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Citrus County chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02702
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 03-07-2012
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:02702

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Commission meeting WednesdayThe Citrus County Commission will hold a special meeting at 9 a.m. Wednesday, March 7, in the Citrus County Courthouse, 110 N. Apopka Ave., Inverness, Room 100, regarding a Notice of Commencement for Citrus County Detention Facility improvements. The Citrus County Budget Workshop will immediately follow. NEWS BRIEF INSIDE MARCH 7, 2012 Floridas Best Community Newspaper Serving Floridas Best Community VOLUME 117 ISSUE 213 50 F O G CITRUS COUNTY Report: Colts, QB Manning appear headed for a split /B1 www.chronicleonline.com INDEX Comics . . . . .C8 Community . . . .C6 Crossword . . . .C7 Editorial . . . .A12 Entertainment . . .B6 Horoscope . . . .B6 Lottery Numbers . .B4 Lottery Payouts . .B6 Movies . . . . . .C8 Obituaries . . . .A6 Classifieds . . . .C9 TV Listings . . . .C7 OPINION: EDITORIAL, PAGE A12 Citrus County does not have a master plan to provide the necessary services for the homeless. STOCKS: Falling Stocks suffered their biggest losses in three months. /Page A11 TUESDAYHIGH 79 LOW 56 Partly cloudy today, patchy fog after midnight and partly cloudy./ PAGE A4 TODAY & Thursday morning SO YOU KNOW Due to early deadlines, some lottery numbers may not appear. M IKE W RIGHT Staff WriterCRYSTAL RIVER It was the news Melissa Pfeiffer waited to hear. Pfeiffer, an Inverness Middle School teacher who is president of the Citrus County Education Association, welcomed Circuit Judge Jackie Fulfords ruling that struck down the states requirement that employees contribute 3 percent of their salary to the Florida Retirement System. I am very happy, she said Tuesday, adding the FRS contribution was not fair. Everyone who worked for the district got basically a 3 percent pay cut. Many people were very financially devastated. The ruling requires the state and local governments to repay employees their 3 percent FRS contribution plus interest. Kenny Blocker, assistant superintendent of the Citrus County School District,Rulings immediate impact unknown in Citrus Judge strikes down pension law Associated PressTALLAHASSEE Gov. Rick Scott and the Legislature violated the state constitution when they enacted a law requiring Florida teachers, police officers, state workers and other public employees to contribute 3 percent of their pay toward their pensions, a judge ruled Tuesday in a decision that could cost the state $2 billion. Scott announced he will appeal Circuit Judge Jackie Fulfords ruling. She wrote in her 11-page opinion that a budget crisis is no excuse for violating public employees collective bargaining, property and contract rights, which are guaranteed under the Florida Constitution. To find otherwise would mean that a contract with our state government has no meaning and that the citizens of our state can place no trust in the work of our Legislature, the Tallahassee-based judge wrote. An ultimate decision against the contribution requirement would blow holes of about $1 billion each in state budgets for the current fiscal year and the next one, While unions, employees rejoice; governor vows to appeal ruling that contribution requirement for state workers is unconstitutional See RULING / Page A2 Jackie Fulford ruled its unlawful to require state employees to make pension contributions. See RATES / Page A2 Super Tuesday WORLD NEWS: ObituaryHow do you sum up the work of songwriter Robert B. Sherman? Try Supercali fragilisticex pialidocious./ Page A6 STATE NEWS: 2012 session Read local votes in the state legislative session./ Page A8 Associated Press Poll worker Dollie Scott, center, points the way for voters who cast their ballots Tuesday at East Rivers Elementary School in Atlanta. Associated PressWASHINGTON Rick Santorum and Mitt Romney split six states and dueled for supremacy in Ohio on a Super Tuesday that stretched from one end of the country to the other in the most turbulent Republican presidential race in a generation. Santorum broke through in primaries in Oklahoma and Tennessee and in the North Dakota caucuses. Romney had a home-state win in Massachusetts to go with victories in Vermont and Virginia. Ohio was the marquee matchup of the night, a second industrial state showdown in as many weeks for the two rivals. Of all the Super Tuesday states, it drew the most campaigning and television advertisements, and for good reason no Republican has ever won the White House without carrying the state in the fall. With votes tallied in 77 percent of the states precincts, Santorum was winning 38 percent of the vote to 37 for Romney, 15 percent for Newt Gingrich and 9 percent for Ron Paul. Gingrich had a victory in his column his first win in more than six weeks. He triumphed at home in Georgia, but had to share the delegates. Paul pinned his hopes on Idaho and Alaska as he scratched for his first victory of the campaign season. Whatever the outcome in Ohio, Romney was on track to pad his lead in the hunt for delegates to the Republican National Convention. Not surprisingly, he focused on the delegate chase. This is a process of gathering enough delegates to become the nominee, and I think were on track to have that happen, he told reporters as he arrived home in Massachusetts to vote in the primary. Santorum, Romney duel in Ohio, split other states in GOP primary race Good Samaritans split-second decision saves little girls life S ANDRA F REDERICK Staff WriterOZELLO When Kristyn Dominy left her mothers house Monday night, she had no idea she would be faced with a life-and-death decision. After rounding a winding corner on West Ozello Trail, the 22-year-old mother had a matter of seconds to decide if she was going to become involved in a tragic fire and risk her own life as well as that of her young daughter who was strapped into her car seat in the back of the car. Just moments beforehand, a car with billowing smoke from its rear passed her aggressively on the narrow road. When she saw the car with a child in the backseat a second time, it was a fireball. I dont know what I was thinking, I just knew I had to help get the child out of the car before it exploded, she said Tuesday afternoon. It was a really big fire and she was stuck in the backseat. Shortly after 6 p.m. Monday, Dominy observed a 1998 red Jeep traveling eastbound on West Ozello Trail and South Winterset Avenue in Crystal River at a high rate of speed. The driver of the Jeep, Brittany Hatfield, 27, of Crystal River, was traveling with her daughter, Zara Clifford, 5, seat-belted into the back. According to Gail Tierney, spokeswoman for the Citrus County Sheriffs Office, the car did not hit anything; it just burst into flames. Dominy said the little girl was trapped inside the vehicle, being held by her seatbelt and her mother, with her hair and clothes on fire, was desperately trying to get her out. I jumped out of my car and helped pull her out. I threw her on the ground and told them both to roll to put the fire out, Dominy said. The little girl was dressed in leggings and in her bare feet. She just looked at me with shock. I dont know if she understood what was going on. I knew she was in a lot of pain. At this point she called 911 and put the woman and her child in her car to get them out of the danger zone in case the car blew up. I live nearby and I took them to my house until the ambulance arrived, she said. It seemed like a long time before the ambulance got there. I didnt know what to do. Both Hatfield and Zara suffered burns and were airlifted to Tampa General. Hatfield was released from the hospital on Tuesday and Zara Clifford was listed in serious but stable condition See LIFE / Page A2 For more on Super Tuesday, see story Page A5 See TUESDAY / Page A4

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said the ruling could cost the district $2 million to $2.5 million. It could be less than that if the state covers the cost, Blocker said. Blocker said he doesnt think there will be any immediate impact with an appeal looming from Gov. Rick Scotts office. Who knows where this is going? Blocker said. Something like this could go on for another year. City Managers Andy Houston of Crystal River and Frank DiGiovanni of Inverness said they, too, are not certain about the rulings impact. Houston said the financial hit is $12,000 to $13,000 in payments to city employees, plus another amount the Citrus County Sheriffs Office reduced its contract amount to the city this year because of the reduced payments it made to employees pension funds. Houston said he contacted the Florida League of Cities for direction. They said it was too soon to know how itll work, he said. DiGiovanni said he didnt immediately know the financial impact to Inverness. It wont be catastrophic, he said. He also said he isnt surprised by the ruling. They tried to change the pension benefits without collective bargaining, DiGiovanni said. And while government officials are wondering where they will find the money in another tight budget year to repay employees, Pfeiffer said public workers are not to blame. Teachers and support staff and Florida public employees pay taxes too, she said. We are in the same boat. Were humble servants. We care about our community. Were not looking to be greedy.Chronicle reporter Mike Wright can be reached at 352-563-3228 or mwright@chronicle online.com. A2 W EDNESDAY, M ARCH 7, 2012 C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE WELL MEET OR BEAT ANY COMPETITORS PRICE* BLINDS LECANTO ~ TREETOPS PLAZA 1657 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY. *Must present written estimate from competitor for this price 527-0012 1-877-746-0017 000ANVQ FREE Valances Installation In Home Consulting www.72-hourblinds.com 72 HOUR BLIND FACTORY Verticals Faux Wood Blinds Shutters Cellular Shades The Savings Are Yours Because The Factory Is Ours! 2011 2011 2011 2011 FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK! *Floor Prep & Trims at Additional Cost. Min. labor charges may apply. All Prior Sales Excluded. See store for details. **While Supplies Last. V isit us at www.cashcarpetandtile.com 776 N. Enterprise Pt., Lecanto 746-7830 341-0355 Next to Stokes Flea Market on Hwy. 44 Prices Good Wed., March 7 Sat., March 10, 2012 000AJSF 20 20 10 10 20 20 10 10 NO WAX VINYL In Stock Patterns $ 1 79 Name Brand LAMINATE $ 2 87 In Stock Now SF INSTALLED Stranded BAMBOO $ 4 85 SALE MARINE CARPET 8 WIDE 79 SF Blue, Grey & Brown MATERIAL ONLY BUNK CARPET 12 WIDE 97 Black Only LN./FT. EXTRA VALUE NYLON $ 1 89 SF INSTALLED 1/2 x 5 OAK FLOORING $ 3 56 Lifetime Structural Warranty SF 18X18 PORCELAIN TILE $ 1 39 EXTRA SOFT FIBER $ 2 19 EXTRA HEAVY PLUSH CARPET LANDLORD SPECIAL Lifetime Stain Warranty W/7/16 CUSHION *Certain Restrictions Apply FROM $ 1 39 SF INSTALLED W/7/16 CUSHION W/7/16 CUSHION Installation Available MATERIAL ONLY Installation Available SF INSTALLED SF INSTALLED SF MATERIAL ONLY Installation Available SF MATERIAL ONLY MATERIAL ONLY INSIDE Crystal River Mall 7 95-148 4 Inside Walmart Hwy. 200, Ocala 291-1467 000APRX FREE HEARING TEST Coupon Expires 4/15/12 (Limit 2 per visit) BATTERY SALE .89 IN OFFICE ONLY ANY MAKE ANY MODEL Coupon Expires 4/15/12 FREE HEARING AID REPAIRS 000ASRZ Friday, March 16 Jay Newcomer, OD 352.746.0800 Beverly Hills Eye Clinic 3636 N. Lecanto Hwy. Beverly Hills, FL 34465 at the hospital. It is a mothers worse nightmare, Dominy said. I hope they are both OK, especially the little girl. The State Fire Marshals Office is investigating the cause and origin of the fire. Chronicle managing editor Sandra Frederick can be reached at 352-564-2930 or sfrederick@chronicle online.com LIFE Continued from Page A1 RATESContinued from Page A1 Crystal River City Manager Andy Houston said the financial hit to the city is $12,000 to $13,000 in pension payments for city employees. He has contacted the Florida League of Cities for direction. which starts July 1, but House Speaker Dean Cannon said Fulfords decision would have no immediate effect. The ruling of a trial court judge is the first and not the final step, the Winter Park Republican said in a statement. The case likely will wind up before the Florida Supreme Court. This is another example of a court substituting its own policy preferences for those of the Legislature, Scott said in a statement. The Courts decision nullifies the will of the people and leaves Florida as one of the only states in the country in which public employees contribute nothing towards their retirement, leaving working Floridians with100 percent of the tab. Several individual public employees and their unions challenged the law, including the Florida Education Association, which represents teachers and other school workers across the state. We once again find out that the Florida Legislature and the governor have overstepped their bounds by avoiding the constitution, said FEA President Andy Ford. They just dont have respect for the law. At Scotts urging, the Legislature passed the law last year as a cost-cutting measure. It allowed the state and local governments to reduce their contributions to the Florida Retirement System. Thats because Floridas plan is rated as one of the nations strongest and does not currently need additional funding. The law affects 560,000 public employees, including all those at the state and county levels and some city workers. Scott initially asked for a 5 percent employee contribution. The Republican governor said it would be only fair because private sector workers and public employees in most other states contribute to their retirement plans. Public employees and their unions called the contribution an income tax and said it amounts to a 3 percent pay cut after theyve gone years without raises. Lawyers for the state argued the Legislature has the authority to require the employee contributions under its constitutional budgeting powers, but Fulford disagreed. She noted employees have a constitutional right to collectively bargain over the terms and conditions of their employment, but no such negotiations were conducted in this case. The power over appropriations does not allow the Legislature to excuse negotiation, Fulford wrote. Otherwise, the fundamental right to collectively bargain in Floridas constitution would be meaningless. Fulford also cited prior Florida Supreme Court opinions and a 1974 law that declared pension benefits to be a contract right. Senate President Mike Haridopolos, R-Merritt Island, blasted the ruling, saying the former prosecutor, who was appointed to the bench in 2009 by then-Gov. Charlie Crist, has proven once again that she is an activist judge who has no problem overstepping her authority and overruling the decisions of the states elected representatives. Fulford, who last year struck down a budget provision that would have privatized nearly 30 prison facilities in South Florida, anticipated such criticism. At the onset let me state clearly, the role of the judiciary is to interpret the law before it; not to make new law, she wrote. This court cannot set aside its constitutional obligations because a budget crisis exists in the state of Florida. To do so would be in direct contravention of this courts oath to follow the law. Plaintiffs attorney Ron Meyer defended Fulford against the judicial activism accusation. Judicial activism is when a court ignores the law, Meyer said. The law in this case is well settled. Meyer said the state has enough money in reserve to pay back the employees and hoped the state would not appeal. This was a gamble that the governor and the Legislature made last year, Meyer said. They gambled taxpayers money that they could balance the budget on the backs of the hardworking public employees of this state. And they lost that bet. RULING Continued from Page A1 In her ruling, Judge Jackie Fulford cited prior Florida Supreme Court opinions and a 1974 law that declared pension benefits to be a contract right.

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Inverness city council convenes Around THE STATE Jacksonville Authorities: 2 dead in high school shooting A man who was fired from a private school Tuesday returned to campus with a gun hidden in a guitar case and shot the headmistress to death before committing suicide, authorities said. No students were injured. Officers responded to the Episcopal School of Jacksonville at 1:23 p.m. Tuesday after receiving reports of a person with a gun, and the school was placed on lockdown. When officers arrived, Dale Regan, head of the school, and the gunman were found dead, Undersheriff Dwain Senterfitt said. The gunman has not been identified. Episcopal has about 900 students in grades six to 12. Its campus sits along the south bank of the St. Johns River in central Jacksonville. Regan began working as a teacher at the school in 1978, according to a profile published in The Florida Times Union in 2010. Melbourne Brevard deputy fatally shot in traffic stop A Brevard County sheriffs deputy was fatally shot Tuesday making a traffic stop while investigating a motel burglary, officials said. The deputy, whose name was not immediately released, had stopped a vehicle shortly after 11 a.m. containing two people suspected of stealing furniture from a local motel, said Maj. Vic DeSantis. Shots were fired and the suspects fled. The deputy was taken to a hospital, where she was pronounced dead. The two suspects fled in a vehicle which went into a ditch during a chase with police and deputies. The suspects were arrested and were being interviewed by investigators, DeSantis said. Citrus County Aviation Advisory Board to meet The Citrus County Aviation Advisory Board (AAB) will meet at 2 p.m. Thursday, March 8, in Room 166 at the Lecanto Government Building. Under new business on the agenda, engineering project manager Quincy Wylupeck will discuss proposed CIP updates. Also on the agenda will be tower updates by Joe Hochadel, land development planner. The AAB will also accept the resignation of a board member, and announce the vacancy of the District 4 position. The Aviation Advisory Board advised the Board of County Commissioners on all land acquisitions, leases, construction, and reconstruction on, improvements, repairs, maintenance and general operation of all public airport facilities in Citrus County. For more information, call 352-527-5480. Veterans Services Advisory Board to meet The Citrus County Veterans Services Advisory Board will meet Thursday, March 8, at 3:30 p.m., at the Citrus County Resource Center, at 2804 W. Marc Knighton Court, Lecanto. The Veterans Services Advisory Board informs the Veterans Service Office of areas of unmet needs in the veterans population, advises local veterans groups of services available, provides input on office policies and procedures and assists other matters specific to veterans services and veterans groups. This meeting is open to the public. Call 352-527-5915. From wire and staff reports S TATE & L OCAL Page A3 WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7, 2012 C ITRUS C OUNTY C HRONICLE DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle John Carr claims to be the oldest member of the Beverly Hills Horseshoe Club at the young age of 88. The Beverly Hills Horseshoe Club is preparing to host a National Horseshoe Pitching Association tournament from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday. Pitchers come from all across the United States and Canada to participate in the NHPA Circuit. The tournament is free. The singles tournament runs from October to May and the club meets every other Saturday at the Beverly Hills Community Park. Dawsy the target at GOP candidate forum M IKE W RIGHT Staff WriterLECANTO A trio of Republicans with varying levels of experience took collective aim at Sheriff Jeff Dawsy on Monday night in the hopes voters in November will elect Citrus Countys first GOP sheriff. Steve Burch, Hank Hemrick and Winn Webb are jockeying for votes in the Republican primary with the winner taking on the 16-year Democrat. Before about 100 people at the Citrus County Republican Executive Committee meeting, each candidate sought to distance himself from his rivals while offering the best hope in unseating Dawsy. Candidates said Republicans have a choice: Burch is retired from the Clearwater Police Department and is the former Crystal River police chief. He lost his job in Crystal River when the city council decided to contract law enforcement with Dawsys office. Hemrick is a retired assistant deputy warden from the New York City Department of Corrections. This is his third run for sheriff. Webb is a Citrus County commis sioner and former sheriffs officer. All three said Dawsys budget is bloated, his officers are not trained properly and his agency doesnt respond well to public concerns. Burch said more than 40 nonsworn officers have take-home cars, something he would eliminate as sheriff. Burch accused the sheriffs office of botched investigations and said a sheriffs office under him would increase arrests for drug dealing and drunken driving. Hemrick also hammered Dawsy for what he said was a lack of drug enforcement. He said he brought up the same topic during candidate forums in 2008. Dawsy would then refute it. He would say to the crowd: Hemrick is trying to scare you. There is no drug problem in Citrus County. Webb noted he was the only candidate born and raised in Citrus County. Hes also the one candidate who ran a successful campaign when he was elected to the county commission in 2008. Webb said he wants to rid the sheriffs office of a Rambo mentality. We need officers who are peoplepeople, Webb said. I dont need people who are Rambos. I need Officer Friendlys. Burch noted he is the only candidate to head a police force and he sees a lack of connection and follow-through with Dawsys agency. The situation, he said, is were just not responding to our citizens. Chronicle reporter Mike Wright can be reached at 352-563-3228 or mwright@chronicleonline.com. Club to host national tournament Members host Girl Scouts, discuss spring cleaning, kudos and accolades N ANCY K ENNEDY Staff WriterINVERNESS Inverness Mayor Bob Plaisted welcomed girls from two local Girl Scout troops to the Inverness City Council meeting Tuesday and presented them with a proclamation commemorating the 100th anniversary of Girl Scouts. To their leaders he said, We thank you and appreciate the time you take to help raise these girls to be good citizens. Also on the agenda was a second reading of a revision to a utility ordinance that would change the definitions of residential and commercial accounts so they match the sanitation ordinances definitions. The ordinance also outlines a better system for identifying new residential customers who may be poor credit risks by using an online verification system. The system would be used to determine deposit fees, deposit waivers and would improve the way the city detects fraud. Currently, the city loses between $8,000 and $10,000 a year in bad debt write-offs. No public comment was made for or against and the council voted unanimously to adopt the ordinance. Council president Jacquie Hepfer said there are a number of ordinances that need such spring cleaning. City council also agreed to reappoint longtime Inverness resident David Arthurs for a three-year term to the Inverness Community Redevelopment Agency Board. The short meeting ended with City Manager Frank DiGiovanni giving kudos and accolades to the Rotary Club of Inverness for its work in renovating the recreation building at Whispering Pines Park, calling the group one of the most seasoned and active organizations in the community. DiGiovanni also thanked Rotarians for their efforts in raising funds and doing the manual labor.Chronicle reporter Nancy Kennedy can be reached at nkennedy@chronicleonline.com or 352-564-2927. Winn Webb Hank Hemrick Steve Burch Celebrate International Womens Day March 8 N ANCY K ENNEDY Staff WriterCITRUS SPRINGS You are here because of a woman. On Thursday, March 8, the Nature Coast Unitarian Universalists invite the public male and female to celebrate the contributions women have made and continue to make at an International Womens Day event. The theme of the local celebration is Connecting Girls Inspiring Futures. Doors open at 3:30 p.m. for light refreshments, followed at 4 p.m. with keynote speaker and musician Mindy Simmons, Floridas Chanteuse. Also, the female trio Patchwork will perform. This non-religious program is being funded by a member of the congregation who will turn 90 on March 8. This free event is a gift to the women and men of the community. Our goal is to call attention to the contributions women have made, which improved the human condition here and in the wider world, said Joan Burnett, member of the event committee. We hope to celebrate how far women have come in their struggle for equality and to recognize that much still needs to be done. She said information will also be available from various organizations that affect women. Mainly, its a celebration, she said. We hope to make this an annual event. Nature Coast Unitarian Universalists is at 7633 N. Florida Ave. (U.S. 41), Citrus Springs. For information, call 352-4654225 or visit the Web at www.naturecoastuu.org. Bob Plaisted mayor of Inverness. Jacquie Hepfer Inverness city councilwoman. Frank DiGiovanni Inverness city manager. Scientists: EPA off on costs of Florida pollution rule Associated PressTALLAHASSEE Federal environmental officials underestimated the cost of implementing their new water pollution rules for Florida, just as critics have been saying, a National Research Council panel concluded in a report released Tuesday. The committee of scientists was not asked to offer its own estimate but wrote that whatever the expense turns out to be, it would be small compared to the ultimate cost of restoring Floridas waters. The Environmental Protection Agency, which commissioned the study, issued a statement saying it already is incorporating some of the reports recommendations in its economic analysis. It noted the scientists also found critics estimates of much higher costs were faulty. State officials as well as business, agriculture and utility interests have opposed the EPAs rules, contending they would cost more than the agencys estimate and be too expensive to implement. They support alternate rules proposed by the state that currently are under challenge by environmental groups in an ad min istrative law case. The EPA has estimated its rules would cost between $135.5 million and $206.1 million annually. Opponents say the cost could be has high as $12 billion. EPA asked the Research Council to review its cost estimate in response to the criticism. It certainly shows we were right from the beginning, said David Childs, a lawyer for a coalition opposed to the EPA rules. All signs seem to be pointing to EPA should approve the state rules and be done with it. David Guest, a lawyer for environmental groups supporting the EPA rules and opposing the states alternate proposals, said he didnt think the study would have much effect. Its a difference in assumptions and the fact is you can test them, said Guest, who works for Earthjustice, an environmental legal group. Guest said hes confident the EPAs assumptions about how rules would be implemented are more realistic. The panel also concluded EPAs costs were too low because the agency underestimated the number of polluted lakes, rivers and streams in Florida and the agency had insufficient time and funding to do a more thorough expense analysis. The EPA statement noted the scientists also agreed with many of the agencys approaches and concluded that while EPAs cost estimates were low, those prepared by stakeholders significantly overestimated the costs in part by wrongly assuming the most expensive technologies would be required in all cases.

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Special to the ChronicleTune into the nextedition of the Sheriffs 10-43 Show on Wednesday,Mar. 7, from 7:30 to 8 p.m. on WYKE, Channel 16. Fire Rescues Chief Larry Morabito and Deputy Chief Jim Goodworth are the special guests on the show. They give an update on whats new at Fire Rescue since joining the Sheriffs Office back in October of 2011. They also discuss how Fire Rescue recently implemented an enhanced service for citizens by responding to more medical calls in the field. The Sheriffs 10-43 is broadcast on WYKE, which is channel 16 for all cable customers. It can also be viewed onFridays at 11 a.m. For those with satellite, prior Sheriffs 10-43 shows can be seen via the Sheriffs website at www.sheriff citrus.org.C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE HI LO PR NA NA NA HI LO PR NA NA NA HI LO PR 74 47 NA HI LO PR 78 47 NA HI LO PR 76 49 NA HI LO PR 77 42 NA YESTERDAYS WEATHER Partly cloudy.THREE DAY OUTLOOK Partly cloudy. Partly cloudy.High: 79 Low: 56 High: 81 Low: 57 High: 80 Low: 57 TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING THURSDAY & FRIDAY MORNING FRIDAY & SATURDAY MORNING Exclusive daily forecast by: TEMPERATURE* Tuesday 76/38 Record 89/30 Normal 76/48 Mean temp. 57 Departure from mean -5 PRECIPITATION* Tuesday 0.00 in. Total for the month 0.32 in. Total for the year 3.55 in. Normal for the year 6.75 in.*As of 6 p.m. at Inverness UV INDEX: 7 0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate, 7-9 high, 10+ very high BAROMETRIC PRESSURE Tuesday at 3 p.m. 30.36 in. DEW POINT Tuesday at 3 p.m. 50 HUMIDITY Tuesday at 3 p.m. 39% POLLEN COUNT** Grasses and weeds were absent and trees were moderate. ** Light only extreme allergic will show symptoms, moderate most allergic will experience symptoms, heavy all allergic will experience symptoms. AIR QUALITY Tuesday was good with pollutants mainly ozone. ALMANAC CELESTIAL OUTLOOK SUNSET TONIGHT ............................6:34 P.M. SUNRISE TOMORROW .....................6:47 A.M. MOONRISE TODAY ...........................6:07 P.M. MOONSET TODAY ............................5:57 A.M. MARCH 8MARCH 14MARCH 22MARCH 30 WATERING RULES BURN CONDITIONS Citrus County: Irrigation is limited to twice per week. Even addresses: Thursday and/or Sunday before 10am or after 4pm. Odd Addresses: Wednesday and/or Saturday before 10am or after 4pm. No restrictions on fountains, car washing or pressure washing. Hand watering requires the use of a shut-off nozzle. PLEASE CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL NEW PLANT MATERIAL. Questions, concerns or reporting violations, please call Citrus County 352-527-7669. For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestrys Web site: http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire_weather/kbdi Todays Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.City H L Fcast Daytona Bch. 76 62 pc Ft. Lauderdale 79 76 sh Fort Myers 85 64 pc Gainesville 77 55 pc Homestead 80 72 sh Jacksonville 73 53 pc Key West 80 74 pc Lakeland 82 60 pc Melbourne 78 69 pc City H L Fcast Miami 81 75 sh Ocala 79 56 pc Orlando 80 61 pc Pensacola 72 59 pc Sarasota 84 62 pc Tallahassee 75 51 pc Tampa 81 64 pc Vero Beach 79 68 pc W. Palm Bch. 79 74 sh FLORIDA TEMPERATURESEast winds around 20 knots. Seas 3 to 5 feet. Bay and inland waters will be choppy. Partly cloudy and warm today. Gulf water temperature68 LAKE LEVELS Location Mon. Tues. Full Withlacoochee at Holder 27.63 27.61 35.52 Tsala Apopka-Hernando 33.92 33.90 39.25 Tsala Apopka-Inverness 35.74 35.72 40.60 Tsala Apopka-Floral City 37.65 37.64 42.40Levels reported in feet above sea level. Flood stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year flood, the meanannual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year. This data is obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision. In no event will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of this data. If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211. MARINE OUTLOOK Taken at Aripeka THE NATION Albany 37 13 s 55 39 Albuquerque 67 41 pc 62 32 Asheville 55 24 pc 59 40 Atlanta 61 34 pc 63 51 Atlantic City 45 22 s 58 44 Austin 76 51 sh 73 67 Baltimore 48 25 s 61 47 Billings 52 28 .10 pc 40 22 Birmingham 67 39 pc 70 54 Boise 54 30 .07 s 45 25 Boston 39 20 s 51 42 Buffalo 43 18 s 49 47 Burlington, VT 32 4 pc 48 45 Charleston, SC 59 36 pc 67 54 Charleston, WV 64 23 s 68 46 Charlotte 57 24 pc 62 45 Chicago 68 31 c 64 46 Cincinnati 64 26 s 66 53 Cleveland 51 20 s 59 41 Columbia, SC 62 35 pc 65 51 Columbus, OH 59 26 s 64 51 Concord, N.H. 35 10 s 49 31 Dallas 72 53 sh 71 66 Denver 73 32 sn 35 24 Des Moines 74 38 sh 61 30 Detroit 58 28 pc 55 48 El Paso 80 44 s 77 41 Evansville, IN 71 34 c 67 53 Harrisburg 46 22 s 60 39 Hartford 43 21 s 55 36 Houston 75 52 sh 78 66 Indianapolis 69 29 pc 65 52 Jackson 73 45 c 73 59 Las Vegas 73 62 pc 56 42 Little Rock 73 38 c 71 57 Los Angeles 59 50 s 62 45 Louisville 70 29 s 65 52 Memphis 72 46 c 71 58 Milwaukee 63 30 sh 58 36 Minneapolis 60 29 r 41 21 Mobile 71 46 c 74 58 Montgomery 70 35 pc 72 53 Nashville 67 31 pc 68 52 New Orleans 75 49 c 75 62 New York City 44 25 s 58 41 Norfolk 47 37 s 65 47 Oklahoma City 69 54 sh 65 61 Omaha 72 41 sh 53 28 Palm Springs 79 53 s 67 46 Philadelphia 45 27 s 62 44 Phoenix 86 53 s 62 43 Pittsburgh 49 20 s 62 45 Portland, ME 36 14 s 46 36 Portland, Ore 48 33 .01 s 53 36 Providence, R.I. 40 19 s 52 39 Raleigh 54 27 s 64 45 Rapid City 70 30 c 36 20 Reno 49 27 .02 s 43 23 Rochester, NY 43 16 pc 63 48 Sacramento 58 46 s 64 37 St. Louis 75 44 c 69 54 St. Ste. Marie 36 19 .01 sh 44 29 Salt Lake City 59 30 sh 44 26 San Antonio 75 53 sh 77 67 San Diego 60 54 s 61 48 San Francisco 54 46 .01 s 59 44 Savannah 63 40 pc 70 54 Seattle 44 32 .02 pc 47 36 Spokane 38 23 trace pc 40 24 Syracuse 43 20 s 60 40 Topeka 73 56 sh 66 36 Washington 49 29 s 64 46YESTERDAYS NATIONAL HIGH & LOW HIGH 88 Goodyear, Ariz. LOW -17 Saranac Lake, N.Y. WEDNESDAY CITY H/L/SKY Acapulco 88/74/s Amsterdam 44/38/r Athens 60/51/c Beijing 49/24/s Berlin 46/35/pc Bermuda 65/59/pc Cairo 72/52/pc Calgary 36/25/s Havana 82/65/ts Hong Kong 77/67/c Jerusalem 64/46/pc Lisbon 66/48/s London 58/39/sh Madrid 61/38/s Mexico City 79/48/s Montreal 43/39/c Moscow 15/9/c Paris 46/41/sh Rio 86/69/pc Rome 58/42/pc Sydney 70/62/ts Tokyo 55/48/sh Toronto 54/44/pc Warsaw 33/22/pc WORLD CITIES Tuesday Wednesday City H L Pcp. Fcst H L Tuesday Wednesda y City H L Pcp. Fcst H L Weather Central, Madison, Wi. Wednesday ThursdayCity High/Low High/Low High/Low High/LowChassahowitzka* 4:38 a/12:29 a 5:23 p/1:02 p 5:25 a/1:12 a 5:51 p/1:38 p Crystal River** 2:59 a/10:24 a 3:44 p/10:34 p 3:46 a/11:00 a 4:12 p/11:16 p Withlacoochee* 12:46 a/8:12 a 1:31 p/8:22 p 1:33 a/8:48 a 1:59 p/9:04 p Homosassa*** 3:48 a/12:01 p 4:33 p/ 4:35 a/12:11 a 5:01 p/12:37 p TIDES *From mouths of rivers **At Kings Bay ***At Masons CreekKEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle; f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain; rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers; sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy. SOLUNAR TABLESDATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR (MORNING) (AFTERNOON) 3/7 WEDNESDAY 4:13 10:26 4:38 10:51 3/8 THURSDAY 5:03 11:16 5:28 11:41 FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M. WEDNESDAY HI LO PR 77 47 NA Today's active pollen: Oak, Nettle, Juniper Todays count: 11.2/12 Thursdays count: 11.7 Fridays count: 11.7 For the RECORD ON THE NET For more information about arrests made by the Citrus County Sheriffs Office, go to www.sheriff citrus.org and click on the Public Information link, then on Arrest Reports. Also under Public Information on the CCSO website, click on Crime Mapping for a view of where each type of crime occurs in Citrus County. Click on Offense Reports to see lists of burglary, theft and vandalism. For the Record reports are also archived online at www.chronicleonline.com. Citrus County Sheriffs Office/Fire Rescue Chief Larry Morabito said the fire service is seeking volunteers to serve along paid staff at all stations. For information, call John Beebe, volunteer coordinator at 352527-5406. The Sheriffs 10-43 show airs on TV station WYKE, digital channel 47 and Bright House cable Channel 16. The show features interviews with sheriffs office staff from all areas of the agency. It also features Sheriff Jeff Dawsy taking live calls during the entire show on the last Wednesday monthly. The Sexual Predator Unit is responsible for tracking all registered sexual offenders and predators in the county. Click on the Sexual Offender Information link on the CCSO website. The Citrus County Sheriffs Office Volunteer Unit is comprised of nearly 900 citizens serving Citrus County. Members come from all walks of life and bring with them many years of life experience. This experience, combined with dedication and a willingness to help fellow citizens, is an excellent example of people helping one another. To volunteer, call Sgt. Chris Evan at 352-527-3701 or email cevan@sheriffcitrus.org. A4 W EDNESDAY, M ARCH 7, 2012 To start your subscription:Call now for home delivery by our carriers:Citrus County: 352-563-5655 Marion County: 888-852-2340 13 weeks: $36.65* 6 months: $64.63* 1 year: $116.07* *Subscription price includes a separate charge of .14 per day for transportation cost and applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352-563-6363 for details. There will be a $1 adjustment for the Thanksgiving edition. This will only slightly affect your expiration date. The Viewfinder TV guide is available to our subscribers for $13.00 per year. For home delivery by mail:In Florida: $59.00 for 13 weeks Elsewhere in U.S.: $69.00 for 13 weeksTo contact us regarding your service:352-563-5655 Call for redelivery: 7 to 10 a.m. Monday to Friday 7 to 11 a.m. Saturday and Sunday Questions: 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday to Friday 7 to 11 a.m. Saturday and Sunday Main switchboard phone numbers: Citrus County 352-563-6363 Citrus Springs, Dunnellon and Marion County residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.I want to place an ad:To place a classified ad:Citrus 352-563-5966 Marion 888-852-2340 To place a display ad:352-563-5592 Online display ad:352-563-5592 I want to send information to the Chronicle:MAIL: 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429 FAX: Advertising 352-563-5665, Newsroom 352-563-3280 EMAIL: Advertising: advertising@chronicleonline.com Newsroom: newsdesk@chronicleonline.com Meadowcrest office 106 W. Main St., Inverness, FL 34450 Inverness office Whos in charge:Gerry Mulligan ............................................................................ Publisher, 563-3222 Trina Murphy............................Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232 Charlie Brennan .................................................................................. Editor, 563-3225 Tom Feeney..........................................................Production Director, 563-3275 Kathie Stewart....................................................Circulation Director, 563-5655 John Murphy................................................................Online Manager, 563-3255 John Murphy..........................................................Classified Manager, 564-3255 Jeff Gordon..............................................................Business Manager, 564-2908 Mike Arnold..........................................Human Resources Director, 564-2910 Report a news tip:Opinion page questions ........................................ Charlie Brennan, 563-3225 To have a photo taken .............................................. Darlene Mann, 563-5660 News and feature stories..................................Sandra Frederick, 564-2930 Community/wire service content .......................... Sarah Gatling, 563-5660 Sports event coverage ................................ Jon-Michael Soracchi, 563-3261 Sound Off ................................................................................................................ 563-0579 The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please recycle your newspaper.www.chronicleonline.com Published every Sunday through Saturday By Citrus Publishing Inc. 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429Phone 352-563-6363 POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Citrus County Chronicle1624 N. MEADOWCREST BLVD., CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429 PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280 CITRUSCOUNTY Florida' s BestCommunity Newspaper Serving Floridas Best Community Where to find us:1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd. Crystal River, FL 34429 Blvd. Legal notices in todays Citrus County Chronicle 000AN36 City of Crystal River . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C4 Meeting Notices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C12 Lien Notices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C12 Notice to Creditors/Administration . . . C12 Self Storage Notices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C12 Surplus Property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C12 Fire Rescue enhances services Special to the Chronicle Deputy Chief Jim Goodworth gives an inside look at one of Fire Rescues squad vehicles, which can be used to respond to outlying areas quickly and efficiently. Sheriffs 10-43 Show to throw spotlight on Fire Rescue Citrus County Sheriffs OfficeBurglary A residential burglary occurred at about 10:38 a.m. March 5 in the 14100 block of W. Sanddollar Lane, Crystal River.Thefts A grand theft occurred at about 11:12 a.m. March 5 in the 5000 block of W. Norvell Bryant Highway, Crystal River. A petit theft occurred at about 11:40 a.m. March 5 in the 6900 block of S. Sonata Avenue, Homosassa. A larceny petit theft occurred at about 11:47 a.m. March 5 in the 14100 block of W. Sanddollar Lane, Crystal River. A grand theft occurred at about 4:24 p.m. March 5 in the 10000 block of W. Fishbowl Drive, Homosassa. Vandalism A vandalism occurred at about 9:41 a.m. March 5 in the 900 block of W. Roosevelt Boulevard, Beverly Hills. 80 46 .00

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TERMITE DAMAGE IS NOT COVERED BY YOUR HOMEOWNERS INSURANCE! $ 299 2011 2011 2011 2011 PREVENTION IS THE BEST PROTECTION! 000ANCJ This Is The Most Active Swarm Season Weve Experienced In 4 Years, T ony Winebrenner Licensed & Insured #8688 406 N.E. 1st St., Crystal River Has Your Termite Company Ever Increased Your Renewal In The Past 3 To 5 Years Or Do You Have A Deductible On Your Insurance? WE HAVE NEVER INCREASED... WE ARE YOUR SOLUTION TO YOUR PEST CONTROL PROBLEMS! www.CitrusPest.com (352) 563-6698 or (866) 860-BUGS QUARTERLY PEST CONTROL SERVICE INTRODUCTORY 1ST SERVICE A complete inspection of the interior and the exterior of your property. Removal of kitchen and bathroom switch plates and place a barrier into wall voids to prevent insects from invading your property. Baits are placed in all cracks and crevices in the kitchen and bathroom area. Treatment around and under appliances such as dishwasher, refrigerator, washer and dryer. Treatment of attic or crawl spaces. EVERY QUARTER Removal of spider webs and wasps nests from under eaves around windows and garage. Treatment of all entry points (doors, windows, and eaves area). Complete treatment of patios, porches, lanais, screen rooms and screened pool space. Treatment of soil, turf or mulch areas outside against the home or building If at any time the homeowner finds evidence of such insects, Citrus Pest Management Inc. will retreat at no additional charge to homeowner Starting At Quarterly New Residential Customers Only Fair Prices for Quality Service, With Guaranteed Results! 3 DAY SALE BOOK BY 5PM, MARCH 9, 2012 Santorum draws conservatives Associated PressWASHINGTON Rick Santorum was drawing strong support Tuesday from the most conservative voters in Ohios Republican presidential primary, according to early results of an exit poll of voters. Yet despite targeting the states blue-collar voters, they were giving him only a slender lead over rival Mitt Romney, the survey was showing. Ohio was the most closely watched among the 10 states holding Super Tuesday presidential contests. With many viewing the state as one of Santorums best chances of slowing Romneys march toward the GOP nomination, the two men were drawing strength from different ideological wings of the party, with Romney faring better with more moderate, less religiously driven voters. Santorum had a near 20 percentage point lead among Ohio Republicans considering themselves very conservative, and was doing especially well with people who are conservative on social issues like gay marriage and abortion. The former Pennsylvania senator was also doing strongly with born-again and evangelical voters, and had more than a 2-1 advantage over Romney with people saying it was very important that they share religious beliefs with their chosen candidate. But while he spent much of his campaign seeking to cement bonds with workingclass voters by citing his upbringing in Pennsylvania coal country and stressing U.S. manufacturing, he had only a tiny lead over Romney among people without college degrees a common measurement for the blue-collar vote. Romney, the one-time Massachusetts governor, was leading among all but the most ardently conservative voters in Ohio. He was also capturing a majority of those saying they want a candidate who can defeat President Barack Obama this fall, and was leading among voters saying their most important issue is the economy. In two Southern states where Santorum fought for strong performances, Oklahoma and Tennessee, he was buoyed by voters who said their choices were influenced by religion, exit polls showed. More than two-thirds of voters in both states said a candidates religious beliefs were important to them. Santorums Oklahoma win was fed by a more than 15 percentage point advantage among those religiously oriented voters over both Romney and Newt Gingrich, the former House speaker who was struggling to keep his candidacy afloat. In Tennessee, Santorums lead over those two men among people looking for a religious match with their candidate was nearly 2-1. Another Santorum source of strength in Tennessee and Oklahoma were bluecollar voters, who were giving him modest but clear leads over his competitors in both states. One of Romneys chief selling points is his assertion that his business background gives him expertise on handling the economy, but Tennessee and Oklahoma voters were not giving him an edge on that issue. Romney and Santorum were running about even among Tennessee voters who consider the economy the top issue in the election, while Oklahoma voters focused on the economy gave Romney only a small advantage over Santorum and Gingrich. The campaigns persistent criticism of Romneys wealth and background as a private equity executive may be hurting him, the exit surveys showed. Asked in Ohio and Tennessee which candidate best understands the problems confronted by average Americans, Romney scored poorly. Around a third in each state picked Santorum while only about a fifth named Romney. Associated Press Supporters of Rick Santorum, David Vann, left, high-fives former Tulsa City Councilor Chris Medlock as they hear the winning results at Santorum's watch party Tuesday in Tulsa, Okla. Santorum has won Oklahomas Republican presidential primary, leaving Mitt Romney and Newt Gingrich to battle for second place in what is called the reddest of the red states. Later, he told supporters, Im going to get this nomination. Yet Santorums multiple victories, coupled with Gingrichs win, provided fresh evidence that Romneys conservative rivals retain the ability to outpoll him in certain parts of the country despite his huge organizational and financial advantages. Santorum waited until Oklahoma and Tennessee fell into his column before speaking to cheering supporters in Ohio. Were going to win a few. Were going to lose a few. But as it looks right now, were going to get a couple of gold medals and a whole passel of silver, he said. In all, there were primaries in Virginia, Vermont, Ohio, Massachusetts, Georgia, Tennessee and Oklahoma. Caucuses in North Dakota, Idaho and Alaska rounded out the calendar. Some 419 delegates were at stake in the 10 states. Romney picked up at least 129 delegates during the evening, Santorum 47, Gingrich 42 and Paul at least 10. That gave the former Massachusetts governor 332, more than all his rivals combined, including endorsements from members of the Republican National Committee who automatically attend the convention and can support any candidate they choose. Santorum had 139 delegates, Gingrich 75 and Paul 35. It takes 1,144 delegates to win the nomination at the Republican National Convention in Tampa, Fla., this summer. In interviews as voters left their polling places, Republicans in state after state said the economy was the top issue and an ability to defeat Obama was what mattered most as they made their Super Tuesday choices. They also indicated nagging concerns about the candidate they supported, even in Massachusetts, There, one-third of all primary voters said they had reservations, and about three-quarters of those voted for Romney. Massachusetts is a reliably Democratic state in most presidential elections, but in Ohio, 41 percent of primary voters said they, too, had reservations about the candidate they supported. No Republican has ever won the White House without capturing Ohio. Gingrichs victory was his first since he captured the South Carolina primary on Jan. 21, and the former House speaker said it would propel him on yet another comeback in a race where he has faded badly over the past six weeks. Ohio was the days biggest prize in political significance, a heavily populated industrial state that tested Santorums ability to challenge Romney in a traditional fall battleground. Georgia, Gingrichs home political field, outranked them all in the number of delegates at stake, with 76, a total that reflected a reliable Republican voting pattern as well as population. Romney, the leader in the early delegate chase, flew to Massachusetts to vote and said he hoped for a good home-state win. 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Associated PressLONDON How do you sum up the work of songwriter Robert B. Sherman? Try one word: Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious. The tongue-twisting term, sung by magical nanny Mary Poppins, is like much of Shermans work both complex and instantly memorable, for child and adult alike. Once heard, it was never forgotten. Sherman, who died in London at age 86, was half of a sibling partnership that put songs into the mouths of nannies and Cockney chimney sweeps, jungle animals and Parisian felines. Robert Sherman and his brother Richard composed scores for films including The Jungle Book, The Aristocats, Mary Poppins and Chitty Chitty Bang Bang. They also wrote the most-played tune on Earth, Its a Small World (After All). Shermans agent, Stella Richards, said Tuesday that Sherman died peacefully in London on Monday. Son Jeffrey Sherman paid tribute to his father on Facebook, saying he wanted to bring happiness to the world and, unquestionably, he succeeded. Jeffrey Sherman told The Associated Press that his father had learned the craft of songwriting from his own father, Tin Pan Alley composer Al Sherman. His rule in writing songs was keep it singable, simple and sincere, Jeffrey Sherman said. In the simplest things you find something universal. Robert Sherman knew another truth, his son said: What seems so simple is really very complex. He was a very simple guy complex but simple. If you ever want to know about my Dad, listen to the lyrics of his songs. Robert A. Iger, president and CEO of The Walt Disney Co., said in a statement that the company mourned the loss of one of the worlds greatest songwriters and a true Disney legend. Three Broadway marquees including The New Amsterdam Theatre, where Mary Poppins is playing will dim their lights Tuesday night in Shermans honor. The Sherman Brothers career was long, prolific and garlanded with awards. They won two Academy Awards for Walt Disneys 1964 smash Mary Poppins best score and best song, Chim Chim Cher-ee. They also picked up a Grammy for best movie or TV score. Their hundreds of credits as joint lyricist and composer also include the films Winnie the Pooh, The Slipper and the Rose, Snoopy Come Home, Charlottes Web and The Magic of Lassie. Their Broadway musicals included 1974s Over Here! and stagings of Mary Poppins and Chitty Chitty Bang Bang in the mid-2000s. Something good happens when we sit down together and work, Richard Sherman told The Associated Press in a 2005 joint interview. Weve been doing it all our lives. Practically since college weve been working together. The brothers awards included 23 gold and platinum albums and a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. They became the only Americans ever to win First Prize at the Moscow Film Festival for Tom Sawyer in 1973 and were inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame in 2005. President George W. Bush awarded them the National Medal of Arts in 2008, commended for music that has helped bring joy to millions. Alan Menken, composer of scores for Disney films including The Little Mermaid, Beauty and the Beast and Aladdin, said the Sherman brothers legacy goes far beyond the craft of songwriting. There is a magic in their songs and in the films and musicals they breathed life into, he said Tuesday. Robert Bernard Sherman was born in New York on Dec. 19, 1925, and raised there and in Beverly Hills, California. The brothers credited their father with challenging them to write songs and for their love of lyrics. Al Shermans legacy of songs includes You Gotta Be a Football Hero, (What Do We Do On a) Dew-DewDewy Day and On the Beach at Bali-Bali. Robert Shermans affection for Britain was nurtured during his service with the U.S. Army in World War II. One of the first American soldiers to enter the Dachau concentration camp and, his son said, the only Jewish serviceman there he was shot in the knee in Germany in 1945. Recovering in hospitals in England, he developed a fondness for and familiarity with the country that stuck with him. He wrote for British characters in Mary Poppins, Chitty Chitty Bang Bang and Winnie the Pooh, and spent the last years of his life in London. After the war, the brothers started writing songs together. They began a decade-long partnership with Disney during the 1960s after having written hit pop songs like Tall Paul for ex-Mouseketeer Annette Funicello and Youre Sixteen, later recorded by Ringo Starr. Though they were estranged for a number of years, the brothers never completely broke ties. When asked about that, Richard Sherman said: Were human. We have frailties and weaknesses. But we love each other very much, respect each other. They wrote more than 150 songs at Disney, including the soundtracks for such films as The Sword and the Stone, The Parent Trap, Bedknobs and Broomsticks, The Jungle Book, The Aristocrats and The Tigger Movie. Dennis Dayton, 76 INGLIS Dennis A. Dayton, age 76, of Inglis, FL, passed away March 5, 2012. Born on August 21, 1935, in Beaver Dam, Wisconsin, to Arden H. and Myrtle M. (Miscke) Dayton. Dennis moved to Inglis in 2009 from Bradenton, FL. He was a self-employed Landscaper; a Navy Veteran and a member of the Kirkwood Presbyterian Church in Bradenton. Preceded in death by his wife, Barbara J. Dayton; and son, Brian Dayton. Survived by his close friend, Michelle Hicks; and her son, Corey Hicks. Private cremation will take place under the direction of Brown Funeral Home and Crematory in Lecanto, FL. Burial will be at the Highland Memory Gardens in Beaver Dam, WI. Sign the guest book at www.chronicleonline.com.Wesley Locke, 75 HOMOSASSA Mr. Wesley Wake Locke, 75, of Homosassa, died Tuesday, March 6, 2012, in Homosassa. Arrangements are under the direction of the Homosassa Chapel of Hooper Funeral Home & Crematory. Ellen ODwyer, 68INVERNESS Ellen Lee ODwyer, age 68, born December 23, 1949, to Edwin and Ethel Crawley in Charleston, S.C. Ellen entered Eternal Rest on March 3, 2012. She moved to St. Petersburg at a young age and grew up there, attending Dixie Hollins High School. In 1970, Ellie married Daniel ODwyer in St. Petersburg, FL, and lived in Andros Island, Bahamas; Palm Beach Gardens, FL; Aurora and Parker, CO. In CO, Ellen worked as an electronics assembler for Honeywell. She and Dan moved to Inverness in 1996 to be nearer to family. Ellen enjoyed tennis in her younger years and served as a Brownie and Girl Scout troop leader in Palm Beach Gardens. She also enjoyed scuba/snorkel diving, wind surfing, sailing, backpacking and camping. Hobby activities included knitting, crocheting and sewing. A stroke in 2004 placed her in a wheelchair and those activities ceased, but she still enjoyed old movies and listening to books. She was preceded in death by her mother and father, daughter Kelly and sister Edwina Porter. She is survived by her husband; daughters Glenyss (Steve) Steinmetz of Tomball, TX, and Evelyn (Richard) Traynom of Marianna, FL; grandchildren Denise Traynom, Matthew and Kaity Steinmetz; niece Debbie White; nephews George and Daniel Beverley; as well as many aunts, uncles and cousins. In lieu of flowers, it is requested that donations be made to the American Diabetes Association or Hospice of Citrus County Inc. A memorial service will be held at 4 p.m. Saturday, March 10, 2012, at Chas. E. Davis Funeral Home, 3075 South Florida Avenue, Inverness, FL 34450. Sign the guest book at www.chronicleonline.com.Doris Morgan, 82HERNANDO Doris L. Morgan, 82, Hernando, died Feb. 29, 2012, at her home. A graveside military service will be at 11 a.m. Wednesday March 14, 2012, at the Florida National Cemetery with VFW Post 4252 of Hernando rendering honors. Chas. E. Davis Funeral Home with Crematory is in charge of arrangements. Donald Snyder, 87INVERNESS Donald A. Snyder, 87, Inverness, died March 5, 2012. A gravesidemilitary honor service will be at 3 p.m. Thursday, March 15, 2012, at the Florida National Cemetery in Bushnell. Chas. E. Davis Funeral Home with Crematory isin charge of arrangements. Hilda Solomon, 89 BEVERLY HILLSHilda May Solomon,age 89, of Beverly Hills, died March 1, 2012, at her home under the loving care of her family and HPH Hospice. Hilda was born on July 17, 1922, in Saint Ann, Jamaica, to the late Joshua and Wilhel Green. She was employed as a nurses aide. Hilda was active as a member of First Assembly of God Church of Inverness; her passion was helping others and giving of herself. She enjoyed being with her family and her church friends. Survivors include her husband of 55 years, Newville Solomon; two sons, Carey (Jacqueline) Solomon, Belle Meade, NJ, and Everton Solomon, Dallas, TX; stepson, Patrick (Carol) Solomon, Orlando, FL; her daughter, Bridgett Solomon, Beverly Hills; stepdaughter Maxine (Evan) Jones, Millston, NJ; four grandchildren; and five step-grandchildren. A Funeral Service of Remembrance will be held on Saturday, March 10, 2012, at 1 p.m. at the First Assembly of God Church. Burial will follow at Fero Memorial Gardens. The family will receive friends in visitation from noon until the hour of service. Chas. E. Davis Funeral Home with Crematory is in charge of arrangements. The family requests donations in Hildas name to the churchs Childrens Fund in lieu of flowers. Sign the guest book at www.chronicleonline.com.Emil Thompson Jr., 85HOMOSASSA Emil William Thompson Jr., age 85, of Homosassa, FL, passed away March 5, 2012. Born on July 16, 1926, in Manhattan, New York, to Emil W., Sr. and Ruth (Friedman) Thompson, Emil moved to Citrus County 22 years ago from Sparta, NJ. He was a retired Engineer for Picatinny Arsenal; a U.S. Army veteran; volunteer of the Homosassa Volunteer Fire Department, a volunteer at Homosassa Springs State Park, and a member of St. Scholastica Catholic Church in Lecanto. Emil earned his Masters degree from Columbia University in Manhattan, NY. He is preceded in death by his brother, Tom; and his sisters, Lillian and Isabel. Survived by his wife, Maria; one daughter, Katherine; five step children, Marie, Chris, Victor, Mark and Gregory; thirteen grandchildren. Private cremation will take place under the direction of Brown Funeral Home and Crematory in Lecanto, FL. Mass of the Resurrection will be offered at 10 a.m. Friday, March 9th, at St. Scholastica Catholic Church in Lecanto, FL. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations can be made to The Salvation Army. Sign the guest book at www.chronicleonline.com.A6 W EDNESDAY, M ARCH 7, 2012 C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE 352-628-2291 DRYER VENT CLEANING $ 90 www.PreventDryerFiresNow.com 2011 2011 2011 2011 W ILL C ONSTRUCTION 000AS4F $ave Electricity CBC1252474 P R E V E N T P R E V E N T PREVENT F I R E F I R E FIRE! FULLY INSURED Liability Workers Comp 000AQOH 000AN84 Cellular & Roman Shades Plantation Shutters Ado Wraps Custom Drapery Top Treatments Etc. 628-7888 CALL NOW! Lorrie 5454 S. Suncoast Blvd. (Hwy 19, next to Sugarmill Family Rest.) www.verticalblindsofhomosassa.com OF HOMOSASSA, Inc. Vertical Blinds of Homosassa More Than Just Verticals 2011 2011 2011 2011 2 Faux Wood Woven Woods To Place Your In Memory ad, Call Mike Snyder at 563-3273 msnyder@chronicleonline.com or Saralynne Schlumberger at 564-2917 sschlumberger@chronicleonline.com Closing time for placing ad is 4 days prior to run date. 0 0 0 A H 6 J 000AQKR 726-8323 Funeral Home With Crematory C h a s E D a v i s Chas. E. Davis MARVIN ADKISSON Service: Graveside Thurs. 2:30 PM Florida National Cemetery EMMITT PIERCE Graveside Service: Fri. 12:30 PM Florida National Cemetery KATHRYN BRYE Service: Fri. 3:00 PM Chapel HILDA SOLOMON Service: Sat. 1:00 PM First Assembly of God Church ELLEN ODWYER Service: Sat. 4:00 PM Chapel OBITUARIES The Citrus County Chronicles policy permits both free and paid obituaries. Obituaries must be submitted or verified by the funeral home or society in charge of arrangements. Free obituaries, run one day, can include: full name of deceased; age; hometown/state; date of death; place of death; date, time and place of visitation and funeral services. If websites, photos, survivors, memorial contributions or other information are included, this will be designated as a paid obituary and a cost estimate provided to the sender. A flag will be included for free for those who served in the U.S. military. (Please note this service when submitting a free obituary.) Additionally, all obituaries will be posted online at www.chronicleonline .com. Paid obituaries are printed as submitted by funeral homes or societies. Area funeral homes with established accounts with the Chronicle are charged $8.75 per column inch. Non-local funeral homes and those without accounts are required to pay in advance by credit card, and the cost is $10 per column inch. OBITUARIES Small photos of the deceaseds face can be included for an additional charge. Larger photos, spanning the entire column, can also be accommodated, and will incur a size-based fee. Email obits@chronicle online.com or fax 352563-3280. Phone 352-563-5660 for details. Deadline is 3 p.m. for obituaries to appear in the next days edition. ERRORS Additional days of publication or reprints due to errors in submitted material are charged at the same rates. Hilda Solomon Obituaries Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious composer Sherman dies at 86 Associated Press In this April, 5, 1965, file photo actress Debbie Reynolds poses with Academy award-winners for best music Richard M. Sherman, right, and Robert B. Sherman, left, who received the award for Mary Poppins in Santa Monica, Calif. Songwriter Robert Sherman, who wrote the tongue-twisting Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious and other enduring songs for Disney classics, died Monday in London. He was 86.

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C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE W EDNESDAY, M ARCH 7, 2012 A7 000ASFU

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Associated PressGULF BREEZE Pray for Our Schools, many fading yard signs scattered throughout Santa Rosa County say, remnants of a bitter court battle over school prayer between conservative Christian groups and the American Civil Liberties Union. That fight, which cost the Santa Rosa County School District at least $500,000 in attorney fees, ended with officials admitting high school administrators had been leading prayers and promoting Christianity in the school system. It is part of the backdrop for a bill just passed by the Florida Legislature that would allow the states 67 school boards to adopt rules permitting the reading of student-initiated inspirational messages at assemblies and ceremonies. Backers say the bill, introduced by Sen. Gary Siplin, D-Orlando, doesnt use the word prayer and doesnt favor any specific religion, but allows students to pick a speaker and message of their choosing. If the chosen student gives a prayer or cites a specific religion, thats his or her right, proponents say. Republican Gov. Rick Scott is expected to sign the bill. The bill doesnt force any message whatsoever, Rep. Eric Eisnaugle, R-Orlando, said in a recent committee hearing. Eisnaugle said the bill is constitutional because it is content neutral. Even if the policy is adopted (by a school board,) it leaves the decision whether to deliver a message up to the students, he said. All the folks whove opposed this bill and who have expressed opposition to this bill seem to have a bias against prayer. They dont like this bill because it allows potentially, if a student wants to give a prayer, it allows prayer. But opponents say the unstated goal is to allow Christian prayers at school events, which they say would violate the constitutional rights of non-Christian students. And they say the bill violates the U.S. Constitutions ban on the government endorsing specific religions in schools and will create additional lawsuits similar to the Santa Rosa County lawsuit that the school districts will lose at great cost to taxpayers. The House rejected an amendment put forward by opponents that would have required the state to pay the legal fees for any district that allowed inspirational messages and was sued. This is an open invitation for 66 more Santa Rosa counties, said Howard Simon, executive director of the ACLU of Florida. Until the early 1960s, state-sponsored, adult-led prayer was common in public schools nationwide. But then the U.S. Supreme Court said such prayers violated the First Amendments clause that says the government cannot establish an official religion or prohibit any religions free exercise. In the five decades since, there have been numerous court fights over what constitutes school prayer, when its legal and where the line is drawn. There is no question there will be lawsuits over this, said Bob Jarvis, a constitutional law professor at Nova Southeastern University in Fort Lauderdale. It is certainly an attempt to get around the ban on prayer in school, no one can question that. I think, in the end, no school district will carry it out for fear that they might get sued. The legislation appears to be more of a political offering than a legal one, he said. The bill raises a lot of constitutional questions that would create headaches for schools to manage, he said. Jarvis said it would be difficult for school districts to give equal time for every student to share an inspirational message, and it would be difficult for districts to control possible offensive content. Its unlikely the bill would stand up to legal scrutiny, he said. I think it was one of those symbolic bills passed by very Republican legislators to throw red meat to their base and to toss (it) up in November if the courts reject it, Jarvis said. The school-prayer fight came to Santa Rosa County in 2008 when the ACLU sued on behalf of two Pace High School students over student-led prayers that were given at graduation and other school events. The principal, who is a Baptist deacon, school administrators and teachers also led students in prayer and Bible readings. The district settled the lawsuit by banning its officials from leading or promoting prayer at school events and by admitting a long-standing culture at Pace High of promoting Christianity. The Liberty Counsel appealed the settlement on behalf of Christian Educators Association International saying the settlement went too far in restricting employees rights. A federal court agreement ended the case by amending the original settlement to, among other things, clarify that teachers can say thank heavens or God bless you in the classroom. Longtime Santa Rosa school board member JoAnn Simpson sees the decision by the Legislature not to cover districts attorney fees as a warning that districts that adopt the measure will be sued and could lose. Simpson said few issues have more power to divide communities than school prayer, and the damage is long term. Its wonderful for people to put signs in their yards that say Pray for our Schools, she said. Im a person of God. I pray, but I do not subject others to my beliefs. There is still animosity out there. There is still a lot of animosity about the lawsuits. Santa Rosa Superintendent Tim Wyrosdick had no comment about the bill. Other Santa Rosa school board members did not return emails or phone messages left by The Associated Press. Opponents say the bill is about Christian prayer, regardless of the carefullychosen terminology, and would likely lead to lawsuits for school districts that adopt the measure. Some question whether the term inspirational message will create problems because it is not specific. Rep. Jeff Clemens, D-Lake Worth, wanted to know if a students reading aloud from the Aryan Satanic Manifesto could be considered an inspirational message. Citizens bill may be dead for the year A bill to try to move people out of Citizens Property Insurance (HB 245) may be dead for this year after the House agreed Tuesday to take a Senate amendment requiring people to opt-in to the switch to a new, unregulated company. This year, it probably is, said bill sponsor Rep. Jim Boyd, R-Bradenton, after his side lost on a vote that he said gutted the bill. The Senate had made the same vote a day earlier, and earlier on Tuesday passed its amended version of the bill 26-8. The bill would let surplus lines insurance companies take policies from Citizens in an effort to reduce Citizens liability. Originally, customers would have had to opt out of the switch in that case. But with the amendment that passed the Senate on Monday and the House on Tuesday, the bill now would require policyholders to approve before being switched. The opt-in provision, as well as other changes restricting rate hikes on surplus insurers amounts to a straight jacket around the surplus lines companies the state is trying to court, and they will simply will go somewhere else, said Senate bill sponsor Sen. Garrett Richter, RNaples. House set to pass medical loss ratio Trying to get federal approval of a statewide Medicaid overhaul, the House could vote Wednesday on a controversial requirement aimed at making sure HMOs spend enough money on patient care. Republican lawmakers refused last year to include the requirement, known as a medical loss ratio, in a plan to shift hundreds of thousands of Medicaid beneficiaries into managed care. Instead, lawmakers sought to require that HMOs share profits above 5 percent with the state. But federal officials, who are reviewing the overhaul, have made clear they want a medicalloss ratio to ensure that HMOs spend a minimum amount of the money they receive possibly 85 percent on patient care. The House on Tuesday added a medical-loss ratio to SB 730. But part of that proposal drew criticism from Democrats because it would allow managed-care plans to also comply with the ratio by contributing money to medical-residency programs or to a state Medicaid fund. Rep. Elaine Schwartz, D-Hollywood, said that could shift money away from patient care and wouldnt be approved by federal officials. In general, patient care is patient care, Schwartz said. Its not contributions to schools, and its not just giving money back to the state. But House Health & Human Services Chairman Rob Schenck, R-Spring Hill, said GOP leaders have come up with cutting-edge ways to improve the medical-loss ratio. He said counting contributions to medical-residency programs would help with a state shortage of doctors. House set to vote on video voyeurism bill The Florida House could vote this week on a bill that increases the charges related to the crime known as video voyeurism. The House on Tuesday rolled the bill (SB 436) to a third reading. That means it will be available for a final vote this week before the legislative session ends on Friday. The Senate already approved the measure. The bill increases video voyeurism offenses that are now first-degree misdemeanors to thirddegree felonies. It also increases current thirddegree felony video voyeurism offenses to second-degree felonies. Video voyeurism is the secret recording of another person while naked or in some state of undress. A high-profile case last year involved a man charged with recording tanning-bed customers. Pharmacy vaccinations get a shot at passing The Senate appears ready to give final approval to a bill that would allow pharmacists to give vaccinations for pneumonia and shingles. The bill (HB 509), which already has passed the House, came up on the Senate floor Tuesday and was placed in position for a vote as soon as Wednesday. It is a compromise between pharmacists and physicians, who have long disagreed about whether people should be able to get vaccinations at their neighborhood pharmacies. Under the bill, pharmacists would be able to give pneumonia vaccinations to adults, similar to the way they give flu shots now. They also would be able to give shingles vaccinations if patients have prescriptions from doctors. Also, the bill would require pharmacists to take a continuing-education course about giving vaccinations. House opens up online learning optionsA bill that expands online learning opportunities to elementary school-age children has been passed by the Florida House. The bill (HB 7063) was approved by a vote of 100-16 on Tuesday and now goes to the Senate. It allows the Florida Virtual School to expand part-time course offerings to children in kindergarten through third grade. The bill also removes the requirement that public school students spend at least a year in public school before they can enroll in Virtual School classes. Supporters say it will promote school choice and support homeschooled children. State employees could access KidCareThe children of state employees could be eligible for low-cost state-subsidized health care coverage, under a measure passed by the Florida Senate unanimously on Tuesday. The bill, SB 510, would take advantage of changes in the 1997 federal State Childrens Health Insurance Program (CHIP) that now allows state employees to qualify. Given the number of state workers who have applied for KidCare and were denied coverage, or are receiving full-pay coverage, its estimated 2,702 children would qualify in the first 12 months. The fiscal impact to the state is estimated to be $447,055 but overall, Florida is expected to save money by not insuring these children through the state employee plan. The House companion, HB 849, hasnt moved. Advocates for children are also working on another effort to broaden KidCare, hoping lawmakers will change rules to allow it to cover certain children of immigrants who are legally in the country but who currently cant get coverage. That effort is mired in the Senate.House sets up vote for official state flagshipThe Florida House has readied a bill for a final vote that designates an official state flagship. The House on Tuesday rolled the bill (SB 326) to a third reading. That means it will be available for a final vote this week before the legislative session ends on Friday. The Senate already approved the measure. The bill would name the Western Union as Floridas flagship. The ship is a 130-foot-long schooner based in Key West where it is being turned into a floating museum. Construction of the yellow pine and mahogany ship began in Grand Cayman and was completed in Key West in 1939. It served as a cable vessel for the Western Union Telegraph Co. for 34 years and later was put to work as a charter boat. Handcuffs could be banned during jailhouse birthsWomen giving birth in a Florida prison or county jail would not be handcuffed or otherwise restrained under a measure that state lawmakers could pass this week. The House took up the Healthy Pregnancies for Incarcerated Women Act (SB 524/HB 367) on Tuesday and rolled it to a third reading. The Senate already approved its version. A similar measure was introduced last year but did not pass into law. The act allows pregnant women to be physically restrained only if theyre shown to be a security or escape risk. A woman who believes she was restrained in violation of the act could file a grievance within one year. House Speaker Cannon thanks Jeb Bush, slams Charlie Crist The formal portrait of Florida House Speaker Dean Cannon is now hanging in the House chamber. Gov. Rick Scott attended the brief ceremony at the beginning of Tuesdays session. Cannon then thanked former Gov. Jeb Bush for showing him what a leader should be and former Gov. Charlie Crist for showing him what a politician should not be. Neither was in attendance. House members also presented Cannon with a hunting shotgun. The Winter Park Republican was first elected to the House in 2004. A8 W EDNESDAY, M ARCH 7, 2012 C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE S TATE 000AO6C 000APN9 Board Certified American Osteopathic Board of Ophthalmology and Otorhinolaryngology Board Certified National Board of Examiners for Osteopathic Physicians and Surgeons Ward Eye Center 8490 W. Homosassa Trail, Homosassa (352) 489-3579 (352) 628-0123 M O D E R N MODERN D I A B E T I C DIABETIC S P E C I A L I S T SPECIALIST Saturday, March 24 ~ Noon Museum Cafe ~ 10466 W. Yulee Drive in Old Homosassa Bands Include: 12:15-12:45 Alexandria Hand 1:00-1:45 Grounded 4 Life 2:00-2:30 Sophie Robitaille 2:45-3:30 Zero Gravity 3:45-4:15 Haley Schroeder 4:30-5:15 Tri Phi For information call 352-503-3498. Gates open at 11:30 a.m. Starts at Noon $7 Adults $3 Teens 12 and under Free B ENEFITING B IG B ROTHERS AND B IG S ISTERS OF C ITRUS C OUNTY 000AIIT No coolers or pets Bring Chairs www.ncfblues.com Present: the Third Annual 2012 000AKNI Florida LEGISLATURE From wire reports 2012 SESSION Inspirational messages bill sure to spur lawsuits

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P ETER S VENSSON AP Technology WriterNEW YORK Apple is expected to reveal a new iPad model on Wednesday, with a sharper screen and perhaps an option for faster wireless broadband. The upgrades are relatively minor, but the iPad is secure in its position as the king of tablets. As usual, Apple has kept the features of the new device secret. No matter what they are, analysts expect the new iPad to be a success, riding on the popularity of the previous models, as well as pent-up demand from consumers who have been waiting for the new model. The iPad 2 was a big step up from the original iPad, since Apple included a camera and reduced both the thickness and the weight of the device. But there isnt that much Apple can do to jazz up the iPad 3. Company watchers expect the new device to have the same basic size and weight as last years model. Nearly a year ago, the iPad 2 went on sale nine days after it was revealed. Apple watchers expect similar timing this year. Some rumored new features include: A sharper screen, similar to the Retina Display on the iPhone 4 and 4s. The rumored resolution is 2048 by 1536 pixels, which would make text look smoother and some high-resolution pictures look better. It wont make much of a difference for images on the Web, or video. Some speculate that Apple will call the model the iPad HD, for high definition, rather than iPad 3. The new iPad could include Siri, the voice-activated assistant found on the iPhone 4S. Siri has gotten mixed reviews, but Apple has been touting the feature heavily in its advertising, and it would make sense to expand the availability of this high-profile feature. Faster wireless capabilities. IPads are available with built-in modems for AT&Ts and Verizons third-generation, or G cellular networks in the U.S. The iPad 3 could come in a version that offers faster G or LTE networks. However, most iPads are used only on Wi-Fi, so an LTE chip wouldnt matter to most buyers. In this respect, Apple is playing catch-up. Some competitors, such as Samsung and Motorola, already sell LTE-compatible tablets. Since last fall, Sprint Nextel Corp. has sold the iPhone. But it doesnt sell the iPad. Its possible it could join AT&T and Verizon Wireless in selling the iPad 3. A faster processor. This is pretty much a given, since every new iPhone or iPad has improved on the computing power of its predecessor. But few users complain about their iPads being slow, so this should not be a major selling point. Sarah Rotman Epps, an analyst for Forrester Research, said hardware features arent that important to tablet buyers. Its about the services what you can do with the device, she said in a blog post. Apples competitors have slowly come to realize this, but only after bringing out dozens of tablets with whiz-bang features like 3-D cameras. The competitor thats done the best is Amazon.com Inc. Its Kindle Fire tablet is cheaper than the iPad, but what really sets it apart is that its tied into Amazons book, movie and music stores, making it an easy route to entertainment, just like the iPad. Still, the Kindle Fire has a long way to go. Epps estimates that Amazon sold 5.5 million Kindle Fires in the fourth quarter of last year. Meanwhile, Apple sold 15.4 million iPads, and has sold 55.3 million in total. According to Canaccord Genuity, 63 percent of the tablets shipped last year were iPads. The only competitors with more than 5 percent market share were Amazon and Samsung Electronics Co. The iPad launch comes as Apple has reached a rare milestone: last week, it was worth more than $500 billion. Only six other U.S. companies have been worth that much, and none have held that valuation for long. On Tuesday, Apples stock had fallen, bringing its market value down to $493 billion, but analysts believe the company is worth closer to $550 billion. One big unknown is whether Apple will keep the iPad 2 in production at a lower price, like it kept the iPhone 3GS after the launch of the iPhone 4. If so, the iPad 2 could carry a price tag that would make consumers think twice about buying a Kindle Fire. Another big unknown is whether Apple will reveal its rumored foray into making TV sets. Some have speculated that the invite to the Apple event, which said We have something you really have to see, points in that direction. N ATIONC ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE W EDNESDAY, M ARCH 7, 2012 A9 000AO1I HOME DELIVERY Call 563-3295 563-3295 TODAY!! or join EZ-PAY and GET ONE MONTH FREE! *NEWST AND PRICES. Cannot have subscribed in 60 days. 52 week pre-paid only Ask for code HP 000AQOM Does your attic go bump in the night? Pests come in all shapes & sizes. Some pose a danger to your home while others are simply a nuisance. Our technicians have the expertise & experience to identify a problem & provide a solution to keep your family & home safe. Rodent Removal Mice Rats Squirrels Etc. Toll Free 1-877-345-BUSH www.bushhomeservices.com Call today for a FREE phone or in-home estimate. 0 0 0 A I R N Homosassa 621-7700 Inverness 860-1037 Crystal River 795-8600 PEST CONTROL New iPad expected to have modest upgrades Associated Press Grant Beacon Middle School student Jeriah Garcia, 13, works out an algebra problem Jan. 17 on his school-supplied iPad in class at Grant, Colo. Apple is expected to reveal a new iPad on Wednesday, March 7, a device with a sharper screen, a faster processor and an option for faster wireless broadband.

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C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE S TOCKS T HE M ARKETINR EVIEW H OW T O R EAD T HE M ARKETINR EVIEW NYSE A MEX N ASDAQ S TOCKSOFL OCAL I NTEREST M OST A CTIVE ($1 ORMORE) NameVol(00)LastChg BkofAm24793587.71-.26 S&P500ETF1718077134.75-2.00 iShEMkts101063642.41-1.47 SPDR Fncl89689214.45-.37 FordM56504212.09-.37 G AINERS ($2 ORMORE) NameLastChg%Chg HarvNRes7.70+1.44+23.0 DrxRsaBear21.73+3.23+17.5 DaqoNwEn2.88+.39+15.7 PrUltVixST6.13+.81+15.2 CSVs2xInPal37.50+4.90+15.0 L OSERS ($2 ORMORE) NameLastChg%Chg DxRssBull rs47.54-9.70-16.9 StMotr20.51-3.86-15.8 CSVS2xPall53.72-9.10-14.5 NoAmEn g4.92-.80-14.0 SunTr wtB2.65-.42-13.7 D IARYAdvanced267 Declined2,804 Unchanged50 Total issues3,121 New Highs24 New Lows30Volume4,111,854,540 M OST A CTIVE ($1 ORMORE) NameVol(00)LastChg NovaGld g724777.52-.45 CheniereEn5896215.14-.74 NwGold g3650910.16-.36 GoldStr g320991.76-.08 DenisnM g223901.61-.10 G AINERS ($2 ORMORE) NameLastChg%Chg Orbital5.82+.41+7.6 Ellomay rs5.75+.38+7.1 Engex2.74+.17+6.6 MastechH5.62+.29+5.4 eMagin3.15+.13+4.3 L OSERS ($2 ORMORE) NameLastChg%Chg GreenHntr2.55-.28-9.9 MtnPDia g4.70-.50-9.6 DocuSec3.46-.34-8.8 PyramidOil4.85-.44-8.3 TriangPet6.67-.56-7.7 D IARYAdvanced100 Declined357 Unchanged41 Total issues498 New Highs4 New Lows10Volume101,934,883 M OST A CTIVE ($1 ORMORE) NameVol(00)LastChg Microsoft50433831.56-.25 PwShs QQQ48453463.57-.63 SiriusXM4626722.22-.04 MicronT3697108.00-.20 Intel36702826.61+.07 G AINERS ($2 ORMORE) NameLastChg%Chg Vermillion3.00+1.67+125.6 EncoreBcsh20.19+5.28+35.4 DUSA5.80+1.15+24.7 Irid wt132.06+.34+19.8 Agenus rs3.76+.55+17.1 L OSERS ($2 ORMORE) NameLastChg%Chg Oncothyr5.07-3.34-39.7 ZeltiqAes n7.36-3.75-33.8 SunshHrt n10.50-3.50-25.0 Aegerion14.17-3.27-18.8 USHmSy10.33-1.84-15.1 D IARYAdvanced446 Declined2,100 Unchanged89 Total issues2,635 New Highs25 New Lows52Volume1,829,965,958 Here are the 825 most active stocks on the New York Stock Exchange, 765 most active on the Nasdaq National Market and 116 most active on the American Stock Exchange. Tables show name, price and net change. Name: Stocks appear alphabetically by the companys full name (not abbreviation). Names consisting of initials appear at the beginning of each letters list. Last: Price stock was trading at when exchange closed for the day. Chg: Loss or gain for the day. No change indicated by ... Stock Footnotes: cld Issue has been called for redemption by company. d New 52-week low. dd Loss in last 12 mos. ec Company formerly listed on the American Exchanges Emerging Company Marketplace. h temporary exmpt from Nasdaq capital and surplus listing qualification. n Stock was a new issue in the last year. The 52-week high and low figures date only from the beginning of trading. pf Preferred stock issue. pr Preferences. pp Holder owes installments of purchase price. rt Right to buy security at a specified price. s Stock has split by at least 20 percent within the last year. wi Trades will be settled when the stock is issued. wd When distributed. wt Warrant, allowing a purchase of a stock. u New 52-week high. un Unit, including more than one security. vj Company in bankruptcy or receivership, or being reorganized under the bankruptcy law. Appears in front of the name.Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial. I NDEXES 52-Week Net % YTD % 52-wk High LowName Last Chg Chg Chg % Chg13,055.7510,404.49Dow Jones Industrials12,759.15-203.66-1.57+4.43+4.46 5,627.853,950.66Dow Jones Transportation5,047.25-78.49-1.53+.55-1.94 467.64381.99Dow Jones Utilities452.53-1.98-.44-2.61+8.49 8,718.256,414.89NYSE Composite7,920.14-171.13-2.12+5.93-5.65 2,498.891,941.99Amex Index2,389.98-47.77-1.96+4.90-.22 3,000.112,298.89Nasdaq Composite2,910.32-40.16-1.36+11.71+5.23 1,378.041,074.77S&P 5001,343.36-20.97-1.54+6.82+1.63 14,562.0111,208.42Wilshire 500014,139.13-233.39-1.62+7.20+.89 868.57601.71Russell 2000787.09-16.56-2.06+6.23-4.56 AK Steel.202.9...6.91-.38-16.3 AT&T Inc1.765.74730.73-.26+1.6 Ametek.24.52046.49-.88+10.4 ABInBev1.161.8...65.88-1.37+8.0 BkofAm.04.5...7.71-.26+38.7 CapCtyBk......257.39-.10-22.6 CntryLink2.907.52338.61-.06+3.8 Citigrp rs.04.1932.12-1.56+22.1 CmwREIT2.0011.01518.22-.58+9.5 Disney.601.41642.00-.70+12.0 EnterPT3.006.62545.25-.45+3.5 ExxonMbl1.882.21085.86-1.15+1.3 FordM.201.7712.09-.37+12.4 GenElec.683.71518.42-.43+2.8 HomeDp1.162.51946.39-.71+10.3 Intel.843.21126.61+.07+9.7 IBM3.001.515197.26-3.40+7.3 Lowes.562.01927.84-.40+9.7 McDnlds2.802.81999.89-.05-.4 Microsoft.802.51131.56-.25+21.6 MotrlaSolu.881.71551.48+.81+11.2 MotrlaMob.........39.69+.01+2.3 NextEraEn2.404.01359.53-.31-2.2 Penney.802.12438.47-.21+9.4 PiedmOfc.804.61317.50-.30+2.7 ProgrssEn2.484.72753.22-.25-5.0 RegionsFn.04.7345.75-.18+33.7 SearsHldgs.33......73.42-1.06+131.0 Smucker1.922.61974.87-1.61-4.2 SprintNex.........2.39-.04+2.1 TexInst.682.11732.12-.07+10.3 TimeWarn1.042.81336.51-.45+1.0 UniFirst.15.31558.36-.59+2.9 VerizonCm2.005.24638.69-.31-3.6 Vodafone2.107.8...26.83-.33-4.3 WalMart1.592.71358.97-.44-1.3 Walgrn.902.71132.87-.43-.6 YRC rs.........8.05-.05-19.3YTD Name Div Yld PELast Chg%Chg YTD Name Div Yld PELast Chg%Chg T O R EQUESTS TOCKS& F UNDS Request stocks or mutual funds to be listed here by writing the Chronicle Attn: Stock Requests, 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429; or call 563-5660. Include the name of the stock, market and ticker symbol. For mutual funds, list parent company, symbol and the exact name of the fund. Staff will not provide real-time quotes. N EW Y ORK S TOCKE XCHANGE A-B-C ABB Ltd19.45-.94 ACE Ltd71.62-1.15 AES Corp12.98-.40 AFLAC45.22-1.81 AGL Res39.51-.27 AK Steel6.91-.38 ASA Gold27.03-.72 AT&T Inc30.73-.26 AbtLab56.35-.93 AberFitc47.77-1.23 Accenture59.46-1.42 AdamsEx10.58-.16 AdvAmer10.38-.01 AMD6.90-.17 Aeropostl18.16-.47 Aetna45.65-1.14 Agilent42.28-.50 Agnico g35.32-.64 AlcatelLuc2.24-.14 Alcoa9.47-.40 AllegTch40.37-1.89 Allete41.30-.06 AlliBGlbHi15.13-.31 AlliBInco8.36-.01 AlliBern14.35-.30 Allstate31.00-.55 AlphaNRs16.19-.16 AlpAlerMLP16.87-.14 Altria30.08-.18 AmBev39.11-.68 Ameren32.01-.23 AMovilL s23.28-.50 AmAxle10.97-.35 AEagleOut14.63-.07 AEP38.19-.07 AmExp51.74-1.23 AmIntlGrp29.05-1.34 AmSIP36.83-.03 AmTower62.18-.71 Amerigas44.89-.30 Ameriprise54.17-1.37 AmeriBrgn36.28-.27 Anadarko81.87-1.29 AnalogDev38.08+.12 AnglogldA39.87-1.08 ABInBev65.88-1.37 Ann Inc25.24-.41 Annaly16.43-.17 Aon Corp47.13-.23 Apache103.31-3.62 AptInv24.62-.50 AquaAm21.94-.25 ArcelorMit18.93-1.27 ArchCoal11.89-.31 ArchDan30.39-1.26 ArcosDor n18.65-.55 ArmourRsd7.09-.04 Ashland59.75-1.92 AsdEstat15.07-.23 AssuredG16.62-.72 ATMOS30.75-.48 AuRico g9.13-.37 Avon18.18-.44 BB&T Cp28.31-.65 BHP BillLt71.97-2.36 BP PLC46.23-1.73 BRT6.53-.03 BakrHu47.17-.89 BallCorp39.28-.41 BcBilVArg8.28-.57 BcoBrades17.61-.61 BcoSantSA7.80-.42 BcoSBrasil10.29-.44 BkofAm7.71-.26 BkIreld rs6.57-.61 BkMont g57.10-1.23 BkNYMel21.64-.53 Barclay14.82-1.28 Bar iPVix26.03+1.84 BarrickG45.73-1.03 BasicEnSv16.99-.95 Baxter57.48-.36 Beam Inc53.82-1.01 BeazerHm2.95-.23 BectDck75.44-.57 BerkHa A117855.00-1040.00 BerkH B78.47-.70 BestBuy24.06-.58 BigLots44.39+.24 BlkHillsCp32.81-.01 BlkDebtStr4.03-.02 BlkEnhC&I13.49-.24 BlkGlbOp14.84-.31 Blackstone14.52-.61 BlockHR15.99-.21 Boeing72.56-1.57 BorgWarn79.55-3.36 BostBeer97.04+.67 BostProp102.55-.47 BostonSci5.70-.14 BoydGm7.39-.37 Brandyw10.92-.29 BrMySq32.33-.59 Brookdale17.23-.70 BrkfldOfPr17.30-.19 Brunswick21.87-1.07 Buckeye59.69-.19 C&J Egy n18.49-.76 CBRE Grp17.93-.71 CBS B29.08-.79 CF Inds168.97-9.01 CH Engy66.80+.20 CMS Eng21.41-.15 CSS Inds19.14-.07 CSX s20.16-.30 CVR Engy25.80-.90 CVS Care44.79-.38 CYS Invest13.45-.16 CblvsNY s13.93-.36 CabotOG s33.84-.51 CallGolf6.40-.08 Calpine16.00+.19 Cameco g22.96-.97 Cameron53.60-.95 CampSp32.67-.37 CdnNRs gs35.26-.61 CapOne48.27-1.11 CapitlSrce6.55-.10 CapM pfB14.80-.08 CardnlHlth41.40-.01 CarMax32.07-.03 Carnival29.48-.84 Caterpillar105.93-4.16 Celanese44.84-1.62 Cemex7.56-.40 Cemig pf22.48-1.05 CenovusE35.78-1.97 CenterPnt19.16-.15 CntryLink38.61-.06 Checkpnt10.78-.17 ChesEng23.56-.67 ChesUtl41.02-.52 Chevron108.85-.47 ChicB&I43.09-2.15 Chicos15.10-.24 Chimera2.96-.03 Cigna43.28-1.17 CinciBell3.79-.08 Citigrp rs32.12-1.56 CleanH s65.36-1.38 CliffsNRs60.35-1.57 Clorox67.80-.12 Coach73.12-3.05 CobaltIEn29.54-.69 CCFemsa97.75-3.03 CocaCola68.76-.47 CocaCE27.24-.85 Coeur25.85-1.00 CogdSpen4.24-.01 CohStInfra17.55-.17 ColgPal93.34-.01 CollctvBrd17.73-.15 Comerica28.55-.55 CmwREIT18.22-.58 CmtyHlt23.30-.76 CompSci31.01-.92 ComstkRs15.04-.97 Con-Way29.30-.58 ConAgra26.02-.34 ConocPhil76.45-1.11 ConsolEngy32.90-.45 ConEd58.35-.04 ConstellA21.82-.39 ConstellEn35.95-.24 Cnvrgys12.22-.13 Cooper Ind58.93-1.67 Corning12.81-.08 Cott Cp6.33-.11 Covidien50.83-1.32 Crane46.19-1.90 CSVS2xVxS17.08+.72 CSVelIVSt s8.35-.70 CredSuiss25.35-1.74 CrwnCstle52.39-.73 Cummins115.37-4.91 CurEuro130.59-1.01 D-E-F DCT Indl5.66-.16 DDR Corp14.03-.40 DNP Selct11.08-.15 DR Horton13.46-.50 DSW Inc53.71-1.28 DTE53.87-.49 DanaHldg15.20-.62 Danaher52.20-.95 Darden49.53-1.27 Deere79.21-2.62 DeltaAir9.36-.31 DenburyR18.76-.84 DeutschBk43.58-3.04 DBGoldDS4.57+.16 DevonE71.00-1.68 DicksSptg46.89+1.32 DxFnBull rs86.20-6.17 DirSCBear21.13+1.19 DirFnBear26.82+1.65 DirLCBear23.40+1.06 DirDGldBll19.73-1.46 DrxEnBear9.48+.43 DirEMBear13.43+1.24 DirxSCBull53.51-3.46 DirxEnBull53.75-2.80 Discover29.93-.56 Disney42.00-.70 DomRescs50.52-.30 DEmmett21.76-.07 Dover60.75-2.69 DowChm32.50-1.19 DrPepSnap37.86... DuPont50.03-.86 DukeEngy21.02-.07 DukeRlty13.82-.26 EMC Cp27.68-.44 EOG Res112.72-.48 EQT Corp51.52-1.16 EastChm s50.12-2.12 Eaton48.70-2.02 EV EnEq10.89-.16 EVTxMGlo8.99-.11 Ecolab59.34-.06 EdisonInt43.02-.08 ElPasoCp28.07-.44 Elan12.32-.08 EldorGld g14.09-.19 Embraer28.42-1.19 EmersonEl48.80-.76 EmpDist19.75+.06 EnbrEPt s31.99-.46 EnCana g19.49-.64 EndvSilv g9.51-.27 Enerpls g23.35-.51 EnPro36.00-1.39 ENSCO54.61-1.67 Entergy66.76-.36 EntPrPt51.75-.70 EqtyOne18.78-.55 EqtyRsd58.28-.35 EsteeLdr s58.10-.75 ExcoRes6.65-.20 Exelis n11.19-.46 Exelon38.72-.26 Express24.38-.17 ExxonMbl85.86-1.15 FMC Tch s50.26-.56 FairchldS13.12-.22 FamilyDlr55.42+.51 FedExCp88.75-1.68 FedSignl4.27-.15 FedInvst19.44-.53 Ferrellgs18.61-.23 Ferro5.22-.21 FidNatInfo31.08-.36 FstHorizon9.21-.22 FTActDiv8.54-.12 FtTrEnEq11.81-.17 FirstEngy44.71... FlagstBc h.80+.04 Fluor58.35-2.84 FootLockr29.62+.21 FordM12.09-.37 ForestLab32.25-.33 ForestOil s12.05-.04 FranceTel14.51-.55 FMCG39.44-1.01 Frontline4.89-.38 Fusion-io n30.10-.92 G-H-I GATX42.59-.78 GabelliET5.59-.11 GabHlthW7.78-.07 GabUtil7.80-.05 Gafisa SA5.55-.24 Gannett14.61-.44 Gap24.27-.34 GencoShip6.22-.23 GenDynam70.85-1.65 GenElec18.42-.43 GenGrPrp16.48-.21 GenMills38.36-.24 GenMotors24.58-1.42 GenOn En2.44-.06 Genworth8.56-.35 Gerdau9.77-.59 GiantInter s4.64+.04 GoldFLtd15.02... Goldcrp g46.89-1.05 GoldmanS113.67-4.96 Goodrich125.91-.12 Goodyear12.25-.47 GtPlainEn19.60-.18 Griffon9.51-.48 GuangRy18.82-.31 HCA Hld n25.16-.72 HCP Inc39.16-.43 HSBC43.16-1.29 HSBC Cap26.47... Hallibrtn34.13-.94 HanJS15.38-.29 HanPrmDv13.94-.04 Hanesbrds27.64-.79 HanoverIns39.60-.81 HarleyD45.12-1.36 HarmonyG11.72-.38 HartfdFn19.35-.78 HarvNRes7.70+1.44 HawaiiEl25.02-.24 HltCrREIT54.06-1.04 HltMgmt6.80-.01 HlthcrRlty20.51-.13 Heckmann5.23-.03 HeclaM4.72-.13 Heinz52.53-.56 Hertz13.65-.52 Hess63.50-1.20 HewlettP24.17-.84 HighwdPrp31.63-.56 HollyFrt s33.07-1.07 HomeDp46.39-.71 HonwllIntl57.77-1.33 HospPT24.76-.35 HostHotls15.06-.47 HovnanE2.40-.14 Humana85.71-1.77 Huntsmn12.69-.64 Hyperdyn1.32+.01 IAMGld g14.29+.05 ICICI Bk33.77-1.81 ING8.46-.63 ION Geoph6.44-.26 iShGold16.31-.32 iSAstla22.74-.77 iShBraz66.61-2.38 iSCan27.91-.72 iShEMU30.14-1.47 iShGer21.77-1.08 iSh HK17.46-.53 iShJapn9.81-.09 iSh Kor57.64-1.72 iSMalas14.49-.26 iShMex58.40-1.67 iShSing12.36-.41 iSTaiwn13.12-.32 iSh UK16.92-.58 iShSilver32.01-1.02 iShChina2537.75-1.42 iSSP500135.16-2.12 iShEMkts42.41-1.47 iShB20 T117.63+1.41 iShB1-3T84.39... iS Eafe52.74-1.74 iShiBxHYB89.65-1.21 iSR1KV67.36-1.10 iSR1KG63.08-.94 iSR2KV69.28-1.29 iSR2KG90.79-1.90 iShR2K78.74-1.60 iShREst60.11-.82 iShSPSm72.41-1.34 iStar6.66-.34 ITT Cp s22.70-.70 Idacorp39.96-.27 ITW53.62-1.74 Imation6.03-.17 IngerRd37.66-1.06 IntegrysE52.07-.23 IntcntlEx137.57-.58 IBM197.26-3.40 IntlGame14.83-.43 IntPap35.13-.36 Interpublic11.39-.29 InvenSen n15.06-.09 Invesco23.88-.54 InvMtgCap17.40-.43 IronMtn28.87-.58 ItauUnibH20.37-.88 IvanhM g17.48-.62 J-K-L JPMorgCh39.32-1.08 Jabil24.72-.68 JanusCap8.47-.27 Jarden37.05+1.29 Jefferies16.18-.63 JohnJn64.35-.56 JohnsnCtl31.06-1.65 JoyGlbl78.45-3.90 JnprNtwk21.09-.24 KB Home10.66-.56 KBR Inc34.90-2.20 KC Southn67.99-.71 Kaydon36.41-1.10 KA EngTR29.18-.07 Kellogg51.84-.25 KeyEngy16.48-.65 Keycorp7.62-.19 KimbClk72.60-.06 Kimco18.24-.63 KindME86.63-1.84 KindMorg35.35-.88 Kinross g10.57-.11 KodiakO g9.03-.17 Kohls48.23+.11 Kraft38.27-.08 KrispKrm7.91-.22 Kroger24.05-.15 KronosW s23.36-.17 LDK Solar5.07-.28 LSI Corp8.08-.02 LTC Prp30.46-.23 LaZBoy13.34-.33 Laclede40.75-.48 LVSands53.08-1.72 LeggMason26.57-.78 LeggPlat22.12-.56 LennarA22.36-.50 Level3 rs23.57-.75 LbtyASG4.19-.08 LillyEli38.64-.49 Limited45.22-.48 LincNat23.95-.76 Lindsay59.32-2.59 LinkedIn n86.44+.07 LionsGt g13.39-.41 LizClaib11.47-.16 LloydBkg2.09-.14 LockhdM87.78-.90 LaPac7.91-.19 Lowes27.84-.40 LyonBas A39.28-2.52 M-N-0 M&T Bk78.72-1.40 MBIA9.87-.37 MDU Res21.70-.04 MEMC3.74+.07 MFA Fncl7.33-.05 MCR9.57-.11 MGIC4.19-.22 MGM Rsts13.08-.36 Macquarie30.81+.23 Macys37.28-.96 MagelMPtr71.42-.33 MagnaI gs45.61-2.32 MagHRes6.20-.23 Manitowoc13.73-.87 Manulife g11.82-.60 MarathnO s32.42-1.04 MarathP n41.99-.76 MktVGold52.47-1.15 MV OilSv s41.70-1.11 MV Semi n33.38-.12 MktVRus31.20-1.92 MktVJrGld25.86-.77 MktVIndo28.42-.68 MarIntA35.78-.29 MarshM31.47-.42 MStewrt4.17-.18 Masco11.06-.68 McDrmInt13.67-.77 McDnlds99.89-.05 McKesson82.28+.03 McMoRn13.17-.36 McEwenM4.77-.21 Mechel9.70-.86 MedcoHlth65.64-1.18 MedProp9.34-.22 Medtrnic37.51-.25 Merck37.44-1.01 Meritor6.69-.27 MetLife37.41-1.26 MetroPCS9.65-.31 MetroHlth7.94-.35 MKors n46.81-1.82 MidAApt63.10-.25 Midas8.78+.05 MitsuUFJ4.94-.09 MobileTele17.76-.55 MolsCoorB42.04-1.29 Molycorp24.69-.87 MoneyG rs17.40+.52 Monsanto77.62-2.38 MonstrWw8.32+.80 MorgStan17.32-.97 MSEmMkt14.38-.51 Mosaic55.00-1.36 MotrlaSolu51.48+.81 MotrlaMob39.69+.01 MurphO59.66-1.35 NCR Corp20.60-.57 NRG Egy16.72-.47 NV Energy15.58-.22 NYSE Eur28.54-.91 Nabors19.85-.77 NBGrce rs3.20+.12 NatFuGas48.15-.47 NatGrid51.13-.52 NOilVarco77.54-2.40 NewAmHi10.65-.11 NJ Rscs45.82-.51 NY CmtyB12.86-.18 NY Times6.55-.18 NewellRub17.28-.74 NewfldExp34.23-.81 NewmtM57.17-.73 NewpkRes7.55-.21 Nexen g19.25-.82 NextEraEn59.53-.31 NiSource23.60-.14 NikeB107.34-1.90 NobleCorp38.20-1.22 NokiaCp4.96-.21 NorflkSo65.95-1.73 NoestUt35.91-.60 NorthropG59.67-.26 Novartis53.31-1.08 NSTAR47.01-.67 Nucor41.31-1.21 NuvMuOpp14.96-.04 NvMulSI&G8.60-.19 NuvQPf28.44-.24 OGE Engy51.66-.51 OasisPet30.04-.53 OcciPet101.03-2.49 Och-Ziff9.02-.51 OfficeDpt3.09-.09 OfficeMax5.04-.03 OldRepub10.92-.21 Olin20.79-.43 OmegaHlt20.39-.28 Omnicom47.70-.70 ONEOK82.54-.58 Oneok Pt s57.35-.80 OpkoHlth4.73-.07 OshkoshCp22.02-.67 P-Q-R PG&E Cp41.85-.10 PHH Corp13.37-.43 PNC57.14-1.62 PNM Res18.51-.06 PPG90.41-1.21 PPL Corp28.25-.31 PallCorp60.09-2.01 Pandora n14.27-.39 ParkDrl5.87-.49 ParkerHan85.54-2.61 PatriotCoal6.55+.19 PeabdyE30.74-.73 Pengrth g9.52-.15 PennVaRs23.98-.74 PennWst g20.42-.80 Penney38.47-.21 PepBoy14.99-.03 PepcoHold19.40-.17 PepsiCo62.28-.51 PerkElm25.86-.71 Prmian22.10-.24 PetrbrsA27.00-1.19 Petrobras28.32-1.30 Pfizer21.27-.24 PhilipMor84.06-1.36 PiedNG32.25-.26 Pier 116.78-.22 PimcoStrat11.86-.13 PinWst46.39-.02 PioNtrl103.27-2.89 PitnyBw17.61-.33 PlainsAA79.57-2.79 PlainsEx44.10-.63 PlumCrk39.46-.32 Polaris s64.21-1.30 Polypore35.97+.06 PostPrp44.24-.59 Potash43.28-1.78 PwshDB28.86-.48 PS Agri28.64-.51 PS USDBull22.23+.14 Praxair107.46-.96 PrinFncl26.44-1.09 ProLogis33.69-.78 ProShtS&P37.56+.56 PrUShS&P16.66+.48 PrUlShDow13.82+.42 ProUltQQQ105.17-2.15 PrUShQQQ34.48+.69 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HstnAEn6.52-.36 ImpOil gs45.45-.95 InovioPhm.63-.02 IntellgSys1.55-.04 IntTower g4.81+.16 J-K-L KeeganR g4.51-.06 KimberR g1.00-.01 LadThalFn1.88-.08 LkShrGld g1.32-.08 LongweiPI1.39-.07 LucasEngy2.69-.10 M-N-0 MadCatz g.53-.02 Metalico4.32-.29 MdwGold g1.61-.02 MincoG g.73-.08 Minefnd g14.52-.35 MinesMgt1.81-.12 NavideaBio2.82-.04 NeoStem.54-.02 NBRESec4.09-.08 Nevsun g3.90-.13 NwGold g10.16-.36 NA Pall g2.59-.15 NDynMn g6.03-.38 NthnO&G22.46-.41 NovaGld g7.52-.45 P-Q-R ParaG&S2.29-.14 PhrmAth1.28-.03 PionDrill9.14-.50 PlatGpMet1.39-.08 PolyMet g1.17-.01 Protalix5.48+.03 PyramidOil4.85-.44 Quaterra g.54-.03 Quepasa3.90-.27 QuestRM g2.44-.05 RareEle g5.19-.37 Rentech1.69-.04 RexahnPh.48... Richmnt g9.07-.27 Rubicon g3.40... S-T-U SamsO&G2.50-.12 SeabGld g21.63-.58 TanzRy g4.01-.13 Taseko3.58-.19 TimberlnR.54+.02 Timmins g2.49-.14 TrnsatlPet1.19-.06 TriValley.17-.00 TriangPet6.67-.56 Ur-Energy1.10-.03 Uranerz2.34-.18 UraniumEn3.70-.16 V-W-X-Y-Z VangTotW46.35-1.17 VantageDrl1.30-.06 VirnetX20.27-.41 VistaGold3.26-.18 VoyagerOG3.20-.06 Vringo1.61... WalterInv20.35-.34 WFAdvInco10.44-.09 XPO Log rs17.47-.60 YM Bio g1.91-.08 Name Last Chg F UTURES S POT C OMMODITIES NMER = New York Mercantile Exchange. CBOT = Chicago Board of Trade. CMER = Chicago Mercantile Exchange. NCSE = New York Cotton, Sugar & Cocoa Exchange. NCTN = New York Cotton Exchange. British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All others show dollar in foreign currency. Yesterday Pvs Day Yesterday Pvs Day Exch Contract Settle Chg Yesterday Pvs Day M ONEY R ATES C URRENCIES Prime Rate Discount Rate Federal Funds Rate Treasuries 3-month 6-month 5-year 10-year 30-year Gold (troy oz., spot) Silver (troy oz., spot) Copper (pound) Platinum (troy oz., spot) Lt Sweet CrudeNYMXApr 12104.70-2.02 CornCBOTMay 12654-6 WheatCBOTMay 12657-14 SoybeansCBOTMay 121335+10 CattleCMEApr 12125.77-2.63 Sugar (world)ICEMay 1224.05-.63 Orange JuiceICEMay 12189.85-2.25 Argent4.33804.3335 Australia.9498.9373 Bahrain.3770.3769 Brazil1.75181.7350 Britain1.57111.5867 Canada1.0021.9938 Chile488.25485.75 China6.31626.3115 Colombia1779.501776.50 Czech Rep19.0018.77 Denmark5.67105.6209 Dominican Rep39.0539.00 Egypt6.03456.0325 Euro.7628.7562 Hong Kong7.76347.7632 Hungary225.04221.40 India50.36549.775 Indnsia9135.009120.00 Israel3.81283.7890 Japan80.7881.46 Jordan.7091.7092 Lebanon1504.001503.50 Malaysia3.02503.0205 Mexico12.988912.8324 N. Zealand1.23301.2186 Norway5.70635.6173 Peru2.6832.676 Poland3.183.12 Russia29.571029.3301 Singapore1.26501.2573 So. Africa7.66567.5555 So. Korea1124.801116.80 Sweden6.79516.6978 Switzerlnd.9190.9118 Taiwan29.5529.55 Thailand30.7930.67 Turkey1.79501.7697 U.A.E.3.67313.6731 Uruguay19.399919.3995 Venzuel4.29274.2949 3.253.25 0.750.75 .00-.25.00-.25 0.070.09 0.130.14 0.820.84 1.941.94 3.083.07 $1671.40$1787.00 $32.741$37.140 $3.7310$3.9120 $1611.90$1723.50 S O Y OU K NOW The remainder of the NYSE listings can be found on the next page. A10 W EDNESDAY, M ARCH 7, 2012 000A7UT 563-5655 E Z E Z EZ Pay NO MORE CHECKS or REMINDERS! E Z Its E Z EZ *Charge may vary at first transaction and at each vacation start. Make your life a bit EASIER!! and get ONE MONTH FREE

