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Citrus County chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02691
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 02-25-2012
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:02691

Full Text



It's time to get outdoors in Citrus /Inside today


... CITRUSY ng 20C O


Chief to TPO: Focus and unite


Man shot by
deputy
transferred
According to infor-
mation from the Cit-
rus County Sheriffs
Office, Nicholas Di-
novo, the armed
Beverly Hills man
who was shot by a
CCSO deputy Thurs-
day, was transferred
to Shands Hospital in
Gainesville on Thurs-
day afternoon. On
Friday morning, he
was reported to be
undergoing surgery.
The Florida De-
partment of Law En-
forcement's
investigation into the
incident is ongoing.
The deputy in-
volved in the shoot-
ing, Laura Newton,
remains on paid ad-
ministrative leave
pending completion
of FDLE's prelimi-
nary investigation.
Workman
calls off
pension bill
Expressing frus-
tration with the un-
willingness of the
Senate to move its
version of the meas-
ure, Rep. Ritch
Workman, R-Mel-
bourne, asked a
House committee to
temporarily postpone
a follow-up to last
year's overhaul of
the pension plan for
state employees.
The move effectively
kills the legislation
(HB 525) for the ses-
sion. "I have learned
just this morning that
our friends in the
Senate, having in my
opinion completely
misunderstood this
bill, have chosen to
punt," Workman told
the State Affairs
Committee. The bill
would have lowered
the retirement age
for employees in the
special-risk category
- largely law-
enforcement officers
- to 55 years of
age. It would have
offset the cost of that
move by increasing
the vesting period for
state employees in
the pension plan
from eight years to
11 years and chang-
ing the default plan
for employees from
the pension plan to
the 401 (k)-style de-
fined contribution
plan.
-From staff and wire reports


STATE NEWS:


2012 session
A series of previews of
the new state legislative
session./Page A3, A5


Com ics ........ C9
Community .......C7
Crossword ........ C8
Editorial ........ .A8
Entertainment . . .B6
Horoscope ...... B6
Lottery Numbers . .B4
Lottery Payouts . .B6
Movies .......... .C9
Obituaries ....... .A5
Classifieds ...... .C10
TV Listings ...... .C8


6 1 II84578 2002!


Transportation group has spent

too much time disagreeing;

FDO T official says


CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff Writer
Drop your differences
and define your trans-
portation needs, a state of-
ficial advised a county
group.
"I think this TPO has
spent a lot of time focusing
on some things that aren't


most important," said Don-
ald Skelton, District 7 Sec-
retary of the Florida
Department of Transporta-
tion, speaking Thursday to
the Citrus County Trans-
portation Planning Organi-
zation while leading a
roundtable discussion.
"There's been a lot of
disagreement and almost


in-fighting instead of step-
ping back and trying to see
how you work together, be-
cause I think you focused a
lot on the differences and
the different objectives
that each entity that sits on
this TPO has, instead of
identifying how those dif-
ferences work together to
form a cohesive whole,"
Skelton admonished, after
being asked his impression
of the TPO by Paula
Wheeler, board member
and Crystal River City
Council member.
"Do you look at our TPO
and wish that we were doing


things that are not being
done?" Wheeler asked. "Do
you see a direction that we
may not be taking?"
TPO members sought
Skelton's guidance be-
cause they were concerned
about the need to transi-
tion into a metropolitan
planning organization
(MPO) within the next few
months when census data
may raise the county's sta-
tus to an urbanized area.
Skelton did not encour-
age the TPO to consider be-
coming an independent
See Page A4


Get to the Greek


(festival)

What: St. Michael
the Archangel Greek
Festival.
When: Saturday 11
a.m. to 8 p.m. and
Sunday 11 a.m. to
3 p.m.
Where: 4705 State
Road 44, Lecanto
on the north side of
the highway.
Admission: $1.

Five things to be
sure not to miss at
the festival:
Greek foods includ-
ing gyro, souvlaki and
loukaniko sandwiches,
roast leg of lamb and
moussaka.
Authentic Greek
music played inside the
church fellowship hall
- dancing, too.
Greek pastries in-
cluding minnies, koks,
kataiffi, greek and ital-
ian cannoli and, of
course, baklava.
Tours of the church's
new sanctuary conducted
through the weekend.
Vendors with au-
thentic wares including
Greek-style clothing,
jewelry and home decor.
compiled by Matthew Beck
St. Michael the Archangel
Greek Orthodox Church
member George Mawos
lights saganaki, or flam-
ing cheese, Friday morn-
ing after the St. Michael
the Archangel Greek Fes-
tival began for the day.
See more photos with
this story online at www.
chronicleonline.com.
MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle


Young students take active role in conferences


Editor'snote: Through-
out the 2011-12 school
year, the Chronicle staff is
following the progress of
several classrooms across
the county during its se-
ries School Days, includ-
ing Connie Kane's
third-grade class at Pleas-
ant Grove Elementary
School in Inverness.
NANCY KENNEDY
Staff Writer
INVERNESS Let's
face it, parent-teacher
conferences can be
intimidating.
See Page A2


NANCY KENNEDY/Chronicle
Pleasant Grove Elementary third grade student Ramius Diaz shows his dad, Alexander Diaz,
his third-quarter progress report as teacher Connie Kane looks on during a student-led
parent-teacher conference. This concept helps students take ownership of their progress and
helps them self-identify areas of improvement. Even though students are the reason for meet-
ing together, traditional parent-teacher conferences generally leave students out of the loop.


Plans to


drug test


welfare


recipients


gain


support

Associated Press
CHEYENNE, Wyo. -
Conservatives who say wel-
fare recipients should have
to pass a drug test in order
to receive government as-
sistance have momentum
on their side.
The issue has come up in
the Republican presiden-
tial campaign, with front-
runner Mitt Romney saying
"it's an excellent idea."
Nearly two dozen states
are considering plans this
session that would make
drug testing mandatory for
welfare recipients, accord-
ing to the National Council
of State Legislatures. And
Wyoming lawmakers ad-
vanced such a proposal this
week.
Driving the measures is a
perception that people on
public assistance are mis-
using the funds and that
cutting off their benefits
would save money for tight
state budgets even as sta-
tistics have largely proved
both notions untrue.
"The idea, from Joe Tax-
payer is, 'I don't mind help-
ing you out, but you need to
show that you're looking for
work, or better yet that
you're employed, and that
you're drug- and alcohol-
free,"' said Wyoming Re-
publican House Speaker
Ed Buchanan on Friday
Supporters are pushing
the measures despite warn-
ings from opponents that
courts have struck down
similar programs, ruling
that the plans amount to an
unconstitutional search of
people who have done
nothing more than seek
help.
"This legislation assumes
suspicion on this group of
people. It assumes that
they're drug abusers," said
Wyoming Democratic Rep.
Patrick Goggles during a
heated debate on the meas-
ure late Thursday
The proposals aren't new,
according to the NCSL.
About three dozen states
have taken up such meas-
ures over the years.
But as lawmakers seek
new ways to fight off the ef-
fect of the recession on
state budgets and Republi-
can politics dominate the
national discussion as the
party seeks a presidential
nominee, the idea has
sparked political debates
across the nation.
This year, conservative
lawmakers in 23 states from
Wyoming to Mississippi -
where lawmakers want ran-
dom screening to include
nicotine tests are moving
forward with proposals of
their own.
Romney, in an interview
this month in Georgia, sup-
ported the idea. "People
who are receiving welfare
benefits, government bene-
fits, we should make sure
they're not using those ben-
efits to pay for drugs," Rom-
ney said to WXIA-TV in
Atlanta.
Newt Gingrich addressed
the topic with Yahoo News
in November, saying he con-
sidered testing as a way to
curb drug use and lower re-
lated costs to public
programs.
"It could be through test-
ing before you get any kind
of federal aid -unemploy-
ment compensation, food
stamps, you name it," he
said.
See Page A2





A2 SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2012


DRUG
Continued from Page Al

In Idaho, budget analysts
last year concluded that
such a program would cost
more money than it would
save, prompting lawmakers
to ditch the idea.
Also, recent federal statis-
tics indicate that welfare re-
cipients are no more likely
to abuse drugs than the gen-
eral population.
Data show that about 8
percent of the population
uses drugs. And before a
random drug testing pro-
gram in Michigan was put
on hold by a court chal-



STUDENTS
Continued from Page Al

If you're a parent, there's
the fear that the teacher
will tell you what's wrong
with your child (and/or
what's wrong with you).
If you're a teacher, there's
the fear that a parent might
blame you for a child who's
not progressing.
If you're a kid, you don't
know what to expect. Will
your teacher tell your mom
that you always mix up
"your" and "you're" and
will you get in trouble when
she gets home?
And even though the stu-
dent is the central reason
for meeting together, tradi-
tional parent-teacher con-
ferences generally leave
students out of the loop and
in the dark.
But not students in Con-
nie Kane's third-grade class
at Pleasant Grove Elemen-
tary School.
This week and next, the
students are leading their
own conferences with their
parents mom and/or dad
coming into the classroom
to see their child's work and
hear him or her talk about


lenge, about 8 percent of its
public assistance applicants
tested positive.
In years past such legal
challenges had a chilling ef-
fect on state legislatures,
but that seems to have
thawed.
Michigan's program was
halted after five weeks in
1999, eventually ending with
an appeals court ruling that
it was unconstitutional.
For more than a decade,
no other state had moved to
implement such a law.
But Florida last year
passed such a law. The plan
was eventually halted by a
federal court ruling, citing
constitutional concerns.
"The biggest piece that


grades, test scores,
strengths and areas of im-
provement.
Mrs. Kane's role is to
oversee the students and be
on hand to answer ques-
tions and add further com-
ments and explanations.
But it's the kids who are
running the show.
Other classrooms in the
county are also using the
student-led model.
On Thursday, several stu-
dents greeted their parents
for a noontime conference,
including Ramius Diaz.
With his dad, Alexander
Diaz, sitting beside him,
Ramius compared two Star
reading report scores.
Star math and reading re-
ports give comparable re-
sults for students nationally


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has held up action now and
in the past are the constitu-
tional questions," said
Rochelle Finzel, the Chil-
dren and Families Program
manager at the NCSL. She
said some states are trying
to avoid court challenges by
requiring drug tests only in
cases where there's reason-
able cause to believe there's
substance abuse, instead of
requiring everyone to take a
test.
One such state is Mis-
souri, which last year also
passed legislation requiring
drug testing for welfare re-
cipients, if there is reason-
able cause to suspect illegal
drug use.
Missouri's law touched off


in the same grade.
"I did bad on this one,"
Ramius said. "But I did bet-
ter the second time I took
it."
He said it felt good to
show his dad how he has
improved.
For Grace Taylor, it was a
time to tell her mom, Faith
Taylor, that she needs to
"work on her expository" -
being more detailed in her
writing.
"I like doing it this way,"
Faith Taylor said. "It's nice
that she can explain, 'This
is where I was at the begin-
ning of the year and this is
where I am now,' and why
It's neat to see their
progress and to hear it in
their own words ... It shows
how much they're growing."






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attempts at political one-
upsmanship as a statehouse
Republican introduced a
bill this month that would
require his colleagues in the
state Capitol to take and
pass the same test.
In Wyoming, the Republi-
can-controlled state House
handily approved a welfare
drug-testing bill after a fiery
debate Thursday The plan
sailed through a second vote
with no debate Friday and
needs only one more read-
ing before heading to the
solidly-conservative state
Senate, where a key leader
supports the concept
The Colorado plan is ex-
pected to fail because De-
mocrats who oppose it


Mrs. Kane said she loves
these types of conferences
because they allow the kids
to take ownership of what
and how they are doing.
"I find it valuable be-
cause it gives them a little
boost to keep focused
throughout the remainder
of the year," she said.
Kane said often, the stu-
dents get a clear picture of
what they've truly achieved
and what they want to im-
prove on.


control the state Senate. But
Republicans have suc-
ceeded in starting a conver-
sation on the issue.
"If you can afford to buy
drugs, and use drugs, you
don't need" welfare, said
Republican Rep. Jerry Son-
nenberg, who is sponsoring
a bill this session.
Sonnenberg said his bill
also seeks to help drug
users get clean because ap-
plicants must complete
rehab to qualify for govern-
ment aid again.
Sonnenberg's critics said
the idea feeds off the nega-
tive and unsubstantiated
- stereotype that low-in-
come communities are
more likely to use drugs.


"They get a sense of,
'Even though I'm doing fan-
tastic, maybe I can chal-
lenge myself in reading
more chapter books or at a
higher (grade) level.' You
can see a real change in the
kids once the conferences
are over," she said.
Mrs. Kane added, "No
matter what is going on with
a student, whether it is
something that is going on
behaviorally, academically,
or even if they are doing


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Sonnenberg said he's not
picking on any group, and
pointed out that the legisla-
tion would likely have a nar-
row effect.
"The five percent, or the
four percent, or whatever
that percentage is that is on
drugs, will have a choice to
make. They will either do
what they can to get clean,
or not have their (Tempo-
rary Assistance for Needy
Families) funds," he said.
In Wyoming, Republican
Rep. Frank Peasley, a co-
sponsor of the testing bill,
said the measure is an effort
to rein in a welfare system
run amok.
"We are going broke," he
said.


perfect, I always give posi-
tive comments and ideas for
improvement. I believe in
my students no matter
what; if I can get them to
see I'm on their side, then
maybe they will believe in
themselves. I also believe
even if everything is great,
we can always set goals for
ourselves to improve."
Chronicle reporter Nancy
Kennedy can be reached at
nkennedy@ chronicle
online. com or 352-564-2927.


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SCORE in partnership with CF is pleased to offer the Small Business Institute again this
spring. Sessions are $10 each or $100 for the entire 11 week program. Individuals who
complete the program will receive a certificate plus a coupon for $100 for future
advertising in the Citrus County Chronicle.


March 8 Introduction
March 22 Elements of a Business
March 29 BP Part I-Executive Summary


BP Part Il-Business Description
BP Part Ill-Market Analysis
Business Information Forum
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BP Part V-Operations &
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SATURDAY DROP OFF FOR 2012
APR. 21, JUL. 28 & OCT. 27
9:00 AM 1:00 PM
For more information call
Citrus County Solid Waste Management (352) 527-7670
E-mail: hazwasteinfo@bocc.citrus.fl.us
000ANOX www.bocc.citrus.fl.us/pubworks/swm


April 5
April 12
April 19
April 26
May 3

May 10
May 17


I







Page A3 SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2012



TATE&


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


THAroundTE Black history event slated for Sunday
THE STATE


Citrus County
Fish-fry fundraiser
benefits fire family
A benefit to assist the Mc-
Cutcheon family, who lost
their home earlier this month
to fire, is scheduled for March
25 at Dan's Clam Stand in
Crystal River. The fish-fry
fundraiser, scheduled for
noon to 4 p.m., includes a
plate of fish, french fries and
tea. The cost of a meal ticket
is $10. Tickets may be pur-
chased at Color Country
Nursery in Lecanto or Dan's
Clam Stand in Crystal River.
Both businesses are located
on State Road 44. RSVP by
calling 352-795-9081.

Tallahassee

Lawmaker quits over
texts to prosecutor
TALLAHASSEE -A law-
maker said he is resigning
after admitting he sent sug-
gestive and harassing texts
to a married federal
prosecutor.
Richard Steinberg an-
nounced Friday he is immedi-
ately resigning from the
Florida House. The resigna-
tion comes two days after
news reports that he used a
hidden identity to send unso-
licited messages to assistant
U.S. Attorney Marlene
Fernandez-Karavetsos.
The Miami Beach Democ-
rat returned home from the
Capitol after The Miami Her-
ald reported the story
Wednesday. In a statement
announcing the resignation,
Steinberg apologized to
everyone he's hurt and asked
for privacy while he deals
with personal affairs.

West Palm
Beach
Gov. calls for changes
to auto insurance law
Gov. Rick Scott pushed
Friday for changes to the
state's auto insurance law,
saying it could be the single
greatest factor in reducing
residents' cost of living.
Speaking in West Palm
Beach, Scott said costs asso-
ciated with motorists' per-
sonal injury protection, or PIP,
inordinately affect the poor
and must be addressed.
A House bill, which the Re-
publican governor supports,
aims to bring down such
costs, but opponents have
called it anti-consumer. Tak-
ing questions from reporters
after his speech, Scott said
addressing PIP was a top
priority.
"It's an unbelievable tax on
our citizens," he said. "It's
probably the thing that we
can have the biggest impact
on reducing the cost of living
in the state."
Scott addressed a wide
range of topics in his address
to the Forum Club of the
Palm Beaches, a business
and community group.
He said the state univer-
sities should work more as a
system and eliminate cross-
school competition.
He said he hasn't seen a
school prayer bill making its
way through the House.
He said he won't make
an endorsement in the
Republican presidential
primary.
-From staff and wire reports

Correction

Due to an editor's error, the
wrong dates were listed on
page C4 of the Friday Chroni-
cle for the 15th annual Civil
War Re-enactment. The
dates for this event are
March 9, 10 and 11, at the
Holcim mine property, seven
miles north of Crystal River.
Visit www.crystalriver
reeanctment.org for more in-
formation.
Readers can alert the
Citrus County Chronicle to


any errors in news articles by
mailing dmann@chronicle
online.com or by calling 352-
563-5660.


SHEMIR WILES
Staff Writer
LECANTO -An event promoting
history, literacy and black contribu-
tions to literature, the Fifth African
American Read-In is slated for Sun-
day at the Learning and Conference
Center on the College of Central
Florida's Citrus Campus.
From 2:30 to 4:30 p.m., Karen


Slaska, a retired branch manager
for the library system, said those in
attendance can expect a lineup of
different activities.
From speeches, spirituals and hip-
hop to oral history, picture books, po-
etry and prayers, there will be a little
bit of something for everybody
As usual, the event will bring to-
gether many members of the com-
munity: school principals, students,


local elected officials, private citi-
zens, actors, singers, editors, and
executives.
In addition, Slaska said there would be
a worship in motion performance and
music from The Ovations. Refreshments
will also be available atthe end ofthe pro-
gram, and there will be a special per-
formance from the Crystal River Drum
Circle.
Slaska expects an audience of 200


Bank gives money to Homosassa food pantry


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
The We Care Food Pantry received a $25,000 donation Friday from the Capital City Bank Group Foundation dur-
ingt a ceremony at the pantry's new warehouse facility in Homosassa.

We Care Food Pantry benefits from foundation generosity


MATTHEW BECK
Staff Writer
The Capital City Bank
Group Foundation re-
cently donated $25,000 to
the We Care Food
Pantry
The facility is still
under construction and is
three miles east of U.S. 19
on West Cardinal Lane.


Diane Toto, the
pantry's president, said
the money will be used to
complete the facility's
parking lot
Toto, holding the cere-
monial check at right,
stands with Kay Wilkes,
president of the Citrus/In-
glis markets of Capital
City Bank. Seated at the
center are Herb and Mary


Stenger, whom Toto calls
"major contributors." She
said they contributed the
first $50,000 to the project
and have recently offered
$75,000 of matching funds
if the pantry can raise
that share.
Wilkes said, "We're
very glad to give you
$25,000 to make your
dream come true." Toto


said she expects the two
7,200 square-foot ware-
houses to be completed in
June or July
On hand for the cere-
mony were We Care Food
Pantry board members.
county government offi-
cials and Capital City
Bank employees. For
more information, call
352-628-0445.


State BRIEFS


TD Bank settles Fla.
Ponzi investor lawsuit
FORT LAUDERDALE TD Bank has
settled a major lawsuit filed by investors
fleeced in the $1.2 billion Ponzi scheme
operated by imprisoned former South
Florida lawyer Scott Rothstein.
Lawyers said at a hearing Friday that
the bank had reached an agreement with
25 investors known as the Razorback
Group. They had claimed losses of at


least $180 million and trial of their lawsuit
was set to start March 1.
Rothstein is serving a 50-year prison
sentence. Seven other people have
pleaded guilty.
House passes increased
penalties for trafficking
TALLAHASSEE The Florida House
has passed a bill that increases penalties
for human trafficking and smuggling in the


sex-for-pay trade.
The measure (HB 7049) won unani
mous approval Friday on a 111-0 vote
The penalty for trafficking would in-
crease from a maximum of 15 years ir
prison to 30 years. The maximum for
human smuggling would go from one
in jail to five years in prison. And additi
trafficking offenses would be created v
some having maximums of life in prison
-From wire r


New members appointed to housing committee<

*-.10 !- Kim Farrar, Harvey Gerber, Nani
-, --- t Smith, Barbara Wheeler and Ro
Lieberman were recently appoint
S' to the Citrus County Affordable
". ~Housing Authority Committee.
Commission Chairman Winn We
i.' '~ officiated the ceremony. The
'~, ,committee was formed to impro
i -ithe housing situation in Citrus
County by studying and developp
.- projects, coordinating with court
I- staff and by making recommend
"'/ tions to the Board of County
S Commissioners.
Special to the Chronicle


to 250 people.
"Hopefully, we'll get a good
turnout," she said. "I think it will be
a fun afternoon."
The program is free and open to
the general public. CF's Citrus Cam-
pus is located at 3800 S. Lecanto
Highway (County Road 491).
Chronicle reporter Shemir Wiles
can be reached at 352-564-2924 or
swiles@chronicleonline. com.



Wrongfully

convicted

will get

money


Housepasses

compensation

legislation

Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE
William Dillon was momen-
tarily overcome with emo-
tion in the Florida House
gallery on Friday as the
chamber passed a bill that
would compensate him
$1.35 million for spending
27 years in prison for a mur-
der he did not commit.
The vote came about 10
months after the House
failed to act on a similar
measure as time ran out on
the 2011 legislative session.
The Senate, as it did last
year, passed the legislation
first and sent it to the
House. This year's bill (SB
2) now goes back to the Sen-
ate for approval of changes
made by the House, which
did not alter the dollar
amount or the measure's
effect.
"It's definitely a closure to
a great degree," Dillon said,
fighting back tears. "They're
admitting that something
wrong did happen."
r Dillon, now 52, was
cleared by DNA testing in
the beating death of James
Dvorak on a Brevard County
beach in 1981. Dillon was
freed in November 2008. A
jailhouse informant also has
since recanted his testi-
mony against Dillon and au-
thorities reopened the
murder investigation.
year The Legislature must
onal pass a claims bill for Dillon
with to receive compensation
because he does not qual-
>. ify for automatic payment
exports due to a prior drug convic-
tion when he was 19 years
old.
The House applauded
e when Dillon was introduced
and after debate by Rep.
cy Will Weatherford, a Wesley
n Chapel Republican who is
nted in line to become speaker in
November.
"The thought of me living
ebb my entire life, my lifespan,
in a prison for a crime I did
ove not commit is beyond my
comprehension," the 32-
ing year-old Weatherford said.
nty "There's no price tag you
da- can put on that," he added.
"There is no dollar amount
that can give this man his 27
years. It will not happen."


SUnsolved MYSTERIES


Sheriffs office searches for clues in 2005 disappearance


In January of
2005, George
"Skip" Zelaya
was reported as
a missing adult '"
to the Citrus
County Sheriff's <-
Office.
Zelaya was last
seen on January Det. Juan
13,2005, when he U NSO
left his resi-
dence in Ho- MYST
mosassa and did
not return. A few days later
his ex-wife, Paula, spotted
George's white, four-door
Lincoln sedan sitting in the
parking lot of the Publix su-
permarket in Homosassa off
U.S. 19. Nothing was found
in his car except his wallet,
which was missing every-


. .A 1


thing but his So-
cial Security
card and photos.
His watch, keys
and cellphone
were found on a
table in his
house.


-! Shortly after
Santiago his disappear-
'LVED ance, Zelaya's
brother, Joe, re-
ERIES ceived numer-
ous personal
items of George's via mail,
including his driver's li-
cense and a few checks for
Joe to cash.
The sheriff's office
searched for Zelaya, but he
has never been found. This,
of course, has been a hard-
ship on his family all of


these years.
We need your help in lo-
cating George "Skip" Ze-
laya. If you have any
information regarding this
case, please contact Det.
Juan Santiago at 352-726-
4488, or contact CrimeStop-
pers of Citrus County by
calling 1-888-ANY-TIPS, tex-
ting the word CITRUS plus
your tip to 274637 or visiting
crimestopperscitrus.com.
You may be eligible to re-
ceive a cash reward and you
can remain anonymous.


The Unsolved Mysteries
column will appear weekly
on Saturday, highlighting
a cold case, unsolved bur-
glary or crime. The column


UNSOLVED MYSTERIES
of Citrus County


* VICTIM: George "Skip" Zelaya.
* AGE: 61 years old at time of
disappearance.
* CIRCUMSTANCES: Missing person.
* DESCRIPTION: White male, five foot
nine inches tall, 130 pounds, thin build,
brown hair with gray at the temples,
brown eyes. Zelaya was last seen
wearing blue jeans and a long-sleeve
dress shirt with work boots, and should
have minor scars on his hands and
arms. He wears glasses for reading and
possibly had a silver Timex watch.


is submitted by the Citrus
County Sheriff's Office.
Det. Juan Santiago is the
Gang/Intelligence/Missing
Persons Detective. He has


George
Zelaya
missing since
2005.


a bachelor's degree in pub-
lic safety administration
from St. Petersburg College
and is in his eighth year at
the sheriff's office.


*
*


1
I
I






A4 SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2012


Three nabbed in




battery cases


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff Writer

Three area residents
were arrested and charged
in battery cases a week ago
by Citrus County Sheriff's
Office.
Adam Francis Camp-
bell, 26, of Hernando, was
arrested Feb. 19 on a charge
of domestic battery for al-
legedly sloshing a drink on a
woman and pushing her
with his chest.
A witness reportedly no-
ticed Campbell push the
woman, also 26, with his
chest.
When officials spoke to
Campbell, he reportedly told
them he and the woman were
pushing each other with their
chests and were later sepa-
rated by the witness.
No bond was allowed.
Joelissa Nicole Smith,
20, of Dunnellon was ar-
rested Feb. 18 on charges of
domestic battery and re-
sisting an officer. Smith is
accused of biting a man on
his forearm and screaming
and arguing with officers.
According to the alleged
victim, Smith kept harass-
ing him for a ride to Wal-
Mart, but her real intent
was to purchase crack co-
caine. The man refused to
give her a ride and Smith
reportedly grabbed the
keys to the man's vehicle
and climbed into the dri-
ver's seat. As the man tried
to retrieve the key from the
ignition, Smith allegedly bit
the man.


Investigators noticed a
substantial bite mark on
the man's arm. While
deputies were trying to
get Smith's side of the
story, she reportedly kept
yelling at the man and
would not listen to com-
mands from officers. She
was arrested and no bond
was allowed.
Tammie Sue Mc-
Clellen, 50, of Homosassa
was arrested Feb. 19 on
charges of battery on a per-
son 65 or older and resist-
ing an officer. McClellen
reportedly shoved a 74-
year-old woman to the
ground while she was try-
ing to call 911 and refused
to be handcuffed by resist-
ing and threatening officers
with spit and urine.
Officials received two
calls from the residence.
The first one indicated Mc-
Clellen was getting physi-
cally violent and the second
noted she slapped the
phone out of the elderly
woman's hand and shoved
her to the ground.
When investigators got to
the scene, McClellen told
them 'don't come near me. I
am going to (urinate) all
over you.' When officers
moved in to subdue her, she
reportedly urinated on
their pant legs. No bond
was allowed.
Chronicle reporter A.B.
Sidibe can be reached at
352-564-2925 or
asidibe@chronicleonline.
com.


ON THE NET

* For more information
about arrests made by
the Citrus County Sher-
iff's Office, go to
www.sheriffcitrus.org
and click on the Public
Information link, then
on Arrest Reports.

* Also under Public Infor-
mation on the CCSO
website, click on Crime
Mapping for a view of
where each type of
crime occurs in Citrus
County. Click on Of-
fense Reports to see
lists of burglary, theft
and vandalism.

* For the Record reports
are also archived online
at www.chronicle
online.com.


TPO
Continued from Page Al

MPO because, with 26
MPOs in Florida, it already
has more MPOs than any
other state. Georgia has 15;
Massachusetts has 10; New
York has 13; New Jersey
has two.
Instead, Skelton encour-
aged the TPO to join with
Hernando County MPO be-
cause they both are in Dis-
trict 7 and members of
TBARTA, the Tampa Bay
Area Regional Transporta-
tion Association.
"Don't isolate Citrus
County," Skelton said. "Cit-
rus County connects to
Tampa Bay You've got a lot
to benefit from that connec-
tion. You yourself can't make
a connection to Tampa Bay.
You need Hernando. You
need Pasco. You need Hills-
borough. That's the value of
TBARTA as well."
Wheeler said she was
concerned that Citrus
County's needs would be
diluted in a merger with
Hernando County, espe-
cially as their needs were
not the same. For example,


Hernando County already
had the Suncoast Parkway
Hernando County might
not support the extension
through Citrus County, as it
might see no need.
"That fact that this board
has set Suncoast II as a pri-
ority tells me you are think-
ing regionally," Skelton
said. "I think your priori-
ties are in line."
Skelton did not think the
county's transportation
needs would get diluted.
"Is it going to require co-
operation and communica-
tion? Absolutely," Skelton
said. "But if you can get that
entity of Hernando and Cit-
rus to agree on set priori-
ties, then you are all moving
together to your benefit."
Skelton said he saw
many similarities between
Citrus and Hernando coun-
ties.
"I think there are a lot of
similarities," Skelton said.
"I think there's some
uniqueness as well. I'd be
scared if there wasn't I see
some of the same things
with Pasco and Hernando as
well. I see similarities being
the outlier to the bigger ur-
banized area. And again that
connection is: You consider


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

yourselves as being con-
nected to Tampa Bay and so
does Hernando County"
The TPO was advised to
identify mutual needs in
the meantime rather than
raise concerns about the
next census update. Skel-
ton pointed out that Dis-
trict 7 could not make best
use of its funding if the TPO
did not target its require-
ments.
"From my perspective,
I'd like to see more focus on
what's the countywide
transportation plan that
meets the objectives of
every entity on here," Skel-
ton told the TPO. "And
move forward with that
transportation plan. Focus
on that and that will be the
best TPO headed in the
right direction."
The request for qualifi-
cations for firms or individ-
uals interested in providing
transportation planning and
related management serv-
ices to the board drew four
applicants: Kimley-Horne
and Associates Inc.,
TBARTA, Wade Trim Inc.
and CDM Smith Inc., all
from Tampa. Presentations
will be heard at a public
meeting.


legal notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle







SSurplus Property


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES
City H L F'cast City H
Daytona Bch. 62 52 pc Miami 79
Ft. Lauderdale 78 67 pc Ocala 65
Fort Myers 77 56 pc Orlando 68
Gainesville 64 42 pc Pensacola 63
Homestead 77 66 pc Sarasota 72
Jacksonville 63 40 pc Tallahassee 64
Key West 78 70 c Tampa 69
Lakeland 69 51 pc Vero Beach 69
Melbourne 68 57 pc W. Palm Bch. 75


MARINE OUTLOOK


Northeast winds around 20 knots.
Seas 3 to 5 feet. Bay and inland
waters will be choppy. Partly cloudy
skies today.


HI LO PR HIM LU PH
84 66 NA NA NA NA

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Excusiv daily
TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 65 Low: 44
Cooler and breezy with some linger-
-- ,' ing clouds
. ....................... SUNDAY & MONDAY MORNING
High: 68 Low: 62
Mostly cloudy; 30% chance of showers

w.**u MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
A High: 77 Low: 62
,i Mostly cloudy; 40% chance of showers

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Friday 86/62
Record 89/27
Normal 75/46
Mean temp. 74
Departure from mean +13
PRECIPITATION*
Friday 0.00 in.
Total for the month 1.59 in.
Total for the year 2.45 in.
Normal for the year 5.51 in.
*As of 6 p.m. at Inverness
UV INDEX: 6
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Friday at 3 p.m. 29.96 in.


DEW POINT
Friday at 3 p.m.
HUMIDITY
Friday at 3 p.m.
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active polle
Juniper, oak, nettle
Today's count: 11.3/
Saturday's count: 9
Sunday's count: 8.
AIR QUALITY
Friday was good with polluta
mainly particulates.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MI
(MORNING)
2/25 SATURDAY 7:49 1:38 8
2/26 SUNDAY 8:38 2:27 9


NOR MA
AFTERNOONO
8:11 2
1:01 2


CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
SUNSET TONIGHT.........
SUNRISE TOMORROW..
MOONRISE TODAY.
1MM 4 M I22 MOONSET TODAY.........

BURN CONDITIONS


................. 1


n:

/12
.7
4

ants



JOR
N)
2:00
2:49


6:27 P.M
6:59 A.M
8:47 A.I
10:02 P.M


Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For
more information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's
Web site: http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi

WATERING RULES
Citrus County: Irrigation is limited to twice per week.
Even addresses: Thursday and/or Sunday before 10am or after 4pm.
Odd Addresses: Wednesday and/or Saturday before 10am or after 4pm.
No restrictions on fountains, car washing or pressure washing. Hand watering requires the
use of a shut-off nozzle.
PLEASE CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL NEW PLANT MATERIAL.
Questions, concerns or reporting violations, please call Citrus County 352-527-7669.

TIDES


*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Saturday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 7:29 a/3:18 a 7:30 p/3:17 p
Crystal River* 5:50 a/12:40 a 5:51 p/12:39 p
Withlacoochee* 3:37 a/10:27 a 3:38 p/11:02 p
Homosassa* 6:39 a/2:17 a 6:40 p/2:16 p


***At Mason's Creek
Sunday
High/Low High/Low
8:07 a/3:52 a 7:56 p/3:43 p
6:28 a/1:14 a 6:17 p/1:05 p
4:15 a/10:53 a 4:04 p/11:39 p
7:17 a/2:51 a 7:06 p/2:42 p


Gulf water
temperature


76
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Thu. Fri. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 27.77 27.79 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 33.95 33.95 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 36.17 36.16 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 37.65 37.66 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level. Flood stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision. In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data. If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211.

THE NATION


I 2 I

/ "' 5 30s


City
Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
M. Burlington, VT
M. Charleston, SC
M. Charleston. WV
Charlotte
M. Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, N.H.
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville. IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
r Nashville


-- -a.

c 40 . .
4 -_ '

50s .
FW 50s Aiant


6O-,u o^ f --...."7-


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SATURDAY


Friday Saturday
H L Pcp. Fcst H L
37 30 .35 sn 39 15
56 26 s 61 36
71 46 .02 s 44 25
70 51 .20 s 56 36
50 45 .90 pc 49 28
65 50 pc 60 37
54 45 .16 pc 50 27
41 27 sh 49 22
69 51 s 56 39
54 28 rs 42 23
41 36 .09 pc 45 25
43 33 .33 sn 31 27
37 25 .24 sn 33 4
81 66 .12 s 61 37
59 42 .87 sn 39 24
74 56 .04 s 53 28
35 30 .55 pc 34 25
52 35 c 36 23
46 34 .07 sn 34 23
73 61 .86 s 60 32
49 36 sn 36 23
36 26 .40 c 37 15
60 44 s 63 41
35 17 pc 57 25
33 27 .04 s 35 25
34 30 .30 sn 35 22
66 35 s 66 43
56 39 s 45 27
46 40 .29 pc 42 27
38 32 .28 pc 43 20
73 57 sh 57 44
43 35 pc 35 23
71 53 pc 61 42
66 43 S 70 45
58 47 s 61 37
64 53 s 67 49
57 40 s 43 25
61 46 s 57 37
35 30 .50 pc 32 22
30 23 .01 pc 28 22
75 54 .05 pc 62 44
74 53 .24 pc 58 43
69 43 s 53 29


Friday Saturday
City H L Pcp. Fcst H L
New Orleans 73 59 pc 62 49
New York City 45 36 58 pc 45 27
Norfolk 82 63 .06 s 54 30
Oklahoma City 54 32 w 66 38
Omaha 38 29 02 s 42 32
Palm Springs 84 60 s 84 50
Philadelphia 50 42 .29 pc 48 29
Phoenix 81 50 s 78 50
Pittsburgh 57 36 .05 sn 35 23
Portland, ME 39 25 22 c 40 20
Portland, Ore 52 39 sh 48 34
Providence, R.I. 40 31 .34 pc 44 24
Raleigh 78 60 .09 s 54 30
Rapid City 35 13 .01 pc 48 27
Reno 64 27 s 46 25
Rochester, NY 45 33 .27 sn 31 22
Sacramento 71 39 s 61 39
St. Louis 50 38 s 43 33
St. Ste. Marie 32 20 .06 c 23 8
Salt Lake City 48 24 pc 46 25
San Antonio 71 51 pc 59 40
San Diego 62 53 s 67 54
San Francisco 70 47 s 58 41
Savannah 86 36 .16 s 61 39
Seattle 44 40 .15 sh 46 33
Spokane 42 28 rs 37 27
Syracuse 43 31 .15 sn 33 18
Topeka 49 31 s 52 36
Washington 57 48 .31 pc 50 31
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 91 Stuart, Fla. LOW -11 Crested Butte,
Colo.
WORLD CITIES


SATURDAY
CITY HIL/SKY
Acapulco 85/71/s
Amsterdam 49/39/pc
Athens 62/47/pc
Beijing 33/13/s
Berlin 41/37/rs
Bermuda 71/64/c
Cairo 66/48/pc
Calgary 31/5/sf
Havana 85/61/pc
Hong Kong 73/66/sh
Jerusalem 55/42/sh


Lisbon
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Paris
Rio
Rome
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Warsaw


64/47/s
54/40/c
64/33/s
70/45/pc
29/18/sn
30/22/c
56/49/sh
93/75/s
65/44/pc
85/66/pc
52/42/sh
31/20/sf
40/27/rs


C I T R U S


F'cast
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
PC
PC
pc


COUNTY T


LHIKON1CLL
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0
MARCH 8


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=raln;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
@2012 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Arnold
Schweitz, 89
SENECA FALLS,
N.Y.
Our loving husband, fa-
ther, and grandfather,
Arnold A. Schweitz, 89, died
peacefully
after a brief
illness, on
February
21, 2012.
Born in
Elgin, ND,
on March
Arnold 22, 1922, to
Schweitz the late
Henry and
Theresa (Quast) Schweitz,
he lived most of his life in
Seneca Falls, NY, where he
and his late wife of 56 years,
Edna Rogers Schweitz,
raised nine children, and he
worked as a machinist/me-
chanic. The couple retired
to Inverness in 1984, where
Arnold continued to work
part-time as a local handy-
man.
Arnold served our nation
in the U.S. Army during
World War II, was a long-
time member of the Ameri-
can Legion and VFW, and a
member of the local Elks
Lodge and United
Methodist Church.
He is survived by his wife,
Carmen Dawkins Schweitz,
and her children, Jason
Worth and Amy Struke, and
their children; his eight
children, Eleanor (Thomas)
Brown, Barbara Waite,
Frederick (Margaret)
Schweitz, Duane Schweitz,
Cassandra (John) Patterson,
Daralene (Leon) Pondo,
Cynthia Schweitz, and
Theresa (William) Priest; 17
grandchildren; 15 great-
grandchildren; a brother,
Rudolf (Gloria) Schweitz; a
sister, Lorrentina Lang;
along with numerous
cousins, nieces and
nephews.
He was preceded in death
by the mother of his chil-
dren, Edna; his daughter,
Marabelle Schweitz; his
brother, Henry Schweitz;
his sister, Rosalee Smith;
and his great-grandson,
Alex Racine.
Funeral arrangements
are Tuesday, February 28, at
the Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home, Inverness, FL. Re-
ceiving of Friends will be at
noon followed by a 1 p.m.
service. Internment, with
full military honors, will be
at the Florida National
Cemetery in Bushnell, FL,
immediately following the
service. Officiating will be
performed by the Rev Rus-
sell Tabbert.
In lieu of flowers, dona-
tions are requested to Hos-
pice of Citrus County, PO.
Box 641270, Beverly Hills,
FL 34464.
"We are confident, yes,
well pleased to be absent
from the body and to be
present with the Lord" II
Corinthians 5:8.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.

OBITUARIES
The Citrus County Chron-
icle's policy permits
both free and paid
obituaries.
Email obits@chronicle
online.com or fax 352-
563-3280.



Funeral Home With Crematory
THOMAS HAYES
Service: Mon. 12:30 PM Chapel
ARNOLD SCHWEITZ
Viewing: Tues. 12Noon
Service: Tues. 1:00 PM Chapel
PATRICIA LOWE
Service: Sat. 2:00 PM
Inverness Church of God
SAMUEL FOWLER
Service: Thurs. 3 PM
Dunnellon First Baptist
NORMA JEAN HOLLIBUSH
Viewing Sun. 2 PM Service Sun. 3 PM
726-8323 00.AGJ4


To Place Your

("In Memory" ad,
Call Mike Snyder at 563-3273


msnyder@chronicleonline com
or
Saralynne Schlumberger at 564-2917
sschlumberger@chronicleonline.com


Norma
Hollibush, 78
FIFE LAKE, MI
Norma Jean Hollibush,
78, Fife Lake, MI, and win-
ter resident of Inverness,
I FL, died
Feb 22,

Florida res-
idence.
A native
of Beards-
town, IL,
VD she was
Norma born July
Hollibush 28, 1933, to
the late Henry and Oma De-
Fraties. She had been a
Florida winter resident
from Fife Lake, MI, since
1989. She was of the Protes-
tant faith and enjoyed play-
ing bingo with her many
She is survived by her
husband of 56 years, Ted W
Hollibush; three sons, Kim
D. Hollibush, Knoxville, TN,
Brian L. Hollibush, MD, Ar-
lington, VA, Todd W Hol-
libush, Knoxville, TN; her
brother, Richard DeFraties,
Wichita, KA; her sister,
Frances Miller, Santee, CA;
and one grandson, Joshua.
The Service of Remem-
brance will be at 3 p.m. Sun-
day, Feb 26, 2012, from the
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Mr Joseph Ter-
rell officiating. Cremation
will follow. The family will
receive friends at the fu-
neral home Sunday from 2
p.m. until the hour of
service.
In lieu of flowers, memo-
rials requested to Citrus
County Unit, American Can-
cer Society, PO. Box 1902, In-
verness, FL 34451.
Sign the guestbook at
wwwchronicleonline. com.

Leola
Kitchens, 49
ATLANTA, GA.
Leola Kitchens, 49, of At-
lanta, GA, died Saturday,
February 18, 2012, at Pied-
mont Hospital in Atlanta,
GA. She was born on De-
cember 11, 1962, in Inver-
ness, FL, to the late Pete
Thomas and Queen
Thomas.
Funeral services for
Leola Kitchens will be con-
ducted Saturday, February
25, 2012, at 11 a.m. at the
First Assembly of God, 4201
S. Pleasant Grove Road, In-
verness, FL. Interment will
follow in the Floral City
Community Cemetery, Flo-
ral City, FL. Friends may
call at the First Assembly of
God Saturday day 9 to
11 a.m.
Arrangements entrusted
to Cason Funeral and Cre-
mation Services, Inverness.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.

SO YOU KNOW
U Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear in
the next day's edition.


Eunice
"Euna-Bug"
Toiler, 86
ALMA, MICH.
Eunice R. Toller, 86 of
Alma, Michigan, died
peacefully at her winter
home in
Port Or-
ang e
Florida, on
Wednesday,
February
22, 2012.
with her
family by
Eunice her side.
Toiler Eunice
(Euna-Bug), a native Florid-
ian, was born October 8,
1925, in Pleasant Grove,
Florida, to the late Ellenor
and James Rooks. She was
the seventh of nine chil-
dren, growing up on her
parents' cattle ranch.
Eunice is survived by her
three loving daughters,
Pamela Toller-Clark and
her husband, Thomas Clark,
Trisha T Webb, and Linda
T Dammer and her hus-
band, Kevin; three cher-
ished grandchildren, Ian
Toller-Clark, Casey Webb
and Toni Dammer; and
three siblings, Marjorie Ter-
rell, Valentine "Buster"
Rooks and Albert Rooks.
A Life Celebration will be
at 2 p.m. Sunday, February
26, at New Hope Chapel on
Istachatta Road with inter-
ment to follow at New Hope
Cemetery, Citrus County,
Fla.
To share a memory with
the family, visit www
BaldwinCremation. com.





David
Mahan, 62
INVERNESS
David Paul Mahan, 62, of
Inverness, died on Feb. 23,
2012, at his residence in In-
verness, FL. McGan Crema-
tion Service LLC,
Hernando, FL.

Maria
Jimenez, 74
LECANTO
Maria Ines Jimenez, 74, of
Lecanto, died Friday, Feb.
24, 2012, at Nature Coast
Lodge of Lecanto. Friends
will be received from 5 to 7
p.m. Monday, Feb. 27, at
Wilder Funeral Home, Ho-
mosassa Springs. A Mass of
Christian Burial will be at
10:30 a.m. Tuesday, Feb. 28,
at St Scholastica Catholic
Church in Lecanto. Burial
will follow at Fero Memorial
Gardens.

OBITUARIES
U Obituaries must be
submitted by the
funeral home or society
in charge of
arrangements.


IDE r


Panel OKs state


drug-testing bill


Jack Ritchie, 85
CRYSTAL RIVER
Jack R. Ritchie, 85, of
Crystal River, died Feb. 24,
2012, at his home.
Private cremation will
take place under the direc-
tion of Brown Funeral
Home and Crematory in
Lecanto, FL.


Deaths
ELSEWHERE

Dennis
Gomes, 68
RESORTS CASINO
CO-OWNER
ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. -
Dennis Gomes, co-owner of
Resorts Casino Hotel in At-
lantic City and a former
mob-busting prosecutor in
Las Vegas, whose exploits
were chronicled in the
movie "Casino," has died.
Casino spokeswoman
Courtney Birmingham says
Gomes died overnight
Thursday of undetermined
causes. He was 68 and lived
in Margate.
Gomes and New York real
estate magnate Morris Bai-
ley bought Resorts in August
2010 and saved the strug-
gling casino from having to
close.

Bill Raggio, 85
FORMER STATE
SENATOR
CARSON CITY, Nev -
Retired state Sen. Bill Rag-
gio has died at age 85.
The prominent Reno Re-
publican was the longest-
serving state senator in
Nevada history when he re-
tired last January just be-
fore the 2011 legislative
session began.
Raggio was first elected in
1972 and served in the sen-
ate for 38 years.
He was shunned by some
members of his party after
endorsing Democratic Sen.
Harry Reid in the 2010 elec-
tion against Sharron Angle.


Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE After
a roller-coaster ride through
the House, a bill that allows
state agencies to randomly
drug-test their employees
was cleared by a final com-
mittee on Friday
The House State Affairs
Committee cleared the bill
(HB 1205) by a
party-line vote
of 9-6.
The measure
allows, but does
not require, I 0
state agencies 4w
to randomly
test workers
every three 2012 SE
months. It
makes it easier
to fire those workers who
show positive for drugs
after a first test that has
been confirmed.
An earlier committee had
rejected the measure after
Republicans and Democ-
rats questioned its cost and
legality Rep. Jimmie Smith,
the Inverness Re-
publican sponsor-
ing the bill, changed
it so that no extra
money for drug tests
is needed. Tests will .
be paid for out of -
the agencies' exist-
ing budgets.
Under this latest Jimn
version of the re- Srr
vived bill, a random druc
sample of employ- spoI
ees to be tested can't be
more than 10 percent of the
agency's workforce and
must be generated by an
"independent third-party"
computer
Smith told the panel he
wasn't insinuating that state
workers have more drug
problems than society at
large, and didn't have any
evidence to that effect. But
drug use anywhere should-
n't be tolerated, he added.
"We can change society
as we know it," Smith said
of his bill. "Be brave
enough to do it."
Rep. Alan Williams, a
Democrat from Tallahas-


see who represents thou-
sands of state employees,
said the bill would do noth-
ing to help the already de-
pressed morale of those
constituents.
"It's the wrong direction
at the wrong time," he said.
"'Just say 'no' to this bill."
But Rep. Scott Plakon
pointed out that employees
of private com-
panies already
work under the
possibility
they'll be
tested.
"I don't see
why state work-
Sers should be
SSION treated any bet-
ter than the pri-
vate sector," the
Longwood Republican said.
Civil liberties experts
and public worker advo-
cates continue to oppose
the bill as unconstitutional
and unfair.
"It's a Big Brother act and
we don't believe in that,"
said Gail Marie Perry of the
Communications
Workers of Amer-
ica.
Drug testing in-
vokes the Fourth
4 Amendment,
rl which protects
against unreason-
able searches and
ie T. seizure.
ith Courts generally
bill frown on drug test-
isor. ing without a rea-
sonable suspicion of
employee drug use, though
the U.S. Supreme Court
has ruled "suspicionless"
testing constitutional in a
handful of situations, in-
cluding on student athletes
and railroad employees
after a major accident.
A separate executive
order by Gov Rick Scott re-
quiring random drug test-
ing of state workers
resulted in a lawsuit, and a
hearing in that case was
held this week. Scott sup-
ports Smith's bill.
The bill should next go to
the full House for consid-
eration.


BEVERLY HILLS LIQUORS
3898 N. Lecanto, Hwy. (Hwy. 491), Beverly Hills, FL 34465 (352) 746-7723

OWEST pmCES


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Sat. 9-1 on

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i---------------------------------


Obituaries


Captain Morgan Original


Oal i .ne Roof At6A lime$ i 7u fl.
II ii II ----------------------


I a nnuman-m 1112%11m aII a r u y ;


SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2012 A5


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'4


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n







A6 SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2012


STOCKS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


THE M RKETIN RE IEWU


I HowTKs *I '1,H"TI f i W


MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) Here are the 825 most active stocks on the New York Stock Exchange, 765
Name Vol(00) Last Chg Name Vol(00) Last Chg Name Vol(00) Last Chg most active on the Nasdaq National Market and 116 most active on the Ameri-
BkofAm 1589308 7.88 -.14 YMBiog 89337 2.00 -.05 SiriusXM 1136798 2.20 +.10 can Stock Exchange. Tables show name, price and net change.
S&P500ETF990776 136.93 +.30 TrnsatlPet 34034 1.57 +.14 PwShs QQQ390867 63.96 +.22 Name: Stocks appear alphabetically by the company's full name (not abbrevia-
SprintNex 664279 2.47 -.05 CheniereEn 30986 14.05 +.10 Intel 390697 26.70 +.04 tion). Names consisting of initials appear at the beginning of each letter's list.
NokiaCp 537559 5.80 +.26 LucasEngy 27921 3.03 +.37 Microsoft 318995 31.48 +.11 Last: Price stock was trading at when exchange closed for the day.
SPDR Fncl 506853 14.67 -.05 Rentech 22914 1.83 +.03 FrontierCm 315697 4.64 +.07 Chg: Loss or gain for the day No change indicated by...

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) Stock Footnotes: cld Issue has been called for redempbon by company, d- New 52-week
low. dd Loss in last 12 mos. ec- Company formerly listed on the American Exchange's
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Ch +%Chg Emerging Company Marketplace. h- temporary exmpt from Nasdaq capital and surplus list-
KenCole 15.49 +2.42 +18.5 NewConcEn 3.70 +1.02 +38.1 ChelseaTh 3.88 +1.47 +61.0 mgqualification. n- Stock was a new issue in the last year.The 52-week high and low fig-
GMXRs 2.16 +.26 +13.7 LucasEngy 3.03 +.37 +13.9 PlumasBc 3.90 +.92 +30.9 ures date only from the beginning of trading. pf- Preferredstockissue.pr- Preferences.pp-
DxRssBull rs57.50 +6.61 +13.0 EllieMae n 8.98 +1.05 +13.2 LeGaga 5.25 +1.06 +25.3 Holder owes installments of purchase price. rt- Right to buy security at a specified price. s-
OrientEH 10.05 +1.12 +12.5 MexcoEn 11.25 +1.25 +12.5 Burcon g 7.35 +1.30 +21.4 Stock has split by at least 20 percent within the last year. wi Trades will be settled when the
Orbitz 3.46 +.36 +11.6 FullHseR 3.15 +.32 +11.3 Vivus 22.13 +3.40 +18.2 stock is issued. wd When distributed. wt Warrant, allowing a purchase of a stock., u New
52-week high. un Unit, including more than one security. vj Company in bankruptcy or re-
LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) ceivership, or being reorganized under the bankruptcy law. Appears in front of the name.
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.
CSVInvCrd 36.01 -7.44 -17.1 Flanign 7.58 -1.33 -14.9 CobraEl 4.61 -1.18 -20.4
KindredHIt 10.69 -1.80 -14.4 PernixTh 8.70 -.81 -8.5 RubiconTc 9.84 -2.33 -19.1 iTl
DrxRsaBear18.57 -2.63 -12.4 eMagin 3.56 -.26 -6.8 DeckrsOut 77.72 -12.49 -13.8
WorldFuel 43.77 -5.17 -10.6 EagleCGr 6.67 -.40 -5.7 TOP Ship rs 3.03 -.47 -13.5 52-Week Net % YT[
TrinaSolar 7.80 -.83 -9.6 ASpecRity 5.66 -.31 -5.2 CarverBrs 6.10 -.90 -12.9 High Low Name Last Chg Chg Ct


DIARY


1,640 Advanced
1,385 Declined
111 Unchanged
3,136 Total issues
174 New Highs
1 New Lows
3,331,153,939 Volume


DIARY


DIARY


232 Advanced
228 Declined
34 Unchanged
494 Total issues
21 New Highs
1 New Lows
91,666,991 Volume


1,131
1,397
120
2,648
108
8
1,614,903,459


13,005.04 10,404.49Dow Jones Industrials
5,627.85 3,950.66Dow Jones Transportation
467.64 381.99Dow Jones Utilities
8,718.25 6,414.89NYSE Composite
2,490.51 1,941.99Amex Index
2,965.05 2,298.89Nasdaq Composite
1,370.58 1,074.77S&P 500
14,562.01 11,208.42Wilshire 5000
868.57 601.71 Russell 2000


12,982.95
5,139.14
453.34
8,151.96
2,469.62
2,963.75
1,365.74
14,434.07
826.92


I NYSE


D % 52-wk
ig % Chg


-1.74 -.01 +6.26 +7.03
-22.51 -.44 +2.38 +1.56
+2.59 +.57 -2.44 +10.33
+15.72 +.19 +9.03 -2.70
+12.04 +.49 +8.40 +4.70
+6.77 +.23+13.77 +6.57
+2.28 +.17 +8.60 +3.47
+20.99 +.15 +9.43 +3.04
-2.31 -.28+11.61 +.60


Request stocks or mutual funds to be listed here by writing

the Chronicle, Attn: Stock Requests, 1624 N. Meadowcrest

Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429; or call 563-5660. Include

the name of the stock, market and ticker symbol. For mu-

tual funds, list parent company, symbol and the exact name

of the fund. Staff will not provide real-time quotes.


I NEWYORK STOKECAG


Name Last Chg Beam Inc 55.60 +.23
BeazerHm 3.23 -.08
BectDck 77.28 +.83
BerkHaA120000.00+1000.00
ABB Ltd 20.92 +.02 BerkH B 80.04 +.67
AES Corp 13.80 +.03 BestBuy 24.99 -.20
AFLAC 46.90 -.34 BioMedR 18.69 -.11
AGL Res 40.37 -.61 BlkHillsCp 33.91 -.49
AKSteel 8.10 +.05 BlkDebtStr 4.12 +.02
ASAGold 28.29 -.23 BlkEnhC&l 13.71 +.05
AT&TInc 30.34 -.12 BlkGlbOp 15.17 +.13
AbtLab 56.70 +.41 Blackstone 15.98 +.37
AberFitc 48.14 -.04 BlockHR 16.38 +.26
Accenture 59.65 +.24 Boeing 76.06 +.21
AdamsEx 10.74 +.01 BorgWarn 82.43 +1.68
AdvAmer 10.46 +.05 BostBeer 99.01 -1.00
AMD 7.46 +.17 BostProp 102.62 -.51
AdvSemi 4.84 BostonSci 6.25 +.35
Aetna 46.89 +.20 BoydGm 8.21 -.11
Agilent 43.02 -.39 Brinker 26.58 -.31
Agniomg 36.90 -.64 BrMySq 32.60 +.25
AlcatelLuc 2.59 +.02 BrwnBrn 23.99 +.01
Alcoa 10.43 -.03 Brunswick 24.16 +.33
AllegTch 44.21 +.14 Buckeye 60.97 +.32
Allete 41.91 +.16 C&J Egy n 21.87 -.76
AlliBGIbHi 15.17 +.19 CBLAsc 17.80 +.59
AlliBInco 8.35 ... CBREGrp 18.51 -.06
AlliBern 14.00 -.22 CBSB 29.75 +.31
Allstate 31.36 -.23 CH Engy 66.48 -.18
AlphaNRs 20.46 +.64 CMS Eng 21.68 +.21
AIpAlerMLP 17.18 +10 CNOFind 7.69
Altria 29.99 +.29 CSS Inds 20.43 -.21
AmBev 39.58 +1.14 CSXs 21.66 -.03
Ameren 32.24 +.12 CVREngy 29.76 -.01
AMovilLs 23.67 -.15 CVR Prsn 25.68 -1.80
AmAxle 12.17 +10 CVSCare 44.07 +03
AEagleOut 14.16 -.08 Cabelas 35.91 +1.57
AEP 37.73 -.18 CblvsNYs 15.62 -.03
AmExp 53.33 +.66 CabotOGs 35.69 +.26
AmlntGrp 28.41 +.42 CallGolf 6.72 -.01
AmSIP3 6.85 +.04 Calpine 15.60 +.11
AmTower 64.16 +.25 Camecog 25.20 +.06
Amerigas 46.21 +.41 Cameron 56.85 -.39
AmeriBrgn 37.70 +.26 CampSp 33.71 +.17
Anadarko 87.30 -.20 CdnNRsgs 38.02 -.46
AnalogDev 38.85 -.48 CapOne 49.29 -.01
ABInBev 66.25 +.25 CapifiSrce 6.56 -.03
Annaly 16.63 ... CapM plB 14.80 -.09
Aon Corp 47.53 -.64 CardnlHIth 42.05 +.51
Apache 111.57 +1.65 Carnival 29.97 -.19
AquaAm 22.55 -.06 Caterpillar 116.00 -.20
ArcelorMit 21.41 +10 Celanese 48.52 -.19
ArchCoal 14.29 +.36 Cemex 7.36 -.53
ArchDan 31.96 +.22 Cemig pf 22.95
ArmourRsd 7.11 +.02 CenterPnt 18.80 -.03
Ashland 63.06 -.02 Cntyink 39.92 +.51
AsdEstat 15.09 -.11 Checkpnt 11.39 +.34
AssuredG 17.71 +.01 ChesEng 25.45 +.47
ATMOS 31.68 -.37 ChesUfi 42.96 +.22
AuRicog 9.59 -.06 Chevron 109.08 +.73
AveryD 30.80 -.05 ChicB&l 47.00 +.75
Avon 18.92 -.20 Chioms 14.84 -.17
BB&TCp 29.48 -.33 Chimera 3.06 +.04
BHPBilLt 77.79 +14 Chubb 68.60 -.03
BP PLC 46.99 -.28 ChungTel 29.91 -.55
BPZ Res 3.52 +.04 Cigna 45.09 +.26
BRT 6.52 -.03 Cimarex 86.41 +.01
BakrHu 51.96 -.44 CindBell 3.78
BallCorp 39.78 -.07 Cifgrp rs 32.35 .36
BcoBrades 17.90 +.03 CleanHs 69.56 -.74
BcoSantSA 8.43 -.02 CliffsNRs 67.86 +1.75
BcoSBrasil 10.52 -.02 Clorox 67.79 -.32
BkofAm 7.88 -.14 Coach 75.28 +1.30
BkMontg 58.18 -.22 CobaltlEn 30.50 +1.41
BkNYMel 21.67 -.36 CCFemsa 101.10 +.36
Barclay 15.66 +.41 CocaCola 69.00 -.18
BariPVki 25.05 +.92 CocaCE 28.71 +.10
BarrickG 48.86 -.72 Coeur 28.39 -.93
Baxter 57.64 +1.05 CohStlnfra 17.68 +.16


Name Last Chg


ACIWwde 39.89 +.57
ASML HId 46.31 +.06
ATPO&G 7.12 -.03
AVI Bio 1.01 -.03
AXT Inc 5.68 +.58
Abiomed 22.12 +.70
Abraxas 4.34 +.15
AcadaTc 41.38 +.17
Achdillion 10.72 +.22
AcmePkt 33.96 +.43
AomrdaTh 27.05 +.78
AcfvePw h .74 +.02
AcfvsBliz 12.12 -.05
AdobeSy 33.41 +.44
Adtran 37.61 -.33
AdvEnId 12.53 +.07
AEternag 1.58 -.01
Affymax 10.38 -.05
Afymetrix 4.49 +.03
Aixtron 17.12 -.23
AkamaiT 37.21 +.69
Akorn 12.72 -.10
AlaskCom 3.12 +.03
Alexions 84.63 -1.28
Alexzah .54 +.04
AlignTech 26.62 +.12
Alkermes 17.29 -.29
AllosThera 1.58 +.01
AllscriptH 19.52
AlnylamP 13.42 +.66
AlteraCp If 38.88 -.25
Amarin 8.99 +.01
Amazon 179.13 +.24
Amedisys 11.99 +.48
ACapAgy 30.66 -.03
AmCapLd 8.79 -.10
ACapMign 21.38 -.41
AmSupr 4.52
Amgen 67.73 +.39
AmkorTIf 6.31 -.12
Amylin 17.99 +.10
Amyris 6.00 +.26
Anadigc 2.69 -.02
Anlogic 58.05 -.09
Analystlnt 6.33 -.48
Ancestry 24.61 +.25
Ansys 63.83 +.75
A123Sys 1.95 -.09
ApolloGrp 52.14 -.09
Apollolnv 7.11 -.12
Apple Inc 522.41 +6.02
ApldMati 12.63 -.11
AMCC 7.01 -.08
Approach 38.32 +.55
ApricusBio 3.56 +.13
ArchCaps 37.19 +.42
ArenaPhm 1.84 +.06
AresCap 16.13 -.19
AriadP 15.06 -.14
Ariba Inc 30.64 +1.22
ArmHId 27.38 +.20
ArrayBio 2.80 +.03
Arris 11.69 -.07
ArthroCre 26.43 +.80
ArubaNet 21.70 -.17
AscenaRi 37.79 -.71
AspenTech 21.17 -.30
AsscdBanc 13.02 -.10
AstexPhm 1.96
athenahlth 70.00 +.80
AfiasAir 42.43 -2.20
Atmel 10.23 -.07
Autodesk 37.62 -.58
AutoData 53.82 +.02
Auxilium 20.19 +.71
AvagoTch 36.32 -.87
AvanirPhm 2.87 +.07
AvisBudg 13.28 +.28
Aware 4.25 +.15
Axcelis 1.70 -.07
BEAero 46.35 +.02
BGC Ptrs 6.82 +.06
BJsRest 50.27 -.50
BMCSft 39.15 +.14


ColgPal 93.30 -.03
CollctvBrd 17.38 -.22
Comerica 29.32 -.37
CmwREIT 19.07 -.38
CmtyHIt 25.11 +.42
ComstkRs 15.36 -.16
Con-Way 28.82 -.90
ConAgra 26.84 +.02
ConocPhil 75.95 +1.14
ConsolEngy 36.33 +.96
ConEd 58.84 +.88
ConstellA 21.57 +.04
ConstellEn 36.49 +.26
ContlRes 94.75 -.18
Cnvrgys 13.19 -.03
Corning 13.75 +.17
Cosan Ltd 14.62 +.65
CottCp 6.66 -.06
CoventryH 32.42 -.15
Covidien 52.88 +1.18
Crane 49.41 -.29
CSVS2xVxS 16.66 +.66
CSVeIIVSts 8.78 -.36
CredSuiss 27.74 +.43
CrwnCsfie 52.55 +.54
CubeSmart 11.57 -.24
Cummins 121.78 -.78

DCTIndl 5.67 -.04
DDRCorp 14.12 +.03
DHT HIdgs 1.24 +.03
DNPSelct 11.41 +.01
DR Horton 13.98 -.18
DSW Inc 53.69 -.37
DTE 54.85 +.04
DanaHIdg 16.35 +.15
Danaher 53.32 -.16
Darden 49.19 -.61
DeanFds 12.30 +.04
Deere 83.27 -.83
DeltaAir 9.53 -.16
DenburyR 20.91 +.19
DeutschBk 46.81 +2.04
DevonE 75.19 +.10
Dillards 58.86 +1.03
DxFnBull rs 90.53 -.47
DirSCBear 18.39 +.11
DirFnBear 25.75 +.12
DrxEnBear 8.47 -.12
DirEMBear 12.01 -.37
DirxSCBull 62.01 -.42
Discover 30.19 +.15
Disney 41.31 -.17
DomRescs 51.32 +.38
DEmmett 21.18 +.08
DowChm 33.82 -.04
DrPepSnap 38.59 -.28
DuPont 50.99 -.44
DukeEngy 21.10 +.21
DukeRlty 13.96 +.04
Dynegy 1.47 +.05
E-CDang 6.32 -.33
EMC Cp 27.52 +.27
EOG Res 117.55 +1.05
EQT Corp 54.04 -.16
EastChms 53.80 -.25
Eatonbs 51.75 -.12
EVEnEq 11.08 +.04
Ecolab 62.69 +.52
EIPasoCp 27.16 +.39
Elan 12.54 +.03
EldorGdg 15.07 +.19
Embraer 30.71 +.05
EmersonEI 50.88 -.19
EmpDist 20.80 +.04
EnbrEPts 32.65 +.13
EnCanag 19.69 -.24
Enerplsg 23.96 -.68


