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Citrus County chronicle
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Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02675
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 02-05-2012
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:02675

Full Text



Super Bowl XLVI: Patriots, Giants set for g game /B1


CITRUS


COUNTY


TODAY & Monday morning
HIGH Mostly cloudy with a l l
s78 20 percent chance of H
LOW showers.
58 PAGE A42012 Florida's Best Communit
FEBRUARY 5, 2012 Florida's Best Communit)


ONICLt'
-L www.chronicleonline.com
l Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community $1 VOI


Citizen of the Year: Jewel Lamb


NATIONAL NEWS:


Port Citrus



had three



sisters


Racial terms
Some blacks insist, "I'm
not African-American."
/Page A12
BUSINESS:








Analysis
How the economy is
viewed can differ
sharply during political
campaigns./Page Dl
COMMENTARY:


Great job
Citrus County schools
maintain a high level of
excellence./Page Cl
LOCAL NEWS:


Furry friends
Citrus County Animal
Services put on the first
Best Friend Fest on
Saturday./Page A3
ENTERTAINMENT:


Actor dies
Actor Ben Gazzara
died late Friday in
Manhattan./Page B6
HOMEFRONT:


There are hundreds of
distinct Camellia
species./Page E9

Annie's Mailbox ......A14
Classifieds ............ D5
Crossword ...........A14
Editorial ............ C2
Entertainment ..........B6
Horoscope ................B6
Lottery Numbers ......B4
Lottery Payouts ........ B6
Movies ....................A10
Obituaries .... ........... A6


6 I IILL5 207!I o


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Jewel and Steve Lamb pose Wednesday for a photo at their home in Crystal River. In
recognition of her humanitarian efforts and the zeal she has for helping those in need in
Citrus County, Jewel Lamb has been named the Chronicle's Citizen of the Year for 2011.



Local woman is




county gem


SHEMIR WILES
Staff Writer
CRYSTAL RIVER A homegrown
champion for charitable organizations
throughout the county, Jewel Lamb never
thinks twice about working hard for the


betterment of her community.
"She helps people all the time and with-
out recognition," said Chronicle publisher
Gerry Mulligan.
However, in appreciation for her
See .Page A7


CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff Writer
The St. Johns River, the
longest river in Florida at
310 miles, never got con-
nected to the Gulf of
Mexico.
Had the Cross Florida
Barge Canal project been
completed rather than
abandoned in 1971, St.
Johns River traffic possibly
would be floating out
through Inglis today
Still, Port Putnam in
Palatka, created at the same
time as Port Citrus in 1967,
developed as a barge port in
1970 and never looked back.
The river flows north to
Jacksonville.
"Economic and feasibility
studies were conducted by
engineers and a committee
of citizens and they recom-
mended in 1966 that the
Putnam County Board of
Commissioners proceed
with action to establish and
construct the barge port,"
said Ray Bunton, Putnam
County Industrial Coordi-
nator, quoted in the Nov 6,
1970, edition of the Daytona
Beach Sunday News-
Journal.
In its early days, Palatka's
economy was based on the
river's steamboat traffic.
Today, the river moves
goods on barges because


the city has a large manu-
facturing sector, about three
times the state average.
Palatka's largest em-
ployer, Georgia Pacific, pro-
duces pulp, paper and
plywood. It employs more
than 1,200 full-time staff
with an annual payroll of
more than $88 million. The
company spends about $13
million a year in Putnam
County and pays taxes and
charitable donations of $3
million to $4 million.
However, Putn3m .
County had a De- -,
cember 2011 -
unemploy-
ment rate
of 11.6 .,
percent, P
com -
pared to "
Citrus 1C ~
County's'.
10.9 percent
But counties
with seaports
had lower unem-
ployment rates
than Citrus.
Current users of
the barge port in-
clude: Apex Metal Fab-
rication, AT&T, Beck Auto
Group, Caraustar Industrial
& Consumer, DSI Forms
Inc., First Coast Technical
College, Florida Rock
See Page A5


Editor's note: The
Chronicle is examining
the Port Citrus project
each Sunday in Febru-
ary. The first segment
deals with plans for a
"Port Citrus" from the
1960s.
CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff Writer
It may seem new but it's
not.
The year was 1965, and
work had begun to con-
nect the Atlantic Ocean
on the east coast of the
state to the Gulf of Mexico
on the west coast via a
barge canal.
The visions of the cre-
ators of the project were
to make it easier for goods
and commodities to tra-
verse the state without
the long journey around
the tip of Florida.
And Citrus County was
slated as the exit point on
the planning board, open-
ing up an economic gold
mine, one proponents of
the project say is stronger
than ever today
A feasibility study was
completed and work was
started; however, only a
third of the barge canal
was finished before the

TODAY
Original port plans
along the Cross Florida
Barge Canal
Port Putnam was cre-
ated in 1967 and still
operates today
The 1969 Port Citrus
feasibility study
SUNDAY, FEB. 12
Port Citrus so far:
"Trans-sea lifters" to
Port Authority
Public perception of
the port project
Role of surrounding
counties
Panama Canal expan-


project was tabled.
Citrus County's first
port authority was cre-
ated when construction
began on the Cross
Florida Barge Canal.
The history of Port Cit-
rus recently came to light
when Lecanto resident
Jeff Nigels discovered a
1969 feasibility study in
family books and Crystal
River resident Bill Lyons
provided another booklet.
Lyons was a member of
the original port author-
ity That information is
the source of this story
The current port au-
thority was created in
July 2011, after state leg-
islation admitted Citrus
to the list of Florida sea-
ports as the 15th member.
But Port Citrus has had
previous incarnations,
one in 1967 and another
in 1984.
The first Citrus County
Port Authority was cre-
ated under a 1967
Florida Law along with
three others in Levy,
Marion and Putnam
counties. Lawmakers at
the time considered the
ports necessary to serv-
ice the soon-to-be-
See Page A5


sion impact on shipping
SUNDAY, FEB. 19
* Other seaports in
Florida
* How Citrus fits into the
ports picture
* Impact of one port in
its community
SUNDAY, FEB. 26
* Logistics of Port Citrus
site: road, rail, water
* Fit with "Hollinswood
Harbor"?
* Reaction from officials,
residents
* What's next for Port
Citrus?


Challenge lingers 40 years later
CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff Writer


Citrus County was a dif-
ferent place when the first
port feasibility study was
issued in 1969.
For one thing, the popu-
lation was only 17,000.
But if the first study
brought forth a plan that
had been followed, what
would Citrus County look
like today? The question
about products to ship out
might have been solved.
Inbound shipping in
1969 did not
represent as
much of a
e hal-
--" nlenge
oa s
7out-


_, l II) ,:, II dIts
S slhi)pients,
accorditl'l the
hI istori,: study:
"Supplement Cargo
Analysis Cost Estimate"
for Citrus County Port
Authority.
'"At present, there are no
industries in Citrus
County producing prod-
ucts in sufficient quantity


Special to the Chronicle
This image shows construction of a Citrus County canal
in the 1960s.


to warrant shipment by
barge," the report stated.
"Therefore, commodities
must originate outside of
Citrus County."
Palatka, site of Port Put-
nam, was trucking rolls of
paper to a loading site on
the west end of the Cross
Florida Barge Canal for
outbound shipment. The
trucking would stop when
the barge canal finished,
connecting the two ports.
Otherwise, "there ap-
pears to be little outbound
commerce that can be ex-
pected to pass through
Port Citrus until such time
as industries are estab-
lished. There is a need for
a back haul load that
would result in competi-
tive tariffs."
These industries were
suggested in 1969 to fill
that load:
Marina and motel at


the canal.
Cement manufactur-
ing.
Fertilizers.
Furniture.
Wood chip plant.
Brewery
Grain and flour
products.
Also, an operational
Port Citrus could become
the site of distributorships
for automobile and ma-
chinery parts, farm ma-
chinery, road building
machinery, lumber, steel
reinforcing and steel re-
structural shapes that
could be delivered by
barge.
County commissioners,
who also sit as members of
the Citrus County Port Au-
thority, were asked what
the county could look like
today if the 1969 plan had


Page A4


I -'% LJ IN1l -A


Barges work for


Putnam County


I


I IN1S-11BID E I


182




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


= PAID ADVERTISEMENT


International Coin Collectors are in Town


to Purchase All Types of Coins

By KEN MCINTOSH
STAFF WRITER


ICCA will be placing ads in newspapers,
radio and running television spots this week
asking people to bring in any old silver and
gold coins made before 1970. Those that do
bring in their coins will be able to speak with
collectors one on one and have their coins
looked at by a specialist. With the help of
these ICCA members, offers will be made to
those that have coins made before 1970.
Offers will be made based on silver or gold
content and the rarity of the coins. All coins
made before 1970 will be examined and
purchased including gold coins, silver coins,
silver dollars, all types of nickels and pennies.
Those that decide to sell their coins will be
paid on the spot.
If you are like a lot of people, you might
have a few old coins or even a coffee can full
lying around. If you have ever wondered what
they are worth, now might be your chance
to find out and even sell them if you choose.
They could be worth a lot according to the
International Coin Collectors Association,
also known as ICCA. Collectors will pay a
fortune for some coins and currency for their
collections. If they are rare enough, one coin
could be worth over $100,000 according to
Eric Helms coin collector and ICCA member.
One ultra rare dime, an 1894S Barber, sold
for a record $1.9 million to a collector in July
of 2007. While that is an extreme example,
many rare and valuable coins are stashed
away in dresser drawers or lock boxes around
the country. The ICCA and its collector members
have organized a traveling event in search of
all types of coins and currency. "Even common
coins can be worth a significant amount due
to the high price of silver and gold," says
Helms. Washington quarters and Roosevelt
dimes and worth many times their face value.
Recent silver markets have driven the price up
on even common coins made of silver. Helms
explains, "All half dollars, quarter and dimes
made before 1970 contain 90% silver and are
sought after any time silver prices rise. Right
now it's a sellers market."




COINS
Any and all coins made before 1970, rare
coins, entire collections, Silver Dollars,
Half Dollars, Quarters, Dimes, Half Dimes,
Nickels, Three Cent Pieces, Two Cent
Pieces, Cents, Large Cents, Half Cents and
all others.
PAPER MONEY
All denominations made before 1934.
GOLD COINS
Including $20, $10, $5, $4, $3, $2.5, $1,
Private Gold, Gold Bars, etc.
INVESTMENT GOLD
Kruggerands, Canadian Maple Leafs,
Pandas, Gold Bars, U.S. Eagles and
Buffalos, etc.
SCRAP GOLD
Broken and unused jewelry, dental gold.
JEWELRY
Diamond rings, bracelets, earrings, loose
diamonds, all gem stones, etc.
PLATINUM
Anything made of platinum.
SILVER
Flatware, tea sets, goblets, jewelry, etc. and
anything marked sterling.
WAR ITEMS
Civil war, WWI AND II, all others, swords,
daggers, bayonets, etc.
OTHER ANTIQUES
Toys, trains, dolls, advertising, banks
(basically anything old we want to see).


The rarest coins these collectors are looking
for include $20, $10, $5 and $2 1/2 gold
coins and any coin made before 1850. These
coins always bring big premiums according to
the ICCA. Silver dollars are also very sought
after nowadays.
Other types of items the ICCA will be
purchasing during this event include U.S.
currency, gold bullion, investment gold, silver
bars, silver rounds, proof sets, etc. Even
foreign coins are sought after and will be
purchased.
Also, at this event anyone can sell their
gold jewelry, dental gold or anything made
of gold on the spot. Bring anything you think
might be gold and the collectors will examine,
test and price it for free. If you decide to sell
you will be paid on the spot it has been an
unknown fact that coin dealers have always
paid more for jewelry and scrap gold than
other jewelers and pawn brokers.
So, whether you have one coin you think
might be valuable or a large collection you
recently inherited, you can talk to these
collectors for free and if your lucky you may
have a rarity worth thousands. Either way,
there is nothing to lose and it sounds like fun!






ADM 1:idISSIONV
CONTINUES IN:[' CRYSTA .'LJ RI -VER
I EVER'Y -:bD AYl-lh 'JT


W~Ell7_D llElDlAY ,- SU-ND -Y
FEBRUARY1 8TH I~- l 12-H
WED ] -SAT 9AMi -, Id t 6,P.
SUNDAY .. 9AM-4] P]. hil h


For more information on this event
visit the ICCA website at www.
internationalcoincollectors.com.


* Gather items of interest from your attic,
safe deposit box, garage, basement,
etc. There is no limit to the amount of
items you can bring
* No appointment necessary
* If interested in selling, we will consult
our collector's database to see if a
buyer exists. 90% of all items have
offers in our database
* The offer is made on the spot on
behalf of our collectors making the
offer
* If you decide to accept the offer, we
will pay you on the spot!
* You get 100% of the offer
with no hidden fees



We Buy
SGold
I 0k, 14k, 18
& 24k


Receni Finds:


, ,4N
'*4


PAID $1,800







PAID $2,800








PAID $250


MILLIONS.


4 1000 NATION
EVENTS!


N


i-


PAID $8,500







PAID $14,000


A2 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2012


)ADHA







Page A3 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY5,2012



TATE&


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Around Feds to rethink farm children rules
THE STATE


Lakeland
Eight arrested in vice
op in Polk County
Polk County authorities say
eight men have been ar-
rested in an undercover vice
operation.
A sheriff's office report said
the investigation took place
Friday at the Saddle Creek
Park between Lakeland and
Winter Haven after receiving
complaints of lewd activity
taking place there.
During the operation, male
undercover detectives made
contact with men in the park.
Six men asked the detectives
to perform sex acts with
them. The report said two
other men were arrested for
trespassing because they
had been arrested before
there for lewd acts and were
not allowed to be at the park.

Orlando
More arrests made
in acid bomb plot
Police have made more ar-
rests following an investiga-
tion into acid bombs left at an
Orlando college.
Seven boys have been ar-
rested in the case. The Or-
lando Sentinel reported two
16-year-olds were arrested
Friday on charges of detonat-
ing a destructive device on the
campus of Valencia College.
Arrested earlier this week
were two 9-year-olds and
three other teens.
Acid bombs have been
found on the college campus
three times over the past few
weeks. According to a police
report, the acid bomb did
about $300 worth of damage.
No one was hurt.
Police said the bombs are
typically made with house-
hold chemicals.

Punta Gorda
Inmates pick 6,400
pounds of oranges
Inmates in one southwest
Florida county picked 6,400
pounds of free oranges for
their jail and local homeless
shelters.
The Charlotte County
Sheriff's Office said Friday
that jail inmates were allowed
to pick oranges for free for
two days from the Peace
River Plantation in Punta
Gorda. Grove owners Walde-
mar and Henny Bokrand ex-
tended the offer.
The 6,400 pounds will help
feed other inmates in the jail
and some will be donated to
the local homeless coalition.
Last year, inmates picked
10,000 pounds of oranges.
-From wire reports


CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff Writer
Farmers who want their children
to help with chores may get cut
some slack from the government.
The U.S. Department of Labor's
Wage and Hour Division announced
Friday it would re-propose the por-
tion of its regulation on child labor
in agriculture interpreting the
"parental exemption."
The decision to re-propose is in
part a response to requests from the
public and members of Congress


SHEMIR WILES
Staff Writer
INVERNESS
The Citrus County Auditorium had
gone to the dogs (and cats) Saturday
morning during the first Citrus
County Animal Services Best
Friend Fest.
A number of pet owners and animal
lovers alike turned up for the "animal adop-
tion extravaganza," sponsored by the Citrus
County Chronicle and the Humanitarians of
Florida.
The purpose of the event was to not only ed-
ucate the public about how to care for their
furry friends, but also promote the adoption
of deserving pets that need loving homes.
Spending a bit of time petting a couple of


that the agency allow time for more
input on this aspect of the rule.
The subject came up at a meeting
in November of the Agricultural Al-
liance of Citrus County.
The department had proposed to
change rules that would drastically
alter the way youths younger than
16 could work in agriculture, said
alliance member Donna Miller of
D. & J. Blueberry Farms in
Inverness.
Such youngsters no longer would
be allowed to ride hay wagons, ac-
cording to a document published


Sept. 2 in the Federal Register, or
take part in many other crop and
livestock activities.
Most of all, the proposed rule
change could prohibit many 4-H
and FFA activities.
Alliance members said the rule
change would greatly affect family
farm operations and teaching agri-
culture to the next generation.
"How can they learn if they can't
get out there and do it?" asked Dale
McClellan, alliance president.
Alliance members asked for the
comment period to be extended.


rambunctious kittens, Kim Prouty said she
had already adopted two cats Charlotte
and Jack to take home. Prouty recently
lost her cat to old age, and she was looking
for new pals.
"I am so thrilled," the Citrus Hills resi-
dent said. "I have a cat condo just waiting
for them."
Prouty said she was originally going to go
to another location to adopt a cat when her
mother told her about the Best Friend Fest
She called the event "fantastic."
"They should have these every six
months," she said.
Susan Schrader and Ann Sanders spent
the day promoting Therapy Dogs Interna-
tional, an organization dedicated to regulat-
ing, testing and registration of therapy dogs
and their handlers.


And that has happened.
Not only would a parental ex-
emption be recognized, allowing
children to perform any job on a
farm owned or operated by their
parent, the department announced
it would continue to consider feed-
back from the public, Congress and
the Department of Agriculture on
portions of the rule outside of the
parental exemption before it is
finalized.
Chronicle reporter Chris Van
Ormer can be reached at
cvanormer@chronicleonline.com.


'4
a



-U


Sanders' dog, Levi, proved popular with
the crowd as he greeted everyone who came
by to say hello.
Schrader, who brought her therapy dog,
Libby, out for a day of fun and education,
said the event was "booming," and she was
hoping the event would prompt more peo-
ple to consider therapy dog training.
Diane Dunn with Countryside Animal
Clinic in Beverly Hills was also amazed
at the number of people inside the
auditorium.
"This is just wonderful," she said, looking
around the room. "Hopefully, we're helping
get pets adopted."
Chronicle reporter Shemir Wiles can be
reached at 352-564-2924 or swiles@
chronicleonline. com.


Campaign TRAIL

Ron Kitchen, Republi-
can for county commission
District 1, will meet the public
Sunday, Feb. 5, at Howard's
Flea Market, booth 97.
Joe Meek, Republican
incumbent for Citrus County
Commission District 3;
Sandy Balfour, Republican
for superintendent of schools;
Geoff Greene, Republican
incumbent for property ap-
praiser; and Angela Vick,
Republican for clerk of court
will speak at the 9 a.m.
Feb. 11 meeting of the Na-
ture Coast Republican Club
and Citrus Republican
Women's Club at American
Legion Post 155 on State
Road 44 in Crystal River. In-
formation: Fred or Rosella
Hale, 352-746-2545.
Sandra "Sam" Himmel,
Democrat for Citrus County
superintendent of schools,
will have a fundraiser from 4
to 6 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 25,
at the Citrus County Builders
Association, 1196 S. Lecanto
Highway, Lecanto. Informa-
tion: Debbie, 352-726-3181.
The Campaign Trail is a
listing of political happenings
for the 2012 election season.
Send events or campaign
fundraisers to Mike Wright at
mwright@chronicleonline.
com.
-From staff reports


Junior Achievement Pirate Bowl


SHEMIR WILES/Chronicle
Julie Conley and her 14-month-old son, Liam Conley, visit with Gail Grimm during the Junior
Achievement Pirate Bowl on Saturday at Manatee Lanes. Conley was there to support her
brother-in-law, Stephen Conley, who is a detective with the Citrus County Sheriff's Office.
The money raised from the event goes toward local Junior Achievement, which teaches
kindergarteners through 12th-graders about business and economics.


200 passengers
struck by norovirus
MIAMI More than 200
passengers on two cruise
ships headed to South Florida
have been stricken with a gas-
trointestinal illness.
Officials with Princess Cruise
Lines said two of its ships were
struck with a norovirus that can
cause vomiting, diarrhea and
stomach pain.
The Crown Princess re-
turned from a seven-day
cruise Saturday and was
docked at Port Everglades. A
total of 140 passengers and
18 crew members were af-
fected by the illness.
The Ruby Princess will dock
Sunday morning. Cruise offi-
cials said another 81 passen-
gers and nine crew members
were affected on that ship.
Passengers set to embark
this weekend have been noti-
fied that their departure will be
delayed a few hours at least
as the ships undergo further
disinfection in Port Everglades.
4 sent to prison in
pill mill crackdown
WEST PALM BEACH -
Four more people have been
sent to federal prison as part


of a crackdown in Florida on
pill mills that illegally distribute
powerful prescription
painkillers like oxycodone.
The sentences were part of
Operation Oxy Alley that tar-
geted pain clinics in Broward
and Palm Beach counties.
Prosecutors say the clinics il-
legally distributed 20 million
oxycodone pills and made
some $40 million between
2008 and 2010. In all, 28 of 32
people charged in the case
have pleaded guilty.
New government figures
show Florida's pill mill problem
may be easing.
3 Fantasy 5 players
win top prize
TALLAHASSEE Three
winners of the "Fantasy 5"
game will collect $83,412.21,
the Florida Lottery said Satur-
day. The winning ticket was
bought in Miami, Orlando and
Davenport, lottery officials
said.
The 318 tickets matching
four numbers won $126.50
each. Another 10,427 tickets
matching three numbers won
$10.50 each. The numbers
drawn Friday night were 3-16-
18-28-35.
-From wire reports


SHEMIR WILES/Chronicle
Julie Ross takes time to show a little love to Rocky and Stella, two dogs that were up for adoption through Citrus County Animal Services dur-
ing the first Citrus County Animal Services Best Friend Fest on Saturday.


Forging furry friendships


State BRIEFS


*


%ft&ftw
fnio






A4 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2012


CHALLENGE
Continued from PageAl


been followed to some ex-
tent in spite of the barge
canal project being
dropped.
"The list (of industries),
of course, is dated," Dennis
Damato said.
Port Citrus today could
be looking at shipping out
wood pellets from Levy
County and scrap metal,
Damato said.
For inbound, Port Citrus
could receive bulk petro-
leum from Port Tampa.
"Two tankers a day come
up by road and go back
empty," Damato said.
Had Port Citrus already
been up and running, "It
would have changed the
county a lot," Damato said.
"There would have been
greater impetus for the
Suncoast Parkway because
we would have had a hub
on the north side, and truck
traffic would bypass Crys-
tal River"
It would be difficult to
say how having a port
would change the county as
we know it today, Rebecca
Bays said.
"We have the opportunity
today to take the tax dollars
spent then, go forward and
still be good stewards of
our environment," Bays
said.
The most noticeable as-
pect would be a more di-
verse economy.
John "JJ" Kenney also
said the product list had
changed during the past 40
years, although he liked
the brewery idea.
"There are a number of
products that could be
manufactured," Kenney
said. "The possibilities are
unlimited."
If the port already ex-
isted, Kenney said, more


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


jobs would be brought to
the county in trucking, se-
curity, food service and
transportation scheduling,
just to name a few.
"Go to the established
ports right now and look at
the jobs they bring," Ken-
ney said.
With more people being
drawn to the county for the
jobs, Kenney said, "They
will need houses and that
could help bring about the
recovery in the construc-
tion industry"
The greatest impact on
the county would be eco-
nomic if a port already was
in place, Winn Webb said.
"We would have more di-
versity of resources and not
be so far in the hole in this
economy," Webb said.
The county likely would
have better roads, such as a
wider U.S. 19, with a port in
place.
"The decisions we make
today will have a great im-
pact on future genera-
tions," Webb said.
"Then, as now, they were
trying to diversify the mar-
ketplace and grow jobs,"
Joe Meek said. "We are
looking at two things: op-
portunity and possibility"
The economy is the
driver for the current effort
to start a port, Meek said.
The port is one element of
several projects that would
interact to help the econ-
omy, with a viable port
leading to a discussion
about the extension of the
parkway
"A rising tide lifts all
boats," Meek said. "Suc-
cessful industries are
drawn to an environment
that encourages that in-
vestment to be made."
Chronicle reporter Chris
Van Ormer can be reached
at cvanormer@
chronicleonline. com.


Special to the Chronicle


This map of the Port Citrus area is part of the 1969 port feasibility study.


legal notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle



SBid Notices...................................D7



4 Meeting Notices........................... D7



Miscellaneous Notices................D7



.... Surplus Property ......................... D7


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
SI"RPR HILOO PR
NA r- NA NA NA J78 57 NA


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
sh
sh
sh
sh
sh
sh
sh
sh
sh


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
sh
sh
sh
sh
sh
sh
sh
sh
sh


MARINE OUTLOOK


South winds around 10 knots. Seas 2
feet. Bay and inland waters will have
a light chop. Showers and isolated
thunderstorms today.


82 62 NA 81 59 NA

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Exclusive daily
l- --iTil TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 78 Low: 58
,.0gpow Mostly cloudy; 20% chance of a
shower sh
1)n MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
),1 High: 77 Low: 48
.,,mi1p Partly sunny; 10% chance of a shower


Gulf water
temperature


70
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 27.56 n/a 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 34.18 n/a 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 36.33 n/a 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 37.69 n/a 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level. Flood stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year. This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision. In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data. If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211.

THE NATION


High: 74 Low: 47
Sun and clouds


ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 80/57
Record 85/26
Normal 72/44
Mean temp. 69
Departure from mean +11
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday 0.00 in.
Total for the month 0.00 in.
Total for the year 0.86 in.
Normal for the year 3.52 in.
*As of 6 p.m. at Inverness
UV INDEX: 6
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Saturday at 3 p.m. 30.10 in.


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m.
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 4
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:


Juniper, maple, oa
Today's count: 8/1
Monday's count: 9
Tuesday's count: 11
AIR QUALITY
Saturday was good with pol
mainly particulates.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MI
(MORNING)
2/5 SUNDAY 3:06 9:19 3
2/6 MONDAY 3:54 10:07 4


NOR MA
AFTERNOONO
3:32
4:20


CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
SSUNSET TONIGHT.........
SUNRISE TOMORROW..
MOONRISE TODAY.
FEB. 14 FB.L21 FB. 21 MOONSET TODAY.........


k
12
.2
3.7

lutants



MAJOR
)N)
9:45
10:33


.6:12 P.
.7:16 A.
.4:15 P.
.5:20 A.k


BURN CONDITIONS


Today's Fire Danger Rating Is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For
more information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's
Web site: http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire_weather/kbdi

WATERING RULES
Citrus County: Irrigation is limited to twice per week.
Even addresses: Thursday and/or Sunday before 10am or after 4pm.
Odd Addresses: Wednesday and/or Saturday before 10am or after 4pm.
No restrictions on fountains, car washing or pressure washing. Hand watering requires the
use of a shut-off nozzle.
PLEASE CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL NEW PLANT MATERIAL
Questions, concerns or reporting violations, please call Citrus County 352-527-7669.

TIDES


*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Sunday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 3:09 a/12:17 p 5:05 p/-
Crystal River* 1:30 a/9:39 a 3:26 p/9:24 p
Withlacoochee* 1:13 p/7:27 a -- /7:12 p
Homosassa*** 2:19 a/11:16 a 4:15 p/11:01 p


***At Mason's Creek
Monday
High/Low High/Low
4:00 a/12:02 a 5:36 p/12:55 p
2:21 a/10:17 a 3:57 p/10:10 p
12:08 a/8:05 a 1:44 p/7:58 p
3:10 a/11:54 a 4:46 p/11:47 p


City
Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
M. Burlington, VT
M. Charleston, SC
M. Charleston, WV
Charlotte
M. Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, N.H.
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
N Nashville


Saturday Sunday
H LPcp. FcstH L
39 29 pc 36 25
48 31 pc 47 27
58 40 .11 sh 53 37
62 52 trace sh 68 45
49 23 .15 c 47 32
70 52 1.70 sh 54 35
45 29 .17 c 45 30
43 18 s 53 22
72 56 .36 sh 64 41
49 25 s 44 22
43 33 pc 34 28
40 27 pc 36 30
29 19 .04 si 27 18
73 52 sh 76 51
V 45 34 .08 sh 50 28
51 45 .07 sh 58 41
42 37 pc 41 32
46 40 .07 s 47 26
39 34 .01 s 38 29
74 49 sh 70 44
40 37 .11 s 44 28
36 21 pc 32 16
56 46 pc 51 35
32 21 .01 pc 36 11
37 33 .37 pc 38 23
43 32 pc 40 29
53 40 pc 50 33
54 46 .43 s 50 32
41 26 pc 46 27
45 34 pc 38 25
72 57 1.07 sh 55 41
46 37 .19 s 46 27
70 58 1.04 c 60 40
61 38 s 61 40
62 51 1.11 pc 53 34
73 50 s 73 52
51 43 .40 S 52 32
63 55 .94 pc 54 37
40 32 pc 41 32
36 23 pc 41 27
75 62 sh 71 44
77 52 sh 69 43
58 50 .48 c 55 34


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=falr; h=hazy; po=partly cloudy; r=raln;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=wlndy.
@2012 Weather Central, Madison, WI.


Saturday Sunday
City H LPcp. Fcst H L
New Orleans 79 65 .28 pc 68 48
New York City 46 37 pc 43 32
Norfolk 62 34 .12 sh 48 37
Oklahoma City 45 38 pc 48 27
Omaha 34 30 .72 s 34 15
Palm Springs 72 46 s 73 47
Philadelphia 45 31 pc 47 33
Phoenix 69 45 pc 71 47
Pittsburgh 36 27 .16 pc 41 25
Portland, ME 34 19 pc 31 19
Portland, Ore 53 40 s 51 37
Providence, R.I. 45 29 pc 37 25
Raleigh 55 40 .04 sh 51 37
Rapid City 43 16 s 52 26
Reno 47 20 s 48 21
Rochester, NY 38 28 pc 36 29
Sacramento 66 37 s 64 40
St. Louis 48 45 .27 s 48 31
St. Ste. Marie 36 30 pc 37 28
Salt Lake City 45 22 s 42 20
San Antonio 68 52 1.46 sh 54 39
San Diego 73 49 s 70 47
San Francisco 62 42 pc 61 46
Savannah 68 55 trace sh 79 54
Seattle 60 41 s 55 38
Spokane 42 26 s 38 24
Syracuse 39 27 .01 pc 35 27
Topeka 43 34 .15 s 44 24
Washington 46 35 .07 sh 46 32
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 87 Harlingen, Texas LOW -18 West
Yellowstone, Mont.
WORLD CITIES


SUNDAY
CITY HN/L/SKY
Acapulco 85/71/pc
Amsterdam 27/18/c
Athens 59/51/sh
Beijing 42/20/pc
Berlin 20/4/s
Bermuda 70/64/c
Cairo 74/55/s
Calgary 45/18/s
Havana 82/70/ts
Hong Kong 68/59/sh
Jerusalem 60/44/s


Lisbon 59/38/s
London 38/33/rs
Madrid 47/28/sh
Mexico City 63/46/sh
Montreal 18/14/s
Moscow 12/3/c
Paris 30/19/sn
Rio 95/72/s
Rome 45/27/pc
Sydney 81/68/s
Tokyo 46/36/s
Toronto 32/27/pc
Warsaw 10/-1/c


C I T R U S


C 0 U N TY


LH(KON1CLL
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There will be a $1 adjustment for the Thanksgiving edition. This will only slightly
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Courthouse office
To mpkins St. square
0 C 106 W. Main
S 41 44 Inverness, FL
S 34450


Who's in charge:
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Kathie Stewart .............................................. Circulation Director, 563-5655
John M urphy ........................ ............................ Online M manager, 563-3255
John M urphy.................................................... Classified M manager, 564-3255
Jeff Gordon .................................................. Business M manager, 564-2908
Mike Arnold.................................... Human Resources Director, 564-2910
Report a news tip:
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To have a photo taken ........................................ Darlene Mann, 563-5660
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Community/wire service content.................... Sarah Gatling, 563-5660
Sports event coverage ...........................Jon-Michael Soracchi, 563-3261
S o u n d O ff ................................................................................................................ 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9
The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please
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Published every Sunday through Saturday
By Citrus Publishing Inc.
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
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g POSTMASTER: Send address changes to:
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0FEB.7


. ... .. .. ......
. .. .... ... .. .. ....


........ .................................


LOCAL





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

SISTERS
Continued from Page Al

completed Cross Florida
Barge Canal. This was the
ports' status in the late
1960s:
Port Levy authority
completed a feasibility study
and selected a site immedi-
ately downstream of the In-
glis Lock on the north side of
the barge canal in Levy
County According to a re-
port in the Aug. 1, 1969, edi-
tion of the St. Petersburg
Times, Levy Port Authority
planned a 600-acre site 2-1/2-
miles east of Inglis adjacent
to the lock. Buren Brice,
port authority chairman, es-
timated the port initially
would require a capital out-
lay of about $4 million, while
the user facilities might run
as high as $12 million.
Brice's plan was for Port
Levy to provide access to the
Mississippi River valley and
ultimately to the eastern
seaboard.
Levy Bargeport Develop-
ment Co. contracted with the
port authority to develop the
first 50 acres of facilities.
Company President Earl
Hardee said Port Levy
would be in operation in
about 18 months. Forty of
the 50 acres were purchased
from J.T Goethe for $600 an
acre. The initial acreage
would be developed with
railroad facilities, roads and
a slip to handle two barges.
Port Marion authority
selected a site east of Dun-


BARGES
Continued from Page Al

Industries, Hanson plc.,
Keith Marine, Lion Pool
Products, Mitchell Grayson
Inc., Newcastle Shipyard
LLC, Price Brothers,


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29q1-14R7


LOCAL


nellon, just west of the Dun-
nellon lock site on State
Road 484, adjacent to rail-
way lines, according to a re-
port in the July 1, 1966,
edition of the Ocala Star-
Banner. The size would
range from 300 to 500 acres
of land owned by the Florida
Canal Authority and would
cost little.
A Jacksonville-based firm
completed a 16-page report
at a cost of $5,000, saying the
port should be self-sustain-
ing 10 years after comple-
tion of the barge canal and
recommended the commis-
sioning of a feasibility study
to support the financing.
The port would then become
a "growing asset for Marion
County."
Port Putnam authority
had an economic and port
study completed in April
1965. In May 1968, a referen-
dum approved the creation
of the port authority and the
issuance of not more than
$750,000 of bonds to be used
for the construction of port
facilities. The proceeds
were used to build the port
facilities.
Port Putnam is still a
barge port today, and the
only port of the four that
went ahead from its feasibil-
ity study (Please see a sepa-
rate report regarding Port
Putnam today)
The other three ports -
Citrus, Marion and Levy -
were stopped when Presi-
dent Richard Nixon signed
an executive order in 1971
suspending the Cross
Florida Barge Canal project

Prichett Trucking, PDM
Bridge, Southwestern Elec-
tric and Weststaff.
The Putnam County Port
Authority is a public corpora-
tion that owns, maintains and
manages the port and its in-
dustrial and commercial
areas. Its governing body is
the Putnam County Board of


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SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2012 A5


Special to the Chronicle


This image shows bridge construction taking place on U.S. 19 in 1970.


following federal lawsuits
citing environmental and
ecological concerns about
the effect of saltwater intru-
sion. The canal project was
one-third complete and had
cost $74 million.
In 1984, Citrus County pe-
titioned the Florida Legisla-

County Commissioners
which sets policies and over-
sees major expenditures.


ture to create a second port
authority to oversee a ma-
rina project. However, the
project didn't move forward
and the port authority
stopped meeting.
The 2011 port authority
was created by the Florida
Legislature.

Day-to-day operations are
carried out by the county's
public works department


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TO ENTER:
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1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429
Anytime before Noon on February 17.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries


Thayer Fair, 70
FLORAL CITY
God needed help with his
flower garden, so on Febru-
ary 1, 2012, he called Thayer
R. Fair, 70,
to heaven to
S- ^help.
Although
she was
born a
Northerner
in Boston
Massachu-
Thayer setts, on
Fair August 10,
1941, to
Arthur and Phyllis Moody
(who both preceded her in
death), she became a con-
verted Southerner with the
influence of her surviving
husband of 44 years, Harold
D. Fair. In 1970, Harold and
Thayer moved to Floral City
from Tarpon Springs and
where they owned and op-
erated The Fairwayy
Restaurant in two different
locations around Floral City
Illness forced the sale of the
restaurant and Thayer later
volunteered for the Citrus
County Fair where she be-
came indispensable as the
fair secretary working there
for over 25 years where dur-
ing the annual fair you
could often hear the occa-
sional page of "Thayer Fair
to the Fair Office."
Family was her highest
priority in life and she was
happiest when she was sur-
rounded by her family She
is survived by 7 children:
Harold D. Fair Jr. of
Afghanistan; Darrell K Fair
of Guam, Tracy L. Horst of
Inverness; Charles M. Fair
of Gulfport, MS; Charles F
Bennett of Ft. Walton
Beach; Kenneth J. Fair of
Gainesville; and Glen A.
Fair of Lynden, WA. She
took great joy in spoiling her
13 grandchildren and 4
great-grandchildren. She is
also survived by her sister,
Sherrol Hanna of Tampa.
She was a happy, joyful
person who enjoyed many
of the simple things in life
such planting flowers and a
vegetable garden; sunrises

a. !avli
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and sunsets at the beach;
fishing; playing cards with
friends and family; and
cooking delicious food. She
was always willing to give a
helping hand to friends and
organizations such as the
Lion's Club, the VFW Post
7122 in Floral City or the
American Legion. Thayer
was loved and respected by
all that knew her. She will
be FOREVER IN OUR
HEARTS!
The family asks those that
were privileged enough to
know Thayer to join us for a
celebration of her life. A
Memorial Gathering will be
held on Saturday, Feb. 11th,
at 2 p.m. at the Chas. E.
Davis Funeral Home. The
VFW Post 7122 Women's
Auxiliary will be officiating.
Her urn will be placed in
the columbarium of Florida
National Cemetery at a
later date. Even though she
loved flowers we feel like
she would want to make a
difference in other people's
lives, so we ask that in lieu
of flowers a donation be
made in her name to a
worthwhile charity such as
the American Cancer
Society
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.
Mildred 'Mickie'
Vusick
BEVERLY HILLS
Mildred "Mickie" Vusick,
Beverly Hills, FL.
Survived by husband, Ed;
daughter Kathy; son Ed-
ward; and four grand-
children; two great-
grandchildren; and sister,
Betty Samarjia.
Heinz Funeral Home.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.

SO YOU KNOW
The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits both free and
paid obituaries. Email
obits@chronicle
online.com or phone
352-563-5660.






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William
Vineyard, 79
William Lee Vineyard
passed away on January 30,
2012, at 1:22 p.m. at Munroe
Regional Medical Center in
Ocala, Fla.
He was born Feb. 23, 1932,
to Edward and Rosie (Bran-
ham) Vineyard in LeFlore
County, Oklahoma. The fam-
ily moved during the De-
pression to Michigan in
1937. He lived most of his
early life in Grand Rapids
and then Hudsonville,
Michigan. Bill served his
country for 30 years first
in Naval Reserves in 1950;
next for three years (1950-
1953 ) in the Army where he
obtained the rank of corpo-
ral. He learned Morse code
in the Army Signal Corp,
which later led to his work-
ing for the CIA for 27 years
in the communications
group. He retired in 1983,
but continued to take TDY
trips over the next 14 years.
He served in this capacity in
over 30 countries. He, his
wife, Marilyn, and three
children spent 10 1/2 years
overseas. Bill was a dedi-
cated worker and served his
country with pride. He re-
ceived many commenda-
tions from the government
and served as officer in
charge at his last post in
Pakistan.
Bill was an avid hunter,
bowler, golfer and fisher-
man and was a natural
handyman who could fix al-
most anything.
He is preceded in death
by his father, Edward D.


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Vineyard; mother, Rosie
Branham Vineyard; a
younger brother, John; a
niece, Colleen; and brother-
in-law, Dale Deering.
Surviving him is his car-
ing companion of 14 years,
Rheta Driggers; her sons,
Jack and Brad; granddaugh-
ters, Leslie and Sherry; and
her great-grandchildren. He
is also survived by his three
children, Kimberly Sparks,
son, Michael Vineyard/Bar-
bara, and Michelle A.
Schmitz; and seven grand-
children, Meghan, Joshua,
Sean, Timothy, Michael,
Matthew and Thomas Jr.
He also leaves two broth-
ers, Howard/Virginia and
Gerald/Iva of Florida; two
sisters, Lorena Brown/Ray
and Betty Deering of Michi-
gan; and a sister-in-law,
Irene, and her three chil-
dren. He also leaves several
nieces, nephews and many
friends. His ex-wife Marilyn
of 41 years still resides in
Virginia.
Services will be at 4 p.m.
on February 2, 2012, and
final burial in Arlington
Cemetery
Arrangements are by
Roberts Funeral Home of
Dunnellon. Condolences
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Health and Rehabilitation
in Inverness, Florida.
She was born in Manhat-
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October 18,1931, to Thomas
and Margaret (Riley) Moore.
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assistant and moved to this
area in 1986 from Plainview,
Long Island, New York. She
was a member of Our Lady
of Grace Catholic Church,
the Polish American Club,
the New Jersey and Friends
Club and the West Citrus
Ladies of the Elks Lodge
2693. Marie enjoyed travel-
ing, cruising, loved to shop
and loved her family and
friends.
Marie was preceded in
death by her parents and
sister, Margaret G. Moore.
Survivors include her
husband of 56 years, Joseph
Morse of Pine Ridge in Bev-
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A6 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2012





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


GEM
Continued from Page Al

humanitarian efforts and
the zeal she has for helping
those in need in Citrus
County, Jewel Lamb has
been named our Citizen of
the Year for 2011.
Jewel, along with her hus-
band, Steve, owns Crystal
Automotive Group in Crys-
tal River.
But Jewel is better known
in the community for her
charitable work.
She is a member of sev-
eral organizations, includ-
ing the We Care Food
Pantry and the YMCA of the
Suncoast Citrus Branch.
She is also a past board
member of the Citrus
County Chamber of Com-
merce, United Way of Citrus
County and the Citrus
County Education
Foundation.
As someone who has had
so much success in her per-
sonal life, Steve Lamb said
his wife believes strongly in
philanthropy because of
that success.
"You know what drives
her? How blessed we are
for what we have," he said.
"She absolutely believes in
giving back to the commu-
nity and helping those less
fortunate ... I think Jewel
pretty much sets the stan-
dard for community
involvement."
Throughout their 17-year-
long marriage, Steve said
his wife has always been a
tenacious yet sweet and giv-
ing person with insur-
mountable amounts of

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WEEKLY LINEUP OF
FEATURES
Nearly a dozen medical
professionals contribute
their expertise to
columns in Health &
Life./Tuesdays
Read up on all things
school-related in the
Chronicle's Education
section.
/Wednesdays
Plan menus for the week
from the tempting
recipes in the Flair for
Food section./Thursdays
Get a jump on weekend
entertainment with the


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2008 Lace Blue-McLean
and Andy Houston
2007 Barbara Mills
2006 Jean Grant
2005 Mike and Kautia
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2004 Aaron Weaver
2003 Pete DeRosa
2002 Don Sutton
2001 Leroy Bellamy

energy and incredible orga-
nizational skills.
Even long-time friend
and neighbor, Silvia Grillo
can't figure out where Jewel
garners all her dynamism.
Beyond working hours on
end helping numerous not-
for-profit organizations and
running a business, she still
finds the time to be an at-
tentive mom, wife and
grandmother who keeps an
immaculate house and has
amazing skills in the
kitchen.
"Even when she cooks
she can whip up a dinner at
the drop of a hat and it's
gourmet," Grillo marveled.
"She's amazing. That's all I
can say She's really Super-
woman."
While Jewel's compas-
sion for others is far-reach-
ing, her true soft spot is for
helping children, the home-
less and the hungry and
also rallying for King's Bay
She is currently chairper-
son of the capital campaign
to build a YMCA in Citrus

* Each deal will be available
online for 48 hours, but a
minimum number of cus-
tomers must participate
for the deal to be available.

stories in Scene./Fridays
* See what local houses of
worship plan to do for
the week in the Religion
section.
/Saturdays
* Read about area busi-
nesses in the Business
section./Sundays
* Pick up tips for home
improvement, saving
money and cashing in on
antiques in HomeFront.
/Sundays
* Find out what your
neighbors have to say in
the Sound Off and let-
ters to the editor in the
Commentary section.
/Sundays


* 2000 Ron and Beverly
Drinkhouse
* 1999 Stan Olsen
* 1998 Gary Maidhof
* 1997 Chet Cole
* 1996 Curt Ebitz
* 1995 Laura Lou Fitz-
patrick and John Lettow
* 1994 Peggy and Dave
Pattillo
* 1993 Ray Darling and
William Bunch


* 1992 Avis Craig
* 1991 Annie W. Johnson
and Father James C.
Hoge
* 1990 Ginger West
* 1989 David Langer and
Phil Zellner
* 1988 Bob and Mary
England
* 1987 Dr. Ed Dodge
* 1986 Wilson Burns and
Steve Lamb
* 1985 Comprehensive


She's amazing ... She's
really Superwoman.
Silvia Grillo
about Jewel Lamb, Citrus County
Citizen of the Year.


County, and this year's
Corvette draw raised
$100,200 for two local chari-
ties: United Way of Citrus
County and the Black Dia-
mond Foundation. She also
is very involved with pro-
viding funding for Mission
in Citrus in Crystal River,
and she is a board member
with Save Crystal River, a
newly formed non-profit op-
posing the regulation of the
bay by U.S. Fish and
Wildlife Service.
Tom Thomas, board mem-
ber and past president of
United Way Citrus County,
said many people do not re-
alize Jewel gives a lot and in
ways that are not well
known to the community.
And it's a couple's effort,


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he added.
"(Jewel and Steve) both
do a lot together," he said.
Most recently, both Jewel
and Steve donated a 2012
Dodge Ram Hemi quad-
cab pickup truck to raise
funds for the new Feed Cit-
rus County Distribution
Center and the We Care
Food Pantry through a
drawing.
"She's like a little unseen
angel that shows up when
you need her," said Diane
Toto, president of the We
Care Food Pantry in Ho-
mosassa. "She's someone
that understands vision.
She has a deep feeling for
people."
Toto said she has always
had contact with Jewel on


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Cohen
* 1980 The Rev. Roger
Shively

and off for about four years,
but when work began on
trying to raise funds to build
the distribution center in
Homosassa, Jewel really
stepped in to help.
And for Jewel, it's not just
about writing a check, Toto
added. She is not afraid to
work hard and "get her
hands dirty"
"She's more than money.
It's what she does behind
the scenes," she said. "Peo-
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Beverly Hills, FL 34465


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Thursday, Feb. 9th

6 PM 8 PM
(Followed by an hour
of individual counseling)

The seminar will be held at the
College of Central Florida
Citrus Campus in Lecanto,
3800 S. Lecanto Hwy., Lecanto
(Building C-4, Room 103)

The Citrus County Chapter of SCORE is
offering a free seminar for individuals
thinking about starting their own business.

The two hour session will cover the main
issues involved in becoming an
entrepreneur from the business idea to
the reality of owning your own business.
Following the seminar, interested
participants will have the opportunity to
meet with seasoned SCORE counselors to
further discuss their ideas.

"R U READY" is specifically designed
for individuals who are not business
owners, but who are interested in learning
what is involved in becoming one. If you
have ever asked yourself "Do I have what
it takes to be an entrepreneur?" then this
seminar is for you!

A one hour counseling session will
follow for those interested in meeting
with a SCORE counselor.

For more information and to register
for the seminar, please contact Dale
Maim at SCORE

352-249-1236
Seating is limited.


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2012 A7

ple don't love Jewel for her
money It's Jewel herself as
a person."
But Steve admits that as
much as his wife loves to
help others, she never does
it for the praise or recogni-
tion. In fact, if someone
tries to give her props, she
quickly changes the subject.
"We have a saying: 'You
can accomplish anything
you want as long as you
don't care who gets credit,"'
Steve said. "She doesn't like
accolades. She lets her
work in the community
speak for her."
Though he said his wife
may be a bit embarrassed
(in a good way) about being
honored so publicly in the
newspaper, he knows she
will be extremely apprecia-
tive for the commendation.
"I'm glad she's getting
recognized," Grillo said.
"She truly deserves it."
Chronicle reporter
Shemir Wiles can be
reached at 352-564-2924 or
swiles@chronicleonline.
comn.


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Weekly roundup: Know when to fold 'em


JIM SAUNDERS
The News Service of Florida
TALLAHASSEE When
the 2012 legislative session
started, it would have been
safe to predict that redis-
tricting would be the most-
difficult and politically
divisive issue to resolve.
But with House votes Fri-
day, the Republican-domi-
nated Legislature is close to
finalizing its redistricting
plans. The maps likely will
face court challenges from
Democrats and other critics,
but Speaker Dean Cannon,
R-Winter Park, praised what
he described as a "careful,
thoughtful and deliberative
process."
Supporters of resort casi-
nos and prison privatization
can only wish their proposals
had moved so smoothly
The controversial casino
idea appears dead this ses-
sion, after House sponsor
Erik Fresen, R-Miami, de-
cided Friday against taking
his chances with a vote in the
Business & Consumer Af-
fairs Subcommittee.
Senate President Mike
Haridopolos, meanwhile,
had to put off a vote this
week on privatizing prisons
across the southern half of
the state after running into
bipartisan opposition.
DISTRICTS COMING
INTO FOCUS: House mem-
bers voted along party lines
Friday to pass legislative and
congressional maps and
send them back to the Senate
for final approval next week
Republican leaders said


the maps follow constitu-
tional requirements, includ-
ing complying with a 2010
ballot initiative aimed at
eliminating gerrymandering.
They said, for example, the
maps will lump some incum-
bent Republicans into the
same districts and also split
fewer cities and counties
than in the past
"At the end of the day, this
decision is bigger than us,
this map is bigger than us,
the Constitution is bigger
than any one of us," said
House Redistricting Chair-
man Will Weatherford, R-
Wesley Chapel.
But Democrats blasted the
maps, saying they were de-
signed to help elect Republi-
cans and violate the 2010
ballot initiative, which was
known as the Fair Districts
amendment. The Demo-
cratic arguments also set the
stage for a legal fight in the
coming months.
"This vote by the GOP is
nothing less than a slap-in-
the face to the 63 percent of
Florida voters who approved
Fair Districts the maps
passed today by the Florida
House are unconstitutional,
pure and simple," state De-
mocrat Party Executive Di-
rector Scott Arceneaux said
in a statement Friday. "They
represent just the type of
partisan gerrymandering
and incumbent protection
voters rejected in 2010."
CASINOS BILL GOES
OUT WITH A WHIMPER
For weeks, swarms of lob-
byists and public-relations
people waged a battle in Tal-


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Associated Press
Sen. Mike Fasano, R-New Port Richey, arranges paperwork
on his desk Tuesday in the Florida Senate.


lahassee about "destination"
resort casinos. Meanwhile,
folks at home turned on their
TVs and saw ads touting or
criticizing the proposed
move into a new realm of
gambling.
But after all of that, the
issue appeared to die Friday
without House members tak-
ing a vote.
House sponsor Fresen de-
cided against having the
Business & Consumer Af-
fairs Subcommittee vote on
the bill (HB 487), after it
looked like the panel would
reject it. Barring a miracle,
that dooms the issue for the
2012 session.
The bill's opponents, such
as Florida Chamber of Com-
merce President Mark Wil-
son, praised the move.


"For all intents and pur-
poses, today decision to
postpone consideration of
the gambling legislation is a
decision to let what happens
in Vegas stay in Vegas and
frees up the Florida Legisla-
ture to address critical issues
facing our state," Wilson said
in a prepared statement
But supporters signaled
they would keep working on
the issue, which could come
back next year
"Private investment is crit-
ical to the health of our in-
dustry and our state's
economy, and we firmly be-
lieve that this great opportu-
nity should not be put to the
wayside," said Carol Bowen,
a vice president of Associated
Builders and Contractors
Florida East Coast Chapter


S ; ,
"--b -1 '


"It's important that the con-
versation continues on this
issue and the job-creating ef-
forts in Florida never rest.
PRISON PRIVATIZATION
SHACKLED
Haridopolos and Budget
Chairman J.D. Alexander
have pushed since last year's
session to privatize prisons
across the southern part of
the state, arguing it would
save money that could be
used for other needs such as
education.
But when Haridopolos
brought the issue to the Sen-
ate floor this week, he ran
into opposition from a coali-
tion of Democrats and Re-
publicans. That forced
Haridopolos to twice post-
pone moving forward with
the privatization bill, as he
tried to gather enough votes
to pass it
The standoff intensified
Wednesday, when Haridopo-
los stripped Sen. Mike
Fasano, R-New Port Richey,
of his role as chairman of the
Senate Criminal Justice Ap-
propriations Subcommittee.
Fasano has been perhaps the
most-outspoken critic of the
privatization plan.
Haridopolos, R-Merritt Is-
land, said he didn't think
Fasano was committed to
making needed budget cuts,
which includes the prison-
privatization plan.
"I'm asking other budget
chairmen to make difficult


cuts," Haridopolos said. "It
became clear to me that Sen.
Fasano was not willing to
make those difficult cuts."
But Fasano harshly criti-
cized the decision and said
he was standing up for the
"little guy and gal."
"No matter how big the
bully in the schoolyard may
be, if the loss of a chairman-
ship is the result of taking a
stand for what is right, I wear
that loss as a badge of honor,"
Fasano said.
Haridopolos acknowl-
edged this week what was
obvious when the vote was
postponed: The votes may
not be there to pass it.
STORY OF THE WEEK:
The proposal to allow up to
three mega-resort casinos in
Florida appeared to die
when the House sponsor
pulled it from consideration
in a House subcommittee.
The subcommittee chairman
and House Rules chairman
both indicated the bill will
not come up again this ses-
sion in the House.
QUOTE OF THE WEEK:
"It's also a comfort today as I
hear testimony and debate
that I'm not the only one
moving. I hope it will help
the housing market in
Florida, what we're doing
here today"-Rep. Dennis
Baxley, an Ocala Republican
whose home was drawn into
a district with another
incumbent


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A8 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2012


STATE


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DEATHS
Continued from Page A6

Herman
Bryant, 73
PIQUA, OHIO
Herman Bryant, age 73, of
Piqua, Ohio, died Thursday
Feb. 2, 2012, at Seven Rivers
Regional Medical Center in
Crystal River.
Services will be held in
Piqua, Ohio. Local arrange-
ments are under the Care of
Strickland Funeral Home
Crystal River.

Velma Craig, 81
CITRUS SPRINGS
Mrs. Velma J. Craig, age
81, of Citrus Springs, FL,
died Thursday, February 2,
2012, in
Lecanto,
FL.
She was
born August
10, 1930, in
Highland
Park, MI,
daughter of
Velma John and
Craig Anna (Jen-
o vic k )
Brunetto. Velma was a kind,
loving and giving person
who never met a stranger.
She will be missed by all
who knew her.
Survivors include her lov-
ing husband, Marvin;
daughters Nancy (David)
and Jennifer (Kevin); sons
Dennis (Debra) and Al


Door Prizes to be
given away!
a $150.00 value


Michael N1. Hashemian, 0 r

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Johnnie Walker
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1.75 Uter


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SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2012 A9


(Denise); grandchildren
Adam (Jennifer), Ryan, Jes-
sica (Brian), Sarah
(Stephen), Katelyn, Zachary,
Devin, Alexandra and Con-
nor; great-grandchildren
Will, Maija, Isaiah, Skyler
and Samuel; sister Mar-
garet; and several nieces
and nephews.
Friends who wish may
send memorial donations to
Hospice of Citrus County
PO. Box 641270, Beverly
Hills, FL 34464.
A Celebration of her life
will be scheduled at a later
date Online condolences
may be sent to the family at
w w w. Hooper Funeral
Home.com.
Arrangements by the Bev-
erly Hills Chapel of Hooper
Funeral Homes &
Crematory

James 'Jim'
Crapser, 81
HERNANDO
Mr. James "Jim" L.
Crapser, age 81, of Her-
nando, FL, died Thursday,
February 2, 2012, at Dia-
mond Ridge Health and
Rehab Center in Lecanto,
FL.
He was born June 16,
1930, in Halsey Valley, NY,
son of the late George and
Mary (O'Connor) Crapser.
He worked for Sylvania
Electric Company (North
American Phillips) before
retiring and moving to Her-
nando, Florida from Empo-
rium, PA in 1984. After
moving to Florida, Jim


worked at various golf clubs
in Citrus County, as well as
Whispering Pines Park in
Inverness. He enjoyed fix-
ing things and working in
the yard. Mr Crapser was a
lifetime member of the
Family Campers RVers, for-
merly NCHA, and Apache
Shores Club, Hernando.
Survivors include his wife
of 63 years, Alice L. Crapser
of Hernando, FL; two sons,
Dennis Edward (Brenda)
Crapser of Montgomery, PA,
and Daniel Mark Crapser of
Tallahassee, FL; sister,
Esther Leupp; four grand-
children; four great-
grandchildren; good friend
David Parkin; and many
nieces and nephews.
Friends who wish may
send memorial donations to
Hospice of Citrus County,
PO. Box 641270, Beverly
Hills, FL 34464. A Memorial
Service for Jim will be held
ot a later date at Emmanuel
Episcopal Church in Empo-
rium, PA.
Online condolences may
be sent to the family at
www. Hooper Funeral
Home.com.
Arrangements by the In-
verness Chapel of Hooper
Funeral Homes &
Crematory

SO YOU KNOW
Paid obituaries are
printed as submitted by
funeral homes.