PAGE 11

Gas price hikes end after 27 days NEW YORK Gasoline prices finally dropped a little after 27 straight days of increases. The nationwide average for regular slipped less than a penny to $3.764 per gallon. That ended a streak of price hikes that began Feb. 8. Pump prices rose by more than 28 cents per gallon in that period, making gasoline the most expensive ever for this time of year. Also Tuesday, oil fell to its lowest price in two weeks, while the price of natural gas remained near a 10-year low. The relief at the pump should be temporary. Experts predict gasoline prices will rise during the next several weeks. The Oil Price Information Service says the nationwide average could peak at $4.25 per gallon by April, beating the record high of $4.11 per gallon set in July 2008. That will likely keep gas prices front and center in the presidential campaign, while economists argue their impact on the U.S. economy.A Ritz hotel on Lehman sale list NEW YORK The RitzCarlton Kapalua hotel in Hawaii, a luxury ski resort in the Rockies and a Manhattan boutique hotel are among the last holdings of Lehman Brothers, the investment house whose spectacular bust triggered the worst of the 2008 financial crisis. The bank said Tuesday it will begin unloading its stakes in those properties in April as it prepares to exit Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection. Lehmans $639 billion bankruptcy remains the largest in U.S. history. It went under Sept. 15, 2008, the same week the government rescued AIG and the $700 billion bailout for major banks was conceived. Android Market checks out SAN FRANCISCO Googles digital marketplace for mobile applications, music, movies and books is unifying under a new name in an effort to spruce up the shopping experience. Beginning Tuesday, the Android Market will be known as the Google Play Store. Googles eBookstore and recently launched music service will be part of the Google Play Store. The same selection of books, music and movies was already available at Android Market. The rebranding will be ushered in with a series of tweaks designed to make it easier for customers to manage content and navigate from one section of the store to another. None of the changes will affect the digital content existing customers have already purchased and stored on Google computers in password-protected accounts. Verizon launches wireless for homesNEW YORK Verizon Wireless on Tuesday announced a version of its wireless broadband service thats designed for use in rural and remote homes that cant get DSL or cable. The service, called HomeFusion, could also appeal to some households where DSL is the only fixed-line option, since its faster than most DSL services. HomeFusion could provide potent competition for satellite broadband providers, which are often providers of last resort for rural homes. The service requires the installation of a cylindrical antenna, about the size of a 5-gallon bucket, on an outside wall. The hardware costs $200, but installation is free. From wire reports B USINESS C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE W EDNESDAY, M ARCH 7, 2012 A11 Advance Capital I: Balanc p 16.56-.16 RetInc 8.82... Alger Funds B: SmCapGr 6.84-.15 AllianceBern A: BalanA p 16.41-.18 GlbThGrA p 66.09-1.75 SmCpGrA 37.21-.75 AllianceBern Adv: LgCpGrAd 28.44-.47 AllianceBern B: GlbThGrB t 56.91-1.51 GrowthB t 26.55-.41 SCpGrB t 29.78-.61 AllianceBern C: SCpGrC t 29.93-.61 Allianz Fds Instl: NFJDvVl 12.21-.22 SmCpVl 30.42-.60 Allianz Funds C: AGICGrthC 25.18-.43 TargetC t 15.22-.31 Amer Beacon Insti: LgCapInst 20.19-.41 Amer Beacon Inv: LgCap Inv 19.17-.39 Ameri Century 1st: Growth 27.25-.44 Amer Century Adv: EqGroA p 23.16-.39 EqIncA p 7.48-.08 Amer Century Inv: AllCapGr 29.73-.53 Balanced 16.85-.16 DivBnd 11.08... EqInc 7.48-.09 GrowthI 27.02-.44 HeritageI 22.00-.45 IncGro 26.15-.43 InfAdjBd 12.93+.03 IntDisc x 9.29-.33 IntlGroI x 10.23-.41 New Opp 7.95-.18 OneChAg 12.50-.21 OneChMd 12.12-.16 RealEstI 21.21-.32 Ultra 25.12-.40 ValueInv 5.96-.08 American Funds A: AmcpA p 20.39-.29 AMutlA p 26.90-.34 BalA p 19.17-.23 BondA p 12.71+.01 CapIBA p 50.75-.70 CapWGA p 34.45-.88 CapWA p 21.05-.06 EupacA p 38.15-1.14 FdInvA p 37.83-.73 GovtA p 14.41+.02 GwthA p 31.42-.55 HI TrA p 11.02-.06 IncoA p 17.26-.21 IntBdA p 13.70+.01 IntlGrIncA p 28.80-.80 ICAA p 28.93-.49 LtTEBA p 16.25-.02 NEcoA p 26.37-.49 N PerA p 28.39-.67 NwWrldA 50.55-1.28 STBFA p 10.09... SmCpA p 37.04-.92 TxExA p 12.78-.02 WshA p 29.56-.43 Ariel Investments: Apprec 42.48-1.08 Ariel 46.48-1.12 Artio Global Funds: IntlEqI r 24.68-.74 IntEqII I r 10.42-.31 Artisan Funds: Intl 21.74-.72 IntlInstl 21.86-.72 IntlVal r 26.91-.66 MidCap 37.82-.81 MidCapVal 20.89-.34 SCapVal 15.74-.28 Baron Funds: Asset 49.62-.80 Growth 53.30-.85 SmallCap 24.69-.51 Bernstein Fds: IntDur 13.94+.01 DivMu 14.85-.01 TxMgdIntl 13.49-.47 BlackRock A: EqtyDiv 18.92-.30 GlAlA r 19.26-.28 HiYInvA 7.71-.06 IntlOpA p 30.15-.94 BlackRock B&C: GlAlC t 17.92-.27 BlackRock Instl: BaVlI 26.18-.50 EquityDv 18.96-.31 GlbAlloc r 19.35-.28 HiYldBd 7.71-.06 Brinson Funds Y: HiYldI Y 6.20... BruceFund 390.65-2.19 Buffalo Funds: SmCap n26.76-.52 CGM Funds: Focus n28.57-.88 Mutl n26.86-.59 Realty n28.11-.50 CRM Funds: MdCpVlI 28.44-.48 Calamos Funds: GrwthA p 51.47-.94 Calvert Invest: Inco p 16.07+.01 IntlEqA p 13.14-.38 SocialA p 29.59-.24 SocBd p 15.99+.03 SocEqA p 36.39-.56 TxF Lg p 16.19-.02 Cohen & Steers: RltyShrs 63.86-.89 Columbia Class A: Acorn t 29.25-.68 DivEqInc 10.12-.19 DivrBd 5.12... DivOpptyA 8.42-.12 LgCapGrA t 24.85-.44 LgCorQ A p 6.19-.10 MdCpGrOp 10.08-.19 MidCVlOp p 7.81-.17 PBModA p 10.92-.13 TxEA p 13.94-.02 SelComm A 46.65-.66 FrontierA 10.66-.24 GlobTech 22.14-.30 Columbia Cl I,T&G: EmMktOp I n8.27-.21 Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 30.29-.69 AcornIntZ 37.88-.93 DivIncoZ 14.17-.21 IntBdZ 9.40... IntTEBd 10.89-.01 LgCapGr 13.67-.23 LgCpIdxZ 26.03-.40 MdCpIdxZ 11.61-.22 MdCpVlZ p 13.58-.28 ValRestr 47.98-1.08 Credit Suisse Comm: ComRet t 8.37-.14 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq n10.08-.31 USCorEq1 n11.57-.21 USCorEq2 n11.38-.22 DWS Invest A: CommA p 17.36-.29 DWS Invest S: CorPlsInc 10.90-.01 EmMkGr r 16.42-.47 EnhEmMk 10.60-.04 EnhGlbBd r 10.08-.03 GlbSmCGr 37.83-.99 GlblThem 22.04-.58 Gold&Prc 15.73-.40 GroIncS 17.33-.36 HiYldTx 12.61-.02 IntTxAMT 11.99-.02 Intl FdS 39.89-1.25 LgCpFoGr 31.87-.41 LatAmrEq 42.11-1.37 MgdMuni S 9.33-.02 MA TF S 14.98-.04 SP500S 17.91-.28 WorldDiv 22.94-.45 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 34.78-.63 Davis Funds B: NYVen B 33.24-.60 Davis Funds C: NYVen C 33.53-.61 Davis Funds Y: NYVenY 35.14-.64 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.27... SMIDCapG 24.70-.34 TxUSA p 11.89-.01 Delaware Invest B: SelGrB t 34.19-.58 Dimensional Fds: EmMCrEq n19.75-.58 EmMktV 30.18-.99 IntSmVa n15.32-.40 LargeCo 10.61-.16 TAUSCorE2 n9.26-.18 USLgVa n20.77-.41 US Micro n13.96-.27 US TgdVal 16.36-.35 US Small n21.85-.44 US SmVa 24.81-.56 IntlSmCo n15.27-.40 EmgMkt n26.72-.75 Fixd n10.33... IntGFxIn n12.99+.04 IntVa n15.86-.56 Glb5FxInc n11.07+.01 TM USTgtV 21.53-.47 2YGlFxd n10.11... DFARlE n24.29-.33 Dodge&Cox: Balanced 71.95-1.10 Income 13.71... IntlStk 31.64-1.07 Stock 109.35-2.27 DoubleLine Funds: TRBd I 11.19... TRBd N p 11.18... Dreyfus: Aprec 42.97-.59 CT A 12.21-.02 CorV A 22.47... Dreyf 9.20-.16 DryMid r 28.19-.55 GNMA 16.00+.01 GrChinaA r 32.79-1.38 HiYldA p 6.42-.04 StratValA 28.21-.60 TechGroA 33.75-.48 DreihsAcInc 10.57-.04 Driehaus Funds: EMktGr 28.39-.80 EVPTxMEmI 46.60-1.16 Eaton Vance A: ChinaA p 16.71-.55 AMTFMuInc 10.05-.03 MultiCGrA 8.33-.16 InBosA 5.80-.04 LgCpVal 18.11-.33 NatlMunInc 9.90-.04 SpEqtA 16.17-.27 TradGvA 7.44... Eaton Vance B: HlthSB t 9.40-.16 NatlMuInc 9.90-.03 Eaton Vance C: GovtC p 7.43... NatMunInc 9.90-.04 Eaton Vance I: FltgRt 8.97-.01 GblMacAbR 9.99-.01 LgCapVal 18.17-.33 FBR Funds: FocusInv t n47.81-.55 FMI Funds: LgCap p n16.15-.24 FPA Funds: NwInc 10.70+.01 FPACres 27.88-.32 Fairholme 28.69-.90 Federated A: MidGrStA 36.34-.85 MuSecA 10.49-.02 TtlRtBd p 11.44... Federated Instl: KaufmnR 5.21-.11 TotRetBd 11.44... StrValDvIS 4.81-.05 Fidelity Adv Foc T: EnergyT 37.44-.82 HltCarT 22.17-.41 Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 21.43-.32 StrInA 12.36-.05 Fidelity Advisor C: NwInsgh t n20.29-.31 Fidelity Advisor I: EqGrI n63.01-.99 EqInI n24.48-.44 IntBdI n11.55+.01 NwInsgtI n21.70-.33 Fidelity Advisor T: BalancT 15.86-.17 DivGrT p 12.58-.30 EqGrT p 58.96-.92 EqInT 24.09-.44 GrOppT 39.86-.80 HiInAdT p 9.83-.08 IntBdT 11.53+.02 MuIncT p 13.43-.01 OvrseaT 16.74-.56 STFiT 9.30... StkSelAllCp 19.18-.38 Fidelity Freedom: FF2010 n13.72-.15 FF2010K 12.68-.14 FF2015 n11.47-.12 FF2015K 12.73-.14 FF2020 n13.84-.17 FF2020K 13.11-.17 FF2025 n11.49-.17 FF2025K 13.22-.19 FF2030 n13.67-.21 FF2030K 13.36-.20 FF2035 n11.30-.20 FF2035K 13.42-.24 FF2040 n7.88-.14 FF2040K 13.47-.24 FF2045 n9.32-.18 Income n11.52-.04 Fidelity Invest: AllSectEq 12.16-.22 AMgr50 n15.80-.17 AMgr70 r n16.50-.26 AMgr20 r n13.04-.06 Balanc n19.24-.21 BalancedK 19.24-.21 BlueChGr n47.50-.89 CA Mun n12.63-.01 Canada n52.13-1.21 CapAp n27.26-.52 CapDevO n11.20-.21 CpInc r n9.11-.09 ChinaRg r 27.89-1.03 CngS 465.09... CTMun r n11.96-.02 Contra n73.46-1.09 ContraK 73.42-1.09 CnvSc n24.88-.40 DisEq n23.04-.48 DiscEqF 23.01-.48 DivIntl n27.61-.80 DivrsIntK r 27.57-.81 DivStkO n15.94-.31 DivGth n28.60-.66 EmergAs r n27.91-.77 EmrMk n22.66-.64 Eq Inc n43.63-.80 EQII n18.27-.28 ECapAp 16.84-.64 Europe 27.73-1.05 Exch 323.88... Export n22.28-.39 Fidel n33.62-.60 Fifty r n18.45-.40 FltRateHi r n9.79-.01 FrInOne n27.66-.47 GNMA n11.85... GovtInc 10.76+.02 GroCo n91.91-1.78 GroInc n19.57-.36 GrowCoF 91.84-1.77 GrowthCoK 91.85-1.77 GrStrat r n20.37-.48 HighInc r n8.97-.06 Indepn n24.47-.56 InProBd n12.96+.06 IntBd n10.97+.01 IntGov n10.98+.02 IntmMu n10.53-.01 IntlDisc n29.58-.95 IntlSCp r n19.35-.54 InvGrBd n11.78+.02 InvGB n7.79+.01 Japan r 9.84-.12 JpnSm n8.75-.08 LgCapVal 10.79-.19 LatAm 54.24-1.59 LevCoStk n28.08-.68 LowP r n39.04-.74 LowPriK r 39.02-.74 Magelln n69.38-1.24 MagellanK 69.32-1.24 MD Mu r n11.48-.02 MA Mun n12.54-.01 MegaCpStk n10.95-.20 MI Mun n12.37-.02 MidCap n29.19-.61 MN Mun n11.93... MtgSec n11.24+.01 MuniInc n13.23-.02 NJ Mun r n12.13-.01 NwMkt r n16.55-.11 NwMill n31.21-.58 NY Mun n13.48... OTC n61.03-1.16 Oh Mun n12.14-.01 100Index 9.47-.14 Ovrsea n29.26-.98 PcBas n23.60-.52 PAMun r n11.26-.02 Puritn n18.91-.21 PuritanK 18.91-.21 RealE n29.18-.44 SAllSecEqF 12.16-.22 SCmdtyStrt n9.16-.16 SCmdtyStrF n9.18-.16 SrEmrgMkt 16.25-.48 SrsIntGrw 10.95-.32 SerIntlGrF 10.97-.32 SrsIntVal 8.48-.25 SerIntlValF 8.50-.25 SrInvGrdF 11.78+.01 StIntMu n10.86-.01 STBF n8.54... SmCapDisc n21.57-.40 SmllCpS r n17.92-.41 SCpValu r 14.95-.28 StkSelLCV r n10.90-.21 StkSlcACap n26.54-.52 StkSelSmCp 19.25-.44 StratInc n11.07-.04 StrReRt r 9.46-.06 TotalBd n11.04+.01 Trend n74.09-1.34 USBI n11.84+.02 Utility n17.16-.14 ValStra t n27.66-.66 Value n69.12-1.46 Wrldw n18.50-.48 Fidelity Selects: Air n37.01-.77 Banking n17.23-.43 Biotch n95.17-2.31 Brokr n45.76-1.31 Chem n106.63-2.87 ComEquip n23.65-.48 Comp n63.39-1.19 ConDis n25.68-.38 ConsuFn n12.36-.26 ConStap n74.45-.97 CstHo n39.17-.93 DfAer n83.27-1.96 Electr n50.61-.58 Enrgy n53.47-1.18 EngSv n69.93-1.81 EnvAltEn r n15.86-.33 FinSv n56.12-1.46 Gold r n43.32-1.13 Health n129.87-2.42 Insur n47.05-.86 Leisr n104.66-1.95 Material n66.87-1.84 MedDl n59.56-1.01 MdEqSys n27.22-.51 Multmd n47.72-.73 NtGas n31.91-.61 Pharm n13.90-.28 Retail n57.51-.62 Softwr n88.41-1.55 Tech n98.50-1.60 Telcm n45.68-.60 Trans n51.59-1.03 UtilGr n52.53-.38 Wireless n7.54-.11 Fidelity Spartan: ExtMkIn n38.63-.79 500IdxInv n47.71-.74 500Idx I 47.71-.75 IntlInxInv n31.93-.97 TotMktInv n38.84-.64 USBond I 11.84+.02 Fidelity Spart Adv: ExMktAd r n38.64-.78 500IdxAdv n47.71-.75 IntAd r n31.93-.97 TotMktAd r n38.85-.64 First Eagle: GlblA 48.02-.60 OverseasA 21.84-.31 First Investors A BlChpA p ...... GloblA p 6.54-.16 GovtA p 11.55+.01 GroInA p 15.68-.29 IncoA p 2.54-.02 MATFA p 12.35-.02 MITFA p 12.68-.02 NJTFA p 13.59-.03 NYTFA p 15.11-.02 OppA p 28.45-.60 PATFA p 13.58-.02 SpSitA p 24.54-.37 TxExA p 10.14-.01 TotRtA p 16.18-.18 ValueB p 7.35-.12 Forum Funds: AbsStrI r 11.04+.04 Frank/Temp Frnk A: AdjUS p 8.87... ALTFA p 11.68-.01 AZTFA p 11.24-.01 CalInsA p 12.57-.02 CA IntA p 11.95-.02 CalTFA p 7.30... COTFA p 12.20-.01 CTTFA p 11.32-.01 CvtScA p 14.85-.19 Dbl TF A 12.27-.01 DynTchA 31.93-.49 EqIncA p 17.43-.27 FedInt p 12.31-.03 FedTFA p 12.39-.01 FLTFA p 11.85-.01 FoundAl p 10.45-.20 GATFA p 12.44-.02 GoldPrM A 37.73-1.11 GrwthA p 48.16-.80 HYTFA p 10.56-.01 HiIncA 1.99-.02 IncomA p 2.14-.02 InsTFA p 12.33-.01 NYITF p 11.75-.02 LATF A p 11.83-.01 LMGvScA 10.40+.01 MDTFA p 11.86-.01 MATFA p 11.98-.01 MITFA p 12.20-.01 MNInsA 12.74-.02 MOTFA p 12.56-.02 NJTFA p 12.50-.01 NYTFA p 11.98-.01 NCTFA p 12.74-.01 OhioI A p 12.90-.02 ORTFA p 12.39-.02 PATFA p 10.75-.01 ReEScA p 15.48-.23 RisDvA p 35.77-.50 SMCpGrA 37.09-.70 StratInc p 10.46-.05 TtlRtnA p 10.26-.01 USGovA p 6.89+.01 UtilsA p 13.07-.08 VATFA p 12.06-.01 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: GlbBdAdv n13.12-.12 IncmeAd 2.12-.03 Frank/Temp Frnk C: IncomC t 2.16-.02 USGvC t 6.85+.01 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: SharesA 20.97-.34 Frank/Temp Temp A: DvMktA p 23.54-.64 ForgnA p 6.44-.21 GlBd A p 13.16-.12 GrwthA p 17.60-.47 WorldA p 14.93-.39 Frank/Temp Tmp Adv: GrthAv 17.60-.47 Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: DevMktC 22.97-.63 ForgnC p 6.31-.20 GlBdC p 13.18-.12 Franklin Mutual Ser: QuestA 16.97-.19 GE Elfun S&S: S&S Inc 11.82+.01 US Eqty 42.23-.69 GMO Trust III: CHIE 21.70-.43 Quality 23.18-.28 GMO Trust IV: IntlGrEq 22.16-.55 IntlIntrVl 19.86-.52 GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r 11.61-.35 Quality 23.19-.28 StrFxInc 16.43+.02 Gabelli Funds: Asset 50.11-1.00 Goldman Sachs A: MdCVA p 35.77-.78 Goldman Sachs Inst: GrOppt 24.51-.41 HiYield 7.12-.05 HYMuni n8.85... MidCapV 36.03-.78 Harbor Funds: Bond 12.54+.02 CapApInst 41.30-.75 IntlInv t 57.35-2.03 Intl r 57.89-2.05 Hartford Fds A: CpAppA p 32.09-.80 DivGthA p 19.90-.32 IntOpA p 13.97-.43 Hartford Fds Y: CapAppI n32.11-.79 Hartford HLS IA : CapApp 41.19-.96 Div&Gr 20.42-.34 Advisers 20.38-.22 TotRetBd 11.86+.01 Hennessy Funds: CorGrIIOrig ...... Hussman Funds: StrTotRet r 12.39+.01 StrGrowth 11.84+.10 ICON Fds: Energy S 19.38-.42 Hlthcare S 15.28-.26 ISI Funds: NoAm p 7.96... IVA Funds: WldwideA t 16.09-.21 Wldwide I r 16.09-.21 Invesco Fds Invest: DivrsDiv p 12.41-.20 Invesco Funds: Energy 40.31-.92 Utilities 16.62-.10 Invesco Funds A: Chart p 17.08-.27 CmstkA 16.37-.32 Const p 23.56-.44 EqIncA 8.70-.10 GrIncA p 19.53-.30 HiIncMu p 7.94... HiYld p 4.20-.03 HYMuA 9.69-.01 IntlGrow 26.80-.70 MuniInA 13.63-.02 PA TFA 16.59-.01 US MortgA 12.98... Invesco Funds B: CapDev t 14.11-.28 MuniInB 13.61-.02 US Mortg 12.92... Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 23.93-.61 AssetStA p 24.65-.64 AssetStrI r 24.87-.64 JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 11.94+.01 JPMorgan C Class: CoreBd p 12.00+.02 JP Morgan Instl: MdCpVal n25.18-.39 JPMorgan R Cl: CoreBond n11.94+.02 ShtDurBd 11.00+.01 JPMorgan Select: USEquity n10.76-.18 JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd n11.93+.02 HighYld n7.87-.05 IntmTFBd n11.32-.02 LgCpGr 23.62-.40 ShtDurBd n10.99... USLCCrPls n21.50-.37 Janus T Shrs: BalancdT 26.10-.33 Contrarn T 13.50-.24 EnterprT 63.52-.95 FlxBndT 10.72-.01 GlLifeSciT r 26.97-.46 GlbSel T 11.30-.28 GlTechT r 17.90-.25 Grw&IncT 32.71-.61 Janus T 30.43-.45 OvrseasT r 37.71-1.38 PrkMCVal T 21.50-.35 ResearchT 31.08-.52 ShTmBdT 3.09... Twenty T 58.50-1.04 VentureT 55.96-1.00 WrldW T r 44.25-1.29 Jensen Funds: QualGrthJ n28.07-.38 John Hancock A: BondA p 15.80-.01 RgBkA 13.04-.27 StrInA p 6.59-.02 John Hancock B: StrIncB 6.59-.02 John Hancock Cl 1: LSAggr 12.20-.25 LSBalanc 12.96-.16 LSConsrv 13.07-.05 LSGrwth 12.81-.22 LSModer 12.86-.10 Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 19.45-.48 Lazard Open: EmgMkO p 19.90-.49 Legg Mason A: CBAgGr p 120.32-2.16 CBAppr p 14.70-.19 CBLCGr p 22.29-.32 GCIAllCOp 8.14-.27 WAHiIncA t 5.96-.03 WAMgMu p 16.74-.01 Legg Mason B: CBLgCGr t 20.34-.30 Legg Mason C: CMSpInv p 28.54-.68 CMValTr p 40.23-.68 Longleaf Partners: Partners 28.96-.59 SmCap 26.68-.40 Loomis Sayles: LSBondI 14.60-.08 StrInc C 15.10-.11 LSBondR 14.55-.07 StrIncA 15.02-.11 Loomis Sayles Inv: InvGrBdA p 12.38-.03 InvGrBdY 12.38-.03 Lord Abbett A: AffilA p 11.34-.20 FundlEq 12.92-.27 BdDebA p 7.92-.05 ShDurIncA p 4.60... MidCpA p 16.87-.37 Lord Abbett C: ShDurIncC t 4.63... Lord Abbett F: ShtDurInco 4.60... MFS Funds A: MITA 20.29-.32 MIGA 16.79-.26 EmGA 45.41-.70 HiInA 3.47-.02 MFLA 9.65... TotRA 14.63-.14 UtilA 17.48-.24 ValueA 24.02-.40 MFS Funds B: MIGB n15.10-.23 GvScB n10.54+.02 HiInB n3.47-.03 MuInB n8.73-.01 TotRB n14.63-.15 MFS Funds I: ReInT 14.71-.42 ValueI 24.13-.41 MFS Funds Instl: IntlEq n17.34-.52 MainStay Funds A: HiYldBA 5.94-.02 MainStay Funds B: ConvB t 15.02-.22 GovtB t 8.92+.01 HYldBB t 5.91-.02 IncmBldr 16.77-.23 IntlEqB 10.14-.27 MainStay Funds I: ICAPSlEq 36.33-.71 Mairs & Power: Growth n75.93-1.07 Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 7.34-.24 Matthews Asian: AsianGIInv 16.36-.22 IndiaInv r 16.54-.32 PacTgrInv 22.12-.45 MergerFd n15.70-.02 Meridian Funds: Growth 44.58-.70 Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.57+.01 TotRtBdI 10.56+.01 Midas Funds: Midas Fd t 3.66-.10 Monetta Funds: Monetta n15.02-.34 Morgan Stanley B: GlobStratB 15.60... MorganStanley Inst: IntlEqI 13.18-.35 MCapGrI 36.89-.59 Muhlenk n54.52-1.03 Munder Funds A: GwthOppA 27.88-.51 Munder Funds Y: MCpCGrY n30.65-.60 Mutual Series: BeacnZ 12.51-.22 GblDiscA 28.38-.55 GlbDiscZ 28.74-.55 QuestZ 17.11-.19 SharesZ 21.14-.34 Neuberger&Berm Fds: Focus 20.50-.36 GenesInst 47.68-.79 Intl r 16.00-.41 Partner 25.57-.51 Neuberger&Berm Tr: Genesis 49.48-.81 Nicholas Group: HiInc I n9.65-.05 Nich n46.23-.86 Northern Funds: BondIdx 10.95+.01 HiYFxInc 7.29-.04 SmCpIdx 8.68-.18 StkIdx 16.70-.26 Technly 15.87-.24 Nuveen Cl A: LtMBA p 11.21-.01 Nuveen Cl R: IntDMBd 9.26-.01 HYMunBd 15.86-.02 Nuveen Cl Y: RealEst n19.97-.26 Oak Assoc Fds: WhitOkSG 40.78-.57 Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 28.38-.43 GlobalI 22.15-.46 Intl I r 18.58-.57 Oakmark 45.30-.77 Select 30.68-.52 Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp 7.18-.06 GlbSMdCap 14.69-.28 LgCapStrat 9.49-.20 Oppenheimer A: AMTFMu 6.79... AMTFrNY 11.91... CAMuniA p 8.32-.01 CapApA p 46.67-.76 CapIncA p 8.81-.04 ChmpIncA p 1.81-.01 DvMktA p 32.76-.81 Disc p 58.74-1.26 EquityA 9.13-.17 GlobA p 57.93-1.45 GlbOppA 29.75-.79 GblStrIncA 4.21-.02 Gold p 35.81-1.09 IntBdA p 6.36-.02 LtdTmMu 14.89-.01 MnStFdA 34.73-.58 PAMuniA p 11.38-.01 SenFltRtA 8.22-.01 USGv p 9.68+.02 Oppenheimer B: AMTFMu 6.76... AMTFrNY 11.91-.01 CpIncB t 8.62-.05 ChmpIncB t 1.81-.01 EquityB 8.43-.15 GblStrIncB 4.23-.02 Oppenheimer Roch: LtdNYA p 3.37... RoMu A p 16.58... RcNtMuA 7.20... Oppenheimer Y: DevMktY 32.39-.80 IntlBdY 6.35-.03 IntGrowY 27.42-.91 PIMCO Admin PIMS: ShtTmAd p 9.78... TotRtAd 11.14+.01 PIMCO Instl PIMS: AlAsetAut r 10.70-.09 AllAsset 12.20-.09 ComodRR 6.86-.11 DivInc 11.66-.01 EmgMkCur 10.42-.11 EmMkBd 11.66-.04 FltInc r 8.59-.04 ForBdUn r 10.88+.02 FrgnBd 10.73+.02 HiYld 9.27-.06 InvGrCp 10.67+.01 LowDu 10.43+.01 ModDur 10.79+.01 RealRet 11.62+.07 RealRtnI 12.02+.03 ShortT 9.78... TotRt 11.14+.01 TR II 10.77+.02 TRIII 9.81+.01 PIMCO Funds A: AllAstAut t 10.63-.08 ComRR p 6.72-.11 LwDurA 10.43+.01 RealRtA p 12.02+.03 TotRtA 11.14+.01 PIMCO Funds C: AllAstAut t 10.51-.09 RealRtC p 12.02+.03 TotRtC t 11.14+.01 PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 11.14+.01 PIMCO Funds P: AstAllAuthP 10.69-.08 TotRtnP 11.14+.01 Parnassus Funds: EqtyInco n27.48-.28 Perm Port Funds: Permannt 48.34-.57 Pioneer Funds A: BondA p 9.69... IntlValA 18.62-.61 PionFdA p 40.67-.71 ValueA p 11.39-.22 Pioneer Funds B: HiYldB t 10.02-.12 Pioneer Funds C: HiYldC t 10.13-.11 Pioneer Fds Y: CullenV Y 17.95-.42 Price Funds: Balance n20.10-.28 BlChip n42.98-.66 CABond n11.26-.01 CapApp n21.89-.25 DivGro n24.61-.36 EmMktB n13.43-.05 EmEurop 18.65-.80 EmMktS n31.74-.98 EqInc n24.52-.43 EqIndex n36.31-.57 Europe n14.42-.53 GNMA n10.11... Growth n35.56-.56 Gr&In n21.20-.32 HlthSci n36.21-.68 HiYield n6.74-.04 InstlCpG 18.04-.27 IntlBond n9.87-.03 IntDis n41.69-1.08 Intl G&I 12.42-.40 IntlStk n13.51-.41 Japan n7.73-.10 LatAm n44.22-1.52 MDShrt n5.25... MDBond n10.89-.01 MidCap n57.27-.99 MCapVal n22.94-.40 N Amer n34.37-.51 N Asia n15.38-.35 New Era n44.91-1.13 N Horiz n34.04-.73 N Inc n9.77+.01 NYBond n11.64-.01 OverS SF n7.89-.24 PSInc n16.61-.17 RealAsset r n11.02-.26 RealEst n19.62-.26 R2010 n15.84-.19 R2015 n12.30-.17 R2020 n17.01-.26 R2025 n12.45-.21 R2030 n17.86-.33 R2035 n12.63-.24 R2040 n17.97-.35 R2045 n11.96-.24 SciTec n29.20-.43 ShtBd n4.85... SmCpStk n33.62-.70 SmCapVal n36.30-.64 SpecGr n18.38-.39 SpecIn n12.64-.05 TFInc n10.33-.01 TxFrH n11.33... TxFrSI n5.71... USTInt n6.25+.02 USTLg n13.39+.12 VABond n12.08-.02 Value n24.16-.47 Principal Inv: DivIntlInst 9.51-.28 LgCGI In 9.89-.16 LT2020In 12.00-.16 LT2030In 11.85-.19 Prudential Fds A: BlendA 17.89-.35 HiYldA p 5.52-.04 MuHiIncA 9.94-.01 UtilityA 11.10-.16 Prudential Fds B: GrowthB 17.83-.31 HiYldB t 5.52-.03 Putnam Funds A: AmGvA p 9.17... AZ TE 9.36-.01 ConvSec 19.68-.24 DvrInA p 7.59-.04 EqInA p 16.16-.32 EuEq 18.76... GeoBalA 12.55-.14 GlbEqty p 9.09... GrInA p 13.75-.28 GlblHlthA 40.67-.72 HiYdA p 7.66... HiYld In 5.93-.03 IncmA p 6.87+.01 IntGrIn p 8.84-.28 InvA p 13.68-.24 NJTxA p 9.69-.01 MultiCpGr 53.44-1.07 PA TE 9.38-.01 TxExA p 8.85-.01 TFInA p 15.39-.01 TFHYA 12.20... USGvA p 13.65... GlblUtilA 10.19-.11 VoyA p 22.23-.53 Putnam Funds B: TaxFrIns 15.40-.02 DvrInB t 7.52-.05 EqInc t 16.01-.32 EuEq 18.01... GeoBalB 12.43-.14 GlbEq t 8.21... GlNtRs t 18.72... GrInB t 13.50-.27 GlblHlthB 32.51-.57 HiYldB t 7.65... HYAdB t 5.81-.04 IncmB t 6.81+.01 IntGrIn t 8.77-.28 IntlNop t 13.46-.42 InvB t 12.32-.22 NJTxB t 9.68-.01 MultiCpGr 45.81-.92 TxExB t 8.85-.01 TFHYB t 12.22... USGvB t 13.58... GlblUtilB 10.15-.10 VoyB t 18.73-.44 RS Funds: IntGrA 16.72-.58 LgCAlphaA 41.19-.62 Value 24.39-.40 RidgeWorth Funds: LCGrStkA p 11.28-.19 Royce Funds: LwPrSkSv r 15.64-.38 MicroCapI 15.71-.32 PennMuI r 11.51-.24 PremierI r 20.03-.41 TotRetI r 13.29-.24 ValSvc t 11.86-.27 Russell Funds S: StratBd 11.10+.01 Rydex Advisor: NasdaqAdv 15.71-.16 SSgA Funds: EmgMkt 20.16-.61 Schwab Funds: HlthCare 18.25-.28 1000Inv r 38.01-.62 S&P Sel 20.98-.33 SmCpSl 20.24-.42 TSM Sel r 24.30-.40 Scout Funds: Intl 30.33-.93 Selected Funds: AmShD 42.15-.75 AmShS p 42.16-.76 Sentinel Group: ComS A p 33.28-.52 Sequoia 156.32-1.93 Sit Funds: LrgCpGr 45.60-.62 SoSunSCInv t 22.01... St FarmAssoc: Gwth 54.24-.91 Stratton Funds: Multi-Cap 35.56-.77 RealEstate 28.48-.38 SmCap 52.25-.92 SunAmerica Funds: USGvB t 10.17+.02 TCW Funds: EmMktIn 8.80-.02 TotRetBdI 9.86+.01 TIAA-CREF Funds: BdIdxInst 10.85+.02 EqIdxInst 10.21-.17 Templeton Instit: ForEqS 18.18-.52 Third Avenue Fds: IntlVaInst r 15.55-.40 REValInst r 23.25-.62 ValueInst 45.30-1.55 Thornburg Fds: IntValA p 26.02-.63 IncBuildA t 18.43-.26 IncBuildC p 18.43-.26 IntValue I 26.61-.64 LtTMuI 14.60-.02 Thrivent Fds A: HiYld 4.85-.03 Incom 8.99... Tocqueville Fds: Gold t n74.55-1.84 Transamerica A: AegonHYB p 9.34... FlexInc p 9.06-.02 Turner Funds: SmlCpGr n34.47-.86 Tweedy Browne: GblValue 23.08-.36 US Global Investors: AllAm 24.34-.37 ChinaReg 7.68-.28 GlbRs 9.93-.27 Gld&Mtls 13.00-.38 WldPrcMn 13.87-.43 USAA Group: AgvGt 35.67-.57 CA Bd 10.78-.01 CrnstStr 22.17-.25 GovSec 10.38... GrTxStr 14.05-.11 Grwth 15.59-.22 Gr&Inc 15.66-.30 IncStk 13.05-.17 Inco 13.25+.01 Intl 23.56-.64 NYBd 12.25-.02 PrecMM 31.61-.87 SciTech 13.72-.19 ShtTBnd 9.19... SmCpStk 14.21-.26 TxEIt 13.48-.02 TxELT 13.55-.01 TxESh 10.83... VA Bd 11.44... WldGr 19.25-.44 VALIC : MdCpIdx 20.31-.40 StkIdx 25.01-.39 Value Line Fd: LrgCo n18.80-.28 Vanguard Admiral: BalAdml n22.85-.21 CAITAdm n11.56-.02 CALTAdm n11.70-.02 CpOpAdl n72.26-1.11 EMAdmr r n35.74-1.08 Energy n119.50-2.94 EqInAdm n n47.81-.67 EuroAdml n55.27-2.07 ExplAdml n72.25-1.54 ExtdAdm n42.85-.89 500Adml n124.17-1.93 GNMA Ad n11.05... GrwAdm n34.83-.52 HlthCr n55.88-.73 HiYldCp n5.86-.03 InfProAd n28.10+.08 ITBdAdml n11.91+.03 ITsryAdml n11.72+.03 IntGrAdm n57.07-1.85 ITAdml n14.20-.02 ITGrAdm n10.22+.01 LtdTrAd n11.20... LTGrAdml n10.52+.06 LT Adml n11.55-.01 MCpAdml n96.88-1.86 MorgAdm n60.04-.99 MuHYAdm n10.96-.01 NYLTAd n11.56-.01 PrmCap r n67.82-1.08 PALTAdm n11.55-.01 ReitAdm r n86.48-1.21 STsyAdml n10.79... STBdAdml n10.65+.01 ShtTrAd n15.95... STFdAd n10.88+.01 STIGrAd n10.76... SmCAdm n35.80-.75 TxMCap r n67.15-1.09 TtlBAdml n11.05+.02 TStkAdm n33.67-.56 ValAdml n21.64-.37 WellslAdm n57.11-.20 WelltnAdm n56.77-.61 Windsor n46.68-.93 WdsrIIAd n48.84-.88 Vanguard Fds: CALT n11.70-.02 CapOpp n31.29-.48 Convrt n12.67-.13 DivdGro n16.06-.19 Energy n63.65-1.57 EqInc n22.81-.31 Explr n77.64-1.66 FLLT n11.97-.02 GNMA n11.05... GlobEq n17.38-.41 GroInc n28.53-.44 GrthEq n11.88-.19 HYCorp n5.86-.03 HlthCre n132.43-1.73 InflaPro n14.30+.04 IntlExplr n14.24-.45 IntlGr n17.94-.58 IntlVal n28.99-.92 ITIGrade n10.22+.01 ITTsry n11.72+.03 LifeCon n16.82-.12 LifeGro n22.48-.36 LifeInc n14.47-.03 LifeMod n20.14-.23 LTIGrade n10.52+.06 LTTsry n13.03+.12 Morg n19.37-.31 MuHY n10.96-.01 MuInt n14.20-.02 MuLtd n11.20... MuLong n11.55-.01 MuShrt n15.95... NJLT n12.15-.02 NYLT n11.56-.01 OHLTTE n12.46-.01 PALT n11.55-.01 PrecMtls r n20.32-.83 PrmcpCor n14.17-.21 Prmcp r n65.37-1.04 SelValu r n19.56-.40 STAR n19.87-.26 STIGrade n10.76... STFed n10.88+.01 STTsry n10.79... StratEq n20.08-.40 TgtRetInc n11.88-.06 TgRe2010 n23.36-.19 TgtRe2015 n12.90-.14 TgRe2020 n22.88-.28 TgtRe2025 n13.01-.18 TgRe2030 n22.28-.36 TgtRe2035 n13.39-.24 TgtRe2040 n21.98-.41 TgtRe2050 n21.88-.41 TgtRe2045 n13.80-.26 USGro n20.26-.36 USValue n10.88-.19 Wellsly n23.57-.08 Welltn n32.86-.36 Wndsr n13.83-.28 WndsII n27.51-.50 Vanguard Idx Fds: DvMkInPl r n94.28-2.93 MidCpIstPl n105.54-2.03 TotIntAdm r n23.77-.72 TotIntlInst r n95.06-2.88 TotIntlIP r n95.08-2.87 TotIntSig r n28.52-.86 500 n124.14-1.94 Balanced n22.85-.21 EMkt n27.20-.83 Europe n23.73-.89 Extend n42.84-.88 Growth n34.82-.52 LgCapIx n24.92-.40 LTBnd n13.92+.09 MidCap n21.35-.41 Pacific n9.79-.20 REIT r n20.26-.29 SmCap n35.77-.75 SmlCpGth n23.16-.50 STBnd n10.65+.01 TotBnd n11.05+.02 TotlIntl n14.21-.43 TotStk n33.66-.56 Value n21.64-.37 Vanguard Instl Fds: BalInst n22.85-.21 DevMkInst n9.05-.28 ExtIn n42.85-.89 FTAllWldI r n84.61-2.58 GrwthIst n34.83-.52 InfProInst n11.45+.04 InstIdx n123.36-1.92 InsPl n123.37-1.92 InstTStIdx n30.48-.50 InsTStPlus n30.48-.51 MidCpIst n21.40-.41 SCInst n35.80-.75 TBIst n11.05+.02 TSInst n33.68-.56 ValueIst n21.64-.37 Vanguard Signal: 500Sgl n102.57-1.59 GroSig n32.25-.48 ITBdSig n11.91+.03 MidCpIdx n30.57-.59 STBdIdx n10.65+.01 SmCpSig n32.26-.67 TotBdSgl n11.05+.02 TotStkSgl n32.50-.54 Virtus Funds: EmMktI 9.53-.18 Virtus Funds A: MulSStA p 4.85-.01 Waddell & Reed Adv: AssetS p 9.34-.25 CoreInvA 6.13-.11 DivOppA p 14.73-.28 DivOppC t 14.57-.27 Wasatch: SmCpGr 41.17-.76 Wells Fargo Adv A: AstAllA p 12.55... Wells Fargo Adv C: AstAllC t 12.10... Wells Fargo Adv : CmStkInv 20.28-.35 OpptyInv 39.11-.72 Wells Fargo Ad Ins: UlStMuInc 4.82... Wells Fargo Admin: Growth 40.19-.67 Wells Fargo Instl: UltSTMuA 4.82... Western Asset: CorePlus I 11.31+.01 William Blair N: GrowthN 11.86-.21 Yacktman Funds: Fund p n18.10-.18 Focused n19.38-.18 H OW T O R EAD T HE M UTUALF UND T ABLES Here are the 1,000 biggest mutual funds listed on Nasdaq. Tables show the fund name, sell price or Net Asset Value (NAV) and daily net change. Name: Name of mutual fund and family. NAV: Net asset value. Chg: Net change in price of NAV. Data based on NAVs reported to Lipper by 6 p.m. Eastern. Name NAV Chg Name NAV Chg Name NAV Chg Name NAV Chg Name NAV Chg Name NAV Chg M UTUALF UNDS SP CnSt33.08-.28 SP Consum42.80-.68 SP Engy73.05-1.21 SPDR Fncl14.45-.37 SP Inds36.05-.83 SP Tech28.55-.29 SP Util34.90-.14 StdPac4.00-.16 Standex36.00-.30 StanBlkDk73.68-1.91 StarwdHtl52.90-1.47 StateStr40.92-.84 Statoil ASA27.33-1.17 Steris30.54-.51 StillwtrM12.70-.68 Stryker52.03-.77 SturmRug41.82-.51 SubPpne44.13-.61 SunCmts41.81-.27 Suncor gs33.34-1.71 Sunoco38.25-.55 SunstnHtl8.74-.28 Suntech2.85-.19 SunTrst21.54-.66 SupEnrgy28.03-1.13 Supvalu6.32+.22 SwiftTrans10.75-.82 Synovus1.89-.16 Sysco29.39-.07 TCF Fncl10.29-.15 TE Connect34.82-.98 TECO17.65-.17 TJX s36.81-.59 TRWAuto42.67-1.72 TaiwSemi14.16-.17 TalismE g13.01-.43 Target56.49-.21 TataMotors26.23-1.10 TeckRes g35.42-1.05 TelNorL10.61-.14 TelcmNZ s9.19+.11 TelefBrasil28.69-.90 TelefEsp16.35-.62 Tenaris38.02-2.13 TenetHlth5.40-.12 Teradata63.62-1.50 Teradyn15.14-.17 Terex21.90-1.41 TerraNitro208.23-14.43 Tesoro26.19-.95 TetraTech8.81-.18 Textron25.34-1.17 Theragen1.64+.03 ThermoFis55.43-1.13 ThmBet72.02-.23 ThomCrk g6.89-.23 ThomsonR28.36-.69 3M Co84.95-2.11 Tiffany67.10-.93 TimeWarn36.51-.45 Timken50.10-1.87 TitanMet13.50-.40 TollBros22.22-.48 TorchEngy2.30-.02 Trchmrk s48.18-1.01 TorDBk g80.49-1.94 Total SA54.59-1.71 TotalSys21.64-.30 Transocn51.44-1.06 Travelers56.99-1.51 Tredgar19.40-1.54 TriContl15.60-.18 TrinaSolar7.03-.22 TwoHrbInv10.30-.16 TycoIntl51.45-.59 Tyson19.18-.21 UBS AG13.10-.73 UDR25.49-.15 UIL Hold34.69-.07 US Airwy6.88-.11 USEC1.25-.07 USG13.06-1.32 UltraPt g23.71+.32 UniSrcEn37.04-.25 UniFirst58.36-.59 UnilevNV32.64-.85 UnionPac106.80-2.75 UtdContl19.88-.59 UtdMicro2.58-.06 UPS B75.61-.71 UtdRentals41.36-1.05 US Bancrp28.37-.53 US NGs rs18.66-.06 US OilFd40.13-.84 USSteel25.25-.96 UtdTech81.39-1.90 UtdhlthGp54.46-.58 UnumGrp23.02-.48 V-W-X-Y-Z Vale SA23.36-1.38 Vale SA pf22.76-1.30 ValeantPh53.86-.45 ValeroE25.17-.52 VangTSM69.15-1.13 VangREIT61.07-.82 VangDivAp56.73-.79 VangAllW42.91-1.36 VangEmg42.75-1.56 VangEur44.01-1.88 VangEAFE32.70-1.06 VarianMed64.48-1.41 Vectren28.93-.29 Ventas56.23-.40 VeoliaEnv13.54-.86 VeriFone50.24+3.69 VerizonCm38.69-.31 VimpelCm11.70-.43 Visa114.84-1.40 VishayInt11.31-.41 Vonage2.15-.10 Vornado80.06-1.17 WGL Hold40.36-.45 WPX En n18.22-.11 Wabash9.62-.30 WalMart58.97-.44 Walgrn32.87-.43 WalterEn57.78-1.58 WsteMInc34.72-.38 WeathfIntl15.90-.52 WeinRlt24.96-.25 WellPoint64.34-.85 WellsFargo30.11-.87 WestarEn27.64-.20 WAstEMkt14.59-.20 WstAMgdHi6.16-.04 WAstInfOpp12.90... WDigital37.22-1.25 WstnRefin18.44-.61 WstnUnion17.07-.07 Weyerhsr20.57-.65 Whrlpl72.80-1.05 WhitingPet55.60-1.73 WmsCos29.72-.63 WmsPtrs60.77-.60 WmsSon37.45-.59 WillisGp34.79-.67 Winnbgo8.27-.24 WiscEngy34.10-.08 WT India19.13-.74 Worthgtn16.85... Wyndham43.18-1.23 XL Grp20.22-.64 XcelEngy26.25-.19 Xerox8.06-.28 Yamana g16.36-.44 YingliGrn3.54-.15 Youku23.96-1.71 YumBrnds65.48-.88 ZweigTl3.27-.03 N EW Y ORK S TOCKE XCHANGE Name Last Chg 000ARM6 Associated PressStocks suffered their biggest losses in three months Tuesday, the first hiccup in a strong and steady rally to start the year. Wall Street worried about the global economy and waited while Greece pressured the last investors to sign on for its bailout. The Dow Jones industrial average fell more than 200 points, giving up more than a quarter of its 745-point advance since Jan. 1, the best start to a year in the U.S. market since 1998. The sell-off, which spread west from Europe, also interrupted a period of unusual calm on Wall Street. Before Tuesday, the Dow had not fallen 100 points for 45 straight trading sessions, the longest streak since 2006. The decline of 203.66 points was the worst for the Dow since Nov. 23 and left the average at 12,759.15. It was only last week the Dow closed above 13,000 for the first time since May 2008, four months before the worst of the financial crisis. When things go straight up and dont ever correct or have some sort of normal pullback, as an investor, that makes me nervous, said Ed Hyland, a global investment specialist with J.P Morgan Private Bank. The gradual rally had been powered by optimism about the U.S. economic recovery. But investors realized Greeces debt problems, Europes economic problems and Israels Iran problems were still very much their problems, too. Stocks fell sharply from the opening bell and never mounted a serious comeback. The Dow was down as much as 227 points. All but one of the 30 stocks in the average finished the day lower. Intel managed a gain of 7 cents. All 10 industry groups in the Standard & Poors 500 declined. Bank stocks, which typically take a hit when there is any reason to worry about Greece, led the declines, followed by industrial and materials companies, which depend on strength in the world economy. Alcoa, which makes aluminum and depends heavily on world economic demand, fell 4.1 percent, the worst of the Dow 30. China revised its projection for economic growth on Monday to 7.5 percent this year, down from 8 percent. The Standard & Poors 500 index fell 20.97 points, its worst decline since Dec. 8, to 1,343.36. The S&P had not declined 1 percent or more for 45 straight trading days, also the longest streak since 2006. That year, the S&P put together 94 in a row. The Nasdaq composite index dropped 40.16 points to 2,910.32. The Nasdaq last week broke through 3,000 for the first time since December 2000, during the collapse in dot-com stocks. Last year, sell-offs like this were much more common. The S&P fell by at least 1 percent on 48 trading days, roughly one in every five. During the depths of the financial crisis in the last four months of 2008, it happened roughly one in every three days. Stocks fell more than 3 percent Tuesday in Germany, Spain and France, and 1.9 percent in Britain. Greece stepped up pressure on private investors to swap their Greek government bonds for replacements with a lower face value and interest rate. Dow down 200 points Drop interrupts 2012 rally Nasdaq diary AP Market watch NYSE diary March 6, 2012 787.09 -16.56 Advanced: 267 Declined: 2,804 Unchanged: 50 446 Advanced: 2,100 Declined: 89 Unchanged: 4.1 b Volume: Volume: 1.8 b Russell 2000 Standard & Poors 500 Nasdaq composite Dow Jones industrials -203.66 12,759.15 2,910.32 -40.16 1,343.36 -20.97 Business HIGHLIGHTS

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O PINION Page A12 WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7, 2012 Gorilla in the room I was dismayed to see a large gorilla at the entrance of Homassasa State Park. And if this wasnt bad enough there is an elephant in the Homer Winslow Room. At least they put it in a corner, too bad it was at the expense of a couple of Homers prints! I thought the state was trying to get back to the Real Florida. Surely they could have found a better place for the gorilla. The elephant well that has seen better days and should probably be put out to pasture, or wherever elephants go to die! Judy Skaling Inverness Whose morality ? Donald Holcomb, on Feb. 15, stated the right challenges sexual immorality at every level because it is the single most destructive force in our society today. He goes on to blame sexual immorality for poverty and crime. His thesis seems to be that the Republican Party and the Religious Right have the right to define sexual morality, and that if only the government could enforce laws based on their ideas of sexual morality, poverty and crime would be things of the past. If only those godless liberal Democrats could be legislated into being as moral as the conservative Republicans, crime would not flourish, poverty and incarceration would be eliminated. I would argue the causes of poverty and crime are much more complex than Mr. Holcomb would have us believe. Many of the problems of single-parent families could be alleviated by living wages and adequate child care, and not every single-parent family is the result of sexual promiscuity. The U.S. Constitution does not define the family; it does not specify religious belief; it does not set specific moral values; and, for instance, it does not prohibit birth control or abortions. It does, however, set out rules and procedures for the operation of government that protect citizens right to live their personal lives without undue interference from the government. Based on other writings of the Founders where faith language is evident, it could have only been deliberate that such language was left out of the Constitution. But is it possible for us to imagine a society where the government employs morality police based on religious doctrine? Does the Taliban in Afghanistan ring a bell? Do we really want our individual rights to be up for grabs every four years?Jo Darling Lecanto A ndrew Breitbart, the Web entrepreneur, writer, provocateur and television personality who died suddenly last week at 43, always described himself as an accidental culture warrior. For the few years Breitbart was given to fight the fight, his conversion from Hollywood guy to culture warrior was one of the most fortunate accidents ever to befall the conservative world. Breitbart did a lot of things. But for the right, by far the most important thing he did was teach, again and again and again, that culture is upstream from politics. Breitbart knew instinctively, as people in Washington, D.C., and most other places did not, that movies, television programs and popular music send out deeply political messages every hour of every day. They shape the culture, and then the culture shapes politics. Influence those films and TV shows and songs, and youll eventually influence politics. The left had known that for generations, but on the right, so many people in politics thought only about politics. To Breitbart, that was folly. The people who have money, every four years at the last possible second, are told, You need to give millions of dollars, because these four counties in Ohio are going to determine the election, Breitbart told the National Policy Council in October 2009. I am saying, why didnt we invest 20 years ago in a movie studio in Hollywood, why didnt we invest in creating television shows, why didnt we create institutions that would reflect and affirm that which is good about America? Breitbart was close with the small but not as small as you might think group of conservatives in the Hollywood entertainment world. They were fond of citing various quotes from history to the effect that those who write a nations songs are more influential than those who write a nations laws. Breitbarts friends in the entertainment industry were extraordinarily talented, accomplished people, but many felt they had to stay quiet about their politics. They had real reason to fear that being outspokenly conservative would hurt their careers in a way that being outspokenly liberal would not. Breitbart helped change that situation, or at least helped begin to change that situation. There is an underground conservative movement, he said in 2009. I have more friends who are conservative in (Hollywood), with brand names, writers, directors, graphic artists, comedians, singers, songwriters, rock and rollers, punk rockers, believe it or not, who love this country, most of whom are cultural conservatives, and who have existed in the closet for the last 40 years, because the conservative movement was, for the most part, based in the Northeast and kind of pooh-poohed the culture or just didnt think that there was a cultural right out there. There really was a cultural right out there, and Breitbart made sure the country and those Eastern conservatives knew it. Sometimes Breitbarts message got lost in his antics. At the recent Conservative Political Action Conference in Washington, he took delight in plunging into a small crowd of Occupy Wall Street protesters. Behave yourself! Breitbart yelled, reminding them of the underreported violence and ugly incidents in some Occupy camps. Stop raping people! Stop raping people! It drove some people nuts, as intended. So did a lot of other things Breitbart said. But his bigger message was always the same: Change the culture and youll change politics. A lot of young conservatives, born into the Web world, considered Breitbart not just a role model, or a mentor, but a hero. He returned the affection. I have spoken at the Leadership Institute, Young Americas Foundation and College Republicans, he said in 2009. I will go for free wherever the kids will listen to me. At that time, Breitbart was riding high from championing the expose of ACORN, in which the young conservative James OKeefe and a friend dressed as a pimp and a prostitute in a (successful) hidden-camera effort to reveal corruption in the government-funded community organizing group. Breitbart knew that kind of energy and audacity didnt come from established politicians or columnists or talking heads. I have said that the youth is where this movement will begin, and they are the only ones who truly matter to me, Breitbart said. I have to be honest with you. I dont like speaking to people my age, because we are too conservative. We have families. We have 401(k)s, and we arent willing to dress as pimps and prostitutes. Breitbart knew conservatives would have to change, to pay more attention to the culture, to win. Thats what he tried to teach, every day.Byron York is chief political correspondent for The Washington Examiner. Every man is entitled to be valued by his best moment. Ralph Waldo Emerson, 1860 Breitbart knew culture is key CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE Founded by Albert M. Williamson You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose. David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus EDITORIAL BOARD Gerry Mulligan .......................................... publisherCharlie Brennan ............................................ editor Mike Arnold .......................................... HR directorSandra Frederick ............................ managing editor Curt Ebitz ........................................ citizen member Mac Harris ...................................... citizen member Rebecca Martin ................................ guest member GLARING NEED Coordinate plan to help the homeless T here are many reasons people find themselves without a place to call home. In Citrus County, there are currently an estimated 1,024 individuals of all ages who fall into the homeless category. Some are chronically homeless who find a comfort zone in staying at shelters or pitching a tent in the woods. In some cases, it is a mental health issue or trauma experienced in military service that forces them onto the streets. Then there are the people who have hit hard times and are economically forced to leave their homes behind, either through foreclosure, inability to pay the rent or loss of a job. But what is really frightening is the upswing in the population of couch surfers. These are the ones who bounce between relatives homes or live in a car. Unfortunately, they are often families divided because of the logistical difficulties in moving in with others. Regardless of the circumstances, they deserve the opportunity to have shelter and a feeling of security. As a county we need to look at a long-term solution and find a viable fix for the problem. We are a giving county. Currently, there are a variety of churches and food banks that temporarily feed the needy, but there are only a couple of shelters that take them in. Citrus County does not have a master plan to provide the necessary services for the homeless. What is desperately needed is an agency or coalition to identify the problems and issues facing these people and then find a way to get them out of the cycle of homelessness. Yes, there are some who cannot be helped or who want to remain in that lifestyle. But there are many we can help. Perhaps if life skills are taught it would bring an end to the cycle of bad decisionmaking over and over again. County Administrator Brad Thorpe is taking steps to bring together various concerned entities to seek a solution. We urge the county to make a game plan on how to get these folks out of the revolving door of homelessness and then implement it. The results could be amazing. THE ISSUE: Homeless in the county.OUR OPINION: A master plan needs to be developed. OPINIONS INVITED The opinions expressed in Chronicle editorials are the opinions of the newspapers editorial board. Viewpoints depicted in political cartoons, columns or letters do not necessarily represent the opinion of the editorial board. Groups or individuals are invited to express their opinions in a letter to the editor. Persons wishing to address the editorial board, which meets weekly, should call Charlie Brennan at 352563-5660. All letters must be signed and include a phone number and hometown, including letters sent via email. Names and hometowns will be printed; phone numbers will not be published or given out. We reserve the right to edit letters for length, libel, fairness and good taste. Letters must be no longer than 350 words, and writers will be limited to three letters per month. SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor, 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to 352563-3280 or email to letters@chronicleonline.com LETTERS to the Editor Accomplishments Dont let anyone tell you that Obama hasnt accomplished anything in his presidency. The latest feather in his cap is the elimination of the No Child Left behind program. Schoolteachers all over the country must be celebrating and this is the best thing that could have happened for our schoolchildren for a long time not to be subject to a course where theyre taught to answer a test, but taught information that they can use. One golden star for President Obama. Drive right Im wondering why drivers around here feel the need to cross multiple lanes to the far left when they first turn onto the roads. When I learned to drive, I was taught to turn into the near lane, build up speed and then merge onto further moving traffic, not immediately go to the far left lane, otherwise known as passing lanes, and disrupt the flow of traffic. And by the way, current Florida law requires slower drivers in the left lane of multi-lane roadways to move to the right, even if they are doing the speed limit. Crazy idea The Tallahassee cheaters who call themselves leaders should get the $2.13 per hour plus tips they are proposing for tipped workers. This whole state is going to the dogs and that is mad ones.Dont sell alcohol Our government should be liable for every death on our highways caused from alcohol and sued for it. Our government allows it to be sold. Its their problem. Alcohol is a killer. You may be next. THE CHRONICLEinvites you to call Sound Off with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record. COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers. S OUND OFF CALL 563-0579 Hot Corner: BURN BARRELS Circle Gs barrelsThis is in response to the person asking about the burn barrels. They sell them at Circle G Sales out by the flea market, Howards Flea Market. They have burn barrels and rain barrels and you can call them at 621-9292.Barrels in LecantoThis call goes out to the person who called the Sounding Off looking for a burn barrel. You can get those at Inter-County Recycling here in Lecanto on (State Road) 44. Just bought one there a couple of weeks ago and their prices are right. Barrel guyThis is in response to where to buy burn barrels. On North Florida Avenue, just past the Dollar General store on the right-hand side, is a guy that has burn barrels, old lawnmowers, bicycles and what have you. Its before you get to Van Ness Drive. Thats where I get mine. I pay $7 or $8 apiece for them. I get them twice a year from that guy. Theyre 55-gallon barrels. They dont have a phone number and they are closed on Mondays. Have a good one. Byron York OTHER VOICES C ITRUS C OUNTY C HRONICLE

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L INDSEY T ANNER AP Medical WriterCHICAGO Morphine and similar powerful painkillers are sometimes prescribed to recent war veterans suffering from posttraumatic stress along with physical pain, and the consequences can be tragic, a government study suggests. These vets are at high risk for drug and alcohol abuse, but theyre two times more likely to get prescriptions for addictive painkillers than vets with only physical pain, according to the study, billed as the first national examination of the problem. Iraq and Afghanistan vets with PTSD who already had substance abuse problems were four times more likely to get these drugs than vets without mental health problems, according to the study. Subsequent suicides, other self-inflicted injuries, and drug and alcohol overdoses were all more common in vets with PTSD who got these drugs. These consequences were rare but still troubling, the study authors said. The results underscore the challenge of treating veterans with devastating physical injuries and haunting memories of the horrors of war. But the findings also suggest that physicians treating these veterans should offer less risky treatment, including therapies other than drugs, the study authors and other experts say. Opium-based drugs like morphine and hydrocodone can dull excruciating physical pain. Relatively few veterans are prescribed such drugs. But some doctors likely prescribe them for vets who also have mental pain with the hope that the emotional distress that accompanies chronic pain will also be reduced. Unfortunately, this hope is often not fulfilled, and opioids can sometimes make emotional problems worse, said Michael Von Korff, a chronic illness researcher with Group Health Research Institute, a Seattle-based health care system. He was not involved in the study. The research involved all veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan wars who were diagnosed with non-cancer physical pain from October 2005 through December 2010 or 141,029 men and women. Half of them also were diagnosed with posttraumatic stress disorder or other mental health problems. The results were published Tuesday in the Journal of the American Medical Association. The Department of Veterans Affairs paid for the study, which is based on VA health care data. Lead author Dr. Karen Seal, who treats patients at the San Francisco VA Medical Center, said she sometimes prescribes opiates for war vets, but only if other painkillers dont work, and only in collaboration with non-drug treatment from mental health experts, occupational therapists and other specialists. That type of approach is part of a VA pain management policy adopted in 2009, toward the end of the study period. Dr. Robert Kerns, the VAs national program director for pain management, said the study draws attention to growing concerns about the use of opiate painkillers in veterans. These drugs may have a role in treating chronic pain in vets but only as part of a comprehensive pain management plan, he said. In a written statement about the study, the VA said its pain management approach has been cited as a model of care, but that we recognize that more work needs to be done. Retired Lt. Col. Steve Countouriotis, a 30-year Army veteran who served in Iraq and Afghanistan, says that after returning home a few years ago, he received a morphine prescription for war-related back and shoulder pain. He refused to take it and used aspirin instead. I dont feel comfortable taking those kinds of medicines, said Countouriotis, 60, of Petaluma, Calif. I dont like mood-altering drugs. He said he doesnt have PTSD, but that some colleagues who do have also been given the drugs. Doctors are too quick to prescribe them, Countouriotis said, adding, Its too many, too soon. Army data provided to The Associated Press last year showed that referrals for opiate abuse among soldiers rose during the decade that ended in 2009, and totaled more than 670 between October 2009 and June 2010. Some vets in the new study got the drugs from overburdened primary care physicians outside the VA health system. Imagine primary care doctors getting about 20 minutes to see a patient expressing high levels of distress, because of war-related physical and mental trauma, said Seal, the study author. The balance between providing pain relief while being cautious with drugs that can be habit-forming is always in play, she said. In the study, 15,676 vets received opiate prescriptions for physical pain. These prescriptions went to almost 18 percent of vets with PTSD and 12 percent of those with other mental health problems, compared with about 7 percent of vets without those problems. Among those with PTSD, subsequent self-inflicted injuries, including suicides, occurred in 3 percent of vets who got the drugs, versus 2 percent who didnt receive those prescriptions. The study doesnt provide a breakdown of suicides vs. nonfatal self-injuries. The study brings much needed attention to the complexity of this problem, said Dr. William Becker, a Yale University instructor and primary care physician who treats substance abuse and has worked with veterans. Patients are typically younger individuals who are in many cases kind of struggling to find their feet again after returning home from war, he said. The ideal treatment includes behavioral counseling, therapy for war wounds and management of chronic pain. The word is spreading and I think this paper is going to send another strong message that this has really got to become the standard of care, Becker said. N ATIONC ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE W EDNESDAY, M ARCH 7, 2012 A13 0 0 0 A P 0 H Vets prone to drug addiction get risky painkillers Associated Press Steve Countouriotis, a chief emergency services command officer, poses in his office March 5 at the U.S. Coast Guard Training Center in Petaluma, Calif. A 30-year Army veteran who served in Iraq and Afghanistan, he refused to take addictive drugs prescribed for his war-related back and shoulder pain, and says doctors should offer veterans less-risky medication. Hackers busted after one becomes FBI informant Associated PressNEW YORK The shadowy underworld of Internet hackers was rocked by news Tuesday that one of the worlds most-wanted and most-feared computer vandals has been an FBI informant for months and helped authorities build a case against five alleged comrades. The FBI said it captured the legendary hacker known as Sabu last June, and he turned out to be Hector Xavier Monsegur, 28, a selftaught, unemployed computer programmer with no college education, living on welfare in public housing in New York. His exploits made him a hero to some in cyberspace until he made a rookie mistake he posted something online without cloaking his IP address, or computer identity and someone tipped off the FBI. Soon after his arrest, he pleaded guilty and began spilling secrets, leading to charges Tuesday against five people in Europe and the U.S., including a Chicago man, and preventing more than 300 attacks along the way, authorities said. Law enforcement officials said it marked the first time core members of the loosely organized worldwide hacking group Anonymous have been identified and charged in the U.S. Investigators said Monsegur and the other defendants were all associated with the group, and some were also part of the elite spinoff organization that Monsegur formed last May, Lulz Security or LulzSec. Lulz is Internet slang for laughs or amusement. Monsegur and the other defendants were accused in court papers of hacking into corporations and government agencies around the world, including the U.S. Senate, filching confidential information, defacing websites and temporarily putting victims out of business. Authorities said their crimes affected more than 1 million people. Prosecutors said that among other things, the hackers, with Monsegur as their ringleader, disrupted websites belonging to Visa, Mastercard and Paypal in 2010 and 2011 because the companies refused to accept donations to Wikileaks, the organization that spilled a trove of U.S. military and diplomatic secrets. Also, prosecutors said, Monsegur and the others attacked a PBS website last May and planted a false story that slain rapper Tupac Shakur was alive in New Zealand. Investigators said it was retaliation for what the hackers perceived to be unfavorable news coverage of Wikileaks on the PBS program Frontline. But it was the arrest of Monsegur that sent shockwaves through the Anonymous movement, where many described him as a leader and one of the collectives most skilled hackers. Some Anonymous members put on a brave face. Anonymous is a hydra, cut off one head and we grow two back, read one defiant message posted to Twitter. But the atmosphere in one of the groups chat rooms had an edge of panic. One Anonymous supporter discussed cleaning the groups hard drive. Another warned that if Sabu is cooperating, then we are all going to have the FBI at are (sic) door. A Twitter account associated with Monsegur has some 45,000 followers and regularly spouts expletive-filled anti-government messages. His last tweet on Monday was in German and described the federal government as being run by cowards. It was apparently aimed at concealing his role as an informant. Dont give in to these people, the message read. Fight back. Stay strong. Monsegur pleaded guilty in August to charges that included conspiracy to commit hacking, admitting he obtained dozens of credit card numbers online and gave them to others or used them to pay his bills. ON THE NET JAMA: www.jama. ama-assn.org PTSD: http://1.usa. gov/ftZKFP

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Blustery Associated Press Hayley Peterson, 11, looks more like a wind vane Tuesday as a gust of wind near 35 mph causes her hair to stand straight out as she plays kickball outside with her friends in LaPorte, Ind. Tycoon convicted in $7B swindle HOUSTON Texas tycoon R. Allen Stanford spent more than 20 years charming investors, who handed him billions of dollars they had spent their lives accumulating through hard work and saving. Stanford promised them safe investments that would help fulfill their dreams of being able to retire comfortably or pay their childrens college tuition. All the while, he was pulling their money out of his Caribbean bank to pay for a string of failed businesses and a jet-setting lifestyle. Stanford, once considered one of the wealthiest people in the U.S., with a financial empire that spanned the Americas, was convicted Tuesday on charges he bilked investors out of more than $7 billion. Prosecutors said his business acumen was nothing more than an old-fashioned Ponzi scheme, and jurors convicted him on 13 of 14 charges, including conspiracy, wire and mail fraud. He was acquitted on a single count of wire fraud that accused him of bribing a regulator with Super Bowl tickets. Jamaica Associated Press Britains Prince Harry, left, is welcomed Tuesday by Jamaicas Prime Minister Portia Simpson Miller to a lunch in Kingston. Britain: Handshakes OK for Olympians LONDON On the other hand ... The British government has rejected advice from the Olympic teams top doctor that athletes should not shake hands at the London Games to avoid germs that could make them sick. Government health advisers seemed perplexed by the guidelines, which Olympic hopefuls derided as rude and pointless. By the end of the day, the British Olympic Association had softened its stance. Yes, the athletes will be able to greet the 10,000 visiting Olympians and hundreds of dignitaries with handshakes. Theyll just have to make sure they wash thoroughly later. From wire reports Nation BRIEFS World BRIEFS N ATION & W ORLD Page A14 WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7, 2012 C ITRUS C OUNTY C HRONICLE R. Allen Stanford faces life in prison. Iran nuke talks may resume Associated PressTEHRAN, Iran Efforts to find a diplomatic solution to Irans disputed nuclear program appeared to get a boost Tuesday when world powers agreed to a new round of talks with Tehran, and Iran gave permission for inspectors to visit a site suspected of secret atomic work. The two developments countered somewhat the crisis atmosphere over Irans nuclear program, the focus of talks in Washington between President Barack Obama and Israels visiting prime minister. Speaking at a news conference, Obama said he saw a window of opportunity to use diplomacy instead of military force to resolve the dispute over Irans nuclear program. He said he is focused on crippling sanctions already imposed on Iran and on international pressure to keep Tehran from developing a nuclear weapon. Iranians need to show they are serious about resolving the crisis, he said, adding that his policy is not one of containment but of stopping Iran from acquiring a nuclear weapon. The U.S. and its allies say Iran is on a path that could lead to the production of a nuclear weapon. Iran denies that, insisting its program is for energy production and other peaceful purposes. Speaking in Brussels, EU foreign policy chief Catherine Ashton said the five permanent members of the U.N. Security Council and Germany had agreed to a new round of nuclear talks with Iran. Previous talks have not achieved what the powers want an end to uranium enrichment on Iranian soil. The last round ended in failure in January 2011. Ashton said the EU hopes Iran will now enter into a sustained process of constructive dialogue which will deliver real progress in resolving the international communitys long-standing concerns on its nuclear program. The time and venue of the new talks have not yet been set. Estrogen lowers risk of breast cancer Associated PressLONDON Women who take estrogen after meno pause appear to have a lower risk of breast cancer even years after they quit taking the hormone, according to a new analysis of a landmark study. The results are reassuring news for women who have had hysterectomies and use the pills to relieve hot flashes and other symptoms of menopause, the researchers and other doctors say. Previous observational studies have suggested a possible connection between estrogen and breast cancer. The new research found women who had a hysterectomy who took estrogen-only pills for about six years were about 20 percent less likely to develop breast cancer than those who didnt take the hormone, and the benefit lasted for at least five years. The study was published online Wednesday in the journal, Lancet Oncology. If women are suffering from serious menopause symptoms and have had a hysterectomy, then estrogen alone is a reasonable approach, said Garnet Anderson, of the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle and the studys lead author. Doctors have long prescribed hormones for women after menopause to relieve symptoms like hot flashes and night sweats. The pills were also believed to be good for bones, the heart and have other health benefits. In the 1990s, researchers began a large, U.S.-funded study, known as the Womens Health Initiative, looking at the effects of estrogen-progestin combination pills and estrogen-only therapies. The estrogenprogestin part of the study was stopped in 2002 when the combo pill was linked to higher risks for heart attacks and breast cancer. In 2004, the estrogen study was halted after researchers detected stroke and blood clot risks in that group. Nursing home with meth lab fire was cited earlier Associated PressCOLUMBUS, Ohio The Ohio Department of Health says a fire at a nursing home apparently was caused by a mobile meth lab. A spokeswoman said officials are looking into the role that visitors to the home may have played. They did not give an exact description of the lab, but said that generally a mobile lab consists of a small container that can be carried in a backpack and that has all the ingredients to make methamphetamine. Five people were hospitalized after the fire Sunday in a residents room at Park Haven Home in Ashtabula, east of Cleveland. One of them, 31-year-old Shaun Warrens of Ashtabula, died Monday. Police say Warrens was not a resident or employee. The nursing home was cited for 18 violations last year, including not providing adequate care, according to state records obtained Tuesday. Police believe two visitors and one Park Haven resident knew about the meth lab, Police Chief Robert Stell told the Star Beacon of Ashtabula. Charges are expected against two men who were burned. The homes alleged violations in a December survey included not providing adequate care, failing to investigate how a resident was injured and not properly responding to residents complaints about missing property. An earlier review of the facility, in June, resulted in citations for two violations, including one alleged to have put residents at risk of harm. Park Haven failed to provide proper urgent care for one resident pained by a fractured leg and a second who had critical changes to her vital signs and level of consciousness, according to the survey findings. The home did not respond to a message left Tuesday. According to a federal rating system, the nursing home has the lowest possible rating one star out of five for health inspections and quality measures. Bounty of bees, bugs Associated Press Beekeeper Orin Johnson, right, and son-in-law Jay Rolon check on colonies pollinating an almond orchard Feb. 23 northwest of Waterford, Calif. A mild and dry winter that gave insects a reprieve from certain death now threatens to make spring a tough season for many U.S. farmers. Warm winter may bring pest-filled spring for many farmers Associated PressHARTFORD, Conn. The mild winter that has given many Northern farmers a break from shoveling and a welcome chance to catch up on maintenance, could lead to a tough spring as many pests that would normally freeze have not. Winters are usually what one agriculture specialist calls a reset button that gives farmers a fresh start come planting season. But with relatively mild temperatures and little snow, insects are surviving, growing and, in some areas, already munching on budding plants. Almost every state had a warmer-than-usual January, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. In Albany, N.Y., for example, the average high in January was 37 degrees, when its usually less than freezing, according to the National Weather Service. In Tulsa, Okla., the average high last month was about 57 degrees, 9 degrees higher than normal. The Upper Midwest, Great Plains and a few other areas were much above normal in temperature, NOAA said. Dawn Allen, who has an 89-yearold, family-run bog in Freetown, Mass., said her family will likely start sweeping bogs with a contraption similar to a butterfly net in April to catch winter moth caterpillars, instead of waiting until midMay, when they typically start. The winter moth caterpillars are aggressive and eat buds, potentially ruining a crop for a whole year. Its a big stress factor that gets us out on the bog early, said Allen, whose farm sells cranberries for juice and pulp converted into cranberry vitamins. Martha Sylvia, a research technician at the University of Massachusetts cranberry station, said growers should expect to start spraying earlier and more often because theres definitely an upswing in winter moths, she said. We just know were in for it, Sylvia said. Tim Tucker, a beekeeper in Niotaze, Kan., said he saw flies in February when all flies should be gone and bumble bees that usually dont appear until May or June. The warm weather hasnt been entirely good for beekeeping, though. Usually, queen bees wont lay eggs in the cold, but this year, his hives have been active. This year, we have some hives that raised bees all winter, Tucker said. I dont think they ever stopped. Because so many bees are being raised, Tucker has had to buy supplemental food, such as sucrose, so they dont eat all the honey he wants to sell. While bees are good for pollination, many of the insects that are surviving have a destructive bent, such as the bean leaf beetle that targets soybeans, corn flea beetle that damages corn, and the alfalfa weevil. Those insects live close to the surface of the ground, so the mild temperatures give them a head start, said Christian Krupke, a Purdue University entomologist. Winter is like a big reset button for the Midwest, Krupke said. It wipes out lots of insects, usually. However, the warmer temperatures generally dont affect insects that spend their winters burrowed deep into the ground, he said. And some insects may be threatened by a lack of snow. Erin Hodgson, an entomologist at Iowa State University, said a drought there due to a lack of snow could threaten boxelder bugs and beetles, who will die if food fails to emerge. And insects that pass the winter in dormancy above ground could die of dehydration or starvation without the insulating cover of snow, she said. Associated Press This photo provided by the Ashtabula Division of Fire shows a room at Park Haven Nursing Home where a Sunday night fire caused by a meth lab in the room killed one person and injured six others, Monday, March 5, in Ashtabula, Ohio.