Baidu 134.89 +2.04 CmplGnom 4.12 -.04
BallardPw 1.63 -.05 Compuwre 8.95 +.27
Bazaarvcn 16.51 ... Comverse 6.58 +.09
BeasleyB 3.61 +.12 ConcurTch 60.05 +1.09
BebeStrs 9.06 +.04 Conmed 29.97 +.09
BedBath 60.35 -.06 Conns 14.32 +.80
Biocryst 4.31 +.10 ConstantC 30.63 +.64
BioFuelEh .79 +.13 Convio 15.74 -.01
Biogenldc 116.39 -.31 CopanoEn 37.68 +.64
BioMarin 35.00 -.25 Corcept 4.35 +.18
BioSanteh .71 -.03 CorinthC 4.89 -.07
BlackDiam 8.17 +.10 CorOnDm n 20.68 +.45
BIkRKelso 9.80 -.20 Coronadon 7.50 +.60
Blckbaud 32.94 +.45 Costom 84.40 -.37
BlueDolph 10.53 +.41 CrackerB 55.86 -.35
BobEvans 37.27 -.55 Cree nc 29.35 -.40
BreitBurn 19.41 +.10 CrimsnExp 3.22 +.18
Brightpnt 8.81 -.21 Crocs 19.41 -1.01
Broadcom 36.75 -.25 CrwnMedia 1.26
BroadSoft 36.84 -.20 Ctrip.omm 25.22 +1.18
BroadVisn 36.99 +1.21 CubistPh 43.02 +.38
Broadwd h .68 -.01 Curis 4.50 -.08
BrcdeCm 5.85 +.01 CyberDefh .06 -.02
BrooksAuto 12.07 +.06 Cyberonics 37.00 +2.68
BuffabWW 85.61 -.52 Cyclacelh .69 +.05
BldrFstSrc 3.12 +.13 Cymer 46.44 -.66
CAInc 26.93 +.01 CypSemi 17.87 +.01
CBOE 27.65 -.25 CytRxh .34 +.02
CH Robins 67.21 -.29 Cvori 3.31 +.04
CME Grp 292.39 +.60
CNinsure 8.07 +.05
CTC Media 10.21 +.48 DealrTrk 28.70 +.16
CadencePh 4.20 -.02 DeckrlsOut 77.72 -12.49
Cadence 11.81 -.09 Dell Inc 17.43 +.03
Caesars n 10.87 -.53 Dndreon 14.86 +.42
Callidus 7.77 +.84 Dennys 4.16 -.04
CdnSolar 3.86 -.16 Dentsply 38.40 +.25
CapCtyBk 8.37 -.12 DexCom 10.80 -.39
CapFedFn 11.63 -.08 DiamndFlf 24.14 +.15
CpstnTrbh 1.16 +.01 DianaCont 6.79 -.04
Cardtronic 27.94 +.13 DigitalGen 10.64 +.02
CareerEd 11.93 +.41 DigRiver 18.10 -.13
CaribouC 17.04 -.11 DirecTVA 45.61 -.02
Carrizo 27.77 -.38 DiscCmA 44.53 +.37
CarverBrs 6.10 -.90 DiscCmC 41.14 +.29
CatalystH 62.63 +1.65 DiscovLab 3.40 +.27
Cavium 35.73 +.04 DishNetwk 28.80 -.82
Celgene 74.89 -.02 DollarTree 87.82 -.24
CellTherrsh 1.28 ... DonlleyRR 14.10 +.55
CelldexTh 3.85 -.51 DrmWksA 19.45 -.08
Celsion 2.07 +.01 DryShips 3.62 +.02
CentEuro 5.75 +.22 Dunkin n 29.22 -.24
CEurMed 7.31 +.03 DurectCp .75 -.01
CentAI 10.46 -.27 Dynavax 4.04 -.04
Cepheid 41.60 -.15 E-Trade 9.66 +.17
Cerner s 73.76 +.61 eBay 36.36 +.34
CerusCp 3.58 -.03 EVEngy 70.59 +.58
ChrmSh 5.57 +.17 EagleBulk 1.88 +.04
Chartlnds 64.42 -1.79 EaglRkEn 10.96 -.44
CharterCm 63.43 -.07 ErthLink 7.47 -.03
ChkPoint 58.87 +.36 EstWstBcp 22.07 -.02
Cheesecake 29.12 -.36 Ebixlnc 23.70 -.31
ChelseaTh 3.88 +1.47 EchoThera 1.77
ChildPlace 48.58 -.02 EchoStar 30.64 -.31
ChipMOS 10.63 +1.63 EducDev 4.90
ChrchllD 54.72 -1.14 8x8 Inc 4.32
CienaCorp 15.68 +.25 ElectSd 14.68 -.28
CinnFin 35.76 -.10 ElectArts 16.93 -.26
Cintas 38.80 +.24 EmmisC h .72 -.01
Cirrus 22.87 +.61 EndoPhrm 36.30 +1.28
Cisco 20.14 -.09 Endobgix 13.01 -.02
CitrixSys 75.16 +1.38 EnrgyRec 2.30 -.12
CleanEngy 18.74 +.46 EngyXXI 38.58 -.45
Clearwire 2.11 -.16 Entegris 9.05 -.17
CobraEl 4.61 -1.18 EntropCom 6.59 -.05
Codexis 3.98 ... Equinix 138.79 +2.24
CogentC 17.45 -.32 EricsnTel 10.27 +.20
CognizTech 72.18 +1.58 ExactScih 9.32 +.13
CogoGrp 2.16 -.02 Exelids 5.77 +.01
Coinstar 60.14 +1.36 EddeTc 3.07 -.02
ColdwtrCrk 1.09 -.03 ExdSvcHId 26.48 -.04
ColumLabs .73 -.06 Expedias 32.97 -.28
ColSprtw 50.64 +1.12 Expdlni 43.34 -.49
Comcast 29.19 -.62 ExpScripts 52.41 -.20
Comcspcl 28.31 -.57 ExtrmNet 3.62 +.07
CmcBMO 39.09 -.27 EZchip 40.49 +.23
CommSys 15.06 +.35 F5Netwks 127.48 -1.22
CommVIt 52.25 -2.15 FBR&Co 2.52 +.04


EnPro 38.04
ENSCO 59.40
Entergy 67.14
EntPrPt 51.85
EqtyRsd 58.06
EsteeLdrs 56.84
ExomRes 7.29
Exelon 39.27
ExterranH 14.41
ExxonMbl 87.34
FMC Tch s 52.27
FTI Cnslt 41.35


FedExCp 90.24 -1.73
FedSignl 4.77 +.19
Fedlnvst 20.05 -.57
Ferrellgs 18.90 +.64
Ferro 6.90 +.06
FibriaCelu 9.12 -.36
RdlNRn 17.60 +.10
FidNatlnf 31.07 -.04
FstHorizon 9.38 -.10
FTActDiv 8.77 +.04
FtTrEnEq 12.12 +.08
FirstEgy 44.07 +.07
Rotek 11.46 +.30
Huor 63.40 -.59
FootLockr 28.52 -.20
FordM 12.23 -.17
ForestOils 13.33 -.03
FranceTel 15.87 +.31
FMCG 43.91 +.13
Fronfline 5.54 +.28
Fusion-io n 28.23 +.63

GATX 43.12 -.05
GMXRs 2.16 +.26
GabelliET 5.76 +.04
GabHlthW 7.83 -.02
GabUDI 7.97 +.16
GafisaSA 6.04 +.05
GameStbp 22.73 -.56
Gannett 15.21 -.21
Gap 22.57 -.95


FLIRSys 26.07 +.23
FX Ener 6.65 -.06
Fastenals 51.97 +.04
FifthStRn 10.06 -.01
FifthThird 13.60 -.21
51job 50.64 +5.42
FindEngin 23.65 -1.29
Fndlnst 17.23 -.51
Finisar 22.76 -.12
FinLine 23.36 -.30
FstCashFn 43.20 +.33
FMidBc 11.52 -.13
FstNiagara 9.59 -.09
FstSolar 35.58 -1.62
FstMerit 16.12 -.18
Fiserv 66.87 +1.03
Flextn 7.17 -.04
FocusMda 23.86 -.39
ForcePro 5.55
FormFac 5.16 +.02
Forfnets 26.99 +.74
Fossil Inc 121.78 +3.00
FosterWhl 25.67 +.28
FreightCar 27.32 -.50
FriendFdn 2.01 -.12
FronferCm 4.64 +.07
FuelSysSol 27.47 -.68
FuelCell 1.60 -.02
FultonFncl 9.59 -.10
[^e]HBIE^


GencoShip 7.00 -.10
GenDynam 72.40 +1.80
GenElec 19.24 -.07
GenGrPrp 16.73 +.09
GenMills 38.15 -.48
GenMobtrs 26.07 -.72
GenOn En 2.48 +.03
Genworth 9.14 -.20
Gerdau 10.44 +.10
GlaxoSKIn 44.63 -.06
GolLinhas 8.43 -.07
GoldFLtd 15.88 -.03


Goldcrpg 48.62 -.86
GoldmanS 115.87 +.07
Goodrich 125.88
GoodrPet 16.29
Goodyear 13.11 -.12
GrafTech 12.80 -.45
GtPlainEn 20.81 +.09
Griffon 10.75 -.59
GpTelevisa 20.77 +.14
GuangRy 19.58 +.07
Guess 34.07 -.31
HCA HId n 26.74 +.67
HCP Inc 39.08 -.54
HSBC 45.60 +.26
HSBC Cap 26.40 +.02
Hallibrth 38.51 +.30
HanJS 15.65 +.05
HanPrmDv 14.02 -.10
Hanesbrds 28.30 +.44
Hanoverlns 40.75 -.14
HarleyD 47.04 -.18
HarmonyG 13.31 +.22
Harsco 22.57 -.59
HartfdFn 20.48 -.12
HawaiiEl 25.38 +.04
HItCrREIT 54.30 -.08
HItMgmt 7.30 +.23
HlthcrRlty 20.81 -.02
HIthSouth 20.98 +.72
Heckmann 5.21 -.06
HeclaM 5.43 -.03
Heinz 53.43 -.33


IdenixPh 12.51 +.22
Illumina 51.22 -.07
ImunoGn 13.98 +.17
ImpaxLabs 23.49 +.09
ImperlSgr 6.41 +.43
Incyte 16.94 -.25
Infinera 8.18 +.01
Informant 49.52 +.24
Infosys 59.63 -.02
InnerWkgs 11.40 -.30
InsightEnt 21.89 -.10
Insulet 20.48 +.46
IntegLfSci 31.38 +.13
IntgDv 6.75 -.06
Intel 26.70 +.04
InteractBrk 15.93 -.13
InterDig 40.31 -.35
Intrface 12.41 -.24
InterMune 14.00 -.15
InterNAP 7.77 +.31
InfiSpdw 25.80 -.17
Intersil 11.22 -.15
Intuit 58.06 -.62
IronwdPh 14.69 -.06
Isis 8.92 +.19
IstaPh 8.30 -.10
Itron 44.68 -.52
IvanhoeEn .88 -.01
PB[34HI


JA Solar 1.86 -.08
GSVCapn 16.05 +.09 JDASoft 26.73 -.47
GTAdvTc 9.02 -.25 JDS Uniph 14.03 -.13
GTxInc 3.43 -.08 JackHenry 33.62 -.17
GalenaBh 1.07 +.02 JacklnBox 23.38 +.35
Garmin 48.05 -.24 Jamba 2.02 -.03
Gentex 26.48 +.35 JamesRiv 6.30 -.17
Genfivah 8.02 +.12 JazzPhrm 50.81 +2.24
Geores 34.04 -.10 JetBlue 4.81 -.22
GeronCp 2.02 -.05 JiveSoftn 20.58 +.21
GileadSd 45.26 +.11 JosABank 50.60 -1.51
GIbSpcMet 14.84 -.15 KITDigit 11.31 +.09
GluMobile 4.11 +.08 KLATnc 47.75 -.80
GolLNGLtd 44.81 +.32 KeryxBio 3.16 +.01
Google 609.90 +3.79 Kulicke 11.24 +.09
GrCanyEd 18.51 +.68 LKQCorp 32.37 -.23
GrWfRes 4.30 +.25 LSI IndIf 7.19 -.22
GreenMtC 66.18 -1.44 LTX-Cred 7.15 +.13
GrifolsSAn 6.95 +.15 LamResrch 40.56 +.06
Grouponn 19.50 +.11 LamarAdv 32.21 -.60
GrpoRn 7.12 -.59 Landstar 53.00 -.11
GulfportE 36.57 -.09 Lattice 6.57 -.06
HMN Fn 1.89 -.06 LeapWirlss 10.67 -.13
HMS Hid s 33.50 +.20 LedPhrm 1.82 +.03
HSN Inc 37.99 +1.05 LibGlobA 49.25 +.76
HainCel 40.66 -.28 LibGlobC 47.03 +.94
HalomnRrs 11.15 +.08 LibCapA 88.28 +.54
Halozyme 11.66 +.01 LibtylntA 18.39
HancHId 33.64 -.45 LifeTech 47.69 +.14
HansenMed 3.47 -.12 LifePtH 39.52 +.29
HanwhaSol 1.70 -.07 LimelghtN 3.94 -.04
Harmonic 6.18 -.21 Lincare 27.00 +.11
Hasbro 34.86 -.24 LincElecs 46.71 +.33
HawHold 5.33 -.15 LinearTch 33.34 -.14
HIthCSvc 20.07 -.36 LinnEngy 37.49 -.06
HIthStrm 22.11 +.73 Liquidity 44.11 +.76
HSchein 74.74 +.61 LivePrsn 15.26 +.32
HercOffsh 5.38 +.23 LodgeNet 3.54 -.18
HimaxTch 1.48 -.02 Logitech 8.89 +.21
Hollysys 11.14 +.48 LookSmart 1.43 +.02
Hologic 21.33 +.26 LoopNet 18.30 +.07
HomeAw n 25.29 +1.28 Lulkin 85.09 -.30
HorsehdH 11.60 +.11 lululens 6659 -11
HotTopic 8.40 +.21
HudsCity 6.89 -.04
HumGen 8.47 +.01 MDCPrg 13.74 +.47
HuntJB 50.80 +.38 MELASci 4.61 -.18
HuntBnk 5.91 -.10 MGE 46.10 -.22
IAC Inter 45.19 -.34 MIPSTech 6.14 +.12
IdexxLabs 87.99 -.11 MTRGam 3.10 +.31
II-VI s 23.71 +.24 MTS 49.70 -.09
IPG Photon 56.50 +.44 MSG 32.18 -.66
iPass 2.21 +.04 MagicSft 6.71 -.04
iRobot 25.69 -.49 Majesom 2.56 -.03
iShACWI 46.72 +.23 MAKOSrg 37.66 +1.23
iShsSOX 57.56 -.18 ManTech 34.71 -.13
iShNsdqBio 119.46 +.14 MannKd 2.23
IconixBr 18.57 +.06 MktAxess 33.07 -.39


Hershey 61.11 +.39
Hertz 14.55 +.02
Hess 67.00 +.62
HewlettP 26.64 -.41
HighwdPrp 32.20 -.19
HollyFrts 33.89 -1.31
HomeDp 46.98 +.03
HomexDev 20.20 -.73
HonwIlln 59.27 +.27
Hornbeck 43.00 +.90
Hospira 36.16 -.20
HospPT 25.35 +.11


HostHofis 15.98 -.15
HovnanE 2.83 -.06
Humana 89.00 +1.22
Huntsmn 13.74 +.20
Hyperdyn 1.21 +.03
IAMGIdg 15.90 -1.55
ICICI Bk 37.60 +.09
ING 8.89 -.01
ON Geoph 7.55 +.17
iShGold 17.28 -.07
iSAsfia 23.76 +.04
iShBraz 69.30 +.62
iShGer 23.19 +.26
iSh HK 18.01 +.11
iShJapn 10.07 +.02
iSh Kor 59.24 +.72
iShMex 59.63 -.35
iShSing 12.80 -.05
iSTaiwn 13.35 +.04
iShSilver 34.37 -.03
iShChina25 40.16 +.02
iShDJTr 91.65 -.56
iSSP500 137.37 +.23
iShBAgB 110.60 +.03
iShEMkts 44.19 +.44
iShiBxB 116.79 +.09
iShB20T 117.50 +.76
iShBl-3T 84.38 -.02
iS Eafe 55.15 +.33
iShiBxHYB 91.81 +.28
iSR1KG 64.24 +.22
iSR2KV 72.52 -.27


iShR2K 82.64
iShREst 60.75
iStar 6.97
ITTCps 23.37
Idacorp 41.05
ITW 55.92
Imafon 6.31
ImaxCorp 25.15
IngerRd 40.48
IntegrysE 54.41
IntcnfiEx 139.74
IntCoHD 22.17


IBM 197.76 +.15
InfiGame 15.25 +.14
IntPap 32.92 -.04
Interpublic 11.62 +.71
Invesco 24.88 -.07
InvMtgCap 16.97 -.33
IronMtn 31.44 +1.19
ItauUnibH 21.12 +.04


JPMorgCh 38.28 -.21
JPMAlerian 41.67 +.38
Jabil 26.01 +.02
JacobsEng 47.19 -.42
JanusCap 8.84 +.04
Jarden 35.34 +.07
Jefferies 15.83 +.21
JohnJn 64.46 -.07
JohnsnCf 33.19 -.28
JoyGIbl 90.65 -.83
JnprNtwk 23.72 +.21
KBHome 11.44 -.31
KBR Inc 36.56 +.45
KCSouthn 69.24 +1.24
Kaydon 37.99 +2.50
KA EngTR 28.44 +.43
Kelbgg 52.75 -.35
KenCole 15.49 +2.42
KeyEngy 17.82 +.32
Keycorp 8.06 +.03
KimbClk 71.81 -.09


MarvelT 15.46 -.60 PSSWrld 24.53 +.08
Masimo 22.83 +.34 Paccar 45.84 -.05
Mattel 32.16 -.15 PacEthrs 1.39 +.30
Maximlntig 28.37 +.16 PacSunwr 2.31 +.17
MaxwIlT 18.70 +.15 PanASlv 25.60 -.25
MedAssets 14.10 +.50 PaneraBrd 152.24 +.05
MedicAcIn 5.58 -.03 ParamTch 26.58 -.06
MediCo 22.04 -.13 Patterson 32.14 -.05
Medidata 19.77 +.51 PattUTI 20.30 +.18
Medivafton 65.01 -.34 Paychex 31.42 +.10
MeloCrwn 12.45 +.03 PnnNGm 42.60 +.40
Mellanox 38.76 +.80 PennantPk 11.05 -.15
MentorGr 14.85 -.04 PeopUtdF 12.46 -.07
MercadoL 98.72 +1.72 PeregrineP .95 +.00
Mercerlnfi 8.49 +.41 PerfectWd 12.41 +.09
MergeHIth 6.70 +.26 Perrigo 96.24 +.24
MeritMed s 12.46 -.89 PetSmart 54.78 +.97
MeruNetw 5.00 +.32 PetroDev 35.73 -.34
Micrel 10.92 -.11 Pharmacyc 24.65 -.54
Microchp 36.37 +.05 PhotrIn 7.39 +.16
Micromet 10.97 ... Polyomms 21.14 -.20
MicronT 7.95 +.13 Popular 1.76 +.01
MicrosSys 52.34 +.56 Power-One 4.67 -.07
MicroSemi 21.22 -.24 PwShs QQQ 63.96 +.22
Microsoft 31.48 +.11 Powrwvrs 1.38 -.05
Micrvisn rs 3.92 +.05 Presstek h .56 -.07
Misonix 2.01 -.03 PriceTR 61.03 -.46
Mitcham 26.09 +.42 priceline 590.41 +3.01
MitekSys 11.78 +.93 PrinctnRh .12 -.01
Momenta 15.71 -.09 PrUPShQQQ 12.91 -.14
MonPwSys 19.00 +.45 PrUItPQQQs101.46 +.98
MonroMuf 46.35 -.79 PrognicsPh 10.05 +.03
MonstrBvs 56.38 +1.51 ProspctCap 10.99 +.02
Motricity 1.52 +.02 PureCycle 2.21 -.04
Mylan 23.48 -.21 QIAGEN 16.02 +.16
MyriadG 23.87 -.10 QlikTech 30.82 +.82
NETgear 39.44 -.04 Qlogic 17.40 +.01
NIl HIdg 20.25 -.96 Qualomm 63.44 -.07
NPS Phm 6.85 +.17 QualityS s 44.00 -.60
NXP Semi 24.98 +.43 QuantFuel .99 -.04
NasdOMX 26.69 +.43 QuestSft 20.55 +.01
NatCineM 14.53 -.08 Questomr 38.90 +1.44
NatPenn 8.64 -.17 QuickLog 2.73 +.02
NektarTh 6.98 +.11 RFMicD 4.92 -.02
NetApp 43.08 -.20 ROIAcqun 10.01
Netease 49.99 +1.21 Rambus 7.52 -.10
Netfiix 111.67 -1.32 Randgold 115.73 -1.15
Netlist 3.28 -.14 RaptorPhm 7.32 -.03
NetSolTh .55 -.00 RealPage 20.30 -.08
Neurcrine 8.12 -.03 RedRobin 34.36 -.31
Newport 17.61 -.03 Regenrn 103.22 -.10
NewsCpA 19.56 -.09 RentACt 36.35 +.80
NewsCpB 20.17 -.07 RschMotn 14.72 +.05
NobltyHIf 7.35 -.08 Respnsysn 12.21 +.22
Nordsons 54.46 +3.64 RetailOpp 11.87 +.08
NorTrst 43.86 -.02 RexEnergy 11.66 -.08
Novlus 45.24 +.01 RigelPh 10.19 -.04
NuVasive 15.30 +.28 RiverbedT 27.82 -.31
NuanceCm 25.08 -.31 RosettaR 52.78 +.77
NutriSyst 11.61 +.13 RossStrss 52.79 +.10
Nvidia 15.79 -.12 RoviCorp 35.62 +1.25
NxStageMd 21.44 +.64 RoyGId 71.59 -.34
OCZTech 8.67 +.18 RoyaleEn 6.05 +.73
OReillyAu 85.67 -.73 RubiomnTc 9.84 -2.33
Oclaro 4.73 -.09 rue21 26.67 -.39
OdysMar 3.15 -.13
OldDomFrt 44.28 +.03
Omnicell 15.69 +.29 SBA Com 46.84 -.12
OmniVisn 17.13 +1.05
OnAssign 14.00 +.07 SEI Inv 19.76 +.07
OnSmcnd 8.96 -.16 SLMCp 16.19 -.17
Onomthyr 8.79 -.17 SS&CTech 19.68 +.22
OnyxPh 38.52 +.68 STEC 9.61 -.24
OpenTxt 61.72 +.33 SVB FnGp 60.85 +.30
OpenTable 48.89 +1.04 SXC HIth 70.99 +3.63
OpnwvSy 2.61 +.18 SalixPhm 46.11 -.34
Opnext 1.12 -.03 SanDisk 49.14 +.29
Oracle 29.25 +.44 SangBio 5.52 -.07
Orexigen 3.76 +.10 Sanmina 12.15 -.11
Orthfx 41.68 -.38 Santarus 5.03 +.02
OtterTail 21.81 -.09 Sapient 12.86 +.13
Overs 6.68 -.05 Satcon h .54 -.03
SavientPh 2.12 -.02
Schnitzer 46.85 +.38
PDFSol 7.70 +.91 SdGames 12.09 -.03
PDLBio 6.45 +.05 SdQuest 15.41 +.93
PFChng 37.77 ... SeagateT 27.49 +.38
PMC Sra 6.94 -.03 SearsHIdgs 68.31 +6.51


Kimco 18.70 -.03 MobileTele 18.37 +.40 PepcoHold 19.84 -.05 RegalEnt 13.63 +.17
KindME 90.60 +.79 Mohawk 62.41 -1.60 PepsiCo 63.31 +.18 RegionsFn 5.80 -.11
KindMorg 33.24 +.92 MolinaHs 34.71 +1.20 PerkElm 27.24 +.59 Renren n 5.24 +.05
KindredHIt 10.69 -1.80 Molyomrp 26.81 -2.28 Prmian 22.52 +.08 Revlon 15.59 -.16
Kinrossg 11.19 -.22 MoneyGrs 18.30 +.12 PetrbrsA 28.45 +.46 ReynAmer 41.28 +.63
KodiakOg 10.75 +.26 Monsanto 79.52 +1.74 Petrobras 30.08 +.47 RioTnto 58.29 +.22
Kohls 49.44 +.33 MonstrWw 6.81 -.09 Pfizer 21.18 +.15 RiteAid 1.54 -.07
Kraft 37.88 -.10 Moodys 38.88 -.27 PhilipMor 83.02 +.85 RockwAut 82.67 +1.03
KrispKrm 8.40 -.24 MorgStan 18.49 -.48 PhilipsEl 21.26 +.11 RockColl 59.88 +.48
Kroger 23.54 +.56 MSEmMkt 14.76 +.14 PiedNG 33.37 -.39 Rowan 38.78 +.31
LDK Solar 5.93 -.04 Mosaic 58.68 -.26 PimoStrat 11.72 -.03 RylCarb 28.49 -.58
LG Display 12.98 +.26 MotrlaSolu 49.43 -.10 PinWst 47.51 +.03 RoyDShllA 73.54 -.17
LSICorp 8.50 -.05 MotrlaMob 39.73 ... PioNtrl 116.24 +1.54 Royce 14.28 -.01
LTC Prp 30.81 -.44 MurphO 64.76 +.64 PitnyBw 18.00 +.20 Royce pfB 25.65 +.03
LaZBoy 14.46 -.30 NCRCorp 21.75 +.29 PlainsEx 46.50 +1.01 Rand 18.11 -.58
Ladede 41.86 -.35 NRG Egy 17.85 +.11 PlumCrk 39.05 +.13
LVSands 53.35 +.02 NV Energy 15.98 -.04 Polaris s 66.81 -.71
LearCorps 46.81 +1.07 NYSEEur 30.84 +.47 Polypore 39.52 +.91 SAIC 12.60 -.16
LeggMason 26.94 -.06 Nabors 22.31 +.31 PostPrp 44.86 +.66 SAPAG 67.77 +1.13
LeggPlat 22.59 +.30 NatFuGas 50.31 +.43 Potash s 46.53 -.20 SCANA 45.35 +.17
LennarA 22.38 -.28 NatGrid 51.31 +.42 PwshDB 29.68 +.18 SKTIcm 13.98 +.06
Level3 rs 23.58 +.07 NOilVarco 86.04 -.19 PSUSDBull 21.81 -.09 SM Energy 83.29 .06
LexRItyTr 8.78 +.29 Navistar 43.31 -.28 Praxair 109.89 -.16 SpdrDJlA 129.62 +.04
LbtyASG 4.24 +.05 NewAmHi 10.67 +.10 Prestge 16.63 +.13 SpdrGold 172.23 -.79
LillyEli 39.05 +.26 NJRscs 47.71 -.06 PrinFnd 27.85 -.04 SPMid 179.21 +.05
Limited 46.26 +.25 NYCmtyB 12.88 +08 ProLogis 33.88 +.22 S&P500ETF136.93 +.30
LincNat 25.08 -.10 NewellRub 18.38 -.13 ProShtS&P 37.00 -.06 SpdrHome 19.65 -.29
Lindsay 64.21 -.94 NewfidExp 36.60 -.36 PrUShS&P 16.17 -.04 SpdrS&PBk 22.07 -.09
Linkedlnn 90.73 -.73 NewmtM 62.51 -1.29 PrUIShDow 13.38 +.01 SpdrLehHY 39.96 +.04
LionsGtg 13.91 +1.01 NewpkRes 8.11 +.04 ProUltQQQ 106.52 +.70 SpdrS&P RB 26.90 -.20
LiveNatn 10.00 -.50 Nexeng 21.16 +.26 PrUShQQQ rs34.11 -.24 SpdrRefi 58.37 -.18
LloydBkg 2.22 -.05 NextEraEn 60.77 +.56 ProUltSP 54.98 +.24 SpdrOGEx 61.34 +.20
LockhdM 89.53 +1.24 NiSource 23.68 +.12 ProUShL20 18.92 -.24 SpdrMetM 53.92 +.05
Lorillard 130.01 +1.13 NikeB 106.29 +.15 ProUSSP50010.06 -.07 STMicro 7.28 +.10
LaPac 7.90 +.22 NobleCorp 38.94 .07 PrUltSP500 s77.53 +.39 Safeway 20.93 -.02
Lowes 27.16 +.10 NokiaCp 5.80 +.26 PrUltVixST 5.73 +.37 StJoe 16.10 +.10
L BA 4415 +96 Nordstrm 53.17 -.08 ProUSSIvrs 9.18 ... Sude 43.23 +.70
NorflkSo 70.03 +.72 PrUltCrders 49.26 +1.47 Saks 11.84 +.43
NoT estUt 35.86 +.12 PrUShCrders31.24 -1.04 Salesforce 143.64 +11.87
M&TBk 81.77 -.34 NorthropG 59.92 +30 ProUltSlvs 66.51 -.16 SJuanB 18.95 +.19
MBIA 11.21 -.39 Novaris 57.51 -.13 ProUShEuro 18.68 -.25 SandRdge 8.81 +.57
MDU Res 22.03 +.17 NSTAR 46.82 +.02 ProctGam 66.71 +.29 Sanofi 37.83 +.08
MEMC 4.18 -.12 Nucor 43.86 +.23 ProgrssEn 53.69 +.51 SaraLee 20.27 -.03
MFAFnd 7.35 -.04 NuvMuOpp 14.95 +15 PrgsvCp 21.43 -.12 Sdlmbrg 79.85 +.26
MCR 9.68 +01 NvMulSI&G 8.88 +.06 ProUSR2Krs 30.32 +.14 Sdcwab 13.52 +.31
MGIC 468 .01 NuvQPf2 8.72 +01 ProtoLab n 29.00 ... SeadrillLtd 40.88 +.50
MG uR 8 Prudently 61.09 -.15 SealAir 19.83 -.10
MGM Rsts 14.00 -.27 OGE Engy 53.45 +.92 5 A
Macquarie 29.78 -.28 OasisPet 34.82 +.34 PSEG 30.43 -.07 Sensient 37.72 -.14
Macys 37.06 +.07 OcciPet 103.86 -.81 PubSrg 137.12 -1.27 ServceCp 11.19 -.04
MageMPtr 72.88 +.53 OcwenFn 15.49 19 PulteGrp 8.49 -.24 SiderurNac 10.34 +.02
M nalgs 47.33 +2.08 OficeDpt 2.94 -17 PPrlT 5.54 +.04 SilvWhthng 38.75 -.39
MagnalHRes 7.53 +2.03 OfficeMpt 2.94 -.17 QEPRes 34.32 +.29 SilvrcpMg 7.55 -.24
Manitowoc 16.13 OldRepub 10.68 +.18 Qihoo360n 19.72 +1.40 SimonProp 136.66 +.89
Ma 12.48 .01 OlidRepubn 21.39 .1 QuanexBld 17.74 -.80 Skechers 12.69 +.07
Maulifeg 12.48 -.0 Oin 21.39 -.14 QuantaSvc 21.07 -.21 SmithAO 45.81 -.68
MarathnOs 35.01 +.17 OmegaHIt 21.03 .45 Questar 19.85 +.07 Smuder 74.74 +1.00
MarathPn 42.6 -.83 Omncre 34.75 +.57 QksilvRes 6.08 -.11 Soluna 27.99 -.09
MtVGold 56.46 -.80 Omnicom 48.61 -.18 RPC 16.46 +.12 SonyCp 21.73 +.54
MVOilSvs 44.69 +03 ONEOK 83.87 .29 RPM 24.93 -.34 SoJernd 54.33 -.29
MtVRus 33.13 +1.32 OneokPts 61.02 +.74 RadianGrp 3.62 -.14 SouthnCo 44.54 +.30
MktVJrGId 29.41 -.16 OpkoHlth 4.79 -.11 RadioShk 7.18 -.06 SthnCopper 33.19 -.14
MarlntA 3473 +43 OrientEH 10.05 +1.12 Reorp 74.66 +.08 SwstAirl 8.68 -.19
MarshM 31.77 -.23 OshkoshCp 24.46 -.02 RaongeRs 65.94 -.13 SwstnErgy 35.21 -.19
MStewrt 4.41 -.04 OwensCorn 30.90 -.50 RamesFn 35.38 -.03 SpecsaEn 31.73 +.17
Maso 11.57 -.36 Owenslll 24.50 +.27 Rayonier s 44.58 +.02 SprintNex 2.47 -.05
Masterd 415.61 +9.51 Raytheon 50.78 +.42 SPMats 37.55 -.02
McDnlds 100.32 -.49 PG&E Cp 41.75 +.09 Rltylnmo 37.19 +.25 SPHIthC 36.19 +18
Mc.,wD M6 .03 0 PN&C 59.38 -''0 RedHat 50.01 +1.11 SP CnSt 33.06 +.11


McKesson 82.00 +.90
McMoRn 14.50 +.44
Mechel 11.42 +.75
MedoHlIth 64.14 +.09
Medtrnic 38.12 +.24
Merck 38.20 -.31
MetLife 37.76 -.45
MetroPCS 12.01 +.31
MetroHIth 8.71 -.17
MidAApt 63.13 +.18
Mdas 9.40 -.03


PNMRes 18.10
PPG 91.67
PPL Corp 28.85
PallCorp 63.41
PatriotCoal 8.10
PeabdyE 36.33
Pengrthg 9.91
PennVa 4.88
PennVaRs 25.03
Penney 41.72
PepBoy 15.07


IA EIA N 5 XCANE1


Name Last Chg


AbdAsPac 7.61 +.07
AbdnEMTel 18.82 +.13
AdmRsc 41.18 +1.07
Adventrx .67 -.05
AlexomRg 8.06 -.04
AlldNevG 35.34 +.50
AlmadnMg 2.87 -.04
AntaresP 2.68 -.02
Augustag 3.01 -.06
Aurizong 5.49 -.03
AvalnRare 2.92 -.09
Bacterin 3.07 -.08


Banrog 5.65 +.32 ComstkMn 1.99 +.01
BarcUBS36 44.63 +.22 CrSuiHiY 3.14
BarcGSOil 27.89 +.47 Crosshr .69 -.00
BrclndiaTR 60.63 -.17
BrgusGg .95 -.00 DourEg .50 +.06
BritATob 99.89 +1.17 D oEg 5 00
CAMACEn .88 DenisnM g 1.94 -.01
CardiumTh .28 -.00 EVMuniBd 13.17 +.07
CelSd .37 -.00 EVMuni2 14.38 +.14
CFCdag 23.74 +.03 ElephTalk 2.28 +.18
CheniereEn 14.05 +10 EllieMaen 8.98 +1.05
CheniereE 20.90 +.10 EllswthFd 7.32 -.08
ChinNEPet 3.42 +.08 eMagin 3.56 -.26
ClaudeRg 1.34 -.03 EntGaming .29
ClghGlbOp 11.63 +.03 EvolPetrol 9.97 +.03


ExeterRgs 3.57 -.11
FrkStPrp 10.44 -.05
FullHseR 3.15 +.32

GamGldNR 16.59 +.04
GascoEngy .25 +.01
Gastargrs 3.19 +.04
GenMoly 3.77 -.08
GeoGloblR .25 +.02
GoldStg 2.10 -.05
GranTrrag 5.79 -.05
GrtBasGg .96 +.02
GtPanSilvg 2.66 -.04
GreenHntr 2.84 -.05
Hemisphrx .31 -.01


HstnAEn 11.82 -.15
ImpOilgs 48.83 -.08
InovioPhm .59 -.00


KeeganRg 5.26 +.01
LadThalFn 2.02 -.03
LkShrGld g 1.61 -.06
LongweiPI 1.57 -.10


MadCatzg .58 -.03
Metalico 4.93 +.33
MdwGoldg 1.88 -.04


MinoGg .90 ... PbnDrill 10.06 +.31 SprottRLg 1.50
Minefndg 15.79 -.20 PlatGpMet 1.46 +.05 SynthBiol 2.32
NavideaBio 3.22 -.08 Protalix 5.50 +.02 TanzRyg 4.14
NeoStem .62 -.01 PyramidOil 6.23 +.11 Taseko 4.20
NBRESec 4.11 -.01 Quaterrag .59 -.01 TasmanMg 2.59
Nevsung 4.27 ... Quepasa 4.18 +01 Tengsco 1.15
NewConcEn 3.70 +1.02 QuestRMg 2.85 -.10 TrnsafiPet 1.57
NwGoldg 11.84 -.12 RareEleg 6.18 -.12 TravelCts 5.42
NAPallg 2.83 -.12 Rentech 1.83 +.03 TriVailey .20
NthnO&G 25.59 +.78 Richmntg 11.89 -.28 TriangPet 7.99
NovaGld g 8.69 -.14 Rubon 77 04 US Geoth .54
S 250 08Uluru s .56
SamsO&G 3.01 +.02 Ur-Energy 1.24
ParaG&S 2.62 -.09 SeabGldg 24.98 -.27 Uranerz 2.60
PhrmAth 1.58 -.05 SilverBull .58 -.01 UraniumEn 4.06


VantageDrl 1.40
VirnetX 23.62 +.04
VistaGold 3.75 -.17
VoyagerOG 3.40 -.07
Vringo 1.30 +.08
WFAdvlnco 10.46 -.05
WTDrfChn 25.43 +.02
WTDrfBz 21.41 -.02
YM Biog 2.00 -.05


The remainder of the

NYSE listings can be

found on the next page.





Yesterday Pvs Day
Argent 4.3540 4.3535
Australia .9348 .9360
Bahrain .3770 .3770
Brazil 1.7108 1.7105
Britain 1.5889 1.5716
Canada 1.0002 .9988
Chile 479.78 481.10
China 6.2978 6.3004
Colombia 1772.00 1777.50
Czech Rep 18.58 18.80
Denmark 5.5250 5.5755
Dominican Rep 38.97 39.00
Egypt 6.0388 6.0355
Euro .7430 .7498
Hong Kong 7.7543 7.7555
Hungary 216.31 217.24
India 48.975 49.215
Indnsia 9103.00 9045.00
Israel 3.7670 3.7567
Japan 80.98 80.08
Jordan .7105 .7095
Lebanon 1503.00 1504.00
Malaysia 3.0125 3.0150
Mexico 12.9083 12.8481
N. Zealand 1.1957 1.1993
Norway 5.5723 5.6305
Peru 2.680 2.681
Poland 3.09 3.13
Russia 29.1566 29.6225
Singapore 1.2549 1.2563
So. Africa 7.5985 7.6665
So. Korea 1125.90 1129.10
Sweden 6.5534 6.6331
Switzerlnd .8950 .9041
Taiwan 29.58 29.62
Thailand 30.33 30.30
Turkey 1.7669 1.7604
U.A.E. 3.6732 3.6731
Uruguay 19.3899 19.3995
Venzuel 4.2949 4.2927


British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.



Yesterday Pvs Day

Prime Rate 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate 0.75 0.75
Federal Funds Rate .00-.25 .00-.25
Treasuries
3-month 0.09 0.077
6-month 0.14 0.12
5-year 0.89 0.86
10-year 1.98 2.00
30-year 3.10 3.15



FUTURES
Exch Contract Settle Chg
Lt Sweet Crude NYMX Apr 12 109.77 +1.94
Corn CBOT May12 644 +11/2
Wheat CBOT May 12 6411/4 +1/4
Soybeans CBOT May12 12863/4 +314
Cattle CME Apr 12 129.50 -.17
Sugar (world) ICE May12 25.22 +.36
Orange Juice ICE May12 184.00 +.20


SPOT
Yesterday Pvs Day
Gold (troy oz., spot) $1775.10 $1724.60
Silver (troy oz., spot) $3b.332 $33.2UU
Copper (pound) $3.862b $3./04b
Platinum (troy oz., spot)$/15b.10 $1633.90

NMER= NewYork Mercantile Exchange. CBOT=
Chicago Board of Trade. CMER = Chicago Mercantile Ex-
change. NCSE = New York Cotton, Sugar & Cocoa Ex-
change. NCTN = New York Cotton Exchange.


SeattGen 17.57 -.48
SelCmfrt 28.64 -.35
Selectvlns 17.91 -.09
Semtech 29.02 -.22
Senomyx 3.76 +.42
Sequenom 4.49 -.18
SvcSourcn 16.34 +.04
SvArtsrsh .26 -.01
ShandaG s 4.34 -.28
Shire 105.43 +.43
ShoreTe 5.45 -.02
Shutterfly 26.09 -.27
SifyTech 3.88 -.07
SigmaDsg 5.59 -.27
SigmaAld 72.60 +.20
SignatBk 59.88 +.53
SilicGrln 9.56 +.03
Silicnlmg 5.35 -.05
SilcnLab 45.80 -.83
SilicnMotn 18.33
Slcnware 5.67 +.02
SilvStdg 16.74 -.43
Sina 61.41 -.94
Sindair 11.98 -.06
SiriusXM 2.20 +.10
SironaDent 49.09 +1.85
Skullcdyn 14.85 +.16
SkywksSol 25.86 +.30
SmartBal 6.73 -.17
SmithWes 5.47 +.13
SmithMicro 2.75 +.10
SodaStrm 44.46 +2.67
Sohu.cm 48.92 +.14
Solazymen 12.52 -.34
SonicCorp 7.69 -.27
Sonus 2.84 -.04
SouMoBc 22.58 +.08
Sourcefire 44.62 -1.10
SpanBrdrs 5.40 +.12
SpectPh 14.25 +.54
SpiritAirn 18.65 -.44
Spreadtrm 16.30 -.21
Stamps.cm 26.13 -.60
Staples 15.28 -.08
StarBulk .97 -.03
StarSdent 4.01 +.04
Starbucks 48.30 -.16
SiDynam 14.78 +.06
StemCefl rs 1.06 +.02
Stericyde 89.23 -.04
SMadden s 42.78 +.07
SunHIth 4.28 -.12
SunPower 7.72 -.20
SupcndTch .98
SusqBnc 9.30 -.16
SwisherHy 3.24 -.18
Symantec 17.88 -.03
Symetricm 6.19 -.08
Synapfcs 38.61 +.21
Synopsys 30.69 +.18
Syntrolmh 1.25 -.11
TDAmeritr 17.93 +.10
THQh .60 -.00
tw teleom 21.66 +.03
TakeTwo 15.57 +.01
TaleoA 45.69
Tangoen 19.67 +.77
Targacept 6.71 -.06
TASER 4.17 -.04
TechData 57.26 +.99
Telikh .14 -.01
Tellabs 3.99 -.02
TescoCp 15.76 +1.35
TeslaMot 33.75 -.78
TesseraTch 16.37 -.58
TetraTc 24.89 -.15
TevaPhrm 44.59 +.06
TxCapBsh 32.80 -.95
Texlnst 33.32
TexRdhse 16.82 -.47
Theravnce 18.27 -.02
ThrshdPhm 6.08 +.17
TibcoSft 28.88 +.56
TibetPhrm .72 -.05
TiVo Inc 11.61 -.39
Tornier 24.54 +1.91
TowerSm h .78 +.01
Towerstm 2.82 +.06


TractSupp 84.33 -.54
Tranzymen 5.10 +.12
Travelzoo 24.97 +.06
TrimbleN 50.97 -.53
TripAdvn 31.80 +1.21
TriQuint 6.53 +.07
TrueRelig 26.66 +.05
TrstNY 5.60 -.07
Trustmk 23.89 -.37
21Vianetn 12.74 +1.17
USHmSy 12.06 +.28
USA Tech h 1.02 -.03
UTStarcm 1.45 -.04
UTiWrldwd 16.11
Ubiquiti n 27.34 +.56
UltaSalon 81.94 -1.46
Umpqua 12.67 -.18
UBWV 29.06 -.17
UtdNtrF 45.79 -.15
UtdOnln 5.30 +.09
US Enr 3.69 -.05
UtdStatns 28.81 -.39
UtdTherap 47.93 +.79
UnivDisp 45.31 +.61
UnivFor 32.60 -1.37
UranmRs h 1.03 -.06
UrbanOut 29.62 +.48


VCAAnt 22.54 +.09
VOXX)In 13.64 -.19
ValenceTh 1.00 +.01
ValVis A 1.79 -.09
ValueClick 20.79 +.30
VanSTCpB 79.23 -.03
Veeomlnst 28.83 -.55
Velt 10.48 +.60
VBradley 35.85 +.64
Verisign 37.64 -.33
Verisk 42.00 +.25
VertxPh 38.39 -.25
ViacomB 47.45 -.04
Vical 3.35 -.11
VirgnMdah 25.10 +.11
ViroPhrm 31.74 +.61
Vivus 22.13 +3.40
Vodafone 27.31 -.07
Volcano 28.20 +.08
Volterra 31.81 +.43
WarnerCh 16.33 -.34
WaveSys 2.07 -.03
Web.comrn 14.35 +.61
WebMD 25.03 -.24
Wendys Co 5.07 -.01
WernerEnt 24.82 -.25
Westmrd 11.56 +.04
Wstptlnng 43.94 +1.51
WetSeal 3.24 -.14
WholeFd 81.10 +.08
Windstrm 12.16 +.09
Winn-Dixie 9.47 -.01
WisdomTr 7.10 -.08
WrightM 16.89 +.22
Wynn 118.10 +1.76
Xilinx 37.23 +.34
YRC rs 11.99 -.04
Yahoo 14.89 +.11
Yandexn 22.70 -.27
Zagg 9.72 +.23
Zalicus 1.02 -.02
Zllown 30.20 +.59
ZonO&G 3.00 +.05
ZonBcp 19.00 +.09
ZpRlty 1.28 +.03
Zpcarn 13.47 +.19
ZxCorp 2.97 +.07
Zoltek 12.47 -.07
Zumiez 30.18 -.32
Zyngan 12.93 +.12
pSivda 1.74 +.57


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I AMEX


I NASDA


YTD YTD
Name Div YId PE Last Chg %Chg Name Div YId PE Last Chg %Chg
AKSteel .20 2.5 ... 8.10 +.05 -1.9 Microsoft .80 2.5 11 31.48 +.11 +21.3
AT&Tlnc 1.76 5.8 46 30.34 -.12 +.3 MotrlaSolu .88 1.8 14 49.43 -.10 +6.8
Ametek .24 .5 20 48.25 -.16 +14.6 MotrlaMob ... ... ... 39.73 ... +2.4
ABInBev 1.16 1.8 ... 66.25 +.25 +8.6 NextEraEn 2.40 3.9 13 60.77 +.56 -.2
BkofAm .04 .5 ... 7.88 -.14 +41.7 Penney .80 1.9 26 41.72 -.21 +18.7
CapCtyBk ... ... 29 8.37 -.12 -12.4 PiedmOfc 1.26 7.1 14 17.86 -.13 +4.8
CntryLink 2.90 7.3 24 39.92 +.51 +7.3 ProgrssEn 2.48 4.6 28 53.69 +.51 -4.2
Citigrp rs .04 .1 9 32.35 -.36 +23.0 RegionsFn .04 .7 34 5.80 -.11 +34.9
CmwREIT 2.00 10.5 16 19.07 -.38 +14.6 SearsHIdgs .33 ... ... 68.31 +6.51+114.9
Disney .60 1.5 16 41.31 -.17 +10.2 Smucker 1.92 2.6 19 74.74 +1.00 -4.4
EnterPT 3.00 6.7 25 45.09 +2.37 +3.2 SprintNex ... ... ... 2.47 -.05 +5.6
ExxonMbI 1.88 2.2 10 87.34 +.32 +3.0 Texlnst .68 2.0 18 33.32 ... +14.5
FordM .20 1.6 7 12.23 -.17 +13.7 TimeWarn 1.04 2.8 14 37.69 +.38 +4.3
GenElec .68 3.5 16 19.24 -.07 +7.4 UniFirst .15 .2 15 61.09 +.01 +7.7
HomeDp 1.16 2.5 19 46.98 +.03 +11.8 VerizonCm 2.00 5.2 45 38.14 +.01 -4.9
Intel .84 3.1 11 26.70 +.04 +10.1 Vodafone 2.10 7.7 ... 27.31 -.07 -2.6
IBM 3.00 1.5 15197.76 +.15 +7.5 WalMart 1.46 2.5 13 58.79 +.25 -1.6
Lowes .56 2.1 19 27.16 +.10 +7.0 Walgrn .90 2.7 11 33.86 -.11 +2.4
McDnlds 2.80 2.8 19100.32 -.49 ... YRCrs ... ... ... 11.99 -.04 +20.3







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BUSINESS


SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2012 A7


I MUTUALFUDSA I


Name NAV Chg
Advance Capital I:
Balancp 16.79 +.02
RetInc 8.81
Alger Funds B:
SmCapGr 7.18 +.02
AllianceBern A:
BalanAp 16.62 +.01
GIbThGrAp 68.79 +.43
SmCpGrA 38.96 +.18
AllianceBern Adv:
LgCpGrAd 29.10 +.09
AllianceBern B:
GIbThGrBt 59.25 +.37
GrowthBt 27.11 +.11
SCpGrBt 31.19 +.14
AllianceBern C:
SCpGrCt 31.35 +.14
Allianz Fds Insti:
NFJDvVI 12.41 +.03
SmCpVl 31.69 -.11
Allianz Funds C:
AGICGrthC 25.72 +.08
TargetC t 15.62 +.03
Amer Beacon Insti:
LgCaplnst 20.47
Amer Beacon Inv:
LgCaplnv 19.43
Ameri Century 1 st:
Growth 27.76 +.09
Amer Century Adv:
EqGroAp 23.60 +.06
EqlncAp 7.57
Amer Century Inv:
AIICapGr 30.29 +.16
Balanced 17.03 +.04
DivBnd 11.07 +.01
Eqlnc 7.58 +.01
Growth 27.52 +.08
Heritagel 22.60 +.08
IncGro 26.62 +.04
InfAdjBd 13.00
IntDisc 9.70 +.07
IntlGrol 10.74 +.07
NewOpp 8.35 +.01
OneChAg 12.75 +.03
OneChMd 12.31 +.03
RealEstl 21.43 +.01
Ultra 25.58 +.11
Valuelnv 6.06 +.01
American Funds A:
AmcpAp 20.83 +.05
AMutAp 27.26 +.02
BalAp 19.40 +.03
BondAp 12.69 +.01
CaplBAp 51.31 +.19
CapWGAp 35.42 +.16
CapWAp 21.14 +.02
EupacAp 39.63 +.17
FdlnvA p 38.77 +.09
GovtAp 14.40
GwthAp 32.17 +.06
HI TrAp 11.08 +.03
IncoAp 17.46 +.04
IntBdAp 13.68
IntlGrlncAp 29.70 +.15
ICAAp 29.45 +.06
LtTEBAp 16.30 +.01
NEcoAp 26.97 +.11
NPerAp 29.22 +.06
NwWrldA 52.08 +.23
STBFAp 10.09
SmCpAp 38.42 +.14
TxExAp 12.82 +.01
WshA p 30.03 +.07
Ariel Investments:
Apprec 43.86 +.11
Ariel 48.30 -.05
Artio Global Funds:
IntlEql r 25.62 +.19
IntEqll I r 10.82 +.08
Artisan Funds:
Intl 22.56 +.12
IntlVal r 27.57 +.16
MidCap 38.93 +.24
MidCapVal 21.52 +.03
SCapVal 16.54 -.06
Baron Funds:
Asset 50.58 +.25
Growth 54.99 +.15
SmallCap 25.60 +.06
Bernstein Fds:
IntDur 13.91 +.01
DivMu 14.90 +.01
TxMgdlntl 14.17 +.11
BlackRock A:
EqtyDiv 19.18 +.01
GIAIAr 19.67 +.03
HiYlnvA 7.76 +.02
IntlOpAp 31.39 +.13
BlackRock B&C:
GIAICt 18.31 +.03
BlackRock InstI:
BaVlI 26.79 -.03
EquityDv 19.22 +.01
GIbAllocr 19.76 +.03
HiYldBd 7.76 +.02
Brinson Funds Y:
HiYldlY 6.16
BruceFund 395.62 +.67
Buffalo Funds:
SmCapn 28.10 -.02
CGM Funds:
Focus n 29.44 -.09
MutI n 27.33 -.02
Realty n 28.76
CRM Funds:
MdCpVII 29.12 +.05
Calamos Funds:
GrwthApp 52.96 +.20
Calvert Invest:
Incop 15.98 +.03
IntEqAp 13.60 +.10
SocialAp 29.89 +.06
SocBdp 15.92 +.03
SocEqAp 37.04 +.13
TxFLgp 16.24 +.01
Cohen & Steers:
RltyShrs 64.56 +.09
Columbia Class A:
Acorn t 30.38 +.04
DivEqlnc 10.32 +.01
DivrBd 5.11 +.01
DivOpptyA 8.53 +.01
LgCapGrAt 25.32 +.09
LgCorQAp 6.29 +.01
MdCpGrOp 10.42 +.01
MidCVlOp p 8.08
PBModAp 11.07 +.02
TxEAp 13.97 +.01
SelCommA 48.05 +.16
FrontierA 11.32 +.06
GlobTech 22.74 +.10
Columbia Cl 1,T&G:
EmMktOp I n 8.49 +.06
Columbia Class Z:
AcornZ 31.45 +.04
AcornlntZ 38.98 +.20
DivlncoZ 14.30 +.02
IntBdZ 9.38 +.01
IntTEBd 10.93
LgCapGr 13.87 +.09
LgCpldxZ 26.45 +.05
MdCpldxZ 11.97
MdCpVIZp 13.96 -.01
ValRestr 49.93 +.17
Credit Suisse Comm:
ComRett 8.68 +.04
DFA Funds:
InftCorEqn 10.54 +.07
USCorEql n11.88 +.01
USCorEq2 nl1.73
DWS Invest A:
CommAp 17.66 +.04
DWS Invest S:
CorPlslnc 10.89 +.01
EmMkGrr 16.91 +.07
EnhEmMk 10.51 -.03
EnhGlbBdr 10.12 -.04
GIbSmCGr 39.41 +.19
GlbliThem 22.88 +.10
Gold&Prc 16.94 .25
GrolncS 17.72 +.03
HiYldTx 12.63 +.01
IntTxAMT 12.05 +.01
Intl FdS 41.54 +.21
LgCpFoGr 32.34 +.10
LatAmrEq 43.42 +.18
MgdMuni S 9.35 ...
MATFS 15.07
SP500S 18.19 +.03
WorldDiv 23.55 +.08
Davis Funds A:
NYVenA 35.43 +.03
Davis Funds B:
NYVen B 33.87 +.03
Davis Funds C:
NYVenC 34.17 +.03
Davis Funds Y:
NYVenY 35.81 +.04
Delaware Invest A:
Diver Inc p 9.25
SMIDCapG 25.52 +.13
TxUSAp 11.90 +.01
Delaware Invest B:
SelGrBt 35.08 +.22
Dimensional Fds:
EmMCrEqn20.35 +.09
EmMktV 31.21 +.16
IntSmVan 15.97 +.09
LargeCo 10.78 +.02
TAUSCorE2n9.54 -.01
USLgVan 21.29
USMicron 14.75 -.08
USTgdVal 17.14 -.05
US Small n 22.93 -.08
USSmVa 26.13 -.11


IntlSmCon 15.91 +.09
EmgMktn 27.53 +.15
Fixd n 10.32
IntGFxlnn 12.94
IntVan 16.71 +.14
Glb5Fxlnc n 11.04 +.01
TM USTgtV 22.54 -.08
2YGIFxdn 10.10
DFARIEn 24.56 +.02
Dodge&Cox:
Balanced 73.45 -.07
Income 13.65 +.01
IntStk 33.20 +.21
Stock 112.56 -.17
DoubleUne Funds:
TRBdI 11.23
TRBd Np 11.22
Dreyfus:
Aprec 43.55 +.12
CTA 12.26
CorV A 22.47
Dreyf 9.35 +.02
DryMid r 29.07 +.01
Dr5001nt 37.42 +.07
GNMA 16.00 -.01


Name NAV Chg
GrChinaAr 34.35 +.10
HiYIdA p 6.45 +.02
StratValA 28.89 -.08
TechGroA 34.58 +.29
DreihsAclnc 10.60 +.01
Driehaus Funds:
EMktGr 29.04 +.07
EVPTxMEmI 47.61 +.29
Eaton Vance A:
ChinaAp 17.30 +.07
AMTFMulnc10.11 +.01
MuIbCGrA 8.53 +.03
InBosA 5.83 +.01
LgCpVal 18.39 +.02
NatlMunlnc 9.94
SpEqtA 16.67 -.04
TradGvA 7.45
Eaton Vance B:
HIthSBt 9.62 +.05
NatlMuInc 9.94
Eaton Vance C:
GovtC p 7.44
NatMunlnc 9.94
Eaton Vance I:
FltgRt 8.97
GblMacAbR 10.01 -.02
LgCapVal 18.44 +.02
FBR Funds:
Focuslnv tn 48.49 -.27
FMI Funds:
LgCappn 16.47 +.03
FPA Funds:
Nwlnc 10.67 -.01
FPACres 28.25 +.05
Fairholme 28.84 +.54
Federated A:
MidGrStA 37.81 +.02
MuSecA 10.53 +.01
TtlRtBdp 11.42
Federated Instl:
KaufmnR 5.33
TotRetBd 11.42
StrValDvlS 4.87 +.02
Fidelity Adv FocT:
EnergyT 39.56 +.08
HItCarT 22.69 +.15
Fidelity Advisor A:
Nwlnsghp 21.73 +.05
StrlnA 12.40 +.02
Fidelity Advisor I:
EqGrl n 64.34 +.23
EqInl n 24.89 +.01
IntBdlIn 11.52
Nwlnsgtl n 22.00 +.05
Fidelity AdvisorT:
BalancT 16.04 +.01
DivGrTp 13.04 +.01
EqGrT p 60.21 +.21
EqInT 24.50 +.01
GrOppT 40.85 +.20
HilnAdTp 9.91 +.01
IntBdT 11.50
MulncTp 13.47 +.01
OvrseaT 17.48 +.14
STFiT 9.29
StSelAIICp 19.71 +.04
Fidelity Freedom:
FF2010n 13.91 +.03
FF2010K 12.85 +.02
FF2015n 11.62 +.02
FF2015K 12.90 +.02
FF2020n 14.06 +.03
FF2020K 13.32 +.03
FF2025n 11.70 +.03
FF2025K 13.47 +.04
FF2030n 13.93 +.03
FF2030K 13.62 +.04
FF2035n 11.55 +.03
FF2035K 13.73 +.04
FF2040 n 8.06 +.02
FF2040K 13.77 +.04
Income 11.59 +.01
Fidelity Invest:
AIISectEq 12.40 +.01
AMgr50n 16.04 +.03
AMgr70rn 16.86 +.05
AMgr20rn 13.14 +.02
Balancn 19.47 +.02
BalancedK 19.47 +.02
BlueChGrn 48.48 +.19
CAMunn 12.67
Canada n 53.56 -.05
CapAp n 27.64
CapDevOn 11.45 +.03
Cplncrn 9.19 +.02
ChinaRgr 29.22 +.12
CngS 465.09
CTMunrn 12.02 +.01
Contran 74.48 +.19
ContraK 74.44 +.19
CnvSc n 25.39 -.06
DisEq n 23.61 +.01
DiscEqF 23.58 +.01
DivlntIn 28.70 +.15
DivrslntKr 28.66 +.15
DivStkOn 16.32 +.02
DivGth n 29.62
EmergAs r n28.82 +.12
EmrMkn 23.35 +.17
Eqlncn 44.37 +.03
EQIIn 18.52
ECapAp 17.65 +.18
Europe 29.06 +.28
Exch 323.88
Export n 22.70 +.07
Fidelan 34.18 +.03
Fifty rn 19.10 +.07
FItRateHi r n 9.80
FrInOnen 28.29 +.08
GNMAn 11.83 -.01
Govtlnc 10.74
GroCo n 93.85 +.57
Grolncn 19.91 +.02
GrowCoF 93.77 +.57
GrowthCoK 93.78 +.57
GrStratrn 21.23 +.08
Highlncrgn 9.01 +.01
Indepn n 25.20 -.02
InProBdn 13.03 -.01
IntBdn 10.94
IntGovn 10.96
IntmMuln 10.56 +.01
IntlDiscn 30.78 +.24
IntlSCprn 20.12 +.20
InvGrBdn 11.76 +.01
InvGBn 7.77
Japanr 10.10 +.06
JpnSm n 8.93 +.01
LgCapVal 11.02 -.01
LatAm 55.97 +.34
LevCoSltkn 29.13 +.02
LowPrn 40.13 +.06
LowPriKr 40.11 +.06
Magellnn 70.59 +.14
MagellanK 70.53 +.14
MDMurn 11.53 +.01
MAMunn 12.59 +.01
MegaCpStknl1.11 +.01
MIMunn 12.42 +.01
MidCap n 30.02 +.04
MNMunn 11.97 +.01
MtgSecn 11.21 -.01
Munilncn 13.28 +.01
NJMunrn 12.18
NwMktrn 16.51 +.04
NwMilln 31.88 +.03
NYMunn 13.51
OTCn 62.95 +.26
OhMunn 12.19 +.01
0l0Index 9.58 +.02
Ovrsea n 30.62 +.26
PcBasn 24.16 +.05
PAMunrn 11.31 +.01
Puritnn 19.08 +.03
PuritanK 19.08 +.03
RealE n 29.54 +.02
SAIISecEqF 12.41 +.02
SCmdtyStrt n 9.50 +.05
SCmdtyStrF n9.52 +.05
SrEmrgMkt 16.85 +.13
SrslntGrw 11.38 +.06
SerlntlGrF 11.40 +.06
SrslntVal 8.81 +.07
SerlntiValF 8.82 +.06
SrlnvGrdF 11.76 +.01
StlntMun 10.88 +.01
STBF n 8.53
SmlICpSrn 18.76 -.01
SCpValu r 15.46 -.06
StkSelLCVrnll.17 -.01
SllSlcACap n27.27 +.05
SllSelSmCp 20.04 -.04
Sfratlncn 11.10 +.02
SfrReRtr 9.58 +.02
TotalBdn 11.02
Trend n 75.69 +.08
USBI n 11.82 +.01
Utilityn 17.20 +.04
ValStratn 28.66 -.06
Valuen 71.21 -.05
Wrldwn 19.14 +.11
Fidelity Selects:
Air n 38.02 -.22
Bankingn 17.70 -.18
Biotchn 99.18 +.16
Brokr n 47.47 -.01
Chemn 111.76 +.18
ComEquip n24.98 +.01
Compn 64.96 +.32
ConDis n 25.73 -.03
ConsuFnn 12.56 -.02
ConStapn 74.73 +.18
CstHo n 39.89 -.06
DfAer n 86.69 +.40
Eleck n 53.50 -.21
Enrgyn 56.50 +.13
EngSvn 75.09 +.18
EnvAltEnrnl6.53 -.01


FinSvn 57.74 -.14
Gold r n 46.88 -.72
Health n 132.91 +.87
Insur n 47.93 -.06
Leisrn 106.02 -.01
Material n 70.24
MedDIn 61.04 +.49
MdEqSysn 28.30 +.46
Mulndn 48.18 +.07
NtGasn 33.56 +.16
Pharmn 14.11 +.09
Retail n 56.61 +.06
Softwr n 90.24 +.98
Techn 101.41 +.64
Telcm n 46.53 -.07
Trans n 53.06 -.29
UtilGr n 52.56 +.25
Wireless n 7.79
Fidelity Spartan:
ExtMkInn 40.11 -.02
5001dxlnvn 48.47 +.08
5001dx I 48.48 +.09
IntllnxInvn 33.33 +.24
TotMktInv n 39.63 +.05


Here are the 1,000 biggest mutual funds listed on Nasdaq. Tables show the fund name, sell
price or Net Asset Value (NAV) and daily net change.
Name: Name of mutual fund and family.
NAV: Net asset value.
Chg: Net change in price of NAVY
Data based on NAVs reported to Lipper by 6 p.m. Eastern.


Name NAV Chg
USBondl 11.81
Fidelity Spart Adv:
ExMktAdrn40.12 -.01
5001dxAdv n48.48 +.09
IntAd r n 33.33 +.24
TotMktAd r n39.63 +.05
First Eagle:
GIbIA 48.94 +.07
OverseasA 22.29 +.07
First Investors A
BIChpAp
GloblAp 6.75 +.04
GovtAp 11.56 -.01
GrolnAp 16.03 +.02
IncoAp 2.56 +.01
MATFAp 12.42 +.01
MITFAp 12.73
NJTFAp 13.66
NYTFAp 15.17 +.01
OppAp 29.51 +.01
PATFAp 13.64 +.01
SpSitAp 25.32 +.02
TxExAp 10.19 +.01
TotRtAp 16.40 +.01
ValueBp 7.50
Forum Funds:
AbsStrlr 10.95
Frank/Temp Frnk A:
AdjUSp 8.85
ALTFAp 11.70 +.01
AZTFAp 11.27 +.01
CallnsAp 12.61 +.01
CAIntAp 12.01
CalTFA p 7.33 +.01
COTFAp 12.23 +.02
CTTFAp 11.35
CvtScAp 15.14 +.03
DblTFA 12.30 +.01
DynTchA 32.70 +.25
EqlncAp 17.74 +.01
Fedlntp 12.39 +.01
FedTFAp 12.45 +.02
FLTFAp 11.87
FoundAlp 10.67 +.03
GATFA p 12.48
GoldPrMA 40.82 -.54
GrwthAp 49.33 +.12
HYTFAp 10.58 +.01
HilncA 2.02 +.01
IncomAp 2.17
InsTFAp 12.36 +.01
NYITFp 11.81
LATFAp 11.87 +.01
LMGvScA 10.39
MDTFAp 11.89 +.02
MATFAp 12.01 +.01
MITFAp 12.22
MNInsA 12.80 +.01
MOTFAp 12.60 +.01
NJTFAp 12.53 +.01
NYTFA p 12.03
NCTFA p 12.77
OhiolAp 12.95 +.01
ORTFAp 12.44 +.01
PATFAp 10.78 +.01
ReEScAp 15.61 +.01
RisDvAp 36.49 +.09
SMCpGrA 38.39 +.07
Stratlncp 10.53 +.02
TtlRtnAp 10.26 +.02
USGovAp 6.90 -.01
UbIsAp 13.22 +.05
VATFAp 12.09
Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv:
GIbBdAdv n 13.21 +.03
IncmeAd 2.16
Frank/Temp Frnk C:
IncomC t 2.19
USGvC t 6.86 -.01
Frank/Temp Mtl A&B:
SharesA 21.29 +.06
Frank/Temp Temp A:
DvMktAp 24.19 +.26
ForgnAp 6.71 +.06
GIBdAp 13.25 +.03
GrwthAp 18.23 +.12
WorldAp 15.43 +.05
Frank/Temp Tmp Adv:
GrthAv 18.23 +.13
Frank/Temp Tmp B&C:
DevMktC 23.61 +.26
ForgnC p 6.58 +.06
GIBdCp 13.27 +.02
Franklin Mutual Ser:
QuestA 17.12 +.02
GE Elfun S&S:
S&Sl Inc 11.79 +.01
US Eqty 43.00 +.13
GMOTrust Ill:
CHIE 22.09 +.05
Quality 23.36 +.08
GMOTrust IV:
IninGrEq 22.84 +.08
IntllntrVl 20.56 +.13
GMOTrustVI:
EmgMktsr 11.95 +.11
IntlCorEq 27.70 +.17
Quality 23.37 +.08
StrFxInc 16.36 -.02
Gabelli Funds:
Asset 51.56 -.02
Goldman Sachs A:
MdCVAp 36.93 +.06
Goldman Sachs Inst:
GrOppt 25.39 +.14
HiYield 7.16 +.02
HYMuni n 8.85 +.01
MidCapV 37.20 +.07
Harbor Funds:
Bond 12.47
CapAplnst 42.04 +.23
Intllnv t 60.09 +.40
Intl r 60.65 +.41
Hartford Fds A:
CpAppAp 32.78 +.05
DivGthAp 20.20 -.02
IntOpAp 14.51 +.09
Hartford FdsY:
CapAppl n 32.78 +.04
Hartford HLS IA:
CapApp 42.29 +.09
Div&Gr 20.74 -.01
Advisers 20.62 +.01
TotRetBd 11.81
Hennessy Funds:
CorGrllOrig
Hussman Funds:
StrTotRetr 12.40
StrGrowth 11.73
ICON Fds:
Energy S 20.29 -.02
HlthcareS 15.55 +.09
ISI Funds:
NoAm p 7.98
IVA Funds:
WldwideAt 16.43 +.01
Wdwide Ir 16.43 +.01
Invesco Fds Invest:
DivrsDivp 12.59 +.01
Invesco Funds:
Energy 43.01 +.10
Utlibes 16.73 +.05
Invesco Funds A:
Chart p 17.47 +.02
CmstkA 16.69 -.04
Constp 24.11 +.09
EqlncA 8.80 -.01
GrlncAp 19.86 -.04
HilncMu p 7.93
HiYld p 4.22 +.01
HYMuA 9.69
InitGrow 27.71 +.12
MunilnA 13.67 +.01
PATFA 16.62 +.02
USMortgA 12.98 .01
Invesco Funds B:
CapDevt 14.61 +.06
MunilnB 13.65 +.01
USMortg 12.91 -.01
Ivy Funds:
AssetSCt 24.74 +.12
AssetStAp 25.49 +.13
AssetSbilr 25.71 +.13
JPMorgan A Class:
CoreBdA 11.94
JPMorgan C Class:
CoreBdp 11.99
JP Morgan Insth:
MdCpVal n 25.58 -.01
JPMorgan R C:
CoreBond nl +.94
ShtDurBd 10.99
JPMorgan Select:
USEquityn 10.96 +.01
JPMorgan Sel CIs:
CoreBdn 11.93
HighYld n 7.94 +.02
lnnTFBd n 11.39 +.01
LgCpGr 24.04 +.10
ShtDurBd n 10.99
USLCCrPIsn21.92 +.01
JanusT Shrs:
BalancdT 26.41 +.09
ContrarnT 13.70 +.06
EnterprT 65.19 +.13
FIxBndT 10.70 +.01
GIUfeSciTr 27.47 +.15
GIbSelT 11.62 +.03
GITechTr 18.36 +.11
Grw&lncT 33.30 +.16
JanusT 30.80 +.10
OvrseasTr 39.67 +.16
PrkMCVal T22.14 +.03
ResearchT 31.73 +.11
ShTmBdT 3.08
TwentyT 59.36 +.25


VentureT 58.41 +.02
WrldWTr 45.79 +.19
Jensen Funds:
QualGrthJ n28.55 +.12
John Hancock A:
BondAp 15.76 +.02
RgBkA 13.40 -.12
StrlnAp 6.61 +.01
John Hancock B:
StrlncB 6.61 +.01
John Hancock Cl 1:
LSAggr 12.52 +.04
LSBalanc 13.15 +.03


Name NAV Chg
LSConsrv 13.11 +.02
LSGrwth 13.08 +.04
LSModer 12.96 +.02
Lazard Instl:
EmgMktl 19.92 +.15
Lazard Open:
EmgMkOp 20.39 +.16
Legg Mason A:
CBAgGrp 123.59 +.16
CBApprp 14.86
CBLCGrp 22.77 +.05
GCIAIICOp 8.45 +.09
WAHilncAt 5.98 +.02
WAMgMup 16.78 +.02
Legg Mason B:
CBLgCGrt 20.79 +.05
Legg Mason C:
CMSplnvp 29.68 -.02
CMValTrp 40.76 -.02
Longleaf Partners:
Partners 29.54 -.12
SmCap 27.47 -.02
Loomis Sayles:
LSBondl 14.64 +.02
StrlncC 15.20 +.03
LSBondR 14.59 +.03
StrlncA 15.11 +.03
Loomis Sayles Inv:
InvGrBdAp 12.41 +.01
InvGrBdY 12.42 +.02
Lord Abbett A:
AffilAp 11.55
FundlEq 13.34 +.02
BdDebAp 7.97 +.01
ShDurlncAp 4.59
MidCpAp 17.43 +.02
Lord Abbett C:
ShDurlncC t 4.62
Lord Abbett F:
ShtDurlnco 4.59
MFS Funds A:
MITA 20.57 +.05
MIGA 17.08 +.09
EmGA 46.18 +.15
HilnA 3.48
MFLA 9.65
TotRA 14.76 +.01
UtilA 17.70 +.09
ValueA 24.25 +.01
MFS Funds B:
MIGBn 15.36 +.08
GvScBn 10.53
HilnBn 3.49 +.01
MulnBn 8.75 +.01
TotRBn 14.76 +.01
MFS Funds I:
ReInT 15.31 +.12
Valuel 24.37 +.02
MFS Funds InstI:
IntlEqn 18.06 +.14
MainStay Funds A:
HiYIdBA 5.98 +.01
MainStay Funds B:
ConvBt 15.36 +.05
GovtBt 8.91
HYIdBBt 5.95 +.01
IncmBldr 17.00 +.04
IntlEqB 10.49 +.08
MainStay Funds I:
ICAPSIEq 37.00 -.01
Mairs & Power:
Growth n 77.74 +.06
Manning&Napier Fds:
WIdOppA 7.71 +.03
Matthews Asian:
AsianGllnv 16.48 +.03
Indialnvr 17.29 +.04
PacTgrlnv 22.75 +.07
MergerFdn 15.72 +.01
Meridian Funds:
Growth 45.65 -.05
Metro West Fds:
TotRetBd 10.53
TotRtBdl 10.53
Midas Funds:
Midas Fdt 4.05 -.06
Monetta Funds:
Monettan 15.60
Morgan Stanley B:
GlobStratB 15.69 +.07
MorganStanley Inst:
IntlEql 13.66 +.06
MCapGrl 37.68 +.14
Muhlenkn 55.64 +.19
Munder Funds A:
GwthOppA 28.19 +.20
Munder Funds Y:
MCpCGrYn31.64 +.21
Mutual Series:
BeacnZ 12.73 +.03
GblDiscA 28.91 +.08
GIbDiscC 28.67 +.07
GIbDiscZ 29.27 +.08
QuestZ 17.26 +.02
SharesZ 21.45 +.06
Neuberger&Berm Fds:
Focus 20.91 +.05
Genesis 35.48 -.08
Geneslnst 49.83 -.11
Intl r 16.64 +.07
Partner 26.14 -.03
Neuberger&Berm Tr:
Genesis 51.70 -.12
Nicholas Group:
Hilnc I n 9.69 +.03
Nichn 47.05 +.03
Northern Funds:
Bondldx 10.93
HiYFxlnc 7.32 +.02
SmCpldx 9.14
Stkldx 16.97 +.03
Technly 16.36 +.07
Nuveen Cl A:
LtMBAp 11.23
Nuveen Cl R:
IntDMBd 9.28
HYMunBd 15.82 +.02
Nuveen Cl YV:
RealEstn 20.19 +.01
Oak Assoc Fds:
WhitOkSG 41.54 +.18
Oakmark Funds I:
Eqtylncr 29.09 +.12
Globall 22.84 +.14
Intl lr 19.39 +.18
Oakmark 45.90 -.01
Select 31.11 +.05
Old Westbury Fds:
GlobOpp 7.25 +.01
GIbSMdCap 15.16 +.05
LgCapStrat 9.82 +.06
RealRet 9.85 -.03
Oppenheimer A:
AMTFMu 6.78 +.02
AMTFrNY 11.91 +.01
CAMuniAp 8.32 +.01
CapApAp 47.72 +.12
CaplncAp 8.84
ChmplncAp 1.82 +.01
DvMktAp 33.75 +.22
Discp 60.62 +.19
EquityA 9.33 +.01
GlobAp 60.27 +.37
GIbOppA 31.06 +.18
GblStrlncA 4.23 +.01
Gold p 39.55
IntBdA p 6.38
LtdTmMu 14.89
MnStFdA 35.24 +.07
PAMuniAp 11.39
SenFltRtA 8.20 -.01
USGv p 9.66
Oppenheimer B:
AMTFMu 6.74 +.01
AMTFrNY 11.92 +.01
CplncB t 8.66
ChmplncBt 1.82 ...
EquityB 8.61 +.01
GblSfrlncB 4.24
Oppenheimer Roch:
LtdNYAp 3.37
RoMuAp 16.54 +.01
RcNtMuA 7.17 +.02
Oppenheimer Y:
DevMktY 33.37 +.22
IntlBdY 6.37 -.01
IntGrowY 28.73 +10
PIMCO Admin PIMS:
ShtTmAdp 9.77
TotRtAd 11.10
PIMCO Instl PIMS:
AIAsetAutr 10.81 +.03
AIIAsset 12.30 +.03
ComodRR 7.12 +.03
Divlnc 11.61 +.01
EmgMkCur 10.55 +.02
EmMkBd 11.61 +.01
Fltlnc r 8.59 +.01
ForBdUnr 10.91 -.02
FrgnBd 10.65 ...
HiYId 9.32 +.03
InvGrCp 10.62 +.01
LowDu 10.41
ModDur 10.75
RealRet 11.73
RealRtnl 12.06
ShortT 9.77
TotRt 11.10
TRII 10.75 +.01
TRIll 9.76 -.01
PIMCO Funds A:
AIIAstAutt 10.74 +.03
ComRRp 6.98 +.03
LwDurA 10.41
RealRtAp 12.06
TotRtA 11.10


PIMCO Funds C:
AllAstAutt 10.63 +.03
RealRtC p 12.06
TotRtC t 11.10
PIMCO Funds D:
TRtnp 11.10
PIMCO Funds P:
AstAIIlAuthP 10.80 +.03
TotRtnP 11.10
Parnassus Funds:
Eqtylncon 27.85 +.15
Perm Port Funds:
Permannt 49.72 +.01


Name NAV Chg
Pioneer Funds A:
BondA p 9.68 +.01
InfitlValA 19.47 +.17
PionFdAp 41.83 +.11
ValueAp 11.63 +.01
Pioneer Funds B:
HiYIdBt 10.18 +.02
Pioneer Funds C:
HiYIdC t 10.29 +.03
Pioneer Fds Y:
CullenVY 18.38 +.06
Price Funds:
Balance 20.43 +.06
BIChip n 43.62 +.20
CABondn 11.28
CapApp n 22.09 +.03
DivGro n 24.97 +.03
EmMktBn 13.38 +.01
EmEurp 19.28 +.53
EmMktSn 32.82 +.23
Eqlnc n 25.01 -.01
Eqlndexn 36.90 +.07
Europen 15.12 +.16
GNMAn 10.11 -.02
Growthin 36.08 +.17
Gr&ln n 21.58 +.02
HIlthScin 37.19 +.21
HiYield n 6.77 +.01
InsflCpG 18.39 +.11
IntlBond n 9.97 +.02
IntDis n 42.84 +.32
Intl G&l 12.95 +.11
IntlStkn 14.05 +.07
Japann n 7.91 -.01
LatAm n 45.74 +.08
MDShrtn 5.25
MDBondn 10.92 +.01
MidCapn 58.75 +.04
MCapVal n 23.65 -.02
NAmern 35.24 +.10
N Asian 15.68 +.06
NewEran 47.64 +.18
NHorizn 35.24 +.07
NIncn 9.75 +.01
NYBondn 11.67
OverS SFn 8.22 +.07
PSIncn 16.81 +.04
RealAssetrnll.51 +.03
RealEstn 19.79 +.07
R2010n 16.07 +.04
R2015n 12.50 +.03
R2020n 17.33 +.04
R2025 n 12.71 +.04
R2030n 18.27 +.06
R2035n 12.93 +.04
R2040n 18.42 +.06
R2045n 12.26 +.04
SciTecn 30.29 +.08
ShtBd n 4.84
SmCpStkn 35.11 -.05
SmCapVal n38.11 -.13
SpecGrn 18.86 +.06
Speclnn 12.68 +.01
TFInc n 10.36 +.01
TxFrHn 11.31
TxFrSIn 5.71
USTIntn 6.24
USTLgn 13.37 +.06
VABondn 12.12
Value n 24.72
Principal Inv:
LgCGIIn 10.11 +.07
LT20201n 12.20 +.04
LT20301n 12.08 +.04
Prudential Fds A:
BlendA 18.54 +.03
HiYIdAp 5.55 +.02
MuHilncA 9.93 +.01
UtilityA 11.27 +.04
Prudential Fds B:
GrowthB 18.14 +.10
HiYldBt 5.54 +.01
Putnam Funds A:
AmGvAp 9.15 -.01
AZTE 9.39
ConvSec 19.96 +.03
DvrlnAp 7.57 +.02
EqlnAp 16.49 +.01
EuEq 18.98 +.24
GeoBalA 12.70 +.01
GIbEqtyp 9.12 +.04
GrInAp 14.05 -.01
GIbIHIthA 41.99 +.23
HiYdApx 7.61
HiYld In 5.94 +.02
IncmAp 6.84
IntGrlnp 9.21 +.06
InvAp 13.90 +.03
NJTxA p 9.72
MulICpGr 55.05 +.28
PATE 9.40
TxExA p 8.88 +.01
TFInA p 15.43 +.01
TFHYA 12.19
USGvAp 13.63
GIblUtilA 10.25 +.04
VoyAp 23.06 +.06
Putnam Funds B:
TaxFrlns 15.45 +.01
DvrlnBt 7.50 +.01
Eqlnct 16.34 +.01
EuEq 18.22 +.23
GeoBalB 12.55
GIbEqt 8.24 +.03
GINtRs t 19.25
GrlnBt 13.80
GIblHIthB 33.57 +.18
HiYldBtx 7.60
HYAdBt 5.82 +.01
IncmBt 6.78
IntGrlnt 9.15 +.07
InitNopt 14.03 +.12
InvBt 12.52 +.02
NJTxBt 9.71
MuIlCpGr 47.20 +.23
TxExB t 8.88 +.01
TFHYBt 12.21
USGvBt 13.57
GlblUtilB 10.21 +.04
VoyBt 19.43 +.05
RS Funds:
IntGrA 17.52 +.08
LgCAIphaA 41.95 -.14
Value 25.12 -.07
RidgeWorth Funds:
LCGrStkAp 11.48 +.06
Royce Funds:
LwPrSkSvr 16.51 -.03
MicroCapl 16.66 -.07
PennMulr 12.04 -.03
Premier r 20.79 -.03
TotRetl r 13.79 -.03
ValSvct 12.33 -.05
Russell Funds S:
StratBd 11.08
Rydex Advisor:
NasdaqAdv 15.81 +.06
SSgA Funds:
EmgMkt 20.78 +.17
Schwab Funds:
HIthCare 18.61 +.08
lOOOInvr 38.70 +.07
S&PSel 21.32 +.04
SmCpSI 21.24 -.06
TSM Ser 24.79 +.03
Scout Funds:
Int 31.62 +.15
Selected Funds:
AmShD 42.95 +.05
AmShSp 42.96 +.04
Sentinel Group:
ComSAp 33.93 +.03
Sequoia 155.68 +.22
Sit Funds:
LrgCpGr 46.28 +.20
SoSunSCInv tn22.47+.07
St FarmAssoc:
Gwth 55.47 +.04
Stratton Funds:
MuI t-Cap 36.61 +04
RealEstate 28.70 +.03
SmCap 54.07 -.12
SunAmerica Funds:
USGvBt 10.16
TCW Funds:
TotRetBdl 9.86
TIAA-CREF Funds:
Bdldxlnst 10.83
Eqldxlnst 10.42 +.02
Templeton Instit:
ForEqS 18.94 +.14
Third Avenue Fds:
IntlValnstr 16.14 +.05
REVallnstr 23.91 +.11
Valuelnst 47.40 +.02
Thornburg Fds:
IntValAp 26.93 +.11
IncBuildAt 18.72 +.03
IncBuildCp 18.71 +.02
IntValuel I 27.54 +.12
LtTMul 14.64 +.01
Thrivent Fds A:
HiYId 4.88 +.01
Income 8.96 +.01
Tocqueville Fds:
Goldtn 80.32 -.84
Transamerica A:
AegonHYBp9.29 +.04
Flexlncp 9.04 +.01
Turner Funds:
SmlCpGrn 36.28 +.03
Tweedy Browne:
GblValue 23.25 +.09
US Global Investors:
AIIAm 24.78 +.07
ChinaReg 7.92 +.02
GIbRs 10.38


Gld&Mtls 14.15 -.11
WdPrcMn 14.98 -.12
USAA Group:
AgvGt 36.40 +.15
CA Bd 10.79
CrnstStr 22.46 +.04
GovSec 10.38 -.01
GrTxStr 14.17 +.02
Grwth 15.89 +.04
Gr&lnc 16.08 +.01
IncStk 13.22 +.03
Inco 13.24
Infl 24.44 +.17


Name NAV Chg
NYBd 12.29 +.01
PrecMM 34.30 -.44
SciTech 13.99 +.08
ShtTBnd 9.18
SmCpStk 14.80-.05
TxElt 13.53 +.01
TxELT 13.58 +.01
TxESh 10.84
VABd 11.46 +.01
WIdGr 19.77 +.08
VALIC:
MdCpldx 20.95
Stkldx 25.41 +.04
Value Line Fd:
LrgCon 19.07 +.02
Vanguard Admiral:
BalAdmln 23.10 +.02
CAITAdmn 11.60
CALTAdm n11.73
CpOpAdln 74.36
EMAdmr r n 36.89 +.23
Energyn 125.63 +.59
EqlnAdm n n48.34 +.01
EuroAdml n 58.10 +.50
ExplAdml n 75.36 -.03
ExtdAdm n 44.53 -.02
500Adml n 126.16 +.23
GNMAAdn 11.06 -.01
GrwAdmn 35.43 +.10
HlthCr n 56.65 +.22
HiYldCp n 5.88 +.01
InfProAdn 28.25 -.01
ITBdAdml n 11.86 +.01
ITsryAdmln 11.69
IntGrAdm n 59.56 +.36
ITAdmln 14.25
ITGrAdmnn 10.17 +.01
LtdTrAdn 11.21
LTGrAdmln 10.46 +.05
LTAdmln 11.57
MCpAdml n 99.82 +.16
MorgAdmn 61.38 +.17
MuHYAdrnm nlO.97
NYLTAdn 11.59
PrmCaprn 69.51 +.12
PALTAdmr n 11.58
ReitAdm r n 87.45 +.07
STsyAdml n 10.78 -.01
STBdAdmlnlO.63
ShtTrAdn 15.95
STFdAdn 10.86 -.01
STIGrAdn 10.74
SmCAdm n 37.42 -.07
TxMCaprn 68.43 +.12
TlBAdml n 11.03 +.01
TStkAdm n 34.36 +.05
ValAdmln 22.01 +.01
WellslAdm n57.18 +.06
WelltAdr n57.28 +.04
Windsor n 47.78
WdsrllAdn 49.45 +.07
Vanguard Fds:
CALTn 11.73
CapOppn 32.20
Convrtn 12.84
DivdGron 16.20 +.04
Energy n 66.92 +.32
Eqlnc n 23.06 +.01
Explr n 80.99 -.03
FLLTn 12.01
GNMAn 11.06 -.01
GlobEqn 17.82 +.08
Grolncn 28.91 +.06
GrthEqn 12.09 +.04
HYCorpn 5.88 +.01
HlthCren 134.26 +.53
InflaPron 14.38 -.01
IntlExplrn 14.85 +.10
IntlGrn 18.73 +.12
InfiVal n 30.23 +.26
ITIGraden 10.17 +.01
ITTsryn 11.69
LifeConn 16.97 +.03
LifeGron 22.94 +.05
Lifelncn 14.51 +.02
LifeMod n 20.44 +.04
LTIGraden 10.46 +.05
LTTsryn 13.00 +.05
Morg n 19.80 +.06
MuHYn 10.97
Mulntn 14.25
MuLtdn 11.21
MuLongn 11.57
MuShrtn 15.95
NJLTn 12.18
NYLTn 11.59
OHLTTE n 12.50
PALTn 11.58
PrecMtls r n 22.24 -.16
PrmcpCorn 14.50 +.01
Prmcprn 66.99 +.10
SelValu r n 20.09 -.01
STARn 20.19 +.05
STIGraden 10.74
STFedn 10.86 -.01
STTsryn 10.78 -.01
StratEq n 20.77 +.03
TgtRetlncn 11.97 +.01
TgRe2010n23.62 +.03
TgtRe2015nl3.08 +.02
TgRe2020 n23.24 +.05
TgtRe2025 nl23.24 +.03
TgRe2030 n22.74 +.06
TgtRe2035 nl3.69 +.03
TgtRe204O0n22.50 +.06
TgtRe2050 n22.39 +.05
TgtRe2045 ni4.12 +.03
USGron 20.75 +.09
USValuen 11.07 +.01
Wellsly n 23.60 +.02
Welltnn 33.16 +.02
Wndsrn 14.16
Wndsll n 27.86 +.04
Vanguard Idx Fds:
DvMklnPl r n98.45 +.64
MidCplstPl n1 08.74 +.17
TotlntAdm r r4.73 +.14
Totlntllnstr n98.91 +.56
TotlntllP r n 98.92 +.56
TotlntSig r n 29.67 +.17
500 n 126.14 +.23
Balancedn 23.10 +.03
EMktn 28.09 +.18
Europe n 24.94 +.21
Extend n 44.52 -.01
Growth n 35.43 +.11
LgCaplxn 25.35 +.05
LTBndn 13.88 +.07
MidCap n 22.00 +.04
Pacificn 10.11 +.03
REITr n 20.49 +.01
SmCap n 37.40 -.06
SmlCpGth n24.28
STBndn 10.63
TotBndn 11.03 +.01
Totllntlin 14.79 +.09
TotStkn 34.34 +.04
Value n 22.00 +.01
Vanguard Instl Fds:
Ballnstn 23.10 +.02
DevMklnstn 9.45 +.06
Extln n 44.53 -.01
FTAIIWIdl r n88.02 +51
Grwthlstn 35.43 +.10
InfProlnstn 11.51
Instldxn 125.34 +.23
InsPIn 125.35 +.23
InstTStldxn 31.10 +.05
InsTStPlusrn31.10 +.04
MidCplstn 22.05 +.04
REITInstrn 13.54 +.02
SCInstn 37.42 -.06
TBIstn 11.03 +.01

Vanguard Signal:
GroSign 32.81 +.10
ITBdSign 11.86 +01
MidCpldxn 31.50 +05
STBdldxn 10.63
SmCpSig n 33.72 -.05
TotBdSgl In 11.03 +01
TotStkSgln 33.16 +.05
Virtus Funds:
EmMktl 9.64 +.05
Virtus Funds A:
MulSStAp 4.85 +.01
Waddell & Reed Adv:
AssetS p 9.67 +05
CorelnvA 6.24 +.03
DivOppAp 15.12 +.03
DivOppC t 14.95 +.03
Wasatch:
SmCpGr 42.57 +.03
Wells Fargo Adv A:
AstAIlAp 12.50
Wells Fargo Adv C:
AstAIICt 12.06
Wells Fargo Adv:
CmStklnv 20.94 +.03
Opptylnv 40.39 +.06
Wells Fargo Ad Ins:
UIStMulnc 4.82
Wells Fargo Admin:
Growth 41.04 +.19
Wells Fargo Instl:
UltSTMuA 4.82
Western Asset:
CorePlusl 11.28 +.01
William Blair N:
GrowthN 12.29 +.01
Yacktman Funds:
Fundpn 18.39 +.01
Focusedn 19.65 +.01


S&P 500 index hits highest



point since June 2008


Associated Press


NEW YORK A two-
point gain was enough to
push the Standard & Poor's
500 index to its highest level
since June 2008, three
months before the collapse
of Lehman Brothers and the
darkest days of the financial
crisis.
The S&P 500 index closed
at 1,365.74, beating its 2011
closing high by two points.
For the second day this
week, the Dow Jones indus-
trial average nudged above
13,000 then pulled back. It
rose 29 points in the morn-
ing but wavered in the after-
noon. The Dow dropped 1.74
points to close at 12,982.95.
American Express was the
leading stock among the 30
that make up the average,
gaining 1.2 percent.
It was a similar story on
Tuesday, when the Dow flit-
ted above 13,000 three times
but ended the day lower.
The average hasn't closed
above 13,000 since May 19,
2008.
What will it take for the
Dow to close above 13,000
and stay there? Mark
Lamkin, CEO of Lamkin
Wealth Management in
Louisville, Ky., said it
would require a surprising
news event, like a huge
merger or an economic re-
port that blows past
expectations.
"It needs some type of sur-
prise, a bombshell," Lamkin
said. "We've had a pretty
good run over the past four
months. Now it's going to
take something great to keep
it above 13,000."


Market watch
Feb.23,2012

Dow Jones +46.02
industrials 12,984.69


Nasdaq +23.81
composite 2,956.98


Standard &
Poor's 500


+5.80

1,363.46


Russell +12.73
2000 829.23


NYSE diary
Advanced: 2,181

Declined: 851

Unchanged: 98

Volume: 3.7 b

Nasdaq diary
Advanced: 1,814

Declined: 729

Unchanged: 103

Volume: 1.7 b
AP


The two economic reports
out Friday didn't make the
cut.
A consumer sentiment
index taken by the Univer-
sity of Michigan and
Reuters edged up in Febru-
ary to its highest level in a
year. And the Commerce
Department reported that
sales of new homes dipped
slightly in January, but the
figure still topped econo-
mists' estimates. It also said
sales in the final three
months of 2011 were higher
than previously reported.
"The numbers are just
OK," Lamkin said. "They
weren't bad, but they
weren't great, either."


Business HIC

AP IMPACT: Lender's own

probe links it to suicides

MUMBAI, India First they were stripped of
their utensils, furniture, mobile phones, televi-
sions, ration cards and heirloom gold jewelry.
Then, some of them drank pesticide. One
woman threw herself in a pond. Another jumped
into a well with her children.
Sometimes, the debt collectors watched
nearby.
More than 200 poor, debt-ridden residents of
Andhra Pradesh killed themselves in late 2010,
according to media reports compiled by the gov-
ernment of the south Indian state. The state
blamed microfinance companies which give
small loans intended to lift up the very poor for
fueling a frenzy of overindebtedness and then
pressuring borrowers so relentlessly that some
took their own lives.
The companies, including market leader SKS
Microfinance, denied it.
However, internal documents obtained by The
Associated Press, as well as interviews with
more than a dozen current and former employ-
ees, independent researchers and videotaped
testimony from the families of the dead, show
top SKS officials had information implicating
company employees in some of the suicides.

Judge awards iPhone user

$850 in throttling case

SIMI VALLEY, Calif. When AT&T started
slowing down the data service for his iPhone,
Matt Spaccarelli, an unemployed truck driver and
student, took the country's largest telecommuni-
cations company to small claims court. And won.
His award: $850.
Pro-tem Judge Russell Nadel found in favor of
Spaccarelli in Ventura Superior Court in Simi Val-
ley on Friday, saying it wasn't fair for the com-
pany to purposely slow down his iPhone, when it
had sold him an "unlimited data" plan.
Spaccarelli could have many imitators. AT&T
has some 17 million customers with "unlimited
data" plans who can be subject to throttling.
That's nearly half of its smartphone users. AT&T
forbids them from consolidating their claims into
a class action or taking them to a jury trial. That
leaves small claims actions and arbitration.

Miracle diet pill? Anti-obesity

drug approval on horizon

WASHINGTON The battle of the bulge has
been a big, fat failure for U.S. drugmakers. But
that hasn't stopped them from trying.
For nearly a century, scientists have struggled
to make a diet pill that helps people lose weight
without side effects that range from embarrass-
ing digestive issues to dangerous heart
problems.
Earlier this week, a government panel recom-


In other trading, the Nas-
daq composite index rose
6.77 points to 2,963.75.
Oil prices hit a nine-
month high of $109.77 a bar-
rel. The price of oil has
jumped 10 percent this
month amid rising concerns
about a conflict with Iran.
The euro added a penny
against the dollar, hitting
$1.346, its highest since Dec.
5. Greece made a formal
offer to creditors to swap
their Greek government
bonds for new ones, another
step toward knocking $142
billion off its debts. The
swap is part of a deal to pre-
vent Greece from defaulting
on a debt payment due next
month.
Stock indexes have been
climbing since November as
European officials redou-
bled their efforts to contain
the region's debt crisis and
the European Central Bank
extended cheap loans to
troubled banks. The S&P
500 index has gained 8.6
percent to start 2012, better
than its long-term annual
average gain.
In contrast to the volatile
trading of late last year, the
market's gains have been
small but steady. To
Lamkin, the lack of large
swings looks ominous. The
world is still full of dangers,
he said. Lamkin tells his
clients that the top risks are
another flare-up in the Eu-
ropean debt crisis and a
war between Israel and
Iran.
"When the next big thing
happens, and it will, you're
going to see a pullback," he
said. "I think we're due."


GHLIGHTS

mended the FDA approve the latest diet drug
Qnexa. The recommendation raises hopes that
the U.S. could approve the first anti-obesity drug
in more than a decade. It also highlights how
challenging it is to create a pill that fights fat in a
variety of people without negative side effects.
Even Qnexa was previously rejected over con-
cerns that it can cause heart palpitations and
birth defects if taken by pregnant women.

Oil prices rising to near 2011

highs as tensions increase

NEW YORK Oil prices are approaching last
year's highs as tensions increase over Iran's nu-
clear program. The rise pushed gasoline prices
on Friday to a national average of $3.65 per gal-
lon, the highest ever for this time of year.
Western nations fear Iran is building a nuclear
weapon and have been trying to force it to open
its facilities to inspection. Iran has refused, turn-
ing away international inspectors this week for
the second time this month. The United Nations
said Friday that Iran has responded to the recent
scrutiny by speeding up production of higher-
grade enriched uranium, feeding concerns that it
is developing a bomb.

New-home sales dip after 4

straight monthly gains

WASHINGTON Sales of new homes
dipped in January but the final quarter of 2011
was stronger than first estimated.
The Commerce Department said Friday that
new-home sales fell 0.9 percent last month to a
seasonally adjusted annual rate of 321,000
homes. That followed four straight months of
gains in which home sales rose 10 percent.
The gains came after the government up-
wardly revised October, November and Decem-
ber's figures. December's annual sales pace of
324,000 was the highest in a year.

New Nike shoe with outer

space theme causes frenzy

Sneaker fanatics who lined up outside stores
overnight got their first crack Friday at a new
outer-space themed Nike basketball shoe, get-
ting so unruly in some cities that police were
called to restore order.
More than 100 deputies in riot gear quelled a
crowd in Orlando, Fla., where the release of the
$220 Foamposite Galaxy coincides with this
weekend's NBAAII-Star Game. In at a mall in
Hyattsville, Md., one person was arrested for dis-
orderly conduct.
The shoes, part of a space-themed collection,
are a draw for so-called "sneakerheads" who col-
lect signature sports footgear and can resell it
online at a marked-up price, sometimes for hun-
dreds more than retail.

-From wire reports


I NE^^^ ~WYORKSTOCjECHNGE I


Name Last Chg
SP Consum 42.86 -.05
SP Engy 76.23 +.30
SPDRFncl 14.67 -.05
SP Inds 37.48 -.01
SPTech 28.82 +.17
SP UI 35.08 +.15
StdPac 4.24 -.18
Standex 40.09 -1.35
StarwdHtl 54.99 +.87
StateStr 40.53 -.33
Steris 32.13 +.03
Sterlite 9.78 +45
SbIIwtrM 14.89 +.16
Sbyker 54.78 +.86
SturmRug 43.64 +1.35
SubPpne 45.17 +.90
SunCmts 40.57 -.14
Suncorgs 36.96 +.47
Sunoco 39.39 -.37
Suntedich 3.06 -.15
SunTrst 22.30 -.02
SupEnrgy 30.09 -.37
Supvalu 6.65 +.03
SwftEng 32.66 -.55
Synovus 2.02 -.02
Sysco 29.27 -.04
TCFFncl 10.99 +.02
TE Connect 35.97 +.29
TECO 18.11 +.17
TJXs 35.97 +.04


ThawSemi 14.37
Talbots 3.02
TalismEg 14.21
Target 55.22
TataMotors 27.36
TeckResg 40.62
TeekayTnk 4.51
TelNorL 10.23
TelcmNZs 8.90
TelefBrasil 29.67
TelefEsp 17.25
TempurP 77.47
Tenaris 40.33
TenetHIth 5.78
Teradata 65.48
Teradyn 16.38
Terex 25.56
TerraNitro 219.91
Tesoro 27.70
TetraTech 10.49
Textron 27.65
Theragen 1.56
ThermoFis 56.66
ThmBet 72.04
3DSyss 24.15
3M Co 88.20
Tiffany 64.68
TWCable 78.21
TimeWarn 37.69
Timken 53.03
TollBros 22.62
TorchEngy 2.49


Trchmrks 48.80
TorDBkg 79.26
Total SA 56.46
TotalSys 21.96
Transom 50.73
Travelers 58.60
Tredgar 24.36
TriContf 15.84
TrinaSolar 7.80
TwoHrblnv 10.31
TycolntI 51.15
Tyson 18.99
UBSAG 14.30
UDR 25.48
UIL Hold 35.88
USAirwy 6.99
USG 13.40
UltraPtg 23.84
UndrArmr 85.83
UniSrcEn 37.59
UniFirst 61.09
UnilevNV 33.59
UnionPac 112.62
UtdContl 20.41
UtdMicro 2.61
UPS B 76.50
UtdRentals 42.89
US Bancrp 28.73
US NGs rs 21.34
US OilFd 42.01
USSteel 28.13
UtdTedch 83.97


UtdhlthGp 55.65 +.71 WsteMInc 35.64
UnumGr 23.18 -.06 WeathflntI 16.50
.VWtWatch 79.61
WelnRlt 25.00
ValeSA 25.69 +.15 WellPoint 66.11
ValeSApf 25.00 +.07 WellsFargo 30.18
ValeantPh 47.93 +.38 WestarEn 28.01
ValeroE 24.39 -1.41 WAstEMkt 14.71
VangTotBd 83.84 +.06 WstAMgdHi 6.21
VangTSM 70.61 +.10 WAstlnfOpp 12.93
VangREIT 61.70 +.08 WDigital 39.78
VangDivAp 57.70 +.13 WsnRefin 18.34
VangEmg 44.51 +.36 WstnUnion 17.88
VangEAFE 34.23 +.23 Weyerhsr 21.06
VarianMed 66.56 +.57 Whrlpl 71.30
Vectren 29.68 -.03 WhibngPet 62.47
Ventas 56.00 -.77 WmsCos 29.31
VeoliaEnv 12.17 +.15 WmsPtrs 61.43
VeriFone 47.00 +1.05 WmsSon 38.84
VerizonCm 38.14 +.01 WillisGp 35.27
VimpelCm 12.50 +.31 Winnbgo 9.44
Visa 117.54 +1.06 WiscEn s 34.37
VMware 100.52 +.90 WT India 20.80
Vonage 2.48 +.02 WorldFuel 43.77
Vornado 84.73 +.19 Worthgtn 17.75
W&T Off 26.83 +2.06 XL Grp 20.08
WGL Hold 41.70 -.36 XcelEngy 26.48
WPXEnn 18.82 -.22 Xerox 8.36
Wabash 10.92 +.07 Yamanag 17.72
WalMart 58.79 +.25 YingliGrn 3.82
Walgrn 33.86 -.11 Youku 22.37
WalterEn 66.31 +.78 YumBrnds 65.54







Page A8 SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2012



PINION


"Success is the one unpardonable sin
against one's fellows."
Ambrose Bierce, 1842-1913


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan............. .................. publisher
Charlie Brennan ............... .................. editor
Mike Arnold ............. .................. HR director
Sandra Frederick....................... managing editor
J Curt Ebitz................ ............. citizen member
Founded Mac Harris ....... .................. citizen member
by Albert M.
Williamson Rebecca Martin ........... ........ guest member
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


PUBLIC SAFETY




Meadowcrest,



S.R. 44 needs



traffic signal


county commissioners
have acknowledged the
impact the new West Cit-
rus Government Center will
have on traffic at the corner of
State Road 44 and Meadow-
crest Boulevard, just east of
Crystal River.
During the first three weeks
at the new center, the Tax Col-
lector's Office alone generated
4,000 visitors, according to
Commissioner JJ Kenney


This coming
week, the Driver
Licenses Office
will open at its
new location in
the West Citrus
Government Cen-
ter, drawing more
traffic.
And, in the near
future, a Family
Dollar store di-
rectly across S.R.
44 from Meadow-
crest Boulevard


agencies, there's a Winn-Dixie
at the corner, a bank and nu-
merous other offices.
Fearing the strong potential
for traffic-related injuries and
fatalities, county officials
asked the Florida Department
of Transportation to consider
installing a traffic signal.
Based on traffic counts, the
request was denied.
The catch: DOT needs to fac-
tor in the additional traffic that


THE ISSUE:
Traffic signal at
State Road 44 and
Meadowcrest
Boulevard.

OUR OPINION:
County wise to install
if state refuses.


will open for business.
In the name of full disclosure,
the Citrus County Chronicle's
main office and printing facili-
ties are in Meadowcrest. With
that said, Chronicle employees
and visitors are keenly aware of
the hazards of venturing across
two lanes of oncoming S.R. 44
traffic, given the frequently
heavy volume. Over the years,
several accidents have been
photographed at the location-
and that's without the addi-
tional impact of the government
center and dollar store.
While traffic generated by
employees is of note, the
greater concern is for citizens
traveling to do business in the
area. In addition to the afore-
mentioned businesses/


Beautiful roads
We want to thank the Citrus
County Road Department for doing
a great job trimming the trees on
Wood Haven and Pine Castle
streets in Crystal River. They did a
beautiful job. Thank you again. The
power companies should take les-
sons on how to trim the trees
properly.
Where's Christiane?


George Stephanopou-
los is back as Sunday
host of "This Week" on
ABC. I have not heard a
word or seen an article
on what happened to
Christiane Amanpour.
Does anyone out there
know? A call to Sound Off
would be appreciated.
Editor's note: Chris-
tiane Amanpour left ABC's
"This Week" to return to
CNN International, where
she previously worked.


CAL563-0
563-0


Pine Ridge coyotes
I've lived there for 11 years in
Pine Ridge. I've seen 13 coyotes,
one full-grown panther, two bob-
cats, many quail, 25-plus turkeys,
and most all these were witnessed
by other people. I think those
couch potatoes need to leave their
house at sunrise or one hour be-
fore sunset and they will see the
same thing I have been able to
see and many others. If you've
got cats or little dogs, they make
very good meals for the critters.


refuses.
The cost-
isn't chump


now will be ac-
cessing the area.
While County
Administrator
Brad Thorpe was
directed to call
that fact to the
DOT's attention,
commissioners
are in agreement
that the dangers
posed warrant
county funding
for a traffic sig-
nal if the state

about $200,000 -
change, but the


dangers are glaringly obvious
and cannot be dismissed.
As county government itself
will be the cause of increased
traffic, taking the responsible
position to safeguard the mo-
toring public makes sense. It's
worth inquiring about whether
the developers of Family Dol-
lar should contribute, as well.
DOT traffic statistics do tell a
story; however, seeing first
hand the perils posed at cer-
tain intersections is a vivid
eye-opener.
Barring the DOT reversing
its position, county officials are
smart to take action in the
name of public safety.


Thanks, strangers)
I would just like to say a big
thank-you to the person or per-
sons who found my cell phone in
Inverness Wal-Mart parking lot on
Saturday (Jan. 28) and turned it
in to the customer service desk. I
surely appreciate that and I hope
good things happen to you the
rest of your life. Thank you.
Take it home
A dog owner in Crystal
IND Oaks likes to leave their
I doggy-doo behind in
someone else's garbage
i can. Please, whatever
S your dog leaves, you take
home. Don't leave it in
someone else's area.
Us, too


m579
)579


In regard to "Cashier
theft:" We had a similar
experience made a
small purchase less than


$3, handed the clerk a $20 bill; we
received change for $10. I hope
the clerk enjoys her stolen money.
Don't water
Why do people water their
brown, dormant lawns in the win-
ter season? Our neighbors have a
contest of who can water the most.
Keys' county
Your geography lesson map in
the Commentary is very colorful
but not correct geographically. The
Florida Keys are not in Miami Dade
County; they're in Monroe County.


The wrong side of justice


ohn Bohanan opposed a
same-sex marriage law in the
Maryland legislature last
year, and the measure lost. But
earlier this month, the Demo-
cratic lawmaker decided to
change his vote, and with his
help, the bill narrowly passed.
"Once I began to look at this
through the eyes of
my own kids and
other young people,
it became pretty
clear," the father of
four sons, ages 17 to 1
21, told The Wash- -.,"
ington Post "You
want them to have
love, and if that's
how they want to ex-
press it, you want Cokie
them to be able to do Steven R
it openly" OTHI
Wade Kach, a con- VOIC
servative Republi-
can, backed the
marriage measure after a hear-
ing at which gay couples talked
poignantly about forming fami-
lies of their own. "As a pro-life
Republican, I believe it's my re-
sponsibility to make sure chil-
dren are taken care of," he
explained. "I left that hearing a
changed person."
Bohanan and Kach reflect a
national tide that is running
swiftly in favor of gay marriage.
As more legislators hear the ar-
guments from their neighbors,
their constituents, their own fam-
ily members they are realizing
that this issue is not about stereo-
types or abstractions, but about
real people living real lives and
taking care of real kids.
Washington recently became
the seventh state (plus the Dis-
trict of Columbia) to legalize
same-sex unions. Maryland will
soon become the eighth. The
New Jersey legislature passed a
bill that was vetoed by Gov Chris
Christie, but he felt compelled to
appoint an ombudsman to cor-


a
E
E


rect complaints against the
state's existing civil union law.
Christie wants to run for presi-
dent, and no Republican can sur-
vive the primaries by supporting
gay marriage. But he could pay a
long-term price. Eventually, said
New Jersey's Assembly speaker,
Sheila Oliver, "The governor will
see that he was on the
^" wrong side of justice."
Last year, for the first
time, national polls
showed a majority of
Americans favoring
same-sex marriage. Stat-
istician Nate Silver, writ-
ing in The New York
Times, estimates that
support for the concept
nd is growing by 4 percent-
)berts age points every year By
-R the November election,
ES he forecasts, 56 percent
will favor legalizing gay
unions and only 40 per-
cent will oppose them. Three
years ago, the numbers were re-
versed.
As Bohanan discovered, this
shift is driven mainly by young
people. According to a recent
Pew study, three out of five voters
under 30 back same-sex mar-
riage, while only one out of three
over 65 share that view. As the
conservative columnist George
Will likes to say, young people
think being gay is about as signif-
icant as being left-handed. And
that makes them far more toler-
ant and open-minded than their
elders.
The other trend driving accept-
ance of gay marriage is simply
visibility. Most people reading
this column, even in the more
conservative corners of the coun-
try, now know someone who is
gay Harvard law professor
Michael J. Klarman made this
point in the Los Angeles Times:
"As more gays and lesbians come
out of the closet, more parents,
children, siblings, friends, neigh-


bors and co-workers know or love
someone who is gay Because few
people favor discrimination
against those they know and love,
every gay person coming out of
the closet creates more support-
ers of gay equality."
We know that's true because it
happened to us. While we always
supported civil unions, we didn't
think gay marriage was appropri-
ate or possible until we started
talking to young people like
Michelle, a former student of
Steve's who lives with her part-
ner, Tina, and their young daugh-
ter in the Maryland suburbs. It
cost them more than $50,000 in
fertility treatments and sperm
donations before Tina became
pregnant a very tangible com-
mitment to family values.
Michelle and Tina were legally
married in Vermont, but they live
in constant fear that the next
emergency room nurse, school-
teacher or benefits manager
won't recognize or understand
their status. Accordingly, they put
all their key documents adop-
tion papers (Michelle adopted
the baby at birth because she had
no biological relationship), mar-
riage license, powers of attorney
- on flash drives and cellphones
that they carry at all times. "The
legal situation is very loose," says
Michelle, "so we have to be pro-
tected to the hilt."
When same-sex marriage be-
comes legal in Maryland later
this year, Michelle and Tina will
be able to relax a little. In most
states, however, gay couples still
don't have the right to make their
unions official. And the forces op-
posing them are well-organized
and highly motivated. But those
forces are on the wrong side of
justice. And history

Steve and Cokie Roberts can be
contacted by email at steve
cokie@gmail. com.


GTAHIER.
UNIVERSAL UCLICK. 2012


_ LETTERS to the Editor


Dependence and debt
As this country spirals deeper
and deeper into an abyss of debt,
I ask why do the people not see
what is happening and elect polit-
ical representatives who will take
the necessary steps to change
course. We have the failed social
democracies of Western Europe
as a guidepost to show us how
our current path will end. We will
end up in financial collapse under
the crushing debt of socialism.
Then our political systems will
collapse and we will end up en-
slaved under despotic rule and
enter a new dark age from which
there may be no return.
I cringe when I hear cries for
cooperation in Washington. These
criers don't understand that the
American way of life, of individual
liberty, freedom and responsibil-
ity, are under assault on all fronts
from world socialism. Socialism
knows of no retreat, no compro-
mise, only steady pressure to con-
vert the world to its viewpoint. It
has been so successful in talking
advantage of compromise that
any more comprise is tantamount
to surrender and defeat.
We can see how successful so-
cialists have been in sending us
drowning in a sea of dependence
and debt by looking at some
data. We can estimate the degree
of dependence by noting the per-
centage of people paying no fed-
eral income tax. Those numbers
are: 23.7 percent in 1962, 12
percent in 1968, 34.1 percent in
2000 and 49.5 percent in 2009.


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in Chroni-
cle editorials are the opinions of
the newspaper's editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Groups or individuals are invited
to express their opinions in a let-
ter to the editor.
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at 352-563-5660.
All letters must be signed and in-
clude a phone number and home-
town, including letters sent via
email. Names and hometowns will
be printed; phone numbers will
not be published or given out.
We reserve the right to edit let-
ters for length, libel, fairness and
good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
350 words, and writers will be
limited to three letters per month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to
352-563-3280, or e-mail to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

We can further see the rise of so-
cialism by looking at the percent-
age of the federal budget devoted
to social dependency programs,
which went from 22 percent in
1959 to 62 percent in 2010. The
worst news of all is Obama has
taken our national debt from $10
trillion in 2008 to $16.7 trillion in
2012. That is the biggest in-
crease that any administration
has ever imposed on us, and he


did it in just four years.
Social justice sounds like a
good idea until you understand
what it means. It means equality
of outcome through progressive
taxation, and redistribution of in-
come and wealth. Give me equal-
ity of opportunity. That's what
made this country great.
Harley Lawrence
Homosassa

A cheap ploy
This business of the Democrats
giving women free birth control
pills under the guise of protecting
women's health is a bunch of
hogwash. What the Democrats
are really saying to women is go
ahead and have sex whenever you
feel like it and don't worry about
getting pregnant. We will take
money from everyone who has in-
surance and by the way, under
Obamacare we will force everyone
to have insurance and give you
free birth control pills. And if in a
moment of passion you should
forget to take your pills, we will
give you free second-day pills to
prevent conception.
And by the way, when it comes
time to vote don't forget that it is
we the Democrats who are giving
you these free pills and if you
want to continue to receive free
things, vote for us. We Democrats
believe in protecting women's
health.
Len Martin
Pine Ridge


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Girl's life full of




turmoil before death


Stepmother,

grandmother

charged
Associated Press
ATTALLA, Ala. Savan-
nah Hardin's life was in tur-
moil long before police say
the 9-year-old was run to
death by her grandmother
and stepmother for al-
legedly lying about some
candy she ate.
Divorce and custody doc-
uments filed in family court
over a period of several
years reflect a history of
fractured family relation-
ships, with Savannah's di-
vorced parents fighting over
her welfare; claims of men-
tal instability and abuse be-
tween her father and his
second wife; medical prob-
lems that required frequent
doctorvisits; and counseling
for the girl who still some-
how managed to remain
among the top students in
her third-grade class.
Authorities say Savan-
nah's life ended in exhaus-
tion earlier this month when
she was forced by her pater-
nal grandmother, Joyce
Hardin Gerrard, to run for
three hours, while her step-
mother, Jessica Mae Hardin,
did nothing to stop it
The grandmother prod-
ded her along cruelly, and
the stepmother didn't inter-
vene until Savannah col-
lapsed in an unconscious
heap, investigators say
Now, Hardin Garrard is
in jail and Savannah's step-
mother is being held in po-
lice custody at a hospital
after giving birth to another
child. Both have been
charged with murder
Jessica Mae Hardin's at-
torneys, Morgan Cunning-
ham and Vince Pentecost,
said in a statement Friday


Associated Press
This undated photo shows
9-year-old Savannah Hardin,
whose grandmother and
stepmother have been
charged with murder.


Associated Press
These photos released by the Etowah County Sheriff's De-
partment on Wednesday show Joyce Hardin Garrard, 46,
left, and Jessica Mae Hardin, 27. Garrard and Hardin -
grandmother and stepmother of a 9-year-old Alabama girl
who died after witnesses said she was forced to run for
three hours as punishment for lying have been charged
with murder and are being held in jail.


"I just can't believe it,"
she said of Savannah's
death.
A few miles away at
Carlisle Elementary School,
students placed written let-
ters and hand-drawn pic-
tures on Savannah's desk,
which was brought into a
main hallway
"Savannah was an excel-
lent student, earning As and
B's in her school work," said
a statement released by
school Principal Linda John-
son. "Her favorite subject
was math; she enjoyed read-
ing books to earn points in
the Accelerated Reader pro-
gram and was very proud
of always meeting her read-
ing goals.... Savannah was a
happy child at school."
Many who knew Savan-
nah described her as nor-
mal and happy She played
and laughed with other kids
at the bus stop, and some-
times rode a four-wheeler
with her dad when he vis-
ited, they said. She loved
horses and her favorite col-
ors were lime green, hot
pink and ocean blue, John-
son said in her statement.


that Hardin was "incredibly
devastated over Savannah's
death" and they would
prove her innocence.
"Unfortunately, when-
ever a child passes away,
our society wants to place
blame, our media wants to
sensationalize and our
elected officials want to
make grandiose statements
that are not based in fact,"
they said.
A defense lawyer repre-
senting the grandmother
said she will be cleared of
any crime.
"Even then, Joyce Gar-
rard and her family will
continue to grieve over the
loss of their beloved Savan-
nah," Dani Bone said.


Neighbors and classmates
created a small memorial
for Savannah, depositing
stuffed animals and flowers
and attaching balloons to a
wooden fence surrounding
the trailer where she lived
with her family off a dirt
road. Included in the infor-
mal memorial was a white
wooden cross hung with a
ribbon and to which a poem
had been attached. A neigh-
bor of Savannah's family,
Gail Denny, held back tears
as she placed a candle and a
stuffed animal at the site
Wednesday She noted that
on Valentine's Day, her
grandson had asked Savan-
nah to be his girlfriend, and
she said yes.


UK media scandal:

2 new computer


hacking arrests


Associated Press

LONDON Britain's
media ethics scandal flared
again just ahead of Rupert
Murdoch's launch of The
Sun on Sunday, with two
men arrested on suspicion
of computer hacking Friday
and a senior police officer
placed under investigation
for allegedly leaking infor-
mation to the Australian ty-
coon's U.K. newspaper
company
Police said that the latest
arrests were carried out in
Hertfordshire and Surrey,
two English counties outside
the capital, under the aegis
of Operation Tuleta, which
is investigating allegations
that journalists broke into
computer systems to steal
information.
But in a statement the
force said that "these ar-
rests are not directly linked
to any news organization or
the activities of journalists."
The force refused to say
whether that meant that the
suspects arrested on suspi-
cion of computer hacking
were police officers or pri-


vate investigators. A spokes-
woman said police wouldn't
go any further than the
statement. She demanded
that her name be kept out of
print, citing policy
Operation Tuleta is one of
three parallel investigations
spawned by the tabloid
phone hacking scandal,
which grew out of revela-
tions that journalists at the
now-defunct News of the
World tabloid routinely
hacked into the cell phones
of those in the public eye to
score scoops.
Dozens have been ar-
rested or been pushed to re-
sign because of the scandal,
including two of Britain's
top police officers, who
were accused of not doing
enough to get to grips with
the tabloid's wrongdoing.
The latest arrests follow
news announced Friday
morning that a senior Lon-
don police officer is being
investigated for allegedly
making an "inappropriate
disclosure of information"
to the paper's publisher
during the initial inquiry
into phone hacking in 2006.


Associated Press
NIAGARA FALLS, N.Y. -
No charges will be filed fol-
lowing a casino scuffle in-
volving New York state Sen.
Mark Grisanti two weeks
ago, authorities said Friday
The Niagara County Dis-
trict Attorney and Niagara
Falls police said they made
the determination after re-
viewing video and talking to
witnesses and those in-
volved in the fight at the
Seneca Niagara Casino.
Calling it "an unfortunate
incident," they said the


case is closed.
"I disagree with the deci-
sion to not press charges,"
Grisanti responded. "How-
ever, I respect the judicial
and legal process."
The first-term Republi-
can and his wife Maria had
said they wanted to pursue
charges.
They said they were at-
tacked when Grisanti tried
to mediate an argument be-
tween two men in the lobby
bar following a fundraising
gala for the Seneca Dia-
betes Foundation on
Feb. 10.


Authorities say Savannah's life
ended in exhaustion earlier this
month when she was forced by her
paternal grandmother, Joyce Hardin
Gerrard, to run for three hours,
while her stepmother, Jessica Mae
Hardin, did nothing to stop it.


No charges in casino

scuffle involving senator


NATION/WORLD


SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2012 A9












NATION


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


NnBRIEFS US, allies aim to end Syrian bloodshed

Reaction

^More than 60 nations plan peacekeeping mission .


Associated Press
Attorney Nadia Kahf listens
Friday to a question at Rut-
gers' Paul Robeson Cam-
pus Center in Newark, N.J.,
as the New Jersey chapter
of the Council on American-
Islamic Relations (CAIR-
NJ), along with the Rutgers
University Muslim Alumni
Association and other
groups, holds a news con-
ference to address con-
cerns about the spying
conducted by the New York
City Police Department on
the Muslim community in
New Jersey.


351-year-old will
sparks dispute
Ipswich, Mass. The
dying wish of William Payne,
one of the state's earliest set-
tlers, created the nation's old-
est charitable trust and
eventually led tenants to build
167 cottages most of them
used by summer vacationers
- on the land he left for the
seaside city of Ipswich. The
rent money has generated
some $2.4 million to help
fund public schools over the
last 25 years. Now, the
trustees want to tear up the
will, convert the property into
condominiums and sell them
to the tenants to settle a 2006
lawsuit filed by the tenants
over rent increases. But hun-
dreds of Ipswich residents
have gone to court to block
the settlement, saying it vio-
lates the sacred intent of
Payne's will and short-
changes the schools. The
Massachusetts Appeals
Court is considering whether
to nullify the settlement and is
scheduled to hear arguments
in the case March 2.

World BRIEFS

Flexible


Associated Press

TUNIS, Tunisia U.S.
Secretary of State Hillary
Rodham Clinton blasted Rus-
sia and China as "despicable"
for opposing United Nations
action on Syria, and more
than 60 nations began plan-
ning a civilian peacekeeping
mission to deploy after the
Damascus regime halts a bru-
tal crackdown on the opposi-
tion. In his most forceful
words to date on the Syrian
crisis, President Barack
Obama said the U.S. and its
allies would use "every tool
available" to end the blood-
shed by the government of
President BasharAssad.
"It is time to stop the
killing of Syrian citizens by
their own government,"


Obama said in Washington,
adding that it is "absolutely
imperative for the interna-
tional community to rally
and send a clear message to
President Assad that it is
time for a transition. It is
time for that regime to move
on."
Obama spoke as a group
known as the Friends of
Syria, led by the U.S. and Eu-
ropean and Arab nations,
met in Tunisia in the latest ef-
fort to halt the Assad regime's
nearly year-old suppression
of an anti-government upris-
ing. The group's actions are
aimed at jolting Assad and
his allies into accepting de-
mands for a democratic tran-
sition, even as they are still
unwilling to commit to mili-
tary intervention.


While the Tunisia confer-
ence offered nothing other
than the threat of increasing
isolation and sanctions to
compel compliance from
Assad, Clinton went on to
predict a military coup in-
side Syria of the kind that
ended the old regimes in
Egypt and Tunisia.
"We saw this happen in
other settings last year, I
think it is going to happen in
Syria," she told reporters at
the end of the meeting. "We
also know from many
sources that there are peo-
ple around Assad who are
beginning to hedge their
bets they didn't sign up to
slaughter people."
Assad allies Russia and
China, which blocked U.N.
action on Syria and are


Associated Press
Demonstrators set up a banner Friday at the Gartago Hotel
in Tunis, Tunisia, during the Conference on Syria. The birth-
place of the Arab Spring hosts a landmark conference on
Syria by high-level U.S., European, Turkish and Arab League
officials.


eager to head off any repeat
of the kind of foreign inter-
vention that happened in
Libya, gave no sign they
would agree to peacekeep-


ers. Moscow and Beijing
have vetoed U.N. Security
Council resolutions backing
Arab League plans aimed at
ending the conflict and con-


Shoe launch creates frenzy


New Nikes with

outer space theme

draw crowds
Associated Press
Sneaker fanatics who lined up
outside stores overnight got their
first crack Friday at a new outer-
space-themed Nike basketball
shoe, getting so unruly in some
cities that police were called to
restore order.
More than 100 deputies in riot
gear quelled a crowd in Orlando,
Fla., where the release of the
$220 Foamposite Galaxy coin-
cides with this weekend's NBA
All-Star Game. In a mall in Hy-
attsville, Md., one person was ar-
rested for disorderly conduct.
The shoes, part of a space-
themed collection, are a draw for
so-called "sneakerheads" who
collect signature sports footgear
and can resell it online at a
marked-up price, sometimes for
hundreds more than retail.
Malls in Florida, New York and
Maryland reported bringing in
police to manage fans clamoring
for the purple and blue shoes,
which have star-like flecks of
white. Some shoppers lucky
enough to get their hands on a
pair immediately posted them for
sale on eBay at skyrocketing
prices: $1,000 and up.
Authorities did have some
warning the shoe could cause
mayhem. Earlier this month, po-
lice were called to a mall outside
Albany after pushing and shoving
broke out during a promotional
event for the shoe.
Orlando resident Gaby Llanos
was in the crowd waiting to buy


Associated Press
Orange County Sheriff's deputies move the crowd back after an announcement Friday morning that a shoe
giveaway was canceled at the Foot Locker at the Florida Mall in Orlando one day after a limited number of
Nike's Foamposite Galaxy shoes at the store sparked a large-scale riot involving hundreds of shoppers. Po-
lice used tear gas and electronic weapons Thursday to disperse the crowds.


two pairs of the shoes when the
rush started outside Florida
Mall.
"It was complete havoc," said
Llanos, 23. "People were running
and hiding in trees so the police
wouldn't find them."
Nike spokesman Matthew
Kneller said the Nike store in
New York City immediately sold
out Friday The shoes were also
quickly out of stock in Cam-


bridge, Mass., where people
began lining up outside a House
of Hoops by Foot Locker at 3 p.m.
Thursday The store only had 12
pairs of the shoes, however, so it
handed out tickets to the first
dozen people in line, and only
those people waited, store man-
ager Terrio Lakes said.
The shoes which are being
sold at Nike stores and select
Foot Lockers, House of Hoops


and Foot Action stores are part
of the Nike's Foamposite line
which originally debuted in 1998.
Their outer space theme is a nod
to Florida, the host state for the
All-Star game, and the longtime
launching pad for the nation's
space program.
Nike has relied for years on its
limited edition sneakers to gen-
erate a lot of buzz with minimal
advertising.


Dancers perform
an outdoor e%
seafront in ti
Greek city of T
Carnival celet
peak Sunday
parades plan
across Greece


Chavez
Cuba for
CARACAS, V
President Hugo
an emotional far
with references
Christ and indep
hero Simon Boli
parted Venezuel
for Cuba for urge
remove a tumor
probably malign
the hand of his y
daughter, Chave
allies of his soci;
movement and t
ing at attention.
"I say this fror
With cancer or v
... come rain, thi
ning ... nobody c
great patriotic vi
the president sa
the date of Vene
dential election.
erenced Bolivar
burdens to desc
with cancer.


Associated Press
rm Friday at
vent on the
he northern


Hard for president to say 'I'm sorry'


Fhessaloniki. Associated Press
rations will
with street WASHINGTON Nearly
ied in cities every president ends up
saying he's sorry for some-
thing America has done -
from a bomb gone tragically
flies to astray to the locking up of
Japanese-Americans during
surgery World War II. This time it's
enezuela disrespectful disposal of
Chavez bid Qurans. And again there are
rewell laced critics who see an apology
to Jesus as a sign of weakness or a
)endence failure of patriotism.
var as he de- Should being president
la on Friday mean never having to say
ent surgery to you're sorry?
he said is Few would go that far, but
ant. Clasping there are plenty of advo-
Coungest cates for keeping presiden-
oun addressed tial regrets to a minimum.
list political So saying the U.S. is sorry
alist political for the mistaken bombing of
troops stand- the Chinese Embassy in Yu-
goslavia or the accidental
m my gut: sinking of a Japanese fish-
Nithout cancer ing boat is widely accepted.
under or light- But apologizing for the
can avoid a moral catastrophe of slav-
ctory Oct. 7," ery is so contentious that no
id, referring to president has done so.
zuela's presi- John Murphy, a University
Chavez ref- of Illinois associate profes-
and Christ's sor who studies presidential
ribe his battle rhetoric, looks at it this way:
Nations aren't that different
-From wire reports from regular people.


"On a personal level, too,
we're much more willing to
apologize if everybody in-
volved knows it was an acci-
dent," he said. "Oops, I did
that, wasn't that stupid of me."
It's easier for a spouse to
apologize for breaking an
heirloom piece of china
than to say "I'm sorry" for
indulging in an illicit affair.
Murphy puts the burning
of Qurans at Bagram Air
Base in Afghanistan in the
category of an accident, al-
though the results have been
tragic. At least 20 people, in-
cluding two U.S. soldiers,
have been killed in violence
that broke out in protest after
Afghans learned that Qurans
were among trash dumped
into a pit for burning.
The U.S. military's policy
is to handle the Muslim holy
book with care and respect
In a letter of apology, Obama
assured Afghan President
Hamid Karzai that "the
error was inadvertent" and
he would make sure it didn't
happen again. A top Penta-
gon official apologized again
Friday at a big mosque in
suburban Virginia.
Republican presidential
hopeful Newt Gingrich de-
nounced Obama's apology.


Associated Press
President George W. Bush
speaks May 6, 2004, to the
media during a statement
with Jordan's King Abdullah
II, left, in the Rose Garden of
the White House in Washing-
ton. Bush apologized for the
abuse of Iraqi prisoners at
Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq
after photographic evidence
was seen around the world.
He called it "a stain on our
country's honor and our
country's reputation."
But he painted it as sympto-
matic of broader weakness
in the Middle East.
"This president has gone
so far at appeasing radical
Islamists," he said, "that he
is failing in his duty as com-
mander in chief."


Iran expanding nuke work


Associated Press
VIENNA- Iran has rap-
idly ramped up production
of higher-grade enriched
uranium over the last few
months, the U.N. nuclear
agency said Friday, in a
confidential report that
feeds concerns about how
quickly the Islamic repub-
lic could produce an
atomic bomb.
The International
Atomic Energy Agency re-
port also said Iran failed to
give a convincing explana-
tion about a quantity of
missing uranium metal.
Diplomats say the amount
unaccounted for is large
enough to be used for ex-
periments in arming a nu-
clear missile.
Iran insists it is not in-
terested in nuclear
weapons and says its activ-
ities are meant either to
generate energy or to be
used for research.
But the report contained
little assurances the coun-
try's activities are purely
peaceful. Instead, it also
confirmed that two IAEA
missions to Tehran within
less than a month had
failed to dent Iran's refusal
to assist an IAEA probe of


suspicions the country has
been secretly working on
aspects of a nuclear
weapons program.
The IAEA team had
hoped to speak with key
Iranian scientists sus-
pected of working on the
alleged weapons program,
break down opposition to
their plans to inspect doc-
uments related to nuclear
work and secure commit-
ments from Iranian au-
thorities to allow future
visits.
But the confidential re-
port said that during those
two sets of talks "no agree-
ment was reached be-
tween Iran and the agency,
as major differences ex-
isted with respect to
approach."
The report obtained by
The Associated Press said
the agency continues to
have "serious concerns re-
garding possible military
dimensions to Iran's nu-
clear program."
The issue of suspected
weapons-related experi-
ments has been stalled for
close to four years, with
Iran insisting the allega-
tions are based on doc-
tored intelligence from the
U.S., Israel and elsewhere.











SPORTS


Dr. Ron Joseph stresses
the importance of your
hands in relations to
sporting activities./B2

CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


.ini Adult sports/B2
Bassmaster Classic/B2
0 NHL, MLB/B3
0 Prep sports/B4
/' .I TV, lottery/B4
0 Golf, auto racing/B5
W Entertainment/B6


'Canes nip Panthers on baseball field


Citrus scores off

Lecanto miscue to

claim 4-3 triumph
SEAN ARNOLD
Correspondent
LECANTO Friday's district
opener between the Lecanto and
Citrus baseball teams was mostly
an evenly matched affair Each
lineup totaled seven hits and one
walk, and the clubs were tied at 3
heading into the final inning.


In the end, Lecanto made one
too many defensive mistakes: the
Panthers surrendered the game-
deciding run by 'Canes senior
catcher Cameron Copas in the
seventh during an attempted pick-
off play, lifting Citrus (3-1
overall, 1-0 district) to
a 4-3 victory
Copas originally
reached on a sin-
gle to centerfield,
and was on third with
the bases loaded and one out
when Panthers senior catcher
Gary Levengood fired the ball
down to first base in an effort to
catch Citrus senior centerfielder


John Smith (double, single, RBI)
off the bag. Smith got back, and
the play provided enough time to
allow Copas to sneak home.
Despite the win, 'Canes coach
Brady Bogart didn't feel like his
team played the better
game overall.
.. ? "We couldn't buy
a big hit at all," he
said. "That's a tes-
tament to (Pan-
thers senior pitcher)
Sheldon Baxter and the way
he mixes it up. I think the wind
took a toll on him with his


Crystal River baseball shuts out Dunnellon 2-0


JUSTIN PLANTE
Correspondent
CRYSTAL RIVER It was a
pitchers' duel out in Crystal River
last night. After an early run scored
by Crystal River's Michael Kidd off
of a Tyler Humphreys double, it was
only a one-run lead that the Pirates
had to maintain.
But that was a task Crystal River
pitcher Donnie Dewees was clearly
up for, as he pitched a complete
game while shutting out Dunnellon's


batters, and helping the Pirates take
home a 2-0 win.
"Being a pitcher, I've always said
that pitching and defense wins
championships," Crystal River head
coach Bobby Stack said. "Donnie's
performance tonight was the best
we've seen out of him this year so
far. We tossed and turned towards
the end there, but felt like his pitch
count was low enough for him to fin-
ish the game."
See Page B4


Page B4


Photos special to the Chronicle
Crystal River-based company Curry's Roofing is a sponsor of Jeremy Clement's No. 51 Nationwide Series car. Curry's
Roofing is owned by brothers Jim and Mike Curry, lifelong Citrus County residents.





Speeding to the top


Local business Curry's Roofing sponsors up-and-coming Clements


J.M. SORACCHI
Staff Writer
If you're watching the
Nationwide Series'
DRIVE4COPD 300 race in
Daytona on Saturday,
check out the back of Je-
remy Clements' No. 51 car.
A name familiar to Cit-
rus County residents will
be displayed prominently
between the taillights:
Curry's Roofing.
On the racer's website
(www.jeremyclementsrac-
ing.com), Curry's Roofing is
listed as a new sponsor for
the 2012 season.
Besides the business,
Curry's Roofing is a name
anyone associated with
youth sports in Citrus
County has seen at some
point.
The family-owned busi-
ness provides sponsorship
for everything from little
league baseball to high
school football.
Brothers Jim, 42, and
Mike, 31, co-own Curry's
Roofing and are avid
NASCAR fans. Both are ex-
cited about their associa-
tion with Clements Racing.
"This is obviously the
biggest thing we've been a
part of," said Jim, while out
at Daytona International
Speedway on Thursday
"We had an opportunity af-
forded to us by this team
that was affordable to our
budget."
Mike said it was good ex-
posure for his company,
but he thought it was also
something for the area to
be proud of.
"We're hometown kids,"
Mike said. "We both went
to high school in Citrus
County (and) it's like bring-
ing a little piece of


NASCAR to share with the
community."
Clements is a rising
driver in NASCAR after
posting his highest points
finish on the Nationwide
circuit to come in 15th
overall. It was also the first
time Clements completed a
full 34-race season.
The challenge facing a
smaller team without back-
ing from Sprint Cup organ-
izations is the tight budgets
from time to time.
"Our expectations are to
try to make the most of this
race and stay out of trou-
ble," said Tony Clements,
team owner and Jeremy's
dad. "Jeremy does an unbe-
lievable job of staying out
of wrecks. He realizes the
bigger picture is we have to
finish races and get re-
sults."
In last year's Daytona
Nationwide race, Jeremy
Clements took a 16th place


finish.
Crew chief Ricky Pear-
son, son of NASCAR Hall of
Famer David Pearson, met
the Currys in 2011 and be-
came fast friends with Jim.
"He's one of those guys
who helps a small team
like us," Pearson said.
"Even though we're a small
team and underfunded, we
expect big things.
"To win this race, it's
going to be a challenge,"
Pearson continued. "The
top 10, that's something we
can do."
Besides just wanting to
be linked to a more ad-
vanced form of auto racing,
the Currys have racing in
the blood themselves.
Jim and Mike have both
raced at the Citrus County
Speedway So has their fa-
ther and Jim's son.
In fact, the underlying
competitiveness of broth-
ers who've raced came out


when Mike said, "Jim's al-
most as good of a race car
driver as I am."
At the end of the day,
both Currys admit the pri-
mary reason for doing it is
the great advertising po-
tential that comes from
being on the back of a
NASCAR automobile.
But being associated
with Clements Racing, a
team that they feel has sim-
ilar values, is also impor-
tant to the duo.
"Like everything we do,
we do it first class," Mike
said. "We're professional
racers and professional
roofers."
Jim didn't mince words,
saying, "We stand behind
our name."
JM. Soracchi is the
Chronicle sports editor.
He can be emailed at
jmsoracchi@
chronicleonline.com or
reached at 352-564-2928.


Economy


brighter in


NASCAR


Some teams still searching

for sponsorship though

Associated Press
DAYTONA BEACH Trevor Bayne won
instant fame with his surprise Daytona 500
victory last year. He earned a small fortune,
too.
He didn't get what he really wanted,
though: a full-time ride.
Going into Sunday's season-opening Day-
tona 500, the 21-year-old Bayne is as sur-
prised as anyone that he's only running a
partial schedule for the Wood Brothers in the
Sprint Cup Series this year. His situation is
even more unsettled in Nationwide, where
Roush Fenway Racing is
committed only to run the
first three races of the season
and is hoping a few good runs
can attract some more
money.
"I figure if we can maybe be
leading the points by then,
then it would be hard for
them to stop racing," Bayne Trevor
said. "But you would hope
you could accumulate some
kind of funding or some kind
of sponsorship after the year
that we had last year. It's just
tough right now for us, and for
every team out there."
Bayne and reigning Na-
tionwide Series champion
Ricky Stenhouse Jr. are two
of the most prominent up- Jimmie
and-coming drivers in
NASCAR. In happier economic times, they
might have Fortune 500 companies falling all
over them.
The fact that neither driver has a full-time
ride in Cup even caught the attention of five-
time champion Jimmie Johnson.
"We're seeing a lot of things showing that
it's turning around, and hopefully it turns
soon and the young guys that are kind of in
the queue now will be able to ride it out and
get a chance when the time comes," Johnson

See Page B3



Panthers crush


Leesburg 10-0


Lecanto shows Yellow

Jackets no mercy in

softball rout
DAVE PIEKLIK
Correspondent
LECANTO The wind was relentless,
Lecanto batters were merciless and the only
kindness the girls softball team showed Fri-
day night was the mercy rule that kept the 10-
0 rout of Leesburg High School from getting
any worse.
The game started early be-
cause of threatening storms
but the only lightning
strikes were from Pan-
thers' bats, as Lecanto (3-
1 overall) collected nine
hits over six innings. If not
for wind gusts of close to 20
miles-per-hour, that could have
included at least two home runs.
The win came three days after the Panthers
struggled offensively and committed seven
errors in a 6-2 district loss to Central High
School of Brooksville.

See .Page B4
















CITRUS COUNTY SP


CITRUS COUNTY'S RECREATIONAL GUIDE TO ADULT SPORTS

a LL.a
(A

0 z


EEDWAY


HITTING THE LINKS OUTDOORS


IN


THE


jAME


Flag football signups imminent


Special to the Chronicle
Men's flag football is
scheduled to start March 15.
It's a semi-competitive 7-on-
7 league that doesn't tackle.
This league is designed
for men ages 18 and up who
love the game of football but
still have to work the next
morning. The last day to reg-
ister will be March 1.
Each team can roster up
to 15 players. To register a
team there is a $50 commit-
ment fee that will be de-
ducted from your total
league fee cost.
Games are played on
Thursday at 6:30 p.m., 7:30
p.m. and 8:30 p.m. at Ho-
mosassa Area Recreational
Park behind the Homosassa
library off Grover Cleve-
land. Each game is two 20-
minute running clock
halves but the last two min-


utes of each half are regular
clock.
Each game lasts about an
hour long. If this is some-
thing you and your friends
want to get in on, call Parks
and Recreation at 527-7547.
This league usually lasts
about 7 to 8 weeks long, de-
pending on the number of
teams joining.
The winner will receive a
$200 gift certificate and a
trophy
Register now for
PLAY program
Registration is open for the
next session of PLAY. The next
session will include flag football,
basketball and cheerleading.
Football will be held at Bicen-
tennial Park on Tuesdays or
Thursday. Basketball will be at
the Citrus County Resource
Center on Mondays or
Wednesday, and cheerleading


will be held at Bicentennial Park
on Thursday from 5 to 6 p.m.
Both basketball and football
have two time slots available, 5
to 6 p.m. or 6 to 7 p.m.
PLAY programs, offered by
Citrus County Parks & Recre-
ation, are designed for children
ages 3 to 5 and the cost is $45
per child. Sign up for more than
one sport in a session and save
$10. Spaces fill up fast and pre-
registration is required.
For more information, call
Crysta Henry, recreation pro-
gram specialist for youth pro-
grams, at 352-527-7543 or visit
www.citruscountyparks.com.

Players compete in men's
flag football action in 2011.
The 2012 version of the
league will be starting soon.
Sign up by March 1 if you
plan on playing.
Special to the Chronicle


Hand an athlete's best


friend and worst enemy


How often have you
heard that an athlete
has great hands? The
hand is man's most useful
tool, not only aiding him in
providing a living, but in
recreation and sports as
well. The hand is the key el-
ement in most
sports from grip-
ping a club, hold-
ing a ball, the
reins of a horse
or throwing the
javelin.
In the current "-:
economy, it is not
prudent to lose -- **
hand function Dr. Ron
due to pain from DOCi
recreational en-
deavors or ORD
sports-related in-
juries. There are few sports
in which the hand is not the
star Hand injuries account
for up to 10 percent of all
sports injuries.
Maintaining an active
lifestyle is the key to enjoy-
ing life. The loss of hand
function due to pain reduces
your ability to play tennis,
golf, baseball or kayaking or
paddle boarding.
As a board-certified hand
surgeon for most of my ca-
reer, I have seen the spec-
trum of hand injuries caused
by a variety of sports. Hand
injuries are the result of the
hand being in front of the
athlete, absorbing the initial
contact in most sports.
A major cause of injury is
direct trauma. A fractured or
joint injury results from a
baseball striking the non-
gloved hand.
The hand being the most
active portion of the upper
extremity, and the least pro-
tected, is therefore at greater
risk of injury In many sports,
the hand is used in a repeti-
tive manner to grip a rac-
quet, bat or ball. Repetitive
stress is not as dramatic or as
apparent a cause as direct
injury, such as crashing your
ATV and breaking a wrist.
Repetitive movements or
use of the hand or fingers re-
sults in a range of condi-
tions, most notably carpal
tunnel syndrome, tendonitis,
trigger fingers and can ag-
gravate existing arthritis to
the point of needing surgery


Carpal tunnel syndrome, a
trapped nerve in the wrist,
causing numbness in the fin-
gers, is commonly associated
with repetition in the work-
place, but is associated in
athletes with overuse of the
digits in gripping.
Look at it this
way, if you use
your cell phone
to text frequently,
you chance get-
ting a non-ath-
Sletic but
repetitive stress
injury called tex-
ting thumb.
Joseph What's the treat-
OR'S ment? My only
treatment would
ERS be to advise you
to get a life.
Finger and thumb injuries
occur most commonly in
sports having a high risk for
falling, such as skiing, biking,
skating of any kind and gym-
nastics. Football, baseball
and basketball currently re-
sult in 15 percent of all in-
juries of the hand.
It is relatively easy to diag-
nose a broken bone (com-
monly called a fracture),
arrive at a treatment pro-
gram and predict a reason-
able time to heal and the
amount of time away from
your sport. This is not the
case with repetitive types of
injury
Certain repetitive injuries
resulting in tendonitis or in-
flammation of tendons are
commonly found at the base
of the thumb or painful and
clicking trigger fingers. Ten-
donitis initially responds to
rest, ice and mild over-the-
counter anti-inflammatory
agents. In the event they do
not improve, cortisone injec-
tions and complete rest with
the proper splint usually
does the job. If not, surgery
may be necessary
Repetitive stress in bowl-
ing can result in bowler's
thumb due to a nerve irrita-
tion from the edge of the
thumbhole. Archery results
in lifeless string hand, which
is really carpal tunnel syn-
drome, the result of inflam-
mation of the finger tendons
repetitively pulling the bow-
string.
Aggravation of an underly-


ing arthritis, especially at
the base of the thumb, by di-
rect trauma or repetitive use
such as gripping a golf club
or tennis racquet is a com-
mon occurrence.
Again, pain may be modi-
fied by ice, cortisone injec-
tion and use of the proper
splint and therapy This does
not cure the underlying
arthritis but aids in return-
ing the thumb to the pre-in-
jury status. Surgery is
occasionally necessary due
to pain because of the natu-
ral progression of the under-
lying arthritis.
For many of these hand in-
juries caused by sports, I
have suggested the use of the
proper splint. The proper
splint really means putting
the injured part to rest by
immobilizing the joints
above and below the injury
Many athletes and people
don't like this degree of re-
striction and do not wear the
splints. This explains the ini-
tial failure of trying to cure
the injury by rest alone.
Thus the addition of a
properly placed cortisone
injection helps quickly di-
minish the inflammation
and thus the pain. Cortisone
injections and proper splint-
ing are frequently a cure.
While my goal is to point
out the frequency of sporting
injuries of the hand in famil-
iar sports, there are several
less common injuries from
sports not commonly associ-
ated with hand injuries. Fish
scale or fishhook punctures
can result in some of the
most devastating infections I
have seen. Rodeo roper's
thumb occurs when roping a
calf and the thumb is pulled
off when caught in the rope.
Regardless of the sport,
the part of your body most
often used is your hand,
hopefully after your brain.
Being aware and paying at-
tention to a hand injury, get-
ting the proper diagnosis
and appropriate treatment
gets you back in the game
sooner
Ron Joseph, M.D., a hand
and shoulder orthopedic
specialist, can be reached
at rbjhand@cox.net or
352-212-5359.


Recreation BRIEFS


Water Safety
Instructor class on tap
Citrus County Parks &
Recreation will off Water
Safety Instructor training from
8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. March 12
through 16; cost is $175.
To participate, individuals
must be at least 16 years old
on or before the final sched-
uled lesson of the course, and
demonstrate the ability to swim
25 yards of the following
strokes: front crawl, back
crawl, breaststroke, elemen-
tary backstroke, sidestroke
and 15 yards of butterfly. Par-
ticipants must be able to float
on their back in deep water for
one minute and tread water for
one minute.
Go to Bicentennial Park
Pool to register. For more in-
formation, call the Bicentennial
Park Pool at 352-795-1478.
Flotilla 15-4
to meet March 6
Homosassa Flotilla 15-4 of
the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary
will meet at 7 p.m. Tuesday,
March 6, at the West Citrus
Community Center, 8940 W.
Veterans Drive, Homosassa.
Visitors are welcome.
The auxiliary is active in as-
sisting the U.S. Coast Guard
with promoting homeland se-
curity, public instruction of safe
boating, vessel safety exams,
safety patrols on the rivers and
coastal waters, search/rescue
and law enforcement air pa-
trols and many other activities.
Anyone interested in joining
this group of volunteers may
call Bob Currie at 352-232-
1516, or e-mail rgcurrie@
bellsouth.net.
Annual benefit bike
ride ready to roll
The annual Clean Air Bike
Ride on the Withlacoochee
State Trail to benefit the Key
Training Center will take place
on Saturday, March 19.
Registration is $25 for
adults; children 12 and
younger are $12, which in-
cludes a continental breakfast
for all entrants, lunch served at
the Inverness Trailhead from
11 a.m. to 2 p.m. and an event
T-shirt. Riders who complete
the 100-mile route will receive
a special commemorative
Century Finisher Medallion.
There is no mass start, al-
lowing participants to com-
mence their 14-, 28-, 48- or
100-mile treks from 7 to 9 a.m.


from the Inverness Trailhead
on North Apopka Avenue.
There are also SAG stops at
the trailheads at Ridge Manor,
Istachatta and Citrus Springs.
Registrations may be made
online or registration forms can
be downloaded and checks
mailed prior to the event,
payable to: Citrus County
Roadrunners, P.O. Box 94, In-
verness, FL 34451-0094. Reg-
istrations are also accepted
the day of the event with
packet pick up from 7 to 9
a.m., and T-shirts only if avail-
able.
This is a rain-or-shine event
hosted by Citrus Road Run-
ners. For more information,
visit cleanairride.com.
Kayak, canoe event
is March 24
The fourth annual Withla-
coochee Wilderness Kayak and
Canoe Challenge will begin at
10 a.m., Saturday, March 24.
Winding River Park on River-
side Drive in Yankeetown will
be the launch site for the pad-
dle downriver to find clues and
answer questions. The approxi-
mately four-mile round trip will
turn around at Bennett's Creek,
end back at the park and has a
two-hour time limit. The individ-
ual with the most correct an-
swers will be the winner and
prizes will be awarded for first,
second and third places.
Hosted by Withlacoochee Area
Residents Inc., all proceeds will
help fund the efforts of the or-
ganization to protect and pre-
serve Florida's Nature Coast
and its water sources for the
benefit of everyone.
Registration fee received
before March 17 is $25. After
March 17, registration will be
$30 per person and will be at
the launch site only (9 to 9:30
a.m.). Fee includes entry, hat,
(guaranteed only for pre-regis-
tration), fruit, water and home-
made lunch.
After the Challenge, partici-
pants and spectators will
gather at the Yankeetown-In-
glis Woman's Club for awards,
door prizes from sponsors and
lunch. The club is on 56th
Street north of the park and is
providing this year's lunch of
homemade pulled pork sand-
wich with beans, slaw and tea.
For registration forms, rally
routes and directions, visit
www.warinconline.com, email
warinc.directors@gmail.com,
or call Jack Schofield at 352-


447-6152 or Jenny McCarthy
at 352-447-2199.
Auxiliary offers
Paddlesports America
Canoeists and kayakers are
boaters, too. Now there is a
new program available to ad-
dress the unique needs of this
audience. Homosassa Flotilla
15-4 of the U.S. Coast Guard
Auxiliary offers Paddlesports
America, a safety program de-
signed to attract the novice
paddle enthusiasts. The four-
hour program presents five
chapters of safety information.
Topics include: Know Your
Paddlecraft, Before You Get
Underway, Operating Your
Boat Safely, Legal Require-
ments of Boating and Boating
Emergencies What to Do.
The program will be from 9
a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, March
10, at West Citrus Community
Center, 8940 W Veterans
Drive, Homosassa. A fee of
$20 for materials will be
charged. For more information,
call Anna Hughes at 352-621-
6963, or Elaine Miranda at
352-564-2521.
Lake Beverly
fishing tourney
The first Lake Beverly Fishing
Tournament will be from 10 a.m.
to 1 p.m. Saturday, March 31.
This is a catch-and-release
tournament for all ages spon-
sored by the Beverly Hills
Fishing Club in association
with Citrus County Parks &
Recreation.
Prizes will be awarded. The
tourney is free for members;
cost is $5 for nonmembers.
Rods and reels will be avail-
able or bring your own.
Participants must register.
Call 352-746-4882 for more in-
formation.
Dragon Boat Festival
to be March 17
Nature Coast Dragon Boat
Club will present its third an-
nual Dragon Boat Festival be-
ginning at 9 a.m. Saturday,
March 17, at Riverside Resort
in old Homosassa.
As many as 10 teams from
Tampa, Tavares, The Villages
and Punta Gorda are expected
to compete against the local
team, which won all three
events last year.
For more information about
the festival, or to get involved
with Nature Coast Dragon
Boat Club, visit the website at
www.meetup.com/
Nature-Coast-Dragon-


Poche grabs lead with 17-pound day in Bassmaster Classic


Associated Press

BOSSIER CITY, La. -
Keith Poche lists his address
as Pike Road, Ala., Louisiana
is "home."
And that showed Friday
Poche hauled in 17 pounds
and 13 ounces of bass on a
blustery day on the Red


River to grab a slim lead at
the 42nd Bassmaster Classic.
The 30-year-old who grew up
in Natchitoches, an hour
south of this weekend's
event, settled into a generous
location early in the opening
day of the competition and
never had to wander
"I had it all to myself


today," Poche said. "The fish
just moved in. I originally
went there to make one quick
stop to get a quick limit (five
fish). I ended up staying all
day and it was game on."
Poche, who hauled in more
than 20 fish Friday, was
boosted by the event's biggest
fish of the day (6-13), which he


hooked around noon.
"I never thought I'd be
leading; it's just a dream
come true," Poche said.
"There are still two more
days of fishing and anything
can happen. I could blank to-
morrow- that's just fishing."
After three sessions on
northwest Louisiana's most


prolific waterway, the winner
will walk away with $500,000
of the $1.2 million purse Sun-
day The second-place angler
will pocket $45,000.
Dustin Wilks of Rocky
Mount, N.C. (16-9), David
Walker of Sevierville, Tenn.
(16-8), and Ott DeFoe of
Knoxville, Tenn. (16-6), were


in contention after Day 1,
while brothers Chris and
Bobby Lane were tied for
sixth at 16-4.
The field of 49 anglers will
get trimmed to 25 after Satur-
day's competition. Many for-
mer champions of the event
will scramble to qualify for
the final day of action.


1
rl
M1


PA SATUR AY, FE




ET





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Avs whitewash Blue Jackets


Caps rout

Canadiens

Associated Press
BUFFALO, N.Y David
Jones scored twice and had
an assist and Semyon
Valamov turned away 28
shots Friday night to lead
the Colorado Avalanche to
a 5-0 victory over the
Columbus Blue Jackets.
Gabriel Landeskog and
Steve Downie each had a
goal and an assist and Matt
Hunwick also scored for the
Avalanche, who were up to
their usual tricks against
the Blue Jackets. They are
32-8-1-1 against Columbus,
including 15-5-1-1 on the
Blue Jackets' home ice.
The Avalanche won a sec-
ond game in a row for the
first time since Dec. 31.
They started the night two
points out of the eighth
playoff spot in the West.
The game was the first
for the Blue Jackets since
they made two major trades
this week.
On Wednesday the Blue
Jackets traded center An-
toine Vermette to Phoenix
for a 2012 second-round
pick, a conditional fifth-
rounder in 2013 and in-
jured goalie Curtis
McElhinney Then on
Thursday night they sent
second-leading goal scorer
Jeff Carter to Los Angeles
for defenseman Jack John-
son and a conditional first-
round pick.
Johnson arrived at Na-
tionwide Arena during the
second period for his phys-
ical and received a loud
ovation when he was intro-
duced to the crowd in the
third period.
Caps 4, Canadiens 1
WASHINGTON -Alex
Ovechkin returned from an in-
jury to combine with Jason
Chimera on a pair of goals 16
seconds apart, and the Capi-
tals ended a three-game losing
streak.
Ovechkin missed Washing-



NASCAR
Continued from Page B1

said. "But it's crazy to think
that Ricky Stenhouse,
Trevor Bayne, you look
through the list and they're
the first two that come to
mind. They've had great
success and white race
cars."
Bayne's stunning Daytona
win kicked off a 2011 season
that NASCAR officials be-
lieve was engaging enough
to give the sport a momen-
tum boost for 2012. It ended
with an epic title fight that
ended with Tony Stewart
edging out Carl Edwards in
the final race of the season.
NASCAR Chief Marketing
Officer Steve Phelps be-
lieves those stories will
drive fan interest this year,
and Phelps sees other signs
that NASCAR is rebounding
from the hit it took when the
economy started sputtering.
"If you go back a couple of
years, obviously, the eco-
nomic downturn certainly
affects our sport more than
any other because it's so de-
pendent on sponsorship,"
Phelps said. "When market-
ing dollars dry up, sponsor-
ship dollars are part of
those (deals) drying up. But
you've seen it start to cycle
back, and it's really getting
healthier and healthier."
Phelps says NASCAR has
seen an overall increase in
sponsorship every year
since 2009 especially in
terms of sponsorship activa-
tion, the extra advertising
and events that companies
do to support their sponsor-
ship programs.
Phelps says NASCAR has
plenty of stories to draw in
casual fans and keep hard-
core fans riveted this year.
Will Johnson rebound from
what was an off season by
his standards? Can Stewart
win another title? How will


Edwards rebound after
coming so close to a title?
And don't forget Danica-
mania, as Danica Patrick
now is racing in NASCAR
on a full-time basis.
"There's so many great
storylines that will help us,
I think, sustain the momen-
tum we've had in the sport,"
Phelps said.
All that said, Phelps ac-
knowledges that seeing


Associated Press
Columbus Blue Jackets' Rick Nash works for the puck in front of Colorado Avalanche's
Paul Stastny in the second period Friday in Columbus, Ohio.


ton's previous game, at Ottawa
on Wednesday, with a lower-
body injury. As it is, the two-
time MVP is having what might
wind up as his worst NHL sea-
son, with only 25 goals and 21
assists so far. He went into Fri-
day with all of four goals in the
preceding month.
But Ovechkin's slap shot from
the left circle off Dmitry Orlov's
pass got past goalie Carey
Price at 8:58 of the second pe-
riod, while the official scoring for
Chimera's breakaway goal still
was being announced over the
loudspeakers.
Ovechkin dropped a knee to
the ice and punched a glove to
celebrate.
Mathieu Perreault scored for
the hosts in the first period,
and Joel Ward added an
empty-netter with 35.1 sec-
onds left. Michal Neuvirth
made 30 saves, although he
did allow the first goal Montreal
has scored against Washing-
ton since March 15, 2011.
Islanders 4,
Rangers 3, SO
UNIONDALE, N.Y. P.A.
Parenteau scored two goals in
regulation and linemate Matt


Bayne and other drivers po-
tentially not getting to race
full seasons because their
teams can't find enough
sponsors is cause for some
concern.
'Are we perfectly pleased
with how everything is?
No," Phelps said. "There's
still some teams with some
sponsorship needs. ... But I
think they're finding their
way on that as well, and it's
getting better."
Beyond Bayne, Roush
Fenway also doesn't have
full sponsorship for its No. 6
Cup car. That'd be a logical
landing place in Cup for
Stenhouse, who won the Na-
tionwide championship for
Roush Fenway last year. As
it stands, Stenhouse will
drive the No. 6 car at Day-
tona and beyond that,
who knows?
Roush Fenway also has
sponsorship space to sell for
Matt Kenseth, the 2003 Cup
series champion.
Clint Bowyer left Richard
Childress Racing in the off-
season; RCR won't field the
No. 33 car for a full season
in 2012. Bowyer's new team,
Michael Waltrip Racing,
still is looking for additional
sponsors for its No. 15 team.
Meanwhile, Red Bull
Racing left NASCAR en-
tirely
Phelps said unsettled
team sponsorship situations
aren't unusual.
"The teams are so de-
pendent on sponsor sup-
port," Phelps said. "That
revenue stream is so impor-
tant to the teams. But that's
the way it's been in
NASCAR for 65 years. That


Moulson netted the winner in a
shootout.
Parenteau scored in the first
and second periods after Moul-
son opened the scoring as the
Islanders grabbed a 3-1 lead.
But the Rangers overcame slop-
piness in front of backup goalie
Martin Biron and got even on
goals by Marc Staal, Marian Ga-
borik and Derek Stepan.
It wasn't enough as Evgeni
Nabokov returned after a bout
with the flu and made 33 tradi-
tional saves and three more in
the shootout. Frans Nielsen
also scored in the tiebreaker
for the Islanders, who had lost
three of four.
Gaborik had the lone
shootout goal for the Rangers,
1-2-1 in their past four. They
have lost consecutive games
for the first time since mid-De-
cember.
Canucks 2, Devils 1
NEWARK, N.J. Cory
Schneider had 30 saves and
Aaron Rome and Mason Ray-
mond scored for Vancouver.
The win came a night after the
Canucks ended the Detroit
Red Wings' NHL-record 23-
game home winning streak.


part's not different."
What is different today,
Phelps said, is the model
teams are using to bankroll
their racing budgets.
In the past, a team would
try to nail down one com-
pany to pay an eight-figure
annual fee to become the
team's primary sponsor. But
there aren't enough compa-
nies willing to do that any-
more so instead, teams
are trying to tie together
enough smaller sponsor-
ships to fund their teams.
Most teams are doing OK.
A few aren't.
"There are realities,"
Phelps said. "It's expensive
to run a team, so if you need
to have six sponsors to make
that thing work, you're going
to have six sponsors. But be-
cause of that, you have
downward pressure on the
other teams, 'Hey, listen, I
only have three sponsors, I
have six races remaining,
how am I going to fill the six
races?' That's why it makes
it difficult, and that's why I
think there's so much focus
on it right now."
But Phelps believes the
teams will get it figured out
And he's confident that
young stars like Bayne and
Stenhouse have full-time
rides in their foreseeable
futures.
"Whenever you have two
up and coming drivers,
young drivers, who don't
have full time support, yeah,
it's concerning," Phelps
said. "It'll get figured out.
Trevor and Ricky are going
to be in good shape. They
are going to be drivers well
into the future."


The Canucks didn't arrive in
New Jersey until 3:30 a.m. be-
cause of snow-related delays
in Detroit. They weren't at their
best, but still won for the ninth
time (9-1-1) in 11 games.
Schneider and a couple of un-
expected goal scorers were
the difference in handing New
Jersey only its third loss since
the All-Star break. The Devils
are 9-2-1 since the break.
David Clarkson scored for
the Devils on a play in which
the puck deflected into the net
off his skate. After a review, of-
ficials upheld the score.
Schneider was outstanding
in winning for the 14th time in
19 decisions as Roberto Lu-
ongo's backup.
Sabres 2, Bruins 1, SO
BUFFALO, N.Y. Derek
Roy scored the decisive
shootout goal in lifting the
Sabres.
Ryan Miller made 35 saves
through regulation and stopped
three of four shootout attempts
in helping the Sabres improve
to 3-0-1 in their past four
games. Andrej Sekera scored
for the Sabres, who are 8-3-2
in their past 13 games.


New arrival Reyes


creates excitement


Marlins SS is

premier added

piece for Miami

Associated Press
JUPITER Despite a
new haircut and new uni-
form, Jose Reyes was easy to
recognize on his first day at
spring training Thursday
Several dozen fans
shouted Reyes' name as
they clustered along a prac-
tice-field fence at the Miami
Marlins' complex, and when
he walked over to sign auto-
graphs, the tumult resem-
bled a New York subway
station at rush hour.
"Don't push! Don't push!"
one fan said.
"Make a line, for God's
sake!" said another.
That's why the Marlins
signed Reyes: to cause a
commotion. They figure
he'll do it on the bases, lead-
ing off and using his speed
to disrupt defenses, like last
year with the New York
Mets when he won the NL
batting championship.
There's also the Big
Apple-style buzz he's bring-
ing to the Marlins, a fran-
chise in transition after
finishing last in NL atten-
dance each of the past seven
years. The Marlins antici-


pate sellout crowds this sea-
son in their new ballpark,
and they're being touted as
potential playoff contenders
thanks to an offseason
spending spree.
The biggest deal was a
$106 million, six-year con-
tract for Reyes, and the
shortstop already ranks
among the most popular
players with Marlins fans.
His No. 7 jersey has become
a common sight in Miami.
"They haven't seen me play
here yet," he said. "When
they see me play, they're
going to fall in love with me,
because I'm a guy who gives
100 percent every day"
They loved him in New
York, where he made the
All-Star team four times and
hit .337 last season with 39
steals and an NL-high 16
triples.
He had been with the or-
ganization since age 16, but
the cash-strapped franchise
didn't make a serious offer
when he became a free
agent this offseason. Mar-
lins officials began courting
him in person at a New York
hotel at midnight, only mo-
ments after the signing pe-
riod began.
He sealed his deal with
Miami at the winter meet-
ings, and Reyes is now so
eager to start earning his big
salary that he reported for
camp three days before the
first full-squad workout


"' ..:. :.


Associated Press
Miami Marlins shortstop Jose Reyes, right, pauses while
running sprints as manager Ozzie Guillen walks past during
spring training baseball Friday in Jupiter.


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SPORTS


SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2012 B3






B4 SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2012



NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
Philadelphia 20 14 .588 -
New York 17 18 .486 3Y2
Boston 15 17 .469 4
Toronto 10 23 .303 9Y2
New Jersey 10 25 .286 10Y2
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 27 7 .794 -
Orlando 22 13 .629 5Y2
Atlanta 20 14 .588 7
Washington 7 26 .212 19Y2
Charlotte 4 28 .125 22
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Chicago 27 8 .771 -
Indiana 21 12 .636 5
Cleveland 13 18 .419 12
Milwaukee 13 20 .394 13
Detroit 11 24 .314 16
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 24 10 .706 -
Dallas 21 13 .618 3
Houston 20 14 .588 4
Memphis 19 15 .559 5
New Orleans 8 25 .242 1512
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 27 7 .794 -
Portland 18 16 .529 9
Denver 18 17 .514 9Y2
Minnesota 17 17 .500 10
Utah 15 17 .469 11
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 20 11 .645 -
L.A. Lakers 20 14 .588 11Y2
Golden State 13 17 .433 612
Phoenix 14 20 .412 712
Sacramento 11 22 .333 10
Thursday's Games
Miami 102, NewYork88
Atlanta 83, Orlando 78
San Antonio 114, Denver 99
Oklahoma City 100, L.A. Lakers 85
Friday's Games
No games scheduled
Saturday's Games
No games scheduled
2012 NBA
All-Star Rosters
All-Star Game: Feb. 26 at Orlando
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Starters
Years
Player Pos Ht Wt A-S
Carmelo Anthony, NY F 6-8 230 5
Dwight Howard, Orl C 6-11 265 6
LeBron James, Mia F 6-8 250 8
Derrick Rose, Chi G 6-3 190 3
Dwyane Wade, Mia G 6-4 210 8
Reserves
Chris Bosh, Mia F-C 6-10 230 7
Luol Deng, Chi F 6-9 220 1
Roy Hibbert, Ind C 7-2 260 1
Andre Iguodala, Phi F-G 6-6 207 1
x-Joe Johnson, Atl G 6-7 235 6
Paul Pierce, Bos F 6-7 235 10
r-Rajon Rondo, Bos G 6-1 171 3
Deron Williams, NJ G 6-3 209 3
Head Coach: Tom Thibodeau, Chicago
Trainer: Keon Weise, Orlando
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Starters
Years
Player P Ht Wt A-S
Kobe Bryant, LAL G 6-6 205 14
Andrew Bynum, LAL C 7-0 285 1
Kevin Durant, OkI F 6-9 230 3
Blake Griffin, LAC F 6-10 251 2
Chris Paul, LAC G 6-0 175 5
Reserves
LaMarcus Aldridge, Por F 6-11 240 1
Marc Gasol, Mem C 7-1 265 1
Kevin Love, Min F-C 6-10 260 2
Steve Nash, Pho G 6-3 178 8
Dirk Nowitzki, Dal F 7-0 245 11
Tony Parker, SA G 6-2 185 4
Russell Westbrook, OkI G 6-3 211 2
Head Coach: Scott Brooks, Oklahoma City
Trainer: Jay Jensen, Portland
x-injured will not play
r-injury replacement



NHL standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
N.Y Rangers 59 3815 6 82164 122
New Jersey 60 3521 4 74169 164
Philadelphia 60 3320 7 73198 183
Pittsburgh 60 3421 5 73186 160
N.Y Islanders 61 2627 8 60144 179
Northeast Division
GP W LOT PtsGF GA
Boston 59 3620 3 75195 136
Ottawa 62 3222 8 72190 185
Toronto 61 2925 7 65182 186
Buffalo 61 2727 7 61152 177
Montreal 62 2428 10 58161 171
Southeast Division
GP W LOT PtsGF GA
Winnipeg 63 3026 7 67161 178
Florida 59 2720 12 66146 165
Washington 61 3026 5 65165 174
TampaBay 60 2727 6 60169 201
Carolina 61 2326 12 58160 184
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W LOT PtsGF GA
Detroit 62 41 18 3 85194 145
St. Louis 61 3717 7 81155 123
Nashville 61 3519 7 77170 158
Chicago 62 3322 7 73192 182
Columbus 61 1836 7 43142 203
Northwest Division
GP W LOT PtsGF GA
Vancouver 62 4016 6 86201 151
Calgary 61 2823 10 66146 165
Colorado 62 31 27 4 66160 169
Minnesota 60 2724 9 63134 156
Edmonton 60 2430 6 54161 178
Pacific Division
GP W L OT PtsGF GA
San Jose 59 3220 7 71172 149
Phoenix 61 3121 9 71161 154
Dallas 61 31 26 4 66158 168
LosAngeles 61 2722 12 66129 135
Anaheim 61 2625 10 62157 173
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over-
time loss.
Thursday's Games
Anaheim 3, Carolina 2, SO
Minnesota 3, Florida 2, SO


Vancouver 4, Detroit 3, SO
St. Louis 3, Nashville 2, SO
Phoenix 4, Calgary 3, SO
San Jose 2, Toronto 1
Winnipeg 4, Tampa Bay 3
Dallas 3, Chicago 1
Edmonton 2, Philadelphia 0
Friday's Games
N.Y Islanders 4, N.Y Rangers 3, SO
Buffalo 2, Boston 1, SO
Vancouver 2, New Jersey 1
Washington 4, Montreal 1
Colorado 5, Columbus 0
Minnesota at Dallas, late
Saturday's Games
Tampa Bay at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m.
St. Louis at Winnipeg, 2p.m.
Phoenix at Edmonton, 4 p.m.
Washington at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Boston at Ottawa, 7 p.m.
Buffalo at N.Y Rangers, 7 p.m.
Florida at Carolina, 7p.m.
Colorado at Detroit, 7p.m.
Chicago at Los Angeles, 8 p.m.
San Jose at Nashville, 8 p.m.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FOr the record


Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Friday in the Florida Lottery:
-_ CASH 3 (early)
r:" 2-1-7
CASH 3 (late)
5-9-5
PLAY 4 (early)
S 2-0-4-8
PLAY 4 (late)
m9-0-9-7
FANTASY 5
13 20 23 28 33
MEGA MONEY
5-27-30-38
SLottey MEGA BALL
12


On the AIRWAVES=

TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
10:30 a.m. (SPEED) Daytona 500 final practice
1:15 p.m. (ESPN) Nationwide Series: Drive4COPD 300
4 a.m. (ESPN2) Nationwide Series: Drive4COPD 300
(Same-day Tape)
BASKETBALL
COLLEGE MEN
12 p.m. (CBS) Vanderbilt at Kentucky
12 p.m. (ABC) Virginia Tech at Duke
12 p.m. (ESPN2) Notre Dame at St. John's
1 p.m. (FSNFL) Boston College at Wake Forest
2 p.m. (CBS) Villanova at Georgetown
2 p.m. (ESPN2) Texas A&M at Oklahoma State
4 p.m. (CBS) Missouri at Kansas
4 p.m. (ESPN) North Carolina at Virginia
4 p.m. (ESPN2) Creighton at Indiana State
4 p.m. (NBCSPT) Air Force at UNLV
4 p.m. (SUN) Memphis at Marshall
6 p.m. (ESPN) Mississippi State at Alabama
6 p.m. (ESPN2) George Mason at Virginia Commonwealth
8 p.m. (ESPN2) Richmond at Xavier
8 p.m. (SUN) Tennessee at South Carolina
9 p.m. (ESPN) Syracuse at Connecticut
COLLEGE WOMEN
6 p.m. (SUN) Oklahoma at Texas
NBA
8:30 p.m. (TNT) 2012 All-Star Saturday Night: featuring
Shooting Stars, Skills Challenge, Three-Point contest and
Slam Dunk contest
BOXING
10 p.m. (HBO) Devon Alexander vs. Marcos Maidana,
Welterweights
GOLF
12 p.m. (GOLF) PGATour: WGCAccenture Match Play
Championship
2 p.m. (NBC) PGA Tour: WGC Accenture Match Play
Championship
2 p.m. (GOLF) LPGA Tour: HSBC Women's Champions
(Same-day Tape)
6:30 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: Mayakoba Classic
(Same-day Tape)
HOCKEY
1 p.m. (SUN) Tampa Bay Lightning at Pittsburgh Penguins
7 p.m. (FSNFL) Florida Panthers at Carolina Hurricanes
BULL RIDING
9 p.m. (NBCSPT) PBR Houston Invitational
(Same-day Tape)

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.



Prep CALENDAR

TODAY'S PREP SPORTS
TRACKAND FIELD
9 a.m. Lecanto at Mitchell Early Bird Invitational
9 a.m. Crystal River at Forest


Philadelphia at Calgary, 10 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Tampa Bay at New Jersey, 1 p.m.
Columbus at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m.
Vancouver at Dallas, 3 p.m.
N.Y. Islanders at Ottawa, 5 p.m.
Montreal at Florida, 5p.m.
San Jose at Minnesota, 6 p.m.
Chicago at Anaheim, 7 p.m.



Camping World Trucks
NextEra Energy
Resources 250 Results
Friday
At Daytona International Speedway
Daytona Beach
Lap length: 2.5 miles
(Start position in parentheses)
1. (23) John King, Toyota, 109 laps, 74.8 rating,
47 points.
2. (27) Timothy Peters, Toyota, 109, 74.9, 42.
3. (15) Justin Lofton, Chevy, 109, 102.2, 41.
4. (19) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, 109, 87.7, 0.
5. (8) Jason White, Ford, 109, 113.5, 40.
6. (10)Todd Bodine, Toyota, 109, 95.7, 38.
7. (22) Chris Fontaine, Toyota, 109, 63.5, 37.
8. (25) Ward Burton, Chevy, 109, 49.2, 36.
9. (4) Ty Dillon, Chevy, 109, 75.8, 35.
10. (26) Clay Greenfield, Ram, 109, 84.1, 34.
11. (28) Parker Kligerman, Ram, 109, 57, 33.
12. (21) Grant Enfinger, Ford, 109, 79.8, 32.
13. (16) Dusty Davis, Toyota, 109, 83.9, 31.
14.(12) R. Hornaday Jr., Chevy, 109, 92.2, 30.
15. (33) Ryan Sieg, Chevy, 109, 84.9, 29.
16. (35) Chris Cockrum, Chevy, 109, 37, 28.
17. (3) James Buescher, Chevy, 109, 96.6, 28.
18. (9) J. Coulter, Chevy, accident, 108, 86.2, 26.
19. (14) Paulie Harraka, Ford, 105, 52.4, 25.
20. (11) Brendan Gaughan, Chevy, accident,
104, 88.4, 0.
21. (17) D. Starr, Toyota, accident, 104, 50.1, 23.
22. (2) Nelson Piquet Jr, Chevy, accident, 104,
71.7, 23.
23. (30) Matt Crafton, Toyota, accident, 104,
40.4, 21.
24. (20) Johnny Sauter, Toyota, accident, 104,
79.5, 21.
25. (36) Rick Crawford, Chevy accident, 101,
43.8, 19.
26. (29) Max Gresham, Chevy, accident, 100,
75.6, 18.
27. (5) Brad Keselowski, Ram, accident, 99,
77.9, 0.
28. (24) Ross Chastain, Toyota, accident, 94,
45.3, 17.
29. (32) B. Silas, Ford, accident, 93, 41.1,16.
30. (1) Miguel Paludo, Chevy, accident, 83,
104.2, 16.
31. (34)TJ. Duke, Chevy, accident, 62, 36.9,13.
32. (7) Cale Gale, Chevy, accident, 61,75.3,12.
33. (13) Mike Skinner, Chevy, accident, 61,
58.3, 11.
34. (31) J.R. Fitzpatrick, Chevy, accident, 61,
40.3, 10.


35. (18) Dakoda Armstrong, Toyota, accident,
33, 41.2, 9.
36. (6) J. Leffler, Toyota, accident, 17, 41.5, 8.
Race Statistics
Average Speed of Race Winner: 119.169 mph.
Time of Race: 2 hours, 17 minutes, 13 seconds.
Margin of Victory: Under Caution.
Caution Flags: 9 for 37 laps.
Lead Changes: 11 among 8 drivers.
Lap Leaders: M.Paludo 1-20; B.Silas 21;
M.Paludo 22-43; R.Chastain 44; M.Paludo 45-
46; J.Buescher 47-54; M.Paludo 55-66;
J.Buescher 67-68; N.Piquet Jr. 69-83; J.White
84-99; J.Sauter 100-103; J.King 104-109.
Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps
Led): M.Paludo, 4 times for 56 laps; J.White, 1
time for 16 laps; N.Piquet Jr., 1 time for 15 laps;
J.Buescher, 2 times for 10 laps; J.King, 1 time
for 6 laps; J.Sauter, 1 time for 4 laps; R.Chas-
tain, 1 time for 1 lap; B.Silas, 1 time for 1 lap.
Top 10 in Points: 1. J.King, 47; 2.T.Peters, 42; 3.
J.Lofton, 41; 4. J.White, 40; 5. TBodine, 38; 6.
C.Fontaine, 37; 7. Wa.Burton, 36; 8. TDillon, 35;
9. C.Greenfield, 34; 10. PKligerman, 33.
NASCAR Driver Rating Formula
A maximum of 150 points can be attained in a
race.
The formula combines the following categories:
Wins, Finishes, Top-15 Finishes, Average Run-
ning Position While on Lead Lap, Average
Speed Under Green, Fastest Lap, Led Most
Laps, Lead-Lap Finish.


BASEBALL
American League
KANSAS CITY ROYALS-Agreed to terms
with INF Alcides Escobar and INF Johnny Gi-
avotella on one-year contracts.
National League
HOUSTON ASTROS-Agreed to terms with
OF Fernando Martinez, LHP Sergio Escalona
and RHP Wilton Lopez on one-year contracts.
BASKETBALL
Women's National Basketball Association
NEWYORK LIBERTY-Agreed to terms with
G Kelly Miller.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
KANSAS CITY CHIEFS-Signed DB
Jacques Reeves.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
CHICAGO BLACKHAWKS-Signed G
Carter Hutton to a one-year contract and as-
signed him to Rockford (AHL).
COLUMBUS BLUE JACKETS-Recalled
RW Cam Atkinson from Springfield (AHL).
DALLAS STARS-Assigned F Matt Fraser to
Texas (AHL).
EDMONTON OILERS-Signed F Ales Hem-
sky to a two-year contract extension.
FLORIDA PANTHERS-Reassigned D
Tyson Strachan to San Antonio (AHL).
LOS ANGELES KINGS-Agreed to a two-
year contract extension with D Willie Mitchell.


Eastside skunks CR, 7-0


Pirates can't

solve Rams in

boys tennis loss

MICHAEL MAKSYMICZ
Correspondent

CRYSTAL RIVER The
Crystal Rivers boys tennis
team didn't have many posi-
tives Friday night The East-
side Rams of Gainesville
showed no mercy on the Pi-
rates, defeating them 7-0 in
a district match.
Crystal River is now 2-1
overall and 1-1 in District
2A-5.
"I am not sure what hap-
pened. My No. 1 player
Brandon Papp could not


find himself tonight," Crys-
tal River coach Bill Reyes
said. "We know what we
have to do. There is not
much more to say"
The Rams' Frasier
Springfield made fast work
of his No. 1 singles match
with Papp winning 6-1, 6-1.
Crystal River's Travis
Swanson faced the wrath of
Jon Yoo with identical set
scores of 6-1, 6-1 at No. 2
singles.
The Pirates' Matt Allen
suffered a similar fate at the
hands of Eastside's Derek
Li, 6-2, 6-1 in No. 3 singles.
On Tuesday, Crystal
River's No. 4 singles player
Ryan Johnson played a
marathon match lasting four
hours, but Friday it appeared
to be over before it started
with the Rams' Max Curtis


defeating Allen 6-0, 6-0.
Aaron Molinero had no
easier a time on the courts.
He was defeated by East-
side's Austin Gillette 6-1, 6-1.
Once again, No. 1 doubles
partners Papp and Swan-
son, who were successful in
their last match, took a pun-
ishing loss by the Rams's
Springfield and Yoo 8-0 in
the pro-set contest.
Allen and Johnson made
a valiant run at No. 2 dou-
bles, only to lose to Curtis
and Gillette 8-3.
"Not much more can be
said, only we need to get our
heads together and to learn
from our mistakes," Reyes
said.
The Pirates' next contest
will be 3:30 p.m. Monday at
Santa Fe.


Citrus stuffs West Port 9-5


Lady 'Canes

raly to deal

Woljack loss

JOE KORNECKI III
Correspondent

INVERNESS The Lady
'Canes softball team defeated
West Port 9-5 by overcoming
a 4-1 deficit with an eight-run
fourth inning Thursday night
in their first district game at
Vicki Overman Field.
"We moved some kids
around, and we're still trying
to find our identity," Citrus
head coach Larry Bishop
said. "I was impressed with
our pitching and hitting
tonight. We were making
things happen, and we were
more aggressive tonight."
With the score tied at 1-1 in
the top of the third inning,
Lauren Decker scored on a
wild pitch to give West Port
(4-1 overall) a 2-1 lead.
Chelsea Day added an RBI
single for a 3-1 advantage,



MERCY
Continued from Page B1

"I feel like we put it to-
gether tonight," Lecanto
catcher Amber Atkinson
said. "A huge improvement
from Tuesday"
Atkinson went 3 for 3 with
five RBIs and a stolen base,
while pitcher Danielle Yant
threw a four-hitter, with
three strikeouts. The Pan-
thers loaded the bases three
times against Leesburg (0-8
overall) and Lecanto coach
Robert Dupler said his team
did a great job of adjusting



CR
Continued from Page B1

The Pirates' offense
struggled a bit against the
off-speed of Dunnellon
pitcher Crystal River man-
aged five hits, while also
drawing six times. The
biggest hit of the game came
off a Humphreys double
that scored Michael Kidd all
the way from first. But after
that, the Pirates just could-
n't find a consistent rhythm.
But the defense saved the
day
Dewees would finish the



BASEBALL
Continued from Page B1

off-speed pitches, but he's
always going to give his
team a chance to win.
"We're just very fortu-
nate," Bogart added.
"Lecanto deserved to win
based on how they put the
ball in play with their big,
timely hits. Fortunately, we
just took advantage of
some crucial errors that
they made."
Baxter pitched a com-
plete game and struck out
seven, including five in the
final three innings. The
senior settled in after
yielding a pair of runs off
43 pitches in the opening
two innings.
But it was 'Canes senior
Patrick Martin who earned
the win. He took over for
senior Eric Nelson after
four innings and forced
five groundouts and three
fly outs during the remain-
ing stretch.
Lecanto (3-3, 0-1) bats
began coming alive in the


and catcher Lillie Guerrero
contributed with a one-out
RBI for a 4-1 Wolf Pack lead,
but she was thrown out from
right field on the play that
denied her a single.
In the top of
the fourth in-
ning, Kayla Friday'
Quesenberry-- Citrus c
a freshman Meadow
pitcher-- came Academy
into the game five innir
for the Lady night. Be
'Canes and technical
proved to be a ties, the
catalyst in the unavaila
game. see Sun
In the bottom sports s
of the fourth in- that store
ning with the
bases loaded -
Quesenberry hit a double in
the gap that cleared the
bases, which tied the score
at four apiece.
The Lady 'Canes (3-3 over-
all) would continue to score
as Aaron McIntyre gave Cit-
rus the lead at 5-4 with an
RBI single. The 'Canes
would make it 6-4 when
Morgan Metzger scored on a

to Yellow Jackets pitcher
Morgan Emerson.
Emerson had four strike-
outs and four walks before
being replaced late in the
game when Lecanto started
scoring at will.
"When we play error free,
we're tough to beat," Dupler
said.
The team had several de-
fensive gems to preserve the
shutout, none better than
third baseman Andrea
Coutu, who was hit in the
face by a line drive off her
glove in the fifth inning.
Stung and shaken for a few
moments, she stayed in the
game after coaching staff


game with nine strikeouts,
while only giving up three
hits for the entire game.
Offensively, Dewees
would help himself out in
the bottom of the fifth. After
hitting a single, and steal-
ing second, Kidd dropped
down a sacrifice bunt to
move Dewees to third base.
After a wild pitch hit the
back wall, Dewees raced
home to give the Pirates the
2-0 lead.
The highlight of the night
came at the top of the third
inning. After a pop-up to
center field, outfielder
Brandon Brooks took flight
and came up with a diving


third when Panthers right
fielder Jimmy Mooney sin-
gled in sophomore first
baseman Jacob Schenck
with a grounder to left to
narrow the Citrus lead to
2-1.
In the top of the fourth,
'Canes senior leftfielder
Zach Gufford scored his
second run of the game off
a Panther error to put his
team back up by two.
The Panthers answered
in the bottom half of the in-
ning when sophomore
shortstop Nathan Hines
knocked in junior right-
fielder Scott Stearns and
sophomore third baseman
Levi O'Steen with a base
hit to left.
In the bottom of the sev-
enth, Lecanto put the ball
in play five times and
loaded the bases with base
hits from Schenck and sen-
ior second baseman Jacob
Sims and a walk by Baxter.
"We were about one
swing away from getting it
done," Panthers coach
David Logue said. "Citrus
is a disciplined and expe-
rienced team, and they're


passed ball.
Melissa Michaud added
an RBI infield single, and
Chelby Lawler added a two-
run double to give Citrus a
9-4 cushion as they scored


s game
defeated
brook
y 10-0 in
ngs Friday
because of
I difficul-
story was
ble. Please
day's
section for
ry.


eight runs in
the inning.
Quesenberry
not only con-
tributed at the
plate, but she
pitched a solid
four innings as
she held West
Port in check
with one run al-
lowed on two
hits. Also, Que-
senberry got
her first-ever


win as a pitcher in her high
school career.
"I saw a big change in the
girls tonight," Quesenberry
said. "They were cheering
more and being more ag-
gressive. It's good to know as
a pitcher to have a great de-
fense behind you. I hope we
keep doing well and use it
as a confidence booster."

examined her.
With Leesburg's Leah Har-
vey on first base after her hit
off Coutu, teammate Kailey
Stephens drilled a line drive
at Coutu on a 0-1 pitch, and
Coutu snagged it She quickly
fired to first base and got the
double play when Harvey -
running hard to second when
Stephens made contact -
couldn't get back safely to
first
With a sore and swollen
face afterward, Coutu was
all smiles about the play,
and praised her team's ef-
forts, adding "I'm really
happy for us. We all hit well
and played good defense."


catch to end the inning.
Coach Stack, although
pleased with the team's
play, commented on some of
the downsides of the game.
"As far as swinging the
bat, we hit some balls right
at people," he said. "We
faced what we like to call an
off-speed guy, and it's not
what we're known to hit.
But, a win's a win.
"Dunnellon played us re-
ally well, kept us off bal-
ance," Stack continued.
"They had a pretty good de-
fense. But tonight, our
pitching and defense really
kept our (heads) above
water."


not going to give you much.
"We're making strides,"
Logue added. "If we keep
putting the work in, we're
going to be okay. I was very
encouraged by some of the
younger guys' at-bats."
'Canes senior first base-
man Hayden Kelly had a
single and scored a run in
the first.
Citrus returns home to
face Central Wednesday
while Lecanto takes on
Hernando Tuesday at
home.
Panthers succumb
to Celtics on road
The Lecanto baseball team
took a 12-5 loss at Trinity
Catholic High School in Ocala
on Thursday night.
The Panthers trailed just 7-
5 before errors opened the
flood gates.
Skylar Summers went 2-for-
4 with two doubles and three
RBIs while Panthers team-
mate Gary Levengood had
two hits, a double and two
runs scored.
Sheldon Baxter was 1-for-3
with an RBI and Jacob Sims
had a hit and two runs.


SCOREBOARD






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Show of strength


Westwood moves


into quarterfinals

at Match Play

Associated Press

MARANA, Ariz. Lee Westwood
and Rory McIlroy suddenly have
more at stake than the Match Play
Championship.
Westwood, who has led 48 of the 49
holes he has played this week, got a
small measure of revenge against
Nick Watney and advanced to the
quarterfinals with a 3-and-2 victory
on Friday at Dove Mountain. Watney
had eliminated him each of the last
two years.
McIlroy built a 3-up lead at the turn
and hung on to beat Miguel Angel
Jimenez of Spain, 2 and 1.
Westwood or McIlroy would go to
No. 1 in the world with the title in this
World Golf Championship. If they win
their quarterfinal matches Saturday,
they would meet in the semifinals
Sunday morning.
"It's a nice incentive," McIlroy said.
"It's nice to have in the back of your
mind. And if you're struggling in a
match and find it hard to get yourself
up, or get any sort of momentum, if
you think about that and you think if
you can really dig deep, you still have
a chance to become No. 1."
Westwood was at No. 1 a year ago,
and it's less of a priority than to cap-
ture his first World Golf Championship.
One year after Luke Donald be-
came the first Match Play champion
to never trail all week Donald
never even played the 18th hole in his
six matches Westwood looks every
bit as dominant.
He is equipped with an improved
short game, and it has carried him
along the high desert. Westwood put
away Watney for good with a pitch up
a steep slope to the top tier on the
15th green, the ball so close that Wat-
ney picked it up for him.
Westwood had never made it out of
the second round in 11 previous trips
to this fickle tournament.
"I'm just happy to be looking for a
different restaurant for Friday night,"
Westwood said. "I had a little chuckle
watching The Golf Channel on
Wednesday morning and listening to
them make all their predictions and
things like that. I don't think they got
many right."
And where did the prognosticators
have Westwood?


Associated Press
Lee Westwood hits on the seventh fairway while playing Nick Watney during
the Match Play Championship golf tournament Friday in Marana, Ariz.


"On the BA 289 on Thursday night,"
he said, referring to his usual British
Airways flight.
Westwood next plays Martin Laird,
who won the battle of Scotland by tak-
ing down former British Open cham-
pion Paul Lawrie, 3 and 1.
Next up for Mcllroy is Bae Sang-
moon of South Korea, the surprise in
his first Match Play Championship.
Bae won three times last year on the
Japan Golf Tour And while he made it
through Q-school to earn a PGA Tour
card, he ended last year at No. 30 in
the world.
He is no stranger in global golf, as
Mcllroy knows all too well.


They played in the final group of
the Korea Open in 2009, where McIl-
roy and Kim Dae-sub were tied for
the 54-hole lead. Bae closed with a 67
and beat them both.
Bae had the only match that went
18 holes in one of the dullest third
rounds ever at the Match Play Cham-
pionship. He took a 1-up lead on the
16th hole against John Senden when
the Australian played a poor chip.
Senden missed a 20-foot birdie putt to
square the match on the 18th, and
Bae completed a long two-putt par
with a 5-footer
"He's been very impressive this
week," Mcllroy said.


Three co-lead at LPGA Singapore


Associated Press
Angela Stanford, seen here Thursday,
co-leads at the HSBC Women's
Champions golf tournament after two
rounds Friday in Singapore.


PGA 's Mexico event

has trio of leaders

Associated Press

SINGAPORE Katie Futcher and
Jenny Shin shot 5-under 67s in the
HSBC Women's Champions on Friday
to grab a share of the lead with first-
round leader Angela Stanford.
American Futcher and South Ko-
rean Shin both had six birdies and
one bogey to reach 8-under 136 and
tie Stanford, who had a 70.
South Korea's Hee Young Park (68),
compatriot Na Yeon Choi (71) and
Japan's Ai Miyazato (70) were tied
three shots back at 5-under at Tanah
Merah Country Club.
World No. 1 Yani Tseng shot a 72
and was 1 under and seven strokes off


the lead, while Michelle Wie had an
81 after a 79 Thursday and was 24
shots behind at 16 over.
The 63-player field in the $1.4 mil-
lion tournament includes 18 of the top
20 in world rankings.
Summerhays, Claxton, Owen
top Mayakoba leaderboard
PLAYA DEL CARMEN, Mexico -
Daniel Summerhays birdied the final hole
Friday for a 6-under 65 and a share of the
second-round lead with Will Claxton and
Greg Owen in the wind-swept Mayakoba
Golf Classic.
Claxton, the first-round leader, shot a
68, and Owen had his second straight 67
to match Summerhays at 8-under 134 on
the El Camaleon course.
Chris Stroud was a stroke back after a
66, and RobertAllenby, Kevin Stadler and
Richard S. Johnson followed at 6 under. Al-
lenby shot 67, Stadler 68, and Johnson 66.


Danica earns pole



for Nationwide


Associated Press

DAYTONA BEACH In
about 24 hours, Danica
Patrick went from her
biggest crash to her biggest
moment in a stock car
The former IndyCar star
won the pole Friday for the
season-opening Nationwide
Series race at Daytona, be-
coming the first woman to
secure the top qualifying
spot in NASCAR's second-
tier series since Shawna
Robinson at Atlanta on
March 12, 1994.
It came a day after she
wrecked on the final lap of a
qualifying race for the Day-
tona 500.
"It's a good turn of events,"
she said.
It also set off a flurry of
Twitter traffic that included
words such as "Dansanity,"
"Danimosity," "Danimite,"
and "Dantastic."
"I really don't think about
it from a girl perspective,"
she said with her proud par-
ents standing a few yards
away "I've been taught from
a young age to want to be the
best driver. ... It was about
being the best driver and not
the best girl."
Patrick won just once in
115 IndyCar starts. She had
seven podium finishes, and
two of them came when she
began dabbling in NASCAR
two seasons ago. She moved
to NASCAR full time this
season, and is scheduled to
drive 10 Sprint Cup races for
Stewart-Haas Racing and
run every Nationwide race
for JR Motorsports.
She will make her Sprint
Cup debut in the Daytona
500 on Sunday
The Nationwide race is
Saturday. She has three top-
10 finishes in 25 Nationwide
races over two years.
She has felt some pressure
since leaving open wheel for
stock-car racing. And now,
after securing the pole,
everything has been ratch-
eted up a notch.
"When you sit on the pole,
you're the fastest car, so if
you don't win the race, then I
just wasted the fastest car,"
she said. "So, yes, it adds a
lot of pressure and I now feel
nervous. Thanks a lot, pole
position. You've made me
nervous already, but it's a
good problem to have and I
don't mind being nervous.


"It tends to bring out some
good things in me, so I'm not
bothered by that But expec-
tations, sure, yeah, anybody
who sits on the pole is going
to (be) expected to do well
because they obviously have
a good car."
Patrick turned a fast lap of
49.250 seconds around the
high-banked speedway, aver-
aging 182.741 mph.
Defending Daytona 500
winner Trevor Bayne quali-
fied second, followed by El-
liott Sadler, Dale Earnhardt
Jr. and Austin Dillon.
And there was little, if
any, animosity about the
qualifying results err,
Danimosity.
"I think it's got a good shot
for No. 1 on SportsCenter,"
Bayne said.

DRIVE4COPD
300 Lineup
After Friday qualifying; race Saturday
At Daytona International Speedway
Daytona Beach, Fla.
Lap length: 2.5 miles
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (7) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 182.741.
2. (60) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 182.715.
3. (2) Elliott Sadler, Chevrolet, 182.671.
4. (5) Dale Earnhardt Jr, Chevrolet, 182.593.
5. (3) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 182.411.
6. (12) Sam Hornish Jr., Dodge, 182.308.
7. (33) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 182.249.
8. (88) Cole Whitt, Chevrolet, 182.109.
9. (22) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 182.094.
10. (6) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 181.829.
11. (38) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 181.635.
12. (31) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 181.496.
13. (44) Mike Bliss, Toyota, 181.43.
14. (1) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 181.327.
15. (30) James Buescher, Chevrolet, 181.2.
16. (43) Michael Annett, Ford, 181.057.
17. (18) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 180.966.
18. (36) Ryan Truex, Chevrolet, 180.93.
19. (11) Brian Scott, Toyota, 180.886.
20. (14) Eric McClure, Toyota, 180.737.
21. (70) Johanna Long, Chevrolet, 180.61.
22. (20) Joey Logano, Toyota, 180.578.
23. (27) David Ragan, Ford, 180.332.
24. (54) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 179.917.
25. (19) Tayler Malsam, Toyota, 179.655.
26. (09) Kenny Wallace, Toyota, 179.594.
27. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 179.251.
28. (01) Mike Wallace, Chevrolet, 179.072.
29. (15) Timmy Hill, Ford, 178.816.
30. (97) Johnny Sauter, Toyota, 178.664.
31. (41) Blake Koch, Ford, 178.501.
32. (08) Casey Roderick, Ford, 178.105.
33. (24) Benny Gordon, Toyota, 178.08.
34. (23) Robert Richardson Jr., Chevy, 178.01.
35. (39) Joey Gase, Ford, 177.641.
36. (51) Jeremy Clements, Chevrolet, 177.235.
37. (40) Josh Wise, Chevrolet, 177.19.
38. (28) J.J.Yeley, Chevrolet, 177.099.
39. (50) T.J. Bell, Chevrolet, Owner Points.
40. (81) Jason Bowles, Dodge, Owner Points.
41. (4) Danny Efland, Chevrolet, Owner Points.
42. (52) Reed Sorenson, Chewvy, Owner Points.
43. (10) Jeff Green, Toyota, Past Champion.
Failed to Qualify
44. (89) Morgan Shepherd, Chevrolet, 177.809.
45. (73) Derrike Cope, Chevrolet, 177.103.
46. (42) Erik Darnell, Chevrolet, 176.967.
47. (47) Scott Speed, Chevrolet, 176.208.
48. (74) Mike Harmon, Chevrolet, 175.898.
49. (76) Donnie Neuenberger, Ford, 173.742.
50. (46) Chase Miller, Chevrolet, 175.002.


Associated Press
Danica Patrick poses Friday after winning the pole position
for Saturday's NASCAR Drive4COPD 300 auto race in
Daytona Beach.


Friday's GOLF LEADERBOARD


Mayakoba Golf Classic
Friday
At Mayakoba Resort, El Camaleon Golf Club,
Playa Del Carmen, Mexico
Purse: $3.7 million
Yardage: 6,987, Par 71
Second Round
Greg Owen 67-67-134 -
Will Claxton 66-68 -134 -
Daniel Summerhays 69-65 -134 -
Chris Stroud 69-66 -135 -
Richard S. Johnson 70-66 -136 -
Kevin Stadler 68-68 -136 -
Robert Allenby 69-67-136 -
John Huh 67-70 -137 -
Billy Mayfair 70-68 -138 -
Matt Every 67-71 -138 -
John Merrick 71-67-138 -
Charles Howell III 67-71 -138 -
Seung-Yul Noh 68-70 -138 -
Marc Turnesa 67-72 -139 -
Michael Allen 68-71 -139 -
Alejandro Canizares 67-72 -139 -
Mark D. Anderson 67-72 -139 -
Stephen Ames 69-70 -139 -
Craig Barlow 71-68 -139 -
Brian Gay 72-68 -140 -
Vaughn Taylor 71-69 -140 -
Briny Baird 71-69 -140 -
Dicky Pride 68-72 140 -
Erik Compton 71-69 -140
Colt Knost 69-71 -140 -
Charlie Beljan 73-67-140 -
David Hearn 68-73 -141 -
Matt Bettencourt 69-72 -141 -
Russell Knox 74-67-141 -
Esteban Toledo 72-69 141 -
Rich Beem 70-71 -141 -
J.J. Henry 72-69 -141 -
Chad Campbell 70-71-141 -
William McGirt 69-72 -141 -
Billy Horschel 69-72-141 -
Nathan Green 73-69 -142 I
Tom Lehman 70-72 -142 I
Paul Stankowski 72-70 -142 I
Gavin Coles 71-71 -142 I
Garrett Willis 70-72 -142 I
Jarrod Lyle 73-69 -142 I
Brian Harman 71-71 -142 I
Brett Wetterich 71-72 -143 +


Hunter Haas 68-75 -
Johnson Wagner 73-70 -
Edward Loar 69-74 -
Gary Christian 73-70 -
Josh Teater 68-75 -
Cameron Beckman 72-71 -1
Patrick Sheehan 70-73 -
Skip Kendall 71-72 -
Tim Herron 70-74 -
Spencer Levin 73-71 -1
Boo Weekley 75-69 -
KirkTriplett 73-71 -1
Jose Maria Olazabal 72-72 -
Sunghoon Kang 68-76 -
Billy Hurley III 73-71 -1
Martin Flores 77-67 -
Brandt Jobe 74-70 -
Michael Thompson 72-72 -
Fred Funk 73-71 -
Heath Slocum 73-71 -
Jerry Kelly 73-71 -
Tim Petrovic 72-72 -
Jose de Jesus Rodriguez 71-73-1
Robert Damron 73-72 -
Chris Riley 73-72 -
John Peterson 73-72 -
Steve Wheatcroft 75-70 -
Will MacKenzie 72-73 -
Charley Hoffman 75-70 -
Stephen Gangluff 70-75 -
Troy Kelly 72-73 -
Garth Mulroy 71-74-1
Failed to qualify
Jhonattan Vegas 73-73-1
Steve Flesch 71-75 -
Jose Manuel Lara 77-69 -
Ben Curtis 71-75-1
Joe Durant 73-73 -
Kent Jones 73-73 -
Richard H. Lee 77-69 -
Jon McLean 71-75--
Harrison Frazar 72-75 --
Shane Bertsch 75-72-
Miguel Angel Carballo 74-73 -
Russell Surber 72-75 -
Shaun Micheel 73-74 -
Peter Lonard 74-73 -
Frank Lickliter II 76-72 -
John Cook 74-74 -
Joe Ogilvie 73-75 -
Kevin Tway 79-69 -


Kyle Reifers 75-73-148 +6
J.J. Killeen 74-74 -148 +6
Lee Janzen 74-74 -148 +6
Armando Favela 75-73- 148 +6
Kyle Thompson 73-75 -148 +6
Oscar Fraustro 76-72 -148 +6
Kevin Kisner 75-73- 148 +6
Thomas Aiken 77-72 -149 +7
Matt Jones 74-75 -149 +7
Steven Bowditch 74-75 -149 +7
Marco Dawson 72-78 -150 +8
Robert Gamez 75-75 -150 +8
Jason Gore 75-75 -150 +8
Alejandro Munoz 77-73 -150 +8
Matt McQuillan 82-68-150 +8
J.P. Hayes 75-75 -150 +8
Rory Sabbatini 76-75 -151 +9
Roberto Castro 75-76 151 +9
Greg Norman 79-73 -152 +10
Scott Brown 76-76 -152 +10
Scott McCarron 74-78 -152 +10
Woody Austin 77-76 -153 +11
Todd Hamilton 76-77- 153 +11
Chad Collins 78-75 -153 +11
Mark Hensby 76-77- 153 +11
Brian Bateman 78-75 -153 +11
Tommy Biershenk 78-76 -154 +12
Alexandre Rocha 79-75 -154 +12
Oscar Serna 78-76 -154 +12
David Duval 77-79 -156 +14
Jose Trauwitz 79-77-156 +14
Mike Weir 79-78-157 +15
David Hutsell 78-79 -157 +15
Daniel Chopra 83-78-161 +19
Zack Miller 81-92 -173 +31
Nick Price 69 -WD
Roland Thatcher 69-WD
DannyLee 73 -WD
Scott Dunlap 80-WD
Accenture Match Play
Championship Results
Friday
At Dove Mountain, The Ritz-Carlton Golf Club
Marana, Ariz.
Yardage: 7,791; Par: 72
Third Round
Seeds in parentheses
Matt Kuchar (13), United States, def. Martin Kaymer (4),
Germany, 4 and 3.
Hunter Mahan (21), United States, def. Steve Stricker


(5), United States, 4 and 3.
Lee Westwood (3), England, def. Nick Watney (14),
United States, 3 and 2.
Martin Laird (38), Scotland, def. Paul Lawrie (43), Scot-
land, 3 and 1.
Peter Hanson (33), Sweden, def. Brandt Snedeker (17),
United States, 5 and 3.
Mark Wilson (40), United States, def. Dustin Johnson
(9), United States, 4 and 3.
Rory Mcllroy (2), Northern Ireland, def. Miguel Angel
Jimenez (50), Spain, 3 and 1.
Bae Sang-moon (42), South Korea, def. John Senden
(39), Australia, 1 up.
Accenture Match Play
Championship Tee Times
Saturday
All Times EST
At Dove Mountain, The Ritz-Carlton Golf Club
Marana, Ariz.
Yardage: 7,791; Par: 72
Quarterfinals
Seeds in parentheses
12:05 p.m.- Peter Hanson (33), Sweden, vs. Mark Wil-
son (40), United States.
12:20 p.m. Matt Kuchar (13), United States, vs.
Hunter Mahan (21), United States.
2:05 p.m.- Rory Mcllroy (2), Northern Ireland, vs. Bae
Sang-moon (42), South Korea.
2:20 p.m. Lee Westwood (3), England, vs. Martin
Laird (38), Scotland.
HSBC Champions
Friday
At Tanah Merah Country Club, Singapore
Purse: $1.4 million
Yardage: 6,547, Par: 72
Second Round
a-amateur
Katie Futcher 69-67- 136 -8
Jenny Shin 69-67-136 -8
Angela Stanford 66-70 -136 -8
Hee Young Park 71-68-139 -5
Ai Miyazato 69-70 -139 -5
NaYeon Choi 68-71 -139 -5
Ji-Hee Lee 71-69 -140 -4
Azahara Munoz 70-70 -140 -4
Jiyai Shin 70-70 -140 -4
Sun Young Yoo 70-70 -140 -4
Shanshan Feng 69-71 -140 -4
I.K. Kim 68-72 -140 -4


So Yeon Ryu
Suzann Pettersen
Chella Choi
Brittany Lang
Mika Miyazato
Inbee Park
Vicky Hurst
Sandra Gal
Anna Nordqvist
YaniTseng
Julieta Granada
Cristie Kerr
Momoko Ueda
Amy Yang
Catriona Matthew
Laura Davies
Sophie Gustafson
Se Ri Pak
Karen Stupples
Karrie Webb
Kristy McPherson
Paula Creamer
Brittany Lincicome
Katherine Hull
Morgan Pressel
Wendy Ward
Amy Hung
Meena Lee
Jimin Kang
Stacy Lewis
Pornanong Phatlum
Hee-Won Han
Melissa Reid
Beatriz Recari
Amanda Blumenherst
Maria Hjorth
Pat Hurst
Candie Kung
Christel Boeljon
Natalie Gulbis
Eun-HeeJi
Tiffany Joh
Hee Kyung Seo
Mindy Kim
Mina Harigae
Paige Mackenzie
Ryann O'Toole
Michelle Wie
Christina Kim
a-Sock Hwee Koh
Song-Hee Kim


3 141
9 142
) 142
) 142
) 142
2 142
3- 142
I 143
2 143
? 143
3- 143
4 143
5 143
5 143
)- 144
? 144
2 144
2 144
? 144
? 144
5 144
4 145
S- 145
2 146
2 146
2 146
4 146
S- 146
5 146
5 146
5 146
6 146
2 -147
3- 147
4 147
S-147
5 -147
4 148
5 148
1 149
7- 149
1 150
6 3-150
7- 150
3- 153
3 153
3- 153
1 160
I 162
6 3-168
79-WD


. O F I



-~ J


SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2012 B5












ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE

Stars rehearse
for Oscar night
LOS ANGELES Tom
Cruise and Angelina
Jolie lit up the Holly-
wood &


with their
star
power
when
they came




megastars each practiced
walking on stage and pre-
senting their categories
Friday, handing out prop
Oscars to stand-ins pre-
tending to be winners.
Jolie said she was jet-
lagged after traveling
with her family from
Sarajevo to Berlin to
Paris to Los Angeles, but
she still looked stunning
in black jeans, heels and
a blazer
"You just blew the
minds of two of our
stand-ins who got a hug
from you," stage manager
Dency Nelson told the ac-
tress, who replied
through a shy smile, say-
ing, "Oh, you're so
sweet"
Even telecast producer
Brian Grazer was struck
by Jolie's charm.
"You have to take a pic-
ture with me first!" he
said as she walked onto
the stage. "Well, you don't
HAVE to," Grazer
clarified.
Jolie obliged.
Cruise also posed for a
photo with the producer,
and likely made the days

Take win-
ners he
presented
prop Os-

beaming
"Congrat-
ulations"
Cruise with his
leading-
man smile.
The 84th Academy
Awards will be presented
Sunday and broadcast
live on ABC.

Maroon 5 singer
finds 'Voice'
NEW YORK- From
moving like MickJagger
to dating Russian model
Anne Vyalitsyna, Maroon
5 front man Adam Levine
hasn't had
problems
attracting
women in
recent
In an
interview,
the 32-
Adam year-old
Levine said that
even
though he was a "nerdy"
musician in high school,
he still always had luck
with the ladies.
"I loved hanging out
with girls... It was never
an issue, how about that?
And, of course, it's been
magnified times 1,000
with this whole (fame)
thing that's happened, so
it's kind of crazy I did
OK I did all right," he
said, laughing.
Levine has found suc-
cess as one of the
celebrity coaches on
NBC's singing competi-
tion show "The Voice."
-From wire reports


Oscar obscurity


Associated Press
Brad Pitt, left, and Laramie Eppler are shown in a scene from "The Tree of Life." For the first time in the three years
since Oscar organizers expanded the best-picture category to more than five films, there's not a single block-
buster in the running. "The Tree of Life" took in a slim $13.3 million domestically.

Academy Award nominations fail to translate at box office


Associated Press

LOS ANGELES It's a common
complaint among movie fans that
the Academy Awards honors films
no one has seen.
Not quite right, but closer to the
mark this year than most.
For the first time in the three
years since Oscar organizers ex-
panded the best-picture category to
more than five films, there's not a
single blockbuster in the running.
Billion-dollar worldwide hits such
as "Avatar" and "Toy Story 3" have
been in the best-picture mix the last
two years, along with such huge
smashes as "Up," "Inception" and
"The Blind Side."
The only contender this time that
has made it to the $100 million
mark domestically is the Deep
South tale "The Help" at $169.7 mil-
lion big business for a drama
with a heavily female audience.
But the rest of the best-picture
lineup ranges from a slim $13.3 mil-
lion domestically for the family
drama "The Tree of Life" to a modest
$78.8 million for the World War I saga
"War Horse" one of the smallest
audiences ever for a film from block-
buster maestro Steven Spielberg.
It's not just studio bottom lines


that are affected when Oscar films
fail to catch fire at the box office.
The Oscar show itself can suffer,
since bigger TV audiences tend to
tune in when enormous hits such as
"Titanic" or "The Lord of the Rings:
The Return of the King" are in the
thick of the awards race.
As of last weekend, the domestic
haul for this season's nine best-pic-
ture nominees totaled $595.6 mil-
lion, according to box-office tracker
Hollywood.com. That's less than
half the business done by the 10
nominees a year ago and about a
third of the revenues for the 10 con-
tenders two years ago. (The Oscars
have only nine nominees this time
because of a rule change requiring
that films receive a certain per-
centage of first-place votes.)
The big hits of 2011 "Harry Pot-
ter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2,"
"Transformers: Dark of the Moon,"
"The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn
- Part 1," "The Hangover Part II" -
just were not best-picture material.
"I think there is a disconnect, but
then I think there's supposed to be
a disconnect It's not about what are
the most popular films. It's the films
deemed by the voting body to be the
best pictures of the year," said Hol-
lywood.com analyst Paul Der-


garabedian. "Often times, what the
academy thinks is a great movie
isn't a movie a general audience
wants to see."
Only four times in the last 30
years has the year's top-grossing
film won best picture at the Oscars
- 1988's "Rain Man," 1994's "For-
rest Gump," 1997's "Titanic" and
2003's "The Lord of the Rings: The
Return of the King."
"The Hurt Locker" domestic
gross just $17 million won best
picture two years ago over "'Avatar,"
which pulled in $760 million domes-
tically and $2.8 billion worldwide.
Critical acclaim and commercial
success merged last year as "The
King's Speech" was crowned best
picture, the Oscar attention helping
it to a domestic take of $138.8 mil-
lion, a fortune for an old-fashioned
period drama.
Most of "The King's Speech"
riches came after Oscar nomina-
tions were announced, the film
packing in audiences in the wake of
all the awards buzz.
That's often been the great value
of Oscar nominations for films that
lack big marketing budgets.
But this season, that usual bump
at the box office has lost much of its
bounce.


From 'iCarly' to 'iFoodie'?


Associated Press


MIAMI BEACH, Florida
- It takes some serious tal-
ent to make carrots cool, but
actor Reed Alexander of
Nickelodeon's "iCarly"
thinks he has the juice to
pull it off.
And it's all part of the 17-
year-old's plan to transform
himself from tween TV star
to food celebrity.
It may sound like a stretch
for a kid barely old enough
to have graduated high
school, never mind have a
culinary degree. But Alexan-
der's efforts to motivate kids
to eat right and lose weight
already are earning him sur-
prising props from some
high-profile foodies.
Why all the attention on a
kid with little food cred?
To Lee Schrager, director


Today's Birthday: Don't be hesitant about elevating your
ambitions in the year ahead, especially where your career
goals are concerned. You're in a far better achievement
cycle at this point in time than you may realize. Make the
most of it.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) -You could achieve some
ample material gains, especially in an arrangement where
you are doing business with someone who is of the oppo-
site gender.
Aries (March 21-April 19) You'd be better off managing
a critical matter yourself rather than giving the assignment
to someone who has never done the job before. At least
you'll know what you're doing.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) It could give you a wonderful
feeling to do something for a loved one without thought of
sacrifice. Follow the dictates of your compassion.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) Don't be reluctant to express


of the South Beach Wine and
Food Festival, it's simple.
Alexander exudes charisma
and confidence. He's pas-
sionate about food and
healthy eating. And, most im-
portantly, he has the ability to
reach a demographic every-
one wants young people.
"That is someone to
watch," said Schrager, who
this year invited Alexander
to do a cooking demo at the
annual festival, a much
sought after gig that puts
him in the company of es-
tablished food names such
as Bobby Flay, Emeril La-
gasse and Rachael Ray
He wants to be the Justin
Bieber of cooking. Besides
starring in many television
and big-screen productions,
he also has appeared on
countless morning shows
and cooking segments shar-


ing some of his favorite
healthy recipes. Alexander
considers himself to be "just
a kid," but his grown-up role
in the kitchen has captured
the attention of many in the
food industry Getting kids
to eat healthy is something
Alexander understands -
he started with himself.
"I was really overweight
and I was lazy and lethargic.
... My eating was out of con-
trol. I didn't have the knowl-
edge and I just wasn't
feeling great," Alexander
said in an interview Friday
"I wanted to be able to find
an answer that would work
for me, but there just wasn't
anything out there from a
kid's point of view."
So Alexander got to work
creating recipes and tips. In
time, he lost 15 pounds and
gained a passion.


Today's HOROSCOPE
your gratitude to someone who has been kind to you just
because you think it may show weakness on your part. On
the contrary, it shows appreciation and strength of character.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Some kind of friendly compe-
tition will prove to be an enjoyable experience for you. You'll
have so much fun that whether you win or lose, you'll do it
with grace.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Don't get upset if your ears start
ringing, because any talk about you is likely to be quite
complimentary, and you'll hear about it later.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) If you feel there is a chance
you might not have shown the proper consideration to a
loved one lately, you should find a way to make amends.
Hugs and kisses generally work well.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) When your mate needs a bit of
cheering up, it behooves you to show a little extra consider-
ation and appreciation for who he or she is. That can gen-


Associated Press
Actor Reed Alexander is
shown during an interview
Friday in Miami Beach. It
takes some serious talent
to make carrots cool, but
the 17-year-old actor
of Nickelodeon's "iCarly"
thinks he has the juice to
pull it off. It's all part of his
plan to transform himself
from tween TV star to food
celebrity.


erally put the relationship back on course.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -You're entering a cycle in
which situations that affect your work or earnings are likely
to start showing some improvement. If it hasn't happened
yet, it should be occurring soon.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) If you're an unattached
Sagittarian who has been hoping to find someone special,
get out and circulate, with an eye to where the nice people
generally hang out.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) You have a special gift for
being able to conclude matters successfully, in ways where
no one is likely to feel shortchanged. Do so when a situa-
tion calls for it.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Go out of your way to com-
pliment someone who is deserving of it. Your comments
could prove to be more important to that person than you
may realize.


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

THURSDAY, FEB. 23
Fantasy 5:2 10 20 28 30
5-of-5 No winner
4-of-5 355 $555
3-of-5 10,066 $16.50
WEDNESDAY, FEB. 22
Powerball: 7 16 17 39 51
Powerball: 32
5-of-5 PB No winner
5-of-5 2 $1 million
No Florida winner
Lotto: 6 12 17 21 26 42
6-of-6 2 winners $7 million
5-of-6 44 $3,415.50
4-of-6 2,434 $51
3-of-6 45,128 $5
Fantasy 5: 5 21 31 33 34
5-of-5 1 winner $255,702.57
4-of-5 312 $132
3-of-5 10,202 $11
TUESDAY, FEB. 21
Mega Money: 9 28 34 40
Mega Ball: 17
4-of-4 MB 1 winner $1.5 million
4-of-4 7 $1,167.00

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num-
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call 850-487-7777.

Today in
HISTORY

Today is Saturday, Feb.
25, the 56th day of 2012.
There are 310 days left in the
year.
Today's Highlight:
On Feb. 25, 1862,
Nashville, Tenn., was occu-
pied by federal forces during
the Civil War; it was the first
Confederate capital to fall to
the Union.
On this date:
In 1779, a militia led by
George Rogers Clark routed
the British from Fort Sackville
in the Revolutionary War Bat-
tle of Vincennes in present-
day Indiana.
In 1836, inventor Samuel
Colt patented his revolver.
In 1901, United States
Steel Corp. was incorporated
by J.P. Morgan.
In 1948, Communists seized
power in Czechoslovakia.
In 1964, Cassius Clay
(later Muhammad Ali) be-
came world heavyweight
boxing champion by defeat-
ing Sonny Liston in Miami
Beach.
Ten years ago: Former
NBA star Jayson Williams
was charged with
manslaughter in the shooting
death of Costas "Gus"
Christofi, a limousine driver at
Williams' estate in Alexandria
Township, N.J. (A jury con-
victed Williams in 2004 of try-
ing to cover up the slaying; it
acquitted Williams of aggra-
vated manslaughter but
deadlocked on a lesser
charge of reckless
manslaughter.)
Five years ago: "The De-
parted" won best picture at the
Academy Awards; its director,
Martin Scorsese, won an
Oscar on his sixth nomination.
One year ago: The
Obama White House broke
decades of tradition, naming
Jeremy Bernard the first man
to ever serve as social secre-
tary in the female-dominated
East Wing.
Today's Birthdays: Coun-
try singer Ralph Stanley is 85.
Actor Tom Courtenay is 75.
CBS newsman Bob Schieffer
is 75. Actress Diane Baker is
74. Humorist Jack Handey is
63. Actress Veronica Webb is
47. Actor Alexis Denisof is 46.
Actress Tea Leoni is 46. Co-
median Carrot Top is 45. Ac-
tress Lesley Boone is 44.
Actor Sean Astin is 41. Singer
Daniel Powter is 41. Latin
singer Julio Iglesias Jr. is 39.
Actors Oliver and James


Phelps ("Harry Potter"
movies) are 26.
Thought for Today:
"Hero-worship is strongest
where there is least regard
for human freedom." Her-
bert Spencer, British philoso-
pher (1820-1903).












RELIGION _
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Music does the talking


Nancy Kennedy
GRACE
NOTES


Autistic organist struggles with words,


SARAH BRYAN MILLER
St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST LOUIS
D avid Kuhns has trouble
finding words; he hesitates
as he speaks. His attention
span is short, his gaze drifts and
he tends to wander away from
the conversations of others after
a few minutes.
Put him on an organ bench,
though, and Kuhns, 38, is com-
pletely focused and at home. His
tongue may have problems with
words, but his hands are adept
and at home on a keyboard.
Kuhns has autism, and music is
how he best expresses himself.
Settling in at the organ Tues-
day afternoon, he announced,
"This is by Massenet. It was writ-
ten for violin. Not all violin
music works on the organ, but


Lenten celebrations
Father Theodore Walsh,
C.P., will lead the 2012 Lenten
Mission at St. Scholastica in
Lecanto. Father Walsh will
speak at Masses at 4 and 6
p.m. today, at 9 and 11:30 a.m.
Sunday, Feb. 26, and at 8:30
a.m. and 7 p.m. Monday
through Wednesday. Exposition
of the Blessed Sacrament and
confessions will take place from
3 to 4 p.m. Monday through
Wednesday. Individual confes-
sions will be heard after
Masses Monday through
Wednesday. Wednesday's
services will be Healing
Masses. Call 352-746-9422.
Our Lady of Fatima
Catholic Church in Inverness
will sponsor a parish mission ti-
tled "Renewal of Faith -
Triad Practice of Faith A
Lenten Retreat" at 8:30 a.m.
and 7 p.m. Monday through
Wednesday at the church, 550
S. U.S. 41, Inverness. Father
Jim Nisbet, world-class Bible
scholar from the Diocese of
Monterey, Calif., will lead the
mission. Father Nisbet will
preach during all weekend
Masses today and Sunday. All
are invited.
Peace Lutheran Church is
at 7201 S. U.S. 41, five miles
north of Dunnellon. For Lent,
Pastor McKee is using Luther's
Catechisms for the midweek
and Holy Week theme. Mid-
week Lenten services are at 7
p.m. Wednesday, preceded by
a potluck meal at 6:15 pm. Call
the church office at 352-489-
5881 or visit www. Peace
LutheranOnline.org.
Every Friday during Lent,
Stations of the Cross will be
walked at noon at St. Mar-
garet's Episcopal Church, 114
N. Osceola Ave., Inverness. A
"Souper Lunch" will follow. On
Good Friday, April 6, Stations of


this does," and he launched into
a note-perfect reading of the
Meditation from "Thais."
Autism, a developmental dis-
order affecting the part of the
brain that deals with communi-
cation and social abilities, ap-
pears in the first three years of
life and afflicts more boys than
girls. The autistic tend to focus
on a narrow band of interests
and have problems in social
situations.
In 1973, when Kuhns was
born, few people had heard of
autism. "I was suspecting there
was something wrong, I guess,
by the time he was 2, but I didn't
know it was autism," said his
mother, Phyllis Kuhns, 77. "He
started out talking at the usual
age, saying 'mama' and 'dada,'
and then he stopped.
"He would be very animated,


the Cross will be walked at 11
a.m., followed by a community
service from noon to 3 p.m.
Stations of the Cross will also
be offered at 7 p.m. Good Fri-
day. Asignup sheet is available
in the parish hall, or call the
church office at 352-726-3153.
Sale away
There will be a yard sale
at 9 a.m. today at the Reflec-
tions Church Ministry House in
Crystal River at 2111 N. Lado-
nia Terrace, off County Road
486. Proceeds will help to pro-
vide funds for the Student Min-
istry's mission trip.
Our Lady of Grace
Catholic Church in Beverly Hills
will host its monthly outdoor
flea market from 8 a.m. to 2
p.m. today on the church prop-
erty at 6 Roosevelt Boulevard
in Beverly Hills off North
Lecanto Highway (County
Road 491). Shoppers are wel-
come. A mobile kitchen will
serve a variety of breakfast and
lunch items. Flea markets take
place the fourth Saturday
monthly except in June, July
and August. The next flea mar-
ket is March 24. For more infor-
mation or to reserve a space,
call Rose Mary at 352-527-
6459 or email wjeselso@
tampabay.rr.com.
Nature Coast Community
Church will have its spring
yard sale from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Friday and Saturday, March 9
and 10. Small appliances, tools,
clothing, furniture and more.
The church is at 4980 S. Sun-
coast Blvd. in Homosassa, one
mile south of the Homosassa
Post Office.
The Ladies Guild of Bev-
erly Hills Community Church
will host its annual rummage
sale from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on
Friday, March 9, and from 9
a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturday,
March 10, in Jack Steele Fel-


but hits the right note with music skills


and then he'd get this faraway
look on his face, like he wasn't
all there, like he was some-
where else mentally," she
added. With no diagnosis, he
was shifted around to different
schools in the Special School
District. "I think he was about 8
when they finally decided
(autism) might be it."
Kuhns always responded to
music, though. He would imitate
the sounds on records, and, his
mother said, "His timing was
perfect." She owned and played
an electric organ and thought
that David might do well with it,
too.
That he did. At 10, when his
legs were long enough to reach
the pedals, he began studying
with a teacher who came to the
house. A decade later, he was
ready for more challenges. Phyl-


Religion NOTES
lowship Hall, 82 Civic Circle.
Bake sale, food and beverages
also available. Find bargains in
men's clothing, linens, lingerie,
blouses, baby items, books,
games, toys, crafts, dresses,
coats, jewelry, shoes, hand-
bags, hats, shorts, slacks,
shirts, sweaters and white ele-
phant items, including small ap-
pliances. Good, usable
household items and clothing
are welcome as donations from
1 to 3 p.m. Wednesday until
March 8. No computer compo-
nents or magazines accepted.
Money earned by the Guild
goes to further the work of the
church. Call the church office at
352-746-3620.
St. Thomas the Apostle
Council of Catholic Women will
have its annual rummage sale
from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Friday,
March 16, on the church
grounds at 7040 S. Suncoast
Blvd., Homosassa. (Rain date
is March 23.) Space rentals are
$15. For details, call 352-
503-7172.
Food & fellowship
Well-known ventriloquist
Julie Boyd is the special guest
appearing Friday at First Bap-
tist Church of Crystal River, 700
N. Citrus Ave. Guest speaker
Judy Rice will also be featuring
during the inspirational dinner
beginning at 6 p.m. Tickets
($12) may be purchased Sun-
day at the church's Welcome
Center or during the week at
the church office. This event is
sponsored by the Women's
Ministry of the church chaired
by Shandry Hembree. Come
enjoy great food, door prizes
and great inspiration.
Chicken and biscuits will
be served from 3:30 to 6 p.m.
today at Floral City United
Methodist Church. Meal in-
cludes chicken and biscuit,
mashed potatoes and gravy,


salad, vegetable, desse
beverage for a donation
$7.50. Takeouts are ava
Call 352-344-1771.
The United Methoc
of Hernando United Me
Church will have their "
can eat" fish fry from 4
p.m. Friday prepared by
Duteau and his helpers
menu also includes fries
grits, coleslaw, hushpup
drink and dessert for $7
Children 12 and young
$3.50.The church is at
Norvell Bryant Highway
(County Road 486), He
Call 352-726-7245. Car
ders can be called in th(
the dinner at 352-726-8
Temple Beth David
annual "Israeli Food F
from noon to 4 p.m. Sui
March 11, features hom
Jewish foods including t
kugels, potato pancake.
stuffed cabbage, chopp
kosher hot dogs and ho
made baked goods. Vis
Judaic Gift Shop and jo
Israeli Folk dancing throw
the day. There will be fu
for the children and a ve
vendors to shop. Admis
free. Call the Temple off
352-686-7034. Sponsor
Tampa Bay Times, with
from Winn Dixie Superr
and Diana's Travel.
Music & mo
The Marksmen, a
grass gospel group, wil
concert during the 10:1
service Sunday, March
New Hope Baptist Chu
Homosassa, 8635 W. C
man Lane. All are invite
The Second Annu
con Benevolence Fun
Southern Gospel Con
featuring Florida's first f
Southern Gospel music
Peytons," is at 4 p.m. S
at First Baptist Church,


lis Kuhns was put in touch with
William S. "Pat" Partridge,
music director at Christ Church
Cathedral. Partridge agreed to
give him a trial lesson and then
to teach him for six months,
"and we'll see how it goes." That
was 18 years ago.
"In the beginning," said Par-
tridge, "I was really dubious.
Then I realized he had a deep,
innate musical talent and that
he really loved it. David has al-
ways practiced diligently He
has never come to a lesson in all
these years without being pre-
pared." In years past, he often
practiced eight hours a day, on a
classical-style Rogers organ in
the family's living room.
Musical phrasing comes easily
to him; he feels the rise and fall

See Page C6




rt and W. Yulee Drive, Homosassa.
of This is a free concert. A love of-
ailable. fearing will be collected with pro-
ceeds going to benefit the
dist Men benevolence fund.
thodist 0 In celebration of Black His-
all you tory Month, the University of
4 to 6:30 Florida Gospel Choir will be in
y Joe concert at 4 p.m. Sunday at
. The Mount Olive Missionary Baptist
s or Church, 2105 N. Georgia Road,
ppies, Crystal River.
'.50. U Join St. Anne's Anglican
er eat for Church at 6 p.m. Sunday for a
2125 E. Bluegrass Gospel sing-along
featuring Annie and Tim's
rnando. United Bluegrass Gospel Band.
rryout or- All are welcome. The church is
e day of on Fort Island Trail West, Crys-
321. tal River.
l's 18th 0 The Celebration Sounds
est" Choir and Orchestra from
nday, Hernando Church of the
remade Nazarene will present a concert
blintzes, at 6 p.m. Sunday at the church,
s, 2101 N. Florida Ave., Her-
ed liver, nando. They will perform a vari-
)me- ety of music. The concert is
3it the open to the public. Come and
in in the bring a friend.
)ughout 0 "Singing Tree," with Ray
in things Belanger on the hammered dul-
ariety of cimer and Lloyd Goldstein on
sion is the double bass, will be in con-
fice at cert at 2:30 p.m. Sunday,
red by March 4, at Nature Coast Uni-
support tarian Universalist Fellowship,
markets 7633 N. Florida Ave. (U.S. 41),
Citrus Springs. "Singing Tree"
re performs music from around
the world with traditional, classi-
1blue- cal and contemporary ap-
Sbe in preaches. Cost is $10 in
5 atm. advance by calling 352-746-
rch in 0655 or at the door. Visit
rood- Naturecoastuu.org.
Ed. 0 First Baptist Church of
Crystal River will present the
jal Dea- renowned Gospel group Tri-
id umphant in concert at 6 p.m.
cert, Sunday, March 4. Free tickets
amily of are available online at
a, "The www.firstbaptistcr.org (seating
Saturday
10540 See Page C2


Shut


my


mouth!

If I were God, I
would've made people
with delay devices on
their mouths or a filter of
some kind.
For example, when
your brain wants to say,
"Poodles aren't real dogs,"
before it comes out of your
mouth the delay device
would kick in and send
you a message: "Really? Is
that really what you want
to say in front of this group
of people who may or may
not include poodle
owners?"
True story I said that
once in front of a group of
women at a local church
(which means I run into
these women at the gro-
cery store) and a woman
in the front row raised her
hand and said, "I have a
poodle."
Crickets chirped in the
silence for about five long
seconds and then she
laughed. She didn't really
have a poodle.
My immediate thought:
Good. Now I don't have to
move to Nebraska.
See, if we had filters,
whenever someone would
say, "Poodles aren't real

See Page C6


Terry Mattingly
ON
RELIGION


Crystal


Cathedral


goes


Catholic

It doesn't take a doctor-
ate in church archi-
tecture to know why
every pew in every
Catholic cathedral allows
worshippers to gaze to-
ward the altar
What happens on the
altar during Mass is the
heart of Catholic faith.
Meanwhile, architects
who design Protestant
churches make sure
preachers have every-
one's attention when they
rise to preach. What hap-
pens in those pulpits is
what matters for most
Protestants.
The Rev Robert H.
Schuller, on the other
hand, asked the legendary
architect Philip Johnson
to design the world's first
great church specifically
built for use as a studio for
televised worship.
Leaders of the Diocese
of Orange will have to
meditate on that fact as
they work to turn the Crys-
tal Cathedral into a spiri-
tual home for Orange
County's nearly 1.3 mil-
lion Catholics, according
to an architect who has
published a sketch of pos-
sible changes in that
structure. The diocese


Page C6


ERIK M. LUNSFORD/St. Louis Post-Dispatch
David Kuhns, 38, practices the organ at St. Lucas United Church of Christ in south St. Louis County, Mo. Kuhns, who is autistic, has been play-
ing the organ under teacher William "Pat" Partridge since 1994. "His musical mind is quite remarkable ... he has perfect pitch," said Partridge.





C2 SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2012


NOTES
Continued from Page C1

is limited to 400). A love offering
will be collected. Call 352-795-
3367.
Kristin Taylor will be in
concert at 6 p.m. St. Patrick's
Day, March 17, at St. John the
Baptist Catholic Church, 7525
S. U.S. 41, Dunnellon. Taylor is
a mother of 12 who has written
eight CDs and is the founder of
THORN Ministries (Thankfully
Helping Others Real Needs). All
are invited. A love offering will
be received. Call 352-489-3166.
St. Timothy Lutheran
Church will host Dry Branch
Fire Squad at 7 p.m. Sunday,
March 25. Bring family and
friends for enjoyable evenings
of music. For tickets and infor-
mation, call 352-795-5325. The
church is at 1070 N. Suncoast
Blvd., Crystal River. Suggested
donation is $10.
Special events
Come for coffee and re-
freshments and participate in a
mystery created by Christian
suspense authors Diane and
David Munson at 10 a.m. Sat-
urday, March 17, at First Baptist
Church, 550 Pleasant Grove
Road, Inverness. They are au-
thors of six thrillers, inspired by
their exciting and dangerous
careers David, a former
NCIS special agent, and Diane,
a former federal prosecutor.
Tickets are $5 per person. Call
the church at 352-726-1252.
David's Tabernacle will
host a one-night revival at 7
tonight at 9585 W. Seven
Rivers Farm St. Crystal River.
Special musical guest Ron
Brewer will lead praise and
worship. Pastor Rick Moore will
deliver the sermon. Everyone
is invited.
First Baptist Church of
Chassahowitzka will celebrate
its 39th homecoming Sunday.
Sunday school begins at 9:30
a.m. and the morning service is
at 11. A covered-dish dinner will
follow the morning service in
the fellowship hall. The church
will install a new pastor, the
Rev. Timothy Pauley, with his
wife, Gail. He was pastor of the
church from April 2000 until
July 31, 2005. The church is
happy to welcome back Pastor
Tim and Gail.
With the help of the Rev.
LoraKim Joyner during the
10:30 a.m. service Sunday, the
Nature Coast Unitarian Univer-
salists will celebrate our rela-
tionships with nonhuman
animals by considering the
wonder of the interdependent
web of existence. Becoming
more aware of this interconnec-
tion brings us a greater sense of
belonging, and also a growing
sense of how we are connected
to one another in beauty and in
harm. The service will end with
an animal blessing, so bring
your nonhuman animal com-
panions or pictures or memen-
tos of their lives. The Nature
Coast Unitarian Universalists
meet at 7633 N. Florida Ave.,
Citrus Springs. Call 352-465-
4225 or visit naturecoastuu.org.
St. Margaret's Episcopal
Church, 114 N. Osceola Ave.,
Inverness, will host a "Ministry
Fair" at 12:30 p.m. Sunday, im-
mediately following the second
service. Representatives from
various ministry groups will
have displays and answer
questions. The Pastoral Care
Commission will provide a light
luncheon buffet. Call the church
office at 352-726-3153.
The Council of Catholic
Women at Our Lady of Grace
Parish will present its "Top Hat
Review Fashion Show" at
noon Thursday in the Parish
Life Center, 6 Roosevelt Blvd.,
Beverly Hills. Fashions by JC
Penney. Prime rib buffet pre-
pared by Elegant Catering. For
tickets ($10), call Char Fontaine
at 352-746-9490 before 8 p.m.
by Thursday Proceeds go to
needed items for the church
and charitable contributions.
Call Candy Sasser at 352-
794-3232.


Temple Beth David will
host "Shabbat Across Amer-
ica" at 6 p.m. Friday at 13158
Antelope St., Spring Hill. Rabbi
Lenny Sarko will officiate. Enjoy
a traditional Shabbat dinner at
6 p.m. followed by a Shabbat
service at 8 p.m. Everyone is
invited. Dinner is $12 for adults
and $5 for children younger
than 13. Reservations required
by Monday. Call the temple of-
fice at 352-686-7034. This pro-
gram is sponsored by National
Jewish Outreach.
The Nature Coast Unitar-
ian Universalists Fellowship in
Citrus Springs will host the
101st anniversary of Interna-
tional Women's Day at 3:45


RELIGION


p.m. Thursday, March 8, featur-
ing inspirational speaker Bar-
bara Surian of Ocala,
singer/songwriter Mindy Sim-
mons, and the all-female trio
Patchwork from Gainesville.
This free event is open to all.
The fellowship meets at 7633
N. Florida Ave., Citrus Springs.
Call Linda Myers at 352-
746-0655.
True Vision Ministries will
present a "911 Help" confer-
ence with guest speakers
Bonita Fagin, Faye Williams
and Pastor Helen Robinson at
7 p.m. Thursday, March 8, and
10 a.m. and 7 p.m. Friday and
Saturday, March 9 and 10, at
Crystal River Church of God,
2180 N.W. 12th Ave., Crystal
River. Call Shante Fagin at
352-257-1265.
"The 52nd Annual Men's
Day and Revival" will begin
with a prayer breakfast at 9
a.m. Saturday, March 10, at
Mount Olive Missionary Baptist
Church, 2105 N. Georgia Road,
Crystal River. The guest
speaker is the Rev. Carl Gad-
son of Galilee Missionary Bap-
tist Church, Hawthorne, Fla.
Events continue on Sunday,
March 18, with a "Men's Day
Service" at 11 a.m. featuring
guest speaker the Rev. Scott
Adams of Ekklesia Community
Ministry, Abingdon, Md. Revival
services will take place at 7


p.m. nightly Monday through
Wednesday, March 19-21, also
featuring guest speaker the
Rev. Adams.
C4 Citrus County Christian
Coalition will have a "March
and Rally for Christ!" at 10
a.m. Saturday, March 10, at the
Citrus County Fairgrounds on
South U.S. 41, Inverness. A $1
donation will help pay for the
rental of the facility. Worship
team Kevin and Cherie Daniels
of Touched Ministry will lead
worship between 2 and 3 p.m.
Also scheduled to appear is the
Christian worship band Saved.
There will be an altar call for
new believers and for prayer re-
quests. Worship, pray and
dance to the Lord. If you can
march, the starting point is Cor-
nerstone Baptist Church on
Highland Avenue in Inverness
at 8 a.m. with other points
along Highland and South U.S.
41. Visit www.blessournation
lord.com to order a T-shirt. Call
Larry at 352-726-0529.
All ladies are invited to a
"SeaSide Escape Women's
Retreat" on Saturday, March
24, at First Presbyterian Church
of Inverness, 206 Washington
Ave., Inverness. Registration
begins at 8:30 a.m. and the
program follows from 9 a.m. to
3:30 p.m. The cost of $10 in-
cludes lunch and materials.
Pre-registration with payment is


required by March 12. Call
Denise Lay at 352-637-0770 or
Tanya Jaros at 352-637-0260
or email: christaned@embarq
mail.com. Child care available.
A five-night Carnival
cruise to benefit Serving Our
Savior (SOS) Food Pantry will
travel to Cozumel and Grand
Cayman on the Carnival Para-
dise on April 30. Funds raised
will benefit the needy in Citrus
County. All categories of cabins
are available. Prices include
cruise, port charges, all taxes
and fees, donations to Serving
Our Savior pantry, round-trip bus
to Tampa, round-trip bus driver
tips and one-way porter tips.
Cancellation insurance available.
Call Lenore Deck at 352-270-
8658 or fax her at 352-270-8665
or email her at cruiselady@
tampabay.rr.com, or call Barbara
Johnson at 352-270-3391.
Worship
The public is invited to
good old-fashioned church
services with friendly people
and good old-fashioned wor-
ship at Trinity Independent
Baptist Church, 2840 E.
Hayes St. (on the corner of
Croft and Hayes), Hernando.
For service times, call 352-
726-0100.
St. Timothy Lutheran
Church has a "come as you
are" service with Communion at


5 p.m. Saturday. Sunday wor-
ship services begin with early
service with Communion at 8
a.m., Sunday school classes for
all ages at 9:30 a.m., coffee fel-
lowship hour at 9 a.m., and tra-
ditional service with
Communion at 10:30 a.m. Spe-
cial services are announced.
Nursery provided. The church
is at 1070 N. Suncoast Blvd.
(U.S.19), Crystal River. Call
352-795-5325 or visit www.st
timothylutherancrystalriver.com.
"Seeing Gray in a World of
Black and White" is the series
topic today at North Oak Bap-
tist Church. "When Faith and
Politics Meet" is the title for the
first sermon at this contempo-
rary-style worship at 6 p.m.
Praise and worship and quiet
times of prayer begin this
unique service for the whole
community. Everyone is wel-
come. KIDZ program for 4-
year-olds through third grade
and childcare is provided for
birth through 36 months. The
church is at the corner of Elk-
cam Boulevard and N. Citrus
Springs Boulevard in Citrus
Springs. Call 352-489-1688.
Faith Lutheran Church,
in Crystal Glen Subdivision in
Lecanto, off State Road 44 and
County Road 490, welcomes
everyone to services. Today at
6 p.m. and Sunday at 9:30
a.m., Pastor Stephen Lane will


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

give a sermon titled, "In the
Midst of Wild Beats," from Mark
1:9-15 for this first Sunday in
Lent. The church is wheelchair
accessible, has hearing assis-
tance, and offers a cry room for
small children. Wednesday ser-
mons for Lent focus on the
"Lies of Lent," with services at 5
p.m. Feb. 29, March 7, 14, 21
and 28, followed by a potluck
supper at 5:45 p.m. Everyone is
invited. Call 352-527-3325 or
visit faithlecanto.com.
First Baptist Church of
Inverness offers the following
Sunday activities: SONrise Sun-
day school class at 7:45 a.m.,
blended worship service at 9
a.m., "Kid's Church" for ages 4
through fourth grade during the
9 a.m. service featuring Bible
stories, skits, music and group
activities; Sunday school
classes for all ages at 10:30
a.m. A nursery is available for all
services except the 7:45 a.m.
class. Evening fellowship is at 6
with various services during
summer months. On Wednes-
days at 6 p.m. is a prayer meet-
ing, "Women in the Life Of
Jesus" study, "Youth Ignite,"
"Praise Kids" and a nursery for
age 3 and younger. Call 352-
726-1252. The church is at 550
Pleasant Grove Road, Inver-
ness. The website is www.fbc
inverness.com.
See NOTES/Page C3


Places of worship that


offer love, peace and ,


harmony to all.

Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF CRYSTAL RIVER AND HOMOSASSA


. ST. ANNE'S
CHURCH
A Parish in the
Anglican Communion
Rector: Fr. Kevin G. Holsapple
S Celebrating 50 Years of
Serving God and the Community
Sunday Masses: 8:00 a.m.
10:15 a.m.
Morning Prayer & Daily Masses
4th Sunday 6:00p.m.
Gospel Sing Along

9870 West Fort Island Trail
Crystal River 1 mile west of Plantation Inn
352-795-2176 i
www.stannescr.org


Crystal River
CHURCH OF
CHRIST
A Friendly Church
With A Bible Message.
Corner of U.S. 19 & 44 East
Sunday Services
10:00 A.M.' 11:00 A.M.' 6:00 P.M.
Wednesday |
7:00 P.M.
Come Worship With Us!
Bible Questions Please Call
Ev. George Hickman
795-8883 746-1239



0 Crystal Qiver
Church of Cod
Church Phone
795-3079
Sunday Morning
Adult & Children's Worship
8:30 & 11:00 AM
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Evening Service 6:00 PM
Wednesday
Life Application Service
Jam Session Youth Ministries & Teen
Kid (ages 4-11) 7:00 PM
2180 N.W. Old Tallahassee Rd.
(12th Ave.) Nursery
Provided


St. Benedict
Catholic Church
U.S. 19 at Ozello Rd.
MASSES -
Vigil: 5:00pm
Sun.: 8:30 & 10:30am
DAILY MASSES
Mon. Fri.: 8:00am
HOLY DAYS
As Announced
CONFESSION
Sat.: 3:30 4:30pm
795-4479

TJ0 CryStal
DE River
Foursquare
Gospel Church
1160 N. Dunkenfield Ave.
795-6720

A FULL GOSPEL
FELLOWSHIP
Sunday 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday "Christian Ed"
7:00 P.M.
Prayer Sat. 4-6pm
Pastor John Hager


Homosassa
First United
Methodist
Church
4 Everyone
Becoming
A Disciple
of Christ

Sunday Worship
8:00 am,9:30 am, 11:00 am
Sunday School
9:30 am & 10:45 am

Reverend
Mark Whittaker
Pastor
8831 W. Bradshaw St.
Homosassa, FL 34448
352-628-4083
www.lumc.org
Office Hours:
8:30 4:30 M-F
Open Hearts
Open Minds
Open Doors


OF GOD


Come
grow
with us!


The First Assembly
of God Family
WELCOMES YOU!

Pastor
Richard
Hart


Schedule of Services:
Sunday:
9:00 a.m.
Adult Bible Study
Youth and Children's
Classes
10:00 a.m.
Spirit Filled Worship Service
Inspiring Message
Youth andChildren's
Ministries
6:00 p.m
Youth Ministries
Wednesday 7:00 p.m
Praise and Worship
In-Depth Bible Study
Youth and Children's
Ministries
Nursery Provided Every Service
Loaton

M75W.Gliii akHy


?Temple
Beth David
13158 Antelope St.
Spring Hill, FL 34609
352-686-7034
Rabbi
Lenny Sarko
Services
Friday 8PM
Saturday 10AM
Religious School
Sunday
9AM-Noon

t St. Timothy t
Lutheran Church
ELCA
Saturday Informal Worship
w/Communion 5:00 PM
Sunday Early Service
w/Communion 8:00 AM
Sunday School
All Ages 9:30 AM
(Coffee Fellowship hour@ 9:00 AM)
Sunday Traditional Service
w/Communion 10:30 AM
Special services are announced.
Nursery provided.
1070 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River
For more information call
795-5325
www.sttimothylutherancrystalriver.com
Rev. David S. Bradford, Pastor




HcK-, YOU'LL FIND
CKPING FAMILY
IN CHKIST!

CKYSTXL


UNITED
METHODIST
CHU KCH
4801 N. Citrus Ave.
(2 Mi. N Of US 19)

795-3148
www.crumc.com
Rev. David Rawls, Pastor
Sunday Worship
8:00 Early Communion
9:30 Praise & Worship
11:00 Traditional
Bible Study
At 9:30 & 11:00 For all ages.
Wednesday 6:30
Nursery available at all services.
Youth Fellowship
Sunday 4:30
Wednesday 6:30
Bright Beginnings
Preschool
6 Weeks-VPK
Mon. Fri. 6:30a.m.-6pm.
795-1240
A Stephen Ministry Provider
L 0 i


THE -
SALVATION
AD V CIRUS COUNTY
ARMYI CORPS.
SUNDAY:
Sunday School 9:45 A.M.
Morning Worship Hour
11:00 A.M.

TUESDAY:
Home League 11:30 A.M.
Lt. Vanessa Miller





ST. THOMAS
CATHOLIC
CHURCH


MASSES:
aturday 4:30 P.M.
unday 8:00 A.M.
10:30 A.M.






West
Citrus
Church of Christ
9592 W. Deep Woods Dr.
Crystal River, FL 34465
352.564.8565
www.westcitruscoc.com
W. Deep Woods Dr.






US Hwy. 19


SERVICES
Sunday AM
Bible Study 9:30
Worship 10:30
Sunday PM
Worship 6:00
Wednesday
PM
Bible Study 7:00
EVANGELIST
Bob Dickey


Special
Event or
Weekly
Services
Please Call
Beverly at
564-2912
For
Advertising
Information

z First Baptist
Church of
Homosassa
"Come Worship with Us"
10540 W. Yulee Drive Homosassa
628-3858
Rev. J. Alan Ritter
Rev. Steve Gerhart, Assoc. Pastor
Sunday
9:00 am Sunday School (All Age Groups)
10:30 am Worship Celebration
Choir / Special Music / "Kidz Worship"
Sunday Night
6 pm Worship Celebration
Wednesday Night
6:30 pm Worship Celebration
Children's Awanas Group
Youth Activities
www.fbchomosassa.org





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NOTES
Continued from Page C2

St. Anne's Anglican
Church is on Fort Island Trail
West, Crystal River. St. Anne's
celebrates the first Sunday in
Lent with services at 8 and
10:15 a.m. St. Anne's will host
"Our Fathers Table" today from
11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Overeaters Anonymous meets
Wednesday at 10:30 a.m. in
the parish library. Recovering
from food addiction meets at 1
p.m. Thursday in the parish li-
brary. Alcoholics Anonymous
meets at 8 p.m. Friday and
Monday in the parish library.
Join St. Anne's at 6 p.m. Sun-
day for a Bluegrass Gospel
sing-along. Annie and Tim's
United Bluegrass Gospel Band
will perform. All are welcome.
First Presbyterian
Church of Inverness is at 206
Washington Ave. Sunday wor-
ship schedule: Traditional serv-
ices at 8 and 11 a.m., casual
service at 9:30 a.m., Sunday
school hour at 9:30 a.m., and
coffee hour from 9 to 11 a.m.
For the first Sunday of Lent,
theme is "Spiritual Cataracts,"
and the Rev. Craig S. Davies
will preach on "The Blindness


RELIGION


of Prejudice," with readings
from Mark 8:27-33. The church
golf scramble is at 1:30 p.m.
Saturday, March 10, at Citrus
Hills Golf and Country Club.
Cost is $23. Anyone can play.
To sign up, call Greg Andre-
ichuk at 352-860-0426 or Frank
Mattox at 352-341-2484.
St. Paul's Lutheran
Church, 6150 N. Lecanto High-
way, Beverly Hills, has Sunday
services at 8 and 10:30 a.m.
with Sunday school and Bible
class at 9:15 a.m. A new Bible
information class begins at 6
p.m. Monday in the fellowship
room. Regular choir rehearsal is
at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday. Lenten
services are at 4 and 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday with a potluck meal
at 5:15 p.m. The Senior Group
will travel Thursday to the home
of Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings in
Hawthorne, meeting at the
church at 9:45 a.m. The trip will
include lunch at "The Yearling"
restaurant. St. Paul's kinder-
garten students will present the
play, "Where the Wild Things
Are" and Precious Lambs Pre-
school students will present the
musical, "The Little Red Hen" at
10:30 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Friday
in the sanctuary. Visitors are
welcome. Call 352-489-3027.
St. Margaret's Episcopal
Church's Sunday services in-


clude the Holy Eucharist Rite 1
service at 8 a.m. and Holy Eu-
charist Rite 2 service at 10:30
a.m. Adult Sunday school be-
gins at 9:30 a.m. Family Eu-
charist service, children's
church and Youth Fun Day are
all at 10:30 a.m.
Part I of a series of ser-
mons about the "24 hours that
changed the world" will begin
Sunday at Crystal River
United Methodist Church,
4801 N. Citrus Ave. The Rev.
David Rawls will start the series
based on Mark 14:12-25 on
events surrounding the Last
Supper. Traditional services are
at 8 and 11 a.m. and a contem-
porary service is at 9:30 a.m.
Call 352-795-3148.
Floral City United
Methodist Church conducts
Sunday services at 8 a.m. in
the 1884 church and 10:30
a.m. in the main sanctuary.
Bible studies are at 10 a.m.
Tuesday and 6 p.m. Wednes-
days. Call the church office at
352-344-1771.
Regular Sunday worship
services are at 8:15 and 11
a.m. at Joy Lutheran Church
on S.W. State Road 2100 at
83rd Place, Ocala. Sunday
school classes are at 9:45 a.m.
The German language worship
service is at 3 p.m. the first


Sunday monthly. The Wednes-
day evening worship service is
at 6:45. Pastor Ed Holloway
leads Bible study in the Gospel
of Luke at 3 p.m. Thursday.
The community is welcome.
Call 352-854-4509, Ext. 221.
First Baptist Church of
Floral City, 8545 E. Magnolia
St., invites everyone to share in
Sunday's worship at the 8:30
a.m. blended service and 11
a.m. traditional service. Coffee
and doughnuts are served in
the fellowship hall from 9 to
9:45 a.m. Sunday school
classes for all ages begin at
9:45 a.m. Sunday evening
Bible study starts at 6. Wednes-
day services begin at 6:30 p.m.
and include children's ministry,
youth ministry (grades 6
through 12), adult Bible study
and prayer meeting. Sanctuary
choir practice follows at 8 p.m.
Call 352-726-4296 or visit
www.fbcfloralcity.org.
Good Shepherd Lutheran
Church invites the public to
worship services at 8:30 and 11
a.m. Sunday. A coffee hour fol-
lows both services. The church
is barrier free and offers a free
tape ministry and large-print
service helps and hearing de-
vices. A nursery attendant is
available for children ages 3
and younger. All are welcome.

Floral City
United Methodist
Church
8478 East Marvin St.
(across from Floral City School)
Sunday School
9:05 A.M.
Sunday Worship Service
10:30 A.M. Sanctuary
8:00 A.M. Service in the 1884 Church
Bible Study
Tuesday 10:00 A.M.
Wednesday 6:00 P.M.
"We strive to make
newcomers feel at home."
Wheel Chair Access
Nursery Available
Rev. Steven Todd Riddle
Church 344-1771
WEBSITE: floralcitychurch.com


On Wednesday during Lent,
evening prayers are at 7. The
church will have a rededication
service at 9:30 a.m. Sunday,
March 4, with guest speaker the
Rev. Rita Gardner Tweed, as-
sistant to the bishop. A single
worship service with refresh-
ments will follow the service.
The church is on County Road
486, opposite Citrus Hills Boule-
vard in Hernando. Call the
church for more information at
352-746-7161.
Inverness Church of God
Sunday worship services are at
8:30 and 10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m.
Children's church is during the
10:30 a.m. worship service in
the Children's Ministries Build-
ing. Sunday school begins at
9:30 a.m. with classes for
everyone The church has many
Christian education opportuni-
ties at 7 p.m. Wednesday.
Missionettes and Royal
Rangers Clubs meet for chil-
dren from the age of 3. The
adult class meets in rooms 105
and 106 at 7 p.m. Wednesday.
The youth group, "Define Grav-
ity," meets at 7 p.m. Friday in
the Youth Ministries Building
with Youth Pastor Jon Uncle.
The church is at 416 U.S. 41
South, Inverness. Call the
church at 352-726-4524.
NorthRidge Church wel-


SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2012 C3

comes the community to Sun-
day worship services at 9 a.m.
in the Inverness Woman's Club
building at 1715 Forest Drive,
across from the Whispering
Pines Park entrance. North-
Ridge is a nondenominational
church where you can come as
you are. Coffee and fellowship
time follows the service. The
home group, "Faith Journey
Bible Study," meets the second
and fourth Wednesday monthly,
beginning with a potluck dinner
at 6:30 p.m., followed by the
video series of "Faith Lessons."
For details and location, call
Kennie Berger at 352-302-5813.
First Christian Church of
Inverness invites everyone to
worship and fellowship. Sunday
school is at 9 a.m. and the wor-
ship service is at 10:15 a.m.
Wednesday evening meals, be-
ginning at 4:45 p.m., are fol-
lowed by choir practice at 5 and
prayer and Bible study at 6 p.m.
The meals are $3 for adults and
$1.50 for children under age 12.
Call the church at 352-344-
1908, email fccinv@yahoo.com
or visit www.fccinv.com. The
church is at 2018 Colonnade St.
Peace Lutheran Church
has Sunday morning Bible
classes for children and youths

See NOTES/Page C4


O


Good

Shepherd

Lutheran

Church
ELCA








Worship

8:30 am

11:00 am
Fellowship After Worship
Weekly Communion
Sunday School 9:45am
Nursery Provided

Reverend
Kenneth C. Blyth
Pastor
439 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, Florida
Building is Barrier-Free
gshernando.org


35-4676


Glory to Glory
.Ministries
i A Family
United by
The Love Of Jesus!
Non-Denominational
Spirit Filled Worship
Family Friendly
Sunday 10:30 a.m.
Wednesday 7:00 p.m.
Bible Study
(352) 566-6613
www.G2GCares.org
Pastor Brian Gulledge
| 1274 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy,
S Hernando,FL


Sunday Schedule
8:30 AM Blended Worship Service
9:45 AM Sunday School
11:00 AM Traditional Worship
6:00 PM Worship
Wednesday
6:30 PM
Music, Youth, Fellowship
A warm, friendly Church
Nursery Available
wwwfbefloralcity.org

Come as you are!

COMMUNITY CHURCH







PASTOR BRIAN AND
KATHY BAGGS
Worship Service &
Children's Church 10:00 AM
Meeting at Knights of Columbus Bldg.
County Rd. 486, Lecanto
(352) 527-4253











St. Scholastica
Roman Catholic
Church
Masses:
SATURDAY VIGIL
4:00 p.m. and 6:00 p.m.
SUNDAY
9:00 a.m. and
11:30 a.m.

Daily Mass:
8:30 a.m. Mon. Fri.
Confessions:
Saturday 2:45 3:30 p.m.
4301 W. Homosassa Trail
Lecanto, Florida 34461
(352)746-9422
www.stscholastica.org
Located one mile south of
Hwy 44 on SR 490 adjacent
to Pope John Paul II
Catholic School


-I


4 Faith
Lutheran

Church(L.C.)
935 S. Crystal Glen Dr., Lecanto
Crystal Glen Subdivision
Hwy. 44 just E. of 490
527-3325

COME
WORSHIP
WITH US
Sunday Service
9:30 A.M.
Sunday Bible Study
& Children's Sunday
School 11 A.M.
Saturday Service
6:00 P.M.
Weekly Communion
Fellowship after Sunday Worship
Calendar of events Audio
of sermons available at
www.faithlecanto.com



HERNANDO
United
Methodist
Church


0^ ~ |
O/,





Voors

S . ry for Children and Families"
2125 E,Norvell Bryant Hwy. (486)
(1I miles from Hwy. 41)
For information call
(352) 726-7245
www.hernandoumcfl .org
Reverend
Tyler Montgomery
Sunday School
8:45 AM 9:30 AM
Fellowship
9:30 AM
Worship Service
10:00AM
Individual Hearing Devices


COME
Worship With The
Church of Christ
Floral City, Florida
Located at Marvin &
Church streets.
Established in 33 A.D. in
Jerusalem by Jesus Christ.
A warm welcome always
awaits you where we teach
the true New Testament
Christian Faith.
Sunday Bible Study
9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship
10:30 a.m. & 6:00 p.m.
Wed./Eve. Bible Study
6:00 p.m.
Steve Heneghan, Minister
CHURCH OF CHRIST
000A5H7 Floral City, FL.





Grace Bible
Church


Sunday
9:30 AM..................Discovery Time
11:00 AM ................Praise & Worship
6:00 PM.................. Evening Service
Monday
6:15 PM ...................Teens
Tuesday
6:15 PM.......Awana (Sept. Apr.)
Wednesday
7:00 PM.................. Bible Study &
Prayer Meeting
Pastor:
Rev. Ray Herriman
(352) 628-5631
Men & Ladies Bible Studies, TOPS,
Infant & Toddler Nursery
1y2mi.eastofUS.19
6382 W. Green Acres St.
P.O. Box 1067
Homosassa, FL. 34447-1067
www.gracebiblehomosassa.org
email: gbc@tampabay.rr.com


H


Shepherd

of the Hills
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Our mission is to be
a beacon of faith known
for engaging all persons
in the love and truth
of Jesus Christ.
Bishop Jim Adams, Rector
527-0052
Services:
Saturday
5:00 pm
Sunday
8:00 & 10:30 am
Christian Formation
9:15 am
Sunday School 10:00 am
Nursery 10:30 am
Healing Service
Wednesday
10:00 am
2540 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
(CR 486)
Lecanto, Florida
(4/10 mile east of CR 491)
wwwSOTHEC.org




V 0


irchof
The azarene
A Place to Belong

2101 N, Florida Ave,
Hernando FL

726-6144
Nursery Provided

*CHILDREN

*YOUTH

*SENIORS

Sunday School
9:45 A.M.
Praise & Worship
10:40 A.M.
Praise Service
6:00 P.M.
Praise & Prayer
(Wed.) 7:00 P.M

Randy T. Hodges, Pastor
www.hernandonazarene.org


Heeno FL 34-44


HERNANDO

ADVENTIST
CHURCH



i SEVENTH-DAY
1880 N. Trucks Ave.
Hernando, FL 34442
(352)344.2008
orne, Fellowship &
Xh Us InJesus
"'-rdary Services
lab-6ath"
Sabbath School 9:30 am
Worship 11:00 am
Wednesday
Mid-Week Meeting 7:00 pm
Pastor Dale Wolfe
www.hernandoadventist.com





C4 SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2012


NOTES
Continued from Page C3

at 9. Adult Bible study groups
also meet at 9 a.m. Sunday
and 10 a.m. and 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday. All residents of the
area are welcome. Sunday
morning worship service is at
10. Peace Lutheran Church,
"The Church On The Hill," is
five miles north of Dunnellon at
the junction of U.S. 41 and
State Road 40. Call the church
office at 352-489-5881 or visit
www.PeaceLutheranOnline.org.
Shepherd of the Hills
Episcopal Church in Lecanto
will celebrate the first Sunday in
Lent with Holy Eucharist serv-
ices at 5 p.m. today and 8 and
10:30 a.m. Sunday. Christian
formation is at 9:15 a.m. Sun-
day, with Sunday school at 10
a.m. and nursery at 10:30 a.m.
Healing service and Eucharist
at 10 a.m. Wednesday is fol-
lowed by Bible study and sack
lunch. SOS at Good Shepherd
Lutheran Church from 9 a.m. to
noon Thursday. Evening Bible
study at 7 Thursday in the
parish hall. Stations of the
Cross are walked at 5 p.m.
Friday through Lent followed
by a soup and bread supper.
At New Testament Bap-
tist Church, Pastor Helms is
preaching verse by verse
through the Book of Revelation
during the morning service.
Sunday school is at 9:45 a.m.
with classes for all ages. Sun-
day church services are at 11
a.m. and 6 p.m. with special
children's classes during the
morning service. A nursery is
provided for all services. Every-
one is welcome to attend. The
church is at 9850 S. Parkside
Ave. in Floral City, just south of
Floral Park. Call 352-726-0360
for more information.
Find a church home at
Faith Baptist Church, 6918 S.
Spartan Ave. (one mile from


RELIGION


U.S. 19, off Cardinal Street).
Visit comeandseefbc.org. Serv-
ices are interpreted for the deaf.
Sunday school classes at 9:45
a.m. with Sunday worship at 11
a.m. and 6 p.m. "King's Kids"
and "Flyers" for K-5 grades
from 6 to 7:15 p.m. Sunday.
Wednesday Bible study and
prayer meeting at 7 p.m. with
"Warriors" for grades 6 through
12 from 6:30 to 8 p.m. Call 352-
628-4793.
Reflections Church
meets at Citrus Springs Middle
School. Sunday morning wor-
ship service begins at 10:17
a.m. Children's church and
nursery is available. Bible study
is at 8:45 a.m. for adults.
First Church of God of
Inverness, a nondenomina-
tional church which meets at
5510 E. Jasmine Lane, invites
the public to Sunday morning
worship services at 10:30 and
an old-fashioned Sunday
evening service at 6 filled with
singing, testimonies and the
Word, including a Christian ed-
ucation hour for children. The
ladies "Joy-Belles" meet the
second Tuesday monthly. A
men's breakfast is enjoyed the
last Saturday monthly and at 6
p.m. the last Saturday monthly
is "The Saturday Night Gospel
Jubilee" (with groups from the
area participating). Refresh-
ments and fellowship follow and
there is no charge. The church
has a once-monthly fellowship
carry-in meal, followed by
"theme-planned" programs.
Bible study and prayer time is
at 6 p.m. Wednesday. Call
352-344-3700.
St. Raphael Orthodox
Church, 1277 N. Paul Drive,
Inverness, welcomes everyone
to worship at Divine Liturgy on
Sunday mornings at 10 and
Saturday evening for Vespers
at 5. A coffee hour/fellowship
gathering takes place after Di-
vine Liturgy every Sunday. The
church appreciates donations
of canned goods and other


nonperishable items, which are
donated regularly to the Citrus
County Resource Center. Visit
www.straphaelchurch.org.
Crystal River Church of
Christ meets for Bible study at
10 a.m. Sunday, worship at 11,
and evening service at 6 p.m.
Wednesday Bible study is at 7
p.m. Everyone is welcome. We
speak where the Bible speaks
and we are silent where the
Bible is silent (1 Peter 4:11).
The church has a radio pro-
gram on WEKJ 96.7 FM at 11
a.m. Saturday. The church is
at the intersection of State
Road 44 and U.S. 19. Call
Evangelist George Hickman at
352-794-3372 or 352-795-
8883, or email georgehickman
@yahoo.com.
Church of Christ services
at 304 N.E. 5th St., Crystal
River. Bible classes at 10 a.m.
Sunday, 7 p.m. Wednesday
and by appointment. Worship
services at 11 a.m. Sunday.
Everyone invited. Call 352-795-
4943 or 352-563-0056.
Citrus Vineyard Commu-
nity Church meets in the First
Christian Church of Inverness
family life center, at 2018
Colonade Street. Sunday serv-
ices are at 10:30 a.m. Home
groups meet in Inverness and
Beverly Hills on Tuesdays. Call
the church at 352-637-0923.
New Beginnings Fellow-
ship, 2577 N. Florida Highway
in Hernando, invites the com-
munity to spirit-led revival serv-
ices during the week and
Sunday worship services.
NBF's weekly schedule in-
cludes "Wednesday Night in the
River" and "Friday Night Fire"
services at 7 p.m. A fellowship
dinner precedes both meetings
at 6 p.m. Dinner guests are
asked to bring a dish to share.
Special guest ministers are in-
vited often\.Childcare provided.
Sunday celebration services at
8 and 10 a.m. include anointed
worship, Bible-based word
teachings and prophetic prayer


ministry. Children's ministry
takes place during the 10 a.m.
service. Child care provided for
the 10 a.m. service only. Visit
www.nbfhernando.com or call
352-726-8333.
First Baptist Church of
Homosassa weekly schedule:
Sunday school for all ages at 9
a.m., followed by morning wor-
ship at 10:25 a.m. Kids worship
dismisses from service. Youth
Bible study at 4:30 p.m. in fel-
lowship hall. Sunday evening
Bible study at 6. Lifecare center
is open (food and clothing) from
9:30 to 11:30 a.m. Monday
and Thursdays. The church is
in Old Homosassa at 10540 W.
Yulee Drive. Turn onto Yulee
Drive from U.S. 19 at Burger
King, follow to stop sign, turn
left, church is about one mile on
left. Call 352-628-3858.
First Christian Church of
Chassahowitzka, 11275 S.
Riviera Drive, Homosassa,
meets at 9:30 a.m. Sunday for
Bible study and 10:30 for morn-
ing worship. The church is non-
denominational and Bible
based, only preaching the Word
as it is in the Bible. All are wel-
come. Call 352-382-2557.
Lighthouse Baptist
Church, 974 W.G. Martinelli
Blvd., Citrus Springs, offers
Sunday school for all ages at
9:45 a.m. Worship services
under the direction of Pastor
Jess Burton at 11 a.m., with
evening service at 5:30 p.m.
Children's/youth program for
ages 5 and older from 6 to 8
p.m. Wednesday featuring
Bible study, fun and games,
with adult Bible study at 7 p.m.
Call 352-489-7515.
Butterfly Ministries wor-
ship, Bible study and personal
ministry from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
the third Saturday monthly at
The Sanctuary, 3888 S. King
Ave., Homosassa. Food and
fellowship follow. Call Margie
Sipes at 352-212-4320.
Beverly Hills Community
Church is nondenominational.


Worship services at 10 a.m. Sun-
days. Bible study at 6 p.m.
Wednesday in chapel. Everyone
welcome. Call 352-746-3620.
All welcome to learn to be
inspired by God's Word in an
open format at 10 a.m. Sun-
days at The Little House, 4929
Shady Acres Drive, Inverness.
All welcome. Call Joe Hupchick
at 352-726-9998.
House of Power Sunday
worship services at 10 a.m. and
6 p.m. at North Lecanto Highway
and North Dawson Drive, Her-
nando. Wednesday, Bible stud-
ies and youth meeting at 7 p.m.
Living Word of God
Church, on Cason Boulevard
in Inglis, offers Sunday school
classes at 10 a.m. and Sunday
evening worship at 6. Everyone
is welcome. Jessie Lolley is the
pastor. Call 352-621-7260 for
information.
House of Peace, a nonde-
nominational full-gospel church
and a division of House of
Power, meets at 10:30 a.m.
Sunday at the Lions Club on
Homosassa Trail, two blocks
east of U.S. 19. All are invited.
First Church of Christ,
Scientist, Inverness, worships
Sunday mornings at 10:30 and
Wednesday evenings at 5 at
224 N. Osceola Ave. Sunday
school class is the same time
as the church service. All are
welcome.
Christ Lutheran Church
services led by the Rev. Paul R.
Meseke, senior pastor, at 475
North Avenue West,
Brooksville. Call 352-796-8331.
Unity Church of Citrus
County healing/prayer service
at 6:30 p.m. the second
Wednesday monthly at 2628
W. Woodview Lane, Beverly
Hills. Call 352-746-1270.
Anglican Church of the
Holy Spirit, Hernando, is a tra-
ditional Anglican mission with
ancient roots. The 1928 Prayer
Book is used. The church is at
1023 E. Norvell Bryant Highway,
Hernando. Call 352-637-5922.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Grupo MisioneroAdven-
tista del 7mo. Dia de Citrus
County. Horario de Reuniones.
Miercoles 7 p.m. Sabados 11 a.m.
Address: 1880 N. Trucks Ave.,
Hemando. Call 352-535-7141.
Just for kids
KidZone Children's Min-
istry of Inverness First United
Methodist Church will host a
free "Fun In The Park" event
March 11-13 at Whispering
Pines Park at the pavilion next
to the playground. Join us for a
picnic lunch of hot dogs, chips,
drinks and dessert from 1 to 3
p.m. Sunday, March 11. We will
meet at the pavilion from 10 to
11:30 a.m. Monday and Tues-
day, March 12 and 13, for story
time, music, crafts, recreation,
and snacks. Children from tod-
dler through fifth grade are wel-
come. All children must be
accompanied by an adult. Call
the church at 352-726-2522.
Inverness Church of God
youth group, "Define Gravity,"
meets at 7 p.m. Friday in the
Youth Ministries Building. Youth
Pastor Jon Uncle invites all
teenagers to attend. The
church is at 416 U.S. 41 South,
Inverness. Call the church of-
fice at 352-726-4524.
Little Friends Learning
Center, a ministry of the Inver-
ness Church of God, is accept-
ing new student applications for
infants, toddlers, K-3, K-4.
Breakfast, lunch and snacks
provided; assist in potty train-
ing; A-Beka curriculum; elec-
tronic security; qualified
teachers; and large fenced
playground. Little Friends
Learning Center is at 416 U.S.
41 S., Inverness. Call 352-
344-5487.
"Saturday Night KIDZ,"
for children 5 years old through
the third grade, is available on
Saturday nights while parents
and teenagers are involved in
"Praise, Prayer and Power" at

See NOTES/Page C5


Places of worship that


offer love, peace and


harmony to all


Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!! E T


SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF CITRUS SPRINGS, BEVERLY HILLS, BROOKSVILLE, DUNNELLON, INVERNESS


Beverly Hills
Community Church
82 Civic Circle, Beverly Hills, Florida
(352) 746-3620
Pastor Stewart R. Jamison, III
Email: bhcchurch@embarqmail.com

Wednesday Bible Study 6p.m.
Sunday Coffee/Conversation 8:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship Service 10 a.m.
Communion 1st Sunday, Monthly
Where Christ is Proclaimed!



FIND
US AND
YE SHALL


SEEK.
If you're searching for a
spiritual home where
questions are as welcome
asanswers, find us. We
are a loving, open-minded
religious community that
encourages you to seek your
own path,wherever it leads. To
nurture your spirit and find your
own truth and meaning.
Welcome to Unitarian Universalism.

nature Coast

Unitarian Universalists
SUNDAY SERVICES
10:30 A.M.




WHERE REASON & RELIGION MEET
GLBT WELCOME
7633 N. Florida Ave.
(Route 41)
Citrus Springs
465-4225
WWW.NATURECOASTUU.ORG


Methodist


-Church
of Inverness
3896 S. Pleasant Grove Rd.
Inverness, FL 34452
(2 mi. so. ofApplebee's)
Come as you are.
(352) 726-2522
TONY ROSENBERGER
Senior Pastor



8:30 AM
Traditional Worship
with Holy
Communion

9:45 AM
Sunday School

11:00 AM
Contemporary
SPraise & Worship
LRA _wn^


A friendly church where
Christ is exalted!!!


Sunday School
Morning Worship
Evening Service

Bible Study & Prayer


9:00 A.M.
10:15 A.M.
6:00 P.M.

7:00 P.M.


746617


5335 E. Jasmine Lane,
Inverness
/ Miles North Of K-Mart Off 41
North (Formally Calvary Bible
Church Location)

You're invited
to our Services
Sunday School
10:00 AM
Sunday
10:45 AM & 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 PM
Independent
Fundamental
Pastor
Terry Roberts
Ph: 726-0201


Mission Possible
MINISTRIES
/ Dan Sturgill
Senior Pastor
9921 N. Deltona Boulevard
(352) 489-3886
www.missionpossibleministries.com
I Sundays
W orship ...................10:30 am
Spanish Translation Provided
(Nursery Care & Children's Church Provided)
Wednesday i
Youth Group, Bible Study &
Kid's Programs................7 pm
(Nursery Care Provided)
ARMS OF MERCY FOOD PANTRY
1st & 3rd Tuesday of the month.
8:00 am-11:00 am








0 Hwy.44E@
0 Washington Ave., Inverness
1 Sunday Services
8 Traditional
S8 AM and 11:00 AM .
* Contemporary
* 9:30 AM
S 11:00 AM Service
" Tapes & CD's Available
" Sunday School for all ages
9:30 AM
Nursery Provided
*Fellowship & Youth Group .
5 to 7 PM 0
m 24-Hour Prayer Line 0
0 563-3639 0
" Web Site: www.fpcinv.org 0
" Podcast: FPC inv.com 0
" Church Office 637-0770
S Pastor Craig Davies *


I COMMUNITY
CONGREGATIONAL
CHRISTIAN CHURCH
I\ ^^~^^


'M/ W7 felconmes

SUNDAY 10:00 AM
Dr. Jeff Timm
9220 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
352-489-1260





BAPTIST CHURCH

Independent
SOME THINGS SHOULDN'T CHANGE
Do you miss sound Bible teaching, the
beloved hymns & gospel songs, an Eve-
ning Service, and being part of a caring,
Christian family? Find them at Grace!
2672 W. Edison PI. at Elkcam Blvd.
Citrus Springs, FL
S.S. 9:45 am, Services 11:00 am & 6:00 pm
Wed. Bible Study & Prayer 7:00 pm
Directions, mp3 sermons & more at
www.gracebapchurch.org
Phone (352) 249-7211
000AOKH















SUNDAY MASSES:
8:00 A.M. 10:30 A.M.



12:30 P I.

CONFESSIONS:
2:30 P.M.to 3:30 P.M. Sat.
orByAppointment


WEEKDAY MASSES:
8:00 A.M.

6 Roosevelt Blvd.,
Beverly Hills |
746-2144
(1 Block East of SR. 491)
www.ourladyofgracefl
W .catholicweb.com .-


Redemption

Christian Church
SUNDAY
Bible School...............9:00
W orship...................... 10:15
WEDNESDAY
Bible School...............6:30
Currently meeting at
East Citrus Community Center
9907 East Gulf-to-Lake Highway

For more
information call
352-422-6535
Pastor li
Todd
Langdon


Hope Evangelical
Lutheran Church
ELCA
Pastor Lynn Fonfara
9425 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
Citrus Springs
Sunday Worship
9:30 a.m.
Sunday School 11:00 a.m.
Communion Every Sunday
Information:
489-5511
Go To Our Web Page
hopelutheranelca.com





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




Board vows to keep
praying to Jesus
SALISBURY, N.C. County
commissioners plan to continue
offering Christian prayers at
public meetings, regardless of
warnings from a civil liberties
group about recent court rulings
affirming a ban on the practice.
The Rowan County Board of
Commissioners meeting Mon-
day night drew a crowd of sup-
porters for elected officials, who
say they'll defy a decision by
the U.S. Fourth Circuit Court of
Appeals striking down sectarian
prayer, or prayer that's explicitly
linked to a particular religion.
"If they tell county commis-
sioners they can't pray, soon
they're going to be in my
church telling me I can't pray in
the name of Jesus," said Terry
Brown, a county resident who
came to the meeting.
The appeals court's ruling
was in the case of the Forsyth
County Board of Commissions.
Last month, the U.S. Supreme
Court declined to hear an ap-
peal by that board, letting the
Fourth Circuit's ruling stand.
Since then, the state chapter of
the American Civil Liberties
Union has contacted 25 to 30
government bodies in North
Carolina in response to com-
plaints from residents about
sectarian prayer.
So far, Rowan County com-
missioners are the only local of-
ficials who say they'll disregard
the court's decision, said Katy
Parker, legal director of the
state ACLU. The group has
asked for a response from the
commissioners to its concerns
by March 5. Salisbury is located
about 40 miles northeast of
Charlotte.
"We hope they'll change their
minds and follow the law,"
Parker said.
The only other government
body to openly disregard the
court's ruling so far, Parker
said, is the General Assembly.
There were Christian prayers
before sessions of both the
state House of Representatives
and Senate during a brief meet-
ing last week. Legislative lead-
ers have said they'll review the
ACLU's concerns, but criticized
the group for sending a letter
calling on lawmakers to end
sectarian prayer.
Church reopens
after protests
ADAMS, Mass. -A Roman
Catholic church in Adams that
was occupied by protesting
parishioners for more than
three years has reopened for
regular worship.
Protesters occupied St.
Stanislaus Kostka since it shut
in December 2008. It was
merged into the new Blessed
John Paul the Great Parish.
The Rev. Daniel Boyle, the
St. Stanislaus pastor, said the


RELIGION


Religion BRIEFS


diocese has approved a plan to
reopen St. Stanislaus Church
as a "chapel-mission" of the
parish. His plan follows a Vati-
can decision to keep the church
in religious use.
The first Mass is scheduled
for 8 a.m. April 1 Palm Sun-
day and Mass is scheduled
for Sunday mornings.
Catholic dioceses around the
country have recently closed
parishes due to falling atten-
dance, a priest shortage, popu-
lation shifts from cities to
suburbs and financial troubles.
Jewish group loses
alleged bias lawsuit
LITCHFIELD, Conn. -A
federal judge has dismissed a
Jewish group's discrimination
lawsuit against town officials
who rejected plans for a
synagogue.
U.S. District Judge Janet C.
Hall issued a 40-page ruling
last week saying Chabad
Lubavitch of Northwest Con-
necticut didn't present evidence
supporting its allegations of reli-
gious bias.
Chabad Lubavitch, a tradi-
tional Hasidic group, claimed its
constitutional right to freedom
of religion was violated when
the Borough of Litchfield's His-
toric District Commission de-
cided in 2007 that the group
couldn't convert a 135-year-old
Victorian house it owns into a
21,000-square-foot synagogue.
Commission members said the
proposed expansion of the
building was too big for the
local historic district.
Rabbi Joseph Eisenbach
says Chabad Lubavitch's board
and its lawyer are reviewing the
ruling and will decide whether
to pursue further legal action.
Farrakhan plans
to speak at church
GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. -
Nation of Islam leader Louis
Farrakhan is expected to speak
at a Grand Rapids church.
Farrakhan is scheduled to
speak March 1 at Fountain
Street Church at an event or-
ganized by the Nation of
Islam's grand Rapids Study
Group, according to reports in
the Grand Rapids Press and
WWMT-TV.
His evening speech is enti-
tled "Duty, Responsibility and
the Necessity of Self-Suffi-
ciency."
The Chicago-based Nation of
Islam has espoused black na-
tionalism and self-reliance
since it was founded in Detroit
in the 1930s, though in recent
years has made efforts to re-
cruit other ethnic groups.
Feds probe fire at
Islamic building
LAS VEGAS Federal
agents are investigating
whether an overnight fire at a
funeral facility under construc-


SUBMISSION DEADLINES
Follow these guidelines to help ensure timely publi-
cation of submitted material. The earlier Chronicle
editors receive submissions, the better chance of
notes running more than once.
Community notes: At least one week in advance of
the event.
Veterans Notes: 4 p.m. Wednesday for publication
Sunday.
Together page: 4 p.m. Wednesday for publication
Sunday.
Business Digest: 4 p.m. Wednesday for publication
Sunday.
Chalk Talk: 4 p.m. Monday for publication Wednes-
day.
Health Notes: 4 p.m. Friday for publication Tuesday.
Religious events : 4 p.m. Tuesday for publication Sat-
urday.
Real Estate Digest: 4 p.m. Thursday for publication
Sunday.
Photos and stories are published as space is avail-
able. The Chronicle cannot guarantee placement on
color pages.
Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or by e-mail
to newsdesk@chronicleonline.com.


GOT A NEWS TIP?
* The Chronicle welcomes tips from readers about
breaking news. Call the newsroom at 352-563-5660,
and be prepared to give your name, phone number,
and the address of the news event.


GET THE WORD OUT
Nonprofit organizations are invited to submit news
releases about upcoming community events.
Write the name of the event, who sponsors it, when
and where it will take place and other details.
Include a contact name and phone number to be
printed in the paper.
News releases are subject to editing.
Call 352 563-5660 for details.


tion outside Las Vegas was
arson or an accident, according
to an official from the Islamic
Society of Southern Nevada.
Aslam Abdullah, of the Is-
lamic Society, says he hopes
the fire that destroyed the $1.2
million project off Lamb Boule-
vard near Carey Avenue was
not a hate crime.
No one was seen in the area
and no injuries were reported
after about 60 firefighters from
Clark County, Las Vegas and
North Las Vegas doused the in-
tense 1 a.m. Wednesday blaze.
Federal Bureau of Alcohol,
Tobacco, Firearms and Explo-
sives supervisor Thomas Chit-
tum said investigators are
looking at whether the fire was
intentional, vandalism or a
crime committed against a
house of worship.
Kansas panel backs
religion measure
TOPEKA, Kan. -A Kansas
House committee has en-
dorsed legislation that backers
say would protect religious free-
dom but opponents believe
would allow discrimination
based on sexual orientation.
Monday's adoption by the
House Judiciary Committee on
a voice vote sends the bill to
the full House.
Committee chairman Lance
Kinzer, an Olathe Republican,
says the bill puts into law the
language of Kansas court deci-
sions for determining when
government policies place too
heavy a burden on practicing
religion.
It also allows people to sue
state and local government
agencies if they feel their reli-
gious freedoms have been
abridged.
Critics, including the Kansas
Equality Coalition, claim the
bill's true intent is to discrimi-
nate against individuals based
on sexual orientation.
From wire reports


Places of worship that


offer love, peace and


harmony to all. .B

Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted! !! "

SERVICING THE CITY OF INVERNESS
IN__________________________________________N_________________SS_______________


INVERNESS
First CHURCH OF GOD
Ni.n



Sunday
10:30AM.& 6:00 PM.
Wednesday 6:00 P.M.
Bible Study & Prayer
726-8986
"Church Like It Used To Be"
Saturday Night Gospel Jubilee"
6:00 PM.
(Last Saturday of month)
Children's Church School Weekly
5510 E. Jasmine Ln.
Phone: 726-8986
ALL ARE WELCOME


Our Lady of

Fatima

CATHOLIC CHURCH

U.S. Hwy. 41 South, Inverness,
Florida

Sunday Masses
7:30 A.M., 9:00 A.M. & 11:00 A.M.
Saturday Vigil
4:00 P.M.
Weekdays 8:00A.M.
Confessions 2:30- 3:30 P.M.

726-1670


o PRIMERA IGLESIA
HISPANA
DE CITRUS COUNTY
Asambleas de Dios
Inverness, Florida
ORDEN DE SERVICIOS:
DOMINGOS:
9:30 AM Escuela Biblica
Dominical
10:30 AM Adoracion y
Pr6dica
MARTES:
7:00 PM Culto de Oraci6n
JUEVES:
7:00 PM Estudios Bfblicos
Les Esperamosa
David Pinero, Pastor
1370 N. Croft Ave. Inverness, FL 34451
Tel6fono: (352) 341-1711


All are invited to our

Healing

Services
First Church of Christ,
Scientist
Inverness
224 N. Osceola Ave.
Sunday Services 10:30 AM
Sunday School 10:30AM
Wed. Testimony Meeting 5:00 PM
352-726-4033


INVERNESS
CHURCH
OF GOD
Rev. larrv Powerr

Sunday Services:
Traditional Service...................8:30 AM
Sunday School.........................9:30 AM
Contemporary Service...........10:30 AM
Evening Service........................6:00 PM
Wednesday Night:
Adult Classes....................7:00 m
Boys and Girls Brigade.....7:00 m
Teens............................. 7:15
"Welcome Home"
Located at 416 Hwy. 41 South
in Inverness Just Past Burger King
Church Office 726-4524
Also on Site "Little Friends Daycare
and Learning Center"


Come To
ST.
MARGARET'S
EPISCOPAL
CHURCH
where everyone is still welcome!
In Historic Downtown Inverness
1 Block N.W. Of City Hall
114 N. Osceola Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
726-3153
www.stmaggie.org
Services:
Sun. Worship 8 & 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday 12:30 P.M.
Morning Prayer
9:00 A.M. Mon- Fri
Fr Gene Reuman, Pastor


NOTES
Continued from Page C4

North Oak Baptist Church in
Citrus Springs. Bible stories
and activities for children are
led by a team of workers. Child
care is also available for ba-
bies through 4 years of age.
Saturday night services begin
at 6 and everyone is welcome.
The church is at the intersec-
tion of N. Elkcam Blvd. and N.
Citrus Springs Blvd. Call 352-
489-1688 for more information.
Live & learn
Pastor Gene Reuman will
begin an "Inquirer's Class" at
3 p.m. Sunday, March 4, at St.
Margaret's Episcopal Church,
114 N. Osceola Ave., Inver-
ness. Call the church office at
352-726-3153.
Reflections Church will
begin a small group study for
adults from 5 to 7 p.m. Sun-
day. Children's activities will be
available at this time. Reflec-
tions Church meets at Citrus
Springs Middle School.
Abundant Blessings
Messianic Congregation
hosts a teaching series titled,
"Prayers: The Keys To the
Kingdom (The Greatest Force
on Earth)" at 5 p.m. Thursday
at the Homosassa Springs
Public Library. Learn how the
Lord's Prayer is a Kaddish, the
vehicle or Merkabah (chariot)
to traverse the five realms of
being and the 10 dimensions
of quantum physics Come and
experience Jewish Christianity
and the way Yeshua (Jesus)
worshiped. Call 352-544-5700.
Congregation Beth Israel of
Ocala offers open registration of
its religious school, Congrega-
tion Beth Israel School of
Jewish Education. The school
meets Sunday mornings at vari-
ous places in the community.
The curriculum consists of Jew-
ish lifecycle and history, Hebrew,
Bible, holidays and traditions, as
well as courses on Israel and


FIRST 43 Years o
|R T Bringing Christ
F IRSxI to Inverness

LUTHERAN

CHURCH
Holy Communion
Every Sunday at
7:45am & 10:00am

Sunday School
& Bible Class
8:45 AM.
726-1637
Missouri Synod
www.1stlutheran.net
1900 W. Hwy. 44, Inverness
The Rev. Thomas Beaverson


At

Victory

Baptist Church
General Conference

Sunday School 9:45 AM


Worship
Sidi.i, Evening


10:45 AM
6:00 PM


Wednesday 7:00 PM


Choir Practice


8:00 PM


Quality Child Care
Pastor Gary Beehler
352-465-8866
5040 N Shady Acres Dr.
726-9719
Highway 41 North, turn at
Sportsman Pt.
I 1 e ',i' to belong.A place to become."


pre-bar and bat mitzvah and
confirmation classes. The
school caters to the individual
needs of the students and par-
ent participation is encouraged.
The staff consists of caring, ex-
perienced teachers. Suzanne
Boetger is educational director.
For more information and enroll-
ment, contact Suzanne at the
boetgers@yahoo.com or Judi at
352-237-8277.
Glory to Glory Min-
istries, at 1274 E. Norvell
Bryant Highway (in the Picard
Storage Unit),offers Men's and
Women's Ministry meetings.
Men's Ministry meetings are
led by Paul Ellis from 6 to 8
p.m. the second Saturday
monthly. All men are welcome
to form Christian bonds while
sharing fun, food and fellow-
ship. The Women's Ministry,
SOIL (Serving Others In Love),
meets from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.
the third Saturday monthly. All
women are welcome to enjoy
Christian fellowship, food, fun
and reaching out to others.
The meetings are led by Ginny
Cieply and Muffy Morin. Glory
to Glory Ministries is led by
Pastor Brian Gulledge. Call
352-566-613.
Announcements
GriefShare seminar is
offered from 6:30 to 8 p.m.
Wednesday through March
28, at Seven Rivers Presbyte-
rian Church. Call 352-746-200
or visit www.sevenrivers.org.
The Sonshine Singles
group meets at 6 p.m. the first
and third Saturday monthly at
Trusting Heart Ministries, 176
N. Rooks Ave, Inverness. This
group is open to all who are
single, widowed or divorced.
Call 352-860-0052 or 352-
586-5174 or email trusting
heartministry@yahoo.com.
Bereavement support
group Homosassa meets
from 1:30 to 3 p.m. Thursday
in the back hall at St. Thomas
Church, off U.S. 19, just south
of Cardinal. The group is com-
posed of men and women who


t+cco
"First For Christ"... John 1 41
000A4L7 ,S
FIRST ||
CHRISTIAN
CHURCH OF
INVERNESS
We welcome you and invite you
to worship with our family.
John A. Scott, Minister
Sunday:
9:00 A.M. Sunday School
10:15 A.M. Worship Service
Wednesday:
6:00 P M. Bible Study






^ First

Assembly

of God
4201 So. Pleasant Grove Rd.
(Hwy. 581 So.) Inverness, FL 34452

Pastor,
Dairold





S Sc
















OFFICE: (352) 726-1107


SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2012 C5

are experiencing grief and are
convinced that "life can be
good again." Open to all. Come
or call Anne at 352-212-0632.
The Independent House
of God Church of The Living
God promotes its "Bus Min-
istry" for sightseeing, family
reunions, shopping trips and
church functions. Call Deacon
Jarrod Campbell at 352-257-
4348 or Deacon William Bunch
at 352-795-2633.
The Bible Giveaway is
looking for used Bibles (prefer-
ably KJV) to give to the less
fortunate who would like to
have a Bible but cannot afford
one. By sending us your old
Bibles, you are helping to
spread God's word. Send
Bibles to: Bible Giveaway,
4865 S. Grand Cir Terrace,
Homosassa, FL 34446.
Celebrate recovery
Celebrate Recovery is a
biblically based program de-
signed to work through life's
hurts, habits and hang-ups in
fellowship with others. This
program is open to the com-
munity and takes place at the
following churches:
Christian Recovery Fel-
lowship Church -At 7 p.m.
Wednesday and Fridays at
2242 W. State Road 44. Call
352-726-2800.
Celebrate Recovery
meets at 6 p.m. Friday at the
Gulf to Lake Ministry Com-
plex in Meadowcrest, left of
SunTrust Bank. A meal for a
minimum amount is served,
followed by praise, worship
and a lesson or testimony,
then gender-specific small
groups. The evening ends with
fellowship, coffee and dessert.
The step studies, an extremely
important extension of the pro-
gram's healing process, take
place on a different night. Call
352-586-4709 or e-mail
celebrate.recovery@gulfto
lake.com. A locator for groups
throughout the United States is
found at the website www.
celebraterecovery.com.










Newton's theological works online


New York Public Library/Associated Press
Engraving of Isaac Newton based on a 1726 painting by John Vanderbank
that was from the frontispiece of a 1726 edition of Principia, from the
New York Public Library's Humanities and Social Sciences Library. Israel's
national library, an unlikely owner of a vast trove of Newton's writings, has
digitized his theological collection, and put it online.


Famed scientist

was also amateur

religion scholar

ARON HELLER
Associated Press

JERUSALEM He's consid-
ered to be one of the greatest sci-
entists of all time. But Sir Isaac
Newton was also an influential
theologian who applied a scien-
tific approach to the study of
scripture, Hebrew and Jewish
mysticism.
Now Israel's national library,
an unlikely owner of a vast trove
of Newton's writings, has digitized
his theological collection some
7,500 pages in Newton's own
handwriting and put it online.
Among the yellowed texts is New-
ton's famous prediction of the
apocalypse in 2060.
Newton revolutionized physics,
mathematics and astronomy in
the 17th and 18th century, laying
the foundations for most of classi-
cal mechanics with the princi-
ple of universal gravitation and
the three laws of motion bearing
his name.
However, the curator of Israel's
national library's humanities col-
lection said Newton was also a de-
vout Christian who dealt far more
in theology than he did in physics
and believed that scripture pro-
vided a "code" to the natural
world.
"Today, we tend to make a dis-
tinction between science and
faith, but to Newton it was all part
of the same world," said Milka
Levy-Rubin. "He believed that
careful study of holy texts was a
type of science, that if analyzed
correctly could predict what was
to come."
So he learned how to read He-


brew, scrolled through the Bible
and delved into the study of Jew-
ish philosophy, the mysticism of
Kabbalah and the Talmud a
compendium of Jewish oral law
and stories about 1,500 years old.
For instance, Newton based his
calculation on the end of days on
information gleaned from the
Book of Daniel, which projected
the apocalypse 1,260 years later.
Newton figured that this count
began from the crowning of
Charlemagne as Roman emperor
in the year 800.
The papers cover topics such as
interpretations of the Bible, the-
ology, the history of ancient cul-
tures, the Tabernacle and the
Jewish Temple.
The collection also contains
maps that Newton sketched to as-
sist him in his calculations and
his attempts to reveal the secret
knowledge he believed was en-
crypted within.
He attempted to project what
the end of days would look like,
and the role Jews would play
when it happened. Newton's ob-
jective curiosity in Judaism and
the Holy Land contrasted with the
anti-Jewish sentiment expressed
by many leading Christian schol-
ars of the era, Levy-Rubin said.
"He took a great interest in the
Jews, and we found no negative
expressions toward Jews in his
writing," said Levy-Rubin. "He
said the Jews would ultimately re-
turn to their land."
How his massive collection of
work ended up in the Jewish state
seems mystical in its own right.
Years after Newton's death in
1727, his descendants gave his sci-
entific manuscripts to his alma
mater, the University of Cam-
bridge.
But the university rejected his
nonscientific papers, so the fam-
ily auctioned them off at
Sotheby's in London in 1936. As
chance would have it, London's


other main auction house -
Christie's was selling a collec-
tion of Impressionist art the same
day that attracted far more
attention.
Only two serious bidders ar-
rived for the Newton collection
that day The first was renowned
British economist John Maynard
Keynes, who bought Newton's
alchemy manuscripts. The second
was Abraham Shalom Yahuda -
a Jewish Oriental Studies scholar
- who got Newton's theological
writings.
Yahuda's collection was be-
queathed to the National Library
of Israel in 1969, years after his
death. In 2007, the library exhib-
ited the papers for the first time
and now they are available for all
to see online.
The collection contains pages
after pages of Newton's flowing
cursive handwriting on fraying
parchment in 18th-century Eng-
lish, with words like "simili-
tudes," "prophetique" and
"Whence."
Two print versions in modern
typeface are also available for
easier reading: A "diplomatic"
one that includes changes and
corrections Newton made in the
original manuscript, and a
"clean" version that incorporates
the corrections.
All of the papers are linked to
the Newton Project, which is
hosted by the University of Sussex
and includes other collections of
Newton's writings.
The Israeli library says the
manuscripts help illuminate
Newton's science as well as his
persona.
"As far as Newton was con-
cerned, his approach was that his-
tory was as much a science as
physics. His world view was that
his 'lab' for understanding history
was the holy books," said Levy-
Rubin. "His faith was no less im-
portant to him than his science."


GRACE
Continued from Page C1

dogs" it would come out,
"Poodles are the greatest
dogs God ever made."
But we don't have auto-
filters, and I have a real
problem with my mouth
sometimes.
Recently, I said some-
thing in public that proba-
bly offended a few people
who heard me and I didn't
realize it until it was too
late. I felt terrible, but it
was a situation where I
couldn't amend my words
because it would've drawn
attention to the people
whom I may have offended
and would've made things
worse.
So, I went home and beat
myself up thinking about
all the unhelpful or hurtful
things I've said in the past
and that I'll surely say in
the future and decided to
join a convent where no
one is allowed to speak at
all, except I'd probably talk
in my sleep and offend
some nun who probably
owns a poodle.
I told God (silently since
I pretty much determined
that my tongue is a lethal
weapon) that I was really,
really, really sorry and
please don't fry me on the
spot. If God rolls his eyes,
I'm sure he did at that
point as he reminded me of
one of my favorite scrip-
tures: "If we confess our
sins, he is faithful and just
and will forgive us our sins
and purify us from all un-
righteousness" (1 John 1:9).
I'm not normally this
neurotic, but something
else was bothering me. In a
radio interview featuring
Toni Birdsong, the author
of the blog and book,
"Sticky Jesus," about Chris-
tians sharing their faith on-
line, she talked about
"reckless" words and
quoted Jesus who said, "On
judgment day, people will
have to account for every
careless word they have
spoken. By your words you
will be found guilty or not
guilty (Matthew 12: 36-37.)"
She echoed what I'd
heard before. A church I
went to years ago also
taught that God would one
day play back a movie of


our lives and as we stand
ashamed in front of him
and the angels and every-
one else, we would have to
explain our thoughts,
words and deeds and God
would condemn or com-
mend us on the spot.
I well remember being
afraid to speak or even
think, feeling condemned
even before I opened my
mouth, certain that God
kept careful score.
Somehow, I missed what
Jesus had really said -
and to whom he was speak-
ing. He was addressing the
self-righteous religious
leaders, whom he called a
"brood of vipers" among
other things. He was accus-
ing them of all sorts of evil,
especially their words.
But he wasn't addressing
his followers. He wasn't
talking to the ones who put
their faith in him, who be-
lieved in him. He wasn't
talking to us, we who call
ourselves Christians.
After all, "Therefore
there is now no condemna-
tion for those who are in
Christ Jesus" (Romans 8:1).
The score has already been
settled, including our
speech. We are not con-
demned and never will be!
However, that doesn't
mean we can speak reck-
lessly Our tongues can be
lethal and still need to be
bridled. We still need a filter
Thankfully, God has given us
one. We have his Spirit who
whispers in our ears, "Not
those words. Not that tone.
Not here, not now."
It's up to us to listen -
and heed the whispers.
Sometimes I hear too
late, but many times I'm
stopped in time. I hope I'm
getting better at it.
For those I've ever of-
fended, I really am sorry
And I don't have anything
against poodles. However, I
do have my doubts about
Yorkies.


Nancy Kennedy is the au-
thor of "Move Over, Victo-
ria I Know the Real
Secret," "Girl on a Swing,"
and her latest book, "Lip-
stick Grace." She can be
reached at 352-564-2927,
Monday through Thurs-
day, or via email at
nkennedy@chronicle
online.com.


MUSIC
Continued from Page C1

of the notes. "I realized that
anything that we talked
about, he remembered,"
Partridge said. "When he
came back the next week, it
would all be there. He ab-
sorbed everything really
quickly; he has an amazing
sense of pitch and
metronome markings."
Kuhns, who drives a Ford
Focus with license plates
that read "R-GANIST,"
played a big, cheerful num-
ber called "Celebration," by
Lani Smith, and then wan-
dered back into the nave to
chat
Kuhns and his mother are


CATHOLIC
Continued from Page C1

recently completed its $57.5
million purchase of the
property.
"It would be hard to imag-
ine a more symbolic project
than this one," said Matthew
Alderman, a graduate of the
University of Notre Dame's
classical design program
and an architect at Cram
and Ferguson Architects in
Concord, Mass. The firm
specializes in traditional
church designs.
"What we are going to see
at the Crystal Cathedral is
sort of like a collision be-
tween the therapeutic
American Protestantism of
the television age with all of
the symbolism, art and an-
cient traditions of the
Catholic Church and its
worship."
At this point, the Diocese
of Orange has not taken for-
mal steps to hire an archi-
tect and the Crystal
Cathedral congregation has
three years to find a new
home. Acting on his own, Al-
derman sketched some pos-
sible changes to illustrate a
piece for an Anglican peri-
odical called The Living
Church.
It would be impossible, he
noted, to retroactively con-
vert this modernist classic
- a structure so open that it
seems to have no true walls
or interior space into


active at their church, St.
Lucas United Church of
Christ, in south St. Louis
County near Gravois Road
and Lindbergh Boulevard.
"My mother told me I
should play for God," he
said.
In 1994, he got a part-time
job playing voluntaries,
hymns and service music at
the Saturday evening
service.
St. Lucas music director
Lana Richard called him
"very responsible, a sweet,
gentle young man. David's
an asset here."
Because the autistic need
routine and certainty,
Kuhns sticks to solo work -
choirs and soloists are noto-
riously unpredictable.
"Once he starts, you can't

what most people would
consider a normal, conven-
tional cathedral.
"While traditional styles
can often be mixed within
historic interiors," wrote Al-
derman, "the modernist
movement was such a de-
structive act of self-exile
that great care must be used
when adding traditional el-
ements to a dated modernist
interior. Plopping down a
Gothic altarpiece into a
1968 ecclesiastical wigwam
usually just makes the wig-
wam look worse."
The crucial decision, ac-
cording to Alderman, is
whether to turn the direc-
tion of the seating so the
faithful will face down the
415-foot length of the sanc-
tuary toward a newly cre-
ated altar platform built
inside the existing glass
building. This would create
a traditional nave with a
center aisle for processions
toward the altar and the tab-
ernacle containing the
Blessed Sacrament. Cur-
rently, the church resembles
a long amphitheater in
which worshippers face a
stage and giant video screen
in the middle of the cruci-
form building, which is 207
feet wide.
"Strong processional
movements from the back of
the church to the altar are
practical, but also theologi-
cal," said Alderman,
reached by phone. "We are
the people of God and we
are traveling somewhere -


stop him," Richard ob-
served. "Things have to be
just a certain way with him."
Kuhns taught himself to
read, is a gifted calligrapher
and did well with a com-
puter data entry class (he
placed first in a statewide
competition), but it's the
organ that holds his interest.
Asked what makes it so spe-
cial, he considered, and
replied, "It could be a com-
bination of sounds." His fa-
vorite stops? "It could be
trumpet or flutes." How
does it feel to play? "Uplift-
ing. Rejuvenated. Relax-
ing."'
He plans his church
music four weeks out; his fa-
vorite composers are Bach,
Beethoven and Handel. Al-
though he attends a contem-

together. We are moving to-
ward Christ and the altar.
That's the focus."
The local Catholic leader-
ship has already concluded
that the Crystal Cathedral is
"not a highly liturgical
space in the traditional
sense. Yet, the Diocese of
Orange considers it a 'clean
(palate),"' wrote Msgr.
Arthur Holquin, in a paper
entitled "Domus Ecclesiae
(House of the Church)."
"While renovations are
called for, not much decon-
struction would be required
and the iconic personality of
the original architecture
and design would, for the
most part, be retained." In
particular, he added, the
"quality of light and its alle-
gory is consistent with the
enlightenment of Christ."
Bishop Tod Brown re-
cently challenged Catholics
nationwide to help name
the new cathedral pro-
posing "Christological"
names linked to the person
and work of Jesus. As of
Tuesday morning, more


porary service at St. Lucas
and serves as an usher, he
restricts his playing to the
classical side. Partridge cur-
rently has him working on
modern English pieces by
William Matthias and Ken-
neth Leighton.
Once he determined that
the interview was over,
Kuhns returned to the organ
bench. "I'm going to play
something special," he an-
nounced, and began an
arrangement of "The Battle
Hymn of the Republic,"
which began with the plain-
tive notes of taps. The sound
built and swelled and filled
the church.
"David has his limita-
tions," Partridge said. "But
his limitations are not
musical."

than 3,500 entries had been
submitted. The deadline is
Feb. 20.
Alderman has already
turned in his vote, propos-
ing what he believes is a log-
ical name for a cathedral
containing 10,000 windows
of silver-tinted glass The
Cathedral of the Transfigu-
ration.
"The Crystal Cathedral is
all about light and the blue
sky being everywhere you
look," he said. "It's the per-
fect place for dramatic im-
ages of Christ being
transfigured and illumi-
nated in divine light .... You
could also say this sanctu-
ary is about to be transfig-
ured, becoming a real
cathedral."


Terry Mattingly is the di-
rector of the Washington
Journalism Center at the
Council for Christian Col-
leges and Universities and
leads the GetReligion. org
project to study religion
and the news.


Celebration Sounds

Choir & Orchestra
will present a concert
Sunday, Feb. 26, 2012, 6:00 PM.

The nhublic is invited to


.1K>


Hernando Church of the Nazarene
2101 N Florida Ave, Hernando FL


First Church of God r
5510 Jasmine Lane
726-8986
Pun...Pellowship...Pood...Pree!
If you or your group would like to participate,
Come Prepared and Join In.


enjoy this gospel \
concert.


C6 SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2012


RELIGION


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


11,












COMMUNITY ___
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE



News NOTHein contrniol the cats NewsNOTES


Honor Flight -m-M W WmmEW m WE WE mm w s w


fundraiser on tap
A World War II Honor
Flight fundraiser breakfast
will be staged from 8 to 10:30
a.m. Sunday, Feb. 26, at In-
verness Beef 'O' Brady's.
Menu includes pancakes,
sausage and orange juice for
$5.
April 3 will be the first flight
for 2012, and they will hope-
fully continue every month for
the next six months. The trip
to Washington, D.C., is free
to the veterans and $400 for
anyone who wants to be a
guardian/escort.
For more information about
the fundraising efforts, call
Barbara Mills at 352-422-
6236, ore mail Barbaramills
@remax.net.
Lions to serve
pancakes Sunday
Beverly Hills Lions Club,
72 Civic Circle Drive, will
have its pancake breakfast
from 7:30 a.m. to noon Sun-
day, Feb. 26.
Cost for adults is $4; chil-
dren younger than 12 eat for
$2. Menu includes all-you-
can-eat pancakes, choice of
bacon or sausage or combo,
orange juice and coffee or
tea.
For more information, call
Lion Karen at 352-746-2986.
CMUG plans
classes this month
Citrus Macintosh Users
Group classes this month will
be iMovie by Laurie Martin
from 1 to 5 p.m. Monday,
Feb. 27, and Address Book
and Mail in Snow Leopard by
Curtis Herrin from 6 to 9 p.m.
Tuesday, Feb. 28.
Both classes will be in
room 103, Building C4 at CF
Lecanto campus. Preregistra-
tion is required; email ck-
moss@tampabay.rr.com.
Cost is $10 for a single mem-
ber, $15 for family and $20
for nonmembers.
For more information about
CMUG, visit cmugonline.com
or contact President Alan
Wentzell at 352-220-6158 or
cmugpres@gmail.com.
Coin Club to meet
in Beverly Hills
The Beverly Hills Coin
Club will meet at 5:30 p.m.
Monday, Feb. 27, at the Cen-
tral Ridge Library.
There are no dues. The
club's purpose is to bring
local coin collectors together
and provide numismatic edu-
cation. For details, call Joe at
352-527-2868.

Humanitarians
OF FLORIDA


Joshua


Special to the Chronicle
Joshua is a precious 10-
week-old black and gray
tabby with loving on his
mind. Joshua and his bud-
dies are all looking for for-
ever homes. All our felines
are neutered, micro-
chipped, vaccinated, and
free of feline leukemia,
AIDs and heartworms. Vis-
itors are welcome from 10
a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday
through Saturday at the
Humanitarians' Manches-
ter House on the corner of
State Road 44 and Conant
Avenue, east of Crystal
River. Call the Humanitari-
ans at 352-613-1629 for
adoptions, or view most of
the Hardin Haven's felines
online at www.petfinder.
com/shelters/f1186.html.


Low-cost spay/neuter program being offered


Special to the Chronicle

Florida spring is just around the cor-
ner and kitten season is right behind it
Volunteers with Precious Paws Res-
cue recognize that there are not enough
homes for the kittens born each season
in Citrus County. To reduce the number
of unwanted kittens and cats, Precious
Paws Rescue has joined with the Floral


City Veterinary Hospital to sponsor a
low-cost feline spay ($20) and neuter
($10) program. The starting goal is 100
spays and/or neuters. Donations to ex-
pand this program are welcome and
needed.
Pet owners wishing to participate in
the program are asked to stop by the
Precious Paws Adoption Center in Crys-
tal River Mall to get a certificate. The


Super Spaghetti


center is open noon to 4 p.m. Thursday
through Sunday; certificates are avail-
able now.
The pet owner will make an appoint-
ment with FCVH, transport their pet
and present the certificate for the pro-
cedure.
Any additional veterinary services
must be requested and paid for by the
owner at the time of the appointment.
To speak with a Precious Paws vol-
unteer, call 352-726-4700 and leave a
message.


U


Special to the Chronicle
The American Legion Riders presented the second annual Super Spaghetti Dinner on Wednesday, Feb. 1, at American Le-
gion Post 155 at 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal River. The community's response to the fundraiser made the
event a success. The dinner supports many initiatives of the group, including the Legion Riders Legacy Run. The Ameri-
can Legion Riders are a diverse group of motorcycle enthusiasts serving America's military, veterans and children and
youths. From left: Charles Hawkes, Linda Baker and Thelma Hawkes enjoy the evening together as supporters are about
to be served their dinner.




CHS grads sought for reunion


Special to the Chronicle

The Citrus High School
class of 1982 wants to share
its 30th class reunion with
other classes, primarily
those who graduated from
1978 through 1985. Any grad-
uates of CHS, however, are
also invited.
Reunion coordinator Jeff
Hudson said faculty and staff
from those years are also in-
vited. The multi-class re-


union effort is in conjunction
with the 100th anniversary of
CHS.
The reunion will be July
13 through 15 at Grand Cy-
press Resort in Orlando.
Festivities will start Friday
night with a cocktail recep-
tion by the pool. Saturday
will be family day around
the pool, which just went
through a multimillion-dol-
lar renovation.
Saturday night will be a


semiformal dinner/dance
with contests and door
prizes for recognition of
most changed, least
changed, who travelled fur-
thest, most children, most
grandiose, etc. After the din-
ner and program, there will
be a deejay for dancing.
Cost for the reunion for
both days is $125 per couple;
$100 for individuals. Those
who wish to attend only one
evening may do so for $80


per couple; $60 for singles.
Grand Cypress offers a spe-
cial rate of $139 per night,
good for two nights prior and
two nights following the
event, for a total of six nights.
Almost 100 people have
committed to attending so
far, but Hudson requests
help in tracking down class
members. To help, or to
RSVP to attend, email Jeff
Hudson at jhudson4992
@yahoo.com.


Meek
speaks to
Sertoma

Brian Tambasco, president
of the Citrus Sertoma Club,
welcomes Citrus County
Commissioner Joe Meek to
a recent meeting of the club
at Oysters restaurant. Meek
spoke to the club about the
current state of Citrus
County. He spoke about
reduction in government
spending, a long-term
focused approach for growth
and economic development.
Citrus Sertoma meets at
7 a.m. each Tuesday.

Special to the Chronicle


Deadline approaches for festival vendors


Parks 6- Rec event slated for March 24


Special to the Chronicle

Citrus County Parks & Recreation
will host an International Festival and
Grand Reopening from 10 a.m. to 3
p.m. Saturday, March 24, at Central
Ridge Community Center at Beverly
Hills.


Local food vendors will sell their
cuisine with themes from around the
world. Arts and crafts vendors will
show their work while music and fes-
tivities are ongoing in the park at the
family-friendly event
Food and art vendors are welcome
to participate in the new festival. The


cost is $25 per space; $50 with electric.
Art exhibitors must provide their own
method of display, including tables)
and standard tents or canopies.
The festival will proceed, rain or
shine. Citrus County Parks and Recre-
ation assumes no responsibility for ex-
hibits. For exhibitor information, call
352-465-7007. Vendors can register at
citruscountyparks.com. Deadline for
vendor submissions is Feb. 27.


* Submit information at least two weeks before the event. 0 Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
* Early submission of timely material is appreciated, but Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
multiple publications cannot be guaranteed. community@chronicleonline.com.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be guaranteed.
* Expect notes to run no more than once.


*


CRUG Word class
begins Feb. 27
Crystal River Users group
will offer a Word 2010 Basic
class from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Monday, Feb. 27, and
March 5 and 12, with instruc-
tor Lynn Page.
Office 2010 introduced
new features to Microsoft's
suite of office applications, in-
cluding Word. This class is
also applicable for those with
Word 2007. This class will
look at some of the new fea-
tures and how they made
generating interesting and at-
tractive documents, including
how to apply artistic effects to
photos and text right within
Word.
See how to use the Ribbon
interface to generate docu-
ments for printing or sharing.
Register online at
www.crug.com; send a check
to: CRUG, P.O. Box 2108
Crystal River, FL 34423. Cost
is $20 for members; $30 for
nonmembers.
Inverness Relay
meeting Feb. 28
Inverness Relay For Life is
actively looking for teams,
sponsors, participants and
survivors. Its next meeting is
Tuesday, Feb. 28 at the Gulf
Room at Citrus Memorial
Health System Old School
Building between the Emer-
gency Room and the back of
Hooper's Funeral Home.
Committee chairpersons
meet at 5:39 p.m.; all teams
at 6 p.m.
Follow the signs and bal-
loons to come to the meeting,
and fill out a survivor form if
you have ever had any type
of cancer, or are currently
battling cancer.
Form a team, become a
sponsor, or just come out and
find out what Relay does for
the community. All are wel-
come. Visit www.relayforlife.
org/invernessfl or call the
local American Cancer Soci-
ety office at 352-637-5577.
Legion welcomes
all to dinner
Allen Rawls Post 77 Ameri-
can Legion welcomes every-
one to a dinner 5 to 7 p.m.
Saturday, Feb. 25, at High-
lands Civic Center, 4375 Little
Al Point, Inverness.
On the menu are creamy
onion soup, cabbage soup,
baked steak with mushroom
gravy, baked chicken,
mashed potatoes, green
beans, candied carrots, din-
ner rolls, assorted desserts,
coffee, iced tea and soda.
Cost is $8; children younger
than 10 eat for $4.
Entertainment will be pro-
vided by Bernie at the
keyboard.
Profits from the dinner will
be used to support the Ameri-
can Legion programs such as
for children and youths, Boys
State, Boy Scouts, American-
ism, school medals and
more.
For more information, call
352-726-0444.
Help feed Citrus,
win Ram truck
There will be a drawing on
Saturday, April 21, for a 2012
Ram Truck Hemi Quad 1500
ST with Express Package,
donated by Crystal Chrysler,
Dodge, Jeep, Ram.
All proceeds will benefit the
Capital Campaign of Feed
Citrus County Food Bank and
the We Care Food Pantry.
Tickets are a $50 donation
with only 2,000 tickets
available.
An additional prize of 1,000
gallons of gas will be
awarded to the winner of the
drawing if the ticket is regis-
tered at any Crystal Chrysler,
Dodge, Jeep, Ram dealer-
ship on or before March 17.
Tickets are available at We
Care Food Pantry, Regions
Bank, Capital City Bank and
all Crystal Motor Car dealer-
ship offices.
Visit wecarefoodpantry.org
or call 352-628-0445 for more
information.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SATURDAY EVENING FEBRUARY 25 2012 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D/h Comcast, Dunnellon & lnglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
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NBC 8 8 8 8 8 News (N) 'PG' Dimaggio" 14' release Mitch.'14' Victims Unit '14 Night Live
( WFTV } ABC 20 20 20 News World Jeopardy! Wheel of Wipeout (In Stereo) *** "The Devil Wears Prada" (2006) Meryl News Hot Topics
ABC 20 20 20 News G'c Fortune PG' Streep. Premiere. (In Stereo)'PG-13' 'PG
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LDISN] 46 40 46 6 5 Ally'G' Up!'G' 'G'x Farm G' Up!'G' G', Ally 'G' Charlie Charlie Charlie Charlie Charlie
EE$PN 33 27 33 21 17 College Basketball Teams TBA. (N) (Live) College GameDay College Basketball SportsCenter (N)
ESPN2 34 28 34 43 49 College Basketball Teams TBA. (N) (Live) College Basketball Richmond at Xavier. (N) Ali 70 From Las Vegas (N)
EWIN) 95 70 95 48 Life Vatican |Angelica Live St. Bernadette of Lourdes |Angelica Web of Faith 'G' |The Journey Home
S"G- **** "Bambi"(1942) Voices of ***Y "The Lion King"(19941 Musical) Voices ***Y "Aladdin" (1992, Fantasy) Voices of
29 52 29 20 28 Force" Hardie Albright. Premiere. 'G' of Rowan Atkinson. Premiere. G' Scott Weinger, Robin Williams. G'
EENCJ 44 37 44 32 America's News HQ FOX Report (N) Huckabee (N) Justice With Jeanine The Five Jour. |News
[FD) 26 56 26 Chopped 'G' Restaurant: Im. Restaurant: Im. Restaurant: Im. Restaurant: Im. Iron Chef America
[FEiD 35 39 35 Hot Stove IPanthers NHL Hockey Florida Panthers at Carolina Hurricanes. |Panthers Boxing Cristian Favela vs. Jessie Vargas.
*** "Iron Man" (2008, Action) Robert Downey UFC 144 Japan Preliminary (N) (Live) *** "Star Trek" (2009, Science Fiction) Chris
30 60 30 51 Jr., Terrence Howard. 'PG-13' Pine, Zachary Quinto. 'PG-13'
GOLF) 727 67 727 Central IPGA Tour Golf IPGA Tour Golf WGC Accenture Match Play Championship, Quarterfinals.
"Meet My Mom" (2010, Romance) Lori "Beyond the Blackboard" (2011, Docudrama) "Audrey's Rain" (2003 Drama) Jean Smart,
ALL 39 68 39 45 54 Loughlin, Johnny Messner. xc EmiryVanCamp.'NR'cc Carol Kane, Richard Gilliland. NR'
*** "Runaway Jury" (2003, Suspense) John *' "Big Mommas: Like Father, 2 Days: Boxing Devon Alexander vs. Marcos Maidana,
BJ 302 201 302 2 2 Cusack. (In Stereo)'PG-13'c Like Son" (2011) 'PG-13' Portrait Welterweights. (N) c
HGTV) 23 57 23 42 52 House |Hunters House |Hunters Candice Dear Color Spl. Interiors House |Hunters House Hunters
Swamp People"No Swamp People "Divide Mudcats"Outlaw Mudcats"Hot Spots" Mudcats"Nightmare Cajun Cajun
i 51 25 51 32 42 Guts, NoGator"PG to Conquer"'PG' Country" 'PG' 'PG' Holes" 'PG' c Pawn Pawn
** "The Perfect Husband: The Laci Peterson "Drew Peterson: Untouchable" (2012 "The Craigslist Killer" (2011, Docudrama)
LIFE 24 38 24 31 Story" (2004) Dean Cain.'PG-13' Docudrama) Rob Lowe, Cara Buono. NRh' Jake McDorman, Billy Baldwin. c
*** "Steel Magnolias" (1989, Comedy- **l "No Reservations"(2007, Drama) *, "New in Town" (2009, Romance-Comedy)
50 119 Drama) Sally Field, Dolly Parton. PG' Catherine Zeta-Jones. 'PG' Renee Zellweger. 'PG' R
S** "Man on Fire"(2004) Denzel Washington. ** "The People Under the Stairs" (1991, **1 "Unknown" (2011) Liam Neeson.
320 221 320 3 3 (In Stereo) 'R' Horror) Brandon Adams. (In Stereo) 'R' Premiere. (In Stereo)'PG-13'
MSNBC 42 41 42 Documentary Documentary Documentary Documentary Documentary Documentary
Border Wars "Cartel Drain the Great Lakes Ultimate Factories Alaska State Troopers Alaska State Troopers Ultimate Factories
109 65 109 44 53 Crackdown"'PG' 'G' "Heineken" (N) 'G' 14' "Ice Patrol"'14' "Heineken"'G'
NICK 28 36 28 35 25 Sponge. |Sponge. iCarly'G' |iCarly'G' Victorious IRock Victorious |iCarly'G' '70s '70s Friends |Friends
OWN 103 62 103 Unfaithful: Stories Unfaithful: Stories Oprah's Oscar Unfaithful: Stories Unfaithful: Stories Oprah's Oscar
** "Enough" (2002 Suspense) Jennifer ** "Monster-in-Law"(2005, Romance- ** "Monster-in-Law"(2005, Romance-
44 123 Lopez, Billy Campbell. PG-13' Comedy) Jennifer Lopez. 'PG-13' Comedy) Jennifer Lopez. 'PG-13'
i**l "The Extra Man" (2010, Comedy) Kevin ***l "The King's Speech"(2010) Colin Firth. ** "The Tempest" (2010, Drama) Helen
340 241 340 4 Kline. iTV. (In Stereo)'R x iTV. (In Stereo) HR'x cMirren, Felicity Jones. iTV Premiere. 'PG-13'
Chasing NASCAR SPEED Motorcycle Racing AMA Supercross Special Atlanta. From the Georgia Battlecross Motorcycle Racing
732 112 732 Daytona Perfor. Center Dome in Atlanta. ) (Live) 14'
**** "Jaws"(1975, Horror) Roy Scheider, **l "Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest" (2006, Action) ** "Starsky &
37 43 37 27 36 Robert Shaw. (In Stereo) 'PG' Johnny Depp, Orlando Bloom. (In Stereo) 'PG-13' Hutch" (2004)
Women's College Basketball Oklahoma at College Basketball Tennessee at South Boxing 'PG'
36 31 36 Texas. (N) (Live Carolina. (N) (Live)
"Red: Werewolf "Black Forest" (2012 Fantasy) Tinsel Korey, "Witchslayer Gretl" (2012, Fantasy) Shannen "Black Forest" (2012)
31 59 31 26 29 Hunter" (2010) NR' Ben Cross. Premiere. 'NR' Doherty Paul McGillion. Premiere. 'R' Tinsel Korey.
Friends Friends Seinfeld Seinfeld Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang *, "My Best Friend's Girl" (2008) Dane Cook,
49 23 49 16 19 14'X '14'c 'PG' PG Theory Theory Theory Theory Kate Hudson. Premiere. 'R'
9 53 1 3 3 **** "EastofEden"(1955, Drama) James **** "The Grapes of Wrath"(1940, Drama) ***1 "Bound for Glory" (1976, Biography)
TCM 169 53 169 30 35 Dean, Julie Harris.'PG' c Henry Fonda.'N R' DavidCarradine.'PG'c
Gold Rush "Bedrock Gold Rush "Man Down" Gold Rush "In the Gold Rush "Frozen Gold Rush "Judgment Gold Rush "Frozen
53 34 53 24 26 Gold" 'PG' 'PG' c Black"'PG' Out"'PG' c Day" PG' Out"'PG'
48 Hours: Hard 48 Hours: Hard 48 Hours: Hard 48 Hours: Hard 48 Hours: Hard 48 Hours: Hard
)UJ 50 46 50 29 30 Evidence'14' Evidence'14' Evidence'14' Evidence'14' Evidence'14' Evidence '14' c
S*** "The Matrix"(1999, Science Fiction) NBA Tip- NBA Basketball 2012 NBA All-Star Saturday Night. (N) Falling Skies "Live and
) 48 33 48 3134 Keanu Reeves. 'R' Off (N) (Live) cc Learn "14'
Most Terrifying Places Most Terrifying Places Ghost Adventures Ghost Adventures Ghost Adventures"Old Ghost Adventures
[TAVI 9 54 9 44 in America 6 in America 4 PG' 14' c Fort Erie"'PG' PG'
iiiii) 25 55 25 98 55 Most Shocking '14' Most Shocking Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn Forensic Forensic
(1LJ 32 49 32 34 24 M*A*S*H |M*A*S*H Home m |Home Im Home Im Home Im Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond King
Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special "No Country for Old
USA 47 32 47 17 18 Victims Unit'14 Victims Unit'14 Victims Unit'14 Victims Unit'14 Victims Unit'14 Men"(2007)'R'
Ghost Whisperer "Pater Ghost Whisperer Ghost Whisperer "Big Ghost Whisperer (In Ghost Whisperer (In Ghost Whisperer
WEJ 117 69 117 Familias"PG' "Firestarter"'PG' Chills"'PG' Stereo) 'PG Stereo) 'PG "Bloodline"'PG'
LWGiEAJ 18 18 18 18 20 Law Order: Cl Funny Home Videos Funny Home Videos Funny Home Videos Videos |News 30 Rock |Scrubs


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
SREETX E

@2012 Tnbune Media Services, Inc
All Rights Reserved
SWKIH


AURROPi

I P

TILUGY
--F-rr -


West
Pass
Pass
Pass
Pass


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


I r.1 I -



,I)^ ..





THEY WOULD HAVE BEEN
BETTER OFF IF THE BOAT
HAP MORE OF THESE
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Answer here:L L I
(Answers Monday)
Yesterday's Jumbles: FUROR GRANT AMBUSH HAIRDO
I Answer: The ranch worker looked forward to his break
so he could play a few FARM HANDS


Bridge

PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

Adrienne Rich, a poet, essayist and feminist,
said, "Pride is a tricky, glorious, double-edged feel-
ing."
A lot of things we do at the bridge table are dou-
ble-edged. If we bid and the opponents buy the
contract, we have probably helped their declarer
play If we use a bidding convention, we give extra
information to the defenders.
In this deal, look at the West hand. South opens
two clubs, strong, artificial and forcing. North re-
sponds two diamonds, weak and artificial. South
rebids two spades, natural. North jumps to four di-
amonds, a splinter bid announcing at least four-
card spade support, some goodies and a singleton
(or void) in diamonds. South control-bids (cue-
bids) four hearts. North signs off in four spades
(denying a diamond void). And South jumps to six
spades.
What should West lead?
West would normally select the diamond ace,
but knowledge of dummy's singleton suggests that
this is not a wise choice. Better is to try to establish
a trick that can be cashed when West is in with a
high diamond. This points to the heart three. And
here, that start is lethal.
A trump lead also looks promising, but South
has a glorious riposte. He takes the first trick,
cashes the club ace (not vital), and continues with
the diamond queen. Since West does not have an-
other trump to lead, declarer can ruff three dia-
monds on the board and discard his heart loser on
the club king


West
!48
V Q 9 6 3
* AK J 5
4 7 6 4 2


North
24
4+
4
Pass


East
Pass
Pass
Pass
Pass


ACROSS
1 TV statuette
5 Mr. Lugosi
9 Camp bed
12 Demented
13 Pinnacle
14 Narrow inlet
15 "Peanuts" kid
16 "Between
you, me and
the -"
18 Busybodies
20 Fastens
21 Textile
colorers
22 Half a fly?
23 Cartoon duck
26 Gambling
stake
30 Pilot a ferry
33 Follow
34 Draw closer
35 Abound
37 Remnant
39 Poodle, for one
40 In (as
found)
41 Like a wolf's
howl


43 Hi-fi records
45 Contended
48 "The Zoo
Story" penner
51 Nonstick
coating
53 Start of
summer
56 Bona -
(genuine)
57 Rough shelter
58 Marched
along
59 Rim
60 Fabric meas.
61 Orange
veggies
62 Suggestive
look
DOWN


Answer to Previous Puzzle


6 MPG monitor 10 River to the
D9 Gator's 19 Exam for jrs.
I N N ASCARHED


YES L.PGA COAL
U R L NWay of Lao Tzu
LIE- -- 31ZAR TAGoken
ETT TETE HMO


















| o|32 To date
FA V ORED ERECT
















I 36 Pack animals
A N A BEE 38 Become a

6 MPG monitor 10 River to the
7 on Seine T
(pretend) 11 Trims a doily
8 Ice-skating 17 Joyous







leaps outburstter
9 Gator's 19 Exam for jrs.
cousin 22 Mary
. -- Moore
I Puzzles" books 24 Bleaches out
m 47Mt25 Dragon's
10 i1l 27 Jarrett of
14 -NASCAR
28 Way of Lao Tzu
30 Qt. parts
31 Aloha token
36 Pack animals
46 42728 29 donors







S51 Koppel and
42 -Paris -d Towerll
46 "Forgetiree's kitty
39 letter
S-47 Matt Dillon's







Swebsite,
48- perhan
46 47 49 Stentorian
52 50 Luncheonette
52 orders
56 51 Koppel and
59 52 -do-well
54 Retiree's kitty
62 55 End of a
perhaps


Dear Annie: When I mar-
ried my husband, his son,
"D.J." was 6 years old. My
children from my first
marriage were slightly
older. Right from the
start, D.J. was a hand-
ful. He was violent and
often in trouble at
school.
A year into the mar-
riage, my husband and
I had a son together.
That same year, D.J.
was diagnosed with
ADHD and aggressive
behavior and was put AN N
on medication. D.J. is MAIL
now 14. In the inter-
vening years, he has
killed animals, pushed his
younger brother off a patio and
tried to suffocate him, and re-
cently hit him in the eye and
caused permanent damage to his
vision. D.J. went to live with his
mother three years ago. She took
him off all of his medications.
Last summer, I insisted that
D.J. stay with my in-laws, who are
completely blind to his flaws. I
told my husband he could visit
D.J. as often as he wanted, and
for six weeks, my husband spent
every day with his older son,
while our kids barely saw him.
The problem is, D.J. will be com-
ing to visit again this summer.
While I understand that this is
my husband's son, I must protect
our younger kids from his vio-
lence. My husband is upset that I
don't want D.J. in our home.
Please help. Scared to Death
Dear Scared: D.J. sounds like a
very disturbed young man who
takes his hostility out on your
children. Based on his track


record, he cannot be trusted
around them. It must be difficult
for your husband to accept that
his son is so violent,
but we think having
D.J. stay with his
grandparents is sensi-
ble. We hope your hus-
band will consider
getting some counsel-
ing for him, and also
for the entire family
Dear Annie: My 90-
year-old mother is an
Alzheimer's patient.
In her younger days,
HE'S she was very active in
BOX the community and
belonged to many or-
ganizations and social
clubs.
Mom doesn't get out of her as-
sisted-living community much.
Occasionally, I take her in her
wheelchair to a local restaurant
or a doctor's appointment. Be-
cause of her former high profile
in the community, many people
recognize her, but she no longer
knows them. I always tell them to
please identify themselves so she
doesn't get confused. Yet even
with this warning, some people
insist on saying, "Hi, Mary! Do
you know who I am?"
Of course, I immediately tell
Mom their name and how she
knows them so she can put them
in context. But what amazes me
is that some people have the
nerve to ask, "Why did you tell
her? I wanted to see if she recog-
nized me!" Mind you, she often
does not know me. Why on earth
would she remember some ac-
quaintance from 30 years ago?
Mom knows enough to be
aware that she has a problem


with her memory The shock and
despair on her face during these
encounters is so sad, it makes me
want to smack these idiots. I'm
amazed at the stupidity of some
people and wanted to tell them
so. Pissed Off in El Paso
Dear El Paso: It is always wise
to identify yourself when ap-
proaching someone. It is both in-
considerate and egotistical to
assume everyone knows who you
are. This is especially important
when dealing with a person with
Alzheimer's. Thanks for saying
so.
Dear Annie: I've been reading
about the barking dogs. Many
years ago, we lived next to a lady
who had chickens. I called and
told her that her rooster was wak-
ing us up too early in the morn-
ing. She promised it wouldn't
happen again.
The next morning, the rooster
began to crow. I got out of bed and
called her on the phone. When
she answered, I began to crow
like a rooster End of problem. -
The Villages, Fla.


Annie's Mailbox is written by
Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar,
longtime editors of the Ann Lan-
ders column. Please email your
questions to
anniesmailbox@comcast.net, or
write to: Annie's Mailbox, c/o
Creators Syndicate, 737 3rd
Street, Hermosa Beach, CA
90254. To find out more about
Annie's Mailbox and read fea-
tures by other Creators Syndi-
cate writers and cartoonists,
visit the Creators Syndicate Web
page at www.creators.com.


North
47643
Y8752
S3
* K J 9 5


East
452
V KJ 10
10 9 6 4
Q 10 8 3
South
* A K Q J 10 9
VA 4
+ Q 8 7 2
4 A


Dealer: South
Vulnerable: North-South


South
2*
24
4
64


Opening lead: ??


2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


C8 SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2012


ENTERTAINMENT


2-25-12


y






CITRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Garfield


For Better or For Worse


is TgERp A WAMI I HION I A OWA I I SL R1 W: I TOLP YOLO
CAM 9o TO EL9 OUC SOMAE COOKIE& &PRAS -, k, I TE rr,
WT"[ 91MER? IN Ti-AT PAW FOR o Y--









Sally Forth

REALLYL? WE CAN'T AGREE ON WELL, I DO HAVE 2 AT LEAST WE'RE I THINK I JUST BLEW UP
A SINGLE HOBBY OR ACTIVITY WE ONE IEA... SPENDING TIME A CITY, A SUBURB ANE
CAN DO AS A FAMILY TOGETHER. AN EXURB.
HIL, SHUT THAT "GO DIRECTLY
GAME OFF. TO JAIL." WAIT,
PLAYING
AGAWINST?


Dilbert
I ~I-I


MY POWERPOINT
SLIDES HAVE A LITTLE
SOMETHING FORP,
EVERYONE.


WHICH REMINDS ME -
DID YOU HEAR ABOUT
THE BOSS WHO DIED
BECAUSE HE DIDN'T
PRAISE HIS EMPLOYEE?

Ti-


Beetle Bailey


The Grizzwells


The Born Loser


Blondie


Kit 'N' Carlyle Rubes


Unkool-Aid


Doonesbury


Big Nate


NO, H5E'5 COOL.
E' ,... T-TALK
ABOUT IT IIHEN ...
5HE.. HE HOME!

BIN&6!








...AND SHY! I'M GET-
TING A VIBE OF SOME-
SODY WHO GETS
NERVOUS IN CROWDS,
WHO' RATHER SPEND
TIME WITH HIS MODEL
TRAINS AND HIS LEGOS...


Arlo and Janis


Today's MOVIES


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377
"Tyler Perry's Good Deeds" (PG-13) 1:10 p.m.,
4:10 p.m., 7:20 p.m., 10 p.m.
"This Means War" (PG-13) 1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m.,
7:30 p.m., 10 p.m.
"Ghost Rider" (PG-13) In Real 3D. 1:40 p.m., 4:40
p.m. 7:40 p.m., 10:05 p.m. No passes.
"Safe House" (R) ID required. 1 p.m., 4 p.m., 7 p.m.,
9:55 p.m.
"The Vow" (PG-13) 1:20 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:10 p.m.,
9:55 p.m.
"Journey 2: The Mysterious Island" (PG) In Real
3D. 4:45 p.m., 7:45 p.m., 10:05 p.m. No passes.
"Journey 2: The Mysterious Island" (PG)
1:45 p.m.
Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Wanderlust" (R) ID required. 1:25 p.m., 4:05 p.m.,
7:50 p.m., 10:15 p.m.


"CANT ,JUT SAY Y66,
AIT. MAWN.IA-
%Y-Y1 IIIAYS PIP.
OR NO?" \










YOU'RE ...AND
PICKING HIS
UP YOUR ACTION
OWN F FIGURES
VIE, AND.
CHAD WHAT?


'ti- p
a o --- I


"Act of Valor" (R) ID required. 1:40 p.m., 4:20 p.m.,
7:20 p.m., 10 p.m.
"Tyler Perry's Good Deeds" (PG-13) 1:30 p.m.,
4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 10:10 p.m.
"This Means War" (PG-13) 1:35 p.m., 4:15 p.m.,
7:15 p.m., 9:55 p.m.
"Ghost Rider" (PG-13) In Real 3D. 1:50 p.m., 4:50
p.m. 7:40 p.m., 10:15 p.m. No passes.
"Safe House" (R) ID required. 2 p.m., 4:45 p.m.,
7:25 p.m. 10:05 p.m.
"Journey 2: The Mysterious Island" (PG)
1:20 p.m.
"Journey 2: The Mysterious Island" (PG) In Real
3D. 4 p.m., 7 p.m., 9:40 p.m. No passes.
"Star Wars: Episode I" (PG) In Real 3D. 1:15 p.m.,
4:10 p.m., 7:05 p.m., 10 p.m. No passes.
"The Vow" (PG-13) 1:45 p.m., 4:25 p.m., 7:10 p.m.,
9:50 p.m.


Times subject to change; call ahead.


FV0ALWAYSDR EAM BIG, SON, AND AS A MATrrE OF PAG,% NOW IN MY DREAM, YOU D EOAM ON,
NEVER L700 0OP: YOUR EAMS! 0I O NAVE A BIG DREAM YOU'RE TiPLE MV ALLOWANCE SON
TALKING AND 'NROW MY CURFEW
11 AI i 1
SOUNOS LIKE A WNNER OU7r r-4 WINDOW!
Lo :.-ME, DAD!
-J -,,-




D t eT a
Dennis the Menace The Family Circus


"But that's just an opinion, right?"


"W:N IT COmNE To A-TN'COOKIES, MoWs
'FNOU6&HIS WAY BEFORE /MY ENOUGH" '
Betty

MOM, 0O YOU OF -TH WOLe ID EA
THINK THiERE llL, COUR56 IS RIDICULOUS- M OILI NG UP e
6e A Z M I A/OT/ t TJSTMAKE5FOR CHINSAW ANYWAY
APOCALYPS6? CREEPY TORIES OKAY?
THAT'S ALL -






Frank & Ernest


/^T ^- ~ NO,"FA;T OOD"
co,"o D065 NOT 1 2
0X0 ^ MEAN YOu
ms CAN EAT IT

XHAj f ijS1-tNT. E





WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public LOCal RADIO WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Contemp. WSKY 97.3 FM News Talk WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WXOF-FM 96.3 Adult Mix WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s, '60s, '70s
WEKJ FM 96.7, 103.9 Religious WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WRZN-AM 720 Adult Standards

CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: X equals F


"EGEKBY EKL WLEZNZOTLYY HJ WL, EZB


N DEFL ZJHDNZO RSH BNYBENZ XJK


EZCJZL GDJ EPHNFLTC PEWAENOZY HJ


OLH JZL." RNTT WSKKEC

Previous Solution: "Work hard to sharpen your talent, to get better at whatever it is
that you do ... that's what it comes back to." Ed Bradley
(c) 2012 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 2-25


Peanuts


Pickles


FOR PMY INTELLIGENT
VIEWERS, I HAVE DATA,
AND FOR THE MORONS,
I HAVE MANIPULATIVE
ANECDOTES.


WELL... I'M SENSING
SOMEONE WHOSE NOT
TOO SURE OF HIM-
SELF.. IT'S SORT OF
AN AWKWARD,
CLUMSY VLBE.


COMICS


SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2012 C9











Turkey's turbulent history with Jews


Associated Press

ISTANBUL As Turkey wel-
comes Syrians fleeing violence,
the anniversary Friday of the
deaths of more than 750 Jewish
refugees who were denied shelter
by Turkey in World War II was a
reminder of perennial tension be-
tween pragmatic and humanitar-
ian impulses.
The SS Struma, whose passen-
gers fled Romania and docked in
Istanbul, was denied entry to
Palestinian territory by colonial
power Britain. On Feb. 23, 1942,
Turkey towed the vessel to the
Black Sea and set it adrift. A So-
viet torpedo sank it the next morn-
ing, and only one person survived.
The episode is a stain on an up-
beat narrative of the Jewish expe-
rience in the mostly Muslim
country, even if Jews are treated
with far more tolerance than else-
where in the region. Turkey
dwells on the legacy of Ottoman
rulers who welcomed Jews fleeing
Christian persecution in Spain in
the 15th century
Tension over the past shadows
Turkey as it seeks to lead in the re-
gion, advocating democracy in the


Middle East and North Africa.
Turkey, which had sought closer
ties with Syria's authoritarian
regime, now demands that its pres-
ident stop a bloody crackdown on
opponents and quit, and it shelters
some 10,000 refugees from Syria.
Signs of Turkish inclusiveness
are many Singer Can Bonomo, of
Sephardic Jewish descent, will
represent Turkey at the Eurovi-
sion song contest in Azerbaijan
this year. Last month, Turkey
showed a French film about the
Nazi genocide, the first time it was
aired on public television in a
mostly Muslim nation.
Huseyin Avni Mutlu, Istanbul's
governor, attended a ceremony to
commemorate Holocaust victims.
"We have strived to serve the
world as a center of tolerance,"
read his prepared remarks. "Never
was any nationality, religion or be-
lief group oppressed in these lands.
On the contrary, they were treated
as equals, with respect, and their
cultural heritages were conserved."
But the way Turkey neutral in
World War II handled the
Struma undercuts claims of favor-
able treatment that Jews and
other minorities purportedly re-


ceived in that era. Even today,
deficits in equal rights and reli-
gious freedoms mar democratic
advances in Turkey
"This is a tragedy which is
treated as something that has noth-
ing to do with Turkey," said author
Rifat Bali, who has written about
non-Muslim minorities in Turkey
He said blame is assigned to
Britain or the Soviet Union, with
some justification, but described
the refugee deaths as a "black
spot" on Turkey's "rosy rhetoric"
about benevolent policies.
A rare commemoration was
held at Sarayburnu, a promontory
near the Golden Horn inlet in Is-
tanbul. Organizer Cem Murat So-
fuoglu said the Turkish
establishment was not interested.
"They don't want to shake the
cage," said Sofuoglu, a lawyer who
wants Turkey and Britain to
apologize.
Turkey's Jewish community of
just over 20,000 has traditionally
kept a low profile to avoid contro-
versy or worse, especially at a
time when political ties between
Turkey and Israel, a former ally,
are frozen. The low point came in
2010 when nine people died dur-


ing an Israeli raid on a Turkish
ship intending to deliver aid to
Palestinians in the Gaza Strip.
In 2003, two Istanbul syna-
gogues were targeted in deadly
bombings by militants tied to al-
Qaida, and Turkey cracked down
on radical Islamists.
Many Turkish Jews had to speak
Turkish and drop Ladino, a lan-
guage that mixes Hebrew and
Spanish and is dying out, in the
early years of the modern repub-
lic. During World War II, Jews, as
well as ethnic Armenians and
Greeks, were subject to an arbi-
trary lump-sum tax, and mobs at-
tacked non-Muslim properties in
Istanbul in 1955.
Anti-Semitism has risen in
Turkey's ultraconservative media
over the past five years, said Murat
Onur, an Istanbul-based commen-
tator who has studied the issue.
Baki Tezcan, an associate pro-
fessor of history and religious
studies at the University of Cali-
fornia, Davis, said the only place
to buy a menorah in Istanbul is at
the offices of Shalom, a Jewish
newspaper In December, he went
there to get one because his fa-
ther-in-law is Jewish, saw no sign


outside, and encountered a strict
screening procedure.
"This experience made me re-
alize how difficult it must be to
live as a Jew in Turkey, feeling so
threatened that they have to hide
their community newspaper's of-
fices and apply such high security
measures," he wrote in an email.
After the Ottoman Empire col-
lapsed and foreign powers carved
up its spoils, Turkey's founder,
Mustafa Kemal Ataturk, hauled
Turkey onto a secular path, though
religious belief remained en-
trenched. Today, the government is
run by pious Muslims who describe
themselves as conservative
democrats.
Eyal Peretz is the Israel-born
chairman of Arkadas, a commu-
nity of ethnic Turkish Jews in Is-
rael. He said the Ottoman
welcome to Jews was something
"we cannot forget" and an "excep-
tional story" in a dire catalogue of
persecution over the centuries.
However, he criticized Turkey
for downgrading relations with Is-
rael, alleging it seeks to curry
favor with Muslims worldwide.
Turkey is incensed over the treat-
ment of the Palestinians by Israel.


C CITRUS COUNTY




H ONICLE

-www.chronicleonline.com


BUSINESS HOURS:

MO\DAV- FRI DY
8:00 A.M. 5:00 P.M.
CLOG ED SATU VDA'/SLNDA,


WE GLADLY ACCEPT

iwsw-


Classifieds


Classifiecs in Print and Online All The Time!


Publication Days/Deadlines

Chrnllde / Ddly....................................... P Ddly
Ha-ncidrat / Sunday..................................3 PK. Friday
Chroilld / Sunda................................4 PM, Friday
C ailde / Maic6y................................. PM Friday
Surrnte- County 1imesn / liu-uday...............11 AM, Tuesday
RYveIlaid Neaw / Thlurs day.....................2 PA4 Mainday
South Marlion atlzi / Friday................... PM Tuesday
WBed Ma-In1 Meseaiger / Wediday...... A PM Friday


5


S2


S -3 tI -4


I Io


42-75893 1




4 2 s5 74 3 1 7


2 9 3 a7s5 g4 1 6


You can earn at least $800 per month
delivering the


Independent contractors delivering the Citrus County
Chronicle can earn as much as $1,000 a month
working only 3-4 early morning hours per day. The
Chronicle is a permanent part of Citrus County with
an excellent reputation. To find out more, call
and speak to one of our district managers or leave
your name and phone number and we will get right
back with you!


B<^K H JTB
KJ ADVERTISE CALL:

352mS63m5966







^~~ ~ Ci oda~~ 9 Tod^fe^^^^ K
=>-30 don Je WdsiiT[Ti NemE'B^*


Clyde,
Ms.Parker loves
and misses you.
Do You Like Bridge,
Ballroom and
Square Dancing?
no strings, dutch treat
73 yr old, Widow.
Respond to
Citrus Co. Chronicle
Blind Box 1758M
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River,
Florida, 34429
Healthy Gentleman,
Extremely honest.
Looking for long term
relationship with
Pentecostal Lady.
also honest, and
healthy. And to share
home expenses &
adventure. Respond to:
Citrus County Chronicle
Blind Box 1759 M
Crystal River Fl. 34429
SWF, 5'2" red hair, lost
the love of my life, I'm
in perfect health, like
football, TV & movies.
Love to cook, member
of VFW. For compan-
ionship. Must be
between 70-80,
Financially secure.
Reply Blind Box 1760-P,
c/o Citrus County
Chronicle, 106 W. Main
St., Inverness, FL 34450
X-pretty boy,older now
but still attractive
enough for some lady's
arm candy, well read,
funny at times, always
considerate, healthy
and financial secure.
So write me at:
WEM, PO Box 1881,
Inverness, FL 34451


5 PIECE BLONDE BED-
ROOM SUITE bed, mir-
rored headboard, mir-
rored dresser, armoire,
nightstand, entertainment
center. $500.
352.270.7420
2005, 42' Cut
Sears Lawn Tractor
Great condition
small hole in deck
$600.
(352) 302-0648
Antique Auction
Sat Feb 25 @ 1pm
View Fri 11-7&Sat10-1
CITRUS HILLS LODGE
350 E Norvell Bryant
Professional App & Liq
Fudge abi 131au1593
352-795-2061
charliefudge.com
13%BP (-3 for cash)
Cash/Cks/MC/VI
Antique Auction
Sat Feb 25 @ 1pm
View Fri 11-7&SatO10-1
CITRUS HILLS LODGE
350 E Norvell Bryant
Professional App & Liq
Fudge ab1131au1593
352-795-2061
charliefudge.com
13%BP (-3 for cash)
Cash/Cks/MC/VI


BEVERLY HILLS
OUR LADY OF
GRACE CHURCH
FLEA MARKET!
SAT. Feb. 25th
8AM to 2PM.
6 Roosevelt Blvd.








Citrus Hills
Sat & maybe Sun
9:30-?
Potterydining
settools,
& household items
805 E. Falconry Ct
L-





Citrus Springs
Sat. & Sun. 7:30am-?
Furnelec.,DVDsappls.
Quality golf equipment
11052 N Fuego Drive
YOU'LL THIS!
DUNNELLON 3/2/2
RENT TO OWN
Close to Rainbow River
RUBLESRENTALS.COM
(561) 719-8787
(561) 575-1718 affr 7pm

ONE OWNER
FORD
2002 Ranger ONE
OWNER, 159K ALL
HIGHWAY MILES
CLEAN, A/C POWER
WINDOWS & DOORS.
CD PLAYER, BED-
LINER. NEW TIRES
jsherouse2@tampabay.rr.c
om
Hernando-Rent to own,
Large 3 bed 2 bath
double wide on 2 lots,
needs clean up, $1000
down $295 mo.
352-726-9369
INGILIS
Saturday 25th, 9a-?
Multi Family Sale
693 Hwy 40 E.


INVERNESS
Sat. 25 & Sun. 26, 9a -4p
ESTATE SALE *
6521 E. Shadow Lane
INVERNESS
Sun 26th, One Day Only
7am-2p MOVING SALE
Furniture, Tools, Etc.
10101 S. Forestline Ave.
JEEP
'95, Cherokee, 159K mi.,
runs good, 4 DR, 4 x 4,
9" Lift on 35, $2,250. obo
(352) 345-6499
KITCHEN TABLE 48 inch
birds eye maple table,
two leaves, six chairs-one
needs repair $150.00 obo
352-503-2226


LINCOLN
2001 Town Car,
new tires & brakes,
runs good $2800. obo
(352) 533-3147
MINI FARMS
2/1/2, w/ Carport, Fen'd
$550. (352) 795-7335
Old Unused
US Postage Stamps
Call for Info.
(352) 344-5622
PRAYER TO THE
BLESSED VIRGIN
(Never known to fail)
O most beautiful
flower of Mt. Cara-
mel, fruitful vine,
splendor of heaven.
Blessed Mother of the
Son of God,
Immaculate Virgin,
assist me in my
necessity. 0 Star of
the Sea, help me and
show me here you
are my mother. 0
Holy Mary, Mother of
God, Queen of
Heaven and Earth, I
humbly beseech you
from the bottom of
my heart to secure
me in my necessity.
(Make request).
There are none that
can withstand your
power. 0 Mary, con-
ceived without sin,
pray for us who have
recourse to thee.
(3 times). Holy Mary,
I place this causein
your hands
(3 times). Say this
prayer for
3 consecutive days
and then you must
publish and it will be
granted to you.
BHL
ROCKING CHAIR blue
upholstered rocking chair
with ottoman $50.00 obo
352-503-2226
Solid Cherry Dining
room set with 8 chairs
$450-1729 W Gulf-to
Lake, ILecanto, FL



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
Paid for Junk Vehicles,
J.W. 352-228-9645
$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not
CASH PAID $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL OF
Scrap Medal, Mowers
Appliances and MORE
Call (352) 224-0698



1 FEMALE CAT
Bangle, Name Tiger
Must find home
(352) 447-0072
Leave Message


8 Pit Mix Puppies
Free to good home
352-257-3052
Baby Gray Pit Bull
Male
Free to good home
(352) 422-2421
Beautiful female calico
cat needs a loving
home. Approximately
2-3 years old.
Up-to-date shots and
spayed. 352-794-3988.
fertilizer, horse manure
mixed with pine shaving
great for gardens or as
mulch. U load and haul
away. 352-628-9624
FREE BUNNY
with cage, very
friendly, brown w/sable
ears(352) 344-5213
KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Savage Pays top $$$.
352-628-4144


FRESH JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct.@ $5 per lb
Stone Crab@ $6 per lb
delivered 727-771-7500



Australian Shepherd
male, chipped, white
with black spots, the
black spot on side looks
like a heart. 2 y.o. miss-
ing for 2 months been
checking at animal
sheltercan you help
me??(352) 746-7024
cell 270-5325
Lost Cat-female, cal-
ico, max short tail, 9
years old, declawed,
no teeth, never been
outside, North Athen/W
Cushions/Citrus Blvd.
area. She had her col-
lar on with her rabies
tag. Please call
(352) 465-1696 or
352-212-5076


Male, Citrus or Levy
last seen at 11480 N.
Moon light Terr. Ingils
(352) 447-0072





REWARD $1000.
No Questions ask.
Min Pin Female 10 lbs
name Zoey, Needs
meds. last seen Sun 8/7
Holiday Dr off Turkey
Oak Crystal River
(352) 257-9546
352-400-1519

L i, i." '
"Hi ) 'Ii lirst.


CHL4N(DLE
Classifieds


Sudoku ****** 4puz.com

3 9 6




6 7__ 1


12 55

6 5 1 2


9__ 4 __

7 6 3

416


___3 7 2
Fill in the squares so that each row colunin and
3-by-3 box contain Ihe numbers I through 9




YOUR AD HERE


$250/month

Call Finette to reserve this space


352-564-2940


There are immediate opportunities for independent contractors to manage

and grow single copy newspaper routes in Citrus and Marion Counties


Be at least 18 years of age. Possess a valid driver's license.
Possess proof of liability insurance.

Su,,,c .... YRoutes are 7 days a week, early morning hours.


www.chronieonlinebo.om Email: mgaouette@chronicleonline.com or bring resume to 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River


C10 SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2012


RELIGION


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


lost uoy z/Iz urown le-
male pit terrier mix 1 y.o.
Black collar last seen
Grover Cleveland/ link
area. just spayed still has
sutures, child broken
hearted. pls call
352-277-4461

Small Brown Teddy Bear
in Ozello
(352) 726-0627

Soft Ball Equipment
blew out of truck
around Grover Cleve-
land & Cardinal 2/18
352-400-0230





PRAYER TO THE
BLESSED VIRGIN
(Never known to fail)
0 most beautiful
flower of Mt. Cara-
mel, fruitful vine,
splendor of heaven.
Blessed Mother of the
Son of God,
Immaculate Virgin,
assist me in my
necessity. 0 Star of
the Sea, help me and
show me here you
are my mother. 0
Holy Mary, Mother of
God, Queen of
Heaven and Earth, I
humbly beseech you
from the bottom of
my heart to secure
me in my necessity.
(Make request).
There are none that
can withstand your
power. O Mary, con-
ceived without sin,
pray for us who have
recourse to thee.
(3 times). Holy Mary,
I place this causein
your hands
(3 times). Say this
prayer for
3 consecutive days
and then you must
publish and it will be
granted to you.
BHL


FRESH JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct.@ $5 per lb
Stone Crab@ $6 per lb
delivered 727-771-7500




VPK Teacher
Experience Preferred

Ark Angels
Christian Preschool
(352) 795-2360



Sereariafl
Admin. Assistant

Experienced with
strong computer skills.
Must pass background
check. Email or send
resume: alex.malley
@multifin.com
Legacy Financial
Associates Inc.
2953 E. Gulf to Lake
Hwy Inverness 34453

Customer
Service/Clerical

Full time, Inverness
Insurance Office
Must have basic
computer skills. Insur-
ance knowledge a
plus. Fax Resume to
352-754-9580 or
email: hilda.cannon@
ffbic.com



Your World

494 awe "&,et





CHkONiCLE


I .1 L. .: I l.- r .


P/T CHURCH
SECRETARYY

Must have strong
microsoft publisher
back ground, approx.
30 hrs per week.
Send Resume to:
First Baptist Church
Attention Robin
550 Pleasant Grove
Rd Inverness Fl 34452




HAIR STYLIST
clientele preferred
Kristy Salon, Bev Hills













M person c
Happy Birthday"







(352) -52 9-993
under Happyi



Call our Classified










Medical experience
a must.(352) 489-2995

#1 Employment sourcelass
Dp fo'dtil


CITRUS PODIATRY
CENTER
IS EXPANDING:
TWO NEW POSITIONS.

-FULL TIME
FRONT/ BACK OFFICE
BILLING/TWO LOCAL
OFF. NO CODING
EXP. REQ.
M-F 8:30AM-5PM.
MED/DENTAL, RETIRE-
MENT, UNIFORMS
AND VACATION.

-PART-TIME MEDICAL
RECORDS/
FRONT OFFICE.
24HRS/WK, VACA-
TION, UNIFORMS.
BOTH POSITIONS
REQUIRE A MINIUM OF
3 YRS EXP IN MED
SETTING, SALARY
NEGOTIABLE.
SEND RESUME TO:
P.O. BOX 1120,
LECANTO FL.
34460-1120 ATT: HR
NO FAXES OR PHONE
CALLS ACCEPTED.

CNA/
CAREGIVER

For Assistant Living
Night Shilfts Available
Call 344-5555 Ext. 102

Come Join The
Avante Team

Avante At Inverness
is looking for
Full time, Part time,
PRN
LPN's for 3-11&11-7

Please contact
Jennifer Daves @
352-726-3141
Or apply online at
Avantecenters.com

FRONT DESK
RECEPTIONIST
Busy Cardiologist office
seeks front office
exp. Individual needs to
be detail oriented,capable
of multi-tasking,
scheduling,multi-line
phone system,and
computer skills. Please
fax resumes
352-547-1342
MARKETER

Health Care is seeking
a Marketer interested in
professional & financial
growth & who also
possess the following
credentials.
Marketing Experience,
Positive Attitude
Good Communication
Skills, Honesty &
Integrity.Self Confi-
dence & Motivation.
Those interested
individuals meeting
the above credentials
Please submit resume
to PO Box 2498
Inverness FIl34451 or
fax 352-726-2864
The Department of
Health has an
opening for:

OPS Dental
Assistant.

Annual Salary
range: $19,902.48 -
$51,721.54. Minimum
Qualifications: Valid
FL radiology license
and expanded
functions certificate;
experience with dig-
ital x-rays and work-
ing with children;
strong patient
manage-
ment/communication/
scheduling/record
keeping skills; willing
to work 10-hour days.
Please apply on-line
at:
https://jobs.myflorida.c
om Refer to
requisition number
64909159. Only State
of Florida
Applications will be
accepted no
resumes, please.
Date closes
03/02/2012.
EO/AA/VP Employer.


Cryst




i

EXP

A
a


SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2012 C I


CLASSIFIED




MA/FRONT DESK

FT for Internal Medicine
practice in Inverness.
Experience preferred.
Fax resume to:
352-637-2311


NOW HIRING

RN's
All Units, wlth Hospltal
Experience

Apply on Line: www.
nurse-temps.com
(352) 344-9828






EXECUTIVE
DIRECTOR

United Way of Citrus
County, a non-profit
agency, is seeking
qualified candidates
for the position of
Chief Professional
Officer/Executive
Director.

This position serves as
chief executive
officer of United Way
of Citrus County
Providing innovative
and strategic leader-
ship while working
with the Board of
Directors to achieve
community impact.
Works with commu-
nity partners, leaders,
and staff to
implement the
strategic plans to
improve education,
achieve financial
stability and promote
healthy lives.
Maintains
accountability for the
overall operational
and fiscal integrity of
the organization.

Skills:
*Ability to prepare
and administer a
non-profit budget.
*Excellent communi-
cations skills (oral and
written).
*Ability to work
successfully with a
non-profit governing
board.
*Ability to coordinate
the annual fund
raising campaign.
*Knowledge of
community planning
operations.
*Provides a
professional image to
the community.
*Sound ethical and
moral principles.
*Commitment to the
mission, vision and
values of United Way.

Education,
A minimum of a
Bachelor's Degree in
business, manage-
ment, finance,
accounting, social
services or related
fields.
Experience:
A minimum of 3 to 5
years managerial
experience, prefera-
bly with a non-profit
health/human serv-
ice agency or busi-
ness.

Send resume to:
United Way of Citrus
County
1205 NE 5th Street,
Suite A


Restaurant Help
ALL POSITIONS

Apply in Person, 2-4pm
108 W. Main St., Inv.
NO PHONE CALLS




AT&T Authorized
Retailer

Looking for Business
SALES REPS, E-mail
Resume to Career@
sanwireless.com

Exp. Sales People
Apply At
777 NE 5th Street CR




ACCOUNTING
POSITION:

Full time. Large
volume accounts
payable department
needs hands on indi-
vidual with problem
solving skills. Must
have full knowledge
of accounts payable
procedures, must
have excellent math
skills, must be well
versed in computers
including spreadshe-
ets, must understand
GL coding, working
knowledge of job
cost and inventory.
Benefits available.
Please send resume
and salary
requirements to
P.O. Box 1589,
Inglis FL 34449 or send
to deborab@
dabcon.com EOE

Equipment
Operator/ Bailor

need for immediate
opening. Must have
forklift and bailor
expereince. 40 hrs
per week. Top Pay
for the right canadi-
ate. Apply
in person at
711 S. Adolph Pt
Lecanto, FI

Exp Carpet Install
Helper
727 686-2879





$$$$$$$
Money is available!
We are seeking
individuals to man-
age rack and store
delivery of the Citrus
County Chronicle
and other publica-
tions. Must be at least
18 years of age and
possess a valid driv-
er's license and insur-
ance. Routes are 7
days a week, early
morning hours. Earn-
ing potential is unlim-
ited! Email
kstew-
art@chronicleonline.co
m or bring
resume to 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd. in
Crystal River.

$$$$$$

Caretaker inside & out-
side 12.5 acre farm.
Volunteer for room &
board some $$$ +
352-220-2774


CITRUS MAIDS

Cleaning Person
needed. Must have
flex. schedule,
lic./vehicle. Exp. a
plus. Leave message
(352) 257-0925

Immediate
Opening

Recycling
Center/Recovered
Material Processing
Plant now looking for
Manager. Must have
experience in
Management/Sales
/Scheduling out
bound loads/Multiple
Computer programs.
Must have a clean
Driver's License. Top
Pay for the right per-
son. Apply in person
@711 S. Adolph Pt,
Lecanto, Fl.
Bring resume

LIVE-IN HOUSE
MAID

For small household,
no children, must be
honest, dependable
references required
352-794-3093

Maintenance
Worker

F/T, P/T Must be
experienced for a
Independent,
Assisted Living Facility
Vacation & Benefits
available.
Apply in person
Bentwood Retirement
1900 W. Alpha Ct.
Lecanto.
Commons Bldg.
(352) 746-6611
DFWP/EOE

NOW HIRING

Class A
Drivers/Laborers
(352) 621-1220





CLEANERS
M/W/F Eve.
ServiceMaster
352-726-4555 E.O.E

Groundsman

Lic & trans. a must.
Pay based on exp.
352-503-2468

SORT LINE
WORKERS

Men & Women for
P/T employment.
Apply in person at
699 S Easy St.
Lecanto, FI




#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)







TAYLD O ICLLEGE



NE QA FW


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
AA AA A ^ ^i sr*-


CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aelvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)

NOW
ENROLLING
I FOR SPRING
2012 CLASSES
=*BARBER
COSMETOLOGY
W FACIAL
I FULL SPECIALTY
u-INSTRUCTOR

MASSAGE THERAPY
I ******W

BENE'S
International
I School of Beauty
NEWPORT RICHEY
/SPRING HILL
727-848-8415
352-263-2744




Barber Shop and
Styling Studio

Very good business,
same great location for
many years, I am 69
yrs. old and time to
retire, call Joanne
352-302-4592/795-4307




Antique Auction
Sat Feb 25 @ 1pmr
View Fri 11-7&Sat10-1
CITRUS HILLS LODGE
350 E Norvell Bryant
Professional App & Liq
Fudge ab1131au1593
352-795-2061
charliefudge.com
13%BP (-3 for cash)
Cash/Cks/MC/VI
MIKASA BONE CHINA
4 Place Setting, Blue
Violets $75.
352 513-4027
OAK OFFICE CHAIR on
casters from Dunedin FIl
train depot.Appraised
$200. Price $100 Pine
Ridge 352-270-3909



Corner Grand Father
Clock, $2500 obo
(352) 726-2326
DISNEY CERAMICS
CHARACTER STATUES
$8 634-2004
GOTHIC HANGING
LIGHT FROM 60'S
Brass colored, interesting
very good condition $40
352-897-4154


al River, FL 34429 LFAKREKRFormica Top 3x24" w/2
EXP POOL ROUTE ,. Drawer File Cabinet
TECH 2 WEEK Iill i|'1'1 Attached. $25 each
_( I1' 727-463-4411
If you know the PREP COURSES ll t FORMICA TOP COM
JTTT'T' difference between PALF ADMINISTRATOR OI ll [ l. PUTER DESKS (4) With
Hayward, calcium $300. 2 Drawer File Cabinet At-
hardness and alkalin- *EKG $475. 7 L1,) Drtached 4ftx24inches $25
'.LINE COOK ity ect., send your -NURSING ASST. $475. each 727-463-4411
qualifications to: *PHLEBOTOMY $475. eacHON TWO DRAWER
Citrus Publishing Blind HON TWO DRAWER
pplv in Person Box 1761P, 1624 N talorcollege.edu LATERAL FILE Like
SCracker'S Meadowcrest Blvd, (352) 245-4119 I new bone color, new
Bar & Grill Crystal River, F 34429 FB, twitter, you tube ( $20000 asking $60 00
352-341-2107






D~Awk


ALL EXTERIOR
ALUMINUM
6" Seamless Gutters
Lic & Ins 352-621-0881
ROB SCREENING
Repairs Rescreen, Front
Entries, Garage, Sliders
Free Est. 352-835-2020
SUBURBAN IND. INC.
Screen rms, Rescreens,
Siding, airports, rf.overs
wood decks, Fla. rooms
windows, garage scrns.
628-0562 (CBC1257141)



SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Washer &
Dryers, Free Pick Up
352-564-8179



Vertical Blind Factory
We custom make all
types. Best prices any-
where! Hwy 44 & CR
491. (352) 746-1998




v' THIS OUT!
PHIL'S MOBILE MARINE
Repairs & Consignment
30 yrs Cert. Best Prices
& Guar 352-220-9435



Loving Adult Care
Home (SL 6906450)
Alzheimer/Dementia
No problem. Nursing
homes do not need to
be your only alternative
352-503-7052


Your World

~949 vtne 44e4


CHR&oNiCE


ROGERS Construction
All Construction
sm jobs Free Est (352)
637-4373 CRC1326872




Sales, Service, Carpet,
laminate, Restretch,
repair, clean Lic#4857
Mitch (352) 422-5136




SHADY VIEW CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
Repairs. 352 613-2518





Clean Ups &
Clean Outs
(352) 220-9190




AFFORDABLE
COMPUTER SERV.
(352) 341-4150
DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
NATURE COAST
COMPUTER Repairs
Free in home inspection
352-212-1551




Bianchi Concrete
inc.com lic/ins
Driveways-Patios-
Sidewalks.352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL/ Lic
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River rock
reseals & repairs. 352
364-2120/410-7383
FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, staining &
Garage Firs. Recession
Prices! 352-527-1097


ROB'S MASONRY
& CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs Tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554




All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing,Hauling,
Site Prep, Driveways.
Lic. & Ins. 352- 795-5755




COUNTYWIDE DRY-
WALL 25 years exp.
For all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Lic/ins. 352-302-6838




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Plasma TV installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
ANNIE'S ELECTRIC
Husband & Wife
Team.(352) 341-5952
EC-13002696
BRIGHT ELECTRICAL
Res./Comm. Lic & Ins.
$50.hr. EC0001303
352-302-2366
DUN-RITE Elect
Elec/Serv/Repairs
New const. Remodel
Free Est 726-2907
EC13002699 Serving
Citrus Co. Since 1978
Thomas Electric LLC
Generator maint &
repair. Guardian
Homestandby, &
Centurion. Cert. Tech.
Briggs Stratton 352-
621-1248 #ER00015377




A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002

BOB BROWN'S
Fence & Landscaping
352-795-0188/220-3194
ROCKY'S FENCING
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
352 422-7279 *


Premium Seasoned split
Firewood $75 Per Stack
(4x8) Free Delivery
(352) 527-8352




ALL EXTERIOR
ALUMINUM
6" Seamless Gutters
Lic & Ins 352-621-0881
ALUMINUM
STRUCTURES
5" & 6" Seamless Gutters
Free Estimates, Lic &
Ins. (352) 563-2977




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Plasma TV installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777

Andrew Joehl
Handyman.
Gen/Maint/Repairs
Pressure cleaning.
Lawns/Gutters. No job
too small!Reli able ,ins.
0256271 352-465-9201

A HANDYMAN
If Its Broke, Jerry Can
Fix It. Housecleaning
also. 352-201-0116 Lic.
ABC Painting & Handy
man All your needs at
recession prices Dale
352-586-8129

Affordable Handyman
V FAST
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handvman
V FAST
V AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *"
Affordable Handyman
FAST
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *


Affordable Handyman
FAST
e AFFORDABLE
VeRELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
.100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 k
Handyman Dave
Pressure Clean, Paint &
Repairs, oddjobs &
hauling (352) 726-9570
HOME CARE
Lawn & Handyman
Services. Sprinkler
Repair 352-212-4935
Remodeling, Additions,
Doors, Windows, Tile
work. Lic.#CRC1330081
Free Est. (352)949-2292





V THIS OUT!
AC & HEAT PUMPS
FREE Estimate & 2nd
Opinion, 10 yr. warr.
on ALL Parts, Great
prices, ALL the time.
352-400-4945
Lic #CAC027361





Citrus Cleaning
Team. top quality
work & great
rates. 302-3348
(352) 527-2279

MAID TO ORDER
House Cleaning *
(352) 586-9125
Have Vacum Will Travel




The Tile Man
Bathroom remodel
Specializing in
handicap. Lie/Ins.
#2441. 352-634-1584




#1 BOBCAT FOR HIRE
Light land clearing, site
work, grading, hauling.
NO JOB TOO SMALL!!!
Lic. & Ins. 352-400-0528


All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
All AROUND TRACTOR

352-795-5755






CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, curbing,
flocrete. River rock
reseals & repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
Florida Sitescapes, LLC
FREE est: Yard Clean Up
Mowing, and MORE
Call 352.201.7374




Florida Sitescapes, LLC
FREE est: Yard Clean Up
Mowing, and MORE
Call 352.201.7374
HALLOCK & SON
LAWN CARE ALL Your
lawn care needs. Detailed
Work. 400-1197, Lic/Ins.
HOME CARE
Lawn & Handyman
Services. Sprinkler
Repair 352-212-4935
JUSTIN LAWN CARE
Fast and Affordable.
and Friendly, Licensed.
(352) 476-3985
LAWN CARE 'N" More
Fall Clean up, bed,
bushes, haul since 1991
(352) 726-9570
Leaves, Beds Bushes
mulch, hauling, press
clean 352 220-6761




AT YOUR HOME
Mower, Parts Service &
Repair.Visit our store@
1332 SE Hwy 19
352-220-4244




RELAX to the MAX
at home ... # MA58428
(352) 897-4670


A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs, trash,
lawn maint. furn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767

ALL OF CITRUS
CLEAN UPS CLEAN OUTS
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790

HAULING
FRE E ESTIMATES
scrap metals haul for
FREE (352) 344-9273




Chris Satchell Painting
ASAP
30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
A-1 George Swedlige
Painting/press cleaning
Int/Ext. texture/drywall
repair (352) 794-0400
ABC Painting LLC
All your painting needs
@ recession prices. Call
Dale 352-586-8129
BILL CAMPBELL
PAINTING- REPAIRS
LIC/ INS/ REFS 33 YRS
352-454-8571
Handyman Dave
Pressure Clean, Paint &
Repairs, odd jobs &
hauling (352) 726-9570
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998




Tim Herndon Plumbing
$10. off w/this ad
10 yrs serving Citrus Co
lic/insCFC 1428395
(352) 201-8237




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996


ABC Press. Cleaning.
All your cleaning needs
at recession prices.
Free Est .Dale 586-8129
Handyman Dave
Pressure Clean, Paint &
Repairs, odd jobs &
hauling (352) 726-9570
JOHN GRAY
DRIVEWAYS $55.
HOUSE $75/POOL $85
(352) 270-8310
Pic PICARD'S Pressure
Cleaning & Painting
352-341-3300




Remodeling, kitchens
baths, ceramic tile &
tops. Decks, Garages
Handyman Services 40
Yrs Exp. crc058140
344-3536; 563-9768




Bruce F. Storman
Septic Services,
lic/in 352-795-5779




Attention Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers are
required by state law
to include their state
license number in all
advertisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious that
you may be contact-
ing an unlicensed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For questions
about business
licensing, please call
your city or county gov-
ernment offices.


$60. Bahia Pallets
U-Pick Up. Special
Winter Pricing. Call
Now!! 352-400-2221




HOME CARE
Lawn & Handyman
Services. Sprinkler
Repair 352-212-4935




A Cutting Edge
Tile Jobs Showers.
Firs Safety Bars ETC
352-422-2019
Lic. #2713, Insured.




A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest Rates
Free est.(352)860-1452
DAVID'S
TREE SERVICE
(352)302-5641
All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
DOUBLE J Tree Serv.
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
RWRIGHT Tree Service
Tree removal & trimming.
Ins. & Lic.# 0256879
352-341-6827
RIVENBARK
LAWN & LANDSCAPE.
15% off Tree Trimming
in Feb. (352) 464-3566
RON ROBBINS Tree Serv
Trim, Shape & Remove
Lic/Ins Free Est.
352-628-2825
T & T TREE SERVICE
We Blow Away
High Prices!
Free Est. 352-362-3610



344-2556, Richard
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


2-25 D LaughingStock International Inc, Dist by Universal UCIIck for UFS, 2012

"You gotta grow up someday. Take it to
three different toy stores and find out
how much it costs to fix it."



Merchant Village of Crystal River

Year Round Indoor Flea Market

Open Friday Sunday 9am-5pm

Spaces from $50/week with Storage

773 SE US Highway 19, Crystal River

Call (352) 794-3857

www.Merchant-Village.com


DISNEY PORCELAIN
CHARACTER STATUES
$8 634-2004
Wanted to Buy
Stamps, US, Worldwide,
sheets, PB, FDC, post-
cards 352-245-4225
352-812-0869




Old Unused
US Postage Stamps
Call for Info.
(352) 344-5622




A/C + HEAT PUMP
SYSTEMS
Starting at $880
13-18 Seer
Installation w/permit
REBATES uo to $2.500
352-746-4394
Lic.&Ins. CAC 057914
CHEST FREEZER
8.8 cu ft, white
like new $250
(352) 621-0982
352-476-3034
CHEST FREEZER
works great $75
blondevampire-
blonde@yahoo
CONVECTION OVEN
Counter Top $20.00
513-4027
DISHWASHER bisque
color in clean excellent
condition. Hardly used,
changing
colors.$165.obo Pine
Ridge 352-270-3909
DRYER $135.00
Excellent condition,
clean, looks and works
great. Can deliver
352 263-7398
GE Electric Stove
self clean oven bisque
like new $200 obo
Admiral Washer top
load 201b hvy duty
$200(352) 795-7193
Haier Refrigerator
2,.7 cu3 yr warranty
19x26x18..$120
(419) 832-9261
HOTPOINT Fridge
$200.00
HTS18GCSARWW Like
New, Ice Maker, White,
WHIRLPOOL Dish-
washer DU930PWSTO,
586-904-3262 in SMW
Kenmore
upright freezer
exc. cond $125
(352) 795-0558
Maytag Hvy Duty
washer & matching
natural gas dryer, exc.
cond $350 for both firm
(352) 270-8215
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR, washers
dryers,FREE pick up
352-564-8179
WANTED DEAD
OR ALIVE
Washers & Dryers
Working or not.
(352) 209-5135
Whirlpool
dishwasher,white works
well Under-counter $50
352-746-5984
WHIRLPOOL ELECTRIC
OVEN STOVE SMOOTH
TOP RF265LXTT, Great
Condition, $200, SMW
586-904-3262



2 DRAWER FILE CABI-
NET PreOwned Com-
mercial Metal Lateral
28"x30"x18" Graphite
Color $45 7274634411
COMPUTER DESKS (4)




C12 SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2012


Jeep


- ~WE


2012 CHRYSLER 200


2012 CHRYSLER 300


2012 CHRYSLER
TOWN & COUNTRY


14,888
DRIVE FOR $ 199 PER MONTH
2012 DODGE JOURNEY


'15,888
DRIVE FOR' 269 PER MONTH
2012 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE


'24888

OUR


IS


L E24HRRCODDMA I'H
11-g,100-84-755Bidi 31 01i


24,888
DRIVE FOR 269 PER MONTH
2012 RAM QUAD CAB


22,888
OR
0*/ APR FOR 72 MONTHS


SECOND


DRIVE FOR S299 PER MONTH


2012 JEEP WRANGLER


'19,888
DRIVE FOR $ 199PER MONTH
2012 DODGE DURANGO


25,888

HALF


BEGIN.


CRYSTAL


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BROOKSVILLE HOMOSASSA INVERNESS


352-564-1971
All prices and payments exclude tax, tag, title and dealer fee of $599.50. *All prices with $2999 cash or trade equity and
$1000 owner loyalty includes all rebates and incentives not all will qualify, with approved credit. ^A Lease for 39 months, 39K
miles, $.21 per mile over, with approved credit. No security deposit required, with approved credit. Extra charges may apply
at lease termination. +Zero percent financing with approved credit. $14 per $1000 financed. Photos are for illustration pur-
poses only. Prior sales may restrict stock. See dealer for details.


ABOUT TO


Jeep 5
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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CRYSTALA L
CHEVROLET
THE CLEAR CHOICE IS CRYSTAL AUTOMOTIVE


crystalautos.com 352-564-1971 1035 S. Suncoast Blvd Homosassa, FL 34448
Lease 36-month one payment lease with approved credit 12K miles per year and $.15 per mile over. Security deposit waived with approved credit. Excludes tax, tag and dealer fee of $599.50. Additional fees may
apply at lease termination. All prices reflect all applicable rebates such as trade-in, bonus cash, owner loyalty and USAA membership, not everyone will qualify. All prices plus tax, tag, title, registration and dealer fee of
1 $599.50, with approved credit. Photos are for illustration purposes only. Prior sales may restrict stock.


SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2012 C13


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ES STER AUDEALWDISYUNT:S. .............

REBATES & INCENTIVES: ....... $6005
USAA DISCOUNT'........................- $750
PER CASH OR TRADE EQUITY'.......-- $2,500
36 month lease, 12K miles/year, $2,495 out of pocket L s /osSr YOU PAY...U Y-8 2
2012 CHEVY 2012 CHEVY
MSRP4
GM OWNER LOYALTY'. .. .......... -
USAA DISCOUN ......... 50
CASH OR TRADE EQUITY:..... 2500PER
YOU PAY$... 16 665 ,9 39 month lease, 12K milestyear, $2,495 out of pocket
2012 CHEVY 2011 CHEW 0O
S1 MSRP: ...... ............................................. $17,0 80 Bo
IVEFORONLY...4DEALER DISCOUNT:............- $400
USAA DISCOUNT.................... $750
PEI CASH OR TRADE EQUTY:...... .. $2,500
27 month lease, 12Kmileear, $2,495 out of pocket YOUPAY...





2004 CHEVY IMPALA LS 2007 SUZUKI SX4 2000 MAZDA MIATA 2011 CHEVY AVED 2008 CHEW IMPALA 2007 SATURN AURA 2006 FORD RANGER 2007 FORD MUSTANG 2008 HONDA CIVIC Si
LUET, EA L L 61KIES,A$E SPEALEOB0K L44 E, LTMHATCHBCk MCHABRIU KM GOL4PfLCl.M, ET.CAM AI #1118PWIRf t S&LOCK COUPE,NA 6SPEE
LONELEES AUlT 9R 68SPEM 4CYL 0ARTLTR HUIETS RUESLET .T,CPLAYRAUTOo SUNR0
$8,998 $9,978 $9,995 $11,888 $12,898 $12,995 $13,888 $13,995 $14,788



2008 CHEVY MALIBU 2LT 2007 FORD EDGE 2010 DODGE AVENGER 200BCHEVY COLORADO 2011 RAM DAKOTA 2010TOYOTA RAV4 2010 CHEVY SILVERADO 2007 GMC ACADIA 2007 FORD F-150
GMCH~ALE A E, ,F HALLWHEELORE I SHLESAUMMEEA LTCEWCMAUI BlOHORN 8$21O US EIMCAARESKLES NAV LEAIN SUHOOF, CREWCABX,
ONSR SE9CL! LE AD. iL IlfM UKENEW PWPLNSTAR LOED LAMT,F14
$14,987 $16,888 $16,970 $17,488 $19,995 $19,995 $21,480 $22,650 $23,998

Come See What LOVE Can Do For You!
In Inverness on .
Highw ay 44HWest -

Allna LAVEI ELVEYSALES CAM
All new car prices include $2,500 cash or trade equity All offers QAC. All options at dealer retail, limited to in stock vehicles only .All prices and/or payments plus
tax, title, tag, & state fees. Dealer installed options and accessories additional cost. Vehicles subject to prior sale. Applies to in stock units.
Offer expires on date of publication.








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SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2012 C15





C16 SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2012


2012 Mazda3i Sport


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For Leaset


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ACURA

Safest Vehicle Lineup In America!
with Highest Expected Residual Value Among Luxury Brands

A 1 2012 TS)


-CU2F6Cj2 i
TSX Lease: $299 mo x 36 months.
$1,999 Due AL Signing
Includes Security Deposit, Down Payment; Excludes Tax & Tag,
With Approved Credit
Safety Rating Safe
NHTSA


* Stla ratings are pan ol Ine U.S. Deparblmeni of Transportalion's Salercar gov program (www.saflercar.govl. Models testes with slanaard side-.mpacl a.rbags ISABsl. I Basea
on ALC's 2009 and 2010 Residual Value Awards for a Luxury Brand Suojecl to limited availabilllty Through February 29 2012 lo approved lessees oy Actura Financial
Services DBA ao Amencan Honda Finance Cop Crosed-ena lease for 2012 TSX5 5 Speeo Automatc (Model CU2F6CJWi MSRP 130 695 Actual pel capilaize cost 128 751 43
Total monthly payments S10 764 Opiion 1o purchase al lease end S19 337.85. Additional lease lerms for well-qual Fied lessees. Nol all losses will qualify Higher lease rates
apply for lessees with lower credh ratings or In different regions Dealer participation may affect actjal payment. MSRPs Incluae destination: taxes, license, title fees options
and Insurance extra. Security deposit walvea. Lessee responsible lor maintenance excessive wearitear and 15trml. over 10.000 miewyear for vehicles with MSRP less Iean
530 000 bl for venrcles wiln MSRP of S30 000 or more mileage coal .s 20gsm. over 10 000 nilesivear Sea aeale, to, complete details


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DESK CHAIRS Commer-
cial PreOwned Fabric
Covered and Adjustable
$45 727-463-4411
LATERAL 2 DRAWER
FILE CABINET New in
Box with Keys Commer-
cial Metal Graphite Color
$75 77-4634411
PREOWNED DESK
CHAIRS (4) Commercial
Dark Gray Fabric $25
each 727463-4411















AUCTION
Feb 25 & 26
10 am,
Preview 8am
Confederate local,
state & Navy buttons,
uniform, political,
studs, cufflinks, bridle
rosettes, hooks,
netsukes-all selling
Saturday. Over 1200
lots of antique cloth-
ing buttons-every
material & topic.
Location:
Plantation Inn,
9301 W. Fort Island Trl,
Crystal River
Phil McBride, AU 2771
1-866-295-9228
Terms, catalog
& photos at
pagebutton
auctions.corn




CONCRETE VIBRATOR
1.5 X 12' SHAFT
$150.(352) 382-1070
Hilti Fastening Gun
350 & 36M
plus many shots
$145.
(352) 249-4420
Smith & Wesson
40VE, new in box
40 Cal. $350.
Barretta Tomcat
32 Cal. $350
(352) 613-0523



27" MAGNAVOX COLOR
TV Works Like New Dig-
ital Cable Ready Seldom
Used. $75 727-4634411
65" PROJECTION TV
works great $400
352.270.7420
FLOOR ONYSTERIO
COMPUT-
ERMONITERWURL-
ITZERTABLEJUKEBfloor
model sterio 5cd changer
cass player $125. com-
puter monitor 19" $50
table jukebx cd
player/radio.yes $70
352 249-0815
SANYO 26" COLOR TV
Older Model Digital Cable
Ready Works Like New
$75 727-463-4411
TUNER AMP, Harmon
Kardon model 330.
Works fine. $25
(352) 795-2820



Alum Camper top
cab high, 6 foot by 6.10
feet long $50.00
(231) 852-0061



DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
HP Computer
for sale
exc cond$100.
(352)586-6891



Case Tractor and
trailer-disc and other
attachments, good
condition, runs good
352-621-0133



FIRE PIT. 32" wrought
iron fire pit with all
weather cover, box of
firewood. $35.00.
352-503-6530



(2) STACKABLE CHAIRS
PreOwned Fabric Cov-
ered Commercial Sturdy
Metal Frame with Arms 2
for $35 727-463-4411
**8' RD CARPET"
COURISTAN
POLYPROPYLENE
RED,BLK,BEIGE
$100 634-2004
"AREA CARPET**
7.9X9.9 WOOL
DEEP RED,GRN,
GOLD AND BLK $100
352-634-2004
*GARDEN DESIGN
QUALITY WOOL
AREA RUG MULTI
COLOR 7.9X9.9FT
$100 634-2004
2 piece Red contemp
sofa & love seat, 1 year
old $700. 2 contempo-
rary bar stools $125.
(352) 257-3802
3 LIVING ROOM
TABLES Coffee and 2
end tables with black
slate-like tops $100. Call
352-621-7892 for photos
5 PIECE BLONDE BED-
ROOM SUITE bed, mir-
rored headboard, mir-
rored dresser, armoire,
nightstand, entertainment
center. $500.
352.270.7420
36" SQUARE TABLE


PreOwned Rugged Gray
Formica Top Sturdy Steel
Frame $65 727463-4411
Antique Wash Stand
w/ mirror and claw feet
$300 Antique 3 drawer
chest with mirror $200
Call for email pics.
(352) 746-0183
Are U Moving? Estate?
In home liquidations?
MARTIN'S Estate &
Consign 352-209-4945
Bassett Bedroom Set
queen bd., dresser/
mirror, 2 night stands,
white Cottage country
style like new $600.
(352) 249-7723
Blue couch, love seat &
recliner $100(firm) takes
ALL 3 pcs 352-637-3636
CATHI'S ATTIC
Offering New and Used
Quality Furniture & Ac-
cessories, 352-513-4802


Queen Anne Glass
Coffee Table, oval
$250
Excellent Condition
(352) 527-4389
CHERRYWOOD FRAME
CHAIRS (2) with Arms
Fabric Upholstery
PreOwned $35 each
727-463-4411
COMPLETE WHITE
RATTAN BEDROOM
SET. Consists of:
1-Twin size bed with
Rattan headboard.
1 6-Drawer dresser
1 4-Drawer dresser
2 2-Drawer Night
Stands
(all white with glass tops)
1 Mirror (Rattan)
1 end of bed bench seat
Asking $1,000- OBO all
in excellent condition.
(352)503-7147 -
Homosassa
352-503-7147
email:
idocargo@gmail.com
Photos available upon re-
quest
COMPUTER DESK &
chair/mat/keyboard
mouse/speakers $75. all
or separate.LIKE NEW
352-621-0175
COUCH Floral
print,green,tan,yellow col-
ors,70 inches,must pick
up,in Citrus Springs,$0
(352)792-7610
Couch w/ reclining
ends $300. obo.
Single Recliner
$200 obo
both good cond.
(352) 382-3280
COURISTAN CARPET
8FT ROUND, RED,
BLACK,BEIGE
PATTERN LIKE NEW
$100 634-2004
Deacon's Bench 4ft
maple $125.
Ladies roll top desk,
blond $150.
Excel cond.
SMW (352) 382-4912
Dinette Set,
Light wood, octagon
shape, & leaf 42"W with
4 swivel chairs
$150 (35 527-4910
Entertainment Center-
light oak color, glass
doors and shelves
nice condition $35.
352-621-0175
Executive Chair, black
$40. 2 Recliners, two,
custom made, white
rattan soft multi color
strip $200 ea
Excel cond. SMW
(352) 382-4912
FOLDING BANQUET
TABLES (3) 6 Foot
PreOwned Wood Grain
Top $35 each
727463-4411
FREE STANDING
BLACK BOOKCASE 5
Shelves 72"x38"xl12" $25
7274634411
Granite top
Dining Rm. table w/6
leather chairs, match-
ing side board (buffet)
matching coffee table
& end tables $1500
will sell separate
(352) 586-6746
KITCHEN TABLE 48 inch
birdseye maple table, two
leaves, six chairs-one
needs repair $150.00 obo
352-503-2226
Lane Recliner Rocker,
burgundy color,
excellent condition
$75 (352) 527-3396
Large Swivel Rocker
w/ ottoman,
dark mauve,
excel. cond. $200
(352) 795-4942
Leather Beige Sofa
w/ Double Recliner
Like New $500.
Black Leather
Executive Chair $75
352-794-4164
NEW AMISH QUILT,
QUEEN, DOUBLE WED-
DING RING greens on
cream. Very pretty. Not
Chinese. $300
352-897-4154
Oak Bar
L shape, 4x5, formica
top, exc cond. w 2 bar
stools $500. call 7a-7pm
(352) 465-2823
PAUL'S FURNITURE
Now open Tues-Sat.
352-628-2306
paulsfurnitureonline.com
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
352-628-0808
Queen Ann-style
Dining table & 6 egg-
shell color upholstery
chairs., solid wood
w/cherry veneer oval
table topgreat cond.
New $1723 sell $390
Cash (352) 489-4795
ROCKER/Recliner
brown over stuffed&
sized, Brand New. $175.
Rocker w/ottman
tan $65.(304) 661-9811
ROCKING CHAIR blue
upholstered rocking chair
with ottoman $50.00 obo
352-503-2226
ROUND TABLE 36" Like
New Rugged Yellow For-
mica Top Sturdy Steel
Pedestal $65
727-463-4411
SOFA,
Hunter Green Leather,
perfect condition
changing decor
$400
(352) 344-2246
Solid Cherry Dining
room set with 8 chairs
$450-1 729 W Gulf-to
Lake, ILecanto, FL
STACKABLE CHAIRS (4)
with Black Metal Framed
Arms Fabric Covered
Your Choice of Color $10
each 727-463-4411
Tan Leather Couch
love seat chair & otto-
man, Sony Entertain-
ment center w/2 large
speakers .$500.
(352) 344-5161
Tea Cart
made in Italy $150.
White Leather LR chair


$50.(352) 795-7254
TWO TWIN FRAMES
one with drawer under
and head board no mat-
tress 35.00 for both
352-364-1081 lye mess
VINTAGE MARBLE
TABLE/LAMP gold toned.
$100.00 352.270.7420
VINTAGE ROUNDBACK
CHAIRS blue seat,
wicker inserts. $100.
352.270.7420



2005, 42' Cut
Sears Lawn Tractor
Great condition
small hole in deck
$600.obo
(352) 302-0648
CHICKEN
MANURE/FERTILIZER
(25 bags avail) time to
prepare your soil! 20 lb
bag, $4.00 352-563-1519


CRAFTSMAN RIDING
MOWER 42" deck
15.5 hp engine $400
(352) 746-7357
LAWN EDGER
troy built edger
4cyl $75.oo
352 726 9708
Lawn Roller
8001b pull with lawn
tractor $150.
(352) 628-5708
TRAILER Open trailer 6'X
16' Mesh gate, solid
wood floor, double axel,
new tires, good condition.
$1000.00 Pics available.
Call 352-563-5259




BEVERLY HILLS
FrI. & Saturday 8a 3p
INDOOR MOVING
SALE! Lrg. Pcs. of Furn.
Antiques, Glassware,
TV's and MUCH MORE
3194 N. Tamarisk Ave.

BEVERLY HILLS
Fri. 9-4p Sat 9-1 P
Men's pants sz 42-44,
ladies X-Lg petite cloth-
ing finished craft &
supplies incl wood, fab-
ric & needle work. etc
993 W. Catbrier Lane

BEVERLY HILLS
OUR LADY OF
GRACE CHURCH
FLEA MARKET!
SAT. Feb. 25th
8AM to 2PM.
6 Roosevelt Blvd.

CITRUS HILLS
1183 N. Mediterraane
Wayfurn, lawn, home
decor, palms. Sat 8-2






MOVING,
SALE

Citrus Hills
Sat & maybe Sun
9:30-?
Potterydining
set ,tools,
& household items
805 E. Falconry Ct

CITRUS SPRINGS
7503 N FLORIDA
AVE(HWY 41)
INDOORIOUTDOOR
Fri Sat. 9-?

,4


Citrus Springs
Sat. & Sun. 7:30am-?
Furnelec.,DVDsappls.
Quality golf equipment
11052 N Fuego Drive


YARDSALE

Crystal River
Fri & Sat 8a -3p
collectible glass,
furniture, jewelry some
antiques, hummels &
precious moments etc,
Airport Storage Units, 80
& 81, behind Olive Tree
Restaurant Hwy 19
CRYSTAL RIVER
Sat. 25 & Sun. 26, 8a-3p
MAN STUFF, Hunt, Fish,
Nascar collectibles,
Tools and Household
9284 N. Kathleen Terr.



LECANTO
Fri Sat 9a-5p. furniture
washer/dryer, lots
new electronics
LOTS OF STUFF
5244 W Caraway PI

GIANT YARD SALE
Sat. & Sun. 7am 2:30p
6725 W. Grant Street

v THIS OUT!
GUN SHOW
Ocala National Guard
Armory
Feb 25 & 26, Sat 9-5,
Sun 9-4
900 SW 20TH Street
Ocala, FL 34474
Concealed Weapons
Classes Daily
Bring your GUNS &
GOLD to sell or trade

GunTraderGunShows.co
m
352-3394780


YARDSALE

Homosassa
Larae Sale Sat & Sun
8a-4pm Lenoxs rugs,
hsehld, drapes, tools,
toys, clothes, diving
equip, etc Cardinal to
Lewdinger go R .Ost
West to 6058 S. Brott Pt



HOMOSASSA
Sat & Sun 8-6p
Lots of Furniture
in house Sale
7200 S. Maxwell Pt.








HOMOSASSA
Sat. 8a-4p, 3p Bid on All
GREEN ACRE
7227 Parkway Lane

INGILIS
Saturday 25th, 9a-?
Multi Family Sale
693 Hwy 40 E
INVERNESS
Feb. 23-25, Bam-5pm
Tools, boats, Harley
collectibles, glassware,
golf clubs, antiques,
8325 Turner Camp
INVERNESS
Sat Sun 8-3p
MOVING SALE Hsehld


clothing, stuff toys, 300
VCR/DVD's incl. Frank
Sinatra, Danille Steele
bks, 311 S. Seminole Av



INVERNESS
Sat. 25 & Sun. 26, 9a -4p
ESTATE SALE *
6521 E. Shadow Lane
INVERNESS
Sun 26th, One Day Only
7am-2p MOVING SALE
Furniture, Tools, Etc.
10101 S. Forestline Ave.

11V INo G :
SA_ I_ E.

Inverness-IGCC
Fri & Sat 8am-?
Whole house full of
items-something for all!
3054 S BIk Mount. Drive


Fri Sat 8a-?tools, hsehld
fishing, saddles, guns
more 1739 N. Squirrel
Tree Ave. off Hwy 486




Pine Ridge
Sat 8:30 till 3p
To Much Too List
5425 W. Pawnee Dr




RIVERHAVEN
Homosassa. Fri Sat 8a-3
Anything you can
imagine, we have it
5240 S. Mystic Pt


MOVING,
SALE

Riverhaven
Sat 8-3 Sun 8-?
Everything must go!
5186 S Stetson Point
Dr-Homosassa


MOV:IG
SALE

Riverhaven
Thur Fri Sat 8a-3p
doll collections, 2
custom autos. grand
father clock tools, too
much to list & more
11748 Timberland Dr

YARDSALE

Rock Crusher
Canyon
Sat Only 9-2p Multi Sale
237 Rock Crusher Rd
Crystal River

MO1V0It1G;
SMA L. E

Starts Sat. 2/25 at 6am
runs all week,
INSIDE SALE
MINI FARMS/
Cry.Riv./ Dunnellon
7155 N. Damuscus Ave
(352) 795-7513







Sugarmill Woods
Sat 8a 2p, tools,
books, misc household
etc. 22 Cypress Blvd E.



GIRLS BABY CLOTHES
Girls: 0-3, 3-6mos.
onsies. 3-6mos dresses
6-9mos dress. 36 pieces
in all $15. 352-6374916



2 unframed glass mir-
rors in exc. cond
(1) 66x42" & the other
42x36" $45 both
Citrus Hills
Hernando/ must pick
up (352) 341-4103
2nd Hand Store
Open Tues-Sat 8a-4p
Furn, Appliances, tools,
clothing, misc. Items,
@ N. Maynard & Hwy 44
1/4 ml E. of Stokes FLea
42" round Ktchen Table
2 chairs $100. 4 drawer
file cab. $10. Ent Center
$20.Irg Oak desk
w/chair. $25.
(352) 527-1042
5TH WHEEL HITCH 16k
100.00 352-628-3455
CROSCILL QUEEN
BEDSPREAD- matching
shams & pillows
-excellent -Aqua floral
$20. 352 382 0220
DOG RAMP FOLDING
Holds up to 2001b dogs
For vans/suv's/trucks.
$45. 352-270-3909
FISH TANK 29 GALLON
w/pump equipment,decor
display & more $35
352-382-3650


CIASSIFIEDS



BICYCLE New boy's 16
inch huffy bike. $30.00
call 352 726 5753
GLASS 6' TANK FOR
REPTILES (LEAKS)
25.00 OBO INVERNESS
352-478-6060
HONDAACCORD
COUPE SPLASH
GUARDS Fit years
2008-2012 Brand New-
$50 (352) 795-2820
ICE CHEST 12 GAL RUB-
BERMAID, NEW CONDI-
TION $13
(352)382-1154
INDUSTRIAL POLISH
COMPOUND 38 lbs
$50.00 metal fabricating
352-860-1039
KING SIZE MATTRESS
Excellent Condition
$100.00 352-637-5331 or
352-476-5603
LARGE METAL DOG
CAGE 15.00 dollars
352.364.1081
leave mess
LOVESEAT dark green
leather dual recliner has
small tear on seat. good
for rec room $50.00
352-503-2226
MAYO CLINIC HEALTH
BOOK HARD COVER In
excellent condition-$20
352 382 0220
Moonstone Granite
Kitchen Sink, big single
bowl, 10" deep, 33" x
22" can be over or
under mount,
desinger black
Retail $550-$600
Sell $125.(352) 503-3914
Sanford Davis Tri-pod
$50. Bogan 3051
Pro-Tri-Podw/head$70.
Gitzo Tri-Pod head $40.
Lrg reflector $15. fold
type writing table $10
hand crafted posing
bench $35.
(352) 697-2452
TELEPHONE ANSWER-
ING MACHINE $10
DIGITAL-LIKE NEW-CAN
E-MAIL PHOTO
419-5981
TOOL CHEST, 24 GAL
RUBBERMAID, LIKE NEW
$18 (352) 382-1154
Towle Candlelight Sterl-
ing 10 pl. setting
(352) 382-5715
Trailer hitch
Buick Rendezvous
PONTIAC 2001 TO 2005
$ 75.00 352- 726- 9708
VERTICAL BLINDS for
sliding glass doors 6'
wide 352-628-3455
$25.00
WALLPAPER vinyl, Lt
beige, commercial grade,
54" x 90 ft,$99 860-1039
Wood Flooring by
BrucePlanks 3"x3/8"x
random lengths Med.Oak
25Ft. NEW in box $59
352-382-3650



PUMP BARBER CHAIR
works great $30.
blondevampire-
blonde@yahoo.com
TATTOO CHAIR $400
blondevampire-
blonde@yahoo.com
Turn Key Buz
Pressure Cleaning &
Painting Bus. ALL
Equip in 2002
Ford Cargo Van,
all built inside $5 K
352-382-4770




Heavy Duty Walker
w/accessories
Alum walker w/tray
alum crutchers $125.
will separate
(352) 746-2665
Like New
Hoveround Power
Chair $1,200
Wheel Chair Lift,
12V, plugs into trlr. hitch
$350 (352) 527-2657
OVER BED TABLE push
button chrome,and brown
wood like top $30.00 firm
352-513-4473
SCOOTER
P3 Cruiser by Planet
Mobility, new batteries
$300 firm
(352) 344-4944


SCOOTER
P3 Cruiser by Planet
Mobility, new batteries
$300 firm
(352) 344-4944
SCOOTER
Pace Saver Jr.
SCOOTER Go Go Pride
both 3 wheel, w/
charger, excel cond.
$450. ea (352) 489-3264
Sphygmomanometer
(blood pressure cuff) &
Stethoscope (used)
$20.00 352-637-3636
WALKER & RAISED
TOILET SEAT NEW still
in box $75 352-637-3636
WALKER 4 wheeled
walker with seat
$30.
blondevampire-
blonde@yahoo.com



BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We Also
Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676










"NEW'ACOUSTIC
GUITAR,SOLID SITKA
SPRUCE&GOLD GRO-
VERS! $100
352-601-6625
"NEW'ELECTRIC LAP
STEEL GUITAR
W/CASE,CORD &FREE
AMP! $100
352-601-6625
CLARINET
Martin Freres Classic
Made in France
$85 (352) 527-1193
CLARINET
Rusg Tone, USA
$85 (352) 527-1193
Guitar Gig Bag $10.
352-419-4464
Guitar Strap
$2.00
352-419-4464
OLD,OLD,OLD ACCOR-
DION WITH CASE
NEEDS WORK ONLY
$100,00 464-0316



12 IN X 12 IN FLOOR
TILES... About 80 pieces
/ loght colors...
20.00 Linda 341-4449
APARTMENT SIZED
FRIG Brown, 3', works
great. $50.00
blondevampire-
blonde@yahoo.com
SOURING EAGLE 12 IN
HIGH.WAS
59.95/SELLING FOR
20.00 LINDA 341-4449
TOILET Used, clean,
bone color. $15
352-513-4614



ELECTRIC TREADMILL
ALL ELECTRONICS
TIME DISTANCE CALO-
RIES ONLY 100.00
464-0316
Weight Set
W/plates, bars, collars
bench $100.
(352) 503-6776
Weslo Cadence 875
treadmill, console,
handrails, padded
walking platform $75
(352) 344-8056



CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pond,
ATVtrails $165Kobo
352 795-2027/ 634-4745
CANOE 16' Fiberglass
Canoe. $100
(352)302-6654
Cash for your Guns will
pay up to $200 each
352-535-0048 leave
message with
make,model & price.


SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2012 C1.7


WORDY R D BY TRICKY RICKY KANE

1. Look at an animal park (1) Every answer is a rhyming
pair of words (like FAT CAT
Sand DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
2. Evasive NFL TV analyst Aikman (1) they will fit in the letter
Squares. The number after the
definition tells you how many
3. Actor Orlando's hotel suites (1) syllables in each word.
21 @2012 UFS, Dist by Univ Uclickfor UFS
4. Astound Clinton's V.P. Al (1)


5. Nonobvious retired NASA transport (2)


6. More on-its-guard wirehaired dog (3)


7. Brings up stresses (2)

I I I I I I I I I I I I I I EI
SNOISNfI SNOIIN3H N1H 33HHH1 i1HVA *9 3111lHS TIMflS *9
HOD9 HOOIT'I SWOOH SIOO NO0'If XOH AOO' OOZ ARIA T
2-25-12 SHMASNY






T, 'A




Iu t ,it I m I



B a. a.C. .ok PA

35-34-50.93272-05


$650
with charger
352-344-8516
CLUB CAR
'06 $1,500,
with charger
352-344-8516
Club Car '08
Precedent, electric,
new batteries, #48
voltwindshield
$2400.(352) 795-7193
CLUB CAR
side curtains, seat cover
windshield, full mirror,
lights, like new $1475.
(352) 564-2756
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
FRESH JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct.@ $5 per lb
Stone Crab@ $6 per Ib
delivered 727-771-7500
GOLF CLUBS
new & used $100.
(352) 795-0558

' THIS OUT!
GUN SHOW
Ocala National Guard
Armory
Feb 25 & 26, Sat 9-5,
Sun 94
900 SW 20TH Street
Ocala, FL 34474
Concealed Weapons
Classes Daily
Bring your GUNS &
GOLD to sell or trade

GunTraderGunShows.co
m
352-339-4780
MC CELLAN SADDLE
tan/brown,12 inch,made
in Columbia. Good
condition. $100.00 firm
352-513-4473
MOSSBERG SHOT GUN
3.5 mag. 2 barrels,
Camo, like new never
used $400 obo
(352) 634-5565
New 100th Anniversary
HD motorcycle cover.
$50. 352-637-4916
Pool Table
full size, exc cond.
balls, ceiling light
$250 (352) 726-5280
Trailmate3 wheel
Bicycle-Joyrider, low to
ground, with a full
seat inc back support
$225 (352) 341-7718


WE BUY GUNS
On Site Gun Smithing
(352) 726-5238




14' UTILITY TRAILER
cargo space appx
10'X6'X18" 22001b carry-
ing cap new harness run-
ning Its dia pit Kobalt tool-
box drop down rear gate
2X6 framework $550
352-249-6293

EZ PULL TRAILERS,
New & Used

Utility & Enclosed
BUY, SELL, TRADE
Custom Built, Parts,
Tires, Whis, Repairs,
Trailer Hitches
7' x 20' 5 ton Equip
trailer, Reg. $3295
Now $2995

5 x 8 used encl.
cargo trailer $895.

Hwy 44 Crystal River
352-564-1299

GULF TO LAKE
TRAILER SALES

Largest Selection &
Lowest Prices.
Offering New & Used
Cargo & utility trailers

Triple Crown Utility TRL
6 x 12w/new spare
$1050.
6 x 12 Enclosed w/
V nose, rear ramp
door, $1950.

Trailer Tires
starting at $69.95

352-527-0555
Hwy 44, Lecanto




HIGH CHAIR. Baby
trends. Excellent condi-
tion. Adjustable w/
removable tray. $30.
Call (352) 201-6967
Nice wood Baby crib and
a Graco baby stroller both
like new for $100.
352-535-0048


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966











I WANT TO BUY
Your CAR, TRUCK, SUV,
RV, BOAT, Imports or
Any Model, Any
Condition, No Titlle OK.
Paying up to $20,000 or
More. (813) 458-0584
JUNK MOTORCYCLES
WANTED Will Pay up to
$200 for Unwanted Mo-
torcycle 352-942-3492
WANT TO BUY HOUSE or
MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation.
Call (352) 726-9369
WANTED Old Radio
Tubes, vacuum tubes,
stereos and electronic
parts (352) 419-9320




BEAGLE PUPPIES 8
wks on 2/15 4 females 1
male $125., also have 3
Bloodhound/beagle mix
10wks old $50.obo
386-344-4218 or
386-344-4219


Home e Finder


www.chroniclehornefinder.com


RnHore r



- -. .,


Find Your Drean I Ho n


Search Hundreds of Local Listings


www.ch ron iclehor-nefinder.com


1


I Sm







C18 SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2012


Chihuahua
Puppies for Sale
5 weeks old
Pure breds,
(352) 419-5105
INVERENESS FL KC
offers Confirmation &
Obedience Dog
Training classes starts
Wed, March 7th
Crystal River Armory
Call 344-1088 to
register.
Pair of large Iguanas
with cage, M&F, go to
same home, $100 for all
(352) 344-5436
Yorkie pups CKC, 8
wks March Ist, females
$600 males $550. Judy,
(352) 344-9803


Livestock


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





C.R/Homosassa
1& 2 Br. furn, quiet park
Util. incl. clean, shrt/long
term 352 220-2077
CRYSTAL RIVER
Nice 2/1, close to
everything. $500. +
Sec. (352)446-3933
352-794-3323
FLORAL CITY
3/1 firm. fenced yd
s sm. pet ok $575 incis
water/trash 726-5062
HERNANDO
2/1 $400 mo+dep
352-201-2428
HERNANDO
2/2, DW, on lot, shed,
deck. $500m+$500
dep. 352-464-0719
HERNANDO
3/2, 2-acre lot, Cent.
Air, Washer/Dryer
Storage, $625 mo. No
pets, (352) 860-0904
Hernando-Rent to own,
Large 3 bed 2 bath
double wide on 2 lots,
needs clean up, $1000
down $295 mo.
352-726-9369
Homosassa
2/1 /2 remodeled, in
ground pool, 1st & sec.
$550/m(352) 503-3363
INVERNESS
RENT SPECIAL: Sec. dep,
pro-rated over 3 mo.
period In the INVERNESS
WATERFRONT 55+ Park
w/5 piers for fishing &
enjoyment, clubhouse,
onslte shuffleboard, and
much more! 1 BR home
$325 plus. 2BR home
$450 Includes H20. 2 BR,
1.5 bath, Park Model
$500. Pets considered.
Section 8 accepted.
(352) 476-4964
INVERNESS
Waterfront 55+ Park
w/5 piers for fishing &
enjoyment, clubhouse,
onslte shuffleboard
and much more!
Furnished, IBR home
with central A/C $600.
352-476-4964
MINI FARMS
C.R. 2/1,2.5 acres
$525. (352) 564-1242




ATTENTION
LAND OWNERS
JACOBSEN NEW 2012
5 yr. warranty, 3/2,
2 x 6 construction,
upgrade insulation,
appliance pkg.
Delivered & set up
with A/C & heat,
steps & skirting only
$279.19./mo. W.A.C.
Includes first year
on homeowner Ins.
Call 352-621-9181

Bank foreclosures
USED HOMES/REPO'S
Bank authorized
liquidator.We Always
have new inventory,
Call 352-621-9183
or come by
Taylor Made Homes
Homes from
$1,000 up!

Drive A Little
Save Thousands!
Looking for A Mobile
Home? Largest section
of Late Model Repos
and Used Homes
in Central Florida,
Dbl. wide & Triplewides
Citrus Home Center
(352) 746-5912
INVERNESS
Waterfront 55+ Park
w/5 piers for fishing &
enjoyment, clubhouse,
onslte shuffleboard
and much more!
Single wide 1 & 2 BR,
starting @ $6,900. Lot
rent $274/mo. H20
Included. 3 mo. free
rent with purchase.
352-476-4964


older Doublewide,
Home in Forestview
Park new appl's, new
roof and AC, Priced to
Sell! (352) 503-2154
LAND-N-HOME
FLORAL CITY
BIG HOME!
The Entertainer,
over 2000 sq. ft., 4/2,
large family room.
Home in great shape
on quiet paved road
near chain of lakes
ONLY $59, 900. or
$2,250 down &
395/mo. W.A.C.
Call 352-621-3807

Palm Harbor Homes
NEW HOME STIMULUS
$5k for your used
Mobile Home any
condition
800-622-2832 x 210




HOMOSASSA
2/2 carport nicely furn
on Homosassa River
w/dock no pet f/Il/s
sht/long term $850
352-220-2077




FLORAL CITY
2/2 carport on canal,
2 sheds,, furnished scr
patio $44,900. Poss.
Own Fin 440-225-8618



3 BR, 2 BA, Completely
Remodeled, inside &
out, on 1/2 Acres,
off School Ave.
Asking $40,000
(352) 302-7451
2/2 SW Homosassa
on Fecnced /2 acre
$39,900. Cash $45,900 if
financed $5,000 down
(352) 527-3204
3/2, 1,800 Sq Ft,
Fenced Yard,
$5,000 down $525. mo
HOMOSASSA
(352) 302-9217
BEST OF THE BEST
New 2012 Jacobsen
Custom 28 x 52, 3/2
big eat in kitchen,
2x6 construction, OSB
wrap, 5 yr. warranty,
elongated toilet,
china sinks, storm
door. Large rooms.
Must see before you
buy anything else.
Only $46,900 or
$1,800 down
$298.89/mo W.A.C.
Call 352-621-9181
Crystal River
Rent to Own ? 2/1
DW, remodeled, clean
& private, 1/2 ac. trees
price neg.352 795-0898
Hernando, Pine Crest
Estates, Doublewide
2BR/2BA, Fla. rm, car-
port, front porch, fully
furn., 2485 Treasure Pt.
Must see. 269-250-0950
HERNANDO, RENT TO
OWN, 2BR, 2BA, single
wide on 1/2 acre mol.
Partially remodelled
$3,000 down, $295 mo
(352) 726-9369
Hernando-Forest Lake
North,2/2 DWvery
niceHA,1.25 acre
$5900 dwn,$500 mo.
Owner Financing
352-637-5143
Homosassa 2 bedroom,
1 bath close to river,
screen porch, appliances,
$35,000 owner financing
available 352-503-7948
HOMOSASSA
3394 Arundel Terr
3/2, lamaniate & tile
floors, All appls. CHA
New Roof, $1500 moves
you in $650/month
Rent to Own
Tony Tubolina Brk
Owner(727) 385-6330
Inverness
3/2 bath home
Deerwood sub. just
under an acre Has
roof over. No Realtors.
$33,500 352-476-4374
MINI FARMS
2/1/2, w/Carport, Fen'd
$550. (352) 795-7335
Northwest Citrus
County 2 bedroom. 1.5
bath. Mobile Home on
1 acre, high and dry,
shaded lot, shed, paved
road $44,900 or make
offer. Possible owner fi-
nancing. 352-795-9908



2/2 on Lake Rousseau.
Was $27,500 NOW
$19,900 Low Lot Rent
$240/m 2003 Mobile
Home. Used Seasonally
Owner bought a house,
our lost is your gain.
(352) 817-1987
Forest View
2 bedroom. 2 bath. 55+
Park Beautiful 1344 sq ft
many upgrades $19900
352 794 3519
HOMOSASSA'S
Best Housing Value
Modern homes from
$8,400 or Lease to Own
from $139/mo.
$800.down + Lot rent at
Evanrldge Community
an exceptional 55+Park
352 628-5977
INVERNESS
Waterfront 55+ Park
w/5 plers for fishing &
enjoyment, clubhouse,
onslte shuffleboard, and
much more! 2 BR 1.5 BA
lor 2.000. must be
approved 352-476-4964
Oak Pond/Inverness
Well maint 2/2 extra
long covered carport
Irg shed lanai,& Irg lot.
up graded kit part furn
(352) 344-1632


2/2, lanai, carport w/2
sheds on pond, metal
roof, all appls, can be
sold furn.cha $15K firm
(352) 503-7677
Stoneridge Landing
55+ Comm. Resales
starting @$13,500
Financing avail
1-800-779-1226
(352) 637-1400
WESTWIND VILLAGE 55+
Park. Updated 2/2 DW's
for sale. Reasonable
(352) 628-2090




LECANTO 55+
*FOR RENT OR SALE*
1/1, Furnished $525.
2/2, Furnished $550.
352-287-9175, 746-1189













835 NE Hwy 19
Crystal River, FI
(352) 795-0021
View our website
C21 NatureCoast.com

CHASSAHOWITZKA
3/2 Wtrfront DW, $600.
3/2 Furnished DW., $600
Agent (352) 382-1000




CRYSTAL RIVER
2 BR. $550., 3BR House
$800., 352-563-9857
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025




Alexander Real Estate
(352) 795-6633

Crystal River Apts
2 BR/1 BA $375-$500

CRYSTAL RIVER 1/1
Handicap Ramp, Small
Pet OK. (352) 628-2815
FLORAL CITY
FREE Use of boat ramp,
fishing dock, canoe &
Jon boat rentals. 1 BR
$4501$200 dp. incis Sat
TV electric, walk to river
Trails End Camp, A
Friendly Place to Live
352-726-3699
HERNANDO
1 BR, Quiet Area, Near
Lake $395., 228-2701
HOMOSASSA
1 BR, W&D, Boat Dock
util. incld. $600. mo.+
sec., 352-628-6537
INVERNESS
2/1, Great Neigh. W/D
Hkup., Storage Rm $500
mo.+ Sec. 352-634-5499
INVERNESS
2/2, scr/porch $600 f/1
$400 dp352-422-2393
LECANTO
Nice 1 Bedrm $500
352-613-6000.216-0012
(352) 746-5238

MAYO DRIVE
APARTMENTS
MOVE IN SPECIAL*
(352) 795-2626

SEVEN RIVERS
APTS

A Beautiful place
to come home too.
35 units on private
street, situated on 10
wooded acres, near
Crystal River &
7 Rivers Hosp. fish-
Ing, walking, trails,
shopping near by.
Old Florida setting,
quite, clean well
malnt. central
laundry room.
352-795-3719
Directions:
Hwy 19 turn W. at
Days Inn, first rlght
onto Tallahassee Rd









CRYSTAL RIVER
Comm. Storefront, very
clean 1000SF exc. loc.
Hwy 19 Downtown
$795/mo 352-634-2528




INVERNESS
LANDINGS 2/1.5 clean
roomy, great location
$550/mo F/L/S
No smoke/No pets
(352) 341-1847




INVERNESS 2/1/1
Great area, nosmk/pets
$600/mo. 1st, last & sec
352-341-3562/400-0743
INVERNESS
2/2 Townhouse, new
appl's & carpet, W/D
trash incl'd $600 mo +
sec. (352) 344-4290





Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225


Take 44 East, continue on 41S to RIGHT on Eden Dr., to RIGHT on Champlain to house on LEFT


FLORAL CITY
1 bedroom. 1 bath. On
Withlapopka Island, 900
sq ft. fenced yard, $550
includes water, electric
and cable, first month
and $250 Deposit due
on move in. Call 813
731-5347 for appoint-
ment.
INVERNESS 2/1/1
Great area, pets, nosmk
$600/mo. 1st, last & sec
352-341-3562/400-0743
INVERNESS
Country Living on large
'/2-acre lot. 3BR, 2BA
home. Garden area,
fenced area, Well &
septic, so no water blll!
$595. RENT SPECIAL
Security dep. pro-rated
over 3 mo. period.
352-476-4964
Specializing in
Sugarmill Woods
Rentals


Debe Johns
Brkr/Assoc/PRM

Coldwell Banker Next
Generation Realty
Property Manager
(352) 382-2700 www.
coldwellbankernext
aeneration.com

See what a
Professional
Residential Manager
can do for you.


Kristi Bortz
Let our property
management team
help you with your
short or long term
rentals.
See all our rentals in
Citrus Co.
www. plantation
rentals
352-795-0782 or
866-795-0784




Beverly Hills
2/1 carport, firm. $600.
1st & dp no pets/smoke
Remodeled
(352) 465-3987
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/1 Fl. Rm, CHAShed,
$525. mo 352-795-9060
CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/2 Family Room
near shopping $850.
(352)897-4447, 697-1384
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/2/2, $800. mo + sec.
850-371-1568
DUNNELLON
Rainbow Lakes Estates
2/2/2, + sunroom
fenc'd yd $600/m. 1st
Lst. sec prorated over
3 mos.. (352) 489-7094
FLORAL CITY
3/1/2, 6 Acres, Private,
$700. 352-212-2264
HOMOSASSA
2/1 home 3/2 DW no
pets(352) 637-1142
HOMOSASSA
3/2, LR, FR, DR, Kit., Sun
Rm. FP, $700. + sec.
Tom (920) 224-2513
INVERNESS
2/1.5/garage.cha,new
carpet, lake access,
close to town,
$575 nosmoke/pets
cell (952) 807-6012
INVERNESS
2/2/2 Detached home,
Royal Oaks upgrds,
clubhouse, pool, lawn
serv, W/D. $800/mo.
incls. cable /wter. Avail
2/20, 949-633-5633
INVERNESS 3/2/2
No pets. near hosp &
Library $800. Mo. F/US
(352) 527-9268
INVERNESS
4/1, $650 first Ist & sec
aft 2pm (352) 408-9470

INVERNESS
SUBSIDIZED RENTALS
3 & 4 BEDROOMS
Starting @ $466.



Mangr., Kim Trawick
352-726-3476.
TDD 888-341-2355

RENT TO OWN!!
No credit check!
3bdrms 352-566-6049
JADEMISSION.COM
Sugarmill Woods
Spacious Ranch Villa
2/2/2, Lanai $750. mo
+ util (352) 382-8935

Sugarmill Woods
Upscale Ctry Club
Brand New Deluxe
Villa 2/2/2 Fam Rm +
Lanai, most until's paid.
Just $800/mo Owner:
352-382-1132




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225

Pcrwue Pe'fecr
CHA~C HOWITZK A
Lg 2 2 : i .:1 ;. I


i: : :ill,:, -S650 mo
(727).59-2671






CITRUS SPRINGS
Lease or Rent to Own
3/3/2/2, Custom Pool
Home on acre $699.
Special. 1st last dep.
bkgrd Ck 352-489-3997




CRYSTAL RIVER
Clean House, cable w/d,
$115/ 125wkly
$430/450mo. No hidden
cost. 563-6428


CLASSIFIED



Inverness
1 br& ba.home prev
incls pool. $500/mo
(352) 201-6057




C.R/Homosassa
1& 2 Br. furn, quiet park
Util. incl.clean, shrt/long
term 352 220-2077




FARMS, LAND,
COMMERCIAL
UNIQUE &
HISTORIC HOMES,
SMALL TOWN
COUNTRY LIFESTYLE
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989


"LIFE IS BETTER
WITH A PORCH"

WWW.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.

PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ille-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination. "
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.




OPPORTUNITY

Specializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches &
Commercial








Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com

WATERFRONT
EQUESTRIAN &
INVESTMENT/
INCOME SALES
*Buyer's
Representative
*Concierge Level
Service






T4&


5091 SO FT BulIng




FOR LEASE-5091 sq. ft.
Commercial Building
7765 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy. Crystal River,
352-464-2514




For Sale By Owner
3/2/2, Custom Built
in '08 by Wheeler
Construction
Call (407) 739-2646
or 407-442-3597




RENT TO OWN!!
No credit check!
3 bdrms 352-566-6049
JADEMISSION.COM




1 or 2BD,1.5 BA
completely remodeled
2 lots, 2 wells, wkshop
2 sheds Owner
Financ $469/mo
lake area 727-457-0850
APACHE SHORE
2 bdrm. 1 bath. close to
lake central heat and
air, new well & water
softening system,
corner wooded lot.
Excellent Investment
Opp. Assumable loan,
$30.000, 352-322-0454




3BR, 3BA, Pool home,
2,000 sq.ft. $163,000
OR BEST OFFER
518 Poinsettia
352-860-0878.
HIGHLANDS
Lrg.2/2- 4 car garage
pool, game room,
mud room, on triple lot
fenced, price to sell
$65,500 (352) 564-4598


3k sf. new kit. Ig closets,
CHA, firepl. on golf
course $139K make of-
fer, norealtors 726-0652
INVERNESS
Waterfront 55+ Park
w/5 piers for fishing &
enjoyment, clubhouse,
onslte shuffleboard
and much more!
Single wide 1 & 2 BR,
starting @ $6,900. Lot
rent $274/mo. H20
Included. 3 mo. free
rent with purchase.
352-476-4964
Lakefront Gospel
Island Location
Spacious 3/2/2
for rent $700/m or for
sale..... 908-322-6529

Large 1 Fam.
Carol Terrace,
Inverness. 4BR 3BA,
2700 sq ft under air,
2.8 acres fully fenced,
important updates
done. $220,000.
Owner 352-419-7017

Recently Foreclosed
*Special Financing*
Available, Any
Credit, Any Income ,
2BD, IBTH, located
at, 7901 Stump Lane,
Inverness, $29,900.
Visit, www.roseland
co.com/A4F,
Drive by then Call
8667003622.




3/2/2 Built 1986, On '2
Acre, Remodeled
above ground pool
w/deck BY OWNER
4141 S. Journey Point
$185,000 813-477-6006
3/2/2, Built 2007
Newly Remodeled
$88,000
100% Financing Avail.


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work For You!

BETTY HUNT,
REALTOR
ERA KEY 1 Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.

Condo for Sale
2/2, 1,850 sq. ft.,
35 Beech Street
(352) 503-3294
Sale or Lease Opt
3/2/3 pool, move in
cond.can be seen on
Fri Sat & Sunday's call
for appt $150K
(352) 634-5415
727-330-6779












Best Time To Buy!
I have lease options,
owner financing &
foreclosures
call Phyllis Strickland
(352) 613-3503
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.











DEB INFANTINE

3 HOMES SOLD
In December
I Need Listings!

Real EstateL...
it's what I do.

ERA American
Realty
Phone:(352) 726-5855
Cell:(352) 302-8046
Fax:(352) 726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com












Michele Rose, Realtor
Simply put I 'II work
harder 352-212-5097
isellcitruscountvy(
yahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515




INVERNESS 2/2/1
Superbly maintained,
1381 Sqft, Oak floors,
Florida room, dining
room, extra pantries, par-
tially furnished. Pictures
avail 631 Whispering
Pines Blvd.
352-726-9983
INVERNESS
Nice 2/2/1 new carpet
tile & paint. Whispering
Pines Villas furnished
$69,900(352) 726-8712




MANHATTAN
CLUB
Most in Demand
Time Share in NYC.
Premier location.
Full Amenities. Split
Wk Silver Pkg. Sleeps
4, World Wide R.C.I.
Program. week
banked, to be used
in 2012. Private
individuals only.
$18K Contact
Stephenaitken@
optonline.net or call:
631-567-5928


CRYSTAL RIVER/OZELLO
$299K, 2+/2/2
Open floor plan,
Hardwood floors,
www.waterfrontozello.co
m or 352-563-5527

Homosassa-Riverhaven
Village on water, 3/2+
bath,river room,lanai-ft
and back,dock, many
upgrades, beautiful
home. $260,000. Go to
forsalebvowner.com
Listing 23023708 or
call 352-628-9647
Realtors 2.5%

Join us to
Pre-view Homes
for sale
Feb 28th &
March 13th


Office Open

7 Days a Week
Lisa VanDeboe
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129





CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pond,
ATVtrails $165Kobo
352 795-2027/ 634-4745





Homosassa
1.6 Acres on Hwy 19
Wet Lands, next to
Bowling Alley, $15,000
Owner Finance
352-621-1664

SUGARMILL
WOODS
Fringetree St,
100 W x 120 deep.
Ready to build $9,999.
(352) 503-6980





BOAT LIFT
Single Pole,
1500 lb. capacity.
$900 obo
352-613-8453





'07 Proline 17 ft
4 stroke 90 HP Suzuki,
very low hours, ready
to fish trailer & more
$13,500 352-795-3894

Angler Model 2500
walk around, pur-
chased New March
2009 paid $54,520.
twin eng. 115 Yamaha
warnty 3/15 (14hrs)
ESTATE PRICE
$37,500 859-229-5667

CAROLINA SKIFF
2001 19 foot Excellent
condition, 90 hp Yamaha,
bimini, radio, depth finder,
includes trailer with new
tires.
$7500.00 obo
352-895-2382 ask for Bill

FRESH JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct.@ $5 per lb
Stone Crab@ $6 per lb
delivered 727-771-7500

HOUSE BOAT
30 ft fiberglass, hrd
wood firs, & more
Live Aboard or eniov
weekends in Paradise
$12,800 (423) 320-3008

Jon Boat
16' Alum. trolling motor
& battery, good cond.
$250.(352) 634-5565

KAYAK 15'
Wilderness Systems
Cape Horn w/rudder,
gar. kept, exc. cond
$700(352) 382-2824

MONARCH 20 ft
Pontoon Boat, new
deck,carpet, & seats,
75H Merc. mtr. $5,400
(703) 220-5916 cell

TUNNEL HULL '05
G3, 90 hp Yamaha,
jack plate, rods, cooler,
live well, camo interior
Galv trailer, low hrs,
4 blade prop $10,500
352 489-1403

Wanna Sell your
Boat? call me
(352) 220-9435

WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LAKE
MARINE
We Pay CASH For Used
Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck & Fishing
Boats (352)527-0555
boatsupercenter.com






















YACHTSMAN
24' Pontoon 70 HP Ev.
T/T, cust. trlr, bimini top,
stored inside $4,200/bo
Homa. (231) 852-0061





2001 38 ft Holiday
Rambler, Cummings
diesel,2 slides, fully
loaded ,sell or trade
property $60000
859-814-3573

Bounder
Fleetwood 32' 1994
454 engine, loaded,
self contained, $9,750
352-795-6736


CITRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


R-Ucet I Cars


I Buy RV'S Steve
Henry, RV World of
Hudson Inc.Since
1974. (888) 674-8376
(727) 514-8875
SUNSEEKER '05
29 ft. Class. C., nearly
all options, generator,
needs awning fabric,
no smoke,33k mi.
Reduce $24K, 464-0316
| .-.. .% |


Tropical LX Diamond
'05, 3 slides, 40'
19k miles, 350
Cat-Diesel. gen. 7.5
too many xtra's to list.
$98,500.352-503-3663




05 SUNNYBROOK 36'
5th whI,2 slides ,king
bed like new heated
tks, 60 amp service
oak cab $39,900
352-382-3298
32" 5th Wheel
$1800
(352) 634-5565
Coachmen '01
Catalina 25' 5th wheel
2 slide outs, fully
equipped$8500 obo
352-382-4084/422-2961
Gulf Steam
Coach 25' model
24RBL, sips upto 6 gas &
elect appis & heat,
shower/toliet $6900
(352) 341-1714
I BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
call me 352-201-6945
Open Road Pilgrim
05, 5th whl. 32' 2 slides,
deluxe Kit. new awning
& a/c, amfmw/TV
$14K(317) 407-4542
Reese Tow power
hitch, max weight 7500
lbs, fits various pick ups.
$100 (352) 341-1714





Travel Trailer '09
34' slide room, W/D,
dishwash, hard wood
firs, Q bed $12,900
cell (813) 699-2262



2010 Stelh Tow Dolly
Like new condition
has straps for Tires
$850.
(352) 221-0709
CAR CREEPER, NEW
CONDITION $18
SET OF CAR RAMPS $22
(352) 382-1154
Chevy 383 Stroker Kit
allies steel crank,
H Beam Rods, forged
pistons balanced $650
obo(352) 628-4110
Hurst Competition,
plus shifter w/mounting
plate, new $200
(352) 628-4110




BIG SALE!
Consignment USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
AUTOS' FROM $1,500.
US 19 BY AIRPORT
US 44, BY NAPA
Low Payments*
461-4518 & 795-4440
consignmentusa.org
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not*
CASH PAID $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars Trucks
& Vans, For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES,
Hwy 19... 352 564-8333
CASH PAID FOR JUNK
CARS Any Condition
Up to $500., Free
Towing 352-445-3909
KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Salvage Pays top $$$
for your autos.
352-628-4144
WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
Perfect Cond. or Not
TItled,No title,
No problem. Paying up
to $25K any make,
any model Call A.J.
813-335-3794/531-4298




'08 Chrysler
Sebring Touring
Convertible,34k miles,
loaded, $14,250firm
352-897-4520
BIG SALE!
Consignment USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
AUTOS' FROM $1,500.
US 19 BY AIRPORT
US 44, BY NAPA
Low Payments *
461-4518 & 795-4440
consignmentusa.org
BUICK 97
LeSabre,100+K mi
loaded, white 4 dr.
$2495. Riverhaven
(352) 628-7077
Citrus Sale Center
We buy/sell/trade
clean pre-owned
vehicles!


02 Ford Quad CabTruck
F- 150 Cab$4999
07 Nissan Murano
$14,900
06 Chrysler PT Cruiser
$6,499
06 Grand Marquis
$13,200 low miles
Call 352-400-1038
HYUNDAI 07
Santafe, 51K mis,
metallic blue, 3rd row
seat, air bags front &
side pwrwinow drs.
locks, steering &more
$15K (352) 382-0661
LINCOLN
'06, Towncar, Signature,
37K miles, looks, drives
even smells like new.
$16,500. (352) 746-1184
LINCOLN
2001 Town Car,
new tires & brakes,
runs good $2800. obo
(352) 533-3147


S420, blue book $11,500
sell $10K FIRM
1729 W. Gulf to lake
Hwy, Lecanto
MERCURY
'00, Sable GS, 4 Door
loaded, only 70K mi.,
leather, V6, AC, Stereo,
garaged Clean $3,500.
(352) 212-9383
VOLKSWAGON
'97, green Cabrio
convertible, a/c 52K mi
garage kept $4,800
(352) 287-5423




Mercedes 82
380 SL, 105Kmi.both
tops exc. cond., runs
good, no dents or rust
$7500 obo352 746-6925







Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





BIG SALE!
Consignment USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
AUTOS' FROM $1,500.
US 19 BY AIRPORT
US 44, BY NAPA
Low Payments *
461-4518 & 795-4440
consignmentusa.org
CHEVROLET
'11, Silverado, 1,500 LT
crew cab, 5.3 V8, trail-
ing pkg, clothe trim
$26,000 (352) 344-0089
CHEVROLET
'99, S 10 pick up, V6,
$2,800
(352) 476-1474
(352) 382-1502
Citrus Sale Center
We buy/sell/trade
clean pre-owned
vehicles!


02 Ford QuadCab F-150
Truck $4999
07 Nissan Murano
$14,900
06 Chrysler PT Cruiser
$6499
06 Grand Marquis
$13,200 low miles
Call 352-400-1038
FORD '01
Lariat F 350 DRW 7.3
turbo diesel super cab
84K mis. exc cond $14K
call Bob(352) 794-3142
FORD 02
F150 Lariat SuperCrew
Cab.Orig.owner, only
53K miles, very clean,
garaged, white,
many extra's $12,950
(352) 628-7898

ONE OWNER
FORD
2002 Ranger ONE
OWNER, 159KALL
HIGHWAY MILES
CLEAN, A/C POWER
WINDOWS & DOORS.
CD PLAYER, BED-
LINER. NEW TIRES
jsher-
ouse2@tampabay.rr.com
FORD
2004, E 350 Moving Box
Truck w/ Ramp, under
27K miles, AC, dual rear
wheels, Asking, $12,000
obo 352-634-1041



FORD RANGER 99
Ig bed w/topper, super
clean, 129K miles,
manual trans. well
maint. good mpg.
new stereo.$3000 Call
Doug 352-794-3463
GMC
'08, Sierra 1500, white,
like new only 10K mi.,
long bed, bed liner,
chrome & tow pkg.
Must See KBB Sug. Ret.
$16,700. Asking $15,500
obo (352) 634-4708 or
mdp@newair.biz
TOYOTA TUNDRA
06, Contractor Model
76K miles. Blue book
$12K sell $10K.
(352) 566-8022



GMC
2000 Yukon 4x4 V-8 Gas,
One Owner,
Non-Smoker, never used
off-road, Runs, drives
great,Great Condition,
140k miles, $6,500 obo
352/586-8880
HYUNDAI '08
Santa Fe, 23,670K mi
loaded w all acc.
242 hp V6 leather
warranty transferable
$18,500 (352) 465-5501




CHEVROLET
2000 CK2500 PICK-UP
127K,EXT CAB, LONG
BEDAUTOAC,CRUISE,TILT,
AM/FM
BILL@352/860-2131
JEEP
'95, Cherokee, 159K mi.,
runs good 4 DR 4 x 4,
9" Lift on 35, $2,250. obo
(352) 345-6499



2005 HD Ultra
Classic w/Fat Bagger
kit, Custom seat,
wheels ect $13000 obo
352-563-6327or 860-3481


Harley 00
Roadking Classic, all
gear 17K miles 11K
obo.(352) 489-0873
JUNK MOTORCYCLES
WANTED Will Pay up to
$200 for Unwanted Mo-
j _ycle352-942-3492



900-0229 DAILY CRN
Surplus Prop.
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County Board
of County Commissioners
will be selling surplus prop-
erty and equipment via
the internet at
govdeals.com from Jan.
15 until Feb. 29, 2012.
Jan. 15 thru Feb. 29, 2012




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE















Spring 2012


KicZcmiU


_J


(p


..... L .:v *.
\\^ c


. W O W O


pW:mp,
I.NNW
mmop


..... ......







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


-Fishing forecast


Spring is the best time


By Rick Burns
Special to the Chronicle


For the angling opportunities in
March and April you need look no
further than right here in Citrus
County.
The springtime fishing along here
is some of the best of the whole year.
Even late February is good for the
freshwater bass fishing, as well as the
saltwater fishing.


Freshwater
The lakes and rivers are still cool
enough to keep the fish active.
And the shiners that are used for
bass bait will remain alive a lot
longer with the cooler water, as
opposed to the dog days of summer
where it can be tough to keep them
frisky. When the water gets too hot,
the shiners will be dead before you
know it, attracting the mudfish and
gars.
So take advantage now, while the
getting is good. if you're going after
one of those wall hangers.
The springtime pan fishing is some
of the best, as well.
Shellcrackers will be going on the
beds and making it a lot of fun for
anglers when they are schooled up
like this. Where you find and catch
one, you'll usually hook into a lot
more.
Toss a nice wiggler or cricket in
the bed and hold on.
The speck (crappie) fishing is still
going on, too.
Slow trolling a few rods rigged
with a minnow-tipped jig makes it
hard for them to resist. I'll always
have a spare ultra-light outfit rigged
with a beetle-spin and fan cast the
areas we're trolling. It's a good
locating method.
Places of interest for the bass and
pan fish are lakes such as Hernando,
Henderson, Floral City pool and
Rousseau.
Be real careful though when fish-
ing and venturing out of the channel
in Rousseau; the stumps there can
ruin your day in a hurry. All of these


lakes have nice concrete ramps to
launch, if the water level doesn't get
extremely low.


Saltwater
First off, the no closure on the
trout for February had a good posi-
tive effect for the guiding business -
and really for everybody.
Nice catches of good size trout
were coming to the cleaning tables
making the anglers and guides
happy.


Throughout March and April it
will be even better.
Last year I had my best trout days
in April. Just Citrus County has ap-
proximately 150,000 acres of these
lush grass beds for the trout to live
and feed in.
Concentrate on the inshore flats
and grass beds in around three to
four feet of water. Bouncing a plastic
jig off the bottom or one under a
popping cork will suffice. I also have
a top-water plug rigged on one outfit
and maybe a weedless jerkbait on yet
another.
If they start biting well, nothing
beats the excitement of a trout
exploding on top nothing!
The Spanish mackerel should be
around through March if the water
doesn't get too hot.
The April cobia run is some of our


favorite fishing. This is a lot like
hunting when you're in your boat
stand anchored off and sight fishing
and casting to these extremely hard
pulling, hard fighting and even better
eating fish.
It'll be too early in March and
April for the redfish to start showing
up and schooling in big numbers.
However, there will be enough
around to oblige. Working the outer
island points, cuts and passes is
going to be the way to go. For the
bait and wait technique utilize some


fresh cut mullet or ladyfish. Yes,
don't throw away any ladyfish you
catch. They make excellent redfish
bait.
For artificial bait, it's hard to beat
the old reliable gold spoon in one-
quarter-ounce size or any color
weedless jerkbait, as long as it's
white. Beat the banks trolling and fan
cast your mangrove island points.
As you can see, there's a lot to do
in the angling world for this spring
along the Nature Coast. So get out
and enjoy. Hope to see ya' on the
water.

Captain Rick Burns operates Reel
Burns Charters and can be reached
at 1w i i ,. a ., ,, %.i. t %,i ...1 ,,,Ji ...i i l


What's Inside
Fishing .......................................... page 2
G olf .............................................. page 4
N nature ............................................ page 5
Bird watching ................................ page 6
Hiking and biking .......................... page 8
Paddle sports ... ....................... page 10
Boating ........................................ page 11



Photos, news welcome
Send photos and news about your
favorite outdoor activity for publication in the
May edition of Outdoors in Citrus which will
cover the period from mid-May through mid-
August to community@chronicleonline.com.


Gerry Mulligan Publisher
Ken Melton Community Affairs Editor
Cindy Connolly Community Affairs Graphic Artist
Sarah Gatling Community Editor
Trista Stokes Advertising Sales Manager


Citrus Publishing
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.
Crystal River, FL 34429
352-563-6363
www.chronicleonline.com


G2 Saturday, February 25, 2012


OUTDOORS IN CITRUS







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Bass challenge has

anglers fishing the

Withlacoochee River


Fish with
m-m-Mel
Country music legend
and singer/songwriter
Mel Tillis, right, visited
Homosassa recently
for a scouting trip off
Citrus County's coast
in preparation for the
upcoming "m-m-Mel
Tillis and Friends Fish-
ing Tournament" set
for April 14 at the Ho-
mosassa Riverside
Resort. Proceeds
from the event will
benefit the Shriners
Hospitals for Children.
Jimmy Brown, of Life
Pirates LLC, is assist-
ing in promoting the
event which is spon-
sored by the Citrus
County Chronicle.
Entry into the tourna-
ment is $150 for each
boat. For more infor-
mation go to www.
fishingwithmel.com.


The eighth annual Citrus
County Bass Challenge is
set for April 28.
Anglers from across
Central Florida will de-
scend upon the Withla-
coochee River in
Dunnellon to compete
for bragging
rights and cash.
The tourna-
ment, historically one
of the largest in the legion,
raises money for the Key
Training Center. The Key
Center provides a home
and day services for sev-
eral hundred developmen-
tally disabled adults living
in Citrus County.
To date, the event has
raised more than $60,000
for the Key Center.


Lake Beverly fishing

tourney is catch and release


Event is sponsored
by the Beverly Hills
Fishing Club
The first Lake Beverly
Fishing Tournament will be
from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Satur-
day, March 31.
This is a catch-and-release
tournament for all ages spon-
sored by the Beverly Hills


Fishing Club in association
with Citrus County Parks &
Recreation.
Prizes will be awarded.
The tourney is free for mem-
bers. The cost is $5 for non-
members.
Rod and reels will be
available or bring your own.
Participants must register.
Call 352-746-4882 for more
information.


Want Smooth Sailing?
...Service Your Boat Now!
SALES* SERVICE 4 CONSIGNMENT
CrEDArte l Y DAne


000AM38


Comfort Bikes Mountain Bikes Fitness Bikes Road Bikes
A *ocn Sales & Service

1)00) 20312 E. Pennsylvania Ave.
Ua I a IlV Dunellon, FL
3UEwUN w352-465-7538
www.bluerunbicycles.comn


U


Anglers will leave the
Dunnellon city boat ramp
at 6:30 a.m. and begin re-
turning to the scales at 3
p.m. in hopes of


i.C cighing
in the heaviest
five-bass limit.
Cash prizes are given to
the top teams, as well as
the team catching the
single largest fish of the
event.


The Port Hotel
and Marina
Boat Rentals Canoeing
Kayaking Snorkeling
Guided Tours
Manatee Encounters
It's all about waterfront dining ...
GCrystaL R-ver

ALE HOUSE

Boat Ramp For Public Use!
1610 SE Paradise Circle, Crystal River
Dive Shop 352-795-7234 (PADI)
Hotel 352-795-3111
Ale House 352-795-3113
www.porthotelanmarine.com


ED'S TACKLE SHOP
983 N. Suncoast Blvd. -
(South U.S. 19)
Airport Plaza, Crystal River, FL
352-795-4178
F Line of Fresh & Salt Water Tackle
Live & Frozen Bait
Rod & Reel Repair
*Snacks Soda
mi 'ri-.:. j Fri S u5 .ij, 5 u .' [,' i


Saturday, February 25, 2012 G3


OUTDOORS IN CITRUS







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


-Golf


Blackshear Memorial
tees off March 10
The Citrus County Builders As-
sociation (CCBA) will host the
Jim Blackshear Memorial Golf
Outing as a Parade of Homes
Kickoff Classic at the Inverness
Golf & Country Club on Satur-
day, March 10.
The Golf Outing, in its 23rd
year, is open to all amateur golfers
and is a favorite event of the


CCBA due to regularly changing
golf courses each year that aid in
keeping the outing interesting and
challenging for returning golfers.
It was renamed in honor of Jim
Blackshear, a founder of the
CCBA, after his passing in 2004
and this year the outing will also
donate a portion of the proceeds
to a local nonprofit, the well-
known child advocacy center,
Jessie's Place.
Registration will begin at 7 a.m.
with a shotgun start at 8 a.m. Cost
is $60 per player which includes
greens fees, carts, a free Mulligan
ticket and a barbecue chicken buf-
fet lunch. Foursomes save $5 per
person at a cost of $220 per team.
Additional Mulligans will be


available for sale and are also
used for door prize tickets. Player
and sponsor registrations are now
open online at www.Citrus
Builders.com or by stopping by
the CCBA office at 1196 S.
Lecanto Highway, Lecanto, any
time Monday through Thursday
from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
For more information visit the
CCBA on the web or call
Executive Officer Donna Bidlack
at 352-746-9028


'Golf for Meals'
tourney in March
Citrus County Home Delivered
Meals Program will host Golf for
Meals fundraising golf tourna-
ment Saturday, March 24, at
Seven Rivers Golf and Country
Club, Crystal River.
The event will begin at 9 a.m.
Business owners and organiza-
tions are invited to sponsor the
event with a variety of advertising
platforms. You can show your
support by sponsoring a hole, pro-
viding items for gift bags, or by
donating prizes that can be given
away or raffled off for additional


funds. There are several different
levels of corporate sponsorship:
* Platinum Sponsor $1,000
and more receives a hole sponsor-
ship, appearance on "The Senior
Club Show"(local television pro-
gram), free monthly advertising in
Citrus County's "Center Stage"
Community Center newsletter for
a year, corporate logo on all event
printed materials and advertising,
and one golf foursome.
* Gold Sponsor $500 receives
a hole sponsorship, free monthly
advertising in Citrus County's
"Center Stage" Community Cen-
ter newsletter for a year, and one
golf foursome.
* Silver Sponsor $370 re-
ceives a hole sponsorship and one
golf foursome.
* Bronze Sponsor $150 re-
ceives a hole sponsorship.
To become a corporate sponsor,
call 352-527-5975. March for
Meals is a nationwide campaign
sponsored by the Meals on
Wheels Association of America.

Gator Club's
Scholarship Scramble
The Citrus County Gator Club's
annual Scholarship Scramble will
be at World Woods Golf Club
May 5.
The deadline for entry is April
25.
Participants will have a change
to win first, second and third team
cash prizes, closest to the pin,
longest drive for male and female
and a 2012 GMC Canyon truck
for a hole-in-one. The vehicle was
donated by Eagle Buick GMC.
Tickets are $65 or $260 per
team. Hole sponsorships are $50.
Lunch is provided and there will
be a beverage cart on the course.
For information call Melanie
Strickland at 352-697-1499 or
email 352-697-1499.


Hit the links for a cause


Black Diamond Ranch
45 holes Private
3125 W. Black Diamond
Circle, Lecanto
746-3446

Brentwood Farms Golf
Club
Regulation 9 holes -
Par 36 Public
1720 W. Nicole Court,
Lecanto
527-2600

Citrus Hills Golf
& County Club
2 courses 18 holes -
Par 70 Semi-private
509 E. Hartford St.,
Hernando
746-4425

Citrus Springs Golf
& Country Club
18 holes Par 72 Public
8690 N. Golfview Drive,
Citrus Springs
352-489-5045

El Diablo Golf
& Country Club
18 holes Par 72 Public
10405 N. Sherman Drive,
Citrus Springs
352-465-0986

Inverness Golf
& Country Club
18 holes Par 72 Private
3150 S. Country Club Drive
Inverness ~ 726-2583

Lakeside Country Club
18 holes Par 72 -
Semi-private
4555 E. Windmill Drive,
Inverness
726-1461


Pine Ridge Golf Club
18 hole Par 72; 9 holes -
Par 27 Public
5600 Elkcam Blvd.,
Beverly Hills ~ 746-6177

The Plantation Inn
& Golf Resort
18 hole championship
9 hole Lagoon Public
9301 W. Fort Island Trail,
Crystal River ~ 795-7211

Point 0' Woods Golf Club
9 holes Par 30 Executive
95 S. Golf Harbor Path,
Inverness ~ 726-3113

Seven Rivers Golf
& Country Club
18 holes Par 72 Private
7395 W. Pinebrook St.,
Crystal River ~ 795-2100

Skyview at Terra Vista
18 holes Par 72 -
Semi-private
2100 N. Terra Vista Blvd.,
Hernando ~ 746-3664

Southern Woods Golf
& Country Club
18 holes Private
1501 Corkwood Blvd.,
Homosassa~ 382-1200

Sugarmill Woods Golf
& Country Club
18 holes Par 72 Private
9 hole Par 36 Private
1 Douglas St., Homosassa
382-2663

Twisted Oaks Golf Course
18 holes Par 72 Public
4801 Forest Ridge Blvd.,
Beverly Hills ~ 746-6257


Golf courses


G4 Saturday, February 25, 2012


OUTDOORS IN CITRUS







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Friends of Homosassa
Springs Wildlife Park Inc. are
giving artists of all ages an
opportunity to submit a design
or designs for a "Wildlife Mo-
ment" photo display of their
favorite animal.
The winning works will
displayed in the Ellie Schiller
Homosassa Springs Wildlife
State park for years to come.
A "Wildlife Moment" is a dis-
play illustrating one of the
park's animals with an open-
ing for a visitor to peer
through and have their photo
taken.
For many years, the park
had a display of this type fea-
turing a manatee near the Fish
Bowl. This was enjoyed by
thousands of park visitors and
was recently retired. Friends'
Board member Vicky lozzia
decided it was time to invite


area artists to be creative and
come up with designs for
three new displays. Submis-
sions should include sketches
and descriptions and will be
judged on creativity, original-
ity and visual impact.
If the Friends' committee
selects your display concept,
you will be notified and asked
to complete your Wildlife
Moment display. The Friends
will provide the materials and
can arrange to pick up the fin-
ished display if transporting it
would be a problem. The win-
ning displays will have a
plaque with the artist's name.
Individual artists, art stu-
dents and classes may partici-
pate. If you are interested in
submitting a design or have
questions, call Susan Straw-
bridge at 352-628-5343 or
Vicky lozzia at 352-563-2651.


Test your knowledge of Florida wildlife


Wildlife Jeopardy is a regular chal-
lenge offered at Ellie Schiller Ho-
mosassa Springs Wildlife State Park.
Upcoming programs include:
0 Bats Saturday, March 10, noon
to 12:30 p.m.
A Question and Answer Jeopardy-
style program for all ages on bats
will be presented in the Children's
Education Center in the Wildlife
Park.


* Reptiles Saturday, April 14,
noon to 12:30 p.m.
A Question and Answer Jeopardy-
style program for all ages on reptiles
will be presented in the Children's
Education Center in the Wildlife
Park.

* Armadillos Saturday, May 12,
noon to 12:30 p.m.
A Question and Answer Jeopardy-


style program for all ages on armadil-
los will be presented in the Chil-
dren's Education Center in the
Wildlife Park.
Regular park admission applies for
all the Wildlife Jeopardy program.
For information call 352-628-5343.


Witness Moon Over the Mounds at archaeological park


Florida Department of En-
vironmental Protection's
Friends of Crystal River
State Parks, the Gulf Archae-
ological Research Institute
and the Florida Public Ar-
chaeology Network an-
nounce the next Moon Over
the Mounds event for 8 to 10


p.m. Friday, March 9, at
Crystal River Archaeological
State Park.
The site is a world-famous
pre-Columbian mound
complex.
Join in a torchlight tour as
interpretive guides will lead
participants though the


moonlit mound complex.
Travel back to A.D. 600
when the Crystal River site
was the most important cere-
monial site in the region.
The Moon Over the
Mounds tour will begin at
the Crystal River Archaeo-
logical State Park Museum at


8 p.m.
The park is at 3400 N.
Museum Point, north of
Crystal River Mall. Drive
north on U.S. 19 and turn left
onto State Park Street.
For more information,
call 352-563-0450 or
352-795-0208.


- =3


The Plantation on Crystal River
can be your resource for all
outdoor recreation needs...
Play golf, rent a pontoon boat,
kayak or Jon boat, swim with the
manatees, or go fishing...visit the
web site call for details.
* 27 hole Championship golf course
* Dive Shop and Marina with manatee tours, fishing, boat
rentals, boat ramp, & diving certification
* Aveda Spa
* -.: : .and lounges
*196 Room and over 12,000 sq. ft of function space
*Sand Volleyball court, regulation croquet and horseshoes
*Two lighted tennis courts
Lagoon-Style swimming pool
Social and golf memberships are also available





PLANTATION


9301 W Fort Island Trail
Crystal River, FL 34429
800-524-7733 or 352-795-1605
www.PlantationOnCrystalRiver.com


Artists can share

'Wildlife Moment'


Saturday, February 25, 2012 G5


OUTDOORS IN CITRUS






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SDAN 'S R"


GUN ROOM

( Citrus County's Oldest Gun Dealer
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See


birds

The following bird walks
are planned at the Ellie
Schiller Homosassa Springs
Wildlife State Park.
Saturday, March 24
8 a.m. until 9:30 a.m.
(Meet at 7:45 a.m.)
Saturday, April 28
8 a.m. until 9:30 a.m.
(Meet at 7:45 a.m.)
Novice
and expe-
rienced
birders
are in-
vited to
take a
guided
bird walk
on Pepper
Creek
Trail.
Leaders
from
Citrus
County
Audubon
take bird-
ers on this
guided
walk.
Bring
binoculars and field guide if
you have them. This
leisurely paced walk is on a
handicapped accessible
(paved) trail winding
through a hydric hammock
along Pepper Creek. Please
call the park office to register
at 352-628-5343.
The walk is free.
For more information,
call 352-628-5343.


-Bird watching -

Birding Trails
Bluebird Springs One mile
west of U.S. 19 atYulee Drive
and West Bradshaw Street in
Homosassa
Chassahowitzka River Trail -
Begins at the boat landing at
the Chassahowitzka River
Campground and follows the
river to the National Wildlife
Refuge at the end of Miss
Maggie Drive
Citrus Tract Part of the With-
lacoochee State Forest
bounded on the north by Gulf-
to-Lake Highway, State Road
44 and on the south by County
Road 480
Crystal
Cove Trail,
Crystal
River Pre-
serve State
Park -
Starts at the
Mullet Hole
parking lot
on the north
side of Sail-
boat Avenue
Crystal
River
Archeologi-
cal State
Trail Citru Park- 3400
N. Museum
Road,
Crystal River
Eagle Snag
Trail Citrus County Landfill
off State Road 44
Eco-Walk Trail, Crystal River
Preserve State Park The
trailhead is off U.S. 19, one
mile south of Progress Energy
on Curtis Tool Road
Fort Cooper State Park -
3100 S. Old Floral City Road,
Inverness
Fort Island Trail 12073 W.
Fort Island Trail, Crystal River
Loop Road Trail-Flying Eagle
Preserve Take U.S. 41 to
Eden Drive, which turns into


U. U
DOLA


Moccasin Slough Road,
Inverness
Johnson Pond Trail Two
Mile Prairie is on County Road
39 between State Road 200
and U.S. 41
King's Bay Trail, Crystal
River Wildlife Refuge Winds
through King's Bay around
refuge islands north to Hunters
Spring to the mouth of the
Crystal River; only accessible
by boat
Inglis Island Trail A walking
trail at the Inglis Dam on Lake
Rousseau off Riverwood Road,
one and half miles east
of U.S. 19
Mason Creek Trail Only ac-
cessible by boat at the end of
Mason Creek Road in Old
Homosassa
Nature Coast Canoe Trail -A
20-mile coastal marsh trail
through the coastal planes of
the St. Martins Aquatic Pre-
serve and the Chassahowitzka
National Wildlife Refuge, it runs
from Fort Island Trail park off
U.S. 19 to Chassahowitzka
Trail on Miss Maggie Drive
Oystercatcher Trail, Withla-
coochee Bay Spoil Islands -
An open-water trail around the
islands created by the building
of the barge canal
Pepper Creek Ellie Schiller
Homosassa Springs Wildlife
State Park, 4150 S.
Suncoast Blvd.
Potts Preserve Trail Five
miles north of Inverness at the
end of Turner Camp Road
Rook's Trail The
Homosassa Tract of the
Withlacoochee State Forest
begins two miles west of U.S.
19 on Burnt Bridge Road
Withlacoochee Bay Trail and
Felburn Park Follows the
south side of the Florida Barge
Canal to Withlacoochee Bay
on the Gulf of Mexico


G6 Saturday, February 25, 2012


OUTDOORS IN CITRUS






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Walk

attracts

birders

and birds

The start of the 8 a.m. bird walk
recently at Ellie Schiller Homosassa
Springs Wildlife State Park could
not have been better, with a bright
sunny sky and warm temperature.
Thirty-five people came prepared
to look for and enjoy the birds
along Pepper Creek Trail, led by
Citrus County Audubon Society
volunteers Nancy Kost and Betsy
Frank.
After a brief introduction and a
few tips by Frank on how to focus
binoculars, the group was intro-
duced to a large flock of yellow-
rumped warblers feeding in the
nearby trees.
These highly active winter visi-


OUTDOORS IN CITRUS


tors are often overlooked, as they
can appear dull and uninteresting at
first glance.
Their lovely colors really come to
life through the binocular lenses -
bright yellow rump on all individu-
als and beautiful multicolor
plumage on adult males.


Saturday, February 25, 2012 G7


Twenty-nine species of birds Creek, where they saw an osprey on
common to our area were viewed her nest with her mate on a branch
that Saturday along the trail, next to her in a tall pine tree where
Among these were bluebirds, they have nested every winter for
woodpeckers, hawks, wading birds the past 20 years.
and songbirds. Following the walk, Bird walks are conducted along
participants returned to the park's the Pepper Creek Trail at the
visitor center via boat on Pepper wildlife park on the fourth Saturday


of each month from October
through April, except in December.
There is no charge.
For more information, contact
Susan Strawbridge at
352-628-5343, ext. 1002.
For information go to
www.citruscountyaudubon.com


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on Hwy 41 465-1635
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Bike ride ready

to roll on trail
The annual Clean Air Bike Ride on
the Withlacoochee State Trail to benefit
the Key Training Center will take place
on Saturday, March 19.
Registration is $25 for adults; children
12 and younger are $12, which includes
a continental breakfast for all entrants,
lunch served at the Inverness Trailhead
from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. and an
event T-shirt.
There is no mass start, allowing par-
ticipants to commence their 14-, 28-, 48-
or 100-mile treks from 7 to 9 a.m. from
the Inverness Trailhead, on North
Apopka Avenue.
Registrations may be made online or
registration forms can be downloaded
and checks mailed prior to the event,
payable to: Citrus County Roadrunners,
P.O. Box 94, Inverness, FL 34451-0094.
Registrations are also accepted the day
of the event with packet pick up from
7 to 9 a.m.
For more information, visit
cleanairride.com.


Hiking and biking


Head outdoors with the Ramblers


.. --. A ,'
a *
4 -- .

r . < '-* ... *w '


Nature Coast Ramblers is
an outdoor activity club of
friendly people of all ages
who enjoy self-paced hiking
or walking, biking and kayak-
ing activities in the Citrus
County area. The club is asso-
ciated with the American
Volkssport Association
(AVA), a national walking as-
sociation, which in turn is af-
filiated with an international
group.
Walking or hiking, biking
or kayaking with the club pro-
motes fitness. Our goal is to
provide events that can chal-
lenge participants to keep ac-
tive and are fun. We start
walks, rides and kayak out-
ings in different locations,
which is a great way to ex-
plore the many beautiful
trails, parks, forests and wa-
terways of this area. Bicycle


outings are generally the sec-
ond Friday each month; hik-
ing or walking is generally the
third Saturday of each month;
kayaking is usually the last
Tuesday of each month.
Nature Coast Ramblers also
maintains three designated
year-round 10K trails or walk-
ing routes, which can be
walked for AVA credit: in the
two state parks in Citrus
County at the Crystal River
Preserve and at Fort Cooper,
and a historic and scenic walk
in Crystal River.
All events are open to the
public.
You can become a member
of Nature Coast Ramblers for
only $10 per year for a single
or $12 per couple. Visit the
website at www.nature
coastramblers.org or call Karl
at 352-344-1531.


Twisted
1 4801 N. Forest Ridge Blvd.
aks Beverly Hills, FL 34465
(352) 746-6257
Golf Course-, wwwv.twistedoaksgc.com

MONDAY 4 PLAY
-FRIDAY PLAY
AFTER 2:00PM FOR
INCLUDES GREENS,
FEES, CART, I
FREE WARM-UP BASKET

4 PLAY: 80
FOR I BEFORE 8AM
0 '. INCLUDES GREENS'
FEES, CARTS
Not Valid For League Play. Must Reserve
Expires 3/31/ Tee Time To Receive Offer.
Expires 3/31/12 I Coupon Required. Offer Expires 3/31/12


SPoo+rA-tim +he poa+!
*Sightseeing *Birdwatching -Weddings
SSunrise & Sunset Cruises
*Moonlight Cruises -Custom Cruises

I' r'r 'j J


Located On the Withlacoochee at Stumpknockers
Hwy. 200 Citrus & Marion County Line
Gift Hernando, FL Open
Available 352-637-2726 all ng
SCertified U.S.C.G. License Captain + ECO Tourism Guide /


t OOOAF31


Rainbow's End

Golf Club J
Par 36 .


9 Holes of Championship Golf

Thursday Night Scramble
3 PM Shotgun 9 Holes
We willI put ou O on a team
Thru, March 30"' $16

Tuesday Night Twilight League
Points Game 5:30 Shotgun
9 Holes $20
Starts March 13th
20650 SW 80th Place Road, Dunnellon
(4 miles north of Dunnellon)
(352) 489-4566


GS Saturday, February 25, 2012


OUTDOORS IN CITRUS







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Hiking and

biking trails
Beverly Hills Park
997 W. Roosevelt Blvd.
Beverly Hills
Jogging trail (dog walk-
ing allowed on trail)

Central Ridge
District Park
6905 N. Lecanto Hwy.
Beverly Hills
Jogging trail (dog walk-
ing allowed on trail)

Cooter Pond Park
181 U.S. 41 South
Inverness
Walking/nature trail

Crystal River Preserve
State Park
3266 N. Sailboat Ave.
Crystal River
352-563-0450


OUTDOORS IN CITRUS


Biking trail
Hiking/nature trail

Eagleton Park
S.J. Kellner Boulevard
Beverly Hills
Jogging trail (dog walk-
ing allowed on trail)

Ellie Schiller
Homosassa Springs
Wildlife State Park
4150 S. Suncoast Blvd.
Homosassa Springs
352-628-5343
Hiking/nature trail

Floral Park
9530 S. Parkside Ave.
Floral City
Jogging trail (dog
walking allowed on trail)

Flying Eagle Preserve
11080 E. Moccasin
Slough Road
Inverness


Bicycling trails
Hiking

Fort Cooper State Park
3100 S. Old Floral City
Road
Inverness
352-726-0315
Hiking/nature trail

Holden
Community Park
4229 S. Rainbow Drive
Inverness
Jogging trail (dog walk-
ing allowed on trails)

Homosassa Springs
Recreation Park
4210 S. Grandmarch Ave.
Homosassa Springs
Joggin trail

Lecanto Community
Park
3505 W. Educational Path
Lecanto


Jogging trail (dog
walking allowed on trails)

Liberty Park
286 N. Apopka Ave.
Inverness
Bicycling trail
Walking trail

Potts Preserve
2988 N. Hooty Point
Inverness
Bicycling trails
Hiking

Two Mile Prairie
7160 N. Lecanto Hwy.
Hernando
Hiking trails

Water Tower Park
4 Laurenshire St.
Beverly Hills
Jogging trail (dog
walking allowed on trail)


Wallace Brooks Parks
328 E. Dampier St.
Inverness
Pedestrian loop

Whispering Pines Park
Forest Drive
Inverness
Mountain bike trail
Nature trails
Dog-walking trail

Withlacoochee Bay
Trail/Felburn Park
Trailhead
U.S. 19 just south of the
Cross Florida Barge
Canal Bridge
352-447-1720
www.floridagreenways
andtrails.org
Paved trail

Withlacoochee State
Forest
157,479 total acres in
four counties


Saturday, February 25, 2012 G9


Hiking trails
Bicycling trails

Withlacoochee
State Trail
Trailhead can be
accessed at the
following locations:
- Off U.S. 41, turn west
on South Citrus Springs
Boulevard approximately
one-quarter mile on left,
Citrus Springs
- North Apopka Avenue,
go left approximately
3/10 of a mile and look
for kiosk, Inverness
- County Road 48,
Floral City
- U.S. 41 and County
Road 486, Hernando
Hiking trail
Walking trail
Mountain biking trail
Biking trail


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G10 Saturday February 25, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


OUTDOORS IN CITRUS


-Paddle sports -


Auxiliary offers


new Paddlesports


America program


Kayak, canoe
challenge is March 24
The fourth annual Withla-
coochee Wilderness Kayak and
Canoe Challenge will begin at 10
a.m., Saturday, March 24.
Winding River Park on River-
side Drive in Yankeetown will be


the launch site for the paddle
downriver to find clues and an-
swer questions.
Registration fee received be-
fore March 17 is $25. After
March 17, registration will be
$30 per person and will be at the
launch site only (9 to 9:30 a.m.).
Fee includes entry, hat, (guaran-


teed only for pre-registration),
fruit, water and homemade lunch.
For registration forms, rally
routes and directions, visit
www.warinconline.com, email
warinc.directors@gmail.com, or
call Jack Schofield at
352-447-6152 or Jenny
McCarthy at 352-447-2199.


Canoeists and kayakers are boaters,
too.
Now there is a new program available
to address the unique needs of this audi-
ence. Homosassa Flotilla 15-4 of the
U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary offers Pad-
dlesports America, an exciting safety
program designed to attract the novice
paddle enthusiasts. This four-hour pro-
gram presents five chapters of safety
information.


Topics include
Know Your Paddlecraft parts of a
canoe and kayak; understanding paddle-
craft characteristics such as basic types,
hull shapes hull materials, lengths and
widths and weights; selecting your pad-
dle for both canoe and kayak.
Before You Get Underway knowing
your paddlecraft's capacity and how to
file a float plan; transporting your pad-
dlecraft; conducting a pre-departure
check; dressing for a safe trip; loading
gear in a canoe or kayak; storing paddle
craft; the responsibilities when paddling
with others.
Operating Your Boat Safely how to
enter and exit a canoe or kayak safely;
securing the paddlecraft and sharing the
waterways with others; the U. S. Aids to
Navigation System (ATONS); learning
about local hazards on waterways.
The Legal Requirements of Boating -
vessel registration, hull identification
numbers and who may operate a paddle-
craft; unlawful operation of paddlecraft;
Homeland Security restrictions; policies
on alcohol and drugs. Life jackets; navi-
gation lights; sound-producing devices
and visual distress signals; protection of
environment and what to do if in a boat-
ing accident. State specific information
may be added at the end of this chapter.
Boating emergencies ... What to Do -
minimizing the risk of drowning, capsiz-
ing, swamping or falling overboard;
emergency techniques; how to deal with


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35 -i,;!-.,' 1t,I El.ilnc hll .ind.i .it .S '-

The auxililay Can u e ilen and wlumen
of every age. It is the volunteer arm of
the U.S. Coast Guard. Call Bob Currie
at 352-232-1516 or emailrgcurrie
" illIItulli nct


Dragon Boat Festival is March 17
N.irtuic ( ,.,rl lDi. ,Ii Bt,.il ( lulh \ Ill pic.- FtI Imloic 1
cnt it tliiih J ui l [)i. 'iin Btiul Fcirrial iniii'triii n.iir,
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c'\. cL 'cd ,r ct, l pcc .i,.lni l tlh lhoc l C.iii N.iltulC
l\ lil,, i \ i< i .ill tIIlCC C% ctll- la.u t ',c.ii ( it,.l-
Little Biuvwn Jug touplhuc ale awaidcd to Diagun
winners in each event, as well as an overall Boat Club,
festival winner. The jugs are reported to be visit www.meetup.com/Nature-Coast-
from the old Yulee Sugar Mill Plantation. Dragon-Boat-Canoe-and-Kayak/.







Saturday February 25, 2012 Gil


Boating safety-


Charting

course

offered

The U.S. Coast Guard Aux-
iliary Homosassa Flotilla 15-4
will offer a course in charting
for the boating public.
This course will explain the
importance of having a nauti-
cal chart aboard recreational
boats. The course also will
provide participants with the
knowledge and skills to inter-
pret nautical charts, identify
navigational hazards, plot po-
sitions and courses, and use
charts to navigate local coastal
waters.
This program will be of-
fered on Tuesday, May 15, and
Thursday, May 17, from 7 to 9
p.m. at the West Citrus Com-
munity Center, 8940 Veterans
Drive in Homosassa.
The cost will be $20. Bring
sharp pencils, eraser, compass,
straight-edge ruler and two
right angle triangles (or a
rolling straight edge).
For more information, or to
sign up, call Elaine Miranda at
352-564-2521 or Rusty Hays
at 352-598-4369.



Boat Ramps
Barge Canal Boat Ramp
U.S. 19, Crystal River
Access to Gulf of Mexico
Chassahowitzka
River Campground
8600 W. Maggie Drive, Homosassa
Access to the Chassahowitzka River
and the Gulf of Mexico
Duval Island
7790 S. Duval Island Drive,
Floral City
Access to Floral City Lake
East Riverside Drive
3997 E. Riverside Drive, Dunnellon
Access to the Withlacoochee River


-.. .
-lop,.
-. _oa... Safely -or m -v -- -l -b
- - -_ -- - - "- --
Abu B..--ti Safely p


About Boating Safely program available


The United States Coast
Guard Auxiliary, Homosassa
Flotilla 15-4, will conduct a two
session About Boating Safely
program on Saturdays, April 14
and April 21, from 9 a.m.
to 1 p.m.
This safe boating class will be
taught at the West Citrus Com-
munity Center, 8940 Veterans
Drive in Homosassa.
Subjects covered will include
knowledge of your boat, boating
preparation, how to navigate on
the waterways, safe vessel oper-
ation, the legal requirements,


Eden Park
614 Park Lake Terrace, Inverness
Access to Lake Spivey and Lake Davis
Fort Island Gulf Beach
16000 W. Fort Island Trail,
Crystal River
Access to Crystal River, Salt River
and the Gulf of Mexico
Fort Island Trail Park
12703 W. Fort Island Trail
Access to Crystal River, Salt River
and the Gulf of Mexico
Hernando Beach
3650 E. Lake Place, Hernando
Access to Lake Hernando


both federal and state. Also in-
cluded will be information on
boating emergencies/what to do,
carbon monoxide dangers and
hypothermia warnings.
At the completion of this pro-
gram, the student will receive a
certificate of completion, a safe
boating card and the knowledge
and information for safe boating
to truly enjoy the waters.
Total cost is $30.
For more information or to
sign up for this class call Rusty
Hayes at 352-598-4369
or Elaine Miranda at


Homosassa
Public Boat Ramp
South Cherokee Way
Access to Homosassa River
Mason Creek Boat Ramp
6891 S. Mason Creek Road,
Homosassa
Access to Mason Creek and
Homosassa River
North Apopka Boat Ramp
420 N. Apopka Ave., Inverness
Access to Lake Henderson
Ozello Community Park
410 N. Pirate Point, Crystal River
Access to Gulf of Mexico
Pete's Pier
S.W. First Place, Crystal River


352-564-2521.
The auxiliary is very active in
assisting the U.S. Coast Guard
with promoting homeland secu-
rity, public instruction of safe
boating, vessel safety exams,
safety patrols on the rivers and
coastal waters, search/rescue
and law enforcement air patrols
and many other activities.
Flotilla 15-4 is always looking
for dedicated persons with inter-
est in the above endeavors.
To join call Rusty Hays at
352-598-4369, or email
rhayslfla@aol.com


Access to Crystal River, Salt River
and Gulf of Mexico
Trails End
12300 E. Trail's End Road
Floral City
Access to Withlacoochee River
Turner Camp
9460 E. Turner Camp Road
Inverness
Access to Withlacoochee River
Withlapopka Community
10851 Gobbler Drive, Floral City
Access to Withlacoochee River
44 East Boat Ramp
1025 State Road 44, Inverness
Access to Lake Henderson


Crystal River

Sail and

Power Squadron
The local chapter of a 99-year-old
nationwide boating organization on
Third Avenue in Crystal River invites
boaters to its boating education activi-
ties and the active social and boating
events.
Monthly meetings are at the Crystal
River Sail and Power Squadron build-
ing, 845 N.E. Third Ave., Crystal
River, on the second Tuesday of each
month, at 7 p.m. Just come and intro-
duce yourself or call Betty Mula at
352-794-3008.

Education program
Saturday seminars, 3 hours
March 24 Trailering
April 21 Emergencies at sea
Other courses
America's Boating Course, a two-day
training program on basic boating skills
-April 28 and May 15 -
Weather, eight two-hour classes on the
study of weather Tuesday mornings -
Starting March 6 -
Call Bob Purcell at 352-795-7312

Vessel safety check
Anew boating season is beginning.
All boats must meet federal and state
requirements for safety equipment:
Squadron boaters will be available at
the Fort Island boat ramp to assist in
checking the equipment on your boat
from 8 a.m. to noon Feb. 25, March
10, March 24, April 14 and April 28.


I ne crystal Kiver baii
and Power Squadron
building is at 845 N.E.
Third Ave., Crystal River.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


OUTDOORS IN CITRUS





G12 Saturday February 25, 2012


LG ''


EAIER OF EVERYT1H1A

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pI & 3rd CAMO "'. '
PM VO %:,ns Lu
Fee Place Pay II: *II A n GL
detaill Outs!! *P,10 *il Mi,', ,14 Yonionoih
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DON'T SETTLE FOR BOX STORE nu,,ne
-OR PAWN SHOP SERVICE iJ


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OUTDOORS IN CITRUS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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