Robert
Hvitfeldt, 96
BROOKSVILLE
Robert Carl Hvitfeldt, age
96, Brooksville, died Thursday,
Feb. 2,2012, at his residence.
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory is in
charge of private cremation
arrangements.

Mary
Zewiey, 74
INVERNESS
Mary T Zewiey, 74, of In-
verness, FL, passed away on
February 2, 2012, at Citrus
Memorial Hospital in Inver-
ness, FL.
Mary was born on Novem-
ber 17, 1937 in Boston, MA,
the daughter of John and
Mae Summers. She moved
to Inverness in 1981 from
East Bridgewater, MA. Mary
was a member of Our Lady
of Fatima Catholic Church
in Inverness.
Mary was preceded in
death by her son, Richard
ZewieyJr She is survived by
her husband of 54 years,
Richard Zewiey of Inver-
ness, FL; eight children,
Jacqueline Pirtzer of E.
Bridgewater, MA, Barbara
Nichols of W Roxbury, MA,
Joanne Van Helden of Tuc-
son, AZ, Christine Dimaggio
of Lynn, MA, Donna Horvit
of Londonderry, NH, Mary


Zinkevicz of Pembrook, MA,
Mark Zewiey of E. Bridge-
water, MA, and Lawrence
Zewiey of Inverness, FL;
sister Shirley; several
grandchildren; and four
great-grandchildren.
Visitation for Mrs. Zewiey
will be held from 9 a.m. to 10
a.m. Monday, February 6,
2012, at the Heinz Funeral
Home in Inverness. A
chapel service will be held
at the funeral home begin-
ning at 10 a.m. Father
Charles Leke will preside.
Heinz Funeral Home &
Cremation, Inverness, FL.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. com.

George
Wisser, 83
CRYSTAL RIVER
George C. Wisser, age 83,
of Crystal River, died Thurs-
day Feb. 2, 2012, at Hospice
House of Citrus County in
Lecanto.
Private cremation
arrangements are under
the care of Strickland Fu-
neral Home with Crema-
tory, Crystal River


Kenneth
Sell, 84
HERNANDO
Kenneth H. Sell, 84, of
Hernando, died Friday, Feb.
3, 2012.
Inurnment in the spring
in Michigan. Fero Funeral
Home, Beverly Hills.

Frank
Robinett, 80
HERNANDO
Frank L. Robinett, 80, of
Hernando, died Thursday,
Feb. 2, 2012.
The Neptune Society,
Tampa, is in charge of
arrangements.

Emma Sipos, 90
INVERNESS
Emma Sipos, 90, of Inver-
ness, died Friday, Feb. 3,
2012, at Hospice of Citrus
County in Inverness.
McGan Cremation Serv-
ice LLC, Hernando.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


A10 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2012


Going paperless priceless!


or months, a large retailer emailed
me twice a day, begging me to switch
from paper billing to online billing.
If only I would go paperless, my hair would
grow back rich and thick, my sciatica would
go away, my plantar fasciitis would heal it-
self, my cats would stop shedding and my
chance of heavenly reward would rise. OK,
fine. I'll sign up, just please stop sending
me your stupid emails.
So the emails ended; content-
ment reigned. The paper bill
stopped coming. I was saving
trees and saving a giant corpora- 1
tion postage each month, plus ......
the cost of paper and envelopes.
My hair started to grow a little. It
was a win/win situation. Life was
good.
About a month later, while pay-
ing some bills, it occurred to me
that I hadn't gotten one from the JI
giant retailer, a store whose MUL
name is a household word. I'd to-
tally forgotten I had signed up
for paperless billing. But how
do I get a bill? Where do I Why th
send the money? I went on-
line to find out why the com- COmpa
pany hadn't sent me a bill by
email. My payment was due. to kn<
"When were they going to
send me a bill?" I asked the Social
woman on the phone. numb
"You told us to stop the
emails, sir" date o
"Yes, but I meant the an-
noying emails you kept send- I'll never
ing me to tell me that you
wanted me to sign up for the
ease and convenience of pa-
perless billing. If you don't send me a bill in
the mail and you don't send me one by
email, how am I supposed to pay the bill?"
"Give me your bank account number and
we'll take it directly out of your checking
account."
Yes, that would be convenient for
them. For me, not so much. Do they not
read the papers? Every day some giant con-
glomerate gets hacked and millions of cus-
tomers are told, "Customer information has
been compromised. Check your bill to be
sure no unauthorized charges have been
made to your account."


Last week my power company got
hacked. The week before, it was a grocery
chain. My bank or this gigantic, household-
name retailer will surely be next. Why the
power company had to know my Social Se-
curity number and date of birth, I'll never
know. Is it afraid an impostor will come in
and pay my bill for me?
"Well, if you want, we'll email you each
month and remind you to pay the bill," my
customer service representative
finally said, not sounding at all
happy about it.
"If it's not asking too much,
yeah, I think that would work."
I'm not kidding, this is a gi-
gantic company with stores in
every town in the country It is-
sues its own credit cards; its
CEO paid himself a gazillion
dollars last year. Where it gets
M the money to pay him if it does-
.LEN n't send out bills is a puzzlement
According to the website, my
payment was due the next
Tuesday
e power It was Saturday, New Year's
Eve, and Monday was offi-
ny had cially a holiday There was no
way the giant retailer was
ow my going to get my check by Tues-
rit day, but I sent it anyway
Security Sure enough, two weeks
er and later I got an email from the
company. A $25 late fee had
f birth, been tacked onto my new bill.
Just its way of saying "thank
,r know. you" for going paperless, I
guess.
Suddenly it became clear
where the money to pay the
CEO was coming from. While on hold wait-
ing to speak with another service repre-
sentative, I cut up the company's card into
many small pieces.
The good news is that the company
quickly removed the charge. And I see its
stock price hit a new low this month. Must
be I'm not the only one who switched to pa-
perless billing.

Jim Mullen's book "Now in Paperback" is
now in paperback. You can reach him at
jimm ullenbooks. com.


We are proud to welcome an all-around family
doctor who will provide excellent care for your whole
family. Dr. Alistair Co graduated from the Cebu
Institute of Medicine in the Philippines. He then
completed his residency at the Genesys Regional
Medical Center in Grand Blanc, Michigan. This
skilled physician can help with high blood pressure,
cholesterol management, diabetes management,
minor surgical procedures and much more. With
Dr. Co, you're a person first, and a patient second.


SUNCOAST PRIMARY CARE SPECIALISTS
10489 N. Florida Ave.
Citrus Springs, 352.489.2486
7991 S. Suncoast Blvd.
Homosassa, 352.382.8282
3733 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy.
Inverness, 352.341.5520


Today's MOVIES


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377
"Chronicle" (PG-13) 1:50 p.m., 4:45 p.m.,
7:50 p.m.
"The Grey" (R) ID required. 1:20 p.m.,
4:10 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
"Man on a Ledge" (PG-13) 1:30 p.m.,
4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
"One For The Money" (PG-13) 1:40 p.m.,
4:40 p.m., 7:40 p.m.
"Red Tails" (PG-13) 1 p.m., 4 p.m.,
7:10 p.m.
"Joyful Noise" (PG-13) 1:10 p.m.,
4:20 p.m., 7:05 p.m.
Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"The Woman in Black" (PG-13) 1:55 p.m.,
4:50 p.m., 7:45 p.m.
"Chronicle" (PG-13) 1:35 p.m., 4:30 p.m.,


7:30 p.m.
"Big Miracle" (PG) 1:20 p.m., 4:20 p.m.,
7:20 p.m.
"Man on a Ledge" (PG-13) 2 p.m.
4:35 p.m., 7:50 p.m.
"One For The Money" (PG-13) 1:45 p.m.,
4:05 p.m., 7:10 p.m.
"The Grey" (R) ID required. 1:30 p.m.,
4:45 p.m., 7:40 p.m.
"Underworld Awakening" (R) ID required.
In Real 3D. 1:30 p.m., 4:45 p.m., 7:40 p.m.
No passes.
"Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close"
(PG-13) 1:15 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:05 p.m.
"The Descendants" (R) ID required.
1:25 p.m., 4 p.m., 7 p.m.
Visit www.chronicleonline. com for area movie
listings and entertainment information.


For the RECORD


Divorces 1/23/12 to 1/29/12
Frank E. Demicoli vs. Bernadette G. Demicoli
Edward Ferguson, Citrus Springs vs. Ashton
Ferguson, Inverness
Randall Shawn Neeld, Beverly Hills vs.
Catherine Raeann Neeld, Inverness
Jeanette Lyn Nickelson, Ocala vs. Douglas
Charles Nickelson, Inverness
Eric W. Spafford, Inverness vs. Brenda M.
Spafford, Inverness
Scott A. Steffer, Lecanto vs. Cheryl J. Steffer,
Lecanto
Jeffrey M. Taccetta, Ocala vs. Kaela J.
Fitzpatrick, Inverness
Steven Becker Taylor, Crystal River vs.


Louisa Mathea Taylor, Homosassa
Marriages 1/23/12 to 1/29/12
Daniel Michael Mulvey, Citrus Springs/
Theresa Rose Smith, Citrus Springs
Marc Adam Smith, Inverness/Corinne Lee
Egbert, Inverness
Johnny Michael Sprouse, Hernando/Kelly
Anne Grady, Hernando
Joshua Brian Varkett, Crystal River/Delva
Patricia Dillon, Crystal River
Divorces and marriages filed in the state of
Florida are a matter of public record, available
from each county's Clerk of the Courts Office.
For Citrus County, call the clerk at (352)341-
6400 or visit www.clerk.citrus.fl.us/.


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Church invites you to join the...


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Treatment for Varicose and Spider Veins


I BEfu J I iAFTEI
I leel like I have a branch new legs I have
no more pain when slanting all day al
work anc my legs are now Iree Irom leg
ulcers Dr Saslry made a big aillerence in
my legs

I can finally wear shores again without
being embarrassed rom unsightly veins
A ly legs are beaulilul again


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H


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY SCHOOLS
Elementary schools
Breakfast
Monday: Ultra cinnamon bun,
grits, cereal and toast, juice and
milk variety.
Tuesday: Ham, egg and cheese
biscuit, tater tots, cereal and toast,
juice and milk variety.
Wednesday: Breakfast sausage
pizza, grits, cereal and toast, juice
and milk variety.
Thursday: Breakfast egg and
cheese wrap, oatmeal with fruit,
tater tots, cereal and toast, juice
and milk variety.
Friday: Pancake slider, grits, ce-
real and toast, juice and milk variety.
Lunch
Monday: Breaded chicken sand-
wich, uncrusted PBJ, turkey super
salad, yogurt parfait, fresh baby car-
rots, broccoli, seasoned rice,
peaches, milk, juice.
Tuesday: Baked chicken ten-
ders, turkey wrap, yogurt parfait,
fresh baby carrots, sweet corn,
baked beans, seasoned rice, fruit
juice bar, crackers, milk, juice.
Wednesday: Pasta with moz-
zarella and meat sauce, mozzarella
MaxStix, PB dippers, fresh garden
salad, green beans, chilled apple-
sauce, milk and juice.
Thursday: Hamburger on bun,
uncrusted PBJ, apple chicken super
salad, yogurt parfait, fresh baby car-
rots, broccoli, ranch pasta salad,
peach cup, crackers, milk, juice.
Friday: Baked chicken nuggets,
sausage pizza, PB dippers, fresh
garden salad, sweet peas, sea-
soned rice, mixed fruit, milk, juice.
Middle schools
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast sausage
pizza, MVP breakfast, grits, peach
cup, cereal and toast, milk, juice.
Tuesday: Sausage, egg and
cheese biscuit, ultra cinnamon bun,
tater tots, cereal and toast, milk,
juice.


Wednesday: Breakfast egg and
cheese wrap, MVP breakfast, tater
tots, cereal and toast, milk, juice.
Thursday: Breakfast sandwich
stuffer, ultimate breakfast round,
peach cup, grits, cereal and toast,
milk, juice.
Friday: Ham, egg and cheese
biscuit, ultra cinnamon bun, tater
tots, cereal and toast, milk, juice.
Lunch
Monday: Oven-baked breaded
chicken, chicken alfredo, yogurt
parfait, fresh baby carrots, peas and
carrots, seasoned mashed pota-
toes, cornbread, fruit juice bar, milk,
juice.
Tuesday: Pasta with mozzarella
and meat sauce, pepperoni pizza,
ham super salad, PB dippers, gar-
den salad, sweet corn, peas, warm
apple crisp, chilled pears, crackers,
milk, juice.
Wednesday: Hamburger on bun,
baked chicken nuggets, yogurt par-
fait, fresh baby carrots, green
beans, seasoned rice, colossal
crisp French fries, strawberry cup,
milk and juice.
Thursday: Stuffed-crust cheese
pizza, cheesy chicken and rice bur-
rito, chef super salad, PB dippers,
garden salad, glazed carrots, apple-
sauce, Jell-O, crackers, milk, juice.
Friday: Hot ham and cheese
sandwich, fajita chicken and rice,
apple chicken super salad, baby
carrots, green beans, ranch pasta
salad, peach cup, crackers, milk,
juice.
High schools
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast sausage
pizza, MVP breakfast, grits, peach
cup, cereal and toast, juice, milk.
Tuesday: Sausage, egg and
cheese biscuit, ultra cinnamon bun,
tater tots, cereal and toast, juice,
milk.
Wednesday: Breakfast egg and
cheese wrap, MVP breakfast, tater
tots, cereal and toast, juice, milk.


Thursday: Breakfast sausage
pizza, ultimate breakfast round,
grits, peach cup, cereal and toast,
juice, milk.
Friday: Breakfast sandwich
stuffer, ultra cinnamon bun, tater
tots, cereal and toast, juice, milk.
Lunch
Monday: Oriental orange
chicken, hamburger, pizza, fajita
chicken super salad, yogurt parfait,
baby carrots, green beans, French
fries, fruit juice bar, crackers, milk.
Tuesday: Turkey and gravy over
rice, chicken sandwich, pizza, ham
super salad, yogurt parfait, fresh
garden salad, peas, baked French
fries, peach cup, crackers, milk.
Wednesday: Macaroni and
cheese, pizza, hamburger, turkey
wrap, turkey super salad, PB dip-
pers, baby carrots, baked beans
corn, mixed fruit, cornbread, French
fries, crackers, milk.
Thursday: Crispy Mexican tacos,
chicken sandwich, pizza, ham
super salad, yogurt parfait, garden
salad, glazed carrots, Spanish rice,
French fries, applesauce, crackers,
milk.
Friday: Oven-baked breaded
chicken, hamburger, pizza, apple
chicken super salad, yogurt parfait,
fresh baby carrots, corn, peas, sea-
soned rice, French fries, strawberry
cup, crackers, milk.
Lecanto High School lunch
Monday: Hot ham and cheese,
macaroni and cheese, hamburger,
chicken sandwich, fajita chicken
salad, pizza, yogurt parfait, baby
carrots, green beans, baked beans,
French fries, fruit juice bar, crack-
ers, milk.
Tuesday: Oriental orange
chicken, hamburger, chicken sand-
wich, turkey and gravy over noo-
dles, ham salad, yogurt parfait,
pizza, garden salad, glazed carrots,
French fries, peach cup, crackers,
milk.
Wednesday: Brunch bowl,


chicken alfredo, hamburger, chicken
sandwich, pizza, turkey super
salad, yogurt parfait, baby carrots,
French fries, ranch pasta salad,
broccoli, tater tots, mixed fruit,
crackers, milk.
Thursday: Cheesy chicken and
rice burrito, hamburger, chicken
sandwich, macaroni and cheese,
pizza, ham super salad, yogurt par-
fait, garden salad, green beans,
sweet corn, applesauce, French
fries, crackers, milk.
Friday: Chicken tenders, pizza,
hamburger, chicken sandwich,
pasta with mozzarella and meat
sauce, apple chicken salad, yogurt
parfait, baby carrots, seasoned rice,
sweet peas, French fries, straw-
berry cup, crackers, milk.

SENIOR DINING
Monday: Pork riblet with brown
gravy, mashed sweet potatoes, gar-
den peas, cranberry-orange relish,
slice white bread with margarine,
low-fat milk.
Tuesday: Frankfurter with bun
and mustard and relish packets,
baked beans with tomato, carrot
coins, coleslaw, pineapple chunks,
low-fat milk.
Wednesday: Beef and macaroni
casserole with cheese, green
beans, yellow corn with red pep-
pers, mixed fruit, Italian bread with
margarine, low-fat milk.
Thursday: Birthday celebration
- Roast chicken thigh coq au vin,
herb mashed potatoes, stewed
tomatoes, birthday cake, whole-
grain roll, low-fat milk.
Friday: Beef stew with vegeta-
bles in gravy, parsley white rice,
Brussels sprouts, applesauce, slice
French bread with margarine, low-
fat milk.
Senior dining sites include:
Lecanto, East Citrus, Crystal River,
Homosassa Springs, Inverness and
South Dunnellon. For details, call
Support Services at 352-527-5975.


Feb. 6to 10 MENUS


I)ca PZ l Saturday, February 11, 2012 L3 6 to 11 p.m.
Sl-ruCO Citrus Springs Community Center
D J tA night filled with fun, food, open bar, music, dancing, live and silent auctions,
old west games and so much more!
? CRNI F E -- ~For more.. information call Citrus County ACS office 352-637-5577 or Dianne Brashear 352-726-6756














Accountability


Taking Care of Business, Taking Care of You.




Citrus Memorial Hospital is part of and serves the people of Citrus
County. Last year approximately 200,000 people depended on our
physicians, nurses, technicians and staff to provide necessary health
care at the hospital and our satellite offices.

But our responsibilities go beyond health care. We want to operate the
hospital, to provide services that increase our revenue so that we can
reduce our reliance on tax dollars.

We're proud to report that over the last 10 years we've improved our
efficiency, added services and improved our operations. That's despite
an increase in "uncompensated care'," lower reimbursement rates for f
our Medicare and Medicaid patients, and other factors.


Our connection to the community includes a commitment to the
physical and fiscal health of our community. We're taking care of
business, taking care of you.

Be well,


CITRUS MEMORIAL

iL/teM ~ ~ 4/'/i f~v~


Ryan Beaty
President and CEO


The table to the right shows you how tough it's been and how far
we've come. Over the years we've improved the financial strength of
the hospital by adding services, increasing efficiency and managing
our resources. Our goal is to reduce our reliance on tax dollars.
We're taking care of business and taking care of you.


Capital Investments $8,357,471
Charity and Uncompensated Care* $37,276,951
Health Fairs $95,000
Payroll and Benefits $76,950,708
Scholarships $70,000
Charitable Donations $34,133


Total Community Investment
* Charges, not costs


$122,784,263


Net Operating Margin Improvement
Excluding Taxes


2003 2011


0.00%
-2.00%
-4.00%
-6.00%
-8.00%
-10.00%


Worth NOTING

Elks slate Sweetheart Luau
West Citrus Elks Lodge No. 2693 will have
its Valentine Sweetheart Luau Tuesday, Feb.
14. Chef Ken will be preparing a special menu
for all members and guests to enjoy. Doors
open at 5 p.m. for cocktails. Entertainment will
feature Johnny "Lovable" Lobo playing roman-
tic favorites from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m.
Tickets are $14 per person and on sale in
the lounge.
Butterfly Club meets Feb. 14
Beverly Hills Butterfly Club will meet at 2
p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 14, at the community
building in Beverly Hills, 1 Civic Circle.
Speaker will be Gary Maidhof about the
dark side of butterfly collecting. This promises
to be a great subject for all of us who are inter-
ested in butterfly conservation and nature.
For information, call Chris at 352-527-8629.
Annual Maine Day is Feb. 14
The "Annual Maine Day" celebration will be
Tuesday, Feb. 14, at the Beverly Hills Recre-
ation Hall, 77 Civic Circle, Beverly Hills. Doors
open at 9:30 and serving starts at 11:30 a.m.
Cost is $5 per person plus a casserole or
salad to share. Coffee, iced tea, lemonade,
dessert and settings provided. Entertainment
will be by singer Carol Kline. All are welcome,
whether from Maine or not.
For details, call Mary Lou at 352-795-9181.
Flotilla charting course
Get help before you ever leave the dock:
Learn how to use and read a chart, the nauti-
cal equivalent of a road map. U.S. Coast
Guard Auxiliary Homosassa Flotilla 15-4 will
offer a course in charting from 7 to 9 p.m.
Tuesday, Feb. 14, and Thursday, Feb. 16, at
the West Citrus Community Center, 8940 Vet-
erans Drive in Homosassa.
The course will explain the importance of
having a nautical chart aboard recreational
boats. The course also will provide partici-
pants with the knowledge and skills to inter-
pret nautical charts, identify navigational
hazards, plot positions and courses, and use
charts to navigate local coastal waters. Cost is
$20. For information and a list of supplies to
bring, call Elaine Miranda at 352-564-2521 or
Rusty Hays at 352-598-4369.


LOCAL


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2012 All











NATION


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Nation BRIEF

Decisions


Russia, China veto UN on Syria


Associated Press
A caucus participant pre-
pares to mark her ballot
during a Republican cau-
cus meeting Saturday in
Las Vegas. A poll of Repub-
licans entering Nevada's
caucuses Saturday showed
that conservatives were
accounting for around four
in five voters, tying Iowa as
the most conservative
group of GOP voters so far
this year as the party picks
its presidential nominee.
Romney takes
lead in Nevada
LAS VEGAS Republi-
can presidential front-runner
Mitt Romney jumped to a
strong lead in the Nevada
caucuses Saturday night,
reaching for a second straight
campaign victory over a field
of rivals suddenly struggling
to keep pace.
Returns from four of 17
counties showed the former
Massachusetts governor
gaining 46 percent of the vote
in a state where fellow Mor-
mons turned out in heavy
numbers. Former House
Speaker Newt Gingrich was
running second with 21 per-
cent, while former Pennsylva-
nia Sen. Rick Santorum had
17 percent and Texas Rep.
Ron Paul 15 percent.
A victory for Romney would
cap a week that began with a
double-digit win in the Florida
primary. A total of 28 Republi-
can National Convention del-
egates were at stake in
caucuses held across a
sprawling state that drew little
attention in the nominating
campaign but figures to be a
fierce battleground in the fall
between the winner of the
GOP nomination and Presi-
dent Barack Obama.
According to the AP count,
Romney began the day with
87 of the 1,144 delegates
needed to win the Republican
nomination. Gingrich had 26,
Santorum 14 and Paul 4.

WorldBRIEFS

Shoveling


Associated Press
A Bosnian man shovels
deep snow to clear the
path for pedestrians Satur-
day in the Bosnian capital
of Sarajevo. Eastern Eu-
rope's unrelenting and
deadly cold snap produced
another heavy snowfall in
the Balkans on Saturday,
trapping people in their
homes and cars, causing
power outages, and closing
airports, railway stations
and bus services. In
Bosnia, about 30 people
whose vehicles were
trapped in a tunnel south of
Sarajevo called local radio
stations to appeal for help,
saying they had children


with them an
ning out of fue

Thousan
against
MOSCOW -
breath rising in t
frigid air, as man
protesters marcl
downtown Mosc
day to keep up t
on Prime Ministe
Putin one month
presidential elec
could extend his
more years.


Associated Press
UNITED NATIONS -
The U.N. Security Council
failed again Saturday to
take decisive action to stop
the escalating violence in
Syria as Russia and China
blocked a resolution back-
ing an Arab League plan
that calls for President
Bashar Assad to step down.
The double-veto outraged
the U.S. and European
council members who
feared it would embolden
the Assad regime.
In an unusual weekend
session, 13 members of the
council, including the
United States, Britain and
France, voted in favor of the
resolution aimed at stop-
ping the brutal crackdown
in Syria that has killed thou-
sands of people since anti-


government protests
erupted a year ago.
It was the second time in
four months that Russia and
China used their veto power
to block a Security Council
resolution condemning the
violence in Syria. Damascus
has been a key Russian ally
since Soviet times and
Moscow has opposed any
U.N. call that could be inter-
preted as advocating mili-
tary intervention or regime
change. The rare double-
veto was issued following
days of high-level negotia-
tions aimed at overcoming
Russian opposition to the
draft resolution. In a true
display of diplomatic brinks-
manship, the U.S., European
nations and the Arab League
ultimately decided to call
Russia's bluff on its threats
to block the measure despite


its overwhelming support
among council members.
Moscow went ahead and
used its veto, bringing Bei-
jing along in support.
Several European envoys
said before the session that
they felt compelled to call
for the vote despite Russia's
attempts to seek a delay be-
cause they were concerned
about the latest outbreak of
violence in Syria.
The urgency was height-
ened by a weekend assault by
Syrian forces firing mortars
and artillery on the city of
Homs. Activists said more
than 200 people were killed
in what they called the blood-
iest episode of the nearly 11-
month-old uprising against
Assad. The U.N. said in De-
cember that more than 5,400
people have been killed
since March, but it has been
unable to update its count for
weeks due to the chaos.
After the vote, U.S. Am-


bassador Susan Rice said
the United States was "dis-
gusted" by the vetoes, ac-
cusing Russia and China of
aiming to "sell out the Syr-
ian people and shield a
craven tyrant." She said
their "intransigence is even
more shameful" because
Russia continues to supply
weapons to Syria.
"For months this council
has been held hostage by a
couple of members," Rice
said. "These members stand
behind empty arguments
and individual interests
while delaying and seeking
to strip bare any text that
would pressure Assad to
change his actions.
"Any further bloodshed
that flows will be on their
hands," she added.
Both President Barack
Obama and Secretary of
State Hillary Rodham Clin-
ton had urged passage of the
resolution earlier Saturday


limits


Associated Press
Gibr6 George, who started a Facebook page called "Don't Call Me African-American," sits Tuesday at the lounge
where he works in Hollywood, Fla. The labels used to describe Americans of African descent mark the movement
of a people from the slave house to the White House. Today, many are resisting this progression by holding on
to a name from the past: "black."

Some blacks insisting: 'I'm not African-American'


Associated Press
The labels used to describe
Americans of African descent mark
the movement of a people from the
slave house to the White House.
Today, many are resisting this pro-
gression by holding on to a name
from the past: "black."
For this group some de-
scended from U.S. slaves, some im-
migrants with a separate history-
"African-American" is not the sign
of progress hailed when the term
was popularized in the late 1980s.
Instead, it's a misleading connec-
tion to a distant culture.
The debate has waxed and waned
since African-American went main-
stream, and gained new significance
after the son of a black Kenyan and
a white American moved into the
White House. President Barack
Obama's identity has been con-


tested from all sides, renewing ques-
tions that have followed millions of
darker Americans:
What are you? Where are you
from? And how do you fit into this
country?
"I prefer to be called black," said
Shawn Smith, an accountant from
Houston. "How I really feel is, I'm
American."
I don't like African-American. It
denotes something else to me than
who I am," said Smith, whose par-
ents are from Mississippi and
North Carolina. "I can't recall any
of them telling me anything about
Africa. They told me a whole lot
about where they grew up in Ma-
comb County and Shelby, N.C."
Gibr6 George, an entrepreneur
from Miami, started a Facebook
page called "Don't Call Me African-
American" on a whim. It now has
about 300 "likes."


"We respect our African her-
itage, but that term is not really us,"
George said. "We're several gener-
ations down the line. If anyone
were to ship us back to Africa, we'd
be like fish out of water
"It just doesn't sit well with a
younger generation of black peo-
ple," continued George, who is 38.
"Africa was a long time ago. Are we
always going to be tethered to
Africa? Spiritually I'm American.
When the war starts, I'm fighting
for America."
The Rev Jesse Jackson is widely
credited with taking African-
American mainstream in 1988, be-
fore his second presidential run.
"Every ethnic group in this coun-
try has a reference to some land
base, some historical, cultural
base," Jackson told reporters at the
time. "African-Americans have hit
that level of cultural maturity."


For Facebook 'Hacker Way is way of life


Associated Press


d were run- NEW YORK Face-
I. book's billionaire CEO
Mark Zuckerberg calls him-
self a "hacker"
ds rally For most people, that word
Putin means something malicious
Their frozen shady criminals who lis-
he brutally ten in on private voicemails
y as 120000 or anonymous villains who
y as 120,000 cripple websites and break
hed through into email accounts.
:ow on Satur- For Facebook, though,
he pressure "hacker" means something
er Vladimir different. It's an ideal that
before a permeates the company's
;tion that culture. It explains the
3 rule for six push to try new ideas (even
if they fail), and to promote
-From wire reports new products quickly even


if they're imperfect). The
hacker approach has made
Facebook one of the world's
most valuable Internet
companies.
Hackers "believe that
something can always be
better, and that nothing is
ever complete," Zuckerberg
explains. "They just have to
go fix it often in the face
of people who say it's im-
possible or are content with
the status quo."
Zuckerberg penned those
words in a 479-word essay
called "The Hacker Way,"
which he included in the
document the company
filed with government regu-
lators about its plans for an


initial public offering.
The 27-year-old, who has
a $28.4 billion stake in the
stock deal, uses the H-word
12 times in the essay;
"shareholder" appears just
once. Should Zuckerberg
have left those references
out of his IPO manifesto,
knowing full-well it could
scare off potential in-
vestors? He could easily
have described Facebook as
"nimble" or "agile" instead.
"Symbolically, it doesn't
bode well to Facebook and
to potential investors," says
Robert D'Ovidio, an associ-
ate professor of criminal
justice at Drexel University
in Philadelphia who studies


computer crime. "I think it
shows maybe an immaturity
on his part. He should defi-
nitely know better"
By using the word,
Zuckerberg is also trying to
reclaim it. To him, Steve
Jobs and the founders of
many of the world's biggest
technology companies were
hackers.
"The word 'hacker' has
an unfairly negative conno-
tation from being portrayed
in the media as people who
break into computers,"
Zuckerberg writes. "In real-
ity, hacking just means
building something quickly
or testing the boundaries of
what can be done."


Associated Press
Russian Ambassador to the
United Nations Vitaly Churkin
speaks to reporters Saturday
after the Security Council
voted on a resolution back-
ing an Arab League peace
plan that calls for Syrian
President Bashar Assad to
step down at United Nations
headquarters. Russia and
China vetoed the resolution.



Iran


launches


new


military


exercises
Associated Press
TEHRAN, Iran Iran
began ground military exer-
cises Saturday and defiantly
warned that it could cut off
oil exports to "hostile" Eu-
ropean nations as tensions
rise over suggestions that
military strikes are an in-
creasing possibility if sanc-
tions fail to rein in the
Islamic Republic's nuclear
program.
Tehran has stepped up its
rhetoric as international
pressure mounts over alle-
gations that it is seeking to
develop atomic weapons, a
charge it denies.
Iran's Supreme Leader
Ayatollah Ali Khamenei has
issued stern warnings
against any possible U.S. or
Israeli attacks against
Tehran's nuclear facilities.
Western forces also have
boosted their naval pres-
ence in the Gulf led by the
American aircraft carrier
USS Abraham Lincoln.
The new military maneu-
vers came weeks after Iran
rolled out its troops and ar-
senals in an unprecedented
display of military readi-
ness, with 10 days of naval
maneuvers that included
the first threats to block Gulf
oil tankers in early January
Ground forces also were
sent on winter war games -
against what a Tehran mili-
tary spokesman called a
"hypothetical enemy" -
with U.S. forces just over
the border in Afghanistan.
Plans for new Iranian
naval games in the Persian
Gulf off the country's south-
ern coast have been in the
works for weeks.
Iranian state media re-
ported the ground maneu-
vers of the elite
Revolutionary Guard
started Saturday near Jiroft,
745 miles south of the capi-
tal Tehran. No more details
were available, but it ap-
peared that they were
small-scale exercises and
not linked to the planned
major naval maneuvers
near the Strait of Hormuz,
the route for one-fifth of the
world's crude oil.
Iranian officials and law-
makers repeatedly have
threatened to close the strait,
which funnels down to a wa-
terway no wider than 30
miles at the mouth of the
Gulf, in retaliation for sanc-
tions that affect Iran's oil ex-
ports. But they have as yet
made no attempts to disrupt
shipping through the water-
way, and the U.S. and other
Western powers have warned
they would respond swiftly to
any attempts at a blockade.


U.S. ambassador 'disgusted'


Term


89*,,
Aq P--






* Veterans Notes can be found on Page
A15 of today's Chronicle.


EXCURSIONS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


NEIL SAWYER/Special to the Chronicle
A chinstrap penguin expresses his displeasure by nip-
ping at a visitor's boot. I A gentoo penguin.


Visit down to the seventh continent


NEIL SAWYER
Special to the Chronicle


A visit to the Antarctic
Centre in Christchurch,
NZ, in 2010, was the
catalyst for me to actually
go to Antarctica in January 2012.
Prior to that experience, my
response to the question of going or
not going would have been, "Why
would anyone want to go there -
subzero cold, stinging horizontal
snow and the hazard of
never-thawing ice?"

Now I can answer that question.
Antarctica is frequently referred to as the seventh
continent, only because it is usually the last of the seven
continents to be visited, and we followed tradition by
recently claiming our seventh
continental visit on a small expe-
dition ship.
As we departed Ushuaia, Ar-
gentina, the southernmost city in
the world, we cruised the Beagle
Channel for several hours, led by
pods of dusky dolphins, before
breaking free of calm waters by
entering the Drake Passage -fa-
mous as the most turbulent body
Neil Sawyer of water on the globe. Prior to
SPONTANEOUS this, however, when we first en-
TRAVELSR tered our cabin at dockside, I
TRAVELER took a picture of our bed -
turned down for the night with a
strap across it- when my wife
asked me, "What's the strap for?" She was more curious
than satisfied when I told her, "To keep you from falling
out of bed."
The Drake Passage is the narrowest body of water be-
tween Antarctica and the land masses to the north -
Australia/New Zealand, South Africa and South Amer-
ica. This narrow stretch of water is often whipped into
frenzy by prevailing winds and turbulence caused by
cold water from the south mixing with warmer water
from the north. Our ship with 106 passengers, however,
proved its sea-worthiness against these forces of nature.
Two days later as we entered the South Shetland Is-
lands, the waters calmed and we began enjoying the
barren scenery of icebergs, numerous islands of vol-
canic origin and islands virtually covered with thou-
sands of penguins. As we progressed, we encountered
islands more and more covered with snow and ice, until
finally we became immersed in a world of white.
Words cannot convey the awe and exhilaration one
feels by standing on deck facing walls of ice and fields
of snow hundreds of feet high, as we slip by unnoticed
by everything except the penguins and an occasional
seal.
Huge sculptures of weathered and broken ice domi-
nate the landscape, being pushed and squeezed up-
ward into grotesque heaps and shapes, as the glaciers
ease their way to water's edge a trek of thousands of
years, finally calving to begin their slow and wayward
drift to the north, as icebergs.


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Special to the Chronicle


Neil and Karyn Sawyer mug for the camera during a visit to Antarctica, the seventh continent.
- I


Crabeater seals and penguins, mostly young ones, share the beach.
icebreaker hull and would accommodate 106 passengers.


Weather conditions in Antarctica are not conducive
to animal or plant life; therefore, mammals, reptiles
and greenery are nonexistent on the continent, except
for penguins and seals which inhabit only the coastal
fringes.
If there is a climax to our journey into that icy nether-
world, it was by zodiac that we experienced, at water
level, the sea ice closing around us, discovering one
bizarre iceberg after another, or a lone seal drifting by
on his personal ice float On two different zodiac out-
ings we experienced the thrill of blizzards creating
complete whiteouts, as the weather could change in
just a few minutes' time. Twenty-two hours of summer
daylight didn't seem like quite enough time to absorb
all that was offered.


About those straps on the bed they would have
spared a rude awakening for a couple of fellow passen-
gers who ended up on the floor, with one sandwiched
between his upturned bed and the wall -he had
bruises to prove it! There were reports of others who
were treated to the same fate. Straps on beds are good
things under the right conditions.
Large cruise ships visit the area for a look-see, but if
you wish to truly experience the elements of the
Antarctic the thrill of planting your boots on ageless
ice fields and have penguins nipping at your heels -
you must go there on a small ship that can maneuver
around the icebergs and get in close for landings by the
zodiacs. Because there are no docking facilities, it's a
tedious exercise getting on and off zodiacs which are
bouncing in the surf on the rocky shores.
If you plan to go to Antarctica, start planning now for
a trip between November 2012 to March 2013, the open
season for visiting the continent, with mid-January the
peak of summer and probably the most ideal time to go.


Neil Sawyer is a 25-year Crystal River resident and
businessman. Traveling is a hobby for Neil and his wife,
Karyn. They enjoy independent travel, small ships
and small-group guided tours. Email him
atgobuddy@tampabay.rrcom.


Mountain majesty

Chuck and Ginni Swenson pose atop Sulphur Mountain with Cascade Mountain
in the background in Banff, Alberta, Canada. The photo was snapped during
their trip to the Canadian Rockies and Glacier National Park in August in
celebration of their 45th wedding anniversary.
Special to the Chronicle


DREAM
VACATIONS


The Chronicle and The
Accent Travel Group are
sponsoring a photo con-
test for readers of the
newspaper.


Readers are invited to
send a photograph from
their Dream Vacation with a
brief description of the trip.
If it's selected as a win-
ner, it will be published in
the Sunday Chronicle. At
the end of the year, a
panel of judges will select
the best photo during the
year and that photograph


will win a prize.
Please avoid photos
with dates on the print.
Photos should be sent
to the Chronicle at 1624
N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429
or dropped off at the
Chronicle office in Inver-
ness, Crystal River or any
Accent Travel Office.


G .






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


It's best to stay


away from sister


SUNDAY EVENING FEBRUARY 5, 2012 C:Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D: Comcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F:OakForest H Holiday Heights
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5 *** "Sleepless in Seattle"(1993) Tom **** "E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial" (1982) Henry Thomas. A **** "E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial"
M I 55 64 55 Hanks, Meg Ryan. Premiere.'PG California boy befriends a homesick alien. (1982) 'PG'
2 35 52 19 21 Puppy Bowl VIII (In Pup Bowl VIII Puppies play on a tiny football Puppy Bowl VIII Puppies play on a tiny football Puppy Bowl VIII (In
N 52 35 52 19 21 Stereo) 'G' field. (In Stereo) 'G' field. (In Stereo) 'G' Stereo) 'G'
S RReed eed Reed Reed Reed Reed Reed Reed Reed Reed TheMo'Nique Show
iT 96 19 96 Between Between Between Between Between Between Between Between Between Between 14'
RIAl 254 51 254 Real Housewives Real Housewives Housewives/Atl. Housewives/Atl. Real Housewives Housewives/Atl.
'"JoeDirt" (2001) -osh.O Tosh.0 Key,& Tosh. Tosh.0 Tosh.0 To osO .0 oh.0 ToshO sh.0
CC 27 61 27 33 David Spade. PG-13' 14' '14' Peele14' 14' 14' '14' '14' '14' '14' '14'
Dallas Cowboys Dallas Cowboys Dallas Cowboys Dallas Cowboys Dallas Cowboys Dallas Cowboys
98 45 98 28 37 Cheerleaders Cheerleaders Cheerleaders Cheerleaders Cheerleaders Cheerleaders
ICNBCl 43 42 43 FREE Paid UPS/Fed. Wall St. American Greed American Greed Steve Jobs: Billion Apocalypse 2012
iCNNi 40 29 40 41 46 CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) Big Hits-Drms Piers Morgan CNN Newsroom (N) Big Hits-Drms
S**"High School **) "High School Musical 3: Senior Year" A.N.T Jessie Shake It Good Austin & A.N.T
S 46 40 46 6 5 Musical 2" (2007) (2008) Zac Efron. (In Stereo) 'G' B Farm'G' 'G' Up! N Charlie Ally'G' Farm'G'
IESPNI 33 27 33 21 17 Strong Strong Strong |Strong Strong Strong Strongest Man SportCtr NFL PrimeTime (N) SportCtr
(ESPN21 34 28 34 43 49 World, Poker World, Poker World, Poker World, Poker World, Poker World, Poker
EWTNI 95 70 95 48 Ben. ICrossing Sunday Night Prime Living The G.K. Rosary Franciscan Univ. Saints Bookmark
** "Bring It On: All or ** "Mamma Mia!"(2008) Meryl Streep. A single hotelier *** "Dirty Dancing" (1987) Jennifer Grey A sheltered
(FAji 29 52 29 20 28 Nothing prepares for her daughter's wedding. teen falls for a street-wise dance instructor.
IFND 44 37 44 32 Fox News Sunday FOX Report (N) Huckabee (N) Fox News Sunday Geraldo at Large (N) Huckabee
FOOD 26 56 26 Cupcake Wars Cupcake Wars Cupcake Wars Cupcake Wars Cupcake Wars (N) Chopped
FS D 35 39 35 World Poker Tour: UFC Ultimate Knockouts (Taped) The Best of Pride (N) PAC Game 365 World PokerTour:
** "Ice Age: The Meltdown" (2006, Comedy) ** "lce Age: Dawn of the Dinosaurs" (2009) ** "lce Age: Dawn of the Dinosaurs" (2009)
:FX 30 60 30 51 Voices of ay Romano.'PG' Voices of Ray Romano.'PG' Voices of Ray Romano.'PG'
GOLF 727 67 727 Golf Central (N) *** "Tin Cup" (1996, Comedy) Kevin Costner'R' PGA Tour Golf Central
** "The Wedding Dress" (2001, Drama) Tyne "A Crush on You"(2011, Romance-Comedy) ** "The Engagement Ring" (2005,
H 39 68 39 45 54 Daly, Margaret Colin. B Brigid Brannagh. 'NR' Romance) Patricia Heaton. N
S*** "Titanic" (1997, Drama Leonardo DiCaprio. A woman falls for an Luck (N) (In Stereo) Luck (In Stereo)'MA' Luck (In Stereo)'MA' m
302 201 302 2 artist aboard the ill-fated ship. (In Stereo) 'PG-13' N 'MA' "
HGTV 23 57 23 42 52 House Hunters Holmes on Homes Holmes on Homes Holmes Inspection Holmes Inspection Property Brothers'G'
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HISTY 51 25 51 32 42 'PG' 'PG' PG' PG 'PG' 'PG' 'PG' 'PG' 'PG PG' 'PG' 'PG'
S*** "Nora Roberts' High Noon"(2009, *** "Nora Roberts'Tribute"(2009, Romance) "Nora Roberts' Montana Sky" (2007, Drama)
LIFE] 24 38 24 31 Suspense) Emilie de Ravin. NR' Brittany Murphy Jason Lewis.N John Corbett.'NR'
** "What Color Is Love?" (2009, .,, .,, ~~1,i ** "Jersey Girl" (2004, Romance-Comedy) "Like Dandelion Dust"(2009, Drama) Mira
50 119 Jennifer Finnigan.'NR'N bE L Affleck, LivTyler. PG-13 Sorvino, Barry Pepper. PG-13'
i 320 221 3** 2 "Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps" *** "Big Fish"(2003 Drama) Ewan ** "The Dilemma" 2011, Comedy) Vince
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I 37 43 37 27 36 Hunters Hunters Hunters Hunters Hunters Hunters Hunters Hunters Hunters Hunters Hunters Hunters
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[B) 36 31 36 Phenoms Gymnastics Shape TV Adv. Sport. Flats Animals'G'
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31 59 31 26 29 This Mother Out" of Blood" into the Fae.N
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S 49 23 49 16 19 Comedy) DebraMessing.'PG-13'" accountant woo an heiress. 'PG-13' B Eva Mendes.'PG-13'
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Dear Annie: My hus-
band's sister is im-
possible. "Anabel" is
bitter, nasty, venal, snide
and vicious. She can't wait
two minutes before making
a cruel remark.
Soon after my husband
and I moved back to his
hometown, he had a stroke
at the age of 52. He's recov-
ering, thankfully. The first
person I notified was An-
abel. She came to the hospi-
tal and put on a great show
of support, but as soon as we
were alone, she'd say
charming things like, "You
should rest- oh, wait, you'd
better not. I don't think I
could pull your big butt out
of the chair." After three
days of being
belittled and
abused by her, I
had a break-
down at the hos-
pital. The
nurses told An-
abel to leave
and not return
unless another
family member
was with her
She has tried
to undermine
everything re- ANNI
garding my hus- MAILI
band's
after-stroke
care. She brought him a
pizza while in rehab, and I
went ballistic. But here's the
kicker: When my husband
and I arrived at his after-
care rehab appointment, we
saw Anabel coming out of
the training room using a
walker. We had no idea
she'd been ill.
While my husband had
therapy, I talked to Anabel,
and she finally confessed
that she'd nearly died a year
before. When I asked why
she hadn't told anyone, she
simply shrugged. I told her
she would have been furi-
ous if I hadn't notified her of
my husband's stroke. Later,
she told the rest of the fam-
ily I was a monster and had
stopped my husband from
coming to see her.
I no longer wish to have
any contact with Anabel. My
husband is cordial to her,
and she thinks this gives her
carte blanche to keep bab-
bling about how horrible we
are. Other than ignoring her
and the rest of this miser-
able breed, can you think of
any other way to deal with
the situation? No Name,
Please
Dear No Name: You had a
slight opportunity to im-
prove things by showing An-
abel some sympathy about
her condition, but we un-
derstand that you were too


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Loafed
6 Port city in Iraq
11 Shining
16 Condition
21 "-- Paris in ..."
22 Ram constellation
23 Suburb of Dallas
24 Havana native
25 Retreads
26 Gaza or Sunset
27 Kitchen gadget
28 A leavening
29 tide
30 Quality of silk
31 Danger
32 Rodent
34 Holy woman (abbr.)
35 Theater district
38 Jump
40 Traditional story
41 Pinna
42 "- No Mountain High
Enough"
44 Garment slit
45 Environment
(prefix)
47 Kind of party
49 Crick
52 Weather outlook
54 Anger
56 Attempt
60 Strong and healthy
61 Sausage
62 Victim
63 Fish in a can
65 Terminate
66 Something
regrettable
67 Invalid
68 Forever --- day
69 Nothing
70 Stone or space
71 Fastens
72 Singing voice
73 Runner
74 Play part
76 Refuse to let up
78 Kick
79 Christian
Andersen
80 Passover meal
81 Wapiti
82 Rasp
83 Took off
84 Farm denizen
85 Resin used in
varnish
88 Monk's room


Dinghy or trawler
Fought
Loos or Bryant
Regret
King's entertainer
Classify
MDs' org.
Pink lady
ingredient
Degree holder, for short
Cut short
English county
Kettle
Request earnestly
Pillow cover
Ornamental mat
Ceremony
Koontz or Martin
Double-cross
Search
Fertile spots
- rosa
That man's
Kind of counter
Daybreak
Big boat
Stage show
Object
Engrossed
Ari Canaan
"With it"
Something
hilarious
Smudge
Rule
Century plant
"Semper Fidelis" composer
Yet
Gap
Quibble
One who loafs
Flower part
Wildly
unconventional
Work dough
Squalid
Hippodrome
War horse


DOWN
1 Metric measure
2 Excuse
3 "- the Greek"
4 Holiday time
5 Moines
6 Big party
7 Commedia dell'-
8 Beget


Make over
Deadly creature
Spring time
Gleamed
Be without
United
Fret
Tool for reaping
- and cry
Lower in prestige
Ristorante fare
Answer to a knock
Child
Furrow
Be present at
Metallic fabric
Gratuity
Every
Extinct bird
AWOL student
Clamp of a kind
Exclaim
Cigar residue
Stingy
Place for shooting
Birch family
member
Weapons
Discord personified
Crews
Sharpened
Relating to sheep
Harrison's
successor
Kitchen tool
Pillar
Tape housing
Amount of overflow
Weathercock
A relative
Bovine creature
Float
Penny
Pants part
Heap
Recuperate
Quarrel
Roller coaster
inversion
Potter or
Belafonte
Imprisoned
Cat- -tails
Ship of 1492
Box
Big noise
Cooked a certain way
- lazuli
Overact


Sticky fruits
Make worn by rubbing
Send
Disorderly mob
Censured
Before long
Hospital workers (abbr.)
- Lanka
Hot rod
Harangue
Old possessive


Mil. rank
Have
Supported
Bridle part
Ventilate
Take (surprise)
Lear's daughter
Rascal
Orbital point
Ancient
Gladden


Puzzle answer is on Page A16.


2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


upset to do so. Her abusive
personality and your anger
make it unlikely that you
two will find common
ground. However, she is
your husband's sister, and
he apparently wants to
maintain contact. Please
allow him to do so, and re-
move yourself from the
equation by staying away
whenever possible.
Dear Annie: I've been
with my boyfriend for a
decade. We have children
together and jointly own
cars, a house and a busi-
ness. I've been pushing the
issue of marriage for three
years. So far, he won't
budge. I've given him dead-
lines and ultimatums, and
still nothing.
I love him
dearly, and I know
he loves me, too,
but I'm at the end
of my rope. What
should I do? -
N.C.
Dear N.C.:
Honey, you haven't
given him dead-
lines and ultima-
tums. You've given
him empty threats
E'S and let him off the
BOX hook. Either ac-
cept the situation
as it is, or leave.
Find out whether your 10-
year union is protected
legally under common-law
marriage statutes. Talk to a
lawyer about child support
and your business entangle-
ments. When he knows you
are truly serious about leav-
ing, he may offer marriage,
but don't count on it. You
should act according to
what you think is best for
you, and not because you
are trying to manipulate
him.
Dear Annie: I found the
solution to getting my 20-
year-old grandson to say
thanks for gifts. I always
gave him between $50 and
$100 for his birthday and
Christmas, depending on
my financial circumstances
at the time.
Finally, I decided if I did-
n't hear from him, I'd give
him less money On his last
birthday, I sent only $10. Be-
lieve it or not, he immedi-
ately got with the program
and sent a thank-you email.
You really have to love
grandchildren. Grandma


Email questions to
anniesmailbox
@comcast.net, or write to:
Annie's Mailbox, c/o
Creators Syndicate,
737 Third Street, Hermosa
Beach, CA 90254.


Mother-of-pearl
Suit material
Govern
Little bit
- vital
- breve
By way of
Poem
Mineral spring
Call for help
Place


A14 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2012


ENTERTAINMENT


II
[]





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Veterans &IN SERVICE


Due to space considera-
tions, the Veterans Notes
sometimes contain only basic
information regarding each
post. For more information
about scheduled activities,
meals and more for a specific
post, call or email that post at
the contact listed.
Inverness Primary
School's 17th annual Veterans
Dinner will be at 5 p.m. Friday,
Feb. 17, in Inverness Primary
School Cafetorium. Students
and staff at Inverness Primary
School invite all veterans and a
guest to come and be honored
at the dinner and program. Din-
ner will be provided this year by
Rustic Ranch Restaurant.
There is no cost. Dinner is at 5
p.m. and the program will be at
6 p.m.
The theme this year is "Wel-
come Home our Vietnam Veter-
ans." For more information, call
352-726-2632.
Red Tail Memorial Chap-
ter 136 of the Air Force Associ-
ation will meet at 7 p.m. Feb.
16 at Ocala Regional Airport
Administration Building, 750
S.W. 60th Ave.
Jason Teaman from U.S.
Rep. Cliff Stearns' staff will talk
about how high school students
apply to the U.S. military
academies.
All are welcome. Call Mike
Emig at 352-854-8328.
The U.S. Air Force is
looking for prior enlisted men
and women from all services in-
terested in both direct duty as-
signments in previously
obtained career fields or retrain-
ing into select career fields.
"A nationwide drive is under
way to fill openings requiring
skills many veterans already
possess," said SSgt. Eric
Hurley, from Inverness. "Some
of the careers include aircraft
electronics/mechanical areas,
cyber operation fields, and vari-
ous other specialties. Enlisted
career openings that include
the opportunities to retrain con-
sist of special operations posi-
tions and unmanned aerial
vehicle."


Special to the Chronicle
Cadets from the Manatee Division and the Centurion Battalion of the U.S. Naval Sea Cadet Corps participated recently at Doe Lake in Ocala
National Forest in a weekend field exercise.


Sea Cadets gather for weekend field exercise


Special to the Chronicle

Cadets from the Manatee Divi-
sion and the Centurion Battalion of
the U.S. Naval Sea Cadet Corps
began gathering on a Friday
evening recently around sunset at
Doe Lake in Ocala National Forest
to participate in a weekend field
exercise.
Adult leaders arrived early to set
up the GP Medium tents to house
the participants for the weekend,
while other volunteers prepared
the kitchen for the 60-plus cadets
and 10 instructors who would need
to be fed.
Cadets were checked in and
grouped into squads, each with a


Assignment locations are
based on Air Force needs. For
more information, call 352-
476-4915.
Citrus County Veterans
Coalition has a new building
holding freezers, refrigerators
and all necessary requirements
to provide food to veterans in
need. Food donations and vol-
unteers are always welcomed
and needed.


petty officer to lead them. A brief
welcome from Commanding Offi-
cer James McClure set the tone:
"This weekend is not about tearing
you down, it is about building you
up. Everyone will succeed and
have fun."
After a quick pizza dinner, they
headed out on their first night pa-
trol, quickly learning to act as a
team.
The next morning, awakened by
a harsh siren at 5 a.m., cadets
hastily prepared for inspection and
began their PT regimen, part of
which was a friendly competition
to air up the inflatable Zodiacs they
would use later that day By 8 a.m.,
they were all ready for chow.


The CCVC is on the DAV
property in Inverness at the cor-
ner of Paul and Independence,
off U.S. 41 north. Hours of op-
eration are 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Tuesday and Thursday. Ap-
pointments are encouraged by
calling 727-492-0292.
CCVC general meetings are
at 10 a.m. the fourth Thursday
monthly at the DAV building in
Inverness. All active duty and


Navy Seal training was next on
the agenda. The squads were de-
briefed on the previous night's ac-
tivities and learned new
maneuvers and tactics that they
would use for their next deploy-
ment in the field.
Cadets were reminded of the
proper way to board a Zodiac and
were outfitted with paddle and
personal floatation device for their
turn on the boats. Eight at a time
made up a crew, plus the cadet
trained to operate the motor. This
was a privilege for most cadets who
previously had only been under-
way in a Zodiac via their own man-
power
After a lunch of MREs, squads


honorably discharged veterans,
their spouses, widows and wid-
owers, along with other veter-
ans' organizations and current
coalition members are wel-
come. Members are encour-
aged to attend general
meetings.
Annual membership donation
is $10 for a calendar year or
$25 for three years. The CCVC
is a nonprofit corporation, and


your donations are tax de-
ductible. Current members
should check their membership
card for expiration dates, and
renew with Gary Williamson at
352-527-4537, or at the meet-
ing. Visit www.ccvcfl.org.
Blanton-Thompson
American Legion Post 155,
6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway,
Crystal River. For information
about the post and its activities,


strategized about routes they
would take once dropped off in the
woods, with the ultimate goal to
make it back to camp before being
caught. Using their recently gained
knowledge, cadets acted together
to find their way through the field
undetected.
The second evening was a good
time for camaraderie and to reflect
on the activities of the past day and
a half.
Sunday morning was another
round of PT, breakfast and dis-
missal from what was a productive
and enjoyable field exercise be-
tween two cadet groups, demon-
strating the goals of the program in
a vivid way


call Cmdr. Jay Conti Sr. at
352-795-6526 or visit
www.postl55.org.
American Legion Auxil-
iary Unit 155 meets at 7:30
p.m. the fourth Tuesday of
every month at the post. The
American Legion Auxiliary is
the world's largest women's pa-
triotic service organization with

See VETERANS/Page A16


Annual holiday cruise

^^^^^^Hf*^^^l!B=:K^^^^^^^^^^^^--


Special to the Chronicle
Tally Ho Vacations spent the Christmas and New Year's Eve on board the Norwegian Star
from Tampa. The group was able to enjoy both celebrations while they visited Roatan,
Belize, Costa Maya and Cozumel on their journey. All are welcome to join them for the 2012
Holiday Cruise with Royal Caribbean for Dec. 22 through 27. Call 352-860-2805 or email
dmuir@tallyhovacations.com.


SO YOU KNOW
* News briefs submitted
by travel clubs associ-
ated with for-profit
travel agencies must be
run as paid advertise-
ments in the Chronicle.
This information in-
cludes trips, travel
shows and meetings to
plan trips and events by
those groups. Civic and
social group trips being
coordinated through
travel agencies are also
included in this policy.
Nonprofit groups or
churches that plan ex-
cursions as social trips
and fundraisers (where
all generated funds ben-
efit that group and its
works) are still invited to
submit their items as
free news briefs for the
travel section. For
more information about
paid advertisements,
call Saralynne
Schlumberger,
352-563-6363, ext.
1367, for information.


Doors open at 11:00 a.m.
Lunch at Noon
1:00 p.m. games,
doorprizes & raffles


$12 per person at office
Advance Reservations Required
by March 9, 2012

WE WANT YOU!
352.746.4882 352.746.3636
Central Ridge Community Center At Beverly Hills
77 Civic Circle

CiIA(FNl K E
000AFOQa.,Idlcl mal m


Nov. 19,2012 Panama Canal July 1,2012 Alaska Cruise Tour
Sunfarer Holland America's Holland America Statendam-13 Days
Zuiderdam-11 Days 7 day cruise starting at $2,416.07
Prices starting at $1,604.87 Price includes taxes and any port charges.
and do include port charges, taxes and fees. Air quote at time of booking.

THE **TRAVEL CLUB L
Full Service Travel Agency
527-8002 476-4242 Ger
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Nights 13 days including 7 night cruise with
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4-night Bahamas departs February 28, 2012 from $229*
11-night Eastern Med departs October 21, 2012 from $949*
7-niqht Bermuda departs Florida April 13, 2013 from $719*


For Reservations and Information, call:
THE TRAVEL AUTHORITY
(352) 628-0668
Rates are USD cruise only, per person based on double occupancy for US and Canadian
citizens Space is subject to availability, capacity controlled, & restrictions apply Government
Taxes & Fees are additional $4750 2/28/12, $2760 10/21/12 & $10444 4/13/13 per person
Offers cannot be combined with other promotions Ship's Registry Panama


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Every Sunday
2 Food coupons
$55 Free Play 1 PP/Do
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2 Food coupons
$55 Free Play
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Pick Up at Spanish Springs Depot. Day Trips Available
I 2/19,3/18,4/15 Call for dates and details.

Fall Fng Carniva -

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S2012 SEPTEMBER 30, 2012
7 Night Western Caribbean from Tampa to Grand Cayman, Cozumel, Belize & Roatan
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Based on double occupancy. Space is limited. Rates include Port/Government taxes. *The fuel supplement has been suspended as of Dec. 2008.
Transportation to/from the port and parking fees are not included. Travel insurance is recommended. PASSPORTS ARE REQUIRED. *Thefuel supplement
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increase above $70S per barrel. Country of Registry Panama.
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uayajBHSou


Becky's Travel Store







3557 N. Lecanto Hwy.n Beverly Hills, FL 34465 (552) 527-8855
lolata N to


1i I IQ rI

(R IAW


COMMUNITY


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2012 A15


1-*mclJ


I


I





A16 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2012


VETERANS
Continued from Page A15

nearly 1 million members in
10,100 communities. The princi-
ples of the American Legion
Auxiliary are to serve veterans,
their families and the community.
Eligibility in the Auxiliary is
open to mothers, wives, sisters,
daughters, granddaughters,
great-granddaughters or grand-
mothers of members of the
American Legion and of de-
ceased veterans who served
during war time (also stepchil-
dren); stepchildren; and female
veterans who served during war
time. Call Unit President Shawn
Mikulas, 352-503-5325, or mem-
bership chairman Barbara
Logan, 352-795-4233.
For more information, call Unit
President Shawn Mikulas, 352-
503-5325, or Barbara Logan,
352-795-4233.
H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post
10087, Beverly Hills, offers
meals, bingo, golf, karaoke and
pool. Review the monthly
newsletter for activities and up-
dates, and call the post at 352-
746-0440. The VFW Post 10087
is off County Road 491, directly
behind Superior Bank.
The Ladies Auxiliary will host
a Chinese auction fundraiser on
Saturday, March 3. Doors will
open at 10 a.m. and drawings
will begin at 1 p.m. Admission is
$2.50 to benefit the Junior Re-
serve Officers' Training Corps,
which instills in students the
value of citizenship service to the
U.S., personal responsibility and
a sense of accomplishment.
Hot dogs will be available for
$1, as well as free dessert and
coffee. For more information, call
Bettie at 352-746-1989 or Donna
at 352-746-5215.
Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs,
352-465-4864. Wi Fi is now
available at the post; bring your
laptop or any other item that will
access the Internet and enjoy
the free service.
All are welcome to join us for
dinner from 5 to 6:30 p.m. Fri-
day, Feb. 10; cost is $8.
On Saturday, Feb. 11, the
post will host Boy Scout Troop
452, who will serve a steak din-
ner from 5 to 6:30 p.m. Cost is
$15; tickets are available in the
canteen.
Information regarding any
post events is available at the
post or call 352-465-4864.
Disabled American Veter-
ans Chapter No. 70 meets at 2
p.m. the second Tuesday
monthly at the chapter hall, 1039
N. Paul Drive, Inverness, at the
intersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41. The chap-
ter hall is on the corner of
Independence Highway and
Paul Drive.
We thank veterans for their
service and welcome any dis-
abled veteran to join us from 9
a.m. to 1 p.m. any Tuesday or
Thursday at the chapter hall.
This is also the time that we
accept donated nonperishable
foods for our continuing food
drive.
Our main function is to assist
disabled veterans and their fami-
lies when we are able. Anyone
who knows a disabled veteran or
their family who requires assis-
tance is asked to call
Commander Richard Floyd 727-
492-0290, Ken Stewart at 352-
419-0207, or 352-344-3464.
Service Officer Joe McClister
is available to assist any veteran
or dependents with their disabil-
ity claim by appointment. Call
352-344-3464 and leave a
message.
Ambulatory veterans who
wish to schedule an appointment
for transportation to the VA med-
ical center in Gainesville should
call the veterans' service office at
352-527-5915. Mobility chal-
lenged veterans who wish to
schedule an appointment for
transportation to the VA medical
center in Gainesville may call the
Citrus County Transit office for
wheelchair transportation; call
352-527-7630.
For more information about
chapter activities, veterans' ben-


efits or membership, Call Ken
Stewart at 352-419-0207; leave
a message, if desired, should
the machine answer.
Disabled American
Veterans Auxiliary Unit No. 70
meets at 2 p.m. the second
Tuesday of the month at the
chapter hall, 1039 N. Paul Drive,
Inverness.
The auxiliary plans a visit to
the VA nursing homes) and
needs toiletry items such as
packaged razors, combs, hair-
brushes, toothbrushes, sham-
poos and deodorant to fill ditty
bags, They are also accepting
cotton material and yarn to make
ditty bags, lap robes, wheelchair


COMMUNITY


and walker bags for disabled
veterans.
The auxiliary membership has
grown to include many more ex-
tended families. Call Auxiliary
Commander Linda Brice at
352-560-3867 or Adjutant Lynn
Armitage at 352-341-5334
for information.
Eugene Quinn VFW Post
4337 and Ladies Auxiliary, 906
State Road 44 E., Inverness.
The post and Ladies Auxiliary
invite everyone to participate in
the third annual Soup Cook Off
on Sunday, Feb. 5.
All entries must be in by 2:30
p.m.; judging is at 3 p.m., with
prizes to be announced. Call the
post at 352-344-3495, or visit
www.vfw4337.org for more
information.
Stop by the canteen and pick
up a current monthly calendar.
Call the post at 352-344-3495
for information about all weekly
post activities, or visit
www.vfw4337.org.
The American Legion
Wall-Rives Post 58 and Auxil-
iary, 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnellon.
Dunnellon Young Marines will
meet at 6 p.m. Tuesday.
Free AARP tax services will
be available 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Wednesday through April 11.
For more information, call
Wayne Sloan at 352-489-5066.
The public is welcome at
bingo at 6 p.m. Thursday.
Everyone is also invited to the
Outdoor Flea Market and Pan-
cake Breakfast from 7:30 to
10:30 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 18.
For information about activi-
ties and the post, call Cad Boos
at 352-489-3544.
Rolling Thunder Chapter
7, a POW/MIA awareness
group, meets at 10 a.m. second
Saturday at the VFW Post
10087 in Beverly Hills. Call
Bob Bruno, secretary, at 352-
201-1228.
A Marine Corps League
Ladies Auxiliary Citrus Unit
meets at 1 p.m. the third Tues-
day monthly at the VFW in Bev-
erly Hills. New members are
welcome. Membership fee is
$30 a year. Female relatives
ages 16 or older who are a wife,
widow, mother, stepmother, sis-
ter, daughter, stepdaughter,
grandmother, granddaughter,
aunt or daughter-in-law of honor-
ably discharged Marines and
FMF Corpsmen are eligible to
belong to the Marine Corps
League. Female Marines (for-
mer, active and reserves) and
associate members are eligible
for MCLA membership. Call
President Elaine Spikes at 352-
860-2400 or Secretary/Treasurer
Joan Cecil at 352-726-0834
for information.
Hunger and Homeless
Coalition -Anyone who knows
of a homeless veteran in need of
food, haircut, voter ID, food
stamps, medical assistance or
more blankets is asked to call Ed
Murphy at the Hunger and
Homeless Coalition at 352-382-
0876, or pass along this phone
number to the veteran.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW
Post 4252 and Ladies Auxil-
iary 3190 N. Cad G. Rose High-


way, State Road 200,
Hernando; 352-726-3339.
Send emails to vfw4252@
tampabay.rr.com.
Everyone is welcome. Post
and auxiliary meet at 6:30 p.m.
every second Thursday.
Post honor guard is available
for funerals, flag raising and
nursing home visits.
The public is welcome to the
Friday night dinner and dance at
5p.m.
See our post activities:
Google us as VFW 4252,
Hernando.
Dumas-Hartson VFW
Post 8189 is on West Veterans
Drive, west of U.S. 19 between
Crystal River and Homosassa.
Call 352-795-5012 for
information.
VFW membership is open to
men and women veterans who
have participated in an overseas
campaign, including service in
Iraq and Afghanistan. The Ko-
rean Campaign medal remains
open, as well. Call the post at
the phone number above.
Joe Nic Barco Memorial
VFW Post 7122, 8191 S. Florida
Ave., Floral City. For information
about the post and its activities,
call 352-637-0100.
Friday is AUCE fish or
three-piece chicken for $7.
American Legion, Beverly
Hills Memorial Post 237, 4077
N. Lecanto Highway, in the Bev-
erly Plaza, invites all eligible vet-
erans and their families to visit
our post and consider joining our
Legion family: American Legion,
Sons of the American Legion
(SAL), or American Legion Auxil-
iary (ALA). Color Guard/Honor
Guard accepting volunteers.
American Legion Riders
Chapter now being formed. Visit
the post for printed schedule or
visit the website at
www.post237.org. For
information, call the post at 352-
746-5018.
The Korean War Veterans
Association, Citrus Chapter
192 meets at the VFW Post
10087, Beverly Hills, at 1 p.m.
the first Tuesday monthly. Any
veteran who has seen honorable
service in any of the Armed
Forces of the U.S. is eligible for
membership if said service was
within Korea, including territorial
waters and airspace, at any time
from Sept. 3, 1945, to the pres-
ent or if said service was outside
of Korea from June 25,1950, to
Jan. 31, 1955. For information,
call Hank Butler at 352-563-
2496, Neville Anderson at 352-
344-2529 or Bob Hermanson at
352-489-0728.
Allen-Rawls American Le-
gion Post 77 and Auxiliary
Unit 77 meet the first Thursday
monthly at the Inverness High-
lands Civic Center at 4375 Little
Al Point Road, Inverness. Call
Post Cmdr. Norman Brumett at
352-860-2981 or Auxiliary
president Marie Cain at 352-
637-5915.
The post will host a dinner
from 5 to 7 p.m. Saturday, Feb.
25, at the center. On the menu
are creamy onion soup, cab-
bage soup, baked steak with
mushroom gravy, baked chicken


mashed potatoes, green beans,
candied carrots, dinner rolls, as-
sorted desserts, coffee, iced tea
and soda. Cost is $8; children
younger than 10 eat for $4.
Entertainment will be provided
by Bernie at the keyboard. Prof-
its from the dinner will be used to
support the American Legion
programs such as for children
and youths, Boys State, Boy
Scouts, Americanism, school
medals and more. For more in-
formation, call Post Cmdr. Nor-
man Brumett at 352-860-2981 or
352-476-2134, or the day of the
dinner at 352-726-0444.
U.S. Submarine Veterans
(USSVI)-Sturgeon Base meets
at 11 a.m. the first Saturday
monthly at the American Legion
Post 155, 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River. Visitors
and interested parties are al-
ways welcome. Call
Base Cmdr. Billy Wein at
352-726-5926.
American Legion Post
166 meets 1:30 p.m., first Satur-
day monthly at the Dumas-Hart-
son VFW Post 8189 Ladies
Auxiliary facility on Veterans
Drive, Homosassa, on the west
side of U.S. 19 at Dixon's Auto
Sales across from Harley-David-
son. We meet in the small build-
ing to the left of the main
building. All former and current
post members, as well as all in-
terested veterans, are cordially
invited to be a part of American
Legion Post 166.
For information about the post
or the American Legion, call and
leave a message for the post
commander at 352-697-1749.
Your call will be returned within
24 to 48 hours.
Seabee Veterans of Amer-
ica (SVA) Island X-23 wel-
comes all Seabees and
Honeybees to its monthly meet-
ing at 10:30 a.m. the third Tues-
day monthly at Citrus Hills
Country Club, Rose and Crown
restaurant, Citrus Hills.
Call John Lowe at 352-
344-4702.
Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219
and Cabane 1219 conducts its
meetings at 7 p.m. the second
Thursday monthly at the Ameri-
can Legion Post 155 on State
Road 44 in Crystal River (6585
E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway). For
more information about the 40/8,
call the Chef De Gare Tom
Smith at 352-601-3612; for the
Cabane, call La Presidente
Carol Kaiserian at 352-746-
1959; or visit us on the Web at
www.Postl55.org.
Aaron A. Weaver Chapter
776 Military Order of the Pur-
ple Heart (MOPH) meets at 2
p.m. the third Tuesday of Janu-
ary, March, May, July, Septem-
ber and November. All
combat-wounded veterans, lin-


eal descendants, next of kin,
spouses and siblings of Purple
Heart recipients are cordially in-
vited to attend and to join the
ranks of Chapter 776. To learn
more about Aaron A. Weaver
Chapter 776 MOPH, visit the
chapter's website at www.citrus
purpleheart.org or call 352-
382-3847.
The combat-wounded Patriots
of Aaron A. Weaver Chapter 776
Military Order of the Purple
Heart (MOPH) cordially invite all
veterans and the public to attend
the seventh annual Purple Heart
Ceremony at 11 a.m., Saturday,
Feb. 18, at the Florida National
Guard Armory, Crystal River.
The ceremony will commemo-
rate the proud legacy of the
Purple Heart and pay tribute to
fallen heroes and wounded
warriors.
For more information, visit the
Chapter 776 website at www.
citruspurpleheart.org or call 352-
382-3847.
Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment
1139 will conduct its regular
meeting at 7 p.m. the third
Wednesday monthly at DAV
Post 70 in Inverness at the inter-
section of Independence High-
way and U.S. 41 North. All
Marines are welcome. Call Jerry
Cecil at 352-726-0834
or Wayne Howard at
352-634-5254.
Marine Corps League
Citrus Detachment 819 meets
at 7 p.m. the last Thursday
monthly at VFW Post 10087 on
Vet Lane in Beverly Hills, be-
hind Superior Bank. Social
hour follows. All Marines and
FMF Corpsmen are welcome.
Meet new friends and discuss


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

past glories. For more informa-
tion, call Morgan Patterson at
352-746-1135, Ted
Archambault at 352-382-0462
or Bion St. Bernard at 352-
697-2389.
Gilley-Long-Osteen VFW
Post 8698 is at 520 State
Road 40 E., Inglis, one mile
east of U.S. 19. The Men's
Auxiliary meets at 7 p.m. the
second Monday. LAVFW meets
at 5 p.m. and the membership
meeting is at 6:30 p.m. the
third Wednesday at the post.
Call the post at 352-447-
3495 for information about the
post and its activities.
Fleet Reserve Associa-
tion, Branch 186 will meet at 3
p.m. the third Thursday
monthly at the DAV Building,
Independence Highway and
U.S. 41 North, Inverness. Call
Bob Huscher, secretary, at
352-344-0727.
American Legion Her-
bert Surber Post 225 meets at
7 p.m. the third Thursday
monthly at the New Testament
Baptist Church of Floral City,
9850 S. Parkside Ave. adjoin-
ing Floral Park, southeast side.
All eligible veterans are
welcome to join.
Landing Ship Dock
(LSD) sailors meet at Denny's
in Crystal River at 2 p.m. the
fourth Thursday monthly. Call
Jimmie at 352-621-0617.
Suncoast U.S. Navy
Armed Guard and Merchant
Marine Veterans of World
War II meetings for 2012 will
be at 11:30 a.m. at Kally K's
restaurant in Spring Hill on the
following dates: Feb. 11, March
10, April 14, May 12, Sept. 8,
Oct. 13, Nov. 10 and Dec. 8.


Sunday PUZZLER

Puzzle is on Page A14.

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2-5 Q 2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


7 |iwLgSAn*A Ba-c-ckpacRk
B A"
549k Run & 1 Mile Walk
4D ~ And Kids Fun Run
Saturday, February 25,2012 4 1
7:00am Registration & Packet Pick-up
8:00am 5K Race Start
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2455 North Citrus Hills Blvd., Hernando
Register Online at:
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Contact: '_ l aC kn
Citrus road Runners (352) 637-2475 t,..,r,. rA,,
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community* history* literacy



!OUT LOUD!

S5th Annual


African
American



Read-In

Sunday, Feb. 26, 2012

2:30-4:30 PM
Listen to moving, inspirational and humorous
selections from African-American literature. Enjoy
musical entertainment & refreshments during this
celebration of history & literacy at CF Citrus Campus.
Join us out loud!

hti.... ..."IE Learn More:
iO I http://facebook.com/citrusaari


Seventh Annual

Purple Heart Ceremony
Florida National Guard Armory, Crystal River
Saturday, February 18,2012,11:00 a.m.
Commemorating the proud legacy of the Purple Heart
&
Honoring Florida's fallen heroes of the Global War on
Terror and America's wounded warriors

















All Gave Some, Some Gave All
Hosted by
The combat wounded Patriots of
Aaron A. Weaver Chapter 776
Military Order of the Purple Heart
Featuring
The Afghanistan/Iraq Memorial Portrait Mural
with
Patriotic music by Paul and Jackie Stevio

VETERANS AND PUBLIC ARE CORDIALLY INVITED


CHRONICLE











SPORTS


* No. 21
FSU took
on No. 16
Virginia on
Saturday
afternoon.
/B3


0 Football/B2, B5
0 Golf/B2
0 NBA, NHL/B3
0 College basketball/B3
0 Local wrestling/B4
0 TV, lottery/B4
0 Entertainment/B6


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Differing opinions on Super Bowl winner


Why the

Patriots will

win Sunday

Associated Press
INDIANAPOLIS -
Rarely is Bill Belichick
outcoached. Tom
Brady almost never
gets outplayed.
The brilliant
coach on the side-
line and his cere-
bral leader on the
field winners of
three Super Bowls to-
gether are still a notch
above their NFL champi-
onship game opponent.


That's why come Sunday
the New England Patriots
will beat the New York Gi- H
ants, a title to be earned
with brains as much as
brawn.
And as a result of the dis-
cipline and preparation
that Belichick has stressed
in his 12 years as coach of
this team.
"Nobody works harder
than he does," Brady
S said. "I don't think
there's ever been a
time that I've
shown up at the
stadium and he's .,1'
not there. He sees
everything. He eval-
uates everything. He Associated Press
watches every bit of film New England quarterback Tom Brady (12) will try to lead
the Patriots to a fourth championship when taking on the
See Page B4 New York Giants in Super Bowl XLVI on Sunday.


Why the

Giants will

win Sunday

Associated Press


by defense, and the Giants
are better than the Patriots
right now. The proof is in
the performance.
Take a look at the five-
game winning streak that's
carried the Giants (12-7)
from a .500 team to a sec-
ond Super Bowl in four
years. The defense has


INDIANAPOLIS In given up only 67 points dur-
this new NFL age of throw ing the streak, not allowed
first and throw again, more than 251 yards
it's easy to forget to passing in any game,
first rule of foot- recorded 20 sacks
ball: Defense wins and forced 11
championships. turnovers.
Sorry, Eli. Sorry 4k And that's
Tom. There's no against some very
doubt you're both L5-ood offenses, in-
among the league's cluding the high-
elite quarterbacks. powered one in Green Bay
The Super Bowl, how-
ever, is going to be decided See Page B5


'Canes clean up


- ~ -


JOSEPH DiCRISTIFALO/for the Chronicle
Citrus junior Taylor Jackson works over Springstead's Ernesto Padilla during the 182-pound final of the District 2A-7 wrestling tournament
Saturday at Hernando High School in Brooksville. Jackson was one of three Hurricanes to win an individual title.

Citrus wrestling squad earns 3 district titles; pushes 13 into regional tournament


TONY CASTRO
Correspondent
BROOKSVILLE Relatively
speaking, five other Class 2A,
District 7 teams would gladly
switch places with Citrus on Sat-
urday at Hernando High School.
For a third straight winter, the
Hurricanes finished as runner-
up to defending Class 2A state
champion Spring Hill
Springstead.
The Eagles captured their
eighth straight district champi-
onship at the Michael A. Imhoff
Gymnasium by solving the 'Canes


by 73 points, 294-221.
In the process, Springstead
grapplers posted wins in 31 of 36
bouts (86 percent) com-
pared to CHS's 27-of-40
(68 percent) effort. MO
SHS walked away wre.
with a tourney-high 14 For
mat men advancing to R i
River'
next week's Region 2A- please
2, beginning Friday at PAGE
noon at St. Cloud High
School.
The 'Canes advanced 13 of 14
members.
The Inverness crew had three
district individual titles junior


o
st
ry
s
e
"EB


Austin Kelly at 120 pounds, sen-
ior Nick McLean at 160 and jun-
ior Taylor Jackson at 182 in
seven championship
bouts.
ore Second-place red rib-
tling bons went to freshman
ystal Perry Reneer at 138,
results, sophomore Colton Jack-
see son at 152, senior Kody
B4. Wood at 195 and senior
Zach Collins at 220.
"It kinda stings a little
bit," said second-year Hurricane
skipper Chris Kelly "We came in
here wanting to win this. We're
one of the better teams around


the state. Unfortunately, you just
can't change the cards you're
dealt."
Coach Kelly addressed the dif-
ference between the defending
state champs and the Hurri-
canes.
"I think the difference is mat
time," he responded. 'A lot of the
Springstead kids begin wrestling
when they're 4, 5, 6 years old.
We're trying to get there but
Springstead's wrestlers are very
disciplined and very organized.
"Yeah, it's a little disappointing
See Page B4


3-point


barrage

UF shoots well in

beating Vandy

Associated Press
GAINESVILLE Florida
appears to have these short
turnarounds figured out.
Of course, it helps when the
Gators are making 3-pointers
and forcing turnovers.
Kenny Boynton scored 18
points, Bradley Beal added 16
and No. 12 Florida beat No. 25
Vanderbilt 73-65 Saturday for
its seventh consecutive
victory
The Gators (19-4, 7-1 South-
eastern Conference) won for
the second time in about 36
hours, improving to 5-0 on
two-day turnarounds this sea-
son. They are 6-1 in Saturday
games that follow Thursday
night affairs in the three years
the SEC has scheduled those.
The latest one had every-
thing to do with 3-pointers
and turnovers.
Florida made 11 of 24 shots
from behind the arc and
forced Vanderbilt into 17
turnovers, most of them com-
ing in the press.
"Our press was the reason
we won the game because we
were able to force turnovers
and get them to play fast and


See Page B4


Associated Press
Florida's Kenny Boynton
shoots over Vanderbilt's Jeffrey
Taylor during the first half
Saturday in Gainesville.


OOOAAH2


e:OO- OiO0 m






B2 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2012



Phoenix Open
Saturday
At TPC Scottsdale, Scottsdale, Ariz.
Purse: $6.1 million
Yardage: 7,216, Par: 71
Third Round
Spencer Levin 65-63-68 196
Webb Simpson 65-69-68-202
Bubba Watson 66-70-67-203
John Huh 68-66-69-203
Chris Stroud 68-70-66 -204
Jason Dufner 64-72-68 -204
Greg Chalmers 68-69-67 204
Ben Crane 69-67-68 204
Kyle Stanley 69-66-69-204
John Rollins 70-70-65 -205
Phil Mickelson 68-70-67-205
Matt Jones 67-72-67 206
Marc Leishman 70-68-68 206
Jeff Maggert 70-68-68 -206
Trevor Immelman 67-70-69 -206
Bill Haas 69-68-69-206
D.J. Trahan 72-70-64 -206
Harrison Frazar 66-67-73 206
Martin Flores 71-68-68 207
Seung-Yul Noh 67-72-68-207
Harris English 70-69-68 207
Bo Van Pelt 65-71-71 -207
Kevin Na 66-73-69-208
Scott Piercy 68-70-70 -208
Jarrod Lyle 66-72-70 -208
James Driscoll 67-70-71 -208
Charles Howell Ill 69-68-71 -208
Josh Teater 68-69-71 208
Derek Lamely 66-70-72 208
Pat Perez 69-73-66-208
Carl Pettersson 70-69-70 209
Rod Pampling 67-71-71 -209
Brendan Steele 71-69-69 -209
Rickie Fowler 69-69-71 -209
Keegan Bradley 68-70-71 209
Bill Lunde 67-73-69-209
Sunghoon Kang 67-73-69 209
Matt Kuchar 69-68-72-209
Bryce Molder 70-69-71 -210
Jeff Quinney 69-71-70 -210
Robert Allenby 71-69-70-210
Chris Couch 70-68-72 -210
Johnson Wagner 68-69-73 210
Bud Cauley 72-67-72 211
Cameron Beckman 69-69-73 211
George McNeill 71-70-70 -211
David Hearn 69-69-73 211
lan Poulter 72-69-70 -211
Billy Mayfair 68-73-70 211
Heath Slocum 73-69-69 211
J.J. Killeen 70-70-72-212
Dustin Johnson 68-70-74-212
Graham DeLaet 71-69-72 212
Ricky Barnes 71-70-71-212
Ken Duke 69-72-71 -212
Gary Woodland 71-71-70 212
Ryan Palmer 64-72-76-212
Sean O'Hair 74-68-70 -212
D.A. Points 69-73-70 212
Blake Adams 69-70-74 213
Aaron Baddeley 72-67-74 -213
Mark Wilson 70-69-74 213
Ted Potter, Jr. 71-69-73 -213
Camilo Villegas 71-67-75 -- 213
J.B. Holmes 71-70-72 -213
Kevin Sutherland 71-70-72-213
Kevin Kisner 69-71-74 -214
Brandt Snedeker 71-70-73 -214
John Merrick 69-73-72-214
Chez Reavie 66-76-72 214
Kenny Perry 70-72-72 214
Bobby Gates 73-67-75 215
Martin Laird 72-70-73 215
Stephen Gangluff 69-73-74-216
Kevin Stadler 70-71-76 -217
Charley Hoffman 71-71-77 219
Ryan Moore 72-70-77 219
Kevin Streelman 68-74-78 -220
Qatar Masters
Saturday
At Doha Golf Club, Doha, Qatar
Purse: $2.5 million
Yardage: 7,381, Par: 72
Second Round
Paul Lawrie, Scotland, 69-67 1
Nicolas Colsaerts, Belgium 69-68 1
Ricardo Gonzalez, Argentina 71-67 1
Peter Hanson, Sweden 69-69f -1
James Kingston, South Africa 70-69- 1
Simon Khan, England, 71-68 1
David Lynn, England 71-69 1
Jason Day Australia 68-72 1
Maarten Lafeber, France 72-68 1
Marc Warren, Scotland 72-68- 1
Marcel Siem, Germany, 71-69 -
John Daly, United States 67-73 -1
Anthony Wall, England 74-66 1
Andrew Dodt, Australia 71-69 1
Sergio Garcia, Spain 72-68 -1
Victor Dubuisson, France 72-68 -1
Rafael Cabrera-Bello, Spain 72-69 1
Pablo Larrazabal, Spain 71-70 1
G. Fernandez-Castano, Spain 66-75 -1
Lee Westwood, England 71-70 1
Jose Maria Olazabal, Spain 71-70 1
Carlos Del Moral, Spain 71-70 1
Martin Kaymer, Germany, 71-70 1
Ben Curtis, United States 71-70 1
Alejandro Canizares, Spain, 72-69 1


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Levin smoking in Phoenix


Associated Press
Tournament-leader Spencer Levin watches his tee shot on the 17th hole
during the third round of the Phoenix Open on Saturday in Scottsdale, Ariz.
Levin shot a 3-under par 68, and leads with a total of 17-under par.


Associated Press

SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. Spencer
Levin passed on Phoenix Open title
sponsor Waste Management's
green-out, wearing a simple black-
and-white outfit.
He didn't exactly soften his car-
bon footprint, either, leaving a trail
of cigarette smoke and butts in his
wake as he increased his big lead
at TPC Scottsdale.
"You mean guys in the crowd?"
he asked when questioned about
fans giving him grief for smoking on
the course. "Oh, yeah, (they get on
me) every time, but I enjoy it (smok-
ing)," Levin said. "They were ask-
ing to bum them from me, too."
He has lit up the Stadium Course
so far, too, stringing together
rounds of 65, 63 and 68 to open a
six-stroke lead in pursuit of a
breakthrough PGA Tour victory


Rodgers named MVP


Brees, Harbaugh

win AP awards

Associated Press

INDIANAPOLIS The best
quarterbacks bring fans out of their
seats. Aaron Rodgers and Peyton
Manning did exactly that Saturday
night when the NFL Most Valuable
Player accepted the trophy from the
only four-time winner of the award.
The Green Bay quarterback won
the 2011 Associated Press award in a
landslide. Manning, the hometown
hero who didn't play a down this sea-
son because of neck surgery, handed
it to him.
Manning was greeted with a stand-
ing ovation when he came on stage at
the Murat Theatre during "NFL
Honors," a primetime special on
NBC. Moments later, the crowd was
back on its feet for Rodgers.
"It means a lot to be recognized as
a consistent player and contributing
on my team," Rodgers said. "I think
it's an award that relies on a player
having the support of his teammates,
obviously, guys blocking, guys run-
ning, guys catching, guys making
plays. But I'm very honored to re-
ceive the award."
Speaking to Manning, who didn't
miss a game for 13 seasons before
2011, Rodgers added: "We're all re-
ally excited to see you back on the
field next year"
Rodgers earned 48 votes to two for
New Orleans quarterback Drew
Brees in balloting by a nationwide
panel of 50 media members who reg-
ularly cover the NFL. The Packers
star is the first Green Bay player hon-
ored since Brett Favre concluded a
run of three straight seasons as MVP
in 1997.
Brees won Offensive Player of the
Year for the second time.
Other winners included:
Baltimore defensive end/line-
backer Terrell Suggs, Defensive
Player of the Year
San Francisco's rookie coach
Jim Harbaugh, Coach of the Year
Detroit quarterback Matthew
Stafford, Comeback Player of the


Associated Press
Green Bay Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers was selected as The
Associated Press' NFL Most Valuable Player on Saturday.


Year
The top two picks in last April's
draft took the rookie awards: Car-
olina QB Cam Newton and Denver
linebacker Von Miller
Rodgers led the NFL in passing
with a 122.5 rating built on 45 touch-
down passes, six interceptions and a
68.3 completion percentage as the
Packers went 15-1 and won the NFC
North. The Packers were beaten by
the New York Giants at Lambeau
Field in the divisional round.
"People really count on me to be
consistent each week, to play well.
Knowing that my performance, the
fact that I touch the ball every play, I
have a direct impact on the game, the
way I play," Rodgers said. "And if I'm
playing consistent and doing things I
know I'm supposed to do, we've been


able to have some success because of
it"
He joined former Packers Bart
Starr, Jim Taylor and Paul Hornung
as MVPs.
Rodgers is the third consecutive
quarterback voted MVP joining New
England's Tom Brady (2007, 2010)
and Manning (2008,2009).
Brees shattered Dan Marino's 27-
year-old mark by passing for 5,476
yards, and his 468 completions broke
Manning's 2010 record of 450. Brees
finished the season completing 71.6
percent of his passes, breaking his
own 2009 NFL record (70.6). He also
surpassed 300 yards passing for
seven straight games and 13 times
during the season, both beating
league marks he already held.
Thanks to Brees' brilliance, the


Saints set several single-season
records, including offensive yards
with 7,474 and first downs with 416.
"Our best is yet to come, not just for
our team, but the league," Brees said.
Suggs had 70 tackles, including 14
sacks, and was a threat all over the
field from his hybrid linebacker-end
position. He also forced seven fum-
bles and had two interceptions.
Teammate Ray Lewis, a two-time
winner of the award, praised Suggs'
versatility
"That's why when you sit back and
watch him year after year, week after
week, I am just proud to say that I
love how he understands the game
now," Lewis said.
In his first season as an NFL head
coach, Harbaugh guided the 49ers to
a 13-3 mark and the NFC West cham-
pionship. They beat New Orleans in
the first round of the playoffs before
losing the conference title game to
the Giants.
Stafford beat out six other players
who received votes. He fought
through injuries his first two seasons,
then threw for more than 5,000 yards
in 2011 to lead Detroit to its first play-
off berth in 12 years.
Newton set an NFL record for
touchdowns rushing in a season by a
quarterback with 14 and became the
first player in league history to throw
for 4,000 yards and rush for 500. He
helped Carolina improve from 2-14 to
6-10, throwing for 21 touchdowns.
"He set a standard, a very high
standard, for any rookie quarterback
coming in, and he wants to improve,"
Carolina coach Ron Rivera said.
"He's gotten better in so many differ-
ent areas. ... He's really taken his
game to next level, and there's so
much room for him to grow. He's got
such a high ceiling."
The second Bronco to win the
award LB Mike Croel got it in 1991
- Miller made 64 tackles and had
1112 sacks despite missing one game
and playing the last four contests
with a cumbersome cast protecting
his surgically repaired right thumb.
He teamed with quarterback Tim
Tebow to energize the Broncos, who
rallied from a 2-5 record to the AFC
West title and a playoff win over
Pittsburgh.


Despite penalty, Lawrie leads


Ryu up by

three strokes at

Aussie Masters

Associated Press

DOHA, Qatar Paul
Lawrie recovered from a
penalty for dropping his ball
on a marker to shoot a 5-
under 67 Saturday and take
a one-shot lead over
Nicolas Colsaerts
after the second
round of the Qatar
Masters.
Lawrie took ad-
vantage of calmer
conditions at Doha
Golf Course to make
six birdies for an 8- Paul L
under total of 136. Scottis
The tournament has up by
been disrupted by
wind and shortened to 54
holes.
Lawrie birdied the 16th to
move into a tie with Col-
saerts and then added an-
other on 18 to take the
outright lead. Playing in
front of Lawrie, Colsaerts
also birdied the 18th after a
bunker shot that rolled
within a foot of the pin to
briefly take the lead.
Peter Hanson of Sweden
(69) and Ricardo Gonzalez


of Argentina (67) are two
shots back.
Ryu leads Australian
Ladies Masters by three
GOLD COAST, Australia -
U.S. Open champion So Yeon
Ryu shot a 3-under-par 69 on
Saturday to take a three-stroke
lead into the final round of the
Australian Ladies Masters.
Ryu, who shot an extraordi-
nary 11-under 61 in the second
round, had a 54-hole total of
20-under 196 at Royal Pines.


Lawrie
;h golfer
a stroke
Datar.


Christel Boeljon of
the Netherlands shot
68 and was alone in
second, followed by
Kim Ha-neul of South
Korea, who shot a 64,
and Diana Luna of
Italy, who carded a 66.
They were tied for
third, five strokes be-
hind the leader.
American-born Aus-


tralian Frances Bondad was the
biggest mover of the day,
shooting a career-best 63. She
was in reach fifth place, seven
strokes behind Ryu.
"I sort of lost track of how low
I was shooting midway through
the back nine," said Bondad,
who has lived in Australia since
she was 3. "It was a pretty good
round and it sets me up well for
Sunday."
Bondad, a Ladies European


Tour regular who won her first
tour event last year in China,
birdied her last five holes.
Laura Davies of England
shot a 70 and was at 213, 17
strokes behind Ryu.


Remember
Febr
Let your signify
much you lov
message front
C


5



Fe

AI


Seven-time champion Karrie
Webb is not playing this week
and will start her 2012 season
next week at the Australian
Open, which is co-sanctioned
by the LPGA Tour.


Valentine's Day is
uary 14th.
Eicant other know how
ve them with a special
n you in the Chronicle
lassifieds.


*14i9 A Includes 20 lines of copy or
9 4 o10 lines of copy and a photo.




;63-5966 4
Deadline is 4
Friday, .
february 10th .
at 1:OOnm ".


6


He wasn't quite as sharp with his
belly putter as he was the first two
days, but remained firmly in con-
trol in front of the largest crowd in
tournament history, a noisy gather-
ing of 173,210 in perfect conditions.
"It was fun for sure, but I was try-
ing to focus, too," Levin said about
the huge crowd and party atmos-
phere. "You don't get that too often,
all those people cheering."
Levin, five strokes ahead after
the completion of the second round
Saturday morning, had four birdies
and a bogey in the third round to
reach 17 under. The bogey on the
par-5 15th was his first since the
opening hole of the tournament.
"I felt like I played solid," Levin
said. "I felt like I was in control of
my ball most of the day, and yeah,
I'm pleased. I've never had a big
lead like that starting the day, and I
thought I played well."


SPORTS


4m%,





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


No. 21 Seminoles edge No. 16 Cavaliers


Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE Reserve
Okaro White scored 13 points,
Xavier Gibson added 10 points
and No. 21 Florida State earned
its seventh straight Atlantic Coast
Conference victory with a 58-55
win over No. 16 Virginia
Virginia (17-4, 4-3) trailed by 13
in the second half but couldn't
complete the comeback. Virginia's
four losses this season have come
by a total of 10 points.
Mike Scott and Joe Harris led
the Cavaliers with 16 points
apiece. Scott also had a game-high
11 rebounds.
It's the first time Florida State
(16-6, 7-1) has won seven straight
games in ACC play since joining
the league in 1991-92.
No. 1 Kentucky 86, South
Carolina 52
COLUMBIA, S.C. -Anthony Davis
had 22 points, eight rebounds and
eight blocks, and No. 1 Kentucky
wiped away the memories of the last
time the top-ranked Wildcats came to
South Carolina with an 86-52 victory
Saturday night.
Kentucky (23-1) has won 15 straight
and moved to 9-0 in the Southeastern
Conference for the first time in seven
years. And it will stay atop the rank-
ings, unlike in 2010 when the No. 1
Wildcats were stunned 68-62 by the
Gamecocks.
This time, Davis and Terrence
Jones made sure there wouldn't be a
similar flop. The two combined for 34
points in the first half as Kentucky took
a 52-25 lead at the break and eventu-
ally increased the margin to 41 points.
No. 2 Syracuse 95,
St. John's 70
NEW YORK Syracuse's Fab
Melo scored a career-high 14 points in
his return after a three-game absence
and Jim Boeheim tied Dean Smith for
third place on the victory list with win
No. 879.
Syracuse (23-1, 10-1 Big East) rallied
behind the return of the 7-foot Melo, tak-
ing a 41-27 halftime lead and blowing it
open by starting the second half on a
16-3 run in front of a sellout crowd of
19,979 at Madison Square Garden,
most of whom were wearing orange.
Melo missed the last three games
as he resolved an academic issue. He
had been allowed to practice with the
team and he looked ready from the
start of his first game back, once again
a force in the middle on the back line
of the 2-3 zone.
No. 3 Ohio State 58,
No. 19 Wisconsin 52
MADISON, Wis. Jared Sullinger
scored 24 points and William Buford
hit a critical 3-pointer down the stretch,
leading Ohio State to the victory.
Deshaun Thomas scored 16 points
and Buford added 11 for the Buckeyes
(20-3, 8-2 Big Ten), who held onto
their lead in the conference standings.


Associated Press
Florida State's Michael Snaer (21) reacts with 2.3 seconds left in the second half Saturday against Virginia in Tallahassee. Florida State won 58-55.


Sullinger also had 10 rebounds.
Ryan Evans scored 14 points for
the Badgers (18-6, 7-4), who were 5
for 27 from 3-point range.
No. 5 UNC 83,
Maryland 74
COLLEGE PARK, Md. -Tyler
Zeller scored 22 points, John Henson
had 17 points and 12 rebounds, and
North Carolina rallied for the win.
The Tar Heels (20-3, 7-1 Atlantic
Coast Conference) got all they could
handle from the upstart Terrapins, who
didn't lead over the final nine minutes
but never let North Carolina get com-
fortable down the stretch.
UNC star Harrison Barnes, who
sprained his left ankle Tuesday
against Wake Forest, scored 18 points
on 5-for-15 shooting.
Kendall Marshall contributed 16 as-
sists, helping North Carolina to its fifth
straight win and 14th in 15 games.
Terrell Stoglin scored 20 for Mary-
land (13-9, 3-5).
No. 6 Baylor 64,
Oklahoma State 60
STILLWATER, Okla. Perry Jones
III had 16 points and 11 rebounds in
Baylor's tight win, and Quincy Acy pro-
vided the go-ahead basket and a key
offensive rebound down the stretch.


The Cowboys (11-12, 4-6 Big 12)
rallied from a nine-point deficit to take
a 57-56 lead on Keiton Page's wide-
open 3-pointer from the right wing with
1:42 to play.
After a timeout, Acy answered at the
other end with a layup set up by Pierre
Jackson's drive. Acy also grabbed the
rebound when Brady Heslip missed the
front end of a one-and-one free throw
opportunity with 6.8 seconds left, allow-
ing Anthony Jones to hit two foul shots
to close it out for Baylor (21-2, 8-2).
Wyoming 68,
No. 11 UNLV 66
LARAMIE, Wyo. Leonard Wash-
ington and Francisco Cruz scored 16
points apiece and Wyoming throttled
UNLV's high-scoring offense.
Luke Martinez added 15 points -
all on 3-pointers and Adam Waddell
scored 14 for Wyoming (18-5, 4-3
Mountain West). The win snapped a
four-game losing streak against UNLV
(21-4, 5-2) and was Wyoming's first
victory against a Top 25 team since
beating New Mexico in 1996.
Northern Iowa 65,
No. 13 Creighton 62
CEDAR FALLS, Iowa Northern
Iowa's Anthony James made a 3-
pointer at the buzzer to snap


Creighton's 11-game winning streak.
James scored 14 of his 16 points in
the second half and Seth Tuttle added
13 points for the Panthers, who
handed visiting Creighton its first loss
since late December.
James buried a huge 3 from the
corner with 23 seconds left to put
Northern Iowa (16-9, 6-7 Missouri Val-
ley) ahead 61-56. Creighton's Antoine
Young hit a 3 with 4.6 seconds left to
tie it at 62.
No. 14 Georgetown 75,
South Florida 45
WASHINGTON Henry Sims
scored 13 points and nine rebounds,
and Georgetown held South Florida
without a point for nearly 11 minutes in
the first half.
Otto Porter added 12 points, and
Jason Clark had 11 for the Hoyas (18-
4, 8-3 Big East), who led 18-5 late in
the first half and spent much of the
second half with a 20-point cushion.
Augustus Gilchrist scored 15 points
to lead the Bulls (13-10, 6-4), who shot
26 percent in the first half and 31 per-
cent for the game. They also commit-
ted 17 turnovers.
Notre Dame 76,
No. 15 Marquette 59
SOUTH BEND, Ind. Freshman


Pat Connaughton had 23 points and
11 rebounds, and Notre Dame made
11 3-pointers in the victory.
Connaughton shot 5 for 8 from
long range, helping the Irish (15-8,
7-3 Big East) earn their fourth con-
secutive win. Notre Dame has de-
feated five ranked opponents this
season.
Eric Atkins chipped in 18 points
and Jerian Grant had 12 in a strong
performance by the Irish backcourt.
Marquette (19-5, 8-3) had won
seven straight Big East games.
No. 22 Miss. State 91,
Auburn 88
STARKVILLE, Miss. -Arnett
Moultrie scored 21 points and Re-
nardo Sidney added 17 to lead Mis-
sissippi State to the win.
Dee Bost hit three consecutive 3-
pointers to open the second half,
turning Mississippi State's 44-43
deficit into a 52-44 lead. The Bull-
dogs (18-5, 5-3 Southeastern Con-
ference) never trailed again,
shooting 60.4 percent (29 of 48), in-
cluding 63.2 percent (12 of 19) from
3-point range.
Bost finished with 15 points and
seven assists. Jalen Steele added
13 points while Rodney Hood
scored 11.


Tired


Displaced from

Indy, Magic

still beat Pacers

Associated Press

INDIANAPOLIS -
Dwight Howard had 27
points and eight rebounds to
lead Orlando over Indiana
85-81 after the Magic were
forced to stay in Cincinnati
by the Super Bowl.
Danny Granger had 19
points and seven rebounds
and Tyler Hansbrough had
17 points and seven re-
bounds for the Pacers, who
have lost two of three to the
Magic in less than two weeks.
Jason Richardson scored
17 points and Ryan Ander-
son scored 12 for the Magic,
who have won three
straight.
Knicks 99, Nets 92
NEW YORK Jeremy Lin
scored a career-high 25 points
and the New York Knicks sal-
vaged the finale of a back-to-
back-to-back set by beating the
New Jersey Nets 99-92.
Lin came off the bench to
control a struggling offense,
adding seven assists while out-
playing Nets All-Star point
guard Deron Williams.
Amare Stoudemire and
Tyson Chandler each added 17
points for the Knicks, who won
for just the third time in 14
games. They fell just short in
losses to Chicago and Boston
over the last two nights before
picking up a much-needed vic-
tory Saturday.
Williams had 21 points and
11 assists for the Nets, while
Kris Humphries added 20


I, but effective St. Louis powers

Cavaliers9 1, Lightning to win


Associated Press
Orlando Magic forward Hedo Turkoglu drives against Indiana
Pacers forward Danny Granger during the second half
Saturday in Indianapolis. Orlando won 85-81.


points and 12 rebounds.
Clippers 107,
Wizards 81
WASHINGTON Blake
Griffin had 21 points, 11 re-
bounds and eight assists, and
DeAndre Jordan had 18 points
and 11 rebounds to lead the
Los Angeles Clippers to a 107-
81 victory against the Washing-
ton Wizards.
Mo Williams added 17 for the
Clippers, who won for the fifth
time in six games.
Nick Young and John Wall
each scored 14 for Washington,
which lost its fourth game in a
row and dropped to 4-20 this
season.
Griffin narrowly missed his
second career triple-double, de-
spite not playing in the fourth


quarter as Los Angeles rested
its starters.
76ers 98, Hawks 87
ATLANTA- Rookie Nikola
Vucevic set a career high with
15 points to lead six Philadel-
phia scorers in double figures
and the Sixers dodged back-to-
back losses once again by beat-
ing the Atlanta Hawks 98-87.
Jeff Teague had 21 points to
lead Atlanta.
The Sixers led by 20 in the
third period and kept the lead in
double figures until the Hawks
staged a final comeback at-
tempt. Joe Johnson's basket
with 1:45 remaining cut
Philadelphia's lead to 94-85.
Lou Williams, who had 14
points, answered with back-to-
back baskets for the Sixers.


CLEVELAND Rookie
Kyrie Irving made a driving
layup in traffic with 15.8 sec-
onds left to give the Cleveland
Cavaliers a 91-88 win over the
defending NBA champion Dal-
las Mavericks.
Irving, who is showing a
knack for last-second drama in
his first season, finished with 20
points and Anderson Varejao
added 17 points and 17 re-
bounds for the Cavs.
Dirk Nowitzki scored 24
points and passed Elgin Baylor
for 22nd place on the NBA's
scoring list.
Timberwolves 100,
Rockets 91
MINNEAPOLIS Kevin
Love had 25 and 18 rebounds
and Luke Ridnour added 22
points to help Minnesota win for
the fifth time in seven games to
reach .500 (12-12).
Kyle Lowry had 24 points
and 11 assists for Houston and
Luis Scola also had 24 points,
but Kevin Martin scored a sea-
son-low two points on 1-for-10
shooting.
Pistons 89, Hornets 87
AUBURN HILLS, Mich. -
Greg Monroe had 24 points
and 16 rebounds and Detroit
won a matchup of two of the
N BA's worst teams.
Rodney Stuckey added 17
for Detroit (6-20), which won
consecutive games for the sec-
ond time this season and had
five scorers in double figures.
New Orleans (4-20) lost its
fifth straight. TrevorAriza led
the Hornets with 26.
Both teams spent most of the
game without their starting
point guards.


Associated Press
TAMPA Martin St.
Louis scored three times in
his 900th NHL game,
Steven Stamkos added his
league-leading 34th goal
and the Tampa Bay Light-
ning beat the Florida Pan-
thers 6-3 on Saturday night
St. Louis got two goals
during Tampa Bay's four-
goal second, helping the
Lightning take a 5-3 lead
entering the third.
Nate Thompson and Vin-
cent Lecavalier also scored
for the Lightning.
Penguins 2, Bruins 1
BOSTON Marc-Andre
Fleury made 28 saves and
Evgeni Malkin scored a
power-play goal to lift the Pitts-
burgh Penguins to their ninth
win in 10 games, 2-1 over the
Boston Bruins.
Matt Cooke had the other
goal for the Penguins, who re-
bounded from a 1-0 loss at
Toronto on Wednesday that
ended a season-best eight-
game winning streak.
Canucks 3,
Avalanche 2, SO
DENVER Kevin Bieksa
tied the game with 34.1 sec-
onds remaining in regulation
and Mason Raymond scored
the lone goal in the shootout
as Vancouver rallied to beat
Colorado.
Raymond sent the puck
through the pads of Jean-Se-
bastien Giguere and Roberto
Luongo stopped all three
shots he faced for Vancouver,
which ended the Avs' streak of
shootout wins at 10.


Devils 6, Flyers 4
PHILADELPHIA- Kurtis
Foster scored a pair of power-
play goals to lead New Jersey
over Philadelphia for the Dev-
ils' third straight win.
Ilya Kovalchuk, Dainius
Zubrus, Zach Parise and
Alexei Ponikarovsky also had
goals for the Devils, whose
special teams scored three
times on the power play and
once short-handed.
Capitals 3, Canadiens 0
MONTREAL Tomas Vok-
oun made 30 saves for his
third shutout of the season
and Alexander Semin scored
on the second of Washington's
two penalty shots in a win over
Montreal.
Alex Ovechkin returned to
the Capitals' lineup after serv-
ing a three-game suspension
for his hit on Pittsburgh's
Zbynek Michalek.
Sabres 4,
Islanders 3, SO
UNIONDALE, N.Y. Brad
Boyes and Jason Pominville
scored shootout goals, and
the Buffalo Sabres rallied from
an early 3-1 deficit to beat the
New York Islanders 4-3.
Buffalo's Paul Gaustad tied
it 3-all midway through the
third period to send the game
to overtime.
Predators 3, Blues 1
NASHVILLE, Tenn. -
Pekka Rinne made 41 saves,
and Martin Erat had a goal
and two assists to lead the
Nashville Predators to a 3-1
win over the St. Louis Blues.
The Predators have won six
of seven, while the Blues have
dropped three of four.


SPORTS


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2012 B3






B4 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2012



NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
Philadelphia 17 7 .708 -
Boston 12 10 .545 4
NewYork 9 15 .375 8
Toronto 8 16 .333 9
New Jersey 8 17 .320 912
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 17 6 .739 -
Atlanta 16 8 .667 1 Y2
Orlando 15 9 .625 2Y2
Washington 4 20 .167 13Y2
Charlotte 3 20 .130 14
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Chicago 20 6 .769 -
Indiana 16 7 .696 212
Milwaukee 10 13 .435 812
Cleveland 9 13 .409 9
Detroit 6 20 .231 14
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 15 9 .625 -
Dallas 14 11 .560 11Y2
Houston 13 11 .542 2
Memphis 12 11 .522 212
New Orleans 4 20 .167 11
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 18 4 .818 -
Denver 15 8 .652 312
Utah 12 9 .571 512
Portland 13 10 .565 512
Minnesota 12 12 .500 7
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 14 7 .667 -
L.A. Lakers 14 9 .609 1
Golden State 8 12 .400 5Y2
Phoenix 8 14 .364 612
Sacramento 7 15 .318 712
Friday's Games
Toronto 106, Washington 89
Miami 99, Philadelphia 79
Orlando 102, Cleveland 94
Minnesota 108, New Jersey 105
Detroit 88, Milwaukee 80
Houston 99, Phoenix 81
Oklahoma City 101, Memphis 94
Boston 91, New York 89
Indiana 98, Dallas 87
L.A. Lakers 93, Denver 89
Saturday's Games
Philadelphia 98, Atlanta 87
Orlando 85, Indiana 81
L.A. Clippers 107, Washington 81
Cleveland 91, Dallas 88
Detroit 89, New Orleans 87
New York 99, New Jersey 92
Minnesota 100, Houston 91
Chicago 113, Milwaukee 90
Oklahoma City at San Antonio, late
Charlotte at Phoenix, late
L.A. Lakers at Utah, late
Golden State at Sacramento, late
Denver at Portland, late
Sunday's Games
Memphis at Boston, 12 p.m.
Toronto at Miami, 1 p.m.
Monday's Games
L.A. Clippers at Orlando, 7p.m.
Toronto at Washington, 7 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Phoenix at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
Chicago at New Jersey, 7:30 p.m.
Utah at New York, 7:30 p.m.
Sacramento at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
San Antonio at Memphis, 8 p.m.
Houston at Denver, 9 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Portland, 10 p.m.
Men's College
Basketball Scores
EAST
American U. 59, Colgate 58
Boston U. 68, Binghamton 53
Bucknell 81, Army 68
Charlotte 69, Fordham 62
Cornell 68, Dartmouth 59
Drexel 65, Towson 57
Duquesne 81, Richmond 72
Georgetown 75, South Florida 45
Georgia St. 59, Hofstra 43
Harvard 57, Columbia 52
lona 85, Manhattan 73
LIU 95, CCSU 81
Lafayette 62, Navy 41
Lehigh 75, Holy Cross 51
Maine 77, UMBC 76, OT
Marist 80, Canisius 69
Penn 65, Brown 48
Quinnipiac 71, Monmouth (NJ) 48
Robert Morris 67, Mount St. Mary's 62
Sacred Heart 66, Fairleigh Dickinson 57
Saint Joseph's 70, La Salle 66
St. Francis (NY) 80, Bryant 67
Stony Brook 76, Albany (NY) 69
Syracuse 95, St. John's 70
Temple 73, Rhode Island 56
UConn 69, Seton Hall 46
UMass 86, George Washington 75
Vermont 82, Hartford 56
Wagner 72, St. Francis (Pa.) 54
Yale 58, Princeton 54
SOUTH
Alabama 69, Mississippi 67, 20T
Alcorn St. 57, Jackson St. 46
Bethune-Cookman 92, NC A&T 79
Coastal Carolina 71, Charleston Southern 58
Coll. of Charleston 74, Appalachian St. 62
Coppin St. 88, Morgan St. 86
Davidson 88, Chattanooga 61
Delaware 85, James Madison 80
Delaware St. 67, Norfolk St. 50
ETSU 64, Kennesaw St. 59
East Carolina 82, Rice 68
Elon 71, The Citadel 66
FlU 76, FAU 56
Florida 73, Vanderbilt 65
Florida Gulf Coast 65, Jacksonville 55
Florida St. 58, Virginia 55
Furman 93, UNC Greensboro 85
George Mason 54, Old Dominion 50
Georgia Southern 68, W. Carolina 65
Georgia Tech 51, Boston College 47
High Point 81, Gardner-Webb 77, OT



PATRIOTS
Continued from Page B1l

that he can get
"Over the course of the
season, our teams have al-


ways seemed to improve."
It's been nearly three
months since the Patriots
lost 24-20 to the Giants,
who scored a touchdown
with 15 seconds left. Since
then, Brady has guided his
team to 10 straight wins.
"It starts with his heart.
The way he reads defenses,
the way he directs and takes
protections," guard Logan
Mankins said. "I think every-
one gets enamored with the
talent side sometimes, but
Tom might not be one of the
fastest guys, but he's defi-
nitely one of the smartest
guys and he has a strong
arm.
"He can make all the


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


For the record


= Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning
numbers selected
Saturday in the
Florida Lottery:

LOTTERY
9 16 34 39 41 46
XTRA
2


CASH 3 (early)
9-6-5
CASH 3 (late)
6-5-5
PLAY 4 (early)
8-5-1-8
PLAY 4 (late)
3-4-6-9
FANTASY 5
4 10 21 34 36
POWERBALL
15 23 43 45 56
POWER BALL
7


On the AIRWAVES

TODAY'S SPORTS
SUNDAY'S SPORTS
BASKETBALL
COLLEGE MEN
1 p.m. (CBS) Michigan at Michigan State
2 p.m. (ESPN) Villanova at Pittsburgh
COLLEGE WOMEN
1 p.m. (FSNFL) Wake Forest at Boston College
3 p.m. (FSNFL) Georgia at Alabama
4 p.m. (SUN) Washington at USC
NBA
1 p.m. (SUN) Toronto Raptors at Miami Heat
BOWLING
4 p.m. (ESPN) PBA Chris Paul Celebrity Invitational (Taped)
FOOTBALL
6 p.m. (NBC) Super Bowl XLVI: New York Giants vs.
New England Patriots
GOLF
8:30 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour: Commercialbank
Qatar Masters (Same-day Tape)
1 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: Waste Management Phoenix Open
3 p.m. (CBS) PGATour: Waste Management Phoenix Open
HOCKEY
12:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) Boston Bruins at Washington Capitals
MOTORCYCLE RACING
12 p.m. (CBS) Monster Energy AMA Supercross World
Championship (Taped)
RUGBY
10 p.m. (NBCSPT) IRB Sevens World Series (Taped)
SOCCER
10:30 a.m. (FOX) English Premier League: Manchester
United at Chelsea
TRACKAND FIELD
2 p.m. (ESPN2) New Balance Indoor Grand Prix (Taped)
WINTER SPORTS
5 p.m. (NBCSPT) Snowmobile Racing Amsoil Champi-
onship Series (Taped)

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


Kentucky 86, South Carolina 52
LSU 71, Arkansas 65
Louisiana-Lafayette 83, Troy 78
Louisville 78, Rutgers 66
MVSU 70, Alabama St. 58
Md.-Eastern Shore 78, Howard 65
Memphis 72, Xavier 68
Mercer 61, SC-Upstate 47
Mississippi St. 91, Auburn 88
Murray St. 65, UT-Martin 58
NC Central 78, Florida A&M 61
NC State 87, Wake Forest 76
Nicholls St. 96, Texas St. 75
North Carolina 83, Maryland 74
North Florida 99, Stetson 96
Northwestern St. 82, Texas A&M-CC 68
Presbyterian 69, Campbell 67
Sam Houston St. 57, SE Louisiana 55
Samford 66, Wofford 61, OT
Savannah St. 73, SC State 60
Southern U. 57, Grambling St. 53
Tennessee 73, Georgia 62
Tennessee Tech 76, Jacksonville St. 68
Tulane 75, Houston 54
UNC Asheville 65, Liberty 51
UNC Wilmington 81, William & Mary 68
VCU 59, Northeastern 56
VMI 86, Winthrop 79
Virginia Tech 67, Clemson 65
W. Kentucky 75, South Alabama 66
MIDWEST
Akron 77, E. Michigan 47
Bowling Green 65, N. Illinois 40
Buffalo 72, Toledo 65
Cincinnati 74, DePaul 66
Detroit 65, Butler 61
IUPUI66, IPFW 63
Illinois St. 78, Bradley 48
Indiana 78, Purdue 61
Iowa 77, Penn St. 64
Kansas St. 64, Texas A&M 53
Kent St. 78, W. Michigan 73, OT
Miami (Ohio) 59, Ball St. 53
Milwaukee 81, Green Bay 75
Missouri St. 57, Drake 39
Morehead St. 56, E. Illinois 55
N. Iowa 65, Creighton 62
NJIT 73, Chicago St. 64
Notre Dame 76, Marquette 59
Oakland 74, W. Illinois 70, 20T
Ohio 68, Cent. Michigan 42
Ohio St. 58, Wisconsin 52
Oral Roberts 85, N. Dakota St. 76
S. Dakota St. 66, S. Utah 56
S. Illinois 53, Evansville 52


throws. He reads defenses so
fast. It makes him a special
player"
The ability of the two-time
Super Bowl MVP to in-
stantly analyze what a de-
fense is likely to do is a huge
asset against the Giants.
They sometimes use four de-
fensive ends at a time and
all are aggressive pass
rushers.
But the Patriots have a vet-
eran group of offensive line-
men who can quickly figure
out who to block. Brady was
sacked an average of only
twice a game in the regular
season. In two playoff games,
he's been sacked once. Even
guard Brian Waters, in his
first season with New Eng-
land after 11 in Kansas City,
has blended in well.
"I think he does a good job
of studying the opponent
that he lines up against,"
New York defensive coordi-
nator Perry Fewell said. "He


N
P
P
N
N


SIU-Edwardsville 80, E. Kentucky 74
Saint Louis 58, Dayton 50
South Dakota 79, UMKC 63
Valparaiso 63, Wright St. 54
SOUTHWEST
Ark.-Pine Bluff 81, Alabama A&M 75
Baylor 64, Oklahoma St. 60
Iowa St. 77, Oklahoma 70
Lamar 80, UTSA 66
Texas 74, Texas Tech 57
Texas-Arlington 69, Cent. Arkansas 61
Texas-Pan American 70, North Dakota 58
Tulsa 79, Marshall 70
UAB 61, UTEP 60
UALR 70, Louisiana-Monroe 66
UCF 59, SMU52
Utah Valley 68, Houston Baptist 66
FAR WEST
Arizona 56, Stanford 43
California 68, Arizona St. 47
Colorado St. 67, Air Force 49
Denver 75, Middle Tennessee 60
New Mexico 65, Boise St. 49
Oregon St. 76, Utah 58
Portland St. 76, N. Arizona 65
San Diego 70, Santa Clara 65
UCLA 63, Washington St. 60
Weber St. 93, N. Colorado 81
Wyoming 68, UNLV 66



NHL standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
I.Y. Rangers 49 3212 5 69136 100
3hiladelphia 51 3015 6 66171 151
3ittsburgh 52 30 18 4 64159 133
lew Jersey 51 2919 3 61144 146
I.Y. Islanders 51 21 22 8 50125 150


Boston
Ottawa
Toronto
Buffalo
Montreal

Florida
Washington
Winnipeg
Tampa Bay
Carolina


Northeast Division
GP W L OT PtsGF GA
50 3216 2 66176 110
55 2721 7 61161 171
52 2719 6 60161 152
52 2224 6 50126 154
52 1924 9 47134 145
Southeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
51 2416 11 59131 145
51 2720 4 58144 145
53 2423 6 54129 147
51 2323 5 51147 173
54 2025 9 49137 165


has a plan in his head about
how he's going to block the
opponent and he sticks to his
plan."
Give Brady time and he
can pick apart the Giants
mediocre secondary and
pile up points at the Patriots'
regular-season rate.
They led the AFC with 32.1
points per game and are av-
eraging 34 in the playoffs.
That offense, which has run
half its plays this postseason
without huddling, keeps de-
fenses from getting a
breather and having the
right players on the field for
a particular situation.
The Giants couldn't even
get much of a break with Rob
Gronkowski's high left ankle
sprain.
The All-Pro tight end is
making daily progress and
Brady almost certainly will
have his most important re-
ceiver back, even if he's not
at full strength.


WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT PtsGF GA
Detroit 52 3516 1 71167 121
Nashville 53 3217 4 68149 136
St. Louis 51 3014 7 67126 105
Chicago 53 2917 7 65169 158
Columbus 52 1432 6 34120 174
Northwest Division
GP W L OT PtsGF GA
Vancouver 52 3215 5 69167 130
Minnesota 52 2519 8 58121 133
Colorado 54 2625 3 55135 151
Calgary 52 2422 6 54124 141
Edmonton 51 2026 5 45133 148
Pacific Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
San Jose 50 2915 6 64145 117
LosAngeles 53 2518 10 60115 116
Dallas 51 2722 2 56136 144
Phoenix 52 2321 8 54136 141
Anaheim 51 1924 8 46132 154
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over-
time loss.
Friday's Games
N.Y. Islanders 2, Ottawa 1, OT
Florida 2, Winnipeg 1
St. Louis 1, Los Angeles 0
Calgary 3, Chicago 1
Columbus 3, Anaheim 2, OT
Saturday's Games
Vancouver 3, Colorado 2, SO
Buffalo 4, N.Y. Islanders 3, SO
Dallas 2, Minnesota 1, SO
Pittsburgh 2, Boston 1
New Jersey 6, Philadelphia 4
Washington 3, Montreal 0
Toronto 5, Ottawa 0
Carolina 2, Los Angeles 1
Tampa Bay 6, Florida 3
Nashville 3, St. Louis 1
Phoenix 5, San Jose 3
Detroit at Edmonton, late
Today's Games
Boston at Washington, 12:30 p.m.
Pittsburgh at New Jersey, 1 p.m.
Philadelphia at N.Y Rangers, 1 p.m.
Winnipeg at Montreal, 2 p.m.
Monday's Games
Edmonton at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Detroit at Phoenix, 8 p.m.
Calgary at Anaheim, 10 p.m.



NFL Playoff Glance
Wild-card Playoffs
Saturday, Jan. 7
Houston 31, Cincinnati 10
New Orleans 45, Detroit 28
Sunday, Jan. 8
New York Giants 24, Atlanta 2
Denver 29, Pittsburgh 23, OT
Divisional Playoffs
Saturday, Jan. 14
San Francisco 36, New Orleans 32
New England 45, Denver 10
Sunday, Jan. 15
Baltimore 20, Houston 13
N.Y. Giants 37, Green Bay 20
Conference Championships
Sunday, Jan. 22
New England 23, Baltimore 20
N.Y. Giants 20, San Francisco 17, OT
Pro Bowl
Sunday, Jan. 29
At Honolulu
AFC 59, NFC 41
Super Bowl
Sunday, Feb. 5
At Indianapolis
New England vs. N.Y. Giants, 6:20 p.m.
NFL MVPs
The NFL Most Valuable Players named by
The Associated Press in balloting by a nation-
wide panel of the media:
2011 -Aaron Rodgers, Green Bay, QB
2010 -Tom Brady, New England, QB
2009 Peyton Manning, Indianapolis, QB
2008 Peyton Manning, Indianapolis, QB
2007-Tom Brady, New England, QB
2006- LaDainianTomlinson, San Diego, RB
2005 Shaun Alexander, Seattle, RB
2004 Peyton Manning, Indianapolis, QB
2003 Peyton Manning, Indianapolis, and
Steve McNair, Tennessee, QBs
2002 Rich Gannon, Oakland, QB
2001 Kurt Warner, St. Louis, QB
2000 Marshall Faulk, St. Louis, RB
1999 Kurt Warner, St. Louis, QB
1998 -Terrell Davis, Denver, RB
1997 Brett Favre, Green Bay, QB, and
Barry Sanders, Detroit, RB
1996 Brett Favre, Green Bay, QB
1995 Brett Favre, Green Bay, QB
1994- Steve Young, San Francisco, QB
1993 Emmitt Smith, Dallas, RB
1992- Steve Young, San Francisco, QB
1991 -Thurman Thomas, Buffalo, RB
1990- Joe Montana, San Francisco, QB
1989-Joe Montana, San Francisco, QB
1988 Boomer Esiason, Cincinnati, QB
1987- John Elway, Denver, QB
1986 Lawrence Taylor, New York Giants,
LB
1985 Marcus Allen, Los Angeles Raiders,
RB
1984 Dan Marino, Miami, QB
1983 Joe Theismann, Washington, QB
1982 Mark Moseley, Washington, PK
1981 Ken Anderson, Cincinnati, QB
1980 Brian Sipe, Cleveland, QB
1979 Earl Campbell, Houston, RB
1978 -Terry Bradshaw, Pittsburgh, QB
1977 -Walter Payton, Chicago, RB
1976 Bert Jones, Baltimore, QB
1975- Fran Tarkenton, Minnesota, QB
1974 Ken Stabler, Oakland, QB
1973- O.J. Simpson, Buffalo, RB
1972 Larry Brown, Washington, RB
1971 -Alan Page, Minnesota, DT
1970 John Brodie, San Francisco, QB
1969- Roman Gabriel, Los Angeles Rams,
QB
1968 Earl Morrall, Baltimore, QB
1967- John Unitas, Baltimore, QB
1966 Bart Starr, Green Bay, QB
1965- Jim Brown, Cleveland, RB
1964- John Unitas, Baltimore, QB
1963 -Y.A.Tittle, New York Giants, QB
1962 -Jim Taylor, Green Bay, RB
1961 Paul Hornung, Green Bay, RB


Brady definitely will have
NFL receptions leader Wes
Welker and the other dan-
gerous tight end, versatile
Aaron Hernandez, who lines
up all over the place as a
split or slot receiver, a run-
ning back and in the tradi-
tional tight end's spot close
to the linemen. He's sure to
keep the Giants defense


guessing.
The Patriots defense?
It's been burned by big
plays all season, especially
the secondary Will coach
Tom Coughlin and quarter-
back Eli Manning test it
early to see if it wilts in the
glare of football's brightest
spotlight?
The Patriots allowed the
second most yards in the
NFL during the regular sea-
son, but only the 15th most
points and they've been
much improved in the play-
offs. And the Giants had the
league's least productive


Nine Pirates move


onto regional tourney


Team comes in

3rd at Fivay

district tourney

Chronicle

Nine Crystal River
wrestlers will be moving on
to the regional tournament
after taking third as a team at
the District 1A-8 tournament
Saturday night at Fivay High
School in Hudson.
The Pirates scored 133.5
points to come in behind
winner Fivay (200) and Pasco
(148).
Dylan Ayala, a 152-



UF
Continued from Page B1

keep them from running
their sets," Beal said. "We
were really patient and then
we trapped hard and we
were able to rotate and
force turnovers.... It's prob-
ably our best performance."
Vanderbilt (16-7, 5-3) had
been able to overcome
turnovers issues in recent
weeks, winning at Mar-
quette, at South Carolina
and at Alabama with at least
17 turnovers. No such luck



CITRUS
Continued from Page B1

to finish second," Kelly
added. "Our guys wrestled
hard. Colton (Jackson) wres-
tled the best match he's ever
had against (Cody) Ross.
And we knew going against
guys like (Thomas) Gupton
would be tough. We thought
our horses would do well -
and they did. We even had a
freshman make the district
finals; that shows how much
improvement we've made."
Kelly attempted to predict
next week's Region of
Doom.
"We've got to take it one
match at a time," he
stressed. "The guys have a
tendency of looking ahead
to certain people. You can't
do that at the regional level.
We have to take baby steps
and hope everybody pulls
their weight"
Jackson: Third
district title
Jackson went 2-0 on Sat-
urday to improve to a team-
best 41-3 record.
Jackson had a bye before
pinning Central senior
Puerto Rico Nieves in 3:10
before slamming Spring-
stead senior Ernesto Padilla
via a 15-3 major decision in
the tourney finals.
The district title was Jack-
son's third straight
"Probably the hardest
(district title) was my first
one," recalled the 18-year-
old Jackson. "Today, I just
wanted to go out there and
work on some stuff. My idea
coming in was to pin every-
body in the state series -
that way people will know
I'm the best."
McLean: Initial
district title
From his freshman year
wrestling in New York,
McLean has gone full circle
at districts. In two seasons at
Oviedo he finished third
and then runner-up last
year
On Saturday, he went 3-0
to climb to 42-8 overall. Most
importantly, he claimed his


running game.
The Patriots defense is
also as healthy as it's been
all season so it may not have
to use wide receiver Julian
Edelman in the secondary as
much as it did in the AFC
championship game against
the Baltimore Ravens.
"I don't really think we
focus on rankings or any of
that," Patriots safeties coach
Matt Patricia said. "All we
are worried about is going
out and trying to do the best
that we can."
Turnovers are one of the


most important factors in the
outcome of a game and the
Patriots led the AFC with a
plus-17 differential, com-
pared to plus-7 for the Gi-
ants. Running back
BenJarvus Green-Ellis has
handled the ball 577 times in
his four NFL seasons, all
with New England, and
never has fumbled.
"Early in the season, they


pounder for the Pirates, was
the only Crystal River
wrestler to win his weight
class.
Cory Corneillie came in
second for the Pirates in the
132 pound weight class while
Crystal River had seven
wrestlers come in third.
Those grapplers were: Bran-
don Martin, Tyler Graber,
Andrew Bilby, Robert
Brooker, Cody Thompson,
Nick Hooper and Jonathan
Vargulish.
The combined record of
the Pirates who competed in
the tournament was 24-15,
which included 18 pins.
The full story will run in
Monday's Chronicle sports
section.


in Gainesville.
"We didn't do a very good
job of attacking (the press),"
Vanderbilt coach Kevin
Stallings said. "It was dis-
ruptive and we did a poor
job with our spacing. We did
a poor job with our ball han-
dling. It caused problems."
The Commodores had
their hands full defending
Boynton and Beal, too.
The guards came up huge
in the second half. Beal
scored 14 points after the
break. Boynton drained a 3-
pointer with 1:10 remaining
after the Commodores
made it a four-point game.


first-ever district title.
After pinning Hernando's
Tical Miller in 3:57, he
stuffed Land O'Lakes'
Bobby Austin in the semis,
8-1.
In the finals he squared
off in a rematch with Nature
Coast's Mitch Lambert For
the third time he solved
Lambert, 11-0. This was the
most lopsided score be-
tween the two. In the earlier
wins, McLean won 10-3 and
6-4.
"Mitch was definitely the
best guy I faced today,"
McLean said. "I came in
wanting to make a state-
ment. He kinda closed the
gap on me in the last match.
I came in wanting to wrestle
a lot better on my feet And a
used a little different warm-
up and I think that worked
too."
Kelly: Breaks through
One thing missing from
Austin Kelly's resume was a
district title until Saturday
The top seeded Kelly
pinned Lecanto's Jon Fill-
inger in the semifinals in
3:30 to face Springstead jun-
ior Stephen Pavao.
Kelly never trailed in
solving Pavao, 9-4, to climb
to 35-12 on the season.
"It feels good to win at dis-
tricts for the first time," said
the 17-year-old Kelly, who
went 2-2 at states last winter.
"I thought Pavao really gave
me a challenge tonight. He's
really progressed and got-
ten much better I would ex-
pect to see him again next
week and at states."
Also advancing to region-
als for the Hurricanes is:
junior Chris Mosher at 106
(third), sophomore Michael
Allan at 113 (third), junior
Dalton Tinsley at 126
(fourth), junior Jacob Nolen
at 132 (third), junior Nick
Fernandez at 170 (third) and
senior Derrick Bostick at
285 (third).
Lecanto placed sixth in the
2A-7 Tourney and will ad-
vance four grapplers to 2A-II:
Fillinger at 120 (4th), Joel
Pelton at 126 (3rd), Nick
Nightengale at 170 (4th) and
Christian Barber at 285 (4th).


wouldn't run the ball as con-
sistent," Giants safety Kenny
Phillips said, "but through-
out the playoffs they are
doing a lot better."
With a balanced offense,
the Patriots can cool the ag-
gression of the Giants pass
rush. Devote too many play-
ers to charging Brady, and
Green-Ellis can run free for
big gains.
Finally, the Patriots, as
much as they deny it, should
gain motivation from their
17-14 loss to the Giants in the
Super Bowl four years ago
on a last-minute touchdown.


"Unfortunately, we know
what it's like to not come out
on top," tackle Matt Light
said. "You want to make sure
you don't put yourself in that
position."
They won't, not with Be-
lichick and Brady leading
the way.
Final score: Patriots, 31,
Giants 24.


SCOREBOARD





NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE


I Welker OK with



I not his favor ite being unheralded


Giants kicker

hated sport as

Scottish youth

Associated Press

INDIANAPOLIS -
Lawrence Tynes hated foot-
ball. Too much hitting, too
much pain.
The native of Scotland
preferred soccer when he
was growing up in Florida,
which was the latest stop for
his military family A lot of
his friends spent their time
tugging on helmets and lac-
ing up shoulder pads, but he
didn't want anything to do
with it
Given that background,
it's quite surprising that he's
a major figure in football's
biggest game.
The New York Giants
kicker will play in his sec-
ond Super Bowl on Sunday
against the New England
Patriots, the team he helped
to beat in the title game four
years ago. It's a big stage for
someone who wanted noth-
ing to do with the game as a
teenager.
"It's pretty weird how it
worked out," Tynes said.
There's no disputing that
he really stumbled onto his
Super path.
The 33-year-old kicker
was born in Greenock, Scot-
land, where his father a
U.S. Navy officer met his
mother. The family moved to
Florida when he was 11, and
he did his best to blend in at
Milton High School.
Football? Uh-uh. Had to
draw the line somewhere.
"I didn't like this game
that I am playing on Sunday
because it was tackling and
physical," he said.
During his junior year, his
physical education teacher
- and the football team's
defensive coordinator -
asked him to see how far
and straight he could kick a
football. The team needed a
kicker; Tynes was a good
soccer player.
"I said, 'Certainly,"' Tynes
recalled. "So I went out to
the baseball field, he throws
his keys down in front of
where I was going to kick
and he said, 'Kick the ball
and pick my keys up,' just to
keep my head down."
He kicked it long and
straight. His friends urged
him join the team. He made
a life-changing decision.
"I am glad I did, because
the only reason I did it was
to hang out with my buddies
in practice," he said.



GIANTS
Continued from Page B1

To say the defense is confi-
dent heading into the Super
Bowl would be an under-
statement
"I feel like we're going to
play our best game, so who-
ever is facing us better play
theirs," defensive captain
Justin Tuck
There is no secret to the
Giants' game plan: Stop the
run, put the Patriots in pass-
ing situations and knock Tom
Brady on his you-know-what
Then do it again.
It's the game plan the Gi-
ants used four years ago in
Phoenix in embarrassing the
Patriots' offensive line, and
the same one they used with
a little less effectiveness in
Foxborough, Mass., early in
November during a 24-20
win.
In that more recent game,
the Giants sacked Brady
twice and had two intercep-
tions. One sack led to a fum-
ble recovery that set up a
score.
Get to Brady and good
things happen.
"We did some things that
disrupted his timing," defen-
sive coordinator Perry
Fewell said. "We caused him
to stay jittery in the pocket
Hopefully we can do that
again."
Brady and the Patriots will


be facing an even better de-
fense in the rematch. The Gi-
ants' front four is healthy and
peaking.
Tuck has overcome the
shoulder and groin injuries
that bothered him in Novem-
ber Osi Umenyiora is as
healthy as he's been all sea-
son, and the defense has sud-


4-



Associated Press
New York Giants kicker Lawrence Tynes practices Friday in Indianapolis. The Giants will
face the New England Patriots in Super Bowl XLVI on Sunday.


Tynes became so good at it
that he became the kicker at
Troy University, where he
was a teammate of Osi
Umenyiora. The Kansas City
Chiefs signed him as a free
agent in 2001, starting a pro
career that meandered for a
few years.
He was released by the
Chiefs before the 2001 sea-
son, then signed again after
the season, only to be re-
leased a second time. He
played for the Scottish Clay-
mores in the NFL Europe
league, then signed with Ot-
tawa of the Canadian Foot-
ball League for two seasons.
The Chiefs signed him
again in 2004, and he played
three seasons there before
the Giants acquired him in a
trade for a seventh-round
draft pick on May 27, 2007.
Good deal for everybody
Tynes immediately be-
came part of Giants lore,


denly found itself after need-
ing a rescue party for the first
14 games.
Not only is the front four
playing well, the linebackers
are stopping the run and the
secondary is covering so well
that quarterbacks Aaron
Rodgers, Matt Ryan and Alex
Smith rarely were able to hit
their primary targets in the
playoffs.
"To be honest, I think our
confidence is very high," said
second-year defensive end
Jason Pierre-Paul, who led
the Giants with 16 1/2 sacks
in the regular season. "We
know what we have to do and
what's at stake."
If Brady meets the same
fate as those other recent
quarterbacks and he's duck-
ing the pass rush, the Patri-
ots are going to have big
problems.
"That's where our energy
comes from," Fewell said of
his front four "That's where
our confidence comes from.
That's where our swagger
comes from, because those
guys unlike most teams
you are associated with -
they set the tone for us. They
are the catalyst for what we
do and how we do it"
Umenyiora has no doubt
the Giants will get to Brady
and put their imprint on the
game.
"They're going to defi-
nitely do some things to keep
us off of him, max protec-
tions, short throws, quick
throws, but they can only do
that for so long," Umenyiora
said. "Whenever we have op-
portunities where he does
hold the ball, we're going to
have to get to the quarter-
back."
The Giants also have got-
ten a little lucky heading into
this one. Patriots All-Pro


kicking a 47-yard field goal
in overtime of the NFC
championship game at Lam-
beau Field that got New
York into the Super Bowl.
The Giants beat the Patriots
for the title on Eli Manning's
late touchdown pass.
Tynes got them back to the
Super Bowl this season with
another decisive kick, mak-
ing a 31-yarder in overtime
at San Francisco for the
NFC championship.
He's enjoying his second
title-game trip more than
the first.
"I really am trying to be-
cause the last time, I told my
wife, the last one was a blur,"
he said. "Let's really enjoy
this one. I am 33 now and
hope to play a lot longer,
(but) you never know when
you are going to get back
here. I am taking in every-
thing. I have taken a lot
more pictures since I have


tight end Rob Gronkowski
suffered a high sprain to his
left ankle in the AFC title
game against Baltimore. It
probably will reduce his ef-
fectiveness.
Offensively, Eli Manning
has had a career year, and
the Giants can match the Pa-
triots point for point. With
New York's running game
struggling much of the sea-
son, the key will be keeping
Manning upright San Fran-
cisco sacked him six times
and hit him 20 times overall
in the NFC title game.
However, the Patriots D
isn't in the same category as


been here."
He didn't get a chance for
a game-winning kick in his
first Super Bowl. Given how
closely the Giants and Patri-
ots have played each other,
there's a chance it could
happen on Sunday
"They're like walk-off
homers," Tynes said. "Those
are fun, that's the only word
to describe it You get to turn
around and see 52 grown
men acting like kids again.
That's the best part."
The worst part? What
happens if he gets the
chance and misses. It's
something that's never com-
pletely out of mind for a
kicker
"I get nervous," Tynes
said. "I am not a robot, but I
certainly know how to deal
with it. That's what kind of
separates guys. It's if you can
deal with the pressure and
the nerves."


49ers. The Patriots allowed
the second-most yards in the
NFL during the regular sea-
son, and their secondary re-
peatedly got burned for big
plays.
Vince Wilfolk will stuff the
middle but Manning should
have a field day against a
shaky New England second-
ary There's no way Devin
McCourty, Kyle Arrington
and nickel back-receiver Ju-
lian Edelman stop Hakeem
Nicks, Victor Cruz and Mario
Manningham and tight end
Jake Ballard.
Championships often are
decided by a big play, and


r

Citrus County Councif
presents...
CONCERNED

CITIZEN

COMMENDATION
AWARD AND DINNER
Helen Spivey
2012 Award Recipient
Friday, February 17, 2012
Dinner 4:00 p.m. 6:00 p.m.
Classic Acoustic Guitar by Craig Jaworski
during dinner

Award Presentation 6:00 p.m.
Beverly Hills Lions Club
72 Civic Circle
Roast Pork Dinner $8.00 donation

For more information & ticket
reservation call
Carl Simpson 527-2929
00 ACNA


INDIANAPOLIS Wes
Welker is used to being
overlooked.
He's 5-foot-9. He wasn't
drafted. His 11 catches
couldn't prevent a Super
Bowl loss four years ago.
And in the run up to Sun-
day's rematch against the
New York Giants, the New
England Patriots wide re-
ceiver is getting little
attention.
Welker's NFL-leading
122 receptions were in the
shadow of the spotlight-fill-
ing injured ankle of 6-foot-6
tight end Rob Gronkowski.
So does the small receiver
feel he needs a big game to
raise his profile?
"I don't think I am really
worried about that too
much," Welker said. "I just
try to go out there and do my
job to the best of my ability.
I really just focus on what-
ever I have to do to help the
team win the game."
He could have a larger
role with Gronkowski at less
than full strength. His high
left ankle sprain could keep
him from tacking on plenty
of yards, as he often does,
after catching passes.
Tom Brady certainly re-
lies on Welker, whose 554
receptions since 2007 lead
the NFL, 80 more than
Brandon Marshall's second
highest total.
"Wes Welker would make
any quarterback better with
his ability to get open and
catch the ball," Brady said.
"He's a very smart player
who has a great feel for the
game, who has a great feel
for how to get open in man-
to-man (coverage), where to
find the spots in zone, great
body language."
That body language and
Welker's ability to confuse
defensive backs are keys to
his success. He also knows
that reading what the
safeties are doing is a key to
how the defense will handle
a play


= == W== W Associated Press


Associated Press
New England Patriots wide receiver Wes Welker answers
questions during a news conference Thursday in Indianapolis.


Cruz and Nicks have been
turning little plays into
touchdowns all season.
There likely will be chances
for more of those.
With both offenses so for-
midable, former Buffalo
Bills coach Marv Levy felt
the game was going to be de-
cided by a special teams
play, a blocked punt or field
goal, or some other play


"Both teams are here be-
cause of special teams
plays," Levy said. "When you
get two very closely matched
teams, which I think they
are, look for the kicking
game to determine the out-
come."
Not likely Not with the Gi-
ants' defense.
Final score: Giants 31,
Patriots 17.


He usually lines up in the
slot and tries to start his pat-
terns the same way so a de-
fender doesn't know what's
coming.
Then the sure-handed re-
ceiver will plant his foot, cut
sharply to the left or right or
head downfield and latch
onto Brady's pass after
eluding a defender
"I think you go off and
react to what they do,"
Welker said. "However they
decide to play you, you at-
tack it A lot of it is reaction
and being quick and in and
out of breaks and doing dif-
ferent things to get open."
Deion Branch usually
lines up on the outside and
tight end Aaron Hernandez
sometimes starts there, too.
Gronkowski and Welker are
at their best over the mid-
dle.
"I just think that they
have a good system," Giants
cornerback Corey Webster
said. "How they use
(Welker) inside the system is
wonderful. You can't have a
system without players in-
side of it as well."
When Welker was at
Texas Tech, he couldn't
imagine being so successful
in the NFL, let alone mak-
ing it to his second Super
Bowl in four years.
"I didn't really have any
big expectations," he said.
"I really just wanted a job. I
wanted to go out there and
do the best I can to try to get
that job."
He signed as a free agent
with San Diego. The Charg-
ers waived him after the
first game in 2004 and the
Miami Dolphins signed him
after the second. As a
rookie, he returned kickoffs
and punts but didn't catch a
single pass.
In seven seasons since
then -five with the Patriots
- he has 650 receptions.
With 123 in 2009 and 122 this
season, he joined Cris
Carter as the only players
with two seasons of more
than 120.


Come Pinch


A Little Tail

Saturday, March 24
11 am- 10 pm
Old Homosassa, FL

Parade Begins

at 10:30 am









Mardi Gras Homosassa Style
The event kicks off at 10:30 AM with the Shrimpa-Palooza
Parade. Festivities will encompass most of Old Homosassa, with
the area's merchants participating by hosting similar festivities.
Don't miss out on the Food, Fun and Live Music!
If you'd like to participate in the parade, be a vendor or would like
more information please call Tom Feeney at 352-201-2520,
Marybeth Nayfield at 352-795-7297 or E-mail

www.shrimpapalooza.com Ci' )ONC1 "

C Rotary Club of Homosassa Springs


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2012 B5












ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Celebs


suit up


for


Beach


Bowl

Associated Press

INDIANAPOLIS -
Deion Sanders said he
wasn't worried. Joe Mon-
tana went in with his game
face on and Jordin Sparks
just hoped sand did not
end up in her eyes.
Athletes and celebrities
had different strategies as
they prepared to play in
the sixth annual DirectTV
Celebrity Beach Bowl. The
event teams up stars with
former and current profes-
sional athletes for a flag
football game on the sand.
Assistant coach Neil
Patrick Harris admitted he
didn't know much about
the game, so he was going
to rely on his teammates to
make the calls.
"I really am not compet-
itive at all. I quite frankly
don't know what is going to
happen or what we are
playing," the actor said
with a smile. "I know it is
football of some sort, but it
might be flag football,
touch, two-handed touch. I
don't know."
Lucky for him, legend
Joe Montana was on his
team.
"I hate to lose," Montana
said ahead of the game. "I
am not very good at losing.
You try to go into this as it's
going to be a fun game, but
as soon as you get involved
... if they score, you go, 'OK'
You have got to at least
keep it competitive. I can't
just go through the mo-
tions. I want to win."
Sparks arrived with her
dad, Phillippi Sparks, a
former New York Giant.
The former '"American
Idol" champ says she
wasn't expecting intense
action.
"I know it is not tackle.
They are just grabbing the
flag, but who knows, we
could get tripped up and
stuff, so I am glad there is
sand," she said. "I am nerv-
ous about it getting in my
eyes if I fall, but other than
that, it is going to be a lot of
fun. I am excited. "
As for the other big game
in Indianapolis, Sanders
said he would not pick the
New England Patriots or
the New York Giants to win
on Sunday.
"I am a former player I
am not rooting for anybody
I just want a good quality
game. I just want the fans
to be entertained for three
and a half hours. I want
Madonna to come out and
do the doggone thing like
she can do it," he said of
her halftime performance.
Other big names at the
event included Peyton
Manning, Chace Crawford,
Cam Newton, Terrell
Owens and David Ar-
quette, who said he's been
having a great time in Indi-
anapolis.
"What I really like about
Super Bowl in general is
that it introduces you to an-
other city," he said. "Indi-
anapolis is a beautiful city
a lot of people might not
know about or have not vis-
ited. To come here and to
meet the people and see
the city, that is my favorite
part, actually"


1930-2012





Ben Gazzara


Associated Press
Actor Ben Gazzara poses in 1965 with dancers Sandy Garrett, left, and Victoria Scruton while filming an episode
of the TV series "Run for Your Life" in Los Angeles. Gazzara, whose powerful dramatic performances brought an
intensity to a variety of roles and made him a memorable presence in films, on television and on Broadway in the
original "Cat on a Hot Tin Roof," has died at age 81.

Popular character actor dies from cancer in New York City


Associated Press

NEW YORK Ben Gazzara,
whose powerful dramatic perform-
ances brought an intensity to a vari-
ety of roles and made him a
memorable presence in such iconic
productions over the decades as the
original "Cat on a Hot Tin Roof" on
Broadway and the film "The Big
Lebowski," has died at age 81.
Longtime family friend Suzanne
Mados said Gazzara died Friday in
Manhattan. Mados, who owned the
Wyndham Hotel, where celebrities
such as Peter Falk and Martin
Sheen stayed, said he died after
being placed in hospice care for
cancer She and her husband
helped marry Gazzara and his wife,
German-born Elke Krivat, at their
hotel.
Gazzara was a proponent of
method acting, in which the per-
former attempts to take on the
thoughts and emotions of the char-
acter he's playing, and it helped
him achieve stardom early in his
career with two stirring Broadway
performances.
In 1955, he originated the role of
Brick Pollitt, the disturbed alcoholic
son and failed football star in "Cat
on a Hot Tin Roof." He left the show
after only seven months to take on
an equally challenging role, Johnny
Pope, the drug addict in "A Hatful of
Rain." It earned him his first of
three Tony Award nominations.
In 1965, he moved on to TV star-
dom in "Run for Your Life," a
drama about a workaholic lawyer
who, diagnosed with a terminal ill-
ness, quits his job and embarks on
a globe-trotting attempt to squeeze
a lifetime of adventures into the
one or two years he has left. He was
twice nominated for Emmys during
the show's three-year run.
Gazzara made his movie debut in
1957 in "The Strange One," Calder
Willingham's bitter drama about
brutality at a Southern military
school. He had previously played


Birthday You are likely to be able to add considerably to
your resources in the year ahead, through ingenuity and
cleverness. On top of that, anybody who becomes closely
involved with what you're doing will also come out well.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -You might get an opening
to tell a sensitive friend something that he or she needs to
hear. You won't do so unless you know you can deliver the
morsel in question without hurting the recipient's feelings.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Because you're self-suffi-
cient and reliable, you're not apt to take your responsibili-
ties lightly. When you give your word to do something, you'll
stand by that promise.
Aries (March 21-April 19) Regardless of how busy you
may be, find some time to get in touch with an old friend
who has been on your mind lately. There's a reason you've
been thinking of him or her.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) You don't need the support of


Ben Gazzara attends The National
Board of Review of Motion Pictures
awards gala Jan. 11, 2011, in New
York.
the lead role of the psychopathic
cadet, Jocko de Paris, on Broadway
in Willingham's stage version of the
story, "End of Man."
He followed that film with
"Anatomy of a Murder," in which he
played a man on trial for murdering
a tavern keeper who had been ac-
cused of raping his wife.
After "Run for Your Life" ended
in 1968, Gazzara spent the rest of his
career alternating between movies
and the stage, although rarely with
the critical acclaim he had enjoyed
during his early years.
In the 1970s, he teamed with his
friend director John Cassavetes for
three films, "The Killing of a Chi-
nese Bookie" and "Opening Night."
In another Cassavetes film, he ap-
peared with Falk, and the two be-
came friends (it was Cassavetes
who introduced them to the Wynd-
ham Hotel, according to a 1982 arti-
cle in New York magazine).
Gena Rowlands appeared with
Gazzara in "Opening Night," which
also starred Cassavetes. Cassavetes
and Rowlands were married; he
died in 1989. Falk died last year


Today's HOROSCOPE
anybody if you are properly motivated to achieve certain
objectives. Let others do what they want while you go your
own way.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) There's no reason to evade
anything at this point. You're better equipped than you think
to achieve whatever you decide to do. You merely have to
make up your mind and get crackin'.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Because you're able to as-
sess your position realistically, you'll know that everything
you expect from another is well deserved on your part.
You've earned a little consideration.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Go ahead and make a minor
concession to a close associate. Even if the person is diffi-
cult to please, he or she will be inwardly grateful.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -You might have to be the one
to pick up the pieces and tie together something that an-
other has started but left unfinished. If you don't do it, it's


"It breaks my heart to have this
era come to an end. Ben meant so
much to all of us. To our families. To
John. To Peter To have them gone
now is devastating to me," she said
in a statement.
She said her prayers and
thoughts went out to "all his loyal
and wonderful fans throughout the
world."
Rita Moreno, who played Gaz-
zara's wife in the 2000 film "Blue
Moon," said, "He was a wonderful
man, and I so enjoyed working with
him. I wish I could have had the
pleasure more often."
Other Gazzara films included
"The Bridge at Remagen," "The
Young Doctors," "They All
Laughed," "The Thomas Crown Af-
fair," "If It's Tuesday, It Must Be Bel-
gium," "The Spanish Prisoner,"
"Stag" and "Road House." He also
made several films in Italy
He appeared on Broadway in re-
vivals of "Who's Afraid of Virginia
Woolf?," "Awake and Sing!"
"Strange Interlude" and several
other plays.
Gazzara began acting in televi-
sion in 1952 with roles on the series
"Danger" and "Kraft Television
Theater" Before landing "Run for
Your Life," he played a police de-
tective in the series "Arrest and
Trial," which lasted two seasons.
Born Biagio Anthony Gazzara in
New York on Aug. 28, 1930, he grew
up on the Lower East Side of Man-
hattan in a cold-water flat with a
bathtub in the kitchen. His parents
were immigrants from Sicily who
met and married in New York, and
his first language was Italian. Al-
though he was baptized under his
birth name, his parents always
called him Ben or Benny
Gazzara's first two marriages, to
actresses Louise Erikson and Jan-
ice Rule, ended in divorce.
While filming "Inchon" in Korea
in 1981, he met Krivat. They mar-
ried the following year, and the
union endured.


likely to languish and fester.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -Yes, you do have a good
chance of succeeding today, but you must believe in your-
self as much as others do. If you don't at least try, then of
course you'll be a total flop.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Even if others haven't been
able to do something, it doesn't mean you'll have no luck.
You have talents they lack, so at least give it a shot. You
might surprise yourself.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -Your associates will be
respectful of your views and comments. Even if what needs
to be said is painful to you or to them, they'll know you'll be
telling it like it is.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) --You should do pretty well
with your shopping, provided you give credence to your in-
tuition and skillfully use it, regardless of what others have to
say about a certain product.


Flrida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

FRIDAY, FEB. 3
Mega Money: 15-20-23-35
Mega Ball: 17
4-of-4 MB 1 winner $500,000
4-of-4 6 $1,204.50
3-of-4 MB 49 $323
3-of-4 906 $52
2-of-4 MB 1,535 $21
1-of-4 MB 12,760 $2.50
2-of-4 28,528 $2
Fantasy 5:3 16 18 28 35
5-of-5 3 winners $83,412.21
4-of-5 318 $126.50
3-of-5 10,427 $10.50
THURSDAY, FEB. 2
Fantasy 5:2 7 19 27 32
5-of-5 3 winners $74,554.07
4-of-5 358 $100.50
3-of-5 9,938 $10

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num-
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call 850-487-7777.

Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, Feb. 5,
the 36th day of 2012. There
are 330 days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On Feb. 5, 1937, President
Franklin D. Roosevelt pro-
posed increasing the number
of U.S. Supreme Court jus-
tices; critics accused Roo-
sevelt of attempting to "pack"
the nation's highest court.
(The proposal failed in Con-
gress.)
On this date:
In 1762, an estimated
30,000 Sikhs were slain by
Muslims in Punjab in present-
day India.
In 1783, Sweden recog-
nized the independence of
the United States.
In 1887, Verdi's opera
"Otello" premiered at La
Scala.
In 1922, the first edition of
Reader's Digest was pub-
lished.
In 1940, Glenn Miller and
his orchestra recorded
"Tuxedo Junction" for RCA
Victor's Bluebird label.
In 1971, Apollo 14 astro-
nauts Alan Shepard and
Edgar Mitchell stepped onto
the surface of the moon in the
first of two lunar excursions.
Ten years ago: Congres-
sional committees decided to
subpoena former Enron
Chairman Kenneth Lay to ap-
pear to tell what he knew of
Enron's complex financial
dealings.
Five years ago: President
George W. Bush unveiled a
$2.9 trillion budget which pro-
posed a big spending in-
crease for the Pentagon while
pinching domestic programs.
One year ago: The lead-
ership of Egypt's ruling party
stepped down as the military
figures spearheading the
transition tried to placate pro-
testers without giving them
the one resignation they were
demanding, that of President
Hosni Mubarak.
Today's Birthdays: Coun-
try singer Claude King is 89.
Baseball Hall-of-Famer Hank
Aaron is 78. Actor Stuart
Damon is 75. Actor David
Selby is 71. Singer-song-
writer Barrett Strong is 71.
Football Hall-of-Famer Roger
Staubach is 70. Singer Cory
Wells (Three Dog Night) is
70. Rock singer Al Kooper is
68. Actress Charlotte Ram-
piling is 66. Actress Barbara
Hershey is 64. Actor Christo-
pher Guest is 64. Actor Tom
Wilkinson is 64. Actress Jen-
nifer Jason Leigh is 50. Ac-
tress Laura Linney is 48.
Actor-comedian Chris Parnell
is 45. Singer Bobby Brown is
43. Actor Michael Sheen is


43. Actor-singer Darren Criss
(TV: "Glee") is 25.
Thought for Today: "Im-
patience is the mark of inde-
pendence, not of bondage."
- Marianne Moore, Ameri-
can poet (born 1887, died
this day in 1972).











COMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


* -


11


i
I>'


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


Good to great


-. 1 :, ,r -, I- ,, ,,-, ,
The governor's office rated Citrus County schools 14 out of 67 school districts as determined by the Florida Com-
prehensive Assessment Test (FCAT).

Citrus County schools maintain high level of excellence


Recently, the governor's office
released a list of Florida pub-
lic school districts and indi-
vidual schools by ranking
as determined by the
Florida Comprehensive
Assessment Test (FCAT).
While I am not a big fan
of FCAT being used to
judge such things as the
quality of schools and com-
pare districts regardless of N
the students they serve, we
are pleased nonetheless to Pat Deu
see that Citrus County
schools rated 14 out of 67 GUI
school districts and all of COLI
our schools were grouped
at around the upper 15th
percentile, edging out 85 percent of
the public schools in Florida.
What can we attribute this success
to? While there are no absolute
things that we can say make all the
difference, we can point to a number
of factors we believe do.
1. Coll.iboirtion, not competition
between s hiools. Unlike most
other- sholil districts, we have no
"mj'net" schools or private
,li.rter sh,:iools, so there is no
imiilpetition for students be-
tw een schools. Principals
m nd teachers from all
s,: hoiols work together to
-share best practices,
collaborate on


I
I
IE
A


lesson plans, receive the same train-
ing or teach each other new tech-
niques and strategies.
2. Adherence to class
size reduction require-
ments smaller class
sizes do make a difference
in a teacher's ability to
provide more individual-
ized instruction.
3. Early school start
date. Citrus schools are
exempt from the manda-
tschman tory late start date, so we
have voted to start school
EST the second Monday in Au-
U MN gust, giving our students at
least a two-week head
start on learning and
preparing for FCAT testing.
4. Investment in teacher and staff
training a high priority for many
years.
5. Investment in technology to im-
prove instruction and accountability
for student mastery Teachers have
better monitoring tools and learning
is more fun and interactive a win-
win for everyone.
6. Lots of opportunities for ad-
vancement and development one
size does not fit all education. Every
student's progress is closely moni-
tored.
7. Long-term teachers are commit-
ted to excellence and strive for con-
tinued improvement. Conservation


of funds has allowed Citnis s, h,-iool to
maintain our teaching stjitf w ith nliv
layoffs or reductions in force. unlike
most other school di-stricts duri-nin.
this economic downturn
8. Consistent leadership ni
eight-year superintendent %ith eidht
years also on school boiurd. tolir it
five school board miemberNs serx in1.
two or more terms. Not j cJallpjiin
speech but stability is certjinl l im-
portant to ensure consistent \ sion.
expectations and accoiintjbilit. re-
sulting in consistent impro\ ellents
I'm sure there are plenty. of oiither
factors that make a dittfference. Iut I
believe these are the hiLhhil.htlis Citi-
zens should be proud ofit u r s hiools
that by other measures shiu Id niot
have fared as well, sii h .,s demno--
graphics, size, resources. etc thjit All
work against us.
But it is our dedi.jted. protfes-
sional teachers, support stittff nd Il-
ministrators who comie to slhil
every day eager to re.t h exer \ tll--
dent regardless of their .billities.
socio-economic states o-r fjimil\
origins-all things we ire idL.ed
on-with no excuses It i j \ be
just that simple. For thit \ e re
most grateful.

Pat Deutschman is a
member of the Citus s
County School Board


They do

important

stuff in

Tallahassee


any people who
live in Citrus
County are not
from here. And they are
not from Florida.
Because of that, it's very
difficult for most folks to
really care about what
goes on in Tallahassee,
the state capital.
Many Snowbirds still
pay attention to New York,
Boston, Albany, Chicago
and Philadelphia, but
they'd have a hard time
finding Tallahassee on a
map.
Here are 10 quick rea-
sons why you should care.
S 1. The 160 legislators
(120 House members and
40 in the Senate) who
gather in Tallahassee
each year, decide how
much money should be
spent on every child who
attends a public school in
Florida. We like to believe
our local county school
boards make those deci-
sions but they don't.
'* The legislators in Talla-
hassee, some of whom
S have not been in a class-
S room since they got out of
See Page C3





FP1*


~i~FI


- S .,mm


Charlie Brennan
SHADES
OF GRAY


Rustling

up some

excitement
Life's been a little
squirrely the past
couple of weeks.
Several days ago I spot-
ted a large splinter of
wood on the home stair-
case. It seemed out of
place, but that's the status
quo around the house.
A couple of days later a
gross, sponge-sized assort-
ment of lint-like material
and dead bugs greeted me
as I walked up the
staircase.
Yet a couple of days
after that discovery, the
first noticeable occur-
rence of what would be-
come an occasional
rustling sound surfaced.
Having, in the past, had
critters vacationing in the
space between our roof
and ceiling via a hole
on the outside of the
house it seemed that
was again the case.
The mystery grew, how-
ever, when we noticed a
couple of baskets that nor-
mally sit atop exposed
beams now on the floor.
Then, early one morn-
ing a day or two later, it
was strongly suggested
that I get out of bed to in-
vestigate the source of the
rustling noise.
Wiping sleep from my
eyes, I ventured off in
search of the sound -
which I found about seven
steps up the staircase.
There, between the step
See Page C3


I


'Ir"







Opage C2 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 5,2012



PINION


"The health of a democratic society may
be measured by the quality of functions
performed by private citizens."
Alexis de Tocqueville, 1805-1859


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan............. .................. publisher
o Charlie Brennan ............... ..................editor
Mike Arnold ............. .................. HR director
Sandra Frederick....................... managing editor
Z...u Curt Ebitz............... ..............citizen member
Founded Mac Harris ........ .................. citizen member
by Albert M.
Williamson Rebecca Martin ..... ................guest member
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


CROWNING JEWEL




Jewel Lamb



is Chronicle



Citizen of Year


Jewel Lamb is a woman
who gets things done.
The Crystal River busi-
nesswoman has used her posi-
tion in the community to
accomplish significant things
to benefit the less fortunate.


Jewel, who owns and oper-
ates the Crystal
Motor Car Com-
pany with her THE I
husband, Steve, 2011 \
has been selected
as the Chronicle's OUR 0
Citizen of the Year
for 2011. A woman
While her pas-


sion for the auto business is
well known, it's for her leader-
ship in the area of nonprofit
fundraising that she has
earned this recognition.
Jewel Lamb has adopted
causes that others have shied
away from because of the enor-
mity of the issues. For exam-
ple, when Diane Toto began
feeding hungry people at We
Care Food Pantry in Old Ho-
mosassa, it was Jewel who
came to her assistance with the
fundraising and organizational
skills necessary to get the job
done.
She pushed the United Way
of Citrus County to get involved
with the We Care Food Pantry
to create the Feed Citrus or-
ganization. We Care provides
food for Homosassa, and the
Feed Citrus group has com-
bined with them to build a
warehouse in Homosassa
Springs so food supplies can be
provided to dozens of nonprofit
groups in our county that feed
thousands of needy residents.
Together they have raised
hundreds of thousands of dol-
lars to build the facility and
feed the hungry.


S
h

P


When it's completed, it will
bring stability and efficiency to
the efforts of all those people
and organizations that help the
needy in our community.
Jewel Lamb has taken a lead-
ership role in creating the
YMCA of Citrus County and
now sits as this re-
;SUE: gion's board mem-
SUE: ber on the Y of the
)noree. Suncoast. She is
chairman of the
INION: capital campaign
committee that
f action, will raise millions
of dollars to build
a new YMCA on County Road
486.
For years, she has used her
organizational skills to raise
funds for the Boy Scouts at
large events at the Lamb's "toy
barn" in Crystal River.
And she has quietly helped
the Mission in Citrus County,
the largest homeless shelter in
our community, serve the many
homeless people who are in
need. She raises money and
writes checks to keep the Mis-
sion afloat, activities that she is
reticent to share with anyone.
The Lambs donate money to
so many causes and have taken
leadership roles in the United
Way, the Boys & Girls Clubs, the
Education Foundation and
other nonprofits that are doing
the hard work to help those in
need.
Truly successful people use
the wealth and influence they
have earned to benefit the
common good. There is no bet-
ter example of that practice in
our community than Jewel
Lamb.
We are proud to recognize
her as the Chronicle's Citizen
of the Year.


One able person
Not money, but ability should
be the deciding factor in choosing
our president. One should not be
able to buy the presidency, lest
corruption run rampant in our
government.
Who to vote for?
The GOP has been unable to
find a candidate they like. The
candidates have said each other
is a crook and a liar. It's easy to
see who to vote for this year.
Fresh politicos
As the politicians are beating
one another up, let us remember
Citrus County is on the last leg.
There is no work, and the inside
politicians (who) were in politics
in the '70s and the '80s cannot


Food stamp numbers
A national network TV
station stated 11 million
people were added to the
food stamp program in the
four-year Obama adminis-
tration. During the eight-
year Bush administration,
there were 11 million peo- CAL
ple added but the econ- 563-
omy only worsened
towards the end of the
Bush era, which was eight years.
A family of three under the


0


run this country. They are totally
too old. We need new, young
blood. Don't look at the man's re-
ligion. Look at what he had done,
prosperity, how many people he
put to work and are still working.
GOP gang
It's really sad but the Republican
politicians are coming across like
hoodlums belonging to a gang.
Debating
I'm calling in reference to the
Republican debate last night (Jan.
23). I thought NBC did the lousi-
est job of a debate ever in record-
ing history. I mean I wonder how
many other people think that way.
I don't know. Just with all the
problems in the world, they're
going back 20 years into some-
body's personal life.


poverty level, which is $18,000 a
year, is eligible. Even with
IND food stamps, you can
barely exist at that level.
Who's moving in?
I was calling to find out if
anybody knew what's going
into the old Cinnamon
Sticks Caf6 you know,
579 the one in Inverness next
door to McDonald's, near
Rustic Ranch. If anybody
knows, could you put it in the
Sound Off please?


Bailing an ocean with a thimble


LOS ANGELES
The worst day of Sugar
Bear's 55 years was one of
the days there have been
many of them when he got out
of prison. In the early 1990s, in a
prison where persons
whose sentences have
ended are being re-
leased, and who see
those whose sen-
tences are just begin- ,
ning, he saw one of his
sons coming in.
Generational re-
cidivism is not un-
usual in Sugar Bear's
world of fatherless- George
ness. His son, who was OTH
convicted of selling VOIC
drugs, is still incarcer-
ated because he has
not been a model prisoner He is
an apple that did not fall far from
the tree.
Sugar Bear few call him
Robert Lewis Jackson was a
precocious lawbreaker His first
arrest "for GTA"' (grand theft
auto), he explains involved a
1959 Chevy El Camino. He re-
members that it was orange. He
pulled off the freeway, into a gas
station, and climbed down from
the vehicle. The police who ap-
prehended him there were star-
tled. He was almost 5.
Really LAPD records confirm
this. He drove the El Camino by
sitting on a large pillow so he
could see out the windshield and
using a long stick to work the ped-
als.
Born to an unmarried, men-
tally ill prostitute, he acquired
his interest in driving from his
grandfather, who would drive
around the block with Sugar Bear
in his lap. Not until Sugar Bear
was 25 did he learn that his
grandfather was his father, too,
having had a sexual relationship


with Sugar Bear's mother
Sugar Bear grew up mostly on
the streets, episodically drifting
into and out of the care, such as it
was, of various female relatives.
He kept moving on because one
relative was beaten to
death in an alley, an-
other killed by a shot-
gun blast, another had
Drano poured in her
eyes for reasons Sugar
Bear does not remem-
ber He supported him-
self gathering
discarded bottles for
their deposits, and
Will cadging hamburgers
ER and peanut butter sand-
;ES wiches from sympa-
thetic strangers.
His life in the nation's
entertainment capital included
the exciting night of Dec. 11, 1964,
when he was outside the motel
when singer Sam ("You Send
Me") Cooke was fatally shot.
Sugar Bear was 8.
Although he has never been
married, he has five children,
and has been shot only once. He
says he "did juvenile time" but
managed, largely because he was
an athlete, to graduate from high
school. After that, he was incar-
cerated five times, for sentences
ranging from six months to 11
years. He says he was implicated
in "a 187" murder of a correc-
tions officer but was exoner-
ated. Then his life's gyrations
intersected with some benevo-
lent institutions.
In 1965, immediately after the
Watts riots that announced to a
largely oblivious nation the
volatility of some pockets of so-
cial regression, a UCLA under-
graduate, Keith Phillips, moved
into this devastated section of the
city of angels. Now 65, Phillips is
the reason why World Impact, his


creation, is a presence in 13 of
America's most troubled cities,
such as Newark and East St.
Louis. Its focus is on fatherless-
ness and the social pathologies
that flow from it.
This is the preoccupation of
Ken Canfield, 58, a Kansas State
Ph.D. who, until five years ago,
headed the National Center for
Fathering in Kansas City. He then
moved here to help Pepperdine
University develop a Center for
the Family, and now labors with
World Impact living among the
city's most troubled people. Can-
field acquainted Sugar Bear with
Psalm 68, which speaks of God as
"father of the fatherless" who
"setteth the solitary in families."
For people like Sugar Bear, peo-
ple with holes in their souls
never filled by the love of fathers,
Canfield says religion offers the
spiritualizationn of fatherhood":
"If you don't have the calm self-
respect that a father gives, your
passions go sideways. For a num-
ber of men, their passions be-
come sexualized as they look for
comfort and affirmation of their
manhood."
On a recent day, Sugar Bear, a
burly, cheerful survivor, was
wearing a windbreaker bearing
the logo of the Union Rescue Mis-
sion. He works there, helping
provide services to, among oth-
ers, a small portion of LA
County's 50,000 homeless, 30 per-
cent of whom are younger than
35. Bailing an ocean with a thim-
ble? Perhaps. Still, Phillips, Can-
field and Sugar Bear, this
unlikely American trio, exem-
plify a very American approach
to social regeneration: One by
one, from the inside out.
--*--A
George Will's email address is
georgewill@washpost. com.


L LETTERS to the Editor


Tebowing works
The Denver Broncos started
this season with an experienced
and capable quarterback. They
lost four games in a row. So the
coach decided to try Tim Tebow,
Denver's number two quarter-
back. To the delight of Denver
fans, Tebow started winning
games often in miraculous ways.
His fame has spread around the
world.
Why? Because he kneels in
prayer before the game, during
the game, and after the game.
The picture of Tim on one
knee with helmet in hand, and
head bowed is showing up
everywhere.
Does God affect a football
game? I say "of course, God af-
fects every aspect of life."
Suppose you were starting a
business, and Warren Buffett, one
of the richest men in the world,
wanted to help you, not with
money but his advice? Would he
not help you climb the ladder of
success? He may not make any
decisions for you, but he can cer-
tainly help you make them.
God does not pass, kick or
punt, but faith in God's presence
helps Tim Tebow to play well.
Life is full of decisions. How
much better they can be if they
are made with lesser anxiety,
and increased confidence. You
don't have to be a quarterback or
a businessman to benefit from
faith and prayer
Self-confidence will improve
your decisions on the playing


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in Chroni-
cle editorials are the opinions of
the newspaper's editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Groups or individuals are invited
to express their opinions in a let-
ter to the editor.
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at 352-563-5660.
All letters must be signed and in-
clude a phone number and home-
town, including letters sent via
email. Names and hometowns will
be printed; phone numbers will
not be published or given out.
We reserve the right to edit let-
ters for length, libel, fairness and
good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
350 words, and writers will be
limited to three letters per month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to
352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.


field, or on a battlefield, or in
the gym, or in the hospital, or in
the office, or courtroom, and in
good times or bad times.
Tebowing works!
Dr. Mike Klinkman
Homosassa Springs

Thanks, blood donors
The "New Years Resolution"
Blood Drive hosted by Our Lady


of Grace Church and the Knights
of Columbus, Abbot Francis Sad-
lier Council No. 6168 on Satur-
day, Jan. 21, was the sixth largest
blood drive we have ever had. A
year ago, we collected 50 pints
for this drive and this year, we
collected 59 pints an 18 per-
cent increase.
We also were delighted to
honor Mr Bill Klug as he ac-
cepted an award from Life South
Blood Services. He has donated
40 gallons of blood during the
years that he lived in Dunedin,
Fla., and now in Beverly Hills.
The K of C will also be making a
presentation to him at our next
meeting.
The real winners will be the
177 people who will be saved by
these 59 pints since each will
help three patients. They could
go to any resident of Citrus
County since every pint of blood
donated is used in Citrus Memo-
rial hospital or Seven Rivers Re-
gional Medical Center
Our next drive will be on St.
Patrick's Day, March 17, when
we will host the second annual
Larry Nestor Memorial Blood
Drive in the Parish Life Center
from 8 a.m. until 2 p.m.
We are looking forward to see-
ing all of you as we honor the
memory of one of our favorite
Leprechauns.
The Blood Ministry of K of C
and Our Lady of Grace
Don Irwin
Beverly Hills


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


Hot Corner: CAMPAIGN


I

\

i


II





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


World travelers? Maybe, then again, maybe not


It was the summer before the completion
of 1958, prior to my of the interstate
birthday on Aug. 1, highway system. Even
while I was still just 12 R though the entire
years old, when I left a distance one way was
the state of Florida for only 600 miles, going
the first time. Our up took two days. On
family Mama, the second day, we
Daddy, my good were still journeying
brother William and I through Georgia, and, I
- took a road trip to Fred Brannen as any 12-year-old
Tennessee to visit with A SLICE might made a
my father's brother, OF LIFE statement my father
Uncle Louis, and his and older brother
family This trip was definitely one found amusing. I said, "Georgia is
of the most exciting things I'd ever the biggest state I've ever seen!"
experienced up until that time. They howled with laughter:
Seeing mountains! Wow! Georgia was the only state, other
We took our time and stopped at than Florida, I'd ever seen!
many of the roadside attractions Teasing was as much a part of
that used to dot the highways our life as breathing air and it was


much more fun for my father and
brother when they teamed up on
me. They quickly dubbed me "the
world traveler" but I didn't let it
bother me; I was enjoying the
excursion too much.
As I grew older, opportunities
came to see other parts of these
United States, but the very first
time I left the country was when
my Cheryl and I celebrated our
25th wedding anniversary with a
Caribbean cruise.
Then, for our 30th anniversary,
we took our first flight "across the
pond." It was a trip that was made
even more enjoyable because my
still-inclined-to-tease older
brother and his delightful wife
went with us. We saw Europe or
as much of it as we could in two


weeks. In addition to England, we
made stops in Holland, Germany,
Austria, Italy, Switzerland and
France. As you can imagine, we
had to look very quickly!
During the past 15 years, Cheryl
and I have been to many fabulous,
famous cities as well as visiting
some very moving historical
venues and I think, more than
anything, the education that
comes from seeing other countries
is what we both appreciate most.
In more recent years, we've
been to Asia and other parts of
Europe, including Ireland; all of
the United Kingdom; and, one of
my favorite destinations, Greece.
Last year, we sailed from New
York City down the Atlantic side as
far south as Uruguay and then east


to Cape Town, South Africa. Now,
if it works out, we're looking ahead
to possibly sailing out of San
Francisco, heading down the
Pacific side with an ultimate des-
tination of Sydney, Australia.
Should that come to pass, the trips
combined would be almost all of
the way around the world with
stops in numerous, exciting places.
So, if that happens, would we
qualify as world travelers?
Maybe. Then again, maybe not
- but at least my personal points
of reference now extend farther
than the state of Georgia.
--In--
Fred Brannen is an Inverness
resident and a Chronicle
columnist.


Court weighs Obama eligibility

Editor's note: It's possible the court rul- lists his surname as "Soebarkah," not
ingnotedin this column could be made be- Obama. A copy of his mother's petition to
tween the production deadline of this have his stepfather, Lolo Soetoro, classified
section and the publication date. as an "immediate relative" to as-
P resident Obama's eligibil- sist with immigration was re-
ity to be on the ballot in : ceived by plaintiffs with all
Georgia is being chal- references to the citizen status of
lenged in court. Obama inked out.
But first, a personal dis- Under oath, plaintiffs showed
claimer: Regardless of public that Obama's Social Security
questions about the president's number originated in Connecti-
eligibility under our Constitu- cut between 1975 and 1977 while
tion to hold that office, I find him Obama lived in Hawaii. The por-
as much an American as any Dr. William Dixon tion of that number designating
candidate currently running for Dr. William xontime of birth indicated it was
office. That his father was OTHER from 1890. When the number
Kenyan, that he spent time in In- VOICES was submitted to "e-Verify," the
donesia attending Muslim federal agency that identifies
schools and that he adopted his fraudulent numbers, plaintiffs
stepfather's name, Soetoro, do not make testified the report said: "SSA does not ver-
him less American. He was elected by a ma- ify Other reasons: SSA found a discrepancy
jority ofAmerican voters to lead our nation. in the records."
My disagreements with the president are As to the Obama birth certificate pre-
philosophical and political only. That he sented last April, plaintiffs show evidence
wants to transform America into a welfare that it is fraudulent. Specifically, they note,
state like those of Europe, I believe, is a re- the certificate number is out of required se-
flection of his background growing up in quence compared with twins born 24 hours
America, not the citizenship of his father, after the purported time of Obama's birth.
That said, the court case in Georgia is the The certifying language is different from
very first where plaintiffs have been able to what appears on the twins' birth certifi-
present their facts and witnesses under cates and the name of the local registrar is
oath. In all the other attempts, plaintiffs different from the twins as well. Plaintiff's
have been told by the courts that they did experts testified under oath that the docu-
not have the necessary requirements, the ment appears to have been altered from the
"standing," to bring suits. No previous court original typewriter form by a computer.
has ever passed upon or even looked at the The Obama legal team failed to honor a
evidence. Comments in the media that the subpoena to appear in Georgia and may
complaints were litigated and found to be lose this one by default Several other states
bogus are untrue. are looking at his eligibility as well. None
Two approaches are being taken by sep- of this, alone, will impact the election.
arate plaintiffs. The first is that Obama These are all states he would expect to lose
does not meet the definition of "natural anyway
born citizen" as required in the Constitu- It is difficult to know whether plaintiffs'
tion and further defined by the Supreme cases will stand up to scrutiny by the courts.
Court in Minor v Happersett, 1875. That At the least, it will be fascinating to follow.
definition requires both parents to be citi- For details, Google: Obama Georgia.
zens of the U.S. for the child to be "a natu-
ral born citizen." Obama fails this because
his father was Kenyan. William Dixon is a graduate of Columbia
The second series of complaints allege University, New YorkMedical College
that Obama may not be a citizen at all and and the USF College ofBusiness
that there has been fraud perpetuated re- Administration. He served in the Army as
garding his official documents. Plaintiffs a surgeon and as a Special Forces Officer,
cite school records from Indonesia listing achieving the rank of lieutenant colonel.
Obama as "Soetoro" and as being an In- He was an assistant professor of surgery
donesian citizen. They presented his at the University of Georgia before
mother's passport renewal, which removes entering private practice. Dr Dixon can
him from the passport as a dependent and be reached at Wdixonl6@yahoo.com.


SHADES
Continued from Page C1

and wall, was what appeared
to be a small squirrel.
Hmmm?!
Moments later, with Tup-
perware and a magazine in
hand, came the successful
capture of not one, but two
small squirrels. They were
transported outdoors and
skittered off to resume life
in the wild.
Clearly, they had come in
through the hole under the
eaves, then wedged their
way through a crack in the
old tongue-and-groove ceil-
ing hence the splinter on
the floor.
No matter, I'd liberated
the captive squirrels and
was feeling pretty good -
until we heard a rustling
sound a day or two later.
The house was not yet
freed of squirrel inhabitants.
The remaining squirrel
was first spotted under the
oven, then disappeared.
Then upstairs. Then back
downstairs. Then on top of
the kitchen cabinets.
While we don't typically
let the kitty cat duo of
Heeba and Sheeba hang out
in the main area of the
house, we let them take a
crack at capturing the squir-
rel. That was done with
mixed feelings, but we
weren't having any luck on
our own. No matter, the cats
were no more successful
than we were.
Another day or two
passed with no sign of the
squirrel then the house
started to smell.
Worried that lack of food
and water may have caused
the little guy to meet his


maker, the question arose:
Did we have a squirrel car-
cass stinking up the place?
The smell grew worse and
worse. It seemed to have a
tinge of septic odor
While bemoaning the up-
surge in stench, a familiar
sound emerged. It was the
rustling of a little squirrel.
He was alive!
But the house still stank!
Contemplating the situa-
tion, and noticing a particu-
larly healthy crop of grass
and weeds by our leach
field, we made a call and
soon someone came to
pump out our septic tank.
The stench began to di-
minish, but the squirrel sit-
uation remained
unresolved.
The next day was Sunday,
a week ago today. I was in
the kitchen when I noticed
the black cloth cover over
our blender moving around
a little bit.
Sizing up the situation, I
pulled the bottom of the
cloth cover tightly around
the base of the blender, and
- sure enough the little
guy started to scramble
around. A minute later, he
was free and romping
through the tall grass span-
ning the leach field.

Realizing the potential for
a repeat of the squirrel in-
vasion, it seemed time to
plug the hole on the outside
of the house and the splin-
tered ceiling board.
A trip to the home-im-
provement store resulted in
the purchase of some
aerosol foam stuff for hole-
filling and patching pur-
poses. I'd been warned that
this stuff expands and the
label clearly said to wear
gloves.


There's no excuse for fail-
ing to heed the advice.
The patch job on the ceil-
ing looks nasty, but it'll do
for now.
As for the exterior gate-
way under the eaves, I
climbed about 25 feet up a
ladder and depleted the can
of foam stuff in filling the
hole.
While it only seemed that
trace amounts of the goo got
on my fingers and hands, it
took seconds to realize that
failure to keep my fingers
separated would result in
them becoming a singular
unit
With fingers on both
hands spread wide, the task
of super-scrubbing them
with nail polish remover
began.
The next day, with fingers
operating independently, I
checked out my handiwork
under the eaves only to
find what appeared to be
the Stay Puft Marshmallow
Man growing sideways out
of the house. The warning
that the goo is very expand-
able was right on.

Since the squirrel es-
capade and home-patching
attempts, we've received no-
tice from our insurance
company that we need to re-
place our roof.
That's not welcomed
news and it comes at a bad
time. Had we learned that a
few weeks earlier and com-
menced work, this whole
squirrely episode could
have been avoided.


Charlie Brennan is editor
of the Citrus County
Chronicle. He can be
emailed at cbrennan
@chronicleonline. com.


4Asr pse h
"OK, team... one more run-throuh... mom passes the
hot wines .. junior hands off the chps n'dip ... double
back, 'r'ab beer ... and I'm in the clear to score a
Spot on the couch ..


Hot Corner: OBAMA


Where are the leaders?
I'll tell the gentleman in Tuesday's paper
(Jan. 24) in the Sound Off why I think Mr.
Obama turned down the pipeline: because
he wants to take this country down. He
does not like capitalism. He's a socialist
and he doesn't like our form of govern-
ment. And the funny thing is, we have the
Department of Energy, which was brought
in and probably cost us billions of dollars
to wean us off of foreign oil. That's why
the Department of Energy was started.
Here we have a chance and what did we
do with it? You're right where did all the
leaders go?


WINDOW
Continued from Page C1

high school, are the ones
who decide.
2. State legislators decide
which land should be set
aside for public ownership.
Most of us like parks and
preserves. Right now, these
legislators have themselves
worked into a snit because
some want to sell off the
state lands we purchased
during the past 25 years for
recreation and preserva-
tion purposes. Apparently,
we have run out of money
and they're looking to im-
prove cash flow
3. State legislators decide
how much you're going to
pay for insurance on your
car, home and whether or
not that big sinkhole that
just opened up in your back
yard is going to be covered
by your policy If you get an
insurance policy through
Citizens, the state legisla-
tors actually provide the
insurance.
4. State legislators have
their hands in your health.
They fund county health de-
partments and decide how
Medicaid dollars are going
to be allocated. They also
have their hands on public
hospitals. For the record,
they are currently reducing
funds for health depart-
ments, trying to reduce
Medicaid programs and
talking out loud about sell-
ing off the public hospitals.
My advice: Stay healthy
5. The state Legislature is
responsible for prisons.
They keep the bad guys
locked up so they'll quit
stealing stuff out of our
garages. We don't have a
state prison here, but
Sumter and Marion coun-
ties are packed full of pris-
ons. Here's a secret:
prisons provide jobs. The
state just announced it's
going to shut down five
prisons because people are
not violating as many laws
as they used to. Some say
our criminals, like the rest
of us, are just getting older
and they don't have enough
energy left to commit as
many crimes.
Who would have thought
that a lack of criminals


Obama's taxes
I would like to know when President
Obama is going to release his tax returns
for 2011. So how about somebody put that
in the paper? When is Obama going to?
And when is he going to put the budget?
When are we going to get his budget?
Lay out the plan
Hey, Obama. Re: Tuesday's article (Jan.
24) in the Citrus County Chronicle Page
A12, "State of the Union": I don't want a
vision where you play doublespeak. I want
a laid-out plan, just like we middle-class
people do ourselves.


State legislators decide how much
you're going to pay for insurance on
your car, home and whether or not
that big sinkhole that just opened
up in your back yard is going to be
covered by your policy.


would be a problem but
when you close down a
prison in a small county
like Jefferson County in
north Florida, 10 percent of
the citizens lose their jobs.
Who knew that decreasing
crime rates could create a
problem somewhere else?
6. And speaking of crime,
state legislators decide
what a crime is. Sheriff's
officials arrest people for
breaking the law but it's
the state Legislature that
decides what the law is.
And the law is always
changing and sometimes
hard to understand. Take,
for instance, all those In-
ternet gambling places that
have opened up in Citrus
County and the rest of
Florida. The laws are so
confusing that enforcement
is different in each of
Florida's 67 counties.
Every county enforces the
law against murder the
same way, but those vague
laws are why the Legislature
meets every year They have
to revisit the bad decisions
they made the year before.
7. The Legislature de-
cides what corruption it
will fight each and every
year As dismaying as it may
sound, Florida has lots of
corrupt people. Every
place you look, someone is
trying to push the limits
and take advantage.
The sinkhole insurance
business is filled with scam
artists. There are personal
injury lawyers who bilk the
system on a daily basis.
There are doctors and
health care providers who
steal from Medicaid every
day
We don't sell as much
swamp land in Florida as
we once did, but that does-
n't mean we no longer have
a lot of crooks.
8. The state Legislature
runs the lottery The lottery
is the largest and most pop-
ular tax increase ever in-


flicted on the people of
Florida. Your chances of
winning the lottery are
about the same as being at-
tacked by a Jack Russell
terrier named "Princess"
on the same day you were
attacked by a black bear
that wandered out of the
state forest.
The irony with the lottery
tax is that the dollars used
from selling tickets provide
money for education. We
tell people they need to get
a good education to get a
good job and become
successful.
But we then send out the
message that the real way
to get rich is to spend your
last 10 bucks on lottery tick-
ets and pray that the Jack
Russell terrier doesn't do
any real damage.
9. The state Legislature
funds our state colleges
and universities. They like
the University of Florida
the best, even though they
can see the campus of FSU
out of their windows at the
Capitol.
10. The state Legislature
also gets to decide very im-
portant things such as our
state bird (Mockingbird);
the state flower (orange
blossom); the state tree
(palmetto palm); the state
motto ("In God we Trust"-
OK, so it's not original); the
state bug (Zebra Longwing
Butterfly) and the state
sales tax rate.
Our Legislature does a
bunch of really important
things and should not be ig-
nored. And for the record,
if you travel 186 miles north
on U.S. 19 and keep straight
on U.S 27, you will run
smack into the old Florida
Capitol building


Gerry Mulligan is the
publisher of the Chronicle.
His email address is
gmulligan@chronicle
online. com.


1 - '


- V, L:.
,, L. ' ,- -'- -, ,% .


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2012 C3





C4 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2012


Sign your name
The Chronicle recently carried
another rant by the easily recog-
nized (person) who blames Bush
for everything wrong with the
country
Now, however, he is also blam-
ing Dick Cheney and Karl Rove.
There are a couple (of) things
this guy needs to realize.
First, gas prices have doubled
since Obama took office; unem-
ployment has soared; he has in-
debted this country more deeply
than all the former presidents
combined; American respect in
the world has dropped to a new
low as has our leadership role.
The list could go on and on of
the disasters Obama has brought
and is bringing to the United
States.
Maybe this guy could find a
way to blame Bush or anyone but
Obama for the Civil War? Maybe
the plagues of medieval Europe?
How about the floods in the time
of Moses (who) was probably a
Bush supporter in this guy's
mind.
Second, if you feel strongly
about a topic, have the backbone
to write a letter and state your
name. To hide behind the call-in
merely makes you look like
(someone) who really doesn't
have the courage to stand behind
what you say
You really lose credibility
when you constantly grouse
about the same topic over and
over again while sniping from the
shadows of a nameless call-in.

Harry Cooper
Hernando


COMMENTARY


Letters to the EDITOR


ER experience
It was my distinct displeasure
to spend six hours for a relatively
non-emergency procedure.
I required an X-ray to deter-
mine if I had a foreign object lo-
cated in my intestinal reservoir
and if so, it would have to be re-
moved. If not, I could be dis-
charged to handle it myself.
The triage group (was) excel-
lent At least three groups of peo-
ple left to go to either Seven
Rivers Hospital or Spring Hill
hospital due to the long wait
It took two hours to get an X-
ray, which is then instanta-
neously sent to the ER computer
to be seen and diagnosed. It took
another two hours to get back
into the "holding" room and yet
another two hours for someone to
even look at it. I see no reason to
have the technology of instant
viewing if it is not instantly
viewed!
People were waiting in the out-
side room because "there were
no beds available in the back."
This was due to a backup, sup-
posedly, in preparing a bed for
these people upstairs in the
wards.
While we were held hostage,
no one was seen or even advised
of what was going on. When I fi-
nally (was) allowed to sit in the
back, out of the 31 supposedly
full beds, I viewed at least a
dozen empty ones.
Technicians are glued to the
computer. Nurses are not seen or
heard from after the initial pa-
perwork. There was only one


doctor in evidence, lat
stretched to two.
Instead of arguing w
"piece of the rock," co
cedures be expedited'
money going to all the
be better spent in adm
and expediting patient
I have been to sever
the past in other state
out of the country onc
have never experience
waste of resources. Th
the first time the ER d
been addressed in the
per and it does not seE
any better.


ter that

vho owns a
uld the pro-
? Can the
attorneys
iinistration
t load?
ral ER's in
s and even
e and I
ed such a
uis is not
delays have
newspa-
em to get

Fran Barg
Homosassa


What about people?
For animals who are sick,
maimed, diseased, and/or in-
jured with little hope of recovery
and substantial pain until death
have their vets and their owners
to determine when they are to
live or die in their most difficult
circumstances.
This is called euthanasia, from
two Greek words eu (good) and
thanatos (death).
Who makes decisions for hu-
mans who have seriously im-
paired bodies that may make
their living any longer perhaps
inhumane?
Problems could include; having
been injured, having an incurable
condition and/or painful living, or
some type of illness that makes
them or others feel life might need
to be terminated immediately
And then there are many indi-


viduals who have lived good
lives, even successful lives, and
are in their late 80s or 90s and do
not want to become a hardship
on their families or the govern-
ment because of some inexplica-
ble disorder such as a heart
attack, kidney disease, or lung
cancer that takes away their fi-
nancial assets.
And there even may be many
who say, "Enough is enough and I
am seriously ready to formalize
the dirt nap," without the stigma
and other ramifications of sui-
cide. Is society advanced enough
to deal with all the questions that
euthanasia raises, such as who,
what, when and where?
Do these questions need to be
answered by the court system,
medical professionals, or is it
sensible and/or even reasonable
to expect a person to individually
make such a decision?
William C. Young
Crystal River

Redistricting question
Honorable Senator Charles
Dean:
Thank you for your response of
January 23 to our earlier request
for information.
Yes, we read with regret and
foreboding that you and every
other Republican in the Florida
Senate and House favored and
passed the Fair District Maps
proposed by Senator Gaetz. And
not a single Democrat voted in
favor of Senator Gaetz's "fair dis-
tricts" map. It appears you repre-
sent only Republican citizens of


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

the state and have no concern for
Democrats, like us, or
independents.
We would appreciate knowing
for our benefit as well as the ben-
efit of all constituents in your
District, what you believe was a
reasonable excuse for no Democ-
rats in the Senate or House vot-
ing for the map other than both
houses are controlled by Repub-
licans, assuring retention of Re-
publican-controlled districts.
This in spite of knowing as soon
as 2012 or 2014, they may not be
Republican-controlled.
We raised the issue in our re-
quest of January 13, of the pro-
posed map not including
amendments 5 and 6 of the Voting
Rights Act, and what we voted on
in 2010. We would appreciate
your confirmation that the map
as approved did in fact include
amendments 5 and 6 of the Voting
Rights Act and what we voted on
in 2010.
We're pleased with your keep-
ing our concerns in mind but do
not understand the term, "long
process continues", since it ap-
pears to us that the Senate and
House approvals of the plan are
a fait accompli.
Bipartisan support is essential.
We know that more voter under-
standing of the Gaetz Map comes
about with recognition that it's
little more than the gerryman-
dered districts we've had for
years, come November we will
see changes in both the House
and Senate.
Thank you. We hope to hear
from you soon.
George and Frances Harbin
Homosassa


Saturday
bruary 11, 2012
1 P.M. to 5 P.M.
Admission $10
ales a or
; t the do I












BUSINESS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


J.C. Penney CEO talks about chain


ANNE D'INNOCENZIO
AP Retail Writer
NEW YORK Everyone wants to
see what Ron Johnson will do next
For 15 years, Johnson worked at Tar-
get, where he pioneered the retailer's
cheap chic image. Then, he spent
about a decade changing the way
Americans shop for electronic gadgets
at Apple. Now, the question is whether
J.C. Penney CEO Ron Johnson. Penney
said Jan. 25 it is getting rid of the
hundreds of sales it offers each year in
favor of a simpler approach to pricing.
Associated Press


Johnson will strike creative genius a
third time as CEO of J.C. Penney
The 30-year retail industry veteran
already is borrowing from Apple's play-
book by innovating Penney's stores,
cutting out heavy discounting and pro-
viding services, not just products.
As part of a strategy it announced
last week, Penney is getting rid of the
hundreds of sales it has each year to
focus on everyday pricing. The re-
tailer will offer discounts on groups of
different items each month and clear-
ance sales on the first and third Fri-
days of the month when many of its
customers are paid.


Additionally, Penney in the next few
years is planning to open areas in the
middle of its stores called Town
Square. Like the popular Apple Ge-
nius Bars that Johnson created so cus-
tomers can get hands-on technical
support, Town Square areas will offer
services, although the company has
been tight-lipped about which ones.
The rest of the store will be divided
into 100 specialty shops.
Despite Johnson's impressive retail
resume, overhauling Penney won't be
easy Department stores, as a whole,

See Page D4


Economic analysis


Associated Press
President Barack Obama leaves Friday after speaking about the economy during an event at Fire Station No. 5 in Arlington, Va. Fire Station
No. 5 was one of the first stations to respond to the 9/11 attack at the Pentagon.

How the economy is viewed can differ sharply during political campaigns


BEN FELLER
AP White House Correspondent

WASHINGTON The stronger the econ-
omy gets, the more the presidential race
comes down to what voters believe: Are
things actually getting better? Or is it all still
a mess?
If the economy's direction is the key, Pres-
ident Barack Obama's hand just keeps get-
ting better.
A new snapshot Friday showed the unem-
ployment rate has tumbled to 8.3 percent.
That means it is almost back to where it was
right after Obama took office, a time when a
monstrous recession was still gobbling up
American jobs. Hiring is now on a consistent
upswing. Employers added nearly twice as
many jobs last year as they did in 2010.
With every fresh batch of economic data,
the Republicans challenging Obama and the
president himself try to spin the numbers to
their advantage, depicting either a nation
mired in trouble or one showing undeniable
signs of progress. Both often seem to be true.
So whichever side sways people on where


to put their focus on America's lingering
economic hole or on the fact that the country
is climbing out of it-will have an enormous
edge toward winning the White House.
Shortly after the jobs report was released,
Obama sounded more confident than ever,
declaring: "The recovery is speeding up."
The Republicans say that's none of his
doing, that improvements have come in spite
of his policies, not because of them. There's
still a long way to go before full recovery-
federal deficits and Europe's troubles hang
ominously over the U.S.; unemployment
could worsen again.
But there's little doubt that the brightening
picture, which is also reflected in other eco-
nomic indicators, has seriously complicated
the messaging for the GOP
It wasn't long ago that the unemployment
rate was closer to 10 percent and stagnant,
making it easier for them to claim nothing
was getting better under Obama. Now they
have to calibrate.
"I believe the economy will come back. It
always does," said Mitt Romney, the Repub-
lican front-runner, during a campaign stop in


Nevada. He blamed Obama's policies for
slowing the recovery, hurting families and
making it harder for businesses to bounce
back. '"And for that," Romney said, "the pres-
ident deserves the blame that he'll receive in
this campaign."
The bigger opening for Republicans has to
do with the burden still resting on Obama's
shoulders: Millions of people don't feel any
better yet, no matter what the statistics show.
About 12.8 million people remain out of
work, and an additional 11 million have ei-
ther given up looking or can find only part-
time jobs. Typical wages have failed to keep
up with inflation. Nearly 43 percent of those
out of work have been unemployed for at
least six months.
And many people around the nation are
struggling to make monthly payments on
homes that are now worth less than their pur-
chase price.
So Republicans are trying to shift the ques-
tion away from whether the economy is get-
ting better to whether their party would do


. Page D4


Nonprofit leadership legal concerns


If you serve as an offi-
cer or director of a
nonprofit (NP) or-
ganization, take notice. _
In recent years, your -
legal liabilities have 'z-
been increasingly publi- R
cized in various forms of .
the print media.
During 2011, national
legislators voiced con- Dr. Fr,
cerns about improper ac- He:
tivities on the part of NP ASK S
officers and directors.
IRS is on the hunt for
NP's where compensation and im-
proper governance practices sexist.
The Annual Tax Return (990) of an
NP now has 12 disclosure require-
ments. One additional disclosure
may not be much concern, but 12?


e
r2
54


Government scrutiny is
increasing. NP leader-
ship, beware!
Fiduciary responsibil-
ity Directors and offi-
cers have a fiduciary
duty to the NP they
serve. Volunteer service
without compensation
does not absolve anyone
derick from breach of fiduciary
zog duties. A fiduciary duty
CORE embodies the essence of
trust and the expectation
to stand behind and sup-
port the best outcome of the organi-
zational endeavors. Legal penalties
in the form of damages become a
distinct reality when breach of this
duty is determined.
Follow principles, not personali-


ties The attention of government
agencies should not frighten volun-
teers from giving of their time and
expertise to worthy causes. What is
of concern is behavior that does not
conform to the constraints of fiduci-
ary responsibility
Here are some facts that provide
clarity on the subject of fiduciary
obligations:
All volunteers should educate
themselves as to the principles they
should follow while exercising their
volunteer assignments. Fear of per-
sonal liability or unwarranted para-
noia should not reign or enter into
the decision to go forward with vol-
unteer contributions.
When a nonprofit is small in com-
parison to the large, highly bud-
geted NP; this condition does not


insulate the small NP from serious
leadership infractions.
Beware of leaders who display a
pattern of poorly conceived ideas
and attempt to apply pressure for
group decisions. Bottom line advice
to the NP volunteer: Be driven by
principles, not personalities.
The main duties There are
four main legal responsibilities that
describe what fiduciary duties
require.
1. A duty to act in the best inter-
ests of the organization. This is a
broad mandate to exercise reason-
able and normal care when repre-
senting the organization. The
interests of the organization must be
placed ahead of any other interest

See Page D4


Bruce Williams
SMART
MONEY


Unsecured

creditors

must stand

in line
DEAR BRUCE: A
new health club
opened about 10
months ago not far from
my house. It was not affil-
iated with any national
chain and it was offering a
great deal, especially if
you paid in advance in-
stead of monthly
I paid for six months,
and then two months ago
for another six months.
Last week, I went down
for my workout, and you
can imagine my surprise
and shock when there was
a notice on the door say-
ing the company had gone
bankrupt and the club was
closed. Since it is not affil-
iated with another club, I
have no way to transfer
the membership from this
closed club to somewhere
else.
Is there any way I can
get back my unused mem-
bership? I have tried call-
ing and mailing, and
nothing.-Reader, via
email
DEAR READER: You
are what they call an "un-
secured creditor" in a
bankruptcy, and the likeli-
hood is you will get little
or nothing. It's unfortu-
nate, but in these bad eco-
nomic times, this is going
to happen.
I wish I had better news
for you, but hopefully your
letter will help someone
else know not to put out
that much money ahead of
time, especially to a com-
pany that is not affiliated
nationally or with another
local company
The notice that was on
the door should have
listed a bankruptcy ad-
ministrator If not, contact
the county or city you are
in to get the administra-
tor's name and then stand
in line. I'm sure there are
many in your same posi-
tion, not to mention ven-
dors to which the club
owes money Good luck.
DEAR BRUCE: I live in
the same neighborhood as
my mom, and lately have
had to become her care-
taker as she has been
stricken with cancer. She
is now in hospice and is
pretty much not aware of
her surroundings.
Several years ago, she
told me about life insur-
ance policies she had
taken out, but of course I
didn't want to hear about
it because she was going
to be around forever.
Now I need to locate
them, as she won't be with
us much longer, but I just
can't find them anywhere.
Is there any way to find
out where these policies
are and with what com-
pany? -J.M., via email
DEARJ.M.: I know of no
state depository that
would have that informa-
tion to help. You are going
to have to go to her house
and go through her
records.
Look at her canceled
checks, bank statements,
credit card statements -
anything with which she
would have paid the pre-
miums. Hopefully, she
kept up with the payments.
Unfortunately, this is a
hard lesson learned.
While I know how you felt
- not wanting to have to
think about the inevitable
passing of a loved one -
we really owe it to our
loved ones to pay atten-
tion to what they want to


Page D4








D2

SUNDAY


FEBRUARY


5, 2012


Promotional information provided by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce


numberr Connection
28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


Make your reservations now!


Join us Friday, Feb. 10, for the
Monthly Membership Luncheon
at the Plantation Golf Resort &
Spa, 9301 W Fort Island Trail from
11: 30 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Commissioner Joe Meek will
share information on happenings
in Citrus County
Sponsored by Cypress Cove
Care Center, the luncheon is $18
for members, $20 at the door; $22
for non-members.
Call 352-795-3149 to make your
reservations or go to our website
at www citruscountychamber com
to register.


CITRUS COUNTY
CITRUS COUNTY Economic Development
CS CO Cc Council, Inc.
Chamber of Commerce


Morey Construction receives award


/.


The New Image Award was awarded to Morey Construction at the January Membership Luncheon. At 7022 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway in Crys-
tal River, Morey Construction specializes in all areas of construction, from residential homes to commercial buildings. They have years of ex-
perience building in Florida's demanding environment and offers excellent customer service. They recently moved into their new facilities at
Cypress Crossings Professional Park. For more information, please call 352-795-7077.



Thank you to our Recent Chamber mixer welcomes president

Boat Captains!
We would like to thank the boat captains who volun-
teered their time and services to provide manatee boat
tours during the Florida Manatee Festival on Jan. 21 and
22. These captains provided an educational and fun ex-
perience to festival attendees and we appreciate their
support. If you are interested in booking a manatee tour,
please give them a call!
Manatee Tours and Dive: 352-795-1333
Plantation Inn Dive Shop: 352-795-5797
Adventure Diving: 352-794-7227
River Adventures: 352-564-8687
Manatee Connection: 352-697-0220
Sea Education Adventures: 352-302-1432


FoLoOoRoIoDoA




FEbTIVAL


Fine Artists recognized at

Florida Manatee Festival


The Fine Art Show at the
Florida Manatee Festival,
Jan. 21 and 22, welcomed
artists from across the
Southeast to Crystal River
as they showed off their
talents.
From pottery to jewelry to
mixed media, artists dis-
played their work down Cit-
rus Avenue and were
judged on Saturday. The fol-
lowing awards were given:


Award of Achievement
- Alexis Ellis, pottery;
Lecanto Florida.
Third Place lan
Williams, woodwork; Her-
nando, Florida.
Second Place Gre-
gory Jones, mixed media;
Lakeland, Florida.
Best of Show Betsy
Bohrer, mixed media
painting; Lakeland,
Florida.


U4


i ne college of central i-oriaa nostea an Aftter Hours NetworKing mixer on Jan. 26 to wel-
come the new president, Dr. James Henningsen. Chamber members, community individ-
uals and college faculty and staff had the opportunity to meet the new president and talk
to him one-on-one. Board of Trustees member and Chamber Director Don Taylor intro-
duced Dr. Henningsen to the crowd and described the rigorous interview process he en-
dured. His dedication to the education of post-secondary students was evident as he
spoke of his goals as he enters his new role. We thank the College for hosting the mixer
and welcome Dr. Henningsen to Citrus County!


Golden

Citrus

Scholar

Award

sponsors

available
The Golden Citrus
Scholar Award program was
designed to recognize out-
standing Citrus County high
school seniors for scholar-
ship based on academic
achievement, personal ac-
complishment and service
to their school and
community.
Awards are given in the
areas of:
Business and Business
Technology
English/Literature.
Fine and Performing
Arts.
Mathematics, Engineer-
ing or Computer Science.
Science.
Social Studies.
New Media and
Journalism.
World Language.
Vocational and Career
Technical.
Nominations are made
through the guidance de-
partments in all public and
private high schools in the
county.
The Awards Ceremony
will take place Monday, May
14, at the College of Central
Florida in Lecanto.
We are seeking sponsors
to provide a memorable
evening.
With your help, we will be
able to give these students
an unforgettable experi-
ence and a token of their
community's pride in their
achievement.
Sponsorship levels range
from $500 to $25 dollars.
Please call Tobey at 352-
795-3149 or email tobey@
citruscountychamber.com
for a sponsorship commit-
ment form or for more in-
formation.


FACEBOOK USERS
We know you like us, so
now "LIKE" us on Face-
book!
Use your smartphone
to scan the QR code at
right. It will take you to
the Citrus County
Chamber of
Commerce's Facebook
page.
Don't have a smart-
phone? Visit the page at
http://www.facebook.
com/CitrusChamber.
Visit the website at
www.citruscounty
chamber.com.


. >


r')





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Florida Cancer
Affiliates adds staff
BROOKSVILLE Florida
Cancer Affiliates (FCA), a
newly-formed, community-
based medical oncology and
hematology practice, an-
nounces the appointment of
Elizabeth Morgan, ARNP,
AOCN (Advanced Registered
Nurse Practitioner, Advanced
Oncology Certified Nurse) as a
nurse practitioner, and
Domenica Molinari as office
manager.
Morgan and Molinari joined
the practice of Richard
Caradonna M.D., at 11373
Cortez Blvd., Suite 200,
Brooksville, FL 34613.
Morgan comes to FCA from
Florida Cancer Institute-New
Hope in Brooksville, where she
served as a nurse practitioner.
She completed her undergrad-
uate educa-
tion at Pasco
Hernando
Community
College earn-
ing an Asso-
ciate Degree C S1
in nursing.
She contin- L
ued her nurs- Elizabeth
ing education Morgan
at the Univer- Florida Cancer
sity of South Affiliates.
Florida, com-
pleting a Bachelor of Science
degree and a Masters in sci-
ence for nurse practitioners ma-
joring in oncology.
Molinari comes to FCA from
Florida Cancer Institute-New
Hope in Zephyrhills, where she
served as office manager. Prior
to FCI-NH, she was employed
at Moffitt
Cancer Cen-
ter for six
years as a
hematology
and bone
marrow trans-
plant clinical
and senior -
patient repre- Domenica
sentative. Molinari
tentative. i Florida Cancer
Richard R. Affiliates.
Caradonna,
M.D., is board-certified in med-
ical oncology and internal medi-
cine. He graduated from Holy
Cross College in Worcester,
Mass., and received his med-
ical degree from St. Louis Med-
ical College in St. Louis, Mo.
FCA is a partner of renowned
oncology care leader, Moffitt
Cancer Center, and united in
healing nationally with The US
Oncology Network, one of the
nation's largest community-
based cancer treatment and re-
search networks, dedicated to
advancing cancer care and ex-
panding patient access to high-
quality care.
The integrated clinical team
of Florida Cancer Affiliates em-
ploys the latest technologies
and drug therapies to ensure
patients receive advanced care
closer to home. The compre-
hensive treatment centers in-
clude outpatient treatment and
diagnostic facilities including


chemotherapy, hematology, ra-
diation therapy, Positron Emis-
sion Tomography (PET), clinical
research, pharmacy and labo-
ratory, as well as financial coun-
seling and patient support
services.
Florida Cancer Associates is
comprised of Drs. Gerald Rob-
bins, Lawrence Hochman,
David Wenk and Richard
Caradonna. Robbins, M.D., is
board certified in medical oncol-
ogy, hematology and internal
medicine. Hochman, D.O.,
FACRO, is board certified in ra-
diation oncology and a fellow of
the American College of Radia-
tion Oncology. Wenk, M.D., is
board-certified in medical on-
cology and internal medicine.
FCA is partnered with F. Lee
Moffitt Cancer Center and
united in healing with The US
Oncology Network. As an affili-
ate of The US Oncology Net-
work, Florida Cancer Affiliates
is united with more than 1,000
physicians and 10,000 cancer
professionals nationwide.
Florida Cancer Affiliates is at
5500 Little Road in New Port
Richey, as well as 11373
Cortez Blvd., Suite 200, in
Brooksville. Call 727-372-9159
in Pasco, 352-597-4998 in Her-
nando, or go to www. Florida
CancerAffilates.com.
Thompson named
a hospice director
LECANTO-Hospice of Cit-
rus County has named Cathi
Thompson director of volunteer
services.
Thompson
will be re-
sponsible for
managing all
volunteer
program
activities.
Thompson Cathi
moved to Cit- Thompson
rus County Hospice of
from Sacra- Citrus County.
mento, Calif.,
where she attained an under-
graduate degree in business
law. She is married to Bill and
has been a resident of Her-
nando since 2004.
Licensed 1985, Hospice of
Citrus County is a not-for-profit
charitable organization provid-
ing comprehensively respon-
sive and compassionate
end-of-life services to the termi-
nally ill and their families. For
information about Thompson,
call 352-527-2020. Visit
www.hospiceofcitruscounty.org.
Early Learning
group honors staff
Early Learning Coalition of
the Nature Coast Chairman
Rob Wardlow and Executive Di-
rector Sonya Bosanko recently
recognized coalition employees
for outstanding performance.
Wendy Lindbert, Employee of
the Quarter for the first quarter
of fiscal year 2011-12; and
Tania Reaves, Employee of the
Quarter for the second quarter
of 2011-12, attended the recog-
nition ceremony.
Lindbert, accounts payable


Business DIGEST

Shredding event Feb. 11


Special to the Chronicle
Steve Tallman, Nature Coast Design, and Lee Cooper, CPA,
prepare to shred sensitive materials at the Shred-It truck,
which is brought to Citrus County by BizCo of Citrus County
Inc., a not-for-profit organization that assists new businesses
in Citrus County The truck will be in Bealls parking lot from
10 a.m. until 2 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 11. For information call
352-628-6624 or visit BizCoTeamCitrus.com.


specialist in
the finance
department,
has been with
the coalition
since Sep-
tember 2009.
Reaves has
worked as Wendy
the education Lindbert
specialist for Early Learning
Sumter Coalition.

April 2009.
Unable to
attend the
recognition
event was
Cynthia
Prodey, em-
ployee of the
quarter for the Tania
fourth quarter Reaves
of fiscal year Early Learning
2010-11. Coalition.
Prodey, client
services counselor for Citrus
County, has been with the coali-
tion since May 2009.
Also recognized were Charlie
Richer and Joan Luebbe, who
recently retired from the Early
Learning Coalition Board of
Directors.
SBA offers tips on
disaster planning
WASHINGTON Because
it's easy for even the best
leader to be overwhelmed
when a crisis hits and misinfor-
mation shows up in a Twitter
feed, managing the flow of in-
formation about your company
is crucial when an emergency
occurs.
Get tips about how to plan a
communications strategy that
will eliminate confusion and
support recovery efforts during
a free webinar from 2 to 3 p.m.
Tuesday, Feb. 14, hosted by
the U.S. Small Business Ad-
ministration and Agility Recov-
ery Solutions.
Bob Boyd, president and
CEO of Agility Recovery Solu-


tions, will present "Crisis Com-
munications Planning The
Keystone of Disaster Recovery
Response." A question-and-
answer session will follow.
Space is limited. Register at
https://wwwl .gotomeeting.com/
register/421917136.
SBA has partnered with
Agility to offer business continu-
ity strategies through its "Pre-
pareMyBusiness" website. Visit
www.preparemybusiness.org to
access past webinars and get
additional preparedness tips.
The SBA provides disaster
recovery assistance in the form
of low-interest loans to home-
owners, renters, private non-
profits and businesses of all
sizes. To learn more, visit
www.sba.gov/disaster.

Oak Hill Hospital's
associates of month
SPRING HILL Oak Hill
Hospital has announced its Star
Associates of the Month of De-
cember. Each month hospital
associates are chosen in a
process that involves nomina-
tions and voting by their peers,
patients, patient families and
physicians. This month's Oak
Hill Hospital "Stars" are:
Keith Joyce, operating
room tech, joined Oak Hill Hos-
pital in Febru-
ary 2006. He
has worked
at both the 1"
second floor ..1
and the radi-
ology depart-
ment and he "
is now in the -
surgery de- Keith
apartment as Oak Hill
an OR techni- Hospital.
cian, where
he prepares the operating room
by setting up equipment, posi-
tioning patients on the operat-
ing room bed, setting up
sterilized tools for the physi-
cians and assisting them in
surgery.


KladisAlkazzi, EKG and
stress techni-
cian and
PCA, began
working at
Oak Hill Hos- 4
pital in April
2003 in the
EKG depart-
ment where Kiadis
she serves as Alkazzi
an EKG Oak Hill
stress techni- Hospital.
cian as well
as a PCA.
The nomination for Annie
Rose San Marte, physical ther-
apy, came from a coworker who
stated she had a patient who
needed to be cleaned before
San Marte was to begin work-
ing with her. "I told her it would
be only a few minutes, and she
immediately grabbed gloves
and began to help. This is not
her job, but she didn't even
blink to help me for the good of
the patient."
Oak Hill Hospital has been
serving the Nature Coast since
1984. It is the largest medical
facility in Hernando and Citrus
County (234 acute-care beds),
is one of the area's largest pri-
vate employers, and offers Her-
nando County's only
comprehensive cardiovascular
program, including open heart
surgery.
It is at 11375 Cortez Blvd.,
Spring Hill, 1.9 miles east of
U.S. 19 on State Road 50. Visit
OakHillHospital.com.
Workforce coming
to Dunnellon
OCALA- Workforce Con-
nection of Citrus, Levy and
Marion counties will bring job-
seeker services to the Annie
Johnson Senior and Family
Service Center in Dunnellon
beginning Wednesday, Feb. 1.
Workforce Connection's Mo-
bile Resource Unit will be on
hand the first Wednesday of
each month from 9 a.m. to 1
p.m. The center is at 1991 W.
Test Court, just south of the
Withlacoochee River.
On every second and third
Wednesday, Workforce will
partner with the Florida Depart-
ment of Children and Families
at the center by providing work
registration services for those
accessing public assistance
programs.
Rusty Skinner, Workforce's
chief executive officer, said the
effort is designed to make it
easier for job seekers to access
services without having to
travel to a resource center in
Ocala, Inverness or Chiefland.
All Workforce Connection serv-
ices, regardless of location, are
provided at no charge.
"We recognize that it's not
always possible to get to one of
our centers, and the Annie
Johnson Center is ideally lo-
cated to serve residents in the
northeast corner of Citrus
County, southeast area of Levy
and southwest portion of Mar-
ion," Skinner said. "The idea is
to provide seamless services
throughout our region."


Workforce Connection's mo-
bile resource unit is staff-sup-
ported and equipped with
satellite Internet, four computer
workstations and office equip-
ment to assist job seekers regis-
ter with the Employ Florida
Marketplace, conduct job
searches, work on their resumes,
fill out online employment appli-
cations, research career informa-
tion and resources, get
information about upcoming hir-
ing events and apply for Unem-
ployment Compensation benefits
and file claims.
For information about the
Annie Johnson Center, call 352-
489-8021. For information about
Workforce Connection services
at the Annie Johnson Center,
call 800-434-JOBS (5627).
Expose your business
to South Marion
Need exposure for your busi-
ness, church or organization?
The Belleview/South Marion
Chamber of Commerce will
host a Community Expo from
10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday,
March 10, at the Market of Mar-
ion. All churches, civic organi-
zations and businesses are
invited to participate.
Participation in this event will
help your business/organization
facilitate business connections,
promote growth of companies
and organizations, as well as
help South Marion business
community to evolve.
To find out if you qualify for a
free booth or for more informa-
tion, contact Mariah Moody at
the Belleview/South Marion
Chamber at 352-245-2178 or
Belleviewchamber@gmail.com.
Registration deadline is Feb.
23. Inside booths are available
and limited.
Habitat benefit
builds business
Habitat for Humanity of Cit-
rus County Inc. will have its fifth
annual Building Dreams Wine
& Food Pairing Benefit from 6
to 10 p.m. Thursday, March 8,
at Skyview Clubhouse at Terra
Vista. Enjoy gourmet food
paired with exquisite wines, ac-
companied by the smooth
sounds of live jazz/R&B/soul
and a silent auction.
Tickets are $50 in advance
and $60 at the door (if avail-
able). For tickets and informa-
tion, call 352-563-2744. Every
dollar raised at this event helps
pay for the lumber and nails,
cement and shingles, plumbers
and permits needed to take a
new home from site work to
move-in.
Habitat not only helps elimi-
nate substandard housing, but
provides business for local con-
struction services, tax dollars
for local government, and stabi-
lization of local neighborhoods.
The Habitat for Humanity
Wishing Well Fundraiser draw-
ing will take place during the
benefit. Tickets for $1 each are
now on sale at the Inverness
and Crystal River ReStores, or
call 352-563-2744. Tickethold-
ers need not be present to win.


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m -E


BUSINESS


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2012 D3









A sample of companies that are hiring, at a glance


Associated Press

Employers across a range of in-
dustries have stepped up hiring.
The economy gained 243,000 jobs
in January, the most since last
April. The hiring spree helped
lower the unemployment rate for
a fifth straight month, to 8.3 per-
cent.
The reasons why businesses are
hiring vary across industries.
Among the employers adding
jobs:
Acquity Group, a website de-
signer in Chicago, added about
100 people in the second half of
2011 and now has about 460. Jim
Newman, an executive vice presi-
dent, says it plans to add 200 to 250
this year. Acquity designs sites for
companies such as Saks Fifth Av-
enue and General Motors Co.
Newman says more companies
see web-based advertising and
communications as cost-efficient.
And Acquity's clients have been
willing to spend more on their
websites. Last year, Newman no-
ticed that marketing budgets


began loosening up. "I don't think
people are as nervous about the
economy as they once were," he
said.
Rackspace Hosting Inc., a
"cloud computing" company that
maintains corporate websites and
provides other services, says it
hired about nearly 650 people last
year and plans a similar number
this year. The company says its
clients have spent about 10 per-
cent more on Rackspace's serv-
ices compared with a year ago as
their businesses have picked up.
When online retailers receive a
crush of sales, for example, they
pay Rackspace for more computer
capacity.
Omaha, Neb.-based Union Pa-
cific Corp., the nation's largest rail
operator, has benefited from ris-
ing auto sales. Union Pacific ships
cars for General Motors, Ford and
Chrysler, including GM's popular
Chevy Cruze. It also ships oil and
gas, as well as drill pipes used to
extract oil and natural gas from
shale. "A lot of our growth is de-
pendent on jobs, hiring and con-


summer spending," said Donna
Kush, a spokeswoman. "We are ex-
pecting moderate growth in these
areas" in 2012. Union Pacific
added 1,500 jobs last year, raising
its work force to about 46,000,
Kush said. It foresees similar ad-
ditions this year. The company is
hiring engineers, mechanics and
computer and communications
specialists to maintain systems to
track and dispatch railcars.
Rising auto sales are straining
Continental AG's ability to keep
up with demand for its tires and
leading to more hiring. The Ger-
man company, which employs
10,000 in the United States, is
building a tire plant in Sumter,
S.C., and expanding another in Mt
Vernon, Ill. One reason car sales
are improving is that many Amer-
icans are replacing aging vehicles,
thereby spurring tire sales. Conti-
nental's stepped-up production
will require adding jobs for sev-
eral years. "We could sell a lot
more tires to automakers if we
had the capacity," said Kathryn
Blackwell, a spokeswoman.


When businesses develop
products, some turn to Avomeen
Analytical Services, which uses
chemical techniques to evaluate
them. Avomeen, based in Ann
Arbor, Mich., tests pharmaceuti-
cals, cosmetics, and industrial
cleaners, among other products. It
evaluates how long ingredients in
new pharmaceuticals will last to
assess the product's shelf-life. It
also tests cosmetics for safety. Last
year, Avomeen's clients began
bringing more products to test,
says Neil Thanedar, a co-founder.
National-Oilwell Varco Inc., a
Houston company that builds
parts for oil drilling, hired about
5,000 people in 2011 and will likely
do so again in 2012. National-Oil-
well says it has about 700 open po-
sitions, mostly in Texas. Higher oil
prices have sparked a surge in
drilling projects, especially on
land, where big oil drillers such as
ExxonMobil Corp. and Chevron
Texaco Corp. have learned to tap
oil deposits in underground layers
of shale rock. The Obama admin-
istration also re-opened the deep


waters of the Gulf of Mexico this
year. That allowed companies to
resume oil and gas exploration
that was halted after BP's oil spill
in 2010. "We still need to add a lot
of folks," said Clay Williams, Na-
tional-Oilwell's chief financial of-
ficer "Demand for equipment for
the oil field is pretty high."
New York-based LocalVox
Inc. is hiring to handle a growing
roster of small-businesses clients
hoping to capitalize on social
media. Its software is intended to
make it easier for clients to simul-
taneously update Facebook pages,
tweets, websites and customer
email lists with marketing an-
nouncements. Among its clients
are Chelsea Piers, an entertain-
ment complex, and restaurants,
including Sushi Samba, Green
Square Tavern and Umberto's
Clam House. The company's pay-
roll jumped from 10 to 30 employ-
ees last year; it plans to double it
to 60 this year "Everybody has to
move their marketing dollars to
the Internet," said Trevor Sumner,
a co-founder


ANALYSIS
Continued from Page Dl

much better yet. That argu-
ment can be heard from the
campaign trail to Capitol
Hill, where House Speaker
John Boehner accurately
pointed out that unemploy-
ment has topped 8 percent
for 36 months in a row
under Obama
Obama's campaign, while
noting recent improve-
ments, is eager to frame the
election around the ques-
tion of which candidate has
a better and more hopeful
economic vision for the next



PENNEY
Continued from Page Dl

have lost market share to
specialty retailers like H&M
and Zara, whose stores have
"wow" factor The group's
market share in clothing and
other areas fell to 31 percent
last year from 57 percent in
1992.
And Penney, in particular,
has struggled. The retailer's
sales have slipped as its core
middle-class customers have
been among the hardest hit
by the economic downturn, it
has failed to attract younger
customers with its stodgy
image and its stores increas-
ingly look uninviting com-
pared to competitors.
For the 11 months through
December, Penney's revenue
at stores open at least a year
- an indicator of a retailer's
health rose 0.7 percent,
while competitors like
Macy's Inc. rose 5.4 percent,
and Kohl's was up 1.1 per-
cent Penney posted a loss in
the third quarter and cut its
fourth-quarter earnings out-
look after a disappointing
holiday season, when it had
to do some deep discounting
to lure in customers.
During an hour-long inter-
view this month at Penney's
Plano, Texas, headquarters,
Johnson, 52, talked about
everything from the chal-
lenges Penney faces to where
he likes to shop. Johnson,
who started his job at Penney
in November, mentioned
Apple 19 times.
Here are some excerpts
from the interview:
Q. Why Penney?
A I chose J.C. Penney be-
cause I think it's the single-
biggest opportunity in
American retailing. Inher-
ently, department stores have
significant advantages com-
pared to all other retailers.