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Citrus splits games on diamond Associated PressTAMPA Milan Michalek scored three third-period goals, helping the Ottawa Senators withstand a Tampa Bay comeback attempt and beat the Lightning 7-3 on Tuesday night. Ottawa, which took a three-goal lead early on, went up 5-3 when Michalek scored a power-play goal at 12:12 of third. The left wing added two empty-goals, including a short-handed effort with 7 seconds left to give him 32 goals this season. Tampa Bay got within 4-3 when Steven Stamkos scored his league-leading 48th goal of the season during a power play at 5:41 of the third. The center has five goals and three assists during a five-game point streak. Sergei Gonchar, Colin Greening, Kyle Turris and Erik Karlsson had the other Ottawa goals. Michalek also had an assist, setting up Greenings goal with a nifty pass from behind the net. Ryan Shannon and Tim Wallace also scored for the Lightning. Teddy Purcell assisted on Stamkos goal and has 14 assists and 20 points during a career-high 10-game point streak. Tampa Bay goalie Mathieu Garon left four minutes into the game with an undisclosed lower body injury after making a save and was replaced by Dwayne Roloson. Garon, who had gone 12-3-2 in his previous 17 starts, appeared to get hurt when he kicked out his leg on the play. Greening and Turris scored 53 seconds apart late in the first as Ottawa took a 3-0 lead. Greening scored from the low slot, while Turris shot went off Tampa Bay defenseman Brett Clark. Gonchar stopped a personal 43-game goal drought, dating back to Nov. 12 against Toronto, to put Senators up 1-0 midway through the first. The Lightning got within 3-2 in the opening 7:12 of the second when Shannon and Wallace scored on 6-foot-7 Ben Bishop, who was making his Senators debut. Bishop was acquired from St. Louis for a 2013 secondround draft pick on Feb. 26. Karlsson made it 4-2 on a power-play goal at 11:58 of the second. The defenseman has 16 goals and 67 points this season. Ottawa is without goalie Craig Anderson, who is sidelined by a hand injury. He won all three of the Senators previous games this season with the Lightning, allowing just three goals overall. Notes: The NHL fined Karlsson $2,500 for slashing Floridas Sean Bergenheim during a game on Sunday. ... Tampa Bay D Victor Hedman was in the lineup after missing four games due to an upper body injury. ... In 10 games against Tampa Bay, Anderson is 6-1-2 with three shutouts and an 1.24 goalsagainst-average. ... Lightning D Marc-Andre Bergeron is scheduled to have back surgery on Wednesday. S PORTS Section B WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7, 2012 Golf/ B2 Tennis/B3 Scoreboard/B4 Lottery numbers/B4 NBA/ B5 NHL/ B5 Entertainment/ B6 How to improve your golf score / B2 C ITRUS C OUNTY C HRONICLE SO YOU KNOW Due to early deadlines, some lottery numbers do not appear. Crystal River creams rivals D AVEP IEKLIK CorrespondentCRYSTAL RIVER Poise, perseverance and power. Crystal River High Schools softball team showed all three to rally late in a 6-4 district win Tuesday over visiting Hernando High School of Brooksville. After unforced errors led to a quick 3-0 deficit, Crystal River (8-2 overall; 3-1 district) settled down and pitcher McCale Wilson bought her team some time to take the lead with solid pitching. Wilson recently called up from junior varsity threw a complete-game seven-hitter, recording five strikeouts and two walks. Crystal River faces Dunnellon on Friday in district play. I have a great team behind me, Wilson said of her fielders and batters. I have everything I could ask for. Hernando (5-4 overall; 23 district) went ahead quick from unforced errors that have plagued Crystal River recently. If Wilson was rattled, she didnt show it, locating her pitches to induce harmless grounders or fly ball to keep the score close. Warriors fall at home J AMES B LEVINS CorrespondentCRYSTAL RIVER Seven Rivers Christian School came out strong in the first inning of Tuesday evenings softball game against the Hernando Christian Lady Lions. The Warriors scored five early runs to take a three-run lead but, by the third inning, Hernando Christian took over the game and led from there on out. Preventing the Warriors from staging any further offensive threats, the Lions won the game 10-5. Hernando Christian utilized strong pitching and consistent hitting to dominate the game, out-hitting the Warriors 17-7. They played hard against a very good team. Seven Rivers head coach Gary Dreyer said. (They) played it all the way to the end. The Lady Lions struck first with two hits and two runs in the first inning. Seven Rivers (0-5 overall, 0-1 district) fought back in its first at-bat, which led to three hits and five runs to take a 5-2 lead. Alexis King singled while pitcher Tessa Kacer and Katie Dreyer doubled. Kacer kept the Lions off S EAN A RNOLD CorrespondentINVERNESS The Citrus baseball team opened up a 4-0 lead in the first inning and never looked back, overwhelming West Port for an 11-0 home triumph in five innings Tuesday. With the victory, Citrus (6-2) improved to 3-0 in its district and is set for a district showdown at Springstead (2-0 in district) on Monday. The Canes made solid contact all night, but didnt need any hits for their initial rally, which found Wolf Pack junior Javy Rivera throwing 35 pitches as three Citrus batters reached and scored off West Port (0-8, 0-3) errors. After adding two runs in the Lightning lose The end of an era Associated Press Indianapolis Colts quarterback Peyton Manning talks to reporters Dec. 2 in the locker room at the NFL football teams practice facility in Indianapolis. The Peyton Manning era in Indianapolis is expected to end. Associated PressINDIANAPOLIS The Peyton Manning era in Indianapolis is expected to end Wednesday, according to a report. Citing anonymous sources, ESPN reported Tuesday the Colts plan to hold a news conference to announce the long-expected decision. Manning and team owner Jim Irsay are expected to attend, the network said. Colts spokesman Avis Roper said he could not confirm the decision or that a news conference would be held Wednesday because Irsay was out of town and could not be reached for comment. Neither Irsay nor Mannings agent, Tom Condon, responded immediately to messages left by The Associated Press. Manning has said in the past all he wanted to do was finish his career in a Colts uniform, but an injured neck forced him to miss all of the 2011 season. I cant tell you what an honor it is to go start-to-finish with the same organization here in Indianapolis. That is something I have always wanted to do as a rookie coming out, Manning said after Report: Colts, Manning breaking up Lady Pirates defeat Leopards 6-4 Associated Pres s ABOVE: Tampa Bay Lightning defenseman Keith Aulie punches Ottawa Senators left wing Colin Greening as they fight Tuesday during the second period in Tampa. BELOW: Ottawa Senators center Jason Spezza tries to stuff the puck past Tampa Bay Lightning goalie Dwayne Roloson as defenseman Victor Hedman helps Roloson during the third period of the game. Panthers pounce on Lady Canes S TEVE M C G UNNIGLE CorrespondentINVERNESS While hitting was on display all night by both sides, one teams ability to play at a high level in all facets of the game proved the difference, as Lecanto connected on all cylinders to defeat Citrus 10-4 in a District 6A-6 matchup Tuesday at Vicki Overman Field. The Lady Panthers (6-2 overall, 2-2 district)got hits from all but one spot in the lineup, capitalized on Citrus errors and played superb defense including two double plays. Lecanto pitcher Hurricanes rout Wolf Pack 11-0 See COLTS / Page B4 Hernando Christian wins 10-5 See WARRIORS / Page B4 See CANES / Page B4 Michalek has 3 goals as Ottawa beats Tampa Bay 7-3 See PANTHERS / Page B4 See PIRATES / Page B4

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O UTDOORS Y OUTH S PORTS A DULTL EAGUE S PORTS C ITRUS C OUNTY S PEEDWAY Page B2 WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7, 2012 C OMING T OMORROW C OMING T UESDAYC OMING F RIDAY C OMING S ATURDAY C ITRUS C OUNTY S R ECREATIONALG UIDETOG OLF HOLE-IN-ONE Bob Lewis hit a hole-in-oneMarch 5 on Hole No. 2 in the Monday Morning Mens Point Quota Group. It was hisfirstone. Witnesses were Chuck Taylor, Pat Voss and Leo Fisher.BRENTWOOD Feb. 29 Wednesday Point Quota Group last Wednesday of the month Scramble results. First7 under Don Oslance, C.W. Goschen, Jay Hylemon and Ron Cart Second6 under (MOC) Jim Kieffer, Possum Lindsey, Basil Varney and Ty Ross Third6 under Tom Cox, Glenn Connelly, Jim Pearson and Bill Owens Closest to the Pin: No. 2Bob Staker No. 4Ron Cart 50, 50 winnerJim Kieffer March 3 Saturday Morning (Handicap) Scramble results. First Ron Worrell, Jim Pearson and Bob Smith Second Kenny McCabe, Bob Staker, Andy McKenney and Joel Fox Third Bob Day, Rich Bleeker and Bob Bouchard Closest to the Pin: No. 2Bob Smith No. 4Kenny Mc Cabe March 4 Sunday Morning Scramble results. First7 under Kenny McCabe, Chuck Curtis and Rolf Kettenberg Second3 under (MOC) Russel Clark, Possum Lindsey, Jay Hylemon and Jerry Walker Third3 under Anita McCabe, Bob Staker and Jim Pearson Closest to the Pin: No. 2Sue Bauerle No. 4Chuck Curtis 50/50 winnerAnn Mc Laughlin March 5 Monday Morning Mens Point Quota Group results. FirstBob Lewis+ 4 SecondKim Kieffer+ 3 (MOC) ThirdDon Treannie+ 3 Closest to the Pin: No. 2Bob Lewis (Hole-in One) No. 4Kenny McCabe WOMEN March 6 Brentwood Tuesday Ladies League standings. Teams: First97.5 points Kay Fitzsimmons and Dianne Joyner Second94.0 points Gail Nowicki and Jeri Meday Third90.5 points Maryann Barch and Sandi Luther Individuals: FirstGail Nowicki46.0 points SecondKay Fitzsimmons45.0 points ThirdDianne Joyner42.5 points (Tie)Penny Magliano42.5 points Low GrossKay Fitzsimmons-44 Low NetKay Fitzsimmons-32 Birdies: No. 9Jane Vandenbergh Game of the Day Fewest Putts: Gigi Haltom 13 Feb. 28 Brentwood Tuesday Ladies League standings. Team: First86.0 points Kay Fitzsimmons and Dianne Joyner Second85.5 points Gail Nowicki and Jeri Meday Third82.0 points (Tie) Maryann Barch and Sandi Luther (Tie) Glenora Hilton and Dorothy Gratien Individual: FirstGail Nowicki42.5 points SecondKay Fitzsimmons39.0 points (Tie)Dianne Joyner39.0 points (Tie)Glenora Hilton39.0 points Low GrossKay Fitzsimmons45 Low NetKay Fitzsimmons32 Birdies: No. 4Dorothy Gratien Chip-ins: No. 5Joan Minnelli Game of the Day Fewest Strokes Tee to Green: Dianne Joyner28CITRUS HILLS Feb. 29 Citrus Hills Mens Association Match Play Championship Final results. Flight A FirstDick Stillwagon SecondJohn Nagle ThirdRon Boguski Flight B FirstFrank Tobey SecondWA Pace ThirdBruce Cahoon Flight C FirstJerry Krause SecondDick Morelli ThirdKeith Bainbridge Flight D FirstBob Prince SecondDick Olsen ThirdRoger Williams Feb. 29 The Citrus Hills Mens Golf Association played on the Oaks Golf Course Irish Four Ball. First17 Bob Miller, Cliff Schoenenberger, Jerry McClernon and John Rowen Second14 Ed Ryan, John Keller Randy Robertson and Joe Skender Third13 Larry Jones, Bob Sarno George Lowell and Harold Cipollone Fourth-12 Jim Rembler, Bob Palmer Frank Kosidiak and Clive Affleck WOMEN Feb. 28 The Citrus Hills Ladies Golf Association played a game called Forty Balls. Each player must select the hole they want to count for the team score immediately upon completion of that hole. This was a (ABCD) team game in which each player must use 10 net hole scores for a 40 hole team score. First124 Dorothy Ammerman, Carol Moon, Gloria Phillips and Diane Halloran Second129 Judy Stone, Ruth Rosenow, Phyllis Mills and Kate Yazbak Third130 Brenda Lindsey, Helen Forte, Nancy McCoy and Virginia Romiti Birdies: No. 3Judy Stone No. 9Brenda Lindsey No. 5Carol Moon No. 16Clara Kim No. 13Sue Burgun No. 14Nancy McCoy No. 14Bonnie Yanosy Nos. 3 and 13June Marbutt Nos. 14 and 15Gloria PhillipsCITRUS SPRINGS March 2 Citrus Springs Golf & Country Club played Two Best Scores. First Net119 Rich Benevente, Seab Johnson, Rich Howard and (Blind) Second Net126 Conrad Medina, David Haas, Tom Rothrauff and (Blind) Birdies: Nos. 2 and 7Rich Benevente Closest to the Pin: No. 16David Haas WOMEN March 2 Points Quota Chicks with Sticks results. Vickie Colebank+11 Sandy Brown+6 Jan Kominski+6 Ruth Meyer+6 Lois Bump+5 Marj Sibley+5 Lorraine Adams+4 Mary McConnell+4 Joy Cocuzzi+1 Carole Seifert+1 Closest to the Pin: No.4Lois Bump No.8June Goyette No.11Carole Seifert No. 16Marj Sibley Chicks with Sticks, a ladies points quota league, meets every Friday morning at Citrus Springs. Interested players with GHIN handicaps should call Jan at 352-344-9550 or Carole at 352-746-2082. LAKESIDE MEN Feb. 29 The annual Memorial Tournament hosted by the Mens League, honored those members who have passed away this past year. John Stewart read the memorial names, and taps were played before play. Format for ladies was low gross and low net. The men played a 1-2-3 format. First Don Lynch, Wayne Perry, and Rich Grunwold Second Len Thomas, Volk Krees, Pete Powell and Joe Johnston Third Angelo Leonardi, Rich Connelly, and Gene Sass Fourth Rich Hausman, Dave McLane, Bob Smith and Dave Smith Fifth Fred Friberg, Marty Gibbings, and John Heymans Closest to the Pin: Mens No. 8Horst Hlawaty Mens No. 13Marty Gibbings Womens Nos. 2 and 15Marlene Friberg Closest to the Line: Mens No. 6Horst Halawaty Mens No. 12Volk Knees Womens No. 6Joyce Smith Womens No. 12Patty Smith Low Net LadiesJoyce Smith71 WOMEN March 1 Lakeside Womens Golf T and F format taking scores on holes with names beginning with a T or F. A Flight FirstJan Kominski34 (Tie)Marlene Friberg34 ThirdMary McConnell 35.5 (Tie)Kaye Brown35.5 B Flight FirstLinda Miller32 (Tie)Diane Atterson32 ThirdJean OBrien33 Chip-ins: No. 8Marj Sibley No. 2Irene Nunes Closest to the Pin: No. 2Marj Sibley No. 15Carol Siefert Sunday Funday Format, Team low net results. First Rick Ross, Joyce Smith, Bruce Mowat and Linda Ross Second Tony Forio, Tim Langs, Pat Mowat and Marnie Florio Closest to the Pin: Womens No.15Marnie Florio Mens No.13Rick RossPINE RIDGE March 6 Beverly Hills Mens Nine Hole Golf League results. Winning Scorers: B. Collier33 G. St. Don31 F. Hughes33 R. Mazzacua33 OTG Winners: V.Bishop, F. Hughes, R. Mazzacua and G. St. Don Golfers of any age and ability are welcome to join in the friendly round of nine holes of competitive golf every Tuesday morning at Pine Ridge The group alternates weekly front nine and back nine with tee time at 8 a.m. For information, call Frank Hughes at 352-746-4800.SEVEN RIVERS March 1 Today the 7Rivers Mens Golf Association played a Better 2 Balls of 4 tournament. First Ron Neal, Ted Grabowski, Dick Shepherd and Sam McMechan Second Will Tripp, Paul Mantey and Joe Muscaro Third Don Eddy, Clayton Jeck, All Silliman and Rick Knoop Closest to the Pin: No. 7Bob Cox No. 11Bill StallingsSOUTHERN WOODS Feb. 29 Southern Woods Mens Golf Association played step-aside scramble mixed flights. First-5 Doug Martin, Rod Fortune, Bill Murray and Bill Bachman Second-3 Dennis Weeks, Brian Hadler, Dan Martinko and Paul Malarkey Third-2 Tony Schmid, Rich Galasso, Bill Gilbert and Bill Long (Tie) Frank Nolan, SocHiotakis, Bob Chadderton and Dale Vaughn Closest to the Pin: No. 4Tom Venable14-7 No. 17Bob Chdderton 7-6SUGARMILL WOODS March 1 Sugarmill Woods Country Club Mens Golf Association played Best 1on 5s, 2 on 4s, 3 on 3s. First-23 John Holden, Bruce Whewell, Bill Engelbrecht and Sid Kaplowitz Second-22 Art Anderson, Paul VanTassell, Tony Valente and Joe Gannon Third-21 Frank Siemietkowski, Ron Broadbent, Bob Chadderton and Tony Corso Fourth-20 Doug Martin, Stan Fleming, Bob Strausser and Dick Henry Fifth-19 Dick Tuxbury, Mike Theodore, John Rada and Harley Lawrence (Tie) Erv Koch, Gus Calleri, Bob Mason and Phil Runfola Golfers of the week: Low GrossDoug Martin75 Low NetPhil Runfola63 Low Net Sr.Joe Gannon59 Closest to the Pin: Pine No. 4Sid Kaplowitz Pine No. 7John Holden Oak No. 3Paul Domino Oak No. 6Doug Martin Feb. 28 Sandblasters Mens Group played Team Point Quota. First+7 Sam Hunt, Felix Tarorick, Tony Valente and Royce Decker (Tie) Dennis Didier, Alex Law, Harley Lawrence and Gary Osborne Third+5 John Doyle, Rich Perry, Bill Pierson and Tom St.Clair Low RoundGarth McGrath76TWISTED OAKS Feb. 28 Best 15 net holes results. First Flight FirstPat Doerr47 SecondShirley Young49 ThirdMia Husler50 (Tie)Betty Smith50 Second Flight FirstMay Forsythe42 SecondHelen Kennerly44 ThirdPat Doing47 Third Flight FirstBonnie Kaiser40 SecondDora Acuna47 (Tie)Fran Quillen47 Local LEADERS Golf For Kids tourney March 23The Inverness Sertoma Clubs 26th annual Golf For Kids Tournament will take place Friday, March 23, at Inverness Golf and Country Club. Registration begins at 7 a.m., with a shotgun start at 8 a.m. The format is a Four-Person Best Ball Scramble. Cost is $60 per player and $100 for hole sponsors. Entry fee includes greens fee, cart, lunch, beverages and door prizes. Mulligan tickets will be available one for $5 or three for $10. Prizes awarded for closest to the pin, longest drive, holein-one, sponsored by Love Honda Proceeds will benefit speechand hearing-impaired children, through the All Childrens Citrus Sertoma Speech & Hearing Clinic in Lecanto Golf for Meals tourney in MarchCitrus County Home Delivered Meals Program will host Golf for Meals fundraising golf tournament Saturday, March 24, at Seven Rivers Golf and Country Club, Crystal River. The event will begin at 9 a.m. Business owners and organizations are invited to sponsor the event with a variety of advertising platforms. You can show your support by sponsoring a hole, providing items for gift bags, or by donating prizes that can be given away or raffled off for additional funds. There are several different levels of corporate sponsorship: Platinum Sponsor Gold Sponsor Silver Sponsor Bronze Sponsor To become a corporate sponsor, call 352-527-5975. March for Meals is a nationwide campaign sponsored by the Meals on Wheels Association of America. Golf BRIEFS Improving your score O f the 14 clubs in the golf bag, I contend three clubs account for 70 percent of the strokes taken by golfers within a stipulated round of golf. They are the putter, driver and wedge. I believe by mastering the putter, driver and wedge, our golf scores will rapidly improve. Not a little, but a lot! Last month, I covered putting, chipping and pitching in my articles. This week, I will address the big dog, the driver. Rather than addressing several technical items, I will provide basic tips I believe will help your driver on the golf course, especially when under pressure. The mental mindset of a golfer is huge when hitting the driver. The tendency is to think purely of the distance you want to hit the ball off the tee. This leads to tighter grip pressure, increased arm tension, faster tempo and reduced balance, all of which causes less distance and inaccuracy. Therefore, I cannot stress enough you should merely think of making a solid hit with your driver without any thought of increased swing speed or distance. Disciplining yourself to this thought will increase distance through hitting the ball on or nearer the sweet spot of the driver face as well as improve accuracy through better tempo and balance. Maintaining your normal tempo is also vital to good driving. Keep the same pace on the golf course as you do on the driving range when warming up. I use a simple slogan for myself less is more before hitting each tee shot. This is a reminder to me less effort will give me more distance equating the importance of tempo in the golf swing. In your minds eye, be extremely specific as to the target you want to hit toward with your driver tee shot. The tendency is to be fearful of out of bounds, water, bunkers and trees. Instead, practice picking out the most specific target in the distance of the hole (where you want the ball to go) and focus on it throughout each tee shot. This will help to relax your mind from all of the negative thoughts that tend to pop up, all of which cause erratic results. When the driver begins to go haywire on the golf course, I suggest you grip down about a half-inch more than normal on the grip to help regain control of the club head and improve the solidness of contact. This move emphasizes the importance of hitting the ball solid rather than swinging from your heels. I truly believe the above tips will improve your driving ability much more than going through the technical 1, 2, 3 we heard so many times before. My wish to you is fairways and greens. Chronicle file By mastering the putter, driver and wedge, golf scores will rapidly improve and not just by a little. Stan Cooke A SLICE FROM STAN From staff reports CORRECTION In the Wednesday, Feb. 22, edition, Lorraine Palazzolos name was misspelled. The Chronicle regrets the error.

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J OE K ORNECKI III CorrespondentINVERNESS The Citrus girls tennis team kept up its winning ways Tuesday night by defeating the Central Bears 6-1. It was a group effort and a good win for the team, Citrus coach Scott Waters said. Consistency is what this team is about, and thats what I see. When this team gets down, they continue to fight back. Citrus (7-1) won four of the five singles matches and won both doubles matches. All of the Lady Hurricanes victorious matches versus the Bears (4-4) were won in straight sets. Two of the singles matches were won without losing one single game. It was a good match, said Melanie Dodd. I hope we keep winning, and everyone did really well.Citrus results are:Singles No. 1: Sarah Labrador def. Danielle Daly 6-0, 6-0. No. 2: Melanie Dodd def. Nicole Carrier 6-0, 6-0. No. 3: Jackie Ear def. Jordan Stenholm 6-2, 6-2. No. 5: Taylor Jordan def. Jordyn Burnett 6-1, 6-0. Doubles No. 1: Labrador/Martone def. Daly/Carrier 6-2, 6-1. No. 2: Ear/Dodd def. Stenholm/Blackburn 6-3, 6-1. C.J. RISAK CorrespondentLECANTO First time out on Feb. 7 Lecantos boys tennis team absorbed a 6-1 trouncing at the hands of Ocala Forest. The second meeting, Tuesday at Lecanto, might not have indicated there was much change, considering the Panthers suffered a 5-2 defeat. Neither of the coaches involved, however, would endorse that finding. Particularly since four of the five singles matches went to the 10-point tiebreaker. Ten points (our) way and we win, noted Lecanto coach Jack Hall, his team now 5-4 in dual-meet play. I thought for a minute we might pull it out. But Im not disappointed. Anytime you can play like that against a team like that . Its very heartening because we lost the first time 6-1. Its also encouraging considering Forest had an 8-0 record coming into this meet. The two teams could face each other again in the state district tournament, scheduled for the first week in April in Gainesville. Neither squad should be capable of defeating Gainesville, but Tuesdays meeting casts some doubt on which will finish second and gain a spot in the regionals. Only the No. 1 singles match between Lecantos Zach Alford and Forests Brad Sanders did not go to the tiebreaker. With strong winds altering game conditions, Alford trimmed a 3-0 deficit in the opening set to 3-2 before losing 6-2, then went game-for-game in the second set until Sanders put two game wins together in a 6-4 triumph. But it was the battle at No. 2 singles that was decisive. Lecantos Rishi Gurnani went up against Jose Medina, usually the Wildcats No. 3 player who moved up due to the absence of Philip Libbey. Medina, a 6-3 loser in the first set, trailed Gumani 5-2 in the second and was facing double match point. He fought back to win that game and four more after that for a 7-5 triumph, then beat Gurnani 10-4 in the tiebreaker. The Panthers did win two of the four tiebreakers, Sam Alford outdueling Forests Connor Cluster at No. 3 singles 3-6, 6-2, 10-8, and Rio Lumpapas besting the Cats Nick Wigelsworth 7-6, 1-6, 10-7 at No. 5 singles. Which meant the outcome of the meet was still in doubt entering doubles play. At both No. 1 and No. 2, the Lecanto pair had a two-game lead in the pro set (first to win eight games) match but failed to hold on. At No. 1 doubles, Forests Sanders and Cluster edged the Panthers Zach Alford and Gumani, and at No. 2 the Cats Medina and Weaver topped Justo and Dale Eastmond, both by 8-5 margins. It was a good match, a good match for both teams, said Forest coach Dave Falcone. And thats just what you want. T eam commitment for the next round of USTA matches has been closed, but there is still time to sign up players. Player registration deadline is March 15. You can sign up after that date, but your team should have enough players signed up to participate. As mentioned before, this is the only time of the year USTA league play involves single players. Every year, teams are scrambling for singles players. So if you like singles, get in touch with one of the teams. Of course, we are talking about the adult league, for players 18 and up. You turn 18 anytime in 2012 and play in this league. The season will run from March 30 through June 17. Levels of play 2.5, 3.0, 3.5, 4.0, 4.5, and 5.0. All teams, except 2.5 and 5.0, should have at least eight players. The others have a fiveplayer minimum. The 2.5 and 5.0 teams play one singles and two doubles matches; all other are two singles and three doubles. Each team needs to have at least 75 percent of their roster at team level. Matches will be played Friday, Saturday and Sunday. For information in District 4 (south), call or email Leigh Chak at 352-572-7157 or vacocala@comcast.net or ustaflorida.com. Monday Night Ladies Doubles League Results for Feb. 27 are: No scores received. This league is geared toward the 3.5 and 4.0 female players, who cannot play during the day and dont mind traveling for tennis matches. For more information, contact Vivien Amabile at tony kgbird@aol.com. Citrus County Tuesday Womens Team TennisResults for Feb. 21 are: Riverhaven Reds def. Bicentennial Breakers, 3-2; Pine Ridge Palominos def. Crystal River Chip and Charge, 4-0. Results for Feb. 28 are: Bicentennial Breakers def. Crystal River Chip and Charge, 4-1; Riverhaven Reds def. Pine Ridge Palominos, 4-1. Standings: Riverhaven Reds, 41; Pine Ridge Palominos, 36; Bicentennial Breakers, 33; Crystal River Chip and Charge, 21. This ladies-only league is geared toward players rated 3.0 to 3.5. If interested in playing or being a team captain, call chairperson Candace Charles at 352-563-5859 or email Candace charles@tampabay.rr.com. Citrus Area Senior Ladies 3.0/3.5 Tuesday LeagueResults for Feb. 28 are: Citrus Hills def. Riverhaven Ospreys, 4-1; Crystal River def. Pine Ridge Mustangs, 4-0; Meadowcrest Aces vs. Meadowcrest Racquettes, 2-2. For information, contact new chairwoman Luanne Miller at lumiller62@yahoo.com or 352794-7247. Ladies on the CourtWinners for March 1 are Claudia and Dot. Ladies on The Court play at 8:30 a.m. Thursdays at Le Grone Park courts in Crystal River. Bring a new can of balls and 50 cents and sign up to play two out of three tie-break sets. For more information, contact Barbara Shook at dshook @tampabay.rr.com or 352-7950872. Thursday Morning Citrus Area Doubles League Results for March 1: Sugarmill Woods def. Bicentennial Babes, 6-3; Pine Ridge Fillies def. Skyview Aces, 7-3. Standings after the second round: Sugarmill Woods, 70; Bicentennial Babes, 70; Skyview, 70; Skyview Advantage, 69; Pine Ridge Fillies, 68; Pine Ridge Mavericks, 63; Skyview Aces, 53; Bicentennial Bratz, 50. The last round of play starts Thursday, March 8. For information, contact chairwoman Carol Keatts at 352-3825280 or ckeatts@aol.com. The Friday Senior Ladies Doubles 3.0-3.5 League Results for March 2: Citrus Hills Hot Shots def. Sugarmill Shooting Stars, 4-1; Pine Ridge Mustangs vs. Riverhaven Eagles, 2-2; Bicentennial Flyers vs Meadowcrest Aces, 2-2. For information contact chairwoman Joyce Shiver at 352795-1086 or jshiver@tampabay.rr.com.USTA Leagues 3.5 Senior Women: Bicentennial Park def. Fort King, 3-0. Record 4-3. Georgica Kearney/Lynne Finman, 1-6, 6-4, 1-0; Tana Hubbard/Linda Martin, 3-6, 6-2, 1-0; Myrt Thomas/Maureen Caruso, 6-2, 6-3. 4.0 Senior Women: Skyview (Barry) lost to The Villages, 2-1. Record 1-4. 7.0 Mixed Adult: Skyview lost to Fort King, 3-0. Record 14. 4.0 Super Senior Women: Skyview def. Fort King, 3-0. Record 3-0. Irma Buttermore/Gail Cooper, 6-4, 2-6, 1-0; Joyce Schaeffer/Nancy Fetzer, 6-3, 6-4; Nadia Maric/Carol Hoinski, 6-4, 6-1. For information about the Hernando leagues, contact Lou Giglio at 727-207-4760 or Lou@topseedtennispro.com Tournaments April 21 and 22: Tournament of Champions at Sugarmill Woods/Oak Village Tennis Complex. May 5 and 6: Adult Mixed Doubles Tournament at Deltona Woods Park in Spring Hill. T ENNIS C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE W EDNESDAY, M ARCH 7, 2012 B3 Citrus Springs 352-489-5045 8690 N. Golfview Dr., Citrus Springs 000ASRD COME AND PLAY THE BEST GREENS IN THE AREA AT CITRUS SPRINGS! EVERY DAY! ALL DAY! AT CITRUS SPRINGS JUST $ 28.00 18 Holes w/Cart March Special! Visit citrusspringsgolf.com and find out about our New Executive Membership! 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The Pirates racked up their third straight win, shutting out the Leopards 7-0 without dropping up a single set. Crystal River coach Bill Reyes was very happy with his teams overall play. Im very satisfied with our performance, Reyes said. All of our guys shined tonight, and thats good going into our break. We have three weeks before our next match, so this is a good to way to finish this portion of our season. Weve won three in a row now, and were really starting to look a lot like a team, with great individual performances. The afternoon started out with the singles matches, as Crystal Rivers No. 1 singles player Brandon Papp cruised to a 6-1, 62 victory over Hernandos James Ortega. At No. 2 singles, the Pirates Travis Swanson kept it going with a victory over Hernandos Justin Argonaillo, taking a 6-0, 7-5 victory while No. 3 singles Matt Allen had no trouble in his match, defeating Hernandos Paolo Ilagan 60, 6-1 in straight sets. Crystal Rivers No. 4 and No. 5 singles took care of business as well, with Alex Papp and Aaron Molinero taking their first sets 6-2 and 6-3 respectively, and both shutting out the opposition in the second set, 6-0. The final doubles matches went just as smoothly for the Pirates, as the No. 1 pairing of Brandon Papp and Swanson, cruised to an 8-1 pro-set victory, while No. 2 doubles team Alex Papp and Allen took the 8-2 win. Citrus girls outserve Central 6-1 Lecanto loses to Forest 5-2 Park offers tennis lessonsWhispering Pines Park offers tennis lessons with Lindsay Rodriquez. Pre-registration and pre-payment are required. Fee for lessons is $100 for four hours, or $30 per hour. Times are arranged with the instructor. Call 352-726-3913 for registration and information. Whispering Pines also offers racquetball lessons. Call for information.

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second, the Canes amassed six more in the fourth off two walks and three hits, including an RBI double by sophomore second baseman Cody Bogart. Junior leadoff hitter and shortstop Kyle Tobin, senior first baseman Hayden Kelly (two walks), and senior shortstop Cameron Copas (two singles) each scored twice for Citrus, while Canes senior third baseman Patrick Martin had two base hits, a walk, and a run. Citrus pitching, led by a strong three-inning performance from senior Mark Pullen, combined to surrender just two base runners on 48 total pitches. Pullen struck out four, picked off a runner and allowed one hit, a soft liner past third base by junior first baseman Kenny Cooper. Afterward, Pullen discussed his effectiveness with the curveball. Its a big pitch when you can locate it, and it worked good for me tonight, Pullen said. You definitely have to have some good off-speed stuff to rely on at this level. Citrus senior pitcher Eric Nelson retired the side in the fourth before Brooks Brasher came in to force three consecutive groundouts in the fifth for his first outing. Citrus coach Brady Bogart was generally satisfied with his clubs execution and work. From a pitching standpoint, we did what we wanted to do, he said. Our plan was to give Mark a few innings, Eric an inning, and we wanted to get Brooks in. With all the sicknesses and injuries weve had, it was good to get him on the mound. I think his arm is going to be good enough to help us out. Brady Bogart found some areas at the plate, however, that need attention. We had ho-hum plate appearances, he said. The ball was pulling foul a lot, and good hitters should be able to keep those in the middle of the field. So well get back at it tomorrow. We have three days to get ready for a big one against Springstead. signing a five-year, $90 million contract in July. Of course, you never know if that is possible, but after yesterday it is official that I will be an Indianapolis Colt for my entire career. I will not play for another team. My last down of football will be with the Colts, which means a great deal to me. But things have changed since last summer. Now it looks like the NFLs only four-time MVP and a former Super Bowl champion, wont be wearing No. 18 for Indy. With a $28 million bonus payment due Thursday to Manning, his neck problems, and the fact that the Colts own the No. 1 pick in Aprils draft, the Colts seem to have deemed it too risky and too pricey to keep the longtime franchise quarterback, who will turn 36 later this month. The twists and turns of a public debate between Manning and Irsay, who have been friends for more than a decade, created the sense the two had been fighting. Irsay twice issued statements to deny a rift. Still, with the Colts in full rebuilding mode, Irsay has been expected by many to play for the future and let Manning try to chase a second Super Bowl ring somewhere else. The Colts are expected to take Stanford quarterback Andrew Luck with the first pick in Aprils draft. Mannings impending departure marks the end of a remarkably successful era that included the 2006 league title. He started every meaningful game for 13 seasons in Indy, 227 straight including the playoffs, and took the Colts from perennial alsoran to one of the NFLs model franchises. In the two decades predating his arrival, the Colts won 116 games, one division title and made the playoffs three times. With Manning taking snaps, the Colts have won 150 games, eight division titles, two AFC championships and the franchises first Super Bowl since moving from Baltimore in 1984. Indy broke the league record for most regular-season wins in a decade (115), tied Dallas league record for most consecutive playoff appearances (nine) and the success changed Indy from a basketball town to an NFL town. Manning is one of four players with more than 50,000 yards passing, one of three with more than 350 touchdown passes and one of two quarterbacks with more than 200 consecutive starts. The only non-active quarterback with a rating higher than Mannings 94.9 is Hall of Famer Steve Young (96.8). He broke all of the franchises major career passing records, previously held by Hall of Fame quarterback John Unitas, and he may not be finished. In 2009, the star QB had the Colts on the cusp of history with a 14-0 start. Its been mostly bad news ever since. The Colts pulled their starters against the New York Jets and lost the final two games that season. Indy then wound up losing to New Orleans in the Super Bowl. During the offseason, Manning had the first of his neck surgeries. Then, after making an early playoff exit in the 2010 season, Manning underwent another neck surgery to repair a damaged nerve that was causing weakness in his throwing arm. But when the nerve did not heal as quickly as anticipated, Manning had two vertebrae fused together in September, a surgery that forced him to miss the first game of his career. There are still questions about how strong Mannings arm is. Yet he has repeatedly insisted he plans to play football again next season. My plan hasnt changed, Manning said during Super Bowl week. Im on track with what the doctors have told me to do, and Im doing that. Im rehabbing hard. The question is where might Manning land if he is no longer a Colt. Arizona, Miami, Tennessee and the New York Jets have all been rumored as possible spots, and Mannings former longtime offensive coordinator Tom Moore did work with the Jets as a consultant less season. Its still possible, however unlikely, that Manning could return to Indy for a lower price if he can prove hes healthy. Danielle Yant also had a strong performance, going the distance forthe complete-game win. She allowed four runs on nine hits while walking none. Paige Richards and Andrea Coutueach went 2-for5 with an RBI, and Amber Russo was 2-for-2 with an RBI, two runs, two walks and two steals for Lecanto. Citrus (5-5, 2-1)put the first two runs of the game on the board in the second inning, as Melissa Michaud doubled to lead it off, then scored on an infield single to deep short by Daniella Garcia. Molly Price later grounded into a double play to score Amy Abramowich, who had legged out another infield hit. But the Lady Panthers turned two, which proved to be instrumental in squashing a potential lengthy rally. Lecanto scored the next nine unanswered runs, including three in the third and three in the fifth, as the lineup slowly wore down Citrus starter Kelly Abramowich. Abramowich finished after four innings, giving up seven runs (two unearned) on five hits and four walks, while striking out two. I think they did a great job of rallying when they needed to with the bats, Lecanto head coach Robert Dupler said. It was the strongest production weve had across the entire lineup all year. In the top of the third, Richards double deep to center scored Breanna Martin, who walked. With one out, Coutu singled to right, scoring Richards to tie the game. Russo drove in Coutu on a double of her own, giving Lecanto the lead they would never relinquish. Yant hurled four 1-2-3 innings, including the seventh to end the game, inducing a double play before getting Devon Perrine to fly out to end it. It was the second double play of the game for Lecanto, something Dupler said he had never seen his team accomplish in his seven years at the helm. I was really impressed, fundamentally and defensively, Dupler said. Were right there...just being able to sustain and stop the flow. He went on about his starter, saying, I cant say enough about Dani. She fights every night, she gets in a jam, gives up a hit or two, where some kids would fold, but she knows the defense is going to stop it. Lecanto also stole seven bases on the night, rounding out acomplete performance. Morgan Metzger (RBI, run)and Amy Abramowich (steal) each went 2-for-3 for the Hurricanes, while Garcia was 1-for-2 with an RBI. Lecanto plays at 6 p.m. Friday against Central while Citrus visits Springstead at 5 p.m. PANTHERSContinued from Page B1 CANES Continued from Page B1 COLTSContinued from Page B1C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE On the AIRWAVES TODAYS SPORTS SPORT COLLEGE BASKETBALL Noon (ESPN) Big East Tournament, second round TBA vs. West Virginia 2 p.m. (ESPN) Big East Tournament, second round Georgetown vs.TBA. 3 p.m. (FSNFL) Pac-12 Tournament, first round Oregon State vs.Washington State 5:30 p.m. (FSNFL) Pac-12 Tournament, first round UCLA vs. USC 7 p.m. (ESPN) Big East Tournament, second round Louisville vs. TBA. 7 p.m. (ESPN2) Northeast Conference Tournament, Final Robert Morris at Long Island 9 p.m. (FSNFL) Pac-12 Tournament, first round Arizona State vs.Stanford 9 p.m. (ESPN) Big East Tournament, first round South Florida vs. TBA 9 p.m. (ESPN2) Big Sky Tournament final: Teams TBA 11:30 p.m. (FSNFL) Pac-12 Tournament, first round Colorado vs.Utah NBA 7:30 p.m. (SUN) Atlanta Hawks at Miami Heat CYCLING 4:30 p.m. (NBCSPT ) Paris-Nice, Stage 4, from Brive-laGaillarde to Rodez (Same-day tape) NHL 7:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) Toronto Maple Leafs at Pittsburgh Penguins SOCCER 2:30 p.m. (SUN) UEFA Champions League Soccer Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider. Prep CALENDAR TODAYS PREP SPORTS BOYS WEIGHTLIFTING 4 p.m. Citrus at Lecanto NBA standings EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division WLPctGB Philadelphia2217.564 Boston1917.5281 New York1819.4863 Toronto1226.3169 New Jersey1227.30810 Southeast Division WLPctGB Miami299.763 Orlando2515.6255 Atlanta2315.6056 Washington829.21620 Charlotte531.13923 Central Division WLPctGB Chicago328.800 Indiana2314.6227 Milwaukee1523.39516 Cleveland1323.36117 Detroit1326.33318 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division WLPctGB San Antonio2512.676 Memphis2215.5953 Dallas2217.5644 Houston2117.5534 New Orleans929.23716 Northwest Division WLPctGB Oklahoma City308.789 Denver2217.5648 Minnesota2019.51310 Portland1919.50011 Utah1819.48611 Pacific Division WLPctGB L.A. Clippers2214.611 L.A. Lakers2315.605 Phoenix1720.4595 Golden State1520.4296 Sacramento1226.31611 Mondays Games Utah 109, Cleveland 100 Orlando 92, Toronto 88 Golden State 120, Washington 100 Chicago 92, Indiana 72 Oklahoma City 95, Dallas 91 Minnesota 95, L.A. Clippers 94 Milwaukee 97, Philadelphia 93 Denver 119, Sacramento 116, OT Portland 86, New Orleans 74 Tuesdays Games Charlotte 100, Orlando 84 Atlanta 101, Indiana 96 Detroit 88, L.A. Lakers 85, OT Miami 108, New Jersey 78 Houston at Boston, late New York at Dallas, late Wednesdays Games Utah at Charlotte, 7 p.m. Houston at Toronto, 7 p.m. L.A. Lakers at Washington, 7 p.m. Boston at Philadelphia, 7 p.m. Atlanta at Miami, 7:30 p.m. Phoenix at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m. Portland at Minnesota, 8 p.m. Chicago at Milwaukee, 8 p.m. L.A. Clippers at New Jersey, 8 p.m. New York at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m. Cleveland at Denver, 9 p.m. New Orleans at Sacramento, 10 p.m. Memphis at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.NHL standings EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GPWLOTPtsGFGA N.Y. Rangers654216791180137 Pittsburgh653921583209168 Philadelphia653721781213193 New Jersey663724579184176 N.Y. Islanders662829965155195 Northeast Division GPWLOTPtsGFGA Boston653923381214154 Ottawa683525878209201 Buffalo663028868163186 Toronto663029767198206 Montreal6625311060170184 Southeast Division GPWLOTPtsGFGA Florida6531221274163184 Winnipeg673227872176187 Washington663228670175188 Tampa Bay663129668187226 Carolina6625271464175200 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GPWLOTPtsGFGA St. Louis664118789169131 Detroit674321389211156 Nashville653820783184166 Chicago673624779202195 Columbus662138749156216 Northwest Division GPWLOTPtsGFGA Vancouver664117890209161 Colorado673429472171180 Calgary6629251270159181 Minnesota6628281066143180 Edmonton652534656172196 Pacific Division GPWLOTPtsGFGA Dallas663526575174178 Phoenix673325975173170 San Jose643324773179163 Los Angeles6530231272142139 Anaheim6729281068170188 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Mondays Games Pittsburgh 2, Phoenix 1 Winnipeg 3, Buffalo 1 Anaheim 4, Edmonton 2 Tuesdays Games Boston 5, Toronto 4 New Jersey 4, N.Y. Rangers 1 Philadelphia 3, Detroit 2 Carolina 4, Washington 3, OT Columbus 3, Phoenix 2 Ottawa 7, Tampa Bay 3 Chicago at St. Louis, late Los Angeles at Nashville, late Minnesota at Colorado, late Montreal at Calgary, late Dallas at Vancouver, late Edmonton at San Jose, late Wednesdays Games Carolina at Buffalo, 7 p.m. Toronto at Pittsburgh, 7:30 p.m. AMERICAN LEAGUE WLPct Boston301.000 Detroit401.000 Los Angeles101.000 Kansas City31.750 Seattle31.750 Oakland42.667 Minnesota32.600 New York22.500 Toronto22.500 Baltimore12.333 Cleveland12.333 Chicago01.000 Tampa Bay04.000 Texas02.000 NATIONAL LEAGUE WLPct Cincinnati201.000 Los Angeles101.000 Houston31.750 Colorado11.500 Miami11.500 Milwaukee11.500 Philadelphia22.500 Pittsburgh22.500 Washington22.500 Arizona12.333 Chicago12.333 New York12.333 San Francisco12.333 Atlanta13.250 San Diego03.000 St. Louis02.000 NOTE: Split-squad games count in the standings; games against non-major league teams do not. Mondays Games Detroit 4, Toronto 2 Philadelphia 9, N.Y. Yankees 3 Miami 4, St. Louis 3 Atlanta 10, Houston 5 Baltimore (ss) 3, Tampa Bay 1 L.A. Dodgers 6, Chicago White Sox 4 Oakland (ss) 8, Chicago Cubs 7 Seattle 13, San Diego 7 Kansas City 7, Texas 6 Cincinnati 12, Cleveland 7 L.A. Angels 9, Oakland (ss) 1 Colorado 6, Arizona 5 Washington 3, N.Y. Mets 1 Boston 10, Minnesota 2 Pittsburgh 10, Baltimore (ss) 3 Milwaukee 7, San Francisco 3 Tuesdays Games Detroit 3, Miami 1 Minnesota 3, Tampa Bay 2 Washington 5, Atlanta 2 Philadelphia 7, Toronto 0 Pittsburgh 7, N.Y. Yankees 4 Houston 4, N.Y. Mets (ss) 1 N.Y. Mets (ss) 8, St. Louis 6 Boston 5, Baltimore 4 Cleveland 3, Kansas City (ss) 2 Cincinnati vs. Seattle at Peoria, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. Oakland 6, Milwaukee 0 Chicago White Sox vs. L.A. Angels at Tempe, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. Kansas City (ss) 7, San Diego 4 San Francisco vs. L.A. Dodgers at Glendale, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs 11, Colorado 4 Texas vs. Arizona at Scottsdale, Ariz., 3:10 p.m. Wednesdays Games Minnesota vs. Baltimore at Sarasota, Fla., 1:05 p.m. Atlanta vs. Detroit at Lakeland, Fla., 1:05 p.m. Toronto (ss) vs. Pittsburgh at Bradenton, Fla., 1:05 p.m. Houston vs. Philadelphia at Clearwater, Fla., 1:05 p.m. N.Y. Mets vs. Miami at Jupiter, Fla., 1:05 p.m. Boston vs. Toronto (ss) at Dunedin, Fla., 1:05 p.m. St. Louis vs. Washington at Viera, Fla., 1:05 p.m. Tampa Bay vs. N.Y. Yankees at Tampa, Fla., 1:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs vs. Kansas City at Surprise, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. Seattle vs. L.A. Angels at Tempe, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. Milwaukee vs. Chicago White Sox at Glendale, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. L.A. Dodgers vs. Oakland at Phoenix, 3:05 p.m. Texas vs. San Diego (ss) at Peoria, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. Colorado vs. San Francisco at Scottsdale, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. San Diego (ss) vs. Cincinnati at Goodyear, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. Cleveland vs. Arizona at Scottsdale, Ariz., 3:10 p.m.B4 W EDNESDAY, M ARCH 7, 2012 S COREBOARD Florida LOTTERY Here are the winning numbers selected Tuesday in the Florida Lottery: CASH 3 (early) 3 1 0 CASH 3 (late) 7 7 5 PLAY 4 (early) 7 9 1 2 PLAY 4 (late) 5 5 7 3 Because of early deadlines, Fantasy 5 and Mega Money numbers were unavailable. Please see Thursdays Entertainment page. WARRIORSContinued from Page B1 the scoreboard in the second inning despite having the bases loaded for most of it, showing poise against unbelievable pressure. Tessa Kacer pitched very well. Dreyer said. Its her first complete game. The top of the third saw the Lions retain the lead and never returning it. The Lions had eight hits in the inning with nine batters seeing the plate. Kacer struggled to keep the ball in the strike zone and the Lions capitalized on it with four RBIs and a 6-5 lead. After the single strongest offensive effort of the game for Hernando Christian, the Lions shut out the Warriors in the bottom of the third. Hernando Christian padded its lead with two more runs in the fourth inning, one off an insidein-the-park home run. This is what we expected. Dreyer said about the level of competition brought by Hernando Christian. You can tell they are well coached. You can (really) see it. Im just real proud of the girls. Dreyer continued. I thought they played well (and) they fought hard. Its the best game weve played all year by far. Seven Rivers hosts St. Francis at 4 p.m. Thursday at Bicentennial Park. The offensive spark came in the bottom of the fourth inning, when Crystal River right fielder Laynee Nadal hit a deep fly ball to left field, streaking around the bases for a triple. She later scored on a wild pitch, just beating a tag and making the score 3-1. The next inning, Maegan McMichen made the score 3-2 when she hit a ball deep to right field that Hernandos Shelbie Goodwin misjudged, allowing McMichen to make it all the way around to score. A sacrifice fly and RBI single for the Pirates made it 5-3, and they never trailed from there. Nadal finished 2 for 4 with two RBIs and a run, saying afterward, I was just finding the pitches. Assistant coach John McDonald, filling in for suspended head coach Dennis Jenkins, praised his team for adjusting to Hernando pitcher Britney Flannery, who kept targeting the outside corner of the plate. They made that adjustment, McDonald said. They started hitting the ball. PIRATESContinued from Page B1 GM: Moss works out with New Orleans Associated PressMETAIRIE, La. The New Orleans Saints held a workout on Tuesday with veteran receiver Randy Moss, who is trying to make a comeback after spending a year out of pro football. General Manager Mickey Loomis confirmed the workout took place, but the club did not provide any details on how the 35-year-old Moss performed. New Orleans may be in the market for a receiver this offseason because two of quarterback Drew Brees regular targets, Marques Colston and Robert Meachem, are entering free agency, and it remains to be seen whether the Saints can offer the type of contracts that both of them want. Colstons agent is Joel Segal, who also represents Moss. Randy had an outstanding workout, as expected, Segal said. Hes in phenomenal shape. The 6-foot-4 Moss last played in the NFL in 2010, a turbulent season for him. Sports BRIEF Schiano completes T.B. offensive staffTAMPA First-year Tampa Bay Buccaneers coach Greg Schiano has finished assembling his offensive staff. The Bucs previously announced the hiring of offensive coordinator Mike Sullivan and the appointment of long-time NFL assistant Jimmy Raye as senior offensive assistant. On Tuesday, the club said Schiano has added Brian Angelichio as tight ends coach, Bob Bostad as offensive line coach, Earnest Byner as running backs coach, P.J. Fleck as wide receivers coach and Steve Loney as assistant offensive line coach. From wire reports

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Associated Press Charlottes Kemba Walker screams after hitting a critical basket against Orlando in the second half of Tuesdays game in Charlotte, N.C. The Bobcats won 100-84. Associated PressPORT CHARLOTTE Scott Baker pitched two hitless innings in his spring debut as the Minnesota Twins beat the Tampa Bay Rays 3-2 on Tuesday. The outing was a good sign for Baker, who went 8-6 with a 3.14 ERA for the Twins before an elbow injury ended his 2011 season. The Rays are winless in their four exhibition games, three of the losses are against Minnesota. Jeff Niemann made a case to keep his spot in the Rays starting rotation, yielding two hits in two innings. The right-hander got off to a rocky start issuing back-toback singles to Ben Revere and Jamey Caroll in the first inning. They advanced to second and third on Niemanns errant pickoff throw to second. Revere scored from third on Ryan Doumits groundout. Niemann recovered with a 1-23 second inning. Phillies 7, Blue Jays 0 DUNEDIN Cliff Lee and Kyle Kendrick each threw two innings, leading the Philadelphia Phillies to a victory over the Toronto Blue Jays. Lee yielded a hit in the first and second before giving way to Kendrick, who allowed a hit, struck out two and walked none. Shane Victorino hit a two-run single off Rick VandenHurk during Philadelphias four-run third inning. John Mayberry Jr. also singled in a run and Ty Wigginton had a sacrifice fly. Blue Jays starter Ricky Romero tossed two innings of one-hit ball. Mets (ss) 8, Cardinals 6PORT ST. LUCIE New York Mets ace Johan Santana pitched two scoreless innings in a win against St. Louis in his first game facing major league hitters in 18 months. Santana gave up one hit and one walk. He threw 29 pitches, 17 for strikes. New Mets center fielder Andres Torres hit a bases-loaded triple. Jake Westbrook pitched two scoreless innings for the Cards. Red Sox 5, Orioles 4 FORT MYERS Daniel Bard, whos in the process of converting from a reliever to starter, opened with two hitless innings and the Boston Red Sox beat the Baltimore Orioles. Bard struck out two and walked one. Jacoby Ellsbury doubled and scored for Boston. Wilson Betemit drove in two runs for Baltimore and Nick Johnson singled and scored. Clayton Mortensen got the win, striking out four in 2 1/3 scoreless innings. Michael Bowden earned the save with 1 2/3 shutout innings. Pirates 7, Yankees 4BRADENTON Andrew McCutchen had two hits and two RBIs hours after agreeing to a new deal with the Pittsburgh Pirates, who beat the New York Yankees. McCutchen hit a run-scoring single to left off CC Sabathia in the first and doubled in Clint Barmes in the third. Sabathia pitched two innings and allowed a run and three hits. Right-hander Phil Hughes reached his pitch limit in 1 1/3 innings and was charged with two runs and four hits. Pirates starter Kevin Correia worked two scoreless innings and issued two walks. Tigers 3, Marlins 1JUPITER Jose Reyes was hitless in three at-bats in his spring debut for the Miami Marlins, who lost to the Detroit Tigers. Tigers starter Rick Porcello allowed an unearned run and a hit over two innings in his first spring game. Austin Jackson had a pair of hits for the Tigers. Marlins slugger Giancarlo Stanton went 1 for 3. Cubs 11, Rockies 4 MESA, Ariz. Alfonso Soriano hit two home runs and a double to send Dale Sveum and the Chicago Cubs to a victory over the Colorado Rockies. Soriano led off the Cubs four-run second inning with a drive that hit halfway up the scoreboard in left field. He led off the third with a double to the wall in center and added a tworun homer in a four-run fifth. Guillermo Moscoso gave up four runs and five hits in two innings for Colorado. Cubs right-hander Matt Garza (1-0) allowed two runs and three hits over two innings in his spring debut. Athletics 6, Brewers 0PHOENIX Jemile Weeks had two hits and tackled his older brother Rickie to end a rundown, helping the Oakland Athletics beat the Milwaukee Brewers. Oakland left-hander Tommy Milone pitched three innings of one-hit ball. Milone walked Rickie Weeks to lead off the game but picked him off first base. Jemile was the last player with the ball in the ensuing rundown and he chased his brother from halfway between first and second before getting down a diving tag at the first-base bag. Yovani Gallardo struck out four in two shutout innings for Milwaukee. Reigning NL MVP Ryan Braun went 0 for 2 and is hitless in four at-bats this spring. Royals (ss) 7, Padres 4SURPRISE, Ariz. Luke Hochevar worked two scoreless innings, Max Ramirez hit two homers and drove in four runs and a Kansas City Royals split squad defeated the San Diego Padres. Hochevar allowed one single, walked one and struck out one. He threw 19 of 29 pitches for strikes. Ramirez, a non-roster invitee, hit a solo homer in the fourth and a three-run shot in the sixth. The Padres Tim Stauffer gave up a run and two hits in two innings. Mariners 8, Reds 6 PEORIA, Ariz. Felix Hernandez struck out four in three hitless innings and the Seattle Mariners beat the Cincinnati Reds. Hernandez hit the first batter he faced this spring, then retired nine in a row. The righthander threw 26 of his 35 pitches for strikes. Seattle star Ichiro Suzuki went 3 for 3 with two RBIs. Cincinnatis Mat Latos allowed two hits in two scoreless innings in his debut. Rangers 16, D-backs 3 SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. Elvis Andrus singled, doubled, scored twice and had a sacrifice fly to help the Texas Rangers rout the Arizona Diamondbacks. A day after going 3 for 3, the star shortstop started out with two more hits. Conor Jackson hit a solo home run and Nelson Cruz singled in two runs for the Rangers, who outhit the Diamondbacks 19-5. Texas starter Matt Harrison threw two scoreless innings, allowing one hit and hitting a batter. Arizonas Joe Saunders gave up two runs on five hits, including Jacksons homer, in two innings. Giants 8, Dodgers 4 GLENDALE, Ariz. Melky Cabrera homered twice to lead the San Francisco Giants to a win over the Los Angeles Dodgers. Barry Zito gave up four hits and two runs and got the win for the Giants. Zito threw 28 strikes out of 35 pitches. Emmanuel Burriss, Nate Schierholtz, Brett Pill and Joe Panik each had two hits for San Francisco. Ted Lilly struggled as he allowed five runs, including two homers, in two innings for Los Angeles. Andre Ethier homered for the Dodgers. Indians 3, Royals (ss) 2 GOODYEAR, Ariz. Shelley Duncan hit a three-run homer to lead the Cleveland Indians to a win over a Kansas City Royals split squad. Duncan connected in the third inning off Royals reliever Zach Miner. Starting pitchers Will Smith for Kansas City and Kevin Slowey of Cleveland each worked two scoreless innings. Irving Falu hit a two-run homer for Kansas City off reliever Chris Ray in the fourth. Falu has 17 homers in eight minor league seasons. Falu, Billy Butler and Brayan Pena each had two of the Royals 10 hits.Astros 4, Mets (ss) 1KISSIMMEE Wandy Rodriguez pitched three shutout innings and the Houston Astros beat a New York Mets splitsquad. Brad Snyder and Chris Snyder homered for the Astros, and first baseman Carlos Lee went 1 for 3 in his first spring game. Lee also made a sliding catch in front of the Mets dugout. Josh Satin had two of New Yorks five hits and drove in a run. Brad Snyder hit a two-run shot off Chris Schwinden in the second inning, giving the Astros a 3-1 lead. Angels 6, White Sox 2 TEMPE, Ariz. Albert Pujols doubled again and scored as the Los Angeles Angels beat the Chicago White Sox. Pujols narrowly missed his first spring homer, doubling deep to left-center field off reliever Matt Thornton in the third. His first time up, Pujols walked and scored on Jorge Cantus two-run single off John Danks.Nationals 5, Braves 2 LAKE BUENA VISTA Gio Gonzalez pitched three scoreless innings in his Washington debut, leading the Nationals to a win over the Atlanta Braves. Gonzalez allowed one hit, walked one and struck out two. Jayson Werth homered to right to put the Nationals ahead. Chad Tracy doubled in two runs in the third to put Washington ahead, 3-0. Kris Medlen started for the Braves and went two innings and gave up three hits including the Werth homer. Brett Carroll also had two hits for the Nationals. S PORTSC ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE W EDNESDAY, M ARCH 7, 2012 B5 000APTG Associated PressNEWARK, N.J. David Clarkson and Ryan Carter scored 1:54 apart early in the third period, and the New Jersey Devils slumbering offense broke out in a 4-1 victory over the NHLleading New York Rangers on Tuesday night. Clarkson tipped Petr Sykoras hard drive past Rangers goalie Henrik Lundqvist at 2:27 to give the Devils their second lead of the game, and Carter pushed New Jersey ahead by two at 4:21. Ilya Kovalchuk also had a goal, and Patrik Elias made it 4-1 by scoring into an empty net with 1:53 left.Maple Leafs 5, Bruins 4TORONTO Jordan Caron and Tyler Seguin scored two goals each and Boston beat Toronto for the Bruins fifth win against the Maple Leafs this season. Chris Kelly also scored and Tim Thomas stopped 25 shots to help Boston end two-game skid. Carl Gunnarsson, JohnMichael Liles, Phil Kessel and Mikhail Grabovski scored for the Maple Leafs. Toronto has also lost six straight at home. Blue Jackets 3, Coyotes 2 COLUMBUS, Ohio Jack Johnson scored his first goal for Columbus, Steve Mason made 38 saves and the Blue Jackets beat the Phoenix Coyotes for their first three-game winning streak in more than a year. R.J. Umberger and Derek MacKenzie also scored for the Blue Jackets. Johnson added an assist. Antoine Vermette and Keith Yandle had goals for the Coyotes, who have lost four in a row in regulation, their longest such skid of the season. Hurricanes 4, Capitals 3, OT WASHINGTON Justin Faulk scored the game-winner at 3:38 of overtime, Cam Ward stopped 46 shots, and the Carolina Hurricanes beat the skidding Washington Capitals. Faulk took a centering pass from Brandon Sutter and fired the puck past goaltender Michal Neuvirth to saddle Washington with its third successive defeat, although the Capitals did get a point by forcing overtime late in regulation. After suffering two straight shutout losses, Washington went ahead 2-0 before Carolina came back to take the lead on a breakaway goal by Sutter at 1:45 of the third period. The tally came after Capitals defenseman Dennis Wideman took a futile whack at the bouncing puck in an effort to keep it in the Washington zone. Washington forced overtime when Brooks Laich scored off a centering pass from Marcus Johansson at 17:08 of the third. Flyers 3, Red Wings 2PHILADELPHIA Claude Giroux, Jakub Voracek, and Max Talbot scored goals to lead the Philadelphia Flyers to a win over the Detroit Red Wings. Ilya Bryzgalov allowed a goal to Henrik Zetterberg on Detroits first shot of the game. Johan Franzen made it 3-2 in the third. Detroit was short-handed as it continued to chase the top spot in the Western Conference. Clarkson, Carter lift Devils over Rangers Associated PressCHARLOTTE, N.C. Corey Maggette scored a season-high 29 points, Gerald Henderson hit some big shots in the fourth quarter, and the Charlotte Bobcats overcame a 20-point, firsthalf deficit to beat the Orlando Magic 100-84 Tuesday night. The Bobcats came in having lost 21 of their last 22 games, but seemed to get a spark after coach Paul Silas was ejected in the second quarter with the team trailing by 18. The Bobcats also got a big game from rookie center Bismack Biyombo, who battled toe-to-toe with Dwight Howard and had 10 points and a career-high 15 rebounds. Howard had 15 points and 17 rebounds, and Ryan Anderson added 14 points and 11 boards for the Magic. Heat 108, Nets 78 MIAMI LeBron James scored 21 points and capped his night by banking in a halfcourt shot, Chris Bosh added 20 points and the Miami Heat snapped a two-game slide by rolling past the New Jersey Nets. The win came with a cost: Dwyane Wade turned his right ankle late in the first half and did not return, finishing with 13 points. The Heat made 12 of their first 15 shots on the way to a 10th straight home win. James finished 9 for 11, adding nine rebounds and six assists. Hawks 101, Pacers 96 INDIANAPOLIS Josh Smith had 27 points and nine rebounds, leading the Atlanta Hawks to their third straight victory over the Indiana Pacers. Smith scored 13 points in the first quarter, 11 in the third, and fell three points shy of his season high. Jannero Pargo had 16 points, while Marvin Williams and Zaza Pachulia each scored 12 for the Hawks. David West scored a season-high 24 points for the Pacers, who have lost two straight. Bobcats dump Magic 100-84 Rays remain winless Minnesota beat Tampa Bay in spring training Associated Press Toronto Blue Jays Kelly Johnson slides into Philadelphia Phillies third baseman Hector Luna on a triple in the third inning of Tuesdays game in Dunedin.

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Associated PressNASHVILLE, Tenn. An emotional Garth Brooks said his addition to the Country Music Hall of Fame at 50 is probably a little premature when you look at the long list of his influences who havent yet been inducted. The Friends in Low Places singer transformed country music, but Tuesday he was more interested in talking about the singers who transformed him. Brooks spoke during a news conference to announce he will be inducted later this year with singer Connie Smith and keyboard player Hargus Pig Robbins. I think eventually (Randy Travis, Ricky Skaggs, Keith Whitley, Steve Wariner) will get in, but it probably shouldve been before Garth Brooks came in, Brooks said. The announcement was made at a news conference at the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum. Brooks, Smith and Robbins will be officially inducted at a ceremony later this year. Brooks, who is in semiretirement in Oklahoma, took country music to a new level over a 15-year period, becoming the top-selling solo artist in the U.S. with more than 128 million albums sold. He busted down the walls of what had been a regional sound, taking country music to stadiums and major metropolitan markets. He opened the door for artists who joined him on a platinum-selling spree in the 1990s never before seen in the genre. Smith, the wife of country singer Marty Stuart, will be inducted as a veterans era selection. She is among a pioneering wave of female singers who laid the foundation for todays success by women in country music and released her 53rd album last year. Robbins, blind since childhood, is considered among the top session players in Nashville over a 50-year career thats included work for everyone from George Jones to Bob Dylan. He was inducted in the rotating category of recording/touring musician active before 1980. Brooks, Smith, Robbins on list Associated PressPHILADELPHIA There are wedding bells in Riverdale, but its not Archie and Betty or Veronica. Its Army Lt. Kevin Keller and the physical therapist who helped him overcome his war wound Clay Walker. Meanwhile, in the comics pages, Gil is an 8-year-old boy being raised by his divorced factory-working mom, and Dustin is 23 and living at home, unable to find a job after graduating from college. Comics have always been a portal for escapism and fantasy but have also labored to reflect a contemporary climate, a process that shows no signs of slowing whether it involves super villains, breast cancer or other complicated realities of modern life. Writers and artists fold realworld events into their fictional worlds, blending boundaries to make readers not just laugh and escape, but also reflect and think. Comics have always been a reflection of our world, said Brendan Burford, comics editor at King Features Syndicate in New York. People want to see a reflection and, chances are, if the reflection is something that rings through with their world, their life, their family and their friends, they can relate and laugh. The title character in Gil is an elementary school student, slightly portly and always picked last for sports, who lives with his mom. He would love a nuclear family because it would mean hed have superpowers. Growing up in a single-parent family during Americas first Great Recession wasnt always easy, but I look back on my formative years fondly, said cartoonist Norm Feuti, who debuted Gil in January and has based it, partly, on his own experiences. He noted with the national divorce rate rising, parents and kids can probably relate to his title character, an 8-year-old quintessential underdog who lacks the latest toys or electronic gadgets. Gil is a very personal comic to me, Feuti said. Its a celebration of the resiliency and indefatigable spirit of childhood. In another strip, Dustin has finished college but is living with his parents, unable to find a significant job or afford his own apartment, experiences not uncommon among many recent graduates. Its humor therapy for people, said Steve Kelly, who, along with fellow cartoonist Jeff Parker, created Dustin in 2010 and has seen it expand to some 300 newspapers since then. If you were to sit at home and you were unemployed and you thought you were the only one, that would be a lot more difficult to deal with. But seeing it in the comic strips, or in the comic books, may soften the blow, he said. In these tough economic times, there are a lot of people sitting in their parents houses and they think youre making fun of them and, honest to God, were not, Kelly said. Ive been unemployed worked at the newspaper in San Diego, got fired and was unemployed for a year. I know how you can feel isolated and depressed and you wonder what the future holds. Sometimes, the topics can be rife with politics or challenge different social values. In Riverdale, longtime home of the high school hijinks of Archie, Betty, Veronica and others, issues ranging from gay marriage to cancer are finding new readers and story lines, bringing up topics not typically found in the funny pages. A story about the wedding of Army Lt. Kevin Keller and the physical therapist who helped him overcome his war wound sold out its print run. It also drew a protest from one group concerned its cover showing the two men in front of a just married sign was too bold for a magazine sold not just in book stores, but also in drug stores and toy stores. One Million Moms, a project of The American Family Association, recently asked retailer Toys R Us not to display the magazine near its checkout aisles, noting a trip to the toy store turns into a premature discussion on sexual orientation and is completely uncalled for. Archie Comics co-chief executive Jon Goldwater said the company isnt aiming to ruffle feathers. Instead, he said, its reflecting a contemporary world where in some states, gay marriage is legal. Tackling tough issues Birthday There is a chance several people from your past will re-enter your life once again. Those who made you happy and brought you luck before will do so again. However, avoid anybody from yesteryear who made your life miserable. Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Its to your benefit to be decisive and assertive pertaining to a critical matter. Dont be afraid to make a bold judgment call if you believe it would work. Aries (March 21-April 19) Some kind of opportunity of considerable dimensions could develop for you. It has something to do with your finances and might be able to enhance your security. Taurus (April 20-May 20) If there are many players involved but they lack your managerial skills, assume a leadership role and take the reins whether or not youre asked to do so. The others will appreciate it. Gemini (May 21-June 20) If youre in need of some assistance concerning a confidential matter, go to someone close whom you respect, such as a good friend or a family member. Theyll do the most to help. Cancer (June 21-July 22) As conditions start to change for the better, fresh hope will instill itself in your heart. A beloved friend might be instrumental in bringing this about. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Due to the fact that Lady Luck wants to divert your attention onto something that would be beneficial, it isnt likely youll be able to dismiss commercial matters from your agenda. Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Dont waste your time and energies on pursuits of little or no opportunity. Go ahead and think in grandiose terms just dont be afraid to put the things you conceive into action. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) If you have something of importance to do, youll find you will work far better if you dont have anyone peering over your shoulders. Seek solitude, not a cheering section. Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Dame Fortune is likely to look favorably on partnership arrangements, so dont impatiently go off on your own simply because you are tired of waiting for others. Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Co-workers might lack your industriousness, so dont allow them to distract you from gratifying your ambitions and fulfilling what you want to accomplish. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Just because they like you, certain people are apt to treat you in a far more generous fashion than they do others. Show your gratitude openly. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) This might be an especially good time to devote your mental and physical energies to a huge critical matter that youve been afraid to tackle. Desirable results are indicated. Garth Brooks Connie Smith Today in HISTORY MONDAY, MARCH 5 Fantasy 5: 7 11 20 27 28 5-of-53 winners$76,100.86 4-of-5418$88 3-of-511,487$8.50 SUNDAY, MARCH 4 Fantasy 5: 10 12 18 24 35 5-of-51 winner$200,528.77 4-of-5290$111.50 3-of-59,294$9.50 Today is Wednesday, March 7, the 67th day of 2012. There are 299 days left in the year. Todays Highlight: On March 7, 1912, Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen arrived in Hobart, Australia, where he dispatched telegrams announcing his success in leading the first expedition to the South Pole the previous December. On this date: In 1793, during the French Revolutionary Wars, France declared war on Spain. In 1876, Alexander Graham Bell received a patent for his telephone. In 1926, the first successful trans-Atlantic radio-telephone conversations took place between New York and London. In 1960, Jack Paar returned as host of NBCs Tonight Show nearly a month after walking off in a censorship dispute with the network. In 1965, a march by civil rights demonstrators was broken up in Selma, Ala., by state troopers and a sheriffs posse. In 1975, the U.S. Senate revised its filibuster rule, allowing 60 senators to limit debate in most cases, instead of the previously required 2/3 of senators present. Ten years ago: The House passed, 417-3, a bill cutting taxes and extending unemployment benefits. Five years ago: Sex offender John Evander Couey was found guilty in Miami of kidnapping, raping and murdering 9-year-old Jessica Lunsford, whod been buried alive. (Couey was sentenced to death, but died of natural causes in September 2009.) One year ago: Reversing course, President Barack Obama approved the resumption of military trials at the U.S. prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, ending a two-year ban. Todays Birthdays: Photographer Lord Snowdon is 82. TV personality Willard Scott is 78. Auto racer Janet Guthrie is 74. Former Walt Disney Co. chief executive officer Michael Eisner is 70. Rock musician Chris White (The Zombies) is 69. Actor John Heard is 66. Rock singer Peter Wolf is 66. Pro Football Hall-of-Famer Franco Harris is 62. Pro and College Football Hall-of-Famer Lynn Swann is 60. Rhythm-andblues singer-musician Ernie Isley (The Isley Brothers) is 60. Golfer Tom Lehman is 53. International Tennis Hall-ofFamer Ivan Lendl is 52. Comedian Wanda Sykes is 48. Classical singer Sebastien Izambard (Il Divo) is 39. Thought for Today: In a democracy, dissent is an act of faith. Like medicine, the test of its value is not in its taste, but in its effects. J. William Fulbright, U.S. senator (1905-1995). INSIDE THE NUMBERS To verify the accuracy of winning lottery numbers, players should double-check the numbers printed above with numbers officially posted by the Florida Lottery. Go to www.flalottery.com, or call 850-487-7777. Florida LOTTERIES SO YOU KNOW Because of early deadlines, last nights winning numbers were not available. See Thursdays edition for the numbers.E NTERTAINMENT Page B6 WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7, 2012 Associated PressLOS ANGELES Kim Novak is clarifying why she used the word rape to describe how she felt about The Artist. The 79-year-old Vertigo actress, who will be honored next month at the TCM Classic Film Festival, said during a phone interview Monday hearing the score from the Alfred Hitchcock film used in the recent Oscar-winning homage to the silent-film era reminded her of the same feelings she experienced when she was raped as a child. It was very painful, said Novak. When I said it was like a rape, that was how it felt to me. I had experienced in my youth being raped, and so I identified with a real act that had been done to me. I didnt use that word lightly. I had been raped as a child. It was a rape I never told about, so when I experienced this one, I felt the need to express it. Novak, who played the dual role of a suicidal trophy wife and a morose working girl opposite Jimmy Stewart in the 1958 thriller, said in a statement released in January by her manager she wanted to report a rape and the filmmakers of The Artist had no reason to depend on Bernard Herrmanns score from Vertigo to provide more drama. Novaks comments drew criticism from rape crisis groups, who noted plagiarism was not the same as a sexual assault. Other actors have similarly been chastised for misusing the word rape. Johnny Depp and Twilight star Kristen Stewart issued apologies after they compared having their photos taken to being raped in respective interviews. I never reported my real rape, so I felt the need to report this one, said Novak, who left Hollywood in the 1970s for Big Sur, an isolated section of California coastline, before eventually relocating to Oregon. I felt that someone needed to speak up because the music has been taken advantage of too much. I hope that in the future, maybe somehow it will do some good. Michel Hazanavicius, the writer-director of The Artist, which won five Academy Awards last month, including best picture and original score, responded to Novak in January, noting the film was a love letter to cinema and he loves Herrmann, and his music has been used in many different films, and Im very pleased to have it in mine. Novak explains feelings behind Artist protest C ITRUS C OUNTY C HRONICLE Todays HOROSCOPE Hargus Pig Robbins Country music to add hall of famers Associated Press Actress Kim Novak, seen Jan. 14, 2007, clarifies why she used the word rape to describe how she felt about "The Artist." The 79-year-old Vertigo actress said during a phone interview Monday hearing Bernard Herrmanns score from the Alfred Hitchcock film used in the recent Oscarwinning homage to the silent-film era reminded her of the same feelings she experienced when she was raped as a child. Associated Press In this image provided by King Features Syndicate, Gil, who lives at home with his mom, ponders the nuclear family, but its not the traditional definition. Comics reflect contemporary topics despite serious nature

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E DUCATION Section C WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7, 2012 C ITRUS C OUNTY C HRONICLE Youll find lots ofsporting goodsto choose from in our classified pages. 794606 Associated PressNEW YORK He is a violin prodigy who has channeled his musical talents to raise more than $5 million for pediatric medical research around the globe, headlining benefit concerts at Carnegie Hall, Lincoln Center and other venues. Jourdan Urbach was honored for his achievements on Tuesday with one of the nations highest public service awards the Jefferson Award. The 20-year-old resident of the Long Island community of Roslyn founded Concerts for a Cure when he was only 7 years old. Since then, he has raised $5.1 million to fight childrens neurological diseases and fund research. Through benefit concerts, he has funded 12 life-saving neurosurgeries, 1,000 cochlear implants, pediatric clinics in Africa and El Salvador and a bedside music program at the University of Michigans Mott Childrens Hospital. He was among four Americans 25 years and younger to be recognized as a Jefferson Awards Globe Changer, said Sam Beard, who founded the awards known as the Nobel Prize for public service with Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis and U.S. Sen. Robert Taft Jr. in 1972. Hes 20 years old and hes basically transformed the way hospitals raise money, said Beard, adding he has never seen someone so young raise so much money. The Jefferson Globe Changer also was awarded to Rachel Okun, 16, and her 13-year-old sister Kelsi, of McLean, Va., for their ThanksUSA project that raised $7.5 million in scholarships for children of military veterans. Charles OrgBon III, 16, of Hoschton, Ga., was recognized for his Greening Forward initiative, which has recycled more than 8,000 tons of Violin prodigy, now award-winning fundraiser Jourdan Urbach rehearses Tuesday at the Pierre Hotel prior to a ceremony where he was awarded the Jefferson Award the nations highest public service award in New York. Associated Press See AWARD / Page C2 Say it like Seuss DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle More that 750 Citrus County schoolchildren took part in the last 1.2 miles of a 26.2 mile marathon during the second annual LifeSouth Community Blood Center Five Points of Life Kids Marathon on Friday, March 2, at Lecanto High School. Kindergarteners through eighth-grade students completed 25 miles, one at a time, during the month prior to the marathon. Citrus Memorial Health System along with LifeSouth Community Blood Center sponsored the marathon. Running for life Even mild concussions can cause lingering symptoms Associated PressCHICAGO Children with even relatively mild concussions can have persistent attention and memory problems a year after their injuries, according to a study that helps identify which kids may be most at risk for lingering symptoms. In most kids with these injuries, symptoms resolve within a few months, but the study results suggest that problems may linger for up to about 20 percent, said study author Keith Owen Yeates, a neuropsychologist at Ohio State Universitys Center for Biobehaviorial Health. Problems like forgetfulness were more likely to linger than fatigue, dizziness and other physical complaints, the study found. Forgetfulness, difficulty paying attention, headaches and fatigue were more common in study children who lost consciousness or who had other mild head trauma that caused brain abnormalities on imaging tests, compared with kids who didnt get knocked out or who had normal imaging test results. The study looked at symptoms up to a year after injury so it doesnt answer whether any kids had longer-lasting or permanent problems. What parents want to know is if my kid is going to do OK. Most do OK, but we have to get better at predicting which kids are going to have problems, Yeates said. Those who do may need temporary accommodations, including extra time taking school tests, or wearing sunglasses if bright light gives them headaches, he said. Most children studied had See INJURIES / Page C2 M ATTHEWB ECK Staff WriterT hey were there to learn it in a box. They were there to learn it in their socks. They even leaned it with a fox. In honor of iconic childrens author Dr. Seuss, seven kindergarten classes at the Central Ridge Elementary School recognized his 108th birthday Friday with a day full of Seuss-related activities including indulging in green eggs and ham. Polly McMillian took time early in class to explain to her 18 students how Seuss used rhyming words to weave tall tales that have passed the test of time. She said his books have been important learning tools for children for decades. Dr. Seuss has made a great contribution to childrens literature because of the wide variety of books he wrote. But, in kindergarten, learning rhyming words is important, she said. And using Dr. Seuss books to teach that is a great way for them to learn how to use rhyming words and exactly what they are. They Kindergarteners get a taste of Green Eggs and Ham on authors birthday Math whiz loves numbers Associated PressGLEN ELLYN, Ill. When you ask Adam Kalinich what about math he finds most riveting, he takes a long pause, then launches into an intense explanation about how math is much more than numbers its about ideas. I love the thinking part the most, where youre puzzling about How does this fit in what I know? How can I make this work? said Adam, 17, a senior at the Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy in Aurora. I think that there are important problems in math, and its beautiful that such complexity arises from simple questions, that such important ideas can be wrapped up with mathematical statements. The Glen Ellyn native is the kind of math student instructors dream about always hungry for more, and unfailingly excited about the possibilities that lay ahead. Its that drive thats landed Adam among 40 high school seniors named finalists in the Intel Science Talent Search 2012, the nations most prestigious pre-college science competition. A second finalist from Illinois is Jordan Saul Cotler, of Northbrook, a senior at Glenbrook North High School. Finalists will gather in Washington, D.C. March 8-13 to compete for $630,000 in prizes. The top finisher will receive $100,000 from the Intel Foundation. Adam was nominated as a result of his research, Flipping the Winner of a Poset Game, which was published in the journal Information Processing Letters. He wrote the paper last year under the guidance of Lance Fortnow, a professor of electrical engineering and computer science Northwestern Universitys McCormick School of Engineering. Publishing such a MATTHEW BECK/ChronicleCentral Ridge Elementary School kindergarten teacher Polly McMillian reads the Dr. Seuss classic book Green Eggs and Ham to her students Friday morning. FACTS ABOUT DR. SEUSS: Theodor Seuss Geisel was born March 2, 1904 in Springfield, Mass. His pseudonym Seuss was both his middle name and his mothers maiden name. He also wrote under the pseudonym Theo. LeSieg.Geisels (Seuss) work as a cartoonist was published in Life Magazine, Vanity Fair and The Saturday Evening Post. The first book he both wrote and illustrated, And to Think That I Saw it on Mulberry Street, was first published in 1934. It was rejected 27 times before being published by Vanguard Press. The first recorded instance of the word nerd was from the Dr. Seuss book, If I Ran the Zoo in 1950. He wrote and illustrated 44 childrens books that have been translated into more than 15 languages. More than 200 million copies have made their way around the globe. His honors include two Academy awards, two Emmy awards, a Peabody award and the Pulitzer Prize. Theodor Seuss Geisel died Sept 24, 1991. Source: www.catinthehat.org. While Trinity Steltzer, 5, gives the thumbs-up to her plate of green eggs and ham most of the class wasnt a fan of the dish. See SEUSS / Page C2 See MATH / Page C2

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waste around the world. Winning the Jefferson Award is a massive honor, Urbach said in a telephone interview a day before the awards ceremony. It is a recognition young people dont expect to get and when we do, its a vote of confidence that often helps us out down the line with our further endeavors, said Urbach, a music composition major at Yale who will play his own work at the ceremony. Hes passionate about the kids who have neurological diseases, Beard said. He figured he had musical talent and if he could combine it with his goals he could make a difference. Urbach showed a passion for music and science at an early age. He began playing violin at 2 1/2. In first grade, he wrote a letter to Dr. Fred Epstein, the late pre-eminent pediatric neurosurgeon at Beth Israel Hospital in Manhattan, requesting an interview for a paper he wanted to write on neurosurgeons. The doctor invited him to the hospital and gave him a tour of the intensive care unit. That completely flipped my view of the world, said Urbach. All I wanted to do is bring those patients something that was beyond those walls. He recalled turning to Epstein and saying: Im going to help your kids. So the doctor suggested that the 7-year-old bring some friends and perform for his patients. He did, first performing in a hospital playroom and later going room to room playing for bedridden patients. Urbach said Concerts for a Cure started its fundraising activities two years later after he met a 13-year-old patient, a pianist who couldnt practice because there was no piano on the hospital floor. I set a goal. I was going to buy a piano for the 10th floor, he said. I put on a concert at my school. We raised enough money to buy a piano and thousands more, enough to start a fund to bring underprivileged kids from all over the world to have surgery at Beth Israel. At the C.S. Mott Childrens Hospital in Michigan, Urbachs concert raised money for a Ronald McDonald space within the hospital and for its bedside music program that provides live music in the neonatal units, said Elaine Sims, director of the Gifts of Art program at the University of Michigan Health System. Another grant from Jourdan is funding a music delivery system for our pediatric oncology inpatients, she said. The funds Jourdan has raised for us have inspired others to give. Its a cumulative snowball effect that just keeps growing. About three years ago, Urbach founded another nonprofit organization, the International Coalition of College Philanthropists, which raises money through various campus events for health, education and shelter projects. ICCP allows university students to leverage a network of students and college campuses to raise a lot of funds ... and then intelligently inject them into microfinance projects, said Urbach. In its first year, the organization donated $40,000 to build a clinic in Ghana, fund a Connecticut chapter of the Multiple Sclerosis Society and finance several Third World projects, including education for 20 children in rural India, he said. In addition to raising money for neuroscience, Urbach delves deeply into the subject, said Arney Rosenblat, a spokeswoman for the MS Society. In 2005, she said, he conducted independent research on multiple sclerosis at Stony Brook University Medical Center. Jourdan has dramatically illustrated that a small hinge can swing large doors, she said. The awards also honored Eagles defensive back Troy Vincent for outstanding service by an athlete. The Lifetime Achievement Award went to the Tribeca Film Festival, cofounded by Robert DeNiro, Jane Rosenthal and Craig Hatkoff. Pfizer was awarded the Jefferson Award for outstanding service by a major corporation. C2 W EDNESDAY, M ARCH 7, 2012 C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE E DUCATION like the entertainment of the goofiness of the books. There are lots of silly things that happen in those books. The teacher has used Seuss books to teach other classroom disciplines as well. We used Dr. Seuss He and She book when we were learning about pronouns, she said. And we used his Ear book when we were learning about the five senses. Theres just a lot of ways you can utilize his books throughout the curriculum because there are so many of them. You have lots of choices. Each of the kindergarten classes started their day reading the Seuss classic Green Eggs and Ham. Then each student bravely tried a small plate of the green delicacy. When asked to evaluate if they liked the green eggs and ham, about two-thirds of McMillians class gave the thumbs down sign. But some managed to finish a second plate. Following the eggs, classes rotated through each kindergarten classroom to hear a new book and complete a project, such as a word search or maze that featured Seuss. Contact Chronicle reporter Matthew Beck at (352) 563-5660 or mbeck@ chronicleonline.com. SEUSS Continued from Page C1 AWARDContinued from Page C1 concussions from playing sports or from falls. About 20 percent had less common mild brain trauma from traffic accidents and other causes. Concussions involve a blow to the head that jostles the brain against the skull, although imaging scans typically show no abnormalities. Other mild brain trauma can cause tissue damage visible on these scans. The study included 186 children aged 8 to 15 with mild concussions and other mild brain injuries treated at two hospitals, in Cleveland and Columbus, Ohio. The reports are based on parents reports of symptoms up to 12 months after the injuries. The brain injuries studied were considered mild because they involved no more than half an hour of unconsciousness; 60 percent of kids with concussions or other brain trauma 74 children had no loss of consciousness. Overall, 20 percent 15 children who lost consciousness had lingering forgetfulness or other non-physical problems a year after their injury; while 20 percent who had abnormal brain scans six kids had lingering headaches or other physical problems three months after being injured. The results were published online Monday in Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine. The study adds to research showing that mild traumatic brain injuries, including concussions should not necessarily be treated as minor injuries, Dr. Frederick Rivara, Archives editor, said in a journal editorial. More information is needed to determine who is most at risk for lingering problems after these injuries, and to determine what type of treatment and activity restriction is needed, said Rivara, a pediatrician and University of Washington researcher. INJURIES Continued from Page C1 ON THE NET www.cdc.gov/concussion/ signs_symptoms.html Five-year-old Austin Purinton looks through a Dr. Seuss word search Friday morning as part of the Dr. Seuss birthday celebration at Central Ridge Elementary School. MATTHEW BECK /Chronicle research paper would have been a fantastic achievement for an undergraduate student let alone for a high schooler, Fortnow said. Adam studied at a certain class of games called poset or partially ordered set games. He found a way to take one of these games and convert it into another game where the other person wins, Fortnow said, explaining he had given Adam an efficient computation problem that didnt require advanced mathematics, but that nevertheless had been unsolved for a while. He came out with the entire proof. The nice thing about his proof was really that it was not the way it was expected to happen. I expected simple manipulation, but I saw this out-of-the box thinking you dont even see often in grad students. Stepping onto Northwesterns campus was intimidating at first, Adam says. I had a desk in a room with 12 grad students. You have this feeling that This is beyond me, I cant do this, he said. You have to work past that and focus. Adam reads books about topology and real and complex analysis as if they were novels, said IMSA math teacher Steve Condie, who also coaches Adam on the Chicago Area All-Star Math Team. Adam has such a passion for mathematics. He competed on the team for four years straight, this will be his fifth year, and hes skipping graduation to be able to compete, Condie said. Adam started off as a verbally precocious child who read on his own at about age 3, said his mother, Gail Kalinich. She first got an inkling about his talent for math when he was in the first grade and his teachers suggested he skip a grade in math. A couple of years later, the gifted (students) teacher started pulling him and another student to teach alone for an hour. He just developed a strong love for math, said Gail who, along with her husband, Kevin, is an attorney. Adam also has a penchant for teaching math. After starting the math team at Hadley Junior High School in Glen Ellyn, he became its coach when he was in high school. Among the students he coached is IMSA sophomore Kevin Hi, 15, of Glen Ellyn, who said Adam was instrumental in opening his eyes to the beauty of math. Adam was one of the first people to really reveal that other side of math, which was awesome, said Kevin, now the assistant coach for the Hadley math team. Hes been a really good (role) model. He didnt need to spend all that time helping me, but he did. Adam also inspired his younger sister, Chaney, to follow in his footsteps. She is now a member of Glenbard Wests math team, and has applied to IMSA. Far from being singletracked, Adam has a variety of interests, including history and science fiction. I love going through history and finding stories in there. For every historical story that people have grabbed and made into a movie like Braveheart, there are 10 more out there that people have never heard about, he said. MATHContinued from Page C1 Adam Kalinich loves numbers. 000AS0M From Noon Friday, March 9 To Sunset Sunday, March 11 at Sertoma Youth Ranch at On-Site Camping Entertainment by Floridas Best Songwriters and Singers Florida Songwriting Contest Workshops Arts and Crafts Food Childrens Activities Bring your Lawn Chairs Rain or Shine 000ALWU Will McLean Music Festival 2012 For camping information, call 352-465-2167. For more about the festival visit www.willmclean.com

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E DUCATIONC ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE W EDNESDAY, M ARCH 7, 2012 C3 000AR4X Casual Fine Dining www.mangogrillhernando.com 352-560-0012 1305 Norvell Bryant Hwy., Hernando 10 Entrees your choice $ 10 00 Includes soup or salad, rolls & butter Mon Sat 3-5pm Mon: Maine Lobster Roll w/side plus soup or salad $ 14 00 Tues: Baked Haddock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 12 00 Wed: Liver & Onions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 12 00 Thur: Maine Lobster Pie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 20 00 Your Choice Surf & Turf: . . . . . . $ 18 00 NY Strip Steak & Lobster Pie or Filet Oscar w/Lobster Asparagus & Bernaise Above served with potato, vegetable & soup or salad E A R L Y B I R D S P E C I A L S E A R L Y B I R D S P E C I A L S EARLY BIRD SPECIALS D I N N E R S P E C I A L S D I N N E R S P E C I A L S DINNER SPECIALS OPEN ON SUNDAYS AT 3PM St. Patricks Day Corned Beef & Cabbage $ 14 00 SUNDAY 000AM9W 795-0956 www.burkesofireland.com The Heart of Ireland Located in the Heart of Historic Crystal River 564 Citrus Avenue, Crystal River The ORIGINAL St. Patricks Day! 5th Annual Crystal River Dog Walking Parade Sponsored by Burkes of Ireland Pub March 17, 2012 Walkers meet 10am in front of Burkes of Ireland. Parade route is down Citrus Avenue to 3rd Street (right) onto Kings Bay Park and around the back to Citrus Avenue onto Hunter Springs Beach, back to 3rd Street and finally to Citrus Avenue ending at the pub! RULES 1. A $10.00 donation for each entry in parade. All proceeds go to CC Animal Shelter, a Citrus County organization that has special people helping animals. 2. Owners are responsible for cleanup and behavior of dogs in parade. 3. Dogs must be on a leash at ALL TIMES. 4. Entry can NOT have motors. This is a walking parade using sidewalks. 5. Each entry must be decorated in the St. Paddys theme (Dont forget your dog!) 6. Each person in entry must wear a costume, even if only a green hat. 7. Go crazy Dress your dog Be creative? Have fun! 8. DONT FORGET TO ADD YOUR MUSIC!!!!! For Charity Citrus County Animal Shelter SIGN UP NOW Deadline March 10th You too can be in the St. Patricks Day Dog Walking Parade for Charity. If you dont have a dog, come walk in the parade anyway and have fun! 000ARPJ $ 2 0 0 P e r P e r s o n S h o e R e n t a l $ 2 0 0 H o t D o g s & C h i p s $ 2 0 0 W e l l D r i n k s MANATEE LANES SPRING BREAK SPECIALS MAR. 9 MAR. 25 7 9 5 4 5 4 6 795-4546 HWY 44 CRYSTAL RIVER 34429 ALL OPEN BOWLING $2.00 PER GAME PER PERSON E x c e p t F r i d a y a f t e r 7 P M a n d S a t u r d a y a f t e r 6 P M S o r r y n o c o u p o n s d u r i n g s p e c i a l Spring Break is AWESOME 000ARPB Citrus Countys Best Kept Dining Secret! Serving freshly prepared food in a relaxed atmosphere with outstanding service. Celebrating 11 Years Serving Citrus County. Bentleys Restaurant 11920 N. Florida Ave. (Hwy 41) Citrus Springs One mile south of Dunnellon Mention this ad and receive a small gift as a token of our appreciation. J oin us for Lunch, Dinner or Sunday Brunch Visit our website at www.dineatbentleys.com to view all our menus or call 352-465-5810 Hours: 11am-9pm Wed. Sat. 9am-9pm Sunday Closed Mon. & Tue. 000ASQM P R I M E PRIME R I B RIB with choice of soup or salad 10oz. cut 9301 W. Ft. Island Trail Crystal River 795-4211 www.plantationoncrystalriver.com $ 1 9 9 5 $ 1 9 95 000ASR9 E v e r y Every T h u r s d a y Thursday, F r i d a y & Friday & S a t u r d a y Saturday WED. & THURS. ONLY DINE-IN ONLY 000APND 2 L O C A T I O N S 7364 Grover Cleveland Blvd. Homosassa 3 5 2 6 2 8 9 5 8 8 Highway 44, Crystal River 3 5 2 7 9 5 9 0 8 1 LOBSTER (1) 1-1 1 4 Lb. Maine Lobster Slaw & Corn $ 15 99 BOSTON STRANGLER Cup of N.E. Chowdah 1 2 Lb. Steamers (1) 1-1 1 4 Lobster Slaw & Corn $ 21 99 TWIN LOBSTERS (2) 1-1 1 4 Lb. Maine Lobsters Slaw & Corn $ 26 99 per person LOBSTER ROLL Real Lobster Roll with Slaw & Hush Puppies $ 15 99 LIMITED TIME ONLY 000A7V2 2011-12 D ISTINGUISHED H ONOR R OLL SECONDNINEWEEKSOlivia Grey, Micheal Griffin, Grace Groccia, Austin Groff, Zachary Groff, Nadra Gulzar, Madison Gurganus, Rishi Gurnani, Brittany Gutekunst, Austin Guth, Amanda Hackett, Maxwell Haffner, Jennifer Hafner, Kimberly Hafner, Michael Hale, Brianna Hall, Emily Hall, Dominic Hamrick, Allison Harden, Joy Harris, Rodger Harris, Rachel Hartley, Emily Havranek, Amy Hays, Sarah Heathcoat, Alexander Hebert, Teresa Hebert, James Heinzman, Alivia Heisler, Bradley Hendrickson, Travis Hendrickson, Matthew Henry, Natalie Herndon, Benjamin Herrick, Joseph Hindalong, Courtlyn Hisey, Michael Hodgkins, Ashley Hoffman, Sierra Hogan, Sean Hogerheide, Hailey Holmes-Ray, Dakota Holt, Joshua Holton, Ashton Honeggar, Andrew Hooper, Teandre Hopkins, Joshua Hordeman, Amanda Houghton, Chad Howard, Katelyn Howard, Carly Howell, Andrew Huggins, Ashley Hulbert, Hannah Huntington, Kileigh Huscher, Angela Ibarra, Luisa Ibarra, Mary Jane Ice, Angelica Iglesias, Brian Imparato, Geri Ingall, Samantha Ivkovic, Jessica Jackson, Samantha Jackson, Tyler Jacques, Madison Jemison, Sarah-Jo Jenkins-Stout, Megan Jervis, Jonathan Jimenez, April Johnson, Breanna Johnson, Jessica Jones, Grace Jordan, Carolina Junqueira, Heather Jurgensen, Hunter Justice, Lloyd Justo, Bridget Kabacinski, Christopher Kauffman, Chloe Kaufmann, Alexander Kazemfar, Taylor Keeran, Alicia Keiser, Emily Kelley, Danielle Kelly, MichaelBryan Kelly, Seth Kelly, Don Kemp, Laura Ketcham, Laila Khan, Emily King, Brianna Kirkpatrick, Shaindyl Klein, Jessica Klement, Kelena Klippel, Cassandra Kluth, Brandon Knight, Kayla Kofmehl, Shane Kokx, Nicolai Kortendick, Darren Lamb, Jonathan Lambert, Madison Lambert, Eden Land, Allison Laplante, Alexis Larson, Tabitha Laubheimer, Xavier Lawrence, Haleigh Lawter, Christian Leander, ALaura Ledford, Jeremiah Lee, Jordan Lee, Kaitlyn Lee, Christina Lello, Kaitlyn Lemanowicz, Meagan Lemery, Gary Levengood, Kelsey Lilley, Michael Lindsey, Joshua Linn, Chynna Liu, Callie Long, Virada Long, Matthew Lopes, Bianca Lopez, December Lowery, Gregorio Lumapas, Arianna Lybaek-Polla, Andrew Lynch, Hunter Macaluso, Samantha Mader, Dalea Magee, Michael Makros, Aaron Mancha, Hunter Manfredo, Bradley Mann, Breanna Martin, James Martin, Jordan Martin, Pride Martin, Yuly Martinez, Marisa Mascatelli, Kalley Mason, Jessica Massey, Arica Mast, Samantha Matos, Daniel Mauldin, Belinda Maxey, Braidy May, Cody McCary, Elizabeth McClelland, Seth McCormick, Cody McCoy, Madeline McCoy, Cory McCoy, Wade McDonald, Kiera McDougall, Savannah McGee, Matthew McKibbin, Brandon McKinney, Macy McKinney, Hallie McManama, David McNall, Abygail McNeely, Sonja Meigs, Seryi Mejia, Kimberly Menietti, Jorge Mercado, Matthew Michelet, Joseph Milleker, Alena Miller, Alli Miller, Christopher Miller, Dylan Miller, Lance Miller, Samantha Miller, Jonah Miller, Cody Miller, Christian Miranda-Boulay, Christopher Molinelli, Steffi Montayre, Alexandra Moore, Kendall Moore, Wineshka Morales, Marissa Morgan, David Murphy, Ashlyn Murray, Christian Myers, Benjamin Navarro, Ryan Neale, Tyler Neihoff, Thi Nguyen, Alayna Nightengale, Franklin Noll, Guillermo Nunez, John Obday, Travis Oberst, Courtney OBrien, Paige Obstfeld, AustinOdell, Kirk Osburn, Christopher Pace, Taylor Palmer, Mariah Paovella, Alexsander Park, Girard Parmenter, Blake Parsons, Chandni Patel, Dhrumil Patel, Dhruv Patel, Umang Patel, Michael Pater, Rebecca Paugh, Carlo Paveglio, Grace Payne, Tyler Payne, Rachelle Peake, Shane Pellegrine, Brandon Pelletier, Marissa Peragine, Tayler Perez, Joseph Perkins, Jonathan Perry, Alex Persavich, Amera Peterson, Jocelyn Philipson, Michelle Phillips, Wade Phillips, Alexander Pich, Katelyn Place, Jessica Poppen, Bailey Poppleton, Amber Poteet, Bryson Powers, Brittani Provenzano, Amanda Provost, Jordan Quintanilla, Shivam Radadia, Suraj Radadia, Sydney Rafferty, Taina Ramirez, Alexander RamosRuiz, Lane Ramsey, Erin Ratliff, Jesse Ray, Jessika Ray, Danielle Rehberg, Jessica Rehm, Samuel Renovato, Jacob Rice, Samantha Rich, Shawn Richmond, Samantha Risak, Eric Riser, Victor Rivera, Patrick Rizzo, Angelo Rizzolo, Richard Rizzolo, Kaylin Roddenberry, Katelyn Roderick, Cheryl Rome, Dawn Rood, Alexis Roos, Brittany Rush, Amber Russo, Allison Ryan, Sean Ryan, Kori Sabol, Yusma Sadiq, Sara Saiz, Zuhair Sami, Michael Sanchez, Michael Santos, Ashley Saunders, Derek Savery, Hope Schortemeyer, Katelyn Schulze, Heather Seeko, Eric Selke, Peter Sencenbaugh, Frank Serrano, Yamilette Serrano, Chase Seymour, Kori Seymour, Alexander Sharp, Emily Sharpe, Brittany Shier, Jaclyn Shier, Cheyenne Shilling, Lory Shires, Grant Shoemaker, Joshua Sibel, Amanda Siller, Lauren Siller, William Simmons, Jacob Sims, Shelby Sims, Rebecca Sirven, Thomas Sisson, Tyler Sisson, Amber Slack, Kristin Slanker, Michael Slusser, Andrew Small, Logan Smith, Rachel Smith, Scott Smith, Kateri Soboleski, Daisy Souther, Shauna Sowell, Colin Spain, Savannah Spangler, Morgan Speagle, Collin Speale, John Stacy, Kendal Stark, Scott Stearns, George Steele, John Steely, Brittany Stevenson, Parker Stillions, Alexis Stines, Erin Stokes, Phoenix Stokes, Jeffrey Story, Megan Straight Sarah Strelow, Jordin Strempel, Sara Strempel, Skylar Summers, Cassie Surrency, Joshua Swander, Abigail Swartz, Steven Swartz, Hunter Taskey, Brittany Taylor, Callie Taylor, Jacob Teter-Jones, KaraTettenburn, Lecanto High School HONOR ROLL Jordyn Thibault, Melanesia Thomas, Joseph Thompson, Timothy Thompson, Mason Tiley, Nicholas Tinaro, Kimberly Toohey, Francis Torralba, Tyler Touchton, Benjamin Trivett, Ariana Troxel, James Trudeau, Sara Turner, Danyelle Ulloa, David Underwood, Maria Valdivia, Christi Valentin, Ashlynne Van Cleef, Kyle Van De Griek, Andreanna Van Quelef, Loren VanQuelef Summer Van Quelef, Elisabeth Veal, Paola Vega, Taylor Vent, Rodney Vickers, Britny Vickers, Cassandra Vientos, Thomas Vilardi, Danielle Villella, Jamesha Walker, Stacy Wandishin, Lonny Warren, Saiddel Watson, Breeanna Waugh, Mackenzie Way, Taylor Weaver, Matthew Webb, Brandon Weiss, Sabrienna Weldon, Savannah Weller, Christian Wesch, Kelsey West, Rita West, Samantha Wheeler, Elise Wideman, Sarah Wilker, Rachel Wilkins, Cheri Wilkinson, Amber Williams, Samantha Williams, Tiffany Williams, Trevon Williams, Holly Wingrove, Wrenda-Ann Witt, Nicholette Wunderly, Acadia Wyckoff, Michael Wyka, Erica Yarborough, Mikaela Zoucha, Gabrielle Zuniga, Edward Zwolski, Sara Zybell. H ONORS Lecanto High School students Allison Hulbert and Benjamin Hecht have been named West Citrus Elks Lodge No. 2693 students of the month for February. Hulbert, 18, is the daughter of Heidi and Bill Hulbert of Citrus Springs. She is a three-year member of Fellowship of Christian Athletes, Key Club, Link Crew and National Honor Society, currently serving as president. She is a four-year member of Student Government, having served as secretary/treasurer, historian, class representative, and secretary. She is also a two-year member of Spanish Club. Last summer, Allison represented Lecanto High School at the S4TL Leadership Program sponsored by the local Rotary Club. Hulbert is a four-year member of the girls weightlifting team, a three-year member of the cheerleading squad, a twoyear member of the track and field team, and a one-year member of the girls golf team earning Rookie of the Year as part of the district championship team. She has taken 13 years of private dance lessons. Hulbert has logged more than 300 hours of community service by volunteering to coach middle school cheerleaders, mentoring incoming 9th grade students, assisting with clerical tasks at Lecanto High School, and babysitting in the nursery at her church. She maintains a 3.9 GPA and has been on the principals and distinguished honor rolls throughout high school. She plans to pursue dual degrees in pharmacy and Spanish. Hecht, 18, is the son of Cora and Jeff Hecht of Beverly Hills. He is a three-year member of National Honor Society and a two-year member of Interact Club. He is currently attending the College of Central Florida as a full-time dual-enrollment student, earning both college and high school credit. He maintains a 4.44 weighted GPA and has been on the principals and distinguished honor rolls throughout high school. He was recognized as an AP Scholar in psychology, English language and English literature. Hecht is a two-year member of the ROCCS crew rowing team and has served as manager of the LHS girls weightlifting team for the past two years. Hecht gives back to his community through participation in Relay for Life, MedShare and Habitat for Humanity. He has been accepted to the University of Florida and the honors program at Florida State University. He plans to pursue a degree in mathematics and actuarial science. Valmon Munn, of Citrus Springs, son of Mr. and Mrs. Norman Munn, of Palmyra, Maine, was awarded a Bachelor of Science in Applied Science and Technology degree in nuclear engineering technology from Thomas Edison State College. Munn is a senior nuclear procedure writer at Progress Energy in Crystal River.S CHOLARSHIPS ANDCONTESTS Citrus 20/20 Inc., in support of its Youth Needs aspiration, is offering a $ 500 scholarship for Academic Year 2012-13 for college-bound students who have fulfilled the requirements for graduation from an accredited Citrus County secondary school. Scholarship applicants will be evaluated on their SAT/ACT score, GPA, anticipated major, community involvement, extracurricular activities and written essay. Applicants selected as finalists will be interviewed and evaluated by the Citrus 20/20 scholarship committee. Award of the scholarship is contingent upon verification of the recipients enrollment at an institution of higher learning accredited to confer a baccalaureate degree by its office of admissions. Applicants may obtain the scholarship application by visiting the Citrus 20/20s website at www.citrus2020.com or from their high school guidance counselor. Applications must be received no later than 5:00 p.m., March 23, 2012. Applications may be submitted by email to info.citrus2020@ gmail.com or mailed to Citrus 20/20, Inc., P. O. Box 1141 Lecanto, FL, 34460-1141. For more information, call Lace Blue-McLean at 352-2010149. BFF Society will offer a minimum of two $1,000 scholarships. Those eligible are U.S. citizens attending Citrus County schools or Citrus County residents seeking a professional career. Applicants must have a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or above, and applicants may be interviewed. The scholarship must be used to attend an accredited college, junior college or professional school. Applicants may be graduating high school seniors or adult students seeking to further their education, regardless of gender. Candidates will be judged on academic achievement and financial need. Scholarships are to be used for tuition and books only. The check will be made payable to the educational institution for the benefit of the scholarship recipient. Scholarship winners will be Special to the Chronicle The Lecanto High School Army JROTC recently earned Honor Unit with Distinction status for the 19th consecutive year. The status is awarded to units that receive a score of 96 percent or higher during the annual evaluation. Above, Sgt. Maj. Douyard inspects 1st Lt. Michel Calbi during the in-ranks inspection. See CHALK / Page C4 Allison Hulbert Benjamin Hecht

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notified by April 2012. It will be necessary for the scholarship winner(s) to attend the BFF Society Awards Banquet on May 14 or forfeit the scholarship. If the money for the scholarships is not used as indicated, it will be rescinded to the founding chapter. All applications must be postmarked by March 31; no exceptions. The application must be in its entirety or it will not be considered for review. Applications can be obtained at school guidance offices. Mail applications to: BFF Society, c/o Dianne Micklon, 2833 W. Laureen St., Lecanto, FL 34461-9529. For more information, call 352-527-7442 or email trechuck@tampabay.rr.com. Each year, Yankeetown-Inglis Womans Club searches for deserving students to receive a scholarship The awards are open to students who attended Yankeetown School for at least two years and graduated, or will graduate, from Dunnellon High School or Crystal River High School. Also eligible are homeschooled seniors, those who are attending college and maintain a 3.0 GPA, and those who have worked after graduation but now have concrete plans for resuming their education. To be considered for a scholarship, students are asked to write a personal essay and complete a questionnaire, have a 3.0 GPA or higher, and submit teacher and counselor recommendation letters. Those who wish to apply may obtain an application from guidance counselors at Dunnellon or Crystal River high schools, at A.F. Knotts Library on 56th Street in Yankeetown or download from the Womans Club website, www.yiwomansclub.com. Selection will be made by members of the Yankeetown-Inglis Womans Club Education Committee. Completed applications should be mailed to: Yankeetown-Inglis Womans Club Education Committee, P.O. Box 298, Yankeetown, FL 34498, and must be postmarked no later than April 4 to be considered. For more information, call the club at 352-447-2057, Tuesday through Saturday, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., or email yiwomansclub@gmail.com. Disabled American Veterans, Gerald A. Shonk Chapter 70 of Inverness, is offering a $1,000 scholarship for the 2012-13 school year. The scholarship is offered to a disabled veteran, a veteran, a survivor of a veteran or a dependent of a veteran. The recipient shall be enrolled in a full-time course of instruction leading to a degree program or to a vocational skill. Selection shall be conducted by the scholarship committee and will be based on the applications submitted. The procedure requires that applicants write a statement detailing their course of study, goals and why they are deserving of this award. Applications are now available and may be picked up at guidance department offices in area high schools, the Withlacoochee Technical Institute, Central Florida Community College guidance department offices, or by calling John Seaman at 352-860-0123. All applications must be returned to the DAV Chapter at 1039 N. Paul Drive, Inverness, FL 34453, by March 16. Scholarships are provided by the Daughters of the American Revolution at three different levels local, state and national. The local Fort Cooper Chapter offers a $500 award for a graduating senior woman with a 3.0 average who has been accepted at an accredited college or university. Several categories of scholarship assistance are offered by the State DAR for high school graduates or older with a GPA of 3.0 or higher. Guidelines and application forms for these awards are available at local high school guidance offices. The National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution has more than 30 scholarships available for high school and college graduates; information and forms for these awards can be accessed from the website at www.dar.org (click on Scholarships and follow the prompts). For more information, call Fort Cooper Chapter DAR Scholarship Chairman Shirley Hartley at 352-637-1319. Up to 12 deserving high school seniors from Sumter Electric Cooperatives service territory will receive assistance from the co-op this year to go on to college or a technical school following high school. The SECO Board of Trustees recently voted to continue the co-ops scholarship program The students chosen to receive SECO Scholarships in 2012 will each receive a $2,500 grant to assist them in their pursuit of higher education. To qualify, graduates must reside in a home being served by SECO and be enrolled in an accredited college, university or vocational/technical school by the end of 2012. Applications are now available at area high school guidance offices and at any of SECOs customer service centers in Marion, Lake, Citrus, and Sumter counties. They must be returned to SECO no later than March 30, 2012. The Homosassa Civic Club is offering the Beri Hagerty-Phelps Scholarship(s) to students to help further their educations at colleges or technical schools. Applicants must live within the Homosassa Elementary School District. Applications are available at local high schools guidance offices, and at WTI and CCF. Applications must be received on or before March 31. For more information, call 352-628-9333. Citrus Garden Club is accepting applications for its annual $500 Environmental Scholarship to be awarded to a senior graduate from Citrus High School, Crystal River High School, Lecanto High School and the Academy of Environmental Science. The scholarship will be awarded to a senior planning to continue his or her education in an environmental field. Applications can be obtained from school guidance counselors departments. Deadline to apply is March 31. For more information, call Lucy Murphy at 352-527-4239. The Business Womens Alliance of Citrus County Chamber of Commerce announces the opening of its 2012 scholarship award program to offer financial assistance for students planning further education for health occupations, as well as for students planning a future in businesses other than health care. Proceeds from BWAs 2011 Womens Health & Fitness Expo and quarterly networking luncheons will fund the scholarships, being offered to students in Lecanto, Crystal River and Citrus high schools, plus Withlacoochee Technical Institute. Applicants must be Citrus County residents planning to attend a university, college or technical school in Florida, or attend WTI, and who demonstrate financial need. Completed application form and personal statement, financial resources affidavit, transcript and letters of reference are required. Applications are available at the school guidance offices. For the high schools, deadline date for return of completed applications to the guidance office is March 30. For WTI, consult the Student Services office. For more information, call the Citrus County Chamber of Commerces Crystal River office at 352-7953149. The Citrus County Shooting Club is offering scholarship money to students graduating from Citrus County High Schools who are planning on a career in law enforcement. Students interested can inquire at their schools guidance office. Applications are available at the clubs website, www.ccsc.us, or by calling Greg Cwick at 352-382-2530 or Luis Michaels at 352-746-2414. American Legion Post 155 has been running its Oratorical Contests in Citrus County area high schools since 1950. Information packets with rules and entry forms for The American Legion Oratorical Contest have been given to the guidance counselors of Crystal River, Lecanto and Seven Rivers Christian High Schools. All high school students (no matter what grade) public, private or home-schooled children are eligible to enter. Scholarships are awarded the winning contestants ranging from $100 to $18,000. The contest consists of an eightto 10minute prepared oration on some phase of the Constitution of the United States and a threeto five-minute assigned topic discourse on a particular article or amendment. The purpose of the American Legions High School Oratorical Contest is to develop a deeper knowledge and appreciation of the Constitution. Other objectives include development of leadership qualities, ability to think and speak clearly and intelligently, and preparation for acceptance of the duties and responsibilities, the rights and privileges of American citizenship. For more about scholarships, including grants, visit www.NeedALift.org (College Financial Aid Handbook). The American Legion puts out the book to educate students on educational opportunities, scholarships, grants, student loans, careers and employment. The latest downloadable copy of the book, now in its 61st year of publication, is available on the website. Copies are also at county and school libraries. More information and entry forms are available by calling Oratorical Contest coordinator Larry White at 352-249-7663. The Citrus Community Concert Choir Inc. is now accepting applications for its 2012 scholarship award of $1,500. Application is open to graduating high school seniors or enrolled college students and residents of Citrus County, or children of Citrus County residents. Past and present choir members and relatives of choir members are also eligible. Applicantsmay obtainscholarship qualifications and application forms from their school guidance counselors or online at citruschoir.com Completed applications must be received no later than April 30. U.S. high school students and their teachers are invited to participate in the Bill of Rights Institutes sixth annual Being an American Essay Contest The Being an American Essay Contest explores the Founding principles outlined in the Constitution. The contest is administered by the Bill of Rights Institute, a nonprofit educational organization in the Washington, D.C. area devoted to educating young people about the Constitution and Founding principles. The 201112 contest is sponsored by the History Channel. Students are asked to share their thoughts on the Constitution by answering the following question: How does the Constitution establish and maintain a culture of liberty? The top three student winners from each of the five geographical regions will be awarded cash prizes of $1,000 (first place), $500 (second place), and $250 (third place). Teacher sponsors for each student winner will also receive a cash prize of $100. Further information, including submission criteria, lesson plans and background information on the Constitution, Bill of Rights, founders and the founding principles are available at www.BillofRightsInstitute.org/ Contest. Your child may be eligible for a wonderful opportunity a Take Stock in Children college scholarship Take Stock in Children is a program that helps economically disadvantaged students and their families realize their dream of sending their child to college. To be considered for a scholarship, your child must be in public school in the sixth, seventh or eighth grade, meet the financial eligibility requirements, agree to remain drugand alcohol-free and get good grades. Take Stock in Children scholarships are provided through the Florida Prepaid Foundation. Applications are now available. To obtain more information about the program, call 352344-0855. The College of Central Florida is now awarding dozens of scholarships to qualifying students interested in taking honors classes at the Citrus campus this fall semester. A major component of CFs Honors Institute, the Community of Scholars Honors Program offers incoming high school graduates two-year tuition scholarships, currently valued at $3,000 per academic year, while offering partial scholarships to those who are currently attending CF. Students in the honors program are free to pursue the degree option of their choosing at CF, with the scholarship requirement being successful participation in a limited number of honors level classes that also serve to fulfill degree requirements. Students may also take classes at any of the CF locations each term, and are not bound to enrolling only in classes offered at the Citrus Campus. Besides financial benefits, the Community of Scholars offers members priority registration each term. Typically, a cumulative high school GPA of 3.75 is needed to qualify for the Community of Scholars, although applications for those with a slightly lower GPA may be considered in some cases. Students wishing to be considered for scholarships should call Dr. June Hall at 352-746-6721. Oratorical scholarship contest. All high school students are eligible to enter. Scholarships awarded to winning contestants range from $100 to $18,000. The contest consists of an eightto 10minute prepared oration on some phase of the Constitution of The United States and a threeto five-minute assigned topic discourse on a particular article or amendment. Most all American Legion Posts participate in this program, and additional information and entry forms are available through American Legion Post No. 155 Oratorical Contest coordinator Jack Marchitto, who can be reached at 352-628-9843, or American Legion Post No. 155 Commander Jay Conti Sr., who can be reached at 352-795-6526. You can also see your guidance counselor for more details. C LASSESANDCOURSESFor information about outdoors and recreational classes in Citrus County, see the Sunday sports section of the Chronicle. The Art of Calligraphy art class is offered every ThursdayC4 W EDNESDAY, M ARCH 7, 2012 C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE E DUCATION 000AH60 905-0307-F/WCRN NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING CITY OF CRYSTAL RIVER ZONING AMENDMENT The Crystal River City Council will hold a public hearing to consider the proposed small scale amendment to the City of Crystal River Comprehensive Plan. The public hearings will be held at City Hall in the Council Chamber, 123 NW Hwy 19, Crystal River, FL 34428. The dates and times are as follows: The 1st Public Hearing will be held February 27, 2012 @ 7:00 p.m. The 2nd Public Hearing will be held March 12, 2012 @ 7:00 p.m. ORDINANCE 12-O-02 AN ORDINANCE AMENDING THE OFFICIAL ZONING MAP OF THE CITY OF CRYSTAL RIVER, FLORIDA, CHANGING THE ZONING ON PROPERTIES LOCATED AT 1017 US HIGHWAY 19 FROM HIGH INTENSITY COMMERCIAL (CH) AND MEDIUM DENSITY RESIDENTIAL (R-2) TO INDUSTRIAL (I) AS DESCRIBED IN SECTION 1; PROVIDING FOR REPEAL OF CONFLICTING ORDINANCES; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; AND PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE. The proposed Comprehensive Plan Amendment may be inspected by the public at City of Crystal River City Hall, 123 NW Hwy 19, Crystal River, FL 34428, between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. weekdays. Pursuant to the provision of Chapter 286, Florida Statutes, Section 286.0105, if a person decides to appeal any decision made by Crystal River City Council with respect to the matters considered at this public hearing, he/she will need a record of the proceedings, at that, for such purpose he/she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record may include the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of disability or physical impairment should contact the City of Crystal River, Building and Zoning Office, 123 NW Highway 19, Crystal River, Florida 34428, (352) 795-4216 Ext. 306, at least two (2) days before the meeting. WHETSTONE OIL 000AH5U 904-0307-F/WCRN NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING CITY OF CRYSTAL RIVER SMALL SCALE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT The Crystal River City Council will hold a public hearing to consider the proposed small scale amendment to the City of Crystal River Comprehensive Plan. The public hearings will be held at City Hall in the Council Chamber, 123 NW Hwy 19, Crystal River, FL 34428. The dates and times are as follows: The 1st Public Hearing will be held February 27, 2012 @ 7:00 p.m. The 2nd Public Hearing will be held March 12, 2012 @ 7:00 p.m. ORDINANCE 12-O-01 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF CRYSTAL RIVER, FLORIDA, PROVIDING FOR A SMALLSCALE AMENDMENT TO THE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN, RECLASSIFYING 1.83 ACRES (MOL) (WHETSTONE OIL COMPANY, INC. AND INTERCOASTAL DEVELOPMENT, INC.) FROM COMMERCIAL (.5 ACRES MOL) AND MEDIUM DENSITY RESIDENTIAL (1.33 ACRES MOL) LAND USE TO INDUSTRIAL; PROVIDING FOR REPEAL OF CONFLICTING ORDINANCES; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; AND PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE. The proposed Comprehensive Plan Amendment may be inspected by the public at City of Crystal River City Hall, 123 NW Hwy 19, Crystal River, FL 34428, between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. weekdays. Interested parties are encouraged to appear at these hearings and provide comments regarding the proposed ordinance. Pursuant to the provision of Chapter 286, Florida Statutes, Section 286.0105, if a person decides to appeal any decision made by Crystal River City Council with respect to the matters considered at this public hearing, he/she will need a record of the proceedings, at that, for such purpose he/she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record may include the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of disability or physical impairment should contact the City of Crystal River, Building and Zoning Office, 123 NW Highway 19, Crystal River, Florida 34428, (352) 795-4216 Ext. 306, at least two (2) days before the meeting. 000AJHS Knights of Columbus council 6168 and Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church Present St. Patricks Dinner Dance 6 p.m. Saturday, March 17, 2012in The Parish Life Center 6 Roosevelt Blvd. Beverly Hills, FL Corned Beef & Cabbage Irish Bread and Dessert Cash Bar with Beer and Wine Donation: $15 per person Music by Steven Robinson For more information or tickets, contact: Tany Tanafranca 352-344-5249, Les Magyar 352-419-7205, or the Parish Office, 352-746-2144 CHALK Continued from Page C3 000ASJE Sponsor: Tampa Bay Times Supporters: Winn Dixie Supermarkets Dianas TravelTEMPLE BETH DAVID13158 Antelope Street, Spring Hill(1 blk. S. of Spring Hill Dr., corner of Linden) For more info call 352-686-7034 COME BRING YOUR FRIENDS FOR GOOD FOOD(eat in or take home). Israeli Folk Dancing, Judaic Gift Shop, vendors galore & lots more. You dont have to be Jewish to enjoy our celebration. See CHALK / Page C9

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E DUCATIONC ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE W EDNESDAY, M ARCH 7, 2012 C5 2012 Universal Uclick from The Mini Page 2012 Universal Uclick To order, send $15.99 ($19.99 Canada) plus $5 postage and handling for each copy. Make check or money order (U.S. funds only) payable to Universal Uclick. Send to The Mini Page Book of States, Universal Uclick, P.O. Box 6814, Leawood, KS 66206. Or call tollfree 800-591-2097 or go to www.smartwarehousing.com. Please send ______ copies of The Mini Page Book of States (Item #0-7407-8549-4) at $20.99 each, total cost. (Bulk discount information available upon request.) Name: ________________________________________________________________________ Address: _______________________________________________________________________ City: _________________________________________ State: _________ Zip: ________________ The Mini Pages popular series of issues about each state is collected here in a 156-page softcover book. Conveniently spiral-bound for ease of use, this invaluable resource contains A-to-Z facts about each state, along with the District of Columbia. Illustrated with colorful photographs and art, and complete with updated information, The Mini Page Book of States will be a favorite in classrooms and homes for years to come. I]Z\025B^c^\025EV\\000Z\234 dd`\025d[\025HiViZh NEW! Newspaper in Education WeekNewspaper Funnies Did you read the newspaper this morning? You might have checked a basketball game score or looked for a weather report. People use newspapers in many different ways. Adults can read more detailed explanations of whats going on in our country and around the world. Cooks can find new recipes to serve their families. For many kids, the first stop in the newspaper is the comics, or funnies, page. This week, in honor of Newspaper in Education Week (March 5-9), The Mini Page learns more about newspaper comics and the artists and writers who create them. Humor in newspapers The first comics in newspapers werent comic strips. Instead, cartoonists used humor to comment on events happening in the world. Benjamin Franklin created the first cartoon that appeared in an American newspaper, the Pennsylvania Gazette. The Yellow Kid Hogans Alley was about a group of kids in a neighborhood, but the Yellow Kid soon became the star of the comic. His popularity helped sell more copies of the World Hearst and Pulitzer began to fight over the cartoonist Outcault, and finally both papers were publishing their own version of the Yellow Kid with two different artists! Newspaper publishers realized how important comics were to selling more papers. Success in the 20th century Many more well-loved comic strips appeared in newspapers in the early 20th century, such as Gasoline Alley, Little Orphan Annie and later, Dick Tracy. In 1754, Benjamin Franklin drew this cartoon to urge the British colonies to fight the French and Native Americans for control of more land. Later, during the Revolutionary War, the cartoon became a symbol of the colonies uniting against the British. image courtesy Library of Congress Newspaper wars In the 1890s in New York City, two famous newspapermen, William Randolph Hearst and Joseph Pulitzer, were competing for readers. Pulitzer had a brand-new color press that he decided to use for comic art in the New York World Pulitzer hired artist Richard Outcault in 1894, and in May 1895 Hogans Alley appeared in the World The comic series featured a little boy character known as the Yellow Kid. The Yellow Kid In 1950, Peanuts brought a childs world to the comics. The strip became one of the most beloved cartoons in history and is still seen in newspapers today. Hearst Pulitzer Peanuts Peanuts Worldwide LLC. Dist. by UUReady Resources from The Mini Page 2012 Universal UclickThe Mini Page provides ideas for websites, books or other resources that will help you learn more about this weeks topics. On the Web: s\000CARTOONS\016OSU\016EDU\017YELLOWKID\017INDEX\016HTM s\000SUPERHEROSQUAD\016MARVEL\016COM\017CREATE?YOUR?OWN?COMIC At the library: \000\000s\000h!RT\000FOR\000+IDS\032\000#OMIC\000TRIPSv\000BY\000!RT\000OCHE \000\000s\000h!DVENTURES\000IN\000#ARTOONING\032\000\(OW\000TO\000URN\000OUR\000 $OODLES\000\#OMICSv\000BY\000*AMES\000TURM\f\000!NDREW\000!RNOLD\000 and Alexis Frederick-Frost from The Mini Page 2012 Universal Uclick Syndication Today, cartoonists have many places to share their ideas with others. They can create for the Internet on websites and blogs, in comic books, or for television and movies through animation. In the newspaper, most of the cartoons you read are syndicated \b\Y\rTED\t\016\000HIS\000MEANS\000THAT\000 the cartoonist has an agreement with a company (or syndicate) that promotes and sells the comic to different newspapers all around the world. This is why your favorite strips can be found in newspapers in other cities.Ideas Cartoonists say the hardest part about their job is coming up with ideas for new strips. Most will write and draw at least a weeks worth OF\000STRIPS\000AT\000A\000TIME\016\000OMETIMES\000THEY\000 follow one story for the whole week, and other times each strip is a separate joke. \000\000OME\000 comics are created by two people, an artist and a writer. They may come up with ideas together, or the writer may give his story to the artist to be illustrated. Cartoon artists may use different TECHNIQUES\000TO\000CREATE\000THEIR\000ART\016\000OME\000 use a computer tablet that lets them draw right onto the screen. Others use pen and ink, and some use brushes or a combination of tools. T Lewis (left) and Michael Fry create the comic Over the Hedge. Lewis is the artist; Fry is the writer.photo courtesy Universal UclickProduction Before computers were so easy to use, cart oonists would send their original art through the mail to the syndicate offices. Today, most cartoonists scan their artwork and then send the files electronically to the syndicate. There, an editor puts a date on each strip and reads them to catch ERRORS\000IN\000SPELLING\016\000OMETIMES\000EDITORS\000 even see continuity (con-ti-NOOih-tee) errors for example, when a character has on a white shirt in one panel or section of the strip, and a striped shirt in another.Distribution After strips are dated and corrected, they are electronically sent out to the client newspapers that have paid to include the strip in their comics pages.L]Vi\025VgZ\025ndjg\025[Vkdg^iZ\025Xdb^X\025hig^eh\025BV`Z\025 V\025a^hi\025VcY\025XdbeVgZ\025l^i]\025V\025[g^ZcY# A Cartoons Life Rookie Cookies RecipeCauliflower Mash Youll need: s\000\021\000HEAD\000CAULIFLOWER\f\000CUT\000INTO\000FLORETS s\000\0211 \017 2 cups chicken broth s\000\022\000TABLESPOONS\000BUTTER s\000 1 \017 3 cup light sour cream s\000\021\000CUP\000FRESHLY\000GRATED\000PARMESAN\000CHEESEWhat to do: 1. Boil cauliflower in chicken broth for 5 minutes. 2. Reduce heat, cover and simmer for 10 minutes. \023\016\000\000 NCOVER\000AND\000CONTINUE\000COOKING\000UNTIL\000LIQUID\000IS\000REDUCED\000AND\000CAULIF LOWER\000IS\000 tender. If necessary, pour off 1 \017 4 to 1 \017 2 \000CUP\000LIQUID\016\000EMOVE\000PAN\000FROM\000HEAT\016 4. Add butter, sour cream and cheese. Beat on low with a hand mixer until mixture is the consistency of mashed potatoes (it may be slightly chunky). You will need an adults help with this recipe.from The Mini Page 2012 Universal Uclick TM from The Mini Page 2012 Universal Uc lick Peter: Why didnt the piglets pay attention to the big pig? Paula: Because he was a boar! Piper: What did the pig use when he had a bad rash? Pamela: A special oinkment!TM All the following jokes have something in common. Can you guess the common theme or category? Peg: What type of neckwear do pigs like? Perry: Pigstys!Mini Spy . .-INI\000PY\000LOVES\000TO\000READ\000THE\000COMICS\000IN\000THE\000NEWSPAPER EVERY\000MORNING\016\000EE\000IF\000YOU\000CAN\000FIND\032 s\000KITE\000s\000HOE\000s\000CUP\000s\000SNAKE s\000PENCIL\000s\000LIGHTNING\000s\000RULER\000s\000WORD\000-\ s\000BOOK\000s\000TOOTHBRUSH\000s\000BASKET\000s\000ARROW s\000SCISSORS\000s\000NUMBER\000\027\000s\000LETTER\000:\000 from The Mini Page 2012 Universal Uclick TM from The Mini Page 2012 Universal UclickMeet Kiara Muhammad \000\000+IARA\000-UHAMMAD\000IS\000THE\000VOICE\000OF\000$OC\000-CTUFFINS\000 in the new Disney Junior animated TV series, Doc -CTUFFINS\016v\000HIS\000SHOW\f\000BEGINNING\000IN\000-ARCH\f\000IS\000 about a 6-year-old girl who operates a medical clinic for broken toys and stuffed animals. Kiara, 13, spent her early years in Boston. Her FAMILY\000MOVED\000TO\000.EW\000ORK\000#ITY\000WHEN\000SHE\000WAS\000\027\000 YEARS\000OLD\016\000HE\000BEGAN\000TAKING\000ACTING\000LESSONS\000AFTER\000SHE\000GOT\000THE\000LEAD\000 role of Fern in her schools production of Charlottes Web. Her family moved to Los Angeles so Kiara could work on her acting career. \000\000HE\000HAS\000APPEARED\000ON\000\000SHOWS\000SUCH\000AS\000h\(ANNAH\000-ONTANAv\000AND\000 IN\000THE\000$ISNEY\000#HANNEL\000\000MOVIE\000h$EN\000"ROTHER\016v\000HE\000HAS\000APPEARED\000 in several commercials and magazine ads, and also sings and dances. \000\000HE\000IS\000AN\000HONOR\000ROLL\000STUDENT\016\000HE\000ENJOYS\000FASHION\f\000BOWLING\f\000AN D\000 playing tennis and basketball. photo Disney Junior from The Mini Page 2012 Universal UclickWomen in the Comics The Mini Page StaffBetty Debnam Founding Editor and Editor at Large Lisa Tarry Managing Editor Lucy Lien Associate Editor Wendy Daley A rtist Early female cartoonists Women were drawing comic strips for newspapers as early as 1901. In 1932, Martha Orr introduced a cartoon character named Mary Worth to newspaper readers. Today Mary Worth is still in papers, although its written and drawn by other creators. \000\000!NOTHER\000FAVORITE\f\000h"RENDA\000TARR\fv\000 was started by female cartoonist Dale Messick in 1940. Cathy and For Better or For Worse, both written and drawn by women, appeared in NEWSPAPERS\000IN\000THE\000\021\031\027\020S\016 March is National Womens History Month. The Mini Page interviewed cartoonist Jan Eliot, CREATOR\000OF\000hTONE\000OUP\fv\000TO\000FIND\000OUT\000 more about women cartoonists. Jan lives in Eugene, Ore.Getting started Mini Page: How did you get your start in cartooning? Jan Eliot: I had a friend who thought I was funny. It was her idea. I had been an art major in college, so I drew 10 cartoons and took them to my local weekly paper. To my surprise, they printed them and asked for more. I did a weekly cartoon for them. But I wanted to be syndicated so I could make a living at cartooning. It took me 16 years to get syndicated! Mini Page: Do you think the job is different for men and women cartoonists? Jan Eliot: Not really. Funny wins. 365 days of inspiration Mini Page: You draw a strip for every day of the year. How do you get your ideas? Jan Eliot: Its mostly imagination, but the characters are real to me and have lives and personalities of their own. Ill eavesdrop on a bus or anywhere in a department store fitting room or a grocery store. I hear things on the news and think about how they would affect my characters. Mini Page: How has cartooning changed since you started? Jan Eliot: The space is decreasing comics are getting smaller. Ive enlarged my type twice over the years so that people can read it, and the artwork has gotten simpler. There is less room for full bodies and background art. But I hope theres always room for interesting and funny art. Thats what makes a cartoon! Jan Eliot writes and draws the comic strip Stone Soup. She works in a studio in her home. She wears a white glove on her right hand so she wont smear the ink under her hand.images courtesy Universal Uclick Mini Page: How did you come up with your characters? Jan Eliot: Theyre all reflections of me in some way. Next week, The Mini Page is about the Girl Scouts 100th birthday. Jan Eliot, courtesy Universal UclickCreating Stone Soup Mini Page: Did you look up to other women newspaper cartoonists? Jan Eliot: Yes. Nicole Hollander \bhYLVIAv\t\f\000#ATHY\000'UISEWITE\000\bh#ATHYv\t\000 and Lynn Johnston (For Better or For Worse). Lynn was really helpful to me in the years before I was SYNDICATED\016\000HE\000LOOKED\000OVER\000MY\000WORK\000 for me. from The Mini Page 2012 Universal UclickSupersport: Anthony Davis Height: 6-10 Weight: 220 Hometown: Chicago Opponents attempting a shot against Kentuckys Anthony Davis are likely to get the basketball slammed back at them. Through the first 23 games, the talented freshman led the NCAAs Division I in blocked shots, with 108. Tall, with long arms, hes an intimidator and a candidate for national Defensive Player of the Year. Davis who grew from a 6-3 guard to a 6-10 post player after his sophomore year in high school is tough overall. In helping highly ranked Kentucky post a 22-1 record, he averaged 13.5 points, 10.2 rebounds and shot 65 percent from the floor. Rabid Wildcat fans enjoy watching him play, but realize they might not see him in a Kentucky uniform for long. This time next year, he might be in the NBA. TM Words that remind us of newspaper comics are hidden in the block below. Some words are hidden backward or diagonally, and some letters are used twice. See if you can find: CARTOONIST, CHARACTER, COMICS, DAILY, DRAW, EDIT, FUNNY, HEARST, HUMOR, NEWSPAPER, PANEL, PEANUTS, PULITZER, READERS, SELL, STORY, STRIP, SYNDICATION, WEEKLY, WRITE, YELLOW KID.Newspaper Funnies TRY N FIND COMICS ARE A DAILY DOSE OF FUN! W S T S I N O O T R A C B D Q R R C J C T S R A E H E D I T E X I I N E W S P A P E R K S Z D S T M E T E R D L V N W T T A E R E O A A R E H U M O R I I L K R N C A N R L H W L I L L L Y U T W A Z S C Y J L P U Y G T E K P D Y N N U F E F P B S R N O I T A C I D N Y S from The Mini Page 2012 Universal UclickBasset Brown The News Hounds TM

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Submit information at least two weeks before the event. Early submission of timely material is appreciated, but multiple publications cannot be guaranteed. Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to community@chronicleonline.com. Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an event. Publication on a special day cant be guaranteed. Expect notes to run no more than once. Pet SPOTLIGHT Yard sale to benefit hearing impairedA yard sale set for 8 a.m. March 10 at Crystal River Lions Club, 109 N.E. Crystal St., Crystal River, will benefit Citrus Hearing Impaired Program Services. Donations can be dropped off at the CHIPS train from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday (no clothing, please). Anyone interested in reserving table space for $10 can call the office at 352-795-5000.Spiritual thinkers to meet March 10New Age Thinkers will meet at 2 p.m. Saturday, March 10, at the Ellie Schiller Homosassa Springs Wildlife Park. There will be two guest speakers. Kristine Gay Johnson, local author of Dance With The Stars and The We Factor, will discuss how her books provide a personal journey to spirituality and metaphysical elements that underlie our world. Pat Roberts, a spiritual and intuitive photographer, will also speak. All are welcome, but space is limited. Call Donna at 352-6283253 or email miss-donna@ tampabay.rr.com for more information. Rainforest plants talk at garden clubFloral City Garden Club will meet at noon Friday, March 9, at the Community Building on East Orange Avenue. The program will start at 12:30 p.m. and the business meeting will start at 1:30 p.m. Jerry Wetherington will speak about rainforest botanicals. All meetings are open to the public. For more information, call club President Christine Harnden at 352-341-3247. Program helps paddle enthusiasts Canoeists and kayakers are boaters, too. Now there is a new program available to address the unique needs of this audience. Homosassa Flotilla 15-4 of the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary offers Paddlesports America, a safety program designed to attract the novice paddle enthusiasts. The fourhour program presents five chapters of safety information. Topics include: Know Your Paddlecraft, Before You Get Underway, Operating Your Boat Safely, Legal Requirements of Boating and Boating Emergencies What to Do. The program will be from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, March 10, at West Citrus Community Center, 8940 W Veterans Drive, Homosassa. A fee of $20 for materials will be charged. For more information, call Anna Hughes at 352-621-6963, or Elaine Miranda at 352564-2521. CASA volunteers meet monthly CASA Citrus Abuse Shelter Association volunteers meet at 10:30 a.m. the second Tuesday monthly at CASAs outreach center, 1100 Turner Camp Road, Inverness. Those interested in volunteering are welcome. Call Linda Fernandez at 352344-8111. Timeshare owners to convene March 18SARASOTA Florida Timeshare Owners Group spring meeting will be 1 to 5 p.m. March 18 at the Palm Aire Country Club, 5601 Country Club Way, Sarasota. Industry representatives will provide advice on buying and selling a timeshare, distinguishing between an initial purchase and a resale and using a licensed resale broker to avoid up-front fees before a sale is completed. The meeting will include a round-table discussion on industry issues, vacation experiences and exchange companies. Copies of the 2012 Members Resort Directory will be provided to all members attending. The meeting is open to all Florida timeshare owners, with a $10 door charge and reservations required. Membership information and reservations can be obtained by contacting Frank Debar at 941-351-1384 or fdebar433@gmail.com. The groups website is http://tsownersgroup.com. Garage, bake sales at Crystal OaksCrystal Oaks Civic Association will host a community fundraiser garage sale, bake sale and white elephant sale from 7:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Saturday, March 17, at the clubhouse, 4858 Crystal Oaks Drive, Lecanto. There will be a large array of items, plus homemade baked goods. Coffee will be available. While at the clubhouse, pick up a map of participating houses in the community. For more information, call Hedda at 352-527-8144. Program to observe Womens DayThe Nature Coast Unitarian Universalists will host a free, non-religious program at 4 p.m. March 8, International Womens Day. The free event starts with food and a keynote talk and songs by Mindy Simmons, Floridas Chanteuse. A motivational speaker, plus music by Patchwork, a female trio, will round out the celebration. The theme is Connecting Girls Inspiring Futures. Unitarian Universalist Fellowship is at 7633 N. Florida Ave., Citrus Springs, north of the Holder light. Call 352-465-4225 or visit naturecoastuu.org. Rec group slates Military Card PartyBeverly Hills Recreation Association invites everyone to its Military Card Party Tuesday, March 13, at Central Ridge Community Center, 77 Civic Circle, Beverly Hills. Reservations are required by March 9. Doors open at 11 a.m. and lunch will be served at noon. Games will begin at 1 p.m. Donation is $12. Tickets are available at the community center office from 7:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Friday. For more information, call the center at 352-746-4882 or Barbara Wezwick at 352746-3636. Welcome, baby brother Pet SPOTLIGHT Brandy Special to the Chronicle Annie welcomes new brother Cadet, a cock-a-poo, to the family. Annie looks forward to taking Cadet to the dog park to meet her friends. The pair live with Bob and Jody Fahey of Inverness. C OMMUNITY Page C6 WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7, 2012 C ITRUS C OUNTY C HRONICLE ROCHELLE KAISER /For the Chronicle Brandy, a 5-year-old dachshund, is happy to roll over for attention. She lives the good life in Homosassa with Jeff and Lori Moser. News NOTES M ARYA NN L YNN Special to the ChronicleThe current exhibit at the Old Courthouse Museum is Sisters All, Friends Forever: 100 years of Girl Scouts. Hours are from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday. With our Library Partnership, Coastal Lakes Library in Crystal River has a Civil War exhibit running in conjunction with Civil War Re-enactment, slated for March 9 through 11. The exhibit can be viewed during library hours. At the Lakes Region Library in Inverness at 2 p.m. Friday, March 9, John Miller will be speaking about his new book, Citrus White Gold. Phosphate mining was a major factor in the development of Floral City and other areas of Citrus County more than 100 years ago. At the Old Courthouse Museum at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. Saturday, March 10, Dr. Jeff Mitchem, archaeologist with the Florida Museum of Natural History, will present Tatham Mound: Hernando de Soto in Citrus County. Tatham Mound is in the Tsala Apopka Lake area. Mitchem will discuss excavations and the archaeological evidence of the encounters between native Floridians and the Spanish expedition of Hernando de Soto in 1539. The 1 p.m. program will address the older burials and artifacts recovered during excavations, and the story of the reburial of the remains in their final resting place. This is part of a program from the Florida Public Archaeology Network, Central Region of the University of South Florida. Music at the Old Courthouse Museum in March will be at 7 p.m. (doors open at 6:15) Thursday, March 15, with Jimmy Crowley, singer/songwriter from Cork, Ireland. He will entertain with delightful Celtic music. This is part of the Concerts at the Old Courthouse series. Cost is $10; call 352-341-6427 for reservations because space is limited. On March 25 at the Hernando Historic School in Hernando will be Pickin and Grinin Goin on Here, a family bluegrass festival, with music from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m or later. Grounds open at 9 a.m.; get there early for the best listening spot. Admission is $10; family tickets are available. There are only three types of purely American music and bluegrass in one of them. Come and enjoy American music, food, fun and vendors. Coming up on April 20, 21 and 22, When Elvis Came to Town will again grace the Old Courthouse Museum. Tickets are now on sale for $25. Last year we had to add two production times, as demand was so great. For more information about tickets and museum events, call 352341-6427. Music, more in March Museum also offers history in its lineup Special to the Chronicle Ruth Anne Rackley, owner, Ace Hardware of Inverness, 465 E. Highland Blvd., displays a plaque honoring her business as a Hospice of Citrus County Partner In Care. Rackley, who also owns Ace Hardware of Hernando at 2585 N. Florida Ave., recently made a donation of merchandise to the Hospice of Citrus County Thrift & Gift Shoppes in the amount of $3,100. Pictured, from left, are: Hospice of Citrus County Development Director Linda Baker, Ace Hardware general manager Bubby Duteau, Ace Hardware owner Ruth Anne Rackley and Hospice of Citrus County Thrift Shoppe distribution manager C.J. Pattillo. Visit Hospice of Citrus County on the web at www.hospiceofcitruscounty.org. Ace supports Hospice Special to the ChronicleOur Lady Of Grace/Knights Of Columbus Abbot Francis Sadlier Council No. 6168 stage the second annual Larry Nestor Memorial Blood Drive from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, March 17, in the Parish Life Center of Our Lady of Grace Church in Beverly Hills. Nestor was a powerful voice for the Knights of Columbus in New York and in Florida. He also was an active member of Our Lady of Grace Church. A former Marine who spent time in Iwo Jima, he donated blood as often as was allowed. All are welcome, whether they knew Larry Nestor, to donate a pint of blood in his memory. Each pint of blood collected will go toward saving at least three lives. Donors will receive a mini-physical, a commemorative gift, an Irish complimentary breakfast and free cholesterol reading. Rose Nestor, who was married to Larry for 59 years, will be there to greet donors. For more information, call Don Irwin at 352-527-8450. Drive to honor Larry Nestor Second annual event will be March 17 Special to the ChronicleWere you born after Jan. 1, 1988? If so, you should know it is the law that to legally operate any vessel with a motor of 10 HP or greater, you must have the Florida Safe Boaters card. You can obtain this card by successfully completing a Boating Skills and Seamanship Class, to be offered by U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary Flotilla 15-1, beginning Monday, March 12. The program runs for 10 sessions from 7 to 9 p.m. Mondays and Thursdays at the flotilla building, 148 N.E. Fifth St., Crystal River. Participants learn how to have a safe experience; how to use a marine radio and call in emergencies; required and suggested safety equipment; trailering a boat; highway signs on the water; piloting; rules of the road (as they pertain to the water); safe handling of a boat; specific Florida state regulations in relation to the waters, marine mammals, the environment and more. Upon satisfactory completion of the program, participants will be mailed the Florida Safe Boating card from Florida Fish and Wildlife. Many insurance companies recognize the card and offer discounts on boat insurance. Cost is $40 (includes book and instruction by certified Coast Guard Auxiliary instructors). For more information or to register, call Linda Jones at 352-503-6199. Learn to be a safe boater with USCG auxiliary Friends sale The Friends of the Citrus County Library Systems mega spring sale runs from Friday, March 9, through Tuesday, March 13, at the Citrus County Auditorium on U.S. 41 South, next to the fairgrounds. Sale hours are 5 to 8 p.m. Friday ($5 donation Friday night only); 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday; 1 to 4 p.m. Sunday (blue light and BOGO specials); 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday (half-price day); and 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday ($3 a bag). Proceeds benefit Citrus County libraries. For sale information, call 352-746-1334 or 352-527-8405. Call 352-503-6199 to register. News NOTE

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E NTERTAINMENTC ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE W EDNESDAY, M ARCH 7, 2012 C7 P HILLIP A LDER Newspaper Enterprise Assn. It is well-known that no-trump contracts are races. The defense is trying to set up its long suit, while declarer is battling to establish the winners that he needs to get home. Suit contracts tend not to be such clear-cut contests. But sometimes speed is important. In this example, West leads the diamond three against four spades. Who should win and how? North has 12 high-card points and four-card spade support, which would often be sufficient for a gameforcing response. However, with 4-3-3-3 distribution and eight losers, North sensibly downgraded the value of his hand to a game-invitational limit raise. South, having more than a minimum opening, raised to game. Declarer starts by counting his losers: none in spades, one in hearts, one or two in diamonds and two in clubs. Next, he should check his winners: six in spades, two in hearts, one or two in diamonds and one in clubs. South needs one diamond and one club or two diamonds. There is a strong temptation to take the diamond finesse at trick one. Here, though, it loses, and if East shifts to the heart queen, declarer will go down. The defenders will take one heart, one diamond and two clubs before South can establish his 10th winner in clubs. Instead, declarer should win immediately with dummys diamond ace, draw trumps using honors from his hand, and play on clubs. The defenders can take one diamond, but they lose the race. South sets up his club trick, on which he discards his heart four, before the defenders can cash a heart trick. (NGC) 109 65 109 44 53 A mer i can W ee d W ee d Jacked! Al as k a St a t e T roopers D rugs, I nc. M e th A mer i can W ee d W ee d Jacked! A mer i can W ee d W ar Over Weed D rugs, I nc. M e th (NICK) 28 36 28 35 25VictoriousVictoriousAnubisiCarly GssFriendsFriendsGeorgeGeorgeFriendsFriends (OWN) 103 62 103 Forensics: YouThe Rosie Show PG48 Hours: Hard Evid.48 Hours: Hard Evid.48 Hours: Hard Evid.48 Hours: Hard Evid. (OXY) 44 123 Top ModelSnapped PG Bad Girls ClubBad Girls ClubSnapped PG Snapped PG (SHOW) 340 241 340 4 Twil: Eclipse Youth in Revolt (2009) Michael Cera. R Shameless Parenthood (iTV) MA Snoop Dogg: The Bad Girls of ComedyCalifornicationHouse of Lies MA Inside Comedy Drive Angry (SPEED) 732 112 732 NASCAR Race Hub (N) Pass TimePass Time PG Dumbest Stuff Dumbest Stuff Car Warriors Rebuilding a Chevy Chevelle.Stuntbusters Stuntbusters PG NASCAR Race Hub (SPIKE) 37 43 37 27 36Ways to Die Enter the Dragon (1973) Bruce Lee. A kung fu expert is sent to infiltrate an island fortress. R I Am Bruce Lee (2011) People discuss the legacy of Bruce Lee. NR Enter the Dragon (1973) R (STARZ) 370 271 370 Multiplicity (1996) PG-13 Soul Surfer (2011, Drama) AnnaSophia Robb, Helen Hunt. (In Stereo) PG Air Force One (1997, Suspense) Harrison Ford. Premiere. (In Stereo) R Takers (2010) Matt Dillon. (SUN) 36 31 36 PowerboatingIsraeli Bask. Heat Live! (Live) NBA Basketball Atlanta Hawks at Miami Heat. From the AmericanAirlines Arena in Miami. (Live) Heat Live! (Live) Inside the HEAT Special Olympics 3 Wide Life PG (SYFY) 31 59 31 26 29Face Off Alien Interpreters Face Off BurtonesqueGhost Hunters (In Stereo) Ghost Hunters International (N) Face Off Dinoplasty (N) Ghost Hunters International (TBS) 49 23 49 16 19KingKingSeinfeldSeinfeldFam. GuyFam. GuyFam. GuyFam. GuyBig BangBig BangConan (N) (TCM) 169 53 169 30 35 Having a Wild Weekend (1965, Musical Comedy) The Dave Clark Five. NR Ruby Gentry (1952) Jennifer Jones. NR Parrish (1961) Troy Donahue. Poor young man cuts swath in Connecticut tobacco world. NR (TDC) 53 34 53 24 26Sons of Guns (In Stereo) Sons of Guns Wedlock & Load Sons of Guns (In Stereo) Sons of Guns Sniper Rifle Silencer Doomsday Bunkers (Series Premiere) (N) Sons of Guns Sniper Rifle Silencer (TLC) 50 46 50 29 30CakeCakeMedical ExaminerHoard-BuriedUntold Stories of ERObsesObsesUntold Stories of ER (TMC) 350 261 350 Fatal Secrets Bratz (2007) Nathalia Ramos. Four lifelong best friends enter high school. PG Furry Vengeance (2010) Brendan Fraser. PG Buck (2011, Documentary) (In Stereo) PG Lucky (2011) R (TNT) 48 33 48 31 34Law & Order Slaughter Law & Order Illegitimate (In Stereo) Law & Order Monster (In Stereo) Law & Order Black, White and Blue Law & Order Charity Case Southland Gods Work MA (TOON) 38 58 38 33 MAD PGGumballAdvenJohnny TNinjaGoLevel UpKing/HillKing/HillAmericanAmericanFam. GuyFam. Guy (TRAV) 9 54 9 44FoodFoodFoodFoodFoodFoodFoodFoodSlce-Slce-FoodFood (truTV) 25 55 25 98 55Cops Cops PGWorlds Dumbest...RepoRepoRepoRepoTowTowVegas Vegas (TVL) 32 49 32 34 24M*A*S*HM*A*S*HM*A*S*HM*A*S*HHome ImHomeRaymondRaymondClevelandDivorcedDivorcedCleveland (USA) 47 32 47 17 18NCIS Legend NCIS: Los Angeles Callen, G NCIS Cracked (In Stereo) PG NCIS A new special agent arrives. PG Psych Heeeeeres Lassie (N) PG NCIS Knockout (In Stereo) PG (WE) 117 69 117 Charmed Blinded by the Whitelighter Charmed Wrestling With Demons PG Sleepless in Seattle (1993, Romance-Comedy) Tom Hanks, Meg Ryan. PG Sleepless in Seattle (1993) Tom Hanks. PG (WGN-A) 18 18 18 18 2030 Rock30 RockFunny Home VideosFunny Home VideosFunny Home VideosWGN News at Nine30 RockScrubs D ear Annie : Bill and I have been married for 43 years. He retired three years ago. We didnt socialize with any of his co-workers, so I didnt know them well. Last Christmas, Bill got a card with no return address. It only had Bills name on it. I handed it to him so he had to open it in front of me. It was a really nice card from Betty and a note telling him how much she missed him, their talks, their lunches and their personal conversations. She suggested they get together for a holiday lunch. When I asked Bill why he never mentioned Betty to me, he said the lunches didnt mean anything and he probably forgot because they were so insignificant. I dont believe him. We have always told each other everything. He put Bettys card on display with the others, but I asked him to take it down since it wasnt sent to us as a couple. He said hed throw it away because it made me unhappy. But, Annie, my instincts said he was lying, so I checked the trash. No card. The other day, I saw his old briefcase, and inside was Bettys card. He had written her phone number on it. If this card meant nothing to him, why keep it? Why lie to me? I love my husband. I want to trust him. Ive never had reason not to, but Im shaken to the core. Now I pay close attention when he leaves the house and keep track of how long hes gone. Last week, he said he needed to run some errands and was gone for nearly two hours. He claims he ran into Dave, a former co-worker, but I wonder if this was Bettys holiday lunch. I hate feeling this way. My kids say to forget about it before I make myself sick. Are they right? Am I just paranoid? Card Woes Dear Card : No. Your husband is not being totally truthful about Betty, and this creates suspicion and distrust, both of which undermine your relationship. You need to have a long talk with him and explain why his behavior is hurting you. If he cannot reassure you sufficiently, the next step is counseling. Dear Annie : Recently, my wife and I were in Las Vegas and had a terrible experience at a buffet at one of the top hotels. I sent an email to the manager, and she forwarded it to the executive chef. The executive chef apologized, invited us to dine at any of the hotels restaurants and suggested the most expensive one. He met us at the restaurant and said to order anything we wanted on the menu, starting with wine. The total bill came to $350. I said we should leave a tip, but my wife (who has a restaurant background) said that when the management invites you, you do not tip. Who is right? Comped Bill Dear Bill: You are. The waitstaff still had to work to serve you, no matter who paid the bill. Unless there was an added service charge that was then picked up by the owner, the waitstaff should not be penalized because you had a bad experience at another location. Dear Annie : Hurt in California felt bad that she called the police on a brother who might be raising children in a neglectful, possibly abusive environment. As a person whose childhood was very similar to that scenario, I would have been rescued many times over if an adult had had the courage to call Child Protective Services. I cringe when I hear my aunts say they still wonder whether they should have done the same, but didnt want to interfere. Please take the risk of sticking up for those kids. They will remember for the rest of their lives that someone was paying attention. Shouldawouldacoulda Annies Mailbox is written by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar, longtime editors of the Ann Landers column. Please email your questions to anniesmailbox@comcast.net, or write to: Annies Mailbox, c/o Creators Syndicate, 737 3rd Street, Hermosa Beach, CA 90254. To find out more about Annies Mailbox and read features by other Creators Syndicate writers and cartoonists, visit the Creators Syndicate Web page at www.creators.com. ANNIES MAILBOX Bridge (Answers tomorrow) ALONG PSYCH UNRULYDINNER Yesterdays Jumbles: Answer: He refused to draw the Jumble cartoon because the idea behind it wasnt this -PUNNYENOUGH Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAMEby David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words. KNIBL MAIDT FSIXUF CREGRO Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Find us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/jumble A: WEDNESDAY EVENING MARCH 7, 2012 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D/I: Comcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights C B D/I F H6:006:307:007:308:008:309:009:3010:0010:3011:0011:30 ^ (WESH) NBC 19 19 NewsNewsEntAccessWhitneyChelseaLaw & Order: SVURock CenterNewsJay Leno # (WEDU) PBS 3 3 14 6World News Nightly Business PBS NewsHour (N) (In Stereo) Ed Slotts Retirement Rescue! Financial planning for retirement. (In Stereo) G Yanni -Live at El Morro Yanni performs with orchestra. G Blood Sugar % (WUFT) PBS 5 5 5 41NewsBusinessPBS NewsHour (N)Nature PGNOVA G Muhammad AliWorldT. Smiley ( (WFLA) NBC 8 8 8 8 8NewsNightly NewsEntertainment Ton.Extra (N) PG Whitney (N) Are You There Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Rock Center With Brian Williams (N) NewsJay Leno ) (WFTV) ABC 20 20 20 NewsWorld News Jeopardy! (N) G Wheel of Fortune The Middle PG Suburgatory PG Modern Family Happy Endings Revenge for Real (Series Premiere) (N) Eyewit. News Nightline (N) (WTSP) CBS 10 10 10 10 1010 News, 6pm (N) Evening News Inside Edition Be a Millionaire Survivor: One World (N) (In Stereo) Criminal Minds (DVS) CSI: Crime Scene Investigation 10 News, 11pm (N) Letterman ` (WTVT) FOX 13 13 13 13FOX13 6:00 News (N) TMZ (N) PG The Insider PG American Idol Finalists Compete The finalists perform for the judges. (N) PG FOX13 10:00 News (N) NewsAccess Hollywd 4 (WCJB) ABC 11 11 4 NewsABC EntInside Ed.MiddleSuburg.FamilyHappyRevenge for RealNewsNightline 6 (WCLF) IND 2 2 2 22 22Christian Fitness BelieversWayJack Van Impe Great AwakeningJoseph Prince G The Place for MiraclesFreedom Today Life TodayClear Vision Great Awaken < (WFTS) ABC 11 11 11NewsWorld News Wheel of Fortune Jeopardy! (N) G The Middle PG Suburgatory PG Modern Family Happy Endings Revenge for Real (Series Premiere) (N) NewsNightline (N) @ (WMOR) IND 12 12 16Family Guy PG Family Guy Big Bang Theory Big Bang Theory Law & Order: Criminal Intent Law & Order: Criminal Intent How I MetHow I MetThe Office PG The Office PG F (WTTA) MNT 6 6 6 9 9RaymondSeinfeldFamily FdFamily FdBurn Notice PGBurn Notice PGScrubsSeinfeldTournament Preview H (WACX) TBN 21 21 The Faith The 700 Club (N) GVictor M.ChildCotroneVarietyGaitherStudio DirectVariety L (WTOG) CW 4 4 4 12 12King of Queens King of Queens Two and Half Men Two and Half Men One Tree Hill (N) (In Stereo) Americas Next Top Model: British Friends PG Friends PG The Simpsons According to Jim O (WYKE) FAM 16 16 16 15Nature Coast I.N.N. News County Court Sheriffs 10-43 To Be Announced Straight Talk Med Visiting History Inverness Spotlight Music Mix USA Music Mix USA The Cisco Kid G Black Beauty S (WOGX) FOX 13 7 7SimpsonsSimpsonsBig BangBig BangAmerican Idol Finalists Compete (N) PGFOX 35 News at 10TMZ PGAccess (WVEA) UNI 15 15 15 15 14NoticiasNotic.Una Familia con Suerte (N) PG (SS)El Talismn (N) (SS)La Que NoNoticiasNoticiero (WXPX) ION 17 Ghost WhispererCold Case PGCold Case PGCold Case Criminal Minds PGCriminal Minds PG (A&E) 54 48 54 25 27Storage Wars PG Storage Wars PG Storage Wars Storage Wars PG Storage Wars PG Storage Wars PG Dog the Bounty Hunter PG Bounty Hunter Bounty Hunter Dog the Bounty Hunter PG (AMC) 55 64 55 CSI: Miami Sudden Death CSI: Miami See No Evil National Lampoons Vacation (1983, Comedy) Chevy Chase. R National Lampoons Vacation (1983, Comedy) Chevy Chase. R (ANI) 52 35 52 19 21River Monsters: Unhooked PG Gator Boys Mud Gator Attacks PG Call of Wildman Call of Wildman Finding Bigfoot (In Stereo) PG Finding Bigfoot (In Stereo) PG Call of Wildman Call of Wildman (BET) 96 19 96 106 & Park: BETs Top 10 Live Top 10 Countdown Wild Out Wednesday. PG Soul Plane (2004) Kevin Hart. Passengers and crew party aboard an airliner. Steppin: The Movie (2009, Musical Comedy) Darius McCrary. PG-13 (BRAVO) 254 51 254 Tabatha Takes OverTabatha Takes OverHousewives/OCTop Chef: Texas (N)Million Dollar ListingHappensMillion (CC) 27 61 27 33Daily ShowColbert Report 30 Rock 30 Rock Chappelle Show Chappelle Show South Park MA South Park MA South Park MA South Park MA Daily ShowColbert Report (CMT) 98 45 98 28 37 Blue Collar Comedy Tour: The Movie (2003) Jeff Foxworthy. PG-13 Vince Vaughns Wild West Comedy Show: 30 Days & 30 Nights Hollywood to the Heartland R Blue Collar Comedy Tour: One for the Road (2006) (CNBC) 43 42 43 Mad Money (N)The Kudlow ReportCrime Inc.American GreedAmerican GreedMad Money (CNN) 40 29 40 41 46John King, USA (N)Erin Burnett OutFrontAnderson CooperPiers MorganAnderson CooperErin Burnett OutFront (DISN) 46 40 46 6 5Shake It Up! G GoodCharlie A.N.T. Farm G Austin & Ally G So Random! G Shake It Up! G Jessie G A.N.T. Farm G Austin & Ally G Austin & Ally G Austin & Ally G A.N.T. Farm G (ESPN) 33 27 33 21 17SportsCenter (N)College BasketballCollege BasketballSportCtr (ESPN2) 34 28 34 43 49NFL32 (N) College BasketballCollege BasketballSportCtrBasket (EWTN) 95 70 95 48DanaGalleryDaily MassEWTN Live GSaintRosarySaintsThe FaithWomen (FAM) 29 52 29 20 28 Raising Helen (2004, Comedy-Drama) Kate Hudson, John Corbett. PG-13 The Parent Trap (1998, Comedy) Lindsay Lohan. Reunited twin girls try to get their parents back together. PG The 700 Club PG (FLIX) 118 170 Celebrity (1998, Comedy-Drama) Hank Azaria, Kenneth Branagh. R Unstrung Heroes (1995) Andie MacDowell. PG I Am David (2004) Ben Tibber. (In Stereo) PG My Lifes in Turnaround (1993) (FNC) 44 37 44 32Special ReportFOX ReportThe OReilly FactorHannity (N)Greta Van SusterenThe OReilly Factor (FOOD) 26 56 26 DinersDinersRestaurant: Im.Restaurant: Im.Restaurant: Im.Restaurant: Im.Worst Cooks (FSNFL) 35 39 35 College BasketballDan PatrickCollege BasketballBasket (FX) 30 60 30 51Two and Half Men Two and Half Men Two and Half Men Two and Half Men Jennifers Body (2009, Horror) Megan Fox, Amanda Seyfried. Premiere. R Jennifers Body (2009, Horror) Megan Fox, Amanda Seyfried. R (GOLF) 727 67 727 CentralEuro TourGolfGolfOn the Range (N)On the RangeOn the RangePGA TourCentral (HALL) 39 68 39 45 54Little House on the Prairie PG Little House on the Prairie PG Little House on the Prairie Rage PG Little House on the Prairie PG Frasier PGFrasier PGFrasier PGFrasier PG (HBO) 302 201 302 2 2 Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1 (2010) Daniel Radcliffe. Something Borrowed (2011) Ginnifer Goodwin. (In Stereo) PG-13 Luck Ace pitches a deal. MA Real Time With Bill Maher MA (HBO2) 303 202 303 Seabiscuit (2003, Drama) Tobey Maguire. (In Stereo) PG-13 GasLand (2010) Josh Fox. (In Stereo) NR Ring Life: Sergio Hereafter (2010, Drama) Matt Damon, Jay Mohr. (In Stereo) PG-13 (HGTV) 23 57 23 42 52Sell LASell LAHuntersHouseProperty Brothers GIncomeKitchenHouseHuntersProperty Brothers G (HIST) 51 25 51 32 42To Be AnnouncedRestorationRestorationRestorationRestorationOnly in America With Larry the Cable Guy RestorationRestorationOnly in America With Larry the Cable Guy (LIFE) 24 38 24 31Wife Swap Funderburgh/ Warren PGWife Swap Harris/ Weasel PG Wife Swap King/ Reeves PG Wife Swap (In Stereo) PG Wife Swap Women trade places. PG Wife Swap Ghani/ Stallone PG (LMN) 50 119 The Perfect Child (2007, Drama) Rebecca Budig, Lochlyn Munroe. NR A Killer Among Friends (1992, Docudrama) Patty Duke, Loretta Swit. Dangerous Child (2001, Drama) Delta Burke, Ryan Merriman. (MAX) 320 221 320 3 3 Big Stan (2007) Rob Schneider. (In Stereo) R Face/Off (1997) John Travolta. An FBI agent and a violent terrorist switch identities. R X-Men: First Class (2011, Action) James McAvoy. (In Stereo) PG-13 (MSNBC) 42 41 42 PoliticsNation ( N ) Hardball MatthewsThe Ed Show ( N ) Rachel MaddowThe Last WordThe Ed Show

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C8 W EDNESDAY, M ARCH 7, 2012 C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE C OMICS Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377 Project X (R) ID required. 1:20 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:45 p.m. Dr. Seuss The Lorax (PG) In Real 3D. 12:30 p.m., 7:15 p.m. No passes. Dr. Seuss The Lorax (PG) 2:45 p.m., 5 p.m. No passes. Tyler Perrys Good Deeds (PG-13) 12:45 p.m., 3:45 p.m., 7 p.m. Ghost Rider (PG-13) 12:50 p.m., 3:50 p.m. 7:30 p.m. This Means War (PG-13) 1 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:20 p.m. The Vow (PG-13) 1:20 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:10 p.m. Journey 2: The Mysterious Island (PG) In Real 3D. 4:10 p.m., 7:05 p.m. No passes. Journey 2: The Mysterious Island (PG) 1:10 p.m. Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864 Project X (R) ID required. 2 p.m., 5 p.m., 8 p.m. Dr. Seuss The Lorax (PG) 1 p.m., 5:30 p.m. No passes. Dr. Seuss The Lorax (PG) In Real 3D. 3:15 p.m., 7:50 p.m. No passes. Wanderlust (R) ID required.1:20 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7:55 p.m. Act of Valor (R) ID required. 1:45 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m. Tyler Perrys Good Deeds (PG-13) 1:30 p.m., 4:15 p.m., 7:15 p.m. This Means War (PG-13) 1:35 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:20 p.m. Ghost Rider (PG-13) In Real 3D. 1:50 p.m., 4:50 p.m., 7:40 p.m. No passes. Journey 2: The Mysterious Island (PG) 1:10 p.m. Journey 2: The Mysterious Island (PG) In Real 3D. 4:10 p.m., 7:05 p.m. No passes. The Artist (PG-13) 1:25 p.m., 4 p.m., 7 p.m. Peanuts Garfield For Better or For Worse Sally Forth Beetle Bailey Dilbert The Grizzwells The Born Loser Blondie Doonesbury Kit N Carlyle Rubes Dennis the Menace The Family Circus Betty Big Nate Arlo and Janis Frank & Ernest Times subject to change; call ahead. Todays MOVIES W LYWTP STNLWZH NCK DST SAAHDL XHCXMH WT RHTHVSM WT S XCGWLWEH BSN, LYHT NCKVH S MKDPN WTJWEWJKSM. GSZ HMMWCLL Previous Solution: There are some days when I think Im going to die from an overdose of satisfaction. Salvador Dali (c) 2012 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 3-7 Pickles WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Contemp. WXOF-FM 96.3 Adult Mix WEKJ FM 96.7, 103.9 Religious WSKY 97.3 FM News Talk WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies WFJV-FM 103.3 s, s, s WRZN-AM 720 Adult Standards Local RADIO Editors note: Louis Campos now runs the cipher clue upside-down for more of a challenge.

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E DUCATIONC ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE W EDNESDAY, M ARCH 7, 2012 C9 Classifieds Classifieds Classifieds In Print and Online All The Time! TO ADVERTISE CALL:352-563-5966 OR PLACE YOUR AD ONLINE ATwww.chronicleonline.comCONNECTING THE RIGHT BUYERS WITH YOUR MESSAGE BUSINESS HOURS: MONDAY-FRIDAY 8:00 A.M. 5:00 P.M. CLOSED SATURDAY/SUNDAY WE GLADLY ACCEPTPublication Days/Deadlines Chronicle / Daily.......................................1 PM, Daily Homefront / Sunday............................. ....3 PM, Friday Chronicle / Sunday............... ....................4 PM, Friday Chronicle / Monday..................................4 PM, Friday Sumter County Times / Thursday. ..............11 AM, T uesday Riverland News / Thursday. ................. .....2 PM, Monday South Marion Citizen / Friday....................4 PM, Tuesday West Marion Messenger / Wednesday.......4 PM, Friday 0008KWF Page C3 000AN30 000AN34 Domestic Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details 352-563-5966 Medical #1 AffordableCNA Prep Course CPR-AED-Free Book Am & PM classes getyour cna.com 352-341-PREP (7737) AR/ASSISTANTFor busy office. Medical experience a must. (352) 489-2995 CNA/HHAs Apply At HOME INSTEAD SENIOR CARE 4224 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy, Lecanto Clerical/ Secretarial Contractor seeking a full time Motivated Candidate with Human Resourcesbackground and payroll experience. Candidate must possess computer skills in Micro soft Windows plus Excel and be able to adapt quickly to company accounting program. Knowledge of HR policies, procedures, rules and regulations and payroll required. Must be dependable and detail oriented for this position. Background checks and drug screening will be required after hiring. Send resume to jrogers@fandhcontractors.com. Personal/ Beauty HAIR STYLIST FT/PT Immediate Openings, CallSue 352-628-0630 Your world first.Every Day v automotive Classifieds Lost Lost Bird, Sun Conure, Bright Colors, Friendly, Talks Floral City Area REWARD (352) 726-3185 Found Found Med Size Dog, 1 -2yrs old, Female Withlacoochee Forest Lost around 1 mo. Cattle Dog/ Mix 352-302-4801 Announcements May The Lady of Guadalupe be praised, adored & loved. Lady of Guadalupe Pray for us. St Jude worker of miracles pray for us. St Jude helper of the hopeless pray for us. Seafood FRESH JUMBO SHRIMP 15ct.@ $5 per lb Stone Crab@ $6 per lb delivered 727-771-7500 Situations Wanted Will Babysit and/or Tutor Any Day Spanish or English pls call and ask for Yuly 352-270-4141 Child Care Personnel NOW TAKING APPLICATIONS For Exp TeacherFor 2 & 3 yr old Class (352) 527-8440 TEACHER Fulltime, Exp. Req. CDA PreferredTODAYS CHILD(352) 344-9444 Free Offers KEEPyour used auto parts in Citrus Co. Dales Auto Parts. & Savage Pays top $$$. 352-628-4144 we are taking donations of kids clothes,toys,furniture,baby stuff,ect.call and we will come pick it up.jamie @ 352-586-9754.thank you Good Things to Eat FRESH JUMBO SHRIMP 15ct.@ $5 per lb Stone Crab@ $6 per lb delivered 727-771-7500 Lost 8 mos old BRINDLE & White Boxer cropped tail but ears not done. Red collar female last seen. Service Dog REWARD 3/6, Beverly Hills area Canvas Grocery Bag orange, Inverness or Floral City Sentimental Value (352) 341-0292 Long Haired Chihuahua, Male 9 months old Loved, Missed, would love to have him home (352) 628-3228 Lost Cat-female, calico, max short tail, 9 years old, declawed, no teeth, never been outside, North Athen/W Cushions/Citrus Blvd. area. She had her collar on with her rabies tag. Please call (352) 465-1696 or 352-212-5076 REWARD $1000. No Questions ask. Min Pin Female 10 lbs name Zoey, Needs meds. last seen Sun 8/7 Holiday Dr off Turkey Oak Crystal River (352) 257-9546 352-400-1519 Todays New Ads R WRIGHT Tree Service Tree removal & trimming. Ins. & Lic.# 0256879 352-341-6827 TREADMILL WESLO fold up treadmill $50 352-637-1965 Free Services $$ TOP DOLLAR $$Paid for Junk Vehicles,J.W. 352-228-9645 $$ CASH PAID $$ For Wrecked, Junk or Unwanted Cars/Trucks. $$ (352) 201-1052 $$ $$ CASH PAID $$for junk vehicles. 352-634-5389 BUYING JUNK CARS Running or Not CASH PAID -$200 & UP (352) 771-6191 FREE REMOVAL appls, motors, mowers, scp.metals & other services. 352-270-4087 FREE REMOVAL OF Scrap Medal, Mowers Appliances and MORE Call (352) 224-0698 Free Offers 42 Round Wood Table FREE (352) 527-7183 Dachshund Hound 2 yrs. old, paperwork Outside dog, needs room to play Needs Good Home (352) 476-5321 Free fertilizer horse manure mixed with pine shavings great for gardens or mulch 352-628-9624 FREE Oak Firework already cut, u haul 6545 S Dolphin RD FLoral CIty Fresh cut palm trunk, 12 diameter, 5to 6 lengths 795-8800 LOUVERED BI-FOLD DOORS w/ hardware 2 SETS -8ft by 12 and 4 sets of 8ft by 9 Citrus Hills (352) 341-4103 Todays New Ads CHEVY S10 4 x 4 cold AC, 4.3, V6 motor, auto, runs good $2,800 (352) 212-4835 DODGE 1500 Sport regular cab, 28K mil. Like New $16,000 (352) 419-7703 Retired dont need it! EXPERIENCED ROOFING CREW & ROOFERS Must have Truck Tools & Equipment.Apply In Person AAA ROOFING Crystal River (352) 563-0411 HERNANDO 3/2/2 Rent to Own $850 mo www.rickybobs.com 352-613-5818 HOMOSASSA Wooded Lot on Lee Woods Drive, 112 x114ft River access, but not on river $7,000. 352-621-1664 INVERNESS Fri. & Sat. 8a-2pm 2 Family Sale Tools, Household, LOTS OF STUFF, Downsizing 8823 E. Cresco Lane Inverness Golf CC MAID TO ORDER House Cleaning (352) 586-9125 Have V acum W ill T ravel May The Lady of Guadalupe be praised, adored & loved. Lady of Guadalupe Pray for us. St Jude worker of miracles pray for us. St Jude helper of the hopeless pray for us. Todays New Ads Todays New Ads Todays New Ads Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details 352-563-5966 from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at The Garden Shed, 2423 S. Rockcrusher Road., Homosassa. Call Louise at 352-503-7063 for more information. Withlacoochee Technical Institute would like input from community members regarding what classes they would like to see offered at the school. To offer suggestions, log on to wtionline.cc, then click on Community Education and fill out a suggestion form. The College of Central Florida has announced that its January to June 2012 CF Institute schedule is now available. The schedule can be viewed online at CFItraining.cf.edu and includes hundreds of classes on arts, culture and leisure; business, industry and leadership; child care and family; computers; driving; insurance; real estate; security officer training and more. Printed copies are available at the Ocala Campus, 3001 S.W. College Road; Citrus Campus, 3800 S. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto; Levy Center, 114 Rodgers Blvd., Chiefland; and the Hampton Center, 1501 W. Silver Springs Blvd., Ocala. For information, visit CFItraining.cf.edu or call 352-8738504. The College of Central Florida is offering a variety of non-credit courses : A Writing Your Memoirs course is being offered at the Citrus campus. Whether your life has been filled with disasters, unbelievable events or even if your life has been mundane, a memoir is a way to find meaning in the world, make sense of your existence, leave a legacy for family and friends, and maybe help someone benefit from your experience. This course will cover the ways to make this project happen. The class will be offered once more this semester: sign up for Monday, March 26, from 6 to 8 pm. Cost is $25 and includes handouts. How to Write and Publish Your Own Book will be presented from 6 to 8 p.m. Mondays, April 9, 16 and 23. The six-hour course will cover all the specifics, details, advantages and disadvantages of writing and publishing. Fee is $49 and includes handouts. Instructor is Claudine Dervaes, author-publisher of 15 books, who founded her company, Solitaire Publishing Inc., 31 years ago. Her travel writing appears in the Travel Talk column of the Ocala Star Banner and Gainesville Sun For more information and registration, call the College of Central Florida at 352-2491210 or 352-746-6721, or go online to CFItraining.cf.edu. The College of Central Florida offers basic motorcycle training in cooperation with the Motorcycle Training Institute. The Motorcycle Basic Rider Course is a research-based and action-oriented curriculum designed to teach beginning motorcyclists of all ages the physical and mental skills necessary to ride safely on the road. It includes basic motorcycle operation, maximum effective braking techniques, turning skills, obstacle avoidance maneuvers, classroom instruction and 10 hours of on-cycle training. The course is on Fridays from 5:30 to 9 p.m., Saturdays from 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., and Sundays 7 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. The course fee is $195 until March 31 and includes student workbooks and use of helmets and motorcycles. RiderCoaches for the program are all experienced motorcycle operators who are nationally certified by the Motorcycle Safety Foundation. For enrollment, call MTII at 877-308-7246. The schedule is also available at www.mtii.com. For more information on these course and registration, call the College of Central Florida at 352-249-1210 or 352746-6721 or go online at CFItraining.cf.edu. Join the excitement as the Homosassa Public Library begins a new Celebrate Reading program from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Tuesdays. Celebrate Reading is a session consisting of two programs geared toward helping preschool and elementary schoolage children develop literacy skills, improve their reading and gain a love of books. The first program, PAWS to Read, gives children the opportunity to build confidence in their reading ability by reading aloud to a certified therapist. The second program, Reading Pals, pairs teens and younger children together. Teens read storybooks aloud to one or two younger children at a time. Children may wish to draw or write about a story they like. Listening to stories, talking about stories and reading aloud are great ways to improve literacy skills while having a good time. For information, call the youth librarian at 352-6285626. Whispering Pines Park will offer the following classes at the Recreation Building. All classes require preregistration and payment at the park office. Call 352-726-3913 for information or visit www.invernessfl.gov (Recreation and Leisure classes). Genealogy Strategies Stumped in your search? Attend this class to get started again with Jackie Reiss. Classes are April 21 and May 12 from 9 a.m. to noon. Cost is $15. Beginning Genealogy Offered on Saturdays, March 10, 17, 24 and 31 from 10 a.m. to noon. Four classes for $20 with instructor Jackie Reiss. Want to find out where you came from? Reiss will show you how to find them, where to look and what to believe about the information you find. Scrapbooking Sherri Geick offers weekly scrapbooking classes on Tuesdays from noon to 4 p.m. Cost is $7.50 for each class. Bring your own photos, supplies and scrapbook. Geick will help you put it all together to create those special memories your family will treasure through each generation. Geick also offers all-day or half-day scrapbooking workshops. Come spend the day creating your photo memory book. Cost is $25 for the whole day or $12.50 for a half day of fun and fellowship and making memories. Dates are April 28 and May 19. M ISCELLANEOUS Lecanto Middle School will host a talent show at 6 p.m. Friday, March 9, with concessions opening at 4:30 p.m. The talent show will be presented at Curtis Peterson Auditorium with advance tickets to be purchased at the school for $3; at the door they are $5. For more information, call Joellen Collazo at 352-7462050, ext. 4727; email collazoj@citrus.k12.fl.us. The College of Central Florida, in partnership with the Early Learning Coalition of Marion County Inc., will host the 24thannual Early Childhood Education Conference on Saturday, March 24, with keynote presenter Jack Hartmann, a nationally recognized childrens singer. The conference will be held from 7:15 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Ewers Century Center of the CF Ocala Campus, 3001 S.W. College Road. The fee for this workshop is $30 before March 19 or $50 at the door. Attendees can participate in nearly 40 workshop sessions and discover ideas to encourage children to learn through play and participate in meaningful learning activities. Hartmann owns a successful music and book company, Hop 2 Music and Press Inc. As a counselor, social worker and trainer, he has worked with children, families and human service professionals for more than 25 years. His highly regarded educational songs are used by teachers and sung by children in schools across the Unites States and around the world. To register or for more information about this event, call 352-873-5804 or email Marybeth Kyle at kylem@cf.edu. Hernando Elementary School is looking for donations of working Kindles Nooks, iPod Touches, iPads, Internet tablets, digital cameras and digital recording devices to be used by our students in the classroom. If you have any used but working electronic devices from the list above or would like to donate a new electronic device, contact Heather Bone or Laura Manos at 352-726-1833 Monday through Friday, between the hours of 8:15 a.m. to 4:15 p.m. If you would like to contact someone outside of these hours, call Heather Bone at 352-462-4768. Citrus High School class of 1982 wants to share its 30th class reunion with other classes, primarily those that graduated from 1978 through 1985. Any graduates of CHS, however, are also invited. Reunion coordinator Jeff Hudson said faculty and staff from those years are also invited. The multi-class reunion effort is in conjunction with the 100th anniversary of CHS. The reunion will be July 13 through 15 at Grand Cypress Resort in Orlando. Festivities will start Friday night with a cocktail reception by the pool. Saturday will be family day around the pool, which just went through a multimilliondollar renovation. Saturday night will be a semiformal dinner/dance with contests and door prizes for recognition of most changed, least changed, who travelled furthest, most children, most grandiose, etc. After the dinner and program, there will be a deejay for dancing. Cost for the reunion for both days is $125 per couple; $100 for individuals. Those who wish to attend only one evening may do so for $80 per couple; $60 for singles. Grand Cypress offers a special rate of $139 per night, good for two nights prior and two nights following the event, for a total of six nights. Almost 100 people have committed to attending so far, but Hudson requests help in tracking down class members. To help, or to RSVP to attend, email Jeff Hudson at jhudson 4992@yahoo.com. Boys & Girls Clubs of Citrus County Central Ridge and Robert Halleen clubs seek mentors to work with their members. The two clubs have received federal grants through Boys & Girls Clubs of America, allowing mentors to come into the clubs to serve as tutors and special friends of members. All mentors will undergo complete background security checks with fingerprinting. Cost of background checks will be covered in most cases through grant funding by the Boys & Girls Clubs of Citrus County. Mentors may be assigned more than one child. A training session will be done prior to mentoring. All mentoring will be done at the club sites. Those who are interested may call Amy Stonestreet at 352-270-8841 or Lane Vick at 352-621-9225. The Evelyn Waters Boys & Girls Club on North Apopka Avenue in Inverness is ready to enroll new members. The club provides quality programs and services that enhance the lives of club members and shape their futures. Participation provides daily access to five core program areas: education and career development, character and leadership development, health and life skills, the arts, and sports, fitness and recreation. Fees for the afterschool program are $60 per month with the before-school programs costing $20 per week. Discounts are available for families with more than one child. Some scholarships may be available. Clubs open at 6 a.m. until the bus transports them to school, and in the afternoon until 6 p.m. Call club director Cindy Beane at 352-341-2507 for more information. Take Stock in Children is a mentoring program that offers a college scholarship and the promise of hope to deserving youths in Citrus County. Take Stock scholars join the program in the sixth through eighth grades. One of the benefits of being a scholar is having the opportunity to work with a mentor. The program is actively seeking male and female role models to help support active student scholars, as well as new students who will soon be entering the program. Call Pat Lancaster, program coordinator at 352-422-2348 or 352-344-0855 for more information about the program and to sign up for the mentor training. CHALK Continued from Page C4

