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Citrus County chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02685
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 02-19-2012
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:02685

Full Text


Lefty hangs on: Mickelson takes wild ride into share lead /B2


C CITRUS COUNT TY' E


TODAY & Monday morning
HIGH Line of showers to pass,
75 then clearing and windy.
LOW PAGE A4
47
FEBRUARY 19, 2012


HRONICLt
www.chronicleonline.com
SBest CommunityL Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community $1


Stay issued
in CMH case
An appeals court
judge late Friday is-
sued a stay in the
Citrus Memorial hos-
pital case. The stay
is in effect until
Feb. 29, when the
court will decide to
extend the stay or let
the Citrus Memorial
hospital law take
effect.
The stay means
the Citrus County
Hospital Board can-
not immediately
cease control of the
hospital foundation
board of directors.
The foundation is ap-
pealing Leon County
Ciruict Court Judge
Jackie Fulford's rul-
ing that the new law
giving CCHB
trustees overright of
the hospital is consti-
tutional. Fulford ear-
lier Friday denied the
foundation's request
for a stay.
Both boards are
trying to schedule
special meetings this
week to plan their
next move.
-From staff reports

BUSINESS:
Made in China
Chinese officials face a
conflict of law vs.
business in the fight
over iPads./Page D1


Prison issue
The Florida Senate
slams the door on
private prisons.
/Page Cl

OPINION:
The
consumers and
taxpayers of
Citrus County
are concerned
about
high-quality
medical care
at an
affordable
price.


HOMEFRONT:


Honoring wounded warriors


Annual Purple Heart Ceremony

recognizes veterans 'sacrifices


SHEMIR WILES
Staff Writer

CRYSTAL RIVER With
heads hung mournfully, the
families of local fallen he-
roes stood staunchly while
the sweet sound of "Amazing
Grace" brought many to tears
Saturday at the Florida Na-
tional Guard Armory
Hundreds of veterans,


.... For more
photos, click
on this story at
www.chronicle
online.com.
local dignitaries and sup-
porters filled the venue for
the seventh annual Purple
Heart Ceremony hosted by
the Aaron A. Weaver
See Page A5


Anthony
Nicholsen, adju-
tant, left front,
and Washington
Sanchez, com-
mander, Depart-
ment of Florida
Military Order of
the Purple
Heart, right
front, joined
hands with local
veterans Satur-
day in the
seventh annual
Purple Heart
Ceremony.
DAVE SIGLER/
Chronicle


CITRUS


Will port save the day?






create economic --

stability

Editor's note: The Chroni- ,
cle is examining the Port Cit-
rus project each Sunday in '
February Today's segment
visits the Port of Port St. Joe
in the Panhandle.
- _ _. . .
MIKE WRIGHT
Staff Writer
PORT ST JOE When the
paper mill closed in 1998,
this Panhandle city had a
collective heart attack.
The town's largest em-
ployer by far, the closing
eliminated more than 800
jobs. Its impact spread far-
ther: The paper mill was the
largest property taxpayer,
the largest user of natural .
gas, the largest electric util- .
ity customer.
"It was the largest every-
thing," Mayor Mel Magidson
Jr said. "We went from a '.- ,
county with very low unem- MIKE WRIGHT/Chronicle
ployment to the highest The Port of Port St. Joe, foreground, is vacant along the Gulf County Canal off the Gulf of Mexico. Officials believe
See Page A10 they are close to getting their first tenant.


SUNDAY, FEB. 5
* Original port plans along
the Cross Florida Barge
Canal
* Port Putnam was cre-
ated in 1967 and still
operates today
* The 1969 Port Citrus
feasibility study
SUNDAY, FEB. 12
* Port Citrus so far:
"Trans-sea lifters" to
Port Authority
* Public perception of the
port project
* Panama Canal
expansion impact


TODAY
* Panhandle town makes
go of port
* Impact of port in one
community
* Map of Florida seaports.

SUNDAY, FEB. 26
* Logistics of Port Citrus
site: road, rail, water
* Fit with "Hollinswood
Harbor"?
* Reaction from officials,
residents
* What's next for Port
Citrus?


Residents look to port for jobs
MIKE WRIGHT
Staff Writer
PORT ST JOE It's a
lament that many small com-
munities face.
Children grow up, gradu-
ate high school, attend col-
lege and leave home for good
because there are no oppor-
tunities to make a living.
Charlotte Faircloth knows
all about that. The 21-year-
old Port St. Joe resident
knows many friends who MIKE WRIGHT/Chronicle
don't want to leave, but feel
they have no choice. Both Lena Hunt, right, a stylist at Kelly Rene Hair
So count Faircloth as a big Studio, and her customer, Charlotte Faircloth, say
the Port of Port St. Joe has the potential for new
S,-- Page A10 jobs in the area.


IBotanica
Botanical


F 'Grandmother' Eloise Van Ness dies at 89


Is


Bring in spring with
nature-inspired
prints./HomeFront


Annie's Mailbox ......A14
Classifieds .............D5
Crossword ..............A14
Ed itorial............. ........ C 2
Entertainment ..........B6
Horoscope ...............B6
Lottery Numbers ......B4
Lottery Payouts ........ B6
Movies .................. A16
Obituaries ................A6
Together................ A16


6 !11111 0 IJ!7l o


Celebration oflife takes place today in Hernando


NANCY KENNI
Staff Writer


INVERNESS


1 lia

Eloise
Van Ness


EDY
l o's l,
Eloise


Van Ness
was more at
home on a
horse than
any place
else, her fa-
vorite being
an Arabian
stallion she
named
"Rookie."


As a young girl growing
up in Inverness, off Turner
Camp Road on Cato Lake,


she rode to schi
horseback.
Later, when she r
rancher husband ev
called Mr. Mike, she
in with the life, rid
open ranges of rura
County.
Decades ago, she
Ease's Rough Ride
horse club and volui
with 4-H for 49 years
ing generations of ki


, to ride and how to live.
- A1 And if there are horses in
j / heaven, Eloise Van Ness is
S already saddled up.
Eloise Tindale Van Ness,
ool on much-loved local treasure
whom many called "Grand-
net her mother," died Feb. 14. She
everyone was 89.
fit right Hal Porter, Citrus County
ing the Fair Board manager, re-
1 Citrus called the first time he saw
her. She was driving cattle
started down U.S. 41 to Eden Drive
ers 4-H in Inverness. Being just a
steered boy he shouted, "Look!
, teach- There's a real cowgirl!"
ids how See Page A2


' ,.


V

.^


I


117 ISSUE 196


PORT


Eloise
Tindale Van
Ness
participates
in a
Hernando
Cattle Drive
in 2008.
Van Ness, a
much-loved
local
treasure
whom many
called
"Grand-
mother,"
died Feb.
14. She
was 89.
Chronicle file


.~ss!
~ 3r
'If k;
l,,c~





A2 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2012


Veterans Court headed POSTSCRIPT
Continued from Page Al


AUDRA D.S. BURCH
The Miami Herald

FORT LAUDERDALE
- After all these decades,
Chief Judge Peter Wein-
stein still remembers the
soldier.
Weinstein had served
with him in the U.S. Army
at Fort Gordon in Augusta,
Ga., in the beginning of the
1970s, as the Vietnam War
raged overseas. But by the
time the soldier was dis-
charged, he was an alco-
holic, his rank reduced
several levels, his future
uncertain. He was, in
many ways, the prototype
of the kind of veteran the
judge now hopes to help
with the upcoming
Broward County Veteran's
Court: perhaps troubled
or misguided, but deserv-
ing of help back to a stable
life.
"He had such a severe
issue with alcohol that he
once passed out on duty,
and ended up being dis-
charged. I tried to get him
help, but by that time it
was just too late. I can't
imagine what his civilian
life was like," says Wein-
stein, a former Florida
state senator who served
as a legal officer in the
Army. "I have thought of
him often as we planned
this court. Someone like
him could have benefitted
from this kind of pro-
gram."
Led by Weinstein, the
17th Judicial Circuit Court
of Florida is forming a Vet-
eran's Court division in
Broward, designed to pro-
vide rehabilitative serv-
ices to veterans facing
criminal charges. The


hope, much like drug
courts, is that vets can
avoid jail or prison
through comprehensive,
court-monitored programs
that address the underly-
ing issues, which are often
related to post traumatic
stress disorders.
The opening is part of a
larger movement to help
vets across Florida. Legis-
lation that would allow the
establishment of separate
courts for veterans was
unanimously passed in
House Appropriations
Committee. The chief
judge in each judicial cir-
cuit would be allowed -
but not required to cre-
ate a vet court. Two similar
bills are making their way
through the Senate.
"We just wanted to make
sure the state was aligned
so we can open vet courts
if needed for vets here and
those soldiers returning.
We need to recognize the
stress of the battlefield
and help them rather than
lock them up in jail and
throw away the key. We
want to make sure they get
the assistance they need
without letting them off
the hook," says Rep. Dar-
ren Soto, D-Kissimmee.
"The vet courts already in
Palm Beach and Miami-
Dade counties would
serve as models."
With its planned
Broward opening this
year, South Florida will
have three courts avail-
able to the region's nearly
287,000 veterans, along
with the thousands of
whom are expected to re-
turn from Iraq and
Afghanistan as the United
States continues its mili-


to Broward County


And that's what she was,
working right alongside her
husband for decades. They
raised livestock, butchered
and ate what they raised,
and gave much of it away -
vegetables from their gar-
den, as well.
The farmhouse she and
Mr. Mike built on Croft Av-
enue where she lived for
more than 60 years always
had an open door, a warm
bed and plenty of chores and
life lessons for anyone who
needed a place to stay
"She was tough, but she
had good things to pass on
about being a real human
being," said nephew Steve
Peterson. "You didn't come
into the house until you
washed your hands on the
back porch and you better
make sure the animals were
fed before you ate."
Niece Midge Tindale grew
up in Tampa but came to In-
verness every chance she
could.
"Theirs was a wonderful,
wonderful house," she said.
"Aunt Eloise was sweet, but
she was feisty. There was a
right way to do things, and
that was her way And she
made the best breakfast in
the entire world huge bis-
cuits that she'd make that
morning, fresh butter that
was just churned and on top
of that, syrup that was made
yesterday and cream right
off the top of the milk
bucket"
Eloise raised three daugh-
ters: Ginger, Ricki and June,
who died in 1979. As a
mother, she taught her girls
to cook and sew and, of
course, ride horses. But she
also taught them about re-
spect and responsibility and
kindness.
"She was always there for
you," said youngest daughter


Ginger Jackson. "She taught
by example how to be a
woman, a mother, a wife and
a grandmother. She was
compassionate, loving, car-
ing and giving."
She was also notoriously
always late, which was un-
derstandable if you knew
how much she accomplished
before many people even got
out of bed in the morning,
said Hal Porter There were
animals to tend to, breakfast
to make, lunches to pack.
"Her work ethic and val-
ues that was a big part of
who she was," Porter said.
"You worked hard, you did it
right, but you had fun, too."
As Porter transitioned
from a 4-H kid to an adult, he
never outgrew his relation-
ship with the woman he
called "Grandmother"
When he was named presi-
dent of the Citrus County
Fair Board in the early
1990s, he asked Eloise to
serve as livestock chairman.
"We needed someone who
was good with people, and
she was," he said.
For Eloise Van Ness, her
life was filled with 4-H, the
rodeo and horse shows. A
few years back, when the
arena at the county fair-
grounds was named after
her, she was made an hon-
orary fair board member
and given a belt buckle, of
which she was extremely
proud.
And she could pop a mean
cow whip.
She led local Christmas
parades on horseback, drove
a school bus, served with
many local organizations


SERVICE MONDAY
* A celebration of life
service for Eloise Van
Ness will take place at
2 p.m. Monday, Feb.
20, at the Eloise Van
Ness Arena at the Cit-
rus County fairgrounds.
A processional "honor
ride" to the cemetery
on Windmill Drive off
U.S. 41 between Inver-
ness and Hernando is
planned for after the
service. Meet at the
arena with horses sad-
dled, loaded on your
trailer and ready to ride
before the service.
Those who will not be
at the service but want
to take part, be sad-
dled up and ready to
ride at 2:30 p.m. at
BR's Feed & Western in
Inverness. Walkers are
also welcome.
Youths under 16 riding
horses are required to
wear helmets and
those in 4-H are asked
to wear their 4-H attire.
(For information, call
Angie at 352-697-2551
or Michele at 352-212-
5097.

and earned many honors
and accolades. Up until two
years ago, she rode in the an-
nual cattle drive as part of
the Hernando Southern
Heritage Days.
She was a lifelong mem-
ber of the First United
Methodist Church in Inver-
ness, read her Bible every
day and kept a journal, writ-


Citrus County's











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(EQ


Parties

Proms

Weddings


For advertising
information
UL ou ru,., tynne UL


aue 3urua nne ut i
564-2917 or 563-5992







Citrus County



HIGH-SPEED INTERNET



0 mainstreet


mainstreetbb.com
OOOALPE


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888-807-FAST (3278)


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

ing in it every day.
For many years she at-
tended cowboy church on
Thursday nights in Williston
with her daughter Ginger
and granddaughter Terry
Johnston.
"She was a godly example
for us to follow," Johnston
said. "Their marriage was a
godly example of marriage...
She taught me how to ride
and instilled in me that you
always do your best, as if
you're doing it for God."
"When I was too young for
regular 4-H, I remember
being hand-in-hand with my
grandmother at 4-H meet-
ings and events," said grand-
daughter Wendy Gregory "I
remember trailriding with
her and working cows with
her ... She was very awe-
some. She instilled (faith in
Jesus) and molded me into
who I am today"
Grandson James ("Chip-
per") Abbe said, "Simply put,
Grandmother touched a lot
of live, both young and old.
She will forever be in our
hearts and memories. She
once said that my grand-
daddy was a good man, and I
told her a man has to have a
good woman to be a good
man."
Summing up her life, Hal
Porter said, "The legacy she
left and the greatest tribute
to her are the generations of
children she impacted. I'm a
different person for having
known her."
Chronicle reporterNancy
Kennedy can be reached at
nkennedy@chronicle
online.com or 352-564-2927.


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rC4







Page A3 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 19,2012



TATE &


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Around
THE STATE

Tallahassee

PEF's settlement
agreement hearing set
The Florida Public Service
Commission (PSC) will con-
duct a hearing beginning
Monday, Feb. 20, and contin-
uing Wednesday, Feb. 22, if
needed, to consider the
Progress Energy Florida
(PEF) Settlement Agreement.
The agreement seeks to re-
solve many PEF issues cur-
rently before, or about to be
before, the PSC. Parties to
the agreement include the Of-
fice of Public Counsel, the
Florida Industrial Power Users
Group, the Florida Retail Fed-
eration, White Springs Agricul-
ture Chemicals Inc. and the
Federal Executive Agencies.
The hearing is scheduled
for 1 p.m. Monday, Feb. 20
- or if needed, at 9:30 p.m.
Wednesday, Feb. 22 at
the Betty Easley Conference
Center, Joseph P. Cresse
Hearing Room (Room 148),
4075 Esplanade Way,
Tallahassee. For information,
visit www.florida psc.com or
follow the PSC on Twitter,
@floridapsc.

St. Petersburg

Woman accidentally
shot at church dies
Authorities say a pastor's
daughter accidentally shot in
the head in a Florida church
has died.
The Pinellas County Sher-
iff's Office said 20-year-old
Hannah Kelley died Saturday
at a hospital. An autopsy is
pending.
Kelley had been hospital-
ized since Sunday when she
was struck in the head by a
bullet at her father's Grace
Connection Church in St.
Petersburg.
Investigators have said Moi-
ses Zambrana was showing
his gun in a small closet to an-
other church member inter-
ested in buying a firearm.
Zambrana reportedly removed
the magazine from the Ruger
9mm weapon, but did not
know a bullet remained in the
chamber. The gun went off, fir-
ing a bullet through a wall. No
charges have been filed.


Ocala


Ice cream shop in
controversy closes
Notoriety over a costumed
ice cream cone mascot mis-
taken by passersby for a Ku
Klux Klan protestor appar-
ently did not result more cus-
tomers for a Florida ice
cream shop.
The Ocala Star Banner re-
ported Saturday the Ice
Cream Family Comer & Sand-
wiches had closed for good.
The shop closed for roof
repairs just before Christmas
but never reopened.
-From staff and wire reports


Campaign TRAIL

Ron Kitchen, Republi-
can for county commission
District 1, will meet the public
from 7:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Sat-
urday, Feb. 25, at the Inver-
ness Flea Market inside the
Jacobs Building at the Citrus
County Fairgrounds.
Angela Vick, Republi-
can for clerk of courts, will
speak at the Women's Politi-
cal Network of Citrus County
meeting at 6:30 p.m. Tues-
day, Feb. 21, at the Citrus
County Resource Center,
2804 Marc Knighton Court,
off C.R. 491 in Lecanto.
Sandra "Sam" Himmel,
Democrat for Citrus County
superintendent of schools, will
have a fundraiser from 4 to 6
p.m. Saturday, Feb. 25, at Cit-
rus County Builders Associa-
tion, 1196 S. Lecanto
Highway, Lecanto. Informa-
tion: Debbie at 352-726-3181.
The Campaign Trail is a
listing of political happenings
for the 2012 election season.
Send events or campaign
fund-raisers to Mike Wright at
mwright@chronicleonline.
com.


Restructure fixes pay inequity


CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff Writer
Confirmation of administrative
staff reorganization last week re-
solved one woman's pay discrepancy
"You have the one female depart-
ment director who is making ap-
proximately, on average, $20,000 less
than her male counterpart of simi-
lar longevity, similar duties, similar
responsibilities and similar number
of employees supervised," said
County Attorney Richard Wesch,
speaking in support of County Ad-
ministrator Brad Thorpe's revised
senior staff structure at Tuesday's
meeting of the Citrus County Board
of County Commissioners (BOCC).
"I've conferred with Mr Wesch,
I've conferred with Sherry Ander-
son (human resources director) and
I can tell you that it's my responsi-
bility to make it equitable and so
therefore I'm giving her a compen-
sation that's equal to her male
counterparts," Thorpe said.
With BOCC approval Tuesday,
Ken Frink, director of public works,
and Cathy Pearson, community
services director, both became as-
sistant county administrators on
equal pay: $99,500 per annum, an


I can tell you that it's my
responsibility to make
it equitable.
Brad Thorpe
county administrator, speaking about
Cathy Pearson, community services director.


increase of at least $20,000 for Pear-
son. Each of the assistant county ad-
ministrator roles will assume
significant additional responsibili-
ties while maintaining their current
primary responsibility within their
respective departments.
"I would like to note specifically for
Ms. Pearson there has been a large
disparity in the compensation pack-
age for her since she has been here
relative to the male counterparts in
her area," Thorpe said. "I'm gonna fix
that And I realize that is the majority
of the compensation increase for this
organizational change."
Frink's and Pearson's department
assistants, Deputy Public Works Di-
rector Larry Brock and Operations
Manager for Community and Recre-
ational Programs Amy Engelken
also get raises for their new support
roles as assistant public works di-


rector and assistant community
services director Salary increases
will be taken from the salary of
about $110,000 set aside for a
deputy county administrator, a po-
sition that has been vacant for eight
months. Thorpe said his plan saved
about $80,000.
No blame was laid for the big pay
gap.
"When I asked Mr Thorpe why
this transpired, his only response -
to his credit was it was the system
he inherited," Wesch said.
With his new structure, Thorpe
would no longer have direct super-
vision of 12 department heads, but
still would have the office of man-
agement and budget report to him
directly as a primary responsibility
to develop the county's budget
Frink will be at the Lecanto Gov-
ernment Building, while Pearson's


e is in the Citrus County Re-
ce Center, two of county gov-
nent's biggest building with
t of its employees.
believe these two positions will
ide a balance between commu-
and social programs and facili-
and infrastructure," Thorpe
"We saw evidence of that when
e two people worked together
Ive the Hernando School prob-
You had Ken Frink's depart-
t working on the facilities and
infrastructure of that school and
had Cathy Pearson work on the
al programs of occupants of that
ol. I was very pleased the way
resolved itself. And I've seen
r actions by both of them to re-
e other similar issues like the
erly Hills rec center"
*arson and Frink also will help
pare BOCC agendas and attend
fing sessions.
)mmissioner J.J. Kenny made
notion to approve the reorgan-
on and was seconded by Com-
ioner Dennis Damato. It was
led by a unanimous vote.
ironicle reporter Chris Van
er can be reached at
normer@chronicleonline. com
52-564-2916.



Students


raise


funds for


Ugandan


refugees

SHEMIR WILES
Staff Writer

LECANTO A group of
Lecanto High School Inter-
national Baccalaureate (IB)
students presented a $645
check Friday morning to the
woman who inspired their
fundraising efforts.
Dr Jody Lynn Brien, a
tenured professor at the
University of South Florida
in Sarasota/Manatee, spoke
to the group of IB students
recently about her work in
Uganda.
Brien spends half of the
year in the war-affected
African nations of Ghana
and Uganda teaching and
aiding victims of the Ugan-
dan civil war
Her current work in-
volves doing research for a
book she plans to publish
about the Joseph Kony's
Lord's Resistance Army and
how it affected the people of
northern Uganda.
Chandni Patel, 16, said
she was so moved from
Brien's presentation and
her work in advocating for
human rights and social jus-
tice, she and a number of IB
students decided to sell
handmade Ugandan crafts
Brien provided to them dur-
ing the Florida Manatee
Festival to raise money for
the widows and youths in
Uganda.
"I was just really inter-
ested in helping," Patel said
about spearheading the
fundraising campaign, "and
I know it will help a lot."
Brien expressed thanks to
the group and explained the
money would go a long way
in Uganda. For example,
with just $20, she said a fam-
ily could buy groceries for
two weeks. And a school
uniform cost $5.
The money will be given
to the two groups that pro-
vided the crafts for the stu-
dents to sell Children of
Hope Uganda (COHU) and
Te Cwao.
Brien said she was so
pleased with what the stu-
dents took the initiative to
do.
"They've done a better job
than what I did on my own,"
she said. "The students just
rallied."
But the fundraising does-
n't stop there. Patel said she
and other IB students would
have a booth at the upcom-
ing Strawberry Festival,
where they hope to raise
$1,000.


Chronicle reporterShemir
Wiles can be reached at 352-
564-2924 or si' ues.
chronicleonline. com.


Associated Press

MIDDLEBURG Nine deputies
investigating a tip about a meth lab at
north Florida home acted "by the
book" in a shootout that left a detec-
tive and a suspect dead and another
detective wounded, a sheriff said.
No one should have been staying at
the Middleburg home where Clay
County deputies approached Thurs-
day evening, Sheriff Rick Beseler
said Friday at a news conference.
The sheriff's office said Ted Arthur
Tilley answered when deputies
knocked, then opened fire on them.
Tilley, 36, was fatally shot as he fled
out the back of the house.
Detective David White, 35, died en
route to the hospital after the


shootout Detective Matthew Hanlin,
37, was recovering Saturday from a
gunshot wound to the arm, The
Florida Times-Union reported.
The Florida Department of Law
Enforcement is investigating.
Beseler said he's not sure which or
how many deputies fired back at
Tilley
"Everything they did last night was
by the book. They wore all their pro-
tective gears. They followed all the
proper protocols," Beseler said.
"Someone that was intent on hurting
them made this happen."
The homeowner had given deputies
permission to enter, Beseler said.
Electricity to the home had been cut
off, but squatters had run an extension
cord from a nearby house for power


"They had no right to be there,"
seler said.
Five others in the house were q
tioned. A 16-year-old from Valdc
Ga., was charged with felony c
possession for having meth in
pocket, the sheriff's office said.
Tilley's criminal history inclu
multiple arrests, including charge
drug possession and resisting an
cer, according to court records.
White, who was married with
young children, was a nine-year
eran of the sheriff's office, as wel
an Army veteran.
"He was just one of the finest
cers and military men that I've e
met," Beseler said. "He was jus
unbelievably nice individual thai
will sorely miss."


FAMU police records show hazing complaints


Associated Press

ORLANDO Docu-
ments show Florida A&M
University police investi-
gated at least 10 complaints
about hazing involving the
school's famed marching
band between August 2007
and November, when a
band member died after
being hazed, the Orlando
Sentinel reported Saturday
The newspaper reported
it received the campus po-
lice documents through a
public records request.
Among the documents is
a complaint from former
FAMU student Bria Shante
Hunter days before alleged
hazing ceremonies Oct. 31
and Nov 1 left her with a
broken leg. Three students
have been charged with
hazing Hunter
Hunter told campus po-
lice that she complained to


a band employee during a
band trip to South Carolina
around Oct. 22 about being
"battered" earlier in the se-
mester during an initiation
by a group affiliated with
the band, the documents
show.
Chuck Hobbs, an attorney
for longtime band director
Julian White, said that if
the employee heard a com-
plaint about hazing, he
should have reported it.
"Protocol dictates that
band staff, upon receiving
reports of hazing, are re-
quired to report them to Dr
White, who immediately re-
ports any alleged incidents
to FAMU police," Hobbs
said.
White was not informed
of any hazing involving
Hunter until her parents
contacted him about her in-
juries in November, Hobbs
said.


White is on administra-
tive leave.
The documents detail
hazing Marching 100 band
members reported in the
years before Robert Cham-
pion died in November Au-
thorities are still
investigating Champion's
death on a charter bus dur-
ing a band trip to Orlando.
On Aug. 25, 2007, the
mother of a clarinet player
complained to campus po-
lice that her daughter was
hospitalized after being hit
with a clothes hanger and
other items during band
practice, according to the
documents.
It's unclear whether any-
one was disciplined for that
incident. Later that month,
after a freshman reported
being hit on the elbows with
the metal portion of a musi-
cal instrument's mouth-
piece, two seniors were


suspended from the band,
and two people were later
arrested, the records show.
One man was charged
with battery after allegedly
hitting another student
twice in the face on Sept.
18,2007, calling him a racial
slur and demanding that he
quit the band, the records
show.
The documents show that
one campus police investi-
gation was prompted by a
letter from FAMU Presi-
dent James Ammons' office
in late 2007. The result of
that investigation was not
available.
After Champion's death,
Hobbs wrote Ammons a let-
ter stating that hazing had
been met with "reckless in-
difference by White's supe-
rior officers who often
ignored his requests for as-
sistance," according to the
records.


Ozello Chili Cook-off


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
The pavilion was packed with people tasting the chili Saturday at the Ozello Chili Cook-off at the community park
on the community. Andrew Bolash tastes a sample of chili while others rate one of the 20 or more chili recipes
entered into the competition.




Sheriff: Deputies acted properly in fatal raid






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Arrests
William Frank Nimnicht,
23, of 330 W. Liberty St., Her-
nando, at 12:26 p.m. Tuesday on
an active Citrus County warrant
for a failure to appear on an orig-
inal felony charge of theft of a
firearm. No bond.
KrystalA. Spindler, 26, of 65
S. Davis St., Beverly Hills, at 9:23
a.m. Tuesday on felony charges of
grand theft, traffic or endeavor to
traffic in stolen property and pro-
viding false information to a pawn-
broker. According to Spindler's
arrest report, she was released on
her own recognizance.
James Richard Spindler
Jr., 26, of 4229 N. Fillmore St.,
Beverly Hills, at 9:23 a.m. Tues-
day on felony charges of burglary
of an unoccupied residence,
grand theft, traffic or endeavor to
traffic in stolen property and pro-
viding false information to a
pawnbroker. Bond $35,000.
Amy Helena Gerhardt, 25,
of 3493 Van Nuys Loop, New
Port Richey, at 3:46 p.m. Tues-
day on an active Pasco County
warrant for a violation of proba-
tion on an original felony charge
of grand theft. No bond.


Anthony Creig Ballard,
39, of 5600 S. Oakridge Drive
Lot B, Homosassa, at 3:38 p.m.
Wednesday on an active Citrus
County warrant for a failure to
appear on an original felony
charge of forgery/obtain a con-
trolled substance. No bond.
Richard B. Adams Jr., 50,
of 7313 W. Rosedale Drive, Ho-
mosassa, at 6 p.m. Wednesday
on a misdemeanor charge of
petit theft. Bond $250.
Christopher Ryan Oney,
24, of 27026 Colassa Road,
Brooksville, at 7:36 p.m.
Wednesday on a felony charge
of criminal mischief. According to
Oney's arrest report, he was re-
leased on his own recognizance.
HarleyA. Taylor III, 21,of 150
S. SchmidtAve., Inverness, at 7:48
p.m. Wednesday on felony
charges of possession of metham-
phetamine and possession of rox-
icodone and a misdemeanor
charge of possession of drug para-
pheralia. Bond $15,500.
Deborah Elizabeth Lewis,
26, of 2314 S. Covey Terrace,
Inverness, at 7:48 p.m.
Wednesday on a misdemeanor
charge of possession of
cannabis (less than 20 grams).
Bond $500.


Mercury workers gather 50 years after launch


Associated Press

CAPE CANAVERAL -
Veterans of NASAs Project
Mercury reunited Saturday
to celebrate the 50th an-
niversary of John Glenn's
orbital flight, visiting the old
launch pad and meeting the
famed astronaut himself.
The first American to
orbit the Earth thanked the
approximately 125 retired
Mercury workers, now in
their 70s and 80s, who gath-
ered with their spouses at
Kennedy Space Center to
swap stories and pose for
pictures.
"We might have been the
focal point of attention, but
you were all the ones mak-
ing the whole thing possi-
ble," Glenn told the crowd.
Glenn and Scott Carpen-
ter, the only other survivor
of NASAs original Mercury
7 astronauts, spent nearly
an hour being pho-
tographed with the retirees,
posing in front of a black
curtain with a model of a
Mercury-Atlas rocket.
Glenn is 90; Carpenter is 86.


Earlier in the afternoon,
the Mercury brigade trav-
eled by bus to Launch Com-
plex 14. That's the pad from
which Glenn rocketed away
on Feb. 20, 1962.
Some retirees were in
wheelchairs, while others
used walkers or canes. Most
walked, some more surely
than others. But they all
beamed with pride as they
took pictures of the aban-
doned pad and of each
other, and went into the
blockhouse to see the old
Mercury photos on display
and to reminisce.
As retired engineer Norm
Beckel Jr rode to the pad
Saturday, he recalled being
seated in the blockhouse
right beside Scott Carpenter
as the astronaut called out
to Glenn right before liftoff,
"Godspeed John Glenn."
But there's more to the
story
"Before he said that, he
said, 'Remember, John, this
was built by the low bid-
der,"' Beckel, 81, told The
Associated Press.
The Mercury-Atlas rocket


shook the domed bunker-
like structure, although no
one inside could hear the
roar because of the thick
walls.
"Nothing was said by
anybody until they said,
'He's in orbit,' and then the
place erupted," Beckel
recalled.
Beckel and Jerry
Roberts, 78, a retired engi-
neer who also was in the
blockhouse that historic
day, said almost all the
workers back then were in
their 20s and fresh out of
college. The managers
were in their 30s. "I don't
know if I'd trust a 20-year-
old today," Beckel said.
"They don't know it, but
we would have worked for
nothing," said Roberts, who
spends the winter in
Florida.
Bob Schepp, 77, who like
Beckel traveled from St.
Louis, Mo., for the reunion,
was reminded by the old
launch equipment of how
rudimentary everything
was back then.
"I wonder how we ever


managed to launch any-
thing in space with that
kind of stuff," Schepp said.
"Everything is so digital
now. But we were pioneers,
and we made it all work."
The Mercury team in-
cluded women, about 20 of
whom gathered for the an-
niversary festivities. One
pulled aside an Associated
Press reporter to make sure
she knew women were part
of the team.
"Most of the women here
are wives," said Lucy Simon
Rakov, 74. But not her
"We weren't secretaries.
We were mathematicians,"
said Rakov, a pioneering
computer programmer who
traveled from Boston for
the reunion.
Patricia Palombo, 74, also
a computer programmer,
said working on Project
Mercury proved to be the
most significant thing she's
done in her career.
Glenn's flight was the
turning point that put
America on a winning path
that ultimately led to the
moon.


ON THE NET

* For more information about arrests made by the
Citrus County Sheriff's Office, go to www.sheriff
citrus.org and click on the Public Information link,
then on Arrest Reports.
* Also under Public Information on the CCSO website,
click on Crime Mapping for a view of where each type
of crime occurs in Citrus County. Click on Offense Re-
ports to see lists of burglary, theft and vandalism.
* For the Record reports are also archived online at
www.chronicleonline.com.
* The Citrus County Sheriff's Office Volunteer Unit is
comprised of nearly 900 citizens serving Citrus
County. Members come from all walks of life and
bring with them many years of life experience. To
volunteer, call Sgt. Chris Evan at 352-527-3701 or
email cevan@sheriffcitrus.org.


,egal notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle



SCitrus County Division

of Solid Waste ...................................... A10


B id Notices...............................................D7


Miscellaneous Notices............................D7


SSurplus Property......................................D7


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES
City H L F'cast City H
Daytona Bch. 81 49 sh Miami 84
Ft. Lauderdale 87 61 c Ocala 76
Fort Myers 81 56 pc Orlando 81
Gainesville 74 39 ts Pensacola 63
Homestead 85 61 pc Sarasota 76
J,:r.rinvll.e 75 42 ts Tallahassee 72
Key West 82 71 pc Tampa 78
Lakeland 78 52 pc Vero Beach 82
Melbourne 82 55 c W. Palm Bch. 86


MARINE OUTLOOK


HI LO PR HI LO PR
81 64 trace 83 64 trace

THREE DAY OUTLOOK oExcusve day


TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING .
High: 75 Low: 47
.-1 Line of showers pass; then clearing
and windy
MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 68 Low: 47
Mostly sunny

.................................................. TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
High: 75 Low: 55
Partly cloudy

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 73/64
Record 88/23
Normal 74/45
Mean temp. 69
l.p irui,- from mean +9
PRECIPITATION*
7 iur, i 1 0.00 in.
Total for the month 0.37 in.
Total for the year 1.23 in.
Normal for the year 4.89 in.
'As of 6 p.m at Inverness
UV INDEX: 7
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Saturday at 3 p.m. 29.92 in.


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m.
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 61
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:


Oak, juniper, grasses
Today's count: 7.8/12
Monday's count: 9.4
Tuesday's count: 8.6
AIR QUALITY
Saturday was good with pollutants


mainly ozone.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MI
(MORNING)
2/19 SUNDAY 3:11 9:24 3
2/20 MONDAY 3:58 10:10 4


NOR
AFTERN
:37
:22


CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
E0 SUNSET TONIGHT
SUNRISE TOMORROW.
MOONRISE TODAY....
MABCH8 MMllH14 MOONSET TODAY

BURN CONDITIONS


MAJOR
IOON)
9:50
10:34


......6:23 Pi
......7:05 A.
.......5:18 A.


Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For
more information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's
Web site: http://flame.fl-dof.com/fireweather/kbdi

WATERING RULES
Citrus County: Irrigation is limited to twice per week.
Even addresses: Thursday and/or Sunday before 10am or after 4pm.
Odd Addresses: Wednesday and/or Saturday before 10am or after 4pm.
No restrictions on fountains, car washing or pressure washing. Hand watering requires the
use of a shut-off nozzle.
PLEASE CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL NEW PLANT MATERIAL.
Questions, concerns or reporting violations, please call Citrus County 352-527-7669,

TIDES


'From mouths of rivers "At King's Bay
Sunday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 3:13a/12:18p 5:02 p/-
Crystal River" 1:34 a/9:40 a 3:23 p/9:29 p
Withlacoochee* 1:10 p/7:28 a -- 7:17 p
Homosassa" 2:23 a/11:17 a 4:12 p/11:06 p


*"At Mason's Creek
Monday
High/Low High/Lov
4:08 a/12:07 a 5:31 p/12:56
2:29a/10:18 a 3:52 p/1014
12.16 a/8:06 a 1:39 p/8:02
3:18 a/11:55 a 4:41 p/11:51


I

64

o0%


Sui.Uli winds around 15 knots. Seas
'iI.ilijing to 6 to 8 feet. Bay and inland
waters will be rough. Partly to mostly
(Ioud, with showers and thunder-
storms possible today.


Gulf water
temperature



68
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 27.76 27.77 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 33.96 33.96 39.25
Tsala Apopka-Inverness 36.15 36.14 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 37.65 37.64 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level. Flood stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood whicl las a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year. This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management Distct and is subject to revision In no event
will the Distic o Ithe United Slates Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out ol the use of
this data f you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211.

THE NATION

-. P a-Q...

30s 2 I D
S- 2
M. '1 ,edlig 70s4!
40as 0 '50s \' 0 -' -


70S E Pll 50r5 t 7 7s
-.^ 60 60-44.
,,ow 6o _' -
lo s m ,tn
g ._ 1


--5V Juneau
a-os
*30a


* 70s
80s
FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY


Saturday Sunday
H LPcp. Fcst H L


Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
M Burlington. VT
M. Charleston SC
M. Charleston. WV
S Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia. SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, N H.
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
w Nashville


27 .02
29
34
47 17
28
53 1.10
28
26
47 .73
39 .01
34
30 .06
32
41
27
40
30
25
31
38
30
23
46 1.25
14
21
30
30
30
27
34
55 1.89
30
48 167
41
45
47
33
45
27
18
55 1 77
50 1 83
39


Saturday Sunday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
New Orleans 73 57 2.27 pc 62 45
New York City 48 35 .02 pc 47 33
Norfolk 60 42 r 48 33
OklahomaCity 47 39 17 s 55 40
Omaha 38 18 s 43 31
Palm Springs 68 45 pc 65 47
Philadelphia 52 33 rs 43 30
Phoenix 70 45 pc 72 47
Pittsburgh 48 28 c 36 21
Portland ME 43 32 s 37 26
Portland, Ore 47 40 10 pc 46 38
Providence, R. 48 28 s 43 24
Raleigh 65 40 r 44 31
Rapid City 51 10 c 44 27
Reno 54 30 pc 41 22
Rochester. NY 40 24 12 pc 29 19
Sacramento 58 46 pc 59 38
St Louis 46 35 pc 43 27
St Ste Marie 27 19 03 s 30 15
Salt Lake City 47 26 sn 39 26
San Antonio 61 54 1 35 s 66 45
San Diego 60 51 s 61 51
San Francisco 57 50 pc 53 41
Savannah 69 45 ts 72 42
Seattle 43 39 71 sh 45 40
Spokane 40 32 .22 c 39 27
Syracuse 42 24 08 pc 32 19
Topeka 47 27 s 50 34
Washington 59 34 01 r 40 30
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 83 Opa Locka. Fla. LOW -9 Fraser. Colo.

WORLD CITIES


SUNDAY
CITY HIL/SKY
Acapulco 87/72/pc
Amsterdam 42/32/rs
Athens 53/41/pc
:'.: ,,.i 40/24/s
Berlin 42/29/sf
Bermuda 68/67/sh
Cairo 61/44/pc
Calgary 39/18/pc
Havana 86/67/pc
Hong Kong 65/57/pc
Jerusalem 45/35/sh


Lisbon 61/47/s
London 46/31/pc
Madrid 58/31/pc
Mexico City 69/46/pc
Montreal 28/18/s
Moscow 17/3/c
Paris 44/29/pc
Rio 90/71/pc
Rome 56/40/sh
Sydney 81/64/r
Tokyo 43/30/pc
Toronto 32/21/pc
Warsaw 34/29/sn


C I T R U S


F'cast
pc
ts
ts
pc
sh
ts
pc
c
c


For the RECORD


C 0 U N T


LHKON1CLL
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To start your subscription:
Call now for home delivery by our carriers:
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N L :

I Inverness
Courthouse office
To pkins St. square
0 Cn 106 W. Main
St.
41Inverness, FL
S 34450


Who's in charge:
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Tom Feeney .......................................................... Production Director, 563-3275
Kathie Stew art .................................................... Circulation Director, 563-5655
John M urphy ........................ .............................. Online M manager, 563-3255
John Murphy........................................................... Classified Manager, 564-3255
Jeff Gordon .................................................... Business Manager, 564-2908
Mike Arnold.......................................... Human Resources Director, 564-2910
Report a news tip:
Opinion page questions........................................ Charlie Brennan, 563-3225
To have a photo taken .............................................. Darlene Mann, 563-5660
News and feature stories ................................. Sandra Frederick, 564-2930
Community/wire service content.......................... Sarah Gatling, 563-5660
Sports event coverage ................................Jon-Michael Soracchi, 563-3261
S o u n d O ff ............................................................................................................... 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9
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By Citrus Publishing Inc.
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PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL
SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280


*E
FIB. 21 FEB. 29


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
@2012 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


A4 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2012


.


p
P
P
P
p
p
p





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Citrus County families who lost loved ones in the Iraq and Afghanistan wars where honored by the laying of a wreath
Saturday while Marleigh Miller sang "Amazing Grace" during the Seventh Annual Purple Heart Ceremony at the National
Guard Armory in Crystal River.


Gas prices are highest

ever for this time of year


Associated Press

NEW YORK- Gasoline
prices have never been
higher this time of the year.
At $3.53 a gallon, prices
are already up 25 cents
since Jan. 1. And experts
say they could reach a
record $4.25 a gallon by
late April.
The surge in gas prices
follows an increase in the
price of oil.
Oil around the world is
priced differently Brent
crude from the North Sea
is a proxy for the foreign oil
that's imported by U.S. re-
fineries and turned into
gasoline and other fuels. Its
price has risen 11 percent
so far this year, to around
$119 a barrel, because of
tensions with Iran, a cold
snap in Europe and rising
demand from developing
nations. West Texas Inter-
mediate, used to price oil


produced in the U.S., is up
4 percent to around $103 a
barrel. That's 19 percent
higher than a year earlier.
Higher gas prices could
hurt consumer spending
and curtail the recent im-
provement in the U.S.
economy
A 25-cent jump in gasoline
prices, if sustained over a
year, would cost the econ-
omy about $35 billion. That's
only 0.2 percent of the total
U.S. economy, but econo-
mists say it's a meaningful
amount, especially at a time
when growth is only so-so.
Gas prices are already
an issue in the presidential
campaign. Republican can-
didate Newt Gingrich
spoke several times this
week about opening up
more federal land to oil
and gas drilling as a path
toward U.S. energy inde-
pendence and lower
pump prices.


WARRIORS
Continued from Page Al

Chapter 776 Military Order
of the Purple Heart.
The audience included
several elected officials, vet-
erans and supporters who
attended to pay tribute to
military service members
and their sacrifices and to
"commemorate the proud
legacy of the Purple Heart"
The Purple Heart is
awarded to members of the
U.S. military who are
wounded by an instrument
of war in the hands of an
enemy or to the next of kin
in the name of those who
are killed or die of wounds
received in action.
Much recognition was
given to not only local digni-
taries in attendance, but to
other key participants who
contributed to the event,
such as the Nature Coast
Young Marines and the Pa-
triot Guard Riders, who
rode 180 miles to join in the
ceremony
Chapter 776 also gave a
special presentation to Cit-
rus County Tax Collector
Janice Warren for her office
raising more than $40,000
for the benefit of the Citrus
County Veterans Founda-
tion Inc.'s mission of provid-
ing immediate financial
assistance to needy honor-
ably discharged veterans
and their surviving spouses.
"I want to thank the citi-
zens of Citrus County," War-
ren said.
After a rousing patriotic
medley and combination of
service songs performed by
the students of Phantastic
Sounds and the Sunshine
Art Center Chorale under
the direction ofJackie Ste-
vio, Warren returned to the
stage to give a deeply mov-
ing speech about Frances
Scott Key, who penned "The
Star-Spangled Banner."
While describing the
scene at Fort McHenry dur-
ing the Battle of Baltimore,
Warren passionately de-
picted how as dawn broke
on Sept. 14, 1814, Key could
see through the smoke and
haze that the American flag
British forces so desper-
ately wanted to destroy was
still there, waving majesti-
cally above the rampart.
Inspired by the scene,
Warren explained how Key
went on to write what would
later become the National
Anthem.
"The debt was demanded.
The price, it was paid," she
said, "and it continues to be
paid."


WEEKEND LINEUP
OF FEATURES
Get a jump on weekend
entertainment with the
stories in Scene./Fridays
See what local houses
of worship plan to do
for the week in the Reli-
gion section.
/Saturdays
Read about area busi-
nesses in the Business
section./Sundays
Pick up tips for home
improvement, saving
money and cashing in
on antiques in Home-
Front../Sundays
Find out what your
neighbors have to say
in the Sound Off and
letters to the editor in
the Commentary sec-
tion./Sundays


Instead of the usual pres-
entation of the history of the
Purple Heart, Chapter 776
patriot Don Guard decided
to recount the history of the
local Purple Heart
ceremony
Then everyone in the au-
dience joined hands to sing
"God Bless the U.S.A."
Chapter 776 patriots also
honored both living and
fallen veterans, and then in-
vited the families of local
fallen heroes to the stage for
the laying of the wreath in
remembrance of the eight
local patriots that have per-
ished since 2001, which cast



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a somber note on the occa-
sion as 7-year-old Marleigh
Miller crooned "Amazing
Grace."
"There are many true he-
roes in the room. All gave
some. Some gave all. Some
still give," said Chapter 776
alternate executive commit-
teeman, Richard Hunt. "We
must never forget the
fallen."
And as many audience
members silently wept and
wiped away tears, the cere-
mony serenely concluded
with prayers, a stirring rifle
salute and a solemn playing
of "Taps."


Chronicle reporter Shemir
Wiles can be reached at 352-
564-2924 or swiles@
chronicleonline.com.


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SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2012 A5


- --a
a





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries


Terry Allion, 77
INVERNESS
Terry Ray Allion, 77, of In-
verness, Florida, passed
away Thursday, February
16, 2012, at Heron Point
Health & Rehab,
Brooksville, Florida.
Terry was born on April
29, 1934, in Hudson, Michi-
gan, to the late Floyd B. and
Trenna (Terrill) Allion. He
was a construction Superin-
tendent, and a Lutheran.
Terry served his country
honorably in the U.S. Army
during the Korean Conflict.
He arrived in the area in
1993, coming from South
Carolina. Terry was a life
member of the VFW Post
4337, Inverness Florida. He
loved traveling and spend-
ing time with his family
Terry was preceded in
death by one daughter,
Shelly Ann Garrett. Sur-
vivors include his loving
wife of 59 years, Marjorie
Allion; one son, Darryl A.
(Jodi) Allion; one daughter,
Sherry Lee Mittler of Inver-
ness, Florida; eight grand-
children and three
great-grandchildren; and
many nieces and nephews.
A Celebration of Life is
scheduled for Wednesday,
February 22, 2012, 11 a.m. at
the Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home, Inverness, Florida.
The VFW Post 4337, Inver-
ness, will be providing
honor guard services at that
time. In lieu of flowers, the
family has requested dona-
tions be made to Hernando
Pasco Hospice. Chas. E.
Davis Funeral Home with
Crematory, Inverness,
Florida, is in charge of the
arrangements.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.

Lila Webster, 84
HOMOSASSA
Lila S. Webster, 84, of Ho-
mosassa, died Friday, Feb-
ruary 17, 2012, at the HPH
Hospice Care Center in In-
verness, FL.
She was born February 6,
1928, to Orville and Sylvia
Reffelt Sawyer in Green-
wich, CT, and came here 25
years ago from Boynton
Beach, FL. She was a mem-
ber of the Daughters of the
American Revolution.
In addition to her parents,
she was preceded in death
by her husband, William T
Webster. She is survived by
her daughters, Marcia St.
Charles (Dennis) of Palm
Beach Gardens, FL, Karen
Millette (Roger) of Chester-
field, VA, Pamela Frank of
Jacksonville, FL, and Gail
Stokes of Homosassa; sons,
William Webster (Sue) of
Cape Coral, FL, and Todd A.
Webster of Lake Worth, FL;
15 grandchildren; and 4
great-grandchildren.
Private arrangements are
under the direction of
Strickland Funeral Home,
Crystal River, FL.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.

Lois Eckels, 83
HERNANDO
Lois R. Eckels, 83, of Her-
nando, died Thursday, Feb.
16, 2012.
Private cremation
arrangements under the di-
rection of Chas. E. Davis Fu-
neral Home with
Crematory, Inverness.

* Additional days of pub-
lication or reprints due
to errors in submitted
material are charged at
the same rates.


Theresa
Buckley, 81
Theresa Trombly Buckley,
age 81, native of Nashua,
N.H., peacefully died Feb-
ruary 9, 2012, with her
daughters and granddaugh-

side.
She grad-
uated with
the class of
1948 from
Nashua
High School s
and at-
tended the
University Theresa
of New Buckley
Hampshire
where she was a member of
the Chi Omega sorority
Theresa was a member of
the Nashua Country Club,
where she was an avid
golfer and curler. She was a
member of the Good Cheer
Society, and never divulged
the recipe for the famous
caramels to her family She
enjoyed bridge, traveling,
and her friendships. She es-
pecially looked forward to
spending time with her
grandchildren.
Theresa was predeceased
by her husband of 55 years,
George K. Buckley Jr, in
2005; by her sister, Doris
O'Brien; and her parents,
Royal and Lillian( Lessard)
Trombly She is survived by
her daughters and sons-in-
law, Deborah and David
Buxton of Peterborough,
N.H., Nancy and Mark
Ergmann of York, Maine;
her son, George Buckley III
of Crystal River, Florida; a
brother and sister-in-law,
Raymond and Effie
Trombly of Boca Raton,
Florida. She leaves five
grandchildren, Erik and
Jennifer Buxton, Nathan
and Stephen Ergmann, and
George Buckley IV; and her
nieces and nephews.
In lieu of flowers, the fam-
ily has requested that dona-
tions be made to Beacon
Hospice, 42 Brickyard
Court, York, Maine 03909. A
memorial service will be
held at St. Christopher's
Parish, Nashua, N.H., in
April.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.

John
Manion Jr., 88
BEVERLY HILLS
John S. Manion Jr, 88, of
Beverly Hills, died Friday,
Feb. 17, 2012.
National Cremation Soci-
ety is in charge of
arrangements.

Elizabeth
Murray, 94
HERNANDO
Elizabeth T Murray 94,
Hernando, died Friday, Feb.
17, 2012.
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory is in
charge of private cremation
arrangements.




CI. E. avti
Funeral Home
With Crematory
Burial Shipping
Cremation
Member of

G LDEN 4th
.,t, ,, ., 7
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For Information and costs,
00,,0Y4 call 726-8323


Andrea
Coppola, 96
CITRUS SPRINGS
Andrea Coppola, age 96,
Citrus Springs, died Thurs-
day, February 16, 2012,
under the loving care of his
family and
HPH Hos- -
pice.
Andrea
was born on
June 10,
1915, in
Italy to the 4
1 a t e
Francesco Andrea
and Guisep- Coppola
pina (D'Am-
ico) Coppola. He relocated
to this area in 2005 from
New York. Andrea was a
farmer, who enjoyed not
only his work on his land,
but also his animals and
gardening. He was Catholic
by faith.
Survivors include four
children, Francesco (Vitto-
ria) Coppola, Italy, Antonio
(Maria) Coppola, Citrus
Springs, FL, Giuseppina
(Gian Piero) Fanucci, Italy,
and Benedetta Coppola,
Queens, NY; seven grand-
children; and eight great-
grandchildren. He was
preceded in death by his
wife, Angela Galante Cop-
pola; and four sisters, Santa,
Teresa, Leonarda and
Caterina.
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory is in
charge of private
arrangements.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.

Willard
Troxel, 79
INVERNESS
Willard Kolher Troxel, 79,
of Inverness, died Friday,
Feb. 17, 2012.
Private cremation
arrangements under the di-
rection of Chas. E. Davis Fu-
neral Home with
Crematory, Inverness.

FREE OBITUARIES
Free obituaries, run one
day, can include: full
name of deceased;
age; hometown/state;
date of death; place of
death; date, time and
place of visitation and
funeral services.
If websites, photos,
survivors, memorial
contributions or other
information are in-
cluded, this will be a
paid obituary.

0009ZHL

BROWN
FUNERAL HOME
& CREMATORY

Lecant, Florda34451
(352)
795-0111

Richard T Brown
FUNERALDIRECTOR

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FUNERAL HOMES
& CREMATORY
Inverness
Homosassa
Beverly Hills

(352) 726-2271
1-888-746-6737
www.HooperFuneralHome.comj


Bertha
Mercer, 93
DOUGLASVILLE,
GA.
The Service of Remem-
brance for Mrs. Bertha
Hazel Mercer, age 93, of
Douglasville, Georgia, for-
merly of Inverness, will be
held 12 noon, Tuesday, Feb-
ruary 21, 2012, at the Sylvan
Abbey Memorial Park,
Clearwater, FL, with Pastor
Eddie Lamb officiating. In-
terment will follow at the
cemetery Online condo-
lences may be sent to the
family at www.Hooper
FuneralHome.com.
She was born July 18,
1919, in Live Oak, FL,
daughter ofJohn and Bessie
(Brown) Skeen, moved to
Clearwater in 1955, and to
Inverness to 1983 from
there. She died February
15,2012, in Douglasville, GA.
Mrs. Mercer was pre-
ceded in death by parents;
her husband, Clarence Cur-
tis Mercer; a stepson, Clark
Mercer; a brother, WD.
Skeen; and 2 sisters, Lucille
Ward and Merle Smith. Sur-
vivors include her 2 daugh-
ters, Phyllis R. Rogers of
Douglasville, GA, Carol
Corbin of Inverness; step-
daughter, Barbara Joann
Hunt of Clearwater, FL;
brother, Tommy Earl Skeen
of Live Oak, FL; 2 sisters,
Betty Jo Smith and Mary K.
Shelton, both of Clearwater,
FL; 9 grandchildren, Mark
Rogers, Byron Rogers,
Phillip Rogers, Randy
Rogers, Lori Corbin, Debbie
Halstead, Tracy Davis, Greg
Mercer, Jeff Mercer; 13
great-grandchildren; and 4
great-great-grandchildren.
Arrangements are under
the direction of the Inver-
ness Chapel Hooper Fu-
neral Homes & Crematory

OBITUARIES
A flag will be included
for free for those who
served in the U.S. mili-
tary. (Please note this
service when submit-
ting a free obituary.)
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear in
the next day's edition.
All obituaries will be
posted online at www.
chronicleonline.com.


Joshua
Staab, 27
TAM PA
Joshua Edward Staab, 27,
of Tampa, formerly of
Lecanto, died Thursday,
Feb. 16, 2012, in Tampa. He
was born
March 25,
1984, in In- I
verness and
moved to
Tampa 6 i. .
years ago -
f r o m
Lecanto.
Josh gradu- Joshua
ated from Staab
Lecanto
High School in 2002 and at-
tended the University of
South Florida. He was a
marathon runner and a
member of the Off Road
Club at USE He enjoyed all
outdoor activities including
boating, camping, mud
slinging and biking.
He was a Financial Ad-
ministrator for USF Health.
Josh was a loving son,
amazing brother and a loyal
friend. He was fun-loving
and he brightened every
room that he walked into
with his smile and sense of
humor.
He is survived by his par-
ents, Skip and Barbara
Staab of Lecanto; brother,
Tim Staab of Tampa; mater-
nal grandparents, Frank and
Janet Pollock of Chinchilla,
PA; paternal grandfather,
Anthony R. Staab of Beverly
Hills, FL; several aunts, un-
cles and cousins in Florida,
Pennsylvania and Ohio.
Friends will be received
from 4 p.m. until 7 p.m.,
Wednesday, Feb. 22, at
Wilder Funeral Home, Ho-
mosassa Springs. A celebra-
tion of Josh's life will be
held 11 a.m. Thursday, Feb.
23, at Wilder Funeral Home
with Fr. Michael Smith offi-
ciating. Burial will follow at
Fountains Memorial Park.
Condolences may be given
at www.wilderfuneral.com.

SO YOU KNOW
The Citrus County Chron-
icle's policy permits
both free and paid obit-
uaries. Email obits@
chronicleonline.com or
phone 352-563-5660
for details and pricing
options.


"In Memory" ad,
"Your Trusted Family-Owned Call Mike Snyder at 563-327
Funeral Home Since 1962 Cllie nyr 3


Burial
Cremation
Pre-Planning
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C. Lyman Strickland & Tom L. Pace
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CRYSTAL RIVER
352-795-2678
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or
Saralynne Schlumbergerger at 564-2917
sschlumberger@chronicleonline.com


Deaths
ELSEWHERE

Anthony
Shadid, 43
REPORTER
NEW YORK New York
Times correspondent An-
thony Shadid, a two-time
Pulitzer Prize winner whose
dispatches captured untold
stories from Baghdad under
"shock and awe" bombing to
Libya wracked by civil war,
has died of an apparent
asthma attack in Syria while
reporting on the uprising
against its president.
Shadid, who survived a
gunshot wound in the West
Bank in 2002 and was cap-
tured for six days in Libya
last year, was returning with
smugglers from Syria to
Turkey when he collapsed
Thursday, the Times said.
Times photographer
Tyler Hicks told the news-
paper Shadid, who was 43,
had suffered one bout of
asthma the first night, fol-
lowed by a more severe at-
tack a week later on the way
out of the country
"I stood next to him and
asked if he was OK, and
then he collapsed," Hicks
told the Times.
Hicks said he adminis-
tered CPR for 30 minutes
but couldn't revive Shadid.
Hicks carried Shadid's body
to Turkey, the newspaper
said.
Shadid, an American of
Lebanese descent, had a
wife, Nada Bakri, and a son
and a daughter. He had
worked previously for the
AP The Washington Post
and The Boston Globe. He
won Pulitzer Prizes for in-
ternational reporting in
2004 and 2010 when he was
with the Post

Henry
McPherson Jr.,
82
LBJ ADVISER
AUSTIN, Texas Henry
McPherson Jr, who was an
adviser to President Lyndon
B. Johnson, has died. He
was 82.
The Lyndon Baines John-
son Presidential Library in
Texas said McPherson died
Thursday The library said
McPherson had cancer.
McPherson served as spe-
cial assistant and special
counsel to Johnson.
He influenced the presi-
dent on a range of policies
from civil rights to bombing
in Vietnam.
He helped write John-
son's 1968 speech announc-
ing a halt in bombing in
Vietnam and that Johnson
would not run for
re-election.
After working for John-
son, McPherson worked as a
lawyer and lobbyist in
Washington, D.C. He wrote a
1972 memoir, "A Political
Education," recalling his
experience in government
and the Johnson presidency
-From wire reports


CRYSTAL U RIVER

A New, Innovative Assisted Living
is opening in February in Crystal River!
An exclusive 24 bedroom "key west style" home
for seniors with various stages of dementia will provide
a new standard of living.
Reservations are now being accepted so today for a personalized tour!
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STitle Date(s)
The Last Dance of Dr. Disco March 9-10-11
The Pajama Party Murders June 22-23-24
The Case of The Hopeless Diamond September 7-8-9
Win, Lose or Die Nov. 30 Dec. 1-2

All shows to be performed at the Encore Ensemble Ballroom located
in The Central Ridge Community Center at Beverly Hills (formerly the
B.H.R.A.) which is ideally located in the center of Citrus County.
Ticket Prices*:
Individual: $25 **Season (all 4 Shows): $80
C.R.C.C Member: $20 **C.R.C.C. Member Season: $70
*All prices INCLUDE a Themedd" dinner.
** Season Tickets available for a LIMITED TIME ONLY!

Each Show Will Benefit A Citrus County Charity.

To purchase tickets or for more information,
please contact our Box Office at:
352-212-5417.

I^^^^^^^^B^^^^c~iiR()siE


I


A6 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2012





--,,I.--.. 1 -1




* 2


I


CITRUS COUNTY
HOSPITAL BOARD
(352) 419-6566
123 North Apopka Ave., Inverness FL 34450
co P.O. Box 1030, Inverness, FL 34451
www... so.u'ntyhospitlbL o 44.o


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


February 19, 2012




(OaA JaxpaqeA and 9'lIghbto,
On June 24, 2011, Governor Rick Scott signed into law HB 1043, which transferred the governing
control of the Citrus Memorial Health Foundation to the Citrus County Hospital Board to ensure, by
law, the appropriate oversight, accountability, and transparency of Citrus Memorial Hospital. On June
29, 2011, the Foundation was granted an injunction which prevented this law from taking effect until
the courts could determine if this law was constitutional. After months of court hearings and careful
deliberation by the courts, Circuit Court Judge Fulford ruled that the law was, in fact, constitutional
and would provide a benefit to the citizens of Citrus County.
On February 17, 2012, the Foundation attempted to get the court to issue a stay so that the law
could not be implemented. The court rejected and DENIED the Foundation's request for a stay.
This letter is to reassure the taxpayers of Citrus County that Citrus Memorial Hospital will remain
ready to serve the health care needs for all residents. In addition, all hospital employees should take
comfort in knowing that a resolution is near, and that your perserverance and professionalism does not
go unrecognized by the Citrus County Hospital Board. A smooth transition of Governance will now
begin to be planned and carefully implemented to ensure that the quality of health care and the efforts
of employees are championed and not compromised.
On February 15, 2012, the Citrus County Hospital Board sued the Foundation to prevent the
payment of over $1.4 million in "Golden Parachutes" for hospital CEO, Ryan Beaty and other
executive officers of the Foundation. The Citrus County Hospital Board believes these proceeds are
better spent on the rank and file employees that make Citrus Memorial the great hospital that it is today
and will be for generations to come.
Finally, I want to reassure the taxpayers, and the employees of Citrus Memorial Hospital, that
while this has been a long dispute, the matter is near resolution. Our hospital and all of its diligent and
professional employees should feel confident that Citrus Memorial Hospital will remain ready to
serve the citizens of Citrus County.
Please feel free to contact the Citrus County Hospital Board with any questions you may have.
Thank you.

Wichaed Sma&tqidg
Michael Smallridge
Chairman, Citrus County Hospital Board


L


I I


AN OPEN LETTER TO THE

CITIZENS OF CITRUS COUNTY

AND

THE EMPLOYEES OF

CITRUS MEMORIAL HOSPITAL


www~itrucoutyhospitalboard-com





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY SCHOOLS
Elementary schools
Breakfast
Monday: President's Day
holiday.
Tuesday: Ham, egg and
cheese on warm flatbread, tater
tots, cereal and toast, juice and
milk variety.
Wednesday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, grits, cereal and
toast, juice and milk variety.
Thursday: Breakfast egg
and cheese wrap, oatmeal with
fruit, tater tots, cereal and toast,
juice and milk variety.
Friday: Pancake slider, grits,
cereal and toast, juice and milk
variety.
Lunch
Monday: President's Day
holiday.
Tuesday: Mozzarella Max
Stix, fajita chicken and rice with
Rip Stick, turkey super salad,
yogurt parfait, garden salad,
steamed broccoli, ranch pasta
salad, applesauce, crackers,
milk, juice.
Wednesday: Hot dog on
bun, macaroni and cheese, PB
dippers, fresh baby carrots,
steamed green beans, mixed
fruit, milk and juice.
Thursday: Oven-baked
breaded chicken, turkey wrap,
chicken super salad, yogurt
parfait, fresh garden salad, roll,
seasoned mashed potatoes,
peach cup, crackers, roll, milk,
juice.
Friday: Sausage pizza,
pasta with mozzarella and meat
sauce, PB dippers, fresh baby
carrots, sweet corn, fruit juice
bar, milk, juice.
Middle schools
Breakfast
Monday: President's Day
holiday.
Tuesday: Sausage, egg and
cheese biscuit, ultra cinnamon
bun, tater tots, cereal and toast,
milk, juice.
Wednesday: Breakfast egg
and cheese wrap, MVP break-
fast, tater tots, cereal and toast,
milk, juice.
Thursday: Breakfast sand-
wich stuffer, ultimate breakfast
round, peach cup, grits, cereal
and toast, milk, juice.
Friday: Ham, egg and
cheese biscuit, ultra cinnamon
bun, tater tots, cereal and toast,
milk, juice.
Lunch
Monday: President's Day
holiday.
Tuesday: Pasta with moz-
zarella and meat sauce, pep-
peroni pizza, ham super salad,
PB dippers, garden salad,
sweet corn, peas, warm apple
crisp, chilled pears, crackers,
milk, juice.
Wednesday: Hamburger on
bun, baked chicken nuggets,
yogurt parfait, fresh baby car-
rots, green beans, seasoned
rice, colossal crisp French fries,
strawberry cup, milk and juice.
Thursday: Stuffed-crust
cheese pizza, cheesy chicken
and rice burrito, chef super
salad, PB dippers, garden
salad, glazed carrots, apple-
sauce, Jell-O, crackers, milk,
juice.
Friday: Hot ham and cheese
sandwich, fajita chicken and
rice, apple chicken super salad,
baby carrots, green beans,
ranch pasta salad, peach cup,
crackers, milk, juice.
High schools
Breakfast
Monday: President's Day
holiday.
Tuesday: Sausage, egg and
cheese biscuit, ultra cinnamon
bun, tater tots, cereal and toast,
juice, milk.
Wednesday: Breakfast egg
and cheese wrap, MVP break-
fast, tater tots, cereal and toast,
juice, milk.


Thursday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, ultimate break-
fast round, grits, peach cup, ce-
real and toast, juice, milk.
Friday: Breakfast sandwich
stuffer, ultra cinnamon bun,
tater tots, cereal and toast,
juice, milk.
Lunch
Monday: President's Day
holiday.
Tuesday: Turkey and gravy
over rice, chicken sandwich,
pizza, ham super salad, yogurt
parfait, fresh garden salad,
peas, baked French fries,
peach cup, crackers, milk.
Wednesday: Macaroni and
cheese, pizza, hamburger,
turkey wrap, turkey super
salad, PB dippers, baby car-
rots, baked beans, corn, mixed
fruit, cornbread, French fries,
crackers, milk.
Thursday: Crispy Mexican
tacos, chicken sandwich, pizza,
ham super salad, yogurt parfait,
garden salad, glazed carrots,
Spanish rice, French fries, ap-
plesauce, crackers, milk.
Friday: Oven-baked breaded
chicken, hamburger, pizza,
apple chicken super salad, yo-
gurt parfait, fresh baby carrots,
corn, peas, seasoned rice,
French fries, strawberry cup,
crackers, milk.
Lecanto High School lunch
Monday: President's Day
holiday.
Tuesday: Oriental orange
chicken, hamburger, chicken
sandwich, turkey and gravy
over noodles, ham salad, yo-
gurt parfait, pizza, garden
salad, glazed carrots, French
fries, peas, peach cup, crack-
ers, milk.
Wednesday: Brunch bowl,
chicken alfredo, hamburger,
chicken sandwich, pizza, turkey
super salad, yogurt parfait,
baby carrots, French fries,
ranch pasta salad, broccoli,
tater tots, mixed fruit, crackers,
milk.
Thursday: Cheesy chicken
and rice burrito, hamburger,
chicken sandwich, macaroni
and cheese, pizza, ham super
salad, yogurt parfait, garden
salad, green beans, sweet
corn, French fries, applesauce,
crackers, milk.
Friday: Chicken tenders,
pizza, hamburger, chicken
sandwich, pasta with moz-
zarella and meat sauce, apple
chicken salad, yogurt parfait,
baby carrots, French fries, sea-
soned rice, sweet peas, straw-
berry cup, crackers, milk.

SENIOR DINING
Monday: Lasagna casse-
role, garlic spinach, Italian veg-
etable medley, peaches, slice
whole-wheat bread with mar-
garine, low-fat milk.
Tuesday: Barbecued pork ri-
blet, Lyonnaise potatoes, warm
cinnamon apples with raisins,
graham crackers, slice whole-
grain wheat bread with mar-
garine, low-fat milk.
Wednesday: Macaroni and
cheese casserole, three-bean
medley, stewed tomatoes, fresh
seasonal fruit, slice whole-grain
bread with margarine, low-fat
milk.
Thursday: Roast chicken
thigh with chicken gravy, green
beans, mashed potatoes, oat-
meal cookie, whole-grain roll
with margarine, low-fat milk.
Friday: Meatballs with brown
gravy, rice pilaf, mixed vegeta-
bles, fresh seasonal fruit, slice
whole-grain bread with mar-
garine, low-fat milk.
Senior dining sites include:
Lecanto, East Citrus, Crystal
River, Homosassa Springs, In-
verness and South Dunnellon.
For information, call Support
Services at 527-5975.


News NOTES


Retired nurses
to meet Feb. 27
Citrus Marion Chapter of the
Registered Nurses Retired
(RNR) will meet Monday, Feb.
27, at the Inverness Golf &
Country Club.
Sign-in for the meeting starts
at 11 a.m., with lunch at 11:30
and a speaker to follows at
noon. Speaker will be Karen
Strouse of the Guardian Ad
Litem Program.
Retired registered nurses
should RSVP by Wednesday,
Feb. 22, to Mary Jane at 352-
726-6882 or Gladys at 352-
854-2677.
Park to host
bird walk Feb. 25
The Florida Department of
Environmental Protection's Ellie
Schiller Homosassa Springs
Wildlife State Park, in coopera-
tion with Citrus County
Audubon Society, will host the


first of the season's monthly
bird walks on Pepper Creek
Trail Saturday, Feb. 25.
Experienced birders will lead
the walk on the trail, one of 19
birding trails in Citrus County
that are part of the Great
Florida Birding Trail.
Participants should meet at
7:45 a.m. at the entrance to the
park's Visitor Center and the
bird walk will begin at 8 a.m.
Binoculars and a field guide are
recommended.
Call 352-628-5343, ext. 1002
or visit www.floridastateparks.org.
Positive Christians
group forming
A new group is forming for
people with HIV/AIDS and the
parents, family and friends who
love them.
"Positive Christians" is a non-
profit support, education and
advocacy organization.
For more information, call
352-601-3243.


Grocery and liquor
stores in my neigh-
borhood are much
more strict about asking for
IDs than they were just a few
years ago. Of course, if you
live near a college campus,
you know that checking IDs
really hasn't
done much to
curb underage
drinking. Some-
times I think fake
IDs are included
in the kids' orien-
tation packets.
As for those of
us who are two
and three times
as old as the typi- JI
cal student,you'd MUL
think our faces
would announce
that we are older than 21.
Way, way older Not even
close to 21. It takes years of
erosion to get a face like
mine. Unfortunately, teen-
age cashiers cannot tell the
difference between some-
one who is 30 and someone
who is 90. To them, we're all
the same old.
In part, that's true. There's
a huge difference between
an 11-year-old and a 16-year-
old. Between a 50-year-old
and a 55-year-old, not so
much. But if you can't tell the
difference between a 21-
year-old and a 61-year-old,
there's a problem.
I remember a story about
a group of 10 men who got to-


gether to eat breakfast and
gossip every morning at the
same restaurant Their ages
ranged from 50 to 90. The
day a new, young waitress
showed up, they thought
they'd have a little fun.
"You know," a 60-year-old
said, "it's Joe's
90th birthday
today, and he
wants to know if
you'll give him a
free piece of
Sakee"
The waitress
looked at all of
them and said,
"OK Which one
M of you is Joe?" To
LEN them, it was obvi-
ous. But to her,
they were all ex-
actly the same age old.
Almost everyone who is of
obvious legal age has stories
about getting carded. A
friend told me that one day
he went into a store to buy
liquor and was asked for
identification. Then he went
next door to the drugstore,
where the kid behind the
counter gave him the 15 per-
cent senior discount
At a get-together the other
night of "old" people in
their 50s, a woman asked
the group, "So what do you
say when you're buying beer
and the teenager at the
checkout counter asks to see
your ID?"
"I say 'thank you,"' three


women said at the same
time. They all had stories
that more or less ended with,
"I'll take flattery wherever I
can get it"
"I didn't say 'thank you,"'
the first woman said. "I said,
'NO! This is ridiculous. Look
at me. No, I will not show you
my ID."'
I didn't understand why
she was frothing over such a
little thing until I realized
that she didn't want to deny
her age; she wanted credit
for it None of us gets older
without getting a few little
nicks and dings, without get-
ting our bumpers dented,
without having to be taken to
the shop for a little repair
now and then.


The store that says it asks
everyone for their IDs is the
same one that runs a little
pen over each $20 bill I
hand the clerk, checking to
make sure I haven't become
a counterfeiter since the
last time I was in the store,
say, two days earlier. I never
thought of it as insulting be-
fore. Now I do.
Funny thing is, they never
run a pen over the ID of the
kid buying two cases of beer
who looks like he's 17. That,
they don't check.
U
Jim Mullen's book "Now in
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A8 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2012


.I
.1





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Australia asks again:


Did a dingo kill the baby?


tii-;fkhii [' i


Associated Press

SYDNEY The growl
came first, low and throaty,
piercing the darkness that
had fallen across the remote
Australian desert. A
baby's cry followed,
then abruptly went
silent. Inside the
tent, the infant girl
had vanished. Out-
side, her mother
was screaming:
"The dingo's got my
baby!"
With those pan- Lin
Chamln
icked words, the c
mystery of Azaria seen i
Chamberlain's dis-
appearance in the Aus-
tralian Outback in 1980
became the most notorious,
divisive and baffling legal
drama in the country's his-
tory. Had a wild dog really
taken the baby? Or had
Azaria's mother, Lindy, slit
her daughter's throat and
buried her in the desert?
Thirty-two years later,
Australian officials hope to
finally, definitively, deter-
mine how Azaria died when
the Northern Territory
coroner opens a fourth in-
quest on Friday Lindy
Chamberlain, who was con-
victed of murdering her
daughter and later cleared,
is still waiting for authori-
ties to close the case that
made her the most hated
person in Australia.
To the rest of the world,
the case is largely known for
its place in pop culture:
countless books, an opera,
the Meryl Streep movie "A
Cry in the Dark," and the sit-
com Seinfeld's spoof of
Lindy's cry, "Maybe the
dingo ate your baby!"
But to Australians, the
case is about much more
than the guilt or innocence
of one woman. It is about
the guilt or innocence of a
nation a nation that
prides itself on the concept
of a "fair go," an equal
chance, for all. Did Lindy
Chamberlain get a fair go?
Or had Australians mis-
judged this woman? With
doubts growing about just
how fair and tolerant they
truly were, many wondered
if they had misjudged
themselves.
And so Australia will once
again try to get to the bottom
of one of the most painful
chapters in its history
"It's a bit like a really bad
war," says Tony Raymond,
chief forensic scientist in an
investigation that debunked
much of the evidence used
to convict Lindy "You've got
to learn from it and make
sure it doesn't happen
again."
MEN
The nightmare began on
Aug. 17, 1980, during a fam-
ily vacation to Ayers Rock,
the sacred Outback mono-
lith now known by its Abo-
riginal name Uluru.
Lindy and Michael Cham-
berlain, their two sons and
their 9-week-old daughter,
Azaria, were settling in for
the night at a campsite near
the rock. Azaria was sleep-
ing in a tent and Lindy and
Michael were making din-
ner nearby when a baby's
cry rang out. Lindy went to
check on her daughter and
says she saw a dingo slink
out of the tent and disap-


1
ib
t


pear into the darkness.
Azaria's bassinet was empty,
the blankets still warm.
There was an intense
search, but Azaria was
never found.
The Chamber-
lains insisted the
dingo snatched their
daughter. Outside
the tent were dingo
tracks; inside were
spots of blood. Fel-
low campers told of-
ficials they had
heard a low growl,
dy then a baby's cry
berlin Azaria's torn, blood-
1982. ied jumpsuit was
found in the sur-
rounding desert. There was
no motive for a crime, no
eyewitness, no body
But police and the public
doubted a dingo was big or
strong enough to drag away
a 10-pound baby
The daily details of the
trial were picked over in
pubs and debated around
dinner tables, breeding a
generation of armchair cops
who analyzed every piece of
evidence described in the
morning papers and on the
nightly news.
Lindy heavily pregnant
with her fourth child was
convicted of murder, ac-
cused of slashing her daugh-
ter's throat with nail
scissors and making it look
like a dingo attack. She was
sentenced to life in prison
with hard labor. Michael


was convicted of being an
accessory
Three years into Lindy's
prison sentence, Azaria's
jacket was found by chance
- near a dingo den. Days
later, Lindy was released
from prison. A Royal Com-
mission, the highest form
of investigation in Aus-
tralia, debunked much of
the forensic evidence used
at trial and her conviction
was overturned.
M E
Despite the increased
public support, Azaria's
death certificate remains
incomplete. Three coro-
ner's inquests held to de-
termine a cause of death
have returned conflicting
results. On Friday, Feb. 24,
Northern Territory Coro-
ner Elizabeth Morris will
examine fresh evidence of
dingo attacks before issu-
ing a finding on how Azaria
died.
Lindy declined an inter-
view request, but in an
open letter on the 30th an-
niversary ofAzaria's disap-
pearance, she wrote that
she was fighting for her
daughter.
"Our family will always
remember today as the day
truth was dragged in the
dirt and trampled upon,
but more than that it is the
day our family was torn
apart forever because we
lost our beautiful little
Azaria," Lindy wrote.


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A10 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2012


PORT
Continued from Page Al

unemployment rate in the
state."
The ripple continued 10
years later. Two chemical
plants, which used a
byproduct of the paper mill
in their production, closed
in the past two years, taking
80 to 100 jobs each.
The St Joe Co., Florida's
largest landowner, had sold
the paper mill and associ-
ated box plant in the mid
1990s. When the new owner
shut down the plants, the
land reverted back to St. Joe.
Its 200 acres on St Joseph
Bay were cleared. In 2005,
St. Joe Co. received ap-
proval for a development of
homes, condominiums,
restaurants and shops next
to the city marina.
But when the housing
boom fell apart, St. Joe Co.
abandoned those plans.
The economic eyes of Port
St Joe and Gulf County are
now turned to another plan,
one they hope will reap jobs
and stability for years to
come.
The Port of Port St Joe,
one of 15 recognized ports in
Florida, is nothing more
today than a slab of concrete
and a bulkhead along the
Gulf Coast Canal, a 6-mile
stretch of the Intracoastal
Waterway that is strikingly
similar to the Cross Florida
Barge Canal in Citrus County
Using the investment in-
terest from a 1980s bond
issue that never panned out,
the port authority bought
property. It leveraged local
funds with grants to extend
a road to the port site and
build the 876-foot bulkhead.
A month ago, St. Joe Co.
and the port authority
signed a memorandum of
understanding that will in-
clude the company's 200
acres as part of the Port of
Port St. Joe. None of the de-
tails have been arranged,
but officials are excited
about the potential.
And officials also say they
expect an announcement
sometime in the coming
weeks of a company plan-
ning to move or expand to
the port site. They believe



JOBS
Continued from Page Al

supporter of the Port of
Port St. Joe.
"I love it," she said. "I'm
younger and I'm not dying
to get out of this town. The
port will bring in jobs. I'm
excited to show people this
town."
Many people in this Pan-
handle town of 4,000 are
anxiously hoping for some
activity at the port, some
sign of potential.
Port St. Joe is a lot like
Crystal River. Its main
downtown street, Reid Av-
enue, has theme lighting
and red-brick crosswalks
and could double for Citrus
Avenue.
And just like U.S. 19 in
Crystal River, shops,
restaurants and stores
downtown and along U.S.
98 depend on a vibrant
tourist trade in the spring
and summer.
But the loss of the paper
mill, which closed in 1998
and eliminated more than
800 jobs, is still felt.
"That's when things
started changing around
here," said Latonya Bailey,


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MIKE WRIGHT/Chronicle
Port Director Tommy Pitts said the port authority leveraged
$4 million with grants to buy property and build a bulkhead
along the Gulf County Canal.


more will follow.
"Once we get that first an-
nouncement we're going to
be bombarded," said Barry
Sellers, executive director
of the Gulf County Chamber
of Commerce.
The port authority hopes
so. Money invested from the
bond program has nearly
run out, meaning the au-
thority must count on new
tenants to provide the
matching funds for state
grants to continue improve-
ments at the port site.
Asked how much money
the port authority has in the
bank, port director Tommy
Pitts said: "Just about none."
Once-thriving port
looks to future
Though separated by 200
miles, the circumstances
surround the Port of Port St
Joe and Port Citrus are
strikingly similar
Port St. Joe's economy
was decimated by the clos-
ing of the paper mill, the
town's big industry Citrus
County's unemployment
rate shot up when the con-
struction boom ended.
Both communities rely
heavily on tourism.
Port St. Joe has 4,000
people, similar in popula-
tion to Crystal River. Unlike
Citrus, though, most of the
remainder of Gulf County is
timber; the county popula-
tion is about 15,000.


33, a clerk at the Express
Lane convenience store.
Bailey grew up in Port St.
Joe and she's hoping the
port will bring jobs.
"I think it'll give a real
boost to the economy," she
said. "We need a steady
source of income."
Summer Smith, manager
at Provisions restaurant on
Reid Avenue, said the town
needs jobs.
"People want Port St. Joe
to stay the same but we
need more opportunity,"
she said. "There are no jobs
around her."
Barry Sellers, executive
director of the Gulf County
Chamber of Commerce, ar-
rived in Port St. Joe four
months ago from Jones-
boro, Ark.
"The reason I'm here -
51 percent of the reason I'm
here is that port," Sellers
said. "My goal is to give
people a choice whether to
stay or leave. Right now
there isn't much choice."
Lena Hunt, 25, a stylist at
Kelly Rene Hair Studio on
Reid Avenue, said the econ-
omy is stagnant.
"We do need the jobs," she
said. "People who do have
jobs, there's not enough
room for advancement."


Both have a barge canal
from the Gulf of Mexico cut-
ting through the county, of-
fering commercial and
industrial potential. Both
canals are 12 to 15 feet deep.
The Gulf County Canal is
lined with commercial fish-
ing and marina uses on one
side, and some industrial
uses on the other side. Plus,
the U.S. 98 bridge crosses
the canal at the mouth, un-
like in Citrus, where the
U.S. 19 bridge is about five
miles inland.
The Port Citrus project is
barely off the ground.
Though county commission-
ers have yet to select a con-
sultant for the feasibility
study, CountyAdministrator
Brad Thorpe's public pre-
sentations point to the Port
of Port St. Joe as the model
of how best to proceed.
A port presence as ex-
isted in Gulf County dating
back to the late 1700s. Pitts
said the harbor of St. Joseph
Bay provided an attractive
destination for carriers,
with the port being a regula-
tion stop for commerce
shipping in the 1800s.
The paper mill was con-
structed in 1938 and Con-
gress authorized a 35-foot
deep channel to a bulkhead
at the mill property. While
port activity eventually
slowed and then died in the
1980s, that channel and
bulkhead remain.


Like many, Hunt is count-
ing on the port.
"I know it's been an off-


Port St. Joe Mayor Mel
Magidson Jr. said, "we do
have that ray of hope that
somebody will come into the
port and bring in jobs."
Pitts said the port author-
ity borrowed $30 million in
the 1980s to develop the
port. While the develop-
ment never took place and
the unspent money was re-
paid 10 years ago, it earned
$4 million in interest.
Pitts said the port was
able to use that money to
leverage with state grants to
buy 100 acres of property,
build an access road and $5
million bulkhead on the
barge canal.
That money is about to
run out, so Pitts is counting
on tenants to provide
matching money for state
grants to continue develop-
ing the bulkhead.


and-on deal for a while,"
she said. "People would
like to have more jobs -


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"The state has made it
known they're not going to
develop a local seaport for
us," Pitts said.
While the port authority is
a taxing district, Pitts said he
would not ask for tax support
unless he was certain the
public bought into the plan.
"We will avoid that as long
as possible," he said.
Mayor Magidson said he
doesn't think the port would
have gotten off the ground
without the seed money pro-
vided by interest on that
1980s bond.
"It would be difficult if
not impossible," he said.
Hopes rise in
port plans
Even with the best inten-
tions, the port road has not
been smooth.
The port authority made
significant improvements to
the site in the early 2000s,
only to see the economy
fade. Interest from compa-
nies for importing or ex-
porting goods at the port
was few and far between.
"It's been chasing rain-
bows somewhat," Magidson
said. "There was a major ef-
fort the last six or seven
years, then the economy as
a whole went into the tank."
Magidson, 65, an attorney
who was born and raised in
Port St. Joe, sees much evi-


real jobs."
Chronicle reporter Mike
Wright can be reached at


www.flaseaports.org
dence of optimism.
The expansion of the
Panama Canal in 2014 or
2015 will bring larger ships to
the large ports, which are al-
ready running out of space.
Both Magidson and Pitts be-
lieve the smaller ships will
be forced from the larger
ports to small ones, such as
the Port at Port St Joe.
"There's going to be a
need for expanded port ca-
pacity," Magidson said.
Sellers, the chamber ex-
ecutive director, said he can
see the Port of Port St. Joe
becoming as busy as Port
Panama City, just 30 miles
west.
"Once that first an-
nouncement comes in, I'll
be an order-taker, not a
salesman," he said.
Magidson said the town is
surviving off tourism, but
with unemployment in Gulf
County just under 10 per-
cent, he knows the port pro-
vides long-term economic
stability.
"We do have that ray of
hope that somebody will
come into the port and bring
in jobs," he said. "There's
nothing that promises that
many jobs anywhere else."
Chronicle reporter Mike
Wright can be reached at
352-563-3228 or
m wrigh t@chronicle
online, com.


352-563-3228 or
m wrigh t@ chronicle
onlinecom.


tlI ArmU aI I Cair

S lTrulickI ShoI w

Saturday, March 10
Inverness City Hall ~ 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Hosted by the Nature Coast Corvair Club


nccorvairclub@yahoo.com


community* history literacy



OUT LOUD!

5th Annual


African


American


Read-In

Sunday, Feb. 26, 2012

2:30-4:30 PM
Listen to moving, inspirational and humorous
selections from African-American literature. Enjoy
musical entertainment & refreshments during this
celebration of history & literacy at CF Citrus Campus.
Join us out loud!
I'I.i 'Nc E Lea/rn More:
..http://facebook.com/citrusaari


380-0219-SUCRN

Notice of Public Disclosure
Of Full Cost of Solid Waste Management
Within Unincorporated
County of Citrus Florida
For the Fiscal Year 2010 2011
Pursuant to 62-708
Florida Administrative Code


RESIDENTIAL:


Collection:

Disposal:

Recycling:


NONRESIDENTIAL:

Collection:

Disposal:

Recycling:
)AM7X


Cost per household

Varies, by subscription

$ 24.29

$ 5.43

Cost per ton

Varies, by subscription

$ 228.17

$ 18.40


Florida Ports







rt e atPner

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FLORIDA SEAPORTS
CHARTING OUR FUTURE




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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Youths shaping future of online TV, movies, music


MARTHA IRVINE
AP National Writer
CHICAGO Young peo-
ple want their music, TV
and movies now even if it
means they get these things
illegally
A recent Columbia Uni-
versity survey found, in fact,
that 70 percent of 18- to 29-
year-olds said they had
bought, copied or down-
loaded unauthorized music,
TV shows or movies, com-
pared with 46 percent of all
adults who'd done the same.
With such an entrenched
attitude, what can be done
about widespread online
piracy?
Certainly, law enforce-
ment has gone after
scofflaws like these, hitting
them with fines and, in
some cases, even jail time.
Congress is considering
controversial anti-piracy
bills that would, among
other things, forbid search
engines from linking to for-
eign websites accused of
copyright infringement. And
there are lawsuits pitting
media heavyweights against
Internet firms notably Vi-
acom's billion-dollar litiga-
tion against YouTube.
But here's a radical no-
tion to consider: What if
young people who steal con-
tent weren't viewed as the
problem?
What if they and advo-
cates for maximum online
access could persuade the
entertainment industry to
loosen its tight grip on its
coveted, copyrighted mate-
rial quite the opposite of
what the industry is trying
to do right now?
"The real problem is not
pirates downloading ille-
gally, but a failure to inno-
vate on the part of the
content providers," says
Steven Budd, a law student
at Drexel University in
Philadelphia.
Like it or not, that's how a
lot of people of his genera-
tion view the situation. And
some experts think they're
gaining clout, as they insist
on easy access to music and
other content while the In-
ternet world loudly protests
anti-piracy legislation that it
says unfairly puts the re-
sponsibility of policing
piracy sites on search en-


gines and other sites.
"We've seen the emer-
gence of a real social move-
ment around these issues,"
says Joe Karaganis, vice
president of The American
Assembly, a public policy in-
stitute at Columbia Univer-
sity, which oversaw the
recent survey, funded by a
grant from Google.
He's talking, in part,
about "blackouts" staged by
popular Internet sites that
included Wikipedia, the
user-generated online ency-
clopedia, and Reddit, the
social news website. With
support from Google, Face-
book and Twitter, they were
protesting the proposed fed-
eral anti-piracy bills.
But here's the surprising
part a lot of young people
don't necessarily expect to
get movies, TV shows and
music for free.
"I do think people would
pay for this content if it's
reasonably priced and it's
available when they want to
watch it," says Srikant
Mikkilineni, a law student at
Drake University in Des
Moines.
Not wanting to mar his
law school record, Mikkili-
neni pays for the songs,
movies and TV shows he
downloads. But he does so
grudgingly "Right now, they
want us to pay multiple
times for the same content,"
he says, complaining that
that's not reasonable.
If he buys a DVD, for in-
stance, it's $15. He can
watch it on his laptop but
it's illegal for him to copy it
in order to watch it on his
iPod or smart phone.
Many young people point
to Apple's iTunes service as
a model that could be repli-
cated by other entertain-
ment companies.
"iTunes changed the
landscape for music be-
cause it made it far too con-
venient and much easier
than downloading music
through alternative meth-
ods (even illegal ones)," says
Matt Gardner, an informa-
tion technology student at
Rochester Institute of Tech-
nology in New York.
But even more than con-
venience, a recent study at
Duke University found that
cost was the major factor
that drives college students


Associated Press
Drake University law school student Srikant Mikkilineni
stands Jan. 30 with his laptop computer in the school's law
library in Des Moines, Iowa. Some observers say that instead
of focusing on punishing youths for stealing music, TV and
movies, the entertainment industry should be more innova-
tive in the delivery of content, making it more easily avail-


able and cheaper.
to copy entertainment con-
tent illegally Researchers
there found that the lower
the students' income, in-
cluding their parents' in-
come, the more likely they
were to search for free, ille-
gal options.
To address the issue of
cost, the study's authors sug-
gested that universities con-
sider making licensing
agreements with services
that sell entertainment con-
tent so students could get a
discount.
Cornell University is one
institution that has experi-
mented with this. From 2004
to 2006, an anonymous
donor paid for two years'
worth of Napster service for
Cornell students, but stu-
dents ultimately declined to
have their student activity
fees raised to continue the
service because the music
couldn't be played on all de-
vices, according to the Duke
study
There are those who


doubt that students would
pay for content they can pi-
rate, especially when the
habit has become so
ingrained.
"Nobody's going to pay
you for something they can
get for free," says Glenn
MacDonald, an economics
professor at the Olin School
of Business at Washington
University in St. Louis.
So he asks: What if you
gave music and movies to
consumers for free, or asked
them to pay what they
thought the content was
worth?
Some bands such as Ra-
diohead are already doing
that in essence, using
their songs to build a follow-
ing and entice people to pay
to see them in concert and,
once there, to buy their
merchandise.
The song becomes the ad,
MacDonald says. Or a movie
on the small screen be-
comes the driving force for
a line of merchandise or


drives the wish to see it
again on a big screen in 3-D
or at a special theater event.
A free clip from a TV show
seen online draws viewers
to the show.
"It's like a bar. They give
you the peanuts so you buy
the beer," MacDonald says.
He notes that music com-
panies already take a cut of
money made from concerts,
merchandise and endorse-
ments. So he thinks that
should, at the very least, off-
set the cost of the recorded
music to consumers, who've
been increasingly willing to
pay big prices to see artists
live.
"Music companies would
be better served by increas-
ing their focus on how to
make artists' music, and es-
pecially their concerts, even
better," MacDonald says.
Nice thought, but not re-
alistic, says Thomas Car-
penter, general counsel for
legislative affairs for the
American Federation of Tel-
evision and Radio Artists, a
union that represents peo-
ple working in the enter-
tainment industry
As it stands, he says 90
percent of the earnings that
a musician currently makes
under a recording contract
is tied directly to royalties
from sales, including lawful
downloads. For actors, he
says, it's about 50 percent.
"There's a lot at stake -
much more than most peo-
ple realize," Carpenter says.
And he adds, "You have to
be paid in order to be good.
You have to use the funds
from your projects to fund
your future creativity"
Still even some people
who've spent their careers
defending copyrights say it's
time to find some middle
ground.
"It really is a failure to


come up with practical, rea-
sonable models for sales
and distribution," says
Michael R. Graham, a
Chicago attorney who spe-
cializes in trademark and
copyright law. "There's a
real disconnect."
Like many, he thinks
iTunes has set the standard
for the future.
Another possible ap-
proach: licensing agree-
ments with online
services, for instance, pay-
ing a fee to content creators
so they can provide it to con-
sumers for free or for a
monthly subscription fee.
Popular options so far in-
clude online music stream-
ing services such as Spotify
and Pandora. Others point
to movie and TV services
such as Netflix, though
some complain that content
on Netflix's online stream-
ing service is still too lim-
ited. Hundreds of thousands
of people also quit Netflix
last year after it started
charging more to those who
wanted both the streaming
service and DVDs sent to
them in the mail another
indication of just how much
impact the public can have
in these matters.
A major lawsuit now be-
fore a federal appeals court
has put a spotlight on these
issues.
Viacom Inc. is appealing a
lower court ruling that
found YouTube, Google
Inc.'s popular video sharing
service, is protected from
copyright infringement
claims. Viacom claims that
YouTube is making millions
when people post copy-
righted videos including
some shows Viacom owns.
YouTube says it forces peo-
ple to remove the content
when discovered, as the law
allows.


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Introducing: Kenneth A. Son, MD
He completed his undergraduate education
at Boston University, his medical training at
Hahnemann Medical College, and his residency
in urology at Ohio State University. With more
than 25 years of experience in private practice
Dr. Son will be a valued addition to the Citrus
County medical community.

Accepting new patients
605 W Highland Blvd. Inverness FL 34452
| 352 341 6338


DENTAL


Amir Akel, DMD
www.akeldental.com


CONVENIENTLY LOCATED ON US 19

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fee, or reduced fee services, examination, or treatment. Cosmetic dentistry is not recognized as a specialty area by the American Dental Association,,
the Florida Board of Dentistry. Some restrictions may apply.


Citrus County

Craft Council
Presents their

22nd Annual


Spring-


Fling


Graft


S hou, tS Fek:1
Shv l Saturday. Feb. 25
9 A.M. 3 .M.

Crystal River Armory
W. Venable, Crystal River
(Across from Home Depot) CI I)N:I.E
Free Admission
For more information, call 352-860-2598.
Proceeds to benefit Habitat for Humanity
DODAB26


,' AM


AK E L 5445 Commercial Way, Spring Hill '

A KEL352-596-9900


MEDICAiDAIUIIiiHjjjTE


NATION


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2012 All












NATION


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Nation BRIEFS

Take-back NYPD eyed scholars

MMMMF777 y


Associated Press
Area residents dispose of
unneeded medications at
the drug take-back event
Saturday at Walgreens and
other participating loca-
tions in Palm Springs, Calif.


Delayed Maine
caucus completed
EAST MACHIAS, Maine -
Ron Paul has gained 83
votes on Mitt Romney follow-
ing a Republican presidential
caucus in eastern Maine,
where voting last week had
been postponed due to bad
weather. Romney still holds a
156-vote lead over Paul in
statewide totals.
Paul received 163 votes in
Saturday's Washington
County caucus, where Re-
publicans from more than two
dozen towns gathered to cast
their votes. Romney received
80 votes. Rick Santorum got
57 votes and Newt Gingrich
received four votes.
Atheists raise
$40K for student
CRANSTON, R.I. -A na-
tional association that says
there's no proof for the exis-
tence of God is managing a
scholarship fund set up for a
teenage atheist at the center
of a dispute about a prayer
banner at a Rhode Island
school.
The American Humanist
Association said 16-year-old
Jessica Ahlquist was targeted
with online threats after she
challenged the constitutional-
ity of the display at Cranston
High School West.
A federal judge last month
ordered the banner removed.
Blogger Hemant Mehta
started a campaign at the
Friendly Atheist website to
raise money for Ahlquist. The
Friendly Atheist states the
fund has brought in more
than $40,000.
The fundraiser runs
through the end of February.


World BRIEFS

Carnival


Associated Press
A mud-covered reveler
wears a costume during
the "Bloco da Lama," or
"Mud Block" carnival pa-
rade Saturday in Parati,
Brazil.


Police monitored

Muslim students all

over Northeast

Associated Press

NEW YORK- The New York Po-
lice Department monitored Muslim
college students far more broadly
than previously known, at schools
far beyond the city limits, including
the Ivy League colleges of Yale and
the University of Pennsylvania, The
Associated Press has learned.
Police talked with local authori-
ties about professors 300 miles
away in Buffalo and even sent an
undercover agent on a whitewater
rafting trip, where he recorded stu-
dents' names and noted in police in-


telligence files how many times
they prayed.
Detectives trawled Muslim stu-
dent websites every day and, al-
though professors and students had
not been accused of any wrongdo-
ing, their names were recorded in
reports prepared for Police Com-
missioner Raymond Kelly
Asked about the monitoring, po-
lice spokesman Paul Browne pro-
vided a list of 12 people arrested or
convicted on terrorism charges in
the United States and abroad who
had once been members of Muslim
student associations, which the
NYPD referred to as MSAs. Jesse
Morton, who this month pleaded
guilty to posting online threats
against the creators of "South
Park," had once tried to recruit fol-
lowers at Stony Brook University on
Long Island, Browne said.
"As a result, the NYPD deemed it


prudent to get a better handle on
what was occurring at MSAs,"
Browne said in an email. He said
police monitored student websites
and collected publicly available in-
formation, but did so only between
2006 and 2007.
"I see a violation of civil rights
here," said Tanweer Haq, chaplain
of the Muslim Student Association
at Syracuse. "Nobody wants to be on
the list of the FBI or the NYPD or
whatever Muslim students want to
have their own lives, their own pri-
vacy and enjoy the same freedoms
and opportunities that everybody
else has."
In recent months, the AP has re-
vealed secret programs the NYPD,
built with help from the CIA, to
monitor Muslims at the places
where they eat, shop and worship.
The AP also published details about
how police placed undercover offi-


cers at Muslim student associations
in colleges within the city limits;
this revelation has outraged faculty
and student groups.
Though the NYPD says it follows
the same rules as the FBI, some of
the NYPD's activities go beyond
what the FBI is allowed to do.
Kelly and New York City Mayor
Michael Bloomberg repeatedly
have said the police only follow le-
gitimate leads about suspected
criminal activity
But the latest documents mention
no wrongdoing by any students.
In one report, an undercover offi-
cer describes accompanying 18
Muslim students from the City Col-
lege of New York on a whitewater
rafting trip in upstate New York on
April 21, 2008. The officer noted the
names of attendees who were offi-
cers of the Muslim Student
Association.


Iran poised for big nuclear jump


Associated Press

VIENNA Iran is poised to
greatly expand uranium enrich-
ment at a fortified underground
bunker to a point that would boost
how quickly it could make nuclear
warheads, diplomats tell The As-
sociated Press.
They said Tehran has put fin-
ishing touches for the installation
of thousands of new-generation
centrifuges at the cavernous facil-
ity machines that can produce
enriched uranium much more
quickly and efficiently than its
present machines.
While saying that the electrical
circuitry, piping and supporting
equipment for the new cen-
trifuges was now in place, the
diplomats emphasized that
Tehran had not started installing
the new machines at its Fordo fa-
cility and could not say whether it
was planning to.
Still, the senior diplomats -
who asked for anonymity because
their information was privileged
- suggested that Tehran would
have little reason to prepare the
ground for the better centrifuges
unless it planned to operate them.
They spoke in recent interviews
- the last one Saturday
The reported work at Fordo ap-
peared to reflect Iran's determi-
nation to forge ahead with
nuclear activity that could be used
to make atomic arms despite rap-
idly escalating international sanc-
tions and the latent threat of an
Israeli military strike on its nu-
clear facilities.
Fordo could be used to make
fissile warhead material even
without such an upgrade, the
diplomats said.
They said that although older
than Iran's new generation ma-
chines, the centrifuges now oper-
ating there can be reconfigured
within days to make such material
because they already are enrich-
ing to 20 percent a level that
can be boosted quickly to
weapons-grade quality
Their comments appeared to
represent the first time anyone
had quantified the time it would
take to reconfigure the Fordo cen-
trifuges into machines making
weapons-grade material.
In contrast, Iran's older enrich-
ment site at Natanz is producing


Associated Press
Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad speaks April 9, 2007, at a ceremony in Iran's nuclear enrich-
ment facility in Natanz, 186 miles south of capital Tehran, Iran. Iran has put finishing touches for the in-
stallation of thousands of new-generation machines at a cavernous underground bunker that would allow
it speed up production of material that can be used to arm nuclear warheads, diplomats told The Associ-
ated Press on Saturday. While saying that the electrical circuitry, piping and supporting equipment for the
new centrifuges was in place, the diplomats emphasized that Tehran had not started installing more effi-
cient centrifuges at its Fordow facility and could not say whether it was planning to.


uranium at 3.4 percent, a level
normally used to power reactors.
While that too could be turned
into weapons-grade uranium, re-
assembling from low to weapons-
grade production is complex, and
retooling the thousands of cen-
trifuges at Natanz would likely
take weeks.
The diplomats' recent com-
ments came as International
Atomic Energy Agency inspectors
are scheduled to visit Tehran on
Sunday Their trip the second
this month is another attempt
to break more than three years of
Iranian stonewalling about alle-
gations that Tehran has or is -
secretly working on nuclear


weapons that would be armed
with uranium enriched to 90 per-
cent or more.
Diplomats accredited to the
IAEA expect little from that visit
They told the AP that as before
- Iran was refusing to allow the
agency experts to visit Parchin,
the suspected site of explosives
testing for a nuclear weapon and
had turned down other key re-
quests made by the experts.
Iranian officials deny nuclear
weapons aspirations, saying the
claims are based on bogus intelli-
gence from the U.S. and Israel.
But IAEA chief Yukiya Amano
has said there are increasing in-
dications of such activity. His con-


cerns were outlined in 13-page
summary late last year listing
clandestine activities that either
can be used in civilian or military
nuclear programs, or "are spe-
cific to nuclear weapons."
Among these were indications
that Iran has conducted high ex-
plosives testing and detonator de-
velopment to set off a nuclear
charge, as well as computer mod-
eling of a core of a nuclear war-
head. The report also cited
preparatory work for a nuclear
weapons test and development of
a nuclear payload for Iran's Sha-
hab 3 intermediate range missile
- a weapon that could reach
Israel.


Latvians GOP contenders face 3-state test after brief lullreject
Russian language GOP contenders face 13-state test after brief lull


RIGA, Latvia
voters resoundir
a proposal to giv
tus to Russian, t
tongue of their fc
occupiers.
About one-thil
Baltic country's
people consider
first language. M
say that accordii
tus to the Russia
in the nation's cc
would reverse w
claim has been:
discrimination.
With nearly 7c
ballots counted
percent of voters
were against Ru
national language
to the Central El
mission results.


- Latvian
ngly rejected
ve official sta-
:he mother


DAVID ESPO
AP Special Correspondent


former Soviet WASHINGTON -A resur-
gent Rick Santorum hopes to
rd of the spring his next big surprise
2.1 million in Michigan. Newt Gingrich
Russian their looks for a campaign revival
lany of them in the Bible Belt. Mitt Rom-
ng official sta- ney has his home state of
ng Massachusetts, and the lux-
an language ury of picking his spots else-
titt where, if not everywhere, as
that they the race for the Republican
20 years of presidential nomination
roars back to life.
9 percent of After a brief midwinter
Saturday, 75 lull, the Republican field
s said they faces a cross-country series
issian as a of nine primaries and four
ge, according caucuses between Feb. 28
section Com- and Super Tuesday on
March 6. At stake are 518
-From wire reports delegates, more than three


times the number awarded
so far in the unpredictable
competition to pick a GOP
opponent for President
Barack Obama.
A debate Feb. 22 in Ari-
zona, the first in three
weeks and possibly the last
of the GOP campaign, adds
to the uncertainty.
The political considera-
tions are daunting as Rom-
ney, Santorum, Gingrich
and Ron Paul weigh the cost
of competing in one state
against the hope of winning
in a second or perhaps
merely running well but
gaining delegates in a third.
"Not all states are of
equal importance," said
Steve Schmidt, who helped
the GOP's 2008 nominee,
Arizona Sen. John McCain,


navigate the campaign cal-
endar as a senior adviser
According to numerous
strategists inside and out-
side the campaigns, the
Michigan primary on Feb.
28 shapes up as particularly
important contest as Rom-
ney tries to fend off a charg-
ing Santorum one week
before a 10-state night on
Super Tuesday
Yet of the 13 states, Geor-
gia has the biggest delegate
haul at stake, 76, and Gin-
grich can ill afford to lose
now where his political ca-
reer was launched in 1978.
Sensing an opportunity,
the pro-Romney group Re-
store Our Future is targeting
Gingrich in television ads in
the state, hoping to deny the
former House speaker a


sweep of the delegates and
leave some on the table for
Romney to scoop up.
Not such maneuver is
possible in Arizona. There,
all 29 delegates go to the
winner, and Romney, a for-
mer Massachusetts gover-
nor, is heavily favored.
"If you're the front-runner,
and inevitability or elec-
tability are things that are
driving the ballot, it's impor-
tant to do a combination of
both" win states and accu-
mulate delegates, Schmidt
said in an interview, offering
a description of the situation
that Romney confronts.
For Romney's rivals, first-
place finishes are critical to
creating or maintaining the
impression of momentum,
said Terry Nelson, who was


a top strategist for campaign
dropout Tim Pawlenty, a for-
mer Minnesota governor
"It's going to matter more
for Rick Santorum and
Newt Gingrich because
their campaigns are more
reliant on cash flows and
they need the victories to
maintain that," he said.
All candidates share one
objective, he added. "You go
from win to win."
Texas Rep. Ron Paul, the
only of the four contenders
without a victory so far, eyes
four chances to break
through: caucuses in Wash-
ington on March 3, and in
North Dakota, Idaho and
Alaska three days later An
unusual presidential cam-
paign trip to Alaska is
possible.











EXCURSIONS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


* \JVeerll Nojle
c,1 be1 found Con
Page A 15 of
l0(I,3,'5 CHlionirle.


Amazing


waterfall


experience


in Brazil's


rainforests

NEIL SAWYER
Special to the Chronicle

Brazil may be best
known for the
Amazon River, Rio
de Janeiro's Carnivale
and coffee, but they pale
as natural attractions to
Brazil's most visited
jewel, Iguassu Falls. The
fact that Brazil shares this
fame with Argentina does
not detract from this
spectacular creation of
nature and only
enhances the scale and
beauty of the world's
greatest waterfalls.
Deep in the heart of the Brazilian
rainforests a silver thread of water, the
Iguassu River, zigzags and curls across
a forested plateau until a rift in the
earth separates the water into 275 sep-
arate waterfalls that cascade in a shim-
mering tapestry of water, all
500,000-plus gallons of it, every second,
over the craggy
brinks.
The various
falls are accessed
by open-air trains
or shuttles, deliv-
ering visitors to a
network of paths
often chiseled
into the canyon
walls, elevated
Neil Sawyer walkways over
SPONTANEOUS water, or board-
TRAVELER walks, offering
spectacular views
of both the Brazil-
ian and Argentine
sides. The paths lead to numerous plat-
forms and viewing areas at the base of
the falls as well as upper panoramic
views on both the Brazilian and Argen-


NEIL SAWYER/Special to the Chronicle
The Iguassu River, zigzagging through the Brazilian rainforests, has an amazing collection of 275 waterfalls to inspire awe.


Visitors enjoy the beautiful falls while cooling off in the mist.


tine sides.
Because of the somewhat limited ac-
cessibility of sporadic shuttles and
trainS and the steep and uneven paths,
wheelchairs and strollers pose consid-
erable problems for visitors. Foreign
countries do not participate in "disabil-
ities acts" with which we are familiar
in the United States.
On this sunny blue-skied day, oohs
and ahhs were the most-often heard ut-
terances as hundreds of awe-struck
viewers stareD at the falls, mesmer-
ized, as if anticipating something differ-


ent to occur The torrents and thunder-
ous crashing is incessant, drowning out
any other sounds, and the spray -
when caught by the wind delivers a
refreshing shower to onlookers amid
squeals of delight
To get in touch with the reality of this
gala water show one must participate
in the event, and that is what we did:
After walking down switch-backs of
hundreds of rocky steps to the boat
launch we suited up -including life
vests for the dunking we were prom-
ised. We were prompted that the Maid


of the Mist at Niagara Falls was akin to
taking a shower at home compared to
what we were about to experience in a
small, high-powered boat that runs al-
most into the plume of the falls.
As we neared the main falls, the boat-
man "tested the waters" by sticking the
nose of the boat under a couple of
small waterfalls. I began thinking back
to my Navy survival training and could-
n't resist coaching my wife on escape
techniques should the boat capsize or
See Page A15


Enjoy quiet, recreation, fauna at Half Moon


Sumter County

acres offer

tranquil trek

JOE KORNECKI III
Special to the Chronicle
Lake Panasoffkee-Half Moon
Wildlife Management Area
consists of 9,480 acres and
lies in the remote northwestern
part of Sumter County, northeast
of Inverness. The terrain includes
pine flatwoods, cypress swamp
and oak hammock. The property
lies adjacent to the Withlacoochee
River, Gum Slough and Gum
Slough Springs Run, which were
designated Outstanding Florida
Waterways in 1989.
At Half Moon, recreational op-
portunities abound. There are 24
miles of trails for biking and hik-
ing. The property includes 13
ponds, which make for good fish-
ing opportunities for anglers.
Hunting is allowed during certain
times of the year Picnicking and
birding are other amenities that
can be enjoyed.
There were new trails added to
the property a couple of years ago
and they traverse the different
types of terrain the property has to


The peaceful forest environment off the yellow loop trail.


offer The Gateway Trail is a nice
1.2-mile hike. The trail begins at
the gate as you enter the manage-
ment area at the end of County
Road 247.
The yellow, blue, and white
trails go deeper into Half Moon.


The yellow is a 3.3-mile loop trail
that begins just as you enter Mill
Creek Road, which runs north and
south through the property.
The blue and white trail can be
accessed deeper into the property
from either Mill Creek Road or


JOE KORNECKI Ill/Special to the Chronicle

the yellow loop trail. The blue
trail is 2.7 miles and the white is
1.8 miles.
Other trail roads that connect to
Mill Creek (south to north) on the
property are: Wall, Welch, McKin-
ney, Pendarvis, Alto Landing, Old


IF YOU GO
From Inverness, take State
Road 44 8 miles east. Look
for a brown sign and go
down County Road 247. Half
Moon WMA is at the end
of C.R. 247.
Visit online at
www.swfwmd.fl.state.us

Oxford, Potter Bend, Davies and
Cedar Hammock.
These trail roads have trails
connected to them as well. Gum
Slough Spur is very remote and
takes you into a cypress swamp in
the northwestern section. The
spur can be accessed from Davies
Road.
In 1888, the town of Alto was es-
tablished on the property, but it
didn't last that long; it became ob-
solete in 1905.
Homesteads were established
on the property as well, and some
of the trail roads carry their
names. However, after 1945, these
homesteads became a part of his-
tory
White-tailed deer, feral hogs, ar-
madillos, turkeys and alligators
are some of the fauna that can be
seen at Half-Moon.
There are also cattle on the
property, so be extra careful
around them.






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Roommate has



to want help


SUNDAY EVENING FEBRUARY 19, 2012 C: Comcast,Citrus B: Bright House D : Comast, Dunnellon & Inglis F:OakForest H: Holiday Heights
c B D/n F H 6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00110:3011:00111:30
0 WESH NBC 19 191 News News Dateline NBC (In Stereo) 'PG' The Celebrity Apprentice 'PG' News Access
The House of Windsor Masterpiece Classic "Downton Abbey" Spanish Masterpiece Classic "Downton Abbey"The fam- As Time As Time
SWEDU PBS 3 3 14 6 'PG' flu disrupts Downton Abbey'PG' ily gathers for Christmas. (N) PG' Goes By Goes By
0 WUFT PBS 5 5 5 41 Keep Up AsTime... Masterpiece Classic (In Stereo) 'PG' Masterpiece Classic (In Stereo) 'PG' MI-5 "Isolated"'PG'
News Nightly Dateline NBC (In Stereo) 'PG' The Celebrity Apprentice The teams raise cash News Paid
Q WFL NBC 8 8 8 8 8 News selling sandwiches.'PG'B Program
News World America's Funniest Once Upon a Time (N) Desperate Housewives Pan Am "1964" News Sports
S WFV ABC 20 20 20 News Home Videos'PG' 'PG' (N) PG' (Season Finale) (N) Night
0_ ) CBS 10 10 10 10 10PGATour 0 News 60 Minutes (In Stereo) The Amazing Race (In TheGood Wife (N) (In CS: Miami "Last Straw" 10 News, Cindy
SWSP CBS 10 10 10 10 10 Golf (N) St N o)B Stereo)'14' (N)'14' 11pmr(N) Crawford
FOX13 6:00 News Bobs Cleveland The Napoleon Family Guy American FOX13 10:00 News The Closer "Red Tape"
0 WTVT FOX 13 13 13 13 (N) Burgers Show Simpsons Dynamite 14 Dad 14 (N) '14'
B [WCJB ABC 11 11 4 News ABC Funny Home Videos Once Upon a Time Desp.-Wives Pan Am "1964" News Brothers
Joseph CTN Coral Great Awakening Love a The Place for Miracles Daniel Jesse Pastor Great
SWCLF IND 2 2 2 22 22 PrinceG' Special Rdge Hr Child G' Kolenda Dupantis Dayna Awaken
News World America's Funniest Once Upon a Time (N) Desperate Housewives Pan Am "1964" News Grey's
S(WFTS ABC 11 11 11 News Home Videos'PG' 'PG' (N) PG' (Season Finale) (N) N Anatomy
Family Guy Family Guy Big Bang Big Bang Law & Order"Silence" Law & Order"Working ** "PerfectStranger"(2007, Suspense) Halle
S'WMTeyIND 12 12 16 '14' 14' Theory Theory 'PG' Stiff"'14' Berry, BruceWillis. R'
E wTTA MNT 6 6 6 9 9 ** "l, Robot" (2004) Will Smith. Seinfeld Seinfeld Chris Chris Paid Whacked Born Ride Paid
CS WACX TBN 21 21 In Touch Rejoice in the Lord Variety King- Journey World 40 Days Variety Dayna Gaither
S TCW 4 4 2 King of Til Death Two and Two and Criminal Minds Without a Trace "4G" NUMB3RS Serial killer. The Unit Keeping a pop
S (WTOCW 4 4 4 12 12 Queens PG' Half Men Half Men "Haunted"'14' '14' 'PG' diva safe.'14
Redneck Urban Spy Crime Cold Squad'14' Da Vinci's Inquest (In Music Mix Music Mix CiscoKid Black
2 WYiKEFAM 16 16 16 15 Advent. American Games Strike'14' (DVS) Stereo)'14' USA USA 'G' Beauty
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S[WVEA UNI 15 15 15 15 14 Futbol Mexicana Dale con Ganas PG Parodiando (SS) Saly Pimienta 14 Aguila Noticiero
m XWPX ION 17 *** "The Terminator" (1984) 'R' **2 "Out ofTime" (2003) Denzel Washington. ***t "Boyz NtheHood"
Criminal Minds "House Criminal Minds Criminal Minds Criminal Minds "Middle Criminal Minds"Intothe Criminal Minds
IAEJ 54 48 54 25 27 on Fire"'14' "Conflicted"'14 "Bloodline"'14' Man"'14' B Woods"'14 "Demonology"'14' m
*** "V for Vendetta" (2006, Action) Natalie The Walking Dead The Walking Dead Comic Book Men (N) B The Walking Dead
A 55 64 55 Portman, Hugo Weaving. Premiere. R' "Nebraska" 'Triggerfinge"'14' "Triggerfinger"'14'
Gator Boys "Stormin' Finding Bifoot (In Hillbilly Handfishin' (N) Gator Boys (N) (In Finding Bifoot (N) (In Rattlesnake Republic
WANO 52 35 52 19 21 Gators"'PG' B Stereo) 'P' .c (In Stereo) 'PG' Stereo) PG' Stereo) "Hell 'n' Back"'14'
96 19 96 The BET Awards 2011 Music, entertainment and sports in LA.'PG' TheGame Let'sStay BETTakes Hollywood
S 96 19 96 '14 Together PG'
IFRAVOl 254 51 254 Housewives/OC |Housewives/Atl. Housewives/Atl. Housewives/Atl. Housewives/Atl. Happens Atlanta
S*** "Beverly Hills Cop" (1984, Comedy- Chappelle Key& Kevin Hart: Laugh at IAin't Scared of You: "The Original Kings
BCC 27 61 27 33 Drama) Eddie Murphy R' Show Peele14' My Pain'MA, L ATribute of Comedy" (2000)
ITD 98 45 98 28 37 "Speed" ** "Kindergarten Cop" (1990 Comedy) Arnold ***2 "Speed" (1994, Action) Keanu Reeves. A transit bus is wired to
19 98 45 98 28 37 (194)'R' Schwarzenegger.(In Stereo)'PG-13' explode if it drops below 50 mph. (In Stereo) 'R'
CNBC 43 42 43 Take It Paid Diabetes IWall St. Selling Cars Biography on CNBC Porsche |Baghdad Cruise Inc.
ICNN 40 29 40 41 46 CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Presents (N) Piers Morgan CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Presents B
ii 46 40 46 6 5So 0Random! "Radio Rebel" (2012) Debby Ryan. Austin & Shake It A.N.T Jese So Random! A.N.T Austin & Shake It
ISN) 46 40 46 6 5 (In Stereo)'NR'c Ally'G' Up!'G' Farm'G' 'G' N 'G' Farm'G' Ally'G' Up!'G'
IESPNI 33 27 33 21 17 SportsCenter (N) (Live) B NBA Basketball: Nuggets at Thunder SportsCenter (N) (Live) N
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(EWTNJ 95 70 95 48 Ben. |Crossing Sunday Night Prime LivingThe G.K. |Rosary IFr Pat IDedicated ISaints IBookmark
*** "Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix" (2007, ***"Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince" (2009, Fantasy) Daniel Radcliffe.
(FANI 29 52 29 20 28 Fantasy) Daniel Radcliffe, Rupert Grint.'PG-13' New dangers lurkfor Harry, Dumbledore and theirfriends. PG'
FND 44 37 44 32 Fox News Sunday FOX Report (N) Huckabee (N) Fox News Sunday Geraldo at Large (N) Huckabee
FOOD 26 56 26 Diners |Diners Worst Cooks Cupcake Wars (N) Worst Cooks Iron Chef America Chopped
(FSNFL 35 39 35 NHL Hockey Anaheim Ducks at Florida Panthers. (Live) IPanthers The Best of Pride Connected World PokerTour
** "Ghost Rider" (2007, Action) Nicolas Cage, *** "Star Trek" (2009, Science Fiction) Chris Pine. Chronicles the early *** "StarTrek"
(X) 30 60 30 51 Eva Mendes, Wes Bentley'PG-13' days of the starship Enterprise and her crew.'PG-13' (2009) Chris Pine.
GOLF 727 67 727 LPGA ICentral PGATour Golf IPGA Tour Golf Central
*** "The Parent *** "The Parent Trap" (1998, Comedy) Lindsay Lohan. Reunited twin Frasier PG'Frasier Frasier Frasier'PG'
HALL 39 68 39 45 54 Trap" (1998)'PG' girls try to get their parents back together. 'PG' 'G' 'G'
i** "Lottery Ticket" "Little Fockers" (2010, Comedy) Robert De Luck Ace meets with a Eastbound Life'sToo Luck Ace meets with a
(II 302 201 302 2 2 (2010) Niro. (In Stereo) 'PG-13' colleague. (N)'MA' Short colleague.'MA'
HGTV 23 57 23 42 52 House |Hunters Holmes on Homes Holmes on Homes Holmes Inspection Holmes Inspection Property Brothers'G'
Modern Marvels 'PG' Ax Men "Hell Hole" Ax Men "Cowboy Up" Ax Men "Fists of Fury" Full Metal Jousting (N) Mudcats "Hot Spots"
HISTI 51 25 51 32 42 'PG'B '14'B (N)'14'B '14, L,VB 'PG'B
S** "The Secret Life of Bees" (2008, Drama) *2 "Obsessed" (2009) Idris Elba. A stalker "Taken From Me: The Tiffany Rubin Story"
LIFE] 24 38 24 31 QueenLatifah.'PG-13' threatens a married man's idyllic life. (2011)Taraji P Henson.'NR '
"You Belong to Me" 2008, Suspense) "A Trusted Man" (2011) Charisma Carpenter. "Deadly Sibling Rivalry" (2011, Suspense)
N 50 119 Shannon Elizabeth. 'NR' A mysterious stalker torments a woman. Charisma Carpenter 'NR'
l** 30 21 30 3 "Ruthless "House of the Rising Sun" (2011) Due Da1e"'(2010) Robert *** "Boogie Nights" (1997, Drama) Mark
MAX 320221 320 3 3 People" (1986) 'R' DaveBautista.'R' i...-, HWahlberg. (In Stereo)'R'
CMSNBC 42 41 42 Caught on Camera Caught on Camera |Caught on Camera |Caught on Camera The Killing Game? Predator Raw
(, 109 65 109 44 53 Alaska State Troopers OutlawBikers"Bandido Street Heat: High LA Street Racers (N) Underworld Inc. (N)'14' Street Heat: High
109 65 109 44 53 Nation"'14' Speed Justice (N) 14, L,V' Speed Justice
(NICI 28 36 28 35 25 Sponge. |Sponge. Sponge. |Sponge. 70sShow 70s Show MyWife My Wife George IGeorge Friends Friends
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44 123 Cannon"'PG' Juliet story PG' Savage" N Seaman" (N) N hire plot. 'PG' Intent'14' B
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SH 340 241 340 4 Documentary) NR' a Mother" (iTV) LiesMA' ignores Lip. (N) MA Lies'MA' ignores Lip.MA'
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SEE 732 112 732 Replay (N) (Live) Day (N) i.iii. iA Garage G'
SoiI* 37 43 37 27 36 "Rambo" (2008, Action) Sylvester Stallone, ** "WalkingTall" (2004, Action) The Rock, ** "Walking Tall" (2004, Action) The Rock,
37 43 37 27 3 JulieBenz.(In Stereo) 'R' Johnny Knny ille. nStereo'PG-13JohnnyKnoxville. (In Stereo)'PG-13'
I 1 Women's College Spotlight College Basketball Oregon at Stanford. (N) Ship Sprtsman Florida Fins & Reel
36 31 36 Basketball (Live) Shape TV Adv Sport. Skins Animals'G'
SYFY 31 59 31 26 29 "Prey" (2010) "Land of the Lost" (2009, Comedy) Will "Signs" (2002) Mel Gibson. A widower investigates Face Off
31 59 31 26 29 Berenice Bejo.'NR' B Ferrell, Anna Friel.'PG-13' huge circles in his crop fields.'PG-13'
ri **2 "Madeas Family Reunion" (2006, "Tyler Perry's Madea Goes to Jail" (2009, ** 'Tyler Perry's Madea Goes to Jail" (2009,
49 23 49 16 19 Comedy) Tyler Perry.PG-13' B Comedy) Tyler Perry'PG-13' B Comedy) Tyler Perry.'PG-13' m
S 19 53 19 30 35 "Joan of Arc"(1948, Biography) Ingrid **** "The Song of Bernadette" (1943, Drama) Jennifer Jones.A *** "The Razor's
169 53 169130 35 Bergman, Jose Ferrer. NR B young peasant experiences a miracle near Lourdes. NR Edge" (1946) 'NR'
Gold Rush "Bedrock Gold Rush "Man Down" Gold Rush "In the Gold Rush "Frozen Cruise Ship Disaster: Gold Rush "Frozen
ITt J 53 34 53 24 26 Gold"'PG'B 'PG' c Black"'PG' Out"'PG' c InsidetheConcordia Out"'PG'B
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TED 50 46 50 29 30 Holiday Special'PG' (N)'PG' c Addon diction PG
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48 33 48 31 34 Chalice" (2008, Adventure) Noah Wyle. N his children try to survive an alien invasion.'PG-13' Armory"'14'm Worlds"
9_ 54 9 44 Extreme RV's 'G' Extreme RV's 'G' Mud People (N) 'G' Sturgis: Wild Ride'PG, Sturgis: Cops 'G' Daytona Motorcycle
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jiiiTVJ 25 55 25 98 55 Most Shocking Most Shocking Bait Car Bait Car Vegas Vegas Vegas Vegas Forensic Forensic
(TVI 32 49 32 34 24 M*A*S*H M*A*S*H M*A*S*H M*A*S*H M*A*S*H M*A*S*H Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond
Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special *** "The Mummy"
A 47 32 47 17 18 Victims Unit'14 Victims Unit'14 Victims Unit'14 Victims Unit'14' Victims Unit'14 (1999) B
My FairWeddingWith My Fair Wedding With My Fair Wedding With My FairWedding With My Fair Wedding With My FairWedding With
(WE 117 69 117 David Tutera David Tutera David Tutera David Tutera David Tutera David Tutera
IWGN-A 18 18 18 18 20 Chris |Chris 30Rock Mother Mother Mother Mother |Mother News |Replay The Unit'PG'


Dear Annie: My room-
mate, "Michelle," is
suffering from de-
pression. Six months ago, she
suddenly lost interest in
going out with friends and
would cry for no reason. She
began calling in sick so many
times that she was fired. She
cashed out her 401(k) and
now sits in her room all day
watching TV and eating. In
the past six months, she has
gone from a size 10 to a size
24.
Michelle seldom bathes or
does laundry Once in a
while, she'll go on a shopping
spree. Last month, she spent
$1,000 getting oddball things
like yarn and
coffee cups. Her
bedroom is a
hoarder's c
dream, and it's
spilling over into
the rest of the
house.
Today, she
went to the mall,
and I cleaned
her bedroom so
we wouldn't get
ants from the
dirty dishes. I ANNII
found a shoebox MAILE
full of prescrip-
tion medica-
tions, all belonging to her
grandmother or ex-
boyfriend. I even found one
of mine, along with bottles of
alcohol on her nightstand. I
confronted her when she got
home (with $200 worth of
peanuts and birdseed). She
claimed she may someday
need those medications and
got angry I called her mother
with my concerns, but she
was more worried about how
it would look to her friends to
have a daughter like that.
I finally asked Michelle to
move out, and she threat-
ened to OD on the drugs. I
called the police, who told
me they could put her on sui-
cide watch for 48 hours, but
if she really wants to kill her-
self, she'll find a way My
boyfriend says I should be
prepared to find her dead
one of these days.
What else can I do? I care
about Michelle, but I can't
keep living like this. -
Stressed-Out Roomie in
Michigan
Dear Roomie: The depres-
sion combined with the out-
of-control shopping could
indicate that Michelle is
bipolar Please contact the
Depression and Bipolar Sup-
port Alliance (dbsalliance.
org) for suggestions. But ulti-
mately, you must consider
your own well-being. If
Michelle is turning your


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Shocks
6 Soft mineral
10 Phi--Kappa
14 To pieces
19 Any
20 Celestial hunter
22 Where Greeks once met
24 Defense system
25 Rescues
26 Hair preparation
27 Challenged
28 Evergreen genus
29 Pace
30 Hinder
32 Scandinavians
34 Something done
35 Most uncanny
39 More impolite
41 Cheap eatery
(2 wds.)
43 Reverie
45 Legends
47 Mug with a lid
48 Certain voter (abbr.)
51 Kind of sale
53 Volcanic output
55 Annex
56 One---- kind
59 Fall stone
61 Start for gram
or tone
62 Twofold
64 Of roses and mums
66 Meat stock jelly
68 Pavilion
70 Vendor
72 Nonstandard speech
73 Cowboys, at times
75 Tantalize
77 Disconnect
79 Indian of Peru
80 Me, andl
82 Destroys
84 Study of Chinese culture
86 "- Fiction"
88 Liking
90 Gratify
91 Abuse
95 Antlered animal
97 Stop computing
(2 wds.)
101 Ali-
102 Kind of lab dish
104 Proportion
106 Curies' discovery


Charlotte -
"- days hath September..."
Brink
Luft or Doone
Zend- -
Pathological fluids
Whirlpool
Tear
Private place
Garment border
Borrower's problem
The Beaver State
Color
Wise man
Merchandise
In the raw
Recall past times
Neglects
Investor's concern
Spoken
Milan's La -
Revealed
Cash advance
Old-womanish
Smell
An explosive, for short
- cum laude
Eats
Slender candle
Misbehave
(2 wds.)
Direct
Farming need
Crooked
Greedy ones
A possessive


DOWN
1 James or Ventura
2 Egg-shaped
3 Pry
4 Fearful
5 Sound or solar (abbr.)
6 Rocky hill
7 Dry
8 Raincoat part
9 Disguise
10 From- to worse
11 Mild oath
12 The Pentateuch
13 Hippodromes
14 Exist
15 Forgive officially


Word at parting
Hurries
Commerce
The poor
"- Fideles"
Soaks flax
Ledge
Work unit
Line of stitches
Kind of magical card
- Island
Black and Beverly
French painter
Persons
Bellow
- salts
One of the
Yokums
Hopeless case
Yarns
Chimp relative
Ornate
Marine plant
Perjurer's
specialty
Jeans brand
Hodgepodge
Moved slowly
Tense
Part of ESP
Of the kidney
Drink noisily
Thailand, formerly
Revolving part
Swift
Old portico
Lawful
Rural ways
Punta del -
Light purple
"A Doll's House" playwright
Talk back to
- and true
Sea duck
Bouquet
Discharged
Laughable
Headless nail
Like a sale
garment (abbr.)?
Nash the poet
Crafted
Frome or Allen
Forbidden
- Rice Burroughs
Protection


119 Join, as draft
animals
123 Grape for raisins
125 Sepulcher
126 Flightless bird
127 Snood
129 Ground, as grain
130 Beetle
132 RiggorRoss
134 Minnesota city


home into a hoarder's para-
dise and you are overly
stressed, try to help her find
another place to live. Check
on her as often as you can.
But you have no obligation to
be held hostage to the de-
structive behavior of some-
one who refuses to get help.
Dear Annie: My daughter-
in-law says if food is on the
floor for three seconds or
less, it is OK for her 4-year-
old son to eat it.
At my house, I insist that
he wash his hands before
eating, and when I can, I
clean his fingernails with a
small brush and soap be-
cause his nails are always
filthy At his own
house, however, he
never washes his
hands before
meals. Should I say
something? -Con-
cerned Grandma
Dear Concerned:
Unless your grand-
son is frequently
sick, say nothing. A
lot of people follow
the "three-second
rule" about
E'S dropped food. It's
BOX not the healthiest
thing to do, but we
assume the floor is
cleaned regularly and the
food isn't covered in grime
(or worse). Continue to teach
your grandson appropriate
hygiene in your home, and
suggest to your son that he do
the same. Beyond that, let it
go.
DearAnnie: "Broken" said
his ex-girlfriend dropped by,
they had a couple of beers,
and because he had taken a
sleep aid earlier, he fell
asleep and woke up having
sex with her You said he ap-
parently didn't make a con-
scious decision to cheat on
his current girlfriend.
I wish you had pointed out
that what happened to him
was rape. Any person who
wakes up in that situation is
a victim, regardless of their
gender -Concerned Citizen
Dear Concerned: If the ex
had given him the sleeping
pill, we would agree. But she
was unaware of it In fact, it's
possible "Broken" initiated
the sexual contact.


Annie's Mailbox is written
by Kathy Mitchell and
Marcy Sugar longtime
editors of the Ann Landers
column. Email anniesmail
box@comcast.net, or write
to: Annie's Mailbox,
c/o Creators Syndicate,
737 Third St.,
Hermosa Beach, CA 90254.


Highways
AMuppet
Portland's state
Run off
Fight (hyph.)
Tragic lover
Monikers
Trap
Word of
agreement


Narcotic
Curved letter
Skill
Special -
Opp. of NNE


Puzzle answer is on Page A16.


2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


A14 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2012


ENTERTAINMENT


I
B





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Veterans NOTES


Due to space considera-
tions, the Veterans Notes some-
times contain only basic
information regarding each post.
For more information about
scheduled activities, meals and
more for a specific post, call or
email that post at the contact
listed.
The Citrus County Chapter
of SCORE, in conjunction with
the Veterans Fast Launch Initia-
tive Program, will offer a free
small business institute work-
shop for veterans. Veterans
who are in business or planning
to start a business qualify for this
program. The workshop starts at
6 p.m. Friday, March 9, at the
College of Central Florida Citrus
Campus. The seminar will run for
11 weeks.
To apply, visit www.vetsfast
launch.org\coupon-signup, print
the coupon and call the college
at 352-249-1210 and register for
the workshop. Bring the coupon
to the first meeting. The cost of
the workshop is $100 and will be
completely covered by the
coupon.
For more information, call
SCORE at 352-249-1236.
The U.S. Air Force is look-
ing for prior enlisted men and
women from all services inter-
ested in both direct duty assign-
ments in previously obtained
career fields or retraining into se-
lect career fields. Some of the
careers include aircraft electron-
ics/mechanical areas, cyber op-
eration fields, and various other
specialties. Enlisted career open-
ings that include the opportuni-
ties to retrain consist of special
operations positions and un-
manned aerial vehicle.
Assignment locations are
based on Air Force needs.
For more information, call
352-476-4915.
Citrus County Veterans
Coalition has a new building
holding freezers, refrigerators
and all necessary requirements
to provide food to veterans in
need. Food donations and volun-
teers are always welcomed and
needed.
The CCVC is on the DAV
property in Inverness at the cor-
ner of Paul and Independence,
off U.S. 41 north. Hours of opera-
tion are 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tues-
day and Thursday. Appointments
are encouraged by calling
727-492-0292.
CCVC general meetings are
at 10 a.m. the fourth Thursday
monthly at the DAV building in In-
verness. All active duty and hon-
orably discharged veterans, their
spouses, widows and widowers,
along with other veterans' organi-
zations and current coalition
members are welcome. Mem-
bers are encouraged to attend
general meetings.
Annual membership donation
is $10 for a calendar year or $25
for three years. The CCVC is a
nonprofit corporation, and your
donations are tax deductible.
Current members should check
their membership card for expira-
tion dates, and renew with Gary
Williamson at 352-527-4537, or
at the meeting. Visit
www.ccvcfl.org.
Blanton-Thompson
American Legion Post 155,
6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway,
Crystal River.
All are welcome to join the
post for a 4077 M*A*S*H
fundraiser costume party at the


DAVA Mid-winter Conference


Special to the Chronicle
Several members of the Disabled American Veterans No. 70 Auxiliary attended the Mid -win-
ter Conference recently in Lake Mary. Those attending were Commander Linda Brice, Treas-
urer Shirley McElhiney, Adjutant Lynn Armitage, Chaplain and Membership Chairman Lucy
Godfrey and State Consultant and Past National Commander Lucille McCarthy. From left
are: Brice, McCarthy and National Commander Patti Rapisand.


post beginning at 4 p.m. Satur-
day, Feb. 25. Dinner of open-
face roast beef sandwiches and
sides will be served at 5 p.m.;
cost is $10. Entertainment will be
by J&S starting at 6 p.m.
For information about the post
and its activities, call Cmdr. Jay
Conti Sr. at 352-795-6526 or visit
www.postl55.org.
American Legion Auxil-
iary Unit 155 meets at 7:30 p.m.
the fourth Tuesday of every
month at the post. The American
Legion Auxiliary is the world's
largest women's patriotic service
organization with nearly 1 million
members in 10,100 communi-
ties. The principles of the Ameri-
can Legion Auxiliary are to serve
veterans, their families and the
community.
Eligibility in the Auxiliary is
open to mothers, wives, sisters,
daughters, granddaughters,
great-granddaughters or grand-
mothers of members of the
American Legion and of de-
ceased veterans who served
during war time (also stepchil-
dren); stepchildren; and female
veterans who served during war
time. Call Unit President Shawn
Mikulas, 352-503-5325, or mem-
bership chairman Barbara
Logan, 352-795-4233.
For more information, call Unit
President Shawn Mikulas, 352-
503-5325, or Barbara Logan,
352-795-4233.
0 H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post
10087, Beverly Hills, offers
meals, bingo, golf, karaoke and
pool. Review the monthly
newsletter for activities and up-
dates, and call the post at 352-
746-0440. The VFW Post 10087
is off County Road 491, directly
behind Superior Bank.
The Ladies Auxiliary will host a
Chinese auction fundraiser on
Saturday, March 3. Doors will
open at 10 a.m. and drawings
will begin at 1 p.m. Admission is
$2.50 to benefit the Junior Re-
serve Officers' Training Corps,
which instills in students the
value of citizenship service to the
U.S., personal responsibility and
a sense of accomplishment.


Hot dogs will be available for
$1, as well as free dessert and
coffee. For more information, call
Bettie at 352-746-1989 or Donna
at 352-746-5215.
Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs,
352-465-4864. Wi Fi is now
available at the post; bring your
laptop or any other item that will
access the Internet and enjoy the
free service.
All are welcome to the pork
chop dinner from 5 to 6:30 p.m.
Friday, Feb. 24 at the post. Cost
is $8.
Information regarding any post
events is available at the post or
call 352-4654864.
Disabled American Veter-
ans Chapter No. 70 meets at 2
p.m. the second Tuesday
monthly at the chapter hall, 1039
N. Paul Drive, Inverness, at the
intersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41. The chap-
ter hall is on the corner of Inde-
pendence Highway and Paul
Drive.
We thank veterans for their
service and welcome any dis-
abled veteran to join us from 9
a.m. to 1 p.m. any Tuesday or
Thursday at the chapter hall. This
is also the time that we accept
donated nonperishable foods for
our continuing food drive.
Our main function is to assist
disabled veterans and their fami-
lies when we are able. Anyone
who knows a disabled veteran or
their family who requires assis-
tance is asked to call Com-
mander Richard Floyd
727-492-0290, Ken Stewart at
352-419-0207, or 352-344-3464.
Service Officer Joe McClister
is available to assist any veteran
or dependents with their disability
claim by appointment. Call 352-
344-3464 and leave a message.
Ambulatory veterans who wish
to schedule an appointment for
transportation to the VA medical
center in Gainesville should call
the veterans' service office at
352-527-5915. Mobility chal-
lenged veterans who wish to
schedule an appointment for


transportation to the VA medical
center in Gainesville may call the
Citrus County Transit office for
wheelchair transportation; call
352-527-7630.
For more information about
chapter activities, veterans' bene-
fits or membership, Call Ken
Stewart at 352-419-0207; leave
a message, if desired, should the
machine answer.
Disabled American Veter-
ans Auxiliary Unit No. 70 meets
at 2 p.m. the second Tuesday of
the month at the chapter hall,
1039 N. Paul Drive, Invemess.
The auxiliary plans a visit to
the VA nursing homes) and
needs toiletry items such as
packaged razors, combs, hair-
brushes, toothbrushes, sham-
poos and deodorant to fill ditty
bags, They are also accepting
cotton material and yarn to make
ditty bags, lap robes, wheelchair
and walker bags for disabled
veterans.
The auxiliary membership has
grown to include many more ex-
tended families. Call Auxiliary
Commander Linda Brice at 352-
560-3867 or Adjutant Lynn Ar-
mitage at 352-341-5334 for
information.
Eugene Quinn VFW Post
4337 and Ladies Auxiliary, 906
State Road 44 E., Inverness.
The public is welcome to join
the post family for the annual
Chili/Cornbread Cook-off and
Chinese Auction Sunday, Feb.
26. Doors open at 1 p.m.; judging
at 2 p.m. with prizes for first-,
second- and third-place winners.
Auction tickets go on sale at 1
p.m. with drawings to pick the
winners at 3 p.m.
Stop by the canteen and pick
up a current monthly calendar.
Call the post at 352-344-3495
for information about all weekly
post activities, or visit
www.vfw4337.org.
The American Legion
Wall-Rives Post 58 and Auxil-
iary, 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnellon.
Dunnellon Young Marines will
meet at 6 p.m. Tuesday.
Free AARP tax services will be
available 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.


Wednesday through April 11.
For more information, call Wayne
Sloan at 352-489-5066.
The public is welcome at
bingo at 6 p.m. Thursday.
For information about activities
and the post, call Carl Boos at
352-489-3544.
Rolling Thunder Chapter
7, a POW/MIA awareness group,
meets at 10 a.m. second Satur-
day at the VFW Post 10087 in
Beverly Hills. Call Bob Bruno,
secretary, at 352-201-1228.
SA Marine Corps League
Ladies Auxiliary Citrus Unit
meets at 1 p.m. the third Tues-
day monthly at the VFW in Bev-
erly Hills. New members are
welcome. Membership fee is $30
a year. Female relatives ages 16
or older who are a wife, widow,
mother, stepmother, sister,
daughter, stepdaughter, grand-
mother, granddaughter, aunt or
daughter-in-law of honorably dis-
charged Marines and FMF
Corpsmen are eligible to belong
to the Marine Corps League. Fe-
male Marines (former, active and
reserves) and associate mem-
bers are eligible for MCLA mem-
bership. Call President Elaine
Spikes at 352-860-2400 or Sec-
retary/Treasurer Joan Cecil at
352-726-0834 for information.
Hunger and Homeless
Coalition -Anyone who knows
of a homeless veteran in need of
food, haircut, voter ID, food
stamps, medical assistance or
more blankets is asked to call Ed
Murphy at the Hunger and
Homeless Coalition at 352-
382-0876, or pass along this
phone number to the veteran.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW Post
4252 and Ladies Auxiliary 3190
N. Carl G. Rose Highway, State
Road 200, Hernando; 352-726-
3339. Send emails to
vfw4252@tampabay.rr.com.
Everyone is welcome. Post
and auxiliary meet at 6:30 p.m.
every second Thursday.
Post honor guard is available
for funerals, flag raising and
nursing home visits.
The public is welcome to the
Friday night dinner and dance at
5p.m.
See our post activities: Google
us as VFW 4252, Hernando.
Dumas-Hartson VFW Post
8189 is on West Veterans Drive,
west of U.S. 19 between Crystal
River and Homosassa. Call
352-795-5012.
VFW membership is open to
men and women veterans who
have participated in an overseas
campaign, including service in
Iraq and Afghanistan. The Ko-
rean Campaign medal remains
open, as well. Call the post at
the phone number above for
information.
Joe Nic Barco Memorial
VFW Post 7122, 8191 S. Florida
Ave., Floral City. For information
about the post and its activities,
call 352-637-0100.
Friday is AUCE fish or three-
piece chicken for $7.
American Legion, Beverly
Hills Memorial Post 237,4077
N. Lecanto Highway, in the Bev-
erly Plaza, invites all eligible vet-
erans and their families to visit
our post and consider joining our
Legion family: American Legion,
Sons of the American Legion
(SAL), or American Legion Auxil-
iary (ALA). Color Guard/Honor
Guard accepting volunteers.
Beverly Hills Memorial Ameri-
can Legion Post 237, by ap-


proval of its Executive Board on
Jan. 22, and by those members
present at the Jan. 26 general
membership meeting, has
changed its regular meeting time
to 7 p.m. on the fourth Tuesday
monthly beginning Tuesday, Feb.
28. Contact the post at 352-
746-5018 for more information.
American Legion Riders
Chapter now being formed. Visit
the post for printed schedule or
visit the website at
www.post237.org. For
information, call the post at
352-746-5018.
The Korean War Veterans
Association, Citrus Chapter
192 meets at the VFW Post
10087, Beverly Hills, at 1 p.m.
the first Tuesday monthly. Any
veteran who has seen honorable
service in any of the Armed
Forces of the U.S. is eligible for
membership if said service was
within Korea, including territorial
waters and airspace, at any time
from Sept. 3, 1945, to the pres-
ent or if said service was outside
of Korea from June 25,1950, to
Jan. 31, 1955. For information,
call Hank Butler at 352-563-
2496, Neville Anderson at 352-
344-2529 or Bob Hermanson at
352489-0728.
Allen-Rawls American Le-
gion Post 77 and Auxiliary Unit
77 meet the first Thursday
monthly at the Inverness High-
lands Civic Center at 4375 Little
Al Point Road, Inverness. Call
Post Cmdr. Norman Brumett at
352-860-2981 orAuxiliary
president Marie Cain at
352-637-5915.
The post will host a dinner
from 5 to 7 p.m. Saturday, Feb.
25, at the center. On the menu
are creamy onion soup, cabbage
soup, baked steak with mush-
room gravy, baked chicken
mashed potatoes, green beans,
candied carrots, dinner rolls, as-
sorted desserts, coffee, iced tea
and soda. Cost is $8; children
younger than 10 eat for $4.
Entertainment will be provided
by Bernie at the keyboard. Profits
from the dinner will be used to
support the American Legion
programs such as for children
and youths, Boys State, Boy
Scouts, Americanism, school
medals and more. For more in-
formation, call Post Cmdr. Nor-
man Brumett at 352-860-2981 or
352476-2134, or the day of the
dinner at 352-726-0444.
U.S. Submarine Veterans
(USSVI)-Sturgeon Base meets
at 11 a.m. the first Saturday
monthly at the American Legion
Post 155, 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River. Visitors
and interested parties are always
welcome. Call Base Cmdr. Billy
Wein at 352-726-5926.
American Legion Post 166
meets 1:30 p.m., first Saturday
monthly at the Dumas-Hartson
VFW Post 8189 Ladies Auxiliary
facility on Veterans Drive, Ho-
mosassa, on the west side of
U.S. 19 at Dixon's Auto Sales
across from Harley-Davidson.
We meet in the small building to
the left of the main building. All
former and current post mem-
bers, as well as all interested vet-
erans, are cordially invited to be
a part of American Legion
Post 166.
For information about the post
or the American Legion, call and
leave a message for the post

See VETERANS/Page A16


AWE
Continued from Page A13

get sucked into the waterfall. My
thoughts turned inward, "Why
would I want to spend my last
breath of life being hammered by
a waterfall?"


Next was the true test of our
boat's agility and durability. We
headed into an absolute torrent of
water and blinding spray from
every angle, while being pounded
by what felt like tons of water!
Then the question: "Why am I
doing this?" I've caught myself
babbling a couple of times since:
"Why did I do that?" I have yet to


see a picture from inside a water-
fall!
Weather was in the mid-90s, and
humid, so the shower of the falls
was a welcome refreshment -
only to be undone on the strenu-
ous climb out of the canyon. It was
then I questioned: "And I paid to
do this?" Yes, and I'd do it again
given the opportunity.
Ig uass u


Falls is another of the UNESCO
sites that is well worth a visit even
if you have seen the other major
falls of the world Niagara Falls
in the United States and Victoria
Falls in Zimbabwe.
After the dazzling display in the
cataracts, the Iguassu River set-
tles back into its channel as it
joins the Parana River, which then
flows along the border of Ar-


gentina and Paraguay to the At-
lantic Ocean, by way of Buenos
Aires.



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Karyn. They enjoy independent


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TRAVEL & COMMUNITY


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2012 A15


=9





A16 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2012


Engagement

Huddleston/Goulet


Lawrence and Susan
Goulet of Inverness an-
nounce the engagement of
their son, Chad Goulet, to
Katie Huddleston, daughter
of Wayne and Martha Hud-
dleston of Keystone Heights.
The bride-elect is a 2009
graduate of Palm Beach At-
lantic University with a
Bachelor of Science degree
in molecular biology and
biotechnology, and a 2011
Master of Science degree in
clinical research.
She is in her second year
of study for her doctorate of
pharmacy at Campbell Uni-
versity and is a pharmacy
intern at CVS Pharmacy
A biology lab instructor at
CU, she is in the Kappa Psi
Pharmaceutical Fraternity
Inc. and the American Phar-
macists Association.
Her fiance is a 2010 grad-
uate of Palm Beach Atlantic
University with a Bachelor
of Science in business ad-
ministration.
He is currently associated
with Smartphone Experts
Inc.
The couple will exchange




VETERANS
Continued from Page A15


commander at 352-697-1749.
Your call will be returned within
24 to 48 hours.
Seabee Veterans of Amer-
ica (SVA) Island X-23 welcomes
all Seabees and Honeybees to
its monthly meeting at 10:30 a.m.
the third Tuesday monthly at Cit-
rus Hills Country Club, Rose and
Crown restaurant, Citrus Hills.
Call John Lowe at 352-3444702.
Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219
and Cabane 1219 conducts its
meetings at 7 p.m. the second
Thursday monthly at the Ameri-
can Legion Post 155 on State
Road 44 in Crystal River (6585
E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway). For
more information about the 40/8,
call the Chef De Gare Tom Smith
at 352-601-3612; for the Ca-
bane, call La Presidente Carol
Kaiserian at 352-746-1959; or
visit us on the Web at
www.Postl55.org.
Aaron A. Weaver Chapter
776 Military Order of the Pur-
ple Heart (MOPH) meets at 2
p.m. the third Tuesday of Janu-
ary, March, May, July, September
and November. All combat-
wounded veterans, lineal de-
scendants, next of kin, spouses
and siblings of Purple Heart re-
cipients are cordially invited to at-
tend and to join the ranks of
Chapter 776. To learn more
about Aaron A. Weaver Chapter
776 MOPH, visit the chapter's
website at www.citruspurple-
heart.org or call 352-382-3847.
Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment
1139 will conduct its regular
meeting at 7 p.m. the third
Wednesday monthly at DAV
Post 70 in Inverness at the inter-
section of Independence High-
way and U.S. 41 North. All
Marines are welcome. Call Jerry
Cecil at 352-726-0834 or Wayne


nuptial vows in a spring cer-
emony at 3 p.m. June 2, 2012,
at Ponte Vedra Beach.



Howard at 352-634-5254.
Marine Corps League Cit-
rus Detachment 819 meets at 7
p.m. the last Thursday monthly at
VFW Post 10087 on Vet Lane in
Beverly Hills, behind Superior
Bank. Sodal hour follows. All
Marines and FMF Corpsmen are
welcome. Meet new friends and
discuss past glories. Call Morgan
Patterson at 352-746-1135, Ted
Archambault at 352-382-046
or Bion St. Bernard at 352-
697-2389.
Gilley-Long-Osteen VFW
Post 8698 is at 520 State Road
40 E., Inglis, one mile east of
U.S. 19. The Men'sAuxiliary
meets at 7 p.m. the second Mon-
day. LAVFW meets at 5 p.m. and
the membership meeting is at
6:30 p.m. the third Wednesday at
the post.
Call the post at 352447-3495
for information about the post
and its activities.
Fleet Reserve Associa-
tion, Branch 186 will meet at 3
p.m. the third Thursday monthly
at the DAV Building, Independ-
ence Highway and U.S. 41
North, Inverness. Call Bob
Huscher, secretary, at
352-344-0727.
American Legion Herbert
Surber Post 225 meets at 7
p.m. the third Thursday monthly
at the New Testament Baptist
Church of Floral City, 9850 S.
Parkside Ave. adjoining Floral
Park, southeast side. All eligible
veterans are welcome to join.
Landing Ship Dock (LSD)
sailors meet at Denny's in Crystal
River at 2 p.m. the fourth Thurs-
day monthly. Call Jimmie at
352-621-0617.
Suncoast U.S. Navy
Armed Guard and Merchant
Marine Veterans of World War
II meetings for 2012 will be at
11:30 a.m. at Kally K's restaurant
in Spring Hill on the following
dates: March 10, April 14, May
12, Sept. 8, Oct. 13, Nov. 10 and
Dec. 8.


In SERVICE


Tiffany J. Beck

Air Force Airman Tiffany J.
Beck graduated from basic mili-
tary training at Lackland Air
Force Base, San Antonio,
Texas.
The airman completed an in-
tensive, eight-week program
that included training in military
discipline and studies, Air Force
core values, physical fitness


and basic warfare principles
and skills.
Airmen who complete basic
training earn four credits toward
an associate in applied science
degree through the Community
College of the Air Force.
Beck is the daughter of Bob-
bie and Thomas Beck of Bev-
erly Hills. She is a 2010
graduate of Lecanto High
School.


Sunday' PUZZLER

Puzzle is on Page A14.


JOLTS TIALC BETA APART
EV E RY ORION AG 0 R A AGORA RAD AR
EIS -'E N D A R-E DNE R I G'A
S T E P R STE ET ERVD A N E S DI N-E E-D
SA E S TRIU N E D A S H IU SE
STEP DETER DANES DEED
EERIEST RUDER HASH HOUSE
DREAM MYTHSS TE IN
| |T | | A |RIA G EIS o1o TIl L Li0 F A
SPAL MONO DUAL FLORAL
AS TENT S E L L ER S L A NG
RO P E RS T E A SE S E V ER I N C A
M|Y SE L F RUI NS S I NO L O|G Y
P u LP TASTE SATE
MI S T R E A T M OO S E L O G 0 F F
BA B A PE TR I R AT I O A D I U M
R US SE THIRTY EDGE LORNA
AV ES T A S ERA E DD Y RE ND
DEN HIEM D E B|T OREGONID Y|E
MAG US GOODS NAK ED
REMI N ISCE I TS R E T URNS S
O R A L SCAA A B AR E D L OAN
ANI LE A ROMA AN T R0O SUIM M A
DI NES T APER A C T U P S T E EIR
S E BENTE D S B EIN T HOGS WHOSE


TOGETHER & COMMUNITY


Engagement

Fagan/Holbrook


Joseph and Margaret
Fagan of Homosassa an-
nounce the engagement of
their daughter, Katie
Fagan of Knoxville, Tenn.,
to Scott Holbrook of
Knoxville, son of Mike and
Gail Holbrook of Corbin,
Ky, and Constance and
Jack Carson of Folsom,
Calif.
The bride-elect is a
graduate of the University


of Tennessee, Knoxville,
where she was a member
of Kappa Delta sorority.
Her fiance is a graduate
of Middle Tennessee State
University, Murfreesboro,
Tenn..
The couple will ex-
change vows in a summer
evening ceremony at 6:30
p.m. Aug. 25, 2012, at the
Historic Bleak House in
Knoxville.


Engagement=

Peets/Parker


Ron and Lori Peets of ber of Phi Eta Sigma
Pine Ridge announce the Honor Society.
engagement of their Her fiance is a nuclear
daughter, Corrissa Peets engineering student at the
of Pine Ridge, to Paul University of Florida in
Parker III of Homosassa, Gainesville, and a mem-
son of Bonnie Parker of ber of the Nuclear Engi-
Homosassa. neering Society and the
The bride-elect is a UF Honors Program.
nursing student at Florida Nuptial vows will be ex-
Gulf Coast University in changed at 4 p.m. Dec. 29,
Fort Myers, and is a mem- 2012, in Lecanto.


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"Star Wars: Episode I" (PG)
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p.m., 7:10 p.m., 10:02 p.m.
No passes.
"The Vow" (PG-13) 1:35 p.m.,
4:10 p.m., 7:15 p.m., 9:45 p.m.
"The Woman in Black"
(PG-13) 1:50 p.m., 4:50 p.m.,
7:45 p.m., 10:10 p.m.
"Big Miracle" (PG) 1:45 p.m.,
4:20 p.m., 7:25 p.m.
"The Grey" (R) ID required.
10 p.m.
"The Descendants" (R)
ID required. 1:40 p.m., 4:25
p.m., 7:05 p.m., 9:50 p.m.

Visit www.chronicleonline.com
for area movie listings and
entertainment information.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Wedding

Lea/Llewellyn


Lisa Marie Lea and
Charles Andrew Llewellyn
of Fort Worth, Texas, ex-
changed nuptial vows on
Nov 12, 2011, at Good Shep-
herd Catholic Community.
Father Richard Eldredge
officiated the evening cere-
mony
The new bride is the
daughter of Mona Elliott
and Michael Lea of Ho-
mosassa. The groom is the
son of James and Marilyn
Llewellyn of Fort Worth.
Given in marriage by her
parents, the bride wore a
corset-style Maggie Sottero
mermaid gown with custom
grosgrain and crystal sash.
She donned a white rabbit
fur bolero and Old Gringo
cowboy boots gifted by her
groom. Her bouquet was de-
signed with green cymbid-
ium orchids, green
hydrangea, green dianthus
pods, green roses and green
hypericum berries, all
wrapped with the groom's
grandfather's antique black
rosary
Amanda Cole of
Gainesville, sorority sister
of the bride, served as maid
of honor. She wore a green
Lula Kate Dupioni silk cus-
tom gown with a vintage
broach gifted by the bride.
Bridesmaids were Alexis
Llewellyn, Fort Worth,
daughter of the groom; Eliz-
abeth Campagna, Marlton,
N.J., sorority sister of the
bride; Amelia Daniels,
British Virgin Islands,
sorority sister of the bride;
Andrea Farquhar, Jack-
sonville, sorority sister of
the bride; Ashley Glover,
Ocala, sorority sister of the
bride; Rachel Helton, Ho-
mosassa, childhood friend
of the bride; Melissa
McHale, Tampa, childhood
friend of the bride; Laura
Neil, Indio, Calif., sorority
sister of the bride; Marisa
Roberts, San Francisco,
Calif., sorority sister of the
bride; Brandy Seawright,
Madison, Miss., close friend
of the bride; Shannon
Smith, Jacksonville Beach,
sorority sister of the bride;
and Amanda Wedgworth,
Wellington, childhood
friend of the bride.
The attendants wore Lula
Kate Dupioni silk custom
dresses and cowboy boots;
carried bouquets of white
spider mums.
Flower Girl: Lily Lea,
niece of the bride, was
flower girl and Landon Lea,
nephew of the bride, was
ring-bearer.
Ryan Maxwell of Fort
Worth, close friend of the


couple, served as best man.
Ushers and groomsmen
were Stephen Bottoms, Fort
Worth, close friend of the
groom; Byron Godwin, Fort
Worth, close friend of the
groom; Loren Lea, Fort
Worth, brother of the bride;
Michael Lea, deployed to
Afghanistan, brother of the
bride; David Llewellyn, Fort
Worth, brother of the groom;
Frank Llewellyn, Bayside,
Wisc., brother of the groom;
Robert Llewellyn, Dallas,
Texas, brother of the groom;
John Llewellyn, Fort Worth,
brother of the groom; Paul
Llewellyn, Fort Worth,
brother of the groom;
Stephen Llewellyn, Coto de
Caza, Calif., brother of the
groom; Donald Meredith,
Joshua, Texas, close friend
of the groom; and Adam
Thompson, Dallas, close
friend of the couple.
A reception followed at
Austin Ranch, Grapevine,
Texas. After a honeymoon
trip to Rome, Italy, and a 10-
day Mediterranean cruise,
the couple are at home in
Hurst, Texas.
The new bride has a
Bachelor of Science degree
from the University of
Florida and is associated
with Walsworth Publishing
Co. in yearbook sales. Her
husband has a Bachelor of
Science degree from the
University of Texas and a
Master of Science degree
from Texas Wesleyan Uni-
versity. He is principal at
Saint Andrew Catholic
School with the Roman
Catholic Diocese of Fort
Worth.


Divorces 2/6/12 to 2/12/12
David Lynn Blackburn,
Inverness vs. Jody Kay
Blackburn, Inverness
Patricia A. Buchmaier,
Citrus Springs vs. Robert S.
Buchmaier, Citrus Springs
Alice M. Ashbrook Elder,
Citrus Springs vs. Michael S.
Elder, Crystal River
Brian Gerald Furchner,
Sudbury Ontario vs. Sandra
Lynn Furchner, Beverly Hills
Amber Lynette Witty,
Lecanto vs. Brian Ward Witty,


Crystal River

Marriages 2/6/12 to 2/12/12
Mark Craig Carlon, Old Town/
Regina Marie Loring,
Beverly Hills
Jack Eugene Graham,
Crystal River/Kelly Lynn Simms,
Crystal River
James Albert Kerce Jr.,
Homosassa/Amelia Ann
Norman, Homosassa
Casey Wheeler Reeves,
Crystal River/Jamie Marie Cain,
Crystal River


r


. lt


For the RECORD


Come Pinch


A Little Tail


Mardi Gras Homosassa Style







Don't miss out on the Food, Fun and Live Music!
If you'd like to participate in the parade, be a vendor or would like
more information please call Tom Feeney at 352-201-2520, Marybeth
Nayfield at352-795-7297 orE-mailC ..... I, .. ..... ..
TEENI TOC www.shrimpapalooza.com
"KIDS HELPING KID 121
BrI.II N | IIN 1......


I Rotary Club of Homosassa Springs


2-19


2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS











SPORTS


0 Golf/B2
0 Tennis/B2
0 Basketball/B3
0 Scoreboard/B4
0 Hockey/B4
0 Boxing/B5
0 Entertainment/B6


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Former big-leaguers tutor Citrus players


C.J. RISK
Correspondent
BEVERLY HILLS Learn
from the best.
A simple premise to adhere to
when trying to master any sub-
ject. On Saturday, members of the
Central Citrus Little League had
just that opportunity presented to
them when four former Major
League Baseball players showed
up for a free clinic at Central
Ridge Park.
Part of the Legends for Youth
program presented by the MLB
Players Alumni Association, 200
kids between ages 6 and 16 got
some valuable tips from John
Frascatore, Bob Stinson, Lenny


Faedo and Gerry Fosnow
And so did their coaches.
"That's a big part of it, really,"
said Central Citrus Little League
coach coordinator Randy Adams,
"just listening to these guys talk.
... Hopefully, our coaches will
pick something up, too."
The players didn't try to lecture
those in attendance on the game's
finer points. Rather, they demon-
strated, dividing the players by
age group with their coaches into
separate stations.
Faedo, a shortstop with the
Minnesota Twins from 1980-84,
worked with each player on basic
fielding techniques, tossing
ground balls and pop-ups to them
by turn.


Two hundred kids between ages 6 and 16
got some valuable tips from John Frascatore,
Bob Stinson, Lenny Faedo and Gerry Fosnow.


"A lot of kids make errors be-
cause they think it won't be hit to
them," Faedo said. "You should
always be ready
"Don't sit back on the ball,
come and get it. And keep your
eyes on the ball, watch it all the
way into your glove."
Stinson, a switch-hitting catcher
who played 12 seasons with six
teams, instructed kids on the art
of hitting (in 1978, Stinson played
124 games with Seattle, batting.258
with 14 doubles, three triples, 11
home runs and 55 runs batted in).


"When you practice something,
you should practice what you're
going to do," he said, then told the
kids, "Now, I want you to jump
into the air without bending your
knees. You can't, can you? Because
you don't have any power. If you
want to hit the ball hard, you have
to bend your knees (when you bat)."
Frascatore and Fosnow, former
pitchers, worked with their par-
ticular groups on throwing. A right-
handed reliever from 1994-2001
with St Louis, Toronto and Arizona,
Frascatore kept his message basic.


"The most important thing you
have to learn is to throw," he said.
"Many kids are hurt today be-
cause they don't throw the right
way"
It doesn't matter what position
one's playing, Frascatore added.
Start by throwing the ball the cor-
rect way, with your hand behind
the ball, even "when you're play-
ing catch. You have to take care of
your arm."
Fosnow, a left-handed reliever
with Minnesota in 1964-65, told
his audience to throw the ball ei-
ther with the seams or across the
seams. "Every position is impor-
tant in baseball," Fosnow added.
See Page B4


JOE DICRISTOFALO/Special to the Chronicle
Citrus High wrestler Taylor Jackson repeated as Class 2A state champion after trouncing his foes in a two-day, double-elimination contest.

'Canes'Jackson climbs summit again; three CHS grapplersplace in statefinals

TONY CASTROe"I want to dedicate the title

LAKELAND to my Poppa Jackson and
F or Citrus High
senior Citrus H my friend Fred Drew."

Jackson, the -TaylorJackson
view from the top of J a
thp nrliumin lth


me ,uuium i tie all, while Jackson com-
Jenkins Arena was pleted his third season at
rather stunning, the Inverness campus with


Again.
On Saturday night, Jack-
son, 18, repeated as a
Class 2A state champion
collecting CHS' third-ever
gold medal in the 48th
FHSAA State Finals in
Polk County
Jackson, who garnered
gold at 171 pounds in 2011,
completed a perfect 4-0
run this weekend at 182.
This time, Jackson man-
handled Fort Walton
Beach senior Chris Lupo
via a technical fall, 18-1.
Lupo finished 48-9 over-


a career-best and team-
best 49-3.
Jackson opened the two-
day, double-elimination
individually bracketed
tournament with a pair of
wins on Friday by stuffing
Pompano Beach-Ely's
Arias Knight in 65 seconds
before folding Matanzas's
Jason Cowles via a major
decision, 16-4.
In Saturday morning's
semifinals, Jackson
trimmed Homestead's
Keith Simmons 11-7 to
earn his second straight
state finals berth.


After stuffing Lupo in
the finals, Jackson was "'
asked which state title run
was more difficult.
"Hands down it was last
year," said Jackson. "I had JH,
to beat a lot of seniors last ,
year to win. This time I just | M e,- *,w*om ,
wanted to go out, show up, ..
dominate and go home. In r
this sport, you celebrate
after the state finals, not -
before."-
Jackson wanted to dedi- - --- .
cate the win two special -
people in his life.
"I want to dedicate the -
title to my Poppa Jackson
and my friend Fred Drew," -
Jackson made a perfect 4-0 run this weekend
See Page B4 competing in the 182-pound weight class.


Associated Press
Florida's Kenny Boynton drives
downcourt Saturday as Arkansas'
Devonta Abron watches during
the second half in Fayetteville.



Gators


stomp


Arizona


98-68
Associated Press
FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. -
Florida made itself right at
home in Bud Walton Arena.
Erving Walker scored a ca-
reer-high 31 points and the No.
14 Gators ended Arkansas'
perfect home record with a 98-
68 win.
Florida (21-6,9-3 Southeast-
ern Conference) shot a season-
high 58.3 percent from the field,
hitting a 13 of 23 3-pointers.
Walker, who was 2 of 18 from
behind the arc over his last
four games, hit his first four 3-
point attempts. Florida led 53-
27 at halftime after connecting
on 9 of 14 3-pointers.
Kenny Boynton had 25
points and Bradley Beal
added 21 for the Gators.
The loss ended a 17-0 start to
the season in Fayetteville for the
Razorbacks (17-10, 5-7), who
were led by BJ Young's career-
high 31 points. It was Arkansas'
worst defeat in Bud Walton
Arena since it opened in 1993.
The previous worst loss was
a 73-51 defeat to Auburn in
2009. The Razorbacks were
down by more than at halftime
to Florida, which led 53-27 at
the intermission.
That Arkansas team was led
by former Razorbacks coach
John Pelphrey
Pelphrey was once again on
hand Saturday, only this time
as an assistant coach for the
Gators after behind fired by
See Page B3


Kyle Busch edges Stewart to win Shootout


Associated Press
DAYTONA BEACH -
The pack is back. And so
is the Big One.
Kyle Busch edged
Tony Stewart in a
thrilling finish of the
first race of 2012, using a
slingshot pass Saturday
night on the last lap of the
exhibition Budweiser
Shootout to beat the de-
fending NASCAR cham-
pion to the checkered flag.
It gave Busch a victory
in a wild race that saw
him use two incredible
saves to stay in con-


tention at Daytona In-
ternational Speedway
The event was a pre-
view of next weekend's
season-opening Daytona
500, and showed NASCAR
has successfully broken
up the two-car tandem
racing that dominated
restrictor-plate racing
last year. Fans were
overwhelmingly op-
posed to that style of
racing, and NASCAR
worked hard through
the offseason to develop
a rules package that
would separate the cars.
It was obvious at the


start that the new rules
worked as the cars were
lumped in a big pack from
the drop of the green
flag. It led to the first
multi-car accident a mere
nine laps into the race
when David Ragan
nudged Paul Menard
to trigger the nine-car
accident.
A later wreck with two
laps remaining sent Jeff
Gordon sliding on his
roof for roughly 1,000
feet. The four-time
NASCAR champion ulti-
mately climbed out the
window with his car still


upside down, and said it
was the first time in his
career he'd been on his
roof.
Gordon's accident
began when he ran into
the back of Busch, who
used his second save of
the night to avoid the ac-
cident. An earlier save
left fellow competitors
in awe.
"There aren't many
people, ever, who could
have done that," said
three-time champion
Stewart, who was be-
hind Busch on the first
save.


Associated Press
Martin Truex Jr. leads the field to start the NASCAR Budweiser Shootout
Saturday at Daytona International Speedway.










Mickelson takes wild ride into share of the lead


Associated Press

LOS ANGELES Phil
Mickelson hit one tree,
threaded a shot through five
trees and hit a drive that
wound up in a spectator's
shorts. He somehow man-
aged a 1-under 70 Saturday
to share the lead with PGA
champion Keegan Bradley
in the Northern Trust Open.
Bradley, inspired by a
Riviera course that is one of
his favorites, took only five
putts over the final five
holes, including a 10-footer
for par on the last hole, for a
5-under 66 that assured him
being in the final group.
The par was meaningful
because he wanted to play
Sunday with Mickelson, a
mentor to him.
There's no telling what to
expect in the final round. The
phrase "routine par" was not
part of Mickelson's vocabu-
lary on a beautiful after-
noon off Sunset Boulevard.
Mickelson played one chip
well past the hole on the
par-3 sixth so it would roll
off the bank some 25 feet be-
hind the cup and roll back.
He made a 12-footer for par.
The only disappointment
was not taking advantage of
enough birdie chances, twice
missing birdie putts inside 8


feet and failing to give him-
self a good look on the par-5
17th when his wedge rolled
off the front of the green.
Mickelson and Bradley
were at 7-under 206, though
this is hardly a two-man
race at Riviera.
A dozen players were
within four shots of the lead
going into the final round,
including defending cham-
pion Aaron Baddeley (66),
Dustin Johnson (67) and
FedEx Cup champion Bill
Haas (68).
Johnson was tied for the
lead until he botched the
end of his round. He made
bogey from the bunker on
the 16th, then three-putted
for bogey from just outside 3
feet on the 17th. He finished
with a birdie and a small
measure of redemption.
"I'm going to come out to-
morrow and give it every-
thing I've got" Johnson said.
Pat Perez still has a shot,
too. He three-putted from 10
feet for bogey on the third
hole, then took four putts on
the next hole. His long
birdie try from 60 feet on the
fringe came up 5 feet short,
and Perez took three more
putts from there.
But he kept his patience,
made a few birdies and shot
70. Perez was in the group


I ... 1 1
Associated Press
Phil Mickelson watches his tee shot on the second hole Saturday during the third round of
the Northern Trust Open golf tournament at Riviera Country Club in Los Angeles.


one shot out of the lead
along with Jonathan Byrd,
who had a 69, and Bryce
Molder, who one-putted his
last eight greens for a 66.
Bradley surged into a
share of the lead with an 8-
foot birdie on the 16th, and
a pitch to tap-in range on
the next hole. From the
right rough, he came up


short of the 18th and
chipped to 10 feet to set up
the important closing par.
There was a stretch
where Mickelson lived up to
his "Phil the Thrill" reputa-
tion at Riviera.
He pulled his tee shot so
far right on the par-3 sixth
that it was headed for the
ivy-covered fence until clip-


ping a tree and dropping
down. Then, instead of hit-
ting a lofted chip that could
run to the pin, he chose to
chip some 25 feet past the
hole, have it run up the
bank and come down. It
rolled 12 feet past the hole,
and he made it for a par.
On the par-4 eighth, which
gives players the option of


two fairways, Mickelson found
his own route. He blasted a
tee shot so far left it went
over a white fence and landed
at the base of the stairs of a
corporate tent. After getting
a free drop, he threaded a 9-
iron through five eucalyptus
trees to 12 feet.
It would have been one of
the more amazing birdies in
his career, except he missed
the putt.
He was introduced to a
Bottle Brush on the 10th.
That was the name of the
tree between the pin and
where his tee shot landed.
Mickelson caught a tiny
branch and didn't reach the
green, but hit a skillful pitch
to 3 feet for par
And on the 15th, Mickelson
blocked a tee shot into the
gallery and discovered a man
lying on his back, fearful of
moving. The ball landed in-
side the hem of his shorts,
and he remained still until
Mickelson could remove the
ball and take his free drop.
He managed another par.
Haas birdied two of his
last three holes and was in
the group at 5-under 208.
"I'm in a good position for
tomorrow," Haas said. "I
don't know what the leaders
are going to do, but I'll be in
striking distance."


Azarenka to meet Stosur



in final of Qatar Open


Associated Press

DOHA, Qatar Top-
ranked Victoria Azarenka
hobbled around the court
with an ankle injury Satur-
day, adjusting her game and
persevering to defeat Age-
nieszka Radwanska 6-2, 6-4
and reach the Qatar Open
final.
Azarenka expects to be OK
when she plays for the title
Sunday against Sam Stosur
The U.S. Open champion
advanced from her semifi-
nal after Marion Bartoli re-
tired with a right calf injury
after losing the first set 6-3.
Azarenka has won 16
matches in a row, the most
to start a WTA season in
four years.
"I'm so proud I'm stand-
ing here," said Azarenka,
appearing close to tears.
"I'm just happy it's over."
This will be the first time
Azarenka plays in a final
since she ascended to No. 1.
She has won all five previous
matches against the fifth-
ranked Stosur, most recently
in November at the year-
ending WTA Championships.
The Australian Open
champion from Belarus eas-
ily won the first set against
Radwanska. She broke the
fourth-seeded Radwanska
to go up 1-0 in the second set
but then fell and twisted her
right ankle trying to chase a
drop shot. She limped off
the court and a trainer
wrapped the ankle.
Radwanska broke to go
up 2-1 but Azarenka perse-
vered, using her powerful
groundstrokes and a great
return game to regain con-
trol. While her mobility was
clearly limited, she still
managed to return every-
thing Radwanska hit to win
the next four games, includ-
ing a forehand winner that
made it 5-2.
Radwanska saved one
match point to make it 5-3
and won the next game to
raise the possibility of a
third set. But Azarenka was-
n't having any of it, hitting a
forehand winner down the
line.


Associated Press
Victoria Azarenka reacts Saturday after injuring her leg
during the women's singles semifinal match against
Agnieszka Radwanska of Poland at the Qatar tennis open
tournament in Doha.
"Before my fall I was re- Stosur said. "So any player
ally playing very good tennis, will always take it if you play
in control and was really asetortwo sets. But,of course,
putting a lot of pressure on in the nature of the sport, you
her and the way I wanted to want to be able to finish it."
play today," Azarenka said. The win was the fourth in
"After the fall, I mean, I a row for Stosur, who was
had to adjust. And it was a coming off a dismal run in
little bit unfortunate, but I her native Australia where
just tried to stay, you know, she was knocked out in the
mentally tough and just first rounds in Sydney and
tried to play one at a time. It the Australia Open. She at-
was difficult but I just didn't tribute her troubles in Aus-
want to panic too much in tralia to the pressure of
the situation. ... I'm proud expectations.
that I could manage to ad- "This week I've tried to
just in a very, very difficult stay relaxed, be a lot more
situation." loose," Stosur said. "When
Stosur won the first set I'm able to be like that, my
against Bartoli and had two tennis just flows. And then I
break-point opportunities want to hit a forehand, I can
in the first game of the sec- get out there and whack it.
ond set when Bartoli sought My feet move better, and
help from the trainer and everything about my tennis
then withdrew, is just better. So, no doubt,
"You always want to win a the way you're feeling about
match playingthe full match yourgamecanplayahugepart
out and winning match point," in the results that you get."


Perry breaks Champions



Tour's 36-hole record


Associated Press

NAPLES, Fla. After
the first round, Kenny Perry
deadpanned that it was a
typical day on the Champions
Tour when he shot 8 under
and wasn't in the lead.
Saturday, it was time for
the others to talk about him.
Perry shot a 10-under 62
and set the Champions
Tour's 36-hole scoring
record at 18-under 126 in
the second round of the
ACE Group Classic.
"That's amazing," said
Perry, three shots ahead of
first-round leader Larry
Mize. "So many great play-
ers have played this tour,
and to be able to now say
I've had the lowest 36 of all
time is pretty neat. It's a
neat accomplishment. It's
just amazing I can make 20
birdies in 36 holes. That's
just phenomenal."


Tom Lehman was four
back, and defending cham-
pion Bernhard Langer an-
other stroke behind at 13
under
"What he's done the first
two days is spectacular, but
not surprising," Lehman
said. "Nothing anybody
does out here surprises me,
and especially from him."
Perry made five birdies
on the front nine on The
TwinEagles Club's Talon
Course, and six more on the
back. He bounced back
from a bogey on No. 15,
with birdies on the last
three holes. Perry made a
25-footer for birdie on No.
1, and followed that up with
a 35-footer on No. 2.
"That really loosened me
up, relaxed me, kind of really
freed my game up," he said.
"It was off and running."
Mize followed his open-
ing 62 with a 67.


"Kenny played a great
round," Mize said, who had
a 62 on Friday "Gee whiz,
that's pretty special."
Mize and Lehman were
tied for second most of the
day, then Mize birdied the
last two holes to move into
sole possession of second.
"Otherwise, I'm five
back, which is a lot bigger
mountain to climb," said
Mize, who has one Champi-
ons Tour win "But three back,
the way Kenny's playing,
it's going to be a lot bigger
mountain to climb anyway"
Lehman was 5 under for
the day after eight holes,
but parred nine of the last
10, with a tap-in birdie on
the par-5 17th. He had a 66.
Langer, 13 under for his
last 27 holes, made a late
charge by eagling the par-5
17th for the second
straight day. He ended up
with a 65.


Miyazato leads LPGA Thailand


Associated Press

CHONBURI, Thailand -
Ai Miyazato shot a 7-under
65 on Saturday to take a
one-stroke lead over top-
ranked Yani Tseng after the
third round of the LPGA
Thailand.
Miyazato, the Japanese
player who won the 2010
tournament, birdied five of
the first six holes on the
back nine. She had a 14-
under 202 total on Siam
Country Club's Pattaya Old
Course.
"I think I have a good
feeling with this golf course,"
Miyazato said. "It's just the
beginning of the season and
a beautiful golf course and
a nice temperature today
The people are really nice
over here and I'm just hav-
ing a really good time."
Tseng, the winner last
year, shot her second
straight 65 after opening
with a 73. The Taiwanese
star had 12 worldwide vic-
tories last year, seven on
the LPGA Tour.


Associated Press
Ai Miyazato of Japan watches her third tee shot Saturday
during the third round of the LPGA Thailand golf tournament
in Pattaya, Chonburi province, southeastern Thailand.


Australia's Karrie Webb
and South Korea's Jiyai
Shin were 12 under
Webb shot a 71, and Shin
had a 68.
Webb had a three-stroke
lead Saturday morning after
the completion of the light-
ning-delayed second round,
playing the final four holes
in 1 under after a 65.
Miyazato's trying to win
her eighth LPGA Tour title


in the last four seasons.
"I just need to focus my
game," Miyazato said.
Sixteen-year-old Thai
amateur Ariya Jutanugarn
had two eagles in a 65 that
left her at 9 under. Last
year, she won the U.S. Jun-
ior Girls' Championship
and was the Rolex Junior
Player of the Year
Michelle Wie was even
par after a 73.


Nicolas Almagro, Filippo Volandri advance to Brazil Open final


Associated Press

SAO PAULO Defending
champion Nicolas Almagro of
Spain defeated countryman Al-
bert Ramos 6-4, 7-6 (4) Saturday to
reach the Brazil Open final.
The top-seeded Almargo will
play for the title Sunday against
Italy's Filippo Volandri, who elim-
inated fourth-seeded Brazilian
Thomaz Bellucci 5-7, 6-0, 6-2.
Almagro, the winner in Brazil
in 2008 and 2011, broke the
eighth-seeded Ramos once in
each set at the Ibirapuera sport-
ing complex.
Trying to win his 1lth ATP Tour
title, Almagro needed a wild card
to play the indoor clay-court
event. He wasn't sure at first he


could commit to the tournament
because of his Davis Cup duties
with Spain.
"Ramos is a great player, he
knows how to defend well," Alma-
gro said. "He has a great serve, but
gladly I've been serving well too
recently"
Almagro has a chance to be-
come the most successful player
in Brazil with three titles. It would
be his 1lth ATP Tour title.
He needed a wild card to play
the indoor clay-court event in
Brazil because he initially wasn't
certain if he would make the tour-
nament because of his Davis Cup
duties with Spain. He also
reached the quarterfinals at the
Australian Open.
It is the eighth straight time a


Spaniard has made it to the Brazil
Open final, and they have five
wins.
Fourth-seeded Bellucci won the
first set against Volandri but
couldn't keep up with the Italian
at the end despite the support
from the crowd in South Amer-
ica's biggest city Volandri had 18
break opportunities, converting
on six of them.
The match was even until
Volandri broke Bellucci at 2-2 in
the third set, taking control from
then on as the Brazilian became
exhausted.
"I was very tired, I couldn't even
see the ball during some points,"
Bellucci said. "I had pain in my
entire body. I kept telling myself
not to give up and keep fighting


until the end, but I couldn't do it
today"
The match lasted 2 hours, 33
minutes, just three minutes less
than Bellucci's quarterfinal
against Leonardo Mayer of Ar-
gentina on Friday
"(Friday's) match was very
tough and I couldn't recover for
today," Bellucci said.
It is the seventh ATP final for
Volandri, who will be trying to win
his third singles title, the first
since 2006.
Sao Paulo is hosting the event
for the first time after 11 editions
in the northeastern city of Costa
do Sauipe. The tournament
moved indoors because of the
rainy weather in Sao Paulo this
time of the year.


Raonic tops Harrison to
advance to SAP Open final
SAN JOSE, Calif. Defending
tournament champion Milos Raonic
advanced to his second straight SAP Open
final Saturday, beating American Ryan
Harrison 7-6 (4), 6-2 in only 78 minutes.
The 6-foot-5 Canadian piled up 20
aces behind a powerful serve that
reached 150 mph in the comfortable
conditions of the indoor arena. Raonic
relied on his serve to force a first-set
tiebreaker and cruise past the 19-
year-old Harrison after a break in the
second set gave him a 3-1 lead.
Harrison is still searching for his first
ATP Tour final. He has lost three times
in the semifinals on tour, including
twice last year to Mardy Fish.


B2 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2012


GOLF/TENNIS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


-*"""





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Baylor, Gonzaga fall




to unranked opponents

Associated Press L


LEXINGTON, Ky. Ter-
rence Jones had 15 points
and 11 rebounds to lead No.
1 Kentucky to a 77-62 victory
over Mississippi on Satur-
day, the Wildcats' 50th con-
secutive win at home.
The Wildcats (26-1, 11-0
Southeastern Conference)
are 49-0 at home under head
coach John Calipari as part
of the nation's longest active
home winning streak.
Kentucky took an early
16-5 lead, but the Rebels
took advantage of freshman
center Anthony Davis sitting
for much of the first half be-
cause of foul trouble.
Ole Miss forwards Ter-
rance Henry and Murphy
Holloway took the ball in-
side without the nation's
leading shot blocker loom-
ing. Henry who had 16 of his
18 points in the first half,
helped the Rebels (15-11, 5-
7) take a 31-29 lead.
But the Wildcats hit three
straight 3-pointers to take a
43-35 halftime lead, and
they never trailed in the
second half.
Doron Lamb had 16
points for Kentucky.
No. 3 Missouri 71,
Texas A&M 62
COLLEGE STATION, Texas
- Kim English scored 21
points and Marcus Denmon
had a key 3-pointer late to lift
Missouri over Texas A&M for its
seventh straight win.
It was Missouri's 12th win in
Big 12 play, tying a school
record for most in a season.
Texas A&M cut the lead to
five on a 3-pointer by Elston
Turner with 1:22 remaining, and
a turnover by Phil Pressey on
the next play gave A&M the ball
back.
But Denmon hit a 3-pointer
to make it 68-60 with 35 sec-
onds left, and his two free
throws seconds later sealed the
win for Missouri (25-2, 12-2).
Khris Middleton had 15
points to lead A&M (13-13, 4-
10).
No. 4 Kansas 83,
Texas Tech 50
LAWRENCE, Kan. -
Thomas Robinson had 16
points and eight rebounds to
lead a balanced attack for
Kansas, which emptied its
bench early in a rout of over-
matched Texas Tech.
Travis Releford added 12
points and six others scored at
least nine for the Jayhawks (22-
5, 12-2), who built a 44-22 lead
by halftime and then cruised over
the final 20 minutes as they
moved back into a tie with Mis-
souri for first place in the Big 12.
Kansas shot 56 percent from
the field, including a 9-for-15
clip from beyond the arc, while
forcing 20 turnovers and turning
them into 24 points.
Javarez Willis had 17 points to
lead the Red Raiders (8-18, 1-13).
No. 8 North Carolina 74,
Clemson 52
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. Harri-
son Barnes scored 24 points and
Tyler Zeller added 14 to help
North Carolina beat Clemson.
The Tar Heels (23-4, 10-2 At-
lantic Coast Conference) im-
proved to 56-0 all-time against
Clemson (13-13, 5-7) in Chapel
Hill a record for consecutive
home wins over one opponent.
North Carolina led by 15
points in the first half and never
let Clemson closer than six in
the second before blowing it
open late.
John Henson added 13 points
for the Tar Heels, while Kendall
Marshall had 13 assists.
Andre Young scored 13
points to lead the Tigers, who
shot 38 percent.
Kansas St. 57,
No. 9 Baylor 56
WACO, Texas Angel Ro-
driguez had 15 points and six
assists, and Kansas State
made up for the freshman's po-
tentially costly turnover in the
final seconds against Baylor.
Rodriguez had an apparent
breakaway layup with 13 sec-
onds left after a turnover by
Baylor guard Pierre Jackson.
But Rodriguez was called for
traveling, wiping out the basket
and giving the Bears one more


chance.
Baylor (22-5, 9-5 Big 12) got
it inside to Quincy Miller, whose
shot was blocked.


assocated press
New Jersey Nets guard Deron Williams drives the lane
between Chicago Bulls guard Ronnie Brewer, left, and Car-
los Boozer on Saturday during the second half in Chicago.
The Nets won 97-85.



Nets stop slide


Associated Press
Kansas State's Jordan Henriquez and Rodney McGruder defend the the basket against Baylor's
Quincy Miller on Saturday during the first half in Waco, Texas. Kansas State won 57-56.


Rodney McGruder also had
15 points for the Wildcats (18-8,
7-7).
Quincy Acy led Baylor with
14 points.
No. 10 Georgetown 63,
Providence 53
PROVIDENCE, R.I. Hollis
Thompson and Jason Clark
scored 13 points each and
Georgetown shut down Provi-
dence's shooters for the sec-
ond time this season.
The Friars made just 14 of
54 field goals (25.9 percent). In
the previous meeting Dec. 31,
they hit only 13 attempts and shot
25.5 percent in a 49-40 loss.
Georgetown (20-5, 10-4 Big
East) held Providence (13-15,
2-13) without a basket for a 14-
minute stretch in the first half and
led 31-20 at the break. The Friars
cut it to 36-32 before the Hoyas
went on a 13-3 run to open a
49-35 lead with 9:43 remaining.
Providence was led by Vin-
cent Council with 13 points.
New Mexico 65,
No. 11 UNLV 45
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. -
Drew Gordon scored a career-
high 27 points and grabbed 20
rebounds to lead New Mexico
to its seventh straight victory
with a win over UNLV.
It was the second win this
week over a ranked team for
the Lobos (22-4, 8-2 Mountain
West), who beat No. 13 San
Diego State 77-67 on Thursday.
Anthony Marshall had 18
points to lead UNLV (22-6, 6-4),
which lost for the third time in
four games.
UNLV, which led 27-26 at
halftime, had just four field
goals during a second half in
which Gordon had 18 points
and 11 rebounds.
No. 12 Marquette 79,
Connecticut 64
HARTFORD, Conn. Jae
Crowder had 29 points and 12
rebounds to help Marquette
beat UConn and remain in po-
sition for a double bye in next
month's Big East tournament.
Darius Johnson-Odom
added 24 points for Marquette
(22-5, 11-3 Big East), which
won for the 10th time 11 games.
Johnson-Odom and Crowder
combined for 29 first-half points
as the Golden Eagles ran out to
a 43-29 halftime lead. UConn
cut the deficit to four early in the
second half, but could not stay
with Marquette.


Jeremy Lamb had 19 points
to lead Connecticut (16-10, 6-8).
Air Force 58, No. 13
San Diego St. 56
AIR FORCE ACADEMY,
Colo. Michael Lyons scored
27 points and Air Force upset
San Diego State when Xavier
Thames' off-balance 3-point at-
tempt fell short at the buzzer.
The Falcons (13-11, 3-7
Mountain West) won for just the
second time in 74 games
against a Top 25 team. They
also beat then-No. 22 UTEP on
Feb. 15,1992.
The short-handed Aztecs
(20-6, 6-4) lost their third straight,
something they hadn't done
since 2008, a span of 124
games. The Aztecs fell two
games behind conference leader
New Mexico, which upset No. 11
UNLV 65-45 earlier Saturday.
Chase Tapley scored 17
points, and Tim Shelton had 13
points and 11 rebounds for
SDSU.
No. 16 Murray St. 65,
No. 21 Saint Mary's 51
MURRAY, Ky. Isaiah
Canaan scored 17 of his 23
points in the second half as
Murray State beat Saint Mary's
for its most convincing win over
a nationally recognized opponent.
The Racers (26-1) have al-
ready clinched the Ohio Valley
Conference regular-season
title, but were still short of victo-
ries over quality opponents
since beating Memphis in early
December before hosting this
Bracket Buster matchup with
the Gaels.
Murray State jumped out to a
10-2 lead and never trailed,
building a double-digit advan-
tage early in the second half
and cruising from there in front
of a sold-out CFSB Center.
Matthew Dellavedova scored
17 for Saint Mary's (23-5),
which has lost three of four.
No. 19 Louisville 90,
DePaul 82 (OT)
ROSEMONT, Ill. Russ
Smith hit back-to-back baskets
in overtime and Louisville rallied
from an early 17-point deficit to
beat DePaul for its seventh win
in eight games.
Kyle Kuric scored 25 points,
Chris Smith added 20 and
Russ Smith 16 to lead the Car-
dinals (21-6, 9-5 Big East), who
trailed by 10 at the half.
DePaul (11-15, 2-12) has
now lost 36 straight games


against ranked opponents. The
Blue Demons have lost 11 of
their last 12.
Brandon Young scored 27
points and Cleveland Melvin
chipped in with 14 points and
10 rebounds for DePaul.
No. 20 Florida St. 76,
N.C. State 62
RALEIGH, N.C. lan Miller
scored 17 points and Bernard
James had 12 to lead Florida
State past North Carolina State.
Okaro White and Michael
Snaer each finished with 10
points for the Seminoles (19-7,
10-2 Atlantic Coast Confer-
ence), who led by double fig-
ures for the entire second half.
Florida State won its third
straight to remain atop the
league standings and improved
to 4-0 against the Tobacco
Road schools in North Carolina.
C.J. Leslie scored 21 points
to lead the Wolfpack (18-9, 7-
5), but the rest of the team
combined to shoot 9 of 44 in
their second straight loss.
No. 22 Virginia 71,
Maryland 44
CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. -
Mike Scott scored 25 points
and Virginia took command
with a 16-0 run early in the sec-
ond half to beat Maryland.
Malcolm Brogdon added 14
points and Sammy Zeglinski 11
for the Cavaliers (20-6, 7-5 At-
lantic Coast Conference), who
ended their first two-game los-
ing streak of the season.
Maryland missed all six of its
shots from long range in the
second half.
San Francisco 66,
No. 24 Gonzaga 65
SAN FRANCISCO -
Rashad Green scored on a
short leaner with 3.3 seconds
left to lift San Francisco to a win
over Gonzaga.
Green finished with 16
points, Perris Blackwell added
14 points and 10 rebounds, and
Michael Williams scored 13 for
the Dons (18-11, 8-7 West
Coast Conference), who have
beaten the Bulldogs each of the
past three seasons at home.
Elias Harris had 21 points and
11 rebounds for Gonzaga (21-
5, 11-3) but shot an off-balance
airball from behind the 3-point line
as time ran out. The loss dropped
the Bulldogs a game behind
No. 21 Saint Mary's in the con-
ference standings with two
games remaining.


Associated Press

CHICAGO Deron
Williams scored 29 points,
Kris Humphries had 24
points and 18 rebounds,
and the New Jersey Nets
beat the Chicago Bulls 97-
85 Saturday to snap an
eight-game losing streak.
Chicago's Derrick Rose
missed his fifth straight
game because of back
pain, and the Nets took ad-
vantage, jumping out to a
22-3 lead while rolling to
their first victory since
Feb. 1.
The lopsided win wasn't
the only good news for New
Jersey. Coach Avery John-
son said center Brook
Lopez will start Sunday
against Milwaukee after
being sidelined all season
by a broken right foot, a big
boost for a team that began
the day last in the Atlantic
Division.
Lopez was injured in the
preseason and the Nets
have floundered all year,
but they took control right
from the start in a surpris-
ingly easy victory over
Chicago.
With Rose sidelined,
Williams had his way He
scored 21 points in the first
half and hit five 3-pointers
in the game. He also had
eight assists.
Humphries narrowly
missed season-highs for
points (25) and rebounds
(19), while MarShon
Brooks added 19 points.



GATORS
Continued from Page B1

Arkansas after last season.
He entered the arena to a
polite ovation from the Ra-
zorbacks crowd, which had
few opportunities to cheer
once the game started.
Pelphrey was fired after
compiling a 69-59 record in
four seasons at Arkansas.
He said at the time that he
wasn't given enough time
to turn around a Razor-
backs program that had
missed the NCAA Tourna-
ment the last three seasons.
He was prophetic for
much of the season for
Arkansas, which had wins
over three ranked teams at
home on its resume. How-
ever, its only lead on Satur-
day came after Mardracus
Wade's 3-pointer put the
Razorbacks up 3-2.
The game was all about
the Gators after that, par-
ticularly Walker in the
early going. The senior
scored 18 first-half points
on 6 of 7 shooting, includ-


Spurs 103,
Clippers 100 (OT)
LOS ANGELES Gary Neal
hit key 3-pointers in regulation
and overtime, Tony Parker
scored 30 points and the San
Antonio Spurs held off the L.A.
Clippers 103-100 on Saturday
to earn their NBA-leading 10th
consecutive victory.
Neal was one of six Spurs
in double figures with 17
points. He stole the ball and hit
the tying 3-pointer with 5.7
seconds left in regulation. His
3 with 25 seconds to go in
overtime snapped a 98-all tie.
Matt Bonner added 13 points,
Tim Duncan had 11 points and
17 rebounds and Danny
Green had 11 for the Spurs.

Grizzlies 104,
Warriors 103
MEMPHIS, Tenn. -Tony
Allen scored on a tip-in with
5.6 seconds left to give the
Memphis Grizzlies their fourth
straight victory, 104-103 over
the Golden State Warriors on
Saturday night.
Allen scored after Rudy Gay
missed a shot to the right of
the lane. Memphis also won
on a tip-in off a miss from Gay
on Friday night, beating Den-
ver 103-102 on Dante Cun-
ningham's tip.
The Warriors had one last
shot after Allen's tip-in, but
David Lee was called for an
offensive foul with less than a
second left, sending the War-
riors their third straight loss.


ing 4 of 4 3-pointers.
His previous career high
also came against
Arkansas, a 27-point effort
two years ago as a sopho-
more.
Walker scored 11-
straight points at one point
in the half. He opened the
stretch with a drive to the
basket and followed it with
three-straight 3-pointers
that helped Florida extend
its lead to 30-13.
Florida was 21 of 31 (68
percent) from the field at
one point early in the sec-
ond half and hit 11 of its
first 16 3-point attempts.
The Gators, who lead the
SEC in made 3-pointers,
finished 28 of 48 from the
field, topping a 56.3 per-
cent performance in a win
over LSU on Jan. 21.
Florida opened the sea-
son 0-4 on the road, includ-
ing losses at Ohio State,
Syracuse, Rutgers and Ten-
nessee. The Gators im-
proved to 4-5 on the road
with the win and have now
won four of their last five.
Arkansas was 21 of 57 (37
percent) from the field.


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BASKETBALL


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2012 B3






B4 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2012



Final Class 2A State
PL TEAM PTS.
1. Spring Hill-Springtsead (SPG) 171.5
2. Lakeland-Lake Gibson (LKG) 92.5
2. Fort Myers-Riverdale (RVD) 89.5
4. Jensen Beach (JENB) 72.5
5. Punta Gorda-Charlotte (CHAR) 64.0
6. B'ville-Nature CoastTech. (NCT)63.0
7. Inverness-Citrus (CIT) 55.0
8. Dunedin (DUND) 47.0
8. Melbourne-Palm Bay (PALMB) 47.0
8. Orange Park-Ridgeview (RDV) 47.0
Other:
72. Brooksville-Hernando (HER) 1.00

Class 2A
Round 1 Results:
106 Cole Schreiber (COL) pin Chris Mosher
(CIT), 3:31.
152 Colton Jackson (CIT) major dec. Gage
Munoz (STC), 9-1.
160 Nick McLean (CIT) pin Carvens Joseph
(ELY), 1:28.
182 Taylor Jackson (CIT) pin Aris Knight
(ELY), 1:05.
220 Zach Collins (CIT) dec. Taylor Flocken
(MILT), 4-2 (OT).
Round 2:
106 David Richards (BAY) dec. Chris Mosher
(CIT), 6-1.
Round 3:
152 Colton Jackson (CIT) dec. Connor Fun-
derburke (LINC), 5-1.
160 Nick McLean (CIT) dec. Jordan Harriott
(OSS), 7-0.
182 Taylor Jackson (CIT) major dec. Jason
Cowles (MAT), 16-4.
220 Charles Kerkesner (CYL) dec. Zach
Collins (CIT), 8-2.
Round 4:
220 -Aaron Berynadott (PAB) dec. Zach Collins
(CIT), 8-2.
Round 5:
No matches
Round 6: (Semifinals)
152 Cody Ross (SPG) major dec. Colton
Jackson (CIT), 12-4.
160 Javier Rodriguez (ARCHM) dec. Nick
McLean (CIT), 11-4.
182 -TaylorJackson (CIT) dec. Keith Simmons
(HOME), 11-7.
Round 7:
152 Anthony Curto (PALR), dec. Colton Jack-
son (CIT), 7-3.
160 Nick McLean (CIT) tech. fall Carvens
Joseph (ELY), 16-0.
Round 8:
152 Colton Jackson (CIT) dec. Connor Fun-
derburke (LINC), 3-0.
160 Nick McLean (CIT) dec. Mitch Lambert
(NCT), 9-2.
Round 9:
182 -Taylor Jackson (CIT) tech. fall Chris Lupo
(FWB), 18-1.
Class 1A
Round 1:
126 David Nguyen (ROB) dec. Nick Hooper
(CR), 9-3.
152 Jason Wojcik (CLAY) major dec. Dylan
Ayala, 13-2.
Round 2:
126 Johnathan Kenney (BOZ) pin Nick
Hooper (CR), 0:42.
152 Dylan Ayala (CR) dec. Miller Judge
(TPR), 5-4.
Round 3:
152 Cody Hankerson (BRF) dec. Dylan Ayala,
4-3.
Crystal River Individual Results
WGT NAME W L PINS PL
126 Hooper, Nick 0 2 0
152 Ayala, Dylan 1 2 0
TOTALS 1 4 0

Citrus Individual Results
WGT NAME W L PINS PL
106 Mosher, Chris 0 2 0
152 Jackson, Colton 3 2 0 5th
160 McLean, Nick 4 1 1 3rd
182 Jackson, Taylor 4 0 1 1st
220 Collins, Zach 1 2 0
TOTALS 12 7 2


EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
N.Y Rangers 56 3714 5 79158 114
Philadelphia 58 3219 7 71193 177
Pittsburgh 58 3320 5 71182 154
New Jersey 57 3320 4 70161 158
N.Y Islanders 58 2525 8 58139 168
Northeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Boston 56 3519 2 72190 130
Ottawa 60 3022 8 68179 183
Toronto 59 2924 6 64178 180
Montreal 59 2425 10 58159 161
Buffalo 58 2427 7 55142 173
Southeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Florida 57 2719 11 65144 160
Washington 58 2924 5 63159 163
Winnipeg 60 2826 6 62148 169
Tampa Bay 58 2626 6 58163 195
Carolina 59 2226 11 55153 181
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Detroit 59 4017 2 82187 137
St. Louis 58 3615 7 79149 114
Nashville 58 3319 6 72162 152
Chicago 59 31 21 7 69186 177
Columbus 58 1735 6 40134 192
Northwest Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Vancouver 58 3715 6 80189 142
Calgary 58 2722 9 63141 155
Colorado 59 2926 4 62150 163
Minnesota 58 2524 9 59129 154
Edmonton 57 2229 6 50151 172
Pacific Division
GP W L OT PtsGF GA
San Jose 56 3118 7 69165 139
Phoenix 59 2921 9 67152 147
LosAngeles 58 2720 11 65124 125
Dallas 58 2925 4 62150 164
Anaheim 58 2424 10 58150 168
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over-
time loss.
Saturday's Games
Pittsburgh 6, Philadelphia 4
Chicago 6, Columbus 1
St. Louis 4, Minnesota 0
N.Y Islanders 4, Carolina 3
Tampa Bay 2, Washington 1
Vancouver 6, Toronto 2
Phoenix 2, Dallas 1, OT
Calgary at Los Angeles, late
Sunday's Games
Pittsburgh at Buffalo, 12:30 p.m.
San Jose at Detroit, 12:30 p.m.
St. Louis at Chicago, 12:30 p.m.


Boston at Minnesota, 3:30 p.m.
New Jersey at Montreal, 6 p.m.
Anaheim at Florida, 6 p.m.
Nashville at Dallas, 7p.m.
Columbus at N.Y Rangers, 8 p.m.
Colorado at Winnipeg, 8:30 p.m.
Vancouver at Edmonton, 9 p.m.


Philadelp
Boston
NewYork
New Jers
Toronto

Miami
Orlando
Atlanta
Washing
Charlotte


EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct
ihia 20 11 .645
15 14 .517
15 16 .484
sey 9 23 .281
9 23 .281
Southeast Division
W L Pct
24 7 .774
20 11 .645
19 11 .633
ton 7 24 .226
4 26 .133


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


For the record


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On the AIRWAVES

TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
11 a.m. (ESPN2) NHRA Drag Racing Lucas Oil Series. From
Pomona, Calif. (Taped)
1 p.m. (FOX) NASCAR Sprint Cup: Daytona 500, Qualifying.
9 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRA Drag Racing Arizona Nationals. From
Phoenix. (Same-day Tape)
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
1 p.m. (CBS) Michigan State at Purdue.
1 p.m. (FSNFL) NCAAW: Rice at Southern Methodist.
1 p.m. (SUN) Vanderbilt at Georgia.
2 p.m. (MNT) NCAAW: Tennessee at Mississippi.
3 p.m. (ESPN2) NCAAW: Duke at Maryland.
3 p.m. (FSNFL) NCAAW: South Carolina atAlabama.
3:30 p.m. (SUN) NCAAW: Florida State at Miami.
5 p.m. (ESPN2) NCAAW: Purdue at Michigan State.
5:30 p.m. (SUN) NCAAW: Washington at Arizona. (Joined in
Progress)
7 p.m. (ESPN2) South Florida at Pittsburgh.
7:30 p.m. (SUN) Oregon at Stanford.
NBA BASKETBALL
1 p.m. (ABC) Dallas Mavericks at New York Knicks.
3:30 p.m. (ABC) Orlando Magic at Miami Heat.
8 p.m. (ESPN) Denver Nuggets at Oklahoma City Thunder.
2 a.m. (ESPN2) Orlando Magic at Miami Heat. (Same-day Tape)
4 a.m. (ESPN2) Denver Nuggets at Oklahoma City Thunder.
(Same-day Tape)
4:30 a.m. (ESPN) Dallas Mavericks at New York Knicks.
(Same-day Tape)
BOWLING
3 p.m. (ESPN) PBA Bowling Scorpion Open. (Taped)
GOLF
9 a.m. (GOLF) European PGATourAvantha Masters, Final
Round. From New Delhi, India. (Same-day Tape)
1 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour Northern Trust Open, Final Round.
From Riviera Country Club in Pacific Palisades, Calif.
3 p.m. (CBS) PGA Tour Northern Trust Open, Final Round.
From Riviera Country Club in Pacific Palisades, Calif.
3 p.m. (GOLF) LPGA Tour Honda LPGA Thailand, Final
Round. From Chonburi, Thailand. (Same-day Tape)
7 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour Champions: Ace Group Classic,
Final Round. From Naples, Fla. (Same-day Tape)
GYMNASTICS
1:30 p.m. (ESPN2) Women's College Gymnastics: LSU at
Florida. (Taped)
HOCKEY
12:30 p.m. (NBC) San Jose Sharks at Detroit Red Wings.
3 p.m. (NBC) Boston Bruins at Minnesota Wild.
6 p.m. (FSNFL) Anaheim Ducks at Florida Panthers.
6 p.m. (NBCSPT) New Jersey Devils at Montreal Canadiens.
LACROSSE
2 p.m. (NBCSPT) College Lacrosse Denver vs. Ohio State.
From Jacksonville, Fla. (Live)
4 p.m. (NBCSPT) College Lacrosse Jacksonville vs. Navy.
From Jacksonville, Fla. (Live)

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


Central Division
W L Pct
Chicago 25 8 .758
Indiana 18 12 .600
Milwaukee 12 18 .400
Cleveland 11 17 .393
Detroit 10 22 .313
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct
San Antonio 22 9 .710
Dallas 20 11 .645
Memphis 18 14 .563
Houston 17 14 .548
New Orleans 7 23 .233
Northwest Division
W L Pct
Oklahoma City 23 7 .767
Denver 17 14 .548
Utah 15 14 .517
Portland 16 15 .516
Minnesota 15 16 .484
Pacific Division
W L Pct
L.A. Clippers 19 10 .655
L.A. Lakers 18 12 .600
Golden State 11 17 .393
Phoenix 12 19 .387
Sacramento 10 20 .333


17. (6) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, accident, 73,
GB 70.8,0.
18. (10) Joey Logano, Toyota, accident, 54,
5'2 70.8,0.
11 2 19. (1) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, accident, 54,
11/2 86.5,0.
14/2 20. (8) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, acci-
dent, 54, 78.4, 0.
21. (23) Matt Kenseth, Ford, accident, 54,
GB 50.9,0.
22. (22) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, accident,
2 54, 75.5,0.
412 23. (24) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, accident, 8,
5 35.4, 0.
14/2 24. (5) David Ragan, Ford, accident, 8, 33.6,


GB

6/2
7/2
7/2
8/2


Saturday's Games
San Antonio 103, L.A. Clippers 100, OT
New Jersey 97, Chicago 85
Memphis 104, Golden State 103
Atlanta at Portland, 10 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Dallas at New York, 1 p.m.
Orlando at Miami, 3:30 p.m.
Sacramento at Cleveland, 6 p.m.
Boston at Detroit, 6 p.m.
Charlotte at Indiana, 6 p.m.
Utah at Houston, 7 p.m.
Philadelphia at Minnesota, 7 p.m.
Milwaukee at New Jersey 7 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at Phoenix, 8 p.m.
Denver at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.


Sprint Cup Budweiser
Shootout Results
Saturday
At Daytona International Speedway
Daytona Beach, Fla.
Lap length: 2.5 miles
(Start position in parentheses)
1. (2) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 82 laps, 103.4 rat-
ing, 0 points.
2. (15) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 82, 90.3, 0.
3. (21) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 82, 84.6, 0.
4. (3) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 82, 55.9, 0.
5. (16) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 82, 69.4, 0.
6. (7) Greg Biffle, Ford, 82, 97.2, 0.
7. (13) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 82, 61.9, 0.
8. (17) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 82, 66.2, 0.
9. (11) Carl Edwards, Ford, 82, 71.1,0.
10. (25) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 82,
68.8, 0.
11. (12) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 81,49.5, 0.
12. (9) A J Allmendinger, Dodge, 80, 56.2, 0.
13. (19) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 79, 37.8, 0.
14. (18) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, acci-
dent, 74, 90.2, 0.
15. (14) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, accident, 73,
98.5, 0.
16. (4)Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, accident,
73, 105.7, 0.


0.
25. (20) Michael Waltrip, Toyota, accident, 8,
25, 0.

Race Statistics
Average Speed of Race Winner: 124.096
mph.


Time of Race: 1 hour, 39 minutes, 7 seconds.
Margin of Victory: 0.013 seconds.
Caution Flags: 5 for 22 laps.
Lead Changes: 26 among 13 drivers.
Lap Leaders: D.Earnhardt Jr. 1-3; J.McMur-
ray 4; J.Logano 5; K.Harvick 6; D.Earnhardt Jr.
7-15; K.Harvick 16; J.McMurray 17; M.Truex Jr.
18-22; J.McMurray 23-25; J.Gordon 26-27;
G.Biffle 28-33; A.Allmendinger 34; G.Biffle 35-
36; J.Montoya 37; J.McMurray 38-42; M.Truex
Jr. 43-44; J.Johnson 45; K.Harvick 46-47; J.Gor-
don 48-51; J.McMurray 52; G.Biffle 53-61;
J.Gordon 62-71; Ky.Busch 72-73; TStewart 74-
80; M.Ambrose 81; Ky.Busch 82.
Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps
Led): G.Biffle, 3 times for 17 laps; J.Gordon, 3
times for 16 laps; D.Earnhardt Jr., 2 times for 12
laps; J.McMurray, 5 times for 11 laps; TStewart,
1 time for 7 laps; M.Truex Jr., 2 times for 7 laps;
K.Harvick, 3 times for 4 laps; Ky.Busch, 2 times
for 3 laps; M.Ambrose, 1 time for 1 lap; J.Mon-
toya, 1 time for 1 lap; A.Allmendinger, 1 time for
1 lap; J.Johnson, 1 time for 1 lap; J.Logano, 1
time for 1 lap.

NASCAR Driver Rating Formula
A maximum of 150 points can be attained in
a race.
The formula combines the following cate-
gories: Wins, Finishes, Top-15 Finishes, Aver-
age Running Position While on Lead Lap,
Average Speed Under Green, Fastest Lap, Led
Most Laps, Lead-Lap Finish.

BASEBALL
American League
KANSAS CITY ROYALS Agreed to terms
with RHP Luis Mendoza, INF Eric Hosmer, INF
Mike Moustakas and OF Lorenzo Cain on one-
year contracts.
NEW YORK YANKEES Signed LHP Clay
Rapada to a minor league contract.
SEATTLE MARINERS Sent OF Mike Wilson
outright to Tacoma (PCL).
National League
HOUSTON ASTROS -Agreed to terms with
LHP Fernando Abad, OF Brian Bogusevic, C
Jason Castro, RHP Paul Clemens, IF Chris
Johnson, RHP Fernando Rodriguez and IF
Brett Wallace on one-year contracts.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
NHL Fined Pittsburgh Penguins F Jordan
Staal has been fined $2,500.


Associated Press
Tampa Bay Lightning's Steven Stamkos scores past Washington Capitals goalie Tomas
Vokoun on Saturday during the second period in Tampa.


Bolts beat

Associated Press 21st straight h
league-best 2f
TAMPA- Steven Stamkos scored his NHL- Minnesota h
leading 40th goal of the season and Tampa Bay streak since ai
beat Washington. 28, 2011. The
The 22-year old Stamkos became the first in the last sev
Lightning player to have three consecutive sea- Jackman sc
sons of at least 40 goals when he scored 1:50 2010, and gav
into the second period. Tom Pyatt also scored, and second period
Mathieu Garon made 23 saves for the Lightning. Elliott earne
Brooks Laich had the lone goal for the Capi- and 15th of his
tals, who snapped a three-game skid with a 2-1 after entering \
road win over the Florida Panthers on Friday. against avera(
With a win, Washington could have tied the Pan- Islan
others who have one game at hand for first
place in the Southeast Division. UNIONDAL
Tomas Vokoun finished with 21 saves, vantage of Ca
and an assist i
Penguins 6, Flyers 4 ped Nw
pleted New Yo
PHILADELPHIA- Dustin Jeffrey scored a the Hurricanes
go-ahead goal 37 seconds into the third period, Kevin Poulir
Matt Cooke had two goals, and the Pittsburgh (25-25-8), who
Penguins beat the Philadelphia Flyers 6-4 on place Toronto
Saturday. race.
Jordan Staal, Pascal Dupuis and James Neal Tavares has
also scored goals for the Penguins, who moved Carolina. He a
into a tie with Philadelphia for fourth place in the ricanes (22-26
Eastern Conference. 55 points for Is
Jaromir Jagr scored two goals against his for- Frans Niels<
mer team, and Eric Wellwood notched his first for the Islande
NHL goal for the Flyers. high in points
Philadelphia lost for the sixth time in eight Brandon Su
games and got another poor performance from Tlusty scored 1
Ilya Bryzgalov, who was benched after allowing in their previoL
three goals on 13 shots. Staal extended
Staal was fined $2,500 by the NHL after the with an assist
game for boarding Flyers defenseman Braydon goals and four
Coburn during the second period. Canu
Blackhawks 6, Blue Jackets 1 VANCOUVE
COLUMBUS, Ohio Jonathan Toews and rows and Dani
Patrick Sharp both had a goal and two assists, 10 points in Va
and Chicago finished a nine-game trip with a vic- Burrows sec
tory over Columbus. goal and three
Patrick Kane added a goal and an assist, and added four as,
Viktor Stalberg also scored. Stalberg has eight after both had
goals in five games against Columbus this sea- It was Vanc
son matching his total against the rest of the Toronto, cover
NHL in 51 games. Manny Malh
Corey Crawford had 33 saves for the Black- also scored fol
hawks, who have won two straight following a won six of sev
nine-game losing streak (0-8-1). Marcus Kruger Coye
and Sami Lepisto added third-period goals for
the Blackhawks, who matched their season high GLENDALE
in goals. career-high 28
Derick Brassard had the lone goal for Columbus. Smith stopped
point in its eight
Blues 4, Wild 0 Mikkel Boedl
ST. LOUIS Barret Jackman broke an NHL- and Smith with
high, 150-game scoreless drought, and Brian El- period after ha,
liott made 13 saves to lift St. Louis past netted his 10th
Minnesota. Michael Rye
The Blues won for the sixth time in seven Lehtonen had
games and gained points in a franchise-record without leading!


STATE
Continued from Page B1

said Jackson.
As far as future plans,
Jackson intends to focus on
an off-season national
championship.
Taylor's younger brother
Colton Jackson completed
his initial visit to states with
a fifth-place finish following
a 3-2 record at 152.
Colton opened the tour-
ney Friday with a major de-
cision over Strawberry
Crest senior Gage Munoz 9-
1, followed by a decision
over Tallahassee-Lincoln
senior Connor RFnderburke
7-3.
In the semifinals Jackson
fell to Springstead's three-
time defending state cham-
pion Cody Ross via a major
decision, 12-4. Ross de-
feated Jackson in all three
meetings this season.
From the consolation
round, Palmetto Ridge sen-
ior Anthony Curto solved
Jackson 7-3.




CAMP
Continued from Page B1

"When you throw the ball
(to a teammate), try to hit
him in the chest."
Both had their groups
breaking into pairs and
throwing to each other,
keeping what they'd been


In his final consolation
match, Jackson blanked
Funderburke for fifth place
3-0.
Afterward, Jackson was
not upset in placing fifth.
"At this point, I'm OK with
it," said the 16-year-old
Jackson, who finished 35-10
overall, "Next year, I want
to come back and wrestle
even harder. Most of the
guys I lost to this year were
seniors."
At season's close Jackson
had one regret: "Maybe I
should have starting getting
pushed harder by my
brother"
Team-wise, "We did
pretty well, with three of
five guys placing," replied
Jackson. "I'm like every-
body else; next season
starts tomorrow."
Like Colton Jackson,
McLean (49-9) roared
through his first two foes on
Friday
McLean stuck Pompano
Beach-Ely senior Carvens
Joseph in 98 seconds before
blanking Seminole-Osceola
senior Jordan Harriott, 7-0.


taught in mind.
The Legends of Youth
program made 55 such stops
last year, throughout the
U.S. and in Puerto Rico, the
Dominican Republic and
Venezuela. Another stop is
planned in London this
year, according to Michael
Obyc, special events coordi-
nator for MLB Players
Alumni Association.


Caps

ome game. St. Louis earned its
6th home win (26-3-4).
has lost seven straight, its longest
n eight-game skid from Dec. 13-
Wild have scored just nine goals
en games.
;ored his first goal since Jan. 7,
e the Blues a 2-0 lead early in the

d his sixth shutout of the season
s career. He improved to 20-5-2
with an NHL-best 1.61 goals-
ge.
ders 4, Hurricanes 3
E, N.Y. John Tavares took ad-
rolina again, notching two goals
n the Islanders' victory that com-
irk's four-game season sweep of
S.
n made 33 saves for the Islanders
o pulled within six points of eighth-
in the Eastern Conference playoff

S24 goals this season, six against
ilso has six assists versus the Hur-
6-11), who are tied with Buffalo at
ist in the conference.
en and Kyle Okposo also scored
rs. P.A. Parenteau tied his career
at 53 with two assists.
tter, Jaroslav Spacek, and Jiri
for the Hurricanes, who were 4-0-2
Is six games. Carolina captain Eric
d his point streak to eight games
on Spacek's goal. He has five
r assists during the spurt.
cks 6, Maple Leafs 2
ER, British Columbia -Alex Bur-
iel and Henrik Sedin combined for
incouver's thrashing of Toronto.
ored two goals, Daniel Sedin had a
Assists, and twin brother Henrik
sists. The Sedins' outburst came
gone three games without a point.
over's 10th straight win over
ng a span of more than eight years.
lotra, Sami Salo and Kevin Bieksa
r the Canucks (37-15-6), who have
en.
otes 2, Stars 1 (OT)
E, Ariz. Radim Vrbata scored his
8th goal 1:15 into overtime, Mike
30 shots, and Phoenix earned a
ith straight game by beating Dallas.
ker scored his first goal in 21 games,
stood a flurry of shots in the third
ving a scoreless streak end. Vrbata
I game-winning goal of the season.
der scored his 22nd goal, and Kari
31 saves for Dallas, which played
g scorer Jamie Benn.


Saturday's semifinals saw
Archbishop McCarthy sen-
ior Javier Rodriguez solve
McLean for third time this
season in three clashes via
an 11-3 major decision.
From the consolation
bracket, McLean stuffed
Joseph in a rematch via a
16-0 technical fall before
solving NCT senior Mitch
Lambert for third place 9-2.
Citrus' second-year skip-
per Chris Kelly evaluated
his team's performance.
"The positives start with
three players. Taylor was
dominant. Nick (McLean)
had a tough draw in the
semifinals; that should have
been the final. He lost, but
he came back to take third,"
said Kelly "We lose some in-
valuable seniors like Zach
(Collins). We're gonna miss
'em.
"Right now, we're looking
toward the future," said
Kelly "We're looking toward
have multiple champs at
states next year Right now,
I don't have any regrets. The
kids wrestled their hearts
out; that's all I could ask."


"We're trying to expand to
75 this year," Obyc said.
This was the first time the
tour made a stop in Citrus
County. Adams thanked
Mike Scott Plumbing for its
financial support in bring-
ing the event to Central
Ridge.
"This was the first time
here," Adams said. "Hope-
fully not (the last)."


SCOREBOARD





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Klitschko unanimously outpoints Chisora


Associated Press

MUNICH Vitali Kl-
itschko unanimously out-
pointed British challenger
Dereck Chisora on Satur-
day to keep the WBC
heavyweight title.
Chisora found little
support from the sellout
crowd of 12,500 after his
slap on Klitschko at the
weigh-in Friday, and en-
sured the ill-feeling con-
tinued when he spat in
the 40-year-old's face as
the champion's record
was being called out.
Klitschko's younger
brother, Wladimir, who
holds the IBF and
"super" WBA titles as
well as the minor WBO
and IBO belts, acted as a


buffer as Chisora goaded
his opponent.
Vitali was clearly in-
censed, but it took some
time before he could assert
control against the 28-year-
old Briton's aggressive
approach. His greater
reach and experience
made the difference.
The judges scored it
118-110, 118-110 and 119-
111.
Klitschko improved
his record to 44-2 with
the 10th successful de-
fense of the title he won
from Corrie Sanders in
2004.
It was arguably the
toughest bout he's had
since losing on a techni-
cal knockout to Lennox
Lewis in 2003.


"I'm not proud of my
performance tonight be-
cause I feel I let my fans
down," Klitschko said.
The Zimbabwe-born
Chisora dropped to 15-3
after his third loss in his
last four fights, but he had
fans in Munich's Olympia-
halle worried as Klitschko
appeared to tire from his
relentless attack.
Sensing an upset, they
chanted the Ukrainian's
name in the seventh round
before Klitschko reasserted
his dominance with a se-
ries of precision blows.
Chisora was bleeding
from the lip after the first
round, but seemed more
than capable of taking
Klitschko's repeated
punishment.


Klitschko appeared to
tire as the bout progressed,
the Briton maintaining
pressure by constantly
forcing the initiative.
Klitschko eventually
stamped his authority on
the bout in the ninth round,
catching Chisora with a
huge right and seemingly
picking his punches at
will, and Chisora was
hanging on in the 10th.
Chisora gave it every-
thing he had in the 12th
and final round as he
sought a knockout blow,
but Klitschko, knowing
the work was already done,
used his greater experi-
ence to safely see out the
round, and maintain
family dominance of the
heavyweight division.


Associated Press
WBC heavyweight Champion Vitali Klitschko of Ukraine, left, fights
with challenger Dereck Chisora of Britain on Saturday during their WBC
heavyweight title bout at the Olympiahalle in Munich, southern Germany.


Knicks expect Lin to be quick study Minus big names,

Associated Press new-look Cards


GREENBURGH, N.Y -
Jeremy Lin has flawlessly
handled Linsanity Handling
the ball has been tougher.
The Knicks' point guard
has been turnover prone,
and it finally caught up to
New York on Friday in an
89-85 loss to New Orleans.
It was the Knicks' first
loss since Lin became the
starter and an international
sensation. All the hype, and
seven straight wins, had
prevented much attention
on his mistakes. But when
he coughed the ball up nine
times Friday, tied for the
most in the NBA this sea-
son, Lin put the blame on
himself and perhaps gave
the team reason for worry
Not so, coach Mike D'An-
toni said Saturday, insisting
that Lin's turnovers are
"not even a concern" and
that the ex-Harvard guard
will be a quick study
"I just want him to keep
his mentality to not get hes-
itant, 'Oh, I might turn it
over,"' D'Antoni said.
"That's OK. Risk it."
Taking those risks led to
some of Friday's miscues.
D'Antoni said Lin occasion-
ally went for the "home run
play," rather than take a
simpler option that may have
been available, things they
looked at on film Saturday
"I mean, he's a level-
headed kid. He's not going
to get down. He'll take the
blame that's what Steve
Nash did all the time, 'my
fault'--buthe knows the next
game is brand new," D'An-
toni said. "He's playing bet-
ter than he said he played.
"Twenty-eight (actually
26) points and five assists,
you might say 'Oh, that's not
Linsanity' but for any NBA
player that's pretty good.
Just too many turnovers."
Lin has played fearlessly,
particularly for someone
who had no previous NBA
success until two weeks
ago. He took big fourth-
quarter shots on national
TV to beat Kobe Bryant and
the Lakers, and calmly
fired the tiebreaking 3-
pointer with 0.5 seconds
left that gave the Knicks a
90-87 victory in Toronto.
So he wasn't going to let
his first failure as an NBA
starter linger too long.
"I'm going to keep my
preparation the same. I'm
OK moving onto the next
game," he said. "I'm going
to make mistakes and have
bad games, but that's fine
with me. I'm going to grow
as a player, so I'm not too
worried."
Skeptics of Lin note the
weakness of the Knicks'
schedule since Linsanity
began, with only two win-
ning teams among the
seven games. The schedule
gets real rugged before the
All-Star break, including
nationally televised games
against Dallas on Sunday
and Miami on Thursday


say they're ready


Associated Press
The New York Knicks' Jeremy Lin passes away from the New Orleans Hornets' AI-Farouq
Aminu on Friday during the first half in New York.


The Mavericks made Le-
Bron James look ordinary
in the NBA finals, so they
might have a field day
against an undrafted
player. Jason Kidd, still one
of the league's craftiest de-
fenders, will probably have
a few tricks for his fellow
Northern California native.
Lin seems so focused on
his basketball that he refuses
to get caught up in the
hoopla surrounding him. He
didn't know he was being
added to the All-Star Rising
Stars Challenge or even
which team he ended up on
- Shaq drafted him with
the No. 3 pick for his squad
- nor was he aware that
Time Warner cable and MSG


network had settled a dis-
pute to put Knicks games
back on TV in New York, a
breakthrough clearly in re-
sponse for cries to see Lin.
So his teammates know he
will do what it takes to clean
up the sloppy play that has
led to six or more turnovers
in five straight games.
"He has a great basket-
ball life ahead of him and
great knowledge for the
game, so all those are very
correctable and minor mis-
takes," fellow point guard
Baron Davis said.
Davis expects to play this
week for the first time this
season. He's a former All-
Star and was expected to be
the starting point guard -


and savior when he was
ready
Lin seized both roles.
D'Antoni strongly believes
in him he said he doesn't
think Lin has any weak-
nesses and views him as
the starter even when Davis
is back. But if Lin has more
struggles like Friday night,
it opens the door for change.
"Baron, we know how
good he can be. If he's that
good, then it'll be tough, but
I think they're both com-
fortable with whatever hap-
pens," D'Antoni said. "And
we just try to play for the
best and the luxury is hav-
ing two really good point
guards, and that's where
we're hoping to get to."


Associated Press

JUPITER, Fla. So long,
Albert Pujols. Happy trails,
Tony La Russa. Timeout,
Dave Duncan.
The World Series champion
St. Louis Cardinals have
had plenty of upheaval.
Now they enter spring train-
ing looking for a new No. 3
hitter and breaking in a
rookie manager and pitch-
ing coach. Time for the new-
comers to step forward.
Before meeting with re-
porters, just steps from the
closest of six practice fields
at Roger Dean Stadium, Mike
Matheny jokingly checked
to make sure this was where
La Russa usually held court
for 16 springs. Armed with a
cup of coffee instead of face-
mask and shin guards, the
former four-time Gold Glove
catcher confessed to feeling
a bit strange.
"Is this the spot?" Math-
eny asked.
Two equipment bags
topped by six boxes of shoes
were stacked in front of
Matt Holliday's locker stall,
which used to be Pujols'
spot As for Pujols' decision
in December to take a 10-
year, $254 million free-agent
deal with the Angels after 11
Hall of Fame-trajectory sea-
sons with the team that
drafted him? Old news.
Pujols' name never even
came up during Matheny's
wide-ranging 18-minute
opening media session.
"It's going to be different,"
pitcher Kyle Lohse said.
"But it's a business and we
have 25 other guys who'll
pull together to win as many
games as we can. That's the
way it goes. And nobody's
going to feel sorry for us."
The Cardinals anticipate
a visit in the next few weeks
from La Russa, who will be
assisting longtime friend
Jim Leyland with the Tigers.
La Russa has said he won't
be looking over Matheny's
shoulder
Just like La Russa, Math-
eny plans on short, activity-
filled days before the spring
schedule starts March 5. He
devoted a lot of Saturday to
completing the routine that
likely won't deviate much
from the La Russa days.
That's no surprise consid-
ering Matheny played for St.
Louis for four seasons and
was an instructor in the or-
ganization for two more
years before getting the job
last November.
"Guys get in and get their
work done, there's not a lot
of standing around," Math-
eny said. "Actually, there's
no standing around. We get
our job done, we get better
and then we get them out of
here. That is all going to be
very similar to what's hap-
pened in the past."


Derek Lilliquist plans on
sticking with Duncan's tried
and true methods in his first
year as pitching coach. He's
already battle-tested after
filling in late last season
while Duncan took a leave
of absence following his
wife's surgery to remove a
brain tumor, and was ele-
vated to the full-time posi-
tion when Duncan decided
he wouldn't be back this
season.
"The recipe for his choco-
late cake is pretty good,"
Lilliquist said. "Maybe add
some sprinkles here and
there."
Good news for Lilliquist,
who began last season as the
bullpen coach, is that the ro-
tation appears to be among
the strongest in the National
League. Adam Wainwright,
a 20-game winner in 2010, is
set to return from recon-
structive elbow surgery that
sidelined him all of 2011
and rejoins fellow ace Chris
Carpenter.
The 37-year-old Carpenter
will probably be eased into
things coming off a heavy
workload last season, but
Lilliquist said Wainwright
will be on the same sched-
ule as everybody else.
The other major medical
issue entering camp is utili-
tyman Allen Craig's surgi-
cally repaired right knee.
Craig, one of the team's sur-
prise postseason heroes, ex-
pects to beat the initial
timetable for a May return
from a torn patellar tendon
and is holding out hope of
being ready on opening day
"It's going to be close,"
Craig said. "I don't like to
say that I'm going to be back
on this day for sure, but the
path I'm on now it could be
a possibility"
As to who'll bat third? Ma-
theny joked that spring
training hasn't even begun
and there's plenty of time to
figure it out, several times
mentioning that there's flex-
ibility with Holliday, Lance
Berkman, Carlos Beltran
and perhaps even Craig up
for consideration.
"Since the first day of this
deal I've been scribbling
lineups and it's been a lot of
fun," Matheny said. "We
have multiple guys who
have hit in the three hole,
multiple guys who can hit 4,
5,6 and even in the two hole.
There will be a little bit of
toying around to see who re-
ally fills the best spot."
Position players aren't to
report until Thursday, but
most players are expected
to beat that deadline. Just
like virtually all the pitchers
and catchers, who have
been in town for a while.
Such enthusiasm. And off
the short break that comes
with beating the Texas
Rangers in Game 7, too.


New addition Papelbon eager to get started with Phillies


Associated Press

CLEARWATER, Fla. -Jonathan
Papelbon relishes the challenge of
trying to help the Philadelphia
Phillies win another World Series.
Baseball's highest-paid reliever
is accustomed to lofty expectations
after spending seven seasons with
the Boston Red Sox and insists a
change of scenery and the $50 mil-
lion, four-year contract he signed
this winter shouldn't make his job


any more difficult.
"I like pressure. That what
makes me tick, man," the 30-year-
old closer said Saturday on the
eve of the Phillies' first spring
training workout for pitchers and
catchers. "I'm excited."
Making the playoffs hasn't been
a problem for the Phillies, who
have won five consecutive NL East
titles and enter 2012 as the team to
beat in the division. But ultimately,
manager Charlie Manuel and his


players know the club will be
judged on whether they get back
to the World Series and win it.
Since winning it all in 2008,
Philadelphia has regressed in the
postseason returning to the
World Series but losing to the New
York Yankees in 2009, falling short
in the NL championship series in
2010 and exiting in the divisional
round last year after winning a
franchise-record 102 games in the
regular season.


Papelbon, who won a World Se-
ries with the Red Sox in 2007, said
club and fan expectations are sim-
ilar in Boston and Philadelphia.
That's one of the reasons he liked
the idea of joining the Phillies and
doesn't feel the burden will be on
him to get the team over the hump
in the playoffs.
"There's not going to be one guy
that comes in this clubhouse that's
going to make a difference," said
Papelbon, a four-time AL All-Star


who had 219 saves with the Red Sox.
"I think every year you start
fresh and you see what guys you
have in your clubhouse and you
really just try to get that team ca-
maraderie as good as you can
get and get everybody kind of
pulling on the same rope in the
same direction."
Papelbon replaces Ryan Mad-
son, who converted 32 of 34 save
opportunities in 2011 in his first
season as Philadelphia's closer.


SPORTS


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2012 B5












ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE-

Bonnaroo halts
ticket sales
NASHVILLE, Tenn. -
Bonnaroo halted sales
Saturday for the four-day
music festival during the
first day of ticket sales
because of overwhelming
demand and technical
problems.
Organizers said on he
2012 Bonnaroo Music and
Arts Festival's website
that they were trying to
fix the problem and
would announce later
when tickets would be
available for the June
festival in Manchester,
about 65 miles southeast
of Nashville.
This year's lineup in-
cludes the reunited
Beach Boys, along with
Radiohead, Red Hot
Chili Peppers, Phish and
Bon Iver.

Judi Dench
battling blindness
LONDON -Actress
Judi Dench is battling to
save her sight.
The James Bond star
said in an interview pub-
lished
Saturday
that she
had been
, diag-
nosed
- with mac-
ular de-
genera-
Judi Dench tion, an
eye condi-
tion which can cause
blindness, and that her
eyesight was already so
bad that she couldn't
even read her own
scripts.
The 77-year-old told
the Daily Mirror she was
relying on friends and
family to keep her up to
speed with her lines.
"It's usually my daugh-
ter or my agent or a
friend and actually I like
that, because I sit there
and imagine the story in
my mind," she told the
newspaper during an in-
terview at a London
hotel.
"The most distressing
thing is in a restaurant in
the evening I can't see
the person I'm having
dinner with."

Ruby slippers
to be conserved
WASHINGTON -
Dorothy's ruby slippers
from "The Wizard of Oz"
are being removed from a
Smithsonian exhibit to be
conserved.
Curators said the fa-
mous shoes are old and
need to be prepared for a
future display at the Na-
tional Museum of Ameri-
can History The last day
to see the slippers in
their current exhibit is
Wednesday They will re-
turn to public view April
5 in a new exhibit called
"American Stories."
The slippers were do-
nated anonymously to the
museum in 1979 and have
been on display almost
continuously since.
The 1939 movie's cos-
tume designer altered
red shoes by attaching
netting on their tops and
heels and covering them
with red sequins. Cura-
tors say they were made
quickly and cheaply.
While the shoes are
gone, "Oz" will be repre-
sented by the Scare-
crow's hat
-From wire reports


Associated Press
A poster with fans' messages to Whitney Houston is seen Saturday near the funeral service for the singer at the
New Hope Baptist Church in Newark, N.J. Houston died Feb. 11 at the Beverly Hills Hilton in Beverly Hills, Calif.,
at the age 48.


Whitney's voice soars at funeral


NEKESA MUMBI MOODY
AP Music Writer

NEWARK, N.J. The best voices
of a generation all paid tribute to
her. But in the end, the most power-
ful voice at Whitney Houston's fu-
neral was her own.
The first notes of "I Will Always
Love You," at the end of a 3 1/2-hour
remembrance of the pop superstar,
played Saturday as her casket left
the hometown church where she
first wowed a congregation.
Her mother, gospel singer Cissy
Houston, walked right behind her,
sobbing, "My baby"
Houston's voice "you wait for a
voice like that for a lifetime," men-
tor Clive Davis said moved her
daughter, mourners like Oprah
Winfrey and a packed church to
tears after the biggest names in
gospel and pop music sang about
God, love, lost angels and moving
on.
Stevie Wonder rewrote lyrics to
"Ribbon in the Sky" for Houston -
"you will always be a ribbon in the
sky," he sang. So did gospel's the
Rev. Kim Burrell for "A Change is
Gonna Come," which cousin
Dionne Warwick said was Hous-
ton's favorite song of all time. R.
Kelly brought the New Hope Bap-
tist Church to its feet with a stirring
version of"I Look to You," the title
of Houston's final studio album.
Wonder and Alicia Keys may have
been the most famous singers offer-
ing tributes, in a congregation of
mourners that included Winfrey,
Mariah Carey, Kevin Costner and
Chaka Khan. But the church choir
and performances from the Winans
family, the gospel star Rev Donnie
McClurkin and Burrell were
equally powerful.
Houston's 18-year-old daughter,
Bobbi Kristina, sobbed and em-
braced Houston's close friend,
singer Ray J, at length, as her
mother's voice began to drift
through the church. His sister,
singer Brandy, put her arm around
him throughout the service.
Clapping hands, swaying and
singing along with the choir to
gospel hymns, the biggest names in
entertainment joined Houston's
family and fans in the New Jersey
city where she was first born and
found her in voice in church.
Costner, Houston's co-star in "The
Bodyguard," which spawned her
greatest hit, imagined a young
Houston using her winning smile to
get out of trouble. He also remem-
bered the megastar as uncertain of
her own fame, who "still wondered,
'Am I good enough? Am I pretty
enough? Will they like me?"'
"It was the burden that made her
great and the part that caused her
to stumble in the end," Costner said.
Filmmaker Tyler Perry praised
Houston's "grace that kept on car-
rying her all the way through, the


Birthday If too many of your opportunities come simul-
taneously in the year ahead and are more than you can
handle, you might have to prioritize them. However, regard-
less of which you choose first, don't assume it'll be easy.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Chances are you'll do rea-
sonably well with those projects that can be accomplished
easily. However, if patience or a second effort is required,
it'll be another story.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) If you have any hope of
success, you must be able to distinguish between wishful
thinking and realistic expectations. Don't allow your crav-
ings to overpower reality.
Aries (March 21-April 19) You might find a tug-of-war
going on within you, inasmuch as you are likely to be quite
adept at acquisition but equally adroit at spending. Which
side will win is up to you.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Scheduling an agenda that is


Today's HOROSCOPE
too demanding is likely to be self-defeating. Don't attempt
to do so much that all your good intentions end up going by
the boards.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) There is nothing wrong with
having a good imagination, as long as you don't use it to
sell yourself on illogical conceptions while totally ignoring
the hard truth.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Someone you know might be
flying false colors in order to get you to do something your
common sense tells you to avoid. Listen to your inner
voice.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Objectives you establish for
yourself are likely to be worthy ones. If you're not careful
however, a cohort who isn't in harmony with your aims
might try to take you down another path.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Before investing a lot of
money on a do-it-yourself project, make certain you can


handle it and/or sustain enough interest to finish it. If it's a
momentary whim, you'll come up short.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Just because a friend of yours
is experiencing some luck with a speculative venture, this
doesn't mean you will have the same good fortune. By the
time you jump in, it may be too late.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Leave undisturbed any
volatile issues you and your mate hold opposing opinions
about. If you can't talk it out peacefully, it will quickly be-
come an argument neither can win.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -There's a strong possibil-
ity you have a surfeit of talk and a dearth of walk. Speaking
of your good intentions is worthless if it's merely hot air.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) If you aren't disciplined
and prudent with your financial dealings, there's a probabil-
ity you'll be using far more red ink than black on your bal-
ance sheet.


same grace led her all the way to
the top of the charts. She sang for
presidents."
Warwick presided over the fu-
neral, introducing speakers and
singers and offering short insights
about her cousin; she joked that
Houston's Super Bowl performance
of "The Star Spangled Banner" be-
came almost as big as the telephone
book.
Houston's mother was helped by
two people on either side of her as
she walked in and sat with her
granddaughter and other family to
begin the service.
Houston's ex-husband, Bobby
Brown, briefly appeared at her fu-
neral, walking to the casket, touch-
ing it and walking out. He later said
in a statement that he and his chil-
dren were asked repeatedly to
move and he left rather than risk
creating a scene. Close family
friend Aretha Franklin, whom
Houston lovingly called "Aunt Ree,"
had been expected to sing at the
service, but said early Saturday she
was too ill to attend. Franklin said
in an email to The Associated Press
saying she had been up most of the
night with leg spasms and sent best
wishes to the family
Singers Jennifer Hudson, who
sang "I Will Always Love You" a
night after Houston's death in a
Grammy tribute, mourned Houston
along with Monica, Brandy, Jordin
Sparks representing a genera-
tion of big-voiced young singers who
grew up emulating the star of the
'80s and '90s.
As the funeral began, mourners
fell quiet as three police officers es-
corted Houston's casket, draped
with white roses and purple lilies.
White-robed choir members began
to fill the pews on the podium. As
the band played softly, the choir
sang in a hushed voice, "Whitney,
Whitney, Whitney"
A program featuring a picture of
Houston looking skyward read "Cel-
ebrating the life of Whitney Eliza-
beth Houston, a child of God."
Pictures of Houston as a baby, with
her mother and daughter filled the
program.
"I never told you that when you
were born, the Holy Spirit told me


that you would not be with me
long," Cissy Houston wrote her
daughter in a letter published in
the program. "And I thank God for
the beautiful flower he allowed me
to raise and cherish for 48 years."
"Rest, my baby girl in peace," the
letter ends, signed "mommie."
The service marks one week after
Houston, one of music's all-time
biggest stars, was found dead in the
bathtub of a Beverly Hills hotel the
night before the Grammys. The cause
of death has yet to be determined.
To the world, Houston was the
pop queen with the perfect voice,
the dazzling diva with regal beauty,
a troubled superstar suffering from
addiction and, finally, another vic-
tim of the dark side of fame.
To her family and friends, she
was just "Nippy" A nickname given
to Houston when she was a child, it
stuck with her through adulthood
and, later, would become the name
of one of her companies. To them,
she was a sister, a friend, a daugh-
ter and a mother.
"She always had the edge," the
Rev Jesse Jackson said outside
church Saturday. "You can tell
when some kids have what we call a
special anointing. Aretha had that
when she was 14. ... Whitney culti-
vated that and took it to a very high
level."
A few fans gathered hours before
the service as close as they could
get to the church, some from as far
away as Washington, D.C., and
Miami. Bobby Brooks said he came
from Washington "just to be among
the rest of the fans.
"Just to celebrate her life, not just
(mourn her)," said Brooks, "just to
sing and dance with the people that
love her."
Others were more entrepreneur-
ial, setting up card tables to sell silk-
screened T-shirts with Houston's
image and her CDs.
Only the invited would get close
to the church; streets were closed to
the public for blocks in every direc-
tion. But their presence was felt
around the church, with a huge
shrine of heart-shaped balloons
and personal messages that cov-
ered the street corner around the
church entrance.


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

FRIDAY, FEB. 17
Mega Money: 19 22 26 29
Mega Ball: 13
4-of-4 MB No winner
4-of-4 8 $1,134.50
3-of-4 MB 57 $318
3-of-4 1,150 $47
2-of-4 MB 1,673 $22.50
1-of-4 MB 13,557 $2.50
2-of-4 33,528 $2
Fantasy 5:7 19 22 28 29
5-of-5 2 winners $124,550.56
4-of-5 350 $114.50
3-of-5 11,124 $10
THURSDAY, FEB. 16
Fantasy 5:1 10 26 29 30
5-of-5 1 winner $226,823.59
4-of-5 289 $126.50
3-of-5 9,418 $10.50

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num-
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call 850-487-7777.


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, Feb. 19,
the 50th day of 2012. There
are 316 days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On Feb. 19, 1942, during
World War II, President
Franklin D. Roosevelt signed
Executive Order 9066, which
authorized the U.S. military to
exclude people from desig-
nated areas. (The order was
used to relocate and intern
American residents of Japan-
ese ancestry, a majority of
whom were native-born U.S.
citizens.)
On this date:
In 1473, astronomer Nico-
laus Copernicus was born in
Torun, Poland.
In 1878, Thomas Edison
received a U.S. patent for "an
improvement in phonograph
or speaking machines."
In 1945, during World War
II, some 30,000 U.S. Marines
began landing on Iwo Jima,
where they commenced a
successful month-long battle
to seize control of the island
from Japanese forces.
Ten years ago: NASA's
Mars Odyssey spacecraft
began mapping the Red
Planet.
Five years ago: Three-
way talks in the Mideast be-
tween Secretary of State
Condoleezza Rice and Israeli
and Palestinian leaders, ini-
tially billed as a new U.S.
push to restart peace efforts,
ended with little progress
other than a commitment to
meet again.
One year ago: The world's
dominant economies, meet-
ing in Paris, struck a wa-
tered-down deal on how to
smooth out trade and cur-
rency imbalances blamed for
a global financial crisis.
Today's Birthdays:
Singer Smokey Robinson is
72. Singer Bobby Rogers
(Smokey Robinson & the Mir-
acles) is 72. Actress Carlin
Glynn is 72. Singer Lou
Christie is 69. Actor Michael
Nader is 67. Rock musician
Tony lommi (Black Sabbath,
Heaven and Hell) is 64. Actor
Stephen Nichols is 61. Author
Amy Tan is 60. Actor Jeff
Daniels is 57. Rock singer-
musician Dave Wakeling is
56. Talk show host Lorianne
Crook is 55. Actor Ray Win-
stone is 55. Actor Leslie
David Baker (TV: "The Of-
fice") is 54. Britain's Prince
Andrew is 52. Singer Seal is
49. Actress Jessica Tuck is
49. Country musician Ralph
McCauley (Wild Horses) is
48. Rock musician Jon Fish-
man (Phish) is 47. Actress
Justine Bateman is 46. Actor
Benicio Del Toro is 45. Rock
musician Daniel Adair is 37.


Pop singer-actress Haylie
Duff is 27.
Thought for Today: "Pas-
sion and prejudice govern the
world; only under the name of
reason." John Wesley, Eng-
lish theologian (1703-1791).


The coffin holding the remains of singer Whitney Houston is carried to a
hearse after funeral services at the New Hope Baptist Church.












COMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


Special to the Chronicle


How Florida Senate

slammed door on

privateprisons
Rarely do bills that reach the Florida
Senate floor go down to defeat. By the
time leaders schedule a vote, they can
generally guarantee the outcome. So when
they scheduled a vote this past week to pri-
vatize state prisons in 18 South Florida coun-
ties, those of us fighting this deeply flawed
plan caught our
breaths. By our reck-
oning, the Senate was
tied, 20-20.
In the business of
s politics, bills don't live
or die on their merits.
There's arm-twisting,
"- deal-making and an
enormous pressure to
acquiesce, especially
Paula Dockery if you want something
FLORIDA else for folks back
VOICE home.
There's also proce-
dural gamesmanship,
cards that Senate leaders played in the ex-
treme this session to advance the cause of
private prison corporations.
The drama began in earnest two weeks
ago, when those of us fighting prison privati-
zation which would have killed 3,800 jobs
for a "trust us" savings of 7 percent were
buoyed to see the bill temporarily passed on
second reading.
"Temporarily passed" is a procedural
move that sounds better than it is. To "TP a
bill" can be a face-saving kiss of death. But it
also can give leaders more time to twist arms.
When the prison bill got TP'd, it was headed
for defeat: 17-23.
Perhaps you heard what happened next.
For questioning the so-called financial analy-
sis, Senate leaders stripped Sen. Mike
Fasano, R-New Port Richey who repre-
sents western-most Citrus County of his
chairmanship on the Criminal Justice Ap-
propriations Committee and his seat on the
Budget Committee.
A week passed without movement, though


Photo courtesy Florida Senate
Sen. Charlie Dean, R-lnverness, standing at right, speaks during a recent session of the Florida
Senate, shadowed by a student from Florida State University, center. Sen. Mike Fasano, R-New
Port Richey, sits behind Dean at left.


FLORIDA VOICES
Florida Voices is a feature carried
periodically in the Citrus County
Chronicle. Florida Voices is a new media
company at the intersection of opinion
journalism, public affairs and
government. It provides a roundtable
forum regarding what influential people
think about key issues facing Florida
from differing perspectives.

leaders kept the bill on Special Order the
list of bills to be taken up by the Senate that
day At least, that's how Special Order is sup-
posed to work.
Talk spread through the Capitol that prison
privatization was dead. Lobbyists for the pri-
vate prisons agreed their prospects were
bleak.
Gov Rick Scott tried to sway two former
sheriffs, Sen. Charlie Dean, R-Inverness -
who represents the bulk of Citrus County -
and Sen. Steve Oelrich, but both stood strong
in opposition. However, two others were won
over by senators in powerful positions. The
new tally: 19-21.
The sooner we voted, the better for our
side, but leadership kept the bill lingering on


Special Order for two weeks. Fearing it might
be sprung with one of us absent, Sen. Jack
Latvala made a defensive move. Since sena-
tors can force the hearing of a bill on Special
Order, and we hadn't made that request, Lat-
vala sought and received the promise of a 24-
hour notice before the bill's next hearing.
This past week, after two weeks in limbo,
the bill came up for second reading, the stage
where senators can ask questions and offer
amendments.
Sen. Fasano offered an amendment that
would have gutted the bill and mandated a
thorough fiscal analysis instead. The 21 sen-
ators opposed to privatization the mini-
mum number needed to pass an amendment
- stood by him. But then a senator acqui-
esced, while promising to vote against the
overall bill. Another senator defected, too, for
a desired budget item. Fasano's amendment
was defeated, 19-21, and leadership tried to
persuade media the tide had turned.
Finally, the bill itself was ready for a yea-
or-nay vote. Opponents hoped the bill could
be quickly rolled over to third reading, the
stage at which the actual vote happens. But
it wasn't to be.

See Page C3


Book REVIEW


Book explores what to do about Afghanistan


MICHAEL FRANCIS
Special to the Chronicle

"Ghosts of Afghanistan: The
Haunted Battlefield" by Jonathan
Steele (London, Portobello Books
2011) 450 pages, $26.
MEN
During the next three years,
probably the most important
foreign policy decision fac-
ing any U.S. president is what to do
about Afghanistan. President
Obama has promised to bring
troops out by the end of 2014, but it
is not clear how he is going to do it
With the exception of Ron Paul, the
Republican candidates decry this
commitment because, they say, we
have not "won" the war and
Afghanistan would fall again under
the control of the Islamic extremist
Taliban.
The author of this book has been


a global affairs reporter for the
British newspaper the Manchester
Guardian and traveled to
Afghanistan often since the Russian
intervention 35 years ago and then
witnessed the U.S. move into the
area.
Most of us have a poor recollec-
tion of the actual chain of events
that led the Russians to go into
Afghanistan in 1979. Moscow acted
because:
1. It feared that Islamic extrem-
ism in that country would spread
discontent in regions of Russia with
large Islamic majorities.
2. It worried about the growing in-
fluence of Iran on a country bor-
dering both Russia and Iran.
3. It believed that the flow of oil
from the Middle East would be
interrupted.
4. And, they naively hoped it
could help to help combat the ex-


treme backwardness of a country
that ranks as the poorest, worst ed-
ucated country in the world.
This decision to send in the
troops was made by the aging Rus-
sian leadership. To their credit, the
Russians introduced the idea of ed-
ucating women, of building west-
ernized educational systems, and
tried to thwart the growth of Islamic
extremism. (Sound familiar?) But
this experiment soon turned sour as
the mujahedin, a loosely organized
group of Islamic fundamentalists,
war lords, and various ethnic
groups, began waging a guerrilla
war against the Russian occupation.
The CIA helped the mujahedin be-
cause we feared allowing Russian
power in the oil-rich Middle East
Despite the government-con-
trolled media, the war became in-
creasingly unpopular in Russia.
When Mikhail Gorbachev came to


power in 1985, he recognized that
this was a losing cause and began
trying to negotiate his way out. In
1989 the last Soviet troops left Most
Afghans felt the Russians had
treated them harshly and used tac-
tics that killed many innocent
Afghans while destroying towns and
villages.
With the Russians gone, the
loosely organized mujahedin fell
apart as they attempted to rule the
country Eventually one particular
group, the Taliban, won the military
struggle to control the central gov-
ernment in Kabul. This group
called for throwing out the foreign-
ers and advocated an extreme Is-
lamic fundamentalism that made
neighboring Islamic countries un-
easy The author has an interesting
perspective on the Taliban. He

See Page C4


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


Computers

with a

personality

I am getting creeped
out by my new
cellphone.
At the Chronicle, we
like to think we embrace
new technologies. Our cu-
riosity about emerging
forms of communication
has always been strong.
It was more than 25
years ago that the late
Garry Manning of our staff
came to work one day with
this new invention called
a fax machine. He was so
proud when we got it in-
stalled until we realized
that no one else in town
had a fax machine so we
couldn't fax anybody
During coffee breaks
we'd sit around and stare
at the fax machine, pa-
tiently waiting for some-
thing to happen. It was
about three months be-
fore we got our first fax. It
was an advertisement for
a fax machine.
When the Tandy Com-
pany first introduced lap-
top computers in the early
1980s, we went out and
purchased a half dozen of
them and gave them out to
reporters. To send a story
from the field we had to
mount this large rubbery
device that looked like a
gas mask onto a telephone
and then grind through all
these keyboard com-
mands to send the actual
story
The Model 100 (I still
have one in my office) had
8K of memory and, in
truth, it was easier to just
call a story in over the
telephone and forget
about the computer. 8K of
memory could only hold
half a story; so on occa-
sions, we would have to
delete the first part of the
story before we wrote the
second part.
Some people may also
forget that it was the
Chronicle that first
brought dial-up Internet
service to Citrus County
back in the early 1990s.
That was before cable,
satellite and the phone
company all got into the
business. At its peak, our
Internet business was pro-
viding service to about
4,000 homes in the county.
So you should not be sur-
prised that when the new
iPhone 4S came out from
Apple that we were some
of the first folks to jump on
the new technology
But I have to admit, I'm
having second thoughts.
This time, the technology
may have gone too far
The iPhone 4S comes
with all of the latest appli-
cations, but the line may
have been crossed with
Siri, the in-phone genie
that actually has conver-
sations with you.
You may have seen
some of the television ad-
vertisements where the
phone user asks Siri
where the nearest gas sta-
tion is or where you can
buy a pepperoni pizza in
your neighborhood.
As time goes on Siri be-
gins to collect information
on you based on the ques-
tions you ask. And Siri
also begins to take note of
your personality and con-
verses with you in a tone
that you deserve.
I have been accused of
having a high degree of
sarcasm, so it's not a sur-
prise that all of our chil-
dren have grown up with
a bit of that know-it-all
sarcastic wit.
Now Siri my friend in


Page C3


I







Page C2 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2012



PINION


"You can't learn too soon that the most
useful thing about a principle is that it
can always be sacrifced to expediency."
Somerset Maugham, 1874-1965


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan....................................... publisher
o Charlie Brennan ..........................................editor
S Mike Arnold ....................................... HR director
Sandra Frederick........................... managing editor
SCurt Ebitz......................................citizen member
Founded Mac Harris ..................... ........... citizen member
by Albert M.
Williamson Rebecca Martin ................................guest member
'You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus

GET BACK ON TRACK




Court ruling



should end



hospital fight


Could the controversy fi-
nally be over?
The three-year battle
over the management and di-
rection of Citrus Memorial hos-
pital may have come to the
beginning of the end on
Wednesday when a Tallahas-
see judge ruled in favor of the
Citrus County Hospital Board
of Trustees.
Circuit Court THE I
Judge Jackie Ful-
ford decided that Court de
the governing Citrus M
board has the
upper hand in the OUR 01
dispute with the
Citrus Memorial Get bac
Health Founda-
tion because it is the body that
has legislative oversight and
the direct taxing responsibility.
The governing board has
been fighting with the founda-
tion board, an organization it
started and then leased the
hospital to for operational pur-
poses. The two organizations
began to battle when the ex-
panded foundation board had
more members, and more
votes, than the gubernatorial-
appointed governing board.
State Sen. Charles Dean, R-
Inverness, and state Rep. Jim-
mie T. Smith, R-Inverness, led
a legislative effort to create a
new law that clearly gave au-
thority to the governing board.
The foundation board chal-
lenged the constitutionality of
the legislation, but the court
finding this past week put a
stamp of approval on the law.
The court also ruled against
the charge that members of the
governing board violated the
state's Sunshine Law by having
a private meeting with then-
state Rep. Ron Schultz, R-Ho-
mosassa, to discuss the law.
The judge's decision was
very clear. It is the governing
board that can be held ac-
countable because it is run by
appointees selected by the gov-
ernor and confirmed by the
Florida Senate. The founda-
tion board members are se-
lected by the other members of
the foundation board.
The judge felt that a public
hospital spending local
property tax dollars should
be held accountable and oper-
ate in an open fashion.
The judge's decision is a stun-
ning setback for the current ad-
ministration of the hospital.
Barring the unforeseen, sig-
nificant changes are in store for


Leave the weeds
In regard to Christmas trees for
fish attractors. We spent all
the money to spray weeds
that were the natural at-
tractors, plus feed like
grass shrimp, etc. Common
sense abused again. We
could have left some weeds
and spent the money on CA
restocking. 563-C
It should be easier
I had to pass my voting
precinct, which is a mile from my
house, and go an additional 10
miles to where the redistricting


I(

P
k


c


how the hospital is governed.
This governance battle over
Citrus Memorial hospital has
gone on way too long. Many
millions of tax and consumer
dollars have been wasted on at-
torneys who have argued over
the justification of their non-
compromising positions.
As we have argued for years,
the general public
5SUE: is not really
overly concerned
vision on about the com-
emorial. plex governing is-
sues. The
DINION: consumers and
taxpayers of Cit-
to work. rus County are
concerned about
high-quality medical care at an
affordable price.
Citizens are concerned about
easy access and the stress-free
delivery of services.
While the administration
will argue otherwise, this legal
battle has hurt the reputation
and delivery of services at Cit-
rus Memorial. While resources
and time have been pumped
into fighting this complex legal
case, consumers continue their
complaints that the delivery of
services in the emergency
room takes way too long.
And the hospital's relation-
ship with the local medical
community is on the critical
care list. The legal confronta-
tion has spilled over into con-
flicts between hospital
administration and many of
our best known and respected
physicians.
It's time for this to stop.
We urge the governing board
to invite the foundation board
to the table and let the two
sides hammer out a gover-
nance model. The court deci-
sion certainly gives the
governing board the upper
hand, but that doesn't mean
there needs to be winners and
losers.
How about sitting down and
working out a compromise
where the consumers and tax-
payers of the community are
the winners? A hospital in the
middle of a three-year gover-
nance squabble is not as fo-
cused on patient care and the
delivery of services as it needs
to be.
We urge the hospital leaders
to not push this to the next court
of appeals and instead listen to
the appeals of the taxpayers
and consumers stop the dis-
pute and get back to work.


has me voting. So it's inconven-
ient and an effort to go vote. Is
that the design of the whole
ND thing? I'm highly upset that
it was an effort to go vote.
What's the limit?
I'm compelled to make
an observation about
(County Road) 486, the
Norvell Bryant Highway,
)579 where the speed limit is 45
mph. If I do 60, only about
one-third of the drivers pass me.
If I do 55, about half of them do.
At 50, I'm one of the slowest peo-
ple on the road. When did we
change the speed limit from 45?


Reasons to like (and honor) Ike


wo coming developments,
one dismal and one excel-
lent, pertain to America's
memory of a great man.
One of several over-
sight panels soon will
consider a proposed
memorial to Dwight
Eisenhower. The pro-
posal is an exhibition- (
istic triumph of theory
over function more
a monument to its cre- -
ator Frank Gehry, -
practitioner of archi-
tectural flamboyance, Georg
than to the most un- OTI
derrated president. VOI
Fortunately, on Tues-
day comes Jean Ed-
ward Smith's biography
"Eisenhower in War and Peace,"
which demonstrates why the
man's achievements merit a me-
morial better than the proposed
one.
Filling four acres across Inde-
pendence Avenue from the Na-
tional Mall, the memorial will
have a colonnade of huge lime-
stone-clad columns from which
will hang 80-foot stainless-steel
mesh "tapestries" depicting im-
ages evocative of Eisenhower's
Kansas youth. And almost as an
afterthought, there will be a
statue of Eisenhower- as a boy
Philip Kennicott, The Washing-
ton Post's cultural critic, says the
statue suggests Eisenhower "both
innocent of and yet pregnant with
whatever failings history ulti-
mately attributes to his career"
Failings? A memorial is not an
exhaustive assessment, it is a cel-
ebration of a preponderance of
greatness.
Kennicott praises Gehry's proj-
ect because it allows visitors
"space to form their own assess-
ment of Eisenhower's legacy"
But memorials are not seminars,
they are reminders that a per-
son esteemed by the nation lived
and is worth learning more
about.
Kennicott says Gehry's project
acknowledges that "few great


I

c


men are absolutely great, without
flaws and failings." Good grief. If
Ike, with all his defects, was not
great, cancel the memorial.
Kennicott celebrates
the "relatively small
representation of
Eisenhower" because
"there were other
Eisenhowers right be-
hind him, other men
who could have done
what he did, who
would have risen to the
occasion if they had
e Will been tapped." How
IER sweetly democratic:
DES Greatness can be
tapped hither and yon.
But if greatness is so
abundant and assured, it is
hardly greatness, so cancel all
memorials.
So far, the best remembrance of
Eisenhower is Smith's superb bi-
ography of one of three Ameri-
cans (with Washington and Grant)
who were world figures before
becoming president. Eisenhower
entered the White House having
dealt with such demanding mili-
tary men as John Pershing, Dou-
glas MacArthur and George
Marshall, then FDR, Churchill,
Stalin (Eisenhower was the only
foreigner ever to stand alongside
Stalin atop Lenin's tomb), de
Gaulle and others in the excruci-
atingly complex task of conduct-
ing coalition warfare with the
largest multinational force ever
assembled.
Intellectuals and journalists,
who are often the last to learn
things, regarded Eisenhower as
amiable and mediocre. He was
neither He was cold (see Smith
on Eisenhower's dismissal of his
wartime companion Kay Sum-
mersby). He was steely (a three-
to-four pack a day smoker, he quit
when "I simply gave myself an
order"). He was brutal (he used
financial pressure to bring
Britain to heel during the 1956
Suez crisis). He was subtle (he as-
sisted de Gaulle's seizure of
power in France in 1944, contrary


THLe WAsrMSs

; srW i ovsro...
$m~uh~ti.,


LETTERS


Teachers need support
Assistant superintendent
should be suspended teacher
reinstated with back pay and
benefits and kid strongly disci-
plined (suspension would be
appropriate in or out of
school) when things like this
happen, teachers avoid getting
involved because they lack the
support of the administration -
as a result kids run the school -
hope the teacher union takes a
strong stand and supports their
member to the wall.
Harry Gardner
Citrus Springs

Thanks for bike run
The Citrus County Foster Par-
ent Association would like to
thank a very special person Mr
Warren Hill of Harley-Davidson
in Crystal River who had little
over 300 bikers do a bike run for
us. Because of this, our children
received a beautiful Christmas.
He also he arranged for some of
the children to have bicycles.
The children, foster parents
and the board of directors were


to FDR's fervent wishes). He was
audacious (he evaded Churchill
by dealing directly with Stalin).
After Eisenhower quickly liq-
uidated a stalemated war in
Korea, no American died in com-
bat during his presidency Twice,
concerning the French besieged
at Dien Bien Phu in Vietnam and
during the Formosa Strait crisis,
he resisted a president with
less military confidence might
not have -his most senior advis-
ers advocating the use of nuclear
weapons.
Smith is most mind-opening re-
garding Eisenhower on race. In
February 1953 15 months be-
fore Brown v Board of Education
- he vowed to use every power of
his office to end segregation in
the District of Columbia and the
armed forces two-thirds of
Army units were still segregated
five years after President Tru-
man's integration order By Octo-
ber 1954, no more segregated
units existed.
In 1957, he sent the 101st Air-
borne to integrate Little Rock's
Central High School. In 1958, he
told the Red Cross to ignore a
Louisiana law requiring that
blood from black and white
donors be segregated. This was in
character: In 1942, when Aus-
tralia desperately sought U.S.
troops but said a law prohibited
blacks from entering the country,
Gen. Eisenhower said, "All right.
No troops." Australia quickly saw
the light
Smith, biographer of Lucius
Clay, John Marshall, Grant and
FDR, writes: "(Eisenhower) was
buried in a government-issue,
eighty-dollar pine coffin, wearing
his famous Ike jacket with no
medals or decorations other than
his insignia of rank" His memory
should not be buried beneath a
grandiose memorial that con-
tributes only to the worsening
clutter on and around the Mall.
--*--A
George Will's email address is
georgewill@washpost. com.


T W ASiN6 P.
Z~ bNY SflFowwiNs

.Comw


\ to the Editor


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in Chroni-
cle editorials are the opinions of
the newspaper's editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Groups or individuals are invited
to express their opinions in a let-
ter to the editor.
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at 352-563-5660.
All letters must be signed and in-
clude a phone number and home-
town, including letters sent via
email. Names and hometowns will
be printed; phone numbers will
not be published or given out.
We reserve the right to edit let-
ters for length, libel, fairness and
good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
350 words, and writers will be
limited to three letters per month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to
352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

very pleased and teary-eyed.
On behalf of the CCFPA and


our children, the board of direc-
tors wants to say thank you to all
the bikers who rode and helped
out on that day We also wish to
thank another special person, Mr
George Nelson of Mickey's Bar,
who donated all the bicycles.
The children were very ex-
cited to see Santa and the motor-
cycles. They loved the bicycles
and gifts that they received on
that day
Citrus County Foster Parent
Association
Inverness

Thanks for caring
I want to thank all the caring
people that made the passing of
my loving wife easier for me to
bear
The neighbors, church people,
our many clubs, senior services
and the Hospice House.
Charles E. Davis Funeral Home
was exceptional in their care for
all our needs. She is resting in the
Bushnell National Cemetery May
her soul rest in peace.
Charles E. Mattingly
Lecanto


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Feb. 19 anything but an ordinary, typical day


T thinking of this comfort in knowing my
Sunday, Feb. 19, Cheryl was still there...
my mind scur- but on that morning,
ries back to another she wasn't
Feb. 19. 4I began to hear in se-
I remember that day quence the sounds that
well very, very well. go along with cleaning:
I had expected it to the vacuum cleaner
be just another ordi- humming; dishes clink-
nary, typical, season- ing while being re-
ably cold, rainy Fred Brannen moved from the
Saturday in Tallahas- A SLICE dishwasher; and the
see, but it would be OF LIFE noises common to
something else cleaning bathrooms.
altogether. I continued to drift between
During the early morning hours, slumber and lucidity until I saw
as I've done throughout our mar- daylight creeping in around the
ried life, I reached over to gain bedroom curtains.


Then it happened Cheryl wad-
dled in, smiled ever so sweetly and
announced, "Sweetheart, it's time."
I then fully understood that I'd
been listening to nesting- Cheryl's
natural instinct had kicked in and
she was preparing for the coming of
a new life, a child to whom she
would soon give birth, a life that, by
God's grace, would remain a part of
us for the rest of ours.
Panic a familiar, almost
friendly, panic, but panic nonethe-
less struck
I grabbed the previously packed
go-to-the-hospital bag and put it in
the car; I awoke 9-year-old Beth
and 6-year-old Becky; hurriedly


helped them prepare their morn-
ing meal; told them their mother
and I were about to go to the hospi-
tal for the anticipated event; and, I
gave them strict instructions to re-
main inside our townhouse and not
to allow anyone in except the next-
door neighbor
Cheryl called the neighbor and,
as pre-arranged, she confirmed
that she'd come and look after our
girls.
Cheryl quickly fluffed her lovely
blond hair and refreshed her
makeup; we gave Beth and Becky
- both now very excited about the
coming of their new sibling -
hugs and kisses; and we were on


our way
I drove to the hospital; Cheryl
was checked in without delay and,
within the hour, our son arrived.
On this date in 2012, most any
events of note that might come our
way will pale in comparison to the
one we shared on this date in 1977,
when we welcomed Fred 3 into our
family.
Feb. 19 anything but an ordi-
nary, typical day.
Happy 35th birthday, son.
--In--
Fred Brannen is an Inverness
resident and a Chronicle
columnist.


Lincoln Day Dinner:



90 percent turnout


Editor's note: What follows are Dr
William Dixon's comments when address-
ing Citrus County Republicans at the Fri-
day Feb. 10, Lincoln DayDinner where he
served as the emcee.
MEN
Progressive policies began with the
presidency of Woodrow Wilson in
1913. They have been
adopted by successive presi-
dents and politicians of both po-
litical parties. Ronald Reagan,
alone among presidents, sup-
ported no progressive platforms.
But he was not an Ivy League
graduate and was thought a fool
by the ruling elite.
Progressives believe that,
using government authority, un-
selfish, intellectually elite polit- Dr. Willih
ical leaders can overcome the OTH
traditions and culture of our na- VOI
tion and transform it into an
utopian state with equality for
all citizens. In this utopia there would be
no personal failure, no poverty, and hu-
mans would behave in an unselfish
manner.
Progressives delude themselves as to the
effectiveness of their policies and ideas.
They ignore their own manifest failures
while congratulating themselves on having
good intentions. They cannot and will not
learn from their mistakes. They have
squandered our national treasure, trading
entitlements for votes and tax favors for
campaign contributions. In their zeal to tax
and regulate, they have made it difficult for
our entrepreneurs to produce goods and
create jobs.
Progressive judges with lifetime ap-
pointments have ruled long-standing reli-
gious traditions and moral codes
unconstitutional. As a result, our culture
has become more coarse, lacking in basic
manners and civil behavior. A violent un-
derclass has arisen, dependent upon gov-
ernment for its sustenance, a class that
lacks an understanding of social norms re-
quired to live in civil society.
Conservatives have seen the universal
failure of progressive policies worldwide.
We know that human behavior is flawed,
unchanged since the time of the first writ-
ten history We know that there can be no
group of leaders both unselfish and so bril-
liant that they can guide us to utopia. After
all, Moses came down from Sinai with 10
simple commandments from God all the
guidance humanity required. Had we been
able to obey them then or now, lasting
peace and prosperity would reign on
Earth.


a

4


Why vote for Obama?
I just want to know why people would
vote for Obama again. He has taken the
country down. Can't people see this was
all a plan? How strange all of a sudden the
economy is doing better stocks are up.
How strange all this should be in place
just when we have a presidential election
coming up.
We should not want to see Obama get in
again or say goodbye to America as we
know it. I know it is the same old same
old. But someone else has to get it, not
Obama. We are imploding within. So stop


VOICES
Continued from Page Cl

Then, one more twist: the
scheduled start of the next
day's session was moved
from the morning to the af-
ternoon. We assumed they
wanted more time to try to
switch votes. Then we
learned two of our senators
were heading home for spe-
cial events. But when they
saw what was happening,
they abandoned their plans,
so important was their vote.
Wednesday's events were
as intense as anyone can re-
member. One senator was
guarded by two other sena-
tors and had a posse of
four large men at the door
- to keep proponents from
getting to her. Another sena-
tor avoided the Capitol until
the start of session. Two sen-
ators were visited on the


being brainwashed that the economy just
happens to be doing better, etc. It is
planned just to get people like some of
you to vote for Obama again while we go
down even further.
So do not be fooled as to think Obama is
doing a good job. Think again. How easy it
is to sway some people into believing he is
doing good. That is why he feels he will be
re-elected as president again. Wait and
see how Obamacare will affect most of
you. So think before you think he is doing
such a good job!
Anna DeRose
Lecanto


light signifies yes; red, no. I
frantically counted the red
votes, looking for our 20. Lo
and behold, we had picked
up another vote. Final tally:
19-21.
It was a rare moment on
the floor of the Senate. A
bad bill, dressed with flimsy
facts, went down to defeat.
It was a good day, even
though senators who voted
their consciences already
face punishment.
Sadly, you can expect a
similar push next year.
For given the money at
stake, the business of poli-
tics is relentless.


Paula Dockeryis a
term-limited Republican
senator from Lakeland who
is chronicling her final
year in the Florida Senate.
She can be reached at
pdockery@florida
voices, com.


floor, throughout the day, to
see what issues could be
bartered.
When the bill finally came
up at the end of bills on
third reading, the Rules
Chair moved to postpone
the vote until the end of bills
on second reading. They
needed more time. Vote
count: 20-20 and holding.
Weary from the pressure,
we wanted to vote and be
done with it. Finally, the bill
was brought up.
Members raised their mi-
crophone to debate, and op-
ponents laid out a
persuasive case against the
ill-conceived rush to priva-
tize prisons. Proponents
still promised a "savings of
7 percent," no matter the
lack of analysis or historical
evidence. Senator after sen-
ator spoke. The chamber
was silent, the gallery full.
Finally, they opened the
vote board, where a green


Great leaders can move the culture for-
ward, but they cannot make of it a perfect
society. So long as we humans remain
flawed, some of us will fail. Poverty and
suffering will always be with us. The best
we can hope for is that our nation will
evolve slowly, improving the human condi-
tion while preserving our God-given rights
to life, liberty and the pursuit of
happiness.
If progressive rule continues
another four years, our nation
will surely decline economi-
cally, morally and militarily Our
individual liberties will be taken
from us one by one. Our chil-
dren and grandchildren will
struggle to achieve levels of
prosperity and freedom much
am Dixon less than we enjoy today
|ER The founders of this nation
C were but a small minority deter-
CES mined to throw off the British
yoke and fight for freedoms
given them by their Creator. The elite, the
wealthiest of colonists, made deals with the
Crown and supported the king. A majority
of colonists had little interest in fighting for
freedom from the crown. Yet, risking their
fortunes, their honor and their lives, this
dedicated minority reached out to the pub-
lic to gain the support they needed to sus-
tain a revolution and to prevail against a
stronger and more numerous enemy
Conservatives, like the founders, are but
a minority of voters. But if we leverage our
votes by contributing to think tanks and ac-
tion committees, if we pen letters to our ed-
itors, if we support solid conservative
candidates, if we urge fellow conservatives
to vote, we, too, will prevail.
Had 90 percent of conservatives in Cit-
rus County turned out to vote in 2000, Bush
vs. Gore, no recount would have been
needed. If we can achieve a 90 percent
turnout of conservative voters in Florida
this November, Barack Obama will lose the
state and likely the election. Bill Nelson
will no longer be our senator
This we must do, if we are to turn this na-
tion back from the progressive path to
failure.

William Dixon is a graduate of Columbia
University New York Medical College
and the USF College ofBusiness
Administration. He served in the Army as
a surgeon and as a Special Forces Officer,
achieving the rank of Lieutenant Colonel.
He was an assistant professor ofsurgery
at the University of Georgia before
entering private practice. Dr Dixon can
be reached at Wdixonl6@yahoo.com.


Letters to the EDITOR


Inglis police issue
Dissolve the Inglis Police? Your safety
is in your hands! The Chronicle's Mike
Wright states incumbents Kellman, Mer-
ritt and Ely support the police. Kirkland
and White want them dissolved. One
commissioner wants them dissolved. No
matter how you vote in the referendum,
three commissioners can vote to amend
the charter and abolish the police
Sheriff Smith will be at the March 6
meeting. He will send Inglis one deputy
on call. If he has a busy night he might
not be able to come. He will not absorb
the police or establish a substation in In-
glis as his budget has been cut way back.
Bill Bachschmidt donated $170,000 in
road millings to Inglis. He states he will
move his business if the police are dis-
solved. Your taxes will take up the slack for
roads. Half of the people who signed to dis-
solve the police pay no taxes. The $50,000
homestead exemption lets them off free,
but your taxes will tell a different story
County or city law enforcement is re-
quired under ES. 562.14 to regulate the
time for sale of alcoholic beverages. ES.
562.4 gives the power to search people or
to determine violation of the beverage law.
It is not harassment to do one's job. Bar
checks are required under Inglis Ordi-
nance Sec. 10-3. Chief Dixon states,
"There's a misconception that Inglis po-
lice sit at bars to arrest patrons. We did 10
DUI arrests in 2011. Two for felony re-
peats, two for traffic accidents and the rest
made on patrol. It is unethical to observe a
bar patron, obviously drunk, to get in a car
and drive. We do not use this entrapment
Officers deter fights around bars. Inglis is
NOT a speed trap. We gave 745 citations in
2011 and 876 warnings. More than 30 cita-
tions were for traffic accidents."
"We did 6705 building checks and an-
swered 1696 calls. Total hours worked
were 8984."
Tarmac Rock Mine could put 1,000
rock trucks a day on U.S. 19 500 in and
500 out. It takes 500 feet to stop a rock
truck when they see a red light.
Betty Berger
Inglis


WINDOW
Continued from Page C

the iPhone has joined
my children and responds
sarcastically when I ask
questions.
For the record, Siri does
an incredible job of giving
out information. When I
asked her where I could get
a good pizza in Crystal
River, she gave me the top
10 locations in town and
ranked them in order of
how consumers rated the
food. The list came up with
highlighted phone num-
bers so I could immediately
place an order.
When I pressed the Siri
button and told her I had
an 11 a.m. meeting in
Spring Hill, she quickly
produced a map that
showed the best route from
Crystal River to Spring
Hill.
At first, when I asked
more complex questions of
Siri, she gave me a rea-
soned response. When I
asked her why our dog
would occasionally do his


business in th
responded: "I
about this, I v
with you."
A few minu
sent me a w
"Why do dogs
how to stop it.'
That didn't s
online location
spend any tim
n't really addr
lem I identify
tried.
A few days
traveling out
was having tr(
the local airp
Siri for some I
produced a m,
While I foll
structions, th
dot on the map
I was traveling
direction.
"Siri, I third
the wrong w
sure about thi:
"Let me
that," she repl
I was late f
and traveling
what appeared
wrong direction
"Siri, are
asked her


Voters: Consider pensions
In our efforts to pick the next president
we should consider how our 401Ks and
pensions have been affected by previous
administrations. The Nasdaq Index is a
good indicator. During the Clinton years,
it reached an all-time high of 4572 in June
of 2000. Under the Bush administration it
went steadily down, reaching a low of
1528 during the last month of his adminis-
tration in January of 2001. Obama then
took over and the Nasdaq Index pro-
ceeded to go back up hitting 2905 in Janu-
ary of 2012. Our pensions and 401Ks have
pretty much followed this pattern. Basi-
cally, they went up during Democratic ad-
ministrations and down during
Republican administrations.
Ralph Jacobsen
Lecanto

Whose steer?
Happy New Year to me. On New Year's
Eve, we were driving home on County
Road 491 (heading north) after a nice
dinner at 6:20 p.m.
It was very dark and just prior to
reaching the construction area, an FHP
patrol car was parked on the east side of
the road facing us with his overhead
lights blinking.
Not knowing what had occurred, we
slowed down to a crawl and at approxi-
mately 15 miles per hour, a longhorn
steer ran into my front fender causing
over $1,400 in damage.
We pulled over and observed approxi-
mately 6 to 10 cows loose and running
around on the road. We had the vehicle
repaired and had to pay a $500
deductible.
After talking with one rancher, animal
control, FHP and the sheriff's office, no
one admitted to owning the cows. We
know the owner is aware of the collision
and is liable for the damage, but obvi-
ously will not come forward and man up.
Again, happy New Year to me!
Ralph Ciancia
Citrus Springs


.e house, she "This is about you, not
Let me think me," she replied.
will get back "Good point," I said to
her, "but don't take it per-
tes later she sonal, just help me."
ebsite titled "I am really sorry about
eat poop and this, but I can't take any re-
" quests right now," she
sound like an replied.
n I wanted to "Siri, I need your help," I
e on and did- replied.
ess the prob- "Sorry, I can't help you,"
ied, but she she said.
"Siri, why are you doing
later I was this to me?" I begged.
of state and "I really have no opin-
ouble finding ion," Siri replied, sounding
)ort. I asked very much like my 16-year-
help and she old daughter did when I
ap. asked her if she cared what
owed her in- her parents thought about
e little blue her dirty room.
showed that "Thanks," I replied.
in the wrong "You're welcome," she
said.
ik I'm going If sarcastic computers
ay Are you are in our future, it may
s?" just be time to dig out my
think about Model 100.
ied.
'or my plane
S70 mph in Gerry Mulligan is the
ed to be the publisher of the Chronicle.
Dn. His email address is
you lost?" I gmulligan@chronicle
online.com.


Letter to the EDITOR


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2012 C3






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I


U.S. TO BUILPTW tW NUCLER PLANtTS


REVIEW
Continued from Page C1

points out that many of the
most widely circulated and
gruesome stories of mis-
treatment of women were
killings or mutilations that
came out of the centuries-
old concepts of honor which
actually were contrary to
Taliban religious teachings.
No country sought to top-
ple the Taliban until 9/11.
Osama bin Laden an out-
cast from most Islamic
states had been offered
refuge there. The Taliban
refused to give up bin Laden
to America. With the coop-


eration of some allied
troops mainly British -
and with the support of war
lords who had opposed the
Taliban, the United States
military drove the Taliban
from power Bin Laden, the
reason the U.S. sent in
troops, managed to escape
to Pakistan.
So now the United States
had control of the country
and President Bush de-
cided to build up a function-
ing democratic government
But in the process of taking
over the country, and then
trying to form a broadly-
based new government, the
U.S. came to be seen as oc-
cupiers who destroy towns
and villages and called it


A lot of groups are going to have to be

convinced that cooperation is a better

solution than continued violence.


pacification with collateral
damage. We have propped
up a government that is
widely known as corrupt.
This book, which is by far
the best volume I've read on
the situation, has four basic
themes.
First, it is almost impos-
sible for a high-tech army to
fight in a backward country
without causing collateral
damage that angers the na-
tive population.
Secondly, there is little
loyalty to the central gov-


ernment in Kabul. Afghans
are loyal to local clan lead-
ers and war lords.
Thirdly, the United
States is replicating what
the Russians did (hence the
"ghosts" reference although
they lost 15,000 and we have
"only" lost 1,500.
Finally, to form a cen-
tral government, a lot of
groups are going to have to
be convinced that coopera-
tion is a better solution than
continued violence, and this
is something they have to


work out Washington
can't dictate the basis of the
peace settlement.
But if the situation is this
bad, how does Washington
get out gracefully?
On this point, author
Steele has an interesting
perspective. Washington has
advocated a settlement that
includes all the political ac-
tors (except the Taliban).
Steele believes that no sta-
ble group can be set without
including the Taliban. He
argues that the group has
largely realized that its reli-
gious extremism went too
far. He argues that the cur-
rent Taliban leadership has
as its sole goal the exit of the
United States. In support of


this, he claims most Taliban
now know educating women
is important.
This long book gives a
valuable and unique per-
spective on the Afghanistan
issue. Whether, or how, we
can disentangle ourselves
from Afghanistan is going to
be an increasingly contro-
versial issue in the United
States in the upcoming pres-
idential election contest.


Michael Francis is a
Sugarmill Woods resident
who taught international
politics and US. foreign
policy at the University of
Notre Dame for 39 years
prior to retiring.


, 7_LW..-'


Citrus Watercolor
Show & Sale

Celebrate Spring


26


The Greek Festival

Oscar Night

African American
Read In


Luminary Arts Night

Strawberry Festival

Friends of Library
Book Sale


Manatee Car
& Truck Show


27


Friends of Library
Book Sale


21


28
Chet Cole
Casino Night


Friends of Library
Book Sale

Tampa Bay Lightening
vs. Ottawa Senators


22


29


23
Celebrity Bartenders &
Silent Auction

The Greek Festival


24
The Greek Festival


2
Luminary Arts Night


25 Greek Festival
Runway for Rescues
Fashion Sweethearts
Spring Fling Craft Show
Seminarian Dinner
& Dance
Academy of Environmental
Science Dinner
Kids Fishing Clinic
Blessings in a Backpack


3 m Tricky Tray
minary Arts Night
Strawberry Festival
Friends of Library
Book Sale
Red Ribbon Tour
of Homes
Movie in the Park
Kung Fu Panda 2


- I -IN ITR-


7
Friends of Library
Book Sale


8
Friends of Library
Book Sale


-l. .i h ,,. l .. I


9
Friends of Library
Book Sale


i,. ,, . .. I .. . .



1.1 1 ,,
I I,,


1 0 Will McLean
Music Festival
Friends of Library
Book Sale
JiM Ph'khipqr

I Ih.


S I n, I h
h- I I


Citrus County


Craft Council

Presents their


22nd Annual


Spring



Fling



Craft


S h 11 Saturday. Feb. 25
9 A.M. 3 P.M.

Crystal River Armory

IV. Venable, Crysital River
(Across from Home Depot) Cl II )NI(II.E

Free Admission

For more information, call 352-860-2598.
Proceeds It benefit Habilal for HIIaniaty
,.l..'l ....


JANUARY
* Citrus Jazz Society Jam
* Manatee Festival
* Keys to Fashion West Citrus Ladies Elks
* Truck and Tractor Pull
SAWinter Wonderland
* CRWC Showtime
* Music in the Park
* Beatles Tribute
* Book Festival
* Concert at the Old Courthouse, The Porch Dogs
* Early Childhood Expo
* West Citrus Elks Fashion Show
* ACT The Kids Left, The Dog Died, Now What?
*James Rogers Concert
* Music in the Park Southern Sounds
* Light Shine The Ashley Gang Folk Songs & Florida
FEBRUARY
* Citrus Jazz Jam
STaekwondo Women's Defense Class
* Mow It Dinner Beverly Hills Lions Club
* Best Friend Fest Citrus County Animal Services
* 2012 Festival of Books
* Rotary of Inverness Online and TV Auction
* Country Diamonds Show Beverly Hills Civic Assoc.
* Jr. Achiement Bowl-A-Thon
* Light Shine
* Dollars for Scholars Doo Wop
* Fitness in Citrus begins
* Jazz Valentine Concert
SCrystal Oaks Military Card Party
* Cattle Barons' Ball American Cancer Society
* Yoga Day USA
* CF Performing Arts Series Cooking With
The Calamari Sisters
* Bartiershoppers Singing Valentines
* Citrus Springs Library Book Sale
Love Your Library Evening
SACT- Moonlight and Magnolias
SSt. Patrick's Day Dinner Dance
Concerned Citizen Commendation Award and Dinner
* West Citrus Elks Book Sale and Flea Market
SKiwanis Concert Live
SOzello Chili Cook Off and Craft Show
STricky Tray, CCW of St. Scholastics
* Purple Heart Ceremony
* Citrus Watercolor Show & Sale
German American Club Celebrate Spring
SCelebrity Bartenders & Silent Auction
* Greek Festival
* Runway For Rescues
* Fashion Sweethearts
* Spring Fling Citrus County Craft Council
* Seminarian Dinner & Dance Knights of Columbus
* 8th Annual Kids Fishing Clinic Parks & Recreation
* Blessings in a Backpack
SAcademy of Environmental Science Dinner
Oscar Night 2012 Promoting Literacy SMW Rotary
*Afican American Read In
*'School'astic Golf Tournament
* Chet Cole Casino Night

MARCH
* Luminary Art Nights
SStrawberry Festival
SFriends of the Library Spring Book Sale
* Red Ribbon Tour of Homes
STricky Tray Crystal Oaks Civic
* Movies in the Park Kung Fu Panda 2
* Manatee Car & Truck Show
STampa Bay Lightening vs. Ottawa Senators


* Habitat for Humanity Building Dreams
* Encore Ensemble The Last Dance of Dr Disco
STrivia Night Kiwanis Central RidgeiCrystal River
* Will McLean Music Festival
* Jim Blackshear Golf Tournament
* Nature Coast Corvair Car & Truck Show
* Dublin City Ramblers
* B&G 20th Anniversary Birthday BashiSleak & Steak
* Homosassa Heritage Day
* Nature Coast Civil War ReenacImeni
* Benefit for Karen Dinner, Dancing, Entertainment
* Military Card Party Beverly Hills Recreation Assoc.
* Concert at the Old Courthouse, Jimmy Crowley
* Blood Drive Honor Larry Nestor
* Fort Cooper Days
* Inverness St Patrick's Day Parade
* Crystal River St. Patrick's Day Parade
* St. Patrick's Day Dinner Dance
* Nature Coast Dragon Boat Festival
St. Patick's Day Golf Classic
SSt. Paddy's Pot of Gold Card Party and Luncheon
* Inverness Sertoma Club Golf Toumamenl
* Scope it Out 5K
* Tampa Bay Lightening vs. NY Islanders
* Teen Stock
* Swing into Spring Fashion Show
* International Food & Arls Festival
* Golf for Meals Citrus County Resource Center
* Steppin Out in Style
* Shrimpa-Palooza
* Bluegrass Festival in Hemando
* Citrus County Fair
* ACT Dr. Cook's Garden
* Withlacoochee Wilderness Canoe and Kayak Rally & Race
* Lakeside Craft Show
S3rd Annual Spring "Eggstravaganza
* Citrus Jazz Jam
* Sugarmill Chorale
* We Care Food Pantry Golf TournamenI
* Floral City Library Friends March Book Sale
APRIL
* ACT Dr. Cook's Garden
* Jazz Spring Concert
* Movies in the Park Hop
* Inverness Rotary Golf Tournamrnt
* Homosassa Springs Easter Egg HunI
* Citrus Jazz Jam
* Crystal River Relay For Life
* Bluegrass & Oldtyme Music Festival
* Taste of Inverness
* Camp Good Hope Golf Tournament
* Mel Tillis Golf Tournament
* Floral City Garden Club Annual PlanI Sale
* Annual Charity Ball Knights of Columbus
* CF Performing Arts Ballet Folkorico
* Inverness Relay For Life
* When Elvis Came to Town
SRed Eagle Lodge Intedribal Pow-Wow
American Irish Club Golf Tournameni
S2012 Ram Truck Drawing We Care Food Pantry
* April Madness Basketball TournamenI
* Ozello Adventure Race
* Citrus County Bass Challenge
* Sheriff's Summer Safety Expo
* Citrus Jazz Jam
* Volunteer Fair
* Central CitrusRotary Golf Classic
* United Way Spirit of the Community Awards Luncheon
* Letter Carriers Food Drive
* Cattlemen's Fish Fry
MAY
* Lecanto Relay For Life


* Cars in Me Canyon
* Movies in the Park Tangled
* Citrus County Gator Club Golf Tournament
* ACT Moon Over Buffalo
SWorld's Greatest Baby Shower
* Concert al the Old Courthouse, Spring Finale
* Citrus Jazz Society Jam Session
* Informational Fiesta
* Winds, Rains or Flames All Hazards Expo
* 832 K-9 Deputy Dogs Golf Tournamenml.
* Lions Spring Craft Fair
* ALLEGRO
* Wish Upon a Child Goal Tournament
* Covenant Children's Home Charity Fish Fry
* Lighl Shine
* Law Enforcemenl and FirsI Responder Appreciation BBO
* Music in the Park
JUNE
* Cobia Big Fish Tournament
* Homosassa Fireworks & Poker Run
* Flag Day al Fort Cooper
* Rolling Thunder Independence Day Goall TournamenI
* Music on the Square
*Cirus Jazz Jam
* Next Generation Professional Nelworking
* Rays vs. Red Sox Trip
* Red Keitle Bar-B-Q
* Concerts al the Courthouse
* Encore Ensemble Theater My Big Fat Italian Funeral
*Teen Stock
* Citrus Memorial "We Care" Golf Toumamenl
* Jim Blackshear Memorial GolrToumameni
* 832 K-9's Deputy Dog's Annual Golf Tournament
* Veterans Serving Velerans
* Encore Ensemble The Pajama Party Murders
* Movies in the Park Happy Feel 2
JULY
* Patriotic Evening
* Fireworks over Kings Bay
* Key raining Center Celebrity Auction
*Key Run For Ihe Money
* Key Center Telethon
* Family Fun Day Kings Bay Park
* Firecracker 5K
* Beverly Hills Recrealion Military Card Party
* Uncle Sam's Scallop Jam
* Citrus Community Concert Choir Greal Music
for Your Summer Enjoyment
* Movies in the Park Madagascar 2
AUGUST
* Rotary Club ol Sugarmill Woods Arts and Crafts
* Pregnancy and Family Life Center Military Card Party
* So You Think You Can Dance Like A Star
* Cyslic Fibrosis Foundalion Fundraiser Golf journey
*Gator Club Kick Off
* Concert a the Courhouse Back 2 School Bash
* Citrus Community Concert Choir Great Music
for Your Summer EnjoymenI
*The Other Volumn
* OC5K
* Movies in the Park Shark Tale
SEPTEMBER
* Harvest Moon Cral Show
* Veterans Golt tournament
* Jazz Society Jam Session
* Citrus 20120 Fundraiser
* Save our Waters Week
* Christmnas in September
* United Way Kick Off


* Business Women's Alliance Health & Fitness Expo
* Industry Appreciation Luncheon
* Industry Appreciation Week EDC Barbecue
* 832 K-9"s Deputy Dog Fundraiser
* VFW Post 10087 Goall Ouling
* Friends ol the Library Fall Book Sale
* Music on the Square
* CF Professional DevelopmenI Series
* Two Good Soles
* Matl Curley Memorial Blood Drive
* Barbecue Blast
* Under One Rool Campaign Auction
* Page h Forward
* Sunsel Festival
* Country Western Hoedown Cruise
*Beat the Sheriff Race
* Movies in the Park G-Force
OCTOBER
* Seroma Oktobedesl
* Oklobertest German American
* Bikes and BBQ
* Habital For Humanity Gall Tournament
* Jazz Jam
* Rails to Trails Bike Ride
* Artisans Boulique
* Great American Cooler Festival
* Day ol CaringfMake a Difference Day Food Drive
* National Wildlife Reluge Week
* Scarecrow Festival
* WesIl Citrus Elks Arts & Crafts Show
* Cooler Blast
* Harvest Time Festival
* Hauntled ram Ride
* Cooterween
* Greek Festival
* Spike Filzpatrick Memorial Goll Tourney
* Haunled Halloween
* Hernando Heritage Days
* Comedy Night at Citrus Springs
* Swing for a Cure
SNerieds Military Card Party
*Lakeside Craft Show
* Chamber Business Expo
* Nature CoasI All Veterans Reunion
* Citrus Garden Club Shades or Autumn
* Fr Willie Classic Golf Memorial
*2nd Annual Ford Car & Truck Show
* Car Show for Charity
* We Care Golf foumament
* A Night al the Museum
* Citrus Springs Memorial Library Fall Book Sale
* Jazz Goes to Movies
* Nature Coas Fine Arts and True Crafts Show
* Citrus "Haunled' Hills 5K
* Page it Forward
* Make a Difference Day
*Authors Fair
* Robby Brown Memorial Gol fournameni
*CASI Chili Cook Off
* Movie on the Square
* Ladies of the West Citrus Elks Fall Card Party
* Light Shine
* Art Fair and Auction
* Halloween Scramble for Hospice
* Candlelight Vigil
Fall Fling
* Health & Wellness Fair

NOVEMBER
* BH Lions Foundation Craft Fair
SInglis/Yakeetown Arts and Seafood Festival
* Festival of The Arts
*Jazz Society Jam


SRotary Blood Screening
* Blues & Bar B-Oue
* Veterans Fair
* Veterans Day Parade/Memorial Service
* Veterans Appreciation Show
* Stone Crab Jam
* CCBA Home & Outdoors Show
* Canlh Camp Challenge
* Parade of Trees
* Citrus Stampede Rodeo
* Winter Wonderland Craft Show
*Ozello Arts & Crafts Feslival
* Jazz Concert
SFriends of the Homosassa Library Book Sale
* SOS Golf TournamenI
* Festival of he Arts Wine Tasting
* Veteran's Appreciaion Week
* Annual Christmas Toy Run
* King's Bay 5K Run
* Hospice Tree of Remembrance
* Concert al the Old Courthouse, Jim Hurst
* Inverness Fall Classic
* BFF Society Fashion Show
* Light Shine Dunnellon Concert Singers
* Silver Jubilee Fashion Show
* Precious Paws Fundraiser
*Recycle Day
* Never Forgel SK Run/Walk
* Kiwanis Pancake Breakfast
*Cooking lor a Cause
SWish Upon a Child Golf TournamenI
SK-9 Karnival
* Cul-a-thon
* Citrus Community Concert Choirs Messiah
* Music in the Park
* Encore Ensemble Win, Lose or Die
DECEMBER
* Father Christmhas Ball
* Fort Cooper State Part Nights of Lights
SFloral City Heritage Days
Beverly Hills Christmas Parade
SChristmas Craft Show
* CRWC Silver Bells
* Crystal River Chrisimas Parade
SJazz Holiday Concert
Jazz Jam
* Inverness Christmas Parade
* Homosassa Boal Parade
* Sugannill Chorale Christmnas Concert
SAirboat Christmas Parade
* Cibrus Springs Holiday Parade
* Nutcracker Ballet
* Celebration of Lights
* ACI Richard Gilewilz
* Inverness Winter Celebration
* ACf Halvan Youth Theatre
SFrosty's Winter Wonderland
SAnnual Holiday Party
*Suncoas Business Masters Auction
* Rotary of Sugarnmill Woods Golf Tournament
* Beverly Hills Recreation Cenler Military Card Party
* Citrus Springs Rockin the Holiday
* Citrus Springs New Years Eve Ball
* Send Them To Serve Gol Tournament
* lOA 1V and Online Auction
. Citrus Community Concert Choir's Messiah
* Make a Smile Happen
* Music in the Park
* Adopt a Chnstmas Tree
SElvis & Friends
* Encore Ensemble Win, Lose or Die


PRER.
UlNIVEIMA CJCIC =52


L I
11
II,,


NESS IN CITRUS


C4 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2012


COMMENTARY


" p r'.., '


.-lf













CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


in


China


Officials face

conflict of law,

business in

iPad row
JOE MCDONALD
AP Business Writer
BEIJING Chinese offi-
cials face a choice in
Apple's dispute with a local
company over the iPad
trademark side with a
struggling entity that a court
says owns the name or with
a global brand that has cre-
ated hundreds of thousands
of jobs in China. Experts say
that means Beijing's politi-
cal priorities rather than
the courts will settle the dis-
pute if it escalates.
Shenzhen Proview Tech-
nology has asked regulators
to seize iPads in China in a
possible prelude to press-
ing Apple Inc. for a payout.
There have been seizures
in some cities but no sign of
action by national-level
authorities.
Proview has a strong
case under Chinese trade-
mark law, but that could
quickly change if Beijing
decides to intervene to
avoid disrupting iPad sales
or exports from factories in
southern China where the
popular tablet computers
are made, legal experts say
"If this becomes political
- and it's very easy to see
this becoming political -
then I think Apple's
chances look pretty good,"
said Stan Abrams, an
American lawyer who
teaches intellectual prop-
erty law at Beijing's Cen-
tral University of Finance
and Economics.
The dispute centers on
whether Apple acquired
the iPad name in China
when it bought rights in
various countries from a
Proview affiliate in Taiwan
in 2009 for 35,000 British
pounds ($55,000).
Apple insists it did. But
Proview, which registered
the iPad trademark in
China in 2001, won a ruling
from a mainland Chinese
court in December that it
was not bound by that sale.
Apple appealed and a hear-
ing is scheduled for Feb. 29.
"My gut reaction is that
many of these activities re-
ally could be seen as pre-
settlement brinksmanship,"
said David Wolf, a technol-
ogy marketing consultant in
Beijing. "Proview's motive
is money, not to shut down
Apple."
Shenzhen Proview Tech-
nology is a subsidiary of
LCD screen maker Proview


Associated Press
Rowell Yang Long-san, chairman and CEO of Proview International Holdings Ltd., speaks Friday at a news conference
in Beijing to disclose information about the legal battle against Apple Inc. over the iPad name in China. Authorities
seized iPads from more Chinese retailers in an escalating trademark dispute between Apple Inc. and the Proview Tech-
nology that could disrupt global sales of the popular tablet computer.


* TOUGH CHOICE: In Apple's dispute over the iPad
trademark, Chinese officials can either side with a
struggling Chinese company that a court says owns
the name or with a global brand that has created
hundreds of thousands of jobs.
* DETERMINING FACTOR: Experts say Beijing's
political priorities rather than the courts will prevail.
* WHAT'S AT STAKE: Shenzhen Proview Technology
has a strong case under Chinese trademark law,
but that could quickly change if Beijing decides to
intervene, legal experts say.


International Holdings
Ltd., headquartered in
Hong Kong.
Chinese news reports say
Proview is deeply in debt,
increasing the pressure for
it to demand a substantial
payout from Apple.
Proview International,
meanwhile, has been sus-
pended from trading on the
Hong Kong stock market
since August 2010 and will
be removed in June if it
cannot show it has suffi-
cient assets, business oper-
ations and working capital.
In a rapid-fire series of
moves, Proview has filed a
trademark-violation law-
suit that goes to court
Wednesday in Shanghai.
That deadline is likely to
prompt Apple to agree to a
settlement within a few
days to avoid the uncer-
tainty of a court fight, said
Kenny Wong, an intellec-
tual property lawyer for the
firm Mayer Brown JSM in
Hong Kong.
"I think Apple will be


under immense pressure to
have this settled as soon as
possible," he said. "Obvi-
ously, it depends on the
amount the Shenzhen com-
pany is asking."
An Apple spokeswoman
in Beijing, Carolyn Wu, de-
clined to comment
Apple ran into a similar
issue before it launched
the iPhone in 2007.
Cisco Systems Inc., the
maker of networking hard-
ware, had owned the trade-
mark since 2000 and used it
for a line of Internet-con-
nected desk phones. Cisco
sued, the companies
reached an undisclosed
settlement and the phone
launch went off as planned.
China is Apple's fastest-
growing market and the
company already has bigger
sales here than any other
market except the United
States. In the year that
ended in September, sales
totaled $12.5 billion in China
and Hong Kong, nearly 12
percent of revenue.


"We've been very, very fo-
cused on China," CEO Tim
Cook told investors this
week at a conference in
San Francisco.
The dispute comes amid
complaints Beijing is fail-
ing to do enough to stamp
out rampant unlicensed
Chinese copying and ex-
ports of goods ranging from
music and Hollywood
movies to designer clothing
to pharmaceuticals.
But unlike "trademark
squatters" who register
names of products already
sold abroad and then de-
mand foreign companies
pay for the Chinese rights,
Proview registered the
iPad name long before
Apple planned its phone.
Apple, based in Cuper-
tino, California, insists it
owns the iPad name in
China and accuses Proview
of failing to live up to the
2009 sales agreement.
Neither company has re-
leased that contract, which
lawyers said made it im-
possible to know who has
the stronger case.
Apple points to a Hong
Kong court ruling in July
that said Proview and the
Taiwan company both were
"clearly under the control"
of the same Taiwanese busi-
nessman, Yang Long-san,
and refused to take steps re-
quired to transfer the name
under the agreement.
The companies acted to-


gether "with the common
intention of injuring
Apple," the judge said.
But that was not the final
judgment in the case and
might not be accepted by
mainland courts, because
although Hong Kong is a
Chinese territory, it has a
separate legal system,
Wong said.
Proview says it plans to
ask China's customs agency
to block imports and ex-
ports of iPads.
Such requests are rou-
tine under rules enacted to
help stamp out rampant
Chinese product piracy
that has strained relations
with the United States and
other trading partners.
But enforcing this one
could force regulators to
confront the cost of disrupt-
ing Apple's business. That
might hurt China's image as
a high-tech manufacturing
center at a time when for-
eign producers are being
squeezed by rising costs.
All of Apple's iPads are
made in China by Foxconn
Technologies Group, which
employs more than 1 mil-
lion people in sprawling
factory complexes. Taiwan-
based Foxconn previously
did all its production in
China but Brazil's govern-
ment says the company
plans to open factories
there to produce iPads and

SeeI Page D2


Paying off mortgage might make sense


DEAR BRUCE: I will be
changing jobs in the first
quarter of this year to a po-
sition that will provide a
better work environ-
ment. I will have a pen- POO
sion and will be able to
contribute to a deferred
compensation plan (no
match by the employer)
at my new job. I am a di- =
vorced female, 48 years
old.
When I change jobs, I
will be taking a pay cut Bruce
that I hope to make up SM
over the next four to five MO
years. I have a 2011 vehi-
cle that is paid in full, no
credit card debt and no other debt
I have about $125,000 in my 401(k)
and about $2,500 in a Roth IRA
through my current employer. The
mortgage on my home is $96,000,
and the house has an appraised
value of $168,000. I refinanced last
year to a 15-year mortgage at 3.5
percent, and my monthly payment
is $690.
I have $101,000 in CDs earning
less than 1 percent at this time.
Should I use the money in the CDs
to pay off my mortgage? Doing so
will certainly help my monthly
budget with the new job and will


A
A
I


allow for saving more money in the
Roth IRA. L.S., via email
DEAR L.S.: On balance, it seems
that at your age you are
r- qd doing reasonably well -
not well enough to guar-
antee a wonderful retire-
ment, but you are
certainly on the right
path. You are also the
S victim of the federal gov-
ernment's "terror of in-
flation," which has
resulted in the Federal
Villiams Reserve pushing down
ART interest rates on CDs to a
NEY nonexistent level. Even
with a wonderful 3.5 per-
cent mortgage, you are
going in the hole more than 2.5 per-
cent with the return on your CDs.
Other circumstances being equal,
I would suggest hanging on. Interest
rates very likely will rise the
question is when. But because of
your tight budget, you should con-
sider paying off the mortgage. In ef-
fect, paying it off adds to your
income about 2.5 percent per
annum. That is not princely, but
measured against the effective con-
fiscatory interest that's paid on CDs
and similar instruments, I suggest
that is the way to go.
I say this considering where the


money is invested now. If you are
not market-averse, many believe
the market is now very attractive, a
belief I share.
DEAR BRUCE: I recently sold my
home (about $40,000 profit that is
currently in my bank account until I
can figure out how to invest it) and
moved in with my fiance. He makes
about $80,000, I make about $40,000,
and my 18-year-old, full-time col-
lege student who lives with us
makes about $7,000.
I am wondering about several
things. How should we file our in-
come taxes for the state of Texas?
Should my fiance file as head of
household? Should I file single and
claim my daughter, or should my
daughter claim herself? If she does,
would she have better chances at
qualifying for FASFA?
She currently attends a two-year
community college to deal with her
"basics" and will move on to a four-
year college when the time comes.
This year, her first year at college,
her FASFA grant was enough to
cover all of her tuition and most of
the expenses of her required books,
supplies, etc. I filed that FASFA
when I was a single mom/head of
household in my own residence. -
LR. in Texas
DEAR L.R: These are the types


of questions that I am reluctant to
even get into in this column. I an-
swer only because yours is a classic
and not uncommon situation, but
one that is complex enough to re-
quire the help of someone who is
intimately familiar with the tax
code.
Mercifully, there is no state in-
come tax in Texas, which simplifies
some things. Regarding your fed-
eral taxes, some decisions will be
forced upon you, and for others you
will have options. Once made, your
decisions may have consequences
that follow you for a significant
time. Thus I urge you to research
these issues carefully with a CPA
and/or tax attorney before you file
for 2011. I'm not talking about some-
one who operates in the back of a
local barbershop; I mean someone
with demonstrated appropriate cre-
dentials who can help you make
these decisions.

Send your questions to Smart
Money, PO. Box 2095, Elfers, FL
34680. Send email to
bruce@brucewilliams.com. Ques-
tions of general interest will be an-
swered in future columns. Owing
to the volume ofmail, personal
replies cannot be provided.


Dr. Frederick
Herzog
ASK SCORE


Ethics


matter

Business ethics in
corporate America
are sometimes de-
scribed as a practice that
avoids lawsuits or actions
bad for the company's rep-
utation. This mindset rep-
resents a very limited
viewpoint and may tend to
suggest conflict between
profits and ethical business
behavior Nothing could be
further from the truth.
A reasonable bottom
line is only one primary
goal in business. Owners
and corporate executives
work toward it and share-
holders expect it Ethics in
business is and will always
be linked to the practice of
social responsibility and
individual rights.
Understanding the im-
portance of business ethics,
SCORE established the ul-
timate example of a strong
code of business ethics.
The SCORE Code of
Ethical Conduct: SCORE
delivers significant coun-
seling services to the
American business com-
munity. SCORE fully un-
derstands the importance
of this responsibility and
has developed a compre-
hensive Code of Ethics and
Ethical Conduct Every
SCORE Business Mentor
must adhere to, review and
sign off on this ethics code
annually Here are the ba-
sics of the SCORE Code of
Ethical Conduct.
Client interests must
prevail: SCORE mentors
must, under all circum-
stances, place the interests
of the client first This prin-
ciple applies to offering
appropriate resources to
clients, protecting the con-
fidentiality of business in-
formation provided by the
client and avoidance of
conflict of interest wher-
ever it may exist Even the
perception of conflict of in-
terest is to be avoided.
Compensation: SCORE
volunteers are unpaid
mentors and may not
charge fees or accept com-
pensation, in any form, di-
rectly or indirectly for
counseling services.
SCORE mentors are coun-
selors not paid consultants.
If a SCORE client wishes
to engage and compensate
a mentor, the ethics code
requires the mentor to re-
sign in writing to the chap-
ter chairperson. The client
must be notified all futures
services from that mentor
are completely outside the
scope of SCORE. Notice to
the client must state, in
writing, the SCORE/Men-
tor relationship no longer
exists and SCORE is not
responsible for any out-
comes that may arise from
the new relationship. For
the record, the district di-
rector shall also, in writing,
be notified of the above
change in relationship.
Third parties: SCORE
mentors may provide a list
of professionals or suppli-
ers (third parties to the re-
lationship) that may be
able to help the SCORE
client. The code states a
minimum of at least three,
whenever feasible, is to be
offered. The client is
thereby afforded freedom
of choice and conflict is
avoided.
A mentor may not en-
dorse a particular source
of service or product to a
client if the mentor, in fact,
has a financial/familial in-
terest, directly or indi-
rectly with the
recommended source.
When a SCORE mentor
See Page D2


e





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Business DIGEST


Free workshops to SCORE offers free
help veterans veterans workshop


OCALA- Workforce Con-
nection of Citrus, Levy and
Marion counties will offer a"Re-
tooling and Refueling for Suc-
cess" workshop Feb. 28 to
March 1 in Lecanto, designed
to arm United States veterans
with the updated skills they
need to compete in today's
tough marketplace.
The three-day workshop
features instruction and career
tools to help veterans develop
strategies and maintain focus
during career transitions.
The Citrus County workshop
begins at 8 a.m. in Building 2,
Room 202 at CF's Lecanto
campus, 3800 S. Lecanto
Highway.
Retooling and Refueling
workshops, offered at no
charge, explore talent and ca-
reer options, how to prepare
an effective resume, tech-
niques to sharpen interview
skills and how to develop
strategic career campaigns.
In addition to the Retooling
and Refueling workshops, Vet-
erans Job Information services
are available year round at the
three Workforce Connection
Centers in Chiefland, Inver-
ness and Ocala.
Disabled Veterans Outreach
Program (DVOP) specialists
and Local Veterans Employ-
ment Representatives (LVER)
provide priority services to vet-
erans, including job placement,
information about the local job
market, assessments, referrals
and help securing funds to
complete training or retraining.
To register for either of the
Retooling and Refueling work-
shops for veterans, or for more
details, contact Ellen Hayes,
local veterans employment
representative, at 352-840-
5700, ext. 1416 or 800-434-
JOBS (5627), ext. 1416.



CHINA
Continued from Page D1

other products.
"The government cares
about jobs. The government
cares about industry And
who is Proview? Nobody
cares about Proview,"
Abrams said. "Apple is a big
employer in this country If
it comes to politics, that is a
decent argument."
Proview has accused
Apple of acting dishonestly
when it bought rights to the
iPad name from the Taiwan
company. According to
July's Hong Kong court rul-
ing, Apple set up a com-
pany in Britain to buy the
iPad trademark from own-
ers in various markets
without revealing Apple
was the purchaser
Once the dispute arose,
Proview demanded $10 mil-
lion for the name in China,
the court document said.


The Citrus County chapter
of SCORE, in conjunction with
the Veterans Fast Launch Ini-
tiative Program, will offer a free
Small Business Institute work-
shop for veterans. Veterans
who are in business or plan-
ning to start a business qualify
for this program.
SCORE's Small Business
Institute (simple steps to start
your business) starts at 6 p.m.
March 9 on the Citrus Campus
of the College of Central
Florida. The seminar will run
for 11 weeks.
In order to apply, the veteran
can go to www.vetsfastlaunch.
org\coupon-signup, print the
coupon and call the college at
352-249-1210 and register for
the workshop. Bring the
coupon to the first meeting.
The cost of the workshop is
$100 and will be completely
covered by the coupon.
If you have any questions,
call the SCORE office at 352-
249-1236.
Ray Turner in
Biltmore Who's Who
INVERNESS Ray Turner,
paramedic for Nature Coast
EMS, has been selected as an
honored member of the Bilt-
more Who's Who Executive
and Professional Registry. The
selection recognizes Turner's
commitment to excellence in
health care.
Turner, a licensed para-
medic in both North Carolina
and Florida, began pursuing
his career in paramedics after
completing his duty in the U.S.
Air Force. He worked for the
city of Goldsboro for 13 years
before accepting a position
with Harnett County EMS in
North Carolina as an assistant
shift supervisor. In 2006, he
was hired by his current organ-
ization, Nature Coast EMS,


and has been working as a na-
tionally registered paramedic
ever since.
Responsible for the care of
the sick and injured, Turner
provides advanced life support
during transport to area hospi-
tals. He administers medica-
tions and helps patients in any
way possible during the time
they are in his care.
"I have never settled for sec-
ond best," Turner said about
his career. "I have always tried
to help those I serve as best I
can and to ask those with
more experience on issues I
needed their expertise on. It is
also important to share my
knowledge with others when
possible, too."
Having more than 20 years
experience in the field, Turner
is constantly striving to learn
as much as possible to better
serve his patients; due to an
injury; however, he is currently
out of work until further notice.
When he isn't busy working,
he pursues his passion of pho-
tography, which he hopes to
turn into a business someday
soon.
Turner received a Commen-
dation Medal and Good Con-
duct Medal during his time
served in the U.S. Air Force.
He was honorably discharged
at the rank of staff sergeant in
1989. When Turner isn't busy
working, he enjoys karaoke
and photography.
Biltmore Who's Who special-
izes in providing members with
pertinent biographical informa-
tion of key executives and pro-
fessionals who comprise its
membership throughout North
America. Biltmore Who's Who
encourages all members to
use the publication to contact
and network with other mem-
bers to enhance public rela-
tions or possibly develop
mutual and beneficial business
relationships.


Associated Press
A man stands near an advertisement for an Apple iPad on
Jan. 26, 2011, in Shanghai, China.


Apple has other legal op-
tions in China, such as ask-
ing regulators to cancel
Proview's trademark if it
can be shown not to have


been used for three years,
said Wong. But he said that
would take 12 to 18 months,
extending the uncertainty
for manufacturing and sales.


Special to the Chronicle
The owners of Citrus County Life Magazine celebrate eight years of publishing. From left are:
Kathy Sayadoff, Bob Crowley and Joanne Crowley.

Citrus County Life Magazine marks 8 years


Special to the Chronicle
LECANTO Citrus County Life, a quar-
terly magazine about life in Citrus County
targeted exclusively for Citrus County resi-
dents or those who visit or plan to move
here, is celebrating its eighth anniversary
with the publishing of the Winter/Spring
2012 issue, which will be available by end
of February
The announcement was made by the
magazine's owners, Bob Crowley, Joanne
Crowley and Kathy Sayadoff, who are also
the owners of Crowley & Company Adver-
tising Inc.
Each issue of the magazine is available
free of charge and ready to be picked up at
nearly 300 high-traffic locations throughout
the county, such as at restaurants, doctors'
waiting rooms, hair salons, many places of
business, most hotels and at all three of the
chamber of commerce offices. This free dis-
tribution is made possible by the advertis-
ers who participate in the issues. It is
estimated that each issue reaches about
35,000 readers and is kept in the homes for
months until the new issue comes out.
"Each issue of our magazine has stories
to tell that are of local interest," said Bob
Crowley "We continue to encourage our
readers to submit their one-or two-page ar-


SCORE
Continued from Page D1

makes a presentation to an
organization and the group
wishes to reimburse the men-
tor, such as in an honorarium,
the organization must reim-
burse the SCORE chapter
The mentor, in turn, may re-
ceive expense only reim-
bursement from SCORE.
Personal interests: Safe-
guarding the SCORE mission
is vital to avoidance or the
appearance of conflict of in-


ticles about life and experiences in Citrus
County"
The magazine features stories about
health, homes, gardens, travel and
lifestyles. The cover stories are always pow-
erful because they feature local businesses
that have made a definitive mark on the
people of Citrus County through their serv-
ices or products. Many of the issue's arti-
cles as well as information about the
magazine appear on the magazine's web-
site: www.citruscountylife.com.
In addition to the articles written by local
residents is the "Grandparents' Brag page,"
which allows grandparents who live in Cit-
rus County to submit a photo of their young
grandchild who also lives here, and to write
a few words about him or her. Another is
the "Pride of the County" which features
someone who has grown up here, attended
our schools and then has gone out into the
world to make their mark ... thus bringing
pride to Citrus County The most recent
person recognized was Jason Money, who is
an important part of the U.S. Navy's Blue
Angels Flight Demonstration Squadron
based in Pensacola.
Citrus County Life Magazine is designed
and produced by Crowley & Company Ad-
vertising Inc. Both companies are at 305 S.
Salisbury Terrace in Lecanto.


terest. This means family
members of a volunteer who
are involved in a business
must follow the same ethical
code of conduct that is re-
quired of the volunteer
Final comments on
SCORE's ethics code: There
remain other aspects of the
SCORE Code of Ethical Con-
duct to be considered. Future
ASK SCORE articles will
cover the balance of ethical
guidelines.
SCORE's main business is
to coach, educate and mentor
client entrepreneurs and the
Official Code of Ethical Con-


duct has been adopted to best
serve that goal.
SCORE is on the Campus
of the College of Central
Florida in Lecanto. Office
hours are 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Tuesday through Thursday
Call 352-249-1236 for infor-
mation about SCORE and
leave your contact informa-
tion during non-office hours
so we can call you back

Dr FrederickJ Herzogis
Chairman of Citrus
SCORE. Email him at:
fherzog@tampabay.rrcom.


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D2 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2012


BUSINESS






Promotional information provided by the Citrus County Builders Association






Builder's connection


D3

SUNDAY
FEBRUARY 19, 2012


Rich Gelfand of Sherwin-Williams


= January V.I.P. -

Store manager

dedicated to his

community
Richard Gelfand has been with
Sherwin-Williams for more than
20 years. Starting as a warehouse
manager in the Florence, S.C.,
store, Rich then relocated to
sunny Florida as a store manager
first in Ocala and then, for the past


. -

_ _


~ii4


Rich Gelfand
14 years, at the Crystal River store.
Rich's responsibility as a Sher-


win-Williams store manager is to
develop and implement a store
market plan based on the market
conditions, store mission and fi-
nancial/budget objectives.
He also works to implement cre-
ative marketing strategies de-
signed to increase market share.
Rich conducts periodic market
research studies to assist in devel-
oping marketing plans and strate-
gies for the store.
He works closely with builders,
architects, engineers and contrac-
tors to provide the technical train-
ing and support needed to select
the correct coatings for a project.


Sherwin-Williams has been a
proud member of the Citrus
County Builders Association for
nearly 25 years.
Rich is a Life Director, a past
Associate Vice President (twice)
and also has served as Chairman
of the Golf committee, Building
and Grounds committee and is
Secretary of the Membership
committee.
He has also been President of
the CCBA founded 501c3, Builders
Care and President of the CCBA
Spike Club.
Rich enjoys the relationships


that have formed over the years,
and working with members to
help them be successful in their
business.
Rich is also the immediate past
president of the Boys & Girls
Clubs of Citrus County, currently
serving on its board as a director.
For assistance with painting
needs, feel free to contact Rich at
352-563-1952 or email
swilliamsl5@tampabayrr.com.
You can also check out the Sher-
win-Williams website at
www.Sherwin-Williams.com for all
your painting and decorating
needs.


Future Builders of America visit Santa Fe College


On Feb. 2, the Citrus County
Builders Association Future
Builders of America Club trav-
eled to Gainesville to visit the
Santa Fe College Careers in Construc-
tion Day Students and chaperones
from Citrus, Crystal River and Lecanto
high schools enjoyed a tour of the
Charles R. Perry Construction Insti-
tute, speakers from the company that
donated the building in memory of its
founder and had lunch with more than
a hundred other high school students
visiting on that day
Students learned about the Building
Construction Program at Santa Fe Col-
lege, the Santa Fe College "Student
Builders Association" that is active
there, as well as the Habitat for Hu-
manity home that current Santa Fe Col-
lege students are building. Field trips
to learning institutions like Santa Fe
College help to eliminate the common
misconception that construction indus-
try careers are an alternative to or a
distraction from a college education for
the student.
On Friday, Feb. 10, for the first time
since its inception, the Citrus County
Future Builders of America Club suc-
cessfully coordinated a student field
trip to the International Builders Show
in Orlando for their third and final
field trip of the 2011-12 school year.
Students toured the trade show and
learned about many of the new prod-
ucts and services in the building indus-
try, along with statewide and


Ilrj r'I
K r~r-1 r I


/ .. \
Students and chaperones from Citrus, Crystal River and Lecanto high schools enjoyed a tour Feb. 2 of the Charles R. Perry Con-
struction Institute during the Santa Fe College Careers in Construction Day.


nationwide suppliers.
Field trips like Santa Fe College and
the International Builders Show are
made possible by FBA Club Sponsors
like Porter's Locksmithing. If you
would like more information on the Fu-
ture Builders of America Club, hosting


an FBA field trip or would like to be-
come a club sponsor, please contact the
Citrus County Builders Association by
calling 352-746-9028
The Citrus County Builders Associa-
tion is a Lecanto-based trade association
representing members involved in Cit-


rus County's home building, remodeling
and commercial construction industry
CCBA was founded in 1977 as the Citrus
County affiliate of the Florida Home
Builders Association and the National
Association of Home Builders. Visit us
on the Web at www.CitrusBuilders.com.


Show off your barbecue skills Feb. 28


Sample the

works ofother

chefs at BBQ

Cook Off
Calling all Business Or-
ganization Members! The
CCBA will hold its third an-
nual Bull & BBQ Network-
ing Event on Tuesday, Feb.
28, at the CCBA. All mem-
bers of all Citrus County
business organizations are
invited to attend and even to
enter the BBQ Cook-Off.
This great event will be
outside at the CCBA Head-
quarters at 1196 S. Lecanto
Highway, Lecanto, FL 34461
from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Judg-
ing will begin at approxi-
mately 6 p.m. and there will
be a people's choice award,
as well.


2012 Cornerstone Pillar Golf Crest Homes swept two categories in the 2011 Bull & BBQ
Event by winning both the "Bodacious Beef" category as well as Best of Show. Pictured are
Kathleen Gilbert (left) and Anjela Wright (middle), both of Gold Crest Homes with award pre-
senter 2011 CCBA President Holly Jones.


Contest entrants do not
pay for entry into the event;
all other attendees are $10
at the door, which includes
BBQ Cook-Off sampling,
music and more.
You can register and pre-


pay for this event by visiting
the events calendar of
www.CitrusBuilders.com
and be sure to bring plenty
of business cards.
Donations of items for
door prizes are happily ac-


cepted. For more informa-
tion on how to enter the
BBQ Cook-Off, RSVP or do-
nate a door prize item,
please contact Executive Of-
ficer Donna Bidlack at 352-
746-9028.


CCBA renewing members
CCBA renewing members hon-
ored at the General Membership
Meeting of Jan. 26 are pictured,
from left, with Membership Chair I
Anjela Wright of Gold Crest
Homes (far left): Melissa Gilbert,
Affiliate Member of Gold Crest
Homes, (1 year) (kneeling); Ken
Lindquist of Ken Lindquist Cor-
poration on behalf of Affiliate
Members Ken Lindquist Jr. (1
year); Lance Peavy (1 year); and
Rosemarie Lindquist (1 year); .
Dusty Porter, Affiliate Member
of Porter's Locksmithing (1
year); Joe Bell of Surfaces Floor-
ing (6 years); Chris DeFelice of
Nature Coast Communications
(9 years); Mark Stoltz of White
Aluminum (31 years); and CCBA President Wayne Bardsley of Quality Crafted Builders Inc. Renewing members not pres-
ent were Atkinson Construction Inc. (9 years); Bay Area Air Conditioning Affiliate Dee Mahler-Castillo (1 year); Bob Tsac-
rios Plumbing (8 years); Bruce Component Systems Inc. (13 years); City Electric Supply (1 year); Dan Ryan Construction
(1 year); Eagle Buick GMC Trucks (1 year); Fairbanks Construction (6 years); Florida Pest Control (31 years); Flynn
Builders (17 years); Gold Crest Homes Affiliate Joe Lanier (1 year); Lada Construction Inc. (6 years); LePage Carpet &
Tile (1 year); Nature Coast Pools Inc. (17 years); Oyster's Restaurant & Catering (1 year); Paul LaFond Fine Homes (28
years); Pro-Line Tile of Citrus County (17 years); Ro-mac Lumber & Supply Inc. (7 years); Sauter Framing Inc. (19 years);
Sweetwater Homes of Citrus Inc. (22 years); The Hagar Group (19 years); Tropical Window Inc. (17 years); Veolia En-
vironmental Services (17 years); Whiting Agency (17 years); and Winkel Construction Inc. (12 years).


Upcoming EVENTS

Jim Blackshear Parade of Homes
Memorial Golf Outing spans two counties


The Citrus County Builders
Association (CCBA) and Cor-
porate Sponsor Spires Con-
tracting Inc. will host the Jim
Blackshear Memorial Golf
Outing as a Parade of Homes
Kickoff Classic on Saturday,
March 10, at Inverness Golf &
Country Club.
The Golf Outing, in its 23rd
year, is open to all amateur
golfers and is a favorite event
of the CCBAdue to regularly
changing golf courses each
year that aid in keeping the
outing interesting and chal-
lenging for returning golfers. It
was renamed in honor of Jim
Blackshear, a founder of the
CCBA, after his passing in
2004, and this year the Jim
Blackshear Memorial Golf
Outing will also donate a por-
tion of the proceeds to well-
known local child advocacy
center and 501c3 nonprofit
"Jessie's Place."
Registration will begin at 7
a.m. with a shotgun start at 8
a.m. Cost is $60 per player
which includes greens fees,
carts, a free Mulligan ticket
and a BBQ Chicken buffet
lunch. Foursomes save $5 per
person at a low cost of $220
per team. Additional Mulligans
will be available for sale and
are also used for door prize
tickets.
Player and sponsor regis-
trations are now open online
at www.CitrusBuilders.com or
by stopping by the CCBA of-
fice at 1196 S. Lecanto High-
way, Lecanto, FL 34461
anytime from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Monday through Thursday.
For more information about
the Jim Blackshear Memorial
Golf Outing or the Citrus
County Builders Association
please visit the CCBA on the
Web or call Executive Officer
Donna Bidlack at 352-
746-9028.


The 2012 Spring Parade of
Homes, presented by Plat-
inum Sponsor Florida Public
Utilities, will begin March 17
and run until April 1 in its tradi-
tional scattered-site format
with entries throughout Citrus
and Hernando counties. For
more information and a map
to the models, visit the official
Parade of Homes website at
www.CitrusParadeofHomes.
cor or call 352-746-9028.
Two fishing tourneys
coming up soon
Entries and sponsorships
are now open for the 2012
17th annual Family Fishing
Tournament sponsored by Ex-
clusive Platinum Sponsor
F.D.S. Disposal Inc.; Gold
Sponsors Barnacle Bills Bait &
Tackle Shop and Gold Crest
Homes Inc.; and Silver Spon-
sors City Electric Supply and
Florian Masonry Inc. This
event will be May 5 and 6 at
the Homosassa Riverside Re-
sort. This year's tournament
boasts more than $12,500 in
cash and prizes, as well as the
return of the Aaron Monier
Memorial Youth Tournament
by CCBA Tournament Partner
Coastal Conservation Associ-
ation Citrus Chapter. The
Aaron A. Weaver Chapter 776
Military Order of the Purple
Heart receives a portion of this
year's proceeds.
The Super Angler Pass of-
fers a discount for anglers who
wish to fish in both the CCBA
Annual Family Fishing Tourna-
ment in May and in the M-m-
Mel Tillis and Friends
Tournament in April. The pass
saves anglers $25 off of each
entry by signing up for both at
the same time through the
CCBA. For more information,
please visit www.Citrus
Builders.com or call 352-
746-9028.


I I










D4

SUNDAY


FEBRUARY


19, 2012


Promotional information provided by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce


numberr Connection
28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


Annual Chamber Awards nominations open


The Chamber of Commerce recognizes
businesses and individuals each year who
have contributed to the growth and well-
being of Citrus County.


New host debuts on

weekly cable show
Melissa Benefield is the new host
of "Chamber Chat." Melissa, a native
Floridian, has been a resident of Cit-
rus County for 20 years. She is mar-
ried to her husband Drew Benefield
of Bluewater Drafting for seven years
and has two beautiful daughters,
Gabriella and Adriana. Melissa en-
joys volunteering for local community
events and serves on several
fundraising committees.
She is the host of the Citrus County
Chamber of Commerce weekly show
"Chamber Chat" on WYKE. "Cham-
ber Chat" features chamber members
and their businesses, leaders in our
community and promotes upcoming
events in Citrus County. If you are a
business owner and would like to be
featured on our show or have an
event within Citrus County that you
would like to promote all free of
charge email Melissa Benefield at
Spotlightmelissa@aol.com.
Watch "Chamber Chat" on Bright
House Networks channel 16 Mondays



New Image Award


Awards are presented at the Annual
Chamber Awards Dinner, which will be Fri-
day, April 20, at Citrus Hills Golf& Country
Club.


Melissa Benefield


at 6 p.m. "Like" "Chamber Chat" on
Facebook for updates on our weekly
show.


Ohana Restaurant, at 7431 S. Suncoast Blvd. in Homosassa, was awarded the New Image
Award at the February Chamber Membership Luncheon. The improvements made to their
establishment create a wonderfully relaxing dining environment and their menu offers
something for everyone. Please call 352-621-0107 for more information or visit their web-
site at www.ohanarestaurants.com. Pictured with the Ohana owners and staff are Cham-
ber CEO Josh Wooten, Chamber Ambassador Rhonda Lestinsky, Nature Coast Bank, and
Chamber Board Chairman Bill Winkel, Winkel Construction.


We would like for our members to be in- both Chamber offices and on our website,
volved in the nomination process and we wwwcitruscountychamber com.
value their opinion. Please call Tobey at 352-795-3149 for any
The nomination form is now available at questions.




What time is it?


It's Tax Time ... please use a Chamber
member to help with your tax preparation
and financial planning!
Bob Lane's Complete Accounting & Tax
Service Inverness, 352-344-2888.
Brian Carlson, CPA, PA Inverness,
352-637-0437.
Christine C. Eck, CPA, PA Crystal
River, 352-563-2522.
Edward J Serra, CPA PLLC Crystal
River, 352-794-3879.
Hallmann Tax Group LLC Beverly
Hills, 352-400-4800.
Humphrey & Saltmarsh, CPA Inver-
ness, 352-341-3449.
Frederick Koehl, CPA PA Crystal
River, 352-795-7966.
Michelle's Accounting and Tax Service
- Hernando, 352-746-1855.
Oliver & Company Inverness, 352-746-
1400.
Price & Company Crystal River, 352-
795-6118.
Quickbooks-Assist Hernando, 410-
207-3233.
Rita Weckesser, EA, PA Beverly Hills,
352-746-1705.
Schlumberger Accounting Services Inc.
- Crystal River, 352-795-3691.
Tamara Young EA, Tax & Accounting
Services Crystal River, 352-795-2496.
Williams, McCranie, Wardlow, & Cash -
Inverness, 352-726-8130; Crystal River, 352-
795-3212.


Ameriprise Financial Services Inc. -
Lecanto, 352-746-9006.
Edward Jones-Brian Fitzpatrick In-
verness, 352-860-2839.
Edward Jones-Justin Rooks Ho-
mosassa, 352-628-3466.
Edward Jones Investments- Andrew
Breese Crystal River, 352-795-1603.
The Hagar Group Crystal River-352-
795-2697; Inverness 352-726-1691.
Insurance by George Inverness, 352-
726-1403.
Investor's Choice Financial Group-
Candy Murphy Crystal River, 352-563-
0700.
Joseph Capital Management LLC -
Hernando, 352-746-4460.
Merrill Lynch WeekiWachee, 352-592-
8912.
MorganStanleySmithBarey-Ellen Zane
- Ocala, 352-401-3825.
Raymond James & Associates Crystal
River, 352-795-6155.
Raymond James at The Shoppes of Cit-
rus Hills Hernando, 352-527-3700.
Williams Wealth Management Floral
City, 352-344-1003.
Calabro Financial Management Bev-
erly Hills, 352-527-2866.
Jackson Hewitt Tax Service Crystal
River, 888-282-1040.
Liberty Tax Service Crystal River,
352-563-2777.


February Membership Luncheon
The Chamber Membership
SLuncheon was Friday, Feb.
10, at Plantation Inn and
Swas sponsored by Cypress
Cove Care Center. The guest
speaker was Commissioner
Joe Meek and he shared
valuable information on the
status of Citrus County and
goals the Board of County
Commissioners is currently
working on. We would like to
thank Cypress Cove Care
Center for their support and
please visit their website
www.cypresscovecare.com
A for more information on their
services or call 352-795-
8832.


'Kidney for Karen' fundraising event is Feb. 23


Join the Citrus County
Chamber of Commerce and
The Grove Downtown from
6 to 8 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 23,
as we celebrate our friend
and neighbor Karen Dixon-
Pulcini with her fight
against kidney disease.


There will be a live and
silent auction that night and
all items must be purchased
that night with cash or
check. No cover charge and
drink specials served by
these Celebrity Bartenders:
Citrus County Commis-


sioner Rebecca Bays; Inver-
ness City Manager Frank Di-
Giovanni; and Citrus County
Chronicle Publisher Gerry
Mulligan. There will also be
a 50/50 so be sure to come
out and join us at The Grove
Downtown from 6 to 8 p.m.


Ambassador Spotlight
Jennifer Duca is the
Community Liaison for
Comfort Keepers in In-
verness. Originally from
South Portland, Maine,
she has been a resident
of Citrus County since
1987. Her husband,
Michael, is a local busi- -
ness owner and they
have two children,
Michael and Thomas.
Jennifer enjoys fishing,
reading, and working in
the yard. Jennifer was a
company clerk in the I
U.S. Army, 50th Signal
Battalion, Fort Bragg,
N.C. She has been a
Chamber Ambassador
since 2007 and is cur-
rently serving as the
chairperson for the Am-
bassador program.


"L
-


CITRUS COUNTY
Chamber of Commerce

After Hours Networking Mixer is Feb. 21
Join us from 5 to 7 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 21, at Cypress
Cove Care Center for a Chamber After Hours Network-
ing Mixer.
At 700 S.E. Eighth Ave. in Crystal River (behind Sweet-
bay plaza) they will have a Mardi Gras theme with food,
drinks and a live DJ.
There will also be a fundraiser for Relay for Life, so
bring money to support this cause!
For more information about Cypress Cove Care Cen-
ter, please call 352-795-8832.


Donation for Manatee Festival volunteers


The Crystal River High School Future Farmers of America (FFA) group was recently presented with a check for their vol-
unteer time at the 25th Annual Florida Manatee Festival on Jan. 21 and 22. Students from this organization assisted
with parking at the Crystal River Mall shuttle site both days of the festival. FFA will be using this donation to assist with
education field trips. Pictured: Carlos Gutierrez, faculty sponsor, FFA students, and Tobey Phillips, Chamber of Commerce
Special Events Coordinator.


FACEBOOK USERS
* We know you like us, so now "LIKE" us on Facebook!
* Use your smartphone to scan the QR code at right.
It will take you to the Citrus County Chamber of


Commerce's Facebook page.
* Don't have a smartphone? Visit the
page at http://www.facebook.com/
CitrusChamber.
* Visit www.citruscountychamber.com.


'Chamber Chat'







SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2012 D5


C CITRUS COUNTY





H ONICLE

www.chronicleonline.com


Classifieds


Classifieds In Print and Online All The Time!


BUSINESS HOURS:

MONDAY-FRIDAY

8:00 A.M. 5:00 P.M.

CLOSED SATURDAY/SUNDAY



WE GLADLY ACCEPT


I34


Do You Like Bridge,
Ballroom and
Square Dancing?
no strings, dutch treat
73 yr old, Widow.
Respond to
Citrus Co. Chronicle
Blind Box 1758M
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River,
Florida, 34429
Healthy Gentleman,
Extremely honest.
Looking for long term
relationship with
Pentecostal Lady.
also honest, and
healthy. And to share
home expenses &
adventure. Respond to:
Citrus County Chronicle
Blind Box 1759 M
Crystal River Fl. 34429
SWF, 5'2" red hair, lost
the love of my life, I'm
in perfect health, like
football, TV & movies.
Love to cook, member
of VFW. For compan-
ionship. Must be
between 70-80,
Financially secure.
Reply Blind Box 1760-P,
c/o Citrus County
Chronicle, 106 W. Main
St., Inverness, FL 34450




YouIlI"r\ firsi



c r I

qualified
employee?


This area's
#1
employment
source!


IConn eI'o
X-pretty boy older now
but still attractive
enough for some lady's
arm candy, well read,
funny at times, always
considerate, healthy
and financial secure.
So write me at:
WEM, PO Box 1881,
Inverness, FL 34451


N55 w Ad
05 SUNNYBROOK 36'
5th whl,2 slides ,king
bed,like new,heated
tks, 60 amp service
oak cab $39,900
352-382-3298
Case Tractor and
trailer-disc and other
attachments, good
condition, runs good
352-621-0133
OPEN HOUSE
SUNDAY 12-4pm
4/3/3 Pool Home
1276Tacoma St.
HERNANDO
X-pretty boy,older now
but still attractive
enough for some lady's
arm candy, well read,
funny at times, always
considerate, healthy
and financial secure.
So write me at:
WEM, PO Box 1881,
Inverness, FL 34451



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
Paid for Junk Vehicles,
J.W. 352-228-9645
$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not*
CASH PAID $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191



Y. I ir \\'- I It I st.


ONoETIGTHE RIGH






^ O^jIla j 1 I Pesn11 r e1 lT



------ *^___^ ^^i^H ^*


I'ELL ILMUVAL U0
Scrap Medal, Mowers
Appliances and MORE
Call (352) 224-0698



Fertilizer horse manure
mixed with pine shavings
great for spring gardens
or as mulch. U load and
haul call 352-628-9624
FREE 50" DLP HD TV
Model HL-T50765 works
but needs work -
352-270-9021
Free American Pitt
Bull, approx. 4 yrs. old
w/ papers, not
neutered all shots.
(352) 212-2098
FREE CATS
Spayed & Neutered
To adult cats spoiling
homes (352) 201-4522
FREE KITTENS
to good home. Have
both males & females
(352) 476-5230
SNOWBALL
Looking for a good
home for solid white
female cat, fixed and
shots, very lovable &
friendly
(352) 344-1692



FRESH JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct.@ $5 per lb
Stone Crab@ $6 per Ib
dP.-ivP 1 ... =o-_= 17


REWARD $1000.
No Questions ask.
Min Pin Female 10 lbs
name Zoey, Needs
meds. last seen Sun 8/7
Holiday Dr off Turkey
Oak Crystal River
(352) 257-9546
352-400-1519


Black cat female
very friendly found 495
Citrus Av & 488
Dunnellon Rd.
(352) 563-0772
Found in Inverness a
few years ago-Mother's
bracelet with birth-
stones and names,
please call to identify.
561-315-7290
Young Female Pitbull
Citrus Springs Area
Call to identify
(352) 634-0437



Advertise in
Over 100 Papers
throughout Florida. for
One Low Rate
Advertising
Networks of Florida,
Put us to work for You!
(866)742-1373 or visit:
www.florida-classifieds.
corn
Internationally
Recognized Lively
Stones World Healing
Ordination Seminar.
www.willardfuller.com
850-342-1011 March
9-16th 2012. Lively
Stones Fellowship
Headquarters 119
Mallard Lane Lloyd, FL
32337 Regiser www.
aloriararamirez.com
/ordination.html.
Forty-five Hours-
Week Course
Become Ordained
Minister
RED GREEN LIVE
Experience this hilarious
one-man show.
April 5,Tampa Theatre
800-745-3000.
April 7, News-Journal
Centre, Davidson
Theatre, Daytona State
College. 800-595-4849
www.redgreen.com


FRESH JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct.@ $5 per lb
Stone Crab@ $6 per Ib
delivered 727-771-7500

1--


AT THE 'HEART OF OUR COMMUNITY


& RING...FOR MANY YEARS,

IN MANY WAYS.



For 50 years, Citrus Memorial Health System CnCMHS) has been providing
quality care to the community. Although we're embracing the future with
innovative technology and an energetic atmosphere, we're still a dose-knit
team who greets people by name. It's just our way.

RNs
Cardiovascular Surgery CVRR CVPCU CCU Med/Surg/Tele
Surgical Floor Orthopedics Neuro-Telemetry Emergency
Nursing Supervisor-PRN ET/Wound Care Resource Pool PCU
Nurse Navigator
PTs & PTAs
Full-time and PRN outpatient PT opportunities at our Homosassa, Crystal
River and Inverness locations. PTA openings at our Lecanto and Inverness
locations. Degree with state of Florida licensure is required.
Manager, Compensation & Benefits
Responsible for managing wage/salary and benefits programs, pension and
401K. Will supervise performance and merit systems, HRIS and records
compliance and HCAHPS. Master's degree and two to five years of
experience preferred.
HIM Coder III
Requires technical/college level course work in the medical field; advanced
ICD-9-CM, HCPCS/CPT, APC; DRG knowledge and RHIT/RHIA and/
or CCS; and a minimum of 3 years inpatient and outpatient coding
experience. CIRCC and experience with Interventional Radiology preferred.
Come join us in Inverness, our scenic town on Florida's Nature Coast, just
north of the Tampa Bay area. If you're looking for a friendly workplace
where people truly care, make yourself at home here. CMHS offers a
competitive salary, a generous benefits package and relocation assistance.

Please apply online at
www.citrusmh.com

CITRUS MEMORIAL 0


A-l the Heart ol Our Commumn)

CMHS L in equal opportunr employer.


TEACHER

Fulltime, Exp. Req.
CDA Preferred
TODAY'S CHILD
(352) 344-9444

VPK Teacher
Experience Preferred
Ark Angels
Chrlstlan Preschool
(352) 795-2360




HAIR STYLIST
FT/PT ComeJoin our
team Georgieos
352-564-0006




Lead Crew Person
for small cleaning co. In
Inverness. Good driving
record and experience
need apply.
(352) 400-2772







Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966


Publication Days/Deadlines

Chronicle / Daily.................................... 1 PM, Daily
Homefront / Sunday...............................3 PM, Friday
Chronicle / Sunday.............................4...4 PM, Friday
Chronicle / Monday............................4...4 PM, Friday
Sumter County Times / Thursday.............11 AM, Tuesday
Riverland News / Thursday.....................2 PM, Monday
South Marion Citizen / Friday..................4 PM, Tuesday
West Marion Messenger / Wednesday.......4 PM, Friday


#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341 -PREP (7737)
Certified Medical
Assistant
Homosassa

FLOATER
Citrus County
(M/A & Receptionist)
Busy Medical Prac-
tice is seeking F/T MA
with 2+ years solid
experience with in-
jections, phlebotomy,
EKG's, vitals, etc.
Citrus County Floater
requires front office
and back office exp.
including: injections,
phlebotomy, EKG's,
vitals, etc.
Excellent salary and
benefits.
E-mail resume to:
glasser@access
healthcarellc.net
or Fax resume to
352-688-6189

CNA/HHA's
Apply At
HOME INSTEAD
SENIOR CARE
4224 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Lecanto

Exp. Accounts
Receivable
Representative
Full time. Must have
expereince with
coding, medicare,
insurance, billing
and collections,
Apply in Person to:
WEST COAST EYE
INSTITUTE,
240 N. Lecanto Hwy,
Lecanto,
352-746-2246, ext 834

Exp. Medical
Biller/Coder


F/T DENTAL
FRONT DESK
RECEPTIONIST
Dental Exp. a must!!
Great Customer
Service, Telephone
Skills, Professional
Appearance Up Beat
Multi Task, Team
Player, Good Work
Ethics. FAX Resume
to 352-628-9199 OR
Drop off at office
Ledger Dentistry
3640 S Suncoast Blvd.

F/T Receptionist
Must be pleasant,
well versed on the
phone, good
customer service,
multl-tasker medical
exp a plus, for busy
Medical office.
Fax: Resume
352-746-5605
MARKETER
Health Care is seeking
a Marketer interested in
professional & financial
growth & who also
possess the following
credentials.
Marketing Experience,
Positive Attitude
Good Communication
Skills, Honesty &
Integrity.Self Confi-
dence & Motivation.
Those interested
individuals meeting
the above credentials
Please submit resume
to PO Box 2498
Inverness Fl 34451 or
fax 352-726-2864
MEDICAL
ASSISTANT
Experience needed.
Please send resume
to P.O. Box 3087
Homosassa Springs,
Florida 34447

NEEDED
Experienced,
Caring &
Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
i(32 8An-nA08


Granny Nannies
CNA'S & HHA'S,
Needed Immediately.
Must be Certified.
(352) 794-3811

NOW HIRING

RN's
All Units, with Hospital
Experience
Apply on Line: www.
nurse-temps.com
(352) 344-9828
P/T,CNA
Must pass level 2
background screening.
Req CEU's. Serious inq.
only(352) 503-7052



HbSPICE-
of Citrus County
of the Nature Coast
U..wn 1S5
Registered Nurse
Homosassa/West
Home Team
Responsible for
maintaining continu-
ity of care and
services to Hospice
Patients through the
use of a comprehen-
sive Plan of Care
established at the
time of admission
and as periodically
updated. Also
responsible for
providing direct
patient care
services; Issuing and
maintaining proper
documentation;
Interacting with
and supporting the
interdisciplinary
team. Requires a
State of Florida Regis-
tered Nurse's license.
A minimum of one
year experience as a
RN with a back-
ground in Hospice,
surgery, critical care,
nursing home or
home health pre-
ferred. This full time
position offers excel-
lent salary & benefits
Job summary and
application:
www.hospiceofcitrusc
ounty.org
Hospice of Citrus Co.
P.O. Box 641270
Beverly Hills, FI 34464
DFWP/EOE

REHAB
COORDINATOR

Crystal River, FL
For the Therapy
Depart in a Skilled
Nursing facility.
Individual to assist
with geriatric
patients. Must have
1-2+ yrs medical
and/or additional
office experience.
Part-time position.
Competitive salary,
excellent benefits.
Please apply online:
www.therapvmamt.
coa


HPH Hospice, a non-profit agency serving
Pasco and Hernando Counties since 1984, and
Citrus County since 2005. We are searching
for candidates with at least one year of current
experience working in an acute care or medical
surgical unit for the following position:


The positions requires travel throughout
Hernando & Citrus Counties and as needed into
Pasco County


EOE DFWP. ".-.... -. -- -


Receptionist
Part-time receptionist
needed with expert
in a medical office.
Please fax resumes to
(352) 726-7582.





COLLEGE of
CENTRAL
FLORIDA
Community of
Promise an equal
opportunity college

Faculty -
Welding Instructor
Commitment to the
college objective of
providing instruction
for a diverse student
population. Ameri-
can Welding Society
(AWS) Certified
Welder required.
Screening begins
3/22/2012.
* Specialist
Catering Services
* Manager Public
Safety
* Retired Senior
Volunteer Program
* Project Manager
(RSVP)
To apply
for a position go to
www.CF.edu, click on
Quick Links then
Employment at CF.
Submit unofficial
transcripts and re-
sume with the online
application at time of
submission. Alterna-
tively fax transcripts
to 352-873-5885.
3001 SW College Rd
Ocala, FL 34474
CF is an Equal
Opportunity Employer

EXECUTIVE
DIRECTOR

United Way of Citrus
County, a non-profit
agency, is seeking
qualified candidates
for the position of
Chief Professional
Officer/Executive
Director.
This position serves as
chief executive
officer of United Way
of Citrus County
Providing innovative
and strategic leader-
ship while working
with the Board of
Directors to achieve
community impact.
Works with commu-
nity partners, leaders,
and staff to
implement the
strategic plans to
improve education,
achieve financial
stability and promote
healthy lives.
Maintains
accountability for the
overall operational
and fiscal integrity of
the organization.
Skills:
*Ability to prepare
and administer a
non-profit budget.
*Excellent communi-
cations skills (oral and
written).
*Ability to work
successfully with a
non-profit governing
board.
*Ability to coordinate
the annual fund
raising campaign.
*Knowledge of
community planning
operations.
*Provides a
professional image to
the community.
*Sound ethical and
moral principles.
*Commitment to the
mission, visision and
values of United Way.
Education:
A minimum of a
Bachelor's Degree in
business, manage-
ment, finance,
accounting, social
services or related
fields.


Experience:
A minimum of 3 to 5
years managerial
experience, prefera-
S bly with a non-profit
health/human serv-
ice agency or busi-
ness.


Send resume to:
United Way of Citrus
County
1205 NE 5th Street,
Suite A
Crystal River, FL 34429


1I t I I III


There are immediate opportunities for independent contractors to manage

and grow single copy newspaper routes in Citrus and Marion Counties


Be at least 18 years of age. Possess a valid driver's license.

Possess proof of liability insurance.

SI ....U.0 c-umr0 Routes are 7 days a week, early morning hours.



A'lB wwwhmnicoi [In.coma Email: mgaouette@chronicleonline.com or bring resume to 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River


I


CIASSIFIEDS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE






D6 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2012


WAITSTAFF
Experience Only!
Apply in Person
Mango Grill
1305 NorvellBryant
Hwy,(352) 560-0012




Manager Needed
Openings in mgt. Exp.
Pref'd but not req'd
Training & Benefits
$650 $850. Call Ms.
Watson 352-436-4460

Telemarketing
Regional Builder has
opportunities for
full-time and
part-time tele-
marketers to cultivate
large prospect
database. No cold
calling. Late
afternoon, evening
and weekend hours
with flexible
schedules. Must be
personable and com-
puter literate. E-mail
resume to
aschwein-
bera@citrushills.com.




DRIVER
OTR, Flatbed
RGN
2 Yrs Experience
Class A CDL
(352) 799-5724

Exp. Tree Climber
& Groundsman
Dri./Lic 352-746-5129


tI I 11 l \'t

YoLI \\oIld first.

Eubo Day


HOLIDAY INN
EXPRESS
Front Desk/Niaht
Auditor/Housekeepina/
Laundry
Hotel exp. required.
Apply within at
1203 NE 5th St. Crys. Riv
Fax or email resume:
352-563-1112.
RN@mymaverick.net





CLEANERS
M/W/F Eve. Job Site
Hwy 50 & Suncst Blvd.
ServlceMaster
352-726-4555 E.O.E

VIRTUAL ASSISTANT
exp or will train, must
have computer knowl-
edge352-220-0480





#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna. com
352-341-PREP (7737)








TAYLORCOLLEGE


NEIRDAfW


2 WEEK
PREP COURSES!
*ALF ADMINISTRATOR
$300.
*EKG $475.
*NURSING ASST. $475.
*PHLEBOTOMY $475.
tavlorcolleae.edu
(352) 245-4119
FB, twitter, you tube


#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)

ALLIED HEALTH
Career training
-Attend college 100%
online. Job place-
ment assistance.
Computer available.
Financial Aid if quali-
fied. SCHEV certified.
Call (800)481-9409
www.Centura
Online.com
r-N- - E
SNOW

ENROLLING
FOR SPRING
I 2012 CLASSES
BARBERBR
COSMETOLOGY
- reFACIAL
I FULL SPECIALTY
w INSTRUCTOR
TRAINING
IMANICURE/Nall Ext
MASSAGE THERAPY

BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
NEW PORT RICHEY
/SPRING HILL
727-848-8415
352-263-2744




$$$ ACCESS
LAWSUIT
CASH NOW!! $$$
As seen on TV. Injury
Lawsuit Dragging?
Need $500-$500,000++
within 48/hours? Low
rates APPLY NOW BY
PHONE! Call Today!
Toll-Free: (800)568-8321
www.lawcapital.com



1938 Gibson Gui-
tar,
good condition
Asking $1,500 obo
(352) 344-5168


Antique Auction
Sat Feb 25 @ Ipm
View Fri 11-7&Sat10-1
CITRUS HILLS LODGE
350 E Norvell Bryant
Professional
App & Liq
Fudge abi1131au1593
352-795-2061
charliefudge.com
13%BP (-3 for cash)
Cash/Cks/MC/VI

VINTAGE TEA SERVICE
FOR SIX Hand painted
scenes on each
piece.$75.00
352-341-2107




Pewter Figurines
Dinasours & Knights
5" on wooden base
$125.
(352) 220-4483












Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





A/C + HEAT PUMP
SYSTEMS
Starting at $880
13-18 Seer
Installation w/permit

Lic.&Ins. CAC 057914


CLASSIFIED



CHEST FREEZER
8.8 cu ft, white
like new $250
(352) 621-0982
352-476-3034
GE Electric Stove
self clean oven bisque
like new $200 obo
Admiral Washer top
load 201b hvy duty
$200(352) 795-7193
GE microwave, white,
great condition $50
352-746-4261
Haier Refrigerator
2_.7 cu3 yrwarrnty
19x26x18..$120
Magic Chef 18 cu
almond frost free refrig.
$125 (419) 832-9261
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR, washers
dryers,FREE pick up
352-564-8179
WANTED DEAD
OR ALIVE
Washers & Dryers
Working or not.
(352) 209-5135
WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 Each. Reliable,
like new,excellent condi-
tion. Can deliver.
352 263-7398




2 DRAWER FILE CABI-
NET PreOwned Com-
mercial Metal Lateral
28"x30"x18" Graphite
Color $45 727-463-4411
2 DRAWER LATERAL
FLE CABINET New in
Box with Keys Commer-
cial Metal Graphite Color
$75 727-463-4411
COMPUTER DESKS
Formica Top
3ftx24inches with 2
drawer File Cabinet At-
tached $25
727-4634411
DESK CHAIR Commer-
cial PreOwned Fabric
Covered and Adjustable
$45 727-463-4411
DESK CHAIRS (4)
PreOwned Commercial
Mauve Fabric Covered
$10 each 727463-4411


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ERGONOMIC COMMER-
CIAL DESK CHAIR Fully
Adjustable Fabric Cov-
ered PreOwned $85
727-4634411
FORMICA TOP COM-
PUTER DESKS (4) With
2 Drawer File Cabinet At-
tached 4ttx24inches $25
each 727-463-4411
PREOWNED DESK
CHAIRS (4) Commercial
Dark Gray Fabric $25
each 727-4634411

















5 speed bench drill
press on wheels, like
new, built on table
w/drawer, $180.
Craftsman 12" band
saw with saw dust
catcher, on wheels,
like new, $150.
(352) 726-9002
Hilti Fastening Gun
350 & 36M
plus many shots
$145.
(352) 249-4420
RYOBI CORDLESS
DRILL 9.6 VOLT-USED
1X-$25- 352 382 0220
Wood Lathe &
10" Table Saw
$100 obo
(352) 465-1477



JVC HD 52z TV,52 inch
rear projection,
Samsung HD 841 DVD
player $350 for both
(352) 637-6945
MAGNAVOX 27" COLOR
TV Older Model. Works
Like New. Seldom Used.
$75 727463-4411


MAGNAVOX 37" COLOR
TV Older Model. Works
Like New. Seldom Used.
$75 727463-4411

SANYO 26" COLOR TV
Works Like New. Older
Model. $75 727-463-4411


DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469


Case Tractor and
trailer-disc and other
attachments, good
condition, runs good
352-621-0133


Home e Finder

www ,hi-:iir; ,.. ,-finder.com


Fid Your Drw* tow

Search Hundreds of Local Listings

www.ch ron iclehomefinder.com


rw ik esr DfrU;'y


ALL EXTERIOR
ALUMINUM
6" Seamless Gutters
Lic & Ins 352-621-0881
ROB SCREENING
Repairs Rescreen, Front
Entries, Garage, Sliders
Free Est. 352-835-2020
SUBURBAN IND. INC.
Screen rms, Rescreens,
Siding, airports, rf.overs
wood decks, Fla. rooms
windows, garage scrns.
628-0562 (CBC1257141)



SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Washer &
Dryers, Free Pick Up
352-564-8179



Vertical Blind Factory
We custom make all
types. Best prices any-
where! Hwy 44 & CR
491. (352) 746-1998




' THIS OUT!
PHIL'S MOBILE MARINE
Repairs & Consignment
30 yrs Cert. Best Prices
& Guar 352-220-9435


Your World

t!a. iaea~e

CHRONICLE


Loving Adult Care
Home (SL 6906450)
Alzheimer/Dementia
No problem. Nursing
homes do not need to
be your only alternative
352-503-7052



ROGERS Construction
All Construction
sm jobs Free Est (352)
637-4373 CRC1326872



Sales, Service, Carpet,
laminate, Restretch,
repair, clean Lic#4857
Mitch (352) 422-5136




SHADY VIEW CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
Repairs. 352 613-2518




Clean Ups &
Clean Outs
(352) 220-9190



AFFORDABLE
COMPUTER SERV.
(352) 341-4150
DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
NATURE COAST
COMPUTER Repairs
Free in home inspection
352-212-1551


BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Day,
We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over"Your Old One!!!
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!
Call now for a FREE
In-Home Estimate

1-866-585-8827
BATHFITTER.COM
000AECJ






S Diamond Brite
Florida Gem
S *Marcite Decks
Pavers
FREE Tile ,
ESTIMATES "
GRDEP' COMPLETE
UNEUG REMODEL

MARCITE, INC.
,iNSURE% 352-746-5200


Blanchi Concrete
inc.com lie/ins
Driveways-Patios-
Sidewalks.352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL/ Lic
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River rock
reseals & repairs. 352
364-2120/410-7383
FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, staining &
Garage Firs. Recession
Prices! 352-527-1097
ROB'S MASONRY
& CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs Tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554




All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing,Hauling,
Site Prep, Driveways.
Lic. & Ins. 352- 795-5755




COUNTYWIDE DRY-
WALL 25 years exp.
For all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Lic/ins. 352-302-6838




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Plasma TV installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
ANNIE'S ELECTRIC
Husband & Wife
Team.(352) 341-5952
EC-13002696
BRIGHT ELECTRICAL
Res./Comm. Lic & Ins.
$50.hr. EC0001303
352-302-2366


* 1 Day Cabinets Laminates
* Remodeling Supplies Woods
* Refacing Supplies Glues
* Hinges Saw Sharpening
Cabinet Supplies & Hardware



3835 S. Pittsburgh Ave., Homosassa, FL
ooA7ZV 352-628-9760


Specuilit "
Inlernor & E.terior
/', 1 h,, ,.,
-FREE ESTIMATES -

352-465-6631


Full service electrical
contractor. Residential
& Commercial. Service
changes, large & small
repairs, spa hookups &
more. Lic / Ins. Call
352-427-4216
DUN-RITE Elect
Elec/Serv/Repairs
New const. Remodel
Free Est 726-2907
EC13002699 Serving
Citrus Co. Since 1978
Thomas Electric LLC
Generator maint &
repair. Guardian
Homestandby, &
Centurion. Cert. Tech.
Briggs Stratton 352-
621-1248 #ER00015377



A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002
BOB BROWN'S
Fence & Landscaping
352-795-0188/220-3194
ROCKY'S FENCING
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
352 422-7279 *



DRY OAK FIREWOOD
Split, 4 X 8 Stack $80
Delivered & Stacked.
352-344-2696
Premium Seasoned split
Firewood $75 Per Stack
(4x8) Free Delivery
(352) 527-8352



ALL EXTERIOR
ALUMINUM
6" Seamless Gutters
Lic & Ins 352-621-0881
ALUMINUM
STRUCTURES
5" & 6" Seamless Gutters
Free Estimates, Lic &
Ins. (352) 563-2977



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Plasma TV installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
Andrew Joehl
Handyman.
Gen/Maint/Repairs
Pressure cleaning.
Lawns/Gutters. No job
too small!Reli able ,ins.
0256271 352-465-9201


A HANDYMAN
If Its Broke, Jerry Can
Fix It. Housecleaning
also. 352-201-0116 Lic.
ABC Painting &
Handyman.
Low, Low Rates
30 yrs exp. lic/ins Dale
352-586-8129
Affordable Handyman
V FAST
V AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
*k 352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
P FAST
AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
*R 352-257-9508
Handyman Dave
Pressure Clean, Paint &
Repairs, oddjobs &
hauling (352) 726-9570
HOME CARE
Lawn & Handyman
Services. Sprinkler
Repair 352-2124935
Remodeling, Additions,
Doors, Windows, Tile
work. Lic.#CRC1330081
Free Est. (352)949-2292





V THIS OUT!
AC & HEAT PUMPS
FREE Estimate & 2nd
Opinion, 10 yr. warr.
on ALL Parts, Great
prices, ALL the time.
352-400-4945
Lic #CAC027361




Citrus Cleaning
Team. top quality
work & great
rates. 302-3348
(352) 527-2279


MAID TO ORDER
House Cleaning *
(352) 586-9125
Have Vacum Will Travel




The Tile Man
Bathroom remodel
Specializing in
handicap. LiecIns.
#2441. 352-634-1584



#1 BOBCAT FOR HIRE
Light land clearing, site
work, grading, hauling.
NO JOB TOO SMALL!!!
Lic. & Ins. 352-400-0528
All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
All AROUND TRACTOR

352-795-5755





CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, curbing,
flocrete. River rock
reseals & repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
Florida Sitescapes, LLC
FREE est: Yard Clean Up
Mowing, and MORE
Call 352.201.7374
YARD CLEAN UP
Flowers, Bushes, Mulch
Rock & MORE! Call for
Your Yard Make Over
Lic/Ins (352) 344-8672



Florida Sitescapes, LLC
FREE est: Yard Clean Up
Mowing, and MORE
Call 352.201.7374
HALLOCK & SON
LAWN CARE ALL Your
awn care needs. Detailed
Work. 400-1197, Lic/Ins.
HOME CARE
Lawn & Handyman
Services. Sprinkler
Repair 352-212-4935
JUSTIN LAWN CARE
Fast and Affordable.
and Friendly, Licensed.
(352) 476-3985
LAWN CARE 'N" More
Fall Clean up, bed,
bushes, haul since 1991
(352) 726-9570


* Furniture Refinishing
* Entryway Refinishing
* Tool/Knife Sharpening
* Pressure Washing
* Lawn/Property Maintenance

Classical Custom
Services, Inc.
Mark McClendon

3S2-613-7934
Over 20 Years Experience Licensed& Insured


Leaves, Beds Bushes
mulch, hauling, press
clean 352 220-6761



AT YOUR HOME
Mower, Parts Service &
Repair.Visit our store@
1332 SE Hwy 19
352-2204244




RELAX to the MAX
at home ... # MA58428
(352) 897-4670



A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs, trash,
lawn maint. furn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
ALL OF CITRUS
CLEAN UPS CLEAN OUTS
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790

HAULING
FREE ESTIMATES
scrap metals haul for
FREE (352) 344-9273




Chris Satchell Painting
ASAP
30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
A- George Swedlige
Painting/press cleaning
Int/Ext. texture/drywall
repair (352) 794-0400
ABC Painting & Handy
man Low. Low Rates
30 yrs exp lic/ins
Dale 352-586-8129
Handyman Dave
Pressure Clean, Paint &
Repairs, odd jobs &
hauling (352) 726-9570
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998



Tim Herndon Plumbing
$10. off w/this ad
10 yrs serving Citrus Co
lic/insCFC 1428395
(352) 201-8237


CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
ABC Painting &
Handyman.
Low. Low Rates
30 yrs exp lic/ins Dale
352-586-8129
Handyman Dave
Pressure Clean, Paint &
Repairs, odd jobs &
hauling (352) 726-9570
JOHN GRAY
e*Driveways $55.
s*Pool Enclosures $85.
(352) 270-8310
Pic PICARD'S Pressure
Cleaning & Painting
352-341-3300




Remodeling, kitchens
baths, ceramic tile &
tops. Decks, Garages
Handyman Services 40
Yrs Exp. crc058140
344-3536; 563-9768




Bruce F. Storman
Septic Services,
lic/in 352-795-5779




Attention Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers are
required by state law
to include their state
license number in all
advertisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious that
you may be contact-
ing an unlicensed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For questions
about business
licensing, please call
your city or county gov-
ernment offices.


Ron's Affordable
Handyman Services
All Home
SRepairs
\ *, Small Carpentry
SFencing
Screening
CLean Dryer
Vents
Affordable & Dependable
Expenence lifelong
352 l44-0905
ceLL: 400-1722


$60. Bahia Pallets
U-Pick Up. Special
Winter Pricing. Call
Now!! 352-400-2221



HOME CARE
Lawn & Handyman
Services. Sprinkler
Repair 352-212-4935



A Cutting Edge
Tile Jobs Showers
Firs .Safety Bars. ETC
352-422-2019
Lic. #2713, Insured.



A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest Rates
Free est.(352)860-1452
All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
DOUBLE J Tree Serv.
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
R WRIGHT Tree Service
Tree removal & trimming.
Ins. & Lic.# 0256879
352-341-6827
RIVENBARK
LAWN & LANDSCAPE.
15% off Tree Trimming
in Feb. (352) 464-3566
RON ROBBINS Tree Serv
Trim, Shape & Remove
Lic/Ins Free Est.
352-628-2825
RON ROBBINS Tree Serv
Trim, Shape & Remove
Lic/Ins Free Est.
352-628-2825
T & T TREE SERVICE
We Blow Away
High Prices!
Free Est. 352-362-3610



344-2556, Richard
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!





Your\orlid first


Need a job
or a
qualified
employee?


This area's
#1
employment
source!


( ,, .,,.I


COPES POOL
-AND PAVER LLC
YOUR INTERLOCKING BRICK PAVER SPECIALIST
Build your new pool now and
WILL CONSTRUCTION be ready for next summer!
3,52-628-229 1 Refinish your pool during the cooler months.
- PreventDryerFiresNow.com 352-400-3188


F W Lawn Mowers
01 Trimmers
.0: Chain Saws
1. 6\ ""' 1 111*Blowers
SPressure Washers



FREE ESTIMATES


AYLOR RENTAL
OPEN 7 DAYS 7095-5600
8081 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Crystal River


ROOFING


AAA ROOFING
Call the "eakhuste."
Free Written Estimate

*$100 OFF:
Any Re-Roof
Must present coupon at time contract is signed
I ir /Inc CCmc5757 DOD^G


ia


. REMODE


GENERAL
Stand Alone
Generator

Thomas Electric, LLC
Residential/Commercial Service
Generac Centurion
Guardian Generators
Factory Authorized Technicians
ER0015377

352-621-124


56-01 T7687


* New Landscapes

* One Time Cuts

* Free Estimates




Rivenbark Lawn
('1 & Landscape
<.2.'^ (352) 464-3566


F


I L-







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2012 D7


Matching Set Black
side by side fridge,
glass top stove, and
ventless microwave
$550.
(352) 302-9845



WICKER CHAISE
LOUNGE natural color
wicker lounge- $40.00
352-794-3020




"THOMASVILLE"
TABLE Solid wood end
table.PrisrnecondionAdditonal
tables available
99.00 352-726-9132
(2) STACKABLE CHAIRS
PreOwned Fabric Cov-
ered Commercial Sturdy
Metal Frame with Arms 2
for $35 727-463-4411
36" SQUARE TABLE
Rugged Gray Formica
Top Sturdy Steel Frame
Like New $65
727463-4411
Are U Moving? Estate?
In home liquidations?
MARTIN'S Estate &
Consign 352-209-4945
Book Case w/ 2 doors
$40 Ashley Furniture,
Chair $25., Mirror $15
352-794-4164
CATHI'S ATTIC
Offering New and Used
Quality Furniture & Ac-
cessories, 352-513-4802
Chest drawers
med dark wood
40x24 great shape $50
352-746-4261
China Cabinet
80x40x10, medium dark
wood, 2 glass shelves
$300 352-746-4261
China Cabinet, white
(approx. 7ft.) w/ open
windows $25 White
Armoire w/ 6 drawers
$40 352-794-4164
COMMERCIAL METAL
CABINET Graphite Color
2 Sliding Doors with Key
36"x30"x18" 2 Shelves
$30 727-463-4411
COMPLETE WHITE
RATTAN BEDROOM
SET. Consists of:
1-Twin size bed with
Rattan headboard.
1 6-Drawer dresser
1 4-Drawer dresser
2 2-Drawer Night
Stands
(all white with glass tops)
1 Mirror (Rattan)
1 end of bed bench seat
Asking $1,000- OBO all
in excellent condition.
(352)503-7147 -
Homosassa
352-503-7147
email:
idocargo@gmail.com
Photos available upon re-
quest
COUCH Floral,light
green tan a little yellow
must pick up $25.
(352)792-7610
Curio Cabinet
Excellent condition, 2
shelves, lighted 37"L x
30" H., dark wood
$225 obo
(352) 270-8709
Dinning Room Set,
beautiful all wood,
pedestal table &
6 chairs, $325.
(352) 270-8684
Floral Sofa
light multi color flowers
& leaves ,matching
chair & ottoman w/light
wood exc cond $350.
(352) 249-7263
FOLDING BANQUET
TABLES (2) PreOwned 6
Foot Wood Grain Top
$35 each 727-463-4411
KING SIZE BED
headboard, w/ light
and phone connec-
tion, big storage space
under bed $300
352-795-7513
Large Swivel Rocker
w/ ottoman,
dark mauve,
excel. cond. $200
(352) 795-4942
Leather Beige Sofa
w/ Double Recliner
Like New $500.
Black Leather
Executive Chair $75
352-794-4164
Leather Sofa, medium
brown, excel cond.
with matching leather
chair & ottaman $300
Lazy Boy Wall Recliner
& coffee table triangu-
lar lift top and storage
excel. cond. $75.
352-746-6034
Oak Dinette Set
table 60" w/leaf,4
microfiber sea foam
green swivel chairs,
Exc cond $250
(352) 527-1810
Oak Glider Chair
Excel. Cond.
$55.
(352) 382-7071
PAUL'S FURNITURE
Now open Tues-Sat.
352-628-2306
paulsfurnitureonline.com
Porch Glider
Excel. cond $35
(352) 220-8371
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
352-628-0808
ROCKER/Recliner
brown over stuffed&
sized, Brand New. $175.
Rocker w/ottman
tan $65.(304) 661-9811
ROUND TABLE 36"
Like New Rugged For-
mica Top Misc Colors
Sturdy Steel Pedestal
$65 727-463-4411
SOFA Rust colored 90
inch dual recliner in
great shape microfiber
$300.00 352-503-2226
SOFA Used but very
clean. $100.00
352-257-5722
STACKABLE CHAIRS (4)
with Metal Framed Arms
Fabric Covered Your


Choice of Color $10 each
727463-4411
Tea Cart
made in Italy $150.
White Leather LR chair
$50.(352) 795-7254
Twin Bed
w/pillow top matt
dresser w/mirror, night
stand, maghoney set
of linens & spread$500.
(352) 400-4987




1964, 110 John Deere
Lawn Tractor
Completely restored
10HP Kohler Motor
$550
(352) 726-9724
CRAFTSMAN RIDING
MOWER 42" deck
15.5 hp engine $400
(352) 746-7357


8001b pull with lawn
tractor $150.
(352) 220-8371
SEARS 22" LAWN
MOWER 550 series
Briggs @ Stratton engine
used only twice. $99.99
SMW 352-228-9030
SEARS CRAFTSMAN
22" like new 550 Briggs
@ Stratton lawnmower.
$95 SMW 352-228-9030
Sears Craftsman
Riding Mower, 42"cut
HY-dro static, 15.5
Kokle motor
$500. 352-601-6639
352-746-5762
Wards wood chipper,
5 horsepower
$80.00, call John at
352-208-7294





__AL E
MOVIt4G
SA IE
Beverly Hills
Inside home. 2/19 -23rd
daily. Sect. sofa, coffee.
table + much more
206 S Jackson St
CRYSTAL RIVER
Sat. &Sun., 10a-5p
Muti Units Yard Sale
14 ft. fishing boat 90HP
Johnson w/ trlr. $800
120HP Evinrude, runs
great w/ controls $900
Everything Must Go
Ft. Is Trail & Audubon Ln



LECANTO
Fri Sat 9a-5p. furniture
washer/dryer, lots
new electronics
LOTS OF STUFF
5244 W Caraway PL


(-t= .. ... ,




PINE RIDGE
Friday 12N-3p,
Sat. & Sun. 9a-3p
Antiques, collectibles,
House full of goods &
furn. Everything Goes!
5395 N Red Ribbon Pt.




BLOUSES & TOPS from
size xl to 3xxx- most cas-
ual and some t shirt type
$2.00 each
352-794-3020
MATCHING WESTERN
SHIRTS Cumberland
Outfitters. New, Men's XL
Womans Med.
$20. each 352-637-4916
WESTERN SHIRTS New
Cumberland Outfitter
Mens short sleeve west-
ern shirts. XL, S $20.00
each 352-637-4916



5 Foot, 12V2 Gauge
High Tensile Fixed Knot
Fence, 200' Per Roll
$250 Per Roll or
2 Rolls $450.
Call (352) 563-5164
16' alum extension
ladder $70.
men's golf
clubs in bag$150.
(352) 637-2281
18" BOYS NEXT
BICYCLE ORANGE BMX
style $40.00
352-489-8633
42" round Ktchen Table
2 chairs $100. 4 drawer
file cab. $10. Ent Center
$20.1rg Oak desk
w/chair. $25.
(352) 527-1042
CHANDELIER 5 LIGHT,
UMBER COLORED
GLASS, BRONZE
METAL, EXCEL CON.
$90 727.857.6583
CONSIGNMENTS
Wanted..corner of
Citrus Av. & Turkey
Oak..352- 220-9435
FISHER fisher
radio/detachable stereo
microcassette never used
in box good gift 10.00
phone 352 344 3485
Florida style coffee
table set $100
and
Queen plush
pillowtop matt ress
set $150.
(352) 419-4513
all prices neg.
FOLD-A-CART TFC 150
HOLDS 6 CU FT FOLD
FLAT STORAGE EXCEL
CON. $75 727.857.6583
GROUPER RODS 7 foot
grouper rods with 4/0
penn senator reels.
Eighty dollars.
352-726-2350
Heavy duty canvas patio
set cover for 40x70 table
& 6 large chairs-never
used-$50 352 382 0220
HP PHOTOSMART ALL
IN ONE Wireless Printer
good condition $65.00
527-1399
KAWASHO kawasho
color tv,radio and clock
new in box nice gift pro-
gramed 15.00 phone
352 344 3485
LENSE cannon lense
200 mm telephoto lense
used once 50.00 phone
352 344 3485 absolutely
flawless
STORAGE RACK
77"w x 24"d x 78"h, steel,
4 shelf, heavy duty, $85
727.857.6583
VERTICAL BLINDS
118"x79" VALANCE, ALL
HARDWARE. EXCEL
VINYL, $75
727.857.6583
WHIRLPOOL Dryer
hvy duty $175.
4 leather bar stools
$50.


(352) 795-7254
WHITE CHAIR COVERS
for sale.
Brand new,never used.
great for weddings, ca-
tering ect. 115 in all.
$350.00 please call
352-637-1024




Pressure Cleaning &
Painting Bus. ALL
Equipment and 2002
Ford Cargo Van,
all built inside $7K
obo 352-382-4770




4 wheel walker
w /seat, needs I break
cable $30 good cond.
(352) 220-8371


Heavy Duty Walker
w/accessories
Alum walker w/tray
alum crutchers $125.
will separate
(352) 746-2665
SCOOTER
Pace Saver Jr.
SCOOTER Go Go Pride
both 3 wheel, w/
charger, excel cond.
$450. ea (352) 489-3264
WALKER & BEDSIDE
COMMODE aluminum
fold up walker & com-
mode only 20.00 each
464 0316




BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We Also
Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676




ACOUSTIC GUITAR
GOLD GROVER
TUNERS,"NEW" IN BOX
PRO QUALITY $100
352-601-6625
ELECTRIC LAP STEEL
W/GIGBAG NEW
CONDITION,EASY TO
LEARN $100
352-601-6625




ELECTRIC TREADMILL
STATIONARY TYPE ALL
ELECTRONICS VERY
STABLE GOOD SHAPE
100.00 464 0316
New Body Champ
Cardio Dual Trainer
Elliptical or Cycle
$150.
(352) 860-2034




CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pond,
ATVtrails $165Kobo
352 795-2027/ 634-4745
CLUB CAR
'06 $1,400,
with charger
352-344-8516
Club Car '08
Precedent, electric,
new batteries, #48
voltwindshield
$2400.(352) 795-7193
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
FRESH JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct.( $5 per lb
Stone Crab@ $6 per lb
delivered 727-771-7500
GOLF CLUB SALE!
Used, Drivers, iron Sets,
wedges, putters, BAR-
GAINS 315 W. Inverness
Blvd. SATURDAY &
SUNDAY 352-344-1413
Men's full set of
Magregor, Heritage
Tour golf clubs
and bag, used 3 times
$100 (352) 527-0096

SWE BUY GUNS
On Site Gun Smithing
(352) 726-5238




14' UTILITY TRAILER
cargo space appx
10'X6'X18" 22001b carry-
ing cap new harness run-
ning Its dia pit Kobalt tool-
box drop down rear gate
2X6 framework $550
352-249-6293
5th Wheel Car Trailer
dbl. axle, 20 ft bed,
$1,000
(269) 252-9134

EZ PULL TRAILERS,

Utility & Enclosed
BUY, SELL, TRADE
Custom Built, Parts,
Tires, Whis, Repairs,
Trailer Hitches

16' Car Trailer, Reg.
$1765 CASH $1695.

Stehl Tow Dollies
$895 ( limited supply)
w/brks $1195

Hwy 44 Crystal River
352-564-1299

GULF TO LAKE
TRAILER SALES

Largest Selection &
Lowest Prices.
Offering New & Used
Cargo & utility trailers

Triple Crown Utility TRL
6 x 12 w/new spare
$1050.
6 x 12 Enclosed w/
V nose, rear ramp
door, $1950.

Trailer Tires
starting at $69.95

352-527-0555
Hwy 44, Lecanto


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966











I WANT TO BUY
Your CAR, TRUCK, SUV,
RV, BOAT, Imports or
Any Model, Any
Condition, No Titlle OK.
Paying up to $20,000 or
More. (813) 458-0584
WANT TO BUY HOUSE or
MOBILE Any Area.
Condition or Situation.
Call (352) 726-9369


Basset Hound Pup-
pies
$150 ea.,
have shots,
(352) 566-7667
Chihuahua
Puppies for Sale
5 weeks old
Pure breds.


DOG Rocky is a english
bulldog/boxer mix. He is 3
1/2 years old, up to date
on shots, and heartworm
prevention, neutered,and
potty trained. We must
relocate and need to find
a loving home without
kids or cats.Very affec-
tionate once he gets
used to you and is prop-
erly introduced. He
sleeps with us and lays
on the chair with us to
watch tv.Will need vet ref-
erence, home visit and
$50 rehome fee to insure
good home. call
352-212-8040
INVERENESS FL KC
offers Confirmation &
Obedience Dog
Training classes starts
Wed, March 7th
Crystal River Armory
Call 344-1088 to
register.
PUG PUPPIES pug pup-
pies weeks old, pedi-
gree papers and health
certificate, cute and play-
ful. paper trained, call
352-637-1024
Shi-A-Poo Puppies
Paper trained, good
with kids, will not shed,
health certs. CKC reg.
Fem $225 Males $200
Yorkie Poos Male
$300 (352) 489-6675




BAILS OF HAY
FOR SALE $25. ea
(352) 344-8737




2 Female Goats
$125. both
(352) 419-4340


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





BOAT LIFT
Single Pole,
1500 lb. capacity.
$900 obo
352-613-8453




'06 ProKat 20 ft
140 HP Suzuki 4
strokelow hours, very
clean, Magic alum tan-
dem trailer, VHF,
Depth, GPS, Windless
anchor $18k obo
(352) 464-4877
'07 Proline 17 ft
4 stroke 90 HP Suzuki,
very low hours, ready
to fish trailer & more
$13,500 352-795-3894
12' Aluminum Jon
Evinrude 7V2, Trailer
$750
(352) 341-1569
14' Aluminum V
Mercury 9.9 & Trolling
Motor, swivel seats, trlr.
$1,100
(352) 341-1569


walk around, pur-
chased New March
2009 paid $54,520.
twin eng. 115 Yamaha
warnty 3/15 (14 hrs)
ESTATE PRICE
$37,500 859-229-5667
BAYLINER
'87, Loaded, w/extra,
50HP force, Beautiful,
like new, extra low hrs.
$3,500 (352) 341-1569
CAROLINA SKIFF
2001 19 foot Excellent
condition, 90 hp Yamaha,
bimini, radio, depth finder,
includes trailer with new
tires.
$7500.00 obo
352-895-2382 ask for Bill
FRESH JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct.@ $5 per lb
Stone Crab@ $6 per lb
delivered 727-771-7500
HOUSE BOAT
30 ft fiberglass, hrd
wood firs, & more
Live Aboard or enloy
weekends in Paradise
$12,800 (423) 320-3008
KAYAK 15'
Wilderness Systems
Cape Horn w/rudder,
gar. kept, exc. cond
$700(352) 382-2824
PROLINE
21' Cuddy, full transom,
w/brack, 150 HP Yam.,
Bimini, VHF, porta pot,
dep. finder, trailer
$5,900. (352) 382-3298
TUNNEL HULL '05
G3, 90 hp Yamaha,
jack plate, rods, cooler,
live well, camo interior
Galv trailer, low hrs,
4 blade prop $10,500
352 489-1403
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LAKE
MARINE
We Pay CASH For Used
Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck & Fishing
Boats (352)527-0555
boatsupercenter.com
























05 SUNNYBROOK 36'
5th whl,2 slidesking
bedlike newheated
tks, 60 amp service
oak cab $39,900
352-382-3298
1988 Motor Home
28 w/ Ford chassie,
exc ond wall apples
$5000(352) 341-5762
2001 38 ft Holiday
Rambler, Cummings
diesel,2 slides, fully
loaded ,sell or trade
property $60000
859-814-3573
Bounder
Fleetwood 32' 1994
454 engine, loaded,
self contained, $9,750
352-795-6736

I Buy RV'S, Steve
Henry, RV World of
Hudson Inc.Since
1974. (888) 674-83762
(727) 514-8875
MONACO
'98, Diplimoat 38 ft.
loaded low miles
$44,900
(352) 382-5663












Tropical LX Diamond
05, 3 slides, 40'
19k miles, 350
Cat-Diesel. gen. 7.5
too many xtra's to list.
$98,500.352-503-3663


29 ft. Class. C., nearly
all options, generator,
needs awning fabric,
no smoke,33k mi.
Reduce $24K, 464-0316
WINNEBEGO
2001 Chieftain 35U,
garaged, non smoker
no pets, 2 slides, Cen.
Heat Pump, exc. cond.
76K mi., $38,900
(352) 208-8292




'07 32 foot KZ toy
hauler, like new, full
slide out, sleeps 7, new
tires, Owan Gen., gas
tank, alumwheels
Lrg living area separate
cargo area $18,900
352-795-2975
I BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
call me 352-201-6945
Open Road Pilgrim
05, 5th whl. 32' 2 slides,
deluxe Kit. new awning
& a/c, amfmw/TV
$14K(317) 407-4542



Travel Trailer '09
34' slide room, W/D,
dishwash, hard wood
firs, Q bed $12,900
cell (813) 699-2262



4 Goodyear Eagle
255/45/R20 on Ameri-
can racing rims, 6 lugg
Chevy /2 ton or Toyota,
over $2,000 new Asking
$750. Like new cond.
513-280-7854 Inverness
4 TIRES
FR380/P215/70R15
Lots of Tread $80.
(352) 220-8371
2010 Stelh Tow Dolly
Like new condition
has straps for Tires
$850.
(352) 221-0709
Chevy 383 Stroker Kit
callies steel crank,
H Beam Rods, forged
pistons balanced $650
obo(352) 628-4110
Hurst Competition,
plus shiffer w/mounting
plate, new $200
(352) 628-4110
Kenwood Stereo
w/10 CD Sony charger,
fits 69 Camaro & other
w/6x9 speakers $125.
(352) 628-4110
Maroon Cap 63V2 x 80
Rear slide, locks & keys
exc cond. fiberglass
brke & inter lights off a
Dakota, New $1500 sell
$400.OB0352-795-3920
Transmission Jack
for auto or standard
Trans,works perfect
$100.
(352) 628-4110
Two 4 cylinder 30 HP,
Teledyne Military
Gas Engines,
brand new, in crate,
$400. ea.
(352) 726-9724




BIG SALE!
Consignment USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
AUTOS' FROM $1,500.
US 19 BY AIRPORT
US 44, BY NAPA
Low Payments *-
461-4518 & 795-4440
consignmentusa.org
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not*
CASH PAID $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars Trucks
& Vans, For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES,
Hwy 19... 352 564-8333
CASH PAID FOR JUNK
CARS Any Condition
Up to $500., Free
Towing 352-445-3909
LOOKING FOR
American Made
Mid Size Car
Between Yr. 2000-2010
(419) 744-4111
WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
Perfect Cond. or Not
TItled,No title,
No problem. Paying up
to $25K any make,
any model Call A.J.
813-335-3794/ 531-4298


'08 Chrysler
Sebring Touring
Convertible,34k miles,
loaded, $14,250firm
352-897-4520

BIG SALE!
Consignment USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
AUTOS' FROM $1,500.
US 19 BY AIRPORT
US 44, BY NAPA
Low Payments *
461-4518 & 795-4440
consignmentusa.org

HONDA
'93, Prelude,
Needs distributor
$700
(352) 726-7106

HYUNDAI 07
Santafe, 51K mis,
metallic blue, 3rd row
seat, air bags front &
side, pwr winow, drs.
locks, steering &more
$15K (352) 382-0661

LINCOLN
'06, Towncar, Signature,
37K miles, looks, drives
even smells like new.
$16,500. (352) 746-1184

VOLKSWAGON
'97, Cabrio convertible
51K mi, AC, Garage
kept $4,800
(352) 287-5423





1931 FORD
HOT ROD project, steel
body, fiberglass fend-
ers, 9"Ford rear end,
w/ 4 link & disc brks.
I -beam front end
w/single leaf and disc
brks, many extras, roll-
ing body & chassie
w/clear Florida title
Can del. if needed.
$2800 352-503-6103
(352) 212-6497

Mercedes 82
380 SL, 105K mi., both
tops exc. cond., runs
good, no dents or rust
$7500 obo352 746-6925




900-0229 DAILY CRN
Surplus Prop.
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County Board



^^^^^^-11


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday "
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





BIG SALE!
Consignment USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
AUTOS' FROM $1,500.
US 19 BY AIRPORT
US 44, BY NAPA
k Low Payments *
461-4518 & 795-4440
consignmentusa.org
CHEVROLET
'11, Silverado, 1,500 LT
crew cab, 5.3 V8, trail-
ing pkg, clothe trim
$26,000 (352) 344-0089
CHEVY
'02, 3500 Box Truck
15 ft box, 104K mi.,
new tires, cold air,
$9000. (352) 621-3929
FORD '01
Lariat F 350 DRW 7.3
turbo diesel super cab
84K mis. exc cond $14K
call Bob(352) 794-3142
FORD
2004, E 350 Moving Box
Truck w/ Ramp, under
27K miles, AC, dual rear
wheels, Asking, $12,000
obo 352-634-1041



FORD RANGER 99
Ig bed w/topper, super
clean, 129K miles,
manual trans. well
maint. good mpg.
new stereo.$3500 Call
Doui352-794-3463




of County Commissioners
will be selling surplus prop-
erty and equipment via
the internet at



Misc. Notice


FORD F 150' 97
X-Tra nice,3 dr, all pwr.
5.4 eng '04 Chapprel
5th whl $21k, or 17k for
trailer( (641) 919-4652
TOYOTA TUNDRA
06, Contractor Model
76K miles. Blue book
$12K ,sell $10K.
(352) 566-8022




GMC
2000 Yukon 4x4 V-8 Gas,
One Owner,
Non-Smoker, never used
off-road, Runs, drives
great,Great Condition,
140k miles, $6,500 obo
352/586-8880
HYUNDAI '08
Santa Fe, 23,670K mi
loaded w all acc.
242 hp V6, leather
warranty transferable
$18,500 (352) 465-5501




CHEVROLET
2000 CK2500 PICK-UP
127K,EXT CAB, LONG
BEDALUTOAC,CRUISE,TILT,
AMvFM
BILL@352/860-2131
DODGE 87
D250, SC 4x4 318 auto.
Tough Truck 6" lift
35-1250BFG-AT-Tires
looks & works good
$4500 (352) 628-5222




2005 HD Ultra
Classic w/Fat Bagger
kit, Custom seat,
wheels ect $13000 obo
352-563-6327or 860-3481
FASHION
SCOOTER
2007 CF250-T 4130 mi-
les ,wht,Lots of features
,security system,Great
condition. 352-464-1005
Cash only Asking $2000
Harley 00
Roadking Classic, all
gear 17K miles 11K
obo.(352) 489-0873




govdeals.com from Jan.
15 until Feb. 29,2012.
Jan. 15 thru Feb. 29, 2012


379-0219 SUCRN
Elig, To Vote- Wetherell
PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice is hereby given to the following, at last known address:
Don R. Wetherell
11628 E. Head Ct.
Floral City, FL 34436
You are hereby notified that your eligibility to vote is in question. You are required to
contact the Supervisor of Elections, in Inverness, Florida, no later than thirty (30) days
after the date of this publishing. Failure to respond will result in a determination of in-
eligibility by the Supervisor and your name will be removed from the statewide voter
registration system. If further assistance is needed, contact the Supervisor of Elections
at the below listed address or call 352-341-6747.
Susan Gill, Citrus County Supervisor of Elections
120 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida, 34450
February 19, 2012.


381-0219 SUCRN
Order to Demolish, Wallace E. Wheatley
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF ACTION: ORDER TO DEMOLISH
CASE NUMBER: 115292

Description of property:AK: 2287578and legally described asEDEN GARDENS 1ST ADD
PB 3 PG 87 LOT 7 UNREC OF LOTS 31, 32 & 33: BEG AT NW COR OF LT 31, TH E AL N LN
OF LT 31 91 FT, TH AL N LN OF LT 32 9 FT TO POB, TH CONT ON N LN OF LT 32 7 5 FT, TH S
PAR WITH E LN OF LT 32 45 FT, TH W PAR WITH N L N OF LT 32 75 FT, TH N PAR WITH W LN
OF LT 32 45 FT TO POB D ESC IN OR BK 1323 PG 2010
WALLACE E. WHEATLEY
10508 E PATIENCE LN, INVERNESS, FL
On November 8, 2011, an order was issued by the Citrus County Certified Building Of-
ficial to demolishthe structure(s)on the property located at: 10508 E. Patience Ln.; In-
verness, FL. If the property owners) fail to comply with this order, the Code Compli-
ance Division will issue a work order to abate the nuisance condition.
Any persons) having a legal interest in this property may contact the Code Compli-
anceOffice within 30 days of this publication. Board of County Commissioners, Dept.
of Development Services, Code Compliance Division, 3600 W. Sovereign Path,
Lecanto, FL. 352-527-5350.lf you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD tele-
phone (352) 341-6580.
February 19, 2012.


382-0219 SUCRN
Order to Demolish, Wheatley & Smith
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF ACTION: ORDER TO DEMOLISH
CASE NUMBER: 115293
Description of property:AK: 2287624and legally described asEDEN GARDENS 1ST ADD
PB 3 PG 87 LOT 6 UNREC OF LOTS 31, 32 & 33 FURTHER DESC AS: BEGIN AT THE NW
CORNER OF LT 31 EDEN GARDENS FIRST ADD TH E AL THE N LN OF LT 31 A DIS OF 91 FT
TH CONT AL THE N LN OF LT 32 A DIS OF 9 FT TH S PARALLEL WITH THE E LN OF LT 32 A
DIS OF 45 FT TO THE POB TH E PARALLEL WITH THE N LN OF LT 32 A DIS OF 77 FT AN 9
INCHES TH S PARALLEL WITH THE W LN OF LT 32 A DIS OF 32 FT AND 9 INCHES TH W PAR-
ALLEL WITH THE N LN OF LT 32 A DIS OF 78 FT TH N PARALLEL WITH THE E LN OF LT 32 A
DIS OF 34 FT AND 9 INCHES TO THE POB DESC IN OR BK 1346 PG 321
WALLACE WHEATLEY & NANCY SMITH
616 S GLORY PT, INVERNESS, FL
On November 8, 2011, an order was issued by the Citrus County Certified Building Of-
ficial to demolishthe structure(s)on the property located at: 616 S. Glory Pt.; Inver-
ness, FL. If the property owners) fail to comply with this order, the Code Compliance
Division will issue a work order to abate the nuisance condition.
Any persons) having a legal interest in this property may contact the Code Compli-
anceOffice within 30 days of this publication. Board of County Commissioners, Dept.
of Development Services, Code Compliance Division, 3600 W. Sovereign Path,
Lecanto, FL. 352-527-5350.lf you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD tele-
phone (352) 341-6580.
February 19, 2012.


378-0304 SUCRN
Lecanto HS,-Kitchen Hood Replacement Inv, to Bid
PUBLIC NOTICE
INVITATION TO BID
Sealed bids for furnishing of all labor and materials and performing all work neces-
sary and incidental to LECANTO HIGH SCHOOL KITCHEN HOOD REPLACEMENT will
be received by the Citrus County School Board prior to 2:00 p.m. local time, Tuesday
13 March, 2012 in the Purchasing Department, Citrus County School Board, Building
200, 1007 West Main Street, Inverness, Florida, 34450-4698. Immediately following all
bids received will be opened and read aloud in Building 300, Purchasing Depart-
ment.
Each bid must be accompanied by a certified check or bid bond in the amount of
not less than five percent (5%) of the maximum amount of the Bid as a guarantee
that the Bidder, if awarded the Contract, will within ten (10) calendar days after writ-
ten notice being given of bid acceptance, enter into a written Contract with the
Citrus County School Board, in accordance with the accepted Bid, and give a
surety bond satisfactory to the Citrus County School Board equal to one hundred
percent (100%) of the Contract amount.
No Bidder may withdraw his/her Bid for a period of thirty (30) days after the date set
for the opening of the Bids.

All prime contractors must hold a Citrus County School Board Certificate of
Pre-qualification to bid on Citrus County School Board construction projects. Prime
contractors must be pre-qualified by the Citrus County School Board prior to submit-
ting a bid. Prime contractor's bids must be within the bid limits specified on their
pre-qualification certificate. For contractor pre-qualification information call the Cit-
rus County School Board Facilities and Construction Department at 352/726-1931,
ext. 2208.
Pre-bid Conference:
A. A mandatory pre-bid conference for Prime Contractors, and optional for
sub-contractors, will be held in the Cafeteria, at LecantoHigh School.
B. Conference will occur on Tuesday 6 March, 2012 at 4:00 P.M.
Bidders may obtain a maximum of two (2) sets of Contract Documents from
VERRANDO ENGINEERING CO., INC., 1111 NE 25th AVE, SUITE 401, OCALA, FL 34470
PHONE NO: (352) 854-2664 upon deposit of a check made payable to the Citrus
County School Board in the amount of $ 50.00 per set. A refund of this deposit will
be made upon the return of these Documents in satisfactory condition within ten
(10) days after the opening of Bids.
The Citrus County School Board reserves the absolute right to award the Bid to the
lowest, responsive Bidder, to waive any informality or irregularity in any Bid, or to re-
ject any and all Bids received based solely on the Board's determination of the best
interests of the School District.
CITRUS COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD, INVERNESS, FLORIDA
BY: Sandra Himmel, Superintendent of Schools
February 19, 26 and March 4, 2012.


,. - 1 ",
4P^ ^^ (^ ^ - /


You can earn at least $800 per month
delivering the





Swww.chronicleonline.com

Independent contractors delivering the Citrus County
Chronicle can earn as much as $1,000 a month
working only 3-4 early morning hours per day. The
Chronicle is a permanent part of Citrus County with
an excellent reputation. To find out more, call
and speak to one of our district managers or leave
your name and phone number and we will get right
back with you!



563-3201


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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H Section E- SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2012


OMEFRONT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE REAL ESTATE GUIDE


f Sikorski's
L Attic
PAGE E6


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floral needleworked
lampshade. Many
of this season's
botanicals straddle
both traditional and
modern d6cor, making
them very versatile.
Associated Press


SEE


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rus nuts


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E2 SUNDA~~ FEBRUARY 19, 2012 Cimus Cou2wrY (FL) CHRONICLE


LARGE ROOM SIZES!!
MASTER SUITE W/FP 3,000 SQ. FT.
Gorgeous Pool Area Lg. Eat-In Kitchen
4/2.5/2 Car Garage Workshop w/AC
Fabulous Pool Area Horses Welcome!!
KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997
*ir "jl.i,>i m iE IIIITT r i ..r- i jR


to move on from this quiet corner acre lot so close to
town 2/2/2 has new drain field and updated roof
Beautiful tree-shaded lot full of flowering plants, trees
and natural Wood burning fireplace in the family
room Eat-in kitchen Oversized garage Come bask
in the silence
JENNIFER STOLTI (352) 637-6200 l
Email: Info@CirusCountyHomes.com
www.CtrusCountyHomes.com


*3BR/2BA/2CG Split Floor Plan
* Living & Family Room
* Dining Room & Eat-In Kitchen Area
* Nice Covered Patio Area Well Maintained
*Lots of Ceramic Tile & Crown Molding
LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611
Email: lenpalmer@remax.net


BELOW ACCESSED VALUE!!!
4/3 with 2,612 sq. ft. of living. Separate
refrigerator and freezer, two pantries, double
oven, pool with hot tub, detached garage with
office, pole barn, fully fenced and gated.
KEVIN & KAREN CUNNINGHAM
(352) 637-6200
Email: kcunningham@remax.net


Boat dock w/8,000# lift, updated kitchen w/Corlan,
maple cabinets, and pot faucet for cook-top
Spectacular view from the enclosed patio overlooking
a fresh water bay and the Indian River Minutes to the
Crystal River, the bay, or the Gulf of Mexico Scenic
boating, good fishing, and community swimming pool
and tennis Call for an appointment T

WAYNE HEMMERICH (352) 302-8575 .
Email: Woyne@WoyneHemmerich.com


WATERFRONT POOL HOME 3/2/2 with
living and family room nestled under trees in
front Canal view in rear with 40 ft. dock on
deep canal leading to the river and Gulf.

JODY BROOM (352) 634-5821
Email: team@citrusrealty.com

24N IFO LINE
(35637.2828
Enter house I#56 1
-~-~'*


wnln ALL inc APmcniilE
* This beautiful home is total quality inside & out
SLots of tile, crown molding and gas fireplace
* Gourmet kitchen, stainless appliances & lots of granite
* Heated pool, spa, brick pavers & outdoor kitchen
GEILA 'gala' ENGLISH 352-249-6961
Email: g.english@remax.net
www.sellingcitruscountyhomes.com i


STUNNING Pine Ridge custom Flynn
built 4/3/2 with 2,900+ sq. ft. of living
area and upgrades galore. Beautiful
flowing floor plan lends itself to
entertaining. MOTIVATED Seller is
ready to move on. Call me for your
personal tour.
CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555
Email: cnadal@remax.net


* I0u leaI DUIlO31ZIZ Ul .IU nMre
* Hardwood Floors Throughout Home
* Large Master Suites Split Floor Plan
* Security System Fully Enclosed Screen
* Room for Pool and More
* Close to Schools Must See!!!
CHERYL LAMBERT 352-637-6200
Email: cheryllambert@remax.net


242 N. y e H I10W


SHow much
home can I

comfortably

afford?
P1 For more information call:
Ben Branch
352.564.2250
NMLS ID: 432391

Bankof America Home Loans
BrdialZnancaNxMinte"FtlHB 6 qid Ho [arerhr edulier
JF ,r,'rt wullr ,ir r r nlnI, ln Ilup r,,.n k., i.J.,'ln Ii rl
I,.rsw.l .Wlir Ir.Y..l.fr iT l w .s Th. i'.f IC
'M '**I ****I'


BEST DEAL in BRENTWOOD Immaculate
3/2 with oversized 2-car garage. Elegant
window treatments and light fixtures and updated
tile flooring. 32' X 12" screened lanai with in-
ground hot-tub. Come by and see it today!
DIR Norvell Bryant Hwy East to Left into Brentwood, to
Right onto Brentwood Circle, to home on nght
LEO SMITH 352-697-2771
Email: leosmith@remax.net


TH sE KELLY / ELLIE TEAs(M P_/MA


E2 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


* Clubs are invited to submit infor-
mation about regular meetings for
publication on the Community
page each weekday.
* Include the name of the organiza-
tion, the time, day and place of


MEET AND GREET
the meeting, whether it meets
weekly, biweekly or monthly, and
whom to call for details.
U Send in information attn: Commu-
nity Page Editor, 1624 N. Meadow-
crest Blvd., Crystal River, FL


34429, or fax to 352-563-3280,
attention: Club meetings.
* E-mail to community@
chronicleonline.com.
Include "Club Meetings"
in the subject line.


FORMS AVAILABLE
* The Chronicle has forms available for wedding and
engagement announcements, anniversaries, birth
announcements and first birthdays.


WHERE FUNCTION
MEETS PRESTIGE!
This custom built home has the livability for
everyday life & the elegance & upgrades for
any buyer. Located in Citrus Hills on a
gorgeous one-acre landscaped lot. The formal
living room opens to the lanai, which has
beautiful tongue & groove ceilings. Features
include an office with custom built-ins, formal
diningroom, kitchen with granite counters &
wood cabinets, free form pool with waterfall,
media/game room with projection theater,
paved courtyard with fireplace & a completely
insulated 3 car garage. One of a kind!
Visit
WWW.3765NTYRONEAVE.COM
or Call 888-303-6405
MLS 353155
Code: 9414 for more details.


-a-
ELEGANT HOME
on a beautiful mature landscaped lot located
in a quiet subdivision close to 7 Rivers Golf &
Country Club &just minutes from shopping &
amenities. This lovingly maintained home has
vaulted ceilings with a beautiful fireplace in
the spacious living room. You will enjoy the
beauty & natural light that fill this home. The
floor plan is open & flows well. Light & bright
updated kitchen with a breakfast bar that will
keep you involved when entertaining. Come
take a look to appreciate all that this home
offer. #352793
Visit
WWW.809NVENTURIAVECRYSTALRIVERFL.INFO
or Call
888-303-6405 Code: 9413


Gene Wade 352-794-0888
EXIT Realty Leaders W
352-795-0888
352-527-1112


Anmdla & Nrk Johns Tom Balfour il Avens & Hal Stener Art Paty 7 4 6 9 0 0 0
BROKERASSOC. t RALTR R REALTOR EALTOR BROER REALTOR




.4f. ii .tt


1238 E. TRIPLE CROWN L 4/3/3 353329 $385,000 7170 N. GRACKLE, 3/2/2 348792 $109,900 2173 W TACOMA, 4/3/3 353801 $169,000






4144 N. MAE WEST, 3/2/2 351560 $89900 21 TRUMAN BLVD 22 3656 $65900 9870 N. CORTAND DR., 2/2/2 352002 $74,500






SPL2/1 353713 $,50 W.PLAYER PH 2/2/1 35298491500 9570 N. CITRUS SPRINGS, $176,900

3521 N. LECANTO HWY., BEVERLY HILLS, FL 34465 1-888-789-7100


A RESORT LIFE FOR YOU!
Beautifully maintained and upgraded, you'll find this spacious 3/2/2 home in a total maintenance
community. From the brick pavers on the entry, porch, and inground caged pool surround, to the solar
panels keeping your pool swimmable year 'round, you'll see attention to detail. Wood-ceilinged porch
looks out to "Lake Heron," with every natural creature that swims or flies. Mirrored walls in liv. rm. and
dini. rm., split BR plan, all with splashy Italian marble bathrooms. A kitchen modern and elegantly simple,
with casual din. area. Designed for convenience, comfort and style. Close to golf and community area.
Storage area for boats, etc. Access to Chain of Lakes. Convenient to downtown and to the Interstate. Down-
sizing owners would consider an offer. $165,000 MLS #353024.
Ask for M. Booth 637-4904 or T. Donovan 220-0328


DDOOAMLL


w.ge


lteexcutdder
REAL ESTATE, INC.
5569 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY.
CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429
OFICE: (352) 795-6633
WWWALEXRE.COM E-MAIL: SALES@ALEXRE.COM


Sf/',
BEST

R*or
Realtor


I N N DI S V DY !


I


CAROLE LISTER -.
Multi-Million Dollar Realtor ERA |
Cell: 422-4620 Office: 382-1700 Kro
View virtual tours @ www.listerlistings.com
OPE HOSE
AI 00111121 1 A."W lit %t


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2012 E3












Putting together a new garden, step by step


At my new home in the
sandhills I first placed a 2-
foot wide barrier of 3/4 inch
local limerock around the
foundation perimeter. This
looks clean and neat, and
provides maintenance ac-
cess for cleaning and paint-
ing, but primarily leaches
alkalinity down into the soil
surrounding the home. In-
sects, including termites
and ants, do not like alka-
line environments, so they
stay away from the house.


r, Jackie Gaffney Jason Gaffney I ]
.6 Realtort A HOUSE Realtor I
S302.3179 soLDN-,,ni 287.9022
WEEKS REALTY, 5 BEVERLY HILLS BLVD.
The Golden Girl 746.6700 AM
6340 N. Whispering Oak Lp, Oak Ridge 3/2/2 ...................................... 139,900
3233 E. Lloyd St., Inverness 2/1/1 ............. ........ ................. $44,900
3855 N. Grapefern Way, Beverly Hills 3/2/2 ............................................ $99,900
922 W. Beakrush, Beverly Hills 2/2/2 ........................ .......................... $74,900
257 W. asurina, Beverly Hills 2/2/2 ........................ .......................... $85,000


Gail Stearns '-
Realtor KELLER WILLIAMS
Cell: 352-422-4298 R E A L T Y
S gstearnsl @tampabay.rr.com 352-746-7113
gstearnsl@tampabay.rr.com 699 S. Adolph point, Lecanto


-WATERFRONT Lovely mobile
in Homosassa just off main river.
2/2 with carport, workshop, 2
porches and great addition, dock,
fully furnished. Only $129,000.
WATERFRONT completely renovated waterfront mobile, new everything.
New appliances still under warranty! Call for more information. $169,000.

A "Always There For You"
m GAIL COOPER
i-i i Multi-Million Dollar Realtor
ERA: Cell: (352) 634-4346
OFFICE : (352) 382-1700x309
E-mail me: homes4u3@mindspring.com





II 1


* 2006 with 3 bedrooms + office 3-car garage 3rd bay is storage
* Neutral carpet -18" tile Corian with 42" cabinetry
* Unique indirect lighting Nicely wooded private greenbelt
#353023 $199,900
DIRECTIONS: Route 19 S to left on 98; left on Oak Village Blvd;
right on Lone Pine; 4th left on Pepper Ct; home on left.


As there is no the sandy soil
prey to eat, spi- and clay-sand fill
ders and scorpi- dirt that the
ons do not lurk in builder trucked
the limerock bar- in. The clay con-
rier zone. Frogs tent holds mois-
and lizards ture and is not
search for their well-drained
meals among gar- enough for gar-
den plants, not on Jane Weber den soil. I re-
the walls. Lime- moved some of
rock is a natural, JANE'S the clay and piled
local material GARDEN it near the well
providing insect and pressure
control without toxic tank where someday a gar-
chemicals.. den shed might be built. I
The next step was to add will amend the remaining
natural organic humus to sandy soil with lots of the


0 CITRUS -- &I I OFFICES


SandraOlear




Brian Murray




Anna Moore
B








Florence Cleary




Helen Forte



Jane 0. Gwynn



JoannMartin




Matt Robinson




Tami Mayer


OPEN HOUSE SUN. 12-2



ll, n./i M i r 1.. n S1
MLS#351328 $185,000
Charming 3/2 52 pool home on a corner
. .. h t-..l ,h ,,,,, i .... I h I ,-.. 1 .. I
IJ ', ii ,., ,,,,, ,,, Ii
... ..... . .. . ... .. .
Fresno, toright oncomerofMassachusefs#418.
JoAnn Condit 352-212-9774
NEW LISTING
W -r '


MLS #353736 $107,500
Nice 2/2/1 unfurnished duplex in
Meadowview. Convenient loca-
tion, screened lanai, good
condition, shows well. Ready for
immediate occupancy.


free fine mulch made from
yard waste at Citrus County
Central Landfill.
Natural debris dries and
dies while being stockpiled.
When there is enough mate-
rial, the county hires a ma-
chine to grind it into mulch.
Fine mulch sifts out of the
equipment, while coarser
mulch goes up a conveyor
into a mountainous pile.
The decaying vegetable
matter heats up to more
than 130 degrees, cooking
weed seeds to death. A few
species like palms and
coontie seeds can survive to


OPEN HOUSE SUN. 1-3 OPEN HOUSE SUN. 1-3 OPEN HOUSE SUN. 1-3




MLS #350261 $86,900 MLS #351428 $81,900 MLS #353383 $79,900
Partially furnished, spacious and well kept Beautiful 2/2/2 one owner home in quiet iii ..... ,, ,,, i .,
2 story townhome with glassed/screened ,ii i i .. i ', 11 i i ... i i... i
lanai on the lower level and screened II I h I h I ,11 .'1 '1 .. . II "' I I I "' hI h i. 1 ,1,,, i
porch off the master suite on the upper II I I ., i I .. ..i...i i 11 room, sprinkler system, Roof replaced 2006
S i I I .,I 11 ..... I ..,,, I i. I I ii ,.i I Home iswell maintained
r ........ . ..... , f, .. ,.,s, .',... .. 1 . ... .. .a.. ... ..'h,,, .. , . .. .. ,a,.. f, fa. ..
...... ... .1 H II M I 1.- M.1 H I I.- .-I-
,, ,D.. H 1 . ,, ... ,,i -..i. .. ,.,, -.,,- M . % . I . .%, .1 .. .. ,, M 1.. % I %, . '3
NEW LISTING NEW LISTING NEW LISTING
W =i-i'


MLS #353649 $79,000
3/2 2000 Skyline home. Split floor plan
& large eat-in kitchen. Built-up
construction (16" on centers) through
entire home including the roof. Public
boat ramp at Withlacoochee River
2 miles away


MLS #344572 $109,900 MLS #346381 $59,500
Beautful, maintenance free, expanded *PRIVATE COUNTRY SETTING/2.5
Briarwood Model. This lovely 3/2/2 villa ACRES* This 3/2 doublewide sits up
+ pool has upgraded tile in the front on a hill & backfrom the road for lots
bedroom, front entrance and lanal. of privacy. Home features covered
Window seats with storage in MBR deck on front & new deck on rear, a
and dining room. Ig. storage shed/workshop


S 31utE GIh I,,ul L. IN ,
MLS #353703 $67,88
"UPDATED", new ceramic tile
everywhere except the bedrooms, new
counter tops in the kitchen, new
appliances, new paint &furnished. This
ground floor 2 bedroom, 2 bath unit is
readyfor a new owner.
PENDING


MLS #351663 $119,000
FL. Cracker Style home has been totally
remodeled & updated. 3BR, 2.5BA home
sits on 2 lots & feat Newer roof, newer
A/C, updated plumbing, electric, energy
efficient windows, remodeled BR,
kitchen, cast-iron fire place.


pee 38'E Hqf.r.uISI 1 1.,
MLS #353675 $6100
Fully furnished upstairs end unit
w/cathedral ceilings, carport and
only 6 short steps up. Windows in
both bedrooms make them bright.
Great view out the back and fabulous
location close to the club.
PENDING
BW Awbam


/V a- 22,;MN VuIIIc-, PL
MLS #352603 $109,900
Drastically Reduced! No Disappointment!
Lowest priced unit with Florida Room under
heat & air. Owners leaving town and want
an offer. Move Right into this completely
furnished and updated villa.


2011 Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entitles. An independently owned and operated broker member of Prudential Real Estate Affiliates, Inc., a
SPrudential Financial company. Prudential, the Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are service marks of Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entitles,
registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Used under license. Equal Housing Opportunity.


over 150 degrees. Tempera-
ture is checked daily by
county staff. The pile can be
turned with a huge loader
machine if temperature gets
too high and spontaneous
combustion is a possibility.
I will mix the fine mulch
about half and half with the
well-drained sand that
makes up most of the soil in
the central peninsula of
Florida. There is little or-
ganic material, barely 5 per-
cent, in sandhill soils. Few
desirable garden plants can

See JANE/Page E8


1 Prudential

Florida Showcase
Properties


RENTALS AVAILABLE


Open 1 Days For Your Convenience
20W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, FL 34442
1-888-222-0856 (352) 746-0744
1481 Pine Ridge Blvd.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465
1-888-553-2223 (352) 527-1820


1j
JoyHolland




KathyDagle



Lori Nickerson



Mark Caper




MikeMcHale




PhilPhillips



Steve Dobbyn



Teresa Booer




Joann Condit




Barry Cook


ell-designed land-
scaping definitely
increases the value
of a home. A well-planned
garden provides curb ap-
peal, enhances the beauty of
the home and neighborhood
and is a pleasure to the fam-
ily Careful selection of
plants can increase biodi-
versity and cater to the
needs of birds, butterflies
and the wildlife that have
had their natural habitat
disturbed by development.


For a Visual Tour or Multiple Photos, Go to: wwwfloridashowcaseproperties.com


E4 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MEN ME ROB HARD .

















EVEN IN THISNAEAOF WELL KEPT HOMES,



DIRECTIONS:
Hwy 491 to TreaINVESTMEN, thenell (352right on Jefferson, home o270.0130 right.
Beve Hi,, M.e(352) 746-3600



OPEN HOUSE
SUN., FEB. 19 10AM-2PM









EVEN IN THIS AREA OF WELL KEPT HOMES,
THIS HOME STANDS OUT AS A GEM.
You will love the updated kitchen, along with the double
pane windows. Priced to sell. Don't let this one get away.
DIRECTIONS:
Hwy. 491 to Trueman, then right on Jefferson, home on right


BANK OWNED-CITRUS SPRINGS, FL
3BR/2BA home built in 2004. 80 x 125 lot.
Central water. Front & rear covered porches.
$57,900 MLS#353187


----- -. _.

BANK OWNED-CRYSTAL RIVER, FL
3BR/2BA home with fireplace situated on 2 acres
in Crystal Manor. Caged in ground pool. Fenced
rear vard. $105,000


_____________ I -


KEY '"Always There For You"
REALT GAIL COOPER
f l i Multi-Million Dollar Realtor
ERA w Cell: (352) 634-4346
OFFICE : (352) 382-1700x309
E-mail me: homes4u3@mindspring.com








See Virtual Tours @ w.resalehomes4u.com



See Virtual Tours @ www.resalehomes4u.com


GOLF COURSE
HERNANDO, FL
1/2 acre on The Oaks
in Citrus Hills.
$29,900
MLS#321216


CALL Roy Bass TODAY (352)726-2471
Email: roybassfampabay.rr.com www.allcitrusrealty.com After Hours s302-6714


c


MiE


Investors Realty
of Citrus County, Inc.
Visit my website at: www.myflorida-house.com
I IIi


ITTA BARTH
REALTOR
(352) 220-0466


38 HAWTHORNE 3644 E. LAKE TODD DR. PINE RIDGE
CYPRESS VILLAGE ARBOR LAKES One-of a kind horse lover's dream home in
Fabulous Sweetwater 3/2/2 home on cul- Beautiful 2/2/1 home in gated 55+ the Equestrian section next to trails
de-sac! Move-in ready condition. All community on Lake Tsala Apopk. ni-- I- "m-"1 v/exquisite taste, attention to
neutral colors and sparkling clean! floor plan, vaulted ceilings, tile : I I I.. i...I. quality & craftsmanship shows
Conveniently located to the new i. 1 I d : .. i. .. .1 1. yard even has room throughout the 3 bed, 25 bath, 4car garage
center and Suncoast Parkway. home Fenced paddock w/water & shelter
MLS 353832 $149,000 MLS#353089 $116,000 MLS #349970 $415,000




3560 N WOODGATE DR.
THE GLEN 1432 SEATTLE SLEW
I., I, .... ..... INVERNESS .-. ..
located m The Glen, a 55+ community, and catch the breezes this 3/2 5/2 home in GRAB THIS
surrounded by nature, close to i. ... i. ,. I ..... gated community of BARGAIN!
during, medical. The home is i. i i i... .. 11. homess with upgrades like Take a look at this magmficent 4+/4/5
condition, ready for you to move m, relax on hardwood floors, gourmet kitchen and an Country Estate on 10+ acre and take a 360
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115 N. LEGION TERR. 7373 E. SHADIWOODS CT.
CITRUS HILLS FLORAL CITY 7080 DUVAL ISLAND DR.
Enjoy nature with mature oak trees and i .I ... . I FLORAL CITY
i i .,.. ... i ,.....i Citrus Hills!! I .. i .....i i i 1.I Vistas open waterfront on
...... ner lot, this olling 5 82 MOL acres fenced Nice mix of pasture Lake Tsala Apopka, beautiful landscaped
3BR, 3BAhome with screened in pool and and woods Relax on the porch and watch the yard with waterfall and pond, a dock for
patio area offers you tl. ... ... .111.1 . . .. .. .. .1 .. ... I it to go fishing this 3/2/1 pool
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andmove right in! .1 ... I.
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DAMI'\ UvIuU rLUV AL ui l, rL
Waterfront 3BR/2BA mobile on wide canal.
Boat dock. Great weekender, winter or year
round living. $34,900 MLS#352914


- U -


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2012 E5


COLDweLL
BANWRO I







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


E6 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2012


IHOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information......352-563-5592
......... .....................................advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information......................... 352-563-5966
News information.......................... ................ 352-563-5660
............................... .............newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listing...............www.ChronicleHomeFinder.com
"The market leader in real estate information"




HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
* Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-563-
3280, attention HomeFront.
* News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
* Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront.
* Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
* The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes for
space and/or clarity.
* For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


Compost key to happy plants


Most people consider banana
peels, wilted lettuce leaves and
other fruit and vegetable scraps
to be "trash." With a little effort, though,
this "trash" can be converted into "black
gold," or compost, for your yard.
On average, one person generates
over 450 pounds of waste suitable for
composting each year. Composting is
an easy way to reduce the amount of
waste sent to the landfill while creat-
ing a rich soil amendment (humus) to
help plants grow.
Citrus County's soils are usually
sandy, low in nutrients (except phos-
phorus) and low in humus. Humus is
anything that was recently living
(leaves, rotten logs, kitchen waste, etc.)
and has completely broken down (de-
composed). Humus is what makes a
soil healthy and "rich."
Humus also acts like a sponge in the
soil, trapping water, fertilizer and pes-
ticides in the root zone where plants
can use them. You can build up the
amount of valuable humus in our soil
by composting kitchen and yard waste.
Many people think that composting
smells bad and attracts pests, but
when done properly, this is not true.
Keeping meat and dairy products out
of the pile and providing enough car-


bon-rich materials (like dry leaves)
will eliminate odors and pests.
The Florida-friendly demonstration
garden behind the Citrus County
UF/IFAS Extension Office at 3650 W
Sovereign Path in Lecanto
has nine different compost-
ing units on display There's
a tumbling unit made from a
recycled plastic drum (as-
sembly instructions are
available at the display), a
worm composting unit and
several other commercially -
available bins. You can visit
the garden any day of the
week from sunrise to sunset Audre
There are many different F
ways to compost, depending
on how much space and
time you have, as well as what types of
waste you produce. Worm composting
is especially appealing, because it can
be done anywhere and at any scale.
In my "Composting with Worms"
workshop from 6 to 7:30 p.m. Wednesday,
March 7, participants will assemble a
worm bin that can be kept under the
sink or anywhere that you have enough
room for a container the size of a dish
pan. For only $15, you'll receive a small
bin, bedding and worms everything


V
*5


you need to transform your kitchen
scraps into potent compost The work-
shop itself is free and participants do not
have to purchase a worm bin to attend.
Space is limited, and preregistra-
tion is required. Call Gina
Hamilton at 352-527-5707 by
March 2 or sign up online at
www.surveymonkey.com
/s/GBNVPVW
For questions on com-
posting or other Florida-
friendly landscaping topics,
call 352-527-5708, or send
an email to Audrey.Durr
@bocc.citrus.fl.us.
Durr For more information on-
'N line, visit Citrus County's
website at www.bocc.citrus.
fl.us, the Southwest Florida
Water Management District's website at
www.WaterMatters.org and the Univer-
sity of Florida's website at www.Solu
tionsForYourLife.org.
The Citrus County Florida Yards &
Neighborhoods program is a free pub-
lic education program that is funded
jointly by the Citrus County Depart-
ment of Water Resources and the
Coastal Rivers and Withlacoochee
River basin boards of the Southwest
Florida Water Management District.


Reader asks for help with dolls; valuing old comic books


Dear John: Can you help
me out with an ap-
praisal of these two
dolls or can you di-
rect me to someone
who might be able to
assess their value? I
am including photos.
Both have soft, fabric
midsection bodies.
The smaller doll has
a china face, hands
and feet. The doll
wearing the blue and John S
white pinafore outfit SIKOF
probably has a ce-
ramic or china face. AT
Thank you for any
help you can give me in this
matter -PMcL, The Villages
Dear PMcL: The best way to
check out current collector in-
terest and value for your two
dolls is to contact doll afi-
cionado Sherry Minton at 407-
293-3164. Let us know how
things work out.
Dear John: Can you please


i


t
1
1


tell me anything about the
glasses in the attached picture?
I originally had three anisette
glasses in this style
that belonged to my
grandmother. I have
since added several
other types in the
S same pattern to my
"collection," but
every time I have
found additional
glasses, the people I
ikorski have bought them
SK|'S from cannot tell me
anything about them.
IC They vary in size and
shape and all have
the wheat (I guess that is what
it is) pattern and three "dots"
on them. They come in various
very interesting colours and I
would really like to know the
origin of them. Anything you
can tell me will be greatly ap-
preciated. -JS., Internet
Dear J.S.: I recognize the
glasses but do not know what


company made them. The folks
at Sparkle Plenty Glass may be
able to help you. The website is
www.spglass.com. Another re-
source to try is Replacements
Ltd. in Greensboro, N.C., at 800-
REPLACE (737-5223).
Dear John: I had the privi-
lege to participate in your radio
program. I asked you about an
S.E. Waller lithograph. I as-
sumed the work was a litho-
graph, as that is the most
commonly reproduced artwork
by S.E. Waller.
Now, I am not sure if it is a
lithograph. Above the work on
the mat, written in delicate
penmanship, is "London, Pub-
lished in the year 1901 by J.P
Mendoza, Limited, St. James'
Gallery, 4th King Street, St.
James's SW copyright." The
painting, entitled "The Hunts-
man's Courtship," is signed
"S.E. Waller 1899." Below the


Special to the Chronicle


What are these lovely dolls worth? A specialist in doll collecting can provide a
See Page E7 more informed appraisal.






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ATTIC
Continued from Page E6

work is written "Painted by S.E.
Waller." I appreciate your help.
D.R., Destin
Dear D.R.: Samuel Edmund Waller,
1850-1903, was a British artist whose
specialty was genre and wildlife
paintings.
His oil-on-canvas paintings have
sold from $2,000 to $25,000. You have a
lithographic print of one of his paint-
ings, as noted on the picture, done in
1901 by the Mendoza Printing Com-
pany Potential dollar value is
catch-as-catch-can.
Dear John: I have a question. My fa-
ther-in-law left us two boxes: One with


old beautiful books and another one
with a collection of old comic books,
very well-preserved. I live in San
Diego and I have no clue where to go
to have them appraised and/or sold. Of
course, I do have Internet access, so
any idea how to deal with this prob-
lem? -I-S., Internet
Dear I.S.: First, you need to make an
inventory of the comic books and the
old beautiful books. To find out what
they would sell for currently, contact
Heritage Auctions at wwwha.com in
Dallas, Texas.
They are one of the biggest boys on
the block for comic book auctions.
Good luck.

John Sikorski has been a profes-
sional in the antiques business for 30


years. He hosts a call-in radio show,
Sikorski's Attic, on WJUF (90.1 FM)
Saturday from noon to 1 p.m. Send
questions to Sikorski's Attic, c/o The
Citrus County Chronicle, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River FL
34429 or asksikorski@aol. com.


PHOTO REQUEST GUIDELINES
* Chronicle photographers will consider requests to take
photos of community events. Call the newsroom at
352-563-5660 for details.


S "Nancy Knows Sugarmill Woods" (
MONA MCV Direct: 352-634-4225
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S NEW HOMES, VILLAS, REMODELS & COMMERCIAL


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2012 E7







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


= Real Estate DIGEST =

RE/MAX
gives kudos
to Barnes
The associates and
staff of RE/MAX Realty
One would like to con-
gratulate Lucy Barnes
for passing the $1 million Lucy
mark in sales volume this Barnes
year. In less than two RE/MAX
months she has qualified Realty One.
for this select club.
Lucy is a veteran Realtor in Citrus County
with more than two decades of experience
in the profession. She is well known for her
waterfront expertise and knowledge of the
area. Lucy can be reached at the Crystal
River office of RE/MAX.
Loger named
Culture Icon
Keller Williams Re-
alty in Lecanto is
pleased to recognize
Dennis Loger as 2011
Culture Icon of the Year.
A Keller Williams Cul- De
Dennis
ture Icon is summed up Loger
as a person who gives, Keller Williams
shares and cares. Dennis Realty.
consistently goes the
extra milein the Keller Williams office, in his
Board of Realtors position, and with his fel-
low agents all on a volunteer basis. His
commitment to excellence with his real es-
tate customers also goes the extra
mile.Simply stated, Dennis gives unselfishly,
shares freely, and cares enormously! We
are very proud to honor Dennis for his devo-
tion and unselfish attitude and are extremely
proud to have him on our team.


Johnson Team
off to fast start
Citrus Ridge Realty
is proud to announce
that Kirk and Amanda
Johnson and buyers'
specialist Tom Balfour
have closed more than
$1.3 million in sales vol-
ume thus far in 2012.
Call them at 352-
746-9000, or by email at
akjohnson@atlantic.net.


Kirk and
Amanda
Johnson
Central Ridge
Realty.


Bring in spring with botanicals


Nature-inspiredprints, patterns take cue from this season's haute couture

KIM COOK
For The Associated Press


If you followed the spring fashion shows,
you noticed floral motifs blooming all over
the place.
Diane Von Furstenberg used feminine
pastels. Peter Som used digital florals in
over-saturated, intense pigments. Timo
Weiland created watery digital prints that
floated down the catwalk.
And inspiration from the runway often
finds its way into our rooms.
So it's no surprise that in home decor
this spring, botanicals are big. You'll find
everything from restrained nature motifs to
saucy florals, executed in painterly hues,
photo prints and pop art graphics.
And while soft goods bedding, pillows
and so on are where some of the best ex-
amples can be found, watch too for uphol-
stered furniture, wallcoverings and
tabletop items featuring botanical prints.
San Francisco interior designer Jennifer
Bishop loves incorporating botanical pat-
terns, and likes all the modern options.
"This isn't like the past where a botanical
garden exploded on your bedspread, drap-
ery and wallpaper," she laughs. "Used as
accents, botanicals can become so
striking."
Bishop often uses a multicolored print as
a launch point for a room's palette. She's a
fan of needlework, mentioning Anthropolo-
gie's line of sewn lampshades.
She also likes the work of Florida artist
Mindy Lighthipe, who makes watercolor,
pencil and pen and ink illustrations of un-

Target's yellow and
white floral pattern
towel and rug set.
Associated Pre::


S .. .
"^ ^ii

-^ r I '


A designer pil-
low showing a
silk-screened
image of a
forest, from
Allem Studio.
associatedd Press


-'4




usual flora, such as exotic plants, insect-
nibbled oak leaves and flowering kale.
Lighthipe sells on Etsycom.
Shrewsbury, Mass., designers Mitali Seth
and Lovisa Shergill showed several inter-
esting botanical print pillows at the recent
New York International Gift Fair, including
an evocative tree graphic.
r "Before going to design school,
~~ Niinyi college major was botany, so
SIl1illre- always creeps into our
~ i:ollet: ti on," says Shergill. The
"Trees.' pillow was inspired
) I\ a scene outside their
SQ studio window. "The
,*--= s. starkness of the
branches against gray
skies looked almost
poetic," Shergill
says.
There's a bolster


in the line with a pretty oak leaf repeat,
and several other pieces with unusual styl-
ized prints.
Fans of contemporary style will also like
the work of Chicago designers Robert Segal
and Alicia Rosauer, who returned from
four years in Finland with a decidedly
Scandinavian aesthetic. For their Unison
label, they've designed the Larch bedding
set, with tree branches draped across du-
vets and pillowcases in either a rich bold
plum or a subtle yet striking ash gray
Pottery Barn offers several feminine op-
tions in a spring bedding collection that's
marked by restful patterns and calming
hues. Cherry blossoms bloom on a set by
British artist Rosamund James. The
Ravenna line is an Art Nouveau-inspired
pattern, Giselle draws from an 18th century

See BOTANICALS/Page E9


JANE
Continued from Page E4

grow in very sandy soil. The
fine mulch can even be used
to topdress a turf-grass lawn


or flowerbed. The fine
mulch particles wash and
trickle down between the
coarse grains of sand when
rained on. Then the humus
holds moisture in the soil
around the root zone of the
plants. Straight fine mulch


not mixed with sand is not
well-drained or aerated and
can pack rock hard. Mix it
with sand to create a good
garden soil where plants
will thrive.
There has been no fine
mulch available at Central


Landfill for several weeks.
A new batch has been
ground and is now available
for hand-loading any time
the facility is open.
Staff will load homeown-
ers' trailers and pick-up
trucks between 9 and 10


a.m. Tuesday to Friday and
from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Saturday


Jane Weberis a profes-
sional gardener and con-
sultant Semi-retired,


she grows thousands of
native plants. Visitors
are welcome to her
Dunnellon, Marion County
garden. For an appoint-
ment call 352-249-6899 or
contact JWeberl2385@
gmail.com.


E8 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2012







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


A close-up of
Anthropologie's
floral
needleworked
lampshade.
Associated Press



SOURCEBOOK
* www.allemstudio.com -
Trees silkscreened pillow,
$90.
* www.garnethill.com -
Catalina collection, $30-
$848; Half Moon Bay quilt,
$198-298.
* www.unisonhome.com -
Larch bedding, $28-$148.
* www.urbanoutfitters.com -
Woodland Garden duvet,
$79.
* www.target.com -
Sun towels and floral rug,
$9.99-$24.99 (April
in-store).
* www.potterybarn.com -
Cherry Blossom, $29-129;
Alessandra, $39-250;
Ravenna, $29-129; Giselle,
$49-219.
* www.pineconehill.com -
Erika bedding, $48 and up.
* www.jenniferbishop
design.com.
* www.etsy.com/shop/
bugsbeastsbotanicals -
Mindy Lighthipe's botanical
artwork starts at around
$30.


TIMBERLANE ESTATES
4/3/2 pool home features over 4,000 sq. ft. of
living, 2 master suites, upgraded master baths,
bonus room, double-sided fireplace, porcelain tile
throughout, plus much more. See it today!
MLS #353612 $349,000
Directions Hwy 486 to Prospect, Rt. on Sunrise, Rt. on
Camevale, Lt. on Antioch
Alan DeMichael 352-613-5752 0ALTJ
S AMERICAN 2
ERA REALTY& INVESTMENTS 352-746-3600


Jackie & Bob Davis
American Realty & Investments
S117 S. Hwy 41 Inverness, FL
N N (352) 634-2371 Cell (800) 476-2590 Toll Free
ER A bob@bjdavis.com
S For a Visual Tour of our listings and all MLS: bidavis.cor
or a


BOTANICALS
Continued from Page E8

English print, and Alessandra was in-
spired by a 250-year-old, hand-blocked
French textile.
If you like your bouquets bold,
Annie Selke's vibrant, imaginative de-
signs for soft goods retailer Pine Cone
Hill include the Erika bedding collec-
tion, which features a broad leafy vine
in hothouse hues of fuchsia or per-
simmon on crisp white.
You can wake up every morning in
a French Impressionist painting with
Urban Outfitters' Woodland Garden
rug, duvet, drapery and shower cur-
tain in a joie de vivre palette of paint-
box colors.
Garnet Hill pulls the essence of laid-
back Cali sunshine into its Catalina
bedding collection, with oversize ice-
pop blue and coral blooms on an aqua
background.
Jason Berke, Target's bath design
manager, says overseas scouting trips


If you followed

the spring fashion

shows, you noticed

floral motifs

blooming all over

the place. And

inspiration from the

runway often finds its

way into our rooms.

inspired the retailer's spring florals,
which feature exaggerated-scale
prints. "The feminine styles and de-
tailing we encountered had a fun play
on scale, and placement," he says.
As Jennifer Bishop points out,
"Every room needs some form of life.
I love to use plants, but if you've got a
brown thumb, a botanic pattern just
might be your answer"


REALTY GROUP


2 Bd/Den/2Bath/2Car/Brentwood Villas
i, .... . .. ... ... f the Brentw ood Gol
i i... I II I ,i i 11. ii', i nii.. Large kitchen w ith
dining and breakfast bar Enjoy the spectacular view from your
screened-in lanai Close to the Brentwood Golf & Pro Shop
M LS#353732 ...................................... $145,000
I .


2Bd/2.5Bath/Den/2Car/Point Vista
Nestled in the heart of Terra Vista you'll find a uniquely private enclave called Pointe Vista
This impressive collection of12 carefree carriage homes are highlighted by striking design and
refined architectural detailing Each with its own charming character and handsomely

MLS 353660 $415,000


Detached Villa/3Bd/2Bath/2Car/Pool/Woodview Villas Detached Villa/2Bd/2Bath/2Car/Hillside Villas
One of a kind pool home in Terra Vista Large private lot with Luxurious Lantana Model This open floor plan has a beautifully mirrored formal
extended patio and lush landscaping This home will please even
the most discriminating buyer Loaded with upgrades
MLS#352030 $289,900 MLS#352909 ...................................... $194,900
Terr Vist & Brnwo Rn
Terms -.....m-.d.


Townhome/2Bd+office space/2.5Bathl/Car/Brentwood Townhomes Townhome/3B
Fully Furnished Immaculate end unit townhome with extensive tile Unfurnished End
flooring, Corlan countertops and nice private lanai Social Club I II.. I1i1 I
Membership included ,,,,
#1169 ....... ............................ $1150 #1158 .........
Terra Vista Realty Group, LLC
2400 North Terra Vista Blvd., Hernando, Florida 34442
(352) 746-6121 (800) 323-7703


d12.5Balhl CarlBrenliood Townhomes
Unit Townhome, Spacious Kitchen w/ Breakfast
I1.1 11 .... .1i .... .11 1 ... Great location
.... .......... ....... ... .... ........ $ 1 0 0 0
Office in the 8
Terra Vista F
Welcome Center 9


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2012 E9








E10 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2012







Real Estate


Classifieds


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


To place an ad, call 563-5966



-- Classifieds


. -- In Print


and


..... Online


0 7. iAll


The Time


FaX: 1352) 5W-5665 lllll~1111` I Toll Frll (888) 852-2340 1 Email: lla'siedsgthronCcleonlinellom I -'site: wwwnchronialeoni


-obile Homes A Mobile Home!] Mobile Home Mobile Home Rea l -stateII..rar -.ents-1 Apartment D


C.R/Homosassa
1& 2 Br. furn, quiet park
Util. incl. clean, shrt/long
term 352 220-2077
**t++******
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1, $425, 2/2 $450,
3/2 $450 All on Acre
Lots (207) 205-0592
FLORAL CITY 2/2
DW, on 1 Acre $500.
Ist, Ist. sec., 344-4414
HERNANDO
2/1 $400 mo+dep
352-201-2428
HOMOSASSA
3/2, cha, $600.m $600
dp.352-503-6747
(352) 628-1928
INVERNESS
RENT SPECIAL: Sec. dep,
pro-rated over 3 mo.
period In the INVERNESS
WATERFRONT 55+ Park
w/5 piers for fishing &
enjoyment, clubhouse,
onsite shuffleboard, and
much more! 1 BR home
$325 plus. 2BR home
$450 Includes H20. 2 BR,
1.5 bath, Park Model
$500. Pets considered.
Section 8 accepted.
(352) 476-4964




ATTENTION
LAND OWNERS
JACOBSEN NEW 2012
5 yr. warranty, 3/2,
2 x 6 construction,
upgrade insulation,
appliance pkg.
Delivered & set up
with A/C & heat,
steps & skirting only
$279.19./mo. W.A.C.
Includes first year
on homeowner Ins.
Call 352-621-9181

Bank foreclosures
USED HOMES/REPO'S
Bank authorized
liquidatorWe Always
have new inventory,
Call 352-621-9183
or come by
Taylor Made Homes
Homes from
$1,000 up!


Beautiful 1 owner,
older Doublewide,
Home in Forestview
Park new appl's, new
roof and AC, Priced to
Sell! (352) 503-2154
Drive A Little
Save Thousands!
Looking for A Mobile
Home? Largest section
of Late Model Repos
and Used Homes
in Central Florida,
Dbl. wide & Triplewides
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(352) 746-5912
INVERNESS
Waterfront 55+ Park
w/5 piers for fishing &
enjoyment, clubhouse,
onslte shuffleboard
and much more!
Single wide 1 & 2 BR,
starting @ $6,900. Lot
rent $274/mo. H20
Included. 3 mo. free
rent with purchase.
352-476-4964
LAND-N-HOME
FLORAL CITY
BIG HOME!
The Entertainer,
over 2000 sq. ft., 4/2,
large family room.
Home in great shape
on quiet paved road
near chain of lakes
ONLY $59, 900. or
$2,250 down &
395/mo. W.A.C.
Call 352-621-3807

Palm Harbor Homes
New 2012 Models
$15K off All Homes
800-622-2832 x 210




HOMOSASSA
2/2 carport nicely furn
on Homosassa River
w/dock no pet f/l/s
sht/long term $850
352-220-2077




3 BR, 2 BA, Completely
Remodeled, inside &
out, on 1 /2 Acres,
off School Ave.
Asking $40,000
(352) 302-7451


2/2 SW Homosassa
on Fecnced /2 acre
$39,900. Cash $45,900 if
financed $5,000 down
(352) 527-3204

BEST OF THE BEST
New 2012 Jacobsen
Custom 28 x 52, 3/2
big eat in kitchen,
2x6 construction, OSB
wrap, 5 yr. warranty,
elongated toilet,
china sinks, storm
door. Large rooms.
Must see before you
buy anything else.
Only $46,900 or
$1,800 down
$298.89/mo W.A.C.
Call 352-621-9181

Crystal River
Rent to Own ? 2/1
DW remodeled, clean
& private, 1/2 ac. trees
price neg.352 795-0898
DUNNELLON
5159 W. Disney Ln
Large lot, new CHA
quite area $32,500
(727) 536-9443
Hernando, Pine Crest
Estates, Doublewide
2BR/2BA, Fla. rm, car-
port, front porch, fully
furn., 2485 Treasure Pt.
Must see. 269-250-0950
HERNANDO, RENT TO
OWN, 2BR, 2BA, single
wide on 1/2 acre mol.
Partially remodelled
$3,000 down, $295 mo
(352) 726-9369
Hernando-Forest Lake
North.2/2 DWvery
niceHA,1.25 acre
$5900 dwn,$500 mo.
Owner Financing
352-637-5143
Homosassa 2 bedroom,
1 bath close to river,
screen porch, appliances,
$39,000 owner financing
available 352-503-7948

HOMOSASSA
3394 Arundel Terr
3/2 lamaniate & tile
floors. All appls. CHA
New Roof, $1500 moves
you in $650/month
Rent to Own
Tony Tubolina Brk
Owner(727) 385-6330


LvulIIIcIUII, rl o U UIUUnIl.
2 bath. Mobile Home w/5
acres Jacobsen Mobile
Home built in 2000, 32ft x
68ft, central air/heat
w/appliances. Master
Bedroom 14x20, Master
Bath w/jetted tub & dou-
ble vanity 10x15, 2 bed-
rooms 14x20, living rm.
14x16, family rm
w/fireplace 15x14, kitchen
w/38 cabinets 16x16,
dining rm. 14x12. Low
taxes 685.00 for current
year. Asking $145,000,
open to offers.
352-682-0266
Inverness
3/2 bath home
Deerwood sub. just
under an acre Has
roof over. No Realtors.
$33,500 352-476-4374
Northwest Citrus
County 2 bedroom. 1.5
bath. Mobile Home on
1 acre, high and dry,
shaded lot, shed, paved
road $44,900 or make
offer. Possible owner fi-
nancing. 352-795-9908

-I-I

EEDGE WATER OAKS
55+ Comm.lake ac-
cess, 2/1.5, 12x56
furn.12 x 30 scr. porch,
shed, new 200 amp.
$11,500(352) 419-6477


2/2 on Lake Rousseau.
Was $27,500 NOW
$19,900 Low Lot Rent
$240/m 2003 Mobile
Home. Used Seasonally
Owner bought a house,
our lost is your gain.
(352) 817-1987
Forest View
2 bedroom. 2 bath. 55+
Park Beautiful 1344 sq ft
many upgrades $19900
352 794 3519
HOMOSASSA'S
Best Housing Value
Modern homes from
$8,400 or Lease to Own
from $139/mo.
$800.down + Lot rent at
Evanrldge Community
an exceptional 55+Park
352 628-5977
INVERNESS
Waterfront 55+ Park
w/5 piers for fishing &
enjoyment, clubhouse,
onslte shuffleboard, and
much more! 1. BA
for $2.000. must be
approved 352-476-4964
Oak Pond/Inverness
Well maint 2/2 extra
long covered carport
Irg shed lanai,& Irg lot.
up graded kit part furn
(352) 344-1632
Stonebrook 55+
2/2. lanai. carport w/2
sheds on pond, metal
roof, all appls, can be
sold furn.cha $15K firm
(352) 503-7677
Stoneridge Landing
55+ Comm. Resales
starting @$13,500
Financing avail
1-800-779-1226
(352) 637-1400
WESTWIND VILLAGE 55+
Park. Updated 2/2 DW's
for sale. Reasonable
(352) 628-2090





LECANTO 55+
* FOR RENT OR SALE *
1/1, Furnished $525.
2/2, Furnished $550.
352-287-9175, 746-1189


835 NE Hwy 19
Crystal River, FI
(352) 795-0021
View our website
C21NatureCoast.com




J.W. MORTON
REAL ESTATE, INC.
1645 W. MAIN ST
INVERNESS, FL
Property Management

3/2/1 Fenced Yard,
Corner Lot ............ $750
2/2/1 Fenced Yard,
New Carpet ........... $625
2/2 Villa, Comm. Pool... $600
2/1 On A Canal.......... $550
2/1/1 Duplex............ $550
*W,7.lrTTTT rTrT.
2/2 .................. $850

2/2/2 Tile Floors........ $725
Jennifer Fudge,
Property Manager
Cheryl Scruggs,
Realtor-Associate
352-726-9010















CHASSAHOWITZKA
3/2 Wtrfront DW, $600.
3/2 Furnished DW., $600
Agent (352) 382-1000


CRYSTAL RIVER
2 BR. $550., 3BR House
$800., 352-563-9857
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025



Alexander Real Estate
(352) 795-6633
Crystal River Apts
2 BR/I BA $375-$500
CRYSTAL RIVER 1/1
Handicap Ramp, Small
Pet OK. (352) 628-2815
DOWNTOWN INV.
2/1, CHA, W/D hk-up
absolutely spotless
$525/m (352) 422-3217.
FLORAL CITY
FREE Use of boat ramp,
fishing dock, canoe &
Jon boat rentals. 1 BR
$4501$200 dp. incis Sat
TV electric, walk to river
Trails End Camp, A
Friendly Place to Live
352-726-3699
HOMOSASSA
1BR, W&D, Appl's., air,
util. incld. $550. mo.+
sec., 352-628-6537
INVERNESS
2/1, Great Neigh. W/D
Hkup.. Storage Rm $500
mo.+ Sec. 352-634-5499
LECANTO
Nice 1 Bedrm $500
352-613-6000. 216-0012
(352) 746-5238
MAYO DRIVE
APARTMENTS
MOVE IN SPECIAL*
(352) 795-2626



Get

Results in

the

homefront

classified!


SEABREEZE
MANOR
Senior Citizens,
Disabled or Handi-
capped. Rent based
on income.
Applications now
accepted for 1 & 2
bedrm units with
carpeting, custom
cabinets, central air
& heat, stove, refrig-
erator & additional
outside storage with
patio.
37 Seabreeze Dr.,
Inglis
Call (352)
447-0277-TDD




SOPPORTUnTY






DOWNTOWN INV.
2/1,CHA W/D hk-up
absolutely spotless
$525/m (352) 422-3217.


INVERNESS 2/1/1
Great area, nosmk/pets
$600/mo. 1st, last & sec
352-341-3562/400-0743




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




INVERNESS 2/1/1
Great area, nosmk/pets
$600/mo. 1st, last & sec
352-341-3562/400-0743
INVERNESS
Country Living on large
'/2-acre lot. 3BR, 2BA
home. Garden area,
fenced area, Well &
septic, so no water blll!
$595. RENT SPECIAL
Security dep. pro-rated
over 3 mo. period.
352-476-4964
Over 3,000 Homes
and Properties
listed at
www.naturecoast
homefront.com


AC ACTION
( RENTAL MANAGEMENT REALTY. INC. )
352-795-RENT
352-795-7368


HOMES MOBILES APARTMENTS
FEATURED PROPERTIES
HOMOSASSA
4119 S. Springsong Ter. 3/2 M/H. New vinyl.
Outside storage. Large yard, partially fenced. 950+ sq. ft.....$600
6747 Oak Park Ln. 2/2/2 Duplex in SMW near Publix.
Sparkling clean, open floor plan. 925 sq. ft. .............................$700
11701 W. Clearwater Ct. 2/2/2 D-wide MH on water in
Riverview Estates. 1,200+ sq. ft. ..................................................$ 9 5 0
7 Bumelia Court (SMW) 3/2/2 House with pool
on golf course, incl. lawn & pool service. 1,695 sq. ft......$1200
INVERNESS
1863 Elderberry Lane 2/2/1 condo. Pretty place
in nice complex/clubhouse/pool/trash incl. 959 sq. ft.............$695
8 S. Lunar Terr. 2/2/2 w/dock. Large lanai overlook cove.
Open floorplan, wood floors, fans, storage. 1,521 sq. ft...........$800









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Furn. Lakefront Home,
2/2/1, new remodeled.
tastefully decorated,
great view, Fl. Rm. 1 yr
lease. $950 mo. + dep
Available April
(352) 228-0177

INVERNESS
5/2, scr/porch$800 f/l
$400 dp352-422-2393


Kristi Bortz
Let our property
management team
help you with your
short or long term
rentals.
See all our rentals in
Citrus Co.
www.plantation
rentals
352-795-0782 or
866-795-0784




Beverly Hills
2/1 carport, firm. $600.
1st & dp no pets/smoke
Remodeled
(352) 465-3987
BEVERLY HILLS
38 S. Jeffery, nice 2/1
fam rm $550.+ 628-0033
CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/2 Family Room
near shopping $850.
(352)897-4447, 697-1384
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/2/1 + Family Room
$650 + dep, 464-2716
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/2/2. $800. mo + sec.
850-371-1568
Gospel Island
2 Homes, 2bd.1.5 ba.
CHA. remodeled, good
water, no smoke/pets
$475/ $575. f/l/s
cell (952) 807-6012
HOMOSASSA
3/1.5,remodeled $700/m
o+ dp 352-220-1815
INVERNESS
2/2/2 Detached home,
Royal Oaks upgrds.
clubhouse, pool, lawn
serv. W/D. $800/mo.
incls. cable /wter. Avail
2/20, 949-633-5633
RENT TO OWN!!
No credit check!
3bdrms 352-566-6049
JADEMISSION.COM

SUBSIDIZED
RENTALS IN
Lecanto/Crys. Riv
3 bedrm-Starting
@ $582/mo.


EOUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY
352-746-0373
TDD: 888-341-2355


Sugarmill Woods
Upscale Ctry Club
Brand New Deluxe
Villa 2/2/2 Fam Rm +
Lanai, most until's paid.
Just $800/mo Owner:
352-382-1132





HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225

Picture Perfect
CHASSAHOWITZKA
Lg. 2/2 on canal/gulf.
Sscrnd patio, cov.
parking/storage, w/
boathouse$650/mo.
(727)459-2871






CITRUS SPRINGS
Lease or Rent to Own
3/3/2/2, Custom Pool
Home on acre $699.
Special. 1st last dep.
bkgrd Ck 352-489-3997




CRYSTAL RIVER
Clean House, cable w/d,
$115/125wkly
$430/450mo. No hidden
cost. 563-6428
CRYSTAL RIVER
Waterfront Priv rm & ba
share kit. $400 evryth-
ing.352-795-9045
Inverness
1 br & ba.home prev
incls pool. $500/mo
(352) 201-6057




C.R/Homosassa
1 & 2 Br. furn, quiet park
Util. incl. clean, shrt/long
term 352 220-2077






UNIQUE &
HISTORIC HOMES,
SMALL TOWN
COUNTRY LIFESTYLE
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989





",A
"LIFE IS BETTER
WITH A PORCH"
www.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.

Inverness Highlands
West Two adjoining lots
for sale- 3566 S. Dean
$8K adjoining lot $7K.
(352) 302-1940


ALL uA4e-r


Floral City, 40 AC Florida
Hilly vacant land, never
lived on, with under-
ground electric,excellent
well water, zoned agricul-
ture, private coded gate,
updated fence, under
brushed with trimmed
trails, concrete cattle gap
for horses or cattle. Cost
$495K (352) 302-1940
trishmilton@gmail.com
ALL/4e -



PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ille-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination. "
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275



E.UAL oUS-N
OPORTU NITY





Specializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches &
Commercial


Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com


WATERFRONT
EQUESTRIAN &
INVESTMENT/
INCOME SALES
*Buyer's
Representative
*Concierge Level
Service


Sherri C. Parker &
Assoc. Realtors,
Direct 352-422-3261
Office 352-527-8090
www.
sherricparker.com





5091 SQ. FT. Buding




FOR LEASE-5091 sq. ft.
Commercial Building
7765 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy. Crystal River,
352-464-2514




For Sale By Owner
3/2/2, Custom Built
in '08 by Wheeler
Construction
Call (407) 739-2646
or 407-442-3597




RENT TO OWN!!
No credit check!
3 bdrms 352-566-6049
JADEMISSION.COM




1 or 2BD,1.5 BA
completely remodeled
2 lots, 2 wells, wkshop
2 sheds .Owner
Financ $469/mo
lake area 727-457-0850
APACHE SHORE
2 bdrm. 1 bath. close to
lake central heat and
air, new well & water
softening system,
corner wooded lot.
Excellent Investment
Opp. Assumable loan,
$30.000, 352-322-0454




3BR, 3BA, Pool home,
2,000 sq.ft. $163,000
OR BEST OFFER
518 Poinsettia
352-860-0878.

3/2/2, I.G. &C.C.
3k sf. new kit. Ig closets,
CHA, firepl. on golf
course $139K make of-
fer, norealtors 726-0652


H
HIGHLANDS
Lrg.2/2- 4 car garage
pool, game room,
mud room, on triple lot
fenced. price to sell
$65,500 (352) 564-4598
INVERNESS
Waterfront 55+ Park
w/5 piers for fishing &
enjoyment, clubhouse,
onsite shuffleboard
and much more!
Single wide 1 & 2 BR,
starting @ $6,900. Lot
rent $274/mo. H20
included. 3 mo. free
rent with purchase.
352-476-4964

Lakefront Gospel
Island Location
Spacious 3/2/2
for rent $700/m or for
sale..... 908-322-6529

Large 1 Fam.
Carol Terrace,
Inverness. 4BR 3BA,
2700 sq ft under air,
2.8 acres fully fenced,
important updates
done. $220,000.
Owner 352-419-7017

Recently Foreclosed
*Special Financing*
Available, Any
Credit, Any Income .
2BD, IBTH, located
at, 7901 Stump Lane,









HOMOSASSA
3/2/2 $88,000
(352) 400-0230


IS=1


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work For You!

BETTY HUNT,
REALTOR
ERA KEY 1 Realty Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.

Condo for Sale
2/2, 1,850 sq. ft.,
35 Beech Street
(352) 503-3294


Lease Option
3/2/3 pool, move in
cond.can be seen on
Fri Sat & Sunday's call
for appt $150K
(352) 634-5415
727-330-6779


Best Time To Buy!
I have lease options,
owner financing &
foreclosures
call Phyllis Strickland
(352) 613-3503
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
=i


DEB INFANTINE

3 HOMES SOLD
In December
I Need Listings!

Real Estate!...
it's what I do.

ERA American
Realty
Phone:(352) 726-5855
Cell:(352) 302-8046
Fax:(352) 726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com


Michele Rose Realtor
Simply put I 'II work
harder 352-212-5097
isellcitruscountvyC)
yahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515





MANHATTAN
CLUB
Most in Demand
Time Share in NYC.
Premier location.
Full Amenities. Split
Wk Silver Pkg. Sleeps
4, World Wide R.C.I.
Program. Week
banked, to be used
in 2012. Private
individuals only.
$18K Contact
Stephenaitken@
optonline.net or call:
631-567-5928





CRYSTAL RIVER/OZELLO
$299K, 2+/2/2
Open floor plan,
Hardwood floors,
www.waterfrontozello.co
m or 352-563-5527


Village on water, 3/2+ Hunting recreational
bathriver roomlanai-ft in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
and backdock, many Area, well, pond,
upgrades, beautiful ATV trails $165K obo
home. $260,000. Go to 352 795-2027/ 634-4745
forsalebvowner.com
Busting 23023708 or
call 352-628-9647
Realtors 2.5%


Salt waterfront stilt
home on Ozello Key
Owner finance,3%
down payment, pri-
vate boat ramp and
dock, 1000 square foot
living upstairs, 1000
square foot screen
downstairs workshop
$174,900 Call Craig or
Debra at 352-422-1011
or 352-634-3872

See all the listings
in Citrus County @
lisavandeboe
@yahoo.com
Plantationrealtv
listings. com


Office Open
7 Days a Week

Lisa VanDeboe
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129


LAND 1.5 Acres fenced
partially cleared, on 480
in Homosassa across
from firehouse.
MUST SEE!!!
352-382-0535




CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pond,
ATVtrails $165K obo
352 795-2027/ 634-4745




Homosassa
1.6 Acres on Hwy 19
Wet Lands, next to
Bowling Alley, $15,000
Owner Finance
352-621-1664


8525 LAKE
BREEZE LANE,
INVERNESS, FL,
34450
Build your dream home
on this GOLF COURSE
lot (100X125) located in
Inverness Golf and Coun-
try Club. Have fun boat-
ing, fishing and jet skiing
on the nearby Tsala
Apopka Chain of Lakes.
Enjoy nature, wildlife and
the natural beauty of Fort
Cooper State Park. Ask-
ing 20,000.00
Call Kelly at
860-459-2411

INVERNESS
For Sale 12 lots (20 X
120 each) $8,000. Zoned
residential.At 3109 E
Millside Ln, Inverness.
Sold together or sepa-
rately. Contact: Shayn
Robinson 832 549 0286
or
ShaynRobinson@hot-
mail.com

SUGARMILL
WOODS
Fringetree St,
100 W x 120 deep.
Ready to build $9,999.
(352) 503-6980


Home e Finder

www.chroniclehomofinder.com


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Search Hundreds of Local Listings
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In The Homefront


Classifieds!


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2012 Ell









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


HERNANDO
51..';: .ihl llll...1 1 II . 1.11 llll. ,.l.1 ... II .... l\
o,,, lll s I'n" h ,,.l l,,,, h .,,. ,l,l.l [, .,l l,,ih,, ,ilr:,
,,i~l lllj lull I cl ;; I l ~lihl il l rlu \Ii ii ll ill iii
I .ill In,.: Ill .j,\ ll I. ,,,, I . 1 n

MtI_ i,_: .' .l, s ,l,,, i,:5 ..$40,900
Deb Thompson 352 634 2656


RELRVING NC O Tl



Emal:ufcourul A A
PRCPETUS OMNER OGE
FOR 3 2 s7oaPN
37 SUNDAY


OWNER WANTS AN OFFER
lIi'llj IIIIII II i6il i I6 11: 11' 1 l,:,il h


ili $35,000
Call Maitha Snydei 352 4768727
ask foi hle =349225


SUGARMILL WOODS
*..p "' A P 00.1 .i *9 1_ l -ar I ,, ,
* _1 -,1 1 I i i-,i q I. I Iii. .1
* 1;:llllllll 11 I'I~ I .a1-Ill,; a

MI i = 'c.0:0:01:7 $169,000
Jeanne 352212.3410
Itti''. CilusCountlySold. comn


S I VVITH Fl jF.ii-A F.00IM Fi i ii:. l.i .:.
. l...,l,& 1-, n, -16 Il .; lh; ilh;i I,),) i
l. jlI N ci.: 1-,,v.il .i:, .11$ wIjI ,l;l 3 5 ; 1w .l
N:.il I .: 1,1 l 1. l i: Nil HIA P il F.V .,il
i.il.l i i VIm; 1 .ii I Ihp1 ill p .il 'll e :J..i il
M1i_ = .1: :`x $69,800
Pat Davis 13522122 7280
Vie sting: m. Istl. c21paldaviis.com


S i 111 .I I, |11 111 ,,,, .1 .111 hMl. l l 1 1 IVl, I

.11i ".1 hf l I l I ..i ..l.l p .l ... 11 -..... i n .i .

. .v ill:, ,.lpl 1- .IvI ,11 6:I,:,,:,,, I
MIiI i-: Ai $30,900 MI = i:_,.::
Call Dolis Mine ,'352 422-4627


BANK OWNED!
, _ ,i ,i. 16i1 I11:11:1 i if i iiiiij

a.ip,. .1 iI VV.i. l -i
hPI.I:,ll. i: 1 $85,000 Mi .i: ,l. i'
Call Ouade Feesei 352 302 7699










CHEAP WATERFRONT BEST PRICE
:~; 1 I i I I ..ii I i. ill .la : .. ii i Ii,.-

W ill.lI .::. hn 1 h 6 i :il hl l ,i li,:
d i ml 0 -11 ,lo Il 0, ,i lh:l 1 ,iil h) lh;:

$69,900
Call Ruth fiedeick 1352 563 6866








CHURCH FOR SALE
Uld.l- f i.; f %l;: ;:. d ;:(; :ii
I1-,;' i l ,ll ,lln :V l : i ai6i, 1.1.. il



l,:,i;:,, H;:in,,..,Jin .,,,d I.:. il. $239,500
Call Maltha Snydei
ask lot hle =349332.


GOSPEL ISLAND HOME ON 2 LOTS
* )B `BA L. flU i...I f.

* 1 1: ,l l i; ,i:. A ll 1-,, i,,
* I: I I:, l 11 lll A i,:,i ,

Mi ~ i= .~i') ONLY $139,900
Call Chatles Kellr 352 4222387


MAKE US
AN OFFER!!
lin l Ihn o-, 1, 1 H. l,,fll Ihno h,, i l li: licili:,l 11,
lh il l,:i H nll ml 1 hi, li l$ I :ii,,i:li:

II lc ,:, ,llll l ll p l_. jn, ; I pm l. ,lln

I.il1'. $69,900
Call Maqy Paisons 352 634 1273


SPARKLE PLENTY!
FI ll hiil 16 i : j I l|i. l 11I I i ,J i 1-,:, ;



.^l lhl ll ;: l i ~. II. I.ll I l ll ,10 .j ll I661 :I 1 66
II l I ,:i 1,llu lll. j p, h.. I i ,

Mi1 =.' I. 1' $94.900
Ask foI Maril'n Booth 637 4904


MOBILE HOME PARK!


l 61 i l, ll l .::,Ii ll i v L .ll l :lll I I p j nl 1j

j, nil: ii I ) _i H I l.j. 1. ihn.] f,,,i

l..ii i i..I 1-. ,1 $900.000
Call Dois Mine ,'352 422 4627


SINGING FOREST
* I-.ii. l. i ,ii .. *I: L ,il .III i

$18,000
Call Willaid Pickiel
7266668 oi 201.9871


--~ -

INVERNESS GOLF & CC AREA

* _1" 1,h,), ;,,, Il, l 1-,,,1 I,, ,, ;


Mi 3 = 1. "1i ONLY $94.500
Call Chadles Kelly 352 4222387


CUSTOM BUILT


i.a iii .ai i:c iai-,il. .i :' i i1i II.6 ,Iv


Mi_= :-3i.:, ail i,, $168.900
Pat Daiis. 1352212. 7280
Viewt hstling: w tr'. c21paldaris. com


GOLFER'S DREAM



hIi d.illl I l III, 1 :i: l i :i:11 -n .ll:. il I:. il l :
1.. pll .ii i .ii .i.J i i i .a l .. I

MI n = :.:.I ,. ,i i il $159,000
Nancy Jenks 352 400 8072


HERNANDO
. I .. h i:. | I l. Ti . ....:.1..l I I.-. .i..I..|. li ...]
..:" .. .. r = "*".-- ".
: j, ...~ h ... . a .. I$34.500
Deu fi mp..n 352 634 2656


plIIIIIII llrl l lh l |l||llJ hl ii 1 ,| .lll ;illa l.ll, l:
,,llu, ; h, ,,I lh, I,,,,,,: ,h ,,,u11 ,ll ,i,, ll.j ,l
l.:lllll : .:lllill.:llll1: Ii, III I. I I II l hlll lll l .l|..|. i i.|
jpp1.. n .cliji n1 111ji .lllllvl: I. 11 1 .1


Mi. :.i. OFFERED AT $105,000
Ci, T"i R Bu,.i o 352 42 9252


VALUE ADDED
* II:: ii 1,,l l ,I, .l I IVV
*I I A ,i Lu .i:,


Mi = i.i'1ii: $78,750
Jeanne or Willaid Pickiel 352212.3410
it'I t't. CIlusCountrSold. comn


FLORAL CITY
l 1111II I,1 iiln a i. FB
IJl illl ll .l l 1111Z :1 I. l.I r lll: Iri 1 1 I:

I 4.1.:1 .-1 II M .il. 0111,I MI = III:Ii
David Kui I/ Cel1954 383 8786
Olhce 352 72666686


BANK OWNED!
H lI. ,aI,, Fl ii II .i,:i i i _,, I. lIii ,.ai,,
Il.ai Ml :. 1i 1I
l: I..., i-cll $34.500
Call Ouade Feesei 352 302 7699


E12 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2012


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