<%BANNER%>
Citrus County chronicle
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02699
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 03-04-2012
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:02699

Full Text



PGA: Golfers still tightly packed at Honda Classic, /B1


TODAY & Monday morning
HIGH Cooler and drier air
63 moving in.
LOW PAGI
38
MARCH 4, 2012


I --tS UI NI D :


SO YOU KNOW
Due to early
deadlines, certain
content today-
including lottery
numbers and
some sports
coverage do not
appear.





Is glass
half-empty or
half-full?
March is National
Optimism Month and
we're looking for both
optimists and pes-
simists for a fun, lively
exchange of opinions
on various topics. If
people accuse you of
being Mary (or Mar-
vin) Sunshine or
Gloomy Gus or
Gladys, contact
Nancy Kennedy at
nkennedy@
chronicleonline.com
or 352-564-2927.
Must be able to come
to the Chronicle office
in Crystal River during
a week day and be
willing to have your
picture in the paper.
-From staff reports


COMMENTARY:


--I-
Manatee mix
Guest writer Lisa Moore
describes growing up in
Crystal River./Page Cl

BUSINESS:









Windows 8
The newest version of
Microsoft's operating
system does away with
the Start bar./Page Dl


HOMEFRONT:


A mother's lament


Woman says daughter is caught

in clutches of legal drug


Editor's note: The
Chronicle has withheld the
real names of the mother
and daughter because of
the sensitivity of the story.
A.B. SIDIBE
Staff Writer
These days Maria is liv-
ing a mother's terrible
lament she feels her


teen daughter is caught up
in the intoxicating haze of
drug addiction and abuse.
And she is at a loss about
what to do to wrest her
child from the claws of a
drug that is legal and read-
ily available at most corner
stores.
Police are also faced
with a similar dilemma,
but feel they may be mak-


ing headway in their ef-
forts to make the "scourge"
illicit.
The drug commonly
known by its brand names
K2/Spice is highly popular
with young people (ages 14
to 24), according to Citrus
County Sheriff's Office
Tactical Impact Sgt. Justin
Ferrara. The drug is also
called legal marijuana.
The mother said her 18-
year-old daughter was an
otherwise normal high
school senior, and she no-
ticed a precipitous change


in her as soon as she
started on the drugs.
"She has moved out of
our home into what
amounts to a slum mobile
home, quit her senior year
of high school and is now
collecting food stamps and
is proud of it," the mother
said.
"Since this has hit our
family in a big way, I find


myself di
others an
is not one


Flavorful festiviti


DAV
Kayla Abrams, 7, Lilly Abrams, 5, eat strawberry shortcakes Saturday at the Floral City Strawberr
festival has a hometown feel with vendors selling food and sharing their arts and crafts. The fest
today from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. for anyone wanting to get some Citrus County-grown strawberries pro
Groves.

Strawberry festival continues today in Floral Ci


SHEMIR WILES
Staff Writer
FLORAL CITY It
may be the Floral City
Strawberry Festival's sil-
ver anniversary, but good
weather, plenty of fresh
berries and loads of ven-
dors made the day
golden.
"I enjoy seeing ,,
all the vendors,"
Citrus Hills resi-
dent Barbara
Philipp said Sat-
urday morning, To see
"and the straw- photos
berry shortcake is on this
delicious." www.c
The festival, online.
sponsored by the
Citrus County Chamber
of Commerce and the Cit-
rus County Chronicle,
celebrates its 25th year
this weekend. Tobey
Phillips, chamber special
events coordinator, said


I
, '
s
hr
c


the chamber estimates
more than 25,000 visitors
would visit Floral Park
for the two-day event of
food and fun.
Though the day didn't
officially begin until 9
a.m., Phillips said people
were lined up at 8:15,
waiting for the gates to
open.
For the first
time, the Floral
City Strawberry
Festival is the
same weekend as
nore the Florida
click Strawberry Festi-
tory at val opening week-
onicle end in Plant City.
om. And while
Phillips said the
chamber fielded a num-
ber of questions involving
mix-ups between the two
events, a bit of competi-
tion didn't seem to have
an affect on foot traffic.
"Obviously, we're not


Alice Abbott and Sally Cottrell from Beve
walking sticks made by Tommy Miller f
Creations. The canes and walking sticks


all variety of Florida woods.
having an issue," Phillips
said pointing to the large
crowds of people.
And with 47 new ven-
dors, she said, there have
been a few "growing
pains," but all in all, it ap-
peared people were out
enjoying the event.


Securing
pints of str
verness re
Griffith an
both agree
berry fe
pleasant.


State seeks Medicaid payback from sa


Nice chair
Antiques expert John
Sikorski advises a
reader about this French
armchair./Page E6

Annie's Mailbox ......A14
Classifieds ............. D5
Crossword ...........A14
Editorial ............ C2
Entertainment ..........B6
Horoscope ................B6
Lottery Numbers ......B4
Lottery Payouts ........ B6
Movies ................. A16
O bituaries ................A6


6. I!1 J!I |1 0 o


CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff Writer
Citrus is reeling along-
side 66 other counties from
a potential state demand
for Medicaid repayments.
The state estimates
counties owe about $325.5
million in back billing, ac-
cording to Lindsay Ubinas,
Citrus County public infor-
mation officer
"For Citrus County, the
state says the bill stands at
$844,000," Ubinas an-
nounced in a media
release.
The sum of $844,000 rep-
resents a 15 percent dis-
count legislation proposes
for each county.
"County leaders are


WHAT: Special
budget workshop.
WHEN: 9 a.m.
Wednesday.
WHERE: Room 100,
Citrus County
Courthouse, 110 N.
Apopka Ave.,
Inverness.

wrestling with some harsh
decisions on what to cut
from the county's 2012-13
budget if certain proposals
are passed in the State
Legislature," the release
continued. "Citrus County
Commissioners could soon
be dealing with more un-
funded mandates."
State lawmakers cur-


rently are considering leg-
islation that requires re-
payments in a system
called the Medicaid Cost
Shift (H.B. 5301), which
concerns disputed Medi-
caid billing.
Florida's counties are
required to pay a portion of
the state's share for certain
Medicaid services. The
Florida Senate is propos-
ing a statutory change that
would require every
county to pay inaccurate,
old bills and would with-
hold each county's half-
cent sales tax distribution
for Medicaid each month
going forward, regardless
of the bills' accuracy, ac-
cording to the Florida As-
sociation of Counties


(FAC). Lo
would ha
state for a
lieve a ch
The FA
during th
Medicaid
consistent
such issue(
dress in
takes in e
of reside
charges
rates, wh
backlog o
Citrus (
portion o
for hosi
nursing h
residents
say the c(

See


BP begins


to put spill


behind

it with


settlement

Associated Press


scusslig it wii NEW YORK BP's set-
d honestly... there tlement deal with thou-
person that I talk sands of victims of the 2010
Gulf of Mexico oil spill is a
See Page A4 major step toward putting
the worst oil spill in U.S.
history behind it.
BP says it will not have to
| increase the $37.2 billion it
has set aside to pay for the
spill, and analysts say the
le S settlement could allow BP
to quickly resolve outstand-
ing claims by states and the
federal government
If approved by a federal
court in New Orleans, Fri-
day's deal would settle law-
suits filed by some 100,000
individuals and businesses
affected by the spill. They
include fishermen who lost
work, cleanup workers who
got sick and others who
claimed harm from the oil
giant's April 20, 2010,
disaster.
The accident destroyed a
drilling rig called the Deep-
/ water Horizon, killed 11
workers, spilled an esti-
mated 200 million gallons of
oil and disrupted thousands
of Gulf Coast lives. The spill
soiled sensitive tidal estu-
aries and beaches, killed
wildlife and closed vast
areas of the Gulf to com-
mercial fishing.
The momentous settle-
.. ment announced late Fri-
day will have no cap to
compensate the plaintiffs,
though BP PLC estimated it
VE SIGLER/Chronicle would have to pay out about
y Festival. The $7.8 billion, making it one of
tival continues the largest class-action set-
vided by Ferris tlements ever.
The settlement would
come out of a $20 billion
ify trust the company had es-
iJ tablished to pay these types
of claims. The trust has $9.5
billion in assets. Whatever
remains in the trust after
----- -: victims are paid out would
S. come back to BP
The settlement does not
resolve state claims against
the company or federal
fines and penalties that
could total $20 billion to $25
billion. BP is also mired in
lawsuits with some of its
partners in the Macondo
project in the Gulf.
Also, individual victims
are not required to ared to agree to
rly Hills look at terms of the settlement and
arom Odd Wood they could choose to bring
Sare made from separate cases.
But analysts say individ-
g a couple of ual claims aren't expected
rawberries, In- to amount to much, and
sidents Leann they now expect BP to be
d Hilda Butler able to move quickly to set-
ed the straw- tle the rest of the claims
estival was against it.
"They are clearing the
decks for a potential deal
Page A2 with the government that
would end this litigation
and enable them to move
beyond the Gulf oil spill,"
said David Uhlmann, a Uni-
les tax versity of Michigan Law
les served as chief of the Jus-
ical governments tice Department's environ-
e to apply to the mental crimes section.
eudif thUhlmann called the deal
refund if they be- fair for both sides and said
arge isxplainedthacorrect it cleared what appeared to
C explained that rs, be the biggest hurdle to a
bills have been global settlement in the
tly wrong, with case. "The only trial I
es as incorrect ad- thought we would see in
formation, mis- this case is the one that just
establishing proof went away," he said.
ency, duplicated Fadel Gheit, an analyst at
and incorrect Oppenheimer & Co., said
ich has led to a the settlement shows BP is
f disputed bills. willing to pay in order to try
County pays for a to put the oil spill behind it.
f Medicaid costs That willingness, he said,
)italization and will help the company
tome beds for its reach deals with govern-
. County leaders ments and other plaintiffs.
county did its due BP is the largest oil pro-
untyddiducer in the Gulf, and it


Page A4


See Page A4


CITR US COUNTY






www.chronicleonline.com
; Best Community Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community $1 VOLUME 117 ISSUE 210





A2 SUNDAY, MARCH 4, 2012


LOCAL


dren 12 and younger admit-
ted free.
Strawberries from Ferris
Groves will be available for
sale from the Capital City
Bank booths at gates 2 and 3
at the festival and at the
county auditorium for shut-
tle bus riders $12 for a flat
and $7 for a half-flat.
Free parking for the event
is available at the Citrus
County Fairgrounds in In-


verness, with a shuttle serv-
ice running continuously to
and from Floral Park. Shut-
tle service is $1 per person,
round-trip. Handicapped
parking and bus service is
available at the fairgrounds.
Limited handicapped and
other parking is available at
Floral Park.
New this year, a shuttle
bus, donated by Sunflower
Springs Assisted Living fa-


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE
cility in Homosassa, will be
available during the festival
to bring people into Floral
City, with two stops: Ferris
Groves on U.S. 41 and the
public parking lot behind
Floral City Public Library,
giving festivalgoers the op-
portunity to visit the Floral
City downtown area and the
local shops. Shuttle bus
service between Floral Park
and Floral City is free.


Your sexual health is an important part our your life, your well-
being, and your relationship. If you are a sexually active female
who is losing your sexual desire. Meridien Research may have
a study for you.


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Crowds packed into Floral Park on Saturday for the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce-
sponsored Floral City Strawberry Festival. This is the 25th anniversary for the festival, and
the crowds and vendors keep growing each year.


FESTIVAL
Continued from Page Al
Griffith especially en-
joyed paying $4 before get-
ting on the shuttle at the
fairgrounds so when she ar-
rived at the park, she could
be stamped and walk right
in without waiting in line to
pay at the gate.
"How about that? That's
the best way to go," she said.
Nancy Foryan, who was
selling a wide variety of
stained and fused glass art,
said it was her first time
being a vendor at the straw-


berry festival.
"I'm excited about being
here," she said. "It's quite
the crowd."
Though Foryan, who
came all the way from Cler-
mont, hadn't sold any art by
late morning, she said it was
still early, and people were
taking her business card so
she was pleased.
Mindy Finlay and her
husband, Tom, said they
drove over from Citra to be
vendors in this year's straw-
berry festival.
"It's fun ... the traffic is
just constant," she said.
Mindy said she just
started her floral arrange-


ment business a few months
ago and recently, she's cre-
ated a new business, which
involves turning undergar-
ments into flower-like
arrangements that people
can buy
On his way to the car after
enjoying a full day at the fes-
tival, John Beagen from In-
verness said the festival was
well organized this year.
"The lines were fast," he
said. "There were plenty of
booths ... I saw everything."
Festival hours are from 9
a.m. to 4 p.m. today at Floral
Park on U.S. 41, 2 1/2 miles
south of Floral City. Admis-
sion is $3 per person; chil-


Qualified participants will receive study-related
procedures at no cost:
* Evaluation, routine lab work, investigational
medication
* Physical exams and counseling
Compensation of up to $400 for time
and travel may be available (includes up to
8 study visits).
Medical insurance is not necessary.


Meridienir

Research

FSD10001C2


352-597-8839

16176 Cortez Blvd.
Brooksville, FL 34601

Mildred V. Farmer, MD
Board Certified, Internal Medicine


m STPTESBURG-TA MPA-BOKASMILLE i-BADN


Hi, CITRUS COUNTY WE'RE YOUR NEW NEIGHBOR!


for qualified customers only


mainstreetbb.com


0 mainstreet


888-807-FAST(3278)


FOmAOTR


A5445 Commercial Way, Spring Hill ,-''

A K E L 352-596-9900


DENT L


Amir Akel, DMD
www.akeldental.com


CONVENIENTLY LOCATED ON US 19
NEW PATIENTS AND EMERGENCIES WELCOME
Hablamos Espafiol

ADULTS & CHILDREN WELCOME

CLEANING, FILLINGS AND SEALANTS j
Most Insurances Accepted -
Accepting: Chase Health Advance And CareCredit
*D0150, D0274, D1110. The patient and any other person responsible for payment has a right to refuse to pay, cancel payment, or be reimbursed for i,
other service, examination, or treatment that is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discount. I
fee, or reduced fee services, examination, or treatment. Cosmetic dentistry is not recognized as a specialty area by the American Dental Association,,
the Florida Board of Dentistry. Some restrictions may apply.


MICAID AiCEPTyr


,, Al







Page A3 SUNDAY, MARCH 4,2012



TATE &


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE



District seeks parents' help in solving IMS traffic dilemma


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff Writer
INVERNESS When Citrus
County School District officials
thought they found a traffic solu-
tion at Inverness Middle School in
January, reality hit them square in
the jaw.
A new traffic pattern that
brought long lines of frustrated
drivers, children late for classes
and confused parents came to an
abrupt halt in just three days.
But the problem of congestion
from dropping off and picking up
children at IMS didn't go away, so
district officials went to where
they hope to find the solution:
parents.
More than 60 parents partici-
pated in an online survey about
traffic patterns at IMS, leading
district officials who are ready to
make some subtle changes they


hope will improve the bottlenecks
that occur each day at IMS en-
trances off both U.S. 41 and Ella
Avenue.
"Parents have helped us iden-
tify what some of the problems
are," school board member Pat
Deutschman said.
Deutschman had believed the
district's biggest mistake in the
traffic pattern change that oc-
curred after the winter holiday
break was not asking for parental
feedback first.
She said parents who drop off
and pick up their children from
the school know the issues
firsthand.
"We need to take time to involve
our parents," she said.
Chuck Dixon, director of the dis-
trict's department of planning and
growth, who organized the survey,
said a meeting is set for 5:30 p.m.
April 16 at the school to discuss


survey responses with parents.
While the responses touched on
a variety of areas, some stood out:
The Key Training Center
picks up clients near the Ella Av-
enue entrance on mornings
around the same time parents are
dropping off children at school.
Dixon said Key Training Center
has agreed to adjust its schedule
to avoid IMS morning congestion.
Crossing guards create traffic
backup on Ella, Turner Camp
Road and U.S. 41 by stopping traf-
fic for one or two vehicles leaving
the school. On the Ella entrance,
parents said the crossing guard
stops traffic to allow children to
cross, but not to allow motorists to
turn left onto Middle School
Drive, the street that borders the
school.
Dixon said survey results have
been sent to the Citrus County
Sheriff's Office for review.


Congestion at the parent
drop-off/pickup point causes
backup. Dixon said when spring
break ends March 19, parents will
find two stacking lanes for drop-
off and pickup instead of one.
The biggest problem identi-
fied by parents is the lack of a traf-
fic signal at U.S. 41 and Middle
School Drive.
U.S. 41 is two lanes at that inter-
section, and school traffic is mon-
itored by a crossing guard.
There is no center turn lane, so
the guard stands on the yellow
center line directing and stopping
traffic on U.S. 41 and Middle
School Drive.
"I have seen crossing guards get
run into, students nearly hit, and
frequent collisions where there
really needs to be a light at high-
way 41 and Middle School Road,"
one parent wrote.
Said another: "Chaos! There


needs to be a light at the intersec-
tion of Hwy. 41 and Middle School
Road. That is a dangerous mess."
Dixon said the district is dis-
cussing with the state Department
of Transportation to get a traffic
signal at that intersection and the
district may seek federal trans-
portation funding to pay for it.
However, DOT approval for the
signal is uncertain because the
state is buying right-of-way for the
eventual widening of U.S. 41.
Dixon said he believes a traffic
signal is the best solution, espe-
cially for safety reasons, at U.S. 41
and Middle School.
"Any time you have a traffic con-
trol officer instead of a signal, it's
less efficient," he said. "The ideal
situation is to get a signal. We need
to move in that direction."
Chronicle reporter Mike Wright
can be reached at 352-563-3228 or
m wrigh t@chronicleonline. com.


Around

THE STATE

Tallahassee

Insurance overhaul
bill clears key panel
The Senate Budget Com-
mittee has OK'd financial
changes to Citizens Property
Insurance Corp. and the
Florida Hurricane Catastro-
phe Fund to gird them before
one or more major storms hit
Florida.
But critics say the changes
might end up causing policy-
holders to shoulder more of
the cost for post-hurricane
damage claims.
The committee on Satur-
day cleared SB 1346, affect-
ing Citizens, and an
amendment from committee
chair JD Alexander that dealt
with the hurricane catastro-
phe, or "CAT," fund. The vote
was 18-2, with Sens. Anitere
Flores of Miami and Jim Nor-
man of Tampa opposed. Both
are Republicans.

West Palm Beach

Occupy protesters in
city hall must leave
The dozen remaining Oc-
cupy Wall Street demonstra-
tors in West Palm Beach are
looking for a new location to
'occupy' after being told they
were trespassing at the for-
mer city hall.
Organizer Brien Huley said
they plan to occupy another
location when they leave
West Palm Beach.
-From wire reports


Campaign TRAIL

Steve Burch, Hank
Hemrick and Winn Webb -
Republicans for sheriff will
participate in a Citrus County
Republican Executive Com-
mittee forum at 7 p.m. Mon-
day, March 5, at the Realtors
Association of Citrus County
building at 714 S. Scarboro
Ave., off State Road 44, in
Lecanto.
Tom Chancey and
Michael Smallridge, Republi-
cans for county commission
District 5, will participate in a
forum at 9 a.m. Saturday,
March 10, at the American Le-
gion Post 155 on S.R. 44 near
Crystal River. The Nature
Coast Republican Club and
Republican Women's Club
are sponsoring the forum. In-
formation: Fred or Rosella
Hale, 352-746-2545.
The Women's Political
Network of Citrus County will
host Republican candidates
and elected officials at a wine-
tasting event from 5:30 to 7:30
p.m. Tuesday, March 20, at
Copp Winery in Crystal River.
The public is invited. Informa-
tion: Jeanne Mclntosh, 352-
746-5660 or 352-484-9975.
The Citrus Hills Civic As-
sociation is hosting a candi-
dates' forum at 7 p.m.
Thursday, Oct. 4, at the Citrus
Hills Golf and Country Club.
The Campaign Trail is a
listing of political happenings
for the 2012 election season.
Send events or campaign
fundraisers to Mike Wright at
mwright@chronicleonline.
com.


Day at the park


S-


':- : I
DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Inverness Rotary Club members are spending the weekend renovating the Whispering Pines Recreation Build-
ing. The club got a matching grant for the community project, and since the Inverness Rotary Club was involved
with the development of the Inverness park, they felt it was only right to spend the grant and their weekend time
to help the community.

Inverness Rotary rehabs rec. building at Whispering Pines


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff Writer

INVERNESS
It's not often that you see
Judge Mark Yerman on his
knees, sweating while doing
community service, but
there he was Saturday as
he and fellow members of
the Inverness Rotary Club
worked on two renovation
projects at the Whispering
Pines recreation building.
While Yerman and sev- .
eral other men chiseled
the wood spacers from be-
tween the stone slabs of
the building's entrance Yer
walkway, other members
were inside renovating the aidedRo
kitchen.
The project is partially funded
by a $1,072 grant from the Rotary
district organization, with the rest
of the money coming from the
local club. Rotary member Dora
Hunt said the full project will


a
r
a
Cie


ON THE NET
Whispering Pines Park:
http://fl-inverness.civicplus.
com/index.aspx?N ID=165
Rotary Club of Inverness:
www.invernessflrotary.org/

probably cost between
$2,500 and $3,000.
"We wanted to do some-
thing hands-on for the
community- get involved
and do the labor our-
selves," Hunt said. "An-
other project that we're
irk funding, but Daly Con-
nan struction will do the labor
rian renovating the bathrooms."
eanup. When completed, the
front entrance walkway
will have fresh river rock and the
kitchen will have new vinyl floor-
ing and freshly painted walls and
cabinets.
Pati Smith, director of parks
and recreation for the city of In-


verness, said Inverness Rotary
has always played an important
role at Whispering Pines Park.
"They were the ones who were
instrumental in getting the grant
money and developing the idea for
a park and coming to the city of In-
verness many years ago. That's why
you see the Rotarian wheel out
front," Smith said. "And they con-
tinue to do projects at the park."
She added that the work being
done at the recreation building
has been much needed and is
much appreciated. Besides a vari-
ety of classes that meet in the
building, including quilting,
scrapbooking and genealogy, clubs
such as TOPS, Citrus and Inver-
ness garden clubs, Citrus Water-
color Club, Citrus County Unit of
Parliamentarians and a bridge
club regularly use it.
Plus, the YMCA uses it for its
summer camp.
"So, this is a good project for
them to be able to help us with,"
Smith said.


Group donates $5,000 for King's Bay cleanup


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff Writer

Kings Bay Rotary's ef-
forts to clean up the bay got
a $5,000 boost from another
group primarily known for
fighting plans by the U.S.
Fish and Wildlife Service to
change the rules of conduct
in the area.
Save Crystal River Inc.
recently made the donation
to Art Jones, leader of the
voluntary effort to rid the
once-pristine waters of the
bay of noxious filamentous
algae called lyngbya.
"It should show people
we are more than just about
the rules. We are about the
bay and keeping it clean


INFORMATION
* Art Jones: Call 727-642-7659.
* Rotary Club of Crystal River Kings Bay:
http://kingsbayrotary.org/


and what Art is doing is
great for all of us," said
Jewel Lamb, whose hus-
band, Steve, is on the
group's board of directors
and made the donation on
behalf of the group.
This comes on the heels
of another by Cheryl and
John Phillips of a $75,000
diver vacuum to suck up
the invasive weed that in-
terferes with boating,
swimming, fishing and


even manatees.
"We are really glad that
there are good people will-
ing to step forward and
help us clean the bay,"
Jones said.
He said this latest dona-
tion will set in motion ef-
forts to modify pontoon
barges into catch baskets to
help drain water from the
weeds when they are lifted
from the bay
Jones and his volunteers


have been raking what they
could out of the bay since
last fall and hope to have
the bay restored to its pris-
tine past by the end of the
project in five years.
Jones said volunteers
and donors are needed to
help keep the project mov-
ing forward. To help in the
efforts or for information,
contact Jones at 727-642-
7659. The group also has a
YouTube video. Search
under "Savekingsbay" or
click on the link with this
story at www.chronicle
online.com.
Chronicle reporter A.B.
Sidibe can be reached at
352-564-2925 or asidibe@
chronicleonline.com.


Justice Dept.

wants trial

on voting

changes

Associated Press

WASHINGTON The
Justice Department is oppos-
ing changes in Florida voting
procedures and said it wants
a trial in the dispute, a move
that could impact the state's
August primary elections.
In court papers filed Fri-
day, Florida officials strongly
opposed having a trial and
noted that the federal court
hearing the case in the Dis-
trict of Columbia wants suffi-
cient time to issue a decision
before the August primaries.
The state is seeking court ap-
proval for changes that
shorten the time for voter
registration groups turning in
registration forms to 48 hours
and narrow the time frame
for early voting to 10 days be-
fore Election Day
Florida says the court in
Washington can decide the
case on the basis of informa-
tion already submitted in the
lawsuit
The state sued the federal
government last August,
seeking a ruling that the
changes in state law comply
with the Voting Rights Act of
1965. Five Florida counties
are covered by the Voting
Rights Act
Section 5 of the act re-
quires all or parts of 16 states
to be cleared by the Justice
Department's civil rights di-
vision or a federal court be-
fore carrying out changes in
elections. The states are
mostly in the South and all
have a history of discrimi-
nating against blacks, Ameri-
can Indians, Asian-
Americans, Alaskan Natives
or Hispanics.
The Florida counties cov-
ered by Section 5 are Collier,
Hardee, Hendry, Hillsbor-
ough and Monroe.
"As to the third-party voter
registration and early voting
changes ... the United States'
position is that the state has
not met its burden ... that the
two sets of proposed voting
changes are entitled to pre-
clearance under Section 5 of
the Voting Rights Act," the
Justice Department said in
its court filing.
In the joint court filing with
the federal government, the
state said it "strongly opposes
the United States' attempt to
extend this action well into
the summer. The court was
quite clear that it wanted to
have this case fully submitted
for its review by early May,
because this would allow the
court sufficient time to issue
a decision before the August
primaries."
In a separate case in fed-
eral court in Tallahassee,
civic groups said Florida's
new Republican-backed
election law unconstitution-
ally restricts voter-
registration drives.
The Florida League of
Women Voters, the Rock the
Vote group that focuses on
young people, and the
Florida Public Interest Re-
search Group Education
Fund said the election law in-
fringes their First Amend-
ment rights of free speech
and freedom of association.


I


I






A4 SUNDAY, MARCH 4, 2012



DRUG
Continued from Page Al

to that does not have a story
to tell about how it has af-
fected the life of someone
they know."
She said a lot of other par-
ents are confused and do
not know what to do about
what she calls a scourge.
"I have heard horror story
after horror story, but why is
nothing being done?" she
asked.
Ferrara said his office
and a host of other law en-
forcement organizations
have been working tire-
lessly to make the synthetic
cannabinoid illegal, but the
manufacturers always try to
stay a step ahead of author-
ities by altering the chemi-
cal makeup to pass muster.
The drug is made like an
incense and has a warning
that it is not for human con-
sumption, but young people
flock to it and often smoke
it.
The substance got na-
tional attention when Holly-
wood actress Demi Moore
was reported to have
smoked the same incense-
type drug before suffering
seizures and being admitted
into a hospital last month.
"There has been multiple
incidences of young people
being involved in car
wrecks, a drowning, being
confused, having paranoia
and hallucinating while on
this stuff," Ferrara said.
"It's a very dangerous
drug and that's why we are
trying to have legislation to
strengthen the restrictions
on the chemicals they use to
manufacture it," Ferrara
said.
He said authorities went
through similar issues with
the bath salts and lawmak-
ers moved to ban some
those substances and now


STATE/LOCAL


The substance

got national

attention when

Demi Moore was

reported to have

smoked the drug

before suffering

seizures.

the manufacturers proudly
announce the changes they
have made to the chemicals
in order to stay legal.
"It's a constant battle, but
I think this time they (law-
makers) are trying to ban all
the chemicals and make it
really difficult for the man-
ufacturers to get around the
rules," Ferrara said.
He said Florida House
bill HB1175 and Senate bill
502 are currently going
through the legislature and
urges residents to call their
representatives to make
sure they pass.
The mother said her
daughter, who moved out in
December, came back home
recently and efforts are
under way to have her com-
plete high school via online
classes, but she said the
struggle continues because
the daughter is still using.
"When I contacted our
sheriff's office, they told me
that I am just one of many
parents in this predicament
and that since it is legal,
there is nothing that they
can do about it," she said.
"The deputy I talked to said
unfortunately she would
probably end up in the
Emergency Room or even
dead. Can you imagine how
that made me feel?"
Chronicle reporter A.B.
Sidibe can be reached at
352-564-2925 or asidibe@
chronicleonline. com.


BP
Continued from Page Al

needs to be able to continue
to drill for oil there to en-
sure its future, he said.
"They have been telling
the government: 'We'll do
whatever it takes. We're just
going to pay and get this
over with. We want to be
back in business,"' Gheit
said.
The main targets of litiga-
tion resulting from the ex-
plosion and spill were BP,
Transocean, cement con-
tractor Halliburton Co. and




MEDICAID
Continued from Page Al

diligence in keeping
billing paperwork up to
date.
The Florida Senate al-
ready passed its version of
the Medicaid Cost Shift.
Now H.B. 5301 will be ne-
gotiated this week in the
House of Representatives
as part of the budget con-


Cameron International,
maker of the well's failed
blowout preventer. BP, the
majority owner of the well
that blew out, was leasing
the rig from Transocean.
The Justice Department
sued some of the compa-
nies involved in the ill-fated
drilling project, seeking to
recover billions of dollars
for economic and environ-
mental damage. The de-
partment opened a
separate criminal investi-
gation, but that probe hasn't
resulted in any charges.
The companies also sued
each other, although some of
those cases were settled last


ference process.
If passed, counties
would be allowed to pay
their bills over three
years. Overdue payments
would be collected by
withholding revenue shar-
ing funds (such as a
county's share of state
sales tax) from the delin-
quent counties.
"The state will subtract
$288,000 for three years
from the $2.8 million we
receive each year in State


year In one of the pending
lawsuits, BP has sued
Transocean for at least $40
billion in damages.
A series of government
investigations have spread
blame for the disaster
In January 2011, a presi-
dential commission found
that the spill was caused by
time-saving and money-sav-
ing decisions by BP, Hal-
liburton and Transocean
that created unacceptable
risk. But the panel also con-
cluded that the mistakes
were the result of systemic
problems, not necessarily
the fault of any one
individual.



The Senate

passed its

version of the

Medicaid Cost

Shift.

Revenue Share," Ubinas
said. "The county starts
paying Oct. 1, 2012."
An amendment to H.B.
5301 could ease some


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

In September 2011, how-
ever, a team of Coast Guard
officials and federal regu-
lators issued a report that
concluded BP bears ulti-
mate responsibility for the
spill. The report found BP
violated federal regula-
tions, ignored crucial
warnings and made bad
decisions during the ce-
menting of the well a mile
beneath the Gulf of
Mexico.
BP has repeatedly said it
accepts some responsibility
for the spill and will pay
what it owes, while urging
other companies to pay
their share.


pressure from counties if
passed, according to Ubi-
nas. It would offer a larger
discount of 26 percent in-
stead of the currently pro-
posed 15 percent to cover
backlogs. It also would
stretch payments over five
years instead of three.
At $884,000, Citrus is in
better shape than some
counties. Hernando faces
a $2.7 million bill; Alachua
$11 million; Orange -
$24 million.


legal notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle



i Fictitious Name Notices...........................D7

Bid Notices...................................................D7

B Meeting Notices........................................D7

Miscellaneous Notices.............................D7

Notice to Creditors/Administration............ D7

S. Self Storage Notices.................................D7

LNSurplus Property..........................................D7


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
sh
sh
sh
sh
sh
sh
sh
pc
sh


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
sh
sh
sh
s

s
pc
sh
sh


MARINE OUTLOOK


Northwest winds from 20 to 25 knots.
Seas 6 to 8 feet. Bay and inland
waters will be rough. Showers will be
possible early, then look for sunshine
to take over in the afternoon today.


87 65 NA 88 71 NA

THREE DAY OUTLOOK fExcu daily
TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 63 Low: 38


4" MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
), High: 71 Low: 41
Mostly sunny to partly cloudy


TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
High: 73 Low: 47
Mostly sunny to partly cloudy, breezy

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 87/60
Record 88/20
Normal 76/47
Mean temp. 74
Departure from mean +12
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday 0.00 in.
Total for the month 0.00 in.
Total for the year 3.23 in.
Normal for the year 6.34 in.
"As of 6 p.m. at Inverness
UV INDEX: 6
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Saturday at 3 p.m. 29.84 in.


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. (
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 49
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Juniper, Oak, Nettle
Today's count: 7.9/12


Monday's count: 1
Tuesday's count: 1
AIR QUALITY
Saturday was good with poll
mainly particulates.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR Ml
(MORNING)
3/4 SUNDAY 1:55 8:08 2
3/5 MONDAY 2:40 8:53 3


NOR MA
AFTERNOONO
2:21
3:06


CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
i- u R M Un IUfIT


SUNRISE TOMORROW....................
MOONRISE TODAY ..................
MOONSET TODAY.....................


0.5
0.7

lutants


&JOR
N)
8:33
9:19


.6:32 P.I
.6:51 A I
.2:59 P.I
.3:55 A.


1.


BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban


For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For
more information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's
Web site: http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi

WATERING RULES
Citrus County: Irrigation is limited to twice per week.
Even addresses: Thursday and/or Sunday before 10am or after 4pm.
Odd Addresses: Wednesday and/or Saturday before 10am or after 4pm.
No restrictions on fountains, car washing or pressure washing. Hand watering requires the
use of a shut-off nozzle.
PLEASE CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL NEW PLANT MATERIAL.
Questions, concerns or reporting violations, please call Citrus County 352-527-7669.

TIDES


*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Sunday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 1:42 a/10:57 a 3:49 p/10:47 p
Crystal River" 12:03 a/8:19 a 2:10 p/8:09 p
Withlacoochee* 11:57 a/6:07 a 10:58 p/5:57 p
Homosassa* 12:52 a/9:56 a 2:59 p/9:46 p


***At Mason's Creek
Monday
High/Low High/Lov
2:50 a/11:44 a 4:24 p/11:42
1:11 a/9:06 a 2:45 p/9:04
12:32 p/6:54 a 11:55 p/6:52
2:00 a/10:43 a 3:34 p/10:41 |


Gulf water
temperature


80
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 27.64 27.63 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 33.97 33.95 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 35.79 35.77 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 37.68 37.67 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level. Flood stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year. This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision. In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data. If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211.

THE NATION
"*si ... -- "' --* "" !,
S 50 .. ,-.'
Sn5 30s "

I I , | .....

So-- "6M'-e

B.... 70s on-o. l
A'g us ..


s."--
"" 'de 309
S/ BOS'.


Saturday Sunday
H L Pcp. Fcst H L


Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
M. Burlington, VT
M. Charleston, SC
M Charleston, WV
M. Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, N.H.
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
W Nashville


34
23
44 .43
47 2.09
50 1.25
50
36 .53
32
45 .41
37
34 .38
34
33 .03
59 1.12
39
55 1.48
31 trace
34
34
61 .16
35
28 .66
41
18
29
33
33
31
44
34 26
56
32
47
38
37
50
34
37
30
18 .02
53 .01
52 .77
33


.J
FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY

Saturday Sunday
City H L Pcp. Fcst H L
New Orleans 74 54 s 64 51
New York City 56 43 .13 pc 49 29
Norfolk 66 60 .56 sh 53 37
Oklahoma City 55 34 s 71 40
Omaha 42 25 rs 50 26
Palm Springs 78 43 s 79 57
Philadelphia 58 46 .13 rs 51 30
Phoenix 72 44 s 85 53
Pittsburgh 56 37 rs 37 23
Portland, ME 39 28 .62 pc 39 19
Portland, Ore 56 44 trace pc 55 40
Providence, R.I. 55 36 .32 c 45 24
Raleigh 65 53 .71 pc 53 34
Rapid City 45 13 pc 51 32
Reno 61 26 s 61 29
Rochester, NY 49 35 sn 27 14
Sacramento 69 35 s 72 42
St. Louis 47 34 rs 46 34
St Ste.Marie 32 15 .51 c 12 -7
Salt Lake City 41 27 s 51 35
San Antonio 65 51 .12 s 75 42
San Diego 74 47 s 78 54
San Francisco 69 42 s 67 47
Savannah 76 59 1.10 sh 61 42
Seattle 54 43 .05 pc 51 42
Spokane 43 34 c 49 36
Syracuse 52 39 sn 31 15
Topeka 48 29 pc 60 32
Washington 63 48 .16 c 50 32
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 90 Orlando, Fla. LOW -18 Angel Fire,
N.M.
WORLD CITIES


SUNDAY
CITY HIL/SKY
Acapulco 86/72/s
Amsterdam 46/41/sh
Athens 58/46/pc
Beijing 45/30/pc
Berlin 46/29/pc
Bermuda 71/68/c
Cairo 67/54/s
Calgary 50/27/pc
Havana 83/57/r
Hong Kong 75/68/ts
Jerusalem 55/45/sh


Lisbon
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Paris
Rio
Rome
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Warsaw


64/49/c
49/44/sh
61/41/c
68/42/pc
24/20/c
27/14/c
55/44/sh
87/73/sh
58/43/pc
80/68/sh
46/39/sh
28/17/c
41/23/pc


C I T R U S


C O U N TY


LHRKON1CLL
Florida's Best Communlty Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community

To start your subscription:
Call now for home delivery by our carriers:
Citrus County: 352-563-5655
Marion County: 888-852-2340
13 weeks: $36.65* 6 months: $64.63*
1 year: $116.07*
*Subscription price includes a separate charge of .14 per day for transportation cost
and applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352-563-6363 for details.
There will be a $1 adjustment for the Thanksgiving edition. This will only slightly
affect your expiration date. The Viewfinder TV guide is available to our subscribers for
$13.00 per year.
For home delivery by mail:
In Florida: $59.00 for 13 weeks
Elsewhere in U.S.: $69.00 for 13 weeks
To contact us regarding your service:

352-563-5655
Call for redelivery: 7 to 10 a.m. Monday to Friday
7 to 11 a.m. Saturday and Sunday
Questions: 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday to Friday
7 to 11 a.m. Saturday and Sunday
Main switchboard phone numbers:
Citrus County 352-563-6363
Citrus Springs, Dunnellon and Marion County
residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.
I want to place an ad:
To place a classified ad: Citrus 352-563-5966
Marion 888-852-2340
To place a display ad: 352-563-5592
Online display ad: 352-563-5592
I want to send information to the Chronicle:
MAIL: 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
FAX: Advertising 352-563-5665, Newsroom 352-563-3280
EMAIL: Advertising: advertising@chronicleonline.com
Newsroom: newsdesk@chronicleonline.com

Where to find us:
Meadowcrest
-.44 office
Si -NorvellBrianti Hwi 1624 N.
Dunkentield I Meadowcrest
Ave -- annondal Dr Crystal River,
A \ Meadowcrest FL 34429


i ICo.houS Inverness
Courthouse office
To mpkins St. o square
CID
S n 2 106 W. Main
S41 44 Inverness, FL
S 34450

Who's in charge:
G erry M u lliga n ............................................................................ P ub lish er, 5 6 3 -3 2 2 2
Trina Murphy ...................... Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232
C harlie B rennan ............................ .................................... Editor, 563-3 2 25
Tom Feeney .................................................... Production Director, 563-3275
Kathie Stewart .............................................. Circulation Director, 563-5655
John M urphy ........................ ............................ Online M manager, 563-3255
John M urphy.................................................... Classified M manager, 564-3255
Jeff Gordon .................................................. Business M manager, 564-2908
Mike Arnold.................................... Human Resources Director, 564-2910
Report a news tip:
Opinion page questions.................................. Charlie Brennan, 563-3225
To have a photo taken ........................................ Darlene Mann, 563-5660
News and feature stories ............................ Sandra Frederick, 564-2930
Community/wire service content.................... Sarah Gatling, 563-5660
Sports event coverage ...........................Jon-Michael Soracchi, 563-3261
S o u n d O ff ............................................................... .......................................... 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9
The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please
recycle your newspaper
www.chronicleonline.com
Published every Sunday through Saturday
By Citrus Publishing Inc.
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
Phone 352-563-6363
1 POSTMASTER: Send address changes to:
Citrus County Chronicle
1624 N. MEADOWCREST BLVD., CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429

PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL
SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280


MARCH14 MAU122 IMAH30


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstonns; w=windy.
@2012 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


...................


T ESNUS TONIGHT........


p
p
p
p
P
P
P





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Anglers flock to contaminated Texas reservoir


Associated Press


DONNA, Texas Signs
bearing a skull and cross-
bones dot the banks of a
reservoir and canal near
this town on the U.S.-Mexico
border, but the fishermen
standing in the reeds nearby
ignore them, casually reel-
ing in fish that are contami-
nated with toxic chemicals
and banned for human
consumption.
Some do it to quell their
hunger, others to make
some cash by selling the
carp, catfish and gar in
nearby neighborhoods.
"It's a great little lake,"
says Joe Garcia, 43, among
those fishing here one day
recently, where a carp with
the highest levels of toxic
PCB chemicals ever tested
in a fish was caught years
ago. He says he throws back
his catch but a lot of others
here can't afford to pass up
the meal.
The reservoir is one of
thousands of sites along the
U.S.-Mexico border where
industry, pesticide use and
population growth left haz-
ards in past decades that
still await solutions. Donna
is among the worst -earn-
ing a place on the Environ-
mental Protection Agency's
priority list and illus-
trates how slowly the gov-
ernment cleanup process
moves and how those strug-
gling for subsistence in poor


areas like this sometimes do
not wait.
Four years after the site
made the priority list, the
EPA plans to begin soon ex-
tensive sampling of the
water, sediment and fish
that could become the foun-
dation for a cleanup plan.
But with limited funds and
an elaborate process, the ef-
fort could take years, leaving
authorities to educate a pop-
ulation that is often more con-
cerned with daily survival
than warnings of potential
problems. Donna reservoir is
surrounded by fields of sway-
ing sugarcane and green leafy
rows of celery Workers who
toil in migrant agriculture
live in sparse neighborhoods
of trailer homes and campers
that border the canal. Some
stubbornly believe they can
cook the chemicals out of the
fish, state environmental offi-
cials say
"They just don't tend to
pay attention to that (sign),"
said Juan Salazar, 41, who
became so frustrated by the
fishermen crossing his yard
to reach the water that he
erected a small fence.
"There are too many low-
income families here that
may make a living selling
this stuff."
State and federal officials
have repeatedly gone door-
to-door to warn residents
since PCB contamination
was discovered in 1993.
Twice federal authorities


d o ..,.,, ; .,..y.,..
Associated Press
Joe Garcia fishes along Donna reservoir Feb. 13 in Donna,
Texas. The lake's fish have long been known to carry harm-


ful chemicals, but fishermen
warning signs.
used electric charges to kill
more than 35,000 fish in the
reservoir and the 612-mile
canal that brings water from
the Rio Grande. But the fish
- at least 22 species, in-
cluding tilapia and large-
mouth bass repopulate.
Every day, people are
drawn to the tranquil scene,
where birds feed along the
shores and fish constantly
break the surface. Officials
believe many area residents
fish there to supplement
their diet. But in the fatty
tissue of the fish are poly-


keep coming back in spite of

chlorinated biphenyls or
PCBs, an industrial residue


When mopping
isn't enough call...
Mr. Tile Cleaner
Showers Floors Lanais
S Cleaning & Sealing
Grout Painting
Residential &
Commercial
586-1816 746-9868


apparently emanating from
something dumped in the
canal years ago. Officials say
it could be a submerged
piece of machinery, but
haven't been able to find it.
PCBs, typically found as
oily liquids in electrical
equipment, have been
banned in the U.S. since
1979 after causing cancer in
animal testing. Researchers
believe the chemicals can
lead to lower birth weights,
suppress the immune sys-
tem and increase the risk of
cancer.
A carp caught in the
Donna canal 19 years ago
contained more than 1,500
times the limit of PCBs be-
lieved safe, the highest such
reading ever. Members of
the family who ate it had el-
evated PCB levels in their
blood. Readings taken since
then in the lake have been
lower, but still in the haz-
ardous range.
However, the health im-


DENTAL IMPLANTS

in Citrus County

Since 1990

( ltrus Oral & c
axillofaclalJurgery, PA
9 Robert L Brockett D.M.D., FA.A.O.M.S
6129 WEST CORPORATE OAKS DRIVE, CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429
www.citrusoms.com
...A... (352) 795-4994



'Will 5c_,ean


5usic 'Festival 2012

From Noon
Friday, March 9
To Sunset
Sunday, March 11
at Sertoma Youth Ranch at On-Site Camping


For camping information, call 352-465-2167.
For more about the festival visit
www.willmclean.com
Cil Ik pN(l.E







MARCH
9.13
Citrus County Auditorium
Citrus County Fairgrounds -U.S. 41 S., Inverness

Sale Hours
Fri. 5-8 p.m.
with $5 donation
No admission charge for the following
Sat. 9 a.m.-4 p.m.
Sun. 1 p.m.-4 p.m.
Mon. 10 a.m.-7 p.m. (half price day)
Tues. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. ($3abag)
Great bargains in recycled reading!
Thousands of best sellers, large print, crafts,
cooking, health, children's, travel, CDs, DVDs,
games, puzzles, treasures, etc.
Proceeds benefit Friends of Coastal Region,
Central Ridge and Lakes Region Libraries and
Citrus County Library System.
www.foccls.org
For book sale information call
746-1334 or 527-8405 C II()NICI.E


DISCOUNTS AT THIS STORE ONLY


Sears CRYSTAL RIVER
S1801 NW US Highway 19


r All Ready
To Assemble
Furniture


All Fashion
Clothing

Amf %


C3>IJIIM


Everything Bed & Bath
4 0 J All Sheets, Towels, Blankets,
4 041 Comforters, Pillows & More!


All Tool Storage2 !


ALL SALES FINAL NO REFUNDS OR EXCHANGES. OPEN DAILY REGULAR HOURS. WE ACCEPT VISA, MASTERCARD, DISCOVER, AMERICAN EXPRESS AND SEARS
CARDS. WE ACCEPT SEARS GIFT CARDS. DISCOUNTS DO NOT APPLY TO PREPAID GIFT CARDS. INVENTORY IS LIMITED TO STOCK ON HAND. THIS STORE IS NOT
PARTICIPATING IN CURRENT SEARS CIRCULARS. THIS EVENT EXCLUDES ELECTROLUX. THE AUTO CENTER IS NOT PARTICIPATING IN THIS SALES EVENT.

YOURWAYS S *. 6'
SHUI' REWARDS .. 1


* Entertainment by Florida's
Best Songwriters and Singers
* Florida Songwriting Contest
* Workshops Arts and Crafts
* Food Children's Activities
* Bring your Lawn Chairs
Rain or Shine -


a%

I3>


pact on those eating Donna
reservoir fish is unknown be-
cause no health survey has
been conducted. A 2010 study
by Texas Department of State
Health Services estimated
nearly 4,000 people living
within a one-mile radius.
The EPA is planning a
community meeting in late
March to begin the process
that could lead to a cleanup
plan. One of the best-known
PCB cleanup efforts on a
much larger scale contin-
ues in New York's Hudson
River more than 27 years
after it made the priority
list. Tons of sediment have
been dredged from the
riverbed.
Though nearly a dozen
people were interviewed
near the reservoir for this
story, only one admitted to
eating the fish he caught, but
he then declined to speak
further there is a $500
fine for taking the fish, but
not if you throw them back


NATION


SUNDAY, MARCH 4, 2012 A5


g0





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries


Ann Averitt, 73
HERNANDO
On the morning of Feb. 26,
2012, Ann Averitt peacefully
passed away
If life was measured by
inches and
.t- the average
person was
a 12-inch
ruler, Ann
Averitt
S would
surely be a
!' yardstick!
Ann Ann was
Averitt born in
Paris, Ky.,
on Jan. 14, 1939, to William
and Ethel Wilson. Raised in
the horse capital of the
world, it was clear Ann was
destined to live her life
around horses. The family
would eventually move to
Upstate New York in the
summer of 1950. Several
years later, Ann would meet
and marry her high school
sweetheart, Donald Snyder.
By 1958, the love birds had
achieved their academic
goals and exchanged vows
on a frigid November after-
noon. Soon after their cere-
mony, they moved to the
tropical climate of South
Florida to start a family
In the fall of 1961, they
gave birth to their daughter,
Barbee Snyder. Shortly
after, in the spring of 1963,
their son Donald Snyder Jr.
was born. By 1965, the un-
certainties of life and love
had left Ann a single
mother. True to form, Ann
rose to the occasion and se-
cured a position with
Florida Power and Light.
After several years of work-
ing her way up through the
company, Ann was able to
purchase a modest home.
After several more years of
hard work and persistence,
Ann purchased a 5-acre
piece of land and built her
dream home, complete with
horses, stalls and pastures
she named "Highland
Farms."
After 30 years with
Florida Power and Light,


Ann achieved and held an
executive-level position.
Barely 50 years into her life,
Ann was offered an early re-
tirement package. With her
children gone perusing
their own lives, Ann ac-
cepted and was now living
her dream as a full-time
horse rancher
As the years went on, her
friends began relocating to
Citrus County and sur-
rounding areas. Subse-
quently the property around
Highland Farms began turn-
ing into subdivisions rid-
dled with houses. Now
living in a fishbowl that was
once her Shangri-La, Ann
decided it was time to sell
and relocate to Citrus
County.
Ann found and purchased
a beautiful 5-acre ranch
complete with stalls and
pastures in Hernando. She
would spend the next 16
years there enjoying her re-
tirement before returning to
South Florida, where she
was looked after by her fam-
ily before passing.
Ann led a full life, pursu-
ing her passions, including
riding horses, dancing,
kayaking, motorcycle riding,
yoga and socializing with
her friends both old and
new. She was an advocate
for animals and would stop
traffic to bring a stray to
safety. She was a kind, mod-
est, hardworking person
both respected and liked by
all who had the fortune to
know her
Ann will be sorely missed
by her children Barbee and
Donald Snyder; grandchil-
dren Leeann, Molly, Vir-
ginia and Luke; as well as
her sisters Lucinda Hill and
Nancy Clark; and brother
William J. Wilson.
A celebration of Ann's life
will be held on Sunday,
March 11, 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. at
the Kellner Auditorium, 92
Civic Circle, Beverly Hills,
FL. In lieu of flowers, the
family requests donations
be made to either Horse
Protection Association of
Florida, 20690 N.W 130th


FREE HEARING TEST
+ EVALUATION
_ The Hearing Aid
I/l ,,, B ,

A TTD-TBEL T


5 --1v Homosassa

*P .^ 352-621 -8000


I J. JL -i.
Inverness
352i- H57, 5 9w9I
352-586-7599


Ave., Micanopy, FL 32667 or
Humanitarians of Florida
Inc., PO. Box 924 Inverness,
FL 34451.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.

Claryce
Blair, 89
FLORAL CITY
Mrs. Claryce M. Blair, age
89, of Floral City, Florida,
died Thursday, March 1,
2012, in Inverness, FL.
She was born July 8, 1922,
in Hammond, IN, daughter
of the late Fred and Alma
(Hass) Hoover. She was a
homemaker and moved to
Floral City from Seymour,
Indiana, in 2003.
She was preceded in
death by her husband,
Chauncey, on October 29,
2001. Survivors include 4
sons, Phillip, Tony, Michael
and George; 8 daughters,
Marilyn, Antoinette, Rose,
Trina, Mary, Margaret,
Sharon and Grace; and 4
siblings, Vernon, Raymond,
Helen and Roy
Online condolences may
be sent to the family at
www. Hooper Funeral
Home.com. Arrangements
by the Inverness Chapel of
Hooper Funeral Homes &
Crematory

SO YOU KNOW
The Citrus County Chron-
icle's policy permits
both free and paid obit-
uaries. Email obits@
chronicleonline.com or
phone 352-563-5660
for details and pricing.







www.verticalblindsofhomosassa.com


SThan Just
Lorrie Verticals
BEST
,T, 2" Faux Wood
%-1 .Woven Woods
Cellular & Roman Shades
Plantation Shutters
Ado Wraps
Custom Drapery
Top Treatments
Etc.
5454 S. Suncoast Blvd.
(Hwy 19, next to Sugarmill Family Rest.)
CALiOW


Kathryn
Brye, 62
INVERNESS
Kathryn A. Brye, 62, of In-
verness, Florida, passed
away under the care of Hos-
pice of Citrus County
Wednesday, February 29,
2012, at her residence in
Inverness.
Kathryn was born on No-
vember 3, 1949, in Key West,
Florida, to the late George
and Josephine (Porcelle)
Whidden. She arrived in the
area in 2008, coming from
Deltona, Florida; and she
was a Registered Medical
Assistant. Kathryn was a
Catholic, and loved cooking,
animals, travel, and thrift
stores.
She is preceded in death
by one sister, Mary Shep-
herd. She is survived by her
loving companion of twenty
years, Jose Mauricio of De-
land, Florida; one son,
Christopher (Alexis) Wilkins
of Inverness, Florida; two
brothers, George Whidden
of Longwood, Florida and
Louis (Susie) Whidden of
Ocala, Florida; and her sec-
ond child "Blew," her faith-
ful dog; and eight
"grandpups."
A Celebration of Life
Service is scheduled for Fri-
day, March 9,2012,3 p.m., at
the Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home, Inverness, Florida.
In lieu of flowers, please
make donations to St. Jude
Children's Hospital, or Hos-
pice of Citrus County.
Arrangements under the di-
rection of Chas. E. Davis
Funeral Home with Crema-

To Place Your

'"In Memory"ad,
Call Mike Snyder at 563-3273
msnyder@chronicleonline. om
or
Saralynne Schlumberger at 564-2917
sschlumberger@chronicleonline.com
r- Cosig tmefoplaingad-
L i 4 aysprir t ru dae.


tory, Inverness, Florida.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. com.

William
Hannigan, 73
CRYSTAL RIVER
William R. Hannigan
("Bill," "Roger"), 73, of Crys-
tal River, died Feb. 27, 2012,
in Lancaster, Calif.
A private memorial was
Feb. 28, 2012, in California.
Cremation handled by: An-
telope Valley Cremation
Services.

Dalia
Lounders, 94
YBOR CITY
Dalia Badia Lounders, 94,
of Tampa (Ybor City) and
Miami, died Wednesday,
Feb. 29,
2012, in
Lecanto.
She was
born Aug.
15, 1917, in
i-N Tampa
(Ybor City)
to Irene
Badia. She
Dalia came here
Lounders from Miami
in 1996. She
was a mother, wife, grand-
mother and great-grand-
mother. Her hobbies
included cooking, crafts,
loving others well, sewing
and gardening. She was a
member of God's family She
was a member of Our Lady
of Grace Catholic Church in
Beverly Hills.
She was preceded in


.-M&. E. 2Wavl
Funeral Home
With Crematory
Burial Shipping
Cremation
Member of
It-er tional Order of the
G@TLDEN 4.
G U1 L D E .N,-..-:."-


For Information and costs,
.000Y.4 call 726-8323


death by her husband of 63
years, Nestor Lounders; son
Nestor Jr; five siblings; and
grandson Mitchell
Lounders.
Survivors include daugh-
ter Alice Kirk of Citrus
Springs; son R. Joseph
Lounders of Crystal River;
grandsons Douglas Kirk of
Miami, and Larry Kirk of
Roanoke, Va.; three grand-
daughters, Darlene Kirk of
San Francisco, Calif., Kim-
berly Osburn of Citrus
Springs, and Lisa Lounders
of Grand Cayman Island;
and four great-
grandchildren.
Sign the guest book at
ww. chronicleonline. com.

See Page A8


OBITUARIES
Obituaries must be
submitted by the
funeral home or society
in charge of
arrangements.
Paid obituaries are
printed as submitted by
funeral homes or
societies.
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear in
the next day's edition.






"Your Trusted Family-Owned
Funeral Home for 50 Years"




Burial
Cremation
Pre-Planning
Funeral Directors
C. Lyman Strickland & Tom L. Pace
1901 SE HwY. 19
CRYSTAL RIVER
352-795-2678
www.stricklandfuneralhome.com


CITRUS COUNTY
HOSPITAL BOARD


BOYS & GIRLS CLUBS
OF CITRUS COUNTY


llth

ANNUAL


united way
of Citrus County


Steak 8 Steak Dinner


Celebrating
20 Years
of Dedication
to the Children
of Citrus County

Great Live and Silent
Auction Items!!


Business Attire


Saturday
March 10, 2012
College of Central Florida
> Lecanto Campus, Bldg. L4
3800 S. Lecanto Hwy., Lecanto
2 >Reception 5:30 p.m.
Dinner 6:30 p.m.
$50 in advance $60 at the door
VIP Table $500 (table of 8)


For tickets or more information call
Emcee: Chad Halleen 621-9225/www.citrusbgc.com
Auctioneer: Sheriff Jeff Dawsy 621-9225 citrusbgc.com
Guest Speaker: Doug Johnson; former QB for UF, the Atlanta ... | j | V
Falcons & the Tennessee Titans .LI.L_. -
000AFCV


Successful appointees to the Associate Board of
Trustees will serve in an advisory capacity to
the Citrus County Hospital Board for the
promotion and accomplishment of its goals and
objectives.


Associate board members will be invited to
serve for a 1 year term. Initial appointees will
serve until fiscal year ending September 30,
2012 with new appointees beginning a
1 year term on October 1, 2012.


All interested citizens of Citrus County are
welcome to apply. Please send a letter of
interest, along with a current resume, to the
attention of Vickie LaMarche, Chief Operating
Officer, Citrus County Hospital Board, P.O. Box
1030, Inverness, FL 34451, no later than March
15, 2012.


Applications can be downloaded at
www.citruscountyhospitalboard.com or obtained
from Citrus County Hospital Board Office at
123 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida.



Michael Smallridge
Chairman
Citrus County Hospital Board


I


I


A6 SUNDAY, MARCH 4, 2012




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


\ Chevrolet Division
, l" I A .2'- .' .. .

CHEVRON1 ET'

hi:1 -", '-- ) -"'


k' 1 ,-*II J IP
':: .t I l _,':fll : ,
I i n '. : : ' , ,
H ^ ,:,,::.: '":' l .3 4 4 :

.. ..." L .- l/ ,,, t-,'.- ^ 1-0I' -II'.. .. ,

1 - l ip .:, - I u.Fi .i... '- -, |,-' -l
I A I1 -in . -ii ' : .. ... ,-I ,-,

-' -u -'l "i -.I I
"I-' ,I Ii l u-, I,- A ,_ I u iE _i .i ,- -,1 ii '- -
I : / e ] - -'': -.. I ? '-..I ,: r : l L L ,L -.' -'1 --, / r ,: ,' ' " "

|~ ~ ~~~~~~-.- -1' 1 ':" '- ... .. . . 1 *l- : t:;*' : ^^- '


-*-I I[ -.-. n |1'- '
1 i .I- u I '-


1.
\
2.




ii.

f



vi


L


II


I \.:..c.~ V:.*' curl V. -


ln.:ie '-- ,ei
/ -:'-1 - -


S


CRYSTAL
CHEVROLET
1035 S. Suncoast Boulevard
Homosassa, FL 34448
(352) 564-1971


MtARKl


EXCELLENCE
crystalautos.com


SUNDAY, MARCH 4, 2012 A7





A8 SUNDAY, MARCH 4, 2012


DEATHS
Continued from Page A6





Warren
Young, 88
GAINESVILLE
Warren Clarence Young,
88, of Oak Hammock,
Gainesville, Florida, passed
away peacefully on March 2,
2012, after a brief illness.
Warren was born to
Clarence and Atha (Hunger-
ford) Young in Mauston,
Wisconsin, on September 7,
1923. He graduated from
Mauston High School and
earned a B.S. in Mechanical
Engineering at the Univer-
sity of Wisconsin. Upon
graduation he served in the
U.S. Navy as a radio signal-
man until the end of WWII.
Warren met Mary Currier of
Kensington, Kansas, when
she was visiting family in
Wisconsin. They married on
March 3,1945, while he was
still in the service.
Upon returning to Wis-
consin at the end of the war,
Warren completed his M.S.
and Ph.D. in Mechanical
Engineering while he and
Mary raised their family
Warren taught at the Uni-
versity of Wisconsin until
his retirement in 1984. His
work as an educator with
USAID took him and his
family to an extended stay
in India. Later he and Mary
lived in Indonesia, where he
led an energy research
team. He was highly re-
garded as a teacher and
graduated many doctoral
students, was author of a
number of scientific papers,
and held a patent. He was
the continuing author of
"Roark's Formulas for
Stress and Strain," best
known as Roark and Young,
a world-respected hand-
book of engineering, and
coauthor of "Cook & Young,
Advanced Strength of
Materials."
Warren was a man of
quiet faith, great integrity,
boundless curiosity, and an
uncanny ability to fix just
about anything. He de-
signed and built his own
homes. He was a private
pilot. He and Mary were
quiet and effective leaders
in several church homes
over the years. They shared
a love of adventure, from
tent camping to cruises, and
traveled on five continents.
Warren was preceded in
death by his parents; his sis-
ter, Janet Amsrud of
Wausau, Wisconsin; sister-
in-law Lillian Currier of
Madison, Wisconsin; and
four nephews.
He is survived by his de-
voted wife of 67 years, Mary;
three sons, Richard (Laura)
of Brown County, Indiana;
James (Virginia) of Jones
County, Iowa; and John
(Lynne) of Eau Claire, Wis-
consin; three grandchil-
dren, Rebecca Young of
Alaska, Annabeth Young of
Indiana and Bryan Young of
Wisconsin; brother-in-law
Fred Currier; and numer-
ous cousins, nieces and
nephews.
At Warren's request, his
body was donated to sci-
ence. Memorial services
will be held at First Presby-
terian Church in Crystal
River, Florida, at 1:30 p.m.
Wednesday, March 7, and at
Oak Hammock at 1:30 p.m.
Thursday March 8. In lieu of
flowers, memorials may be
made to the church in Crys-
tal River or to one of Warren
and Mary's favorite chari-
ties, the Florida Sheriff's
Ranches Inc., Habitat for
Humanity, or Heifer Inter-
national, PO. Box 8058, Lit-
tle Rock, AR 72203.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. cornm.

OBITUARIES
U Free obituaries, run one
day, can include: full
name of deceased;
age; hometown/state;
date of death; place of


death; date, time and
place of visitation and
funeral services.
* If websites, photos,
survivors, memorial
contributions or other
information are
included, this will be
designated as a paid
obituary..
* A flag will be included
for free for those who
served in the U.S.
military. (Please note
this service.)


Fyrl Palmer, 78
HOMOSASSA
Graveside Services for
Mrs. Fyrl Joy Palmer, age 78,
of Homosassa, Florida, will
be at 10 a.m. Tuesday, March
6,2012, at Woodlawn Memo-
rial Park, Orlando. A Serv-
ice of Remembrance will
take place at 11:30 a.m.
Tuesday at South Ferncreek
Community Church, Or-
lando, FL. The family will
receive friends from 5 to 7
p.m. Monday at the Ho-
mosassa Chapel of Hooper
Funeral Homes. Online con-
dolences may be sent to
the family at www.Hooper
FuneralHome.com.
In lieu of flowers, dona-
tions, may be made to First
Baptist Church of Ho-
mosassa "Benevolent Fund
-Joy Palmer," PO. Box 578,
Homosassa, FL 34487.
Mrs. Palmer was born
May 21, 1933, in Fristoe, MO,
daughter of the late Guy and
Grace (Campbell) Young.
She died March 2, 2012, in
Apopka, FL. She worked as
an office assistant with an
appraisal company and
moved to Homosassa, FL,
from Orlando in 1944. Mrs.
Palmer was preceded in
death by her husband,
Samuel Palmer.
Survivors include two
daughters, Terri (Steve)
Soulard and Gail (Dale)
Byrd; sister, Bonnie Flick;
and four grandchildren,
Bryan Soulard, Shannon
Soulard, Megan Byrd and
Brooke Byrd.


Mildred
Riehl, 91
INVERNESS
The Service of Remem-
brance for Mrs. Mildred
Ruth Riehl, age 91, of Inver-
ness, Florida, will be held
10 a.m. Thursday, March 8,
2012, at the Oak Ridge
Cemetery, Inverness, FL
under the direction of the
Inverness Chapel of Hooper
Funeral Homes. Online con-
dolences may be sent to the
family at www.HooperFu-
neralHome.com.
Mrs. Riehl was born
March 31, 1920, in Colum-
bus, OH, daughter of Cecil
and Hazel (Thatcher) Wise-
man. She died March 2,
2012, in Lecanto, FL. She
moved to Inverness,
Florida, from Ft. Laud-
erdale in 1970 and worked
as a Secretary for Hooper
Funeral Homes, Inverness.
Mrs. Riehl was preceded
in death by her parents; her
husband, Palmer Riehl;
daughter, Barbara Lee Mer-
cer; and sister, Peggy Moore.
She is survived by her
grandson, Steve L. Rieser of
Inverness, FL; two great-
grandchildren, Steve L.
Rieser II of Cabot, AR, Vic-
toria Ashlea Quitter and her
husband, Matt, of Jack-
sonville, FL; and a great-
great-grandchild, Adiden
Parker Jean Rierser of
Cabot, AR.


John
Tomasheski, 82
HERNANDO
A Celebration of Life for
John Tomasheski will be
March 16,
2012, a Mass
at Our Lady
of Grace in
Be ver ly
Hills at 9
(L a.m. Follow-
ing will be a
repast at the
Knights of
John Columbus
Tormasheski on C.R. 486.
All friends
and family are invited.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. com.

Shirley
Weber, 67
CITRUS SPRINGS
Mrs. Shirley Ann Weber,
67, of Citrus Springs and for-
merly of Casco, Mich., went
to be with the Lord on Feb-
ruary 29, 2012.
She was born June 6,
1944, to the late Clyde and
Wilhelmina Edwards in De-
troit, Mich. Shirley was an
active member of St. James
United Church of Christ in
Michigan, a devoted mother
to her children and family,
an accomplished painted
and en extraordinary Chris-
tian with the purest heart.
Shirley was preceded in


b FIRST AMERICAM TRUST I* ' ,.[rd rk Wt ULLmC t irtar Wr Q T L..C.f., F OD .r. .J' n .'..hs M 1 vnit .1 u '.9 ajBt
eid ,a .s Cl s n .- Er, ..ISIu w. n r, eufgrlounopIjA.be". _fl nr
C' n 11, weO t T.i Ntj gc mn r. ) Mj r "
00AROE APPOINTMENTS RECOMMENDED






:Village Cadillac Toyota0


- Is pleased to announce that



Andy Carlton

HAS JOINED THEIR SALES DEPARTMENT


We invite Andy's many friends and former
customers to visit him at Village Cadillac Toyota


death by her parents and
two brothers, Robert and
William (Emma) Edwards.
She is survived by one
daughter, Michelle
(Michael); and three sons,
Roy (Cindy), Rob (Lauren),
Randy (Theresa); five
grandchildren; and three
great-grandchildren.
A Celebration of Life and
Remembrance will be held
at the First United
Methodist Church in Ho-
mosassa, FL, on March 6 at
3p.m.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. com.





Edward
Sidor, 82
HERNANDO
Edward Sidor, age 82, of
Hernando, Florida passed
away March 1,2012.
He was born February 23,
1930, in Detroit, MI.
Ed was the loving hus-
band of Bonnie for 57 years;
the beloved father of Paula


DINNER
Catered by
Joe Fallon of
"Joe's Deli"
Inverness.

ENTERTAINMENT t
by Allen O'Neal &
Kathryn Selvester

Party Manager
Linda Ross 'A


DANCING
PRIZES
RAFFLES
and
50/50 TICKETS

Call for
Sponsor
Information*
and/or tickets

Tickets: $20
Sponsor Tables $500


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Cahill and Laura Worthing-
ton; and loving grandfather
to David, Kelly and Kimmy
Cahill.
Ed was retired from Ford
Motor Company and he was
an Army Veteran of the Ko-
rean War.
Private cremation will
take place under the direc-
tion of Brown Funeral
Home and Crematory in
Lecanto, FL
In lieu of flowers dona-
tions can be made to the
Hospice of your choice.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. com.

SO YOU KNOW
All obituaries will be
posted online at
www.chronicleonline
.com.
Area funeral homes
with established
accounts with the
Chronicle are charged
$8.75 per column inch.
Small photos of the
deceased's face can be
included for an addi-
tional charge.


, 3299 16,99
Smlrnoff
. Jack Danlels *. Vodka

aIdt Ketel One k Pinnocie
Vodka Vodka

I., '2 -
fl [* ^l


29,99e 19.99
SSouthern
Bombay 940 Comfort
Sapphire Gin Liqueur
Grand Captain
Marnier r Morgan
SSpiced Rum


Incr IedibiSe HNtIdliaonyouur,
Sprii-1V00ue5 Padvoiti'brands


Coulsons Vodka 1.75L..........10.99
Coulsons Gin 1.75..................10.99
Admiral Nelson's
Spiced Rum 1.75L ..................... 12.99
Inverhouse Scotch 1.75..... 14.99
Canadian Mist 175.............. 16.99
Early Times 1.75L........................16.99


Crown Royal 1.75.................... 38.99
New Amsterdam
Vodka or Gin 1,75L.................. 19.99
Mount Gay Rum .7L .......... 18.99
Tanqueray Gin 1.75L.............. 27.99
Woodford Reserve
Bourbon 750ml ........................... 27.99
Johnnie Walker Black
750m l ................................................2 7 .99


FRRAO


9,99
Barefoot


Franzia
L') L D -




Busch or
Busch Ught
Miller
High Ufe 1 1 99
Pabst Blue
Ribbon Becks or


13,99
Stella Artois
12 pk, 11.2oz boffttles


Becks Light
12 pk, 12 oz bottles

Land Shark

Red Stripe

Shock Top
12 pk, 12 oz bottles


W"INIES


Benefit for Karen Dixon-Pulcini
on March 11th, 2012 *3pm to 7pm
PLEASE COME and SHARE in a BEAUTIFUL evening
of GIVING & HOPE for a WONDERFUL PERSON
who is LOVED by ALL, and has become VERY ILL.
HOSTED by KATHRYN SELVESTER


352-270-8912 or 352-613-2727
The Builders Association Banquet Hall
1196 South Lecanto Hwy, Lecanto, FL 34461


RIneIucM6th9.ram Iacn4wnxuaricaE MawO 2012
i a F. e ilr r j. .tL ( *r Ia
6 il'- jsa%~ nmrI~-


Y





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


YouTube phenomenon has girls asking: Am I pretty?


LEANNE ITALIE
Associated Press
NEW YORK The young
girl shows off her big, comfy
koala hat and forms playful
hearts with her fingers as
she drops the question on
YouTube: "Am I pretty or
ugly?"
"A lot of people call me
ugly, and I think I am ugly I
think I'm ugly, and fat," she
confesses in a tiny voice as
she invites the world to
decide.
And the world did.
The video, posted Dec. 17,
2010, has more than 4 mil-
lion views and more than
107,000 anonymous, often
hateful responses in a trou-
bling phenomenon that has
girls as young as 10 and
some boys asking the
same question on YouTube
with similar results.
Some experts in child psy-
chology and online safety
wonder whether the videos,
with anywhere from 300 to
1,000 posted, represent a
new wave of distress rather
than simple self-questioning
or pleas for affirmation or
attention.
How could the creators not
anticipate the nasty re-
sponses, even the tender
tweens uploading videos in
violation of YouTube's 13-
and-over age policy? Their
directness, playful but stead-
fast, grips even those accus-
tomed to life's open Internet
channel, where revolutions
and executions play out
alongside the ramblings of
anybody with digital access.
Commenters on YouTube
curse and declare the young
video creators "attention
whores," ask for sex and to
see them naked. They won-
der where their parents are
and call them "fugly" and
worse.
"Y do you live, and kids in
africa die?" one responder
asks the girl in the koala hat
who uses the name Kendal
and lists her age as 15 in her
YouTube profile, though her
demeanor suggests she was
far younger at the time.
Another commenter posts:
"You need a hug.. around
your neck. with a rope.."
Some offer support and
beg Kendal and the other
young faces to take down
their "'Am I Pretty?" and "'Am
I Ugly?" videos and feel good
about themselves instead.
Much has been made of cy-
berbullying and pedophiles
who cruise the Internet, and
of low self-esteem among pre-
adolescents and adolescents,


Pitcher 14
Specialsi^

CrftfmBeers $12Bfor itcher


You


Q. Browse Movie


AM I PRETTY OR UGLY?


sgal901 0 Subscribe


14 videos


SLike I + Add to- Share p 4,295,521 .1'.1


Uploaded by sgal901 on Dec 17. 2010
Hay guys, just wanted to make a video to see how many you people think
i'm either pretty or ugly.


13,789 likes, 42,615 dislikes
TheBlaze corn Stones


Associated Press
This image made Friday, March 2, from video posted on the YouTube website on Dec. 17, 2010, shows a girl with a koala
hat asking "Am I pretty or ugly?" The video has more than 4 million views and more than 107,000 anonymous, often hate-
ful responses in a troubling phenomenon that has girls as young as 10 and some boys asking the same question on
YouTube with similar results.


especially girls, as their
brains continue to develop.
There have been similar
"hot or not" memes in the
past, but as more young peo-
ple live their lives online,
they're clearly more aware of
the potential for negative
consequences.
"Negative feedback that is
personal is rarely easy to
hear at any age, but to
tweens and teens who value
as well as incorporate feed-
back into their own sense of
worth, it can be devastating,"
said Elizabeth Dowdell, a
nursing professor at Vil-
lanova University in subur-
ban Philadelphia. She has
researched child Internet
safety and risk behavior in
adolescents in partnership
with the Justice Department
In another video posted by
Kendal, she offers to "do two
dares" on camera, inviting
her open-channel audience

Try our unique
Old World and
New World
BREAKFAST
MENU
Ask about the exclusive
Taverna Manos
Baklava French
Toast and Baklava
Pancakes.
Only at Taverna Manos


5705 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy.
Crystal River (East of Rock Crusher
Road on State Road 44)
http://www.tavernamanos.com
(352) 564-0078


8 a.m. to 9 p.m. 7 days a week
000APT9 Fine dining at casual dining prices!



Crystal River

Civil War

4 Reenactment
]J't'/'/lIS
a trip back in history to see what life was like
during the American Civil War Between the States
7 miles north of Crystal River on US. Hwy. 19







Education Day is open to the public schools
on Friday, March 9th, 9:30 am until 2:00pm.
Authentic, interactive Confederate and Union Camps
Sutlers selling period wares to include period clothing, toys and books.
Medical camp with original tools. ..
Calvary camp for horses. /" '_ "\
S2:00pm Battle
30 Cannons Blasting
500+ Soldiers
I March Into Battle '


Sunday 10:00am Donation: $5 Adults
Non-denomination $2 for Children ages 8 to 17
1 Worship Service Children under the age of 8 FREE


Contact us by website: www.crystalriverreenactment.org CII >IMlI.E


to come up with some as she
holds a little white stuffed
monkey
In heavy eye makeup and
neon orange nail polish, a girl
who calls herself Faye not
only asks the pretty/ugly
question but tells in other
videos of being bullied at
school, suffering migraines
that have sent her to the hos-
pital and coping with the di-
vorce of her parents.
"My friends tell me that I'm
pretty," she says. "It doesn't
seem like I'm pretty, though,
because, I don't know, it just
doesn't, because people at
school, they're like, 'Faye,
you're not pretty at all."'
She narrates a slideshow
of still close-ups of herself to
make the judging easier
(she's had more than 112,000
views) and joins other girls
who have posted videos on
another theme, "My Perfect
Imperfection," that have


them noting what they hate
and love about the way they
look.
"I just don't like my body at
all," says Faye as she pulls up
her sweatshirt to bare her
midriff
Faye's profile lists her age
as 13. Tracked down in sub-
urban Denver, her mom,
Naomi Gibson, told ABC's
"Good MorningAmerica" she
knew nothing of the video
until reporters started to call.
"I was floored," she said.
Faye told ABC she has
been called names and gos-
siped about behind her back
"Deep down inside, all
girls know that other peo-
ple's opinions don't matter,"
she said. "But we still go to
other people for help be-
cause we don't believe what
people say."
A third girl who uploaded
one of the pretty/ugly videos
in September attempts a few


I *_


Crystal River Mall
795-1484
Inside WAL*MART
, Hwy. 200, Ocala
291-1467


HEARING AID
i, REPAIRS ,
INOFFICEONLY.ANYMAKEANYMODEL
L Coupon Expires4/15/12
BATTERY SALE

S (Limit 2 per visit)
L Coupon Expires 4/15/12


S Pam Wolfe
toi7meri ot Kist\ s S/ilon

Welcomes you at
Cutting Edge Hair Studio
8820 S\\' State Rd. 200
)c.ala. FL 344-6 -
352-854-11-8


Urology Institute


KIlrhdle rr. P
Fzz,_,re L-' I ac.-L..-.m-r, p,- ,


Introducing: Kenneth A. Son, MD
He completed his undergraduate education
at Boston University his medical training at
Hahnemann Medical College and his residency
in urology at Ohio State University With more
than 25 years of experience in private practice.
Dr Son will be a valued addition to the Citrus
County medical community

Accepting new patients
605 W Highland Blvd Inverness FL 34452
352 341 6338


model poses in childlike
pedal pushers and a long,
multicolored T-shirt after
posing the question. She
takes down her ponytail and
brushes her hair as she stares
into the camera.
"If you guys are wondering,
I am 11," she offers. Her
video has been viewed more
than 6,000 times.
"COMMUNICATE WITH
YOUR PARENTS AND
CLEAN YOUR ROOM!!!


BUT TAKE THIS TERRI-
BLE VIDEO DOWN YOU
ARE A CHILD AND
SHOULD NOT HAVE THIS
KIND OF ACCESS TO THE
INTERNET," one com-
menter screams.
None of the three girls re-
sponded to private messages
on YouTube seeking com-
ment from The Associated
Press. Gibson told ABC she
was considering revoking
her daughter's YouTube
privileges, but stopped short
of demanding Faye take
down the video.
"Hopefully it will open up
the eyes of the parents," Gib-
son said. "The kids aren't let-
ting their parents know
what's wrong, just like Faye
didn't let me know."
YouTube would not com-
ment directly about the 'Am
I Pretty?" controversy, but it
issued a statement advising
parents to visit the site's
safety center for tips on how
to protect their kids online.
The site's posting policy
prohibits videos and com-
ments "containing harass-
ment, threats or hate
speech" and encourages
users to flag such material
for review, the statement
said.
Emilie Zaslow, a media
studies professor at Pace
University in New York, said
today's online world for
young people is only just be-
ginning to be understood by
researchers.
When the Internet is your
diary and your audience is
global, she said, "The public
posting of questions such as
'"Am I ugly?" which might
previously have been per-
sonal makes sense within
this shift in culture."
Add to that the unattain-
able pressures of the beauty
industry, a dose of reality TV
where ordinary people can
be famous, and superstars
who are discovered via viral
video on YouTube, she said.
"These videos could be
read as a new form of self-
mutilation in line with cut-
ting and eating disorders,"
Zaslow said.


3640 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa, FL 34448

(352) 628-3443
SeHabla Espanol Se Habla Espafiol license I#DN 17606



Join Us At ur


r March 9, 7 PM
STIXX Billiards
3283 S. Suncoast Blvd.
Homosassa, FL
628-0432
March 16, 7 PM
Castaways Bar
5430 N. Suncoast Blvd.
Crystal River, FL
795-3653
March 23, 7 PM
Old Mill Tavern
10465 W Yulee Drive
a Homosassa, FL ,
628-2669 :

tCff51U N:i ,'f
oIa I1^'rl


Come have a great
time and help us
pick this year's

Shrimpa Palooza


King&

Queen
If you'd like to participate in
the parade, enter your Gumbo,
be a vendor or would like more
information please call
Tom Feeney at 352-201-2520,
Marybeth Nayfield at
352-795-7297 or E-mail
Gregg@homosassaprinting.com


'r. ............... www.shrimpapalooza.com
0 Rotary Club of Homosassa Springs


"We Cater to Cowards!"
Experience The Difference
HONEST PROFESSIONAL COMPASSIONATE

FREE SECOND
OPINION.
"You deserve a beautiful,
healthy smile without
high-pressure sales tactics.
We offer conservative
treatment plans, a friendly
staff, and a safe and
comfortable environment
for all our patients."


Ledger Dentistry.com
Jeremy A. Ledger, D.M.D., P.A.


NATION


SUNDAY, MARCH 4, 2012 A9












Scammers vs. seniors


Losses mountfrom

scams targeting

older Americans

Editor's note: This is the latest
installment ofAgingAmerica, the
jointAP-APME project examining
the aging of the baby boomers and
the impact this silver tsunami will
have on the communities in which
they live.
DAVID CRARY
AP National Writer

NEW YORK- Boomers beware:
Scams, frauds and other financial
exploitation schemes targeting
older Americans are a growing
multibillion-dollar industry enrich-
ing the schemers, anguishing the
victims and vexing law enforcement
officials who find these crimes
among the hardest to investigate
and prosecute.
"The true con artists, who are in
the business of making money off
older folks through devious means,
are very good at what they do," said
Sally Hurme, a consumer fraud
specialist with AARP "They cover
their tracks, they use persuasive
psychological means to spin their
tales."
Elder financial abuse encom-
passes a wide range of tactics,
some perpetrated by relatives or
trusted advisers, some by strangers
via telemarketing and Internet-
based scams.
Researchers say only a fraction of
the abuse gets reported to the au-
thorities, often because victims are
too befuddled or embarrassed to
speak up. Even with the reported
cases, data is elusive because most
federal crime statistics don't in-
clude breakdowns of victims' ages.
Nonetheless, there's ample re-
search to convey the scope of this
scourge.
A federally funded study con-
ducted for the National Institute of
Justice in 2009 concluded 5 percent
of Americans 60 and older had been
the victim of recent financial ex-
ploitation by a family member,
while 6.5 percent were the target of
a nonfamily member The study, led
by psychologist Ron Acierno of the
Medical University of South Car-
olina, was based on input from 5,777
older adults.
A report last year by insurer
MetLife Inc. estimated the annual
loss by victims of elder financial
abuse at $2.9 billion, compared with
$2.6 billion in 2008.
"Elder financial abuse is an in-
tolerable crime resulting in losses
of human rights and dignity,"
MetLife said. "Yet it remains un-
derreported, underrecognized and
underprosecuted."
Older Americans are by no
means the only target of schemers
and scammers, but experts say they
have distinctive characteristics that
often make them a tempting prey
Some have disabilities that leave
them dependent on others for help;
others are unsophisticated about
certain financial matters or poten-
tial pitfalls on the Internet. Many
are relatively isolated and suscep-
tible to overtures from seemingly
friendly strangers.
"That's why telemarketing scams
are so successful," said Karen
Turner, head of a newly formed
elder fraud unit in the Brooklyn
District Attorney's Office in New
York City "They're delighted to
have someone to talk with they
almost welcome the calls."
Coupled with these factors, most
older Americans, even in these
troubled economic times, have tan-
gible assets in the form of home-
ownership, pensions and Social
Security income scammers seek to
exploit
Another factor is the older gen-
eration's patriotism and respect for
authority according to Sid Kirch-
heimer, who writes a weekly
"Scam Alert" column for the AARP
Bulletin.
'A lot of the scammers pretend to
be with the government they say
they're calling from the Social Se-
curity Administration or the IRS,"
Kirchheimer said. "People 65 and
over, they often fall for that"
There's a multitude of scam sce-
narios, some of them new twists on
old ploys.
Among the current variations:
U The Grandparent Scam: Im-
postors, often calling from abroad,
pose as a grandchild in need of cash
to cope with some sort of emer-
gency perhaps an arrest or an acci-
dent The grandparent is asked to
send money and urged not to tell
anyone else about the transfer


Police in Bangor, Maine, said a
man in his 70s was bilked out of
$7,000 in January by a con artist
pretending to be his grandson who


Associated Press
Entertainer Mickey Rooney testifies March 2, 2011, on Capitol Hill in Washington about elder abuse before the Senate Aging Committee. Rooney
is suing his stepson and others on allegations they tricked him into thinking he was on the brink of poverty while defrauding him out of millions and
bullying him into continuing to work. The case is pending in Los Angeles Superior Court.


ON THE NET
National Council on Aging
tips for avoiding scams:
http://bit.ly/yQ2Swp
AARP scam expert:
http://tinyurl.com/7tlxjmx
MetLife study of elder
financial abuse:
http://bit.ly/IZApvi
FBI Internet Crime
Complaint Center:
www.ic3.gov

called to say he needed money to
get out of jail in Spain.
In another version, scammers
pose as soldiers who've been serv-
ing in Afghanistan, and call grand-
parents claiming to need money as
part of their homecoming.
The Lottery Scam: Scammers
inform their target they have won a
lottery or sweepstakes and need to
make a payment to obtain the sup-
posed prize. The targets may be
sent a fake prize-money check they
can deposit in their bank account
Before that check bounces, the
criminals will collect money for
supposed fees or taxes on the prize.
Police in Holden, Mass., say an
80-year-old woman recently was
bilked out of $400,000 over the
course of a year in her efforts to
claim bogus prize money In Los
Angeles, authorities said last year
an 87-year-old widower fell for a
lottery scam masterminded in Que-
bec, and mailed $160,000 in checks
he'd been told was for taxes on his
purported $3.3 million in winnings.
Many recent lottery scam calls
have come from Jamaica, to the
point where its area code (876) is
now cited by anti-scam experts as
a warning sign. Other Caribbean
area codes also have been impli-
cated.
The Toilet Paper Scam: Fraud-
sters often try to convince gullible
targets into paying exorbitant sums
for unneeded products and serv-
ices, as exemplified by a scam un-
covered in South Florida last year
According to U.S. investigators,
salespeople claiming their com-
pany was affiliated with federal
agencies told their elderly victims
they needed special toilet paper to
comply with new regulations and
avoid ruining their septic tanks. In
all, prosecutors said the company
scammed about $1 million from vic-
tims across the country, including
some who purchased more than 70
years' worth of toilet paper
Three suspects in that case, all
from Florida's Palm Beach County,
pleaded guilty to wire fraud. But
officials say arrests are the excep-
tion, not the rule, especially in tele-
marketing and Internet scams
where there's no paper trail, no
face-to-face interaction and the
perpetrators are often operating
from abroad.
"It's very hard for us to investi-
gate overseas the likelihood of
us finding them and extraditing
them is slim," said Turner, the
Brooklyn prosecutor
Paul Greenwood, a deputy dis-
trict attorney in San Diego who runs
an elder abuse prosecution unit,
says he's been trying cajole local
banks and credit unions to be more
aggressive in protecting their eld-
erly customers. One way is for those
institutions to contact authorities if
they detect suspicious withdrawal
patterns.
Greenwood says he's often spo-
ken by phone with overseas scam-
mers, initially pretending to be a
potential victim, then revealing


who he is.
"They're not in the least affected.
They just move on to the next call,"
he said. "If they're outside the U.S.,
they're home free."
Nonetheless, Greenwood hopes
his fellow prosecutors nationwide
will become more aggressive in
pursuing charges when they can
catch a suspected scammer
"The cliche is that these are vic-
tims with poor memories or who
are reluctant to testify," Greenwood
said. "We've found we can over-
come that Once you get them into
court, the victims have such strong
jury appeal that most of time the
defense just pleads out"
Cases of financial elder abuse
surface at all levels of U.S. society.
For example, Anthony Marshall,
the son of multimillionaire philan-
thropist Brooke Astor, was found
guilty in 2009 of exploiting his
mother's dementia to help himself
to millions of dollars. He's free
pending appeal.
Mickey Rooney, the 91-year-old
actor, is suing his stepson and oth-
ers on allegations they tricked him
into thinking he was on the brink of
poverty while defrauding him out of
millions and bullying him into con-
tinuing to work The case is pend-
ing in Los Angeles Superior Court
"I felt trapped, scared, used and
frustrated," Rooney told a special
Senate committee considering
abuse-prevention legislation last
year. "But above all, when a man
feels helpless, it's terrible."
For elderly scam victims of mod-
est means, the results can be
catastrophic.
"The abuse can leave a person
devastated," Turner said. "They're
not young to enough to grow a nest
egg again the nest egg is gone."
Even small-scale scams can have
long-lasting impact.
Now in her mid-80s, Eunice
Langa of New York's Duchess
County still remembers a phone
call some 20 years ago telling her
she'd won a free cruise.
Delighted at the chance to give
her brother and his wife the cruise
as a gift, Langa agreed to mail off
more than $100 in fees to claim the
prize, only to learn later she was
victim of a scam.
"I just took them at their word,"
she said. "There was no such thing
and no way of tracking it"
Since then, Langa, who has a
master's degree and work experi-
ence in broadcasting, teaching and
public relations, has updated her-
self on potential exploitation and
how to avoid it Among other pro-
grams, she participated in two
workshops developed by the Na-
tional Council on Aging to help
older adults learn how to budget
their money, find benefits and
avoid scams.
Her advice to others: "Don't get
excited with an offer and jump into
anything without thoroughly inves-
tigating first"
For prosecutors and other anti-
scam experts, the most wrenching
cases often involve financial abuse
by an older person's adult children
or other family members who'd
been put in positions of trust
"These people think they're enti-
tled to something they say, 'I just
wanted an advance on my inheri-
tance,"' said Arlene Markarian, an
assistant district attorney in Brook-
lyn who specializes in elder abuse
prevention.
She said this type of financial ex-
ploitation is often accompanied by
physical abuse, and yet many eld-


early victims balk at reporting it
"There's the embarrassment fac-
tor -no one wants to see relatives
prosecuted," Markarian said. "And
there's fear of losing your inde-
pendence being put in a nursing
home. A lot of the times, it's the of-
fender making that threat"
Markarian added another note
of caution.
"We're seeing not just older vic-
tims but older perpetrators," she
said. "Not all old people are sweet"
A case in point: The estranged fa-
ther of actress Jodie Foster 89-
year-old Lucius Foster was
sentenced to a five-year jail term in
December for bilking more than
$100,000 from poor and elderly peo-
ple in a home-building scheme.
Financial abuse by family mem-
bers and trusted advisers will be
among the targets of the federal
Office of Older Americans, part of
the new Consumer Financial Pro-
tection Bureau. Plans are in the
works to provide guidelines for
relatives and others on ethical
standards for helping handle an
older person's finances.
The Office of Older Americans is
headed by Hubert H. Humphrey III,
a former attorney general of Min-
nesota who said awareness of elder
abuse is growing among law en-
forcement agencies and among cit-
izens he's been meeting with in
recent months.
"You ask if there's someone in
(the) audience who had something
like this happen, someone will
stand up and have the courage to
tell their story, and you'll see others
nodding their heads in recogni-
tion," Humphrey said. "It's out
there and people are beginning
to have a greater confidence to
speak out about it"
One of the policy advisers work-
ing with Humphrey is Naomi Karp,
who formerly handled elder-abuse
issues for AARP
She said most states have devel-
oped appropriate laws for dealing
with elder abuse, and the key ques-
tion is whether there are enough in-
vestigators and other resources to
carry them out effectively
She likened the challenge to a
whack-a-mole game.
'As soon as law enforcement or
regulatory agencies go after one
scam, it's so easy for the con artist
to morph with the next best one,"
she said.
One needed step, according to
abuse-prevention advocates, is get-
ting money for the federal Elder


Justice Act. It was passed by Con-
gress two years ago with the aim of
helping states combat various forms
of elder abuse, but thus far no dol-
lars have been appropriated to put
it in practice.
The FBI is actively fighting elder
financial abuse, issuing anti-scam
top sheets and tracking the online
portion of this problem through its
Internet Crime Complaint Center
Special Agent Nick Savage said
the center received more than
300,000 complaints last year, re-
flecting close to a half-billion dol-
lars in losses, with 45 percent of the
toll borne by people over 50.
Among older victims, Savage
said, there's often a hesitancy to re-
port the crimes.
'A lot of people are ashamed of
the victimization and don't want to
come forward for fear that they'll be
seen (as) silly, that they should have
known better," he said.
Savage acknowledged that local
law enforcement agencies are
sometimes reluctant to pursue
scam investigations if the perpe-
trators are abroad. He said the
FBI, with help from its foreign
counterparts, can make headway
in some instances, especially if it
can establish a pattern that bun-
dles a number of individual cases
into one.
Looking ahead, there are mixed
views on whether the baby
boomers, now mostly in their 50s
and early 60s, will be less prone to
scams and exploitation than their
elders.
The AARP's Hurme thinks that's
possible.
"They're more assertive, ques-
tioning certainly they've grown
up on computers and are more
savvy with them, so there is hope,"
Hurme said. "But I don't think the
bad guys are going to go away -
they're going to adjust their pitches
as the demographics change."
Naomi Karp noted many victims
of securities fraud are well-
educated men, not yet of retire-
ment age, who overestimate their
acumen, perhaps foretelling fur-
ther problems as they age. She also
noted many boomers, no less so
than their elders, will eventually
experience cognitive declines that
will increase their vulnerability
"They may be boomers," she said.
"But financial capacity is often the
first kind to decline."
David Crary can be followed on
Twitter at http://twittercom/
CraryAP


Charlene Marshall holds the shoulder of her husband, Anthony Marshall,
in a courtroom Oct. 8, 2009, in New York. Brooke Astor's 85-year-old
son, Marshall, was convicted of exploiting his philanthropist mother's
failing mind and helping himself to her nearly $200 million fortune.


A10 SUNDAY, MARCH 4, 2012


NATION


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Wanted: Teen life


coach with answers


More and more peo-
ple are becoming
"life coaches," ac-
cording to a recent newspa-
per report, and many
colleges now offer degrees
in life coaching.
It appears that a degree in
life coaching pays better
than a degree in a results-
oriented field such as engi-
neering, computer
programming or
foreign language.
Life coaches right
out of school can
charge anywhere
from $25 to $75 an
hour
I'd prefer to be
paid $75 an hour, if
you don't mind.
But, then, I don't j
have a college de-
gree in life coach- MU
ing. I'm just a guy
who's gone through life with-
out any coaching except
from my family, my friends,
my teachers, my football
coach, my pastors, my co-
workers and my bosses.
What do I know about life?
My advice would be worth
absolutely nothing per hour
because I didn't go to college
and get a degree in life
coaching.
I hate to think of all the
mistakes I'd make if I tried to
coach other people. First, I'd
probably forget to collect the
$75 upfront and then find out
this clown needs a life coach
because he doesn't have a
job because he has a
drinking problem. I'd coach
Bob (not his real name his
real name is Tom) to join AA
and to stop showing up for
work drunk, whereas a real
life coach would probably
tell him to punch up his re-
sume, post frequently on
Facebook and update his
LinkedIn profile at least
once a month. That'll be $75,
thank you.
Would I be life coaching
without a license if I told
Doreen that she's forever
dating the wrong kind of
men and that she will end up
having to change her locks,
again, if she doesn't learn to


Are your treasures
UNDERVALUED?


Is your clutter worth
A FORTUNE?


Do hidden antiques
surround you ... or
is it all just "old" stuff?

TO FIND OUT,
BRING UP TO 3 ITEMS
(or photographs of them)
TO THE NEXT
ANTIQUE
DISCOVERY TOUR!


I


tell the difference between a
guy with a big belt buckle
and a guy with a big heart?
Besides, I'm too old to be a
life coach. One of the life
coaches I read about was 20
years old and already had 10
clients. Wow! Who couldn't
learn something from a 20-
year-old? How do you juggle
kids and a career? Please,
coach me. How
do you take care
of your sick,
aging parents
and still find the
time to take care
of your sick,
young children?
Please, coach
me. How do you
put three kids
IM through college
on a shrinking
LLEN paycheck? How
do you sell your
house and move away when
the biggest factory in town
closes? Here's $75; please,
tell me how you did it.
Maybe 20 is a little too old
to be a life coach. Maybe I
should find someone
younger, maybe 16 or 18.
Someone who's not as out of
touch with today's world.
Someone who may not be as
set in her ways as a 20-year-
old. After all, who knows
more about how to run your
life than a 16-year-old? Just
ask one; she'll be happy to
tell you what you're doing
wrong, and in a pleasant,
easy-to-swallow way
Actually, if you have $75
an hour to throw away on a
life coach, maybe you don't
need a life coach you
seem to be doing pretty well
for yourself.
Maybe you can give me a
few tips. The first thing I'd
like to know, is what team
am I on? If your coaching
works, can I throw a bucket
of Gatorade down your
back?

Jim Mullen's book "Now in
Paperback" is now in
paperback You can reach
him via email at
jimmullenbooks. com.


Where: Homosassa Too
Thrift & Gift Shoppe
8471 V. PeriwinKle Lane
Homosassa. Florida 34446
When: Saturday
March 10, 2012
10:00 a m. 2 00 pm
Cost: Appraisals are
$5.00 per item
(Limit: 3 Hems Per Person)
Appraisals By
Dale Smrekar
Professional Estale Liquidalor
& Cerliflie Personal Property Appraiser
iMfrfir iNrr ,j Aippria,. AuTlc 0I ATin

H iSP]( I


News NOTES


Stitchers to meet
in Brooksville
BROOKSVILLE The
Sandhill Crane Chapter of the
Embroiderers' Guild of America
will meet from 10 a.m. to 2
p.m. Wednesday, March 7, at
Faith Evangelical Presbyterian
Church, 200 Mount Fair Ave.,
Brooksville.
Groups of members will be
taking classes, but open stitch-
ing for others will occur until 2
p.m. Bring a lunch and enjoy
the day.
Membership is open to any-
one who is interested in stitch-
ing, from the most experienced
to those who would like to
learn to stitch. Mentors avail-
able.
For membership
information, call 352-621-6680.


Lions to offer
corned beef dinner
Beverly Hills Lions, at 72
Civic Circle Drive, will have its
corned beef and cabbage din-
ner from 4 to 6 p.m.
Wednesday, March 7.
Cost for the dinner is $10
and includes corned beef, cab-
bage, potatoes, carrots, salad,
roll, dessert and coffee or tea.
Those who plan to attend
with a group of six or more can
make reservations by calling
352-527-0962. Carry-outs will
be available.
Civic group
to meet March 8
Citrus Hill's Civic Associa-
tions annual meeting will be at
7 p.m. Thursday, March 8, in
the Garden Room at Citrus


Hills Golf and Country Club.
Speakers will be John
Marmish and Debbie Lattin,
who will discuss what Citrus
County organizations are doing
to help feed the less fortunate.
For more information about
the meeting, call Cathi Smith at
352-746-7532.
Calligraphers to
gather March 8
Creative Calligraphers of
Citrus Springs will meet at
12:30 p.m. Thursday, March 8,
at Citrus Springs Library on
Country Club Boulevard in Cit-
rus Springs.
Members have been study-
ing the Foundational Hand and
will decide at that time if they
want to move on to a new
study of the Italic Hand or con-
tinue for the rest of the year


perfecting the foundational
study.
The program for the March
meeting will be on developing
a "calligram," a word or words
that have been written in a cer-
tain way so that their meanings
are shown in a design or en-
hanced by a design. They can
be simple or show artistic flair.
For more information, call
352-489-2313. Bring paper,
pencil, calligraphy pen(s),
colored markers and a ruler.
Citrus Springs
MSBU to convene
Citrus Springs MSBU will
meet at 9 a.m. Wednesday,
March 7, at Citrus Springs
Community Center, 1570 W.
Citrus Springs Blvd.
For more information, call
Larry Brock at 352-527-5478.


Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center believes in investing in technology, equipment and
especially people. Our consistent, long-term leadership is driven by four key individuals,
three ofwhich are Registered Nurses. We're positively looking for additional leaders to join
our thriving team, including:


* Physical Therapist


*RN- Med/Surg


Learn more at SevenRiversRegional.com.
Apply at the Human Resources Career Center.
Fax: 352.795.8464 / Job Line: 352.795.8418 / Email: stephanie.arduser@hma.com

Positively SEVEN RIVERS
-- REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER

EOE/DRUG-FREEITOBACCO-FREE WORKPLACE Your Life. Our Story.


MARCH 2012




P&G brandSAVER
smarter savings, better brands


CITY






RAMBLERSI i


* RN- Cath Lab


SUNDAY, MARCH 4, 2012 All


DOARLY









N 12. ,,N

ATION


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Nation RIEFS CIA-led force may speed Afghan exit
Group hug


Plan considered by Pentagon staffers to

target militants not yet on Panetta's desk


Associated Press
First Lady Michelle Obama,
center, embraces members
of the Johnson C. Smith
ladies' basketball team
during a "Let's Move!"
physical fitness promotion
between games Friday at
the CIAA basketball tour-
nament in Charlotte, N.C.


Rush Limbaugh
apologizes
WASHINGTON Conser-
vative talk show host Rush
Limbaugh apologized Satur-
day to a Georgetown Univer-
sity law student he had
branded a "slut" and "prosti-
tute" after fellow Republicans
as well as Democrats criti-
cized him and several adver-
tisers left his program.
The student, Sandra Fluke,
had testified to congressional
Democrats in support of their
national health care policy
that would compel her college
to offer health plans that
cover her birth control.
"My choice of words was
not the best, and in the at-
tempt to be humorous, I cre-
ated a national stir,"
Limbaugh said on his web-
site. "I sincerely apologize to
Ms. Fluke for the insulting
word choices."
Attempts to reach Fluke by
telephone and email were
unsuccessful.

WorldBRIEFS

Off day


Associated Press
WASHINGTON Top
Pentagon officials are con-
sidering putting elite spe-
cial operations troops under
CIA control in Afghanistan
after 2014, just as they were
during last year's raid on
Osama bin Laden's com-
pound in Pakistan, sources
told The Associated Press.
The plan is one of several
possible scenarios being de-
bated by Pentagon staffers.
It has not yet been pre-
sented to Secretary of De-
fense Leon Panetta, the
White House or Congress. If
the plan were adopted, the
U.S. and Afghanistan could
say there are no more U.S.


troops on the ground in the
war-torn country because
once the SEALs, Rangers
and other elite units are as-
signed to CIA control, even
temporarily, they become
spies. No matter who's in
charge, the special opera-
tions units still would target
militants on joint raids with
Afghans and keep training
Afghan forces to do the job
on their own.
The idea floated by a senior
defense intelligence official
comes as U.S. defense chiefs
try to figure out how to draw
down troops fast enough to
meet the White House's 2014
deadline. Pentagon staffers
already have put forward a
plan to hand over much of the


war-fighting to special opera-
tions troops. This idea would
take that plan one step fur-
ther, shrinking the U.S. pres-
ence to less than 20,000 troops
after 2014, according to four
current and two former U.S.
officials, who spoke on condi-
tion of anonymity
Pentagon spokesman
George Little denied the
idea is being discussed.
"Any suggestion that such a
plan exists is simply wrong,"
Little said Saturday
"United States special oper-
ations forces continue to
work closely with the intel-
ligence community to con-
front a range of national
security challenges across
the world."


Associated Press
U.S. General David H. Petraeus, center left, commander of
the NATO International Security Assistance Force (ISAF)
meets May 8, 2011, with special forces in Kunar province in
eastern Afghanistan. Top Pentagon officials are considering
putting elite special operations troops under CIA control in
Afghanistan after 2014, just as they were during last year's
raid on Osama bin Laden's compound in Pakistan, sources
told The Associated Press. Petraeus took charge of the CIA
in 2011.


Path of destruction


Associated Press
Amy Kinnaird hugs her friend Gina Ridolphi on Saturday near her destroyed car in Cookeville, Tenn. Emergency
crews desperately searched for survivors Saturday after a violent wave of Midwest and Southern storms flattened
some rural communities and left behind a trail of shredded homes, downed power lines and streets littered with
tossed cars.

Storms demolish towns in Indiana, Kentucky; 38 dead


Associated Press
Myanmar's pro-democracy
leader, Aung San Suu Kyi,
delivers her speech Satur-
day during her election
campaign in Mandalay,
central Myanmar. Suu Kyi
consulted with a doctor at
the large campaign rally
after telling the crowd that
she felt unwell and dizzy.


Muslim issues in
French election
Echoing his 2007 cam-
paign,French President Nico-
las Sarkozy insisted that
French civilization must pre-
vail in France. He created
France's first Ministry of Im-
migration and National Iden-
tity after being elected, but
has since done away with it.
Muslims and immigration
are constant themes in recent
French presidential races, but
the topic is rising to the fore
with vehemence as the April
22 first-round vote nears -
50 days from now. The final
round is May 6. Critics say
Sarkozy is ogling supporters
of extreme-right candidate
Marine Le Pen, who is third in
polls after front-runner Fran-
cois Hollande, a Socialist, and
the conservative president. Le
Pen, who succeeds party
founder Jean-Marie Le Pen,
her father, has worked to
erase the image of the party
as anti-Semitic but now
castigates what she said is
the profile of Islam in France.
There are an estimated 5
million Muslims in France, the
largest such population in
Westem Europe, and the latest
generation is making increas-
ing demands that the country
accommodate needs set out by
their religion or their customs.
-From wire reports


Associated Press
WEST LIBERTY, Ky. Across
the South and Midwest, survivors
emerged Saturday to find blue sky
and splinters where homes once
stood, cars flung into buildings and
communications crippled after
dozens of tornadoes chain-sawed
through a region of millions, level-
ing small towns along the way
At least 38 people were killed in
five states, but a 2-year-old girl was
somehow found alive and alone in
a field near her Indiana home. Her
family did not survive. A couple
who fled their home for the safety of
a restaurant basement made it,
even after the storms threw a school
bus into their makeshift shelter.
Saturday was a day filled with
such stories, told as emergency of-
ficials trudged with search dogs
past knocked-down cellphone tow-
ers and ruined homes looking for


survivors in rural Kentucky and In-
diana, marking searched roads and
homes with orange paint President
Barack Obama offered federal as-
sistance, and Ohio Gov John Kasich
declared an emergency Saturday
The worst damage appeared
centered in the small towns of
southern Indiana and eastern Ken-
tucky's Appalachian foothills. No
building was untouched and few
were recognizable in West Liberty,
Ky., about 90 miles from Lexington,
where two white police cruisers
were picked up and tossed into
City Hall.
In East Bernstadt, two hours to
the southwest, Carol Rhodes
clutched four VHS tapes she'd
found in debris of her former home
as she sobbed under a bright sun
Saturday
"It was like whoo, that was it,"
said Rhodes, 63, who took refuge
with four family members in a


basement bedroom that she had
just refinished for a grandchild.
"Honey, I felt the wind and I said,
'Oh my God,' and then it (the house)
was gone. I looked up and I could
see the sky."
The spate of storms was the sec-
ond in little more than 48 hours,
after an earlier round killed 13
people in the Midwest and South,
and the latest in a string of severe-
weather episodes that have rav-
aged the American heartland in
the past year.
Friday's violent storms touched
down in at least a dozen states from
Georgia to Illinois, killing 19 peo-
ple in Kentucky, 14 in Indiana,
three in Ohio, and one each in Ala-
bama and Georgia. They scarred
the landscape over hundreds of
miles, leaving behind a trail of
shredded sheet metal, insulation,
gutted churches, crunched-up cars
and even a fire hydrant


Gingrich, Santorum battle for Bible Belt voters


Associated Press
SAVANNAH, Ga. The
GOP presidential candi-
dates are fighting to win
over conservative voters in
the Bible Belt as the race
takes on a more prominent
Southern focus.
After bowing out of re-
cent contests north of the
Mason-Dixon line, Newt
Gingrich is staking his en-
tire campaign on a big vic-
tory Tuesday in Georgia,
where the onetime House
speaker represented a sub-
urban Atlanta district for 20
years. Rick Santorum is
making inroads in Ten-
nessee with a message that
the state's evangelical vot-
ers should feel right at
home with the former
Pennsylvania senator's so-
cially conservative views.


Both candidates hope to
capitalize on Super Tues-
day victories to propel their
campaigns forward to Ala-
bama and Mississippi on
March 13 and to Louisiana
on March 24. None of those
Southern states was very
hospitable to Mitt Romney
during the former Massa-
chusetts governor's White
House bid in 2008, so
there's prime recruiting
ground to entice conserva-
tive voters who want an al-
ternative to Romney
"I fully believe that the
South will be a key player,"
said Joe Dendy, Republican
chairman for Cobb County in
metro Atlanta. "I think we're
going to see a clearer picture
between Newt and Rick as
to which one the South has
seen as more conservative."
With 76 delegates up for


Associated Press
Republican presidential candidates Rep. Ron Paul, R-
Texas, left, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, sec-
ond from left, former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum,
second from right, and former House Speaker Newt Gin-
grich speak to each other Wednesday during a break in a
Republican presidential debate in Mesa, Ariz.


grabs, Georgia holds the
biggest prize on Super
Tuesday, and Gingrich
spent most of the past week


touring the state by bus.
For Santorum, any victory
in the South would come off
as a sign of strength.


Iran


trumps


Palestine


as top


US-Israel


issue
Associated Press
WASHINGTON Peace
talks with the Palestinians
dominated President Barack
Obama's meeting last year
with Israeli Prime Minister
Benjamin Netanyahu, but
will barely warrant a mention
at their White House session
Monday or in speeches to a
powerful pro-Israeli lobby
Iran is now the issue com-
manding urgent attention.
The United States, Israel
and much of the world are
trying to figure out how to
deal with Iran and its nu-
clear program. While all
sides insist a resolution to
the long-running Israeli-
Palestinian conflict is criti-
cal to Israel's security, the
Israelis have come to be-
lieve that Iran may be on the
threshold of developing
atomic weapons and is the
primary existential threat to
the Jewish state.
The Palestinians probably
will not get much more than
a passing reference by the
U.S. and Israeli officials, law-
makers, GOP presidential
hopefuls and others at the
America Israel Public Affairs
Committee's annual policy
conference, where Obama
was scheduled to speak Sun-
day, a day before Netanyahu.
Nor is the peace process
at the top of the agenda for
Netanyahu's meeting with
Obama at the Oval Office on
Monday and his talks with
congressional leaders on
Tuesday But the Israeli-
Palestinian conflict "is not
going to just go away," said
Maen Rashid Areikat, the
Palestinian envoy in Wash-
ington. He said Netanyahu
"can focus on Iran, but he
can only bring peace to his
country by making peace
with the Palestinians and
his Arab neighbors."
Shifting focus from the
seemingly intractable
Mideast conflict has politi-
cal advantages for both
Obama and Netanyahu,
even if they also don't see
eye to eye on the preferred
tactics to prevent Iran from
being a nuclear-armed state.
For one, no politician in
an election year has ever
suffered from being tough
on Iran. Pressing Israel on
the need to make conces-
sions to the Palestinians can
be a political minefield.
That is what happened last
year when Obama declared
that the need for a two-state
solution was "more urgent
than ever" He challenged Is-
rael to make concessions on
borders and security that
have hindered an agreement
for six decades.











EXCURSIONS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


* Veterans Notes can be found on Page A15 of .
today's Chronicle.


Roar into sun, sea


Keys on two

wheels can be

exhilarating

GLENN ADAMS
Associated Press
KEY WEST
Lots of Northerners
shake off the last of
the cold weather
with a trip south this time
of year. We decided to
head into the Florida
sunshine on two wheels,
on a motorcycle trip from
Miami down through the
Keys, where the flat lanes
seem to skim you over the
blue-and-aquamarine,
coral-lined sea before
you're vaulted skyward
bound up a causeway and
onto another island.
From the Keys, we turned west
through the Everglades on the Tamiami
Trail (Route 41), then up the Gulf Coast
and back east to Miami via Alligator
Alley (Interstate 75). With side trips, it
was around 600 miles in four days, not
a big challenge for the true wind-in-
your-face aficionado.
On our first leg, we slogged our way
through local traffic in Miami and the
surrounding area to connect with U.S. 1
about 50 miles south of the city. A wiser
choice would have been to spend the


4:


.-- J -


Associated Press
Travelers on motorcycles can enjoy traveling across miles of water when touring in the Keys. This is the Seven-Mile Bridge lead-
ing out of Marathon at Knight's Key, heading to the Lower Keys and ultimately Key West.


extra few bucks and cruise toward the
islands on Florida's Turnpike.
If you're renting a motorcycle, you
don't even need to fumble for cash at
the tolls; photos of the bike license
plate will be sent to the rental com-
pany, which in my case added toll
charges to the bill.
The feel of escaping the mainland
and entering the Keys on U.S. 1 is no
less than exhilarating. The roadway,


also called the Overseas Highway, runs
127 miles, connecting the island chain
with a series of bridges and expansive,
seemingly endless views of the ocean
on either side.
Our first stop was Key Largo. With
the help of a chamber of commerce in-
formation center, we found a seaside
one-bedroom apartment there. Infor-
mal but graceful, the palm-shaded com-
pound opened to a spacious dock


overlooking Florida Bay and was a
short walk to a selection of Mexican,
sushi and other restaurants, including
one that will be remembered for its
pitchers of margaritas. And if you're
not a privacy freak, sharing four to a
unit can save a lot of bucks. In this
case, $140 split between two couples
wasn't bad.
See Page A16


Lure of siren's song with 'Romance of the Rhine'


NEIL SAWYER
Special to the Chronicle
River cruising, especially in Europe,
is more than just about eating,
drinking and watching the shore-
line glide by.
Scenery, architecture, culture and the
crop of the season are soon relegated to
our memory bank and perhaps soon
forgotten if for no other reason than
sensory overload.
But everlasting memories may be those
that were planted
many years ago. As
in my own instance,
those years were my
college days, when I
studied German
while attending col-
lege in California.
My class was very
active in pursuing
not only the lan-
Neil Sawyer guage, but the cul-
SPONTANEOUS ture in the manner of
TRAVELER German dinners,
dances and other as-
sociated activities,
creating the spirit of friendliness and
cheer gemutlichkeit!
We also studied the mysterious Loreley
(Lorelei, if you prefer), the infamous
mythical siren who was brought to life by
Heinrich Heine.
The destiny of a cruise on the Rhine
River, dubbed "Romance of the Rhine,"
which I took last year, was that our river-
boat had no choice but to pass the treach-


NIL SAWYhiR/pecial to the Chronicle


One of many castles along the Rhine River.
erous, rocky point of Loreley
Prior to the installation of 30 locks that
now tame the Rhine, this stretch of the
river was rapids, rocky shores and an
abrubt turn in the river. It is here that the
irresistible Loreley lured fishermen and
others in their boats onto the rocks to


their ultimate demise.
Here's how poet Heine, as interpreted
by Mark Twain, assigned mysterious Lore-
ley to fabled history:
I wonder why I am so weary,
What's making me so depressed,


It must be the tale old and dreary,
That's keeping my mind quite obsessed.
The air is cool, the night is sinking,
And quietly's flowing the Rhine,
The tops of the mountains are blinking,
In purple-red-setting shine.
There's sitting high up in the light
A maiden so beautiful, fair
Her jewels are glistening bright
She combs her gold shimmering hair
Her comb is of most precious gold,
She's combing and singing so sweet
Bewitchingyoung fishers and old
Their hearts start to quiver and beat.
There's a man in his boat on the river,
He cannot but listen and stare
A longing is making him shiver,
Look out, the rock's edge, oh beware!
I fear there's a crash, the boat sinking,
The man will be swallowed and gone,
And that with melodious singing
The Loreley will have done ...
Did boatmen of that era stare into the
sunset too long, becoming mesmerized by
the changing light of the setting sun? Or was
grog, a common beverage on boats, the vil-
lain in disguise? Boatmen of today take
heed or you, too, may be lured to the rocks
by the siren's haunting song.
Happy cruising!
-0
Neil Sawyer is a 25-year Crystal River
resident and businessman. Traveling is a
hobby for Neil and his wife, Karyn.
They enjoy independent travel,
small ships and small-group guided tours.
Email him atgobuddy@tampabayrrcom.


Arches National Park

In May 2011, John and Louise Purdin traveled cross-country in their RV
and made a stop at Arches National Park in Utah. Louise pauses in front of
one of the amazing views the park offers.
Special to the Chronicle


DREAM
VCATIONS

The Chronicle and The
Accent Travel Group are
sponsoring a photo con-
test for readers of the
newspaper.


Readers are invited to
send a photograph from
their Dream Vacation with a
brief description of the trip.
If it's selected as a win-
ner, it will be published in
the Sunday Chronicle. At
the end of the year, a
panel of judges will select
the best photo during the
year and that photograph


will win a prize.
Please avoid photos
with dates on the print.
Photos should be sent
to the Chronicle at 1624
N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429
or dropped off at the
Chronicle office in Inver-
ness, Crystal River or any
Accent Travel Office.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Wife wants help


with son's school


SUNDAY EVENING MARCH 4, 2012 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House DII: Comcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
C B D/I F H 6:00 16:30 I7:00 7:30 8:00 1 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30
O WESH NBC 19 19 News News Dateline NEC (N) Celebrity Apprentice The Celebrity Apprentice (N) 'PG' ac News Access
SGreat Performances "The Phantom II Volo Takes Flight Italian teen vocal Downton Abbey -- Story of the Costume Use Your Brain to
S WED PBS 3 3 14 6of the Opera."'PG' c group. 'G' c Behind the Drama Drama ChangeYourAge
0 WUFT PBS 5 5 5 41 Great Performances Great Performances "The Phantom of the Opera." PG' Ribbon MI-5 '14'
News Nightly Dateline NBC The Celebrity The Celebrity Apprentice The teams must News Paid
0 NBC 8 8 8 8 8 News Pharmaceutical testing. Apprentice 'PG' c design window displays. (N) 'PG' c Program
o WFTV ABC 20 20 20 News World America's Funniest Once Upon a Time Desperate Housewives GCB "Pilot" (Series News Sports
0 WFT AB 20 2020News Home Videos 'PG' "Dreamy" (N)'PG' (N) 'PG' Premiere) (N) 'PG' Night
S WTP CBS 10 10 10 10 10 Evening 10 News 60 Minutes (In Stereo) The Amazing Race (N) The Good Wife "After CSI: Miami "No Good 10News, Paid
C0 W]CBS 10 10 10 10 10News (N) c (In Stereo) N the Fall"14' Deed" (N) '14' 11pm (N) Program
FOX13 6:00 News Bobs Cleveland The Napoleon Family Guy American FOX13 10:00 News The Closer "Strike
0 [WTT FOX13 13 13 13(N) c Burgers Show Simpsons Dynamite 14 Dad 14 (N) m Three"'14'm
D WCJBl ABC 11 11 4 News ABC Funny Home Videos Once Upon aTime Desp.-Wives GCB "Pilot"'PG' News Brothers
WCLF IND 2 2 2 22 22 Brody File Stacklebeck Coral Great Awakening Love a The Place for Miracles Daniel Jesse Pastor Great
RWCIF IND 2 2 2 22 22 Ridge Hr Child G' Kolenda Duplantis Dayna Awaken
W FT ABC 1 News World America's Funniest Once Upon a Time Desperate Housewives GCB "Pilot" (Series News Grey's
WFT ABC 11 11 11 News Home Videos 'PG' "Dreamy" (N)'PG' (N) PG' Bc Premiere) (N) 'PG' Anatomy
Wio ND 12 12 16 Family Guy Family Guy Big Bang Big Bang Law & Order Law & Order"The **h "Proof" (2005 Drama) Gwyneth Paltrow,
IND 12 12 1614' 14' Theory Theory "Forgiveness"'PG'c Corporate Veil" '14' Anthony Hopkins.'PG-13' mc
3 WTTA MNT 6 6 6 9 9 ** "Big Momma's House"(2000) 'PG-13' Seinfeld Seinfeld Chris Chris Paid Whacked Born Ride Paid
O [WACX TBN 21 21 In Touch Rejoice in the Lord Variety King- Journey World 40 Days Variety Dayna Gaither
WTo CW 4 4 4 12 12 *** 'Til Death Two and Two and Criminal Minds Without a Trace "Hard NUMB3RS "Finders The Unit"Play 16" (In
S cw 4 4 4 12 12 "An" 'PG' Half Men Half Men "Hopeless"'14' Reset"'PG' Keepers"'PG' Stereo)'14'm
SSorts GillzNFinz Spy Crime Cold Squad '14' Da Vinci's Inquest (In Music Mix Music Mix TheCisco Black
S WY FAM 16 16 16 15 Fishing 'G' Games Strike 14' (DVS) Stereo)'14' USA USA Kid'G' Beauty
S C[WOOX FOX 13 7 7 FOX 35 News at 6 Burgers Cleveland Simpsons |Napoleon Fam. Guy American FOX 35 News at 10 Big Bang Big Bang
B CWVEA UNI 15 15 15 15 14 Futbol Mexicana Dale con Ganas'PG' NuestraBelleza Latina (N) (SS) Sal y Pimienta'14' Aguila Noticiero
I [WPX ION 17 *** "The Fugitive" *** "Jarhead"(2005, War) Jake Gyllenhaal. 'R' *** "Jarhead" (2005) Jake Gyllenhaal.
Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Breakout Kings"An Breakout Kings "An
(AE) 54 48 54 25 27 Wars Wa WarsPG Wars'PG' WarsPG' WarsPG WarsPG' Wars N) Unjust Death 14 Unjust Death 14'
*** "Braveheart" (1995, Historical Drama) The Walkin Dead "18 The Walking Dead Comic Book Men The Walking Dead '14'
55 64 55 Mel Gibson.'R'N Miles Out"'14' (N) '14' "Zombies" (N) N
(N 52 35 52 19 21 Rattlesnake Republic Finding Bigfoot (In Hillbilly Handfishin' Rattlesnake Republic Finding Bigfoot (N) (In Rattlesnake Republic
52 35 52 19 21(In Stereo)'14' Stereo)P' "Best Of" (N)'PG' "Mutiny" (N)'14 Stereo) P' "Mutiny"'14'
S**2 "Poetic Justice" *** "Baby Boy" (2001, Drama) Tyrese Gibson. A man juggles woman- The Game Let's Stay Let's Stay Let's Stay
96 19 96 (1993)'R' izing with fighting his mother's boyfriend. R' c 14 Together Together Together
[BIRAVO0) 254 51 254 Housewives/OC Housewives/OC Housewives/Atl. Housewives/Atl. The Kandi Factory (N) Happens
**1 "Office Space" ** "Withouta Paddle" (2004, Comedy) Seth Jeff Dunham: Arguing Ralphie May: Too Big to Tosh.0 Key &
CC 27 61 27 33 (1999)'R' Green, Matthew Lillard. PG-13' c With Myself Ignore 'MA, L '14' Peele'14'
My Big Redneck My Big Redneck Bayou Bayou Bayou Bayou My Big Redneck My Big Redneck
98 45 98 28 37Vacation'PG' Vacation PG' Bilion Bilion Bilion Bilion VacationPG Vacation 'PG'
CNBCJ 43 42 43 Take It |Paid Diabetes |Wall St. Millions Millions Biography on CNBC Wikileaks-Lies Mind of Google
(WHJ 40 29 40 41 46 CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) Big Hits-Drms Piers Morgan CNN Newsroom (N) Big Hits-Drms
Wii 46 40 46 6 5 rShake It Up! (In Stereo) Good- So Random! Austin & Lab Rats (In Stereo) Jessie Shake It Up! (In Stereo) So Random! Austin &
IS) 46 40 46 6 5 'G' Charlie G' .Ally G' Y7' G' 'G' G' Ally G'
(ESPfl 33 27 33 21 17 Lacrosse |SportCtr NBA Basketball Chicago Bulls at Philadelphia 76ers. NBA Basketball Denver Nuggets at San Antonio Spurs.
(ESPW 34 28 34 43 49 Women's College Basketball Women's College Gymnastics Fishing E:60
EEWTl 95 70 95 48 Ben. |Crossing |Sunday Night Prime Living The |G.K. Rosary Catholic Compass |Saints Bookmark
S** "Hocus Pocus"(1993, ** "Alice in Wonderland" (2010, Fantasy) Johnny Depp, *** "Matilda" (1996, Comedy) MaraWilson,
(EM 29 52 29 20 28 Comedy) Bette Midler. PG Mia Wasikowska. 'PG' Danny DeVito, Rhea Perlman.'PG'
e "Up Close & Personal" (1996) Robert ** "The Core" (2003) Aaron Eckhart. ** "Star Trek: Nemesis" (2002) Patrick
118 170 Redford. (In Stereo) 'PG-13' m Scientists travel to the center of the Earth. a Stewart. (In Stereo) PG-13 m
Ij 44 37 44 32 Fox News Sunday FOX Report (N) Huckabee (N) Fox News Sunday Geraldo at Large (N) Huckabee
FOOD 26 56 26 Diners |Diners Worst Cooks Cupcake Wars (N) Worst Cooks Iron Chef America Chopped
(ISNFLJ 35 39 35 NHL Hockey Ottawa Senators at Florida Panthers. Panthers UFC Unleashed World PokerTour World PokerTour
eX 30 60 30 51 ** "X-Men: The Last Stand" (2006, Action) ** "X-Men Origins: Wolverine" (2009, Action) Hugh ** "X-Men Origins: Wolverine"
S30 60 30 51HughJackman. PG-13' Jackman, Liev Schreiber, will.i.am. 'PG-13' (2009) HughJackman.
GOLF 727 67 727 Golf Central (N) |Morning |Top 10 Haney |PGA Tour Golf Honda Classic, Final Round. (In Stereo) a ICentral
39 68 39 45 54 "Goodnightfor Justice"(2011,Western) Luke "Goodnight for Justice: The Measure of a "Goodnight for Justice: The Measure of a
iLL 39 68 39 45 54 Perry. Man" (2012, Western) Luke Perry. N Man"(2012, Western) Luke Perry. N
Hi 302 201*** "Hanna"3(2011) Saoirse ** "The Transporter" (2002) Luck Ace pitches a Eastbound Life's Too Luck Ace pitches a
302 201302 2 2 Ronan. (In Stereo)'PG-13' c Jason Statham.'PG-13' deal. (N)'MA' cc Short (N) deal. 'MA' cc
*** "Runaway Jury" Real Time With Bill Game of Thrones "A *2 "Your Highness" (2011) Danny Bridesmaids **+ "Exporting
tHiDIZ 303 202 303 (2003) 'PG-13' Maher MA' Golden Crown" 'MA' McBride. 'R'N cRaymond" (2010)
HGTV 23 57 23 42 52 House Hunters Holmes on Homes Holmes on Homes Holmes Inspection Holmes Inspection Property Brothers 'G'
S 51 25 51 32 42 Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Ax Men "Fists of Fury" Ax Men Travis earns Ax Men "Out of Control" Full Metal Jousting (N) Top ShotSho t gun
51 25 51 32 42 'PG' 'PG 14'm his stripes.'14' c (N)'14'B '14, L,V m Showdown"'PG'
S"While the Children "Blue-Eyed Butcher" (2012, Docudrama) Sara Army Wives (Season Premiere) Roxy struggles "Blue-Eyed Butcher"
24 38 24 31 Sleep" (2007)'NR' Paxton, Lisa Edelstein. NR' with moving away (N) 'PG' c (2012) Sara Paxton.
** "Terror in the Family" (1996, Drama) "Bringing Ashley Home" (2011, Docudrama) "Reviving Ophelia" (2010 Drama) Jane
^ l 50 119u Joanna Kerns, Dan Launa. cc A.J. Cook. 'NR' Kaczmarek, Kim Dickens, NickThurston. [
S****"Pulp Fiction" (1994) John *** "X-Men: First Class" (2011) James McAvoy.-.- .-- in, Ouli ,I97, Comedy) "House
(WiAX) 320 221 320 3 3 Travolta. 'R' years of Charles Xavier and Erik Lehnsherr. i.- ... I.- : I .' a Rising"
CMSNBlC 42 41 42 Caught on Camera Caught on Camera |Caught on ht on C camera t on Camera Trafficked: Slavery |Sex Slaves: TX
When Aliens Attack Fighting back in case of an Area 51 Declassified Million Dollar Moon Alaska State Troopers Digers
(W) 109 65109 44 53attack. '14, V' 'PG' Rock Heist'PG, L,S' (N) '14 P'G Diggers
tNiJ 28 36 28 35 25 Sponge. |Sponge. Sponge. |Sponge. '70s '70s My Wife |My Wife George IGeorge Friends IFriends
(DWNJ 103 62 103 "Bird on a Wire" Oprah's Next Oprah's Next Oprah's Next Master Class Oprah's Next
IXY) 44 123 Snapped 'PG' c Snapped 'PG' c Snapped 'PG' m Snapped 'PG' c Law Order: Cl Law Order: Cl
(SiuW) 340 241 340 **4 "The Switch" Shameless iTV) lan Californication House of Shameless "Parenthood" House of Californication Shameless
340 241 340 4 (2010) cNignores Lip. MA Lies MA' (iTV) (N)'MA' Lies'MA' "Parenthood" (iTV)'MA'
NASCAR Victory SPEED Center (N) Wind Tunnel With Dave NASCAR Victory Lane Octane Car Crazy SPEED Center
EE 732 112 732 Lane (N) Despain (N) Academy 'G'
p**4 "Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's *** "Kill Bill: Vol. 1" (2003, Action) Uma Thurman. An *** "Kill Bill: Vol. 2" (2004) Uma
37 43 37 27 36 Chest" (2006) Johnny Depp. 'PG-13' assassin seeks vengeance against her attackers. 'R' Thurman. (In Stereo) 'R'
"Soul *** "Tangled" (2010) Voices of "Grown Ups" (2010, Comedy) Adam Spartacus: Vengeance *** "Red Dragon"
370 271 370 Surfer" Mandy Moore. P' W Sandier. (In Stereo) 'PG-13' m 'MA' (2002) 'R'
College Basketball California at Ship Sprtsman Florida Women's College Basketball Stanford at Ship Sprtsman
36 31 36 Stanford. (N) (Live) Shape TV Adv. Sport. California. (N) (Live) Shape TV Adv.
31 "Cirque du Freak: ** "Underworld: Rise of the Lycans" (2009, ** "Jeepers Creepers 2" (2003, Horror) Ray ***"Drag Me to
SYFY 31 59 31 26 29 Vampire's" Horror) Michael Sheen.'R VWise, Jonathan Breck. R P Hell"(2009) 'PG-13'
(rj5) 49 23 49 16 19 ***n"Shrek" *** "Shrek2"(2004, Comedy)'PG' **"ShrektheThird"(2007) 'PG' ** "17Again"
S35**** "The Snake Pit" (1948, Drama) Olivia *** "Charly" (1968, Fantasy) Cliff Robertson, ***t "Awakenings" (1990, Drama) Robert De
(M 169 53 169 30 35de Havilland, Mark Stevens. 'NR' N Claire Bloom, Lilia Skala. 'PG Niro, Julie Kavner PG-13'm
Secrets of the Secret The 9/11 Tapes: Chaos Gold Rush (In Stereo) Grand Design Theories Grand Design Theories Grand Design Theories
(M) 53 34 53 24 26 Service 'PG, V in the Sky N of life's origin. of life's origin. of life's origin.
TI ) 50 46 50 29 30 Lottery Changed Lottery Changed Complusive Hoard-Buried Addiction |Addiction Hoard-Buried
*** "Air Force One" (1997, Suspense) ** "The Mechanic" (2011, Action) "The Grind" (2009, Suspense) C. **t "Jeepers
350 261 350 Harrison Ford, Gary Oldman. (In Stereo) 'R Jason Statham. R Rc Thomas Howell. 'NR' Creepers" (2001) 'R
n** "Shooter" (2007, Suspense) Mark **t "Terminator Salvation" (2009, Science **t "Terminator Salvation" (2009, Science
(U 48 33 48 31 34 Wahlberg, Michael Pena. NR Fiction) Christian Bale. PG-13 Fiction) Christian Bale. PG-13 '
(flfl) 38 58 38 33 "Scooby-Doo! Music" |Adven Level Up |Level Up King/Hill |Squidbill. Chicken Fam. Guy Fam. Guy |Chicken
TRAV 9 54 9 44 No Reservation No Reservation Last Resorts II 'G' Last Resorts III 'G' New Jersey Shr Florida Spring
[ijiiVJ 25 55 25 98 55 Vegas Vegas Cops'14' Cops'14 Vegas |Vegas Vegas |Vegas Vegas Vegas Forensic Forensic
TIYL 32 49 32 34 24 Cleveland Cleveland Cleveland Cleeland Cevend ** "Miss Congeniality" (2000) Sandra Bullock. cN Raymond Raymond Raymond
NCIS "Minimum NCIS A detective helps NCIS Bored house- NCIS "Love & War" (In NCIS A Navy diver is ** "The Game Plan"
US 47 32 47 17 18 Security"'PG' the team. 'PG' wives. '14' cc Stereo) '14' murdered. 'PG' (2007) 'PG'
My Fair Wedding With My Fair Wedding With My Fair Wedding With My Fair Wedding With My FairWedding With My FairWedding With
tWEJ 117 69 117 DavidTutera David Tutera David Tutera David Tutera David Tutera David Tutera
rWGN-IAJ 181 18 18 18 20 Chris Chris 30Rock Mother Mother Mother Mother Mother News Replay TheUnit'14' c


Dear Annie: Six years
ago, I divorced my al-
coholic, workaholic
husband and became a sin-
gle parent My ex has regu-
lar visitation, but I am the
one who handles all the sick
days, school conferences,
injuries, etc. He never both-
ers. Shortly after the di-
vorce, I had to take a job at a
much lower salary There
were times when I won-
dered how we would eat
and stay warm.
When my ex married his
third wife, he decided my
son didn't need a bedroom
at his place. His wife's kids
have three of the four bed-
rooms in their home, and
my son sleeps on the couch
when he visits.
Our son is an
amazing boy He
recently was ac-
cepted into a
prestigious mag- .
net school for
gifted kids. The
problem is, al-
though his tu-
ition is paid for,
there is a bill for
room and board.
When I brought ANNI
this up with my MAILI
ex, I was treated
to a lecture
about how the father of one
of his wife's children does-
n't pay child support, so he
has been supporting him
since she quit her job to be a
stay-at-home mom. This is
his excuse for not helping
with our son's schooling.
Annie, am I wrong to
think he should be thinking
first of his own child? Mind
you, he still takes beach-
front vacations with his wife
and her kids. Why am I the
one who makes all the sacri-
fices? He pays regular child
support, and I am grateful,
but it doesn't cover every-
thing. Our son is extremely
gifted, and I fear his gift
won't be nurtured in the
local public high school,
which has a terrible reputa-
tion. Even my ex agrees.
I finally got a raise, and I
worry that my ex will try to
have his support payments
reduced. I have applied for
financial aid for the school
bill. Am I wrong to ask my ex
for help, or am I just being a
bitter ex-wife? Worn-Out
Mom
Dear Worn Out: Your son
is lucky to have such a lov-
ing mother as his advocate.
There is a difference be-
tween the basics of what
parents are obligated to do
and the extra benefits that
come from doing more. It
would be wonderful if your


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Modify
6 Code word for A
10 Affectionate
14 Denomination
18 Made a contented sound
20 Dyed-in-the- -
21 -fixe
22 Bitter
24 Extol
25 Help in wrongdoing
26 Orderly
27 Led
29 Telescope part
30 Spear tip
32 Fish eggs
34 Three wise men
36 Poison
37 Linear measures (abbr.)
38 Sported
39 Malediction
41 Furnish
43 Caustic substance
44 Charter
45 Paper-folding art
47 Thailand neighbor
49 New
52 Club charge
53 Type size
55 Abounding in trees
59 Prize
60 Legislative body
62 Took off
64 Valerie Harper role
65 Office note
66 Kind of con artist
67 Affectedly shy
69 Old interjection
71 Leave out
72 Quid quo
73 Napped leather
74 Piggery
75 River horse, for short
77 Native of (suffix)
78 Increased
80 Supportive one
82 Pressed
84 In flames
85 Norse god
87 School period
88 Like Batman or Robin
89 Anger
90 Pagan
92 Private teacher's pupil
93 One - customer
94 Barkin or Burstyn


96 Pinna
97 Job
99 Steal from
102 Marine plant
104 Indeed!
105 Cutting tool
106 Grayish brown
107 Of very good
quality
108 Shop assistant
110 Work the land
112 Come forth
114 Juan- de Leon
115 Alaskan island
117 Chimney dust
119 City in Norway
120 Kind of eel
121 "- Karenina"
123 Mexican food
125 Fair
126 Stomach muscles
129 Region (abbr.)
131 Ray flower
132 Rabbit
133 Highway sign
letters
136 Latvian
138 Send forth
140 Doily
141 Big brass
instrument
142 Game on
horseback
143 Interstellar distance
145 Let fall
147 "Exodus" author
149 Where Taipei is
151 Goddess
of the hunt
152 Mushroom part
153 Smell
154 Ancient sect member
155 Make ready, for short
156 Sword
157 Whirlpool
158 Bash

DOWN
1 Put on
2 Enticed
3 Across (prefix)
4 Discord goddess
5 In medias -
6 Like an insomniac
7 Rounded part
8 Enemy


Humanitarian
Variety of apple
Lemon or lime ending
500 sheets
Alloy
Town in Michigan
Old French coin
Nursery item
- wave
Expel officially
Gainsay
Poor grade
Wrath
Cousin to an assn.
Hair goo
Get of
Squeaking sound
Post or Dickinson
Hatch
Big sandwich
Weight unit
Sherbet relative
Section of London
Inclined way
Pitcher
Hidden, in a way
Numb
State positively
Bossy
Used a blue pencil
Old-fashioned
Took legal action
Outer (prefix)
End
Regal
Edible mollusk
Lover of good food
Binge
Classified
That ship
Deliver a speech
In apple- order
Feather scarf
Playing card
Unclose, poetically
Greek god
Dissertation
Farm denizen
Pile
Smog
Drink too much
Allow
Monte -
"Les Miserables" author
Formerly
Lager


Diva's song
Audibly
Easily annoyed
Style of type
German philosopher
Throw
Dew
Sit for an artist
Patella
Tread on
Clergyman


Garment part
Estuary
Boxer's move
High mountain
Draw a on
Gaza or Sunset
Raised line
Sled dog
Lawn-care item
Factory
Something sweet


137 Old Russian ruler
139 Journey
141 Fastened
142 Leaning tower town
144 Dir. letters
146 Cry heard at
bullfights
148 Crimson
150 Snake


Puzzle answer is on Page A16.


2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


husband would help with
the school bill, but unfortu-
nately, he doesn't have to.
Your best approach would
be to ask him sweetly, focus-
ing on how this school could
create a better future for his
son. But we hope the finan-
cial aid package comes
through.
DearAnnie: If a person is
recovering from a back in-
jury and has constant pain
and trouble walking, stand-
ing and sitting, is it OK to
skip the funeral of a rela-
tive? If so, how much ex-
plaining do I have to do
when family members in-
quire judgmentally? N.Y,
N.Y
Dear N.Y: If it's a fifth
cousin twice re-
moved whom you
haven't seen in 20
years, you don't
have to attend, and
you don't need to
say why If it's your
grandmother, you
need to apologize,
explain the cir-
cumstances and
tell the family you
would have
E'S crawled on your
3OX knees to attend if it
had been physi-
cally possible. We
recommend you send a card
of condolence with a hand-
written note saying how im-
portant this relative was in
your life, and perhaps a do-
nation to the deceased's fa-
vorite charity.
DearAnnie: I read the let-
ter from "Somewhere in
Oregon," who was upset that
her husband wanted to put
up his late wife's old Christ-
mas decorations. You gave
her good advice, but I think
you let her off too easily Her
behavior was selfish, and
her insecurities are show-
ing.
Our histories make us
who we are. The holidays
can be a tough time, and it's
not a stretch to think he may
have been missing his first
wife. If "Somewhere" can't
deal with that, maybe she
could divorce and marry a
12-year-old. He should come
with a pretty clean slate. -
Shaking My Head


Annie's Mailbox is written
by Kathy Mitchell and
Marcy Sugar, longtime
editors of the Ann Landers
column. Email questions to
anniesmailbox@
comcast.net, or write to:
Annie's Mailbox, c/o
Creators Syndicate,
737 Third St., Hermosa
Beach, CA 90254.


A14 SUNDAY, MARCH 4, 2012


ENTERTAINMENT


II
[]





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Veterans NOTES -


Due to space considera-
tions, the Veterans Notes some-
times contain only basic
information regarding each post.
For more information about
scheduled activities, meals and
more for a specific post, call or
email that post at the contact
listed.
Honor Flight of West
Central Florida (HFWCF)
needs people to serve as
guardians for the first flight of
2012, taking World War II veter-
ans to Washington, D.C., so the
veterans can see the memorials
on the National Mall.
HFWCF has chartered a
plane from Allegiant Air to fly ap-
proximately 75 elderly veterans
from St. Petersburg/Clearwater
International Airport to Washing-
ton on a one-day trip. The flight
will leave at 7 a.m., Tuesday,
April 3, and return at 7:30 p.m.
to a public "Welcome Home" pa-
rade.
While in Washington, stops
are planned at the Iwo Jima and
World War II Memorials, and Ar-
lington National Cemetery. The
veterans will also be able to visit
the Lincoln, Washington, Korea
and Vietnam memorials. En
route, the chartered buses will
pass the Navy, Air Force and
Jefferson memorials, the U.S.
Capitol, the Pentagon and sev-
eral other federal buildings.
Each veteran will have a
"guardian angel" who will be re-
sponsible for pushing their
wheelchair and provide for their
safety.
In 2011, the West Central
Florida Honor Flight flew 241
veterans to Washington. This
first flight of 2012 is being made
possible by a donation from
Progress Energy Florida.
The veterans fly free; how-
ever, guardians are asked to
make a donation of at least
$400 to the operating fund of
HFWCF. All donations are tax
deductible.
Persons interested in serving
as a guardian can visit
www.honorflightwcf.org, print
the guardian application and
mail it to P.O. Box 55661, St.
Petersburg, FL 33732.
The Red Tail Memorial
Chapter 136, Air Force Asso-
ciation, will meet at 7 p.m.
Thursday, March 15, at Ocala
Regional Airport Administration
Building, 750 S.W. 60th Ave.,
Ocala. AFA and Red Tail Chap-
ter member Rob Thomas, an
Iraq War veteran, will speak. All
are welcome.
Call 352-854-8328 for more
information.
The Citrus County Chapter
of SCORE, in conjunction with
the Veterans Fast Launch Initia-
tive Program, will offer a free
small business institute work-
shop for veterans. Veterans
who are in business or planning
to start a business qualify for
this program. The workshop
starts at 6 p.m. Friday, March 9,
at the College of Central Florida
Citrus Campus. The seminar will
run for 11 weeks.
To apply, visit www.vetsfast-
launch.org\coupon-signup, print
the coupon and call the college
at 352-249-1210 and register for
the workshop. Bring the coupon
to the first meeting. The cost of
the workshop is $100 and will be
completely covered by the
coupon.
For more information, call
SCORE at 352-249-1236.
The U.S. Air Force is look-
ing for prior enlisted men and
women from all services inter-
ested in both direct duty assign-
ments in previously obtained
career fields or retraining into
select career fields. Some of the
careers include aircraft electron-
ics/mechanical areas, cyber op-
eration fields, and various other
specialties. Enlisted career
openings that include the oppor-
tunities to retrain consist of spe-
cial operations positions and
unmanned aerial vehicle.
Assignment locations are
based on Air Force needs. For
more information, call 352-476-
4915.
Citrus County Veterans
Coalition has a new building
holding freezers, refrigerators
and all necessary requirements
to provide food to veterans in
need. Food donations and vol-
unteers are always welcomed


and needed.
The CCVC is on the DAV
property in Inverness at the cor-
ner of Paul and Independence,
off U.S. 41 north. Hours of oper-
ation are 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tues-
day and Thursday.
Appointments are encouraged
by calling 352-400-8952.
CCVC general meetings are
at 10 a.m. the fourth Thursday
monthly at the DAV building in
Inverness. All active duty and
honorably discharged veterans,


Special to the Chronicle


Manatee Division U.S. Naval Sea Cadets are pictured with Marine Cpl. Rusty Wineberger, in front.



Marine corporal visits with Sea Cadets


Special to the Chronicle

Marine Cpl. Rusty Wineberger
came full circle when he visited
with Manatee Division, U.S. Naval
Sea Cadet Corps in Yankeetown re-
cently When Wineberger was a high
school student in Citrus County, he
heard about the Sea Cadets and
joined Nautilus Division, which was
drilling at Coast Guard Station Yan-
keetown.
Although he and several of his
buddies knew they were going to
join the Marines after they gradu-
ated from high school, they enjoyed
the advanced training offered to
them in Sea Cadets. Since the Ma-
rine Corps is part of the U.S. Navy, it
was a natural fit
Returning from deployment in
Afghanistan, the Marine asked if he


their spouses, widows and wid-
owers, along with other veter-
ans' organizations and current
coalition members are welcome.
Members are encouraged to at-
tend general meetings.
Annual membership donation
is $10 for a calendar year or $25
for three years. The CCVC is a
nonprofit corporation, and your
donations are tax deductible.
Current members should check
their membership card for expi-
ration dates, and renew with
Gary Williamson at 352-527-
4537, or at the meeting. Visit
www.ccvcfl.org.
AMVETS William Crow
Post 447, Inglis, is on State
Road 40 East. Sons meeting is
at 5:30 p.m. first Monday; Riders
meeting is at 5:30 p.m. first
Thursday; post meeting is at
5:30 p.m. second Thursday;
Ladies Auxiliary meeting is 5:30
p.m. third Thursday.
The Ladies Auxiliary yard sale
will be Saturday and Sunday,
March 10 and 11.
Corned beef and cabbage will
be served on St. Patrick's Day,
March 17, for $8 from 5 to 7
p.m. Music by The Quitters from
7 to 11 p.m.
For more information about
the post and its activities, call
352-447-1816; email
Amvet447@comcast.net.
Blanton-Thompson
American Legion Post 155,
6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway,
Crystal River.
A St. Patrick's Day party will
take place Saturday, March 17,
at the American Legion Post
155. Doors open at 4 p.m.
Corned beef and cabbage will
be served at 5 p.m. Cost is $12.
Purchase tickets at the post
from bartenders. Entertainment
will be provided by Moses Grey
Hound Band.
For information about the post
and its activities, call Cmdr. Jay
Conti Sr. at 352-795-6526 or
visit www.postl 55.org.
American Legion Auxil-
iary Unit 155 meets at 7:30
p.m. the fourth Tuesday of every
month at the post. The Ameri-
can Legion Auxiliary is the
world's largest women's patriotic
service organization with nearly
1 million members in 10,100
communities. The principles of
the American Legion Auxiliary
are to serve veterans, their fami-
lies and the community.
Eligibility in the Auxiliary is
open to mothers, wives, sisters,
daughters, granddaughters,
great-granddaughters or grand-
mothers of members of the
American Legion and of de-
ceased veterans who served
during war time (also stepchil-
dren); stepchildren; and female
veterans who served during war
time. Call Unit President Shawn


could meet with Manatee Division
Sea Cadets and share with them
some of his experiences as a Ma-
rine, and how his time in the Cadet
Corps helped him as a Marine.
Wineberger conducted a dress uni-
form inspection, led them in a run
and combat conditioning physical
training. He also had some class-
room training time, teaching them
about the Marine Corps and an-
swering questions.
"My buddy Jon Taylor and I loved
being in Sea Cadets together," said
Wineberger. "We had such good
times here and became best friends
in the Sea Cadets."
They were both leaders in the
unit and went away to training to-
gether. Wineberger shared the
painful reality of being a Marine
when he told the cadets and officers


Mikulas, 352-503-5325, or
membership chairman Barbara
Logan, 352-795-4233.
For more information, call
Unit President Shawn Mikulas,
352-503-5325, or Barbara
Logan, 352-795-4233.
H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post
10087, Beverly Hills, offers
meals, bingo, golf, karaoke and
pool. Review the monthly
newsletter for activities and up-
dates, and call the post at 352-
746-0440. The VFW Post 10087
is off County Road 491, directly
behind Superior Bank.
Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs,
352-465-4864. Wi Fi is now
available at the post; bring your
laptop or any other item that will
access the Internet and enjoy
the free service. The post is now
a nonsmoking facility; smoking
is allowed on the porch.
All are welcome to the meat-
loaf dinner from 5 to 6:30 p.m.
Friday, March 9, at the post.
Information regarding any
post events is available at the
post or call 352-465-4864.
Disabled American Veter-
ans Chapter No. 70 meets at 2
p.m. the second Tuesday
monthly at the chapter hall,
1039 N. Paul Drive, Inverness,
at the intersection of Independ-
ence Highway and U.S. 41. The
chapter hall is on the corner of
Independence Highway and
Paul Drive.
We thank veterans for their
service and welcome any dis-
abled veteran to join us from 9
a.m. to 1 p.m. any Tuesday or
Thursday at the chapter hall.
This is also the time that we ac-
cept donated nonperishable
foods for our continuing food
drive.
Our main function is to assist
disabled veterans and their fam-
ilies when we are able. Anyone
who knows a disabled veteran
or their family who requires as-
sistance is asked to call Com-
mander Richard Floyd
727-492-0290, Ken Stewart at
352-419-0207, or 352-344-
3464.
Service Officer Joe McClister
is available to assist any veteran
or dependents with their disabil-
ity claim by appointment. Call
352-344-3464 and leave a mes-
sage.
Ambulatory veterans who
wish to schedule an appoint-
ment for transportation to the VA
medical center in Gainesville
should call the veterans' service
office at 352-527-5915. Mobility
challenged veterans who wish
to schedule an appointment for
transportation to the VA medical
center in Gainesville may call
the Citrus County Transit office
for wheelchair transportation;


that his best friend, Cpl. Jonathon
Taylor, the best Marine he ever met,
was killed by an IED in Helmand
Province in Afghanistan last year.
He was thankful that local cadets
presented the fallen warrior's fam-
ily with a shadow box of Cpl. Tay-
lor's Sea Cadet achievements
"Sea Cadets continues to pay off
for me. It helped me through boot
camp and I still remember and use
lessons I learned while I was a
cadet," Wineberger said. "Some of
my best childhood memories were
formed right here at Coast Guard
Station Yankeetown."
Manatee Division drills at Coast
Guard Station Yankeetown on the
second weekend of each month. To
learn more about Sea Cadets, go to
wwwmanateedivorg or call Lt. j.g.
Todd Dunn at 352-212-5473.


call 352-527-7630.
For more information about
chapter activities, veterans' ben-
efits or membership, Call Ken
Stewart at 352-419-0207; leave
a message, if desired, should
the machine answer.
Disabled American Veter-
ans Auxiliary Unit No. 70
meets at 2 p.m. the second
Tuesday of the month at the
chapter hall, 1039 N. Paul Drive,
Inverness. The March 13 meet-
ing, however, will begin at 11:30
a.m. There will be a luncheon of
ham, beans and cornbread prior
to the meeting. The meeting will
be a School of Instruction.
So that material can be pro-
vided for those who plan to at-
tend, call the auxiliary adjutant
at 352-341-5334 by Saturday,
March 10.
The auxiliary plans a visit to
the VA nursing homes) and
needs toiletry items such as
packaged razors, combs, hair-
brushes, toothbrushes, sham-
poos and deodorant to fill ditty
bags, They are also accepting
cotton material and yarn to
make ditty bags, lap robes,
wheelchair and walker bags for
disabled veterans.
The auxiliary membership
has grown to include many
more extended families. Call
Auxiliary Commander Linda
Brice at 352-560-3867 or Adju-
tant Lynn Armitage at 352-341-
5334 for information.
Eugene Quinn VFW Post
4337 and Ladies Auxiliary,
906 State Road 44 E., Inver-
ness.
VFW Post 4337 Ladies Auxil-
iary will present a "Step into
Spring" fashion show luncheon
on March 10 at the post. Doors
open at noon with a lunch of
chicken salad sandwich, potato
salad, coleslaw, deviled egg,
dessert, and coffee. The show
will follow, featuring fashions
provided by Bon Worth. Tickets
are $8, with proceeds going to
the Veterans and Family Sup-
port fund.
Call the post at 352-344-3495
for information about all weekly
post activities, or visit
www.vfw4337.org.
The American Legion
Wall-Rives Post 58 and Auxil-
iary, 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnellon.
Dunnellon Young Marines will
meet at 6 p.m. Tuesday.
Free AARP tax services will
be available 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Wednesday through April 11.
For more information, call
Wayne Sloan at 352-489-5066.
The public is welcome at
bingo at 6 p.m. Thursday.
The post will honor outstand-
ing firemen and policemen at
the annual Law & Order Dinner
and Awards Night. Reservations
only.


The outdoor flea market and
pancake breakfast will be from
7:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Satur-
day, March 17. The public is in-
vited.
For information about activi-
ties and the post, call Carl Boos
at 352-489-3544.
Rolling Thunder Chapter
7, a POW/MIA awareness
group, meets at 10 a.m. second
Saturday at the VFW Post
10087 in Beverly Hills. Call Bob
Bruno, secretary, at 352-201-
1228.
SA Marine Corps League
Ladies Auxiliary Citrus Unit
meets at 1 p.m. the third Tues-
day monthly at the VFW in Bev-
erly Hills. New members are
welcome. Membership fee is
$30 a year. Female relatives
ages 16 or older who are a wife,
widow, mother, stepmother, sis-
ter, daughter, stepdaughter,
grandmother, granddaughter,
aunt or daughter-in-law of hon-
orably discharged Marines and
FMF Corpsmen are eligible to
belong to the Marine Corps
League. Female Marines (for-
mer, active and reserves) and
associate members are eligible
for MCLA membership. Call
President Elaine Spikes at 352-
860-2400 or Secretary/Trea-
surer Joan Cecil at
352-726-0834 for information.
Hunger and Homeless
Coalition -Anyone who
knows of a homeless veteran in
need of food, haircut, voter ID,
food stamps, medical assis-
tance or more blankets is asked
to call Ed Murphy at the Hunger
and Homeless Coalition at 352-
382-0876, or pass along this
phone number to the veteran.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW
Post 4252 and Ladies Auxil-
iary 3190 N. Carl G. Rose High-
way, State Road 200,
Hernando; 352-726-3339. Send
emails to
vfw4252@tampabay.rr.com.
Everyone is welcome. Post
and auxiliary meet at 6:30 p.m.
every second Thursday.
Post honor guard is available
for funerals, flag raising and
nursing home visits.
The public is welcome to the
Friday night dinner and dance at
5p.m.
The Ladies Auxiliary will host
a Bonanza Bingo beginning at
10 a.m. Saturday, March 3; non-
smoking hall. Cost is $35 and in-
cludes bingo package and
lunch. Tickets are available at
the post. Proceeds will benefit
the Cancer Aid & Research
Foundation.
See our post activities:
Google us as VFW 4252, Her-
nando.
Dumas-Hartson VFW
Post 8189 is on West Veterans
Drive, west of U.S. 19 between


more information about the 40/8,
call the Chef De Gare Tom
Smith at 352-601-3612; for the
Cabane, call La Presidente
Carol Kaiserian at 352-746-
1959; or visit us on the Web at
www.Postl55.org.
Aaron A. Weaver Chapter
776 Military Order of the Pur-
ple Heart (MOPH) meets at 2
p.m. the third Tuesday of Janu-
ary, March, May, July, Septem-
See VETERANS/Page A16


VETERANS & IN SERVICE


SUNDAY, MARCH 4, 2012 A15


Crystal River and Homosassa.
Call 352-795-5012 for informa-
tion.
VFW membership is open to
men and women veterans who
have participated in an overseas
campaign, including service in
Iraq and Afghanistan. The Ko-
rean Campaign medal remains
open, as well. Call the post at
the phone number above for in-
formation.
Joe Nic Barco Memorial
VFW Post 7122, 8191 S.
Florida Ave., Floral City. For in-
formation about the post and its
activities, call 352-637-0100.
Friday isAUCE fish or three-
piece chicken for $7.
American Legion, Bev-
erly Hills Memorial Post 237,
4077 N. Lecanto Highway, in the
Beverly Plaza, invites all eligible
veterans and their families to
visit our post and consider join-
ing our Legion family: American
Legion, Sons of the American
Legion (SAL), or American Le-
gion Auxiliary (ALA). Color
Guard/Honor Guard accepting
volunteers.
Beverly Hills Memorial Ameri-
can Legion Post 237, by ap-
proval of its Executive Board on
Jan. 22, and by those members
present at the Jan. 26 general
membership meeting, has
changed its regular meeting
time to 7 p.m. on the fourth
Tuesday monthly. Contact the
post at 352-746-5018 for more
information.
American Legion Riders
Chapter now being formed. Visit
the post for printed schedule or
visit the website at
www.post237.org. For informa-
tion, call the post at 352-746-
5018.
The Korean War Veterans
Association, Citrus Chapter
192 meets at the VFW Post
10087, Beverly Hills, at 1 p.m.
the first Tuesday monthly. Any
veteran who has seen honor-
able service in any of the Armed
Forces of the U.S. is eligible for
membership if said service was
within Korea, including territorial
waters and airspace, at any time
from Sept. 3, 1945, to the pres-
ent or if said service was outside
of Korea from June 25,1950, to
Jan. 31, 1955. For information,
call Hank Butler at 352-563-
2496, Neville Anderson at 352-
344-2529 or Bob Hermanson at
352-489-0728.
Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 and Auxiliary
Unit 77 meet the first Thursday
monthly at the Inverness High-
lands Civic Center at 4375 Little
Al Point Road, Inverness. Call
Post Cmdr. Norman Brumett at
352-860-2981 or Auxiliary presi-
dent Marie Cain at 352-637-
5915.
U.S. Submarine Veterans
(USSVI)-Sturgeon Base meets
at 11 a.m. the first Saturday
monthly at the American Legion
Post 155, 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River. Visitors
and interested parties are al-
ways welcome. Call Base Cmdr.
Billy Wein at 352-726-5926.
American Legion Post
166 meets 1:30 p.m., first Satur-
day monthly at the Dumas-Hart-
son VFW Post 8189 Ladies
Auxiliary facility on Veterans
Drive, Homosassa, on the west
side of U.S. 19 at Dixon's Auto
Sales across from Harley-David-
son. We meet in the small build-
ing to the left of the main
building. All former and current
post members, as well as all in-
terested veterans, are cordially
invited to be a part of American
Legion Post 166.
For information about the post
or the American Legion, call and
leave a message for the post
commander at 352-697-1749.
Your call will be returned within
24 to 48 hours.
Seabee Veterans of
America (SVA) Island X-23
welcomes all Seabees and Hon-
eybees to its monthly meeting at
10:30 a.m. the third Tuesday
monthly at Citrus Hills Country
Club, Rose and Crown restau-
rant, Citrus Hills. Call John Lowe
at 352-344-4702.
Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219
and Cabane 1219 conducts its
meetings at 7 p.m. the second
Thursday monthly at the Ameri-
can Legion Post 155 on State
Road 44 in Crystal River (6585
E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway). For





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY SCHOOLS
Elementary schools
Breakfast
Monday: Ultra cinnamon
bun, grits, cereal and toast,
milk, juice.
Tuesday: Ham, egg and
cheese on warm flatbread, tater
tots, cereal and toast, milk,
juice.
Wednesday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, grits, cereal and
toast, milk, juice.
Thursday: Breakfast egg
and cheese wrap, oatmeal with
fruit, tater tots, cereal and toast,
milk, juice.
Friday: Pancake slider, grits,
cereal and toast, milk, juice.
Lunch
Monday: Crispy Mexican
tacos, mozzarella MaxStix, PB
dippers, fresh baby carrots,
sweet peas, Spanish rice, juice
bar, milk, juice.
Tuesday: Stuffed-crust
pizza, chicken alfredo with Rip-
Stick, ham super salad, yogurt
parfait, fresh baby carrots,
steamed green beans, straw-
berry cup, crackers, milk, juice.
Wednesday: Oven-baked
breaded chicken, turkey wrap,
PB dippers, garden salad,
sweet corn, seasoned rice,
chilled applesauce, milk, juice.
Thursday: HALF DAY:
Breaded chicken sandwich,
fresh baby carrots, juice bar,
milk, juice.
Friday: HALF DAY: Baked
chicken nuggets, tuna salad
sandwich, fresh baby carrots,
fruit juice bar, milk, juice.
Middle schools
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast sausage
pizza, MVP breakfast, grits, ce-
real and toast, milk, juice.
Tuesday: Sausage, egg and
cheese biscuit, ultra cinnamon
bun, tater tots, cereal and toast,
milk, juice.
Wednesday: Breakfast egg
and cheese wrap, MVP break-
fast, tater tots, cereal and toast,
milk, juice.
Thursday: Breakfast sand-
wich stuffer, ultimate breakfast
round, peach cup, grits, cereal
and toast, milk, juice.
Friday: Ham, egg and
cheese biscuit, ultra cinnamon
bun, tater tots, cereal and toast,
milk, juice.
Lunch
Monday: Oven-baked
breaded chicken, chicken al-
fredo, yogurt parfait, fresh baby
carrots, peas and carrots, sea-
soned mashed potatoes, corn-
bread, fruit juice bar, milk, juice.
Tuesday: Pasta with moz-
zarella and meat sauce, pep-
peroni pizza, ham super salad,
PB dippers, garden salad,
sweet corn, peas, warm apple
crisp, chilled pears, crackers,
milk, juice.
Wednesday: Hamburger on
bun, turkey wrap, yogurt parfait,
fresh baby carrots, peas, ranch
pasta salad, colossal crisp
French fries, fruit juice bar, milk,
juice.
Thursday: HALF DAY:
Breaded chicken sandwich,
fresh baby carrots, juice bar,
milk, juice.
Friday: HALF DAY: Chicken
nuggets, tuna salad sandwich,
fresh baby carrots, juice bar,
milk, juice.
High schools
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast sausage
pizza, MVP breakfast, grits, ce-
real and toast, milk, juice.
Tuesday: Sausage, egg and
cheese biscuit, ultra cinnamon
bun, tater tots, cereal and toast,
milk, juice.
Wednesday: Breakfast egg
and cheese wrap, MVP break-
fast, tater tots, cereal and toast,
milk, juice.
Thursday: Breakfast


sausage pizza, ultimate break-
fast round, grits, peach cup, ce-
real and toast, milk, juice.
Friday: Breakfast sandwich
stuffer, ultra cinnamon bun,
tater tots, cereal and toast, milk,
juice.
Lunch
Monday: Oriental orange
chicken, hamburger, pizza, fa-
jita chicken super salad, yogurt
parfait, baby carrots, green
beans, chilled peaches, French
fries, crackers, milk.
Tuesday: Turkey and gravy
over rice, chicken sandwich,
pizza, ham super salad, yogurt
parfait, fresh garden salad,
peas, baked French fries, warm
apples, crackers, milk.
Wednesday: Macaroni and
cheese, pizza, hamburger,
turkey wrap, turkey super
salad, PB dippers, baby car-
rots, baked beans, corn, mixed
fruit, cornbread, French fries,
crackers, milk.
Thursday: HALF DAY:
Chicken sandwich, stuffed-crust
cheese pizza, pepperoni pizza,
fresh baby carrots, corn, baked
French fries, juice bar, milk.
Friday: HALF DAY: Chicken
nuggets, stuffed-crust cheese
pizza, pepperoni pizza, fresh
baby carrots, peas, baked
French fries, juice bar, milk.
Lecanto High School lunch
Monday: Hot ham and
cheese, macaroni and cheese,
hamburger, chicken sandwich,
fajita chicken super salad,
pizza, yogurt parfait, baby car-
rots, green beans, baked
beans, warm apples, French
fries, baked chips, crackers,
milk.
Tuesday: Oriental orange
chicken, hamburger, chicken
sandwich, turkey and gravy
over noodles, ham salad, yo-
gurt parfait, pizza, garden
salad, glazed carrots, French
fries, peas, strawberry cup,
baked chips, milk.
Wednesday: Brunch bowl,
chicken alfredo, hamburger,
chicken sandwich, pizza, turkey
super salad, yogurt parfait,
baby carrots, French fries,
ranch pasta salad, broccoli,
tater tots, mixed fruit, baked
chips, crackers, milk.
Thursday: HALF DAY:
Chicken sandwich, stuffed-crust
cheese pizza, pepperoni pizza,
fresh baby carrots, corn, baked
French fries, juice bar, milk.
Friday: HALF DAY: Chicken
nuggets, stuffed-crust cheese
pizza, pepperoni pizza, fresh
baby carrots, corn, baked
French fries, juice bar, milk.
SENIOR DINING
Monday: Pork riblet with
brown gravy, mashed sweet po-
tatoes, garden peas, cranberry
orange relish, slice white bread
with margarine, low-fat milk.
Tuesday: Frankfurter on bun
with mustard and relish, baked
beans with tomato, carrot coins,
coleslaw, pineapple chunks,
low-fat milk.
Wednesday: Beef and mac-
aroni casserole with cheese,
green beans, yellow corn with
red peppers, mixed fruit, Italian
bread with margarine, low-fat
milk.
Thursday: Birthday celebra-
tion: Roast chicken thigh coq
au vin, herb mashed potatoes,
stewed tomatoes, birthday
cake, whole-grain roll with mar-
garine, low-fat milk.
Friday: Beef stew with veg-
etables in gravy, parsley white
rice, Brussels sprouts, apple-
sauce, slice French bread with
margarine, low-fat milk.
Senior dining sites include:
Lecanto, East Citrus, Crystal
River, Homosassa Springs, In-
verness and South Dunnellon.
For information, call Support
Services at 527-5975.


March5to9MENUS


VETERANS
Continued from Page A15


ber and November. All combat-
wounded veterans, lineal de-
scendants, next of kin, spouses
and siblings of Purple Heart re-
cipients are cordially invited to
attend and to join the ranks of
Chapter 776.
To learn more about Aaron A.
Weaver Chapter 776 MOPH,
visit the chapter's website at
www.citruspurpleheart.org or
call 352-382-3847.
Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment
1139 will conduct its regular
meeting at 7 p.m. the third


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377
"Project X" (R) ID required. 1:20 p.m.,
4:20 p.m., 7:45 p.m.
"Dr. Seuss' The Lorax" (PG) In Real 3D.
12:30 p.m., 7:15 p.m. No passes.
"Dr. Seuss' The Lorax" (PG) 2:45 p.m.,
5 p.m. No passes.
"Tyler Perry's Good Deeds" (PG-13)
12:45 p.m., 3:45 p.m., 7 p.m.
"Ghost Rider" (PG-13) 12:50 p.m., 3:50 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
"This Means War" (PG-13) 1 p.m., 4 p.m.,
7:20 p.m.
"The Vow" (PG-13) 1:20 p.m., 4:20 p.m.,
7:10 p.m.


ROAR
Continued from Page A13

U.S. 1 slows down in the towns dotting
the islands, but it's a good idea to keep
alert for cross-traffic that doesn't seem
to notice bikes. These areas are re-
plete with shops, restaurants, and
places offering side trips for diving,
boating, sport fishing, parasailing and
bicycling.
For the non-motorized biking crowd,
bike paths are laned off along the
Overseas Highway There's also a
sumptuous selection of state parks of-
fering swimming, snorkeling, canoeing
and camping. The John Pennekamp
Coral Reef State Park, combined with
the Florida Keys National Marine
Sanctuary, covers 178 nautical square
miles and offers divers breathtaking
sights of coral formations and tropical
marine life.
Closer to Key West is Big Pine Key,
noted for its tiny, endangered Key deer
There are ample warnings and much
of the stretch across the island is
fenced off, but riders should take note.
We found the turnoff from Big Pine
that took us literally off the beaten
path to No Name Key, noted for a road-
side pub by the same name. The food
and beer are fine, but the walls and
ceilings dressed in a lush coating of
dollar bills left by legions of patrons
who've paraded through are the real
attraction.
As the green mile markers across
U.S. 1 complete their countdown from
127 to 0, you're in Key West A ride into
town for a look-see circuit is fine, but
it's a good idea to find a hotel, B&B or
other lodging and leave the two-wheel-
ers parked before the sightseeing and
partying begin. We lucked out with
perhaps the last room on the island,
around $300. But, again, we bunked
four to a room.
The streets fill up at nighttime and
the drinks flow at Sloppy Joe's, Hog's
Breath Saloon and the other noted
haunts and honky tonks. (The bounc-
ers are glad to make sure your beer is
in a plastic cup instead of a bottle if
you decide to take to the streets.)
Amid it all, Key West is full of restau-
rants to suit all tastes. At the pierside
Alonzo's, a fine dinner and drinks


came to about $100 on the nose.
The town's attractions are many, but
Key West can hardly be uttered with-
out mentioning its most famous
denizen, Ernest Hemingway His coral
rock home and a museum can be vis-
ited for an admission. The ever-pho-
tographed monument marking the
southernmost point in the continental
states is open and free. Any visitor will
quickly see the selection of shops fea-
turing art, sandals, cigars and you-
name-it lining the streets.
Fortunately for bikers, there's little
room for extra baggage so we contin-
ued our tour virtually souvenir-free. It
was on to the Everglades, a wholly dif-
ferent world and kind of beauty just a
few hours' ride away
From U.S. 1, on the mainland, it's a
sharp left (west) to U.S. 41, the Tami-
ami Trail, and a delightful straight-
away into the Everglades and Big
Cypress National Preserve. This time,
instead of riding over the sea we had
the sense of riding over a sea of swamp
grass, bounded at great lengths by
canals off the edges of the highway
The starkness of the surroundings


Wednesday monthly at DAV
Post 70 in Inverness at the in-
tersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41 North.
All Marines are welcome. Call
Jerry Cecil at 352-726-0834 or
Wayne Howard at 352-634-
5254.
Marine Corps League
Citrus Detachment 819 meets
at 7 p.m. the last Thursday
monthly at VFW Post 10087 on
Vet Lane in Beverly Hills, be-
hind Superior Bank. Social hour
follows. All Marines and FMF
Corpsmen are welcome. Meet
new friends and discuss past
glories. Call Morgan Patterson
at 352-746-1135, Ted Archam-
bault at 352-382-0462 or Bion
St. Bernard at 352-697-2389.


was refreshing after the heavy com-
mercialization along the Keys. Miles go
by before you see a store or gas station,
so check your fuel gauge.
The road passes the entrance to
Shark Valley Visitor Center where
tram tours into the Everglades are
available. Traffic was light, but no
fewer than a dozen airboats towed by
pickups that passed by attested to the
busy day vendors had taking people
into the subtropical wilderness es-
sentially a giant, shallow moving river.
The ride got more interesting, if
eerie, as the sun set and we made way
for Naples. Signs appeared, warning
drivers to slow down for panther cross-
ings.
From Naples, the vistas give way to
miles of strip malls and shopping
areas that service growing Gulf Coast
communities. The final leg began with
a turn back east toward 1-75, or Alliga-
tor Alley, across Big Cypress National
Preserve, leading back to Fort Laud-
erdale and Miami.
The ride is, again, a motorcyclist's
dream, but here there are no tourist
amenities, just the necessities.


Gilley-Long-Osteen VFW
Post 8698 is at 520 State Road
40 E., Inglis, one mile east of
U.S. 19. The Men's Auxiliary
meets at 7 p.m. the second
Monday. LAVFW meets at 5
p.m. and the membership
meeting is at 6:30 p.m. the third
Wednesday at the post.
Call the post at 352-447-
3495 for information about the
post and its activities.
Fleet Reserve Associa-
tion, Branch 186 will meet at 3
p.m. the third Thursday monthly
at the DAV Building, Independ-
ence Highway and U.S. 41
North, Inverness. Call Bob
Huscher, secretary, at 352-344-
0727.
American Legion Herbert


Today's MOVIES

"Journey 2: The Mysterious Island" (PG)
In Real 3D. 4:10 p.m., 7:05 p.m. No passes.
"Journey 2: The Mysterious Island"
(PG) 1:10 p.m.

Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Project X" (R) ID required. 2 p.m., 5 p.m.,
8 p.m.
"Dr. Seuss' The Lorax" (PG) 1 p.m.,
5:30 p.m. No passes.
"Dr. Seuss' The Lorax" (PG) In Real 3D.
3:15 p.m., 7:50 p.m. No passes.
"Wanderlust" (R) ID required. 1:20 p.m.,
4:40 p.m., 7:55 p.m.
"Act of Valor" (R) ID required. 1:45 p.m.,


Surber Post 225 meets at 7
p.m. the third Thursday monthly
at the New Testament Baptist
Church of Floral City, 9850 S.
Parkside Ave. adjoining Floral
Park, southeast side. All eligible
veterans are welcome to join.
Landing Ship Dock (LSD)
sailors meet at Denny's in Crys-
tal River at 2 p.m. the fourth
Thursday monthly. Call Jimmie
at 352-621-0617.
Suncoast U.S. Navy
Armed Guard and Merchant
Marine Veterans of World
War II meetings for 2012 will be
at 11:30 a.m. at Kally K's
restaurant in Spring Hill on the
following dates: March 10, April
14, May 12, Sept. 8, Oct. 13,
Nov. 10 and Dec. 8.


4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
"Tyler Perry's Good Deeds" (PG-13)
1:30 p.m., 4:15 p.m., 7:15 p.m.
"This Means War" (PG-13) 1:35 p.m.,
4:20 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
"Ghost Rider" (PG-13) In Real 3D. 1:50 p.m.,
4:50 p.m., 7:40 p.m. No passes.
"Journey 2: The Mysterious Island"
(PG) 1:10 p.m.
"Journey 2: The Mysterious Island" (PG) In
Real 3D. 4:10 p.m., 7:05 p.m. No passes.
"The Artist" (PG-13) 1:25 p.m., 4 p.m., 7 p.m.

Visit www.chronicleonline.com for area movie
listings and entertainment information.

CRUISE SALE
MARCH 5-MARCH 16, 2012

50% OFF
REQUIRED DEPOSITS
Value Coupon Hand le
Booklets andAmercane
Call for Details A Si,-. t.. oi ,d .
(352) 726-6623
209 N. PineAve., Inverness, FL
kathy@accenttravelgroup.com
aw


Sunday's PUZZLER


Puzzle is on Page A14.


ALTER ALFA WARM SECT
PURRED WOOL EI DEE ACR ID
P R A I S E ABETENEATBG UI DE
LENS PIK E ROE MACI BANE
YDS WORE CURSE LEND LYE
HIRE OR I GAM I LAOS
RECENT DU-ES PS-ICA WOODED
A WARD SENATIEILEFITIRHODA
MEM QU C K C Y F I E OM I T
PR SGUE E STY HIPPO ITE
UPPED BOOSTER IRONED
A F IRE T HOR1 TE RM CA PE D
SPLEEN HEATHEN ETJUTEE
TOA ELLEN EAR CHORE ERjOB
AL GA YES AD Zl TAUPE FINE
C L E R K TILL EMER GE PONCE
KOD I A KOO SOT SLO CONGER
ANNA BURR ITO JUSTE
ABS TERR DAISY HARE MPHH
LETT EMIT MAT TUBA POLO
ARSECID PIUR I S T A I W A N
D I A N A DROP I R E EK Ss E N E
PREP EPEE EDD Y PARTY
3-4 2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


Every Sunday I1 2 Food coupons
Casio Vsit $55 Free Play
|2Pocops4, k I I Innn$55 Free Play
A55 rer Ppa c179paP/DO or PP/DO a in ests
2 Casino Visits Attn.couponplayers, call for details to see if qualified.


NEuVCTRY CAINO* CRU~tISE


I Pick Up at Spanish Springs Depot I Da r mTips ailable
3/18,4/15 I Day Trips Available
Pick Up at OTOW 3/18 & 4/22 I Call for dates and details.


11-night Eastern Med departs October 21, 2012 from $949*
10-night S. Caribbean departs Dec. 11,2012 from $799*
7-night Bermuda departs Florida April 13, 2013 from $719*

For Reservations and Information, call:
THE TRAVEL AUTHORITY
(352) 628-0668
Rates are USD, cruise only, per person based on double occupancy for US and Canadian
citizens Space is subject to availability, capacity controlled, & restrictions apply Government
Taxes & Fees are additional $92 16 12/11/12, $27 60 10/21/12 & $104 44 4/13/13 per person
Offers cannot be combined with other promotions Ship's Registry Panama



Becky's lfaeIStore

IEX O Ih IC I IIAV EIII Small Group Travel 12-24 Guests
18 Days from 4395 ys from4495 11Days
18 43 BurmeseHeritage Revealed Air and Land
With Ranthambore Post Extention 3days/2nights Inclusive From
and Tiger Preserve Cambodia: 795
Includes air from Tampa or Orlando includes air from Tampa or Orlando 35 95
3557 N. Lecanto Hwy., Beverly Hills, FL 34465 5 5 7-8855
Located Next to Winn Dixie HlF3 (352) 5278855
A ,.. ........... .... ... ....... .......- .


Associated Press
Tourists pose and take photos in February at the monument marking the conti-
nental states' southernmost point, in Key West.


M9


i dl


iI


THE VIL Ia


II


A16 SUNDAY, MARCH 4, 2012


TRAVEL & COMMUNITY











SPORTS


Early deadlines
Lottery numbers, as well
as some later basketball
and hockey games, were
unavailable at press time.

CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


0 College basketball/B2, B5
0 NBA, NHL/B3
0 Sports briefs/B4
0 Scoreboard/B4
0 TV, lottery/B4
0 Baseball, auto racing/B5
0 Boxing/B5
0 Entertainment/B6


NFL: Saints violated league's 'bounty' policy


Associated Press
The NFL and commissioner Roger Goodell released details of a
three-year bounty program run by the New Orleans Saints. The
program was a pool of money from Saints players that could be
collected for delivering a big hit on an opposing player.


Players were

rewardedfor

knocking players out

Associated Press
NEW YORK Encouraging de-
fensive players to be aggressive, hit
hard and not back down is standard
procedure in pro football. Paying
them to injure the opposition is not.
New Orleans Saints players and at
least one assistant coach, defensive
coordinator Gregg Williams, main-
tained a bounty pool of up to $50,000
the last three seasons, the NFL said
Friday Payoffs came for inflicting
game-ending injuries.


Among the targets were Brett
Favre and Kurt Warner, with "knock-
outs" worth $1,500 and "cart-offs"
worth $1,000. Payments doubled or


tripled for the
playoffs, and, ac-
cording to an in-
vestigation by
NFL security, pool
amounts reached
their height in
2009 the year
the Saints won the
Super Bowl.
"It was a terrible
mistake, and we


"Instead of getting caught up in it,
I should have stopped it. I take full
responsibility for my role," added
Williams, now the defensive coordi-


It was a terrible
mistake, and we knew
it was wrong ...
Gregg Williams
former Saints defensive coordinator on
the bounty pool the team maintained.


knew it was wrong while we were
doing it," Williams said after the
league said between 22 and 27 de-
fensive players were involved in the
program he administered, with the
knowledge of coach Sean Payton.


nator in St. Louis.
"I am truly sorry I
have learned a
hard lesson and I
guarantee that I
will never partici-
pate in or allow
this kind of activity
to happen again."
Williams, the
Saints organiza-
tion and the play-


ers involved face hefty fines and
possible suspensions. The team
could lose draft picks when NFL
Commissioner Roger Goodell hands


One round away


With Honda

win, Rory can

move to No. 1

Associated Press
PALM BEACH GARDENS
- Rory McIlroy is one round
away from being No. 1 in the
world.
McIlroy made two big par
saves Saturday on a windy
back nine at PGA National
and finished with a birdie
from the bunker for a 4-under
66, giving him a two-shot lead
over Harris English and Tom
Gillis in the Honda Classic.
McIlroy was in a similar po-
sition a week ago when he
reached the final of the
Match Play Championship -
win and the 22-year-old from
Northern Ireland becomes
the second-youngest player
behind Tiger Woods to be No.
1 in the world.
Only this time, there is
more than one player to con-
tend with in the final round.
Five players were within four
shots of the lead, a group that
includes PGA champion Kee-
gan Bradley
"I wasn't standing up 2 up
on the first tee in the final,"
McIlroy said, smiling.
The group does not include
Woods. He finally made a few
putts, but not nearly enough
to keep pace with everyone
else. Woods went the last 11
holes without a birdie and
had to settle for a 69, leaving
him nine shots behind.
English, the 22-year-old
rookie who won on the Na-
tionwide Tour last year while
still an amateur, made a 10-
foot par save on the 17th and
finished with a 66. He will be
in the final group with McIl-
roy, a rare time when the U.S.
Open champion will be play-
ing with someone his own age
with a tournament on the line.
They will be joined by
Gillis, a 43-year-old journey-
man who turned pro a year
after McIlroy and English
were born. Gillis had the lead
to himself on the back nine
until a bogey on the par-3
15th. He had a 69.
McIlroy was at 11-under
199.
"It's nice to have the lead
going into tomorrow," he said.


Associated Press
Rory Mcllroy chips to the sixth green during the third round of the Honda Classic golf tournament
Saturday in Palm Beach Gardens. Mcllroy leads by two strokes heading into the final day Sunday.
If the golfer can win, he will move into the No. I spot in the world golf rankings.


"I have to try to focus on what
I've been trying to do all week,
which is hit fairways and hit
greens and stay in the pres-
ent, and not think about
everything that could happen.
"I've just got to go out there
and try to put a good number
on the board."
The wind was at its


strongest, though not too se-
vere and the tees were moved
forward on the par 3s over the
water because of the danger-
ous front hole locations.
That's where Mcllroy was
at his best.
He hit 8-iron at the middle
of the green on No. 5 with a
draw that held up against the


wind to 10 feet and made one
of only 10 birdies on the day
On the 15th hole, the start of
PGA National's famous fin-
ish, Mcllroy hit 9-iron to just
outside 5 feet, the closest any-
one got in the third round.
There also was a bonus

See Page B4


Page B4


Martin


claims pole


at Phoenix

Top position is

driver's 52nd of

NASCAR career

Associated Press
AVONDALE, Ariz. -Mark Martin
switched teams in the offseason to
join Michael Waltrip Racing, the lat-
est move in his multi-stop career
Wherever he's gone, the veteran
driver has won, and it doesn't look as
if it'll take long to do it again with his
new team.
Martin followed up a solid run at
the Daytona 500, nabbing his 52nd
career pole on one of the last quali-
fying runs Saturday at Phoenix In-
ternational Raceway
"You look at Mark Martin, it does-
n't matter whose car he drives, he's
good in it," said defending Sprint
Cup champion Tony Stewart, who
will start on the
front row next to
Martin for Sunday's
312-mile race. "To
me, it's cool to see
stuff like this where
you've got a guy like
Mark that has
bounced around to -
different organiza- Mark
tions and he's been Martin
fast and won races will start up
at everywhere he's front Sunday.
been."
Regan Smith appeared to be in
line for his first career pole, sitting
atop the grid with just a handful of
qualifiers left.
Two of those drivers were Martin
and Stewart, who know a little about
racing around Phoenix's mile oval
- or anywhere else.
Martin was the first to pass Smith,
turning a lap of 26.313 seconds with
a top speed of 136.815 mph. Stewart
also bettered Smith with the last
qualifying run of the day, finishing
0.13 seconds behind.
Smith watched it unfold quickly,
seeing himself go from first to third
in a matter of minutes as the TV
cameras followed his reaction.
"Yeah, you get nervous," said
Smith, who wrecked in both
Phoenix races last season. "You
want to get it Poles mean something,
they're stats. Nobody is going to re-
member we qualified third ... but
we're happy to be starting up front."
Five-time Sprint Cup champion
Jimmie Johnson, off to a disastrous
start to the season, will start on the


See Page B3


Citrus' Henderson heads west


J.M. SORACCHI
Staff Writer
Most of the time, a college
will come find the football
player. In Thomas Hender-
son's case, he sought out the
program.
Henderson, a Citrus senior,
signed a National Letter of In-
tent with Western State Col-
lege of Colorado, a Division II
program in the town of Gunni-
son (which is located about 200
miles southwest of Denver).
"We sent out film but
Thomas did his own re-
search," Citrus football coach
Rayburn Greene said. "That's
really the one place he was
looking to go, so it made it easy


for us to narrow it down."
Wanting to be out west and
become a game warden post-
graduation, Henderson is
moving to a state where he has
family and where he can at-
tend the No. 1 forestry pro-
gram in the nation.
The Moun-
taineers com- -
pleted a 1-10
season in 2011
while playing in
the Rocky Mountain
Athletic Conference.
Also, Western State's sta-
dium sits at an elevation of
7,750 feet, which is listed as
the highest in all of college
football.


"The program's good, the -
weight room's good and the
coaches seem to really like
me," said Henderson of West-
ern State. "Plus they said they
can use a noseguard."
Henderson is originally
from Laramie,
Wyoming, and
lived there until
moving to Cit- p.,
rus County as a
6-year-old. He
got his football start
playing for the InvernessRACCHI/Chronicle
Razorbacks the same year. .m. so
Still, he said his dad lives in Citrus senior Thomas Henderson, front center, will be playing collegiate football
Colorado within driving dis- at Western State College of Colorado. In the front row, from left, are Henderson's
tance of the campus and great grandmother Jane Anne Hatch, Henderson, his mother Stephani Harris and
Citrus head coach Rayburn Greene. In the back row, from left, are assistant coach
See Page B4 Chris Stephenson, principal Dale Johns and assistant coach Jim Haeser.


-- -. -













No. 6 UNC bashes No. 4 Duke


Tar Heels clinch

ACC regular-season

title Saturday

Associated Press

DURHAM, N.C. Kendall Mar-
shall had 20 points and 10 assists,
and No. 6 North Carolina beat No.
4 Duke 88-70 on Saturday night to
win the Atlantic Coast Conference
regular-season title.
Tyler Zeller had 19 points and
10 rebounds, and Harrison Barnes
added 16 points for the Tar Heels
(27-4, 14-2). They never trailed,
and for the second straight year
they rolled in a winner-take-all
season finale with the ACC tour-
nament's top seed on the line.
North Carolina shot 54.5 per-
cent, built a 45-28 rebounding ad-
vantage and sent Duke to its
deepest halftime deficit ever at
Cameron Indoor Stadium 24
points while winning its sev-
enth straight since last month's
loss to the Blue Devils.
Mason Plumlee had 17 points,
brother Miles Plumlee added 16
points and 11 rebounds and fresh-
man Austin Rivers the hero of
that last meeting had 15 points
for the Blue Devils (26-5, 13-3).
No. 2 Syracuse 58,
No. 19 Louisville 49
SYRACUSE, N.Y. Brandon
Triche scored 18 points, Kris Joseph
added 11 in the final home game of
his career, and second-ranked Syra-
cuse beat No. 19 Louisville 58-49.
Syracuse (30-1, 17-1) matched the
Big East record for victories Con-
necticut also won 17 conference
games in 1995-96 and the Orange
also finished the regular season with
30 wins for the first time in coach Jim
Boeheim's 36-year tenure.
The Orange capped only their sec-
ond unbeaten season in the Carrier
Dome, going 19-0. The only other
Syracuse team to go undefeated in
the dome was the national champi-
onship squad of 2002-03 led by
Carmelo Anthony, which finished 17-0.
Dion Waiters had 13 points for Syra-
cuse, which held the Cardinals to
2-of-23 shooting from 3-point range
and a season low in points.
Chane Behanan and Russ Smith
led Louisville (22-9, 10-8) with 10
points apiece, while Gorgui Dieng
finished with six on 3-of-13 shooting.
No. 7 Missouri 81,
Texas Tech 59
LUBBOCK, Texas Kim English
scored 20 points, Marcus Denman
added 17 and Missouri hit a season-
best 16 3-pointers to beat Texas Tech.
Denmon scored all his points in the
second half, going 5 of 8 from 3-point
range in the half, and Ricardo Ratliffe
finished with 13 points and a career-
high 15 rebounds.
The Tigers (27-4, 14-3 Big 12)
slowly pulled away in the second half
with 12 of their 3s coming after half-
time. The win gave Missouri a school
record for wins in the regular season.
Jaye Crockett scored 17 points
and Ty Nurse added 12 for the Red
Raiders (8-22, 1-17), who walked
away with their worst finish in
Big 12 play.
No. 8 Marquette 83,
No. 11 Georgetown 69
MILWAUKEE Jae Crowder had
26 points and 14 rebounds in his final
home game, helping Marquette beat
Georgetown and clinch the No. 2 seed
in the Big East tournament.
Fellow senior Darius Johnson-
Odom added 17 points for the Golden


-.m ..Ar '- 7
Associated Press
North Carolina's James Michael McAdoo dunks past Duke's Mason Plumlee, rear, and Miles Plumlee while Tar Heels teammate P.J. Hairston
looks on during the first half Saturday in Durham, N.C.


Eagles (25-6, 14-4). Marquette was 33
of 45 from the free throw line.
Otto Porter and Hollis Thompson
scored 19 points each for the Hoyas
(22-7, 12-6), who could have clinched
a double-bye in the conference tour-
nament with a victory. Marquette al-
ready had clinched the double-bye.
The Golden Eagles forced 15
turnovers, scoring 24 points off the
miscues.
Iowa St. 80, No. 9 Baylor 72
AMES, Iowa Scott Christopher-
son had 23 points in his final home
game and Iowa State rallied to beat
No. 9 Baylor 80-72 Saturday night for
its second win over a top-10 opponent
this season.
Melvin Ejim added 15 points for the
Cyclones (22-9, 12-6 Big 12), who
also secured the No. 3 seed for next
week's conference tournament.
Baylor led by as much as nine late
in the second half, but the Bears went
nearly 5 minutes without a point down
the stretch. Baylor pulled to 66-64, but
Tyrus McGee drilled a 3 with 1:24 left
and the Bears followed with a crushing
offensive foul.
Pierre Jackson had a career night
with 35 points for the Bears (25-6, 12-
6), who fell to the fourth seed for the
Big 12 tournament.
No. 12 Murray St. 54,
Tennessee St. 52
NASHVILLE, Tenn. Jewuan Long
drove the baseline for a layup with 4.4
seconds left, and Murray State rallied
from seven points down in the final
5:28 to beat Tennessee State for the


Ohio Valley Conference tournament
title and an automatic NCAA
tournament berth.
Isaiah Canaan stripped Tigers
guard Patrick Miller of the ball driving
to the basket, and Long guarded
Robert Covington on his 3-point at-
tempt at the buzzer to preserve the
win, getting the Racers to 30-1 and
avoiding a second loss to the only
team to beat them this season.
Covington led Tennessee State (20-
12) with 14 points and Kellen Thornton
had 11.
Illinois St. 65,
No. 15 Wichita St. 64
ST. LOUIS Tyler Brown scored
25 points, including two free throws
with 6.4 seconds left, and Illinois State
advanced to the final of the Missouri
Valley Conference tournament.
Jackie Carmichael added 12 points
and 11 rebounds for the fourth-
seeded Redbirds (20-12), who rallied
from 13 points down early in the sec-
ond half. Illinois State snapped a 24-
game slide against ranked teams
dating to 1987. The Redbirds head
into the tournament championship
game on Sunday against No. 25
Creighton seeking their first NCAA
tournament berth since 1998.
Joe Ragland had 17 points for Wi-
chita State (27-5), which had won nine
in a row and 17 of 18. Now they must
wait to learn if they will receive an at-
large bid to the NCAAs.
No. 23 Temple 80,
Fordham 60
NEW YORK Juan Fernandez


scored 19 points, backcourt mate Ra-
mone Moore added 16 and Temple
beat Fordham to win the outright At-
lantic 10 regular-season title for the
first time since 1989-90.
The Owls (24-6, 13-3) had clinched
at least a share of their conference-
record 10th title with a win over Mas-
sachusetts on Wednesday.
No. 25 Creighton 99,
Evansville 71
ST. LOUIS Gregory Echenique
had a season-best 20 points, nine re-
bounds and three blocked shots in just
20 minutes as Creighton beat Evans-
ville in the Missouri Valley Conference
tournament semifinals.
Doug McDermott added 14 points
and Antoine Young 13 for the second-
seeded Bluejays (27-5), who were 8
for 10 from 3-point range in the first
half while building a 19-point cushion.
Creighton carries a six-game win-
ning streak into the championship
game against No. 4 seed Illinois State,
which upset No. 15 Wichita State 65-
64 in the other semifinal.
Central Florida 71,
Alabama-Birmingham 63
ORLANDO Keith Clanton had 22
points and Marcus Jordan 16 to lead
Central Florida to a 71-63 win over
Alabama-Birmingham in the regular-
season finale for both.
UCF (21-9, 10-6 Conference USA)
clinched fourth place in the conference
and a first-round bye in the tourna-
ment that begins Wednesday.
Isaiah Sykes added 15 points and
A.J. Rompza had 11 points and 10 as-


sists for UCF, which improved to 16-1
at home this season.
Jordan Swing led UAB (14-15, 9-7)
with 17 points. Cameron Moore and
Quincy Taylor each had 13.
West Virginia 50,
South Florida 44
TAMPA- Darryl Bryant had 12 of
his 16 points in the second half and
West Virginia scored its last 10 points
on free throws to hold off surging
South Florida 50-44.
Bryant overcame a poor shooting
day by going 8 for 8 from the foul line.
Kevin Jones made four free throws in
the final 1:51 to finish with 18 points
for the Mountaineers (19-12, 9-9 Big
East), who won their conference regu-
lar season finale despite shooting less
than 29 percent from the field.
Anthony Collins had 11 points for
USF (19-12, 12-6), which had won six
of its previous seven games to build a
strong case for being invited to the
NCAA tournament.
Miami 77, Boston College 56
CORAL GABLES Kenny Kadji
and Durand Scott scored 14 points
each to lead Miami past Boston Col-
lege 77-56.
The Hurricanes broke open a close
game with a 16-1 run during a 6:13
stretch midway through the first half.
Malcolm Grant keyed Miami's surge
with consecutive 3-pointers. Scott's 3-
pointer with 4:55 remaining capped
the run and gave Miami a 36-19 lead.
Grant finished with 12 points for the
Hurricanes (18-11, 9-7 Atlantic Coast
Conference).


No. 1 Baylor completes its first perfect regular season


Maryland,

Ga. Tech set

in ACC final

Associated Press

WACO, Texas Brittney
Griner scored a career-high
41 points and top-ranked
Baylor completed its first
undefeated regular season
with a 77-53 win over Iowa
State on Saturday
The Lady Bears (31-0, 18-
0 Big 12) stretched their
home winning streak to 40
in a row.
No. 6 Maryland 73,
Wake Forest 58
GREENSBORO, N.C.-
Alyssa Thomas had 18 points
and 12 rebounds to help Mary-
land beat Wake Forest in the
semifinals of the Atlantic Coast
Conference tournament.
Laurin Mincy added 13 for


the third-seeded Terrapins (27-
4), who shot 53 percent and
controlled the glass for their
sixth straight victory.
The Terrapins advanced to
Sunday's championship game
for the third time in seven years
and the first since winning the
2009 title.
LSU 72,
No. 10 Kentucky 61
NASHVILLE, Tenn. Court-
ney Jones scored 18 points
and LSU beat Kentucky to ad-
vance to the Southeastern
Conference tournament cham-
pionship game.
The fourth-seeded Lady
Tigers (22-9) haven't played in
the conference title game since
appearing in four in a row start-
ing in 2005. They will face No.
13 Tennessee in the title game
after the Lady Vols beat No. 25
South Carolina 74-58 in the
other semifinal.
No. 11 Wis-G. Bay 77,
Illinois-Chicago 64
CHICAGO Julie Wojta


had 27 points and 10 rebounds
to lead Wisconsin-Green Bay
past over Illinois-Chicago for its
seventh straight victory.
Wojta had her sixth double-
double in the last seven
games for the Phoenix (27-1,
17-1 Horizon League) and tied
the school record with her
32nd double-double this
season.
No. 13 Tennessee 74,
No. 25 S. Carolina 58
NASHVILLE, Tenn. Glory
Johnson had 23 points and 10
rebounds as Tennessee beat
South Carolina to advance to
its 21st Southeastern Confer-
ence championship game.
The second-seeded Lady
Volunteers (23-8) will face
fourth-seeded LSU, which
upset 10th-ranked Kentucky in
the other semifinal. The game
will pit Tennessee coach Pat
Summitt against her former
player, Lady Tigers coach Nikki
Caldwell.


No. 24 Nebraska 77,
No. 14 Ohio St. 62
INDIANAPOLIS Jordan
Hooper had 21 points and 10
rebounds as Nebraska
knocked off Ohio State in the
semifinals of the Big Ten
tournament.
Kaitlyn Burke scored 20
points and Emily Cady 10 for
the sixth-seeded Cornhuskers
(24-7), who advanced to Sun-
day's final against either No. 9
Penn State or No. 21 Purdue.
Samantha Prahalis scored
23 points for the second-
seeded Buckeyes (25-6),
who were denied a chance to
win their fourth straight
tournament title.
No. 15 Georgia Tech 87,
N.C. State 61
GREENSBORO, N.C.-
Tyaunna Marshall scored 16 of
her 20 points in the first half
and Georgia Tech claimed a
spot in the Atlantic Coast Con-
ference championship game by


routing North Carolina State.
Metra Walthour added 13
points for the fourth-seeded
Yellow Jackets (24-7). They led
by as much as 36, shot 53 per-
cent and built a 53-28 rebound-
ing advantage to reach their
first title game since 1992.
No. 19 St. Bonavent. 68,
La Salle 53
PHILADELPHIA- Megan
Van Tatenhove led five players
in double figures with 13 points
and St. Bonaventure pulled
away in the second half to beat
La Salle in the quarterfinals of
the Atlantic 10 conference
tournament.
Jessica Jenkins and Armelia
Horton each scored 11 points
for the Bonnies (28-2), who
advanced to the conference
semifinals for the first time in
program history.
No. 20 Louisville 63,
Villanova 47
HARTFORD, Conn. Shoni
Schimmel scored 15 of her 20


points in the first half to lead
Louisville past Villanova in the
second round of the Big East
tournament.
Asia Taylor added 13 points
for the Cardinals (22-8), who
will face No. 18 St. John's in the
quarterfinals on Sunday.
Leading 38-33 early in the
second half, Louisville went on
a 22-8 run over the next 13
minutes to take control.
No. 22 Gonzaga 83,
Saint Mary's 78
LAS VEGAS Kayla Stan-
dish scored 31 points as Gon-
zaga held off Saint Mary's in
the semifinals of the West
Coast Conference tournament.
Katelan Redmon added 20
points, Haiden Palmer 14 and
Taelor Karr 11 for the top-
seeded Bulldogs (26-4), who
won their fifth straight and 11 th
in their last 12 games.
Gonzaga will face second-
seeded BYU in Monday's final.
BYU defeated San Diego 64-46
in the other semifinal.


B2 SUNDAY, MARCH 4, 2012


SPORTS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Magic kick Bucks


Howard helps

Orlando earn

season sweep

Associated Press

ORLANDO Dwight
Howard had 28 points and
14 rebounds to lead six
Magic players in double fig-
ures, and Orlando beat the
Milwaukee Bucks 114-98 on
Saturday night
The game was close until
the Magic pulled away in
the fourth quarter thanks to
some hot 3-point shooting
and dominant play from
Howard.
Jason Richardson had 18
points for the Magic, while
Hedo Turkoglu and Ryan
Anderson chipped in 16
points apiece. The Magic
shot 51.7 percent (14 of 27)
from 3-point distance.
It was the Magic's fourth
victory over the Bucks in 22
days. The Magic overcame
fourth-quarter deficits in
the first three wins, but
they didn't need a come-
back on Saturday night
Brandon Jennings led
Milwaukee with 27 points
and Ersan Ilyasova added
18.
The Magic jumped out to
an early 17-point lead on
the back of Howard, who
scored 12 points, including
five dunks, as the Magic led
36-21 after the first quarter
The 36 points tied for the
second-most they've scored
in a quarter this season.
But the Bucks went on a
12-2 run to begin the second
quarter with Howard on
the bench and erased the
deficit. The Bucks scored 39
second-quarter points, their
season high for any period.
The Magic led 61-60 at
halftime.
Orlando went 11-for-18
from the field in the fourth
quarter
J.J. Redick (14 points)
and Chris Duhon (12) also
scored in double figures for
Orlando.
Notes: Magic F Quentin
Richardson sat out his third
straight game with a
strained right Achilles' ten-
don. .. Mike Dunleavy Jr.
rejoined the Bucks after
missing Friday night's game
because of the birth of his
second child. It was the first
career start for Bucks F To-
bias Harris. Bucks G
Stephen Jackson didn't
make the trip because of
soreness in his right ham-
string. It was his sixth con-
secutive missed game. The



POLE
Continued from Page B1

second row with Smith after
qualifying fourth. Juan Pablo
Montoya qualified fifth, five
days after a bizarre crash into
a safety truck at the Daytona
500.
Martin has raced for seem-
ingly every team on the cir-
cuit while winning 40 career
races. He spent the past three
seasons with Hendrick Mo-
torsports, but changed teams
in the offseason, joining
Michael Waltrip for a partial
season.
Martin, who will run 24 of
36 races this season while
sharing seat time with Wal-
trip, struggled in qualifying at
the Daytona 500 and started
22nd. He was good once the
race finally got going after
nearly two days of weather
delays, leading two laps be-
fore finishing 10th at
NASCAR's biggest race.
Martin followed that up by
grabbing the pole at PIR,
where he's won twice last
in 2009 and has 28 top-10
finishes.
Not bad for a grizzled 53-
year-old whose first Sprint
Cup race was in 1981.
"I think all of you know that
I do work real hard at it, and
I know that I have to work
harder at it than guys that are
20 years younger than me,"
Martin said. "I'm willing to do
that to be able to compete."


Orlando Magic center Dwight Howard dunks the ball in
Larry Sanders during the first half Saturday in Orlando.


Magic overcame 22
turnovers, although the
Bucks had 20 of their own.
Wizards 101, Cavs 98
WASHINGTON Jordan
Crawford scored 31 points and
John Wall added 24 to lead the
Washington Wizards to a 101-
98 victory over the Cleveland
Cavaliers.
Antawn Jamison scored 29
in his return to Washington but
missed a 3-point attempt to tie
the game with 35 seconds to
play. It was Jamison's first ap-
pearance in the Verizon Center
since being traded from the
Wizards to Cleveland in Febru-
ary 2010.
JaVale McGee had nine
points and 12 rebounds for
Washington, which snapped a
six-game losing streak.
Kyrie Irving scored 20
points, 12 in the fourth quarter,
and Ryan Hollins had 15 for
the Cavaliers, who lost their
fifth straight.
Hawks 97, Thunder 90
ATLANTA- Josh Smith


had a good first run together,
qualifying third for the Day-
tona 500. Once the race
started, things didn't go so
well; Stewart led two laps
early, but wasn't really a fac-
tor, finishing 16th to extend
his winless streak at the Day-
tona 500 to 14 years.
"It's what I would truly con-
sider our first real weekend
with Steve Addington as crew
chief," Stewart said. "Daytona
is always kind of a different
deal, but this is where you


scored 13 of his 30 points in
the fourth quarter, Jeff Teague
added 16 points and the At-
lanta Hawks snapped Okla-
homa City's seven-game
winning streak with a 97-90
victory over the Thunder.
Kevin Durant finished with
35 points, going 14 of 17 on
free throw attempts, and Rus-
sell Westbrook had 25 points
for league-best Oklahoma City.
Smith, who matched a sea-
son-high in scoring and pulled
down seven of his 12 re-
bounds in the fourth, had
dunks on consecutive posses-
sions to give the Hawks an 87-
79 lead with 4:43 remaining.
Then, after forcing Durant to
commit a turnover and pound-
ing his first against his own
chest with 3:04 left, Smith
matched Durant 3-pointer for
3-pointer to put Atlanta up 92-
88 at the 2-minute mark.
Odom playing for
Mavs, not in D-League
DALLAS Lamar Odom
was in uniform Saturday night


first really get to start working
on the handling of your car
with your crew chief. I'm re-
ally proud of what we did yes-
terday and today"
Johnson needed a good
run at Phoenix.
He had his run of five
straight Sprint Cup titles last
season with his worst season
in NASCAR, winning just one
race and finishing sixth in the
Sprint Cup standings.
Hoping for a bounce-back
season, Johnson instead had


Associated Press
front of the Milwaukee Bucks'


after he returned to the Dallas
Mavericks without playing a
planned game in the NBA De-
velopment League.
Dallas coach Rick Carlisle
said Odom had been recalled
and will play against the Utah
Jazz in his first game since
Feb. 20.
Odom had been set to play
for the Texas Legends on Sat-
urday night after missing four
straight games for the Maver-
icks. He was assigned to the
D-League team Friday.
Dallas has been without
guard Delonte West (right fin-
ger fracture) for more than two
weeks. Carlisle also said cen-
ter Brandan Wright will miss
Saturday's game with a
concussion.
"We're struggling and could
use the extra manpower,"
Carlisle said.
After missing the Mavericks'
last game before the All-Star
break against his former team,
the Los Angeles Lakers, Odom
has missed all three games
since the break.


his car fail inspection on the
opening day of Speedweeks
at Daytona, then was
knocked out of the race on
the second lap when he was
bumped by Elliott Sadler
Johnson's start got even
worse on Wednesday, when
NASCAR announced crew
chief Chad Knaus was fined
$100,000 and, along with car
chief Ron Malec, was sus-
pended six races. Both were
allowed to work at Phoenix
after Hendrick Motorsports


Lightning crash


Carolina in OT


Stamkos nets

two, including

game-winner

Associated Press

RALEIGH, N.C. Steven
Stamkos scored twice, in-
cluding a power-play goal
2:41 into overtime, to lift the
Tampa Bay Lightning to a 4-
3 win over the Carolina Hur-
ricanes on Saturday night.
Stamkos leads the NHL
with 47 goals. Teddy Purcell
extended his career-best
point streak to nine games
with a power-play goal in
the third period, and Tim
Wallace netted the first goal
of his career
Mathieu Garon had 20
saves in the win.
Tampa Bay won in over-
time for the second straight
night after beating the New
York Rangers at home on
Friday
Anthony Stewart had two
goals in his first multipoint
game for Carolina, and Jussi
Jokinen also scored for the
Hurricanes. Carolina cap-
tain Eric Staal, who had two
assists, extended his NHL-
best point streak to 11 games
and his assist streak to 10.
Staal matched the marks
he and Cory Stillman share
for the club's longest scoring
streaks since it moved from
Hartford in 1997.
Cam Ward, playing in his
400th NHL game, stopped
24 shots in the loss.
Chad LaRose played in
his first game for Carolina
after missing seven because
of an undisclosed upper
body injury
The teams had split four
previous games this season.
Wallace gave Tampa Bay
the lead at 5:58 with his first
goal in 58 games. Wallace
was in his third game with


Tampa Bay after being
claimed on waivers from the
New York Islanders.
Stewart tied it at 5:23 of
the second, taking a pass
from Staal and went in on a
breakaway, beating Garon
with a backhander
Jokinen put Carolina
ahead 2-1 at 15:02, driving to
the slot and scoring over
Garon's right shoulder
Stewart netted his second at
16:18 with a shot between
Garon's pads off a ricochet
from behind the net.
Maple Leafs 3,
Canadiens 1
MONTREAL- Mikhail
Grabovski scored twice in the
third period and Toronto gave
Randy Carlyle a victory in his
first game behind the Maple
Leafs' bench, beating the Mon-
treal Canadiens 3-1.
The Maple Leafs fired Ron
Wilson on Friday night and
hired Carlyle, the former
Toronto defenseman who was
fired by Anaheim in December.
Matt Frattin also scored and
Jonas Gustavsson made 21
saves to help Toronto end a
six-game winless streak and
win for only the second time in
12 games. Erik Cole scored for
Montreal.
Islanders 3, Bruins 2
BOSTON John Tavares
tipped in Matt Moulson's shot
for the late tiebreaking goal,
Evgeni Nabokov stopped 32
shots, and the New York Is-
landers snapped a five-game,
road-losing streak with a 3-2
victory over the Boston Bruins
on Saturday.
Josh Bailey and Moulson
also had goals for the Islanders,
who won for just the second
time in six games. New York, 0-
4-1 in its five previous road
games, completed a 1-2-1 trip.
Tyler Seguin tied the game
for Boston with his 22nd goal
early in the third period. Milan
Lucic also scored his 22nd for
the Bruins.


Associated Press
Tampa Bay Lightning's Nate Thompson works behind the net
with Carolina Hurricanes' Jussi Jokinen during the first period
Saturday in Raleigh, N.C.


appealed the ruling.
Johnson also was docked
25 points, leaving him 70 be-
hind Kenseth in the season
standings. Johnson has been
good at Phoenix, though, win-
ning four races in 17 career
starts, so starting near the


front was good news for what
he hopes will be a big rally
from a tough start
I'm very proud of the lap,"
Johnson said. "The car has
been great all weekend, and
I look forward to tomorrow's
race."


Stewart made a change of
his own during the offseason.
Smoke won his third
Sprint Cup title in 2011 by
edging Carl Edwards in the
final race, then fired crew
chief Darian Grubb a week
later He later hired Steve
Addington away from Penske
Racing to serve as his new
crew chief.
Stewart and Addington


CHII NICLE

0 _APTG To enter visit www.chronicleonline.com


SPORTS


SUNDAY, MARCH 4, 2012 B3






B4 SUNDAY, MARCH 4, 2012



Honda Classic
Saturday
At PGA National Resort and Spa (The
Champion Course), Palm Beach Gardens
Purse: $5.7 million
Yardage: 7,100, Par: 70
Third Round
Rory Mcllroy 66-67-66 -199 -11
Harris English 66-69-66-201 -9
Tom Gillis 68-64-69 -201 -9
Keegan Bradley 67-68-68 203 -7
Brian Harman 73-61-69-203 -7
Justin Rose 66-66-71 -203 -7
Charl Schwartzel 71-66-67-204 -
Dicky Pride 66-67-71 204 -
Greg Chalmers 68-69-68-205 -5
Chris Stroud 70-69-67-206 -4
Kevin Stadler 66-71-69 -206 -
Graeme McDowell 73-64-69-206 -
Jeff Overton 71-65-70 -206 -4
Gary Christian 73-67-67-207 -
DavisLovell I 64-72-71 -207 -
Charles Howell III 68-67-72-207 -3
Jimmy Walker 67-67-73-207 -3
FredrikJacobson 70-71-67-208 -2
Spencer Levin 72-69-67-208 -
Rickie Fowler 69-72-67-208 -
MarkWilson 70-70-68-208 -2
Brandt Jobe 70-69-69-208 -2
TigerWoods 71-68-69-208 -2
Ernie Els 70-68-70-208 -2
Ted Potter, Jr. 72-64-72 -208 -
VaughnTaylor 68-66-74 208 -
D.A. Points 71-70-68-209 -1
Henrik Stenson 70-69-70 -209 -1
Lee Westwood 70-69-70 209 -1
Erik Compton 67-71-71 -209 -1
Ryan Palmer 66-71-72-209 -1
Rocco Mediate 69-67-73 209 -1
Bob Estes 67-69-73-209 -1
Rory Sabbatini 69-72-69 -210 E
John Mallinger 74-67-69 -210 E
YE.Yang 70-70-70-210 E
Robert Garrigus 71-69-70 -210 E
Jason Kokrak 71-68-71 -210 E
Padraig Harrington 70-68-72-210 E
Ken Duke 67-69-74 --210 E
Kenny Perry 70-71-70 -211 +1
Cameron Tringale 72-69-70 211 +1
Heath Slocum 70-71-70 -211 +1
J.B. Holmes 70-70-71 -211 +1
Stuart Appleby 69-71-71-211 +1
Rod Pampling 69-71-71 -211 +1
Nick O'Hern 69-71-71 -211 +1
Tim Herron 71-69-71 -211 +1
Sean O'Hair 70-69-72-- 211 +1
Carl Pettersson 67-70-74-211 +1
Ben Crane 67-69-75- 211 +1
Ryan Moore 70-71-71 -212 +2
Louis Oosthuizen 67-74-71 212 +2
Sang-Moon Bae 70-71-71 212 +2
Jason Bohn 70-70-72- 212 +
William McGirt 69-71-72-212
Michael Thompson 74-66-72-212 +2
Scott Langley 70-69-73 -212 +2
Brian Davis 68-70-74-212
Martin Flores 66-72-74- 212 +
Stewart Cink 70-67-75-212 +2
John Huh 68-69-75-212 +2
Chris Kirk 71-70-72-213 +,
Kris Blanks 69-7272-213 +
JhonattanVegas 71-69-73-213 +3
Michael Bradley 70-70-73-213 +3
Robert Allenby 72-68-73 -213 +3



Men's College
Basketball Scores
EAST
Buffalo 68, Bowling Green 64
Cincinnati 72, Villanova 68
La Salle 71, St. Bonaventure 61
NJIT 58, Chicago St. 50
Penn 68, Yale 47
Saint Louis 75, Duquesne 60
Syracuse 58, Louisville 49
Temple 80, Fordham 60
UConn 74, Pittsburgh 65
UMass 89, Rhode Island 83
SOUTH
Alabama St. 49, Jackson St. 46
Auburn 67, LSU 52
Georgia 67, South Carolina 55
Georgia Tech 69, Wake Forest 62
Grambling St. 75, Alabama A&M 72, OT
Marshall 79, Southern Miss. 75
Miami 77, Boston College 56
Mississippi 60, Alabama 51
Mississippi St. 79, Arkansas 59
Prairie View 64, Alcorn St. 61
SE Louisiana 68, Nicholls St. 58
Southern U. 56, Texas Southern 54
Tennessee 68, Vanderbilt 61
UCF 71, UAB 63
West Virginia 50, South Florida 44
MIDWEST
Ball St. 62, N. Illinois 51
Dayton 75, George Washington 59
DePaul 86, Seton Hall 58
Kansas St. 77, Oklahoma St. 58
Marquette 83, Georgetown 69
Minnesota 81, Nebraska 69
North Dakota 57, Utah Valley 56
Northwestern 70, Iowa 66
Ohio 63, Miami (Ohio) 54
Toledo 76, E. Michigan 51
Xavier 72, Charlotte 63
SOUTHWEST
Lamar 78, McNeese St. 68
Memphis 78, Tulsa 66
Missouri 81, Texas Tech 59
Oklahoma 65, Texas A&M 62
SMU 57, UTEP 48
Sam Houston St. 63, Texas St. 61
FAR WEST
Colorado St. 75, Air Force 65
New Mexico 76, Boise St. 61
Oregon 94, Utah 48
Oregon St. 83, Colorado 69
UCLA 75, Washington 69
Washington St. 43, Southern Cal 38
TOURNAMENT
America East Conference
Quarterfinals
Albany (NY) 63, New Hampshire 45
Stony Brook 78, Binghamton 69
Vermont 50, Maine 40
Big Sky Conference
First Round
E.Washington 81, Idaho St. 75
Big South Conference
Championship
UNC Asheville 80, VMI 64
Colonial Athletic Association
Quarterfinals
Drexel 59, UNC Wilmington 47
Old Dominion 88, Delaware 74
VCU 75, Northeastern 65
Horizon League
Semifinals
Detroit 63, Cleveland St. 58
Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference
Quarterfinals
Fairfield 65, Rider 63
lona 87, Marist 63
Missouri Valley Conference
Semifinals
Creighton 99, Evansville 71
Illinois St. 65, Wichita St. 64
Ohio Valley Conference


Championship
Murray St. 54, Tennessee St. 52
Patriot League
Semifinals
Bucknell 79, Lafayette 52
Lehigh 85, American U. 66
Southern Conference
Quarterfinals
Davidson 73, Furman 54
UNC Greensboro 66, Appalachian St. 55
W. Carolina 82, Wofford 59
NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GE
Philadelphia 22 15 .595
Boston 18 17 .514 C
NewYork 18 18 .500 312
Toronto 11 25 .306 10
New Jersey 11 26 .297 11
Southeast Division
W L Pct GE
Miami 28 8 .778 -
Orlando 24 14 .632 E


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Fa r the record


Florida LOTTERY

CASH 3 (early)
1-9-5
PLAY 4 (early)
2-0-0-7

CASH 3 (late)
ord Lattry 4- 8 -9
Here are the winning PLAY 4 (late)
numbers selected 8 0 0 9
Saturday in the
Florida Lottery: Because of early deadlines, Fantasy 5, Power-
ball and Lottery numbers were unavailable.
Please see Monday's Entertainment page.



On the AIRWAVES

TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
2:30 p.m. (FOX) Sprint Cup: Subway Fresh Fit 500
COLLEGE BASEBALL
1 p.m. (FSNFL) Florida at Miami
BASKETBALL
NBA
1 p.m. (ABC) New York Knicks at Boston Celtics
3:30 p.m. (ABC) Miami Heat at Los Angeles Lakers
7 p.m. (ESPN) Chicago Bulls at Philadelphia 76ers
9:30 p.m. (ESPN) Denver Nuggets at San Antonio Spurs
2 a.m. (ESPN2) New York Knicks at Boston Celtics
(Same-day Tape)
3 a.m. (ESPN) Miami Heat at Los Angeles Lakers
(Same-day Tape)
4 a.m. (ESPN2) Chicago Bulls at Philadelphia 76ers
(Same-day Tape)
COLLEGE MEN
12 p.m. (CBS) Kentucky at Florida
12 p.m. (ESPN2) Clemson at Florida State
1 p.m. (ESPN) Michigan at Penn State
2 p.m. (CBS) Missouri Valley Tournament final: Teams TBA
3:30 p.m. (SUN) Arizona at Arizona State
4 p.m. (CBS) Ohio State at Michigan State
5:30 p.m. (SUN) California at Stanford
COLLEGE WOMEN
1 p.m. (SUN) Texas A&M at Texas
2 p.m. (ESPN2) ACC Tournament, Final: Teams TBA
4 p.m. (ESPN2) Big Ten Tournament, Final: Teams TBA
6 p.m. (ESPN2) SEC Tournament, Final: Teams TBA
9 p.m. (SUN) Stanford at California
BICYCLING
3 p.m. (NBCSPT) Paris-Nice, Stage 1 (Same-day Tape)
BOWLING
3 p.m. (ESPN) PBA Geico Shark Open (Taped)
GOLF
1 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: Honda Classic
3 p.m. (NBC) PGATour: Honda Classic
3 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: Honda Classic The Bear Trap
GYMNASTICS
8:30 a.m. (SUN) Georgia at Florida (Taped)
8 p.m. (ESPN2) Alabama at LSU (Taped)
HOCKEY
12:30 p.m. (NBC) Boston Bruins at New York Rangers
6 p.m. (FSNFL) Ottawa Senators at Florida Panthers
7 p.m. (NBCSPT) Philadelphia Flyers at Washington Capitals
LACROSSE
4:30 p.m. (ESPN) Syracuse at Virginia
OUTDOORS
9:30 p.m. (ESPN2) Bassmaster Classic Final Day:
Weigh-In (Taped)
TRACKAND FIELD
6 a.m. (FSNFL) Conference USA Men's and Women's
Indoor Championships (Taped)
WINTER SPORTS
5 p.m. (NBCSPT) Snowmobile Racing: Amsoil
Championship Series (Taped)

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


Atlanta 22 15 .595
Washington 8 28 .222
Charlotte 4 30 .118
Central Division
W L Pct
Chicago 30 8 .789
Indiana 22 12 .647
Milwaukee 14 23 .378
Cleveland 13 22 .371
Detroit 12 25 .324
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct
San Antonio 25 11 .694
Memphis 21 15 .583
Dallas 21 16 .568
Houston 21 16 .568
New Orleans 9 27 .250
Northwest Division
W L Pct
Oklahoma City 29 8 .784
Denver 20 17 .541
Portland 18 18 .500
Minnesota 18 19 .486
Utah 17 18 .486
Pacific Division
W L Pct
L.A. Clippers 21 13 .618
L.A. Lakers 22 14 .611
Phoenix 16 20 .444
Golden State 14 19 .424
Sacramento 12 24 .333
Friday's Games
Memphis 102, Toronto 99
Atlanta 99, Milwaukee 94
Boston 107, New Jersey 94
Chicago 112, Cleveland 91
Denver 117, Houston 105
New Orleans 97, Dallas 92
Philadelphia 105, Golden State 83
San Antonio 102, Charlotte 72
Utah 99, Miami 98
L.A. Lakers 115, Sacramento 107
Phoenix 81, L.A. Clippers 78
Saturday's Games
Atlanta 97, Oklahoma City 90
Orlando 114, Milwaukee 98
Washington 101, Cleveland 98
Indiana at New Orleans, late
Detroit at Memphis, late
Utah at Dallas, late
Minnesota at Portland, late
Sunday's Games
New York at Boston, 1 p.m.
Miami at L.A. Lakers, 3:30 p.m.
New Jersey at Charlotte, 6 p.m.
Golden State at Toronto, 6 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at Houston, 7 p.m.
Chicago at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Sacramento at Phoenix, 8 p.m.
Denver at San Antonio, 9:30 p.m.
Monday's Games
Utah at Cleveland, 7 p.m.
Orlando at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Golden State at Washington, 7 p.m.
Indiana at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Dallas at Oklahoma City 8 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Philadelphia at Milwaukee, 8 p.m.
Sacramento at Denver, 9 p.m.
New Orleans at Portland, 10 p.m.


NHL standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division


N.Y. Ranger
Pittsburgh
Philadelphia
New Jersey
N.Y. Island

Boston
Ottawa
Toronto
Buffalo
Montreal

Florida
Winnipeg
Washington
Tampa Bay
Carolina


GP W L OT PtsGF GA
rs 63 41 15 7 89175 130
63 3721 5 79202 166
63 3521 7 77209 191
64 3623 5 77180 174
rs 65 2729 9 63154 195
Northeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
63 3822 3 79206 146
66 3424 8 76200 194
65 3028 7 67194 201
64 2927 8 66157 180
66 2531 10 60170 184
Southeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
63 3021 12 72158 179
66 31 27 8 70173 186
64 3227 5 69172 183
65 31 28 6 68184 219
65 2427 14 62171 197


WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT PtsGF GA
Detroit 65 4319 3 89208 151
St. Louis 65 40 18 7 87166 130
Nashville 64 3720 7 81181 165
Chicago 66 3524 7 77200 194
Columbus 64 1938 7 45148 212
Northwest Division
GP W L OT PtsGF GA
Vancouver 65 41 16 8 90206 156
Colorado 65 3328 4 70168 175
Calgary 65 2925 11 69157 178
Minnesota 65 2827 10 66143 178
Edmonton 64 2533 6 56170 192
Pacific Division
GP W L OT PtsGF GA
Phoenix 64 3322 9 75168 160
San Jose 63 3323 7 73178 160
Dallas 65 3426 5 73171 176
Los Angeles 64 2923 12 70138 137
Anaheim 65 2827 10 66164 182
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over-
time loss.
Saturday's Games
N.Y Islanders 3, Boston 2
Toronto 3, Montreal 1
Tampa Bay 4, Carolina 3, OT
Nashville at Florida, late
Columbus at Phoenix, late
Pittsburgh at Colorado, late
Buffalo at Vancouver, late
Anaheim at Los Angeles, late
St. Louis at San Jose, late
Sunday's Games
Boston at N.Y Rangers, 12:30 p.m.
New Jersey at N.Y Islanders, 3 p.m.
Chicago at Detroit, 4p.m.
Ottawa at Florida, 6 p.m.
Dallas at Calgary, 6 p.m.
Philadelphia at Washington, 7 p.m.
Colorado at Minnesota, 7 p.m.
Monday's Games
Phoenix at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m.
Buffalo at Winnipeg, 8 p.m.
Edmonton at Anaheim, 10 p.m.


Sports BRIEFS


Pirates power past
Sharks in district win
Buoyed by a three-run home
run by senior Donnie Dewees,
the Crystal River baseball team
took a 4-2 triumph at Nature
Coast in Brooksville on
Friday night.
Dewees also got the pitching
win but allowed two runs in six
innings of work.
Crystal River's Weston Pope
added a scoreless seventh in-
ning to earn the save
The Pirates (6-2, 2-1) are at
Eustis on Tuesday.
Panthers can't catch
soaring Eagles
The Lecanto baseball team



WEST
Continued from Page B1

he'll also have a job as well.
"It'a a good choice be-
cause my family's there and
I've got good things going for
me up there," Henderson
said.



SAINTS
Continued from Page B1

out punishment.
"It is our responsibility to
protect player safety and the
integrity of our game, and
this type of conduct will not
be tolerated," Goodell said.
"We have made significant
progress in changing the cul-
ture with respect to player
safety and we are not going to
relent We have more work to
do and we will do it"
The NFL said its findings
were corroborated by multi-
ple, independent sources.
Asked about potential crimi-
nal charges, NFL spokesman
Greg Aiello said:
"We believe that any viola-
tion of league rules should
and will be handled by the
commissioner"
All payouts for specific
performances in a game, in-
cluding interceptions or
causing fumbles, are against
NFL rules. The NFL also
warns teams against such
practices before each season.
Saints players contributed
cash to the pool, at times
large amounts, and in some
cases the money pledged was
directed against a specific
person, the NFL said.
"The payments here are
particularly troubling be-
cause they involved not just
payments for 'performance,'
but also for injuring opposing
players," Goodell said in a
statement "The bounty rule
promotes two key elements of
NFL football: player safety
and competitive integrity."
"Cart-offs" are defined by
the NFL as a player being



ROUND
Continued from Page B1

birdie on the par-4 11th,
with water in front of the
green. Mcllroy was in man-
gled rough to the right, and
the safe route was to play
short and left of the green to
avoid a big number. He
blasted a 7-iron from 181
yards to the back fringe, and
then holed a 50-foot putt.
NBC Sports reporter Roger
Maltbie walked by on the
way to the 12th tee and said
to him, "Really?"
Mcllroy tried to contain a
smile under his cap and
curly brown hair
Even so, his two key shots
were for par. From the right
rough on the 13th, the best
he could manage was to hit
into a front bunker, some 30
yards short of the flag. McIl-
roy nearly holed the shot to
escape with par, and then he
made an 8-footer for par on
the next hole.
"They were two crucial
holes today" he said.
English is showing that
his win last summer on the
Nationwide Tour was not an
accident. He breezed
through Q-school in Decem-
ber and has yet to miss a cut
all year, though he has not
finished better than a tie for


15th in the Phoenix Open.
Even so, he is polished and
looks capable of winning,
even against a player whom
everyone is ready to crown
as No. 1. English is among
them, smiling when asked
about playing a 22-year-old
on the verge of going atop the
world ranking.
"Rory is awesome," Eng-
lish said. "I haven't had a
chance to meet him yet, but
I've definitely watched him
play the last couple of
years. He's got a great game


took a 4-1 District 6A-6 loss at
Springstead in Spring Hill on
Friday night.
For the Panthers, Skylar
Summers and Sheldon Baxter
each had a hit. Baxter also
tossed six innings and gave up
six hits and two earned runs
while striking out two.
Lecanto (4-5, 1-2) hosts
Central on Friday.
Hurricanes come up
just short at Vanguard
The Citrus boys weightlifting
team earned four first-place fin-
ishes but couldn't upend Van-
guard in Ocala on Friday night
during a 55-38 loss.
The following are the top fin-
ishers for the Hurricanes:

As a strong defensive
tackle for the Hurricanes,
coach Greene said the
Mountaineers are getting a
motivated player.
"What they're getting the
most is a kid with a mean
streak," Greene said. "He
plays with a chip on his
shoulder and he's really
good at bull-rushing into the

carried off the field; "knock-
outs" as when a player can-
not return to the game.
The league absolved Saints
owner Tom Benson of any
blame, but said the investiga-
tion showed Payton and gen-
eral manager Mickey Loomis
knew about the "pay for per-
formance" program.
'Although head coach
Sean Payton was not a direct
participant in the funding or
administration of the pro-
gram, he was aware of the al-
legations, did not make any
detailed inquiry or otherwise
seek to learn the facts, and
failed to stop the bounty pro-
gram. He never instructed
his assistant coaches or play-
ers that a bounty program
was improper and could not
continue," the NFL said.
When informed about it
earlier this year, the NFL
said Benson directed
Loomis to "ensure that any
bounty program be discon-
tinued immediately" How-
ever, the NFEs report said
evidence showed Loomis
didn't carry out Benson's di-
rections and that in 2010
Loomis denied any knowl-
edge of a bounty program.
"There is no evidence that
Mr Loomis took any effective
action to stop these prac-
tices," the NFL said.
The NFL found no evi-
dence of similar bounty pro-
grams within the league, but
several Redskins told The
Washington Post that
Williams had a similar sys-
tem as defensive coordinator
for the team.
Former defensive end
Philip Daniels, now Washing-
ton's director of player devel-
opment, said he believed


First place
129: Tommy Diestler, 360
pounds
154: Kody McDow, 500
pounds
139: Xavier Rodgers, 370
pounds
199: Darius Chapes, 565
pounds
Second place
119: Raymond Vielleux, 355
pounds
183: Steven Knowles, 540
pounds
238: Thomas Henderson,
525 pounds
219: Dalton Pollard, 550
pounds
Citrus is now 2-1 overall and
lifts Monday at Crystal River.

backfield.
"He's 100 percent com-
mitted to what he's doing,
he's a hard worker and a re-
ally tough kid."
JM. Soracchi is the
Chronicle sports editor He
can be emailed at
jmsoracchi@
chronicleonline.com or
reached at 352-564-2928.

Williams paid off big hits with
fines collected from players
for being late to meetings or
practices.
"Rather than pocket that
money or whatever, he would
redistribute it to players who
had good games or good prac-
tices," said Daniels, who
added the most he received
was $1,500 for a four-sack
game against Dallas in 2005.
"I think it is wrong the way
they're trying to paint
(Williams)," Daniels told the
Post "He never told us to go
out there and break a guy's
neck or break a guy's leg. It
was all in the context of good,
hard football."
Benson responded to the
NFEs report saying: "I have
been made aware of the
NFLs findings relative to
the 'Bounty Rule' and how
it relates to our club. I have
offered, and the NFL has
received, our full coopera-
tion in their investigation.
While the findings may be
troubling, we look forward
to putting this behind us
and winning more champi-
onships in the future for
our fans."
The NFEs most infamous
bounty case occurred in 1989
when Eagles coach Buddy
Ryan was accused of putting
a bounty on Cowboys players.
On Thanksgiving Day,
Cowboys coach Jimmy John-
son accused Ryan of putting
a bounty on Dallas quarter-
back Troy Aikman and
placekicker Luis Zendejas
before a 27-0 Philadelphia
victory Ryan and his players
denied the charges and NFL
Commissioner Paul Tagli-
abue found no evidence of
wrongdoing.


Associated Press
Tiger Woods acknowledges the gallery after making a birdie
on the fourth hole during the third round of the Honda
Classic golf tournament Saturday in Palm Beach Gardens.


and he deserves. I think
he's the best player in the
world right now, hands
down, and I'm looking for-
ward to tomorrow. He's
very impressive."
Bradley had a 68 and was
in the group at 7-under 203
with Brian Harman (69) and
Justin Rose (71). Masters
champion Charl Schwartzel
wasted a good start with a
double bogey on the 11th
hole, but still had a 67 and
was five shots behind.
The best Woods looked
came early in his round,
when he birdied the third
hole from 7 feet, holed a 20-
footer on the fourth for
birdie, made a 15-foot par
save on the sixth and stuffed


his tee shot on the seventh
into 4 feet.
That was his last birdie,
though.
"I was close to putting a
low one up there today,"
Woods said. "I felt like it
could be had, I could make a
run and post 5-under par for
the day or something like
that and get myself within
reach. Right now, Rory is
playing some great golf."
Starting times have been
moved up for the final
round because of storms in
the forecast, meaning play-
ers will be in threesomes.
Gillis could only laugh at the
notion of a journeyman
being in the last group with
a pair of kids.


SCOREBOARD





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



Subway Fresh Fit
500 Lineup
After Saturday qualifying; race Sunday
At Phoenix International Raceway
Avondale, Ariz.
Lap length: 1 miles
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (55) Mark Martin, Toyota, 136.815.
2. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 136.126.
3. (78) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 135.998.
4. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 135.583.
5. (42) J. Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 135.547.
6. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 135.491.
7. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 135.074.
8. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 135.014.
9. (20) Joey Logano, Toyota, 134.998.
10. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 134.771.
11. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 134.615.
12. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 134.564.
13. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 134.499.
14. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 134.449.
15. (22) AJ Allmendinger, Dodge, 134.278.
16. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 134.268.
17. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 134.058.
18. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 134.048.
19. (51) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 133.939.
20. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 133.814.
21. (1) Jamie McMurray Chevrolet, 133.764.
22. (83) Landon Cassill, Toyota, 133.665.
23. (36) Dave Blaney Chevrolet, 133.63.
24. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 133.615.
25. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 133.417.
26. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 132.871.
27. (23) Scott Riggs, Chevrolet, 132.743.
28. (2) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 132.709.
29. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 132.597.
30. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 132.441.
31. (13) Casey Mears, Ford, 132.251.
32. (10) David Reutimann, Chevrolet, 132.231.
33. (26) Josh Wise, Ford, 132.081.
34. (34) David Ragan, Ford, 132.057.
35. (49) J.J. Yeley, Toyota, 131.685.
36. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 131.516.
37. (98) Michael McDowell, Ford, 131.502.
38. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 130.596.
39. (7) Robby Gordon, Dodge, 130.364.
40. (33) Brendan Gaughan, Chevrolet, 128.824.
41. (93) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, Owner Points.
42. (32) Mike Bliss, Ford, Owner Points.
43. (30) David Stremme, Toyota, 129.092.
Failed to Qualify
44. (37) Timmy Hill, Ford, 128.968.
Bashas' Supermarkets
200 Results
Saturday
At Phoenix International Raceway
Avondale, Ariz.
Lap length: 1 miles
(Start position in parentheses)
1. (8) Elliott Sadler, Chevy, 200 laps, 120.4 rat-
ing, 47 points.
2. (7) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 200, 119.9, 0.
3. (2) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 200, 114.3, 41.
4. (9) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 200, 106, 40.
5. (12) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 200, 140.2, 0.
6. (6) Sam Hornish Jr., Dodge, 200, 98.5, 38.
7. (5) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 200, 103, 38.
8. (10) Joey Logano, Toyota, 200, 101.3, 0.
9. (1) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 200, 117.5, 0.
10. (21) Michael Annett, Ford, 200, 86, 34.
11. (14) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 200, 91, 0.
12. (25) James Buescher, Chevy, 200, 82.7, 0.
13. (17) Cole Whitt, Chevrolet, 200, 88.1, 31.
14. (11) Brian Scott, Toyota, 200, 85.2, 30.
15. (13) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 200, 89.9, 29.
16. (19) Mike Bliss, Toyota, 200, 77.7, 28.
17. (22) Casey Roderick, Ford, 200, 72.8, 27.
18. (4) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 198, 97.7, 0.
19. (18) Jason Bowles, Dodge, 197, 71.7, 25.
20. (24) Tayler Malsam, Toyota, 197, 64.9, 24.
21. (30) Danica Patrick, Chevy, 197, 62.1, 23.
22. (28) Jeremy Clements, Chevy, 197, 65.2, 22.
23. (32) Jamie Dick, Chevrolet, 196, 58.7, 21.
24. (15) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, throttle linkage,
195, 68, 20.
25. (31)Joey Gase, Ford, 195, 51.5, 19.
26. (36) Erik Darnell, Chevrolet, 194, 61.9, 18.
27. (39) Benny Gordon, Chevy, 194, 47.6, 17.
28. (37) Eric McClure, Toyota, 193, 47.1, 16.
29. (41)T.J. Bell, Chevrolet, 189, 43.4, 15.
30. (38)Tim Schendel, Chevrolet, 189, 37.2,14.
31. (34) Blake Koch, Ford, 166, 49.4, 13.
32. (23) Mike Wallace, Chevrolet, wheel bear-
ing, 162, 50.6, 12.
33. (40) Daryl Harr, Chevrolet, 149, 40.7, 11.
34. (42) Charles Lewandoski, Chevrolet, brakes,
115, 33.2, 10.
35. (35) D. Green, Dodge, vibration, 109, 35.1,9.
36. (3) K.Wallace, Toyota, accident, 102, 69.6, 8.
37. (16) J.J. Yeley, Ford, vibration, 25, 41.4, 0.
38. (29) Morgan Shepherd, Chevrolet, fuel pres-
sure, 17, 41.3, 6.
39. (43) M. Harmon, Chevy, fly wheel, 8, 34.4, 5.
40. (33)Josh Wise, Chevy, electrical, 7,34.1,0.
41. (26) C. Miller, CheWvy, electrical, 6, 33, 3.
42. (20) S. Speed, Chevy, electrical, 3, 33.4, 0.
43. (27) J. Green, Toyota, vibration, 3, 31.8, 1.
Race Statistics
Average Speed of Race Winner: 116.317 mph.
Time of Race: 1 hour, 43 minutes, 10 seconds.
Margin of Victory: 0.259 seconds.
Caution Flags: 3 for 15 laps.
Lead Changes: 8 among 5 drivers.
Lap Leaders: D.Hamlin 1-4; T.Bayne 5-8;
D.Hamlin 9-52; K.Harvick 53-105; D.Hamlin
106-110; K.Harvick 111-164; D.Hamlin 165-167;
B.Keselowski 168-174; E.Sadler 175-200.
Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps
Led): K.Harvick, 2 times for 107 laps; D.Hamlin,
4 times for 56 laps; E.Sadler, 1 time for 26 laps;
B.Keselowski, 1 time for 7 laps; TBayne, 1 time
for 4 laps.
Top 10 in Points: 1. E.Sadler, 89; 2. A.Dillon, 79;
3. TBayne, 72; 4. C.Whitt, 71; 5. R.Stenhouse
Jr., 66; 6. S.Hornish Jr., 63; 7.TMalsam, 62; 8.
M.Annett, 51; 9. B.Gordon, 49; 10. J.Nemechek,
42.
NASCAR Driver Rating Formula
A maximum of 150 points can be attained in a
race.
The formula combines the following categories:
Wins, Finishes, Top-15 Finishes, Average Run-
ning Position While on Lead Lap, Average
Speed Under Green, Fastest Lap, Led Most
Laps, Lead-Lap Finish.


SPORTS


SUNDAY, MARCH 4, 2012 B5


Klitschko knocks out Mormeck


Boxer retains both

heavyweight titles

Associated Press

DUSSELDORF, Germany -
Wladimir Klitschko stopped French
challenger Jean-Marc Mormeck in
the fourth round of a one-sided fight
to retain the WBA and IBF heavy-
weight titles Saturday night.
The Ukrainian put down
Mormeck with a left-right combi-
nation, followed by a short left.
Mormeck beat the count but looked
wobbly and referee Luis Pabon
stopped the fight.
"His strategy was to make me
tired, but I dominated," Klitschko
said.
Klitschko was credited with the
50th KO of his career, but Mormeck
said he could have fought on.


"I was frustrated, I could have
continued," Mormeck said.
Klitschko floored Mormeck in
the second and completely domi-
nated the much smaller challenger
Mormeck never connected with a
clean punch, although Klitschko
said he had been hit with one jab.
"My eye is still stinging," Kl-
itschko said.
Klitschko improved to 57-3,
while Mormeck dropped to 36-5.
Klitschko also held on to the minor
IBO and WBO belts.
Mormeck kept trying to come in,
lunging forward with his head low
and gloves high, often clinging to
Klitschko.
A former cruiserweight, Mormeck
gave up 6 1/2 inches in height, 7
inches in reach to the champion.
Klitschko sent Mormeck down
with a big right midway into the sec-
ond round and it was soon clear he
was looking to end the fight early


Associated Press
Wladimir Klitschko, right, lands a punch to Jean-Marc Mormeck during
their heavyweight title bout Saturday in Dusseldorf, Germany.


Associated Press
Elliott Sadler leads Kyle Busch and Austin Dillon during a Nationwide Series auto race Saturday at Phoenix
International Raceway in Avondale, Ariz. After a restart following a late caution, Sadler came away with the victory.



Drought ends in Phoenix


Sadler ends

winless streak at

Nationwide Series

Associated Press

AVONDALE, Ariz. Elliott Sadler
took the lead after a late caution and
held on down the stretch to earn his
first Nationwide win in 14 years at
Phoenix International Raceway on
Saturday
A former full-time driver in the
Sprint Cup series, Sadler started
eighth and didn't get near the lead
until the end of the race. He passed
Brad Keselowski after a caution with
33 laps left and wasn't really chal-
lenged on the way to his sixth career
Nationwide win first in 91 races in
the series.
Keselowski finished second and de-
fending series champion Ricky Sten-
house Jr. was third. Kevin Harvick led
the most laps, but finished fifth be-
hind Austin Dillon after pit strategy at
the last caution backfired.
Sadler signed on with Kevin Har-
vick's Nationwide team in 2011 and
was the runner-up to Stenhouse in the
season standings despite not winning
a race. Harvick got out of ownership
to start a family and his team was ab-
sorbed by Richard Childress Racing
this season.
Sadler had a strong start for his new
owners, finishing third at the season-
opener in Daytona last week after
starting in the same spot.
He started eighth in Saturday's race
and was all the way back to 18th with
50 laps left Sadler started making his
way toward the front and was in posi-
tion to make a move after some pit


Associated Press
Driver Elliot Sadler climbs on his car to celebrate with teammates after
winning the Nationwide Series' Bashas' Supermarkets 200 at Phoenix
International Raceway on Saturday in Avondale, Ariz.


strategy on a caution with 36 laps left
Harvick dominated the middle part
of the race, leading 93 laps until the
last caution sent everyone into the
pits for a final stop. Harvick opted for
four tires and fuel, but all the other
leaders either took two tires or just
fuel to get back out quickly
Harvick came out of the pits in sev-
enth and nearly got taken out shortly
after the restart, heading down to the
inside apron to avoid contact. He
moved up to fourth after that, but
couldn't make up any more ground.
Keselowski took the lead the after
the caution, but was quickly passed by


Sadler. Keselowski and Stenhouse
stayed with Sadler over the final 25
laps, but weren't able to get close
enough to make a move.
Sadler celebrated his long-awaited
victory with a massive burnout at the
flag, covering the rest of the cars in a
layer of white smoke along pit road.
He hadn't won on the Nationwide se-
ries since Oct 31, 1998, at North Car-
olina Motor Speedway
Danica Patrick was never a factor
after a wreck-filled run through Day-
tona. The former IndyCar star started
30th and was a lap down before the
midpoint of the race.


Gators


stand in


UK's way

Associated Press

GAINESVILLE No. 16
Florida is the only thing
standing between top-ranked
Kentucky and perfection.
With a victory Sunday in
Gainesville, the Wildcats
would become just the third
team since 1956 to go un-
beaten in Southeastern
Conference play
It's definitely on Ken-
tucky's radar, but far from
the team's top goal. After
winning 21 consecutive
games, being ranked atop
the polls for the last six
weeks and appearing to be a
lock for a No. 1 seed in the
NCAA tournament, the
Wildcats have much loftier
aspirations for the rest of
the season.
For now, though, they will
gladly settle for that unde-
feated mark.
"It means we're one step
closer to the goals we set,"
forward Terrence Jones
said. "It's a special thing to
happen and I think this is a
special team with a lot of
great players. I think it just
shows how much hard work
we've been putting into
every practice, executing
each game plan and just lis-
tening to coach and doing
everything he says."
Kentucky is the only SEC
program to accomplish
league perfection since
Alabama in 1956.
The Wildcats went 16-0 in
1996 and went on to win the
national championship.
They did it again in 2003, but
lost in the regional finals.
Coach John Calipari has
downplayed the signifi-
cance of going undefeated,
even as the final game ap-
proaches.
Having dropped two in
row since losing versatile
forward Will Yeguete,
Florida would like nothing
more than to play spoiler,
especially with the game at
home and on Senior Day
The Gators will honor
guard Erving Walker before
the game. Walker was held
scoreless (0-for-7 shooting)
in Florida's last game
against Kentucky, a 20-point
loss that exposed Florida
for being undersized on the
perimeter and out-muscled
in the post.
"Hopefully this time it
will be a little different,"
Walker said.
Donovan said his players
are confident they can beat
anyone.


Rays fall to Twins in Spring Training opener


Associated Press

FORT MYERS Joe
Mauer, Justin Morneau and
Denard Span all got hits in
the spring training debuts
and the Minnesota Twins
beat the Tampa Bay Rays 7-
3 Saturday
The Twins' three stand-
outs are each returning
from injury-plagued sea-
sons in which they missed a
combined 265 games. Span
had two hits while Morneau
and Mauer drove in runs.
None of the hits came
against David Price. The
Rays ace pitched a hitless
first inning, striking out
Morneau and Mauer.
Carl Pavano, set to start
for the Twins on opening


day, gave up a two-run
homer in the first to Matt
Joyce. Pavano allowed three
hits in two innings.
Yankees 8, Phillies 5
CLEARWATER Hunter
Pence hit a two-run homer and
Jonathan Papelbon pitched a
perfect inning in his Philadel-
phia debut before the New York
Yankees rallied for an 8-5 vic-
tory over the Phillies.
Pence connected off New
York right-hander Ivan Nova.
Kevin Frandsen also homered
for the Phillies.
New Phillies reliever Chad
Quails gave up a two-run
homer to Cole Garner in a
three-run seventh.
Yankees All-Star Curtis
Granderson also homered for


New York.
Cole Hamels gave up a run
on two doubles in the first in-
ning, but was sharp in a score-
less second.
Tigers 2, Braves 0
LAKE BUENA VISTA-
Prince Fielder went 2 for 2 and
Doug Fister combined with
seven pitchers to throw a one-
hitter, leading the Detroit
Tigers to a 2-0 victory over the
Atlanta Braves.
Fielder, Detroit's big free
agent signing this winter, also
walked. He's 3 for 3 in a Tigers
uniform, having doubled in an
exhibition against Florida
Southern on Friday.
Fister walked a batter in two
innings, and the Tigers took a
no-hitter into the eighth inning


when Jordan Parraz singled off
Chris Bootcheck.
Mike Minor pitched two in-
nings for the Braves, allowing
one hit and striking out three.
Red Sox 25,
Northeastern 0
FORT MYERS Cody Ross
hit two homers and Adrian Gon-
zalez connected for another of
the Red Sox's five home runs in
a 25-0 victory over Northeastern
in their first game of a double-
header against Boston-area
college teams.
Ross had a solo shot to lead
off the second inning and a
grand slam in the fourth. Gon-
zalez hit a three-run shot in the
second. Che-Hsuan Lin added
a two-run homer in the fourth


and Ryan Sweeney hit a three-
run shot in the sixth.
Blue Jays 7, Pirates 1
DUNEDIN Brett Lawrie hit
a pair of two-run doubles and
the Toronto Blue Jays beat the
Pittsburgh Pirates 7-1 in a
spring training opener.
Eric Thames homered for
Toronto.
Astros 3, Nationals 1
KISSIMMEE Bryce
Harper had a single in his first
start for the Washington Nation-
als but Chris Johnson hit a two-
run homer that led the Houston
Astros to a 3-1 victory.
Harper, the 19-year-old out-
fielder who was drafted first
overall in 2010, went 1 for 3
with a hit off Astros starter Livan


Hernandez in the Grapefruit
League opener for both teams.
Athletics 9, Mariners 2
PEORIA, Ariz. Jonny
Gomes and Jemile Weeks
each hit two-run homers and
the Oakland Athletics beat the
Seattle Mariners 9-2 Saturday.
Gomes connected in the
third off Kevin Millwood. Weeks
homered in the fifth against
Hong-Chih Kuo.
D'backs (ss) 9, Giants 6
SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. -
Chris Young and Ryan Roberts
homered and an Arizona Dia-
mondbacks split-squad beat
Tim Lincecum and the San
Francisco Giants 9-6 Saturday
in both teams Cactus League
opener.










ENETITNMHN

ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE

Winfrey to talk to
Houston's family
NEW YORK-Oprah
Winfrey has landed an in-
terview with Whitney
Houston's
daughter
and other
family
members


air on the
Oprah Oprah
Winfrey Winfrey
Network.
"Oprah's Next Chap-
ter" will feature an inter-
view with 18-year-old
Bobbi Kristina, Houston's
only child. It will also in-
clude Patricia Houston,
who's the singer's sister-
in-law and manager, as
well as the singer's
brother Gary. It is sched-
uled to air March 11.
The superstar was
found dead in a bathtub
at the Beverly Hilton
Hotel in Beverly Hills,
Calif, on Feb. 11. An
exact cause of death has
yet to be determined.
Houston was 48 years
old. Her daughter turns
19 on Sunday

Report: 'Hawaii
Five-0' star treated
HONOLULU -A rep-
resentative for Alex
O'Loughlin said the
"Hawaii Five-0" star is
taking time away from
the show to get treated
for problems related to
pain medication.
Rachael Wesolowski
said in a report by the
Honolulu Star-Advertiser
that O'Loughlin "is taking
a short break to receive
supervised treatment for
prescription pain med-
ication due to a recent
shoulder injury"
O'Loughlin, who por-
trays crime fighter Steve
McGarrett, is known for
doing many of his own
stunts on the action-
packed show. The paper
said he reportedly will be
absent for at least one
episode.

Philippines: No
hassle for Kitsch
MANILA, Philippines
-A Philippine official
says "Friday Night
Lights" star Taylor Kitsch
was not
hassled at
Manila's
airport
recently,
as the
.- Canadian
actor in-
dicated
Taylor this week.
Kitsch Kitsch
said
Wednesday on the "Late
Show with David Letter-
man" that customs offi-
cers stopped him at the
airport and ordered him
back to Japan because
his passport didn't have
enough pages to stamp
his arrival.
He was to finish film-
ing Oliver Stone's "Sav-
ages" in the Philippines.
Kitsch said he was let
in only after proving with
his iPhone that he was an
actor
Philippine Customs
chief Ruffy Blazon wrote
in his blog Friday that no
airport records show
Kitsch visited Manila,
and that his officers do
not stamp passports.
-From wire reports


Jailhouse rock


MC5s Wayne

Kramer returns to

jail with guitars

Associated Press

LOS ANGELES He spent two
years in a federal lockup for trying
to sell cocaine to undercover
agents, and all Wayne Kramer can
think about these days is trying to
find a way to get back behind bars.
This time, though, the guitar god
for rock music's seminal pre-punk
band, the MC5, wants to bring his ax
with him and a few dozen others
for the inmates to play
With a little help from friends like
the Foo Fighters' Chris Shiflett, for-
mer Guns 'N Roses guitarist Gilby
Clarke and others, Kramer has
formed Jail Guitar Doors USA.
He runs the nonprofit charitable
organization with his wife, Mar-
garet, out of the Hollywood studio
where he makes a comfortable liv-
ing these days composing music for
movies and television. Over the past
two years, Jail Guitar Doors USA
has delivered scores of instruments
to prisons and jails in Nevada, Cal-
ifornia and Texas.
"He's a great man. He's taken his
skill, his talent and he's putting it to
use, giving back to society," said
Deputy David Bates, who has
worked with Kramer in bringing
guitars to several jails run by the
Los Angeles County Sheriff's De-
partment. Bates, who calls music
"the universal language," said he's
seen the positive impact it has had
on inmates.
So, Kramer said, has he. In his
case, first hand.
"When I played music in prison, I
wasn't in prison anymore," he said,
as he sits in his studio over a lunch
of vegetarian Thai food.
"And that's what we're trying to
accomplish with the instrument do-
nations," he continued. "That this is
a way that you can get through this
time, that you can go someplace
else, you can get involved in your
guitar"
Kramer, who is 63, is dressed in
blue jeans and a plaid flannel shirt
over a white T Although he still
looks about as thin as he did in the
days when he was tearing up tunes
like "Kick Out the Jams," the huge
white-guy Afro that once nearly de-
fined him as much as his guitar has
given way to thinning, close-
cropped hair
He was still in his 20s when he ar-
rived at the federal prison in Lex-
ington, Ky., in the 1970s, scheduled
to do four years for trying to sell
$10,000 worth of cocaine.
The place was bleak and dispirit-
ing, especially for someone who had
been a rock star just a few years be-
fore. But Kramer would soon dis-
cover there was a music class there.
It was taught by legendary jazz
trumpeter Red Rodney, who was
doing time himself for a heroin bust
"He'd been to Lexington three
times. ... He was kind of like the
mayor of the prison," Kramer re-
called, laughing. "He taught music
theory"
The guitarist studied with him
and, after he was paroled early, re-
turned to the music business. But
he still struggled for years to keep
from going back.
The MC5, which had helped de-
fine punk rock with its screaming
guitar chords and intense lyrics,
had long since broken up, and De-
troit's music scene had died along
with the city's economy Kramer,
meanwhile, was still drinking heav-
ily and associating with drug users,
a prescription for violating parole.
So he moved to LA, got sober and
began to do music for films includ-
ing "Talladega Nights: The Ballad
of Ricky Bobby"
He also put together a reconsti-
tuted MC5 and took it on a world
tour, subbing in people like Clarke
and Handsome Dick Manitoba of
the Dictators for founding members


Birthday The year ahead appears to be a promising
one in two unrelated areas. The first, which isn't as impor-
tant as the second but is still vital, has to do with your social
life. The second pertains to your career, and it could be
your greatest blessing.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Victory might not go to the
swift but to the persevering. Thus, you'd be better off
stolidly plugging away instead of trying to do everything as
quickly as you can.
Aries (March 21-April 19) If you allow another to run
the show, you're not likely to have an easy row to hoe.
Everything will be done to the benefit of that person instead
of to the benefit of the majority.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Being both patient and perse-
vering allows you to make progress on a difficult endeavor
in yards instead of inches. If you allow yourself to become
hasty, nothing will get done.


Kramer plays one of the guitars.
"Fred "Sonic" Smith and Rob
Tyner, who had died of heart attacks
in their mid-40s.
Throughout the tours and other
projects, however, Kramer kept
yearning to give something back to
those he'd left behind in prison.
Many of them, he said, were similar
to him: young guys looking at years
behind bars for doing something
stupid involving drugs.
"Clearly I knew I was doing
wrong," he said of his own bust.
"But these guys had briefcases full
of money, and I'm out of work, and I
look at those hundred-dollar bills
and say, 'Hmmm, let me make some
calls.'
"I'm not Pollyannaish about it,"
he said of prison life. "There are
some people who aren't going to
change, aren't interested in chang-
ing and need to be locked up. I
would put it at maybe 15 percent.
"But," he quickly added, "that
leaves 85 percent"
That thought led him to start vis-
iting prisons, and it was at a concert
he put on at Sing Sing in Ossining.
N.Y, that Jail Guitar Doors USA
was born.
One of the musicians he'd invited
to take part was old friend Billy
Bragg, and the British rocker ar-
rived with the words "Jail Guitar
Doors" written across his guitar
He told Kramer he'd recently
formed a group to help prisoners in
his native England, taking the name
for it from an old Clash song.
"Maybe you've heard it," Bragg
told him.
"I said, 'Yeah, I know the song,


Today's HOROSCOPE
Gemini (May 21-June 20) Make sure there is parity re-
garding what each has to offer and what each will receive
when involved in a joint venture. If equality is absent, what
you're trying to do won't fly.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Step up, be firm and defend
your basic rights, or persons with whom you're involved are
likely to take advantage of your good nature.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Owing to your negative attitude,
your possibilities for success aren't apt to be as strong as
they might be otherwise. If you can't see yourself as a win-
ner, no one else will either.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -A friend who is a very nice
person but continually forgets to repay what he or she has
borrowed might put the touch on you once again. If you
give in and help, you'll be sorry.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) It might be difficult but impor-
tant to guard against your inclinations to do everything the


Billy," Kramer recalled with a guf-
faw. "It's about me."
He reminded him of the opening
lyrics: "Let me tell you about Wayne
and his deals with cocaine." The
Clash had written it for Kramer
when he was in prison. Thirty years
later it would connect him to the
cause he'd been looking for
He began rounding up others to
help. Finding them turned out to be
relatively easy for a guy who had in-
fluenced a generation of guitarists.
"There aren't many people you
can't speak too highly of, but Wayne
is one of them," said Clarke, who
has gone behind bars with him.
"The challenges he had in his life,
the things he's overcome and the
successes he's having now. And he's
just one of the greatest guitarists
there is. So when Wayne calls, I
have to get involved."
Another was Shiflett, who first
heard of Jail Guitar Doors through
Bragg's website and visited a prison
with him in England. When Kramer
started his USA chapter, he quickly
signed on. At one prison stop, he
taught a music workshop.
"We played a Bob Marley song,"
he recalled recently. "One of the
most moving things about it, for me,
was when we talked music, there
was no dissension at all. It was just
a bunch of guys in a room talking
about music."
Two years after its founding,
Kramer would like to take Jail Gui-
tar Doors USA nationwide. He
knows that will take much more
time, money and phone calls to peo-
ple like Clarke and Shiflett


hard way. Making things tougher on yourself can be need-
lessly self-defeating.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) If there is a specific individual
who would have the answer you're seeking but whom you
haven't been able to reach, you might look elsewhere.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) --The old saying "We can
never have too many friends" might be impressed upon
you when someone whom you always depended upon isn't
available anymore.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Provided you handle it
properly, a major unsolicited change in a project could turn
out to be advantageous for you. If treated improperly, how-
ever, its impact could be negative.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) --There's a chance that you
might have to operate under conditions that are less than
optimal. Although what you want to do can still be effected,
its payoff might be meager.


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's early
numbers, Page B4.

FRIDAY, MARCH 2
Mega Money: 3-4 10 19
Mega Ball: 21
4-of-4 MB No winner
4-of-4 12 $664.50
3-of-4 MB 88 $198.50
3-of-4 1,668 $31
2-of-4 MB 1,965 $18.50
1-of-4 MB 13,744 $2.50
2-of-4 40,746 $2
Fantasy 5:4 6 7 18 28
5-of-5 3 winners $86,092.78
4-of-5 435 $95.50
3-of-5 13,459 $8.50
THURSDAY, MARCH 1
Fantasy 5:1 2 4 16 22
5-of-5 3 winners $77,924.28
4-of-5 336 $112
3-of-5 12,098 $8.50

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num-
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call 850-487-7777.


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, March 4,
the 64th day of 2012. There
are 302 days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On March 4, 1789, the
Constitution of the United
States went into effect as the
first Federal Congress met in
New York. (The lawmakers
then adjourned for lack of a
quorum.)
On this date:
In 1681, England's King
Charles II granted a charter
to William Penn for an area
of land that later became
Pennsylvania.
In 1858, Sen. James Henry
Hammond of South Carolina
declared "Cotton is king" in a
speech to the U.S. Senate.
In 1861, Abraham Lincoln
was inaugurated as the 16th
president of the United
States. The U.S. Government
Printing Office began opera-
tion. The Confederate States
of America adopted as its flag
the original version of the
Stars and Bars.
In 1912, groundbreaking
took place in New York for
Ebbets Field, home of the
Brooklyn Dodgers.
In 1917, Republican Jean-
nette Rankin of Montana took
her seat as the first woman
elected to the U.S. House of
Representatives.
In 1952, Ronald Reagan
and Nancy Davis were mar-
ried in California's San Fer-
nando Valley.
Ten years ago: Seven
American soldiers were killed,
11 wounded, in Afghanistan
at the outset of Operation
Anaconda against remnant
Taliban and al-Qaida forces
One year ago: NASA
launched its Glory satellite
from Vandenberg Air Force
Base in California on what
was supposed to have been
a three-year mission to ana-
lyze how airborne particles
affect Earth's climate; how-
ever, the rocket carrying
Glory plummeted into the
southern Pacific several min-
utes after liftoff.
Today's Birthdays: Ac-
tress Paula Prentiss is 74.
Singer Bobby Womack is 68.
Singer Shakin' Stevens is 64.
Author James Ellroy is 64.
Singer Chris Rea is 61. Actor
Ronn Moss is 60. Actress Kay
Lenz is 59. Actress Catherine
O'Hara is 58. Actress Patricia
Heaton is 54. Actor Steven
Weber is 51. Actress Stacy
Edwards is 47. Rapper Grand
Puba is 46. Rock singer Evan
Dando (Lemonheads) is 45.
Actress Patsy Kensit is 44.
Gay rights activist Chaz Bono
is 43. Country singer Jason
Sellers is 41. Jazz musician
Jason Marsalis is 35. Actress


Jessica Heap is 29. Actor
Joshua Bowman is 24.
Thought for Today: "I
want to live my life so that my
nights are not full of regrets."
- D.H. Lawrence, English
author (1885-1930).


Associated Press
Guitarist Wayne Kramer, founder of the band the MC5, poses Jan. 16 with
one of the instruments that will be provided to jail inmates as part of the Jail
Guitar Doors USA initiative at his recording studio in Los Angeles. The Jail
Guitar Doors program provides instruments to inmates who are using music
as a means of achieving rehabilitation.











COMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


-- - .

-
r ... --.- --.


When

style

makes

substance
It was just about four
years ago when a
young guy came to the
front desk at the Chroni-
cle office and asked to
speak with me.
The local political world
had recently been rocked
by the sudden death of Tom
Franklin, a businessman
and community leader
who had decided to chal-
lenge an incumbent county
commissioner. Franklin
had toyed with running
for public office for years
and in 2008 finally de-
cided to take the plunge.
A fatal heart attack put
an end to the campaign
and his life.
The young man who
came to see me that day
was Joe Meek, a friend of
Franklin's who was help-
ing him with the cam-
paign. Joe explained that
he was going to pick up
Franklin's torch and run
against the veteran
incumbent.
I listened to the polite
young man and honestly
believed he had a better
chance of winning the
Florida lottery than he
did unseating the popular
incumbent.
Meek was unknown in
local politics and ap-
peared to be too nice of a
person to compete in the
nasty world of local poli-
tics. But come Election
Day he proved doubters
wrong by getting 67 per-
cent of the vote in the Re-
publican primary He
went on to win the general
election easily
Now, four years later,
Joe Meek is seeking re-
election as a 31-year-old
veteran of the county com-
mission.
If you haven't noticed,
veterans have not been
doing all that well lately in
seeking re-election to any-
thing. Charlie Crist
learned that the hard way
in the 2010 race.
But County Commis-
sioner Joe Meek is in an
interesting position. As an
incumbent county com-
missioner, he is not facing
opposition.
That's an unusual situa-
tion, but in Meek's case
there may be some reasons
for his lack of an opponent
The young incumbent
does not play the usual
political games that get
people embroiled in con-
troversies. The first thing
Meek asks people who
meet him is, "How are you
doing?"
And the last thing he says
as he's leaving is, "Let me
know if I can help you."
And you believe him.
Part of the problem
with our traditional poli-
tics is that half the fun of
See PageC3


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
This snorkeler slowly makes her way around a sanctuary that provides a protective barrier between man and manatee at Three Sisters Springs.





Saving Crystal River





for generations to come


LISA MOORE
Special to the Chronicle
Have you ever spent a lazy summer day
fishing in King's Bay, splashing at The
Shallows, or snorkeling and diving
with friends in our crystal clear springs?
What about taking turns clinging to an
inner tube as those same friends took you for
a spin across the bay waters glittering with
sunlight, laughing together as you glided
across a gleaming white, sandy river bottom?
Maybe you remember the icy blue waters of
Three Sisters Springs cradled beneath the
shade of a hushed thicket of trees as you dove
into the water, scattering bass, bluegill and
the occasional turtle wishing you hadn't
forgotten your fishing pole?
These don't have to be memories of gener-
ations past and days gone by forever. This is
part of the life experience of what growing up
in Crystal River was and can still be today
And it is the legacy of a magical place I have
called my hometown for 46 years and that
many others like me hope to leave for our
children and grandchildren.
Historically, Crystal River has always been
a boating and fishing community. Generations
of families have fished both commercially
and for recreation, trapped blue crabs, and
spent hours shucking scallops on a dock after
a successful diving trip down the river and
into the Gulf. Parents have taught their chil-
dren to swim, fish, water ski, and live in
King's Bay. Sports such as wind surfing, pad-
dle boarding, kayaking, Jet Skiing, and wake-
boarding have all captured the adventurous
spirit of residents and visitors alike. The peo-
ple of Crystal River have never had a prob-
lem making room for each other's individual
interests while holding firmly to our strongly
ingrained sense of community.
Unfortunately, a divisive element has been
driven into the heart of our hometown in the
form of a proposed rule of federal regulations
so restrictive and unnecessary that they may
eradicate elements of our recreational tradi-
tions and leave us mired in the tangle of bu-
reaucratic rules forever. We never needed the
federal government to tell us how to run our
community before, and we surely do not need
it now.
Citrus County developed the first manatee
protection plan in Florida and has always ex-
ceeded the standards of the Endangered
Species Act for manatee protection by sus-
taining manatee adult survival rates between
94 and 96 percent every year. Our manatee
population grew from a population of 37 ani-
mals in the 1970s to 546 animals in King's Bay
this year (there are actually many more, ac-
cording to state and federal agencies).


I never even saw a manatee while I was
growing up here until Jacques Cousteau
showed up with "Sewer Sam" and plunked
him down in Three Sisters Springs, right
down the canal from my house. We now have
seven manatee sanctuaries and multiple pro-
tected areas during what has come to be
known as "manatee season." We also have
eight months of slow speed in King's Bay each
year while manatees live among us. In Crystal
River, manatee protection has been a com-
munity success story and a source of civic
pride.
But that is not enough for the U.S. Fish and
Wildlife Service (USFWS). With no regard for
the economic hardships, effects on property
values, potential job losses and personal im-
pacts on residents and small business owners
that may result, they stand poised to seize
every square inch of water in King's Bay, the
connecting canals, and tributaries and place
them under the federal control of a manatee
refuge. You are free to read it; it's in the pro-
posed rule.
USFWS refused to conduct an economic
impact study because it believes our commu-
nity is too small to matter USFWS says we
do not meet its threshold of $100 million per
year in potential economic impact due to its
regulations. Tell that to a town full of small-
business owners and the people who work for
them after they have struggled for the past
three to four years of devastating economic
hardship. They can't afford federal rules that
drive customers away because their recre-
ational choices are not welcome in the com-
munity anymore. They will go someplace else
- which is exactly what the USFWS told us to
do in the proposed rule if we wanted to con-
tinue to engage in forbidden recreational ac-
tivities.
That is the part that really got to me the
federal government told my family and me to
get out of town if we wanted to ski or go tub-
ing, or we could take our chances in the busy,
crowded Crystal River channel; or just quit
doing those activities. You really need to read
this part to believe it it's in the rule.
People who enjoy diving, boating, scallop-
ing, skiing and other high-energy water sports
will choose another community to visit or to
buy a home where the federal government
doesn't dictate the kind of ropes they can use
on their boats, the way they must swim (no
fins, weight belts, no diving, wear flotation de-
vices), and how/when/where even if-they
can conduct their boating activities.
In fact, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Con-
servation Commission wrote a letter to
USFWS in September 2011 requesting the
agency reconsider the rule, especially the
part about the recreational zone, and work


with the community to find another solution
for its concerns. That hasn't happened.
As you know, all of our elected officials at
the city and county levels as well as U.S. Rep.
Rich Nugent, state Rep. Jimmy T Smith, and
state Sen. Charles Dean have spoken out ver-
bally and in writing against the proposed rule
as being detrimental to our community.
But what about the manatees? Let's look at
the real facts. We have had a 500 percent (and
growing) population increase in King's Bay
since 1974. King's Bay is only a warm-water
refuge for six months of the year the rest of
the time the Gulf is warmer than the bay, ac-
cording to NOAA records and there is more
food in the Gulf. In 2011, a University of
Florida study stated there is virtually no hy-
drilla (a major food source for manatees) left
in King's Bay Although manatees eat a wide
variety of vegetation, there is not enough for
more than 500 animals.
An insufficient food supply will result in
animals that suffer from starvation, malnu-
trition and disease. They are forced to travel
to the Gulf, into 60-degree water, to feed or
they will die. Cold stress and weakened im-
mune systems can result in additional risk of
illness or death. Yet the USFWS continues to
allow the reintroduction of more manatees
into King's Bay through Three Sisters
Springs.
Data provided by USFWS of aerial surveys
taken during summer months for the past 10
years showed a daily average of fewer than 50
manatees in King's Bay from May to August,
and most of those were in canals and along
the shallow edges of the river and bay Maybe
that is why there have been zero manatee wa-
tercraft-related deaths in King's Bay during
recreational sport days for the past three
years. In fact, 99.8 percent of all manatee
deaths from watercraft in Florida occurred
someplace else not in King's Bay
We don't have a manatee-human problem
in King's Bay We have an excessive, over-
reaching federal government problem in
King's Bay driven by unrealistic environmen-
tal activist groups such as Public Employees
for Environmental Responsibility (PEER)
and others that refuse to consider the impact
on people as they impose increasing numbers
of regulations on communities.
At a January meeting this year, the USFWS
told a group of elected officials and citizens
that the "take" of one manatee justifies their
proposed rule. Under the rule, even simply
petting a manatee is considered a "take." In
fact, people will be required to remain float-
ing on top of the water no closer than 10 feet
to a manatee. No diving, no fins, wear your

See Page C3


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


State budget reflects earmarks, egos and excess


very year the Florida Legisla-
ture is called into session to do
one thing: pass the state's an-
nual budget. We consider a plethora
of bills during our 60-day session, but
the state constitution only mandates
the passage of one: a balanced budget,
in the form of an appropriations bill.
The Senate's top officers made it
clear early on that they did not want
to pass a budget by the session's
March 9 scheduled close. But holding
out hope for a rosier economic fore-
cast is no reason to stall. Despite con-


tinued talk of a delay, the Senate ap-
peared to be acting in good faith when
we took up the budget last week.
Even the 12 Senate Democrats who
have little power to affect the outcome
seemed to give tacit approval to what
the Senate budget chair put forward. As
a thank-you, 36 out of 39 amendments,
appropriating millions of dollars, were
adopted without objection, most of
which were member projects, better
known at the federal level as earmarks.
Earlier in session, during a brutal
debate, senators were chastised for


opposing a plan to privatize state
prisons, which leadership claimed
would save the state $16.5 million -
an optimistic and unsupported esti-
mate. The savings, if realized, did not
seem significant in a corrections budget
of more than $2 billion. Senators were
told that without the savings, funding
would be cut for crucial programs
such as neonatal care and education.
During the budget day, after previ-
ously being told that pennies must be
counted in this tight budget year, more
than $8 million of taxpayer dollars


were doled out with little to no debate
- hardly a penny-counting exercise.
Among the thank-you gifts: $150,000
for a historic log cabin in Biscayne
Park, $75,000 for a Haitian Heritage
Museum, $500,000 for a Bay of Pigs
Museum and $1 million for a Regatta
Sports Center in Sarasota. And this
additional spending occurred despite
the fact that the "critical" $16.5-mil-
lion prison privatization savings was
not factored in.


Page C3


Paula Dockery
FLORIDA
VOICES







Page C2 SUNDAY, MARCH 4, 2012



PINION


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan........... .................. publisher
Charlie Brennan ............. ................. editor
W Mike Arnold ........... ..................HR director
Sandra Frederick....................... managing editor
Curt Ebitz.............. ............ citizen member
Founded Mac Harris ........................ citizen member
by Albert M.
Williamson Rebecca Martin ..........................guest member
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


ANXIOUSLY AWAITING




CR3's future




is critical




to county


or the past year or more,
questions about Citrus
County's long-term eco-
nomic health have included
speculation about whether the
nuclear unit at the Progress
Energy Crystal River Plant
would be repaired or shut down.
Aside from the electric
power it produces and the
high-paying jobs it offers, the
nuclear unit (CR3) accounts for
about $9 million of the county's
$35 million in property taxes. It
is an important
part of the THE I
county's economy
The unit has Rate se
been idle since agreement
late 2009, when help speed
cracking ap- to nucl
peared in part of
the concrete and OUR 01
steel containment
wall as the unit This would
was being pre- news fo
pared to return to resic
service following
replacement of major compo-
nents of the nuclear steam sup-
ply system.
Like all utilities with a nu-
clear plant, Progress Energy
pays into an industry-spon-
sored nuclear insurance pool
- Nuclear Electric Insurance
Limited (NEIL). Initially, the
insurance company paid for
repairs and for the cost of
power the company either had
to buy or to generate with
higher cost fuels since the
plant was not operating.
However, at the end of 2010,
NEIL stopped making payment
for repairs, and last summer
stopped paying for replace-
ment power. Further, the Office
of Public Counsel (OPC), a state
agency that represents the
public interest in hearings
with the state Public Service
Commission (PSC), had
charged that the damage was
due to negligence by the com-
pany, and had opposed the
company recovering cost of the
repairs through electric rates.
Earlier this year, Progress
Energy filed and the PSC ap-
proved a settlement agreement
the company developed in co-
operation with the OPC, the
Florida Industrial Power Users
Group, the Florida Retail Fed-
eration and other parties in-
volved in the company's current
case before the PSC. The net
effect of this agreement is to
take CR3 issues off the table at
least temporarily while the
company determines whether
to repair or retire the unit.
The agreement covers the
CR3 outage, base electric rates
from 2013-2016 and cost recov-
ery for the proposed Levy
County nuclear plant. Under


CAL-5
563-0579


terms of the agreement,
Progress Energy will have to
refund to customers some of
the money the company has
collected to cover the higher
cost of power to replace that
not generated by the plant.
The company will get a
smaller rate increase than re-
quested beginning in 2013;
and, also in 2013, CR3 will be
removed from the rate base on
which the company is allowed
to earn until the unit returns to


SSUE:
ttlement
ent could
ed repairs
ear unit.

PINION:
d be good
r county
lents.


service. The rate
settlement also al-
lows Progress En-
ergy to collect
money for con-
struction of the
planned Levy
County plant, but
caps the amount.
The net result will
be an increase of
$4.63 for 1,000
kilowatt hours for
residential cus-


tomers beginning in 2013.
While no one likes higher
prices for electricity, as a county
we can be glad that one part of the
uncertainty about the future of
CR3 has been taken off the table.
The major remaining uncertainty
is whether the company's in-
surer will pay part or all of the
cost of repairs for the unit.
The company and NEIL are
currently in discussion regarding
future payments. In a meeting
with the Chronicle editorial
board, Progress Energy Florida
Chief Executive Vincent Dolan
said his company believes in-
surance will pay, but it will be
mid-year before they hear the
final decision.
Currently, the company has
two engineering firms develop-
ing repair plans for the plant.
Once these are ready for re-
view and the insurance com-
pany reaches its decision, the
company's board of directors
will make the decision to close
CR3 or repair it.
For the good of the county,
we hope the insurance will pay
and the company will decide to
repair the nuclear unit. Losing
CR3 would mean hundreds of
good-paying jobs would go away,
and the county would either
have to raise property taxes to
offset the loss of tax revenue or
drastically cut services.
A decision to repair the unit
and continue operating it would
mean construction jobs during
the time repairs are under way,
it would preserve good perma-
nent jobs, and it would keep
the unit in the county tax base.
This would be the best out-
come not only for employees at
the plant, but for all the resi-
dents of Citrus County.


Hooray for vultures
This is in regards to somebody complaining about
a neighbor feeding the vultures. The vultures are the
same thing as our seagulls. They eat all the garbage
and stuff that's dead. It's not against the law to feed
the seagulls. I don't see it's against the law to feed
the vultures. If they didn't have any vultures around,
any dead animal that died would stink and cause all
kinds of diseases. They keep your land clean. You
should be glad they're around.


"I have been a woman for fifty years, and I've never
yet been able to discover precisely what it is I am."
Jean Giraudoux, "Tiger at the Gates," 1935


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


How Republicans win by losing


"The beginning of wisdom is
the fear of the Lord. The next
and most urgent counsel is to
take stock of reality"
William F Buckley,
Sept. 11, 1964

WASHINGTON
On that evening 48 years
ago it was still summer,
early in the presidential
campaign Buckley, whose Na-
tional Review maga-
zine had given vital
assistance to Barry
Goldwater's improba-
ble capture of the Re-
publican nomination, ,
addressed the na-
tional convention of /
the conservative
Young Americans for
Freedom. Buckley Georg
told his fervent OTI
acolytes that "when
we permit ourselves VOl
to peek up over the
euphoria" of Goldwater's nomi-
nation, we see that it occurred
"before we had time properly to
prepare the ground."
He then sobered his boisterous
audience: "I speak of course
about the impending defeat of
Barry Goldwater" He urged "the
necessity of guarding against the
utter disarray that sometimes fol-
lows a stunning defeat." Goldwa-
ter's doomed campaign should,
Buckley said, be supported be-
cause it plants "seeds of hope,
which will flower on a great No-
vember day in the future." They
did, 16 Novembers later
Buckley understood the possi-
bility of constructive defeat. He
also understood the need to econ-
omize conservatism's energies.
Today, conservatives dismayed
about the Republican presiden-
tial spectacle may write a codicil
to what is called the Buckley
Rule. He said that in any election,
conservatives should vote for the
most electable conservative. The
codicil might be: Unless the nom-
ination or election of a particular
conservative would mean a net
long-term subtraction from con-
servatism's strength.


HI
Ic


If nominated, Mitt Romney and
Rick Santorum might not cause
such subtraction. Both are con-
servatives, although of strikingly
different stripes. Neither, how-
ever, seems likely to be elected.
Neither has demonstrated, or
seems likely to develop, an apti-
tude for energizing a national
coalition that translates into 270
electoral votes.
If either is nominated, conser-
vatives should vote for
him. But suppose the
accumulation of evi-
dence eventually sug-
gests that the
nomination of either
would subtract from
the long-term project
of making conser-
vatism intellectually
e Will coherent and politi-
-ER cally palatable. If so,
there would come a
DES point when, taking
stock of reality, con-
servatives turn their energies to
a goal much more attainable than,
and not much less important
than, electing Romney or Santo-
rum president. It is the goal of re-
taining control of the House and
winning control of the Senate.
Several possible Supreme Court
nominations and the staffing of the
regulatory state are among the
important reasons conservatives
should try to elect whomever the
GOP nominates. But conserva-
tives this year should have as
their primary goal making sure
Republicans wield all the gavels
in Congress in 2013.
If Republicans do, their com-
mittee majorities will serve as
fine-mesh filters, removing Pres-
ident Obama's initiatives from
the stream of legislation. Then
Republicans can concentrate on
what should be the essential con-
servative project of restoring
something like constitutional
equipoise between the legislative
and executive branches.
Such a restoration would mean
that a re-elected Obama a lame
duck at noon next Jan. 20 would
have a substantially reduced ca-
pacity to do harm. Granted, he


could veto any major conserva-
tive legislation. But such legisla-
tion will not even get to his desk
because Republicans will not have
60 senators. In an undoubtedly bi-
partisan achievement, both par-
ties have participated in
institutionalizing an extraconsti-
tutional Senate supermajority re-
quirement for all but innocuous
or uncontroversial legislation.
This may be a dubious achieve-
ment, but it certainly enlarges the
power of a congressional party to
play defense against a president.
Three years ago, conservatives
were particularly focused on
stopping two of Obama's princi-
pal goals a cap-and-trade cli-
mate policy and "card check" to
abolish secret ballots in union-
ization elections. He still speaks
incessantly but no longer speaks
about either And were it not for
grossly corrupt conduct by Jus-
tice Department prosecutors in
the trial of Republican Sen. Ted
Stevens of Alaska, which cost him
re-election, Obamacare would
not have passed.
Beginning next January, 51 or
more Republican senators, served
by the canny Mitch McConnell's
legislative talents, could put sand
in the gears of an overbearing
and overreaching executive
branch. This could restore some-
thing resembling the rule of law,
as distinct from government by
fiats issuing from unaccountable
administrative agencies exercis-
ing excessive discretion.
From Louisiana's Gov Bobby
Jindal to Wisconsin's Rep. Paul
Ryan, Republicans have a rising
generation of potential 2016 can-
didates. This does not mean con-
servatives should be indifferent
to the fate of this year's nominee,
and it is perhaps premature to
despair of Romney's and Santo-
rum's political aptitudes. Still,
the presidency is not everything,
and there will be another elec-
tion in the next year divisible by
four

George Will's email address
is georgewill@washpost. com.


_ LETTERS to the Editor


Demand public financing
Re: "Hypocrisy and necessity,"
Feb. 13, Page Al0.
Warning: Beware of flying
pigs! Leonard Pitts, columnist
for the Miami Herald, has finally
written an opinion piece with
which I can agree ... in part To
quote, "It is past time we the
people demanded corporate
cash be banned from politics,
and all candidates be required
to accept public financing."
The piece was in response to
Barack Obama's backtracking on
super PACs now that one has
been set up for his benefit, just
as he chose in 2008 to forego
public campaign financing when
it became clear that he had ac-
cess to more lucrative sources.
I agree with Mr Pitts that can-
didates should be required to ac-
cept public financing and eschew
super PACs, with the caveat that
unions be included in the
banned category At least donors
to super PACs are using their
own funds rather than taxpayer
"stimulus" dollars that find their
way into Democratic coffers.
One might even surmise that, ab-
sent union contributions, super
PACs would not have evolved.
So keep an eye to the sky, my
friends. It's getting thick.
Jim Langenmayr
Pine Ridge


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in Chroni-
cle editorials are the opinions of
the newspaper's editorial board.
All letters must be signed and in-
clude a phone number and home-
town, including emailed letters.
Letters must be no longer than
350 words, and writers will be
limited to three letters per month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to
352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

Trooper just doing job
A recent guest column by C.
Carlis Harman has prompted me
to make a few observations.
Mr Harman stated that people
believe small towns like Waldo,
Starke and Lawtey are speed
traps set up by the local govern-
ments to supplement their budg-
ets. This is a common misnomer
U.S. 301 is a state-controlled
highway; the state establishes the
speed limits, not municipalities.
The speed limit determinations
are based on a process established
by the Uniform Highway Traffic
Control Manual. The manual is a
federal document that also has a
state counterpart. Traffic fines
written under the state citations
are distributed to many sources,
including the local governments;
however, the local share is very
small. If anyone wants to see


how fines are divided, I suggest
contacting the Clerk of the Courts.
I have been traveling that
route since 1971 and never re-
ceived a ticket nor been stopped
-possibly because I observed
the signs, stepped on the brake
and complied with the law.
The issue of seat belts has been
rehashed for many years. I spent
numerous years in law enforcement
and seven in accident investiga-
tion. I have seen many lives saved
by seat belts, and none who died
because they were wearing them.
Mr Harman's actions with
Trooper Tod Cloud bordered on
obstructionism. Standing in the
street, distracting the trooper and
causing Cloud to direct him off
the road placed his, the trooper's
and citizens' lives in danger
Traffic is no place to play
games. The reason five deputies
showed up is most likely be-
cause Trooper Cloud requested
backup due to Mr Harman's irra-
tional and reckless behavior
Seatbelts and speed limits are
the law. They were put in place
by our elected officials. Law en-
forcement is charged with en-
forcing these laws. If Mr Harman
does not like a particular law, I
would suggest he take it up with
elected officials not the police
doing what they are paid to do.
Roger B. Krieger
Beverly Hills


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Agreeing to disagree regarding the final


Over the years, Cheryl
and I have found it
easy to agree about
most things, even when it
has meant compromise.
Concerning something we
should have discussed be-
fore marriage but didn't
- I was sure we'd have only
two children; she was
equally certain we'd have at
least four, but when the dust
settled, we were both
thrilled to have three.
Nowadays, we enjoy look-
ing at travel brochures. I'm
usually trying to find what I
think she will like and she's
always hoping to spot what
she thinks will please me.
It's amazing how often we
make the same selection
even before discussing the
options.
Most recently, we began to
consider our final arrange-


ments. We're not that old,
and neither of us is facing
an imminently life-threat-
ening illness, but we know
that the day will eventually
come for each of us. Ini-
tially, some of our thoughts
were at opposite ends of the
spectrum, but with only a
little bit of negotiation we
were able to agree on most
of the issues.
Which funeral director
will be used? No problem,
we were already in agree-
ment, we just didn't know it.
Burial or cremation? Bur-
ial. Memorial service?
Church or funeral home
chapel? This was more dif-
ficult than you might imag-
ine, but after reconfirming
our shared belief that the
funeral is for the living, not
for the dead, we agreed that
a memorial service at the


church will bring more com- lems, but one matter re-
fort to our family members mains unresolved: Where
than will the less personal will we be buried?
environment of a funeral Cheryl prefers that we be
chapel. So, church it is. placed at Inverness Oak
We met with Ridge Cemetery
the funeral di- and I'd rather we
rector and were. be planted at
even more con- Florida National
vinced that we'd Cemetery in
made the right Bushnell. Nei-
choice. We vis- their of us is
ited the casket overly con-
showroom. Yes, cerned about
that's what I said where our own
- casket show- Fred Brannen bones rest, but
room. It was sort A SLICE we both care
of like buying a about where the
car, but without OF LIFE other one is to
the need to eval- be. Cheryl be-
uate miles per gallon or to lives having my body close
get overly excited about a will give her comfort by al-
CD player lowing her to come, visit and
We made our way through place flowers; and, I'm rela-
a myriad of additional deci- tively certain that while she
sions with virtually no prob- will remain on my mind and


in my heart fo
have breath,
benefit in visi
monument on
name is etched
As it stand
agreed to dis
done this with
ings and we've
the last one s
when it must b
the choice for
Simple enoi
Wrong.
Cheryl volu
ised that if I g
in fact has my
at Oak Ridge,
jazz band to
and play while
in-law and gra
cally carry my c
carcass from t
the gravesite
mile. While s
able to swing ti


resting place

ir as long as I just can't see those boys
I'll find little agreeing to carry my rather
ting a marble rotund remains uphill for
n which her the entire length of Hill
d. Street; and, being the hon-
s now, we've est, honorable soul that she
agree; we've is, in light of her promise, I
out hard feel- believe Cheryl might deep-
e agreed that six the Oak Ridge idea and
standing will, have a hearse transport
e made, make what's left of me to Florida
both of us. National where her re-
igh, right? mains will join mine when
the time comes.
ntarily prom- Of course, she might just
o first and she be messing with me. No
body interred matter. Our final arrange-
she will hire a ments have been made, in-
march along cluding amicably agreeing
my son, sons- to disagree regarding the
ndsons physi- final resting place.


*offin-enclosed
the church to
- almost a
she might be
he jazz band, I


--m-
Fred Brannen
is an Inverness resident
and a Chronicle columnist.


The consequences of a century


ur nation is in a se-
vere state of eco-
nomic decline. The
so-called growth of our
economy for the past 10
years was essentially the re-
sult of government borrow-
ing money to spend in the
economy. Growth resulting
from an increase in prod-
ucts and non-government
services in the private sec-
tor was just about zero.
We have gone from the
most dynamic economy in
history to one that is nearly
dead in the water; from a
nation that was the world's
biggest lender to a nation
that is now the world's
biggest debtor.
We are following the path
of other nations from free-
dom and self-reliance to
government dependency,
from the rule of law to the
rule of men, thence to dicta-
torship and collapse.
We thought we were im-
mune to the problems expe-
rienced by other nations. We


thought our constitution
would always protect us; we
would always be free. We
didn't care so much about
whom we elected to Con-
gress or the presidency be-
cause we figured, whether
Democrat or Republican,
they would "do the right
thing" protect the rights
we all enjoyed.
My own failure to act was
due to being too trusting of, in
retrospect, venal, self-serv-
ing politicians of both polit-
ical parties. I did not like
anything political and did
not want to be personally in-
volved, certainly not run for
any office. Most of you will
say the same of yourselves.
If we could have known years
ago what neglect of our civic
responsibilities would do to
our nation, we all might
have acted differently
Our culture, after 100
years of progressive leader-
ship, is a total shambles. We
are a nation divided against
itself. We have gone from


being "one nation, under Zombie
God, indivisible" to a nation many Ar
divided by competing inter- come. N
est groups defined by eco- Living d
nomic status, skin color and pendent
ethnicity. Toss in
gender as well.
The 100-year -
war against
Christian beliefs
orchestrated by
our intellectuals
has taken a
heavy toll. It has
resulted in loss
of morality, loss Dr. William Dixon
of polite man- OTHER
ners, increase in
numbers of chil- VOICES
dren born out of


wedlock, increase in
poverty and a severe coars-
ening of society.
As an aside, most of the
anti-religion intellectual class
spend their lives groping for
some meaning, something to
believe in. Mother Earth?
Environmentalism? A "cru-
sade" to lead the rubes (you
and I) to collectivist utopia?


es. Th
merica
early
ull gi
upon
mei
wh(
Sec
disa
dep
dre
stai
see
Oh,
child
they
por
real
dre
add


of welfare and t
A nation
against itself a
cannot long
states bordering
and Pacific oc
Great Lakes a
strongholds:
huge population
recipients, i
criminals. The


of Progressive control

iat is what so rupt. Productive residents verse the damage our intel-
ans have be- are fleeing to other states. ligentsia has wrought, if
brain-dead. The states bordering Mex- damages can indeed be re-
ray lives de- ico are overrun with illegals versed. Removing as many
some govern- whose "anchor babies" give progressives from office in
nt handout, them a foothold toward citi- November as possible is bul
ether Social zenship. These are not "good one small step on a long
urity, Medicare, Catholic, family-oriented, journey If you will not learn
ability, aid to hard-working people looking the facts and take an inter-
)endent chil- for a new life" as our ruling est in making those changes
n, food elite would have us believe, you and your offspring will
mps-the list They are the overflow from get the government you sc
ms endless. the lower economic class in richly deserve.
and having Mexico. They bring with
ldren who them a culture antithetical
y cannot sup- to that which made America William Dixon is a gradu-
t and do not successful. Those states are ate of Columbia University
lly want, chil- at risk of political and eco- New York Medical College
n who will nomic failure. and the USF College of
Sto the rolls Only middle America, Business Administration.
to the prisons. states referred to by our He served in the Army as a
so divided elite as "flyover country," surgeon and as a Special
as is America retain some semblance of Forces Officer, achieving
stand. The the culture and attributes the rank of Lieutenant
ig the Atlantic that made America great. Colonel. He was an assis-
eans and the One wonders whether those tant professor of surgery at
re Democrat states will remain in a fail- the University of Georgia
They have ing union. Examples of na- before entering private
ons of welfare tions breaking apart are practice. Dr Dixon can be
llegals and everywhere to be found. reached at
ey are bank- It will take decades to re- Wdixonl6@yahoo.com.


WINDOW
Continued from Page C1

winning is that you make the
other guy lose. The problem
for an elected official who
plays the "winners and losers"
game is that eventually all of
the losers you've created find
each other and support some-
one else for the job.
Meek tries hard not to create
losers when he problem-solves.
Instead, he goes searching for
solutions that will work for as
many people as possible.
He also tries to understand
his critics and he has some.
There was a letter to the ed-
itor recently that criticized
Meek over his leadership of
the Economic Development
Council. He tracked down the
letter-writer and went to his
house to discuss the issue.
They talked for two hours.
The critic still may not
agree with Meek's position,
but he must surely know that
the county commissioner
cared about what he said.
Instead of scratching the
eyes out of a critic and creat-
ing a lifelong enemy, Meek
tried to better understand his
adversary's position.
When you look at some of
the big-time controversies we
have in Citrus County is-
sues such as Citrus Memorial
hospital or the Sheriff Jeff
Dawsy/Sen. Charlie Dean flap
- resolution is difficult be-
cause people have spent life-
times trying to create winners
and losers. And out of those
winner-loser scenarios come
lifelong grudges that get in the
way of solving problems.
Meek's style is different, and
we can only hope others rec-
ognize the benefit Citrus County
is too small a place to create
groups of people who are
looking forward to the day
they can make you a loser.
If you think about it, young
Joe Meek has a style that could
offer stronger solutions in both
Tallahassee and Washington.
His lack of opposition in this
election process may be be-
cause most people realize that
even if they disagree with spe-
cific positions he has, they
know he respects the opinion
of others and wants to find the
best solution for the majority.
It's hard to mount a cam-
paign against that.


Gerry Mulligan is the pub-
lisher of the Chronicle. His
email address is gmulligan
@chronicleonline. com.


BAY
Continued from Page Cl

flotation device the list
goes on for 13 specific reg-
ulated human behaviors
and more.
And tour boat operators
beware your business
could be in jeopardy if
your customers do not
abide by the regulations.
Fines are hefty and en-
forcement will be moni-
tored by cameras and
volunteers with cam-
corders. However,
USFWS will probably not
be around because fund-
ing in its budget for addi-
tional law enforcement
personnel and for the
management plan at
Three Sisters Springs -
was not provided for the
600-plus acres it plans to
regulate.
Now, if the "take of one
manatee" is the threshold
that will trigger the need
for federal government
regulation, our ports could
be in trouble, too. Ten of
Florida's 14 ports are lo-
cated in counties that
have had eight or more
manatee watercraft-re-
lated deaths in the past 10
years. Once the precedent
of regulation for the "take
of one manatee" has been
set in King's Bay, it can -
and probably will be ap-
plied elsewhere in
Florida.
Whether the USFWS ap-
plies the regulations or
threats of lawsuits by envi-
ronmental activist groups
force government action,
the results will be the same
- the federal govern-
ment's power over our
state will increase. Just ask
the U.S. Forestry Service.
An environmental group
called EarthJustice just



DOCKERY
Continued from Page C1

Budget conforming bills
were also passed, 38 in all,
including 13 bills with no
language at all on them.
That's right blank bills,
like blank checks, that top
Senate officials can fill in
with any of their top prior-
ities.
Last year, conforming
bills were used to try to
bully the Department of


threatened to sue that
agency unless it removes
the Rodman Dam and
restores the Ocklawaha
River that has been a com-
munity reservoir and bass
fishing haven for more
than 40 years.
Why is the Rodman Dam
important? In 2006, the
Marine Mammal Commis-
sion another federal
government agency is-
sued a grant to a group
called Wildlife Trust (now
called the EcoHealth Al-
liance) to conduct a study
of all springs in Florida to
determine their accessibil-
ity for manatees it did
not matter if manatees
were or ever had used the
springs in the past.
(http://mmc.gov/reports/
workshop/pdf/taylorFL
springsreport.pdf) The
study identified 22 springs,
13 of which had accessibil-
ity issues for manatee ac-
cess. The study suggests
removing Rodman Dam
and possibly the Inglis
Locks to enable manatees
to travel inland through
miles of rivers to sites such
as Silver Springs, Rainbow
Springs and many others.
It also recommends dredg-
ing several rivers, such as
the Homosassa, Chassa-
howitzka, and Weeki
Wachee to improve manatee
access to the springs. Once
manatees arrive, human
regulation and human ex-
clusion begins. There seems
to be no room for the coex-
istence of both species in
the federal mindset.
The Marine Mammal
Commission (MMC) then
used the results of the
study to cite multiple rec-
ommendations over sev-
eral years to the USFWS to
start focusing on regula-
tion of manatee habitat,
feeding grounds, and
ingress/egress routes for


Citrus, to allow bingo slots
at pari-mutuels, to gut
funding and authority for
water management dis-
tricts and to dissolve the
Correctional Medical Au-
thority. The 2011 session
came to a halt over con-
forming bills that had not
been through the commit-
tee process, and here we
are again doing the very
same thing. What could
end up on these? Prison
privatization, which the
Senate already defeated?
A major new highway that


manatee protection as the
manatee population was
exceeding available habi-
tat and power plants were
proving to be an unreliable
artificial warm water re-
source.
In fact, in 2003 the
USFWS stated that all of
the springs and power
plant canals in Florida
could only support about
5,000 manatees. That num-
ber was officially ex-
ceeded by the 2010
minimum population
count. The MMC even rec-
ommended utilities and
their customers should
start paying into a fund to
be used in later years for
the construction of artifi-
cial manatee heat sources
such as solar heaters in
canals where power plants
had either been decom-
missioned or converted to
biofuels and no longer pro-
duced hot water for the
canals. And, if cold stress
causes increased manatee
deaths, additional regula-
tions on human boating -
such as speed restrictions
and no entry zones were
recommended as a coun-
terbalance.
The USFWS responded
with a plan of action
posted in the Federal Reg-
ister in 2009 and 2010 de-
signed to augment its
regulatory powers over
areas deemed to be critical
habitat, feeding grounds,
travel corridors, etc. How-
ever, due to a lack of fund-
ing, many of these plans
have been delayed but
not abandoned. These are
the actions which cause
concerns for future federal
regulation over Three Sis-
ters Springs, King's Bay,
the Crystal River, and the
Salt River areas fre-
quented by large numbers
of manatees and humans
alike.


would benefit the budget
chair? Changes to em-
ployee benefits or pension
plans?
Now that the House and
Senate have each passed
their version of the budget
and their conforming bills,
the two chambers must
now "conference" to re-
solve differences between
the House's $69.2 billion
and the Senate's $71.2 bil-
lion spending plans. This
conference process is
where most of the chi-
canery takes place.


Will human use of these
natural resources be elim-
inated or so severely re-
stricted as to make them
undesirable destinations
for commercial fishermen,
families, and tourism? If
USFWS implements the
plan as written, it surely
will. Which Florida com-
munity will be next?
The overriding issue ap-
pears to be the federal gov-
ernment's exuberance in
its application of authority
in our community. People
like manatees. Manatees
like people. We coexist in
the same ecosystems
where most people do
their best to protect mana-
tees. Cruelty or abuse of
any animal should never
be tolerated. But, there has
to be a limit to the federal
oppression of human activ-
ity and inherent use of the
natural resources espe-
cially when all available
evidence proves that the
manatee birth rate is vastly
exceeding the death rate
and the population has re-
covered to the point that
both the state Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission and the
USFWS are planning to
down-list the manatee from
"endangered" to "threat-
ened" status this year.
Why not celebrate the
successful manatee recov-
ery and continue with only
the regulations that en-
abled that success? Contin-
uing to add regulations
places an undue burden on
people and communities
and may eventually cause
harm to both manatees and
their habitats by exceeding
the carrying capacity of
their environment and by
disrupting ecosystems they
are introduced into by way
of federally required man-
dates. Mother Nature does
not like to be fooled.


Legislative leaders tout
transparency, but much of
the process is scripted by a
very few individuals be-
fore the meeting. Behind
closed doors, egos and per-
sonal agendas trump
sound policy and fiscal re-
sponsibility. Too much
power is entrusted in the
hands of too few.
As I prepare to finish my
final year in the Florida
Legislature, I offer this ad-
vice: In the pursuit of good
government, the greatest
change needed is to de-


Citrus County already
has a successful manatee
protection plan. The state
of Florida has a manatee
protection plan. There are
13 manatee refuges
throughout the state of
Florida. There are count-
less speed zones and time
periods in which people's
activities are regulated.
There is a cooperative
agreement between the
state of Florida law en-
forcement and the
USFWS. We do not need
more laws, more federal
regulations, or more envi-
ronmental lawsuit prece-
dents to be set.
Enforcement of existing
rules and creative, effec-
tive education are the most
exceptionally effective
tools at our disposal. Let's
use them.
Let's leave both the man-
atees and the people alone
so that we can raise our
children, build our busi-
nesses, and go to work
every day to create a place
in which we can all thrive.
Then, let's focus our time
and energy on restoring
the waters of King's Bay
and Crystal River to the
clean, pristine sparkling
gem where families build
memories together in har-
mony with manatees and
are free to enjoy, improve
upon, and prosper in one
of the places we cherish
most on earth our home-
town, Crystal River.


Lisa Moore of Save
Crystal River Inc. has
been a Crystal River
resident for 46 years, with
four generations of family
members residing in
Citrus County She, her
husband and children
graduated from Crystal
River High School. She is
a small-business owner


centralize the way the
state budget is crafted,
restore decision-making
back to the subcommit-
tees, limit the use of
conforming bills and
truly make the process
transparent.


Paula Dockeryis a term-
limited Republican sena-
tor from Lakeland who is
chronicling her final year
in the Florida Senate. She
can be reached atpdockery
@florida voices., com.


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, MARCH 4, 2012 C3


f
y
n
t

9

l
n









0


v





C4 SUNDAY, MARCH 4, 2012



Turn off TV news
In a recent letter, Maria
Weiser asked another writer
to "Turn off Fox News!"
While I will admit that
Fox is by far the worst news
outlet, I would urge people
to turn them all off. While
Fox simply parrots Republi-
can talking points and ac-
tively encourages division
among Americans, the other
networks compete against
each other for ratings, and
ratings alone. Scroll through
the channels some night
during the national news.
Check every network They
will all be talking about the
same six stories, usually in
the same sequence, and end
their news coverage with
some type of entertainment
promo for a show on their
network. News? The excep-
tion here is Fox, which will
still be ranting about some-
body in the Occupy move-
ment defecating on a
sidewalk Or screaming that
Obama is a socialist or,
worse yet, maybe he's not
even an American.
Fox viewers will dismiss
me as a liberal who disre-
gards the bias of MSNBC.
Not at all. I admit MSNBC
has a liberal slant and was
quick to point out the blun-
ders of G.W Bush. But
MSNBC is also quick to
point out what it considers
to be blunders by Obama.
Fox never criticized Bush,
not once. Fox has never
done anything but criticize


COMMENTARY


Letters to THE EDITOR


Obama. "Fair an
anced," give me
But give yours
as well. Stop wat
it. You all read th
per, obviously, so
need some overpay
head telling you
opened today? Or
case, which fello
cans you should
More news than
ever tell you is ii
ing paper. Every
Read, form yo
opinions, pay att
Turn it all off.
Your friends a
will thank you, an
pressure will con
well. Win/Win.


Presidential
As I read Mr. S
ter to the editor
wondered if he e
ered the parallel
mediately drew 1
accusations of PI
Obama and form
dent George W B
was ushered int(
through the Ivy 1
spite unremarka
so void of profes
complishments,'
legacy in acaden
Spoto asserts Pr
Obama complain
ited the problem
previous admini
Even the most cy
servers has to ag
eight years Presi


d bal- managed to turn a surplus
a break, into a gigantic deficit and
elf a break, left the incoming Obama in
;ching all of the most serious financial
.e newspa- position since the Great De-
why do you pression. So is this never to
aid talking be mentioned? Don't statis-
what hap- tics bear out the fact that
, in Fox's things, although certainly not
w Ameri- ideal, are gradually gaining
hate today on what was inherited?
they will Overall, Mr. Spoto makes
n the morn- the point that we the people
day. have the ability to elect our
ur own leaders. But has it crossed
mention. his mind that Supreme
Court justices appointed by
nd family President Bush have man-
id your blood aged through their plurality
ne down as decision in Citizens United
to make it possible for the
rich and powerful to now
Jeff olloy control the elections? The
Inverness rank-and-file citizen so des-
Sarallel perately trying to make
l pi e ends meet in an environ-
poto's let- ment of losing ground cre-
of Feb. 13, I ated by an era of corporate
ever consid- greed is inundated by nega-
Is that I im- tive ad after negative ad to
between his influence his way of think-
resident ing. And isn't this tactic aptly
[er Presi- demonstrated in Mr. Spoto's
Bush: "He espousal of the thinking in
o and billionaire Rupert Murdoch's
League de- Wall Street publication?
able grades, To be sure, President
sional ac- Obama is not perfect as no
'and "no man is, and he certainly has
nia." Mr. had no help from a Republi-
esident can Congress whose only
is he inher- aim is to oust him while to-
is from the tally ignoring the need for
station. cooperation in such dire
nical of ob- times but, surely to God, he
ree that in is not the evil, unworthy,
ident Bush embarrassing incompetent


that Mr. Spoto would have
us believe.
Judith Rystar
Pine Ridge

Share the beauty
We have springs, lakes,
Gulf access, wildlife, low
cost of living, clean air and
a safe haven. Why aren't
people knocking each
other over to get here?
After a decade of resi-
dency, I am still not sure if I
am allowed in the forest.
Are there campsites?
Lakes? Caves? Hiking?
Tourists worldwide love
these things. Where are the
lake boat rentals, conces-
sions, swimming holes, bait
shops, etc on the lakes?
People seem to like water
stuff. Why, whenever the
public finds access to the
springs to go swimming, the
locals start hollering? The
manatees like people and
people like them. Can't use
public money to preserve
areas, then try to keep the
public out. We have Ho-
mosassa state park, never
empty, historical Floral
City, thriving Inverness -
always something going on
downtown. Good job, who-
ever plans that.
Plenty of restaurants,
reasonable housing and
taxes, all denominations of
places of worship, world-
class golf, major chains,
and safety Yes, it costs a lot
of money, and kudos to
Sheriff Dawsy it is not


easy A-rated schools, an
hour to major attractions
and an hour away from the
crowds a jewel. Jobs,
construction, the port,
tourism, health care, gov-
ernment, retail, all need
people to come here.
The Commissioners, The
EDC, the developers all
seem to be trying, but they


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


should focus on the exist-
ing natural jewel.
My late real estate agent,
God rest her soul, used to say:
"The good ol' boys have their
playground and do not want
to share it." Well, I own a
part now, so let's open her up.

Henry Sasser
Hernando


Jim Blackshear
c Memorial Golf Outing


Parade of Homes

Kick Off Classic

Inverness Golf & Country Club

March 10, 20 2
Registration 7 a.m.
Shotgun Start 8:00 a.m.

$60 per player or $220 for
a team of four. Includes:
Greens fees, cart, lunch,
door prizes and one proudly
Mulligan ticket. supporting
Additional Mulligan
tickets will be available. p,.
For online registration, forms
and information visit,
www.CitrusBuilders.com or call 746-9028.

C i I ()N ii


--I-I IN CIT











BUSINESS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Apple market value hits $500 billion


PETER SVENSSON
AP Technology Writer
NEW YORK Apple's market
capitalization topped $500 billion
Wednesday, climbing to a mountain
peak where few companies have
ventured and none have stayed
for long.
Apple was already the world's
most valuable company The gap be-
tween it and No. 2 Exxon Mobil
Corp. has widened rapidly in the
past month, as investors have di-
gested Apple's report of blow-out


holiday-season sales ofiPhones and
iPads. And, more recently, Apple
has raised investors' hopes that it
might institute a dividend.
The company's market capital-
ization was near $506 billion in late-
morning trading as the shares rose
$7, or 1.3 percent, to $542.41.
On Tuesday, the Cupertino, Calif.,
company sent out invites to re-
porters for an event in San Fran-
cisco next Wednesday, apparently to
reveal its next iPad model. The
launch of the new model was ex-
pected around this time, a year


after the launch of the iPad 2.
Apple is in rare company It is the
sixth U.S. corporation to reach the
$500 billion milestone, and the only
one to be worth that much at cur-
rent prices.
Exxon, now worth $411 billion,
was worth just over $500 billion for
two short stretches at the end of
2007.
Apple's arch-nemesis Microsoft
Corp. was worth just more than $500
billion briefly at the end of 1999,
and again in early 2000. It even shot
up above $600 billion for one day


The company is now worth $267 bil-
lion.
Cisco Systems Inc., Intel Corp.
and General Electric Co. also
peaked just above $500 billion in
early 2000. Cisco and Intel are now
worth a bit more than $100 billion
each, while GE is worth $200 bil-
lion.
Exxon's ascent to the $500 billion
level was propelled by record oil
prices. Cisco, Intel, Microsoft and
GE were boosted by the general
See .Page D4


modern


Associated Press
The new Windows 8 Consumer Preview is displayed Wednesday during a presentation at the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, Spain. A
test, or "beta," version of the revamped operating system has been unveiled Wednesday, nudging it a step closer to its anticipated release
next fall.

Microsoft Corp. unveils Windows 8 in Barcelona for consumer testing

ALAN CLENDENNING
AP Business Writers
BARCELONA, Spain Microsoft on Wednesday
let consumers start trying out its upcoming touch-
based Windows 8 operating system, which aims to
power a new wave of computer tablets and tradi-
tional PCs designed to counter Apple's big gains in
the market through its Macs and iPads.
The test "beta" version of the revamped system
was introduced at the Mobile World Congress in
Barcelona, the planet's largest cell phone trade
show, and borrows some of the look of Microsoft's
Windows Phone 7 software for Windows 8.
Windows 8 doesn't have the traditional "Start"
menu, and applications are spread across a mosaic
of tiles in a design Microsoft calls "Metro"- seen as
an attempt by the company as a scramble to preserve
its market share. And executives said it powers up
on PCs in eight seconds, much faster than the previ-
ous version.
The tiles, which resemble road signs, can be navi-
gated with a finger swipe on the screen or with a key-
board and mouse. But those testing out the new Steven Sinofsky, president of Windows and Windows Live, attends the Windows 8 Con-
See Page D4 summer Preview presentation.




Nonprofit leadership legal concerns, part two


he Feb. 5 Ask
SCORE featured
part one of Non-
profit (NP) Leadership
Legal Concerns. Part two
discusses Leader-
ship/Legal Concerns
from an operational and
management perspec-
tive. Here are some key
considerations: Dr. FrE
1. Allow only one, offi- He:
cial voice, to speak for ASK S
the organization.
2. Create a top-down
management practice to operate
within the bylaws.
3. Provide continuing education
for volunteers in nonprofit manage-
ment practices that have legal im-
plications.
4. Indemnify the officers/
directors.
5. Purchase insurance to cover di-
rectors and officers legal risks.
Once an organization is flagged
by the IRS for operational review,
ignorance on the part of the volun-
teers will not provide any legal pro-
tection. Half committed, poorly


e
r2
54


informed and casual in-
volvement doesn't work
anymore.
Let there be only one
(official) voice: A NP
must decide and limit
who among the officers
and directors is author-
ized to speak for the or-
ganization. A common
derick mistake NP's make is to
zog allow multiple opinions
CORE to explain the mission,
policies and practices.
An old adage says it all:
"Too many cooks in the kitchen will
spoil the meal."
When NP officers and directors
each offer different opinions to
their public, confusion is created
and credibility is questioned.
The top-down commitment:
The primary solution to the avoid-
ance of legal issues is the, "Top
Down" commitment of all the offi-
cers and directors to operate within
the bylaws. Unclear bylaws can be
revised and enhanced. In the ab-
sence of clarity a conservative ap-
proach is to be taken. Bylaw


revisions should be made to make
clear what is unclear.
Continuing education of volun-
teers: Ongoing education of the vol-
unteer leadership is key to
compliance and risk avoidance, not
to mention success. Orientation of
new volunteers should include an
operational understanding of not-
for-profit best practices.
Indemnification of officers and
directors: Every state permits non-
profit corporations to indem-
nify(protect legally) their officers
and directors. Indemnification can
be written into the bylaws, provided
by a board resolution and covered
by insurance. Indemnification can
be extended to cover legal defense
and damages, if any, when an officer
or director is accused of wrong
doing in the performance of duties.
Directors and officers liability in-
surance: The best safety net is an in-
surance policy Carriers can tailor a
policy to the needs of the volunteers
and the NP These policies are called
"Directors and Officers Liability In-
surance." NP officers, directors, vol-
unteers and staff can be protected


from claims of wrongdoing.
The next column of Ask SCORE
will complete the discussion of
business ethics.
MEN
Citrus SCORE is on the College of
Central Florida campus in Lecanto.
Office hours are 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Tuesday through Thursday Litera-
ture is available at no charge on
many aspects of business startups
and growth.
SCORE is currently offering an
11-week SBI (Small Business Insti-
tute) that will focus on the business
plan. The SBI begins on March 8.
For those interested in starting a
business or growing one, call 352-
249-1210 or 352-249-1236 for infor-
mation and registration. Cost is
$100 for the entire course. If you're
a veteran, the cost maybe covered
under certain VA benefits call
352-249-1236.

Dr Frederick JHerzogis chairman
of Citrus County SCORE. He can
be reached at: therzog@
tampabay.rr-com.


Bruce Williams
SMART
MONEY


etro'


Pay off


ex's


half of


loan?
DEAR BRUCE: My
ex-husband and I
have been di-
vorced for about two
years. I continue to own
the house solely, and I am
responsible for the first
mortgage.
We share the responsi-
bility for a home equity
line of credit that remains
in both of our names. The
line of credit does not
have any charges on it re-
lating to the home.
Most of the charges
were for existing bills, tu-
ition for our daughter, etc.
(It was not the most prac-
tical way to use the line of
credit, but it was a neces-
sity at the time.) Our di-
vorce decree states that
we equally share respon-
sibility for paying off the
line-of-credit bill.
The problem is that my
ex-husband feels that he
should no longer pay for
his part. I understand that
I can sue him for his por-
tion, and I am considering
that option, but he claims
he has no money to pay
his bills.
He is also considering
filing for bankruptcy
If he does file and in-
cludes his portion of the
line of credit in the bank-
ruptcy, how will it affect
me? Will it ruin my credit
as well? Will the bank-
ruptcy take the entire ac-
count and pay if off, or is
there a way that I can ne-
gotiate to keep the ac-
count open in my name
only and continue to pay
only on the portion that I
owe? E.T. in California
DEAR E.T.: Unfortu-
nately, you are in a situa-
tion that is often
misunderstood. I can't un-
derstand why more di-
vorce lawyers don't sit
down with their clients
and make this point clear
The fact the divorce de-
cree says both of you are
responsible 50/50 has no
legal force or effect upon
your lender. The lender
loaned money to two peo-
ple, and both people are
singularly and jointly re-
sponsible for repayment.
The portion you owe is
100 percent, just as your
ex-husband's portion is
100 percent. It's a difficult
concept, I understand.
If your ex files for Chap-
ter 7 bankruptcy, he's off
the hook and you're on the
hook for 100 percent of the
loan. You cannot say
you're going to pay only 50
percent. If you fail to
make those payments, it
will have a severe effect
on your credit history and
future credit endeavors.
As for negotiating with
the lender, that is always a
possibility But it's un-
likely the lender will
allow you to pay only on
the portion you feel you
owe, because that's not
the way it is. You can take
your ex-husband to court,
but if he has no assets or if
he files Chapter 7, you're
still stuck.
DEAR BRUCE: This is
a follow-up to the young
lady in the Catch-22 situa-
tion, who can't get credit
because she has no credit.
Thirty years ago, my
See Page D4





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Business DIGEST


Workshop to serve up
career opportunities
YANKEETOWN Ike's Old
Florida Kitchen will soon serve
up a healthy helping of informa-
tion to those interested in ca-
reers in upscale dining and
hospitality.
Mitch Simmons, owner of
Ike's restaurant at the Izaak
Walton Lodge in Yankeetown
and Neon Leon's restaurant of
Homosassa, will host the "Se-
crets to Success in the Restau-
rant and Hospitality Industry"
workshop Monday, March 5.
The workshop, offered at no
charge and presented in part-
nership with Workforce Con-
nection, takes place from 11
a.m. to 2 p.m. at Ike's restau-
rant, 6301 Riverside Drive, in
Yankeetown.
Job seekers interested in
restaurants and hospitality will
get an inside look at what it
takes to succeed in the busi-
ness from veteran industry pro-
fessionals. In addition,
Workforce Connection will pro-
vide a workshop covering the
essentials of customer service
for those in the restaurant/hos-
pitality field. Job applications
will also be accepted following
the sessions.
"This opportunity is ideal for
motivated individuals who thrive
in an exciting workplace," said
Frank Calascione, Workforce
Connection's business develop-
ment manager in Citrus County.
"The workshops will lay out the
attitudes, skills and knowledge
job seekers need to excel in
this industry."
Restaurant careers can offer
fast-paced work in vibrant, lively
atmospheres with flexible
hours, good pay and room to
grow. The work requires quick
thinking, problem solving, or-
ganization, the ability to handle
multiple tasks at one time and
social skills.
For more information or to
register for the workshops, call
Workforce Connection in Levy
County at 352-493-6813, in Cit-
rus County at 352-637-2223 or
toll-free at 800-434-JOBS
(5627).
NGP After Hours
networking set
CRYSTAL RIVER Next
Generation Professionals of the
Citrus County Chamber of
Commerce creates opportuni-
ties for young professionals to
build business relationships
and make friends.
On March 8, we invite you to
the second "NGP After Hours"
networking event of 2012 at
The Grove Downtown in Inver-
ness. Food and drink specials
for NGP guests begin at 5:30
p.m.; scheduled activities end
at 7:30 p.m.
Be sure to bring plenty of
business cards as well as a do-
nation for Blessings in a Back-
pack. Every year, thousands of
children are enrolled in the fed-
eral school breakfast and lunch
assisted-meals program. Some
of these children are so poor


they go home on Friday and
don't eat another meal until
they get to school on Monday.
Items needed for donations
are: fruit cups, granola bars,
Pop-Tarts, cereal, pasta
(Spaghetti O's, ravioli, ready-to-
eat mac and cheese, etc.) tuna,
potted meat, soup, crackers,
peanut butter and juice. The
items should have a "pop-top"
to open them because many of
these children do not have ac-
cess to can openers. They
should also be "ready to eat"
since many of them are also
without electricity and
refrigeration.
The Grove Downtown is a
unique martini lounge located in
the central business district of
historic downtown Inverness.
Featuring specialty martinis,
unique wines, bottled beer, live
music and wine lockers, The
Grove Downtown is at 210
Tompkins St., Unit B, Inverness.
For information, call the Cit-
rus County Chamber of Com-
merce at 352-795-3149 or visit
facebook.com/ngpcitrus.
Next Generation Profession-
als of the Citrus County Cham-
ber of Commerce is dedicated
to making the community we
live in a better place for all citi-
zens. NGP connects, engages
and empowers young profes-
sionals in their professional and
personal lives through network-
ing events, professional devel-
opment workshops and
community involvement. Learn
more at www.facebook.com/
ngpcitrus.
CF Foundation
slates meetings
The CF Foundation Execu-
tive Committee meeting will
begin at 4:30 p.m. Wednesday,
March 7, at College of Central
Florida (CF) Enterprise Center,
Foundation Office, 3001 S.W.
College Road, Ocala. The pur-
pose is to discuss general busi-
ness of the CF Foundation
Executive Committee.
The CF Foundation Board of
Directors meeting will be at
4:30 p.m. Wednesday, March
21, at College of Central Florida
(CF) Founders Hall Boardroom,
Ocala Campus, 3001 S.W. Col-
lege Road. The purpose is to
discuss general business of the
CF Foundation Board of
Directors.
A copy of the agenda will be
available at each meeting. For
further information, please con-
tact the CF Foundation office,
3001 SW College Road Ocala,
FL 34474.
SECO annual
meeting March 24
SUMTERVILLE Sumter
Electric Cooperative plans its
Annual Meeting of the Member-
ship on Saturday morning,
March 24, 2012. The meeting
will take place on the grounds
of the Co-op's headquarters
compound in Sumterville.
This year SECO marks its
74th anniversary, and the
theme for the meeting is energy
efficiency. Members will be able


DIGEST GUIDELINES
* To submit information, email newsdesk@chronicleon-
line .com attn: Business Digest; fax (352) 563-5660 or
write to: Business Digest c/o Citrus County Chronicle,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429.
* Information relating to professional training or
seminars attended by those in the health care
industries are considered business briefs, and would
appear in the Business Digest listings.


to see many practical ways
they can reduce their electric
bills and save energy at the
same time.
"Our annual meeting is at-
tended by many members from
all across our service territory
and is always a great event,"
said SECO CEO Jim Duncan.
Those attending will be
treated to refreshments and en-
tertainment featuring Margo
Rochelle & Rodeo Drive. In
SECO's Technology and Con-
servation Tent, members will
see a wide range of displays
about conserving energy.
Each registered member re-
ceives a free gift and is eligible
for the big raffle at the end of
the business meeting. Top
prizes include a refurbished
Dodge Dakota, extended cab,
4x4 pick-up truck, one $1,500,
one $1,000 and two $500 cash
awards. There is also a host of
other major prizes that will be
given away during the drawing.
Registration for the event be-
gins at 8:30 a.m. Saturday and
continues until the business
meeting starts at 10:30 a.m.
"The annual meeting is one
of the things that distinguish
electric cooperatives from other
types of utilities. Aside from
having a lot of fun and learning
more about their Co-op, mem-
bers get to interact one-on-one
with the employees who work
on their behalf all through the
year," Duncan said.
SECO is a member-owned,
not-for-profit utility serving
176,000 members and their
families in parts of Marion,
Lake, Citrus, Sumter, Pasco,
Hernando and Levy counties.
Use social media for
disaster recovery
WASHINGTON When a
deadly tornado destroyed
nearly 8,000 homes and busi-
nesses in Joplin, Mo., last May,
civic and business leaders took
advantage of social media tools
to identify urgent needs, give
accurate information, and con-
nect disaster victims with credi-
ble resources to start the
recovery process.
Businesses typically use so-
cial media to promote their
products, but it's a good idea to
consider Social Media as a
valuable tool in disaster pre-
paredness.
Get tips on best practices for
creating a crisis communica-
tions plan using social media
during a March 13 webinar
hosted by Agility Recovery So-
lutions and the U.S. Small Busi-
ness Administration. Experts
Jim Garrow with the Philadel-
phia Department of Public
Health, and Patrice Cloutier
from the Ontario (Canada) Min-


istry of Community Safety and
Correctional Services will ad-
dress the practical use of social
media during emergency situa-
tions. Case studies, including
the Joplin recovery efforts, will
also be discussed.
SBA has partnered with
Agility to offer business continu-
ity strategies through its "Pre-
pareMyBusiness" website. Visit
www.preparemybusiness.org to
access past webinars and get
additional preparedness tips.
The SBA provides disaster
recovery assistance in the form
of low-interest loans to home-
owners, renters, private non-
profits and businesses of all
sizes. To learn more, visit
www.sba.gov/disaster.
Jim Garrow of the Philadel-
phia Department of Public
Health, and Patrice Cloutier of
the Ontario Ministry of Commu-
nity Safety and Correctional
Services will present "Social
Media and Disaster Recovery"
from 2 to 3:00 p.m. Tuesday,
March 13,1 la webinar. A ques-
tion-and-answer session will
follow. Space is limited. Regis-
ter at https://wwwl .goto
meeting.com/register/
620323496.
Antique tour at
hospice thrift shop
HOMOSASSA- The Ho-
mosassa Too Thrift & Gift
Shoppe of Hospice of Citrus
County will present "The An-
tique Discovery Tour" from 10
a.m. to 2 p.m. to be Saturday,
March 10, at the shop, 8471 W.
Periwinkle Lane, Homosassa.
Is your "clutter" worth a for-
tune? Are your treasures under-
valued? Find out the real value
of your antiques.
Bring up to three items (or
photographs of them) to The
Homosassa Too Thrift & Gift
Shoppe.
A certified personal profes-
sional appraiser will be present
to examine your antiques. Find
out the true value of your items.
Appraisals are $5 per item and
there is a limit of three items
per person. Appraisals will be
offered on a first-come, first-
served basis.
Contact Caroline Wertel, Ho-
mosassa Too Thrift Shoppe
manager, at 352-621-1550.
Visit Hospice of Citrus County
on the Web at www.hospiceof
citruscounty.org.
Crystal River Mall
adds art studio
CRYSTAL RIVER Crystal
River Mall announces the
grand opening of Cafe Impres-
sions fine art photography and
co-op studio March 10.
Photographer Jorge Blanco's


focus is to capture nature and
its surroundings through pho-
tography. Jorge Blanco is a res-
ident of Crystal River and has
been part of the photography
world for 20 years.
For more information about
Crystal River Mall, find it on
Facebook or contact the mall
office at 352-795-2585.
Crystal River Mall is on the
north side of Crystal River
along U.S. 19. For more infor-
mation on events or leasing op-
portunities, call 352-795-2585.
Crystal River Mall is man-
aged by Boxer Retail, a real es-
tate firm that specializes in
improving the value of commer-
cial retail properties and is re-
sponsible for leasing and
managing retail properties
throughout the United States.
For more information about
Boxer Retail and its services,
visit www.BoxerRetail.com.
Mobile unit to
go to Inglis
OCALA- Workforce Con-
nection of Citrus, Levy and
Marion counties will bring job-
seeker services to Inglis on
Wednesday, March 14.
Workforce Connection's
staff-supported Mobile Re-
source Unit will be available
from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the In-
glis Town Hall, 135 County
Road 40 W.
The effort is designed to
make it easier for job seekers to
access services without having
to travel to a resource center in
Chiefland, Inverness or Ocala.
All Workforce Connection serv-
ices, regardless of location, are
provided at no charge.
In addition, a human re-
sources recruitment specialist
will be on hand to meet with
employers interested in learn-
ing about Workforce's business
services, including recruitment,
hiring, training and financial in-
centives. Business services are
also offered at no charge.
The mobile unit is equipped
with satellite Internet, computer
workstations and office equip-
ment to help job seekers register
with the Employ Florida Market-
place, conduct job searches,
work on their resumes, fill out
online employment applications,
research career information and
resources, get information about
upcoming hiring events and
apply for Unemployment Com-
pensation benefits and file
claims.
For more information about
the Mobile Resource Unit and
Workforce Connection services
available in Inglis, call 352-423-
6813 or 800-434-JOBS (5627).
Habitat benefit
builds business
Habitat for Humanity of Cit-
rus County Inc. plans its fifth
annual Building Dreams Wine
& Food Pairing Benefit from 6
to 10 p.m. Thursday, March 8,
at Skyview Clubhouse at Terra
Vista. Enjoy gourmet food
paired with exquisite wines, ac-
companied by the smooth
sounds of live jazz/R&B/soul


and a silent auction.
Tickets are $50 in advance
and $60 at the door (if avail-
able). For tickets and informa-
tion, call 352-563-2744. Every
dollar raised at this event helps
pay for the lumber and nails,
cement and shingles, plumbers
and permits needed to take a
new home from sitework to
move-in.
Habitat not only helps elimi-
nate substandard housing, but
provides business for local con-
struction services, tax dollars
for local government, and stabi-
lization of local neighborhoods.
The Habitat for Humanity
Wishing Well Fundraiser draw-
ing will take place during the
benefit. Tickets for $1 each are
now on sale at the Inverness
and Crystal River ReStores, or
call 352-563-2744. Tickethold-
ers need not be present to win.
All proceeds assist Habitat
for Humanity of Citrus County's
mission to build decent, afford-
able homes for low-income
families.
Citrus Clowns
ready for hire
Citrus Clowns group is no
longer affiliated with The Friends
of Nature Coast Volunteer Cen-
ter, the Nature Coast Volunteer
Center and the Retired and
Senior Volunteer Program.
Citrus Clowns performing
group is now sponsored by
Mary K. Hall. The same zany
clowns will continue to "clown
around," for countywide com-
munity events. Clowns group
performances will now include
commercial and private events,
in addition to organizational and
large public events served in
the past. Only a few charitable
events will continue to be serv-
iced free, all other events at
reasonable rates.
Need clowns for your event?
Jewels The Clown, Clown
Sunny, Clown Zani Bandani,
Clown Yar and Clown Martie
are available!
Call Hall at 352-628-3414 or
email mhall016@tampabay.
rr.com.
SCORE offers free
workshop for vets
The Citrus County chapter of
SCORE, in conjunction with the
Veterans Fast Launch Initiative
Program, will offer a free Small
Business Institute workshop for
veterans. Veterans who are in
business or planning to start a
business qualify for this
program.
SCORE's Small Business In-
stitute (simple steps to start
your business) starts at 6 p.m.
March 9 on the Citrus Campus
of the College of Central
Florida. The seminar will run for
11 weeks.
In order to apply, the veteran
can go to www.vetsfastlaunch.
org\coupon-signup, print the
coupon and call the college at
352-249-1210 and register for
the workshop. Bring the coupon
to the first meeting. If you have
any questions, call the SCORE
office at 352-249-1236.


Family Owned and Operated
6220 W. Corporate Oaks Dr.
Crystal River, FL 34429
SCHLUMBERGER ACCOUNTING SERVICES, INC.
In Business For Over 34 years
795-3691
Rbert Schiumberger E.A.
.e..n ... ... ...b...n.
eJennifer Schlumberger-Jones.


Christine C. Eck, CPA, PA
910 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River, FL 563-2522


Member: Florida Institute of CPAs


T[axPreparation:



\imit is aM "" .1hriEk ,itnl nL ililr lnlliio tIiiol



PRICE & COMPANY, P.A.
Certified Public Accountants
$ 795-6118 $
4V Serving Citrus County for over 30 years


Phillip W. Price, CPA, MBA, PFS
Member: AICPA, FICPA $

Federal & Out-of-State Tax Preparation (
S* Corporate Tax Preparation
Business Accounting Services
'$ * QuickBooks Consulting S
Payroll Services .
www.pwprice.cornm


WILLIAM T. FAINE, CPA, PA
20%i s SF A N l

Certified Public Accountant
All types of tax returns
Reasonable rates
Special rates for S Corporations
35 plus years experience

In Pine View Plaza Shopping Center
Tim Faine,CPA 8012 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Crystal River, FL



Your Trusted Advisor 25+ Years Experience
CPA- Tax Professional ED SERRA

Belinda Brown
(AA) e


AWILLIAMS
McCRANIE,
WARDLOW
& CASH, P.A.
CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS


2 CONVENIENT LOCATIONS to serve you!
Complete Income Tax Service


Crystal River
795-3212


TAX


www.wmwccpa.com


Inverness
726-8130


NIN


There's still time left to place your ad!

Call Michael 563-3273


I


LUINNcmE ,,UDiR,.lRY


For more

information

on adverti g

caff Afichael

I at 563-3273


m -- -- I


D2 SUNDAY, MARCH 4, 2012


BUSINESS


000AAZC


I Certified Public Accountant





Promotional information provided by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce


numberr onneition
28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


Last day of Strawberry Fest

Scious food, entertainment area and Tampa Bay Times, Suncoast Schools, Fed-
Don t miss out shortcake booth will be available eral Credit Union, Hometown Values, and
al from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. today at Floral Citrus 95, CenterState Bank, FDS Dis-
on l the fun! Park in Floral City posal, Nature Coast EMS, Citrus County
I Admission is only $3; children Sheriff's Office, Florida Lottery, Insight
9 under 12 are free. Credit Union, Nick Nicholas Ford, With-
The 25th annual Strawberry Shuttle service will be provided lacoochee River Electric Cooperative,
estival ends today, March 4, so a ), from the Citrus County Fairgrounds Childhood Development Services, Bran-


don't miss the opportunity to enjoy, -4
fresh strawberries and strawberry short-
cake!
Craft and art fair, children's activities, deli-

Patriot Sporting Goods


Sto the festival for $1; children
younger than 12 are free.
We appreciate the support of our
sponsors: Citrus County Chronicle,


D3

SUNDAY
MARCH 4, 2012


e0#
om vo
,r' WI.

'9'


nen Bank, Mainstreet Broadband, and U
Job Site Services.
For more information, please call 352-795-
3149 or visit www.citruscountychamber.com.


Patriot Sporting Goods, a nonprofit organization at 760 W. Hampshire Blvd. in Citrus Springs (corner of Hampshire Boulevard and County Road 491), recently joined the Chamber of
Commerce. Pictured with staff are Chamber Ambassadors: Rhonda Lestinsky, Nature Coast Bank; Kelley Paul, Wollinka-Wikle Title Insurance; Tom Corcoran, Life Care Center of Cit-
rus County; Dennis Pfeiffer, Orkin Pest Control; Bill Hudson, Land Title of Citrus County; Nancy Hautop, Cadence Bank; Lillian Smith, Mary Kay Cosmetics; Linda Townsend, Avante at
Inverness ; Janet Mayo, Plantation Inn; Jennifer Duca, Comfort Keepers. Patriot Sporting Goods offers all the quality fishing equipment you need to catch the big fish of your dreams.
It stocks both freshwater and saltwater equipment, as well as guns, scopes and ammunition. All employees at Patriot Sporting Goods are disabled veterans, or veterans in need with
100 percent of their profits utilized for these veterans. For more information on Patriot Sporting Goods, please call 352-527-1205.


Chamber After Hours Networking Mixer


Please join us from 5 to 7 p.m.
Thursday, March 15 at Ohana
Restaurant for a Chamber After
Hours Networking Mixer.
At 7431 S. Suncoast Blvd. in Ho-
mosassa, Ohana offers a unique
menu and a relaxing atmosphere.
Bring your business cards and min-


gle with business professionals like
yourself!
For more information about
Ohana's menu and hours, visit their
website at wwwohanarestaurants.
com. For more information about
this event, please call the Chamber
at 352-795-3149.


MARCH 2012


4 5 6 7 8 9 10

11 12 13 14 15 16 17

18 19 20 21 22 23 24

25 26 27 28 29 30 31

February 2012 April 2012 u 2011 Vertex42LLC
Find rro f cale ndars, planners,
calculator and other templates on
Verte42 coerIn


FACEBOOK USERS
* Use your smartphone to scan the QR code. It will take you to
the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce's Facebook page.
* Don't have a smartphone? Visit the page at http://www.
facebook.com/CitrusChamber.
* Visit the website at www.citruscountychamber.com.


- March 15


Mainstreet Broadband
Grand Opening and
ribbon cutting March 20


Please join us from 5 to
7 p.m. Tuesday, March 20,
for the Grand Opening
event and ribbon cutting
for Mainstreet Broadband
at the College of Central
Florida.
Food and beverages


will be available.
Come check out the
products and services of-
fered by the company and
welcome a new business
to our community! Please
check out their website at
www.mainstreetbb.com.


Make your
reservations today!
The monthly Chamber Membership
Luncheon will be Friday, March 9, at
Citrus Hills Golf& Country Club.
Sponsored by Hands on America,
networking starts at 11:30 a.m. with
lunch immediately following.
Our guest speaker will be Dr. Fred
Herzog from SCORE.


Dr. Fred
Herzog
chairman,
Citrus County
SCORE.


Kidney

for

Karen

event a

success

$9,500 raised
The Grove Downtown
hosted a fundraising event
in honor of Karen Dixon-
Pulcini on Feb. 23, featuring
celebrity bartenders, food
and a live and silent
auction.
More than 250 people at-
tended the event to raise
money for Karen and more
than $9,500 was collected!
We would like to thank
The Grove Downtown, Cit-
rus County Chronicle, Sun-
flower Springs, Crowley and
Company, Excel Printing,
Josh Wooten and Dale and
the auction committee:
Rosann Strawn, Anne
Adams, Donna Smith, Sarah
Fitts, Nancy Wilson,
Stephanie Price, Suzanne
Mission, Amanda Rowthorn,
Cira Schnettler, Nikie
Brown, Joanne Crowley,
Jennifer Duca.
Thank you to everyone in
this community for their
generous support!


F


CITRUS COUNTY
Chamber of Commerce


March Chamber

Membership Luncheon


I


Created using the Vertex42 Calendar TePlt


More printable calendars 2012 Calenda, 2013 Calendar









New law could free up TV airwaves for mobile use


ANICK JESDANUN
AP Technology Writer

NEW YORK-A new law could
result in fewer TV stations on the
air, in exchange for faster wireless
data services for smartphones and
tablet computers.
Before you rush out to down-
load "Bad Teacher" from iTunes,
though, keep in mind that several
things need to happen over the
next few years before people start
seeing faster wireless speeds.
The law, part of a payroll tax
package signed by President
Barack Obama last week, gives the
Federal Communications Com-
mission authority to explore such


an exchange. The FCC will have to
write the rules for it in the coming
months.
The idea is to squeeze over-the-
air television, which has few view-
ers, into a smaller slice of the
airwaves. Anything freed would
be available for bidding by com-
panies, including wireless carri-
ers such as AT&T Inc. and Verizon
Wireless.
Broadcasters will need to de-
cide whether they want to give up
their frequencies. Those that do
could continue to operate as
cable-only channels if they don't
want to go out of business. Bidding
for freed airwaves likely won't
begin until late 2013 or early 2014,


partly to give bidders time to raise
money to pay for any spectrum
they win.
Although vast swaths of broad-
cast spectrum were freed when
television signals converted from
analog to digital in 2009, much of
that has already been claimed.
Technology companies have been
clamoring for even more airwaves
to satisfy growing consumer ap-
petite for movies, books and web-
sites on mobile devices.
About 11 million households
lack cable or satellite service and
get TV signals only over the air, ac-
cording to Nielsen. That compares
with 89 million who are cable or
satellite subscribers.


There are more than 330 million
devices active on cellular net-
works, which could benefit from
the transfer of the spectrum.
The FCC envisions freeing up
500 megahertz of spectrum over
the next 10 years. As much as a
quarter of that could come from
television.
The National Association of
Broadcasters isn't sure how many
stations would go along, and it's
watching to make sure no broad-
caster will be forced to partici-
pate. Some might have to move to
a different frequency, such as from
Channel 49 to Channel 19, but they
would be compensated to build
new towers and make other ad-


justments. Viewers using anten-
nas would have to find the sta-
tion's new home.
Television stations once had
Channels 2 to 83, except for 37,
which is used for astronomy.
Channels 70 to 83, mostly used to
retransmit signals from other
channels, disappeared in the
1980s and have been reassigned to
other uses.
Stations gave up Channels 52 to
69 in 2009 as part of a transition to
digital broadcasts, and much of
that has already been reassigned.
Depending on how many sta-
tions want to participate, Chan-
nels 31 to 51, excluding 37, could
be freed up.


APPLE
Continued from Page Dl

stock mania of 1999 and 2000, and the hunger
for technology stocks in particular.
Apple's rise, by contrast, is powered by its
mammoth sales and profits, which are
growing at rates unheard of for a company
its size. And despite its sky-high market
capitalization, Apple's shares aren't expen-
sive compared to its earnings. It's worth 15
times its earnings for the last year. That
compares to 21 times earnings for Google
Inc. and 14 times for the S&P 500 overall.
Yet few companies in the index grow their
earnings as fast as Apple does: In its latest
quarter, its earnings rose 118 percent from
a year ago, to $13.06 billion.
Analysts expect the Apple rally to have
some legs. The 35 analysts who have re-
ported to FactSet since Apple's latest earn-
ings report have set an average price target
of $592 per share, or 8 percent higher than


Wednesday's level. That implies a market
capitalization of $552 billion.
Apple has been helped by a general re-
covery in the stock market after the dol-
drums of the financial crisis and the
recession. The S&P 500 index has posted its
best February performance in 14 years, and
on Tuesday, the Dow Jones industrial aver-
age closed above 13,000 for the first time
since May 2008.
Apple's stock accounts for 3.8 percent of
the value of the S&P 500, according to Stan-
dard & Poor's, and it made up 6 percent of
the operating income of the 500 companies
in the fourth quarter
Analysts say Apple's sheer size works
against its stock price. Apple stock already
makes up a large share of the holdings of
technology and growth-focused funds, and
they have little appetite for more. Mean-
while, value-focused funds are often pre-
vented from buying the shares because the
company doesn't pay a dividend.
However, the company has been signal-
ing that a dividend is under consideration,


and several analysts now consider it a given
that one will be announced this year. Last
week, CEO Tim Cook told shareholders at
the annual meeting that the company has
more money than it needs, and the board
and management are thinking "very
deeply" about ways to use the cash.
Former CEO Steve Jobs, apparently
haunted by the company's lean years in the
'90s, had a policy of accumulating cash. The
company now sits on $97.6 billion.
China's largest oil company, PetroChina,
was briefly worth $1 trillion after it listed
on the Shanghai stock exchange in 2007, but
only based on its price on that exchange. Its
shares also trade in Hong Kong and on the
New York Stock Exchange. Based on trad-
ing there, its market capitalization has
never reached $500 billion.


This Oct. 4, 2011, file photo shows the
Apple logo during an announcement at Apple
headquarters in Cupertino, Calif.
Associated Press


METRO
Continued from Page Dl

operating system won't be
able to try out the finger
swiping unless they already
have systems enabled for
touch use, and the system
isn't expected to make its of-
ficial debut until September
or October.
Microsoft executives in
Barcelona showed off how
users can use their finger-
tips to swipe in and out of
applications, and tilt upright
computer screens to a flat
position so they can be used
as two-person gaming
boards or big drawing
tablets. A slim laptop had a
hinge allowing it to be
turned inside out so it could
be used as a tablet instead.
"It's beautiful, it's modern,
it's fast, it's fluid," said
Steven Sinofsky, president of
Microsoft's Windows divi-
sion. "Windows 8 is a gener-
ational change in the
windows operating system."
Microsoft is also opening
an Internet "Windows
Store" where users can
download applications for
the operating system. Appli-
cations are free for those
testing out the beta version,
but would include both free
and paid versions after the
operating system is
released.



MONEY
Continued from Page D1

husband and I were newly-
weds in the same position.
We applied everywhere and
were constantly turned down
for the same reason. We had
no history of credit
Finally, in desperation we
applied for a gasoline card
and were accepted! The
credit limit is usually very
low ($500 to $1,000), and the
APR is typically outrageous
(over 25 percent). But we
were on our way to establish-
ing credit
The next to accept us was
American Express (the
green card that you must pay
off every month) which we
still have. After a few years
of being diligent in always
paying in full on time to
avoid interest payments and
never exceeding our limit,
we now have access to very
large amounts of credit, and
our FICO scores are always
in the 800s.
I know things are much dif-
ferent from 30 years ago, but I
thought I would add this to
your advice to the young lady
It may still apply today -
TL, DeRidder, La.
DEAR TL: Your last cou-
ple of sentences were the
most critical. You say "things
are much different from 30
years ago," but no, they aren't
Things are very much the
same. If you make your pay-
ments on time, you can peck
away at establishing credit
You mention that you had a


The test version was
downloaded by people from
more than 70 countries as
Microsoft gave its presenta-
tion about Windows 8, but
the company didn't immedi-
ately disclose the number of
downloads. The software
can be downloaded at
http://windows.microsoft.
com/en-US/windows-8/
consumer-preview
Apple is also moving fea-
tures from its iPhone and
iPad software over to its Mac
software. That trend will be
particularly visible in Moun-
tain Lion, the new Mac op-
erating system that's
expected to be released this
summer
Windows 8 will also be the
first Microsoft software in a
long time besides its cell
phone software that will run
on non-Intel style proces-
sors. The company is devel-
oping a version that will run
on phone-style chips, such
as those used in the iPad.
If Windows 8 is a hit, it
could help struggling PC
makers, including Hewlett-
Packard Co. and Dell Inc.
Besides giving businesses
and consumers a reason to
consider new PC purchases,
Windows 8 is expected to
spawn a new breed of hybrid
machines that will be part
tablet computer and part
laptop like the device that
Sinofsky demonstrated.
If Windows 8 is a flop,


gas card in the beginning. Gas
cards are some of the easiest
to get because they encour-
age you to spend money on
the issuing company's prod-
uct, as contrasted with a reg-
ular credit card that
generates income only from
lending you money and the
modest amount the company
charges merchants to accept
your card.
The road map that you
drew 30 years ago is as cur-
rent as today's newspaper
Thank you for sharing. And to
the young people out there: If
you pay attention to this, you
will be the beneficiary.
DEAR BRUCE: Any ad-
vice on where to invest cash
these days? I am 54 and have
95 percent of our money in
stocks and bonds and a vari-
ety of mutual funds: index,
REIT, international, etc. I
work more than full time as a
physician, so I don't trade on
my own or try to time the
market We have some cash
in a bank money-market ac-
count, paying only 0.1 per-
cent I know the cash is losing
ground versus inflation, but I
am at a loss to find a good,
fairly liquid place for the
cash. At my bank, CDs pay
about 0.4 percent, and Treas-
ury bills were only about 0.03
percent for six months last
time I checked. S.S., Lex-
ington,Ky.
DEAR S.S.: Congratula-
tions on having someone else
handle your account Cer-
tainly, your time is worth
more as a physician than it
would be trying to time
trades, etc.


* COMING FROM MICROSOFT: A test version of Win-
dows 8 was unveiled Wednesday in Barcelona. The
mass market release is expected in September or Oc-
tober.
* WHAT IT IS: The new Windows version is radically dif-
ferent from its predecessors. The system won't have
Microsoft's familiar "Start" menu, for instance. There's
also a version that can run on the more tablet-friendly
microprocessor technology licensed by ARM Holdings.
* SIGNIFICANCE: Microsoft hopes to keep milking rev-
enue from a PC market that appears to be past its
prime, while trying to gain a stronger foothold in the
more fertile field of mobile devices.


however, it will increase the
pressure on Microsoft CEO
Steve Ballmer. His 12-year
reign has been marred by
the company's troubles
adapting to an Internet-dri-
ven upheaval. As Microsoft
has stumbled, faster-inno-
vating companies such as
Apple and Google have el-
bowed their way into a posi-
tion to steer the direction of
computing for the next
decade or two.
Microsoft's financial per-
formance traditionally im-
proves when it releases a
new version of Windows.
The last upgrade came in
October 2009 when Windows
7 hit the market. The com-
pany has sold more than 525
million copies of Windows 7
since then. Part of Window
7's success stemmed from
pent-up demand; the previ-
ous version, Vista, was so
clunky and buggy that many
PC users stuck with the sys-


For what it's worth, you
and I are in the same situa-
tion. I have been fortunate to
find someone who handles
my investment affairs to my
complete satisfaction (well,
almost complete).
The problem with cash
today is that it doesn't earn
anything if it's in a place
where it's liquid and safe. If
you have substantial amounts
of cash, there is value in hav-
ing some sitting where you
can make a phone call and
it's in your account the next
day
But the reality is that if you
want to get any type of return
at all, you have to start think-
ing in terms of the market-
place. When you do that and
you're in your position or
mine, it's an absolute requi-
site to connect with a finan-
cial adviser in whom you
have confidence. I wouldn't
give large amounts to anyone
without testing the waters to
see how they do. Good luck,
Doc; thanks for writing.
DEAR BRUCE: Someone
has recommended that my
husband and I both get an an-
nuity and long-term health-
care insurance. My husband
is 65 and plans to start col-
lecting Social Security at 66,
retiring at 67. I am 56 and un-
employed. We have no debt, a
home valued at about
$300,000, retirement ac-
counts totaling $600,000, sav-
ings and CDs totaling
$458,000, and $309,000 in
stocks. We have three adult
children. The annuity that is
being suggested is a variable
one that guarantees a mini-


tem they already had on
their machines or switched
to Apple's technology on
Mac computers.
Microsoft shares dipped
10 cents to $31.77 in Wednes-
day's early afternoon trad-
ing. The stock has been
hovering around its highest
levels since April 2008.
Windows 8 is radically dif-
ferent from its predecessors,
with its tiles that provide a
glimpse at the activity oc-
curring in applications con-
nected to the Web, such as
email.
The system also is ex-
pected to enable users to
easily back up their pic-
tures, movies, music and
other files on a Microsoft
storage service called Sky-
Drive, which will compete
against Apple's iCloud.
Julie Larson-Green, head
of "Windows Experience"
and responsible for deliver-
ing a new operating system


mum of 8 percent What is
your recommendation? -
LP., Marietta, Ga.
DEAR LP. Sounds like the
"someone" you're talking to
is an insurance salesman.
(It's a perfectly honorable oc-
cupation.)
As you must know, I'm not
a wild enthusiast about an-
nuities. But there are prod-
ucts out there that certainly
merit a lot of folks' attention
because of tax considera-
tions, etc.
I would first have to know
exactly what kind of variable
annuity you are talking about
There are a ton of different
things that would have to be
considered, not the least of
which is that most variable
annuities have heavy-duty
waiting periods. If you
wanted to take out money
without paying penalties,
your husband would very
likely have to be 72 or 73
years old. Further, while
there are "guarantees," often
they are mitigated by things
such as market conditions
that change, which can result
in lower interest paid, etc.
As for long-term health in-
surance, you can figure that
the average person going into
a nursing home or something
similar can easily spend
$50,000 to $75,000 a year, de-
pending on the part of the
country That sounds like a
great deal of money and it is;
however, most people do not
live for extended periods of
time in nursing homes or as-
sisted care facilities.
You might want to consider
a large deductible when pur-


that wows the world's PC
users, showed how docu-
ments and data can be
stored in one device only to
appear instantaneously in
another
"It will populate with
everything you are used to
using right away," she said.
The operating system's
versatility means it can be
used to power computer
tablets, as well as traditional
PCs.
Microsoft badly wants a
piece of the tablet market
that has been cutting into PC
sales since Apple intro-
duced the iPad two years
ago.
In the quarter that in-
cluded the holiday shopping
season, Apple shipped 15.4
million iPads, more than
doubling the volume from
the same time a year earlier.
Meanwhile, worldwide per-
sonal computer sales
dipped slightly, and Mi-
crosoft's revenue in its Win-
dows division declined 6
percent. It marked the
fourth time in the past five
quarters that Microsoft's
Windows revenue has fallen
from the previous year.
Reversing or slowing that
trend is critical for Mi-
crosoft. It still relies on the
PC industry for about 55
percent of its revenue, ac-
cording to Nomura Equity
Research analyst Rick
Sherlund.


chasing the insurance. With
your assets of well over a mil-
lion dollars, you could take a
small hit, but you don't want
to be wiped out Given that
you are only 56, the premium
is going to be high because of
your long life expectancy
Other than that, you will
have to know specifically
how the savings retirement
accounts and the CDs are set
up. Those investments, I be-
lieve, should be looked over
and perhaps moved around a
bit with the help of a quali-
fied and trusted adviser The
idea of just putting money
away and forgetting it might
have made sense years ago,
but it surely does not now.
On balance, I'd say you're
in great shape. Live long and
be healthy
DEAR BRUCE: I receive
your newsletter every day in
my email and have learned a
lot of valuable information.
My daughter, 19, is trying to
buy a car and finance it her-
self. However, being so young,
she has no credit How do you
recommend a young adult get
credit in her name? She has
applied for a department
store credit card and was de-
nied. What other options
does she have? J.C.,
Wheeling, WVa.
DEARJ.C.: Building credit
is a slow process. You didn't
mention how much your
daughter is earning or what
she is doing. Interestingly, for
a long time credit card com-
panies would issue cards to
undergraduate students with
little or no income, but after
graduation, the companies


"The launch of Windows 8
should provide a few years
of robust growth and oppor-
tunity for Microsoft to repo-
sition itself to better defend
its position against chal-
lengers," Sherlund wrote in
a note after Microsoft re-
ported the latest erosion in
its Windows division.
Besides spurring more
sales of the new operating
system, Windows 8 is likely
to drive demand for the next
generation of the Office
suite, another major money-
maker for Microsoft.
In the demonstration in
Barcelona, Office looked
just like it normally does -
but can be opened with a
finger swipe.
Windows 8 could inspire
more PC makers to design
machines that combine the
convenience of tablets with
the utility of a notebook
computer
These devices would be
similar to the so-called "ul-
trabook" computers that
offer a Windows-based ver-
sion of Apple's lightweight
MacBook Air machines.
Once Windows 8 is avail-
able, the ultrabook line
could be expanded to in-
clude machines equipped
with a screen that swivels
off the keyboard to take ad-
vantage of the system's
touch controls and provide
a tablet-like experience.


started screening people out
and denied credit to those
who would have been
granted credit in school.
Your daughter may find
one option among compa-
nies that vend a product
(such as gasoline) and carry
the credit themselves. One
department store may not
grant a card, but another
might, particularly if it's hav-
ing a big store sale.
Another place she might
try is an airline credit card,
where they might give you a
T-shirt or free one-way ticket
to get you to apply for a card.
Those types of offerings fre-
quently have fewer demands
with regard to previous
credit.
Once she gets a card, be
sure she doesn't abuse it.
Make the payments a few
days early
As for the car she wants to
buy, if it's a new car, I would-
n't even consider helping her
by co-signing the loan. She
can certainly get along with
an older car that doesn't have
much flash to it Oftentimes
kids will say, "I don't want to
drive that" Trust me, buying
a good used car at the begin-
ning beats the bus. If you
want to help her with that,
fine.


Send your questions to
Smart Money, PO. Box 2095,
Elfers, FL 34680. Send
email to bruce@
brucewilliams. com.
Questions ofgeneral
interest will be answered
in future columns.


D4 SUNDAY, MARCH 4, 2012


BUSINESS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE






CLASSIFIED


CITRUS COUNTY
HkRONICLE

www.chronicleonline.com


BUSINESS HOURS:

MONDAY-FRIDAY

8:00 A.M. 5:00 P.M.

CLOSED SATURDAY/SUNDAY



WE GLADLY ACCEPT

- R.^S\fi


SUNDAY, MARCH 4, 2012 D5


Classifieds


Classifieds In Print and Online All The Time!


Publication Days/Deadlines

Chronicle / Daily..................................... 1 PM, Daily
Homefront / Sunday...............................3 PM, Friday
Chronicle / Sunday.............................4...4 PM, Friday
Chronicle / Monday............................4...4 PM, Friday
Sumter County Times / Thursday............. 11 AM, Tuesday
Riverland News / Thursday.................2...2 PM, Monday
South Marion Citizen / Friday..............4...4 PM, Tuesday
West Marion Messenger / Wednesday.......4 PM, Friday


2 RECLINERS BUR-
GUNDY W/RANDOM
DECORATIVE STITCH
$250 EACH 634-2004

8 MOBILE HOMES
12 AC., Good Income
Lots of Possibilities
(352) 212-6182

AUTO SWAP/
Corral CAR SHOW
Sumter County
Fairgrounds
SUMTER
SWAP MEETS
MARCH 4th. 2012
1-800-438-8559
HAYWARD NAVIGATOR
Inground pool navigator,
new hoses, very good
condition.
$75.00 Telephone
352 382-2591
HOMOSASSA
2/1/2 on 1/2 Acre
Low Down EZ Terms
(941) 505-9287




$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
Paid for Junk Vehicles,
J.W. 352-228-9645
$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not*
CASH PAID $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL
appls, motors, mowers,
scp.metals & other
services. 352-270-4087
FREE REMOVAL OF
Scrap Medal, Mowers
Appliances and MORE
Call (352) 224-0698



17 lb. Orange Tabby
Cat, very sweet and
friendly, indoor cat.
(352) 464-3983
Fertilizer Horse Manure
mixed with pine shavings
great for gardens or as
mulch 352-628-9624
FREE CATS
Spayed & Neutered
To adult cats spoiling
homes (352) 201-4522
FREE Oak Firewood ,
already cut you haul
away(352) 794-6410
FREE Oak Firework
already cut, u haul
6545 S Dolphin RD
FLoral City
KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Savage Pays top $$$.
352-628-4144
KITTENS
7 wks, fully weaned
1 female, 3 males
multi colors
(352) 364-1562
Toilet, bone color,
clean
352-513-4614
We will take all unwanted
clothing,shoes,purses,
baby items,anything you
want to get rid of Jamie
@352-586-9754 i will
come pick it up.
Young Small Horse,
Brown, white feet,
white face
to good home
(352) 220-2036



FRESH JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct.@ $5 per lb
Stone Crab@ $6 per Ib
delivered 727-771-7500


Canvas Grocery Bag
orange, Inverness or
Floral City
Sentimental Value
(352) 341-0292
Long Haired
Chihuahua, Male
9 months old
Loved, Missed, would
love to have him home
(352) 628-3228
Lost Cat-female, cal-
ico, max short tail, 9
years old, declawed,
no teeth, never been
outside, North Athen/W
Cushions/Citrus Blvd.
area. She had her
collar on with her
rabies tag. Please
call (352) 465-1696 or
352-212-5076


REWARD $1000.
No Questions ask.
Min Pin Female 10 lbs
name Zoey, Needs
meds. last seen Sun 8/7
Holiday Dr off Turkey
Oak Crystal River
(352) 257-9546
352-400-1519




Brown/White Terrier
Dog- Male under a
year old, clean
no collar or chip
(727) 459-4991




FRESH JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct.@ $5 per lb
Stone Crab@ $6 per Ib
delivered 727-771-7500




Will Babysit and/or
Tutor, Any Day
Spanish or English
pls call and ask for Yuly
352-270-4141




Exp.BOOKKEEPER
Send resume to:
PO Box 328
Inverness Fl. 34451




HAIR STYLIST
FT/PT Immediate
Openings, Call Sue
352-628-0630

RECEPTIONIST
ESTHETIICIAN
Manicurist/Perm make
up/Celestial Spa ofBev
Hills 464-1166 resume
celes-
tialspa4u@yahoo.com




Bnet CARE
Manager

The Centers is seeking
a Bachelor's level
Care Manager to
coordinate mental
health svcs for
children enrolled in
Behavioral Health
Network. Extensive
travel required in
Citrus & Hernando
Counties. Use of
personal vehicle
reqd., State mileage
rate pd. Work hours
dictated by case-
load. Please submit
salary. Full benefits
pkg DFWP/EOE/We
E-Verify. Fax or e-mail
resume to HR, the
Centers, Inc.,
(352) 291-5580,
iobs@thecenters.us
For more info visit
www. thecenters. us

Crystal River
Health & Rehab
Center
Is currently accepting
applications for
R.N. 's & L.P.N.'s
for 7-3 & 3-11
Full-time & Part-time,
all shifts.
Also taking
applications for prn
Come by for a tour.
Great pay with
benefits.
Please apply in
person or e-mail
your resume to:
peter.misura@north
porthealth.com
EOE

F/T Certified
Ophthalmic
Assistant/Scribe,
Experience required
in patient workups,
history, refraction,
documentation and
coding. Apply in
person, West Coast
Eye Institute,
240 N. Lecanto Hwy,
Lecanto FL 34461
(352) 746-2246 x834


#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)



LPN or MEDICAL
ASSISTANT/
PHLEBOTOMIST
Wanted for office based
medical practice in
Inverness. Experience
required. Fax Resume
(352) 726-5818







HOSPICE
;:f C.inJm Co jnr,
of nt Na atre -c.,s,

Registered Nurse
Homosassa/
West Citrus County
Home Team
Responsible for main-
taining continuity of
care and seiMcesto
Hospice Patients
through the use of a
comprehensive Pan
of Care established
at the time of admis-
sbn and as periodi-
cally updated. Also
responsible for pro-
viding direct patient
care services; Issuing
and rraintaining
proper documenta-
tion; Interacting with
and supporting the
interdisciplinary
team. Requires a
State of Forida Regis-
tered Nurse's license.
A minimum of one
year experience as a
RN with a back-
ground in Hospice,
surgery, critical care,
nursing home or
home health pre-
ferred. This full tire
position offers excel-
lent salary & benefits
Licensed
Practical Nurse
Homosassa/
West Citrus County
Home Team
Responsible for main-
taining continuity of
care and services to
Hospice Patients
through the use of a
comprehensive Plan
of Care established
at the time of admis-
sion and as periodi-
cally updated. Also
responsible for pro-
viding direct patient
care services as di-
rected by the Regis-
tered Nurse; Initiating
and maintaining
proper documenta-
tion; Interacting with
and supporting the
interdisciplinary
team.
Requires a State of
Florida Practical
Nurse's license. A
minimum of one year
experience as a LPN
with a background in
Hospice, nursing
home or home
health preferred. This
full time position
offers excellent salary
& benefits.
Licensed
Practical Nurse
Inverness/East Citrus
County Home Team
Responsible for main-
taining continuity of
care and services to
Hospice Patients
through the use of a
comprehensive Plan
of Care established
at the time of admis-
sion and as periodi-
cally updated. Also
responsible for pro-
viding direct patient
care services as di-
rected by the Regis-
tered Nurse; Initiating
and maintaining
proper documenta-
tion; Interacting with
and supporting the
interdisciplinary
team.
Requires a State of
Florida Practical
Nurse's license. A
minimum of one year
experience as a LPN
with a background in
Hospice, nursing
home or home
health preferred. This
full time position
offers excellent salary
& benefits.
Chaplain
Homosassa/West
Citrus County
Home Team
Responsible for pro-
viding the delivery of
spiritual care, coun-
seling and interven-
tion for Hospice pa-
tients and family
members. Master's
degree in ministry
from a college or di-
vinity school. Previ-
ous Hospice or
Healthcare experi-
ence is preferred.
This full time position
offers excellent salary
& benefits.
Job summaries and
application:
www.hospiceofcitrusc
ounty.org
Hospice of Citrus
County
P.O. Box 641270
Beverly Hills, Fl 34464
DFWP/EOE


Medical Assistant
Full Time
Working Knowledge
EMR a plus
Send Resumes to:
wfmarick
@yahoo.com
A Non Smoking
Facility. EOE/DFWP

Medical
Assistant

The Centers is seeking
a Medical Assistant
(RMA or CMA) to
work with the
mentally ill at our
Adult Med Clinic in
Lecanto. Duties
include
pre-authoizations,
vitals & administer
meds, other clerical
& clinical tasks.
Certified or
Registered Medical
Asst Certification &
min 2 yrs exp reqd.
Salary $9.91-11.90/hr.
Full benefits pkg
DFWP/EOE/We
E-Verify. Fax or e-mail
resume to HR, the
Centers, Inc.,
(352) 291-5580,
iobs@thecenters.us
For more info visit
www. thecenters. us


Residential SA
Tech Pool
(352) 291-549
The Centers is
seeking Residential
Substance Abuse
Techs Pool (as
needed) for our
Citrus County
Adolescent Residen-
tial program in
Lecanto, FL. Duties
focus on reducing or
minimizing the effects
of substance abuse,
a 12-Step recovery
process, assisting the
professional staff in
the assurance of
quality client care &
transporting clients.
Exp with troubled
adolescents reqd.
Must be available for
shift work & week-
ends. Background
screenings reqd.
Salary $9.25-$9.75/hr
plus 10% shift diff for
2nd/3rd shifts.
DFWP/EOE/We
E-Verify. Fax or e-mail
resume to HR, the
Centers, Inc.,
(352) 291-5580,
iobs@thecenters. us
For more info visit
www.thecenters.us

TBOSS
Therapist
The Centers is seek-
ing Masters Level
Therapist for TBOSS
positions in Citrus
County. Must have a
min 2 yr exp working
with adults, children
& adolescents pro-
viding individual,
group & family
therapy. Full benefits
pkg DFWP/EOE/We
E-Verify. Fax or e-mail
resume to HR, the
Centers, Inc.
,(352) 291-5580,
jobs@thecenters. us
For more info visit
www. thecenters. us

The Department of
Health has an
opening for:

OPS Dental
Assistant.
Annual Salary
range: $19,902.48 -
$51,721.54. Minimum
Qualifications: Valid
FL radiology license
and expanded
functions certificate;
experience with dig-
ital x-rays and work-
ing with children;
strong patient
manage-
ment/communication/
scheduling/record
keeping skills; willing
to work 10-hour days.
Please apply on-line
at:
https://jobs.myflorida.c
om Refer to
requisition number
64909159. Only State
of Florida
Applications will be
accepted no
resumes, please.
Date closes
03/02/2012.
EO/AA/VP Employer.





EXECUTIVE
HOUSEKEEPER
For Resort Hotel in
Citrus County. 3 years
prior exp. in position
required. Hotel
exp. a plus. benefits
Apply in Person.
BEST WESTERN
614 N.W. Hwy 19
Crystal River
No Phone Calls.


Marketing
Coordinator
Seeking very
organized person to
coordinate
marketing programs
for major area
country club.
Includes website,
email and print
activities for
restaurants, golf and
show events.
Graphic design and
Adobe software
experience prefera-
ble. Forward resume
sleeman@citrushills
.com


MDS
COORDINATOR
Life Care Center
of Citrus County
in Lecanto
Full-time position is
available for a
Florida-licensed RN
with MDS 3.0 and
long-term care
experience. We offer
great pay and bene-
fits, including medical
coverage, 401(k) and
paid vacation, sick
days and holidays.
Sondra Bussell,
Director of Nursing
352-746-4434
352-746-6081 Fax
3325 W. Jerwayne Ln.
Lecanto, FL 34461
Visit us online at
LCCA.COM.
EOE/M/F/V/D 30331







PERMANENT PT/TIME
FOR UPSCALE PET
RESORT IN LECANTO
Must be mature, per-
sonable, hard wking,
reliable, exp w/dogs,
deal respectfully &
helpfully w/customers
Be teachable, flexi-
ble, reliable transp,
some office, comp
exp. able to back
ground& drug test
pls. email
teejaa l1yahoo.com
no walk-ins





EXP. LINE COOK

Apply in Person
at Cracker's
Bar & Grill


P/T SERVER
& COOK

For 7 Rivers Country
Club, 2-3 days per
week. Email resume
marion7rivers@tamDa
bav.rr.com
Experience preferred.





New Home Sales
Agent


A/C SERVICE &
INSTALL TECH
EPA Cert., Valid DL,
Exp. only. Call Bob
352-628-5700
or email resume
bl@newalr.blz

Cert. Fork Lift Driver

7 day shift
Apply at Twin Rivers
Marine 2880 N.
Seabreeze Pt
Crystal River Fl 34429

EXP MECHICAN
Must have tools
Must have
D.lic./Transportation
apply in person
American Auto
8696 W. Halls River Rd


NETWORK
ADMINISTRATOR
The City of Dunnellon
is accepting applica-
tions for a Network
Administrator for
Greenlight Dunnellon
Communications'
service provider
network/ Fiber Optic
Telecommunications
System.
Bachelor's Degree in
Information Systems,
Computer Science,
or related field and
minimum 5-6 years
related experience
and/or training.
Experience in a fiber
optic telecommuni-
cations or service
provider environment
is highly desirable
and CCNA and
CCNP Certifications.
Must obtain a job de-
scription and submit
a COD Employment
Application package
to the City Clerk at
20750 River Drive,
Dunnellon, FL 34431
(352) 465-8500. Apps
can be downloaded
at www.dunnellon.
org. Electronic
applications/resumes
not accepted. Sala-
ried position, pay
Range $38,210 -
$57,315. Application
deadline 03/26/2012.
Position will remain
opened until filled.
E.O.E., DFWP.


OPERATIONS
MANAGER-
FIBER OPTIC COMMU-
NICATIONS SYSTEM
The City of Dunnellon
is accepting
applications for an
Operations Manager
for Greenlight
Dunnellon
Communications'
service provider
network/Fiber Optic
Telecommunications
System. Bachelor's
Degree in engineer-
ing, mathematics,
economics, business
or a field related to
telecommunications
and 5 years experi-
ence in business
operatbns/rrnanagerrent
of a fiberoptic
telecommunications
system with 3 years
supervisory experi-
ence. Must obtain a
job description and
submit a COD
Employment
Application package
to the City Clerk at
20750 River Drive,
Dunnellon, FL 34431
(352) 465-8500. Apps
can be downloaded
at www.dunnellon.
org. Electronic
applications/resumes
not accepted.
Salaried position,
pay Range $40,500 -
$60,750. Application
deadline 03/26/2012.
Position will remain
opened until filled.
E.O.E., DFWP. \\


TRUCK DRIVER

Clean, Class A, CDL,
forlift exp. desired
Call 352-746-4451





$$$$$$$
Money is available!
We are seeking
individuals to man-
age rack and store
delivery of the Citrus
County Chronicle
and other publica-
tions. Must be at least
18 years of age and
possess a valid driv-
er's license and insur-
ance. Routes are 7
days a week, early
morning hours. Earn-
ing potential is unlim-
ited! Email
kstew-
art@chronicleonline.co
m or bring
resume to 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd. in
Crystal River.



*CALL NOW*
Looking to fill
immediate
positions in the
CUSTOMER
RELATIONS
DEPARTMENT.
Training, 401(k),
Medical. No Exp.
Necessary. call
Michelle
352-436-4460


GROUNDS
MAINTENANCE
WORKER
Announcement
#12-14
Heavy manual work
involving grounds/
parks maintenance
tasks. Ability to work
outdoors in hot/cold
temperatures under
noisy conditions.
Current valid Florida
Driver License
required. $7.69 hourly
to start. Excellent
benefits. Must
successfully pass
an employment
reference check,
level II background
check, physical
examination and
drug test.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: Please visit
our website at
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit one
of the local Libraries
or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461
to apply online by
Friday, March 9, 2012
EOE/ADA




Lawn Service Help
EXP. ONLY, Must have
clean Driver Lic.
(352) 341-2027


Get g-.ai


EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT CAREER FAIR
FRIDAX MARCH 9TH, 1:30pm 4:30pm
Florida Hospital Zephyrhills Wellness Center
7050 Gall Boulevard, Zephyrhills, FL

If you're seeking more from your career... explore the fast-paced, exciting
opportunity at Florida Hospital Zephyrhills! Located just minutes norit ol
Tampa, FL, we are East Pasco County's leading healthcare provider. Our
state-of-the-art, 154-bed faith based hospital has continued to gro 10o
better serve the needs of our community. In an effort to obtain our goal of
"No Wait" for our Emergency patients, we are now seeking:

RN, Emergency Department FT variable Shifts
ER Tech FT Variable Shifts


* New Wage Scale
* rncin frnutrnr


* Immediate Benefits
* I I& Dnniic DPrnnrnm


UIDIIn uuyu L UUIIU3 i iUon IUIIis rog

As partof the Adventist Heal1i System, HealthGrades recognized the Florida T
Hospital Emergency Department system its' ED Excellence Award in
2010. Under Florida Emergency Physicians (FEP) leadership, it's an award
that places them in the top 5% of emergency departments in the nation. -,,


OOOARG3


* 25monitorest freelarestrooms

* 34000 urrients annoolly


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


i FLORIDA HOSPITAL
II ZEPHYRHILLS
The skill to heal. The spirit to care.


Home Finder
www.chron cleho finder.com


ISVT IMEAD PL6OLN 'PIR OTE0 VN A:6'.HEP.R


Caite. Comtokit Squppokit.
Find out what these values can mean for your career.

HPH Hospice is a non-profit agency serving Pasco and Hernando Counties
since 1984, and Citrus County since 2005. We are currently searching
for candidates with at least one year of current experience working in an
acute care or medical surgical unit to fill the following positions:
RN Case Manager Full-time, 40 hours
Monday-Friday, 8:30am-5:00pm and on call rotation as needed.
Office located at 3545 N. Lecanto Hwy., Beverly Hills
Weekend RNs Full-time, 32 hours
Saturday and Sunday 8:30am-8:30pm plus one 8-hour shift during the
week. Requires travel throughout Hernando and Citrus Counties and
Pasco as needed
Supplemental Staffing-Crisis Care RN Full-time, 40 hours
Monday-Friday with weekend rotation 11:45pm-8:15am. Travel
throughout Hernando and Citrus Counties
To learn more about becoming a part of our team,
please visit our website at www.hph-hospice.org
(under Careers) or contact our recruiter:
Phone: 352-796-2611
Fax: 358-796-7703
Email: humanresources@hphospice.net
698 S. Broad Street
Brooksville, FL 84601 H dC

EOE/DFWP H Tho p


I
iTO AVERTISE CALL:
352=563=5966

ORPLCEYOUR A ON INEA

ww-croicleon l*ineco



(ONNE(T I TH RIGHT

BUYES WIH YOR MESAG


..h.-f --.






D6 SUNDAY, MARCH 4, 2012


B
RV PARK HOST
Manage private, perma-
nent RV Park on river,
Steinhatchee, Fl. Boat
ramp/dock, access to
Gulf. Free site & salary
exchanged for
groundskeeping,maint &
housekeeping at park &
(2)rental cottages. Must
own RV/TT & live on
premises. Prefer year
round commitment.
229-263-8364




EXP POOL ROUTE
TECH
If you know the
difference between


CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-34 1-PREP (7737)

r NOW
ENROLLING
FOR SPRING
2012 CLASSES
BARBER
COSMETOLOGY
*eFACIAL
I FULL SPECIALTY
I I
wMANICURE/Nall Ext
MASSAGE THERAPY

BENE'S
International
School of Beauty I


Wanted to Buy
Stamps, US, Worldwide,
sheets, PB, FDC,
postcards
352-245-4225
352-812-0869



CORNER HOT TUB Four
person corner hot tub.
Excellent condition. $
400.00 Call 489-4090
HAYWARD NAVIGATOR
Inground pool navigator,
new hoses, very good
condition.
$75.00 Telephone
352 382-2591


Appliances


MAGIC CHEF
Gas Range $65
352-249-9160
WANTED DEAD
OR ALIVE
Washers & Dryers
Working or not.
(352) 209-5135
WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 Each. Reliable,
like new, excellent condi-
tion. Can deliver
352 263-7398
Whirlpool Washer
& Dryer
$200.(352) 400-5152



2 AUCTIONS
THURS. March 1.3PM
Outside Auction
Loads of fresh Estate


I



c
g









T


Haarde c tialium NEW PORT RICHEY i 2 Stackable furn., household, tools,
hardness & alkalinity /SPRING HILL Commercial Gas dolls, toys, row after row -
qetc, send your 727-848-84 i Dryers, $100 for both of adventurous
quafcations to: 352-263-2744 352-476-4964 treasures still unloading.
BlCitrusnd Box 1761P, 1624i ll COME & sneak a peak
NBl Meadowrest Bvd, A/C + HEAT PUMP AT Antique!
Crystal River, FI 34429 Antiue s SYSTEMS Ar Ar * *
CrytalRierF1342 Starting at $880 SUN. March 4
13-18 Seer Antique & Collectible
S DINING TABLE Solid Installation w/permit Prey 10AM Auction 1IPM
_oak very od 42x64 RE S ut20 Primitives, signed glass,
newy efnshed and -4 Instruments Incl'. dulcl-
beautfu $90#1 Affordable 175 Lic.&lns. CAC 057914 mers, Longaberger
#1 Affordable 3526210175 picnic, advertising,
CNA Prep Course FRIGIDAIRE coins, jewelry, vlnt/coll
CPR-AED-Free Book Bisque Range, like new toys, ++ SEE the web
Am & PM classes $200. (352) 419-4429 DudleysAuctlon.com
aetvourcna.com 4000 S. Fla. Ave.
352-341-PREP (7737) 23 pieces Fenton GE Range, 5 yrs old, (US 41-S) Inverness
Glass for Sale white, exc. cond. (352) 637-9588
$500. obo $350 AB1667-AU2246
(352) 382-5810 (352) 419-4011 12% BP-2% ca.disc
DISNEY FIGURINES Maytag Hvy Duty
COLLECTABLES $8 natural gasdryer, exc.
634-2004 cond$175firm f
T SOARING EAGLE... (352) 270-8215
NEW.Was 59.95/selling REFRIGERATOR 5 speed bench drill
TAYLRCO EGE for 20.00 Linda 341 4449 Fdairebeige,21 press, built on cabinet,
GE VINTAGE TEA SERVICE cu.ft.,runsooks with drawer & wheels,
FOR 6 HANDPAINTED good.Great beer/second. like new w/tools, $125.
EARLY 1900'S $60. (352)795-7813 (352) 726-9002 |
NErAf[,f W ASKING $60.00 8 Horse Power Troy Bilt I
352-341-2107 ROPER DRYER white Rototiller $500.
great cond. works perfect 3 HP 220 Volt Sears
100.00 dennis @ Compressor $300.
2 WEEK CU El,,Ill' 352-503-7365 (352) 527-7885
PREP COURSES! SMITTYS APPLIANCE CRAFTSMAN SANDING
*ALF ADMINISTRATOR OLII d Ol is I St REPAIR, washers MACHINE 9"DISC
$300. dryersFREE pick up 6"BELT W/ACC +
*EKG $475. $475. 352-564-8179 STAND $250
PHLE BOTOMY $475. UPRIGHT FREEZER 20 (352) 795-1510
CF, NOT FROST FREE CRAFTSMAN SHAPER
tavlorcolleae.edu .... has some surface rust on 1/2 HP. 1/2 SHAFT
(352) 245-4119 door but works perfectly 3450RPM W/ACC. +
(352) 245-41 19$125 GE elec dryer $100 STAND $275
FB, twitter, you tube ( '. (352) 419-4513 aft 9 am (352) 795-1510


Brand New Air *END TABLES 23"SQ
Compressor, in box WOOD TOP METAL
Campbell Hausfeld, 6 BASE
)al., .08 HP, oilless, port- W/SCROLL DECOR
able air Compressor. $25 EA 634-2004
Sells for $250 asking *WOOL CARPET
$145. (352) 503-6631 GARDEN DESIGN RED
SHOP SMITH MARK 510 MULTI COLOR
Band saw, Thickness 7.9X9.9 $100
planer, Strip sander, 634-2004
Jointer. Many extras. 1 Marble Coffee Table coN
$2000 352 382 4037 w/2 end tables $125. CO
S 1 oval glass coffeeI
table w/2 end tables USED
$75.(352) 527-9862 w,
I Victorian Ladies fortsc
TELEVISION Sylvania 23 Chair $50 furniture
inch. 1965 black and 3 Armish Ladder back COMPU
white french provincial cane bottom chair wide, 29
console. $40 $150 all 3 Call after 10a Excell
(352)795-7813 Sun. (352) 621-3135 $50.00
TELEVISION Zenith, 26 2 RECLINERS BUR- DINEl
inch stereo with remote. GUNDY W/RANDOM Marbl
Excellent condition. $35 DECORATIVE STITCH w/glass
(352)795-7813 $250 EACH 634-2004 padde
TELEVISION Zenith,25 5 PIECE BLONDE BED- unit ligh
inch with remote,works ROOM SUITE bed, mir- doors
fineexcellent color. $30 rored headboard, mir comp
77813 roared headboard, mir- comp
(352)795-7813 roared dresser, armoire, (352
nightstand, entertainment
center. $500. DiningC
f leo352.270.7420 Cher
TER COMPUTER $175 PRIDE LIFT CHAIR (352
DIESTLER COMPUTER Needs minimal cleaning. DINI
New & Used systems Large oak entmnt center DINING
repairs. Visa/ MCard w/ shelves and doors ful refin
352-637-5469 $150 Brand new sofa bed oak 4:
HP Computer pastels and blue $200 352
for sale (352) 419-4513 aft- 9 am ENTI
exc cond$100. Antique Wash Stand Blond
(352)586-6891 w/mirror and claw feet
S $300 Antique 3 drawer (35
chest with mirror $200 FREE TA
Call for email pics. KITCHE
(352) 746-0183 ROOM
CHAIR
PATIO SET 48" Round Are U Moving? Estate? CHAI
table with 3 In home liquidations?
chairs/cushions. MARTIN'S Estate & King
Very Nice (Teal) $135 Consign 352-209-4945 Stearn
Junnellon 352-465-4441 BLONDE OAK WOOD $16(
S Entertainment center (352
Glass shelves. VERY
SNICE $35. 352-621-0175 KITCHEy
CATHI'S ATTIC bileaves,
*3 1/2' WOOL CARPET Offering New and Used needs rep
BEIGE MULTI FLORAL Quality Furniture & Ac- 35;
$50 634-2004 cessories, 352-513-4802 LAZY I
*8' RD COURISTAN CHAIR AND DESK RECLINI
CARPET, RED,BLK W/MAT Various cornm- herculor
BEIGE,MULTI FLORAL puter items barely used. lent co
LIKE NEW $100 Can sell separate or $75 firm. Ca
634-2004 all. 352-621-0175 Maple
*END TABLES 23' CHINA CABINET Large, Full s
SQ.,WOOD TOP ON double sided, 4 glass mattre
DECORATIVE METAL doors,medium brown cond. C
BASE W/SCROLL wood, $100.00 (352) furnitui
$25 EA 634-2004 409-2690 Sherry $600(3


CLASSIFIED


i


ALL EXTERIOR
ALUMINUM
6" Seamless Gutters
Lic & Ins 352-621-0881
ROB SCREENING
Repairs Rescreen, Front
Entries, Garage, Sliders
Free Est. 352-835-2020
SUBURBAN IND. INC.
Screen rms, Rescreens,
Siding, airports, rf.overs
wood decks, Fla. rooms
windows, garage scrns.
628-0562 (CBC1257141)



SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Washer &
Dryers, Free Pick Up
352-564-8179





o Iur\\oldd first


Need a job

ora

qualified
employee?



This area's

#1

employment

source!



Classifieds


Vertical Blind Factory
We custom make all
types. Best prices any-
where! Hwy 44 & CR
491. (352) 746-1998




V THIS OUT!
PHIL'S MOBILE MARINE
Repairs & Consignment
30 yrs Cert. Best Prices
& Guar 352-220-9435



Care Giver/Companion
30 yrs. Exp. Med Ass't,
Pharm Tech. 24/7 care
in home/Hosp/Facility
Info (352) 419-6298
Loving Adult Care
Home (SL 6906450)
Alzheimer/Dementia
No problem. Nursing
homes do not need to
be your only alternative
352-503-7052



ROGERS Construction
All Construction
sm jobs Free Est (352)
637-4373 CRC1326872



Sales, Service, Carpet,
laminate, Restretch,
repair, clean Lic#4857
Mitch (352) 422-5136




SHADY VIEW CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
Repairs. 352 613-2518


GENERAL -
Stand Alone
Generator

Thomas Electric, LLC
Residential/Commercial Service
Generac Centurion
Guardian Generators
Factory Authorized Technicians
ER0015377







AAA ROOFING
Gi the Aakh6usten"
Free Written Estimate

$100 OFF
Any Re-Roof
Must present coupon at time contract is signed
Lic./Ins. CCCO57537 000APN8
11Mj .RT


Clean Ups &
Clean Outs
(352) 220-9190




AFFORDABLE
COMPUTER SERV.
(352) 341-4150
DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469




Bianchi Concrete
inc.com lic/ins
Driveways-Patios-
Sidewalks.352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL/ Lic
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River rock
reseals & repairs. 352
364-2120/410-7383
FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, staining &
Garage Firs. Recession
Prices! 352-527-1097




All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing,Hauling,
Site Prep, Driveways.
Lic. & Ins. 352- 795-5755




COUNTYWIDE DRY-
WALL 25 years exp.
For all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Lic/ins. 352-302-6838


Diamond Brite
r Florida Gem .
Marcite Decks
'E *Pavers
FREE Tile <
ESTIMATES >j '

GREG'S COMPLETE
GREG'S REMODEL

MARCITE, INC.
ICENSE 352-746-5200
& INSURED



DRYE VNCLANG


Serving Citrus County r Lawn Mowers
U Trimmers
Since 1995 U Chain Saws
0 1 Blowers
Mowng Trimming Edging i ow 'e r : i-- .4.i,
Mulch FertilzaLicn -
: i- i ,T -: I. F,. -I I -, ,,, iI-' F 1
E I .E I F ,r r IrFF. R I: FREE ESTIMATES
,Irl IETE ,Ei: F- i- ii L, i- 'I,.1:

OR N IAYLOR RENTAL
OPEN 7 DAYS 795-5600
8081 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Crystal River


#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Plasma TV installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
ANNIE'S ELECTRIC
Husband & Wife
Team.(352) 341-5952
EC-13002696
BRIGHT ELECTRICAL
Res./Comm. Lic & Ins.
$50.hr. EC0001303
352-302-2366
DUN-RITE Elect
Elec/Serv/Repairs
New const. Remodel
Free Est 726-2907
EC13002699 Serving
Citrus Co. Since 1978
Thomas Electric LLC
Generator maint &
repair. Guardian
Homestandby, &
Centurion. Cert. Tech.
Briggs Stratton 352-
621-1248 #ER00015377




A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002

BOB BROWN'S
Fence & Landscaping
352-795-0188/220-3194
ROCKY'S FENCING
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
* 352 422-7279 *k



ALL EXTERIOR
ALUMINUM
6" Seamless Gutters
Lic & Ins 352-621-0881
ALUMINUM
STRUCTURES
5" & 6" Seamless Gutters
Free Estimates, Lic &
Ins. (352) 563-2977


#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Plasma TV installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777

Andrew Joehl
Handyman.
Gen/Maint/Repairs
Pressure cleaning.
Lawns/Gutters. No job
too small!Reli able ,ins.
0256271 352-465-9201

A HANDYMAN
If Its Broke, Jerry Can
Fix It. Housecleaning
also. 352-201-0116 Lic.
ABC Painting & Handy
man All your needs at
recession prices Dale
352-586-8129
Affordable Handyman
FAST
AFFORDABLE
s RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
FAST
AFFORDABLE
s RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
e FAST
AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST
AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *
Handyman Dave
Pressure Clean, Paint &
Repairs, oddjobs &
haulina (352) 726-9570


IREMODLm


HOME CARE
Lawn & Handyman
Services. Sprinkler
Repair 352-212-4935
Remodeling, Additions,
Doors, Windows, Tile
work. Lic.#CRC1330081
Free Est. (352)949-2292




Citrus Cleaning
Painting & Team
Quality Work reason-
able rates. 352-
302-3348
527-2279




The Tile Man
Bathroom remodel
Specializing in
handicap. Lic/Ins.
#2441. 352-634-1584



#1 BOBCAT FOR HIRE
Light land clearing, site
work, grading, hauling.
NO JOB TOO SMALL!!!
Lic. & Ins. 352-400-0528
All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
All AROUND TRACTOR
L ,,,.' H
352-795-5755
TRACTOR WORK
Sm Job Specialist
$30 + $30 per hr
352-270-6800





CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, curbing,
flocrete. River rock
reseals & repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
Florida Sitescapes, LLC
FREE est: Yard Clean Up
Mowing, and MORE
Call 352.201.7374




GOT LEAVES?
Ask about leaf vac
system, Free est.
Winter Clean up +
Hauling 352 344-9273
cell 352-201-9371


* New Landscapes

* One Time Cuts

* Free Estimates




Rivenbark Lawn
& Landscape
2>. (352) 464-3566




i Decorative Mulch
NEW & Stones
U Top Soil

DELIVERY AVAILABLE
WE HAVE SPECIAL
PRICES AVAILABLE!


NURSERY
6658 W. GULF To LAKE HWY.
CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429
(352) 302-6436


Florida Sitescapes, LLC
FREE est: Yard Clean Up
Mowing, and MORE
Call 352.201.7374
HALLOCK & SON
LAWN CARE ALL Your
lawn care needs. Detailed
Work. 400-1197, Lic/Ins.
HOME CARE
Lawn & Handyman
Services. Sprinkler
Repair 352-212-4935
JUSTIN LAWN CARE
Fast and Affordable.
and Friendly, Licensed.
(352) 476-3985
LAWN CARE 'N" More
Spring Clean up, beds,
haul, brush leaves
(352) 726-9570
Leaves, Beds Bushes
mulch, hauling, press
clean 352 220-6761



AT YOUR HOME
Mower, Parts Service &
Repair.Visit our store@
1332 SE Hwy 19
352-2204244



A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs, trash,
lawn maint. furn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
ALL OF CITRUS
CLEAN UPS CLEAN OUTS
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790
HAULING
FRE E ESTIMATES
scrap metals haul for
FREE (352) 344-9273




Chris Satchell Painting
ASAP
30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
A-1 George Swedlige
Painting/press cleaning
Int/Ext. texture/drywall
repair (352) 794-0400
ABC Painting LLC
All your painting needs
@ recession prices. Call
Dale 352-586-8129
Handyman Dave
Pressure Clean, Paint &
Repairs, odd jobs &
hauling (352) 726-9570
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998


Tim Herndon Plumbing
$Sl0. off w/ithisad
10 yrs serving Citrus Co
lic/insCFC1428395
(352) 201-8237



CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
ABC Press. Cleaning.
All your cleaning needs
at recession prices.
Free Est Dale 586-8129
Handyman Dave
Pressure Clean, Paint &
Repairs, odd jobs &
hauling (352) 726-9570
JOHN GRAY
DRIVEWAYS $55.
w=HOUSE $75/POOL $85
(352) 270-8310
Pic PICARD'S Pressure
Cleaning & Painting
352-341-3300



Remodeling, kitchens
baths, ceramic tile &
tops. Decks, Garages
Handyman Services 40
Yrs Exp. crc058140
344-3536; 563-9768



Bruce F. Storman
Septic Services,
lic/in 352-795-5779



Attention Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers are
required by state law
to include their state
license number in all
advertisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious that
you may be contact-
ing an unlicensed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For questions
about business
licensing, please call
your city or county gov-
ernment offices.


Ron's Affordable
Handyman Services
All Home
Repairs
S ." Small Carpentry
Fencing
Screening

Vents
Affordable & Dependable
Expenence lifelong
352- 344-0905
cell: 400-1722




Furniture Refinishing
Entryway Refinishing
Tool/Knife Sharpening
Pressure Washing
Lawn/Property Maintenance

Classical Custom
Services, Inc.
Mark McClendon

352-613-7934
Over 20 Years Experience Licensed& Insured


$60. Bahia Pallets
U-Pick Up. Special
Winter Pricing. Call
Now!! 352-400-2221



HOME CARE
Lawn & Handyman
Services. Sprinkler
Repair 352-212-4935



A Cutting Edge
Tile Jobs Showers
Firs .Safety Bars. ETC
352-422-2019
Lic. #2713, Insured.



A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest Rates
Free est.(352)860-1452
DAVID'S
TREE SERVICE
(352)302-5641
All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
DOUBLE J Tree Serv.
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
RON ROBBINS Tree Serv
Trim, Shape & Remove
Lic/Ins Free Est.
352-628-2825
Sharp Cut Tree Serv.
LET me cut your Tree
not YOUR WALLET.
Full Tree Service
Alicia (352) 942-0455
T & T TREE SERVICE
We Blow Away
High Prices!
Free Est. 352-362-3610



344-2556, Richard
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


* 1 Day Cabinets Laminates
* Remodeling Supplies Woods
* Refacing Supplies Glues
* Hinges Saw Sharpening
Cabinet Supplies & Hardware



3835 S. Pittsburgh Ave., Homosassa, FL
OOOA7Z 352-628-9760





BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Day,
We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over" Your Old One!!!
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!
Call now for a FREE
In-Home Estimate

1-866-585-8827
BATHFITTER.COM
OOOAECJ


COPES POOL
AND PAVER LLC
YOUR INTERLOCKING BRICK PAVER SPECIALIST
Build your new pool now and
be ready for next summer!
Refinish your pool during the cooler months.
352-400-3188


(IT
OUT!


WlFORTS OF
HOME
FURNITURE
ww. com-
ofhomeused
cornm 795-0121
TER DESK 32
9 high, 19 deep.
ent condition.
352-201-4300
TrE SET 5 pcs
ble Top table
s insert, 4 floral
ed chairs $300
c mirrored wall
ted, 2 beveled
$250 or will sell
plete for $500.
2) 527-9862
F room table,
ry wood, 4ft,
85 cash
2) 419-6719
TABLE Beauti-
ished old solid
2" x 64" $90.
2-621-0175
ERTAINMENT
CENTER
Wood $400.
2) 726-9587
TABLES I HAVE 2
N OR FLORIDA
MI TABLES NO
RS FREEEEEE
464 0316
Size Mattress
s & Foster, like
r. old ..new pd
60. sell $850.
) 382-3494
N TABLE 48 inch
maple table, two
six chairs-one
pair $150.00 obo
2-503-2226
BOY ROCKER
ER Neutral color
n fabric in excel-
ndition. $95.00
11 352 746-1819
Bedroom Set
sz. 5 pcs. w/
ess, excellent
)ur spare room
re. Pine Ridge
352) 527-7885


MATTRESS SETS Very
clean. Non-smoker
King-$250.00
Queen-$150. Call
352-257-5722 for details.
NEW AMISH QUILT,
QUEEN, DOUBLE WED-
DING RING greens on
cream. Very pretty. Not
Chinese. $300
352-897-4154
PAUL'S FURNITURE
Now open Tues-Sat.
352-628-2306
paulsfurnitureonline.com
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
352-628-0808
QUEEN BEDROOM SET
OAK
6PC DBL DRESSER, VAN-
ITY NIGHTSTD, HDBD,
FRAME MATTRESS $450
(352) 746-1146
SECTIONAL
Leather, Lazy Boy, 6pc
w/3 recliners, Cream,
great cond. $850 -
2 Curio Cabs, glass + It
gry mica, Igtd, grt $95
ea. 352-563-2776
Sofa & Love seat
beige/mauve/blue
maple trim. MINT
$450.
(352) 726-8040
Sofa and 3 chairs, All
good condition,
$295. (352) 341-3711
kendunn@tampabay.rr.c
om
Solid Cherry Dining
room set with 8 chairs
$450-1729 W Gulf-to
Lake, ILecanto, FL
Thomasville Dining
Room Set 6 chs, 2 leafs,
$500& china cab$800
wall unit Belgium
made.$500 obo
(352) 637-6482
Wood Kitchen table
w/4 chairs, brand new
pd $565 sell $325.
Couch $300 & 2 reclin-
ers, beige $400
(618) 978-2338



2005, 42' Cut
Sears Lawn Tractor
Great condition
small hole in deck
$500.obo
(352) 302-0648


BOLENS FRONT TINE
ROTO TILLER 4.75
horse power, good condi-
tion. Sell for $175.00.
Call 352 746-1017
CHICKEN
MANURE/FERTILIZER
(25 bags avail)The time
to get ready is NOW!!20
lb. Bag$4.00
352-563-1519
Craftmans Self
propelled Lawn
mower, used once
$150.(352) 563-2988
Craftsman Lawn Trac-
tor, 18H, 42" cut a
automatic, with yard
trailer, $500. obo
(352) 637-2942
Dixson Riding Mower
0 turn,42" deck $450
Craftsman riding
mower 42" $400.
(352) 746-7357
TRAILER Open trailer 6'X
16' Mesh gate, solid
wood floor, double axel,
new tires, good condition.
$1000.00 Pics available.
Call 352-563-5259





YARD SALE
FLORAL CITY
Sat Sun 9-5p furn. appls
vintage & much more
1 mi. S. of Stop light on
491S.

YARDSALE
OCALA
Fri, Sat, Sun 9- 5
Horsey, hshld and misc.
10745 SW 100th Ave
352-873-6033



!!!!!!!275/60 R20!!!!!!!
Nice tread!! Pair. Only
asking $80!
(352)551-1810
*******225/60 R17*******
Like new!! High tread!!
Pair. Only asking $80!!
(352)551-1810
-----225/65 R16~~.--
Great tread!! Pair! Only
asking $60!!
(352)551-1810


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CI




Samsung $350.
Manual Hosp. beds $35
ea. Full sz Mattress/box
springs $50.
352-419-6298
Blinds 95"x80" $25
Ladies Blazers sz 14 $5.
2 gal fish tank w/acc.
$8.(352) 291-1556
BOAT HULL Paddle
Boat, hull only. Needs
repair where pedals were.
$25.00 352-726-6224
CAR RAMPS
$35.00
352-746-5612
Copier/fax machine,
like new $60
Oster blender $40.
(352) 527-0004
CROSIL QUEEN BED-
SPREAD Aqua /cream
/floral-3 yrs- EXCELLENT
352 382 0220 $20
Eureka vacuum
upright New $40
(352) 527-0004
Folding6' table,
new $25.00 & card
table $25.both new
(352) 527-0004
HONEYWELL HEPAAIR
PURIFIER Hardly
used-EXCELLENT
COND. $60-Sugarmill
Woods2 382 0220
Shipping Pallets,
all in good shape
No boards missing
(80) $100 for all
(352) 563-2385
SONY. Turn table,
receiver 4 speakers
$75. 1985 Antique
craved chair $75.
Beige Lazy boy Recliner
$40.(847) 366-1464
TOW BAR
Road master-stain/steel
#1 stowmaster 5000
universal fits most
vehicle, new $591
sell $275(828) 226-7593
Towle Candlelight Sterl-
ing 10 pl. setting
(352) 382-5715
TROLLING MOTOR 40
lbs thrust minnkota bow
mount with 2 mounting
brackets 250.00
352-726-9964
WHEELBARROW TUFF
PLASTIC VERY DEEP
GREAT SHAPE ONLY
60.00 CALL 464 0316
WOOD FLOORING by
Bruce, Planks 3"x 3/8
Med. Oak 25Ft. NEW in
box $59 352-382-3650
YOUNG LADY IN DES-
PERATE NEED FORA
VEHICLE! If there's any-
one with a car or truck
available for donation
please help! Contact @
352476-5125



Alante Jr. rear wheel
power Chair GP200,
4 yrs old, never used,
$800 obo
(352) 795-5846
Cell (352) 601-4426
Bruno Lift
for inside vehicle for
electric wheel chair
$500.(352) 726-4558
Celebrity heavy duty,
4 wheel scooter,
like new,
$500. obo
(352) 637-2942
Jet 3 Power Wheel Chair
great shape, with leg ex-
tensions barely used
blue, $475.
464 0316
MOBILITY SCOOTER
3 wheel, heavy duty
Golden Avenger
#za531 5001b cap
$975. All Alum heavy
duty car carrier for
Scooter $850
(352) 522-0467
Single Electric
Medical Bed
w/ 2 mattresses
$550
Wheel chair, $75.
(352) 628-5878



BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We Also
Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676










"NEW" PRO MODEL
ACOUSTIC GUITAR
W/STRAP,PICKS,CD
AND STRINGS,$100
352-601-6625
YAMAHA Digital
Keyboard Like new, 88
key, include matching
stand, sustain pedal,
DVD/manual, org. box,
$400.00 352-726-9797



12 X 12 FLOOR TILES
NEW/118 piecies/$25.00
Linda 341-4449
COMFORTER SET KING
Shams & Bedskirt, NEW,
Cream, Paid $470 sell
$100 firm e-mail photo
352-382-3650
KITCHEN VALENCES
5-12X6 COTTON
BLK/TAN CHECK
JCP HOME 1YROLD
$20 634-2004



ELECTRIC TREADMILL
STATIONARY TYPE
TIMECALORIES DIS-
TANCE ETC. ONLY
100.00 464 0316
RECUMBANT EXER-
CISE BIKE TIME DIS-
TANCE CALORIES
SPEED 0I.00
352 464 0316


-I
Bolt Action cal. .243
$275
(352) 621-0896
CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pond,
ATV trails $165Kobo
352 795-2027/ 634-4745
CLUB CAR
$650
with charger
352-344-8516
CLUB CAR
'06 $1,500,
with charger
352-344-8516

Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238


CHRONICLE




15ct.( $5 per lb
Stone Crab@ $6 per lb
delivered 727-771-7500

Pool Table
full size, exc cond.
balls, ceiling light
$250 (352) 726-5280

WE BUY GUNS
On Site Gun Smithing
(352) 726-5238





EZ PULL TRAILERS,
New & Used

Utility & Enclosed
BUY, SELL, TRADE
Custom Built, Parts,
Tires, Whis, Repairs,
Trailer Hitches

New 6 x 12 open
utility w/ramp $935

Used 6 x 10 enclosed
w/ramp $1595

Hwy 44 Crystal River
352-564-1299

GULF TO LAKE
TRAILER SALES

Largest Selection &
Lowest Prices.
Offering New & Used
Cargo & utility trailers

Triple Crown Utility TRL
6 x 12 w/new spare
$1050.
6 x 12 Enclosed w/
V nose, rear ramp
door, $1995.

Trailer Tires
starting at $69.95

352-527-0555
Hwy 44, Lecanto




CASH For Silver, Decoys
Antiques, Paintings,
Furnitures Cameras, &
Pottery (352) 503-2843







I WANT TO BUY
Your CAR, TRUCK, SUV,
RV, BOAT, Imports or
Any Model, Any
Condition, No Titlle OK.
Paying up to $20,000 or
More. (813) 458-0584
JUNK MOTORCYCLES
WANTED Will Pay up to
$200 for Unwanted Mo-
torcycle 352-942-3492
WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation.
Call (352) 726-9369






A gift for Valentines!
4 adorable little Jack
Russell/Chihuahua
pups 9 wks.w/ Health
Cert.2M/2F $300 ea
352-465-1797

AKC Sheltie male
sable & white 7 mos.
house trained, home
raised w/love, shots, mi-
cro. will sell to loving
home(352) 795-8828
BEAGLE PUPPIES 8
wks on 2/15 4 females 1
male $125., also have 3
Bloodhound/beagle mix
10wks old $50.obo
386-344-4218 or
386-344-4219
Mini Dachshund Pups
8 wks old, shots, paper
trained M/F $350
Breeding Trio $650
mbprozer@tampabay
.rr.com(352) 419-6298

ROTTWEIIER PUPS
8 weeks, 5 girls 3 boys
shots H/C $300 firm
352- 286-4100

TCUP YORKIE Out-
standing Tcup
Yorkie,just 11 wks old,
$450.Good with
kids,AKC reg,vet
checked,dewormed
and shots taken,Pups
comes with papers.
sdpets14@yahoo.com

Yorkie pups CKC, 8
wks March 1st, females
$600 males $550. Judy,
(352) 344-9803




McClelan Saddle
Exc Cond $795.
(352) 795-0619




BOAT LIFT
Single Pole,
1500 lb. capacity.
$900 obo
352-613-8453

JOHNSON O.B.
4.5 hp built in gas tank
exc cond.$395.
Ft. Island Marine Supply
(352) 436-4179
OUTBOARD MOTOR
2003Suzuki 140 4 stroke
251 Hrs like new $6k
352-621-0392




Angler Model 2500
walk around, pur-
chased New March
2009 paid $54,520.


twin eng. 115 Yamaha
warnty 3/15 (14 hrs)
ESTATE PRICE
$37,500 859-229-5667

BAYLINER 15'
Bass or Pleasure,
50hp Force. very low
hrs. all like new $3500
firm(352) 341-1569

COBIA
21FT, Open Fisherman,
w/Evinrude Sea-Pro
and trailer, good cond.
$1,800. (352) 726-8262

CRUISER
INTERNATIONAL
29FT, Rebuilt twin 350's,
fully operational
$10,000 obo Open
House. Fri. 3-6pm
Pete's Pier, Slip 212,
Crystal River
TO BE SOLD SUN. 1PM
Dudley's Auction
AB1667
DudleysAuction.com


15ct.( $5 per lb
Stone Crab@ $6 per lb
delivered 727-771-7500
HOUSE BOAT
30 ft fiberglass, hrd
wood firs, & more
Live Aboard or eniov
weekends in Paradise
$12,800 (423) 320-3008
MONARCH 20 ft
Pontoon Boat, new
deck,carpet, & seats,
75H Merc. mtr. $5,400
(703) 220-5916 cell
MONTERY
'06, 23ft. 305 Inbrd/
Outbrd 400hrs. Mint
Condition, Trailer
$18,500 obo 678-0642
PADDLE BOAT
Seats 4 with bimini top
and canvas cover,
$450. (352) 422-6298
STARCRAFT
1966 15 Ft Fiberglass
1979 Johnson 35 HP out-
board motor
1997 Sportsman trailer
$1000.00
585-259-4184
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LAKE
MARINE
We Pay CASH For Used
Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck & Fishing
Boats (352)527-0555
boatsupercenter.com




















YACHTSMAN
24' Pontoon, 70 HP Ev.
T/T, cust. trlr, bimini top,
stored inside $4,200/bo
Includes Jet Ski,
Homa. (231) 852-0061



2001 38 ft Holiday
Rambler, Cummings
diesel,2 slides, fully
loaded ,sell or trade
property $60000
859-814-3573
2010 MONTANA
Mountaineer, 5th wheel
36ft., 3 slides,loaded
used 1 season, like new
Hickory Addition
$32,500 (419) 307-8954
Bounder
Fleetwood 32 1994
454 engine, loaded,
self contained $9,750
352-795-6736
Holiday Rambler
'98 38' 7.5 gen.super
slide air lever, a/c susp.
loaded call for details
$41K (352) 746-9211
I Buy RV'S Steve
Henry, RV World of
Hudson Inc.Since
1974. (888) 674-8376

SUNSEEKER '05
29 ft. Class. C., nearly
all options, generator,
needs awning fabric,
no smoke,33k mi.
Reduce $24K, 464-0316



05 SUNNYBROOK 36'
5th whl,2 slidesking
bedlike new, heated
tks, 60 amp service
oak cab $39,900
352-382-3298
32" 5th Wheel
$1500
(352) 634-5565
Coachmen '01
Catalina 25 5th wheel
2 slide outs, fully
equipped$8500 obo
352-382-4084/422-2961
Gulf Steam
Coach 25' model
24RBL sips upto 6 gas &
elect appis & heat,
shower/toliet $6900
(352) 341-1714
I BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
Motor Homes
call me 352-201-6945
POP UP Truck
Camper 8' stove refrig-
erator furnace,
good cond $1,800.
(352) 621-0896




BIG SALE!
Consignment USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
AUTOS' FROM $16500.
US 19 BY AIRPORT
US 44, BY NAPA




Running or Not
CASH PAID $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S

& Vans For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES,
Hwy 19... 352 564-8333
CASH PAID FOR JUNK
CARS Any Condition



parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Salvage Pays top $$$
for your autos.
352-628-4144
WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
Perfect Cond. or Not
TItledNo title,
No problem. Paying up
to $25K any make,


any model Call A.J.
813-335-3794/ 531-4298





AFFORDABLE
AUTOS & VANS
Everybody Rides
$495 DOWN
$49 PER WEEK
BUY HERE PAY
HERE..
Lots of clean-safe-
dependable rides.
CALL DAN TODAY
(352) 563 -1902
"WE BUYS CARS
DEAD OR ALIVE"
1675 Suncoast Hwy.
Homosassa Fl.


1


Boats
L9,14:61moll 11,19IMmil i


SUNDAY, MARCH 4, 2012 D7


'08 Chrysler
Sebring Touring
Convertible 34k miles,
loaded, $14,250firm
352-897-4520
ACURA 2002
3.5 RL 4 dr luxury,48k mi
wife can't drive
anymore $11,400
(352) 527-4425

BIG SALE!
Consignment USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
AUTOS' FROM $1,500.
US 19 BY AIRPORT
US 44, BY NAPA
Low Payments *
461-4518 & 795-4440
consignmentusa.org

CADILLAC 04
DeVllle 66k mi, garaged
Champagne, w/top +
Gold Kit, $10,500
352-341-4949
CHEVY
'07, Impala, V6, auto,
ice cold AC, non
smokers lOOK mi $8,250
(352) 726-3093
CHRYSLER 06
Sebring, Touring cony.
45K mi. newer tires,
6 cyl. white, tan top,
loaded, mint, Sr owned
$7500 (352) 513-4257
CHRYSLER
1995 LeBaron Converti-
ble, runs well, needs
some work, sold as is,
$750. (352) 503-6031
Citrus Sale Center
We buy/sell/trade
clean pre-owned
vehicles!


02 Ford Quad CabTruck
F-150 Cab$4999
07 Nissan Murano
$14,900
06 Chrysler PT Cruiser
$6,499
06 Grand Marquis
$13,200 low miles
Call 352-400-1038
CORVETTE
'83, New Motor, BAS
Hammer, SALE! ONLY!
$4,995. (352) 461-4518
ConsignmentUSA.org
HONDA 02
Civic, LX 4 dr. sedan,
103K mis. exc cond.
garage kept, carfax.
5900 (352)382-2581
LINCOLN
'06, Towncar, Signature,
37K miles, looks, drives
even smells like new.
$16,500. (352) 746-1184
MERCEDES '99
S420, blue book $11,500
sell $10K FIRM
1729 W. Gulf to lake
Hwy, Lecanto



908-0330 DAILY CRN
Surplus Prop.
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County Board

SelStrae


of County Commissioners the internet at
will be selling surplus prop- govdeals.com, March 1
erty and equipment via until March 30, 2012.
Pub:March 1 thru 30, 2012


392-0311 SUCRN 3/15 sale Units 500, 521, 434, 527
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
Personal Property of the following Tenants will be sold for cash to satisfy rental liens in
accordance with Florida Statutes, Self Storage Facility Act, Sections 83-806 and
83-807: Windmill Self Storage
UNIT #500; UNIT #521; UNIT #434; UNIT #527
Tenants stored goods, if salable will be sold on site after this Public Notice has been
published two times. Sale will be held on premises, Thurs. March 15, 2012 @ 10 A.M, at
Windmill Self Storage, 2297 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Lecanto, FL 34461 (352) 746-3633.
The sale of stored goods, if not redeemed by payment in full of all delinquent rents
and related costs, may be sold 15 days from the date of the first publication notice
in accordance with Florida Statutes.
March 4 and 11,2012.

396-0311 SUCRN 3/22 sale Diamond Self Storage
PUBLIC NOTICE Notice of Public Sale
Diamond Self Storage wishing to avail itself of the provisions of applicable laws of this
state, Civil Code Section 83.801 83.809, Hereby gives notice of sale under said law,
to wit:
On March 22, 2012, Diamond Self Storage located at 4239 N Modelwood Dr, Bev-
erly Hills, FL 34465, phone 352-746-6997, at 10:00 am of that day Diamond Self Stor-
age will conduct a public sale to the highest bidder, for cash, of household goods,
business property, personal property and misc. items, etc.
Tenant Name Unit# Contents (as listed by tenant)
Tim Evans 752 Household Goods
Glenn Albrecht 279 Household Goods
Alyssa Parker 109 Household Goods
Derek Van Tassell 716 Household Goods
Aida Jiminez 743 Household Goods
Lisa Bristol 443 Household Goods
Jason Fruh 417 Household Goods
Jillian Zizza 702 Household Goods
Judith A. Parker 422 Household Goods
Judith A. Parker 423 Household Goods
Judith A. Parker 424 Household Goods
Judith A. Parker 425 Household Goods
Donna D. Collins 556 Household Goods
The sale is being made to satisfy an owner's lien. The public is invited to attend.
Units will be open for visual inspection at time of sale. Owner reserves the right to bid
and to refuse and reject any and all bids. A $100 (cash) refundable cleaning deposit
is required to bid.
March 4 and 11,2012.


'I *1. s/


394-0311 SUCRN
Aletras, George 2011 CP 781 Notice to Creditors
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2011 CP 781 Division
IN RE: ESTATE OF GEORGE ALETRAS
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of George Aletras, deceased, whose date of
death was December 22, 2009, and whose social security number is 130-48-7555, file
number 2011 CP 781, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Pro-
bate Division, the address of which is 110 N. Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida
34450. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file
their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AF-
TER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is March 4,2012.
Personal Representative:
/s/ Constantine Aletras
59 Arbor Drive, Hohokus, New Jersey 07423
Attorney for Personal Representative:
/s/ Sid C. Peterson, Jr., Florida Bar No. 308587 DeLoach & Peterson, PA.
418 Canal Street, New Smyrna Beach, Florida 32170 Telephone: (386) 2464
March 4 and 11,2012.


391-0311 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Citrus County Hospital Board
Invitation to Submit Qualifications
Consultant to Develop and Implement County Health Plan
SCOPE OF SERVICES: The Citrus County Hospital Board (CCHB) is seeking submittals
from qualified firms or individuals to provide Consulting Services to Develop and Im-
plement the County Health Plan for Citrus County, Florida. Interested firms must ob-
tain and complete all requirements pursuant to this Invitation to Submit Qualifications
(ISQ).
SUBMITTAL DUE DATE: Sealed submittal are due on or before March 30, 2012 at 2:00
p.m. and are to be submitted to:
Vickie D. LaMarche, Chief Operating Officer
Citrus County Hospital Board Offices
123 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450
The Citrus County Hospital Board Offices are located within the building of the Law
Office of Grant & Dozier.
The submittal package will contain one (1) original and seven (7) copies of the com-
pleted submittal clearly marked ISQ No. 03-30-12-2, Invitation to Submit Qualifica-
tions, Consultant to Develop and Implement County Health Plan. Proposals submit-
ted via facsimile or e-mail will not be accepted.
PUBLIC OPENING OF SUBMITTAL: Proposals will be publicly opened on March 30, 2012
at 2:05 p.m. in the offices of CCHB, located at 123 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness,
Florida 34450.
REQUESTING THE ISQ: Please request a copy of the ISQ by e-mail to
cchb.trustees@gmail.com at least three (3) days prior to the above submittal due
date.
ACCOMMODATIONS: Any person requiring reasonable accommodations at the pub-


CIASSIFIEDS



MERCURY GRAND
MARQUIS 97
79K miles, 4 dr, v-8
garage kept
(352) 527-2523

OLDSMOBILE
199688 ...4 Doors,
power locks and win-
dows, a/c and heat, runs
good. $1,100.00
352-400-5152

Saturn Sedan
2000, 31 mpg, runs,
looks good, automatic,
cold air, cruise $3800
(352) 302-2028




AUTO SWAP/
Corral CAR SHOW
Sumter County
Fairgrounds
SUMTER
SWAP MEETS
MARCH 4th. 2012
1-800-438-8559

CHEVY
1977 Corvette T-top, ex-
quisitely maintained only
41,000 miles. Everything
original, new brakes,
looks & runs great.
$13,500. 219-670-1135




BIG SALE!
Consignment USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
AUTOS' FROM $1,500.
US 19 BY AIRPORT
US 44, BY NAPA
Low Payments *
461-4518 & 795-4440
consignmentusa.org

Citrus Sale Center
We buy/sell/trade
clean pre-owned
vehicles!


02 Ford QuadCab F-150
Truck $4999
07 Nissan Murano
$14,900
06 Chrysler PT Cruiser
$6499
06 Grand Marquis
$13,200 low miles
Call 352-400-1038




FORD RANGER 99
Ig bed w/topper, super
clean, 129K miles,
manual trans. well
maint. good mpg.
new stereo.$3000 Call
Doug 352-794-3463


FORD
2006 F150 only 18,000
miles like new org cost
$35,000 call for
appt.352-795-1440 & de-
tails 352-795-1440
$16,200.00
TOYOTA TUNDRA
06, Contractor Model
76K miles. Blue book
$12K ,sell $10K.
(352) 566-8022



FORD 06
EXPEDITION ,Eddie
Bauer, leather int, per-
fect cond, electric 3rd
row LOADED! 92K
(352) 601-0886
HYUNDAI '08
Santa Fe, 23,670K mi
loaded w all acc.
242 hp V6, leather
warranty transferable
$17,500 (352) 465-5501



CHEVROLET
2000 CK2500 PICK-UP
127K,EXT CAB, LONG
BEDAUTOAC,CRUISE,TILT,
AM/FM
BILL@352/860-2131



Harley 00
Roadking Classic, all
gear 17K miles 11K
obo.(352) 489-0873
HARLEY DAVIDSON
08 Night Train, flat blk,
11,500 mis. lots of extra's
$14K obo Jeff
(407) 712-0803
HARLEY-
DAVIDSON
1996 FLSTC Heritage
Softail Classic -9800 mi-
les -like new -frt. & rear
crash bars-
2up backrest seat
w/sissy-bags-lowered-
extra lights
-w/shield-blackcherry/maroon
-everything works
great-must see to appre-
ciate-$7800.00 cheap !
must sell -buying property
352 860 0513 -
352 201 8120
Harley Davidson
883 Hugger,' 99 exc.
cond gar kept, low ms
black. $3500 obo
(352) 613-0523
JUNK MOTORCYCLES
WANTED Will Pay up to
$200 for Unwanted Mo-
torcycle352-942-3492
KAWASAKI 96
GPZ 1100 black, 1800
org miles, garage kept,
Exc Cond. Vance Hines
header & jet kit $4275
obo (352) 795-7584


378-0304 SUCRN
Lecanto HS .-Kitchen Hood Replacement Inv, to Bid
PUBLIC NOTICE
INVITATION TO BID
Sealed bids for furnishing of all labor and materials and performing all work neces-
sary and incidental to LECANTO HIGH SCHOOL KITCHEN HOOD REPLACEMENT will
be received by the Citrus County School Board prior to 2:00 p.m. local time, Tuesday
13 March, 2012 in the Purchasing Department, Citrus County School Board, Building
200, 1007 West Main Street, Inverness, Florida, 34450-4698. Immediately following all
bids received will be opened and read aloud in Building 300, Purchasing Depart-
ment.
Each bid must be accompanied by a certified check or bid bond in the amount of
not less than five percent (5%) of the maximum amount of the Bid as a guarantee
that the Bidder, if awarded the Contract, will within ten (10) calendar days after writ-
ten notice being given of bid acceptance, enter into a written Contract with the
Citrus County School Board, in accordance with the accepted Bid, and give a
surety bond satisfactory to the Citrus County School Board equal to one hundred
percent (100%) of the Contract amount.
No Bidder may withdraw his/her Bid for a period of thirty (30) days after the date set
for the opening of the Bids.
All prime contractors must hold a Citrus County School Board Certificate of
Pre-qualification to bid on Citrus County School Board construction projects. Prime
contractors must be pre-qualified by the Citrus County School Board prior to submit-
ting a bid. Prime contractor's bids must be within the bid limits specified on their
pre-qualification certificate. For contractor pre-qualification information call the Cit-
rus County School Board Facilities and Construction Department at 352/726-1931,
ext. 2208.
Pre-bid Conference:
A. A mandatory pre-bid conference for Prime Contractors, and optional for
sub-contractors, will be held in the Cafeteria, at LecantoHigh School.
B. Conference will occur on Tuesday 6 March, 2012 at 4:00 P.M.
Bidders may obtain a maximum of two (2) sets of Contract Documents from
VERRANDO ENGINEERING CO., INC., 1111 NE 25th AVE, SUITE 401, OCALA, FL 34470
PHONE NO: (352) 854-2664 upon deposit of a check made payable to the Citrus
County School Board in the amount of $ 50.00 per set. A refund of this deposit will
be made upon the return of these Documents in satisfactory condition within ten
(10) days after the opening of Bids.
The Citrus County School Board reserves the absolute right to award the Bid to the
lowest, responsive Bidder, to waive any informality or irregularity in any Bid, or to re-
ject any and all Bids received based solely on the Board's determination of the best
interests of the School District.
CITRUS COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD, INVERNESS, FLORIDA
BY: Sandra Himmel, Superintendent of Schools
February 19, 26 and March 4, 2012.

395-0304 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Citrus County Board of County Commissioners will accept sealed bids for:
Bid No: 026-11
Project: Transit Center for the Citrus County BOCC Division of Fleet and
Transportation.
Financial ID 40262818410 & 40262818410/2-94-10
This is the construction of a new building for Transportation functions and
general site reconfiguration to accommodate bus parking and routing on
site. The budget for this project is $1,800,000.
Bid Due Date: Sealed Bids are due on or before April 13 2012 at 2:00 PM. The mailing
package must be marked to indicate "ITB 026-11", "Bidder's Name" and the words
"Sealed Bid Enclosed". Bids submitted via facsimile or e-mail will not be accepted.
Deliver Bids To: Wendy Crawford
Office of Management & Budget Purchasing Section
Citrus County Board of County Commissioners
3600 W. Sovereign Path Suite 266, Lecanto, FL 34461
Bid Opening Date: Bids will be publicly opened on April 13, 2012 at 2:15 PM at the
Lecanto Government Building Room 226, located at 3600 W. Sovereign Path,
Lecanto, Florida.
Mandatory Pre-Bid Conference: A Mandatory Pre-Bid Conference will be held on
March 21, 2012 at 1:00 PM at the Lecanto Government Building in Room 166 located
at 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Lecanto, Florida 34461.
Bid Security: Bidders must include with their Bid a Bid Bond, Certified Check or
Cashier's Check in the amount of five percent (5%) of the total amount of their Bid.
The Bid Security shall be payable to Citrus County Board of County Commissioners.
Performance and Payment Bonds will be required for this project each in the
amount of one hundred percent (100%) of the Contract Amount.
DBE Utilization Goal: There is a Disadvantaged Business Enterprise (DBE) goal of 8.4%
for this project.
To Obtain Bid Documents: A copy of the Bid Documents may be obtained from FGE
Prints, 8020 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Crystal River, Florida 34429, (352) 302-6824
files@fgeprints.com upon payment of $250.00 for each hard copy set of Bid Docu-
ments, or $50.00 for each electronic copy of the Bid Documents (Florida sales tax is
included). Return of the Bid Documents is not required and the amount paid for the
Bid Documents is non-refundable.
Minimum Requirements to Submit a Bid: Bidders must be pre-qualified by the Florida
Department of Transportation and have bonding capacity for the value of the proj-
ects.
Citrus County Board of County Commissioners hereby notifies all Bidders that it will af-
firmatively ensure that in any contract entered into pursuant to this advertisement,
Disadvantaged Business Enterprises will be afforded full opportunity to submit Bids in
response to this invitation and will not be discriminated against on the grounds of
race, color, gender, religion, age, disability, marital status or national origin in consid-
eration of an award.
Winn Webb, Chairman
CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
March4A 901


393-0304 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Fictitious Name
Notice under Fictitious
Name Law. pursuant to
Section 865.09, Florida
Statutes. NOTICE IS
HEREBY GIVEN that the
undersigned, desiring to


engage in business under
the fictitious name of:
M and L Handyman
Repairs and Services
located at 9050 S. Berk-
shire Ave., Inverness, FL
34452, in the County of
Citrus, intends to register
the said name with the


Division of Corporations of
the Florida Department of
State, Tallahassee, FL.
Dated at Inverness, FL,
this 29 day of Feb., 2012.
/s/ Lee W. Murberg
Owner
March 4, 2012.


lic opening or any interviews of presentations required after submittal because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the Citrus County Hospital Board Of-
fice by calling 352-419-6566 at least two days before the date of any meeting.
NON-DISCRIMINATION: The Citrus County Hospital Board hereby notifies all proposers
that it will affirmatively ensure that in any contract entered into pursuant to this ad-
vertisement all business entities will be afforded full opportunity to submit proposals in
response to this invitation and will not be discriminated against on the grounds of
race, color, gender, religion, age, disability, marital status or national origin in consid-
eration of an award.
March 4 and 11,2012.


388-0304 SUCRN
3/14 Regular Meeting CC Tourist Development Council
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the CITRUS COUNTY TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL
will hold a regular meeting on Wednesday, March 14, 2012 at 9:00 a.m. at the
Lecanto Government Building, Room 166, Lecanto, FL 34461.
Any person desiring further information regarding this meeting may contact the
Executive Offices of the Board of County Commissioners, 110 N. Apopka Avenue,
Inverness, Florida, 34450 (352) 341-6560.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office, 110
N. Apopka Avenue, Room 102, Inverness, Florida, 34450 (352) 341-6560, at least one
day before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD tele-
phone (352) 341-6580.
WINN WEBB, CHAIRMAN
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC: Any person who decides to appeal any decision of the
Governing Body with respect to any matter considered at this meeting will need a
record of the proceedings and for such purpose may need to provide that a verba-
tim record of the proceeding is made, which record includes testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal is to be based (Section 286.0101, Florida Statute).
March 4, 2012.

389-0304 SUCRN
3/8 Meeting Citrus County Aviation Advisory Board
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the CITRUS COUNTY AVIATION ADVISORY BOARD will
meet at 2:00 p.m. on Thursday, March 8, 2012 in Room 166 of the Lecanto
Government Center, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Lecanto, FL 34461.
Any person desiring further information regarding this meeting may contact the
Engineering Division, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Suite 241, Lecanto, FL 34461, or call
(352) 527-5446.
WINN WEBB, CHAIRMAN
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC: Any person who decides to appeal any decision of the Gov-
erning body with respect to any matter considered at this meeting will need a rec-
ord of the proceedings and for such purpose may need to provide that a verbatim
record of the proceeding is made, which record includes testimony and evidence
upon which the appeal is to be based. (Section 286.0105, Florida Statutes).
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the Engineering Division, 3600 W. Sover-
eign Path, Suite 241, Lecanto, FL 34461, or call (352) 527-5446, at least two days be-
fore the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD telephone
(352) 527-5312.
March 4, 2012.

390-0304 SUCRN
3/15 Meeting CC Economic Development Council, Inc.
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Citrus County Economic Development Council,
Inc. will meet on Thursday, March 15, 2012 at 8:30 am. at the College of Central
Florida, Lecanto, Florida.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact 352-795-2000, at least two (2) days
before the meeting.
If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Council with respect to
any matter considered at this meeting, he/she will need to ensure that a verbatim
record of the proceedings is made which record shall include the testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal is to be based.
BY: John Siefert, Executive Director
March 4, 2012.


IMisc. Nod


I Misc. Nod


I Misc Noti g


MeeBtin
I Noice


Meeting
I Notices :1


Meeting
I Notices :1


I ^^Bi oc


I Bid Notic


I Bid Noti


Slo cerage


SelStrae


NdesoCeditrs


Nodces to Creditors/
Administration I


I Misc. Nod


I Misc. Noti


I Misc. Noti




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Tail


www.shrimpapalooza.com

Mardi Gr ra0Homoaat $ le
The-, i,. ll encompass most of Old H,'[I ,i,,, with the area's local merchant participating by '.
similar festivities. It will kick off at 10:30 AM with the Shrimpa-Palooza Parade. Don't miss out on the Food,
Fun and Live Music!
If you'd like to participate in the parade, be a vendor or would like more information please call Tom Feeney
at 352-201-2520, Marybeth Nayfield at 352-795-7297 or E-mail .:.: ........-11. i.-1-1 r: .. ,,,


Rotary Club of
ClTRUS ..C.N T cOU TY
I TllONICLE
\www~chronicleonline~com


Howmosaa Sprinvs 0


CRYSTAL
AUTOMOTIVE
w .I--"J -,


~-
, ~!;


ATTENTION
PHYSICIANS
and Health Related
Businesses
Don't be left out of the
2012 Citrus County
Medical & Wellness Directory


ctRpNiE


Swww.chronicleonline.comrn


RESERVE YOUR
SPACE NOW!
Deadline: Monday, March 5


Come Pinch


We would like to thank
our 2012 Community Partners
for making the
Strawberry Festival Tab possible.


% OTermite and Pest Control


%0IC


- LINCOLN


oopnzr ACE
& CREMATORY The helpful place..
CITRUS MEMORIAL T
W!LIXj r/ 4..4^SQP -


IGSO


ETHI


CITRUS '"COUNTY

www.chronicleonline.com


TAYLOR
MADE
HOMES
u the NVature Cot. l.


Gp


Get current TV listings,
features, movie descriptions,
games and more!!


563-3295
OOOAP9F


2012
Strawberry Festival
March 3 & 4
^A. At .


A Little
Saturday, March 24
10:30 am 10:00 pm
Old Homosassa, FL


Call 563-5592


D8 SUNDAY, MARCH 4, 2012


2011 Directory




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


2012 LINCOLN MKX $f
Introducing MYLINCOLN TOUCH $4 9 t a month cashdueatsigning
Exclusive to the 2012 LINCOLN MKX. Ifor 39 months Security deposit waived.
7 Red Carpet Lease' Excludes tax, title and license fees.
Voice and touch technology2 unlike anything you've ever seen Best-in-class fuel efficiency3 and horsepower
before, What's even more amazing is that it's standard equipment Standard voice-activated SYNC technology2
on the 2012 Lincoln MKX. Available panoramic Vista RoofTM gives you breathtaking views
LINCOLN COMPLIMENTARY MAINTENANCE 4 years or 50,000 miles**


2012 LINCOLN MKZ APR FOR
0 FINANCING MONTHS1
More standard features than Lexus ES 350
Voice-activated SYNC technology standard2


Nick


2012 LINCOLN MKS APR FOR
FINANCING ,J MONTHS'
Available Navigation system with integrated SiriusXM TrafficTM
and SiriusXM Travel LinkTm
Invisible SecuriCodeTM keyless entry keypad
Available active park assist Available EcoBoostTM engine technology


2012 LINCOLN MKT APR FOR
FINANCING U MONTHS'
Available active park assist and EcoBoostTM engine technology
Standard voice-activated SYNC technology2




LINCOLN


iicholas


Crystal River 795-7371
Visit us at www.nicknicholasfordlincoln.com


LINCOLN
VIN# 2LCBL05191, 39 month lease, $499 per month plus tax and title, for 10,500 miles a year. Plus tax and title. Driving while distracted can result in loss of vehicle control. Only use mobile phones/MyLincoln Touch/other devices,
even with voice commands, when it is safe to do so. EPA-estimated 19 city/26 hwy/22 combined mpg, FWD. Class is non-diesel Luxury Midsize Utilities vs. 2011/2012 competitors. Some features are unavailable while driving. Service
available in the 48 contiguous states and DC. Sirius TrafficTM and Sirius Travel LinkTM are trademarks of Sirius XM Radio, Inc. Requires available Navigation System. Offer ends 4/2/12.**Four-year/50,000 mile Maintenance Plan with
purchase or lease. Coverage includes a maximum of 8 regularly scheduled maintenance services. See dealer for complete details.


Nicholas
Ford S.R.44
Lincoln .S.
Formely Gd coas F98


SUNDAY, MARCH 4, 2012 D9




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FI NAL


20 1 1


rIJNJU UN.,J Ll.j


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
1-800-S84-87SS EXT.47373 1-800-S84-872S EXT.17390 1-800-S84-87SS EXT.47407
FINAL MARKDOWN PRICE FINAL MARKDOWN PRICE FINAL MARKDOWN PRICE

$13,999 $13.999 $14.999*


FOR 191


PER I DRIVE
MO. FOR


PER
Mn.


DRIVE $20


PER
Mn.


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
1-800-S8I-87SS EXT.17330
FINAL MARKDOWN PRICE

159.999
DRIVE 1PER
FOR MO.


O 11 SOUL


O011 CRUZE


8011 SEBRING


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
1-800-S84-879S EXT.12101 1-800-S84-879S EXT.17324 1-800-S84-8755 EXT.37307
FINAL MARKDOWN PRICE FINAL MARKDOWN PRICE FINAL MARKDOWN PRICE

$19,99 $19.99 1$15,999*


PER
MO.


DRIVE PER
FOR MO.


DRIVE $219
FOR


PER
MO.


8011 LIBERTY


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
1-800-S84-879S EXT.4739S
FINAL MARKDOWN PRICE

s$1.s999


DRIVE 232
FOR


PER
MO.


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
1-800-S84-87SS EXT.17385 1-800-S84-87SS EXT.61446 1-800-S84-87SS EXT.32078
FINAL MARKDOWN PRICE FINAL MARKDOWN PRICE FINAL MARKDOWN PRICE

ss$19,999 '99I* $18,999*
DRIVE S 0 PER DRIVE $ UR PER DRIVE $ f l PER


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
1-800-S8I-87955 EXT.4730S 1-800-S8I-8755 EXT.37415 1-800-58I-8759 EXT.S1201
FINAL MARKDOWN PRICE FINAL MARKDOWN PRICE FINAL MARKDOWN PRICE

$19.999 F19.999 I20.999
DRIVE PER DRIVE 2 PER DRIVE PER
FOR MO. FOR -- MO. FOR MO.


AWML


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
1-800-584-8759 EXT.17430 1-800-584-8755 EXT.67109 1-800-58I-87SS EXT.37183
FINAL MARKDOWN PRICE FINAL MARKDOWN PRICE FINAL MARKDOWN PRICE

$0.,999 $21.999 559$299*
DRIVE S0 R PER DRIVE fl PER DRIVES 2 E _9 9 PER





OU 11 SEDONA


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
1-800-S84-87SS EXT.112S7
FINAL MARKDOWN PRICE

$18,999*
DRIVE SAN n PER


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
1-800-58I-8759 EXT.37301
FINAL MARKDOWN PRICE

$20,999
DRIVE PER
FOR --- MO.


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
1-800-S84-875S EXT.32162
FINAL MARKDOWN PRICE

26,S999
DRIVE $2UU BER


*ALL PRICES AND PAYMENTS EXCLUDE TAX, TAG, TITLE AND DEALER FEE OF $599.50 WITH APPROVED CREDIT INCLUDES
$1,000 OWNER LOYALTY REBATE, NOT ALL WILL QUALIFY PAYMENTS ARE FOR 84 MONTHS @ 3.99% APR WITH
APPROVED CREDIT PICTURES ARE FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY. PRIOR SALES MAY RESTRICT STOCK.


2 1


*


ID)


WUhm.


LzUN


'-~J1j~


DRIVE 19
FOR


f I


f


c Imqp aI eF


D10 SUNDAY, MARCH 4, 2012


low







Section E SUNDAY, MARCH 4,2012





CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE REAL ESTATE GUIDE


fl Sikorski's
K Attic
PAGE E6


Placemats of weatherworn wood
on woven vinyl are shown in a
style described as modern coun-
try or farmhouse chic.










E2sunday March 4, 2012 Cimus Couivn' (FL) CHRONICLE


*SOARING CEILINGS -STUNNING MASTER
* 3/3/3 Car Gar 2 Gorgeous Patios
* Summer Kit./Lanai Beautiful Ceramic Tile
* Fabulous Pool Area Health Club
KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997

E-MAIL kellygvilemax.niel


3600 N. WILLOWTREE PT.
LAKESIDE VILLAGE
* 2BD/2BA/1CG Maintenance Free
* 1481 sf living area Community pool
* Living & Family Rms. 2 Master suites
PETER & MARVIA KOROL
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875


CITRUS HILLS!!
Stunning 5 bedroom with office, 3 bath,
-car garage, over 3,000 living area,
gourmet kitchen with granite and cherry
cabinets, family room with fireplace,
inground heated pool, vinyl fenced yard,
1 acre.

DIANNE MACDONALD (352) 212-9682 I
Email: djmfl@yahoo.com


4zzo n. LIInIULn AVrlnur
OAKWOOD VILLAGE
* Nice 2BR/2BA/2CG Home
* Eat-In Kitchen Enclosed Lanai
* Ceramic Tile & Carpet
* Built-in Desk & Murphy Bed
* Well-Maintained
LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611
Email: lenpalmer@remax.net


*ALMOST 10ACRES -OPEN PASTURES!
* Huge Screened Pool 20x36 Barn
* Large Great Room Fully Fenced w/Gate
* GREAT PRICE! Serenity Abounds!
KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997
i 1 1 1TT nl 11 i ini nl. Ii n i
www.Floit ida isliunglinlo.coum


WANT PRIVACY???
*ALMOST 3 ACRES GATED & FENCED
*2/2/2 Car Gar. FP in Great Room
Fabulous Kitchen Steel Frame Construction
Great Master Suite! Move-In Ready!!
KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997
*-MIL rT ielslllllreTm, nll,,ln
E-MAIL elliesullon i ilmax nel


INSIST on seeing this one,
magnificent Lantana/Antiqua model
professionally decorated and situated
on an oversized private lot. Corian
countertops, wood cabinets and lots of
tile! Come see it today!
LEO SMITH 352-697-2771
Email: leosmitlh@remax.net


a.-Ir I1. I.mmlmmmulo R.l w 11...
4BR/2BA pool home, Jacuzzi,
out-building, 2.90 acre corner
lot, storage building.

BARBARA MILLS (352) 637-6200
Email: barbarajmills@earthlink.'net


PINE RIDGE ENERGY EFFICIENT (R-30)
POOL HOME ON 1+ AORE. This is a
3/2/2 with open/split floor plan, Corian
counters, instant hot water, seamless window,
pantry, dual pane windows, heated jetted
pool, workshop in garage.
DIR From Hwy 491, to Pine Ridge Blvd, to L on
Baywod, to R on Beamwood, to home
on L, ee ign
DAWN WRIGHT (352) 400-1080
Email: dawnwright@remax.net


3111 N. CHICKASAW WAY
BEVERLY HILLS
*2/2/2 Split Floor Plan Solar Heated Pool
* Oversized Garage w/Workspace Nice Sized Lanai
* Great Location on Cul-De-Sac Laminate Floors
* Newer Roof and NA/C Fresh Paint In & Out
GEILA 'gala' ENGLISH 352-249-6961 I
Email: g.english@remax.net la
www.sellingcitruscountyhomes.com


u lI V I DUl I O//Li unI ./1U tue
* Hardwood Floors Throughout Home
* Large Master Suites Split Floor Plan
* Security System *Fully Enclosed Screen
* Room for Pool and More
* Close to Schools Must See!!!
CHERYL LAMBERT 352-637-6200
Email: cheryllamberl@remax.netl N


<1 242 N. Ieai Hw. eel il 2-82w wRMXco 0 .Mi ,Ivres6760


sU W. InaWInH LANI:
HERNANDO
* Gorgeous 3BR/2BA/2CG Hampton Hills Home
* Gourmet Kitchen w/Stainless Steel Appliances
* Granite Countertops Gas Fireplace
* Lg Screened Tiled Lanai
1 Acre Landscaped Corner Lot
LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611
Email: lenpalimer@remax.net


E2Sunday March 4, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Hire a garden sitter when you go on vacation


DEAN FOSDICK
For The Associated Press

Gardeners don't have to
remain housebound during
the vacation season just be-
cause their edibles and
flowers need tending. Find
a sitter to handle the work.
Keep your must-do list
simple, though. Few plant
minders are willing to do
windows or the laundry.
"The job depends upon
what they have in their
yards and how long they'll
be gone," said Caryn Som-
mersdorf, who operates
Green Garden Sitters in Or-
lando, Fla. 'A vegetable gar-
den may need to be checked
every day A flower garden,
not so much."
Sommersdorf and partner


OOOAR15



Akas]


Jennifer Richardson per-
form the typical seasonal
gardening chores weed-
ing and watering, mowing
and harvesting.
"We'll also bring in the
mail. Turn the lights off and
on to make it look like some-
body's home. We'll fertilize
and prune and care for our
clients' pets, too," she said.
"But we're not going to
clean or paint the house."
Sommersdorf got into the
garden-sitting business a
few years ago after asking a
friend to take care of her
tomatoes while she was
away
"I asked her to water the
plants, but she didn't think
about picking them, and the
plants were a mess when I
came home," she said.


REAL ESTATE, INC.
5569 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY.
CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429
oFcE: (352) 795-6633
WWWALEXRE.COM E-MAIL: SALES@ALEXRE.COM


I O/"
,1/1'
BEST

Realtor


A_ 3 O DUTY SE DAvYS A WEE


HOMOSASSA 1980 D/W M/H w/3
bedrooms, 2 baths, split floor plan, 2 car
carport, screen porch, workshop, shed, .1....
fans, formal dining and eat in kitch ..
breakfast bar Tmmaculate #344627 $64.900


DUNNELLON 1998 nobility D/W M/H w/3
bedrooms, 2 baths, on 2 5 acres Master bath
garden tub w/dbl vanity & shower Country
kitchen, vaulted ceilings, 16 x 20 work shop
w/electric, inside laundry w/washer-dryer


HOMOSASSA Big & beautiful, 2007 4
bedroom, 2 5 bath D/W M/H on 1+ acre of
land Kitchen w/island, large family rm w/
wood burning fireplace, cathedral ceilings,
new carpet, formal dining rm, inside laundry
#353003 $77,900





LECANTO Private pe. r..1
acre lot, 3 bedroom, 2 '*. I II
ceilings, Ig front porch, enclosed rear porch, 3
workshops/sheds, inside laundry, fenced
#352126 $35 000



N -fc* Li


I HOMOSAS' % T beautiful, 4 bdrm, 2
INVERNESS convenient location to bath, 1999 I II on 1/2 ac Financing
downtown, 2 bedroom, I bath, family room, .1 ., ,1. I. .1
utility room, screened patio and car garage .1... .. ...
I .. .. I . T .. .1 ... ..., 1 1. 1., Stone faced
U 1.1h, I.. .... I I,, I I t .AQ Quin


"They had worms every-
where. Fruit flies. It took
them a while to produce
again."
Reliable plant sitters can
provide peace of mind for
vacationing gardeners,
Sommersdorf said. They
also can save them money
"Florida has a lot of
'snowbirds' (winter resi-
dents) who go away for half
a year and come back and
all their landscaping is
dead," she said. "That's
quite an investment lost"
Gardeners going on vaca-
tion should create a chores


0IT RU & I OFFICES


Sandra Olear




Brian Murray




Anna Moore
B




DickHildebrandt




Florence Cleary




Helen Forte



Jane 0. Gwynn



Joann Martin




Matt Robinson




Tamli Mayer


checklist, and arrange for
an interview and plant tour
with prospective sitters well
before departing. Show
them where the hoses,
pruners and other tools are
kept and demonstrate how
they work.
Offer up the edibles when
they ripen, and point out
your favorite flowering
plants to ensure they are not
weeded out.
"Design a watering pro-
gram. Group your container
plants so they're easier to
work with. Timers can be
great on hoses but be sure


you have someone around
who can keep an eye on
them for you," said Robin
Haglund, president of Gar-
den Mentors Inc. in Seattle,
who frequently is asked how
to prep plants for trips.
You may want to provide
your own supplies, too,
such as fertilizers and pest-
control products if you're
into organic gardening, she
said.
Garden sitters also can
serve as temporary man-
agers of a property, said
Jack McKinnon, who oper-
ates a business called The


Garden Coach in the San
Francisco Bay Area.
"Some people hire main-
tenance services for their
yards," he said. "Some of
these crews come at odd
hours and need to be held
accountable for what they
do."
McKinnon suggested a
few ways to find garden sit-
ters: "Go online. Look for
ads in the paper under
'Landscape Gardeners.' I
doubt it's all that difficult to
find knowledgeable people
looking for garden work in
this economy."


Prudential

Florida Showcase
Properties


RENTALS AVAILABLE


Open 1 Days For Your Convenience
20 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, FL 34442
1-888-222-0856 (352) 746-0744
1481 Pine Ridge Blvd.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465
1-888-553-2223 (352) 527-1820


For a Visual Tour or Multiple Photos, Go to: www.floridashowcaseproperties.com


OPEN HOUSE SUN. 12-2
-Pi::="' ^


Helen Forte 352-220-4764


MLS #353957 $324,500
The Beauty, elegance, quality, &
efficiency of this Oaks Golf Course
home w/a 2 fountain view will
satisfy the most discriminating
buyer. You will be amazed at the
many upgrades in this home. WOW!


right onKeller,tohomeon ght
Dick Hildebrandt 35
NEW LIS




1I33INj Sli.,Il
MLS #35
This 3/2/2 w/den has
changes: bedroom 2 e
adding a bay window.
a computer nook. Surr
double French doors le
&a 12x24 gas heated p
PENDII


SUN. 1-3 OPEN HOUSE SUN. 1-3




53847 $214,900 l ....1. AP
NE ALL KNOW / r . ....
MOST IMPORTANT
DISAPPOINT Oaks

Adnc to rightonGadsden
2-586-0478 Jo Ann Martin 352-613-2238
TING NEW LISTING




.,,., P 111 I !0a, E S II0I.I.Itl Di
3918 $250,000 MLS #353924 $122,500
a few design Desirable layout, soaring ceilings
enlarged 4' by and a split floor plan, 3/2/2. Large
Powder rm. to kitchen, huge great room and
ound Sound & enclosed Florida room under AC.
ad to the lanai The ICC offers golf, tennis,
ool. swimming, dining and a pro shop.
NG PENDING


Jo Ann Martin 352-613-2238


MLS #353915 $89,900
2 acre 3/2 ranchette w/country feel
& a short distance to town. A
studio/office separate from the
house that is finished. Lots of
dining, churches, trails, public lake
access & state forest nearby.


JJ.P.Lt lIlC ll l 0 Il j.lrd 1'11 A I 1 I 4ur I iIUl UIl b ulu lLI W I, V" bIylI Irl- Ul
MLS #352045 $139,000 MLS #352119 $119,900 MLS #353631 $69,900 MLS #351154 $49,900
Well maintained pool home in 3/2/2 Britney model w/beautiful "Cottage Unit" The one everybody Cozy 2/1.5/1 in a nice Beverly Hills
secluded cul-de-sac location, offernng solar heated pool, split plan, wants. Ground floor, end-unit, single neighborhood. Newer roof in '03,
3/2.5/2; dining room, large nook, air oversized lot, private backyard, story, well kept, fully furnished with A/C in '05, water heater in '05, +
conditioned work room, security large lanai, separate laundry room, enclosed lanai. Pull into your private backyard. Home has
system, skylights, double pane tile & much more. Priced for quick attached carport and unpack your Florida room and extra sun room.
windows, garden tub & bidet, sale, come see this beauty today clothes. Nothing else needed! Seller will consider all offers!
2011 Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities. An independently owned and operated broker member of Prudential Real Estate Affiliates, Inc., a
Prudential Financial company. Prudential, the Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are service marks of Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities, [
registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Used under license. Equal Housing Opportunity.


li
Joy Holland




Kathy Dagle




LoriNickerson



Mark Casper




Mike McHale




PhilPhillips



Steve Dobbyn










F',
Joann Condkit


SUNDAY, MARCH 4, 2012 E3


^A&<







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Sara answers readers' questions


Dear Sara: I spilled nail polish
on my comforter. How do I re-
move it? -Julie Ann, Illinois
Dear Julie Ann: You can use Off bug
spray (aerosol). Place a cloth under
the stain to catch anything that might
bleed through. Saturate the stained
area, then rub with a cloth or tooth-
brush. Repeat as the stain lifts and
then launder as usual. If there's still a
bit of stain remaining, don't place the
comforter in the dryer. Try spraying
the stained area with hairspray and
launder again. You can try pure ace-
tone, too. I suggest purposely staining
a scrap piece of cotton fabric and test-
ing stain-removing methods before at-
tempting the comforter. This will
allow you to use the least amount of
chemicals on your comforter.
Dear Sara: My oatmeal cookies did-
n't turn out well, and now no one will
eat them. The flavor is fine, but the
texture is mushy. I'd hate to throw


them out Do you have any
suggestions for something I
can do with them? -
Janelle W, email
Dear Janelle: You can
crumble them and use
them as an ice cream, pud-
ding or yogurt topping. Or
take the crumbled cookies
and bake them until they're
crunchy and use them as a
pie crust or incorporate
them into your breakfast
cereal, trail mix or a trifle.


Sara
FRU
LIVI


Dear Sara: Can you please tell me
how to make a windshield cleaner for
my car? Also, can you tell me how to
get rid of rust stains on my cement
basement floor? Dan S., email
Dear Dan S.: There are recipes for
windshield wiper fluid, but it's hard to
beat the price of buying it Plus, many
homemade recipes include ingredi-
ents such as vinegar, alcohol, dish


soap, etc. that might cause
damage to paint finish and
car parts, so I don't recom-
mend them for filling the
reservoir. As for the rust on
your cement floor, try using
vinegar and baking soda
with a scrub brush. You can
try products such as Bar
Keeper's Friend, washing
Noel soda and Spic and Span,
GAL too. Home improvement
ING stores carry stronger rust
removers (products that
contain oxalic acid, for example). Be
sure to read product directions and
wear rubber gloves.
Dear Sara: Can cinnamon sticks be
dried and reused? Last night I made
sweet potato soup from a recipe that
called for one cinnamon stick. I forgot
to put it in until the soup was almost
done, so it was cooking for only about
10 minutes and then I took it out,
rinsed it off and put it aside to dry I'm
sure it lost some of its strength, but do
I really need to throw it away? G.G.,
forums
Dear G.G.: While some will argue

See FRUGAL/Page E7


Jackie & Bob Davis
American Realty & Investments ,
117 S. Hwy 41 Inverness, FL
(352) 634-2371 Cell (800) 476-2590 Toll Free
ER 1A bob@bjdavis.com "
For a Visual Tour of our listings and all MLS: bdaviscom


A perfect his 'n her home. For her: gorgeous new kitchen cabinets, granite
counters, newer appliances, tray ceilings, wood laminate floors. For him: an
18' x 20' workshop w/both garage & service doors. For them: breakfast nook,
interior laundry, garden tub, large pantry, pool with salt system, newer C/H/A. The
extended lanai has a firepit for entertaining, the yard is fenced, and all of this joy
sits on an acre on a quiet street.
$192,000 MLS354004


0.,,., 1 1 I .111 .,. 1 .. ,,rl r ,,,,, r I h Y 11 1- ,,, ..: '.I i.h. I ... i I I lH .,: ...... I .
city of Inverness, but not too close. Just right. This end-unit villa has 2 bedrooms,
2 baths in a split plan, a large screened entry, an eat-in kitchen and a Florida room for
year-round enjoyment. Maintenance fee provides lawncare, irrigation, basic cable,
garbage pickup, water, sewer, active clubhouse and pool. Owner financing is available.
$64,900 MLS 354027 1


Dividing and


planting bulbs

species is the basic conditions, etc., yet it is still
A unit of naming for a a single species. For exam-
1 i v i n g ple, Florida's
group or taxa. It native, cone-
usually contains bearing cycad,
closely related Coontie in the
individuals with Zamia genus,
similar mor- had been for-
phology (exter- merly labeled as
nal forms and Z floridana, um-
relative position brosia and
of plant organs). pumila. The sci-
Individuals F entific rule is to
within a species Jane Weber revert to the
are often found JANE'S first published
in a distinct geo- name. Coontie is
graphical range. GARDEN now officially Z.
Species do not pumila, al-
naturally crossbreed or though it occurs naturally
pollinate with different throughout the Caribbean
species. region.
Scientists can accurately The Cardboard Plant,
identify DNA in plants. A also in the Zamia genus of
species may have several the Cyadaceae family, was
slightly different charac- called Z. furfuracea, but is
teristics due to habitat, soil,
exposure, environmental See JANE/Page E5


MEET AND GREET
Clubs are invited to submit in-
formation about regular meet-
ings for publication on the
Community page each weekday.
Include the name of the organi-
zation, the time, day and place
of the meeting, whether it
meets weekly, biweekly or
monthly, and whom to call for
details.
Send in information attn: Com-
munity Page Editor, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal
River, FL 34429, or fax to 352-
563-3280, attention: Club
meetings.
E-mail to community@chronicle
online.com. Include "Club Meet-
ings" in the subject line.


WONDERING IF YOU
SHOULD SELL YOUR HOME!
WONDER NO LONGER
Call DEBBIE RECTOR'S TEAM
Licensed Real Estate Consultants (Realtors)
For a FREE MarketAnalysis and Marketing Plan
$1.7 million already closed by March 1,2012
Call Debbie Rector's Team
or visit www.buyfloridahomesnow.com
[m To Learn More
| L (352) 746-9924 KELERWILJAMS


REALTY G RO UP





2Bd/2.5Bath/Den/2Car/Pointe Vista
N- F
Nestled in 2 e heart f Te I Vista you'll find this uniquely private enclave This impressive
collection of just 1, carefree carnage homes are highlighted by striking design and refined
Detached Villa/3Bd/2Bath/2CarjPool/Hillside Villas

pool and spa Immaculatel
MLS#353652 $415,000 MLS#348688 $299,900


Luxury at its finest This fabulous Pcasso model features a custom made Terra Vista Maintenance Free Villa Popular Lantana model Open
wet appliances, gas floor plan features form .l, ,I 1,. . Ift I.., and the 3rd
fire Ds nothing to be bedroom can be used for .'. ..'. .. / finished with
pavers for nice curb appeal Well maintained
MLS,353123 $499,000 MLS#353077 $219,000









Detached Villa/2Bd/2Bath/2Car/Brentwood Villas Townhome/3Bd/2.5Bath/1Car/Brentwood Townhomes
Wonderful fully furnished 2 bedroom with den ready for move in Brentwood Townhomes spacious unfurnished end unit Great
Location Enjoy the amenities of Terra Vista with your rental
S1288 $1400 I 149 $1100
Terra Vista Realty Group, LLC Office in the
2400 North Terra Vista Blvd., Hernando, Florida 34442 Terra Vista %
(352) 746-6121 (800) 323-7703 Welcome Center -


E4 SUNDAY, MARCH 4, 2012







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


JANE
Continued from Page E4

now correctly named Z.
maritima. Originating in
Central America and Mex-
ico, it is not frost-hardy in
temperate North Florida.
A favorite garden peren-
nial is the beautiful amaryl-
lis, Hippeastrum hybrids
originally from South
Africa. Flowers are insect-
pollinated. Male pollen
from a striped pink flower
may fertilize the female pis-
til of a solid red-colored
amaryllis. The resulting
seed can have traits from
both parents. Breeders grow
seedlings for years, then se-
lect plants to clone that have
desirable and marketable
size, color, form, fragrance
or other characteristics.
Cold mornings and short
hours of weak winter sun-
light have caused garden
Amaryllis leaves to yellow,
wilt and die off naturally
Winter is a good time to dig
up clumps of dormant
perennial bulbs. Each flow-
ering-sized bulb usually has
smaller bulbs clustered


around its basal plate where
the roots emerge. These
clones will be the same
color as the parent
Replant three to seven
large bulbs of the same
color and characteristics to-
gether in a group. Soil
should be rich in organic
matter to retain moisture
and provide nutrients
naturally
Amaryllis likes afternoon
shade in hot climates. Do
not damage the bulbs by
stomping on them. Settle
soil around the bulbs by wa-
tering. Irrigate every other
week in winter.
Amaryllis bulbs will set
new roots over winter in
temperate Florida zones 8
to 11. After the last frost of
March, wide, strap-like
leaves will emerge. Some-
time in April, a fat round
stem will grow taller than
the leaf height. Each flower
stem produces three to
seven large, spectacular
flowers.
After blooms fade, gar-
deners may cut the flower
stalk at ground level to keep
the bed tidy Experimenters
who have different color
forms growing in the neigh-


borhood may want to let
seed mature. If there are
only red ones locally, there
should be little chance of
pollination with other col-
ors. It will take several years
for the resulting bulbs to
reach flowering size.
The smaller bulbs har-
vested from parents can be
planted in separate grow-
ing-on beds. Keep each
color separated from bulbs
of a different color or you
will have to wait years for


the flower color to be deter-
mined. Use buried plastic
tags cut from a bleach bottle
to identify color lots. Direct
sunlight causes many plas-
tics to disintegrate and per-
manent marker writing to
fade. A label cut from an
aluminum soda can be in-
dented by a nail or old ball-
point pen. Future
generations will all call this
beautiful bulb by its genus
name Hippeastrum. The
former genus name,


KEY "Always There For You"
EY GAIL COOPER
,am Multi-Million Dollar Realtor
ER P Cell: (352) 634-4346
OFFICE : (352) 382-1700x309
E-mail me: homes4u3@mindspring.com


LOOKING FOR A "CRAFT ROOM"?
3/2/2 Great Room home -1545 sq ft
* Air conditioned 11x6 room for crafts/office
* Freshly painted with new carpeting
A/C heat replaced in 2007
SGlassed Florida room
* Owner will consider financing
#353253 $110,000


IMMACULATE SWEETWATER TRADEWINDS!
* 3/2/2 Great Room pool home built in 2005
* Oversized pool filter for greater efficiency
*18" diagonal tile in the walkways
Dual pane windows AND sliding doors
SExtra deep garage measures 20x30
* Home warranty for the buyers
#353972 $227.500


Aanua & Nrk Johson Tom Ballour Ul Avenus & Hal Steier ArtPaty 7 4 6 9 0 0 0
BROKERiASSOC. REALOR REALTOR REALTOR- BROER REALTOR







238 E. TRPLE CROWN LR 4/3/3 353329 $385,000 900N. CTRUSSPRNGSBLVD., 4/3/3 353901$169,900 2173W TACOMA 4/3/5380N DLP .. '." $124 9





N. RACKLE, 3/2/2 48792 $109900 4144 N. MAE WEST, 3/2/2 351560 $86,900 |21 TRUMAN BLVD. 565 6870 N. CORTLAND DR., 2/2/2 352 00




..1., LJ... .L.,'.J JM
N,3/2/2 353982 $89,900 6396 N. EARL, 9570 N. CITRUS SPRINGS, 348850 $176,900
3521 N. LECANTO HWY., BEVERLY HILLS, FL 34465 1-888-789-7100


Amaryllis, is now used as a
common name globally


Jane Weber is a Profes-
sional Gardener and Con-
sultant. Semi-retired, she
grows thousands of native
plants. Visitors are wel-
come to her Dunnellon,
Marion County garden. For
an appointment call 352-
249-6899 or contact
JWeberl2385@gmail. com.


L LOU Miele Realtor
ALWAYS THERE FOR YOU@
Cell: (352) 697-1685


SUNDAY, MARCH 4, 2012 E5


GOT A NEWS TIP?
* The Chronicle welcomes
tips from readers about
breaking news.
* Call the Chronicle
newsroom at 352-
563-5660, and be
prepared to give your
name, phone number,
and the address of the
news event.


SS AMERICAN
KA REALTY & INVESTMENTS
4511 N. Lecamto Hwy.
Beverly His, FL 34465
Office: 352-746-3600


THi S Ei : I


TERRA VISTA
S- Beautiful "Windward"
3 Bed, 2.5 Ba, Cul-De-Sac,
- 2203 Sq. Ft. Liv.
Priced for Immediate Sale
MLS #352882
$224,900





Jackie Gaffney Jason Gaffney
Realtor, USE Realtor'-
302.3179 so a 287.9022
WEEKS REALTY, 5 BEVERLY HILLS BLVD.
The Golden Girl 746.6700


10076 N. OCEAN DR.
6340 N. WHISPERING OAK LP CITRUS SPRINGS
BEVERLY HILLS 3/2/2, Fireplace, fenced backyard, new paint in &
2004 Custom built Rusaw home, 3/2/2, comfortable out, new cabinets throughout new tiled baths wood
eat-in kitchen, tiled entry, kitchen, foyer, baths & lanai. laminate flooring, French doors to den. Home is like
French doors, large master walk-in closet. a dollhouse -like buying a new home!


I See irtul T urs @ www I.reaeoeI.I~com







E6 SUNDAY, MARCH 4, 2012




=HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information........352-563-5592
..................................... .............. advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information......................... 352-563-5966
News information................................................ 352-563-5660
....................................... ............. newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listing............www.ChronicleHomeFinder.com
"The market leader in real estate information"



HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-563-
3280, attention HomeFront.
News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront.
Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes for
space and/or clarity.
For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Spring gardening guidance:


It's just a phone call away


spring is in the air, and it's time to While there is much to be done
get geared up for outdoor activi- around the yard, don't feel like you
ties in and around the need to be an expert to nav-
yard. March is a time to igate through your garden
focus on clearing away cold- chores. UF/IFAS Citrus
damaged and overgrown County Extension is ready
plant materials in prepara- .- a to assist you by answering
tion for a spring flush of your gardening questions
growth. There is no better .. via the very popular
time than the present to get Master Gardener Volunteer
launched on preliminary program.
garden chores such as: The Citrus County Master
Testing the pH levels in Joan Bradshaw Gardener Program is a vol-
planting beds. FLORIDA- unteer-driven program de-
Fixing, sharpening or signed to deliver University
replacinggarden tools that FRIENDLY of Florida information to
will soon be in use. LIVING residents focusing on select-
Tuning up the lawn ing suitable Florida-friendly
mower for many months of use. plants, plant placement and plant care.
Repairing broken or weak arbors, Trained Master Gardener volunteers
fences and trellises, are available weekdays to answer ques-
Cleaning and repairing irrigation tions on everything from which shrubs
heads and drip irrigation lines, grow best in our area to which insect is
Removing leaves from the bottom chewing on your prized canna lilies.
of ponds or other water features. Simply telephone 352-527-5700 and
Inspecting birdfeeders, bird- ask to be connected to the Master Gar-
houses and birdbaths to be sure they dener Volunteer help desk. Better yet,
are in good working order, stop by and visit University of


Florida/IFAS Citrus County Extension
located at 3650 W Sovereign Path,
Suite 1, Lecanto, FL 34461. Have a pad
and pen handy so you don't miss any
gardening tips.
In addition to a telephone help
desk, Citrus County Extension also
provides monthly seminars and plant
clinics hosted by Citrus County Master
Gardener Volunteers. These programs
are available at no cost at libraries
throughout the county Monthly plant
seminars offer an opportunity for the
general public to learn about timely
topics in garden, plant and landscape
maintenance.
For March, Master Gardeners will
be giving a presentation on general
lawn care, fertilizing and weed man-
agement. Plan to attend this seminar
on the dates and places listed below:
2 p.m. Wednesday, March 7, Floral
City Library, Floral City
1:30 p.m. Wednesday, March 14, Cen-
tral Ridge Library, Beverly Hills.
1 p.m. Wednesday, March 21,
See Page E7


Marbletop tables remain popular; a French armchair


Dear John: This antique table was given "thrown out." The stage manager collected it
to me by a dear friend, now deceased. I from the street and it was used in the show.
was told it was nearly 100 There are no markings of where or
years old when I received it some who made it. However, there was a
fifteen years ago. I can find no mark- I paper tag that stated that is was
ings on it. It is in very good to excel- "shipped" via ship from France. I
lent condition. Can you tell me have included several pictures of it
anything about the table and its ap- p and want to know how I can find out
proximate worth? D. WM., Ho- l more about it. -D.L., Internet
mosassa Dear D.L.: In France your chair is
Dear D.W.M.: You have a good- called a bergere, an upholstered
looking American-made white mar- armchair with the sides upholstered
bletop lamp table in Renaissance John Sikorski under the arms. If the arms were left
Revival style. It was manufactured SIKORSKI'S open it would be called a fauteuil. I
in the 1880s, possibly in Grand think it was manufactured long after
Rapids, Michigan. Tables like these ATTIC World War II, probably the 1960s to
are as popular today as they were 1980s. I have no idea what company
originally, since they can be used almost any- made it or if it was a designer-made style. For
where in the home. Current potential dollar possible research at the library, try 20th cen-
value is $250 to $500. tury bergeres. Good luck.
Dear John: I am a long time listener, first Dear John: Great program and articles.
time e-mailer. I follow your show most Satur- Hope you or a reader can help me. I am trying
days on Classic 89. I purchased a chair from a to identify a big, old wooden and brass helm or
stage manager back in 1992. The chair was ac- ship's steering wheel. It is four and half feet in
quired for the Palm Beach Community College diameter with eight spokes. The center hub is
play '"Alice in Wonderland." solid brass, more than an inch thick.
All that I know about the chair is that it was There is no identification of any kind on it It
from an estate in Palm Beach and was being was bolted to the wall in the home of an eld-


early woman. She did not remember where it
came from or anything about its origin, al-
though she seems to recall some link to Guam,
the American-island territory in the Pacific. -
PH., Internet
Dear PH.: The type of ship's wheel you have
was manufactured by numerous makers in I
large quantities. They have been used by inte-
rior designers for novel decorative uses as ta-
bles, chandeliers, wall mounted decor and
more. Those that are in the four-foot diameter
size like the one you have typically sell in the
$250 to $500 range.
Dear John: I listen to your show every Sat- -
urday while I am driving back to Tallahassee
from Lake City I have two sets of encyclope-
dias. One is "Encyclopedia Americana," a 1967 E i
set of 30. I also have The Americana 1968 and
1969 Annual.
The second one is "Illustrated World Ency-
clopedia" set of 21, Copyright USA MCMLXIX.
I also have a copy of "Cole Introduction to
Livestock Production," 2nd edition, Freeman
1966. I am interested in where to find out what Special to the Chronicle
they may be worth. Can you help me? S.N, This upholstered armchair is of the
Internet French style known as berg6re. It
was probably manufactured in the
See Page E9 late 20th century.







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



SPRING
Continued from Page E6

Citrus Springs Library, Citrus
Springs.
1:30 p.m. Friday, March 9,
Coastal Region Library, Crystal
River.
E 1 p.m. each Tuesday, Lakes
Region Library, Inverness.
2 p.m. Tuesday, March 27,
Homosassa Library, Homosassa.
Be sure to make a list of your
questions or bring your prob-
lem plants to one of the re-
gional plant clinics offered
throughout Citrus County.
Another service provided by
Citrus County Extension is soil
analysis. Now is an excellent
time to submit a soil sample for
analysis to determine pH and
fertility problems in garden
and landscape areas.
Citrus County Extension of-


FRUGAL
Continued from Pa

my opinion, I would not reuse c
mon sticks for food if they've all
been used in food. I'd be fear]
contamination. However, I v
reuse them for simmering potp(
or if the original use was in some
such as tea and I drank several
per day, I'd reuse the stick.
Dear Sara: How do I keep my
color from fading? I just got my
highlighted yesterday (color,
bleach) and it's an expensive pr(
But usually within the first two v
it fades a lot I've done some re;
and learned that hair color fade
most in the first two weeks and
stabilizes. I also heard that if I ri
in vinegar it will stop the fadin?
when I looked on the Internet
covered that's what I'm supposed
if it's too dark and I want it to
faster. I don't know what to d
Bunny, Virginia
Dear Bunny: I'm not a special
this area, but I've had good su
with Redken Color Extend. You i
find that brands such as TRESe
Color Revitalize Shampoo work j
well. I suggest you use cooler )
versus hot water to shampoo,
avoid washing your hair in the fi:
hours after coloring. Semi-perm;
color fades faster than permanent
color. Red dyes fade more quickly
other colors, too. I would think vii


SUNDAY, MARCH 4, 2012 E7


Citrus County Extension offers soil pH
testing on site, andhas soil sampling
kits which allow you to mail the sample
to U of F's soil testing laboratory.


fers soil pH testing on site, and-
has soil sampling kits which
allow you to mail the sample di-
rectly to the University of
Florida's soil testing laboratory
for more in-depth analysis. A $3
fee is charged for in-house soil
pH analysis. For more informa-
tion on services offered by Cit-
rus County Extension, please
call 352-527-5700.
Citrus County Extension links
the public with the University of
Florida/IFAS' knowledge, re-
search and resources to address
youth, family, community and
agricultural needs. All pro-
grams and related activities


sponsored for, or assisted by, the
Institute of Food and Agricul-
tural Sciences are open to all
persons without discrimination
with respect to race, creed,
color, religion, age, disability,
sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political
opinions or affiliations, genetic
information and veteran status
as protected under the Vietnam
Era Veterans' Readjustment As-
sistance Act.


Dr Joan Bradshaw is director
of UF/IFAS Citrus County
Extension.


CAROLE ULSTER
f l W Multi-Million Dollar Realtor
ERS Cell: 422-4620 Office: 382-1700 REAL NA
View virtual tours @ www.listerlistings.com





ERA KEY I OPEN HOUSES
24 each day


See Page E9


I CU -D-AC, I COD O GL COUSE


Take my virtual I I I L 1 Y 1--A


4041S


Investors Realty
of Citrus County, Inc.
Visit my website at: www.myflorida-house.c


38 HAWTHORNE
CYPRESS VILLAGE
Fabulous Sweetwater 3/2/2 home on cul-
de sac! Move-in ready condition. All
neutral colors and sparkling clean!
Conveniently located to the new i 1. ...
center and Suncoast Parkway.
MLS 353832 $149,000


GITTA BARTH
REALTOR
(352) 220-0466
om gbarth@myflorida-house.com

-E A~7*]1


3644 E. LAKE TODD DR. PINE RIDGE
ARBOR LAKES One-of a-kind horse lover's dream home in
Beautiful 2/2/1 home in gated 55+ the Equestrian section next to trails
community on Lake Tsala Apopk-. r' r '- D-n4 v/exquisite taste, attention to
floor plan, vaulted ceilings, tile :1 . ..i .. I. quality & craftsmanship shows
. .. .. ... 1. .. 1 .,has room throughout the 3 bed, 2 5 bath, 4-car garage
I. I home Fenced paddock w/water & shelter
MLS #353089 $116,000 MLS #349970 $415,000
LaLd -


3560 N WOODCATE DR. .. ... -
THE GLEN 1432 SEATTLE SLEW -
......... INVERNESS i *tL. fiU
,. ,, i, ...... .... ... ,, I .. ,, .. ... CRAB THIS
surrounded by nature, close to ,, , i..... gated community of BARGAIN!
dining, medical. The home is n. .. i ... .. 11.11 homes with upgrades like Take a look at this magnificent 4+/4/5
condition, ready for you to move in, relax on hardwood floors, gourmet kitchen and an Country Estate on 10+ acre and take a 360
your front porch and watch the wildlife in the impressive porch for entertaining It can be interactive virtual tour at
large greenbelt1 yours wwwmnycountrydreamhome com
MLS #350097 $54,000 MLS#351012 $215,000 MLS#350369. $565,000





115 N. LEGION TERR. 7373 E. SHADIWOODS CT.
CITRUS HILLS FLORAL CITY 7080 DUVAL ISLAND DR.
Enjoy nature with mature oal .. I r .... I . 1. I .11 your toys FLORAL CITY
nice landscaping in beautiful C .i,. I.n I ... I .. I i 1. i i n beautiful Incredible Vistas open waterfront on
Situated on a one acre corner lot, this rolling 5 82 MOL acres fenced Nice nux of pasture Lake Tsala Apopka, beautiful landscaped
3BR, 3BAhome with screened in pool and and woods Relax on the porch and watch the yard with waterfall and pond, a dock for
patio area offers you t.l ... .... ., i i . .. ..... .1 .. ... i tt to go fishing this 3/2/1 pool
want!! Everything is very .. ..... . .. ... .. 05 acre offers the lifestyle and
New roof 5/2009. Just bri.. .... .. ... I I.. . you deserve. It can be your
and move right in! .1 i I i "
MLS#346203 $175,000 $I 4 ,,a $89,500 iLS#351008 $239,000


COLDWeLL
BANKeRo







E8 SUNDAY, MARCH 4, 2012







Designers, decorators give rustic syle modeORARY update















Designers, decorators give rustic style modern update


KIM COOK
For The Associated Press

rowse through old Country-
oriented shelter magazines
and you'll see a lot of what
designers used to call "duck
and basket" decor: calico-
print-filled rooms, Colonial fur-
nishings, walls stenciled with
flowers and ducks.
It was a homey, well-loved
style.
Now a new generation of home
decorators and stylemakers is
updating the look. Country Living
magazine fills pages with bright
colors, crisp graphic prints, tag-
sale side tables and smart mid-
century sofas. There are still
great baskets, but nowadays the
duck's more likely to be part of a
hip new wallpaper.
Call it Modem Country or
Farmhouse Chic it's sparer
and less cluttered than the old
Country, but no less welcoming. It
honors Country's homespun roots
without sending us too literally
back to the past.
Well-worn, often utilitarian el-
ements from the farm house,
barn and small-town store blend
with contemporary furnishings
and finishes, making it all look
fresh and interesting.
Becky Cunningham, a home
decorator near Shreveport, La.,
fell in love with vintage stuff dur-
ing her first visit to a flea market
in Canton, Texas. That's where
she found an old cowboy's bath-
tub that now holds extra blankets
in her bedroom.
The room's transformation,


SOURCEBOOK
www.bucketsofburlap.
blogspot.com Becky
Cunningham blogs about her
farmhouse remodel.
www.homeandharmony.
blogspot.com Rie
Sterling's decorating blog.
www.kelleyandcompany
homedesign.com Kelley
Davis-Motschen bacher's
design site.
www.countryliving.com -
March issue honors Modern
Country's new trendsetters.
www.momastore.org -
Chilewich Faux Bois
placemat, $12.
www.schoolhouse
electric.com early 20th
century lighting.
www.wisteria.com iron
cabinet bins $79.
www.worldmarket.com -
Meagan baskets, $34.99-
$39.99.
www.vermontfarm table.com
tables from about $1,530
and up.
www.potterybarn.com -
pickling jars, $139-179;
dough bowls, $199-249;
grain-sack pillow covers,
$89.50.

which includes snowy white
paint, a chandelier and luxurious
white bed linens, is chronicled on
her blog, "Buckets and Burlap."
An unusual focal point is a gray,


weather-beaten headboard.
"We used 100-year-old lumber
taken from an old shack on my
husband's aunt's farm," says
Cunningham.
Redoing a bathroom in Ojai,
Calif., Kelley Davis-Motschen-
bacher used a timeworn pine
table as a vanity, but dropped in a
sleek modern washbowl and tap.
She fronted a new closet with a
scraped-up vintage door, embel-
lishing it with a cast-iron bird
knocker. Glossy white subway
tiles and marble flooring blend
with harvest baskets and vintage
artwork to make a luxurious yet
homey bathroom that was mostly
sourced from garage sales, Home
Depot and the Internet.
Rie Sterling of Apex, N.C., is
another Modern Country blogger.
"One of the things I love about
this style is how unpretentious it
is," she says. "Nothing's too pre-
cious, which is ideal if you have
children. It's hard to mess up
something that's already chipped
or faded."
She adds: "There's a certain
restfulness about it that appeals
to so many, and it's refreshingly
attainable."
Garage sales, flea markets and
online sites are good sources for
Country items, but you can also
find newly made pieces that
evoke the vibe.
Dustin Glasscoe's furniture stu-
dio, Vermont Farm Table, is filled
with bar stools, benches, dining ta-
bles and bookcases made of re-
claimed pine. The patina of the
wood, coupled with Glasscoe's
craftsmanship, makes for furniture


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Kelley & Company Home Design/Associated Press
In this image, a bathroom vanity and storage cabinet made of a repur-
posed table and door are shown in a design by Kelley Motschenbacher.


that's warm and approachable.
"We're really celebrating the
true character and qualities of
the wood," he says.
Urbanites may not have ready
access to vintage goods, but the
look's easy to replicate with stuff
from stores Wisteria's iron
cabinet bins and World Market's
woven reed baskets make great
storage; IKEA's got flat-woven,
striped cotton rugs; Pottery Barn
has antique glass pickling jars,


wooden dough bowls and grain-
sack throw pillows.
Sandy Chilewich's Faux Bois
placemats have a digital image of
a real wood plank printed on
Plynyl.
Schoolhouse Electric recreates
early 20th century light fixtures
and iron bedsteads.
Repurposing is the watchword
here: Put bath items in jars;

See COUNTRY/Page E9







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ATTIC
Continued from Page E6

Dear S.N.: Today,
when all the information
in all the encyclopedias
and more is at one's fin-
gertips and can be car-
ried in one's pocket


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E7

would lead to more fad-
ing, so I would focus
more on making sure
your hair is healthy and
conditioned and not dry
or damaged prior to
coloring.
Dear Sara: Do we have
to clean the eggshells if
we store them for a day
or so before using them
as compost on house-
plants? -Mimi, email
Dear Mimi: I would
wash the eggshells so
they don't attract bugs.
Dear Sara: What do
you think when you see
an obscene display of
wealth (which frugal
people see all the time,
right)?
Today I saw a guy in
his early 30s driving a
Porsche Carrera, a
pretty common sight
where I live as there are
many wealthy (or appar-
ently wealthy) people
living in my part of town.
When I see that kind of


there is no surprise that
collector interest in en-
cyclopedia sets is nil.
Dollar value is practi-
cally nonexistent short
of good luck.


John Sikorski has been
a professional in the an-
tiques business for 30

blatant display of
wealth, it just screams
insecurity to me. Do they
really value the fine en-
gineering that can only
be found in a Porsche, or
are they just trying to im-
press the guy in the next
lane? I just feel so lucky
to not be caught up in all
of that. I'm curious to
know if you feel as an-
noyed as I do about such
blatant displays of
wealth. B. Smith,
forums
Dear B. Smith: I can't
say I think much about it.
I suppose if I look for an
example that annoys me,
it would be when people
are wasteful. But this
happens with some peo-
ple whether they're
wealthy or not. While I'm
not extreme over it (I
don't force my kids to eat
every speck off their
plate until it's clean I
simply encourage them
to only take what they
can eat), seeing food
wasted seems to bother
me the most I can't help
but think about those
who go without. But


years. He hosts a call-in
radio show, Sikorski's
Attic, on WJUF (90.1
FM) Saturdays from
noon to 1 p.m. Send
questions to Sikorski's
Attic, c/o The Citrus
County Chronicle, 1624
N. Meadowerest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429
or asksikorski@aol. com.

when it comes to luxury
cars or boats, homes,
fashion, jewelry, etc., I
just don't place as much
value or priority on
those kinds of things, so
it doesn't affect me
much. I don't consider
those items obscene dis-
plays of wealth, though.
It's not up to me to judge
how other people spend
their money or how
much. I don't need to
contrast another per-
son's spending with my
own frugality. And on the
flip side, I don't really
care how others value
my own personal
"wealth."


Sara Noel is the owner
of Frugal Village,
wwwfrugalvillage. com,
a website that offers
practical, money-saving
strategies for everyday
living. To send tips,
comments or questions,
write to Sara Noel, c/o
Universal Uclick, 1130
Walnut St., Kansas City
MO 64106, or email
sara@frugalvillage. com.


COUNTRY
Continued from Page E8

magazines, towels or toys in
tubs or wooden crates; and
turn that great jam cupboard


into a compact home office.
Add modern touches like Lu-
cite chairs, a tailored pendant
fixture, a lacquered Parsons
table, or an accent wall
painted in a bold hue.
If you're looking for addi-
tional inspiration, check out


Houzz.com. It's a kind of home-
design-centric Pinterest,
where homeowners and pro-
fessionals post photographs,
articles and advice; you'll find
great examples of Modern
Country style here, as well as
design help.


NEW HOME & HOMESITE IN SUGARMILL WOODS


Building
Custom
Homes
throughout the
Nature Coast


$* 9ll9e 8Dj -B Of Citrus inc.
HOMEBUILDER CBC049056
Hwy. 19, 4/2 miles south of Homosassa Springs. 8016 S. Suncoast Blvd.
352-382-4888 www.sweetwaterhomes.com swhsales@tampabay.rr.com
NEW HOMES, VILLAS, REMODELS & COMMERCIAL


SUNDAY, MARCH 4, 2012 E9








ElOSunday, March 4, 2012







Real Estate


Classifieds




p


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


To place an ad, call 563-5966


-- - Classifleds


-- In Print


and


........ O nline


TeAll


-The Time


FaX: 1352) 5W-5665 I Toll free: (8438) 652-2340 1 Email: classified s:9,chronlicleonfinecom I wetnilte: www.chronicleenline.com

Mobile Homes Mobile Home Waterfront Mobile Homes Mobile Home Real Estate I Arairtments-1 Apartment Condos/Villas-'
For Rent For Sale Mobile For Rent and Land In Park For Rent umished 11 Unfurnished


C.R/Homosassa
1& 2 Br. furn, quiet park
Util. incl. clean, shrt/long
term 352 220-2077
CRYSTAL RIVER
Nice 2/1, close to
everything. $500. +
Sec. (352)446-3933
352-794-3323
DUNNELLON
5159 W. Disney Ln 2/2,
New AC, Lrg. Lot $425.
$400 dp (727) 480-5512
HERNANDO
2/1, $400 Mo. No Pets.
(352)344-1476
HERNANDO
2/1/2 Fresh & Clean,
very quiet, scm. por.
shady deck $475mo. fst
& last (352) 400-2411
HERNANDO
RENT TO OWN, 2/2
single wide on /2 acre
mol. Partially remod-
elled $2,000 down,
$295 mo (352) 726-9369
INVERNESS
RENT SPECIAL: Sec. dep,
pro-rated over 3 mo.
period in the INVERNESS
WATERFRONT 55+ Park
w/5 piers for fishing &
enjoyment, clubhouse,
onsite shuffleboard, and
much more! 1 BR home
$325 plus. 2BR home
$450 includes H20. 2 BR,
1.5 bath, Park Model
$500. Pets considered.
Section 8 accepted.
(352) 476-4964
INVERNESS
Waterfront 55+ Park
w/5 piers for fishing &
enjoyment, clubhouse,
onsite shuffleboard
and much more!
Furnished, IBR home
with central A/C $600.
352-476-4964
MINI FARMS
2/1/2, w/ Carport, Fen'd
$550. (352) 795-7335




1995, Doublewide,
28 x 56, 2BD, 2BA,
LR, DR, Eat in Kit
community Pool
Nice Condition
$30,000 (352) 400-8270


3/2, 1982 24x56 MH as
is U must Move $7K
(352) 400-5152
ATTENTION
LAND OWNERS
JACOBSEN NEW 2012
5 yr. warranty, 3/2,
2 x 6 construction,
upgrade insulation,
appliance pkg.
Delivered & set up
with A/C & heat,
steps & skirting only
$279.19./mo. W.A.C.
Includes first year
on homeowner Ins.
Call 352-621-9181

Bank foreclosures
USED HOMES/REPO'S
Bank authorized
liquidator.We Always
have new inventory,
Call 352-621-9183
or come by
Taylor Made Homes
Homes from
$1,000 up!
Beautiful 1 owner,
older Doublewide,
Home in Forestview
Park new appl's, new
roof and AC, Priced to
Sell! (352) 503-2154
INVERNESS
Waterfront 55+ Park
w/5 piers for fishing &
enjoyment, clubhouse,
onsite shuffleboard
and much more!
Single wide 1 & 2 BR,
starting @ $6,900. Lot
rent $274/mo. H20
included. 3 mo. free
rent with purchase.
352-476-4964
LAND-N-HOME
FLORAL CITY
BIG HOME!
The Entertainer,
over 2000 sq. ft., 4/2,
large family room.
Home in great shape
on quiet paved road
near chain of lakes
ONLY $59, 900. or
$2,250 down &
395/mo. W.A.C.
Call 352-621-3807

Palm Harbor Homes
New 2012 Models
$15K off All Homes
800-622-2832 x 210


HOMOSASSA
2/2 carport nicely furn
on Homosassa River
w/dock no pet f/l/s
sht/long term $850
352-220-2077



FLORAL CITY
2/2 carport on canal,
2 sheds,, furnished scr
patio $44,900. Poss.
Own Fin 440-225-8618



8 MOBILE HOMES
12 AC., Good Income
Lots of Possibilities
(352) 212-6182
1/1 SW, NO lot Rent
near Bike Trail, storage
shed, off Hwy. 41,
Inverness, $12,500
217 -837-2526
217-508-7477
3/2, 1,800 Sq Ft,
Fenced Yard,
$5,000 down $525. mo
HOMOSASSA
(352) 302-9217
BEST OF THE BEST
New 2012 Jacobsen
Custom 28 x 52, 3/2
big eat in kitchen,
2x6 construction, OSB
wrap, 5 yr. warranty,
elongated toilet,
china sinks, storm
door. Large rooms.
Must see before you
buy anything else.
Only $46,900 or
$1,800 down
$298.89/mo W.A.C.
Call 352-621-9181
Crystal River
Rent to Own ? 2/1
DW, remodeled, clean
& private, 1/2 ac. trees
price neg.352 795-0898
FLORAL CITY on 3 Lots,
Assum Mortg. Priv Fin. 2
Mast Suites New appls.
horses ok, $33,900
Cridland Real Uving.
J. Desha 352-634-6340
Hernando-Forest Lake
North,2/2 DWavery
nice ,HA,1.25 acre
$5900 dwn,$500 mo.
Owner Financing
352-637-5143


Homosassa 2 bedroom,
1 bath close to river,
screen porch, appliances,
$35,000 owner financing
available 352-503-7948
HOMOSASSA
2/1/2 on 1/2 Acre
Low Down EZ Terms
(941) 505-9287
Inverness
3/2 bath home
Deerwood sub. just
under an acre Has
roof over. No Realtors.
$33,500 352-476-4374
INVERNESS
Move in neat 2 bath
SW w/extra rooms, nice
area, fenced $35K
Owner (352) 341-1569
Lecanto
881 N. Maynard Av
DWMH 2/2, deck,
Fixer Upper
$15K (352) 746-7952
Northwest Citrus
County 2 bedroom. 1.5
bath. Mobile Home on
1 acre, high and dry,
shaded lot, shed, paved
road $44,900 or make
offer. Possible owner fi-
nancing. 352-795-9908



2/2 on Lake Rousseau.
Was $27,500 NOW
$19,900 Low Lot Rent
$240/m 2003 Mobile
Home. Used Seasonally
Owner bought a house,
our lost is your gain.
(352) 817-1987,
(207) 546-6115
AWESOME DEALS
Financing Available
$500/dn
1/1 remod, shed $5k
1/ lscrnrm/carprt $6k
2/1 carprt/rf.over $7k
furn, move-in ready
55+ park, clean quiet
CR/Homossasa area
Owner 352-220-2077
Forest View
2 bedroom. 2 bath. 55+
Park Beautiful 1344 sq ft
many upgrades $19900
352 794 3519
WESTWIND VILLAGE 55+
Park. Updated 2/2 DW's
for sale. Reasonable
(352) 628-2090


HOMOSASSA'S
Best Housing Value
Modern homes from
$8,400 or Lease to Own
from $139/mo.
$800.down + Lot rent at
Evanridge Community
an exceptional 55+Park
352 628-5977
INVERNESS
Waterfront 55+ Park
w/5 piers for fishing &
enjoyment, clubhouse,
onsite shuffleboard, and
much more! 2 BR 1.5 BA
for $2.000. must be
approved 352-476-4964
Oak Pond/Inverness
Well maint 2/2 extra
long covered carport
Irg shed lanai,& Irg lot.
up graded kit part furn
(352) 344-1632
On Lake Rousseau 2
bedroom. 2 bath.
14x60MH, 8x20 FL
room, 8x10 shed, 2-stall
carport, Withlacoochee
Backwaters MHP,
$8500. 352-219-2240
Stoneridge Landing
55+ Comm. Resales
starting @$13,500
Financing avail
1-800-779-1226
(352) 637-1400
StoneridgeLanding
55+. 1993 26x56, Move
in Cond.2/2 upgrades
$39K view pics @
mhvillage.com/493361
(352) 344-0888



LECANTO 55+
* FOR RENT OR SALE *
1/1, Furnished $525.
2/2, Furnished $550.
352-287-9175, 746-1189



CHASSAHOWITZKA
3/2 Wtrfront DW, $600.
3/2 Furnished DW., $600
Agent (352) 382-1000

Get
Results in


835 NE Hwy 19
Crystal River, FI
(352) 795-0021
View our website
C21 NatureCoast.com

g ntu2
a _.--T-721.
J.W. MORTON
REAL ESTATE, INC.
1645 W. MAIN ST
INVERNESS, FL
Property Management

2/1 On A Canal......... $550
2/1/1 Fenced Yard ...... $600
2/2/2 ................. $650
Pritchard Island
2/2Townhouse....... $550

AVAILABLE APRIL
2/1.5/1.............. $600

2/2/1 Waterfront........ $750
Jennifer Fudge,
Property Manager
Cheryl Scruggs,
Realtor-Associate
352-726-9010














-- I

CRYSTAL RIVER
2 BR. $550., 3BR House
$800., 352-563-9857
CBlITRUS COUNTY

RENTAL











$800., 352-563-9857


CRYSTAL RIVER
Completely furn., Pool,
boat dock, Wash/Dry
(352) 302-5972
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025



Alexander Real Estate
(352) 795-6633
Crystal River Apts
2 BR/1 BA $375-$500
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/1, $600. mo.
382-1162, 795-1878
CRYSTAL RIVER 1/1
Handicap Ramp, Small
Pet OK. (352) 628-2815
FLORAL CITY
FREE Use of boat ramp,
fishing dock, canoe &
Jon boat rentals. 1 BR
$450/$200 dp. incIs Sat
TV electric, walk to river
Trails End Camp, A
Friendly Place to Live
352-726-3699
HOMOSASSA
1BR, W&D, Boat Dock
util. incld. $600. mo.+
sec., 352-628-6537
INVERNESS
2BR, Washer/Dryer
Corner 581 &Anna Jo
No Pets/No Smoking
$600. /Mo, 1 Year Lease
Credit Check Req'd
ALL CITRUS REALTY
352-726-2471
LECANTO
Nice 1 Bedrm $500
352-613-6000. 216-0012
(352) 746-5238
MAYO DRIVE
APARTMENTS
MOVE IN SPECIAL*
(352) 795-2626


Get

Results in

the

homefront

classifieds!


SEVEN RIVERS
APTS
A Beautiful place
to come home too.
35 units on private
street, situated on 10
wooded acres, near
Crystal River &
7 Rivers Hosp. fish-
ing, walking, trails,
shopping near by.
Old Florida setting,
quite, clean well
maint. central
laundry room.
352-795-3719
Directions:
Hwy 19 turn W. at
Days Inn, first right
onto Tallahassee Rd











CRYSTAL RIVER
Completely furn., Pool,
boat dock, Wash/Dry
(352) 302-5972


INVERNESS
LANDINGS 2/1.5 clean
roomy, great location
$550/mo F/L/S
No smoke/No pets
(352) 341-1847



HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




INVERNESS 2/1/1
Great area, pets, nosmk
$600/mo. 1st, last & sec
352-341-3562/400-0743


Get

Results in

the

homefront

classified!


S-ACTION
( RENTAL MANAGEMENT REALTY. INC.
3S2-79S-R ENT


HOMES MOBILES APARTMENTS
FEATURED PROPERTIES
HOMOSASSA
4119 S. Springsong Ter. 3/2 M/H. New vinyl. Uti bldg.
Large yard, partially fenced. 950+ sq. ft ...................................... $600
7845 W. Solar PI. 2/2 Duplex Well & septic new cond.
Open floor plan. 1176 sq. ft ................................................................ $ 7 2 5
7 Bumelia Court (SMW) 3/2/2 House with pool
on golf course, incl. lawn & pool service. 1,695 sq. ft .....$1200

INVERNESS
1863 Elderberry Lane 2/2/1 condo. Pretty place
in nice complex/clubhouse/pool/trash PU. 959 sq. ft ............ $695
8 S. Lunar Terr. 2/2/2 w/dock. Large lanai overlooks cove.
Open floorplan, wood floors, fans, storage. 1,521 sq. ft ...........$800








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/1 $440 mo. to qual-
ified person 382-3525
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/1 Fl. Rm, CHA,Shed,
$525. mo 352-795-9060
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/2/2, No Smoke,
$625 mo. 1st., last, sec.
352-871-2009
CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/1, $750. mo. w/ opt
to Buy (352) 220-8893
Citrus Springs
4/2/2, Split Plan, Lg. FR
$875/mo (352)341-1859

YOU'LL THIS!
DUNNELLON 3/2/2
RENT TO OWN
Close to Rainbow River
RUBLESRENTALS.COM
(561) 719-8787
(561) 575-1718 affr 7pm
Homosassa
2/1 Dup.$450 up
3/2/2 home $675
.SMW Immaculate
3/2/2 no pets $875
Riverlinks Realty
(352) 628-1616
HOMOSASSA
2/1 home 3/2 DW no
pets(352) 637-1142


Reta


HOMOSASSA
2/1, water & sewer,
W/D incl'd., Lg. Yard.
$550. mo. 239-272-9230
HOMOSASSA
3/2, new carpet, appls.
Lg wooden deck, nice
area. $800 month
352 447-0977
352-302-3819
HOMOSASSA Spring
3/2/2, $900/m + sec
(352) 628-3696
INVERNESS
2/1.5/garage.cha,new
carpet, lake access,
close to town,
$575 no smoke/pets
253-370-3700
INVERNESS
2/2/2 Detached home,
Royal Oaks upgrds
clubhouse, pool, lawn
serv, W/D. $800/mo.
incls. cable water Avail
2/20, 949-633-5633
INVERNESS 3/2/2
near hosp & Library.
$800. Mo. FIL/S No pets.
(352) 527-9268
INVERNESS
3BR/2BA, $800 mo
306 Hunting Lodge Dr
(352) 895-0744 cell
INVERNESS
4/1, $650 first 1st & sec
aft 2pm (352) 408-9470
INVERNESS
5/2, scr/porch $800 f/I
$400 sec 352-422-2393
RENT TO OWN!!
No credit check!
3bdrms 352-566-6049
JADEMISSION.COM



CRYSTAL RIVER
Studio, furn.on Hunter's
Springs, sun deck, W/D
rm. All until. incl.+ boat
dock.$700/m avail
4/1/12 352-372-0507
CRYSTAL RIVER
Unfurnished, single fam-
ily 3/3/3 House on
beautiful Kings Bay.
Pier, Ig screened area,
fireplace, lanai
$1600/mnth
352-563-1211
HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




CITRUS SPRINGS
Lease or Rent to Own
3/3/21/2, Custom Pool
Home on acre $699.
Special. 1st last dep.
bkgrd Ck 352-489-3997



INVERNESS
Room for rent, No pets,
$275 mo.
(352) 613-9135




Available March
2/2 WF Crys. Riv. &
Homosassa $1625/mo
Riverlinks Realty
(352) 628-1616


Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com


Get
Results in
the
homefront

classified!


C.R/Homosassa
1 & 2 Br. furn, quiet park
Util. incl. clean, shrt/long
term 352 220-2077



AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE
FARMS, LAND,
COMMERCIAL
UNIQUE &
HISTORIC HOMES,
SMALL TOWN
COUNTRY LIFESTYLE
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989






"LIFE IS BETTER
WITH A PORCH"

crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.

For Saleg V,.
Forest Ridge 2 bedroom.
2 bath. This updated villa
is totally move in ready
and maintenance free!
This beautiful 2/2/2 is
located on a private lot
and includes an optional
membership to Citrus
Hills Golf and Country
Club. The home includes
all appliances, an eat in
kitchen, a fully tiled great
room, and a sun barrier
paneled lanai. Home is
within walking distance to
the pool and club house.
This property is a must
see!! $95,900
352-746-0002
Specializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches &
Commercial


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ille-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination. "
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



ECUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY




For Sale By Owner
3/2/2, Custom Built
in '08 by Wheeler
Construction
Call (407) 739-2646
or 407-442-3597



RENT TO OWN!!
No credit check!
3 bdrms 352-566-6049
JADEMISSION.COM



TERRA VISTA
2+ /2/2 Maint Free,
Open plan, up grades,
,Beautiful Sunsets,
Owner Financ Avail
$259 K (352) 746-6050



1 or 2BD,1.5 BA
completely remodeled
2 lots, 2 wells, wkshop
2 sheds .Owner
Financ $469/mo
lake area 727-457-0850



3/2/2, I.G. &C.C.
3k sf. new kit. Ig closets,
CHA, firepl. on golf
course $129,900
no realtors 726-0652
3BR, 3BA, Pool home,
2,000 sq.ft. $163,000
OR BEST OFFER
518 Poinsettia
352-860-0878.


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work For You!
BETTY HUNT,
REALTOR
ERA KEY 1 Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.


S=11

Condo for Sale
12/2 1,850 sq. ft.,
35 Beech Street
(352) 503-3294


HIGHLANDS
Lrg.2/2- 4 car garage
pool, game room,
mud room, on triple lot
fenced, price to sell
$65,500 (352) 564-4598
INVERNESS
Waterfront 55+ Park
w/5 piers for fishing &
enjoyment, clubhouse,
onsite shuffleboard
and much more!
Single wide 1 & 2 BR,
starting @ $6,900. Lot
rent $274/mo. H20
included. 3 mo. free
rent with purchase.
352-476-4964

Lakefront Gospel
Island Location
Spacious 3/2/2
for rent $700/m or for
sale..... 908-322-6529




AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE




3/2/2 Built 1986, On /2
Acre, Remodeled
above ground pool
w/ deck BY OWNER
4141 S. Journey Point
$185,000 813-477-6006
3/2/2, Built 2007
Newly Remodeled
$88,000
100% Financing Avail.
(352) 400-0230

AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE

-IS= I


INVERNESS 2/2/1
Superbly maintained,
1381 Sqft, Oak floors,
Florida room, dining
room, extra pantries, par-
tially furnished. Pictures
avail 631 Whispering
Pines Blvd.
352-726-9983
INVERNESS
Nice /2/1 new carpet
tile & paint. Whispering
Pines Villas furnished
$69,900(352) 726-8712


Homosassa-Riverhaven
Village on water, 3/2+
bath,river room,lanai-ft
and back,dock, many
upgrades, beautiful
home. $260,000. Go to
forsalebyowner.com
Busting 23023708 or
call 352-628-9647
Realtors 2.5%


Join us to
Pre-view Homes
for sale
Feb 28th &
March 13th.


- i
Office Open
7 Days a Week

Lisa VanDeboe
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com


CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pond,
ATV trails $165K obo
352 795-2027/ 634-4745



48 lots 14W.F. 1 gulf
access, 5 SMW's lots
3 lots impact fees pd.
$425K, = less than $9K
per lot (732) 996-3785


Homosassa
1.6 Acres on Hwy 19
Wet Lands, next to
Bowling Alley, $15,000
Owner Finance
352-621-1664



SUGARMILL
WOODS. BUILDING LOT
ON OAK VILLAGE
$20K firm 43 Vinca St
(352) 726-9587


Get



Results



In The



Homefront



Classifieds!


Home Finder

www.chroniclehomefinder.com


Fiua YoUr Dr&wV HOmW-

Search Hundreds of Local Listings

www.chroniclehor r ,finder.com


I


Best Time To Buy!
I have lease options,
owner financing &
foreclosures
call Phyllis Strickland
(352) 613-3503
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
100% Financing
Citrus Springs
Homes 746-7990


SUNDAY, MARCH 4, 2012 Ell


R en H o= 7es








E12Sunday, March 4, 2012


OWNER FINANCE
_a -lla i n. ll h . ..a a a- _i . ..haa .a . '''a 'a''
_ l. i .1 p .il.l Ill .. .i II I I li .. il
I.i Las ji hI a ., 6,.11 ''L a-''
$57,900
Call Ruth fiedeick 1 352 563 6866


SERVING



CTUSOUNT
Emal:uif ogurs A A

POR OMVER OPEN
37YE3S2 72suN01


IN TOWN, CITY WATER & SEWER
rl.. .1 h. .IaI-a.I al .h. Hi l I.i .I .I ... 1..-.. I .-.
I .. i. j I Iv ri... H II I.- 1. .. ...... ....d.I

I..I. . .- .. Ia i .-....,
L'= -'..lha-. ASKING $78.900
Pat Davis ,3521 212 7280
View hosting: wiwii.c2lpaidavis.com


INVERNESS HOME WITH 4 BEDROOMS!!!
U* a l.lli .-a .1 1.11 6 .l
* I- l.,- I. i l a i. ill. I .a.aI'aII a


Mi 5 = '..l ONLY $63,000
Call Charles Kelly 352 422 2387


CUSTOM HOME
* eF U 1, i ,. i.:
* II ..I.- : I, T 1in IIJIII T l.,ik, i
* '- .:.:.1 .i l.l.i .l.lh,|ll H :..li .:.H.a IM.a.I

MI5 =- -, $169,000
it'it,'i. CiwusCounlSold. corn
Jeanne Pickiel 352 212 3410


3/2 NO RESTRICTIONS -I :,-: I
HERNANDO MAGNETIC ATTRACTION

li l i.a-l ill a aI 1.l ila i.I 1.fil l ll.a il hi l 'l i t 1 a 6ll a 111 ilaahai ii ahlla-a
alaai 1 It .-.... aIIi. 1,"u I alul' ..h '. h II I lal lia ll .iaaa a i II''ia i Ibi l..i. l-pl.j.a
h laan laa'.1-1 1 l c... i da-i -Al -a II 166111 1,61 Ia' '''' Iiaa1,a- ia-a-ia
'''' la- h .lalaail ia l l a I.. 'I' .I llh ia- If fl hl.ili: la lhI :i l.)i a, ll.laJ ia-l ala- aai i' i
.,il Hlaiti.a la 'i. ,aia :. I iial .I. -aa i..i ,. i MIll = 3 i'- $ 115,90 0
/dida Cano 352 270 0202 Mahidn Booth 63714904


SUGARMILL WOODS


* I lIII li T, l. IN I AVVi.
* ..I.I Pi, ..r i I~ I AVV _ria lii
* IV I i=.:uh.ui M .HI.I 1.111..I, l
Mi = 1.IIIIuu $169,000
Jeanne Pickiel 352-212-3410
wi',i' i. CittusCounlySold. corn


..l.u


HERNANDO
l.II.=. l. li. p ill h i .Il I I.P. l h.. I %.ill.
-.1.1 i ... .a l 1 .' l. ....hi II a l. h nl I l..


la I' I' aIllan] It a' ia-. a-al
$34,500
Doll f.n]mp.an 352 634-2656


SINGING

FOREST


Doublewide $18,000

Doublewide $8,000
Call Willaid Pickiel 352 201 9871








MOBILE HOME PARK


I .:f l. I. 11. I H .nl, l I 1li1. iI h li.l



'.. ..I,,, ""a 1han : l $900,000
Call Dons Minet ,`352 422 4627


LOCATION, LOCATION

Tha ija- i I.: Il lii. ir lj6l. .IIr hri, Iai-


,li n ...'ila.i.i il.. I-" r: $179.900
Call Ruth fiedeick 1 3525636866







NEW TO MARKET

Hill li a. rl l j il .. B, .a.6 Iaaa
.II. b,1ilill i ,a la-il 11lil I lilt
haiaa, ..l II h i. .i I I liill i

ASKING $163,850
Call Mai tha Snydei 352 476 8727
lot details. Ask lot file =354029.


.... ... i L p .)- i 1... i .A.. a . H... A'..

III I a h .] .. ] a. .aaaa. ll uII ...I h.:.I,
.ha' -':. a--:. ASKING $168,900
Pat Dav's ,3521 212 7280
View. hsting: w..,.. c2lpatdavts.com


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


GOSPEL ISLAND
WATERFRONT
; a-lh .... i I, '. .,1 l lh i, vifi. fi. a
i all....a,, ........ , ai ll vl %.Vi i lJa. a- ixall

Mt 5 = 301l: NOW $71,500
Call Chetyl Sciuggs ot Jennilei Fudge
at 352 726 9010


* Ia i alii i l. I II.I ..|.c u


MI5 =i a-Il3 ONLY $67,500
Call Chailes Kelly 352 422 2387


idADll