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n trnt ) -26 ] TJ[ (f b ) -26 ] TJ[ () 265 ] TJ/F2 1 Tf14.3 0 0 11 775.7754 1549.5117 Tm[ ( n) -27 ] TJ[ ( rf ) -27 ] TJ[ (b) -27 ] TJ[ (trf n n n b b n n 000AN32 000ALYJ Be at least 18 years of age. Possess a valid drivers license. Possess proof of liability insurance. Routes are 7 days a week, early morning hours. Email: mgaouette@chronicleonline.com or bring resume to 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River There are immediate opportunities for independent contractors to manage and grow single copy newspaper routes in Citrus and Marion Counties YOU CAN OWN YOUR OWN BUSINESS!! 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 8 X X G G Z Z For more information on how to reach Citrus County readers call 352-563-5592. Apartments U nfurnished -4./ '$1 rn ;FBf (Df HDB DJ:>Cf)D+:HGf # *(*... n1nC5HC7? I H=@f=B7@8ffAC ft G 97fn $ )1 ) .. 49K@=J!JQ=J G JF =J FF9'G + G -=LK +G0 EGCAF? r*G 6=9J)=9 K= J= MJF r-GGD : G9LMJF r -GGD : G9L rC Er F ; JEA f f '*-' $/ 4! 0G:D ;7D6H F6 BEn ;>G= >C<9D8@n86CD: % DC 7D6HF :CH 6AGf r9Ef>C8AG .6H / 1:A :8HF>8fK6A@H DF >J:F / F6>AG C96B En F>:C9AM+ A68 :H D'>J: Mobile Homes I n Park JED;H?:=;'7D :?D= nr P *GN= A F GFGJK 9D= r/=9KGF9: D= bt f R eal Estate For Rent ) #MO HOIJ7B-?L; H !B b t f 1 ?;M EKHM;8 I?J; )7 JKH;E7 IJr9EC # ..#*2 $/5& 2JH ; : 2r =;D J b t f Mobile Homes I n Park # (*... =KL%GMK AF?39DM= G<=JF @GE=K>JG E GJ)=9K =LG ,OF > JGEE Gr r 6142<: :A;6 @E ;2D02=@6< ;.9 b&.> 8 f $ )1 -) ..2 7J;H? D= ; D@EOC ;DJ9BK8>EKI ; E DI? J;I>K<CEH; -r < E H r C KIJ 8; 7 FFHEL;: f f 7A+ED:$DL;HD; II 4=DDE 9AFL = PLJ9 D GF?;G N=J =< ; 9JHGJL D J? K@=M JF bt f *C' 6@:-DIGG:6I 7:9 FDD Bf7 6H = f L(#nL!' F DDBnL G= :9n GH6AA 8 6FEDFHn2>H= A68DD8=:: 68@K6H:FG(#+n f JED;H ?:=; '7D:?D= n G EE r/= K9D=K K L 9JL AF? # AF9F;AF? 9N 9AD f f f bt f Mobile Homes a nd Land ;97 DJ E+ r*9QF9JHFIG D IC HM 69 8FCCAff 6 5HJ 7>E KI; EKHBEIJ ?IOEKH =7?Dr bt f bt f 2 .*( '. 6; .;06;4B.6 9. /92 rrf1; H;CE: I>; :A I9H D HC 97 HFHJ A 97HFH JH 7 f f #;H D 7D:E f !EH;IJ' 7A; + GJL@ !4N=JQ F A;= %r 9;J = = F;=< MD; Hbt f Mobile Homes F or Sale N(#7I A K 2 EMKL *GN=( b t f / / )/$*) ') *2) -.% *. )) 2 OHrM 7HH7DJO N9EDIJHK9J?ED K F=H7:; ?DIKB7J?ED 7FFB?7D9; FA=r ;B?L;H;: I;JKF M? J>>; 7J I J; FIIA?HJ?D= EDBO rrCEr 2r rr $D9 BK:; I< ?H IJO; 7H E D> EC;EMD; H$DIr7B B f f 2 *( '. # AF9F; AF? N9AD9:D= rGN=JC >MJ FEG N= f AFJ=9EH?P;: B ?GK?:7JEHr2;BM7 OI >7L ;D ;M?D L;DJEHO 7BB f f EH9EC;8O / 7OBEH(7:; # EC;I # E C;I9 F< +H ?9; :JE .;BBbt f $ )1 -) ..2 7J;H?D= ; D@EOC;DJ9BK8>EKI; E DI?J;I>K<CE H; ? D=B; M?:; I J7HJ?D = r' EJ H ;DJ CEr# ? D9BK:;:rCErFKH9 >7I ;r f f ) f)f #*( '*-'$/4 $"#*( />; DJ;HJ7?D;H E L; HIGr < Jr B7H=;<7C?BO H EE Cr #EC;?D =H;7JI>7 F; EDGK?;JF 7L;: HE7: D ;7H9>7 ?DE< B7 A; I ) '4 rEH :E MD CEr2r rr7B B f f +7BC # 7H8EH #EC;I ); M(E: ;BI &E< MJF *%GF%GEGK 9KK9/AN =J ODK K@L DG F?L=JE f f Waterfront Mobile For Sale '*-'$/4;9J HGJ L GF ;9F9D K@=MJF AK @=< K;J H9LAG r-G KKr ,OF #AF f f Mobile Homes and Land (*$' #*( .r"EE:$ D9E C; EJIE<+ EII?8?B? J?;I b t f .2)* BEJ -; DJ F =9JAC=1J9AD KLGJ9 ?= K@=< G>>%OQ r &FN =JF=KK f f f f ./*!/# ./);M %79E8I; D KI JEC N 8 ?=;7J?DA?J9>;D N9EDIJHK9 J?ED MH7F OHrM7HH7DJO ;BED=7J;:JE ?B; J 9>?D7I?DAIIJE HC :E E Hr '7H=; HE ECIr (K IJI;; 8; ?D=;B I;r *D BO EH :EMD r CE 2rrr 7 BB f f Pets +0+ +$ K @G C Br :9A5 @9G A 5@ 9 fn5@ GC<5 J9 @C C8I>KD:+KFI OCK GD @.:=./.E >>0<: n *//2 $B -+0+. O==CK ? AJDK: GQK K@G LK% > AJE f f ./ 3) ,%#)IH GH 5B8=B; .7I D 3CF ?=9n>IGHK?GC@8n f!CC8K=H< ?= 8G n%F 9;nJ9 H 7<97?9 8n8 9KCFA98 5 B 8 G< CHG H5?9Bn*IDG 7 CA9GK=H7 JIF ;9?7 B F ;HIEDQ#7FFO?HJ >:7OQ M?J>79B7II?EJE 7BB EKH B7II?M 7I>;HrC E bt f $ )1 -) ..)/ .+ $' .;9r:;F F HE f H7J;:EL;HCEr F ;H?E:?DJ>;$)1 ) .. 2 / -!-*) /n +7HA M F?;HI?D= ; D@EOC;DJ 9BK8>EKI; E DI?J; I>K<CEH;>E C; FBKIr->EC; ?D9BK:;I# r r 87J>+7H A(E: ;B r+;JI9 EDI?: ;H;:r .;9J?ED799;FJ;:r b t f $ )1 -) ..2 7J;H ?D= ; D@EOC;DJ 9BK8>EKI; E DI?J ;I >K< CEH ; KHD?I >;:->EC; M ?J>9;DJH 7B r f f Mobile Homes For Sale EK8B;M ?:; N )/ /"9LAF(AL ;GEEMFA LQ-GGD +A;= GF< ALAGF bt f Sporting G oods '0-KA<=;MJ L9A FK K=9L;G NJ O A FMDDEAJJGJ D A?@L KDAC=F=O r b t f DC8: 6A:92 :6ED CG + : FB>H DIFG: )S." 0) **( !.#%0(*.#-$ (+ ; Lr H=JD: .J ED;H 78 F;HB8 < =DAN= J= < f f 2 04 "0).*C .> H: "IC.B>H=>C < Utility T railers 5+0''/-$' -. );M 0I; :0J?B?JO D9BEI;: 04. ''/KI JE CK?BJ+7HJI / ?H;I2>BI ;F7?H I / H 7?B;H#?J9>;I );MNEF;D KJ ?B? JOMH7C F 0I;:N;D9BEI;: MH 7C F #M O HO IJ7B-?L;H f f 0'!/ *'& / -$' -.' .'7H=;IJ.; B;9J?ED 'EM;I J+H?9;Ir *<<;H? D=);M 0I ;: 7H =EK J?B ?JO JH 7?B;HI /H?FB;HEMD 0J?B?JO/-' NMD ;MIF7H; r N D9BEI;:M 1DEI;H;7H H7CF :EE Hr /H7? B;H/? H; I IJ7HJ?D=7Jr f f #MO ';97DJE Sell or Swap / ;BB J>7JIF; 9?7B F ;HIE DQ #7FFO?HJ>:7OQ M?J> 79B7II? EJ E 7BBEKHB7II? ED; %E; GJ 2FO9FL =<* G f LGJ;Q ;D= f f 2 )//* 04#*0. EH ( $' D O H;7 ED:?J?ED EH .?JK7J?EDr 7BBb t f Pets &.> ;BJ?;C 7B ; K9 :D = O@AL=EGKr @G MK=LJ 9AF=< @G E= J9AK=
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Commission meeting WednesdayThe Citrus County Commission will hold a special meeting at 9 a.m. Wednesday, March 7, in the Citrus County Courthouse, 110 N. Apopka Ave., Inverness, Room 100, regarding a Notice of Commencement for Citrus County Detention Facility improvements. The Citrus County Budget Workshop will immediately follow. NEWS BRIEF INSIDE MARCH 7, 2012Floridas Best Community Newspaper Serving Floridas Best CommunityVOLUME 117 ISSUE 213 50 F O G CITRUS COUNTYReport: Colts, QB Manning appear headed for a split /B1 www.chronicleonline.com INDEX Comics . . . . .C8 Community . . . .C6 Crossword . . . .C7 Editorial . . . .A12 Entertainment . . .B6 Horoscope . . . .B6 Lottery Numbers . .B4 Lottery Payouts . .B6 Movies . . . . . .C8 Obituaries . . . .A6 Classifieds . . . .C9 TV Listings . . . .C7 OPINION: EDITORIAL, PAGE A12 Citrus County does not have a master plan to provide the necessary services for the homeless. STOCKS:FallingStocks suffered their biggest losses in three months. /Page A11 TUESDAYHIGH79LOW56Partly cloudy today, patchy fog after midnight and partly cloudy./PAGE A4TODAY & Thursday morning SO YOU KNOW Due to early deadlines some lottery numbers may not appear. MIKEWRIGHT Staff WriterCRYSTAL RIVER It was the news Melissa Pfeiffer waited to hear. Pfeiffer, an Inverness Middle School teacher who is president of the Citrus County Education Association, welcomed Circuit Judge Jackie Fulfords ruling that struck down the states requirement that employees contribute 3 percent of their salary to the Florida Retirement System. I am very happy, she said Tuesday, adding the FRS contribution was not fair. Everyone who worked for the district got basically a 3 percent pay cut. Many people were very financially devastated. The ruling requires the state and local governments to repay employees their 3 percent FRS contribution plus interest. Kenny Blocker, assistant superintendent of the Citrus County School District,Rulings immediate impact unknown in Citrus Judge strikes down pension law Associated PressTALLAHASSEE Gov. Rick Scott and the Legislature violated the state constitution when they enacted a law requiring Florida teachers, police officers, state workers and other public employees to contribute 3 percent of their pay toward their pensions, a judge ruled Tuesday in a decision that could cost the state $2 billion. Scott announced he will appeal Circuit Judge Jackie Fulfords ruling. She wrote in her 11-page opinion that a budget crisis is no excuse for violating public employees collective bargaining, property and contract rights, which are guaranteed under the Florida Constitution. To find otherwise would mean that a contract with our state government has no meaning and that the citizens of our state can place no trust in the work of our Legislature, the Tallahassee-based judge wrote. An ultimate decision against the contribution requirement would blow holes of about $1 billion each in state budgets for the current fiscal year and the next one, While unions, employees rejoice; governor vows to appeal ruling that contribution requirement for state workers is unconstitutional See RULING/ Page A2 Jackie Fulfordruled its unlawful to require state employees to make pension contributions. See RATES/ Page A2 Super Tuesday WORLD NEWS:ObituaryHow do you sum up the work of songwriter Robert B. Sherman? Try Supercali fragilisticex pialidocious./Page A6 STATE NEWS:2012 sessionRead local votes in the state legislative session./ Page A8 Associated PressPoll worker Dollie Scott, center, points the way for voters who cast their ballots Tuesday at East Rivers Elementary School in Atlanta. Associated PressWASHINGTON Rick Santorum and Mitt Romney split six states and dueled for supremacy in Ohio on a Super Tuesday that stretched from one end of the country to the other in the most turbulent Republican presidential race in a generation. Santorum broke through in primaries in Oklahoma and Tennessee and in the North Dakota caucuses. Romney had a home-state win in Massachusetts to go with victories in Vermont and Virginia. Ohio was the marquee matchup of the night, a second industrial state showdown in as many weeks for the two rivals. Of all the Super Tuesday states, it drew the most campaigning and television advertisements, and for good reason no Republican has ever won the White House without carrying the state in the fall. With votes tallied in 77 percent of the states precincts, Santorum was winning 38 percent of the vote to 37 for Romney, 15 percent for Newt Gingrich and 9 percent for Ron Paul. Gingrich had a victory in his column his first win in more than six weeks. He triumphed at home in Georgia, but had to share the delegates. Paul pinned his hopes on Idaho and Alaska as he scratched for his first victory of the campaign season. Whatever the outcome in Ohio, Romney was on track to pad his lead in the hunt for delegates to the Republican National Convention. Not surprisingly, he focused on the delegate chase. This is a process of gathering enough delegates to become the nominee, and I think were on track to have that happen, he told reporters as he arrived home in Massachusetts to vote in the primary. Santorum, Romney duel in Ohio, split other states in GOP primary race Good Samaritans split-second decision saves little girls life SANDRAFREDERICK Staff WriterOZELLO When Kristyn Dominy left her mothers house Monday night, she had no idea she would be faced with a life-and-death decision. After rounding a winding corner on West Ozello Trail, the 22-year-old mother had a matter of seconds to decide if she was going to become involved in a tragic fire and risk her own life as well as that of her young daughter who was strapped into her car seat in the back of the car. Just moments beforehand, a car with billowing smoke from its rear passed her aggressively on the narrow road. When she saw the car with a child in the backseat a second time, it was a fireball. I dont know what I was thinking, I just knew I had to help get the child out of the car before it exploded, she said Tuesday afternoon. It was a really big fire and she was stuck in the backseat. Shortly after 6 p.m. Monday, Dominy observed a 1998 red Jeep traveling eastbound on West Ozello Trail and South Winterset Avenue in Crystal River at a high rate of speed. The driver of the Jeep, Brittany Hatfield, 27, of Crystal River, was traveling with her daughter, Zara Clifford, 5, seat-belted into the back. According to Gail Tierney, spokeswoman for the Citrus County Sheriffs Office, the car did not hit anything; it just burst into flames. Dominy said the little girl was trapped inside the vehicle, being held by her seatbelt and her mother, with her hair and clothes on fire, was desperately trying to get her out. I jumped out of my car and helped pull her out. I threw her on the ground and told them both to roll to put the fire out, Dominy said. The little girl was dressed in leggings and in her bare feet. She just looked at me with shock. I dont know if she understood what was going on. I knew she was in a lot of pain. At this point she called 911 and put the woman and her child in her car to get them out of the danger zone in case the car blew up. I live nearby and I took them to my house until the ambulance arrived, she said. It seemed like a long time before the ambulance got there. I didnt know what to do. Both Hatfield and Zara suffered burns and were airlifted to Tampa General. Hatfield was released from the hospital on Tuesday and Zara Clifford was listed in serious but stable condition See LIFE/ Page A2 For more on Super T uesday, see story Page A5 See TUESDAY/ Page A4

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said the ruling could cost the district $2 million to $2.5 million. It could be less than that if the state covers the cost, Blocker said. Blocker said he doesnt think there will be any immediate impact with an appeal looming from Gov. Rick Scotts office. Who knows where this is going? Blocker said. Something like this could go on for another year. City Managers Andy Houston of Crystal River and Frank DiGiovanni of Inverness said they, too, are not certain about the rulings impact. Houston said the financial hit is $12,000 to $13,000 in payments to city employees, plus another amount the Citrus County Sheriffs Office reduced its contract amount to the city this year because of the reduced payments it made to employees pension funds. Houston said he contacted the Florida League of Cities for direction. They said it was too soon to know how itll work, he said. DiGiovanni said he didnt immediately know the financial impact to Inverness. It wont be catastrophic, he said. He also said he isnt surprised by the ruling. They tried to change the pension benefits without collective bargaining, DiGiovanni said. And while government officials are wondering where they will find the money in another tight budget year to repay employees, Pfeiffer said public workers are not to blame. Teachers and support staff and Florida public employees pay taxes too, she said. We are in the same boat. Were humble servants. We care about our community. Were not looking to be greedy.Chronicle reporter Mike Wright can be reached at 352-563-3228 or mwright@chronicle online.com.A2WEDNESDAY, MARCH7, 2012CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE WELL MEET OR BEAT ANY COMPETITORS PRICE* BLINDS LECANTO ~ TREETOPS PLAZA 1657 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY. *Must present written estimate from competitor for this price 527-0012 1-877-746-0017 000ANVQ FREE Valances Installation In Home Consulting www.72-hourblinds.com 72 HOUR BLIND FACTORY Verticals Faux Wood Blinds Shutters Cellular Shades The Savings Are Yours Because The Factory Is Ours! 2011 2011 2011 2011 FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK! *Floor Prep & Trims at Additional Cost. Min. labor charges may apply. All Prior Sales Excluded. See store for details. **While Supplies Last. V isit us at www.cashcarpetandtile.com 776 N. Enterprise Pt., Lecanto 746-7830 341-0355 Next to Stokes Flea Market on Hwy. 44 Prices Good Wed., March 7 Sat., March 10, 2012 000AJSF 20 20 10 10 20 20 10 10 NO WAX VINYL In Stock Patterns $ 1 79 Name Brand LAMINATE $ 2 87 In Stock Now SF INSTALLED Stranded BAMBOO $ 4 85 SALE MARINE CARPET 8 WIDE 79 SF Blue, Grey & Brown MATERIAL ONLY BUNK CARPET 12 WIDE 97 Black Only LN./FT. EXTRA VALUE NYLON $ 1 89 SF INSTALLED 1/2 x 5 OAK FLOORING $ 3 56 Lifetime Structural Warranty SF 18X18 PORCELAIN TILE $ 1 39 EXTRA SOFT FIBER $ 2 19 EXTRA HEAVY PLUSH CARPET LANDLORD SPECIAL Lifetime Stain Warranty W/7/16 CUSHION *Certain Restrictions Apply FROM $ 1 39 SF INSTALLED W/7/16 CUSHION W/7/16 CUSHION Installation Available MATERIAL ONLY Installation Available SF INSTALLED SF INSTALLED SF MATERIAL ONLY Installation Available SF MATERIAL ONLY MATERIAL ONLY INSIDE Crystal River Mall 7 95-148 4 Inside Walmart Hwy. 200, Ocala 291-1467 000APRX FREE HEARING TEST Coupon Expires 4/15/12 (Limit 2 per visit) BATTERY SALE .89 IN OFFICE ONLY ANY MAKE ANY MODEL Coupon Expires 4/15/12 FREE HEARING AID REPAIRS 000ASRZ Friday, March 16 Jay Newcomer, OD 352.746.0800 Beverly Hills Eye Clinic 3636 N. Lecanto Hwy. Beverly Hills, FL 34465 at the hospital. It is a mothers worse nightmare, Dominy said. I hope they are both OK, especially the little girl. The State Fire Marshals Office is investigating the cause and origin of the fire. Chronicle managing editor Sandra Frederick can be reached at 352-564-2930 or sfrederick@chronicle online.com LIFEContinued from Page A1 RATESContinued from Page A1 Crystal River City Manager Andy Houston said the financial hit to the city is $12,000 to $13,000 in pension payments for city employees. He has contacted the Florida League of Cities for direction. which starts July 1, but House Speaker Dean Cannon said Fulfords decision would have no immediate effect. The ruling of a trial court judge is the first and not the final step, the Winter Park Republican said in a statement. The case likely will wind up before the Florida Supreme Court. This is another example of a court substituting its own policy preferences for those of the Legislature, Scott said in a statement. The Courts decision nullifies the will of the people and leaves Florida as one of the only states in the country in which public employees contribute nothing towards their retirement, leaving working Floridians with100 percent of the tab. Several individual public employees and their unions challenged the law, including the Florida Education Association, which represents teachers and other school workers across the state. We once again find out that the Florida Legislature and the governor have overstepped their bounds by avoiding the constitution, said FEA President Andy Ford. They just dont have respect for the law. At Scotts urging, the Legislature passed the law last year as a cost-cutting measure. It allowed the state and local governments to reduce their contributions to the Florida Retirement System. Thats because Floridas plan is rated as one of the nations strongest and does not currently need additional funding. The law affects 560,000 public employees, including all those at the state and county levels and some city workers. Scott initially asked for a 5 percent employee contribution. The Republican governor said it would be only fair because private sector workers and public employees in most other states contribute to their retirement plans. Public employees and their unions called the contribution an income tax and said it amounts to a 3 percent pay cut after theyve gone years without raises. Lawyers for the state argued the Legislature has the authority to require the employee contributions under its constitutional budgeting powers, but Fulford disagreed. She noted employees have a constitutional right to collectively bargain over the terms and conditions of their employment, but no such negotiations were conducted in this case. The power over appropriations does not allow the Legislature to excuse negotiation, Fulford wrote. Otherwise, the fundamental right to collectively bargain in Floridas constitution would be meaningless. Fulford also cited prior Florida Supreme Court opinions and a 1974 law that declared pension benefits to be a contract right. Senate President Mike Haridopolos, R-Merritt Island, blasted the ruling, saying the former prosecutor, who was appointed to the bench in 2009 by then-Gov. Charlie Crist, has proven once again that she is an activist judge who has no problem overstepping her authority and overruling the decisions of the states elected representatives. Fulford, who last year struck down a budget provision that would have privatized nearly 30 prison facilities in South Florida, anticipated such criticism. At the onset let me state clearly, the role of the judiciary is to interpret the law before it; not to make new law, she wrote. This court cannot set aside its constitutional obligations because a budget crisis exists in the state of Florida. To do so would be in direct contravention of this courts oath to follow the law. Plaintiffs attorney Ron Meyer defended Fulford against the judicial activism accusation. Judicial activism is when a court ignores the law, Meyer said. The law in this case is well settled. Meyer said the state has enough money in reserve to pay back the employees and hoped the state would not appeal. This was a gamble that the governor and the Legislature made last year, Meyer said. They gambled taxpayers money that they could balance the budget on the backs of the hardworking public employees of this state. And they lost that bet. RULINGContinued from Page A1 In her ruling, Judge Jackie Fulford cited prior Florida Supreme Court opinions and a 1974 law that declared pension benefits to be a contract right.

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Inverness city council convenesAroundTHE STATE JacksonvilleAuthorities: 2 dead in high school shootingA man who was fired from a private school Tuesday returned to campus with a gun hidden in a guitar case and shot the headmistress to death before committing suicide, authorities said. No students were injured. Officers responded to the Episcopal School of Jacksonville at 1:23 p.m. Tuesday after receiving reports of a person with a gun, and the school was placed on lockdown. When officers arrived, Dale Regan, head of the school, and the gunman were found dead, Undersheriff Dwain Senterfitt said. The gunman has not been identified. Episcopal has about 900 students in grades six to 12. Its campus sits along the south bank of the St. Johns River in central Jacksonville. Regan began working as a teacher at the school in 1978, according to a profile published in The Florida Times Union in 2010.MelbourneBrevard deputy fatally shot in traffic stopA Brevard County sheriffs deputy was fatally shot Tuesday making a traffic stop while investigating a motel burglary, officials said. The deputy, whose name was not immediately released, had stopped a vehicle shortly after 11 a.m. containing two people suspected of stealing furniture from a local motel, said Maj. Vic DeSantis. Shots were fired and the suspects fled. The deputy was taken to a hospital, where she was pronounced dead. The two suspects fled in a vehicle which went into a ditch during a chase with police and deputies. The suspects were arrested and were being interviewed by investigators, DeSantis said.Citrus CountyAviation Advisory Board to meetThe Citrus County Aviation Advisory Board (AAB) will meet at 2 p.m. Thursday, March 8, in Room 166 at the Lecanto Government Building. Under new business on the agenda, engineering project manager Quincy Wylupeck will discuss proposed CIP updates. Also on the agenda will be tower updates by Joe Hochadel, land development planner. The AAB will also accept the resignation of a board member, and announce the vacancy of the District 4 position. The Aviation Advisory Board advised the Board of County Commissioners on all land acquisitions, leases, construction, and reconstruction on, improvements, repairs, maintenance and general operation of all public airport facilities in Citrus County. For more information, call 352-527-5480.Veterans Services Advisory Board to meetThe Citrus County Veterans Services Advisory Board will meet Thursday, March 8, at 3:30 p.m., at the Citrus County Resource Center, at 2804 W. Marc Knighton Court, Lecanto. The Veterans Services Advisory Board informs the Veterans Service Office of areas of unmet needs in the veterans population, advises local veterans groups of services available, provides input on office policies and procedures and assists other matters specific to veterans services and veterans groups. This meeting is open to the public. Call 352-527-5915. From wire and staff reports STATE& LOCAL Page A3WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7, 2012 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE DAVE SIGLER/ChronicleJohn Carr claims to be the oldest member of the Beverly Hills Horseshoe Club at the young age of 88. The Beverly Hills Horseshoe Club is preparing to host a National Horseshoe Pitching Association tournament from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday. Pitchers come from all across the United States and Canada to participate in the NHPA Circuit. The tournament is free. The singles tournament runs from October to May and the club meets every other Saturday at the Beverly Hills Community Park. Dawsy the target at GOP candidate forum MIKEWRIGHT Staff WriterLECANTO A trio of Republicans with varying levels of experience took collective aim at Sheriff Jeff Dawsy on Monday night in the hopes voters in November will elect Citrus Countys first GOP sheriff. Steve Burch, Hank Hemrick and Winn Webb are jockeying for votes in the Republican primary with the winner taking on the 16-year Democrat. Before about 100 people at the Citrus County Republican Executive Committee meeting, each candidate sought to distance himself from his rivals while offering the best hope in unseating Dawsy. Candidates said Republicans have a choice:Burch is retired from the Clearwater Police Department and is the former Crystal River police chief. He lost his job in Crystal River when the city council decided to contract law enforcement with Dawsys office.Hemrick is a retired assistant deputy warden from the New York City Department of Corrections. This is his third run for sheriff.Webb is a Citrus County commis sioner and former sheriffs officer. All three said Dawsys budget is bloated, his officers are not trained properly and his agency doesnt respond well to public concerns. Burch said more than 40 nonsworn officers have take-home cars, something he would eliminate as sheriff. Burch accused the sheriffs office of botched investigations and said a sheriffs office under him would increase arrests for drug dealing and drunken driving. Hemrick also hammered Dawsy for what he said was a lack of drug enforcement. He said he brought up the same topic during candidate forums in 2008. Dawsy would then refute it. He would say to the crowd: Hemrick is trying to scare you. There is no drug problem in Citrus County. Webb noted he was the only candidate born and raised in Citrus County. Hes also the one candidate who ran a successful campaign when he was elected to the county commission in 2008. Webb said he wants to rid the sheriffs office of a Rambo mentality. We need officers who are peoplepeople, Webb said. I dont need people who are Rambos. I need Officer Friendlys. Burch noted he is the only candidate to head a police force and he sees a lack of connection and follow-through with Dawsys agency. The situation, he said, is were just not responding to our citizens.Chronicle reporter Mike Wright can be reached at 352-563-3228 or mwright@chronicleonline.com. Club to host national tournament Members host Girl Scouts, discuss spring cleaning, kudos and accoladesNANCYKENNEDY Staff WriterINVERNESS Inverness Mayor Bob Plaisted welcomed girls from two local Girl Scout troops to the Inverness City Council meeting Tuesday and presented them with a proclamation commemorating the 100th anniversary of Girl Scouts. To their leaders he said, We thank you and appreciate the time you take to help raise these girls to be good citizens. Also on the agenda was a second reading of a revision to a utility ordinance that would change the definitions of residential and commercial accounts so they match the sanitation ordinances definitions. The ordinance also outlines a better system for identifying new residential customers who may be poor credit risks by using an online verification system. The system would be used to determine deposit fees, deposit waivers and would improve the way the city detects fraud. Currently, the city loses between $8,000 and $10,000 a year in bad debt write-offs. No public comment was made for or against and the council voted unanimously to adopt the ordinance. Council president Jacquie Hepfer said there are a number of ordinances that need such spring cleaning. City council also agreed to reappoint longtime Inverness resident David Arthurs for a three-year term to the Inverness Community Redevelopment Agency Board. The short meeting ended with City Manager Frank DiGiovanni giving kudos and accolades to the Rotary Club of Inverness for its work in renovating the recreation building at Whispering Pines Park, calling the group one of the most seasoned and active organizations in the community. DiGiovanni also thanked Rotarians for their efforts in raising funds and doing the manual labor.Chronicle reporter Nancy Kennedy can be reached at nkennedy@chronicleonline.com or 352-564-2927. Winn Webb Hank Hemrick Steve Burch Celebrate International Womens Day March 8 NANCYKENNEDY Staff WriterCITRUS SPRINGS You are here because of a woman. On Thursday, March 8, the Nature Coast Unitarian Universalists invite the public male and female to celebrate the contributions women have made and continue to make at an International Womens Day event. The theme of the local celebration is Connecting Girls Inspiring Futures. Doors open at 3:30 p.m. for light refreshments, followed at 4 p.m. with keynote speaker and musician Mindy Simmons, Floridas Chanteuse. Also, the female trio Patchwork will perform. This non-religious program is being funded by a member of the congregation who will turn 90 on March 8. This free event is a gift to the women and men of the community. Our goal is to call attention to the contributions women have made, which improved the human condition here and in the wider world, said Joan Burnett, member of the event committee. We hope to celebrate how far women have come in their struggle for equality and to recognize that much still needs to be done. She said information will also be available from various organizations that affect women. Mainly, its a celebration, she said. We hope to make this an annual event. Nature Coast Unitarian Universalists is at 7633 N. Florida Ave. (U.S. 41), Citrus Springs. For information, call 352-4654225 or visit the Web at www.naturecoastuu.org. Bob Plaistedmayor of Inverness. Jacquie HepferInverness city councilwoman. Frank DiGiovanniInverness city manager. Scientists: EPA off on costs of Florida pollution rule Associated PressTALLAHASSEE Federal environmental officials underestimated the cost of implementing their new water pollution rules for Florida, just as critics have been saying, a National Research Council panel concluded in a report released Tuesday. The committee of scientists was not asked to offer its own estimate but wrote that whatever the expense turns out to be, it would be small compared to the ultimate cost of restoring Floridas waters. The Environmental Protection Agency, which commissioned the study, issued a statement saying it already is incorporating some of the reports recommendations in its economic analysis. It noted the scientists also found critics estimates of much higher costs were faulty. State officials as well as business, agriculture and utility interests have opposed the EPAs rules, contending they would cost more than the agencys estimate and be too expensive to implement. They support alternate rules proposed by the state that currently are under challenge by environmental groups in an ad min istrative law case. The EPA has estimated its rules would cost between $135.5 million and $206.1 million annually. Opponents say the cost could be has high as $12 billion. EPA asked the Research Council to review its cost estimate in response to the criticism. It certainly shows we were right from the beginning, said David Childs, a lawyer for a coalition opposed to the EPA rules. All signs seem to be pointing to EPA should approve the state rules and be done with it. David Guest, a lawyer for environmental groups supporting the EPA rules and opposing the states alternate proposals, said he didnt think the study would have much effect. Its a difference in assumptions and the fact is you can test them, said Guest, who works for Earthjustice, an environmental legal group. Guest said hes confident the EPAs assumptions about how rules would be implemented are more realistic. The panel also concluded EPAs costs were too low because the agency underestimated the number of polluted lakes, rivers and streams in Florida and the agency had insufficient time and funding to do a more thorough expense analysis. The EPA statement noted the scientists also agreed with many of the agencys approaches and concluded that while EPAs cost estimates were low, those prepared by stakeholders significantly overestimated the costs in part by wrongly assuming the most expensive technologies would be required in all cases.

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Special to the ChronicleTune into the nextedition of the Sheriffs 10-43 Show on Wednesday,Mar. 7, from 7:30 to 8 p.m. on WYKE, Channel 16. Fire Rescues Chief Larry Morabito and Deputy Chief Jim Goodworth are the special guests on the show. They give an update on whats new at Fire Rescue since joining the Sheriffs Office back in October of 2011. They also discuss how Fire Rescue recently implemented an enhanced service for citizens by responding to more medical calls in the field. The Sheriffs 10-43 is broadcast on WYKE, which is channel 16 for all cable customers. It can also be viewed onFridays at 11 a.m. For those with satellite, prior Sheriffs 10-43 shows can be seen via the Sheriffs website at www.sheriff citrus.org.CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE HI LO PR NA NA NA HI LO PR NA NA NA HI LO PR 74 47 NA HI LO PR 78 47 NA HI LO PR 76 49 NA HI LO PR 77 42 NA YESTERDAYS WEATHER Partly cloudy.THREE DAY OUTLOOK Partly cloudy. Partly cloudy.High: 79 Low: 56 High: 81 Low: 57 High: 80 Low: 57TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING THURSDAY & FRIDAY MORNING FRIDAY & SATURDAY MORNING Exclusive daily forecast by: TEMPERATURE* Tuesday 76/38 Record 89/30 Normal 76/48 Mean temp. 57 Departure from mean -5 PRECIPITATION* Tuesday 0.00 in. Total for the month 0.32 in. Total for the year 3.55 in. Normal for the year 6.75 in.*As of 6 p.m. at InvernessUV INDEX: 7 0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate, 7-9 high, 10+ very high BAROMETRIC PRESSURE Tuesday at 3 p.m. 30.36 in. DEW POINT Tuesday at 3 p.m. 50 HUMIDITY Tuesday at 3 p.m. 39% POLLEN COUNT** Grasses and weeds were absent and trees were moderate.**Light only extreme allergic will show symptoms, moderate most allergic will experience symptoms, heavy all allergic will experience symptoms.AIR QUALITY Tuesday was good with pollutants mainly ozone. ALMANAC CELESTIAL OUTLOOK SUNSET TONIGHT ............................6:34 P.M. SUNRISE TOMORROW .....................6:47 A.M. MOONRISE TODAY ...........................6:07 P.M. MOONSET TODAY ............................5:57 A.M. MARCH 8MARCH 14MARCH 22MARCH 30 WATERING RULES BURN CONDITIONSCitrus County: Irrigation is limited to twice per week. Even addresses: Thursday and/or Sunday before 10am or after 4pm. Odd Addresses: Wednesday and/or Saturday before 10am or after 4pm. No restrictions on fountains, car washing or pressure washing. Hand watering requires the use of a shut-off nozzle. PLEASE CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL NEW PLANT MATERIAL. Questions, concerns or reporting violations, please call Citrus County 352-527-7669. For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestrys Web site: http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire_weather/kbdi Todays Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.City H L Fcast Daytona Bch. 76 62 pc Ft. Lauderdale 79 76 sh Fort Myers 85 64 pc Gainesville 77 55 pc Homestead 80 72 sh Jacksonville 73 53 pc Key West 80 74 pc Lakeland 82 60 pc Melbourne 78 69 pc City H L Fcast Miami 81 75 sh Ocala 79 56 pc Orlando 80 61 pc Pensacola 72 59 pc Sarasota 84 62 pc Tallahassee 75 51 pc Tampa 81 64 pc Vero Beach 79 68 pc W. Palm Bch. 79 74 sh FLORIDA TEMPERATURESEast winds around 20 knots. Seas 3 to 5 feet. Bay and inland waters will be choppy. Partly cloudy and warm today. Gulf water temperature68 LAKE LEVELSLocation Mon. Tues. Full Withlacoochee at Holder 27.63 27.61 35.52 Tsala Apopka-Hernando 33.92 33.90 39.25 Tsala Apopka-Inverness 35.74 35.72 40.60 Tsala Apopka-Floral City 37.65 37.64 42.40Levels reported in feet above sea level. Flood stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year flood, the meanannual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year. This data is obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision. In no event will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of this data. If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211. MARINE OUTLOOKTaken at Aripeka THE NATION Albany 37 13 s 55 39 Albuquerque 67 41 pc 62 32 Asheville 55 24 pc 59 40 Atlanta 61 34 pc 63 51 Atlantic City 45 22 s 58 44 Austin 76 51 sh 73 67 Baltimore 48 25 s 61 47 Billings 52 28 .10 pc 40 22 Birmingham 67 39 pc 70 54 Boise 54 30 .07 s 45 25 Boston 39 20 s 51 42 Buffalo 43 18 s 49 47 Burlington, VT 32 4 pc 48 45 Charleston, SC 59 36 pc 67 54 Charleston, WV 64 23 s 68 46 Charlotte 57 24 pc 62 45 Chicago 68 31 c 64 46 Cincinnati 64 26 s 66 53 Cleveland 51 20 s 59 41 Columbia, SC 62 35 pc 65 51 Columbus, OH 59 26 s 64 51 Concord, N.H. 35 10 s 49 31 Dallas 72 53 sh 71 66 Denver 73 32 sn 35 24 Des Moines 74 38 sh 61 30 Detroit 58 28 pc 55 48 El Paso 80 44 s 77 41 Evansville, IN 71 34 c 67 53 Harrisburg 46 22 s 60 39 Hartford 43 21 s 55 36 Houston 75 52 sh 78 66 Indianapolis 69 29 pc 65 52 Jackson 73 45 c 73 59 Las Vegas 73 62 pc 56 42 Little Rock 73 38 c 71 57 Los Angeles 59 50 s 62 45 Louisville 70 29 s 65 52 Memphis 72 46 c 71 58 Milwaukee 63 30 sh 58 36 Minneapolis 60 29 r 41 21 Mobile 71 46 c 74 58 Montgomery 70 35 pc 72 53 Nashville 67 31 pc 68 52 New Orleans 75 49 c 75 62 New York City 44 25 s 58 41 Norfolk 47 37 s 65 47 Oklahoma City 69 54 sh 65 61 Omaha 72 41 sh 53 28 Palm Springs 79 53 s 67 46 Philadelphia 45 27 s 62 44 Phoenix 86 53 s 62 43 Pittsburgh 49 20 s 62 45 Portland, ME 36 14 s 46 36 Portland, Ore 48 33 .01 s 53 36 Providence, R.I. 40 19 s 52 39 Raleigh 54 27 s 64 45 Rapid City 70 30 c 36 20 Reno 49 27 .02 s 43 23 Rochester, NY 43 16 pc 63 48 Sacramento 58 46 s 64 37 St. Louis 75 44 c 69 54 St. Ste. Marie 36 19 .01 sh 44 29 Salt Lake City 59 30 sh 44 26 San Antonio 75 53 sh 77 67 San Diego 60 54 s 61 48 San Francisco 54 46 .01 s 59 44 Savannah 63 40 pc 70 54 Seattle 44 32 .02 pc 47 36 Spokane 38 23 trace pc 40 24 Syracuse 43 20 s 60 40 Topeka 73 56 sh 66 36 Washington 49 29 s 64 46YESTERDAYS NATIONAL HIGH & LOW HIGH 88 Goodyear, Ariz. LOW -17 Saranac Lake, N.Y. WEDNESDAY CITY H/L/SKY Acapulco 88/74/s Amsterdam 44/38/r Athens 60/51/c Beijing 49/24/s Berlin 46/35/pc Bermuda 65/59/pc Cairo 72/52/pc Calgary 36/25/s Havana 82/65/ts Hong Kong 77/67/c Jerusalem 64/46/pc Lisbon 66/48/s London 58/39/sh Madrid 61/38/s Mexico City 79/48/s Montreal 43/39/c Moscow 15/9/c Paris 46/41/sh Rio 86/69/pc Rome 58/42/pc Sydney 70/62/ts Tokyo 55/48/sh Toronto 54/44/pc Warsaw 33/22/pc WORLD CITIES Tuesday Wednesday City H L Pcp. Fcst H L Tuesday Wednesda y City H L Pcp. Fcst H L Weather Central, Madison, Wi. Wednesday ThursdayCity High/Low High/Low High/Low High/LowChassahowitzka* 4:38 a/12:29 a 5:23 p/1:02 p 5:25 a/1:12 a 5:51 p/1:38 p Crystal River** 2:59 a/10:24 a 3:44 p/10:34 p 3:46 a/11:00 a 4:12 p/11:16 p Withlacoochee* 12:46 a/8:12 a 1:31 p/8:22 p 1:33 a/8:48 a 1:59 p/9:04 p Homosassa*** 3:48 a/12:01 p 4:33 p/ 4:35 a/12:11 a 5:01 p/12:37 p TIDES *From mouths of rivers **At Kings Bay ***At Masons CreekKEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle; f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain; rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers; sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy. SOLUNAR TABLESDATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR (MORNING) (AFTERNOON) 3/7 WEDNESDAY 4:13 10:26 4:38 10:51 3/8 THURSDAY 5:03 11:16 5:28 11:41 FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M. WEDNESDAY HI LO PR 77 47 NA Today's active pollen: Oak, Nettle, Juniper Todays count: 11.2/12 Thursdays count: 11.7 Fridays count: 11.7 For theRECORD ON THE NET For more information about arrests made by the Citrus County Sheriffs Office, go to www.sheriff citrus.org and click on the Public Information link, then on Arrest Reports. Also under Public Information on the CCSO website, click on Crime Mapping for a view of where each type of crime occurs in Citrus County. Click on Offense Reports to see lists of burglary, theft and vandalism. For the Record reports are also archived online at www.chronicleonline.com. Citrus County Sheriffs Office/Fire Rescue Chief Larry Morabito said the fire service is seeking volunteers to serve along paid staff at all stations. For information, call John Beebe, volunteer coordinator at 352527-5406. The Sheriffs 10-43 show airs on TV station WYKE, digital channel 47 and Bright House cable Channel 16. The show features interviews with sheriffs office staff from all areas of the agency. It also features Sheriff Jeff Dawsy taking live calls during the entire show on the last Wednesday monthly. The Sexual Predator Unit is responsible for tracking all registered sexual offenders and predators in the county. Click on the Sexual Offender Information link on the CCSO website. The Citrus County Sheriffs Office Volunteer Unit is comprised of nearly 900 citizens serving Citrus County. Members come from all walks of life and bring with them many years of life experience. This experience, combined with dedication and a willingness to help fellow citizens, is an excellent example of people helping one another. To volunteer, call Sgt. Chris Evan at 352-527-3701 or email cevan@sheriffcitrus.org. A4WEDNESDAY, MARCH7, 2012 To start your subscription:Call now for home delivery by our carriers:Citrus County: 352-563-5655 Marion County: 888-852-2340 13 weeks: $36.65* 6 months: $64.63* 1 year: $116.07**Subscription price includes a separate charge of .14 per day for transportation cost and applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352-563-6363 for details. There will be a $1 adjustment for the Thanksgiving edition. This will only slightly affect your expiration date. The Viewfinder TV guide is available to our subscribers for $13.00 per year.For home delivery by mail:In Florida: $59.00 for 13 weeks Elsewhere in U.S.: $69.00 for 13 weeksTo contact us regarding your service:352-563-5655Call for redelivery: 7 to 10 a.m. Monday to Friday 7 to 11 a.m. Saturday and Sunday Questions: 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday to Friday 7 to 11 a.m. Saturday and Sunday Main switchboard phone numbers:Citrus County 352-563-6363 Citrus Springs, Dunnellon and Marion County residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.I want to place an ad:To place a classified ad:Citrus 352-563-5966 Marion 888-852-2340 To place a display ad:352-563-5592 Online display ad:352-563-5592 I want to send information to the Chronicle:MAIL: 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429 FAX: Advertising 352-563-5665, Newsroom 352-563-3280 EMAIL: Advertising: advertising@chronicleonline.com Newsroom: newsdesk@chronicleonline.comMeadowcrest office 106 W. Main St., Inverness, FL 34450 Inverness officeWhos in charge:Gerry Mulligan ............................................................................Publisher, 563-3222 Trina Murphy............................Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232 Charlie Brennan ..................................................................................Editor, 563-3225 Tom Feeney..........................................................Production Director, 563-3275 Kathie Stewart....................................................Circulation Director, 563-5655 John Murphy................................................................Online Manager, 563-3255 John Murphy..........................................................Classified Manager, 564-3255 Jeff Gordon..............................................................Business Manager, 564-2908 Mike Arnold..........................................Human Resources Director, 564-2910Report a news tip:Opinion page questions ........................................Charlie Brennan, 563-3225 To have a photo taken ..............................................Darlene Mann, 563-5660 News and feature stories..................................Sandra Frederick, 564-2930 Community/wire service content ..........................Sarah Gatling,563-5660 Sports event coverage ................................Jon-Michael Soracchi,563-3261 Sound Off ................................................................................................................ 563-0579The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please recycle your newspaper.www.chronicleonline.com Published every Sunday through Saturday By Citrus Publishing Inc.1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429Phone 352-563-6363POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Citrus County Chronicle1624 N. MEADOWCREST BLVD., CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429 PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280 CITRUSCOUNTY Florida' s BestCommunity Newspaper Serving Floridas Best Community Where to find us:1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd. Crystal River, FL 34429 Blvd. Legal notices in todays Citrus County Chronicle 000AN36 City of Crystal River . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C4 Meeting Notices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C12 Lien Notices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C12 Notice to Creditors/Administration . . . C12 Self Storage Notices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C12 Surplus Property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C12 Fire Rescue enhances services Special to the ChronicleDeputy Chief Jim Goodworth gives an inside look at one of Fire Rescues squad vehicles, which can be used to respond to outlying areas quickly and efficiently. Sheriffs 10-43 Show to throw spotlight on Fire Rescue Citrus County Sheriffs OfficeBurglary A residential burglary occurred at about 10:38 a.m. March 5 in the 14100 block of W. Sanddollar Lane, Crystal River.Thefts A grand theft occurred at about 11:12 a.m. March 5 in the 5000 block of W. Norvell Bryant Highway, Crystal River. A petit theft occurred at about 11:40 a.m. March 5 in the 6900 block of S. Sonata Avenue, Homosassa.A larceny petit theft occurred at about 11:47 a.m. March 5 in the 14100 block of W. Sanddollar Lane, Crystal River.A grand theft occurred at about 4:24 p.m. March 5 in the 10000 block of W. Fishbowl Drive, Homosassa.Vandalism A vandalism occurred at about 9:41 a.m. March 5 in the 900 block of W. Roosevelt Boulevard, Beverly Hills. 80 46 .00

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TERMITE DAMAGE IS NOT COVERED BY YOUR HOMEOWNERS INSURANCE! $ 299 2011 2011 2011 2011 PREVENTION IS THE BEST PROTECTION! 000ANCJ This Is The Most Active Swarm Season Weve Experienced In 4 Years, T ony Winebrenner Licensed & Insured #8688 406 N.E. 1st St., Crystal River Has Your Termite Company Ever Increased Your Renewal In The Past 3 To 5 Years Or Do You Have A Deductible On Your Insurance? WE HAVE NEVER INCREASED... WE ARE YOUR SOLUTION TO YOUR PEST CONTROL PROBLEMS! www.CitrusPest.com (352) 563-6698 or (866) 860-BUGS QUARTERLY PEST CONTROL SERVICE INTRODUCTORY 1ST SERVICE A complete inspection of the interior and the exterior of your property. Removal of kitchen and bathroom switch plates and place a barrier into wall voids to prevent insects from invading your property. Baits are placed in all cracks and crevices in the kitchen and bathroom area. Treatment around and under appliances such as dishwasher, refrigerator, washer and dryer. Treatment of attic or crawl spaces. EVERY QUARTER Removal of spider webs and wasps nests from under eaves around windows and garage. Treatment of all entry points (doors, windows, and eaves area). Complete treatment of patios, porches, lanais, screen rooms and screened pool space. Treatment of soil, turf or mulch areas outside against the home or building If at any time the homeowner finds evidence of such insects, Citrus Pest Management Inc. will retreat at no additional charge to homeowner Starting At Quarterly New Residential Customers Only Fair Prices for Quality Service, With Guaranteed Results! 3 DAY SALE BOOK BY 5PM, MARCH 9, 2012 Santorum draws conservatives Associated PressWASHINGTON Rick Santorum was drawing strong support Tuesday from the most conservative voters in Ohios Republican presidential primary, according to early results of an exit poll of voters. Yet despite targeting the states blue-collar voters, they were giving him only a slender lead over rival Mitt Romney, the survey was showing. Ohio was the most closely watched among the 10 states holding Super Tuesday presidential contests. With many viewing the state as one of Santorums best chances of slowing Romneys march toward the GOP nomination, the two men were drawing strength from different ideological wings of the party, with Romney faring better with more moderate, less religiously driven voters. Santorum had a near 20 percentage point lead among Ohio Republicans considering themselves very conservative, and was doing especially well with people who are conservative on social issues like gay marriage and abortion. The former Pennsylvania senator was also doing strongly with born-again and evangelical voters, and had more than a 2-1 advantage over Romney with people saying it was very important that they share religious beliefs with their chosen candidate. But while he spent much of his campaign seeking to cement bonds with workingclass voters by citing his upbringing in Pennsylvania coal country and stressing U.S. manufacturing, he had only a tiny lead over Romney among people without college degrees a common measurement for the blue-collar vote. Romney, the one-time Massachusetts governor, was leading among all but the most ardently conservative voters in Ohio. He was also capturing a majority of those saying they want a candidate who can defeat President Barack Obama this fall, and was leading among voters saying their most important issue is the economy. In two Southern states where Santorum fought for strong performances, Oklahoma and Tennessee, he was buoyed by voters who said their choices were influenced by religion, exit polls showed. More than two-thirds of voters in both states said a candidates religious beliefs were important to them. Santorums Oklahoma win was fed by a more than 15 percentage point advantage among those religiously oriented voters over both Romney and Newt Gingrich, the former House speaker who was struggling to keep his candidacy afloat. In Tennessee, Santorums lead over those two men among people looking for a religious match with their candidate was nearly 2-1. Another Santorum source of strength in Tennessee and Oklahoma were bluecollar voters, who were giving him modest but clear leads over his competitors in both states. One of Romneys chief selling points is his assertion that his business background gives him expertise on handling the economy, but Tennessee and Oklahoma voters were not giving him an edge on that issue. Romney and Santorum were running about even among Tennessee voters who consider the economy the top issue in the election, while Oklahoma voters focused on the economy gave Romney only a small advantage over Santorum and Gingrich. The campaigns persistent criticism of Romneys wealth and background as a private equity executive may be hurting him, the exit surveys showed. Asked in Ohio and Tennessee which candidate best understands the problems confronted by average Americans, Romney scored poorly. Around a third in each state picked Santorum while only about a fifth named Romney. Associated PressSupporters of Rick Santorum, David Vann, left, high-fives former Tulsa City Councilor Chris Medlock as they hear the winning results at Santorum's watch party Tuesday in Tulsa, Okla. Santorum has won Oklahomas Republican presidential primary, leaving Mitt Romney and Newt Gingrich to battle for second place in what is called the reddest of the red states. Later, he told supporters, Im going to get this nomination. Yet Santorums multiple victories, coupled with Gingrichs win, provided fresh evidence that Romneys conservative rivals retain the ability to outpoll him in certain parts of the country despite his huge organizational and financial advantages. Santorum waited until Oklahoma and Tennessee fell into his column before speaking to cheering supporters in Ohio. Were going to win a few. Were going to lose a few. But as it looks right now, were going to get a couple of gold medals and a whole passel of silver, he said. In all, there were primaries in Virginia, Vermont, Ohio, Massachusetts, Georgia, Tennessee and Oklahoma. Caucuses in North Dakota, Idaho and Alaska rounded out the calendar. Some 419 delegates were at stake in the 10 states. Romney picked up at least 129 delegates during the evening, Santorum 47, Gingrich 42 and Paul at least 10. That gave the former Massachusetts governor 332, more than all his rivals combined, including endorsements from members of the Republican National Committee who automatically attend the convention and can support any candidate they choose. Santorum had 139 delegates, Gingrich 75 and Paul 35. It takes 1,144 delegates to win the nomination at the Republican National Convention in Tampa, Fla., this summer. In interviews as voters left their polling places, Republicans in state after state said the economy was the top issue and an ability to defeat Obama was what mattered most as they made their Super Tuesday choices. They also indicated nagging concerns about the candidate they supported, even in Massachusetts, There, one-third of all primary voters said they had reservations, and about three-quarters of those voted for Romney. Massachusetts is a reliably Democratic state in most presidential elections, but in Ohio, 41 percent of primary voters said they, too, had reservations about the candidate they supported. No Republican has ever won the White House without capturing Ohio. Gingrichs victory was his first since he captured the South Carolina primary on Jan. 21, and the former House speaker said it would propel him on yet another comeback in a race where he has faded badly over the past six weeks. Ohio was the days biggest prize in political significance, a heavily populated industrial state that tested Santorums ability to challenge Romney in a traditional fall battleground. Georgia, Gingrichs home political field, outranked them all in the number of delegates at stake, with 76, a total that reflected a reliable Republican voting pattern as well as population. Romney, the leader in the early delegate chase, flew to Massachusetts to vote and said he hoped for a good home-state win. DODGEContinued from Page A1

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Associated PressLONDON How do you sum up the work of songwriter Robert B. Sherman? Try one word: Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious. The tongue-twisting term, sung by magical nanny Mary Poppins, is like much of Shermans work both complex and instantly memorable, for child and adult alike. Once heard, it was never forgotten. Sherman, who died in London at age 86, was half of a sibling partnership that put songs into the mouths of nannies and Cockney chimney sweeps, jungle animals and Parisian felines. Robert Sherman and his brother Richard composed scores for films including The Jungle Book, The Aristocats, Mary Poppins and Chitty Chitty Bang Bang. They also wrote the most-played tune on Earth, Its a Small World (After All). Shermans agent, Stella Richards, said Tuesday that Sherman died peacefully in London on Monday. Son Jeffrey Sherman paid tribute to his father on Facebook, saying he wanted to bring happiness to the world and, unquestionably, he succeeded. Jeffrey Sherman told The Associated Press that his father had learned the craft of songwriting from his own father, Tin Pan Alley composer Al Sherman. His rule in writing songs was keep it singable, simple and sincere, Jeffrey Sherman said. In the simplest things you find something universal. Robert Sherman knew another truth, his son said: What seems so simple is really very complex. He was a very simple guy complex but simple. If you ever want to know about my Dad, listen to the lyrics of his songs. Robert A. Iger, president and CEO of The Walt Disney Co., said in a statement that the company mourned the loss of one of the worlds greatest songwriters and a true Disney legend. Three Broadway marquees including The New Amsterdam Theatre, where Mary Poppins is playing will dim their lights Tuesday night in Shermans honor. The Sherman Brothers career was long, prolific and garlanded with awards. They won two Academy Awards for Walt Disneys 1964 smash Mary Poppins best score and best song, Chim Chim Cher-ee. They also picked up a Grammy for best movie or TV score. Their hundreds of credits as joint lyricist and composer also include the films Winnie the Pooh, The Slipper and the Rose, Snoopy Come Home, Charlottes Web and The Magic of Lassie. Their Broadway musicals included 1974s Over Here! and stagings of Mary Poppins and Chitty Chitty Bang Bang in the mid-2000s. Something good happens when we sit down together and work, Richard Sherman told The Associated Press in a 2005 joint interview. Weve been doing it all our lives. Practically since college weve been working together. The brothers awards included 23 gold and platinum albums and a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. They became the only Americans ever to win First Prize at the Moscow Film Festival for Tom Sawyer in 1973 and were inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame in 2005. President George W. Bush awarded them the National Medal of Arts in 2008, commended for music that has helped bring joy to millions. Alan Menken, composer of scores for Disney films including The Little Mermaid, Beauty and the Beast and Aladdin, said the Sherman brothers legacy goes far beyond the craft of songwriting. There is a magic in their songs and in the films and musicals they breathed life into, he said Tuesday. Robert Bernard Sherman was born in New York on Dec. 19, 1925, and raised there and in Beverly Hills, California. The brothers credited their father with challenging them to write songs and for their love of lyrics. Al Shermans legacy of songs includes You Gotta Be a Football Hero, (What Do We Do On a) Dew-DewDewy Day and On the Beach at Bali-Bali. Robert Shermans affection for Britain was nurtured during his service with the U.S. Army in World War II. One of the first American soldiers to enter the Dachau concentration camp and, his son said, the only Jewish serviceman there he was shot in the knee in Germany in 1945. Recovering in hospitals in England, he developed a fondness for and familiarity with the country that stuck with him. He wrote for British characters in Mary Poppins, Chitty Chitty Bang Bang and Winnie the Pooh, and spent the last years of his life in London. After the war, the brothers started writing songs together. They began a decade-long partnership with Disney during the 1960s after having written hit pop songs like Tall Paul for ex-Mouseketeer Annette Funicello and Youre Sixteen, later recorded by Ringo Starr. Though they were estranged for a number of years, the brothers never completely broke ties. When asked about that, Richard Sherman said: Were human. We have frailties and weaknesses. But we love each other very much, respect each other. They wrote more than 150 songs at Disney, including the soundtracks for such films as The Sword and the Stone, The Parent Trap, Bedknobs and Broomsticks, The Jungle Book, The Aristocrats and The Tigger Movie. Dennis Dayton, 76INGLISDennis A. Dayton, age 76, of Inglis, FL, passed away March 5, 2012. Born on August 21, 1935, in Beaver Dam, Wisconsin, to Arden H. and Myrtle M. (Miscke) Dayton. Dennis moved to Inglis in 2009 from Bradenton, FL. He was a self-employed Landscaper; a Navy Veteran and a member of the Kirkwood Presbyterian Church in Bradenton. Preceded in death by his wife, Barbara J. Dayton; and son, Brian Dayton. Survived by his close friend, Michelle Hicks; and her son, Corey Hicks. Private cremation will take place under the direction of Brown Funeral Home and Crematory in Lecanto, FL. Burial will be at the Highland Memory Gardens in Beaver Dam, WI. Sign the guest book at www.chronicleonline.com.Wesley Locke, 75HOMOSASSAMr. Wesley Wake Locke, 75, of Homosassa, died Tuesday, March 6, 2012, in Homosassa. Arrangements are under the direction of the Homosassa Chapel of Hooper Funeral Home & Crematory. Ellen ODwyer, 68INVERNESSEllen Lee ODwyer, age 68, born December 23, 1949, to Edwin and Ethel Crawley in Charleston, S.C. Ellen entered Eternal Rest on March 3, 2012. She moved to St. Petersburg at a young age and grew up there, attending Dixie Hollins High School. In 1970, Ellie married Daniel ODwyer in St. Petersburg, FL, and lived in Andros Island, Bahamas; Palm Beach Gardens, FL; Aurora and Parker, CO. In CO, Ellen worked as an electronics assembler for Honeywell. She and Dan moved to Inverness in 1996 to be nearer to family. Ellen enjoyed tennis in her younger years and served as a Brownie and Girl Scout troop leader in Palm Beach Gardens. She also enjoyed scuba/snorkel diving, wind surfing, sailing, backpacking and camping. Hobby activities included knitting, crocheting and sewing. A stroke in 2004 placed her in a wheelchair and those activities ceased, but she still enjoyed old movies and listening to books. She was preceded in death by her mother and father, daughter Kelly and sister Edwina Porter. She is survived by her husband; daughters Glenyss (Steve) Steinmetz of Tomball, TX, and Evelyn (Richard) Traynom of Marianna, FL; grandchildren Denise Traynom, Matthew and Kaity Steinmetz; niece Debbie White; nephews George and Daniel Beverley; as well as many aunts, uncles and cousins. In lieu of flowers, it is requested that donations be made to the American Diabetes Association or Hospice of Citrus County Inc. A memorial service will be held at 4 p.m. Saturday, March 10, 2012, at Chas. E. Davis Funeral Home, 3075 South Florida Avenue, Inverness, FL 34450. Sign the guest book at www.chronicleonline.com.Doris Morgan, 82HERNANDODoris L. Morgan, 82, Hernando, died Feb. 29, 2012, at her home. A graveside military service will be at 11 a.m. Wednesday March 14, 2012, at the Florida National Cemetery with VFW Post 4252 of Hernando rendering honors. Chas. E. Davis Funeral Home with Crematory is in charge of arrangements. Donald Snyder, 87INVERNESSDonald A. Snyder, 87, Inverness, died March 5, 2012. A gravesidemilitary honor service will be at 3 p.m. Thursday, March 15, 2012, at the Florida National Cemetery in Bushnell. Chas. E. Davis Funeral Home with Crematory isin charge of arrangements. Hilda Solomon, 89BEVERLY HILLSHilda May Solomon,age 89, of Beverly Hills, died March 1, 2012, at her home under the loving care of her family and HPH Hospice. Hilda was born on July 17, 1922, in Saint Ann, Jamaica, to the late Joshua and Wilhel Green. She was employed as a nurses aide. Hilda was active as a member of First Assembly of God Church of Inverness; her passion was helping others and giving of herself. She enjoyed being with her family and her church friends. Survivors include her husband of 55 years, Newville Solomon; two sons, Carey (Jacqueline) Solomon, Belle Meade, NJ, and Everton Solomon, Dallas, TX; stepson, Patrick (Carol) Solomon, Orlando, FL; her daughter, Bridgett Solomon, Beverly Hills; stepdaughter Maxine (Evan) Jones, Millston, NJ; four grandchildren; and five step-grandchildren. A Funeral Service of Remembrance will be held on Saturday, March 10, 2012, at 1 p.m. at the First Assembly of God Church. Burial will follow at Fero Memorial Gardens. The family will receive friends in visitation from noon until the hour of service. Chas. E. Davis Funeral Home with Crematory is in charge of arrangements. The family requests donations in Hildas name to the churchs Childrens Fund in lieu of flowers. Sign the guest book at www.chronicleonline.com.Emil Thompson Jr., 85HOMOSASSAEmil William Thompson Jr., age 85, of Homosassa, FL, passed away March 5, 2012. Born on July 16, 1926, in Manhattan, New York, to Emil W., Sr. and Ruth (Friedman) Thompson, Emil moved to Citrus County 22 years ago from Sparta, NJ. He was a retired Engineer for Picatinny Arsenal; a U.S. Army veteran; volunteer of the Homosassa Volunteer Fire Department, a volunteer at Homosassa Springs State Park, and a member of St. Scholastica Catholic Church in Lecanto. Emil earned his Masters degree from Columbia University in Manhattan, NY. He is preceded in death by his brother, Tom; and his sisters, Lillian and Isabel. Survived by his wife, Maria; one daughter, Katherine; five step children, Marie, Chris, Victor, Mark and Gregory; thirteen grandchildren. Private cremation will take place under the direction of Brown Funeral Home and Crematory in Lecanto, FL. Mass of the Resurrection will be offered at 10 a.m. Friday, March 9th, at St. Scholastica Catholic Church in Lecanto, FL. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations can be made to The Salvation Army. Sign the guest book at www.chronicleonline.com.A6WEDNESDAY, MARCH7, 2012CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE 352-628-2291 DRYER VENT CLEANING $ 90 www.PreventDryerFiresNow.com 2011 2011 2011 2011 W ILL C ONSTRUCTION 000AS4F $ave Electricity CBC1252474 PREVENT PREVENT PREVENT FIRE! FIRE! FIRE! FULLY INSURED Liability Workers Comp 000AQOH 000AN84 Cellular & Roman Shades Plantation Shutters Ado Wraps Custom Drapery Top Treatments Etc. 628-7888 CALL NOW! Lorrie 5454 S. Suncoast Blvd. (Hwy 19, next to Sugarmill Family Rest.) www.verticalblindsofhomosassa.com OF HOMOSASSA, Inc. Vertical Blinds of Homosassa More Than Just Verticals 2011 2011 2011 2011 2 Faux Wood Woven Woods To Place Your In Memory ad, Call Mike Snyder at 563-3273 msnyder@chronicleonline.com or Saralynne Schlumberger at 564-2917 sschlumberger@chronicleonline.com Closing time for placing ad is 4 days prior to run date. 000AH6J 000AQKR 726-8323 Funeral Home With Crematory Chas. E. Davis Chas. E. Davis MARVIN ADKISSON Service: Graveside Thurs. 2:30 PM Florida National Cemetery EMMITT PIERCE Graveside Service: Fri. 12:30 PM Florida National Cemetery KATHRYN BRYE Service: Fri. 3:00 PM Chapel HILDA SOLOMON Service: Sat. 1:00 PM First Assembly of God Church ELLEN ODWYER Service: Sat. 4:00 PM Chapel OBITUARIES The Citrus County Chronicles policy permits both free and paid obituaries. Obituaries must be submitted or verified by the funeral home or society in charge of arrangements. Free obituaries, run one day, can include: full name of deceased; age; hometown/state; date of death; place of death; date, time and place of visitation and funeral services. If websites, photos, survivors, memorial contributions or other information are included, this will be designated as a paid obituary and a cost estimate provided to the sender. A flag will be included for free for those who served in the U.S. military. (Please note this service when submitting a free obituary.) Additionally, all obituaries will be posted online at www.chronicleonline .com. Paid obituaries are printed as submitted by funeral homes or societies. Area funeral homes with established accounts with the Chronicle are charged $8.75 per column inch. Non-local funeral homes and those without accounts are required to pay in advance by credit card, and the cost is $10 per column inch. OBITUARIES Small photos of the deceaseds face can be included for an additional charge. Larger photos, spanning the entire column, can also be accommodated, and will incur a size-based fee. Email obits@chronicle online.com or fax 352563-3280. Phone 352-563-5660 for details. Deadline is 3 p.m. for obituaries to appear in the next days edition. ERRORS Additional days of publication or reprints due to errors in submitted material are charged at the same rates. Hilda Solomon Obituaries Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious composer Sherman dies at 86 Associated PressIn this April, 5, 1965, file photo actress Debbie Reynolds poses with Academy award-winners for best music Richard M. Sherman, right, and Robert B. Sherman, left, who received the award for Mary Poppins in Santa Monica, Calif. Songwriter Robert Sherman, who wrote the tongue-twisting Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious and other enduring songs for Disney classics, died Monday in London. He was 86.

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CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLEWEDNESDAY, MARCH7, 2012 A7 000ASFU

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Associated PressGULF BREEZE Pray for Our Schools, many fading yard signs scattered throughout Santa Rosa County say, remnants of a bitter court battle over school prayer between conservative Christian groups and the American Civil Liberties Union. That fight, which cost the Santa Rosa County School District at least $500,000 in attorney fees, ended with officials admitting high school administrators had been leading prayers and promoting Christianity in the school system. It is part of the backdrop for a bill just passed by the Florida Legislature that would allow the states 67 school boards to adopt rules permitting the reading of student-initiated inspirational messages at assemblies and ceremonies. Backers say the bill, introduced by Sen. Gary Siplin, D-Orlando, doesnt use the word prayer and doesnt favor any specific religion, but allows students to pick a speaker and message of their choosing. If the chosen student gives a prayer or cites a specific religion, thats his or her right, proponents say. Republican Gov. Rick Scott is expected to sign the bill. The bill doesnt force any message whatsoever, Rep. Eric Eisnaugle, R-Orlando, said in a recent committee hearing. Eisnaugle said the bill is constitutional because it is content neutral. Even if the policy is adopted (by a school board,) it leaves the decision whether to deliver a message up to the students, he said. All the folks whove opposed this bill and who have expressed opposition to this bill seem to have a bias against prayer. They dont like this bill because it allows potentially, if a student wants to give a prayer, it allows prayer. But opponents say the unstated goal is to allow Christian prayers at school events, which they say would violate the constitutional rights of non-Christian students. And they say the bill violates the U.S. Constitutions ban on the government endorsing specific religions in schools and will create additional lawsuits similar to the Santa Rosa County lawsuit that the school districts will lose at great cost to taxpayers. The House rejected an amendment put forward by opponents that would have required the state to pay the legal fees for any district that allowed inspirational messages and was sued. This is an open invitation for 66 more Santa Rosa counties, said Howard Simon, executive director of the ACLU of Florida. Until the early 1960s, state-sponsored, adult-led prayer was common in public schools nationwide. But then the U.S. Supreme Court said such prayers violated the First Amendments clause that says the government cannot establish an official religion or prohibit any religions free exercise. In the five decades since, there have been numerous court fights over what constitutes school prayer, when its legal and where the line is drawn. There is no question there will be lawsuits over this, said Bob Jarvis, a constitutional law professor at Nova Southeastern University in Fort Lauderdale. It is certainly an attempt to get around the ban on prayer in school, no one can question that. I think, in the end, no school district will carry it out for fear that they might get sued. The legislation appears to be more of a political offering than a legal one, he said. The bill raises a lot of constitutional questions that would create headaches for schools to manage, he said. Jarvis said it would be difficult for school districts to give equal time for every student to share an inspirational message, and it would be difficult for districts to control possible offensive content. Its unlikely the bill would stand up to legal scrutiny, he said. I think it was one of those symbolic bills passed by very Republican legislators to throw red meat to their base and to toss (it) up in November if the courts reject it, Jarvis said. The school-prayer fight came to Santa Rosa County in 2008 when the ACLU sued on behalf of two Pace High School students over student-led prayers that were given at graduation and other school events. The principal, who is a Baptist deacon, school administrators and teachers also led students in prayer and Bible readings. The district settled the lawsuit by banning its officials from leading or promoting prayer at school events and by admitting a long-standing culture at Pace High of promoting Christianity. The Liberty Counsel appealed the settlement on behalf of Christian Educators Association International saying the settlement went too far in restricting employees rights. A federal court agreement ended the case by amending the original settlement to, among other things, clarify that teachers can say thank heavens or God bless you in the classroom. Longtime Santa Rosa school board member JoAnn Simpson sees the decision by the Legislature not to cover districts attorney fees as a warning that districts that adopt the measure will be sued and could lose. Simpson said few issues have more power to divide communities than school prayer, and the damage is long term. Its wonderful for people to put signs in their yards that say Pray for our Schools, she said. Im a person of God. I pray, but I do not subject others to my beliefs. There is still animosity out there. There is still a lot of animosity about the lawsuits. Santa Rosa Superintendent Tim Wyrosdick had no comment about the bill. Other Santa Rosa school board members did not return emails or phone messages left by The Associated Press. Opponents say the bill is about Christian prayer, regardless of the carefullychosen terminology, and would likely lead to lawsuits for school districts that adopt the measure. Some question whether the term inspirational message will create problems because it is not specific. Rep. Jeff Clemens, D-Lake Worth, wanted to know if a students reading aloud from the Aryan Satanic Manifesto could be considered an inspirational message. Citizens bill may be dead for the yearA bill to try to move people out of Citizens Property Insurance (HB 245) may be dead for this year after the House agreed Tuesday to take a Senate amendment requiring people to opt-in to the switch to a new, unregulated company. This year, it probably is, said bill sponsor Rep. Jim Boyd, R-Bradenton, after his side lost on a vote that he said gutted the bill. The Senate had made the same vote a day earlier, and earlier on Tuesday passed its amended version of the bill 26-8. The bill would let surplus lines insurance companies take policies from Citizens in an effort to reduce Citizens liability. Originally, customers would have had to opt out of the switch in that case. But with the amendment that passed the Senate on Monday and the House on Tuesday, the bill now would require policyholders to approve before being switched. The opt-in provision, as well as other changes restricting rate hikes on surplus insurers amounts to a straight jacket around the surplus lines companies the state is trying to court, and they will simply will go somewhere else, said Senate bill sponsor Sen. Garrett Richter, RNaples. House set to pass medical loss ratioTrying to get federal approval of a statewide Medicaid overhaul, the House could vote Wednesday on a controversial requirement aimed at making sure HMOs spend enough money on patient care. Republican lawmakers refused last year to include the requirement, known as a medical loss ratio, in a plan to shift hundreds of thousands of Medicaid beneficiaries into managed care. Instead, lawmakers sought to require that HMOs share profits above 5 percent with the state. But federal officials, who are reviewing the overhaul, have made clear they want a medicalloss ratio to ensure that HMOs spend a minimum amount of the money they receive possibly 85 percent on patient care. The House on Tuesday added a medical-loss ratio to SB 730. But part of that proposal drew criticism from Democrats because it would allow managed-care plans to also comply with the ratio by contributing money to medical-residency programs or to a state Medicaid fund. Rep. Elaine Schwartz, D-Hollywood, said that could shift money away from patient care and wouldnt be approved by federal officials. In general, patient care is patient care, Schwartz said. Its not contributions to schools, and its not just giving money back to the state. But House Health & Human Services Chairman Rob Schenck, R-Spring Hill, said GOP leaders have come up with cutting-edge ways to improve the medical-loss ratio. He said counting contributions to medical-residency programs would help with a state shortage of doctors.House set to vote on video voyeurism billThe Florida House could vote this week on a bill that increases the charges related to the crime known as video voyeurism. The House on Tuesday rolled the bill (SB 436) to a third reading. That means it will be available for a final vote this week before the legislative session ends on Friday. The Senate already approved the measure. The bill increases video voyeurism offenses that are now first-degree misdemeanors to thirddegree felonies. It also increases current thirddegree felony video voyeurism offenses to second-degree felonies. Video voyeurism is the secret recording of another person while naked or in some state of undress. A high-profile case last year involved a man charged with recording tanning-bed customers.Pharmacy vaccinations get a shot at passingThe Senate appears ready to give final approval to a bill that would allow pharmacists to give vaccinations for pneumonia and shingles. The bill (HB 509), which already has passed the House, came up on the Senate floor Tuesday and was placed in position for a vote as soon as Wednesday. It is a compromise between pharmacists and physicians, who have long disagreed about whether people should be able to get vaccinations at their neighborhood pharmacies. Under the bill, pharmacists would be able to give pneumonia vaccinations to adults, similar to the way they give flu shots now. They also would be able to give shingles vaccinations if patients have prescriptions from doctors. Also, the bill would require pharmacists to take a continuing-education course about giving vaccinations.House opens up online learning optionsA bill that expands online learning opportunities to elementary school-age children has been passed by the Florida House. The bill (HB 7063) was approved by a vote of 100-16 on Tuesday and now goes to the Senate. It allows the Florida Virtual School to expand part-time course offerings to children in kindergarten through third grade. The bill also removes the requirement that public school students spend at least a year in public school before they can enroll in Virtual School classes. Supporters say it will promote school choice and support homeschooled children. State employees could access KidCareThe children of state employees could be eligible for low-cost state-subsidized health care coverage, under a measure passed by the Florida Senate unanimously on Tuesday. The bill, SB 510, would take advantage of changes in the 1997 federal State Childrens Health Insurance Program (CHIP) that now allows state employees to qualify. Given the number of state workers who have applied for KidCare and were denied coverage, or are receiving full-pay coverage, its estimated 2,702 children would qualify in the first 12 months. The fiscal impact to the state is estimated to be $447,055 but overall, Florida is expected to save money by not insuring these children through the state employee plan. The House companion, HB 849, hasnt moved. Advocates for children are also working on another effort to broaden KidCare, hoping lawmakers will change rules to allow it to cover certain children of immigrants who are legally in the country but who currently cant get coverage. That effort is mired in the Senate.House sets up vote for official state flagshipThe Florida House has readied a bill for a final vote that designates an official state flagship. The House on Tuesday rolled the bill (SB 326) to a third reading. That means it will be available for a final vote this week before the legislative session ends on Friday. The Senate already approved the measure. The bill would name the Western Union as Floridas flagship. The ship is a 130-foot-long schooner based in Key West where it is being turned into a floating museum. Construction of the yellow pine and mahogany ship began in Grand Cayman and was completed in Key West in 1939. It served as a cable vessel for the Western Union Telegraph Co. for 34 years and later was put to work as a charter boat.Handcuffs could be banned during jailhouse birthsWomen giving birth in a Florida prison or county jail would not be handcuffed or otherwise restrained under a measure that state lawmakers could pass this week. The House took up the Healthy Pregnancies for Incarcerated Women Act (SB 524/HB 367) on Tuesday and rolled it to a third reading. The Senate already approved its version. A similar measure was introduced last year but did not pass into law. The act allows pregnant women to be physically restrained only if theyre shown to be a security or escape risk. A woman who believes she was restrained in violation of the act could file a grievance within one year. House Speaker Cannon thanks Jeb Bush, slams Charlie CristThe formal portrait of Florida House Speaker Dean Cannon is now hanging in the House chamber. Gov. Rick Scott attended the brief ceremony at the beginning of Tuesdays session. Cannon then thanked former Gov. Jeb Bush for showing him what a leader should be and former Gov. Charlie Crist for showing him what a politician should not be. Neither was in attendance. House members also presented Cannon with a hunting shotgun. The Winter Park Republican was first elected to the House in 2004.A8WEDNESDAY, MARCH7, 2012CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE STATE 000AO6C 000APN9 Board Certified American Osteopathic Board of Ophthalmology and Otorhinolaryngology Board Certified National Board of Examiners for Osteopathic Physicians and Surgeons Ward Eye Center 8490 W. Homosassa Trail, Homosassa (352) 489-3579 (352) 628-0123 MODERN MODERN DIABETIC DIABETIC SPECIALIST SPECIALIST Saturday, March 24 ~ Noon Museum Cafe ~ 10466 W. Yulee Drive in Old Homosassa Bands Include: 12:15-12:45 Alexandria Hand 1:00-1:45 Grounded 4 Life 2:00-2:30 Sophie Robitaille 2:45-3:30 Zero Gravity 3:45-4:15 Haley Schroeder 4:30-5:15 Tri Phi For information call 352-503-3498. Gates open at 11:30 a.m. Starts at Noon $7 Adults $3 Teens 12 and under Free B ENEFITING B IG B ROTHERS AND B IG S ISTERS OF C ITRUS C OUNTY 000AIIT No coolers or pets Bring Chairs www.ncfblues.com Present: the Third Annual 2012 000AKNI FloridaLEGISLATURE From wire reports 2012SESSION Inspirational messages bill sure to spur lawsuits

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PETERSVENSSON AP Technology WriterNEW YORK Apple is expected to reveal a new iPad model on Wednesday, with a sharper screen and perhaps an option for faster wireless broadband. The upgrades are relatively minor, but the iPad is secure in its position as the king of tablets. As usual, Apple has kept the features of the new device secret. No matter what they are, analysts expect the new iPad to be a success, riding on the popularity of the previous models, as well as pent-up demand from consumers who have been waiting for the new model. The iPad 2 was a big step up from the original iPad, since Apple included a camera and reduced both the thickness and the weight of the device. But there isnt that much Apple can do to jazz up the iPad 3. Company watchers expect the new device to have the same basic size and weight as last years model. Nearly a year ago, the iPad 2 went on sale nine days after it was revealed. Apple watchers expect similar timing this year. Some rumored new features include: A sharper screen, similar to the Retina Display on the iPhone 4 and 4s. The rumored resolution is 2048 by 1536 pixels, which would make text look smoother and some high-resolution pictures look better. It wont make much of a difference for images on the Web, or video. Some speculate that Apple will call the model the iPad HD, for high definition, rather than iPad 3. The new iPad could include Siri, the voice-activated assistant found on the iPhone 4S. Siri has gotten mixed reviews, but Apple has been touting the feature heavily in its advertising, and it would make sense to expand the availability of this high-profile feature. Faster wireless capabilities. IPads are available with built-in modems for AT&Ts and Verizons third-generation, or G cellular networks in the U.S. The iPad 3 could come in a version that offers faster G or LTE networks. However, most iPads are used only on Wi-Fi, so an LTE chip wouldnt matter to most buyers. In this respect, Apple is playing catch-up. Some competitors, such as Samsung and Motorola, already sell LTE-compatible tablets. Since last fall, Sprint Nextel Corp. has sold the iPhone. But it doesnt sell the iPad. Its possible it could join AT&T and Verizon Wireless in selling the iPad 3. A faster processor. This is pretty much a given, since every new iPhone or iPad has improved on the computing power of its predecessor. But few users complain about their iPads being slow, so this should not be a major selling point. Sarah Rotman Epps, an analyst for Forrester Research, said hardware features arent that important to tablet buyers. Its about the services what you can do with the device, she said in a blog post. Apples competitors have slowly come to realize this, but only after bringing out dozens of tablets with whiz-bang features like 3-D cameras. The competitor thats done the best is Amazon.com Inc. Its Kindle Fire tablet is cheaper than the iPad, but what really sets it apart is that its tied into Amazons book, movie and music stores, making it an easy route to entertainment, just like the iPad. Still, the Kindle Fire has a long way to go. Epps estimates that Amazon sold 5.5 million Kindle Fires in the fourth quarter of last year. Meanwhile, Apple sold 15.4 million iPads, and has sold 55.3 million in total. According to Canaccord Genuity, 63 percent of the tablets shipped last year were iPads. The only competitors with more than 5 percent market share were Amazon and Samsung Electronics Co. The iPad launch comes as Apple has reached a rare milestone: last week, it was worth more than $500 billion. Only six other U.S. companies have been worth that much, and none have held that valuation for long. On Tuesday, Apples stock had fallen, bringing its market value down to $493 billion, but analysts believe the company is worth closer to $550 billion. One big unknown is whether Apple will keep the iPad 2 in production at a lower price, like it kept the iPhone 3GS after the launch of the iPhone 4. If so, the iPad 2 could carry a price tag that would make consumers think twice about buying a Kindle Fire. Another big unknown is whether Apple will reveal its rumored foray into making TV sets. Some have speculated that the invite to the Apple event, which said We have something you really have to see, points in that direction.NATIONCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLEWEDNESDAY, MARCH7, 2012 A9 000AO1I HOME DELIVERY Call 563-3295 563-3295 TODAY!! or join EZ-PAY and GET ONE MONTH FREE! *NEWST AND PRICES. Cannot have subscribed in 60 days. 52 week pre-paid only. Ask for code HP 000AQOM Does your attic go bump in the night? Pests come in all shapes & sizes. Some pose a danger to your home while others are simply a nuisance. Our technicians have the expertise & experience to identify a problem & provide a solution to keep your family & home safe. Rodent Removal Mice Rats Squirrels Etc. Toll Free 1-877-345-BUSH www.bushhomeservices.com Call today for a FREE phone or in-home estimate. 000AIRN Homosassa 621-7700 Inverness 860-1037 Crystal River 795-8600 PEST CONTROL New iPad expected to have modest upgrades Associated PressGrant Beacon Middle School student Jeriah Garcia, 13, works out an algebra problem Jan. 17 on his school-supplied iPad in class at Grant, Colo. Apple is expected to reveal a new iPad on Wednesday, March 7, a device with a sharper screen, a faster processor and an option for faster wireless broadband.

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CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESTOCKS THEMARKETINREVIEW HOWTOREADTHEMARKETINREVIEW NYSE AMEX NASDAQ STOCKSOFLOCALINTEREST MOSTACTIVE($1 ORMORE)NameVol(00)LastChg BkofAm24793587.71-.26 S&P500ETF1718077134.75-2.00 iShEMkts101063642.41-1.47 SPDR Fncl89689214.45-.37 FordM56504212.09-.37 GAINERS($2 ORMORE)NameLastChg%Chg HarvNRes7.70+1.44+23.0 DrxRsaBear21.73+3.23+17.5 DaqoNwEn2.88+.39+15.7 PrUltVixST6.13+.81+15.2 CSVs2xInPal37.50+4.90+15.0 LOSERS($2 ORMORE)NameLastChg%Chg DxRssBull rs47.54-9.70-16.9 StMotr20.51-3.86-15.8 CSVS2xPall53.72-9.10-14.5 NoAmEn g4.92-.80-14.0 SunTr wtB2.65-.42-13.7 DIARYAdvanced 267 Declined 2,804 Unchanged 50 Total issues 3,121 New Highs 24 New Lows 30Volume4,111,854,540 MOSTACTIVE($1 ORMORE)NameVol(00)LastChg NovaGld g724777.52-.45 CheniereEn5896215.14-.74 NwGold g3650910.16-.36 GoldStr g320991.76-.08 DenisnM g223901.61-.10 GAINERS($2 ORMORE)NameLastChg%Chg Orbital5.82+.41+7.6 Ellomay rs5.75+.38+7.1 Engex2.74+.17+6.6 MastechH5.62+.29+5.4 eMagin3.15+.13+4.3 LOSERS($2 ORMORE)NameLastChg%Chg GreenHntr2.55-.28-9.9 MtnPDia g4.70-.50-9.6 DocuSec3.46-.34-8.8 PyramidOil4.85-.44-8.3 TriangPet6.67-.56-7.7 DIARYAdvanced 100 Declined 357 Unchanged 41 Total issues 498 New Highs 4 New Lows 10Volume101,934,883 MOSTACTIVE($1 ORMORE)NameVol(00)LastChg Microsoft50433831.56-.25 PwShs QQQ48453463.57-.63 SiriusXM4626722.22-.04 MicronT3697108.00-.20 Intel36702826.61+.07 GAINERS($2 ORMORE)NameLastChg%Chg Vermillion3.00+1.67+125.6 EncoreBcsh20.19+5.28+35.4 DUSA5.80+1.15+24.7 Irid wt132.06+.34+19.8 Agenus rs3.76+.55+17.1 LOSERS($2 ORMORE)NameLastChg%Chg Oncothyr5.07-3.34-39.7 ZeltiqAes n7.36-3.75-33.8 SunshHrt n10.50-3.50-25.0 Aegerion14.17-3.27-18.8 USHmSy10.33-1.84-15.1 DIARYAdvanced 446 Declined 2,100 Unchanged 89 Total issues 2,635 New Highs 25 New Lows 52Volume1,829,965,958 Here are the 825 most active stocks on the New York Stock Exchange, 765 most active on the Nasdaq National Market and 116 most active on the American Stock Exchange. Tables show name, price and net change. Name: Stocks appear alphabetically by the companys full name (not abbreviation). Names consisting of initials appear at the beginning of each letters list. Last: Price stock was trading at when exchange closed for the day. Chg: Loss or gain for the day. No change indicated by ... Stock Footnotes: cld Issue has been called for redemption by company. d New 52-week low. dd Loss in last 12 mos. ec Company formerly listed on the American Exchanges Emerging Company Marketplace. h temporary exmpt from Nasdaq capital and surplus listing qualification. n Stock was a new issue in the last year. The 52-week high and low figures date only from the beginning of trading. pf Preferred stock issue. pr Preferences. pp Holder owes installments of purchase price. rt Right to buy security at a specified price. s Stock has split by at least 20 percent within the last year. wi Trades will be settled when the stock is issued. wd When distributed. wt Warrant, allowing a purchase of a stock. u New 52-week high. un Unit, including more than one security. vj Company in bankruptcy or receivership, or being reorganized under the bankruptcy law. Appears in front of the name.Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial. INDEXES52-Week Net % YTD % 52-wk High Low Name Last Chg Chg Chg % Chg13,055.7510,404.49Dow Jones Industrials12,759.15-203.66-1.57+4.43+4.46 5,627.853,950.66Dow Jones Transportation5,047.25-78.49-1.53+.55-1.94 467.64381.99Dow Jones Utilities452.53-1.98-.44-2.61+8.49 8,718.256,414.89NYSE Composite7,920.14-171.13-2.12+5.93-5.65 2,498.891,941.99Amex Index2,389.98-47.77-1.96+4.90-.22 3,000.112,298.89Nasdaq Composite2,910.32-40.16-1.36+11.71+5.23 1,378.041,074.77S&P 5001,343.36-20.97-1.54+6.82+1.63 14,562.0111,208.42Wilshire 500014,139.13-233.39-1.62+7.20+.89 868.57601.71Russell 2000787.09-16.56-2.06+6.23-4.56 AK Steel.202.9...6.91-.38-16.3 AT&T Inc1.765.74730.73-.26+1.6 Ametek.24.52046.49-.88+10.4 ABInBev1.161.8...65.88-1.37+8.0 BkofAm.04.5...7.71-.26+38.7 CapCtyBk......257.39-.10-22.6 CntryLink2.907.52338.61-.06+3.8 Citigrp rs.04.1932.12-1.56+22.1 CmwREIT2.0011.01518.22-.58+9.5 Disney.601.41642.00-.70+12.0 EnterPT3.006.62545.25-.45+3.5 ExxonMbl1.882.21085.86-1.15+1.3 FordM.201.7712.09-.37+12.4 GenElec.683.71518.42-.43+2.8 HomeDp1.162.51946.39-.71+10.3 Intel.843.21126.61+.07+9.7 IBM3.001.515197.26-3.40+7.3 Lowes.562.01927.84-.40+9.7 McDnlds2.802.81999.89-.05-.4 Microsoft.802.51131.56-.25+21.6 MotrlaSolu.881.71551.48+.81+11.2 MotrlaMob.........39.69+.01+2.3 NextEraEn2.404.01359.53-.31-2.2 Penney.802.12438.47-.21+9.4 PiedmOfc.804.61317.50-.30+2.7 ProgrssEn2.484.72753.22-.25-5.0 RegionsFn.04.7345.75-.18+33.7 SearsHldgs.33......73.42-1.06+131.0 Smucker1.922.61974.87-1.61-4.2 SprintNex.........2.39-.04+2.1 TexInst.682.11732.12-.07+10.3 TimeWarn1.042.81336.51-.45+1.0 UniFirst.15.31558.36-.59+2.9 VerizonCm2.005.24638.69-.31-3.6 Vodafone2.107.8...26.83-.33-4.3 WalMart1.592.71358.97-.44-1.3 Walgrn.902.71132.87-.43-.6 YRC rs.........8.05-.05-19.3YTD Name Div Yld PELast Chg%Chg YTD Name Div Yld PELast Chg%Chg TOREQUESTSTOCKS& FUNDS Request stocks or mutual funds to be listed here by writing the Chronicle, Attn: Stock Requests, 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429; or call 563-5660. Include the name of the stock, market and ticker symbol. For mutual funds, list parent company, symbol and the exact name of the fund. Staff will not provide real-time quotes. 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HstnAEn6.52-.36 ImpOil gs45.45-.95 InovioPhm.63-.02 IntellgSys1.55-.04 IntTower g4.81+.16 J-K-LKeeganR g4.51-.06 KimberR g1.00-.01 LadThalFn1.88-.08 LkShrGld g1.32-.08 LongweiPI1.39-.07 LucasEngy2.69-.10 M-N-0MadCatz g.53-.02 Metalico4.32-.29 MdwGold g1.61-.02 MincoG g.73-.08 Minefnd g14.52-.35 MinesMgt1.81-.12 NavideaBio2.82-.04 NeoStem.54-.02 NBRESec4.09-.08 Nevsun g3.90-.13 NwGold g10.16-.36 NA Pall g2.59-.15 NDynMn g6.03-.38 NthnO&G22.46-.41 NovaGld g7.52-.45 P-Q-RParaG&S2.29-.14 PhrmAth1.28-.03 PionDrill9.14-.50 PlatGpMet1.39-.08 PolyMet g1.17-.01 Protalix5.48+.03 PyramidOil4.85-.44 Quaterra g.54-.03 Quepasa3.90-.27 QuestRM g2.44-.05 RareEle g5.19-.37 Rentech1.69-.04 RexahnPh.48... Richmnt g9.07-.27 Rubicon g3.40... S-T-USamsO&G2.50-.12 SeabGld g21.63-.58 TanzRy g4.01-.13 Taseko3.58-.19 TimberlnR.54+.02 Timmins g2.49-.14 TrnsatlPet1.19-.06 TriValley.17-.00 TriangPet6.67-.56 Ur-Energy1.10-.03 Uranerz2.34-.18 UraniumEn3.70-.16 V-W-X-Y-ZVangTotW46.35-1.17 VantageDrl1.30-.06 VirnetX20.27-.41 VistaGold3.26-.18 VoyagerOG3.20-.06 Vringo1.61... WalterInv20.35-.34 WFAdvInco10.44-.09 XPO Log rs17.47-.60 YM Bio g1.91-.08 Name Last Chg FUTURES SPOT COMMODITIES NMER = New York Mercantile Exchange. CBOT = Chicago Board of Trade. CMER = Chicago Mercantile Exchange. NCSE = New York Cotton, Sugar & Cocoa Exchange. NCTN = New York Cotton Exchange.British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All others show dollar in foreign currency. Yesterday Pvs Day Yesterday Pvs Day Exch Contract Settle Chg Yesterday Pvs Day MONEYRATES CURRENCIES Prime Rate Discount Rate Federal Funds Rate Treasuries 3-month 6-month 5-year 10-year 30-year Gold (troy oz., spot) Silver (troy oz., spot) Copper (pound) Platinum (troy oz., spot) Lt Sweet CrudeNYMXApr 12104.70-2.02 Corn CBOTMay 12654-6 WheatCBOTMay 12657-14 SoybeansCBOTMay 121335+10 CattleCMEApr 12125.77-2.63 Sugar (world)ICEMay 1224.05-.63 Orange JuiceICEMay 12189.85-2.25 Argent4.33804.3335 Australia.9498.9373 Bahrain.3770.3769 Brazil1.75181.7350 Britain1.57111.5867 Canada1.0021.9938 Chile488.25485.75 China6.31626.3115 Colombia1779.501776.50 Czech Rep19.0018.77 Denmark5.67105.6209 Dominican Rep39.0539.00 Egypt6.03456.0325 Euro.7628.7562 Hong Kong7.76347.7632 Hungary225.04221.40 India50.36549.775 Indnsia9135.009120.00 Israel3.81283.7890 Japan80.7881.46 Jordan.7091.7092 Lebanon1504.001503.50 Malaysia3.02503.0205 Mexico12.988912.8324 N. Zealand1.23301.2186 Norway5.70635.6173 Peru2.6832.676 Poland3.183.12 Russia29.571029.3301 Singapore1.26501.2573 So. Africa7.66567.5555 So. Korea1124.801116.80 Sweden6.79516.6978 Switzerlnd.9190.9118 Taiwan29.5529.55 Thailand30.7930.67 Turkey1.79501.7697 U.A.E.3.67313.6731 Uruguay19.399919.3995 Venzuel4.29274.2949 3.253.25 0.750.75 .00-.25.00-.25 0.070.09 0.130.14 0.820.84 1.941.94 3.083.07 $1671.40$1787.00 $32.741$37.140 $3.7310$3.9120 $1611.90$1723.50 SOYOUKNOW The remainder of the NYSE listings can be found on the next page. A10WEDNESDAY, MARCH7, 2012 000A7UT 563-5655 EZ EZ EZ Pay NO MORE CHECKS or REMINDERS! EZ Its EZ EZ *Charge may vary at first transaction and at each vacation start. Make your life a bit EASIER!! and get ONE MONTH FREE

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Gas price hikes end after 27 daysNEW YORK Gasoline prices finally dropped a little after 27 straight days of increases. The nationwide average for regular slipped less than a penny to $3.764 per gallon. That ended a streak of price hikes that began Feb. 8. Pump prices rose by more than 28 cents per gallon in that period, making gasoline the most expensive ever for this time of year. Also Tuesday, oil fell to its lowest price in two weeks, while the price of natural gas remained near a 10-year low. The relief at the pump should be temporary. Experts predict gasoline prices will rise during the next several weeks. The Oil Price Information Service says the nationwide average could peak at $4.25 per gallon by April, beating the record high of $4.11 per gallon set in July 2008. That will likely keep gas prices front and center in the presidential campaign, while economists argue their impact on the U.S. economy.A Ritz hotel on Lehman sale listNEW YORK The RitzCarlton Kapalua hotel in Hawaii, a luxury ski resort in the Rockies and a Manhattan boutique hotel are among the last holdings of Lehman Brothers, the investment house whose spectacular bust triggered the worst of the 2008 financial crisis. The bank said Tuesday it will begin unloading its stakes in those properties in April as it prepares to exit Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection. Lehmans $639 billion bankruptcy remains the largest in U.S. history. It went under Sept. 15, 2008, the same week the government rescued AIG and the $700 billion bailout for major banks was conceived.Android Market checks outSAN FRANCISCO Googles digital marketplace for mobile applications, music, movies and books is unifying under a new name in an effort to spruce up the shopping experience. Beginning Tuesday, the Android Market will be known as the Google Play Store. Googles eBookstore and recently launched music service will be part of the Google Play Store. The same selection of books, music and movies was already available at Android Market. The rebranding will be ushered in with a series of tweaks designed to make it easier for customers to manage content and navigate from one section of the store to another. None of the changes will affect the digital content existing customers have already purchased and stored on Google computers in password-protected accounts.Verizon launches wireless for homesNEW YORK Verizon Wireless on Tuesday announced a version of its wireless broadband service thats designed for use in rural and remote homes that cant get DSL or cable. The service, called HomeFusion, could also appeal to some households where DSL is the only fixed-line option, since its faster than most DSL services. HomeFusion could provide potent competition for satellite broadband providers, which are often providers of last resort for rural homes. The service requires the installation of a cylindrical antenna, about the size of a 5-gallon bucket, on an outside wall. The hardware costs $200, but installation is free. From wire reportsBUSINESSCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLEWEDNESDAY, MARCH7, 2012 A11 Advance Capital I: Balanc p 16.56-.16 RetInc 8.82... Alger Funds B: SmCapGr 6.84-.15 AllianceBern A: BalanA p 16.41-.18 GlbThGrA p 66.09-1.75 SmCpGrA 37.21-.75 AllianceBern Adv: LgCpGrAd 28.44-.47 AllianceBern B: GlbThGrB t 56.91-1.51 GrowthB t 26.55-.41 SCpGrB t 29.78-.61 AllianceBern C: SCpGrC t 29.93-.61 Allianz Fds Instl: NFJDvVl 12.21-.22 SmCpVl 30.42-.60 Allianz Funds C: AGICGrthC 25.18-.43 TargetC t 15.22-.31 Amer Beacon Insti: LgCapInst 20.19-.41 Amer Beacon Inv: LgCap Inv 19.17-.39 Ameri Century 1st: Growth 27.25-.44 Amer Century Adv: EqGroA p 23.16-.39 EqIncA p 7.48-.08 Amer Century Inv: AllCapGr 29.73-.53 Balanced 16.85-.16 DivBnd 11.08... EqInc 7.48-.09 GrowthI 27.02-.44 HeritageI 22.00-.45 IncGro 26.15-.43 InfAdjBd 12.93+.03 IntDisc x 9.29-.33 IntlGroI x 10.23-.41 New Opp 7.95-.18 OneChAg 12.50-.21 OneChMd 12.12-.16 RealEstI 21.21-.32 Ultra 25.12-.40 ValueInv 5.96-.08 American Funds A: AmcpA p 20.39-.29 AMutlA p 26.90-.34 BalA p 19.17-.23 BondA p 12.71+.01 CapIBA p 50.75-.70 CapWGA p 34.45-.88 CapWA p 21.05-.06 EupacA p 38.15-1.14 FdInvA p 37.83-.73 GovtA p 14.41+.02 GwthA p 31.42-.55 HI TrA p 11.02-.06 IncoA p 17.26-.21 IntBdA p 13.70+.01 IntlGrIncA p 28.80-.80 ICAA p 28.93-.49 LtTEBA p 16.25-.02 NEcoA p 26.37-.49 N PerA p 28.39-.67 NwWrldA 50.55-1.28 STBFA p 10.09... SmCpA p 37.04-.92 TxExA p 12.78-.02 WshA p 29.56-.43 Ariel Investments: Apprec 42.48-1.08 Ariel 46.48-1.12 Artio Global Funds: IntlEqI r 24.68-.74 IntEqII I r 10.42-.31 Artisan Funds: Intl 21.74-.72 IntlInstl 21.86-.72 IntlVal r 26.91-.66 MidCap 37.82-.81 MidCapVal 20.89-.34 SCapVal 15.74-.28 Baron Funds: Asset 49.62-.80 Growth 53.30-.85 SmallCap 24.69-.51 Bernstein Fds: IntDur 13.94+.01 DivMu 14.85-.01 TxMgdIntl 13.49-.47 BlackRock A: EqtyDiv 18.92-.30 GlAlA r 19.26-.28 HiYInvA 7.71-.06 IntlOpA p 30.15-.94 BlackRock B&C: GlAlC t 17.92-.27 BlackRock Instl: BaVlI 26.18-.50 EquityDv 18.96-.31 GlbAlloc r 19.35-.28 HiYldBd 7.71-.06 Brinson Funds Y: HiYldI Y 6.20... BruceFund 390.65-2.19 Buffalo Funds: SmCap n26.76-.52 CGM Funds: Focus n28.57-.88 Mutl n26.86-.59 Realty n28.11-.50 CRM Funds: MdCpVlI 28.44-.48 Calamos Funds: GrwthA p 51.47-.94 Calvert Invest: Inco p 16.07+.01 IntlEqA p 13.14-.38 SocialA p 29.59-.24 SocBd p 15.99+.03 SocEqA p 36.39-.56 TxF Lg p 16.19-.02 Cohen & Steers: RltyShrs 63.86-.89 Columbia Class A: Acorn t 29.25-.68 DivEqInc 10.12-.19 DivrBd 5.12... DivOpptyA 8.42-.12 LgCapGrA t 24.85-.44 LgCorQ A p 6.19-.10 MdCpGrOp 10.08-.19 MidCVlOp p 7.81-.17 PBModA p 10.92-.13 TxEA p 13.94-.02 SelComm A 46.65-.66 FrontierA 10.66-.24 GlobTech 22.14-.30 Columbia Cl I,T&G: EmMktOp I n8.27-.21 Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 30.29-.69 AcornIntZ 37.88-.93 DivIncoZ 14.17-.21 IntBdZ 9.40... IntTEBd 10.89-.01 LgCapGr 13.67-.23 LgCpIdxZ 26.03-.40 MdCpIdxZ 11.61-.22 MdCpVlZ p 13.58-.28 ValRestr 47.98-1.08 Credit Suisse Comm: ComRet t 8.37-.14 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq n10.08-.31 USCorEq1 n11.57-.21 USCorEq2 n11.38-.22 DWS Invest A: CommA p 17.36-.29 DWS Invest S: CorPlsInc 10.90-.01 EmMkGr r 16.42-.47 EnhEmMk 10.60-.04 EnhGlbBd r 10.08-.03 GlbSmCGr 37.83-.99 GlblThem 22.04-.58 Gold&Prc 15.73-.40 GroIncS 17.33-.36 HiYldTx 12.61-.02 IntTxAMT 11.99-.02 Intl FdS 39.89-1.25 LgCpFoGr 31.87-.41 LatAmrEq 42.11-1.37 MgdMuni S 9.33-.02 MA TF S 14.98-.04 SP500S 17.91-.28 WorldDiv 22.94-.45 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 34.78-.63 Davis Funds B: NYVen B 33.24-.60 Davis Funds C: NYVen C 33.53-.61 Davis Funds Y: NYVenY 35.14-.64 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.27... SMIDCapG 24.70-.34 TxUSA p 11.89-.01 Delaware Invest B: SelGrB t 34.19-.58 Dimensional Fds: EmMCrEq n19.75-.58 EmMktV 30.18-.99 IntSmVa n15.32-.40 LargeCo 10.61-.16 TAUSCorE2 n9.26-.18 USLgVa n20.77-.41 US Micro n13.96-.27 US TgdVal 16.36-.35 US Small n21.85-.44 US SmVa 24.81-.56 IntlSmCo n15.27-.40 EmgMkt n26.72-.75 Fixd n10.33... IntGFxIn n12.99+.04 IntVa n15.86-.56 Glb5FxInc n11.07+.01 TM USTgtV 21.53-.47 2YGlFxd n10.11... DFARlE n24.29-.33 Dodge&Cox: Balanced 71.95-1.10 Income 13.71... IntlStk 31.64-1.07 Stock 109.35-2.27 DoubleLine Funds: TRBd I 11.19... TRBd N p 11.18... Dreyfus: Aprec 42.97-.59 CT A 12.21-.02 CorV A 22.47... Dreyf 9.20-.16 DryMid r 28.19-.55 GNMA 16.00+.01 GrChinaA r 32.79-1.38 HiYldA p 6.42-.04 StratValA 28.21-.60 TechGroA 33.75-.48 DreihsAcInc 10.57-.04 Driehaus Funds: EMktGr 28.39-.80 EVPTxMEmI 46.60-1.16 Eaton Vance A: ChinaA p 16.71-.55 AMTFMuInc 10.05-.03 MultiCGrA 8.33-.16 InBosA 5.80-.04 LgCpVal 18.11-.33 NatlMunInc 9.90-.04 SpEqtA 16.17-.27 TradGvA 7.44... Eaton Vance B: HlthSB t 9.40-.16 NatlMuInc 9.90-.03 Eaton Vance C: GovtC p 7.43... NatMunInc 9.90-.04 Eaton Vance I: FltgRt 8.97-.01 GblMacAbR 9.99-.01 LgCapVal 18.17-.33 FBR Funds: FocusInv t n47.81-.55 FMI Funds: LgCap p n16.15-.24 FPA Funds: NwInc 10.70+.01 FPACres 27.88-.32 Fairholme 28.69-.90 Federated A: MidGrStA 36.34-.85 MuSecA 10.49-.02 TtlRtBd p 11.44... Federated Instl: KaufmnR 5.21-.11 TotRetBd 11.44... StrValDvIS 4.81-.05 Fidelity Adv Foc T: EnergyT 37.44-.82 HltCarT 22.17-.41 Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 21.43-.32 StrInA 12.36-.05 Fidelity Advisor C: NwInsgh t n20.29-.31 Fidelity Advisor I: EqGrI n63.01-.99 EqInI n24.48-.44 IntBdI n11.55+.01 NwInsgtI n21.70-.33 Fidelity Advisor T: BalancT 15.86-.17 DivGrT p 12.58-.30 EqGrT p 58.96-.92 EqInT 24.09-.44 GrOppT 39.86-.80 HiInAdT p 9.83-.08 IntBdT 11.53+.02 MuIncT p 13.43-.01 OvrseaT 16.74-.56 STFiT 9.30... StkSelAllCp 19.18-.38 Fidelity Freedom: FF2010 n13.72-.15 FF2010K 12.68-.14 FF2015 n11.47-.12 FF2015K 12.73-.14 FF2020 n13.84-.17 FF2020K 13.11-.17 FF2025 n11.49-.17 FF2025K 13.22-.19 FF2030 n13.67-.21 FF2030K 13.36-.20 FF2035 n11.30-.20 FF2035K 13.42-.24 FF2040 n7.88-.14 FF2040K 13.47-.24 FF2045 n9.32-.18 Income n11.52-.04 Fidelity Invest: AllSectEq 12.16-.22 AMgr50 n15.80-.17 AMgr70 r n16.50-.26 AMgr20 r n13.04-.06 Balanc n19.24-.21 BalancedK 19.24-.21 BlueChGr n47.50-.89 CA Mun n12.63-.01 Canada n52.13-1.21 CapAp n27.26-.52 CapDevO n11.20-.21 CpInc r n9.11-.09 ChinaRg r 27.89-1.03 CngS 465.09... CTMun r n11.96-.02 Contra n73.46-1.09 ContraK 73.42-1.09 CnvSc n24.88-.40 DisEq n23.04-.48 DiscEqF 23.01-.48 DivIntl n27.61-.80 DivrsIntK r 27.57-.81 DivStkO n15.94-.31 DivGth n28.60-.66 EmergAs r n27.91-.77 EmrMk n22.66-.64 Eq Inc n43.63-.80 EQII n18.27-.28 ECapAp 16.84-.64 Europe 27.73-1.05 Exch 323.88... Export n22.28-.39 Fidel n33.62-.60 Fifty r n18.45-.40 FltRateHi r n9.79-.01 FrInOne n27.66-.47 GNMA n11.85... GovtInc 10.76+.02 GroCo n91.91-1.78 GroInc n19.57-.36 GrowCoF 91.84-1.77 GrowthCoK 91.85-1.77 GrStrat r n20.37-.48 HighInc r n8.97-.06 Indepn n24.47-.56 InProBd n12.96+.06 IntBd n10.97+.01 IntGov n10.98+.02 IntmMu n10.53-.01 IntlDisc n29.58-.95 IntlSCp r n19.35-.54 InvGrBd n11.78+.02 InvGB n7.79+.01 Japan r 9.84-.12 JpnSm n8.75-.08 LgCapVal 10.79-.19 LatAm 54.24-1.59 LevCoStk n28.08-.68 LowP r n39.04-.74 LowPriK r 39.02-.74 Magelln n69.38-1.24 MagellanK 69.32-1.24 MD Mu r n11.48-.02 MA Mun n12.54-.01 MegaCpStk n10.95-.20 MI Mun n12.37-.02 MidCap n29.19-.61 MN Mun n11.93... MtgSec n11.24+.01 MuniInc n13.23-.02 NJ Mun r n12.13-.01 NwMkt r n16.55-.11 NwMill n31.21-.58 NY Mun n13.48... OTC n61.03-1.16 Oh Mun n12.14-.01 100Index 9.47-.14 Ovrsea n29.26-.98 PcBas n23.60-.52 PAMun r n11.26-.02 Puritn n18.91-.21 PuritanK 18.91-.21 RealE n29.18-.44 SAllSecEqF 12.16-.22 SCmdtyStrt n9.16-.16 SCmdtyStrF n9.18-.16 SrEmrgMkt 16.25-.48 SrsIntGrw 10.95-.32 SerIntlGrF 10.97-.32 SrsIntVal 8.48-.25 SerIntlValF 8.50-.25 SrInvGrdF 11.78+.01 StIntMu n10.86-.01 STBF n8.54... SmCapDisc n21.57-.40 SmllCpS r n17.92-.41 SCpValu r 14.95-.28 StkSelLCV r n10.90-.21 StkSlcACap n26.54-.52 StkSelSmCp 19.25-.44 StratInc n11.07-.04 StrReRt r 9.46-.06 TotalBd n11.04+.01 Trend n74.09-1.34 USBI n11.84+.02 Utility n17.16-.14 ValStra t n27.66-.66 Value n69.12-1.46 Wrldw n18.50-.48 Fidelity Selects: Air n37.01-.77 Banking n17.23-.43 Biotch n95.17-2.31 Brokr n45.76-1.31 Chem n106.63-2.87 ComEquip n23.65-.48 Comp n63.39-1.19 ConDis n25.68-.38 ConsuFn n12.36-.26 ConStap n74.45-.97 CstHo n39.17-.93 DfAer n83.27-1.96 Electr n50.61-.58 Enrgy n53.47-1.18 EngSv n69.93-1.81 EnvAltEn r n15.86-.33 FinSv n56.12-1.46 Gold r n43.32-1.13 Health n129.87-2.42 Insur n47.05-.86 Leisr n104.66-1.95 Material n66.87-1.84 MedDl n59.56-1.01 MdEqSys n27.22-.51 Multmd n47.72-.73 NtGas n31.91-.61 Pharm n13.90-.28 Retail n57.51-.62 Softwr n88.41-1.55 Tech n98.50-1.60 Telcm n45.68-.60 Trans n51.59-1.03 UtilGr n52.53-.38 Wireless n7.54-.11 Fidelity Spartan: ExtMkIn n38.63-.79 500IdxInv n47.71-.74 500Idx I 47.71-.75 IntlInxInv n31.93-.97 TotMktInv n38.84-.64 USBond I 11.84+.02 Fidelity Spart Adv: ExMktAd r n38.64-.78 500IdxAdv n47.71-.75 IntAd r n31.93-.97 TotMktAd r n38.85-.64 First Eagle: GlblA 48.02-.60 OverseasA 21.84-.31 First Investors A BlChpA p ...... GloblA p 6.54-.16 GovtA p 11.55+.01 GroInA p 15.68-.29 IncoA p 2.54-.02 MATFA p 12.35-.02 MITFA p 12.68-.02 NJTFA p 13.59-.03 NYTFA p 15.11-.02 OppA p 28.45-.60 PATFA p 13.58-.02 SpSitA p 24.54-.37 TxExA p 10.14-.01 TotRtA p 16.18-.18 ValueB p 7.35-.12 Forum Funds: AbsStrI r 11.04+.04 Frank/Temp Frnk A: AdjUS p 8.87... ALTFA p 11.68-.01 AZTFA p 11.24-.01 CalInsA p 12.57-.02 CA IntA p 11.95-.02 CalTFA p 7.30... COTFA p 12.20-.01 CTTFA p 11.32-.01 CvtScA p 14.85-.19 Dbl TF A 12.27-.01 DynTchA 31.93-.49 EqIncA p 17.43-.27 FedInt p 12.31-.03 FedTFA p 12.39-.01 FLTFA p 11.85-.01 FoundAl p 10.45-.20 GATFA p 12.44-.02 GoldPrM A 37.73-1.11 GrwthA p 48.16-.80 HYTFA p 10.56-.01 HiIncA 1.99-.02 IncomA p 2.14-.02 InsTFA p 12.33-.01 NYITF p 11.75-.02 LATF A p 11.83-.01 LMGvScA 10.40+.01 MDTFA p 11.86-.01 MATFA p 11.98-.01 MITFA p 12.20-.01 MNInsA 12.74-.02 MOTFA p 12.56-.02 NJTFA p 12.50-.01 NYTFA p 11.98-.01 NCTFA p 12.74-.01 OhioI A p 12.90-.02 ORTFA p 12.39-.02 PATFA p 10.75-.01 ReEScA p 15.48-.23 RisDvA p 35.77-.50 SMCpGrA 37.09-.70 StratInc p 10.46-.05 TtlRtnA p 10.26-.01 USGovA p 6.89+.01 UtilsA p 13.07-.08 VATFA p 12.06-.01 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: GlbBdAdv n13.12-.12 IncmeAd 2.12-.03 Frank/Temp Frnk C: IncomC t 2.16-.02 USGvC t 6.85+.01 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: SharesA 20.97-.34 Frank/Temp Temp A: DvMktA p 23.54-.64 ForgnA p 6.44-.21 GlBd A p 13.16-.12 GrwthA p 17.60-.47 WorldA p 14.93-.39 Frank/Temp Tmp Adv: GrthAv 17.60-.47 Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: DevMktC 22.97-.63 ForgnC p 6.31-.20 GlBdC p 13.18-.12 Franklin Mutual Ser: QuestA 16.97-.19 GE Elfun S&S: S&S Inc 11.82+.01 US Eqty 42.23-.69 GMO Trust III: CHIE 21.70-.43 Quality 23.18-.28 GMO Trust IV: IntlGrEq 22.16-.55 IntlIntrVl 19.86-.52 GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r 11.61-.35 Quality 23.19-.28 StrFxInc 16.43+.02 Gabelli Funds: Asset 50.11-1.00 Goldman Sachs A: MdCVA p 35.77-.78 Goldman Sachs Inst: GrOppt 24.51-.41 HiYield 7.12-.05 HYMuni n8.85... MidCapV 36.03-.78 Harbor Funds: Bond 12.54+.02 CapApInst 41.30-.75 IntlInv t 57.35-2.03 Intl r 57.89-2.05 Hartford Fds A: CpAppA p 32.09-.80 DivGthA p 19.90-.32 IntOpA p 13.97-.43 Hartford Fds Y: CapAppI n32.11-.79 Hartford HLS IA : CapApp 41.19-.96 Div&Gr 20.42-.34 Advisers 20.38-.22 TotRetBd 11.86+.01 Hennessy Funds: CorGrIIOrig ...... Hussman Funds: StrTotRet r 12.39+.01 StrGrowth 11.84+.10 ICON Fds: Energy S 19.38-.42 Hlthcare S 15.28-.26 ISI Funds: NoAm p 7.96... IVA Funds: WldwideA t 16.09-.21 Wldwide I r 16.09-.21 Invesco Fds Invest: DivrsDiv p 12.41-.20 Invesco Funds: Energy 40.31-.92 Utilities 16.62-.10 Invesco Funds A: Chart p 17.08-.27 CmstkA 16.37-.32 Const p 23.56-.44 EqIncA 8.70-.10 GrIncA p 19.53-.30 HiIncMu p 7.94... HiYld p 4.20-.03 HYMuA 9.69-.01 IntlGrow 26.80-.70 MuniInA 13.63-.02 PA TFA 16.59-.01 US MortgA 12.98... Invesco Funds B: CapDev t 14.11-.28 MuniInB 13.61-.02 US Mortg 12.92... Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 23.93-.61 AssetStA p 24.65-.64 AssetStrI r 24.87-.64 JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 11.94+.01 JPMorgan C Class: CoreBd p 12.00+.02 JP Morgan Instl: MdCpVal n25.18-.39 JPMorgan R Cl: CoreBond n11.94+.02 ShtDurBd 11.00+.01 JPMorgan Select: USEquity n10.76-.18 JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd n11.93+.02 HighYld n7.87-.05 IntmTFBd n11.32-.02 LgCpGr 23.62-.40 ShtDurBd n10.99... USLCCrPls n21.50-.37 Janus T Shrs: BalancdT 26.10-.33 Contrarn T 13.50-.24 EnterprT 63.52-.95 FlxBndT 10.72-.01 GlLifeSciT r 26.97-.46 GlbSel T 11.30-.28 GlTechT r 17.90-.25 Grw&IncT 32.71-.61 Janus T 30.43-.45 OvrseasT r 37.71-1.38 PrkMCVal T 21.50-.35 ResearchT 31.08-.52 ShTmBdT 3.09... Twenty T 58.50-1.04 VentureT 55.96-1.00 WrldW T r 44.25-1.29 Jensen Funds: QualGrthJ n28.07-.38 John Hancock A: BondA p 15.80-.01 RgBkA 13.04-.27 StrInA p 6.59-.02 John Hancock B: StrIncB 6.59-.02 John Hancock Cl 1: LSAggr 12.20-.25 LSBalanc 12.96-.16 LSConsrv 13.07-.05 LSGrwth 12.81-.22 LSModer 12.86-.10 Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 19.45-.48 Lazard Open: EmgMkO p 19.90-.49 Legg Mason A: CBAgGr p 120.32-2.16 CBAppr p 14.70-.19 CBLCGr p 22.29-.32 GCIAllCOp 8.14-.27 WAHiIncA t 5.96-.03 WAMgMu p 16.74-.01 Legg Mason B: CBLgCGr t 20.34-.30 Legg Mason C: CMSpInv p 28.54-.68 CMValTr p 40.23-.68 Longleaf Partners: Partners 28.96-.59 SmCap 26.68-.40 Loomis Sayles: LSBondI 14.60-.08 StrInc C 15.10-.11 LSBondR 14.55-.07 StrIncA 15.02-.11 Loomis Sayles Inv: InvGrBdA p 12.38-.03 InvGrBdY 12.38-.03 Lord Abbett A: AffilA p 11.34-.20 FundlEq 12.92-.27 BdDebA p 7.92-.05 ShDurIncA p 4.60... MidCpA p 16.87-.37 Lord Abbett C: ShDurIncC t 4.63... Lord Abbett F: ShtDurInco 4.60... MFS Funds A: MITA 20.29-.32 MIGA 16.79-.26 EmGA 45.41-.70 HiInA 3.47-.02 MFLA 9.65... TotRA 14.63-.14 UtilA 17.48-.24 ValueA 24.02-.40 MFS Funds B: MIGB n15.10-.23 GvScB n10.54+.02 HiInB n3.47-.03 MuInB n8.73-.01 TotRB n14.63-.15 MFS Funds I: ReInT 14.71-.42 ValueI 24.13-.41 MFS Funds Instl: IntlEq n17.34-.52 MainStay Funds A: HiYldBA 5.94-.02 MainStay Funds B: ConvB t 15.02-.22 GovtB t 8.92+.01 HYldBB t 5.91-.02 IncmBldr 16.77-.23 IntlEqB 10.14-.27 MainStay Funds I: ICAPSlEq 36.33-.71 Mairs & Power: Growth n75.93-1.07 Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 7.34-.24 Matthews Asian: AsianGIInv 16.36-.22 IndiaInv r 16.54-.32 PacTgrInv 22.12-.45 MergerFd n15.70-.02 Meridian Funds: Growth 44.58-.70 Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.57+.01 TotRtBdI 10.56+.01 Midas Funds: Midas Fd t 3.66-.10 Monetta Funds: Monetta n15.02-.34 Morgan Stanley B: GlobStratB 15.60... MorganStanley Inst: IntlEqI 13.18-.35 MCapGrI 36.89-.59 Muhlenk n54.52-1.03 Munder Funds A: GwthOppA 27.88-.51 Munder Funds Y: MCpCGrY n30.65-.60 Mutual Series: BeacnZ 12.51-.22 GblDiscA 28.38-.55 GlbDiscZ 28.74-.55 QuestZ 17.11-.19 SharesZ 21.14-.34 Neuberger&Berm Fds: Focus 20.50-.36 GenesInst 47.68-.79 Intl r 16.00-.41 Partner 25.57-.51 Neuberger&Berm Tr: Genesis 49.48-.81 Nicholas Group: HiInc I n9.65-.05 Nich n46.23-.86 Northern Funds: BondIdx 10.95+.01 HiYFxInc 7.29-.04 SmCpIdx 8.68-.18 StkIdx 16.70-.26 Technly 15.87-.24 Nuveen Cl A: LtMBA p 11.21-.01 Nuveen Cl R: IntDMBd 9.26-.01 HYMunBd 15.86-.02 Nuveen Cl Y: RealEst n19.97-.26 Oak Assoc Fds: WhitOkSG 40.78-.57 Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 28.38-.43 GlobalI 22.15-.46 Intl I r 18.58-.57 Oakmark 45.30-.77 Select 30.68-.52 Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp 7.18-.06 GlbSMdCap 14.69-.28 LgCapStrat 9.49-.20 Oppenheimer A: AMTFMu 6.79... AMTFrNY 11.91... CAMuniA p 8.32-.01 CapApA p 46.67-.76 CapIncA p 8.81-.04 ChmpIncA p 1.81-.01 DvMktA p 32.76-.81 Disc p 58.74-1.26 EquityA 9.13-.17 GlobA p 57.93-1.45 GlbOppA 29.75-.79 GblStrIncA 4.21-.02 Gold p 35.81-1.09 IntBdA p 6.36-.02 LtdTmMu 14.89-.01 MnStFdA 34.73-.58 PAMuniA p 11.38-.01 SenFltRtA 8.22-.01 USGv p 9.68+.02 Oppenheimer B: AMTFMu 6.76... AMTFrNY 11.91-.01 CpIncB t 8.62-.05 ChmpIncB t 1.81-.01 EquityB 8.43-.15 GblStrIncB 4.23-.02 Oppenheimer Roch: LtdNYA p 3.37... RoMu A p 16.58... RcNtMuA 7.20... Oppenheimer Y: DevMktY 32.39-.80 IntlBdY 6.35-.03 IntGrowY 27.42-.91 PIMCO Admin PIMS: ShtTmAd p 9.78... TotRtAd 11.14+.01 PIMCO Instl PIMS: AlAsetAut r 10.70-.09 AllAsset 12.20-.09 ComodRR 6.86-.11 DivInc 11.66-.01 EmgMkCur 10.42-.11 EmMkBd 11.66-.04 FltInc r 8.59-.04 ForBdUn r 10.88+.02 FrgnBd 10.73+.02 HiYld 9.27-.06 InvGrCp 10.67+.01 LowDu 10.43+.01 ModDur 10.79+.01 RealRet 11.62+.07 RealRtnI 12.02+.03 ShortT 9.78... TotRt 11.14+.01 TR II 10.77+.02 TRIII 9.81+.01 PIMCO Funds A: AllAstAut t 10.63-.08 ComRR p 6.72-.11 LwDurA 10.43+.01 RealRtA p 12.02+.03 TotRtA 11.14+.01 PIMCO Funds C: AllAstAut t 10.51-.09 RealRtC p 12.02+.03 TotRtC t 11.14+.01 PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 11.14+.01 PIMCO Funds P: AstAllAuthP 10.69-.08 TotRtnP 11.14+.01 Parnassus Funds: EqtyInco n27.48-.28 Perm Port Funds: Permannt 48.34-.57 Pioneer Funds A: BondA p 9.69... IntlValA 18.62-.61 PionFdA p 40.67-.71 ValueA p 11.39-.22 Pioneer Funds B: HiYldB t 10.02-.12 Pioneer Funds C: HiYldC t 10.13-.11 Pioneer Fds Y: CullenV Y 17.95-.42 Price Funds: Balance n20.10-.28 BlChip n42.98-.66 CABond n11.26-.01 CapApp n21.89-.25 DivGro n24.61-.36 EmMktB n13.43-.05 EmEurop 18.65-.80 EmMktS n31.74-.98 EqInc n24.52-.43 EqIndex n36.31-.57 Europe n14.42-.53 GNMA n10.11... Growth n35.56-.56 Gr&In n21.20-.32 HlthSci n36.21-.68 HiYield n6.74-.04 InstlCpG 18.04-.27 IntlBond n9.87-.03 IntDis n41.69-1.08 Intl G&I 12.42-.40 IntlStk n13.51-.41 Japan n7.73-.10 LatAm n44.22-1.52 MDShrt n5.25... MDBond n10.89-.01 MidCap n57.27-.99 MCapVal n22.94-.40 N Amer n34.37-.51 N Asia n15.38-.35 New Era n44.91-1.13 N Horiz n34.04-.73 N Inc n9.77+.01 NYBond n11.64-.01 OverS SF n7.89-.24 PSInc n16.61-.17 RealAsset r n11.02-.26 RealEst n19.62-.26 R2010 n15.84-.19 R2015 n12.30-.17 R2020 n17.01-.26 R2025 n12.45-.21 R2030 n17.86-.33 R2035 n12.63-.24 R2040 n17.97-.35 R2045 n11.96-.24 SciTec n29.20-.43 ShtBd n4.85... SmCpStk n33.62-.70 SmCapVal n36.30-.64 SpecGr n18.38-.39 SpecIn n12.64-.05 TFInc n10.33-.01 TxFrH n11.33... TxFrSI n5.71... USTInt n6.25+.02 USTLg n13.39+.12 VABond n12.08-.02 Value n24.16-.47 Principal Inv: DivIntlInst 9.51-.28 LgCGI In 9.89-.16 LT2020In 12.00-.16 LT2030In 11.85-.19 Prudential Fds A: BlendA 17.89-.35 HiYldA p 5.52-.04 MuHiIncA 9.94-.01 UtilityA 11.10-.16 Prudential Fds B: GrowthB 17.83-.31 HiYldB t 5.52-.03 Putnam Funds A: AmGvA p 9.17... AZ TE 9.36-.01 ConvSec 19.68-.24 DvrInA p 7.59-.04 EqInA p 16.16-.32 EuEq 18.76... GeoBalA 12.55-.14 GlbEqty p 9.09... GrInA p 13.75-.28 GlblHlthA 40.67-.72 HiYdA p 7.66... HiYld In 5.93-.03 IncmA p 6.87+.01 IntGrIn p 8.84-.28 InvA p 13.68-.24 NJTxA p 9.69-.01 MultiCpGr 53.44-1.07 PA TE 9.38-.01 TxExA p 8.85-.01 TFInA p 15.39-.01 TFHYA 12.20... USGvA p 13.65... GlblUtilA 10.19-.11 VoyA p 22.23-.53 Putnam Funds B: TaxFrIns 15.40-.02 DvrInB t 7.52-.05 EqInc t 16.01-.32 EuEq 18.01... GeoBalB 12.43-.14 GlbEq t 8.21... GlNtRs t 18.72... GrInB t 13.50-.27 GlblHlthB 32.51-.57 HiYldB t 7.65... HYAdB t 5.81-.04 IncmB t 6.81+.01 IntGrIn t 8.77-.28 IntlNop t 13.46-.42 InvB t 12.32-.22 NJTxB t 9.68-.01 MultiCpGr 45.81-.92 TxExB t 8.85-.01 TFHYB t 12.22... USGvB t 13.58... GlblUtilB 10.15-.10 VoyB t 18.73-.44 RS Funds: IntGrA 16.72-.58 LgCAlphaA 41.19-.62 Value 24.39-.40 RidgeWorth Funds: LCGrStkA p 11.28-.19 Royce Funds: LwPrSkSv r 15.64-.38 MicroCapI 15.71-.32 PennMuI r 11.51-.24 PremierI r 20.03-.41 TotRetI r 13.29-.24 ValSvc t 11.86-.27 Russell Funds S: StratBd 11.10+.01 Rydex Advisor: NasdaqAdv 15.71-.16 SSgA Funds: EmgMkt 20.16-.61 Schwab Funds: HlthCare 18.25-.28 1000Inv r 38.01-.62 S&P Sel 20.98-.33 SmCpSl 20.24-.42 TSM Sel r 24.30-.40 Scout Funds: Intl 30.33-.93 Selected Funds: AmShD 42.15-.75 AmShS p 42.16-.76 Sentinel Group: ComS A p 33.28-.52 Sequoia 156.32-1.93 Sit Funds: LrgCpGr 45.60-.62 SoSunSCInv t 22.01... St FarmAssoc: Gwth 54.24-.91 Stratton Funds: Multi-Cap 35.56-.77 RealEstate 28.48-.38 SmCap 52.25-.92 SunAmerica Funds: USGvB t 10.17+.02 TCW Funds: EmMktIn 8.80-.02 TotRetBdI 9.86+.01 TIAA-CREF Funds: BdIdxInst 10.85+.02 EqIdxInst 10.21-.17 Templeton Instit: ForEqS 18.18-.52 Third Avenue Fds: IntlVaInst r 15.55-.40 REValInst r 23.25-.62 ValueInst 45.30-1.55 Thornburg Fds: IntValA p 26.02-.63 IncBuildA t 18.43-.26 IncBuildC p 18.43-.26 IntValue I 26.61-.64 LtTMuI 14.60-.02 Thrivent Fds A: HiYld 4.85-.03 Incom 8.99... Tocqueville Fds: Gold t n74.55-1.84 Transamerica A: AegonHYB p 9.34... FlexInc p 9.06-.02 Turner Funds: SmlCpGr n34.47-.86 Tweedy Browne: GblValue 23.08-.36 US Global Investors: AllAm 24.34-.37 ChinaReg 7.68-.28 GlbRs 9.93-.27 Gld&Mtls 13.00-.38 WldPrcMn 13.87-.43 USAA Group: AgvGt 35.67-.57 CA Bd 10.78-.01 CrnstStr 22.17-.25 GovSec 10.38... GrTxStr 14.05-.11 Grwth 15.59-.22 Gr&Inc 15.66-.30 IncStk 13.05-.17 Inco 13.25+.01 Intl 23.56-.64 NYBd 12.25-.02 PrecMM 31.61-.87 SciTech 13.72-.19 ShtTBnd 9.19... SmCpStk 14.21-.26 TxEIt 13.48-.02 TxELT 13.55-.01 TxESh 10.83... VA Bd 11.44... WldGr 19.25-.44 VALIC : MdCpIdx 20.31-.40 StkIdx 25.01-.39 Value Line Fd: LrgCo n18.80-.28 Vanguard Admiral: BalAdml n22.85-.21 CAITAdm n11.56-.02 CALTAdm n11.70-.02 CpOpAdl n72.26-1.11 EMAdmr r n35.74-1.08 Energy n119.50-2.94 EqInAdm n n47.81-.67 EuroAdml n55.27-2.07 ExplAdml n72.25-1.54 ExtdAdm n42.85-.89 500Adml n124.17-1.93 GNMA Ad n11.05... GrwAdm n34.83-.52 HlthCr n55.88-.73 HiYldCp n5.86-.03 InfProAd n28.10+.08 ITBdAdml n11.91+.03 ITsryAdml n11.72+.03 IntGrAdm n57.07-1.85 ITAdml n14.20-.02 ITGrAdm n10.22+.01 LtdTrAd n11.20... LTGrAdml n10.52+.06 LT Adml n11.55-.01 MCpAdml n96.88-1.86 MorgAdm n60.04-.99 MuHYAdm n10.96-.01 NYLTAd n11.56-.01 PrmCap r n67.82-1.08 PALTAdm n11.55-.01 ReitAdm r n86.48-1.21 STsyAdml n10.79... STBdAdml n10.65+.01 ShtTrAd n15.95... STFdAd n10.88+.01 STIGrAd n10.76... SmCAdm n35.80-.75 TxMCap r n67.15-1.09 TtlBAdml n11.05+.02 TStkAdm n33.67-.56 ValAdml n21.64-.37 WellslAdm n57.11-.20 WelltnAdm n56.77-.61 Windsor n46.68-.93 WdsrIIAd n48.84-.88 Vanguard Fds: CALT n11.70-.02 CapOpp n31.29-.48 Convrt n12.67-.13 DivdGro n16.06-.19 Energy n63.65-1.57 EqInc n22.81-.31 Explr n77.64-1.66 FLLT n11.97-.02 GNMA n11.05... GlobEq n17.38-.41 GroInc n28.53-.44 GrthEq n11.88-.19 HYCorp n5.86-.03 HlthCre n132.43-1.73 InflaPro n14.30+.04 IntlExplr n14.24-.45 IntlGr n17.94-.58 IntlVal n28.99-.92 ITIGrade n10.22+.01 ITTsry n11.72+.03 LifeCon n16.82-.12 LifeGro n22.48-.36 LifeInc n14.47-.03 LifeMod n20.14-.23 LTIGrade n10.52+.06 LTTsry n13.03+.12 Morg n19.37-.31 MuHY n10.96-.01 MuInt n14.20-.02 MuLtd n11.20... MuLong n11.55-.01 MuShrt n15.95... NJLT n12.15-.02 NYLT n11.56-.01 OHLTTE n12.46-.01 PALT n11.55-.01 PrecMtls r n20.32-.83 PrmcpCor n14.17-.21 Prmcp r n65.37-1.04 SelValu r n19.56-.40 STAR n19.87-.26 STIGrade n10.76... STFed n10.88+.01 STTsry n10.79... StratEq n20.08-.40 TgtRetInc n11.88-.06 TgRe2010 n23.36-.19 TgtRe2015 n12.90-.14 TgRe2020 n22.88-.28 TgtRe2025 n13.01-.18 TgRe2030 n22.28-.36 TgtRe2035 n13.39-.24 TgtRe2040 n21.98-.41 TgtRe2050 n21.88-.41 TgtRe2045 n13.80-.26 USGro n20.26-.36 USValue n10.88-.19 Wellsly n23.57-.08 Welltn n32.86-.36 Wndsr n13.83-.28 WndsII n27.51-.50 Vanguard Idx Fds: DvMkInPl r n94.28-2.93 MidCpIstPl n105.54-2.03 TotIntAdm r n23.77-.72 TotIntlInst r n95.06-2.88 TotIntlIP r n95.08-2.87 TotIntSig r n28.52-.86 500 n124.14-1.94 Balanced n22.85-.21 EMkt n27.20-.83 Europe n23.73-.89 Extend n42.84-.88 Growth n34.82-.52 LgCapIx n24.92-.40 LTBnd n13.92+.09 MidCap n21.35-.41 Pacific n9.79-.20 REIT r n20.26-.29 SmCap n35.77-.75 SmlCpGth n23.16-.50 STBnd n10.65+.01 TotBnd n11.05+.02 TotlIntl n14.21-.43 TotStk n33.66-.56 Value n21.64-.37 Vanguard Instl Fds: BalInst n22.85-.21 DevMkInst n9.05-.28 ExtIn n42.85-.89 FTAllWldI r n84.61-2.58 GrwthIst n34.83-.52 InfProInst n11.45+.04 InstIdx n123.36-1.92 InsPl n123.37-1.92 InstTStIdx n30.48-.50 InsTStPlus n30.48-.51 MidCpIst n21.40-.41 SCInst n35.80-.75 TBIst n11.05+.02 TSInst n33.68-.56 ValueIst n21.64-.37 Vanguard Signal: 500Sgl n102.57-1.59 GroSig n32.25-.48 ITBdSig n11.91+.03 MidCpIdx n30.57-.59 STBdIdx n10.65+.01 SmCpSig n32.26-.67 TotBdSgl n11.05+.02 TotStkSgl n32.50-.54 Virtus Funds: EmMktI 9.53-.18 Virtus Funds A: MulSStA p 4.85-.01 Waddell & Reed Adv: AssetS p 9.34-.25 CoreInvA 6.13-.11 DivOppA p 14.73-.28 DivOppC t 14.57-.27 Wasatch: SmCpGr 41.17-.76 Wells Fargo Adv A: AstAllA p 12.55... Wells Fargo Adv C: AstAllC t 12.10... Wells Fargo Adv : CmStkInv 20.28-.35 OpptyInv 39.11-.72 Wells Fargo Ad Ins: UlStMuInc 4.82... Wells Fargo Admin: Growth 40.19-.67 Wells Fargo Instl: UltSTMuA 4.82... Western Asset: CorePlus I 11.31+.01 William Blair N: GrowthN 11.86-.21 Yacktman Funds: Fund p n18.10-.18 Focused n19.38-.18 HOWTOREADTHEMUTUALFUNDTABLES Here are the 1,000 biggest mutual funds listed on Nasdaq. Tables show the fund name, sell price or Net Asset Value (NAV) and daily net change. Name: Name of mutual fund and family. NAV: Net asset value. Chg: Net change in price of NAV. Data based on NAVs reported to Lipper by 6 p.m. Eastern. Name NAV Chg Name NAV Chg Name NAV Chg Name NAV Chg Name NAV Chg Name NAV Chg MUTUALFUNDS SP CnSt33.08-.28 SP Consum42.80-.68 SP Engy73.05-1.21 SPDR Fncl14.45-.37 SP Inds36.05-.83 SP Tech28.55-.29 SP Util34.90-.14 StdPac4.00-.16 Standex36.00-.30 StanBlkDk73.68-1.91 StarwdHtl52.90-1.47 StateStr40.92-.84 Statoil ASA27.33-1.17 Steris30.54-.51 StillwtrM12.70-.68 Stryker52.03-.77 SturmRug41.82-.51 SubPpne44.13-.61 SunCmts41.81-.27 Suncor gs33.34-1.71 Sunoco38.25-.55 SunstnHtl8.74-.28 Suntech2.85-.19 SunTrst21.54-.66 SupEnrgy28.03-1.13 Supvalu6.32+.22 SwiftTrans10.75-.82 Synovus1.89-.16 Sysco29.39-.07 TCF Fncl10.29-.15 TE Connect34.82-.98 TECO17.65-.17 TJX s36.81-.59 TRWAuto42.67-1.72 TaiwSemi14.16-.17 TalismE g13.01-.43 Target56.49-.21 TataMotors26.23-1.10 TeckRes g35.42-1.05 TelNorL10.61-.14 TelcmNZ s9.19+.11 TelefBrasil28.69-.90 TelefEsp16.35-.62 Tenaris38.02-2.13 TenetHlth5.40-.12 Teradata63.62-1.50 Teradyn15.14-.17 Terex21.90-1.41 TerraNitro208.23-14.43 Tesoro26.19-.95 TetraTech8.81-.18 Textron25.34-1.17 Theragen1.64+.03 ThermoFis55.43-1.13 ThmBet72.02-.23 ThomCrk g6.89-.23 ThomsonR28.36-.69 3M Co84.95-2.11 Tiffany67.10-.93 TimeWarn36.51-.45 Timken50.10-1.87 TitanMet13.50-.40 TollBros22.22-.48 TorchEngy2.30-.02 Trchmrk s48.18-1.01 TorDBk g80.49-1.94 Total SA54.59-1.71 TotalSys21.64-.30 Transocn51.44-1.06 Travelers56.99-1.51 Tredgar19.40-1.54 TriContl15.60-.18 TrinaSolar7.03-.22 TwoHrbInv10.30-.16 TycoIntl51.45-.59 Tyson19.18-.21 UBS AG13.10-.73 UDR25.49-.15 UIL Hold34.69-.07 US Airwy6.88-.11 USEC1.25-.07 USG13.06-1.32 UltraPt g23.71+.32 UniSrcEn37.04-.25 UniFirst58.36-.59 UnilevNV32.64-.85 UnionPac106.80-2.75 UtdContl19.88-.59 UtdMicro2.58-.06 UPS B75.61-.71 UtdRentals41.36-1.05 US Bancrp28.37-.53 US NGs rs18.66-.06 US OilFd40.13-.84 USSteel25.25-.96 UtdTech81.39-1.90 UtdhlthGp54.46-.58 UnumGrp23.02-.48 V-W-X-Y-ZVale SA23.36-1.38 Vale SA pf22.76-1.30 ValeantPh53.86-.45 ValeroE25.17-.52 VangTSM69.15-1.13 VangREIT61.07-.82 VangDivAp56.73-.79 VangAllW42.91-1.36 VangEmg42.75-1.56 VangEur44.01-1.88 VangEAFE32.70-1.06 VarianMed64.48-1.41 Vectren28.93-.29 Ventas56.23-.40 VeoliaEnv13.54-.86 VeriFone50.24+3.69 VerizonCm38.69-.31 VimpelCm11.70-.43 Visa114.84-1.40 VishayInt11.31-.41 Vonage2.15-.10 Vornado80.06-1.17 WGL Hold40.36-.45 WPX En n18.22-.11 Wabash9.62-.30 WalMart58.97-.44 Walgrn32.87-.43 WalterEn57.78-1.58 WsteMInc34.72-.38 WeathfIntl15.90-.52 WeinRlt24.96-.25 WellPoint64.34-.85 WellsFargo30.11-.87 WestarEn27.64-.20 WAstEMkt14.59-.20 WstAMgdHi6.16-.04 WAstInfOpp12.90... WDigital37.22-1.25 WstnRefin18.44-.61 WstnUnion17.07-.07 Weyerhsr20.57-.65 Whrlpl72.80-1.05 WhitingPet55.60-1.73 WmsCos29.72-.63 WmsPtrs60.77-.60 WmsSon37.45-.59 WillisGp34.79-.67 Winnbgo8.27-.24 WiscEngy34.10-.08 WT India19.13-.74 Worthgtn16.85... Wyndham43.18-1.23 XL Grp20.22-.64 XcelEngy26.25-.19 Xerox8.06-.28 Yamana g16.36-.44 YingliGrn3.54-.15 Youku23.96-1.71 YumBrnds65.48-.88 ZweigTl3.27-.03 NEWYORKSTOCKEXCHANGE Name Last Chg 000ARM6 Associated PressStocks suffered their biggest losses in three months Tuesday, the first hiccup in a strong and steady rally to start the year. Wall Street worried about the global economy and waited while Greece pressured the last investors to sign on for its bailout. The Dow Jones industrial average fell more than 200 points, giving up more than a quarter of its 745-point advance since Jan. 1, the best start to a year in the U.S. market since 1998. The sell-off, which spread west from Europe, also interrupted a period of unusual calm on Wall Street. Before Tuesday, the Dow had not fallen 100 points for 45 straight trading sessions, the longest streak since 2006. The decline of 203.66 points was the worst for the Dow since Nov. 23 and left the average at 12,759.15. It was only last week the Dow closed above 13,000 for the first time since May 2008, four months before the worst of the financial crisis. When things go straight up and dont ever correct or have some sort of normal pullback, as an investor, that makes me nervous, said Ed Hyland, a global investment specialist with J.P. Morgan Private Bank. The gradual rally had been powered by optimism about the U.S. economic recovery. But investors realized Greeces debt problems, Europes economic problems and Israels Iran problems were still very much their problems, too. Stocks fell sharply from the opening bell and never mounted a serious comeback. The Dow was down as much as 227 points. All but one of the 30 stocks in the average finished the day lower. Intel managed a gain of 7 cents. All 10 industry groups in the Standard & Poors 500 declined. Bank stocks, which typically take a hit when there is any reason to worry about Greece, led the declines, followed by industrial and materials companies, which depend on strength in the world economy. Alcoa, which makes aluminum and depends heavily on world economic demand, fell 4.1 percent, the worst of the Dow 30. China revised its projection for economic growth on Monday to 7.5 percent this year, down from 8 percent. The Standard & Poors 500 index fell 20.97 points, its worst decline since Dec. 8, to 1,343.36. The S&P had not declined 1 percent or more for 45 straight trading days, also the longest streak since 2006. That year, the S&P put together 94 in a row. The Nasdaq composite index dropped 40.16 points to 2,910.32. The Nasdaq last week broke through 3,000 for the first time since December 2000, during the collapse in dot-com stocks. Last year, sell-offs like this were much more common. The S&P fell by at least 1 percent on 48 trading days, roughly one in every five. During the depths of the financial crisis in the last four months of 2008, it happened roughly one in every three days. Stocks fell more than 3 percent Tuesday in Germany, Spain and France, and 1.9 percent in Britain. Greece stepped up pressure on private investors to swap their Greek government bonds for replacements with a lower face value and interest rate. Dow down 200 points Drop interrupts 2012 rally Nasdaq diaryAPMarket watchNYSE diaryMarch 6, 2012787.09-16.56Advanced:267Declined:2,804Unchanged:50 446 Advanced: 2,100 Declined: 89 Unchanged:4.1 bVolume: Volume: 1.8 b Russell 2000 Standard & Poors 500 Nasdaq composite Dow Jones industrials -203.66 12,759.15 2,910.32 -40.16 1,343.36-20.97 BusinessHIGHLIGHTS

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OPINION Page A12WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7, 2012 Gorilla in the roomI was dismayed to see a large gorilla at the entrance of Homassasa State Park. And if this wasnt bad enough there is an elephant in the Homer Winslow Room. At least they put it in a corner, too bad it was at the expense of a couple of Homers prints! I thought the state was trying to get back to the Real Florida. Surely they could have found a better place for the gorilla. The elephant well that has seen better days and should probably be put out to pasture, or wherever elephants go to die!Judy Skaling InvernessWhose morality ?Donald Holcomb, on Feb. 15, stated the right challenges sexual immorality at every level because it is the single most destructive force in our society today. He goes on to blame sexual immorality for poverty and crime. His thesis seems to be that the Republican Party and the Religious Right have the right to define sexual morality, and that if only the government could enforce laws based on their ideas of sexual morality, poverty and crime would be things of the past. If only those godless liberal Democrats could be legislated into being as moral as the conservative Republicans, crime would not flourish, poverty and incarceration would be eliminated. I would argue the causes of poverty and crime are much more complex than Mr. Holcomb would have us believe. Many of the problems of single-parent families could be alleviated by living wages and adequate child care, and not every single-parent family is the result of sexual promiscuity. The U.S. Constitution does not define the family; it does not specify religious belief; it does not set specific moral values; and, for instance, it does not prohibit birth control or abortions. It does, however, set out rules and procedures for the operation of government that protect citizens right to live their personal lives without undue interference from the government. Based on other writings of the Founders where faith language is evident, it could have only been deliberate that such language was left out of the Constitution. But is it possible for us to imagine a society where the government employs morality police based on religious doctrine? Does the Taliban in Afghanistan ring a bell? Do we really want our individual rights to be up for grabs every four years?Jo Darling Lecanto Andrew Breitbart, the Web entrepreneur, writer, provocateur and television personality who died suddenly last week at 43, always described himself as an accidental culture warrior. For the few years Breitbart was given to fight the fight, his conversion from Hollywood guy to culture warrior was one of the most fortunate accidents ever to befall the conservative world. Breitbart did a lot of things. But for the right, by far the most important thing he did was teach, again and again and again, that culture is upstream from politics. Breitbart knew instinctively, as people in Washington, D.C., and most other places did not, that movies, television programs and popular music send out deeply political messages every hour of every day. They shape the culture, and then the culture shapes politics. Influence those films and TV shows and songs, and youll eventually influence politics. The left had known that for generations, but on the right, so many people in politics thought only about politics. To Breitbart, that was folly. The people who have money, every four years at the last possible second, are told, You need to give millions of dollars, because these four counties in Ohio are going to determine the election, Breitbart told the National Policy Council in October 2009. I am saying, why didnt we invest 20 years ago in a movie studio in Hollywood, why didnt we invest in creating television shows, why didnt we create institutions that would reflect and affirm that which is good about America? Breitbart was close with the small but not as small as you might think group of conservatives in the Hollywood entertainment world. They were fond of citing various quotes from history to the effect that those who write a nations songs are more influential than those who write a nations laws. Breitbarts friends in the entertainment industry were extraordinarily talented, accomplished people, but many felt they had to stay quiet about their politics. They had real reason to fear that being outspokenly conservative would hurt their careers in a way that being outspokenly liberal would not. Breitbart helped change that situation, or at least helped begin to change that situation. There is an underground conservative movement, he said in 2009. I have more friends who are conservative in (Hollywood), with brand names, writers, directors, graphic artists, comedians, singers, songwriters, rock and rollers, punk rockers, believe it or not, who love this country, most of whom are cultural conservatives, and who have existed in the closet for the last 40 years, because the conservative movement was, for the most part, based in the Northeast and kind of pooh-poohed the culture or just didnt think that there was a cultural right out there. There really was a cultural right out there, and Breitbart made sure the country and those Eastern conservatives knew it. Sometimes Breitbarts message got lost in his antics. At the recent Conservative Political Action Conference in Washington, he took delight in plunging into a small crowd of Occupy Wall Street protesters. Behave yourself! Breitbart yelled, reminding them of the underreported violence and ugly incidents in some Occupy camps. Stop raping people! Stop raping people! It drove some people nuts, as intended. So did a lot of other things Breitbart said. But his bigger message was always the same: Change the culture and youll change politics. A lot of young conservatives, born into the Web world, considered Breitbart not just a role model, or a mentor, but a hero. He returned the affection. I have spoken at the Leadership Institute, Young Americas Foundation and College Republicans, he said in 2009. I will go for free wherever the kids will listen to me. At that time, Breitbart was riding high from championing the expose of ACORN, in which the young conservative James OKeefe and a friend dressed as a pimp and a prostitute in a (successful) hidden-camera effort to reveal corruption in the government-funded community organizing group. Breitbart knew that kind of energy and audacity didnt come from established politicians or columnists or talking heads. I have said that the youth is where this movement will begin, and they are the only ones who truly matter to me, Breitbart said. I have to be honest with you. I dont like speaking to people my age, because we are too conservative. We have families. We have 401(k)s, and we arent willing to dress as pimps and prostitutes. Breitbart knew conservatives would have to change, to pay more attention to the culture, to win. Thats what he tried to teach, every day.Byron York is chief political correspondent for The Washington Examiner. Every man is entitled to be valued by his best moment.Ralph Waldo Emerson, 1860 Breitbart knew culture is key CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE Founded by Albert M. Williamson You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose. David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus EDITORIAL BOARDGerry Mulligan ..........................................publisherCharlie Brennan ............................................editorMike Arnold ..........................................HR directorSandra Frederick ............................managing editorCurt Ebitz ........................................citizen memberMac Harris ......................................citizen memberRebecca Martin ................................guest member GLARING NEED Coordinate plan to help the homeless There are many reasons people find themselves without a place to call home. In Citrus County, there are currently an estimated 1,024 individuals of all ages who fall into the homeless category. Some are chronically homeless who find a comfort zone in staying at shelters or pitching a tent in the woods. In some cases, it is a mental health issue or trauma experienced in military service that forces them onto the streets. Then there are the people who have hit hard times and are economically forced to leave their homes behind, either through foreclosure, inability to pay the rent or loss of a job. But what is really frightening is the upswing in the population of couch surfers. These are the ones who bounce between relatives homes or live in a car. Unfortunately, they are often families divided because of the logistical difficulties in moving in with others. Regardless of the circumstances, they deserve the opportunity to have shelter and a feeling of security. As a county we need to look at a long-term solution and find a viable fix for the problem. We are a giving county. Currently, there are a variety of churches and food banks that temporarily feed the needy, but there are only a couple of shelters that take them in. Citrus County does not have a master plan to provide the necessary services for the homeless. What is desperately needed is an agency or coalition to identify the problems and issues facing these people and then find a way to get them out of the cycle of homelessness. Yes, there are some who cannot be helped or who want to remain in that lifestyle. But there are many we can help. Perhaps if life skills are taught it would bring an end to the cycle of bad decisionmaking over and over again. County Administrator Brad Thorpe is taking steps to bring together various concerned entities to seek a solution. We urge the county to make a game plan on how to get these folks out of the revolving door of homelessness and then implement it. The results could be amazing. THE ISSUE:Homeless in the county.OUR OPINION:A master plan needs to be developed. OPINIONS INVITED The opinions expressed in Chronicle editorials are the opinions of the newspapers editorial board.Viewpoints depicted in political cartoons, columns or letters do not necessarily represent the opinion of the editorial board. Groups or individuals are invited to express their opinions in a letter to the editor. Persons wishing to address the editorial board, which meets weekly, should call Charlie Brennan at 352-563-5660.All letters must be signed and include a phone number and hometown, including letters sent via email. Names and hometowns will be printed; phone numbers will not be published or given out.We reserve the right to edit letters for length, libel, fairness and good taste.Letters must be no longer than 350 words, and writers will be limited to three letters per month. SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor, 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to 352-563-3280, or email to letters@chronicleonline.com .LETTERSto the Editor AccomplishmentsDont let anyone tell you that Obama hasnt accomplished anything in his presidency. The latest feather in his cap is the elimination of the No Child Left behind program. Schoolteachers all over the country must be celebrating and this is the best thing that could have happened for our schoolchildren for a long time not to be subject to a course where theyre taught to answer a test, but taught information that they can use. One golden star for President Obama.Drive rightIm wondering why drivers around here feel the need to cross multiple lanes to the far left when they first turn onto the roads. When I learned to drive, I was taught to turn into the near lane, build up speed and then merge onto further moving traffic, not immediately go to the far left lane, otherwise known as passing lanes, and disrupt the flow of traffic. And by the way, current Florida law requires slower drivers in the left lane of multi-lane roadways to move to the right, even if they are doing the speed limit.Crazy ideaThe Tallahassee cheaters who call themselves leaders should get the $2.13 per hour plus tips they are proposing for tipped workers. This whole state is going to the dogs and that is mad ones.Dont sell alcoholOur government should be liable for every death on our highways caused from alcohol and sued for it. Our government allows it to be sold. Its their problem. Alcohol is a killer. You may be next. THE CHRONICLEinvites you to call Sound Off with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record. COMMENTSwill be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers. SOUND OFFCALL563-0579 Hot Corner: BURN BARRELS Circle Gs barrelsThis is in response to the person asking about the burn barrels. They sell them at Circle G Sales out by the flea market, Howards Flea Market. They have burn barrels and rain barrels and you can call them at 621-9292.Barrels in LecantoThis call goes out to the person who called the Sounding Off looking for a burn barrel. You can get those at Inter-County Recycling here in Lecanto on (State Road) 44. Just bought one there a couple of weeks ago and their prices are right. Barrel guyThis is in response to where to buy burn barrels. On North Florida Avenue, just past the Dollar General store on the right-hand side, is a guy that has burn barrels, old lawnmowers, bicycles and what have you. Its before you get to Van Ness Drive. Thats where I get mine. I pay $7 or $8 apiece for them. I get them twice a year from that guy. Theyre 55-gallon barrels. They dont have a phone number and they are closed on Mondays. Have a good one. Byron YorkOTHER VOICES CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE

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LINDSEYTANNER AP Medical WriterCHICAGO Morphine and similar powerful painkillers are sometimes prescribed to recent war veterans suffering from posttraumatic stress along with physical pain, and the consequences can be tragic, a government study suggests. These vets are at high risk for drug and alcohol abuse, but theyre two times more likely to get prescriptions for addictive painkillers than vets with only physical pain, according to the study, billed as the first national examination of the problem. Iraq and Afghanistan vets with PTSD who already had substance abuse problems were four times more likely to get these drugs than vets without mental health problems, according to the study. Subsequent suicides, other self-inflicted injuries, and drug and alcohol overdoses were all more common in vets with PTSD who got these drugs. These consequences were rare but still troubling, the study authors said. The results underscore the challenge of treating veterans with devastating physical injuries and haunting memories of the horrors of war. But the findings also suggest that physicians treating these veterans should offer less risky treatment, including therapies other than drugs, the study authors and other experts say. Opium-based drugs like morphine and hydrocodone can dull excruciating physical pain. Relatively few veterans are prescribed such drugs. But some doctors likely prescribe them for vets who also have mental pain with the hope that the emotional distress that accompanies chronic pain will also be reduced. Unfortunately, this hope is often not fulfilled, and opioids can sometimes make emotional problems worse, said Michael Von Korff, a chronic illness researcher with Group Health Research Institute, a Seattle-based health care system. He was not involved in the study. The research involved all veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan wars who were diagnosed with non-cancer physical pain from October 2005 through December 2010 or 141,029 men and women. Half of them also were diagnosed with posttraumatic stress disorder or other mental health problems. The results were published Tuesday in the Journal of the American Medical Association. The Department of Veterans Affairs paid for the study, which is based on VA health care data. Lead author Dr. Karen Seal, who treats patients at the San Francisco VA Medical Center, said she sometimes prescribes opiates for war vets, but only if other painkillers dont work, and only in collaboration with non-drug treatment from mental health experts, occupational therapists and other specialists. That type of approach is part of a VA pain management policy adopted in 2009, toward the end of the study period. Dr. Robert Kerns, the VAs national program director for pain management, said the study draws attention to growing concerns about the use of opiate painkillers in veterans. These drugs may have a role in treating chronic pain in vets but only as part of a comprehensive pain management plan, he said. In a written statement about the study, the VA said its pain management approach has been cited as a model of care, but that we recognize that more work needs to be done. Retired Lt. Col. Steve Countouriotis, a 30-year Army veteran who served in Iraq and Afghanistan, says that after returning home a few years ago, he received a morphine prescription for war-related back and shoulder pain. He refused to take it and used aspirin instead. I dont feel comfortable taking those kinds of medicines, said Countouriotis, 60, of Petaluma, Calif. I dont like mood-altering drugs. He said he doesnt have PTSD, but that some colleagues who do have also been given the drugs. Doctors are too quick to prescribe them, Countouriotis said, adding, Its too many, too soon. Army data provided to The Associated Press last year showed that referrals for opiate abuse among soldiers rose during the decade that ended in 2009, and totaled more than 670 between October 2009 and June 2010. Some vets in the new study got the drugs from overburdened primary care physicians outside the VA health system. Imagine primary care doctors getting about 20 minutes to see a patient expressing high levels of distress, because of war-related physical and mental trauma, said Seal, the study author. The balance between providing pain relief while being cautious with drugs that can be habit-forming is always in play, she said. In the study, 15,676 vets received opiate prescriptions for physical pain. These prescriptions went to almost 18 percent of vets with PTSD and 12 percent of those with other mental health problems, compared with about 7 percent of vets without those problems. Among those with PTSD, subsequent self-inflicted injuries, including suicides, occurred in 3 percent of vets who got the drugs, versus 2 percent who didnt receive those prescriptions. The study doesnt provide a breakdown of suicides vs. nonfatal self-injuries. The study brings much needed attention to the complexity of this problem, said Dr. William Becker, a Yale University instructor and primary care physician who treats substance abuse and has worked with veterans. Patients are typically younger individuals who are in many cases kind of struggling to find their feet again after returning home from war, he said. The ideal treatment includes behavioral counseling, therapy for war wounds and management of chronic pain. The word is spreading and I think this paper is going to send another strong message that this has really got to become the standard of care, Becker said.NATIONCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLEWEDNESDAY, MARCH7, 2012 A13 000AP0H Vets prone to drug addiction get risky painkillers Associated PressSteve Countouriotis, a chief emergency services command officer, poses in his office March 5 at the U.S. Coast Guard Training Center in Petaluma, Calif. A 30-year Army veteran who served in Iraq and Afghanistan, he refused to take addictive drugs prescribed for his war-related back and shoulder pain, and says doctors should offer veterans less-risky medication. Hackers busted after one becomes FBI informant Associated PressNEW YORK The shadowy underworld of Internet hackers was rocked by news Tuesday that one of the worlds most-wanted and most-feared computer vandals has been an FBI informant for months and helped authorities build a case against five alleged comrades. The FBI said it captured the legendary hacker known as Sabu last June, and he turned out to be Hector Xavier Monsegur, 28, a selftaught, unemployed computer programmer with no college education, living on welfare in public housing in New York. His exploits made him a hero to some in cyberspace until he made a rookie mistake he posted something online without cloaking his IP address, or computer identity and someone tipped off the FBI. Soon after his arrest, he pleaded guilty and began spilling secrets, leading to charges Tuesday against five people in Europe and the U.S., including a Chicago man, and preventing more than 300 attacks along the way, authorities said. Law enforcement officials said it marked the first time core members of the loosely organized worldwide hacking group Anonymous have been identified and charged in the U.S. Investigators said Monsegur and the other defendants were all associated with the group, and some were also part of the elite spinoff organization that Monsegur formed last May, Lulz Security or LulzSec. Lulz is Internet slang for laughs or amusement. Monsegur and the other defendants were accused in court papers of hacking into corporations and government agencies around the world, including the U.S. Senate, filching confidential information, defacing websites and temporarily putting victims out of business. Authorities said their crimes affected more than 1 million people. Prosecutors said that among other things, the hackers, with Monsegur as their ringleader, disrupted websites belonging to Visa, Mastercard and Paypal in 2010 and 2011 because the companies refused to accept donations to Wikileaks, the organization that spilled a trove of U.S. military and diplomatic secrets. Also, prosecutors said, Monsegur and the others attacked a PBS website last May and planted a false story that slain rapper Tupac Shakur was alive in New Zealand. Investigators said it was retaliation for what the hackers perceived to be unfavorable news coverage of Wikileaks on the PBS program Frontline. But it was the arrest of Monsegur that sent shockwaves through the Anonymous movement, where many described him as a leader and one of the collectives most skilled hackers. Some Anonymous members put on a brave face. Anonymous is a hydra, cut off one head and we grow two back, read one defiant message posted to Twitter. But the atmosphere in one of the groups chat rooms had an edge of panic. One Anonymous supporter discussed cleaning the groups hard drive. Another warned that if Sabu is cooperating, then we are all going to have the FBI at are (sic) door. A Twitter account associated with Monsegur has some 45,000 followers and regularly spouts expletive-filled anti-government messages. His last tweet on Monday was in German and described the federal government as being run by cowards. It was apparently aimed at concealing his role as an informant. Dont give in to these people, the message read. Fight back. Stay strong. Monsegur pleaded guilty in August to charges that included conspiracy to commit hacking, admitting he obtained dozens of credit card numbers online and gave them to others or used them to pay his bills. ON THE NET JAMA: www .jama. ama-assn.org PTSD: http://1.usa. g ov/ftZKFP

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Blustery Associated PressHayley Peterson, 11, looks more like a wind vane Tuesday as a gust of wind near 35 mph causes her hair to stand straight out as she plays kickball outside with her friends in LaPorte, Ind. Tycoon convicted in $7B swindleHOUSTON Texas tycoon R. Allen Stanford spent more than 20 years charming investors, who handed him billions of dollars they had spent their lives accumulating through hard work and saving. Stanford promised them safe investments that would help fulfill their dreams of being able to retire comfortably or pay their childrens college tuition. All the while, he was pulling their money out of his Caribbean bank to pay for a string of failed businesses and a jet-setting lifestyle. Stanford, once considered one of the wealthiest people in the U.S., with a financial empire that spanned the Americas, was convicted Tuesday on charges he bilked investors out of more than $7 billion. Prosecutors said his business acumen was nothing more than an old-fashioned Ponzi scheme, and jurors convicted him on 13 of 14 charges, including conspiracy, wire and mail fraud. He was acquitted on a single count of wire fraud that accused him of bribing a regulator with Super Bowl tickets. Jamaica Associated PressBritains Prince Harry, left, is welcomed Tuesday by Jamaicas Prime Minister Portia Simpson Miller to a lunch in Kingston. Britain: Handshakes OK for OlympiansLONDON On the other hand ... The British government has rejected advice from the Olympic teams top doctor that athletes should not shake hands at the London Games to avoid germs that could make them sick. Government health advisers seemed perplexed by the guidelines, which Olympic hopefuls derided as rude and pointless. By the end of the day, the British Olympic Association had softened its stance. Yes, the athletes will be able to greet the 10,000 visiting Olympians and hundreds of dignitaries with handshakes. Theyll just have to make sure they wash thoroughly later. From wire reports Nation BRIEFS World BRIEFS NATION& WORLD Page A14WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7, 2012 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE R. Allen Stanfordfaces life in prison. Iran nuke talks may resume Associated PressTEHRAN, Iran Efforts to find a diplomatic solution to Irans disputed nuclear program appeared to get a boost Tuesday when world powers agreed to a new round of talks with Tehran, and Iran gave permission for inspectors to visit a site suspected of secret atomic work. The two developments countered somewhat the crisis atmosphere over Irans nuclear program, the focus of talks in Washington between President Barack Obama and Israels visiting prime minister. Speaking at a news conference, Obama said he saw a window of opportunity to use diplomacy instead of military force to resolve the dispute over Irans nuclear program. He said he is focused on crippling sanctions already imposed on Iran and on international pressure to keep Tehran from developing a nuclear weapon. Iranians need to show they are serious about resolving the crisis, he said, adding that his policy is not one of containment but of stopping Iran from acquiring a nuclear weapon. The U.S. and its allies say Iran is on a path that could lead to the production of a nuclear weapon. Iran denies that, insisting its program is for energy production and other peaceful purposes. Speaking in Brussels, EU foreign policy chief Catherine Ashton said the five permanent members of the U.N. Security Council and Germany had agreed to a new round of nuclear talks with Iran. Previous talks have not achieved what the powers want an end to uranium enrichment on Iranian soil. The last round ended in failure in January 2011. Ashton said the EU hopes Iran will now enter into a sustained process of constructive dialogue which will deliver real progress in resolving the international communitys long-standing concerns on its nuclear program. The time and venue of the new talks have not yet been set. Estrogen lowers risk of breast cancer Associated PressLONDON Women who take estrogen after meno pause appear to have a lower risk of breast cancer even years after they quit taking the hormone, according to a new analysis of a landmark study. The results are reassuring news for women who have had hysterectomies and use the pills to relieve hot flashes and other symptoms of menopause, the researchers and other doctors say. Previous observational studies have suggested a possible connection between estrogen and breast cancer. The new research found women who had a hysterectomy who took estrogen-only pills for about six years were about 20 percent less likely to develop breast cancer than those who didnt take the hormone, and the benefit lasted for at least five years. The study was published online Wednesday in the journal, Lancet Oncology. If women are suffering from serious menopause symptoms and have had a hysterectomy, then estrogen alone is a reasonable approach, said Garnet Anderson, of the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle and the studys lead author. Doctors have long prescribed hormones for women after menopause to relieve symptoms like hot flashes and night sweats. The pills were also believed to be good for bones, the heart and have other health benefits. In the 1990s, researchers began a large, U.S.-funded study, known as the Womens Health Initiative, looking at the effects of estrogen-progestin combination pills and estrogen-only therapies. The estrogenprogestin part of the study was stopped in 2002 when the combo pill was linked to higher risks for heart attacks and breast cancer. In 2004, the estrogen study was halted after researchers detected stroke and blood clot risks in that group. Nursing home with meth lab fire was cited earlier Associated PressCOLUMBUS, Ohio The Ohio Department of Health says a fire at a nursing home apparently was caused by a mobile meth lab. A spokeswoman said officials are looking into the role that visitors to the home may have played. They did not give an exact description of the lab, but said that generally a mobile lab consists of a small container that can be carried in a backpack and that has all the ingredients to make methamphetamine. Five people were hospitalized after the fire Sunday in a residents room at Park Haven Home in Ashtabula, east of Cleveland. One of them, 31-year-old Shaun Warrens of Ashtabula, died Monday. Police say Warrens was not a resident or employee. The nursing home was cited for 18 violations last year, including not providing adequate care, according to state records obtained Tuesday. Police believe two visitors and one Park Haven resident knew about the meth lab, Police Chief Robert Stell told the Star Beaconof Ashtabula. Charges are expected against two men who were burned. The homes alleged violations in a December survey included not providing adequate care, failing to investigate how a resident was injured and not properly responding to residents complaints about missing property. An earlier review of the facility, in June, resulted in citations for two violations, including one alleged to have put residents at risk of harm. Park Haven failed to provide proper urgent care for one resident pained by a fractured leg and a second who had critical changes to her vital signs and level of consciousness, according to the survey findings. The home did not respond to a message left Tuesday. According to a federal rating system, the nursing home has the lowest possible rating one star out of five for health inspections and quality measures. Bounty of bees, bugs Associated PressBeekeeper Orin Johnson, right, and son-in-law Jay Rolon check on colonies pollinating an almond orchard Feb. 23 northwest of Waterford, Calif. A mild and dry winter that gave insects a reprieve from certain death now threatens to make spring a tough season for many U.S. farmers. Warm winter may bring pest-filled spring for many farmers Associated PressHARTFORD, Conn. The mild winter that has given many Northern farmers a break from shoveling and a welcome chance to catch up on maintenance, could lead to a tough spring as many pests that would normally freeze have not. Winters are usually what one agriculture specialist calls a reset button that gives farmers a fresh start come planting season. But with relatively mild temperatures and little snow, insects are surviving, growing and, in some areas, already munching on budding plants. Almost every state had a warmer-than-usual January, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. In Albany, N.Y., for example, the average high in January was 37 degrees, when its usually less than freezing, according to the National Weather Service. In Tulsa, Okla., the average high last month was about 57 degrees, 9 degrees higher than normal. The Upper Midwest, Great Plains and a few other areas were much above normal in temperature, NOAA said. Dawn Allen, who has an 89-yearold, family-run bog in Freetown, Mass., said her family will likely start sweeping bogs with a contraption similar to a butterfly net in April to catch winter moth caterpillars, instead of waiting until midMay, when they typically start. The winter moth caterpillars are aggressive and eat buds, potentially ruining a crop for a whole year. Its a big stress factor that gets us out on the bog early, said Allen, whose farm sells cranberries for juice and pulp converted into cranberry vitamins. Martha Sylvia, a research technician at the University of Massachusetts cranberry station, said growers should expect to start spraying earlier and more often because theres definitely an upswing in winter moths, she said. We just know were in for it, Sylvia said. Tim Tucker, a beekeeper in Niotaze, Kan., said he saw flies in February when all flies should be gone and bumble bees that usually dont appear until May or June. The warm weather hasnt been entirely good for beekeeping, though. Usually, queen bees wont lay eggs in the cold, but this year, his hives have been active. This year, we have some hives that raised bees all winter, Tucker said. I dont think they ever stopped. Because so many bees are being raised, Tucker has had to buy supplemental food, such as sucrose, so they dont eat all the honey he wants to sell. While bees are good for pollination, many of the insects that are surviving have a destructive bent, such as the bean leaf beetle that targets soybeans, corn flea beetle that damages corn, and the alfalfa weevil. Those insects live close to the surface of the ground, so the mild temperatures give them a head start, said Christian Krupke, a Purdue University entomologist. Winter is like a big reset button for the Midwest, Krupke said. It wipes out lots of insects, usually. However, the warmer temperatures generally dont affect insects that spend their winters burrowed deep into the ground, he said. And some insects may be threatened by a lack of snow. Erin Hodgson, an entomologist at Iowa State University, said a drought there due to a lack of snow could threaten boxelder bugs and beetles, who will die if food fails to emerge. And insects that pass the winter in dormancy above ground could die of dehydration or starvation without the insulating cover of snow, she said. Associated PressThis photo provided by the Ashtabula Division of Fire shows a room at Park Haven Nursing Home where a Sunday night fire caused by a meth lab in the room killed one person and injured six others, Monday, March 5, in Ashtabula, Ohio.

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Citrus splits games on diamond Associated PressTAMPA Milan Michalek scored three third-period goals, helping the Ottawa Senators withstand a Tampa Bay comeback attempt and beat the Lightning 7-3 on Tuesday night. Ottawa, which took a three-goal lead early on, went up 5-3 when Michalek scored a power-play goal at 12:12 of third. The left wing added two empty-goals, including a short-handed effort with 7 seconds left to give him 32 goals this season. Tampa Bay got within 4-3 when Steven Stamkos scored his league-leading 48th goal of the season during a power play at 5:41 of the third. The center has five goals and three assists during a five-game point streak. Sergei Gonchar, Colin Greening, Kyle Turris and Erik Karlsson had the other Ottawa goals. Michalek also had an assist, setting up Greenings goal with a nifty pass from behind the net. Ryan Shannon and Tim Wallace also scored for the Lightning. Teddy Purcell assisted on Stamkos goal and has 14 assists and 20 points during a career-high 10-game point streak. Tampa Bay goalie Mathieu Garon left four minutes into the game with an undisclosed lower body injury after making a save and was replaced by Dwayne Roloson. Garon, who had gone 12-3-2 in his previous 17 starts, appeared to get hurt when he kicked out his leg on the play. Greening and Turris scored 53 seconds apart late in the first as Ottawa took a 3-0 lead. Greening scored from the low slot, while Turris shot went off Tampa Bay defenseman Brett Clark. Gonchar stopped a personal 43-game goal drought, dating back to Nov. 12 against Toronto, to put Senators up 1-0 midway through the first. The Lightning got within 3-2 in the opening 7:12 of the second when Shannon and Wallace scored on 6-foot-7 Ben Bishop, who was making his Senators debut. Bishop was acquired from St. Louis for a 2013 secondround draft pick on Feb. 26. Karlsson made it 4-2 on a power-play goal at 11:58 of the second. The defenseman has 16 goals and 67 points this season. Ottawa is without goalie Craig Anderson, who is sidelined by a hand injury. He won all three of the Senators previous games this season with the Lightning, allowing just three goals overall. Notes: The NHL fined Karlsson $2,500 for slashing Floridas Sean Bergenheim during a game on Sunday. ... Tampa Bay D Victor Hedman was in the lineup after missing four games due to an upper body injury. ... In 10 games against Tampa Bay, Anderson is 6-1-2 with three shutouts and an 1.24 goalsagainst-average. ... Lightning D Marc-Andre Bergeron is scheduled to have back surgery on Wednesday. SPORTSSection BWEDNESDAY, MARCH 7, 2012 Golf/B2 Tennis/B3 Scoreboard/B4 Lottery numbers/B4 NBA/ B5 NHL/B5 Entertainment/ B6 How to improve your golf score / B2 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE SO YOU KNOW Due to early deadlines some lottery numbers do not appear. Crystal River creams rivals DAVEPIEKLIK CorrespondentCRYSTAL RIVER Poise, perseverance and power. Crystal River High Schools softball team showed all three to rally late in a 6-4 district win Tuesday over visiting Hernando High School of Brooksville. After unforced errors led to a quick 3-0 deficit, Crystal River (8-2 overall; 3-1 district) settled down and pitcher McCale Wilson bought her team some time to take the lead with solid pitching. Wilson recently called up from junior varsity threw a complete-game seven-hitter, recording five strikeouts and two walks. Crystal River faces Dunnellon on Friday in district play. I have a great team behind me, Wilson said of her fielders and batters. I have everything I could ask for. Hernando (5-4 overall; 23 district) went ahead quick from unforced errors that have plagued Crystal River recently. If Wilson was rattled, she didnt show it, locating her pitches to induce harmless grounders or fly ball to keep the score close. Warriors fall at home JAMESBLEVINS CorrespondentCRYSTAL RIVER Seven Rivers Christian School came out strong in the first inning of Tuesday evenings softball game against the Hernando Christian Lady Lions. The Warriors scored five early runs to take a three-run lead but, by the third inning, Hernando Christian took over the game and led from there on out. Preventing the Warriors from staging any further offensive threats, the Lions won the game 10-5. Hernando Christian utilized strong pitching and consistent hitting to dominate the game, out-hitting the Warriors 17-7. They played hard against a very good team. Seven Rivers head coach Gary Dreyer said. (They) played it all the way to the end. The Lady Lions struck first with two hits and two runs in the first inning. Seven Rivers (0-5 overall, 0-1 district) fought back in its first at-bat, which led to three hits and five runs to take a 5-2 lead. Alexis King singled while pitcher Tessa Kacer and Katie Dreyer doubled. Kacer kept the Lions off SEANARNOLD CorrespondentINVERNESS The Citrus baseball team opened up a 4-0 lead in the first inning and never looked back, overwhelming West Port for an 11-0 home triumph in five innings Tuesday. With the victory, Citrus (6-2) improved to 3-0 in its district and is set for a district showdown at Springstead (2-0 in district) on Monday. The Canes made solid contact all night, but didnt need any hits for their initial rally, which found Wolf Pack junior Javy Rivera throwing 35 pitches as three Citrus batters reached and scored off West Port (0-8, 0-3) errors. After adding two runs in the Lightning lose The end of an era Associated PressIndianapolis Colts quarterback Peyton Manning talks to reporters Dec. 2 in the locker room at the NFL football teams practice facility in Indianapolis. The Peyton Manning era in Indianapolis is expected to end. Associated PressINDIANAPOLIS The Peyton Manning era in Indianapolis is expected to end Wednesday, according to a report. Citing anonymous sources, ESPN reported Tuesday the Colts plan to hold a news conference to announce the long-expected decision. Manning and team owner Jim Irsay are expected to attend, the network said. Colts spokesman Avis Roper said he could not confirm the decision or that a news conference would be held Wednesday because Irsay was out of town and could not be reached for comment. Neither Irsay nor Mannings agent, Tom Condon, responded immediately to messages left by The Associated Press. Manning has said in the past all he wanted to do was finish his career in a Colts uniform, but an injured neck forced him to miss all of the 2011 season. I cant tell you what an honor it is to go start-to-finish with the same organization here in Indianapolis. That is something I have always wanted to do as a rookie coming out, Manning said after Report: Colts, Manning breaking up Lady Pirates defeat Leopards 6-4 Associated Pres sABOVE: Tampa Bay Lightning defenseman Keith Aulie punches Ottawa Senators left wing Colin Greening as they fight Tuesday during the second period in Tampa. BELOW: Ottawa Senators center Jason Spezza tries to stuff the puck past Tampa Bay Lightning goalie Dwayne Roloson as defenseman Victor Hedman helps Roloson during the third period of the game.Panthers pounce on Lady CanesSTEVEMCGUNNIGLE CorrespondentINVERNESS While hitting was on display all night by both sides, one teams ability to play at a high level in all facets of the game proved the difference, as Lecanto connected on all cylinders to defeat Citrus 10-4 in a District 6A-6 matchup Tuesday at Vicki Overman Field. The Lady Panthers (6-2 overall, 2-2 district)got hits from all but one spot in the lineup, capitalized on Citrus errors and played superb defense including two double plays. Lecanto pitcher Hurricanes rout Wolf Pack 11-0 See COLTS/ Page B4 Hernando Christian wins 10-5 See WARRIORS/ Page B4 See CANES/ Page B4 Michalek has 3 goals as Ottawa beats Tampa Bay 7-3 See PANTHERS/ Page B4 See PIRATES/ Page B4

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OUTDOORS YOUTHSPORTS ADULTLEAGUESPORTS CITRUSCOUNTYSPEEDWAY Page B2WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7, 2012 COMINGTOMORROWCOMINGTUESDAYCOMINGFRIDAY COMINGSATURDAY CITRUSCOUNTYSRECREATIONALGUIDETOGOLF HOLE-IN-ONEBob Lewis hit a hole-in-oneMarch 5 on Hole No. 2 in the Monday Morning Mens Point Quota Group. It was hisfirstone. Witnesses were Chuck Taylor, Pat Voss and Leo Fisher.BRENTWOODFeb. 29 Wednesday Point Quota Group last Wednesday of the month Scramble results. First7 under Don Oslance, C.W. Goschen, Jay Hylemon and Ron Cart Second6 under (MOC) Jim Kieffer, Possum Lindsey, Basil Varney and Ty Ross Third6 under Tom Cox, Glenn Connelly, Jim Pearson and Bill Owens Closest to the Pin: No. 2Bob Staker No. 4Ron Cart 50, 50 winnerJim Kieffer March 3 Saturday Morning (Handicap) Scramble results. First Ron Worrell, Jim Pearson and Bob Smith Second Kenny McCabe, Bob Staker, Andy McKenney and Joel Fox Third Bob Day, Rich Bleeker and Bob Bouchard Closest to the Pin: No. 2Bob Smith No. 4Kenny Mc Cabe March 4 Sunday Morning Scramble results. First7 under Kenny McCabe, Chuck Curtis and Rolf Kettenberg Second3 under (MOC) Russel Clark, Possum Lindsey, Jay Hylemon and Jerry Walker Third3 under Anita McCabe, Bob Staker and Jim Pearson Closest to the Pin: No. 2Sue Bauerle No. 4Chuck Curtis 50/50 winnerAnn Mc Laughlin March 5 Monday Morning Mens Point Quota Group results. FirstBob Lewis+ 4 SecondKim Kieffer+ 3 (MOC) ThirdDon Treannie+ 3 Closest to the Pin: No. 2Bob Lewis (Hole-in One) No. 4Kenny McCabe WOMEN March 6 Brentwood Tuesday Ladies League standings. Teams: First97.5 points Kay Fitzsimmons and Dianne Joyner Second94.0 points Gail Nowicki and Jeri Meday Third90.5 points Maryann Barch and Sandi Luther Individuals: FirstGail Nowicki46.0 points SecondKay Fitzsimmons45.0 points ThirdDianne Joyner42.5 points (Tie)Penny Magliano42.5 points Low GrossKay Fitzsimmons-44 Low NetKay Fitzsimmons-32 Birdies: No. 9Jane Vandenbergh Game of the Day Fewest Putts: Gigi Haltom 13 Feb. 28 Brentwood Tuesday Ladies League standings. Team: First86.0 points Kay Fitzsimmons and Dianne Joyner Second85.5 points Gail Nowicki and Jeri Meday Third82.0 points (Tie) Maryann Barch and Sandi Luther (Tie) Glenora Hilton and Dorothy Gratien Individual: FirstGail Nowicki42.5 points SecondKay Fitzsimmons39.0 points (Tie)Dianne Joyner39.0 points (Tie)Glenora Hilton39.0 points Low GrossKay Fitzsimmons45 Low NetKay Fitzsimmons32 Birdies: No. 4Dorothy Gratien Chip-ins: No. 5Joan Minnelli Game of the Day Fewest Strokes Tee to Green: Dianne Joyner28CITRUS HILLSFeb. 29 Citrus Hills Mens Association Match Play Championship Final results. Flight A FirstDick Stillwagon SecondJohn Nagle ThirdRon Boguski Flight B FirstFrank Tobey SecondWA Pace ThirdBruce Cahoon Flight C FirstJerry Krause SecondDick Morelli ThirdKeith Bainbridge Flight D FirstBob Prince SecondDick Olsen ThirdRoger Williams Feb. 29 The Citrus Hills Mens Golf Association played on the Oaks Golf Course Irish Four Ball. First17 Bob Miller, Cliff Schoenenberger, Jerry McClernon and John Rowen Second14 Ed Ryan, John Keller Randy Robertson and Joe Skender Third13 Larry Jones, Bob Sarno George Lowell and Harold Cipollone Fourth-12 Jim Rembler, Bob Palmer Frank Kosidiak and Clive Affleck WOMEN Feb. 28 The Citrus Hills Ladies Golf Association played a game called Forty Balls. Each player must select the hole they want to count for the team score immediately upon completion of that hole. This was a (ABCD) team game in which each player must use 10 net hole scores for a 40 hole team score. First124 Dorothy Ammerman, Carol Moon, Gloria Phillips and Diane Halloran Second129 Judy Stone, Ruth Rosenow, Phyllis Mills and Kate Yazbak Third130 Brenda Lindsey, Helen Forte, Nancy McCoy and Virginia Romiti Birdies: No. 3Judy Stone No. 9Brenda Lindsey No. 5Carol Moon No. 16Clara Kim No. 13Sue Burgun No. 14Nancy McCoy No. 14Bonnie Yanosy Nos. 3 and 13June Marbutt Nos. 14 and 15Gloria PhillipsCITRUS SPRINGSMarch 2 Citrus Springs Golf & Country Club played Two Best Scores. First Net119 Rich Benevente, Seab Johnson, Rich Howard and (Blind) Second Net126 Conrad Medina, David Haas, Tom Rothrauff and (Blind) Birdies: Nos. 2 and 7Rich Benevente Closest to the Pin: No. 16David Haas WOMEN March 2 Points Quota Chicks with Sticks results. Vickie Colebank+11 Sandy Brown+6 Jan Kominski+6 Ruth Meyer+6 Lois Bump+5 Marj Sibley+5 Lorraine Adams+4 Mary McConnell+4 Joy Cocuzzi+1 Carole Seifert+1 Closest to the Pin: No.4Lois Bump No.8June Goyette No.11Carole Seifert No. 16Marj Sibley Chicks with Sticks, a ladies points quota league, meets every Friday morning at Citrus Springs. Interested players with GHIN handicaps should call Jan at 352-344-9550 or Carole at 352-746-2082.LAKESIDEMEN Feb. 29 The annual Memorial Tournament hosted by the Mens League, honored those members who have passed away this past year. John Stewart read the memorial names, and taps were played before play. Format for ladies was low gross and low net. The men played a 1-2-3 format. First Don Lynch, Wayne Perry, and Rich Grunwold Second Len Thomas, Volk Krees, Pete Powell and Joe Johnston Third Angelo Leonardi, Rich Connelly, and Gene Sass Fourth Rich Hausman, Dave McLane, Bob Smith and Dave Smith Fifth Fred Friberg, Marty Gibbings, and John Heymans Closest to the Pin: Mens No. 8Horst Hlawaty Mens No. 13Marty Gibbings Womens Nos. 2 and 15Marlene Friberg Closest to the Line: Mens No. 6Horst Halawaty Mens No. 12Volk Knees Womens No. 6Joyce Smith Womens No. 12Patty Smith Low Net LadiesJoyce Smith71 WOMEN March 1 Lakeside Womens Golf T and F format taking scores on holes with names beginning with a T or F. A Flight FirstJan Kominski34 (Tie)Marlene Friberg34 ThirdMary McConnell 35.5 (Tie)Kaye Brown35.5 B Flight FirstLinda Miller32 (Tie)Diane Atterson32 ThirdJean OBrien33 Chip-ins: No. 8Marj Sibley No. 2Irene Nunes Closest to the Pin: No. 2Marj Sibley No. 15Carol Siefert Sunday Funday Format, Team low net results. First Rick Ross, Joyce Smith, Bruce Mowat and Linda Ross Second Tony Forio, Tim Langs, Pat Mowat and Marnie Florio Closest to the Pin: Womens No.15Marnie Florio Mens No.13Rick RossPINE RIDGEMarch 6 Beverly Hills Mens Nine Hole Golf League results. Winning Scorers: B. Collier33 G. St. Don31 F. Hughes33 R. Mazzacua33 OTG Winners: V.Bishop, F. Hughes, R. Mazzacua and G. St. Don Golfers of any age and ability are welcome to join in the friendly round of nine holes of competitive golf every Tuesday morning at Pine Ridge The group alternates weekly front nine and back nine with tee time at 8 a.m. For information, call Frank Hughes at 352-746-4800.SEVEN RIVERSMarch 1 Today the 7Rivers Mens Golf Association played a Better 2 Balls of 4 tournament. First Ron Neal, Ted Grabowski, Dick Shepherd and Sam McMechan Second Will Tripp, Paul Mantey and Joe Muscaro Third Don Eddy, Clayton Jeck, All Silliman and Rick Knoop Closest to the Pin: No. 7Bob Cox No. 11Bill StallingsSOUTHERN WOODSFeb. 29 Southern Woods Mens Golf Association played step-aside scramble mixed flights. First-5 Doug Martin, Rod Fortune, Bill Murray and Bill Bachman Second-3 Dennis Weeks, Brian Hadler, Dan Martinko and Paul Malarkey Third-2 Tony Schmid, Rich Galasso, Bill Gilbert and Bill Long (Tie) Frank Nolan, SocHiotakis, Bob Chadderton and Dale Vaughn Closest to the Pin: No. 4Tom Venable14-7 No. 17Bob Chdderton 7-6SUGARMILL WOODS March 1 Sugarmill Woods Country Club Mens Golf Association played Best 1on 5s, 2 on 4s, 3 on 3s. First-23 John Holden, Bruce Whewell, Bill Engelbrecht and Sid Kaplowitz Second-22 Art Anderson, Paul VanTassell, Tony Valente and Joe Gannon Third-21 Frank Siemietkowski, Ron Broadbent, Bob Chadderton and Tony Corso Fourth-20 Doug Martin, Stan Fleming, Bob Strausser and Dick Henry Fifth-19 Dick Tuxbury, Mike Theodore, John Rada and Harley Lawrence (Tie) Erv Koch, Gus Calleri, Bob Mason and Phil Runfola Golfers of the week: Low GrossDoug Martin75 Low NetPhil Runfola63 Low Net Sr.Joe Gannon59 Closest to the Pin: Pine No. 4Sid Kaplowitz Pine No. 7John Holden Oak No. 3Paul Domino Oak No. 6Doug Martin Feb. 28 Sandblasters Mens Group played Team Point Quota. First+7 Sam Hunt, Felix Tarorick, Tony Valente and Royce Decker (Tie) Dennis Didier, Alex Law, Harley Lawrence and Gary Osborne Third+5 John Doyle, Rich Perry, Bill Pierson and Tom St.Clair Low RoundGarth McGrath76TWISTED OAKSFeb. 28 Best 15 net holes results. First Flight FirstPat Doerr47 SecondShirley Young49 ThirdMia Husler50 (Tie)Betty Smith50 Second Flight FirstMay Forsythe42 SecondHelen Kennerly44 ThirdPat Doing47 Third Flight FirstBonnie Kaiser40 SecondDora Acuna47 (Tie)Fran Quillen47 LocalLEADERS Golf For Kids tourney March 23The Inverness Sertoma Clubs 26th annual Golf For Kids Tournament will take place Friday, March 23, at Inverness Golf and Country Club. Registration begins at 7 a.m., with a shotgun start at 8 a.m. The format is a Four-Person Best Ball Scramble. Cost is $60 per player and $100 for hole sponsors. Entry fee includes greens fee, cart, lunch, beverages and door prizes. Mulligan tickets will be available one for $5 or three for $10. Prizes awarded for closest to the pin, longest drive, holein-one, sponsored by Love Honda Proceeds will benefit speechand hearing-impaired children, through the All Childrens Citrus Sertoma Speech & Hearing Clinic in Lecanto Golf for Meals tourney in MarchCitrus County Home Delivered Meals Program will host Golf for Meals fundraising golf tournament Saturday, March 24, at Seven Rivers Golf and Country Club, Crystal River. The event will begin at 9 a.m. Business owners and organizations are invited to sponsor the event with a variety of advertising platforms. You can show your support by sponsoring a hole, providing items for gift bags, or by donating prizes that can be given away or raffled off for additional funds. There are several different levels of corporate sponsorship: Platinum Sponsor Gold Sponsor Silver Sponsor Bronze Sponsor To become a corporate sponsor, call 352-527-5975. March for Meals is a nationwide campaign sponsored by the Meals on Wheels Association of America. Golf BRIEFS Improving your score Of the 14 clubs in the golf bag, I contend three clubs account for 70 percent of the strokes taken by golfers within a stipulated round of golf. They are the putter, driver and wedge. I believe by mastering the putter, driver and wedge, our golf scores will rapidly improve. Not a little, but a lot! Last month, I covered putting, chipping and pitching in my articles. This week, I will address the big dog, the driver. Rather than addressing several technical items, I will provide basic tips I believe will help your driver on the golf course, especially when under pressure. The mental mindset of a golfer is huge when hitting the driver. The tendency is to think purely of the distance you want to hit the ball off the tee. This leads to tighter grip pressure, increased arm tension, faster tempo and reduced balance, all of which causes less distance and inaccuracy. Therefore, I cannot stress enough you should merely think of making a solid hit with your driver without any thought of increased swing speed or distance. Disciplining yourself to this thought will increase distance through hitting the ball on or nearer the sweet spot of the driver face as well as improve accuracy through better tempo and balance. Maintaining your normal tempo is also vital to good driving. Keep the same pace on the golf course as you do on the driving range when warming up. I use a simple slogan for myself less is more before hitting each tee shot. This is a reminder to me less effort will give me more distance equating the importance of tempo in the golf swing. In your minds eye, be extremely specific as to the target you want to hit toward with your driver tee shot. The tendency is to be fearful of out of bounds, water, bunkers and trees. Instead, practice picking out the most specific target in the distance of the hole (where you want the ball to go) and focus on it throughout each tee shot. This will help to relax your mind from all of the negative thoughts that tend to pop up, all of which cause erratic results. When the driver begins to go haywire on the golf course, I suggest you grip down about a half-inch more than normal on the grip to help regain control of the club head and improve the solidness of contact. This move emphasizes the importance of hitting the ball solid rather than swinging from your heels. I truly believe the above tips will improve your driving ability much more than going through the technical 1, 2, 3 we heard so many times before. My wish to you is fairways and greens. Chronicle fileBy mastering the putter, driver and wedge, golf scores will rapidly improve and not just by a little. Stan CookeA SLICE FROM STAN From staff reports CORRECTIONIn the Wednesday, Feb. 22, edition, Lorraine Palazzolos name was misspelled. The Chronicle regrets the error.

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JOEKORNECKIIII CorrespondentINVERNESS The Citrus girls tennis team kept up its winning ways Tuesday night by defeating the Central Bears 6-1. It was a group effort and a good win for the team, Citrus coach Scott Waters said. Consistency is what this team is about, and thats what I see. When this team gets down, they continue to fight back. Citrus (7-1) won four of the five singles matches and won both doubles matches. All of the Lady Hurricanes victorious matches versus the Bears (4-4) were won in straight sets. Two of the singles matches were won without losing one single game. It was a good match, said Melanie Dodd. I hope we keep winning, and everyone did really well.Citrus results are:Singles No. 1: Sarah Labrador def. Danielle Daly 6-0, 6-0. No. 2: Melanie Dodd def. Nicole Carrier 6-0, 6-0. No. 3: Jackie Ear def. Jordan Stenholm 6-2, 6-2. No. 5: Taylor Jordan def. Jordyn Burnett 6-1, 6-0. Doubles No. 1: Labrador/Martone def. Daly/Carrier 6-2, 6-1. No. 2: Ear/Dodd def. Stenholm/Blackburn 6-3, 6-1. C.J. RISAK CorrespondentLECANTO First time out on Feb. 7 Lecantos boys tennis team absorbed a 6-1 trouncing at the hands of Ocala Forest. The second meeting, Tuesday at Lecanto, might not have indicated there was much change, considering the Panthers suffered a 5-2 defeat. Neither of the coaches involved, however, would endorse that finding. Particularly since four of the five singles matches went to the 10-point tiebreaker. Ten points (our) way and we win, noted Lecanto coach Jack Hall, his team now 5-4 in dual-meet play. I thought for a minute we might pull it out. But Im not disappointed. Anytime you can play like that against a team like that . Its very heartening because we lost the first time 6-1. Its also encouraging considering Forest had an 8-0 record coming into this meet. The two teams could face each other again in the state district tournament, scheduled for the first week in April in Gainesville. Neither squad should be capable of defeating Gainesville, but Tuesdays meeting casts some doubt on which will finish second and gain a spot in the regionals. Only the No. 1 singles match between Lecantos Zach Alford and Forests Brad Sanders did not go to the tiebreaker. With strong winds altering game conditions, Alford trimmed a 3-0 deficit in the opening set to 3-2 before losing 6-2, then went game-for-game in the second set until Sanders put two game wins together in a 6-4 triumph. But it was the battle at No. 2 singles that was decisive. Lecantos Rishi Gurnani went up against Jose Medina, usually the Wildcats No. 3 player who moved up due to the absence of Philip Libbey. Medina, a 6-3 loser in the first set, trailed Gumani 5-2 in the second and was facing double match point. He fought back to win that game and four more after that for a 7-5 triumph, then beat Gurnani 10-4 in the tiebreaker. The Panthers did win two of the four tiebreakers, Sam Alford outdueling Forests Connor Cluster at No. 3 singles 3-6, 6-2, 10-8, and Rio Lumpapas besting the Cats Nick Wigelsworth 7-6, 1-6, 10-7 at No. 5 singles. Which meant the outcome of the meet was still in doubt entering doubles play. At both No. 1 and No. 2, the Lecanto pair had a two-game lead in the pro set (first to win eight games) match but failed to hold on. At No. 1 doubles, Forests Sanders and Cluster edged the Panthers Zach Alford and Gumani, and at No. 2 the Cats Medina and Weaver topped Justo and Dale Eastmond, both by 8-5 margins. It was a good match, a good match for both teams, said Forest coach Dave Falcone. And thats just what you want. Team commitment for the next round of USTA matches has been closed, but there is still time to sign up players. Player registration deadline is March 15. You can sign up after that date, but your team should have enough players signed up to participate. As mentioned before, this is the only time of the year USTA league play involves single players. Every year, teams are scrambling for singles players. So if you like singles, get in touch with one of the teams. Of course, we are talking about the adult league, for players 18 and up. You turn 18 anytime in 2012 and play in this league. The season will run from March 30 through June 17. Levels of play 2.5, 3.0, 3.5, 4.0, 4.5, and 5.0. All teams, except 2.5 and 5.0, should have at least eight players. The others have a fiveplayer minimum. The 2.5 and 5.0 teams play one singles and two doubles matches; all other are two singles and three doubles. Each team needs to have at least 75 percent of their roster at team level. Matches will be played Friday, Saturday and Sunday. For information in District 4 (south), call or email Leigh Chak at 352-572-7157 or vacocala@comcast.net or ustaflorida.com.Monday Night Ladies Doubles LeagueResults for Feb. 27 are: No scores received. This league is geared toward the 3.5 and 4.0 female players, who cannot play during the day and dont mind traveling for tennis matches. For more information, contact Vivien Amabile at tony kgbird@aol.com.Citrus County Tuesday Womens Team TennisResults for Feb. 21 are: Riverhaven Reds def. Bicentennial Breakers, 3-2; Pine Ridge Palominos def. Crystal River Chip and Charge, 4-0. Results for Feb. 28 are: Bicentennial Breakers def. Crystal River Chip and Charge, 4-1; Riverhaven Reds def. Pine Ridge Palominos, 4-1. Standings: Riverhaven Reds, 41; Pine Ridge Palominos, 36; Bicentennial Breakers, 33; Crystal River Chip and Charge, 21. This ladies-only league is geared toward players rated 3.0 to 3.5. If interested in playing or being a team captain, call chairperson Candace Charles at 352-563-5859 or email Candace charles@tampabay.rr.com. Citrus Area Senior Ladies 3.0/3.5 Tuesday LeagueResults for Feb. 28 are: Citrus Hills def. Riverhaven Ospreys, 4-1;Crystal River def. Pine Ridge Mustangs, 4-0; Meadowcrest Aces vs. Meadowcrest Racquettes, 2-2. For information, contact new chairwoman Luanne Miller at lumiller62@yahoo.com or 352794-7247.Ladies on the CourtWinners for March 1 are Claudia and Dot. Ladies on The Court play at 8:30 a.m. Thursdays at Le Grone Park courts in Crystal River. Bring a new can of balls and 50 cents and sign up to play two out of three tie-break sets. For more information, contact Barbara Shook at dshook @tampabay.rr.com or 352-7950872.Thursday Morning Citrus Area Doubles LeagueResults for March 1: Sugarmill Woods def. Bicentennial Babes, 6-3; Pine Ridge Fillies def. Skyview Aces, 7-3. Standings after the second round: Sugarmill Woods, 70; Bicentennial Babes, 70; Skyview, 70; Skyview Advantage, 69; Pine Ridge Fillies, 68; Pine Ridge Mavericks, 63; Skyview Aces, 53; Bicentennial Bratz, 50. The last round of play starts Thursday, March 8. For information, contact chairwoman Carol Keatts at 352-3825280 or ckeatts@aol.com. The Friday Senior Ladies Doubles 3.0-3.5 LeagueResults for March 2: Citrus Hills Hot Shots def. Sugarmill Shooting Stars, 4-1; Pine Ridge Mustangs vs. Riverhaven Eagles, 2-2; Bicentennial Flyers vs Meadowcrest Aces, 2-2. For information contact chairwoman Joyce Shiver at 352795-1086 or jshiver@tampabay.rr.com.USTA Leagues 3.5 Senior Women: Bicentennial Park def. Fort King, 3-0. Record 4-3.Georgica Kearney/Lynne Finman, 1-6, 6-4, 1-0;Tana Hubbard/Linda Martin, 3-6, 6-2, 1-0; Myrt Thomas/Maureen Caruso, 6-2, 6-3. 4.0 Senior Women: Skyview (Barry) lost to The Villages, 2-1. Record 1-4. 7.0 Mixed Adult: Skyview lost to Fort King, 3-0. Record 14. 4.0 Super Senior Women: Skyview def. Fort King, 3-0. Record 3-0. Irma Buttermore/Gail Cooper, 6-4, 2-6, 1-0; Joyce Schaeffer/Nancy Fetzer, 6-3, 6-4;Nadia Maric/Carol Hoinski, 6-4, 6-1. For information about the Hernando leagues, contact Lou Giglio at 727-207-4760 or Lou@topseedtennispro.comTournaments April 21 and 22: Tournament of Champions at Sugarmill Woods/Oak Village Tennis Complex. May 5 and 6: Adult Mixed Doubles Tournament at Deltona Woods Park in Spring Hill. TENNISCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLEWEDNESDAY, MARCH7, 2012 B3 Citrus Springs 352-489-5045 8690 N. Golfview Dr., Citrus Springs 000ASRD COME AND PLAY THE BEST GREENS IN THE AREA AT CITRUS SPRINGS! EVERY DAY! ALL DAY! AT CITRUS SPRINGS JUST $ 28.00 18 Holes w/Cart March Special! Visit citrusspringsgolf.com and find out about our New Executive Membership! Monday, Monday, March 19, 2012 March 19, 2012 golf 14th 14th ANNUAL ANNUAL CLASSIC CLASSIC SCORE 795012 S UGARMILL W OODS C OUNTRY C LUB Sugarmill Woods, Homosassa, Florida S UGARMILL W OODS C OUNTRY C LUB Sugarmill Woods, Homosassa, Florida $100 Hole or Tee Sponsor Sign at tee or greens Free foursome greens fees for future golf Media recognition Listing in program Sponsor name displayed at registration desk Free web page to advertise and promote your business All Entries Must Be Received by Friday, March 9, 2012 For more information call Norm Mangano 352-249-1236 Please make all checks payable to: SCORE #646 3810 S. Lecanto Hwy., Lecanto, Fl 34461 www.scorecitrus.org SPONSORS NEEDED! SPONSORS NEEDED! $300 Hole Sponsor Plus Foursome All hole sponsor benefits plus Foursome for tournament Lunch, refreshments, prizes & Silent auction $40 discount on combined tournament entry for $100 hole sponsor $ 60 per person, golf only TIME: 11:00 a.m. Registration 11:30 a.m. Lunch 1:00 p.m. Shotgun Start 5:30 p.m. Award Ceremony TIME: 11:00 a.m. Registration 11:30 a.m. Lunch 1:00 p.m. Shotgun Start 5:30 p.m. Award Ceremony 000AD7W Call today or Go Online... www.eldiablogolf.com www.eldiablogolf.com Tee times are going fast!! Membership and Group Rates Available 352-465-0986 352-465-0986 Toll Free: 1-888-886-1309 18 Hole Championship Golf Course Citrus Springs, FL Rated 4 1 2 Stars by Golf Digest Visit El Diablo and find The Hidden Treasure of Central Florida! Monday Wednesday Monday Wednesday $28 morning $25 after 1pm $28 morning $25 after 1pm Saturday Sunday Saturday Sunday $30 morning $28 after 1pm $30 morning $28 after 1pm Prices include tax and 18 holes with cart. Good anytime through March 31, 2012 Must Present This Ad at Check In **THURSDAY POINTS GAME** CALL FOR DETAILS Dont waste money playing the cheapest, Dont waste money playing the cheapest, come to El Diablo and play the best for less! come to El Diablo and play the best for less! 000AQOV GOLF AND COUNTRY CLUB GOLF AND COUNTRY CLUB Rotary Club of Inverness A NNUAL C HARITY G OLF T OURNAMENT Saturday April 7 8:30 a.m. Shotgun Start Download Entry Form at: ww w.invernessflrotary .org Inverness Golf & Country Club 000AKAJ for information call 726-6496 or 212-0232 Parade of Homes Kick Off Classic Jim Blackshear Memorial Golf Outing Registration 7 a.m. Shotgun Start 8:00 a.m. 000AIGS For online registration, forms and information visit, www.CitrusBuilders.com or call 746-9028. Inverness Golf & Country Club March 10, 2012 proudly supporting $60 per player or $220 for a team of four. Includes: Greens fees, cart, lunch, door prizes and one Mulligan ticket. Additional Mulligan tickets will be available. USTA deadline looms Eric van den HoogenON COURT Pirates shut out Leopards 7-0 JUSTINPLANTE CorrespondentCRYSTAL RIVER The Crystal River boys tennis team hosted Hernando Tuesday afternoon, and took absolutely no mercy on the visiting Leopards. The Pirates racked up their third straight win, shutting out the Leopards 7-0 without dropping up a single set. Crystal River coach Bill Reyes was very happy with his teams overall play. Im very satisfied with our performance, Reyes said. All of our guys shined tonight, and thats good going into our break. We have three weeks before our next match, so this is a good to way to finish this portion of our season. Weve won three in a row now, and were really starting to look a lot like a team, with great individual performances. The afternoon started out with the singles matches, as Crystal Rivers No. 1 singles player Brandon Papp cruised to a 6-1, 62 victory over Hernandos James Ortega. At No. 2 singles, the Pirates Travis Swanson kept it going with a victory over Hernandos Justin Argonaillo, taking a 6-0, 7-5 victory while No. 3 singles Matt Allen had no trouble in his match, defeating Hernandos Paolo Ilagan 60, 6-1 in straight sets. Crystal Rivers No. 4 and No. 5 singles took care of business as well, with Alex Papp and Aaron Molinero taking their first sets 6-2 and 6-3 respectively, and both shutting out the opposition in the second set, 6-0. The final doubles matches went just as smoothly for the Pirates, as the No. 1 pairing of Brandon Papp and Swanson, cruised to an 8-1 pro-set victory, while No. 2 doubles team Alex Papp and Allen took the 8-2 win. Citrus girls outserve Central 6-1 Lecanto loses to Forest 5-2 Park offers tennis lessonsWhispering Pines Park offers tennis lessons with Lindsay Rodriquez. Pre-registration and pre-payment are required. Fee for lessons is $100 for four hours, or $30 per hour. Times are arranged with the instructor. Call 352-726-3913 for registration and information. Whispering Pines also offers racquetball lessons. Call for information.

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second, the Canes amassed six more in the fourth off two walks and three hits, including an RBI double by sophomore second baseman Cody Bogart. Junior leadoff hitter and shortstop Kyle Tobin, senior first baseman Hayden Kelly (two walks), and senior shortstop Cameron Copas (two singles) each scored twice for Citrus, while Canes senior third baseman Patrick Martin had two base hits, a walk, and a run. Citrus pitching, led by a strong three-inning performance from senior Mark Pullen, combined to surrender just two base runners on 48 total pitches. Pullen struck out four, picked off a runner and allowed one hit, a soft liner past third base by junior first baseman Kenny Cooper. Afterward, Pullen discussed his effectiveness with the curveball. Its a big pitch when you can locate it, and it worked good for me tonight, Pullen said. You definitely have to have some good off-speed stuff to rely on at this level. Citrus senior pitcher Eric Nelson retired the side in the fourth before Brooks Brasher came in to force three consecutive groundouts in the fifth for his first outing. Citrus coach Brady Bogart was generally satisfied with his clubs execution and work. From a pitching standpoint, we did what we wanted to do, he said. Our plan was to give Mark a few innings, Eric an inning, and we wanted to get Brooks in. With all the sicknesses and injuries weve had, it was good to get him on the mound. I think his arm is going to be good enough to help us out. Brady Bogart found some areas at the plate, however, that need attention. We had ho-hum plate appearances, he said. The ball was pulling foul a lot, and good hitters should be able to keep those in the middle of the field. So well get back at it tomorrow. We have three days to get ready for a big one against Springstead. signing a five-year, $90 million contract in July. Of course, you never know if that is possible, but after yesterday it is official that I will be an Indianapolis Colt for my entire career. I will not play for another team. My last down of football will be with the Colts, which means a great deal to me. But things have changed since last summer. Now it looks like the NFLs only four-time MVP, and a former Super Bowl champion, wont be wearing No. 18 for Indy. With a $28 million bonus payment due Thursday to Manning, his neck problems, and the fact that the Colts own the No. 1 pick in Aprils draft, the Colts seem to have deemed it too risky and too pricey to keep the longtime franchise quarterback, who will turn 36 later this month. The twists and turns of a public debate between Manning and Irsay, who have been friends for more than a decade, created the sense the two had been fighting. Irsay twice issued statements to deny a rift. Still, with the Colts in full rebuilding mode, Irsay has been expected by many to play for the future and let Manning try to chase a second Super Bowl ring somewhere else. The Colts are expected to take Stanford quarterback Andrew Luck with the first pick in Aprils draft. Mannings impending departure marks the end of a remarkably successful era that included the 2006 league title. He started every meaningful game for 13 seasons in Indy, 227 straight including the playoffs, and took the Colts from perennial alsoran to one of the NFLs model franchises. In the two decades predating his arrival, the Colts won 116 games, one division title and made the playoffs three times. With Manning taking snaps, the Colts have won 150 games, eight division titles, two AFC championships and the franchises first Super Bowl since moving from Baltimore in 1984. Indy broke the league record for most regular-season wins in a decade (115), tied Dallas league record for most consecutive playoff appearances (nine) and the success changed Indy from a basketball town to an NFL town. Manning is one of four players with more than 50,000 yards passing, one of three with more than 350 touchdown passes and one of two quarterbacks with more than 200 consecutive starts. The only non-active quarterback with a rating higher than Mannings 94.9 is Hall of Famer Steve Young (96.8). He broke all of the franchises major career passing records, previously held by Hall of Fame quarterback John Unitas, and he may not be finished. In 2009, the star QB had the Colts on the cusp of history with a 14-0 start. Its been mostly bad news ever since. The Colts pulled their starters against the New York Jets and lost the final two games that season. Indy then wound up losing to New Orleans in the Super Bowl. During the offseason, Manning had the first of his neck surgeries. Then, after making an early playoff exit in the 2010 season, Manning underwent another neck surgery to repair a damaged nerve that was causing weakness in his throwing arm. But when the nerve did not heal as quickly as anticipated, Manning had two vertebrae fused together in September, a surgery that forced him to miss the first game of his career. There are still questions about how strong Mannings arm is. Yet he has repeatedly insisted he plans to play football again next season. My plan hasnt changed, Manning said during Super Bowl week. Im on track with what the doctors have told me to do, and Im doing that. Im rehabbing hard. The question is where might Manning land if he is no longer a Colt. Arizona, Miami, Tennessee and the New York Jets have all been rumored as possible spots, and Mannings former longtime offensive coordinator Tom Moore did work with the Jets as a consultant less season. Its still possible, however unlikely, that Manning could return to Indy for a lower price if he can prove hes healthy. Danielle Yant also had a strong performance, going the distance forthe complete-game win. She allowed four runs on nine hits while walking none. Paige Richards and Andrea Coutueach went 2-for5 with an RBI, and Amber Russo was 2-for-2 with an RBI, two runs, two walks and two steals for Lecanto. Citrus (5-5, 2-1)put the first two runs of the game on the board in the second inning, as Melissa Michaud doubled to lead it off, then scored on an infield single to deep short by Daniella Garcia. Molly Price later grounded into a double play to score Amy Abramowich, who had legged out another infield hit. But the Lady Panthers turned two, which proved to be instrumental in squashing a potential lengthy rally. Lecanto scored the next nine unanswered runs, including three in the third and three in the fifth, as the lineup slowly wore down Citrus starter Kelly Abramowich. Abramowich finished after four innings, giving up seven runs (two unearned) on five hits and four walks, while striking out two. I think they did a great job of rallying when they needed to with the bats, Lecanto head coach Robert Dupler said. It was the strongest production weve had across the entire lineup all year. In the top of the third, Richards double deep to center scored Breanna Martin, who walked. With one out, Coutu singled to right, scoring Richards to tie the game. Russo drove in Coutu on a double of her own, giving Lecanto the lead they would never relinquish. Yant hurled four 1-2-3 innings, including the seventh to end the game, inducing a double play before getting Devon Perrine to fly out to end it. It was the second double play of the game for Lecanto, something Dupler said he had never seen his team accomplish in his seven years at the helm. I was really impressed, fundamentally and defensively, Dupler said. Were right there...just being able to sustain and stop the flow. He went on about his starter, saying, I cant say enough about Dani. She fights every night, she gets in a jam, gives up a hit or two, where some kids would fold, but she knows the defense is going to stop it. Lecanto also stole seven bases on the night, rounding out acomplete performance. Morgan Metzger (RBI, run)and Amy Abramowich (steal) each went 2-for-3 for the Hurricanes, while Garcia was 1-for-2 with an RBI. Lecanto plays at 6 p.m. Friday against Central while Citrus visits Springstead at 5 p.m. PANTHERSContinued from Page B1 CANESContinued from Page B1 COLTSContinued from Page B1CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE On the AIRWAVES TODAYS SPORTS SPORT COLLEGE BASKETBALL Noon (ESPN) Big East Tournament, second round TBA vs. West Virginia 2 p.m. (ESPN) Big East Tournament, second round Georgetown vs.TBA. 3 p.m. (FSNFL) Pac-12 Tournament, first round Oregon State vs.Washington State 5:30 p.m. (FSNFL) Pac-12 Tournament, first round UCLA vs. USC 7 p.m. (ESPN) Big East Tournament, second round Louisville vs. TBA. 7 p.m. (ESPN2) Northeast Conference Tournament, Final Robert Morris at Long Island 9 p.m. (FSNFL) Pac-12 Tournament, first round Arizona State vs.Stanford 9 p.m. (ESPN) Big East Tournament, first round South Florida vs. TBA 9 p.m. (ESPN2) Big Sky Tournament final: Teams TBA 11:30 p.m. (FSNFL) Pac-12 Tournament, first round Colorado vs.Utah NBA 7:30 p.m. (SUN) Atlanta Hawks at Miami Heat CYCLING 4:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) Paris-Nice, Stage 4, from Brive-laGaillarde to Rodez (Same-day tape) NHL 7:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) Toronto Maple Leafs at Pittsburgh Penguins SOCCER 2:30 p.m. (SUN) UEFA Champions League Soccer Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider. Prep CALENDAR TODAYS PREP SPORTS BOYS WEIGHTLIFTING 4 p.m. Citrus at Lecanto NBA standingsEASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division WLPctGB Philadelphia2217.564 Boston1917.5281 New York1819.4863 Toronto1226.3169 New Jersey1227.30810 Southeast Division WLPctGB Miami299.763 Orlando2515.6255 Atlanta2315.6056 Washington829.21620 Charlotte531.13923 Central Division WLPctGB Chicago328.800 Indiana2314.6227 Milwaukee1523.39516 Cleveland1323.36117 Detroit1326.33318 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division WLPctGB San Antonio2512.676 Memphis2215.5953 Dallas2217.5644 Houston2117.5534 New Orleans929.23716 Northwest Division WLPctGB Oklahoma City308.789 Denver2217.5648 Minnesota2019.51310 Portland1919.50011 Utah1819.48611 Pacific Division WLPctGB L.A. Clippers2214.611 L.A. Lakers2315.605 Phoenix1720.4595 Golden State1520.4296 Sacramento1226.31611 Mondays Games Utah 109, Cleveland 100 Orlando 92, Toronto 88 Golden State 120, Washington 100 Chicago 92, Indiana 72 Oklahoma City 95, Dallas 91 Minnesota 95, L.A. Clippers 94 Milwaukee 97, Philadelphia 93 Denver 119, Sacramento 116, OT Portland 86, New Orleans 74 Tuesdays Games Charlotte 100, Orlando 84 Atlanta 101, Indiana 96 Detroit 88, L.A. Lakers 85, OT Miami 108, New Jersey 78 Houston at Boston, late New York at Dallas, late Wednesdays Games Utah at Charlotte, 7 p.m. Houston at Toronto, 7 p.m. L.A. Lakers at Washington, 7 p.m. Boston at Philadelphia, 7 p.m. Atlanta at Miami, 7:30 p.m. Phoenix at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m. Portland at Minnesota, 8 p.m. Chicago at Milwaukee, 8 p.m. L.A. Clippers at New Jersey, 8 p.m. New York at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m. Cleveland at Denver, 9 p.m. New Orleans at Sacramento, 10 p.m. Memphis at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.NHL standingsEASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GPWLOTPtsGFGA N.Y. Rangers654216791180137 Pittsburgh653921583209168 Philadelphia653721781213193 New Jersey663724579184176 N.Y. Islanders662829965155195 Northeast Division GPWLOTPtsGFGA Boston653923381214154 Ottawa683525878209201 Buffalo663028868163186 Toronto663029767198206 Montreal6625311060170184 Southeast Division GPWLOTPtsGFGA Florida6531221274163184 Winnipeg673227872176187 Washington663228670175188 Tampa Bay663129668187226 Carolina6625271464175200 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GPWLOTPtsGFGA St. Louis664118789169131 Detroit674321389211156 Nashville653820783184166 Chicago673624779202195 Columbus662138749156216 Northwest Division GPWLOTPtsGFGA Vancouver664117890209161 Colorado673429472171180 Calgary6629251270159181 Minnesota6628281066143180 Edmonton652534656172196 Pacific Division GPWLOTPtsGFGA Dallas663526575174178 Phoenix673325975173170 San Jose643324773179163 Los Angeles6530231272142139 Anaheim6729281068170188 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Mondays Games Pittsburgh 2, Phoenix 1 Winnipeg 3, Buffalo 1 Anaheim 4, Edmonton 2 Tuesdays Games Boston 5, Toronto 4 New Jersey 4, N.Y. Rangers 1 Philadelphia 3, Detroit 2 Carolina 4, Washington 3, OT Columbus 3, Phoenix 2 Ottawa 7, Tampa Bay 3 Chicago at St. Louis, late Los Angeles at Nashville, late Minnesota at Colorado, late Montreal at Calgary, late Dallas at Vancouver, late Edmonton at San Jose, late Wednesdays Games Carolina at Buffalo, 7 p.m. Toronto at Pittsburgh, 7:30 p.m. AMERICAN LEAGUE WLPct Boston301.000 Detroit401.000 Los Angeles101.000 Kansas City31.750 Seattle31.750 Oakland42.667 Minnesota32.600 New York22.500 Toronto22.500 Baltimore12.333 Cleveland12.333 Chicago01.000 Tampa Bay04.000 Texas02.000 NATIONAL LEAGUE WLPct Cincinnati 201.000 Los Angeles 101.000 Houston 31.750 Colorado 11.500 Miami 11.500 Milwaukee 11.500 Philadelphia 22.500 Pittsburgh 22.500 Washington 22.500 Arizona 12.333 Chicago 12.333 New York 12.333 San Francisco 12.333 Atlanta 13.250 San Diego 03.000 St. Louis 02.000 NOTE: Split-squad games count in the standings; games against non-major league teams do not. Mondays Games Detroit 4, Toronto 2 Philadelphia 9, N.Y. Yankees 3 Miami 4, St. Louis 3 Atlanta 10, Houston 5 Baltimore (ss) 3, Tampa Bay 1 L.A. Dodgers 6, Chicago White Sox 4 Oakland (ss) 8, Chicago Cubs 7 Seattle 13, San Diego 7 Kansas City 7, Texas 6 Cincinnati 12, Cleveland 7 L.A. Angels 9, Oakland (ss) 1 Colorado 6, Arizona 5 Washington 3, N.Y. Mets 1 Boston 10, Minnesota 2 Pittsburgh 10, Baltimore (ss) 3 Milwaukee 7, San Francisco 3 Tuesdays Games Detroit 3, Miami 1 Minnesota 3, Tampa Bay 2 Washington 5, Atlanta 2 Philadelphia 7, Toronto 0 Pittsburgh 7, N.Y. Yankees 4 Houston 4, N.Y. Mets (ss) 1 N.Y. Mets (ss) 8, St. Louis 6 Boston 5, Baltimore 4 Cleveland 3, Kansas City (ss) 2 Cincinnati vs. Seattle at Peoria, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. Oakland 6, Milwaukee 0 Chicago White Sox vs. L.A. Angels at Tempe, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. Kansas City (ss) 7, San Diego 4 San Francisco vs. L.A. Dodgers at Glendale, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs 11, Colorado 4 Texas vs. Arizona at Scottsdale, Ariz., 3:10 p.m. Wednesdays Games Minnesota vs. Baltimore at Sarasota, Fla., 1:05 p.m. Atlanta vs. Detroit at Lakeland, Fla., 1:05 p.m. Toronto (ss) vs. Pittsburgh at Bradenton, Fla., 1:05 p.m. Houston vs. Philadelphia at Clearwater, Fla., 1:05 p.m. N.Y. Mets vs. Miami at Jupiter, Fla., 1:05 p.m. Boston vs. Toronto (ss) at Dunedin, Fla., 1:05 p.m. St. Louis vs. Washington at Viera, Fla., 1:05 p.m. Tampa Bay vs. N.Y. Yankees at Tampa, Fla., 1:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs vs. Kansas City at Surprise, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. Seattle vs. L.A. Angels at Tempe, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. Milwaukee vs. Chicago White Sox at Glendale, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. L.A. Dodgers vs. Oakland at Phoenix, 3:05 p.m. Texas vs. San Diego (ss) at Peoria, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. Colorado vs. San Francisco at Scottsdale, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. San Diego (ss) vs. Cincinnati at Goodyear, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. Cleveland vs. Arizona at Scottsdale, Ariz., 3:10 p.m.B4WEDNESDAY, MARCH7, 2012SCOREBOARD Florida LOTTERY Here are the winning numbers selected Tuesday in the Florida Lottery: CASH 3 (early) 3 1 0 CASH 3 (late) 7 7 5 PLAY 4 (early) 7 9 1 2 PLAY 4 (late) 5 5 7 3Because of early deadlines, Fantasy 5 and Mega Money numbers were unavailable. Please see Thursdays Entertainment page. WARRIORSContinued from Page B1 the scoreboard in the second inning despite having the bases loaded for most of it, showing poise against unbelievable pressure. Tessa Kacer pitched very well. Dreyer said. Its her first complete game. The top of the third saw the Lions retain the lead and never returning it. The Lions had eight hits in the inning with nine batters seeing the plate. Kacer struggled to keep the ball in the strike zone and the Lions capitalized on it with four RBIs and a 6-5 lead. After the single strongest offensive effort of the game for Hernando Christian, the Lions shut out the Warriors in the bottom of the third. Hernando Christian padded its lead with two more runs in the fourth inning, one off an insidein-the-park home run. This is what we expected. Dreyer said about the level of competition brought by Hernando Christian. You can tell they are well coached. You can (really) see it. Im just real proud of the girls. Dreyer continued. I thought they played well (and) they fought hard. Its the best game weve played all year by far. Seven Rivers hosts St. Francis at 4 p.m. Thursday at Bicentennial Park. The offensive spark came in the bottom of the fourth inning, when Crystal River right fielder Laynee Nadal hit a deep fly ball to left field, streaking around the bases for a triple. She later scored on a wild pitch, just beating a tag and making the score 3-1. The next inning, Maegan McMichen made the score 3-2 when she hit a ball deep to right field that Hernandos Shelbie Goodwin misjudged, allowing McMichen to make it all the way around to score. A sacrifice fly and RBI single for the Pirates made it 5-3, and they never trailed from there. Nadal finished 2 for 4 with two RBIs and a run, saying afterward, I was just finding the pitches. Assistant coach John McDonald, filling in for suspended head coach Dennis Jenkins, praised his team for adjusting to Hernando pitcher Britney Flannery, who kept targeting the outside corner of the plate. They made that adjustment, McDonald said. They started hitting the ball. PIRATESContinued from Page B1 GM: Moss works out with New Orleans Associated PressMETAIRIE, La. The New Orleans Saints held a workout on Tuesday with veteran receiver Randy Moss, who is trying to make a comeback after spending a year out of pro football. General Manager Mickey Loomis confirmed the workout took place, but the club did not provide any details on how the 35-year-old Moss performed. New Orleans may be in the market for a receiver this offseason because two of quarterback Drew Brees regular targets, Marques Colston and Robert Meachem, are entering free agency, and it remains to be seen whether the Saints can offer the type of contracts that both of them want. Colstons agent is Joel Segal, who also represents Moss. Randy had an outstanding workout, as expected, Segal said. Hes in phenomenal shape. The 6-foot-4 Moss last played in the NFL in 2010, a turbulent season for him. Sports BRIEF Schiano completes T.B. offensive staffTAMPA First-year Tampa Bay Buccaneers coach Greg Schiano has finished assembling his offensive staff. The Bucs previously announced the hiring of offensive coordinator Mike Sullivan and the appointment of long-time NFL assistant Jimmy Raye as senior offensive assistant. On Tuesday, the club said Schiano has added Brian Angelichio as tight ends coach, Bob Bostad as offensive line coach, Earnest Byner as running backs coach, P.J. Fleck as wide receivers coach and Steve Loney as assistant offensive line coach. From wire reports

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Associated PressCharlottes Kemba Walker screams after hitting a critical basket against Orlando in the second half of Tuesdays game in Charlotte, N.C. The Bobcats won 100-84. Associated PressPORT CHARLOTTE Scott Baker pitched two hitless innings in his spring debut as the Minnesota Twins beat the Tampa Bay Rays 3-2 on Tuesday. The outing was a good sign for Baker, who went 8-6 with a 3.14 ERA for the Twins before an elbow injury ended his 2011 season. The Rays are winless in their four exhibition games, three of the losses are against Minnesota. Jeff Niemann made a case to keep his spot in the Rays starting rotation, yielding two hits in two innings. The right-hander got off to a rocky start issuing back-toback singles to Ben Revere and Jamey Caroll in the first inning. They advanced to second and third on Niemanns errant pickoff throw to second. Revere scored from third on Ryan Doumits groundout. Niemann recovered with a 1-23 second inning.Phillies 7, Blue Jays 0DUNEDIN Cliff Lee and Kyle Kendrick each threw two innings, leading the Philadelphia Phillies to a victory over the Toronto Blue Jays. Lee yielded a hit in the first and second before giving way to Kendrick, who allowed a hit, struck out two and walked none. Shane Victorino hit a two-run single off Rick VandenHurk during Philadelphias four-run third inning. John Mayberry Jr. also singled in a run and Ty Wigginton had a sacrifice fly. Blue Jays starter Ricky Romero tossed two innings of one-hit ball.Mets (ss) 8, Cardinals 6PORT ST. LUCIE New York Mets ace Johan Santana pitched two scoreless innings in a win against St. Louis in his first game facing major league hitters in 18 months. Santana gave up one hit and one walk. He threw 29 pitches, 17 for strikes. New Mets center fielder Andres Torres hit a bases-loaded triple. Jake Westbrook pitched two scoreless innings for the Cards.Red Sox 5, Orioles 4FORT MYERS Daniel Bard, whos in the process of converting from a reliever to starter, opened with two hitless innings and the Boston Red Sox beat the Baltimore Orioles. Bard struck out two and walked one. Jacoby Ellsbury doubled and scored for Boston. Wilson Betemit drove in two runs for Baltimore and Nick Johnson singled and scored. Clayton Mortensen got the win, striking out four in 2 1/3 scoreless innings. Michael Bowden earned the save with 1 2/3 shutout innings.Pirates 7, Yankees 4BRADENTON Andrew McCutchen had two hits and two RBIs hours after agreeing to a new deal with the Pittsburgh Pirates, who beat the New York Yankees. McCutchen hit a run-scoring single to left off CC Sabathia in the first and doubled in Clint Barmes in the third. Sabathia pitched two innings and allowed a run and three hits. Right-hander Phil Hughes reached his pitch limit in 1 1/3 innings and was charged with two runs and four hits. Pirates starter Kevin Correia worked two scoreless innings and issued two walks.Tigers 3, Marlins 1JUPITER Jose Reyes was hitless in three at-bats in his spring debut for the Miami Marlins, who lost to the Detroit Tigers. Tigers starter Rick Porcello allowed an unearned run and a hit over two innings in his first spring game. Austin Jackson had a pair of hits for the Tigers. Marlins slugger Giancarlo Stanton went 1 for 3.Cubs 11, Rockies 4MESA, Ariz. Alfonso Soriano hit two home runs and a double to send Dale Sveum and the Chicago Cubs to a victory over the Colorado Rockies. Soriano led off the Cubs four-run second inning with a drive that hit halfway up the scoreboard in left field. He led off the third with a double to the wall in center and added a tworun homer in a four-run fifth. Guillermo Moscoso gave up four runs and five hits in two innings for Colorado. Cubs right-hander Matt Garza (1-0) allowed two runs and three hits over two innings in his spring debut.Athletics 6, Brewers 0PHOENIX Jemile Weeks had two hits and tackled his older brother Rickie to end a rundown, helping the Oakland Athletics beat the Milwaukee Brewers. Oakland left-hander Tommy Milone pitched three innings of one-hit ball. Milone walked Rickie Weeks to lead off the game but picked him off first base. Jemile was the last player with the ball in the ensuing rundown and he chased his brother from halfway between first and second before getting down a diving tag at the first-base bag. Yovani Gallardo struck out four in two shutout innings for Milwaukee. Reigning NL MVP Ryan Braun went 0 for 2 and is hitless in four at-bats this spring.Royals (ss) 7, Padres 4SURPRISE, Ariz. Luke Hochevar worked two scoreless innings, Max Ramirez hit two homers and drove in four runs and a Kansas City Royals split squad defeated the San Diego Padres. Hochevar allowed one single, walked one and struck out one. He threw 19 of 29 pitches for strikes. Ramirez, a non-roster invitee, hit a solo homer in the fourth and a three-run shot in the sixth. The Padres Tim Stauffer gave up a run and two hits in two innings. Mariners 8, Reds 6PEORIA, Ariz. Felix Hernandez struck out four in three hitless innings and the Seattle Mariners beat the Cincinnati Reds. Hernandez hit the first batter he faced this spring, then retired nine in a row. The righthander threw 26 of his 35 pitches for strikes. Seattle star Ichiro Suzuki went 3 for 3 with two RBIs. Cincinnatis Mat Latos allowed two hits in two scoreless innings in his debut.Rangers 16, D-backs 3SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. Elvis Andrus singled, doubled, scored twice and had a sacrifice fly to help the Texas Rangers rout the Arizona Diamondbacks. A day after going 3 for 3, the star shortstop started out with two more hits. Conor Jackson hit a solo home run and Nelson Cruz singled in two runs for the Rangers, who outhit the Diamondbacks 19-5. Texas starter Matt Harrison threw two scoreless innings, allowing one hit and hitting a batter. Arizonas Joe Saunders gave up two runs on five hits, including Jacksons homer, in two innings.Giants 8, Dodgers 4GLENDALE, Ariz. Melky Cabrera homered twice to lead the San Francisco Giants to a win over the Los Angeles Dodgers. Barry Zito gave up four hits and two runs and got the win for the Giants. Zito threw 28 strikes out of 35 pitches. Emmanuel Burriss, Nate Schierholtz, Brett Pill and Joe Panik each had two hits for San Francisco. Ted Lilly struggled as he allowed five runs, including two homers, in two innings for Los Angeles. Andre Ethier homered for the Dodgers.Indians 3, Royals (ss) 2GOODYEAR, Ariz. Shelley Duncan hit a three-run homer to lead the Cleveland Indians to a win over a Kansas City Royals split squad. Duncan connected in the third inning off Royals reliever Zach Miner. Starting pitchers Will Smith for Kansas City and Kevin Slowey of Cleveland each worked two scoreless innings. Irving Falu hit a two-run homer for Kansas City off reliever Chris Ray in the fourth. Falu has 17 homers in eight minor league seasons. Falu, Billy Butler and Brayan Pena each had two of the Royals 10 hits.Astros 4, Mets (ss) 1KISSIMMEE Wandy Rodriguez pitched three shutout innings and the Houston Astros beat a New York Mets splitsquad. Brad Snyder and Chris Snyder homered for the Astros, and first baseman Carlos Lee went 1 for 3 in his first spring game. Lee also made a sliding catch in front of the Mets dugout. Josh Satin had two of New Yorks five hits and drove in a run. Brad Snyder hit a two-run shot off Chris Schwinden in the second inning, giving the Astros a 3-1 lead.Angels 6, White Sox 2TEMPE, Ariz. Albert Pujols doubled again and scored as the Los Angeles Angels beat the Chicago White Sox. Pujols narrowly missed his first spring homer, doubling deep to left-center field off reliever Matt Thornton in the third. His first time up, Pujols walked and scored on Jorge Cantus two-run single off John Danks.Nationals 5, Braves 2LAKE BUENA VISTA Gio Gonzalez pitched three scoreless innings in his Washington debut, leading the Nationals to a win over the Atlanta Braves. Gonzalez allowed one hit, walked one and struck out two. Jayson Werth homered to right to put the Nationals ahead. Chad Tracy doubled in two runs in the third to put Washington ahead, 3-0. Kris Medlen started for the Braves and went two innings and gave up three hits including the Werth homer. Brett Carroll also had two hits for the Nationals.SPORTSCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLEWEDNESDAY, MARCH7, 2012 B5 000APTG Associated PressNEWARK, N.J. David Clarkson and Ryan Carter scored 1:54 apart early in the third period, and the New Jersey Devils slumbering offense broke out in a 4-1 victory over the NHLleading New York Rangers on Tuesday night. Clarkson tipped Petr Sykoras hard drive past Rangers goalie Henrik Lundqvist at 2:27 to give the Devils their second lead of the game, and Carter pushed New Jersey ahead by two at 4:21. Ilya Kovalchuk also had a goal, and Patrik Elias made it 4-1 by scoring into an empty net with 1:53 left.Maple Leafs 5, Bruins 4TORONTO Jordan Caron and Tyler Seguin scored two goals each and Boston beat Toronto for the Bruins fifth win against the Maple Leafs this season. Chris Kelly also scored and Tim Thomas stopped 25 shots to help Boston end two-game skid. Carl Gunnarsson, JohnMichael Liles, Phil Kessel and Mikhail Grabovski scored for the Maple Leafs. Toronto has also lost six straight at home.Blue Jackets 3, Coyotes 2COLUMBUS, Ohio Jack Johnson scored his first goal for Columbus, Steve Mason made 38 saves and the Blue Jackets beat the Phoenix Coyotes for their first three-game winning streak in more than a year. R.J. Umberger and Derek MacKenzie also scored for the Blue Jackets. Johnson added an assist. Antoine Vermette and Keith Yandle had goals for the Coyotes, who have lost four in a row in regulation, their longest such skid of the season.Hurricanes 4, Capitals 3, OTWASHINGTON Justin Faulk scored the game-winner at 3:38 of overtime, Cam Ward stopped 46 shots, and the Carolina Hurricanes beat the skidding Washington Capitals. Faulk took a centering pass from Brandon Sutter and fired the puck past goaltender Michal Neuvirth to saddle Washington with its third successive defeat, although the Capitals did get a point by forcing overtime late in regulation. After suffering two straight shutout losses, Washington went ahead 2-0 before Carolina came back to take the lead on a breakaway goal by Sutter at 1:45 of the third period. The tally came after Capitals defenseman Dennis Wideman took a futile whack at the bouncing puck in an effort to keep it in the Washington zone. Washington forced overtime when Brooks Laich scored off a centering pass from Marcus Johansson at 17:08 of the third. Flyers 3, Red Wings 2PHILADELPHIA Claude Giroux, Jakub Voracek, and Max Talbot scored goals to lead the Philadelphia Flyers to a win over the Detroit Red Wings. Ilya Bryzgalov allowed a goal to Henrik Zetterberg on Detroits first shot of the game. Johan Franzen made it 3-2 in the third. Detroit was short-handed as it continued to chase the top spot in the Western Conference. Clarkson, Carter lift Devils over Rangers Associated PressCHARLOTTE, N.C. Corey Maggette scored a season-high 29 points, Gerald Henderson hit some big shots in the fourth quarter, and the Charlotte Bobcats overcame a 20-point, firsthalf deficit to beat the Orlando Magic 100-84 Tuesday night. The Bobcats came in having lost 21 of their last 22 games, but seemed to get a spark after coach Paul Silas was ejected in the second quarter with the team trailing by 18. The Bobcats also got a big game from rookie center Bismack Biyombo, who battled toe-to-toe with Dwight Howard and had 10 points and a career-high 15 rebounds. Howard had 15 points and 17 rebounds, and Ryan Anderson added 14 points and 11 boards for the Magic.Heat 108, Nets 78MIAMI LeBron James scored 21 points and capped his night by banking in a halfcourt shot, Chris Bosh added 20 points and the Miami Heat snapped a two-game slide by rolling past the New Jersey Nets. The win came with a cost: Dwyane Wade turned his right ankle late in the first half and did not return, finishing with 13 points. The Heat made 12 of their first 15 shots on the way to a 10th straight home win. James finished 9 for 11, adding nine rebounds and six assists.Hawks 101, Pacers 96INDIANAPOLIS Josh Smith had 27 points and nine rebounds, leading the Atlanta Hawks to their third straight victory over the Indiana Pacers. Smith scored 13 points in the first quarter, 11 in the third, and fell three points shy of his season high. Jannero Pargo had 16 points, while Marvin Williams and Zaza Pachulia each scored 12 for the Hawks. David West scored a season-high 24 points for the Pacers, who have lost two straight. Bobcats dump Magic 100-84 Rays remain winless Minnesota beat Tampa Bay in spring training Associated PressToronto Blue Jays Kelly Johnson slides into Philadelphia Phillies third baseman Hector Luna on a triple in the third inning of Tuesdays game in Dunedin.

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Associated PressNASHVILLE, Tenn. An emotional Garth Brooks said his addition to the Country Music Hall of Fame at 50 is probably a little premature when you look at the long list of his influences who havent yet been inducted. The Friends in Low Places singer transformed country music, but Tuesday he was more interested in talking about the singers who transformed him. Brooks spoke during a news conference to announce he will be inducted later this year with singer Connie Smith and keyboard player Hargus Pig Robbins. I think eventually (Randy Travis, Ricky Skaggs, Keith Whitley, Steve Wariner) will get in, but it probably shouldve been before Garth Brooks came in, Brooks said. The announcement was made at a news conference at the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum. Brooks, Smith and Robbins will be officially inducted at a ceremony later this year. Brooks, who is in semiretirement in Oklahoma, took country music to a new level over a 15-year period, becoming the top-selling solo artist in the U.S. with more than 128 million albums sold. He busted down the walls of what had been a regional sound, taking country music to stadiums and major metropolitan markets. He opened the door for artists who joined him on a platinum-selling spree in the 1990s never before seen in the genre. Smith, the wife of country singer Marty Stuart, will be inducted as a veterans era selection. She is among a pioneering wave of female singers who laid the foundation for todays success by women in country music and released her 53rd album last year. Robbins, blind since childhood, is considered among the top session players in Nashville over a 50-year career thats included work for everyone from George Jones to Bob Dylan. He was inducted in the rotating category of recording/touring musician active before 1980. Brooks, Smith, Robbins on list Associated PressPHILADELPHIA There are wedding bells in Riverdale, but its not Archie and Betty or Veronica. Its Army Lt. Kevin Keller and the physical therapist who helped him overcome his war wound Clay Walker. Meanwhile, in the comics pages, Gil is an 8-year-old boy being raised by his divorced factory-working mom, and Dustin is 23 and living at home, unable to find a job after graduating from college. Comics have always been a portal for escapism and fantasy but have also labored to reflect a contemporary climate, a process that shows no signs of slowing whether it involves super villains, breast cancer or other complicated realities of modern life. Writers and artists fold realworld events into their fictional worlds, blending boundaries to make readers not just laugh and escape, but also reflect and think. Comics have always been a reflection of our world, said Brendan Burford, comics editor at King Features Syndicate in New York. People want to see a reflection and, chances are, if the reflection is something that rings through with their world, their life, their family and their friends, they can relate and laugh. The title character in Gil is an elementary school student, slightly portly and always picked last for sports, who lives with his mom. He would love a nuclear family because it would mean hed have superpowers. Growing up in a single-parent family during Americas first Great Recession wasnt always easy, but I look back on my formative years fondly, said cartoonist Norm Feuti, who debuted Gil in January and has based it, partly, on his own experiences. He noted with the national divorce rate rising, parents and kids can probably relate to his title character, an 8-year-old quintessential underdog who lacks the latest toys or electronic gadgets. Gil is a very personal comic to me, Feuti said. Its a celebration of the resiliency and indefatigable spirit of childhood. In another strip, Dustin has finished college but is living with his parents, unable to find a significant job or afford his own apartment, experiences not uncommon among many recent graduates. Its humor therapy for people, said Steve Kelly, who, along with fellow cartoonist Jeff Parker, created Dustin in 2010 and has seen it expand to some 300 newspapers since then. If you were to sit at home and you were unemployed and you thought you were the only one, that would be a lot more difficult to deal with. But seeing it in the comic strips, or in the comic books, may soften the blow, he said. In these tough economic times, there are a lot of people sitting in their parents houses and they think youre making fun of them and, honest to God, were not, Kelly said. Ive been unemployed worked at the newspaper in San Diego, got fired and was unemployed for a year. I know how you can feel isolated and depressed and you wonder what the future holds. Sometimes, the topics can be rife with politics or challenge different social values. In Riverdale, longtime home of the high school hijinks of Archie, Betty, Veronica and others, issues ranging from gay marriage to cancer are finding new readers and story lines, bringing up topics not typically found in the funny pages. A story about the wedding of Army Lt. Kevin Keller and the physical therapist who helped him overcome his war wound sold out its print run. It also drew a protest from one group concerned its cover showing the two men in front of a just married sign was too bold for a magazine sold not just in book stores, but also in drug stores and toy stores. One Million Moms, a project of The American Family Association, recently asked retailer Toys R Us not to display the magazine near its checkout aisles, noting a trip to the toy store turns into a premature discussion on sexual orientation and is completely uncalled for. Archie Comics co-chief executive Jon Goldwater said the company isnt aiming to ruffle feathers. Instead, he said, its reflecting a contemporary world where in some states, gay marriage is legal.Tackling tough issues Birthday There is a chance several people from your past will re-enter your life once again. Those who made you happy and brought you luck before will do so again. However, avoid anybody from yesteryear who made your life miserable. Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Its to your benefit to be decisive and assertive pertaining to a critical matter. Dont be afraid to make a bold judgment call if you believe it would work. Aries (March 21-April 19) Some kind of opportunity of considerable dimensions could develop for you. It has something to do with your finances and might be able to enhance your security. Taurus (April 20-May 20) If there are many players involved but they lack your managerial skills, assume a leadership role and take the reins whether or not youre asked to do so. The others will appreciate it. Gemini (May 21-June 20) If youre in need of some assistance concerning a confidential matter, go to someone close whom you respect, such as a good friend or a family member. Theyll do the most to help. Cancer (June 21-July 22) As conditions start to change for the better, fresh hope will instill itself in your heart. A beloved friend might be instrumental in bringing this about. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Due to the fact that Lady Luck wants to divert your attention onto something that would be beneficial, it isnt likely youll be able to dismiss commercial matters from your agenda. Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Dont waste your time and energies on pursuits of little or no opportunity. Go ahead and think in grandiose terms just dont be afraid to put the things you conceive into action. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) If you have something of importance to do, youll find you will work far better if you dont have anyone peering over your shoulders. Seek solitude, not a cheering section. Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Dame Fortune is likely to look favorably on partnership arrangements, so dont impatiently go off on your own simply because you are tired of waiting for others. Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Co-workers might lack your industriousness, so dont allow them to distract you from gratifying your ambitions and fulfilling what you want to accomplish. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Just because they like you, certain people are apt to treat you in a far more generous fashion than they do others. Show your gratitude openly. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) This might be an especially good time to devote your mental and physical energies to a huge critical matter that youve been afraid to tackle. Desirable results are indicated. Garth Brooks Connie Smith Today inHISTORY MONDAY, MARCH 5 Fantasy 5: 7 11 20 27 28 5-of-53 winners$76,100.86 4-of-5418$88 3-of-511,487$8.50 SUNDAY, MARCH 4 Fantasy 5: 10 12 18 24 35 5-of-51 winner$200,528.77 4-of-5290$111.50 3-of-59,294$9.50 Today is Wednesday, March 7, the 67th day of 2012. There are 299 days left in the year. Todays Highlight: On March 7, 1912, Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen arrived in Hobart, Australia, where he dispatched telegrams announcing his success in leading the first expedition to the South Pole the previous December. On this date: In 1793, during the French Revolutionary Wars, France declared war on Spain. In 1876, Alexander Graham Bell received a patent for his telephone. In 1926, the first successful trans-Atlantic radio-telephone conversations took place between New York and London. In 1960, Jack Paar returned as host of NBCs Tonight Show nearly a month after walking off in a censorship dispute with the network. In 1965, a march by civil rights demonstrators was broken up in Selma, Ala., by state troopers and a sheriffs posse. In 1975, the U.S. Senate revised its filibuster rule, allowing 60 senators to limit debate in most cases, instead of the previously required 2/3 of senators present. Ten years ago: The House passed, 417-3, a bill cutting taxes and extending unemployment benefits. Five years ago: Sex offender John Evander Couey was found guilty in Miami of kidnapping, raping and murdering 9-year-old Jessica Lunsford, whod been buried alive. (Couey was sentenced to death, but died of natural causes in September 2009.) One year ago: Reversing course, President Barack Obama approved the resumption of military trials at the U.S. prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, ending a two-year ban. Todays Birthdays: Photographer Lord Snowdon is 82. TV personality Willard Scott is 78. Auto racer Janet Guthrie is 74. Former Walt Disney Co. chief executive officer Michael Eisner is 70. Rock musician Chris White (The Zombies) is 69. Actor John Heard is 66. Rock singer Peter Wolf is 66. Pro Football Hall-of-Famer Franco Harris is 62. Pro and College Football Hall-of-Famer Lynn Swann is 60. Rhythm-andblues singer-musician Ernie Isley (The Isley Brothers) is 60. Golfer Tom Lehman is 53. International Tennis Hall-ofFamer Ivan Lendl is 52. Comedian Wanda Sykes is 48. Classical singer Sebastien Izambard (Il Divo) is 39. Thought for Today: In a democracy, dissent is an act of faith. Like medicine, the test of its value is not in its taste, but in its effects. J. William Fulbright, U.S. senator (1905-1995). INSIDE THE NUMBERS To verify the accuracy of winning lottery numbers, players should double-check the numbers printed above with numbers officially posted by the Florida Lottery. Go to www.flalottery.com, or call 850-487-7777. FloridaLOTTERIES SO YOU KNOW Because of early deadlines last nights winning numbers were not available. See Thursdays edition for the numbers.ENTERTAINMENT Page B6WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7, 2012 Associated PressLOS ANGELES Kim Novak is clarifying why she used the word rape to describe how she felt about The Artist. The 79-year-old Vertigo actress, who will be honored next month at the TCM Classic Film Festival, said during a phone interview Monday hearing the score from the Alfred Hitchcock film used in the recent Oscar-winning homage to the silent-film era reminded her of the same feelings she experienced when she was raped as a child. It was very painful, said Novak. When I said it was like a rape, that was how it felt to me. I had experienced in my youth being raped, and so I identified with a real act that had been done to me. I didnt use that word lightly. I had been raped as a child. It was a rape I never told about, so when I experienced this one, I felt the need to express it. Novak, who played the dual role of a suicidal trophy wife and a morose working girl opposite Jimmy Stewart in the 1958 thriller, said in a statement released in January by her manager she wanted to report a rape and the filmmakers of The Artist had no reason to depend on Bernard Herrmanns score from Vertigo to provide more drama. Novaks comments drew criticism from rape crisis groups, who noted plagiarism was not the same as a sexual assault. Other actors have similarly been chastised for misusing the word rape. Johnny Depp and Twilight star Kristen Stewart issued apologies after they compared having their photos taken to being raped in respective interviews. I never reported my real rape, so I felt the need to report this one, said Novak, who left Hollywood in the 1970s for Big Sur, an isolated section of California coastline, before eventually relocating to Oregon. I felt that someone needed to speak up because the music has been taken advantage of too much. I hope that in the future, maybe somehow it will do some good. Michel Hazanavicius, the writer-director of The Artist, which won five Academy Awards last month, including best picture and original score, responded to Novak in January, noting the film was a love letter to cinema and he loves Herrmann, and his music has been used in many different films, and Im very pleased to have it in mine.Novak explains feelings behind Artist protest CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE TodaysHOROSCOPE Hargus Pig RobbinsCountry music to add hall of famers Associated PressActress Kim Novak, seen Jan. 14, 2007, clarifies why she used the word rape to describe how she felt about "The Artist." The 79-year-old Vertigo actress said during a phone interview Monday hearing Bernard Herrmanns score from the Alfred Hitchcock film used in the recent Oscarwinning homage to the silent-film era reminded her of the same feelings she experienced when she was raped as a child. Associated PressIn this image provided by King Features Syndicate, Gil, who lives at home with his mom, ponders the nuclear family, but its not the traditional definition. Comics reflect contemporary topics despite serious nature

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EDUCATIONSection CWEDNESDAY, MARCH 7, 2012 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE Youll find lots ofsporting goodsto choose from in our classified pages.794606 Associated PressNEW YORK He is a violin prodigy who has channeled his musical talents to raise more than $5 million for pediatric medical research around the globe, headlining benefit concerts at Carnegie Hall, Lincoln Center and other venues. Jourdan Urbach was honored for his achievements on Tuesday with one of the nations highest public service awards the Jefferson Award. The 20-year-old resident of the Long Island community of Roslyn founded Concerts for a Cure when he was only 7 years old. Since then, he has raised $5.1 million to fight childrens neurological diseases and fund research. Through benefit concerts, he has funded 12 life-saving neurosurgeries, 1,000 cochlear implants, pediatric clinics in Africa and El Salvador and a bedside music program at the University of Michigans Mott Childrens Hospital. He was among four Americans 25 years and younger to be recognized as a Jefferson Awards Globe Changer, said Sam Beard, who founded the awards known as the Nobel Prize for public service with Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis and U.S. Sen. Robert Taft Jr. in 1972. Hes 20 years old and hes basically transformed the way hospitals raise money, said Beard, adding he has never seen someone so young raise so much money. The Jefferson Globe Changer also was awarded to Rachel Okun, 16, and her 13-year-old sister Kelsi, of McLean, Va., for their ThanksUSA project that raised $7.5 million in scholarships for children of military veterans. Charles OrgBon III, 16, of Hoschton, Ga., was recognized for his Greening Forward initiative, which has recycled more than 8,000 tons of Violin prodigy, now award-winning fundraiser Jourdan Urbach rehearses Tuesday at the Pierre Hotel prior to a ceremony where he was awarded the Jefferson Award the nations highest public service award in New York. Associated Press See AWARD/ Page C2 Say it like Seuss DAVE SIGLER/ChronicleMore that 750 Citrus County schoolchildren took part in the last 1.2 miles of a 26.2 mile marathon during the second annual LifeSouth Community Blood Center Five Points of Life Kids Marathon on Friday, March 2, at Lecanto High School. Kindergarteners through eighth-grade students completed 25 miles, one at a time, during the month prior to the marathon. Citrus Memorial Health System along with LifeSouth Community Blood Center sponsored the marathon. Running for life Even mild concussions can cause lingering symptoms Associated PressCHICAGO Children with even relatively mild concussions can have persistent attention and memory problems a year after their injuries, according to a study that helps identify which kids may be most at risk for lingering symptoms. In most kids with these injuries, symptoms resolve within a few months, but the study results suggest that problems may linger for up to about 20 percent, said study author Keith Owen Yeates, a neuropsychologist at Ohio State Universitys Center for Biobehaviorial Health. Problems like forgetfulness were more likely to linger than fatigue, dizziness and other physical complaints, the study found. Forgetfulness, difficulty paying attention, headaches and fatigue were more common in study children who lost consciousness or who had other mild head trauma that caused brain abnormalities on imaging tests, compared with kids who didnt get knocked out or who had normal imaging test results. The study looked at symptoms up to a year after injury so it doesnt answer whether any kids had longer-lasting or permanent problems. What parents want to know is if my kid is going to do OK. Most do OK, but we have to get better at predicting which kids are going to have problems, Yeates said. Those who do may need temporary accommodations, including extra time taking school tests, or wearing sunglasses if bright light gives them headaches, he said. Most children studied had See INJURIES/ Page C2 MATTHEWBECK Staff WriterThey were there to learn it in a box. They were there to learn it in their socks. They even leaned it with a fox. In honor of iconic childrens author Dr. Seuss, seven kindergarten classes at the Central Ridge Elementary School recognized his 108th birthday Friday with a day full of Seuss-related activities including indulging in green eggs and ham. Polly McMillian took time early in class to explain to her 18 students how Seuss used rhyming words to weave tall tales that have passed the test of time. She said his books have been important learning tools for children for decades. Dr. Seuss has made a great contribution to childrens literature because of the wide variety of books he wrote. But, in kindergarten, learning rhyming words is important, she said. And using Dr. Seuss books to teach that is a great way for them to learn how to use rhyming words and exactly what they are. They Kindergarteners get a taste of Green Eggs and Ham on authors birthday Math whiz loves numbers Associated PressGLEN ELLYN, Ill. When you ask Adam Kalinich what about math he finds most riveting, he takes a long pause, then launches into an intense explanation about how math is much more than numbers its about ideas. I love the thinking part the most, where youre puzzling about How does this fit in what I know? How can I make this work? said Adam, 17, a senior at the Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy in Aurora. I think that there are important problems in math, and its beautiful that such complexity arises from simple questions, that such important ideas can be wrapped up with mathematical statements. The Glen Ellyn native is the kind of math student instructors dream about always hungry for more, and unfailingly excited about the possibilities that lay ahead. Its that drive thats landed Adam among 40 high school seniors named finalists in the Intel Science Talent Search 2012, the nations most prestigious pre-college science competition. A second finalist from Illinois is Jordan Saul Cotler, of Northbrook, a senior at Glenbrook North High School. Finalists will gather in Washington, D.C. March 8-13 to compete for $630,000 in prizes. The top finisher will receive $100,000 from the Intel Foundation. Adam was nominated as a result of his research, Flipping the Winner of a Poset Game, which was published in the journal Information Processing Letters. He wrote the paper last year under the guidance of Lance Fortnow, a professor of electrical engineering and computer science Northwestern Universitys McCormick School of Engineering. Publishing such a MATTHEW BECK/ChronicleCentral Ridge Elementary School kindergarten teacher Polly McMillian reads the Dr. Seuss classic book Green Eggs and Ham to her students Friday morning. FACTS ABOUT DR. SEUSS: Theodor Seuss Geisel was born March 2, 1904 in Springfield, Mass His pseudonym Seuss was both his middle name and his mother s maiden name. He also wrote under the pseudonym Theo. LeSieg.Geisels (Seuss) work as a car toonist was published in Life Magazine, Vanity Fair and The Saturday Evening Post. The first book he both wrote and illustrated, And to Think That I Sa w it on Mulberry Street, was first published in 1934. It was rejected 27 times before being published by Vanguard Press. The first recorded instance of the word nerd was from the Dr. Seuss book, If I Ran the Zoo in 1950. He wrote and illustrated 44 childrens books that have been tr anslated into more than 15 languages. More than 200 million copies have made their way around the globe His honors include two Academy awards, two Emmy awards, a P eabody award and the Pulitzer Prize. Theodor Seuss Geisel died Sept 24, 1991. Source: www.catinthehat.org. While Trinity Steltzer, 5, gives the thumbs-up to her plate of green eggs and ham most of the class wasnt a fan of the dish. See SEUSS/ Page C2 See MATH/ Page C2

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waste around the world. Winning the Jefferson Award is a massive honor, Urbach said in a telephone interview a day before the awards ceremony. It is a recognition young people dont expect to get and when we do, its a vote of confidence that often helps us out down the line with our further endeavors, said Urbach, a music composition major at Yale who will play his own work at the ceremony. Hes passionate about the kids who have neurological diseases, Beard said. He figured he had musical talent and if he could combine it with his goals he could make a difference. Urbach showed a passion for music and science at an early age. He began playing violin at 2 1/2. In first grade, he wrote a letter to Dr. Fred Epstein, the late pre-eminent pediatric neurosurgeon at Beth Israel Hospital in Manhattan, requesting an interview for a paper he wanted to write on neurosurgeons. The doctor invited him to the hospital and gave him a tour of the intensive care unit. That completely flipped my view of the world, said Urbach. All I wanted to do is bring those patients something that was beyond those walls. He recalled turning to Epstein and saying: Im going to help your kids. So the doctor suggested that the 7-year-old bring some friends and perform for his patients. He did, first performing in a hospital playroom and later going room to room playing for bedridden patients. Urbach said Concerts for a Cure started its fundraising activities two years later after he met a 13-year-old patient, a pianist who couldnt practice because there was no piano on the hospital floor. I set a goal. I was going to buy a piano for the 10th floor, he said. I put on a concert at my school. We raised enough money to buy a piano and thousands more, enough to start a fund to bring underprivileged kids from all over the world to have surgery at Beth Israel. At the C.S. Mott Childrens Hospital in Michigan, Urbachs concert raised money for a Ronald McDonald space within the hospital and for its bedside music program that provides live music in the neonatal units, said Elaine Sims, director of the Gifts of Art program at the University of Michigan Health System. Another grant from Jourdan is funding a music delivery system for our pediatric oncology inpatients, she said. The funds Jourdan has raised for us have inspired others to give. Its a cumulative snowball effect that just keeps growing. About three years ago, Urbach founded another nonprofit organization, the International Coalition of College Philanthropists, which raises money through various campus events for health, education and shelter projects. ICCP allows university students to leverage a network of students and college campuses to raise a lot of funds ... and then intelligently inject them into microfinance projects, said Urbach. In its first year, the organization donated $40,000 to build a clinic in Ghana, fund a Connecticut chapter of the Multiple Sclerosis Society and finance several Third World projects, including education for 20 children in rural India, he said. In addition to raising money for neuroscience, Urbach delves deeply into the subject, said Arney Rosenblat, a spokeswoman for the MS Society. In 2005, she said, he conducted independent research on multiple sclerosis at Stony Brook University Medical Center. Jourdan has dramatically illustrated that a small hinge can swing large doors, she said. The awards also honored Eagles defensive back Troy Vincent for outstanding service by an athlete. The Lifetime Achievement Award went to the Tribeca Film Festival, cofounded by Robert DeNiro, Jane Rosenthal and Craig Hatkoff. Pfizer was awarded the Jefferson Award for outstanding service by a major corporation. C2WEDNESDAY, MARCH7, 2012CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLEEDUCATION like the entertainment of the goofiness of the books. There are lots of silly things that happen in those books. The teacher has used Seuss books to teach other classroom disciplines as well. We used Dr. Seuss He and She book when we were learning about pronouns, she said. And we used his Ear book when we were learning about the five senses. Theres just a lot of ways you can utilize his books throughout the curriculum because there are so many of them. You have lots of choices. Each of the kindergarten classes started their day reading the Seuss classic Green Eggs and Ham. Then each student bravely tried a small plate of the green delicacy. When asked to evaluate if they liked the green eggs and ham, about two-thirds of McMillians class gave the thumbs down sign. But some managed to finish a second plate. Following the eggs, classes rotated through each kindergarten classroom to hear a new book and complete a project, such as a word search or maze that featured Seuss. Contact Chronicle reporter Matthew Beck at (352) 563-5660 or mbeck@ chronicleonline.com. SEUSSContinued from Page C1 AWARDContinued from Page C1 concussions from playing sports or from falls. About 20 percent had less common mild brain trauma from traffic accidents and other causes. Concussions involve a blow to the head that jostles the brain against the skull, although imaging scans typically show no abnormalities. Other mild brain trauma can cause tissue damage visible on these scans. The study included 186 children aged 8 to 15 with mild concussions and other mild brain injuries treated at two hospitals, in Cleveland and Columbus, Ohio. The reports are based on parents reports of symptoms up to 12 months after the injuries. The brain injuries studied were considered mild because they involved no more than half an hour of unconsciousness; 60 percent of kids with concussions or other brain trauma 74 children had no loss of consciousness. Overall, 20 percent 15 children who lost consciousness had lingering forgetfulness or other non-physical problems a year after their injury; while 20 percent who had abnormal brain scans six kids had lingering headaches or other physical problems three months after being injured. The results were published online Monday in Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine. The study adds to research showing that mild traumatic brain injuries, including concussions should not necessarily be treated as minor injuries, Dr. Frederick Rivara, Archives editor, said in a journal editorial. More information is needed to determine who is most at risk for lingering problems after these injuries, and to determine what type of treatment and activity restriction is needed, said Rivara, a pediatrician and University of Washington researcher. INJURIESContinued from Page C1 ON THE NET www.cdc.gov/concussion/ signs_symptoms.html Five-year-old Austin Purinton looks through a Dr. Seuss word search Friday morning as part of the Dr. Seuss birthday celebration at Central Ridge Elementary School.MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle research paper would have been a fantastic achievement for an undergraduate student let alone for a high schooler, Fortnow said. Adam studied at a certain class of games called poset or partially ordered set games. He found a way to take one of these games and convert it into another game where the other person wins, Fortnow said, explaining he had given Adam an efficient computation problem that didnt require advanced mathematics, but that nevertheless had been unsolved for a while. He came out with the entire proof. The nice thing about his proof was really that it was not the way it was expected to happen. I expected simple manipulation, but I saw this out-of-the box thinking you dont even see often in grad students. Stepping onto Northwesterns campus was intimidating at first, Adam says. I had a desk in a room with 12 grad students. You have this feeling that This is beyond me, I cant do this, he said. You have to work past that and focus. Adam reads books about topology and real and complex analysis as if they were novels, said IMSA math teacher Steve Condie, who also coaches Adam on the Chicago Area All-Star Math Team. Adam has such a passion for mathematics. He competed on the team for four years straight, this will be his fifth year, and hes skipping graduation to be able to compete, Condie said. Adam started off as a verbally precocious child who read on his own at about age 3, said his mother, Gail Kalinich. She first got an inkling about his talent for math when he was in the first grade and his teachers suggested he skip a grade in math. A couple of years later, the gifted (students) teacher started pulling him and another student to teach alone for an hour. He just developed a strong love for math, said Gail who, along with her husband, Kevin, is an attorney. Adam also has a penchant for teaching math. After starting the math team at Hadley Junior High School in Glen Ellyn, he became its coach when he was in high school. Among the students he coached is IMSA sophomore Kevin Hi, 15, of Glen Ellyn, who said Adam was instrumental in opening his eyes to the beauty of math. Adam was one of the first people to really reveal that other side of math, which was awesome, said Kevin, now the assistant coach for the Hadley math team. Hes been a really good (role) model. He didnt need to spend all that time helping me, but he did. Adam also inspired his younger sister, Chaney, to follow in his footsteps. She is now a member of Glenbard Wests math team, and has applied to IMSA. Far from being singletracked, Adam has a variety of interests, including history and science fiction. I love going through history and finding stories in there. For every historical story that people have grabbed and made into a movie like Braveheart, there are 10 more out there that people have never heard about, he said. MATHContinued from Page C1 Adam Kalinichloves numbers. 000AS0M From Noon Friday, March 9 To Sunset Sunday, March 11 at Sertoma Youth Ranch at On-Site Camping Entertainment by Floridas Best Songwriters and Singers Florida Songwriting Contest Workshops Arts and Crafts Food Childrens Activities Bring your Lawn Chairs Rain or Shine 000ALWU Will McLean Music Festival 2012 For camping information, call 352-465-2167. For more about the festival visit www.willmclean.com

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EDUCATIONCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLEWEDNESDAY, MARCH7, 2012 C3 000AR4X Casual Fine Dining www.mangogrillhernando.com 352-560-0012 1305 Norvell Bryant Hwy., Hernando 10 Entrees your choice $ 10 00 Includes soup or salad, rolls & butter Mon Sat 3-5pm Mon: Maine Lobster Roll w/side plus soup or salad $ 14 00 Tues: Baked Haddock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 12 00 Wed: Liver & Onions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 12 00 Thur: Maine Lobster Pie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 20 00 Your Choice Surf & Turf: . . . . . . $ 18 00 NY Strip Steak & Lobster Pie or Filet Oscar w/Lobster Asparagus & Bernaise Above served with potato, vegetable & soup or salad EARLY BIRD SPECIALS EARLY BIRD SPECIALS EARLY BIRD SPECIALS DINNER SPECIALS DINNER SPECIALS DINNER SPECIALS OPEN ON SUNDAYS AT 3PM St. Patricks Day Corned Beef & Cabbage $ 14 00 SUNDAY 000AM9W 795-0956 www.burkesofireland.com The Heart of Ireland Located in the Heart of Historic Crystal River 564 Citrus Avenue, Crystal River The ORIGINAL St. Patricks Day! 5th Annual Crystal River Dog Walking Parade Sponsored by Burkes of Ireland Pub March 17, 2012 Walkers meet 10am in front of Burkes of Ireland. Parade route is down Citrus Avenue to 3rd Street (right) onto Kings Bay Park and around the back to Citrus Avenue onto Hunter Springs Beach, back to 3rd Street and finally to Citrus Avenue ending at the pub! RULES 1. A $10.00 donation for each entry in parade. All proceeds go to CC Animal Shelter, a Citrus County organization that has special people helping animals. 2. Owners are responsible for cleanup and behavior of dogs in parade. 3. Dogs must be on a leash at ALL TIMES. 4. Entry can NOT have motors. This is a walking parade using sidewalks. 5. Each entry must be decorated in the St. Paddys theme (Dont forget your dog!) 6. Each person in entry must wear a costume, even if only a green hat. 7. Go crazy Dress your dog Be creative? Have fun! 8. DONT FORGET TO ADD YOUR MUSIC!!!!! For Charity Citrus County Animal Shelter SIGN UP NOW Deadline March 10th You too can be in the St. Patricks Day Dog Walking Parade for Charity. If you dont have a dog, come walk in the parade anyway and have fun! 000ARPJ $2.00 Per Person Shoe Rental $2.00 Hot Dogs & Chips $2.00 Well Drinks MANATEE LANES SPRING BREAK SPECIALS MAR. 9 MAR. 25 795-4546 795-4546 HWY 44 CRYSTAL RIVER 34429 ALL OPEN BOWLING $2.00 PER GAME PER PERSON Except Friday after 7PM and Saturday after 6PM Sorry, no coupons during special Spring Break is AWESOME 000ARPB Citrus Countys Best Kept Dining Secret! Serving freshly prepared food in a relaxed atmosphere with outstanding service. Celebrating 11 Years Serving Citrus County. Bentleys Restaurant 11920 N. Florida Ave. (Hwy 41) Citrus Springs One mile south of Dunnellon Mention this ad and receive a small gift as a token of our appreciation. J oin us for Lunch, Dinner or Sunday Brunch Visit our website at www.dineatbentleys.com to view all our menus or call 352-465-5810 Hours: 11am-9pm Wed. Sat. 9am-9pm Sunday Closed Mon. & Tue. 000ASQM PRIME PRIME RIB RIB with choice of soup or salad 10oz. cut 9301 W. Ft. Island Trail Crystal River 795-4211 www.plantationoncrystalriver.com $ 1 9 95 $ 1 9 95 000ASR9 Every Every Thursday, Thursday, Friday & Friday & Saturday Saturday WED. & THURS. ONLY DINE-IN ONLY 000APND 2 LOCATIONS 7364 Grover Cleveland Blvd. Homosassa 352-628-9588 Highway 44, Crystal River 352-795-9081 LOBSTER (1) 1-1 1 4 Lb. Maine Lobster Slaw & Corn $ 15 99 BOSTON STRANGLER Cup of N.E. Chowdah 1 2 Lb. Steamers (1) 1-1 1 4 Lobster Slaw & Corn $ 21 99 TWIN LOBSTERS (2) 1-1 1 4 Lb. Maine Lobsters Slaw & Corn $ 26 99 per person LOBSTER ROLL Real Lobster Roll with Slaw & Hush Puppies $ 15 99 LIMITED TIME ONLY 000A7V2 2011-12 DISTINGUISHEDHONORROLL,SECONDNINEWEEKSOlivia Grey, Micheal Griffin, Grace Groccia, Austin Groff, Zachary Groff, Nadra Gulzar, Madison Gurganus, Rishi Gurnani, Brittany Gutekunst, Austin Guth, Amanda Hackett, Maxwell Haffner, Jennifer Hafner, Kimberly Hafner, Michael Hale, Brianna Hall, Emily Hall, Dominic Hamrick, Allison Harden, Joy Harris, Rodger Harris, Rachel Hartley, Emily Havranek, Amy Hays, Sarah Heathcoat, Alexander Hebert, Teresa Hebert, James Heinzman, Alivia Heisler, Bradley Hendrickson, Travis Hendrickson, Matthew Henry, Natalie Herndon, Benjamin Herrick, Joseph Hindalong, Courtlyn Hisey, Michael Hodgkins, Ashley Hoffman, Sierra Hogan, Sean Hogerheide, Hailey Holmes-Ray, Dakota Holt, Joshua Holton, Ashton Honeggar, Andrew Hooper, Teandre Hopkins, Joshua Hordeman, Amanda Houghton, Chad Howard, Katelyn Howard, Carly Howell, Andrew Huggins, Ashley Hulbert, Hannah Huntington, Kileigh Huscher, Angela Ibarra, Luisa Ibarra, Mary Jane Ice, Angelica Iglesias, Brian Imparato, Geri Ingall, Samantha Ivkovic, Jessica Jackson, Samantha Jackson, Tyler Jacques, Madison Jemison, Sarah-Jo Jenkins-Stout, Megan Jervis, Jonathan Jimenez, April Johnson, Breanna Johnson, Jessica Jones, Grace Jordan, Carolina Junqueira, Heather Jurgensen, Hunter Justice, Lloyd Justo, Bridget Kabacinski, Christopher Kauffman, Chloe Kaufmann, Alexander Kazemfar, Taylor Keeran, Alicia Keiser, Emily Kelley, Danielle Kelly, MichaelBryan Kelly, Seth Kelly, Don Kemp, Laura Ketcham, Laila Khan, Emily King, Brianna Kirkpatrick, Shaindyl Klein, Jessica Klement, Kelena Klippel, Cassandra Kluth, Brandon Knight, Kayla Kofmehl, Shane Kokx, Nicolai Kortendick, Darren Lamb, Jonathan Lambert, Madison Lambert, Eden Land, Allison Laplante, Alexis Larson, Tabitha Laubheimer, Xavier Lawrence, Haleigh Lawter, Christian Leander, ALaura Ledford, Jeremiah Lee, Jordan Lee, Kaitlyn Lee, Christina Lello, Kaitlyn Lemanowicz, Meagan Lemery, Gary Levengood, Kelsey Lilley, Michael Lindsey, Joshua Linn, Chynna Liu, Callie Long, Virada Long, Matthew Lopes, Bianca Lopez, December Lowery, Gregorio Lumapas, Arianna Lybaek-Polla, Andrew Lynch, Hunter Macaluso, Samantha Mader, Dalea Magee, Michael Makros, Aaron Mancha, Hunter Manfredo, Bradley Mann, Breanna Martin, James Martin, Jordan Martin, Pride Martin, Yuly Martinez, Marisa Mascatelli, Kalley Mason, Jessica Massey, Arica Mast, Samantha Matos, Daniel Mauldin, Belinda Maxey, Braidy May, Cody McCary, Elizabeth McClelland, Seth McCormick, Cody McCoy, Madeline McCoy, Cory McCoy, Wade McDonald, Kiera McDougall, Savannah McGee, Matthew McKibbin, Brandon McKinney, Macy McKinney, Hallie McManama, David McNall, Abygail McNeely, Sonja Meigs, Seryi Mejia, Kimberly Menietti, Jorge Mercado, Matthew Michelet, Joseph Milleker, Alena Miller, Alli Miller, Christopher Miller, Dylan Miller, Lance Miller, Samantha Miller, Jonah Miller, Cody Miller, Christian Miranda-Boulay, Christopher Molinelli, Steffi Montayre, Alexandra Moore, Kendall Moore, Wineshka Morales, Marissa Morgan, David Murphy, Ashlyn Murray, Christian Myers, Benjamin Navarro, Ryan Neale, Tyler Neihoff, Thi Nguyen, Alayna Nightengale, Franklin Noll, Guillermo Nunez, John Obday, Travis Oberst, Courtney OBrien, Paige Obstfeld, AustinOdell, Kirk Osburn, Christopher Pace, Taylor Palmer, Mariah Paovella, Alexsander Park, Girard Parmenter, Blake Parsons, Chandni Patel, Dhrumil Patel, Dhruv Patel, Umang Patel, Michael Pater, Rebecca Paugh, Carlo Paveglio, Grace Payne, Tyler Payne, Rachelle Peake, Shane Pellegrine, Brandon Pelletier, Marissa Peragine, Tayler Perez, Joseph Perkins, Jonathan Perry, Alex Persavich, Amera Peterson, Jocelyn Philipson, Michelle Phillips, Wade Phillips, Alexander Pich, Katelyn Place, Jessica Poppen, Bailey Poppleton, Amber Poteet, Bryson Powers, Brittani Provenzano, Amanda Provost, Jordan Quintanilla, Shivam Radadia, Suraj Radadia, Sydney Rafferty, Taina Ramirez, Alexander RamosRuiz, Lane Ramsey, Erin Ratliff, Jesse Ray, Jessika Ray, Danielle Rehberg, Jessica Rehm, Samuel Renovato, Jacob Rice, Samantha Rich, Shawn Richmond, Samantha Risak, Eric Riser, Victor Rivera, Patrick Rizzo, Angelo Rizzolo, Richard Rizzolo, Kaylin Roddenberry, Katelyn Roderick, Cheryl Rome, Dawn Rood, Alexis Roos, Brittany Rush, Amber Russo, Allison Ryan, Sean Ryan, Kori Sabol, Yusma Sadiq, Sara Saiz, Zuhair Sami, Michael Sanchez, Michael Santos, Ashley Saunders, Derek Savery, Hope Schortemeyer, Katelyn Schulze, Heather Seeko, Eric Selke, Peter Sencenbaugh, Frank Serrano, Yamilette Serrano, Chase Seymour, Kori Seymour, Alexander Sharp, Emily Sharpe, Brittany Shier, Jaclyn Shier, Cheyenne Shilling, Lory Shires, Grant Shoemaker, Joshua Sibel, Amanda Siller, Lauren Siller, William Simmons, Jacob Sims, Shelby Sims, Rebecca Sirven, Thomas Sisson, Tyler Sisson, Amber Slack, Kristin Slanker, Michael Slusser, Andrew Small, Logan Smith, Rachel Smith, Scott Smith, Kateri Soboleski, Daisy Souther, Shauna Sowell, Colin Spain, Savannah Spangler, Morgan Speagle, Collin Speale, John Stacy, Kendal Stark, Scott Stearns, George Steele, John Steely, Brittany Stevenson, Parker Stillions, Alexis Stines, Erin Stokes, Phoenix Stokes, Jeffrey Story, Megan Straight Sarah Strelow, Jordin Strempel, Sara Strempel, Skylar Summers, Cassie Surrency, Joshua Swander, Abigail Swartz, Steven Swartz, Hunter Taskey, Brittany Taylor, Callie Taylor, Jacob Teter-Jones, KaraTettenburn, Lecanto High School HONOR ROLL Jordyn Thibault, Melanesia Thomas, Joseph Thompson, Timothy Thompson, Mason Tiley, Nicholas Tinaro, Kimberly Toohey, Francis Torralba, Tyler Touchton, Benjamin Trivett, Ariana Troxel, James Trudeau, Sara Turner, Danyelle Ulloa, David Underwood, Maria Valdivia, Christi Valentin, Ashlynne Van Cleef, Kyle Van De Griek, Andreanna Van Quelef, Loren VanQuelef Summer Van Quelef, Elisabeth Veal, Paola Vega, Taylor Vent, Rodney Vickers, Britny Vickers, Cassandra Vientos, Thomas Vilardi, Danielle Villella, Jamesha Walker, Stacy Wandishin, Lonny Warren, Saiddel Watson, Breeanna Waugh, Mackenzie Way, Taylor Weaver, Matthew Webb, Brandon Weiss, Sabrienna Weldon, Savannah Weller, Christian Wesch, Kelsey West, Rita West, Samantha Wheeler, Elise Wideman, Sarah Wilker, Rachel Wilkins, Cheri Wilkinson, Amber Williams, Samantha Williams, Tiffany Williams, Trevon Williams, Holly Wingrove, Wrenda-Ann Witt, Nicholette Wunderly, Acadia Wyckoff, Michael Wyka, Erica Yarborough, Mikaela Zoucha, Gabrielle Zuniga, Edward Zwolski, Sara Zybell. HONORS Lecanto High School students Allison Hulbert and Benjamin Hecht have been named West Citrus Elks Lodge No. 2693 students of the month for February. Hulbert, 18, is the daughter of Heidi and Bill Hulbert of Citrus Springs. She is a three-year member of Fellowship of Christian Athletes, Key Club, Link Crew and National Honor Society, currently serving as president. She is a four-year member of Student Government, having served as secretary/treasurer, historian, class representative, and secretary. She is also a two-year member of Spanish Club. Last summer, Allison represented Lecanto High School at the S4TL Leadership Program sponsored by the local Rotary Club. Hulbert is a four-year member of the girls weightlifting team, a three-year member of the cheerleading squad, a twoyear member of the track and field team, and a one-year member of the girls golf team earning Rookie of the Year as part of the district championship team. She has taken 13 years of private dance lessons. Hulbert has logged more than 300 hours of community service by volunteering to coach middle school cheerleaders, mentoring incoming 9th grade students, assisting with clerical tasks at Lecanto High School, and babysitting in the nursery at her church. She maintains a 3.9 GPA and has been on the principals and distinguished honor rolls throughout high school. She plans to pursue dual degrees in pharmacy and Spanish. Hecht, 18, is the son of Cora and Jeff Hecht of Beverly Hills. He is a three-year member of National Honor Society and a two-year member of Interact Club. He is currently attending the College of Central Florida as a full-time dual-enrollment student, earning both college and high school credit. He maintains a 4.44 weighted GPA and has been on the principals and distinguished honor rolls throughout high school. He was recognized as an AP Scholar in psychology, English language and English literature. Hecht is a two-year member of the ROCCS crew rowing team and has served as manager of the LHS girls weightlifting team for the past two years. Hecht gives back to his community through participation in Relay for Life, MedShare and Habitat for Humanity. He has been accepted to the University of Florida and the honors program at Florida State University. He plans to pursue a degree in mathematics and actuarial science. Valmon Munn, of Citrus Springs, son of Mr. and Mrs. Norman Munn, of Palmyra, Maine, was awarded a Bachelor of Science in Applied Science and Technology degree in nuclear engineering technology from Thomas Edison State College. Munn is a senior nuclear procedure writer at Progress Energy in Crystal River.SCHOLARSHIPS ANDCONTESTS Citrus 20/20 Inc., in support of its Youth Needs aspiration, is offering a $500 scholarship for Academic Year 2012-13 for college-bound students who have fulfilled the requirements for graduation from an accredited Citrus County secondary school. Scholarship applicants will be evaluated on their SAT/ACT score, GPA, anticipated major, community involvement, extracurricular activities and written essay. Applicants selected as finalists will be interviewed and evaluated by the Citrus 20/20 scholarship committee. Award of the scholarship is contingent upon verification of the recipients enrollment at an institution of higher learning accredited to confer a baccalaureate degree by its office of admissions. Applicants may obtain the scholarship application by visiting the Citrus 20/20s website at www.citrus2020.com or from their high school guidance counselor. Applications must be received no later than 5:00 p.m., March 23, 2012. Applications may be submitted by email to info.citrus2020@ gmail.com or mailed to Citrus 20/20, Inc., P. O. Box 1141 Lecanto, FL, 34460-1141. For more information, call Lace Blue-McLean at 352-2010149. BFF Society will offer a minimum of two $1,000 scholarships. Those eligible are U.S. citizens attending Citrus County schools or Citrus County residents seeking a professional career. Applicants must have a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or above, and applicants may be interviewed. The scholarship must be used to attend an accredited college, junior college or professional school. Applicants may be graduating high school seniors or adult students seeking to further their education, regardless of gender. Candidates will be judged on academic achievement and financial need. Scholarships are to be used for tuition and books only. The check will be made payable to the educational institution for the benefit of the scholarship recipient. Scholarship winners will be Special to the ChronicleThe Lecanto High School Army JROTC recently earned Honor Unit with Distinction status for the 19th consecutive year. The status is awarded to units that receive a score of 96 percent or higher during the annual evaluation. Above, Sgt. Maj. Douyard inspects 1st Lt. Michel Calbi during the in-ranks inspection. See CHALK / Page C4 Allison Hulbert Benjamin Hecht

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notified by April 2012. It will be necessary for the scholarship winner(s) to attend the BFF Society Awards Banquet on May 14 or forfeit the scholarship. If the money for the scholarships is not used as indicated, it will be rescinded to the founding chapter. All applications must be postmarked by March 31; no exceptions. The application must be in its entirety or it will not be considered for review. Applications can be obtained at school guidance offices. Mail applications to: BFF Society, c/o Dianne Micklon, 2833 W. Laureen St., Lecanto, FL 34461-9529. For more information, call 352-527-7442 or email trechuck@tampabay.rr.com. Each year, Yankeetown-Inglis Womans Club searches for deserving students to receive a scholarship. The awards are open to students who attended Yankeetown School for at least two years and graduated, or will graduate, from Dunnellon High School or Crystal River High School. Also eligible are homeschooled seniors, those who are attending college and maintain a 3.0 GPA, and those who have worked after graduation but now have concrete plans for resuming their education. To be considered for a scholarship, students are asked to write a personal essay and complete a questionnaire, have a 3.0 GPA or higher, and submit teacher and counselor recommendation letters. Those who wish to apply may obtain an application from guidance counselors at Dunnellon or Crystal River high schools, at A.F. Knotts Library on 56th Street in Yankeetown or download from the Womans Club website, www.yiwomansclub.com. Selection will be made by members of the Yankeetown-Inglis Womans Club Education Committee. Completed applications should be mailed to: Yankeetown-Inglis Womans Club Education Committee, P.O. Box 298, Yankeetown, FL 34498, and must be postmarked no later than April 4 to be considered. For more information, call the club at 352-447-2057, Tuesday through Saturday, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., or email yiwomansclub@gmail.com. Disabled American Veterans, Gerald A. Shonk Chapter 70 of Inverness, is offering a $1,000 scholarship for the 2012-13 school year. The scholarship is offered to a disabled veteran, a veteran, a survivor of a veteran or a dependent of a veteran. The recipient shall be enrolled in a full-time course of instruction leading to a degree program or to a vocational skill. Selection shall be conducted by the scholarship committee and will be based on the applications submitted. The procedure requires that applicants write a statement detailing their course of study, goals and why they are deserving of this award. Applications are now available and may be picked up at guidance department offices in area high schools, the Withlacoochee Technical Institute, Central Florida Community College guidance department offices, or by calling John Seaman at 352-860-0123. All applications must be returned to the DAV Chapter at 1039 N. Paul Drive, Inverness, FL 34453, by March 16. Scholarships are provided by the Daughters of the American Revolution at three different levels local, state and national. The local Fort Cooper Chapter offers a $500 award for a graduating senior woman with a 3.0 average who has been accepted at an accredited college or university. Several categories of scholarship assistance are offered by the State DAR for high school graduates or older with a GPA of 3.0 or higher. Guidelines and application forms for these awards are available at local high school guidance offices. The National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution has more than 30 scholarships available for high school and college graduates; information and forms for these awards can be accessed from the website at www.dar.org (click on Scholarships and follow the prompts). For more information, call Fort Cooper Chapter DAR Scholarship Chairman Shirley Hartley at 352-637-1319. Up to 12 deserving high school seniors from Sumter Electric Cooperatives service territory will receive assistance from the co-op this year to go on to college or a technical school following high school. The SECO Board of Trustees recently voted to continue the co-ops scholarship program. The students chosen to receive SECO Scholarships in 2012 will each receive a $2,500 grant to assist them in their pursuit of higher education. To qualify, graduates must reside in a home being served by SECO and be enrolled in an accredited college, university or vocational/technical school by the end of 2012. Applications are now available at area high school guidance offices and at any of SECOs customer service centers in Marion, Lake, Citrus, and Sumter counties. They must be returned to SECO no later than March 30, 2012. The Homosassa Civic Club is offering the Beri Hagerty-Phelps Scholarship(s) to students to help further their educations at colleges or technical schools. Applicants must live within the Homosassa Elementary School District. Applications are available at local high schools guidance offices, and at WTI and CCF. Applications must be received on or before March 31. For more information, call 352-628-9333. Citrus Garden Club is accepting applications for its annual $500 Environmental Scholarship to be awarded to a senior graduate from Citrus High School, Crystal River High School, Lecanto High School and the Academy of Environmental Science. The scholarship will be awarded to a senior planning to continue his or her education in an environmental field. Applications can be obtained from school guidance counselors departments. Deadline to apply is March 31. For more information, call Lucy Murphy at 352-527-4239. The Business Womens Alliance of Citrus County Chamber of Commerce announces the opening of its 2012 scholarship award program to offer financial assistance for students planning further education for health occupations, as well as for students planning a future in businesses other than health care. Proceeds from BWAs 2011 Womens Health & Fitness Expo and quarterly networking luncheons will fund the scholarships, being offered to students in Lecanto, Crystal River and Citrus high schools, plus Withlacoochee Technical Institute. Applicants must be Citrus County residents planning to attend a university, college or technical school in Florida, or attend WTI, and who demonstrate financial need. Completed application form and personal statement, financial resources affidavit, transcript and letters of reference are required. Applications are available at the school guidance offices. For the high schools, deadline date for return of completed applications to the guidance office is March 30. For WTI, consult the Student Services office. For more information, call the Citrus County Chamber of Commerces Crystal River office at 352-7953149. The Citrus County Shooting Club is offering scholarship money to students graduating from Citrus County High Schools who are planning on a career in law enforcement. Students interested can inquire at their schools guidance office. Applications are available at the clubs website, www.ccsc.us, or by calling Greg Cwick at 352-382-2530 or Luis Michaels at 352-746-2414. American Legion Post 155 has been running its Oratorical Contests in Citrus County area high schools since 1950. Information packets with rules and entry forms for The American Legion Oratorical Contest have been given to the guidance counselors of Crystal River, Lecanto and Seven Rivers Christian High Schools. All high school students (no matter what grade) public, private or home-schooled children are eligible to enter. Scholarships are awarded the winning contestants ranging from $100 to $18,000. The contest consists of an eightto 10minute prepared oration on some phase of the Constitution of the United States and a threeto five-minute assigned topic discourse on a particular article or amendment. The purpose of the American Legions High School Oratorical Contest is to develop a deeper knowledge and appreciation of the Constitution. Other objectives include development of leadership qualities, ability to think and speak clearly and intelligently, and preparation for acceptance of the duties and responsibilities, the rights and privileges of American citizenship. For more about scholarships, including grants, visit www.NeedALift.org (College Financial Aid Handbook). The American Legion puts out the book to educate students on educational opportunities, scholarships, grants, student loans, careers and employment. The latest downloadable copy of the book, now in its 61st year of publication, is available on the website. Copies are also at county and school libraries. More information and entry forms are available by calling Oratorical Contest coordinator Larry White at 352-249-7663. The Citrus Community Concert Choir Inc. is now accepting applications for its 2012 scholarship award of $1,500. Application is open to graduating high school seniors or enrolled college students and residents of Citrus County, or children of Citrus County residents. Past and present choir members and relatives of choir members are also eligible. Applicantsmay obtainscholarship qualifications and application forms from their school guidance counselors or online at citruschoir.com Completed applications must be received no later than April 30. U.S. high school students and their teachers are invited to participate in the Bill of Rights Institutes sixth annual Being an American Essay Contest The Being an American Essay Contest explores the Founding principles outlined in the Constitution. The contest is administered by the Bill of Rights Institute, a nonprofit educational organization in the Washington, D.C. area devoted to educating young people about the Constitution and Founding principles. The 201112 contest is sponsored by the History Channel. Students are asked to share their thoughts on the Constitution by answering the following question: How does the Constitution establish and maintain a culture of liberty? The top three student winners from each of the five geographical regions will be awarded cash prizes of $1,000 (first place), $500 (second place), and $250 (third place). Teacher sponsors for each student winner will also receive a cash prize of $100. Further information, including submission criteria, lesson plans and background information on the Constitution, Bill of Rights, founders and the founding principles are available at www.BillofRightsInstitute.org/ Contest. Your child may be eligible for a wonderful opportunity a Take Stock in Children college scholarship. Take Stock in Children is a program that helps economically disadvantaged students and their families realize their dream of sending their child to college. To be considered for a scholarship, your child must be in public school in the sixth, seventh or eighth grade, meet the financial eligibility requirements, agree to remain drugand alcohol-free and get good grades. Take Stock in Children scholarships are provided through the Florida Prepaid Foundation. Applications are now available. To obtain more information about the program, call 352344-0855. The College of Central Florida is now awarding dozens of scholarships to qualifying students interested in taking honors classes at the Citrus campus this fall semester. A major component of CFs Honors Institute, the Community of Scholars Honors Program offers incoming high school graduates two-year tuition scholarships, currently valued at $3,000 per academic year, while offering partial scholarships to those who are currently attending CF. Students in the honors program are free to pursue the degree option of their choosing at CF, with the scholarship requirement being successful participation in a limited number of honors level classes that also serve to fulfill degree requirements. Students may also take classes at any of the CF locations each term, and are not bound to enrolling only in classes offered at the Citrus Campus. Besides financial benefits, the Community of Scholars offers members priority registration each term. Typically, a cumulative high school GPA of 3.75 is needed to qualify for the Community of Scholars, although applications for those with a slightly lower GPA may be considered in some cases. Students wishing to be considered for scholarships should call Dr. June Hall at 352-746-6721. Oratorical scholarship contest. All high school students are eligible to enter. Scholarships awarded to winning contestants range from $100 to $18,000. The contest consists of an eightto 10minute prepared oration on some phase of the Constitution of The United States and a threeto five-minute assigned topic discourse on a particular article or amendment. Most all American Legion Posts participate in this program, and additional information and entry forms are available through American Legion Post No. 155 Oratorical Contest coordinator Jack Marchitto, who can be reached at 352-628-9843, or American Legion Post No. 155 Commander Jay Conti Sr., who can be reached at 352-795-6526. You can also see your guidance counselor for more details. CLASSESANDCOURSESFor information about outdoors and recreational classes in Citrus County, see the Sunday sports section of the Chronicle. The Art of Calligraphy art class is offered every ThursdayC4WEDNESDAY, MARCH7, 2012CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE EDUCATION 000AH60 905-0307-F/WCRN NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING CITY OF CRYSTAL RIVER ZONING AMENDMENT The Crystal River City Council will hold a public hearing to consider the proposed small scale amendment to the City of Crystal River Comprehensive Plan. The public hearings will be held at City Hall in the Council Chamber, 123 NW Hwy 19, Crystal River, FL 34428. The dates and times are as follows: The 1st Public Hearing will be held February 27, 2012 @ 7:00 p.m. The 2nd Public Hearing will be held March 12, 2012 @ 7:00 p.m. ORDINANCE 12-O-02 AN ORDINANCE AMENDING THE OFFICIAL ZONING MAP OF THE CITY OF CRYSTAL RIVER, FLORIDA, CHANGING THE ZONING ON PROPERTIES LOCATED AT 1017 US HIGHWAY 19 FROM HIGH INTENSITY COMMERCIAL (CH) AND MEDIUM DENSITY RESIDENTIAL (R-2) TO INDUSTRIAL (I) AS DESCRIBED IN SECTION 1; PROVIDING FOR REPEAL OF CONFLICTING ORDINANCES; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; AND PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE. The proposed Comprehensive Plan Amendment may be inspected by the public at City of Crystal River City Hall, 123 NW Hwy 19, Crystal River, FL 34428, between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. weekdays. Pursuant to the provision of Chapter 286, Florida Statutes, Section 286.0105, if a person decides to appeal any decision made by Crystal River City Council with respect to the matters considered at this public hearing, he/she will need a record of the proceedings, at that, for such purpose he/she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record may include the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of disability or physical impairment should contact the City of Crystal River, Building and Zoning Office, 123 NW Highway 19, Crystal River, Florida 34428, (352) 795-4216 Ext. 306, at least two (2) days before the meeting. WHETSTONE OIL 000AH5U 904-0307-F/WCRN NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING CITY OF CRYSTAL RIVER SMALL SCALE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT The Crystal River City Council will hold a public hearing to consider the proposed small scale amendment to the City of Crystal River Comprehensive Plan. The public hearings will be held at City Hall in the Council Chamber, 123 NW Hwy 19, Crystal River, FL 34428. The dates and times are as follows: The 1st Public Hearing will be held February 27, 2012 @ 7:00 p.m. The 2nd Public Hearing will be held March 12, 2012 @ 7:00 p.m. ORDINANCE 12-O-01 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF CRYSTAL RIVER, FLORIDA, PROVIDING FOR A SMALLSCALE AMENDMENT TO THE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN, RECLASSIFYING 1.83 ACRES (MOL) (WHETSTONE OIL COMPANY, INC. AND INTERCOASTAL DEVELOPMENT, INC.) FROM COMMERCIAL (.5 ACRES MOL) AND MEDIUM DENSITY RESIDENTIAL (1.33 ACRES MOL) LAND USE TO INDUSTRIAL; PROVIDING FOR REPEAL OF CONFLICTING ORDINANCES; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; AND PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE. The proposed Comprehensive Plan Amendment may be inspected by the public at City of Crystal River City Hall, 123 NW Hwy 19, Crystal River, FL 34428, between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. weekdays. Interested parties are encouraged to appear at these hearings and provide comments regarding the proposed ordinance. Pursuant to the provision of Chapter 286, Florida Statutes, Section 286.0105, if a person decides to appeal any decision made by Crystal River City Council with respect to the matters considered at this public hearing, he/she will need a record of the proceedings, at that, for such purpose he/she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record may include the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of disability or physical impairment should contact the City of Crystal River, Building and Zoning Office, 123 NW Highway 19, Crystal River, Florida 34428, (352) 795-4216 Ext. 306, at least two (2) days before the meeting. 000AJHS Knights of Columbus council 6168 and Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church PresentSt. Patricks Dinner Dance6 p.m. Saturday, March 17, 2012inThe Parish Life Center6 Roosevelt Blvd. Beverly Hills, FL Corned Beef & Cabbage Irish Bread and Dessert Cash Bar with Beer and Wine Donation: $15 per person Music by Steven Robinson For more information or tickets, contact: Tany Tanafranca 352-344-5249, Les Magyar 352-419-7205, or the Parish Office, 352-746-2144 CHALKContinued from Page C3 000ASJE Sponsor: Tampa Bay Times Supporters: Winn Dixie Supermarkets Dianas TravelTEMPLE BETH DAVID13158 Antelope Street, Spring Hill(1 blk. S. of Spring Hill Dr., corner of Linden) For more info call 352-686-7034COME BRING YOUR FRIENDS FOR GOOD FOOD(eat in or take home). Israeli Folk Dancing, Judaic Gift Shop, vendors galore & lots more. You dont have to be Jewish to enjoy our celebration. See CHALK / Page C9

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EDUCATIONCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLEWEDNESDAY, MARCH7, 2012 C5 2012 Universal Uclick from The Mini Page 2012 Universal Uclick To order, send $15.99 ($19.99 Canada) plus $5 postage and handling for each copy. Make check or money order (U.S. funds only) payable to Universal Uclick. Send to The Mini Page Book of States, Universal Uclick, P.O. Box 6814, Leawood, KS 66206. Or call tollfree 800-591-2097 or go to www.smartwarehousing.com. Please send ______ copies of The Mini Page Book of States (Item #0-7407-8549-4) at $20.99 each, total cost. (Bulk discount information available upon request.)Name: ________________________________________________________________________ Address: _______________________________________________________________________ City: _________________________________________ State: _________ Zip: ________________ The Mini Pages popular series of issues about each state is collected here in a 156-page softcover book. Conveniently spiral-bound for ease of use, this invaluable resource contains A-to-Z facts about each state, along with the District of Columbia. Illustrated with colorful photographs and art, and complete with updated information, The Mini Page Book of States will be a favorite in classrooms and homes for years to come. NEW! Newspaper in Education WeekNewspaper Funnies Did you read the newspaper this morning? You might have checked a basketball game score or looked for a weather report. People use newspapers in many different ways. Adults can read more detailed explanations of whats going on in our country and around the world. Cooks can find new recipes to serve their families. For many kids, the first stop in the newspaper is the comics, or funnies, page. This week, in honor of Newspaper in Education Week (March 5-9), The Mini Page learns more about newspaper comics and the artists and writers who create them.Humor in newspapers The first comics in newspapers werent comic strips. Instead, cartoonists used humor to comment on events happening in the world. Benjamin Franklin created the first cartoon that appeared in an American newspaper, the Pennsylvania Gazette.The Yellow Kid Hogans Alley was about a group of kids in a neighborhood, but the Yellow Kid soon became the star of the comic. His popularity helped sell more copies of the World Hearst and Pulitzer began to fight over the cartoonist Outcault, and finally both papers were publishing their own version of the Yellow Kid with two different artists! Newspaper publishers realized how important comics were to selling more papers. Success in the 20th century Many more well-loved comic strips appeared in newspapers in the early 20th century, such as Gasoline Alley, Little Orphan Annie and later, Dick Tracy. In 1754, Benjamin Franklin drew this cartoon to urge the British colonies to fight the French and Native Americans for control of more land. Later, during the Revolutionary War, the cartoon became a symbol of the colonies uniting against the British.image courtesy Library of CongressNewspaper wars In the 1890s in New York City, two famous newspapermen, William Randolph Hearst and Joseph Pulitzer, were competing for readers. Pulitzer had a brand-new color press that he decided to use for comic art in the New York World. Pulitzer hired artist Richard Outcault in 1894, and in May 1895 Hogans Alley appeared in the World The comic series featured a little boy character known as the Yellow Kid. The Yellow Kid In 1950, Peanuts brought a childs world to the comics. The strip became one of the most beloved cartoons in history and is still seen in newspapers today. Hearst PulitzerPeanuts Peanuts Worldwide LLC. Dist. by UUReady Resources from The Mini Page 2012 Universal UclickThe Mini Page provides ideas for websites, books or other resources that will help you learn more about this weeks topics. On the Web: At the library: and Alexis Frederick-Frost from The Mini Page 2012 Universal Uclick Syndication Today, cartoonists have many places to share their ideas with others. They can create for the Internet on websites and blogs, in comic books, or for television and movies through animation. In the newspaper, most of the cartoons you read are syndicated the cartoonist has an agreement with a company (or syndicate) that promotes and sells the comic to different newspapers all around the world. This is why your favorite strips can be found in newspapers in other cities.Ideas Cartoonists say the hardest part about their job is coming up with ideas for new strips. Most will write and draw at least a weeks worth follow one story for the whole week, and other times each strip is a separate joke. comics are created by two people, an artist and a writer. They may come up with ideas together, or the writer may give his story to the artist to be illustrated. Cartoon artists may use different use a computer tablet that lets them draw right onto the screen. Others use pen and ink, and some use brushes or a combination of tools. T Lewis (left) and Michael Fry create the comic Over the Hedge. Lewis is the artist; Fry is the writer.photo courtesy Universal UclickProduction Before computers were so easy to use, cart oonists would send their original art through the mail to the syndicate offices. Today, most cartoonists scan their artwork and then send the files electronically to the syndicate. There, an editor puts a date on each strip and reads them to catch even see continuity (con-ti-NOOih-tee) errors for example, when a character has on a white shirt in one panel, or section of the strip, and a striped shirt in another.Distribution After strips are dated and corrected, they are electronically sent out to the client newspapers that have paid to include the strip in their comics pages. A Cartoons Life Rookie Cookies RecipeCauliflower MashYoull need: 12 cups chicken broth 13 cup light sour cream What to do:1. Boil cauliflower in chicken broth for 5 minutes. 2. Reduce heat, cover and simmer for 10 minutes. tender. If necessary, pour off 14 to 12 4. Add butter, sour cream and cheese. Beat on low with a hand mixer until mixture is the consistency of mashed potatoes (it may be slightly chunky). You will need an adults help with this recipe.from The Mini Page 2012 Universal Uclick TM from The Mini Page 2012 Universal Uc lick Peter: Why didnt the piglets pay attention to the big pig? Paula: Because he was a boar! Piper: What did the pig use when he had a bad rash? Pamela: A special oinkment!TM All the following jokes have something in common. Can you guess the common theme or category? Peg: What type of neckwear do pigs like? Perry: Pigstys!Mini Spy . from The Mini Page 2012 Universal Uclick TM from The Mini Page 2012 Universal UclickMeet Kiara Muhammad in the new Disney Junior animated TV series, Doc about a 6-year-old girl who operates a medical clinic for broken toys and stuffed animals. Kiara, 13, spent her early years in Boston. Her role of Fern in her schools production of Charlottes Web. Her family moved to Los Angeles so Kiara could work on her acting career. in several commercials and magazine ads, and also sings and dances. playing tennis and basketball. photo Disney Junior from The Mini Page 2012 Universal UclickWomen in the Comics The Mini Page StaffBetty Debnam Founding Editor and Editor at Large Lisa Tarry Managing Editor Lucy Lien Associate Editor Wendy Daley A rtist Early female cartoonists Women were drawing comic strips for newspapers as early as 1901. In 1932, Martha Orr introduced a cartoon character named Mary Worth to newspaper readers. Today Mary Worth is still in papers, although its written and drawn by other creators. was started by female cartoonist Dale Messick in 1940. Cathy and For Better or For Worse, both written and drawn by women, appeared in March is National Womens History Month. The Mini Page interviewed cartoonist Jan Eliot, more about women cartoonists. Jan lives in Eugene, Ore.Getting started Mini Page: How did you get your start in cartooning? Jan Eliot: I had a friend who thought I was funny. It was her idea. I had been an art major in college, so I drew 10 cartoons and took them to my local weekly paper. To my surprise, they printed them and asked for more. I did a weekly cartoon for them. But I wanted to be syndicated so I could make a living at cartooning. It took me 16 years to get syndicated! Mini Page: Do you think the job is different for men and women cartoonists? Jan Eliot: Not really. Funny wins. 365 days of inspiration Mini Page: You draw a strip for every day of the year. How do you get your ideas? Jan Eliot: Its mostly imagination, but the characters are real to me and have lives and personalities of their own. Ill eavesdrop on a bus or anywhere in a department store fitting room or a grocery store. I hear things on the news and think about how they would affect my characters. Mini Page: How has cartooning changed since you started? Jan Eliot: The space is decreasing comics are getting smaller. Ive enlarged my type twice over the years so that people can read it, and the artwork has gotten simpler. There is less room for full bodies and background art. But I hope theres always room for interesting and funny art. Thats what makes a cartoon! Jan Eliot writes and draws the comic strip Stone Soup. She works in a studio in her home. She wears a white glove on her right hand so she wont smear the ink under her hand.images courtesy Universal Uclick Mini Page: How did you come up with your characters? Jan Eliot: Theyre all reflections of me in some way. Next week, The Mini Page is about the Girl Scouts 100th birthday. Jan Eliot, courtesy Universal UclickCreating Stone Soup Mini Page: Did you look up to other women newspaper cartoonists? Jan Eliot: Yes. Nicole Hollander and Lynn Johnston (For Better or For Worse). Lynn was really helpful to me in the years before I was for me. from The Mini Page 2012 Universal UclickSupersport: Anthony DavisHeight: 6-10 Weight: 220 Hometown: Chicago Opponents attempting a shot against Kentuckys Anthony Davis are likely to get the basketball slammed back at them. Through the first 23 games, the talented freshman led the NCAAs Division I in blocked shots, with 108. Tall, with long arms, hes an intimidator and a candidate for national Defensive Player of the Year. Davis who grew from a 6-3 guard to a 6-10 post player after his sophomore year in high school is tough overall. In helping highly ranked Kentucky post a 22-1 record, he averaged 13.5 points, 10.2 rebounds and shot 65 percent from the floor. Rabid Wildcat fans enjoy watching him play, but realize they might not see him in a Kentucky uniform for long. This time next year, he might be in the NBA. TM Words that remind us of newspaper comics are hidden in the block below. Some words are hidden backward or diagonally, and some letters are used twice. See if you can find: CARTOONIST, CHARACTER, COMICS, DAILY, DRAW, EDIT, FUNNY, HEARST, HUMOR, NEWSPAPER, PANEL, PEANUTS, PULITZER, READERS, SELL, STORY, STRIP, SYNDICATION, WEEKLY, WRITE, YELLOW KID.Newspaper FunniesTRY N FIND COMICS ARE A DAILY DOSE OF FUN! W S T S I N O O T R A C B D Q R R C J C T S R A E H E D I T E X I I N E W S P A P E R K S Z D S T M E T E R D L V N W T T A E R E O A A R E H U M O R I I L K R N C A N R L H W L I L L L Y U T W A Z S C Y J L P U Y G T E K P D Y N N U F E F P B S R N O I T A C I D N Y S from The Mini Page 2012 Universal UclickBasset Brown The News Hounds TM

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Submit information at least two weeks before the event. Early submission of timely material is appreciated, but m ultiple publications cannot be guaranteed. Submit material at Chronicle of fices in Inverness or Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to community@chronicleonline.com. Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an e vent. Publication on a special day cant be guaranteed. Expect notes to run no more than once. Pet SPOTLIGHT Yard sale to benefit hearing impairedA yard sale set for 8 a.m. March 10 at Crystal River Lions Club, 109 N.E. Crystal St., Crystal River, will benefit Citrus Hearing Impaired Program Services. Donations can be dropped off at the CHIPS train from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday (no clothing, please). Anyone interested in reserving table space for $10 can call the office at 352-795-5000.Spiritual thinkers to meet March 10New Age Thinkers will meet at 2 p.m. Saturday, March 10, at the Ellie Schiller Homosassa Springs Wildlife Park. There will be two guest speakers. Kristine Gay Johnson, local author of Dance With The Stars and The We Factor, will discuss how her books provide a personal journey to spirituality and metaphysical elements that underlie our world. Pat Roberts, a spiritual and intuitive photographer, will also speak. All are welcome, but space is limited. Call Donna at 352-6283253 or email miss-donna@ tampabay.rr.com for more information.Rainforest plants talk at garden clubFloral City Garden Club will meet at noon Friday, March 9, at the Community Building on East Orange Avenue. The program will start at 12:30 p.m. and the business meeting will start at 1:30 p.m. Jerry Wetherington will speak about rainforest botanicals. All meetings are open to the public. For more information, call club President Christine Harnden at 352-341-3247.Program helps paddle enthusiastsCanoeists and kayakers are boaters, too. Now there is a new program available to address the unique needs of this audience. Homosassa Flotilla 15-4 of the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary offers Paddlesports America, a safety program designed to attract the novice paddle enthusiasts. The fourhour program presents five chapters of safety information. Topics include: Know Your Paddlecraft, Before You Get Underway, Operating Your Boat Safely, Legal Requirements of Boating and Boating Emergencies What to Do. The program will be from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, March 10, at West Citrus Community Center, 8940 W Veterans Drive, Homosassa. A fee of $20 for materials will be charged. For more information, call Anna Hughes at 352-621-6963, or Elaine Miranda at 352564-2521.CASA volunteers meet monthlyCASA Citrus Abuse Shelter Association volunteers meet at 10:30 a.m. the second Tuesday monthly at CASAs outreach center, 1100 Turner Camp Road, Inverness. Those interested in volunteering are welcome. Call Linda Fernandez at 352344-8111. Timeshare owners to convene March 18SARASOTA Florida Timeshare Owners Group spring meeting will be 1 to 5 p.m. March 18 at the Palm Aire Country Club, 5601 Country Club Way, Sarasota. Industry representatives will provide advice on buying and selling a timeshare, distinguishing between an initial purchase and a resale and using a licensed resale broker to avoid up-front fees before a sale is completed. The meeting will include a round-table discussion on industry issues, vacation experiences and exchange companies. Copies of the 2012 Members Resort Directory will be provided to all members attending. The meeting is open to all Florida timeshare owners, with a $10 door charge and reservations required. Membership information and reservations can be obtained by contacting Frank Debar at 941-351-1384 or fdebar433@gmail.com. The groups website is http://tsownersgroup.com.Garage, bake sales at Crystal OaksCrystal Oaks Civic Association will host a community fundraiser garage sale, bake sale and white elephant sale from 7:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Saturday, March 17, at the clubhouse, 4858 Crystal Oaks Drive, Lecanto. There will be a large array of items, plus homemade baked goods. Coffee will be available. While at the clubhouse, pick up a map of participating houses in the community. For more information, call Hedda at 352-527-8144.Program to observe Womens DayThe Nature Coast Unitarian Universalists will host a free, non-religious program at 4 p.m. March 8, International Womens Day. The free event starts with food and a keynote talk and songs by Mindy Simmons, Floridas Chanteuse. A motivational speaker, plus music by Patchwork, a female trio, will round out the celebration. The theme is Connecting Girls Inspiring Futures. Unitarian Universalist Fellowship is at 7633 N. Florida Ave., Citrus Springs, north of the Holder light. Call 352-465-4225 or visit naturecoastuu.org.Rec group slates Military Card PartyBeverly Hills Recreation Association invites everyone to its Military Card Party Tuesday, March 13, at Central Ridge Community Center, 77 Civic Circle, Beverly Hills. Reservations are required by March 9. Doors open at 11 a.m. and lunch will be served at noon. Games will begin at 1 p.m. Donation is $12. Tickets are available at the community center office from 7:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Friday. For more information, call the center at 352-746-4882 or Barbara Wezwick at 352746-3636. Welcome, baby brother Pet SPOTLIGHT Brandy Special to the ChronicleAnnie welcomes new brother Cadet, a cock-a-poo, to the family. Annie looks forward to taking Cadet to the dog park to meet her friends. The pair live with Bob and Jody Fahey of Inverness. COMMUNITYPage C6WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7, 2012 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE ROCHELLE KAISER/For the ChronicleBrandy, a 5-year-old dachshund, is happy to roll over for attention. She lives the good life in Homosassa with Jeff and Lori Moser. NewsNOTES MARYANNLYNN Special to the ChronicleThe current exhibit at the Old Courthouse Museum is Sisters All, Friends Forever: 100 years of Girl Scouts. Hours are from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday. With our Library Partnership, Coastal Lakes Library in Crystal River has a Civil War exhibit running in conjunction with Civil War Re-enactment, slated for March 9 through 11. The exhibit can be viewed during library hours. At the Lakes Region Library in Inverness at 2 p.m. Friday, March 9, John Miller will be speaking about his new book, Citrus White Gold. Phosphate mining was a major factor in the development of Floral City and other areas of Citrus County more than 100 years ago. At the Old Courthouse Museum at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. Saturday, March 10, Dr. Jeff Mitchem, archaeologist with the Florida Museum of Natural History, will present Tatham Mound: Hernando de Soto in Citrus County. Tatham Mound is in the Tsala Apopka Lake area. Mitchem will discuss excavations and the archaeological evidence of the encounters between native Floridians and the Spanish expedition of Hernando de Soto in 1539. The 1 p.m. program will address the older burials and artifacts recovered during excavations, and the story of the reburial of the remains in their final resting place. This is part of a program from the Florida Public Archaeology Network, Central Region of the University of South Florida. Music at the Old Courthouse Museum in March will be at 7 p.m. (doors open at 6:15) Thursday, March 15, with Jimmy Crowley, singer/songwriter from Cork, Ireland. He will entertain with delightful Celtic music. This is part of the Concerts at the Old Courthouse series. Cost is $10; call 352-341-6427 for reservations because space is limited. On March 25 at the Hernando Historic School in Hernando will be Pickin and Grinin Goin on Here, a family bluegrass festival, with music from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m or later. Grounds open at 9 a.m.; get there early for the best listening spot. Admission is $10; family tickets are available. There are only three types of purely American music and bluegrass in one of them. Come and enjoy American music, food, fun and vendors. Coming up on April 20, 21 and 22, When Elvis Came to Town will again grace the Old Courthouse Museum. Tickets are now on sale for $25. Last year we had to add two production times, as demand was so great. For more information about tickets and museum events, call 352341-6427. Music, more in March Museum also offers history in its lineup Special to the ChronicleRuth Anne Rackley, owner, Ace Hardware of Inverness, 465 E. Highland Blvd., displays a plaque honoring her business as a Hospice of Citrus County Partner In Care. Rackley, who also owns Ace Hardware of Hernando at 2585 N. Florida Ave., recently made a donation of merchandise to the Hospice of Citrus County Thrift & Gift Shoppes in the amount of $3,100. Pictured, from left, are: Hospice of Citrus County Development Director Linda Baker, Ace Hardware general manager Bubby Duteau, Ace Hardware owner Ruth Anne Rackley and Hospice of Citrus County Thrift Shoppe distribution manager C.J. Pattillo. Visit Hospice of Citrus County on the web at www.hospiceofcitruscounty.org. Ace supports Hospice Special to the ChronicleOur Lady Of Grace/Knights Of Columbus Abbot Francis Sadlier Council No. 6168 stage the second annual Larry Nestor Memorial Blood Drive from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, March 17, in the Parish Life Center of Our Lady of Grace Church in Beverly Hills. Nestor was a powerful voice for the Knights of Columbus in New York and in Florida. He also was an active member of Our Lady of Grace Church. A former Marine who spent time in Iwo Jima, he donated blood as often as was allowed. All are welcome, whether they knew Larry Nestor, to donate a pint of blood in his memory. Each pint of blood collected will go toward saving at least three lives. Donors will receive a mini-physical, a commemorative gift, an Irish complimentary breakfast and free cholesterol reading. Rose Nestor, who was married to Larry for 59 years, will be there to greet donors. For more information, call Don Irwin at 352-527-8450. Drive to honor Larry Nestor Second annual event will be March 17 Special to the ChronicleWere you born after Jan. 1, 1988? If so, you should know it is the law that to legally operate any vessel with a motor of 10 HP or greater, you must have the Florida Safe Boaters card. You can obtain this card by successfully completing a Boating Skills and Seamanship Class, to be offered by U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary Flotilla 15-1, beginning Monday, March 12. The program runs for 10 sessions from 7 to 9 p.m. Mondays and Thursdays at the flotilla building, 148 N.E. Fifth St., Crystal River. Participants learn how to have a safe experience; how to use a marine radio and call in emergencies; required and suggested safety equipment; trailering a boat; highway signs on the water; piloting; rules of the road (as they pertain to the water); safe handling of a boat; specific Florida state regulations in relation to the waters, marine mammals, the environment and more. Upon satisfactory completion of the program, participants will be mailed the Florida Safe Boating card from Florida Fish and Wildlife. Many insurance companies recognize the card and offer discounts on boat insurance. Cost is $40 (includes book and instruction by certified Coast Guard Auxiliary instructors). For more information or to register, call Linda Jones at 352-503-6199. Learn to be a safe boater with USCG auxiliary Friends saleThe Friends of the Citrus County Library Systems mega spring sale runs from Friday, March 9, through Tuesday, March 13, at the Citrus County Auditorium on U.S. 41 South, next to the fairgrounds. Sale hours are 5 to 8 p.m. Friday ($5 donation Friday night only); 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday; 1 to 4 p.m. Sunday (blue light and BOGO specials); 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday (half-price day); and 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday ($3 a bag). Proceeds benefit Citrus County libraries. For sale information, call 352-746-1334 or 352-527-8405. Call 352-503-6199 to r egister. NewsNOTE

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ENTERTAINMENTCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLEWEDNESDAY, MARCH7, 2012 C7 PHILLIPALDER Newspaper Enterprise Assn.It is well-known that no-trump contracts are races. The defense is trying to set up its long suit, while declarer is battling to establish the winners that he needs to get home. Suit contracts tend not to be such clear-cut contests. But sometimes speed is important. In this example, West leads the diamond three against four spades. Who should win and how? North has 12 high-card points and four-card spade support, which would often be sufficient for a gameforcing response. However, with 4-3-3-3 distribution and eight losers, North sensibly downgraded the value of his hand to a game-invitational limit raise. South, having more than a minimum opening, raised to game. Declarer starts by counting his losers: none in spades, one in hearts, one or two in diamonds and two in clubs. Next, he should check his winners: six in spades, two in hearts, one or two in diamonds and one in clubs. South needs one diamond and one club or two diamonds. There is a strong temptation to take the diamond finesse at trick one. Here, though, it loses, and if East shifts to the heart queen, declarer will go down. The defenders will take one heart, one diamond and two clubs before South can establish his 10th winner in clubs. Instead, declarer should win immediately with dummys diamond ace, draw trumps using honors from his hand, and play on clubs. The defenders can take one diamond, but they lose the race. South sets up his club trick, on which he discards his heart four, before the defenders can cash a heart trick. (NGC) 109 65 109 44 53 A mer i can W ee d W ee d Jacked! Al as k a St a t e T roopers D rugs, I nc. M e th A mer i can W ee d W ee d Jacked! A mer i can W ee d W ar Over Weed D rugs, I nc. M e th (NICK) 28 36 28 35 25VictoriousVictoriousAnubisiCarly GssFriendsFriendsGeorgeGeorgeFriendsFriends (OWN) 103 62 103 Forensics: YouThe Rosie Show PG48 Hours: Hard Evid.48 Hours: Hard Evid.48 Hours: Hard Evid.48 Hours: Hard Evid. (OXY) 44 123 Top Model Snapped PG Bad Girls ClubBad Girls ClubSnapped PG Snapped PG (SHOW) 340 241 340 4Twil: Eclipse Youth in Revolt (2009) Michael Cera. R Shameless Parenthood (iTV) MA Snoop Dogg: The Bad Girls of ComedyCalifornicationHouse of Lies MA Inside ComedyDrive Angry (SPEED) 732 112 732 NASCAR Race Hub (N) Pass TimePass Time PG Dumbest Stuff Dumbest Stuff Car Warriors Rebuilding a Chevy Chevelle.Stuntbusters Stuntbusters PGNASCAR Race Hub (SPIKE) 37 43 37 27 36Ways to Die Enter the Dragon (1973) Bruce Lee. A kung fu expert is sent to infiltrate an island fortress. RI Am Bruce Lee (2011) People discuss the legacy of Bruce Lee. NR Enter the Dragon (1973) R (STARZ) 370 271 370 Multiplicity (1996) PG-13 Soul Surfer (2011, Drama) AnnaSophia Robb, Helen Hunt. (In Stereo) PG Air Force One (1997, Suspense) Harrison Ford. Premiere. (In Stereo) R Takers (2010) Matt Dillon. (SUN) 36 31 36 PowerboatingIsraeli Bask. Heat Live! (Live) NBA Basketball Atlanta Hawks at Miami Heat. From the AmericanAirlines Arena in Miami. (Live) Heat Live! (Live) Inside the HEAT Special Olympics 3 Wide Life PG (SYFY) 31 59 31 26 29Face Off Alien Interpreters Face Off BurtonesqueGhost Hunters (In Stereo) Ghost Hunters International (N) Face Off Dinoplasty (N) Ghost Hunters International (TBS) 49 23 49 16 19KingKingSeinfeldSeinfeldFam. GuyFam. GuyFam. GuyFam. GuyBig BangBig BangConan (N) (TCM) 169 53 169 30 35 Having a Wild Weekend (1965, Musical Comedy) The Dave Clark Five. NR Ruby Gentry (1952) Jennifer Jones. NR Parrish (1961) Troy Donahue. Poor young man cuts swath in Connecticut tobacco world. NR (TDC) 53 34 53 24 26Sons of Guns (In Stereo) Sons of Guns Wedlock & Load Sons of Guns (In Stereo) Sons of Guns Sniper Rifle Silencer Doomsday Bunkers (Series Premiere) (N) Sons of Guns Sniper Rifle Silencer (TLC) 50 46 50 29 30CakeCakeMedical ExaminerHoard-BuriedUntold Stories of ERObsesObsesUntold Stories of ER (TMC) 350 261 350 Fatal Secrets Bratz (2007) Nathalia Ramos. Four lifelong best friends enter high school. PG Furry Vengeance (2010) Brendan Fraser. PG Buck (2011, Documentary) (In Stereo) PG Lucky (2011) R (TNT) 48 33 48 31 34Law & Order Slaughter Law & Order Illegitimate (In Stereo) Law & Order Monster (In Stereo) Law & Order Black, White and Blue Law & Order Charity Case Southland Gods Work MA (TOON) 38 58 38 33 MAD PGGumballAdvenJohnny TNinjaGoLevel UpKing/HillKing/HillAmericanAmericanFam. GuyFam. Guy (TRAV) 9 54 9 44FoodFoodFoodFoodFoodFoodFoodFoodSlce-Slce-FoodFood (truTV) 25 55 25 98 55Cops Cops PGWorlds Dumbest...RepoRepoRepoRepoTowTowVegas Vegas (TVL) 32 49 32 34 24M*A*S*HM*A*S*HM*A*S*HM*A*S*HHome ImHomeRaymondRaymondClevelandDivorcedDivorcedCleveland (USA) 47 32 47 17 18NCIS Legend NCIS: Los Angeles Callen, G NCIS Cracked (In Stereo) PG NCIS A new special agent arrives. PG Psych Heeeeeres Lassie (N) PG NCIS Knockout (In Stereo) PG (WE) 117 69 117 Charmed Blinded by the Whitelighter Charmed Wrestling With Demons PG Sleepless in Seattle (1993, Romance-Comedy) Tom Hanks, Meg Ryan. PG Sleepless in Seattle (1993) Tom Hanks. PG (WGN-A) 18 18 18 18 2030 Rock30 RockFunny Home VideosFunny Home VideosFunny Home VideosWGN News at Nine30 RockScrubs Dear Annie: Bill and I have been married for 43 years. He retired three years ago. We didnt socialize with any of his co-workers, so I didnt know them well. Last Christmas, Bill got a card with no return address. It only had Bills name on it. I handed it to him so he had to open it in front of me. It was a really nice card from Betty and a note telling him how much she missed him, their talks, their lunches and their personal conversations. She suggested they get together for a holiday lunch. When I asked Bill why he never mentioned Betty to me, he said the lunches didnt mean anything and he probably forgot because they were so insignificant. I dont believe him. We have always told each other everything. He put Bettys card on display with the others, but I asked him to take it down since it wasnt sent to us as a couple. He said hed throw it away because it made me unhappy. But, Annie, my instincts said he was lying, so I checked the trash. No card. The other day, I saw his old briefcase, and inside was Bettys card. He had written her phone number on it. If this card meant nothing to him, why keep it? Why lie to me? I love my husband. I want to trust him. Ive never had reason not to, but Im shaken to the core. Now I pay close attention when he leaves the house and keep track of how long hes gone. Last week, he said he needed to run some errands and was gone for nearly two hours. He claims he ran into Dave, a former co-worker, but I wonder if this was Bettys holiday lunch. I hate feeling this way. My kids say to forget about it before I make myself sick. Are they right? Am I just paranoid? Card Woes Dear Card: No. Your husband is not being totally truthful about Betty, and this creates suspicion and distrust, both of which undermine your relationship. You need to have a long talk with him and explain why his behavior is hurting you. If he cannot reassure you sufficiently, the next step is counseling. Dear Annie: Recently, my wife and I were in Las Vegas and had a terrible experience at a buffet at one of the top hotels. I sent an email to the manager, and she forwarded it to the executive chef. The executive chef apologized, invited us to dine at any of the hotels restaurants and suggested the most expensive one. He met us at the restaurant and said to order anything we wanted on the menu, starting with wine. The total bill came to $350. I said we should leave a tip, but my wife (who has a restaurant background) said that when the management invites you, you do not tip. Who is right? Comped Bill Dear Bill: You are. The waitstaff still had to work to serve you, no matter who paid the bill. Unless there was an added service charge that was then picked up by the owner, the waitstaff should not be penalized because you had a bad experience at another location. Dear Annie: Hurt in California felt bad that she called the police on a brother who might be raising children in a neglectful, possibly abusive environment. As a person whose childhood was very similar to that scenario, I would have been rescued many times over if an adult had had the courage to call Child Protective Services. I cringe when I hear my aunts say they still wonder whether they should have done the same, but didnt want to interfere. Please take the risk of sticking up for those kids. They will remember for the rest of their lives that someone was paying attention. ShouldawouldacouldaAnnies Mailbox is written by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar, longtime editors of the Ann Landers column. Please email your questions to anniesmailbox@comcast.net, or write to: Annies Mailbox, c/o Creators Syndicate, 737 3rd Street, Hermosa Beach, CA 90254. To find out more about Annies Mailbox and read features by other Creators Syndicate writers and cartoonists, visit the Creators Syndicate Web page at www.creators.com. ANNIES MAILBOX Bridge (Answers tomorrow) ALONG PSYCH UNRULYDINNER Yesterdays Jumbles: Answer: He refused to draw the Jumble cartoon because the idea behind it wasnt this -PUNNYENOUGH Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAMEby David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words. KNIBL MAIDT FSIXUF CREGRO Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Find us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/jumble A: WEDNESDAY EVENING MARCH 7, 2012 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D/I: Comcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights C B D/I F H6:006:307:007:308:008:309:009:3010:0010:3011:0011:30 ^ (WESH) NBC 19 19 NewsNewsEntAccessWhitneyChelseaLaw & Order: SVURock Center NewsJay Leno # (WEDU) PBS 3 3 14 6World News Nightly Business PBS NewsHour (N) (In Stereo) Ed Slotts Retirement Rescue! Financial planning for retirement. (In Stereo) G Yanni -Live at El Morro Yanni performs with orchestra. G Blood Sugar % (WUFT) PBS 5 5 5 41NewsBusinessPBS NewsHour (N)Nature PG NOVA G Muhammad AliWorldT. Smiley ( (WFLA) NBC 8 8 8 8 8NewsNightly NewsEntertainment Ton.Extra (N) PG Whitney (N) Are You There Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Rock Center With Brian Williams (N) NewsJay Leno ) (WFTV) ABC 20 20 20 NewsWorld News Jeopardy! (N) G Wheel of Fortune The Middle PGSuburgatory PGModern Family Happy Endings Revenge for Real (Series Premiere) (N) Eyewit. News Nightline (N) (WTSP) CBS 10 10 10 10 1010 News, 6pm (N) Evening News Inside Edition Be a Millionaire Survivor: One World (N) (In Stereo) Criminal Minds (DVS) CSI: Crime Scene Investigation 10 News, 11pm (N) Letterman ` (WTVT) FOX 13 13 13 13FOX13 6:00 News (N) TMZ (N) PG The Insider PG American Idol Finalists Compete The finalists perform for the judges. (N) PG FOX13 10:00 News (N) NewsAccess Hollywd 4 (WCJB) ABC 11 11 4 NewsABC EntInside Ed.MiddleSuburg.FamilyHappyRevenge for RealNewsNightline 6 (WCLF) IND 2 2 2 22 22Christian FitnessBelieversWayJack Van Impe Great AwakeningJoseph Prince G The Place for MiraclesFreedom Today Life TodayClear Vision Great Awaken < (WFTS) ABC 11 11 11NewsWorld News Wheel of Fortune Jeopardy! (N) G The Middle PGSuburgatory PGModern Family Happy Endings Revenge for Real (Series Premiere) (N) NewsNightline (N) @ (WMOR) IND 12 12 16Family Guy PG Family Guy Big Bang Theory Big Bang Theory Law & Order: Criminal Intent Law & Order: Criminal Intent How I MetHow I MetThe Office PG The Office PG F (WTTA) MNT 6 6 6 9 9RaymondSeinfeldFamily FdFamily FdBurn Notice PGBurn Notice PGScrubsSeinfeldTournament Preview H (WACX) TBN 21 21 The Faith The 700 Club (N) GVictor M.ChildCotroneVarietyGaitherStudio Direct Variety L (WTOG) CW 4 4 4 12 12King of Queens King of Queens Two and Half Men Two and Half Men One Tree Hill (N) (In Stereo) Americas Next Top Model: British Friends PG Friends PG The Simpsons According to Jim O (WYKE) FAM 16 16 16 15Nature Coast I.N.N. News County Court Sheriffs 10-43 To Be Announced Straight Talk Med Visiting History Inverness Spotlight Music Mix USA Music Mix USA The Cisco Kid G Black Beauty S (WOGX) FOX 13 7 7SimpsonsSimpsonsBig BangBig BangAmerican Idol Finalists Compete (N) PGFOX 35 News at 10TMZ PGAccess (WVEA) UNI 15 15 15 15 14NoticiasNotic.Una Familia con Suerte (N) PG (SS) El Talismn (N) (SS)La Que No NoticiasNoticiero (WXPX) ION 17 Ghost WhispererCold Case PGCold Case PGCold Case Criminal Minds PGCriminal Minds PG (A&E) 54 48 54 25 27Storage Wars PG Storage Wars PG Storage Wars Storage Wars PG Storage Wars PG Storage Wars PG Dog the Bounty Hunter PG Bounty Hunter Bounty Hunter Dog the Bounty Hunter PG (AMC) 55 64 55 CSI: Miami Sudden Death CSI: Miami See No Evil National Lampoons Vacation (1983, Comedy) Chevy Chase. R National Lampoons Vacation (1983, Comedy) Chevy Chase. R (ANI) 52 35 52 19 21River Monsters: Unhooked PG Gator Boys Mud Gator Attacks PG Call of Wildman Call of Wildman Finding Bigfoot (In Stereo) PG Finding Bigfoot (In Stereo) PG Call of Wildman Call of Wildman (BET) 96 19 96 106 & Park: BETs Top 10 Live Top 10 Countdown Wild Out Wednesday. PG Soul Plane (2004) Kevin Hart. Passengers and crew party aboard an airliner.Steppin: The Movie (2009, Musical Comedy) Darius McCrary. PG-13 (BRAVO) 254 51 254 Tabatha Takes OverTabatha Takes OverHousewives/OCTop Chef: Texas (N)Million Dollar ListingHappensMillion (CC) 27 61 27 33Daily ShowColbert Report 30 Rock 30 Rock Chappelle Show Chappelle Show South Park MA South Park MA South Park MA South Park MA Daily ShowColbert Report (CMT) 98 45 98 28 37 Blue Collar Comedy Tour: The Movie (2003) Jeff Foxworthy. PG-13 Vince Vaughns Wild West Comedy Show: 30 Days & 30 Nights Hollywood to the Heartland R Blue Collar Comedy Tour: One for the Road (2006) (CNBC) 43 42 43 Mad Money (N)The Kudlow ReportCrime Inc. American GreedAmerican GreedMad Money (CNN) 40 29 40 41 46John King, USA (N)Erin Burnett OutFrontAnderson CooperPiers MorganAnderson CooperErin Burnett OutFront (DISN) 46 40 46 6 5Shake It Up! G GoodCharlie A.N.T. Farm G Austin & Ally GSo Random! GShake It Up! G Jessie G A.N.T. Farm G Austin & Ally G Austin & Ally G Austin & Ally G A.N.T. Farm G (ESPN) 33 27 33 21 17SportsCenter (N)College Basketball College Basketball SportCtr (ESPN2) 34 28 34 43 49NFL32 (N) College Basketball College Basketball SportCtrBasket (EWTN) 95 70 95 48DanaGalleryDaily Mass EWTN Live GSaintRosarySaintsThe FaithWomen (FAM) 29 52 29 20 28 Raising Helen (2004, Comedy-Drama) Kate Hudson, John Corbett. PG-13 The Parent Trap (1998, Comedy) Lindsay Lohan. Reunited twin girls try to get their parents back together. PG The 700 Club PG (FLIX) 118 170 Celebrity (1998, Comedy-Drama) Hank Azaria, Kenneth Branagh. R Unstrung Heroes (1995) Andie MacDowell. PG I Am David (2004) Ben Tibber. (In Stereo) PG My Lifes in Turnaround (1993) (FNC) 44 37 44 32Special ReportFOX Report The OReilly FactorHannity (N) Greta Van SusterenThe OReilly Factor (FOOD) 26 56 26 DinersDinersRestaurant: Im.Restaurant: Im.Restaurant: Im.Restaurant: Im.Worst Cooks (FSNFL) 35 39 35 College Basketball Dan Patrick College Basketball Basket (FX) 30 60 30 51Two and Half Men Two and Half Men Two and Half Men Two and Half Men Jennifers Body (2009, Horror) Megan Fox, Amanda Seyfried. Premiere. R Jennifers Body (2009, Horror) Megan Fox, Amanda Seyfried. R (GOLF) 727 67 727 CentralEuro TourGolfGolfOn the Range (N)On the RangeOn the RangePGA TourCentral (HALL) 39 68 39 45 54Little House on the Prairie PG Little House on the Prairie PG Little House on the Prairie Rage PG Little House on the Prairie PG Frasier PGFrasier PGFrasier PGFrasier PG (HBO) 302 201 302 2 2 Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1 (2010) Daniel Radcliffe. Something Borrowed (2011) Ginnifer Goodwin. (In Stereo) PG-13 Luck Ace pitches a deal. MA Real Time With Bill Maher MA (HBO2) 303 202 303 Seabiscuit (2003, Drama) Tobey Maguire. (In Stereo) PG-13 GasLand (2010) Josh Fox. (In Stereo) NR Ring Life: Sergio Hereafter (2010, Drama) Matt Damon, Jay Mohr. (In Stereo) PG-13 (HGTV) 23 57 23 42 52Sell LASell LAHuntersHouseProperty Brothers GIncomeKitchenHouseHuntersProperty Brothers G (HIST) 51 25 51 32 42To Be AnnouncedRestorationRestorationRestorationRestorationOnly in America With Larry the Cable Guy RestorationRestorationOnly in America With Larry the Cable Guy (LIFE) 24 38 24 31Wife Swap Funderburgh/ Warren PGWife Swap Harris/ Weasel PG Wife Swap King/ Reeves PG Wife Swap (In Stereo) PG Wife Swap Women trade places. PG Wife Swap Ghani/ Stallone PG (LMN) 50 119 The Perfect Child (2007, Drama) Rebecca Budig, Lochlyn Munroe. NR A Killer Among Friends (1992, Docudrama) Patty Duke, Loretta Swit. Dangerous Child (2001, Drama) Delta Burke, Ryan Merriman. (MAX) 320 221 320 3 3 Big Stan (2007) Rob Schneider. (In Stereo) R Face/Off (1997) John Travolta. An FBI agent and a violent terrorist switch identities. R X-Men: First Class (2011, Action) James McAvoy. (In Stereo) PG-13 (MSNBC) 42 41 42 PoliticsNation ( N ) Hardball MatthewsThe Ed Show ( N ) Rachel MaddowThe Last WordThe Ed Show

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C8WEDNESDAY, MARCH7, 2012CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLECOMICS Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377 Project X (R) ID required. 1:20 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:45 p.m. Dr. Seuss The Lorax (PG) In Real 3D. 12:30 p.m., 7:15 p.m. No passes. Dr. Seuss The Lorax (PG) 2:45 p.m., 5 p.m. No passes. Tyler Perrys Good Deeds (PG-13) 12:45 p.m., 3:45 p.m., 7 p.m. Ghost Rider (PG-13) 12:50 p.m., 3:50 p.m. 7:30 p.m. This Means War (PG-13) 1 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:20 p.m. The Vow (PG-13) 1:20 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:10 p.m. Journey 2: The Mysterious Island (PG) In Real 3D. 4:10 p.m., 7:05 p.m. No passes. Journey 2: The Mysterious Island (PG) 1:10 p.m. Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864 Project X (R) ID required. 2 p.m., 5 p.m., 8 p.m. Dr. Seuss The Lorax (PG) 1 p.m., 5:30 p.m. No passes. Dr. Seuss The Lorax (PG) In Real 3D. 3:15 p.m., 7:50 p.m. No passes. Wanderlust (R) ID required.1:20 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7:55 p.m. Act of Valor (R) ID required. 1:45 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m. Tyler Perrys Good Deeds (PG-13) 1:30 p.m., 4:15 p.m., 7:15 p.m. This Means War (PG-13) 1:35 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:20 p.m. Ghost Rider (PG-13) In Real 3D. 1:50 p.m., 4:50 p.m., 7:40 p.m. No passes. Journey 2: The Mysterious Island (PG) 1:10 p.m. Journey 2: The Mysterious Island (PG) In Real 3D. 4:10 p.m., 7:05 p.m. No passes. The Artist (PG-13) 1:25 p.m., 4 p.m., 7 p.m. Peanuts Garfield For Better or For Worse Sally Forth Beetle Bailey Dilbert The Grizzwells The Born Loser Blondie Doonesbury Kit N Carlyle Rubes Dennis the Menace The Family Circus Betty Big Nate Arlo and Janis Frank & Ernest Times subject to change; call ahead. TodaysMOVIES W LYWTP STNLWZH NCK DST SAAHDL XHCXMH WT RHTHVSM WT S XCGWLWEH BSN, LYHT NCKVH S MKDPN WTJWEWJKSM. GSZ HMMWCLLPrevious Solution: There are some days when I think Im going to die from an overdose of satisfaction. Salvador Dali (c) 2012 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 3-7Pickles WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Contemp. WXOF-FM 96.3 Adult Mix WEKJ FM 96.7, 103.9 Religious WSKY 97.3 FM News Talk WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies WFJV-FM 103.3 s, s, s WRZN-AM 720 Adult Standards LocalRADIO Editors note: Louis Campos now runs the cipher clue upside-down for more of a challenge.

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EDUCATIONCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLEWEDNESDAY, MARCH7, 2012 C9 Classifieds ClassifiedsClassifieds In Print and Online All The Time! TO ADVERTISE CALL:352-563-5966OR PLACE YOUR AD ONLINE ATwww.chronicleonline.comCONNECTING THE RIGHT BUYERS WITH YOUR MESSAGEBUSINESS HOURS:MONDAY-FRIDAY 8:00 A.M. 5:00 P.M. CLOSED SATURDAY/SUNDAY WE GLADL Y ACCEPTPublication Days/DeadlinesChronicle / Daily .......................................1 PM, Daily Homefront / Sunday ............................. ....3 PM, Friday Chronicle / Sunday ............... ....................4 PM, Friday Chronicle / Monday ..................................4 PM, Friday Sumter County Times / Thursday .............. 1 1 A M T uesday Riverland News / Thursday .......................2 PM, Monday South Marion Citizen / Friday ....................4 PM, T uesday W est Marion Messenger / W ednesday . . . .4 PM, Friday 0008KWF Page C3 000AN30 000AN34 Domestic Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 Medical #1 AffordableCNA Prep Course CPR-AED-Free Book Am & PM classes getyour cna.com 352-341-PREP (7737) AR/ASSISTANTFor busy office. Medical experience a must.(352) 489-2995 CNA/HHAsApply At HOME INSTEAD SENIOR CARE 4224 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy, Lecanto Clerical/ Secretarial Contractor seeking a full timeMotivated Candidate with Human Resourcesbackground and payroll experience. Candidate must possess computer skills in Micro soft Windows plus Excel and be able to adapt quickly to company accounting program. Knowledge of HR policies, procedures, rules and regulations and payroll required. Must be dependable and detail oriented for this position. Background checks and drug screening will be required after hiring. Send resume to jrogers@fandhcontractors.com. Personal/ Beauty HAIR STYLISTFT/PT Immediate Openings, CallSue 352-628-0630 Your world first.Every Dayvautomotive Classifieds Lost Lost Bird, Sun Conure, Bright Colors, Friendly, Talks Floral City Area REWARD (352) 726-3185 Found Found Med Size Dog, 1 -2yrs old, Female Withlacoochee Forest Lost around 1 mo. Cattle Dog/ Mix 352-302-4801 Announcements May The Lady of Guadalupe be praised, adored & loved. Lady of Guadalupe Pray for us. St Jude worker of miracles pray for us. St Jude helper of the hopeless pray for us. Seafood FRESH JUMBO SHRIMP 15ct.@ $5 per lb Stone Crab@ $6 per lb delivered 727-771-7500 Situations Wanted Will Babysit and/or Tutor, Any Day Spanish or English pls call and ask for Yuly 352-270-4141 Child Care Personnel NOW TAKING APPLICATIONS For Exp TeacherFor 2 & 3 yr old Class (352) 527-8440 TEACHERFulltime, Exp. Req. CDA PreferredTODAYS CHILD(352) 344-9444 Free Offers KEEPyour used auto parts in Citrus Co. Dales Auto Parts. & Savage Pays top $$$. 352-628-4144 we are taking donations of kids clothes,toys,furniture,baby stuff,ect.call and we will come pick it up.jamie @ 352-586-9754.thank you Good Things to Eat FRESH JUMBO SHRIMP 15ct.@ $5 per lb Stone Crab@ $6 per lb delivered 727-771-7500 Lost 8 mos old BRINDLE & White Boxer cropped tail but ears not done. Red collar female last seen. Service Dog REWARD 3/6, Beverly Hills area Canvas Grocery Bag orange, Inverness or Floral City Sentimental Value (352) 341-0292 Long Haired Chihuahua, Male 9 months old Loved, Missed, would love to have him home (352) 628-3228 Lost Cat-female, calico, max short tail, 9 years old, declawed, no teeth, never been outside, North Athen/W Cushions/Citrus Blvd. area. She had her collar on with her rabies tag. Please call (352) 465-1696 or 352-212-5076 REWARD $1000. No Questions ask. Min Pin Female 10 lbs name Zoey, Needs meds. last seen Sun 8/7Holiday Dr off Turkey Oak Crystal River(352) 257-9546 352-400-1519 Todays New Ads R WRIGHT Tree Service Tree removal & trimming. Ins. & Lic.# 0256879 352-341-6827 TREADMILL WESLO fold up treadmill $50 352-637-1965 Free Services $$ TOP DOLLAR $$Paid for Junk Vehicles,J.W. 352-228-9645 $$ CASH PAID $$ For Wrecked, Junk or Unwanted Cars/Trucks. $$ (352) 201-1052 $$ $$ CASH PAID $$for junk vehicles. 352-634-5389 BUYING JUNK CARS Running or Not CASH PAID -$200 & UP (352) 771-6191 FREE REMOVAL appls, motors, mowers, scp.metals & other services. 352-270-4087 FREE REMOVAL OF Scrap Medal, Mowers Appliances and MORE Call (352) 224-0698 Free Offers 42 Round Wood Table FREE (352) 527-7183 Dachshund Hound 2 yrs. old, paperwork Outside dog, needs room to play Needs Good Home (352) 476-5321 Free fertilizer horse manure mixed with pine shavings great for gardens or mulch 352-628-9624 FREE Oak Firework already cut, u haul 6545 S Dolphin RD FLoral CIty Fresh cut palm trunk, 12 diameter, 5to 6 lengths 795-8800 LOUVERED BI-FOLD DOORS w/ hardware 2 SETS -8ft by 12 and 4 sets of 8ft by 9 Citrus Hills (352) 341-4103 Todays New Ads CHEVY, S10, 4 x 4 cold AC, 4.3, V6 motor, auto, runs good $2,800 (352) 212-4835 DODGE, 1500 Sport, regular cab, 28K mil. Like New $16,000 (352) 419-7703 Retired dont need it! EXPERIENCED ROOFING CREW & ROOFERSMust have Truck Tools & Equipment.Apply In PersonAAA ROOFINGCrystal River (352) 563-0411 HERNANDO 3/2/2Rent to Own $850 mo www.rickybobs.com 352-613-5818 HOMOSASSA Wooded Lot on Lee Woods Drive, 112 x114ft River access, but not on river $7,000. 352-621-1664 INVERNESSFri. & Sat. 8a-2pm 2 Family Sale, Tools, Household, LOTS OF STUFF, Downsizing 8823 E. Cresco Lane Inverness Golf CC MAID TO ORDER House Cleaning (352) 586-9125Have V acum W ill T ravel May The Lady of Guadalupe be praised, adored & loved. Lady of Guadalupe Pray for us. St Jude worker of miracles pray for us. St Jude helper of the hopeless pray for us. Todays New Ads Todays New Ads Todays New Ads Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at The Garden Shed, 2423 S. Rockcrusher Road., Homosassa. Call Louise at 352-503-7063 for more information. Withlacoochee Technical Institute would like input from community members regarding what classes they would like to see offered at the school. To offer suggestions, log on to wtionline.cc, then click on Community Education and fill out a suggestion form. The College of Central Florida has announced that its January to June 2012 CF Institute schedule is now available. The schedule can be viewed online at CFItraining.cf.edu and includes hundreds of classes on arts, culture and leisure; business, industry and leadership; child care and family; computers; driving; insurance; real estate; security officer training and more. Printed copies are available at the Ocala Campus, 3001 S.W. College Road; Citrus Campus, 3800 S. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto; Levy Center, 114 Rodgers Blvd., Chiefland; and the Hampton Center, 1501 W. Silver Springs Blvd., Ocala. For information, visit CFItraining.cf.edu or call 352-8738504. The College of Central Florida is offering a variety of non-credit courses: A Writing Your Memoirs course is being offered at the Citrus campus. Whether your life has been filled with disasters, unbelievable events or even if your life has been mundane, a memoir is a way to find meaning in the world, make sense of your existence, leave a legacy for family and friends, and maybe help someone benefit from your experience. This course will cover the ways to make this project happen. The class will be offered once more this semester: sign up for Monday, March 26, from 6 to 8 pm. Cost is $25 and includes handouts. How to Write and Publish Your Own Book will be presented from 6 to 8 p.m. Mondays, April 9, 16 and 23. The six-hour course will cover all the specifics, details, advantages and disadvantages of writing and publishing. Fee is $49 and includes handouts. Instructor is Claudine Dervaes, author-publisher of 15 books, who founded her company, Solitaire Publishing Inc., 31 years ago. Her travel writing appears in the Travel Talk column of the Ocala Star Banner and Gainesville Sun For more information and registration, call the College of Central Florida at 352-2491210 or 352-746-6721, or go online to CFItraining.cf.edu. The College of Central Florida offers basic motorcycle training in cooperation with the Motorcycle Training Institute. The Motorcycle Basic Rider Course is a research-based and action-oriented curriculum designed to teach beginning motorcyclists of all ages the physical and mental skills necessary to ride safely on the road. It includes basic motorcycle operation, maximum effective braking techniques, turning skills, obstacle avoidance maneuvers, classroom instruction and 10 hours of on-cycle training. The course is on Fridays from 5:30 to 9 p.m., Saturdays from 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., and Sundays 7 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. The course fee is $195 until March 31 and includes student workbooks and use of helmets and motorcycles. RiderCoaches for the program are all experienced motorcycle operators who are nationally certified by the Motorcycle Safety Foundation. For enrollment, call MTII at 877-308-7246. The schedule is also available at www.mtii.com. For more information on these course and registration, call the College of Central Florida at 352-249-1210 or 352746-6721 or go online at CFItraining.cf.edu. Join the excitement as the Homosassa Public Library begins a new Celebrate Reading program from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Tuesdays. Celebrate Reading is a session consisting of two programs geared toward helping preschool and elementary schoolage children develop literacy skills, improve their reading and gain a love of books. The first program, PAWS to Read, gives children the opportunity to build confidence in their reading ability by reading aloud to a certified therapist. The second program, Reading Pals, pairs teens and younger children together. Teens read storybooks aloud to one or two younger children at a time. Children may wish to draw or write about a story they like. Listening to stories, talking about stories and reading aloud are great ways to improve literacy skills while having a good time. For information, call the youth librarian at 352-6285626. Whispering Pines Park will offer the following classes at the Recreation Building. All classes require preregistration and payment at the park office. Call 352-726-3913 for information or visit www.invernessfl.gov (Recreation and Leisure classes). Genealogy Strategies Stumped in your search? Attend this class to get started again with Jackie Reiss. Classes are April 21 and May 12 from 9 a.m. to noon. Cost is $15. Beginning Genealogy Offered on Saturdays, March 10, 17, 24 and 31 from 10 a.m. to noon. Four classes for $20 with instructor Jackie Reiss. Want to find out where you came from? Reiss will show you how to find them, where to look and what to believe about the information you find. Scrapbooking Sherri Geick offers weekly scrapbooking classes on Tuesdays from noon to 4 p.m. Cost is $7.50 for each class. Bring your own photos, supplies and scrapbook. Geick will help you put it all together to create those special memories your family will treasure through each generation. Geick also offers all-day or half-day scrapbooking workshops. Come spend the day creating your photo memory book. Cost is $25 for the whole day or $12.50 for a half day of fun and fellowship and making memories. Dates are April 28 and May 19. MISCELLANEOUS Lecanto Middle School will host a talent show at 6 p.m. Friday, March 9, with concessions opening at 4:30 p.m. The talent show will be presented at Curtis Peterson Auditorium with advance tickets to be purchased at the school for $3; at the door they are $5. For more information, call Joellen Collazo at 352-7462050, ext. 4727; email collazoj@citrus.k12.fl.us. The College of Central Florida, in partnership with the Early Learning Coalition of Marion County Inc., will host the 24thannual Early Childhood Education Conference on Saturday, March 24, with keynote presenter Jack Hartmann, a nationally recognized childrens singer. The conference will be held from 7:15 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Ewers Century Center of the CF Ocala Campus, 3001 S.W. College Road. The fee for this workshop is $30 before March 19 or $50 at the door. Attendees can participate in nearly 40 workshop sessions and discover ideas to encourage children to learn through play and participate in meaningful learning activities. Hartmann owns a successful music and book company, Hop 2 Music and Press Inc. As a counselor, social worker and trainer, he has worked with children, families and human service professionals for more than 25 years. His highly regarded educational songs are used by teachers and sung by children in schools across the Unites States and around the world. To register or for more information about this event, call 352-873-5804 or email Marybeth Kyle at kylem@cf.edu. Hernando Elementary School is looking for donations of working Kindles Nooks, iPod Touches, iPads, Internet tablets, digital cameras and digital recording devices to be used by our students in the classroom. If you have any used but working electronic devices from the list above or would like to donate a new electronic device, contact Heather Bone or Laura Manos at 352-726-1833 Monday through Friday, between the hours of 8:15 a.m. to 4:15 p.m. If you would like to contact someone outside of these hours, call Heather Bone at 352-462-4768. Citrus High School class of 1982 wants to share its 30th class reunion with other classes, primarily those that graduated from 1978 through 1985. Any graduates of CHS, however, are also invited. Reunion coordinator Jeff Hudson said faculty and staff from those years are also invited. The multi-class reunion effort is in conjunction with the 100th anniversary of CHS. The reunion will be July 13 through 15 at Grand Cypress Resort in Orlando. Festivities will start Friday night with a cocktail reception by the pool. Saturday will be family day around the pool, which just went through a multimilliondollar renovation. Saturday night will be a semiformal dinner/dance with contests and door prizes for recognition of most changed, least changed, who travelled furthest, most children, most grandiose, etc. After the dinner and program, there will be a deejay for dancing. Cost for the reunion for both days is $125 per couple; $100 for individuals. Those who wish to attend only one evening may do so for $80 per couple; $60 for singles. Grand Cypress offers a special rate of $139 per night, good for two nights prior and two nights following the event, for a total of six nights. Almost 100 people have committed to attending so far, but Hudson requests help in tracking down class members. To help, or to RSVP to attend, email Jeff Hudson at jhudson 4992@yahoo.com. Boys & Girls Clubs of Citrus County Central Ridge and Robert Halleen clubs seek mentors to work with their members. The two clubs have received federal grants through Boys & Girls Clubs of America, allowing mentors to come into the clubs to serve as tutors and special friends of members. All mentors will undergo complete background security checks with fingerprinting. Cost of background checks will be covered in most cases through grant funding by the Boys & Girls Clubs of Citrus County. Mentors may be assigned more than one child. A training session will be done prior to mentoring. All mentoring will be done at the club sites. Those who are interested may call Amy Stonestreet at 352-270-8841 or Lane Vick at 352-621-9225. The Evelyn Waters Boys & Girls Club on North Apopka Avenue in Inverness is ready to enroll new members. The club provides quality programs and services that enhance the lives of club members and shape their futures. Participation provides daily access to five core program areas: education and career development, character and leadership development, health and life skills, the arts, and sports, fitness and recreation. Fees for the afterschool program are $60 per month with the before-school programs costing $20 per week. Discounts are available for families with more than one child. Some scholarships may be available. Clubs open at 6 a.m. until the bus transports them to school, and in the afternoon until 6 p.m. Call club director Cindy Beane at 352-341-2507 for more information. Take Stock in Children is a mentoring program that offers a college scholarship and the promise of hope to deserving youths in Citrus County. Take Stock scholars join the program in the sixth through eighth grades. One of the benefits of being a scholar is having the opportunity to work with a mentor. The program is actively seeking male and female role models to help support active student scholars, as well as new students who will soon be entering the program. Call Pat Lancaster, program coordinator at 352-422-2348 or 352-344-0855 for more information about the program and to sign up for the mentor training. CHALKContinued from Page C4

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ntrnt)-26(fb)-26()]TJ /T1_1 1 Tf 14.3 0 0 11 775.7754 1549.5117 Tm ( n)-27(rf)-27(b)-27(trfn n n b b n n 000AN32 000ALYJ Be at least 18 years of age. Possess a valid drivers license. Possess proof of liability insurance. Routes are 7 days a week, early morning hours. Email: mgaouette@chronicleonline.com or bring resume to 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River There are immediate opportunities for independent contractors to manage and grow single copy newspaper routes in Citrus and Marion Counties YOU CAN OWN YOUR OWN BUSINESS!! 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 8 X X G G Z Z For more information on how to reach Citrus County readers call 352-563-5592. Apartments Unfurnished -4./'-$1 -rn;FBf(Df HDBDJ:>Cf)D+:HGf #*(*...-n1nC5HC7? IH=@f=B7@8ffACft G97fn $)1 -) ..49K@=J!JQ=J GJF=JFF9'G +G-=LK+G0EGCAF? r*G6=9J)=9K= J=MJFr-GGD :G9LMJFr-GGD :G9L rCErF;JEA ff !'*-'$/4!0G:D;7D6HF6BEn ;>G=>C<9D8@n86CD: %DC7D6HF:CH6AGfr9Ef>C8AG.6H /1:A:8HF>8fK6A@HDF>J:F /F6>AG C9BEn !F>:C9AM+A68:HD'>J: Mobile Homes In Park .JED;H?:=;'7D:?D=nrP*GN= AF GFGJK9D=r/=9KGF9:D= btf Real Estate For Rent ) #MO HOIJ7B-?L;H!B btf 1?;MEKHM;8I?J; )7JKH;E7IJr9EC #..#*2$/5&2JH;:r =;DJbtf Mobile Homes In Park #*(*....=KL%GMKAF?39DM= *G<=JF@GE=K>JGE GJ)=9K=LG,OF >JGEEGr r6142<::A;6@E .;2D02=@6<;.9b&.>8 f $)1 -) ..27J;H?D= ;D@EOC;DJ9BK8>EKI; EDI?J;I>K<CEH;-r MJF btf *C'6@:-DIGG:6I 7:9FDDBf76H=f L(#nL!' FDDBnLG=:9nGH6AA 86FEDFHn2>H=A68DD8=:: @K6H:FG(#+n f .JED;H?:=;'7D:?D= n GEEr/=K9D=K KL9JLAF? #AF9F;AF?9N9AD fff btf Mobile Homes and Land ';97DJE+r*9QF9JHFIG DICHM 698FCCAff 65HJ7>EKI; EKHBEIJ?IOEKH=7?Dr btf btf 2 .*( '. ;.;06;4B.69./92 rrf1; H;CE:I>;:A I9HDHCHFHJA 97HFHJH7ff #;HD7D:Ef!EH;IJ'7A; +GJL@!4N=JQ FA;=%r9;J= =F;=< *MD;Hbtf Mobile Homes For Sale N(#7I AK2EMKL*GN=( btf // )/$*) ')*2) -.%*. )) 2 OHrM7HH7DJO N9EDIJHK9J?ED KF=H7:;?DIKB7J?ED 7FFB?7D9;FA=r ;B?L;H;:I;JKF M?J>>;7J IJ;FIIA?HJ?D=EDBO rrCEr2rrr $D9BK:;IEC;EMD;H$DIrBBff 2 .*( '. #AF9F;AF?N9AD9:D= rGN=JC >MJFEGN=fAFJ=9EH?P;: B?GK?:7JEHr2;BM7OI >7L;D;M?DL;DJEHO BBff EH9EC;8O /7OBEH(7:;#EC;I #EC;I9F< +H?9;:JE .;BBbtf $)1 -) ..27J;H?D= ;D@EOC;DJ9BK8>EKI; EDI?J;I>K<CEH; .?D=B;M?:;IJ7HJ?D=r'EJ H;DJCEr# ?D9BK:;:rCErFKH9>7I;r ff ')f)f#*( !'*-'$/4 $"#*( />; DJ;HJ7?D;H EL;HIGr7F; EDGK?;JF7L;:HE7: D;7H9>7?DEMJF *%GF%GEGK9KK9/AN=J ODK K@LDGF?L=JE ff Waterfront Mobile For Sale !'*-'$/4;9JHGJLGF;9F9D K@=MJFAK@=>%OQr &FN=JF=KK ff ff ./*!/# ./);M%79E8I;D KIJECN 8?=;7J?DA?J9>;D N9EDIJHK9J?ED*. MH7FOHrM7HH7DJO ;BED=7J;:JE?B;J 9>?D7I?DAIIJEHC :EEHr'7H=;HEECIr (KIJI;;8;?D=;BI;r *DBOEH :EMD rCE2rrr BBff Pets "' +0++$ K@G CBr:9A5@9G A5@9fn5@GC<5J9 @CC8I>KD:+KFI OCKGD@.:=./.E >><:n -*//2 $B -+0+.O==CK?AJDK:GQK K@GLK% >AJE ff ./*3),%#)IH GH5B8=B;.7ID 3CF?=9n>IGHK?GC@8n f!CC8K=H< ?=8Gn%F9;nJ9H 7<97?98n89KCFA98 5B8G7JIF;9?7B F;HIEDQ#7FFO?HJ>:7OQ M?J>79B7II?EJE BBEKHB7II?M7I>;HrCE btf $)1 -) ..)/.+ $' .;9r:;F FHEfH7J;:EL;HCEr F;H?E:?DJ>;$)1 -) .. 2/ -!-*)/n+7HA MF?;HI?D= ;D@EOC;DJ9BK8>EKI; EDI?J;I>K<CEH;->EC; FBKIr->EC; ?D9BK:;I#rr87J>+7HA(E:;B r+;JI9EDI?:;H;:r .;9J?ED799;FJ;:r btf $)1 -) ..27J;H?D= ;D@EOC;DJ9BK8>EKI; EDI?J;I>K<CEH; !KHD?I>;:->EC; M?J>9;DJH7Br ff Mobile Homes For Sale EK8B;M?:; N )/!/"9LAF(AL ;GEEMFALQ-GGD +A;= GFMDDEAJJGJ DA?@LKDAC=F=Or btf DC8:6A:92:6EDCG +:FB>HDIFG: )S."0)-**( !.#%0(*.#-$(+ ;LrH=JD: .JED;H78F;HB8 <=DAN=J=< ff 2 "0).*C.>H:"IC.B>H=>C< Utility Trailers 5+0''/-$' -. );M0I;:0J?B?JO D9BEI;: ''/KIJECK?BJ+7HJI /?H;I2>BI-;F7?HI /H7?B;H#?J9>;I );MNEF;D KJ?B?JOMH7CF 0I;:N;D9BEI;: MH7CF #MOHOIJ7B-?L;H ff "0'!/*'& /-$' -.' .'7H=;IJ.;B;9J?ED 'EM;IJ+H?9;Ir *<<;H?D=);M0I;: H=EKJ?B?JOJH7?B;HI /H?FB;HEMD0J?B?JO/-' NMD;MIF7H; r N D9BEI;:M 1DEI;H;7HH7CF :EEHr /H7?B;H/?H;I IJ7HJ?D=7Jr ff #MO';97DJE Sell or Swap /;BBJ>7JIF;9?7B F;HIEDQ#7FFO?HJ>:7OQ M?J>79B7II?EJE BBEKHB7II?ED;%E; GJ2FO9FL=<*Gf LGJ;Q;D= ff 2)//*#*0. EH(*$' DOH;7 ED:?J?ED EH.?JK7J?EDr BBbtf Pets &.>;BJ?;C7B; K9:D=O@AL=EGKr @GMK=LJ9AF=<@GE= J9AK=
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