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Citrus County chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02692
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 02-26-2012
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:02692

Full Text



Daytona 500: Stewart still looking for first win in race


TODAY & Monday morning
HIGH Chance of rain
67 60 percent. Winds
LOW around 10 mph.
59 PAGE A4
FEBRUARY 26, 2012


I-.'S L U I1 N D 'i


NATION & WORLD:


Homeless: Secret society


Afghanistan
A gunman kills two
American military
advisers./Page A6
PREPARATION


Editor's note: The Chron-
icle offers a monthly series
on quality-of-life issues in
Citrus County This month,
the focus is homelessness.
SHEMIR WILES
Staff Writer

In a perfect world, home-
lessness would not exist.
Well-paying jobs would
be abundant and available
to all. Everyone would be
able to afford a roof over
their heads and food to feed
their families.
But the reality is, home-


lessness CITRUSCOUNTY
does exist. QUAL
According
to the Flor- oe
ida Depart- __
ment of J 1E
Children
and Families, using the fed-
eral/HUD definition of
homelessness, there were
502 homeless persons ei-
ther living on the street or
in emergency housing in -
the county in 2011, which .
was up from the depart- RIC BUSH/SpecialtotheChronicle
ment's estimate of 405 Jim Sleighter, director of Mission in Citrus, said on average,
See Page A2 his Crystal River shelter houses 100 people.


MORE INSIDE
* Three women share
their stories./Page A10
* Homeless coalition
works to inspire
teamwork./Page A10
* Hundreds of students
homeless./Page All
* Couch surfing,
doubling up hides
problem./Page All
* Resources./Page All
* More stories./Monday
* Next month: Seniors and
Medicare


The Oscars
Stars complete last
rehearsal before
Sunday show./Page B6
HOMEFRONT:


-.1

PORT CITRUS




Port Citrus seeks its niche


Winding path
Outdoor labyrinths
create opportunities for
reflection. /Homefront

BUSINESS:




Penalty box
A past foreclosure
means waiting years for
a new loan./Page D1
OPINION:
This
debate ...
certainly
should not be
about man
vs. the
manatee.


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Citrus County officials have all but targeted property owned by Dixie Hollins on the Cross Florida Barge Canal as the site for Port Citrus. The key
cut into Hollins' Citrus Mining and Timber property already has a barge landing. The key cut is about 5.5 miles to the Gulf of Mexico.

Proposed feasibility study could draw developers or keep them away


MAKING A DIFFERENCE:









Helping hands
Partners with a Heart
dinner honors heroes to
local youths./Page A3

COMMENTARY:
PL S-


Crossroads
Joe Meek writes about
the potential of Port
Citrus plans./Page Cl


Annie's Mailbox ......A16
Classifieds ............ D5
Crossword ...........A16
Editorial ............ C2
Entertainment ..........B6
Horoscope ................B6
Lottery Numbers ......B4
Lottery Payouts ........ B6
Movies ................. A18
O bituaries ................A5
Together............... A18


. 1|1118J! 00!I o


Editor's note: This is
the final part of a four-
Sunday series in Febru-
ary examining Port
Citrus. Today, the Chroni-
cle looks at the proposed
port site and where the
project goes from here.
MIKE WRIGHT
Staff Writer

INVERNESS Brad
Thorpe knows Port Citrus
is not a done deal.
It's not a slam dunk. Not
a sure thing. It could bring
jobs but, then again, a lot
of things have to happen
for that to occur
"There's peril in
here," Thorpe
said. "I'm not
naive about this."
Thorpe is the
Citrus County ad-
ministrator who,
in the last 12
months, also as- Bi
sumed a new title: Th
port director Citrus
The five-member admin
Citrus County
Commission also serves as
a port authority on occa-
sion, steering the project
known as Port Citrus into
what it hopes is friendly
waters.
It's been a year since
Tampa attorney Fred Bu-
sack first brought the idea
of a port on the Cross
Florida Barge Canal to
the attention of Citrus
County officials. And, fol-
lowing such high-fangled
ideas as trans sea lifters
and mega-ton container
ships, officials have nar-
rowed their vision to
something closer to home.
As one potential con-
sultant called it: a "viable


ra
or
C
is


niche barge port."
"We have to be realistic
with our assets," Thorpe
said.
At least Port Citrus has
a starting point: The Cross
Florida Barge Canal, 6.5
miles straight from the
Gulf of Mexico to the U.S.
19 bridge.
The canal is 250 feet
wide; the 150-foot channel
has an average depth of 13
feet. About 5.5 miles in
from the gulf lay a 1,600-
foot key cut that includes
a barge landing for Citrus
Mining and Timber and
its lease-holder,
Cemex. An aerial
view of the prop-
erty shows active
mining just west of
the key cut on the
545-acre property
owned by Dixie
Hollins.
3d While emails
rpe show Hollins has
countyy been instrumental
trator. from the start in
helping to line up
interest in Port Citrus,
county officials only re-
cently have acknowledged
the Hollins property is
where they would like
Port Citrus to end up.
"Because he's got the
key cut, we've got to deal
with Dixie," Thorpe said.
Records also show the
county started the process
of developing a lease with
Hollins after hiring a lob-
byist to have the law
changed that added Cit-
rus has the 15th port in
Florida.
County Attorney
Richard Wesch said the
lobbyist, Pete Dunbar, told
Citrus officials they


Citrus County Port Authority/Special to the Chronicle
The feasibility study will focus on two properties: Citrus Mining and Timber on the
north side of the barge canal and Holcim Ltd. on the south side. Much of the Citrus Min-
ing and Timber property under consideration has already been approved as Hollinswood
Harbor, a mixed-use development.


needed a lease with the
property owner before
Citrus could be added as a
port He said Dunbar later
told the county that wasn't
necessary
Under the proposed
lease, the Citrus County
Port Authority would pay
Hollins $1 a year, plus pay
all taxes, water and sewer
utilities and electric rates.
Wesch and Thorpe said
the proposed land lease
never went further than
that and there have been
no negotiations.
Wesch said because the
county is counting on a
private port developer to
See Page A13


SUNDAY, FEB. 5
* Original port plans
along the Cross
Florida Barge Canal
* Port Putnam was
created in 1967 and
still operates today
* The 1969 Port Citrus
feasibility study
SUNDAY, FEB. 12
* Port Citrus so far:
"Trans-sea lifters" to
Port Authority
* Public perception of
the port project
* Panama Canal
expansion impact


SUNDAY, FEB. 19
* Panhandle town
makes go of port
* Impact of port in one
community
* Map of Florida
seaports.
TODAY
* Logistics of Port
Citrus site: road, rail,
water
* Fit with "Hollinswood
Harbor"?
* Reaction from
officials, residents
* What's next for Port
Citrus?


CITRUS COUNT Y







SwwwN.chronicleonline.com
Best Community -Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community $1 VOl





A2 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012

HOMELESS
Continued from Page Al

homeless persons in the
county for 2010.
However, when using the
state of Florida's definition,
which includes people liv-
ing in hotels, in the homes of
relatives or friends or in
their vehicles, the number
of homeless persons in Cit-
rus County jumps to 1,024.
While many people theo-
rize that the economy is now
in recovery, at Nature Coast
Ministries in Crystal River,
director Tom Slagle said he
is seeing a dramatic jump in
the number of people seek-
ing services at his non-
denominational, faith-based
organization.
In January 2011, Nature
Coast Ministries assisted
140 families. This year in
January, they helped 742.
Jim Sleighter, director of
Mission in Citrus, said on
average, his Crystal River
shelter houses 100 people.
And to make matters more
difficult, about 90 percent of
the people coming through
his doors have never been
homeless before.
Homelessness is growing
in Citrus County, but Slagle
said many people aren't
aware of how serious it is
because it's a hidden part of
society.
Patty Irons, assistant di-
rector of the Mission in Cit-
rus women's shelter in
Crystal River, said she re-
ceives calls every day from
people looking for help.
"One day, I got 35 calls,"
she said.
Between the foreclosures,
the lack of and loss of jobs
and the cost of necessities
like food and gas skyrocket-
ing, Slagle explained that
people are hurting and the
economic climate is still tur-
bulent, which is causing the
faces of homelessness to
change.
Three or four years ago,
Ginger West, executive di-
rector of the Family Re-
source Center in Hernando,
said she would get the occa-
sional woman or family
looking for a tent and some
supplies. Now, she said,
within the last few weeks
she gave tents to two
women, two men, a couple
and a family
And as the faces change,
what people believe about
the homeless has to change.
According to Betsy Juanis,
assistant director of the Mis-
sion in Citrus veterans shel-
ter in Inverness, and Irons,
many of the biggest miscon-


QUALITY OF LIFE


RIC BUSH/Special to the Chronicle
Jim Sleighter, director of Mission in Citrus, right, sits with residents at the shelter in Crystal River.


I never realized the homeless
problem until I became
homeless myself.
Betsy Juanis
assistant director, Mission in Citrus veterans shelter.


ceptions about the homeless
is they're dirty, unintelligent
and uneducated people who
don't want to work.
However, DuWayne Sip-
per, executive director of
The Path of Citrus County,
said he's seen every angle.
When he first opened his
shelter, one of his first
clients was a former IBM
executive who had a huge
salary, but lost everything
when he "discovered a
vodka bottle."
Shelia Douglas, assistant
director of the Mission in
Citrus outreach center in
Hernando, feels many peo-
ple just don't want to hear
from the homeless or ac-
knowledge their existence.
Plus, people tend to live in a
bubble, she added.
"I never realized the
homeless problem until I
became homeless myself,"
Juanis said.
Another fallacy is those
who live in the woods are
there because they want to
be. West said it couldn't be
further from the truth.
For the most part, people
living in the woods want to
get a job and move on with
their lives.
"They're stuck there and
don't want to be there," she
said. "They want to live a
normal life."


Then there are a few peo-
ple who are veterans, usu-
ally Vietnam veterans, living
in the woods because, in
West's opinion, they have
gotten to the point where
they don't want to be around
people.
When asked what it would
take to drive down home-
lessness in the county, West
said she believes the only
way it will get better is when


I have people come in
bewildered because they
never thought it would happen
to them.
Ginger West
executive director, Family Resource Center.


the employment rate gets
better.
When jobs disappeared,
people's savings disap-
peared and then next was
their homes.
"That's a pretty common
story," West said. "I have
people come in bewildered
because they never thought
it would happen to them."
Then there are the people


with addictions who can't
afford treatment.
Douglas said there needs
to be readily available, af-
fordable treatment facilities
in the county for people who
have substance abuse issues
to receive inpatient
treatment.
Or there are the women
with children who's hus-
bands or boyfriends run out


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

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2012 Chronicle project


on them or force them to
leave their homes and they
have no way to pay for a
place of their own.
"And she would go to
work, but she can't find
work," West added.
Though West said she has
seen an increase in occa-
sional work where people
can work for a few days or a
couple of weeks to put some
money in their pockets, the
return of steady jobs in the
county is still a good distance
away from full recovery
Furthermore, the money
made doing occasional work
is still not enough to pay all
the bills associated with liv-
ing in an apartment or
home.
But there's still hope
things will change, and the
economy will rebound.
Meanwhile, West said all
people can do is continue to
lend a hand and never give
up.
"I think it will get better,"
West said, "and until them,
we all have to just keep
helping each other."
Chronicle reporter
Shemir Wiles can be
reached at 352-564-2924 or
swiles@chronicleonline.
comn.

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Page A3 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012



TATE&


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Around Partners with a Heart honors 'heroes'
THE STATE


Citrus County
Utility service
interruption Tuesday
County utilities will be
working in the Rolling Green
area Tuesday, Feb. 28. Water
services may be interrupted
for residents of Rolling Green
for a period of up to six hours
beginning at 9 a.m. Tuesday.
This interruption is due to
the replacement of flushing
valves within the distribution
system. These repairs are
necessary to enhance serv-
ice and quality of finished
potable drinking water to its
customers. Every effort will
be made to minimize the du-
ration of the interruption.
When the repairs are com-
plete, county utilities staff will
flush the system.
If you notice any discol-
oration in your home faucets,
please flush for several min-
utes until water is dear. Resi-
dents of the Rolling Green
area are encouraged to sched-
ule activities which require
water use around this interrup-
tion. It may be prudent to bottle
some water for emergency
use during this time period.
Utility staff will notify customers
immediately after repairs are
complete. A precautionary boil
water notice will be issued
prior to the interruption.
Customers may call the
Utilities Divisions with ques-
tions or concerns at 352-
527-7650.

Key West

Coast Guard
repatriates migrants
The U.S. Coast Guard has
repatriated 13 Cuban migrants
who were intercepted south of
Key West.
Coast Guard officials say
the group was taken Friday to
Bahia de Cabanas, Cuba.
They were initially spotted in
a boat by a U.S. Customs
and Border Protection aircraft
Sunday.
A Coast Guard boat took
the migrants on board. They
were later transferred to the
cutter Nantucket to be re-
turned to Cuba and were
given food, water and basic
medical care.
-From staff and wire reports


Campaign TRAIL

Steve Burch, Hank
Hemrick and Winn Webb -
Republicans for sheriff will
participate in a Citrus County
Republican Executive Com-
mittee forum at 7 p.m. Mon-
day, March 5, at the Realtors
Association of Citrus County
building at 714 S. Scarboro
Ave., off State Road 44, in
Lecanto.
Tom Chancey and
Michael Smallridge, Repub-
licans for county commission
District 5, will participate in a
forum at 9 a.m. Saturday,
March 10, at the American
Legion Post 155 on State
Road 44 near Crystal River.
The Nature Coast Republi-
can Club and Republican
Women's Club are sponsor-
ing the forum. Information:
Fred or Rosella Hale, 352-
746-2545.
Sandy Balfour, Repub-
lican for superintendent of
schools, will speak at the
East Citrus Republican Club
meeting at 9 a.m. Saturday,
March 24, at the Inverness
Women's Center, 1715 For-
est Drive, Inverness.
Michael Smallridge,
Republican for county com-
mission District 5, will have a
booth Sunday, Feb. 26, at the
Greek Festival in Lecanto. In-
formation: 352-302-7406.
Sandy Balfour, Repub-
lican for superintendent of
schools, will have a cam-
paign kickoff from 1 to 3 p.m.
Saturday, March 3, at
Cracker's restaurant in Crys-
tal River.
The Campaign Trail is a
listing of political happenings
for the 2012 election season.


Send events or campaign
fundraisers to Mike Wright at
mwright@chronicleonline.
com.


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff Writer
LECANTO Just as sol-
diers on the frontlines of a
battlefield fight heroically
against a ruthless enemy, so
do those in our community
who fight for the hearts,
minds and spirits of the
young people in Citrus
County.
Since 2003, local commu-
nity members calling them-
selves Partners for a
Substance-Free Citrus have
made it their mission to
fight the battle against sub-
stance abuse.
On Friday, 17 partners
were honored at the annual
Partners with a Heart
Recognition Celebration at
Seven Rivers Presbyterian
Church in Lecanto, spon-
sored by Capital City Bank,
The Rustic Ranch, Partners
for a Substance-Free Citrus


and the Chronicle.
The theme for the night
was, "We celebrate our he-
roes." Nominees included
school employees, addiction
specialists, those who work
with young kids, those who
work with teens, health care
providers and a cop who
takes down meth labs.
"Each one of you touches
the hearts of children," said
Renna Jablonskis, the part-
nership's executive director
Nancy Moore, group
treatment coordinator at
Camp E-Nini-Hassee, was
named the 2012 Partner
with a Heart. Camp E-
Ninni-Hassee is an outdoors
residential facility in Floral
City that works with trou-
bled teen girls.
Nominated by camp di-
rector Jo Lynn Smith, Moore
received the award for
going beyond her duties and


serving the girls with her
whole heart and soul. Moore
works with girls from foster
care, most of who come
from backgrounds that are
rampant with physical and
sexual abuse, as well as sub-
stance abuse.
"I have a lot of people
who volunteer, but I don't
often have people say, 'Give
me more, my plate's not full
enough,"' Smith said.
"Among other things, Nancy
started a SADD (Students
Against Destructive Deci-
sions) club with girls who
have (serious records) and
she built that club, and it
transformed our camp,"
Smith said.
Moore said she was hum-
bled by the award. "I get to
do something I truly love,
that makes me want to get up
every day," she said. "I get to
share it with so many great


Rotarians, others assemble foodpackages in

Crystal River to help feedpeople around the world


SHEMIR WILES
Staff Writer
CRYSTAL RIVER Kicking the morning
off with a bit of fast-paced mood music, hun-
dreds of volunteers began swiftly toiling their
way through packaging 50,000 meals Satur-
day at Crystal River High School.
Many of the workers, which included mem-
bers of the local Rotary clubs, Interact (the
Rotary Club's service organization for teens),
Rotaract and other groups, worked assembly-
style putting a mixture of rice, dehydrated
vegetables and soy meal into bags that will be
shipped overseas to underdeveloped
countries.
According to Keith Taylor, a Rotary Club of
Crystal River member who organized the
event, the idea is for the meals to be filling
and nutritious.


Hunger is a big
issue in the world.
It's important to
help those in need.

Tony Sanchez
Rotary Club of Invemess member.

This is the third year for the event, which is
done in partnership with Stop Hunger Now,
a not-for-profit organization that has been
providing meals to those in need in more
than 20 countries around the world since
1998.
Robert Samuels with Stop Hunger Now
said Saturday morning that they depend on


Special to the Chronicle
Partners with a Heart awarded Nancy Moore, group treat-
ment coordinator at Camp E-Nini-Hassee, the 2012 Partner
with a Heart at the annual recognition dinner Friday. Shown
are: Partners director Renna Jablonskis, Nancy Moore and
Alida Langley, also with Partners with a Heart.


people that I work with, who
have given so much of their
lives to help these young
girls ... It's great to see the
girls' faces when they know


that they are loved."
Chronicle reporter Nancy
Kennedy can be reached at
nkennedy@ chronicle
online, corn or 352-564-2927.


service groups like Rotary to have these
events. At 25 cents per meal, Samuels said
the sponsoring organizations pay for the food
and then they package it. The food is then
taken to Orlando, where it will be processed
through customs and sent all over the world
to places such as Haiti and Honduras.
Taylor, a Crystal River lawyer, said he
brought a few judges and lawyers from Cit-
rus-Hernando Inn of Court to the event. In
addition, a couple of Boy Scout troops as well
as other citizens from the community were
helping assemble the meals.
Last year, Taylor said they packaged
100,000 meals, doubling their 2010 total. But
this year, he said they were going to shoot for
50,000. Twenty minutes into the event, Taylor
announced they had already finished 5,000.
Tony Sanchez, a member of the Rotary Club
of Inverness, said it was his first year partici-
pating. He felt it was important to attend.
"Hunger is a big issue in the world," he
said. "It's important to help those in need."
Chronicle reporter Shemir Wiles can be
reached at 352-564-2924 orswiles@chronicle
online com.


Learn about old Fla., celebrate archeology


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff Writer

INVERNESS The
stealing of the county seat,
the remains of a local ghost
town, the discoveries found
at the Tatham Mound near
Lake Tsala Apopka.
These are just a few of the
topics that will be discussed
during three free programs
celebrating March as
Florida Archeology Month.
The first at 2 p.m. Friday,


March 9, at Lakes Region Li-
brary, 1511 Druid Road, In-
verness, features John Miller,
author of "Citrus White Gold:
An Alternate History of Cit-
rus County." In his novel,
Miller explores how the his-
tory of Citrus County might
have been different, all be-
cause of a wandering gopher
tortoise crossing a trail.
Miller will discuss the
pros and cons of
self-publishing.
In a two-session seminar


Saturday, March 10 at the
Old Courthouse Heritage
Museum, Dr Jeff Mitchem,
archeologist currently with
the Arkansas Archeological
Survey, will talk about the
Tatham Mound.
From 10:30 to 11:30 a.m.,
Mitchem will talk about the
background of the mound
excavations and archeologi-
cal evidence of the encoun-
ters between native
Floridians and the Spanish
expedition of Hernando de


Soto in 1539.
The second session, from 1
to 2 p.m., will present "the
rest of the story," about the
older burials and artifacts re-
covered during excavations
- Mitchem was one of the
excavators and the story of
the reburial of the remains.
The Tatham Mounds, off
State Road 44 East just be-
fore the Withlacoochee
River on the right, contains
three periods of occupation:
Native Americans, Spanish


and Seminole Indians, said
Kathy Turner Thompson,
Citrus County's historical
resources officer
"It was also the site (of)
Piers Anthony's book 'Tatham
Mound,"' she added. "It
should be a great program."
For information, call the
Old Courthouse Heritage
Museum at (352) 341-6436.
Chronicle reporter Nancy
Kennedy can be reached at
nken nedy@ chronicle
online, corn or 352-564-2927.


SHEMIR WILES/Chronicle
Michael Wilder, 16; Cy Mabjar, 17; Jacob Osborne, 16; Harrison Clark, 17; and Adam Taylor, 18 work on packaging meals Saturday at Crys-
tal River High School. The boys are a part of the Crystal River Interact Club. The meals, which are a mixture of rice, dehydrated vegetables and
soy meal, will be shipped overseas to underdeveloped countries.



Stopping hunger with meals


*











Week in state government: The future is now


DAVID ROYSE
The News Service of
Florida

TALLAHASSEE The
Senate this week passed a
budget for the coming year,
but some of its members
were focused on another
year in the future as those
who want to be Senate pres-
ident down the road intensi-
fied their maneuvering in
the face of an increasingly
apparent challenge to the
chamber's conservative rul-
ing class.
The Senate has long been
a place where the in-charge
Republican Party has been
fractured, with splits be-
tween social moderates and
conservatives, fiscally con-
servative members and
those less antagonistic to
government services, and
populists versus the big
business wing.
That schism has been in
the open as much as ever if
not more in the now almost
two years that Senate Presi-
dent Mike Haridopolos has
led the Senate. It's a murky
split with those opposed to
the faction led by Haridopo-
los a shifting and motley
group. Some are more pop-
ulist, some are more moder-
ate, and some are simply
independent-minded and
seem to be most interested
in preserving a Senate that
doesn't blindly follow a
leader
Put all those together in a
coalition, and throw in a few
surprises in the November
election, and the possibility
has emerged that a real
challenge could be mounted
to the status quo when it
comes to the generally pre-
sumed line of succession to
the Senate throne. The Sen-


ate presidency in the next
several years has generally
been thought to be preor-
dained by the leaders of the
chamber. When Haridopo-
los leaves office in Novem-
ber, the gavel will be handed
to Sen. Don Gaetz, R-
Niceville. That much is
nearly certain.
After that, the general ex-
pectation has been that
Haridopolos-Gaetz ally Sen.
Andy Gardiner, currently a
member of the leadership
team as majority leader, will
take over. Then would come
other members of the lead-
ership team, maybe Sen.
John Thrasher and Sen. Joe
Negron, both conservative,
business-backed Republi-
cans loyal to the current
leadership.
MEANWHILE, BUDGET
For some in the Senate,
the wrangling over its future
leadership was a sideshow
to a more pressing issue:
The session only has a cou-
ple weeks left and there's a
budget to write for the more
immediate future. The ses-
sion is early this year be-
cause of redistricting, so
there's plenty of time before
the start of the fiscal year.
But it is an election year,
and lawmakers who have to
run in new districts would
like to get to it, not be here
in May putting the finishing
touches on a budget.
So the Senate passed its
budget this week, which was
probably the other big news.
A couple of issues domi-
nated the debate the
aforementioned fight over
the University of South
Florida's budget got by far
the most attention.
With Alexander putting a
hold on some money for the
university earlier, and then


backing off, it
was an inter-
esting drama
that overshad-
owed an oth-
erwise pretty
good story: the C
Senate man-
aged to cobble
together a bal-
anced budget 2012 SE
when there's a
tax-revenue shortfall, didn't
raise taxes, increased edu-
cation spending by more
than $1 billion and didn't
have massive protests at the
Capitol over the cuts that
have been suggested.
Still, even with the budget
passing this week in the
Senate, it doesn't match up
with the House yet, and the
hard work is just beginning.
PIPPY LONGSHOT?
Also this week, one of the
things that legislative lead-
ers and Gov. Scott say is a
big priority legislation
aimed at cracking down on
personal injury protection
or PIP insurance fraud got
moving again, passing in the
House Economic Affairs
Committee on Friday but
House Speaker Dean Can-
non didn't sound too confi-
dent that it was going to
pass, priority or not.
"I don't know whether
they'll be able to bring the
House and Senate positions
together before the end of
session," Cannon said of the
PIP bill. If they don't, it will
have to wait until next year
"I'm not contemplating any
special session on that issue
at this time.," Cannon said.
The bill (HB 119) would
put restrictions on some re-
imbursements, and cap at-
torney fees, a provision not


:SSION


included in a
Senate pro-
posal. As law-
makers try to
work out the
differences in
the budget,
this issue will
be secondary
Whether
Scott, who has


made it one of
his main talking points, will
push them to work out a bill
or even keep them in town
until they do is yet to be
seen.
STEINBERG QUITS
Rep. Richard Steinberg
stepped down on Friday
after admitting he'd sent re-
peated text messages
anonymously to a married
Miami prosecutor who
didn't want them. The pros-
ecutor, Marlene Fernandez-
Karavetsos, asked whoever
kept sending her the inap-
propriate messages to iden-
tify himself and to stop
sending them Steinberg
didn't. While she couldn't
figure out who they were
coming from, the U.S. Secret
Service had no problem and
by midweek Steinberg was
facing a looming story in the
Miami Herald about the in-
vestigation. He confessed to
the paper that he'd sent the
messages and said he was
sorry
On Friday, Steinberg, who
wasn't in Tallahassee for the
second half of the week,
apologized again and then
resigned. The Democrat
from Miami Beach likely
will be replaced in a special
election.
DRUG TESTING
State agencies may be
able to soon drug test work-


Weekly ROUNDUP


ers after all. The governor
ordered drug testing of state
employees last year in an
executive order, but it was
blocked by
the courts
for most
workers.
But Rep.
Jimmie -
Smith, R-
Inverness,
has taken
up the Jimmie T.
cause, push- Smith
ing a bill R-Inverness.
(HB 1205)
that would allow agencies,
though not require them, to
set up random drug testing
plans for employees. The
bill looks like it is on its way
to passage, headed to the
House floor after a vote this
week in the State Affairs
Committee. Civil liberties
groups say it, too, will be
found unconstitutional, and
that there's no evidence
state workers are more
likely to use drugs than any-
one else. Backers say it's just
like in the private sector: Of
they know they might be
tested, they wont use drugs.
BONDI JOINS LAWSUIT
Just as the row over the
federal rule requiring cov-
erage of contraceptives
seemed to subside a bit late
this week, Florida got into
the issue. Attorney General
Pam Bondi on Thursday an-
nounced she was joining six


Regal notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle

.t Bid Notices......................................D7

o! Meeting Notices..................... 07.....D7

Miscellaneous Notices.....................D7

S Surplus Property.............................D7


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
sh
c
r
sh
c
sh
sh
r
sh


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
c
sh
r
sh
r
r
r
sh
sh


MARINE OUTLOOK


Northeast winds around 20 knots.
Seas 2 to 3 feet. Bay and inland
waters will be choppy. Cloudy skies
will be in place over a chance of rain
today.


70 58 0.00 70 57 0.10

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Exclusive daily

TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 67 Low: 59
Mostly cloudy; 60% chance of
i showers
MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 78 Low: 62
Mostly cloudy; 60% chance of showers

.p TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
High: 82 Low: 62
Partly sunny; 20% chance of a shower

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 87/57
Record 87/26
Normal 75/46
Mean temp. 72
Departure from mean +11
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday 0.00 in.
Total for the month 1.59 in.
Total for the year 2.45 in.
Normal for the year 5.62 in.
*As of 6 p m at Inverness
UV INDEX: 1
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Saturday at 3 p.m. 30.18 in.


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 30
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 24%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Juniper, oak, nettle
Today's count: 8.3/12
Monday's count: 8.6
Tuesday's count: 10.6
AIR QUALITY
Saturday was good with pollutants


mainly ozone.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MII
(MORNING)
2/26 SUNDAY 8:38 2:27 9
2/27 MONDAY 9:28 3:17 9


NOR MA
(AFTERNO(
:01
:51


CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
SUNSET TONIGHT
SUNRISE TOMORROW.
MOONRISE TODAY..
MARCH 14 MARCH 22 MflONSFT TflnAY


MAJOR
ON)
2:49
3:40


6:28 P.!
.6:58 A.!
.9:21 A.!
10:55 P.R


BURN CONDITIONS


Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For
more information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's
Web site: http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi

WATERING RULES
Citrus County: Irrigation is limited to twice per week.
Even addresses: Thursday and/or Sunday before 10am or after 4pm.
Odd Addresses: Wednesday and/or Saturday before 10am or after 4pm.
No restrictions on fountains, car washing or pressure washing. Hand watering requires the
use of a shut-off nozzle.
PLEASE CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL NEW PLANT MATERIAL.
Questions, concerns or reporting violations, please call Citrus County 352-527-7669.

TIDES


*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Sunday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 8:07 a/3:52 a 7:56 p/3:43 p
Crystal River** 6:28 a/1:14 a 6:17 p/1:05 p
Withlacoochee* 4:15 a/10:53 a 4:04 p/11:39 p
Homosassa*** 7:17 a/2:51 a 7:06 p/2:42 p


***At Mason's Creek
Monday
High/Low High/Low
8:48 a/4:29 a 8:25 p/4:11 p
7:09 a/1:51 a 6:46 p/1:33p
4:56 a/11:21 a 4:33 p/--
7:58 a/3:28 a 7:35 p/3:10 p


Gulf water
temperature


66
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 27.79 27.79 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 33.95 33.94 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lInverness 36.16 36.15 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 37.66 37.66 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211


THE NATION


Saturday Sunday Saturday Sunday
City H L Pcp. Fcst H L City H L Pcp. Fcst H L


Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
M. Burlington, VT
M. Charleston, SC
M. Charleston, WV
Charlotte
S Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, N.H.
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
W Nashville


39 30
63 26
49 31
55 34
46 39
61 35
45 37
51 23
58 31
53 36
45 37
32 27
35 25
58 46
36 30
55 36
27 20
39 27
34 28
57 40
35 28
39 31
64 35
65 21
29 17
32 28
69 37
41 28
42 34
45 35
60 49
35 24
62 31
74 43
62 34
60 54
41 31
55 35
31 22
28 10
59 45
61 39
51 28


s
s
s
s
s
pc
s
c
pc
.08 pc
s
.02 pc
s
c
.01 s
s
pc
s
.01 pc
pc
s
s
pc
.01 pc
s
.01 pc
s
s
s
s
c
s
pc
s
s
s
s
s
pc
c
c
c
s


35 22
65 32
52 30
60 41
46 31
65 53
47 34
35 11
61 44
39 24
38 28
34 33
21 12
55 48
49 32
53 31
45 32
49 34
38 33
57 40
44 33
30 13
66 51
44 23
48 24
38 33
75 50
57 37
42 29
40 25
65 56
52 32
67 46
67 47
64 42
60 50
55 40
62 42
43 29
39 21
61 53
59 45
60 38


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02012 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


New Orleans 58 51 c 63 52
New York City 45 37 s 46 36
Norfolk 53 44 s 48 32
Oklahoma City 63 26 pc 64 44
Omaha 35 16 s 50 23
Palm Springs 83 53 s 72 50
Philadelphia 45 37 s 46 33
Phoenix 79 52 s 81 49
Pittsburgh 33 27 .01 pc 42 30
Portland, ME 40 32 s 31 16
Portland, Ore 44 37 .30 rs 46 32
Providence, R.I. 46 35 s 41 23
Raleigh 53 39 s 53 31
Rapid City 56 14 .01 pc 39 12
Reno 54 41 pc 43 24
Rochester, NY 34 27 .11 pc 34 31
Sacramento 62 40 pc 59 37
St. Louis 43 28 s 61 39
St. Ste. Marie 23 13 sn 27 24
Salt Lake City 53 34 pc 41 32
San Antonio 56 42 c 65 54
San Diego 63 54 s 65 53
San Francisco 57 45 pc 55 41
Savannah 59 48 c 58 49
Seattle 45 38 .30 rs 44 33
Spokane 37 31 .47 sn 38 20
Syracuse 37 28 .15 s 29 22
Topeka 50 25 pc 60 31
Washington 47 35 s 48 33
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 87 Opa Locka, Fla. LOW -15 Hallock,
Minn.
WORLD CITIES
SUNDAY Lisbon 64/49/s
CITY H/L/SKY London 57/45/c
Acapulco 87/73/s Madrid 69/35/pc
Amsterdam 50/38/c Mexico City 73/45/pc
Athens 60/50/pc Montreal 19/18/s
Beijing 34/15/pc Moscow 28/19/sf
Berlin 39/33/pc Paris 54/41/c
Bermuda 63/58/pc Rio 94/75/s
Cairo 66/52/pc Rome 56/41/pc
Calgary 13/-5/sn Sydney 80/69/c
Havana 86/67/sh Tokyo 50/38/c
Hong Kong 68/62/sh Toronto 33/32/pc
Jerusalem 58/42/pc Warsaw 34/28/sf


SC I T R U S


C 0 U N TY


other state attorneys gen-
eral in a lawsuit against the
federal decision to require
religious employers to offer
health insurance that covers
contraceptives and other
services that violate the
tenets of the employer's af-
filiated religion.
"Government has no busi-
ness forcing religious insti-
tutions and individuals to
violate their sincerely held
beliefs," Bondi said in a
statement.
"This lawsuit is about pro-
tecting religious liberty and
the rights of conscience, our
most basic freedoms as
Americans." Bondi joined
attorneys general from Ne-
braska, Michigan, Ohio,
Oklahoma, South Carolina
and Texas in the lawsuit.
Other plaintiffs include a
Catholic high school, social
services agencies and a nun,
among others.
STORY OF THE
WEEK: We've seen the fu-
ture and it is here: the 2012-
13 budget was passed by the
Senate setting up a confer-
ence with the House, while
the 2014 Senate presidency
contest got murky
QUOTE OF THE
WEEK: "I'm not going any-
where," Sen. Andy Gar-
diner, R-Orlando, about his
plans to be the Senate pres-
ident in 2014. Or possibly re-
ferring to the prospects for
his campaign?


LHKON1CLJt
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ITIUUMOC I luum l .......................... I


A4 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012


STATE


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


P
P

P





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries


State BRIEF


Charles
Ehrhardt, 70
INVERNESS
Charles F Ehrhardt, 70, of
Inverness, FL, originally of
Pontiac, IL, died on Thurs-
day, February 23,2012, at his
home in In-
verness sur-
rounded by
his family
A grave-
side service
with mili-
tary rites
will be held
Charles at a later
Ehrhardt date at
Pa y n e
Cemetery in rural Pontiac,
IL, under the direction of
Calvert & Martin Funeral
Home in Pontiac, IL. Cre-
mation arrangements are
under the direction of the
Inverness Chapel of Hooper
Funeral Homes. Online con-
dolences may be sent to the
family at wwwhooper
funeralhome.com.
Memorials in Charles'
name may be left to Hospice
of Citrus County East Citrus
Team, 326 S. Line Ave., In-
verness, FL 34452 or to a
charity of the donor's
choice.
Charles was born on Sep-
tember 16, 1941, in Swygert,
IL, a son of Melvin B. and
Viola M. "Katie" Ehrhardt.
He was educated in Pontiac
Schools and served our
country in the United States
Navy from 1959 until 1965.
Charles was a supervisor at
Florida Power for 27 years.
He enjoyed fishing, reading,
woodworking and was a die-
hard Chicago Bears fan. He
married Helen L. Marler on
September 20, 1986, in Her-
nando, FL.
Mr Ehrhardt was pre-
ceded in death by his father,
Melvin B. Ehrhardt; his
mother and stepfather, Viola
M. "Katie" and Frank R.
Meier; and one sister, A.
Joan Drager
He is survived by his lov-
ing wife of 25 years, Helen
Ehrhardt of Inverness, FL;
daughter, Kelly (Chris)
Nolte of Chesterfield, VA;
two stepdaughters, Dawn
(Tim) Langer and Laurie
Ann Baker; two stepsons,
Hank (Jamie) Marler and
John Marler; 10 grandchil-
dren, Ashley (Brian) Baird,
Kerry Wilkerson, Brittany
Nolte, Jessica and Jennifer
Zimmer, Jeff Casey, Haydn,
Tristan and Makenna Mar-
ler and Brandon Baker; one
great-grandson, Parker
Baird; one brother, Bill
(Kim) Meier of Sigourney,
IA; two sisters, Sandy (Pat)
Collier of Springfield, IL,
and Cindy J. Meier of Pon-
tiac, IL; five nephews, Luke,
Sam and Matt Meier and
Mark and Craig Drager; and
two nieces, Erin Collier and
Kim Neal.

SO YOU KNOW
The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits both free and
paid obituaries.
Email obits@ chronicle
online.com or phone
352-563-5660 for
more information.
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear in
the next day's edition.



BROWN
FUNERAL HOME
& CREMATORY
5430 W Gulf to Lale Hwy
Lecant F r 34451

795-0111

Richard 7. Brown
FUNERAL DIRECTOR


To Place Your
("In Memory" ad,
Call Mike Snyder at 563-3273
msnyder@chronicleonline com


or
Saralynnme Schlumberger at 564-2917
sschlumberger@chronicleonline.com


Lorene
Shively, 90
INVERNESS
Merle Lorene Shively, age
90, Inverness, died Feb-
ruary 23, 2012, under the
loving care
of her fam-
ily and the
staff of
Avante at
Inverness.
A Cele-
bration of
Life and Re-
membrance
Lorene Gathering
Shively will be held
Monday,
February 27, 2012, at 4 p.m.
at the Chas. E. Davis Fu-
neral Home with Crematory
with Pastor Steven Riddle
officiating.
Lorene was born on No-
vember 15, 1921, in Pilot
Rock, Oregon, to the late
Harvey L. and Grace M.
(Horton) Adams and moved
to this area in 1977 from
Luther, MI.
She was a homemaker,
who enjoyed reading, knit-
ting and cross-stitching.
When she lived in Michigan,
she volunteered at Mercy
Hospital in Cadillac. In
1939, she married Dale
Shively and they celebrated
72 years together
In addition to her hus-
band, she is survived by her
son, Terry L. and his wife,
Emma Shively, Floral City;
and daughter Sandra G.
and her husband, Larry
Phillips, Inverness; four
grand-children; 17 great-
grandchildren; and three
great-great-grandchildren.
She was preceded in death
by her brother, Leroy; her
sister, Helen; and a grand-
son, Benjamin Shively
The family requests me-
morial donations in
Lorene's name to Hospice
of Citrus County, PO. Box
641270, Beverly Hills, FL,
34464 in lieu of flowers.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.





Jack
Ritchey, 85
CRYSTAL RIVER
Jack R. Ritchey, age 85, of
Crystal River, FL, passed
away February 24, 2012, at
his home.
He was an Army veteran.
Private cremation will take
place under the direction of
Brown Funeral Home and
Crematory in Lecanto, FL.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.

















I3D. Swt
Funeral Home
With Crematory
Burial Shipping
Cremation
Memberof

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Douglas
Frederick, 52
HERNANDO
Douglas Lester Frederick,
52, Hernando, died sud-
denly Feb. 23, 2012, at Tim-
ber Ridge Emergency
Medical Center
Born in Marshall, MI, on
Jan. 12, 1960, to Melvin and
Ruth Ann (Smith) Frederick,
he came to Florida in 1980
from Homer, MI. He worked
in the construction industry
as a demolition tech, en-
joyed riding his motorcycle,
fishing, and collecting
antiques.
Survivors include his
mother, Ruth Ann Smith
Frederick; a daughter, Tish
Fey of Ormond Beach, FL;
three sisters, Deborah
(James) Oldfield, Sorrento,
FL; Diana (Fred) Loud and
Dawn (Edwin) Finch, both
of Homer, MI; eight nieces
and nephews, Jordan,
Kylee, Rippie, Nichol, Jes-
sica, Daniel, Alex and
Karter; six great-nieces and
-nephews, Ashlynn, Han-
nah, Deacon, Kiana, Do-
minic and Colton; two
special friends, Maria
Tenaglio and Sabrina De-
mott. He was preceded in
death by his father, Lester,
on March 11, 1989.
Services and burial will
be on Tuesday from the
Kevin Tidd Funeral Home
of Albion, MI. The Chas. E.
Davis Funeral Home of In-
verness is in charge locally


Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. com.

Walter
Mimms, 56
DUNNELLON
Walter Kelly Mimms, 56,
Dunnellon, went home
peacefully to be with the
Lord after a three-year bat-
tle with cancer on February
22, 2012.
Born in Tampa, he moved
to Dunnellon from Anthony
eleven years ago. He was a
carpenter by trade.
Preceded in death by his
father, Walter Francis
Mimms; he is survived by
his mother, Mable Gene
Mimms, Dunnellon; sister,
Kay Atkins; nephew Ben;
and numerous friends and
extended family
Funeral Service will be 11
a.m. Tuesday, February 28,
with Bishop Robert M. Hoki
officiating at Countryside
Funeral Home, 9185 NE
Jacksonville Road, Anthony
Interment to follow in An-
thony Cemetery. Visitation
will be one hour prior to the
service. In lieu of flowers,
donations may be made to
Hospice of Citrus County.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. com.


Charles
Comstock, 65
CITRUS SPRINGS
Charles T Comstock Jr,
age 65, of Citrus Springs,
FL, formerly of St. James,
NY, passed away on Febru-
ary 23, 2012, at home in the
loving care of his wife,
Denise (nee Ryan) and Hos-
pice of Citrus County.
He is preceded in death
by his parents, Charles T.
and Audrey Comstock. Do-
nations may be made in
Charlie's memory to Hos-
pice of Citrus County, PO.
Box 641270, Beverly Hills,
FL 34464. Private cremation
arrangements are entrusted
to New Serenity Memorial
Funeral Home & Cremation
Svcs. Inc. 352-563-1394.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. com.

OBITUARIES
Obituaries must be
submitted by the
funeral home or society
in charge of
arrangements.
Paid obituaries are
printed as submitted by
funeral homes or
societies.
A flag will be included
for free for those who
served in the U.S.
military. (Please note
this when submitting a
free obituary.)


Budget process
to start this week
The process of banging
out a budget agreement be-
tween the House and Senate
will hopefully begin some
time early next week, House
Speaker Dean Cannon said
Friday.
"Obviously, there are both
some policy choices in the
budget and some numeric
differences that will have to
be ironed out, but I don't see
any insurmountable obsta-
cles toward coming together
with conference allocations
and getting the budget done,"
said Cannon, R-Winter Park,
during a meeting with
reporters.
But Cannon was mum on
a key issue for Senate
Budget Chairman JD Alexan-
der, R-Lake Wales -
whether the University of
South Florida's Lakeland
campus will become an inde-
pendent Florida Polytechnic
University.
Cannon said he was cur-
rent more focused on higher-
education reforms being
promoted by House Educa-
tion Chairman Bill Proctor, R-
St. Augustine, than the USF
Polytechnic debate.
"I'm going to wait to take a
position on that until we see
how conference goes," Can-
non said.
-From wire reports


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SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012 A5







pNPage A6 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012



NATION


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Nation BRIEF

Stumping

__({MN- t


Two US troops shot in Kabul


NA TO pulls workers from Ajghan ministries J|S 1


* ',.
Associated Press
Campaign signs for Repub-
lican presidential candi-
date, former Pennsylvania
Sen. Rick Santorum, cover
the frozen ground as the
campaign bus carrying
Republican presidential
candidate, former Massa-
chusetts Gov. Mitt Rom-
ney, passes by en route to
a campaign stop Saturday
at the San Marino Club in
Troy, Mich.

Party loyalty
debated in Mich.
FLINT, Mich. Republi-
can Mitt Romney fought Sat-
urday to prove he is the
strongest challenger to Presi-
dent Barack Obama, an in-
creasingly difficult task given
the tight race in his native
state of Michigan against
surging conservative Rick
Santorum. In the final week-
end of campaigning before
Tuesday's Michigan and Ari-
zona primaries, Romney fo-
cused on central and
southeast Michigan's urban
and industrial centers in
hopes of pulling ahead of
Santorum. With a Michigan
victory, Santorum could solid-
ify his place as a real threat to
Romney heading into Super
Tuesday, the 10-state sweep-
stakes in March. Santorum's
victories so far have come in
lower-turnout party caucuses.
While Romney kept most
of his attention on the Demo-
cratic incumbent, he also
worked to lay doubt about the
core principles of his lightly
funded main GOP rival.
Romney is the one facing
stubborn doubts from some
conservatives for his changed
positions on social issues, but
he tried to portray Santorum,
a former Pennsylvania sena-
tor, as a Washington insider
with cracks in his own con-
servative credentials.

World BRIEF

Armed


Associated Press
Supporters of the Free Syr-
ian Army ride a motorcycle
with a rocket-propelled
grenade Friday in Kafar
Taharim, Syria.

Violence across
Syria before vote
DAMASCUS, Syria -
Syria defied international calls
to halt attacks on rebel en-
claves as at least 89 people
were killed nationwide Satur-
day on the eve of a constitu-
tional referendum that the
opposition sees as a ploy by
President Bashar Assad's
regime. Assad presented the
revised charter which al-
lows for at least a theoretical
opening of the country's politi-
cal system as an effort to
placate critics and quell the
11-month uprising against his
rule. Assad was roundly criti-
cized Friday at a major inter-
national conference on the
Syrian crisis in Tunisia, where
U.S., European and Arab offi-
cials began planning a civilian
peacekeeping mission to de-
ploy after the regime falls.
President Barack Obama
said Friday of Assad's rule: "It
is time for that regime to
move on."
-From wire reports


Associated Press
KABUL, Afghanistan A
gunman killed two Ameri-
can military advisers with
shots to the back of the head
Saturday inside a heavily
guarded ministry building,
and NATO ordered military
workers out of Afghan min-
istries as protests raged for
a fifth day over the burning
of copies of the Quran at a
U.S. army base.
The Taliban claimed re-
sponsibility for the Interior
Ministry attack, saying it
was retaliation for the
Quran burnings, after the
U.S. servicemen a lieu-
tenant colonel and a major
- were found dead on the
floor of an office that only
people who know a numeri-
cal combination can get
into, Afghan and Western of-
ficials said.
The top commander of
U.S. and NATO forces re-


Associated Press
PYONGYANG, North Korea -
In his last public appearance, late
North Korean leader Kim Jong II
went shopping.
He peered at the prices affixed
to shelves packed with everything
from Pantene shampoo to Pabst
Blue Ribbon beer And he nodded
his approval of Pyongyang's ver-
sion of Wal-Mart, which was soon to
open courtesy of China.
The visit played up a decidedly
un-communist development in
North Korea: A new culture of com-
merce is springing up, with China
as its inspiration and source. The
market-savvy Chinese are intro-
ducing the pleasures of the mega-
mart to a small niche of North
Koreans, and flooding the country's
border regions with cheap goods.
And they are doing it with the
full approval of North Korea's
leadership. The new consumerism
is part of a campaign launched
three years ago to build up the
economy, and so the image of new
leader Kim Jong Un.
At the Kwangbok area supermar-
ket in downtown Pyongyang, that
translates into lime green frying
pans, pink Minnie Mouse pajamas,
popcorn and a line of silvery high


called all international mil-
itary personnel from the
ministries, an unprece-
dented action in the decade-
long war that highlights the
growing friction between
Afghans and their foreign
partners at a critical junc-
ture in the war
The U.S.-led coalition is
trying to mentor and
strengthen Afghan security
forces so they can lead the
fight against the Taliban and
foreign troops can go home.
That mission, however, re-
quires a measure of trust at a
time when anti-Western sen-
timent is at an all-time high.
Afghan Defense Minister
Gen. Abdul Rahim Wardak
called U.S. Defense Secre-
tary Leon Panetta to apolo-
gize for the shooting and
offer his condolences, Penta-
gon press secretary George
Little said in a statement re-
leased in Washington.
"This act is unacceptable


and the United States con-
demns it in the strongest
possible terms," Little said.
Security is tight in the cap-
ital, which is covered in
snow, and foreigners work-
ing at the U.S. Embassy and
at international organiza-
tions have been banned from
leaving their compounds.
U.S. officials said they
were searching for the as-
sailant, who has not been
identified by name or
nationality
The two American service
members were found by an-
other foreigner who went
into the room, according to
the Afghan official, who
spoke to The Associated
Press on condition of
anonymity because he was
not authorized to disclose
details about the shootings.
They were shot in the back
of the head, according to
Western officials, who spoke
on condition of anonymity


heels sparkling in the sunlight.
"It is very good to come to this
shop and buy goods which I like by
feeling them and looking over them
myself," said shopper Pak So Jong,
bundled up in a winter jacket with
a furry collar, as she examined
bags of locally made sweets and
biscuits a few days after the store's
opening.
In many ways, North Korea can
seem like the land time forgot. Dig-
nitaries are ferried around in an-
cient but immaculate Mercedes
Benzes, and the boxy, beige tele-
phones at the five-star Koryo Hotel
look like something out of 'Austin
Powers."
Billboards in the capital, Py-
ongyang, are likely to feature the
latest Workers' Party slogans, not
advertisements, and there are no
shopping malls, McDonald's
golden arches or Starbucks coffee
shops.
At least, not yet.
Outside Pyongyang, much of the
country remains impoverished.
Millions rely on state-provided
food, but poor agricultural yields
mean they'll get only a fraction of
what they need to survive, accord-
ing to the World Food Program.
Still, there are signs that a new-
found consumer culture is taking


Associated Press
Afghan policemen run toward an anti-U.S. demonstration
Saturday in Mehterlam, Laghman province east of Kabul,
Afghanistan. Protesters threw rocks at police, government
buildings and a U.N. office in eastern Afghanistan on Satur-
day, kicking off a fifth day of riots sparked by the burning of
Qurans at a U.S. base, officials said.


because they were not au-
thorized to disclose the in-
formation. Authorities were
poring over security camera
video for clues, the Afghan
official said.
Taliban spokesman Zabi-
ullah Mujahid identified the


shooter as one of their sym-
pathizers, Abdul Rahman.
He said an accomplice in-
side the ministry helped
Rahman get inside the com-
pound to kill the Americans
in retaliation for the Quran
burnings.


Israeli

attack on

Iran

might pull

US into

new war
Associated Press
WASHINGTON An Is-
raeli pre-emptive attack on
Iran's nuclear sites could
draw the U.S. into a new
Mideast conflict, a prospect
dreaded by a war-weary
Pentagon wary of new
entanglements.
That could mean pressing
into service the top tier of
American firepower- war-
planes, warships, special
operations forces and possi-
bly airborne infantry- with
unpredictable outcomes in
one of the world's most
volatile regions.
"Israel can commence a
war with Iran, but it may
well take U.S. involvement
to conclude it," says Karim
Sadjadpour, a Middle East
specialist at the Carnegie
Endowment for Interna-
tional Peace.
An armed clash with Iran
is far from certain. Diplo-
macy backed by increas-
ingly tough economic
penalties is still seen by the
United States and much of
the rest of the world as
worth pursuing for now.
Israel, however, worries
that Iran soon could enter a
"zone of immunity" in which
enough of its nuclear materi-
als are beyond the reach of
Israeli air power so that Iran
could not be stopped, or per-
haps could be stopped only
by superior American
firepower
If Israel's American-made
strike planes managed to
penetrate Iranian air space
and bomb Iran's main nu-
clear facilities, then Iran
would be expected to retali-
ate in any number of ways.
That possibly could include
the firing of Shahab-3 ballis-
tic missiles at Tel Aviv or
other Israeli targets.
Iran might block the
Strait of Hormuz, a key tran-
sit route for the world's oil
tankers. It could attack
nearby Bahrain, home to
the U.S. Navy's 5th Fleet In
either of these scenarios,
the U.S. military almost cer-
tainly would hit back.
Michael O'Hanlon, a de-
fense analyst at the Brook-
ings Institution, sees a
chance that the U.S. could
largely stay out of the fight if
Israel struck first.
If the U.S. spotted Iran
preparing to fire a ballistic
missile at Israel in a retalia-
tory act, "it's possible we
would decide to take that
missile out," O'Hanlon said.
"I would bet against most
other direct American
involvement."


hold both in Pyongyang and in the
border towns where Chinese-made
goods are bought and sold every
day
Pyongyang Department Store
No. 1 regularly stages exhibitions
of goods to show off what deputy
manager Kim Ja Son calls "social-
ist commerce," borrowing a phrase
attributed by state media to Kim
Jong II.
The displays boast what North
Korea's newly modernized facto-
ries are producing, including per-
fume, rubber boots, silk blankets
and hand towels printed with the
words "peace" and "friendship."
What the North Koreans aren't
making themselves is coming in
from China: cellphones, laptop
computers, cars, Spalding basket-
balls, bicycles, pressure cookers,
karaoke machines, ping pong sets,
even Gucci knockoffs.
Business with China, North
Korea's largest trading partner, has
boomed in the last two years. In
2010, North Korea did $3.5 billion
in trade with China, a 30 percent
increase from the previous year
And for the first 11 months of 2011,
that figure was up to $5.1 billion, a
jump of nearly 70 percent from
2010, according to China's Com-
merce Ministry


Controversy shows Catholic-Evangelical ties


Associated Press


RALEIGH, N.C. -After the White
House decreed this month that reli-
gious employers would have to pay
for workers' birth control, it was no
surprise that Roman Catholic leaders
would protest. That evangelical
Protestants would rally to their cause
was less expected.
"It's just the common good. We're all


brothers. They're Christians, we're
Christians," said Thomas Fallon, 43, who
lives in Auburn, Mass., and converted to
Southern Baptism from Catholicism.
For Protestants who've rallied to
the Catholic bishops' side, the ques-
tion is one of religious liberty rather
than dogma. Even after the Obama ad-
ministration hastily revised the order
to require insurance companies,
rather than religious employers, to


pay for birth control, many evangeli-
cals said the bishops are right to reject
the new rule as the same violation of
conscience in a different form. Most of
the discontent has been voiced by
evangelical leaders like Richard
Land, president of the Southern Bap-
tist Convention's Ethics and Religious
Liberty Commission, and Albert
Mohler, president of the Southern
Baptist Theological Seminary


Retail revelation


Associated Press
A girl looks at women's shoes Jan. 19 at the Kwangbok Area shopping center in Pyongyang, North Korea. A new
culture of commerce is springing up, with China as its inspiration and source. The new consumerism is part of
a campaign launched three years ago to build up the economy, and so the image of new leader Kim Jong Un.

China introduces supermarket concept to North Korea





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


How a girl lost, found the horse she loved


Associated Press
The mare was tall and
spirited and a joy to behold,
galloping across the pasture
with her head high, lithe
and fast and fearless.
A dark bay, nearly black,
with a dramatic white blaze
on her forehead, everyone
thought Burma the diva
of the barn was a beauty.
But, though friendly and
affectionate, the 6-year-old
thoroughbred was practi-
cally impossible to handle.
High-strung and feisty, she
swayed impatiently in her
stall, chewed the wooden
doors, got tangled in her
harness, stuck her nose into
any box or bucket she could
find. To 16-year-old Megan
Chance, she was perfect.
"This is the horse I want,"
she announced jubilantly in
1998, after riding Burma for
the first time at a New Jer-
sey stable.
For six years, they were
inseparable.
"She was more than my
horse or my pet," Megan
said. "She was my best
buddy"
But, as many horse lovers
will attest and as Megan
would discover a horse
who is your best buddy can
break your heart.
In 2004, when Megan de-
cided to take a couple of
months to travel across the
country with her friend
Katie Gaylor, her biggest
dilemma was who could
take care of Burma.
Megan remembered a
conversation several years
earlier with the horse
trainer who had shipped
Burma to West Virginia. She
is so lovely, Megan recalled
the woman saying. If you
ever want to breed her,
please call me.
Megan contacted the
woman, who ran a stable in
New York's Orange County.
They made a deal, Megan
says. The woman would pay
all Burma's costs food,
shelter, veterinary care -
and in return she would
breed the mare and keep
the foal.
In the fall of 2004, Megan
dropped Burma off at well-
appointed stables in the
New York countryside. They
signed a handwritten con-
tract, Megan says, and then
she and her friend took off
on a six-week cross-country
tour. She would call every
few weeks to ask how her


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horse was doing and that
was how she learned that
Burma had miscarried.
She agreed to leave her at
the stable for up to a year
longer so the breeder could
try for another foal.
Months passed. In the
spring of 2005 the breeder
told Megan that Burma was
pregnant again.
That is the last conversa-
tion Megan recalls.
At first Megan paid little
attention to the fact that her
phone calls were not being
returned. But when she
called one day and the
phone was disconnected,
she panicked.
She tried to find the
woman on the Internet, but
she'd left no trace. She tried
email, but her messages
bounced back.
What had happened to
the breeder? What had hap-
pened to her horse?
iME
Six years passed. On July
6, 2011, two strikingly beau-
tiful thoroughbred mares
stood in pen No. 10 at the
weekly horse auction in
Cranbury, N.J, calling fran-
tically to each other, eyes
wild with fear. Number 912
was a tall dark bay, nearly
black, with a stunning white
blaze on her forehead. Her
companion, number 911,
was a skinny bay Both had
unusual white branding on
their necks t-47 and t-38.
No. 10 is the saddest stall,
the feedlot pen also known
as the "kill pen." Horses
here are destined to be
shipped to a slaughterhouse
and butchered for horse
meat abroad. At her pretty
horse farm in Newtown,
Conn., more than 100 miles
away, Annette Sullivan mon-
itored the auction on her
computer.
"I'll bail 911 and 912," she
said, and paid $325 for both.
Papers identified the
dark horse as Burma's Lady
ME.
On a sunny morning in
October, Megan Chance
Adams dropped her son at
kindergarten and checked
her computer in Washing-
ton, N.C. She clicked on a
Facebook link forwarded by
a friend and saw a picture of
a horse, a beautiful tall dark
bay with a familiar white
blaze. Megan gasped.
"I found Burma," she
screamed on the phone to
her mother. "Oh my God,
she's alive."
"Are you sure?" her


Associated Press
Megan Chance pets Burma Jan. 31 in Washington, N.C., before riding the thoroughbred for the first time since the two
were reunited. Megan rode Burma as a child in New Jersey, but after leaving her on a year breeding contract, Burma van-
ished. For years Megan searched in vain, eventually deciding her horse must be dead. Last summer, Burma was rescued
from the "kill pen" at a New Jersey auction, and the two were recently reunited. The white "T-47" on the left side of her
neck was placed there by the test facility Burma was in.


mother asked.
On the day after Thanks-
giving, Megan drove from
her mother's house in New
Jersey to Zoar Ridge stables
in Connecticut.
She was about to see
Burma for the first time in


six years. And she was
terrified.
Would Burma recognize
her? Would she forgive her?
Heart pounding, she
walked towards the pasture
where Burma was grazing.
"Burma," she called


softly, "Burma."
The mare flicked her
head and looked up, ears
pointed, curious. Slowly she
ambled over. Trembling,
Megan reached out and
stroked her. It was hard to
believe, after all this time,


that she could touch the
horse she had never
stopped grieving.
In the barn, Burma didn't
take her eyes off Megan. It
was as if she was trying to
remember, to piece together
all that had happened.


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SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012 A7




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


THANK You

2012 Black Diamond Pro-Am
TOURNAMENT SPONSORS

TITLE SPONSORS
Black Diamond Club & Mlembers
Crystal Chevrolet/Chrysler/Dodge/Jeep/Nissan

PLATINUM
Citrus Memorial Hospital
Cadence Bank
Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center

GOLD
Munroe Regional Medcial Center
Waterside Environmental Care
Wells Fargo Insurance Service
FDS Disposal
Desmond Group Bob Savard
Quest Wealth Management
Nancy Manafort
Sanditz Travel
James Manafort Jr.
Mike Bays State Farm Insurance
Brighthouse Networks
Morgan Stanley
Bob and Lisa Campbell

SILVER
Blackshears II Aluminum
Canadian Meds
Cardiff Construction
Homosassa Printing
Citrus County Chronicle
Suncoast Business Masters
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BRONZE
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ANGEL
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*Black
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A8 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY SCHOOLS
Elementary schools
Breakfast includes juice and milk
Monday: MVP breakfast, grits, cereal, toast.
Tuesday: Sausage and egg biscuit, tater tots,
cereal and toast.
Wednesday: Breakfast sausage pizza, grits,
cereal and toast.
Thursday: Ultimate breakfast round, tater
tots, cheese grits, cereal and toast.
Friday: MVP breakfast, grits, cereal, toast.
Lunch includes juice and milk
Monday: Baked chicken nuggets, sausage
pizza, PB dippers, fresh garden salad, sweet
peas, seasoned rice, mixed fruit.
Tuesday: Baked chicken tenders, turkey
super salad, yogurt parfait, fresh baby carrots,
corn, fruit juice bar, crackers.
Wednesday: Pasta with mozzarella and meat
sauce, mozzarella MaxStix, PB dippers, fresh
garden salad, green beans, chilled applesauce.
Thursday: Hamburger on bun, uncrusted
PBJs, apple chicken super salad, yogurt parfait,
fresh baby carrots, ranch pasta salad, strawberry
cup, crackers, roll.
Friday: Breaded chicken sandwich, turkey
wrap, PB dippers, fresh garden salad, steamed
broccoli, warm apple slices.
Middle schools
Breakfast includes juice and milk
Monday: Breakfast sausage pizza, MVP
Breakfast, grits, cereal and toast, milk, juice.
Tuesday: Breakfast egg and cheese wrap,
MVP Breakfast, tater tots, cereal and toast.
Wednesday: Sausage, egg and cheese bis-
cuit, ultra cinnamon bun, tater tots, cereal, toast.
Thursday: Breakfast sandwich stuffer, ulti-
mate breakfast round, grits, cereal and toast.
Friday: Ham, egg and cheese biscuit, ultra
cinnamon bun, tater tots, cereal and toast.
Lunch includes juice and milk
Monday: Sausage pizza, breaded chicken
sandwich, yogurt parfait, fresh baby carrots, Nor-
mandy-blend vegetables, Italian pasta salad,
strawberry cup.
Tuesday: Crispy Mexican tacos, fajita chicken
and rice, ham super salad, PB dippers, garden
salad, glazed carrots, Mexicali corn, Spanish
rice, applesauce, crackers.
Wednesday: Hamburger on bun, baked
chicken nuggets, yogurt parfait, fresh baby car-
rots, green beans, colossal crisp french fries,
chilled peaches.
Thursday: Oriental orange chicken, Moz-
zarella MaxStix, chef super salad, PB dippers,
garden salad, sweet corn, warm apple slices,
Jell-O, crackers.
Friday: Baked chicken tenders, macaroni and
cheese, apple chicken super salad, fresh baby
carrots, broccoli, seasoned rice, chilled mixed
fruit, crackers.
High schools
Breakfast includes juice and milk
Monday: Breakfast sausage pizza, MVP
Breakfast, grits, cereal and toastk.
Tuesday: Breakfast egg and cheese wrap,
MVP breakfast, tater tots, cereal and toast.
Wednesday: Sausage, egg and cheese bis-
cuit, ultra cinnamon bun, tater tots, grits, cereal


and toast.
Thursday: Breakfast sausage pizza, ultimate
breakfast round, grits, cereal and toast.
Friday: Breakfast sandwich stuffer, ultra cin-
namon bun, tater tots, cereal and toast.
Lunch includes milk
Monday: Fajita chicken and rice, hamburger,
pizza, fajita chicken super salad, yogurt parfait,
fresh baby carrots, broccoli, french fries, fruit
juice bar, crackers.
Tuesday: Pasta with mozzarella and meat
sauce, chicken sandwich, pizza, ham super
salad, yogurt parfait, garden salad, sweet corn,
green beans, french fries, peaches, crackers.
Wednesday: Baked chicken tenders, pizza,
hamburger, turkey wrap, turkey super salad, PB
dippers, baby carrots, peas, pineapple, mashed
potatoes, baked beans, french fries, crackers.
Thursday: Cheesy chicken and rice burrito,
chicken sandwich, pizza, apple chicken super
salad, yogurt parfait, garden salad, green beans,
sweet corn, french fries, mixed fruit, crackers.
Friday: Creamy chicken alfredo, hamburger,
pizza, ham super salad, yogurt parfait, fresh
baby carrots, peas, baked french fries, straw-
berry cup, crackers.
Lecanto High School lunch includes milk
Monday: Chicken tenders, macaroni and
cheese, hamburger, chicken sandwich, fajita
chicken super salad, pizza, yogurt parfait, baby
carrots, baked beans, peas, baked chips, french
fries, fruit juice bar, crackers.
Tuesday: Fajita chicken and rice, pizza,
turkey and gravy over noodles, hamburger,
chicken sandwich turkey salad, yogurt parfait,
garden salad, sweet corn, green beans,
peaches, french fries, baked chips, crackers.
Wednesday: Turkey wrap, chicken alfredo,
hamburger, chicken sandwich, pizza, ham super
salad, yogurt parfait, baby carrots, french fries,
ranch pasta salad, broccoli, pineapple, baked
chips, crackers.
Thursday: Breaded chicken, macaroni and
cheese, hamburger, chicken sandwich, pizza,
turkey super salad, yogurt parfait, garden salad,
french fries, corn, seasoned mashed potatoes,
mixed fruit, baked chips, crackers.
Friday: Crispy Mexican tacos, pizza, ham-
burger, chicken sandwich, pasta with mozzarella
and meat sauce, apple chicken salad, parfait,
fresh baby carrots, peas, french fries, Spanish
rice, strawberry cup, baked chips, crackers.

SENIOR DINING; Call 527-5975.
Monday: Baked meatloaf with mushroom
gravy, mashed potatoes, carrot coins, pineapple,
whole-grain roll with margarine, low-fat milk.
Tuesday: Chicken Florentine thigh, penne
pasta with garlic oil, Tuscan-blend vegetables
(squash, mixed vegetables), tossed salad with
Italian dressing, fresh apple, slice whole-grain
wheat bread with margarine, low-fat milk.
Wednesday: Sweet and sour pork, wild rice
medley, Chinese oriental vegetables (broccoli,
carrots, bamboo shoots, red pepper, bean
sprouts), peaches, slice whole-grain bread with
margarine, low-fat milk.
Thursday: Menu not available.
Friday: Menu not available.


,;~0'w f~'ttYI Ii I


CITRUS COUNTY
HOSPITAL BOARD


Successful appointees to the Associate Board of
Trustees will serve in an advisory capacity to
the Citrus County Hospital Board for the
promotion and accomplishment of its goals and
objectives.


Associate board members will be invited to
serve for a 1 year term. Initial appointees will
serve until fiscal year ending September 30,
2012 with new appointees beginning a
1 year term on October 1, 2012.


All interested citizens of Citrus County are
welcome to apply. Please send a letter of
interest, along with a current resume, to the
attention of Vickie LaMarche, Chief Operating
Officer, Citrus County Hospital Board, P.O. Box
1030, Inverness, FL 34451, no later than March
15, 2012.


Applications can be downloaded at
www.citruscountyhospitalboard.com or obtained
from Citrus County Hospital Board Office at
123 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida.



Michael Smallridge
Chairman
Citrus County Hospital Board


Feb. 27 to March 2 MENUS


I


LOCAL


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012 A9





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SHEMIR WILES/Chronicle
Judy Mattingly proudly shows the number of certificates she's earned during her time at The Path shelter in
Lecanto. She credits The Path for saving her life, and now, she's looking forward to eventually having a job
and a place of her own.



Women share stories



of homelessness, hope


SHEMIR WILES
Staff Writer

LECANTO Three women liv-
ing at The Path of Citrus County
shelter share their stories:
Connie Roberts, 33
Connie Roberts has been clean
and sober for 11 years.
But when she stopped drinking
alcohol and using crack cocaine,
she traded one addiction for an-
other that caused her to lose
everything.
"I got into materialistic stuff,"
said the 33-year-old, who has
been living at The Path for the
past nine months.
Trying to keep
up with the latest
trends in fashion
and technology, -
Roberts would
borrow money
from everyone
she knew, includ-
ing her parents, Connie
to quell her shop- Roberts
ping urge. taking classes
She knew how to become a
to budget, setting patient care
aside money for assistant.
her bills as most
people do. But when she would
see something she had to have,
Roberts said she would take
money away from the electric or
water bill and tell herself she
would replace it later.
She never would.
Roberts worked on and off as a
home health aide for years, but
she admitted she was always
jumping from job to job in search
of better-paying work; she thought
if she could just bring in more
money, she wouldn't have so many
financial problems.
However, being in debt took its
toll.
She lost her home. Her parents
wouldn't take her in because they
didn't want to enable her bad
habits.
For a while, she lived out of her
car until she remembered the
local church she used to attend
supported The Path.
"When I first came here, I didn't
think I had a problem," Roberts
said. "I was embarrassed."
However, during her time at the
shelter, she has learned basic life
skills such as how to manage her
money She puts some of it in sav-
ings and gives herself an al-
lowance to buy items she wants -
but her case manager must ap-
prove the purchases first.
And if she doesn't need it, her
case manager will say no and ex-
plain why It may sound harsh, but
it's the kind of structure Roberts
said she needs.
"I've learned you can achieve
nice stuff; you just have to be pa-
tient," she said. "It takes away
that instant gratification."
She's found she's perfectly fine
with buying used merchandise,
and through Bible study, going to
church and attending on-site re-
covery meetings, she said she's
learned to put Jesus first, and the
urge to shop has diminished.
On Tuesday, Roberts will start
classes at Withlacoochee Techni-


cal Institute in Inverness to be-
come a patient care assistant. Her
goal is to become a licensed prac-
tical nurse.
She is also mending the rela-
tionship with her parents.
"My parents are thrilled. They
are happy I'm taking charge of my
life," she said.
Slowly, Roberts feels she's mak-
ing progress. She's already been
able to pay $400 back to someone
she owed money to, and looking
back at everything, she knows
now all the spending she did was
to fill a void she no longer has.
"It's a learning process, but I
had to stay diligent I had to stay
focused," she said. "It makes me
feel a whole lot better that I'm
doing it myself. Now I know I'm
not incapable of doing stuff."
Judy Mattingly, 55
At one point, Judy Mattingly
said, "Life didn't seem worth
living."
She had no home after she had
to leave her daughter's house in
Lake County She had lost her job
and was forced to send her son to
live with his father in Kentucky
It was hard because she said it
had always been the two of them.
"It broke my heart to send him
up there," Mattingly said as her
voice cracked.
Plus, for years she struggled
with an addiction to alcohol and
marijuana.
Not knowing where to turn, she
went to the First Baptist Church
of Leesburg for help.
She lived there for some time,
but eventually she was told she
couldn't stay
When Mattingly made the re-
mark about life not being worth
living, she was sent to LifeStream
Behavioral Center in Leesburg,
where she was diagnosed as
manic depressive with suicidal
tendencies.
With no place to send Mattingly,
LifeStream contacted The Path.
Mattingly has been at the shelter
for about eight months.
"The Path saved my life," she
said. "I'm not the same person
that I was."
While living at The Path, Mat-
tingly goes to The Centers for
treatment for her manic depres-
sion. She takes Prozac to cope,
but with her depression under
control, Mattingly said her dosage
has already been cut in half.
"They said they see no signs of
manic depression," she said joy-
fully "This is the best I have felt
in my entire life."
Mattingly also has been sober
for eight months, and now she's
focused on trying to find a job.
She's worked at a plant nursery,
managed an apartment complex
and waited tables, but she said at
this point in her life, she's not
picky
"Honey, I'm not too proud. I'd
do almost about anything," she
said with a laugh.
She's also hoping to reestablish
a bond with her daughter.
"I still send her birthday cards
and Christmas cards," the 55-
year-old said. "I'm praying God
will restore our relationship."


But Mattingly, smiling broadly,
said she's just so thankful for The
Path and the ladies she lives with
in the shelter.
"We go to church and have
classes together," she said. "We
lift each other up."
And when she does finally
leave, she said she's going to live
her life for God and start volun-
teering so she can give back to the
community
"God was the only thing missing
from my life," she said. "I have
learned to turn my life completely
over to Him, and I give Him
thanks everyday"
Karen, 55
Frustration seems to be the
word to describe Karen's present
situation.
She wants a job. She wants a
place to call home.
But beside a weak economy, a
felony conviction stands in the
way of her finding the ideal job.
According to Karen who did
not want to use her last name -
she had a good nursing job work-
ing at a rehabilitation center in
Spring Hill making decent money,
but it all went away after she
stopped taking her medication at
the advice of a doctor for mental
health issues.
Her behavior changed, and she
started stealing money from a
good friend, who eventually found
out.
She was charged with grand
theft and credit card fraud and
sentenced to 10 years' probation.
While trying to stay out of jail,
Karen said she bounced from
shelter to shelter feeling fed up.
She even tried to kill herself.
Probation ultimately got her a
bed at The Path. She's been at the
shelter for a little more than a
year
As part of her probation, Karen
said she looks for work, but be-
cause of her record, she finds it
hard to convince anyone to hire
her.
"I've even lowered myself to
looking for a dishwashing job,"
she said.
Nevertheless, she said The
Path has provided her the struc-
ture she needs. She goes to
church and Bible study, and she
was recently baptized. She also
works at The Path's thrift stores
and on their farm during the day
so she isn't sitting around.
"You're always doing some-
thing," she said. "You're never at
a standstill."
Though she has family, Karen
said she doesn't want them to
know about her predicament be-
cause she's determined to turn
her life around on her own.
"I got myself in this mess. I'll get
myself out," she stated.
Her hope is to find a job so she
can have her own place and then
join a church.
"When I was younger, I never
imagined I would be homeless,"
she said, "but you just have to be-
lieve in God. He will provide."
Chronicle reporter Shemir
Wiles can be reached at 352-564-
2924 or swiles@chronicleonline.
corn.


Homeless coalition


works to inspire


teamwork, bring


funds into county


SHEMIR WIL
Staff Write

As executive director
Florida Homeless Coa
bara Wheeler wears m
From helping secu
funding to advocating
among the service age:
demanding job that W]
because it needs to b
for any recognition or
"My job is a lot of th
ple don't see," she said
Moreover, she just d
exclusively in Citrus C
coalition also serves
Lake and Sumter count
fore, she not only str
community leaders \
gether locally, but regi
When Wheeler first
coalition six years ag
inherited a big job. Th
number of not-for-prof
tions providing servi
homeless and needy in
but the dialogue be
agencies was mi
nonexistent.
The problem, Whee
everyone has their
about how problems
solved. In addition, th
the matter is many ofI
cies compete for fund
fore, they do not neces
to share information


inner workings
organizations.
While the govern-
ment expects bring-
ing everyone to the
table should be easy,
it's not, Wheeler
contends.
"It can be over-
whelming," she
admitted.
But during the
past six years,
she's proud to say
she's made some
headway


(I


LES
r

r of the Mid
alition, Bar-
aany hats.
ire federal
teamwork
ncies, it is a
heeler does
e done, not
fanfare.
e stuff peo-
d.
'


We just don't
put it on the front
of the newspaper.
We do work
together.

Barbara Wheeler
executive director of the Mid Florida
Homeless Coalition.


oesn t work mates so when they leave the jail,
County The they don't end up on the street.
Hernando, Additionally, the school district
ties; there- is always at the table expressing
rives to get their concerns and issues when it
working to- comes to homeless children.
onally During one meeting, Wheeler
joined the said there was talk about a 17-
o, Wheeler year-old boy who had been kicked
iere were a out of his home by his mother and
fit organiza- was couch-surfing from one
ices to the friend's home to the next. He did
i the county not stay at one home for too long
tween the and when he would come home
animal to for the night, Wheeler said the boy
would come after the family had
eler said, is already eaten because he was too
own idea proud to ask for food. However, the
should be boy was too young to qualify for
le reality of food stamps, and he didn't have
these agen- money for food. All the while, he
ling; there- was still maintaining straight As,
ssarily want and he just needed a home.
about the One agency offered to help. And
of their that's what the coali-
tion and having the
CITRUS COUNTY monthly meetings are
all about. It's a com-
r__flf TA "TTt mon belief that the
UJ J JLJL nonprofit organiza-
tions in the county
-' OF ',' don't talk to or help
each other
"They do. We just
don't put it on the
front of the newspa-
per," Wheeler said.
2012 Chronicle project "We do work
together."
Wheeler is also in


Ginger West, executive director
of the Family Resource Center in
Hernando, said many of the or-
ganizations that are members of
the coalition do work together on
finding ways to "provide the best
services" they can.
And one of the keys to the coali-
tion's success is staying small.
Wheeler said the board elected
not to become involved in provid-
ing services as a way not to com-
pete for money with the
organizations they serve.
Instead, Wheeler in essence
serves as a liaison between the
local agencies and the govern-
ment, helping funnel federal dol-
lars into the county to help those
less fortunate.
"And if we weren't here, those
monies wouldn't be available,"
she said.
A number of local agencies
have been able to secure money
from the U.S. Department of
Housing and Urban Development
through the Emergency Solutions
Grant program (formerly known
as the Emergency Shelter Grant
program).
For example, Wheeler said
Daystar Life Center in Crystal
River wrote a grant for the first
time and was awarded $30,000. In
addition, Citrus Abuse Shelter As-
sociation (CASA) in Inverness has
received $50,000; The Sanctuary
Mission shelter in Homosassa was
awarded $53,000; and the Path of
Citrus County in Lecanto obtained
$51,000 in grant funding.
To get the money, Wheeler said
organizations have to pull up a
chair and be willing to work col-
laboratively While Wheeler can-
not write grants for the agencies,
she does guide them through the
process.
"I'm their cheerleader," she
said.
As a result, she said her com-
munities are pulling more federal
money into the area than any
other region in the state. Never-
theless, it's important to note
many of the organizations do de-
pend on private donations to sur-
vive, Wheeler added.
Also on the list of successes is
the coalition's continual work
with the school district and the
jail system. Recently, Wheeler
said the coalition held a meeting
at the jail in Lecanto. In the meet-
ing, the coalition addressed want-
ing to have a better system in
place for identifying homeless in-


charge of keeping an eye on the
Mid Florida Information Net-
work. It's a database not-for-profit
organizations can use to enter in-
formation about their clients.
Wheeler said she would like
more agencies to participate in
the database so they can use the
data to look at the big picture here
in Citrus County
'Just about all the shelters are
entering data and (We Care Food
Pantry) has been using it for years
now," she said. "It's just another
hat I wear."
One future endeavor Wheeler
has is bringing a new program to
the county called The Open Table.
According to The Open Table's
website, it is a "growing collabo-
ration of people from faith com-
munities, state and local
government, business, education
and nonprofits who are united in
a shared purpose of restoring
families in poverty to wholeness
and full participation in our
communities."
A group of about 12 people from
various backgrounds would help
an individual or family establish
goals and an overall plan to be-
come self-sufficient.
Wheeler believes this program
would be ideal for the local
churches, and she wants to repro-
duce the already talked-about
program here in Citrus County
Thus, as the year progresses,
Wheeler continues to work hard
at trying to "cover all the pieces of
the puzzle."
"But I don't know any commu-
nity that has every piece covered,"
she said.
Homelessness is not an issue
that is fading away, and as the
needs of the community shift and
change, so does the focus of the
coalition. It's an ever-evolving
process, and when essentials like
money and the expertise aren't
there, there's only so much that
can be done, Wheeler said.
But she's happy local agencies
try to give as much as they can to
those who need it, because at the
end of the day, it's about those
people.
"It's not about us," she said.
"We're just there to provide a
service."
Chronicle reporter Shemir
Wiles can be reached at 352-564-
2924 or swiles@chronicleonline.
corn.


QUALITY OF LIFE: COMING UP MONDAY
* Backgrounds vary for homeless people in Citrus County.
* Tucked away in the woods of Homosassa sits Dennis' House.
* The road to homelessness and back has been a tough one for
Mario Soto.


AlO SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012


QUALITY OF LIFE





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Hundreds of homeless students


MATTHEW BECK
Staff Writer

LECANTO Being a stu-
dent and all the dynamics
that go with it is challenging
in its own right But imagine
not having a home to go to
after the last bell of the day
rings.
Homelessness was a fact
of life for more than 275 Cit-
rus County School District
students at the beginning of
the 2011-12 school year, ac-
cording to the Citrus County
School District.
There is a federally-
funded grant known as the
McKinney-Vento Act avail-
able to provide much-
needed assistance to those
who qualify.
The McKinney-Vento Act
was enacted in the early
2000s as part of the No Child
Left Behind Act. Citrus
County is in the final year of
its three-year grant. The
grant funds the district with
$45,000 per year and the
dollars are federally allo-
cated based on the number
of McKinney-Vento students
identified in each district.
Sandra Sonberg is a
"Teacher on Special Assign-
ment, McKinney-
Vento Act" at the
Student Services
Center in Lecanto.
She is charged with a
coordinating assis- .
tance for the stu-
dents who, along
with their families,
have fallen on hard Sanm
times. Sonb
Sonberg ex- teach
plained students spec
who qualify for as- assign
distance through
the McKinney-Vento Act are
defined as those who "lack a
fixed, regular and adequate
nighttime residence."
She said these students
and their families come in
all shapes and sizes.
Some older highschool
students who may not have
a stable relationship with
their parents might "couch
surf," sleeping at friends'
homes rotating throughout
the week. Students who do
live with their families
might go to a shelter, motel
or a vehicle for short peri-
ods of time.
Sonberg's boss, Cherise
Cernich, coordinator of Stu-
dents Services Center for
the Citrus County School
District, said the most com-
mon type of homeless stu-
dents are those who live
with extended family
"The majority of the
McKinney-Vento students
identified by the district are
not out living in the woods,"
Cernich said. "Many of them
are doubled up. Maybe
they're living with grand-
parents or other family due
to financial reasons. It's not
because it's their first
choice to live there."
Sonberg said the district
will reapply in March for an-
other three-year grant when
the Department of Educa-
tion opens the application
process for school districts.
Assistance through the
program can come in a vari-
ety of ways.
"With this position I'm in


e


CITRUS COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT
Students who qualify for assistance through the
McKinney-Vento Act are defined as those who "lack a
fixed, regular and adequate nighttime residence." Here
is the official breakdown of the number of students
identified at each school level in the Citrus County
School District.
* Elementary- 137 students.
* Middle 44 students.
* High 86 students.


the schools often, but I also
attend things like the Mid-
Florida Homeless Coalition
and the Shared Service Al-
liance meetings. It's allowed
me to meet different agen-
cies and resources and to
make contacts so I have a
name, face and recognition
with them," Sonberg said.
"That way, when we have an
odd need, like when I have a
kid who doesn't have a bed
to sleep on, I have somebody
the family can turn to for
help. I can't provide beds,
we don't have those means,
but now through my contacts
I can at least call someone
or give a parent a phone
number. That's a big relief."
She said the students are
afforded all available
opportunities their
mainstream peers
are offered. The act
] requires that reason-
able accommoda-
- tions be made for
them.
"We're required for
dra full participation and
erg supportive services
,r on for their academics,
ial like print-rich mate-
nent. rials and things that
maybe their parents
couldn't do," Sonberg said.
Because home life is fluid
for many of the students
who fall under the act, it is
not required they move to a
new school every time they
change residence, if that is
what the family desires and
students stay within the
district
'At times, for financial
reasons, families may have
to move several miles to an-
other home and parents feel
like they have to move their
children to another school.
Through the McKinney-
Vento Act, every attempt is
made to keep students at
their school of origin rather
than move to a new school,"
Sonberg said.
Communication from .
parent to guidance coun- \
selor is the answer ac -
cording to the experts.
"I still hear stories
about children we .
could have been trans- A
porting back to their
school of origin if they
had qualified for
McKinney-Vento. Had
the parent known, all
they needed to do was
tell the guidance coun-
selor," she said.
Cernich and Sonberg
said teamwork between
a child's school and the
Student Services Cen-
ter is a critical part in
the process.
And while they say the
guidance department 1t
each school bears the pri-
mary responsibility to coim-


municate with the Student
Services Center all depart-
ments in a school have a re-
sponsibility to help when
they notice a student who
may need it.
"Guidance coun-
selors are trained to
pick up on some key
things to identify a
student who may be
a candidate," Son-
berg said. "Things
such as a parent may
not be able to pro-
vide a home address Ch(
when they are regis- Cer
tering their child or coordi
they are not able to Stu
get copies of birth Ser
certificates or afford Ce


to get physical for
their children before regis-
tering for school. They try to
have dialog with the parents
but that can be difficult be-
cause people don't want to
talk about the fact that
they're not doing well.
Teachers and other school-
related employees such as
school bus drivers and cafe-
teria workers are eyes and
ears on the ground that can
also help to identify a child
who may need assistance.
Sonberg's salary is paid
partially through the
McKinney-Vento Act grant
as well as another grant The
rest of the McKinney-Vento
dollars are used by Sonberg
to purchase school supplies
and other necessities.
Academics are also a
focal point for Sonberg.
"She makes sure many of
these students have their
basic needs met," Cernich
said. "She takes them cloth-
ing, school supplies, hy-
giene items. She helps with
food and points them into
the right direction with
community resources that
can help with rent and elec-
tric bills. But in addition to
that, a major focus of her


er
n
n
d
v
n


CITRUS COUNTY


QUALITY







2012 Chronicle project

work is academics."
Sonberg spends time
weekly in various class-
rooms working with stu-
dents and tracking their
progress.
-- "We track their ac-
Sademic performance
and where their
weak areas are," she
said. "We have a
4 plan, everything
from response to in-
tervention, reading
coaches and online
rise programs. Our dis-
nich trict tries hard to try
ator of to fill in those aca-
lent demic gaps for those
ices children. Our main
,ter. goal, always, is to im-
prove student performance."
"She takes a lot of these
kids under her wing," Cer-
nich said. "It really helps
them a lot."
Sonberg said making a
student's academic world
one where they can concen-
trate on academics rather
than other issues that can
become problematic is the
goal.
Some of her responsibili-
ties could be considered in-
significant by some, but
sometimes the small things
can create large issues for
youths to overcome. Hy-
giene can be one of those.
"As you know, hygiene
items are expensive," she
said. "Sometimes we need
to provide deodorant for
high-school-age students
that can't afford it If you're
in class and that type of hy-
giene issue becomes a prob-
lem for a student, it
becomes a barrier for them.
Our job is to remove
barriers."
Chronicle staff writer
Matthew Beck can be
reached at 352-564-2919 or
mbeck@chronicleonline.
comn.


Couch surfing, doubling up

can disguise homelessness

SHEMIR WILES
Staff Writer

Think "homeless" and images of browbeaten individ-
uals surviving in the woods or living in homeless shel-
ters might come to mind.
But Tom Slagle, director of Nature Coast Ministries,
said there is a third face of homelessness that's quickly
emerging.
Whether people are doubling up or couch surfing,
those who are a part of this newer segment of the home-
less population have no permanent residence but main-
tain a roof over their heads
by either staying at a / f
friend's or family member's w That's just
home or moving in with
family temporarily until the tipofthe
they can afford a place of iceberg. We
their own.
Betsy Juanis, assistant don't know how
director of the Mission in
Citrus veterans' shelter in many adults
Inverness, said many of
these people have jobs, but are
can't afford to pay the bills doing
that come with having a
home or an apartment. t.
"They just don't make
enough to support them-
selves," she said
DuWayne Sipper, execu-
tive director of The Path of DuWayne Sipper
Citrus County, said while executive director,
the public may be taking The Path of Citrus County.
notice of this particular
group nowadays, it's nothing new to those in the
business of helping them.
"It's probably been going on quietly," he said.
And because it's not noticeable, he said people don't
know its happening.
On Thursday, Slagle told the story of a 64-year-old
grandmother who didn't want to be interviewed, but was
willing to share her story
Living in Citrus County, Slagle said the woman has her
daughter, her daughter's husband, their two children
and another grandchild from a different child staying
under her roof.
Though the husband just got a job and her daughter is
a schoolteacher in the county, they still don't have
enough money to be able to afford a place of their own.
The grandmother brings in $1,300 a month, but spends
on average $250 for electricity, $50 for water, $60 on a car
payment and $500 on groceries each month.
Luckily, Slagle said, when the woman's husband died
she took the life insurance money and paid off her
home, so she doesn't have to worry about paying rent or
making a mortgage payment.
Tracking just how many people are doubling up or
couch surfing has been a difficult task, but Sipper said
the school district now asks better questions to find out
how many homeless children are in Citrus County.
"And that's just the tip of the iceberg," Sipper said.
"We don't know how many adults are doing it."
Chronicle reporter Shemir Wiles can be reached at
352-564-2924 or swiles@ chronicleonline.com.


Whether people are doubling
up or couch surfing, those
*. who are a part of this newer
;# segment of the homeless
4;? population have
- no perma-
S- nent resi-
dence but
maintain a
roof over
their heads
by either
staying at
a friend's
or family
member's
home or
moving in
with family
temporarily
until they
can afford a
place of
their own.


Loal RESOURCES


All area codes are 352- unless
otherwise specified.
GENERAL
Department of Children and
Families www.dcf.state.fl.us;
866-762-2237.
Salvation Army -
732-8326; 621-5532.
United Way of Citrus
County (Crystal River) -
795-5483.
ALCOHOL & SUBSTANCE
ABUSE RECOVERY
Alcoholics Anonymous -
www.ncintergroup.com; 621-
0599.
Jesus Is Ministries (Inglis)
-447-2731.
Narcotics Anonymous -
www.naflorida.org; 863-
683-8224.
The Phoenix Program
(Lecanto) 527-0068.
The Centers 628-5020
(Lecanto): 726-7155 (Marion
County).
COUNSELING SERVICES
Children's Home Society
(Inverness) www.chsfl.org;
866427-5451.
Genesis 1:27 Counseling
Center 634-0631.
Good Spirit Foundation
(Hemando) 726-7531.
St. Anne's Counseling Cen-
ter (Crystal River) 795-3440.
The Centers 628-5020
(Lecanto): 726-7155 (Marion
County).


FOOD Some establish-
ments have residence require-
ments. Find more details in the
Food Programs section of the
Chronicle every Monday.
Beverly Hills Community
Church 746-3620.
Suncoast Baptist Church
(Homosassa) 621-3008.
Floral City United Methodist
Church 344-1771.
Daystar Life Center (Crystal
River) 795-8668.
The Hemando Seventh-day
Adventist Church 212-5159.
Nature Coast Ministries
(Crystal River) 563-1860.
SOS Ministry (Hemando)-
527-0052; 746-7161.
Citrus United Basket (Inver-
ness) 344-2242; cublisa@e
mbarqmail.com.
First Baptist Church of Crys-
tal River-- 795-3367.
Our Lady of Fatima (Inver-
ness) 726-1707.
First United Methodist
Church of Inverness -
726-2522.
The New Church Without
Walls (Hemando) 344-2425.
Our Lady of Grace Catholic
Church (Beverly Hills) -
527-2381; 746-2144; 212-5159.
EI-Shaddai food ministries
(Crystal River) 628-9087;
302-9925.
Citrus County Veterans
Coalition (Inverness) -


400-8952; 5274537.
We Care Food Pantry
(Homosassa) 628-0445.
First Presbyterian Church of
Crystal River 795-2259.
St. Margaret's Episcopal
Church (Inverness) 726-3153.
Floral City First Baptist
Church 726-4296.
Dunnellon Presbyterian
Church 489-2682.
Holy Faith Episcopal (Dun-
nellon) 489-2685.
Calvary Chapel of Inver-
ness 726-1480.
Our Father's Table (Crystal
River) 795-2176.
St. Elizabeth Ann Seton
Catholic Church (Citrus Springs)
- 465-6613.
Inverness Church of God -
726-4524.
Hunger Hotline -
www.faca.org; call 211.
Share www.share
florida.org; 800-536-3379.
WIC offices (Crystal
River) 795-2261; (Lecanto) 527-
8490; (Inverness) 726-5222.
FOOD, CLOTHING,
UTILITIES, ETC.
First Baptist Church of In-
verness 726-1252.
First Baptist Church of Crys-
tal River 795-3367.
Annie W. Johnson Senior
Center (Dunnellon) 489-8021.
Citrus United Basket (Inver-


ness) 344-2242; cublisa@
embarqmail.com.
Daystar Life Center (Crystal
River) 795-8668.
Helping Hands (Areas
served: Inverness, Hernando
and Floral City) 726-1707.
First United Methodist of
Homosassa www.lumc.org;
6284083.
Christian Center Church
(Homosassa) 628-5076.
Mid Florida Community
Services 527-3809.
Housing Energy Assistance
- 527-5377.
SHELTERS
Holy Ground Shelter (Hud-
son) 727-863-9123.
Interfaith Emergency Serv-
ices (Ocala) 629-8868.
Jericho Road Ministries
(Brooksville) 799-2912.
Jesus Is Ministries (Inglis)
-447-2731.
The Path of Citrus County
(Lecanto) www.pathofcitrus.
org; 527-6500.
The Sanctuary Mission (Ho-
mosassa) www.sanctuary
mission.org; 621-3277;
568-1757.
Mission in Citrus (Crystal
River) www.missionincitrus.
com; 794- 3825.
HOUSING
Florida Low Income Hous-
ing Associates www.fliha.org;
888-563-1110.


Habitat For Humanity -
563-2744.
Citrus County Housing
Services 527-7520.
HEALTH
American Cancer Society
- www.cancer.org; 637-5577;
877-822-6669.
Citrus County Health De-
partment www.citruscounty
health.org; 795-6233 (Crystal
River); 726-1731 (Inverness);
527-0068 (Lecanto).
George A. Dame Commu-
nity Health Center (Lecanto) -
www.citruscountyhealth.org;
249-9258.
LEGAL
Community Legal Services
of Mid Florida www.clsmf.org;
726-8512.
SERVICES FOR THE DIS-
ABLED
Blind Americans (Her-
nando) 637-1739.
Center for Independent Liv-
ing of North Central Florida
(Lecanto) www.cilncf.org;
527-8399.
Key Training Center
(Lecanto) www.keycenter.org;
341-4633 (Business office);
795-5541 (Adult training).
The Dream Society -
www.thedreamsociety.org;
4004967.
Citrus Hearing Impaired
Program Services (Crystal River)
- 795-5000; TTDY 795-7243.


ELDERLY SERVICES
Alzheimer's Association,
West Central Florida Chapter -
688-4537; 800-272-3900.
Housing Assistance Founda-
tion for the Elderly 726-8767.
Lions Club (Homosassa) -
628-2461.
EMPLOYMENT
One Stop Workforce Con-
nection www.clmworkforce.
com; 637-2223.
VETERANS SERVICES
Veterans Relief- 795-5012.
Veterans Services -
www.citruscountyfl.org; 527-
5411; 527-5429.
SERVICES FOR WOMEN
& CHILDREN
Citrus County Family Re-
source Center (Hernando) -
www.ccfrc.org; 344-1001.
Citrus Abuse Shelter Asso-
ciation (Inverness) 344-8111.
Interfaith Emergency Serv-
ices (Ocala) 629-8868.
Life Choice Care Center
(Inverness) 341-5176.
Pregnancy Crisis Center
(Inverness) 344-3030.
WIC offices (Crystal
River) 795-2261; (Lecanto) 527-
8490; (Inverness) 726-5222.
Childhood Development
Services (Crystal River) -
795-2667.
Early Learning Coalition of
Nature Coast (Crystal River) -
563-0185.


QUALITY OF LIFE


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012 All










Vet: Nobody helped after carjacking


Associated Press
DETROIT -A World War
II veteran said nobody
helped him in the minutes
after he was attacked and
carjacked during daylight at
a busy Detroit gas station
and he had to crawl across a
concrete parking lot to get
help.
A roughly four-minute
surveillance video shows
86-year-old Aaron Brantley
struggling to get from the
fuel pump to the gas sta-
tion's door as people walked
and drove by him Wednes-
day morning. The video was
first obtained by the Detroit
Free Press.
Brantley told The Associ-
ated Press several people
passed by him as he
crawled, unable to walk be-
cause his leg was broken in
the attack. The carjacker
knocked Brantley down,
took his keys and drove off
in his car about 10:40 a.m.
"I was trying to go in ...
and see if somebody could
call the police and an ambu-
lance because I couldn't
stand. I had to crawl I
tried two or three times to
get up," Brantley said Satur-
day He said he was on his
way home from Bible study
when he stopped to put gas
in his 2010 Chrysler 200,
which he recently bought to
replace another car that
had been stolen.
"People were passing me
just like I wasn't there. ... I
was crawling and they just
walk by me like I'm not
there," he said.
Brantley said as he ap-
proached the building, he
asked a woman to open the
door for him. He said at first
it appeared she wasn't going


to but she did and then kept
walking. He found it dis-
tressing that nobody helped
him.
"Any time a person is
crawling on the ground, you
know something happened
to them," Brantley said.
Station manager Haissam
Jaber said he didn't see the
attack but called 911 after a
customer alerted him. As
Brantley sat on rock salt,
waiting for an ambulance to
come, he offered money to a
stranger to drive him to his
house a few blocks away
The customer refused the
money and drove Brantley
home, where an ambulance
took him to the hospital.
Jaber said he also gave
police another surveillance
video from just before the
carjacking that shows
Brantley coming in to pay
the cashier. A man looked at
Brantley and left without
buying anything, then
headed in the direction
from which the carjacker
approached Brantley and
his car, Jaber said.
Jaber said violent crime
isn't common at the gas sta-
tion, which is next to the
University of Detroit Mercy
campus. He said there was a
carjacking about four
months ago, but it happened
at 1 a.m. and nobody was
attacked.
Detroit Police spokes-
woman Sgt. Eren Stephens
said Saturday there have
been no arrests in the case.
The Free Press reported
that a man later found
Brantley's phone number in
his Bible on the stolen car's
front seat and called him.
The car had been aban-
doned hours later and a few
miles away with its wheels


Associated Press
Aaron Brantley, 86, of Detroit, talks Friday about being carjacked at a gas station in his home. Brantley, a World War II
veteran, says nobody helped him after he was attacked and carjacked in daylight at a Detroit gas station.
and radio missing.
Brantley, who said he has
eight children and chuckled
after adding "about 18
grandchildren," said people
wonder how he can main-
tain a sense of humor after
his experience.
"I'm just glad I'm still liv-
ing," said Brantley, who re-
tired after a 31-year career%
at Chrysler as a welder.
"Nowadays, people are
doing away with you when
they do things like that."


Prosecutor: Probation in Wash.

state school shooting case


Associated Press
BREMERTON, Wash. -
A Washington state prosecu-
tor says his office will seek
probation and treatment for
a 9-year-old boy who took to
school a gun that acciden-
tally discharged and criti-
cally injured a classmate
this past week.
Kitsap County prosecutor
Russ Haugen told the Kit-


sap Sun on Friday that "no-
body is trying to lock this lit-
tle boy up." He said
prosecutors hope to hold
the boy accountable not
through incarceration, but
rather probation, treatment
and other services.
The third-grader faces
charges of unlawful posses-
sion of a gun, bringing a
dangerous weapon to school
and third-degree assault.


He is facing a capacity hear-
ing in which a judge will de-
termine if he knew what he
did was wrong. If the judge
decides the boy knew, the
charges go forward.
An 8-year-old classmate
was wounded. She is in a
Seattle hospital in critical
condition.
Few additional details of
the case have been re-
leased.


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NATION


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


PORT
Continued from Page Al

pay for improvements to the
port site, any lease signing
would include three parties
simultaneously the port
authority, Hollins and port
developer.
Thorpe also said the
county hasn't had any dis-
cussions with proposed port
developers.
"We're not that far down
the road yet," he said.
Plenty still
to take place
Thorpe's file on Port Cit-
rus already contains five
binders, though two of them
deal mainly with the
Florida Seaport Trans-
portation and Economic De-
velopment Council, or
FSTED, and its expert advi-
sory board, the Florida
Ports Council.
Citrus pays $11,260 annual
dues to belong to the Florida
Ports Council. FSTED pro-
vides state funding for proj-
ects; the county has a
$50,000 grant for a feasibility
study that is being matched
locally with tax dollars and
private donations.
Officials Thorpe,
Wesch, assistant county ad-
ministrator Ken Frink and
someone with the Florida
Department of Transporta-
tion reviewed nine com-
panies that submitted
proposals for the feasibility
study
Thorpe said he will rec-
ommend four for review by


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012 A13


Florida Ports


Port of


Port of Fernandina

_--Pod of Jacksonville
Lo/-


sacola


Port Citrus -"


Port of St. Petersburg .-"
'-i^


the county commission, sit-
ting as the port authority.
The board will interview
company representatives
and then rank the busi-
nesses. Thorpe and Wesch
will negotiate a contract,
and Thorpe hopes the study
begins in early summer.
By state law, the study
must be completed by 2014
and the project determined
feasible. If not, Citrus is
dropped from the FSTED
and along with it would lose
chances for state funding.
Thorpe said the study will
be more of a marketing plan
for Port Citrus.
"It will tell us what niche
we'll probably be most suc-
cessful at," he said.
Citrus County officials al-
ready have an indicator of
what the state looks for in a
port plan.
Just Friday, the county re-
ceived a letter from the De-


apartment of Economic Op-
portunity, which replaced
the Department of Commu-
nity Affairs as the state re-
view of local comprehensive
plan amendments.
The state Land Planning
Agency reviewed the
county's new port element in
the compressive plan and
found nothing objectionable.
However, the agency noted
the county already amended
its comprehensive plan in
2006 for Hollinswood Harbor,
on the same 545-acre site it
now targets for Port Citrus.
The agency said the
county should clarify how
those two uses will relate.
It also said the county's
port master plan must ad-
dress transportation to sup-
port the port; short-term
port expansion plans; water
and sewer expansions; and
in-water facilities and
maintenance.


Port Canaveral



y-_ Port of Fort Pierce

I`_'Port of Palm Beach

ynrt Everglades
P Port Miami
II4-


Port of Key est
Port of Key West


The agency said FSTED
will want that information
before it approves funding
for capital projects.
Thorpe said the study's


www.flaseaports.org
importance is to draw po-
tential investors. He said
the county does not plan to
spend money to develop the
port other than applying for


/ -'rt of Port St. Joe



FLORIDA S APORTS
CHARTING OUR FUTURE


SSCO RErica's Small Business
Counselors to America's Small Business


Citrus County



HIGH-SPEED INTERNET


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OOOALPE


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grants from FSTED or the
Department of Environ-
mental Protection for a po-
tential water and sewer line
extension.
"I don't see them doling
out hundreds of thousands
of dollars on this project,"
Thorpe said, referring to
commissioners.
So the project could fall
apart if the study does not
show a lucrative market for
potential investors or devel-
opers, he said.
The risk, he said, is well
worth the potential payout:
a viable port providing jobs
and a boost to the economy
And it's not like the Cross
Florida Barge Canal is
going anywhere.
"Right now," Thorpe said,
"it's just a ditch."
Chronicle reporter Mike
Wright can be reached at
352-563-3228 or mwright@
chronicleonline. com.








PORT ( 'CITRUS






waterfront futures


Port concept

followspitch

for marina

CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff Writer

Port Citrus and Hollins-
wood Harbor-how do they
compare?
When the concept of Port
Citrus was launched a year
ago, many Citrus County
residents initially consid-
ered it a progression of the
then year-old plan for a port
district and a marina com-
munity on a portion of the
former Cross Florida Barge
Canal.
Hollinswood Harbor hit
the news in November 2011,
after Citrus County Board of
County Commissioners
(BOCC) voted to create the
port district in the compre-
hensive plan and rezoned
Dixie Hollins' 547 acres of
industrial, conservation and
mining property north of the
canal to open the possibili-
ties of a marina, commercial
development, a hotel and as
many as 600 homes.
Hollins, whose family has
been in Citrus County since
1942, is the president of Cit-
rus Mining and Timber, rep-
resenting a large piece of
land in the northwest cor-
ner of the county between
the barge canal and a north-
ern boundary of residential


HOLLINSWOOD HARBOR AT A GLANCE
* Size: 547 acres.
* Site: North side of the former Cross Florida Barge
Canal west of U.S. 19.
* Current use: Mining and timber.
* Future plan components: A port district, a waterfront
commercial district and an industrial area.
* Potential: A marina, commercial development, a hotel
and 600 homes.


Special to the Chronicle
Hollinswood Harbor is described as the only significant privately owned parcel west of the
U.S. 19 bridge on the website of Genesis Group, a firm of engineers and planners, which
helped attain amendments to the comprehensive plan. On the west side is the key cut, a
potential site for Port Citrus. To the right side on the canal west of U.S. 19 is the site of a
future public boat ramp.


properties along West River
Road.
To make a distinction be-
tween Port Citrus and
Hollinswood Harbor, the
Chronicle asked Hollins
what progress had been
made on his project
"Over the past few years,
we've talked to a number of
businesses interested in
using natural products and
the barge canal," Hollins re-
sponded via email. "Even
though the economy hasn't
been great, people are still


planning for when it recov-
ers. We've talked to busi-
nesses as diverse as
alternative energy and miti-
gation for offshore reefs.
People are thinking twice
and three times before in-
vesting, but there's still a lot
of interest."
Hollins was asked if he
had anticipated the BOCC
would initiate Port Citrus as
a commercial shipping port
His response did not indi-
cate whether he was aware
of the BOCC's move.


"What I want to do is take
what's left of my family's
property and do something
that has meaning," Hollins
wrote. "For us, it needs to
make sense economically,
and it's my goal to make
sure that whatever happens,
it generates jobs for the peo-
ple who live here, and that
it's something that we can
all be proud of."
Historically, the idea of
having a port in the barge
canal goes back to the 1960s.
Hollins was asked how long


making use of the barge
canal had been a goal for his
company, and if it had been
a vision similar to bringing
the Crystal River Energy
Complex.
"We (and a lot of others)
have been making good use
of the barge canal since it
was created by the Federal
Government," Hollins
wrote. "From kayakers and
fisherman to law enforce-
ment and others all use
the canal. Now, there's an
idea to expand and build on
that, we'll have to see if it's
possible."
The key cut is a physical
feature in Hollins' property.
It is where barges currently
dock to pick up aggregate
from the Cemex mine to ship
out to other ports and off-
shore projects. Although the
site of Port Citrus is to be de-
termined by the Citrus
County Port Authority after a
feasibility study is produced,
the key cut is a potential site
for Port Citrus. As the key cut
is shown within the site for
Hollinswood Harbor, Hollins
was asked how the two proj-


ects would work together, or
if they would they merge.
"I can't predict the fu-
ture," Hollins responded.
"We're working on getting
new business into the site
and the county is going
through their process. Who
knows what order things
will happen or not happen
in and what the possibilities
will or won't be? Until we
have new businesses or the
county has a plan, it's im-
possible to say In the mean-
time, we are open-minded
to either public or private
opportunities."
Finally, Hollins was asked
what he saw as the potential
for cargo coming in and
going out and how soon in-
creased transactions could
start.
"Cargo has been coming
in and going out since the
barge canal was dug in the
'60s," Hollins said. "That's
going to continue. The econ-
omy drives that traffic."
Chronicle reporter Chris
Van Ormer can be reached
at cvanormer@chronicle
online. com.


Rail, road network poses challenge to Port Citrus


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Coal barges use this canal to the Progress Energy complex
north of Crystal River. Barges return to Alabama and
Louisiana carrying Holcim limestone products. The closest
rail line to Port Citrus crosses Dunnellon into Citrus County,
ending a few miles south at the Progress Energy plant.
Adding a spur to the likely port site would require a rail
bridge across the Cross Florida Barge Canal.


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff Writer

INVERNESS Citrus
County officials believe in
the viability of Port Citrus,
but they also acknowledge a
potential roadblock:
How does product barged
into the port get to its
destination?
County Administrator
Brad Thorpe, who also is the
port director, said a key com-
ponent to the port's success
is an "inland port" being de-
veloped in Marion County at
U.S. 27 and Interstate 75.
Thorpe said product
brought into Port Citrus
could head to the inland port
for distribution by rail or ex-
pressway to Jacksonville or
up the East Coast.
But getting products to the
inland port is problematic,
he said.
The closest rail line
crosses Dunnellon into Cit-
rus County, ending a few
miles south at the Progress
Energy plant. Adding a spur
to the likely port site would
require a rail bridge across
the Cross Florida Barge
Canal.
Thorpe said officials met
with CSX and Pinsly Rail-
road Co., a Plymouth, Fla.,
company that operates the
regional connection track
between the Progress En-
ergy plant and a CSX line
near Alachua.
"Right now there's no in-


terest, no demand for it," he
said. "There's not enough
activity."
Thorpe said the feasibility
study would determine
whether a market will exist
that would justify extending
rail lines to the port
Road travel is another
barrier. Without available
rail, the only way to trans-
port products from the port
to the distribution center is
by trucks driving along
county and state roads in
Citrus, Levy and Marion
counties.
Thorpe said county offi-
cials support not only com-
pletion of the Suncoast
Parkway through Citrus
County, but also a further ex-
tension of the parkway
through Marion County to
the distribution inland port
As for the barge canal it-
self, Thorpe said the aver-
age depth of 13 feet will
accommodate most barges
and tugboats. He said the
depth at the mouth of the
canal drops at low tide,
which could cause boat cap-
tains to adjust their sched-
ules to avoid low tide.
Thorpe said the feasibil-
ity study should determine
the type of material that is
likely to be shipped to Port
Citrus, and the best way to
move it inland.
Chronicle reporter Mike
Wright can be reached at
352-563-3228 or mwright@
chronicleonline.com.


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The Florida Northern Railroad connects to the Progress En-
ergy power plant in Crystal River to a CSX rail line near
Alachua. Citrus County officials would hope for a rail spur to
Port Citrus, but acknowledge there isn't enough business
yet to justify it to the railroad.


Port Citrus COIMVIENTS


"There's a lot
more information
that we need to
know, so I am
awaiting the out-
come of the feasi-
bility study
Having a function-
ing port is a good
idea, sure. But
how it can func-
tion, I don't know."


Jim
Farley
Crystal River
mayor.


"I think we're
chasing a
pipedream. I don't
think it will work.
I don't think it
worked in Port St.
Joe. I don't think it
is working well
now and in the Brad
other small cities; Potts
the barge canal Crystal River
didn't work. I resident.
think it's a waste
of time and money, and giving peo-
ple false hope."


"I'm not very ex-
cited about it I
would give priority
to the airport and .
the business park AL
in Inverness,
which has been
talked about for 13 ..
years and still Bob
hasn't come to fru- Plaisted
ition. I'm not sure Inverness
what the port will mayor.
create in the way
of jobs. Let's just say I don't get it"

"I just can't see
where it's going to
compete with
Tampa. Maybe
there is something
I just don't know
I've read in the
newspaper those
containers are Carl T.
huge jobs. And as I Hartzell
understand it they 70, Sugarmill
are unloaded in Woods.
the gulf and then
bring them in on barges. So you've
got to unload them out there, un-
load them in here. What's the
sense? I just don't see it I might
be wrong. I've been there before."


"Citrus County
is at the northern
portion of the
Tampa Bay super
region. As growth
comes in the fu-
ture, we'll be able
to use or should
use every asset
we have available
to better the fu-
ture for Citrus
County."


I --. ^

Jimmie T.
Smith
state rep.,
R-Inverness.


"I think Port
Citrus is going to
be a good thing.
This county does
need to grow. We
need the business
and we need the
jobs. I think (it)
will put a lot of Katherine
people back to Arena
work. It will put 39, Hernando.
construction
workers back to
work. I think it's a good thing. The
county needs to be more open to
it."


"I'm really hop-
ing the county will
do something so
that people can
have work. I be-
lieve the port will
give work here.
I'm tired of seeing
everybody with- shirley
out homes, and all Atwood
the foreclosing 59, Invemess.
and people having
to live on the streets. I think it will
be an asset to the county."

"The ports al-
ways been there
but it hasn't been
used. It's almost
like a waste. If it
was done properly '
I think it would be
worth looking into
and I think that's Gordon
what they are Whitehead
doing. We need in- 70, Ozello.
dustry as long as
they are diversified. Not just one.
We don't want to mess up the envi-
ronment, be a noise problem or
screw up the Nature Coast."


"I think it would
be good to bring
more stuff to our
economy We need
to be a more well
rounded economy
instead of relying
on tourism or con-
struction or some- Brian
thing like that. I Tambasco
think it would 50,
help defiantly. I Homosassa.
think it would be
good for the county to pursue. I'm
not really sure how many taxpayer
dollars should go into it. That is
something that would have to be
brought up later"

"I'm not sure we
are big enough to
facilitate or war-
rant a port really. .,
I think it depends I
on how much it
would take to get it
here. I'm not sure
if it's going to need Mike
a lot of dredging. I Hedge
think it's going to 36,
take some. I am Homosassa.
not sure what it
will do to our environment."


I


A14 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE






Veterans Notes can be
foundon Page A17
of today's
Chronicle.
EXCURSIONS Crnce
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE





Dreams are made of these

Winners chosen in 2011 Accent Travel/Chronicle contest

FIRST PLACE: VISITING VENICE


vI





4 Phyllis Savage of
Lecanto pauses near
_L. a bridge over one of
the canals of Venice,
Italy. Savage found
the city and country
to be quite beautiful,
the cuisine delicious
and residents and
fellow travelers from
around the globe to
be friendly.
Printed Nov. 27, 2011







SECOND PLACE: THIRD PLACE:
GALAPAGOS GIANT CAMELS IN CABO
-47iIM AT LEFT: Judy Fowler poses
V next to a giant tortoise while
I visiting the Galapagos
Islands. She also toured the
Avenue of the Volcanoes
4.igl while in Ecuador. 4
Printed Sept.4, 2011

AT RGT: Al and
Gloria Schroedel
pose with Powder, a
dromedary camel.
The photo was
snapped in February
2011 during
whale-watching
'season, north of
1;7Cabo San Lucas,
; Mexico.
40Printed June 5,2011


HONORABLE
MENTION: HONORABLE MENTION:
PAUSING TOLEDO ON THE TEJO
NEAR A PEAK

AT RT: Jim and
Barbara Falkowski of
Lecanto took a trip
Zermott, Switzerland,
where they posed with
a furry friend, and the
Matterhorn in the
background. The
summit is 14,692 feet


high, making it one of
the highest peaks
in the Alps. Hanna Jackson, after graduating from Lecanto High School,
Printed Jan. 2, 2011 took a trip to Spain and Portugal with her mother. This spot
overlooks the city of Toledo, Spain, next to the Tejo River.
Printed Aug. 21, 2011

The Chronicle and The Accent Travel Group If it's selected as a winner, it will be Please avoid photos with dates on the print.
D R EA M are sponsoring a photo contest for readers of published in the Sunday Chronicle. Photos should be sent to the Chronicle at
R EA MS the newspaper. At the end of the year, a panel of judges will 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River,
VACATIONS Readers are invited to send a photograph from select the best photo during the year and that FL 34429 or dropped off at the Chronicle office
r O &/( --e their Dream Vacation with a brief description of photograph will win a prize, in Inverness, Crystal River or any Accent
the trip. Travel Office.






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Use tact with


new neighbors


SUNDAY EVENING FEBRUARY 26, 2012 C:Comcast,Citrus B: Bright House D:Comcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
C B D/I F H 6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 19:301 10:00110:3011:0011:30
0 1WESH NBC 19 19 News News Dateline NBC 'PG' Celebrity Apprentice The Celebrity Apprentice (N) 'PG' News Access
Great Performances Masterpiece Classic "Downton Abbey" The fam- Masterpiece Classic Curiosity shop. Great As Time As Time
0 [WEDU PBS 3 3 14 6 "Memphis" (N) 'PG' ily gathers for Christmas. PG'" 'PG' (DVS) Romances Goes By Goes By
0 WUFT PBS 5 5 5 41 Keep Up As Time... Masterpiece Classic (In Stereo) 'PG' Masterpiece Classic 'PG' In Performance... MI-5 'PG'
News Nightly Dateline NBC (In The Celebrity The Celebrity Apprentice "Getting Medieval" News Pre
0 WFLA NBC 8 8 8 8 8 News Stereo) 'PG' Apprentice 'PG' Creating and performing a show. PG' Auction
On the Red Carpet at Oscars Red Carpet Live (N) (In The 84th Annual Academy Awards Honors for achievements in film. (N) News
0 WFT ABC 20 20 20 the Oscars Stereo Live)'PG, LBI (In Stereo Live)'14, DLV m
Evening 10 News 60 Minutes (In Stereo) The Amazing Race (N) The Mentalist (In CSI: Miami"Killer 10 News, Paid
0I [WTP] CBS 10 10 10 10 10 News (N) B (In Stereo) B Stereo)'14'" Regrets"'14'B 11pm (N) Program
FOX13 6:00 News Bob's Cleveland The Napoleon Family Guy American FOX13 10:00 News The Closer"Half Load"
0 WTVT FOX 13 13 13 13 (N)B Burgers Show Simpsons Dynamite 14 Dad 14 (N) B '14'm
E WCJB ABC 11 11 4 News ABC Oscars Red Carpet Live'PG, L The 84th Annual Academy Awards (N) '14, D,L,V'" News
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__o__ Family Guy Family Guy Big Bang Big Bang Law & Order "Skin Law & Order *2 "Underclassman" (2005, Comedy) Nick
SWMOR IND 12 12 16 14' '14' Theory Theory Deep"PG' "Conspiracy"14 B Cannon, Shawn Ashmore. PG-13'
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King of 'Til Death Friends Hates Criminal Minds Without a Trace "Article NUMB3RS "Nine The Unit "Five
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Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage age Sge age Sge Storage Storage Storage Storage
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55 64 55 Bridget Fonda. R 'Triggerfinger' 14' Miles Out"'14' "Commercial" (N) Miles Out"'14'
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96 19 96 Smollett, Meagan Good. R' Story"(1989) Alfre Woodard. 'NR' 14 Together Together Together
fBRAVO) 254 51 254 Housewives/OC Housewives/Atl. Housewives/Atl. Housewives/Atl. Housewives/Atl. What Happens
S***"The 40-Year-Old Virgin" (2005, ** "Super Troopers" (2001, Comedy) Jay Tosh.0 Katt Williams American Hustle: The
CC 27 61 27 33 Romance-Comedy) Steve Carell. 'R' Chandrasekhar, Kevin Heffernan. 'R' '14' Movie MA' "
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98 45 98 28 37 OiviaNewton-John. (In Stereo *PG' Vacation'PG'B Vacation'PG'B Vacation'PG'B Vacation'PG'B
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(CiiN 40 29 40 41 46 CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Presents (N) Piers Morgan CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Presents "
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(iSH) 46 40 46 6 5 G' Up! G' Ally 'G' 'G' Ally 'G' Up! G' Farm 'G' 'G' Ally 'G' Ally 'G' Farm 'G' G G'
[ISPiN 33 27 33 21 17 SportsCenter (N) (Live) N Track and Field Goose (N) SportsCenter (N) (Live) N
[ESPN2) 34 28 34 43 49 Wm. Basketball SportsCenter (N) *** "Catching Hell" (2011) 'NR' The Real Rocky Goose (N)
(EWYN) 95 70 95 48 Ben. |Crossing Sunday Night Prime Living The G.K. |Rosary New Roman Missal Saints Bookmark
2 ** "The Lion King" *** "Aladdin" (1992, Fantasy) Voices of *** "Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl" (2003,
(EM 29 52 29 20 28 (1994) G' Scott Weinger, Robin Williams.'G' Action) Johnny Depp, Geoffrey Rush. 'PG-13'
fFn 44 37 44 32 Fox News Sunday FOX Report (N) Huckabee (N) Fox News Sunday Geraldo at Large (N) Huckabee
FOOD 26 56 26 D- Diners |Diners Worst Cooks Cupcake Wars (N) Worst Cooks Iron Chef America Chopped
(FSNFD 35 39 35 NHL Hockey |Panthers World PokerTour UFC Unleashed (N) Connected World PokerTour
S*** "Star Trek" (2009, Science Fiction) Chris *** "Zombieland" (2009, Comedy) Woody *** "Zombieland" (2009, Comedy) Woody
FtX 30 60 30 51 Pine, Zachary Quinto.'PG-13' Harrelson, Jesse Eisenberg.'R' Harrelson, Jesse Eisenberg. 'R'
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9 8 3 We Love We Love We Love We Love We Love We Love We Love We Love We Love We Love We Love We Love
HALL 39 68 39 45 54 Lucy Lucy G' Lucy Lucy Lucy G' Lucy G Lucy G' Lucy'G' G Lucy G Lucy G Lucy'G' G Lucy G'
S** "The X-Files" "Big Mommas: Like Father, Like Son" Luck (N) (In Stereo) Eastbound Life's Too Luck (In Stereo) 'MA'
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HGTV 23 57 23 42 52 House |Hunters Holmes on Homes Holmes on Homes Holmes Inspection Holmes Inspection Property Brothers 'G'
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([IS)T 51 25 51 32 42 'PG'm '14' '14' his stripes. (N) '14' 14, L,Vm 'PG"'
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(IFE] 24 38 24 31 Docudrama) Rob Lowe, Cara Buono. 'NR' Davidson. Detective David Reichert searches for a serial killer. NR'
0 1** "A Walk to Remember" (2002, Romance) "Ice Castles" (2010 Drama) Taylor Firth, Rob ** "The Greatest" (2009, Drama) Pierce
50 119 Shane West.'PG' Mayes. Premiere. 'PG' Brosnan, Susan Sarandon. 'R'
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48 33 48 31 34 NBA Tip-Off"m 2012 NBA All-Star Game From Amway Arena in Orlando, 2012 NBA All-Star Game From Amway Arena in
48 33 48 31 34 Fla. (N) (Live) N Orlando, Fla. B
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9 54 9 44 Chowdown'PG' Food'G' Food'G' Manliest Restaurants Hamburgers.'G'
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(TVD 32 49 32 34 24 M*A*S*H |M*A*S*H M*A*S*H M*A*S*H M*A*S*H M*A*S*H Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond King
NCIS "Angel of Death" NCIS "Bury Your Dead" NCIS Murder of a naval NCIS "Jack Knife" (In NCIS "Baltimore" '14' *** "Troy" (2004)
47 32 47 17 18 '14'm '14'm officer.'14' B Stereo) 'PG' B (DVS) Brad Pitt. "
My Fair Wedding With My Fair Wedding With My Fair Wedding With My FairWedding With My Fair Wedding With My FairWedding With
(W. 117 69 117 David Tutera David Tutera David Tutera David Tutera David Tutera David Tutera
[WGNA 18 18 18 18 20 Chris Chris 30Rock Mother Mother Mother Mother Mother News Replay The Unit'PG'


D earAnnie: We live in
a new neighborhood
and take pride in the
appearance of our home
and yard.
We were very pleased
when new neighbors bought
the house next door and
moved in. Unfortunately,
they have a rusting vintage
car that's parked in the
driveway next to our yard. I
can see it from my window
every time I look outside.
Even though they cover it
with a tarp, it is an unsightly
blot on the neighborhood.
Mind you, they neither drive
this car nor work on it.
There is no homeowners
association in our area, and
while the city has rules
about cars
parked on the
street, there is
none for per-
sonal drive-
ways.
How can I
tactfully ap-
proach these
new neighbors
and ask that
they put the car
in their garage
to increase the ANNI
attractiveness of
our street? MAILI
Longing for
Beauty in the 'Burbs
Dear Longing: So you are
not actually objecting to the
car, which is covered.
Rather, you find the tarp un-
sightly Instead of making
your first interaction with
the new neighbors a com-
plaint, bring over some
baked goods, and welcome
them to the neighborhood.
Invite them to drop over for
coffee. Get to know them
well enough to ask about the
vintage car and why it's not
in the garage. Maybe they'll
find a nicer looking tarp so
it's less of an eyesore.
Dear Annie: As a child, I
remember my mother as a
heavily abusive alcoholic.
She has been sober for 11
years, but she has slowly
started drinking again.
When she's drunk, she
makes vulgar and belittling
comments, which she never
does otherwise. After I tell
her how much this hurts me,
she becomes defensive and
acts like she's perfectly OK.
Being around her when
she is even slightly buzzed
brings back terrible memo-
ries. I have offered to go to
AA meetings with her, but
she's not interested. My hus-
band has told me I should
leave the room when Mom
has been drinking.
Annie, I love my mother
with all my heart, but how


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Fanaticism
6 Male deer
10 Take a hike!
15 Bridge support
20 Unreactive
21 Primrose -
22 Hag
23 Celebration in Chihuahua
24 Personal interest
25 Margarine
26 Jockey
27 Cheerful
28 Sea dog
29 Appearance
31 Term in bridge
33 Oil or wishing
35 Commedia dell'-
36 Flavoring plant
37 Russian plain
39 Every
41 Coddled
44 Expressive dance
45 Talk on and on
48 Burning
53 Willow rod
54 Busey or Oldman
55 Trinidad and -
57 White cliffs location
58 It undoes
116-Across
59 Polish
60 Plant pouch
61 Make misshapen
63 Prohibits
64 Knight's title
65 Gossip
66 Pierces
68 Part of CD-ROM
70 Born (Fr.)
71 Box sleigh
72 Kind of green grape
74 Watch part
76 Leigh or Jackson
79 Ran easily
81 Seizes
83 Subtlety
87 Like a lot
88 Discord goddess
89 Kitchen head
91 Dressed to the -
92 Coach
94 Escritoire
96 Word akin to "cheers!"
97 Saplings
98 Nephew of
Donald Duck
100 Suede
102 Matured


Do lawn work
Cut
Wiped
Oath of old
WWII
servicewoman
Mine entrance
Remove
Tip
Maneuver
Perkins or Reiner
Kind of boom
Sour, in a way
Chief
Church
administration
Go cautiously
Run
Isinglass
Hysteria
Stringed instrument
Illusion
Droplet
Goad
Best or St.
Vincent Millay
Portal
Judge
Town in Belgium
Modernize
Broadcast portion
Saharan
City in Georgia
Brunch offering
New husband
Wheel hub
Antelope
French painter
Hagar or Sosa
Defrost
Peachy


DOWN
1 Fine spray
2 Pilaster
3 and dear
4 Annoy
5 Painter's workroom
6 Reel
7 Confabulation
8 Had a bite
9 Phantasmal
10 Discarded piece
11 Curl tightly
12 Pole
13 Freshly
14 Nothing more than
15 Inside info


McEntire's show
Employer
Immediately!
Glut
Parking-lot sign
Longstanding
Pasture
Toiled
Usual food and drink
Ride a wave
- tide
Boy
Office big shot
Wine city
Coffin stand
Handle
Jurisprudence
Culture medium
Watch pocket
- the Terrible
Descartes or Coty
Gaelic
Baby sound
Little pie
Sea
Large container
Auctioneer's cry
Ache
Obedient
Conjectured
Noshed
Intimidated
City in Australia
Salesman's speech
Detest
Scottish
landowner
Stuff
Drink suffix
Persona grata
Command (abbr.)
Kind of eagle
Compass pt.
So-so mark
A letter
Wine bottle
Tear
Black or Carpenter
Molt
Produced
Really small
Lighthearted
Abbr. in grammar
Stench
Champagne
Entreaty
Essayist's pen name
Caution
Neighbor of Mex.


Hardpan
Gift for dad
Print measures
Tempo
Gave a signal
PC part
Electrical unit
Traveler
Studied in haste
Chinese chairman
Charge


Retained
Verbal expression
Capacious
Dampen
School dance, for short
Italy's San -
Baking chamber
Valley
Pesters
Unseen
emanation


Puzzle answer is on Page A18.


Prima donna
Read
Body of water
Rooney or Warhol
Came upon
Monk's title
Encouraging cry
- carte


2012 UFS, Dist. bv Universal Uclick for UFS


do I make her understand
how much the drinking
bothers me and that I wish
she would stop? I don't want
to be her babysitter or tell
her how to live her life, but
for the sake of my family,
how do I get through to her?
- Distraught Daughter
Dear Distraught: You
can't get through if she is de-
termined not to hear you.
You do not need to be
around your mother when
she is drinking. But this is
understandably difficult for
you, and we think you could
use some support. Please
contact Al-Anon (al-
anon.alateen.org) and also
Adult Children of Alcoholics
(adultchildren.org).
Dear Annie:
Like Road Worrier,
I was worried
about my 88-year-
old father's driv-
ing. When I went
with him to the
DMV I was sure
they would not
renew his license.
However, when he
couldn't see the
chart, the DMV
E'S employee said,
"We have a differ-
3OX ent chart for older
folks who can't see
that well." And when he
failed the written exam, he
was told, "You were proba-
bly confused. I'll tell you the
answer." So he passed.
I spoke to his doctor, who
refused to get involved. So,
right before my father
turned 90, I took away the
keys to his car and said we'd
drive him wherever he
wanted to go. Tell "Road
Worrier" to put on her big-
girl panties and take care of
her own problem however
she needs to.-M.
Dear M.: We're glad taking
away the car keys worked
for you, but it doesn't work
for everyone. It helps when
those in charge of issuing li-
censes take their jobs- and
the safety issues involved -
seriously


Annie's Mailbox is written
by Kathy Mitchell and
Marcy Sugar, longtime
editors of the Ann Landers
column. Email questions to
anniesmailbox@
comcast.net, or write to:
Annie's Mailbox, c/o
Creators Syndicate, 737
Third St., Hermosa Beach,
CA 90254. To find out more
aboutAnnie's Mailbox and
read features by other
Creators Syndicate writers,
visit the Web page at
www. creators. com.


A16 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012


ENTERTAINMENT


II
[]





CImus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Veterans N OTES


Due to space considera-
tions, the Veterans Notes some-
times contain only basic
information regarding each post.
For more information about
scheduled activities, meals and
more for a specific post, call or
email that post at the contact
listed.
The Citrus County Chapter
of SCORE, in conjunction with
the Veterans Fast Launch Initia-
tive Program, will offer a free
small business institute work-
shop for veterans. Veterans
who are in business or planning
to start a business qualify for
this program. The workshop
starts at 6 p.m. Friday, March 9,
at the College of Central Florida
Citrus Campus. The seminar will
run for 11 weeks.
To apply, visit www.vetsfast-
launch.org\coupon-signup, print
the coupon and call the college
at 352-249-1210 and register for
the workshop. Bring the coupon
to the first meeting. The cost of
the workshop is $100 and will be
completely covered by the
coupon.
For more information, call
SCORE at 352-249-1236.
The U.S. Air Force is look-
ing for prior enlisted men and
women from all services inter-
ested in both direct duty assign-
ments in previously obtained
career fields or retraining into
select career fields. Some of the
careers include aircraft electron-
ics/mechanical areas, cyber op-
eration fields, and various other
specialties. Enlisted career
openings that include the oppor-
tunities to retrain consist of spe-
cial operations positions and
unmanned aerial vehicle.
Assignment locations are
based on Air Force needs. For
more information, call 352-
476-4915.
Citrus County Veterans
Coalition has a new building
holding freezers, refrigerators
and all necessary requirements
to provide food to veterans in
need. Food donations and vol-
unteers are always welcome
and needed.
The CCVC is on the DAV
property in Inverness at the cor-
ner of Paul and Independence,
off U.S. 41 north. Hours of oper-
ation are 10a.m. to 1 p.m.
Tuesday and Thursday. Appoint-
ments are encouraged by
calling 352-400-8952.
CCVC general meetings are
at 10 a.m. the fourth Thursday
monthly at the DAV building in
Inverness. All active duty and
honorably discharged veterans,
their spouses, widows and wid-
owers, along with other veter-
ans' organizations and current
coalition members are welcome.
Members are encouraged to at-
tend general meetings.
Annual membership donation
is $10 for a calendar year or $25
for three years. The CCVC is a
nonprofit corporation, and your
donations are tax deductible.
Current members should check
their membership card for expi-
ration dates, and renew with
Gary Williamson at 352-
527-4537, or at the meeting.
Visit www.ccvcfl.org.
0 AMVETS William Crow
Post 447, Inglis, is on State
Road 40 East. Sons meeting is
at 5:30 p.m. first Monday; Riders
meeting is at 5:30 p.m. first





OFFSHORE FISHING CHARTERS J
Capt. Dan Cyr, Crystal River




S L license, Bat, and Tackle are provided

i352-422-4640
split Charters Can Be Arranged


Successful run


---__


F


Special to the Chronicle
Under sunny skies, motorcycle riders encircle the American flag outside American Legion
Post 237 on Jan. 28, following the American Legion Post 237 annual poker run to benefit
Hospice of Citrus County and the American Cancer Society efforts to battle ovarian cancer.
"We are thrilled with the turnout for our fundraiser," said ride chairman John Roby. "It's the
largest run we've had and was an overwhelming success." Stops included AmVets Post
441, Inglis; American Legion Post 155 in Crystal River; IRRU; Fraternal Order of Eagles
4272, Homosassa; Scoreboard Sports Bar; and American Legion Post 237. More than 130


motorcycles participated.


Thursday; post meeting is at
5:30 p.m. second Thursday;
Ladies Auxiliary meeting is 5:30
p.m. third Thursday.
The Riders Dinner will be
Sunday, Feb. 26; cost is $5.
For more information about
the post and its activities, call
352-447-1816; email
Amvet447@comcast.net.
Blanton-Thompson
American Legion Post 155,
6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway,
Crystal River.
For information about the post
and its activities, call Cmdr. Jay
Conti Sr. at 352-795-6526 or
visit www.postl 55.org.
American Legion Auxil-
iary Unit 155 meets at 7:30
p.m. the fourth Tuesday of every
month at the post. The Ameri-
can Legion Auxiliary is the
world's largest women's patriotic
service organization with nearly
1 million members in 10,100
communities. The principles of
the American Legion Auxiliary
are to serve veterans, their fami-
lies and the community.
Eligibility in the Auxiliary is
open to mothers, wives, sisters,
daughters, granddaughters,
great-granddaughters or grand-
mothers of members of the
American Legion and of de-
ceased veterans who served
during war time (also stepchil-
dren); stepchildren; and female
veterans who served during war
time. Call Unit President Shawn
Mikulas, 352-503-5325, or
membership chairman Barbara
Logan, 352-795-4233.
For more information, call
Unit President Shawn Mikulas,
352-503-5325, or Barbara
Logan, 352-795-4233.
0 H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post
10087, Beverly Hills, offers
meals, bingo, golf, karaoke and
pool. Review the monthly
newsletter for activities and up-
dates, and call the post at 352-


746-0440. The VFW Post 10087
is off County Road 491, directly
behind Superior Bank.
The Ladies Auxiliary will host
a Chinese auction fundraiser on
Saturday, March 3. Doors will
open at 10 a.m. and drawings
will begin at 1 p.m. Admission is
$2.50 to benefit the Junior Re-
serve Officers' Training Corps,
which instills in students the
value of citizenship service to
the U.S., personal responsibility
and a sense of accomplishment.
Hot dogs will be available for
$1, as well as free dessert and
coffee. For more information,
call Bettie at 352-746-1989 or
Donna at 352-746-5215.
Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs,
352-465-4864. Wi Fi is now
available at the post; bring your
laptop or any other item that will
access the Internet and enjoy
the free service.
All are welcome to the baked
ham dinner from 5 to 6:30 p.m.
Friday, March 2, at the post.
Cost is $8.
Information regarding any
post events is available at the
post, or call 352-465-4864.
Disabled American Veter-
ans Chapter No. 70 meets at 2
p.m. the second Tuesday
monthly at the chapter hall,
1039 N. Paul Drive, Inverness,
at the intersection of Independ-
ence Highway and U.S. 41. The
chapter hall is on the corner of
Independence Highway and
Paul Drive.
We thank veterans for their
service and welcome any dis-
abled veteran to join us from 9
a.m. to 1 p.m. any Tuesday or
Thursday at the chapter hall.
This is also the time that we ac-
cept donated nonperishable
foods for our continuing food
drive.
Our main function is to assist


disabled veterans and their fam-
ilies when we are able. Anyone
who knows a disabled veteran
or their family who requires as-
sistance is asked to call Com-
mander Richard Floyd
727-492-0290, Ken Stewart
at 352-419-0207, or
352-344-3464.
Service Officer Joe McClister
is available to assist any veteran
or dependents with their disabil-
ity claim by appointment. Call
352-344-3464 and leave a
message.
Ambulatory veterans who
wish to schedule an appoint-
ment for transportation to the VA
medical center in Gainesville
should call the veterans' service
office at 352-527-5915. Mobility
challenged veterans who wish
to schedule an appointment for
transportation to the VA medical
center in Gainesville may call
the Citrus County Transit office
for wheelchair transportation;
call 352-527-7630.
For more information about
chapter activities, veterans' ben-
efits or membership, Call Ken
Stewart at 352-419-0207; leave
a message, if desired, should
the machine answer.
Disabled American Veter-
ans Auxiliary Unit No. 70
meets at 2 p.m. the second
Tuesday of the month at the
chapter hall, 1039 N. Paul Drive,
Inverness.
The auxiliary plans a visit to
the VA nursing homes) and
needs toiletry items such as
packaged razors, combs, hair-
brushes, toothbrushes, sham-
poos and deodorant to fill ditty
bags, They are also accepting
cotton material and yarn to
make ditty bags, lap robes,
wheelchair and walker bags for
disabled veterans.
The auxiliary membership
has grown to include many
more extended families. Call


Auxiliary Commander Linda
Brice at 352-560-3867 or Adju-
tant Lynn Armitage at 352-
341-5334 for information.
Eugene Quinn VFW Post
4337 and Ladies Auxiliary,
906 State Road 44 E.,
Inverness.
The public is welcome to join
the post family for the annual
Chili/Cornbread Cook-off and
Chinese Auction Sunday, Feb.
26. Doors open at 1 p.m.; judg-
ing at 2 p.m. with prizes for first-,
second- and third-place winners.
Auction tickets go on sale at 1
p.m. with drawings to pick the
winners at 3 p.m.
Stop by the canteen and pick
up a current monthly calendar.
Call the post at 352-344-3495
for information about all weekly
post activities, or visit
www.vfw4337.org.
The American Legion
Wall-Rives Post 58 and Auxil-
iary, 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnellon.
Dunnellon Young Marines will
meet at 6 p.m. Tuesday.
Free AARP tax services will
be available 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Wednesday through April 11.
For more information, call
Wayne Sloan at 352-489-5066.
The public is welcome at
bingo at 6 p.m. Thursday.
For information about activi-
ties and the post, call Carl Boos
at 352-489-3544.
Rolling Thunder Chapter
7, a POW/MIA awareness
group, meets at 10 a.m. the sec-
ond Saturday at the VFW Post
10087 in Beverly Hills. Call Bob
Bruno, secretary, at 352-
201-1228.
MA Marine Corps League
Ladies Auxiliary Citrus Unit
meets at 1 p.m. the third Tues-
day monthly at the VFW in Bev-
erly Hills. New members are
welcome. Membership fee is
$30 a year. Female relatives
ages 16 or older who are a wife,
widow, mother, stepmother, sis-
ter, daughter, stepdaughter,
grandmother, granddaughter,
aunt or daughter-in-law of hon-
orably discharged Marines and
FMF Corpsmen are eligible to
belong to the Marine Corps
League. Female Marines (for-
mer, active and reserves) and
associate members are eligible
for MCLA membership. Call
President Elaine Spikes at 352-
860-2400 or Secretary/
Treasurer Joan Cecil at 352-
726-0834 for information.
Hunger and Homeless
Coalition -Anyone who
knows of a homeless veteran in
need of food, haircut, voter ID,
food stamps, medical assis-
tance or more blankets is asked
to call Ed Murphy at the Hunger
and Homeless Coalition at 352-
382-0876, or pass along this
phone number to the veteran.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW
Post 4252 and Ladies Auxil-
iary, 3190 N. Carl G. Rose
Highway, State Road 200, Her-
nando; 352-726-3339. Send
emails to vfw4252@tampa
bay.rr.com.
Everyone is welcome. Post
and auxiliary meet at 6:30 p.m.
every second Thursday.
Post honor guard is available
for funerals, flag raising and
nursing home visits.
The public is welcome to the
Friday night dinner and dance at
5p.m.


The Ladies Auxiliary will host
a Bonanza Bingo beginning at
10 a.m. Saturday, March 3; non-
smoking hall. Cost is $35 and in-
cludes bingo package and
lunch. Tickets are available at
the post. Proceeds will benefit
the Cancer Aid & Research
Foundation.
See our post activities:
Google us as VFW 4252,
Hernando.
Dumas-Hartson VFW
Post 8189 is on West Veterans
Drive, west of U.S. 19 between
Crystal River and Homosassa.
Call 352-795-5012 for
information.
VFW membership is open to
men and women veterans who
have participated in an overseas
campaign, including service in
Iraq and Afghanistan. The Ko-
rean Campaign medal remains
open, as well. Call the post at
the phone number above for in-
formation.
Joe Nic Barco Memorial
VFW Post 7122, 8191 S.
Florida Ave., Floral City. For in-
formation about the post and its
activities, call 352-637-0100.
Friday is AUCE fish or three-
piece chicken for $7.
American Legion, Bev-
erly Hills Memorial Post 237,
4077 N. Lecanto Highway, in the
Beverly Plaza, invites all eligible
veterans and their families to
visit our post and consider join-
ing our Legion family: American
Legion, Sons of the American
Legion (SAL), or American Le-
gion Auxiliary (ALA). Color
Guard/Honor Guard accepting
volunteers.
Beverly Hills Memorial Ameri-
can Legion Post 237, by ap-
proval of its Executive Board on
Jan. 22, and by those members
present at the Jan. 26 general
membership meeting, has
changed its regular meeting
time to 7 p.m. on the fourth
Tuesday monthly beginning
Tuesday, Feb. 28. Contact the
post at 352-746-5018 for more
information.
American Legion Riders
Chapter now being formed. Visit
the post for printed schedule or
visit the website at
www.post237.org. For informa-
tion, call 352-746-5018.
The Korean War Veterans
Association, Citrus Chapter
192 meets at the VFW Post
10087, Beverly Hills, at 1 p.m.
the first Tuesday monthly. Any
veteran who has seen honor-
able service in any of the Armed
Forces of the U.S. is eligible for
membership if said service was
within Korea, including territorial
waters and airspace, at any time
from Sept. 3, 1945, to the pres-
ent or if said service was outside
of Korea from June 25,1950, to
Jan. 31, 1955. For information,
call Hank Butler at 352-563-
2496, Neville Anderson at 352-
344-2529 or Bob Hermanson at
352-489-0728.
Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 and Auxiliary
Unit 77 meet the first Thursday
monthly at the Inverness High-
lands Civic Center at 4375 Little
Al Point Road, Inverness. Call
Post Cmdr. Norman Brumett at
352-860-2981 or Auxiliary presi-
dent Marie Cain at 352-
637-5915.

See VETERANS/Page A18


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COMMUNITY


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012 A17





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Fallacy of classless society


Thanks to a story in The New
York Times, we learn that me-
dian tuition at the 61 elite pri-
vate schools in New York City has hit
$36,970 a year for 12th-graders. A new
school in the Chelsea neighborhood
plans to charge $39,750 for a year of
nursery school.
Seriously? The tuition at Harvard
this year was $36,305. Hard
as it is to believe, some
parents will be relieved f
when their kids get ac-
cepted into Ivy League uni-
versities because, at last,
they can start saving some
money Of course, if you're
paying $39,000 and change
annually for grade school
and high school tuition, it's
inevitable that your kids Ji
will get into the university MULl
of their choice.
But tuition is only part of
the cost at these schools. Just like most
public and parochial schools, they are
constantly holding fundraisers, the dif-
ference being that if you don't con-
tribute heftily, Junior may find himself
tossed into the public school system
next year, sitting next to the children of
general practitioners, public defend-
ers, plumbers, electricians, waitresses,
reporters or, heaven forbid, members
of your own household staff.
The good news is that these exclu-
sive schools don't let in our kind. If you
weren't rich enough to get a couple mil-
lion dollars in a taxpayer-paid bailout


I


bonus, there is no way your kids are
going to get into one of these schools.
Which is OK with me, because face it,
exclusive private schools rarely pro-
duce any first-round draft picks in the
big money sports. While many team
owners have graduated from exclusive
schools, almost none of the players
have.
You might guess that with
these kinds of stratospheric
prices, fewer parents are ap-
plying to get their kids into
*c such schools in these tough
times. Ah, but you would
guess wrong. The demand for
exclusive private schools is
up way up which is sure
to drive the price of tuition
even higher Tuition of
MI $40,000 a year to teach your
LEN third-grader multiplication is
right around the corner
Even with that kind of
money, there is no guarantee Junior
will get in. What if he suffers from
NOCD (Not Our Class, Dear)? But wait
consulting services can advise par-
ents on how to get their overprivileged
progeny into these schools. That's right,
many bailed-out brokers and bankers
will happily spend $20,000 of formerly
public money on consultants to help get
their little heirs and heiresses into the
"right" schools. The fee for consulting
will probably rise, too, because of the
demand. Even so, the chances of get-
ting Junior in without having some
kind of legacy at the school are slim or


none.
So what do the students get out of all
this that they won't get from New York's
fine public schools? Well, at a public
school they might not be able to take
Zen Dance, a class offered at one of the
private schools. Their Mandarin teach-
ers may not be as good as the ones at
the private school's pre-K. You know,
the necessities. They may suffer from
low self-esteem when they find out that
the children of non-rich people can be
just as smart and talented as the chil-
dren of the wealthy Some of them are
even smarter and may get into college
for free on things called "scholarships."
Most important, they will miss all the
diversity of exclusive prep schools,
where some of the parents make only
$5 million a year, while others make
$500 million. Imagine, the children of
hedge fund managers and the semi-im-
poverished sixth generation of the rob-
ber barons going to school together It
warms the heart. It's this cross-pollina-
tion of old and new money that makes
this country great
Surely these kids will come up with
entirely new ideas to make themselves
richer than their parents. They'll have
to. Kindergarten could cost $80,000 a
year by the time the next generation
starts having kids.

Jim Mullen's book "Now in
Paperback" is now in paperback
You can reach him at
jimm ullenbooks. com.


Art Center Camera Club

The Art Center Camera Club will meet at 7 p.m. Monday, March 5, at 2644 N.
Annapolis Ave. Jim Houle, chairman, will discuss and demonstrate how to
photograph family groups and children. Houle's skills and techniques were
developed in his 45 years as a professional photographer. He was trained as a
combat photographer with the U.S. Navy Underwater Combat Team. Later, he
was a photojournalist with the Star Ledger newspaper and was part owner of a
company that did portraits, yearbooks and sports photography. Houle has
photographed while under enemy fire and met the demanding task of
photographing squirming children. In retirement, he has continued to pursue
his love of photography and lead the camera club to a higher standard.
All are welcome. For more information, email jhoule@tampabay.rr.com.
Special to the Chronicle


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377
"Tyler Perry's Good Deeds" (PG-13)
1:10 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
"This Means War" (PG-13) 1:30 p.m.;
4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
"Ghost Rider" (PG-13) In Real 3D.
1:40 p.m., 4:40 p.m. 7:40 p.m. No passes.
"Safe House" (R) ID required. 1 p.m.,
4 p.m., 7 p.m.
"The Vow" (PG-13) 1:20 p.m., 4:20 p.m.,
7:10 p.m.
"Journey 2: The Mysterious Island" (PG)
In Real 3D. 4:45 p.m., 7:45 p.m. No passes.


VETERANS
Continued from Page A17

U.S. Submarine Veterans
(USSVI)-Sturgeon Base meets
at 11 a.m. the first Saturday
monthly at the American Legion
Post 155, 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River. Visitors
and interested parties are al-
ways welcome. Call Base Cmdr.
Billy Wein at 352-726-5926.
American Legion Post
166 meets 1:30 p.m., first Satur-
day monthly at the Dumas-Hart-
son VFW Post 8189 Ladies
Auxiliary facility on Veterans
Drive, Homosassa, on the west
side of U.S. 19 at Dixon's Auto
Sales across from Harley-David-
son. We meet in the small build-
ing to the left of the main
building. All former and current
post members, as well as all in-
terested veterans, are cordially
invited to be a part of American
Legion Post 166.
For information about the post
or the American Legion, call and
leave a message for the post
commander at 352-697-1749.
Your call will be returned within
24 to 48 hours.
Seabee Veterans of
America (SVA) Island X-23
welcomes all Seabees and Hon-
eybees to its monthly meeting at
10:30 a.m. the third Tuesday
monthly at Citrus Hills Country
Club, Rose and Crown restau-
rant, Citrus Hills. Call John Lowe
at 352-344-4702.
Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219
and Cabane 1219 conducts its
meetings at 7 p.m. the second
Thursday monthly at the Ameri-
can Legion Post 155 on State
Road 44 in Crystal River (6585
E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway). For
more information about the 40/8,
call the Chef De Gare Tom
Smith at 352-601-3612; for the
Cabane, call La Presidente
Carol Kaiserian at 352-746-
1959; or visit us on the Web at
www.Postl55.org.
Aaron A. Weaver Chapter
776 Military Order of the Pur-
ple Heart (MOPH) meets at 2


Today's MOVIES
"Journey 2: The Mysterious Island"
(PG) 1:45 p.m.
Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Wanderlust" (R) ID required. 1:25 p.m.,
4:05 p.m., 7:50 p.m.
"Act of Valor" (R) ID required. 1:40 p.m.,
4:20 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
"Tyler Perry's Good Deeds" (PG-13)
1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
"This Means War" (PG-13) 1:35 p.m.,
4:15 p.m., 7:15 p.m.
"Ghost Rider" (PG-13) In Real 3D. 1:50 p.m.,


p.m. the third Tuesday of Janu-
ary, March, May, July, Septem-
ber and November. All
combat-wounded veterans, lin-
eal descendants, next of kin,
spouses and siblings of Purple
Heart recipients are cordially in-
vited to attend and to join the
ranks of Chapter 776. To learn
more about Aaron A. Weaver
Chapter 776 MOPH, visit the
chapter's website at www.cit-
ruspurpleheart.org or call 352-
382-3847.
Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment
1139 will conduct its regular
meeting at 7 p.m. the third
Wednesday monthly at DAV
Post 70 in Inverness at the inter-
section of Independence High-
way and U.S. 41 North. All
Marines are welcome. Call Jerry
Cecil at 352-726-0834 or Wayne
Howard at 352-634-5254.
Marine Corps League Cit-
rus Detachment 819 meets at


7 p.m. the last Thursday
monthly at VFW Post 10087 on
Vet Lane in Beverly Hills, behind
Superior Bank. Social hour fol-
lows. All Marines and FMF
Corpsmen are welcome. Meet
new friends and discuss past
glories. Call Morgan Patterson
at 352-746-1135, Ted
Archambault at 352-382-0462
or Bion St. Bernard at 352-
697-2389.
Gilley-Long-Osteen VFW
Post 8698 is at 520 State Road
40 E., Inglis, one mile east of
U.S. 19. The Men's Auxiliary
meets at 7 p.m. the second
Monday. LAVFW meets at 5
p.m. and the membership meet-
ing is at 6:30 p.m. the third
Wednesday at the post.
Call the post at 352-447-3495
for information about the post
and its activities.
Fleet Reserve Associa-
tion, Branch 186 will meet at 3
p.m. the third Thursday monthly


4:50 p.m. 7:40 p.m. No passes.
"Safe House" (R) ID required. 2 p.m.,
4:45 p.m., 7:25 p.m.
"Journey 2: The Mysterious Island"
(PG) 1:20 p.m.
"Journey 2: The Mysterious Island" (PG)
In Real 3D. 4 p.m., 7 p.m. No passes.
"Star Wars: Episode I" (PG) In Real 3D.
1:15 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:05 p.m. No passes.
"The Vow" (PG-13) 1:45 p.m., 4:25 p.m.,
7:10 p.m.
Visit www.chronicleonline.com for area movie
listings and entertainment information.


at the DAV Building, Independ-
ence Highway and U.S. 41
North, Inverness. Call Bob
Huscher, secretary, at
352-344-0727.
American Legion Herbert
Surber Post 225 meets at 7
p.m. the third Thursday monthly
at the New Testament Baptist
Church of Floral City, 9850 S.
Parkside Ave. adjoining Floral
Park, southeast side. All eligible
veterans are welcome to join.
Landing Ship Dock (LSD)
sailors meet at Denny's in Crys-
tal River at 2 p.m. the fourth
Thursday monthly. Call Jimmie
at 352-621-0617.
Suncoast U.S. Navy
Armed Guard and Merchant
Marine Veterans of World War
II meetings for 2012 will be at
11:30 a.m. at Kally K's restau-
rant in Spring Hill on the follow-
ing dates: March 10, April 14,
May 12, Sept. 8, Oct. 13, Nov.
10 and Dec. 8.


Engagement

0 Neal/Hamilton

Larry and Leisha O'Neal
of Inverness have an-
nounced the engagement
and forthcoming marriage
of their daughter, Amanda
O'Neal of Lecanto, to Josh ,
Hamilton of Lecanto, son
of Patricia Hamilton Fults.
The bride-elect is associ- "
ated with New Concepts
International Hair Salon.
Her fiance, a graduate of
Citrus High School, works
with ICC.
Nuptial vows will be ex-
changed at 5:30 p.m. Oct.
20, 2012, in Inverness.


Engagement

Kazee/Mead


The parents of Andrea
Kazee and Tony Mead have
announced the approach-
ing marriage of their chil-
dren.
The bride-elect is the
daughter of Linda Deptola
of Inverness. Her fiance is
the son of Lee and Jerry
Mead of Homosassa.
The nuptial ceremony


will take place at 6 p.m.
March 3, 2012, at Mickey's
Bar and Grill in Crystal
River
Both Andrea and Tony
have lived in Citrus County
for many years. Andrea is
employed by Brentwood
Health Care, Tony is em-
ployed by Litle's Concrete
Finishing Inc.


65th ANNIVERSARY


The Goodenoughs

Doris and Dennis Good-
enough of Citrus County FI7
will celebrate their 65th J i
wedding anniversary on
March 30, 2012.
The couple, originally .
from Suffern, N.Y, were
wed March 30, 1947, in e
New York. Doris was a '.
legal secretary and Den-
nis was a slate roofer
They have three chil-
dren: BettyAnn Casey of -
Sugarmill Woods, Dianne
Patricia Williams of New *
Port Richey and George
Dennis Goodenough of }
Rock Tavern, N.Y They
have eight grandchildren
and seven great-grand-
children, been residents of Citrus
The Goodenoughs have County for 20 years.


Sunday's PUZZLER

Puzzle is on Page A16.

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STAKE OLEO RI0 DER BEAT
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REVAM AUD IO AR I D MACON
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MONET S AMM TMA W MA D Y
2-26 2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


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A18 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012


COMMUNITY











SPORTS


* The Daytona 500
means different
things to different
d rivers./B5


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


0 College basketball/B2
0 NHL, MLB/B3
0 Prep softball/B4
0 TV, lottery/B4
0 Bassmaster Classic/B5
0 Golf/B5
0 Entertainment/B6


Bulldogs refuse to yield to No. 12 Gators


UF never led en

route to 76-62

loss at Georgia

Associated Press
ATHENS, Ga. Gerald Robin-
son Jr. knows that Georgia has a
slim chance of earning a postsea-
son bid.
But that doesn't mean the Bull-
dogs aren't going to try
"We're still pushing forward,"
Robinson said. "At no point have
we thought that the season is
over. We've never given up."
Freshman Kentavious Cald-
well-Pope scored 18 points,
Robinson added 15 and Georgia
snapped No. 12 Florida's three-


game winning streak with a 76-62
victory Saturday
The Gators, who never led in
the game, trailed by double dig-
its most of the second half. They


whittled the lead to
five points on
Kenny Boynton's 3-
pointer with 1:53
remaining.
But Georgia (13-
15, 4-10 Southeast-
ern Conference)


More colle
* No. 5 Kans,
3 Mizzou w
rally Saturd


scored the next six points as
Dustin Ware and Donte' Williams
both made two free throws and
Caldwell-Pope followed with a
breakaway dunk to make it 73-62.
"We came out with a lot of in-
tensity, and our guys were really
determined to play well today,"
Bulldogs coach Mark Fox said.
"We were able to dig deep and
tap into that extra energy, which


we haven't been able to do much
this season. But we did
that today"
Florida (22-7, 10-4) is second,
one game ahead of Vanderbilt in
the SEC. Bradley
ge hoops Beal scored 19
points for the
as stuns No. Gators, who close
ith ferocious the regular season
Jay./Page B2 next week at Van-
derbilt and at
home against
No. 1 Kentucky
Florida had won 10 of 12 over-
all and had taken of 15 of 17
against Georgia, including three
straight.
Florida guard Mike Rosario shoots
past Georgia's John Florveus (32)
and Marcus Thornton on Saturday
in Athens, Ga.
Associated Press


Searching for Daytona


Associated Press
Tony Stewart, right, is the defending Sprint Cup champion but cannot claim a win in the Daytona 500. Stewart and the rest of the 500
field will chase the elusive prize 12 p.m. Sunday at Daytona International Speedway in Daytona Beach.


Defending Sprint

The 54th Daytona 500
* TIME: 12 p.m. Sunday
* TV: FOX
* LAST YEAR'S WINNER:
Trevor Bayne
WHAT'S AT STAKE: Not
many sports have their
biggest event to begin the
season but the winner will
have his (or her) name
etched into NASCAR lore.
The winner expects to win
a minimum of $1.4
million and the overall
$19 million payout for the
entire field is the largest
yet. Another new edition is
the $200,000 bonus for
the driver leading at the
midway point of the race.
The winner will obviously
get a leg up in the very
early Sprint Cup points
standings as well.


Cup champion Stewart still hasn 't won NASCAR's 500


Associated Press
DAYTONA BEACH Tony
Stewart has had plenty of
chances to win the Daytona
500, and he's had his heart bro-
ken every time.
Stewart wound up on his roof
in 2001, and his engine blew in
the opening laps of the 2002
race. He finished second to
Dale Earnhardt Jr in 2004, and
wrecked while leading in 2007.
The most difficult defeat was
likely 2008, when Ryan New-
man was pushed past Stewart
on the last lap to snatch away
the victory Last year, Stewart
was second on the final restart
but faded to a 13th-place finish
as rookie Trevor Bayne pulled
off the upset
The race is such a crapshoot
that one of the Daytona 500
rookies, Danica Patrick, has
said she believes she's got as


good a chance to win the race
as anyone.
"I felt comfortable. I feel
more than ready for Sunday,"
said Patrick, who walked away
from a violent crash in Thurs-
day's qualifying race.
Her car is owned by Stewart,
the defending NASCAR cham-
pion who
goes into I feel
Sunday's sea-
son-opening fortable ...
Daytona 500
with a disap- ready for S
pointing 0-
for-13 record D
in "The Great Sprint Cup driver wl
American first-ev
Race." Stew-
art has been reminded every
day since arriving in Daytona
about his inability to win the
big race here.
"It's not a good feeling to not
have that tally in the win col-


u
a
he
ve


umn," Stewart said. "Every-
thing else we have pretty much
accomplished in this sport that
we want to accomplish. It's the
biggest race of the year. Every-
one wants to win that race. I
won't say that it is not a com-
plete career if you don't win it,
but there is a lot of priority on
this."
He has a
more com- tremendous
more than opportunity
once again.
nday. Stewart,
who closed
nica Patrick last season
D is competing in her with five vic-
r Daytona 500 race. stories in the
final 10 races
to win his third NASCAR title,
has given no indication he's
slowed down one bit during
over the offseason. He lost the

See Page B4


Crashing


the party

Buescher dodges

wreck to win

Daytona race

Associated Press
DAYTONA BEACH Only
six of 43 cars made it unscathed
to the finish line of the Nation-
wide Series opener at Daytona
International Speedway
James Buescher was not driv-
ing one of those clean cars.
Still, he managed to dodge
and weave his way through an
11-car accident on the last lap of
Saturday's race, stealing the vic-
tory and setting the stage for
what's expected to be a wild
Daytona 500.
Buescher joined unknown
John King, winner of Friday
night's Truck Series opener, as
surprise winners this weekend
at Daytona. Both came from
nowhere to win crash-marred
races. Elliott Sadler, runner-up
to Buescher on Saturday, said
Sunday's race will be much of
the same.
"It's the Daytona 500. It's a
once in a lifetime race to be in-
volved in and try to win, and I
think guys are going to go for it
when it's showtime," Sadler
said. "I think guys will be pa-
tient the first part of the race,
test their cars, just like you saw
today When it gets time to go,
crazy things happen."
Buescher was in 11th place as

See Page B3


Associated Press
James Buescher celebrates in
victory lane after winning the
Nationwide Series' Drive4COPD
300 auto race Saturday in
Daytona Beach.


,




-/,., .




Associated Press
Rory Mcllroy hits out of a bunker on the 13th fairway while playing Bae
Sang-moon during the Match Play Championship golf tournament Sat-
urday in Marana, Ariz.


McIlroy, Westwood set to meet


Either golfer will

become No. 1 with

Match Play title

Associated Press
MARANA, Ariz. -A dull day in
the desert ended with high antic-
ipation Saturday when Rory
Mcllroy and Lee Westwood won
their matches, setting up a semi-
final showdown in the Match Play
Championship.
At stake for the winner a
chance to go to No. 1 in the world.


McIlroy had another surge on
the back nine to put away Bae
Sang-moon of South Korean, 3
and 2. Moments later, Westwood
finished off Martin Laird of Scot-
land for a 3-and-2
victory to advance More gC
to the semifinals.
Either of them 0 PGA, LPGf
can replace Luke tight going
Donald at No. 1 day./Page
by winning this
World Golf
Championship.
"It definitely gives the match
an extra bit of spice," McIlroy
said.
Hunter Mahan played the
shortest quarterfinal match in the


if1
A
gi
B


14-year history of the event by
beating Matt Kuchar, 6 and 5. His
semifinal match will be against
Mark Wilson, gaining more re-
spect the deeper he goes in the
bracket. Wilson
f Scores had an easy time in
his 4-and-3 win
events over Peter Hanson
nto final of Sweden.
15 That assures an
American will
reach the championship match
for the first time since Tiger
Woods won in 2008.
The semifinal matches will be
played Sunday morning,
See Page B4













KU's furious comeback shocks Mizzou


Associated Press

LAWRENCE, Kan. Thomas
Robinson made a three-point play
in the closing seconds of regula-
tion, and Tyshawn Taylor's made
two free throws with 8.3 seconds
left in overtime for No. 4 Kansas
gave the Jayhawks an 87-86 victory
in the final scheduled regular-sea-
son matchup with No. 3 Missouri.
The Tigers, who blew a 19-point
second-half lead, never got a po-
tential winning shot off in the final
seconds. Michael Dixon was
boxed in by Robinson as he tried
to get to the basket, and the buzzer
eventually sounded on the 105-
year-old rivalry
Robinson finished with 28
points and 12 rebounds for Kansas
(24-5, 14-2), which wrapped up at
least a share of its eighth straight
Big 12 title. Taylor added 24
points, seven in overtime.
Marcus Denmon had 28 points
to lead Missouri (25-4, 12-4), which
heads off to the Southeastern Con-
ference next season. Ricardo
Ratliffe finished with 22 points,
Dixon had 17 and Kim English 11.
Robinson took a feed in the post
and backed down Dixon, getting
the leaner to go as he was under-
cut for the foul. His free throw
with 16.1 seconds left tied the
game at 75.
The Tigers had the final posses-
sion, clearing the lane for Phil
Pressey to drive to the rim. But
Robinson swatted his shot to force
overtime.
No. 1 Kentucky 83,
Vanderbilt 74
LEXINGTON, Ky. Freshman An-
thony Davis scored a career-high 28
points on 10-of-11 shooting, and No. 1
Kentucky beat Vanderbilt 83-74 on
Saturday to win the Southeastern
Conference regular season title for
the 45th time.
The Wildcats (28-1, 14-0) have
won 51 straight at home and are on a
20-game winning streak overall. But
Kentucky trailed at halftime and
needed a late surge to put away the
scrappy Commodores.
Davis, who had 11 rebounds and
five blocks, hit an 18-foot jumper as
the shot clock expired with 1:06 left.
Terrence Jones added a dunk, and
Davis blocked Lance Goulbourne's
shot with 31 seconds to go to put the
game away.
Jeffery Taylor scored 19 points for
Vanderbilt (20-9, 9-5), and John Jenk-
ins added 15 of his 18 points in the
second half.
No. 5 Duke 70,
Virginia Tech 65, OT
DURHAM, N.C. -Austin Rivers
scored 23 points and Seth Curry
added 19 for Duke.
Miles Plumlee added 15 rebounds
and two free throws with 9.6 seconds
left for the Blue Devils (25-4, 12-2),
who made 6 of 8 foul shots in the final
minute of overtime to win their sixth
straight and remain atop the Atlantic
Coast Conference standings.
Dorenzo Hudson, one of three play-
ers with 16 points for the Hokies (15-
14, 4-10), pulled them to 64-63 with a
deep jumper with 1:19 left in overtime.
Mason Plumlee's free throw with
51.1 seconds left made it a two-point
game, and he had a hand in Hudson's
face during his jumper that would
have tied it.
No. 6 Michigan State 62,
Nebraska 34
EAST LANSING, Mich. Dray-
mond Green had 20 points and 10 re-
bounds to help No. 6 Michigan State
beat Nebraska 62-34 for its seventh
straight victory.
Undefeated at home this season,
the Spartans (24-5, 13-3 Big Ten) lead
No. 8 Ohio State by 1 1/2 games and
No. 11 Michigan by two games in the


Associated Press
Missouri guard Michael Dixon holds his head while Kansas guard Travis Releford waves a towel in celebration Saturday in Lawrence, Kan. The
Jayhawks defeated the Tigers 87-86 in overtime after coming back from a 19-point second-half deficit.


conference race with three games left
in the regular season. The Buckeyes,
who close the regular season at Michi-
gan State, can pull back within a game
by beating Wisconsin at home Sunday.
The last-place Cornhuskers (12-15,
4-11) have lost five of six.
No. 7 UNC 54,
No. 25 Virginia 51
CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. Tyler
Zeller scored 20 points, including a
critical dunk with 13.3 seconds left and
the shot clock winding down, as North
Carolina swep5t the season series.
John Henson added 15 points, in-
cluding 11 in the second half, as the
Tar Heels (25-4, 12-2) kept pace with
No. 5 Duke for first place in the
Atlantic Coast Conference.
Jontel Evans had 13 points and Joe
Harris added 12 for Virginia (21-7, 8-
6), which played much of the game
with leading scorer and ACC player of
the year candidate Mike Scott in foul
trouble. Scott scored just six points,
more than 11 below his average, and
missed 10 of 13 shots.
Harrison Barnes had a poor shoot-
ing day for the Tar Heels, missing 12
of 15 shots. He scored seven points.
No. 9 Georgetown 67,
Villanova 46
WASHINGTON Freshman Otto
Porter had 15 points and six rebounds
in his second start of the season and
Jason Clark had 15 points and six re-
bounds for Georgetown.
The victory moves the Hoyas (21-6,
11-5) into sole possession of fourth
place in the Big East, one-half game
ahead of Cincinnati and South
Florida, who play Sunday. The top
four teams get a double-bye in the
conference tournament
Dominic Cheek scored 19 points to
lead the Wildcats (11-17, 4-12), who
have lost four straight. Maalik Wayns
returned for Villanova after missing
three games with a sprained left knee,
but he finished 1 for 10 from the field
and had three points.
Villanova remained without guard
James Bell, who missed his third


straight game with a sprained left ankle.
Purdue 75,
No. 11 Michigan 61
ANN ARBOR, Mich. Terone
Johnson scored a career-high 22
points and Robbie Hummel added 17
to help Purdue upset No. 11 Michigan
75-61, handing the Wolverines their
first home loss of the season.
Michigan (21-8, 11-5 Big Ten) en-
tered 15-0 at the Crisler Center but
couldn't finish off the third unbeaten
home season in school history. Trey
Burke and Zack Novak led the
Wolverines with 12 points each, while
Tim Hardaway Jr. had 10.
The Boilermakers (19-10, 9-7) won
for the fourth time in five games, im-
proving their postseason resume.
No. 13 Baylor 70,
Oklahoma 60
WACO, Texas Pierre Jackson
scored 18 points, including the
tiebreaking 3-pointer that started Bay-
lor's game-deciding spurt.
The game was tied for the 12th
time before Jackson's 3 put the
Bears (24-5, 11-5 Big 12) up 49-46
with 10:48 left. That started a 13-2
run that was capped by consecutive
3-pointers by Brady Heslip, who had
16 points.
Jackson and Heslip both had four 3-
pointers.
Quincy Miller had 12 points and
nine rebounds for the Bears, whose
11th Big 12 victory matched the most
in school history.
Steven Pledger had 21 points for
Oklahoma (14-14, 4-12), which led 34-
31 at halftime.
No. 14 Murray State 69,
Tennessee Tech 64
COOKEVILLE, Tenn. Isaiah
Canaan scored 18 points and No. 14
Murray State beat Tennessee Tech
69-64 to finish the season unde-
feated on the road for the first time in
school history.
The victory capped the best regular
season ever for the Racers (28-1, 15-
1 Ohio Valley Conference), who were


the last Division I team to lose this
season. The Racers are one of three
teams with only one loss.
Tennessee Tech (18-12, 9-7) didn't
make it easy. The Golden Eagles led
61-60 with 4:54 to play when Bassey
Inameti fouled Canaan with the Rac-
ers already in the double bonus.
Canaan hit both free throws to
launch a run of six straight foul shots.
TCU 83,
No. 18 New Mexico 64
FORT WORTH, Texas Amric
Fields scored eight consecutive points
for TCU in a 48-second span in their
tiebreaking run and the Horned Frogs
upset another ranked team at home,
beating No. 18 and Mountain West
leader New Mexico 83-64.
The Horned Frogs (17-11, 7-5) have
won eight consecutive home games,
the last two over Top 25 teams.
In their last home game 11 days
earlier, the Frogs beat then-No. 11
UNLV 102-97 in overtime. That was
their first win over a ranked team in
five years.
New Mexico (22-6, 8-4) has lost
both games since a seven-game win-
ning streak that had pushed to the top
of the Mountain West standings and
into the latest Top 25 poll.
Connell Crossland's one-handed
slam dunk over a defender put TCU
broke a 48-all tie with 13:26 left. It also
started a 10-0 run in which Fields
scored the rest of the points.
No. 19 Wichita St. 81,
Drake 58
WICHITA, Kan. Ben Smith
scored 18 points to lead Wichita State.
Garrett Stutz added 15 points and
Toure Murry chipped in 14 for Wichita
State (26-4, 16-2), which had already
clinched the Missouri Valley regular
season championship.
The Shockers avenged their only
loss, a 93-86 triple-overtime thriller at
Drake on Jan. 28, in their last 17
games.
Ben Simons scored 21 points, hit-
ting seven 3-pointers, to lead the Bull-
dogs (16-14, 9-9).


St. John's 61,
No. 20 Notre Dame 58
NEW YORK Moe Harkless had
22 points and nine rebounds to lead
St. John's to its first win over a ranked
team in 11 games this season.
D'Angelo Harrison added 15 points
for St. John's (13-16, 6-10 Big East),
while Amir Garrett had 11, including
the drive that gave the Red Storm a
61-58 lead with 8.9 seconds to play.
Scott Martin and Jack Cooley both
had 18 points for the Fighting Irish (20-
9, 12-4), who had won a program-
record nine straight conference
games. Alex Dragevich missed a 3-
point attempt at the buzzer for Notre
Dame, which shot a season-worst 4
for 31 from 3-point range (12.9 per-
cent). The Fighting Irish could have
moved into a tie for second place in
the Big East with No. 10 Marquette.
Cooley had 11 rebounds, his fifth
double-double in his last six games.
No. 21 UNLV 68,
Air Force 58
LAS VEGAS Chace Stanback
scored 21 points to lead UNLV.
Stanback scored 13 points in the
first half for UNLV (24-6, 8-4 Mountain
West), including his first three 3-point
attempts. He had eight rebounds and
finished 5 of 7 from 3-point range.
Michael Lyons scored 18 points and
Kyle Green added 17 for Air Force
(13-13, 3-9), which missed 11 of its
first 13 shots and scored four points in
the game's first 10 minutes.
Air Force had an 8-0 run with just
over 8 minutes left in the first half, but
the Rebels responded with a 17-3 run
to go up by 20 points.
Saint Joseph's 82,
No. 22 Temple 72
PHILADELPHIA- Langston Gal-
loway scored 22 points while Carl
Jones and Ronald Roberts each
added 18 to lead Saint Joseph's to an
82-72 victory over No. 22 Temple.
Halil Kanacevic added 14 points
and 12 rebounds for the Hawks (19-
11, 9-6 Atlantic 10), who snapped the
Owls' 11-game winning streak.


No. 3 Notre Dame withstands USF's upset bid


No. 2 Stanford

rolls over Utah

Associated Press

SOUTH BEND, Ind. -
Natalie Novosel scored a
career-high 32 points, Dev-
ereaux Peters added 17
points and a career-high 18
rebounds, and No. 3 Notre
Dame withstood an upset
bid by South Florida to beat
the Bulls 80-68 on Saturday
and clinch a tie for the Big
East regular-season title.
Skylar Diggins had 18
points for the Irish (27-2, 14-
1), who set a school regular-
season mark with their 27th
victory But this one was not
easy against the scrappy
Bulls (15-14, 7-8), who got 18
points apiece from Inga
Orekhova and Jasmine
Wynne.


No. 2 Stanford 69,
Utah 42
STANFORD, Calif. Chiney
Ogwumike scored 16 points
and had 12 rebounds, older sis-
ter Nnemkadi Ogwumike added
15 points and five blocks and
Stanford beat Utah 69-42 on
Saturday, giving coach Tara
Vanderveer her 700th career
victory with the Cardinal.
The Hall of Fame coach is
fifth on the all-time coaching list
with 852 wins.
Joslyn Tinkle had 12 points
and nine rebounds for Stanford,
which won its 78th straight game
at Maples Pavilion. The Cardinal
(26-1, 17-0 Pac-12) led the en-
tire way and ran their conference
winning streak to 74 despite
going just 2 of 12 on 3-pointers.
No. 4 Connecticut 85,
Marquette 45
MILWAUKEE Kaleena
Mosqueda-Lewis scored a ca-


reer-high 27 points to lead
fourth-ranked Connecticut to an
easy victory over Marquette.
The Huskies (26-3, 13-2 Big
East) have won all seven meet-
ings against Marquette and will
face No. 3 Notre Dame on
Monday night to try and earn a
share of the conference regular
season title.
No. 12 Green Bay 78,
Butler 53
GREEN BAY, Wis. Julie
Wojta had 27 points and 13 re-
bounds to help Green Bay earn
its 14th straight Horizon League
regular season title with a vic-
tory over Butler.
Green Bay (25-1, 15-1), play-
ing its final home game of the
regular season, also got 13
points from Lydia Bauer and 10
from Adrian Ritchie.
No. 15 Georgetown 65,
Syracuse 62
SYRACUSE, N.Y. Sugar


Rodgers scored 21 points, in-
cluding a three-point play in the
game's last minute, and
Georgetown used a 5-0 run in
the final 39 seconds to sink
Syracuse.
The Orange held the lead for
most of the second half, going
up 62-60 on lasia Hemingway's
jumper with 1:03 to play. But
after a Georgetown (22-6, 11-4
Big East) timeout, Rodgers, the
Big East's leading scorer com-
ing in at 19.3 per game, was
fouled on the game-tying bas-
ket and sank the foul shot for a
one-point lead.
No. 16 Louisville 75,
No. 21 DePaul 62
LOUISVILLE, Ky. Becky
Burke scored 20 points and
Louisville defeated DePaul to
earn a split in the season series.
Louisville used a 12-2 run
that spanned the final minute of
the first half and the first four
minutes of the second to build a


43-31 lead after a free throw by
Shoni Schimmel with 16:12 to
play. The Cardinals led by 13
twice and were never threat-
ened the rest of the way.
Schimmel added 18 points,
Bria Smith had 10 and
Shawnta' Dyer finished with 12
points and 11 rebounds for the
Cardinals (20-8, 9-6 Big East).
No. 19 St. Bonaven. 58,
Rhode Island 32
KINGSTON, R.I. Megan
Van Tatenhove scored 17 points
and St. Bonaventure defeated
Rhode Island for its 16th straight
win, becoming just the seventh
team in Atlantic 10 Conference
history to make a perfect run
through league play while earn-
ing its first regular-season title.
In a game featuring the only
undefeated team in the A-10 vs.
the only winless team in the
conference, the Bonnies (27-2,
14-0) held the Rams (1-28, 0-
14) to a season-low point total.


No. 20 St. John's 69,
Villanova 49
NEW YORK- Da'Shena
Stevens scored 21 points and St.
John's won its seventh consecu-
tive game, defeating Villanova.
Eugeneia McPherson scored
11 of her 13 points in the first
half for the Red Storm (20-8,
12-3 Big East), who shot 51.9
percent (14 of 27) to take a 36-
26 lead at the break.
No. 24 Rutgers 68,
Providence 47
PROVIDENCE, R.I. Khadi-
jah Rushdan scored 21 points to
lead Rutgers past Providence,
extending the Scarlet Knights'
winning streak against the Friars
to 19 straight games.
The Scarlet Knights (20-8, 9-
6 Big East) were never really
threatened in this one, leading
by 16 points at the break and
outscoring the Friars 31-26 in
the second half to seal it.


B2 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012


SPORTS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Lightning blitzed

Associated Press


PITTSBURGH Evgeni
Malkin had his ninth career
hat trick, Jordan Staal
added two goals and the
Pittsburgh Penguins won
for the fifth time in seven
games by routing the
Tampa Bay Lightning 8-1
on Saturday
Chris Kunitz, Matt Cooke
and Pascal Dupuis also
scored and Marc-Andre
Fleury made 34 saves for
Pittsburgh, which has won
eight of nine home games
and leapfrogged the New
Jersey Devils in the
crowded middle of the
Eastern Conference play-
off-race pack.
Malkin added an assist,
taking over the NHL scor-
ing lead with Tampa Bay's
Steven Stamkos, who had
tied him with 11 points in
his previous four games.
Stamkos was held scoreless.
Bruins 5, Senators 3
OTTAWA-- Patrice Berg-
eron had two goals and an as-
sist to lead the Boston Bruins
past the Ottawa Senators 5-3.
David Krejci, Carter Camper
and Brad Marchand had the
other goals for Boston (37-20-
3), which moved five points
ahead of the Senators in the
Northeast Division with three
games in hand.
Tim Thomas stopped 27
shots to extend his unbeaten
streak at Scotiabank Place to
nine games.
Avs 4, Red Wings 3
DETROIT Just like that,
the Detroit Red Wings have a
losing streak at home.
After winning 23 straight at
Joe Louis Arena, the Red Wings
have now lost two in a row on
home ice, falling 4-3 to the Col-
orado Avalanche. The Red
Wings hadn't been beaten in
regulation in Detroit since Nov.
3. Their winning streak was
snapped Thursday night with a
shootout loss to Vancouver.
Gabriel Landeskog had two
goals, and Steve Downie
added a goal and two assists
for the Avalanche, who handed



PARTY
Continued from Page B1

he rounded the final turn
and made his way through a
massive pack of spinning
race cars.
"They all piled up in front
of me, and we made it
through," Buescher said.
"It's hard to describe the
feeling when you make it
through the wreck and
you're the only guy You
don't see anybody in front of
you coming to the check-
ered flag. It's pretty
incredible."
It was a mess behind him.
The accident, the third
multi-car wreck in the wan-
ing laps, appeared to start
as the tandem of Tony Stew-
art and Sadler charged to
the top of the track to make
a three-wide pack among
the leaders. Kurt Busch was
leading on the bottom of the
track with younger brother,
Kyle, pushing, and Kurt
Busch seemed to start slid-
ing up the surface in an at-
tempt to block the huge run
on the outside.
Joey Logano was being
pushed through the middle
by defending Daytona 500
winner Trevor Bayne, and
all four cars drifted higher
into Stewart, winner of the
last four Nationwide open-
ers here, who was pinched
into the wall. That triggered
a chain-reaction crash that
had many worried about
the safety of the drivers
involved.
"We got a big run on the
outside, and all of a sudden
the door got slammed on
us," said Stewart,
NASCAR's defending
Sprint Cup champion. "I
don't know why whoever it
was turned right, but it was-
n't a very good time to ei-
ther try blocking or
moving."
Kurt Busch admitted he
tried to "crowd the outside
lane."
"Didn't know that there


were two cars up there. I
thought it was just a single
lane," he said. "I was trying
to side draft to get the best
finish I could at the end.
Everybody was racing to the
end. Man, a lot of tore-up
cars. That's just everybody
full throttle at the end."
There was initial concern


Associated Press
Tampa Bay Lightning's Brendan Mikkelson fights with Pittsburgh Penguins' Joe Vitale
during the second period Saturday in Pittsburgh. The Penguins won 8-1.


the Red Wings their third con-
secutive loss overall. Ryan
O'Reilly had three assists, and
Jean-Sebastien Giguere made
28 saves.
Caps 4, Maple Leafs 2
TORONTO -Alexander
Semin and Jeff Halpern
scored, and Alex Ovechkin
picked up a pair of assists to
lead the Washington Capitals
to a 4-2 win over the Toronto
Maple Leafs.
Marcus Johansson and
Keith Aucoin also scored for
the Capitals, who carried a 4-0
lead into the final period.
Michael Neuvirth had 28 saves
for Washington.
Colby Armstrong and Tim
Connolly scored third-period
goals as Toronto lost its fourth
straight overall and fourth in a
row on home ice earning
plenty of boos from the Air
Canada Centre crowd.
Rangers 3,
Sabres 2, OT
NEW YORK- Ryan Calla-
han scored his 100th NHL goal
2:59 into overtime, and the
New York Rangers snapped a
rare losing streak with a 3-2
victory over the Buffalo Sabres.
Callahan took a pass from


for his younger brother,
Kyle, who appeared to clear
the wreck but was hooked
by defending Nationwide
champion Ricky Stenhouse
Jr. The contact sent Kyle
Busch straight into the wall.
"I don't even know where
to start. I don't even know
what happened," Kyle
Busch said. "I thought we
had the race won. Then
those guys were coming on
the top, and I thought, 'We'll
see where we settled in
here.' When they all
crashed up high, I was
clear. I shot as low as I
could, and somebody
tagged me in the back and
hooked me dead right. It
was a really, really hard hit,
and there were a few more
after that. It seemed like


defenseman Ryan McDonagh
and broke in alone. He flipped
a shot over goalie Ryan
Miller's shoulder for his career-
best 24th goal of the season.
New York was 0-1-1 in its pre-
vious two games, its first losing
streak since mid-December.
The Rangers got tying goals
from Carl Hagelin in the sec-
ond period, and Marian Ga-
borik in the third. New York
(39-15-6) has an Eastern Con-
ference-leading 84 points -
seven more than Boston.
Panthers 3,
Hurricanes 2, SO
RALEIGH, N.C. Stephen
Weiss scored the winning goal
in the third round of the
shootout, lifting the Florida Pan-
thers to a 3-2 comeback win
over the Carolina Hurricanes.
Wojtek Wolski, obtained in a
trade from the New York
Rangers earlier Saturday,
scored the tying goal for
Florida with 1:47 left in the
third period after Tomas Fleis-
chmann cut the Panthers'
deficit to 2-1 at 13:58.
Justin Faulk and Jussi Joki-
nen scored in regulation for Car-
olina, which has dropped two
consecutive games in
shootouts. The Hurricanes are


they kept coming.
"I swore when they all
went up high I was the
leader for a second, and I'm
like, "I won this thing. I won
this thing."'
But it was Buescher, who
went low so low he
crossed the yellow out-of-
bounds line, but NASCAR
said it's allowed when
avoiding an accident to
skirt the cars and take the
checkered flag. Buescher's
win was his first in
NASCAR and came a day
after King's victory in his
eighth career start.
Buescher, driver for
Turner Motorsports, was
listed in two of the eight
caution periods, and said
he was just trying to get a
top-10 finish at the end.


0-6 in the tiebreaker this season.
Faulk has three goals, all on the
power play, in five games.
Coyotes 3, Oilers 1
EDMONTON, Alberta -
Mike Smith stopped 21 shots
for his 10th straight victory and
the streaking Phoenix Coyotes
beat the Edmonton Oilers 3-1 to
move into sole possession of
first place in the Pacific Division.
Oliver Ekman-Larsson, Ray
Whitney and Shane Doan
scored for the Coyotes, who
won their fifth straight to jump
two points ahead of San Jose.
Martin Hanzal added two
assists as Phoenix improved to
10-0-1 in February.
Blues 3, Jets 2, SO
WINNIPEG, Manitoba -
David Perron scored the win-
ning goal in the shootout to lift
the St. Louis Blues to a 3-2 vic-
tory over the Winnipeg Jets.
Perron moved in on Chris
Mason in the fourth round and
roofed a backhander, ruining the
Jets' rally from a two-goal deficit.
Perron and David Backes
scored in regulation for St.
Louis, which led 2-0 after the
opening period despite get-
ting outshot 16-6. Jaroslav
Halak made 39 saves to pick
up the win.


Associated Press
Atlanta Braves pitcher Brandon Beachy throws during spring
training Thursday in Lake Buena Vista.


Braves hoping


Beachy, Minor


make their pitch


Associated Press
KISSIMMEE For more
than two decades, the Atlanta
Braves relied on their rota-
tion to become a contender
From Tom Glavine and
Greg Maddux and John
Smoltz, all the way to Tim
Hudson and Tommy Hanson,
starting pitching has been
the team's one constant
But things change and the
Braves are finding that out
this spring. Entering open-
ing day, they have three
spots available in the rota-
tion, something unheard of
in Atlanta for years.
Hanson and Jair Jurrjens
are locked in as the top two
starters. After that, it's more
uncertain until Hudson re-
turns early in the season after
recovering from back surgery.
Brandon Beachy is likely
set in the No. 3 spot for now,
with Mike Minor the probable
fourth starter. Beyond them,
the final spot is up for grabs.
"There's a lot of competi-
tion," manager Fredi Gonza-
lez said
Beachy made the team in
spring training last year and
started 25 games. Minor also
earned a spot in camp, but he
struggled with his changeup
and with his confidence.
Minor eventually lost out


to Beachy for the final spot
in the rotation, then was hit
hard before getting sent to
Triple-A. He spent much of
the summer in the minors,
and later made it back to At-
lanta, where he went 3-2 in
eight starts.
Minor said he came to
spring training with a new
outlook.
"I am ready to stay up
here," Minor said Saturday
"I've been working on my
pitches and just want to stay
up here this year. I really
don't want to go back down
there again."
Minor had a 2.82 ERA in
22 Triple-A starts. His out
pitch is his changeup, and
that's the pitch that got ham-
mered last year
"If I can control my
changeup there's no reason
I can't pitch in the big
leagues," he said. "I had a
rough year last year, but I
hope they don't judge me by
that. All I want is a spot on
the team."
Gonzalez is just trying to
get the staff through April
until Hudson comes back.
If Minor gets the No. 4 spot,
it should come down to
Randall Delgado, Ardors
Vizcaino, Julio Teheran
and Kris Medlin for the
final spot.


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B4 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012



Sprint Cup
Daytona 500 Lineup
After Thursday qualifying; race Sunday
At Daytona International Speedway
Daytona Beach
Lap length: 2.5 miles
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 194.738.
2. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 194.087.
3. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 193.607.
4. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 193.245.
5. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 194.028.
6. (78) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 191.063.
7. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 193.999.
8. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 193.449.
9. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 192.777.
10. (33) Elliott Sadler, Chevrolet, 191.27.
11. (98) Michael McDowell, Ford, 190.99.
12. (20) Joey Logano, Toyota, 192.868.
13. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 192.914.
14. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 191.873.
15. (22) A J Allmendinger, Dodge, 193.121.
16. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 193.803.
17. (7) Robby Gordon, Dodge, 188.229.
18. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 193.224.
19. (1) Jamie McMurray Chevrolet, 191.84.
20. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 192.583.
21. (6) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 193.665.
22. (55) Mark Martin, Toyota, 193.503.
23. (2) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 192.992.
24. (36) Dave Blaney Chevrolet, 191.506.
25. (34) David Ragan, Ford, 193.249.
26. (56) Martin TruexJr., Toyota, 193.665.
27. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 193.382.
28. (51) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 191.363.
29. (10) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 191.738.
30. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota.
31. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 191.127.
32. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 190.022.
33. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 190.046.
34. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 191.16.
35. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 192.6.
36. (13) Casey Mears, Ford, 193.844.
37. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 193.374.
38. (93) David Reutimann, Toyota, 189.235.
39. (83) Landon Cassill, Toyota, 190.605.
40. (21) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 193.615.
41. (26) Tony Raines, Ford, 192.534.
42. (30) David Stremme, Toyota, 191.963.
43. (32) Terry Labonte, Ford, Past Champion.
Failed to Qualify
44. (40) Michael Waltrip, Toyota, 191.18.
45. (23) Robert Richardson Jr., Toyota, 188.438.
46. (97) Bill Elliott, Toyota, 189.95.
47. (37) Mike Wallace, Ford, 189.853.
48. (09) Kenny Wallace, Toyota, 191.567.
49. (49) J.J. Yeley, Toyota, 187.954.

Nationwide Series
Ddve4COPD 300 Results
Saturday
At Daytona International Speedway
Daytona Beach
Lap length: 2.5 miles
(Start position in parentheses)
1. (15) James Buescher, Chevrolet, 120 laps,
94 rating, 0 points, $114,288.
2. (9) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 120, 109.5, 0,
$81,385.
3. (3) Elliott Sadler, Chevrolet, 120, 105.7, 42,
$79,228.
4. (8) Cole Whitt, Chevrolet, 120, 81.6, 40,
$71,903.
5. (5) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 120, 88.7, 39,
$65,388.
6. (25) Tayler Malsam, Toyota, 120, 58.4, 38,
$59,513.
7. (29) Timmy Hill, Ford, 120, 63.9, 0, $50,770.
8. (7) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 120, 115.6, 0,
$49,695.
9. (11) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 120, 110.7, 0,
$48,445.
10. (14) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 120, 124.9, 0,
$51,770.
11. (2) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 120, 87.7, 34,
$53,113.
12. (33) Benny Gordon, Toyota, 120, 59.1, 32,
$46,020.
13. (41) Danny Efland, Chevrolet, 120, 49.1,31,
$52,013.
14. (37) Josh Wise, Chevrolet, 120, 64.7, 0,
$45,220.
15. (4) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 120,
110.5, 0, $45,770.
16. (22) Joey Logano, Toyota, 120, 97.9, 0,
$44,845.
17. (31) Blake Koch, Ford, 120, 50.4, 27,
$50,838.
18. (24) Kyle Busch, Toyota, accident, 119, 73.7,
0, $44,445.
19. (10) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, accident,
119, 82.4, 25, $51,588.
20. (6) Sam Hornish Jr., Dodge, 119, 94.9, 25,
$50,963.
21. (21) Johanna Long, Chevrolet, 119, 47.9,
23, $50,513.
22. (20) Eric McClure, Toyota, 118, 64.2, 22,
$50,213.
23. (27) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, accident, 116,
88.6, 22, $50,038.
24. (39)T.J. Bell, Chevrolet, accident, 115, 37.5,
20, $49,913.
25. (36) Jeremy Clements, Chevrolet, 115, 61.4,
19, $50,238.
26. (23) David Ragan, Ford, accident, 113, 50.6,
0, $43,170.
27. (16) Michael Annett, Ford, accident, 113, 77,
17, $49,538.
28. (28) Mike Wallace, Chevrolet, 112, 84.7, 16,
$49,463.
29. (35) Joey Gase, Ford, 108, 38.9, 15,
$49,363.
30. (26) Kenny Wallace, Toyota, accident, 104,
71.8, 15, $49,538.
31. (18) Ryan Truex, Chevrolet, accident, 104,
58.8, 13, $42,595.
32. (17) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, accident, 103,
77.8, 0, $42,520.
33. (12) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, accident,
103, 55.3, 11, $48,938.
34. (42) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, accident,
103, 48.2, 10, $48,888.
35. (34) Robert Richardson Jr., Chevrolet, ac-
cident, 103, 57.2, 10, $48,728.
36. (32) Casey Roderick, Ford, accident, 103,
45.8, 8, $42,185.
37. (19) Brian Scott, Toyota, 96, 58.5, 7,
$48,588.
38. (1) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 72, 69.5, 7,
$52,427.
39. (13) Mike Bliss, Toyota, accident, 59, 67, 6,
$40,960.
40. (38) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, engine, 43, 27, 0,
$40,910.
41. (40) Jason Bowles, Dodge, engine, 28, 35.4,
3, $47,333.
42. (30) Johnny Sauter, Toyota, electrical, 14,
26.9, 0, $40,810.
43. (43) Jeff Green, Toyota, vibration, 3, 25.8,
1, $40,721.
Race Statistics
Average Speed of Race Winner: 129.636mph.


Time of Race: 2 hours, 18 minutes, 51 seconds.
Margin of Victory: Under Caution.
Caution Flags: 8 for 35 laps.
Lead Changes: 38 among 16 drivers.
Lap Leaders: D.Patrick 1-2; TBayne 3; E.Sadler
4; T.Stewart 5-8; K.Kahne 9-12; D.Hamlin 13;
T.Bayne 14-15; S.Hornish Jr. 16-20; M.Bliss 21 -
25; D.Earnhardt Jr.26; M.Bliss 27; Ku.Busch 28-
29; D.Earnhardt Jr. 30-32; Ku.Busch 33-36;
T.Stewart 37-43; Ku.Busch 44-48; D.Earnhardt
Jr. 49-50; D.Hamlin 51-53; Ku.Busch 54-64;
E.Sadler 65-66; D.Earnhardt Jr. 67; E.Sadler 68-
72; Ky.Busch 73; Ku.Busch 74-76; R.Richard-
son Jr. 77; J.Nemechek 78-79; S.Hornish Jr.
80-81; Ku.Busch 82; T.Stewart 83-88; Ky.Busch
89; D.Hamlin 90; D.Earnhardt Jr. 91; T.Stewart
92-94; THill 95-98; K.Wallace 99; D.Hamlin 100-
101; T.Stewart 102-103; Ku.Busch 104-119;
J.Buescher 120.
Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps
Led): Ku.Busch, 7 times for 42 laps; T.Stewart,
5 times for 22 laps; E.Sadler, times for 8 laps;
D.Earnhardt Jr., 5 times for 8 laps; S.Hornish
Jr., 2 times for 7 laps; D.Hamlin, 4 times for 7
laps; M.Bliss, 2 timesfor6 laps;T.Hill, 1 time for


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FaOr the record


== lorida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Saturday in the Florida Lottery:
S.. CASH 3 (early)
... ... 3-5-1
CASH 3 (late)
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PLAY 4 (late)
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TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
12 p.m. (FOX) NASCAR Racing Sprint Cup: Daytona 500
BASKETBALL
COLLEGE MEN
12 p.m. (ABC) Cincinnati at South Florida
1 p.m. (ESPN) Indiana at Minnesota
2 p.m. (CBS) Pittsburgh at Louisville
4 p.m. (CBS) Wisconsin at Ohio State
5:30 p.m. (SUN) California at Colorado
7:30 p.m. (SUN) Oregon at Oregon State
COLLEGE WOMEN
1 p.m. (FSNFL) Central Florida at Houston
3 p.m. (ESPN2) Duke at North Carolina
4 p.m. (SUN) Mississippi atAuburn
5 p.m. (ESPN2) LSU at Georgia
NBA
7:30 p.m. (TNT) 2012 All-Star Game
BICYCLING
5 p.m. (NBCSPT) Cycling Tour of Oman (Taped)
BOWLING
3 p.m. (ESPN) PBA U.S. Open
GOLF
9 a.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: WGC Accenture Match Play
Championship
1:30 p.m. (GOLF) LPGA Tour: HSBC Women's Champions
(Same-day Tape)
2 p.m. (NBC) PGA Tour: WGC Accenture Match Play
Championship
7 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: Mayakoba Classic
(Same-day Tape)
HOCKEY
1 p.m. (SUN) Tampa Bay Lightning at New Jersey Devils
5 p.m. (FSNFL) Montreal Canadiens at Florida Panthers
7 p.m. (NBCSPT) Chicago Blackhawks at Anaheim Ducks
TRACKAND FIELD
7:30 p.m. (ESPN) U.S. Indoor Championships (Taped)
WINTER SPORTS
3 p.m. (NBCSPT) Snowboarding Sprint U.S. Grand Prix-
SBX (Taped)
4 p.m. (NBCSPT) Skiing Sprint U.S. Grand Prix Skicross
(Taped)

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


4 laps; K.Kahne, 1 time for 4 laps; T.Bayne, 2
times for 3 laps; Ky.Busch, 2 times for 2 laps;
J.Nemechek, 1 time for 2 laps; D.Patrick, 1 time
for 2 laps; J.Buescher, 1 time for 1 lap; K.Wal-
lace, 1 time for 1 lap; R.Richardson Jr., 1 time
for 1 lap.
Top 10 in Points: 1. E.Sadler, 42; 2. C.Whitt, 40;
3. A.Dillon, 39; 4.T.Malsam, 38; 5. T.Bayne, 34;
6. B.Gordon, 32; 7. D.Efland, 31; 8. B.Koch, 27;
9. R.Stenhouse Jr., 25; 10. S.Hornish Jr., 25.
NASCAR Driver Rating Formula
A maximum of 150 points can be attained in a
race.
The formula combines the following categories:
Wins, Finishes, Top-15 Finishes, Average Run-
ning Position While on Lead Lap, Average
Speed Under Green, Fastest Lap, Led Most
Laps, Lead-Lap Finish.



NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE


Philadelp
New York
Boston
Toronto
New Jers

Miami
Orlando
Atlanta
Washing
Charlotte

Chicago
Indiana
Clevelan
Milwauke
Detroit


San Anto
Dallas
Houston
Memphis
New Orle


Atlantic Division
W L Pct
phia 20 14 .588
17 18 .486
15 17 .469
10 23 .303
sey 10 25 .286
Southeast Division
W L Pct
27 7 .794
22 13 .629
20 14 .588
Iton 7 26 .212
e 4 28 .125
Central Division
W L Pct
27 8 .771
21 12 .636
d 13 18 .419
ee 13 20 .394
11 24 .314
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct
onio 24 10 .706
21 13 .618
20 14 .588
s 19 15 .559
means 8 25 .242
Northwest Division


W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 27 7 .794 -
Portland 18 16 .529 9
Denver 18 17 .514 912
Minnesota 17 17 .500 10
Utah 15 17 .469 11
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 20 11 .645 -
L.A. Lakers 20 14 .588 11Y2
Golden State 13 17 .433 612
Phoenix 14 20 .412 712
Sacramento 11 22 .333 10
Friday's Games
No games scheduled
Saturday's Games
No games scheduled
Saturday Men's College
Basketball Scores
EAST
American U. 76, Lafayette 69
Boston U. 64, Hartford 55
Brown 94, Columbia 78
Bucknell 64, Navy 55
Buffalo 84, Miami (Ohio) 74
CCSU 78, Wagner 61
Delaware 82, Northeastern 72
Fairleigh Dickinson 45, St. Francis (NY) 44
Fordham 67, La Salle 62


George Washington 56, Duquesne 51
Georgetown 67, Villanova 46
Hofstra 93, UNC Wilmington 64
Holy Cross 65, Colgate 58
Lehigh 74, Army 72, OT
Monmouth (NJ) 106, LIU 78
Mount St. Mary's 71, Bryant 62
NJIT 94, Longwood 51
Penn 55, Harvard 54
Princeton 85, Dartmouth 61
Quinnipiac 73, Robert Morris 69
Rhode Island 64, Saint Louis 62
Rutgers 77, Seton Hall 72, OT
Sacred Heart 72, St. Francis (Pa.) 57
Saint Joseph's 82, Temple 72
St. John's 61, Notre Dame 58
Vermont 80, UMBC 49
Yale 71, Cornell 40
SOUTH
Alabama 67, Mississippi St. 50
Alcorn St. 60, Southern U. 40
Ark.-Pine Bluff 46, Jackson St. 44
Arkansas 77, Auburn 71
Belmont 62, Mercer 61
Charleston Southern 65, Radford 59
Chattanooga 86, Samford 78
Clemson 72, NC State 69, OT
Coastal Carolina 81, VMI 64
Coll. of Charleston 55, The Citadel 47
Davidson 71, Georgia Southern 54
Delaware St. 63, Howard 46
Drexel 73, Old Dominion 72
Duke 70, Virginia Tech 65, OT
E. Kentucky 86, E. Illinois 74
ETSU 84, Florida Gulf Coast 71
Elon 93, UNC Greensboro 79
Georgia 76, Florida 62
Georgia St. 64, William & Mary 60
Georgia Tech 63, Maryland 61
Hampton 74, Florida A&M 59
James Madison 65, Towson 59
Kentucky 83, Vanderbilt 74
Liberty 49, Campbell 41
Lipscomb 74, Kennesaw St. 71
Louisiana Tech 84, Hawaii 67
MVSU 79, Grambling St. 60
Md.-Eastern Shore 58, Morgan St. 57
Memphis 87, Marshall 67
Mississippi 72, LSU 48
Morehead St. 76, SIU-Edwardsville 61
NC A&T 79, SC State 75
Nicholls St. 78, McNeese St. 75
Norfolk St. 75, Bethune-Cookman 72
North Carolina 54, Virginia 51
Presbyterian 68, Gardner-Webb 62
SC-Upstate 90, Stetson 72
Savannah St. 60, NC Central 47
St. Bonaventure 72, Charlotte 56
Troy 83, FAU 82
UAB 61, East Carolina 57
UCF 63, UTEP 45
UNC Asheville 67, Winthrop 55
VCU 89, George Mason 77
W. Carolina 83, Appalachian St. 75
W. Kentucky 73, Middle Tennessee 67
Wake Forest 85, Boston College 56
Wofford 67, Furman 52
MIDWEST
Bowling Green 74, Kent St. 58
Cleveland St. 77, Wright St. 55
Creighton 61, Indiana St. 60
Dayton 76, UMass 43
Detroit 76, Youngstown St. 74
E. Michigan 61, Ball St. 50
Evansville 75, Missouri St. 70, OT
Green Bay 71, Ill.-Chicago 63
Illinois St. 54, Bradley 53
Iowa St. 65, Kansas St. 61
Kansas 87, Missouri 86, OT
Michigan St. 62, Nebraska 34
Milwaukee 78, Loyola of Chicago 69
N. Iowa 65, S. Illinois 61
North Dakota 66, Houston Baptist 62
Providence 73, DePaul 71
Purdue 75, Michigan 61


Toledo 83, W. Michigan 74
Urbana 59, Chicago St. 55
Wichita St. 81, Drake 58
SOUTHWEST
Baylor 70, Oklahoma 60
Cent. Arkansas 64, SE Louisiana 63
Lamar 72, Sam Houston St. 49
Oklahoma St. 60, Texas A&M 42
Prairie View 60, Alabama A&M 52
Stephen F Austin 74, Texas A&M-CC 41
TCU 83, New Mexico 64
Texas 71, Texas Tech 67, OT
Texas Southern 67, Alabama St. 59
Texas St. 66, UTSA 52
FAR WEST
Arizona 65, UCLA 63
Arizona St. 56, Southern Cal 52
BYU 76, Portland 66
Gonzaga 65, San Diego 57
Long Beach St. 64, UC Riverside 40
UNLV 68, Air Force 58
Wyoming 64, Boise St. 54
NBA All-Star
Saturday Results
Saturday
At Orlando, Fla.
SKILLS CHALLENGE
First Round
Deron Williams, New Jersey, 28.3
Tony Parker, San Antonio, 29.2
Rajon Rondo, Boston, 32.8
John Wall, Washington, 32.8
Russell Westbrook, Oklahoma City, 33.8
Kyrie Irving, Cleveland, 42.2
Tie Breaker
Rajon Rondo, Boston, 27.5
John Wall, Washington, 45.4
Finals
Tony Parker, San Antonio, 32.8
Rajon Rondo, Boston, 34.6
Deron Williams, New Jersey, 41.4
Previous Winners
2012 -Tony Parker, San Antonio
2011 Stephen Curry Golden State
2010 Steve Nash, Phoenix
2009 Derrick Rose, Chicago
2008 Deron Williams, Utah
2007 Dwyane Wade, Miami
2006 Dwyane Wade, Miami
2005 Steve Nash, Phoenix
2004 Baron Davis, New Orleans
2003- Jason Kidd, New Jersey
THREE-POINT CHALLENGE
First Round
James Jones, Miami, 22
Kevin Durant, Oklahoma City 20
Kevin Love, Minnesota, 18
Mario Chalmers, Miami, 18
Ryan Anderson, Orlando, 17
Anthony Morrow, New Jersey 14
Tie Breaker
Kevin Love, Minnesota, 5
Mario Chalmers, Miami, 4
Finals
Kevin Durant, Oklahoma City 16
Kevin Love, Minnesota, 16
James Jones, Miami, 12
Final Shootoff
Kevin Love, Minnesota, 17
Kevin Durant, Oklahoma City 14
Previous Winners
2012-Kevin Love
2011-James Jones, Miami
2010-Paul Pierce, Boston
2009-Daequan Cook, Miami
2008-Jason Kapono, Toronto
2007-Jason Kapono, Miami
2006-Dirk Nowitzki, Dallas
2005-Quentin Richardson, Phoenix
2004-Voshon Lenard, Denver
2003-Peja Stojakovic, Sacramento
2002-Peja Stojakovic, Sacramento
2001-Ray Allen, Milwaukee
2000-Jeff Hornacek, Utah
1999-No contest
1998-Jeff Hornacek, Utah
1997-Steve Kerr, Chicago
1996-Tim Legler, Washington
1995-Glen Rice, Miami
1994-Mark Price, Cleveland
1993-Mark Price, Cleveland
1992-Craig Hodges, Chicago
1991-Craig Hodges, Chicago
1990-Craig Hodges, Chicago
1989-Dale Ellis, Seattle
1988-Larry Bird, Boston
1987-Larry Bird, Boston
1986-Larry Bird, Boston



NHL standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W LOT PtsGF GA
N.Y. Rangers 60 3915 6 84167 124
Pittsburgh 61 3521 5 75194 161
New Jersey 60 3521 4 74169 164
Philadelphia 60 3320 7 73198 183
N.Y. Islanders 61 2627 8 60144 179
Northeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Boston 60 3720 3 77200 139
Ottawa 63 3223 8 72193 190
Toronto 62 2926 7 65184 190
Buffalo 62 2727 8 62154 180
Montreal 62 2428 10 58161 171
Southeast Division
GP W LOT PtsGF GA
Florida 60 2820 12 68149 167
Winnipeg 64 3026 8 68163 181
Washington 62 31 26 5 67169 176
Tampa Bay 61 2728 6 60170 209
Carolina 62 2326 13 59162 187
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W LOT PtsGF GA
Detroit 63 41 19 3 85197 149
St. Louis 62 3817 7 83158 125
Nashville 62 3619 7 79176 160
Chicago 63 3323 7 73192 186
Columbus 61 1836 7 43142 203
Northwest Division
GP W LOT PtsGF GA
Vancouver 62 4016 6 86201 151
Colorado 63 3227 4 68164 172
Calgary 61 2823 10 66146 165
Minnesota 61 2725 9 63135 160
Edmonton 61 2431 6 54162 181
Pacific Division
GP W LOT PtsGF GA
Phoenix 62 3221 9 73164 155
San Jose 60 3221 7 71174 155
Dallas 62 3226 4 68162 169
LosAngeles 62 2822 12 68133 135
Anaheim 61 2625 10 62157 173
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over-
time loss.
Friday's Games
N.Y. Islanders 4, N.Y Rangers 3, SO
Buffalo 2, Boston 1, SO
Vancouver 2, New Jersey 1
Washington 4, Montreal 1
Colorado 5, Columbus 0
Dallas 4, Minnesota 1
Saturday's Games
St. Louis 3, Winnipeg 2, SO
Florida 3, Carolina 2, SO
Pittsburgh 8, Tampa Bay 1


Phoenix 3, Edmonton 1
Washington 4, Toronto 2
Boston 5, Ottawa 3
N.Y. Rangers 3, Buffalo 2, OT
Colorado 4, Detroit 3
Los Angeles 4, Chicago 0
Nashville 6, San Jose 2
Philadelphia at Calgary late
Sunday's Games
Tampa Bay at New Jersey, 1p.m.
Columbus at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m.
Vancouver at Dallas, 3 p.m.
N.Y. Islanders at Ottawa, 5 p.m.
Montreal at Florida, 5 p.m.
San Jose at Minnesota, 6 p.m.
Chicago at Anaheim, 7 p.m.
Monday's Games
New Jersey at N.Y. Rangers, 7:30 p.m.
Los Angeles at Nashville, 8 p.m.
Edmonton at Winnipeg, 8:30 p.m.
Anaheim at Colorado, 9 p.m.
St. Louis at Calgary, 9 p.m.


Hurricanes sweep



past Mustangs


JOE KORNECKI III
Correspondent

Inverness The Citrus
softball team routed Mead-
owbrook Christian Academy
of Ocala 10-0 in five innings
on Friday night at Vicki
Overman Field. The 'Canes
put up five runs in the bot-
tom of the first inning and
got stellar pitching from
Kayla Quesenberry and
Kelly Ellis.
"We were able to get a lot
of people in the game," Cit-
rus head coach Larry
Bishop said. "Kayla
pitched real well, and Kelly
Ellis did real well. I was
proud how the kids han-
dled themselves."
Citrus (4-3) posted seven
runs in the first two innings
of the game. Molly Price,
Melissa Michaud and Amy
Ambramowich had RBI
walks. Chelby Lawler put
the ball in play and a
'Canes run scored on a
Mustang error, and Kelly
Ellis smacked an RBI dou-
ble for the first inning
scoring.
In the second, Quesen-
berry had an RBI infield
single to put Citrus up 6-0,
followed by another RBI
walk, this time by Emily
Parker, for a 7-0 advantage.
Citrus' Chelsay Tefelski
and Danielle Garcia put the
'Canes up 9-0 in the fourth
inning with RBI walks and,
in the bottom of the fifth in-



MATCH
Continued from Page B1

following by the 18-hole
championship match in the
afternoon.
With a strong breeze,
firmer conditions, tough
hole locations and only four
quarterfinal matches, Satur-
day at Dove Mountain was
lacking excitement. For the
first time ever, none of the
quarterfinals matches
reached the 17th hole.
McIlroy and Westwood
saved the day
For starters, it's the first
time the Match Play Cham-
pionship semifinals have
featured two of the top four
seeds since 2004, when
Woods and Davis Love III
advanced. McIlroy is No. 2,
and Westwood is No. 3.
And while they consider
themselves friends, there
was a testy exchange be-
tween them last summer on
Twitter, and McIlroy later
left the International Sports
Management stable.
Westwood already has
been No. 1 in the world, and
said his priority is picking
up his first WGC title. McIl-


500
Cont


inued from Page BI


exhibition Budweiser
Shootout last week when
Kyle Busch passed him at
the finish line, but rallied to
dominate his qualifying race
on Thursday.
The victory in the 150-mile
race gave Stewart the third
starting spot in the Daytona
500. And unlike years past,
when he's hung around the
back of the pack and waited
to make his move, he's given
every indication he wants to
race hard Sunday
His performance during
SpeedWeeks, he believes,
has made him the driver
everyone should want to
work with on the race track.
"I want those guys to see
that we've got strength," he
said. "I think it's an advan-
tage to do that at this point of
the game, showing that guys
around you are going to
hopefully want to be around
you, and know that you've
got a car that can stay up
there, so they want to stay
with you."
The irony is that Stewart
has always been one of the
strongest drivers at Daytona.
His 17 victories at the track
rank second only to the 34
tallied by the late Dale Earn-
hardt.
But like Earnhardt, it's the
big race that's eluded Stew-
art It took Earnhardt 20 tries
to win the Daytona 500.
Hall of Famer Darrell Wal-
trip needed 17 attempts to
win the Daytona 500. Mark
Martin has never won this
race. Neither have former
NASCAR champions Terry
Labonte, Bobby Labonte or
Kurt Busch, a three-time


ning, Devon Perrine had a
RBI single to end the game
by way of the mercy-rule.
In defeat, the Mustangs (3-
3) made some nice fielding
plays, especially by seventh-
grader Morgan Ridenour at
second base.
"The 'Canes pitching was
strong as Quesenberry and
Ellis combined for a one-
hitter and eight strikeouts
on the evening.
"It was a good chance for
us to calm down," Ellis said.
"We made routine plays and
we got together and we were
disciplined. It gave us a
chance to just throw strikes
and a chance to relax."
Pirates storm past
Sharks 17-4
The Crystal River softball
team earned a resounding 17-4
victory at Brooksville Nature
Coast Technical School in Dis-
trict 5A-7 play on Friday night.
Pirates pitcher Rachel Roe
struck out four and gave up four
runs to earn the victory.
Offensively, Crystal River
had 19 hits as a team. Laynee
Nadal (two doubles, two RBIs)
and Ashley Meiman (double,
two RBIs) each went 4-for-5
for the Pirates.
For Crystal River, Samantha
Jenkins (double, four RBIs,
walk) and Marissa Pool (dou-
ble, three RBIs) each had
two hits.
The Pirates (6-1,2-0) play
Tuesday at Mount Dora Bible.

roy already is a major cham-
pion, having won at Con-
gressional last summer in
the U.S. Open, and would
become at 22 the second-
youngest player behind
Woods to reach No. 1 in the
world.
An All-American semifi-
nal is not nearly as surpris-
ing as the players in the
match.
"I don't think too many
people picked me to win,"
Wilson said.
He has a chance to win for
the fourth time in 14
months, more than anyone
on the PGA Tour in that
time, but gets easily over-
looked by his medium-
length off the tee. Wilson
makes up for that with
smart play and great put-
ting, a deadly combination
in this format. Even on the
par 5s he couldn't reach at
Dove Mountain, he played
to the right angles and kept
pressure on Hanson.
Mahan escaped the open-
ing round in 19 holes over
Zach Johnson before bulling
his way through the bracket
with birdies. He only
needed pars against Kuchar,
whose belly putter went
cold on him.

runner-up and the guy who
pushed Newman past Stew-
art in 2008.
"It's the race that can de-
fine a driver's career," Busch
said. "It's a priority because
of the prestigious value and
what it can do long-term and
the immediate impact. Like
the Super Bowl, this race is
our spectacle."
Stewart, meanwhile, has
six top-10s in his 13 starts.
But he's the only driver in
NASCAR history with three
or more championships who
has never won the Daytona
500.
"I wouldn't trade three
championships to win Day-
tona," said Stewart, who was
also winless in his five Indi-
anapolis 500 attempts.
"We've been leading late
in these races, and so I feel
like the law of averages,
we're going to get one even-
tually There have been a lot
of them that have slipped
away and slipped through
our fingers. But we've had
good luck here; we just
haven't had that good luck
during the 500 yet. So we'll
just keep digging."
Problem is, he may end up
at the mercy of others as the
style of racing at Daytona
has shifted back to the pack
that fans preferred.
Racing at restrictor-plate
tracks the last few years had
morphed into a two-car tan-
dem style as drivers hooked


up with a partner and took
turns pushing each other
around the track. NASCAR
said a survey of fans showed
that more than 80 percent
"hated" the practice, and se-
ries officials worked hard
during the offseason to de-
velop a rules package that
would return the racing to
the three-wide packs.


SCOREBOARD






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Winning Daytona 500 the ultimate for drivers


SANDRA FREDERICK
Staff Writer

DAYTONA BEACH -
Winning the Daytona 500
tops the bucket list
of just about every
Sprint Cup driver.
For young drivers
like Regan Smith,
the 2008 Sprint Cup
Rookie of the Year, it
is more than just
winning a race. It is
a lifelong dream. Reg
"I remember com- Sn
ing here as a 5-year-old and
sitting between turn 1 and
turn 2 and wanting to be a
race car driver, just like
Davey Allison," he said. "I
can still find my seats."
Seeing Rusty Wallace
tumbling though the infield


after a crash left a lasting
impression on the young-
ster And years later, he is
vying for the same title a
Daytona 500 win.
Having the most
prestigious race at
the beginning of the
season, Ragan said
t makes it stand out
in its own class.
"You either win it or
/ take your car home
in a box.
gan "I treat this as a
rith separate season,"
the driver of the No. 78 Fur-
niture Chevrolet said. "What
happens here, stays here. I
forget it and move on."
For Kevin Harvick, it is all
about the trophy
"When you stand in Vic-
tory Lane and you see your


name on the trophy and
they put your name on the
list of winners, it is the
biggest thing of your ca-
reer," he said.
Jeff Burton has a
different take on
winning.
"If I could pick a
race to win, it would
be the Daytona 500,"
he said. "It puts you
in a category later in
life that gets you re-
spect. Every time Ke
you are introduced, Har
you are introduced as a
Daytona 500 winner."
But winning is not as
easy as it sounds. It took
the late Dale Earnhardt Sr.
nearly a quarter of a cen-
tury to win. And it has
eluded Mark Martin for al-


most as many years.
Heading up the list of po-
tential winners of the 54th
Daytona 500 Qualifying
Presented by Kroger is Carl
Edwards, driver of
No. 99 Roush
Fenway Ford.
"I don't ever feel
V like the sport owes
me anything," Ed-
wards said in a
humble voice. "I
owe this sport. I al-
evin ready surpassed my
vick dreams a thousand
times over."
With a fast lap of 194.738
mph, Edwards set the
fastest qualifying lap at Day-
tona International Speed-
way in more than a decade.
After hearing the news that
he was on the front line for


the race, he said, "It is an it 10 laps at a time."
amazing feeling. This is very And winning the coveted
special." race changes lives. For
Three time Daytona 500 many, it happens only once.
winner Jeff Gordon says it For Jamie McMurray, No.
takes more than 1 Bass Chevrolet,
just luck. It also crossing the finish
takes skill. line in the 2010 Day-
"It takes a good tona 500 will be for-
car and good track ever remembered.
conditions as well as "This is not a typ-
skill and help from ical race," he said.
other drivers," he "Most of the time, it
said. "Some years it is who is in the lead
is luck, and other Jeff when the white flag
years it takes skill. Burton falls."
This year is still unknown Still, David Gilliland is up
what it will take." for the challenge: "It is why
So why does winning this everyone is here."
race mean so much to the Chronicle reporter
drivers? Sandra Frederick can be
"It is a fantasy to win," AJ reached at 352-564-2930 or
Allmendinger said. "It is the sfrederick@
kind of race where you take chronicleonline.com


Crowded at the top


Three stay

tied for lead

at LPGA event

Associated Press

SINGAPORE Ameri-
cans Katie Fitcher and An-
gela Stanford and South
Korea's Jenny Shin all shot
1-under 71s on Saturday to
stay tied for the lead after
three rounds of the $1.4 mil-
lion HSBC Women's
Champions.
Futcher led almost the
entire day, jumping ahead
with a birdie on the second
hole. But a bogey on 18 -
just her second of the tour-
nament- allowed Stanford
and Shin to regain a share
of the lead at 9-under 207.
"I'm very pleased with
the consistency of the way
I've been playing," Fitcher
said. "Hitting greens, hit-
ting fairways, and making
some putts. So I feel very
good going into tomorrow."
China's Shanshan Feng
shot a 69 and was two shots
behind the leaders while
South Koreans Jiyai Shin
(70) and Na Yeon Choi (71)
were tied with top-ranked
Yani Tseng (67) of Taiwan
three shots back at Tanah
Merah Country Club.
Tseng struggled during
the first two rounds this
week, but had four birdies
on the front nine Saturday
and two more during the
rest of the round to put her
in contention to win a tour-
nament that has eluded her
since it began in 2008.
"I was much better than
the last two days," Tseng
said. "I make some putts
today, I hit the ball better
and I'm having fun out
there."
The 23-year-old Tseng
dominated women's golf
last year and is off to a
strong start in 2012 with her
victory at last week's LPGA
Thailand.
"I think I'd have been
more surprised if she
(Tseng) hadn't made a
move," Stanford said. "It's
not a three-person tourna-
ment. There are some re-
ally good names pretty
close behind."
Tseng solidified her hold
on the top ranking with
seven LPGA Tour victories
last year, including major
victories in the LPGA
Championship and


Associated Press
Paula Creamer plays on the fairway of the third hole during the first round of the HSBC
Women's Champions golf tournament Thursday in Singapore. Creamer withdrew at the end
of the second round for family reasons.


Women's British Open. She
had 12 worldwide victories
last season and the five-
time major champion has
33 career worldwide pro-
fessional wins.
Co-leader Shin, who
moved to the Los Angeles
area as a child, turned pro-
fessional in 2010 and has
yet to win a tournament.
"I've never been a co-
leader going into a last
round," 19-year-old Shin
said. "I wasn't too nervous
today, but I can feel some
nerves coming in."
American Michelle Wie
had another disappointing
round with a 75 and was 28


shots behind the leaders.
The tournament featured
a field of 63 golfers, includ-
ing 18 of the 20 top-ranked
players when play started
Thursday
However, American
Paula Creamer, the No. 5-
ranked player, withdrew
after the second round for
family reasons. Pat Hurst of
the United States also with-
drew after the second
round.
Summerhays leads
Mayakoba Golf Classic
PLAYA DEL CARMEN, Mex-
ico Daniel Summerhays
shot a 4-under 67 on Saturday
to take a two-stroke lead over


Chris Stroud in the Mayakoba
Golf Classic.
Summerhays had a 12-
under 201 total on the windy,
seaside El Camaleon course.
The 28-year-old former BYU
player won the Nationwide
Tour's 2007 Nationwide Chil-
dren's Hospital Invitational as
an amateur for his biggest ca-
reer victory.
"Tomorrow, I'm just going to
try and do the same things I've
been doing all week," Summer-
hays said. "I'm going to try and
hit the driver really well again.
My swing feels really good, so
I'm picking out good targets.
I'm judging the wind correctly
and I'm managing it well."


Lane holds slim



lead after day 2

ond place is worth $45,000.
Bassmaster Day 1 leader Keith Poche
S. fell to 10th place after an 11-
Classic ends 8 haul Saturday The native
of Natchitoches, La., lo-
Su day cated 70 miles south of
Sunedy here, is a little more than
six pounds behind Chris
Associated Press Lane.
The top 14 anglers are
BOSSIER CITY, La. within eight pounds of the
Chris Lane has a narrow lead.
lead after two days of the Kevin VanDam's run at a
Bassmaster Classic. three-peat and a record
Lane of Guntersville, Ala., fifth Classic title is in seri-
brought in 19 pounds and 4 ous danger. The Kalama-
ounces of bass on the Red zoo, Mich., resident is
River on Saturday to run mired in 18th place with a
his total to 35 pounds, eight 24-15 total.
ounces overall, one pound Takahiro Omori, the 2004
better than Greg Vinson of Classic champion, was the
Watumpka, Ala. final angler to make the cut
Alton Jones of Woodway, at 23-12. Michael laconelli,
Texas, Lane's brother, the 2003 winner, tied
Bobby, of Lakeland, Fla., Omori's total, but lost the
and Edwin Evers of Talala, third tiebreaker (Omori
Okla., round out the top had the biggest single-day
five. catch 13-14 on Friday).
The competition ends on Denny Brauer, who won
Sunday. The winner takes the Classic in 1998, also
home $500,000, while sec- missed the cut.


Associated Press
Kevin VanDam reels in a bass weighing approximately two
pounds during day two of the Bassmaster Classic fishing
tournament Saturday in Shreveport, La.


Saturday's GOLF LEADERBOARD


Mayakoba Classic
Saturday
At Mayakoba Resort, El Camaleon Golf Club,
Playa del Carmen, Mexico
Purse: $3.7 million
Yardage: 6,987, Par: 71
Third Round
Daniel Summerhays 69-65-67-201 -1;
Chris Stroud 69-66-68 -203 -1
Michael Allen 68-71-66-205 -8
Will Claxton 66-68-71 -205 -8
Marc Turnesa 67-72-67-206 -7
Robert Allenby 69-67-70 -206 -7
Brian Harman 71-71-65 -207 -6
Colt Knost 69-71-67-207 -(
Briny Baird 71-69-67-207 -(
Charles Howell III 67-71-69 -207 -(
Matt Every 67-71-69 -207 -(
Greg Owen 67-67-73-207 -(
Dicky Pride 68-72-68 208 -!
Alejandro Canizares 67-72-69 -208 -!
Billy Mayfair 70-68-70 -208 -!
John Huh 67-70-71-208 -!
Richard S. Johnson 70-66-72 -208 -!
Kevin Stadler 68-68-72 208 -!
J.J. Henry 72-69-68 -209 -4
Russell Knox 74-67-68 -209 -4
Stephen Ames 69-70-70 -209 -4
Tim Petrovic 72-72-66-210 -3
Nathan Green 73-69-68 -210 -3
Rich Beem 70-71-69 210 -3
Craig Barlow 71-68-71 -210 -3
Edward Loar 69-74-68 -211 -2
Garrett Willis 70-72-69 -211 -2
Billy Horschel 69-72-70 -211 -2
Seung-Yul Noh 68-70-73 211 -2
Tom Lehman 70-72-70 212 -


Chad Campbell
Esteban Toledo
Vaughn Taylor
Mark D. Anderson
John Merrick
Troy Kelly
Heath Slocum
Sunghoon Kang
Billy Hurley III
Kirk Triplett
Spencer Levin
Skip Kendall
Jarrod Lyle
Matt Bettencourt
Will MacKenzie


70-71-71 -
72-69-71 -
71-69-72-
67-72-73
71-67-74-
72-73-68
73-71-69-
68-76-69-
73-71-69-
73-71-69
73-71-69-
71-72-70-
73-69-71 -
69-72-72
72-73-69-


Jose de Jesus Rodriguez71-73-70 -


Tim Herron
Cameron Beckman
Patrick Sheehan
Josh Teater
Johnson Wagner
Hunter Haas
William McGirt
Brian Gay
Steve Wheatcroft
Chris Riley
Michael Thompson
Stephen Gangluff
Robert Damron
Jerry Kelly
Fred Funk
Brandt Jobe
Gary Christian
Brett Wetterich
Paul Stankowski
Erik Compton
Charley Hoffman


70-74-70
72-71-71 -
70-73-71 -
68-75-71 -
73-70-71 -
68-75-71 -
69-72-73-
72-68-74
75-70-70
73-72-70 -
72-72-71 -
70-75-71 -
73-72-71 -
73-71-72
73-71-72
74-70-72
73-70-73-
71-72-73-
72-70-74
71-69-76-
75-70-72


John Peterson 73-72-72 217
Martin Flores 77-67-73 -217
Jose Maria Olazabal 72-72-74 218
Gavin Coles 71-71-76 -218
David Hearn 68-73-77- 218
Charlie Beljan 73-67-79 219
Boo Weekley 75-69-76 220
Garth Mulroy 71-74-76 221
HSBC Champions
Saturday
At Tenah Marah Country Club, Singapore
Purse: $1.4 million
Yardage: 6,547, Par: 72
Third Round
a-amateur
Katie Futcher 69-67-71 -207
Jenny Shin 69-67-71 -207
Angela Stanford 66-70-71 207
Shanshan Feng 69-71-69 209
Yani Tseng 71-72-67 210
Jiyai Shin 70-70-70 -210
Na Yeon Choi 68-71-71 210
I.K.Kim 68-72-71 -211
So Yeon Ryu 68-73-71 212
Ai Miyazato 69-70-73 212
Hee Young Park 71-68-73 212
Vicky Hurst 69-73-71 -213
Mika Miyazato 72-70-71 -213
Ji-Hee Lee 71-69-73-213
Sun Young Yoo 70-70-73 213
Stacy Lewis 71-75-68 214
Sandra Gal 72-71-71 214
Anna Nordqvist 71-72-71 214
Inbee Park 70-72-72 214
Azahara Munoz 70-70-74 214
Momoko Ueda 68-75-72 215
Brittany Lang 72-70-73 215


Maria Hjorth
Amy Hung
Catriona Matthew
Se Ri Pak
Karen Stupples
Amy Yang
Chella Choi
Jimin Kang
Morgan Pressel
Sophie Gustafson
Kristy McPherson
Karrie Webb
Julieta Granada
Beatriz Recari
Amanda Blumenherst
Meena Lee
Laura Davies
Natalie Gulbis
Christel Boeljon
Candle Kung
Cristie Kerr
Suzann Pettersen
Melissa Reid
Hee-Won Han
Wendy Ward
Brittany Lincicome
Hee Kyung Seo
Katherine Hull
Ryann O'Toole
Pornanong Phatlum
Tiffany Joh
Mindy Kim
Eun-Hee Ji
Paige Mackenzie
Mina Harigae
Christina Kim
Michelle Wie
a-Sock Hwee Koh


73-74-69 -
72-74-70 -
74-70-72 -
72-72-72 -
72-72-72 -
68-75-73 -
72-70-74 -
71-75-71 -
74-72-71 -
72-72-73 -
69-75-73-
72-72-73 -
70-73-74 -
74-73-71 -
73-74-72 -
72-74-73-
72-72-75-
78-71-71 -
73-75-72 -
74-74-72-
69-74-77-
73-69-78 -
75-72-74 -
70-76-75-
74-72-75 -
71-74-76-
74-76-73 -
74-72-77-
74-79-71 -
71-75-78-
79-71-75-
73-77-75 -
72-77-77-
77-76-75-
77-76-77-
81-81-71 -
79-81-75-
82-86-78 -


Paula Creamer
Pat Hurst


71-74-WD
72-75-WD


Accenture Match Play
Championship Results
Saturday
At Dove Mountain,
The Ritz-Carlton Golf Club
Marana, Ariz.
Yardage: 7,791; Par: 72
Quarterfinals
Seeds in parentheses
Mark Wilson (40), United States, def. Peter Hanson
(33), Sweden, 4 and 3.
Hunter Mahan (21), United States, def. Matt Kuchar
(13), United States, 6 and 5.
Rory Mcllroy (2), Northern Ireland, def. Bae Sang-moon
(42), South Korea 3 and 2.
Lee Westwood (3), England, def. Martin Laird (38),
Scotland, 3 and 2.
Accenture Match Play
Championship Tee Times
Sunday
All Times EST
At Dove Mountain, The Ritz-Carlton Golf Club
Marana, Ariz.
Yardage: 7,791; Par: 72
Semifinals
Seeds in parentheses
9:05 a.m. Mark Wilson (40), United States, vs. Hunter
Mahan (21), United States.
9:20 a.m.- Rory Mcllroy (2), Northern Ireland, vs. Lee
Westwood (3), England.
Consolation: 1:50 p.m.
Final: 2:05 p.m.


SPORTS


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012 B5












ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE

Swift asks teen to
music awards
SOMERDALE, N.J. -
Taylor Swift has a date
for the Academy of Coun-
try Music awards.
The country star asked
a fan, Kevin McGuire of
Somerdale, N.J., to the
awards show. McGuire is
18 and
has
leukemia.
His sister
had
S started a
S campaign
on Face-
book to
Taylor get Swift
Swift to go with
him to his
prom.
Swift wrote in a Face-
book post of her own that
she can't make it to the
prom, but that she'd like
for McGuire to accom-
pany her to the awards
ceremony April 1 in Las
Vegas. She is nominated
for three awards.
A spokesman for Swift
confirmed that she wrote
the post. A post on the
Facebook page for
McGuire thanks her for
the invitation. His sister
did not immediately re-
turn a message seeking
comment

Dion cancels
shows due to virus
LAS VEGAS Singer
Celine Dion has canceled
several upcoming con-
certs in Las Vegas be-
cause of a virus.
Caesars Palace offi-

her doc-
tor ad-
vised her
c a to rest for
a week to
recover
from the
virus,
Celine which
Dion caused an
inflam-
mation of her vocal
cords. Shows scheduled
for Friday, Sunday, Tues-
day and Wednesday were
canceled at the resort's
Colosseum.
Her next scheduled
concert there is March 3.
Dion, in a statement,
said she doesn't "like to
let people down," and
she feels terrible about
not being able to perform
at the shows. Refunds
will be given to people
who bought tickets.
Caesars spent $95 mil-
lion to build the Colos-
seum for Dion in 2003,
complete with a humidi-
fier to protect her voice
-From wire reports


'Artist' wins best picture



at indie Spirit Awards


DAVID GERMAIN
AP Movie Writer

SANTA MONICA, Calif. "The
Artist" won best picture and three
other prizes Saturday at the Spirit
Awards honoring independent film,
a possible prelude to a big night at
the Academy Awards for the black-
and-white silent movie.
The film also won for best director
for Michel Hazanavicius and lead
actor for Jean Dujardin as a silent-
era star whose career crumbles as
talking pictures take over in the
1920s. It earned the cinematography
prize for Guillaume Schiffman, too.
"The Artist" is the best-picture fa-
vorite at Sunday's Oscars.
Michelle Williams won best ac-
tress as Marilyn Monroe in the film-
making tale "My Week with
Marilyn."
Supporting-acting honors went to
Christopher Plummer as an elderly
widower who comes out as gay in
"Beginners" and Shailene Woodley
as a troublesome Hawaiian
teenager in "The Descendants."
"The Artist" producer Thomas
Langmann said the awards atten-
tion for the film was especially grat-
ifying given how difficult it was to
line up financing for a silent film, a
form that went out of vogue more
than 80 years ago.
"Everybody told us this is so
much against conventional wis-
dom," Langmann said.
At Sunday's Oscars, Dujardin is
in a two-man race for best actor
against "The Descendants" star
George Clooney Williams is nomi-
nated for best actress at the Oscars,
though Viola Davis of "The Help"
and Meryl Streep of "The Iron
Lady" are considered the favorites.
Williams gave the best perform-
ance among the Spirit Awards win-
ners with a touching acceptance
speech acknowledging her kinship
with low-budget independent film-
makers and recalling her first time
at the ceremony a decade ago.
"I wore my own clothes back
then, which were not very good, and
I cut my own hair, which also was
not very good," Williams said. "I still
remember the feeling that in this
room, unlike others, that that was
OK. Possibly even preferred. And
what I thought then and I still feel
now is that it's because this room
was a room full of misfits, outcasts,
loners, dreamers, mumblers, delin-
quents, dropouts. Just like me."
Plummer is the supporting-actor
favorite at the Oscars, at 82 poten-
tially becoming the oldest actor ever
"It's taken me the longest time to
realize the Spirit Awards have noth-
ing to do with booze," Plummer
joked, going on to thank all the spir-
its that have come his way in his ca-
reer, "good and evil."
Woodley was not nominated for
an Oscar but won out over a lineup
that included Academy Award nom-
inee Janet McTeer of the Irish


Associated Press
Michelle Williams accepts the best female lead award for My Week With
Marilyn on Saturday at the Independent Spirit Awards in Santa Monica,


Calif.
drama "Albert Nobbs."
"The Descendants" also won the
screenplay award for director
Alexander Payne and his co-writ-
ers, Nat Faxon and Jim Rash.
Dujardin was unable to attend
the Spirit Awards. He was traveling
back to Los Angeles for Sunday's
Oscars after the Cesar awards in
France on Friday, where "The
Artist" won six prizes, including
best picture and director for
Hazanavicius.
Writer-director Hazanavicius
made a rushed trip from France to
Los Angeles for the Spirit Awards,
joking backstage that the "police es-
cort to come from the airport, that
was great."
Other winners:


First feature: "Margin Call," di-
rected by J.C. Chandor
International film, "A Separa-
tion," directed by Asghar Farhadi.
Documentary: "The
Interrupters."
First screenplay: Will Reiser,
"50/50."
John Cassavetes Award for fea-
ture film made for less than
$500,000: "Pariah."
An informal celebration com-
pared to Hollywood's many black-
tie honors, the Spirit Awards were
presented in their usual venue in a
tent along the beach in Santa Mon-
ica, just west of Los Angeles.
Hosted by Seth Rogen, the cere-
mony was taped to air later Satur-
day on IFC.


Oscar turns up the star power for rehearsal


Associated Press

LOS ANGELES The
Academy Awards are a big
deal even to A-listers.
That's why a parade of stars
came through the theater at
the Hollywood & Highland
Center Saturday to run
through their lines and pre-
pare to address their peers
in front of a worldwide au-
dience of millions.
FAKE OSCARS, REAL
PRESENTER: Tom Hanks
wore jeans, boots and his al-
ways-affable smile at his
morning rehearsal. The
two-time Oscar winner and
Academy of Motion Picture


Arts and Sciences governor
posed for photos with the
show's producers before
practicing his presentation.
"Brian Grazer, can you be-
lieve it?" Hanks said as he
embraced the producer
"You saved the day!"
Grazer stepped in as co-
producer with Don Mischer
in November after Brett Rat-
ner who had been tapped
to co-produce with Mischer
- resigned following his
public use of a gay slur
Hanks greeted the cam-
era operators and stage
managers who've worked
the Oscar show for years be-
fore presenting his category


Today's birthday: In the year ahead, you might experi-
ence some exciting changes triggered by outside influ-
ences over which you'll have no control. Fortunately, they'll
work out as well as if you had authored them.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Conditions are ripe for you
to do things on a rather grand scale. If you have any bright
ideas or concepts that you'd like to expand, don't be fearful
of doing so.
Aries (March 21-April 19) There is a good chance that
recent events have been showing you that Lady Luck is in
your corner when it comes to your financial involvements.
Don't ignore this opportunity make the most of it.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) It behooves you to be as self-
sufficient as possible, because you are likely to be far more
fortunate when you are in control of your own affairs.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) Conditions in general look to
be exceptionally promising, making you lucky in ways you'd


After opening the prop
envelope, the actor said,
"The fake rehearsal Oscar
goes to..."
EASY IRON: "The Iron
Lady" wears jeans and a
ponytail?
Meryl Streep, up for her
17th Academy Award, this
time for playing Margaret
Thatcher, kept things casual
Saturday for her rehearsal,
arriving in jeans, flats and a
black sweater Of course,
she'll be supremely
glammed up on Sunday:
Streep's publicist joked that
the best-actress nominee
plans to wear "17-inch
heels."


Today's HOROSCOPE

least expect. This will be especially true concerning all
competitive involvements.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) -The possibilities regarding
projects for which you have high hopes appear to be as
good as you'd like them to be. Continue to be optimistic
while all the time thinking, "Win!"
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) There's a chance that you're not
fully aware of all the ramifications of something promising in
which you're involved. Take another look at whatever it is
you're doing in order to make the most of it.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) If there is something you'd like
to do in order to influence public opinion, you couldn't find a
better time than now to get the endeavor started and un-
derway.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) It's quite possible that some
changes could transpire over which you'll have little or no
control. What occurs could affect your status and/or reputa-


I


4

Associated Press
Actor Tom Hanks is kissed by David Wader, a stage man-
ager for the 84th Academy Awards, on Saturday during re-
hearsals for Sunday's show.


tion, but the outcome should please you.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Fortunately for you, an indi-
vidual whose influence and authority exceeds yours views
you as an equal. In fact, this person might approach you in
order to form some kind of propitious alliance.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) The chances for advanc-
ing an ambitious objective that is extremely important to
you are improving immensely. Take advantage of what oc-
curs to give it a push.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Friends are likely to be
drawn to you because they'll sense you'll be fun to be
around. There is an appealing charisma about you, en-
hancing all of your involvements.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Even if there is no visible
endorsement of that innate lucky feeling you're experienc-
ing, it's likely to be accurate. The fates are busily working
out favorable outcomes for you.


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

FRIDAY, FEB. 24
Mega Money: 5 27 30 38
Mega Ball: 12
4-of-4 MB No winner
4-of-4 5 $1,434.50
3-of-4 MB 38 $413.50
3-of-4 890 $52.50
2-of-4 MB 1,353 $24
1-of-4 MB 11,439 $2.50
2-of-4 26,822 $2
Fantasy 5:13 20 23 28 33
5-of-5 1 winner $253,527.92
4-of-5 309 $132
3-of-5 9,991 $11
THURSDAY, FEB. 23
Fantasy 5: 2 10 20 28 30
5-of-5 No winner
4-of-5 355 $555
3-of-5 10,066 $16.50
WEDNESDAY, FEB. 22
Powerball: 7 16 17 39 51
Powerball: 32
5-of-5 PB No winner
5-of-5 2 $1 million
No Florida winner

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num-
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call 850-487-7777.

Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, Feb. 26, the
57th day of 2012. There are 309
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On Feb. 26, 1962, after becom-
ing the first American to orbit the
Earth, astronaut John Glenn
told a joint meeting of Con-
gress, "Exploration and the pur-
suit of knowledge have always
paid dividends in the long run."
On this date:
In 1815, Napoleon Bonaparte
escaped from exile on the Is-
land of Elba.
In 1861, Vassar College in
Poughkeepsie, N.Y, received
its initial funding from its name-
sake, businessman Matthew
Vassar.
In 1952, Prime Minister Winston
Churchill announced that Britain
had developed its own atomic
bomb.
In 1970, National Public Radio
was incorporated.
In 1987, the Tower Commission,
which had probed the Iran-Con-
tra affair, issued its report, which
rebuked President Ronald Rea-
gan for failing to control his na-
tional security staff.
Ten years ago: Former Enron
chief executive Jeffrey Skilling,
at times combative, insisted
during a Senate hearing that he
knew nothing about manipula-
tion of company books and de-
nied misleading Congress as
alleged by some lawmakers
and Enron officials.
Five years ago: The Iraqi Cabi-
net approved draft legislation to
manage the country's vast oil in-
dustry and divide its wealth
among the population.
One year ago: In a statement,
President Barack Obama said
Moammar Gadhafi had lost his
legitimacy to rule and urged the
Libyan leader to leave power
immediately Space shuttle Dis-
covery arrived at the Interna-
tional Space Station, making its
final visit before being parked at
a museum.
One year ago: In a statement,
President Barack Obama said
Moammar Gadhafi had lost his
legitimacy to rule and urged the
Libyan leader to leave power
immediately Space shuttle Dis-
covery arrived at the Interna-
tional Space Station, making its
final visit before being parked at
a museum.
Today's Birthdays: Singer Fats
Domino is 84. Country-rock mu-
sician Paul Cotton (Poco)is 69.
Actor-director Bill Duke is 69.
Singer Mitch Ryder is 67. Rock
musician Jonathan Cain (Jour-
ney) is 62. Singer Michael
Bolton is 59. Actor Greg Ger-
mann is 54. Former Democratic
National Chairman Tim Kaine is
54. Rock musician Tim Com-
merford (Audioslave) is 44.
Singer Erykah Badu is 41. Actor


Greg Rikaart is 35. Rock musi-
cian Chris Culos (O.A.R.) is 33.
Thought for Today: "The wis-
dom of the wise, and the experi-
ence of ages, may be
preserved by quotation." -
Isaac D'lIsraeli, English author
(1766-1848).











COMMENTARY


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Little
Tommy Tucker
teaches about
chewing to-
bacco.
/Page C4


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


Chronicle file
Joe Meek, county commissioner and president of the Citrus County Economic Development Council, sees the potential for job creation through the
establishment of Port Citrus at the Cross Florida Barge Canal in the northwest part of the county. That, however, is just one piece of the puzzle to
revitalizing the local economy, he says.



Citrus County at a crossroads


JOE MEEK
Special to the Chronicle
The economy in Citrus County as well in
the state of Florida, and the entire
United States, is in a very difficult
situation. In Citrus County, we are at a
crossroads with our economy We have two
options, two paths we can choose as a
community
We can stick our heads in the sand and
hope the economy starts to get better, hope
that businesses start to come here, and hope
that the unemployment rate improves. Or, we
can become proactive, and support initiatives,
projects, and policies that give us an opportu-
nity and the possibility to grow jobs, diversify
our marketplace and improve our
unemployment.
If you think that an 11 percent unemploy-
ment rate is acceptable, or if Citrus County
has done a good job over the past decades to
bring in businesses, or you are happy with
where our economy is, then you probably
think we need to do nothing.
But, if you think we need to be proactive, go
after industry and businesses to come to our
county or expand their operations here, to
help grow our marketplace, then I ask that
you join us. Join with your local chamber of
commerce, your economic development coun-
cil, and your board of county commissioners
in the journey to make this county a better
place to call home, because that's what we are
working on right now.
For many years, politicians and others in
our county have made a career out of doing
nothing, being against everything, sitting back
and shooting arrows at anything or any pro-
posal to do something that comes forward,
holding their finger in the air and seeing
which way the political winds are blowing. It
is easy to criticize and, sometimes, politically
expedient not to make big decisions and to do
nothing. Doing nothing is what has gotten us


The federal government in
the 1960s spent $74 million
of your money to start a
Cross Florida Barge Canal.
The project was stopped for
environmental reasons, and
whether or not you feel that
was the correct thing to do,
or if the project was wrong
from the beginning, it does
not change the fact that
there is a barge canal into
our coast.

to where we are now, but today, I ask you to
reject that doing nothing and being against
everything is a legitimate option. Finally your
county commission has, and so have your
chamber of commerce and economic develop-
ment council.
We are moving forward with multiple initia-
tives to make a positive impact on our local
economy Utilizing areas that give Citrus
County a competitive advantage over other
communities and other areas working on eco-
nomic development, we have focused on tar-
geted industries; industries in which we have
some sort of advantage and can grow in. Here
are just a few of the many initiatives we are
working on.
Working with our local doctors and health
care professionals, we are focusing on grow-
ing our medical industry in Citrus County We
have one of the highest median age demo-
graphics in the state and in the nation, and we


feel we have a good opportunity to grow this
industry here. We have worked very closely
with individuals and businesses in the med-
ical community to create incentives to encour-
age private growth and investment.
Another area is the power-generating in-
dustry Citrus County is home to one of the
largest power-generating sites in the United
States. When fully operational, Progress En-
ergy has five power plants in the northwest
portion of our county, one nuclear and four
coal plants. We are working very closely with
them to recruit and expand businesses that
compliment their operations. From the nuts
and bolts manufacturers to their plants; to the
computer software programmers; to their
suppliers, we have a good reason as to why
those companies should be here.
On another note, our quality of life and nat-
ural environment is what attracts so many
people here. We have seven spring-fed rivers
on the west side of the county, and a gorgeous
lake system on the east side. In addition, we
have state forests and other beautiful lands
throughout our county for hiking, biking and
recreational activities. Tourism is a major
driver in our economy and we are focusing on
putting an added emphasis on it. Through our
Tourist Development Council and our Eco-
nomic Development Council, we are working
very closely to utilize our natural assets to our
advantage.
From a geographic standpoint, we are obvi-
ously on the west coast of Florida. Something
very unique to our county is that we have a
barge canal that was dug six and a half miles
into the northwest portion of our coast The
federal government in the 1960s spent $74
million of your money to start a Cross Florida
Barge Canal. The project was stopped for en-
vironmental reasons, and whether or not you
feel that was the correct thing to do, or if the
project was wrong from the beginning, it does


Page C4


Will Hillary Clinton run for president in 2016?


DOUGLAS COHN AND
ELEANOR CLIFT
Special to the Chronicle
When the head of the World
Bank announced he would
step down this summer,
Hillary Clinton's name immediately
came up as a likely replacement.
And while she is on the short list as
the White House ponders which lu-
minary the administration will pro-
pose to fill the prestigious position,
Hillary's friends and admirers
think the former first lady, former
U.S. senator, and current Secretary
of State can do better
What they mean when by doing
better is left up to the imagination. It
might mean founding a global foun-
dation, one that focuses on women
and girls that would operate in tan-
dem with President Clinton's global
initiative and reflect Hillary's life-
long commitment to gender-related
issues of human rights and poverty
around the world.
It might also mean a future run
for the presidency if Hillary still has
fire in the belly After the '08 elec-
tion, it's fair to say a lot of voters, es-
pecially women, regretted Barack


Other VOICES


Obama's victory, seeing that he had
edged aside Hillary and likely
ended her chance as the first and
best hope for a woman to win the
presidency
Now almost four years later,
Hillary has served with enormous
distinction as Secretary of State,
setting aside any feelings of bitter-
ness she may have had to loyally
serve her onetime rival. Until
Obama began in recent months to
find his voice and his message,
there were many Democrats wish-
ing Clinton had been elected in
2008, and who believe she would
have been a stronger president in
the face of Republican opposition.
Obama ran on a message of con-
ciliation in '08, while Clinton said
she had stood up to everything the
Republicans had thrown at her, and
she was still standing. Her message
was one of toughness. Voters
wanted to believe the two parties
could come together in the interest
of the country, and so did Obama.
He was wrong. Hillary was right.
Obama came to understand how


unyielding the GOP could be, but he
lost precious time. In the meantime,
Clinton has built up her stature
across the ideological spectrum. De-
mocrats love her, and so do a lot of
Republicans and Independents, who
recognize her intellect, steadfast-
ness, and potential to mount another
presidential campaign should she
decide that's what she wants to do.
Clinton's interest in the presi-
dency seems to have diminished in
direct proportion to the growing re-
gard for her capabilities. Maybe
that's part of the appeal, that she
doesn't seem like an ambitious
politician, but rather a public ser-
vant who is selfless in her commit-
ment to the country By all accounts
she has done a stellar job repre-
senting the United States in her
current post, and she has avoided
the kind of petty conflicts with the
White House and other Cabinet de-
partments that plagued previous
administrations.
Clinton will turn 69 years old in
2016, which would make her the
same age Ronald Reagan was when


he was elected in 1980. There will
be plenty contenders in both major
parties as a number of sitting sena-
tors and governors come into their
own. On the Democratic side, Gov-
ernors Andrew Cuomo of New York
and Martin O'Malley of Maryland
come to mind, and if consumer
champion Elizabeth Warren wins
her Senate race in Massachusetts,
she could become Clinton's chief
rival on the distaff side.
There will be competition, but
given Clinton's standing in the Dem-
ocratic Party, her entry into the race
might clear the field. For that to
happen, she would have to clarify
her intentions. It's way too early to
expect her to send any definitive
signal, and unless and until she is-
sues a Shermanesque statement ("I
will not accept if nominated, and
will not serve if elected"), she will
top the wish list of many voters as
the president they'd most like to
elect

Douglas Cohn and Eleanor Clift
author the Washington
Merry-Go-Round column, founded
in 1932 by Drew Pearson.


Making


good


things


happen

Helen Spivey is an
avatar.
Gary Maidhof of
Citrus County government
said that last week at an
event recognizing Ms.
Spivey, the advocate for
all things manatee.
He made those com-
ments in the nicest possi-
ble way
More than 100 people
gathered last Friday
evening at the Lion's Den
in Beverly Hills to give
recognition to Helen
Spivey for her decades of
work to protect the envi-
ronment and the endan-
gered Florida manatee.
Maidhof's point was
that Ms. Spivey after 30
years of advocacy has
become the symbol of the
movement. People from
Tallahassee to Miami to
Washington, D.C., all know
what you're talking about
when you mention "The
Manatee Lady." You're
talking about Helen
Spivey
Ms. Spivey was a Girl
Scout leader when she
first got involved back in
the 1970s in the effort to
clean up King's Bay and
protect the manatee. She
served on the Crystal
River City Council and
then went on to represent
the region in the Florida
House of Representatives.
She joined Jimmy Buffett
in the Save the Manatee
Club and worked with the
likes of Hank and Miriam
Cohen and David Walker
to create the Concerned
Citizens of Citrus County
While her accomplish-
ments were many, the
most significant in Citrus
County was her successful
campaign to get the city of
Crystal River to stop
dumping its treated sewer
effluent right back into
King's Bay
For years, she traveled
around with a mason jar
filled with water from
King's Bay and it always
included a layer of sludge
on the bottom.
You can't argue with a
good prop. She eventually
embarrassed local offi-
cials to move the effluent
out of the bay
I have known Helen
Spivey for more than 30
years, and haven't always
agreed with her on spe-
cific issues. She was once
against extending sewer
lines west of U.S. 19 in Cit-
rus County because she
felt the improved infra-
structure would make it
easier for people to de-
velop their property And
she didn't want to see any
more property developed.
The nicest lesson that
Helen always taught was
civility While plenty of
people were nasty to her
along the way, she always
remained courteous, po-
lite and forceful.
She did not let it get
personal. She just stayed
focused on the goal and
treated her opponents
with respect
All five county commis-
sioners were present last
Friday to sing Helen's
praises, as were at least a
dozen other state and
local officials.
She has made a huge
difference in the state of
Florida and truly is the
avatar of the manatee
See Page C3







Page C2 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012



PINION


"Government cannot close its eyes to the pollution
of waters, to the erosion of soil, to the slashing of
forests any more than it can close its eyes to the
need for slum clearance and schools."
Franklin Delano Roosevelt, 1882-1945


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan............... .................. publisher
Charlie Brennan ................. ................. editor
Mike Arnold ............... .................. HR director
Sandra Frederick........................managing editor
Curt Ebitz................. ............. citizen member
Founded Mac Harris ................ ............ citizen member
by Albert M.
Williamson Rebecca Martin ............................guest member
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


COLLABORATE, DON'T MANDATE




Working together


is better than


'The Rule' for bay


he most recent fight over
the right to use King's
Bay will most likely
come to an end during the next
two weeks.
The U.S. Fish & Wildlife
Service is expected to issue its
decision on "The Rule" about
how King's Bay will be utilized
by man and man-
atee in the years
to come. THE I
We urge a show TheF
of restraint by
the federal OUR O0
government.
Fish & Wildlife Citrus
has revisited the already de
King's Bay issue how m
because the herd manatee
of manatees is
growing in Citrus
County and there is fear that
during the summer months,
some manatees might be in-
jured or killed. It is during the
summer that a fun zone for
boaters is permitted around
Buzzard Island, and the feds
are concerned that more re-
strictions are needed.
During the winter months -
when the large manatee herd
comes to visit there are slow
and idle speeds throughout the
bay and certain refuge areas
where no humans are
permitted.
As the summer herd has
grown, environmental groups
have cranked up the pressure
on Fish & Wildlife to do a bet-
ter job protecting the
manatees.
A local opposition group -
Save Crystal River Inc. has
sprouted up in reaction to the
federal government's proposal
and the fight now stretches
from city hall in Crystal River
to the halls of Congress in
Washington.
The opposition group fears
this implementation of the re-
strictive "Rule" is the first step
in the federal government's ef-
fort to completely take over
King's Bay and shut boaters
down permanently.
For the record, the people of
Citrus County love the mana-
tees. That love has been
demonstrated over the years by
local government creating the
most restrictive manatee pro-
tection regulations in Florida.
Those rules are so successful
that during the past three
years, not a single manatee has
been killed by interaction with
a boat or propeller during the
summer months. Only two
manatees have died as a result
of injuries received during the
summer since 2001.
Other coastal communities
in Florida have done a poor
job in protecting the manatees
and many of the mammals are
killed each year because of
boat traffic. Citrus County resi-
dents are miffed that they are
the ones being singled out for
greater regulation when this


FOUND



l-05FF

563-0579


community has taken its stew-
ardship seriously
As Crystal River Mayor Jim
Farley pointed out in his letter
to Florida's Attorney General
complaining about the federal
efforts, the government did not
follow its own official process
and complete an economic


SSUE:
Rule.

PINION:
County
monstrates
ian and
can thrive.


analysis of what
the proposed
changes might
do.
It is true that
Citrus County is
the only place
where it is legal
for swimmers to
interact with the
manatees and
that fact has re-
sulted in a grow-


ing tourism business. Because
of that human interaction, ex-
treme environmental groups
take exception to everything
that relates to the manatees
and Citrus County.
Change and increased regu-
lation are inevitable as time
moves on and the manatee
herd grows. But the federal
government must accept the
fact that one of the reasons the
manatee herd has doubled in
size here during the past
decade is because of the im-
proved stewardship by Citrus
County residents. (And it is
true that after Progress Energy
shut down its nuclear plant
north of Crystal River, the
water temperature at the en-
ergy site is no longer as high as
the manatees would like).
The debate about "The Rule"
and the future of King's Bay
does not need further federal
regulations. Need we point out
that the federal government
doesn't even have the money to
enforce the existing rules and
regulations relating to mana-
tees because slashed budgets
don't provide enough person-
nel to do the job.
Instead of creating new, re-
strictive rules, the U.S. Fish &
Wildlife Service would be
more successful if it worked
with businesses, local resi-
dents, government and tourists
to create more local practices
that protect the manatees.
This debate should not be
about motor boats vs. kayaks or
tourists vs. locals. And it cer-
tainly should not be about man
vs. the manatee.
It should be about coming up
with practices that result in im-
proved manatee mortality
rates and a respect for the in-
terdependence the species
have on each other.
Man and manatees can live
together in harmony and with
respect. Citrus County has
been a model of how that can
happen.
As "The Rule" is readied for
final release, we hope the fed-
eral government has kept that
in mind.


Kent and Jay
Mr. Editor, could you please do something for me?
Would you please check Sen. Kent Conrad from North
Dakota? Is he related to Rockefeller, Sen. Rockefeller?
He looks just like him and I can't help but think that
there's a relationship. Please find that out for me.
Editor's note: No relation.


The ghosts of Watergate


n 1960, when Thomas Mallon having spoken up in a March 30,
was in the fourth grade, he 1972, meeting with Mitchell.
wore his Nixon-Lodge button There the former attorney gen-
to school and warned classmates eral, then running Nixon's re-
that John Kennedy was election campaign,
too inexperienced to deferred for another
be president. Mallon day a decision about fi-
was crushed when nancing Liddy and
Richard Nixon lost, other nitwits bent on
but things worked out mischief.
well. He is a novelist Mallon believes, and
for whom Nixon even- / he thinks Nixon be-
tually provided inter- lived, that a dis-
esting characters. tracted Mitchell, who
They're back. How- was deeply in love with
ard Hunt, Bernard George Will his deeply disturbed
Barker, James McCord, OTHER and alcoholic Martha,
John Dean, Bob was at least partly to
Haldeman, Fred VOICES blame for things spin-
LaRue, Gordon Liddy, ning out of control. Be
John and Martha Mitchell, Jeb that as it may, Mallon uses his lit-
Magruder, Charles Colson, Her- erary sensibility and mordant wit
bert Kalmbach, Gordon Strachan, to give humanity to characters
Rose Mary Woods, Anthony who in their confusions and delu-
("Tough Tony") Ulasewicz and sions staggered across the na-
others. These were the dramatic tional stage, utterly unqualified
personae of the scandal actu- for the prominence they enjoyed
ally a mare's nest of scandals until it devoured them.
that began to become public 40 A mountain of nonfiction has
years ago this coming June 17. been written about Watergate, yet
The gang that couldn't burgle four decades on it is still unclear
well properly got caught breaking who ordered the burglary, or why
back into the Democratic Na- Perhaps no one ordered it; per-
tional Committee offices in the haps Hunt and the Cubans from
Watergate. This burglary was the Bay of Pigs Brigade 2506
supposed to accomplish what a thought they were supposed to
botched burglary in May had not improvise ways to help save the
accomplished planting listen- Republic from President Nixon's
ing devices, opponent, George McGovern,
The characters all have an en- who was just five months away
core in Mallon's novel "Water- from losing 49 states.
gate." In his practiced hands Mallon thinks the burglars may
this is not his first fling at histor- have been seeking evidence that
ical fiction the festering mess Fidel Castro was funneling
of 1972-74 becomes almost fun, money to the McGovern cam-
actually funny, and instructive paign. But having listened to hun-
about how history can be dreds of hours of Nixon's tapes,
knocked sideways by small Mallon considers them "totally
mediocrities, inculpating": He is sure Nixon -
Mallon decided to put the a "misanthrope in a flesh-
minor figure of LaRue a Mis- presser's profession" did not
sissippi moneyman for the Com- know in advance about the bur-
mittee for the Re-election of the glary Mallon hears Nixon on tape
President- at the novel's center constantly "trying to give the im-
after seeing a Watergate docu- pression that he knows more than
mentary in which LaRue was he did, not less." Mallon's "Water-
profoundly remorseful about not gate" is a tale of floundering,


frightened people unsure of what
had happened or what others
were telling investigators.
He says his novel contains "no
big counterfactuals" if you do
not count his made-up affair be-
tween Pat Nixon and an old
flame. The friendship he depicts
between Nixon, he of "that madly
dissociative smile," and the
acidic Alice Roosevelt Longworth
was real. Mallon deftly suggests
the continuities of American his-
tory when he depicts Longworth
remembering Abraham Lincoln's
former private secretary, John
Hay, when he was secretary of
state for her father, Theodore
Roosevelt.
Most Americans have no living
memory of Watergate, and Mal-
lon's novel, which merits many
readers, will be for many of them
a primer, perhaps whetting their
curiosity about this ugly disconti-
nuity in the nation's governance.
Novels can be fine supplements
to histories.
Dumas Malone's six-volume bi-
ography of Thomas Jefferson and
Robert V Remini's several books
on Andrew Jackson are splendid,
but Max Byrd's historical novels
about the third and seventh pres-
idents bring both men alive in
ways that only a literary imagina-
tion can.
One measure of Lincoln's
greatness is that not even a cur-
dled cynic like Gore Vidal could
resist the spell in his novel "Lin-
coln." To understand Huey Long,
read T Harry Williams' masterful
biography, but then get inside the
scoundrel's skin by reading
Robert Penn Warren's portrait of
Long as Willie Stark in the novel
"All the King's Men."
And let Mallon be your archae-
ologist, excavating a now distant
past that reminds us that things
could be very much worse. They
once were.

George Will's email address is
georgewill@washpost. com.


_ LETTERS to the Editor


Permanent jobs
I am responding to Rep. Rich
Nugent's Feb. 11 letter regarding
the Tar Sands crude oil pipeline.
Yes, it is true that jobs will be
created just like the barge canal
did. Bridges to nowhere also cre-
ate short-term jobs. But why not
create permanent jobs?
Yes, we can create thousands
of permanent jobs by moderniz-
ing our century-old rail system.
Rails should bypass cities and
towns as the interstate highways
do and should be taxpayer-
owned just as the interstate
highways are. To create more
jobs, our public transit systems
can be improved. Not only will
this create jobs, it will eliminate
our dependency on foreign
(Canadian tar sands included)
oil.
Tom Morgan
Homosassa

Unfinished business
There has been a lot of misin-
formation floating about for the
past year, and apparently I have
been responsible for some of it. I
had imagined this grandiose
plan and attributed it to our
commissioners wanting to build


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in Chroni-
cle editorials are the opinions of
the newspaper's editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Groups or individuals are invited
to express their opinions in a let-
ter to the editor.
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at 352-563-5660.
All letters must be signed and in-
clude a phone number and home-
town, including letters sent via
email. Names and hometowns will
be printed; phone numbers will
not be published or given out.
We reserve the right to edit let-
ters for length, libel, fairness and
good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
350 words, and writers will be
limited to three letters per month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to
352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

a (shipping) port up at the aban-
doned Cross Florida Barge
Canal location. I did my share of
promulgating the myth through
letters to the editor Unfortu-


nately, I allowed myself to be
misled by the hostile reporting
of the Chronicle, whose staff al-
ways hated the idea and printed
many misquotes attributed to
the various commissioners.
Cargo? Manufactured goods?
Ridiculous, we are now told. The
plan is and always has been to
load some rocks onto barges and
build artificial reefs or some-
thing akin to that. Well, I say
when the backpedaling is done
and they announce the begin-
ning of the fishing pier construc-
tion they have been talking
about all along, I will help pro-
mote the agenda as a token of
my heartfelt remorse.
Thankfully, we have Commis-
sioner Rebecca Bays to set us
straight about what they have
been trying to promote since the
beginning. Perhaps the other
commissioners will join the cho-
rus of denials?
Now let's get back to work on
the Inverness airport so we can
fill our county with high-paying
jobs and industry We were going
to do that, weren't we? Well,
weren't we? But somebody
said....
Stephen C. Brown
Inverness


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Fishing? Was it for fun or was it for food?


Those of you who
are regular
readers of my
ramblings know I have
one sibling, only one -
my good brother
William. He's almost
four years older
When we were little
fellows, no one thought
we looked alike at all
- he was blessed with
our mother's Chero-
kee-based skin color


Fred Brannen
A SLICE
OF LIFE


remained slight of
stature, and even after
I slipped into my 30s, I
could pass as a
teenager unless folks
saw the crows' feet be-
ginning to tweak the
edges of my eyes.
Things change.
As the years passed,
a significant portion of
his hair fell out, what
remained turned gray
and his youthful muis-


her dark brown eyes and he cular physique morphed into
sported a head full of thick, coal- roundness. My thin, blond hair be-
black hair, while I, on the other came even thinner; it, too, turned
hand, resembled our father with a gray and my body rounded out.
fair complexion, green eyes and Now, with very much the same
somewhat thin, blond hair. facial bone structure, as well as
William developed quickly and, the same body shape and hair
as a teenager, he already had the color, we look alike, so much so
look and build of a grown man. I that to my chagrin people


sometimes ask if we are twins.
We are nottwins. He has always
been four years older; but I con-
fess that while I like being the
younger brother, at times I've been
a smidgen envious of the years he
shared with our parents before I
was born.
William and I recently had oc-
casion to leisurely reminisce
about our childhood. As we
walked down memory lane, it be-
came obvious that his memories
were different than mine, not only
because any two people will see
things differently, but because he
could remember things that hap-
pened before I was born.
We were never rich, but while
we talked, things he told me made
it apparent that just as it was for
Cheryl and me, times were
tougher economically for our par-


ents in the early years of their
marriage, the days my brother re-
members that I don't.
During our conversation,
William asked, "Was fishing for
fun or was it for food?"
My response was that in my
memories, fishing with our father
was for fun ... we enjoyed eating
our catch, but if we didn't catch
any fish, there was always a
freezer full of food.
William's recollection differs.
He told of how before I came
along, he would go fishing with
our father, sit by the edge of the
lake and, using a miniature fish-
ing pole, catch minnows the
minnows couldn't take a hook, but
they held onto the bait. William
would throw the minnows into a
bucket.
Daddy, using the minnows as


bait, would then cast out beyond
the lily pads to catch crappie, also
known as speckled perch, which
later that evening would become
supper.
At that time, there was no
freezer full of food to rely on if the
catch wasn't sufficient. In
William's memories, fishing was
fun, but it was for food.
Fishing?
Was it for fun or was it for food?
We agreed that it was both, but,
giving thought to his question has
made me better appreciate my lot
in life; and I think I'll never again
be jealous of the times my brother
remembers that I don't.
--In--
Fred Brannen is an Inverness
resident and a Chronicle
columnist.


Redistricting a matter


of political maneuvers


President Lincoln said that "you can-
not fool all of the people all of the
time." Maybe so, but one can fool a
majority of today's voters most of the time.
The proof is everywhere to be seen:
Nationally, the least-qualified candidate
ever to run for the presidency
was elected by a majority on the
basis of "hope" and "change."
Only after the election did it be- *
come clear that the "hope" was
meaningless and the "change"
was a remaking of the country to
a welfare state.
Locally, Amendments 5 and 6, -
passed by a fooled majority of
Floridians in 2010, require cre-
ation of new voting districts. The Dr. Willi;
voters were warned that these OTH
amendments were a political
sham by but a few editorial VOI
voices while the majority of
media, including the editorial board of this
newspaper, could not see past the plati-
tudes. More "hope" and "change." Seems to
work every time.
Politics is behind the move to change the
layout of voting districts, not the stated pur-
pose of making more rational districts.
Democrats are angry about being out of
power for so many years despite being a ma-
jority of voters in Florida. They liked the sys-
tem just fine when they were able to change
the districts so that former U.S. Rep. Karen
Thurman, along with other Democrats, was
assured of re-election. When Republicans
gained control and changed the boundaries
to favor their candidates, well, that was un-
fair and a crime against the people.
The Democrats' problem has always and
everywhere been that their supporters are
clustered together in big cities. The ultra-
rich progressives and the welfare classes
that make up the bulk of Democrat support
live side by side. Hence, any Democrat in a
voting district dominated by a large city is
assured of a lopsided win.
Outside of the cities, Republicans tend to
win elections. The Democrats needed a way
to get some of their city voters into surround-
ing districts so that they still held a small ma-
jority in the city district but might also gain a
majority in the nearby suburbs. Therefore
Amendments 5 and 6. Pure politics, a sham
laden with platitudes of fairness and reason.
Most Floridians bought their line.


UG RJLA V~OLK.
HINOW TAR
BACK o OUR FRT




'HC-


I

a
(


Editorial boards statewide, dominated by
Democrat-leaning journalists, praised the
amendments. The League of Women Voters,
reliably Democrat in its leanings, lent sup-
port while pretending political neutrality.
The majority of voters, well-meaning but
politically naive, could see no
harm in eliminating voting dis-
tricts whose boundaries had the
appearance of pieces of a jigsaw
puzzle. Why not, after all, remove
the politics from voting districts?
Why not? Because politics cre-
ated the districts and politics
was driving the amendments.
Should we be surprised that vir-
tually everything about elections
im Dixon and political office is about poli-
HER tics? Our constitution set it up
that way
CES As predicted, the redistricting
will end up in the hands of un-
elected judges rather than elected officials
responsible to the people. Oddly shaped
districts will remain so that racial and eth-
nic minorities mostly Democrat voters -
maintain the ability to elect candidates of
their same skin color or language.
Lawsuits have been filed by black and
Hispanic elected officials to prevent any
changes that might make it more difficult
for them to be re-elected in currently safe
districts. When the process is completed, it
will have cost Floridians millions in legal
fees. Democrats will have gained a few rep-
resentatives and politics as usual will have
prevailed.
Much the same can be said for the class-
room size amendment pushed by Democ-
rats to support the teachers unions.
Floridians fell for the sham and are strug-
gling now to pay the extra costs.
The costs for being politically ignorant
are high.


Dr William Dixon is a graduate of
Columbia University, New York Medical
College and the USF College of Business
Administration. He served in the Army as
a surgeon and as a Special Forces Officer,
achieving the rank of lieutenant colonel.
He was an assistant professor ofsurgery
at the University of Georgia before
entering private practice. He can be
reached at Wdixonl6@yahoo.com.


r


WINDOW
Continued from Page C1

movement.
Speaking of all things
political, we've been critical
of state Sen. Charlie Dean
(R-Inverness) lately over his
battles with county sheriff
Jeff Dawsy Sen. Dean has
stood in the way of Dawsy
getting renewed state fund-
ing for child protection
services in the county and
it's hard to figure out why


The two men personally
dislike each other, and that
has gotten in the way of
what's good for child abuse
investigations in our county.
But Sen. Dean does do
many good things in Talla-
hassee representing the
community. Last week, vet-
eran Tampa Bay Times re-
porter Lucy Morgan had a
column on how Dean the
former sheriff of Citrus
County used his bulk and
reputation to protect an-
other senator.
The controversy involved


an effort by Gov Rick Scott
and the Senate leadership
to push through a bill to pri-
vatize some of the state's
prisons. Miami Sen. Larce-
nia Bullard, a Democrat,
was being hounded by lob-
byists and Senate leaders to
change her vote and support
the privatization.
Sen. Bullard had suffered
from five separate heart at-
tacks in recent years and
was complaining about the
pressure being put on her.
The senator was secured in
her office trying to avoid the


God and Republican politics


W hen did Jesus become a Republi-
can? I missed that chapter in the
Bible, but I am Roman Catholic
so there are a few chapters I may have
missed.
From the Republican presi-
dential stump speeches, Jesus
appears to have become more
like Donald Trump playing
"Celestial Apprentice" than the
unemployed carpenter and
itinerant preacher in the 1%
Gospels. He has traded his san-
dals for Gucci loafers. Each
GOP candidate tries to appear Ralph
more spiritual than the others
and tie Jesus' teachingsto t heir FLOI
right-wing platforms. VOI
After bashing President
Obama, GOP frontrunner Mitt
Romney, the surviving Mormon in the race,
sings '"America the Beautiful" with a nice
emphasis on "God shed his grace on thee."
The matrimonially-challenged Newt
Gingrich talks about how he had an
epiphany while in his 20s and became
born-again. He told David Brody of the
Christian Broadcasting Network, "It's al-
ways God's will. That's a point that my wife
reminds me of regularly"
We can only assume Gingrich is refer-
ring to his third wife, Callista, not Jackie,
his wife from 1962 to 1981, or Marianne,
his wife from 1981 to 2000.
New Conservative wunderkind Rick
Santorum quotes the Declaration of Inde-
pendence: "We hold these truths to be self-
evident, that all men are created equal,
that they are endowed by their then
pauses for effect "Creator..' The crowds
love it, particularly when he talks about
America being a gift from God.


C
R
C


There is no talk about charity or toler-
ance, no mention of the homeless or car-
ing for the weakest of our society -
children and the elderly
The Jesus of the 1960s, 1970s
and even the 1980s was nonpar-
tisan and cared about the poor.
He was color blind and more
tolerant of others, even non-
S Christians. He wasn't validated
by laws, but by his followers.
And dare I say it? More socialist
than capitalist.
In the days leading up to the
utzen Florida presidential primary,
Santorum spoke at a prayer
IDA breakfast at Florida State Uni-
DES versity and talked about the
role of faith in government, ed-
ucation and politics.
"We will never have limited govern-
ment, we will continue to be less free, un-
less we revitalize the institutions of faith
and family in America. That's the real
message."
The role of the U.S. president is to revi-
talize faith? Whose faith? Jesus never
sought to be part of government. He didn't
worry about the religious beliefs of the
Roman rulers. He didn't ask to see Pontus
Pilate's birth certificate.
Jesus did attack the hypocrisy of the re-
ligious leaders of his faith. The Republi-
can candidates should take note and take
off their blinders when they read the
Bible. Maybe spend some time reading the
Sermon on the Mount. For blessed are the
poor, the merciful and the peacemakers.
U
Rick Outzen is the publisher/editor of
Pensacola's Independent News.


Stop and think
No matter what the sher-
iff, the county or the state
does to the roads or adding
lights, it's ignorant people
that don't know how to
drive and they go too fast
and they don't care about
anybody else and they're
always in a hurry and im-
patient. That's what causes
accidents. If they'd stop
and think what might kill
themselves, they might not
do it.
Texting and driving
This is about the cell-
phone use and texting in
cars. I just read in another
paper that in 2009, 5,474
people died and an esti-
mated 448,000 were in-
jured in crashes, which
were due to distracted driv-


Broken bench
I'm calling about the lit-
tle park on Roosevelt in
Beverly Hills. We've been
waiting for a bench that
was broken. We walk every
single morning and there's
a lot of elderly people that
also walk in the park and
use that bench. We really
would appreciate it if the
bench would be replaced.
Thanks, all
My husband recently had
surgery at Citrus Memorial
hospital on his back. The


strong-armed tactics of the
privatization proponents so
she wouldn't end up in the
hospital and not be able to
vote on the issue. Sen. Dean,
a Republican, showed up to
help.
Lucy Morgan reported "...
Dean, a gruff former sheriff
who is also a veteran legis-
lator, had tears in his eyes
when arrived at her office."
Dean said he told Bullard
she would be safe "with the
biggest guy in the world sit-
ting next to you."
No one else got to the


ers (who) weren't paying
full attention. Even hands-
free cellphones can reduce
your focusing power on
driving by 37 percent. We
need laws to stop these
fools from texting and talk-
ing on the cellphones. Yes,
I have a cellphone. No, I'm
not that ignorant that I
would even think of an-
swering it while I'm driving.
If need be, I would pull off
the side of the road. Some-
thing has to be done about
these idiots. No. 1, what do
you do the first time you
run into the back of some-
body? Answer: hang up
your cellphone.
Get facts straight
I'm responding to your
Sound Off, "Slow down,"
about the speed limit on I-
75. He says that caused 10


surgery was performed by
Dr. Toumbis, and the staff
at Citrus hospital was just
wonderful and especially the
staff at Arbor Trail Rehab
Center. They were mar-
velous to my husband while
he was in there. A big thank-
you to all those people.

Worry about you
This was in regards to
the "Construction halt" In
Feb. 3's paper. If the peo-
ple are interested, those
men and women work out
there four days a week, 10-


Miami senator that day, and
Bullard later voted against
the privatization effort. The
issue died in a 21-19 vote.
It's nice to see Sen. Dean
use his bulk and authority to
make good things happen.
As an aside, Tampa Bay
Times staff writer Lucy
Morgan has something in
common with Crystal
River's Helen Spivey
Ms. Morgan also got her
start in Crystal River about
40 years ago as a reporter
covering library news for
the Suncoast Sentinel


people to die. Speed was
not the reason that 10 peo-
ple's lives were lost. It was
due to fire, smoke and fog
that caused the people to
get killed. Has nothing to
do with speed. So he or
she needs to get their facts
straight. Has nothing to do
with speed.
Safety in numbers
Well, there sure seems to
be a lot of bad driving
going on out on the high-
way. Must be safety in num-
bers. The fast drivers are
running in pairs. I watched
a couple of them the other
day going down State Road
44. A silver car and another
one went by so fast I could-
n't tell what color it was,
making illegal U-turns. Un-
believable. Must be safety
in numbers, I figure.


hour days. So they need to
get a life and stop com-
plaining. They're doing a
decent job. So why don't
you just forget it and stop
complaining.

Rat door
Some developments have
rules where garage doors
must be shut when it turns
dark. There's a reason for
this. Rats are entering
garages. I've seen it happen
several times on my street.
People should be more
aware of what the danger is.


(which later became part of
the Chronicle). Ms. Morgan
went on to win the Pulitzer
Prize journalism's high-
est honor for her work
uncovering corruption in
the Pasco County sheriff's
office. She is now consid-
ered the dean of journalists
in Florida.


Gerry Mulligan is the
publisher of the Chronicle.
His email address is
gmulligan@chronicle
online. com.


Hot Corner: DRIVERS


Sound OFF


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012 C3





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CROSSROADS
Continued from Page C1

not change the fact that there is a barge
canal into our coast
The fact is, there are hundreds of acres
of vacant land to the north and south bor-
dering this functioning barge canal, with
industries that surround it that may have
the ability to use this underutilized cur-
rent asset to grow jobs and diversify our
economy
There are many other We m
areas and initiatives we are
focused on, including grow- everything
ing our agriculture indus-
try, working to bring in light to cre
manufacturing facilities, environs
technology-based busi-
nesses, a focus on a busi- encou
ness park at the Inverness
airport, and on growing re- private in
tail stores in our county.
The reason for all this to coml
activity and these initia- COunty, g
tives is simple. It is to pro-
mote job creation and grow and dive
our economy In Citrus
County, we have been a sin- market
gle industry marketplace,
heavily reliant on the construction indus-
try When that market falls on hard times,
as it has now for multiple years, we are af-
fected at a much greater rate than those
communities that have a diversified econ-
omy So we must do everything we can to
create an environment that encourages
private investment to come to our county,
grow jobs, and diversify our marketplace.
In addition to jobs for our residents, we
must also ensure we have business and in-
dustry to stabilize our tax base, so that the
burden of taxes doesn't fall disproportion-
ately on the residential property owner,
which in our county are predominantly re-
tired citizens.
There is no silver bullet, no single ini-


I




1



t

i
Ic


tiative that will be an end-all solve-all to
our economic woes. But, with a concerted
effort and a focus on a multitude of differ-
ent initiatives, we will see, through a cu-
mulative effect, the start of a positive
turnaround.
We are already starting to see it now
through the efforts mentioned above. Our
unemployment rate has dropped more than
3 percentage points to just under 11 percent,
from a high of over 14 percent According to
the latest statistics from our Workforce Con-
nection board, there are more than 900 ad-
ditional jobs in our county
ust do today than at this time last
year Also, the average an-
g we can nual wage in our commu-
nity has increased since this
ate an time last year In addition,
lent that we now have a lower unem-
ployment rate than both
rages Marion and Hernando
counties. We are finally
vestment heading in the right direc-
tion, but much work is still
e to our needed.
row jobs, One thing is for sure:
doing nothing should not be
rsify our an option. There will always
be those who are against
Place. everything, those who do
not like change and take the
easy road. We have seen the results of
where that road will take us.
So I ask that you join us, join with your
county to support initiatives to finally try
to grow jobs and diversify our economy.
Join us, so one day if my two young boys
whose ages are 2 and 4, and your children
or your grandchildren choose to live in
Citrus County, they can live here and have
a good quality of life and make a decent
living and wage while doing so. Together,
let's move Citrus County forward!

Joe Meek is a Citrus County
commissioner and president of the
Economic Development Council.


Tommy Tucker is a Citrus County "Super Hero" who will guide you to a healthier lifestyle.
He is also the spokesperson against the abuse of alcohol, tobacco and prescription drugs.


Sound OFF
Drive carefully No more nuke plants economy.


I have driven 1-75 north of
Knoxville. There's an area
with permanent signs warn-
ing of smoke areas. Once
there was a smoke area and
I slowed to 20 mph due to
poor visibility. Semi-trailers
were passing me ... lane
doing 60 to 70 mph. There
were six semis in the recent
Florida accident. You figure.


The Chronicle is con-
cerned and worried that the
Crystal River nuclear plant
will be retired, resulting in a
large tax increase for every
resident of Citrus County,
increased cost of electricity,
a spike in local unemploy-
ment rates, a loss of high-
paying jobs and a general
kick in the shins of local


Sounds OK to me rather
than another Chernobyl,
Three Mile Island. Remem-
ber Japan? Germany's phas-
ing out nuclear power
plants Germany, one of
the biggest industrial coun-
tries in the world.
Nuclear power's too dan-
gerous, it does pollute and it
is very expensive to build it.


--I-I IN CITRUS


C4 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012


COMMENTARY












BUSINESS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Mortgage penalty box










7.7





'A "'T


A foreclosed house with sale pending sign is shown March 8, 2011, in Tigard, Ore.


Past foreclosure means waiting years for new loan from


ALEX VEIGA
AP Real Estate Writer

LOS ANGELES

tion, nothing wrecks your chances
of qualifying for a home loan like a
foreclosure.
And if you got out from under an oppres-
sive mortgage through a short sale when
the bank agrees to accept less than what the
homeowner owes lenders can look upon
you just as unfavorably
It's a reality that the former owners of the
more than 4 million homes lost to foreclo-
sure in the six years since the housing bub-
ble burst will have to confront if they want
to own again. But the passage of time makes
all the difference.
That's because mortgage-lending guide-
lines that most banks follow prohibit them
from making loans to people with foreclo-
sure or a short sale in their credit history,
often for years. Never mind the hit that
one's credit score takes.
Still, some of the homeowners who were
foreclosed upon when the market first
started to skid are now looking to buy and
getting loans.
"They're probably going to pay a little
higher interest rate, but with rates so low, a
higher interest rate of 4 percent is not a big
deal," said Rosa Herwick, a broker and
owner of Century 21 JR Realty in Hender-
son, Nev.
So how likely are banks to approve your
mortgage application if you have a real es-
tate-related blemish on your record? And
can you do anything to spring yourself from
the mortgage penalty box?
It depends on several factors, but largely
on whether you had a foreclosure or a short
sale.


Foreclosure
Generally, borrowers who have a foreclo-
sure in their credit history can expect to
wait between two to seven years before a
lender will even accept their loan
application.
The waiting periods stem from guidelines
most banks must follow in order to be able
to sell their home loans. That's because po-
tential purchasers, such as Fannie Mae and
Freddie Mac, each have a different set of
guidelines for the loans they will buy, and
criteria for whom they deem a qualified
borrower.
The fact is, a person's credit score, em-
ployment history and other factors that
make up one's creditworthiness will take a
back seat to these resale guidelines.
If a buyer with a past foreclosure is seek-
ing a government-backed mortgage, the
waiting period can vary before they can
qualify.
Take the Federal Housing Administra-
tion, which insures roughly 30 percent of
new loans. Under its guidelines, former
homeowners must wait three years from the
date of their foreclosure before they can
qualify for backing by the agency
Compare the U.S. Department of Agricul-
ture's housing program which requires
three years, while the time penalty for a VA
loan is two years. Fannie Mae and Freddie
Mac, which own or guarantee about half of
all mortgages, require the longest stretch:
seven years after a foreclosure.
In some cases, the waiting periods for a
foreclosure can be reduced.
Fannie Mae, for example, allows a three-
year waiting period in the event the foreclo-
sure was due to an extenuating
circumstance. The company defines this as
an event that was beyond the homeowner's
control and resulted in a sudden reduction


Associated Press



banks and lenders


in income or catastrophic increase in finan-
cial obligations. Think job layoff, medical
bills or divorce.
FHA may grant an exception to its waiting
period in the event a wage-earner becomes
seriously ill or dies. A divorce may qualify
for an exception, but only in certain cases.
Short sales
The roadblocks for having a short sale in
your credit history can be less severe, and
in some cases, waived altogether.
FHA requires borrowers who weren't
paying their mortgage when they sold their
house to wait three years before they can
qualify for a home loan. That time penalty
may be waived in certain cases, including
long-term job loss.
There is no FHA time penalty for home-
owners who made their house payments in
the 12 months before their short sale.
The size of a down payment can also
shorten the waiting period.
A down payment of 20 percent or more
will cut Fannie Mae's time penalty on a bor-
rower with a short sale down to two years
from seven. Buyers who put down 10 per-
cent can qualify after four years.
Credit score
It's no longer just a waiting game for
homeowners caught up in the earliest
stages of the foreclosure crisis in 2007 and
2008.
There's still the impact a foreclosure or
short sale has on one's credit score still
very much a factor in qualifying for a loan.
Like most credit blemishes, foreclosures
and short sales will remain in your credit
history for seven years.
As a general rule, the higher your FICO
score, the more it will drop as a result of a
bad debt, said Barry Paperno, consumer


Page D4


Now serving: Career opportunities


his past week, the Florida
Restaurant and Lodging As-
sociation dished up a "help
wanted" radio campaign
promoting careers in the
food service industry
We're not likely to hear
the pitch --"Some of the
best restaurants in
Florida need you and
we're hiring"-since the
commercials are airing
in larger metropolitan
markets such as Orlando,
Miami, Tampa and Talla- Laura
hassee. WORK
But the timing couldn't CONNI
be more perfect
Not only is the winter
tourist season heating up, but the
restaurant and hospitality industry
is as hot as a sizzlin' plate of fajitas,
or juicy steak right off the grill, or
that steaming bowl of Gulf shrimp
we enjoy at our wonderful neigh-
borhood eateries.
In fact, the National Restaurant
Association's 2012 forecast predicts
jobs in the food services will in-
crease 2.3 percent this year, com-


9

I




E


pared to 1.3 percent for the econ-
omy as a whole. For our area, the
Leisure and Hospitality industry
notched a 3.1-percent in-
crease over the year and
right now there are 360
food-service related jobs
available in the Work-
force Connection region
of Citrus, Levy and Mar-
ion counties, including
72 in Citrus County,
which you can find at the
Employ Florida Market-
Byrnes place (EFM) at www.
FORCE employflorida.com.
:CTION What might this mean
for job seekers? Restau-
rant careers can offer
fast-paced work in vibrant, lively at-
mospheres with flexible hours, de-
cent pay and room to grow. The
work requires quick thinking, prob-
lem solving, organization, social
skills and the ability to handle mul-
tiple tasks at one time.
If that sounds appetizing, then
you won't want to miss what Work-
force Connection is serving up on
Monday, March 5, along with Mitch


Simmons, owner of Neon Leon's in
Homosassa and Ike's Old Florida
Kitchen at Izaak Walton Lodge.
Here's what's on the menu: the
"Secrets to Success in the Restau-
rant and Hospitality Industry" and
"Essentials of Customer Service."
The workshops, offered at no
charge, provide an inside look at
what it takes to succeed in the busi-
ness from veteran industry profes-
sionals. The sessions take place
from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Ike's restau-
rant, 6301 Riverside Drive in Yan-
keetown. Job applications will be
accepted following the sessions.
For the main course, "Secrets to
Success" includes customer inter-
action, knowledge of products, sales
techniques, and employee attitude
and focus. Employee interaction,
some safety issues and proper food
handling requirements will also be
covered.
Workforce Connection will end
the feast with a healthy helping of in-
depth information on the essentials
of outstanding customer service.
"This opportunity is ideal for mo-
tivated individuals who thrive in an


exciting workplace," said Frank
Calascione, Workforce Connection's
business development manager in
Citrus County. "It's also a good ex-
ample of how Workforce Connec-
tion can work with businesses to
meet specific recruiting and train-
ing needs all at no charge to em-
ployers."
So, if you are an employer inter-
ested in partnering with Workforce
to grow your business, call Calas-
cione at 352-637-2223, ext. 4206.
If you are a job seeker interested
in a career in upscale dining, be
sure and make your reservations
for the restaurant workshops by
calling 352-637-2223 in Citrus
County, 352-493-6813 in Levy County,
or toll-free at 800-434-JOBS (5627).
Bon appetite!

Laura Byrnes, APR, is community
relations/communications
manager for Workforce
Connection. Contact her at
800-434-JOBS, ext. 1234, or
352-291-9559, or
lbyrnes@clm workforce., com.


Bruce Williams
SMART
MONEY


Pay off


credit


card

DEAR BRUCE:
About 12 years ago,
I started looking at
my credit card debt in a
different light I had never
paid much attention to the
monthly interest. Then
one day someone told me
to look at it. I was paying
more than $85 a month in
interest and bank fees.
That motivated me to
make a change. It took
seven years to get out of
debt. Now I use my credit
card to purchase every-
thing- groceries, gas, ap-
pliances, medication, etc.
- and I pay off the bal-
ance every month, earn-
ing rewards.
It is so nice to be debt-
free. Last month I re-
ceived $39 in rewards,
which I used in the gro-
cery store. It is certainly
worth practicing disci-
pline with your credit
cards. I say, "Pay it off and
get rewards." It has taken
us awhile, but we finally
got it. VA., Klamath
Falls, Ore.
DEARVA.: I am passing
on your letter to my read-
ers. It's a great success
story; thank you for shar-
ing it. Everything you de-
scribe can happen to
almost anyone. So many
times people just don't
recognize where they're
going wrong. They have to
sit down, as you have, and
analyze everything, sepa-
rate the chaff from the
wheat. The motivation
you mentioned is an ab-
solute requisite.
DEAR BRUCE: You
suggested that VP from
Pennsylvania, who had
just come into $22,500 to
invest, might want to have
a broker look into some
decent dividend-paying
stocks. My belief has been
that low-cost index mu-
tual funds would be a bet-
ter investment for those of
us who aren't really inter-
ested in playing the mar-
ket. Could you please
clarify? S.W., Ashland,
Ore.
DEAR S.W: I have no
problem with low-cost
index mutual funds, other
mutual funds and similar
investments. Some have
done well and some have
not The point I was trying
to make is that there is no
reason, in most cases, to
settle for the tiny interest
returns that the Federal
Reserve has caused and
continues to support with
its paranoia about
inflation.
There are myriad possi-
bilities other than the low-
interest-bearing
traditional savings ac-
counts, CDs, government
bonds, etc. For example,
there are very good major
companies that I think are
going to be here for a long
time (no guarantees,
though). Stocks in these
companies pay a reason-
able amount of dividend
income and often, other
things being equal, have
increased in value.
These other possibili-
ties require an additional
investment besides dol-
lars, and that investment
is time spent studying and
learning about your op-
tions. A great deal of help-
ful information is
available. A good place to
begin your research is in
the financial section of
your local newspaper.


Page D4





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Business DIGEST-


ServiceSource has CF to hosts speech
CARF accreditation about Brazil


CLEARWATER Service-
Source, formerly known as Abil-
ities of Florida, has received the
highest level of accreditation by
CARF the Commission on
Accreditation of Rehabilitation
Facilities. The three-year ac-
creditation extends through
2015, and is a reflection of the
organization's dedication and
commitment to improving the
quality of lives of the individuals
they serve, as well as an indi-
cation of excellence in service
delivery and outcomes.
The ServiceSource Florida
Regional Office has been ac-
credited by CARF since 1979.
"Maintaining this level of ac-
creditation is an ongoing team
effort that takes a lot of hard
work. We were well prepared
for the review this year, and I'm
proud to say that we did very
well," said David Higgins, Ser-
viceSource regional executive
director.
The ServiceSource Florida
Regional Office has been ac-
credited for a range of services,
including job development, job
supports, job-site training and
comprehensive vocational eval-
uation services. While the non-
profit organization received
accolades for its many pro-
grams and services for individu-
als with disabilities, it received
an exemplary conformance to
standards report for its Warrior
Bridge program.
Surveyors recognized Ser-
viceSource for being one of the
first organizations of its kind in
the United States to recognize
and address the needs of re-
turning veterans with disabili-
ties. The Warrior Bridge was
recognized for its impact in pro-
viding employment services
and supports to wounded
veterans.
CARF is an independent,
not-for-profit accrediting body
that develops and maintains
current, field-driven standards
that improve the value and re-
sponsiveness of organizations
that serve people with disabili-
ties. The three-year CARF ac-
creditation ensures provision of
services at the highest level of
industry standards, including
risk reduction and
accountability.
The ServiceSource Florida
Regional Office is a 501 (c)(3)
not-for-profit corporation based
in Clearwater. Established in
1959, ServiceSource provides
employment, housing, training
and other support services to
people with disabilities.
ServiceSource's North Cen-
tral Florida offices are in
Lecanto, and serve clients in
Citrus, Marion, Levy, Lake,
Sumter and Hernando coun-
ties. To learn more about serv-
ices the North Central Florida
offices provide, contact Tammy
Adams at 352-527-3722, ext.
105.
For more information about
ServiceSource, visit www.
servicesource.org.


OCALA- The College of
Central Florida will host presen-
tations on "Brazil The South
American
BRIC" with
Dr. Terry L.
McCoy, pro-
fessor emeri-
tus and
director, Latin
American
Business En-
vironment Dr. Terry
Program, McCoy
Center for University of
Latin Ameri- Florida.
can Studies
at the University of Florida.
McCoy will provide back-
ground on BRIC Brazil, Rus-
sia, India and China, countries
considered to be at a similar
stage in economic development
- and will go into depth on
Brazil and its remarkable emer-
gence as a global player.
The presentations will be
from 9:30 to 10:45 a.m. Mon-
day, Feb. 27, in the Citrus
Learning and Conference Cen-
ter, Room 101 B, at the Citrus
Campus, 3800 S. Lecanto
Highway, Lecanto, and from
12:30 to 1:45 p.m. Tuesday,
Feb. 28, in the Ewers Century
Center, Room 108, at the Ocala
Campus, 3001 S.W. College
Road, Ocala. There is no fee to
attend either session.
McCoy was the director of
the UF Center for Latin Ameri-
can Studies, 1985-1996, and
associate director of the Center
for International Business Edu-
cation and Research in the
Warrington College of Business
Administration, 1999-2010. He
is the author of numerous
scholarly publications and a
contributor of commentary on
Latin America events to various
newspapers.
Since 1999 McCoy's re-
search, teaching and consulting
have focused on business and
investment in Latin America. He
publishes an annual assess-
ment of business environment
in the region, teaches a mas-
ter's course on this topic and di-
rects the UF Business in Brazil
study program at the Catholic
University in Rio de Janeiro.
The events are supported by
CF Foundation. For informa-
tion, contact Dr. John Anene,
anenej@cf.edu, 352-746-6721,
ext. 6126; or Dewith Mayne,
mayned@cf.edu, 352-746-
6721, ext. 6127.
Citrus Clowns
ready for hire
Citrus Clowns group is no
longer affiliated with The
Friends of Nature Coast Volun-
teer Center, the Nature Coast
Volunteer Center and the Re-
tired and Senior Volunteer Pro-
gram.
Citrus Clowns performing
group is now sponsored by
Mary K. Hall. The same zany
clowns will continue to "clown
around," for countywide com-
munity events. Clowns group


performances will now include
commercial and private events,
in addition to organizational and
large public events served in
the past. Only a few charitable
events will continue to be serv-
iced free, all other events at
reasonable rates.
Need clowns for your event?
Jewels The Clown, Clown
Sunny, Clown Zani Bandani,
Clown Yar and Clown Martie
are available!
Call Hall at 352-628-3414 or
email mhall016@ tampabay.
rr.com.
Florida Artists
Gallery adds framing
FLORAL CITY -The Florida
Artists Gallery in Floral City has
just added a custom wooden
frame shop on site, with serv-
ices provided by Frame Innova-

Ed Kuch-
ling and his
wife, Elvira,
came to Cit-
rus County in
2006. She is
a stained-
glass artist
and a mem- EdKuchling
ber of the FraKuchmeng
Florida Artists Innovations
Gallery, and by Ed.
he has been
retired since 2009. His hobby is
woodworking. As an affiliate of
the Gallery, Kuchling offers on-
site custom frame designing
and construction services, in-
cluding matting.
Kuchling does not work from
frame kits or use pre-fab mate-
rials. Every frame is custom de-
signed from scratch to enhance
a specific work of art and to
meet each customer's needs.
"Through custom construc-
tion," he said, "I can meet any
challenge, large or small.... For
example, I am currently working
on a five-by-two-foot frame for
a gorgeous, large photograph
of the Havana skyline."
For more information about
Frame Innovations by Ed, an
affiliate of the Florida Artists
Gallery, call 352-586-2698 or
email EKuchling@tampabay.
rr.com.
The Florida Artists Gallery,
which displays the works of al-
most 50 serious local artists, is
in the historic Knight House at
8219 Orange Ave. less than
one block west of the traffic
light in the center of Floral City.
It is open 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Tuesday through Saturdays.
Call 352-344-9300 or visit
www.floridaartistsgallery.com.

Nottage attends
annual conference
Joye Nottage, P.T., center
manager of Select Physical
Therapy in Beverly Hills, at-
tended the eighth annual Cut-
ting Edge Concepts In
Orthopedic & Sports Medicine.
John Hill, M.D., was one of
the presenters. Dr. Hill dis-
cussed concussions and post
concussion syndrome. He re-
viewed primary and secondary


prevention techniques. He dis-
cussed the importance of on-
the-field assessment, and de-
termining appropriate time to
return to play.
Travis B. Van Dyke, M.D.,
lectured on fractures in the ath-
lete. He reviewed treatment
considerations that are specific
to athletes. Risk factors for fa-
tigue fractures were discussed.
Bradd Burkhart, M.D., lec-
tured on the anatomy, pathol-
ogy, and treatment of partial
thickness tears of the rotator
cuff.
Steve Weber, D.O., dis-
cussed cervical spine injuries.
Sports are the second most
common cause of spinal cord
injuries in people under the age
of 30. He reported a decrease
in injuries when "spear tackling"
was outlawed in 1976, with col-
lege injuries decreasing from
30 per 100,000 to 1.3 per
100,000. He discussed assess-
ment of appropriate time for re-
turn to play.
Select Physical Therapy is
comprised of approximately
954 outpatient clinics in 32
states and the District of Co-
lumbia. The local clinic accepts
many insurances and provides
free screenings. Call 352-527-
8489 for information.
Mobile unit
to go to Inglis
OCALA- Workforce Con-
nection of Citrus, Levy and
Marion counties will bring job-
seeker services to Inglis on
Wednesday, March 14.
Workforce Connection's
staff-supported Mobile Re-
source Unit will be available
from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the In-
glis Town Hall, 135 County
Road 40 W.
The effort is designed to
make it easier for job seekers
to access services without hav-
ing to travel to a resource cen-
ter in Chiefland, Inverness or
Ocala. All Workforce Connec-
tion services, regardless of lo-
cation, are provided at no
charge.
In addition, a human re-
sources recruitment specialist
will be on hand to meet with
employers interested in learn-
ing about Workforce's business
services, including recruitment,
hiring, training and financial in-
centives. Business services are
also offered at no charge.
The mobile unit is equipped
with satellite Internet, computer
workstations and office equip-
ment to help job seekers regis-
ter with the Employ Florida
Marketplace, conduct job
searches, work on their re-
sumes, fill out online employ-
ment applications, research
career information and re-
sources, get information about
upcoming hiring events and
apply for Unemployment Com-
pensation benefits and file
claims.
For more information about
the Mobile Resource Unit and
Workforce Connection services
available in Inglis, call 352-423-
6813 or 800-434-JOBS (5627).


Free workshops
to help veterans
OCALA- Workforce Con-
nection of Citrus, Levy and
Marion counties will offer a "Re-
tooling and Refueling for Suc-
cess" workshop Feb. 28 to
March 1 in Lecanto, designed
to arm United States veterans
with the updated skills they
need to compete in today's
tough marketplace.
The three-day workshop fea-
tures instruction and career
tools to help veterans develop
strategies and maintain focus
during career transitions.
The Citrus County workshop
begins at 8 a.m. in Building 2,
Room 202 at CF's Lecanto
campus, 3800 S. Lecanto
Highway.
Retooling and Refueling
workshops, offered at no
charge, explore talent and ca-
reer options, how to prepare an
effective resume, techniques to
sharpen interview skills and
how to develop strategic career
campaigns.
In addition to the Retooling
and Refueling workshops, Vet-
erans Job Information services
are available year round at the
three Workforce Connection
Centers in Chiefland, Inverness
and Ocala.
Disabled Veterans Outreach
Program (DVOP) specialists
and Local Veterans Employ-
ment Representatives (LVER)
provide priority services to vet-
erans, including job placement,
information about the local job
market, assessments, referrals
and help securing funds to
complete training or retraining.
To register for either of the
Retooling and Refueling work-
shops for veterans, or for more
details, contact Ellen Hayes,
local veterans employment rep-
resentative, at 352-840-5700,
ext. 1416 or 800-434-JOBS
(5627), ext. 1416.
SCORE offers free
workshop for vets
The Citrus County chapter of
SCORE, in conjunction with the
Veterans Fast Launch Initiative
Program, will offer a free Small
Business Institute workshop for
veterans.
Veterans who are in busi-
ness or planning to start a busi-
ness qualify for this program.
SCORE's Small Business In-
stitute (simple steps to start
your business) starts at 6 p.m.
March 9 on the Citrus Campus
of the College of Central
Florida.
The seminar will run for 11
weeks.
In order to apply, the veteran
can go to www.vetsfastlaunch.
org\coupon-signup, print the
coupon and call the college at
352-249-1210 and register for
the workshop.
Bring the coupon to the first
meeting. The cost of the work-
shop is $100 and will be com-
pletely covered by the coupon.
If you have any questions,
call the SCORE office at 352-
249-1236.


Expose business
to South Marion
Need exposure for your busi-
ness, church or organization?
The Belleview/South Marion
Chamber of Commerce will
host a Community Expo from
10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday,
March 10, at the Market of Mar-
ion. All churches, civic organi-
zations and businesses are
invited to participate.
Participation in this event will
help your business/organization
facilitate business connections,
promote growth of companies
and organizations, as well as
help South Marion business
community to evolve.
To find out if you qualify for a
free booth or for more informa-
tion, contact Mariah Moody at
the Belleview/South Marion
Chamber at 352-245-2178 or
Belleviewchamber@gmail.com
Registration deadline is Feb.
23. Inside booths are available
and limited.
Habitat benefit
builds business
Habitat for Humanity of Cit-
rus County Inc. plans its fifth
annual Building Dreams Wine
& Food Pairing Benefit from 6
to 10 p.m. Thursday, March 8,
at Skyview Clubhouse at Terra
Vista. Enjoy gourmet food
paired with exquisite wines, ac-
companied by the smooth
sounds of live jazz/R&B/soul
and a silent auction.
Tickets are $50 in advance
and $60 at the door (if avail-
able). For tickets and informa-
tion, call 352-563-2744. Every
dollar raised at this event helps
pay for the lumber and nails,
cement and shingles, plumbers
and permits needed to take a
new home from sitework to
move-in.
Habitat not only helps elimi-
nate substandard housing, but
provides business for local con-
struction services, tax dollars
for local government, and stabi-
lization of local neighborhoods.
The Habitat for Humanity
Wishing Well Fundraiser draw-
ing will take place during the
benefit. Tickets for $1 each are
now on sale at the Inverness
and Crystal River ReStores, or
call 352-563-2744.
Ticketholders need not be
present to win.
All proceeds assist Habitat
for Humanity of Citrus County's
mission to build decent, afford-
able homes for low-income
families.

BUSINESS
GUIDELINES
To submit information
for Business Digest,
email newsdesk@
chronicleonline.com
attn: Business; fax
(352) 563-5660 or
write to: Business
Digest c/o Citrus County
Chronicle, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL
34429.


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Promotional information provided by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce


numberr connection
28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


D3

SUNDAY
FEBRUARY 26, 2012


Annual Chamber Awards nominations open


The Chamber of Commerce recognizes Awards are presented at the annual
businesses and individuals each year who Chamber Awards Dinner, which will be
have contributed to the growth and well- held Friday, April 20, at Citrus Hills Golf
being of Citrus County. and Country Club.


Verizon Wireless


We would like for our members to be in- both Chamber offices and on our website,
volved in the nomination process and we wwwcitruscountychamber.com.
value their opinion. Please call Tobey at 352-795-3149 for any
The nomination form is now available at questions.



Small Business


Development


U Center at UNF


Verizon Wireless celebrated their new Chamber membership last week at their new location at 3085 U.S. 41 in Inver-
ness. The Verizon local and regional staff members are joined by Chamber CEO Josh Wooten; Chamber Directors Com-
missioner Rebecca Bays and Gailen Spinka; EDC President Commissioner Joe Meek; and Chamber Ambassadors Jennifer
Duca, Comfort Keepers; Nicole Fernandez, Coldwell Banker Next Generation; George Bendtsen, Insurance by George;
Janet Mayo, Plantation Inn; and Jeanne Green, The Grove Downtown. For information on the products and services pro-
vided by Verizon Wireless, please call 352-341-0801.




Floral City Strawberry Festival


Don't miss out

on the fn!
The 25th annual Strawberry
Festival will take place Satur-
day, March 3, and Sunday,
March 4, and you don't want to
miss the opportunity to enjoy
fresh strawberries and straw-
berry shortcake!
Craft and art fair, children's
activities, delicious food, enter-
tainment area, and shortcake
booth will be available from 9
a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and 9
a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday at Floral
Park in Floral City. Admission
is only $3; children younger
than 12 are free. Shuttle serv-


ice will be provided from the
Citrus County Fairgrounds to
the festival for $1; children
younger than 12 are free.
We appreciate the support of
our sponsors: Citrus County
Chronicle, Tampa Bay Times,
Suncoast Schools Fbderal Credit
Union, Hometown Values, Citrus
95, CenterState Bank, FDS Dis-
posal, Nature Coast EMS, Citrus
County Sheriff's Office, Florida
Lottery, Insight Credit Union,
Nick Nicholas Ford, Withla-
coochee River Electric Cooper-
ative, Childhood Development
Services, Brannen Bank, and
Job Site Services.
For more information, please
call 352-795-3149 or visit www.
citruscountychamber.com.


Berries, Brew & BBQ Kickoff Party
Help start the festival weekend in downtown Floral
City!
Please join the Citrus County Chamber of Com-
merce and the Floral City Merchants Association on
Friday, March 2, in downtown Floral City from 6 to 9
p.m. for the Berries, Brew & BBQ Kickoff Party!
To kick off the Strawberry Festival weekend, we
will gather in the downtown square to enjoy live en-
tertainment, food from the Agricultural Alliance of Cit-
rus County, strawberry shortcake from Ferris Farms,
and beer, soda and water from the Chamber of
Commerce.
Downtown businesses will be open late to show-
case their products and services, so come check it
out and support the Floral City Merchants!
No admission fee; for more information, please call
Tobey at the Chamber 352-795-3149.


CCBA offers BBQ Cook-off and Networking Event


There will be a BBQ Cook-off Net-
working Event on Feb. 28 at the Citrus
County Builders Association building
at 1196 S. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto
from 5:30 to 8 p.m. RSVP for your spot
no later than 5 p.m. Monday, Feb. 27,
by calling the CCBA office at 352-746-
9028, or register online using the
events calendar at www.Citrus-
Builders.com. Cost of this event is $10
per person.
Bring lots of business cards to hand
out and a big appetite for barbecue.
There will be lots of great barbecue


and some tasty side dishes, too!
Awards will be given for four BBQ
Cook-off categories based on a team
of judges, and a people's choice
award as well. BBQ Cook-off partici-
pants get in free (one person per
company).
If you would like to enter the BBQ
Cook-off, please contact the CCBA di-
rectly at 352-746-9028. There will be a
prize for the best decorated "booth"
space ("booth" means grill area, table,
etc).
Other refreshments will be avail-


able for a donation courtesy of the
CCBA Spike Club. Let's have a good
time, do some great networking and
play a little Cow Chip Bingo! CCBA
will happily accept donations of items
from businesses for door prizes to be
drawn from business cards of
attendees.
If you wish to donate a door prize,
please contact Donna at 352-746-9028
or donnab@citrusbuilders.com. For
questions regarding RSVP and billing
for this event, contact info@citrus
builders.com or call 352-746-9028.


Our Citrus County center
provides potential and exist-
ing business owners with
confidential consulting and
training in all aspects of
business management and
growth. Experienced con-
sultants help business own-
ers develop strategies to
increase sales, create jobs
and improve profitability. We
have three locations in Cit-
rus County Homosassa at
the Citrus Enterprise Center
(former Homosassa Cham-
ber), Crystal River and In-
verness Chamber offices.
Please call 866-998-8332 to
request an appointment
The SBDC at UNF is the
principal source for small
business assistance in North
Florida, earning that status
by its track record of service
to small businesses for more
than 35 years. It is a true
public-private partnership
- leveraging federal, state,
local and private resources
to provide services at little
or no cost to our small busi-
ness clients. SBDC at UNF is
a proud U.S. Small Business
Administration Resource
Partner. Our matching part-
ners are Citrus County, UNF,
private-sector Friends of the
SBDC and program income
funds.
How can you benefit?
Pre-Venture business
planning: Are you thinking
of starting a business? We
sponsor nominally priced
workshops and webinars to
help you get started on the
right foot, with start-up kits,
workbooks and more. Please
visit www.sbdc.unf.edu for
calendar and to register
online.
Start-Up Businesses: If
you have been in business
less than three years, meet
with your very own SBDC
Certified Business Analyst at
no charge for information,
advice and mentoring on
marketing, business plan-
ning, access to capital, cash-
flow management and much
more or attend a training
session on QuickBooks,
"How to Hire Your First Em-
ployee" and more.
Micro Business: If you
have been in business more
than three years with less
than five employees, your
SBDC Certified Business


Analyst can offer the confi-
dential information and con-
sulting you need to grow to
the next level. With a focus
on new markets, the SBDC
provides assistance with
selling to the government
through its successful PTAC
program; selling interna-
tionally; and commercializ-
ing new technologies.
Small-Medium Enter-
prises: Small and medium
size companies in business
more than three years with
five or more employees may
take advantage of the
Growth Acceleration Serv-
ices offering advanced fi-
nancial analysis, strategic
and business continuity
planning, in-depth market
research, the CEO XChange
Peer Mentoring, access to
advanced LEAN training
and more.
Current SBA Borrowers:
Ask us about our "Business
180" program to turn the sit-
uation around and face chal-
lenges with new solutions.
The Small Business De-
velopment Center is one of
the Citrus County Business
Alliance Partners along with
the Economic Development
council, Chamber of com-
merce, Workforce Connec-
tion, SCORE, College of
Central Florida, Withla-
coochee Training Institute
and Citrus County Govern-
ment. These groups work
closely together to advance
economic development-to
attract employers and jobs,
provide tools to strengthen
small businesses, provide
business management train-
ing, job training and net-
working opportunities.
The Small Business De-
velopment Center at Uni-
versity of North Florida is
an outreach program of the
U.S. SBA, and a member of
the Florida SBDC and the
American Small Business
Development Center Net-
works. SBDC's are hosted by
educational institutions in
every state and U.S.
territory
Mike Orlito is a Certified
Business Analyst with the
Small Business Develop-
ment Center at UNE Email:
mdo-sbdc@atlantic.net,
phone 866-998-8332, Web:
www.sbdc.unf.edu.


Superior Bank teams with Cadence Bank


Branches cut ribbons
Cadence Bank and Superior Bank have


teamed up to better serve your community!
"This joining of exceptional financial in-
stitutions marks a revitalization for Ca-
dence; some of the brightest minds in the


banking and financial business have come
together to create a best-in-class bank whose
mission is to better serve its customers and
the communities they live in ...now and for


years to come." states Sam Tortorici, CEO.
The Inverness and Beverly Hills Cadence
Bank branches recently celebrated their
new look with Chamber Ambassadors.


Cadence Bank Beverly Hills Branch staff pictured are: Kim Baxter, Tammy LaValle, Linda
Cook, Shelia Marshall, Nancy Hautop, Allison Norcutt, Amy Gronert, Deborah Fiore, and
Kristen Nippers. Chamber Ambassadors pictured are: Jennifer Duca, Comfort Keepers;
Rhonda Lestinsky, Nature Coast Bank; Bill Hudson, Land Title of Citrus County; Dennis
Pfeiffer, Orkin Pest Control; Jeanne Green, The Grove Downtown.


- .ii U4-
Cadence Bank Inverness Branch staff pictured are: Karen Dennis, Tammy LaValle, Kim Bax-
ter, Mary Pericht, LuAnn Gilroy, Anne Beck. Chamber Ambassadors pictured are: Jennifer
Duca, Comfort Keepers; Dan Pushee; Bonnie Hardiman; Dennis Pfeiffer, Orkin Pest Control.


Be a patriot, shop at Patriot Sporting Goods in Citrus Springs


Patriot Sporting Goods, a non-
profit organization, will have a
grand opening event from 1 to 4 p.m.
March 3 at 760 W Hampshire Blvd.
in Citrus Springs (corner of Hamp-


shire Boulevard and C.R. 491).
Food and refreshments will be pro-
vided by Moschello's Italian
Restaurant, Military Honor Guards
will perform, and raffles and give-


aways will run throughout the day
All employees at Patriot Sporting
Goods are disabled veterans or vet-
erans in need with 100 percent of
the store's profits utilized for these


veterans, and saltwater equipment, as well as
Patriot Sporting Goods offers all guns, scopes and ammunition.
the quality fishing equipment you For more information on Patriot
need to catch the big fish of your Sporting Goods or this event, please
dreams. They stock both freshwater call 352-527-1205.









Some money from mortgage settlement to be diverted


Associated Press

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. The
ink wasn't even dry on a settle-
ment with the nation's top mort-
gage lenders when Missouri Gov.
Jay Nixon laid claim to a chunk of
the money to avert a huge budget
cut for public colleges and univer-
sities.
He's not the only politician eye-
ing the cash for purposes that have
nothing to do with foreclosure.
Like a pot of gold in a barren field,
the $25 billion deal offers a tempt-
ing and timely source of funding
for state governments with multi-
million-dollar budget gaps.
Although most of the money
goes directly to homeowners af-
fected by the mortgage crisis, the
settlement announced this month
by attorneys general in 49 states
includes nearly $2.7 billion for
state governments to spend as they
wish.
Some are pledging to use it as
relief for struggling homeowners
or to help related initiatives such
as a Michigan plan to assist chil-
dren left homeless by foreclosures.
But several states are already
planning to divert at least some of
the money to prop up their budg-
ets, and more will be wrestling
with those decisions in the coming
weeks.
For some consumer advocates,
the diversion is reminiscent of the
1998 tobacco settlement in which
states spent billions on projects
that had nothing to do with curb-
ing smoking.
"We shouldn't be in the position
of taking money that is intended to
help consumers and their mort-
gage tribulations and putting that
to another purpose," said Joan
Bray, a former Democratic Mis-
souri senator who now is chair-


Associated Press
Missouri Attorney General Chris Koster stands in front of a chart Feb. 9
in Jefferson City, Mo., showing the proposed distribution of the state's
$196,842,222.21 share of a settlement with the nation's top mortgage
lenders. Of that amount, $41 million would be paid directly to the state
government to spend as it chooses and Gov. Jay Nixon plans to use
nearly all of it to help shore up the budget. He's not the only politician
eyeing the cash for purposes that have nothing to do with foreclosure.


woman of the Consumers Council
of Missouri.
States that use the onetime pay-
out for immediate expenses may
also face the question of what to do
next year when the money is used
up. But officials in struggling
states say they must deal with the
most immediate problems first.
A federal judge in Washington
could approve the final settlement
by the end of February Once that
happens, money could begin flow-
ing to states within a couple of
weeks, arriving just as lawmakers
are crafting budgets for the up-
coming fiscal year.
Republican legislative leaders
in Missouri have already em-
braced the Democratic governor's


plan to use nearly all of the state's
$41 million settlement payment to
help shore up the budget. The
mortgage money allowed Nixon to
reduce his proposed funding cut
for public colleges and universi-
ties from 12.5 percent to 7.8 per-
cent potentially easing student
tuition increases.
The money was "as we looked at
it, relatively unfettered," Nixon
said. "Clearly, the economy was af-
fected all across the country by
foreclosure challenges, and I think
it is apt and appropriate to use
those dollars to help restore some
of the challenging cuts that I was
forced to make."
In Pennsylvania, where a fourth
straight budget deficit is projected,


Democrats are pressing the Re-
publican-run attorney general's of-
fice to use some of its $69 million
payment to offset $2 billion in cuts
to programs that benefit educa-
tion, the elderly, disabled or poor.
"The governor's budget has so
many cuts to so many valuable pro-
grams, if the attorney general's of-
fice has $69 million, why not use
that to offset these cuts to essential
programs?" said state Rep. Joe
Markosek, the ranking Democrat
on the House Appropriations
Committee.
Vermont plans to use $2.4 mil-
lion from the settlement to help
balance its budget. Maryland At-
torney General Doug Gansler said
about 10 percent of his state's $62.5
million payment will be made
available for the governor and law-
makers to spend as they choose.
In Wisconsin, Gov Scott Walker
wants to use $26 million to plug a
state budget hole because the fore-
closure crisis had a "direct impact
on the economy" But the Republi-
can governor's plan has ruffled
some Democrats, including Mil-
waukee Mayor Tom Barrett
St Louis homebuilder Bob Suel-
mann, who has a background in
real estate and finance, said it's
"ridiculous" for states to divert
mortgage settlement payments to
other purposes.
"It's like taking tax money that
was supposed to go to road im-
provements, and then suddenly
the bridges are falling down and
you don't know what to do about
it," Suelmann said. "That money
should go to something that can di-
rectly improve the situation with
the housing program."
When the tobacco settlement
was reached, states initially prom-
ised to beef up public health with
the $206 billion paid out over sev-


eral decades. Instead, much of the
money went to general govern-
ment operations. State funding for
tobacco-prevention programs has
now fallen to its lowest level since
1999, according to recent
estimates.
"The lesson is advocates have to
be vigilant," said Marie Cocco, a
spokeswoman for the Campaign
for Tobacco-Free Kids.
Most states will probably use the
money for mortgage-assistance
hotlines, mediation between bor-
rowers and lenders, legal aid and
financial counseling, said Geoff
Greenwood, a spokesman for Iowa
Attorney General Tom Miller, who
was the lead negotiator on the set-
tlement.
But, he added, officials "have to
acknowledge that there has been
damage done to states and their
budgets and their services be-
cause of this mortgage crisis. ...So
states will have some flexibility in
how they spend" the money
Illinois Attorney General Lisa
Madigan said she will oppose any
efforts to use the money to prop up
the state's shaky budget.
California, which was one of the
hardest hit states by the mortgage
crisis, will receive the largest pay-
ment about $430 million at a
time when the state is facing a $9.2
billion deficit. A spokesman for
Gov Jerry Brown said no decision
has been made on how to spend
the money
Some consumer advocates say
they will be watching closely to see
where the payments are spent.
"As insufficient as it is," said
Kathleen Day, a spokeswoman for
the nonprofit Center for Responsi-
ble Lending, "this money was in-
tended to go directly to help
struggling homeowners."


PENALTY
Continued from Page Dl

affairs manager for My-
FICO.com, the consumer
website for FICO.



MONEY
Continued from Page D1

When you are investing a
relatively modest amount of
money, you can't expect a
broker to spend a lot of time
on your specific situation.
However, a broker will
spend a little time with you,
pointing out some of the
company stocks and other
options I've mentioned.
DEAR BRUCE: I will be
turning 70 1/2 in a few short
years. We have no debt
other than credit cards,
which we pay off each
month. My monthly income
from Social Security, sev-
eral pensions, the VA and a
few other sources usually
meets our needs. We have
investments in stocks,
bonds, mutual funds, annu-
ities and an IRA. The IRA
has about $65,000 in it
My question: Should I
wait and take the yearly
withdrawal from the IRA re-
quired by the IRS when I
turn 70 1/2 or roll the money
into something else? If you
suggest rolling it over, where
would be the best place to
put it? Thank you for your
sage advice. J.S., via
email
DEAR J.S.: There are
other variables to consider
before you can make an in-
telligent decision. From
what I gather, while your in-
come is sufficient for you to


FICO credit scores range
from 300 to 850.
In simulations, a foreclo-
sure sent a FICO score of
about 720 down to as low as
570 and took about seven
years to recover fully, as-
suming everything else


live comfortably, you are not
in a situation where your
taxes are severe.
Where are the IRA funds
invested, and how is the IRA
doing? If it's doing well, why
not let it continue to sit
there tax-deferred? You are
not required to take out all
of your IRA beginning at age
70 1/2; you must take out
only an amount each year
that would result in the IRA
being actuarially exhausted
when your life expectancy
ends. You may pass away
the next week, or you may
live to be 100.
The major issues are not
only whether the IRA is
carefully invested, but
whether it is invested in
something that is producing
a reasonable income. If it is
not, then rolling it over to
something else may be
called for.
Without considering these
variables, you're between a
rock and a hard spot. The
tax deferment has a value
no matter how the IRA is
doing, and I wouldn't give
that up just to start paying
the taxes. It is an important
distinction, and I'm sure you
understand that.
DEAR BRUCE: What per-
centage of a trust is for the
administrator? The trust is
most likely $200,000 to
$300,000. There are two chil-
dren (one is the administra-
tor) and four grandchildren.
The administrator will have
to pay all future expenses


Crystal Oaks Civic Association is hosting their annual


Triclqj0Tri0If
Fundraiser

Saturday, March 3rd
Crystal Oaks Clubhouse 4858 Crystal Oaks Drive
Doors Open at 11:30 a.m. Drawings begin at 1 p.m.
.A I,
~6. -**- = -


being equal.
Still, there are steps one
can take to burnish one's
tarnished credit rating.
While in the foreclosure
penalty box, make sure to
pay all your bills on time.
Get more credit. This


until the house is sold. -
I.N., Sun City, Ariz.
DEAR I.N.: You men-
tioned that the administra-
tor is one of your children.
It's very possible that this
adult will serve without fee.
I would discuss that with
him or her.
Another consideration is
the four grandchildren. Are
they legal adults, or are they
still minors? If they are mi-
nors, the administrator will
have considerably more de-
tails to handle. At what
point should the money be
distributed to the grandchil-
dren? You may wish to delay
distribution beyond age 18.
If your administrator
thinks he or she should be
paid and you share that
point of view, the two of you
should discuss that up front
There is no exact percent-
age, although there may be
restrictions on maximum
fees.
To avoid any family strife,
you should sit down with
your two children and any
adult grandchildren and ex-
plain precisely what you are
doing and why I'd also sug-
gest (here I go spending
money again) that you sit
down with an attorney and
let the attorney explain all


may sound counterintuitive
after a foreclosure, but beef-
ing up your track record of
good credit accounts can
help boost one's credit
score.
A car loan or a credit card
will do. But if you get a


the ramifications.
You also might wish to
consider how the adminis-
trator is to pay these future
expenses taxes, insur-
ance, etc. until the sale of
the house is completed. If
you are able, you could es-
tablish, as part of the trust,
a cash deposit to pay for all
of these expected annual
expenses. The residual, if
any, could be included in
the trust when the property
is sold. If no money is avail-
able and your two children
are not able to contribute,
then the administrator
should be aware and should
accelerate the sale, or very
possibly the home should be
sold while you are alive.
If you'd like to stay in the
house and you're not able to
put aside cash for expenses
that may continue for a long
time, there is another alter-
native: a reverse mortgage.
You could use the money
generated by the mortgage
to pay the expenses you will
incur until your demise,
then the mortgage company
would sell the house to re-
tire the mortgage. There are
lots of options.

Send your questions to


CITY






RAMBLERSI'


credit card, pay it off every
month.
Be patient. A foreclo-
sure's drag on your credit
score will decline over time.
Dispute any mistakes
on your credit report, which
can lower your score.


Smart Money, PO. Box 2095,
Elfers, FL 34680 or
bruce@brucewilliams. com.


IE


Don't close your oldest
credit accounts. Your score
gets a boost from older
credit lines.
Scale back your lifestyle
and pocket the savings to-
ward a future down
payment


Questions of general
interest will be answered
in future columns.


FRIDAY & SATURDAY, MARCH 2 & 3
5 PM. TIL 9 P.M.

Look for the lighted pathways
Get to know your local artists
Artist Demonstrations
Refreshments Free Admission & Parking

1 Olde Mill House Gallery & Cafe Photography, Painting
& Print Museum
2 River Safaris & Safari Cafe-Pottery,
Wood, Glass & Metal Work
3 Glass Garage Stained & Fused Glass, Jewelry
Wildlife Paintings on Wood
4 Pepper Creek Pottery Sculptural & Functional
Clay Works & Studio
5 Riverworks & Homosassa Smokehouse,
Copper Sculpture & Driftwood Furniture
All shops owned and operated by local artists!!
For more info call (352) 628-5222 or (352) 212-3617


N- IC, ,1


s ABU,


Will %c ean


5usic 'Festival 2012

From Noon

Friday, March 9

To Sunset

Sunday, March 11
at Sertoma Youth Ranch at On-Site Camping

Entertainment by Florida's
Best Songwriters and Singers
Florida Songwriting Contest
S Workshops Arts and Crafts
Food Children's Activities
Bring your Lawn Chairs
Rain or Shine -

For camping information, call 352-465-2167.
For more about the festival visit
www.willmclean.com
Ci KPNmCLE


12TH ANNUAL

[Kiubzay,


cid A&A


D4 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012


BUSINESS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I- A






CLASSIFIED


C CITRUS COUNTY




HRONICLE
www.chronicleonline.com


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012 D5


Classifieds


Classifieds In Print and Online All The Time!


BUSINESS HOURS:

MONDAY-FRIDAY
8:00 A.M. 5:00 P.M.
CLOSED SATURDAY/SUNDAY


WE GLADLY ACCEPT
-/-,
Vi S4r^ c.*^s' s


TOADVETIE ALL



'?Af ^^j A '^* - ^* IT B





I I.
OR PLC YU A NLN AT
BUYERS WITH YOU MES11SAGr^ 111T 5IEji^


Publication Days/Deadlines

Chronicle / Daily....................................... 1 PM, Daily
Homefront / Sunday..............................3 PM, Friday
Chronicle / Sunday.................................4 PM, Friday
Chronicle / Monday...............................4 PM, Friday
Sumter County Times / Thursday..............11 AM, Tuesday
Riverland News / Thursday......................2 PM, Monday
South Marion Citizen / Friday..................4 PM, Tuesday
West Marion Messenaer / Wednesday.......4 PM. Friday


Independent contractors delivering the Citrus County
Chronicle can earn as much as $1,000 a month
working only 3-4 early morning hours per day. The
Chronicle is a permanent part of Citrus County with
an excellent reputation. To find out more, call
and speak to one of our district managers or leave
your name and phone number and we will get right
back with you!


Clyde,
Ms.Parker loves
and misses you.
SWF, 5'2" red hair, lost
the love of my life, I'm
in perfect health, like
football, TV & movies.
Love to cook, member
of VFW. For compan-
ionship. Must be
between 70-80,
Financially secure.
Reply Blind Box 1760-P,
c/o Citrus County
Chronicle, 106 W. Main
St., Inverness, FL 34450
X-pretty boy,older now
but still attractive
enough for some lady's
arm candy, well read,
funny at times, always
considerate, healthy
and financial secure.
So write me at:
WEM ,PO Box 1881,
Inverness, FL 34451



2010 MONTANA
Mountaineer, 5th wheel
36ft., 3 slides,loaded
used 1 season, like new
Hickory Addition
$32,500 (419) 307-8954
CASH For Silver, Decoys
Antiques, Paintings,
Furnitures Cameras, &
Pottery (352) 503-2843
lost dog 2/22 brown fe-
male pit terrier mix 1 y.o.
Black collar last seen
Grover Cleveland/ link
area. just spayed still has
sutures, child broken
hearted. pls call
352-277-4461



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
Paid for Junk Vehicles,
J.W. 352-228-9645
$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not.
CASH PAID $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL OF
Scrap Medal, Mowers
Appliances and MORE
Call (352) 224-0698



8 Pit Mix Puppies
Free to good home
352-257-3052
Baby Gray Pit Bull
Male
Free to good home
(352) 422-2421
Beautiful female calico
cat needs a loving
home. Approximately
2-3 years old.
Up-to-date shots and
spayed. 352-794-3988.
fertilizer, horse manure
mixed with pine shaving
great for gardens or as
mulch. U load and haul
away. 352-628-9624
FREE BUNNY
with cage, very
friendly, brown w/sable
ears(352) 344-5213
KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Savage Pays top $$$.
352-628-4144



FRESH JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct.@ $5 per lb
Stone Crab@ $6 per lb
delivered 727-771-7500



Australian Shepherd
male, chipped, white
with black spots, the
black spot on side looks
like a heart. 2 y.o. miss-
ing for 2 months been
checking at animal
sheltercan you help
me??(352) 746-7024
cell 270-5325
Lost Cat-female, cal-
ico, max short tail, 9
years old, declawed,
no teeth, never been
outside, North Athen/W
Cushions/Citrus Blvd.
area. She had her col-
lar on with her rabies
tag. Please call
(352) 465-1696 or
352-212-5076
lost dog 2/22 brown fe-
male pit terrier mix 1 y.o.
Black collar last seen
Grover Cleveland/ link
area. just spayed still has
sutures, child broken
hearted. pls call
352-277-4461






REWARD $1000.
No Questions ask.
Min Pin Female 10 lbs
name Zoey, Needs
meds. last seen Sun 8/7
Holiday Dr off Turkey
Oak Crystal River
(352) 257-9546
352-400-1519
Small Brown Teddy Bear
in Ozello
(352) 726-0627
Soft Ball Equipment
blew out of truck
around Grover Cleve-
land & Cardinal 2/18
352-400-0230



Advertise in
Over 100 Papers
throughout Florida.
Call Advertising
Networks of Florida for
statewide and regional
advertising.
(866)742-1373 or visit:
www.florida-classifieds.
corn


PRAYER TO THE
BLESSED VIRGIN
(Never known to fail)
0 most beautiful
flower of Mt. Cara-
mel, fruitful vine,
splendor of heaven.
Blessed Mother of the
Son of God,
Immaculate Virgin,
assist me in my
necessity. 0 Star of
the Sea, help me and
show me here you
are my mother. 0
Holy Mary, Mother of
God, Queen of
Heaven and Earth, I
humbly beseech you
from the bottom of
my heart to secure
me in my necessity.
(Make request).
There are none that
can withstand your
power. 0 Mary, con-
ceived without sin,
pray for us who have
recourse to thee.TS
(3 times). Holy Mary, I
place this causein
your hands (3 times).
Say this prayer for 3
consecutive days
and then you must
publish and it will be
granted to you.
TS

PRAYER TO THE
BLESSED VIRGIN
(Never known to fail)
0 most beautiful
flower of Mt. Cara-
mel, fruitful vine,
splendor of heaven.
Blessed Mother of the
Son of God,
Immaculate Virgin,
assist me in my
necessity. 0 Star of
the Sea, help me and
show me here you
are my mother. 0
Holy Mary, Mother of
God, Queen of
Heaven and Earth, I
humbly beseech you
from the bottom of
my heart to secure
me in my necessity.
(Make request).
There are none that
can withstand your
power. 0 Mary, con-
ceived without sin,
pray for us who have
recourse to thee.TS
(3 times). Holy Mary, I
place this causein
your hands (3 times).
Say this prayer for 3
consecutive days
and then you must
publish and it will be
granted to you.
TS




FRESH JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct.@ $5 per lb
Stone Crab@ $6 per lb
delivered 727-771-7500




Admin. Assistant
Experienced with
strong computer skills.
Must pass background
check. Email or send
resume: alex.malley
@multifin.com
Legacy Financial
Associates Inc.
2953 E. Gulf to Lake
Hwy Inverness 34453

Customer
Service/Clerical
Full time, Inverness
Insurance Office
Must have basic
computer skills. Insur-
ance knowledge a
plus. Fax Resume to
352-754-9580 or
email: hilda.cannon@
ffbic.com

P/T CHURCH
SECRETARY
Must have strong
microsoft publisher
back ground, approx.
30 hrs per week.
Send Resume to:
First Baptist Church
Attention Robin
550 Pleasant Grove
Rd., Inverness, Fl 34452




HAIR STYLIST
clientele preferred
Kristy Salon, Bev Hills
(352) 527-9933

HAIR STYLIST
FT/PT Immediate
Openings, Call Sue
352-628-0630










Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
352-34 1-PREP (7737)


3-11 RN
SUPERVISOR
FULLTIME
Seeking a dynamic
experienced RN
Leader to
join a progressive
customer service
oriented team.
Candidate will have
a stable work history,
excellent clinical and
management abili-
ties, great organiza-
tional skills and
effective delegation
and monitoring of
clinical systems.
New Wage Scale
Apply in person at:
ARBOR TRAIL REHAB
611 Turner Camp Rd,
Inverness, FL 34453
Send Resume to:
atdon@
SouthernLTC.com
An EEO/AA Employer
M/F/V/D

AR/ASSISTANT
For busy office.
Medical experience
a must.(352) 489-2995

CITRUS PODIATRY
CENTER
IS EXPANDING:
TWO NEW POSITIONS.
-FULL TIME
FRONT/ BACK OFFICE
BILLING/TWO LOCAL
OFF. NO CODING
EXP. REQ.
M-F 8:30AM-5PM.
MED/DENTAL, RETIRE-
MENT, UNIFORMS
AND VACATION.
-PART-TIME MEDICAL
RECORDS/
FRONT OFFICE.
24HRS/WK, VACA-
TION, UNIFORMS.
BOTH POSITIONS
REQUIRE A MINIUM OF
3 YRS EXP IN MED
SETTING, SALARY
NEGOTIABLE.
SEND RESUME TO:
P.O. BOX 1120,
LECANTO FL.,
34460-1120, ATT: HR
NO FAXES OR PHONE
CALLS ACCEPTED.

CNA/
CAREGIVER
For Assistant Living
Night Shifts Available
Call 344-5555 Ext. 102

Come Join The
Avante Team
Avante At Inverness
is looking for
Full time, Part time,
PRN
LPN's for 3-11&11-7
Please contact
Jennifer Daves @
352-726-3141
Or apply online at
Avantecenters.com

Dental Assistant
30 hours a week
Certified and
Experience,
Coleman Area
1-800-469-4467

FRONT DESK
RECEPTIONIST
Busy Cardiologist office
seeks front office
exp. Individual needs to
be detail oriented,capable
of multi-tasking,
scheduling,multi-line
phone system,and
computer skills. Please
fax resumes
352-547-1342
MA/FRONT DESK

FT for Internal Medicine
practice in Inverness.
Experience preferred.
Fax resume to:
352-637-2311
MEDICAL BILLING
TRAINEES NEEDED
Train to become a
Medical Office Assis-
tant! No Experience
needed! Job Training
& Local Placement
assistance. HS
Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)374-7294

NOW HIRING

RN's
All Units, with Hospital
Experience
Apply on Line: www.
nurse-temps.com
(352) 344-9828

The Department of
Health has an
opening for:

OPS Dental
Assistant.
Annual Salary
range: $19,902.48-
$51,721.54. Minimum
Qualifications: Valid
FL radiology license
and expanded
functions certificate;
experience with dig-
ital x-rays and work-
ing with children;
strong patient
manage-
ment/communication/
scheduling/record
keeping skills; willing
to work 10-hour days.
Please apply on-line
at:
https://jobs.myflorida.c
om Refer to
requisition number
64909159. Only State
of Florida
Applications will be
accepted no
resumes, please.
Date closes
03/02/2012.
EO/AA/VP Employer.


Consulting
Executive
Director
Closing Date/Time:
March 30, 2012,
5:00 p.m. EST
Summary of Duties:
This is an annual
contractual position;
however, the
appointment is as
the Chief Executive
Officer of the
Withlacoochee
Regional Water
Supply Authority. The
position is referred to
as the Executive
Director and reports
directly to the Board
of Directors of the
Authority. The position
includes daily direc-
tion and operating
responsibility, includ-
ing managing all of
the Authority's
consulting contracts
and project
contracts as well as
budgeting and finan-
cial responsibility. The
Executive Director is
responsible for organ-
izing and preparing
the monthly Board
meeting agenda
and ensuring minutes
of the meeting are
prepared. The
Executive Director
functions as the prin-
cipal agent of the
18-memberBoard of
Directors in recom-
mending and imple-
menting policies the
Board adopts and
also participates in
Authority activities
and performs other
duties as needed.
Position Qualifications
and Reauirements:
Bachelor's degree
from an accredited
college or university
in political science,
business administra-
tion, public adminis-
tration or manage-
ment, or in a tech-
nical field related to
water resources/
water supply AND
ten years progres-
sively responsible,
related experience,
INCLUDING at least
five years' experi-
ence in a senior-
level management
capacity OR an
equivalent combi-
nation of education
and experience
is required.
* Demonstrated
strong leadership,
management,
communication
and diplomacy
skills are required.
* Possession of a valid
Florida Driver
License upon
signing of contract
is required.
* Demonstrated
knowledge of
water resource-
related issues,
resource manage-
ment, regulation
and conservation
theory and prac-
tice or education or
experience in engi-
neering, science or
water-resource
related field
is required
* Masters or higher-
level education or
professional ac
creditation in busi-
ness, management,
public administra-
tion or other appli-
cable degree field
is preferred.
* Applicants are
subject to a
background check.
Appointment
Conditions:
The Executive
Director is appointed
by and serves at the
pleasure of the
Authority Board of
Directors. The position
is an annual contrac-
tual arrangement in
which the consulting
Executive Director is
NOT an employee of
the Board, but a
consultant. Condi-
tions of employment
and remuneration
are subject to con-
tract negotiations.
Applicants must
live either in the
four- county regional
area or within short
commuting distance
outside the region
such that daily
access to the office
in Lecanto and/or to
events within the
region are possible.
To Apply for this
Position: To receive
consideration as an
applicant, interested
candidates must
submit the following:
1. A cover letter
summarizing interest
in the position and
relevant qualifica-
tions;
2. A current resume;
3. The names,
addresses and
telephone numbers
of five references at
least three of which
must be work-
related.
For Questions Call
352-527-5795.
Submittals may be
made by mail, email,
or fax to the following
address: WRWSA,
3600 W. Sovereign Pth
Ste. 228, Lecanto,
FL 34461; email:
nsmithnhs@aol.com;
Fax: 352-527-5797.


EXECUTIVE
DIRECTOR

United Way of Citrus
County, a non-profit
agency, is seeking
qualified candidates
for the position of
Chief Professional
Officer/Executive
Director.
This position serves as
chief executive
officer of United Way
of Citrus County
Providing innovative
and strategic leader-
ship while working
with the Board of
Directors to achieve
community impact.
Works with commu-
nity partners, leaders,
and staff to
implement the
strategic plans to
improve education,
achieve financial
stability and promote
healthy lives.
Maintains
accountability for the
overall operational
and fiscal integrity of
the organization.
Skills:
*Ability to prepare
and administer a
non-profit budget.
*Excellent communi-
cations skills (oral and
written).
*Ability to work
successfully with a
non-profit governing
board.
*Ability to coordinate
the annual fund
raising campaign.
-Knowledge of
community planning
operations.
*Provides a
professional image to
the community.
*Sound ethical and
moral principles.
*Commitment to the
mission, vision and
values of United Way.
Education:
A minimum of a
Bachelor's Degree in
business, manage-
ment, finance,
accounting, social
services or related
fields.
Experience,
A minimum of 3 to 5
years managerial
experience, prefera-
bly with a non-profit
health/human serv-
ice agency or busi-
ness.
Send resume to:
United Way of Citrus
County
1205 NE 5th Street,
Suite A
Crystal River, FL 34429






M
























How



To Make



Your



Car


Disappear...



Simply advertise


in the Classifieds


and get results


quickly!







- B-



(352) 563-5966






wwwmchroniclonlnecm


EXECUTIVE
HOUSEKEEPER
For Resort Hotel in
Citrus County. 3 years
prior exp. in position
required. Hotel
exp. a plus. benefits
Apply in Person.
BEST WESTERN
614 N.W. Hwy 19
Crystal River
No Phone Calls.




EXP. LINE COOK

Aoly in Person
at Cracker's
Bar & Grill
Restaurant Help
ALL POSITIONS
Apply in Person, 2-4pm
108W. Main St., Inv.
NO PHONE CALLS




AT&T Authorized
Retailer
Looking for Business
SALES REPS, E-mail
Resume to Career@
sanwireless.com
Exp. Sales People
Apply At
777 NE 5th Street CR




ACCOUNTING
POSITION:
Full time. Large
volume accounts
payable department
needs hands on indi-
vidual with problem
solving skills. Must
have full knowledge
of accounts payable
procedures, must
have excellent math
skills, must be well
versed in computers
including spreadshe-
ets, must understand
GL coding, working
knowledge of job
cost and inventory.
Benefits available.
Please send resume
and salary
requirements to
P.O. Box 1589,
Inglis FL 34449 or send
to deborab@
dabcon.com EOE
Apply Now, 12 Drivers
Needed Top 5% Pay
2Mos. CDL Class A Driv-
ing Exp. (877)258-8782
www.meltontruck.com
DRIVER
Hometime Choices:
Weekly, 7/ON-7/OFF,
14/ON-7/OFF. Daily
Pay. New trucks! Van
and Refrigerated,
CDL-A, 3 months re-
cent experience re-
quired. Top Benefits!
(800)414-9569
www.drivekniaht.com
Drivers:
Run 5 States Regional!
Get home weekends,
earn up to 39cent mile,
1 yr OTR Flatbed Exp.
required. SUNBELT
TRANSPORT, LLC
800-572-5489 X 227
Equipment
Operator/ Bailor

need for immediate
opening. Must have
forklift and bailor
expereince. 40 hrs
per week. Top Pay
for the right canadi-
ate. Apply
in person at
711 S. Adolph Pt
Lecanto, FI



WH



-














How

To Make

Your

Washer

Disappear...


Simply advertise

in the Classifieds

and get results

quickly!






(352) 563-5966


Clli <)\ICI.E

www.chronicleonline.com


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







D6 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012


Driver-Sign on Bonus
Food grade tanker
drivers needed. Com-
petitive pay, Benefits,
Guaranteed time off.
Class A CDL w/tanker
endorsement. Prefer 2
yrs experience. For
information call
(800)569-6816 or
www.otterv
transportation.com
Exp Carpet Install
Helper
727 686-2879




$$$$$$$
Money is available!
We are seeking
individuals to man-
age rack and store
delivery of the Citrus
County Chronicle
and other publica-
tions. Must be at least
18 years of age and
possess a valid driv-
er's license and insur-
ance. Routes are 7
days a week, early
morning hours. Earn-
ing potential is unlim-
ited! Email
kstew-
art@chronicleonline.co
m or bring
resume to 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd. in
Crystal River.

$$$$$$
Caretaker inside & out-
side 12.5 acre farm.
Volunteer for room &
board some $$$ +
352-220-2774

CUSTOMER
RELATIONS
*Call Now!* Looking
to fill immediate
positions. Training,
401(k), medical.
No exp. necessary.
$550-$800 a week.
Call Karen
352-436-4460

EXP POOL ROUTE
TECH
If you know the
difference between
Hayward, calcium
hardness and alkalin-
ity ect., send your
qualifications to:
Citrus Publishing Blind
Box 1761P, 1624 N
Meadowcrest Blvd,
Crystal River, Fl 34429


CITRUS MAIDS
Cleaning Person
needed. Must have
flex. schedule,
lic./vehicle. Exp. a
plus. Leave message
(352) 257-0925

Immediate
Opening
Recycling
Center/Recovered
Material Processing
Plant now looking for
Manager. Must have
experience in
Management/Sales
/Scheduling out
bound loads/Multiple
Computer programs.
Must have a clean
Driver's License. Top
Pay for the right per-
son. Apply in person
@ 711 S. Adolph Pt,
Lecanto, Fl.
Bring resume

LIVE-IN HOUSE
MAID

For small household,
no children, must be
honest, dependable
references required
352-794-3093

Maintenance
Worker

F/T, P/T Must be
experienced for a
Independent,
Assisted Living Facility
Vacation & Benefits
available.
Apply in person
Bentwood Retirement
1900 W. Alpha Ct.
Lecanto.
Commons Bldg.
(352) 746-6611
DFWP/EOE

NOW HIRING

Class A
Drivers/Laborers
(352) 621-1220





SORT LINE
WORKERS

Men & Women for
P/T employment.
Apply in person at
699 S Easy St.
Lecanto, FI


Groundsman
Lic & trans. a must.
Pay based on exp.
352-503-2468




#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)
Heat & Air JOBS -
Ready to work? 3 week
accelerated program.
Hands on environment.
Nationwide certifica-
tions and Local Job
Placement Assistance!
(877) 994-9904




AIRLINES ARE HIRING -
Train for hands on
Aviation Maintenance
Career. FAA approved
program.
Financial aid if qualified
Housing Available.
CALL Aviation Institute
Of Maintenance.
(866)314-3769




#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes

352-341-PREP (7737)

ALLIED HEALTH

Career training
-Attend college 100%
online. Job place-
ment assistance.
Computer available.
Financial Aid if quali-
fied. SCHEV certified.
Call (800)481-9409
www.Centura
Online.com

Attend College
Online from Home
*Medical, *Business,
*Paralegal,
*Accounting,
*Criminal Justice. Job
placement assis-
tance. Computer
available. Financial
Aid if qualified. Call
888-203-3179
www.CenturaOnline
.com


TAYLOU LLEGE






2 WEEK
PREP COURSES!
*ALF ADMINISTRATOR
$300.
*EKG $475.
*NURSING ASST. $475.
*PHLEBOTOMY $475.

tavlorcolleae.edu
(352) 245-4119
FB, twitter, you tube



ENROLLING
I FOR SPRING
I 2012 CLASSES
BARBERR
|*COSMETOLOGY
I 'FULL SPECIALTY
I INSTRUCTOR
TRAINING
IMANICURE/Nall Ext
MASSAGE THERAPY

BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
NEW PORT RICHEY
/SPRING HILL
727-848-8415
352-263-2744




Barber Shop and
Styling Studio
Very good business,
same great location for
many years, I am 69
yrs. old and time to
retire, call Joanne
352-302-4592/795-4307




OAK OFFICE CHAIR on
casters from Dunedin FIl
train depot.Appraised
$200. Price $100 Pine
Ridge 352-270-3909




Corner Grand Father
Clock, $2500 obo
(352) 726-2326


CLASSIFIED



DISNEY CERAMICS
CHARACTER STATUES
$8 634-2004













Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966

Wanted to Buy
Stamps, US, Worldwide,
sheets, PB, FDC, post-
cards 352-245-4225
352-812-0869



CORNER HOT TUB Four
person corner hot tub.
Excellent condition. $
400.00 Call 489-4090
Old Unused
US Postage Stamps
Call for Info.
(352) 344-5622




A/C + HEAT PUMP
SYSTEMS
Starting at $880
13-18 Seer
Installation w/permit
REBATES up to $2.500
352-746-4394
Lic.&Ins. CAC 057914
APPLIANCES WHITE
SMALL SANYO FRIDGE
65.00 (352)419-4429
BLACK SHARP MICRO-
WAVE 35.00 WHITE
BROAN RANGE HOOD
LIKE NEW 25.00
352-419-4429
CHEST FREEZER
8.8 cu ft, white
like new $250
(352) 621-0982
352-476-3034


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CHEST FREEZER
works great $75
blondevampire-
blonde@yahoo
DISHWASHER bisque
color in clean excellent
condition. Hardly used,
changing
colors.$165.obo Pine
Ridge 352-270-3909
DRYER $135.00
Excellent condition,
clean, looks and works
great. Can deliver
352 263-7398
FRIGIDAIRE
Bisque Range, like new
$200. (352) 419-4429
GE Electric Stove
self clean oven bisque
like new $200 obo
Admiral Washer top
load 201b hvy duty
$200(352) 795-7193
Haler Refrigerator
2_.7 cu3 yr warranty
19x26x18..$120
(419) 832-9261
HOTPOINT Fridge
$200.00
HTS18GCSARWW Like
New, Ice Maker, White,
WHIRLPOOL Dish-
washer DU930PWSTO,
586-904-3262 in SMW
Kenmore Range
4 BURNER & Warmer
Zone, blk glass top, all
the bells, Stain/Steel
$250(352) 228-7940
Kenmore
upright freezer
exc. cond $125
(352) 795-0558
Maytag Hvy Duty
washer & matching
natural gas dryer, exc.
cond $350 for both firm
(352) 270-8215
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR, washers
dryers, FREE pick up
352-564-8179
WANTED DEAD
OR ALIVE
Washers & Dryers
Working or not.
(352) 209-5135
WHIRLPOOL ELECTRIC
OVEN STOVE SMOOTH
TOP RF265LXTT, Great
Condition, $200, SMW
586-904-3262




2 DRAWER FILE CABI-
NET PreOwned Com-
mercial Metal Lateral
28"x30"x18" Graphite
Color $45 727-463-4411


COMPUTER DESKS (4)
Formica Top 3'x24" w/2
Drawer File Cabinet
Attached. $25 each
727-463-4411
DESK CHAIRS Commer-
cial PreOwned Fabric
Covered and Adjustable
$45 727-463-4411
FORMICA TOP COM-
PUTER DESKS (4) With
2 Drawer File Cabinet At-
tached 4ftx24inches $25
each 727-463-4411
LATERAL 2 DRAWER
FILE CABINET New in
Box with Keys Commer-
cial Metal Graphite Color
$75 77-463-4411
PREOWNED DESK
CHAIRS (4) Commercial
Dark Gray Fabric $25
each 727-463-4411




CONCRETE VIBRATOR
1.5-"X12' SHAFT
$150.(352) 382-1070
Hilti Fastening Gun
350 & 36M
plus many shots
$145.
(352) 249-4420




27" MAGNAVOX COLOR
TV Works Like New Dig-
ital Cable Ready Seldom
Used. $75 727-463-4411
65" PROJECTION TV
works great $400
352.270.7420
FLOOR ONYSTERIO
COMPUT-
ERMONITERWURL-
ITZERTABLEJUKEB toor
model sterio 5cd changer
cass player $125. com-
puter moniter 19" $50
table jukebx cd
player/radio.yes $70
352 249-0815
SANYO 26" COLOR TV
Older Model Digital Cable
Ready Works Like New
$75 727-463-4411
TUNER AMP, Harmon
Kardon model 330.
Works fine. $25
(352) 795-2820




DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469


u
HP Computer
for sale
exc cond$100.
(352)586-6891




"THOMASVILLE" END
TABLE Beautiful solid
dark oak traditional table.
Add'tl avail. 99.00
352-726-9132
"THOMASVILLE" TA-
BLE Solid wood coffee
table.Pristine Condition!
Additional tables availa-
ble. 99.00 352-726-9132
(2) STACKABLE CHAIRS
PreOwned Fabric Cov-
ered Commercial Sturdy
Metal Frame with Arms 2
for $35 727-463-4411
*GARDEN DESIGN
QUALITY WOOL
AREA RUG MULTI
COLOR 7.9X9.9FT
$100 634-2004
1 Victorian Ladies
Chair $50
3 Armish Ladder back
cane bottom chair
$150 all 3 Call after 10a
Sun. (352) 621-3135
1 Victorian Ladies
Chair $50
3 Armish Ladder back
cane bottom chair
$150 all 3 Call after 10a
Sun. (352) 621-3135
2 piece Red contemp
sofa & love seat, 1 year
old $700. 2 contempo-
rary bar stools $125.
(352) 257-3802
3 LIVING ROOM
TABLES Coffee and 2
end tables with black
slate-like tops $100. Call
352-621-7892 for photos
5 PIECE BLONDE BED-
ROOM SUITE bed, mir-
rored headboard, mir-
rored dresser, armoire,
nightstand, entertainment
center. $500.
352.270.7420
36" SQUARE TABLE
PreOwned Rugged Gray
Formica Top Sturdy Steel
Frame $65 727-463-4411
Antique Wash Stand
w/ mirror and claw feet
$300 Antique 3 drawer
chest with mirror $200
Call for email pics.
(352) 746-0183
Are U Moving? Estate?
In home liquidations?
MARTIN'S Estate &
Consign 352-209-4945


CATHI'S ATTIC
Offering New and Used
Quality Furniture & Ac-
cessories, 352-513-4802
Cherry wood
Queen Anne Glass
Coffee Table, oval
$250
Excellent Condition
(352) 527-4389
CHERRYWOOD FRAME
CHAIRS (2) with Arms
Fabric Upholstery
PreOwned $35 each
727-463-4411
COMPLETE WHITE
RATTAN BEDROOM
SET. Consists of:
1-Twin size bed with
Rattan headboard.
1 6-Drawer dresser
1 4-Drawer dresser
2 2-Drawer Night
Stands
(all white with glass tops)
1 Mirror (Rattan)
1 end of bed bench seat
Asking $1,000- OBO all
in excellent condition.
(352)503-7147 -
Homosassa
352-503-7147
email:
idocargo@gmail.com
Photos available upon re-
quest
COMPUTER DESK &
chair/mat/keyboard
mouse/speakers $75. all
or separate.LIKE NEW
352-621-0175
Couch w/ reclining
ends $300. obo.
Single Recliner
$200 obo
both good cond.
(352) 382-3280
COURISTAN CARPET
8FT ROUND, RED,
BLACK,BEIGE
PATTERN LIKE NEW
$100 634-2004
Deacon's Bench 4ft
maple $125.
Ladies roll top desk,
blond $150.
Excel cond.
SMW (352) 382-4912
Dinette Set,
Light wood, octagon
shape, & leaf 42"W with
4 swivel chairs
$150 (352) 527-4910
ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER
Blonde Wood $400.
(352) 726-9587
Entertainment Center-
light oak color, glass
doors and shelves
nice condition $35.
352-621-0175


Srnwhget


ALL EXTERIOR
ALUMINUM
6" Seamless Gutters
Lic & Ins 352-621-0881
ROB SCREENING
Repairs Rescreen, Front
Entries, Garage, Sliders
Free Est. 352-835-2020
SUBURBAN IND. INC.
Screen rms, Rescreens,
Siding, airports, rf.overs
wood decks, Fla. rooms
windows, garage scrns.
628-0562 (CBC1257141)



SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Washer &
Dryers, Free Pick Up
352-564-8179





Yotii\\orld first

Need a .jol)
or ;a

qualified
employee?


This area's
#1
employment
source!


Cf k l LE

.. ... .. ..


Vertical Blind Factory
We custom make all
types. Best prices any-
where! Hwy 44 & CR
491. (352) 746-1998





e' THIS OUT!
PHIL'S MOBILE MARINE
Repairs & Consignment
30 yrs Cert. Best Prices
& Guar 352-220-9435




Loving Adult Care
Home (SL 6906450)
Alzheimer/Dementia
No problem. Nursing
homes do not need to
be your only alternative
352-503-7052




ROGERS Construction
All Construction
sm jobs Free Est (352)
637-4373 CRC1326872




Sales, Service, Carpet,
laminate, Restretch,
repair, clean Lic#4857
Mitch (352) 422-5136




SHADY VIEW CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
Repairs. 352 613-2518


Clean Ups &
Clean Outs
(352) 220-9190




AFFORDABLE
COMPUTER SERV.
(352) 341-4150
DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
NATURE COAST
COMPUTER Repairs
Free in home inspection
352-212-1551



Bianchi Concrete
inc.com lic/ins
Driveways-Patios-
Sidewalks.352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL/ Lic
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River rock
reseals & repairs. 352
364-2120/410-7383
FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, staining &
Garage Firs. Recession
Prices! 352-527-1097
ROB'S MASONRY
& CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs Tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554



All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing,Hauling,
Site Prep, Driveways.
Lic. & Ins. 352- 795-5755



COUNTYWIDE DRY-
WALL 25 years exp.
For all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Lic/ins. 352-302-6838



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Plasma TV installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
ANNIE'S ELECTRIC
Husband & Wife
Team.(352) 341-5952
EC-13002696


Res./Comm. Lic & Ins.
$50.hr. EC0001303
352-302-2366
DUN-RITE Elect
Elec/Serv/Repairs
New const. Remodel
Free Est 726-2907
EC13002699 Serving
Citrus Co. Since 1978
Thomas Electric LLC
Generator maint &
repair. Guardian
Homestandby &
Centurion. Cert. Tech.
Briggs Stratton 352-
621-1248 #ER00015377




A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002
BOB BROWN'S
Fence & Landscaping
352-795-0188/220-3194
ROCKY'S FENCING
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
k 352 422-7279 k



Premium Seasoned split
Firewood $75 Per Stack
(4x8) Free Delivery
(352) 527-8352



ALL EXTERIOR
ALUMINUM
6" Seamless Gutters
Lic & Ins 352-621-0881
ALUMINUM
STRUCTURES
5" & 6" Seamless Gutters
Free Estimates, Lic &
Ins. (352) 563-2977



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Plasma TV installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
Andrew Joehl
Handyman.
Gen/Maint/Repairs
Pressure cleaning.
Lawns/Gutters. No job
too small!Reli able ins.
0256271 352-465-9201
A HANDYMAN
If Its Broke, Jerry Can
Fix It. Housecleaning
also. 352-201-0116 Lic.


man All your needs at
recession prices Dale
352-586-8129
Affordable Handyman
V FAST
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handyman
V FAST
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handvman
V FAST
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
.100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
FAST
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
.100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 k
Handyman Dave
Pressure Clean, Paint &
Repairs, oddjobs &
hauling (352) 726-9570
HOME CARE
Lawn & Handyman
Services. Sprinkler
Repair 352-212-4935
Remodeling, Additions,
Doors, Windows, Tile
work. Lic.#CRC1330081
Free Est. (352)949-2292





V' THIS OUT!
AC & HEAT PUMPS
FREE Estimate & 2nd
Opinion, 10 yr. warr.
on ALL Parts, Great
prices, ALL the time.
352-400 -4945
Lic #CAC027361




Citrus Cleaning
Team. top quality
work & great
rates. 302-3348
(352) 527-2279
MAID TO ORDER
House Cleaning *
(352) 586-9125
Have Vacum Will Travel


The Tile Man
Bathroom remodel
Specializing in
handicap. Lic/Ins.
#2441. 352-634-1584




#1 BOBCAT FOR HIRE
Light land clearing, site
work, grading, hauling.
NO JOB TOO SMALL!!!
Lic. & Ins. 352-400-0528
All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
All AROUND TRACTOR
,L -,,,. ,, ,
352-795-5755






CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, curbing,
flocrete. River rock
reseals & repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
Florida Sitescapes, LLC
FREE est: Yard Clean Up
Mowing, and MORE
Call 352.201.7374




Florida Sitescapes, LLC
FREE est: Yard Clean Up
Mowing, and MORE
Call 352.201.7374

GOT LEAVES?
Ask about leaf vac
system, Free est.
Winter Clean up +
Hauling 352 344-9273
cell 352-201-9371
HALLOCK & SON
LAWN CARE ALL Your
lawn care needs. Detailed
Work. 400-1197, Lic/Ins.
HOME CARE
Lawn & Handyman
Services. Sprinkler
Repair 352-212-4935
JUSTIN LAWN CARE
Fast and Affordable.
and Friendly, Licensed.
(352) 476-3985
LAWN CARE 'N" More
Fall Clean up, bed,
bushes, haul since 1991
(352) 726-9570


mulch, hauling, press
clean 352 220-6761



AT YOUR HOME
Mower, Parts Service &
Repair.Visit our store@
1332 SE Hwy 19
352-220-4244



RELAX to the MAX
at home ... # MA58428
(352) 897-4670



A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs, trash,
lawn maint. furn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
ALL OF CITRUS
CLEAN UPS CLEAN OUTS
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790
HAULING
FRE E ESTIMATES
scrap metals haul for
FREE (352) 344-9273




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
A- George Swedlige
Painting/press cleaning
Int/Ext. texture/drywall
repair (352) 794-0400
ABC Painting LLC
All your painting needs
@ recession prices. Call
Dale 352-586-8129
BILL CAMPBELL
PAINTING- REPAIRS
LIC/ INS/ REFS 33 YRS
352-454-8571
Handyman Dave
Pressure Clean, Paint &
Repairs, odd jobs &
hauling (352) 726-9570
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998



Tim Herndon Plumbing
$10. off w/this ad
10 yrs serving Citrus Co
lic/insCFC 1428395
(352) 201-8237


CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
ABC Press. Cleaning.
All your cleaning needs
at recession prices.
Free Est .Dale 586-8129
Handyman Dave
Pressure Clean, Paint &
Repairs, odd jobs &
hauling (352) 726-9570
JOHN GRAY
DRIVEWAYS $55.
.wHOUSE $75/POOL $85
(352) 270-8310
Pic PICARD'S Pressure
Cleaning & Painting
352-341-3300




Remodeling, kitchens
baths, ceramic tile &
tops. Decks, Garages
Handyman Services 40
Yrs Exp. crc058140
344-3536; 563-9768




Bruce F. Storman
Septic Services,
lic/in 352-795-5779




Attention Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers are
required by state law
to include their state
license number in all
advertisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious that
you may be contact-
ing an unlicensed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For questions
about business
licensing, please call
your city or county gov-
ernment offices.


$60. Bahia Pallets
U-Pick Up. Special
Winter Pricing. Call
Now!! 352-400-2221




HOME CARE
Lawn & Handyman
Services. Sprinkler
Repair 352-212-4935




A Cutting Edge
Tile Jobs Showers,
Firs .Safety Bars. ETC
352-422-2019
Lic. #2713, Insured.




A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest Rates
Free est.(352)860-1452

DAVID'S
TREE SERVICE
(352) 302-5641

All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
DOUBLE J Tree Serv.
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
R WRIGHT Tree Service
Tree removal & trimming.
Ins. & Lic.# 0256879
352-341-6827
RIVENBARK
LAWN & LANDSCAPE.
15% off Tree Trimming
in Feb. (352) 464-3566
RON ROBBINS Tree Serv
Trim, Shape & Remove
Lic/Ins Free Est.
352-628-2825
T & T TREE SERVICE
We Blow Away
High Prices!
Free Est. 352-362-3610




344-2556, Richard
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


I REMODE


COPES POOL
AND PAVER LLC
YOUR INTERLOCKING BRICK PAVER SPECIALIST
Build your new pool now and
be ready for next summer!
Refinish your pool during the cooler months.

352-400-3188


GENERAL '
Stand Alone .,
Generator

Thomas Electric, LLC
Residential/Commercial Service
Generac Centurion
Guardian Generators
Factory Authorized Technicians
ER0015377

352-61-124


* New Landscapes

* One Time Cuts

* Free Estimates




Rivenbark Lawn
S&Landscape
^. (352) 464-3566




Si Lawn Mowers
S* Trimmers
0l Chain Saws
1. 6\ "*' 1 Y, *Blowers
E PrPess re Washers



A*- FREE ESTIMATES
1, 1,,,,,'' ,I''-,, ,=,,,,,

AYLOR RENTAL
OPEN 7 DAYS 7095-5600
8081 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Crystal River


* Furniture Refinishing
SEntryway Refinishing
STool/Knife Sharpening
Pressure Washing
Lawn/Property Maintenance

Classical Custom
Services, Inc.
Mark McClendon

352-613-7934
Over 20 Years Experience Licensed& Insured


*ss^^^


AAA ROOFING
Call the 4eak6uste
Free Written Estimate

:$100 OFF:
Any Re-Roof
Must present coupon at time contract is signed
7 i35/in 7C CCsCn7i7 000AGKI


iJ


Ron's Affordable

Handyman Services
~ All Home
Repairs
.*SmaLL Carpentry
Fendcing
Screening
-. Clean Dryer

Affordable & Dependable
Experience lifelong
S 352.344-0905
celt 400-1722


DRYE VEN CLANG


. .. .. . .


* 1 Day Cabinets Laminates
* Remodeling Supplies Woods
* Refacing Supplies Clues
* Hinges Saw Sharpening
Cabinet Supplies & Hardware



3835 S. Pittsburgh Ave., Homosassa, FL
OOOA7Z 352-628-9760





Diamond Brite
L= 7T^^ Florida Gem
Marcite Decks
,Pavers
FREE Tile -
ESTIMATES

GREG'S COMPLETE
REG REMODEL

MARCITE, INC.
i'cENsE 352-746-5200


BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Day,
We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over"Your Old One!!!
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!
Call now for a FREE
In-Home Estimate

1-866-585-8827
BATHFITTER.COM
000AECJ


F


I L-







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



xecu ive rair7ack iL l M
$40. 2 Recliners, two,
custom made, white
rattan soft multi color HOMOSASSA
strip $200 ea Sat & Sun 8-6p
Excel cond. SMW Lots of Furniture
(352) 382-4912 in house Sale
FOLDING BANQUET 7200 S. Maxwell Pt.
TABLES (3) 6 Foot INVERNESS
PreOwned Wood Grain Sun 26th, One Day Only
Top $35 each 7am-2p MOVING SALE
727-463-4411 Furniture, Tools, Etc.
FREE STANDING 10101 S. Forestline Ave.
BLACK BOOKCASE 5
Shelves 72"x38"x12" $25
727463-4411
Granite top GIRLS BABY CLOTHES
Dining Rm. table w/6 Girls. 0-3, 3-6mos.
leather chairs, match- onsies. 3-6mos dresses
ing side board (buffet) 6-9mos dress. 36 pieces
matching coffee table in all $15. 352-637-4916
& end tables $1500
will sell separate
(352) 586-6746
KITCHEN TABLE 48 inch
birdseye maple table, two 2 unframed glass mir-
leaves, six chairs-one rors in exc. cond
needs repair $150.00 obo (1) 66x42" & the other
352-503-2226 42x36" $45 both
Lane Recliner Rocker, Citrus Hills
burgundy color, Hernando/ must pick
excellent condition up (352) 341-4103
$75 (352) 527-3396 42" round Ktchen Table
Leather Beige Sofa 2 chairs $100. 4 drawer
w/ Double Recliner file cab. $10. Ent Center
Like New $500. $20.Irg Oak desk
Black Leather w/chair. $25.
Executive Chair $75 (352) 527-1042
352-794-4164 5TH WHEEL HITCH 16k
NEW AMISH QUILT, 100.00 352-628-3455
QUEEN, DOUBLE WED- BICYCLE New boy's 16
DING RING greens on inch huffy bike. $30.00
cream. Very pretty. Not call 352 726 5753
Chinese. $300 Blinds 95"x80" $30.
352-897-4154 Blazers, yellow & green
Oak Bar Ladies sz 14 $10 ea.
L shape, 4x5, formica 2 gal fish tank w/acc.
top, exc cond. w 2 bar $8.(352) 291-1556
stools $500. call 7a-7pm CEMETERY SPRING
(352) 465-2823 TIME WREATH/STAND
PAUL'S FURNITURE $100 HANDCRAFTED
Now open Tues-Sat. E-MAIL PHOTO
352-628-2306 419-5981
paulsfurnitureonline.com CHANDELIER 5 LIGHT,
Preowned Mattress BRONZE METAL, UM-
Sets from Twin $30 BER COLORED GLASS,
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75. EXCEL CONDITION $90
352-628-0808 727.857.6583
CROSCILL QUEEN
Queen Ann-style BEDSPREAD- matching
Dining table & 6 egg- shams & pillows
shell color upholstery -excellent -Aqua floral
chairs., solid wood $20. 352 382 0220
w/cherry veneer oval
table top,great cond. DOG RAMP FOLDING
New $1723 sell $390 Holds up to 2001b dogs
Cash (352) 489-4795 For vans/suv's/trucks.
ROCKER/Recliner $45. 352-270-3909
brown over stuffed& FISH TANK 29 GALLON
sized, Brand New. $175. w/pump equipment,decor
Rocker w/ottman display & more $35
tan $65.(304) 661-9811 352-382-3650
ROCKING CHAIR blue FOLD-A-CART HOLDS
ROCKING CHAIR blu 6 CU FT GOOD FOR
upholstered rocking chair 6 CU FT GARDINING/MARINA
Ocolbon GARDINING/MARINA
with ottoman $50.00 obo LD FLAT EXCEL CON
352-503-2226 FOLD FLAT EXCEL CON
352-503-2226$75 727.857.6583
ROUND TABLE 36" Like GLASS 6' TANK FO
New Rugged Yellow For- REPTILES (LEAKS)
mica Top Sturdy Steel 25.00 OBO INVERNESS
Pedestal $65 352-478-6060
727463-4411
OF HONDA ACCORD
SOFA, COUPE SPLASH
Hunter Green Leather, GUARDS Fit years
perfect condition 2008-2012 Brand New -
changing decor $50 (352) 795-2820
$400
(352) 344-2246 ICE CHEST 12 GAL RUB-
Dining BERMAID, NEW CONDI-
Solid Cherry Dining TION $13
room set with 8 chairs (352) 382-1154
$450-1729 W Gulf-to KING SIZE MATTRESS
Lake ILecantoFL Excellent Condition
STACKABLE CHAIRS (4) $100.00 352-637-5331 or
with Black Metal Framed 352-476-5603
Arms Fabric Covered LOVESEAT dark green
Your Choice of Color $10 leather dual recliner has
each 727463-4411 small tear on seat. good
Tan Leather Couch for rec room $50.00
love seat chair & otto- 352-503-2226
man, Sony Entertain- MAYO CLINIC HEALTH
ment center w/2 large BOOK HARD COVER In
speakers .$500. excellent condition-$20
(352) 344-5161 352 382 0220
Tea Cart Moenstone Granite
made in Italy $150. Kitchen Sink, big single
White Leather LR chair bowl, 10" deep, 33" x
$50.(352) 795-7254 22" can be over or
VINTAGE MARBLE under mount,
TABLE/LAMP gold toned. desinger black
$100.00 352.270.7420 Retail $550-$600
VINTAGE ROUNDBACK Sell $125.(352) 503-3914
CHAIRS blue seat, Sanford Davis Tri-pod
wicker inserts. $100. $50. Bogan 3051
352.270.7420 Pro-Tri-Podw/head$70.


2005, 42' Cut
Sears Lawn Tractor
Great condition
small hole in deck
$600.obo
(352) 302-0648
CHICKEN
MANURE/FERTILIZER
(25 bags avail) time to
prepare your soil! 20 lb
bag, $4.00 352-563-1519
CRAFTSMAN RIDING
MOWER 42" deck
15.5 hp engine $400
(352) 746-7357
LAWN EDGER
troy built edger
4cyl $75.oo00
352 726 9708
Lawn Roller
8001b pull with lawn
tractor $150.
(352) 628-5708
TRAILER Open trailer 6'X
16' Mesh gate, solid
wood floor, double axel,
new tires, good condition.
$1000.00 Pics available.
Call 352-563-5259








Citrus Springs
Sat. &Sun. 7:30am-?
Furn,elec.,DVDs,appls.
Quality golf equipment
11052 N Fuego Drive

*/THIS OUT!
GUN SHOW
Ocala National Guard
Armory
Feb 25 & 26, Sat 9-5,
Sun 9-4
900 SW 20TH Street
Ocala, FL 34474
Concealed Weapons
Classes Daily
Bring your GUNS &
GOLD to sell or trade

GunTraderGunShows.co
m
352-339-4780


YARDSALE

Homosassa
Large Sale Sat & Sun
8a-4pm Lenoxs ,rugs,
hsehld, drapes, tools,
toys, clothes, diving
equip, etc Cardinal to
Lewdinger go R Ost
West to 6058 S. Brott Pt
HOMOSASSA
Sunday 8-4 House Estate
Sale (neat Non-smoker)
at 47 Pine St in Sugar Mill
Woods. Everything must
go:
Furniture, appliances, 3
Robert Bateman prints,
military and wildlife books,
50" plasma TV, Blu-ray
player, CDs, DVDs,
china, kitchen stuff, home
and gardening tools, HO
train structures with
track/switches, model
paints and accessories,
and lots of misc. stuff


GIILU ll-uu IIhea d $U.
Lrg reflector $15. fold
type writing table $10
hand crafted posing
bench $35.
(352) 697-2452
TELEPHONE ANSWER-
ING MACHINE $10
DIGITAL-LIKE NEW-CAN
E-MAIL PHOTO
419-5981
TOOL CHEST, 24 GAL
RUBBERMAID, LIKE NEW
$18 (352) 382-1154
Towle Candlelight Sterl-
ing 10 pl. setting
(352) 382-5715
Trailer hitch
Buick Rendezvous
PONTIAC 2001 TO 2005
$ 75.00 352- 726- 9708
VERTICAL BLINDS
118"x79" VALANCE, ALL
HARDWARE. EXEC
CON. IVORY/TAUPE $75
727.857.6583
VERTICAL BLINDS for
sliding glass doors 6'
wide 352-628-3455
$25.00
Wood Flooring by
BrucePlanks 3"x3/8"x
random lengths Med.Oak
25Ft. NEW in box $59
352-382-3650



PUMP BARBER CHAIR
works great $30.
blondevampire-
blonde@yahoo.com
TATTOO CHAIR $400
blondevampire-
blonde@yahoo.com
Turn Key Buz
Pressure Cleaning &
Painting Bus. ALL
Equip in 2002
Ford Cargo Van,
all built inside $5 K
352-382-4770




Like New
Hoveround Power
Chair $1,200
Wheel Chair Lift,
12V, plugs into trlr. hitch
$350 (352) 527-2657
OVER BED TABLE push
button chrome,and brown
wood like top $30.00 firm
352-513-4473
SCOOTER
P3 Cruiser by Planet
Mobility, new batteries
$300 firm
(352) 344-4944
SCOOTER
Pace Saver Jr.
SCOOTER Go Go Pride
both 3 wheel, w/
charger, excel cond.
$450. ea (352) 489-3264
WALKER 4 wheeled
walker with seat
$30.
blondevampire-
blonde@yahoo.com



BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We Also
Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676


"NEW"ACOUSTIC
GUITAR,SOLID SITKA
SPRUCE&GOLD GRO-
VERS! $100
352-601-6625
"NEWELECTRIC LAP
STEEL GUITAR
W/CASE,CORD &FREE
AMP! $100
352-601-6625
CLARINET
Martin Freres Classic
Made in France
$85 (352) 527-1193
CLARINET
Rusg Tone USA
$85 (352) 527-1193
Guitar Gig Bag $10.
352-4194464
Guitar Strap
$2.00
352-419-4464
OLD,OLD,OLD ACCOR-
DION WITH CASE
NEEDS WORK ONLY
$100,00 464-0316




12 IN X 12 IN FLOOR
TILES... About 80 pieces
/ loght colors...
20.00 Linda 341-4449
APARTMENT SIZED
FRIG Brown, 3', works
great. $50.00
blondevampire-
blonde@yahoo.com
SOURING EAGLE 12 IN
HIGH.WAS
59.95/SELLING FOR
20.00 LINDA 341-4449
TOILET Used, clean,
bone color. $15
352-513-4614




ELECTRIC TREADMILL
ALL ELECTRONICS
TIME DISTANCE CALO-
RIES ONLY 100.00
464-0316
Weight Set
W/plates, bars, collars
bench $100.
(352) 503-6776
Weslo Cadence 875
treadmill, console,
handrails, padded
walking platform $75
(352) 344-8056




CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pond,
ATVtrails $165Kobo
352 795-2027/ 634-4745
CLUB CAR
$650
with charger
352-344-8516
CLUB CAR
'06 $1,500,
with charger
352-344-8516
Club Car '08
Precedent, electric,
new batteries, #48
voltwindshield
$2400.(352) 795-7193
CLUB CAR
side curtains, seat covr
windshield, full mirror,
lights, like new $1475.
(352) 564-2756
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
FRESH JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct.@ $5 per lb
Stone Crab@ $6 per lb
delivered 727-771-7500
GOLF CLUBS
new& used $100.
(352) 795-0558

V THIS OUT!
GUN SHOW
Ocala National Guard
Armory
Feb 25 & 26, Sat 9-5,
Sun 9-4
900 SW 20TH Street
Ocala, FL 34474
Concealed Weapons
Classes Daily
Bring your GUNS &
GOLD to sell or trade

GunTraderGunShows.co
m
352-339-4780
MC CELLAN SADDLE
tan/brown,12 inch,made
in Columbia. Good
condition. $100.00 firm
352-513-4473
MOSSBERG SHOT GUN
3.5 mag. 2 barrels,
Camo like new never
used $400 obo
(352) 634-5565
New 100th Anniversary
HD motorcycle cover.
$50.352-637-4916
Pool Table
full size, exc cond.
balls, ceiling light
$250 (352) 726-5280
Trailmate3 wheel
Bicycle-Joyrider, low to
ground, with a full
seat inc back support
$225 (352) 341-7718

| WE BUY GUNS |
On Site Gun Smithing
(352) 726-5238




EZ PULL TRAILERS,
New & Used

Utility & Enclosed
BUY, SELL, TRADE
Custom Built, Parts,
Tires, Whls, Repairs,
Trailer Hitches

7' x 20' 5 ton Equip
trailer, Reg. $3295
Now $2995


5 x 8 used encl.
cargo trailer $895.

Hwy 44 Crystal River
352-564-1299

GULF TO LAKE
TRAILER SALES

Largest Selection &
Lowest Prices.
Offering New & Used
Cargo & utility trailers

Triple Crown Utility TRL
6 x 12 w/new spare
$1050.
6 x 12 Enclosed w/
V nose, rear ramp
door, $1950.

Trailer Tires
starting at $69.95

352-527-0555
Hwy 44, Lecanto


HIGH CHAIR. Baby
trends. Excellent condi-
tion. Adjustable w/
removable tray. $30.
Call (352) 201-6967
Nice wood Baby crib and
a Graco baby stroller both
like new for $100.
352-535-0048


Sell r Swa


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





CASH For Silver, Decoys
Antiques, Paintings,
Furnitures Cameras, &
Pottery (352) 503-2843






I WANT TO BUY
Your CAR, TRUCK, SUV,
RV, BOAT, Imports or
Any Model, Any
Condition, No Titlle OK.
Paying up to $20,000 or
More. (813) 458-0584
JUNK MOTORCYCLES
WANTED Will Pay up to
$200 for Unwanted Mo-
torcycle 352-942-3492
WANT TO BUY HOUSE or
MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation.
Call (352) 726-9369
WANTED Old Radio
Tubes, vacuum tubes,
stereos and electronic


BEAGLE PUPPIES 8
wks on 2/15 4 females 1
male $125., also have 3
Bloodhound/beagle mix
10wks old $50.obo
386-344-4218 or
386-344-4219
Chihuahua
Puppies for Sale
5 weeks old
Pure breds,
(352) 419-5105
INVERENESS FL KC
offers Confirmation &
Obedience Dog
Training classes starts
Wed, March 7th
Crystal River Armory
Call 344-1088 to
register.
Pair of large Iguanas
with cage, M&F, go to
same home, $100 for all
(352) 344-5436
Yorkie pups CKC, 8
wks March 1st, females
$600 males $550. Judy,
(352) 344-9803

Livestock


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





BOAT LIFT
Single Pole,
1500 lb. capacity.
$900 obo
352-613-8453




07 Proline 17 ft
4 stroke 90 HP Suzuki,
very low hours, ready
to fish trailer & more
$13,500 352-795-3894
Angler Model 2500
walk around, pur-
chased New March
2009 paid $54,520.
twin eng. 115 Yamaha
warnty 3/15 (14 hrs)
ESTATE PRICE
$37,500 859-229-5667
CAROLINA SKIFF
2001 19 foot Excellent
condition, 90 hp Yamaha,
bimini, radio, depth finder,
includes trailer with new
tires.
$7500.00 obo
352-895-2382 ask for Bill
FRESH JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct.@ $5 per lb
Stone Crab@ $6 per lb
delivered 727-771-7500
HOUSE BOAT
30 ft fiberglass, hrd
wood firs, & more
Live Aboard or eniov
weekends in Paradise
$12,800 (423) 320-3008
Jon Boat
16' Alum. trolling motor
& battery, good cond.
$250.(352) 634-5565
KAYAK 15'
Wilderness Systems
Cape Horn w/rudder,
gar. kept, exc. cond
$700(352) 382-2824
MONARCH 20 ft
Pontoon Boat, new
deck,carpet, & seats,
75H Merc. mtr. $5,400
(703) 220-5916 cell
Pontoon Boat
24' 150hp Evinrude
Party Boat $3500
(352) 628-5218


CIASSIFIEDS




G3, 90 hp Yamaha,
jack plate, rods, cooler,
live well, camo interior
Galv trailer, low hrs,
4 blade prop $10,500
352 489-1403
Wanna Sell your
Boat? call me
(352) 220-9435
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LAKE
MARINE
We Pay CASH For Used
Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck & Fishing

boatsupercenter.com





















YACHTSMAN
24' Pontoon, 70 HP Ev.
T/T, cust. trlr, bimini top,
stored inside $4,200/bo
Homa. (231) 852-0061




2001 38 ft Holiday
Rambler, Cummings
diesel,2 slides, fully
loaded ,sell or trade
property $60000
859-814-3573
2010 MONTANA
Mountaineer, 5th wheel
36ft. 3 slidesloaded
used 1 season, like new
Hickory Addition
$32,500 (419) 307-8954
Bounder
Fleetwood 32 1994
454 engine, loaded,
self contained, $9,750
352-795-6736
I Buy RV'S, Steve
Henry, RV World of
Hudson Inc.Since
1974. (888) 674-8376
(727) 514-8875
SUNSEEKER '05
29ft. Class. C., nearly
all options, generators
needs awning fabric,
no smoken33k mi.
Reduce $24K, 464-0316




05 SUNNYBROOK 36'
5th whl,2 slidesking
bedlike new, heated
tks 60 amp service
oak cab $39,900
352-382-3298
32" 5th Wheel
$1800
(352) 634-5565
Coachmen '01
Catalina 25 5th wheel
2 slide outs, fully
equipped$8500 obo
352-382-4084 422-2961
Gulf Steam
Coach 25' model
24RBL, sips upto 6 gas &
elect appls & heat,
shower/toliet $6900
(352) 341-1714
I BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
call me 352-201-6945
Open Road Pilgrim
05 5th whl. 32' 2 slides
deluxe Kit. new awning
& a/c, amfmw/TV
$14K(317) 407-4542
Reese Tow power
hitch, max weight 7500
Ibs, fits various pick ups.
$100(352) 341-1714





Travel Trailer '09
34' slide room, W/D,
dishwash, hard wood
firs, Q bed $12,900
cell (813) 699-2262




2010 Stelh Tow Dolly
Like new condition
has straps for Tires
$850.
(352) 221-0709
CAR CREEPER, NEW
CONDITION $18
SET OF CAR RAMPS $22
(352) 382-1154
Chevy 383 Stroker Kit
H Beam Rods forged
pistons balanced $650
obo(352) 628-41i10
Hurst Competition,
plus shifter w/mounting
plate, new $200
(352) 628-4110




BIG SALE!
Consignment USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
AUTOS FROM $1,500.
US 19 BY AIRPORT
US 44, BY NAPA
Low Payments *r
461-4518 & 795-4440
consignmentusa.org
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not .
CASH PAID $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars Trucks
& Vans, For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES,
Hwy 19... 352 564-8333


CASH PAID FOR JUNK
CARS Any Condition
Up to $500., Free
Towing 352-445-3909
KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Salvage Pays top $$$
for your autos.
352-628-4144
WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
Perfect Cond. or Not
TItled,No title,
No problem. Paying up
to $25K any make,
any model Call A.J.
813-335-3794/ 531-4298




'08 Chrysler
Sebring Touring
Convertible,34k miles,
loaded, $14,250firm
352-897-4520


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012 D7


Consignment USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
AUTOS' FROM $1,500.
US 19 BY AIRPORT
US 44, BY NAPA
Low Payments *
461-4518 & 795-4440
consignmentusa.org

BUICK 97
LeSabre,100+K mi
loaded white 4 dr.
$2495. Riverhaven
(352) 628-7077
Citrus Sale Center
We buy/sell/trade
clean pre-owned
vehicles!


02 Ford Quad CabTruck
F- 150Cab$4999
07 Nissan Murano
$14,900
06 Chrysler PT Cruiser
$6,499
06 Grand Marquis
$13,200 low miles
Call 352-400-1038
LINCOLN
'06, Towncar, Signature,
37K miles, looks, drives
even smells like new.
$16,500. (352) 746-1184
LINCOLN
2001 Town Car,
new tires & brakes,
runs good $2800. obo
(352) 533-3147
MERCEDES '99
S420, blue book $11,500
sell $10K FIRM
1729 W. Gulf to lake
Hwy, Lecanto
MERCURY
'00, Sable GS, 4 Door
loaded, only 70K mi.,
leather, V6, AC, Stereo,
garaged Clean $3,500.
(352) 212-9383
VOLKSWAGON
'97, green Cabrio
convertible, a/c 52K mi
garage kept $4,800
(352) 287-5423




Mercedes 82
380 SL, 105K mi., both
tops exc. cond., runs
good, no dents or rust
$7500 obo352 746-6925







Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





BIG SALE!
Consignment USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
AUTOS' FROM $1,500.
US 19 BY AIRPORT
US 44, BY NAPA
Low Payments *
461-4518 & 795-4440
consignmentusa.org

CHEVROLET
'11, Silverado, 1,500 LT
crew cab, 5.3 V8, trail-
ing pkg, clothe trim
$26,000 (352) 344-0089
CHEVROLET
'99, S 10 pick up, V6,
$2,800
(352) 476-1474
(352) 382-1502
Citrus Sale Center
We buy/sell/trade
clean pre-owned
vehicles!


02 Ford QuadCab F-150
Truck $4999
07 Nissan Murano
$14,900
06 Chrysler PT Cruiser
$6499
06 Grand Marquis
$13,200 low miles
Call 352-400-1038
FORD '01
Lariat F 350 DRW 7.3
turbo diesel super cab
84K mis. exc cond $14K
call Bob(352) 794-3142
FORD 02
F150 Lariat SuperCrew
Cab.Orig.owner, only
53K miles, very clean,
garaged, white,
many extra's $12,950
(352) 628-7898

ONE OWNER
FORD
2002 Ranger ONE
OWNER, 159K ALL
HIGHWAY MILES
CLEAN, A/C POWER
WINDOWS & DOORS.
CD PLAYER, BED-
LINER. NEW TIRES
jsher-
ouse2@tampabay.rr.com
FORD
2004, E 350 Moving Box
Truck w/ Ramp, under
27K miles, AC, dual rear
wheels, Asking, $12,000
obo 352-634-1041



FORD RANGER 99
Ig bed w/topper super
clean, 129K miles,
manual trans. well
maint. good mpg.
new stereo.S3000 Call
Doug 352-794-3463
GMC
'08, Sierra 1500, white,
like new only 10K mi.,
long bed, bed liner
chrome & tow pkg.
Must See KBB Sug. Ret.
$16,700. Asking $15,500
obo (352) 634-4708 or
mdp@newair.biz
TOYOTA TUNDRA


06, Contractor Model
76K miles. Blue book
$12K ,sell $10K.
(352) 566-8022




GMC
2000 Yukon 4x4 V-8 Gas,
One Owner,
Non-Smoker, never used
off-road, Runs, drives
great,Great Condition,
140k miles, $6,500 obo
352/586-8880
HYUNDAI '08
Santa Fe, 23,670K mi
loaded w all acc.
242 hp V6, leather
warranty transferable
$18,500 (352) 465-5501


CHEVROLET
2000 CK2500 PICK-UP
127K,EXT CAB, LONG
BEDAUTLOAC,CRUISE,TILT,
AM/FM
BILL@352/860-2131

JEEP
'95, Cherokee, 159K mi.,
runs good, 4 DR, 4 x 4,
9" Lift on 35, $2,250. obo
(352) 345-6499



900-0229 DAILY CRN
Surplus Prop.
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County Board

^^^^^^-11


2005 HD Ultra
Classic w/Fat Bagger
kit, Custom seat,
wheels ect $13000 obo
352-563-6327or 860-3481



L, D L'i

CHKi)NICLE
Classtfteds



of County Commissioners
will be selling surplus prop-
erty and equipment via
the internet at

^^^^^^^I


Harley 00
Roadking Classic, all
gear 17K miles 11K
obo.(352) 489-0873



JUNK MOTORCYCLES
WANTED Will Pay up to
$200 for Unwanted Mo-
torcycle352-942-3492




govdeals.com from Jan.
15 until Feb. 29,2012.
Jan. 15 thruFeb. 29,2012


385-0226 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS
RFP No. 009-12
Technology Marketing Services
The Citrus County Tourist Development Council invites interested parties to submit a
Proposal to provide technology marketing services to include but not be limited to a
new visitcitrus.com website as well as marketing, advertising, and inquiry database
management.
SEALED Proposals are to be submitted on or before March 26, 2012@ 2:00 PM to
Wendy Crawford, Office of Management & Budget, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Suite
266, Lecanto, Florida 34461.
A Public Opening of the Proposals is scheduled for March 26, 2012 @ 2:15 PM at 3600
West Sovereign Path, Room 283, Lecanto, Florida 34461. The only information con-
veyed at the public opening will be the names of the companies who submitted
Proposals.
Anyone requiring reasonable accommodations to the public opening because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the Office of Management &
Budget at (352) 527-5457 at least two days before the meetings. If you are hearing
or speech impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 527-5312.
To obtain a copy of the Request for Proposal Document for this announcement,
please visit the Citrus County Website at www.bocc.citrus.fl.us and select
BIDS/PURCHASING" on the left hand side of the Home Page. Or, call the Office of
Management & Budget/Purchasing at (352) 527-5457.
CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
Winn Webb, Chairman
February 26, 2012.


387-0226 SUCRN 2010-A24
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF INTENT TO CONSIDER AN ORDINANCE
AMENDING THE CITRUS COUNTY CODE
The Citrus County Board of County Commissioners (BCC) proposes to amend the fol-
lowing ordinance:
2010 A24 CITRUS COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT IS RE-
QUESTING:
AN ORDINANCE OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA, AMENDING CHAPTER 18 OF THE CITRUS
COUNTY CODE ENTITLED BUILDING REGULATIONS, BY AMENDING SECTION 18-61,
ADOPTION OF CODES; BY PROVIDING FOR INCLUSION IN THE CITRUS COUNTY CODE;
BY PROVIDING SEVERABILITY; BY PROVIDING FOR CODIFICATION; AND PROVIDING
FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE.
A public hearing on the proposed ordinance will be held by the Board of County
Commissioners on March 13, 2012, at 2:30 P.M., at the Citrus County Courthouse, 110
N. Apopka Avenue, Room 100, Inverness, Florida. Interested parties may appear at
the meeting and be heard with respect to the proposed ordinance amendment.
A copy of the proposed ordinance and supporting materials are available for public
inspection and copying between the hours of 8:00 A.M. and 5:00 P.M., Monday
through Friday, at the Department of Planning and Development, 3600 West Sover-
eign Path, Lecanto, Florida 34461. For more information about this application,
please contact the Building Division at (352) 527-5310.
If any person decides to appeal any decision made by the board with respect to
any matter considered at this meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of the
proceedings and, for such purpose, he or she may need to insure that a verbatim
record of the proceedings is made, which record includes all testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal is to be based.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office, Cit-
rus County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, (352)
341-6565, (352) 341-6560, at least two days before the meeting. If you are hearing or
speech impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 341-6580.
Winn Webb, Chairman
Board of County Commissioners
Citrus County, Florida
February 26, 2012.


383-0226 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
A Conflicts Committee meeting of the Citrus Memorial Health Foundation, Inc., will
be held on Friday, March 2, 2012, at 12:00 pm, in the Board Room located on the
second floor of the Citrus Memorial Health System Administration Building, 502 High-
land Blvd., Inverness, Florida. Copies of the Agenda are available in the Administra-
tion office. Any person wishing to appeal any decision made by this Board, with re-
spect to any matter considered at such meeting, must ensure that a verbatim rec-
ord of the proceedings is made, which record must include the testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal is to be based.
February 26,2012.


384-0226 SUCRN
3/15 meeting- Citrus County Transit
PUBLIC NOTICE
Public Notice:
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Transportation Disadvantaged Coordinating Board
will hold a regular meeting at 10:30 A.M. on the 15th day of March. 2012 at the
Lecanto Government Building at 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Room 166, Lecanto, FL
34461.
Any person requiring special accommodations or desiring further information regard-
ing this meeting may contact the Transportation Supervisor of Citrus County Transit,
1410 S. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto, FL 34461-9015. Telephone: (352) 527-7630.
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC: Any person who decides to appeal any decision of the gov-
erning body with respect to any matter considered at this meeting will need a rec-
ord of the proceedings and for such purposes may need to provide that a verbatim
record of the proceeding is made, which includes testimony and evidence upon
which the appeal is based. (Section 286.0101, Florida Statutes)
WINN WEBB, CHAIRMAN
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
February 26, 2012.


386-0226 SUCRN
3/7 Meeting CC Economic Development Council, Inc.
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Citrus County Economic Development Council,
Inc. will meet on Wednesday, March 7, 2012 at 5:00 p.m. at the Citrus County Cham-
ber of Commerce, Crystal River, Florida.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact 352-795-2000, at least two (2) days
before the meeting.

If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Council with respect to
any matter considered at this meeting, he/she will need to ensure that a verbatim
record of the proceedings is made which record shall include the testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal is to be based.
BY: John Siefert, Executive Director
February 26, 2012.


378-0304 SUCRN
Lecanto HS,-Kitchen Hood Replacement Inv, to Bid
PUBLIC NOTICE
INVITATION TO BID
Sealed bids for furnishing of all labor and materials and performing all work neces-
sary and incidental to LECANTO HIGH SCHOOL KITCHEN HOOD REPLACEMENT will
be received by the Citrus County School Board prior to 2:00 p.m. local time, Tuesday
13 March, 2012 in the Purchasing Department, Citrus County School Board, Building
200, 1007 West Main Street, Inverness, Florida, 34450-4698. Immediately following all
bids received will be opened and read aloud in Building 300, Purchasing Depart-
ment.
Each bid must be accompanied by a certified check or bid bond in the amount of
not less than five percent (5%) of the maximum amount of the Bid as a guarantee
that the Bidder, if awarded the Contract, will within ten (10) calendar days after writ-
ten notice being given of bid acceptance, enter into a written Contract with the
Citrus County School Board, in accordance with the accepted Bid, and give a
surety bond satisfactory to the Citrus County School Board equal to one hundred
percent (100%) of the Contract amount.
No Bidder may withdraw his/her Bid for a period of thirty (30) days after the date set
for the opening of the Bids.
All prime contractors must hold a Citrus County School Board Certificate of
Pre-qualification to bid on Citrus County School Board construction projects. Prime
contractors must be pre-qualified by the Citrus County School Board prior to submit-
ting a bid. Prime contractor's bids must be within the bid limits specified on their
pre-qualification certificate. For contractor pre-qualification information call the Cit-
rus County School Board Facilities and Construction Department at 352/726-1931,
ext. 2208.
Pre-bid Conference:
A. A mandatory pre-bid conference for Prime Contractors, and optional for
sub-contractors, will be held in the Cafeteria, at LecantoHigh School.
B. Conference will occur on Tuesday 6 March, 2012 at 4:00 P.M.
Bidders may obtain a maximum of two (2) sets of Contract Documents from
VERRANDO ENGINEERING CO., INC., 1111 NE 25th AVE, SUITE 401, OCALA, FL 34470
PHONE NO: (352) 854-2664 upon deposit of a check made payable to the Citrus
County School Board in the amount of $ 50.00 per set. A refund of this deposit will
be made upon the return of these Documents in satisfactory condition within ten
(10) days after the opening of Bids.
The Citrus County School Board reserves the absolute right to award the Bid to the
lowest, responsive Bidder, to waive any informality or irregularity in any Bid, or to re-
ject any and all Bids received based solely on the Board's determination of the best
interests of the School District.
CITRUS COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD, INVERNESS, FLORIDA
BY: Sandra Himmel, Superintendent of Schools
February 19, 26 and March 4, 2012.


Meeting^
I Notices


Metn


Meeting
I Notices j


I ^^Bi oc


I ^^Bi oc


I Bi














k, k --^ .* H REBATES & INCIENTIVES:.......... $6,005
USAA DISCOU'r: b.....................- $780
PERW .........CASH OR TRADE EQUIT..........-.-- $2,500.
36 month lease, 12K miles1year, $2,495 out of pocke YOU P9Y...
2012 CHEVY 2012 CHEW
M SRP: ................................................................. $24,805
EA R lCON.. ............ Y1,8o VWE FOR ONLY ...
REA- .. ................ ..........
GM OWNER LOYALTY ..... ......... -
CASH OR TRADE OEQUR':..... .PER2,5002

YOU PAY... 616K m39 month lease, 12K miles ear, $2,495 out of pockets
2012 CHEW 2011 CHEW
..Y......................................... $17,

IVE FOR ONLY DISCOUN ....... ............$00

usaA DU ....... ....... $750
CASH OR TRADE EQUrY......... 2,500

27month lease, 12Kesear, $2495 out eock p YOU A ,of pct






2004 CHEVY IMPALA LS 2007 SUZUKI SX4 2000 MAZDA MIATA 2011 CHEVY AVEO 2008 CHEW IMPALA 2007 SATURN AURA 2006 FORD RANGER 2007 FORD MUSTANG 2008 HONDA CIVIC Si
ULAC 0Ef ABIff 61KfILE~A$ SPECALEUO1DO ELE LT,HATClBCK, AUTJOCIHBROfIA GOLPLCLE EXt.CAB,AUTl,4 111R, I SPLOCKS, COUPENAV PEE~
LOL.B AlT0 SW..ERM.IS.EED rCW L0.ARL. SRES REUS T..,CPLAW)ER..11 NSR0. T
$8,998 $9,978 $9,995 $11,888 $12,898 $12,995 $13,888 $13,995 $14,788



2008 CHEVY MAUBU2LT 2007 FORD EDGE 2010 DODGE AVENGER 200CHEVY COLORADO 2011 RAM DAKOTA 2010TOYOTA RAV4 2010 CHEVY SILVERADO 2007 GMC ACADIA 2007 FORD F150
GHICRIER LEu1~ ALLUEUE I5LESAUD(UEES LT,CEWCA,ALI1 BISHORMCK 8$11NE EMCARED1KR EAV I LEAINR9JI0F, E
OSTAR SC.EC LEAD CDL 10EES! UENEW PW, Pi, STAR LAOAED LAATFB
$14,987 $16,888 $16,970 $17,488 $19,995 $19,995 $21,480 $22,650 $23,998


Come See What LOVE Can Do For You!
In Inverness on .
SHi-^ghway44 West _


All new car prices include $2,500 cash or trade equity All offers QAC. All options at dealer retail, limited to in stock vehicles only All prices and/or payments plus
tax, title, tag, & state fees. Dealer installed options and accessories additional cost. Vehicles subject to prior sale. Applies to in stock units.
Offer expires on date of publication.








9WIIMAaEIS. I .E&'M








SA
DRIVErIN STYLE:VOO .
4 0 I 0 UUII 505AD0MAA21 CEYAE 20 HV IPL ATR UA21116FRDRNE FR UTNG 20 OOAIVCS
S S FRVKM04KLLMTHM DRAON 041KWETCA,% 11P~fWMLM UAPE
























S. 5 9o0' SSShi*yuuuIs!
ONLY Mo.** N


a 9 9. a a^^^y^^fy ^TT~T''T*?^
LOVEeeWa LV anD orYu


HONDA,
.9 LI.. 111 Il a7i til- gi)TK.1llggg aggrg.
'3 Mnt, naproedcrdt.* 6 onhclse, edl eswi taprvdceit, plus II.. .. .. .. .. ., tg$9 elrfead$00cpcs e cinf rc igian acor PO cpc g rdc ionfrc .Alinstlle opion r trealpie.Itc
unitonl atthe dvetisd p ice Rsdul:iic 1,035, cod*1,31adg 1633.5 2,0 ispryacpw it915 etprmleteefe. Dae ntle pin n acsoisadtoa o.Veilssbett ro ae


D8 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


VILLAGE TOYOTA
OF CRYSTAL RIVER


Beffer Cars.

Beffer Deals.

Beffer Hurry.


201 I V


351
MPG
HWY


28
MPG
HWYl


#T120565


#T120145


All New Redesigned!
2.5L 4-Cyl DOHC 16V W/Dual VVT-I Engine 6-Speed ECT-1 Transmission
Star Safety System Includes: VSC, TRAC. Air Conditioning AM/FM/CD Player
Cruise Control Power Windows Power Door Locks
MSRP............................................$22,770
Village Savings...............................$2,772


191998 or


mo 0o for
048mos.*


2.5L DOHC 16V 4-Cyl Engine Star Safety System Anti-Lock Brakes
Enhanced Vehicle Stability Control, Traction Control AM/FM/CD Player
Cruise Control Power Windows Power Door Locks
MSRP..............................................$24,379
Village Savings.............................. $1,889


$22.495 0%for


1i2IC]ii' I


ST120493 120i
H MWPG
HWY


4 Speed Automatic
Front & Rear Side Curtain Airbags Power Windows
Remote Keyless Entry W/Lock, Unlock, Panic
MSRP............................................$17,800
Village Savings...............................$1,801


990or


m O'o0%for
S48mos.*


4.01 V6 DOHC 24V WT-1 270 HP/278 LB-FT 5-Spd Automatic Trans W/Sequential Shift
Automatic Limited-Slip Differential Dual Zone Air Conditioning
AM/FM CD W/MP3/WMA, 6 Speakers Power Windows/Door Locks
MSRP............................................$27,959
Village Savings...............................$3,660


9 or $ 319* mo.


Sloci l v 12010243 Stock #12010262
1999 ORD CROWN VICTORIA 2009 CHEVROLET IMPALA
4 Dr. Sdn. LX 4 Dr. Sdn. 3.3L LT
15,995 s11,995


Sloc '. 12010358
2001 TOYOTA COROLLA
4 Dr. Sdn. LE Auto
$5,995


Sloci'. 12010440
2006 TOYOTA TUNDRA
AccessCab V8 SR5
$17,995
w~ir


Slock lv12020053
2004 TOYOTA RUNNER
4 Dr. Limited V6 Auto
18,995


Sloci' V12020074
2005 FORD TAURUS
4 Dr. Sdn SE
$4,995


2003 FORD RANGER
Reg Cab 3.0: XLT
$4,995


2004 FORD FREESTAR WAGON
4 DR. SEL
$7,995


2011 HONDA PILOT
2 WD, 4 Dr. EX
s24,995


C-


352
-
628
-
5100


W~k-VkV- I WVV
*Pice excludes tax, tag, registration, tile, and $499 dealer fee Prices include all Village Toyota incentives Offers cannot be combined 0% in lieu of Village Savings All vehicles subject to prior
purchase All leases are 39 months, 12k miles, and includes $1999 down on 2012 Camry, 2012 Corolla and 2011 Prus, and $2999 down on 2012 Tundra 4x2 A customers who purchase or lease a
new Toyota receive a 2 year, 25K mile free maintenance plan Photos for illustration purposes only We reserve the right to correct typographical errors


MUST PRESENT AD PRIOR TO PURCHASE
www.villagetoyota.
r -


ToyotaCare
Featuring a complimentary maintenance
plan with roadside assistance


[34
HWYi
t


VILLAGE
19 *


0 ,.,.


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012 D9


imSSN ow.


m




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


w


,


0


'09 JOURNEY


'09 CHARGER


'09 TOWN & COUNTRY '09 SILVERADO
,---R-j


=2H=Bl .l r MSPIAL=C
1-80-58755Ed.221


$14,999 $13,999 $12,999 $12,999
OR$235 M. OR $219 .OR203 OR203


'09 SONATA


'08 LUCERNE

I^K~fI


'08 CIVIC
-^R


'08 SEBRING


$11,999 $12,999 $11,999 $10,999
oR$188M. OR203M o. R$188 O. OR172Mo.


'07 PATHFINDER


'07 EXPLORER


'07 PACIFICA


'06 SANTE FE
, l~l^


$15,999* $11,999* $7999 $8,999
OR$250 s.l OR$188 O.OR$125*M OR$ 141M0.


'06 IMPALA

1, A: .fl
*C:.I B ^ = r


'05 WRANGLER '05 HIGHLANDER


$8,999 $13,999 $11,999* $8,999
P PER PER PER
oR $141 0. OR$219 0R$188 8OR$ 141 Ro.





N^ CALL THE INSTANT APPRAISAL LINE:
800"440--0054


0


0


*


'05 MUSTANG


FR 4H EOMDNE IH INFOlAND RMl I PMCIN
1-80-M -8755: =xt.622


tFR!E -;2 4 H R E EM fHIF M WI1I
1-800-8"755B:^Mi65^


D10 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012


liii6


FaREE 4 R ECRDD EM WHINF A SEIA WN
1-80-58 755b d.124


Fif24HR iECOM MSSAE r rHINOADSEILP G
*E-800-58:755 E[.621


Fif 2!H REOREDMESMEWrH lOMD PER WN
1*800-58"75: 1=T.I.)c


RE 24HR JMRIM IHINFO = SPECA LRIIN
:-&wk"755 id.6215


tF!E 2 4 H EOMDNSSG H NDM D I PMCINGy
1-800-5Wb:^-875 Et.61i


R~IEE2 RRMED '^MEM fH NDM ONMI
1-80-58755B: Z2W5


FaREE 4 R EDROO ESAG WHIlNFOA PCILWN
1-800-58"755:Ext.5216l


RE24HR RECORDED MENEWIHIW D MPRCN
1-800.58B55 EdA12l


Fiff24!IRCODD ESAE rH JOM SECA P N
1-80-5"75 Em.604


RR 4H RCIM EM IHINO=SEIA RCN







Section E -SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012



... _OME I RONI

CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE REAL ESTATE GUIDE


-he-


fl Sikorski's
L 7Attic
PAGE E4


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An outdoor labyrinth at the Allegany
College of Maryland in Cumberland.
Md. Labyrinths, which have been
constructed for thousands of years.
have become a popular addition to
hospitals. gardens and public insti-
tutions. Designed to have a single
path in and out. labyrinths create
opportunities for reflection.
-II. :.I)_ r .1I_, ,.i 1 i::. I: ,


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E2 SUNDA'I~ FEBRUARY 26, 2012 Cimus Couivn' (FL) CHRONICLE


* Nice 3BR/2BA/2CG Home Florida Room
* Screened Lanai Area
* 22x14 Detached Garage/Workshop
* Fenced Backyard
* Vacant Lot Next to Home Included
LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611
Email: lenpulmer@remax.net i


BELOW ACCESSED VAWE!!!
4/3 with 2,612 sq. ft. of living. Separate
refrigerator and freezer, two pantries, double
oven, pool with hot tub, detached garage with
office, pole barn, fully fenced and gated.
KEVIN & KAREN CUNNINGHAM
(352) 637-6200
Email: kcunningham@remax.net


CUTE AS A BUTTON 2/1 country living
home with woodburning FP, on 5 lovely
acres. Neat as a pin with some nice
upgrades. Detached garage/workshop.
Plenty of room to expand. 2008 roof +
newer drainfield. Need a family compound?
House next door can be purchased as well.

CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555 '
Email: cnadal@remax.net


tUIVIELE I ELI rulill"M anCU
3BR/2BA mobile home. Move-in
condition, carport, large screen
room and Florida room. Eat-in
kitchen plus formal dining area.

BARBARA MILLS (352) 637-6200
Email: barbarajmils@earthlink.net


248 1 FOSS GROVE PATHn, IGLIS
OWNER SAYS, "SHOW ME THE MONEYII" Looking for
peace and quiet? Look no further Once you pull up to your
very own covered bridge you will know your home This
private retreat sits on three separate lois and has over
700 ft of waterfront Future development is possible This
3/2 has an updated interior including updated aths, kitchen
and living spaces spiders open up to an inviting deck sittin
on a peninsula Multiple outbulldings, dock, garden area and
enclosed screen room '
DAVID IVORY 352-613-4460
Email: davidsivory@holmail.com


< 41N L aio Hw. Beel ilI2-82w wRMXcmI 0 .Mi *,Ivres6760
8375 S. Sucos Bld. Ionssa6870 w.oueos~a~flecm54N w.1,C lRvr7524


E2 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Real Estate DIGEST


Deanna Sarah Dawn
Rodrick Spencer Theroux


Rob
Hard


Deb Jennifer
Infantine Munn
M Miele, Deanna Ro
Spencer and Dawn
n Million dollar pro
2011 were Barbara
Kathy Canfield, Al
v"r DeMichael, Bobbi


] Rob Hard,
Deb Infantine,
Sam Latiff,
Jennifer
Lehman, Dou-
glas Lindsey,
Joanna Mor-
Betty Greg ris, Jennifer
Powell Rodrick Munn, Betty
Powell and
rick, Sarah Greg Rodrick. ERAAmerican
n Theroux. Realty and ERA Suncoast Re-
ducers in alty proudly salute these fine
Banks, real estate professionals.


an
DiLego,


See DIGEST/Page E8


Janice Bill
Ayers Moore
Latest happenings
at ERA Realty

can Realty
and Invest-
ments is
pleased to an-
nounce that
Vincent Mc-
Crave has re-
cently become
licensed as a Vincent
real estate McCrave
salesperson and has joined the
company's Inverness office,
where he will work as a sales
associate.
Contact Vincent at 352-726-


Harry
Eck


Karen Barbara
Stukes Banks


Karen and Gary Jeanne
Baxley Gaskill
5855, or email him at vincent
mccrave@yahoo.com.
ERAAmerican Realty and
ERA Suncoast Realty recently
recognized their top-producing
agents for 2011.
Leading the way as the com-
pany's top producer in 2011
was Steve Latiff.


BANK OWNED-CITRUS SPRINGS, FL
3BR/2BA home built in 2004. 80 x 125 lot. OPEN LAKE-FLORAL CITY, FL
Central water. Front & rear covered porches. Wonderful, furnished 2BR/1 BA cottage on tree-
$57,900 MLS#353187 shaded 1 acre of open lakefront. $174,900


BANK OWNED FLORAL CITY, FL
Waterfront 3BR/2BA mobile on wide canal.
Boat dock. Great weekender, winter or year
round livinQ. $34,900 MLS#352914


GOLF COURSE
HERNANDO, FL
1/2 acre on The Oaks
in Citrus Hills.
$29,900
MLS#321216


CALL Roy Bass TODAY (352)726-2471
Email: roybass@fampabay.rr.com www.allcitrusrealty.com After Hours 13521 302-6714 ".


Alan
DeMichael


Kathy
Canfield


Bobbi Douglas
DiLego Lindsey


"Megamillion" producers
were Jackie Davis, the team of
Harry Eck and Karen Stukes,
and the Home Team of Janice


Ayers and Bill Moore.
Multimillion dollar producers
included Karen and Gary Bax-
ley, Jeanne Gaskill, Lou


Aida & KkJohnson Tom Balfour I Aveus & Hal Steiner Art Paty
BROBESSOC. EAL REALTLTO TO BOKERI REALTOR


Jackie Gaffney Jason Gaffney
Realtor. A HOUSE Realtor
302-3179 SOLON- ,i 287-9022
WEEKS REALTY, 5 BEVERLY HILLS BLVD.
The Golden Girl 7466700 000AD2
9475 N. ARGO WAY
CITRUS SPRINGS
2/1.5, carport, 1060 sq. ft. Great
to inspect, fiberglass dimensional roof, white
raised cabinets, ots of file, central A/C.
3233 E. LLOYD ST.
INVERNESS
, : h,,, 1: I,, I.
L- ..... r I,,. 1,.1


746-9000


I wv w.ct0sb sbu.4a


Steve
Latiff


Lou
Miele


,C^ITR US RIDGE REAi1^^ T


. A A V


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012 E3







E4 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012




HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information...... 352-563-5592
..................................... .............. advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information..................... 352-563-5966
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C"I 0--o-;,-

HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
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Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
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The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes for
space and/or clarity.
For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


4-H troops to state capital



to see government in action


More than 550 Florida 4-H ing senior 4-Hers to gain more knowl-
youths and volunteers will ar- edge of their government" said Kaitlyn
rive in Tallahassee on Tuesday, Pace, Florida 4-H state council historian
Feb. 28. Adorned in green shirts with and 2012 4-H Day at the Capitol chair
the bold words "I Am the 4-H Day at the Capitol
Revolution of Responsibil- V gives 4-H Youth and volun-
ity," youths and volunteers teers the opportunity to pro-
will converge on the state mote to their legislators and
capitol for the annual 4-H M government officials the
Day This year's message, "I positive impact of the
Am the Revolution of Re- Florida 4-H program. Last
sponsibility" addresses the year, Florida 4-H youths
misconception that youths completed more than
are not informed of what's 100,000 projects in the area
going on in their communi- of citizenship and leader-
ties and promotes the find- Amy Duncan ship development. There
ings that youth are making a YOUNG will be attendees from Cit-
real impact every day. rus County, including 4-H
The event, which is spear- IDEAS youth group leaders David
headed by the state 4-H and Nathan Meeks, Shyanna
council, allows 4-H youths to meet law- Miller, Shellby Gilson and participant
makers and elected officials, including Anna Venero. 4-H volunteers attending
former 4-H member and Commissioner as chaperones are Cara Meeks and Tri-
of Agriculture Adam Putnam, and to ex- cia Miller. 4-H Day at the Capitol is a
perience civic engagement firsthand. great leadership role for our members
"This is an excellent opportunity for and a wonderful opportunity to see our
young 4-Hers to learn about the govern- State Government at work.
ment and how it works, as well as allow- For information about how to start


The event allows
4-H youths to meet
officials, including
former 4-H member
and Commissioner of
Agriculture Adam
Putnam.
or join a club in your area, please con-
tact your Citrus County Extension's 4-
H Office by calling 352-527-5712, or
email 4-H Agent Amy Duncan at
amy.duncan@bocc.citrus.fl.us.
Citrus County Extension connects
the public with the University of
Florida/IFAS's knowledge, research
and resources to address youth, fam-
ily, community and agricultural needs.
programs and activities offered by the
extension service are available to all
persons without regard to race, color,
handicap, sex, religion or national
origin.


Lithograph was once controversial; a pirate's mug?


Dear John: I enjoy your column.
Now I hope you can give me some
information on the pictures in the
enclosed photos. One is a lith-
ograph titled "Soft Morn." I do
not know how old it is, but it
has been in my home since I
was about 5 years old. I am
now 85.
The "Newsboys" is also old.
It was painted in 1902 by a
Wm. Jameson. I hate to part
with either one, but my chil-
dren are not interested. I want John S
them in a place where they SIKOF
will be appreciated and en- AT
joyed. Any information you
can give me as far as their
worth and where I might sell them would
be most appreciated. Keep up the good
work. S.0., Inverness
Dear S.O.: The lithograph titled "Sep-
tember Morn" of a young female nude
standing in water was originally painted
by Paul Emile Chabas, 1869-1937. He was
a French artist who specialized in paint-
ings of young nude girls. Chabas won a
gold medal for his painting "September


Morn" at the Paris Salon in 1912.
The print you have was produced not
long after the Paris gold medal in large
quantities, due to the publicity
surrounding a charge that the
painting was indecent getting
it a lot of press attention. (The
charge was dropped.) His orig-
inal oil on canvas paintings
have sold from $300 to $24,000.
It looks like your print has
condition problems. Potential
dollar value is $50 to $100.
ikorski The painting depicting two
SKI'S young boys, with one holding
TIC an armful of newspapers, has
a Hummel look to it. I was not
able to find any track record
of sales or any biographical information
about the artist William Jameson, the
signer of the picture. So there is no value
added for the artist. Potential dollar
value is $250 to $500.
Dear John: I would like to know if you
could give me any information on four
panels I have. I saw one on the "Antiques
Roadshow." It was similar to one they
showed. It had multi-colored peonies


and bluebirds. The panels measure 3
feet by 6 feet. M.M., Inverness
Dear M.M.: You have a beautiful four-
panel screen made in either Japan or
China. I suggest you have the chop mark
on the screen translated. Unless it is
done by a notable artist, potential dollar
value is catch-as-catch-can.
Dear John: I saw your article in the
paper and wonder if you could help me
with this. I have a very old copper grog
mug we found washed up on the beach
in the Bahamas after a hurricane. It has
very slight scalloping along the top and
two lines around the body It is very
flared at the bottom to avoid tipping. The
bottom is put together with cut-out tabs.
All in all, it's rather primitive-looking.
We think it may have come from a slave
or pirate ship. I found something similar
from the 1600s to 1700s. I would appreci-
ate your help. -R.A, Crystal River
Dear RA: I think the mug was made
in England during the late 19th century
and originally silver plated. I see no rea-
son to think it is as old as you do. The rest
See ATTIC/Page E8


special to tne unronicle
This piece was painted in 1902 and signed by a
"William Jameson," who is not a known artist. It
might sell for between $250 to $500.


I





1







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Palms have unique



care requirements

lorida's landscape p more than necessary may
has an abundance of be an attempt to lengthen
palms. These tropi- -- the interval before trim-
cal species do not require i .^ ming has to be done again.
the same kind of pruning as Or, sometimes, out of fear
branching, broad-leaved that the palm fronds could
trees do. become projectiles in a
As a matter of fact, the storm, healthy lower leaves
only trimming any palm are removed. Using this
needs is removal of dead, logic, the limbs of broad-
badly damaged or diseased Kerry Kreider leaved trees also pose a
leaves. THE threat and require removal.
It is unfortunate that Such precautions are obvi-
some landscape mainte- ARBORIST ously too extreme.
nance workers have a ten- Removal of healthy
dency to over-trim palms, removing leaves is a disservice to the palm, es-
perfectly good green leaves, along pecially those species whose canopy
with the dead or drying fronds.
The reasons for this vary Trimming See PALMS/Page E8




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DO~-lahed Villa 2Bd Den/2Balhl2Caif/iloodwie Villa | Wonderful fuurnished 2 bedroom with den ready for move in
Open floor plan with two bedrooms plus a den Nice .1 .i Tastefully decorated with an extended lanai Features many
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Terra Vista Realty Group, LLC Office in the
2400 North Terra Vista Blvd., Hernando, Florida 34442 Terra Vista 3
(352) 746-6121 (800) 323-7703 Welcome Center


GOT A NEWS TIP?
* The Chronicle welcomes tips from readers about breaking news. Call the newsroom at 352-563-
5660, and be prepared to give your name, phone number, and the address of the news event.
* To submit story ideas for feature sections, call 352-563-5660 and ask for Sandra Frederick.
Again, be prepared to leave a detailed message.


A 311 W. Main St., Inverness

LANDMARK 352-726-5263
www.Iandmarkinverness.com 5E I


I AD0 TC7 CUI EITI1% flE 1%fV l DE I CIID2 ILI 1%7TDI IC 1 IIiTV


I REDUCED BUY IT RENT IT
BANK OWNEDt AND MAKE
REHAB MONEY FROM IT'
PROJECTI ,,, .. .. I
.. . .., ,,,,,,h,. fl...,d ( ,'I
I .-,,-....i I.- ONLY
u ,- ,uL liuii Iului, upin I pli Nut.r ........ $19,000' h, ,
breakfast bar, dining area, fully fenced, and ...... .... ..... 1
need of repairs. MLS #353241. 1725 Fl 11 ASKING ,, ,,,.. I I .....il. ...... .
$82,900! Call Tonmika Spires-Hanssen 352- .... .... ..... .. ,ll i,,,,,,,, .. ..* ,
Fuller 352-212-5752. Fuller 3522125752.


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012 E5












Get 'lost' in quiet reflection


Outdoor ]

labyrinths a source ,

ofcalm for many

MELISSA KOSSLER
For The Associated Press


When Carol Maurer has a
lot on her plate, she finds
it useful to visit the
labyrinth made of river rocks at
the Delaware Art Museum, in
Wilmington.
"It quiets my mind," said Mau-
rer, who lives in Hockessin, Del.
"It sets the path for me so I can
spiral inward."
Labyrinths, which have been
constructed for thousands of
years, have become a popular ad-
dition to hospitals, gardens and
public institutions.
With a single path in and out,
labyrinths are designed to en-
courage reflection. They differ
from mazes, which are designed
as puzzles. Labyrinths have been
associated with religions and cul-
tures throughout the world.
The number of labyrinths in
the United States has been
steadily increasing for about 15
years, said Robert Ferre, a
labyrinth builder who founded
Labyrinth Enterprises.
"Nowadays they're so wide-
spread, it's more about how to
best utilize them than what they
are," he said from San Antonio,
Texas.
When he started the business
in 1995, churches were his pri-
mary customers. Labyrinths were
an important feature of Euro-
pean Roman Catholic churches
in the Middle Ages; walking one
was a devotional activity and rep-
resented a spiritual journey
The most famous remaining
labyrinth from that period is at
Chartres Cathedral, near Paris.
Many newer labyrinths are based
on the Chartres pattern.
They can be constructed of turf
or stone or painted on pavement.
Today, labyrinths are widely
used in secular spaces, too, said
Maurer, who serves on the board
of The Labyrinth Society, an or-


Allegany College of Maryland/Associated Press
People walk a labyrinth at the Allegany College of Maryland in Cumberland, Md. Labyrinths, which have been constructed for thousands of years,
have become a popular addition to hospitals, gardens and public institutions. Designed to have a single path in and out, labyrinths create oppor-
tunities for reflection.


ganization dedicated to using and
promoting the paths. She helped
get the labyrinth built near the
sculpture garden at the Delaware
Art Museum.
"People are looking for ways to
travel inward," she said. "They're
trying to find a deeper connec-
tion with themselves that may be
spiritual but not necessarily
religious."
It's even possible for home-
owners to build labyrinths them-
selves in their yard, with rock,
gravel or mulch, Ferre said.
Plans are available online or
through his company
Patricia Cadle, the oncology
chaplain at N.C. Cancer Hospital
in Chapel Hill, N.C., encourages
patients, family members and
hospital employees to walk a
labyrinth.


The medical facility dedicated
an outdoor labyrinth in 2009, and
just completed an indoor one this
month (February).
"It's a great tool for meditation
and relaxation," Cadle said.
"Labyrinths can help connect
the mind, the body and the spirit.
I think we can use that when
we're dealing with disease."
Allegany College of Maryland
in Cumberland built a labyrinth
in 2005 as part of its integrative
health program, which focuses
on holistic approaches to heal-
ing. The walking path has be-
come widely used on campus,
said Cherie Snyder, a professor
and director with the program.
"Many of the faculty here have
incorporated it into their teach-
ing," she said.
The community, initially un-


sure of the labyrinth, also has put
it to good use, she said.
'"A lot of times people think it's
a religious cult," she said. But
once area residents understood
the labyrinth's history, they
began to visit. Cancer support
groups, church groups and organ-
izations that serve the develop-
mentally disabled have all used
the labyrinth, Snyder said.
"It's just been a wonderful tool
to introduce people to walking
meditation, walking prayer and
communing with nature," she
said.
Many users feel a labyrinth in-
spires creativity, said Katja Mar-
quart a member of The
Labyrinth Society and an associ-
ate professor of interior architec-
ture at the University of
Wisconsin-Stevens Point. She has


encouraged graduate students to
walk a labyrinth to help them
sort out their work.
"They always came back with
really great insights," she said.
And walking a labyrinth does
not have to be a solo endeavor,
said Amy Morgan, a homeless
services coordinator for The Sal-
vation Army's Ray and Joan Kroc
Corps Community Center in Ash-
land, Ohio, which has a labyrinth
on its grounds. To build a sense of
community, Morgan walks through
it with a women's group she leads.
"As you walk, you are able to
release what you need to release.
You go back out prepared to
reenter the world," said JoAnn
Shade, corps officer for the Sal-
vation Army facility "You get a
sense of, what do I believe and
who am I."


E6 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE













Sabal Palms cut striking pose in garden


F lorida's
State tree
is the
Sabal Palm,
Sabal palmetto.
After sprouting
from a seed, it de-
velops under-
ground for 10 to
12 years before
starting to de- Jane
velop a sturdy
trunk. Each year, JAN
Sabal palms put GAR
out up to 12 new
fronds. The leaf stems, peti-
oles, are unarmed, with no
saws or spikes along the
edges. The segmented leaf
blade is fan shaped, with a
strongly recurved midrib,
and is called a costapalmate
leaf.
Fine filaments fray off the
leaf edges, called margins,
and are used by birds and
wildlife as nesting material.
Native, beneficial yellow
bats naturally roost under
the dead fronds high up in


the Sabal Palm
canopy Remov-
ing dying fronds
eliminates a nat-
ural bat nursery
where baby bats
are protected
from predators
and wandering
domestic cats.
Veber Bats fly out at
dusk to devour
E'S insects.
DEN Twenty-five-
year-old Sabal
Palms with at least a 5-foot
trunk have enough trunk
mass to survive transplant-
ing; shorter ones will most
likely die. Roots are adven-
titious and will sprout new
feeding roots from whatever
white roots the digger left,
providing they do not dry
out and are planted or
heeled up promptly The
longer the roots, the sooner
the Sabal Palm can start to
develop feeding roots, ab-
sorb water and minerals


I


2743 N. CanteAbury Lake Dr.
Hemando
Directions: 41N, L on 486W, R into
S Canterbury Lakes. Home is on right.
S3 Bedrooms, 2 Baths
2-Car garage
Split plan
Family room w/fireplace
Formal dining room
* '-'- Caged pool
$159,000 MLS 352706


and re-anchor itself.
Florida homes are en-
hanced by the addition of
tall palms in the landscape.
Planted 4 or 5 feet from the
house foundation, the leafy
canopy can shade the roof
and walls from the hot sum-
mer sun. Fronds rustling in
the breeze provide a pleas-
ant relaxing sound. From
May to June, Sabal Palm
send out long flower stalks
with bisexual flowers. Male
pollen fertilizes the female
pistil and small black fruit
develops. The canopy is
abuzz with pollen gatherers


0IR & I RIDGEo OICES


Sandra Olear




Brian Murray




Anna Moore




DickHildebrandt




Florence Cleary




Helen Forte




Jane 0. Gwynn




Joann Martin




Mat Robinson




Tarnmi Mayer


OPEN HOUSE SUN. 1-3
** i m


Mark Casper 352-476-8136
NEW LISTING


C' 3I E tlKeiie 6ti
MLS#353847 $214,900
DRASTICALLY REDUCED" WE ALL
KNOW LOCATION IS ONE OF THE
MOST IMPORTANT CRITERIA" THIS
HOME WONT DISAPPOINT -Oaks
Golf Course -3/2/2 +den, golf cart
garage, game room and gas heated
pool with spa
PENDING


1591 E Monopoly Lp
MLS#349777 $449,000
Unique 3/3/3, two masters each w/
large sitting areas 3rd bedroom has
4 built-in bunk beds used as family
rm Kitchen w/double oven &
granite Heated pool/spa, Ig lanai,
meditation area, game rm & wet bar


such as bees and Zebra
Longwing butterflies. Nec-
tar supplies hummingbirds,
butterflies and other insects
with food. Birds and bats eat
the insects. Sabal Palm is a
whole ecosystem in one na-
tive plant.
Recently, I asked my
young friend Dale from
Levy County to custom dig,
deliver and plant three
Sabal Palms with extra-
wide root systems. Dale cut
the roots a foot from the
trunk much longer than the
usual 3 to 4 inches many dig-
gers do. Since the root ball


OPEN HOUSE SUN. 1-3




535 E Charleston Ct
MLS#342358 $299,900
Beautiful 2007 nearly new Sanderson Bay
built home This 4//3 home offers you 2975 sf
S .. i-ground pool, gas
n, ii .." .... i treatments, alarm
system,w0ood kitchen cabinets
Directions: Rte 486 to south on Annapolis to
right on Charleston to home on right.
JoAnn Martin 352-613-2238
NEW LISTING





MLS#353800 $111,900
Golf Course Community What A
Buyil Immaculate 2 bedroom, 2
bath, new paint outside and inside,
all new ble floors, eat-in kitchen and
enclosed lanai Great Location and
So Quiet-Quick Sale Priced"
PENDING





6471 N Misty Oaks Lp
MLS#350733 $159,900
3/2/2 Nearly New, Part Time Home
w/eat-in-kitchen, great room &
heated pool on a beautifully land-
scaped private cul-de-sac The
home is built for coziness & com-
fort Owners will consider all offers


was so heavy, some of the
sandy dirt fell away when
the plant was hoisted by the
custom-welded derrick onto
the back of his battered
truck.
More dirt was shaken off
to reduce overall weight
,and the roots were carefully
wrapped in plastic to reduce
water loss and drying out
during transportation.
Dale trimmed the leaf
boots neatly and uniformly
up the entire trunk. I had re-
quested full booting, so he
had to search for 5 foot palm
trunks with them. Older and


OPEN HOUSE SUN. 1.3




S MLS#353960 $229,900
Elegantly decorated 3/3/2 Sweetwater
custom home nestled on 1 30 acre w
double pane windows energy efficient
heating and air condit oning system
installed 7/09, energy efficient water
heater 2/10
Directions: Rte 486 to north on Annapolis to
end of road to right on Indianhead to #4394.
Jo Ann Martin 352-613-2238
REDUCED 24K




1411 W Double Eagle Ct
MLS#351360 $474,500
Architectural elegance in 3600+ sf
designed for comfort & beauty in
Foxfire @ Terra Vista, w/curved
extenor walls, 14' ceilings, gourmet
kitchen + a walk in butler's pantry &
Canadian Birch flooring
PENDING


" 715W Sunbird Path
ML#351694 $124,900
Move-In ready 3/2/2 fully
maintained villa with private pool
Updated with new a/c, cabinets,
countertops, pool surface & heater,
etc There is also a screened-in
front porch, extra landscaping


taller palms normally lose
the lower boots. Very old
ones will lose all their leaf
boots. Boots of leaf bases
must be cut about 3 inches
from the natural base divi-
sion or they will split and rot
away quickly Dale left up to
a dozen top fronds and tied
them together to protect the
single growth bud. If the bud
is damaged, the palm will
die. The biodegradable
twine is left in place so the
remaining fronds have mu-
tual support and lose less

See Page E9


* Prudential

Florida Showcase
Properties


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20 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, FL 34442
1-888-222-0856 (352) 746-0744
1481 Pine Ridge Blvd.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465
1-888-553-2223 (352) 527-1820


Joy Holland




Kathy Dagle




Lori Nickerson




Mark Casper




MikeMcHale




PhilPhillips




Steve Dobbyn




Teresa Bozer




Joann Condit




Barry Cook


OPEN HOUSE SUN. 2-4




MLS#353344 $89,900
Newer 3/2/2 home w/fenced yard, open floor
improvents to the home Pnde of
ownership shines throughout this home
Directions: Pine Ridge Blvd to north on
Elkcam to right on Dove Orchard to left on
Saxon Way to home on left
Teresa Boozer 352-634-0213
REDUCED 10K





4818 W Ranger St
MLS#346934 $399,000
Absolute perfection is seen
throughout this beautiful
3BR,3BA,pool home on 2 75 acre
lot Exquisite taste abounds from the
Coffered ceiling in the office, granite
counters & wood cabinets in the kit
PENDING





2493 N Brentwood Cir
MLS#353553 $99,900
1st come 1st serve on this bargain
Priced to move fast New floors, New
appliances, New paint, New fixtures,
even a New lawn & lots more
goodies NO monthly maintenance
fee, single family home WOWil


2011 Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities. An independently owned and operated broker member of Prudential Real Estate Affiliates, Inc., a
Prudential Financial company. Prudential, the Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are service marks of Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities, [
registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Used under license. Equal Housing Opportunity.


Jackie & Bob Davis
American Realty & Investments
117 S. Hwy 41 Inverness, FL
(352) 634-2371 Cell (800) 476-2590 Toll Free
ERA bob@bjdavis.com I
For a Visual Tour of our listings and all MLS: bidaviscorn
^^E S *^ e ^^ ^ e ^A|


For a Visual Tour or Multiple Photos, Go to: www.floridashowcaseproperties.com


I~ir


I^^^^^^^^T" ALS B F' E i TU*MD ^^^^^


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012 E7


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







ES SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012


DIGEST
Continued from Page E3

Geistfeld tops at Villages
of Citrus Hills
Karis Geistfeld has earned the 2011
Agent of the Year honors from The Vil-
lages of Citrus Hills.
Beyond new home sales, Geistfeld and
her husband Phil enjoy cooking, entertain-
ing, kayaking and spending time with their
two children. She also exercises her love
for music by playing the saxophone and
singing locally in church.
The welcome center for The Villages of
Citrus Hills is at 2400 N. Terra Vista Blvd.
in Hernando. Visit them online at www.
CitrusHills.com.
Rector
team off toh
healthy -
start
Keller Williams
Realty would like
to congratulate
Debbie Rector's
Team for closing
more than $1 mil-
lion in business as
of Feb. 15. The Debbie Rector's
team also has Team
more than $2.8 Keller Williams
million under con- Realty.
tract to close. Debbie and her team can be
reached at 352-746-9924.

DO YOU TWITTER?
Sign up to follow the latest news
from the Citrus County Chronicle
by following us on
Twitter!
You can see our Twitter updates
online at http://twitter.com/
CitrusChronicle.


PALMS
Continued from Page E5

consists of no more than eight to
12 leaves. Over-trimming also re-
duces the food manufacturing ef-
ficiency of the living palm and
can result in suboptimal devel-
opment of the trunk diameter at
the point in the crown where di-
ameter increase is currently tak-

ATTIC to dis
of We
patte
Continued from Page E4 pleas
asto\
is wishful thinking; who the be
knows. You might con- An
sider taking it to the a con
Florida Museum of Natu- an au
ral History at the Univer- anyw
sity of Florida and see ing
what they think. Beve.
Dear John: I would like Dei


ing place. There is also some ev-
idence that over-trimming
makes the palm more suscepti-
ble to cold damage.
There is no evidence to indi-
cate a palm will grow better or
worse if the boots (old leaf bases)
are removed. The boots do pro-
vide protection and insulation
from cold damage, fire and other
natural disasters.
Sometimes, too, trunk tissue
can be stripped off when a boot


pose of my 112 pieces
*dgwood Cornflower
rn dishes. Could you
e give me suggestions
here I might receive
est remuneration?
antique shop is not
sideration. Is there
action establishment
here within travel-
distance? M.A,
rly Hills
ar MA: I think your


REAL ESTATE, INC.
5569 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY.
CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429
OFFICE: (352) 795-6633
WWW.ALEXRE COM E-MAIL: SALES@ALEXREOM


BEST

Realtor


S T ONDSUTY ISEVE DAYiS AWEEK!


is removed before it is ready.
Care should be taken to avoid
causing such damage. Growing
ferns in the "pockets" created by
boots, through aesthetically
pleasing, can trap moisture close
to the trunk and create a poten-
tial for fungus and vermin in the
crown.
Do not permit the use of climb-
ing spikes on your palms, be-
cause palms lack the ability to
produce callus to cover wounds.


best bet would be to sell
your Wedgwood china to a
pattern-matching service.
There is no interest in the
collector marketplace. I
suggest you contact Re-
placements Ltd. in Greens-
boro, N.C. at www.replace
ments.com or 1-800-
REPLACE (737-5223).
They buy the Cornflower
pattern by Wedgwood.
They give you 30 days after


msiL


Investors Realty
of Citrus County, Inc.
Visit my website at: www.myflorida-house.c
I~II


38 HAWTHORNE
CYPRESS VILLAGE
Fabulous Sweetwater 3/2/2 home on cul-
de-sac! Move-in ready condition. All
neutral colors and sparkling clean!
Conveniently located to the new shopping
center and Suncoast Parkway.
MLS 353832 $149,000
k. ^y%7 ^1


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Any holes in the trunk, including
those caused by spikes, can lead
to disease problems.


Kerry Kreider is a practicing
arborist and a member of the
International Society ofArbori-
culture, a tree preservationist
and president ofAction Tree
Service. You can reach us a 352-
726-9724 or actionpro
arborist@yahoo. com.

to de- Citrus County Chronicle,
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd., Crystal River, FL
34429 or
een a asksikorski@aol.com.
an-
r30 U The Chronicle has
ll-in forms available for
'ki's wedding and en-
1 FM) gagements, anniver-
n to 1 series, births and
is to first birthdays.
The


GITTA BARTH
REALTOR
(352) 220-0466
om gbarth@myflorida-house.com

= W K I


ARBOR LAKES One-of-a-kind horse lover's dream home m
Beautiful 2/2/1 home in gated 55+ the Equestrian section next to trails.
community on Lake Tsala Apopka. Open Designed w/exquisite taste, attention to
floor plan, vaulted ceilings, tile floors, a details, hlugh quality & craftsmanship shows
spacious patio and the yard even has room throughout the 3 bed, 2.5 bath, 4-car garage
for a pool! home. Fenced paddock w/water & shelter.
MLS #353089 $116,000 MLS #349970 $415,000


SSI _1 It


3560 N WOODCATE DR. -
THE GLEN 1432 SEATTLE SLEW
INVERNESS 4
: ... ..... ... ........ I. INVERNESS .... .---m-- k : B
located min The Glen, a 55+ community, and catch the breezes this 3/2.5/2 home min GRAB THIS
surrounded by nature, close to shopping, the prestigious gated community of BARGAIN!
dmmning, medical. The home is m perfect Belmont Hills comes with upgrades like Take a look at tlus magnificent 4+/4/5
condition, ready for you to move in, relax on hardwood floors, gourmet kitchen and an Country Estate on 10+ acre and take a 360
your front porch and watch the wildlife m the impressive porch for entertaining. It can be interactive virtual tour at
large greenbelt yours, wwwnmycountrydreamhome.com.
MLS #350097 $54,000 MLS#351012 $215,000 MLS# 350369. $565,000





115 N. LEGION TERR. 7373 E. SHADIWOODS CT.
CITRUS HILLS FLORAL CITY 7080 DUVAL ISLAND DR.
Enjoy nature with mature oak trees and Lots of privacy and a great place for all your toys FLORAL CITY
nice landscaping in beautiful Citrus Hills!! Room for your RV or ide the ATV's on beautiful Incredible Vistas open waterfront on
Situated on a one acre corner lot, this trolling 5.82 MOL acres fenced. Nice mix of pasture Lake Tsala Apopka, beautiful landscaped
3BR, 3BAhome with screened in pool and and woods Relax on the porch and watch the yard with waterfall and pond, a dock for
patio area offers you the privacy you wildlifepassing byiThis 3/2 home has alargeeat-m your boat to go fishing this 3/2/1 pool
want!! Everything is very well maintained kitchen, spacious hying room with an impressive home on 05 acre offers the lifestyle and
New roof 5/2009. Just bring your suitcase fireplace.This is a short sale so your chance to buy a privacy you deserve. It can be your
and move right in! great value for less. paradise.
MLS #346203 $175,000 MLS #349004 $89,500 MLS #351008 $239,000


you receive the offer
cide to sell.


John Sikorski has b
professional in the
tiques business fo
years. He hosts a ca
radio show, Sikors
Attic, on WJUF (90.
Saturday from noo.
p.m. Send question
Sikorski's Attic, c/o


CL-DTe"^
R"Kjj







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


JANE
Continued from Page E7

moisture due to transpiration
while the new root system is
developing.
The three palms were
planted singly in the raised and
amended beds surrounding my
home. An azalea and clumps of
perennial blue-eyed iris and
Florida violets had to be re-
moved first. Excess yellow sand
from the wide and deep plant-
ing holes was put in big nursery
pots and removed. Dale care-
fully removed the protective
plastic. Backfill soil was
amended with fine humus be-


MEET AND GREET
Clubs are invited to submit ir
formation about regular mee
ings for publication on the
Community page each week

Include the name of the orga
nation, the time, day and plal
of the meeting, whether it
meets weekly, biweekly or
monthly, and whom to call fo
details.

Send in information attn: Cor
munity Page Editor, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal
River, FL 34429, or fax to 35;
563-3280, attention: Club
meetings.

E-mail to community@chroni
online.com. Include "Club Me
ings" in the subject line.

For special events or fund-rai:
ers, submit a separate news
release.


3141 CHICKASAW WAY
BEVERLY HILLS, FL
2/2/1 Move right in, new appliances, eat-in
kitchen, lots of cabinets, glassed-in back
porch, indoor laundry area, vaulted ceiling.
$59,900
Forest Ridge Blvd. to Roosevelt to
Chickasaw (on left)


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012 E9


fore being filled and flushed
with water around the tender
roots.
Spraying the tied fronds sev-
eral times a day for the first
month keeps up the humidity
around them and reduces tran-
spiration. While Dale planted
them at the level of the sur-
rounding flower bed, he
bermed up a rim of soil to act as
a saucer and direct hose irriga-
tion to the new roots.
As a rain gauge to indicate
the humidity around the palm
trunks, Dale gently planted
clumps of native Resurrection
Fern in several boots. If the
fern curls up, it is time to water
the beautifully transplanted
Sabal Palms.


Companion plants, native
blue-eyed iris and Florida vio-
lets, were replanted within the
palm saucer.
These companion plants
shade the soil and will not mind
the excess water during the
Sabal Palm's period of estab-
lishment. Add an inch or two of
pine needles to shade the soil
and prevent the sun baking out
the moisture.
Mature Sabal Palms are an
instant landscape feature with
curb appeal and a quick return
on the investment of about $200
per palm.


Jane Weber is a Professional
Gardener and Consultant.


KEY 4"Always There For You"
KEY GAlL COOPER
-a1 1 Multi-Million Dollar Realtor
ERI Cell: (352) 634-4346
OFFICE : (352) 382-1700x309
E-mail me: homes4u3@mindspring.com


ADJACENT LOT IS INCLUDED!
* 3/2/2 custom heated pool home
* South Oak Village location
* Gas fireplace in the Great Room
SCorian kitchen with maple cabinetry
* Well for irrigation
* Large 10x31 lanai for entertaining
#352591 $239,900


6 MASTERS DR $119,900
Perfect for Snowbird: Association
maintains garden. Great rm (30x16)
with vaulted ceiling & fireplace. 2-1/2
baths, 2 car garage. Deck overlooks
golf course.

Dir: main entrance, East on Cypress;
turn right at golf course (Cypress
Circle) rt at next corner, Byrsonima, rt
at Medinah, stay right to cul-de-sac.


WALK TO THE GOLF COURSE!
3/2.5/2 solar heated pool home
Island kitchen with Jenn-Aire cooktop
Walk-in pantry spacious nook
14x30 Master suite w/sitting area
Roof 5 years new, over 2500 sq ft living
Home warranty for the buyers
#353811 $179,900


3 LAURELCHERRY CT $91,000
Possibly the best buy: 3 bedrm, 2
baths, 2 car garage with NEW
roof. Vaulted ceiling in living rm.
Family room with fireplace. In side
laundry room. Tip top shape.

Dir: Main entrance, East on
Cypress; Ist left on Douglas, left
on Laurelcherry.


Semi-retired, she grows thou-
sands ofnative plants. Visitors
are welcome to her Dunnel-
lon, Marion County garden.
For an appointment call 352-
249-6899 or contact
JWeberl2385@gmail. com.


mom American
EpRA Realty
AL-1 & Investments
117 S. Hwy. 41, Inverness, FL
800-476-2590
352-726-5855


2/2 POOL HOME




ASKIiNG .D I : : :


1 L 11 1 r i .. r,



ASKINGSI99.900 L. :::

r Wl K ,3 2 CARPO:RT
TRIPLEWVDE
IILIE NEVW







ASKINGS 124.500 ...
Zechariah 4:6


2/1 INVERNESS SW



ASKINGS200 :::


.i,,-, ,. 91, i : i.,, -.:1 .11


ASKINGS9.900 ..


ASKING S91.000 :


INVERNESS CITY LIMITS

ll I 1,, I i: i
Hr IN d h-i
ASKINGS89.500 ._. =


4 PLEX IN LOVEL ROIAL OAi5 INVERNESS




ASKING S1l9.900 i
000ANs7


NEW HOME & HOMESITE IN SUGARMILL WOODS

Building
Custom


06fST

HOMEBUILDE Of Citrus Inc.
HOMEBUILDER CBC049056
Hwy. 19, 4/2 miles south of Homosassa Springs. 8016 S. Suncoast Blvd.
352-382-4888 www.sweetwaterhomes.com swhsales@tampabay.rr.com
NEW HOMES, VILLAS, REMODELS & COMMERCIAL


BARBARA BANKS n
Aways Realtor
For Ya cell: 352-476-3232
Please visit website www.barbarabanks.net

-~


Tony & Louise ScmidT52-38 T557
Poit Fro Our Exeiec wwgFhms 5


MEN KECy Office 382-1700
ERA EATXIC
IFA ISI









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


C.R/Homosassa
1& 2 Br. furn, quiet park
Util. incl. clean, shrt/long
term 352 220-2077
CRYSTAL RIVER
Nice 2/1, close to
everything. $500. +
Sec. (352)446-3933
352-794-3323
FLORAL CITY
3/1 firm. fenced yd
sm. pet ok $575 incls
water/trash 726-5062
HERNANDO
2/1 $400 mo+dep
352-201-2428
HERNANDO
2/2, DW, on lot, shed,
deck. $500m+$500
dep. 352-464-0719
HERNANDO
3/2, 2-acre lot, Cent.
Air, Washer/Dryer
Storage, $625 mo. No
pets, (352) 860-0904
Hernando-Rent to own,
Large 3 bed 2 bath
double wide on 2 lots,
needs clean up, $1000
down $295 mo.
352-726-9369
Homosassa
2/1/2 remodeled, in
ground pool, 1st & sec.
$550/m(352) 503-3363
INVERNESS
RENT SPECIAL: Sec. dep,
pro-rated over 3 mo.
period in the INVERNESS
WATERFRONT 55+ Park
w/5 piers for fishing &
enjoyment, clubhouse,
onsite shuffleboard, and
much more! 1 BR home
$325 plus. 2BR home
$450 includes H20. 2 BR,
1.5 bath, Park Model
$500. Pets considered.
Section 8 accepted.
(352) 476-4964
INVERNESS
Waterfront 55+ Park
w/5 piers for fishing &
enjoyment, clubhouse,
onsite shuffleboard
and much more!
Furnished, 1BR home
with central A/C $600.
352-476-4964
MINI FARMS
C.R. 2/1 2.5 acres
$525. (352) 564-1242





ATTENTION
LAND OWNERS
JACOBSEN NEW 2012
5 yr. warranty, 3/2,
2 x 6 construction,
upgrade insulation,
appliance pkg.
Delivered & set up
with A/C & heat,
steps & skirting only
$279.19./mo. W.A.C.
Includes first year
on homeowner Ins.
Call 352-621-9181


Bank foreclosures
USED HOMES/REPO'S
Bank authorized
liquidator.We Always
have new inventory,
Call 352-621-9183
or come by
Taylor Made Homes
Homes from
$1,000 up!

Beautiful 1 owner,
older Doublewide,
Home in Forestview
Park new appl's, new
roof and AC, Priced to
Sell! (352) 503-2154
Drive A Little
Save Thousands!
Looking for A Mobile
Home? Largest section
of Late Model Repos
and Used Homes
in Central Florida,
Dbl. wide & Triplewides
Citrus Home Center
(352) 746-5912

INVERNESS
Waterfront 55+ Park
w/5 piers for fishing &
enjoyment, clubhouse,
onsite shuffleboard
and much more!
Single wide 1 & 2 BR,
starting @ $6,900. Lot
rent $274/mo. H20
included. 3 mo. free
rent with purchase.
352-476-4964

LAND-N-HOME
FLORAL CITY
BIG HOME!
The Entertainer,
over 2000 sq. ft., 4/2,
large family room.
Home in great shape
on quiet paved road
near chain of lakes
ONLY $59, 900. or
$2,250 down &
395/mo. W.A.C.
Call 352-621-3807

Palm Harbor Homes
NEW HOME STIMULUS
$5k for your used
Mobile Home any
condition
800-622-2832 x 210





HOMOSASSA
2/2 carport nicely furn
on Homosassa River
w/dock no pet f/l/s
sht/long term $850
352-220-2077





FLORAL CITY
2/2 carport on canal,
2 sheds,, furnished scr
patio $44,900. Poss.
Own Fin 440-225-8618


3 BR, 2 BA, Completely
Remodeled, inside &
out, on 1 /2 Acres,
off School Ave.
Asking $40,000
(352) 302-7451
2/2 SW Homosassa
on Fecnced /2 acre
$39,900. Cash $45,900 if
financed $5,000 down
(352) 527-3204
3/2, 1,800 Sq Ft,
Fenced Yard,
$5,000 down $525. mo
HOMOSASSA
(352) 302-9217

BEST OF THE BEST
New 2012 Jacobsen
Custom 28 x 52, 3/2
big eat in kitchen,
2x6 construction, OSB
wrap, 5 yr. warranty,
elongated toilet,
china sinks, storm
door. Large rooms.
Must see before you
buy anything else.
Only $46,900 or
$1,800 down
$298.89/mo W.A.C.
Call 352-621-9181

Crystal River
Rent to Own ? 2/1
DW, remodeled clean
& private, 1/2 ac. trees
price neg.352 795-0898
Hernando, Pine Crest
Estates, Doublewide
2BR/2BA, Fla. rm, car-
port, front porch, fully
furn., 2485 Treasure Pt.
Must see. 269-250-0950
HERNANDO, RENT TO
OWN, 2BR, 2BA, single
wide on 1/2 acre mol.
Partially remodelled
$3,000 down, $295 mo
(352) 726-9369
Hernando-Forest Lake
North,2/2 DWvery
nice ,HA,1.25 acre
$5900 dwn,$500 mo.
Owner Financing
352-637-5143
Homosassa 2 bedroom,
1 bath close to river,
screen porch, appliances,
$35,000 owner financing
available 352-503-7948
HOMOSASSA
3394 Arundel Terr
3/2, lamaniate & tile
floors, All appls. CHA
New Roof, $1500 moves
you in $650/month
Rent to Own
Tony Tubolina Brk
Owner(727) 385-6330
Inverness
3/2 bath home
Deerwood sub. just
under an acre Has
roof over. No Realtors.
$33,500 352-476-4374

MINI FARMS
2/1/2, w/ Carport, Fen'd
$550. (352) 795-7335


Real Estate


Classifieds


Northwest Citrus
County 2 bedroom. 1.5
bath. Mobile Home on
1 acre, high and dry,
shaded lot, shed, paved
road $44,900 or make
offer. Possible owner fi-
nancing. 352-795-9908



2/2 on Lake Rousseau.
Was $27,500 NOW
$19,900 Low Lot Rent
$240/m 2003 Mobile
Home. Used Seasonally
Owner bought a house,
our lost is your gain.
(352) 817-1987
Forest View
2 bedroom. 2 bath. 55+
Park Beautiful 1344 sq ft
many upgrades $19900
3527943519
HOMOSASSA'S
Best Housing Value
Modern homes from
$8400 or Lease to Own
from $139/mo.
$800.down + Lot rent at
Evanridge Community
an exceptional 55+Park
352 628-5977
INVERNESS
Waterfront 55+ Park
w/5 piers for fishing &
enjoyment, clubhouse,
onsite shuffleboard, and
much more! 2 BR, 1.5 BA
for $2,000. must be
approved 352-476-4964
Oak Pond/Inverness
Well maint 2/2 extra
long covered carport
Irg shed lanai,& Irg lot.
up graded kit part turn
(352) 344-1632
Stonebrook 55+
2/2, lanai, carport w/2
sheds on pond, metal
roof, all appls, can be
sold furn.cha $15K firm
(352) 503-7677
Stoneridge Landing
55+ Comm. Resales
starting @$13,500
Financing avail
1-800-779-1226
(352)637-1400
WESTWIND VILLAGE 55+
Park. Updated 2/2 DW's
for sale. Reasonable
(352) 628-2090




LECANTO 55+
*FOR RENT OR SALE *
1/1, Furnished $525.
2/2, Furnished $550.
352-287-9175, 746-1189













835 NE Hwy 19
Crystal River, Fl
(352) 795-0021
View our website
C21 NatureCoast.com

CHASSAHOWITZKA
3/2 Wtrfront DW, $600.
3/2 Furnished DW., $600
Agent (352) 382-1000


J.W. MORTON
REAL ESTATE, INC.
1645 W. MAIN ST
INVERNESS, FL
Property Management

2/1 ................. $625
3/2/1 Fenced Backyard.. $750
2/1/1 New Paint, New Flooring $575
2/1/1 Fenced Backyard,
Nice Florida Room.... $600
Apartments Starting At.. $450
2/1 On A Canal......... $550

2/2/2 Tile Throughout
PRICE REDUCED.. $675
2/1/1 Cute, Cute........ $500
Jennifer Fudge,
Property Manager
CherylScruggs,
Realtor-Associate
352-726-9010
















CRYSTAL RIVER
2 BR. $550., 3BR House
$800., 352-563-9857
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025




Alexander Real Estate
(352) 795-6633

Crystal River Apts
2 BR/1 BA $375-$500
CRYSTAL RIVER 1/1
Handicap Ramp, Small
Pet OK. (352) 628-2815
FLORAL CITY
FREE Use of boat ramp,
fishing dock, canoe &
Jon boat rentals. 1 BR
$450/$200 dp. incis Sat
TV electric, walk to river
Trails End Camp, A
Friendly Place to Live
352-726-3699
HERNANDO
1 BR, Quiet Area, Near
Lake $395., 228-2701
HOMOSASSA
1BR, W&D, Boat Dock
util. incld. $600. mo.+
sec., 352-628-6537
INVERNESS
2/1, Great Neigh. W/D
Hkup. Storage Rm $500
mo.+ Sec. 352-634-5499
INVERNESS
2/2, scr/porch $600 f/I
$400 dp352-422-2393
LECANTO
Nice 1 Bedrm $500
352-613-6000. 216-0012
(352) 746-5238


INVERNESS
Country Living on large
'/2-acre lot. 3BR, 2BA
home. Garden area,
fenced area, Well &
septic, so no water bill!
$595. RENT SPECIAL
Security dep. pro-rated
over 3 mo. period.
352-476-4964

Specializing in
Sugarmill Woods
Rentals


MAYO DRIVE
APARTMENTS
I* MOVE IN SPECIAL*
(352) 795-2626

SEVEN RIVERS
APTS

A Beautiful place
to come home too.
35 units on private
street, situated on 10
wooded acres, near
Crystal River &
7 Rivers Hosp. fish-
ing, walking, trails,
shopping near by.
Old Florida setting,
quite, clean well
maint. central
laundry room.
352-795-3719
Directions:
Hwy 19 turn W. at
Days Inn, first right
onto Tallahassee Rd









CRYSTAL RIVER
Comm. Storefront, very
clean 1000 SF, exc. loc.
Hwy 19 Downtown
$795/mo 352-634-2528




INVERNESS
LANDINGS 2/1.5 clean
roomy, great location
$550/mo F/L/S
No smoke/No pets
(352) 341-1847




INVERNESS 2/1/1
Great area, nosmk/pets
$600/mo. 1st, last & sec
352-341-3562/400-0743
INVERNESS
2/2, Townhouse, new
appl's & carpet, W/D
trash incl'd $600 mo +
sec. (352) 344-4290




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




FLORA CITY
3/1 large scr porch
private 1/2 acre, 2
sheds,new appls, part
turn. $585/mo. 5310 S.
Bass Terr (352) 503-6703
FLORAL CITY
1 bedroom. 1 bath. On
Withlapopka Island, 900
sq ft. fenced yard, $550
includes water, electric
and cable, first month
and $250 Deposit due
on move in. Call 813
731-5347 for appoint-
ment.
INVERNESS 2/1/1
Great area, pets, nosmk
$600/mo. 1st, last & sec
352-341-3562/400-0743


Kristi Bortz
Let our property
management team
help you with your
short or long term
rentals.
See all our rentals in
Citrus Co.
www.plantation
rentals
352-795-0782 or
866-795-0784




Beverly Hills
2/1 carport, firm. $600.
1st & dp no pets/smoke
Remodeled
(352) 465-3987
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/1 Fl. Rm, CHA,Shed,
$525. mo 352-795-9060
CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/2 Family Room
near shopping $850.
(352)897-4447, 697-1384

CRYSTAL RIVER
2/2/2, $800. mo + sec.
850-371-1568


YOU'LL THIS!

DUNNELLON 3/2/2
RENT TO OWN
Close to Rainbow River
RUBLESRENTALS.COM
(561) 719-8787
(561) 575-1718 affr 7pm
DUNNELLON
Rainbow Lakes Estates
2/2/2, + sunroom
fenc'd yd $600/m. 1st
Lst. sec prorated over
3 mos.. (352) 489-7094
FLORAL CITY
3/1/2, 6 Acres, Private,
$700. 352-212-2264
HOMOSASSA
2/1 home 3/2 DW no
pets(352) 637-1142
HOMOSASSA
3/2, LR, FR, DR, Kit., Sun
Rm. FP, $700. + sec.
Tom (920) 224-2513
INVERNESS
2/1.5/garage.cha,new
carpet, lake access,
close to town,
$575 nosmoke/pets
cell (952) 807-6012
INVERNESS
2/2/2 Detached home,
Royal Oaks upgrds,
clubhouse, pool, lawn
serv, W/D. $800/mo.
incls. cable water Avail
2/20, 949-633-5633
INVERNESS 3/2/2
No pets. near hosp &
Library. $800. Mo. FIL/S
(352) 527-9268
INVERNESS
4/1, $650 first 1st & sec
aft 2pm (352) 408-9470
INVERNESS
SUBSIDIZED RENTALS
3 & 4 BEDROOMS
Starting @ $466.



Mangr., Kim Trawick
352-726-3476.
TDD 888-341-2355

RENT TO OWN!!
No credit check!
3bdrms 352-566-6049
JADEMISSION.COM

Sugarmill Woods
Spacious Ranch Villa
2/2/2, Lanai $750. mo
+ util (352) 382-8935


SUBSIDIZED
RENTALS IN
Lecanto/Crys. Riv
3 bedrm-Starting
@ $582/mo.




352-746-0373
TDD: 888-341-2355

Sugarmill Woods
Upscale Ctry Club
Brand New Deluxe
Village 2/2/2 Fam Rm +
Lanai, most until's paid.
Just $800/mo Owner:
352-382-1132





HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225

Picture Perfect
CHASSAHOWITZKA
Lg. 2/2 on canal/gulf,
scrnd patio, cov.
parking/storage, w/
boathouse$650/mo.
(727)459-2871






CITRUS SPRINGS
Lease or Rent to Own
3/3/2'/2, Custom Pool
Home on acre $699.
Special. 1st last dep.
bkgrd Ck 352-489-3997










Inverness
1 br & bahome prey
incls pool. $500/mo
(352) 201-6057


Debe Johns
Brkr/Assoc/PRM

Coldwell Banker Next
Generation Realty
Property Manager
(352) 382-2700 www.
coldwellbankernext
aeneration.com

See what a
Professional
Residential Manager
can do for you.




HERNANDO
Furn. Lakefront Home,
2/2/1, new remodeled.
tastefully decorated,
great view, Fl. Rm. 1 yr
lease. $950 mo. + dep
Available April
(352) 228-0177


YTAC TION
( RENTAL MANAGEMENT REALTY, INC.
352-795-RENT



HOMES MOBILES APARTMENTS
FEATURED PROPERTIES

HOMOSASSA
4119 S. Springsong Ter. 3/2 M/H. New vinyl. Uti bldg.
Large yard, partially fenced. 950+ sq. ft ......................................$600
7845 W. Solar PI. 2/2 Duplex. Well & septic new cond.
Open floor plan. 1176 sq. ft ..............................................................$ 7 2 5
7 Bumelia Court (SMW) 3/2/2 House with pool
on golf course, incl. lawn & pool service. 1,695 sq. ft. ....$1200

INVERNESS
1863 Elderberry Lane 2/2/1 condo. Pretty place
in nice complex/clubhouse/pool/trash PU. 959 sq. ft ............$695
8 S. Lunar Terr. 2/2/2 w/dock. Large lanai overlooks cove.
Open floorplan, wood floors, fans, storage. 1,521 sq. ft ...........$800


E10 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


C.R/Homosassa
1 & 2 Br. furn, quiet park
Util. incl. clean, shrt/long
term 352 220-2077







AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number

REMIX
REALTY ONE



FARMS, LAND,
COMMERCIAL
UNIQUE &
HISTORIC HOMES,
SMALL TOWN
COUNTRY LIFESTYLE
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989


"LIFE IS BETTER
WITH A PORCH"
www.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.




PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ille-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination. "
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.




OPPORTUNITY


Specializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches &
Commercial


Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com

WATERFRONT
EQUESTRIAN &
INVESTMENT/
INCOME SALES
*Buyer's
Representative
*Concierge Level
Service


Anarea MIQgIaccio
andreaworks 4u
@amall.com
Sherri C. Parker &
Assoc. Realtors,
Direct 352-422-3261
Office 352-527-8090
www.
sherrlcparker.com





509150 Fr 8ultding




FOR LEASE-5091 sq. ft.
Commercial Building
7765 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy. Crystal River,
352-464-2514




For Sale By Owner
3/2/2, Custom Built
in '08 by Wheeler
Construction
Call (407) 739-2646
or 407-442-3597




RENT TO OWNI!
No credit check!
3 bdrms 352-566-6049
JADEMISSION.COM




TERRA VISTA
2+ /2/2 Maint Free,
Open plan, up grades,
,Beautiful Sunsets,
Owner Financ Avail


I or2BD ,1.5 BA
completely remodeled
2 lots, 2 wells, wkshop
2 sheds .Owner
Flnanc $469/mo
lake area 727-457-0850




3BR, 3BA, Pool home,
2,000 sq.ft. $163,000
OR BEST OFFER
518 Poinsettia
352-860-0878.
3/2/2, I.G. &C.C.
3k sf. new kit. Ig closets,
CHA, firepl. on golf
course $139K make of-
fer, norealtors 726-0652
HIGHLANDS
Lrg.2/2- 4 car garage
pool, game room,
mud room, on triple lot
fenced. price to sell
$65,500 (352) 564-4598
INVERNESS
Waterfront 55+ Park
w/5 piers for fishing &
enjoyment, clubhouse,
onslte shuffleboard
and much more!
Single wide 1 & 2 BR,
starting @ $6,900. Lot
rent $274/mo. H20
Included. 3 mo. free
rent with purchase.
352-476-4964

Lakefront Gospel
Island Location
Spacious 3/2/2
for rent $700/m or for
sale..... 908-322-6529

Large 1 Fam.
Carol Terrace,
Inverness. 4BR 3BA,
2700 sq ft under air,
2.8 acres fully fenced,
important updates
done. $220,000.
Owner 352-419-7017

Recently Foreclosed
*Special Financing*
Available, Any
Credit, Any Income ,
2BD, 1 BTH, located
at, 7901 Stump Lane,
Inverness, $29,900.
Visit, www.roseland
co.com/A4F,
Drive by then Call
8667003622.




AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number

RE/MRC
REALTY ONE




3/2/2 Built 1986, On /2
Acre, Remodeled
above ground pool
w/ deck BY OWNER
4141 S. Journey Point
$185,000 813-477-6006
3/2/2, Built 2007
Newly Remodeled
$88,000
100% Financing Avail.


AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE


^S^^^^^


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work For You!
BETTY HUNT,
REALTOR
ERA KEY 1 Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.


Condo for Sale
2/2, 1,850 sq.ft.,
35 Beech Street
(352) 503-3294


Sale or Lease Opt
3/2/3 pool, move in
cond.can be seen on
Fri Sat & Sunday's call
for appt $150K
(352) 634-5415
727-330-6779


DEB INFANTINE
3 HOMES SOLD
In December
I Need Listings!
Real Estate!...
it's what I do.
ERA American
Realty
Phone:(352) 726-5855
Cell:(352) 302-8046
Fax:(352) 726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com


tu County"


CAROLE LISTER I
ME Multi-Million Dollar Realtor I
ERA Cell: 422-4620 Office: 382-1700 --
View virtual tours @ www.listerlistings.com

%U ^nrS


A AL
Michele Rose. Realtor
Simply put I '11 work
harder 352-212-5097
isellcitruscountv()
yahoo cor
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515




INVERNESS 2/2/1
Superbly maintained,
1381 Sqft, Oak floors,
Florida room, dining
room, extra pantries, par-
tially furnished. Pictures
avail 631 Whispering
Pines Blvd.
352-726-9983
INVERNESS
Nice 2/2/1 new carpet
tile & paint. Whispering
Pines Villas furnished
$69,900(352) 726-8712





20 Acres-ve on Land
NCW!! Only $99/mo
$0 Down, Owner
Finance.NO CREDIT
CHECKS! Near El
PasoTexas Beautiful
Mountain Views! Free
Color Brochure.
800-755-8953www.
sunsetranches.com


GENTLEMAN'S FARM
FOR SALE
stable w/bath and
equipment barn on 2+/
Acres in Chatham, VA.
$148,900. Agnes Dowdy
& Associates Real Es-
tate (434)851-8522
photos at www.
AanesDowdvRE.com
Waterfront Grand
Opening Sale!
One Day Only Sat
March 10th New Log
Cabin on 2+ Acres
w/200+ FT DOCKABLE
WF Only $74,500. Save
tens of thousands on
new log cabin
w/dockable lake front-
age on one of
Alabama's premier
recreational lakes.
Excellent financing.
Call now
(866)952-5302, x151




MANHATTAN
CLUB
Most in Demand
Time Share in NYC.
Premier location.
Full Amenities. Split
Wk Silver Pkg. Sleeps
4, World Wide R.C.I.
Program. week
banked, to be used
in 2012. Private
individuals only.
$18K Contact
Stephenaitken@
optonline.net or call:
631-567-5928




CRYSTAL RIVER/OZELLO
$299K, 2+/2/2
Open floor plan,
Hardwood floors,
www.waterfrontozello.co
m or 352-563-5527


CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pond,
ATV trails $165K obo
352 795-2027/ 634-4745

Over 3,000 Homes
and Properties
listed at
www.naturecoast
homefront.com


MmImTSl I tacKI!h3f Ir
This custom built home has the livability for
everyday life & the elegance & upgrades for
any buyer. Located in Citrus Hills on a
gorgeous one-acre landscaped lot. The formal
living room opens to the lanai, which has
beautiful tongue & groove ceilings. Features
include an office with custom built-ins, formal
diningroom, kitchen with granite counters &
wood cabinets, free form pool with waterfall,
media/game room with projection theater,
paved courtyard with fireplace & a completely
insulated 3 car garage. One of a kind!
Visit
WWW.3765NTYRONEAVE.COM
or Call 888-303-6405
MLS 353155
Code: 9414 for more details.


Homosassa-Riverhaven
Village on water, 3/2+
bath,river room,lanai-ft
and back,dock, many
upgrades, beautiful
home. $260,000. Go to
forsalebyowner.com
Listing 23023708 or
call 352-628-9647
Realtors 2.5%
Join us to
Pre-view Homes
for sale
Feb 28th &
March 13th.


How
To Make
Your
Dining
Room
Set
Disappear...

Simply advertise
in the Classifieds
and get results
quickly!




(352) 563-5966

Cl I)\ Ic(.I.IE
www.chronicleoine.com


ELEGANT HOME
on a beautiful mature landscaped lot located
in a quiet subdivision close to 7 Rivers Golf &
Country Club & just minutes from shopping &
amenities. This lovingly maintained home has
vaulted ceilings with a beautiful fireplace in
the spacious living room. You will enjoy the
beauty & natural light that fill this home. The
floor plan is open & flows well. Light & bright
updated kitchen with a breakfast bar that will
keep you involved when entertaining. Come
take a look to appreciate all that this home
offer. #352793
Visit
WWW.809NVENTURIAVECRYSTALRIVERFL.INFO
or Call
888-303-6405 Code: 9413


Gene Wade 352-794-0888
EXIT Realty Leaders 11
S 352-795-0888 R
I 352-527-1112


Homosassa
1.6 Acres on Hwy 19
Wet Lands, next to
Bowling Alley, $15,000
Owner Finance
352-621-1664
SUGARMILL
WOODS
Fringetree St,
100Wx 120 deep.
Ready to build $9,999.
(352) 503-6980


'a .
an,


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012 E11









E12 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012


* inn,,, c.in n .. n l, u .- nn -.
l .. i ,:ll i. lh l6 il:- 1 ... l
* i., ,,'l llm- i; l,,,,iii,, h l ni.,,
* i.i i in l.. l il i....l.hii, .i.i.n il.n .i
Mi = .' IIIIII i).. $79,900
Call Chailes Kell)' 352 422 2387


$ERItvNG


~CIuS cOUlNT A
FO M OVEB OPT

RyEALS. suNar I


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE











CUSTOM HOME
* e .F ,,uu I6 I..n-
1 U ;: I,:, Th,- i, IJI11 / .ilv.i
* i n- n in-l .l i.:l..ih i -.i. .a i ,. i .
* II-n .iii n. i..,qi.i H .l. a.-i l, ii
Mii_ = '-.' $169,000
W'Ni'i. CitiusCountSold. corn
Jeanne Pickiel 212 3410










CHEAP CHEAP
lI.il .& .:.l HIAP l WV .,i. .1 ,l II..i .r _j I
ll In i h I- I ll.Vi.a .a I nal ii li.l.d

.i',.ii $11,900
Call Ruth Fiedeiick I 352 563 6866


SUGARMILL WOODS
* I' CF A L.i. .,;
* p llJlJ A I ti.j; -.ii.ii,
* _I.IIII -.I I T l_ v....l A .li;
* pl.i PlI .l ll IN I AVV ~n.i.
* IM ;:h.I |.I..i.h, IV ,.M ..l,:...1.1 l
Mi = uIIIIII $169,000
Jeanne Pickiel 352 212 3410
nit'i'i',. CitusCountlSold. corn









FLORAL CITY
I.curn:.Mi' .ll i i.... l: l .'iN hl...-jl1 l 1 I
l.v.ii. i i inn1 i .i I.I :i l l i.:i i i


I 5.I I i.l II M .il 0 W ,l i M = .i IIIiI:
Daid Kui I, Cell954 383 8786
Ohice 352 726 6668


I ^- ...- ,-- .
BLDG FOR SALE
i l I.flll i n ,. I h' i i ,,,hli .hi IJ 0
' I.I 1 "1 II ....I I. . I... 1I I I II ..II I' |... i, l

i: ,..- P...n.n .. .i I,. i lr i $225,000
Call Maltha Snydei 352 476 8727
loi details. Ask Io file =352415.


EXCEPTIONAL 14 WIDE
il .INI| FI)Jhh. T I PAhI,, i..In.

l [I ; l.,.II . l." i I h i ; 1 .1 N,]i I ., A l


$14,900
Call DORIS MINER ,-352 422 4627


IN IUWN-UVUAIIUu
" I W ITH hflll, IIiA Fij M l,,, i,,i.,I:n .I

'ill' i ll ;: i.N .: lli :11, ii l si : ll ii ll i 1 ,111
N i h l II 1, ii Iil nI N.: HI)A Pill F.V 6.. Il
iil ,l ; Mi llmll i ; I.. m ini h .i i l .ll:.lf. ,l
Mi 5' = i.l::. $69,800
Pat Dawis /3521212 7280
View hstinq: nww. c21paldavis.com


HERNANDO
11,.II .. l l ...1 l .. I, I 1 : (. 11.I .1.1. ... 1 .11m l




Mi_ i, .:I .i .1 .1.,,. ,:. i.. $40.900
Deb Thompson 352 634 2656


MOBILE HOME PARK!
n .. ; ,,il I In H ..ii i ...i n- il In i li i lin n .I I .Iiia

In6 ;:. lin I. mi iinnin i.V iBi I1161; piil
hi- ; ,:l, l in I I, li I._l inl ll a I, ll:lll .ill n lhii :-

'. ..,, i l, .l..,, i. $900,000
Call Dois Mine 352 422 4627


MAGNETIC ATTRACTION
_ve li lhl l ..l , .l Ih li ii ll ll l _ I

IHi ,l.l II n t nlhai li hla ll'll lh;: ii,, Ill- Il

. 1 6:i: l i I. j -I 1. I; .. . .. l,]. I.

,:.. ,inn.ih. Mi 5 = i.7 h $115,900
Ma//dyn Booth 6374904


aUM7





Advertising Supplement


Citrus County's
Portraits


Success


Profiles in Community Busi


nesses


CITRUS COUNTY
CH ONICLE
www.chronicleonline.com


*





ml





G2 Sunday, February 26, 2012


ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT To THE CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

LI.11


I


I0


At Kinnard Chiropractic, you will receive the finest care
through use of modern equipment and technology.
Our Doctors are specialty trained in neurology, orthopedics,
rehabilitation, trauma, sports medicine, and occupational health.
Our Doctors at Kinnard Chiropractic have extensive experience
in the documentation and treatment of auto and work injuries.
Our Doctors and Staff at Kinnard Chiropractic genuinely care
about you, your health, and your progress toward a better
quality of life.


Gentle Palmer Techniques Digital X-ray
Massage and Neuromuscular Therapy
Hydrotherapy Nutritional Counseling


KINNARD

Injury Rehab Massage Therapy
Visit our website at
www.kinnardchiropractic.com
VISA 1 CareCredit
Most Insurance accepted Auto Insurance
Medicare and Medicaid Workman's Comp


Dr. Jeffery Kinnard


M..


Dr. Steen Daniels Dr. Christian Grause
Dr. Steven Daniels Dr. Christian Grause


Mon Fri 7:30am 5:00pm Saturday 8:00am 11:00am
Make your appointment today!
352.726*0554


Inverness, Fl 34453


111





II i
*I


2611 Hwy 44 W.







ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT To THE CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Paid Advertisement



What Good Health Feels Like


Kinnard Chiropractic has been
caring for patients in Citrus and
surrounding Counties for more
than 15 years. Through a
comprehensive, structured
approach, the doctors and staff
are able to help their patients
achieve optimal levels of health
and wellness.
Our mission is to provide
members of our community, and
the areas that surround it, with
exceptional quality, affordable
health care in a comfortable and
caring environment. We work in
conjunction with other health
care providers to assure that our
goals are being met.
Our doctors genuinely care
about the health and welfare of
every patient. Kinnard
Chiropractic has three full-time
Chiropractors, a full-time massage
therapist, and a Physiatrist (M.D.
who specializes in Rehabilitation
Medicine) who is in our office
once a week. Our clinic is
absolutely state-of-the-art,
including onsite digital X-ray.
Dr. Jeffery Kinnard, owner of
Kinnard Chiropractic, has been
providing chiropractic health care
for Inverness, Beverly Hills and
surrounding communities for
more than 15 years. He graduated
from Palmer College of
Chiropractic with honors in
research. He also received a
BS Degree in Chemical and
Biological Science from Florida
State University. Along with his
degrees he is certified in
Manipulation Under Anesthesia
(MUA) and is certified in the
treatment and documentation of
Workers Compensation Patients.
Along with Chiropractic care he
is very passionate about
involvement in the community.
His whole family is actively
involved in outreach, church and
school athletic programs.


Dr. Christian Grause graduated
from Palmer College of
Chiropractic Florida in 2006.
His undergraduate work was
completed by attending both
University of Florida and The
University of Hawaii where he
achieved his Bachelor of Science
in chemistry. Dr. Grause is
licensed to practice in both
Florida and Australia. He has
also practiced in Germany.
Dr. Grause takes a holistic view
to the body, with the paradigm
that a "person is greater than the
sum of their parts."
His methodology for adjusting
focuses attention to the spine, but
also closely considers the
interaction of the extremities
(arms, legs, hands, etc.), as well
as the biomechanics of the body
as to what may be causing a
dysfunction.
When not busy advocating
health or furthering his
knowledge on the human body,
Dr. Grause enjoys being active.
He has surfed for more than 25
years; kite surfed for 8 years and
is an active runner.
Dr. Steven Daniels is a native
Floridian who has lived in the
Spring Hill area for many years.
He completed his undergraduate
studies at St. Petersburg College
with a Bachelors Degree in
Orthotics and Prosthetics and
obtained his Doctor of
Chiropractic Degree from Palmer
College of Chiropractic Florida.
Dr. Daniels' chiropractic
philosophy is to treat the person
as a whole, not just in certain
areas of symptomatology or chief
complaint. "I strive to address my
patient's nutritional &
supplementation needs along with
their lifestyle choices in addition
to treating their spinal
subluxations and biomechanical/
musculoskeletal patterns of


dysfunction. It's a Zen thing, all
about balancing the body along
with the electrical or nerve
energy within the body."
Over the years, his hobbies
have seen him compete in off-road
motorcycle racing, triathlons,
road cycling and mountain bike
racing. "I know a few things about
sports injuries!" Dr. Daniels
enjoys treating children and
families as well as athletes.
To better serve his patients,
Dr. Daniels continues to expand
his knowledge of health and the
human body by attending various
chiropractic, medical and health
related educational seminars
each year. He is married to his
wife of many years, Maggie, and
they have one daughter... Casey.
As a family, they are actively
involved in church and local
community.
As a practice, Kinnard
Chiropractic is actively involved
in youth athletics, and treat many
of their sports-related injuries. A
large portion of their practice are
patients of retirement age, many
of whom are very physically active
in golf, tennis, bicycling, etc. and
require specific types of
treatment, as well as specific
home exercise programs to help
keep them involved in their
activity of choice. Another
specialty at Kinnard Chiropractic
is the treatment and
documentation of Automobile
Accident Injuries. The doctors
and staff assist accident injury
patients in all of the areas of care
required for this specialty, from
attorney referrals to pain relief
and rehabilitative care.
In the interest of community
education, Kinnard Chiropractic
has a weekly television show,
Straight Talk Medicine, on WYKE
channel 16, Cox and Bright house
channel 16. The show is an


information series designed to
help you make the best health,
wellness and safety decisions
possible for you and your family
Join our doctors as they host an
array of special guests that will
inform and enlighten you of the
benefits of nutrition, weight
management, exercise and much
more. Straight Talk on Channel 16
is on Monday's at 8:30 p.m.,
Wednesday's at 8:30 p.m. and
Thursday's at 3:00 p.m. You can
submit a question for the show at
www.straighttalkmedicine.com
The doctors welcome the
opportunity to speak to local
groups on various topics such as:
diet, exercise, nutrition, spinal
health, injury prevention, and
home exercise.
The goal Kinnard Chiropractic
strives to achieve is to not only
alleviate pain; but, more
importantly, correct its cause, and
educate our patients to become
active participants in their own
well-being. The desire of the
Doctors and Staff at Kinnard
Chiropractic is for their patients
to experience what good health
feels like. They successfully treat
many conditions some may not
associate with "Chiropractic
Care." Some of those conditions
treated are: Fibromyalgia, Carpal
tunnel syndrome, neuropathy,
sports injuries and many others.
Kinnard Chiropractic is located
at 2611 Highway 44 West in
Inverness, FL. Hours of
operation: Monday through
Friday: 7:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.;
Saturday: 8:00 to 11:00 a.m.
We always do our best to
accommodate those who call and
need an appointment that day!
Phone: (352) 726-0554.
Kinnard Chiropractic accepts
most insurances including
Medicare and Medicaid.
000AHW3


Sunday, February 26, 2012 G3


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE






ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT To THE CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Citrus County's



Portraits


Citrus County Chronicle
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.
Crystal River, FL 34429


/ET
/^t


Congratulations Ken & Tina Heimann
on your Citrus County Outstanding
Business Community Award!


88o f6 tCate t i
Breakfast r
HE RESTAURAst Chef Srtephen Digiovanni

B&W E//l DRUg g
214 US Hwy. 41 S., Inverness, FI 34450 Phone 726-1021 Fax 726-0164
Pharmacy Hours: UNITEDSTATES Restaurant Store Hours:
9:00am-6:OOpm Mon-Fri. POST-ALSERVICE* Mon.-Fri. 6:30am-8:00pm
9:Oam- 1 pm Sat. Post Office Hours: Saturday 6:30am-6pm
9:OOam-1pm Sat. 7am-4pm Mon.-Fri. 7am-12pm Sat. Sunday 6:30am-4:0pm


Success


Welcome to the second edition of
Portraits of Success. We are excited to
present this special advertising section
providing you with a better knowledge
about a variety of local businesses. In
these advertisements, readers will learn
about the rich history of these
businesses and about the products and
services they offer. These businesses
provide an excellent choice for
customers to meet their shopping needs.
They make our community a better
place to live with their choices of
products and services and serve as an
integral part of the community through
participation in community events and
fundraisers.
The feature articles contained in this
publication were written by Advertising
Features Correspondent Rita Johnson,


who has been a freelance writer with
the Chronicle for seven years. She has
written hundreds of advertising feature
articles about Citrus County businesses
and the Nature Coast. Her background
includes more than 20 years of writing
while working in nutrition, alternative
medicine and quantum physics. After
receiving her doctorate in Alternative
Medicine, Rita completed her PhD in
Integrative Medicine so that she can
now publish articles in medical
journals and teach college level
courses.
We are confident you will find this
publication useful and interesting and
we encourage your support of these
local businesses as they help our
community grow and prosper.


Advertiser Index -
Kinnard Chiropractic.........................................................page 2,3
B&W Rexall Drugs........................................................page 4,5,28
Comfort Keepers.................................................................. page 6
W halen Jewelers...................................................................page 7
Dynabody Fitness................................................................ page 8
Gardner Audiology................................................................page 9
Plantation Golf Resort/Spa.................................................page 10
Dudley's Appraiser & Liquidator...................................... page 11
Citrus Pest Management....................................................page 12
Dave's body Shop............................................................... page 13
Citrus County Health Dept.......................................... page 14,15
M2 Metabolic Method................................................... page 16,17
Golddiggers & Gunslingers............................................... page 18
Sunflower Springs...............................................................page 19
Michaels Floor Covering.....................................................page 20
Home Instead..................................................................... page 21
Citrus County Chronicle.....................................................page 22
Hooper Funeral Home....................................................... page 23
Todd Financial .....................................................................page 24
The Snyder Center of Pain................................................ page 25
Nick Nicholas..................................................................... page 26
Tropical Windows................................................................page 27


A ..sin.g Supplement
Citr Cornty "
Portraits Success
Profiles in Community Businesses


Gerry Mulligan
Publisher

Trina Murphy
Advertising/Operations Director

Trista Stokes
Advertising Sales Manager


G4 Sunday, February 26, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT To THE CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Paid Advertisement


B&W Rexall Drugs


B&W Rexall Drugs is the oldest
and largest family owned drugstore in
Citrus County, which was originally
located on the square in downtown
Inverness in 1931. In 1971 it was
relocated to its current location in the
Citrus Plaza. Acquired in 1989 by
Ken and Tina Heimann, B&W Rexall
Drugs continues the nostalgic, full
service drugstore that has kept this
icon of the county in business for 80
years. Many customers remember
eating at the Coca-Cola themed soda
fountain when they were children, and
it is still popular with its Home of the
88/ Breakfast.
B&W Rexall also has a unique gift
department that includes many popular
items that have remained strong
collectibles throughout the years, like
Betty Boop, Coca-Cola, John Deere,
and Harley Davidson memorabilia, to
name just a few.
Under one roof you will find:
A large gift shop where you are
certain to find just the right gift for
everyone on your list.
"I have a lot of fun going into
B&W Rexall Drugs, it's like going
back in time. First of all, they offer a
variety of gift items that are so unusual
that your gift is sure to be original.
Second, they have a unique restaurant
in the back. ..."
JoAnn M


B&W Rexall Drugs is a high tech
pharmacy that still has old fashion
apothecary, compounding services &
homeopathic remedies with
personalized care.
2000 B&W Rexall Drugs'
Pharmacist and Owner Ken Heimann
received Pharmacist of the Year
Award from the Florida Pharmacy
Association for his innovations by
having the First Mobile Flu Shot
Clinic. The Mobile Flu Shot Clinic
has provided over 200,000 flu shots in
the Citrus County area.
B&W Rexall Drugs "Home of the
880 Breakfast" The Restaurant not
only became a historic part of
Inverness and an icon of Citrus
County, it's an attraction for many of
our out of town visitors and a nest for
snowbirds.
An award winning, full service
restaurant for a delicious breakfast,
lunch or dinner that also caters. The
restaurant also received the Citrus
County 2011 Golden Fork Award.
Elegant Catering services offers
mouth watering choices for any event
- casual or formal, big or small. This
is definitely not your average
drugstore.
2010 "Home of the 880
Breakfast" The Restaurant's Elegant
Catering Services won two 1st Place
Blue Ribbons for their Prime Rib and
Chicken Florentine, which are daily
specials at The Restaurant for $ 7.99.
2011 The Elegant Catering
Services provided by the "Home of
the 880 Breakfast" The Restaurant,
B&W Rexall Drugs, did an
unprecedented sweep of the First
Place awards in all four categories in a
landslide victory at the Taste of
Inverness.
Durable Medical Department


stocked with wheelchairs and other
appliances, braces and wraps, and a
line of diabetic footwear.
The Durable Medical Equipment
Shoppe provides FREE Blood
Pressure Checks; FREE Blood Sugar
Checks and Specializes in Diabetic
Footwear.
B&W Rexall Drugs has a United
States Post Office located in the rear
of the store next to the pharmacy and
offers full United States Postal
Service from stamps to shipping.
FREE Notary Services that opens
at 7:30am.
As owner, Ken Heimann states,
"We are truly thankful and appreciate
our community for shopping locally
with us, which is important in helping
B&W Rexall in providing back to the
community."
B&W Rexall Drugs enjoys giving
back to the community in many ways.
At no cost, hosting Citrus County's
largest blood drive, providing their
Annual Backpack giveaways,
outreach support for Partners for
Substance Free Citrus, the local 4-H
Chapter, The Boys & Girls Club of
Citrus County, and many more
worthwhile organizations.
2009 B&W Rexall Drugs'
Pharmacist & Owner Ken Heimann
received the Presidents Award given
by the Citrus County Chamber, the
first Presidents Award given in many
years by the Citrus County Chamber.
Exhibit Winners of the 2009 &
2010 Citrus County Fair. The Spin-
To-WIN Entry Forms for the Tax-
Relief T.V. Giveaway are always
drawn on April 15th.
In 2010 B&W Rexall Drugs
hosted the largest independent blood
drive in Citrus County with 102
donors, saving up to 300 lives, based


on 'The Twilight Saga' with a 'VIP
vampire' theme.
B&W Rexall Drugs has provided
over 600 backpacks to children in
need over the years. The backpacks
are filled with all the school supplies
needed to return to school, such as:
notebooks, pens, pencils, crayons,
glue and folders.
Recently B&W Rexall Drugs'
Pharmacist & Owner Ken Heimann
has been nominated for "Partners with
a Heart." This is the first time a
Person of the Year Award will be
presented by Partners for a Substance
Free Citrus, an advocate of Citrus
County Sheriff's Department. Many
years ago B&W Rexall made a
commitment to the community, and
the community has in turn supported
B&W Rexall Drugs' creative
accomplishments which both the
community and B&W Rexall have
benefited from. Shopping locally has
ushered the success of the community
as a whole.


In 2010 B&W Rexall was
presented with the Citrus County
Outstanding Community Business
Award.
B&W Rexall Drugs is located at
214 U.S. Highway 41 S in Inverness,
FL 34450. The Restaurant opens daily
at 6:30am.
Phone 352/726-1021.
O00AHKT


Sunday, February 26, 2012 G5


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT To THE CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


WeA re Comfort Keep's


tOur family
is here
to give comfort
to your family.
.. ,.,,,, t.,, OfficeManager,
G ..0 1... IIn ,s...


Gailen, Jennifer
& Lindsey
discussing
quality care.
Gailen Spinka, General Manager-Owner,
Jennifer Duca, Community Liaison,
Lindsey Arthur, Administrator-Owner
II


S,- Marlene &
Deborah
will help you
\when you call.
S. l .l ,,i, l, office Manager
C m f rt.,o, 1 .... u .,o r vecutiveSec.






Comfort


7 Independently owned and operated office. HH299992888

In-Home Care Services that help people
maintain full and independent lives


Companionship
Meal Preparation
Laundry
Light Housekeeping
Medication Reminders


* Escort for Shopping and
Doctor's Appointments
* Bathing and
Incontinence Care
* Alzheimer's/Dementia Care


224 Hwy. 44 Wet Inenes FL(5)7644

OOA1 wwwenorericsivene sfloid.com


Paid Advertisement


In home care for


longer, healthier, and


more purposeful life


T .


Comfort Keepers of Inverness takes
in-home care to a new level. Since the
business opened in 2004, their mission
has been to transform day-to-day
caregiving into opportunities for
meaningful conversation and activities
that engage and enrich the lives of
seniors physically, mentally, socially and
emotionally. Comfort Keepers feels that
the practice of "Interactive Care-
giving'"' contributes to longer, healthier,
more purposeful lives for seniors.
Comfort Keepers caregivers are well
trained, professional caregivers who are
set apart by their natural gift of caring for
others. To work with Comfort Keepers,
caregivers must pass stringent screening
and interviewing processes and must
show a strong devotion to others.
Only a few special people who pass
this process go on to complete the
training necessary to deliver this special
brand of care and become Comfort
Keepers. All Comfort Keepers pass
extensive background checks that exceed
both state and franchise requirements and
also must complete continuing education.
In-home care is a growing need for
seniors who desire to stay in their own
homes with familiar surroundings, but
can no longer take care of the necessary
requirements of the home. Sometimes,
all that is needed is a little assistance to
enable a senior to stay in their own home
and function safely for many more years.
Whether it is only a few hours a week,
or 24 hours a day, the caregivers at
Comfort Keepers make it possible for
seniors to continue to live in their own
home and enjoy a quality of life that they
thought was going to change forever.
This care reinforces seniors self value by
allowing them to continue their daily
activities with as much independence as
possible. The focus is providing solutions
for the normal transition of aging.


G6 Sunday, February 26, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


In order to achieve the most favorable
outcome for each client, Comfort
Keepers carefully matches caregivers and
clients by personalities, interests, skills
and needs. This extra consideration
forms the basis of strong, healthful
relationships. Comfort Keepers Care
Coordinators work as partners with our
client's family to provide their loved one
a complete in-homecare solution to
promote independent living.
Comfort Keepers provides
companionship and assistance through:
Meal Preparation
Laundry & Linen Washing
Light Housekeeping
Grooming & Dressing Support
Errand Services
Bathing & Hygiene Care
Grocery Shopping
Respite Care
Transportation
Alzheimer's/Dementia Care
All Comfort Keepers caregivers are
employees of the company and not
independent contractors. All of our
caregivers are bonded and covered with
Worker's Compensation and Liability
Insurance.
Comforts Keepers is locally-owned
and family operated by Deborah and
Gailen Spinka and daughter, Lindsey
Arthur. Comfort Keepers is actively
involved in the community and
participates and sponsors local
organizations like, Chamber of
Commerce, Womens Business Alliance,
Leadership Citrus, Suncoast Business
Masters and various health expos.
For in-depth information about
Comfort Keepers, visit the websites at
www.seniorservicesinvernessflorida.com
or stop by the local office at 2244
Highway 44 West in Inverness, Florida.
Phone: 352-726-4547







ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT To THE CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


PAID ADVERTISEMENT


Whalen Jewelers


Whalen Jewelers has been offering quality
and value to the Citrus County area since 1977.
Whalen Jewelers is the oldest operating
jewelry store in the entire Nature Coast area,


and is owned and operated by
Joyce Taylor. Specializing in
fine diamonds, they have trav-
eled half way around the world
to hand-select diamonds direct
from the world's leading
sources at considerable sav-
ings.
Whalen Jewelers is the only
jeweler in the county that is a


PANDORA'T
SNFORGFTTARI F MOMENTS


BUYNG








255 E. HIHLN BLVD.


W kH& Win Dii Center^^^^^^^^^^^^^
MATE ( L[0 JEELR 726-4709^^^ tsi~sSw S^


Wko~e~


member of an elite group of retailers hand-
selected for membership in the Independent
Jewelers Organization (IJO) and Retail
Jewelers Organizations (RJO), which only
accepts jewelers with the highest ethical stan-
dards and superior professional integrity.
Group purchasing power through IJO &
RJO allows Whalen Jewelers to bring the top
fashions and highest quality products at the
best prices, which means a significant savings
for their customers.
Being affiliated with IJO, Whalen Jewelers
is allowed to buy directly from the actual dia-
mond cutters through their offices in the
famous city of Antwerp, Belgium, the diamond
capital of the world diamonds direct at sig-
nificant savings. Whalen Jewelers attends trade
shows each year, where top-notch manufactur-
ers exhibit the latest designs long before other
jewelers have access to them. In addition,
Whalen Jewelers is allowed to attend edu-
cational seminars to hone their skills and to
keep abreast of changes in the diamond and
gemstone market.
From your first visit to the Whalen Jewelers
store in Inverness you will feel like a favorite
friend. Customers will find knowledgeable
employees to assist you whether you are shop-
ping for a diamond selection or just need a new
watch battery installed. Whalen Jewelers has
always worked hard to keep your total satisfac-
tion a top priority. The owners and employees
are a part of the local community, which is
another requirement to be an IJO Jeweler, and
they strive to offer an unsurpassed level of
service.
Whalen Jewelers has a large, varied inven-
tory. They are a full service jeweler with pro-
fessional staff who will educate and guide you
through your purchase.
TRUST Whalen's earns your trust based
on their commitment to a high standard of
excellence delivered through their friendly
hometown service.
INTEGRITY As a Master IJO Jewelers,
Whalen must follow an ethical code of conduct
and best practices.
HONESTY Master IJO Jewelers are sin-
cere and truthful about the information and
pricing of the fine jewelry in their store.


EXPERTISE The combination of expe-
rience, skill, and knowledge are qualities that
result in confident shopping and a satisfying
jewelry purchase.
Whalen Jewelers offers
Si /'F the following services:
BfEST Diamond Inspection -
free-of-charge. To prolong the
.b T life of your jewelry Whalen's
%. 7rff recommends a professional
inspection four times per year.
.-.,.' ;Let the experts check the con-
, edition of your settings to help
prevent further damage or loss
of gemstones. Always a free service pro-
vided by Whalens.
Jewelry Repair: Whalen Jewelers' pro-
fessional staff is ready to service your jew-
elry repair needs. They can repair all types of
jewelry, from diamond settings to broken
chains.
Custom Designs/Restyling: Whalen's
skilled staff can perform magic with your
older jewelry, inherited items, or gift pieces
you might like better in another style.
Whalen's maintains a large selection of the
latest styles for you to "try on" which helps
in your selection of the custom style for your
personal taste.
Watch Repair: Whalen's watch repair-
man is certified, even on Rolex watches.
Watch batteries and bands are professional
installed. All watch estimates are free.
Pearl and Bead Stringing: Whalen's
does custom stringing for your necklaces or
bracelets.
Engraving: Jewelry, cuff links or money
clips purchased at Whalen Jewelers may be
engraved.
Appraisals: All appraisals are performed
by a Certified Gemologist, who is trained by
Gemological Institute of America (GIA), and
a member of the National Association of
Jewelry Appraisers.
Silver Restoration: Bring in your family
heirloom sterling or plated silver wares and
have them restored to their original beauty.
Wish Lists: Whalen Jewelers offers a
wish list for all customers. Ask for their
popular "Pssst." cards to pass on a subtle hint
about that special gift that caught your eye.
Layaway: Whalen Jewelers offers a laya-
way program for your convenience.
Whalen Jewelers Credit Plan: Provided
through GE Money Luxury Card.
As a Master IJO Jeweler, Whalen
Jewelers guarantees you the "Brilliance You
Deserve" at a price you can afford.
Whalen Jewelers is located at
225 E. Highland Blvd., Inverness,
FL. Phone 352-726-4709
www.whalenjewelers.com


Iw 255 E. Highland Blvd.
W Wol ml Inverness, Fl 34452
S7 726-4709


Sunday, February 26, 2012 G7


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT To THE CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Paid Advertisement

I Dynabody Fitness Club is the largest and

most complete fitness center in Citrus County.


el


23Hw. 44 W. Invernss


They are fulfilling their Mission
Statement; the dedication to making a
positive impact on the health and
wellness of Citrus County residents
by inspiring them through their
actions, attitude and commitment to
the fitness industry.
For over 15 years, Dynabody has
continued to grow and extend their
services to incorporate a wide variety
of health and wellness therapies. They
now offer an 18,000 square foot
indoor outdoor full service facility,
and employ certified personal trainers
with over 30 years of combined
experience. Whether you are training
for a marathon or are a couch potato
with a new resolution to get healthier,
Dynabody has the facility and trainers
to help you reach your goals.
With a membership as diverse as
this area, at Dynabody you will meet
all ages and fitness levels.
In the Member Lounge, you can
relax and meet other members while
you refresh with energy drinks,
protein shakes, and protein bars.
They offer a Group Fitness Room
that is action packed with a full
schedule of activities. Check out the
Cardio Fight Xperience, Zumba
toning, Extreme Boot Camp, Spin
City group cycling studio, and so
many more of the most effective and
up to date programs. Class
descriptions and schedules are
available online or at the front desk.
Dynabody has a new Ab Room for
abdominal/stretching workouts that
are as effective and results-driven as
possible, with personal trainers
available.
In the Strength Training Area you
will find machines by Body Masters,
Life Fitness, Star Trac, and Hammer
Strength, as well as a massive
collection of free weights. Remember,
the personal trainers are there for you!
The Cardio Equipment room
utilizes over 25 pieces of cardio
equipment, including treadmills,
ellipticals, steppers, and recumbent


cycles. New flat screen televisions are
viewable from all cardio areas.
Come out and meet the trainers.
Beginners are welcome and there are
individualized programs for all ages
and fitness levels. The trainers offer
nutritional and supplementary guidance,
weight loss programs, as well as
motivation and goal setting. Your goal
may be strength conditioning or
resistance training or you may want to
increase your flexibility and stamina to
improve your golf game. Private
training is also available in their Fitness
Studio.
After a great workout, you deserve a
therapeutic massage treatment by one
of the Licensed Massage Therapists on
staff. They offer many services
including Massage Therapy, Bamboo
Fusion, Craniosacral, Reflexology, and
Reiki. Massage is not just for relaxing,
but is proven to improve circulation and
joint mobility, improves energy flow
and releases tension and anxiety. It also
speeds recovery from strenuous
physical exertion and shortens recovery
time between workouts. Remember:
Massage is a powerful ally for a
healthier life!
In addition to all of this, Dynabody
has the only heated indoor swimming
pool in Citrus County with a Jacuzzi
and five hours of instructor led water
aerobics everyday.
Dynabody offers everything you
need under one roof and all in a
friendly, unintimidating atmosphere that
works around your schedule!
Stop by and learn how you can
improve your health and fitness at
Dynabody Fitness Club or check out the
website first at
www.dynabodyfitnessclub .com.
Dynabody Fitness Club is located at
2232 Highway 44 West
Inverness, Fl 34453
Phone: 352/344-3553.
Hours of Operation: Open 24 hours
Monday 4:00 a.m.- Friday 9:00 p.m.
Saturday 7:00 am. to 7:00 p m Sunday
8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.


G8 Sunday, February 26, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT To THE CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Paid Advertisement


He is no stranger to hearing


problems ... and hearing aids


If you think you can hear fine but have
difficulty understanding conversation,
then you want help from someone who
understands your problem. Dan Gardner
is that person. Dan knows firsthand about
hearing loss. While serving in the U.S.
Navy in the 1960's, Dan's Oceanography
studies were abruptly halted when he
sustained a head injury with ear damage.
Since that injury, he has been passionate
about helping people hear better. Upon
discharge from the military, Dan returned
to the University of South Florida and
earned his graduate degree in audiology,
the science of hearing. The primary
mission of Gardner Audiology, Dan's
36-year-old Citrus-based company, is to
help people solve their hearing problems.
Dan addressed his hearing problem


early in life when he began wearing
hearing aids. Many Americans miss out
on a full life because they will wait up
to seven years or more before they do
something about their hearing loss. Ten
percent of the U.S. population suffers
from hearing loss. Approximately 30
percent of the people over the age of 60
have hearing problems. Almost all of
these people could hear better with
hearing aids.
The majority of hearing loss in adults
is a result of irreversible deterioration of
the sensory cells of the inner ear caused
by phenomenon such as noise exposure,
aging, medications, trauma, and various
hereditary factors.
Hearing loss seriously impacts
your personal and professional life
with symptoms of irritability, anger,
fatigue, stress and depression, that
slowly leads to isolation and
withdrawal. Recent research has linked
hearing loss with the progression of
Alzheimer's and dementia.
Hearing aids are the best and
sometimes the only solution for most
people suffering from hearing loss.
Gardner Audiology is unique
because it partners with large
international companies to research


consumer satisfaction with hearing aids.
Through research with over 2000
patients, Gardner learned that although
the latest hearing aid technology helped
most of the participants to hear better,
about 35 percent did not perceive
enough value to embrace hearing aids
as part of their everyday life.
How can you decide if hearing aids
are a good value for you? You could
participate in one of Gardner's hearing
aid field studies and earn a free trial
fitting by simply sharing your
experience on a pre-and post- fit
questionnaire. You could also buy a set
of hearing aids with a return clause in
the purchase agreement. The State of
Florida protects the consumer from
fraudulent hearing aid sales, but Dan
recommends that you thoroughly read
contracts and purchase agreements.
When Dan was asked what he felt
was the most valuable advice he could


give to people considering a hearing
aid, he replied, "Consult with an
audiologist instead of a salesman,
because who you see is much more
important than the products you buy."
You can watch field study videos
and gather a wealth of information by
visiting www.gardneraudiology.corn.
If you have questions about or would
like to participate in a hearing aid field
study, call Gardner Audiology at one
of these Citrus county locations.
Gardner Audiology offices
are located at:
700 SE Fifth Terrace, Suite 11
Crystal River, FL 34429
352/795-5700
and
In the office of Rama Nathan, M D.
820 S. Bea Avenue
Inverness, FL 34452
352/419-6565


Interesting hearing loss facts:
* About 30% of Americans over the age of 60 have hearing
loss.
The Americans for Disability act protects hearing impaired
from discrimination.
There is a 65% chance that you will embrace new hearing
aid technology to solve your hearing problems. 4
Both Audiologists and Hearing Aid Specialists licensed to
sell hearing aids in Florida. Audiologists are required to
earn a masters or doctorate degree. In comparison Hearing
Aid Specialists need only a high school degree or its
equivalent.

Over 2000 patients have participated in Gardner Audiology
Research Studies. View videos of their experiences on
www.GardnerAudiology.com





Audiology

7 Locations in Tampa Bay
1-800-277-1182


(.


Most all adults with
hearing losses suffer
from irreversible
damage to sensory
cells of inner ear
from such
causes as
noise
exposure,
aging,
hereditary factors,
and toxic medications.
Hearing aids are the
most common solution.


Sunday, February 26, 2012 G9


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT To THE CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Sophisticated Old Florida hospitality and charm with new,

modern amenities, sumptuous dining and exhilarating activities


Plantation on Crystal River is best
known for being the top and only full-
service resort in the Nature Coast. We
provide not only hotel service, but have
a championship golf course with The
Pro Bar & Grill, Aveda Spa, sparkling
pool with Tiki Bar and the newly
renovated West 82 Bar & Grill. Our
shining star is the dive shop offering
manatee and nature tours, PADI dive
services, boat rentals and charter
fishing. We are a centerpiece in the
Crystal River community and take
pride in the product that we put forth.

A hidden gem tucked along Florida's
Nature Coast, the Plantation on Crystal
River is surrounded by the natural
springs of Kings Bay and more than
25,000 surface acres of pristine lakes,
rivers, wildlife refuges and state parks.
We sit on 232 acres of lush preserve
land with emerald greens and grand
oaks housing hundreds of birds and


wildlife that include osprey, sandhill
cranes, blue heron, red bellied warbler,
yellow bellied warbler, nedropic
cormorant, great egret, eagles, and grey
horned owls to mention a few.
Centrally located, this irresistibly
charming eco-friendly and green
lodging luxury resort has remained a
popular escape for more than 50 years.


We recently closed for renovation, so
we now have brand new guestrooms,
dining room, lobby bar and lobby area
to showcase to the community. We are
unique in that you never have to leave
the resort if you don't want to we
offer golf, spa, boating, manatee tours,
scuba diving, fishing and more. And
you can bring all members of the
family, including pets. If you want to
arrive by boat, that is okay also. You
can tie up right behind your room. We
also house the largest amount of


meeting space in the county 12,000
square feet. So we welcome you to
plan your special events such as
weddings, reunions, and anniversary
and birthday parties along with
meetings for associations, corporate
and social groups, with us.

If you're looking for a special package,
we have several themed ones to choose
from ranging from manatee and golf to
fishing and romance. We also offer
value packages and specials for Florida
residents. There's the Manatee Tour
and Breakfast package, The Golf and
Breakfast package, Plantation on the
hook! Fishing package, Stay 3 Nights
for the Price of 2 Night offer, Romance
package and The Florida Resident
Special Resort offer. These packages
can be booked at 800-632-6262 or by
going online:
www.PlantationOnCrystalRiver.com.


We want local residents to know that
they are welcome to come to the
Plantation on Crystal River and take
advantage of this great facility right
here in their own backyard. They can
dine, dive, golf, fish and enjoy the spa.
It is the perfect "extra bedroom" for
visiting friends and family or even a
fun, local escape for residents. We
have lots of wonderful dining specials
in the restaurant, which is open to the
public and we host special events to
celebrate all the holidays. Plus don't
forget your special occasions such as
weddings, birthdays, reunions and
meetings. Like us on Facebook to keep
up with the latest information and
specials that we offer.

Plantation on Crystal River is located at
9301 West Fort Island Trail in Crystal
River, Florida, west of U.S. Highway
19. We are open 24 hours a day.


G10 Sunday February 26, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT To THE CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Dudlev's Auction & Maine-lv Real Estate


DiUDLIY' A UCTON
4000 S. FLORIDA AVE., (U.S. 41 S) INVERNESS, FLORIDA 34450
Central Florida's Largest & Most Diverse Auction Company

PREVIEW: 10AM AUCTION: 3PM
These sales are set up outside as we prepare for the antique auctions and always
have great treasures. What fun!


PREVIEW: 10AM AUCTION: 1PM
Monthly Antique & Collectible Auction. 400-500 Lots of the finer things in life
including coins, art, furniture, primitives, jewelry, porcelain, art glass & more! 100+ of
these lots are also featured live and online via www.proxibid.com/dudleys.


STARTING OUTSIDE AT 3PM INSIDE AROUND 6PM
Truly a sale for the adventurous with a large assortment of household furniture & goods,
appliances, tools & equipment, new, nearly new merchandise & often vehicles.


PREVIEW: 8AM AUCTION: 9AM REAL ESTATE: 10AM
105 W. KELLER ST., HERNANDO
HOME TO BE SOLD ABSOLUTE, REGARDLESS OF PRICE!!!
3 Bedroom, 2 bath pool home to be sold "Regardless of price" to settle estate!!
2228 sq. ft., 1 +/- acre, granite countertops, tiled floors, Ig. MB w/2 walk-ins, dual
showers, garden tub. Formal DR to pool area, FR w/cathedral ceilings, wet bar &
fireplace. Pool bath. Pool 30x14 w/jets. Home needs face lift. CONTENTS:
Includes 7 pc. DR set, 5 pc. BR set, 4 pc. full size bedroom set, dinette set, 3 pc.
wall unit, LR, TV's, wing chairs, lamps, glass and china, yard wagon, patio
furniture & more.


PREVIEW: 11AM AUCTION: 1PM
This is a full sale of a variety of sports trading cards and a lifelong, collection of
signed NY Yankee collectibles. This sale will be held live at the hall and online!
Bring your family to this great event.


PREVIEW: 8AM AUCTION: 9AM REAL ESTATE: 10AM
Wildwood mobile home Continental Country Club golfing community. Great set up for
retirees or snowbirds. This sale is in the works, so be sure to follow on website.


PREVIEW: 11AM AUCTION: 1PM
Monthly Antique & Collectible Auction. 400-500. Lots of the finer things in life
including coins, art, furniture, primitives, jewelry, porcelain, art glass & more! 100+ of
these lots are also featured live and online via www.proxibid.com/dudleys.


PREVIEW: 10AM AUCTION: 9AM


STARTING OUTSIDE AT 3PM INSIDE AROUND 6PM
Truly a sale for the adventurous with a large assortment of household furniture & goods,
appliances, tools & equipment, new, nearly new merchandise & often vehicles.


PREVIEW: 11AM AUCTION: 1PM This is a full sale.
Personal Property sold together w/udley's Auction AB1667 The Real Estate by Main-ly Real Estate-Chrisfine Dudley Lic RE Broker #381384 AU#4239
A 111 4 For real estate inquires contact Chris @ 352-344-9588, Bob Brittain @ 813-317-8007 10% Buyers Premium Dimensions are approxmate
S- *.,U Absentee and phone bids always accepted 352-637-9588
BE SURE TO WATCH THE WEBSITE Up-To-Date Photos On Web www.dudleysauction.com Sn


Paid Advertisement

Certified Estate Specialist,

a Full Service Personal

Property Liquidator


Dudley's Auction, and partner,
Maine-ly Real Estate, are a family owned
business, headed by Robert & Chris
Dudley. In partnership since 1992, they
have grown to employ a staff of 15, with
varying licenses and areas of expertise.
With lifelong interests in antiques and
collectibles, this story began in 1987
acquiring the future Auction site property.
After attending auction school, becoming
a licensed Florida auction in 1996, a
passion was born. Beginning in 1996
monthly antiques auctions was held the
first Sunday of every month. Design and
building process began of our present
state-of-the-art auction facility in 2001
with the first auctions held in 2005. Since
that day, we have conducted over 500
auctions with a mix of antique, personal
property, real estate, specialty on line,
onsite and gallery sales. We started with
conducting an average of 14 sales per
year in 1996 to over 100 per year
currently.
As Certified Estate Specialists with
the National Auction Association, the
services offered range from a single item
to the liquidation of the entire contents of
a home or business. The may include the
vehicles, coins, jewelry and estate
firearms. Depending on the needs of the
situation, we can offer consignment and/
or cash buyouts. Confidential
appointments are encouraged to discuss
clients' particular needs. Dudley's
Auctions mission is to provide top-
quality, innovative, and practical services
that offers a feasible option to any
liquidation process.
The personal property division of the
company offers estate, insurance and
court approved appraisals. With five
licensed auctioneers on staff, combined
60 years of experience, we are able to
answer most value related questions.
Dudley's highly visible website, e-mail


program and trained staff are constantly
updating the marketing programs.
Maine-ly Real Estate, in partnership
with Dudley's Auction, has created a full
service auction division delivering a
marketing alternative to the ever-
changing real estate situations. Together
the company has developed strong and
trusted cooperating relationships with
professional guardians, banks, trust
companies, accountants and attorneys.
We work with heirs and bereaved family
members, both local and out of state to
simplify the process in the liquidation.
In the future Dudley's will continue to
expand their visibility and continue to be
known as the largest & most diverse
auction company in central Florida.
At Dudley's Auction there is a full and
varied schedule, with Thursdays Estate
Adventure Auctions and the first Sunday
of every month conducting Antique &
Collectible Auctions. Specialty targeted
auctions with live and on-line bidding are
designed to maximize exposure in the
liquidation of lifelong collections
including but not limited to, coins,
knives, dolls, and postcards returning the
highest and best value. The website plays
an integral part in all of these sales.
Consignment days are Friday and
Monday: 9 am. to 4 p m., and the hall is
open Monday thru Friday: 9 a m. to 4
p m. Formal preview times vary for each
sale. An updated calendar of events is
always available on the
website:www.dudleysauction.com.
Dudley's mission is to provide top-
quality, innovative, practical option to
liquidation and valuation needs. We
believe our first responsibility is to the
customers who utilize our services, as we
assist in life's transitions.
Dudley's Auction is located at 4000 S.
Florida Avenue in Inverness, FL. Phone:
352-637-9588.


Sunday February 26, 2012 Gil


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT To THE CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Paid Advertisement



Citrus Pest Management


As Tony Winebrenner, founder of Citrus
Pest Management, explains, "There is a lot
we could say about what we do. The bottom
line is that we are a pest management
company. That is our sole focus and we do it
well. What customers want to know is that
we will continue to show up when we say
we will and that we can take care of their
pest problem."
Citrus Pest Management has won the
"Best of the Best Award" in Citrus County
for 11 years in a row. This award is given
based on votes by satisfied customers; and
obviously, Citrus Pest Management is doing a
great job according to their customers. Citrus
Pest Management is known for quality service
at a fair price, and for the past 15 years they
have been committed to excellence.
"At Citrus Pest Management, we charge a
fair price for quality service, with guaranteed
results-period!" To Tony, those aren't just
some clever words he thought up one night to
use as a company statement. They are a way
of life. It's what he believes and it's what
his company delivers.


After ten years of learning the pest control
industry literally from the ground up as a
route technician all the way to general
manager for a large company, Tony felt
customers were paying too much for too little
customer service and results. In 1997,
Tony established Citrus Pest Management as
a means of providing his customers with
service that matches the words by which
he lives.
Citrus Pest Management offers termite
and pest control service for Citrus, Hernando,
Pasco, Pinellas, Marion, Sumter, and Levy
Counties in Florida.
Their skilled technicians will take care of
problems you may have with: termites, fire
ants, rodents, wasp nests, roaches, fleas, ticks,
bedbugs, bees, and any other pest. Their
website even has a link to show you recent
outbreaks of bedbugs across the country to
help with your travel plans.
They offer installation of inside wall
delivery systems during construction for a
safer, quicker, no smell, no interruption
protection that is accessed from outside the


home. Learn all about their pest control plans
on their website.
Quarterly Pest Control Service
Intro 1st Service
A complete inspection of the interior and
the exterior of you property.
Removal of
kitchen and bathroom Service
switch plates and Agreements
place a barrier into Available
wall voids to prevent U One Time
insects from invading U Monthly
your property.
Baits are placed in Bi-monthly
all cracks and U Quarterly
crevices in the kitchen U Annual
and bathroom area.
Treatment around
and under appliances such as dishwasher,
refrigerator, washer and dryer.
Treatment of attic or crawl spaces.
Every Quarter
Removal of spider webs and wasps nests
from under eaves around windows and
garage.


Treatment of all entry points (doors,
windows, and eaves area).
Complete treatment of patios, porches,
lanais, screen rooms and screened pool space.
Treatment of soil, turf or mulch areas
outside against the home or building.
If at any time the homeowner finds
evidence of such insects, Citrus Pest
Management Inc. will retreat at no additional
charge to homeowner.
Their website at www.citruspest.com
www.citruspest.com contains a wealth of
information about the services available and
the pests that invade our homes here in
Central Florida, as well as an online customer
survey, contact form for service request, and
much more.
Office hours are Monday through Friday
8:00 am. to 5:00 p.m.
Contact Citrus Pest Management today to
learn about guaranteed results.
Phone: 352-563-6698 fax 352-563-5599
- Toll Free 1-866-860-2847
Citrus Pest Management is located at 406
NE 1st Street, Crystal River, Fl 34429.


%V


G12 Sunday February 26, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE






ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT To THE CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Paid Advertisement

When it comes to quality

collision repair, Dave's

Body Shop is the number

one recommended body

I% shop in Citrus County.


with Spies Hecker pai


nt,


Dave's Body Shop is a family
owned and operated business and
has been in the same Homosassa
location since 1975.

Owner Dave Warren's
commitment to be the best comes
with years of experience
combined with continued
education and training in the
newest technologies.
Quality ali\a\ come
first for the l

staff
tha t
strives
to satif
each and c\ci ur
customer. and ,
assurances that
your auto will be restored to meet
or beat the industries highest
standards.

The staff, including a full-time
onsite mechanic and ICAR
certified technicians, at Dave's
Body Shop uses the highest
quality replacement parts and
equipment as well as cutting edge
technologies to achieve quality
repairs.

The body shop includes two chief
frame machines, three paint
booths, quality auto refinishing


Sunday February 26, 2012 G13


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


computerized paint mixing.

Dave's Body Shop 24-hour towing
service serves Homosassa,
Inverness, Crystal River and other
areas of Citrus and Hernando
counties.

In addition to a full line of truck
accessories, Dave's Body
Shopl alo) offers Rhino
Linings. Rhino
Linings is a
spray-on
bed liner
product that
is used as a
11 protect iv e
coating for a
variety of
vehicle applications.

Other services include complete auto
detail hand wash and wax service.

Estimates, using the Mitchell
Ultramate computerized estimating
system for all major insurance
companies, is always free.

Dave's Body Shop is located at 4870
S. Suncoast Blvd, Homosassa. They
are open Monday through Friday
8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. 352-628-
4878. After hours towing 352-942-
3284 (Mike).


I




ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT To THE CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


tner


i


h


Next Quarterly Meeting
April 26, 2012
Lecanto Government Building
3600 W. Sovereign Path
9:00 AM Room 166
Our Mission
Advocate for positive reform and systemic change in tobacco
prevention and control policies
/I Our Goals
Si Goal 1: Prevent Initiation of Tobacco Use Among Youth
Goal 2: Eliminate Secondhand Smoke Exposure
I Goal 3: Promote Cessation from Tobacco Use
Goal 4: Develop and maintain Partnership Infrastructure
Our Commitment
Reduce Youth Access to Tobacco
Reduce the Tobacco Marketing Influences in Our Community
Help People Quit Using Tobacco Products
For more information Contact Tobacco Prevention Program
(352) 726-1731 ext. 242


a


G14 Sunday February 26, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT To THE CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Offer employees

quit-smoking

resources...

It's about health,
productivity
& dollars


4
...a.....>


Benefits of Having a Tobacco-Free Workforce
Improve safety & productivity
* Non-smokers have half as many on-the-job accidents a smokers
* Non-smokers have better attendance records than smokers
Reduce employee absenteeism
* The average smoking employee spends about 18 days a year on smoking breaks
* Smokers are absent from work for sickness at least 26% more than non-smokers
Reduce healthcare costs
* Smokers' costs are as much as 40% higher than those of non-smokers
* Smokers are 50% as likely to be hospitalized


Each adult
smoker costs
employers $3,400
per ear in lost
productivity and
excess medical
expenditures.
U .S. Centers for Disease
Control & Prevention


Encourage your smoking employees to quit...
add tobacco cessation resources to your employee policies
Find out about free onsite & telephone counseling resources
that also provide free nicotine replacement therapy
Contact: Tobacco-Free Partnership of Citrus County
(352) 726-1731 ext 242
DOACFE PATNRSI


Sunday February 26, 2012 G15


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Ar~EEE .







ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT To THE CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


M I* t S Paid Advertisement

M2 clients successfully


keep their weight off


M2 Metabolic Method has opened its newest
Weight Loss Center in the Citrus Center
Shopping Center located at 2609 E Gulf to
Lake Highway in Inverness. Based out of
Volusia County, M2 is privately owned by its
CEO Mitchell Menaker, and has two other
office locations in Deland and New Smyrna
Beach Florida. The Company has 5 full time
weight loss coaches and 2 support staff
members. All coaches have successfully lost
their weight on the M2 Program and were
previously coached by Mr. Menaker.

M2 Metabolic Method was founded in 2010
after the owner lost 100 pounds in 3 5 months
on the weight loss program. Having struggled
with weight and health issues for almost 30
years, Mr. Menaker saw the ability to help
others who suffer from similar issues, and to
work to make a difference in the health and
quality of people's lives. The M2 program
consists of an all natural proprietary weight
loss supplement, that, when combined with a
low calorie diet eating regular foods, will
cause average weight loss of anywhere from -
1 pound per day. The supplement will
naturally suppress your hunger, remove
physical cravings and release the abnormal
fat deposits stored by the body (what is more
commonly known as "brown fat"). Many
other diets and exercise programs cause the
body to lose muscle and normal fat deposits
known as "white fat" while the abnormal fat
deposits remain intact.

What makes M2 unique in the market place is
its one on one private weight loss coaching
and support. M2's private coaching and
support has helped over 2000 people in the
last 2 years achieve not only their initial
target goal, but in many cases fantasy weight
goals that have not been seen since Jr. High
or High School. In addition, many of the
clients whom have worked with M2 have
seen improved health in Diabetes, Blood
Pressure and Cholesterol. Mr. Menaker
himself was diabetic, had high blood pressure
and cholesterol medical issues that were so
dangerous to his health that in 2009 his
Physician gave him back his medical chart
and said she was not going to attend his
funeral. Within 90 days of starting the
program, Mr. Menaker was totally off all
medications and his physician was in shock
when she saw him 90 days after his last visit.


In addition, due to the natural changes that
often occurs with the body as a result of this
program, (and especially when combined
with the M2 private coaching), M2 clients
have successfully kept their weight off in
almost all cases and have not experienced the
"yo-yo" effect so often found with other
weight loss scenarios.

Many people who suffer from being
overweight or worse from obesity can look to
the root of their problem in the fact that they
are addicted to food, no different than any
other addiction such as drugs or alcohol. M2
offers group support meetings Monday nights
in their Inverness office where clients whom
are being coached and their guests come
together to support each other and to begin to
understand where the addiction originated
from so they can change their daily behavior
and thus their addictive relationship with
food. The combination of the accountability
of the coaching relationship combined with
the group support has allowed M2 to be able
to boast a 97% success rate for their clients
achieving their goals or beyond.

M2 has a division of the company known as
M2 Medical Method. Many times Dr's and or
Chiropractors are looking to help their
patients by suggesting and offering a weight
loss program. M2 has been invited to be the
weight loss program for several Dr's and
Chiropractors around the state by offering
private labeling of its Proprietary Platinum
Formula under the Dr's own branded name.
Mr. Menaker will then go into the medical
office to train and support the appointed staff
members) so that they can coach and support
their own patients. It is estimated that 70% of
the US population will be overweight or
obese by the year 2030. Through the Medical
Method Program, our success stories are now
being expanded directly between Dr and
Patient.

The new Inverness location features a
spectacular ZUMBA studio and will offer
exercise classes for people of all fitness
levels. The classes will be given daily, and
M2 is proud to have 5 of the top Certified
ZUMBA instructors in Citrus County on its
team. Classes are $7 each if purchased
individually or $25 if purchased in a bundle
of 5. Please call our office for dates and times


of the classes.

Mr. Menaker and his ,
team of consultants have
collaborated to offer
several new and exciting
additional products in
2012 to enhance weight
loss, maintenance and skin
care. These proprietary I
products help to improve :
metabolism, tighten and
enhance the skin and
naturally curb hunger and
cravings with no drug
involved.

A recent M2 client commented.
"In most all cases when
something sounds too good it be
true it usually is. However, in ihi'
case, too good to be true is the L ad
that I am down 122 pounds in 13
days".

Mr. Menaker is a National Public
Speaker and Motivational Well ne,, nd
Diet Coach and is happy to speak i, Ci i:c.
Social or business groups. Pleae call the
corporate office at 386-423-i I i b[ook
speaking engagements. Mr. Nlein.tei ie'ide,
here in Lecanto, as well as ii Del.ind. Flo iida.
He is a father of two girls, age, 211 aind 2'- aiLd A.
110 pound Newfoundland puppi. Nh. Nleiu.kei
graduated from The Universin\ oI FHi kla in I ')">
with a Bachelors Degree in Bumine,. H li' hhhblie
include travel, music, antiques. nd i H id
movie enthusiast.

M2 Metabolic Method offers No Co,'i Pi i\ ite
Consultations in order to discuii, \,, piei ,mi.l
situation and to explain their: weighl Ih',, pi0og.iam
and services. To schedule youI Pi i \tie
Consultation please call 352-341 -4242 Lod.\.

'^ -'*!
=-- "s


k- - -- -.A


G16 Sunday February 26, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT To THE CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Come See and Hear What All 5,000
Successful Clients are Talkinq A out...


O N q




A "^



r-.. Lose Wc


Feel Gr

Lose those extra pounds with no side effects or adverse
health risks with the ultimate fat burning diet...


MA


eight

eat


* Hormone free
* No injections
* No prescription needed


* No heavy exercise
* Eat regular foods
* Dedicated Customer Coaching
and Support Program


*Individual r ult ma Vr These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. The products
al re m ry described herein are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.
z v v


Sunday February 26, 2012 G17


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


g.dz






ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT To THE CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Paid Advertisement

Nobody Pays More For Your Gold & Guns


Goldiggers & Gunslingers is a
unique establishment that pays cash
for gold & silver jewelry, diamonds,
coins, guns and ammo, and sells
home decor, jewelry, western style
items and one-of-a-kind gifts, as well
as offers one of the few
gunsmithing shops in
Inverness.
Together, owners
Kenny & Frances
Williams provide
friendly, down to earth
service at great prices
with two locations to
serve you in Citrus
County.
Buying or selling,
find out what your
valuables are worth "
with a free appraisal.
Jewelry offerings
include men's and
women's jewelry


featuring gold, silver, diamond rings,
engagement rings, wedding bands and
more with a wide variety of styles and
prices.
If you are looking for a jewelry
buyer with honesty, integrity, and
reliability, Goldiggers &
Gunslingers pays top
dollar for gold, silver,
platinum, coins and
diamonds.
The gun room
includes a large
selection of high-quality
hunting and assault
rifles, shotguns
including single, hand
pump, long stock, hand
grip, auto loading, over
and under, and side-by-
side, from .410 gauge to
10 gauge; pistols and
hand guns for personal
protection and concealed


carry, handgun hunting, plinking, and
black powder; as well as a large
assortment of revolvers and semi-


automatic pistols.
Manufacturers include
Kimber, Weatherby,
Winchester, Colt, Smith
Ruger and more.


Remington,
Browning,
& Wesson,


Ammo and accessories are
available and include extra clips and
magazines, ammo, scopes, holsters,
slings and more, and we offer a
Concealed Weapons class in the
Inverness store.
Along with a two-gunsmith
workshop that can do most anything
including a full take down with gun
cleaning, oil, and site adjustments,
Goldiggers & Gunslingers offers a
wide selection of gun safes in stock
and provides free shipping on all
Sentry Gun Safes.


Gunsmithing services include:
* Barreling
* Replacement barrels
* Replacement contour stocks &
chamber stocks in fine wood or
composite
* Synthetics triggers fitted & tuned
* Scope installation
* Back boring & custom choke tubes
* Stock replacement & gun stock
refinishing
* Gun site beads & ribs
* Complete restorations
Specialty items perfect for gift-
giving include those by Arthur Court
Designs".
Goldiggers & Gunslingers is
located at 2416 Highway 44 West in
Inverness Phone 352-341-4867, and
1821 South Suncoast Boulevard,
Homosassa. 352-341-4653
They are open Monday through
Friday 9:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. and
Saturday from 9:30 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.


__ 3Nobody Pays More

BFor Your Gold &

Guns Period!


[ NO TW LOATIN


IKenny ana 1-rances Williams

BUY -1SMS INT70
TRADE B S
Lifetime warranty on We would like to welcome Kimber to our line up of hand
new auns Durchased guns & rifles. Come see this exclusive line of firearms!


Citrus County's Largest Gold Buyer!

Also Diamonds, Silver, Coins, & Entire Estates


g d . .



str. Do' trs you vlaes
to jus anoe com to the


IMon.-Fri. 9:00 5:30 2416 Hwy. 44 W., Inverness 1821 S. Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa
n Sat. 9:00 3:00 352-341-GUNS (4867) 352-341-GOLD (4653)


goldiggersandgunslingers.com
.= I


G18 Sunday February 26, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE






ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT To THE CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Paid Advertisement


Sunflower Springs offers

Resort Style Living


S. -


This is your time. Live the Lifestyle!
Are you ready to worry less and enjoy life more?
Sunflower Spring is a resort-style senior community that offers
unique, active, independent and assisted lifestyles!

Resort Style Living for Seniors
Sunflower Springs offers a unique lifestyle in assisted living.
Conveniently located near shopping and medical facilities, you
will find the warmth of home and peace of mind from our
24-hour compassionate staff.

Amenities


* Restaurant Style Dining 3 Meals per Day Weekly
* Spacious Floor Plans Studios, One Bedroom Fireplac
or Two Bedroom Apartments Beauty.
* All Utilities Included: Cable TV, Electricity, Media I
Local and Long Distance Phone Calls Courtya
* Medication Assistance and Supervision Wellnes


p 6Y ere/r / /
Assisted Livin Comm ity

8733 West Yulee Drive
Homosassa, FL 34448
Assisted Living #11566
www.sunfloweralf.com
Where relationships blossom daily!

.:P,

2 t -1-M


Housekeeping and Laundry
e Lounge, Caf6 and Ice Cream Parlor
and Barber Salon
Lounge with Wi-Fi
rd with Gazebo
s Center and so much more...


352-621-8017


Cheers! Sunflower Springs resident
Charlie Drake toasts another beautiful
afternoon with Executive Director,
Theressa Foster.
From the day it opened its doors in
2009, Sunflower Springs has continued to
be an exceptional assisted living
community where senior residents can go
about their daily lives while leaving the
staff to the mundane but necessary chores
such as food shopping, cooking, house
cleaning and more. However, when and
where needed, assistance with personal
care is always a priority. Our beautiful
building has received glowing reports for
its design, decorating style and for the
many amenities offered for the residents.
Sunflower Springs Assisted Living is
locally owned by a group of Citrus County
investors who had a vision for an upscale
yet affordable facility that could be called
home by seniors. The executive director is
Theressa Foster who has been with
Sunflower Springs from its beginning
stages and has watched it blossom into a
wonderful home for so many people.
Resort Style Living
Sunflower Springs features restaurant-
style open seating for all meals. And the
food is superb! It's tasty, healthy and
plentiful. As for living space, residents
appreciate their oversized apartments
which range in size from 521 sq. ft. to 916
sq. ft. which represents the largest
apartments among assisted living
residences in this area. Pets are welcomed
and at present, several dogs and cats also
call Sunflower Springs their home.
Social hours are celebrated six days a
week beginning at 3:30 pm, and outside
activities are organized such as trips to


Sunday February 26, 2012 G19


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


many popular places and destinations
including the Show Palace, Tampa Bay
Rays baseball games, Sun Cruz casino
cruises, plus outings for lunches at
restaurants throughout Citrus County
and beyond. Residents are invited to
participate in games of all kinds,
including Bridge & Pinochle. The in-
house exercise classes are provided by
physical therapists from the well-
respected Weston Group. Residents can
choose to utilize the many special areas
located within the building such as the
library, watch a movie in the theater,
gather in the living room to meet up with
other residents or guests. Or they can
choose to simply relax and do nothing
at all.
A Commitment to Service
Sunflower Springs has always wanted
to be known for being different and
going that extra step to make the
residents and their guests feel
comfortable and welcome. Extra effort
is taken to assist with visits to the
hospital, doctor's offices and other
special appointments. The health of our
residents is our first concern. Sunflower
Springs has an Extended Congregate
Care License which allows us to have a
nurse carry out physician orders within
her scope of training. This helps a
resident who may need more assistance
as they age.
Our care staff is reminded that
customer service is everything and
whatever they may be called upon to do
for a resident, they do it with a SMILE!
At Sunflower Springs, the motto is
"Where relationships blossom daily".
These are but a few of the things that
make us a different kind of assisted
living residence. Find out for yourself.
Call for a personal tour or to arrange a
visit to your home.
Visit our Facebook page at
wwwfacebook.com/sunflowers8733 or visit
our website at www.sunfloweralf.com.
Sunflower Springs is located at 8733
W. Yulee Drive, Homosassa, FL 34448.
We can be reached at (352) 621-8017 or
by email at info@sunfloweralf.com







ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT To THE CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Paid Advertisement

Quality you can depend on -

from our family to yours


Michael's Floor Covering has been
serving Central Florida for over 10 years.
They offer the most popular products on
the market today, with all types of wood,
laminates, carpet, vinyl, and tiles of every
imaginable color and style. Michael's is
proud to offer the finest selections
available from the top manufacturers in
the industry.
Owner, Michael Carpenter,
explains, "We want all of our
customers to feel that they
received flooring
where quality and
value come *
together."
Willing to
always go the extra
mile for customer
satisfaction, .-.
Michael's wants
every customer's
experience to be so
good that they will gladly refer their
closest friends.
Michael Carpenter is a life-long
resident of Citrus County. He and his
wife, Denise, and their three children are
active members of the community.
Michael has over 25 years of experience
in the flooring industry, starting as an
installer himself; and has worked with all
types of flooring. Michael feels that his
background gives him an added insight to
the needs of the customers, as well as to
the challenges being faced by the
installers who work with his company.
Michael's Floor Covering provides a
full two-year warranty on all of their
installations. They are so confident in the
quality of their work that they double the
warranty time given by most other
companies. This commitment to quality
not only encourages customers to give
referrals for Michael's, but has also given
local builders the confidence to pass the
name along.
Whatever the job, you'll be glad you
chose Michael's to provide the service.
Customers have come to expect quality
flooring at a competitive price.
Is it time to replace your carpets for a
modern new look? From sophisticated


patterns to luxuriously thick Saxony,
Michael's has the carpet styles and colors
to fit any personality and room decor.
Thinking of changing to tile floors?
Today's technology has created a
ceramic tile that is much easier to
maintain and is much more affordable
than ever. Browse through the large
variety of exotic colors, patterns, sizes,
shapes, and textures.
How about a beautiful hardwood?
When it comes to
natural beauty, it is
hard to beat the
Y character and
..- warmth of real
hardwood flooring.
Hardwood products
Shave changed
dramatically over
the past few years,
and Michael's
offers all of the
latest styles in one convenient place.
Vinyl Sheet flooring combines
dramatic, authentic looks such as slate,
limestone, sisul, and linen. Create a
visual statement all with the durability
and easy maintenance you would expect
from a top quality vinyl.
Laminates offers the perfect floor
covering for active families, and it is
easy to clean. Laminates will fit any
decorative style: from formal to
traditional, country to contemporary. The
advancements in modern laminates make
it the smart choice for today's busy
families.
Come in and browse around. You are
certain to find just the style and color of
flooring you have in mind. And rest
assured, Michael's can accommodate any
budget. Still trying to decide what you
want? Let the skilled professionals help
with your plans.
Michael's Floor Covering, Inc. is open
9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday through
Friday, and 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. on
Saturday. Closed on Sunday. Located at
685 E. Gulf to Lake Highway in Lecanto,
FL. Phone 352/341-0813.
www.michaelsfloorcoveringinc .net


G20 Sunday February 26, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT To THE CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


* Companionship Y

* Meal Preparation / -

* Med Reminder .

* Housekeeping ,

SPersonal Care .

* Shopping/ /< 1

Errands



To you, it's about making

the right choice.

To us, it's personal.


HomeIYn stead

SEN10R C ARE


u r, r o- fW .ZSM


Call for a free, no-obligation appointment

352-249-1257

4224 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Lecanto

www.homeinstead.com/671
HCS230036 HHA299993253


Paid Advertisement



There's No Place Like Home


According to a recent AARP study, 85% of
older Americans intend to remain in their homes
after retiring. In this community, 78% of adults
who do live in their own homes and are in need of
long-term care depend on family and friends as
their only source of help.
The local franchise of Home Instead Senior
Care in Lecanto, was opened five years ago by a
fourth generation Citrus County resident, Carolyn
Quintanilla, who saw the need for the services and
wanted to be involved with a company that makes
a difference to the seniors in this community.
Taking on the role as a family caregiver is an
important one, and Home Instead Senior Care
knows how difficult it can be to make the decision
to get outside help.
Loved ones and other
family members rely Hom e
on your help and the Home
demands can be great.
As the primary
caregiver, not only do
you deserve an
occasional break, but Z0 -F, t-f
it's essential that you
have the opportunity to recharge your own
batteries and enjoy your own life. It's crucial to
take the time to care for yourself in order for you
to continue to handle the challenges of this
daunting responsibility.
Home Instead Senior Care was created to
help seniors remain safely in the comfort of their
own home and to provide support to the family
and friends who love them and care for them. All
of the CAREGivers"s are thoroughly screened,
extensively trained, insured and bonded, and
matched to the client's preferences.
Sometimes all that's needed for a senior to
remain in their home is a little companionship or
help with daily chores. Other situations might
require overnight care or an escort to doctor's
appointments. Whether it is just a few hours a
week or 24-hour home care, Home Instead Senior
Care provides professional CAREGiverssM who
take the time to get to know each client and tailor
care for their individual needs.
It is a difficult decision to turn over some of
the care for your loved one. Caregivers need to
ask themselves some probing questions. What is
your biggest concern regarding your aging loved
one? Are you worried about caring for them
while also keeping up with the needs of your own
life? Are you making compromises in your life
due to your responsibilities as a caregiver? What
do you need to help create balance in your life?
What do you need to feel confident that your
loved one can remain safely at home?
Home Instead Senior Care can be the
perfect match for your loved one a connection to
compassionate and reliable, non-medical
assistance. They provide everything for your
loved one that you would do and more, giving you
confidence that they are cared for and safe...


P
n


whether you live across the country or just across
town.
Home Instead Senior Care is available
around the clock, every day of the year and
includes everything from companionship, meal
preparation, light housekeeping, medication
reminders, shopping and errands to continual care
and also trained Alzheimer's care. The
CAREGivers"s of Home Instead Senior Care are
ready to step in with care and concern for your
loved one's needs so you can get away for any
reason. Whether you need to shop, attend an
event, go to church, get some exercise or just have
lunch with a friend, their respite care services
allow you to relax and enjoy, knowing your
family member is well
cared for in your
stead absence. Their respite
wonderful solution
-when you go on
vacation, travel for the
holidays, or attend an
out-of-town event such
as a wedding or
reunion. While respite care can't change the
situation, it can help you maintain a sense of well
being and significantly improve your ability to
deal with the situation, while ensuring that your
loved one is receiving the best of care.
If you are dealing with a loved one with
Alzheimer's, studies have shown that the best
place for a person with memory loss is in familiar
surroundings. The American Society on Aging has
recognized Home Instead as the Small Business of
the Year for it's exclusive CAREGiver"s training
program designed by the world-renowned experts
of The George G. Glenner Alzheimer's Family
Center. This program and other professionally
developed and recognized Alzheimer's care
training programs provide CAREGivers" with the
latest in Alzheimer's education and dementia care
techniques, so you can be assured your loved one
is with a trusted professional.
Home Instead Senior Care works very hard
to keep rates as affordable as possible. Rates for
individuals for Companionship, Home Helper and
Personal Care Services are per hour, depending on
the services needed. Service can be arranged for
as little as 3 consecutive hours in a day or up to 24
hours per day, seven days a week, including
holidays and weekends. Some insurance policies
may cover certain in-home services. Please call
the office to see if your insurance benefits include
this type of coverage.

Home Instead Senior Care
is located at 4224 W. Gulf to Lake
Highway, Lecanto, FL 34461
352-249-1257
www.homeinstead.com/671


Sunday February 26, 2012 G21


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT To THE CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Chronicle is oldest business in Citrus


The Citrus County Chronicle is the oldest
business in the community.
Starting in August of 1894, the Chronicle
has continuously published the newspaper of
record through two World Wars, the Great
Depression, and man's first walk on the moon.
Even through the hurricanes, the Chronicle
has never missed an edition.
The newspaper remained a weekly through
1981 when it began to publish three times a
week. In 1986 the Chronicle became a six-
day daily and the seventh day of publication
was added in 1989.
The Chronicle was founded by Albert M
Williamson, a Floral City resident.
The intent of the original newspaper was to
get announcements of merchandise and goods
sales to people living in the Hernmando,lnver-
ness, and Floral City areas.
Editor J.F. Sherwood set the small type and
layouts by hand. Money was so scarce he
credited subscribers by name and when they
came in to pay their bills. "O.M. Johnson
stopped by the Chronicle office today to pay
his subscription," he wrote. "Mr. Johnson
says he can't get along without it."
The ads that appeared were a sign of the
times. A pound of sugar went for 5 cents,
fresh eggs sold for 8 to 11 cents a pound, and
coffee was 21 and 22 cents a pound.
Sherwood, it is recorded, sold the newspa-
per to a Rev. Geiger at the time when Jim
Priest was sheriff, George Carter was his
deputy, and Walter Warnock was the county
clerk. Circulation began increasing and so did
poor paying, delinquent advertisers. Warnock
was appointed deputy clerk of Circuit Court
in 1897 and was elected Clerk of Circuit
Court in 1900. After his election, Warnock
listed himself as Editor and proprietor of the
Chronicle and George Butler as "local editor."
Later Warnock sold the weekly paper and
took his family to Mexico to grow citrus fruit.
George Butler, then 70 became owner and
editor of the Chronicle in 1914.
In the summer of 1914, while the war with
Germany was raging in Europe, Albert W.
Butler became editor and owner. Butler re-
ported the close-down of many of the phos-
phate mines in the area, "pending operations
of the European war." Most of the mines were
never reopened.
In 1926, when Minor L. Smith was manag-
ing editor, the Chronicle caused a flurry of
talk in the community when it announced it
would run comic pages featuring Jiggs and
Maggie, Polly and Her Pals, the Katzenjam-
mer Kids, Harold Teen and others.
The year 1928 was the beginning of the
calamitous depression era in Citrus County.
.Joseph J. Wilson of Clearwater took over the
editorial reins of the paper in April 1929. Dur-
ing the boom, the Chronicle was running 10
to 12 pages a week after the crash it was


hard pressed to turn out four pages.
Wilson managed to pull the paper out of a
financial hole, and kept after local businesses
with a two-column headline, "DOES INVER-
NESS WANT THE CHRONICLE?" It was a
plea for support and for a time businessmen
managed to scrape up enough money for ad-
vertising to keep it in print.
Wilson, a go-getting creative editor, kept
subscribers' interest through his lively and
timely editorials. In those editorials he
established goals for the coirimmu-
nity to help return to prosper-
ity. '
He advocated ..
general farm-
ing, to- .- :".


~~e'-~ ~
C' ~


bacco ... ";
grow- ..
ing,tung .
oil trees, .
organization ..
of a Chamber :.
of Commerce,
the advertising of
fishing to lure :'.
tourists, unity of
thought and action to ; '
get businesses located
here, and more work and .
less sitting around. -
In 1934, the Chronicle a.. 't .. .
edited by B.C. Ellsworth, % ho
reported that boxing champ la\ *
Baer "stopped by Lanier, Drug
Store for a cold drink while on his I
way from Tampa to Jackson ille for a -
four-round exhibition fight."
Taylor Dawson became the Chronicle
editor in 1935, and he tore into the editor of
the Tampa Tribune for disparaging both the
idea and that first work on the Cross Florida
Barge Canal which had just started.
In 1935 Scofield Publishing Company,
owners of the Chronicle, acquired the Dun-
nellon Sun, and Taylor Dawson added the
new paper to his duties.
By the year 1940, Citrus County had a pop-
ulation of 5,844, an increase of 328 people in
10 years.
The country was growing. Florida's popula-
tion, according to the Chronicle, was 1.8 mil-
lion.
In 1942, casualty lists were being carried
by the Chronicle: Pvt. Eugene Quinn, Seaman
Bently Halbert, Jack Carter and P. Blanton.
Citrus County had 49 men in the service at
the time and sent more than 150 more.
Mrs. M.C. Scofield, editor of the Chronicle
in 1944, wrote in a front page story, the
"Yuletide spirit in Citrus County was conspic-
uous by its absence".


On May 10, 1945 Chronicle headlines in
120-point type shouted "MAY 8th V-E DAY".
County Commissioners erected an honor roll
of veterans listing 600 names including 22
who paid the supreme sacrifice for their
county.
It was noted 11 percent of Citrus County's
people were in the service.
In November of 1945, Mrs. Scofield
stepped down as editor and J.R.
Harkrcadcr took over the editorial reins.
He %\as .LIuceeded in July 1946 by
Alton B ClaN tor. \\ ho died in Jack-
Sor ille in 14-F4
-' Scotield sold his rights to the
Chronicle in Mkl: 1946 to N.A.
Perry of Bradenion, who sold
it 1hortkl afrenrard to J.R.
Hough.
One ear later, Col.
S Georue H. Johnson
bought both the
Chronicle and the
i ., Dunnellon Sun
Sfromn Hough.
N.'. Before the
end of 1948,
S 4 the Chroni-
-. cle was
.sold
.again
..to
Paul W.
Ramsey, for-
'." mier city editor of
the Chicago Sun.
Atier II Ncars ofpublica-
Sion b. Mr and Nhis Paul Ramsey,
the Chronicle \\ as bought by Mr. and
Mrs. Phil Bennett of the Bennett-Hahn Com-
pany in June 1959. In the last editorial Ram-
sey wrote:
"Giving up the publishing of the newspaper
is something like saying goodbye to a friend
who is gay and rewarding and entertaining at
times and at others as cantankerous and
ornery as a hungry mule... "
The Bennett-Hahn Company announced
they were selling the Chronicle to Frances
and Carl Turner of Waupaca, Wisc. The Turn-
ers also published three newspapers in their
home state.
Turner died suddenly on June 19, 1962 at
his Wisconsin home, and his wife sold the
Chronicle to a group in St. Petersburg headed
by Robert L. Chamberlain and former St. Pe-
tersburg mayor Herman Goldner.
Early in 1964, 33-year-old David S. Arthurs
purchased the Chronicle from the St. Peters-
burg group.
A native of Atchison, Kansas, Arthurs had
come to Florida to work as a publishing su-
pervisor of the John H. Perry newspapers in
Delray and Palatka.


THE 80's and BEYOND
When the young publisher and editor took
over the paper, the population of the county
had grown to about 19,000.
And when he merged with Landmark Com-
munity Newspapers, Inc. in September 1980,
the county had zoomed to nearly 70,000.
Arthurs had selected Gerry Mulligan, for-
mer editor of the Brooksville Sun-Journal, to
head up the editorial department of the news-
paper. Garry Manning joined the company in
1980 in the position of General Manager.
In 1981, the Chronicle converted to a tri-
weekly publication, serving the entire Citrus
County market.
In the same year the Florida Press Associa-
tion named the newspaper Florida's best
weekly newspaper.
Two years later the newspaper won the
state's most prestigious journalism award pre-
sented by the press association.
In 1982, the newspaper had finally out-
grown it's historic courthouse square location
and had moved into a modem new publishing
facility on SR 44 in Inverness.
By 1986, the Chronicle had grown into a
daily publication and employed over 160 em-
ployees, correspondents, and contractors.
In July 1990, the newspaper had once again
outgrown it's publishing facility, under the
leadership of Publisher Gerry Mulligan.
Leaving the Inverness location, the newspa-
per relocated its main offices and production
plant to our existing operation in Meadow-
crest, Crystal River.

AND NOW...
The product line of Citrus Publishing, Inc.
has grown significantly since it's humble be-
ginnings. In addition to our core publication
of the daily Chronicle, Citrus Publishing, Inc.
circulated the weekly editions of the Sumter
County Times, Riverland News, South Mar-
ion Citizen, West Marion Mcssager, Central
Ridge Visitor, Crystal River Current, Inver-
ness Pioneer, Homosassa Beacon, Chiefland
Citizen and Williston Pioneer Sun News,
Cedar Key Beacon, Wakulla News and Gads-
den County Times.
Specialty and niche advertising publica-
tions of the company include the Florida Real
Estate News covering a multi-county distribu-
tion area on Florida's Nature Coast
The company has also stayed in step with
changing times, and in many cases, been the
leader in utilizing the latest technology. From
moving away from old school paste-up
boards by implementing state-of-the-art pagi-
nation systems in the pre-press process of the
Chronicle and weekly editions, to putting the
newspaper online for viewing on the World
Wide Web, Citrus Publishing, Inc. has been
bold in changing the way we work.


G22 Sunday February 26, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


N


7,






ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT To THE CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Paid Advertisement

When it comes to quality

collision repair, Dave's

Body Shop is the number

one recommended body

I% shop in Citrus County.


with Spies Hecker pai


nt,


Dave's Body Shop is a family
owned and operated business and
has been in the same Homosassa
location since 1975.

Owner Dave Warren's
commitment to be the best comes
with years of experience
combined with continued
education and training in the
newest technologies.
Quality ali\a\ come
first for the l

staff
tha t
strives
to satif
each and c\ci ur
customer. and ,
assurances that
your auto will be restored to meet
or beat the industries highest
standards.

The staff, including a full-time
onsite mechanic and ICAR
certified technicians, at Dave's
Body Shop uses the highest
quality replacement parts and
equipment as well as cutting edge
technologies to achieve quality
repairs.

The body shop includes two chief
frame machines, three paint
booths, quality auto refinishing


Sunday February 26, 2012 G13


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


computerized paint mixing.

Dave's Body Shop 24-hour towing
service serves Homosassa,
Inverness, Crystal River and other
areas of Citrus and Hernando
counties.

In addition to a full line of truck
accessories, Dave's Body
Shopl alo) offers Rhino
Linings. Rhino
Linings is a
spray-on
bed liner
product that
is used as a
11 protect iv e
coating for a
variety of
vehicle applications.

Other services include complete auto
detail hand wash and wax service.

Estimates, using the Mitchell
Ultramate computerized estimating
system for all major insurance
companies, is always free.

Dave's Body Shop is located at 4870
S. Suncoast Blvd, Homosassa. They
are open Monday through Friday
8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. 352-628-
4878. After hours towing 352-942-
3284 (Mike).


I






ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT To THE CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Todd Financial


Services


PAID ADVERTISEMENT
is a full-service financial company


committed to helping people pursue their financial goals


J. Michael Todd, a financial
advisor for 23 years, has been in
Citrus County for the past 11
years and at the same Homosassa
location for the past six years.

While developing a customized
financial program, the staff at
Todd Financial Services will
walk the client through a step-by-
step process that will help make
them feel confident in their
decisions.

Once their goals have been
established, they will customize
appropriate strategies to suit their
vision and objectives. They can
help the client execute a sound


financial program utilizing the
following products and services:
Investment Management
Retirement Strategies
Insurance and Annuity
Products

Todd Financial Services is
committed to maintaining the
highest standards of integrity and
professionalism in their
relationship with the client. They
endeavor to know and understand
the client's financial situation and
provide the client with only the
highest quality information,
services, and products to help the
client reach their goals.


J. Michael Todd takes a proactive
approach to the client's personal
financial situation and offers a
wide range of financial products
and services to individuals and
business owners. He believes the
client will be better able to
identify their goals and make the
sound decisions to help reach
their goals by providing sound
financial information.

He is here to help educate the
client about the basic concepts of
financial management; to help the
client learn more about who we
are; and to give the client fast,
easy access to market
performance data.


Please call Todd Financial
Services if you have any
questions about the company or
the range of financial products
and services they provide. Todd
Financial Services and J. Michael
Todd have relationships with a
variety of financial service
companies that can be utilized to
help meet our clients' financial
goals.

Todd Financial Services is
located at 8546 W. Homosassa
Trail, Suite 1, in Homosassa. We
are open Monday-Friday from
8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Phone
352-621-8013, or cell 352-634-
0627.


(352) 621-8013


I A J.Michael Todd
Financial Advisor

8546 W. Homosassa Trail, Suite 1

Todd Homosassa, FL
financial services Cell (352) 634-0627
www.toddfinservices com


WE PROVIDE ACCESS TO:


* Stocks Bonds

* Mutual Funds

* Real Estate Investment Trusts


* Life Insurance & Annuities

* Long Term Care Strategies

* 1031 Exchanges


Securities offered through Investors Capital Corporation, Member FINRA/SIPC
Advisory Services offered through Investors Capital Advisory.


G24 Sunday February 26, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE






ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT To THE CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Paid Advertisement

Local Compounding Pharmacy Meeting


The Individual Needs Of Each Patient


The Snyder Pharmacy, formerly known
as Custom Meds, is an independently
owned, highly specialized compounding
pharmacy that has been operating since
April 1985. For almost 30 years, they
have specialized in compounding
medications for various pharmaceutical
needs, including veterinary, pediatric,
bio-identical hormone replacement,
dermatology, erectile dysfunction and
many others with their niche lying in
topical pain relief. They can also add
flavors, colors and fragrances to most
prescriptions to further meet patients'
needs or desires. The Snyder Pharmacy
is known for "Creating Custom Meds" -
customizing medications to meet the
specific needs of individual patients.

Some unique services and products
that set them apart from other pharmacies
include unique delivery systems, patient
specific formulas, patient follow-ups and
recommendations. Topical pain relief


offers numerous advantages to traditional
oral medications. For example, because
a cream or gel
can deliver relief
directly to the
site of pain,
minimal
absorption into
the bloodstream
occurs producing
fewer side
effects, if any at
all, as well as
reducing the
possibility of
adverse drug
interactions and a
organ toxicity.
Furthermore,
topical formulations are non-addictive!
While The Snyder Pharmacy offers a few
proprietary formulas to treat pain, any
formula can be tailored to the specific
symptoms of each individual patient. One


of the most beneficial services The
Snyder Pharmacy provides is a clinical
evaluation of
The ti each patient by
o p vr rom'lg l their on-site
nurse to
aT Snydr Pamd l determine if the
conditon. Beca usl patient is
eac ptintisreceiving the
fullest benefit
unique, Th Sn r from the topical
CenterfPin compound he or
Pharmacology c.an she was
idin cso n prescribed. Once
and eretn any the follow-up is
p.i., completed, the
ther .,apyregim. nurse and
pharmacist will
make a
recommendation regarding treatment to
the patient's doctor.

The Snyder Pharmacy will make every
effort to bill the patient's insurance


carrier. They are also willing to work
with low income patients and Medicare
recipients.

As a staff, they make every effort to
make sure each patient is knowledgeable
in their own treatment plan in order to
obtain the optimal result, and above all is
treated with courtesy and care. By
building a relationship with their patients
and continually monitoring each patient's
progress, The Snyder Pharmacy ensures
that they will continue to provide a
valuable service to this area.

The Snyder Pharmacy is located at 102
E. Highland Blvd. in Inverness, FL
34452. Phone: 352-341-1212

Hours of Operation: 8:30 a.m. to 5:00
p.m. Monday through Friday


Creating
The Snyder Center of Pain Pharmacology is a highly
specialized compounding pharmacy that serves as a
facility for clinical research and a locus of information
on the pharmaceutical treatment of pain. With unique
formulas and proprietary topical delivery systems that
target pain, The Snyder Center of Pain Pharmacology
has been able to assist doctors in the treatment of
their patients. Typically, doctors call and say, "We
have a problem. Can you help?" Thanks to our
contact with an extraordinarily wide variety of pain
cases and to our own research, we are able to
recommend treatments that even specializing
physicians may not be fully familiar with.
To ensure preparation of the most effective formula,
we use the highest quality raw materials, equipment,
and technology.


Custom Medications


Sunday February 26, 2012 G25


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







Paid Advertisement

30 Years Of Service In Citrus County


Nick Nicholas came to Citrus
County 30 years ago and acquired
what was Citrus Ford at the time.
Having several years of experience
with both Ford Motor Company and
other Ford dealerships, he chose Citrus
County and Inverness to start his own
path in the automobile industry.
A few years after operating in
Inverness, Mr. Nicholas opened a
satellite dealership in Crystal River
under the name Gulf Coast Ford.
Starting with a mere 30 employees,
after expanding to the second facility
in Crystal River he now employs over
100 people.
Both dealerships have expanded
several times in all areas of sales and
service, and there is even a large
collision center at the Inverness
dealership for any accident or paint
related repair.
Just a few years a go, Mr. Nicholas
added the Lincoln nameplate to the
Crystal River Dealership, now
operating under Nick Nicholas Ford


Lincoln. Adding that luxury brand
really brought what the Nick Nicholas
family of dealerships could offer the
residents of Citrus County to a full
circle.
Offering the luxury of the Lincoln


name in the form of a Navigator,
MKZ, MKX or MKS, totally
compliments the fact of having the #1
selling truck for 35 years the F-Series
truck.
If fuel efficiency is your need, Nick


Nicholas has that too with the Fiesta,
Focus and Fusion Hybrid, all have the
capability of 40 mpg.
If a sports car is in your future, the
Heritage and performance of the
Mustang is unmatched.
The all new Explorer has taken the
world by storm and is quickly
becoming a top seller in the SUV
market that ford has been the leader in
with the Escape, Expedition and of
course the Explorer.
The Nick Nicholas family of
dealerships has always prided itself on
selling the cleanest and best quality
preowned vehicles available. Ford and
Lincoln Certified Program preowned
vehicles allow you the peace of mind
for a worry free purchase.
So if you have any automotive
needs, please visit the Nick Nicholas
family of dealerships and experience
why they are a 5-time winner of the
prestigious Presidents Award from
Ford Motor Company and put their 30
years of experience to work your you!


Come Test Drive The New 2012s


2012 MKZ 2012 MKX



-J ICHCL3


NICK NICHOLAS ,.
IN CRYSTAL RIVER

Hwy. 19 N. Crystal River
TOLL FREE 1-877-795-7371 9 5 7 f
Sales: Mon-Fri 8:30 AM to 7 PM; Sat 8:30 AM to 5 PM Parts & Service: Mon-Fri 8 AM to 5:30 PM; Sat 8 AM to 4 PM


UP--



2012 TAURUS 2012 FOCUS

GENUINE PARTS.
(( "We're GENUINE SERVICE.
Committed" GENUINE PEOPLE.
|0 "~ GENUINE PEACE OF MIND.

OLT


Hwy. 44 W. Inverness
www.nicknicholasford.com
SALE HOURS: Mon Fri: 8-7 Sat: 8:30 5
tBased on CYTD sales, 11/11.


726-1231


G26 Sunday February 26, 2012


ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT To THE CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE






ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT To THE CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


-- *,^ Wi
Ask us about -"
hurricane
protection -
panels for -
your existing -
windows.
Expert installation
NEW
VINYL? ALUMINUM? WOOD?
Our experts can guide you to making the proper selection for your
home. We use our own in-house installers and stand behind all
products and installations.
REPLACEMENTS
* Free Estimates Aluminum Windows
* Energy Efficient Windows Insulated Glass Products
* Vinyl Frame Windows Sliding glass Doors
* Window Parts for 168 Brands
REPAIRS
* Windows Custom Made Screens
* Sliding Glass Doors Repair/Replace Broken glass
If you are a builder or a homeowner/builder bring us your blueprints!

www.SeeTropical.com

E352-795-4226
Visit our showroom: 1731 S. Suncoast Blvd. (US 19),
3853 Homosassa, Fl 34448


PAID ADVERTISEMENT
Tropical Window Inc. is the

Nature Coast's best home window

and window replacement specialist


TOOO COLD . .

TOOO HOT?

WE'LL MAKE IT

JUST RIGHT!!
Call the company you can trust for
REPAIRS, REPLACEMENTS & PARTS
Over 50 Years in the
Window Business





Where we sell windows!


Twenty-six years ago, Mike
Moberley, a third generation
window business owner, opened
his own store in Citrus County
after working for 13 years in the
family business started by his
grandfather in St Petersburg in
1949.

Tropical Window Inc. is a proven
leader for over 63 years and is
your one stop shop for all of your
window, sliding glass door, screen
and glass shower door needs.

We specialize in replacement
windows and sliding glass doors
with a wide variety of
manufactures to choose from and
most are on display in our
showroom located on Highway
19. We use only certified in-
house installers with 10 to 25
years of experience working
directly for Tropical Window Inc.

"Our specialty is windows and
sliding glass doors," Mike said.
That is one of the things that
makes Tropical Window Inc.
unique to the market.

Not only do they carry windows,
we also offer a parts counter that
is stocked with parts for over 168
brands of sliding doors, closets,
windows, and shower doors. As
well, they have a service
department with staff that come to
your home and can repair
windows and sliding glass doors,


Sunday February 26, 2012 G27


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


as well as replace fogged up
insulated glass.

Tropical Window Inc. uses the
most energy efficient windows on
the market that offer outstanding
warranties. They also provide in-
home estimates on replacement
windows and sliding glass doors.

For screen rooms and patios they
offer a wide variety of windows to
help convert your existing screen
room into a room for year 'round
enjoyment. They repair vinyl
porch windows and offer a
replacement service for old vinyl
porch windows.

In addition to windows, Tropical
Window Inc. is your headquarters
for protecting your home and
windows from destructive
hurricanes, tropical storms and
tropical depressions. They provide
storm shutters, Kevlar and vinyl
protective window coverings, and
impact-resistant doors and
windows. They service Citrus,
Marion and Hernando counties.

For more information on the
services of Tropical Window Inc.,
contact them directly at their
Homosassa location at 1731 South
Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa, next
to the Harley Davidson
Motorcycle Shop. Business hours
are Monday through Friday 8:00
a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Phone 352-795-
4226. Visit their website at
www.seetropical.com







B&W UXBi DRUGS
214 US Hwy. 41 S., Inverness, Fl 34450 Phone 726-1021 Fax 726-0164
A Name You've Known and Learned To Trust!
Serving Citrus County Since 1930

svOME OFT


Breakfast
HE RESTAURANT
-and-

Chf Steyhen' Dig giovanni


DIABETES SHOPPE Medical Supplies & Equipment, located inside of Drugstore next to the Pharmacy
Diabetic Shoes (Certified Fitter) Dr. Comfort Miami Leather Aetrex
* Lift Chairs Incontinent Needs Wheelchairs
* Mastectomy Supplies Ostomy Appliances Convalescent Aids Crutches, Braces
FLU SHOTS AVAILABLE! (During Season) Medicare & Most Major Insurance Accepted
Pharmacy Hours: 9 UNITED STATES Restaurant Store Hours:
9:00am-6:00p Mon.-Fri POSTAL SERVICEe Mon.-Fri. 6:30am-8:00pm
9:OPOa6O p t. Post Office Hours: Saturday 6:30am-6pm
9:00am-1 pm Sat. 7am-4pm Mon.-Fri. 7am-1 2pm Sat. Sunday 6:30am-4:00pm


G28 Sunday February 26, 2012


ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT To THE CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE