 +.39
CardiumTh .28 +.01 EVLtdDur 15.93 +.03
CelSd .37 +.01 EVMuni2 14.82 +.02
CFCdag 23.07 +.28 ElephTalk 2.39 +.03
CheniereEn 16.20 -.30 EllswthFd 7.33 +.03
CheniereE 24.70 +.27 EnovaSys .36 +.01
ChinaShen 1.57 +.11 EntGaming .30 +.02
ClaudeRg 1.11 -.07 ExeterRgs 3.02 -.01
ClghGlbOp 11.72 +.03 FrkStPrp 10.36 +.12


GSESy 2.24 +.41
GamGldNR 16.18 -.01
GascoEngy .28 -.01
Gastargrs 2.88 +.01
GastarpfA 19.72 -1.87
GenMoly 3.46 +.16
GoldResrc 23.84 +.09
GoldenMin 7.42 -.03
GoldStrg 1.82 +.05
GranTrrag 6.25 +.13
GrtBasGg .84 -.06
GtPanSilvg 2.50 +.06
GreenHntr 2.74 -.20


Hemisphrx .33 +.02
HooperH .69 -.01
HstnAEn 6.42 +.21
ImpOilgs 46.32 +.06
InovioPhm .63 -.01
IntellgSys 1.56
IntTower g 4.67 -.02


KeeganRg 4.72 +.11
KimberRg 1.09 +.01
LadThalFn 2.09 +.10
LkShrGldg 1.39 -.01
LucasEngy 2.65 -.08


- kfl8 6 +19


MadCatzg .56
Metaliom 4.49
MdwGoldg 1.68
Minefndg 14.81
NavideaBio 3.13
NeoStem .60
NBRESec 4.15
Neuralstem 1.15
Nevsung 3.87
NwGoldg 10.68
NA Pall g 2.77
NDynMng 6.19
NthnO&G 23.34


-.01
+.10 ParaG&S 2.41 ... SamsO&G 2.62 +.02
+.08 PhrmAth 1.44 +.05 SeabGld g 21.90 +.47
+.16 PbnDrill 9.63 +.33 TanzRyg 4.39 +.21
+.14 PlatGpMet 1.54 +.02 Taseko 3.82 +.07
+.14 PolyMetg 1.19 -.02 TasmanMg 2.61 +.52
+.0 PyramidOil 5.16 -.03 Tengsco 1.04 +.03
Quaterrag .55 -.01 TimberlnR .51 .04
-01 Quepasa 4.20 +.10 TrnsafiPet 1.29 +.04
-.01 QuestRMg 3.00 +.50 TravelCts 5.12 +.25
-.06 RareEleg 6.15 +1.04 TriValley .17 +.00
-.04 Rentech 1.86 +.13 TriangPet 7.31 +.23
+.11 Richmntg 9.36 -.10 Tuomwsg .95 +.02
+.21 Rubicong 3.62 +.10 USGeoth .58


Univ lnsur 4.14 +.09
Ur-Energy 1.19 +.03
Uranerz 2.62 +.11
UraniumEn 3.77 -.02

VantageDrl 1.53 +.10
VirnetX 24.10 +.22
VistaGold 3.43
VoyagerOG 3.47 +.07
Vringo 1.72 -.01
Walterlnv 23.31 +1.17
WFAdvlnco 10.56 -.04
XPOLogrs 16.08 +.77
YMBiog 1.92 -.03


IASD AQ AINL5AKT1


Name Last Chg


AMCNetn 45.69 +1.13
ASML HId 46.68 +.36
ATP O&G 8.47 +.26
AVI Bio 1.07 +.03
Aastom 2.20 +.38
Abiomed 21.87 +.68
Abraxas 3.84 +.10
AcadaTc 39.58 +.58
Accuray 6.64 -.01
Achillion 10.82 +.07
AcmePkt 28.40 +.87
AornEngy 9.15 +.21
AcfvsBliz 11.91 -.10
Acxiom 14.37 +.26
AdobeSy 33.64 +.59
Adtan 32.50 +.77
AdvEnld 12.26 +.07
Aegion 18.90 +.75
AeroViron 26.14 -.18
AEternag 1.83 +.03
Affymax 11.00 -.16
Affymetix 4.21 +.05
AkamaiT 36.84 +.72
Akorn 11.92 +.01
AlaskCom 3.17 +.05
Alexions 84.73 -.18
Alexzah .63 -.02
Alkermes 17.21 -.04
Allosmera 1.40 -.02
AllscriptH 18.61 -.26
AlteraCp If 38.00 +.58
Amarin 7.35 -.08
Amazon 184.32 -3.32
Amedisys 13.05 +.68
ACapAgy 29.50 +.15
AmCapLd 9.02
ACapMign 23.55 -.54
ACareSrch .64 +.17
ARItyCTn 10.42 -.04
AmSupr 3.77 -.06
Amgen 68.01 +.21
AmkorTIf 6.37 +.08
Amylin 15.79 +.02
Amyris 5.07 +.13
Anadigc 2.31 +.04
Anlogic 64.37 +1.56
Analystlnt 5.57 +.06
Ancestry 23.75 -1.12
Ansys 63.42 +.75
A123Sys 1.64 +.08
ApolloGrp 42.52
Apollolnv 7.08 +.03
Applelnc 545.17 +3.18
ApldMatf 12.37 +.19
AMCC 6.76 +.25
Approach 35.44 +.36
ApricusBio 3.41 +.20
ArchCap s 37.37 +.54
ArchLearn 11.04 -.01
ArdeaBio 19.87 -.54
ArenaPhm 1.74 +.02
AresCap 16.44 -.02
AriadP 14.72 -.13
Ariba Inc 32.09 +.65
ArkBest 18.52 +.80
ArmHId 26.98 +.12
ArrayBio 3.05 +.05
Arris 11.28 +.06
ArubaNet 23.27 +.99
AscenaRb 42.50 +.61
AspenTech 20.80 +.53
AssodBanc 13.29 +.23
AstexPhm 1.88 -.03
athenahlth 76.00 +1.10
Athersys 1.74 -.20
Atmel 10.00 -.21
Autodesk 36.81 +.29
AutoData 54.95 +.35
AvagoTch 36.77 +.35
AvanirPhm 3.03 +.03
AvisBudg 13.61 +.02
Aware 4.16 +.01
Axcelis 1.63 -.01
BBCNBcp 10.30 +.17


BEAero 47.16 +.75 Compuwre 9.36 +.18
BGC Pts 7.97 +.05 Comtech 32.86 +.89
BMC Sft 37.84 +.41 Comverse 6.22 +.06
Baidu 138.53 +1.34 ConcurTch 60.53 +.16
Balchem 28.49 +1.18 Conmed 29.74 +.23
BkOzarkss 30.54 +1.06 ConstantC 29.82 -.63
BeacnRfg 24.71 +.83 Corcept 4.00
BeasleyB 3.76 +.05 CorinthC 4.35 +.04
BedBath 62.66 -.05 Cosi Inc 1.02 +.02
Bioayst 5.59 +.08 CostPlus 14.75 +.58
BioFuelEh .66 +.00 Costom 89.34 +1.04
Biogenldc 120.61 +.19 Creelnc 29.84 +.80
BioMarin 34.37 -.26 Crocs 18.66 +.27
BioSanteh .74 -.01 CrssCtyHI 4.71 +.12
BioScrip 6.97 +.35 Ctrip.omm 24.09 -.89
BiostarPh 1.05 +.26 CubistPh 43.13 +.49
BIkRKelso 10.04 +.18 CumMed 3.49 +.15
BobEvans 37.91 +.42 Curis 4.60 +.08
BodyCentrl 26.75 -1.95 Cyclacelh .66 -.03
BonTon 8.06 -.18 Cymer 47.60 +.10
BreitBurn 19.50 +.32 CypSemi 15.94 +.44
Brighpnt 8.28 +.05 C ri 2.62 -.06
Broadcom 36.38 +.54
BroadSoft 36.94 +.01
BroadVisn 43.13 +1.23 DUSA 6.06 -.14
Broadwd h .69 +.01 DeckrsOut 68.31 +.98
BrcdeCm 5.69 +.06 Delcath 3.49 -.36
BrooksAuto 12.23 +.21 Dell Inc 16.93 -.28
BrukerCp 15.64 +.02 Dndreon 10.08 -.04
BuffabWW 88.83 -.29 Dentsply 38.61 +.19
BldrFstSrc 3.30 +.04 Depomed 6.08 -.21
CA Inc 27.00 +.25 DexCom 10.22 -.13
CBOE 27.37 +.01 DiamndFlf 24.07 +.18
CEVAInc 23.60 +.05 DigitalGen 10.63 +.06
CH Robins 66.35 +.59 DigRiver 17.06 -.02
CME Grp 276.56 +.33 Diodes 23.61 +1.21
CTCMedia 10.97 +.09 DirecTVA 47.15 +.73
CVBFnd 10.75 +.11 DiscCmA 47.18 +.10
CabtMics 36.06 +.17 DiscCmC 44.07 -.20
Cadence 12.01 +.05 DiscovLab 3.64 -.12
CdnSolar 3.20 +.23 DishNetwk 31.46 +.11
CapCtyBk 7.51 +.11 DollarTree 93.12 +.55
CapFedFn 11.83 +.11 DonlleyRR 12.94
CpstnTrbh 1.07 +.01 DrmWksA 17.21 -.06
CareerEd 8.08 +.21 DryShips 3.31 -.01
Carrizo 29.25 +.16 Dunkinn 30.51 +.32
CarverB rs 5.40 -.09 DurectCp h .83 -.05
CatalystH 63.23 +1.59 Dynavax 4.22 +.04
CathayGen 16.68 +.37 E-Trade 9.67 -.01
Cavium 33.35 +.65 eBay 36.25 +.47
Celgene 75.18 +.94 EagleBulk 1.49 -.02
CellTherrsh 1.29 ... ErthLink 7.44 +.07
CelldexTh 3.90 +.01 EstWstBcp 22.53 +.48
Celsion 1.71 -.05 EasyLkSInt 5.12 +.25
CentEuro 4.53 -.07 Ebix Inc 22.33 +.39
CentAI 9.12 +.29 EchdeonC 4.80
Cepheid 42.78 +.62 EchoStar 28.64 -.63
Cerner s 76.86 +.79 EducDev 4.94 -.01
CerusCp 3.73 8x8 Inc 4.65 +.02
ChrmSh 5.86 +.13 ElectSd 14.25 +.07
Chartlnds 73.55 +1.78 ElectArts 17.26 -.14
CharterCm 61.09 +.05 Emomrers 4.31 +.32
ChkPoint 59.78 +.15 EndoPhrm 37.28 +.21
Cheesecake 30.70 -.05 Endocyte 3.62 +.13
ChelseaTh 3.48 -.04 Endobgix 13.31 +.15
ChildPlace 51.06 -.39 EnerNOC 7.56 +.22
ChipMOS 14.11 +.51 EnrgyRec 2.36 +.08
ChrchllD 52.86 +.93 EngyXXI 37.08 +.69
CienaCorp 14.99 +.20 Entegris 9.24 +.13
CinnFin 35.04 +.10 EntropCom 6.15 +.05
Cintas 39.30 +.04 Equinix 138.38 -1.00
Cirrus 23.77 +.33 Ericsson 9.77 +.11
Cisco 19.80 +.12 ExactScih 9.47 +.29
CitrixSys 76.27 +1.02 Exelids 5.26 -.22
CleanEngy 20.77 +.06 EddeTc 2.93 +.02
Clearwire 2.11 -.09 Expedias 31.71 -.61
CoffeeH 10.60 +2.75 Expdlni 44.33 +.50
CognizTech 72.70 -.16 ExpScripts 54.18 +.90
CogoGrp 1.86 -.05 ExtrmNet 3.78 +.04
Coinstar 61.25 -.74 F5Netwks 125.61 +1.35
ColdwtrCrk 1.05 +.03 FLIRSys 26.34 +.26
ColumLabs .66 ... Fastenals 52.88 +.10
Comcast 29.84 +.22 FifthStFin 9.93 -.03
Comcspcl 29.33 +.23 FifthThird 13.76 +.29
CmcBMO 39.22 +.71 FinclEngin 21.97 +.48
CommSys 14.16 +.21 Fncllnst 16.36 +.31
CommVIt 51.50 +.12 Finisar 18.97 +.38
CmplGnom 3.49 -.34 FinLine 23.94 +.34


FstCashFn 45.43 +2.12 InterDig 38.15 +.26
FstNiagara 9.36 +.08 Intrface 12.42 +.57
FstSolar 27.49 +1.34 InterMune 14.59 +.74
FstMerit 16.45 +.43 InfiBcsh 19.49 +.46
Fiserv 67.97 +.09 InfiSpdw 25.73 -.07
Flextrn 7.17 +.11 Intersil 11.23 +.23
FocusMda 25.63 +.75 Intervals 15.51 +2.13
ForcePro 5.55 ... Intuit 58.17 +.95
FormFac 5.17 +.05 IntSurg 523.83 +6.97
Forfnets 26.59 +.28 InvRIEst 7.62 +.15
Fossil Inc 129.53 +3.31 IridiumCm 8.88 +.09
FosterWhl 23.35 +.10 IronwdPh 13.51 +.38
Francescn 25.30 +.34 Isis 8.31 +.10
FreshMkt 47.60 +1.13 Itron 46.13 +1.07
FriendFd n 1.59 -.06 IvanhoeEn .94
FronterCm 4.42 +.05
FuelSysSol 25.69 +.03
FuelCell 1.50 +.09 JA Solar 1.76 +.01
FultonFncl 9.89 +.15 JDASoft 25.69 +.45
S JDS Uniph 13.52 +.37
JackHenry 33.69
GSVCapn 18.10 +.22 JacklnBox 23.61 +.44
GTAdvTc 8.11 +.50 Jamba 2.10 +.08
GTx Inc 3.48 +.07 JamesRiv 5.70 +.34
GalenaBio 1.32 +.05 JazzPhrm 48.67 -.32
Garmin 47.51 +.08 JetBlue 4.98 -.01
GenProbe 66.94 +.01 JiveSoftn 23.93 +.46
Gentex 24.62 +.47 JonesSdah .51 -.05
Genfvah 7.00 +.55 KITDigit 9.23 -.01
GeoEye 19.70 +.73 KLATnc 49.46 +1.51
GeronCp 1.84 +.06 KeryxBio 4.21 +.20
GileadSd 46.09 -.44 Knology 18.34 +.19
GladerBc 14.20 +.23 KratosDef 6.63 -.06
GIbSpcMet 14.96 +.56 Kulicke 11.75 +.20
GluMobile 4.00 -.03 LCA Vis 7.65 +.84
GolLNGLtd 41.27 +.30 LKQCorp 31.50 +.22
Google 600.25 -6.89 LML Pay 1.85 +.01
GreenMtC 52.59 -9.81 LPL Inv 36.15 +1.13
GrifolsSAn 7.10 +.05 LSI IndIf 6.88 +.07
Grouponn 17.06 +.08 LamResrch 41.95 +.85
GulfportE 33.12 +.54 LamarAdv 31.27 -.12
H&EEq 19.83 -.23 Landstar 56.14 +.83
HMN Fn 2.18 +.18 Lattice 6.26 -.06
HMS Hd s 31.35 +.58 LeapWirlss 10.00 +.29
HalomnRrs 10.08 +.07 LedxPhrm 1.71 +.03
Halozyme 11.39 -.12 LibGlobA 50.27 -.17
HancHId 34.52 +.38 LibCapA 90.20 +2.70
HanmiFrs 9.10 +.51 LibtylntA 18.68 -.14
HansenMed 3.02 -.15 LifeTech 46.59 +.03
HanwhaSol 1.46 ... LifePtH 38.97 +.65
Harmonic 5.82 +.05 LimeEngy 3.18 -.22
Hasbro 35.18 +.32 LimelghtN 3.57 +.04
HawHold 5.16 +.13 Lincare 26.73 +.37
HrfindEx 14.87 +.20 LinearTch 33.17 +.08
HSchein 73.93 +.67 LinnEngy 38.84 +.42
HercOffsh 4.98 +.03 Liquidity 44.51 +.51
HercTGC 10.81 +.09 LivePrsn 16.27 +.11
Hibbett 51.49 -.15 LodgeNet 3.40 +.02
Hologic 21.00 -.05 Logitech 7.87 -.12
Home Inns 27.80 -1.89 LookSmart 1.41 -.02
HotTopic 10.01 +.15 lululemngs 72.09 +1.15
HudsCity 6.79 +.18 LumosNtw 11.77 +.34
HumGen 8.23 +.50
HuntJB 52.15 +.95
HuntBnk 5.86 +.06 MAPPhm 17.06 -.08
IAC Inter 48.65 +.61 MCG Cap 4.31 +.06
IdexxLabs 85.09 +1.19 MGE 44.76 +.39
iGateCorp 17.37 +.23 MIPSTech 5.62
IPG Photon 52.72 -.77 MTRGam 4.81 +.25
iRobot 26.59 +1.05 MTS 49.69 +.42
iShACWI 46.60 +.07 MYRGrp 18.95 +.06
iShNsdqBio 119.41 +.16 MSG 33.04 +.35
IconixBr 16.85 +.13 MagicJcks 24.00 +1.72
IdenixPh 11.16 -.03 Majesom 2.81 +.18
Ikanosh .71 -.04 MAKOSrg 38.05 +.85
Illumina 50.12 -.42 MannKd 2.26 +.01
ImunoGn 13.23 +.08 MarvellT 14.87 -.09
ImpaxLabs 23.40 -.08 Mattel 33.39 +.33
ImperlSgr 5.30 -.15 Mattson 2.75 +.09
Incyte 17.16 +.11 Madmlnig 27.88 +.13
Infinera 7.91 ... MaxwIlT 18.48 +.25
InfoSpace 13.01 +.48 MedAssets 13.66 -.04
Informant 49.35 +.31 MedicActn 5.37 +.35
Infosys 58.20 +.48 MediCo 20.77 +.05
IntegLfSd 34.20 +.81 Medivafon 74.04 +1.13
IntgDv 6.83 +.09 MelcoCrwn 13.13 -.06
Intel 27.07 +.23 Mellanox 35.68 -.36
InteractBrk 16.56 +.07 MentorGr 15.16 -.06


MercadoL 96.01 +.78 Pantry 12.04 +.35
MergeHIth 6.55 +.06 ParamTch 27.27 +.89
Methanx 31.44 -.06 Parexel 25.08 +.22
Microchp 36.13 +.28 ParkerVsh 1.00 +.05
MicronT 8.33 +.17 Patterson 31.04 +.08
MicrosSys 53.98 +.97 PattUTI 18.90 -.04
MicroSemi 20.84 +.14 Paychex 31.49 +.19
Microsoft 31.99 -.02 Pendrell 2.50 -.03
Micrvisnrs 3.04 -.21 PnnNGm 43.51 +.14
MillerHer 21.72 +.37 PennantPk 11.09 +.11
Mindspeed 6.35 +.35 PeopUtdF 12.54 +.09
Misonix 2.06 -.02 PeregrineP .68 -.22
MitekSys 12.15 -.44 Perrigo 105.09 -.46
MobileMini 21.88 +.70 PetSmart 58.40 +.53
Molex 27.29 +.22 PetMed 11.95 +.16
Momenta 15.07 +.11 PetroDev 38.13 +1.60
MonPwSys 18.08 +.51 Pharmacyc 25.37 -.24
Monotype 14.49 +.36 PhotrIn 6.46 -.02
MonstrBvs 59.57 +1.89 PlugPwrrs 1.77 -.14
MoSys 3.76 +.23 Polyomms 18.91 +.05
Motricity 1.12 -.09 Popular 1.91 +.04
Mylan 22.97 +.39 Power-One 4.22 +.11
MyriadG 24.68 +.19 PwShsQQQ 65.02 +.27
NETgear 38.76 +.48 Powrwvrs 1.42 +.08
NICInc 11.94 -.01 PremExhib 3.23 +.16
NICESys 37.03 +1.19 Presstekh .64
NIl HIdg 17.34 +.28 PriceTR 63.11 +1.06
NPS Phm 6.77 +.10 priceline 647.45 -6.37
NXPSemi 25.64 +.67 PrUPShQQQ 12.25 -.14
NasdOMX 26.13 +.18 PrUltPQQQ 106.34 +1.27
NatCineM 15.79 +.32 PrognicsPh 9.33 +.27
Natlnstrm 27.32 +.90 ProgrsSoft 23.43 +.72
NatPenn 8.62 +.08 ProspctCap 10.68 -.09
NatusMed 10.50 +.39 PureCycle 2.19 -.11
NektarTh 7.56 +.04 QIAGEN 15.08
NetApp 42.94 +1.10 QlikTech 30.56 +.79
Netease 54.29 +2.09 Qlogic 17.58 +.22
Netfiix 109.13 +1.06 Qualomm 63.93 +.61
Neflist 3.63 +.09 QltyDistr 13.02 +.01
NetSolTh .39 -.01 QualityS s 43.33 +.44
NetSpend 7.95 -.07 QuantFuel .99 -.04
Neurcrine 7.99 +.12 QuestSft 24.07 +4.67
NeurogXh .50 -.03 Questomr 35.84 -2.25
NYMigTr 6.64 -.41 QuinStreet 10.01 -.16
Newport 17.29 +.73 RFMicD 4.65 -.03
NewsCpA 19.83 +.23 RadNet 3.45 +.33
NewsCpB 20.13 +.18 Rambus 6.76 +.07
NobltyHIf 7.58 -.21 Randgold 112.41 +.75
NorTrst 44.28 +.31 RaptorPhm 7.01 -.06
Novavax 1.29 -.02 RealPage 21.56 +1.41
Novlus 46.94 +1.03 Regenrn 107.21 +1.01
NuVasive 15.54 -.01 RentACt 34.80 +.64
NuanceCm 25.86 -.22 RschMotn 13.58 +.39
NutriSyst 10.53 -.04 Respnsysn 10.25 -.15
Nvidia 14.82 -.04 RetailOpp 11.94 +.07
NxStageMd 18.48 +.22 RexEnergy 10.71 -.16
OCZTech 8.88 +.19 RiverbedT 27.25 +.24
OReillyAu 90.42 +.50 RosettaR 50.55 +.33
Oclaro 4.40 +.02 RossStrss 55.98 +.62
OdysMar 3.11 +.03 Rovi Corp 34.25 +.34
OldDomFrt 47.17 +1.04 RoyGId 66.97 -.05
OmniVisn 18.11 +.23 RoyaleEn 5.99 -.32
OnAssign 13.55 +.03 RubiomnTc 9.02 +.11
OnSmcnd 8.81 +.09 RuthsHos 6.71 +.43
Onoothyr 5.04 -.16
OnyxPh 38.14 +.25
OpenTable 42.93 -.43 SBA Com 49.67 +.54
OpnwvSy 2.42 +.08 SEI Inv 20.03 +.12
OpntTch 30.18 +1.46
OpbmerPh 12.94 -.06 SLM Cp 16.36 +.20
Oracle 30.13 +.06 STEC 9.32 +.18
Orbcomm 3.70 +.10 SXC HIth 72.82 +.28
Orexigen 3.70 -.04 SalemCm 2.88 +.20
Orthfx 39.99 +.63 SalixPhm 49.30 +.10
OtterTail 21.63 +.28 SanderFm 53.25 +2.43
Overstk 5.34 +.09 SanDisk 50.25 +1.03
SangBio 4.95 -.05
Sanmina 11.13 +.10
PDLBio 6.13 +.06 Sanofirt 1.36 +.01
PFChng 39.93 -.37 Santarus 4.78 -.07
PMCSra 6.93 +.03 Sapient 12.66 +.31
PSSWrld 24.81 +.33 Satconh .44 +.00
Paccar 45.85 +.58 SavientPh 1.99 +.10
PacBiosci 3.61 -.09 SdGames 10.73 +.32
PacEthrs 1.06 -.01 SeagateT 28.33 +.35
PacSunwr 2.21 ... SearsHIdgs 80.48 +2.85
PanASIv 23.64 +.22 SeattGen 17.93 -.07
PaneraBrd 161.18 +2.17 SeiCmfrt 32.16 +1.15


Selectlns 17.16 +.26 TriMash 23.61 +.35
Semtech 27.14 +.08 TrimbleN 50.86 +.56
Sequenom 4.18 -.08 TripAdvn 30.70 -.56
SvcSourcn 16.75 +.44 TriQuint 6.27 +.10
SvArtsrsh .18 +.00 Trius-mer 4.81 +.01
Shenglnn h .76 +.02 TrueReig 26.22 +.84
Shire 105.66 +.82 Trueig 26.22 +.84
ShoreTel 5.15 -.09 TrstNY 5.36 +.09
ShuffiMstr 16.80 +.10 Trustmk 23.78 +.40
Shutterfly 32.07 +.43 TudouHn 15.39 +1.71
SigmaAld 71.61 +.11 21Vianetn 11.62 +.24
SignatBk 61.51 +1.14 USHmSy 11.68 +.59
SilicGrln 8.96 +.01 UltaSalon 89.28 +.01
Silicnlmg 5.17 -.07 Umpqua 12.14 +.06
SilicnMotn 18.42 +.43 UBWV 29.75 +.10
Slcnware 5.73 +.03 UtdOnln 4.84 +.02
SilvStdg 15.50 +.06 USEnr 3.34 +.06
Sina 77.40 +2.75 US Enr 3.34 +06
Sindair 11.68 +.31 UtdStatns 29.47 -.05
SinoClnEn 2.55 +.08 UtdTherap 46.85 +.01
SiriusXM 2.35 +.06 UnivDisp 39.90 -.15
SironaDent 49.66 +.64 UnivFor 32.31 +.11
Skullcdyn 14.43 +.11 UranmRsh .00 +.03
SkywksSol 26.91 +.14 UrbanOut 29.50 +.82
SmartBal 6.29 +.19 Uroplasty 2.91
SmithWes 6.95 +1.29
SmithMicro 2.50 -.06
SodaStrm 34.56 +.32 VCA Ant 22.30 +.54
Sohu.cm 49.30 +.35 VO)(nl 12.99 +15
SolarCap 22.68 +.17 VOXXIn 12.99 +.15
Solazymen 12.93 +.75 ValueClick 20.74 +.19
SonicCorp 7.29 -.14 VandaPhm 4.76 +.28
Sonus 2.86 -.05 VanlntCpB 84.55 -.05
SouMoBc 25.00 +.20 Veeomlnst 29.81 +1.32
Sourcefire 48.30 +2.35 Veli 9.82
SpectPh 12.76 -.07 VBradley 37.14 +2.20
SpiritAirn 19.35 +.24 Verisign 36.95 +.47
Spreadtrm 14.78 +.27 Verisk 45.10 +.95
Stamps.cm 28.52 +.61 Vermillion 1.95 .12
Staples 15.40 +.03 on -
StarSdent 3.98 +.05 VertxPh 41.79 +.13
Starbucks 51.84 +1.47 iacomB 47.79 -.51
SfDynam 14.35 +.26 Vical 3.21 +.03
StemCelrs 1.05 +.01 VirgnMdah 24.93 +.06
Stericyde 87.75 +1.08 ViroPhrm 29.65 +.28
StewEnt 5.59 +.07 Vivus 20.66 -.59
StratDiag 1.99 -.01 Vocus 14.16 +.72
SunHIth 5.13 +.28 Vodafone 26.58 -.42
SunesisPh 2.29 +.01 Volcano 29.17 +.77
SunPower 7.24 +.07 WCAWsth 6.49 -.01
SusqBnc 9.24 +.14
SwisherHy 3.11 +.02 WarnerCh 16.67 -.35
Symantec 17.73 +.16 WarrenRs 3.73 +.33
Symetricm 5.73 +.11 WashFed 16.33 +.08
Synaorn 5.24 +.14 WaveSys 1.73 -.08
Synaptfcs 37.00 -.01 WebMD 25.47 -.03
Synchron 31.46 -.04 Websense 19.32 +.70
Synopsys 30.11 +.24 Wendys Co 4.89 +.08
Syntrolm h 1.02 WernerEnt 25.32 +.26
TDAmerit 18.97 +.19 Westmrld 11.82 +.31
THQh .52 +.01
TPCGrp 41.88 +3.47 Wstptlnn g 45.46 +.6
tw teleom 21.88 -.06 WetSeal 3.28 .07
TakeTwo 15.83 +.22 WholeFd 83.87 +.03
TaleoA 45.91 +.01 Windstrm 12.17 +.17
Targacept 7.30 +.04 Winn-Dixie 9.51 +.01
TASER 4.05 +.04 WisdomTr 7.59 +.56
TearLab 2.96 +.11 WrightM 18.07 +.38
TechData 54.52 +.29 Wynn 120.79 -2.60
TICmSys 2.71 +.05 XOMA 1.86 +.01
TeleTech 15.76 +.24 Xilinx 36.44 +.03
Telikh .18 -.00
Tellabs 3.93 +.01 Xyrate 16.03 -.76
TeslaMot 34.74 +1.67 YRCrs 8.45 +.22
TesseraTch 15.74 +.29 Yahoo 14.63 +.01
TevaPhrm 44.92 +.08 Yandexn 23.47 -.48
Texlnst 32.27 -.33 Yongye 3.61 +.18
TexRdhse 16.74 +.24 Zagg 10.04 -.09
Theravnce 18.01 +.11 Zalicus 1.12 +.04
Thoratec 33.99 +.52 ZeliqAes n 6.70 +1.04
ThrshdPhm 6.46 +.31 ZonBcp 18.99 +.30
TibcoSft 30.15 +.87 o
TibetPhrm 1.64 +.04 Zopharm 4.92 +.03
TiVoInc 11.28 +.07 pcarn 13.99 +.19
TractSupp 87.37 -.10 Zogenix 2.03 -.46
TranSi 3.45 -.16 Zoltek 11.33 +.11
Trnscnd 29.20 +.02 Zumiez 34.33 +2.01
Travelzoo 23.06 -.41 Zyngan 13.89 +.22


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Yesterday Pvs Day
Argent 4.3410 4.3350
Australia .9454 .9385
Bahrain .3770 .3770
Brazil 1.7830 1.7625
Britain 1.5673 1.5825
Canada .9899 .9899
Chile 483.63 485.18
China 6.3103 6.3175
Colombia 1762.60 1764.60
Czech Rep 18.78 18.66
Denmark 5.6686 5.6023
Dominican Rep 39.00 39.00
Egypt 6.0363 6.0338
Euro .7624 .7536
Hong Kong 7.7571 7.7553
Hungary 222.32 221.10
India 49.805 50.075
Indnsia 9129.00 9134.00
Israel 3.7932 3.7713
Japan 82.52 81.60
Jordan .7095 .7095
Lebanon 1503.50 1503.50
Malaysia 3.0095 3.0100
Mexico 12.6509 12.6874
N. Zealand 1.2161 1.2110
Norway 5.7051 5.5807
Peru 2.669 2.673
Poland 3.12 3.09
Russia 29.4165 29.4185
Singapore 1.2543 1.2516
So. Africa 7.5454 7.5044
So. Korea 1117.23 1118.40
Sweden 6.8069 6.7004
Switzerlnd .9194 .9087
Taiwan 29.41 29.51
Thailand 30.57 30.57
Turkey 1.7875 1.7757
U.A.E. 3.6731 3.6731
Uruguay 19.5499 19.5899
Venzuel 4.2951 4.2950


British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.



Yesterday Pvs Day

Prime Rate 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate 0.75 0.75
Federal Funds Rate .00-.25 .00-.25
Treasuries
3-month 0.08 0.065
6-month 0.13 0.12
5-year 0.90 0.84
10-year 2.03 1.98
30-year 3.18 3.10



FUTURES
Exch Contract Settle Chg
Lt Sweet Crude NYMX Apr 12 107.40 +.82
Corn CBOT May12 645 +91V2
Wheat CBOT May12 643 +81/4
Soybeans CBOT May12 13373/4 -34
Cattle CME Apr12 126.02 -.63
Sugar (world) ICE May12 23.66 -.30
Orange Juice ICE May12 188.80 -.95


SPOT
Yesterday Pvs Day
Gold (troy oz., spot) $1710.90 $1708.80
Silver (troy oz., spot) $34.1/0 $3595bb
Copper (pound) $3.8525 $3.8955
Platinum (troy oz., spot)tlbb4.90 $1b91./0
NMER= New York Mercantile Exchange. CBOT=
Chicago Board of Trade. CMER = Chicago Mercantile Ex-
change. NCSE = New York Cotton, Sugar & Cocoa Ex-
change. NCTN = New York Cotton Exchange.


I AMEX


I NASDA


YTD YTD
Name Div YId PE Last Chg %Chg Name Div YId PE Last Chg %Chg
AKSteel .20 2.7 ... 7.32 +.29 -11.4 Microsoft .80 2.5 12 31.99 -.02 +23.2
AT&Tlnc 1.76 5.6 47 31.18 +.18 +3.1 MotrlaSolu .88 1.7 15 50.74 -1.02 +9.6
Ametek .24 .5 20 48.12 +.61 +14.3 MotrlaMob ... ... ... 39.75 ... +2.4
ABInBev 1.16 1.7 ... 69.56 ... +14.1 NextEraEn 2.40 4.0 13 60.01 +.25 -1.4
BkofAm .04 .5 ... 8.05 -.01 +44.8 Penney .80 2.1 23 37.66 -.96 +7.1
CapCtyBk ... ... 26 7.51 +.11 -21.4 PiedmOfc .80 4.6 13 17.36 +.07 +1.9
CntryLink 2.90 7.4 23 39.02 +.30 +4.9 ProgrssEn 2.48 4.6 27 53.60 -.03 -4.3
Citigrp rs .04 .1 9 34.20 +.20 +30.0 RegionsFn .04 .7 34 5.80 +.01 +34.9
CmwREIT 2.00 11.0 15 18.13 +.19 +9.0 SearsHIdgs .33 ... ... 80.48 +2.85+153.2
Disney .60 1.4 16 42.24 +.22 +12.6 Smucker 1.92 2.5 19 75.44 -.13 -3.5
EnterPT 3.00 6.6 25 45.46 -.04 +4.0 SprintNex ... ... ... 2.78 +.18 +18.8
ExxonMbI 1.88 2.2 10 84.30 -.53 -.5 Texlnst .68 2.1 17 32.27 -.33 +10.9
FordM .20 1.6 7 12.58 +.12 +16.9 TimeWarn 1.04 2.8 14 36.72 -.14 +1.6
GenElec .68 3.6 15 19.04 +.01 +6.3 UniFirst .15 .3 15 59.47 +.51 +4.8
HomeDp 1.16 2.4 19 48.10 +.28 +14.4 VerizonCm 2.00 5.1 46 39.10 -.12 -2.5
Intel .84 3.1 11 27.07 +.23 +11.6 Vodafone 2.10 7.9 ... 26.58 -.42 -5.2
IBM 3.00 1.5 15200.62 +.81 +9.1 WalMart 1.59 2.6 13 60.08 +.31 +.5
Lowes .56 1.9 21 29.77 +.41 +17.3 Walgrn .90 2.7 11 33.48 +.70 +1.3
McDnlds 2.80 2.9 18 96.84 -.12 -3.5 YRC rs ... ... ... 8.45 +.22 -15.2


m


A6 SATURDAY, MARCH 10, 2012


STOCKS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BUSINESS


SATURDAY, MARCH 10, 2012 A7


I MUTUALFUDSA I


Name NAV Chg
Advance Capital I:
Balancp 16.76 +.04
Retlnc 8.81
Alger Funds B:
SmCapGr 7.12 +.10
AllianceBern A:
BalanAp 16.67 +.05
GIbThGrAp 68.02
SmCpGrA 38.72 +.46
AllianceBern Adv:
LgCpGrAd 29.19 +.16
AllianceBern B:
GIbThGrBt 58.57 -.01
GrowthBt 27.18 +.11
SCpGrBt 30.99 +.36
AllianceBern C:
SCpGrCt 31.15 +.37
Allianz Fds Insti:
NFJDvVI 12.43 +.03
SmCpVi 31.35 +.31
Allianz Funds C:
AGICGrthC 25.94 +.11
TargetC t 15.76 +.08
Amer Beacon Insti:
LgCaplnst 20.66 +.06
Amer Beacon Inv:
LgCaplnv 19.61 +.06
Ameri Century 1 st:
Growth 27.92 +.14
Amer Century Adv:
EqGroAp 23.70 +.07
EqlncAp 7.59 +.02
Amer Century Inv:
AIICapGr 30.59 +.13
Balanced 17.07 +.03
DivBnd 11.06
Eqlnc 7.59 +.02
Growthl 27.68 +.13
Heritagel 22.74 +.12
IncGro 26.73 +.09
InfAdjBd 12.97 +.04
IntDisc 9.66 -.01
IntlGrol 10.57 -.06
NewOpp 8.28 +.10
OneChAg 12.78 +.04
OneChMd 12.32 +.02
RealEstl 21.37 +.10
Ultra 25.67 +.09
Valuelnv 6.08 +.03
American Funds A:
AmcpAp 20.84 +.07
AMuiAp 27.37 +.07
BalAp 19.45 +.02
BondAp 12.69 +.01
CaplBA p 51.35 -.03
CapWGAp 35.23 -.07
CapWAp 21.05 -.08
EupacAp 39.23 -.05
FdlnvA p 38.76 +.09
GovtAp 14.38
GwthAp 32.21 +.09
HI TrAp 11.07 +.02
IncoAp 17.46 +.02
IntBdAp 13.68
IntlGrlncAp 29.47 -.10
ICAAp 29.56 +.07
LtTEBAp 16.23
NEcoAp 27.08 +.10
NPerAp 29.11 -.01
NwWrldA 51.69 -.02
STBFAp 10.09
SmCpAp 38.25 +.25
TxExA p 12.77 +.01
WshAp 30.04 +.01
Ariel Investments:
Apprec 43.90 +.25
Ariel 48.31 +.52
Artio Global Funds:
IntlEql r 25.30 -.09
IntEqll I r 10.69 -.03
Artisan Funds:
Intl 22.52 -.06
IntlnstI 22.65 -.05
InftlVal r 27.61 +.02
MidCap 39.17 +.24
MidCapVal 21.46 +.16
SCapVal 16.26 +.18
Baron Funds:
Asset 51.18 +.41
Growth 55.00 +.49
SmallCap 25.59 +.31
Bernstein Fds:
IntDur 13.89 -.01
DivMu 14.82
TxMgdlntl 13.91 -.06
BlackRock A:
EqtyDiv 19.25 +.05
GIAIAr 19.55
HiYlnvA 7.74 +.01
InflOpAp 31.01 -.06
BlackRock B&C:
GIAICt 18.20
BlackRock Instl:
BaVII 26.77 +.10
EquityDv 19.29 +.04
GIbAllocr 19.65 +.01
HiYldBd 7.74 +.01
Brinson Funds Y:
HiYldlY 6.20
BruceFund 396.58 +2.05
Buffalo Funds:
SmCapn 27.81 +.33
CGM Funds:
Focusn 29.60 +.15
MutI n 27.54 +.11
Realty n 28.64 +.28
CRM Funds:
MdCpVll 29.22 +.22
Calamos Funds:
GrwthAp 52.89 +.23
Calvert Invest:
Incop 15.95 -.01
InfEqAp 13.47 -.07
SocialAp 29.98 +.11
SocBdp 15.91
SocEqAp 37.28 +.12
TxFLgp 16.15
Cohen & Steers:
RltyShrs 64.20 +.24
Columbia Class A:
Acorn t 30.32 +.26
DivEqlnc 10.34 +.03
DivrBd 5.11
DivOpptyA 8.58 +.02
LgCapGrA t25.56 +.10
LgCorQAp 6.33 +.02
MdCpGrOp 10.39 +.06
MidCVlOp p 8.05 +.05
PBModAp 11.09 +.02
TxEAp 13.92
SelComm A 48.31 +.46
FrontierA 11.12 +.14
GlobTech 22.91 +.19
Columbia Cl 1,T&G:
EmMktOp I n 8.50 +.02
Columbia Class Z:
AcornZ 31.39 +.27
AcornlntZ 38.99 -.08
DivlncoZ 14.41 +.05
IntBdZ 9.38
IntTEBd 10.87
LgCapGr 14.00 -.03
LgCpldxZ 26.57 +.10
MdCpldxZ 11.97 +.11
MdCpVIZp 14.00 +.11
ValRestr 48.95 +.12
Credit Suisse Comm:
ComRett 8.45 +.06
DFA Funds:
IntfCorEqn 10.34 -.05
USCorEql nll.87 +.08
USCorEq2nl11.70 +.09
DWS Invest A:
CommAp 17.69 -.03
DWS Invest S:
CorPlslnc 10.90 +.01
EmMkGrr 16.84 +.03
EnhEmMk 10.64 +.05
EnhGlbBdr 10.06 .03
GIbSmnCGr 38.95 +.09
GIblNhem 22.66 +.06
Gold&Prc 16.04 +.02
GrolncS 17.86 +.10
HiYldTx 12.61 ...
IntTxAMT 11.96
Intl FdS 41.00 -.25
LgCpFoGr 32.71 +.23
LatAmrEq 42.76 -.44
MgdMuni S 9.33
MATES 14.96 -.01
SP500S 18.28 +.07
WorldDiv 23.36 -.04
Davis Funds A:
NYVenA 35.51 +.12
Davis Funds B:
NYVenB 33.93 +.10
Davis Funds C:
NYVen C 34.24 +.11
Davis Funds Y:
NYVenY 35.88 +.11
Delaware Invest A:
Diver Inc p 9.26
SMIDCapG 25.66 +.34
TxUSAp 11.87
Delaware Invest B:
SelGrBt 35.23 +.27
Dimensional Fds:
EmMCrEqn20.29 +.04
EmMktV 31.04 +.03
IntSmVan 15.75 -.06
LargeCo 10.80 +.04
TAUSCorE2 n9.52 +.07
USLgVan 21.26 +.08
US Micron 14.52 +.20
USTgdVal 16.96 +.20
US Small n 22.69 +.31


USSmVa 25.77 +.35
IntlSmCon 15.67 -.05
EmgMktn 27.43 +.07
Fixd n 10.33
IntGFxlnn 12.87 -.01
IntVan 16.29 -.06
Glb5Fxlncnll.06
TM USTgtV 22.32 +.27
2YGIFxdn 10.11
DFARIEn 24.43 +.10
Dodge&Cox:
Balanced 73.46 +.21
Income 13.69
IntlStk 32.50 -.11
Stock 112.48 +.43
DoubleUne Funds:
TRBdI 11.20
TRBdNp 11.20
Dreyfus:
Aprec 43.52 -.02
CTA 12.18 -.01
CorVA 22.47
Dreyf 9.46 +.06
DryMid r 29.08 +.27
GNMA 16.02 +.01


Name NAV Chg
GrChinaAr 34.07 +.14
HiYIdA p 6.44 +.01
StratValA 29.04 +.16
TechGroA 34.85 +.18
DreihsAclnc 10.62 +.01
Driehaus Funds:
EMktGr 29.20 +.19
EVPTxMEmI 47.57 +.05
Eaton Vance A:
ChinaAp 17.32 +.09
AMTFMuInc 10.05
MuIbCGrA 8.58 +.04
InBosA 5.82
LgCpValx 18.42 +.01
NatlMunlnc 9.93 +.01
SpEqtA 16.74 +.22
TradGvA 7.43
Eaton Vance B:
HlthSBt 9.62 +.02
NatlMulnc 9.93 +.01
Eaton Vance C:
GovtC p 7.42 +.01
NatMunlnc 9.93 +.01
Eaton Vance I:
FltgRt 8.98 +.01
GblMacAbR 10.02 +.02
LgCapValx 18.46 -.01
FBR Funds:
Focuslnvtn49.19 +.27
FMI Funds:
LgCappn 16.51 +.05
FPA Funds:
Nwlnc 10.69
FPACres 28.30 +.06
Fairholme 29.32 +.23
Federated A:
MidGrStA 37.56 +.29
MuSecA 10.47
TtlRtBdp 11.42
Federated Instl:
KaufmnR 5.40 +.04
TotRetBd 11.42
StrValDvlS 4.85 -.01
Fidelity Adv Foc T:
EnergyT 38.44 +.01
HItCarT 22.74 +.12
Fidelity Advisor A:
Nwlnsghp 21.93 +.09
StrlnA 12.39
Fidelity Advisor C:
Nwlnsghtn 20.77 +.10
Fidelity Advisor I:
EqGrl n 64.71 +.35
EqInl n 25.00 +.07
IntBdlIn 11.53
Nwlnsgtl n 22.21 +.10
Fidelity Advisor T:
BalancT 16.11 +.05
DivGrTp 13.00 +.07
EqGrTp 60.54 +.32
EqInT 24.61 +.08
GrOppT 40.97 +.20
HilnAdTp 9.92 +.04
IntBdT 11.50 -.01
MulncTp 13.41
OvrseaT 17.24 -.06
STFiT 9.30
StkSelAIICp 19.73 +.10
Fidelity Freedom:
FF2010n 13.89 +.02
FF2010K 12.84 +.02
FF2015n 11.61 +.02
FF2015K 12.89 +.02
FF2020n 14.04 +.03
FF2020K 13.31 +.03
FF2025n 11.69 +.03
FF2025K 13.45 +.04
FF2030n 13.91 +.03
FF2030K 13.60 +.04
FF2035n 11.53 +.03
FF2035K 13.70 +.04
FF2040 n 8.05 +.03
FF2040K 13.75 +.04
FF2045 n 9.53 +.03
Incomen 11.58 +.01
Fidelity Invest:
AIISectEq 12.48 +.06
AMgr50n 16.02 +.04
AMgr70rn 16.82 +.04
AMgr20rn 13.11 +.01
Balancn 19.55 +.06
BalancedK 19.55 +.06
BlueChGrn 48.81 +.15
CAMunn 12.61
Canadan 53.49 +.13
CapApn 28.03 +.16
CapDevOn 11.50 +.06
Cplnc r n 9.20 +.03
ChinaRgr 28.72 +.17
CngS 465.09
CTMunrn 11.93
Contran 75.15 +.32
ContraK 75.12 +.33
CnvScn 25.42 +.10
DisEq n 23.66 +.05
DiscEqF 23.64 +.06
Divlntl n 28.44 -.04
DivrslntKr 28.40 -.04
DivStkOn 16.36 +.07
DivGthn 29.56 +.17
EmergAs r n28.75 +.28
EmrMkn 23.30 +.11
Eql Incn 44.56 +.13
EQII n 18.59 +.04
ECapAp 17.40 -.10
Europe 28.65 -.17
Exch 323.88
Exportn 22.85 +.08
Fideln 34.56 +.18
Fiftyrn 19.12 +.13
FItRateHi r n 9.79
FrInOnen 28.21 +.05
GNMAn 11.85 +.01
GovtInc 10.73
GroCo n 94.48 +.45
Grolnc n 20.06 +.09
GrowCoF 94.40 +.44
GrowthCoK 94.41 +.44
GrStratrn 21.00 +.10
Highlncrn 9.00 +.01
Indepnn 25.19 +.10
InProBdn 12.99 +.04
IntBdn 10.95
IntGov n 10.95 -.01
IntmMu n 10.51
IntlDiscn 30.56 -.03
IntlSCprn 19.86 -.01
InvGrBd n 11.75
InvGBn 7.77
Japanr 10.13 +.05
JpnSm n 8.94 -.02
LgCapVal 11.05 +.04
LatAm 55.21 -.34
LevCoStkn 29.10 +.15
LowPrn 40.10 +.23
LowPriKr 40.08 +.23
Magellnn 71.30 +.30
MagellanK 71.24 +.30
MDMurn 11.46
MAMun en 12.50 -.01
MegaCpStk nl3.20 +.03
MIMunn 12.36
MidCapn 29.99 +.10
MNMunn 11.91
MtgSecn 11.22
Munilncn 13.22
NJMunr n 12.10
NwMktrn 16.67 +.01
NwMilln 31.90 +.09
NYMun en 13.44 -.01
OTCn 62.45 +.07
Oh Munn 12.11
0l0Index 9.64 +.02


PuriBin 19.22 +.06
PuritanK 19.22 +.07
RealEn 29.36 +.13
SAIISecEq 12.49 +.07
SCmdtyStrt n 9.25 +.06
SCmdtyStrF n9.27 +.07
SrEmrgMkt 16.70 +.07
SrslntGrw 11.31 -.01
SerlntlGrF 11.33 -.01
SrslntVal 8.69 -.05
SerlntlValF 8.70 -.05
SrlnvGrdF 11.76 +.01
StlntMu n 10.85 +.01
STBF n 8.54
SmCapDisc n22.36 +.25
SmllCpSrn 18.56 +.21
SCpValur 15.48 +.15
SllSelLCVrnll.17 +.06
SllSlcACap n27.31 +.14
SllSelSmCp 19.91 +.21
Sfratlncn 11.09 -.01
SfrReRtr 9.51 +.03
TotalBdn 11.02
Trend n 76.04 +.28
USBIn 11.80
Utilityn 17.40 +.06
ValStratn 28.53 +.10
Valuen 71.20 +.50
Wrldwn 19.12 +.06
Fidelity Selects:
Aim 37.90 +.15
Banking n 17.98 +.22
Biotch n 98.53 +.41
Brokr n 47.33 +.41
Chemn 110.42 +.24
ComEquipn24.38 +.18
Comp n 65.28 +.46
ConDisn 26.41 +.19
ConsuFnn 12.76 +.11
ConStapn 75.57 +.07
CstHon 41.19 +.63
DfAer n 85.59 +.33


Elect n 52.63 +39
Energy n 54.90 +.01
EngSv n 72.06 +.23
EnvAltEnrnl6.19 +.11
FinSv n 58.08 +.44
Goldrn 44.08 +.08
Health n 133.23 +.73
Insur n 47.78 +.29
Leisran 107.91 +1.04
Material n 68.79 +.17
MedDIn 61.55 +.63
MdEqSysn 28.06 +.29
Multmdn 48.90 +.30
NtGasn 32.67 +.15
Pharm n 14.20 +.04
Retail n 59.31 +.27
Softwr n 90.86 +.45
Techn 101.95 +.83
Telcm n 46.73 +.23
Trans n 52.67 +.09
UtilGr n 53.29 +.33
Wireless n 7.75 +.04
Fidelity Spartan:
ExtMklnn 39.94 +.41


Here are the 1,000 biggest mutual funds listed on Nasdaq. Tables show the fund name, sell
price or Net Asset Value (NAV) and daily net change.
Name: Name of mutual fund and family.
NAV: Net asset value.
Chg: Net change in price of NAV.
Data based on NAVs reported to Lipper by 6 p.m. Eastern.


Name NAV Chg
500dxlnvn 48.70 +.17
5001dxl 48.71 +.18
Infllnxlnvn 32.77 -.14
TotMktInvn 39.75 +.19
USBondl 11.80
Fidelity Spart Adv:
ExMktAdr n39.94 +.41
5001dxAdvn48.71 +.18
IntAdrn 32.78 -.14
TotMktAdrn39.75 +.19
First Eagle:
GIbIA 48.71 +.15
OverseasA 22.07 +.05
First Investors A
BIChpAp
GloblAp 6.71
GovtApp 11.54 -.01
GrolnAp 16.08 +.09
IncoAp 2.55
MATFAp 12.32
MITFAp 12.65
NJTFAp 13.56
NYTFA p 15.07
OppAp 29.32 +.20
PATFAp 13.55
SpSitAp 25.35 +.23
TxExAp 10.12 +.01
TotRtAp 16.42 +.06
ValueBp 7.50 +.03
Forum Funds:
AbsStrlr 11.01
Frank/Temp Frnk A:
AdjUS p 8.86 -.01
ALTFAp 11.67
AZTFAp 11.25
CallnsAp 12.56
CAIntAp 11.91
CalTFAp 7.30
COTFAp 12.19 -.01
CTTFAp 11.31
CvtScAp 15.13 +.05
Dbl TFA 12.25
DynTchA 32.91 +.17
EqlncAp 17.76 +.06
Fedlntp 12.28 +.01
FedTFAp 12.38
FLTFAp 11.84
FoundAlp 10.65 +.03
GATFA p 12.43
GoldPrMA 38.48 -.06
GrwthAp 49.24 +.20
HYTFA p 10.56
HilncA 2.01 +.01
IncomAp 2.16
InsTFAp 12.32
NYITFp 11.70
LATFA p 11.81
LMGvScA 10.39
MDTFAp 11.85 +.01
MATFAp 11.95
MITFAp 12.19
MNInsA 12.71
MOTFAp 12.54 -.01
NJTFAp 12.48
NYTFAp 11.97
NCTFA p 12.73
OhiolAp 12.88
ORTFAp 12.37
PATFAp 10.74
ReEScAp 15.60 +.08
RisDvAp 36.38 +.09
SMCpGrA 38.41 +.30
Stratlncp 10.51 +.01
TtlRtnAp 10.26
USGovAp 6.89
UbIsAp 13.22 +.06
VATFAp 12.04
Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv:
GIbBdAdvn 13.27 +.01
IncmeAd 2.15 +.01
Frank/Temp Frnk C:
IncomC t 2.18
USGvCt 6.84
Frank/Temp Mtl A&B:
SharesA 21.37 +.08
Frank/Temp Temp A:
DvMktA p 23.90 +.04
ForgnAp 6.59 -.02
GIBdAp 13.31 +.01
GrwthAp 18.04 -.02
WorldAp 15.28 -.01
Frank/Temp Tmp Adv:
GrthAv 18.03 -.02
Frank/Temp Tmp B&C:
DevMktC 23.32 +.04
ForgnC p 6.46 -.01
GIBdCp 13.33 +.01
Franklin Mutual Ser:
QuestA 17.21 +.03
GE Elfun S&S:
S&Sl Inc 11.79
USEqty 43.17 +.16
GMOTrust IIll:
CHIE 22.26 +.09
Quality 23.52 +.01
GMOTrust IV:
IntGrEq 22.76 -.08
IntllntrVl 20.25 -.13
GMOTrustVI:
EmgMktsr 11.87 +.01
Quality 23.53 +.01
StrFxlnc 16.42 -.01
Gabelli Funds:
Asset 51.41 +.25
Goldman Sachs A:
MdCVAp 36.89 +.30
Goldman Sachs Inst:
GrOppt 25.28 +.22
HiYield 7.15 +.01
HYMunin 8.89 +.01
MidCapV 37.16 +.30
Harbor Funds:
Bond 12.52 +.01
CapAplnst 42.58 +.19
Intlnv t 59.27 -.30
Intl r 59.84 -.30
Hartford Fds A:
CpAppAp 33.01 +.15
DivGthAp 20.29 +.06
IntOpAp 14.41 -.09
Hartford FdsY:
CapAppln 33.02 +.15
Hartford HLS IA:
CapApp 42.40 +.18
Div&Gr 20.83 +.07
Advisers 20.69 +.05
TotRetBd 11.83 -.01
Hennessy Funds:
CorGrllOrig
Hussman Funds:
StrTotRetr 12.36 -.01
StrGrowth 11.77 -.01
ICON Fds:
EnergyS 19.78 -.01
HIthcareS 15.58 +.05
ISI Funds:
NoAm p 7.98
IVA Funds:
WdwideAt 16.29
Wldwide I r 16.29
Invesco Fds Invest:
DivrsDivp 12.68 +.07
Invesco Funds:
Energy 41.32 +.02
Utlibes 16.79 +.08
Invesco Funds A:
Chart p 17.47 +.06
CmstkA 16.77 +.05
Constp 24.27 +.11
EqlncA 8.83 +.02
GrlncAp 19.94 +.07
HilncMu p 7.95
HiYld p 4.22 +.01
HYMuA 9.69
IntlGrow 27.44 -.06
MunilnA 13.62 +.01
PATFA 16.57
USMortgA 13.00 +.02
Invesco Funds B:
CapDevt 14.58 +.11
MunilnB 13.59
USMortg 12.93 +.01
Ivy Funds:
AssetSCt 24.54 +.02
AssetStAp 25.29 +.03
AssetStbl r 25.51 +.02
JPMorgan A Class:
CoreBdA 11.92
JPMorgan C Class:
CoreBdp 11.98
JP Morgan Inst:
MdCpValIn 25.81 +.17
JPMorgan R C:
CoreBond n 11.92
ShtDurBd 10.99
JPMorgan Select:
USEquityn 11.02 +.04
JPMorgan Sel CIs:
CoreBdn 11.91
HighYIdn 7.91 +.02
IntmTFBdn 11.31 +.01
LgCpGr 24.23 +.08
ShtDurBdn 10.99
USLCCrPIsn22.02 +.10
JanusT Shrs:
BalancdT 26.49 +.06
ContrarnT 13.90 +05
EnterprT 65.44 +.55
FIxBndT 10.70
GlUfeSciTr 27.70 +.15
GIbSelT 11.55 +.04
GITechTr 18.43 +.12
Grw&lncT 33.48 +.13
JanusT 31.21 +.17
OvrseasTr 38.61 +.11
PrkMCValT21.98 +.13


ResearchT 31.91 +.14
ShTmBdT 3.09
TwentyT 60.33 +.44
VentureT 57.99 +.73
WrldWTr 45.56 +.21
Jensen Funds:
QualGrthJ n28.70 +.11
John Hancock A:
BondAp 15.80 +.01
RgBkA 13.60 +.19
SfMrlAp 6.60
John Hancock B:
StrlncB 6.60


Name NAV Chg
John Hancock CIl1:
LSAggr 12.51 +.04
LSBalanc 13.16 +.03
LSConsrv 13.13 +.01
LSGrwth 13.09 +.04
LSModer 12.98 +.02
Lazard InstI:
EmgMktl 19.75
Lazard Open:
EmgMkOp 20.20 -.01
Legg Mason A:
CBAgGrp 124.30 +.92
CBApprp 14.94 +.03
CBLCGrp 22.83 +.08
GCIAIICOp 8.37
WAHilncAt 5.99 +.01
WAMgMu p 16.72
Legg Mason B:
CBLgCGrt 20.83 +.07
Legg Mason C:
CMSplnvp 29.46 +.24
CMValTrp 41.06 +.11
Longleaf Partners:
Partners 29.70 +.06
SmCap 27.56 +.17
Loomis Sayles:
LSBondl 14.68 -.01
StrlncC 15.21 -.02
LSBondR 14.62 -.01
StrlncA 15.13 -.01
Loomis Sayles Inv:
InvGrBdAp 12.39 -.01
InvGrBdY 12.39 -.02
Lord Abbett A:
AffilAp 11.61 +.04
FundlEq 13.29 +.08
BdDebAp 7.95
ShDurlncAp 4.60
MidCpAp 17.41 +.11
Lord Abbett C:
ShDurlncC t 4.63
Lord Abbett F:
ShtDurlnco 4.60
MFS Funds A:
MITA 20.74 +.08
MIGA 17.17 +.06
EmGA 46.57 +.18
HilnA 3.48 +.01
MFLA 9.65
TotRA 14.78 +.02
UtilA 17.73 +.04
ValueA 24.49 +.08
MFS Funds B:
MIGBn 15.44 +.06
GvScBn 10.50 -.01
HilnBn 3.49 +.01
MulnBn 8.72
TotRB n 14.79 +.03
MFS Funds I:
ReInT 15.11 -.07
Valuel 24.60 +.07
MFS Funds Instl:
IntlEqn 17.90 -.05
MainStay Funds A:
HiYIdBA 5.95
MainStay Funds B:
ConvBt 15.32 +.07
GovtBt 8.91 +.01
HYIdBBt 5.92
IncmBldr 17.04 +.06
IntlEqB 10.43 +.01
MainStay Funds I:
ICAPSIEq 37.06 +.06
Mairs & Power:
Growth n 78.05 +.56
Manning&Napier Fds:
WIdOppA 7.58 -.02
Matthews Asian:
AsianGllnv 16.54 -.01
Indialnvr 17.12 +.39
PacTgrlnv 22.65 +.12
MergerFdn 15.76 +.02
Meridian Funds:
Growth 45.93 +.30
Metro West Fds:
TotRetBd 10.55 -.01
TotRtBdl 10.55
Midas Funds:
Midas Fdt 3.78 +.03
Monetta Funds:
Monettan 15.44 +.03
Morgan Stanley B:
GlobStratB 15.58 -.01
MorganStanley Inst:
IntlEql 13.51 -.08
MCapGrl 37.97 +.24
Muhlenkn 55.87 +.38
Munder Funds A:
GwthOppA 28.77 +.17
Munder Funds Y:
MCpCGrYn31.72 +.31
Mutual Series:
BeacnZ 12.77 +.03
GblDiscA 28.97 +.11
GIbDiscZ 29.33 +.10
QuestZ 17.35 +.02
SharesZ 21.54 +.09
Neuberger&Berm Fds:
Focus 20.98 +.10
Geneslnst 49.12 +.42
Intl ir 16.42
Partner 26.15 +.08
Neuberger&Berm Tr:
Genesis 50.96 +.44
Nicholas Group:
Hilnc In 9.69 +.01
Nichn 47.32 +.37
Northern Funds:
Bondldx 10.92
HiYFxlnc 7.30
SmCpldx 8.89
Stkldx 16.99
Technly 16.29
Nuveen Cl A:
LtMBAp 11.20
Nuveen Cl R:
IntDMBd 9.24
HYMunBd 15.90
Nuveen Cl YV:
RealEstn 20.11 +.09
Oak Assoc Fds:
WhitOkSG 41.92 +.24
Oakmark Funds I:
Eqtylncr 28.96 +.08
Globall 22.75 +.10
Intl lr 19.18 +.02
Oakmark 46.26 +.15
Select 31.47 +.12
Old Westbury Fds:
GlobOpp 7.25 +.01
GIbSMdCap 15.08 +.06
LgCapStrat 9.71 -.02
Oppenheimer A:
AMTFMu 6.79
AMTFrNY 11.90
CAMuniAp 8.32
CapApAp 47.73 +.07
CaplncAp 8.86 +.02
ChmplncAp 1.82 +.01
DvMktAp 33.50 -.03
Discp 61.23 +.78
EquityA 9.34 +.03
GlobAp 59.68 +.01
GIbOppA 30.74 +.07
GblStrlncA 4.22 -.01
Gold p 36.80 -.04
IntBdA p 6.36 -.02
LtdTmMu 14.87
MnStFdA 35.54 +.16
PAMuniAp 11.39
SenFltRtA 8.23 +.01
USGv p 9.65 -.01
Oppenheimer B:


ChmplncBt 1.82 ...
EquityB 8.61 +.02
GblSfrlncB 4.24
Oppenheimer Roch:
LtdNYAp 3.37
RoMuAp 16.56
RcNtMuA 7.20
Oppenheimer Y:
DevMktY 33.12 -.03
IntlBdY 6.36 -.02
IntGrowY 28.37 -.13
PIMCO Admin PIMS:
ShtTmAd p 9.78
TotRtAd 11.14 +.02
PIMCO Instl PIMS:
AlAsetAutr 10.81 +.03
AIIAsset 12.30 +.02
ComodRR 6.95 +.07
Divlnc 11.67 +.01
EmgMkCur 10.55 -.03
EmMkBd 11.72 +.01
Fltlnc r 8.65 +.02
ForBdUnr 10.79 -.10
FrgnBd 10.74 +.01
HiYId 9.31 +.01
InvGrCp 10.66 ...
LowDu 10.42 +.01
ModDur 10.78
RealRet 11.67 +.06
RealRtnIl 12.06 +.04
ShortT 9.78
TotRt 11.14 +.02
TRII 10.75
TRIll 9.80 +.01
PIMCO Funds A:
AIIAstAutt 10.73 +.03
ComRRp 6.81 +.07
LwDurA 10.42 +.01
RealRtAp 12.06 +.04
TotRtA 11.14 +.02


PIMCO Funds C:
AllAstAutt 10.61 +.03
RealRtCp 12.06 +.04
TotRtCt 11.14 +.02
PIMCO Funds D:
TRtnp 11.14 +.02
PIMCO Funds P:
AstAIIAuthP 10.79 +.03
TotRtnP 11.14 +.02
Parnassus Funds:
Eqtylncon 27.91 +.12
Perm Port Funds:
Permannt 48.91 +.09


Name NAV Chg
Pioneer Funds A:
BondA p 9.68
InitValA 19.07 -.14
PionFdAp 41.71 +.18
ValueAp 11.63 +.02
Pioneer Funds B:
HiYldBt 10.16 +.04
Pioneer Funds C:
HiYIdC t 10.27 +.04
Pioneer FdsY:
CullenVY 18.34 +.02
Price Funds:
Balance n 20.41 +.02
BIChipn 44.15 +.16
CABondn 11.25 +.01
CapAppn 22.20 +.07
DivGron 25.10 +.10
EmMktBn 13.52 +.02
EmEurop 19.25 +.02
EmMktSn 32.61 +.04
Eqlncn 25.03 +.10
Eqlndexn 37.07 +.13
Europe n 14.88 -.10
GNMAn 10.11
Growthin 36.55 +.17
Gr&lnn 21.69 +.09
HIthSci n 37.24 +.19
HiYield n 6.76 +.01
InsfCpG 18.55 +.06
InstHiYId n 9.52 +.01
IntlBondn 9.84 -.09
IntDisn 42.81 -.01
Intl G&l 12.75 -.05
IntlStkn 13.94 -.03
Japan n 7.94 +.01
LatAmn 45.12 -.40
MDShrtn 5.24
MDBondn 10.88
MidCapn 59.07 +.51
MCapValn 23.56 +.19
NAmern 35.19 +.18
N Asian 15.79 +.04
New Eran 46.01 +.07
NHorizn 35.36 +.43
NIncn 9.75 +.01
NYBondn 11.62
OverS SFn 8.09 -.04
PSlncn 16.81 +.02
RealAssetrnll.23 +.02
RealEstn 19.77 +.09
R2010n 16.06 +.02
R2015n 12.50 +.02
R2020n 17.33 +.04
R2025n 12.71 +.04
R2030n 18.27 +.05
R2035n 12.93 +.04
R2040n 18.41 +.05
R2045n 12.26 +.04
SciTecn 30.06 +.15
ShtBd n 4.84
SmCpStkn 34.89 +.51
SmCapVal n37.59 +.43
SpecGrn 18.87 +.05
Speclnn 12.67
TFIncn 10.32
TxFrHn 11.33
TxFrSIn 5.70
USTIntn 6.23
USTLgn 13.23 +.01
VABondn 12.06
Valuen 24.74 +.10
Principal Inv:
LgCGlIn 10.18 +.06
LT20201n 12.21 +.03
LT20301n 12.08 +.02
Prudential Fds A:
BlendA 18.45 +.14
HiYIdAp 5.54 +.01
MuHilncA 9.94
UtilityA 11.31 +.04
Prudential Fds B:
GrowthB 18.37 +.08
HiYldBt 5.53
Putnam Funds A:
AmGvAp 9.17
AZTE 9.35
ConvSec 20.02 +.10
DvrlnAp 7.63 +.01
EqlnAp 16.57 +.09
EuEq 18.62 -.13
GeoBalA 12.71 +.03
GIbEqtyp 9.11
GrInAp 14.11 +.06
GIbIHIthA 41.53 +.16
HiYdAp 7.63
HiYId In 5.95 +.01
IncmAp 6.85 -.01
IntGrln p 9.11
InvAp 13.99 +.06
NJTxAp 9.67
MuItCpGr 55.06 +.36
PATE 9.37 +.01
TxExA p 8.85
TFInAp 15.37
TFHYA 12.21 -.01
USGvAp 13.65
GIblUtilA 10.28 +.01
VoyAp 23.00 +.19
Putnam Funds B:
TaxFrlns 15.38
DvrlnBt 7.57 +.01
Eqlnct 16.41 +.09
EuEq 17.88 -.12
GeoBalB 12.58 +.03
GIbEqt 8.23
GINtRst 18.64
GrlnBt 13.85 +.06
GIblHIthB 33.20 +.13
HiYIdBt 7.62
HYAdB t 5.84 +.01
IncmBt 6.79 -.01
IntGrlnt 9.04
InfiNopt 13.84 -.07
InvBt 12.61 +.06
NJTxBt 9.66
MultCpGr 47.20 +.31
TxExBt 8.85
TFHYBt 12.23 -.01
USGvBt 13.58
GlblUtilB 10.24 +.01
VoyBt 19.38 +.16
RS Funds:
IntGrA 17.24 -.08
LgCAIphaA 42.02 +.07
Value 25.02 +.08
RidgeWorth Funds:
LCGrStkAp 11.59 +.04
Royce Funds:
LwPrSkSvr 16.18 +.15
MicroCapl 16.29 +.19
PennMulr 11.95 +.15
Premier r 20.73 +.25
TotRetlr 13.66 +.13
ValSvct 12.29 +.13
Russell Funds S:
StratBd 11.08 -.01
Rydex Advisor:
NasdaqAdv 16.06 +.06
SSgA Funds:
EmgMkt 20.61 +.06
Schwab Funds:
HIlthCare 18.67 +.07
lOOOInvr 38.85 +.15
S&PSel 21.42 +.08
SmCpSI 21.00 +.27
TSMSelr 24.87 +.12
Scout Funds:
Intl 31.09 -.15
Selected Funds:
AmShD 43.02 +.14
AmShSp 43.03 +.14
Sentinel Group:
ComSAp 33.97 +.12
Sequoia 159.42 +.66
Sit Funds:
LrgCpGr 46.62 +.14
SoSunSCInv tn22.13+.23
St FarmAssoc:
Gwll 55.15 +.06
Stratton Funds:
Mul-Cap 36.52 +12
RealEstate 28.78 +.21
SmCap 54.20 +.85
SunAmerica Funds:
USGvBt 10.13 -.01
TCW Funds:
EmMktln 8.84 +.01
TotRetBdl 9.86
TIAA-CREF Funds:
Bdldxlnst 10.82
Eqldxlnst 10.45 +.05
Templeton Instit:
ForEqS 18.60 -.05
Third Avenue Fds:
InlValnstr 16.17 +.22
REVallnstr 23.78 +.07
Valuelnst 46.10 -.08
Thornburg Fds:
IntValAp 26.49 -.04
IncBuildAt 18.61 +.01
IncBuildCp 18.60
IntValue I 27.09 -.05
LtTMul 14.59
Thrivent Fds A:
HiYld 4.87
Incom 8.96
Tocqueville Fds:
Goldtn 76.29 +.03
Transamerica A:
AegonHYBp9.32 +.02
Flexlncp 9.08
Turner Funds:
SmlCpGrn 35.91 +.46
Tweedy Browne:
GblValue 23.55 +.07
US Global Investors:
AIIAm 24.90 +.10


ChinaReg 7.89 +.04
GIbRs 10.30 +.12
Gld&Mtls 13.32 +.01
WdPrcMn 14.36 +.04
USAA Group:
AgvGt 36.64 +.18
CABd 10.76
CrnstStr 22.42 +.01
GovSec 10.37 -.01
GrTxStr 14.18 +.03
Growth 15.98 +.06
Gr&lnc 16.07 +.08
IncStk 13.27 +.02


Name NAV Chg
Inco 13.22 -.01
Inl 24.23 -.05
NYBd 12.25 +.02
PrecMM 32.26
SciTech 14.07 +.10
ShtTBnd 9.19
SmCpStk 14.71 +.20
TxElt 13.47 +.01
TxELT 13.54 +.01
TxESh 10.83
VABd 11.42
WldGr 19.77 +.01
VALIC:
MdCpldx 20.95 +.19
Stkldx 25.53 +.09
Value Line Fd:
LrgCon 19.22 +.07
Vanguard Admiral:
BalAdmln 23.14 +.07
CAITAdmn 11.54
CALTAdm n 11.69
CpOpAdl n 74.24 +.29
EMAdmr r n 36.72 +.07
Energyn 121.65 -.39
EqlnAdm nn48.60 +.13
EuroAdml n 56.85 -.52
ExplAdml n 74.88 +.73
ExtdAdm n 44.33 +.45
500Adml n 126.76 +.46
GNMAAdn 11.04 +.01
GrwAdmn 35.65 +.14
HlthCr n 57.02 +.24
HiYldCp n 5.87
InfProAdn 28.18 +.08
ITBdAdml n 11.86 -.01
ITsryAdmln 11.68
IntGrAdm n 58.77 -.21
ITAdmIn 14.17
ITGrAdmn 10.19
LtdTrAdn 11.18
LTGrAdmln 10.41 +.02
LTAdmln 11.53
MCpAdml n 99.69 +.69
MorgAdmn 61.75 +.35
MuHYAdm nlO.95
NYLTAdn 11.54
PrmCap r n 69.38 +.22
PALTAdmn11.53
ReitAdm r n 87.02 +.39
STsyAdmln 10.78
STBdAdmlnlO.63
ShtTrAdn 15.94
STFdAdn 10.86
STIGrAdn 10.75
SmCAdm n 37.12 +.46
TxMCaprn 68.69 +.32
TlBAdmln 11.01
TStkAdmn 34.46 +.16
ValAdmI n 22.07 +.08
WellslAdm n57.29 +.05
WelltnAdm n57.44 +.09
Windsor n 48.05 +.23
WdsrllAdn 49.93 +.13
Vanguard Fds:
CALTn 11.69
CapOppn 32.14 +.12
Convrtn 12.91 +.06
DivdGron 16.31 +.04
Energy n 64.79 -.21
Eqlncn 23.18 +.06
Explr n 80.47 +.78
FLLTn 11.96
GNMAn 11.04 +.01
GlobEqn 17.85 +.03
Grolncn 29.11 +.10
GrthEqn 12.20 +.07
HYCorpn 5.87
HlthCren 135.13 +.56
InflaPron 14.35 +.04
IntlExplrn 14.63 -.02
IntlGrn 18.48 -.06
InftVal n 29.81 -.07
ITIGraden 10.19
ITTsryn 11.68
LifeConn 16.95 +.02
LifeGro n 22.90 +.04
Lifelncn 14.50 +.01
LifeMod n 20.41 +.03
LTIGraden 10.41 +.02
LTTsryn 12.86
Morgn 19.91 +.11
MuHYn 10.95
Mulntn 14.17
MuLtdn 11.18
MuLongn 11.53
MuShrtn 15.94
NJLTn 12.13
NYLTn 11.54
OHLTTEn 12.44 +.01
PALTn 11.53
PrecMtls r n 20.82 -.09
PrmcpCorn 14.51 +.04
Prmcp r n 66.87 +.22
SelValurn 20.14 +.11
STARn 20.17 +.03
STIGraden 10.75
STFedn 10.86
STTsryn 10.78
StratEq n 20.76 +.20
TgtRetlncn 11.96 +.02
TgRe2010n23.59 +.03
TgtRe2015 nl3.06 +.02
TgRe2020 n23.21 +.04
TgtRe2025 nl3.22 +.02
TgRe2030 n22.70 +.05
TgtRe2035 nl3.67 +.03
TgtRe2040 n22.46 +.05
TgtRe2050 n22.36 +.05
TgtRe2045 nl4.10 +.03
USGron 20.79 +.08
USValuen 11.15 +.06
Wellsly n 23.64 +.02
Welltnn 33.25 +.05
Wndsrn 14.24 +.07
Wndslln 28.13 +.07
Vanguard Idx Fds:
DvMklnPl r n96.86 -.52
MidCplstPln1 08.60 +.75
TotlntAdm r r24.42 -.07
Totlntllnstr n97.67 -.27
TotlntllP r n 97.69 -.27
TotlntSig r n 29.30 -.08
500n 126.74 +.46
Balancedn 23.14 +.07
EMktn 27.95 +.06
Europe n 24.41 -.22
Extend n 44.31 +.45
Growth n 35.64 +.14
LgCaplxn 25.46 +.10
LTBndn 13.77 +.01
MidCapn 21.97 +.16
Pacific n 10.04 +.01
REITr n 20.39 +.09
SmCap n 37.09 +.46
SmlCpGth n24.08 +.30
STBndn 10.63
TotBndn 11.01
Totllntl n 14.60 -.04
TotStkn 34.44 +.16
Value n 22.06 +.08
Vanguard Instl Fds:
Ballnstn 23.14 +.07
DevMklnstn 9.30 -.05
Extlnn 44.33 +.45
FTAIIWIdl r n86.91 -.25
Grwthlstn 35.65 +.14
InfProlnstn 11.48 +.03
Instldxn 125.94 +.46
InsPIn 125.95 +.46
lnstTStldxn 31.19 +.15
lnsTStPlusrn31.20 +.15
MidCplstn 22.02 +.15
SCInstn 37.12 +.47
TBIstn 11.01
TSInstn 34.46 +.16
Valuelstn 22.07 +.08
Vanguard Signal:
500Sgln 104.71 +.38
GroSign 33.01 +.13
ITBdSign 11.86 -.01
MidCpldvn 31.46 +.22
STBdldvn 10.63
SmCpSig n 33.44 +.41
TotBdSgl n 11.01
TotStkSgIn 33.26 +.16
Virtus Funds:
EmMktl 9.72 +.04
Virtus Funds A:
MulSStAp 4.86
Waddell & Reed Adv:
AssetS p 9.58
CorelnvA 6.29 +.02
DivOppAp 15.07 +.03
DivOppC t 14.90 +.03
Wasatch:
SmCpGr 42.72 +.54
Wells Fargo Adv A:
AstAIAp 12.56
Wells Fargo Adv C:
AstAIICt 12.12
Wells Fargo Adv:
CmStklnv 20.90 +.14
Opptylnv 40.32 +.28
Wells Fargo Ad Ins:
UlStMulnc 4.82
Wells Fargo Admin:
Growth 41.37 +.16
Wells Fargo Inst:
UItSTMuA 4.82
Western Asset:
CorePlus I 11.29
William Blair N:
GrowthN 12.08 +.04
Yacktman Funds:
Fundpn 18.38 +06
Focusedn 19.65 +.06


Stocks rise modestly




on February jobs report


Associated Press


Stocks closed modestly
higher Friday after the gov-
ernment's monthly report
on employment bolstered
hopes that the economic re-
covery is on track. The gains
were tempered by news that
a big debt write-down by
Greece could cause big
losses for banks.
Three years after stocks
hit bottom during the Great
Recession, the Dow Jones
industrial average rose 14
points and finished the week
with a loss of 56. That was
after a 203-point dive Tues-
day, the worst drop this year
The Dow was up more
than 60 points Friday morn-
ing but lost ground in the af-
ternoon after the trade
group that oversees finan-
cial derivatives said
Greece's bond-swap deal
will trigger payouts on bond
insurance.
The Dow finished up
14.08 points, or 0.1 percent,
at 12,922.02. The Standard &
Poor's 500 gained 4.96, or 0.4
percent, to 1,370.87. The
Nasdaq composite average
gained 17.92, or 0.6 percent,
to 2,988.34.
The Dow has nearly dou-
bled in the three years since
its bottom during the finan-
cial crisis. On March 9,2009,
it closed at 6,547. The S&P


Market watch
March 9, 2012

Dow Jones +14.08
industrials 12,922.02


Nasdaq +17.92
composite 2,988.34


Standard & +4.96
Poor's 500 1,370.87

Russell +10.66
2000 817.00


NYSE diary
Advanced: 2,110

Declined: 898

Unchanged: 121

Volume: 3.5 b

Nasdaq diary
Advanced: 1,798

Declined: 718

Unchanged: 108

Volume: 1.5b
AP



500 closed that day at 676.
The morning's gains were
driven by news that employ-
ers added 227,000 jobs last
month, finishing three of the
best months for hiring since
the recession began. The
unemployment rate was un-
changed at 8.3 percent be-
cause unemployed people
started looking for work
again, which increased the


Business HIGHLIGHTS


U.S. search engine users rated Google as their
preferred search engine. That was up from 47
percent in 2004, the last time that Pew gauged
people's attitudes about Internet search en-
gines.
Yahoo's search engine ranked a distant sec-
ond at 6 percent, according to the latest num-
bers, down from 26 percent in 2004.

US adds 227,000 jobs in Feb.;

jobless rate 8.3 percent


iple will adu more than o,ouu employees at its WASHINGTON The United States added
w facility in the state capital over the next 227,000 jobs in February in the latest sign of the
cade, including customer support, sales and economic recovery's surprising breadth. The
counting staff, Perry said. country has put together the strongest three

Survey ranks Google highly months of pure job growth since the Great Re-
despite privacy fears cession. Economists expected February job
growth of 210,000.
SAN FRANCISCO Google is almost every- The unemployment rate stayed at 8.3 percent.
e's favorite search engine, despite misgivings It was the first time in six months it didn't fall, and
out data-collection and advertising practices that was because a half-million Americans, per-
it are widely seen as intrusive. haps finally seeing hope in the economy, started
A survey released Friday by the Pew Internet looking for work.


Ap
ne
de
ac







on
ab
tha


& American Life Project found 83 percent of


WATER SHORTAGE RESTRICTIONS


Modified Phase III water shortage re-
strictions began March 10, 2012, and
expire on June 30, 2012.

The restrictions affect Hernando, Cit-
rus, Sumter, Lake and Levy counties as
well as the city of Dunnellon and The
Villages in Marion County.

Lawn Watering Schedule and Times

* Lawn watering is limited to a
once-per-week schedule. The fol-
lowing is a schedule and summary of
the restrictions unless your city or
county has a different once-per-week
schedule or more stringent restrictions.

Addresses

* House numbers ending in:


0 or 1

2 or 3

4 or 5

6 or 7

8 or 9


Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday


watered on Wednesday, Friday, and
Sunday.

Fountains

Fountains and other aesthetic water
features may only operate four hours
per day. The regular hours of operation
can be selected by the owner, but
must be posted (see list of exemp-
tions such as water features that
also provide aerification to koi ponds
at WaterMatters.org/).

Car Washing

* Car washing is limited to once per week
on the designated watering day for the
location.

* Fundraiser and commercial car washes,
including mobile detailing businesses,
may still operate on any day.

* Emergency and other first responder
vehicles may still be washed on any day
as needed.

Pressure Washing

* Pressure washing is allowed for neces-
sary purposes such as prior to painting
or sealing, in order to maintain a paint
or material warranty, to address a
health or safety hazard and to comply
with health laws.

* Aesthetic concerns, even those raised
by an HOA in accordance with its deed
restrictions, do not constitute a "neces-
sary" purpose.

Other Water Uses

* Restaurants shall only serve water upon
request.

* Agricultural operations, commercial es-
tablishments, golf courses and indus-
trial facilities must also comply with
applicable best management practices
listed in the Water Shortage Order.


I NE^^^ ~WYORKSTOCjECHNGE I


Name Last Chg
SPDRFncl 14.89 +.12
SP Inds 37.02 +.08
SPTech 29.18 +.13
SPUDI 35.17 +.14
StdPac 4.57 +.16
Standex 38.30 +.95
StanBlkDk 77.63 +1.36
StarwdHtl 54.89 +.76
StateStr 42.10 +.34
Statil ASA 28.02 -.66
Steris 31.36 +.52
Sterlite 9.43 +.33
SIIwtrM 13.26 +.21
SratHotels 6.18 +.14
Syker 52.90 +.13
SturmRug 42.87 -.43
SubPpne 43.63 -.57
SunCmts 42.97 +.41
Suncorgs 34.53 -.01
Sunooo 40.04 +.27
SunstnHtl 9.20 +.30
Suntech 2.84 -.03
SunTrst 22.43 +.18
SupEnrgy 29.80 -.12
Supvalu 6.42 -.08
Synovus 1.98
Sysoo 29.93 +.18
TCF Fnc 10.73 +.12
TE Connect 36.05 +.54
TECO 17.78 +.09


TJXs 38.12
TRWAuto 45.85
ThawSemi 14.60
TalismEg 13.38
Target 57.69
TataMotors 27.99
TeckRes g 36.85
TelcmNZs 9.78
TeleBrasil 30.52
TelefEsp 16.51
Tenaris 40.92
TenetHlth 5.47
Teradyn 16.21
Terex 23.73
TerraNitro 223.00
Tesoro 29.46
TetraTech 9.61
Textron 27.01
Theragen 1.71
ThermoFis 56.27
ThmBet 72.21
ThomCrkg 7.13
3M CO 86.80
Tiffany 68.77
TimeWarn 36.72
Timken 52.30
TitanMet 13.87
TollBros 24.03
TorchEngy 2.29
Trchmrks 48.77
TorDBkg 82.82
Total SA 55.38


TotalSys 22.32
Transom 53.76
Travelers 57.61
Tredgar 19.73
TriConfi 15.86
TrinaSolar 7.31
TwoHrblnv 10.30
Tyolnfi 52.92
Tyson 19.86
UBSAG 13.47
UDR 25.61
UIL Hold 34.91
USAirwy 7.03
USEC 1.37
USG 14.15
UlraPtg 23.44
UniSrcEn 37.47
UniFirst 59.47
UnionPac 107.64
UtdContl 19.82
UtdMicro 2.64
UPSB 77.16
UtdRentals 42.88
US Bancrp 29.72
USNGsrs 18.37
USOilFd 41.09
USSteel 26.85
UtdTedich 83.55
UtdhlthGp 55.78
UnumGrp 23.76


ValeSA 23.07 -.22
ValeSApf 22.34 -.39
ValeroE 28.56 +.69
VangTSM 70.82 +.35
VangREIT 61.38 +.30
VangEmg 44.16 -.04
VangEAFE 33.68 -.13
VarianMed 67.17 +.11
Vecren 29.25 +.08
Ventas 55.39 -.29
VeoliaEnv 14.74 +.22
VeriFone 50.72 -.47
VerizonCm 39.10 -.12
VersoPap 2.50 +.45
VimpelCm 11.84 -.22
Visa 117.17 -.80
Vishaylnt 11.64 -.01
Vonage 2.19 -.05
Vornado 80.02 +.12
WGL Hold 41.16 +.45
WPX En n 18.67 -.18
Wabash 9.91 -.07
WalMart 60.08 +.31
Walgrn 33.48 +.70
WalterEn 62.22 +3.23
WsteMInc 34.90 +.08
WatsnPh 59.61 +1.15
WeathflntI 16.55 -.24
WeinRIt 24.80 -.01
WellPoint 64.88 +.47


size of the labor force.
The hiring was spread
across a range of industries,
including business and pro-
fessional services, leisure
and hospitality and health
care.
Later Friday, the Interna-
tional Swaps and Deriva-
tives Association said it had
determined that a massive
bond-swap by Greece con-
stituted a "credit event,"
meaning that holders of
credit-default swaps on
their Greek bonds will be
able to claim insurance pay-
ments. Traders sold stocks
on the news, fearing big
losses for banks that had
sold the insurance.
Greece convinced most of
its private creditors to swap
their bonds for new ones
worth far less. The deal
clears the way for a fresh
bailout from Greece's neigh-
bors. Fears of a disorderly
Greek default have weighed
on the market for two years.
"There's a lot less imbal-
ance and a lot less uncer-
tainty than there was three
years ago," said John
Canally, investment strate-
gist with LPL Financial
Corp. Canally said the odds
of another recession have
been dropping as the eco-
nomic recovery strengthens
and becomes less vulnera-
ble to shocks.


Apple to add 3,600 jobs at new

$304 million Texas campus

AUSTIN, Texas -Apple Inc. is investing $304
million in a new campus and more than doubling
its workforce in Austin, Texas, boosted by a $21
million incentive from a state fund designed to at-
tract high-tech companies, Gov. Rick Perry said
Friday.
The investment from the Texas Enterprise
Fund comes in exchange for a promise that


-From wire reports


Unless your city or county already has
stricter hours in effect, the allowable
watering hours are before 8 a.m. or
after 6 p.m. regardless of property size.

Landscape Watering Schedule and Times

* Handwatering and microirrigation of
plants (other than lawns) can be done
on any day, but is limited to the hours
of before 8 a.m. or after 6 p.m.

New Lawns and Plants

* New lawns and plants have a 60-day
establishment period. On days 1-30,
they may be watered any day of the
week. During days 31-60, they may be
watered approximately every other day.
Even-numbered addresses may water
on Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday.
Odd-numbered addresses may be


WellsFargo 31.66
WestarEn 27.81
WAstEMkt 14.85
WstAMgdHi 6.27
WAstlnfOpp 12.93
WDigital 40.32
WstnRefin 19.79
WstnUnion 17.67
Weyerhsr 21.48
Whrlpl 75.30
WhibngPet 57.30
WmsCos 29.86
WmsPtrs 60.74
WmsSon 36.28
Winnbgo 8.58
WiscEngy 34.85
WT India 20.20
Worthgtn 17.71
Wyndham 44.15
XLGrp 21.22
XcelEngy 26.69
Xerox 8.25
YPFSoc 27.24
Yamanag 16.82
YingliGrn 3.80
Youku 25.01
YumBrnds 67.41
Zimmer 61.56
ZweigTI 3.25







Page A8 SATURDAY, MARCH 10, 2012



PINION


"In politics, as in high finance, duplicity
is regarded as a virtue."
Mikhail A. Bakunin, (1814-1876)


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan............. .................. publisher
o Charlie Brennan ............... ..................editor
Mike Arnold ............. .................. HR director
Sandra Frederick....................... managing editor
Z...u Curt Ebitz................ .............citizen member
Founded Mac Harris ....... .................. citizen member
by Albert M.
Williamson Rebecca Martin ................................guest member
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


ONCE-A-WEEK WATERING




Heed new



restrictions



on water use


Faced with continuing dry
weather and the forecast
for more, the Southwest
Florida Water Management
District (SWFWMD) has im-
posed more stringent watering
restrictions that limit lawn wa-


tering to one day
a week. These re-
strictions go into
effect today and
are in effect until
June 30.
In announcing
the new restric-
tions, the water
management dis-
trict said the
more stringent
watering limits


THE IS
More sti
watering re
now in

OUR OP
Get seriol
water


are due to below-normal rain-
fall this winter that has re-
duced levels in lakes, streams
and the aquifer. Under the new
restrictions, residents in Cit-
rus, Hernando, Lake, Levy and
Sumter counties can water
lawns only one day a week, and
it must be done before 8 a.m. or
after 6 p.m. on their designated
day. The reason lawns are a
primary focus is because wa-
tering accounts for about half
of residential water use.
Details of these restrictions
are on the Citrus County govern-
ment website at wwwbocc.
citrus.fl.us/waterres/watering_
restrictions, or see the list on
Page A7 today. With the county's
policy of strict enforcement, res-
idents should read them, under-
stand them, and take them
seriously. People with automatic
sprinkler systems need to im-
mediately adjust their timers to
be in accordance with the re-
strictions or face the possibility
of a $100 fine.
While these more stringent
restrictions may be lifted once
we begin receiving summer
rainfall, the real message citi-
zens need to take away is that


everyone needs to get serious
about water use. Yes, the cur-
rent restrictions are related to
a prolonged dry spell, but they
are also the inevitable conse-
quence of population growth
and a desire for lush green
lawns that re-
quire substantial
;SUE: amounts of water
ringent to maintain.
strictions Florida has
strictions been blessed with
an abundant sup-
'INION: ply of water, and
INION: this has allowed
us about sometimes-
use. profligate use of
the resource. Ac-
cording to
SWFWMD, most of the water
used in West Central Florida
comes from pumping ground-
water. As a result of over-use of
this resource, combined with
drought, levels in lakes and
wetlands have declined, river
flows have been reduced, and
there has been increased salt-
water intrusion into the aquifer
along the coast.
While we can reasonably ex-
pect continuing limits on use of
water for irrigation, this does not
mean a loss of attractive yards.
One way residents can have an
attractive yard and still save
water is to utilize the principles
of Florida-friendly landscaping.
There are many sources for in-
formation on these practices, in-
cluding http://wwwswfwmd.
state.fl.us/yards/.
The new restrictions are
aimed at reducing water con-
sumption and helping us con-
tinue to have the water we
need for our daily use. Aside
from the financial penalties for
violating them, observing them
is an act of good citizenship be-
cause it helps us preserve a
vital resource we all depend on
every day


NOW'S THE TIME




Fix PIP problem


Before our Florida legis-
lators go home this week
they need to reform our
current Personal Injury Pro-
tection (PIP) sys-
tem that is hurting THE I
so many Florida T
consumers. PIP leg
Floridians cur-
rently pay way too OUR 01
much for their auto
insurance because Action n
our state has the
highest fraud rates in the na-
tion. Fraudulent claims involv-
ing the minimum $10,000
medical coverage provided to
Florida drivers has caused a
spike in PIP rates of more than
50 percent over the last three
years.
In certain Florida cities such
as Miami, Orlando and Tampa,
PIP coverage can cost up to 10
percent of take-home pay for
the family with two drivers
earning the average $40,000 a
year


S
is

P
n


The House currently has leg-
islation in front of it that will
properly make it more difficult
for the phony pain clinics to
take advantage of
;SUE* current rules. The
SUE: Senate version of
station. the reforms does not
have enough teeth
INION: in it and will permit
the fraud and abuse
needed. to continue.
Gov. Rick Scott
has appropriately made PIP
reform a top priority of the reg-
ular session. If legislators don't
solve the dilemma, the gover-
nor will most likely call a spe-
cial session to deal with it.
We urge Sen. Charlie Dean,
R-Inverness, Sen. Mike
Fasano, R-New Port Richey,
and Rep. Jimmie T. Smith, R-
Inverness, to properly address
the PIP reform and support the
changes proposed by the
House. Florida consumers
need your leadership now.


Rush's comments poison politics


Olympia Snowe and Sandra
Fluke don't have much in
common. One is a 65-year-
old Republican senator from
Maine, the other a 30-year-old
feminist law student at George-
town. But their stories reflect a
similar theme: the
growing dismay and
disgust over the toxic
political climate in
Washington today
They also have a
common enemy:
Rush Limbaugh, the .--
loudmouthed bully 4
who runs one of
America's most popu-
lar talk shows. Every- C okie
one knows that Steven
Limbaugh called Steven
Fluke a "slut" and a OTH
"prostitute" for argu- VOI(
ing that health insur-
ance plans should


cover contraceptives. But Snowe
is also a victim of Limbaugh's in-
fluence on American politics.
He and his many clones -
have coarsened the political con-
versation by making insult and
invective the common tongue of
public discourse. And they en-
force a doctrine of conservative
purity by branding moderates
like Snowe as RINOs (Republi-
cans In Name Only), heretics who
should be banished into exile.
Snowe didn't mention Lim-
baugh when she recently an-
nounced her retirement from the
Senate after three terms, but he
is a big part of the problem she
described: "An atmosphere of po-
larization and 'my way or the
highway' ideologies has become
pervasive in campaigns and in
our governing institutions.... I see
a vital need for the political cen-
ter in order for our democracy to
flourish and to find solutions that
unite rather than divide us."
That's exactly the opposite of
what Limbaugh and his friends
stand for They thrive on conflict,
division and a black-and-white,
us-against-them view of


R
II
D


the world.
This polarization is not all on
one side. Liberals can play their
own purist games, condemning
someone like Sen. Bob Casey, a
Pennsylvania Democrat, for
straying from the party's pro-
choice orthodoxy on
abortion. But Rush-iza-
tion is more pro-
nounced on the
Republican side, where
even a straight-laced
conservative like for-
mer Sen. Bob Bennett of
Utah was purged from
office for daring to work
with Democrats and
and support government
help for the financial in-
oberts dustry Sen. Richard
ER Lugar of Indiana, an-
'ES other conservative who
actually believes that
Democrats are not
demons, is facing a primary chal-
lenge from the right on May 8.
Limbaugh is only one factor
driving this "my way or the high-
way" mentality, but as John Mc-
Cain noted on CBS, "He has
influence because he has a strong
conservative base." As a result,
many leading Republicans refuse
to stand up to him.
House Speaker John Boehner
called Limbaugh's attack on
Fluke "inappropriate," an ap-
palling understatement. Mitt
Romney could muster only a fee-
ble rebuke: "It's not the language I
would have used." Rick Santorum
called Limbaugh "absurd" but ex-
cused his excesses by saying, 'An
entertainer can be absurd."
Those comments are, well, ab-
surd. And cowardly Conservative
columnist George Will got it ex-
actly right when he said on ABC's
"This Week," "It was depressing,
because what it indicates is that
the Republican leaders are
afraid of Rush Limbaugh."
It's time to stop being afraid of
Rush Limbaugh, and of the other
smokestacks belching pollution
into the political atmosphere. It's


time to start fighting back in favor
of civility and decency and mu-
tual respect as cornerstones of
our politics. We're not talking
about censuring Limbaugh; he
has every right to say anything he
wants. But others have the right
to turn him off, to boycott his ad-
vertisers, to make his allies pay a
price for their timidity
Sure, Democrats are trying to
exploit his comments- Presi-
dent Obama called Fluke and
said later he was thinking about
his daughters. "I don't want them
attacked and called horrible
names because they are being
good citizens," he told a press
conference. But if Republicans
cannot count votes, that's their
problem. Obama won the male
vote by only one point in 2008 but
posted a 13-point margin among
women. Voters like Sandra Fluke,
unmarried without children,
backed Obama over McCain 69
percent to 31 percent. Limbaugh
could help enlarge that margin in
November
This episode has caused other
brave voices to step forward and
reclaim the terrain of civility.
David Friend, the head of Car-
bonite, one of about 20 advertis-
ers to drop the Limbaugh show,
said: "No one with daughters the
age of Sandra Fluke, and I have
two, could possibly abide the in-
sult and abuse heaped upon this
courageous and well-intentioned
young lady" John DeGioia, the
president of Georgetown, con-
demned Limbaugh's "misogynis-
tic, vitriolic" attack and quoted
the wisdom of St. Augustine: "Let
us, on both sides, lay aside all ar-
rogance. Let us not, on either
side, claim that we have already
discovered the truth. Let us seek
it together as something which is
known to neither of us."
Amen.

Steve and Cokie Roberts can be
contacted by email at steve
cokie@gmail. com.


LETTERS > to the Editor


Why vote for Obama?
1. Even a Republican trying
for the nomination admitted
"President Obama did not cause
the problems facing our coun-
try..'. So then who caused most
of our problems? The last ad-
ministration was, in fact, a Re-
publican. Why would we want to
vote in another Republican?
2. Yes, we have had a reces-
sion, but this is certainly very
different from what could have
been a full-blown depression. Do
any of you recall the Big Depres-
sion?
3. In our democracy when we
have one party in the office of
president and the other party in
control of the House and Senate,
the office of president is in the
minority. Our leaders are not in-
terested in what is best for our
country, but what is best for their
power and financial gain.
4. We have a much better
standing in the world now than
we did four years ago. President
Obama was wise to appoint
Hillary Clinton to her position. If
you traveled in Europe four
years ago, you did not let others
know you were American. That
atmosphere has changed for the
better
5. The bailout has enabled the
auto industry to start to thrive
again. GM is back in production
and the employees are back at
work.


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in Chroni-
cle editorials are the opinions of
the newspaper's editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Groups or individuals are invited
to express their opinions in a let-
ter to the editor.
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at 352-563-5660.
All letters must be signed and in-
clude a phone number and home-
town, including letters sent via
email. Names and hometowns will
be printed; phone numbers will
not be published or given out.
We reserve the right to edit let-
ters for length, libel, fairness and
good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
350 words, and writers will be
limited to three letters per month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to
352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

6. The Republicans began a
costly war looking for weapons
of mass destruction which did
not exist.
7. President Obama with the
correct advice, and the courage
of our armed forces, finally
ended the control of Osama bin
Laden.


8. I am not knowledgeable re-
garding the health coverage
issue. But, even I can see some-
thing was done instead of noth-
ing.
9. I will add a personal note
here. I do not think politics has
any right to determine contra-
ception or abortion. I feel this is
a moral issue that should be be-
tween the family and whatever
religion you chose to follow.
10. So, vote with your heart
and mind and not with just the
mindset that big money spent on
TV ads will try to buy your vote.
Joan C. Slusser
Crystal River

Keep time the same
I wonder how many people
would love the time to stay as is,
to not spring forward next
month. I think it's perfect just
the way it is. And there are a few
states that do not change time.
Thinking mostly of school kids
having to get the bus in the dark,
I see no purpose or advantage to
changing the time.
To everyone who agrees with
me, please let's get with it
and email or write the governor;
there's not much time left. And
Chronicle, it would be very inter-
esting to see a poll on this.
Carol Jackson
Hernando


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NATURE
Continued from Page Al

Complex, Inc., formerly the
Friends of the Chassahow-
itzka National Wildlife
Refuge Complex, Inc., se-
cured a $10,000 grant
through the U.S. Fish and
Wildlife Services' National
Fish and Wildlife Founda-
tion to make the outdoor
classroom happen.
The grant specifies the
group design and enact an
environmental-education
program, which the group
calls the Nature of Learning
Environmental Education
Project at the Chassahow-
itzka Salt Marsh Trails com-
plex in Homosassa.
As with many grants,
there is a requirement for
matching contributions. The
Friend's contribution was in
the form of volunteer
hours. There are more than
550 hours in volunteer



FIRE
Continued from Page Al

No people were injured
in the fire. However, Animal
Services and Nature Coast
EMS were unsuccessful in
reviving the pet dog, who
died at the scene.
"A lady from animal res-
cue immediately began CPR
and they were administer-
ing oxygen," Brian said.
"She worked a long time but
wasn't able to revive the
dog."
First on the scene was an
Inverness unit that began to
aggressively battle the
flames. Also at the scene
were additional units from
Floral City, Hernando,
Highlands, Pine Ridge and
Connell Heights. Fire serv-
ices personnel from Station
#131 in Beverly Hills also
assisted at the scene.
The fire was contained to
the garage but also extended
into the kitchen and one
bedroom. The house sus-
tained about $100,000 in



BRIEFS
Continued from Page Al

her ruling.
In the meantime, the
foundation asked Fulford to
place a stay on the law
pending its appeal to the
First District Court of Ap-
peal. However, Fulford de-
nied the motion and told
attorneys in an emergency
hearing in Tallahassee that
the foundation would suffer
no harm if trustees take im-
mediate oversight of the
hospital as is required by a
law that was to take effect
July 1, 2011.


hours which were con-
tributed to this Nature of
Learning project in the
preparation and perform-
ance. At the Florida hourly
rate for volunteer hours of
$18.40 (2010 rates), the vol-
unteer hour contribution to
this project is more than
$10,000, making the total
value of this project to the
community $20,000 accord-
ing to the group.
The complex is about 10
acres in size and located in-
side of the 31,000-acre Chas-
sahowitzka National
Wildlife Refuge in Ho-
mosassa, just off South
Mason Creek Road.
Last month each of the
classes in the fifth grade at
the Homosassa Elementary
was given a tour of the com-
plex and was offered les-
sons that correlated with
the standardized FCAT
testing.
This week's tour for the
fourth-graders was a slightly
less mentally-rigorous ex-



No people were
injured in the
fire. However, a
pet dog died at
the scene.

structural damage and about
$90,000 to the contents.
"It was sobering to watch
as someone's home was de-
stroyed in a matter of min-
utes," the neighbor said.
Chronicle managing edi-
tor Sandra Frederick can be
reached at 352-564-2930 or
sfrederick@chronicle
online.comrn


cursion into the salt marsh,
but highly educational
nonetheless.
A group of seven retired
educators with the Friends
group, many with biology
and science expertise, as
well as four staff members
from the U.S. Fish and
Wildlife Service acted as
tour guides including Ivan
Vicente, visitor services spe-
cialist with the U.S. Fish
and Wildlife Service.
"We want the youth to un-
derstand the environment
they live in by showing
them, hands-on, the differ-
ent habitats that they will
find within the ecosystem of
the salt marsh," he said. "By
exposing them to the five
habitats we're able to show
them what these habitats
are made of. They can iden-
tify wildlife that exists in
each part of a particular
habitat by using binoculars,
spotting scopes, nets and
even getting in the water to
find invertebrates. It's a



MAP
Continued from Page Al

The court said eight Sen-
ate districts are unconstitu-
tional as well as the
chamber's changes in dis-
trict numbers because it
was done to favor certain
incumbents.
The renumbering would
allow more incumbents to
serve 10 years under an ex-
ception to eight-year term
limits also in the constitu-
tion. That's because some
senators, depending on
whether they are in odd-
or even-numbered dis-
tricts, would get four year


-From staff reports ...





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great way to give these kids
a fresh perspective on the
environment they live in."
Bonnie Rybak, educa-
tional coordinator for the
Nature of Learning grant
project for the Friends of the
Crystal River National
Wildlife Refuge Complex,
Inc. is one of the many volun-
teers putting the programs
together for the youths.
"Shirley secured the
$10,000 grant last spring to
work with students and
bring their awareness of the
nature that's right in the
back yard and to make their
textbook knowledge come
alive," she said. "These
tours tie into a lot of the
standardized testing ques-
tions and knowledge they
need to know."
For instance, the students
studied what a food chain is
and how different species
rely on other species to sur-
vive. They also studied the
ecosystem of the salt marsh
where the saltwater meets


terms and others two year
terms this year to keep
them staggered so only half
are up for election in non-
redistricting years.
Each chamber drew its
own map although both
need approval from both
chambers. Senate Presi-
dent Mike Haridopolos, R-
Merritt Island, said in a
statement that once Gov.
Rick Scott calls a special
session, the Senate "will
work diligently to adjust the
areas that the court has ex-
pressed concern over."
House Speaker Dean


the freshwater and how the
different plant and animal
life is actually built to live
here.
"And it's right in their
back yard," Rybak said. "It's
made their text books come
alive."
The grant monies paid for
a litany of student materials,
including activity sheets,
clipboards and pencils, mag-
nifying glasses, microscopes
and slides. Each student was
also provided a lunch free of
charge and a commemora-
tive T-shirt for each student,
graduation certificate and
notebooks with all class ma-
terials included.
The Friends group began
blazing trails in the Salt
Marsh Trail complex in 2008
but recently began utilizing
it for student education. The
complex, which is open to
the public, is located on
South Mason Creek Road
about two miles from Ho-
mosassa Elementary
School.


Cannon, R-Winter Park,
said the ruling "will pro-
vide a great help moving
forward."
Democrats and three non-
partisan groups that backed
the Fair Districts amend-
ments alleged both maps vi-
olated the new restrictions,
including a ban on inten-
tionally drawing districts to
favor or disfavor incum-
bents and political parties.
They alleged the maps
would let the GOP maintain
two-to-one majorities in
both chambers although
Florida's voter registration


SATURDAY, MARCH 10, 2012 A9

Vincente said there is a
greater purpose to teaching
children, and the general
public about the salt marsh.
"This is important because
these communities surround
these refuges. These refuges
are for preserving wildlife
and we want the community
to understand the value of
the Chassahowitzka National
Wildlife Refuge estuary," he
said.
He added, "We have
whooping cranes that live in
this refuge and they're an
endangered species. They
are one of the most iconic
species in the nation. We
want the community to un-
derstand how important
whooping cranes are to the
environment and make
them stewards for such a
special species that lives
right in their back yard."
Chronicle staff writer
Matthew Beck can be
reached at 352-564-2919 or
mbeck@chronicleonline.
com.


and voting patterns are al-
most equally divided be-
tween Democrats and
Republicans.
The Supreme Court,
though, said that's not
enough to conclude unlaw-
ful intent. The justices said
each district must be exam-
ined to determine if there's
a violation.
The amendments also
protect minority voting
rights and require that
maps be compact and fol-
low political or geographic
boundaries whenever
feasible.


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NATION


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


BRIES US adds 227,000 jobs in February


Jobless rate stays at 8.3 percent


Associated Press
The northern lights or au-
rora borealis fill the west-
ern sky Friday above the
Russian Orthodox Saint
Nicholas Memorial Chapel
in Kenai, Alaska. The dis-
play of lights came in the
aftermath of a solar storm
that struck Earth on
Thursday.


Missing hiker
found in N.M.
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M -
A woman who was missing
for nearly a month in a New
Mexico national forest was
found emaciated Wednesday
in a sleeping bag with her cat
by her side, authorities said.
Authorities said Margaret
Page, 41, took some food
with her but ran out, and
stayed alive by drinking water
from a nearby creek. She fed
her cat, Miya, with cat food
she had packed.
She was located by a res-
cue crew in the Gila National
Forest around a mile up the
Railroad Canyon Trail in a
rugged area known as the
Black Range of an isolated
region of southwestern New
Mexico.
That's where authorities
believe Page, who authorities
said has a history of mental
illness, purposefully went hik-
ing off a trail with her cat be-
tween Feb. 10 and Feb. 12
and set up a camp.
Dave Kuthe, search crew
leader, told the Silver City
Sun-News that Page was
found malnourished but well-
hydrated and sleeping in a
blue sleeping bag.

World BRIEFS

Run away


Associated Press
Palestinian protesters run
away from a stun grenade
fired Friday by Israeli troops
during a protest against
the expansion of the
nearby Jewish settlement
^f 11n1mmi!h in fha UhlaaS


Uf nHalamisdin i
Bank village o
near Ramallah

Syrian I
reject
BEIRUT-A
international mis
the Syrian crisis
day before it beg
opposition reject
U.N. envoy Kofi
alogue with Pres
Assad as pointle
touch after a yea
The dispute e
widening gap be
sition leaders wh
military aid can
regime, and We
who fear more v
exacerbate the
As the prospe
macy faltered, T
ported the defec
high-ranking mil
- two generals
- as well as twc
a significant dev
cause until now
defectors have
conscripts.


Associated Press
WASHINGTON The
United States added 227,000
jobs in February in the lat-
est display of the economic
recovery's surprising
breadth and brawn. The
country has put together the
strongest three months of
pure job growth since the
Great Recession.
The unemployment rate
stayed at 8.3 percent. It was
the first time in six months
it didn't fall, and that was
because a half-million
Americans, perhaps finally


seeing hope in the economy,
started looking for work.
The Labor Department
also said Friday that Decem-
ber and January, already two
of the best months for jobs
since the recession, were
even stronger than first esti-
mated. It added 41,000 jobs
to its total for January and
20,000 for December Econo-
mists were expecting Feb-
ruary job growth of 210,000.
"It's a very strong report,"
said Bob Baur, chief global
economist at Principal
Global Investors, an asset
management company "I


could hardly find anything
not to like in it."
Since the beginning of
December, the country has
added 734,000 jobs. The only
three-month stretch that
was better since the reces-
sion ended was March
through May 2010, when the
government was hiring tens
of thousands of temporary
workers for the census.
Stocks rose steadily
through the morning. The
Dow Jones industrial aver-
age climbed 48 points to
12,956. Last week, it closed
above 13,000 for the first time
since May 2008. The improv-
ing jobs picture figures to
improve the re-election
chances for President


Gunman


Police say shooter

at Pittsburgh

psychiatric clinic

used two guns
Associated Press
PITTSBURGH -A gunman who
killed one person and shot several
others at a University of Pittsburgh
psychiatric clinic before being shot
dead by police was identified Fri-
day as a 30-year-old local man.
The man, John Shick, was armed
with two handguns traced to Texas,
one of which had been reported
stolen, police said.
Police still don't have a motive
for Thursday's shooting by Shick,
who's believed to have lived in
Pittsburgh's Shadyside neighbor-
hood near the hospital.
Police confirmed his name at a
Friday news conference in which
they released a more detailed de-
scription of the shooting. They said
it's too early for them to have de-
termined if Shick had any criminal
history or mental health problems.
Police confirmed what they'd
previously believed was true: At
least one University of Pittsburgh
police officer shot and killed Shick
to end the rampage.
The gunman had two semiauto-
matic pistols when he shot seven
people, including 25-year-old
Michael Schaab, of Edgewood, who
was pronounced dead at the scene
about 80 minutes after the shooting
began, the medical examiner's of-
fice said. An eighth person was hurt,
but officials say that injury was not
gunshot-related. The surviving vic-
tims are all expected to recover
Mary Schaab, the dead victim's
mother, told The Associated Press
on Friday that authorities have told


Barack Obama and to com-
plicate the political strategy
for the Republicans com-
peting for the right to re-
place him.
Obama on Friday visited a
manufacturing plant run by
Rolls-Royce, a maker of air-
craft engines, in Virginia, a
state expected to be closely
contested in November He
told workers there that
American manufacturing is
adding jobs for the first time
since the 1990s.
"The economy is getting
stronger," the president
said. "When I come to
places like this and I see the
work that's being done, it
gives me confidence there
are better days ahead."


ID'd


Associated Press
People evacuate the Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic on Thursday
in the Oakland section of Pittsburgh. A man armed with two semiauto-
matic handguns entered the lobby of the psychiatric clinic at the Univer-
sity of Pittsburgh on Thursday afternoon and opened fire, killing one person
and wounding several others before he was shot dead, apparently by cam-
pus police.


them "absolutely nothing" beyond
notifying them of her son's death. A
state trooper from a barracks near-
est to their Greensburg home
brought the news to the family late
Thursday night.
Until the trooper arrived, the
family was glued to television news


reports but assumed her son was
safe, Schaab said.
"We sat and watched the news
for hours and not even thinking (he
might be a victim) because he
worked on another floor, an upper
floor," Schaab said. The shooting
occurred in the first-floor lobby


Britain awash in gloom as London Olympics approach


Associated Press


i Lne vveLt LONDON With less
f Nabi Saleh than five months until the
games begin, England's
mood is about as gray and
rebels gloomy as a rainy day along
rebelS the River Thames.
talks Instead of enthusiasm,
high-profile euphoria and ebullience,
ssion to end the Olympic countdown is
stumbled Fri- generating a drumbeat of
stumbled F- skepticism, scare stories
gan as the and doom.
ted calls by There are persistent
Annan for di- complaints about the ticket-
sident Bashar ing, worries over cost over-
ass and out of runs, predictions of traffic
ar of violence, gridlock and transportation
xposes the chaos, threats of blood
tween oppo- shortages, disease and
ho say only strikes even talk of
stop Assad's drought.
stern powers British oddsmakers are
Weapons will even taking bets on every-
conflict. thing that could go wrong.
cts for diplo- The Olympic flame will
urkey re- fail to arrive on time for the
;tions of three July 27 opening? That's 66-1
itary officers at Ladbrokes.
and a colonel An athlete will miss the
o sergeants, start of competition and
elopment be- cite transport problems as
elopmente- the reason? That's 2-1.
most army A power cut at the open-
been low-level ing ceremony? That's 25-1.
Britons have a reputation
-From wire reports as natural-born grumblers


Associated Press
Mayor of London Boris Johnson talks during a news confer-
ence Oct. 15, 2010, at a school in east London. The
Olympic countdown is generating a drumbeat of skepticism,
scare stories and doom-mongering. Feeding the gloom and
grumbling are persistent complaints about the ticketing
system, worries about cost overruns, predictions of traffic
gridlock and transport chaos, threats of blood shortages,
disease and strikes, even talk of drought and water
shortages.


who love nothing more than
to complain, and the
Olympics have proved to be
a perfect outlet for naysay-
ers and killjoys.
"This is very typical of the
British mentality," said Ellis
Cashmore, a professor of cul-
ture, media and sport at
Staffordshire University.
"There is a quite healthy


recognition of our own limi-
tations. There is a tradition
in Britain to think, 'Well, we
really don't do things that
well, you know. If anyone can
screw it up, the British can."'
Many Londoners plan to
leave town to avoid the
whole thing, especially
when they can cash in by
renting out their homes or


apartments for the
Olympics.
"It's going to be difficult
getting in and out of the city
center during the games,"
said Jason Hammond, a 45-
year-old company director
who lives in northwest Lon-
don with his wife and five
children. "It's too much of a
hassle. So we've booked a
holiday and put our house
up for rent for 12,000
pounds ($19,000) a week,
four times the normal
price."
Also feeling in a sour
mood and planning to leave
town during the Olympics is
Andrew Doughty, 41, who
lives with his wife and two
young children in the north
London borough of Islington
- a short train ride from the
Olympic Park. He applied
for tickets for his family and
came up empty-handed.
"Now we feel really dis-
connected," Doughty said.
"Everything for us is now
just a major inconvenience.
It's all downside now being
in London. The place is
going to be overrun. The
Tube system is going to be
swamped. I'd rather watch
it on TV on holiday
somewhere."


Associated Press
President Barack Obama
waves as he arrives Friday for
a speech on the economy at
the Rolls-Royce aircraft en-
gine part production plant in
Prince George, Va.



Air


controller


involved


in 2nd


potential


collision
Associated Press
WASHINGTON An air
traffic controller who nearly
caused a midair collision
last year has again been re-
lieved of duty after putting
two planes on converging
courses. The case raises
questions about whether
employee rights are trump-
ing safety at the Federal Avi-
ation Administration.
Shortly after beginning the
7 p.m. work shift at the FAA
radar facility at Gulfport-
Biloxi International Airport
in Mississippi on Feb. 29,
controller Robert Beck or-
dered an Air Force C-130
transport jet to increase its
altitude from 2,000 feet to
3,000 feet and to adjust its
heading. That put the jet on
a converging course with a
twin-engine turboprop
owned by the Department of
Homeland Security, accord-
ing to an FAA employee with
knowledge of the incident
The controller whom
Beck had relieved was
standing in the back of the
radar room while taking a
break. He noticed the mis-
take and alerted Beck so he
was able to separate the
planes, avoiding a possible
collision, said the employee
with knowledge of the inci-
dent. The planes were just
north of Gulfport at the time.
The employee wasn't au-
thorized to speak publicly
and commented only on con-
dition of not being named.
An FAA report on the inci-
dent, released Friday in re-
sponse to an Associated
Press request under the
Freedom of Information Act,
confirms most of the details,
although it doesn't name the
controller involved.
An FAA analysis of radar
data shows the planes came
within 2.59 miles laterally
and 300 feet vertically of
each other Regulations re-
quire a minimum separa-
tion distance between
planes of three miles later-
ally and 1,000 feet vertically
Air traffic was light at the
time, leaving Beck who
has a history of disciplinary
problems with no planes
to handle except the two
that he put on a converging
course, the employee said.
Beck didn't return a tele-
phone call from the AP The
FAA report said the con-
troller who made the error
initially thought he'd been
told the planes were at the
same altitude, which is why
he told the Air Force jet to
go up to 3,000 feet.
The controller has been
removed from directing air
traffic and is "currently as-
signed to administrative du-
ties while the FAA evaluates
the individual's future sta-
tus with the agency," the
FAA said in a statement.











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CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


NFL free agency scheduled to hit soon


Associated Press
Peyton Manning is a free man. Drew
Brees is not
A week after a record 21 players were
given franchise tags only Saints star
quarterback Brees got an exclusive tag
and can't even talk to other teams the
NFL's free agency free-for-all begins.
And it will be crazy
For teams willing to part with two
New Orleans Saints quarterback Drew
Brees was hit with an exclusive franchise
tag recently.
Associated Press


first-round draft picks, such game-
changers as Ray Rice, Wes Welker and
Matt Forte are available. For those
looking just to spend money to acquire
new talent, Saints starters Marques
Colston and All-Pro guard Carl Nicks
are on the market. So is highly touted
quarterback Matt Flynn, who doesn't
seem to have much future in Green Bay
behind Aaron Rodgers.
And for teams ready to gamble, there
is four-time MVP Manning.
"I have no idea who wants me, what
team wants me, how this process works,"
Manning said after being released by


Survive and advance

UFholds on

againstAlabama

in SEC quarters

Associated Press
NEW ORLEANS One of
Florida's biggest assets is itsP.
ability to shoot the 3. The
Gators are learning how to win
when they've lost their touch.
Bradley Beal scored 16 and
Florida beat Alabama 66-63 in
the Southeastern Conference
tournament quarterfinals on
Friday despite a rough per-
formance from outside.
"This has kind of been a
trend for us these last couple
games of not making shots,"
Beal said. "So we really had to
bear down on defense and
guard guys."
Erik Murphy had 15 points
and Kenny Boynton scored 14
for the Gators, who shot just
38.5 percent (20 of 52) from the
field, including 33.3 percent
(10 of 30) from 3-point range.
The Gators had a 45-33 lead
with 12:50 remaining after
Murphy hit a pair of free
throws, but Alabama re-
sponded with a 16-4 run to tie it
at 49 on JaMychal Green's
three-point play with 6:52 to go.
Alabama had a chance to tie
in the final seconds, but Trevor
Lacey's 3-pointer bounced off
the front of the rim.
Though the game was usu-
ally tight, the Crimson Tide
never led. .
I think this time of year, "4
you've got to find ways to ad-
vance and move on and we
did,' Florida coach Billy
Donovan said.
Florida (23-9) will face top-
ranked Kentucky on Saturday
in the semifinals. The Gators
lost to the Wildcats twice this
season, but hope their post- .
season-tested team will be up
for the challenge. Much of "
Florida's roster was around -
last season, when the Gators
advanced to the Elite Eight. ..
"Our team, we're mature," i
said senior guard Kenny Boyn-
ton, who hit two late free
throws to seal the victory.
"We've been through every-
thing, played the best teams Associated Press
throughout this year, so I think Florida's Patric Young dunks the ball as Alabama guard Charles Hankerson Jr. watches during the
second half of the SEC tournament quarterfinals Friday at the New Orleans Arena in New Orleans.
See Page B134 The Gators now move on the tournament's semifinals, where they will face No. 1 Kentucky.


Watson shoots 62 to take Doral lead


"They
Wilson sa


DORAL Bubba Watson and best golf I'
Justin Rose put on an amazing tween the:
show of birdies in blustery condi- Watsonm
tions at Doral, making 17 between will get to
them while playing in the same group Satu
group Friday at the Cadillac to settle fo:
Championship.
Their playful fuel Golf leaderboard
was decided by Wat-
son's eagle, giving 0 For more golf scores,
him a 10-under 62 please see Page B2.
and a one-shot lead.
Watson belted a 3-iron that
barely got over a palm tree, car- scores on
ried over the water into the wind average sc
and settled 6 feet away on the par- three str
5 eighth for an eagle putt that gave opening r
him a one-shot lead over Rose. scores in t
Mark Wilson, the third in that 31 of them
group, shot a respectable 70 and Tiger W
was just along for the ride. for a 67 ai


did everything right,"
id. "It was some of the
've seen collectively be-
m."
was at 12-under 132 and
play again in the final
urday with Rose, who had
r a 64.
"Maybe they've
been cutting the
hole a little bigger,"
Rose said.
Despite the
steady wind, there
were plenty of low
the Blue Monster. The
core was 69.9, close to
okes easier than the
round. There were 12
he 60s on Thursday, and
Friday
oods played bogey-free
nd actually lost ground.


the Indianapolis Colts, who are rebuild-
ing, uncertain about his health after four
neck surgeries, and have a $28 million
roster bonus remaining in their bank ac-
count by cutting Manning. "I mean, this
is all so new to me."
Manning can even sign before free
agency opens Tuesday because he was
released. Already, cornerback Stanford
Routt took that route, joining the Chiefs
for a three-year, $19.6 million deal soon
after he was cut by Oakland.
This could be the wildest free agency

See Page B4





Panthers


dismiss


Central

SEAN ARNOLD
Correspondent
LECANTO Senior pitcher
Sheldon Baxter surrendered no
earned runs, struck out seven,
and walked two in a complete
game to lead his Panthers in a 3-
1 district victory at home against
Central on Friday
Lecanto senior shortstop Jacob
Sims drove in junior right fielder
Scott Stearns (two hits) with a
double deep down the left-field
line before going on to score off a
base-hit rip to right field by soph-
omore third baseman Levi
O'Steen to put the Panthers up
2-0 in the third inning.
An RBI double
by senior
catcher Gary
Levengood
that scored
Baxter in the
fifth gave the sen-
ior ace and his defense more than
enough support to even Lecanto's
district record to 2-2 (5-5 overall).
Panthers coach David Logue
was happy to see his club's recent
strides in practice pay off in its
first game in a week.
"We did a really good job in all
four phases tonight," Logue said.
"I could see us in practice, work-
ing hard, just getting better and
getting more confidence in our-
selves. Hopefully, it's going to
propel us for the season. We can't
lose another game in district if
we want a shot at our goal of the
No. 1 seed."
The Bears (4-5, 1-3) did put to-
gether a threat in the sixth, with
Central junior third baseman Zack
Taylor knocking in junior center
fielder Jalaun Outlaw with a liner
to left for their club's sole run.
On the mound for Central,
sophomore Trevor McKenna
struck out three and allowed four
hits and a walk in the first three
innings. Junior Joey Wright took
over in the fourth and finished
out the game with four strikeouts.
Baxter was both overpowering
and effective at mixing speeds, at
times showing subtle changes of
speed on his fastball.
"I can reach back and get a
couple more miles an hour when
I need it," he said afterward. "It
helps a lot.
"Tonight, the fastball was work-
ing really well, and I was hitting
spots with the curveball."
Lecanto plays at home at 6:30
p.m. Thursday against Class 8A
Coral Gables High.


He moved up the leaderboard, but
is seven shots behind going into
the weekend, with 14 players
ahead of him.
"This is the highest score I could
have shot today, for sure," Woods
said.
Rory McIlroy, in his first tour-
nament as the new world No. 1,
managed a 69 and fell 10 shots off
the lead.
Perhaps most peculiar about
Watson being atop the leader-
board at Doral is that he really
doesn't like the course. Without
many trees except for the waving
See Page B2
Bubba Watson hits from the 11th
tee during the second round of the
Cadillac Championship golf
tournament on Friday in Doral.
Associated Press


Associated Press

















CITRUS COUNTY SP


CITRUS COUNTY'S RECREATIONAL GUIDE TO ADULT SPORTS



a LL.
(A

I- 0


EEDWAY


HITTING THE LINKS OUTDOORS


IN


THE


jAME


The future of sports


My wife called me at work re-
cently and related a phone
conversation she had with a
teacher in Citrus County. The con-
versation revolved around her
wanting to use one of the local high
school's track to train her newly
formed U.S. Track and Field team.
The team is made up of second-to-
eighth-graders who are just starting
those formative years of sports par-
ticipation and individual sports in
particular where it is all
up to the participant.
In team sports, there
is reliance on team-
mates, but in the indi-
vidual sports it is totally
on the participant and ..
this is still a very new
experience.
The gentleman re-
lated that he never Dr. Ron
thought he would again DOCI
see kids competing in
track and field, which he ORD
thought was more or less
a sport in its decline. Individual
sports participation seems to have
given way to team sports such as
soccer, basketball, football, etc.
The individual sports such as
track and field, wrestling, cross


r
)1


country skiing and speed skating (to
name a few) are not as popular be-
cause these sports do not have the
media exposure or the same type of
stars. Individual sports do not gar-
ner the funds or the eventual
money, salaries and endorsements
at the professional level.
These athletes in individual
sports do most of the hard physical
work away from the media and
cameras, on the frozen slopes of a
mountain in the Rockies
or conditioning in a gym
to lose that extra five
pounds to make the next
wrestling weight
bracket
SAll of the effort is to
SR -. prepare for a moment of
glory that lasts from
9.937 seconds in sprint-
Joseph ing the 100 meter dash...
OR'S Even a long race such as
the marathon lasts for
ERS slightly longer than two
hours.
Success or failure, first or last
place, will depend entirely upon
that kid's efforts, practice time and
talents. There will be no one else to
blame for failure and all the success
for the hard work and effort will be


his or hers alone.
What other better avenue do we
have that teaches kids how to be
self-sufficient, to depend on their
own physical preparedness and
how to persevere and stick to their
best physical effort to endeavor to
finish, accomplish and improve on
a goal.
The most successful athletes that
I saw in years of participating and
coaching sports and being the or-
thopedic team doctor for several
teams, are the ones not with the
most talent, but the ones who have
worked the hardest and stuck to it,
win or lose.
Regardless of the child's talents,
in track and field as an example, the
child can find an event that will suit
his talents and skills and challenge
that child to work at being better
Individual sports teach kids
about competition. The competi-
tion they face in their daily lives,
not only in academic classes but
also in the world. Mainly, individ-
ual sports teach that not all people
involved win. The athlete who wins
is the one that regardless of race,
creed, ethnicity or political lean-
ing, is the one who is most pre-
pared, best trained and has the


sport's technique mastered.
Regardless of the competitor's
hope or most fervent desire, it is the
child athlete who crosses the finish
line obtains the benefits of the work
ethic and effort that he or she alone
expended.
In our society, where being
mediocre has become much too
commonplace and where it is eas-
ier to lounge around and play
video games, it is refreshing to see
kids training for foot races running
up the lanes of the track, throw the
shot put with a maximum effort
and grunt.
It is a miracle to see kids sweat-
ing, turning red, fall in exhaustion,
develop side cramps or start crying
in glee as opposed to quitting pre-
maturely and blustering because it
is too much effort or not being easy
enough.
Exercise, training and competi-
tion are the heart and soul of brain
and body growth and the growth of
the Olympic spirit. Individual
sports are the basis of a lifetime of
participation.
Ron Joseph, M.D., a hand and
shoulder orthopedic specialist can
be reached at rbjhand@cox.net
or 352-212-5359.


Inaugural tennis event upcoming


The inaugural Free-
dom Open is a new
tennis tournament on
our Citrus County tennis
calendar The event will be
at the Crystal River High
School tennis courts. It is a
little short notice, because
the dates are
March 24-25.
I have been -
informed that by
the time you -
read this, e- V
mails have been r
sent to many of
you as well, to
make you aware A-
of this new event Eric v
which will be of- 00
fering the fol- Ho
lowing divisions: ON C4
Men's singles
and doubles, A and B;
Women's singles and dou-
bles, A and B; Mixed dou-


4
14


bles, A and B.
The fee is $20 for one
event, $10 for an additional
event. Each player will be
given a gift and is guaran-
teed two matches.
If you wanted to practice
your singles in real compe-
tition before the
new Adult USTA
league starts,
here is your
chance. This is
the only event at
the moment
(that we know
of) to offer
singles.
an den Generally
gen speaking, the
reason for this is
OURT the simple fact
that more people
can play on the available
courts in the tournament
when it is doubles only and,


after all, they are trying to
raise money for a good
cause. But it can also be an
opportunity to stand out
from the rest of the tourna-
ments and thus bringing in
different players.
One word of caution, if
you decide to play singles
and are used to playing
more than one event in tour-
naments, remember singles
will take way more out of
you than doubles.
This event will benefit the
youth ministry of Inverness
First United Methodist
Church. The funds will go to
help pay for various mission
opportunities for the youth
group.
The group is very in-
volved with assisting local
missions, like Mission in
Citrus (an organization that
reaches out to homeless vet-


erans in the county) in
building a better Citrus
County.
A portion of the donations
will also go to NotForSale-
Campaign.org, which is an
organization that fights to
end human trafficking
throughout the world.
Human trafficking is a
worldwide problem that af-
fects 30 million people,
some right here in the USA.
Their mission is to "Stand
with those who are en-
slaved, work together to free
them, and empower them in
their freedom to break the
cycle of vulnerability."
Again, they are very ex-
cited to be the only tourna-
ment in the county to offer a
singles division for both
men and women. The or-
ganizers encourage all ten-
nis players to come out and


support this noble cause
and to have some fun. High
school players are more
than welcome to come to
use this as a warm-up for
the district tournament The
intention is to making this a
regular tournament in years
to come.
The organizers are well
aware of the fact that some
of you still have USTA
matches to play But remem-
ber that they will try very
hard to fit you in, so please
let that not keep you from
helping out this good cause.
For more information or
to sign up contact, AJ Glenn
at 697-3089 or
ajglenn03@gmail.com; Sally
deMontfort at 795-9693 or
deMont@embarqmail.com;
or Eric van den Hoogen at
(352) 382-3138 or
hoera@juno.com.


Friday's GOLF LEADERBOARD


Puerto Rico Open
Friday
At Trump International Golf Club-Puerto
Rico, Rio Grande, Puerto Rico
Purse: $3.5 million
Yardage: 7,506, Par: 72
Second Round
a-amateur
Matt Jones 66-67- 133 -11
George McNeill 66-70- 136 -8
Ryo Ishikawa 70-67- 137 -7
Todd Hamilton 68-69-137 -7
Andres Romero 71-67-138 -6
Daniel Summerhays 68-70- 138 -6
Roberto Castro 69-69 -138 -6
Boo Weekley 70-68 -138 -6
Kevin Stadler 69-69-138 -6
Kevin Kisner 68-70-138 -6
Brendon de Jonge 69-70- 139 -5
Brian Davis 69-70-139 -5
Graham DeLaet 69-70-139 -5
Henrik Stenson 70-69-139 -5
J.J. Killeen 70-69 -139 -5
Roland Thatcher 69-71 -140 -4
Vaughn Taylor 70-70 -140 -4
William McGirt 71-69-140 -4
DannyLee 70-70-140 -4
Richard S. Johnson 71-69- 140 -4
Gavin Coles 69-71 -140 -4
Lee Janzen 69-71 -140 -4
Ben Curtis 67-73-140 -4
Jerry Kelly 71-70-141 -3
Will Claxton 69-72-141 -3
Stephen Gangluff 74-67- 141 -3
Jeff Overton 68-73- 141 -3
Shaun Micheel 69-72- 141 -3
Scott Brown 69-72-141 -3
Peter Lonard 72-70-142 -2
Nathan Green 71-71 -142 -2
Rocco Mediate 74-68-142 -2
Jamie Lovemark 70-72-142 -2
Blake Adams 74-68 -142 -2
Duffy Waldorf 73-69-142 -2



WATSON
Continued from Page B1

palms, he can't figure out
where he's supposed to be
hitting the ball. But he kept
hitting it long, had short
irons into the greens and
made his share of putts.
That works just about any-


Erik Compton 71-71 -142
Ken Duke 73-70 -143
Dicky Pride 71-72-143
Ted Potter, Jr. 72-71 -143
Miguel Angel Carballo 71-72 -143
James Driscoll 70-73-143
Troy Matteson 71-72-143
Kent Jones 71-72-143
Michael Bradley 72-71 -143
Brendon Todd 70-73-143
Marc Turnesa 73-71 -144
Charlie Beljan 71-73-144
Angel Cabrera 69-75 -144
Bill Lunde 73-71 -144
Matt Bettencourt 72-72 -144
Garrett Willis 72-72 -144
Joe Durant 71-73 -144
Matt Every 71-73-144
Rod Pampling 71-74 -145
Will MacKenzie 74-71 -145
BrandtJobe 76-69-145
J.J. Henry 73-72-145
Briny Baird 71-74-145
Robert Gamez 73-72 -145
Patrick Sheehan 74-71 -145
Billy Horschel 72-73-145
Seung-Yul Noh 71-74 -145
DerekTolan 73-72 -145
Marco Dawson 72-73 -145
David Mathis 70-75 -145
J.B. Holmes 73-72-145
Heath Slocum 75-70 -145
Edward Loar 75-70-145
Mark D. Anderson 70-75 -145
KyleReifers 75-70 -145
Emiliano Grillo 72-73-145
Tommy Biershenk 77-68-145
Jeff Curl 72-73-145
Failed to qualify
Jhonattan Vegas 71-75-146
Woody Austin 72-74-146
KirkTriplett 73-73-146
Kyle Thompson 76-70-146
Richard H. Lee 71-75-146
a-Edward Figueroa 72-74-146


where.
As always, there were a
few shots that only Watson
can see.
He was so far left of the
sixth fairway, that a tree was
blocking his path to the
green. Watson had only 135
yards to the hole, but in-
stead of playing a sand
wedge, he hit 9-iron and
aimed it some 20 yards right


Maximiliano Godoy
Martin Flores
David Duval
Sunghoon Kang
Chris DiMarco
Arjun Atwal
Tim Petrovic
Paul Stankowski
Nicholas Thompson
Gary Christian
Stephen Ames
Brett Wetterich
Kevin Streelman
Wilfredo Morales
Mathew Goggin
Daniel Chopra
Chris Smith
Chris Riley
Scott Dunlap
Nelson Ledesma
Hunter Haas
Derek Lamely
Jonas Blixt
Troy Kelly
Alexandre Rocha
Craig Barlow
Will Dodson
Alvaro Arizabaleta
Steve Wheatcroft
Russell Knox
Rich Beem
Peter Uihlein
Frank Lickliter II
Bobby Gates
Andy Matthews
Jason Bohn
Jason Gore
Steven Bowditch
Matt McQuillan
Billy Hurley III
Fran Quinn
Steve Flesch
Rafael Campos
Chris Kaufman
Zack Miller


73-73-146
73-73-146
72-74-146
71-75-146
78-68-146
74-72-146
73-73-146
74-72-146
70-76-146
73-73-146
74-73-147
76-71-147
73-74-147
77-70-147
69-78-147
73-74-147
74-74-148
73-75-148
76-72-148
76-72-148
70-78-148
73-75-148
76-72-148
73-76-149
75-74-149
75-74-149
78-71-149
75-74-149
77-72-149
75-74-149
76-74-150
74-76-150
74-76-150
76-74-150
75-75-150
77-74-151
76-75-151
78-74-152
79-73-152
78-74-152
74-78-152
75-79-154
75-79-154
76-79-155
80-75-155


of the green, slicing it back
into the left-to-right wind
beyond the hole until the
wind pushed it back on the
descent. It landed 6 feet
from the cup.
His caddie, Ted Scott,
keeps notes in the yardage
book of how Watson plays
each hole in every round.
Next to the 9-iron from 135
yards, he put in parenthe-


Scott McCarron 78-78-156 +12
Joaquin Estevez 78-78-156 +12
Max Alverio 79-77-156 +12
Miguel Suarez 80-77-157 +13
David Hutsell 77-81-158 +14
a-Robert Calvesbert 84-79-163 +19
a-Juan Campusano 82-83-165 +21
Kris Blanks 75-DQ
Cadillac Championship
Friday
AtTPC Blue Monster at Doral
Purse: $8.5 million
Yardage: 7,334, Par: 72
Second Round
Bubba Watson 70-62 -132 -12
Justin Rose 69-64 -133 -11
Adam Scott 66-68-134 -10
Peter Hanson 70-65 -135 -9
Thomas Bjorn 68-68 -136 -8
Keegan Bradley 69-67-136 -8
Charl Schwartzel 68-69-137 -7
Martin Kaymer 73-64-137 -7
Charles Howell III 70-67-137 -7
Jason Dufner 66-72 -138 -6
ZachJohnson 70-68-138 -6
Bo Van Pelt 73-65 -138 -6
Kyle Stanley 69-69 -138 -6
Luke Donald 70-68-138 -6
Y.E.Yang 72-67-139 -5
Hennie Otto 73-66 -139 -5
Steve Stricker 69-70 -139 -5
TigerWoods 72-67-139 -5
Matt Kuchar 72-67-139 -5
Johnson Wagner 70-69 -139 -5
Juvic Pagunsan 69-71 -140 -4
Jason Day 73-67-140 -4
Miguel A. Jimenez 69-71 -140 -4
Webb Simpson 75-66 -141 -3
Greg Chalmers 71-70 -141 -3
Gary Woodland 71-70 -141 -3
K.J. Choi 74-67-141 -3
MarkWilson 72-70-142 -2
Anders Hansen 70-72 -142 -2
David Toms 72-70-142 -2

ses, "Wow."
There was another "wow"
inscription two holes later.
Watson was in the fairway
on the par-5 eighth, but the
best path to the green was
around a palm tree near the
ropes where the photogra-
phers were camped out.
"I took it right up the
edge of that tree. There's a
little tree there and it actu-


Graeme McDowell 75-67
Rory Mcllroy 73-69
Jonathan Byrd 72-70
Jbe' Kruger 72-71
Francesco Molinari 75-68
Dustin Johnson 75-68
Alvaro Quiros 69-74
Robert Karlsson 75-68
Hunter Mahan 71-72
Phil Mickelson 72-71
Nicolas Colsaerts 73-70
John Senden 76-67
Lee Westwood 76-67
Aaron Baddeley 69-74
Marcus Fraser 76-68
Paul Lawrie 70-74
NickWatney 71-73
Gonzalo Fdez-Castano 74-70
Garth Mulroy 73-71
Ben Crane 73-71
Brandt Snedeker 75-69
Bill Haas 74-70
Rickie Fowler 74-70
Martin Laird 72-73
Robert Rock 75-70
Rafael Cabrera Bello 75-70
Retief Goosen 74-71
Chez Reavie 78-68
Geoff Ogilvy 73-73
K.T Kim 74-72
Simon Dyson 74-72
Paul Casey 76-71
TadahiroTakayama 74-73
Louis Oosthuizen 77-70
Darren Clarke 74-74
Vijay Singh 75-73
Fredrik Jacobson 72-76
Sergio Garcia 75-74
Alexander Noren 74-75
Pablo Larrazabal 76-73
Branden Grace 78-72
Tetsuji Hiratsuka 78-73
lan Poulter 76-77
Sang-Moon Bae 79-76


ally nicked that limb a little
bit," Watson said. "I hit it as
hard as I could, just a low,
what everybody calls a
stinger. Hit as hard as I
could low and knew it was-
n't going to slice. So all I
was protecting was the
draw and it went dead
straight and came off per-
fect. And the rest is
history"


Rec BRIEFS

2012 Jim Blackshear
Memorial Golf Outing
Citrus County Builders As-
sociation (CCBA) will host the
Jim Blackshear Memorial
Golf Outing as a Parade of
Homes Kickoff Classic Satur-
day, March 10, at the Inver-
ness Golf & Country Club.
The outing, in its 23rd year,
is open to all amateur golfers
and is a favorite event of the
CCBA due to regularly
changing golf courses each
year that aid in keeping the
outing interesting and chal-
lenging for returning golfers.
It was renamed in honor of
Jim Blackshear, a founder of
the CCBA, after his passing
in 2004 and this year the Jim
Blackshear Memorial Golf
Outing will also donate a por-
tion of the proceeds to the
local child advocacy center
and nonprofit Jessie's Place.
Registration will begin at 7
a.m. with a shotgun start at 8
a.m. Cost is $60 per player,
which includes greens fees,
carts, a free Mulligan ticket
and a barbecue chicken buf-
fet lunch. Foursomes save $5
per person at $220 per team.
Additional Mulligans will be
available for sale and are also
used for door prize tickets.
Player and sponsor regis-
trations are open online at
www.CitrusBuilders.com or
by stopping by the CCBA of-
fice, 1196 S Lecanto High-
way, Lecanto, from 9 a.m. to
5 p.m. Monday through
Thursday. For more informa-
tion, call Executive Officer
Donna Bidlack at 352-746-
9028.
'Golf for Meals'
tourney in March
Citrus County Home Deliv-
ered Meals Program will host
aO Golf for Meals fundraising
golf tournament Saturday,
March 24, at Seven Rivers
Golf and Country Club,
Crystal River.
The event will begin at 9
a.m. Business owners and
organizations are invited to
sponsor the event with a vari-
ety of advertising platforms.
You can show your support
by sponsoring a hole, provid-
ing items for gift bags, or by
donating prizes that can be
given away or raffled off for
additional funds. There are
several different levels of cor-
porate sponsorship:
Platinum Sponsor -
$1,000 and more receives a
hole sponsorship, appear-
ance on "The Senior Club
Show"(local television pro-
gram), free monthly advertis-
ing in Citrus County's "Center
Stage" Community Center
newsletter for a year, corpo-
rate logo on all event printed
materials and advertising,
and one golf foursome.
Gold Sponsor $500
receives a hole sponsorship,
free monthly advertising in
Citrus County's "Center
Stage" Community Center
newsletter for a year, and
one golf foursome.
Silver Sponsor $370
receives a hole sponsorship
and one golf foursome.
Bronze Sponsor-- $150
receives a hole sponsorship.
To become a corporate
sponsor, call 352-527-5975.
Good Hope Scramble
benefits Hospice
The fourth annual Camp
Good Hope Golf Scramble will
begin at 8:30 a.m. Saturday,
April 14, at Southern Woods
Golf& Country Club, 1501
Corkwood Blvd., Homosassa.
The tournament supports
Hospice of Citrus County be-
reavement camps Camp
Good Hope and Teen
Encounter.
Entry fee for the event is
$60. Hole sponsorships are
$100. Entry fee includes
lunch, first- through third-place
prizes, special hole prizes and
a golfer gift bag. Registration
deadline is April 7.
For more information or to
register, call Hospice of Cit-
rus County at 352-527-2020.


AE SATURDAY,

aE





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Scary moment for Orioles


Rayspitcher

Cobb beans

batter in head

Associated Press

PORT CHARLOTTE -
Baltimore Orioles left fielder
Nolan Reimold was taken to
a hospital after he was hit in
the left side of the head by a
fastball from Tampa Bay
Rays pitcher Alex Cobb in
the first inning of a 3-3, 10-in-
ning tie on Friday
Reimold, batting fifth in
the lineup, immediately
dropped to the ground and
was face-down for several
minutes while a hushed
crowd watched nervously as
Orioles trainers tended him.
Also looking on was a vis-
ibly upset Cobb, who said in
the Rays clubhouse, "It's
probably the worst feeling
you can have as a pitcher"
Reimold eventually
walked to a cart, which took
him off the field.
Cobb pitched three score-
less innings, giving up two
hits and two walks in his
first start of the spring.
Yankees 3,
Braves (ss) 0
TAMPA- Hoping to earn a
spot in Atlanta's rotation, Julio
Teheran allowed one run and
three hits over three innings as
a Braves split squad lost 3-0 to
the New York Yankees.
The 21 year old struck out
three, including Robinson
Cano, and walked one in his
second spring training start.
Teheran was tagged for six
home runs in just two innings
last Sunday when the Braves
were beat 18-3 by the Detroit
Tigers.
Mets 5, Braves (ss) 3
KISSIMMEE Dillon Gee
allowed two runs and five hits in
three innings as the New York
Mets defeated an Atlanta
Braves split squad 5-3.
The projected No. 5 starter for
New York struck out two and
walked none as he concentrated
on throwing his cut fastball to
the Braves' lefty-heavy lineup.
Atlanta starter Randall Del-
gado pitched three innings, al-
lowing two runs and three hits.
It was an improvement over
his first start of the spring, in
which he allowed four runs in
one inning.
Cardinals 3, Twins 2
FORT MYERS -Adam
Wainwright pitched two score-
less innings in his first start in
over a year, leading the St.
Louis Cardinals to a 3-2 win
over the Minnesota Twins.
Wainwright missed all of last
season after having elbow liga-
ment replacement surgery and
hadn't pitched since Sept. 24,
2010. He walked one and
struck out two Friday.
Phillies 7, Tigers 5
LAKELAND Roy Halladay
gave up two homers to non-
roster invitee Eric Patterson
and allowed three runs overall
in three innings but the
Philadelphia Phillies beat the
Detroit Tigers 7-5 Friday.
Halladay wasn't concerned


Associated Press
Minnesota Twins right fielder Wilkin Ramirez tries unsuccessfully to make the play on a foul
by the St. Louis Cardinals' Pete Kozma during the seventh inning Friday in Fort Myers.


his ERA was 7.20 in two starts
this spring. He said he was
tweaking some of his pitches.
Phillies manager Charlie
Manuel said he isn't looking at
any numbers until opening day.
Athletics 6, Rockies 4
SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. Juan
Nicasio took another big step in
his remarkable comeback from
a broken neck when he threw
three impressive innings in the
Colorado Rockies' 6-4 loss to
the Oakland Athletics.
This was his first start since
Aug. 5, when Washington's lan
Desmond scorched a line drive
that struck the stocky right-han-
der in his right temple, fracturing
his skull. The fall broke his neck.
Dodgers 9, Rangers 0
SURPRISE, Ariz. Clayton
Kershaw allowed three hits in
three shutout innings in his
spring debut and Matt Kemp
homered and the Los Angeles
Dodgers shut out the Texas
Rangers 9-0.
Juan Rivera and Alex
Castellanos also homered for
the Dodgers.
Padres 6, Angels 3
TEMPE, Ariz. Jaff Dacker
and Matt Clark each hit a solo
homer during a three-run sev-
enth inning to lead the San
Diego Padres to a 6-3 win over
Los Angeles in front of 9,562
fans the Angels' first home
sellout of the spring.
Angels slugger Albert Pujols
gave many of the fans their


money's worth with two hits in
two at-bats with a sacrifice fly
and an RBI. He narrowly
missed a homer to left-center
field in the sixth and settled for
a double.
Giants 6, Reds (ss) 3
SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. -
Buster Posey and Freddy
Sanchez, two key Giants who
missed most of last season be-
cause of injuries, returned to
action in San Francisco's 6-3
Cactus League victory over the
Cincinnati Reds.
Posey, the 2010 NL Rookie
of the Year, was behind the
plate for the first two innings
and he hit a flyout in his only at-
bat. Sanchez, who played the
entire game at designated hit-
ter, went 1 for 4.
Brewers 12, Indians 2
PHOENIX Randy Wolf and
five Milwaukee relievers held the
Cleveland Indians to three hits
and the Brewers belted four
home runs in a 12-2 win.
Cristian Guzman lined a sin-
gle to center with two outs in
the seventh off Manny Parra for
Cleveland's first hit. Felix Pie
had a bloop double in the
eighth and Andy LaRoche hit a
two-run double in the ninth.
Cubs 5, White Sox 1
GLENDALE, Ariz. Travis
Wood boosted his chances of
earning a spot in the Chicago
Cubs' rotation, allowing one run
while pitching into the third inning
of a 5-1 win over the White Sox.


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Saturday SundayCIUII


Woods was lifted with one
out in the third and the bases
loaded but Randy entered and
got Paul Konerko to bounce into
an inning-ending double play.
Reds (ss) 5, Royals 1
GOODYEAR, Ariz. Scott
Rolen singled in a run to help a
Cincinnati Reds split squad beat
the Kansas City Royals 5-1.
Rolen's health is a key for
Cincinnati after the veteran third
baseman played in only 65
games for the Reds last sea-
son. He had surgery on his left
shoulder in July.
Rolen has five hits in nine at-
bats this spring and appears to
be mobile in the field.
Royals left-hander Danny
Duffy, in his first spring start,
struck out five of the six batters
he faced, including Rolen.
Blue Jays 11, Astros 2
KISSIMMEE David Cooper
drove in three runs with a single
and a double and reliever Luis
Perez struck out four in two in-
nings as the Toronto Blue Jays
beat the Houston Astros 11-2.
Brett Lawrie, Edwin Encama-
cion and Travis d'Amaud drove in
two runs each for the Blue Jays.


Kahne sets record


at Vegas qualifying


Associated Press

LAS VEGAS Kasey
Kahne will start on the
pole after setting a track
record on a fast day of
qualifying at Las Vegas
Motor Speedway
Kahne had a top speed
of 190.456 mph on the 1.5-
mile tri-oval on Friday to
earn his 23rd career pole
and first since joining Hen-
drick Motorsports.
Kyle Busch qualified
second and will join Kahne
on the front row for Sun-
day's 400-mile race after a
warm afternoon in the
desert where 15 drivers
eclipsed Matt Kenseth's
record of 188.884 mph set
in in 2011.
Kevin Harvick will start
third and Dale Earnhardt
Jr. will be next to him.
It was the fourth straight
year the track record was
broken at Las Vegas Motor
Speedway
Kahne has bounced
around during his Sprint
Cup car career, managing
to win 12 races despite his
lack of a permanent home.
He signed with Hendrick
Motorsports in 2010, but
had to wait until this season
to join the team because
Mark Martin was under
contract through 2011.
Kahne started last sea-
son with Richard Petty
Motorsports and ended it
with Red Bull Racing,
which pulled out of
NASCAR. He snapped an
81-race winless streak at
Phoenix in his penulti-
mate race with the team
and was looking forward to
a good run with Hendrick
after the long wait.
Kahne didn't get off to
the start he wanted, crash-
ing in his first two races.
He finished 29th at the
Daytona 500 and 34th last
week at Phoenix, putting
him 32nd in points.
Kahne has had intermit-
tent success at Las Vegas -
top-10 finishes every other
year since 2004 but No. 5
was fast off the hauler,


posting one of the 10 best
times in practice.
Busch, who grew up in
Las Vegas, broke the track
record near the midpoint
of qualifying with a speed
of 190.040 mph, which
stood despite several other
drivers bettering the
record.
Kahne finally beat
Busch's time late in the
session, turning a lap of
28.353 seconds that'll give
him a chance to start up
front in Sunday's race and,
he hopes, jumpstart his
season.
Sprint Cup
Kobalt Tools 400 Lineup
After Friday qualifying; race Sunday
At Las Vegas Motor Speedway
Las Vegas, Nev.
Lap length: 1.5 miles
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 190.456 mph.
2. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 190.04.
3. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 190.014.
4. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chewvy, 189.873.
5. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 189.807.
6. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 189.773.
7. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 189.667.
8. (20) Joey Logano, Toyota, 189.62.
9. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 189.5.
10. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 189.421.
11. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 189.208.
12. (51) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 189.148.
13. (55) Mark Martin, Toyota, 188.97.
14. (22) A J Allmendinger, Dodge, 188.937.
15. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 188.91.
16. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 188.758.
17. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 188.712.
18. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 188.436.
19. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 188.16.
20. (2) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 188.134.
21. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 188.088.
22. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 187.754.
23. (33) Brendan Gaughan, Chevy, 187.669.
24. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 187.663.
25. (21) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 187.363.
26. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 187.305.
27. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 186.987.
28. (78) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 186.987.
29. (42) J. Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 186.78.
30. (83) Landon Cassill, Toyota, 185.65.
31. (10) David Reutimann, Chevy, 185.644.
32. (13) Casey Mears, Ford, 185.274.
33. (26) Josh Wise, Ford, 184.837.
34. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 184.685.
35. (34) David Ragan, Ford, 184.388.
36. (49) J.J. Yeley, Toyota, 184.37.
37. (93) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, 184.175.
38. (36) Dave Blaney Chevrolet, 183.949.
39. (98) Michael McDowell, Ford, 183.861.
40. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 183.542.
41. (32) Ken Schrader, Ford, 183.306.
42. (37) Timmy Hill, Ford, 182.877.
43. (30) David Stremme, Toyota, 182.704.
Failed to Qualify
44. (23) Scott Riggs, Chevrolet, 182.426.
45. (7) Robby Gordon, Dodge, 182.285.


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SPORTS


SATURDAY, MARCH 10, 2012 B3


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B4 SATURDAY, MARCH 10, 2012



Spring Training Glance
AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L Pct
Detroit 6 1 .857
Boston 3 1 .750
Seattle 6 2 .750
Toronto 5 2 .714
Oakland 5 3 .625
Baltimore 3 2 .600
Los Angeles 3 2 .600
Kansas City 4 3 .571
New York 3 4 .429
Minnesota 3 5 .375
Cleveland 2 4 .333
Texas 2 4 .333
Tampa Bay 2 5 .286
Chicago 1 4 .200
NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L Pct
Los Angeles 3 1 .750
San Francisco 5 2 .714
Miami 3 2 .600
Milwaukee 3 2 .600
Cincinnati 4 3 .571
Houston 4 3 .571
Philadelphia 4 3 .571
Chicago 3 3 .500
NewYork 3 3 .500
St. Louis 2 2 .500
Washington 3 3 .500
Arizona 2 4 .333
Pittsburgh 2 4 .333
San Diego 2 5 .286
Colorado 1 4 .200
Atlanta 1 7 .125
NOTE: Split-squad games count in the stand-
ings; games against non-major league teams
do not.
Thursday's Games
Baltimore 2, Atlanta 1
St. Louis 9, Boston 3
Tampa Bay (ss) 1, Minnesota 0
Philadelphia 5, Pittsburgh 4, 10 innings
Detroit 8, Tampa Bay (ss) 1
Washington 8, Houston 0
Toronto 6, N.Y Yankees 1
Miami 5, N.Y Mets 4
Seattle 10, Chicago Cubs 3
L.A. Dodgers 7, Oakland 2
Chicago White Sox 6, Texas 3
L.A. Angels 6, Cleveland 5
San Francisco 5, San Diego 2
Cincinnati 8, Milwaukee 6
Kansas City 5, Colorado 0
Friday's Games
N.Y Yankees 3, Atlanta (ss) 0
Toronto 11, Houston 2
St. Louis 3, Minnesota 2
Philadelphia 7, Detroit 5
N.Y Mets 5, Atlanta (ss) 3
Tampa Bay 3, Baltimore 3, tie, 10 innings
Milwaukee 12, Cleveland 2
Cincinnati (ss) 5, Kansas City 1
San Francisco 6, Cincinnati (ss) 3
Chicago Cubs 5, Chicago White Sox 1
San Diego 6, L.A. Angels 3
Arizona 8, Seattle 5
L.A. Dodgers 9, Texas 0
Oakland 6, Colorado 4
Miami 3, Washington 0
Pittsburgh, Boston, late
Saturday's Games
N.Y Mets vs. Washington (ss) at Viera, Fla.,
1:05 p.m.
Washington (ss) vs. Detroit at Lakeland, Fla.,
1:05 p.m.
St. Louis vs. Miami at Jupiter, Fla., 1:05 p.m.
Houston vs. Toronto at Dunedin, Fla., 1:05
p.m.
Minnesota vs. Pittsburgh at Bradenton, Fla.,
1:05 p.m.
Baltimore vs. Philadelphia at Clearwater, Fla.,
1:05 p.m.
N.Y Yankees vs. Atlanta at Kissimmee, Fla.,
1:05 p.m.
Texas vs. Chicago White Sox at Glendale,
Ariz., 3:05 p.m.
San Francisco (ss) vs. L.A. Angels atTempe,
Ariz., 3:05 p.m.
Cincinnati vs. Oakland at Phoenix, 3:05 p.m.
Chicago Cubs vs. Milwaukee (ss) at Phoenix,
3:05 p.m.
Milwaukee (ss) vs. San Francisco (ss) at
Scottsdale, Ariz., 3:05 p.m.
Colorado vs. Kansas City at Surprise, Ariz.,
3:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers vs. Seattle (ss) at Peoria, Ariz.,
3:05 p.m.
San Diego vs. Cleveland at Goodyear, Ariz.,
4:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay vs. Boston at Fort Myers, Fla.,
7:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers vs. Chicago White Sox at Glen-
dale, Ariz., 9:05 p.m.
Seattle (ss) vs. Arizona at Scottsdale, Ariz.,
9:10 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Pittsburgh vs. Tampa Bay at Port Charlotte,
Fla., 1:05 p.m.
Detroit (ss) vs. Philadelphia (ss) at Clearwa-
ter, Fla., 1:05 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees (ss) vs. Minnesota at Fort
Myers, Fla., 1:05 p.m.
Toronto (ss) vs. Atlanta (ss) at Kissimmee,
Fla., 1:05 p.m.
Atlanta (ss) vs.Toronto (ss) at Dunedin, Fla.,
1:05 p.m.
Washington vs. St. Louis at Jupiter, Fla., 1:05
p.m.
Detroit (ss) vs. Houston at Kissimmee, Fla.,
1:05 p.m.
Philadelphia (ss) vs. N.Y Yankees (ss) at
Tampa, Fla., 1:05 p.m.
Boston vs. Baltimore at Sarasota, Fla., 1:05
p.m.
Miami vs. N.Y Mets at Port St. Lucie, Fla.,
1:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs vs. L.A. Dodgers at Glendale,
Ariz., 3:05 p.m.
Colorado (ss) vs. Milwaukee at Phoenix, 4:05
p.m.
L.A. Angels (ss) vs. Cincinnati at Goodyear,
Ariz., 4:05 p.m.
Seattle vs. San Francisco at Scottsdale, Ariz.,
4:05 p.m.
Cleveland (ss) vs. Texas at Surprise, Ariz.,
4:05 p.m.
Cleveland (ss) vs. L.A. Angels (ss) at Tempe,
Ariz., 4:05 p.m.
Kansas City vs. Oakland at Phoenix, 4:05
p.m.
Arizona vs. San Diego at Peoria, Ariz., 4:05
p.m.
Chicago White Sox vs. Colorado (ss) at
Scottsdale, Ariz., 4:10 p.m.


Men's College
Basketball Scores
TOURNAMENT
Atlantic 10 Conference
Quarterfinals
Saint Louis 78, La Salle 71
St. Bonaventure 71, Saint Joseph's 68
UMass 77, Temple 71
Atlantic Coast Conference
Quarterfinals
Duke 60, Virginia Tech 56
NC State 67, Virginia 64
North Carolina 85, Maryland 69
Big 12 Conference
Semifinals
Baylor 81, Kansas 72
Big Ten Conference
Quarterfinals
Michigan 73, Minnesota 69, OT
Michigan St. 92, Iowa 75
Wisconsin 79, Indiana 71


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FOr the record


Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Friday in the Florida Lottery:
CASH 3 (early)
S" 22-9-9
^^y.p S. ~ CASH 3 (late)
S.*:m 8--4-5
P PLAY 4 (early)
: 6-6-8-0
PLAY 4 (late)
5 -7 -3-3

Because of early deadlines, Fantasy 5
and Mega Money numbers were
unavailable. Please see Sunday's
Entertainment page.




On the AIRWAVES


TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
5 p.m. (ESPN2) Nationwide Series: Sam's Town 300
4 a.m. (ESPN2) NHRA Tire Kingdom Gatornationals
qualifying (Same-day Tape)
MLB PRESEASON
1 p.m. (FSNFL) St. Louis Cardinals at Miami Marlins
3 p.m. (WGN-A) Chicago Cubs at Milwaukee Brewers
BASKETBALL
COLLEGE MEN
11 a.m. (ESPN2) America East Tournament Final -
Vermont at Stony Brook
11:30 a.m. (CBS) Conference USA Tournament, Final:
Teams TBA
1 p.m. (ABC) SEC Tournament semifinal: Florida vs.
Kentucky
1 p.m. (ESPN) ACC Tournament semifinal: UNC vs.
NC State
1 p.m. (ESPN2) MEAC Tournament, Final: Teams TBA
1:40 p.m. (CBS) Big Ten Tournament, First Semifinal:
Teams TBA
3 p.m. (ABC) SEC Tournament, Second Semifinal: Teams
TBA
3 p.m. (ESPN) ACC Tournament, Second Semifinal: Teams
TBA
3 p.m. (ESPN2) Southland Tournament final Lamar vs.
McNeese State
4 p.m. (CBS) Big Ten Tournament, Second Semifinal:
Teams TBA
5:30 p.m. (ESPN) Big 12 Tournament, Final: Teams TBA
6 p.m. (CBS) Pac-12 Tournament, Final: Teams TBA
7 p.m. (NBCSPT) MWC Championship: Teams TBA
8 p.m. (ESPN2) MAC Tournament, Final: Teams TBA
9 p.m. (ESPN) Big East Tournament, Final: Teams TBA
10 p.m. (ESPN2) Big West Tournament, Final: Teams TBA
12 a.m. (ESPN2) WAC Tournament, Final: Teams TBA
COLLEGE WOMEN
12 p.m. (SUN) Big 12 Tournament, Final: Teams TBA
2:30 p.m. (SUN) Pac-12 Tournament, Final: Teams TBA
4 p.m. (NBCSPT) MWC, Championship: Teams TBA
NBA
7:30 p.m. (SUN) Indiana Pacers at Miami Heat
8 p.m. (WGN-A) Utah Jazz at Chicago Bulls
BICYCLING
3 p.m. (NBCSPT) Paris-Nice, Stage 7 (Same-day Tape)
GOLF
12 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: WGC Cadillac Championship
2 p.m. (NBC) PGA Tour: WGC Cadillac Championship
6:30 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: Puerto Rico Open (Same-day
Tape)
RODEO
9 p.m. (NBCSPT) Bull Riding PBR Last Cowboy Standing
SOCCER
7:30 a.m. (ESPN2) English Premier League: Bolton
Wanderers vs. Queens Park Rangers
4:30 p.m. (FSNFL) UEFA Champions League: Apoel vs.
Olympique Lyonnais (Taped)
WINTER SPORTS
12 p.m. (NBC) Snowboarding USSA Grand Prix (Taped)
1 p.m. (NBC) Skiing USSA Freeskiing Grand Prix (Taped)

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


Prep CALENDAR


TODAY'S PREP SPORTS
BASEBALL
12 p.m. Kissimmee Gateway at Crystal River
2 p.m. Seven Rivers at Oak Hall
TRACKAND FIELD
8 a.m. Citrus, Lecanto at Crystal River Invitational


Conference USA
Semifinals
Marshall 73, Southern Miss. 62
Memphis 83, UCF 52
Great West Conference
Semifinals
NJIT 88, Utah Valley 78, OT
North Dakota 63, Texas-Pan American 59
Mid-American Conference
Semifinals
Akron 78, Kent St. 74
Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference
Semifinals
Bethune-Cookman 81, Hampton 72
Norfolk St. 58, Florida A&M 46
Southeastern Conference
Quarterfinals
Florida 66, Alabama 63
Kentucky 60, LSU 51
Mississippi 77, Tennessee 72, OT
Southwestern Athletic Conference
Semifinals
Texas Southern 60, Alcorn St. 55
Women's College
Basketball Scores
TOURNAMENT
Big 12 Conference
Semifinals
Baylor 86, Kansas St. 65
Texas A&M 79, Oklahoma 66
Big Sky Conference
Semifinals
N. Colorado 51, Montana St. 43
Big South Conference
First Round
Charleston Southern 57, Campbell 53
High Point 78, Coastal Carolina 57
Liberty 71, UNC Asheville 50
Radford 62, Winthrop 56
Big West Conference
Semifinals
Long Beach St. 51, Cal Poly 48
UC Santa Barbara 84, Pacific 66
Colonial Athletic Association
Quarterfinals


Delaware 74, Old Dominion 54
Drexel 65, VCU 61
James Madison 64, George Mason 54
UNC Wilmington 94, Hofstra 87
Conference USA
Semifinals
Tulane 63, Memphis 44
UTEP 60, UAB 49
Great West Conference
Semifinals
Utah Valley 63, NJIT 52
Horizon League
Semifinals
Detroit 78, Wright St. 70
Mid-American Conference
Semifinals
Cent. Michigan 69, Bowling Green 66
E. Michigan 59, Toledo 57
Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference
Semifinals
Hampton 64, Coppin St. 43
Howard 51, Florida A&M 43
Missouri Valley Conference
Quarterfinals
Creighton 53, N. Iowa 46
Drake 56, Illinois St. 54
Missouri St. 58, Bradley 54
Mountain West Conference
Semifinals
New Mexico 51, Boise St. 50
San Diego St. 73, Wyoming 55
Pacific-12 Conference
Semifinals
California 64, Washington St. 49
Stanford 52, Arizona St. 43
Southland Conference
Semifinals
McNeese St. 60, Stephen F Austin 56
Southwestern Athletic Conference
Semifinals
Grambling St. 67, Alcorn St. 41
Prairie View 58, MVSU 55
Western Athletic Conference
Semifinals
Fresno St. 80, Idaho 55
Louisiana Tech 73, Utah St. 69


NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct
Philadelphia 24 17 .585
Boston 21 18 .538
New York 18 21 .462
New Jersey 14 27 .341
Toronto 13 26 .333
Southeast Division
W L Pct
Miami 30 9 .769
Orlando 26 15 .634
Atlanta 23 17 .575
Washington 9 29 .237
Charlotte 5 33 .132
Central Division
W L Pct
Chicago 33 9 .786
Indiana 23 14 .622
Cleveland 15 23 .395
Milwaukee 15 24 .385
Detroit 14 26 .350
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct
San Antonio 26 12 .684
Memphis 23 15 .605
Dallas 23 18 .561
Houston 21 19 .525
New Orleans 9 30 .231
Northwest Division
W L Pct
Oklahoma City 31 9 .775


Denver
Minnesota
Utah
Portland


L.A. Lakers
L.A. Clippers
Phoenix
Golden State
Sacramento


22 18 .
21 20 .
19 20 .
19 21
Pacific Division
W L
24 16 .
22 15 .
18 21 .
15 21
13 26


Thursday's Games
Orlando 99, Chicago 94
Phoenix 96, Dallas 94
Friday's Games
New Jersey 83, Charlotte 74
Philadelphia 104, Utah 91
Boston 104, Portland 86
Detroit 86, Atlanta 85
Cleveland 96, Oklahoma City 90
L.A. Lakers 105, Minnesota 102
L.A. Clippers at San Antonio, late
New York at Milwaukee, late
New Orleans at Denver, late
Dallas at Sacramento, late
Saturday's Games
Portland at Washington, 7 p.m.
Toronto at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Indiana at Miami, 7:30 p.m.
Utah at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Charlotte at Oklahoma City 8 p.m.
New Orleans at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Houston at New Jersey, 8p.m.
Memphis at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
Dallas at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Philadelphia at New York, 12 p.m.
Boston at L.A. Lakers, 3:30 p.m.
Houston at Cleveland, 6 p.m.
Milwaukee at Toronto, 6 p.m.
Indiana at Orlando, 6 p.m.
Memphis at Denver, 8 p.m.
Atlanta at Sacramento, 9 p.m.
Golden State at L.A. Clippers, 9:30 p.m.



NHL standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
N.Y. Rangers 66 4217 7 91181 141
Pittsburgh 67 41 21 5 87214 171
Philadelphia 66 3821 7 83218 193
New Jersey 67 3824 5 81189 177
N.Y. Islanders 67 2830 9 65156 200


Boston
Ottawa
Buffalo
Toronto
Montreal


Florida
Washington
Winnipeg
Tampa Bay
Carolina


Northeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
66 4023 3 83217 155
69 3625 8 80213 202
68 31 29 8 70167 191
67 3030 7 67200 209
68 2632 10 62179 192
Southeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
67 31 23 13 75164 191
67 3328 6 72178 190
68 3228 8 72178 190
67 31 29 7 69189 229
67 2527 15 65177 203


WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W LOT PtsGF GA
St. Louis 68 4318 7 93177 133
Detroit 68 4421 3 91215 159
Nashville 67 3921 7 85192 173
Chicago 68 36 25 7 79203 200
Columbus 67 2238 7 51159 217
Northwest Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Vancouver 68 42 18 8 92214 168
Colorado 69 3530 4 74180 185
Calgary 67 3025 12 72164 185
Minnesota 68 2929 10 68147 189
Edmonton 67 2635 6 58178 203
Pacific Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Dallas 68 3726 5 79183 183
Phoenix 68 3325 10 76175 173
San Jose 66 3324 9 75184 170
Los Angeles 68 31 25 12 74151 150
Anaheim 68 2929 10 68171 191
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over-
time loss.
Thursday's Games
Dallas 4, San Jose 3, SO
Minnesota 3, Phoenix 2, SO
Boston 3, Buffalo 1
New Jersey 5, N.Y. Islanders 1
Philadelphia 5, Florida 0
Washington 3, Tampa Bay 2, OT
Columbus 3, Los Angeles 1
Ottawa 4, N.Y. Rangers 1
St. Louis 3, Anaheim 1
Nashville 4, Colorado 2
Montreal 5, Edmonton 3
Vancouver 3, Winnipeg 2
Friday's Games
Pittsburgh 2, Florida 1, SO
Detroit 4, Los Angeles 3
Chicago 4, N.Y. Rangers 3
Winnipeg at Calgary, late
Saturday's Games
Washington at Boston, 1 p.m.
Edmonton at Colorado, 3 p.m.
Philadelphia at Toronto, 7p.m.
Buffalo at Ottawa, 7 p.m.
New Jersey at N.Y. Islanders, 7 p.m.
Carolina at Tampa Bay, 7 p.m.
Columbus at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Detroit at Nashville, 8 p.m.
Anaheim at Dallas, 8 p.m.
San Jose at Phoenix, 8 p.m.
Montreal at Vancouver, 10 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Boston at Pittsburgh, 12:30 p.m.
Toronto at Washington, 5 p.m.
Carolina at Florida, 5 p.m.
St. Louis at Columbus, 6 p.m.
Calgary at Minnesota, 6 p.m.
Philadelphia at New Jersey, 7p.m.
N.Y. Islanders at N.Y Rangers, 7 p.m.
Los Angeles at Chicago, 8 p.m.


Jones takes 3-stroke


lead in Puerto Rico


Associated Press

RIO GRANDE, Puerto
Rico Matt Jones shot a 5-
under 67 on Friday to open
a three-stroke lead over
George McNeill in the PGA
Tour's Puerto Rico Open.
Jones, tied with McNeill
for the first-round lead, had
a bogey-free morning round
to reach 11-under 133 on the
wind-swept Trump Interna-
tional course. The Aus-
tralian is winless on the
PGA Tour.
"I've been putting really
well and chipping unbeliev-
ably well," Jones said. "My
ball-striking was much bet-
ter yesterday I missed a few



SURVIVE
Continued from Page B1

we'll come out tomorrow
and be ready to play"
Alabama (21-11) lost for
just the second time in
seven games. Green had 22
points, Trevor Releford
scored 12 and Lacey added
11.
"My teammates did a
great job of finding me,"
Green said. "I think we did
a great job of just passing
the ball and playing as a
team."
It's been a struggle of late
for Florida, which lost its
last three regular-season
games to Georgia, Vander-
bilt and Kentucky.
And this one wasn't much
different except for the
final result. The Gators shot
just 32 percent (8 of 25) from
the field in the first half and
led 26-24 at the break after
Alabama's Levi Randolph
hit a long 3-pointer at the
buzzer
Alabama's defense had
something to do with
Florida's offensive woes.
The Crimson Tide's bruis-
ing, grind-it-out style is com-
pletely opposite of the
Gators, who like to run, shoot
and turn the game into a
constant sprint
It wasn't until Erving
Walker's outburst early in
the second half that the



NFL
Continued from Page Al

period in years. Coming off
the 2010 season that had no
salary cap and different free
agent rules, then the lockout
and a condensed bidding
war, the marketplace is
crowded. Many of those
available figure to be back-
ups: quarterbacks Chad
Henne and Rex Grossman,
running back Ronnie Brown,
defensive back Pacman
Jones, for example.
But there are quality play-
ers with starting potential,
even Super Bowl credentials
- such as Giants receiver
Mario Manningham and
Colts wideout Reggie Wayne
- who could wind up wher-
ever Manning goes.
"I want to be here," Man-
ningham said of remaining
with the Giants after his star
turn in the Super Bowl. But
he would be the No. 3 re-
ceiver in the Meadowlands
behind Hakeem Nicks and
Victor Cruz. "I feel like we
can do a lot of damage in
these next four, five years.
That's just how I feel, be-
cause we're all young.... It's
not up to me, I want to stay
It's a business, too. You've got
to look at it like that, too. You
got to look out for your fam-
ily, that's how it is."
One player expected to be
franchise-tagged who wasn't
and could draw interest is
Chargers wideout Vincent
Jackson. Another is Steelers
receiver Mike Wallace, who
will cost one first-rounder
because he is a restricted
free agent. Pittsburgh also
has the right to match any
offer to the speedy Wallace.
If your secondary is leaky,
cornerbacks Brandon Carr of
the Chiefs and Carlos Rogers
of the Lions can help patch it
Perhaps the most intrigu-
ing free agents, aside from
Manning, also are coming off


injuries. Mario Williams, the
outstanding defensive end in
Houston who was making a
strong transition to line-
backer in a 3-4 alignment,
missed the final 11 games
with a torn chest muscle.
Center Dan Koppen, the glue
for New England's offensive
line for several years, was
out for all but the opening


greens today"
The wind increased
throughout the day, gusting
to 23 mph in the afternoon.
"It started to kick up
maybe around the eighth,
ninth hole, but compared to
yesterday, I didn't really feel
it," Jones said. "Growing up
in Australia, we're used to
playing in the wind. It's
nothing uncommon, and I
actually, more often than
not, enjoy playing in the
wind because it makes you
not worry about score so
much. You worry about hit-
ting the shots one shot at a
time, and you play a little
smarter."
McNeill had a 70.

Gators were finally able to
get some separation. The 5-
foot-8 point guard scored
seven points in less than five
minutes, shrugging off Al-
abama's physical guards and
consistently getting into the
lane, where he could finish
at the rim or find another
shooter around the 3-point
line.
For a while, it looked as if
the Gators looked would
cruise, butAlabama erased a
12-point deficit in less than
six minutes. The Tide got a
huge game from Green, who
was 7 for 14 from the field
and 8 of 9 from the free-
throw line. He also grabbed
10 rebounds and dished out
four assists.
But that one miss at the
free-throw line hurt.
Green had a chance to tie
it with 20.3 seconds remain-
ing, but his second of two
foul shots rattled out and
Boynton converted both of
his free throws on the other
end to push Florida's lead to
66-63.
Lacey got a fairly clean
look on the last-gasp 3-point
attempt, but it was short The
Tide shot 56.5 percent from
the field (13 of 23) in the sec-
ond half and outrebounded
Florida 32-27 for the game.
"I thought we got a good
look," Alabama coach An-
thony Grant said. "I thought
it had a chance to go in, but
unfortunately, it didn't go in
our favor."

game, but is better than more
than half the incumbents
around the league.
Looking for veteran lead-
ership from likely Hall of
Famers nearing the end of
the NFL road? There's
LaDainian Tomlinson, Brian
Dawkins and Hines Ward.
Looking for headaches
from likely Hall of Famers
nearing the end of the NFL
road? There's Randy Moss
and Terrell Owens.
Plenty of offensive line-
men become less anonymous
during free agency as they
are coveted to solidify block-
ing units. Centers Scott Wells
of Green Bay and Chris
Myers of Houston, guard Ben
Grubbs of Baltimore and the
Saints' Nicks figure to make
out best
And there are potential
bargains, players who won't
command top dollar and will
be dependable contributors:
Jets nose tackle Sione Pouha,
Titans cornerback Cortland
Finnegan and linebacker
Barrett Ruud, Colts receiver
Pierre Garcon and tight end
Jacob Tamme, Patriots run-
ning back BenJarvus Green-
Ellis, Chiefs RB Jackie
Battle, and Panthers line-
backer Dan Connor
Quite a few free agents
simply need a chance of
scenery, including running
backs Cedric Benson of
Cincinnati, Michael Bush of
Oakland and Peyton Hillis of
Cleveland.
As always, quarterbacks
command most of the atten-
tion. San Francisco still is
haggling over contract num-
bers for Alex Smith, whose
superb 2011 season and rap-
port with NFL Coach of the
Year Jim Harbaugh makes it
logical he will re-sign with
the 49ers.
Kyle Orton has been a de-
cent, sometimes impressive
stopgap in several places and
is available again. Jason
Campbell had the Raiders in
contention before a broken


collarbone sidelined him for
two months.
Then there is Flynn, who
has been superb in his infre-
quent stints when Aaron
Rodgers was either hurt or
rested. Several teams hungry
for a new starter must figure
out if Flynn has shown
enough to command big
bucks and a starting role.


SCOREBOARD





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Kentucky staves off LSU


Cincinnati knocks

off No. 2 Orange

Associated Press

NEW ORLEANS Michael
Kidd-Gilchrist scored 19 points
and No. 1 Kentucky survived a
feisty effort by LSU to take a 60-51
victory Friday in the second round
of the Southeastern Conference
tournament.
Terrence Jones added 15 points
and 11 rebounds, including a 9-0
run by himself that gave the Wild-
cats (31-1) the lead for good as they
extended their winning streak to
23 games. Anthony Davis added 12
points and 14 rebounds after a
slow start, and Doron Lamb
scored 12.
Storm Warren scored 14 for LSU
(18-14), which came in as a 17-
point underdog after beating
Arkansas in Thursday's opening
round. The Tigers led by as much
as five points early in the second
half before Jones' surge turned
the tide.
Andre Stringer added 11 points
for the Tigers.
Kentucky will face Florida in
the tournament semifinals on
Saturday
Cincinnati 71,
No. 2 Syracuse 68
NEW YORK Sean Kilpatrick
keyed Cincinnati's early 3-point bar-
rage and scored 18 points in the semi-
finals of the Big East tournament.
The fourth-seeded Bearcats (24-9)
will meet the Louisville-Notre Dame
winner in Saturday night's champi-
onship game at Madison Square
Garden.
To get there, they ended the 11 -
game winning streak of the top-
seeded Orange (31-2). They did it with
an incredible shooting performance
over the opening 14 minutes of the
game when they took a 17-point lead,
and then by holding on as Syracuse
was able to get within one point in the
final seconds.
This was Cincinnati's seventh win
over a ranked team this season, the
most in the country.
Dion Waiters had 28 points for Syra-
cuse. The loss shouldn't hurt the Or-
ange's chances of being a No. 1 seed
in the NCAA tournament.
No. 12 Baylor 81,
No. 3 Kansas 72
KANSAS CITY, Mo. Baylor
sharpshooter Brady Heslip hit a pair of
3-pointers to keep Kansas at bay, and
the Bears advanced to the Big 12 tour-
nament title game.
Quincy Miller added 13 points and
eight rebounds, and Pierre Jackson
had 11 points and seven assists for
the Bears (27-6), who will play
No. 5 Missouri or Texas for the
championship.
Baylor lost to the Tigers in its only
previous Big 12 title game.
Tyshawn Taylor had 20 points for
Kansas (26-6), which used a big sec-
ond-half charge to briefly take the
lead. But the Bears hung tough down


Associated Press
Kentucky forward Anthony Davis shoots the ball despite the defense of LSU center Justin Hamilton and
forward Johnny O'Bryant III during the first half in the second round of the 2012 Southeastern Conference
tournament Friday at the New Orleans Arena in New Orleans.


the stretch, and Heslip's two 3-point-
ers one with 2:03 remaining, the
other with 1:12 left allowed them
to hang on.
No. 4 North Carolina 85,
Maryland 69
ATLANTA- North Carolina shook
off an injury to defensive ace John
Henson and pulled away from Mary-
land in the quarterfinals of the Atlantic
Coast Conference tournament.
Reggie Bullock hit back-to-back 3-
pointers to start the second half,
quickly extending a 10-point halftime
lead to 42-26. Behind 30 points from
Terrell Stoglin, the Terrapins sliced the
deficit down to seven points a couple
of times before the fourth-ranked Tar
Heels pulled away again.
North Carolina (28-4) simply had
too many weapons for Maryland (17-
15), which was essentially a
one-man show.
Kendall Marshall scored 13 points,
knocking down three attempts from 3-


point range, and had North Carolina
putting on a dunking show at the rim
with 12 assists.
The Tar Heels will face North Car-
olina State in the semifinals Saturday.
It's not yet known if Henson will be
available. The ACC defensive player
of the year injured his left wrist early in
the game.
No. 6 Duke 60,
Virginia Tech 56
ATLANTA Tyler Thornton scored
a career-high 13 points, Austin Rivers
hustled for a clinching three-point
play and Duke survived an ugly per-
formance against cold-shooting
Virginia Tech.
Seeking their fourth straight ACC
tournament title, the Blue Devils (27-5)
advanced to the semifinals against ei-
ther No. 17 Florida State or Miami,
who met in the final game of the
quarterfinals.
Duke didn't put away the 10th-
seeded Hokies (16-17) until the clos-


ing seconds, even though Virginia
Tech went more than 8 minutes with-
out making a field goal in the second
half.
Rivers scored 17 points and sealed
it by outrunning two Hokies for a loose
ball near midcourt. He then drove to
the basket, drew a foul and completed
the three-point play to make it 58-51
with 15.1 seconds left.
Robert Brown and Erick Green led
the Hokies with 16 points apiece.
No. 8 Michigan State 92,
Iowa 75
INDIANAPOLIS Draymond
Green had 21 points and 10 rebounds
to lead Michigan State to the victory in
the Big Ten tournament quarterfinals.
Adreian Payne added a career-high
16 points, Keith Appling had 12 points
and six assists and Brandon Wood
had 10 points for the top-seeded Spar-
tans (25-7). The Spartans shot 58 per-
cent from the field.
Michigan State will play No. 15 Wis-


Celtics trounce Trail Blazers 104-86


Pistons beat

Hawks on late shot

Associated Press

BOSTON Paul Pierce and
Ray Allen each scored 22 points
and the Boston Celtics rebounded
from a lopsided loss and handed
one to Portland on Friday night,
beating the Trail Blazers 104-86.
The win came after Boston lost
by 32 points at Atlantic Division-
leading Philadelphia on Wednes-
day, its worst setback in more than
six years.
Kevin Garnett grabbed seven
defensive rebounds to move into
second place on the NBAs career
list with defensive rebounds since
the league started keeping the stat
in 1973-74. He has 10,122 and
moved ahead of Robert Parish
(10,117). Karl Malone holds the top
spot with 11,406.
LaMarcus Aldridge led the Trail
Blazers with 22 points. Portland
has dropped five of six games and
played the second of seven
straight away from the Rose
Garden.
Pistons 86, Hawks 85
AUBURN HILLS, Mich. -
Tayshaun Prince made a driving left-
handed shot with 24.3 seconds re-
maining, and Detroit held on to beat
Atlanta.
The Pistons wasted a 12-point
fourth-quarter lead and trailed by one
after Jeff Teague's layup with 36.6
seconds to play, but Prince answered
and Atlanta's Joe Johnson missed a
contested shot from the left corner in
the final seconds.


Associated Press
Boston Celtics guard Avery Bradley drives against Portland Trail Blazers
guard Nolan Smith during the second half Friday in Boston. The Celtics
won 104-86.


Josh Smith came up with the re-
bound for the Hawks and sank a fade-
away that was immediately waived off
for coming after the buzzer. The call
was upheld after a video review.
Greg Monroe scored 20 points and
Jason Maxiell added 19 for Detroit.
Smith led the Hawks with 21 and
Johnson scored 18 in his first game
back after missing four with left knee
tendinitis.
Nets 83, Bobcats 74
CHARLOTTE, N.C. Kris
Humphries had 20 points and 15 re-
bounds and New Jersey overcame an
injury to Deron Williams to beat
Charlotte.
Anthony Morrow scored all 17 of his


points in the fourth quarter to help the
Nets break open a tight game.
Williams, who scored a career-high
and franchise-record 57 points on this
same floor Sunday night against the
Bobcats, left in the second quarter
with a sore right calf and did not re-
turn. He finished with seven points
and three assists.
Corey Maggette led the Bobcats
with 19 points and Bismack Biyombo
had 11 points and 11 rebounds.
76ers 104, Jazz 91
PHILADELPHIA- Lou Williams
and Thaddeus Young scored 21 points
each, lifting Philadelphia past Utah.
Evan Turner had 16 points and 12
rebounds, Jrue Holiday also scored 16


point, and Andre Iguodala added 10
points, 10 assists and seven rebounds
for the Sixers, who followed Wednes-
day's 32-point victory over the Boston
Celtics with another impressive
performance.
Young returned with a strong per-
formance following a one-game
absence with an upper respiratory
illness.
Paul Millsap had 15 points to lead
the Jazz while Derrick Favors and Al
Jefferson added 14 each. Gordon
Hayward had 13 and Devin Harris 10
as Utah snapped a two-game winning
streak.
Cavaliers 96, Thunder 90
OKLAHOMA CITY Antawn Jami-
son scored 21 points and Kyrie Irving
orchestrated a decisive run in the final
3 minutes and the Cleveland Cavaliers
snapped Oklahoma City's 14-game
home winning streak by beating the
Thunder 96-90 on Friday night.
The Cavaliers scored their first con-
secutive road wins of the season by
turning the normally fast-breaking
Thunder into a half-court team. Okla-
homa City converted only three transi-
tion baskets until trying to make a
dramatic comeback in the final minute.
Neither team led by more than five
until the final minute, when the Cava-
liers were putting the finishing touches
on a 12-0 run spearheaded by Irving.
Irving drove for a pair of layups to
put Cleveland ahead and then found
Jamison wide open under the basket
for a layup to make it 90-85.
Kevin Durant tried to lead Okla-
homa City back, but missed on a pair
of 3-point attempts. He finished with
23 points and Russell Westbrook
scored 19 for the Thunder.


consin in the semifinals Saturday.
Josh Oglesby scored 20 points for
Iowa (17-16). Zach McCabe and Roy
Devyn Marble added 13 points each
for the Hawkeyes, who defeated Illi-
nois on Thursday.
No. 10 Michigan 73,
Minnesota 69, OT
INDIANAPOLIS Trey Burke
scored seven of his career-high 30
points in overtime, and Michigan used
a late flurry of 3-pointers to rally for the
victory in the Big Ten tournament
quarterfinals.
Next up for the second-seeded
Wolverines is a rematch with either
surging Purdue or archrival Ohio State
in Saturday's semifinals. The Boiler-
makers and Buckeyes were playing in
Friday night's final game.
Michigan's Tim Hardaway Jr. fin-
ished with 20 points.
Minnesota (19-14) was led by Andre
Hollins with 21 points and Rodney
Williams with 20. Coach Tubby Smith
was denied his 100th victory since tak-
ing the Minnesota job in 2007.
No. 14 Wisconsin 79,
No. 15 Indiana 71
INDIANAPOLIS Rob Wilson
scored a career-high 30 points to
power Wisconsin coach Bo Ryan to
his 266th win since coming to Madison
in 2002, breaking a tie for most career
wins with Harold "Bud" Foster.
Wisconsin (24-8) faces No. 8 Michi-
gan State in Saturday's semifinals.
Three Indiana players Christian
Watford, Jordan Hulls and Cody Zeller
- each scored 17 points. The loss
ended the Hoosiers' five-game win-
ning streak and came just hours after
the school announced senior guard
Verdell Jones would miss the rest of
the season with a torn ACL in his
right knee.
Wilson went 7 of 10 from 3-point
range, despite coming in with a career
percentage of 27.8 from beyond the
arc. He was 11 of 16 overall.
Indiana (25-8) has lost 10 straight to
the Badgers.
Massachusetts 77,
No. 21 Temple 71
ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. Jesse Mor-
gan scored 21 points and Chaz
Williams had 20 to help Massachu-
setts advance to the Atlantic 10 tour-
nament semifinals.
The eighth-seeded Minutemen (22-
10) stunned No. 1-seed Temple with a
15-0 run to open the second half and
spoil the Owls' bid for a fourth tourna-
ment title in five seasons.
UMass took control in the second
half on a string of 3-pointers and
Williams clinched it down the stretch
from the free-throw line. Williams
popped his No. 3 jersey toward a
small but vocal group of UMass fans
behind the basket in celebration.
Khalif Wyatt scored 15 points and
Ramone Moore had 14 for the Owls
(24-7). The Owls won their first out-
right A-10 title since 1990 and likely
will be in the NCAA tournament field
of 68.
The Minutemen will play St.
Bonaventure on Saturday.



Pens ice


Panthers


Red Wings glide

past Kings 4-3

Associated Press
PITTSBURGH Steve Sul-
livan scored the tying goal in
the third period, and James
Neal and Evgeni Malkin con-
nected in the first two rounds
of a shootout to lift the Pitts-
burgh Penguins to their
eighth straight victory, 2-1
over the Florida Panthers on
Friday night
Marc-Andre Fleury stopped
28 shots and was perfect in the
shootout for his 36th victory of
the season, putting him one
behind Nashville's Pekka
Rinne for the NHL lead.
The Penguins extended the
league's longest active win-
ning streak by overcoming a
third-period deficit for the
eighth time this season, tied
with Tampa Bay for the most
in the league.
Red Wings 4, Kings 3
DETROIT Darren Helm


scored with 1:13 left in regulation,
lifting banged-up Detroit past
Los Angeles.
Detroit's Henrik Zetterberg
scored twice and assisted on Valt-
teri Filppula tying goal with 4:02
left, less than 2 minutes after
Dwight King put Los Angeles
ahead 3-2.
Joey MacDonald made 21
saves for the Red Wings.


SPORTS


SATURDAY, MARCH 10, 2012 B5












ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE

Dick Van Dyke,
86, a newlywed
LOS ANGELES-Dick
Van Dyke is a very happy
newlywed at age 86, his
spokesman said Friday
Van
Dyke and
makeup
artist Ar-
lene Sil-
ver, 40,
were mar-
ried last
r week in a
Dick small
Van Dyke Leap Day
ceremony
at a Malibu chapel near
the actor's home, publi-
cist Bob Palmer said.
"I've never seen him
happier She adds a lot to
his life," he said, adding
that the couple has much
in common, including a
love of singing.
Members of Silver's
family and some of Van
Dyke's close friends were
on hand for the intimate
wedding. Van Dyke sug-
gested the couple may
hold a bigger ceremony
in the future, Palmer
said.
Silver and the stage,
film and TV star became
friends about five years
ago after meeting at the
Screen Actors Guild
Awards, Palmer said
Friday
Michelle Triola
Marvin, Van Dyke's part-
ner of 30 years, died in
October 2009 at age 76.
Van Dyke gained fame
in the musical "Bye Bye
Birdie," for which he won
a Tony Award in 1961,
and starred in the 1963
film based on the play
His other movie credits
include "Mary Poppins"
and "Chitty Chitty Bang
Bang."
The 1961-66 "The Dick
Van Dyke Show" made
him a TV star, and he's
proved an enduring one:
His other series include
"Diagnosis Murder"
(1993-2002) and made-for-
TV movies such as 2008's
"Murder 101: New Age."
Van Dyke, who had a
longtime marriage that
ended in divorce, has
four children.

Coolio arrested in
Vegas ticket case
LAS VEGAS Rapper
Coolio was arrested Fri-
day on a warrant charg-
ing him
with fail-
ure to ap-
pear in
court on a
traffic
ticket al-
most two

Coolio,
Coolio 48, whose
real name
is Artis Leon Ivey Jr., was
a passenger in a vehicle
officers stopped about
2:20 a.m. several blocks
east of the Las Vegas
Strip, Officer Laura
Meltzer said. No one else
in the car was arrested.
It was not immediately
clear if Ivey had a lawyer
His manager Susan
Haber said she had not
heard about the incident
and had no comment
Ivey was sought on a
warrant charging him
with failure to appear on
an illegal stop and driv-
ing without a license
summons issued in June

in the day
-From wire reports


What's the buzz?


Associated Press
Doug Quinn serves a Sidecar cocktail Thursday as he works at the bar at P.J. Clarke's in New York. P.J. Clarke's
is one of many bars and restaurants in Manhattan featured on the AMC show "Mad Men," which returns March
25 after more than a year hiatus. The show is filmed in California but it's set in New York, with many references
to real establishments from the 1960s, some of which still exist.

'Mad Men 'fans head to Manhattan, knock back a cocktail


Associated Press

NEW YORK "Mad Men" fans,
it's time for a cocktail.
The return of the AMC show
March 25 after a hiatus of a year
and a half is cause for celebration,
and there's no better place to raise
your glass than in Manhattan at one
of Don Draper's favorite haunts.
While many of the places name-
dropped in "Mad Men" no longer
exist- Lutece, the Stork Club, Toots
Shor's there are plenty that do,
among them PJ. Clarke's, the Roo-
sevelt Hotel and Sardi's. Some Man-
hattan bars, clubs and hotels are even
offering packages, drinks or viewing
parties to mark the show's return.
Of course, the series is filmed in
California, so what you see on TV
are well-researched sets, not real
Manhattan bars. But "Mad Men"
fans will not be disappointed by re-
ality: Many of the establishments
that turn up on the show retain a
classy, retro vibe in real life, and
can offer a fun, sophisticated set-
ting for drinks or a meal.
Judy Gelman and Peter Zheutlin,
authors of "The Unofficial Mad
Men Cookbook," provide "A Handy
List of Mad Men Haunts" in their
book along with recipes from them.
"Some of these places just never
go out of style, like the Grand Cen-
tral Oyster Bar," said Zheutlin. "It's
such a classic and bustling place."
"Mad Men" aficionados know the
Oyster Bar at the landmark train ter-
minal was not mentioned by name on
the show, but it's believed to be the
place where Don takes Roger Ster-


ling for a martini-and-oyster lunch.
PJ. Clarke's, at Third Avenue and
55th Street, manages to appeal to a
trendy 21st century sensibility while
channeling the classic cool that got
the crowd from "Mad Men" ad
agency Sterling Cooper drinking
and doing the twist. P J. Clarke's
"was the site of many 'Mad Men'
parties," Gelman said. "I think there
might be more scenes set there"
than any other bar or restaurant
According to its real-life bar-
tender, Doug Quinn, PJ. Clarke's
"was a joint often frequented by
Madison Avenue advertising execu-
tives during the 1960s. Our bar and
restaurant continues to be a desti-
nation for this crowd."
Quinn says he'd recommend a
sidecar cocktail to any "Mad Men"
fans dropping by "one part sweet,
one part sour and one part strong."
For food, try a medium-rare bacon
cheeseburger, once named "the
Cadillac of burgers" by singer Nat
King Cole. "It continues to be one of
our most ordered menu items,"
Quinn said.
The Roosevelt Hotel, 45 E. 45th
St. at Madison Avenue, where Don
stayed after his wife Betty threw
him out, is offering a "Mad Men in
the City" package, starting at $425 a
night through June 30, so guests can
"experience New York City as Don
Draper would," according to Kevin
Croke, the hotel's director of sales
and marketing.
The package includes accommo-
dations, '60s-era themed cocktails at
the hotel's lobby-level Madison Club
Lounge or its rooftop bar, called


mad46. Guests also get a DVD of the
show's fourth season, a copy of "The
Unofficial Mad Men Cookbook," and
tickets to the Paley Center for Media
at 25 W 52nd St., where the hotel has
reserved a screening booth for view-
ing ads from the era.
The Pierre, a Taj Hotel, at 2 E.
61st St., which in "Mad Men"
housed offices for the Sterling
Cooper Draper Pryce firm, will host
a party March 27 at its Two E
Bar/Lounge in honor of the new
season. Fans are invited to dress up
in their favorite "Mad Men" outfits
and try cocktails like a creme de
menthe grasshopper or a "bikini
martini," a gin, schnapps and blue
curacao drink created in honor of
the character Joan Holloway The
$14 cocktails will be offered Tues-
days, 6:30 p.m.-9:30 p.m., along with
a no-cover jazz duo. One of the best
places Zheutlin and Gelman ate
while researching their cookbook
was Keens Steakhouse, 72 W 36th
St. They found the steak "sumptu-
ous," and were amused to learn that
Keens' top chef had no idea the
restaurant turned up in "Mad Men."
(It was the site of a client lunch in
which Don and Pete Campbell dis-
cuss the sport ofjai alai.)
Gelman said the show's depiction
of Keens also did not fully capture
its rich atmosphere and quirky his-
tory. The restaurant dates to the
19th century and the low ceilings
are lined with thousands of old clay
pipes. Patrons like Teddy Roosevelt
and Babe Ruth stored personal
pipes on the premises for use when
they dropped by


Marco Andretti grateful dad stepped in to NBC show


Associated Press


ST PETERSBURG -
Marco Andretti has been
following his father's
progress on "Celebrity Ap-
prentice," and is grateful
the retired race car driver
filled in for him following
the death of Dan Wheldon
last October
The IndyCar Series driver
was scheduled to begin film-
ing the NBC hit show imme-
diately after the Oct 16 season
finale race at Las Vegas Motor
Speedway The race was can-
celed following an early 15-
car accident that killed
Wheldon, and Andretti de-
cided he could not honor his
commitment to do the show.
"I had a private plane
right next to the track in Las


Birthday: You're the type of person who enjoys being able
to operate independently of others, yet in the near future
some of your biggest successes are likely to come through
joint endeavors, not necessarily from solo efforts.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Someone who is indebted
to you isn't likely to clear up his or her obligation in the
agreed-upon time without being prodded to do so. It will be
up to you to provide the necessary reminder.
Aries (March 21-April 19) Ignore any inclinations you
have to postpone making a difficult decision. Nothing will
change with time, and you'll only be putting off doing what
you must take care of eventually.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Substantial achievements
can be made, provided you're willing to face facts and pay
the price. You're going to have to earn what you want the
hard way: by doing it yourself.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) Your energy, drive and luck


Vegas, and we were literally
going to start filming hours
after that race," Andretti
said this week during test-
ing for the March 25 season-
opening race at St.
Petersburg.
"I lost my maternal grand-
father the same week and I
was just like 'I'm not ready
to do this.' I always said if
my heart is not in it 100 per-
cent, then I'm not going to
do it. I knew I was not going
to be at my full potential. I
was not going to do well. My
mind wasn't in it."
Wheldon, a two-time Indi-
anapolis 500 winner, had
agreed the morning of the
race to rejoin Andretti Au-
tosport for the 2012 season,
and would have been one of
Andretti's teammates.


Michael Andretti ulti-
mately replaced his son on
the show, and joined the
cast midway through the
first episode. He's made it
through the first three
boardrooms heading into
Sunday night's telecast.
"I am glad Dad stepped up
because it's great for all of
us, but I didn't want to be
seen on national TV in the
state I was in,"Andretti said.
Michael Andretti has not
been featured through the
first three episodes, and the
Internet has been abuzz about
how little he speaks on the
show. Marco Andretti would-
n't bite when asked about his
father's seemingly small role.
"He's still there, so, I don't
think he's doing too bad," he
said. "They can choose to


Today's HOROSCOPE
all have their limitations, so don't push any one of them too
far. The results could end up being counterproductive.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) When it comes to handling a
delicate domestic development, be smart and use a feath-
erlike touch. Heavy-handed methods are only likely to cre-
ate additional rebellion.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Think before you open your
mouth when conversing with your pals. If you don't, there's
a strong chance that you could unwittingly blurt out some
caustic remarks that won't be readily forgiven.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) You should of course look out
for your own interests, but do so in ways that won't hurt oth-
ers in the process. If you steamroll people to get what you
want, you'll have very little to show for it in the end.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Even though you might have
considerable reserves upon which to draw, it still might not
be enough to accomplish your aims. However, don't lose


Associated Press
IndyCar driver Marco An-
dretti is shown Wednesday in
St. Petersburg.
have you perceived anyway
they want, I guess, and that's
the tough part about it."


heart, you'll have it all soon.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Usually it doesn't take much
to arouse your optimism, yet testy circumstances might
cause you to think negatively. Don't let gloom overshadow
the light.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Don't allow old objectives
or friends to suffer neglect because of a newfound enthusi-
asm on your part. Give each one the proper, adequate at-
tention it deserves.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) This might be one of those
days when the progress you make isn't as rapid as you
would like it to be. However, keep in mind that each and
every step you make moves you closer to your goal.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -Although your faith might
be put to the test, remember that as long as you hold fast
to the things you believe in, life will eventually work out to
your satisfaction.


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

THURSDAY, MARCH 8
Fantasy 5: 16 27 28 34 35
5-of-5 2 winners $116,098.87
4-of-5 328 $114
3-of-5 9,204 $11
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7
Powerball: 12 35 45 46 47
Powerball: 12
5-of-5 PB 1 winner $40 million
5-of-5 1 $1 million
No Florida winner
Lotto: 5-9-18-31-44-48
6-of-6 No winner
5-of-6 39 $3,742
4-of-6 2,075 $59
3-of-6 38,369 $5
Fantasy 5:1 9 27 29 36
5-of-5 2 winners $132,578.94
4-of-5 414 $103
3-of-5 11,823 $10
TUESDAY, MARCH 6
Mega Money: 3 16 21 41
Mega Ball: 7
4-of-4 MB No winner
4-of-4 11 $746

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num-
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call 850-487-7777.


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Saturday, March
10, the 70th day of 2012.
There are 296 days left in the
year. Daylight-saving time
begins Sunday at 2 a.m. local
time. Clocks go forward one
hour.
Today's Highlight:
On March 10, 1876, the
first successful voice trans-
mission over Alexander Gra-
ham Bell's telephone took
place in Boston as his assis-
tant heard Bell say, "Mr. Wat-
son come here I want
to see you."
On this date:
In 1785, Thomas Jefferson
was appointed America's
minister to France, succeed-
ing Benjamin Franklin.
In 1880, the Salvation
Army arrived in the United
States from England.
In 1949, Nazi wartime
broadcaster Mildred E.
Gillars, also known as "Axis
Sally," was convicted in
Washington, D.C., of treason.
(She served 12 years in
prison.)
In 1972, the three-day Na-
tional Black Political Conven-
tion convened in Gary, Ind.
In 1985, Konstantin U.
Chernenko, who was the So-
viet Union's leader for just 13
months, died at age 73.
Ten years ago: Russell
Crowe won best actor honors
at the Screen Actors Guild
awards for "A Beautiful Mind"
while Halle Berry won best
actress for "Monster's Ball."
Five years ago: President
George W. Bush, in Uruguay
as part of his Latin America
tour, asked Congress for $3.2
billion to pay for 8,200 more
U.S. troops in Afghanistan
and Iraq on top of the
21,500-troop buildup he had
announced in January 2007.
One year ago: The House
Homeland Security Commit-
tee examined Muslim ex-
tremism in America during a
hearing punctuated by tearful
testimony and angry recrimi-
nations. (Chairman Peter
King, R-N.Y., accused U.S.
Muslims of doing too little to
help fight terror in America;
Democrats warned of inflam-
ing anti-Muslim sentiment.)
Today's Birthdays: Talk
show host Ralph Emery is 79.
Bluegrass/country singer-mu-
sician Norman Blake is 74.
Actor Chuck Norris is 72.
Playwright David Rabe is 72.
Singer Dean Torrence (Jan
and Dean) is 72. Actress


Katharine Houghton is 67. Ac-
tress Aloma Wright is 62. Ac-
tress Shannon Tweed is 55.
Thought for Today: "He
who knows, does not speak.
He who speaks, does not
know." Lao Tzu, Chinese
philosopher.









RELIGION.
,LIGI ON


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


They love to tell the story


Nancy Kennedy
GRACE
NOTES


SUSAN DIBBLE
The Daily Herald
When a group of biblical
storytellers presents the
Gospel of Mark in area
churches over the next several
weeks, audience members may
find some comic moments.
They may hear Jesus exclaim,
"You ain't seen nothing yet!" to
one of his future disciples.
This is Scripture as it was
originally passed on around
campfires and dinner tables,
told as stories filled with emo-
tions, human frailties and in-
fused with the presence of God,
said the Rev Beth Galbreath, co-
ordinator of Chicago-area
Prairie Wind Guild: Tellers of
Sacred Stories.
"We are trying for our day to
tell it as it was originally told to
people, verbally, by memory,"
she said. "The thing that they
(audience members) usually say
is, 'Wow, you really bring it
alive."'
Ten guild members will make
presentations of the Gospel of
Mark to eight area churches -


Sale away
Nature Coast Community
Church will continue its spring
yard sale from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.
today. Small appliances, tools,
clothing, furniture and more.
The church is at 4980 S. Sun-
coast Blvd. in Homosassa, one
mile south of the Homosassa
Post Office.
The Ladies Guild of Bev-
erly Hills Community Church
will continue its annual rum-
mage sale from 9 a.m. to 1
p.m. today in Jack Steele Fel-
lowship Hall, 82 Civic Circle.
Bake sale, food and beverages
also available. Find bargains in
men's clothing, linens, lingerie,
blouses, baby items, books,
games, toys, crafts, dresses,
coats, jewelry, shoes, hand-
bags, hats, shorts, slacks,
shirts, sweaters, white elephant
items, including small appli-
ances. Money earned by the
Guild goes to further the work
of the church. Call the church
office at 352-746-3620.
St. Thomas the Apostle
Council of Catholic Women will
have its annual rummage sale
from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Friday on
the church grounds at 7040 S.
Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa.
(Rain date is March 23.) Space
rentals are $15. For details, call
352-503-7172.
First Christian Church of
Chassahowitzka will have its
annual rummage sale from 9
a.m. to 3 p.m. Friday and Satur-
day, March 16 and 17, at the
church, 11275 S. Riviera Drive.


including ones in Carol Stream,
Villa Park and Woodridge -
from February through April.
Mark is the shortest and most
action-packed of the New Testa-
ment's four gospels, with pre-
sentations taking two hours with
an intermission.
Learning by heart
Audience members will find
hearing the unedited words of
the biblical text spoken as a
story a far different experience
than listening to Scripture read,
said Galbreath, a United
Methodist deacon in digital cul-
ture ministry and wife of James
Galbreath, pastor of Woodridge
United Methodist Church. The
ancient art of storytelling is a
more appropriate way to reach a
post-literate society, she said.
"What frequently happens as
soon as someone starts to read,
everybody's brain checks out,"
she said. "Hearing someone
read to us from a document is
not our idea of entertainment,
not our idea of fun."
Biblical storytellers learn the
text by heart rather than a word-


The sale will feature all kinds of
items; the public is welcome.
Call 352-382-2557.
The Agape House
Fundraising Sale is from 8
a.m. to 1 p.m. Friday, March 23,
and 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday,
March 24, at First Baptist
Church, 700 N. Citrus Ave.,
Crystal River. Free admission.
Funds are used to purchase
Bibles, toiletries and other mis-
cellaneous items. The Agape
House is an all-volunteer min-
istry of First Baptist Church of
Crystal River for the area -
where everything is donated
and everything is free for peo-
ple in need. This includes cloth-
ing and shoes for each family
member, Bibles, toiletries and if
needed, household items such
as dishes, silverware, pots and
pans, small appliances; bed
and bath linens, blankets, etc.
We not only help people with
their material needs but also
talk with each family about their
spiritual needs and pray with
them. We need and appreciate
financial support from our com-
munity. Call the Agape House
on Wednesday at 352-795-
7064 or First Baptist Church at
352-795-3367.
The Council of Catholic
Women of Our Lady of Grace
Church will host a "Trash 'n
Treasures Fundraiser," from 9
a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday, March 23,
and 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday,
March 24, in the Parish Life
Center, 6 Roosevelt Blvd., Bev-
erly Hills. Sale items include
household items, clothing,


for-word memorization, said
Galbreath, the vice president of
Network of Biblical Storytellers
International.
Studying the Scripture to gain
a deeper understanding of its
meaning and the times in which
the events occurred, they add in-
flections in their voices and por-
tray emotions in their body
language. They work from one
Bible translation, but use other
translations and colloquiums to
bring home meaning.
"When we learn by heart, we
want the whole story to sink into
the center of our being," Gal-
breath said. "This is spiritual
discipline because you don't
learn these things by heart with-
out being brought closer to God
yourself."
Formed about two years ago,
the Prairie Wind Guild draws
members from throughout
northern Illinois, Indiana and
Wisconsin. The Rev Linda
Braggs, a Chicago resident,
joined after being involved in
other storytelling groups. She
was thrilled to find one devoted
to Biblical storytelling, she said.


Religion NOTES
books, jewelry, plants, tools,
small furniture, toys, knick-
knacks and white elephant
items. Proceeds go to needed
items for the church and chari-
table contributions. Call Anna
Panasik at 352-527-3226. Our
Lady of Grace monthly flea
market is from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.
the fourth Saturday monthly will
take place in concert with
"Trash 'n Treasures."
The United Methodist
Women of Crystal River United
Methodist Church will have
their annual "Trash and Treas-
ure" sale on Friday and Satur-
day, March 30 and 31, at the
outdoor tabernacle area, 4801
N. Citrus Ave.
First Assembly of God
Women's Ministry will have a
yard sale from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Saturday, April 14, at the
church, 5735 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway (State Road 44), Crys-
tal River. The sale is open to the
public. Rent a table for a dona-
tion of $10 and bring your items
to sell. Table donations will go to
the church's overseas mission-
aries. Call 352-795-2594.
Helping Hands Thrift
Store, a ministry of Our Lady of
Fatima Catholic Church, is
open from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Monday through Saturday at
604 U.S. 41 South. Proceeds
fund the food pantry. The store
is accepting donations of
household items, clothing and
small appliances. Estate dona-
tions are also accepted. Pick-
up is available for larger
donations. Items donated are


tax-deductible and a form is
provided from Helping Hands.
Call 352-726-1707.
Food & fellowship
Temple Beth David's 18th
annual "Israeli Food Fest"
from noon to 4 p.m. Sunday
features homemade Jewish
foods including blintzes, kugels,
potato pancakes, stuffed cab-
bage, chopped liver, kosher hot
dogs and homemade baked
goods. Visit the Judaic Gift
Shop and join in the Israeli Folk
dancing throughout the day.
There will be fun things for the
children and a variety of ven-
dors to shop. Admission is free.
Call the Temple office at 352-
686-7034. Sponsored by
Tampa Bay Times, with support
from Winn-Dixie Supermarkets
and Diana's Travel.
Enjoy a St. Patrick's Day
dinner from 4 to 6:30 p.m. Fri-
day at Parsons Memorial Pres-
byterian Church on Riverside
Drive in Yankeetown. Takeouts
available at 352-447-2506.
Meals include corned beef,
cabbage, potatoes, carrots,
dessert and Irish soda bread for
$6.50. There will be a drawing
for a $50 money tree with tick-
ets for $1 each or six for $5.
There will be a St.
Patrick's Day corned beef
and cabbage dinner from 5 to
6:30 p.m. Friday at St. Mar-
garet's Episcopal Church, 114
N. Osceola Ave., Inverness.
Proceeds will help to fund re-
roofing the storage building on
the church campus. Call the


"A lot of people don't read
Scripture. When, for the first
time, they hear it, when they
hear it, that's the first time it
comes alive in them, in their
heart," she said.
Jesus himself taught by para-
bles and explained the meaning
later to his often baffled disci-
ples, Braggs said.
"It is a delight to be able to re-
late in the same way Jesus did,"
she said. "This method of
spreading God's Word is a joy"
Storytelling journey
Galbreath herself might not be
a storyteller today if only she
had been a nurse. She ex-
plained that, as the wife of a
pastor in the United Methodist
Church, when her husband was
transferred to a new location,
she often had to find a new
career
"This is about my sixth ca-
reer," she said. "It's much better
if you're a nurse. Pastors' wives
who are nurses usually can find
a job anywhere."

See Page C7


church office at 352-726-3153.
"Third Saturday Supper"
is from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Satur-
day, March 17, in the Dewain
Farris Fellowship Hall at Com-
munity Congregational Christian
Church, 9220 N. Citrus Springs
Blvd., Citrus Springs. Menu in-
cludes corned beef and cab-
bage, apple crisp, coffee and
tea for $10 for adults and $5 for
children. Tickets can be pur-
chased at the door. Takeouts
available. Call 352-489-1260.
St. John the Baptist
Catholic Church, on the corner
of U.S. 41 and State Road 40
East in Dunnellon, has a fish fry
from 4 to 6 p.m. Friday during
Lent. Cost is $7 for adults and
students and $3.50 for children
ages 6 through 12. The fish fry
is open to the public and takes
place in the church pavilion.
Beverly Hills Community
Church spaghetti suppers are
from 4 to 6 p.m. the third Friday
monthly in the Jack Steele Hall,
82 Civic Circle, Beverly Hills.
Donation of $7 per person in-
cludes salad, spaghetti with
meat sauce, Italian bread, cof-
fee or tea and dessert. Come
and enjoy a delicious meal. Tick-
ets are available at the door.
All-you-can-eat pancake
breakfasts, with sausage, cof-
fee and orange juice, are
served from 8 to 10 a.m. the
second Saturday monthly at
First United Methodist Church,
8831 W. Bradshaw St.,
Homosassa.

See Page C2


We


are all


loved
Oh, to be loved as
Dennis Williams is
loved!
A week or so ago on a
Sunday afternoon, two
women I don't know
knocked on my door
They said they knew
me, or at least knew me
through my writing, and
somehow thought I could
help them find their
friend Dennis.
They knew enough
about me to deduce that I
owned my own home and
searched the county prop-
erty appraiser's website to
find my address so they
could come and see me in
person because they were
that desperate to find
their friend who was
missing.
Since they only looked
partially crazy, and they
assured me that they don't
normally stalk people I
was their first I let them
in my house.
Their friend Dennis
was missing and they
were frantic to find him.
They would've done any-
thing to find someone to
help them.
See Page C7


Terry Mattingly
ON
RELIGION


An early


glimpse


atU2
One thing was clear
back in the winter
of 1982. No one at
the famous Record Serv-
ice store near the Univer-
sity of Illinois campus
could figure out the hot
new Irish band that was
about to hit town.
The guy behind the
front desk cranked up the
group's new single so that
everyone could ponder
the lyrics.
"I try to sing this song,"
sang the young singer
called Bono Vox. "I, I try to
stand up, but I can't find
my feet. I, I try to speak
up, but only in you I'm
complete. Gloria, in te
domine. Gloria, exultate."
That was Latin, but
what did it mean? A New-
man Center priest told me
that the first phrase, per-
haps a Mass fragment or
drawn from chant, meant,
"Glory in you, Lord." The
next meant, "Exalt Him."
Then again, it was hard to
hear the second Latin
phrase.
The priest apologized
and said he wasn't used to
parsing rock lyrics.
Yes, the band 30 years
ago was U2 and its myste-
rious second album was
called "October" Both
were surrounded by
clouds of rumors, which I
explored in a News-
See Page C7


DANIEL WHITE/Daily Herald
The Rev. Beth Galbreath, left, of Woodridge United Methodist Church in Woodridge, III., rehearses with the Rev. Linda Braggs of Covenant Faith
Church of God in Chicago, center, and Nora McNamara of the Vineyard Community Church in Joliet, III. Galbreath is the coordinator of a team
of biblical storytellers, the Prairie Wind Guild: Tellers of Sacred Stories, who present the Gospel of Mark.

Storytellers use performance, narrative skills to bring Biblical tales to life


MAII f -





C2 SATURDAY, MARCH 10, 2012


NOTES
Continued from Page C1

Music & more
A "Gospel Sing," hosted by the
Sunny South Trio featuring The
Puffers, will take place at 6 p.m. Satur-
day, March 17, at Gulf Ridge Park
Baptist Church, 20200 Manacke
Road, Brooksville. Call 813-469-0623.
Floral City United Methodist
Church will host a hymn sing and
more at 2 p.m. Sunday, March 25, at
the 1884 church. Jim King, an accom-
plished saxophonist, and his wife
Linda, a gifted singer, will add their tal-
ents to the event. The audience will
have the opportunity to choose the
hymns to be sung. The church is at
8478 E. Marvin St., Floral City, across
from the elementary school. A freewill
offering will be collected to help pay for
painting the exterior of the church. A
handicap entrance is available in the
back of the church. Call 352-
344-1771.
The "Master's Encouragers"
will present a message in "Sermon &
Song" at the 10:30 a.m. service Sun-
day at First Christian Church of Ho-
mosassa Springs, 7030 W. Grover
Cleveland Blvd. The "Master's Encour-
agers" are twin brothers, Blaine and
Boyd Cornwell, who have traveled all
over the United States proclaiming
Christ in revivals, schools and many
congregations. They both possess de-
grees from Ohio University and have
taught in the public school system. For
directions to the church, call 352-628-
5556. Nursery provided. All are wel-
come. Freewill offering collected.
Yankeetown Community Church
will presents "The Redhead Ex-
press," a family Gospel group from
Alaska, at 6 p.m. Sunday. The concert
is free. A love offering will be collected.
Light refreshments served afterward.
The church is on State Road 40 West,
two miles west of the traffic light on
U.S. 19 in Inglis.
Never Fade Bluegrass Gospel
Band will be in concert from 1 to 3
p.m. Saturday, March 17, on the lawn


at Suncoast Baptist Church. Bring
your chairs and coolers and enjoy an
afternoon of Bluegrass Gospel music.
A love offering will be collected.
Kristin Taylor will be in concert
at 6 p.m. St. Patrick's Day, March 17,
at St. John the Baptist Catholic
Church, 7525 S. U.S. 41, Dunnellon.
Taylor is a mother of 12 who has writ-
ten eight CDs and is the founder of
THORN Ministries (Thankfully Helping
Others Real Needs). All are invited. A
love offering will be received. Call 352-
489-3166.
Beacon Award-winning trio
"Heirs of Grace" will present the
Gospel through music at 6 p.m. Sun-
day, March 18, at First Baptist Church
Homosassa, 10540 W. Yulee Drive,
Homosassa.
The University of Florida Cello
students, conducted by Steven
Thomas, DMA, will present a concert
at 3 p.m. Sunday, March 25, at Dun-
nellon Presbyterian Church, 20641
Chestnut St., Dunnellon. This presen-
tation takes in 350 years of musical
styles from the Renaissance and
Baroque works by Gabrieli, Gesualdo
and Handel, to the Romantic period by
Buckner and Popper, concluding with
Brazilian works by Villa-Lobos. A love
offering will be collected at the end of
the concert with all proceeds going to
the performers.
St. Timothy Lutheran Church will
host Dry Branch Fire Squad at 7
p.m. Sunday, March 25. Bring family
and friends for enjoyable evenings of
music. For tickets and information, call
352-795-5325. The church is at 1070
N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River. Sug-
gested donation is $10.
Southern Sound Quartet, a
Southern Gospel group, will be in con-
cert Wednesday, March 28, at Her-
nando Church of the Nazarene, 2101
N. Florida Ave., Hernando. Celebration
Sounds Choir & Orchestra will open
the concert at 6:45 p.m. The public is
invited to enjoy this free concert. A
love offering will be collected. Call the
church office at 352-726-6144.
Special events
The March for Christ our Mes-
siah begins at 8 a.m. today in Corner-


RELIGION


stone Baptist Church parking lot on
Highland Avenue, Inverness (across
from Citrus High School) sponsored
by the C4 Citrus County Christian
Coalition. The march will end at 10
a.m. at Citrus County Fairgrounds,
U.S. 41 South, Inverness, where we
will then begin with special worship,
prayer, unity and fellowship. Several
worship teams and speakers will lead
us in song and prayer, including Kevin
and Cherie Daniels of Touched Min-
istry and SAVED Ministry team. There
will be an altar call for new believers
and for prayer requests. Bring your
friends, neighbors, family. Visit
www.blessournationlord.com. A$1 do-
nation will help pay for the rental of the
facility. Food is available for purchase.
Call Susan at 352-476-8310.
"The 52nd Annual Men's Day
and Revival" will begin with a prayer
breakfast at 9 a.m. today at Mount
Olive Missionary Baptist Church, 2105
N. Georgia Road, Crystal River. The
guest speaker is the Rev. Carl Gadson
of Galilee Missionary Baptist Church,
Hawthorne. Events continue on Sun-
day, March 18, with a "Men's Day
Service" at 11 a.m. featuring guest
speaker the Rev. Scott Adams of
Ekklesia Community Ministry, Abing-
don, Md. Revival services will take
place at 7 p.m. nightly Monday
through Wednesday, March 19-21,
also featuring guest speaker
the Rev. Adams.
First Baptist Church Floral City
will have its second annual spring re-
vival Sunday through Friday. Kickoff
service begins at 6 p.m. Sunday, with
Monday through Friday services at 7
p.m. Guest speaker is the Rev. Steve
McDonald of Calvary Baptist Church
in Oak Ridge, Tenn. Music presented
by Paul Giglio. A special music pro-
gram begins at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday
with evening supper served at 5 p.m.
Friday's service is followed by a social
in the fellowship hall with light refresh-
ments. The church is at 8545 E. Mag-
nolia St. Visit www.fbcfloralcity.org.
The St. Benedict Council of
Catholic Women will have a bakeless
cake sale all month. Send checks to
St. Benedict Council of Catholic
Women. The Citrus Deanery Spring


Conference is at 9 a.m. Thursday at
St. Elizabeth Ann Seton. Cost is $15.
Make checks out to St. Benedict
CCW. Pay at the church office or at
the March 8 meeting. St. Patrick's Day
corned beef and cabbage dinner
served at 6 p.m. Saturday, March 17,
Donation is $10. Tickets available at
church or in the office.
Come for coffee and refresh-
ments and participate in a mystery
created by Christian suspense authors
Diane and David Munson at 10 a.m.
Saturday, March 17, at First Baptist
Church, 550 Pleasant Grove Road, In-
verness. They are authors of six
thrillers, inspired by their exciting and
dangerous careers David, a former
NCIS special agent, and Diane, a for-
mer federal prosecutor. Tickets are $5
per person. Call the church at 352-
726-1252.
All ladies are invited to a "Sea-
Side Escape Women's Retreat" on
Saturday, March 24, at First Presbyte-
rian Church of Inverness, 206 Wash-
ington Ave., Inverness. Registration
begins at 8:30 a.m. and the program
follows from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. The
cost of $10 includes lunch and materi-
als. Pre-registration with payment is
required by Monday. Call Denise Lay
at 352-637-0770 or Tanya Jaros at
352-637-0260 or email: christened
@embarqmail.com. Child care
available.
The youths of Crystal River
United Methodist Church will host a
'50s-style Sock Hop at 6 p.m. Satur-
day, March 24. DJ Sebastian Hawes
will provide music. Free child care on
the premises. Refreshments for sale.
Tickets are $6 per person or $10 per
couple. Tickets will be available at the
door or may be reserved at the
church, 4801 N. Citrus Ave., on Sun-
day morning. Money raised for the
event will be used toward the annual
mission trip the youths take part in.
Alan Shawn Feinstein will add
money to donations given to the Bev-
erly Hills Community Church's Food
Pantry. Donations must be received
through April 30, and can include
cash, checks, and/or food items. The
more donations made to the food
pantry, the more Feinstein money will


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

be added to the donation. The next
food distribution at the church is
from 11 a.m. to noon and 6 to 7 p.m.
Tuesday, March 27. To qualify for as-
sistance, you must be a Beverly Hills
resident with identification. The church
office needs to be notified at least a
week ahead of time, if requiring food,
to ensure its availability. Call the
church office at 352-746-3620, or stop
by, to make a reservation before
March 20. There is an initial registra-
tion for each recipient.
The United Methodist Women of
Inverness will have their Sixth annual
"Sunny Saturday" Charity Golf
Tournament (in memory of Ruby
Moore) on Saturday, March 31, at In-
verness Golf and Country Club, 3150
S. Country Club Drive, Inverness. The
event starts at 7:30 a.m. with a conti-
nental breakfast followed by an 8:30
a.m. shotgun start, four-person scram-
ble, full 18 holes, followed by a hot
lunch prepared by the restaurant staff.
Grand prize drawing of a $100 Visa
gift card, door prizes, drawings, Chi-
nese auction. Entry is $50 per golfer.
To sponsor a hole costs $100. Pro-
ceeds go to local charities. For infor-
mation or to register, call
352-726-2522. Register by March 23.
Every Friday during Lent, Sta-
tions of the Cross are walked at
noon at St. Margaret's Episcopal
Church, 114 N. Osceola Ave., Inver-
ness. A "Souper Lunch" will follow. On
Good Friday, April 6, Stations of the
Cross will be walked at 11 a.m., fol-
lowed by a community service from
noon to 3 p.m. Stations of the Cross
will also be offered at 7 p.m. Good Fri-
day. A sign-up sheet is available in the
parish hall, or call the church office at
352-726-3153.
Community pancake breakfast
and Easter egg hunt from 8 to 11
a.m. Saturday, April 7, at Crystal River
United Methodist Church, 4801 N. Cit-
rus Ave., Crystal River. All-you-can-eat
pancake breakfast with the Easter
Bunny is from 8 to 9:30 a.m. with a
cost of $4 for adults and $2 for chil-
dren. The free Easter egg hunt follows
from 9:30 to 11 a.m. Egg hunts for

See NOTES/Page C3


Places of worship that


offer love, peace and



harmony to all.


Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!!

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF CRYSTAL RIVER AND HOMOSASSA


ST. THOMAS
CATHOLIC
CHURCH


MASSES:
aturday 4:30 P.M.
unday 8:00 A.M.
10:30 A.M.

,: h] .: l .] H , ,ii ] ]




St. Benedict
Catholic Church
U.S. 19 at Ozello Rd.
MASSES -
Vigil: 5:00pm
Sun.: 8:30 & 10:30am
DAILY MASSES
Mon. Fri.: 8:00am
HOLY DAYS
As Announced
CONFESSION
Sat.: 3:30 4:30pm
795-4479


Crystal River
CHURCH OF
CHRIST
A Friendly Church
With A Bible Message.
Corner of U.S. 19 & 44 East
Sunday Services
10:00 A.M.* 11:00 A.M.' 6:00 P.M.


Wednesday
7:00 P.M.


Come Worship With Us!
Bible Questions Please Call
Ev. George Hickman
795-8883 746-1239


. ST. ANNE'S
T CHURCH
A Parish in the
Anglican Communion
Rector: Fr. Kevin G. Holsapple
Celebrating 50 Years of
Serving God and the Community
Sunday Masses: 8:00 a.m.
10:15 a.m.
Morning Prayer & Daily Masses
4th Sunday 6:00pm,.
Gospel Sing Along

9870 West Fort Island Trail
Crystal River 1 mile west of Plantation Inn
352-795-2176
www.stannescr.org


t St. Timothy "
Lutheran Church
ELCA
Saturday Informal Worship
w/Communion 5:00 PM
Sunday Early Service
w/Communion 8:00 AM
Sunday School
All Ages 9:30 AM
(Coffee Fellowship hour@ 9:00 AM)
Sunday Traditional Service
w/Communion 10:30 AM
Special services are announced.
Nursery provided.
1070 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River
For more information call
795-5325
www.sttimothylutherancrystalriver.com
Rev. David S. Bradford, Pastor


. Temple
Beth David
13158 Antelope St.
Spring Hill, FL 34609
352-686-7034
Rabbi
Lenny Sarko
Services
Friday 8PM
Saturday 10AM
Religious School
Sunday
9AM-Noon





H-KE, YOU'LL FIND
A CAKING FAMILY
IN CHKIST!

C KYSTXL
RiVK-
VNITED
.AETHODIST
CHU CH
4801 N. Citrus Ave.
(2 Mi. N Of US 19)

795-3148
www.crumc.com
Rev. David Rawls, Pastor
Sunday Worship
8:00 Early Communion
9:30 Praise & Worship
11:00 Traditional
Bible Study
At 9:30 & 11:00 For all ages.
Wednesday 6:30
Nursery available at all services.
Youth Fellowship
Sunday 4:30
Wednesday 6:30
Bright Beginnings
Preschool
6 Weeks-VPK
Mon. Fri. 6:30a.m.-6pm.
795-1240
A Stephen Ministry Provider.


( Crystal iver
Church of God
Church Phone
795-3079
Sunday Morning
Adult & Children's Worship
8:30 & 11:00 AM
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Evening Service 6:00 PM
Wednesday
Life Application Service
Jam Session Youth Ministries & Teen
Kid (ages 4-11) 7:00 PM
2180 N.W. Old Tallahassee Rd.
(12th Ave.)
I Provided


SWest
Citrus
Church of Christ
9592 W. Deep Woods Dr.
Crystal River, FL 34465
352-564-8565
www.westcitruscoc.com
W. Deep Woods Dr.






US Hwy. 19



SERVICES
Sunday AM
Bible Study 9:30
Worship 10:30
Sunday PM
Worship 6:00
Wednesday
PM
Bible Study 7:00

EVANGELIST
Bob Dickey


First Baptist
Church of
Homosassa
"Come Worship with Us"
10540 W. Yulee Drive Homosassa
628-3858
Rev. J.Alan Ritter
Rev. Steve Gerhart, Assoc. Pastor
Sunday
9:00 am Sunday School (AII Age Groups)
10:30 am Worship Celebration
Choir/ Special Music /"Kidz Worship"
Sunday Night
6 pm Worship Celebration
Wednesday Night
6:30 pm Worship Celebration
Children's Awanas Group
Youth Activities
www.fbchomosassa.org


Come -F
grow A
with us!

The First Assembly
of God Family
WELCOMES YOU!


Schedule of Services:
Sunday:
9:00 a.m.
Adult Bible Study
Youth and Children's
Classes
10:00 a.m.
Spirit Filled Worship Service
Inspiring Message
Yout and Children's
Ministries
6:00 p.m
Youth Ministries
Wednesday 7:00 p.m
Praise and Worship
In-Depth Bible Study
Youth and Children's
Ministries
Nursery Provided Every Service


THE
SALVATION
ARMY CORPS.Y
SUNDAY:
Sunday School 9:45 A.M.
Morning Worship Hour
11:00 A.M.

TUESDAY:
Home League 11:30 A.M.
Lt.Vanessa Miller





MO Crystal
9F River
Foursquare
Gospel Church
1160 N. Dunkenfield Ave.
795-6720

A FULL GOSPEL
FELLOWSHIP
Sunday 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday "Christian Ed"
7:00 P.M.
Prayer Sat. 4-6pm
Pastor John Hager


Homosassa
First United
Methodist
Church
| Everyone
Becoming
A Disciple
of Christ

Sunday Worship
8:00 am, 9:30 am, 11:00 am
Sunday School
9:30 am & 10:45 am

Reverend
Mark Whittaker
Pastor
8831 W. Bradshaw St.
Homosassa, FL 34448
352-628-4083
www.lumc.org
Office Hours:
8:30 4:30 M-F
Open Hearts
Open Minds
Open Doors





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NOTES
Continued from Page C2

toddlers, preschoolers and elementary
school-aged children. Free Easter
Bunny photos, cupcake decorating,
relay games, a bouncy house, movie
and more. RSVP for the breakfast with
the Easter Bunny online at www.
crumc.com or call the church office at
352-795-3148 by Thursday, April 5.
James Williams leads the Sta-
tions of the Cross at noon Fridays
during Lent at Holy Faith Episcopal
Church in Blue Cove, Dunnellon, off
East Pennsylvania Avenue. The last
presentation is March 30. Everyone is
welcome.
Peace Lutheran Church is at
7201 S. U.S. 41, five miles north of
Dunnellon. For Lent, Pastor McKee is
using Luther's Catechisms for the mid-
week and Holy Week theme. Midweek
services are at 7 p.m. Wednesday,
preceded by a potluck meal at 6:15
pm. Call the church office at 352-489-
5881 or visit www.PeaceLutheran
Online.org.
A five-night Carnival cruise to
benefit Serving Our Savior (SOS)
Food Pantry will travel to Cozumel and
Grand Cayman on the Carnival Para-
dise on April 30. Funds raised will ben-
efit the needy in Citrus County. All
categories of cabins are available.


RELIGION


Prices include cruise, port charges, all
taxes and fees, donations to Serving
Our Savior pantry, round-trip bus to
Tampa, round-trip bus driver tips and
one-way porter tips. Cancellation in-
surance available. Call Lenore Deck at
352-270-8658 or fax her at 352-270-
8665 or email her at cruiselady@
tampabay.rr.com, or call Barbara
Johnson at 352-270-3391.
Crystal River of Life Coffee
House meets from 7 to 9:30 p.m. Fri-
days at the Village Cafe, 789 N.W. 5th
St. (West State Road 44). Enjoy Chris-
tian fellowship, conversation and
music.
"Saturday Night Gospel Ju-
bilee" at 6 p.m. the last Saturday
monthly at First Church of God, Inver-
ness. Anyone interested in participat-
ing is invited to come prepared to be
included in the program. Food and fel-
lowship follow. No charge. Pastor Tom
Walker invites the public to attend. Di-
rections: Go one mile north of Kmart
on U.S. 41, turn right on Jasmine Lane
(at the corner where Citrus Sew & Vac
is). The church is a block or two down
on the right side. Call 352-344-3700.
Citrus Zen Group, Buddhist
meditation, meets at 3 p.m. Sunday
at the Unitarian Universalists Fellow-
ship, 7633 N. Florida Ave. (U.S. 41
north of the Holder intersection). Call
352-464-4955 for information.
Abundant Life conducts an "Hour
of Prayer" from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m.


Sunday. These times of prayer are
open to everyone who wants to see a
spiritual awakening sweep Citrus
County and the surrounding areas.
Join us as we pray for the govern-
ment, the nation, the church, the city
and the world. Abundant Life can also
receive prayer requests through its
website at www.abundantlifecitrus.org.
Call the church for more information at
352-795-LIFE.
Worship
First Presbyterian Church of
Crystal River meets for worship at
10:30 a.m. Sunday. A Lenten study
continues at 6 p.m. Wednesday with
a soup and bread shared meal. A
"Community Arts and Craft Show" will
take place from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sat-
urday, March 17, and after worship
Sunday, March 18, in Webster Hall.
Come see local artists' work. Call 352-
795-2259 or visit www.fpcofcrystal
river.com.
The public is invited to good old-
fashioned church services with friendly
people and good old-fashioned wor-
ship at Trinity Independent Baptist
Church, 2840 E. Hayes St. (on the
corner of Croft and Hayes), Hernando.
For service times, call 352-726-0100.
Shepherd of the Hills Episco-
pal Church in Lecanto will celebrate
the third Sunday in Lent with Holy Eu-
charist services at 5 p.m. today and 8
and 10:30 a.m. Sunday. Adult Chris-


SATURDAY, MARCH 10, 2012 C3


tian Formation is at 9:15 a.m. Sunday
with Sunday school at 10 a.m. and
nursery at 10:30 a.m. Healing service
and Eucharist at 10 a.m. Wednesday
is followed by Bible study and sack
lunch. SOS at Good Shepherd
Lutheran Church from 9 a.m. to noon
Thursday. Evening Bible study is at 7
Thursday in the parish hall. Stations of
the Cross are walked at 5:30 p.m. Fri-
days through Lent followed by a soup
and bread supper and discussion.
St. Timothy Lutheran Church
has a "come as you are" service with
Communion at 5 p.m. Saturday. Sun-
day worship services begin with early
service with Communion at 8 a.m.,
Sunday school classes for all ages at
9:30 a.m., coffee fellowship hour at 9
a.m., and traditional service with Com-
munion at 10:30 a.m. Special services
are announced. Nursery provided. The
church is at 1070 N. Suncoast Blvd.
(U.S.19), Crystal River. Call 352-795-
5325 or visit www.sttimothylutheran
crystalriver.com.
Faith Lutheran Church, at 935 S.
Crystal Glen Drive in Crystal Glen Sub-
division in Lecanto, will have services
today at 6 p.m. and Sunday at 9:30
a.m. This week, Pastor Lane will
preach theme of "Turning the Tables,"
from John 2:13-22. The church is
wheelchair assessable, offers hearing
assistance and has a cry room with fa-
cilities for parents to hear and see the
service. Following the Sunday service


is a time of fellowship. Adult Bible study
and Sunday school for children is at 11
a.m. The third Lenten service, with
theme, "Lies of Lent," is at 5 p.m.
Wednesday followed by a covered-dish
supper. Everyone is invited. Call 352-
527-3325 or visit faithlecanto.com.
First Baptist Church of Inver-
ness offers the following Sunday ac-
tivities: SONrise Sunday school class
at 7:45 a.m., blended worship service
at 9 a.m., "Kid's Church" for ages 4
through fourth grade during the 9 a.m.
service featuring Bible stories, skits,
music and group activities; Sunday
school classes for all ages at 10:30
a.m. A nursery is available for all serv-
ices except the 7:45 a.m. class.
Evening fellowship is at 6 with various
services during summer months. On
Wednesday at 6 p.m. is a prayer
meeting, "Women in the Life Of Jesus"
study, 'Youth Ignite," "Praise Kids" and
a nursery for age 3 and younger. Call
the office at 352-726-1252. The
church is at 550 Pleasant Grove
Road, Inverness. The website is
www.fbcinverness.com.
St. Paul's Lutheran Church, at
6150 N. Lecanto Highway in Beverly
Hills, will have worship services at 8
and 10:30 a.m. with Sunday school
and Bible class at 9:15 a.m. Bible in-
formation class continues at 6 p.m.
Monday in the fellowship room. Choir
See NOTES/Page C4


Places of worship that


offer love, peace


and harmony to all. |


Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted! !

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF HERNANDO, LECANTO, FLORAL CITY, HOMOSASSA SPRINGS


HHomosassa Springs
A SEVENTH-DAYADVENTIST'CHURCH


\



Come, Fellowship &
Grow With Us In Jesus
5863 W. Cardinal St.
Homosassa Springs, FL 34446
Telephone: (352) 628-7950
Pastor Dale Wolfe
Tuesday
Mid-Week Meeting 7:00 pm
Sabbath-Saturday Services
Sabbath School 9:30 am
Worship 10:45 am
www. homosassaadventist.com

Come as you are!

COMMUNITY CHURCH
~-T






PASTOR BRIAN AND
KATHY BAGGS
Worship Service &
Children's Church 10:00 AM
Meeting at Knights of Columbus Bldg.
County Rd. 486, Lecanto
(352) 527-4253


HERNANDO
United
Methodist
Church

Ope
HeartO m "o H


OpMe
Vows

4 . ryfor Children and Families"
2125 E, Norvell Bryant Hwy. (486)
(1/2 miles from Hwy. 41)
For information call
(352) 726-7245
www.hernandoumcfl.org
Reverend
Tyler Montgomery
Sunday School
8:45 AM 9:30 AM
Fellowship
9:30 AM
Worship Service
10:00 AM
Individual Hearing Devices


1880.N. Tucs ve

Henado FL344

(32 3420


Hernando
TheNazarene
Place to Belong

2101 N. Florida Ave,
Hernando FL

726-6144
Nursery Provided

*CHILDREN

*YOUTH

*SENIORS

Sunday School
9:45 A.M.
Praise & Worship
10:40 A.M.
Praise Service
6:00 PM,
Praise & Prayer
(Wed.) 7:00 P.M

Randy T. Hodges, Pastor
www.hernandonazarene.org


Old Flor'
.3 of a mile north of SR 48
at 7431 Old Floral City Rd.
Come & Fellowship
Service Times:
Sunday School.........9:30 am
Sunday Worship.....11:00am
Wed-Night Awesome
Bible Study................ 7:00 pm
Call 352-726-0501
Where Love
it says,
% but what
T it does. s


Glory to Glory
Ministries
^ A Family
United by
The Love Of Jesus!
Non-Denominational J1l
Spirit Filled Worship I
Family Friendly
Sunday 10:30 a.m.
Wednesday 7:00 p.m.
Bible Study
(352) 566-6613
www.G2GCares.org
Pastor Brian Gulledge
1274 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy,
Hernando, FL



SShepherd

of the Hills
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Our mission is to be
a beacon of faith known
for engaging all persons
in the love and truth
of Jesus Christ.
Bishop Jim Adams, Rector
527-0052
Services:
Saturday
5:00 pm
Sunday
8:00 & 10:30 am
Christian Formation
9:15 am
Sunday School 10:00 am
Nursery 10:30 am
Healing Service
Wednesday
10:00 am
2540 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
(CR 486)
Lecanto, Florida
(4/10 mile east of CR 491)
www.SOTHEC.org


Church


St. Scholastica
Roman Catholic
Church
Masses:
SATURDAY VIGIL
4:00 p.m. and 6:00 p.m.
SUNDAY
9:00 a.m. and
11:30 a.m.

Daily Mass:
8:30 a.m. Mon. Fri.
Confessions:
Saturday 2:45 3:30 p.m.
4301 W. Homosassa Trail
Lecanto, Florida 34461
(352)746-9422
www.stscholastica.org
Located one mile south of
Hwy 44 on SR 490 adjacent
to Pope John Paul II
Catholic School


Sunday
9:30 AM-..................Discovery Time
11:00 AM................Praise & Worship
6:00 PM...................Evening Service
Monday
6:15PM ...................Teens
Tuesday
6:15 PM.......Awana (Sept. Apr.)
Wednesday
7:00 PM-..................Bible Study &
Prayer Meeting
Pastor:
Rev. Ray Herriman
(352) 628-5631
Men & Ladies Bible Studies, TOPS,
Infant & Toddler Nursery
y2 mi.eastof US.19
6382 W. Green Acres St.
P.O.Box 1067
Homosassa, FL. 34447-1067
www.gracebiblehomosassa.org
email: gbc@tampabay.rr.com


COME
Worship With The
Church of Christ
Floral City, Florida
Located at Marvin &
Church streets.
Established in 33 A.D. in
Jerusalem by Jesus Christ.
A warm welcome always
awaits you where we teach
the true New Testament
Christian Faith.
Sunday Bible Study
9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship
10:30 a.m. & 6:00 p.m.

Wed./Eve. Bible Study
6:00 p.m.
Steve Heneghan, Minister
CHURCH OF CHRIST
.... Floral City, FL.


First Baptist
Church
:00 AM Tof Floral City
LifiunUp Jesusay
8545 Magnolia
726-4296

Sunday Schedule
8:30 AM Blended Worship Service
9:45 AM Sunday School
11:00 AM Traditional Worship
6:00 PM Worship
Wednesday
6:30 PM
Music, Youth, Fellowship
A warm, friendly Church
Nursery Available
www.fbcfloralcity.org

Floral City
< United Methodist
U Church
8478 East Marvin St.
(across from Floral City School)
Sunday School
9:05 A.M.
Sunday Worship Service
10:30 A.M. Sanctuary
8:00 A.M. Service in the 1884 Church
Bible Study
Tuesday 10:00 A.M.
Wednesday 6:00 P.M.
"We strive to make
newcomers feel at home."
Wheel Chair Access
Nursery Available
Rev. Steven Todd Riddle
Church 344-1771
WEBSITE: floralcitychurch.com


0


Good

Shepherd

Lutheran

Church
ELCA









Worship

8:30 am

11:00 am
* Fellowship After Worship
Weekly Communion
Sunday School 9:45am
Nursery Provided

Reverend
Kenneth C. Blyth
Pastor
439 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, Florida
Building is Barrier-Free
gshernando.org


I11 Faith
Lutheran

Church(L.C.)
935 S. Crystal Glen Dr., Lecanto
Crystal Glen Subdivision
Hwy.44 just E. of 490
527-3325

COME
WORSHIP
WITH US
Sunday Service
9:30 A.M.
Sunday Bible Study
& Children's Sunday
School 11 A.M.
Saturday Service
6:00 P.M.
Weekly Communion
Fellowship after Sunday Worship
Calendar of events Audio
of sermons available at
www.faithlecanto.com

ASfaiewtor hti^ I


I





C4 SATURDAY, MARCH 10, 2012


NOTES
Continued from PageC3

rehearsal is at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday.
Wednesday evening Lenten services
are at 4 and 6:30 p.m. St. Paul's
Lutheran School report cards will be
handed out Monday, March 19. Par-
ent-teacher conferences are Thursday,
March 22. Call 352-489-3027.
St. Anne's Anglican Church is
on Fort Island Trail West, Crystal
River. St. Anne's celebrates the third
Sunday in Lent with services at 8 and
10:15 a.m. St. Anne's will host "Our
Fathers Table" today from 11:30 a.m.
to 12:30 p.m. Overeaters Anonymous
meets Wednesdays at 10:30 a.m. in
the parish library. Recovering from
food addiction meets at 1 p.m. Thurs-
days in the parish library. Alcoholics
Anonymous meets at 8 p.m. Friday
and Monday in the parish library. St.
Anne's hosts a Bluegrass gospel sing-
along at 6 p.m. Sunday, March 25.
Annie and Tim's United Bluegrass
Band will perform. All are welcome.
St. Margaret's Episcopal
Church's Sunday services include the
Holy Eucharist Rite 1 service at 8 a.m.
and Holy Eucharist Rite 2 service at
10:30 a.m. Adult Sunday school be-
gins at 9:30 a.m. Family Eucharist
service is at 10:30 a.m. Children's
church and Youth Fun Day take place
during the family Eucharist service.
Lunch and youth Sunday school
youth/adult forum is at noon. St.
Patrick's dinner served from 5 to 6:30
p.m. Friday. Call the church office for
tickets and information.
First Presbyterian Church of In-
verness is at 206 Washington Ave.
Sunday worship schedule: Traditional
services at 8 and 11 a.m., casual serv-
ice at 9:30 a.m., Sunday school hour
at 9:30 a.m., and coffee hour from 9 to
11 a.m. For the third Sunday of Lent,
theme is "Spiritual Cataracts." The
Rev. Craig S. Davies will preach on
"The Blindness of Jealousy, Envy and
Resentment," with readings from Mark
9:38-41. Wednesday at 6 p.m. is a
prepared dinner followed by the Pres-
byPlayers' presentation of the play


"The Shepard King." Call 352-637-
0770 for meal reservations. The class
for receiving new members into the
church family is from 4 to 6:30 p.m.
Sunday, March 18, at the church. For
reservations, call 352-637-0770.
Pastor David Rawls continues a
series of sermons about the "24 hours
that changed the world" at Crystal
River United Methodist Church,
4801 N. Citrus Ave. Pastor Rawls' ser-
mons are accentuated with film clips.
Traditional services are at 8 and 11
a.m. and a contemporary service is at
9:30 a.m. Call 352-795-3148.
Floral City United Methodist
Church conducts Sunday services at
8 a.m. in the 1884 church and 10:30
a.m. in the main sanctuary. Bible stud-
ies are at 10 a.m. Tuesday and 6
p.m. Wednesday. Call the church of-
fice at 352-344-1771.
Regular Sunday worship services
are at 8:15 and 11 a.m. at Joy
Lutheran Church on S.W. State
Road 2100 at 83rd Place, Ocala. Sun-
day school classes are at 9:45 a.m.
The German language worship serv-
ice is at 3 p.m. the first Sunday
monthly. The Wednesday evening
worship service is at 6:45. Pastor Ed
Holloway leads Bible study in the
Gospel of Luke at 3 p.m. Thursday.
The community is welcome. Call 352-
854-4509, Ext. 221.
Inverness Church of God Sun-
day worship services are at 8:30 and
10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Children's
church is during the 10:30 a.m. wor-
ship service in the Children's Min-
istries Building. Sunday school begins
at 9:30 a.m. with classes for everyone
The church has many Christian edu-
cation opportunities at 7 p.m. Wednes-
days. Missionettes and Royal Rangers
Clubs meet for children from the age
of 3. The adult class meets in rooms
105 and 106 at 7 p.m. Wednesday.
The youth group, "Define Gravity,"
meets at 7 p.m. Friday in the Youth
Ministries Building with Youth Pastor
Jon Uncle. The church is at 416 U.S.
41 South, Inverness. Call the church
at 352-726-4524.
Good Shepherd Lutheran
Church invites the public to worship
services at 8:30 and 11 a.m. Sunday.


RELIGION


A coffee hour follows both services.
The church is barrier free and offers a
free tape ministry and large-print serv-
ice helps and hearing devices. A nurs-
ery attendant is available for children
ages 3 and younger. All are welcome.
Join us for Wednesday evenings in
Lent for prayers at 7. The church is on
County Road 486, opposite Citrus
Hills Boulevard in Hernando. Call the
church for more information at 352-
746-7161.
NorthRidge Church welcomes
the community to Sunday worship
services at 9 a.m. in the Inverness
Woman's Club building at 1715 Forest
Drive, across from the Whispering
Pines Park entrance. NorthRidge is a
nondenominational church where you
can come as you are. Coffee and fel-
lowship time follows the service. On
the second and fourth Wednesdays
monthly, the home group continues its
study of "Faith Lessons" from the
video series by Ray Vander Laan in
conjunction with "Focus on the Fam-
ily," beginning with a potluck dinner at
6:15 p.m. followed by a study of the
biblical sites, culture and the of the
Scriptures. For details and location,
call Kennie Berger at 352-302-5813.
First Christian Church of Inver-
ness invites everyone to worship and
fellowship. Sunday school is at 9 a.m.
and the worship service is at 10:15
a.m. Wednesday evening meals, be-
ginning at 4:45 p.m., are followed by
choir practice at 5 and prayer and
Bible study at 6 p.m. The meals are $3
for adults and $1.50 for children under
age 12. Call the church at 352-344-
1908, email fccinv@yahoo.com or visit
www.fccinv.com. The church is at
2018 Colonnade St.
Peace Lutheran Church has
Sunday morning Bible classes for chil-
dren and youths at 9. Adult Bible study
groups also meet at 9 a.m. Sunday
and 10 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Wednes-
day. All residents of the area are wel-
come. Sunday morning worship
service is at 10. Peace Lutheran
Church, "The Church On The Hill," is
five miles north of Dunnellon at the
junction of U.S. 41 and State Road 40.
Call the church office at 352-489-5881
or visit www.PeaceLutheranOnline.org.


At New Testament Baptist
Church, Pastor Helms will begin a
study on prayer during the morning
service this Sunday. The study will
take several Sundays to complete.
Sunday school is at 9:45 a.m. with
classes for all ages. Sunday church
services are at 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. with
special children's classes during the
morning service. A nursery is provided
for all services. Everyone is welcome
to attend. The church is at 9850 S.
Parkside Ave. in Floral City, just south
of Floral Park. Call 352-726-0360 for
more information.
Find a church home at Faith
Baptist Church, 6918 S. Spartan
Ave. (one mile from U.S. 19, off Cardi-
nal Street). Visit comeandseefbc.org.
Services are interpreted for the deaf.
Sunday school classes at 9:45 a.m.
with Sunday worship at 11 a.m. and 6
p.m. "King's Kids" and "Flyers" for K-5
grades from 6 to 7:15 p.m. Sunday.
Wednesday Bible study and prayer
meeting at 7 p.m. with "Warriors" for
grades 6 through 12 from 6:30 to 8
p.m. Call 352-628-4793.
Reflections Church meets at
Citrus Springs Middle School. Sunday
morning worship service begins at
10:17 a.m. Children's church and
nursery is available. Bible study is at
8:45 a.m. for adults.
First Church of God of Inver-
ness, a nondenominational church
which meets at 5510 E. Jasmine
Lane, invites the public to Sunday
morning worship services at 10:30 and
an old-fashioned Sunday evening
service at 6 filled with singing, testi-
monies and the Word, including a
Christian education hour for children.
The ladies "Joy-Belles" meet the sec-
ond Tuesday monthly. A men's break-
fast is enjoyed the last Saturday
monthly and at 6 p.m. the last Satur-
day monthly is "The Saturday Night
Gospel Jubilee" (with groups from the
area participating).
Refreshments and fellowship follow
and there is no charge. The church
has a once-monthly fellowship carry-in
meal, followed by "theme-planned"
programs. Bible study and prayer time
is at 6 p.m. Wednesday. Call 352-
344-3700.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

St. Raphael Orthodox Church,
1277 N. Paul Drive, Inverness, wel-
comes everyone to worship at Divine
Liturgy on Sunday mornings at 10 and
Saturday evening for Vespers at 5. A
coffee hour/fellowship gathering takes
place after Divine Liturgy every Sun-
day. The church appreciates donations
of canned goods and other nonperish-
able items, which are donated regu-
larly to the Citrus County Resource
Center. Visit www.straphaelchurch.org.
Crystal River Church of Christ
meets for Bible study at 10 a.m. Sun-
day, worship at 11, and evening serv-
ice at 6 p.m. Wednesday Bible study is
at 7 p.m. Everyone is welcome. We
speak where the Bible speaks and we
are silent where the Bible is silent (1
Peter 4:11). The church has a radio
program on WEKJ 96.7 FM at 11 a.m.
Saturday. The church is at the inter-
section of State Road 44 and U.S. 19.
Call Evangelist George Hickman at
352-794-3372 or 352-795-8883, or
email georgehickman@yahoo.com.
Church of Christ services at 304
N.E. Fifth St., Crystal River. Bible
classes at 10 a.m. Sunday, 7 p.m.
Wednesday and by appointment. Wor-
ship services at 11 a.m. Sunday.
Everyone invited. Call 352-795-4943
or 352-563-0056 for information.
Citrus Vineyard Community
Church meets in the First Christian
Church of Inverness family life center,
at 2018 Colonade Street. Sunday
services are at 10:30 a.m. Home
groups meet in Inverness and Beverly
Hills on Tuesdays. Call the church at
352-637-0923.
New Beginnings Fellowship,
2577 N. Florida Highway in Hernando,
invites the community to spirit-led re-
vival services during the week and
Sunday worship services. NBF's
weekly schedule includes "Wednes-
day Night in the River" and "Friday
Night Fire" services at 7 p.m. A fellow-
ship dinner precedes both meetings at
6 p.m. Dinner guests are asked to
bring a dish to share. Special guest
ministers are invited often\.Childcare
provided. Sunday celebration services
at 8 and 10 a.m. include anointed
See NOTES/Page C7


Places of worship that


offer love, peace and


harmony to all.


Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!! l'


SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF CITRUS SPRINGS, BEVERLY HILLS, BROOKSVILLE, DUNNELLON, INVERNESS


Beverly Hills
Community Church
82 Civic Circle, Beverly Hills, Florida
(352) 746-3620
Pastor Stewart R. Jamison, III
Email: bhcchurch@embarqmail.com

Wednesday Bible Study 6 p.m.
Sunday Coffee/Conversation 8:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship Service 10 a.m.
Communion -1st Sunday, Monthly
Where Christ is Proclaimed!



FIND
US AND
YE SHALL


SEEK.

If you're searching for a
spiritual home where
questions are as welcome
as answers, find us. We
are a loving, open-minded
religious community that
encourages you to seek your
own path, wherever it leads. To
nurture your spirit and find your
own truth and meaning.
Welcome to Unitarian Universalism.

Iature Coa

Unitarian Universalists
SUNDAY SERVICES
10:30 A.M.




WHERE REASON & RELIGION MEET
GLBT WELCOME
7633 N. Florida Ave.
(Route 41)
Citrus Springs
465-4225
WWW.NATURECOASTUU.ORG


GRACE
BAPTIST CHURCH

Independent
SOME THINGS SHOULDN'T CHANGE
Do you miss sound Bible teaching, the
beloved hymns & gospel songs, an Eve-
ning Service, and being part of a caring,
Christian family? Find them at Grace!
2672 W. Edison PI. at Elkcam Blvd.
Citrus Springs, FL
S.S. 9:45 am, Services 11:00 am & 6:00 pm
Wed. Bible Study & Prayer 7:00 pm
Directions, mp3 sermons & more at
www.gracebapchurch.org
Phone (352) 249-7211
000AOKH












VIGIL MASSES:
4:00 P.M. & 6:00 P.M.
************
SUNDAY MASSES:
8:00 Am. &10:30 A.
*************
SPANISH MASS:
12:30 P.M.
******* ****

CONFESSIONS:
2:30 PX to 3:30 PM Sat.
orByAppointinent





6 Roosevelt Blvd.,
Beverly Hills 1
746-2144
(1 Block East of S.R. 491)
www.ourladlyofgracefl
.catholicweb.com .:


0 Hwy. 44 E@
0 Washington Ave., Inverness
1 Sunday Services
Traditional
* 11:00 AM
* Contemporary :
9:30 AM
* 11:00 AM Service
* Tapes & CD's Available
* Sunday School for all ages
9:30 AM
Nursery Provided
SFellowship & Youth Group m
5 to 7 PM 0
I 24-Hour Prayer Line
0 563-3639 0
I Web Site: www.fpcinv.org
" Podcast: FPC inv.com
S Church Office 637-07700
0 P
0 Pastor Craig Davies m


At
Victory

Baptist Church
General Conference

Sunday School 9:45 AM
Worship 10:45 AM
Si"id.i, Evening 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 PM
Choir Practice 8:00 PM

Quality Child Care
Pastor Gary Beehler
352-465-8866
5040 N Shady Acres Dr.
726-9719
Highway 41 North, turn at
Sportsman Pt.
1 ,0 i to belong.A place to become."


Our Lady of

Fatima

CATHOLIC CHURCH
U.S. Hwy, 41 South, Inverness,
Florida

Sunday Masses
7:30 A.M., 9:00 A.M. & 11:00 A.M.
Saturday Vigil
4:00 P.M.
Weekdays 8:00A.M.
Confessions 2:30 3:30 P.M

726-1670


Come To
ST.
MARGARET'S
EPISCOPAL
CHURCH
where everyone is still welcome!
In Historic Downtown Inverness
1 Block N.W Of City Hall
114 N. Osceola Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
726-3153
www.stmaggie.org
Services:
Sun. Worship 8 & 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday 12:30 P.M.
Morning Prayer
9:00 A.M. Mon- Fri
Fr Gene Reuman, Pastor


Hope Evangelical
Lutheran Church
ELCA
Pastor Lynn Fonfara
9425 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
Citrus Springs
Sunday Worship
9:30 a.m.
Sunday School 8:30 a.m.
Communion Every Sunday
Information:
489-5511
Go To Our Web Page
hopelutheranelca.com



Redemption

Christian Church
SUNDAY
Bible School...............9:00
W orship.....................10:15
WEDNESDAY
Bible School...............6:30
Currently meeting at
East Citrus Community Center
9907 East Gulf-to-Lake Highway
(At The Flashing Light)
For more
information call
352-422-6535
Pastor
Todd
Langdon


COMMUNITY
8 CONGREGATIONAL
CHRISTIAN CHURCH







// re//F edWeom.es

SUNDAY 10:00 AM
Dr. Jeff Timm
9220 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
352-489-1260
IvyvS S S iI SSS..$ijiI l. [[ |i|' .P II |iP 1[


Mission Possible
MINISTRIES
Dan Sturgill
Senior Pastor
9921 N. Deltona Boulevard
(352) 489-3886
www.missionpossibleministries.com
I Sundays
Worship ................. 10:30 am
Spanish Translation Provided
(Nursery Care & Children's Church Provided)
Wednesday
Youth Group, Bible Study &
Kid's Programs................7 pm
(Nursery Care Provided)
ARMS OF MERCY FOOD PANTRY
1st & 3rd Tuesday of the month.
8:00 am-11:00 am





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


China locks down Tibetan monastery town


Area has been

focalpoint

ofprotests

Associated Press
ABA, China China's sti-
fling lockdown of this Ti-
betan town has not only
been about patrolling its
sleepy streets, but also
policing the minds of a com-
munity at the center of self-
immolation protests against
Chinese rule.
Soldiers with helmets, ri-
fles, sticks and shields
march in rows along this
monastery town's main road
against a backdrop of snow-
speckled mountains, while
police stare at passing cars,
scanning license plates and
faces of passengers for un-
welcome visitors. In school
dormitory rooms in the
county, there are random
checks for books that go
against the ruling Commu-
nist Party establishment -
and the constant questions
about political leanings.
"They'll ask you questions
and if you answer with your
true feelings, they will be
very unhappy If you keep
quiet, they will also be un-
happy," said a Tibetan who
teaches at a school in Aba
county and who spoke on
condition of anonymity for
fear of government
reprisals.
"They want you to say that
the party is good and their
policies are good," he
added.
Teachers also are banned
from making any mention -
positive or negative of the
Tibetan spiritual leader, the
Dalai Lama, the teacher
said during an interview in
the neighboring county of
Hongyuan.
Earlier this week, an As-
sociated Press reporter
managed to get through sev-
eral checkpoints along the
road leading to Aba, for a
rare glimpse of a town that
has been under lockdown
for more than three years,
as well as an apparent
uptick in security this week
ahead of sensitive
anniversaries.
The Aba township govern-
ment referred telephoned
questions about the heavy
police presence to Aba pre-
fecture, where government
and Communist Party of-
fices denied that security
was high.
The town sits among high-
altitude valleys grazed by
yaks on the Tibetan plateau
in southwestern Sichuan
province. The town's Kirti
Monastery, a large com-
pound with an enormous
white stupa, occupies a po-
sition in Tibetan society like
that of a major university Its
monks have been at the
forefront of unrest since Ti-
betan communities across
western China rose up in a
rebellion in 2008 that was
quashed by a massive and
continuing show of force.
Many of the nearly two
dozen Tibetans who set
themselves on fire in the
past year were monks or for-
mer monks from Kirti.
During this week's trip,
the county surrounding Aba
was cordoned off with road-
blocks, usually manned by
paramilitary police in green
uniforms. On the way into
town, a large signboard de-
clared in Chinese, with no
translation in the local Ti-
betan language: "A peaceful
Aba is built by all, a peace-
ful Aba is shared by all."
Authorities had used traf-
fic cones and barricades to
narrow the town's main two-
lane thoroughfare to one
lane. Military trucks with
green canvas covers and po-
lice vehicles were parked in
rows in front of shops and
restaurants. An armored
paramilitary police van fol-
lowed a group of marching
soldiers on patrol.
Police stood close by as
Tibetans huddled with
crimson-robed monks over
games, repaired cars or
sawed wood. Multicolored


prayer flags strung up on
rooftops or tied to lamp-
posts fluttered in the wind.
Plainclothes security men
- easily identifiable by
their close-cropped hair,
dark clothing and sun-
glasses sat on the side-
walk, newspapers in hand.
Barricades and a police
minivan were perched at
the junction to the narrow


Associated Press
Chinese paramilitary police and riot police stand guard Feb. 27 near barricades set up along the main street of Aba county seat, in China's Sichuan
province. China's stifling lockdown of this Tibetan monastery town has not only been about patrolling its otherwise sleepy streets. Beijing is also polic-
ing the minds of a community at the center of self-immolation protests against Chinese rule.


lane leading to the
monastery. The first thing
visible down the lane was a
large white-and-blue police
station, a Chinese flag
atop it
Internet and cell phone
text messaging services in
the area have been cut Only
telephone calls are allowed,
and many believe that most
calls are tapped. Describing
a code he uses to ask friends
in Aba about trouble with
authorities, the teacher
said: "Sometimes I ask
them, 'Is the wind over at
your end strong?' If they say
it's strong, then there is a
problem."
The authorities have dra-
gooned Tibetans working in
the governments of neigh-
boring counties to serve as
surveillance staff in Aba -
putting them in the awk-
ward position of policing
their ethnic brethren, said
another Tibetan teacher,
from Hongyuan, who stayed
for three days in Aba last
week.
The Tibetans have been
deployed with red arm-
bands at shop and hotel en-
trances, said the teacher,
who also spoke on condition
of anonymity.
"When ordered to, they
don't dare to say 'I won't
go,"' he said. "Once they get
there, the people in Aba
look at them accusingly, as if
to say: 'You're a Tibetan and
you're also coming here to
treat us this way?"'
By nightfall, the street
turns quiet and most secu-
rity forces retire to hotels,
while four or five military
trucks patrol until morning,
the teacher said.
"The locals are definitely
feeling very heavy-hearted,
very frustrated, all day The
soldiers are everywhere,"
said the teacher "At every
moment, people wonder
what will happen to the per-
son next to them, what the
soldiers will do to them."
Security appeared to be
tightening ahead of March,
a month of sensitive an-
niversaries including that of
the deadly anti-government
riot among Tibetans in
Lhasa in 2008, when frustra-
tion about Beijing's constant
vilification of the exiled
Dalai Lama boiled over The
period also marks the an-
niversary of the Dalai
Lama's flight from the re-
gion in 1959 after an
abortive uprising.
While the Chinese gov-
ernment has sought to win
over the region by boosting
economic growth, Tibetans
worry about the gradual
erosion of their culture and
religion amid an influx of
majority Han Chinese.
"In the people's hearts,
what they probably can't
stand the most is that the
authorities scold our living


Buddha, the Dalai Lama.
We cannot stand it when
they scold him," the teacher
said. "He's the person we


Places of worship that


offer love, peace and


harmony to all.

Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!!

SERVICING THE CITY OF INVERNESS


INVERNESS
First CHURCH OF GOD
NMn
Dtnii nin in. ln.l


Sunday
10:30AM4.& 6:00 PM.
Wednesday 6:00 P.M.
Bible Study & Prayer
726-8986
"Church Like It Used To Be"
Saturday Night Gospel Jubilee"
6:00 PM.
(Last Saturday of month)
Children's Church School Weekly
5510 E. Jasmine Ln.
Phone: 726-8986
ALLARE WELCOME

SI43 Years of
|RST Bringing Christ
FIR I to Inverness

LUTHERAN

CHURCH
Holy Communion
Every Sunday at
7:45am & 10:00am
Sunday School
& Bible Class
S8:45 A.M.
726-1637
Missouri Synod
www. 1 stlutheran.net
1900 W. Hwy. 44, Inverness
The Rev. Thomas Beaverson



tfcc1
"First For Christ"... John 1:41
000A4L7
FIRST |
CHRISTIAN
CHURCH OF
INVERNESS I
We welcome you and invite you
to worship with our family.
John A. Scott, Minister
Sunday:
9:00 A.M. Sunday School
10:15 A.M. Worship Service
Wednesday:
6:00 P M. Bible Study

Ig~gfffS


are most loyal to."
Dozens of security vehi-
cles poured into the Aba
area throughout the first


All are invited to our

Healing

Services
First Church of Christ,
Scientist
Inverness
224 N. Osceola Ave.
Sunday Services 10:30 AM
Sunday School 10:30AM
Wed. Testimony Meeting 5:00 PM
352-726-4033











g ist


ch

5335 E. Jasmine Lane,
Inverness
X Miles North Of K-Mart Off 41
North (Formally Calvary Bible
Church Location)

You're invited
to our Services
Sunday School
10:00 AM
Sunday
10:45 AM & 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 PM
Independent
Fundamental
Pastor
Terry Roberts
Ph: 726-0201


few days of the week, lights students: "Without the Com-
flashing. They drove past a munist Party, Tibetan areas
school where a red painted would not be where they are
slogan on a wall reminded today"


jo PRIMERA IGLESIA
HISPANA
DE CITRUS COUNTY
Asambleas de Dios
Inverness, Florida
ORDEN DE SERVICIOS:
DOMINGOS:
9:30 AM Escuela Biblica
Dominical
10:30 AM Adoraci6n y
Pr6dica
MARTES:
7:00 PM Culto de Oraci6n
JUEVES:
7:00 PM Estudios Biblicos
Les Esperamos!
David Pinero, Pastor
1370 N. Croft Ave. Inverness, FL 34451
Tel6fono: (352) 341-1711



W First

Assembly

of God
4201 So. Pleasant Grove Rd.
(Hwy. 581 So.) Inverness, FL 34452
| i
Pastor,
Dairold

Bettye
Rushing


















OFFICE: (352) 726-1107


INVERNESS
CHURCH
OF GOD
Rev.I.arrvPower
Sunday Services:
Traditional Service...................8:30
Sunday School ........................ 9:30
Contemporary Service...........10:30
Evening Service........................6:00 PM
Wednesday Night:
Adult Classes....................7:00
Boys and Girls Brigade.....7:00
Teens........................... 7:15
"Welcome Home"
Located at 416 Hwy. 41 South 2
in Inverness Just Past Burger King
Church Office 726-4524
Also on Site "Little Friends Daycare
and Learning Center"





First United

Methodist


SChurch
of Inverness
3896 S. Pleasant Grove Rd.
Inverness, FL 34452
(2 mi. so. ofApplebee's)
Come as you are.
(352) 726-2522
TONY ROSENBERGER
Senior Pastor


8:30 AM
Traditional Worship
with Holy
Communion

9:45 AM
Sunday School

11:00 AM
Contemporary
Praise & Worship
I m m


RELIGION


SATURDAY, MARCH 10, 2012 C5





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Pat Robertson: Pot


should be legalized


Associated Press
RICHMOND, Va. Religious broadcaster
Pat Robertson says marijuana should be le-
galized and treated like alcohol because the
government's war on drugs has failed.
The outspoken evangelical Christian and
host of "The 700 Club" on the Virginia
Beach-based Christian Broadcasting Net-
work he founded said the war on drugs is
costing taxpayers billions of dollars. He
said people should not be sent to prison for
marijuana possession.
The 81-year-old first became a self-pro-
claimed "hero of the hippie culture" in
2010 when he called for ending mandatory
prison sentences for marijuana possession.
"I just think it's shocking how many ofthese
young people wind up in prison and they get
turned into hardcore criminals because they
had a possession of a very small amount of a
controlled substance," Robertson said on his
show March 1. "The whole thing is crazy
We've said, 'Well, we're conservatives, we're
tough on crime.' That's baloney"
Robertson's support for legalizing pot ap-
peared in a New York Times story pub-
lished Thursday His spokesman confirmed
to The Associated Press that Robertson sup-
ports legalization with regulation. Robert-
son was not made available for an interview.
"I really believe we should treat marijuana
the way we treat beverage alcohol," Robert-
son was quoted by the newspaper as saying.
"If people can go into a liquor store and buy
a bottle of alcohol and drink it at home legally,
then why do we say that the use of this other
substance is somehow criminal?"
Robertson said he "absolutely" supports
ballot measures in Colorado and Washing-
ton state that would allow people older
than 21 to possess a small amount of mari-
juana and allow for commercial pot sales.
Both measures, if passed by voters, would
place the states at odds with federal law,


Crystal Cathedral
fires three of
founder's relatives
GARDEN GROVE, Calif. -
The Crystal Cathedral has fired
three relatives of the
megachurch's founder in an ef-
fort to revamp the "Hour of
Power" amid declining dona-
tions and viewership.
California's Orange County
Register reports that the
church's board voted to oust
the Rev. Robert H. Schuller's
daughter and two sons-in-law
along with five other people.
Church spokesman John
Charles says Schuller and his
wife abstained from voting to
dismiss daughter Gretchen
Penner and her husband Jim
Penner as producers of the
"Hour of Power" program. Son-
in-law Jim Coleman was dis-
missed as director of creative
services.
The program will replay pre-
vious episodes for a few weeks
amid the change in direction.
The Crystal Cathedral has
sold its sparkling church to the
Roman Catholic Diocese of Or-
ange under a plan to emerge
from bankruptcy.
Atheist protests
'Year of the Bible'
on billboard
HARRISBURG, Pa. -A bill-
board in Harrisburg, Pa., that
protests legislation designating
2012 as the "Year of the Bible"
in Pennsylvania is being criti-
cized by a legislator who calls it
racist.
State Rep. Thaddeus Kirk-
land objected to the image of a
shackled black slave above a
Bible verse that says, "Slaves,
obey your masters."
Kirkland, who supported the
House resolution, says the bill-
board takes the Bible out of
context and depicts racism and
hatred.
The billboard a few blocks
from the state Capitol is co-
sponsored by a group called
American Atheists.
The organization's Pennsyl-
vania director says it wants law-
makers to repeal the resolution
celebrating a book he calls
"barbaric."
California woman
gets prison for fake
Christian concerts
SANTAANA, Calif.--Afed-
eral judge has sentenced a pro-
moter of Christian rock concerts
to more than four years in
prison for a Ponzi scheme in-
volving nearly $1 million.
Federal prosecutors say 43-
year-old Lauren Baumann of
Downey, Calif., was sentenced
to four years, nine months in
prison and must pay restitution
to more than two dozen victims.
Baumann, who owned the
promotion company Steward-
ship Estates, pleaded guilty to


which bans marijuana use of all kinds.
While he supports the measures, Robert-
son said he would not campaign for them
and was "not encouraging people to use
narcotics in any way, shape or form."
"I'm not a crusader," he said. "I've never
used marijuana and I don't intend to, but
it's just one of those things that I think: this
war on drugs just hasn't succeeded."
In a statement Thursday, Ethan Nadel-
mann, executive director of the Drug Pol-
icy Alliance, said Robertson's "clearly
stated and well-reasoned comments throw
a curve ball into the growing debate over
legalizing marijuana."
"Defenders of marijuana prohibition ...
must be wondering if it's only a matter of
time before theirs proves to be a lost
cause," he said.
Christian advocacy group Focus on the
Family opposes legalization for medical or
recreational use, Carrie Gordon Earll, the
organization's senior director of govern-
ment and public policy, said in a statement
The group would not comment specifically
on Robertson's statements.
Sixteen states and the District of Colum-
bia have legalized the medical use of mari-
juana. Fourteen states also have some kind
of marijuana decriminalization law, which
removes or lowers penalties for possession.
Legalization, however, would eliminate
penalties and pave the way for regulated
sales similar to alcohol.
Robertson's comments will likely help
drive cultural conversations on the issue,
said Allen St. Pierre, executive director of
the National Organization for the Reform
of Marijuana Laws.
"Whenever somebody of substance and
notoriety in this country ... comes out in
favor of changing the status quo regarding
marijuana, for us and for the reform com-
munity, as the kids say, 'It is all good,"' St.
Pierre said.


Religion BRIEFS
wire fraud in October for falsely
promising investors that their
money would be used to host
Christian battle-of-the-bands
concerts.
Prosecutors say she instead
used the money to pay previ-
ous investors, to rent a
$10,000-a-month mansion and
to pay for private school for her
children.
New York rabbi
meets with jailed
American in Cuba
HAVANA-- A New York
rabbi has met with imprisoned
American subcontractor Alan
Gross in Cuba, describing him
as upbeat and concerned about
family members back home.
Rabbi Arthur Schneier said
he spent about an hour and a
half Tuesday with Gross in the
Havana facility where he's
being held.
Schneier said he brought
Gross a prayer shawl and pas-
tries, and they prayed together
to mark the eve of the Jewish
holiday of Purim. The rabbi
said, "Purim is a festival of mir-
acles, so we all pray that a mir-
acle will allow us to see a
resolution of the pain and suf-
fering of all involved."
Gross is serving a 15-year
prison sentence stemming from
his work importing satellite and
other communications equip-
ment onto the island under a
USAID-funded democracy-
building program. Cuba consid-
ers such programs subversive,
and he was convicted of crimes
against the state. Gross main-
tains that he was only trying to
help Cuban Jews improve their
Internet capability.
Kirk Cameron
defends remarks
on homosexuality
LOS ANGELES -Actor Kirk
Cameron says he shouldn't be
accused of hate speech for re-
sponding honestly when he
was asked what he believed
about homosexuality and gay
marriage.
Cameron told CNN's Piers


Morgan that marriage "was de-
fined in the garden between
Adam and Eve one man,
one woman for life." He added
that in his view, homosexuality
is "unnatural," "detrimental, and
ultimately destructive to so
many of the foundations of civi-
lization."
That prompted gay advo-
cates to launch an online peti-
tion that has more than 6,000
signatures. It says Cameron's
views are "out of step" with
other people of faith who be-
lieve gays and lesbians should
not be "condemned because of
their sexual orientation."
The Christian actor responds
in a statement that he tries to
love everyone, but believes
"God has something to say
about these things." Cameron
adds that people who preach
tolerance shouldn't expect him
to be silent or bend his "beliefs
to their moral standards."
Islamist, leftist
students clash at
Tunisian university
TUNIS, Tunisia Ultracon-
versative Muslim students have
clashed with leftists at a
Tunisian university over
women's right to wear the face
veil. Five people were injured in
the fighting.
Since a popular uprising top-
pled its secular dictator a year
ago, Tunisia has seen a rise in
activity by religious groups.
Manouba University, which
sits just outside the capital
Tunis, has witnessed numerous
demonstrations by hardline Is-
lamist students, known as
Salafis, who insist the university
change its policy to allow
women to wear the veil during
classes and exams.
The Salafis also said
Wednesday's clash with leftist
students from the official stu-
dent union came as they were
trying to avenge an attack on
two veiled students by the dean
of the university. He denies the
charge, saying he was the one
attacked.
From wire reports


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C6 SATURDAY, MARCH 10, 2012


RELIGION





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NOTES
Continued from Page C4

worship, Bible-based word teachings and
prophetic prayer ministry. Children's ministry
takes place during the 10 a.m. service. Child
care provided for the 10 a.m. service only. Visit
www.nbfhernando.com or call 352-726-8333.
First Baptist Church of Homosassa
weekly schedule: Sunday school for all ages at 9
a.m. followed by morning worship at 10:25 a.m.
Kids worship dismisses from service. Youth Bible
study at 4:30 p.m. in fellowship hall. Sunday
evening Bible study at 6. Lifecare center is open
(food and clothing) from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. Mon-
days and Thursdays. The church is in Old Ho-
mosassa at 10540 W Yulee Drive. Turn onto
Yulee Drive from U.S. 19 at Burger King, follow
to stop sign, turn left, church is about one mile
on left. Call 352-628-3858.
First Christian Church of Chassahow-
itzka, 11275 S. Riviera Drive, Homosassa,
meets at 9:30 a.m. Sunday for Bible study and
10:30 for morning worship. The church is nonde-
nominational and Bible based, only preaching
the Word as it is in the Bible. All are welcome.
Call 352-382-2557.
Lighthouse Baptist Church, 974 W.G.
Martinelli Blvd., Citrus Springs, offers Sunday
school for all ages at 9:45 a.m. Worship services
under the direction of Pastor Jess Burton at 11
a.m., with evening service at 5:30 p.m. Chil-
dren's/youth program for ages 5 and older from
6 to 8 p.m. Wednesday featuring Bible study,
fun and games, with adult Bible study at 7 p.m.
Call 352-489-7515.
Butterfly Ministries worship, Bible study
and personal ministry from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. the
third Saturday monthly at The Sanctuary, 3888
S. King Ave., Homosassa. Food and fellowship
follow. Call Margie Sipes at 352-212-4320.
Beverly Hills Community Church is non-
denominational. Worship services at 10 a.m.
Sunday. Bible study at 6 p.m. Wednesday in
chapel. Everyone welcome. Call 352-746-3620.
All welcome to learn to be inspired by God's
Word in an open format at 10 a.m. Sunday at
The Little House, 4929 Shady Acres Drive, In-
verness. All welcome. Call Joe Hupchick at 352-
726-9998.
House of Power Sunday worship services
at 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. at North Lecanto Highway
and North Dawson Drive, Hernando. Wednes-
day Bible studies and youth meeting at 7 p.m.
First Church of Christ, Scientist, Inver-
ness, worships Sunday mornings at 10:30 and
Wednesday evenings at 5 at 224 N. Osceola
Ave. Sunday school class is the same time as
the church service. All are welcome.
Christ Lutheran Church services led by the
Rev. Paul R. Meseke, senior pastor, at 475 North
Avenue West, Brooksville. Call 352-796-8331.
Unity Church of Citrus County
healing/prayer service at 6:30 p.m. the second
Wednesday monthly at 2628 W. Woodview
Lane, Beverly Hills. Call 352-746-1270.
Anglican Church of the Holy Spirit, Her-


U2
Continued from Page C1

Gazette column on Feb. 19,
1982. What I needed to do
was meet the band before
its Feb. 23 concert in Cham-
paign-Urbana.
Luckily, the 20-year-old
Bono was willing to discuss
"Gloria" and "October." De-
scribing that interview, the
reference book "U2: A
Diary" notes: 'Although the
band have gone out of their
way to avoid talking about
their faith up to this point,
they speak candidly now."
That column ran on March
5 of that year, and it appar-
ently was the first main-
stream news piece in which
Bono and company dis-
cussed their faith. I immedi-
ately pitched the story to
Rolling Stone, where editors
decided that U2 wasn't all
that important or that it was
bizarre for a guy like Bono to
talk about God or both.
All of that changed -
quickly
Thirty years down the road,
what is striking about that in-
terview is the fact that the is-
sues that drove Bono then
still dominate his life today
For example, he stressed that
U2 had no interest in being
stereotyped as a "Christian
band" or in allowing "Christ-
ian" to become a sad market-
ing term for its work.
"The band is anxious not to
be categorized," he said. "You
know, if, for instance, people
are talking about U2 in a spir-
itual sense ... that becomes a
pigeonhole for people to put
us in. That worries us.
"Also, from the point of
view of coming from where
we come from, Ireland is a
place that's been cut in two
by religion. I have no real
time for religion and, there-
fore, avoid those kinds of
stereotypes. I would hate for
people to think of me as re-
ligious, though I want peo-
ple to realize that I am a
Christian."
Decades later, tensions
remain between believers
who work in the so-called
"contemporary Christian
music" industry and believ-
ers who work in the main-
stream music industry The
latter often cite U2's work as
a prime example of how re-


nando, is a traditional Anglican mission with an-
cient roots.
The 1928 Prayer Book is used. The church is
at 1023 E. Norvell Bryant Highway, Hernando.
Call 352-637-5922.
Grupo Misionero Adventista del 7mo. Dia
de Citrus County. Horario de Reuniones. Mier-
coles 7 p.m. Sabados 11 a.m. Address: 1880 N.
Trucks Ave., Hernando. Call 352-535-7141.
Just for kids
KidZone Children's Ministry of Inverness
First United Methodist Church will host a free
"Fun In The Park" event Sunday through Tues-
day at Whispering Pines Park at the pavilion
next to the playground. Join us for a picnic lunch
of hot dogs, chips, drinks and dessert from 1 to 3
p.m. Sunday.
We will meet at the pavilion from 10 to 11:30
a.m. Monday and Tuesday for story time, music,
crafts, recreation, and snacks. Children from tod-
dler through fifth grade are welcome. All children
must be accompanied by an adult. Call the
church at 352-726-2522.
Inverness Church of God youth group, "De-
fine Gravity," meets at 7 p.m. Friday in the
Youth Ministries Building. Youth Pastor Jon
Uncle invites all teenagers to attend. The church
is at 416 U.S. 41 South, Inverness. Call the
church office at 352-726-4524.
Little Friends Learning Center, a ministry
of the Inverness Church of God, is accepting new
student applications for infants, toddlers, K-3, K-
4. Breakfast, lunch and snacks provided; assist in
potty training; A-Beka curriculum; electronic secu-
rity; qualified teachers; and large fenced play-
ground. Little Friends Learning Center is at 416
U.S. 41 S., Inverness. Call 352-344-5487.
"Saturday Night KIDZ," for children 5
years old through the third grade, is available on
Saturday nights while parents and teenagers are
involved in "Praise, Prayer and Power" at North
Oak Baptist Church in Citrus Springs. Bible sto-
ries and activities for children are led by a team
of workers.
Child care is also available for babies through
4 years of age. Saturday night services begin at
6 and everyone is welcome. The church is at the
intersection of North Elkcam Boulevard and
North Citrus Springs Boulevard. Call 352-489-
1688 for more information.

Live & learn
"Spiritual Solutions for Difficult Situa-
tions" is the subject of a one-hour talk at 2 p.m.
Saturday, March 17, at the Coastal Region Li-
brary, 8619 W. Crystal St., Crystal River.
Speaker Lorenzo Rodriguez, a pioneer in the
field of employment for people with disabilities, is
now completely dedicated to the practice of
prayer-based healing in Christian Science. He
will explain how prayer can be a great help in
overcoming challenges of every sort. Rodriguez,
an international speaker, practitioner and teacher
of Christian Science healing, was born in Cuba
and raised in Mexico and the United States. Call
352-726-4033 or Bob at 352-746-0464. This talk
is sponsored by First Church of Christ, Scientist,
Inverness.


ligious imagery and themes
can be woven into success-
ful popular music.
The goal, Bono stressed, is
to avoid making preachy
music that settles for easy an-
swers while hiding the strug-
gles that real people
experience in real life. When
writing a song about sin, such
as "I Fall Down," he stressed,
"I always include myself in
the 'we.' You know, 'we' have
fallen. I include myself.... I'm
not telling everybody that I
have the answers. I'm trying
to get across the difficulty I
have being what I am."
At the same time, he ex-
pressed disappointment
that so many people -
artists in particular at-
tempt to avoid the ultimate
questions that haunt life.
The doubts, fears, joys and
grace of religious faith are a
part of life that "we like to
sweep under the carpet," he
concluded.


"Deep down, everyone is
aware. You know, when
somebody dies, when some-
body in their family dies. ...
Things that happen around
us, they shock people into a
realization of what is going
down," he told me.
"I mean, when you look at
the starvation, when you
think that a third of the pop-
ulation of this earth is starv-
ing, is crying out in hunger, I
don't think that you can sort
of smile and say, 'Well, I
know. We're the jolly human
race, you know. We're all
very nice, REALLY' I mean,
we're not, are we?"


Terry Mattingly is the di-
rector of the Washington
Journalism Center at the
Council for Christian Col-
leges and Universities and
leads the GetReligion.org
project to study religion
and the news.


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GRACE
Continued from Page C1

Then they described
him: He's a bit scary, like an
alligator. When he opens
his mouth, you think he
might bite you. With a loud
and thunderous voice, peo-
ple often think he's mean.
He rushes into a room like
Superman. He's a bull-
dozer and socially
awkward.
He doesn't sound lovable
and cuddly, but these
women seemed to love him.
Tears welled in their eyes
as they continued to tell me
about him.
Before Dennis disap-
peared, he volunteered at
the same local outreach
ministry where the women
volunteer. He was there
every single day the ministry
was open, arriving a half-
hour early and staying until
they made him go home -
except he didn't have a
home, at least not one with
traditional walls and such.
He lived in a structure
that has a tree growing in
the middle of it, and he let
anyone who needed a
home stay there, too.
He has nothing but
shares everything.
At the ministry, if you
asked Dennis to "clear out"
one end of the donations
room, he would, the women
said, although you might
find everything from that
end in piles at the other
end.
He took it upon himself
to make sure all the trash
cans were clean. No dirty


STORIES
Continued from Page C1

Galbreath began her ca-
reer as a journalist and
worked for United Press In-
ternational in Chicago. After
they were transferred to
Rockford while their chil-
dren were small, she be-
came involved in Girl
Scouts, first as a volunteer
and then as a staff member
When the Girl Scouts
needed to computerize and
the software wasn't avail-
able, Galbreath taught her-
self computer programming.
She eventually formed
her own business and stayed
in the computer program-
ming field through subse-
quent moves and positions
with other organizations.
Then one day she
doesn't remember how -
she learned about Lumicon
Institute, founded by Tom
Boomershine, who had
started the Network of Bib-
lical Storytellers. The insti-
tute, which no longer exists,
had been created to edu-
cate pastors and others in
the church about the
change from the literate to
the digital culture.
Already passionate about
the need to use technology
in ministry, Galbreath
signed on.
"Little did I know that


trash cans on Dennis'
watch, no sir.
The women, no longer
even partially crazy, contin-
ued to tell me about Dennis
and about how it wasn't like
him to go missing other
than after an occasional
night of too much drinking.
Then one of the women
said, "Initially, when you
hear about or see Dennis'
situation, your heart might
yearn to help 'fix' such a
man, but quite to the con-
trary, Dennis doesn't need
to be fixed."
Sometimes Dennis will
find something a ce-
ramic angel, a certain
snack he knows you like -
and hold it out to you and
say, "Here, you need this."
The woman standing in
my entryway, with the pas-
sionate desperation that can
only be fueled by love, said
"Dennis possesses the one
thing the rest of us can only
hope for a heart of love
for others. His words are
true: 'Here, you need this."'
Then she said his friend,
"Hobo Joe," had recently
died in a tragic fire and
Dennis somehow doesn't
have the skills or the ca-
pacity or the language nec-
essary to process his
feelings. That maybe that's
why their developmentally
disabled friend was miss-
ing. Maybe he grabbed his
backpack and just took off,
trying to escape his confus-
ing feelings.
(Really, don't we all do
that one way or another?)
Before the women left
my house they said, "He is
our Dennis and we love
him we need him."

the first thing they taught
you was storytelling," she
said. "It was the most in-
tense educational year of
my life."
Galbreath went on to
graduate from seminary
and was ordained a deacon
with specialized ministry
in digital culture in 2009.
She moved to Woodridge
about 11/2 years ago when
her husband became the
pastor of the United
Methodist Church.
By now, deeply involved
with storytelling, she helped
found the Prairie Wind
Guild for the Chicago area
after attending the Network
of Biblical Storytellers' an-
nual Festival Gathering two
years ago. She teaches bibli-
cal storytelling online and in
person.
One of her current proj-
ects is to deliver video sto-
rytelling lessons by
cellphones to make them
accessible to young people
in the Philippines and
other countries.
Simply relating the sto-
ries of Scripture without
telling people what to be-
lieve is powerful, Gal-
breath said. She recounted
when some of the story-
tellers decided to have a
joint event with a group of
Muslim believers that
meets in the United
Methodist Church.
They fretted over telling


RELIGION


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SATURDAY, MARCH 10, 2012 C7

The next day I worked on
the story for the newspaper
and by the end of the week,
mostly thanks to the sher-
iff's office, Dennis was
found safe and sound help-
ing at an outreach ministry
at a church in Tallahassee,
hundreds of miles away
But the story doesn't end
here. I talked with the pas-
tor at the church in Talla-
hassee how he got that
far, the pastor didn't know.
But she did know that he
had been "their" Dennis
years before. He would
show up at their mission
outreach every day, all
gruff and thunderous and
bulldozer-like, and his awk-
ward, sometimes annoying
love transformed them.
When he disappeared
one day several years ago,
they, too, filed a missing
person's report and wor-
ried and prayed and cried
until they learned of his
whereabouts.
When I told my boss the
whole story she said, "I
want to be that loved!"
And you know what? We
are that loved. We're all a
Dennis, broken and imper-
fect, and Jesus came
searching for us all the
way to the Cross.


Nancy Kennedy is the au-
thor of "Move Over, Victo-
ria I Know the Real
Secret," "Girl on a Swing,"
and her latest book, "Lip-
stick Grace." She can be
reached at 352-564-2927,
Monday through Thursday,
or via email at
nkennedy@chronicle
online.com.

the story of Hagar and Ish-
mael, Abraham's second
wife, and the son he had by
her. According to the bibli-
cal story, Abraham sent
Hagar and Ishmael away
after his first wife, Sarah,
was jealous for Isaac, the
son she bore Abraham.
God's angel comforted
Hagar by telling her that
her son would also become
a great nation. Christian
teaching says Ishmael be-
came the father of the Ara-
bic people, while the Jews
descended from Isaac.
The Muslim listeners
were impressed, rather
than offended, Galbreath
said.
"We didn't know your
Bible says that God made a
great nation of Ishmael,"
they told her.
After Prairie Wind Guild
finishes its presentations of
The Gospel of Mark, mem-
bers plan to create videos
of healing stories from the
Bible and make them avail-
able to hospitals for their
internal TV feeds, Gal-
breath said. Anyone inter-
ested in biblical
storytelling is welcome to
join the effort
"We're extremely ecu-
menical," she said. "The
purpose of the Network of
Biblical Storytellers and its
associated guilds is to en-
courage everyone to learn
and tell biblical stories."












COMMUNITY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


tNewsOTES Salute state's seniors
Butterfly Club will
gather March 11


The Beverly Hills Butterfly
Club will meet at 2 p.m. Sun-
day, March 11, at the Com-
munity Building, 1 Civic
Circle, Beverly Hills.
Speaker will be Don Still-
waugh, who will address a
variety of butterfly subjects.
He is usually very informative
for new butterfly enthusiasts,
as well as the seasoned but-
terfly watcher.
For more information, call
352-527-8629.
Lions to serve
pancakes Sunday
Beverly Hills Lions Club,
72 Civic Circle Drive, will
have its pancake breakfast
from 7:30 a.m. to noon Sun-
day, March 11.
Cost for adults is $4 and
children younger than 12 eat
for $2. Menu includes all you-
can-eat pancakes, choice of
bacon or sausage or combo,
orange juice and coffee or
tea.
For additional information,
call Lion Janet at 352-
527-0962.
NARFE to convene
in Inverness
Chapter 776 of the Na-
tional Active and Retired Fed-
eral Employees Association
(NARFE) invites all active
federal and retired employ-
ees and surviving annuitants
to attend the next meeting on
Monday, March 12, at B&W
Rexall Drugs, 214 S. U.S. 41,
Inverness.
The meeting will begin at
12:30 p.m. with a short lunch,
followed at 1 p.m. by regular
business. Guest speaker the
month is member Elaine
Lewis, master gardener,
speaking about "Florida-
friendly plants that don't re-
quire much watering."
For more information, call
352-270-0185.
Elks Ladies slate
card party
The West Citrus Ladies of
the Elks (LOE) 2693 will
present a Card Party at 11
a.m. Tuesday, March 13, at
the Lodge, Grover Cleveland
Boulevard, Homosassa.
There will be games in ad-
dition to the card party, with
luncheon served at noon.
Festivities will end at 3:30
p.m. The fundraiser helps
support local children's needs
and charities. Donation is
$12.
Call Judy at 352-382-3878
or Anne at 352-382-1848 for
tickets or more information.

Humanitarians
OF FLORIDA


Buster
Brown


Search on for outstandine-volunteers to honor for contributions


Special to the Chronicle

The Home Instead Senior Care of-
fice serving Citrus County has an-
nounced the Salute to Senior Service
program to honor senior volunteers for
the contributions they make to their
communities.
The program will include a search
for the most outstanding senior volun-
teer in each state and culminate with
the selection of a national Salute to
Senior Service winner during Older
Americans Month in May
State Senior Hero winners will re-
ceive plaques and have their stories
put on the SalutetoSeniorService.com
website. What's more, $5,000 will be
donated to the national winner's non-
profit charity of choice.
"Helping others defines life for


many local retired seniors," said Car-
olyn Quintanilla, owner of the Home
Instead Senior Care office in Citrus
County. "And what a difference we
have observed in seniors' health, atti-
tude and outlook among those who
choose to stay active as they age."
According to research conducted by
the Home Instead Senior Care net-
work, 52 percent of seniors volunteer
their time through unpaid community
service.
Nearly 20 percent (one in five) of
seniors surveyed started volunteering
when they reached the traditional age
of retirement 65 or older. Further-
more, 20 percent of seniors who volun-
teer say that their community service
is the most important thing they do.
"The one thing that I hear constantly
from the seniors in our programs is


that volunteering gives them a purpose
in life they say it's the reason they
get up in the morning," said Dr Erwin
Tan, director of Senior Corps, a na-
tional organization that links more
than 400,000 Americans age 55 and
older to service opportunities. Tan
serves as the expert source for the pro-
gram.
Nominate seniors 65 and older who
volunteer at least 15 hours a month,
making a positive impact on their
communities through volunteerism,
by submitting their story at
www.SalutetoSeniorService.com. Or,
request a form from ckoehler@home
insteadinc.com and return to Home
Instead Inc., Cat Koehler, 13323
California St., Omaha, NE 68154.
Submit nominations for outstanding
senior volunteers by March 15.


Trunk show, luncheon


JOAN NOVAK/Special to the Chronicle
Creative Quilters plan an Eleanor Burns Quilt-In-A-Day Trunk Show, featuring Pat Knoechel, from 10 a.m. to noon Monday,
April 16, at First Baptist Church of Crystal River, 705 Citrus Ave. Luncheon will follow at 12:30 p.m. Knoechel will demon-
strate techniques from the newest Eleanor Burns publications. Cost is $12. To reserve a spot, send a check to Mary
Redrick, P.O. Box 202, Lecanto, FL 34460-0202 by Monday, April 9. Checks should be made out to First Baptist Church.
For more information, call Mary Redrick at 352-746-2722, or email jredrick@tampabay.rr.com or call Patsy Jenkins at 352-
746-9204, or email pjenkin7@tampabay.rr.com.



Citrus Y to expand group exercise


Demo for new classes in Homosassa on March 12


Special to the Chronicle

The Citrus County YMCA
will expand its Group Exer-
cise program very soon to
include residents on the
west side of Citrus County.
A new location, First
United Methodist Church in
Homosassa, will become the
Y's westside venue for
health and wellness classes.
Since January 2010, the
YMCA has been holding
group exercise classes on
the east side of the county at
Cornerstone Baptist in In-
verness. Recently, a second
location at First Presbyte-
rian Church was added.
Currently, there are Pilates,


cardio interval, and stability
and strength classes offered
at these locations.
"The YMCA is thrilled to
be able to expand our
Group Exercise program to
Homosassa, and we look for-
ward to working with the
First United Methodist
Church there," said Sara
Bargiel, program director
for the YMCA.
"We are so thankful to
them for opening the doors
of their facility to us, and
truly appreciative of the op-
portunity to provide a
healthy living initiative to
people who live in this
area."
The group exercise will


kick off from 9:30 to 10:15
a.m. Monday, March 12, with
a free demonstration. There
will be another demonstra-
tion from 10:30 to 11:15 a.m.
Those interested will be
able to come and partici-
pate in the class at no
charge that day
There will be demonstra-
tions in cardio interval, Pi-
lates, and stability and
strength. The YMCA will
provide light snacks, bottled
water and a few door prizes.
After the demonstration
classes on March 12, the Y
will begin a regular sched-
ule on Wednesday, March
14. The weekly classes at
First United Methodist


Church will be:
Monday: Cardio inter-
val from 9:30 to 10:15 a.m.,
stability and strength from
10:30 to 11:15 a.m.
Wednesday: Pilates
from 9:30 to 10:15 a.m., sta-
bility and strength from
10:30 to 11:15 a.m.
Friday: Pilates from
9:30 to 10:15 a.m., cardio in-
terval from 10:30 to 11:15
a.m.
For more information
about the YMCA Group Ex-
ercise program, call the of-
fice at 352-637-0132.
Financial assistance is
available to all those who
qualify. The YMCA office is
in Beverly Hills at 3909 N.
Lecanto Highway, and is
open noon to 5:30 p.m. Mon-
day through Friday


Seeking help for Citrus' most vulnerable


Special to the Chronicle
Buster Brown is a big and
sweet declawed gray
tabby. This 2-year-old gen-
tle giant and his buddies
are looking for their forever
homes. Visitors are wel-
come from 10 a.m. to 4
p.m. Monday through Sat-
urday at the Humanitari-
ans' Manchester House on
the corner of State Road
44 and Conant Avenue,
east of Crystal River. Call
the Humanitarians at 352-
613-1629 for adoptions, or
view most of the Hardin
Haven's felines online at
www.petfinder.com/
shelters/fl186.html.


From the beginning of The Path, widows and orphans. Some text
15 years ago, I started with the seems to be an order, not a request, in
same thought that I that we are responsible
still have today: I want to do for taking care of them
something good with my life. and offering a greater
Where does that thought amount of support. They
come from? Why do many ,- are looked upon as more
people share this same -=, vulnerable and easily
thought with me? How do I \. taken advantage of.
we define good? For me, it Today in America, there
was simple. I read in the is a segment of our society
Bible of how Jesus describes that may be part of the
good ways to lead our lives DuWayne Sipper widows even if they have
and how to follow Him. He DuWayne Sipp never been married. It is
is quoted saying "No greater THE PATH common for The Path to
gift does a man have than to HOME have women in their 50s
lay his life down for a fellow who are left out in the ele-
man." He also describes ments or have to choose


some of these acts by feeding the hun-
gry, giving water to the thirsty, cloth-
ing the naked and housing the
strangers.
Today, this is still the primary vision
of The Path. The Bible also mentions


circumstances they do not like in
order to be taken care of. I have had a
dream for quite some time now that
Citrus County would respond to these
situations by helping us take care of
these women until they qualify for So-


cial Security.
We are looking for stable families
who agree with the Bible's commands
to take care of the widows. I see these
people coming forward on a case-by-
case basis and finding a mutually ben-
eficial life with one of our clients. Our
clients can trade services for the room
and board being offered, as well as a
case plan that helps the women reach
their goals, continue to go to church,
volunteer and attend counseling.
I believe the benefits to our com-
munity are immeasurable. The rela-
tionships will be bonding. God will
smile. Most of all, I want to do some-
thing good with my life, and so do they

Du Wayne Sipper is the executive
director of The Path of Citrus County,
a faith-based homeless shelter.
Contact him at 527-6500 or
sipperd@bellsouth.net.


News NOTES

Senior Friends
plan activities
The March meeting of
Senior Friends for Life will be
at 11 a.m. Monday, March 12,
at Inverness Golf & Country
Club. Menu choices will be
baked tilapia or pork roast.
The group will have a St.
Patrick's Day Potluck Party at
11:30 a.m. Saturday, March
17, at 6435 W. Pine Ridge
Blvd. Bring a St. Patrick's
Day dish.
All are welcome.
Reservations must be
made in advance for all gath-
erings. Call Myrna Hocking at
352-860-0819, Teddie Holler
at 352-746-6518 or Astrid
Grant at 352-341-0346.
Genealogical
group to meet
The Citrus County Ge-
nealogical Society (CCGS)
will meet at 10 a.m. Tuesday,
March 13, at the Church of
Jesus Christ of Latter-day
Saints, 3474 W. Southern St.,
Lecanto.
There will be an interactive
Web-based seminar (webi-
nar) presentation by Pat
Richley as DearMYRTLE.
She is a popular lecturer, au-
thor and host of a genealogy
blog http://blog.dear
myrtle.com. Her topic will be
"Where to Turn Next?"
Guests are welcome to at-
tend CCGS meetings.
For more information, call
Mary Ann Machonkin at 352-
382-5515.
Golden Agers to
meet for lunch
The Golden Agers will
have lunch at 11:30 a.m.
Tuesday, March 13, at Cinna-
mon Sticks Restaurant on
U.S. 41 South, Inverness.
All seniors are invited.
CRUG to hear
Ubuntu talk
Crystal Rivers User Group
(CRUG) will meet at 6 p.m.
Wednesday, March 14, at
Crystal Oaks Clubhouse.
Ray Seely will demonstrate
Ubuntu, an open source
Linux operating system rec-
ommended for home use.
Ubuntu is the core of the
Free Software Initiative and
has more than 35,000 appli-
cations that are free for
downloading.
Seely will show some of
Ubuntu's desktops (GUIs)
and applications and discuss
the installation.
Social time and refresh-
ments are from 6 to 6:30
p.m., followed by the general
membership meeting and
drawing for door prizes. The
presentation begins at 7 p.m.
Snowbirds to have
picnic March 14
The annual Snowbird/
Canadian picnic will be from
11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesday,
March 14, at Whispering
Pines Park.
Bring a dish to pass and
your own place setting.
Chicken and coffee will be
provided. A horseshoe golf
tournament will be held for
those interested. Bring cards
or board games and folding
chairs.
For more information, call
352-465-3384 or 352-
341-4407.
Join 'thunder' at
hockey March 24
The Senior Foundation of
Citrus County, sponsored by
the Citrus County Chronicle,
still has tickets left for the
Tampa Bay Lightning's Satur-
day, March 24, game against
the New York Islanders.
Tickets are $40 and in-
clude admission to the game
and roundtrip motor coach
transportation from Lecanto
to the Tampa Bay Times
Forum.
Space is limited, so reser-
vations should be made
quickly.
For tickets or information,


call 352-527-5975. All pro-
ceeds go toward helping
seniors in Citrus County.


* Submit information at least two weeks before the event. 0 Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
* Early submission of timely material is appreciated, but Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
multiple publications cannot be guaranteed. community@chronicleonline.com.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be guaranteed.
* Expect notes to run no more than once.






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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Bering Sea Gold (In Bering Sea Gold (In Bering Sea Gold (In Bering Sea Gold (In Bering Sea Gold (In Bering Sea Gold (In
53 34 53 24 26 Stereo) ca Stereo) ca Stereo) ca Stereo) ca Stereo) ca Stereo) a
aiC) 50 46 50 29 30 48 Hours: Hard Evid. 48 Hours: Hard Evid. 48 Hours: Hard Evid. Crash Survivors 48 Hours: Hard Evid. 48 Hours: Hard Evid.
i**Y, "Booty Call" **Y "Casino Jack"(2010, Docudrama) Kevin "Botched" (2007) Stephen Dorff. *Y "The Collector" (2009, Horror)
350 261 350 (1997) 'R' c Spacey (In Stereo) 'R'x a Premiere. (In Stereo) 'MNR' s Josh Stewart. 'R' cc
*** "The Librarian: Curse of the Judas ** "National Treasure" (2004) Nicolas Cage. A man tries Leverage 'PG' c Leverage
48 33 48 31 34 Chalice" (2008, Adventure) Noah Wyle. a to steal the Declaration of Independence.'PG' 'PG'
TOONi 38 58 38 33 Adven Adven Movie'MA' God/Devil |King/Hill King/Hill Fam. Guy Boon Boon
TRAY 9 54 9 44 Killer RV Upgrades Mud People'G' Ghost Adventures Ghost Adventures Ghost Adventures Ghost Adventures
triiT 25 55 25 98 55 Most Shocking'14' Lizard Lizard Lizard Lizard Lizard Lizard Lizard |Lizard Forensic Forensic
[LVLJ 32 49 32 34 24 M*A*S*H |M*A*S*H Home Im Home m Home Im Home m Raymond Raymond Everybody-Raymond Raymond Raymond
NCIS "Bloodbath" (In NCIS A petty officer is NCIS A distraught NCIS "Dog Tags" (In NCIS "Toxic" (In Stereo) CSI: Crime Scene
47 32 47 17 18 Stereo)'14' s murdered.'PG' naval officer.'14' C] Stereo) '14' 'PG' a Investigation'14'
Ghost Whisperer Ghost Whisperer (In Ghost Whisperer "Leap Ghost Whisperer (In Ghost Whisperer Ghost Whisperer
WE 117 69 117 "Ghost Busted"'PG' Stereo)'PG 'c of Faith"'PG' Stereo)'PG' "Stage Fright"'PG' "Cursed"'PG' c
1Wii 18 18 18 18 20 Law Order: Cl Funny Home Videos Funny Home Videos Funny Home Videos WGN News at Nine 30 Rock |Scrubs


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
SBADIE

2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc
All Rights Reserved
SLELP



YOLRUH



GENUTO I



AnsL I I I


Yesterday Jumbles: BRAWN FACET OUTFIT RODENT
| Answer: After the success of his Model T, Henry expanded
his business because he could AFFORD TO


Bridge

PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

Yogi Berra, the famous New York Yankees
catcher and wit, said, "You better cut the pizza in
four pieces because I'm not hungry enough to eat
six."
In this deal, how would you play in three no-
trump after West leads the spade king?
Your response of three no-trump showed a bal-
anced hand with 13 to 15 points. (Two no-trump
would have been game-invitational with only 10 to
12 points.) It was a debatable choice with no spade
stopper, but nothing else looked better.
You have seven top tricks: one spade, two hearts,
one diamond and three clubs. And it looks easy be-
cause as long as clubs are not 4-0, you can get two
more tricks there. However, look closely at the club
spot-cards. If the clubs are 3-1 (which is more likely
than 2-2), after cashing dummy's three winners,
you will have to take the fourth round in your hand,
and there will be no dummy entry left, given that
West will continue spades to get that ace off the
board.
You can make the contract by running four club
tricks, guessing that West has the diamond king and
working out his distribution. But it is much better
to duck the first trick and to duck again when West
continues spades. You take the third spade with
dummy's ace, then cash the club ace and king, con-
firming the 3-1 split. Now play dummy's last spade
and discard a club from your hand to unblock the
suit After that, it is plain sailing.
Do you lose a spade trick? Yes, yes, no, yes, yes -
but you make your contract

North 03-10-12
4 A 7 6 3
V 643
+ 5
AKQ 4 3
West East
4 K QJ 10 9 42
V852 I QJ 10 9
K863 + 10 9742
S2 4 J 10 7
South
4 854
SVAK7
SA QJ
49865

Dealer: North
Vulnerable: East-West
South West North East
1 Pass
3 NT Pass Pass Pass


Opening lead: 4 K


12 Trees with
catkins
15 Radon, e.g.
18 PBS founder
19 Drug busters,
briefly
53 Commuter
vehicles,
maybe
56 Fix potatoes
57 Fusses
58 Zuider -
59 Boat front
30 Salamander
31 Monsieur's
summer
32 Evergreens

DOWN
1 Shooting
marbles
2 Post-
kindergarten
3 Blissful spot
4 "Luncheon on
the Grass"
painter
5 Sitcom alien
6 Is deserving of


Answer to Previous Puzzle


"Will it
play in -?"
Oliver Stone
film
Diva's piece
Apple products


Pharaoh's
charm
- whiz!
Whitecaps
Term of
respect
Motel vacancy
Aw, shucks!
Locale
Call it quits
Muse of
history
Skimpy
pullover
Minerals
One-pot
dinner
Shrimp
Environmental
prefix
Dirty politics
Neptune or
Venus
Packing slip,
briefly
Sentimental
FBI agent
(hyph.)
Candy striper
Natural
crystals
Steakhouse
order
Cornfield
menace
Hems up
Ego ending
Get a load of


Dear Annie: '"John" and I
have been married for 15
years. He is a wonderful
person and a great fa-
ther to our two young
girls.
Our relationship is
fine on the surface, but
it's emotionally empty.
There is little intimacy,
which has been an
issue throughout our
marriage. It manifests
itself periodically in
arguments that never
seem to get resolved.
John refuses to go to ANNI
counseling. He won- MAIL
ders why I cannot "just
be happy," because
from his perspective, everything
is fine. I have told him clearly
that I need more attention and af-
fection, but I have come to the re-
alization that he is "just not that
into me."
I have tried counseling on my
own, but I was told to accept
things as they are or end the mar-
riage. Annie, I love my family I
am not asking for a magical ro-
mance. I don't think it's too much
for a woman to need occasional
loving physical gestures from her
husband. I can't figure out why
it's so hard for him to express his
love if he cares for me as much as
he says.
I don't want to leave, but things
could be so much better if John
would only put a little more effort
into our marriage. Any sugges-
tions on how to improve things?
Or am I just destined to have an
emotionless relationship? -
Lonely in the Ville
Dear Lonely: There is a variety
of reasons why a man may not


show any interest in his wife: He
could be gay, asexual, not at-
tracted to you or having an affair.
He could have low
testosterone or other
medical or emotional
issues. The real prob-
lem is that he refuses
to address it. Start
with the approach
most likely to get re-
sults. Ask John to see
his doctor to have his
testosterone levels
checked. If he refuses
or it doesn't help,
IE'S move on to the other
BOX possibilities. Talk
frankly with him. He
needs to understand
the level of your unhappiness.
Dear Annie: Last week, my sis-
ter surprised me by showing up
unannounced with her two dogs.
She said she planned to stay for a
week.
I do not have dogs, and that is
my choice. My sister's dogs are
kept in a truck while she travels,
and I feel sorry for them. But I
don't want them in my house.
Please tell people not to bring
their beloved animals to other
people's homes. We don't find
them nearly as cute as they do. I
don't care how well mannered
they are, they still shed, need at-
tention and occasionally dig a
hole in the yard. Annoyed in
Yuma
Dear Yuma: No one, relatives
included, should drop by unan-
nounced and expect to be put up
for days on end. And bringing
their animals with them is terri-
bly inconsiderate unless they
have been specifically invited.
We know how much people love


their dogs and cats (and birds and
pet snakes), but asking others to
be responsible for housing them
is inappropriate and makes the
entire crew unwelcome. Please,
people, be the type of guest who
is enthusiastically invited back.
Dear Annie: I agree whole-
heartedly with your suggestion to
"Desperate in Colorado" to bring
in her younger brothers to live
with her However, I disagree that
she should consider including
her alcoholic mom. Her mother
must show that she desires help
by attending AA meetings, going
to counseling or joining a rehab
program. Otherwise, "Colorado"
will only be inviting problems
into her household.
My mother was a violent alco-
holic who died when I was 23. I'm
53 now and still recovering. -
Concerned About Her Brothers
Dear Concerned: We agree that
living with Mom would be diffi-
cult, but it may be the only way
"Colorado" can extricate her
brothers and have any control
over how they live.
Dear Readers: Remember to
set your clocks ahead before you
go to sleep tonight. And please
change the batteries in your
smoke alarms and carbon
monoxide detectors.
U

Annie's Mailbox is written by
Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar,
longtime editors of the Ann
Landers column.
Please email your questions to
anniesmailbox@comcast.net, or
write to: Annie's Mailbox, c/o
Creators Syndicate, 737 3rd
Street, Hermosa Beach, CA
90254.


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

v-i -



"I -







WHEN THE R-THING -LA55
INSTRUCTORF TCOL>-P A
JOKE SHE GOT THIS.
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


(Answers Monday)


ACROSS
Rain hard
Elec. unit
Dr.'s
magazine
Swit co-star
Mr. Trevino
Kukia friend
As soon as
Swimming
stroke
(2 wds.)
Tendon
Vexation
Hearth
residue
More
toothsome
So there!
Tourist's need
Eight, in
combos
Pencil end
Type of bear
Druids
Valuable fur
Petruchio's
intended
Humane org.
Authorizes


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


3-10


2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


CAIT K IISSMVA
OD NA ETON OO N
AMAH B NE ITS
S E M I A R A D I T
TUB EW SF I T


ORBI T PAS ED
IE SNA GAY U
ATA AAG EIDROO
A M EA EA
M EON S LOPS


S E CO S N S
E S CE T S


ENTERTAINMENT


SATURDAY, MARCH 10, 2012 C9


y





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Peanuts


Garfield


1;
-, i 4

/,. .o ^ E


WHP DO I ALWAYS
It2 FEELLIKEAN
> Lf OUTSIPER?



\L! ________th.^^g


SO GLtaEGs )OoCOLOLP
CALL A M ERo \F A
ToI,''
INAt, OKAY.
I'M OVdER2 uIf


Sally Forth


Dilbert


Beetle Bailey

DDIDYOUSEETHAT NO.DIP HE
BIG SPIDER ON OUR CAUSE ANY
TENT LAST NIGHT? HARMA?


I YELLED HIM you lJflS
RILLbJEE ITELLED HIM
YOU Go-s No CLOTHES
ON-FW'ITELLE_,
HIM TO CFILL
A BFCK IN
FEEj

I^^
I kPYSjJ


I F-HINK I NEED
R NEW fliNSWERING-
SEKVICE. V


i


i, ..._


The Grizzwells


The Born Loser

M^ PRE5CRIPQOTI 15:F; EkLY | WAT NOUT WEkALTR'
TO BE5> N P' EALY AU WL5E 7

M '6
R:, ELT.J \


Kit 'N' Carlyle Rubes


Blondie


I HEARD TrHEV'RE CLOSING LOTS OF P IT MIGHT BE EASIER FOR ME, 2 THEY COULD JUST DUMP THE MAIL
POST OFFICES TO SAVE MONEY THOUGH, TO WORK FROM HOME ON MY PORCH AND THEN I COULD

Th 4,mil i rc
r -ME -Lrf. 1 C- .,,





_----_, __,._'________-_ ,^- -, Dennis the Menace The Family Circus


Doonesbury


SI HOUSE HO








Big Nate -


W&HAT7 HOW MUCH PIP
YOU PUT POINW? IS IT AN
APJUSTABL.B MORT6A65?
WHAT ARE YOUR CLOSING
CO5T5? HOW ABOUT TAXaS?









OKAY, BUT HOW Do
YOU KNOW HE WAS
SO DEVASTATED
ABOUT LOSING HIS
JOB TO CHIP
C AVENDISH '
FROM HIS
B5LOG
I 5 r


Arlo and Janis


"PopoGS GOTO HWAEN?" PTRO'L. ION'T-INK
114REG ARE HYPRANTS
IN T-5 OT-TIERPLACE."
Betty


WHAT, ;
WHAT?
1---,"'
I*,; .".' J
IF-":^ :; ,'


Frank & Ernest


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377
"John Carter" In Real 3D. 1 p.m., 4 p.m., 7 p.m., 10:05
p.m. No passes.
"Project X" (R) ID required. 12:30 p.m., 2:45 p.m., 5:05
p.m., 7:50 p.m., 10:10 p.m.
"Dr. Seuss' The Lorax" (PG) In Real 3D. 2:40 p.m.,
7:30 p.m. No passes.
"Dr. Seuss' The Lorax" (PG) 12:20 p.m., 5 p.m., 9:50
p.m. No passes.
"Act of Valor" (R) ID required. 12:05 p.m., 2:35 p.m.,
5:05 p.m., 7:40 p.m., 10:10 p.m.
"Ghost Rider" (PG-13) In Real 3D. 9:50 p.m.
"This Means War" (PG-13) 12:45 p.m., 3:50 p.m., 7:10
p.m., 10:05 p.m.
"Journey 2: The Mysterious Island" (PG) In Real 3D.
12 p.m., 2:30 p.m., 4:55 p.m., 7:20 p.m. No passes.
Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"John Carter" In Real 3D. 1 p.m., 4 p.m., 7 p.m., 7:30
p.m., 10 p.m., 10:30 p.m. No passes.


"A Thousand Words" (PG-13) 1:25 p.m., 4:25 p.m.,
7:20 p.m., 9:45 p.m.
"Gone" (PG-13) 1:35 p.m., 4:45 p.m., 7:15 p.m., 9:55
p.m.
"Project X" (R) ID required. 1:15 p.m., 4:15 p.m., 7:55
p.m., 10:05 p.m.
"Dr. Seuss' The Lorax" (PG) 1:05 p.m., 5:25 p.m., 9:50
p.m. No passes.
"Dr. Seuss' The Lorax" (PG) In Real 3D. 3:15 p.m.,
7:50 p.m. No passes.
"Wanderlust" (R) ID required. 2 p.m., 8 p.m.
"Act of Valor" (R) ID required. 1:45 p.m., 4:40 p.m.,
7:45 p.m., 10:20 p.m.
"Ghost Rider" (PG-13) 4:55 p.m., 10:25 p.m.
"Journey 2: The Mysterious Island" (PG) In Real 3D.
1:50 p.m. No passes.
"The Artist" (PG-13) 1:30 p.m., 4:05 p.m., 7:05 p.m.,
9:40 p.m.


Times subject to change; call ahead.


WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public Local RADIO WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Contemp. WSKY 97.3 FM News Talk WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WXOF-FM 96.3 Adult Mix WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s, '60s, '70s
WEKJ FM 96.7, 103.9 Religious WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WRZN-AM 720 Adult Standards

CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: s slenba A


"KSD ZDNE CGK WSP KSDP NMAN. MW


KSD YGLU


GBPUGRK CGMR, CBUGNU


MVASPU EYMN ASEMOU."


- NGZ


BULUANSA

Previous Solution: "I'm not on Earth to win a popularity contest. I'm here to be the
best human being I possibly can be." Tab Hunter
(c) 2012 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 3-10


Pickles


For Better or For Worse


-0 ..EF

"I thought this was Daddy's screw-
driver. Billy said it's Phillip's."


Today's MOVIES


C10 SATURDAY, MARCH 10, 2012


COMICS






SATURDAY, MARCH 10, 2012 Cil


C CITRUS COUNTY




H PONICLE

Swww.chronicleonline.com


BUSINESS HOURS:

MONDAY-FRIDAY
8:00 A.M. 5:00 P.M.
CLOSED SATURDAY/SUNDAY



WE GLADLY ACCEPT
- .


Classifieds


Classifieds In Print and Online All The Time!


Publication Days/Deadlines

Chronicle / Daily.................................... 1 PM, Daily
Homefront / Sunday...............................3 PM, Friday
Chronicle / Sunday.............................4...4 PM, Friday
Chronicle / Monday............................4...4 PM, Friday
Sumter County Times / Thursday............ 11 AM, Tuesday
Riverland News / Thursday.................2...2 PM, Monday
South Marion Citizen / Friday..............4...4 PM, Tuesday
West Marion Messenger / Wednesday.......4 PM, Friday


89 x 165 MOL, LOT
Lucky Hills, Nice
Residential Area
$19,000/Offer
Owner FiNance
(352) 422-1916
BEVERLY HILLS
$575. MO. 2/1, C/H/A,
W/D Hkup., 382-1344
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1 Cute cottage Max.
two. lst/last/sec $500 per
mo. 628-1062
CRYSTAL RIVER
Extreme Yard Sale
Sat. Mar. 10, 8a-3pm
generator, fishing, golf,
RV, household items
525 N. Pompeo Ave.

YOU'LL 4 THIS!
DK BROWN LEATHER
LOVE SEAT, Excellent
condition, double recliner.
$250.00 Rich Brown
Leather 382-352-7911
DVD Home Theater
Sound System
6 speakers
$150
(812) 629-6538
EXPERIENCED
ROOFING CREW
& ROOFERS
Must have Truck
Tools & Equipment.
Apply In Person
AAA ROOFING
Crystal River
(352) 563-0411
FOOD & HEALTH PROD-
UCTS For ALL Your Ani-
mals, Flea remedies,
We Now Carry Taste
of the Wild, Black Gold,
& Chicken Soup Dog &
Cat Food American
Farm & Feed 795-6013
GRASS SEEDS! GRASS
SEEDS! GRASS SEEDS!
American Farm & Feed
352-795-6013





Yotiir\\orld first

Need i .jo1h
or ii
qualified
employee?


This area's
#1
employment
source!


Vegetable Plant &
Bulk Seed, Insecticides
& Pesticides.
American Farm & Feed
(352) 795-6013
HAY, SADDLES, TACK,
AND FEED (FRM) Ask
About our Free Delivery
American Farm & Feed
(352) 795-6013
HITCHHIKER II LS
2008, 3 slides, excel
cond. heat pump, de-
luxe pkg. too many ex-
tras to list $32,000.
Dodge Truck also avail
(636) 209-0308
INVERNESS
Sat 8-2
Misc. items
1790 S Covewalk
Lecanto 3 bedroom. 2
bath. Senior Park 14x66
S/W, Screened Porch,
Furnished. Very clean.
Call 815-535-7958
LUND
1978 15' FIBERGLASS
Bass Boat w/Trailer. 30
horse Johnson. 60beam.
Console Steer. 50# Troll-
ing motor. Only needs
new battery to run. First
$1750 (firm) takes it.
352-341-0447.
NOW HIRING
Preschool
Teachers
Ft or Pt, Exp. Req.
CDA Preferred
Kiz 'R" RUSS Preschool
Apply Within
(352) 344-4106
Portable Generator
550 Watts, 4 outlets
$500
Craftsman 42"
lawn tractor $300
(812) 629-6538
ROB SCREENING
Repairs Rescreen, Front
Entries, Garage, Sliders
Free Est. 352-835-2020
Seats for Town &
Country Van
captain seat $30.
Bench Seat $45,
Gray excel cond.
(352) 344-4192
SHEAR SISTERS

Stylist & Nail Tech
needed (352)
344-8282 or 400-2722
SIBEX IS HIRING!
Growing electronics
contract mfr. has multi-
ple positions available.
For detailed job de-
scriptions and to apply,
visit www.sibex.com.
Only online applicants
will be considered.
EOE/ADA/Drug-Free
Workplace
SOFA,
Hunter Green Leather,
Perfect condition
changing decor
$350
(352) 344-2246


$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
Paid for Junk Vehicles,
J.W. 352-228-9645
$$ CASH PAID $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
A FREE REMOVAL OF
Scrap Medal, Mowers
Appliances and MORE
Call (352) 224-0698
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not .
CASH PAID $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL
appls, motors, mowers,
scp.metals & other
services. 352-270-4087



Cement Block &
Scallops,
Saturday Morning Only,
No Calls after 10am
(352) 746-9451 Iv msg
Chihuahua/Min Pin Mix,
Black Lab/Shepherd
Mix Shepherd/Alaskin
Husky Mix, Cats & Kitten
(352) 216-6668
Dachshund Hound
2 yrs. old, paperwork
Outside dog, needs
room to play
Needs Good Home
(352) 476-5321
fertilizer horse manure
mixed with pine shavings
great for gardens or as
mulch 352-628-9624
free black lab female she
loves kids.8 months
old.needs a good home.
Jamie @ 352-628-6572.if
not home leave a mes-
sage.
FREE CATS
Spayed & Neutered
To adult cats spoiling
homes (352) 201-4522
free female full blooded
lab 8 months old.loves
kids plays hide and
seek.really good dog. ja-
mie @ 586-9754
Free horse manure ,no
shavings pure, you haul.
352-5134473
Free Horse Manure
and shavings
for garden
(352) 746-7044
FREE
Horse Manure
Pine shaving, hay mix
(352) 527-2911
Free horse manure,
pure,no shavings, u-haul
5134473
Free Swing set and
dog house.
(352) 220-1692
KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Savage Pays top $$$.
352-628-4144


we are taking donations
of all kinds
baby
stuff,toys,clothing,shoes,fur
niture,
ect.call and we will come
pick it up...jamie@
352-586-9754.thank you



FRESH JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct.@ $5 per Ib
Stone Crab@ $6 per lb
delivered 727-771-7500



Black & White Apple
head Female
Chihuahua, name Lucy
Beverly Hills
(352) 287-4142
Lost Bird, Sun Conure,
Bright Colors,
Friendly, Talks
Floral City Area
REWARD (352) 726-3185
LOST DOG
Australian Shepherd
Black w/ white& tan
markings above eyes
6 yrs old, REWARD
(352) 322-0649
LOST on Tuesday,
March 6 at Bealls in
CRYSTAL RIVER -
gold color ELEPHANT
bracelet, great senti-
mental value, RE-
WARD. 352-425-0316.
Lost Tabby Cat
Female gray & black
on Lilac Lane
Inverness
(352) 344-2520





REWARD $1000.
No Questions ask.
Min Pin Female 10 lbs
name Zoey, Needs
meds. last seen Sun 8/7
Holiday Dr off Turkey
Oak Crystal River
(352) 257-9546
352-400-1519
Reward
Red Long Haired
Dachshund, 4 yrs. old
named pepper. Has
color and micro chip-
ped. Tag number 32977
LAST SEEN TURNER
LAKE RD AT LITTLE
LAKE HENDERSON.
INVERNESS 3/8/12
(352) 489-4361
352-419-4293


Min Pin, female,
Registered Medical
Dog,
Lecanto Area
(352)449-0114
Standard Collie
looks like Lassie, male
last seen 3/9 in Floral
City(352) 476-1349



CHIHUAHUA
long hair red/white
found in Beverly Hills
by Publix
(352) 513-4471
Found Med Size Dog,
1 /2 2yrs old, Female
Withlacoochee Forest
Lost around 1 mo.
Cattle Dog/ Mix
352-302-4801



May The Lady of
Guadalupe
be praised,
adored & loved.
Lady of Guadalupe
Pray for us.
St Jude worker of
miracles pray for us.
St Jude helper of the
hopeless pray for us



FRESH JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct.@ $5 per lb
Stone Crab@ $6 per Ib
delivered 727-771-7500



Will Babysit and/or
Tutor, Any Day
Spanish or English
pls call and ask for Yuly
352-270-4141



NOW HIRING
Preschool
Teachers
Ft or Pt, Exp. Req.
CDA Preferred
Kiz 'R" RUSS Preschool
Apply Within
(352) 344-4106

NOW TAKING
APPLICATIONS
For Exp Teacher
For 2 & 3 yr old Class
(352) 527-8440


TEACHER

Fulltime, Exp. Req.
CDA Preferred
TODAY'S CHILD
(352) 344-9444





Contractor seeking a
full time
Motivated
Candidate with
Human
Resources
background and
payroll experience.
Candidate must pos-
sess computer skills in
Micro soft Windows
plus Excel and be
able to adapt quickly
to company
accounting program.
Knowledge of HR
policies, procedures,
rules and regulations
and payroll required.
Must be dependable
and detail oriented
for this position.
Background checks
and drug screening
will be required after
hiring. Send resume
to
jrogers@fandhcontrac-
tors.com.





HAIR STYLIST
FTIPT Immediate
Openings, Call Sue
352-628-0630


SHEAR SISTERS

Stylist & Nail Tech
needed (352)
344-8282 or 400-2722





Housekeeper/
cleaning

CITRUS SPRINGS,
need 2 days a week
available for more
days. call
(352) 522-1109


#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)

AR/ASSISTANT
For busy office.
Medical experience
a must.(352) 489-2995

CNA/HHA's
Apply At
HOME INSTEAD
SENIOR CARE
4224 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Lecanto

Exp. Medical Asst
FT/PT For busy Medical
Office Fax resume to
Fax (352) 564-4222
Call (352) 564-0444

Exp. Vet Tech
Lecanto Vet Hospital
Bring Resume to
1250 S. Lecanto Hwy

F/T Certified
Ophthalmic
Assistant/Scribe,
Experience required
in patient workups,
history, refraction,
documentation and
coding. Apply in
person, West Coast
Eye Institute,
240 N. Lecanto Hwy,
Lecanto FL 34461
(352) 746-2246 x834

LPN or MEDICAL
ASSISTANT/
PHLEBOTOMIST
Wanted for office based
medical practice in
Inverness. Experience
required. Fax Resume
(3521-726c-581


^CWH ^. JT^
TO*ADVE RTISE CALL:
352=563=5966^*1 r| j^ 1 TT^T~*iT^


OR LAC YOR D OLIN A

wwwachroniclenlneco


NOW HIRING

RN's
All Units, with Hospital
Experience
Apply on Line: www.
nurse-temps.com
(352) 344-9828


ULTRASOUND
SONOGRAPHER
NEEDED
Registered
sonographer needed
for busy Mobile X-ray
Company.
Triple registry
preferred.
Must have a good
driving record
Fax resume to
:.352-372-2386






COMMERCIAL
LICENSED AGENT
220 OR 440
Please fax Resume
352-489-0384
or email
birdins@bellsouth.net


Contractor seeking a
full time
Motivated
Candidate with
Human
Resources
background and
payroll experience.
Candidate must pos-
sess computer skills in
Micro soft Windows
plus Excel and be
able to adapt quickly
to company
accounting program.
Knowledge of HR
policies, procedures,
rules and regulations
and payroll required.
Must be dependable
and detail oriented
for this position.
Background checks
and drug screening
will be required after
hiring. Send resume
to
jrogers@fandhcontrac-
tors.com.

CUST. SERVICE
REP/or 220 Agent

Needed for busy
Insurance office.
Apply in person
9am-12N
SHELDON PALMES
INSURANCE
8469 W Grover Cleve-
1In -d Un.......


"AN3IL-II I I M
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8 _4 sell rightA

9 6 3 away.


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6 798


8 3 5 Others take a


-3 7 9 little more time.
You can earn at least $800 per month

1 3 delivering the
S- I CITRUS COUNTY
Fill in the squares so that each row, column, and
3-by-3 box contain the numbers 1 through 9.


BATTERIES: BATTERY REBUILD SERVICES: www.chronicleonline.com
Laptop / GPS Cordless Power Tools Independent contractors delivering the Citrus County
Cell / Cordless Phone U.P.S. Backup Chronicle can earn as much as $1,000 a month
-Camera/Camcorder Cordless Vacuums working only 3-4 early morning hours per day. The
-Watch/Electronics Custom Battery Rebuild Chronicle is a permanent part of Citrus County with
-Wheelchair / Scooter j E an excellent reputation. To find out more, call
Rechargeables / Chargers as nt and speak to one of our district managers or leave
Airsoft/RC 0 tC. your name and phone number and we will get right
3850 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy, Inverness II back with you!
New Store Hours: Mon.-Fri. 9am-5pm, Saturday 10am-5pm & Closed Sunday
(352) 344-1962 Menuon this coupon geta freepack of batteries. 50



I I I I I


There are immediate opportunities for independent contractors to manage

and grow single copy newspaper routes in Citrus and Marion Counties


S* Be at least 18 years of age. Possess a valid driver's license.

Possess proof of liability insurance.

-..... -0 0UT...... Routes are 7 days a week, early morning hours.


www..chronicleonline.com Email: mgaouette@chronicleonline.com or bring resume to 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River


632 589 S 17|
9 1 8 7 6 4 3 5 2
5 4 7312 92 86G
895 12764 6 4 3
374698521
126453798
77 6 9 8 4 1 2 3 5:
483275 1 69
25 19368741


I Medical


CLASSIFIED


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







C12 SATURDAY, MARCH 10, 2012


Executive
Director

Boys & Girls Clubs of
Citrus County
Bachelor's Degree or
equivalent training
and experience with
a similar non-profit.
Excellent
communication skills.
Proven successful
fundraising experi-
ence & grant writing.
Knowledge of Citrus
County with estab-
lished relationships to
businesses and
individuals.
Administrative
experience.
Ability to work with a
Board of Directors.
Send letter of appli-
cation, resume, 3
references, and
salary expectations
to P.O. Box 907,
Lecanto, FL 34460 or
fax 352-621-4679.
No Calls


Social Services
Assistant

Looking for energetic
detail oriented per-
son who is
comfortable taking
initiative. And enjoy
working with people.
Exp. preferred
NO PHONE CALLS
Apply in Person
CYPRESS COVE
CARE CENTER
700 SE 8TH AVENUE
Crystal River EOE





BARTENDER

Apply in Person
SABINA'S DINER
Hernando, after 2pm


EXP. BARTENDERS
& COOKS

Wanted, Please Call
(352) 382-5894





ACCOUNT
EXECUTIVE

Nature coast radio
group is interviewing
for an account
executive to repre-
sent Citrus 95 and
Fox Classic Hits.
Complete training is
provided, and radio
experience is not
necessary. Income
potential of $ 25,000+
EOE email your letter
or resume to
staff@citrus953.com.





ANIMAL GROOMER
Experienced Dog/Cat
Groomer needed for a
busy, high quality veter-
inary hospital. Be a
part of a dynamic team
of professionals, pro-
viding high quality ani-
mal care to Citrus
County residents. Part
time or full time availa-
ble, with benefits.
Please send resume to
allcreatures83@gmail.co
m

Cert. Fork Lift Driver

7 day shift
Apply at Twin Rivers
Marine 2880 N.
Seabreeze Pt
Crystal River Fl 34429

CHOIR DIRECTOR

Needed at Hernando
United Methodist Ch.
Call the 726-7245
For application.
Apply by March 21


Exp. Boat Captain

Wanted, w/ current Lic
TWIC, Drug Consortium
Call Dan 352-746-9477

LOCAL TOWER
SERVICE CO.
Looking for
Individual capable of
ascending & servic-
ing tall broadcasting
towers.
Electronic,electrical
exp.strongly prefer
red. Travel required
throughout the
Southeast.
Company Vehicle,
fuel, hotel provided
for travel. Good
Pay,Health
Beneflts,Per Diem.
Vacation / Bonuses!
Background Check.
NEED CLEAN FL
DRIVER'S LICENSE!
Apply In person at:
Hillghts Inc.
4177 N. Citrus Ave.
Crystal River, FI
(352) 564-8830
rsobol@
hlllahtslnc.com

r- - -1
r -" SERVICE
PLUMBERS

Must have driver's
llcense352-621-0671

SMALL ENGINE
TECH

Needed for Busy Shop,
Tools Required,
Experience preferred.
Apply in Person M-Fri
6659 W NORVELL
BRYANT HWY, Crys River
NO CALLS

UNDER GROUND
UTILITY CONTRACTOR
SEEKING

Skilled Site and
Underground
Utility Operators

experienced only for
work in down town
areas, in Marion,
Citrus, Lake &
surrounding counties,
Drug Free Work
Place/EEO contact
Croft Contracting Inc.
(352) 860-1202
k.croftcontractina-
inc@earthlink.net





$$$$$$$
Money is available!
We are seeking
individuals to man-
age rack and store
delivery of the Citrus
County Chronicle
and other publica-
tions. Must be at least
18 years of age and
possess a valid driv-
er's license and insur-
ance. Routes are 7
days a week, early
morning hours. Earn-
ing potential is unlim-
ited! Email
kstewart@chronicleon-
line.com or bring
resume to 1624 N.
Meadocwcrest Rlvd. in


L


Exp. Appt. Setters

Top Pay, Hrly. Clean
work enviont. Call
Barb (352) 726-1002

RESIDENT CARE
SPECIALISTS

New Horizons Village
is a residential care
facility for develop-
mentally disabled
adults. We are
currently seeking P/T
Habilitative Training
Instructors to provide
care and training to
these individuals
through direct care.
Basic qualifications
include: HS diploma
or equivalency.
Madatory Criminal
background
investigation & refer-
ence inquiry.Ability to
pass a post-offer
physical exam & drug
test.Demonstrated
oral & written com-
munications skills.
Ability to lift up
to 50 Ibs.
New Horizons Village
offers: Competitive
wages & a tobacco
free campus. To be
considered, please
complete an
application at 1275 N.
Rainbow Loop,
Lecanto, FL 34461.
(352) 746-3262.

SALES REP
eBay Sales. Apply in per-
son @ 8409 W. Crystal
St. Crystal River 9:30-4
SIBEX IS HIRING!
Growing electronics
contract mfr. has multi-
ple positions available.
For detailed job de-
scriptions and to apply,
visit www.sibex.com.
Only online applicants
will be considered.
EOE/ADA/Drug-Free
Workplace

Site Manager
PT -Inglis Villas,
Inglis Fl. Resume to:
jobs@flynnmanage
ment.com




#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)







TAYLORCOLLEGE



NE6RI W


2 WEEK
PREP COURSES!
*ALF ADMINISTRATOR
$300.
*EKG TECH $475.
*NURSING ASST. $475.
*PHLEBOTOMY $475.


CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)




8 MOBILE HOMES
12 AC., Good Income
Lots of Possibilities
(352) 212-6182
SILK FLOWER
BUSINESS FOR SALE

Silk Flowers, Swags &
Greenery. One price
takes ALL, Crystal River
(352) 212-3942


Collectble


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





A/C + HEAT PUMP
SYSTEMS
Starting at $880
13-18 Seer
Installation w/permit
REBATES up to $2.500
352-746-4394
Lic.&Ins. CAC 057914
DISHWASHER Older
Kitchen aid looks and
works good. White $50.
352-270-3909
DISHWASHER PORTA-
BLE MAYTAG Maytag
portable dishwasher. 3yo
used as built in. 100.00
call 352-575-1898
GE Range, 5 yrs old,
white, exc. cond.
$350
(352) 419-4011
Kenmore refrigerator,
2 door, good cond.,
$100 Water cooler, $10
(352) 220-1692
Kenmore Washer
Like New
$350
386-547-8855
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR, washers
dryers,FREE pick up
352-564-8179
USED MICROWAVE
brown or white $15.00
513-4473
WANTED DEAD
OR ALIVE
Washers & Dryers
(352) 209-5135
WANTED DEAD
ORD AlIVc


iin vv.i
Crystal River. taylorcollege.edu Washers & Dryers
(352) 245-4119 (352) 209-5135
$$$$$$ FB, twitter, you tube WASHER OR DRYER
Sq $135.00 Each. Reliable,
r- NO like new, excellent condi-
Marketing Trainee NOW tion. Can deliver
ENROLLING 352 263-7398 a
$ 9.00 an hour FOR SPRING Whirlpool Washer
Local broadcasting FOR SPRING Whirlool Washer
company offers an 2012 CLASSES $200& Dryer400-5152
entry level marketing I BARBER $200.352 400-5152
position. If you're COSETOLOGY
intelligent, with a FACIAL
professional appear- FULL SPECIALTY
ance, and an IN I&
outgoing personality. I TRAINING
complete training is MANICURE/Nall Ext
provided, with wMASSAGE THERAPY
excellent potential to ***** 0 0_
advance and BENE'S m
increase your income. Intrntional
This isn't a job, it's an international
entry level into an ex- School of Beauty
citing career. NEW PORT RICHEY
Forward your letter /SPRING HILL g
or resume to 727-848-8415
staff@cltrus953.com. 352-263-2744
immmmW-47








nan"Isd


CLASSIFIEDrS




4 DRAWER METAL
FILING CABINET $10
527-9518
Computer table
w/draws, 2 bkcases
6ft x 28 in,
1 bkcase 3ftx30in,
2 drawer filing cab,
bone/whiteS145 all
(352) 746-6456
FREE STANDING
WOODEN SHELVES,
9"X16"X78". $20.
527-9518



5 speed bench drill
press, built on cabinet,
with drawer & wheels,
like new w/tools, $125.
(352) 726-9002
8 Horse Power Troy Bilt
Rototiller $500.
3 HP 220 Volt Sears
Compressor $300.
(352) 527-7885
Delta 1" x6'"Disc
Bench Sander $50.
Dewalt Scroll Saw
Like New stand & light
included $400
(352) 794-0296
Brand New Air
Compressor, in box
Campbell Hausfeld, 6
gal. .08 HP oilless port-
able air Compressor.
Sells for $250 asking
$145. (352) 503-6631
OVER THE TRUCK BED
took box.heavy poly,
made by Delta. black
$50.00 352-513-4473
SCROLL SAW Crafts-
man variable speed 16
inch in very good condi-
tion $65. Can email
photo. 352 726 9983



27" FLATSCREEN TV
Olevia Flatscreen TV -
Excellent working condi-
tion $150 Call
352-746-6848
MITSUBISHI 50 INCH
HDTV 50 inch tv nice pic-
ture excellent condition.
352-344-2331 $300.00
SONY T V
63inch Floor Model
Projection Screen
exc. cond. $275.00
(352) 746-6456
SONY T.V. 13 INCH
W/REMOTE. NICE FOR
KITCHEN OR BED-
ROOM. $20.00
352-726-0686



Professional Office
partitions, new condi-
tion w/hardware.
Enough for 4 offices
$300 obo
(352) 563-1033
USED WINDOWS
4 38 x 53 & 1- 53 x74
Grt for shed or project
All $65 obo
(352) 489-3914
Com utrs


DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
DIGITALL PHOTO FRAME
Polaroid 7 inch with re-
mote and memory card.
Like New.$45. Can email
photo. 352 726 9983
GPS Nextar 3.5 inch
with AC adaptor, auto
adaptor, dash mount and
carrying case $35. Can
mail photos. 726 9983



FORD 1350 Diesel
TRACTOR, 3. hitch &
PTO, HD Brushhog,
$2,200 810-471-8819
Cell



PATIO SET 48" Round
table with 3
chairs/cushions.
Very Nice (Teal) $135
Dunnellon 352-465-4441


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


*WOOL RUG GARDEN
DESIGN MULTI COLOR
EXCELLENT COND.
7.9'X9.9' $100 634-2004
1 Marble Coffee Table
w/2 end tables $125.
1 oval glass coffee
table w/2 end tables
$75.(352) 527-9862
2 RECLINERS BUR-
GUNDY W/RANDOM
DECORATIVE STITCH
$250 EACH 634-2004
7 piece bernhardt
sectional sofa
excel. cond. paid $3,740
asking $1,500
(352) 382-1167
Beautiful crystal lamp and
round glass top table on
an S-shaped brass base.
$100 for both.
352-746-4028
Beautiful crystal table
lamp with round glass
end table on brass
base.$100.00 for both.
352-746 4028
CATHI'S ATTIC
Offering New and Used
Quality Furniture & Ac-
cessories, 352-513-4802
CHAIRS WOODEN for
desk,sewing etc.Very old
dark wood/sturdy and
nice.$25.ea Pine Ridge
352-270-3909







V 11



COMFORTS OF
HOME
USED FURNITURE
www. com-
fortsofhomeused
furniture.com. 795-0121
DESK SECRETARY Top
opens and closes.Cherry
wood. Excellent
condition.$100.Pine
Ridge 352-270-3909
DINETTE SET 5 pcs
Marble Top table
w/glass insert, 4 floral
padded chairs $300
1- 3 pc mirrored wall
unit lighted, 2 beveled
doors $250 or will sell
complete for $500.
(352) 527-9862

YOU'LL THIS!
DK BROWN LEATHER
LOVE SEAT, Excellent
condition, double recliner.
$250.00 Rich Brown
Leather 382-352-7911
END TABLES 23"SQ
DARK STAINED WOOD
ON DECORATIVE
METAL BASE $25EA
634-2004
hunter green wrought
iron, glass top tables,
2 end 1 coffee, 1 sofa,
Paid $1,200.
Asking $600.
Sugar mill 352-382-1167
hunter green wrought
iron, glass top tables,
2 end 1 coffee, 1 sofa,
Paid $1,200.
Asking $600.
Sugar mill 352-382-1167
Maple Bedroom Set
Full sz. 5 pcs. w/
mattress, excellent
cond. Our spare room
furniture. Pine Ridge
$600(352) 527-7885
MATTRESS Queen size
pillow top. Like new
condition. $99.00
352-726-3922
MATTRESS SETS Very
clean. Non-smoker
King-$250.00
Queen-$150. Call
352-257-5722 for details.
POANG CHAIR AND
FOOTSTOOL in excellent
condition $85. Can email
photo 352 726 9983
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
352-628-0808
RECLINER CHAIR Blue
tweed, good condition,
lays way back. $50.00
513-4473


3-10 LaughingStock International Inc Dist by Universal UCIick for UFS, 2012

"You don't have to stop at red lights."






TRACTOR WORK


$30 + $30/hr Mowing, Grading,

Lite Loader, Tree Work,

Cleanup, and Wood Fences

Licensed and Insured


352-270-6800


CHAINSAW POULAN
262 PRO chainsaw, very
good condition, runs
smooth $55-
352 563 9987
CHICKEN
MANURE/FERTILIZER
The time is NOW! (25
avail)20 lb bag,$4.00
352-563-1519
GRASS SEEDS! GRASS
SEEDS! GRASS SEEDS!
American Farm & Feed
352-795-6013
GRASS SEEDS, FERTILIZER
Vegetable Plant &
Bulk Seed, Insecticides
& Pesticides.
American Farm & Feed
(352) 795-6013
LAWN MOWER
TROYBUILT, 6 yrs
42 inch auto
$225 o/b/o
(352) 637-2499
Murray riding mower
40" cut, good cond.,
$350 or best offer.
(352) 637-4718
Outside Fountain
3 tier w/pump $100.
Garden Cart w/tools &
fertilizer $30.
(352) 527-1789





MOVING
S.AL E
Beverly Hills Fri Sat
8;30-3pm
1100 Buttonbush



BEVERLY HILLS
Fri, Sat 8-4
Huge estate sale
Antique furn, primi-
tives, pottery, oriental
rugs, indian artifacts,
many collectibles
97 South Adams

CITRUS HILLS
Sat. March 10, 9am-?
Movina, Furn., tools,
misc. 1398 E. Ridgefield
Drive, Fairview Estates


CITRUS HILLS
ESTATE SALE
102 N. SETON
FRI & SAT 8:00 -3:00
CRYSTAL RIVER
Extreme Yard Sale
Sat. Mar. 10, 8a-3pm
generator, fishing, golf,
RV, household items
525 N. Pompeo Ave.
CRYSTAL RIVER
Fri. & Sat. 9a-3p
Multiple Family Sale,
6 Mi. W. of US 19 on
Ozello Trl. Hsware,
clothes, Hand & Power
tools, & silk flowers,
2097 S. SCHOONER DR
CRYSTAL RIVER
Fri. through Sun.
Tools table saw air
nailer, fertilize spreader,
lawn areator, Banjo,
Recliner, Freezer, fabric
& notions, crafts, Christ-
mas, crystal & depres-
sion glassware & MORE
3979 N. Olive Ave

CRYSTAL RIVER
MEADOWCREST
Community Yard Sale
Saturday, Mar. 10th
8a-1p in Winn-Dixie
Parking Lot/Hwy. 44.

CRYSTAL RIVER
Trash and Treasure Sale
Cry. Riv. Women's Club
Sun. March 11th, 8a-2p
Collectibles, clothing,
Hshold, jewelry, crafts,
boutique, lots morel
320 N. CITRUS AVE.


MO VI-G
SALE

DUNNELLON
Fri, Sat, Sun 10 ?
Antiques, tools,
books, fabric, furn,
piano
11311 NSpringvale
Ter

DUNNELLON
Fri. & Sat. 8am-?
Multiple Neighborhood
Sale Tanden Kayak,
stihl chainsaw, clothes,
coca cola beanie
bears. Much More!
8756 N. Dixie Drive


Sofa & Love Seat
$350.
Red Mahogany end
tables & coffee table
$200.
(352) 228-1325
Sofa & Love seat
beige/mauve/blue
maple trim. MINT
$450.
(352) 726-8040
SOFA & LOVE SEAT
greenish Blue $150
Dinette set 4 swivel
chairs light wood
octagon shape 5'x3,5'
includes 18" leaf$150
352-344-8652
Sofa and 3 chairs, All
good condition,
$295. (352) 341-3711
kendunn@tampabay.rr.c
om
SOFA,
Hunter Green Leather,
Perfect condition
changing decor
$350
(352) 344-2246
Thomasville Dining
Room Set 6 chs, 2 leafs,
$500& china cab$800
wall unit Belgium
made.$500 obo
(352) 637-6482
TRUNDLE BED
PAUL'S FURNITURE
628-2306 Homosassa
paulsfurnitureonline.com
TV STAND Light wood.
18 1/2"high x 33"wide
x22"deep $20. Two bot-
tom shelves -open front
352-464-0955
Wood Kitchen table
w/4 chairs, brand new
pd $565 sell $325.
Couch $300 & 2 reclin-
ers, beige $400
(618) 978-2338
WOOL CARPET 3.5FT
ROUND BEIGE MULTI
FLORAL $40 634-2004




21" 6.50 HP,
self propelled Troy Bilt,
Bagger, key start &
books. Used very little
$195. (352) 382-1167


ALL EXTERIOR
ALUMINUM
6" Seamless Gutters
Lic & Ins 352-621-0881
ROB SCREENING
Repairs Rescreen, Front
Entries, Garage, Sliders
Free Est. 352-835-2020
SUBURBAN ND. INC.
Screen rms, Rescreens,
Siding, airports, rf.overs
wood decks, Fla. rooms
windows, garage scrns.
628-0562 (CBC1257141)



SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Washer &
Dryers, Free Pick Up
352-564-8179



Vertical Blind Factory
We custom make all
types. Best prices any-
where! Hwy 44 & CR
491. (352) 746-1998




V THIS OUT!
PHIL'S MOBILE MARINE
Repairs & Consignment
30 yrs Cert. Best Prices
& Guar 352-220-9435



Loving Adult Care
Home (SL 6906450)
Alzheimer/Dementia
No problem. Nursing
homes do not need to
be your only alternative
352-503-7052




ILII, \\oi ld llust.




S( i .


ROGERS Construction
All Construction
sm jobs Free Est (352)
637-4373 CRC1326872





Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
Repairs. 352 613-2518




Clean Ups &
Clean Outs
(352) 220-9190




AFFORDABLE
COMPUTER SERV.
(352) 341-4150
DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469



Bianchi Concrete
inc.com lic/ins
Driveways-Patios-
Sidewalks.352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL/ Lic
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River rock
reseals & repairs. 352
364-2120/410-7383
FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, staining &
Garage Firs. Recession
Prices! 352-527-1097
ROB'S MASONRY
& CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs Tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554



All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing,Hauling,
Site Prep, Driveways.
Lic. & Ins. 352- 795-5755


COUNTYWIDE DRY-
WALL 25 years exp.
For all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Lic/ins. 352-302-6838




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Plasma TV installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777

ANNIE'S ELECTRIC
Husband & Wife
Team.(352) 341-5952
EC-13002696

BRIGHT ELECTRICAL
Res./Comm. Lic & Ins.
$50.hr. EC0001303
352-302-2366

DUN-RITE Elect
Elec/Serv/Repairs
New const. Remodel
Free Est 726-2907
EC1o3002699 Serving
Citrus Co. Since 1978

Thomas Electric LLC
Generator maint &
repair. Guardian

Centurion. Cert. Tech.
Briggs Stratton 352-
621-1248 #ER00015377





A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002

BOB BROWN'S
Fence & Landscaping
352-795-0188/220-3194

ROCKY'S FENCING
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,





ALL EXTERIOR
ALUMINUM
6" Seamless Gutters
Lic & Ins 352-621-0881


ALUMINUM
STRUCTURES
5" & 6" Seamless Gutters
Free Estimates, Lic &
Ins. (352) 563-2977



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Plasma TV installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
Andrew Joehl
Handyman.
Gen/Maint/Repairs
Pressure cleaning.
Lawns/Gutters. No job
too small!Reli able ,ins.
0256271 352-465-9201
ABC Painting & Handy
man All your needs at
recession prices Dale
352-586-8129
Affordable Handyman
V FAST
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est

Affordable Handyman
FAST
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est

Affordable Handyman
V FAST
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est

Affordable Handyman
V FAST
s AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est







Handyman Dave
Pressure Clean, Paint &
Repairs, oddjobs &
hauling (352) 726-9570


Lawn & Handyman
Services. Sprinkler
Repair 352-212-4935
Remodeling, Additions,
Doors, Windows, Tile
work. Lic.#CRC1330081
Free Est. (352)949-2292





V THIS OUT!
AC & HEAT PUMPS
FREE Estimate & 2nd
Opinion, 10 yr. warr.
on ALL Parts, Great
prices, ALL the time.
352-400-4945
Lic #CAC027361




Citrus Cleaning
Painting & Team
Quality Work reason-
able rates. 352-
302-3348
527-2279
MAID TO ORDER
House Cleaning *
(352) 586-9125
Have Vacum Will Travel




The Tile Man
Bathroom remodel
Specializing in
handicap. Lie/Ins.
#2441. 352-634-1584



#1 BOBCAT FOR HIRE
Light land clearing, site
work, grading, hauling.
NO JOB TOO SMALL!!!
Lic. & Ins. 352-400-0528
All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
All AROUND TRACTOR
L , -. ,,.. H ,., ,.
35 795,-57) I.5 : 5 W :
352-795-5755


TRACTOR WORK
Sm Job Specialist
$30 + $30 per hr
352-270-6800





lQ .LC
CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, curbing,
flocrete. River rock
reseals & repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
Florida Sitescapes, LLC
FREE est: Yard Clean Up
Mowing, and MORE
Call 352.201.7374
RIVENBARK LAWN &
LANDSCAPE.
Best Prices in town for
all your lawn care
needs!! (352) 464-3566




Florida Sitescapes, LLC
FREE est: Yard Clean Up
Mowing, and MORE
Call 352.201.7374
GOT LEAVES?
Ask about leaf vac
system, Free est.
Winter Clean up +
Hauling 352 344-9273
cell 352-201-9371
GRASS SEEDS! GRASS
SEEDS! GRASS SEEDS!
American Farm & Feed
352-795-6013
HALLOCK & SON
LAWN CARE ALL Your
lawn care needs. Detailed
Work. 400-1197, Lie/Ins.
HOME CARE
Lawn & Handyman
Services. Sprinkler
Repair 352-212-4935
JUSTIN LAWN CARE
Fast and Affordable.
and Friendly, Licensed.
(352) 476-3985
LAWN CARE 'N" More
Spring Clean up, beds,
haul, brush leaves
(352) 726-9570
Leaves, Beds Bushes
mulch, hauling, press
clean 352 220-6761


AT YOUR HOME
Mower, Parts Service &
Repair.Visit our store@
1332 SE Hwy 19
352-220-4244




ALL OF CITRUS
CLEAN UPS CLEAN OUTS
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790




Chris Satchell Painting
ASAP
30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
A-I George Swedlige
Painting/press cleaning
Int/Ext. texture/drywall
repair (352) 794-0400
ABC Painting LLC
All your painting needs
@ recession prices. Call
Dale 352-586-8129
Handyman Dave
Pressure Clean, Paint &
Repairs, odd jobs &
hauling (352) 726-9570
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998




Tim Herndon Plumbing
SI0. off w/thisad
10 yrs serving Citrus Co
lic/insCFC 1428395
(352) 201-8237




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
ABC Press. Cleaning.
All your cleaning needs
at recession prices.
Free Est .Dale 586-8129


Handyman Dave
Pressure Clean, Paint &
Repairs, odd jobs &
hauling (352) 726-9570
JOHN GRAY
DRIVEWAYS $55.
HOUSE $75/POOL $85
(352) 270-8310
Pic PICARD'S Pressure
Cleaning & Painting
352-341-3300




Remodeling, kitchens
baths, ceramic tile &
tops. Decks, Garages
Handyman Services 40
Yrs Exp. crc058140
344-3536; 563-9768




Bruce F. Storman
Septic Services,
lic/in 352-795-5779




Attention Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers are
required by state law
to include their state
license number in all
advertisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious that
you may be contact-
ing an unlicensed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For questions
about business
licensing, please call
your city or county gov-
ernment offices.


Le ek
Now $80 Bahia Pallets
U-Pick Up. Special
Spring Pricing. Call
Now!! 352-400-2221




HOME CARE
Lawn & Handyman
Services. Sprinkler
Repair 352-212-4935




A Cutting Edge
Tile Jobs Showers
Firs .Safety Bars. ETC
352-422-2019
Lic. #2713, Insured.




A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest Rates
Free est.(352)860-1452
DAVID'S
TREE SERVICE
(352) 302-5641
All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
DOUBLE J Tree Serv.
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
R WRIGHT Tree Service
Tree removal & trimming.
Ins. & Lic.# 0256879
352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree Serv
Trim, Shape & Remove
Lic/Ins Free Est.
352-628-2825
Sharp Cut Tree Serv.
LET me cut your Tree
not YOUR WALLET.
Full Tree Service
Alicia (352) 942-0455



344-2556, Richard
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


-Kr


D


Dir l 14%,




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


S9 *12, 495 R OR
99D 0 W N/199.79 PER MONTH


V-Pr^ic

-----ht ptace


2008 KIA
TSUBISHI "12,495
iALANT ...
$12,495
2007 G286827A
HYUNDAI SANTA FE
S 12,495
h 2009
CHEVROLET
MALIBU
G259A 12,495
72 MONTHS AT 4.90 APR W.A.C. + TAX AND FEES, $699.00 ADMIN. FEE


-i


S8, 995 OR
99 DOWN/1 68.44 PER MONTH


2005 DODGE


STRATUS
18,995


12007 KIA
RONDO LX
$8,995


2007 FORD
TAURUS
$8,995


T W 46.41-1 41l ^o p -/
60 MONTHS AT 4.90 APR W.A.C. + TAX AND FEES,
$699.00 ADMIN. FEE


NOW ON ALL USED VEHICLES SOLD
At CITRUS KIA "PEACE OF MIND WARRANTY" PROGRAM
Starting November 1st, 2009 Citrus Kia introduced the New "Peace Of Mind" Warranty program on Used vehicles.
Peace of mind is a Dealership promise... When you Buy a used car, truck, van, or SUV from us we will be at your side
for the 1st 90 days /or 3000 miles of your driving. If anything, and we are talking anything breaks* on your vehicle,
from the headlights to the taillights we will fix it for you at NO CHARGE. You have trusted us for all your NEW car
needs and have made us the #1 New Kia dealer in the state. Now we want to prove to you that Citrus Kia is the best
place in the state of Florida to buy a Used vehicle also.
At Citrus Kia, "We just don't close car deals, we open relationships"


A


T THE ALL NEW 2012
KIA OPTIMA HYBRID


C itr
--------i


352-564-8668
Mon Fri: 9:00am 7:00pm
Sat 9:00am 6:00pm
Sunday Noon 5:00pm


The Power to SurpriseTM
1850 S.E. Hwy. 19, Crystal River, FL
Shop from Home @ www.citruskia.com


I *ALL PRICES PLUS TAX, TAG, LICENSE AND $699 ADMIN. FEE. *PICTURES PHOTOS ARE FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY.


SATURDAY, MARCH 10, 2012 C13


AC7


.!N


" :B- A
[Cifiusl!
P~~twm -- ^ ftl




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


- 4UW


at at*
pyIdk


2012


-w==..


;ilI i


A I


Lease s1 36 Mo.
For Leaset


i! PL- r e p'u iat .\ ta g irad ar helv'e .dat Je IF.ia..[ 6t'",",1 \1r! >..rn cT-^ ".lru-...ptied .'nlll ".rJ .r~r-carn ve." n.1-OTr.n..il *F.pSpced J 'ie in.- .nn>>[ Jrr,r. ,uT^rarJ "Tlikjae r..,u ..,r, .Iperad.r.u' **
ri-....n tuiL-re .1.0 rr.,.-.L.i. i~rl 'eh.iiie Srcr ir. i.'r dek.il. Pro'.,.. art l>-r !!.[ruri..U ri.r Orryoc. .M. i rerr..cd .vhkklc. .w.1e.. u.- p~.-.>-r...re Pn;:r~irr..uihrec' L>-.


InmI-


ACURA

Safest Vehicle Lineup In America!
with Highest Expected Residual Value Among Luxury Brands !e ) !

S2012 TSX


=Cu2Z C.ji
TSX Lease: $259 mo x 36 months.
$2,899 Due At Signing
Includes Security Deposit, Down Payment; Excludes Tax & Tag,
With Approved Credit
Safety Rating Safe
NHTSA


' Siar ralngs are pari of Ihe U.S. Depanrtmen of Transponal-on s Sae',ca' gov program iwww.salercar.govi. Mooels leied will standard side-impact airoags ISABl. r
Based on ALG's 2009 and 2010 Realdual Value Awards for a Luxury Brand." Subject To limited availability. Through April 30th 2012 to approved lessees by Acura Financial
Services DBA ol American Honda Finance Corp. AdalLIonal lease Lerrs tor well-qualifed lessees. Nol all lesses will qual'y. Higher lease rales apply ior lessees with lower
credil ralings or in dilfereni regions Dealer panicipallon may affect acltal payrnenl MSRPs include deil.naLon taxes I.cernse I-ie lees oplons and insurance extra
Secanly depos-I waived Lessee responsible lor mariararce. excessive wearriear and 15com.. over 10.000 milearyea,' or vehicles wilh MSRP less liha 530 000 bdl for
vehicles wiln MSRP of S30.000 or more. mileage cosm is 20vemi. over 10.000 miles'yeai. See dealer ror complete details.


C14 SATURDAY, MARCH 10, 2012


t i N




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Start the new year
in a brand-new Ford.
Our 2012 lineup of fuel-efficient cars,
trucks, SUVs and crossovers is here.
Get into the Ford you want with great
offers that make it easy for you to get
behind the wheel.
Come in today. And start the new year in
a brand-new Ford. You'll know why Ford
is the best-selling brand' out there. Get
out of the old and into the new at Nick
Nicholas Ford today.


2012 FIESTA


M
Si


15,090
-91
-500


999


S IW N2Cl 55 W W Ns2T 051W
2012 FOCUS SE 2012 ESCAPE XLT
ISRP 19,720
aecial Discount -35 $


Dealer Discount
Retail Customer Cash


-986
-2,000


*1 6,999 *


24 month Red Carpet Lease
$2,715 due at signing.
Security deposit waived.
Excludes tax, title and license fees.


2004 HONDA PILOT EX 2004 FORD F1504X4SUPERCAB 2008 CHRYSLIRTOWN& COUNTRY DURING 2007 TOYOTA PRIUS HYBRID 2008 CHRYSLER SEBRING LIMITED
Four wheeling & fun to drive. N1T372M Extra extra clean. N1T484D Lookng for a new home& loves kds N2T055A Think green. N2C130A Only 17k miles. NP5635
$16,668 $16,968 $17,668 $17,968 $19,968




2008 FORD RANGER LT SUPER CAB 2007 FORD EDGE SEL 2009 GMC SIERRA C1500 EXT CAB 2009 NISSAN ROGUE SL 2007T0YOOTAIAOMAPRRUHIERACCESS CAB
Only 25k miles on this 4x4. N1T441D Affordable cross over. N1T310A Only 9k miles on this local trade. N1T014D A must to drive. N1T257A One local owned trade. N1T476A
$20,968 $20,968 $21,668 $21,668 $21,968




2009 HONDA CR-V 2006 TOYOTAHIGHLANDER4X4 LIMITED 2010 MINI COOPER 2009 BUICK LUCERNE CXL 2008 BUICK LUCERNE CXL
Roomy and economical. N2T106A Moon roof &navigation & only 16k miles. NP5682 Fun to drive. NP5628 Loaded and lots of luxury. N1C123M Local one owner trade & looksike new. N2C069A
$22,968 $23,668 $23,668 $23,668 $23,968




2008 BUICK ENCLAVE CX 2009 SUBARU FORRESTER LLBE 2006 FORD!F150LARIAT4X4 SUPER CREW 2008 LINCOLN MKX 2010 FORD F50 XLT4X4 CREW CAB
Really different in a goodway N1T210A This all wheel drive vehicle is real cool. NP5 0 Only 21k miles and like new. NP5677 The luxury cross over. NP5663 One owner local trade. N1T492A
S$26,968 $26,968 $28,968 $29,968


2008 FORD EDGE SEL 2011 FORD E250 VAN
A great cross over. N 1 C 181A A real work horse. NP5649
$22,668 $22,968


2009 LINCOLN MKS 2010 FORD FI50 RAPTOR 4X4 EXT CAB
Believe it or not ifs really a lincoln. NP5667 Loaded raptor with nav and sun roof. N2T113A
$29,968 $41,668


;i Inglis Dunnellon ala
Beverly Hills4a
S Crystal
G ENUiver -,.T.RvrFloral City
HEUNsassO IN .Nick Nicholas
a Springs Hwy. 98
,U I V7 Spring Hwy 50
Hill Brooksville


MSRP
Dealer Discount
Retail Customer Cash


S$1


SATURDAY, MARCH 10, 2012 C15








CIBM SATURDAY. MARCH 10, 2012 C imu 8,Kelss Couin'()CHOIL




$ AF1 PM

ARZ LT ONI
0 *^^E^ S IS S S 55zS-fi^




$1-PER

AM -
AutoACSD, OS tar, Turbo-charged 1.41L Y








lfc33(!I8fiopi


unts Hr epie-o. dt opbictan
*^^^R k*t riy^^^ *' ^^^ 'I~tZ'^^^ 1ij .v\ l i*^ v >* *TAr^^^ I, r*TiiAi^^^^ I,^ KI II'^^^ I,'T.'~'^^^^ I II t***^

I i I I. I I I^ ^ ^


Honda _
REALLY '
_______L a, sjniJ
a m. .... .a..


SALES EVENT


REAL DEALS.


l. tyjt' I .oOJ)p



Fikflr


BIG INVENTORY.


Coe .e What= LOW=.. .


J Come See What LOVE
Can Do For You!!!
110NEA -


I
L ~. k... .4 t~ A


On approved credit. Must finance with AHFC. 1. 36 Month closed end lease 12,000 miles per year with approved credit, plus tax, tag, 1st payment,$4000 cash or trade equity and lease fees excess milage penalty is 20
cents per mile. Limited to in stock vehicles only, all options are at additional price. Residual values: Civic $12043.50, Accord $13081.50, Pilot $16689.60. Pictures for illustration purposes only, all prices plus tax, tag, state
fees and $499 administrative fee. Dealer installed options additional cost, in stock units only. All vehicles subject to prior sale. Applies to in stock units. Offers expire on date of publication.
000AT4R


-fmmwq.wp" Pjr
dbbmmmm Plj


C16 SATURDAY, MARCH 10, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




FLORAL CITY FLORAL CITY
HUGE Rummage Fri., Sat. & Sun. 8am-?
Sale 10175 S. ARABIAN AVE
SAT. 8-3 Withlapopka INVERNESS
Community Center Sat 8-2
Huge Indoor Sale, Misc. items
Pancake Breakfast 1790 S Covewalk
8-10am Brats &
Hot Dogs 11-2 pm INVERNESS
Plant, Bake Sale, Saturday, 10th, 8a-12
& Kettle Corn Stoneridge Landing
11104 E. Flounder Dr. COMMUNITY SALE
for info Sharon
352-560-7716 or Mary INVERNESS
352- 344-2460 Veterans Yard Sale
Our Lady of Fatima
MChurch
l>M M P? Saturday 7:30a-1:30p
550 US HWY 41S.
Fund Raiser Sale Call 352-400-8952
Crystal River for vendor space, $10
Train Depot Please Bring
Sat8a-2p A Can Good to help
sat8a-2p feed veterans
Something for every- feed veterans
one 109 NE Crystal St ARDSALE


f" .. LECANTO
0li'. Fri. & Sat 8AM-4PM
Tools, fishing, boating


INVERNESS
Fri, 8 4, Sat 8 3
Lots of good stuff
8240 E Fairway Lp

INVERNESS
Fri, Sat 8-?
Fishing, diving, kids
motor cycles, tool bxs
3815 S Susan Pt.
(352) 726-2666

INVERNESS
Fri. & Sat. 8a-2pm
2 Family Sale, Tools,
Household, LOTS OF
STUFF, Downsizing
8823 E. Cresco Lane
Inverness Golf CC



INVERNESS
Fri. & Sat. 8am-Until
Tools, Furniture,
Mowers, Rods &
Reels, Lots of Pretty's
4055 E. Jessie Lane


furniture, vehicles, MISC
2068 W Shining Dawn Ln
PINE RIDGE
Fri.& Sat. 7:30-3:00.
491 Pineridge Blvd.
Right Lena, Right
6014 N. Kingwood Terr
PINE RIDGE
Woman's CLUB SALE
Fri & Sat 8am-
5253 W. Wichita Dr.,
PRB to Bronco to
3rd left to Withita




Are U Moving? Estate?
In home liquidations?
MARTIN'S Estate &
Consign 352-209-4945




BLUE FOX COAT waist
length, excellent condi-
tion, size med -large,
$100 firm 513-4473
GIRLS BABY CLOTHES
40 pieces. Assorted
sizes.Newborn to 9mos.
$20.00 352-637-4916


!!!!!!!!275/60 R20!!!!!!!!
Nice tread!!!!!! Only ask-
ing $80 for the pair!!
(352)551-1810
*225/70R1 6*
Great tread!!! Only asking
$60 for the pair!!
(352)551-1810
---- 245/65R17---
Nice tread!!!!!! Only
asking $80 for the pair!!
(352)551-1810
4 TIRES
#275/60/17
Nearly New
$200 obo
(352) 726-9369
55 GALLON AQUARIUM
Tank and matching wood
cabinet. $95.00 Call
746-1017
2010 Kenmore Elite
water filter, used 6 mos.
New $600 sell $400 obo
cell (917) 721-1287
401-447-9222
1 HP, Submersible
pump, $75.
Guaranteed
will demonstrate
352-726-7485
2nd Hand Store
Open Tues-Sat 9a-5p
Furn, Appliances, tools,
clothing, misc. Items,
@ N. Maynard & Hwy 44
1/4 ml E. of Stokes FLea
50" TV flat screen
Samsung $350.
Manual Hosp. beds $35
ea. Full sz Mattress/box
springs $50.
352-419-6298
BEAR WHITETAIL
HUNTER COMPOUND
BOW- RH., Quiver &
Sight, 451bs, Ex., $40,
352-628-0033
BOAT & UTILITY
TRAILER DOLLY- 1-7/8"
Ball, RubberAir Inflated
Tires, Ex., $30,
352-628-0033
BOXES OF ITEMS
Boxes of: Pictures, Milk
glass, corning ware,
glasses, clothes,oil paint,
plates 352-527-8287
COMPOUND BOW,
OUTERS ASTRO- RH.,
45-60lbs, viking sight,
$25, 352-628-0033


ALUMINUM STORM
DOOR with windows $15
Walter @ 352-364-2583
DVD Home Theater
Sound System
6 speakers
$150
(812) 629-6538
Easy Pop up
12 x 12 tent,
waterproof,
never used, $215
(352) 322-6456
FREE FIREWOOD
352 628 3551
GUINEA PIG female,
5 weeks old, must see
habitat b4 rehoming.
$15.00 b48pm
352-575-1898
HOVABATOR INCUBA-
TOR Picture Window
model. Almost new!
$25.00 Call 746-1017
LARGE MOUTH BASS
NATURAL SKIN FISH
MOUNT- 20 inches long,
Excellent condition, $25,
352-628-0033
NIKON
D40, DSLR Camera
used,18 to 55 lens
battery & charger
$350 excel.Camera
(352) 621-6606
Off shore map
Citrus county $15. +
pen censor for /0 reel
w/7'rod $55 or $60 for
both(352) 726-2350
Off white round 41 inch
table with butterfly leaf
and 6 chairs. Good condi-
tion. $100 Call
357 726 5753
Pool Pump
1.5 hp, Stay-Rite Pool
pump & motor
unitw/filter basket,
2" fittings $125.
(352) 637-3059
Portable Generator
550 Watts, 4 outlets
$500
Craftsman 42"
lawn tractor $300
(812) 629-6538
PVC PATIO TABLE
w/4 chairs & 2 gliders
$300.
Hitachi 50" projection
color TV $250.
(352) 726-2278


CLASSIFIEDS




BICYCLE- Childs Bike
Trailer, 20" Tire, fits all
adult Bikes, Ex., $65,
352-628-0033
SALMON NATURAL
SKIN FISH MOUNT-
31 inches long, Excellent
condition, $50,
352-628-0033
Shipping Pallets,
all in good shape
No boards missing
(80) $100 for all
(352) 563-2385
SINK WITH COUNTER-
TOP and all hardware off
white color $25 Walter
@ 352-364-2583
SOARING EAGLE
STATUE.. NEW/eas
59.95/selling for 20.00
Linda 341-4449
SONY. Turn table,
receiver 4 speakers
$75. 1985 Antique
craved chair $75.
Beige Lazy boy Recliner
$40.(847) 366-1464
TOILET AND SINK
BASIN navy blue elon-
gated w/matching sink
$25 Walter @
352-364-2583
TROLLING MOTOR 40
Ibs thrust minnkota bow
mount with 2 mounting
brackets 250.00
352-726-9964
WALL LIGHT FIXTURE
3 BULBS NEW WITH
TAGS $35 CAN E-MAIL
PHOTO 419-5981
WALL PAPER $35 CAN
E-MAIL PHOTO.2 1/2
ROLLS MADE IN
ENGLAND 419-5981



True Model T5SU-27-8
Sandwich and Salad
Refrigerator
NSF approved 8 trays
27/2" Wide, 30" H, 37"
High at sub bar, Like
New 7 years old, 100%
complete and working
no rust no corrosion
$700 obo
Stainless Steel Table 36"
W, 23" p 36" H, 2 shelves
$200 .(352) 344-4408


Alante Jr. rear wheel
power Chair GP200,
4 yrs old, never used,
$800 obo
(352) 795-5846
Cell (352) 601-4426

Bruno Lift
for inside vehicle for
electric wheel chair
$500.(352) 726-4558

ELECTRIC WHEEL-
CHAIR its brand new. its
a jizzy 614 series
352-503-2742

MOBILITY SCOOTER
3 wheel, heavy duty
Golden Avenger
#za531 5001b cap
$975. All Alum heavy
duty car carrier for
Scooter $850
(352) 522-0467

Single Electric
Medical Bed
w/ 2 mattresses
$550
Wheel chair, $75.
(352) 628-5878

WALKER WITH CUSH-
IONED SEAT, BRAKES
AND 8" WHEELS. $90.
527-9518




BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We Also
Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676











"NEW" 10-20W AMP
W/DISTORTION, GREAT
FOR PRACTICE OR
"LESSON ROOM" $15
352-601-6625


^~cITRUS COUNTY
For more information on how to reach C T RUC NT YE
Citrus County readers call U HL O N J C I
352-563-5592. www.chronicleonline.com

Scarborough 2010


SATURDAY, MARCH 10, 2012 C17


Mqic


3. Door pivot hint of color (1)


4. Lass's round white gems (1)


5. Shake up and disturb beef animals (2)


ig
AT
E),and


squares., ne number a r me
definition tells you how many
syllables in each word.

S2012 UFS, Dist by Univ Uclick for UFS


6. Car "store" owner curer (2)


7. "Red Hot Mama" Tucker's sports awards (2)

---------I-- 0 -1---EI----I-


3-10-12


SHIHdOHl SHIHdOS 'L *iIvatH WIV3'9 3ILLV3 TLIVII H9
S'IHVHd SUTII9 T ODNI NINIH Sff13H Srs 'g GIH (IX 11
SHAMSNV


0 ORSSALE

Twi Patio o es...222 .. e.m..$ 9 ,0

Gae Adl- Cm u ity...Po/y/irr
Ownr inncng.. % wn..6% nt..30YR






Babaa0..rok0 .A

352464250 or35272.035


4x8 utility trailer
$400.
(352) 746-7357


Sell r Swa


"NEW" ACOUSTIC
DREDNAUT GUITAR
W/XTRAS PRO
QUALITYGOLD GRO-
VERS $95 352-601-6625
"NEW" PRO ACOUSTIC
GUITAR
MAHOGANYABALONEYGR
OVERS,PREMIUM
QUALITY $80
352-601-6625
ELECTRIC GUITAR
W/AMPTUNER,STRAPCORD,
STRINGS
CD,&GIGBAG $85
352-601-6625
YAMAHA Digital
Keyboard Like new, 88
key, include matching
stand, sustain pedal,
DVD/manual, org. box,
$400.00 352-726-9797



4 DRAPE PANELS OL-
IVE GREEN ROD
POCKET PANELS JCP
HOME 45"X84" $20
634-2004
5 KITCHEN VALANCES
12"X60" BLACK AND
BEIGE CHECK JCP
HOME LIKE NEW $20
634-2004
12 X 12 FLOOR TILES...
NEW /ABOUT 118
PIECIES/LIGHT COL-
ORS/ 25.00 LINDA
341-4449
COMFORTER Charter
Club White 3" thick, 60
x90 washable cotton and
Nordicfill like new $35
352-464-0955
COMFORTER SET KING
Shams & Bedskirt, NEW,
Cream, Paid $470 sell
$100 firm, email photo
352-382-3650
WOOD FLOORING BY
BRUCE, Planks 3"x3/8"x
random Med Oak 25 sq ft
NEW in box $59 email pic
352-382-3650



TREADMILL DP
Lifestrider, variable speed
in very good condition,
$85. Can email photo.
352 726 9983
TREADMILL WESLO
fold up treadmill $50
352-637-1965


-I
303 LEE ENFIELD
sporterized, nice clean
rifle,
$200 firm, 860-1039
CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pond,
ATVtrails $165Kobo
352 795-2027/ 634-4745
CLUB CAR
'06 $1,500,
with charger
352-344-8516
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
FRESH JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct.@ $5 per lb
Stone Crab@ $6 per lb
delivered 727-771-7500
GOLF CLUBS Ladies Ti-
ger Shark Set 4 woods 7
irons all graphite Lady
Shark like new $100.
Dunnellon 465.8495
GOLF DRIVER Nike
Sasquatch Sumo 10.5R
Diamana graphite Std loft
lie exc cond $50.
Dunnellon 465-8495
SWE BUY GUNS
On Site Gun Smithing
(352) 726-5238




EZ PULL TRAILERS,
New & Used

Utility & Enclosed
BUY, SELL, TRADE
Custom Built, Parts,
Tires, Whis, Repairs,
Trailer Hitches

New 6 x 12 open
utility w/ramp $935

Used 6 x 10 enclosed
w/ramp $1595

Hwy 44 Crystal River
352-564-1299

GULF TO LAKE
TRAILER SALES

Largest Selection &
Lowest Prices.
Offering New & Used
Cargo & utility trailers

Triple Crown Utility TRL
6 x 12 w/new spare
$1050.
V nose, rear ramp
door, $1995.

Trailer Tires
starting at $69.95

352-527-0555
Hwy 44, Lecanto


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





DUNNELLON
5159 W. Disney Ln 2/2,
New AC, Lrg. Lot
$400/m $400 dp
(727) 480-5512


.R/Homosassa
1& 2 Br. furn, quiet park
Util. incl. clean, shrt/long
term 352 220-2077
HERNANDO
3/2, Country Setting
$575 mo 352-362-5019
HOMO. 3/2 1/2AC
CH/A, fenced, $450
212-2051 or 220-2447
HOMOSASSA
3/2, $475
2/2 ,$500, F/L/S
(320) 282-3061
HOMOSASSA
Rent to Own. Lrg 3/1/2,
1/2 ac fenced, W/D,
dish washer $695./mo
(352) 419-1744
INVERNESS
RENT SPECIAL: Sec. dep,
pro-rated over 3 mo.
period In the INVERNESS
WATERFRONT 55+ Park
w/5 piers for fishing &
enjoyment, clubhouse,
onslte shuffleboard, and
much more! 1 BR home
$325 plus. 2BR home
$450 Includes H20. 2 BR,
1.5 bath, Park Model
$500. Pets considered.
Section 8 accepted.
(352) 476-4964
INVERNESS
Waterfront 55+ Park
w/5 piers for fishing &
enjoyment, clubhouse,
onslte shuffleboard
and much more!
Furnished, IBR home
with central A/C $600.
352-476-4964



1995, Doublewide,
28 x 56, 2BD, 2BA,
LR, DR, Eat in Kit,
community Pool
Nice Condition
$30,000 (352) 400-8270
3/2, 1982 24x56 MH as
is U must Move $7K
(352) 400-5152
ATTENTION
LAND OWNERS
JACOBSEN NEW 2012
5 yr. warranty, 3/2,
2 x 6 construction,
upgrade insulation,
appliance pkg.
Delivered & set up
with A/C & heat,
steps & skirting only
$279.19./mo. W.A.C.
Includes first year
on homeowner Ins.
Call 352-621-9181

AWESOME DEALS
Financing Available
$500/dn
1/1 remod, shed $5k
1/lscrnrm/carprt $6k
2/1 carprt/rf.over $7k
turn, move-in ready
55+ park, clean quiet
CR/Homossasa area
Owner 352-220-2077

Bank foreclosures
USED HOMES/REPO'S
Bank authorized
liquidator.We Always
have new inventory,
Call 352-621-9183
or come by
Taylor Made Homes
Homes from
$1,000 up!
BEAUTIFUL 1 OWNER,
older Doublewide,
Home in Forestview
Park new appl's, new
roof and AC, Priced to
Sell! (352) 503-2154
INVERNESS
Waterfront 55+ Park
w/5 piers for fishing &
enjoyment, clubhouse,
onslte shuffleboard
and much more!
Single wide 1 & 2 BR,
starting @ $6,900. Lot
rent $274/mo. H20
Included. 3 mo. free
rent with purchase.
352-476-4964
LAND-N-HOME
FLORAL CITY
BIG HOME!
The Entertainer,
over 2000 sq. ft., 4/2,
large family room.
Home in great shape
on quiet paved road
near chain of lakes
ONLY $59, 900. or
$2,250 down &
395/mo. W.A.C.
Call 352-621-3807

Palm Harbor Homes
4/2 From $499/month
Loaded.
3/2 From $399/month
Loaded.
Homes on Your Lot
0 Down.
800-622-2832 X 210

Why Pay Rent When
You can own this
32x60 3/2 w/family
room & corner firepl.
$359.mo W.A.C.
call 352-490-7422 or
877-372-4941



HOMOSASSA
2/2 carport nicely turn
MH on Homosassa River
w/dock no pet f/I/s
sht/long term $850
352-220-2077


oonaoxzs


WORDY GUR DY BY TRICKY RICKY KANE
1. Child avoided a seeker in a game (1) Everyanswerisa rhymin
pair of words (like FAT C
and DOUBLE TROUBLE
2. Belgrade native's sage and thyme (1) they will fit in the letter


0OAN32


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966











JUNK MOTORCYCLES
WANTED Will Pay up to
$200 for Unwanted Mo-
torcycle 352-942-3492
WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation.
Call (352) 726-9369




AKC Sheltie male
sable & white 7 mos.
house trained, home
raised w/love, shots, mi-
cro. will sell to loving
home(352) 795-8828
BEAGLE PUPPIES 8
wks on 2/15 4 females 1
male $125., also have 3
Bloodhound/beagle mix
10wks old $50.obo
386-344-4218 or
386-344-4219
FOOD & HEALTH PROD-
UCTS For ALL Your Ani-
mals, Flea remedies,
We Now Carry Taste of
the Wild, Black Gold, &
Chicken Soup Dog &
Cat Food American
Farm & Feed 795-6013
Mini Dachshund Pups
8 wks old, shots, paper
trained M/F $350
Breeding Trio $650
mbprozer@tampabay
.rr.com(352) 419-6298

TCUP YORKIE Out-
standing Tcup
Yorkiejust 11 wksold,
$450.Good with
kids,AKC reg,vet
checked,dewormed
and shots taken,Pups
comes with papers.
sdpets14@yahoo.com




HAY, SADDLES, TACK,
AND FEED (FRM) Ask
About our Free Delivery
American Farm & Feed
(352) 795-6013
McClelan Saddle
Exc Cond $795.
(352) 795-0619


Livestock







C18 SATURDAY, MARCH 10, 2012


FLORAL CITY
2/2 carport on canal,
2 sheds,, furnished scr
patio $44,900. Poss.
Own Fin 440-225-8618



1/1 SW, NO lot Rent
near Bike Trail, storage
shed, off Hwy. 41,
Inverness, $12,500
217 -837-2526
217-508-7477
3/2, 1,800 Sq Ft,
Fenced Yard,
$5,000 down $525. mo
HOMOSASSA
(352) 302-9217
BEST OF THE BEST
New 2012 Jacobsen
Custom 28 x 52, 3/2
big eat in kitchen,
2x6 construction, OSB
wrap, 5 yr. warranty,
elongated toilet,
china sinks, storm
door. Large rooms.
Must see before you
buy anything else.
Only $46,900 or
$1,800 down
$298.89/mo W.A.C.
Call 352-621-9181
Crystal River
Rent to Own ? 2/1
DW, remodeled, clean
& private, 1/2 ac. trees
price neg.352 795-0898
FLORAL CITY on 3 Lots,
Assum Mortg. Priv Fin. 2
Mast Suites New appls.
horses ok, $33,900
Cridland Real Living.
J. Desha 352-634-6340
Hernando-Forest Lake
North,2/2 DWvery
nice,HA,1.25 acre
$5900 dwn,$500 mo.
Owner Financing
352-637-5143
INVERNESS
Move in neat 2 bath
SW w/extra rooms, nice
area, fenced $32,500
Owner (352) 341-1569
Lecanto
881 N. Maynard Av
DWMH 2/2, deck,
Fixer Upper
$15K (352) 746-7952
Northwest Citrus
County 2 bedroom. 1.5
bath. Mobile Home on
1 acre, high and dry,
shaded lot, shed, paved
road $44,900 or make
offer. Possible owner fi-
nancing. 352-795-9908



2/2 on Lake Rousseau.
Was $27,500 NOW
$19,900 Low Lot Rent
$240/m 2003 Mobile
Home. Used Seasonally
Owner bought a house,
our lost is your gain.
(352) 817-1987,
(207) 546-6115
AWESOME DEALS
Financing Available
$500/dn
1/1 remod, shed $5k
1/Iscrnrm/carprt $6k
2/1 carprt/rf.over $7k
furn, move-in ready
55+ park, clean quiet
CR/Homossasa area
Owner 352-220-2077
Crys Rver Village
55+ DW Home of Merit
2/2/1 carport, com-
pletely furnish all new &
appls. Must See
$39K for appt /details
(704) 489-0523
574-946-6286


LISTINGS
Homosassa 2 bedroom.
2 bath. 55+double wide
mobile home in park
14,900.New wooden
floors very clean. Closed
in front and back porch.2
car carport.Club
house,community swim-
ming pool,exercise
room.Pool table.Close to
shopping area. call 352
7946601
Homosassa
Turtle Creek
1/1 park model
w/screen porch
$16K (352) 628-3351
HOMOSASSA'S
Best Housing Value
Modern homes from
$8,400 or Lease to Own
from $139/mo.
$800.down + Lot rent at
Evanrldge Community
an exceptional 55+Park
352 628-5977
INVERNESS
Waterfront 55+ Park
w/5 piers for fishing &
enjoyment, clubhouse,
onslte shuffleboard, and
much more! 2 BR 1.5 BA
for S2.000. must be
approved 352-476-4964

bath. Senior Park 14x66
S/W, Screened Porch,
Furnished. Very clean.
Call 815-535-7958
On Lake Rousseau 2
bedroom. 2 bath.
14x60MH, 8x20 FL
room, 8x10 shed, 2-stall
carport, Withlacoochee
Backwaters MHP,
$8500. 352-219-2240
Stoneridge Landing
55+ Comm. Resales
starting @$13,500
Financing avail
1-800-779-1226
(352)637-1400
StoneridgeLanding
55+. 1993 26x56, Move
in Cond.2/2 upgrades
$39K view pics @
mhvillage.com/493361
(352) 344-0888
WESTWIND VILLAGE 55+
Park. Updated 2/2 DW's
for sale. Reasonable
(352) 628-2090



LECANTO 55+
*FOR RENT OR SALE*
1/1, Furnished $525.
2/2, Furnished $550.


352-287-9175, 746-1189













835 NE Hwy 19
Crystal River, Fl
(352) 795-0021
View our website
C21 NatureCoast.com

Action 352-195-RENT
Rental Management Really, In
ww.citruscountyhomerentalscom
8520 Shannon
North Crystal River
Large 3/2/2, furn./unfurn.
1.4 acre.
'1100 mR
... R]1'


CHASSAHOWITZKA
3/2 Wtrfront DW, $600.
3/2 Furnished DW., $600
Agent (352) 382-1000




CRYSTAL RIVER
2 BR. $550., 3BR House
$800., 352-563-9857
CRYSTAL RIVER
Completely furn., Pool,
boat dock, Wash/Dry
(352) 302-5972
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025




Alexander Real Estate
(352) 795-6633

Crystal River Apts
2 BR/1 BA $375-$500

BEVERLY HILLS
1 Rm Eff, All Util. incl.
Cable,Sep. Kit./ bth
$525. mo.,pet ok
352- 228-2644
CRYSTAL RIVER 1/1
Handicap Ramp, Small
Pet OK. (352) 628-2815
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1, frm $450. Mo. $750
to move in. No Pets.
(352) 263-6321
FLORAL CITY
FREE Use of boat ramp,
fishing dock, canoe &
Jon boat rentals. 1 BR
$450/$200 dp. incis Sat
TV electric, walk to river
Trails End Camp, A
Friendly Place to Live
352-726-3699

INVERNESS
1 BR & 2 BR Garden
& Townhouse Apts.
NOW AVAILABLE *
$512 to $559 a mo
water included
small pets welcome
Park like setting
must see to appreci-
ate Occassionally
Barrier Free Available
GATEHOUSE APTS
(352) 726-6466
Equal Housing
Opportunity

LECANTO
Nice 1 Bedrm $500
352-613-6000.216-0012
(352) 746-5238

MAYO DRIVE
APARTMENTS
MOVE IN SPECIAL*
(352) 795-2626


SEVEN RIVERS
APTS
A Beautiful place
to come home too.
35 units on private
street, situated on 10
wooded acres, near
Crystal River &
7 Rivers Hosp. fish-
Ing, walking, trails,
shopping near by.
Old Florida setting,
quite, clean well
malnt. central
laundry room.
352-795-3719
Directions:
Hwy 19 turn W. at
Days Inn, first right
onto Tallahassee Rd









FLORAL CITY
STOREFRONT 1000 Sq Ft

813-310-5391




CRYSTAL RIVER
Completely furn., Pool,
boat dock Wash/Dry
(352) 302-5972
INVERNESS
LANDINGS 2/1.5 clean
roomy great location






HERNANDO 1/1
Furnished $125/wk.
$300 sec $425 Moves In.
352-206-4913,465-0871
LECANTO
$400mo w/elect/water
garb. $100 dp 746-3073




CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1 Cute cottage Max.
two. 1st/last/sec $500 per
mo. 628-1062

Specializing in
Rentals


Debe Johns
Brkr/Assoc/PRM

Coldwell Banker Next
Generation Realty
Property Manager
(352) 382-2700 www.
coldwellbankernext
aeneration.com

See what a
Professional
Residential Manager
can do for you.


Ren Hoss


2 acres, 4BR, 3BA,
inground pool, Can
have horses. $925 mo.
or option to buy
(352) 220-1692
BERVERLY HILLS
2bed, 1 bath, C/H/A
1st Mo FREE $650/m
(352) 422-7794
BEVERLY HILLS
$575. MO. 2/1, C/H/A,
W/D Hkup., 382-1344
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1 carport, remodeled
$600 first, last, sec
(786)286-1163
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/1, $600. mo.
382-1162, 795-1878
BEVERLY HILLS
2/2, CHA, $550. mo. +
$300 Sec. 352-422-0139
BUSHNELL
3/2 on 4 Acres, pas-
tured fenced, $800.
mo. (352) 422-5634
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 Clean, $800 mo.
795-6299 364-2073

YOU'LL THIS!

DUNNELLON 3/2/2
RENT TO OWN
Close to Rainbow River
RUBLESRENTALS.COM
(561) 719-8787
(561) 575-1718 after 7pm
FLORAL CITY
3/1/2, 6 Acres, wooded
$700. 352-212-2264
FLORAL CITY
3/2/2, Fm. Rm., Dbl Lot
w/ 2 sheds, $850. mo
(352) 422-5634
HERNANDO 312/2
Rent to Own $850 mo
www.rlckybobs.com
352-613-5818
INVERNESS
1/1, $400. mo. + Sec.
(352) 726-1921
INVERNESS
2/1.. $500
352-422-2393
INVERNESS
2/2/2 Detached home,
Royal Oaks upgrds,
clubhouse, pool, lawn
serv, W/D. $800/mo.
incls. cable /wter. Avail
2/20, 949-633-5633
INVERNESS
3BR/2BA, $800 mo
306 Hunting Lodge Dr
(352) 895-0744 cell
RENT TO OWN!!
No credit check!
3bdrms 352-566-6049
JADEMISSION.COM




CRYSTAL RIVER
Adorable furn water-
front 1 BR or 2BR,
Laundry Boatslip, Lanai
Pets? Near Mail Pool
Priviledges $1,200-
$1,400. 352-220-6593
CRYSTAL RIVER
Studio, furn.on Hunter's
Springs, sun deck, W/D
rm. All uti l. incl.+ boat
dock.$700/m avail
4/1/12 352-372-0507
HOMOSASSA
2/2 carport nicely furn
MH on Homosassa River
w/dock no pet f/I/s
sht/long term $850
352-220-2077




C.R/Homosassa
1& 2 Br. furn, quiet park
Util. incl. clean, shrt/long
term 352 220-2077




FARMS, LAND,
COMMERCIAL
UNIQUE &
HISTORIC HOMES,
SMALL TOWN
COUNTRY LIFESTYLE
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989










(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.

PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is



or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limit
tion or discrimination. "
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY


For Sale
Forest Ridge 2 bedroom.
2 bath. This updated villa
is totally move in ready
and maintenance free!
This beautiful 2/2/2 is
located on a private lot
and includes an optional
membership to Citrus
Hills Golf and Country
Club. The home includes
all appliances, an eat in
kitchen, a fully tiled great
room, and a sun barrier
paneled lanai. Home is
within walking distance to
the pool and club house.
This property is a must
see!! $95,900
352-746-0002

Specializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches &
Commercial








Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com





HOMOSASSA OPEN
HOUSES, Sunday
March 11th, 2012

10:00amtil 1:00pm
11491 Riverhaven Dr
2 bed, 2 bath, water-
front in Riverhaven for
$179,000

3:00pm til 6:00pm
10848 W Halls River rd
3 bedroom, 2 bath
waterfront home on
the Homosassa River
for $459,000

Kristi Bortz
Plantation Realty, Inc.
(352) 228-9505 Cell
(352) 795-0784 Off
KristiBortz@
Yahoo.corn





Lot For Sale Pine Ridge
sub. 3620 N. Stirrup Dr.,
2.78 ac, horse trail on
back side, wooded, for
sale by owner. Google it!
Make offer
bill@agairupdate.com
478.957.0211




Black Diamond/Lecant
Owner Financing
3/2/2.5 SS appls
custom flooring,Hot Tub
new outdoor kit. w cov-
ered lanai. Price to sell.
$185K. (352) 527-3501





RENT TO OWN!!
No credit check!
3 bdrms 352-566-6049
JADEMISSION.COM




TERRA VISTA
2+ /2/2 Maint Free,
Open plan, up grades,
,Beautiful Sunsets,
Owner Financ Avail
$259 K (352) 746-6050




1 or2BD,1.5 BA
completely remodeled
2 lots, 2 wells, wkshop
2 sheds .Owner
Financ $469/mo
lake area 727-457-0850

ARBOR LAKES
55+ Comm. 3/2/2 +
Lg enclosed a/c porch,
most pvt. location,
Upgrades $169,900
(352) 726-7952

HERNANDO 312/2
Rent to Own $850 mo
www.rlckybobs.com
352-613-5818




3/2/2, I.G. &C.C.
3k sf. new kit. Ig closets,
CHAfirepl. on golf
course $129,900
no realtors 726-0652

3BR, 3BA, Pool home,
2,000 sq.ft. $163,000
OR BEST OFFER
518 Poinsettia
352-860-0878.

HIGHLANDS
Lrg.2/2- 4 car garage
pool, game room,
mud room on triple lot
fenced, price to sell
$65,500 (352) 564-4598

INVERNESS
Waterfront 55+ Park
w/5 plers for fishing &
enjoyment, clubhouse,
onslte shuffleboard
and much more!
Single wlde 1 & 2 BR,
startling $6,900. Lot
rent $274/mo. H20
Included. 3 mo. free
rent wlth purchase.
352-476-4964

Lakefront Gospel
Island Location


Spacious 3/2/2
for rent $700/m or for
sale..... 908-322-6529


1 1,m I. L- I 11114 i], -li_4...." -., ;.. ..-q

PINE RIDGE ESTATES
Spectacular Custom Built Home. 3/3/3, Pool
home PLUS detached 2 car garage/barn on
3 fenced acres. Too many extras to name.
MLS #353907 $329,900
Directions: Hwy 486 to Pine Ridge Blvd. Home on right side.
Alan DeMichael 352-613-5752
Jeanne Gaskill 352-476-5582

m AMERICAN 3 000ASRR
ER4 REALTY& INVESTMENTS 352-746-3600


CLASSIFIED



3/2/2 Built 1986, On '/2
Acre, Remodeled
above ground pool
w/deck BY OWNER
4141 S. Journey Point
$185,000 813-477-6006
3/2/2, Built 2007
Newly Remodeled
$88,000
100% Financing Avail.
(352) 400-0230


^^S^----l


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work For You!

BETTY HUNT,
REALTOR
ERA KEY 1 Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.

Condo for Sale
2/2, 1,850 sq. ft.
35 Beech Street
(352) 503-3294













Best Time To Buy!
I have lease options,
owner financing &
foreclosures
call Phyllis Strickland
(352) 613-3503
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.

100% Financing
Citrus Springs
Homes 746-7990





t o




DEB INFANTINE

3 HOMES SOLD
In December
I Need Listings!

Real Estate!...
it's what I do.

ERA American
Realty
Phone:(352) 726-5855
Cell:(352) 302-8046
Fax:(352) 726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com












Michele Rose Realtor
Simply put I 'II work
harder 352-212-5097
isellcitruscountvy(
yahoo com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515




INVERNESS 2/2/1
Superbly maintained,
1381 Sqft, Oak floors,
Florida room, dining
room, extra pantries, par-
tially furnished. Pictures
avail 631 Whispering
Pines Blvd.
352-726-9983
INVERNESS
Nice 2/2/1 new carpet
tile & paint. Whispering
Pines Villas furnished
$69,900(352) 726-8712



Homosassa-Riverhaven
Village on water, 3/2+
bathriver roomlanai-ft
and back,dock, many
upgrades, beautiful
home. $260,000. Go to
forsalebvowner.com
Listing 23023708 or
call 352-628-9647
Realtors 2.5%

Join us to
Pre-view Homes
for sale
Feb 28th &
March 13th


Office Open
7 Days a Week

Lisa VanDeboe
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com


PERFECT
FLORIDA COTTAGE
ON the MAIN LAKE,
near the BIKE trail &
downtown Inverness
1368 SQ FT renovated
2/2/2 720 Edgewater
$189,500
www.crosslandrealty.c
om 352 726 6644




CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area. well. pond,
ATVtrails $165Kobo
352 795-2027/ 634-4745




CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pond,
ATVtrails $165Kobo
352 795-2027/ 634-4745




48 lots 14W.F. 1 gulf
access, 5 SMW s lots
3 lots impact fees pd.
$425K, = less than $9K
per lot (732) 996-3785
89 x 165 MOL, LOT
Lucky Hills, Nice
Residential Area
$19,000/Offer
Owner FiNance
(352) 422-1916
Homosassa
1.6 Acres on Hwy 19
Wet Lands, next to
Bowling Alley, $15,000
Owner Finance
352-621-1664
HOMOSASSA
Wooded Lot on
Lee Woods Drive,
112 xl 14ft River access,
but not on river $7,000.
352-621-1664
SUGARMILL
WOODS. BUILDING LOT
ON OAK VILLAGE
$20K firm 43 Vinca St
(352) 726-9587




BOAT LIFT
Single Pole,
1500 lb. capacity.
$900 obo
352-613-8453
JOHNSON O.B.
4.5 hp built in gas tank
exc cond.$395.
Ft. Island Marine Supply
(352) 436-4179
New 6 gal Plastic
gas tank $35.
Ft Island Marine Supply
9683 W. Ft Lsland Trailer
(352) 436-4179




Angler Model 2500
walk around, pur-
chased New March
2009 paid $54,520.
twin eng. 115 Yamaha
warnty 3/15 (14 hrs)
ESTATE PRICE
$37,500 859-229-5667
BAYLINER 15'
Bass or Pleasure,
50hp Force. very low
hrs. all like new $3500
firm(352) 341-1569
CAROLINA SKIFF
'03, 17ft, 60HP, Yam.
Bimini Top, elec. kick.,
CC, front deck seat
$5,895. 352-637-5426
FRESH JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct.@ $5 per lb
Stone Crab@ $6 per lb
delivered 727-771-7500
HOUSE BOAT
30 ft fiberglass, hrd
wood firs, & more
Live Aboard or entov
weekends in Paradise
$12,800 (423) 320-3008
Kayak 12'
fiberglass weight 221bs.
open cock pit w/cover
new paddles & life
jacket New $1700
sell $475.(352) 637-4760
PROLINE 20 CC
T-Top VHF, elect. New
135 Honda,4S, new EZ
Load trlr. $11,400 Extras
(352) 257-1161
STARCRAFT
1995 Starcraft 20 Foot
Pontoon with trailer. 75
Hp Mariner. Like new
motorcushbns,bimini,steering
and battery $6750
(352) 794-3391
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LAKE
MARINE
We Pay CASH For Used
Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck & Fishing
Boats (352)527-0555
boatsupercenter.com





















YACHTSMAN
24' Pontoon, 70 HP Ev.
T/T, cust. trlr, bimini top,
stored inside $4,200/bo
Includes Jet Ski,
Homa. (231) 852-0061


CLEARVIEW ESTATES AT CITRUS HILLS
2005 BUILT SPACIOUS 3/3/3 POOL HOME on
1.02 Acres Will this beautiful Mitch Underwood
custom built home with 2,665 sq. ft. of living space
be your new home? Sure to please, it is immaculate
and built with great attention to detail at every level.
Directions: From Gulf to Lake Hwy (44), turn north on E.
Crown of Roses Loop (Clearview Est. Entrance) and follow to
Man 0 War. House on left.


Yan Mak
Cell: 352-220-3991


Marge Maszota
Cell: 352-464-4220


I KELLERWILLIAMS 352-746-7113


Seats 4 with bimini top
and canvas cover,
$450. (352) 422-6298



2001 38 ft Holiday
Rambler, Cummings
diesel,2 slides, fully
loaded ,sell or trade
property $60000
859-814-3573
2010 MONTANA
Mountaineer. 5th wheel
36ft., 3 slidesloaded
used 1 season. like new
Hickory Addition
$32,500 (419) 307-8954
Bounder
Fleetwood 32' 1994
454 engine, loaded,
self contained, $9,750
352-795-6736
HITCHHIKER II LS
2008, 3 slides, excel
cond. heat pump, de-
luxe pkg. too many ex-
tras to list $32,000.
Dodge Truck also avail
(636) 209-0308
Holiday Rambler
'98 38' 7.5 gen.super
slide, air lever, a/c susp.
loaded call for details
$41K (352) 746-9211
I Buy RV'S, Steve
Henry, RV World of
Hudson Inc.Since
1974. (888) 674-8376
(727) 514-8875
SUNSEEKER '05
29 ft. Class. C., nearly
all options, generator,
needs awning fabric,
no smoke,33k mi.
Reduce $24K, 464-0316
WINNEBAGO
'02, Adventurer 33 ft.
2 slides, CHA, all extras,
low miles. non smoker.
garaged $30,000 obo
(352) 560-4246



05 SUNNYBROOK 36'
5th whl,2 slides,king
bed,like new,heated
tks, 60 amp service
oak cab $39,900
352-382-3298
Gulf Steam
Coach 25' model
24RBL, sips upto 6 gas &
elect appls & heat,
shower/toliet $6900
(352) 341-1714
I BUY RVS,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
call me 352-201-6945



Seats for Town &
Country Van
captain seat $30.
Bench Seat $45,
Gray excel cond.
(352) 344-4192



$$ CASH PAID $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
BIG SALE!
Consignment USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
AUTOS' FROM $1,500.
US 19 BY AIRPORT
US 44, BY NAPA
o* Low Payments *
461-4518 & 795-4440
consignmentusa.org
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars Trucks
& Vans, For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES,
Hwy 19... 352 564-8333
CASH PAID FOR JUNK
CARS Any Condition
Up to $500, Free
Towing 352-445-3909
KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Salvage Pays top $$$
for your autos.
352-628-4144
WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
Perfect Cond. or Not
TItledNo title,
No problem. Paying up
to $25K any make,
any model Call A.J.
813-335-37094/ 151-42O9


Everybody Rides
$495 DOWN
$49 PER WEEK
BUY HERE PAY
HERE..
Lots of clean-safe-
dependable rides.
CALL DAN TODAY
(352) 563 -1 902
"WE BUYS CARS
DEAD OR ALIVE"
1675 Suncoast Hwy.
Homosassa Fl.

BIG SALE!
Consignment USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
AUTOS' FROM $1,500.
US 19 BY AIRPORT
US 44, BY NAPA
Low Payments *
461-4518 & 795-4440
consignmentusa.org


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

IClassic
^^| Vehicles


uo '0 nrysler
Sebring Touring
Convertible,34k miles,
loaded, $14,250firm
352-897-4520
CADILLAC 04
DeVllle 66k mi, garaged
Champagne, w/top +
Gold Kit, $10,500
352-341-4949
CHEVY
'07, Impala, V6auto,
ice cold AC, non smok-
ers 100K mi $7,500
(352) 726-3093
CHRYSLER 06
Sebring, Touring cony.
45K mi. newer tires,
6 cyl. white, tan top,
loaded, mint, Sr owned
$8,200 (352) 513-4257
CHRYSLER
1995 LeBaron Converti-
ble, runs well, needs
some work, sold as is,
$750. (352) 503-6031
Citrus Sale Center
We buy/sell/trade
clean pre-owned
vehicles!


02 Ford Quad CabTruck
F-150 Cab$4,999
02 Mazda Milllenia
$5,400,
00, Ford Explorer
4 DR $3,800,
06 Grand Marquis
$13,200 low miles
Call 352-400-1038
DODGE
1996 Intrepid,
$3,000
(352) 220-2511
LINCOLN
'06, Towncar, Signature,
37K miles, looks, drives
even smells like new.
$16,500. (352) 746-1184
MERCEDES '99
S420, blue book $11,500
sell $10K FIRM
1729 W. Gulf to lake
Hwy, Lecanto
MERCURY
'03, Sable, Station
Wagon, V6, silver,
very good cond
64K mi., Serious Only
$5,100. (352) 270-4224
MITSUBIHI '07
Eclipse SE 4cyl finan
avail- consignment
usa.org across from air-
port us 19352-461-4518
OLDSMOBILE
199688 ...4 Doors,
power locks and win-
dows, a/c and heat, runs
good. $1,100.00
352-400-5152
PLYMOUTH
2000 Neon 152,734 mi-
les. New battery, tires,
belts, and recently
tuned-up. $700 obo.
352-746-2476 or
352-601-0134(cell)
Saturn Sedan
2000, 31 mpg, runs,
looks good, automatic,
cold air, cruise $3800
(352) 302-2028
TOYOTA P/U 1983
excellent mechanical
condition, has topper,
new tires $1500 firm
(352) 628-6515





BUICK
2007, Lacrosse only
33k mint condition
call for details
ACURA
2007, TSX, call to take
over payments of
225.00 wac
FORD
2010, Eddie Bauer
explorer call to take
over pyts of
359.00 wac
HONDA
2011 Accord
call to take over
pyts of 289.00 wac
HONDA
2010, Fit gas sipper
low miles only
14,995.00
CHRYSLER
2004 PT Cruiser rare
find only 35k 7995.00
HYUNDAI
2010 Genesis coupe
only one in town
call for details
TOYOTA
2007 Camry Solora
1 owner low miles
13,995
TOYOTA
2012 Highlander
call to take over pyts
of 379.00 wac
HONDA
2010 CRV deal of the
day only 14,995.00.
8888-874-5524











Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966


CHEVROLET '01
Camaro, Z28, Org. 9000
miles, Pristine show car
frozen in time. Loaded
black/black leather
Flawless rare find!
$15,750 (352) 513-4257





BIG SALE!
Consignment USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
AUTOS' FROM $1,500.
US 19 BY AIRPORT
US 44, BY NAPA
Low Payments *
461-4518 & 795-4440
consignmentusa.org

CHEVY 00
Silverado LS 1500, ext
cab. new AM/Fm CD
player, keyless entry
$3k obo(352) 220-2840
CHEVY
'98, S104 x 4 cold AC,
4.3, V6 motor, auto,
runs good $2,800
(352) 212-4835
Citrus Sale Center
We buy/sell/trade
clean pre-owned
vehicles!


02 Ford QuadCab F-150
Truck $4999
07 Nissan Murano
$14,900
06 Chrysler PT Cruiser
$6,499
06 Grand Marquis
$13,200 low miles
Call 352-400-1038
FORD '06
F250 Super Duty, 4 x 4,
6.0, Lariat Pkg. Off Rd.
Pkg., Hard Bed Cover
$21,500 (352) 586-8576
TOYOTA TUNDRA
2006, MUST SEE!
Reg. Cab, 76K miles.
Asking $6,900 obo
352-3220634




FORD 06
EXPEDITION,Eddie
Bauer, leather int, per-
fect cond, electric 3rd
row LOADED! 92K
(352) 601-0886
HYUNDAI '08
Santa Fe, 23,670K mi
loaded w all acc.
242 hp V6, leather
warranty transferable
$17,500 (352) 465-5501




CHEVROLET
2000 CK2500 PICK-UP
127K,EXT CAB, LONG
BEDAUTOAC,CRUISE,TILT,
AM/FM
BILL@352/860-2131

DODGE
'07, 1500 Sport, regular
cab, 28K mil. Like New
$16,000 (352) 419-7703
Retired don't need it!




FORD
'01, Windstar, LX Van,
white/gray, 88,400 mi.
non smoker, serv.
records $6,695
(352) 382-1167




Harley 00
Roadking Classic, all
gear 17K miles 11K
obo.(352) 489-0873
Harley Davidson
'02 FAT BOY, 15,357. mi-
les, loaded w/extra's
asking $12K
(352) 270-8488
HARLEY DAVIDSON
08 Night Train, flat bik,
11,500 mis. lots of extra's
$14K obo Jeff
(407) 712-0803
JUNK MOTORCYCLES
WANTED Will Pay up to
$200 for Unwanted Mo-
torcycle352-942-3492

KAWASAKI 96
GPZ 1100 black, 1800
org miles, garage kept,
Exc Cond. Vance Hines
header & jet kit $4275
obo (352) 795-7584
RIDLEY
2007 Auto Classic Auto-
matic,750 cc,
bags,windshield,one
ownerlow miles,beautiful
bike $11,500.00
352-628-3736

ROADSTAR
SILVERADO 04
Garage kept very well
maint lots of extras ask
$6k obo (352) 214-9800




908-0330 DAILY CRN
Surplus Prop.
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County Board
of County Commissioners
will be selling surplus prop-
erty and equipment via
the internet at
govdeals.com, March 1
until March 30, 2012.
Pub:March 1 thru 30, 2012


212-0310 SACRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Board of Directors of the Citrus Memorial Health
Foundation, Inc., a Fla. not for profit corporation will meet in Special Meeting for the
purpose of conducting an ATTORNEY/CLIENT SESSION on Tuesday, March 13, 2012;
Wednesday, March 14, 2012; Thursday, March 15, 2012, and Friday, March 16, 2012,
at 5:00 o'clock PM, in the Board Room, Administration Annex Building, Citrus Memo-
rial Hospital, 502 W. Highland Boulevard, Inverness, Florida, for the purpose of com-
mencing an attorney/client session pursuant to Section 286.011(8), Florida Statutes.
The purpose of the ATTORNEY/CLIENT SESSION will be to discuss settlement negotia-
tions and litigation strategy including, but not limited to, an action styled: Fifth Judi-
cial Circuit Court, (1) Citrus Memorial Health Foundation, Inc., Plaintiff, v. Citrus
County Hospital Board. Defendants, Case No.: 2010-CA-5399; (2) Citrus County Hos-
pital Board. Plaintiff, v. Citrus Memorial Health Foundation, Inc.. Case No.:
2010-CA-5702; (3) Citrus Memorial Health Foundation, Inc., Plaintiff, v. V. Upender
Rao. M.D. Deborah L. Ressler and Michael A. Smallridae. Defendants, Case No.:
2011-CA-1388; and (4) Citrus Memorial Health Foundation, Inc., Plaintiff, v. V.
UDender Rao. M.D., Deborah L. Ressler and Michael A. Smallridae, as Trustees of the
Citrus County Hospital Board, a Public Body of the State of Florida. Defendants, Case
No.: 2011-CA-1476; and (5) Citrus County Hospital Board, et al., Plaintiffs, vs. Citrus
Memorial Health Foundation, Inc, et al. Defendants, Case No.: 2012-CA-219.
Pursuant to said statute, the Board will meet in open session and subsequently com-
mence the attorney/client session which is estimated to be approximately two (2)
hours in duration. At the conclusion of the ATTORNEY/CLIENT SESSION, the meeting
shall be reopened per public notice. Board members may attend the attorney client
session telephonically.
Those persons to be in attendance at this ATTORNEY/CLIENT SESSION are as follows:
Citrus Memorial Health Foundation Board Members:
Robert Henigar David Langer
James Sanders Joseph Brannen
Sandra Chadwick V. Reddy, M.D.
Robert Collins Ralph Abadier M.D.
Ryan Beaty, Chief Executive Officer
Clark A. Stillwell Esquire, Attorney for Citrus Memorial Health Foundation, Inc.
James J. Kennedy, Esquire, Attorney for Citrus Memorial Health Foundation, Inc.
Court Reporter
March 10, 2012.


Water




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Das Auto.

WVolkswageioQaid_
IVl s %ehetob P, eseatsithe....








How much are gas prices these days?
At Volkswagen of Ocala we're giving gas away for
one year with the purchase of any New Volkswagen!


VEFINMAiEIMi



IJ Mmo WU ,Iii UA ono


COMPLIMENT HTARN
MLBj Sprigj .
T jrihg Tickets
ToAnyonrqReWhojAk
A ,~estj Drive. I


SCarefree Maintenance

1 year or gasol-ne based on EPA highway MPG estimate on 10K m.ies per year ai $3.70 per gallon. 36 monih leases, $1999 due ai signing ,nclud-ng $0 secure ty aepos.l. Plus lax, lag. lile ana dealer lee.
Wiln approved creOil. Three years or 36 [nousana mile no-charge scheduled maintenance. Some resiriclions apply. "For a Ilniled lerm on select models win approved credit. Tinlerest accrues from dale
ol purchase. 'Musil esl dr.ve a new vehicle. While supplies lasI. Lrm.l 2 per larmly. See dealer ior oeiraIs. Others exp-re 3 10 2012.


Volkswagen


3949 SW College Rd. Ocala
On SW College Road, Just West of 1-75
HOURS: Monday Friday: 8:30am-7pm Saturday: 9am-6pm


of Ocala


877-209-5199


MID


w


I


SATURDAY, MARCH 10, 2012 C19




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


,~..


AUTOOTI0E


1V2"


'04 FRONTIER


'06 HHR
,,w.,w


'08 F150


'08 MALIBU


$6,999 $6,999 $7,999 $7,999
OR$ 13EMO. OR$ 13'O. O.R129MO. OR 129Mo.


'09 COBALT


'06 SANTE FE


'04 TITAN


'07 PACIFICA
- -AmQM--


$7,999 $9,999 | $9,9999 $9,999
oR$129& MOR$161Mo. oR$161MO. R$161 o.


'08 LIBERTY


'07 CRV
/


'06 WRANGLER


'08 ALTIMA


$10,999 $10,999 $10,999 $12,999
oSE7777 .PERl 77 .PER oS209ER
,oR$ l 7 *MO. IoR$ l 7 Mo O. lI7 Mo. OR$209MO.


'09 CIVIC


'08 LUCERNE
I11WfM


'09 CAMRY


'09 TOWN AND COUNTRY


$12,999 $12,999 $13,999 $13,999
R209 OR$209 MO.OR$225M. OR$225 Mo





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