SCORE
Continued from Page Dl

2. A duty to disclose other
interests and avoid con-
flicts. An officer or director
may have other interests.
These can include working
for a company that does
business with the nonprofit



MONEY
Continued from Page Dl

share with us. After all, it
may be that you will need
this information later, as in
your instance.
As a favor to your loved
ones, try to keep together in
one place all the important
documents and papers that


four years and beyond.
The contrast there, in
policies, is remarkably
clear. Obama promises to
use government as a lever to
ensure fairness.
Opponents Romney and
Newt Gingrich promise to
repeal Obama legislation
they say has helped weaken
the economy, such as his
health care law and tighter
rules on Wall Street behav-
ior
Gingrich, asked on CNN
whether Obama deserves
any credit for improving
employment, said: "If it
makes you happy, give him
some credit."
Even with the new jobs


Yet our productivity is at the
low end, and that just doesn't
make sense.
Q. What was your first im-
pression of Penney?
A. I would describe J.C.
Penney as one of a handful
of great American brands
that seemed like it was dor-
mant, that had been a great
part of the fabric of America
for almost a century, but it
just wasn't modern. It wasn't
top of mind. Everybody can
tell a story about their mom
or their grandma or the old
catalog days. But they don't
have modern stories. Be-
cause we haven't been cre-
ative enough, so we have to
rethink everything.
Q. Who are the chain's
competitors?
A Our No. 1 competitor is
ourselves and our way of
thinking, which is informed
by decades of experience. It's
not another store; it's not an-
other format like the Inter-
net. Our competition is
ourselves, and our best friend
is our imagination.
Q. How did you come up
with the new pricing
strategy?
A. Pricing is actually a
pretty simple and straight
forward thing. Customers
will not pay literally a penny
more than the true value of
the product And as I have
been watching the depart-
ment stores for the past
decade, I have been struck by
the extraordinary amount of
promotional activity, which to
me, didn't feel like it was ap-
propriate for a department
store. My instinct was that it
wasn't a good thing.
Q. Won't shoppers be
turned off because they won't
see the big markdowns?
A. I wouldn't assume they
like the pricing strategy. I
think they're insulted by it
Q. Who are you targeting?
A We are going after all
Americans. We would like to


or holding a position of
leadership in a competing
NP Proper disclosure is the
key ingredient to avoid vol-
unteer conflicts of interest.
It is not enough to simply
understand the concept Ig-
norance will not protect
anyone. Individual boards
can define conflict of inter-
est and possess the power to
make the ultimate decision


someone may need in an
emergency I am sorry for
your situation. Good luck.
DEAR BRUCE: What are
the rules, if any, about whom
you can leave something to
after you pass away,
whether it be money or a
possession? I have a nosy
neighbor who keeps telling
me I can leave things in my
will only to an immediate
family member (I told her I


numbers, he said, the most
Obama will be able to say is
that he is "less destructive"
than he was a year ago.
Obama's vulnerability, as
the president who owns the
economy, is that voters who
remain in dire economic
straits will be so turned off
by their current condition
that they won't listen to talk
about the future.
That would play into the
underlying Republican ar-
gument: Obama has had his
chance, and if your life isn't
better, it's time to kick him
out.
In turn, Obama always
tempers his remarks about
the economy, even with the


trends in his favor
As he put it on Friday:
"There's still far too many
Americans who need a job,
or need a job that pays bet-
ter than the one they have
now."
Nine months before Elec-
tion Day, the nation is split
Obama's approval rating
has improved over the past
few months, rebounding
from lows reached last sum-
mer, though it has not
turned positive.
The latest Gallup tracking
poll finds the public torn on
his performance, with 45
percent saying they approve
and 48 percent
disapproving.


For every number about
how things are getting bet-
ter, another is available for
sobering perspective and
political opportunism.
Obama made a point Fri-
day to say that the economy
had added 3.7 million pri-
vate sector jobs over the
past 23 months.
Yet overall, the nation has
about 5.6 million fewer jobs
than it did when the giant
recession began in late 2007.
A better direction for the
economy is not all that
Obama promised.
When he was a new pres-
ident, Obama told NBC's
Matt Lauer people were


ABOUT J.C. PENNEY'S CEO
* NAME: Ron Johnson.
* OCCUPATION: Chief executive officer of J.C. Penney Co.
* AGE: 52.
* FAMILY: Wife, Karen, one daughter, one son.
* EDUCATION: Stanford University, BA, economics, 1980; Harvard Business School,
1984.
* RESUME: Johnson became chief executive of J.C. Penney in November 2011. He
joined the board in August. Before joining Penney, he worked as Apple Inc.'s senior
vice president of retail for 11 years and pioneered the company's highly successful
retail stores. During his time,
Apple stores have grown from
zero to more than 300 locations
worldwide with $15 billion in rev- :
enue. He has been credited for de-
veloping such innovations as The
Genius Bar, where customers can
get hands-on technical support.
Johnson joined Apple from Target
Corp, where over a span of 15
years, he held a number of differ-
ent roles including vice president J4
of merchandise. During his career
there, he was responsible for
men's clothing, women's clothing
and accessories, children's and i
home furnishings. Under his lead-
ership, Target launched its first
design initiative featuring a home
collection from architect Michael
Graves. That move helped to de-
velop Target's image as a cheap
chic discounter. Johnson began Associated Press
his retailing career in 1984 as a The February 2012 J.C. Penney catalog cover.
trainee with the now defunct On Feb. 1, the retailer rolled out a three-tiered
Mervyns, which was formerly strategy that offers "Every Day" low pricing daily,
owned by The Dayton Hudson "Monthly Value" discounts on select merchan-
Corp.. During his first retail job at dise each month and clearance deals called
Mervyns, he spent half the time "Best Price" during the first and the third Fridays
on the floor in the men's clothing of each month, when many shoppers get paid.
department.
* OTHER: A member of the board of Stanford Hospital
* FAVORITE DEPARTMENT STORE GROWING UP: Dayton's at the Southdale Mall in
Edina, Minn., where Johnson's family bought their first color TV.
* WHERE HE SHOPS NOW: Johnson says he shops at lots of different stores from Tar-
get and Levi's to high-end Italian clothier Zegna.
* QUOTE: "I didn't come here to improve. I came here to transform. Every single
leader in America who works to improve their business year after year ... can create
gradual results, but the only question is, how fast did you improve compared to
someone else? You don't fundamentally change your position in the marketplace."


be the store for everyone.
Q. What are your plans to
make the shopping experi-
ence more exciting?
A We are going to make the


as to what is a conflict.
3. A duty to maintain the
organization's information in
confidence. This duty ap-
plies only to information that
is considered "confidential"
but also, information the of-
ficer/director reasonably ex-
pects should be confidential.
4. A duty to respect orga-
nizational (corporate) op-
portunities. This duty is


had a very close friend I was
thinking of adding to my
will.)
I would like to remember
my friend with something,
but now this neighbor, who
offered her opinion where it
wasn't asked, has me think-
ing.
Can I leave something to
whomever I wish? I don't
want to be wrong and then
mess everything up for my


store a place people love to
come just to come. Be-
cause they can get support
before they're ready to buy
They can get great support


usually a business opportu-
nity, idea or investment.
Officers/directors can
generally engage in the
same areas of interest of the
NP with no conflict as long
as the competition does not
cause unfair injury to the
organization. Other, lesser-
known conflicts of interest
will follow in subsequent
ASK SCORE columns.


family when the time
comes. Sarah in North
Carolina
DEAR SARAH: In most
states, you are obliged to
leave at least one-third of
your assets to your spouse,
but what you do with the
other two-thirds is entirely
up to you. If you want to give
the other two-thirds to a
charity, so be it. If you want
to leave $1,000 to your mas-


when they want to buy and
they can come in after they
buy We'll transform the buy-
ing experience, not unlike
what we did at Apple.


The legal content in this ar-
ticle is credited to Jerald A.
Jacobs Esq., a partner in the
law firm of Pillsbury
Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP,
in Washington, D.C. Mr. Ja-
cobs specializes in Nonprofit
Organization Law Practice.
SCORE stands "for the
life of your business." Need
counsel and guidance in
matters of business startups


sage therapist, go for it.
There is no prohibition
against remembering some-
one's kindness in your will.
It is important to have a
competent attorney draw up
the will, reflecting your
wishes as much as possible,
in conformance with the laws
of the state where you live.
This is a very important step,
just in case a family member
decides to contest the will.


going to start seeing
progress in a year from his
policies.
Then he added: "If I don't
have this done in three
years, then there's gonna be
a one-term proposition."
The three-year mark is
here, and voters will soon
decide on the one-term part.
The answer may well
come down to which econ-
omy they're voting on the
one they see now or their
faith in the one ahead.
White House Correspon-
dentBen Feller has covered
the Obama and Bush presi-
dencies for The Associated
Press. Follow him at http://
twitter com/BenFellerDC.


Q. When will we start to see
improvements?
A. You'll start to see the ex-
perience change month by
month. Everyone thinks it's
an overnight success, but it
never is. I was at Apple from
2000 to 2011, but it wasn't
until 2004 that the iPod be-
came an important part of
people's lives. It wasn't until
2007 that Apple reinvented
the phone. It wasn't until 2009
that Apple launched the
iPad. But we look at it today,
and we feel Apple had always
been beloved. It took time,
and this will take time as
well.
Q. What ideals have you
embraced from Steve Jobs?
A The importance of doing
everything you do to your
very best And that the jour-
ney is the reward. If you do
things well one at a time, you
end up in a really good place.
Don't get ahead of yourself.
Control the things you can.
Q Other than Apple, which
stores do you admire?
A. I admire lots of stores.
Whole Foods is a great store.
I just like their passion for
food. It shows up in every-
thing they do. It shows up in
their packaging, their pres-
entation and their employ-
ees. Starbucks. It truly has
created a community. As I
travel around the world, I
just know that if I go to Star-
bucks I will have a great
experience.
Q. You're dressed casually
Where do you shop?
A I just dress to be com-
fortable. I shop at lots of
stores. These are Levi 514s. I
bought them at a Levi's store.
I have a T-shirt. That's from
Lacoste. I have a cashmere
sweater It came from Zegna.
My socks are from Target My
shoes are from Tod's. We
shop multiple places. But we
do have a favorite store.
That's what we're going to
become.


or growth? Call SCORE at
352-249-1236. Sign up for our
free "R.U. Ready Seminar"
scheduled for Feb. 9 at the
College of Central Florida.


Dr FrederickJ Herzogis
chairman of Citrus County
SCORE. He can be reached
via email at therzog@
tampabayrrcom.


Once you are gone, there is
no one to speak for you.


Send questions to Smart
Money PO. Box 2095,
Elfers, FL 34680, or email
bruce@brucewilliams. com.
Questions of general inter-
est will be answered in fu-
ture columns. Owing to the
volume of mail, personal
replies cannot be provided.


D4 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2012


BUSINESS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


YOU'LL* THIS!
Remember
Valentine's Day
is Tuesday,
February 14th.








Let your signif-


olherknow
how
much you
love them
wih a special
mes-
sage iom
you in fte
Chronicle
Classifieds.
$14.95
Includes 20 lines of
copy or 10 lines of
copy and a photo.
Call 563-5966
Deadline is Friday,
February 10th at
1:00pm.





Single Man 64 y.o.
positive romanticclean
cut ,understanding,
duplomatic,spirtual,
seeking lady w/same
qualities Send
response to:
Chronicle,
Blind box 1753M,
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd,Crystal River, FL
34429




YOU'LL THIS!
Remember
Valentine's Day
is Tuesday,
February 14th.




Let your significant
other know how
much you love them
with a special mes-
sage from you in the
Chronicle Classifieds.
$14.95
Includes 20 lines of
copy or 10 lines of
copy and a photo.
Call 563-5966
Deadline is Friday,
February 10th at
1:00pm.
' Nf ) (f if (






YOI oF\Ol ld first

Need a job
or a
qualified
employee?


This area's
#1
employment
source!


Tonneau Cover
'09, Trifecta, 70"W 81"L
Like new, fits Super Cab
Cost $425
Asking $200
(352) 628-2690
UP RIGHT FREEZER 21
cubic inch Kenmore. Still
under warranty. do not
need. Excellent condition.
352-503-2226 $300.00



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
Paid for Junk Vehicles,
J.W. 352-228-9645
$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL OF
Scrap Medal, Mowers
Appliances and MORE
Call (352) 224-0698



10 month old Cats
Variety of Colors
Need good Homes
(352) 341-2219
Cat Himalyan female,
indoor ,declawed,
spayed.
Dog Muti Poo Male,
nuet. house trained
Rabbit lions head, male
(352) 249-7451
fertilizer horse manure
mixed with pine shavings.
great for gardens. U load
and haul away
352-628-9624
FREE 4YR CALICO CAT
shots,declawed,microchip,s
payed
indoor adults only pet
352-382-0069
Guinea pigs (3)
w/cage free to good
home(352) 249-7145
KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Savage Pays top $$$.
352-628-4144
Kittens
5 to good home
(352) 400-6100
MOVING OR DE-
CLUTTERING? Dona-
tions of good condition
temsIurniture,applianceselectron
cs,babystuff
olsdots,d ishes,tys,pet
items,etc. needed for
our church yardsale in
March. We'll pick up. Tax
deductible receipt
provided.Call
352-621-0175 8am- 7pm
Thank you.
Pine Straw
You load and Haul
(352) 726-1633



FRESH JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct.( $5 per lb
Stone Crab@ $6 per lb
delivered 727-771-7500



Grey female cat
dropped belly on
Seymeria Dr. in Beverly
Hills, name Muffin,
greatly missed by her
bother of 0lyrs.;
(352) 746-1905
Pit Bull
Fawn female
1 y.o. about 50 Ibs,
Citronelle/Citrus Springs
area.(352) 422-1038


You've Got It!




Somebody





Wants




It!


(352) 563-5966

www.chronicleonline.com
640980A


CLASSIFIED


C CITRUS COUNTY




H ONICLE

www.chronicleonline.com


BUSINESS HOURS:

MONDAY-FRIDAY
8:00 A.M. 5:00 P.M.

CLOSED SATURDAY/SUNDAY



WE GLADLY ACCEPT


AIRPORT RIDES
(352) 746-2929J

Huge discounts when
you buy 2 types of
advertising! 122
weekly newspapers,
32 websites, 25 daily
newspapers. Call
now to diversify your
advertising with Ad-
vertising Networks of
Florida
(866)742-1373 www.
florida-classifieds.com

RED GREEN LIVE
Experience this hilarious
one-man show.
April 5 Tampa Theatre
800-745-3000.
April 7, News-Journal
Centre, Davidson
Theatre, Daytona State
College. 800-595-4849
www.redgreen.com




FRESH JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct.@ $5 per lb








Christian Preschool
(352) 795-2360




Clerk Typist
Announcement
#12-11
Full-time position
performing routine
clerical work in
Must be willing to
handle animals.
Must be familiar
with Microsoft Office
Suite of Products.
Must possess a
current valid Florida
Driver license.
$8.45 hourly.




website at
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us
of the
local Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461
to apply online by
Friday, February 10,
2012 EOE/ADA




HAIR STYLIST
FT/PT Immediate
Openings, Call Sue
352-628-0630


Tell that special
person
"Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





LPN

The Centers is seeking
full-time LPN for Citrus
County Med Clinic in
Lecanto, FL. Provides
quality client care in
accordance with
acceptable nursing
practice and focuses
on reducing or mini-
mizing the effects of
substance abuse &
mental illness.
$17.00/hr Full benefits
pkg DFWP/EOE/We
E-Verify. Fax or e-mail
resume to HR,
the Centers, Inc.,
(352) 291-5580,
iobs@thecenters.us
For more info visit
www. thecenters. us

3-11 RN
SUPERVISOR
FULLTIME
Seeking a dynamic
experienced RN
Leader to
join a progressive
customer service
oriented team.
Candidate will have
a stable work history,
excellent clinical and
management abili-
ties, great organiza-
tional skills and
effective delegation
and monitoring of
clinical systems.
New Wage Scale
Apply in person at:
ARBOR TRAIL REHAB
611 Turner Camp Rd,
Inverness, FL
Send Resume to:
atdon@
SouthernLTC.com
An EEO/AA Employer
M/F/V/D

EXP. ACCOUNTS
RECEIVABLE
REPRESENTATIVE
Must have knowl-
edge w/medicare &
third party billing &
collections.
Exp with ECW is a +
Excel Pay & Benefits,
NON smoking
Environment
Send Resume to
Citrus County
Chronicle
Blind Box #1713P
106 W. Main St
Inverness, FL 34450
Applicants w/exp.
only need to apply


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2012 D5


Classifieds


Classifieds In Print and Online All The Time!


Publication Days/Deadlines

Chronicle / Daily.................................... 1 PM, Daily
Homefront / Sunday...............................3 PM, Friday
Chronicle / Sunday.............................4...4 PM, Friday
Chronicle / Monday............................4...4 PM, Friday
Sumter County Times / Thursday.............11 AM, Tuesday
Riverland News / Thursday.....................2 PM, Monday
South Marion Citizen / Friday..................4 PM, Tuesday
West Marion Messenger / Wednesday.......4 PM, Friday


NOW HIRING

RN'S
All Units, with Hospital
Experience
Apply on Line: www.
nurse-temps.com
(352) 344-9828

P/T Front Office
in Crystal River. Exp'd
w/verifying patient
insurance eligibility
by internet/phone;
schedule patient
appts; handling busy
phone lines,
check-in/check out
desk; filing charts. If
you're a team player
w/a positive attitude
& enjoy working in a
busy medical office
email your resume to:
medof-
ficehrdeDt@tamDabavg

Receptionist/CNA
P/T, For MD Office
Send Resume to:
Citrus Co. Chronicle
Blind Box 1755 M
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River
Florida, 34429

Therapist
The Centers is seeking
Outpatient Licensed
or Masters Level
Therapist for positions
in Citrus County.
Must have a min
1 yr exp working with
adults, children &
adolescents provid-
ing individual, group
& family therapy.
Full benefits pkg
DFWP/EOE/We
E-Verify. Fax or e-mail
resume to HR, the
Centers, Inc.,
(352) 291-5580
iobs@thecenters.us
For more info visit
www. thecenters. us


(ONNE(TIGTHE^ RIGHT

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[O^rA ljl:[l j l1^ 1 1r]l j1 11 I Il i -l T' ^






Anoneet]l DomestdicIeiaoq l Me
^^^^* ^^^^^ *^^^ ^^


Saint Leo University is
one of the largest and
most innovative
Catholic universities
in the United States.
A leading provider of
the higher education
to the military and a
leader in the online
education, Saint Leo
enrolls more than
15,000 students at the
traditional University
campus (main cam-
pus), though the
Center for the Online
Learning, and at 17
regional centers in
seven states.
Saint Leo University is
creating a pool of
potential adjunct
instructors to teach
Accounting courses
at our Ocala Center
location in Ocala,
FLorida. Appoint-
ments are for
immediate and
upcoming terms. A
Master's degree in
Accounting or a
closely related field is
the minimum require-
ment. The degree
must be from a region
ally accredited institu
tion. Also, candidate
must have eighteen
graduate credit hours
in Accounting or a
closely related field.
For additional infor-
mation & application
instructions, please
visit: www.
saintleo.edu/iobs
Saint Leo University is
an equal opportunity
employer.
Catholics, women
and minorities are
encouraged to apply.


Y uI '.' ,. ld list.

L iiJMU


How

To Make

Your

Car

Disappear...

Simply advertise
in the Classifieds
and get results
quickly!


#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)

CNA/HHA's
Apply At
HOME INSTEAD
SENIOR CARE
4224 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Lecanto

EXP. MEDICAL
BILLER
Must also be Exp.
with Medicare.
Call 855-285-1025

FRONT OFFICE
Med Experience
preferred
Call (352) 522-0094
Fax Resume 489-9400

NEEDED
Experienced,
Caring &
Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885

OTR/COTA
PART-TIME/PRN
PERMANENT WK/ENDS
Busy skilled nursing
rehab. Fantastic
working environment!
Excellent hrly. wages
DIAMOND RIDGE
HEALTH & REHAB CTR.
Contact:
Bethel Snyder @
(352)746-9500, ex 740
2730 W. Marc
Knighton Ct.
Lecanto, Fl. 34461


For more information on how to reach C ITRUo OU\TIiYE
Citrus County readers call
352-563-5592. www.chronicleonline.com
Scarborugh 2010


Saint Leo University is
one of the largest and
most innovative
Catholic universities
in the United States.
A leading provider of
the higher education
to the military and a
leader in the online
education, Saint Leo
enrolls more than
15,000 students at the
traditional University
campus (main cam-
pus), though the
Center for the Online
Learning, and at 17
regional centers in
seven states.
Saint Leo University is
creating a pool of
potential adjunct
instructors to teach
English for Speakers
of Other Languages
(ESOL) at the Ocala
Center location in
Ocala Florida.
Appointments are for
the immediate and
upcoming terms. A
Master's degree in
ESOL, TESOL, Foreign
Language Education
or a closely
related field is the
minimum require-
ment. The degree
must be from a
regionally accred-
ited institution.
Also, candidates
must have eighteen
graduate credit hours
in ESOL or closely
related field.
For additional infor-
mation & application
instructions, please
visit: www.
saintleo.edu/iobs
Saint Leo University is
an equal opportunity
employer.
Catholics, women
and minorities are
encouraged to
apply.


s~Iho


(352) 563-5966

.chronicleonline.com
www.chronicleonline.com


SENIOR ACCOUNTANT II
THE CITRUS COUNTY SHERIFF'S OFFICE IS
ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR A FULL TIME
SENIOR ACCOUNTANT II.
Regular, full time position working Monday through Friday Under the
general direction of the Assistant Finance Director, this position
performs a variety of tasks in directing, and supervising the staff and
activities of the fiscal services division of the Sheriff's Office Duties
include performing a variety of complex tasks involving supervision of
payroll and accounts payable functions, review of purchase orders
and other expenditure items, assisting with developing, and
monitoring of the sheriff's office personnel and operating budget,
supervising and reviewing accounting staff work, forecasting fiscal
availabilities, providing management analysis and technical
assistance to various divisions within the sheriff's office, monitoring
grants and contracts for fiscal compliance and billing, and heavily
involved in year-end audit
REQUIREMENTS: Must be a United States Citizen or resident alien
Must be a high school graduate or its equivalent Bachelor's degree or
education and training equivalent to four years of college education in
business administration, accounting, finance, or a closely related field
preferred Three years work experience in governmental accounting
administration or closely related field Supervisory experience
preferred Complete familiarity and skill in the use of Microsoft Office
programs including Excel spreadsheets, Power Point, and other
software programs used in modern accounting practices Knowledge
of public sector budgetary development principles and practices
Must not have any felony convictions
Must not have any misdemeanor convictions involving perjury or false
statements Must successfully complete a background investigation
including drug testing
Human Resource Division
Citrus County Sheriff's Office
1 Dr Martin Luther King Jr Ave, Inverness, Fl 34450
(352) 341-7429
On-line employment applications are available at
www shenriffcitrus org
OOOAHRM Equal Opportunity Employer MF/DN


m







D6 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2012


Eagle Buick GMC, Inc
is in need of
experienced
automotive service
consultants/advisors.
One of the best deal-
ership pay plans in
the county. Minimum
2 yrs experience
preferred. Great
opportunity for one to
find a career path,
and earn a great
living. Very produc-
tive repair facility and
a professional
environment with
plenty of growth po-
tential in a growing
community. Benefits.
Drug Free Workplace.
Application Available
@ Eagle Buick GMC
Inc
Send Resume:
Fax (352)417-0944
Email
robbcole@eagle
buickgmc.com

n iop of the Wa.d.


JOB FAIR
February 8th
10AM 2PM
CHANDLER HILLS
COMMUNITY CENTER
8143 SW 90th Terr. Rd.
POSITIONS INCLUDE:
CABLE INSTALLATION
TECHNICIAN
ASSISTANT PROPERTY
MANAGER
WAIT STAFF &
BARTENDERS
COOKS
TICKET AGENT

GROUNDS
MAINTENANCE
LICENSED SPRAY
TECHNICIAN .

Come find
your place
in the World!
DFWP/EOE


Y 01t1lI ,' < l.1 l1ll t.
L Lj Dij,


Classifieds


AUTO TECHNICIAN
Exp'd tech needed with
ability to R & R transmis-
sions and good diagnos-
tic skills. Must have tools
and driver's license. Call
489-5580 or e-mail
cjstransmis-
siont@Bellsouth.net

Drivers Wanted:
Class A- CDL
w/hazmat. Company &
0/0's Lots of Freight to
move!! CAll
877-893-9645


Exp. Granite
Frabricator

Need valid Dri. Lic.
and dependable
vehicle. Heavy lifting
and polishing req., FT
Apply in Person at
Deem Cabinets
6843 N. Citrus Ave.
Crystal River






Field Librarian
Announcement
# 12-10

Advanced clerical
work in Coastal
Region Library. Coor-
dinates volunteers
and community
service workers.
Must be able to bend
and stoop and lift
approximately 20
pounds. Must be
available to work
some evenings and
Saturday at various
branch locations
when needed. Start-
ing pay $10.77 hourly.
Excellent benefits.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE:
Visit our website at
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also
visit one of the
local Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 West Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, Fl. 34461
to apply online by
Friday, February 10,
2012 EOE/ADA.


*CALL NOW*
Looking to fill
immediate
positions in the
CUSTOMER
RELATIONS
DEPARTMENT.
Training, 401(k),
Medical. No Exp.
Necessary. call
Michelle
352-436-4460

$300 is a bad
day! Fortune 500
Company.
Security equip. dist.
Several positions
avail. entry-level to
mgmt. Great pay /
full benefits. We train.
Advancement
oppy's. Co. trans.
avail. H.S. Diploma or
GED req'd.
No Felonies.
352-597-2227

Join Our Team

Opening for a
Part time Laundry/
Housekeeping
specialist Days and

in Person.
Rehabilitation Cntr
701 Medical Ct. E.
Inverness
(352) 860-0200
EOE/DFW

Program Assistant
Announcement
# 12-09
Responsible for
determining eligibility
for energy and/or
housing assistance
under federal, state
and local programs.
Must successfully pass
a level II background
$10.77 hourly.
Excellent benefits.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE:
Visit our website at
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also
visit one f the
local Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 West Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, Fl. 34461
to apply online by
Friday, February 10,
2012 EOE/ADA.


OUTSIDE CART
ATTEND
Must be flexible, some
golf knowledge req.
Apply in Person at
Southern Woods
Golf Club 1501
Corkwood Blvd
Homosassa

P/T Front & Snack
Counter Help
Nights &
weekends.Experience
a plus.Smlllng faces
a must!
Apply in Person.
MANATEE LANES
Crystal River DFWP

VOLUNTEER
SECRETARY
For the Blind
American
Hernando call
(352) 637-1739




#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)
Heat & Air JOBS -
Ready to work? 3 week
accelerated program.
Hands on environment.
Nationwide certifica-
tions and Local Job
Placement Assistance!
(877) 741-9260




#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)

ALLIED HEALTH
Career training
-Attend college 100%
online. Job place-
ment assistance.
Computer available.
Financial Aid if quali-
fied. SCHEV certified.
Call (800)481-9409
www.Centura
Online.comrn


CLASSIFIED






TAYLTOOLLEGE





2 Week Courses!
*NURSING ASST. $475.
*PHLEBOTOMY $475.
*EKG $475.
*ALF ADMINISTRATOR
$300.
tavlorcolleae.edu
(352) 245-4119

NOW
---o -- E


ENROLLING
For January
2012 Classes
BARBER
COSMETOLOGY
FACIAL
FULL SPECIAL LTY

MANICURE/NAIL EXT.
MASSAGE THERAPY

BENE'S
International
School of Beauty I
New Port Richey/
Spring Hill
727-848-8415
352-263-2744
Li =11mill




8 MOBILE HOMES
12 AC., Good Income
Lots of Possibilities
(352) 212-6182




$$$ ACCESS
LAWSUIT
CASH NOW!! $$$
As seen on TV. Injury
Lawsuit Dragging?
Need $500-$500,000++
within 48/hours? Low
rates APPLY NOW BY
PHONE! Call Today!
Toll-Free: (800)568-8321
www.lawcapital.com



6 Alice & Wonderland
Collector Plates,
have org. boxes & cer-
tificates $25. 726-1059


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


AVON
Avon bottles most full
with boxes 2.00 and up
352 726 9708
SOURING BALAD
EAGLE/NEW Was
59.95/selling for 20.00.
Linda 341-4449










k

Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





2 Stackable
Commercial Gas
Dryers, $300 for both
352-476-4964
2 yr Old GE Washer
Org. $500
Asking $250 Like New
Kenmore Dryer, elec.
good cond $50.
352-382-4612

A/C + HEAT PUMP
SYSTEMS
Starting at $880
13-18 Seer
Installation w/permit
REBATES u to $2.500
362-746-4394
Lic.&lns. CAC 057914

AIR PURIFIER
Duracraft Hepa 260 Air
Purifier and 2 new filters.
$50
Phone: (352) 344 2558
Great Buy!!!
GE PROFILE
*30" glass top range
w/convention oven.
*Kitchen-Aid
(under the counter)
Dishwasher w/Stainless
steel tub.
2 Cherry counter
chairs, $300 takes all.
(352) 628-0508


7.2 cu ft. excel. cond.
$75
Dish Washer,
bisque, excel cond.
$75. (352) 795-6151
Drop in Counter white
gas stove like new $85
(352) 527-0460
MICROWAVE HOOD
COMBO by Whirlpool.
White with sensor cook-
ing. Great condition! $75.
352-634-4906.
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR, washers
dryers,FREE pick up
352-564-8179
WANTED DEAD
OR ALIVE
Washers & Dryers
Working or not.
(352) 209-5135
WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 Each. Reliable,
like new, excellent condi-
tion. Can deliver
352 263-7398



(4) DESK CHAIRS Com-
mercial PreOwned Dark
Gray Fabric $25 each
727-463-4411
2 DRAWER LATERAL
FILE CABINET New in
Box with Keys Commer-
cial Metal Graphite Color
$75 727-463-4411
DESK CHAIRS (4)
PreOwned Commercial
Fabric Covered $10 each
727-463-4411



2 AUCTIONS
STHURS. FEB. 2
OUTSIDE AUCTION
3PM Auction. Bowling
lawn tractor, furn., tools,
concrete yard art,
recllners. Row after
Row of Treasuresl!
SUN. FEB. 5
Antlaue & Collectible
Prev: Oam Auction: 1 pm
1971 Comet, Baldwin
Parlor Player Grand,
Weber Rol Player Parlor
Grand, collection of
clocks, art, antique
glass, estate jewelry,
Fararl collect., Antique
furn. from Oak to Mid
Century. Watch the
webslte. Worth the trip!
DudleysAuctlon.com
4000 S. Fla. Ave.
(US41-S) Inverness
(352) 637-9588
AB1667-AU2246
12% BP-2% ca.disc


Craftsman Drill Press,
12 speed, $100
(352) 344-2161



DVD AM FM STEREO
HOME THEATER
SYSTEM 6 Speakers
Subwoofer remote $50.
352-527-0324
SURROUND RECEIVER
AND SPEAKERS Tech-
nics dolby surround re-
ceiver with four bose
speakers 250.00
352-726-9964



DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469



Patio Set
Glass top table
6 chairs with cushions
$125
(352) 527-2729




PreOwned Commercial
Metal Frame with Arms
Fabric Covered Both for
$35 727-463-4411
*FRAMED DECOR
39X39 WIDE GOLD
FRAME W/GLASS
REDS/GOLDS/FLWS
$50 634-2004
5-piece dinette set.
Oak table and 4
arrowback chairs.
Table has inverted leaf
and is 42 inches by 58
inches with leaf in
place, 42 inches round
without. Top has pretty
tile inlay. Chairs have
dual cross supports for
extra sturdiness. Seat
cushions included.
$225 obo. Two large
table lamps. $15 ea.
Will e-mail photos.
352-746-1644.










ww.chronicleonline.com


m
*TWIN HEADBOARDS
UPSCALE SCROLL
METAL BEIGE W/
CREAM ANTIQUING
$100EA 634-2004
2 Solid Oak Dressers
9 drawer w/mirror and
a 6 drawer w/ 2 shelf
(352) 601-0826
Beautiful 42 x 6ft Glass
Table with 6 chairs $250
6ft China Cabinet,
dark wood & Glass $75.
(352) 419-7447
Black Couch/Recliner
& Love Seat,
$300
47" Polarized TV
$100.
(352) 302-3383
Black Leather Recliner
good cond $45. Navy
cranberry plaid Q sz
sofa bed $85. non
smokers/pets.
(740) 815-2826







CHROME CRAFT
DINETTE SET 6 chairs,
pedestal table (78 x 42
$450 352 527-2760
COMPUTER DESK
Fair condition/20.00
Linda 341-4449
COMPUTER DESK light
wood has top shelf great
condition asking 75.00
call 352-897-4678
COUCH Floral
couch,great condition,in
Citrus Springs,must pick
up,$40. (352)792-7610
Cream color leather
Love Seat $100. &
Cream color leather
Recliner $75. like new
cond, changing decor.
(352) 726-3707
Dinning Rm. Set, with
Hutch and 6 Chairs
$300.
Murphy Bed $200
(352) 249-7866
(352) 220-0135
Entertainment Center
Broyhill dark wood,
holds 37" flat screen
component cabinet
$200(352) 560-3519
FOLDING BANQUET
TABLES
(2) 6 Foot Wood Grain
Top PreOwned $35 each
727-463-4411


b&Iw~ vie Das r


ALL EXTERIOR
ALUMINUM
6" Seamless Gutters
Lic & ins 352-621-0881
SUBURBAN IND. INC.
Screen rms, Rescreens,
Siding, airports, rf.overs
wood decks, Fla. rooms
windows, garage scrns.
628-0562 (CBC1257141)



SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Washer &
Dryers, Free Pick Up
352-564-8179
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Washer &
Dryers, Free Pick Up
352-564-8179



Vertical Blind Factory
We custom make all
types. Best prices any-
where! Hwy 44 & CR
491. (352) 746-1998



Affordable Mobile
mechanical, electrical
fiberglass, OB/IO/IB.
WE BUY BOATS
711 NE 6thAv. Cry Riv
352-795-5455

v THIS OUT!
PHIL'S MOBILE MARINE
Repairs & Consignment
30 yrs Cert. Best Prices
& Guar 352-220-9435

3 suaCo2 th'T

Loving Adult Care
Home (SL 6906450)
Alzheimer/Dementia
No problem. Nursing
homes do not need to
be your only alternative
352-503-7052


ROGERS Construction
All Construction
sm jobs Free Est (352)
637-4373 CRC1326872




SHADY VIEW CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
Repairs. 352 613-2518




Clean Ups &
Clean Outs
(352) 220-9190



DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
NATURE COAST
COMPUTERS,
Free in home inspec-
tions, (352) 212-1551



Bianchi Concrete
inc.com lic/ins
Driveways-Patios-
Sidewalks.352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL/ Lic
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River rock
reseals & repairs. 352
364-2120/410-7383
FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, staining &
Garage Firs. Recession
Prices! 352-527-1097
ROB'S MASONRY
& CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs Tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554



COUNTYWIDE DRY-
WALL 25 years exp.
For all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Lic/ins. 352-302-6838
Make Walls & Ceilings
Look Brand New!
Custom textures & paint
* Ask about Popcorn
Removal (352)812-3388


#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Plasma TV installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
ANNIE'S ELECTRIC
Husband & Wife
Team.(352) 341-5952
EC-13002696
BRIGHT ELECTRICAL
Res./Comm. Lic & Ins.
$50.hr. EC0001303
352-302-2366
CREATION ELECTRIC.
Full service electrical
contractor. Residential
& Commercial. Service
changes, large & small
repairs, spa hookups &
more. Lic I Ins. Call
352-427-4216
DUN-RITE Elect
Elec/Serv/Repairs
New const. Remodel
Free Est 726-2907
EC13002699 Serving
Citrus Co. Since 1978
Thomas Electric LLC
Generator main &
repair Guardian
Homestandby, &
Centurion. Cert. Tech.
Briggs Stratton 352-
621-1248 #ER00015377




A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002

BOB BROWN'S
Fence & Landscaping
352-795-0188/220-3194
ROCKY'S FENCING
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
* 352 422-7279 k




DRY OAK FIREWOOD
Split, 4 X 8 Stack $80
Delivered & Stacked.
352-344-2696



ALL EXTERIOR
ALUMINUM
6" Seamless Gutters
Lic & Ins 352-621-0881
ALUMINUM
STRUCTURES
5" & 6" Seamless Gutters
Free Estimates, Lic &
Ins. (352) 563-2977


1 CALL & RELAX! 25 vrs
exp in home repairs &
remodel WE DO IT ALL!
Lic. 37658. & Ins. Steve
& Scott 352-476-2285
#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Plasma TV installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
Andrew Joehl
Handyman.
Gen/Maint/Repairs
Pressure cleaning.
Lawns/Gutters. No job
too small!Reli able ,ins.
0256271 352-465-9201
A HANDYMAN
If Its Broke, Jerry Can
Fix If. Housecleaning
also. 352-201-0116 Lic.
ABC Painting &
Handyman.
Low. Low Rates
30 yrs exp. lic/ins Dale
352-586-8129
Affordable Handyman
I FAST
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handyman
V FAST
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handyman
I FAST
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handyman
a FAST
AFFORDABLE
e RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
.100% Guar. -Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *
EXP'D HANDYMAN
All phases of home
repairs. Exc. work
Honest, reliable,
goodprices.Pres/was
paint Ins/Li c860-0085






Handyman Dave
Pressure Clean, Paint &
Repairs, oddjobs &
hauling (352) 726-9570


HOME CARE
Lawn & Handyman
Services. Sprinkler
Repair 352-212-4935
Remodeling, Additions,
Doors, Windows, Tile
work. Lic.#CRC1330081
Free Est. (352)949-2292





V THIS OUT!
AC & HEAT PUMPS
FREE Estimate & 2nd
Opinion, 10 yr. warr.
on ALL Parts, Great
prices, ALL the time.
352 400-4945
Lic #CAC027361




Citrus Cleaning
Team. top quality
work & great
rates. 302-3348
(352) 527-2279
MAID TO ORDER
House Cleaning *
(352) 586-9125
Have Vacum Will Travel




The Tile Man
Bathroom remodel
Specializing in
handicap. Lic/Ins.
#2441. 352-634-1584



#1 BOBCAT FOR HIRE
Light land clearing, site
work, grading, hauling.
NO JOB TOO SMALL!!!
Lic. & Ins. 352-400-0528
All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955





CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, curbing,
flocrete. River rock
reseals & repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120


Florida Sitescapes, LLC
FREE est: Yard Clean Up
Mowing, and MORE
Call 352.201.7374
YARD CLEAN UP
Flowers, Bushes, Mulch
Rock & MORE! Call for
Your Yard Make Over
Lic/Ins (352) 344-8672



Florida Sitescapes, LLC
FREE est: Yard Clean Up
Mowing, and MORE
Call 352.201.7374
GOT LEAVES
Let our DR Vac
Do the work
Call 502-6588
HOME CARE
Lawn & Handyman
Services. Sprinkler
Repair 352-212-4935
JUSTIN LAWN CARE
Fast and Affordable.
and Friendly, Licensed.
(352) 476-3985
LAWN CARE 'N" More
Fall Clean up, bed,
bushes, haul since 1991
(352) 726-9570
Leaves, TRIM, MULCH
Hauling FALL Clean
since '91 352 220-6761




Mower, Parts Service &
Repair.Visit our store@
1332 SE Hwy 19








ALL OF CITRUS
CLEAN UPS CLEAN OUTS
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790
A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,




FREE ESTIMATES
scrap metals, haul for
FREE (352) 344-9273,




Chris Satchell Paintng
ASAP
30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-464-1397


CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lie. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
A- George Swedlige
Painting/press cleaning
Int/Ext. texture/drywall
repair (352) 794-0400
ABC Painting & Handy
man Low. Low Rates
30 yrs exp lic/ins
Dale 352-586-8129
CheapCheapCheap
DP painting/press.clean
Many, many refs. 20 yrs
in Inverness 637-3765








Handyman Dave
Pressure Clean, Paint &
Repairs, odd jobs &
hauling (352) 726-9570
INTERIORIEXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998



Tim Herndon Plumbing
$10. off w/this ad
10 yrs serving Citrus Co
lic/insCFC 1428395
(352) 201-8237



CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
ABC Painting &
Handyman.
Low. Low Rates
30 yrs exp lic/ins Dale
352-586-8129








Handyman Dave
Pressure Clean, Paint &
Repairs, odd jobs &
hauling (352) 726-9570
Pic PICARD'S Pressure
352-341-3300


Remodeling, kitchens
baths, ceramic tile &
tops. Decks, Garages
Handyman Services 40
Yrs Exp. crc058140
344-3536; 563-9768




Attention Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers are
required by state law
to include their state
license number in all
advertisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious that
you may be contact-
ing an unlicensed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For questions
about business
licensing, please call
your city or county gov-
ernment offices.




HOME CARE
Lawn & Handyman
Services. Sprinkler
Repair 352-212-4935


A Cutting Edge
Tile Jobs Showers
Firs .Safety Bars. ETC
352-422-2019
Lic. #2713, Insured.




A TREE SURGEON
Lie. & Ins. Lowest Rates
Free est.(352)860-1452
All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
DOUBLE J Tree Serv.
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
KING's Land Clearing &
Tree Serv. complete
tree & stump removal
hauling, demo& tractor
work 32 yrs. exp.
(352) 220-9819
R WRIGHT Tree Service
Tree removal & trimming.
Ins. & Lic.# 0256879
352-341-6827
RIVENBARK
LAWN & LANDSCAPE.
15% off Tree Trimming
in Feb. (352) 464-3566
RON ROBBINS Tree Serv
Trim, Shape & Remove
Lic/Ins Free Est.
352-628-2825




344-2556, Richard
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


Installations by Brian ci-sss2
PermitAnd "
Engineering Fees
i RE *Up to $200 value





-Siding* Soffit.-Fascia;*Skirting.*Roofovers.*Carports
-Screen Rooms-*Decks-Windows.-Doors.*Additions
352-620-7519
www.Advancedaluminumofcitrus.com


* CANY T

* 1 Day Cabinets Laminates
* Remodeling Supplies Woods
* Refacing Supplies Glues
* Hinges Saw Sharpening
Cabinet Supplies & Hardware

"M |MIR| C bifumu

3835 S. Pittsburgh Ave., Homosassa, FL
00OA7ZV 352-628-9760



REMODELI


BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Day,
We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over"Your Old One!!!
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!
Call now for a FREE
In-Home Estimate

1-866-585-8827
BATHFITTER.COM
000AECJ


Illll sl L iI
U. 1, Hmoaa62-91


Ron's Affordable

Handyman Services
.'" *All Home
. Repairs
S. Small Carpentry
Fencing
Screening
*Clean Dryer
Vents
Affordole' & Dependable
S Expenence lifelong
352 344-0905
cell: 400-1722


" Furniture Refinishing
Entryway Refinishing
STool/Knife Sharpening
Pressure Washing
Lawn/Property Maintenance

Classical Custom
Services, Inc.
Mark McClendon

352-613-7934
Over 20 Years Experience Licensed& Insured


--- ---


AAA ROOFING
Call the 4eak6uste
Free Written Estimate

:$100 OFF:
Any Re-Roof
Must present coupon at time contract is signed
I i7 /In 5 CCCsI7ci7 0AGKI^


iJ


*. .


'llRepaint


'] Inlenor & E tenor
P/', ,.... 1 li -,h, ,

FREE ESTIMATES -

352-465-6631




P 00 Lawn Mowers
Trimmers
S k Chain Saws
'4\ 1 '- Blowers
SPrpvesi.ir Washers



FREE ESTIMATES


IAYLOR RENTAL
OPEN 7 DAYS 795-5600
8081 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Crystal River


SDiamond Brite
- ?-* Florida Gem
Marcite Decks |
Pavers ,
FREE *Tile
ESTIMATES ^"-_-_'-

GREG'S COMPLETE
GREG'S REMODEL

MARCITE, INC.
.I..NSED 352-746-5200

E& INSURED


COPES POOL
AND PAVER LLC
YOUR INTERLOCKING BRICK PAVER SPECIALIST
Build your new pool now and
be ready for next summer!
Refinish your pool during the cooler months.

352-400-3188


F


I L-







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FURNITURE
sofa,rediner,tabb&chairs,bbq
grill,excer bike
ect.100.00 for all
352-533-8230
Futon
Black $50. glass top
table 4 chairs $100.
Black entertainment
center $50.
(352) 795-7254
Glass & Chrome Din.
Rm. Set, 6 Chairs $500
2 Dressers, $100 both
3 Pc. Enter. Unit $100.
& Misc. Peices 795-6212
LARGE Butcher Block
Kitchen Island w/ draw-
ers, shevels etc. nice
piece for the kitchen
$75(352) 302-5468
LOVESEAT
Brown/Beige Velour
fabric Clean & Comfort-
able NICE! $50.
352-621-0175
MOVING SALE
(3) Queen Anne Tables
brass lamps, 3 pcs
Entertainment Center
(352) 382-4404
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
352-628-0808
Rattan sofa, chair and
ottoman, excellent
condition $300(352)
795-7325
SECTIONAL SOFA
Sugarmill Woods.Three
pieces. Brown tweed fab-
ric. Clean, Great condi-
tion. Non smoking home
with no pets. $200.
Phone:352-634-1696
STACKABLE CHAIRS 4
with Metal Framed Arms
Fabric Covered Your
Choice of Color $10 each
727463-4411
Table and chairs.


$100.
Light Colored Wood
Table w/ 4 chairs
$100.

TV CONSOLE
cherry 80" tall, 42" w
perfect for small
spaces, room for 4 or
more components, plus
storage & glass
display shelf's $250.
(352) 341-6991
TWIN BED
Extra long wood HB &
frame, sealy
posturpedic mattress
$150.(352) 628-2346
Twin Beds
with Headboards and
Bedding Like New
$200.
(352) 270-8256
Two Love Seats,
Leather, Light Tan
Good Condition
$58. ea
(352) 795-9203








FARM SOLD Clearing
plants & statuary,
1000 s of plants, OPEN
Sat/ Sun or call for
appt.(352) 465-0649
5019W StargazerCitrus
Co. Dunnellon
GOD-A-CART, TFC150
6 CUFT. FOLDS FLAT.
EXCEL CON $75
727.857.6583
LAWN EDGER
Troy built,lawn edger
4cyl $70.00
352 726 9708



5' HOLLY TREES very
nice for the price $50.
352-257-3850




Barn Doors
8'x7' $45.
Electric Kiln
$45. 32"x32"
(352) 628-5606
CITRUS SPRINGS
Estate Sale, Starting
FEB. 2, for a week.
7591 N. Primrose Drive


MOVIE MG
SALE

INVERNESS
Sat Sun 8a-4p
some furniture, Big
screen TV, hsehld
1028 N. Charles Av
off Croft




MEANS CLOTHING
JEANS, PANTS,
SHORTS @ SHIRTS 14
PIECES GOOD CONDI-
TION $25 352-613-0529
USMC LEATHER MO-
TORCYCLE JACKETS
2X,3X Embroidered
$25.00 each Cookie
(352) 634-2737



5 MONTH OLD PIG good
with other animals about
30 Ibs $30 352-464-4280
5,550 W Generator
Brigg & Straton,
w/ 11.5 HP Subaru
Engine, Like New
$400.
(352) 302-6069
15" Saddle Western
Military style (1880's)
brand new $300.
Man's Fuji Mountain
Bike $200.
(352) 433-9843
BOAT SEATS Bass boat
butt seats very good
shape 25.00 for both
352 726 9708
CAGE 4 Teir critter cage
on wheels 60.00 NICE
call 637-6967 leave mes-


sage if no answer
CAGES Lg Iron bird cage
on wheels w/playtop
100.00 Call
352-637-6967 leave
message if no answer
CALICO Cat
4YR.FEMALE,indoor,only
pet,spayed,dedawed,microchip,,
shfriendly
352-382-0069
CAT FURNITURE cat
tree,cat condo,pet
carrier,litter box,dishes
some free,others, $100 &
under 352-382-0069
CHANDELIER 5 LIGHT.
UMBER GLASS.
BRONZE METAL.
EXCEL CON. $99
727.857.6583
CLOTHING MEANS
JEANS, PANTS,
SHORTS @ SHIRTS 14
PIECES GOOD CONDI-
TION $25 352-613-0529


=-
NAH MONTANA FULL
SIZE INCLUDES SHEET
SET $45 352-613-0529
GARAGE DOOR
OPENER Garage door
opener works good
50.00 352 726 9708
GE UPRIGHT FREEZER
14 cu.ft,
Day Bed w/trundle bed
& covers........Inverness
(352) 601-0826
GLASS TOP TABLE
mitered corners, or-
nate brass base $75.
Zenith Combo, AM/FM
Tape, 8 track, recorder
clear case $50.
Collectible 637-7248
GPS MAGELLAN
ROADMATE 1440 excel-
lent condition-$50
352-382-0220
HITCH FOR 2000 FORD
TAURUS. $30.
352-566-6646
HI-TEC MAGNUM SWAT
BOOTS Men's size 11.5,
excellent condition. $40.
Hernando 864-283-5797
HP OFFICEJET ALL IN
ONE PRINTER/FAX
J5780 Works Like New
$70.(cost $549. new)
352-621-0175
MEN'S WENGER
WATCH Military/hunting,
leather band. worn 3-4
times. $65 352-860-2475
Old wooden mahog-
any canoe, 17FT long,
perfect cond. $1,250 or
trade for sm. 4-cyl.
truck of equal value.
(352) 303-0928
Refrigerator RCA
21.7 cu. ft almond
side/side, no frost w/ice
maker $145. Treadmill
good cond $75. firm
(518) 314-7130
SHARPER IMAGE
SUPERWAVE OVEN
Tabletop,electric
oven.Cooks faster.$65.00
352-344-3472
STORAGE RACK
HEAVY DUTY, STEEL, 4
SHELF 77"W X 24"D X
78"H EXCEL CON. $90
727.858.0529
TRAILER HITCH receiver
hitch for Buick Rendez-
vous 2001 to 2005 Pon-
tiac Aztec 2001 to2005
75.00 352- 726 -9708
8 am to 5 pm
TRAVEL PRO 26" LUG-
GAGE Excellent-hunter
green-$150 new-$20
352-382-0220
WENGER TENT LIKE
NEW $40 CAN E-MAIL

INVERNESS
WOMEN LEATHER
COAT Like new black
Med. zip up 60.00 call
637-6967 leave message
if no answer



Electric Lift Recliner
lifts to standing position
rose color $200
(352) 628-2346
GO-GO Pride
$400. Space Saver Jr.
$400. Shoprider $150 all
w/chargers
(352) 489-3264
LIFT CHAIR
Turquoise
exc. condition
used very little
$300(352) 746-2665
Pride Lift Chair
design for larger per-
son, exc cond. navy
blue $450. Shower chair
$25. (352) 621-3342



BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We Also
Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676










"NEW" LAP STEEL
W/GIGBAG & FREE
AMP! VERY NICE &
EASY TO LEARN! ONLY
$100 352-601-6625
2 AUCTIONS
THURS. FEB. 2
OUTSIDE AUCTION
3PM Auction. Bowling
lawn tractor, furn., tools,
concrete yard art,
recllners. Row after
Row of Treasures!!!

SUN. FEB. 5
Antlaue & Collectible
Prev: 10am Auction: 1 pm
1971 Comet, Baldwin
Parlor Player Grand,
Weber Rol Player Parlor
Grand, collection of
clocks, art, antique
glass, estate jewelry,
Fararl collect., Antique
turn. from Oak to Mid
Century. Watch the
webslte. Worth the trlp!
DudleysAuctlon.com
4000 S. Fla. Ave.
(US 41-S) Inverness
(352) 637-9588
AB1667-AU2246
12% BP-2% ca.disc
BLACK BEAUTY SG
ELECTRIC GUITAR
W/AMP,GIGBAG,TUNER
STRAP,CORD ETC $90
352-601-6625
NEW JASMINE S35
ACOUSTIC W/GIGBAG
STRINGS,PICKS,STRAPCD&
T"JNER$100
352-601-6625
NEW TAKAMINE
JASMINE ACOUSTIC
GUITARPERFECT
CONDITION! $85
352-601-6625



36 ROUND TABLE Like
New Rugged Formica
Top Misc Colors Sturdy
Steel Pedestal $65


727-463-4411
SOLD
New White Elongated
Toilet Bowl
with seat
$75.
SQUARE TABLE 36"
Rugged Gray Formica
Top Sturdy Steel Frame
Like New $65
7274634411
TRIM
248 ft of pine trim
scalloped edges, great
for a cottage $75.
(352) 726-1059
VERTICAL BLINDS
118" X 79" VALANCE,
TRACK, ALL HARD-
WARD. EXCEL $99
727.857.6583
WOOD BOOKCASE
White Sturdy 3 Shelves
30"x32"x12" $30
727-4634411


Aero Pilates Performer.
Model 55-4298A. Easy,
lie-down exercise as
seen on TV. Includes
neck pad and cardio
rebounder. Like new
cond. $150 obo.
352-746-1644.
Bow FLex Ultimate
2 ,home gym,
like new $950.
(352) 621-0522
Nordic Track SL 728,
Recumbent Exercycle
Electronic console,
like new, $125.
Pro-form XP 130,
Eliptical Excercisor,
elec. console, like new
$125. (352) 465-3924
NORDICTRACK E8100
COMPETITION SERIES
OLYMPIC RACK Olym-
pic smith rack machine,
good condition, all attach-
ments included. $530.00
Call between 10AM-8PM
352-628-9126
NORDICTRACK T5ZI
TREADMILL Excellent
condition! Folds up for
easy storage. Built in
speakers, ifit compatible,
multiple programs to
choose from. Priced to
sell quickly at $500. Call
(352) 489-1527
WEIGHT SET
160 POUND w/bar&
almost new padded
bench w/multi positions
$100. Hernando
Cell (607) 652-4012



BUCK KNIVES 2 with
cases 1 without case. All
in good condition $10.00
each. Call Cookie
(352) 634-2737
BUTTERFLY KNIFE
New, never carried. $25.
Hernando 864-283-5797
CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well pond,
ATVtrails $165Kobo
352 795-2027/634-4745
Club Car '05
Loaded with
accessories. $2200
(352) 794-7247
CLUB CAR
'06 $1,400,
with charger
352-344-8516
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
FRESH JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct.@ $5 per lb
Stone Crab@ $6 per lb
delivered 727-771-7500
GLOCK 36
45ACP titanium
plugger, 3.5 LB
connector, 3 megs,
holster, must D/L & V/R
$525.(352) 322-6456
GUN Marlin 30/30 Rifle
Model 336
Good Condition $ 250.00
o.b.o. 352/344-5746 or
352/201-8158

WE BUY GUNS
On Site Gun Smithing
(352) 726-5238




EZ PULL TRAILERS,

Utility & Enclosed
BUY, SELL, TRADE
Custom Built, Parts,
Tires, Whis, Repairs,
Trailer Hitches

16' Car Trailer, Reg.
$1765 CASH $1695.

Stehl Tow Dollies
$895 ( limited supply)
w/brks $1195

Hwy 44 Crystal River
352-564-1299

GULF TO LAKE
TRAILER SALES

Largest Selection &
Lowest Prices.
Offering New & Used
Cargo & utility trailers

Triple Crown Utility TRL
6 x 12 w/new spare
$1,050.
6 x 12 Enclosed w/
V nose, rear ramp
door, $1895.

Trailer Tires
starting at $69.95

352-527-0555
Hwy 44, Lecanto




BABIES R US high chair
great condition asking
50.00 352-897-4678


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966











I WANT TO BUY
Your CAR, TRUCK, SUV,
RV, BOAT, Imports or
Any Model, Any
Condition, No Titlle OK.
Paying up to $20,000 or
More. (813) 458-0584
JUNK MOTORCYCLES
WANTED Will Pay up to
$200 for Unwanted Mo-
torcycle 352-942-3492
WANT TO BUY HOUSE or
MOBILE Any Area.
Condition or Situation.
Call (352) 726-9369
Wanted Used Kayak
Trailer, good or
bad condition okay
(352) 563-2763


old Bulldog Mix. He
weighs 50 Ibs. He loves
to play fetch and is
friendly. He is neutered,
has all shots, and is
micro-chipped. He is
looking for a forever
home. Call
352-746-8400
KITTENS & CATS
many breeds, all
neutered micro chip,
tested, shots some
declawed $85-$150
352-476-6832
Koi and Gold Fish
FOR SALE, Great Prices
ALL SIZES. Call Jean
(352) 634-1783
Shi-A-Poo Puppies
Paper trained, good
with kids, will not shed,
health certs. CKC reg.
Fem $225 Males $200
Yorkie Poos Male
$300 (352) 489-6675
Shih-Tzu Pups, ACA
starting@ $300. Lots of
colors, Beverly Hills,
FL (352)270-8827
www.aceofpups.net




Panel Dog Kennel From
Tractor Supply and Lrge
Ingido dog hse ,less
than 6 mos old. pd
over $800. all for $575
obo (352) 465-6863




FOR SALE
Ponies and Horses,
used saddles and tack,
Diamond P Farm
352-873-6033


Livestock


I* J




Tell that special
person
SHappy Birthday
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





BOAT LIFT
Single Pole,
1500 lb. capacity.
$900 obo
352-613-8453
Minnkota 24 lb. thrust
transom mount, $70
(352) 344-2161




'06 ProKat 20 ft
140 HP Suzuki4
strokelow hours, very
clean, Magic alum tan-
dem trailer, VHF,
Depth, GPS, Windless
anchor $18k obo
(352) 464-4877
'07 Proline 17 ft
4 stroke 90 HP Suzuki,
very low hours, ready
to fish trailer & more
$13,500 352-795-3894
20ft Pontoon
2000 Fiesta Fish N Fun,
no carpet, fiberglass fir,
85 Yamaha, Galv. trir.
$6,500. 352-613-8453
Angler Model 2500
walk around, pur-
chased New March
2009 paid $54,520.
twin eng. 115 Yamaha
warnty 3/15(14 hrs)
ESTATE PRICE
$37,500 859-229-5667
FRESH JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct.@ $5 per lb
Stone Crab@ $6 per lb
delivered 727-771-7500
HOUSE BOAT
30 ft fiberglass, hrd
wood firs, & more
Live Aboard or enoyv
weekends in Paradise
$14,500 (423) 320-3008
PROLINE
21' Cuddy, full transom,
w/brack, 150 HP Yam.,
Bimini, VHF, porta pot,
dep. finder, trailer
$5,900. (352) 382-3298
WANTED TO BUY
Pontoon Boat
Needing Repair
(352) 637-3983
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LAKE
MARINE
We Pay CASH For Used
Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck & Fishing
Boats (352)527-0555
boatsupercenter.com

























2001 38 ft Holiday
Rambler, Cummings
diesel,2 slides, fully
loaded ,sell or trade
property $60000
859-814-3573
'94 Fleetwood
454 engine Bounder,
32ft., loaded, self
contained, 79k
$9,800. 352-795-6736
I Buy RV'S, Steve
Henry, RV World of
Hudson Inc.Since
1974. (888) 674-8376
(727) 514-8875


CIASSIFIEDS




by 4 Winds, 35' Triton
V-10 gas, 44K mis. front
rear a/c, Onan Gen.
back up camera,
leveling jacks, TV, fully
equipped incl tow bars
& hitch + brks buddy,
assisted for tow vech.
all manuals for coach
& appls. NON Smoker
incls hoses, sewer &
electric hook-ups,
7 new NEW Goodyear
tires, See at Oak Bend
Village Route 40 W.
Dunnellon call for tour
(352) 465-6335 Was
$22,500 Now $19,750
LAREDO
Like new '06, 33FT, T.T.
w/14FT slide, Has fiber-
glass Ext, free standing
dinette, elec. fireplace.
over 30K new asking
$13,000 obo
(352) 637-1796
SUNSEEKER '05
29 ft. Class. C., nearly
all options, generator,
needs awning fabric,
non smoker, 33k mi.
Only $26,500., 464-0316
1 '1_ "


Tropical LX Diamond
'05, 3 slides, 40'
19k miles, 350
Cat-Diesel. gen. 7.5
too many xtra's to list.
$98,500.352-503-3663
WINNEBEGO
2001 Chieftain 35U,
garaged, non smoker
no pets, 2 slides, Cen.
Heat Pump, exc. cond.
76K mi., $38,900
(352) 208-8292



2011 Grand Junction
5 wheel. 40 ft. 4 slides.
w/Bumper to bumper
for 16 years, too many
extras to list! $37,000
(603) 991-8046
'07 32 foot KZ toy
hauler, like new, full
slide out sleeps 7, new
tires, Owan Gen., gas
tank alumwheels
Lrg living area separate
cargo area $18,900
352-795-2975
I BUY RVS,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
call me 352-201-6945
JAYCO
2005 Jay Feather
LGT 25Z
New tires/brakes; sleeps
6;new queen mattress;
shower/tub; stove/oven;
refrig/sep freezer lots of
storage. Like new $9,500
priced below blue book
retail see in Inglis
352-447-5434
Shasta 97
31' 5th whl, too much
to list, ready to go, Must
sale, death in family
$7k (352) 341-5408




Trailer hitch,
luggage hauler,
1-1/4" receiver,
$75 obo.
269-568-0577




BIG SALE!
Consignment USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
AUTOS' FROM $1,500.
US 19 BY AIRPORT
US 44, BY NAPA
Low Payments *
461-4518 & 795-4440
consignmentusa.org
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not
CASH PAID $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars Trucks
& Vans, For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES,
Hwy 19... 352 564-8333
CASH PAID FOR JUNK
CARS Any Condition
Up to $500., Free
Towing 352-445-3909
KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Salvage Pays top $$$
for your autos.
352-628-4144
WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
Perfect Cond or not
Titled,No title,
No problem. Paying up
to $25K any make,
any model Call A.J.
813-335-3794/ 531-4298




BIG SALE!
Consignment USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
AUTOS' FROM $1500.
US 19 BY AIRPORT
US 44, BY NAPA
Low Payments -
461-4518 & 795-4440
consignmentusa.org

IMMACULATE


CHEVROLET
2007 TrailBlazer 2007
Chevy
TrailBlazer,immaculate
condition
89,500 miles,2 wheel
drive, white
Asking $8,900
Call 352-746-1502
HONDA
2008 Civic Coupe EXL
22,00 Miles $14,100
Galaxy Gray
Metallic/Gray
Leather Interior-
Great Condition
AUTO/AC/PS/Airbags
Power Doors/Window
Mirrors
Heated Seats
AM/FM/CD/XM Radio
and Navigation
Honda Remote Start
and Fog Lights
Tire Pressure
Monitoring System
352-422-0216


ing Touring
Convertible 34k miles,
loaded, $14995 firm
352-897-4520
CHEVROLET
1999 Monte Carlo, runs
& looks good. First
$1,775. 352-637-2588
or 845-701-6370
KAWASAKI '82
11,662K ,mis. LTD 550
lots of extras
great cond $1600 obo
(352) 228-1897
LINCOLN
'06, Towncar, Signature,
37K miles, looks, drives
even smells like new.
$16,500. (352) 746-1184
MERCURY
'99, Mystique LX, 4 DR,
loaded, low mi, leather,
great MPG, auto, Clean
$3,250. (352) 212-9383




2 AUCTIONS
THURS. FEB. 2
OUTSIDE AUCTION
3PM Auction. Bowling
lawn tractor, furn., tools,
concrete yard art,
recllners. Row after
Row of Treasures!!!

SUN. FEB. 5
Antlaue & Collectible
Prev: 10 am Auction: 1pm
1971 Comet, Baldwin
Parlor Player Grand,
Weber Rol Player Parlor
Grand, collection of
clocks, art, antique
glass, estate jewelry,
Fararl collect., Antique
furn. from Oak to Mid
Century. Watch the
webslte. Worth the trip!
DudleysAuctlon.com
4000 S. Fla. Ave.
(US41-S) Inverness
(352) 637-9588
AB1667-AU2246
12% BP-2% ca.disc
AUTO SWAP/
Corral CAR SHOW
Sumter County
Fairgrounds
SUMTER
SWAP MEETS
Feb. 5, 2012
1-800-438-8559







Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





BIG SALE!
Consignment USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
AUTOS' FROM $1,500.
US 19 BY AIRPORT
US 44, BY NAPA
Low Payments *
461-4518 & 795-4440
consignmentusa.org
DODGE
1986 150 1/2 ton
6 cyl.. Rough, runs good.
$950 (352-563-2674)
618) 830-6615
FORD '01
Lariat F 350 DRW 7.3
turbo diesel super cab
84K mis. exc cond $14K
call Bob(352) 794-3142
FORD 05
Sports Trac, Explorer
shortbed 6 cy. 4 dr.
excel. cond., 80K m.
$11,900 (352) 726-2038
FORD '99
7.3 Diesel, heavy
duty, 4x4 156K mi.
$10,900
(352) 628-4265
GMC
2007 Sierra 2500 Crew
Cab, 4x4, Turbo Diesel,
price $7000
407-792-2275
JEEP
1988 Comanche runs
good $500 OBO call
352-270-3183
TOYOTA TUNDRA
06, Contractor Model
76K miles. Blue book
$12K ,sell $10K.


i MLU
2008 MXU 300,ONLY
390 MILES, GARAGE
KEPT. LIKE NEW
$2000.00 CALL KEVIN
AT 352-212-8121




2005 HD Ultra
Classic w/Fat Bagger
kit, Custom seat,
wheels ect $13000 obo
352-563-6327or 860-3481
Harley Davidson
'06, Road King Classic,
9K miles, like brand new
$11,000
352-212-0329
JUNK MOTORCYCLES
WANTED Will Pay up to
$200 for Unwanted
Motorcycle
352-942-3492
KAWASAKI Vulcan
500 2005 garage kept,
7200 miles, new tire &
battery, READY $2,800.
obo(352) 897-1445
Lucky U Cycles
(352) 330-0047

2003 HONDA
GOLDWING TRIKE
W/TRAILER. LOADED
$18,995
2012 GOLDWING
801 MILES
$22,500.00
2004 HARLEY ULTRA
CLASSICLOADED
$10,750.00
2009 HARLEY 1200N
ALL BLACK
$6,995.00

FINANCE AVAILABLE !
WWW.LUCKYUCYCLES.
COM
352-330-0047
SUZUKI
2009 DR200SE DUAL
SPORT ONLY HAS 380
MILES ON IT. GARAGE
KEPT UNIT IS IN EX-
CELLENT CONDITION.
$2965.00 OBO CALL
KEVIN AT 352-212-8121


900-0229 DAILY CRN
Surplus Prop.
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County Board



Misc. Notice


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2012 D7


of County Commissioners govdeals.com from Jan.
will be selling surplus prop- 15 until Feb. 29, 2012.
erty and equipment via Jan. 15thru Feb. 29,2012
the internet at


370-0205 SUCRN
Order to Demolish, alberto & Teresa Barrientos
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF ACTION: ORDER TO DEMOLISH
CASE NUMBER: 114435
Description of property:AK: 1849691and legally described as KEATINGS 1ST ADD TO
FLORAL CITY LOT 1: W 75 FT OF N1/2 OF LOT 13 & W 75 FT OF S 25 FT OF LOT 14 LESS N
20 FT DESC IN OR BK 1090 PG 1615
ALBERTO & TERESA BARRIENTOS
8800 E FREEMAN CT, FLORAL CITY, FL
On October 14, 2011, an order was issued by the Citrus County Certified Building Offi-
cial to demolish the structure(s)on the property located at: 8800 E. Freeman Ct.;
Floral City, FL. If the property owners) fail to comply with this order, the Code Com-
pliance Division will issue a work order to abate the nuisance condition.
Any persons) having a legal interest in this property may contact the Code Compli-
ance Office within 30 days of this publication. Board of County Commissioners, Dept.
of Development Services, Code Compliance Division, 3600 W. Sovereign Path,
Lecanto, FL. 352-527-5350.lf you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD tele-
phone (352) 341-6580.
February 5, 2012.

372-0205 SUCRN
Elig, To Vote- Ivkovic, Godin
PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice is hereby given to the following, at last known address:
Michael J. Ivkovic Bridgett L. Godin
6679 W. Berrigan Ct. 2580 W. Express Ln
Homosassa, FL 34446 Lecanto, FL 34461
You are hereby notified that your eligibility to vote is in question. You are required to
contact the Supervisor of Elections, in Inverness, Florida, no later than thirty (30) days
after the date of this publishing. Failure to respond will result in a determination of in-
eligibility by the Supervisor and your name will be removed from the statewide voter
registration system. If further assistance is needed, contact the Supervisor of Elections
at the below listed address or call 352-341-6747.
Susan Gill, Citrus County Supervisor of Elections
120 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida, 34450
February 5, 2012.

373-0205 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS
RFQ No. 008-12
Energy Conservation Services Program
The Citrus County Board of County Commissioners invites qualified Energy Services
Companies (ESCOs) to submit Statements of Qualifications. For the purpose of this
RFQ, "ESCO" refers to any company that is qualified to provide an energy conserva-
tion program that includes all services listed in this RFQ. Responses to this RFQ shall
describe the ESCO's capabilities to identify the need for, design, install, train, and
monitor a comprehensive energy-conservation program. Citrus County Board of
County Commissioners (BOCC) intends to select an ESCO and to award contracts)
to perform cost effective energy conservation retrofits.
Retrofits will be provided through an agreement providing a guarantee of savings
where the County:
Incurs minimal initial capital costs
Achieves significant long term savings
Is guaranteed energy savings
Obtains consistent levels of occupant comfort and building functionality
Citrus County proposes to address energy management in its facilities for this
conservation program. Additionally, Citrus County intends to upgrade outdated and
obsolete building equipment and to perform property improvements through this
program based on an Investment Grade Technical Energy Audit to be performed by
the ESCO.
Citrus County anticipates a major reduction in annual utility and maintenance
costs through the implementation of this energy conservation program. Citrus
County intends to structure the program's implementation schedule in a manner to
minimize the programs capital needs.
Respondents to this Request for Qualifications (RFQ) shall identify their experience
and qualification to design, install and manage a major energy conservation project
that involve energy conservation measure (ECM) retrofits which address the follow-
ing building components and applications: lighting, space heating, ventilation,
air-conditioning, envelope, heat recovery, energy management systems, environ-
mental system controls, motors, domestic water heating, air distribution systems and
water consumption systems. Citrus County is also interested in the respondents' quali-
fications and experience related to programs designed to train building occupants
and maintenance workers in energy conservation awareness.
Minimum Requirements For Submittina A Response
Respondents must comply with the Florida State Statutes 607 entitled "Corporations"
to transact business in the state of Florida.
"Key Personnel" within the Respondent's firm shall possess a valid and current profes-
sional license or certification issued by the State of Florida for the services for which
Respondent is applying.
Respondents must also be properly licensed in accordance with the State of Flori-
da's regulations governing such profession for the provision of the Services covered
under this RFQ. Furthermore, Respondents must comply with the policies, codes and
regulations of Citrus County for conducting business in the County.
Respondents must be able to provide five (5) references, for which they have pro-
vided services similar to those outlined in this Request for Qualifications over the past
ten (10) years to be considered for award.

SEALED Responses are to be submitted on or before March 6, 2012 @ 2:00 PM to
Wendy Crawford, Office of Management & Budget, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Suite
266, Lecanto, FL 34461.
A Public Opening of the Responses is scheduled for March 6, 2012 @ 2:15 PM at 3600
West Sovereign Path, Room 283, Lecanto, Florida 34461. The only information con-
veyed at the public opening will be the names of the companies who submitted Re-
sponses.
Anyone requiring reasonable accommodations to the public opening because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the Office of Management &
Budget at (352) 527-5457 at least two days before the meetings. If you are hearing
or speech impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 527-5312.
To obtain a copy of the Request for Qualifications Document for this announcement,
please visit the Citrus County Website at www.bocc.citrus.fl.us and select "BIDS" on
the left hand side of the Home Page. Or, call the Office of Management &
Budget/Purchasing at (352) 527-5457.
CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
Winn Webb, Chairman
February 5, 2012.


371-0205 SUCRN
2/9 Meeting Citrus County Aviation Advisory Board
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the CITRUS COUNTY AVIATION ADVISORY BOARD will
meet at 2:00 p.m. on Thursday, February 9, 2012 in Room 166 of the Lecanto
Government Center, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Lecanto, FL 34461.
Any person desiring further information regarding this meeting may contact the
Engineering Division, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Suite 241, Lecanto, FL 34461, or call
(352) 527-5446.
WINN WEBB, CHAIRMAN
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC: Any person who decides to appeal any decision of the Gov-
erning body with respect to any matter considered at this meeting will need a rec-
ord of the proceedings and for such purpose may need to provide that a verbatim
record of the proceeding is made, which record includes testimony and evidence
upon which the appeal is to be based. (Section 286.0105, Florida Statutes).
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the Engineering Division, 3600 W. Sover-
eign Path, Suite 241, Lecanto, FL 34461, or call (352) 527-5446, at least two days be-
fore the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD telephone
(352) 527-5312.
February 5, 2012.


374-0205 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
INVITATION TO BID
ITB No. 007-12
NON-EMERGENCY MEDICAL TRANSPORTATION SERVICES
SECONDARY/BACK-UP PROVIDER TO THE COUNTY RE-BID
Citrus County Board of County Commissioners invites interested parties to submit a
Bid to provide for the County's secondary/back up provider for non-emergency
transportation services for eligible Medicaid recipients. Such services are for Medi-
caid compensable medical appointments by utilization of the following modes of
transportation: multi-load vehicles, wheelchair vehicle, stretcher vehicle, and public
transportation and escort services. The secondary/back up provider will be used
only when Citrus County Transit cannot accommodate the County's clients and
there is no guarantee of number of trips or payment.
In accordance with federal regulations (42CFR 431.53), Non-emergency medical
transportation (NEMT) services are defined as medically necessary transportation for
a recipient and a personal care attendant or escort, if required, who have no other
means of transportation available to any Medicaid compensable service to receive
treatment, medical evaluation, or therapy. NEMT services do not include ambulance
transportation.

Minimum Requirements For Submittina A Bid
The transportation operator shall provide verification of 2 years of experience in the
field and shall demonstrate compliance with the rules and regulations found in
Chapter 427 Florida Statutes, Rule 14-90 and Rule 41.2 of the Florida Administrative
Code.
The transportation operator must demonstrate the ability to submit billing data in
electronic format.
SEALED Bids are to be submitted on or before March 5, 2012 at 2:00 PM to Wendy
Crawford, Office of Management & Budget, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Suite 266,
Lecanto, FL 34461.
A Public Opening of the Bids is scheduled for March 5, 2012 at 2:15 PM at 3600 West
Sovereign Path, Room 283, Lecanto, Florida 34461.
Anyone requiring reasonable accommodations at the bid opening because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the Office of Management &
Budget at (352) 527-5457 at least two days before the meetings. If you are hearing
or speech impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 527-5312.
To obtain a copy of the Bid Document for this announcement, please visit the Citrus
County Website at www.bocc.citrus.fl.us At the Home Page, select "BIDS" on the
left hand side of the screen. Or, call the Office of Management &
Budget/Purchasing at (352) 527-5457.
CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
Winn Webb, Chairman
February 5, 2012.


I


I Misc.Notic


I Misc. Noti


Meeting


Meeting


MBeting
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I ^^Bi oc


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I Bi




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


These Deals Don't



Get Ini Sweeter


GETinto
THENEW


Start the new year
in a brand-new Ford.
Our 2012 lineup of fuel-efficient cars, trucks, SUVs and crossovers is here.
Get into the Ford you want with great offers that make it easy for you to get
behind the wheel.
Come in today. And start the new year in a brand-new Ford. You'll know why
Ford is the best-selling brandt out there. Get out of the old and into the new at
Nick Nicholas Ford today.


1,090 M
ni Si


w W N2C1 55
2012 FOCUS SE
ISRP 19,720
necial Discount -35


Dealer Discount
-500 Retail Customer Cash


-986
-2,000


$1 6,999*


2012 ESCAPE XLT


$199mo
24 month Red Carpet Lease
$2,715 due at signing.
Security deposit waived.
Excludes tax, title and license fees.


I N NIH1 OLAS US-ElDiC SP CElT =1 Eh I


1999 FORD CROWN VICTORIA 2000 MERCURY GRAND MARQUIS LS 2003 FORD MUSTANG CONVERT 20031ORD0ECONOLINEE150 CONVERSION 2004 LINCOLN TOWN CAR SIG SERIES
Only 55k miles. N2C120P Low miles and low price. N1T472A Top down fun. N1T403D Like new and loaded. N1T494A Lincolnluxuryataveryaffordableprice. N1T402M
$7,468 $7,968 $9,968 $11,968 $11,968




2009 FORD FOCUS SE 2003 FORD F250XLT 4X4 SUPER CAB 2000 FORD MUSTANG GT 2006MERCURYGRANDMARQUISGS 2004 NISSAN MAXIMA SL
Great fuel economy. N2C078A Ready for work or play. N1T179A Top down five speed fun. N2C033D Full size luxury. N1T318B Come drive this one. N1T456A
$13,968 $13,968 $13,995 $14,668 $14,968


2007 FORD FOCUS SE WGN 2003 MERCEDES.BENZ SIK230 HT CON.
Hard to find wagon. N2C 168A Fun fun fun with the top down. N2T108B
$12,668 $12,968
I - _.- I


2009 FORD FOCUS SE
Only 19k miles. N2C120D
$14,968


ZUU0O JP WKANbLIK 414 WUKI
Only 29k miles. NP5653A
$18,968


2007 FORD EDGE SEL
Affordable cross over. N 1T310A
$20,968


2004 HONDA PILOT EX
Four wheeling & fun to drive. N1T372M
$16,668


2004 FORD F 50 4X4 SUPER CAB 200 CHRISLER TOWN ICOUNIR1TOURIH 2011 FORD FIESTA SE
Extra extra clean. N 1T484D Looking for o new home & loves ids. N2T055A Can you say 40 mpg. N2C076A
$16,968 $17,668 $17,968
HUBTae *^~ti ^--J]\


2010 HYUNDAI ELANTRA 2008 FORD EXPEDITION E. BAUER
Great economy. NP5662 One owner local trade. N2T108A
$18,968 $18,968




2009 GMC SIERRA C1500 EXT CAB 2009 NISSAN ROGUE SL
Only 9k miles on this local trade. N1T014D A must to drive. N1T257A
$21,668 $21,668


2007 TOYOTA PRIUS HYBRID 2010 CHEVROLET HHR LT
Think green. N2C130A Lots of room and economy too. N2C082A
$17,968 $17,968


2007TYTATAOMAPRERUHIERCCEB 2009 FORD FUSION SEL 2008 FORD EDGE SEL
One local owned trade. N1T476A Ford certified vehicle. NP5626 A great cross over. N1C181A
$21,968 $22,468 $22,668


2006 IOYOTA HIGHLANDER 4X4 LIMITED
Moon roof & novigoaion & only 16k miles. NP5682
$23,668




2006 FORD 150 LARIAT414 IUPER CREW
Only 21k miles and like new NP5677
$26,968


2009 FORD TAURUS X SEL 2010 MINI COOPER
Still smells new. NP5680 Fun to drive. NP5628
$23,668 $23,668


2011 FORD TAURUS SEL
This is one you have to drive. NP5642
$26,968


2008 LINCOLN MKX
The luxury cross over. NP5663
$28,968


2009 BUICK LUCERNE CXL 2007 CADILLAC STS
Loaded and lots of luxury. N1C123M Only 25k miles on this luxury car NP5660
$23,668 $24,668
P,


2010 FORD F150 XLT 414 CREW CAB 2010 FORD 1150 LARIAT 4X4 CREW AB
One owner local trade. N 1T492A This one has the wow factor. NI C125A
$29,968 $35,668


Believe it or not its really a lincoln. NPr /
$29,968


2010 FORD F15O RAPTOR 4X4 EXT CAB
Loaded rapor with nav and sun roof. N2T113A
$41,668


-Inglis Dunnellon
:6 [ EBeverly Hills
SLHRMnFi8St805Crystal
Floral City
HomosaEEsACEsOFMI Nick Nicholas ,
BHomosass
a Springs Hwy. 98

S U I V7 Spring Hwy. 50
kn -ic afoBlasf Hill Brooksville


1 4,999*


2011 FORD E250 VAN
A real work horse. NP5649
$22,968


D8 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2012










I OME TRONI
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE REAL


INSIDE
I Sikorski's
r Attic
S PAGE E6


ESTATE GUIDE


Hollis Malone. manager of horticulture, is shown
Jan. 24 in the Garden Conservatory at the Gaylord
Opryland Resort & Convention Center in Nashville.
Tenn. Malone is in charge of maintaining 50.000
tropical plants, rare international blooms and
Southern species spread over nine acres that in-
clude an indoor lake. a river, and waterfalls.


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E2 SUNDA'I~ FEBRUARY 5, 2012 Cimus Couivn' (FL) CHRONICLE


NEVER LIVED IN!!!
*ALMOST 5 ACRES *SCREENED LANAI
* Commercial Fridge Superb Appliances
*2/3/1 Gar. + Det. Gar. Fully Fenced w/Gate
* Solar Water Heater Truly a Must See
KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997
VIRTUAL TOURS I r I IMo. Flo -laisling l Io coml i
VIRTUAL TOURS al wd, FloiidaLislinglnlo coine


IIa3ULAIU U ;uncr; IN I WALL
* Country Style Home!! Low Maintenance Vinyl!!
* Lots of Ceramic Tile Large Front Porch
S3/2/2 Car Garage Fabulous Master Bath
* Al on ONE ACRE Pretty Wooded Property
KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997
EMAIL kellgq lienmn nel


13'.4163-282







BARELY LIVED IN!!
* Former Model Home New Roof Shingles '05
* Bright Kit. w/Nook Lots of Cabinets
* 3/2/2 Split Plan Great Scrn. Lanai
* Inside Laundry!! Sold Fully Furnished!!
KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997
E-MAIL elliesullon ii innx el


BRENTWOOD BEAUTY
AT A CRAZY PRICE!
This 3/2 with oversized 2 car garage has
everything! 32' x 12' screened lanai with built-in
hot tub. Lots of tile and kitchen that overlooks your
greatroom. Elegant window treatments and light
fixtures makes you feel at home. See it today!

LEO SMITH 352-697-2771
Email: leosmith@remax.net


PINE RIDGE
* 4BD/3BA/3CG Over 3,600 SF Living
* 2nd Story Bonus Rm. or 4th Bedroom w/Bath
* Office or Den Many Extras
PETER & MARVIA KOROL
352) 527-7842
352) 422-3875


YOU GOTTA SEE THIS!
Spacious, private lanai overlooking in-ground
pool on just over 2 acres w/detached
2-car garage! Peace and serenity awaits!
Search 1000's of Homes INSTANTLY!
Goato:
www.KimDeVane.com


* 4BD/2BA/2 Car Gar Built 2005 2,165 SF
* Large Family Room Wood Oabn'ts Throughout
* Formal LR/DR Master BR w/2 Walk-Ins
* Kitchen w/Brkfst Nook Stainless Steel AppI
* Large Screened Porch Extr Brick Paver Patio

LOU HALLEY (352) 257-9016 1 1
Email: lounolley@tampabay.rr.com


335 FEET OF WATERFRONT!!
3 bedroom, 2 bath block home on
private lagoon, 2.84 acres, great room
with fireplace, screen porch, 21x40
entertainment room, huge kitchen with
island and nook.
DIANNE MACDONALD (352) 212-9682
Email: dmifl@yahoo.com A


WIDE OPEN LAKEFRONTII If you're looking for a
LOADED, spectacular, waterfront home in pristine
condition, don't miss this opportunity to see one of
the best available Private, homes only, gated
community At the end of Duvall Island Rd in Floral
City Call my cell if you need directions PREPARE
TO FALL IN LOVE.
JOHN HOLLOWAY SR. (352) 212-6002
CRS, GRI, ABR, e-PRO
Email: johnHolloway@tampabay.rr.com
www.TheHollowayTeam.comn


5129 N. CROSSGATE PT., PINE RIDGE
Was 925k NOW 539,900. Seller's loss your gainlll This
beautiful 3/3/4 brick colonial is situated on five peaceful acres
in Pine Ridge Farms Interior features include, but not limited to
split floor plan, upgraded gourmet kitchen, hardwood
throughout, fireplace, dual AC, security system, built-in buffet,
tasteful paint/carpet and window treatments Master bedroom
boast 18x24 size with huge dual walk-in closets Master bath
features dual sinks, walk-in shower and two person jacuzzi tub

DAVID IVORY 352-613-4460
Email: davidsivory@holmuil.com


STUNNING ELEGANCE describes this
4/3/2 Flynn built custom home. As you enter the
driveway the WOW-factor enthralls you. Open the
front door to a beautiful home with 2,900+ sq. ft.
of flowing floor plan and too many upgrades to
mention here. MOTIVATED sellers want to hear
your offer.
CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555
Email: cnadal@remax.net


1995 Year Built 3/2/2 on .75 Acre
SHardwood Floors Throughout Home
SLarge Master Suites Split Floor Plan
Security System Fully Enclosed Screen
Room for Pool and More
.Close to Schools Must See!!!
CHERYL LAMBERT 352-637-6200
Email: cheryllamberl@remax.net


* f ~i~ I,, IiiI *A
2421 N. Leafl Hw. Beel il 2-82wwRMXcmI 0 .Mi IIvres6760


3600 H. WILLOWTREE PT.
LAKESIDE VILLAGE
*2BD/2BA/1CG Maintenance Free
* 1481 sf living area Community pool
Living & Family Rms. 2 Master suites
PETER & MARVIA KOROL _
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875


1820 W. IVORYWOOD
SUPER BUY ON BIG GAME DAYI Not a single
thing was overlooked in this remodeled 3BR/2bth/
3 gar pool & hot tub home Kitchen and baths have
been upgraded as well as the floors Fireplace, vaulted
ceilings, cement RV pad w/50 amp electric as well as
solar heat are a few of the extra amenities

GARY ALTMAN (352) 795-2441
Email: garyalitmn@remax.net k


5338 S. PARKLAND TERRACE
HOMOSASSA
* Fisherman's Paradise *2BR/2BA/1 CG
* Beautiful Remodeled Kitchen Ceramic Tile & Carpet
* Freshly Painted Inside & Out Boat & RV Parking
* Close to Water & Boat Ramps Move-In Ready

LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611
Email: lenpolmer@remax.netl


Upgraded custom built 2005 Jacobsen on 2 3 ac
(mol) completely fenced for your privacy Features
include GR stone fireplace, ceramic tile island kitchen
wood cabinets, Conan counters, stainless appliances,
deluxe master bath Caged solar heated pool/spa,
cabana w/full kitchen & 1/2 bath 20x40 detached RV
barn/workshop for all the toysllll
MARTHA SATHER (352)212-3929
Email mailhasalhei, iemao nel
VIRTUAL TOURS al t a inailha solhei lema. coin I ,


E2 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Be smart about weeding


Right approach

can save time,

back strain

DEAN FOSDICK
For The Associated Press

Hand weeding is one of
the most demanding chores
in gardening, but it doesn't
have to be that way.
Mulching, spraying, plant
crowding and inexpensive
stand-up tools can ease
much of the back-straining
work.
And the time to plan for it
is now, before you use any of
that homemade compost or
build your budget for plant-
ing supplies.
"Weed control is per-
sonal," said Barb Pierson,
nursery manager for White
Flower Farm, a mail-order
nursery at Litchfield, Conn.
"To me, there are two types
of weeds. Those that spread
quickly and look terrible,
and those that don't look so
bad but if you leave them in
your garden, it will appear
messy"
"Some people enjoy cot-
tage or natural gardens that
have tons of weeds but you
don't notice them because
the flowering plants are so
big and bodacious," Pierson
said. "Yet if you have a sim-
ple garden, those weeds will
stand out."
It pays to know your
plants before uprooting any-
thing, she said. "Otherwise
you might pull up something
you like something at-
tractive that's trying to self-
sow and naturalize, like
violas or pansies."
Weeds generally are con-
sidered the thugs of the gar-
den because they steal sun,
water and nutrients that
you're trying to direct to-
ward edibles and ornamen-
tals. They often appear
unsightly and out of place.
But weeds have a positive
place in nature. They can be
used to prevent soil erosion,


DEAN FOSDICK/Chronicle
A cottage garden is shown at Fordhook Farm in Doylestown, Pa. Hand weeding is one of
the most demanding chores in gardening, but it doesn't have to be that way.


provide food and cover for
pollinators, and supply or-
ganic matter to depleted
ground.
Despite all that, it may be
necessary to do some hand
weeding around the yard.
And there are ways to save
time and effort doing it.
Weed after it rains, when
the ground is softer and
weeds are easier to pull.
Weed when the plants are
small. Weed whenever and
wherever you see them pop
up, at any time of year.
Or try:
Crowding your favorite
plants. "The lazy man's
guide to gardening is to
plant your flowers so tight
there isn't room enough for
any weeds to compete,"
Pierson said.
Mulching. "Compost
and leaves can smother
weeds while making your
soil healthier," Pierson said.
Solarization, or spreading
plastic sheets or "geotex-
tiles" over the ground, also


Landmark agents
hit high for 2011
Land-
mark Realty -
of Inverness
is pleased to
announce
that the
team of
Tomika
Spires- Tomika
Hanssen Spires-
and Kim Hanssen
Fuller are Landmark
number one Realty.
in Citrus
County for
sold and
closed sales
in 2011, with
more than
$15 million
in real estate
sold. Tomika Kim
and Kim Fuller
have 17 Landmark
years of Realty.
combined
experience listing and selling
real estate in Citrus County.
They specialize in personal
customer service and the


needs of their clients. Call Kim
or Tomika at 352-726-5263
Landmark Realty.
Sargent soars
in 2011
Patty Sargent has done it
again! Not only was she a
multi-million
dollar pro-
ducer at
Plantation -
Realty Inc.
for 2011, but -
she was
also the top
producer of Patty
all agents for Sargent
the year. Plantation
Patty has Realty Inc.
been a resi-
dent of Citrus County for over
30 years. Reach her at 352-
613-6500 or at the Plantation
Realty office, open seven days
a week, at 352-795-0784.

* Chronicle photogra-
phers will consider re-
quests to take photos
of community events.
Call 352-563-5660.


7k h ITRUS RII 1 IA


Amannda & kJohison TomBalfour UlAvenus &HalStdne ArtPaty
BO SOC.E AL c REACTOR ALmO BtO REACTOR


I vvvv0~c 0 Susbastbuyica


1238 E. TRIPLE CROWN LR 4/3/3 353329 $385,000 7170 N. GRACKLE, 3/


Jw, J
4144 N. MAE WEST, 3/2/2 351560 $89,900



1/3acre, 352170
$9Y900


2/2 348792 $109,900 I 6396 N. EARLSHIRE TER. 4/2/2 350502 $135,000


510 W. PLAYER PATH 2/2/1 352984 $91,500 9570 N. CITRUS S 0


3521 N. LECANTO HWY., BEVERLY HILLS, FL 34465 1-888-789-7100


Real Estate DIGEST


746-9000


CITRUS HILLS


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LARE RIDGE


COMMERCIALLY


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SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2012 E3


I - . . .. ... .... . .. .. . ..... . . . .


See WEEDS/Page E15







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Uses for old yoga mats


Once a yoga mat is too worn out
for its original purpose, it can
still be reused around your
home. Keep one in the trunk of your
car. It makes a nice cushion on bleach-
ers or grass. You can place one in the
tub to create a non-slip surface for
kids. They can be used for pets to sleep
on. Rather than throwing them away,
they can be donated or recycled, too.
Visit RecycleYourMat.com and The-
BolderMatCompany.com for details.
The first reader tip shares a few
more ideas:
Reuse yoga mats: We have found a
lot of uses for our old mats, including
putting one under the cat box. The cat
jumps out and the litter in her paws
sticks better to the mat than any sur-


face I've used. Just vacuum
up when litter begins to
cluster (or roll up and shake
into bin). We've also used an
old mat under heavy items
(like weights in the home
gym) on hardwood floors, to
avoid denting the wood.
Use one as a doormat from
the garage into the house. S
Old mats can be cut into any ar
size you find useful. FRU
Tanya, email LIV
Caution with gift cards:
When purchasing a gift card instead of
a gift or cash, read the small print on
the card carefully. Visa and Master-
Card charge an activation fee of $3.95
on a $25 card! Outrageous. Many other


I


cards for malls, grocery
chains, restaurants, etc.
don't have an activation fee.
-Joyce Maurer, email
^ Reuse ice-cream tubs: I
H- use my old ice-cream con-
-- tainers to hold potato chips
and other snacks that come
in bags. The air-tight seal
Noel keeps them fresh and crisp.
Noel -Chuck, email
GAL I use ice-cream contain-
ING ers to store my home baked
cookies, muffins, etc., in the
freezer. Stacy email
2+2+2 soup: In a large pot, mix two
cans minestrone soup, two cans pinto

See FRUGAL/Page E14


A lesson in toilet efficiency


Q Hi, Ed.
Thanks
for all
the plumbing les-
sons that I have
learned from you
over the years. I
could use another
one right now.
We're doing a
small bathroom-
remodeling job
that will include a
new toilet. Our
contractor in-


Ed Del
ASK
PLUN


eluded in the estimate a
high-efficiency toilet. Before
we contact them, I'd like to
know exactly what type of
toilet that is. Could you
please give me a quick les-
son? -Jill, California


A: It sounds
like your contrac-
tor is up-to-date.
Water-saving
plumbing fix-
tures are becom-
ing very popular
Partly because of
the green move-
ment, and partly
Grande because the new
THE wave of water-
BER saving plumbing
fixtures performs
very well com-
pared to older low-flow
fixtures.
High-efficiency toilets are
also called HETs in the
trades, and, like the name
says, they are very efficient
toilets. For example, new


F7 Jackie Gaffney Jason Gaffney
. Realtori, A "OUSE Realtor-, -e
S 3023179 soLDa-' 287-9022
T WEEKS REALTY, 5 BEVERLY HILLS BLVD.
The Golden Girl 746-6700 ....
2 N. MELBOURNE ST.
BEVERLY HILLS
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standard toilets currently
use 1.6 gallons per flush,
while an HET uses 1.3 gpf -
or, in some cases, even less.
For the best-performing
HETs, I recommend looking
for toilets that carry the En-
vironmental Protection
Agency's WaterSense label.
These toilets have been in-
dependently tested for flush-
ing power and water-saving
potential. The WaterSense
label is a good topic to bring
up with your contractor
The secret of strong-
flushing HETs is that the


SPECTACULAR CUSTOM
POOL HOME
4/2.5/3 with family room and
office. 1 acre with surrounding
DRA for privacy. Homes only
community of Fairview Estates.
Impressive architecture and
upgrades.
MLS# 353444 $299,900


tank and bowl have been re-
designed from the bottom
up, and that's a good place
to start when you're talking
toilets!


Master plumber Ed Del
Grande is the author of "Ed
Del Grande's House Call,"
the host of TV and Internet
shows, and a LEED green
associate. Visited
delgrande. com or write
eadelg@cs. com. Always
consult local contractors
and codes.


LOOKING FOR A
GREAT VALUE?
3/2/2 home with 2 adjoining
lots. Meticulously maintained.
Sliders to Florida Room. Deck
and fenced backyard. Close to
community park with ball fields.
MLS# 353369 $84,900


Arbor experts


start with review


of tree situation


Keeping trees healthy
requires early detec-
tion, or anticipation
of problems caused by dis-
eases, insects and environ-
mental factors.
To ensure that
tree health prob-
lems do not be-
come too
advanced to re-
spond to treat-
ment, tree health
must be periodi-
cally monitored
by a professional
arborist Kerry I
To establish a TIH
good tree health ARBC
care program,
the arborist
should begin by surveying
the trees on the property
and evaluating their
health.
An arborist often makes
maps showing not only tree
locations, but any nearby
conditions that could affect
tree health. On periodic fol-
low up visits, the arborist
can monitor the continued
health or deterioration of
each tree, and make rec-
ommendations for opera-
tions to maintain or restore
tree health.


These operations may
include routine arboricul-
ture care, such as fertiliz-
ing, watering, mulching,
pruning, cabling or bracing
or may extend
to control treat-
ments, such as
applying fungi-
cides, insecti-
cides or
_* antibodies.
Treatments
are more effec-
tive when prob-
lems are caught
Ereider in the early
IE stages.
RIST To ensure the
health of your
trees, I recom-
mend annual inspections
from a professional arborist
This will protect the value of
the owner's investments in
trees, at a reasonable cost


Kerry Kreider is a practic-
ing arborist and a member
of the International Soci-
ety ofArboriculture, a tree
preservationist and presi-
dent ofAction Tree Serv-
ice. You can reach us at
352-726-9724 or actionpro
arborist@yahoo. com.


KEY "Always There For You"
REALTY GAIL COOPER
W l Multi-Million Dollar Realtor
Cell: (352) 634-4346
WEA OFFICE : (352) 382-1700x309 i
E-mail me: homes4u3@mindspring.com


CUSTOM SWEETWATER POOL HOME!
* 3/2/2+ home with 2094 living
*15x30 pool w/outdoor shower & privacy
* Roof and AC/heat new in 2005
* Exterior painted in 2010
* Dual pane windows well for yard
* Home warranty for buyers
#353061 $165,000


PRIVATE GOLF COURSE SETTING!
*3/2/2 Hammocks villa
* New AC/heat with Puron in 2010
* Neutral freize carpeting in 2011
* Glassed Florida room with AC/heat
* Open patio to #3 hole on Oak
* Dual pane windows throughout
#343127 $135,000


^See VrulTus @vvwEesahoe^sSucmI


E4 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2012


K
1
)







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Mineral deposits in


pipes slow water flow


Q We installed a new electric
hot-water heater I thought
maybe the old one had col-
lected sludge in the bottom and was
cutting water pressure to the faucets
upstairs. This didn't work.
The water pressure is the f. d
same as before. We have a V
3/4-inch line to the bath and
kitchen in the basement, .-
then 1/2-inch lines to
faucets. Is there anything
available to increase pres-
sure to faucets, or is this
what electric water heaters
do? People that I've seen
with gas water heaters don't Dwight
have this problem unless wH
I've missed something HO
when looking at their hot- MAINTE
water heaters.
A: Because your problem is on the
hot-water side of the system, I must as-
sume that you have older galvanized
water pipes.
Over the years, a crust of mineral
deposits will collect inside the galva-
nized pipes, reducing the amount of
water flow to the faucets. This hap-
pens to both the cold- and hot-water
pipes, but hot water increases the ac-
cumulation of the crust more than the
cold-water pipes.
You may also discover that the crust
forms mostly in the horizontal pipes
and not so much in the vertical pipes.
Why is this fact important? Horizontal
pipes are more readily accessible than
vertical pipes, making them easier to
replace.
What you need to do to increase


water flow is to replace the older hor-
izontal pipes with either copper or
PVC (polyvinyl chloride) plastic.
Vertical pipes are in the walls of
the home and replacement would re-
quire removing the drywall
or plaster to get to the
pipes. Horizontal pipes
will be in the basement or
crawlspace of the home
and are much easier to
access.
SIf you choose copper for
the water lines, there are
quick-connect compression
fittings to reduce the
Barnett amount of soldering re-
quired to join the pipes
MIE together
NANCE Also, soldering requires
working with a torch in
some tight areas where an accidental
spark could ignite the home. PVC is
easy to work with, and there's no torch
involved.
This is a project for the more expe-
rienced do-it-yourselfer, so you might
want to call in a professional to do the
work.


Dwight Barnett is a certified
master inspector with the
American Society of Home
Inspectors. Write to him with
home improvement questions at
C. Dwight Barnett, Evansville
Courier & Press, PO. Box 268,
Evansville, Ind. 47702 or email
him at d.Barnett@
insightbb.com.


GOT A NEWS TIP?
* The Chronicle welcomes tips from readers about breaking news. Call the newsroom at 352-
563-5660, and be prepared to give your name, phone number, and the address of the news
event.
" To submit story ideas for feature sections, call 352-563-5660 and ask for Nancy Kennedy.
Again, be prepared to leave a detailed message.


311 W. Main St., Inverness
LANDMARK 352-726-5263
www.andmarkinverness.com

A ^ ^ ^ ^, 1 2) V
ol T U-,


LETANTO:
5 ACRE BEAUTY...BRING HORSES.
.-, ., , I,. ,, ,, i , ,,, ,,
.. .. ........ t..,,,....... LAKE LIFE ,,,,O, ,,,, t,, 0NLY S189000 ,, i,,, t,,,l
mmaculate! Whole house generator included. Covered 50' deck circa 1987 home features 2 bdrms/2 baths/2 car garage. Watch
overlooks pool and beautiful pasture. This is an exceptional the sun rise and set from your own private deck or dock. Close to
property located in quiet area. Don't miss this one. I trail and town. Handicap Access. Must See. 506 Turner Camp
MLS#351534 SI 09,000. Call Vicki Love 352-697-0712. MLS#352486 Call Jean Cassese 352-201-7034.


Alan 1 il AMERICAN Jeanne
DeMichael ERA REALTY& INVESTMENTS Gaskill
,:- ., :", "Always There For You" Realtor
352-613-5752 4511 N. Lecanto Hwy. 352-476-5582
Beverly Hills, FL 34465
.-.I 352-746-3600 Office
INE1 ON THE M ARKE


BRENTWOOD AT TERRA VISTA
Don't miss this maintenance-free move-in condition 3/2/2 split floor
plan home. New tile flooring in kitchen and master bath, upgraded
kitchen cabinets plus more. Citrus Hills Golf & County Club
membership, which is required, gives you use of world class
amenities. Go to www.visualtour.com tour #2683360 to see more.
M LS #353406. $132,000 000AHN7
CALLS TA OA P NTMENT!


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2012 E5


t







E6 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2012



HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information........352-563-5592
..................................... .............. advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information........................352-563-5966
News information................................................ 352-563-5660
....................................... ............. newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listing............www.ChronicleHomeFinder.com
"The market leader in real estate information"

Cil IONicIE


HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-563-
3280, attention HomeFront.
News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront.
Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes for
space and/or clarity.
For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


Wasps can be used to


control mole crickets

M ole crickets are invasive pests New research suggests that biocontrol
whose nighttime feeding can dam- of mole crickets with these wasps may be
age plants such as vegetables, bed- more effective than pesticides.
ding plants, bahia grass, bermuda grass, The mole cricket accidentally migrated
St. Augustine grass and zoysia here from South America and
grass. Luckily, there is a power- \ populations were able to ex-
ful, inexpensive and natural so- pand unchecked due to the lack
lution for controlling mole of natural enemies in the U.S.
crickets: The Larra bicolor i ,, The Larra wasp is a natural
wasp. enemy of the mole cricket, and
Larrawasps control mole it has been released throughout
crickets naturally, and you can f Florida to control mole cricket
easily attract them to your yard populations. The wasp is pres-
by planting two special plants: ent in at least 31 Florida coun-
larraflower and partridge pea. ties, including Citrus. The
Mole cricket damage peaks in Audrey Durr wasps are not territorial and
August through October, so now FYN they should not sting unless
is the time to sow seeds for threatened.
these plants. Release of the Larra wasp is an exam-
The adult wasps feed on the flowers' ple of biological control, or biocontrol, a
nectar, and then each wasp lays up to 100 completely natural method of pest man-
eggs on mole crickets. Once hatched, the agement using beneficial species. Biocon-
young wasps feed off the mole cricket's trol is inexpensive, safe for humans and
blood, eventually killing it. animals, does not create pollution and
Each generation of wasps kills about 25 does not present a risk of chemical resist-
percent of the local mole cricket popula- ance by the targeted pests.
tion and there are three generations of Traditionally, pesticides have been used


wasps per year, compared to only one gen-
eration of mole crickets.


See WASPS/Page E15


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Inside...


Grand garden
PAGE E8
Real Estate Digest
PAGE E3
For current property transac-
tions, use the search features on
the website for the Citrus County
Property Appraiser's Office,
www.pa.citrus.fl.us.


Smoking memorabilia attracts collectors; John was right


Dear John: A friend of mine gave
me your name and email ad-
dress and told me that you
could help me. I have a DuPont lighter
It is red lacquer and gold and was
made in France. I need to
sell it, but before that I need
to get the lid repaired, as it ..
does not close properly I
have no idea where to fix it,
or even if it is worth doing
it. Attached you will find a
picture of the lighter. I have
owned it for more than 30
years. It is authentic
DuPont. -L.L, Ocala John S
Dear L.L.: Smoking mem- SIKOI
orabilia is a large category AT
of collector interest. Ciga-
rette lighters are a subcate-
gory DuPont lighters are widely
recognized in the general market as
high quality luxury products. Your red
enameled DuPont is good looking. It is
gold plated, not gold. If it were in ex-
cellent condition, it would sell below
$500. With the damage to the hinge
and the chip in the enamel, it would
be difficult to sell even at a cheap


i
1
T


price. Restoration would likely cost
more than it is worth.
Dear John: You hit the nail on the
head when you told the writer that he
had a towel clip for behind the bar.
That is exactly what it is. I
grew up in the 1950s; in my
grandfather's bar and grill,
one of my jobs was to
i change the towels every day
behind the bar. There are
\ ^ some bars that still use
them today I do not know
how far back they date.
Thanks for your informative
korski column. -JB., Internet
SKI'S Dear J.B.: Fantastic! I am
IC glad you responded and re-
moved all doubt about the
item in question. I, too,
tended bar early in my life and was
quite sure I remembered it.
Dear John: I am the one who had
the old radio in your article a few
weeks back, and then on Jan. 1, you
had a man who answered back saying
he could help me. I am so excited, but
I am having a problem trying to con-
tact him. It says "R.A.A. of Citrus Co.


Amateur Radio Club," and I have tried
my best to locate him. I have two peo-
ple who belong to such a club, but so
far nothing. They were trying to help
me by sending my email to others.
Thank you so very kindly for all the in-
formation you have already given. -
C. V, Inverness
Dear C.V: Here is an out of state re-
source located in New York. I believe
they offer restoration of radios, as well
as parts and supplies for vintage radios.
The website is www.radiodaze.com.
The phone number is 877-653-8823. Let
us know how things work out
Dear John: I have a friend who has
three pieces of glass that she would
See ATTIC/Page E15
RIGHT: Smoking memorabilia is a very
large category of collecting. This
antique lighter was made by DuPont,
a recognized luxury manufacturer.
A lighter like this in mint condition
would sell likely sell in the $500
range, but the wear and tear on this
example would probably severely
diminish collector interest.
Special to the Chronicle







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Connecticut neighbors swap houses


LINDA TUCCIO-KOON
The News-Times of Danbury

DANBURY, Conn. At first,
it was just something they
joked about.
Danbury residents Tosha and
Michael Gordon needed a big-
ger house to raise their family,
while neighbor Rachel
Williams who lived across
the street was looking to
downsize. Williams' real estate
agent, Matt Rose, suggested the
neighbors trade homes.
"He (Rose) knew us," said
Tosha Gordon. "We did need
more room; we have three kids
and one bathroom. But we
weren't looking, because the
market was so bad. We thought
maybe we'd do an addition
down the road.
"We didn't have plans to go
anywhere any time soon,"
stressed Gordon. "That's the
crazy thing about this for us."
Back in August, swapping
homes was just a wisp of an
idea, floating on the embers of a
neighborhood fire pit.
"We had a bonfire outside


Nonprofit organizations are it
vited to submit news releases
about upcoming community
events.
Include a contact name and
phone number to be printed
the paper. Call 352-563-566(
for details.


Terra Vista
1064 W. Diamond Shore Loop,
Hernando
Directions: Enter main entrance of Terra Vista at 486 (Norvell
Bryant Hwy.) and Forest Ridge Blvd. Take first right onto Skyview
Crossing and left onto Diamond Shore Loop. Home on left.
$229,900 ., -
MLS#353337 _7 "
Nancy Ayres
352-279-5058
EXIT Realty Leaders
352-527-1112


our house during the weeklong
power outage in August when
(tropical storm) Irene came
through," Gordon said. "Rachel
and Mike and I were joking
about swapping houses. My
husband said, 'You'll need to
redo the bathroom here!' We
didn't take it seriously at all."
Williams, though, was serious
about downsizing. Her husband
passed away in 2010, and "it
was getting to be a real hassle
to take care of everything" in
her four-bedroom ranch,
she said.
In the aftermath of Irene, the
Gordons' fire pit became a
gathering place.
"Our neighborhood is really
nice," Williams said, recalling
chats around the bonfire, and
neighbors who helped her have
a tag sale.
"We had no power (after
Irene) for seven or eight days,"
she added. "After that I said I
just can't do this house any-
more. Then when October
came and we had all that snow,
I was ready to scream!"
Williams, whose daughter


One household looks to scale up,

the other wants to downsize


CAROLE LISTER AHGA
ERA3 Multi-Million Dollar Realtor
ERA Cell: 422-4620 Office: 382-1700
View virtual tours @ www.listerlistings.com
All; .


Sara, 26, lives with her and is
pursuing a master's degree,
said she and the Gordons had
actually joked about swapping
houses earlier.
The Gordons have three
young boys: Liam, 7; Colin, 5;
and Owen, 22 months. And they
weren't getting smaller. When
Rachel's husband had been
outside mowing, the Gordons
would say "You don't need that
big house!"
"Well, you've got to buy it
from us!" came the reply
Williams said she enjoys fix-
ing things and that her brother
is in construction. When she
began house hunting with Rose,
she looked at several fixer-up-
pers. Unfortunately, it seemed
everything would cost more to
renovate than it was worth.
Still, she was determined to
move. In early October she told
the Gordons she was putting
her house on the market
"We were going to lose our
neighbor," Tosha Gordon said
sadly "I knew it was a hard de-
cision to leave, and I'd said to
her, 'if it's meant to be it will go
smoothly and you'll know it
was right."'
It was at that point that the
Gordons called Rose to find out
the listing price. Then they in-


vited Williams over.
"She'd been to our house, but
not for a tour," Gordon said.
"We gave her a tour to see if it
was doable, and she gave us a
tour. A few days later, we made
an offer. It was totally crazy"
The hardest part, Rose said,
was having to put a price on
both properties.
"You want to be realistic with
the market value," he said. "But
this market is tough. There's not
that many sales, so it's tough to
even put values on properties."
Rose handled the negotia-
tions and there was some back-
and-forth with the numbers. No
one knew if it would work out,
but everyone was hopeful.
"We were concerned: Is this
going to be what she (Rachel)
wants?" said Gordon.


REALTY GROUP


Detached Villa/2Bd/Bonus Room/2Bath/2Car/Brentwood Villas
Make Offer! Comfy and Cozy describe this Fully Furnished
Villa in Brentwood. This home is ready for move in. Within
walking distanceto the community pool and exercise area.
MLS#349929.................... .......................$119,000


uetacnea viiia/ll a/zuatn/zL;ar/rooi/miiisiae villas
Pride of ownership shows in this elegant pool home in Terra
Vista. Open floor plan overlooking your own private
extended lanai with pool and spa. Immaculate!
M LS#348688........................ ................... $299,900


Single Family/3Bd/2.5Bath/3Car/Hillside South
Luxury at its finest This fabulous Picasso Model features a custom made
wet bar, gourmet kitchen with granite countertops, SS appliances, gas
fireplace and the list goes on. The master suite leaves nothing to be
desired. A three car garage completes this stunning home.
MLS#353123.......................................... $499,000


Del iched Vill., 2Bd. 2B3ilh, 2C31. Hillside Villas
Luxurious Lantana Model. This open floor plan has a beautifully
mirrored formal dining room with butler pantry. Large eat-in
kitchen. Spacious great room overlooks the private screened
Lanai. 2 bedrooms plus a den/office complete this lovely home.
M LS#352909 ........................................... $194,900


-Terra Vsa "".o --.
Terms ~ otso oeSca eb- rhpicue wt l e~


Toi nhoiime.3Bd. 2 5Ba.ilh. I Ca.i. Bienil ood To niiihomes 1 ....... i .. : 11. l ..r..... i............
Unfurnished end unit townhome, spacious kitchen w/breakfast Fully Furnished Immaculate end unit townhome with
bar, upgraded lighting fixtures, tile in all wet areas. Great extensive tile flooring, Corlan counter tops and nice private
location in Brentwood. Social Club Membership Included. lanai. Social Club Membership included.
#1158....................................................... $1000 #1169 ................................... ..................$1150
Terra Vista Realty Group, LLC Office in the
2400 North Terra Vista Blvd., Hernando, Florida 34442 Terra V ista I
(352) 746-6121 0 (800) 323-7703 Welcome Center 5


Eventually they agreed
Williams would pay $287,500 for
2 Golfview Drive. It's a three-
bedroom, one-bathroom ranch,
with 1,376 square feet on .78
acres. And the Gordons would
pay $400,000 for 1 Golfview
Drive a four-bedroom ranch
with two and a half bathrooms.
It has 2,301 square feet and is
on 1.2 acres.
"The first time I saw her after
we'd agreed on a price, I was
driving around looking for my
dog, who was always in her
yard," said Gordon. "She had
him on a leash and walked him
out to me. It was all very nice."
(Turns out the dog, Jake, had
gone to Williams' door, so she
let him in!)

See SWAP/Page E14


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2012 E7











One gardener, 50,000 plants


Head ofhorticulture at Nashville's Opryand Resort can stop and smell the roses; he's got thousands


JOE EDWARDS
Associated Press
NASHVILLE, Tenn.
Hollis Malone's garden is gi-
gantic and enjoyed by many
Malone is in charge of main-
taining 50,000 tropical plants, rare
international blooms and South-
ern species at the sprawling Gay-


lord Opryland Resort & Conven-
tion Center.
His garden covers nine acres of
lavish landscape inside soaring,
glistening glass atriums at the re-
sort, which bills itself as the
largest non-gaming hotel facility
in the continental U.S. There are
literally hundreds of species.
"It's extremely interesting,"


Malone said as he took a breather
from supervising his staff of 42.
"It's not anything like an office
with a plant or two inside."
He can stop and smell the roses,
for sure. There are thousands.
When that's done, the 65-year-
old horticulturist can look up at
banana trees rising 60 feet above
the atrium floor For good meas-


ure, there are 40-foot-tall South-
ern magnolias. Not quite so im-
posing are 6-foot-tall ginger
bushes.
And that's not all. Throw in a
12,500-square-foot indoor lake, a
quiet river for gondola rides and
picturesque waterfalls.
But for Malone, his considerable
passion has been on the plants


dominating the 2,881-room hotel,
which is the cornerstone of
Nashville's tourism industry, with
1 million overnight guests annually
"I like all phases of plant life,"
he said. "I have a nurturing nature
and I like to do things with live
materials."


Page E13


E8 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Three times the charm with Camellias










Jane Weber
JANE'S
GARDEN
eorg Kamel, 1661-
.1706, was a plant col-
lector who travelled
in Asia. In 1704, Kamel pub-
lished a history of Chinese
plants from the Luzon area.
Carl Linnaeus, 1707-1778,
, Latinized names to honor
/,noted people by naming
plants after them. The
genus name of Camellia
plants honors Camellus, or
Kamel.
There are hundreds of
distinct natural Camellia
species. Chinese Camellia
sinensis leaves are globally
used to brew tea. Slow-
growing Camellias are ever-
green shrubs or trees with
See Page E12


MEET AND GREET
* Clubs are invited to submit in-
formation about regular meet-
ings for publication on the
Community page each weekday.
* Include the name of the organi-
zation, the time, day and place
of the meeting, whether it
meets weekly, biweekly or
monthly, and whom to call for
details.
* Send in information attn: Com-
munity Page Editor, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal
River, FL 34429, or fax to 352-
563-3280, attention:
Club meetings.


JANE WEBER/Special to the Chronicle
A red 'Laura Walker' Camellia japonica.
This variety flowers during the middle of the sea-
son, from December to March. Japonicas have
larger leaves than sasanquas. A pink 'Cotton
Candy' Camellia sasanqua. Sasanquas bloom from
early November to December.

NEW HOME & HOMESITE IN SUGARMILL WOODS
_- ----9 ...b


JLou Miele Re.,io
". ALWAYS THERE FOR YOU"
K Cell: (352) 697-1685


W AMERICAN
LERA REALTY & INVESTMENTS
4511 N. Lecato Hwy.
Bevey His, FL 34465
Offie. 352-746-3600


^THIiS\; WWi:j1 3 1i\


TERRA VISTA
Beautiful "Windward"
3 Bed, 2.5 Ba, Cul-De-Sac,
2203 Sq. Ft. Liv.
Priced for Immediate Sale
MLS #352882
$224,900


3,d* /Bn We have the --
Op... finest team of
subcontractors *"' "-. -
in Citrus W t.7
SaCounty "a
352-382-4888 and the staff to
,Of Citrus Inc. handle any job!t
5ET cOoA056
f' r-" NEW HOMES, VILLAS, REMODELS & COMMERCIAL
.'f 8016 S. Suncoast Blvd., Hwy. 19, 4/2 miles south of Homosassa Springs
HOMEBUILDER www.sweetwaterhomes.com swhsales@tampabay.rr.com


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2012 E9


- TO'EEVIUL TO SNVEA


'War
^Lfc








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


E10 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2012





mezo


To place an ad, call 563-5966



-- =--: CClasszifeds


-- In Print


and


Online


S, All


The Time


Fo- etI FrSl I an Lan 11 an Lan In PakIakFrRn I Ununse 1Ufrise


Brooksville
NO DEPOSIT
$100. PER WEEK
2/1, WATER GARBAGE
INCLUDED
Call Tom
352-754-8687

*** ******
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1, $425, 2/2 $450,
3/2 $450 All on % Acre
Lots (207) 205-0592
CRYSTAL RIVER
Nice 2/1, close to
everything. $500. +
Sec. (352) 446-3933
352-794-3323
Hernando
Waterfront 3/2 CHA,
completelyremodeled,
dockNo Pets 1st Lst
$500 dep. $750/mo
leave message
813-731-0348
813-416-7590
HOMOSASSA
2/1, $475. mo. + sec.
(352) 344-5457
HOMOSASSA
2/2, MH No Pets $500.
Mo. (352) 628-5696
INVERNESS 2/1
remodeled DW, clean
neat, $500.352-795-0898
INVERNESS
Close In, 1 & 2 BR MH
Clean, Quiet & Com-
fortable 352-212-6182
INVERNESS
RENT SPECIAL: Sec. dep,
pro-rated over 3 mo.
period in the INVERNESS
WATERFRONT 55+ Park
w/5 piers for fishing &
enjoyment, clubhouse,
onsite shuffleboard, and
much more! 1 BR home
$325 plus. 2BR home
$450 includes H20. 2 BR,
1.5 bath, Park Model
$500. Pets considered.
Section 8 accepted.
(352) 476-4964



INVERNESS
55+ Comm. 2/1.5,
carport, screen rm.
shed $6900
(352) 586-7962


Bank foreclosures
USED HOMES/REPO'S
Doublewides from
$8,500
Singlewides from
$3,500
Bank authorized
liquidator.
New inventory daily

Drive A Little
Save Thousands!
Looking for A Mobile
Home? Largest section
of Late Model Repos
and Used Homes
in Central Florida,
Dbl. wide & Triplewides
Citrus Home Center
(352) 746-5912
HOLIDAY SALE
Bad credit OK.!
New 2012 Jacobsen
w/ 5 yr. warranty.
Appx. 1200 sq. ft. 3/2,
many upgrades.
Buy for only $36,900
or have delivered
and set up with A/C,
heat, steps & skirting
only $2,600 down,
$379.97/mo.
for 20 years W.A.C.
Come by or call
352-621-9181
Taylor Made Homes
INVERNESS
Waterfront 55+ Park
w/5 piers for fishing &
enjoyment, clubhouse,
onsite shuffleboard
and much more!
Single wide 1 & 2 BR,
starting @ $6,900. Lot
rent $274/mo. H20
included. 3 mo. free
rent with purchase.
352-476-4964
Palm Harbor Homes
4/2 From $499/month
Loaded.
3/2 From $399/month
Loaded.
Homes on Your Lot
0 Down.
800-622-2832 X 210




3 BR, 2 BA, Completely
Remodeled, inside &
out, on 1 /2 Acres,
off School Ave.
Asking $40,000
(352) 302-7451


2/2 SW Homosassa
on Fecnced /2 acre
$39,900. Cash $45,900 if
financed $5,000 down
(352) 527-3204
CR Mini Farms-
3/2 DW Remodeled
on 1 1/4 acres fenced,
Owner Financing $6000
down, $500 month
(850) 557-0356

DUNNELLON
5159 W. Disney Ln
Large lot, new CHA
quite area $32,500
(727) 536-9443



S*


Uunnellon, -i i bedroom.
2 bath. Mobile Home w/5
acres Jacobsen Mobile
Home built in 2000, 32ft x
68ft, central air/heat
w/appliances. Master
Bedroom 14x20, Master
Bath w/jetted tub & dou-
ble vanity 10x15, 2 bed-
rooms 14x20, living rm.
14x16, family rm
w/fireplace 15x14, kitchen
w/38 cabinets 16x16,
dining rm. 14x12. Low
taxes 685.00 for current
year. Asking $145,000,
open to offers.
352-682-0266

FLORAL CITY on 3 Lots,
Assum Mortg. Priv Fin. 2
Mast Suites New appls.
horses ok, $33,900
Cridland Real Living.
J. Desha 352-634-6340


Green Acres
Is The Place To Be
3/2 ON V2 ACRE
New carpet through-
out, new appliances.
Nice Home
$2,200 down P& I only
$369.84/mo. W.A.C.
Call to View
352-621-9182

Hernando, Pine Crest
Estates, Doublewide
2BR/2BA, Fla. rm, car-
port, front porch, fully
furn., 2485 Treasure Pt.
Must see. 269-250-0950
HOLDER
3/2, Fireplace, fncd,
yd $450/mo 10% down
Owner Finance Avail
(352) 302-9217
HOMOSASSA
3394 Arundel Terr
3/2, lamaniate & tile
floors, All appls. CHA
New Roof, $1500 moves
you in $650/mo
Rent to Own
Tony Tubolina Brk
Owner(727) 385-6330

Sugarmill Woods
Area
3/2, approx. 1500 sq.
ft. on over 1 acre.
Quite,, nice home on
paved road. Brand
new A/C & heat &
appliance, under full
warranty. Ceramic
tile in master bath,
guest bath & kitchen.
New wood cabinets,
new deck & driveway
This house has a
great location,
2 mi. from Publix,
3 mi., from Suncoast
Pkwy. 5 mi. from new
Walmart. $2,200.
down $399.00/mo.,
P & I, W.A.C. Must See
to steal this house
352-621-9181





2/1 FURNISHED
MOBILE HOME,
Over 55 Park $190 Lot
Rent Village Pine, Inglis
Lot 4 A $9,500 OBO
(906) 281-7092


2/2 on Lake Rousseau.
Was $27,500 NOW
$19,900 Low Lot Rent
$240/m 2003 Mobile
Home. Used Seasonally
Owner bought a house,
our lost is your gain.
(352) 817-1987
Beverly Hills
55 + park 2/2 fully
remodeled,lg screen
lanaicarport, shed,
laundry landscape & ir-
rigation all appliances,
Club house activities,
Heated pool.Lot rent
$258, $39,900
Call 352-422-0927
Dunnellon, Fl 2 bedroom.
2 bath. 1997 Redman
14x60 MH. 2 BR 2 Bath.
New kitchen, new roof,
Air conditioner only 3 yrs
old. 12 x 14 glassed in
patio, tiled floor. Two
sheds, one is 10x12,
other is 12x14. Lot rent is
$240.00 pm Asking
$31,500.00 Call
352-465-1761
EEDGE WATER OAKS
55+ Comm.lake ac-
cess, 2/1.5, 12x56
furn.12 x 30 scr. porch,
shed, new 200 amp.
$11,500(352) 419-6477
Forest View
2 bedroom. 2 bath. 55+
Park Beautiful 1344 sq ft
many upgrades $19900
3527943519
Homosassa Springs
2008 12x40 park model
home, completely
furnished, ready to
move in $23,500
Tony 828-674-9996
HOMOSASSA'S
Best Housing Value
Modern homes from
$8 400 or Lease to Own
from $139/mo.
$800.down + Lot rent at
Evanridge Community
an exceptional 55+Park
352 628-5977
INVERENESS 55 +
Comm. 14X54 MH, 2/1
55' carport w/deck,
front scr room
w/storage shed, CHA
part furn, W/D, Reduce
to $5K, 352-344-1002
WESTWIND VILLAGE 55+
Park. Updated 2/2 DW's
for sale. Reasonable
(352) 628-2090


INVERNESS
Waterfront 55+ Park
w/5 piers for fishing &
enjoyment, clubhouse,
onsite shuffleboard, and
much more! 2 BR 1.5 BA
for $2.000. must be
approved 352-476-4964
Stonebridge Landing
55+ Comm. Resales
starting @$13,500
Financing avail
1-800-779-1226
(352) 637-1400



Homosassa-3/2 nice
and large, doublewide
on 1/2 acre. $39,900
owner financing or
lease at $750 month
(352) 628-5598
LECANTO 55+
* FOR RENT OR SALE *
1/1, Furnished $525.
2/2 Furnished $550.
352-287-9175, 746-1189




Fonluen
--- -~rZI.1,
J.W. MORTON
REAL ESTATE, INC.
1645 W. MAIN ST
INVERNESS, FL
Property Management

2/2/1 Fenced Yard...... $650
3/2/1 Fenced Yard...... $750
2/2/1 New Flooring...... $625
2/1 On A Canal.......... $550
Apartments Starting At... $375

3//2 ............... $850

2/2/2 Tile Throughout
Freshly Painted ....... $725
2/1/1 Ouiet Neighborhood $500
Jennifer Fudge,
Property Manager
Cheryl Scruggs,
Realtor-Associate
352-726-9010

CHASSAHOWITZKA
3/2 House, $600.
3/2 Furnished DW., $600
Agent (352) 382-1000


835 NE Hwy 19
Crystal River, FI
(352) 795-0021
View our website
C21NatureCoast.com






-I








CRYSTAL RIVER
2 BR. $550., 3BR House
$800., 352-563-9857
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025




AlexanderReal Estate

Crystal River Apts
2 BR/1 BA $375-$500
CRYSTAL RIVER 1/1
Handicap Ramp, Small
Pet OK. (352) 628-2815
CRYSTAL RIVER
Newly Remodeled 1/1
all until. incl'.d. $600 mo.
+Sec. 352-634-5499
FLORAL CITY
FREE Use of boat ramp,
fishing dock, canoe &
Jon boat rentals. 1 BR
$450/$200 dp. incls Sat
TV electric, walk to river
Trails End Camp, A
Friendly Place to Live
352-726-3699


HERNANDO
1 BR, Quiet Area, Near
Lake $395., 228-2701
HOMOSASSA
1/1, Clean, Quiet, CHA
$375. Incl. Wtr. 563-2114
HOMOSASSA
1 BR, Boat Dock, W&D,
cbl. TV air, until. inc. $600.
mo.+ sec, 352-628-6537
INVERNESS
Close to hosp 1/ 1 $450
5/2 $800 352-422-2393
LECANTO
Nice 1 Bedrm $500
352-613-6000. 216-0012


Ventura Village
Apartments
3580 E. Wood Knoll
Lane
Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 637-6349
Now Accepting
Applications
Central H/A
Storage;Carpet
Laundry Facilities;
On Site Mgmt
Elderly (62+)
Handicap/Disabled
with or without
children
1Bds $396;
2 Bds $ 436
TDD# 800-955-8771
"This institution is an
Equal Opportunity
Provider & Employer."



J 'l JH L mll

Get
Results
In The
Honmefront
Classifieds!


--- ---
[iACITION
C RENTAL MANAGEMENT REALITY. INC.
352-795-RENT


HOMES MOBILES APARTMENTS
FEATURED PROPERTIES
CRYSTAL RIVER

3/2/1 House in Woodland Estates. Nice yard. Has W/D..............$775
8520 N. Shannon Ave. 3/2/2 Furn or unfurnished.
1.4 acre, lots of living space/large lanai. 2,266 sq. ft. .........$1100
1365 N.E. 5th Ave.
2/1 Home on corner lot/downtown. 928 sq. ft ...........................$500
BEVERLY HILLS & CITRUS SPRINGS
11 N. Desoto St. (BH) 2/1 House, living room, family room,
uti room, screen porch. 1,368 sq. ft ..............................................$ 57 5
INVERNESS
1863 Elderberry Lane 2/2/1 condo. Pretty place
in nice complex/clubhouse/pool/trash p.u. 959 sq. ft ...........$695
8 S. Lunar Ter. 2/2/2 w/dock. Large lanai
overlook cove. Open floorplan, fans, sto. 1,521 sq. ft ................$800









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


HERNANDO
2/2, 400 E Glasboro,
$675 incl pool, water
trash etc 352-697-1907




CRYSTAL RIVER
2 bedroom. 1 bath.
$475.00 a month,$500.00
deposit.Includes
water/trash/lawn/1 car
garage.Near Park/Airport
352-598-8787
CRYSTAL RIVER
472 Briarcreek, 3/1 CHA,
pets OK, W/D hkup,
$500. Gale 795-6633
HERNANDO
Waterfront Lg. 1/1I
CHA, newly remodel.,
lawn, garb & water
incl. Ist/last/dep No
pets $575 + $500 sec
813-731-0348/416-7590
INVERNESS
2/1/1 Near Wal-mart
incIs water, lawn & trash
$510/mo. 352-637-3734
LECANTO
2/1/1 C/H/A, Water
Incl'd, W/D Hkup, $500.
mo 352-382-1344




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1 $600 per mo.
1st/last/sec.
352-628-1062
INVERNESS
Country Living on large
'/2-acre lot. 3BR, 2BA
home. Garden area,
fenced area, Well &
septic, so no water bill!
$595. RENT SPECIAL
Security dep. pro-rated
over 3 mo. period.
352-476-4964
Specializing in
Sugarmill Woods
Rentals


Debe Johns
Brkr/Assoc/PRM

Coldwell Banker Next
Generation Realty
Property Manager
(352) 382-2700 www.
coldwellbankernext
aeneration.com

See what a
Professional
Residential Manager
can do for you.




CRY RIV 2/1 $775
near bay, w/util./cable
212-2051 or 220-2447


HERNANDO
Furn. Lakefront Home,
2/2/1, new remodeled.
tastefully decorated,
great view, Fl. Rm. 1 yr
lease. $950 mo. + dep
Available April
(352) 228-0177


Kristi Bortz
Let our property
management team
help you with your
short or long term
rentals.
See all our rentals in
Citrus Co.
www.plantation
rentals
352-795-0782 or
866-795-0784




BEVERLY HILLS
2/1, FI. Rm., CHA,
$525. mo. +$300 Sec.
87 Regina Blvd.
(352) 422-0139
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/1, Cen Air, Fenc'd,
Remodeled like new
Sec. & 1st., $625 mo.
352-228-3454

CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/2 $850.
(352) 400-0230

CR/HOM 3/2/1
RC Elem,
fenced, $575
352-220-2447 212-2051


Loolk
CRYSTAL RIVER
Rent or Rent to Own
$699 Move-in Special
3/2 Lrg. fm. rm., tiled,
Spotless. Cul-de-sac.
Copeland Pk.. Fncd..
Pets OK.352-527-0493


YOU'LL t THIS!
DUNNELLON 3/2/2
RENT TO OWN
Close to Rainbow River
RUBLESRENTALS.COM
(561) 719-8787
(561) 575-1718 aftr 7pm
HOMOSASSA
2/1 CHA, No pets
$600.mo. 1st + sec
(352) 628-4210
Homosassa
2/1 Dup.$450 up
3/2/2 home $675
.SMW Immaculate
3/2/2 no pets $875
Riverlinks Realty
(352) 628-1616

Inv. Royal Oaks
3/2/2, den,comm
pool/tennis/clbhse
$850 incl water/cab.tv
no pets, non smoker
(920) 210-6788


3/2/2, like new, $749.
2/1/1, country setting,
$529. Close to town &
shopping 352-212-3412
RENT TO OWN!!
No credit check
3 bedrooms.
352-464-6020
JADEMISSION.COM

SUBSIDIZED
RENTALS IN
Lecanto/Crys. Riv
3 bedrm-Starting
@ $582/mo.



EOUAL KOU$ tN
OPPORTUNITY
352-746-0373
TDD: 888-341-2355
SUGARMILL
WOODS. 3/2/2 golf
course home, fireplace
Pool w/solar & elect
heat, stainless appl.
W/D,mediation garden,
Golf, tennis & social
memberships avail.
$1195. 352 382-1373




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225
YANKEETOWN
Furnished 2/2, Beautiful
stilt home, on last canal
to Gulf, floating dock,
on 150ft. of waterfront
Beautifully furnished
water, garb. & cable
incl.'d $1,100. mo.
Seasonal rates Avail
(352) 726-1172




CITRUS SPRINGS
Lease or Rent to Own
3/3/2'/2, Custom Pool
Home on acre $699.
Special. 1st last dep.
bkgrd Ck 352-489-3997




INVERNESS
Waterfront 3/2/2, turn.
$1,300. Nice 527-9268




FARMS, LAND,
COMMERCIAL
UNIQUE &
HISTORIC HOMES,
SMALL TOWN
COUNTRY LIFESTYLE
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989


"LIFE IS BETTER
WITH A PORCH"

www.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ille-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination. "
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



EQUAL $tNG
OPPORTUNiTY


Specializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches &
Commercial


Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com


WATERFRONT
EQUESTRIAN &
INVESTMENT/
INCOME SALES
*Buyer's
Representative
*Concierge Level
Service


Andrea Migliaccio
andreaworks 4u
@amail.com
Sherri C. Parker &
Assoc. Realtors,
Direct 352-422-3261
Office 352-527-8090
www.
sherricparker.com


For Sale By Owner
3/2/2, Custom Built
in '08 by Wheeler
Construction $129,500
Call (407) 739-2646 or
407-442-3597




3 Bedroom, 2 Bath
Double carport,
fenced yd. new roof,
1,100 sf, $55,500
(352) 464-0641
(239) 298-0076
LAUREL RIDGE
Deed res./newly
remodeled 2/2/2,
open floor plan w/den,
$109K. comm pool &
clubhse(352) 270-8488
RENT TO OWN!!
No credit check, 3
bdrm. 352-464-6020
JADEMISSION.COM




2 Bedroom, 2 bath
house with heated pool
& fireplace on 1 acre
lot in Citrus Hills. In ex-
cellent cond., Owner
finance with D/P +
Excellent credit. Call
352-860-1872 or
304-673-0110 or
304-673-5550.
Reduced to $139,000
Clearview 1 Acre
w/3 bdrm w/office/den off
master,2.5 baths,2plus
garage,great rm w/pocket
sliders to 50x24 lanai,
cooks kitchen, Master
suite to die for.Much
more! $254,900.
352-860-0444




APACHE SHORE
2 bdrm. 1 bath. close to
lake central heat and
air, new well & water
softening system,
corner wooded lot.
Excellent Investment
Opp. Assumable loan,
$30.000, 352-322-0454




297 S. Canaday Dr. 1/2
ac. 3BR, 2BA, gar/work
shop lot 198ftX11Oft
paved St. front and rear
parking for RV's, boats
etc. Inside of house
needs updating$35,500
OMO 352-726-6568
3/2/2, I.G. &C.C.
3k sf. new kit. Ig closets,
CHA, firepl. on golf
course $139K make of-
fer, norealtors 726-0652
3BR, 3BA, Pool home,
2,000 sq.ft. $165,000
OR BEST OFFER
518 Poinsettia
352-860-0878.

INVERNESS
Waterfront 55+ Park
w/5 piers for fishing &
enjoyment, clubhouse,
onsite shuffleboard
and much more!
Single wide 1 & 2 BR,
starting @ $6,900. Lot
rent $274/mo. H20
included. 3 mo. free
rent with purchase.
352-476-4964


Lakefront Gospel
Island Location
Spacious 3/2/2
for rent $700/m or for
sale..... 908-322-6529

Large 1 Fam.
Carol Terrace,
Inverness. 4BR 3BA,
2700 sq ft under air,
2.8 acres fully fenced,
important updates
done. $220,000.
Owner 352-419-7017





IMMACULATE
Plantation area
Energy-wise 3 bed-
room. 2 bath. Garage.
Ready move in. Fenced
backyard w/playhouse.
352-563-1341


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work For You!

BETTY HUNT,
REALTOR
ERA KEY 1 Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.

Condo for Sale
2/2, 1,850 sq.ft.,
35 Beech Street





5 Acres(2 lots) adj Pine
Ridge/C.Springs
3/2/2, sits back off road
paved driveway, part.
chain fence $150K firm
(352) 564-8307


Best Time To Buy!
I have lease options,
owner financing &
foreclosures
call Phyllis Strickland
(352) 613-3503
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.


For S e k ,,

Citrus County
3BR/2Bath Make
Offers 352-563-9857


DEB INFANTINE

3 HOMES SOLD
In December
I Need Listings!
Real Estate!...
it's what I do.

ERA American
Realty
Phone:(352) 726-5855
Cell:(352) 302-8046
Fax:(352) 726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com












Michele Rose, Realtor
Simply put I 'II work
harder 352-212-5097
isellcitruscountv5@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515




MANHATTAN
CLUB
Most in Demand
Time Share in NYC.
Premier location.
Full Amenities. Split
Wk Silver Pkg. Sleeps
4, World Wide R.C.I.
Program. Week
banked, to be used
in 2012. Private
individuals only.
$18K Contact
Stephenaitken@
optonline.net or call:





2/2, Garage, heated
pool/spa, 8500 Gospel
Isl. Road, Inverness
$112,000 Owner financ-
ing, email for photo,
trader@tampabay.rr.
com (727) 415-7728
CRYSTAL RIVER/OZELLO
$299K, 2+/2/2
Open floor plan,
Hardwood floors,
www.waterfrontozello.co
m or 352-563-5527
Salt waterfront stilt
home on Ozello Key
Owner finance 3%
down payment, pri-
vate boat ramp and
dock, 1000 square foot
living upstairs, 1000
square foot screen
downstairs workshop
$174,900 Call Craig or
Debra at 352-422-1011
or 352-634-3872


See all the listings
in Citrus County @
lisavandeboe
@vahoo.com
Plantationrealtv
listings.com


m= aI
Office Open
7 Days a Week

Lisa VanDeboe
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129





CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pond,
ATV trails $165K obo
352 795-2027/ 634-4745


For Sa le%'
HOMOSASSA, OFF
GROVER
CLEVELAND
1.2 Acres off Grover
Cleveland Ave. Already
has power pole, septic,
and well. Call Richard
352-897-6777


Citruls County
Homes


Get

Results

In The

Homefront

Classifieds!



SHomrne Finder
www.ch r h m finder,corn


LAND 1.5 Acres fenced
partially cleared, on 480
in Homosassa across
from firehouse.
MUST SEE!!!
352-382-0535






CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational
in Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Area, well, pond,
ATV trails $165K obo
352 795-2027/ 634-4745






INVERNESS
For Sale 12 lots (20 X
120 each) $8,000. Zoned
residential.At 3109 E
Millside Ln, Inverness.
Sold together or sepa-
rately. Contact: Shayn
Robinson 832 549 0286
or
ShaynRobinson@hot-
mail.com


INVERNESS,
Beautiful Wooded Lot
on Edged Dry Lake,
100 x 150 $8,900
Owner Finance
(352) 621-1664


SUGARMILL
WOODS
Fringetree St,
100 W x 120 deep.
Ready to build $9,999.
(352) 503-6980


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2012 Ell







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


JANE
Continued from Page E9

tough, shiny dark green leaves. Three species are
used in Florida gardens japonica, reticulata
and sasanqua.
Sasanquas bloom early from November to De-
cember Japonicas flower mid-season from De-
cember to March, and reticulatas open later from
March to April. Each variety blooms for only three
or four weeks.
If several varieties of Camellias are carefully se-
lected, a garden can have a series of exotic flowers
spanning the cooler months in Florida. Pink 'Cot-
ton Candy' and white 'Polar Ice' sasanquas bloom
in November. From late November to mid-
December pure white 'Mi-No-Yoki,' Deep pink
'Shishi Gashira' and the popular 'Sparkling Bur-
gundy' sasanquas burst into flower. In December
the larger-leaved japonicas take over 'Yuletide' is
covered in 2-inch, single pink flowers in time for
the holidays. 'Professor Sargent' has bright red
double pompom flowers that ornament the dark
green shrub in late December Mid-season japon-
icas take their turn in January and February Fi-
nally, the spectacular reticulatas flower in March,
some lasting until April.
There are many growers specializing in Camel-
lias surrounding Lake Weir, south of Ocala. It is
worth a field trip to buy a collection from a knowl-
edgeable nursery farm. A second option is to fre-
quent a local nursery every three weeks to buy the
variety currently in flower. Eight different Camel-
lias can be chosen to provide flowers throughout
the cool season. There are hundreds of species
and thousands of cultivated varieties and hybrids.
Temperate camellias need cool winters and can
tolerate frost. Good drainage is essential to pre-
vent root rot. Soil must be humus-rich, retain
moisture and be acidic with a pH of 5 to 7. Camel-
lias will weaken and die in sand. Afternoon shade
in Florida's hot summer is critical, especially for
the larger-leaved japonicas, which sun-scorch eas-
ily Too-dense shade yields few Camellia flowers.
Warmth and sunlight in late summer promote bud
growth. Shade also protects young plants and
flower buds from frost in winter Select the plant-
ing site carefully to suit the plant's needs in your
location.
Asian Camellias are prone to Asian scale in-
sects. Look on the undersides of leaves for clus-
ters of tiny white insects. It is impossible to kill all
the hidden insects, larvae and eggs with topical
spray insecticides or oil and soap mixes. A long-
lasting systemic insecticide will kill insects on
contact and be absorbed into the plant to kill for
weeks after application. Nearby, other Asian
species may also be infested. Check Burford Holly,
King Sago and Magnolia plants for scale too.
For a denser, more compact plant, prune each
variety immediately after flowering and before
new leaf growth begins. Propagation by semi-hard
stem cuttings under mist is a long-term project.

Jane Weber is a professional gardener and nurs-
ery owner She welcomes weekend visitors to her
Florida Friendly Yard and Wildlife Habitat at 5019
W Stargazer Lane, Dunnellon. Call 352-465-0649.


'Heath gardens' require preparation


I


-. 1Q.-'-.-r



.-7 .
.. .





-- ---" ii


LEE REICH/Associated Press
This undated photo shows a heath bed in a garden in New Paltz, N.Y. Botanical kin sometimes make good garden companions,
and such is the case for the heath family.

British use peat to provide necessary acidity, but there are alternatives


LEE REICH
For The Associated Press
Botanical kin sometimes make good
garden companions, and such is the case
for the heath family.
You know these plants: rhododen-
dron, azalea, pieris, mountain laurel
and, of course, heather and heath. Add
blueberry, huckleberry and lingonberry,
and you have a grouping that can pro-
vide months of good eating, flowers al-
most year round, and attractive stems or
leaves.
In Britain, such plants are among
those that dwell in so-called "peat gar-


dens," in which the soil is amended with
enormous quantities of peat. Peat pro-
vides the extreme acidity, low fertility,
consistent moisture and aeration in
which these plants thrive.
All that peat is not a must for a heath
bed. But some special soil preparation
is required, and anytime you can work
the soil is a good time to do it.
Sawdust in the soil
Many years ago, in autumn, I prepared
a heath bed by mixing sawdust instead
of peat into the soil. Any kind of sawdust
will do, except that from wood that has
been treated with a preservative, such


as pressure-treated wood.
Sawdust breaks down slowly, so pro-
vides a long-lasting source of humus,
and it is finely divided, so it can be
mixed intimately with the soil. It also
acidifies the soil, at least for a while.
Soil acidity is crucial for most heath
plants, their preference being a range
from 4 to 5.5, which is much more acidic
than most other plants demand. The
ideal is to test your soil and then add sul-
fur a natural mineral to bring acid-
ity to the correct range.
In sandy soils, add three-quarters of a
See HEATH/Page E15


E12 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2012








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



PLANTS
Continued from Page E8

Water loops feed the
plants with valves, controls
and timers. And yes, some
watering is done by hand.
His staff works from 6 a.m.
to 2:30 p.m., and 16 people
water the plants by hand for
up to 90 minutes each morn-
ing.
A climate controlled sys-
tem keeps the temperature
at 68 to 72 degrees year
round.
Relative humidity stays
around 55 percent most of
the time. An air exchange
system ensures that air in
the atriums does not be-
come stale.
"It's kind of like a park,"
Malone said. "People come in
and are amazed. It's always a
good day inside even if the


Investors Realty
of Citrus County, IF
Visit my website at:
www.myflorida-hou


weather outside is bad."
Most of the plants re-
bloom "if they're happy," he
said. He estimates just 2
percent of the plants die.
"We've taken some out be-
cause they just got too big,"
Malone confessed.
The hotel, next to the
Grand Ole Opry House,
home of the world's most fa-
mous country music show,
uses well water with very
little sulfur and just a little
iron. Fortunately, there is
plenty of water pressure. He
disdains chemicals.
"Sometimes visitors from
a tropical country will
come in and give me sug-
gestions about certain
plants," Malone said. "You
learn."
The hotel and atriums are
so far-flung that Malone,
weaving through under-
ground tunnels, was almost
late for an interview on a far


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REALTOR
nc. (352) 220-0466
se.com gbarth@myflorida-house.com


S3560 N WOODGATE DR.- THE GLEN
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The hotel and atriums are so far-flung that

Malone, weaving through underground tunnels,

was almost late for an interview on a far end of the

resort. But once there, he asked the interviewer

where he lives in Nashville, and a few minutes later

analyzed the soil from that neighborhood off


end of the resort. But once
there, he asked the inter-
viewer where he lives in
Nashville, and a few min-
utes later analyzed the soil
from that neighborhood off
the top of his head.
Advice for backyard


0 TiI & I OFFICES


SandraOlear




Brian Murray




Anna Moore




DickHildebrandt




Florence Clearyf




Helen Forte




Jane 0. Gwynn




Joann Martin




Matt Robinson




Tami Mayer


the top of his head.

gardeners:
"The biggest mistake
made is buying something
without thinking. You need
a plan and you've got to do a
little studying. Know the site
and select the right plant.
Making the right selection is


the key And remember that
there is no such thing as no
maintenance.
"Plants like warm (not hot
or cold) water
"Light is the key to every-
thing. No light, no plant
growth.


NEW LISTING


REDUCED 26K


L "' 383 W M..:I y M .ilP. ll
MLS#346181 $399,000
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Magnificent 4/3.5/2.5 pool home, 3rd
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MLS#352603 $109,900
Drastically reduced! No disappointment!
Lowest priced unit with Florida room
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NEW LISTING




C r1. 18ll E Mu-1 "I. uly L
MLS#353393 149,900
Picture perfect three bedroom home
w/new roof, new appliances, new
flooring & recent painted inside & out,
2-car garage provides lots of storage
and enclosed lanai w/half bath provides
a bonus rm.

REDUCED 10K




C 2822 N ChIrcl.IIW *,
MLS#351651 $149,900
Immaculate custom 3/2/2 w/self-
cleaning, caged, heated pool, new
heating and A/C unit 12/10, great
room, formal dining room, large
eat-in kitchen, split floor plan, lots
of tile, and much more.
REDUCED 5K


MLS#349612 $79,900
Fully furnished 2/2.5 townhome has
updated flooring, air conditioning.
Sliding glass door enclosure on the
downstairs porch overlooks a large
green space & the beautiful heated
community pool.


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2012 E13

"Most people kill more
plants by overwatering, not
underwatering."
Donna James of Min-
neapolis, admiring the
plants during a two-day
stopover at the hotel en
route to Florida, said she
could use Malone's expert-
ise in her own backyard.
"He has a pretty darn
hard job, and he's done an
excellent job," she said. "I
don't do too well."
Malone goes home and
works every day in his own
garden, more than 7 acres
with a lot of boxwoods and
quite a bit of shade, "which
makes it harder"
"I'm fascinated by green
things," he said.


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Beautiful 2/2/2 in quiet neighborhood.
Bright kitchen w/lots of cabinets,
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eat-in kitchen, Florida room,
sprinkler system, roof replaced 2006.
Home is well-maintained.

REDUCED 5K




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MLS#351513 $119,900
Not a short sale, but priced like one.
Bright & cheery single family home
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i .*., N I.r.lly [1i0
MLS#353378 $44,900
Lowest priced villa in The Glen. 2/2/1
is easy to maintain, enjoy life at The
Glen. Tenant could stay if new owner
wants to rent property. Otherwise,
unit could be cleaned and ready to
close in 30 days.


1t01 l lIu7 NE3rI A
MLS#351663 $119,000
FL Cracker Style home has been totally
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sits on 2 lots & feat. newer roof, newer
A/C, updated plumbing, electric, energy
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MLS#347648 $59,900
Beautiful 2/1.5/1 in quiet neighborhood.
Home has central water and sewer,
family room, living room, eat-in kitchen
with lots of cabinets, 2 large bedrooms,
sprinkler system and much more.


2011 Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities. An independently owned and operated broker member of Prudential Real Estate Affiliates, Inc., a
Prudential Financial company. Prudential, the Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are service marks of Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities,
registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Used under license. Equal Housing Opportunity.


For a Visual Tour or Multiple Photos, Go to: wwwfloridashowcaseproperties.com


Kb *







E14 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2012


FRUGAL able to
board. I
other me
Continued from Page E4 plannedc
go on tl
or black beans (one of each days, I ta
if you are a rebel) and two and see
cans diced tomatoes. Add there. If i
spices to taste. Sprinkle days, it
with cheese as desired. fridge: e
Cricket, Texas eaten by
Rain gutter bookshelves: to the c
You can turn any corner of also try
your home into a reading night on'
corner for your little ones. clean oul
The "shelves" are actually called it
vinyl rain gutters. We paid my guys
$5.99 for a 10-foot piece at complain
Lowe's. My wonderful hus- ing it "
band cut the piece into night" (c
three shelves and screwed and now
them to the wall. For photos lous. Tl
visit www.frugalvillage.com FFY n:
/forums/just-tips/144662- Oregon
rain-gutter-book-shelves.
html TB., Wyoming Dear S
Basmati rice: A word of spices la
warning: If you buy basmati tons that
rice in bulk packaging, it dates on
often contains bugs. You'll still hav
want to rinse the rice in a I'm not s
bowl of cold water, slosh it their tru
gently and you'll see brown ing cook
specks and maybe even a them, bul
few black bugs floating. I them in
find that three changes of and not
water generally does the Other th
trick. C.H., Missouri cream ol
Leftover inventory: I have eral Mc(
a whiteboard on the fridge tin cans:
for leftovers. If it is avail- prika, n


SWAP
Continued from Page E7

Signing the papers went smoothly
There was lots of joking and laughing,
not to mention brownies.
"We said we had a list of contingen-
cies, like we wanted her to tug on her
ear every time she signed her name -
stuff like that, just goofing around,"
Gordon said.
After finishing the paperwork, they
celebrated with wine and
Pepe's Pizza.
Everything had to be taken out of
both homes for the closing, so they
rented trucks to hold furniture and be-
longings. Then, by chance, both par-
ties hired the same house cleaner to
do a once-over When moving day ar-
rived Dec. 2, they did everything
themselves.
Gordon feels very fortunate to be in
her new house now, to have the space


eat, it goes on the
f it's saved for an-
al (some call these
1-overs"), it doesn't
ie list. Every few
ke a peek at the list
what is still on
it isn't eaten in four
needs to exit my
either to be frozen,
someone or added
ompost/garbage. I
to plan a leftovers
ce a week, to help
t the fridge. When I
"leftovers night,"
would moan and
n. So I started call-
fend for yourself
r FFY for short),
they think it's fabu-
tey even request
ights! Zakity,

mNE
ara: How long do
ist? I know I have
have no expiration
them. Some spices
e a good smell, but
ure if they will hold
e spice flavor dur-
ing. I hate to pitch
t I'd also hate to use
a batch of cookies
lave them turn out
an cinnamon and
f tartar, I have sev-
Cormick spices in
allspice, dill, pa-
iustard seed, etc.


Any tips? Tina, Midwest
Dear Tina: McCormick's
website states that if their
spices are in a tin can, they
are at least 15 years old. The
site states that ground
spices have a shelf life of
two to three years, whole
spices three to four years,
seasoning blends one to two
years, herbs one to three
years and extracts four
years (except pure vanilla).
Your cream of tartar should
be fine if it was stored in
your pantry and sealed.
Much like pure vanilla, it
has a very long shelf life.
Spices with a good aroma
can still be used. But you'll
probably need to use more
than you would with newer
spices because the potency
definitely diminishes over
time. I would toss out the
dried herbs, though. They
simply start to look faded
and completely unappeal-
ing after a couple of years.
As for the use of herbs
and spices, you can visit
www.lontano. com/images/S
piceChart.pdf for a basic
compatibility guide. Once
you've read the guide, you
could mix your own herb
and spice blends to use up
older spices, too. As you re-
place your herbs and spices,
you'll find that the contain-
ers sold at your local gro-


she needs for her family, and to still
have Williams as her neighbor.
Williams said, "God has always
taken care of me and still does."
It appears things worked out for
the best.
"I've been doing this for 26 years,
and it's the most satisfying thing to be
able to put something like this to-
gether," said Rose, who works at Lom-
bardi Realtors in Danbury "With them
being right across the street from each
other, it was definitely a unique trans-
action."
Rose said he can't predict what's
next for the market, but there's always
someone who needs to buy and some-
one who needs to sell.
'As this scenario shows, it's just
finding those people," he said.
Gordon said she is always falling in
love with a new room in the Danbury
house she bought from Williams. At
first it was "the mud room," where
there is also a washer and dryer
"Having three small kids, that's


cery store will provide a list
of compatible foods, too.
Dear Sara: I was making
cookies for my son's birth-
day, and when I opened two
packages of brown sugar,
they were both solid as a
rock. They were stored un-
opened in the kitchen cabi-
net, so I'm not sure what the
issue is. Is there any way to
soften or salvage them? -
Kelily, forums
Dear Kelily: There are
quite a few ways to soften
brown sugar. You can use a
hand grater and grate it You
can place the brown sugar
in a zipper baggie and add a
cut apple, a piece of bread
or a small, water-soaked
clay saucer. Leave it for a
couple of days in the sealed
baggie so it regains mois-
ture. You can put the brown
sugar in a bowl and place it
in your microwave with a
mug of water Run your mi-
crowave for 30 to 40 seconds
at a time and keep checking
the brown sugar until it soft-
ens. In the future, you can
store brown sugar in your
freezer and thaw before
using it.
Dear Sara: Any tips for
cleaning the inside of my
dishwasher? Hannah L,
Ohio
Dear Hannah: I remove
the racks and use a green


ideal," she said. "Then it was the mas-
ter bath. Literally, the first week or so,
every day I had a new favorite room.
Now I love the kitchen. I look at my old
house out my kitchen window."
The Gordons' new home was origi-
nally Williams' grandparents' house.
Williams said her new home is per-
fect for her She likes changing things,
and is looking forward to having the
bathroom redone.
The fireplace near a picture win-
dow in her living room is another fa-
vorite spot for Williams. She finds it
cozy and loves to sit there and read.
"I was so blessed to have friends
and family helping with all this," said
Williams. "My late husband's sister
and her husband move all the time -
just for fun, can you imagine? and
were invaluable in their help with the
moving sale, packing and schlepping
my stuff.
"The next move will be never," said
Williams. But if it happens, she's hir-
ing professionals.


3M scotch pad and an old
toothbrush to scrub around
the seal/gasket and drain,
and to clean the interior
walls. I use hot, soapy water
(regular liquid dishwashing
soap), too. I pour vinegar in
the dishwasher and let it
run on a hot cycle. Many of
my readers swear by citric
acid to clean their dish-
washers. They fill the soap
dispenser with either pow-
dered Tang or lemonade
Kool-Aid and run a full
cycle. Lemi Shine dish-
washing additive works
well, too.
Dear Sara: I made toast
this morning and acciden-
tally left the bread bag too
close to the toaster oven. I
now have melted plastic on
the door. Any tips to remove
it? Crystal, Florida
Dear Crystal: While the
toaster oven is still warm,
you can use a wooden or
plastic spoon, a spatula or a
plastic/nylon dish scrubbie
to try to scrape off as much
of the melted plastic as pos-
sible, then wipe the door
with a damp cloth. Unplug
your toaster oven, and once


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

it is completely cool, apply
nail-polish remover, rub-
bing alcohol, WD-40 or Vase-
line on a cloth and rub it
onto the melted plastic area.
Rinse with a clean, damp
cloth and keep wetting,
wringing, wiping, rinsing
until it's as clean as possi-
ble. If there's still some
melted plastic left, try bak-
ing soda on a moistened
cloth or sponge, then rinse
with a damp cloth again. If
there's still some remaining
plastic, make a paste from
cream of tartar and vinegar
on a sponge and apply it to
the glass door. Wipe the
door with a clean damp
cloth.


Sara Noel is the owner of
Frugal Village (www.
frugalvillage.com), a web-
site that offers practical,
money-saving strategies for
everyday living. To send
tips, comments or ques-
tions, write to Sara Noel,
c/o Universal Uclick, 1130
Walnut Street, Kansas City
MO, 64106, or email
sara@frugalvillage. com.


Jackie &Bob Davis
American Realty & Investments
0 % 117 S. Hwy 41 Inverness, FL
(352) 634-2371 Cell (800) 476-2590 Toll Free
E RA bob@bjdavis.com "
EL EST E For a Visual Tour of our listings and all MLS:bdavis co


You'll find a joyful, good feeling in
i, bedroom, 2 bath villa. An eat-
r', ,tchen (granite counters), a
1m rom, a screened porch and
h i,, overlooking the 9th tee.
1 ,',-',,',, provides lawn service,
'A,', E' .: i:eace of mind if you're a
S while you travel, along
Srr, ir-, ,:, nimunity's pool
*105.000 MLS 353490


A GEM OF A HOME
2 Master suites
2-Car garage
Caged pool
A Remodeled kitchen, baths
Newer roof, C/H/A
Half-acre
Ais $144,900 MLS 351129
CENTER HALL COLONIAL
3 Bedrooms, 2.5 baths
1st Floor master suite
2,814 SFLA
Formal living & dining rooms
_*J IFamily room
On 2 waterfront lots
$175,000 MLS 350543







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


WASPS
Continued from Page E6

to control mole crickets. One downside
to using pesticides to control any insect
is that insects that survive a pesticide
application may have a higher resist-
ance to the pesticide. As the surviving
insects reproduce, the pesticide resist-
ance is passed to subsequent genera-
tions. This can result in resistance to the
chemical, possibly making it ineffective.
The Larra wasp is just one of the
millions of beneficial insect species in
existence. A limited number of free
larraflower seeds are available on a
first come, first served basis by calling


ATTIC
Continued from Page E6

identify. I have checked all my EAPG
books and Depression glass books, and
it is not in any of them. I have tried
using the Internet by searching the
term "iris," but the only pattern I get
is iris and herringbone.
She is not interested in selling it, but
would like to know the pattern and the
maker and perhaps if there is more
available to purchase. I have been told
that there are businesses or sites that
will help with identification. Can you
tell me anything about the pattern
from the attached picture, or do you
know an identification source? The
pieces she has are a berry bowl, a
desert bowl, and the plate that goes


Gina Hamilton at 352-527-5707.
Fbr questions on pest management or
other Florida-friendly landscaping top-
ics, call 352-527-5708 or send an email to
AudreyDurr@bocc.citrus.fl.us. For more
information, visit Citrus County's website
at www.bocc.citrus.fl.us, the Southwest
Florida Water Management District's
website at www.WaterMatters.org and
the University of Florida's website at
www.SolutionsForYourLife.org.
The Citrus County Florida Yards &
Neighborhoods program is a free pub-
lic education program that is funded
jointly by the Citrus County Depart-
ment of Water Resources and the
Coastal Rivers and Withlacoochee
River basin boards of the Southwest
Florida Water Management District

with it. The glass is clear. The color
you see is from the chair it was sitting
on for the picture. -EP, Internet
Dear P: I do not recognize the pat-
tern of your glass I think it was made
in America between World War I and
II. In order to perhaps get the pattern
and maker identification, as well as
finding more pieces to purchase, con-
tact Sparkle Plenty Glass, at www.sp-
glass.com. Good luck.

John Sikorski has been a profes-
sional in the antiques business for 30
years. He hosts a call-in radio show,
Sikorski's Attic, on WJUF (90.1 FM)
Saturday from noon to 1 p.m. Send
questions to Sikorski's Attic, c/o The
Citrus County Chronicle, 1624 N.
Meadowerest Blvd., Crystal River, FL
34429 or asksikorski@aol. com.


HEATH
Continued from Page E12

pound of sulfur per 100 square
feet for each pH unit above 4.5.
Use three times that amount for
soils high in clay
Sawdust has just a smidgen
of nitrogen, and when soil mi-
croorganisms start making saw-
dust into humus, they're going
to need more. As they scavenge
excess nitrogen from the soil,
plants are apt to get starved for
this element Avert the problem
by adding extra nitrogen to the
soil along with the sawdust, to
the tune of 2 pounds of actual
nitrogen for every 40 bushels of
sawdust.
That 2 pounds of nitrogen
might be supplied, for example,
by 20 pounds of any fertilizer
that is 10 percent nitrogen, or


WEEDS
Continued from Page E6

prevents unwanted germination.
U Using the right tools. Long-
handled hoes, string trimmers
and propane-fueled flamerss"
have helped gardeners avoid
many an aching back. But be
careful about where you direct
those flames. Leaves and wood


by 30 pounds of my prefer-
ence soybean meal, which is
7 percent nitrogen.
To prepare the bed for plant-
ing, I spread a 3-inch depth of
sawdust on the soil along with
the fertilizer and sulfur, then
dug it into the top 6 inches of
soil. No need to mix the stuff
any deeper because another
quirk of the heath family is that
the plants have few roots rang-
ing deeper than 6 inches.
This is a one-time digging,
needed only to prepare the
ground for planting.
The bed was ready for plant-
ing the spring after the autumn
soil preparation. (I could also
have prepared and planted that
same spring.) For best growth,
peat moss is needed at planting
time, in the form of a bucketful
mixed into the soil of each
planting hole.
After planting, more sawdust

mulch are combustible
combinations.
U Spraying with synthetic her-
bicides. Weed-killing chemicals
have proven effective, but don't
overdo it Targeting the spray
rather than broadcasting it, and
timing applications for windless
days should reduce some of the
ecological hazards. "Many peo-
ple are using corn gluten now,
which is more responsible for
our groundwater," Pierson said.


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2012 E15

- or shredded leaves, wood
chips, pine needles or any other
weed-free organic material is
needed, spread 2 to 3 inches
deep on top of the ground.
Mulch, which needs to be re-
newed annually, protects the
shallow roots from hot sun and
drying out, snuffs out weeds,
and gradually breaks down to
keep enriching the soil with
humus.
The only other item in this
prescription for a heath bed is
water Plants need a weekly
soaking 1 inch deep, or a half-
gallon per square foot of root
area throughout their first
and second growing seasons.
When planting a heath bed,
there's no need to ban non-rela-
tives. Call it a "peat garden," and
trilliums, some kinds of phlox
and lilies, and primulas, which
also enjoy these soil conditions,
will also feel welcome.

Finally, if you can't beat
them, eat them. One person's
eyesore is another's salad.
Some of the most common
edible weeds, such as Canada
thistle, dandelion and wild
mustards, can make appetizing
side dishes or key ingredients
in salads. Know what you're
gathering, however, because
some weeds are toxic. And
avoid anything that may have
been sprayed with pesticides.


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JUST REDUCED $20,000
* ,Ji lil, i i illil [` H ill; I...)'i i ,), .. i 111l II :; .1

pi.,ll A l'lji i I iii i:
$164,800
Call Maitha Snydei 352 476 8727
Ask lot ile = 352101


h. l : i. ,l .| ;: ii l .if .i i l l i 11".:l l l .ll.ill' llll



Cal 1 O 1S. 1 MI 11. illi 3 a i i.2 i.627 i cell
Call DORIS MINER 352 422 4627 ,celli


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S PINE RIDGE ESTATES
OW NER FINANCE '""' i "..I h.. "". ",l. I' .I **"I,
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$57,900 il.IV.. ML = M i ; ::
Call Ruth Fiedewick 1 352 563 6866 Call loiamne 0 Regan 352 586 0075


BANK-OWNED COMMERCIAL

l Cilail I .l l .lI il Ou die.. II l' .7111, el3.:.3 9
1h j.l I:,) &ll ,$i
MtI=. ,.L' $150,000!
Call Ouade Feesei 352 302 7699


WATERFRONT
* I I. U. ,l IVI. .il.l I i, I

* N VV I,01)if Iil VViia. _~.li.-
= 1: ,,.:.: $128,900
Jeanne b Ih'//lard Picktel 212 3410
iz'i'ii' CiuinsCounil Sold corn


SPOTLESS PERFECT
C Fe N ii,. lii VVI.,i
Ill v1 I, ll I' nn il ,, l, invl i ,jl i l

= .i'_17** $59,000
Jeanne 6b 'llaid Pickiel 2/23410
wiz'iz'iz CilinsCounIt Sold corn







EDEN FARMS
i.ai. i l. IuIu I.,. .i 1. I.h II U. .. _' i, ..h. 1,



h' a.i a a lv .i aIll mmi I II l I16 mI.a hv,

P1 = .11.. OFFERED AT $105,000
C fP mI R BoI.c 352 4299252


LOCATION ,LOCATION


Cal'lll Rit Fell delicii 135 2I563 1666 i
. ,iil.n.n M iia II~liI..... $179,900
Call Ruth fiedeick I1352 5636866


Ili. I Ai Rf_ IIVE Ijf i'llj 1iR I)W i PARi Tin.

Iln ll M I. E i 1 ... 2. hill h R h... Ii.. :.

h., i ph,,l .1 .l,],ii,.iil. Ib. h ll.ll Ih t V.ill.l .in i: 11 i d l1.i .ilm il h ..1

.llI T III:llJl TI)J $75,000
Call DORIS MINER 352 422 4627 celll


.,. li l l .' x .h l i, 6:..ii lV il fl in.lil hll :
.- ,, ,lC,,. _W ',, I Jlh ,
Mi = A.i ,., $69,900
Pat Davis 352 212 7280
Viei, listing: iti'i:'. c21 paidavis. com


NICE, NEWER 3/2/2



$110,000
Call Ouade Feesei 352 302 7699


BLACK DIAMOND RANCH 3/2/2+
* IVM.ilI il. i ...I lld II. ..
* H ,hl i .,L ,I l a,,'i ''' 'lh hdl
* I li, einiin.. I,' ,Irr,, all-nIion, I.., ,-la i
Mt Cl = -1llj 'I $389,900
Call Chailes Kelly 352 422 2387


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,lln.il. I VV II: I I. .1i"Nll i i n,' n ll I inI n
Mi_ = .76,,. $67,900
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E16 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2012




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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE