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Citrus County chronicle
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Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02668
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 01-29-2012
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:02668

Full Text



Hot as the desert: Tiger surges to top ofleaderboard


TODAY & Monday morning
HIGH Mostly sunny. North
70 winds 5 tolO 10 mph.
LOW Clear tonight.
37 PAGE A4
JANUARY 29, 2012


CITRUS


COUNTY


HRONICTI


COMMENTARY:


Vote for 'Blessings' as Everyday Heroes


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff Writer
All it takes is a click to
make Citrus County's Bless-
ings in a Backpack pro-


gram, and volunteers Mary
Catherine Spires and Elisa-
beth Moore, Bay News 9's
Viewer's Choice Everyday
Hero of the Year.
The winner is selected by


viewers votes from the Bay
News 9 website at www.
baynews9.com/article/news/
2012/january/370762/Vote-
See Page A4


VOTE ON THE NET
* Visit Bay News 9's website at www.
baynews9.com/article/news/2012/
january/370762/Vote-for-9s-Viewers-
Choice-Hero-of-the-Year


Geography
Candidate roots don't
much matter in this
diverse state./Page Cl
HOMECOMING:


Patriotic
City welcomes Iraq vets
with parade./Page A12


Reel it in
Antique fishing gear has
long been of interest to
collectors./Page E6
OPINION:
Let our
message be
clear: We
think closing
down the
nuclear plant
is a bad idea.


ENTERTAINMENT:
SUNDAY EVENING
C B D/l
SWESHI NBC 19 19
0 WEDUPBS 3 3
B WiFT] PBS 5 5
0 WFLA NBC 8 8 8
0 WFTV) ABC 20 20 20

Tonight's TV
Find listings for Sunday
evening TV, plus the
crossword./Page A14
SUBSCRIPTION ONLY:


I563-565 t EZ Pay Way! |

Miss it?
If you did not sign up
for the new, separate
subscription to the
Viewfinder TV book, you
won't find it in today's
Chronicle. Call 352-
563-5655 before
10 a.m. today, or
business hours week-
days, to sign up for next
week's guide.


MEDICAID

Last-chance lifeline for mar


MATTHEW BECK/
Helen Blum, left, receives balancing help from physical therapist Genevieve Lim at Citrus Health and Rehab (
in Inverness. The facility receives Medicaid funding for about half its patients, and budget cuts could affect se

Woman exasperated with Medicaid problem


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff Writer
HERNANDO These days, 60-
year-old Debbie Simonton's life is
suffused with carefully crafted de-
cisions about what to do about her
health, her mother's well-being and
the overwhelming financial pinch
she is feeling.
Simonton's fate took a turn for the
worst about a year ago when she
took a spill from her 4-foot-high bed
and hit her head on a side table,
causing nerve damage to portions of
her torso.
The former nurse descended
from full-time work to the nether-
world of disability, foreclosure, lack
of insurance, Social Security and
Medicaid.
"I lost everything. I lost my house.
I lost my car. I lost my savings,
everything. I moved in with my 80-
year-old mother, who has all kinds
of health problems also," Simonton
said.
See Page A9


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Debbie Simonton is having problems after losing her Medicaid benefits when
she went on disability after she took a fall that left her unable to work. The
Citrus County resident has been engaged in a battle to recover the benefits
but has been told it would cost her $900 monthly out of her $1,100 to get
the coverage she had with the state program.


10,798
11,619
10,462
11,965
15,514
146,564
18,917,612


Editor's note: Today the
Chronicle kicks off a
I monthly series on quality-
of-life issues in Citrus
County by focusing on
Medicaid: those who ben-
efit by programs and
those who struggle with
its bureaucracy, and the
ly potential impact ofMedi-
caid budget cuts.
CITRUS COUNTY

QUALITY



L\IIF &

2012 Chronicle project
MIKE WRIGHT
Staff Writer
No one grows up hop-
ing to get on Medicaid.
The program pays for
medical care for the poor
and disabled and those
who are barely scraping by
It's the place to go when
there is no place else to
go. Without Medicaid,
most couldn't afford a
simple medical checkup
or trip to the dentist.
But it's also for children
of struggling parents to
give them the opportunity
to grow up healthy, and
mothers-to-be for pre-
natal care.
And, it is for the poor as
they grow older. Just be-
cause someone qualifies
for Medicare at age 65
doesn't mean they don't
/Chronicle need the help Medicaid
Center also provides. Nursing
rvices. homes have Medicare pa-
tients as well as those on
S Medicaid.
[is Medicaid also helps
those who cannot help
themselves in other ways.
Persons with severe men-
tal and physical disabili-
ties are treated in
facilities that receive
Medicaid funding.
To many Americans,
the program is a lifesaver.
It serves 3.2 million
Floridians, with half of
those being children and
people younger than 20,
state data shows.
See Page A8


MORE INSIDE
* Family struggles to
help son./Page A2
* Q&A./Page A2
* List of Medicaid
providers./Page A8
* Providers say they
cannot absorb
Medicaid cuts.
/Page A9
* Next month: Homeless


TOTAL NUMBER OF RESIDENTS ELIGIBLE FOR MEDICAID IN CITRUS COUNTY
Number of Medicaid eligibles and percent of total population by ZIP code, Citrus County and Florida as of December 2010.


Area


Total


Medicaid Eligibles


Population Number


34428 Crystal River


10,669


34429 Crystal River 9,998


34433 Dunnellon
34434 Dunnellon
34436 Floral City
34442 Hernando


6,488
7,630
9,667
13,805


1,526
1,524
1,029
1,217
1,345
1,818


Percent
14.3
15.2
15.9
16.0
13.9
13.2


Area


34450 Inverness
34452 Inverness
34453 Inverness
34461 Lecanto
34465 Beverly Hills
Citrus County
Florida


Medicaid Eligibles
timber Percent


1,482
1,728
1,814
1,370
2,246
20,669
2,953,993


13.7
14.9
17.3
11.5
14.5
14.1
15.6


Annie's Maibox......A14 34446 Homosassa 16,342 2,086 12.8 Source: Agency for Health Care Administration, Medicaid Program Office; 2010;
Classifieds...............D7 34448 Homosassa 10,905 2,022 18.5 ESRI Business Solutions, 2010. Prepared by: WellFlorida Council, 2012.
Crossword ...........A14
Editorial.................... C2
Entertainment ..........B4
Horoscope...........B4 G
LotteryPayouts........ GOP candidates' pitch to voters: I'm your leader
M ovies ....................A 16
Obituaries ................ A6 Associated Press 2012 PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY Barack Obama.
Together ............ A16.. A16 201lUPRIIAL rIOV RY If anyone missed Monday's con-
WASHINGTON-The pitch from ference call from the Romney cam-
the Republican presidential con- leader, own leadership credentials, they're paign about Gingrich's record as a
S7 tenders to voters sounds a lot like When Mitt Romney and Newt running down the leadership skills
6 7 0 51 o the children's game of follow-the- Gingrich aren't puffing up their of one another and of President See Page AlO


Total
Population Nu


w


c~










Happy ending to a long journey


UNDERSTANDING MEDICAID
Q: What is Medicaid?
A: Medicaid provides medical coverage to low-income indi-
viduals and families; also persons with certain disabilities.
Q: Who pays for it?
A: Medicaid is a state pro- CITRUS COUNTY
gram; state and federal govern-
ments share in the cost. QUA L ITY
Q: Is it the same as Medicare?
A: No. Medicare is health in- O< QOF
surance provided to Americans
over age 65 regardless of in-
come. Low-income Medicare re-
cipients also are eligible for 1 F E \
Medicaid. Here's an easy way to
think of it: Medicaid is health 2012 Chronicle project
care for the poor and Medicare is
health care for anyone older than 65.
Q: Is Medicaid an insurance policy?
A: Not in the technical sense. Medicaid pays providers, such
as hospitals and nursing homes, a flat rate for patients. Private
insurance companies pay providers for specific services or
treatment.
Q: Who is eligible for Medicaid?
A: Low-income families with children; pregnant women; non-
citizens with medical emergencies; aged and/or disabled indi-
viduals not receiving Supplemental Security Income (SSI).
Florida also has Medicaid coverage exclusively for children in
certain situations.
Q: How many people in Florida receive Medicaid coverage?
A: According to the Agency for Health Care Administration,
or AHCA, nearly 3 million Floridians participate in the Medicaid
program.
Q: What are the income requirements?
A: Family income limits are based on the size of the house-
hold and are calculated as a percentage of the federal poverty
level. The weekly income in a family of four cannot exceed
$364. Plus, the family cannot have more than $2,000 in assets.
The income requirements are different or may be waived for
residents who are aged, disabled or pregnant. Also, some
Medicaid programs require clients to share in the cost, similar
to an insurance deductible.
Q: Who determines eligibility?
A: The Florida Department of Children and Families or the
Social Security Administration for persons on SSI.
Q: What is covered by Medicaid?
A: It covers a variety of health-related services, including
emergency care, doctor's visits, inpatient and outpatient sur-
gery, dental and vision. Services are also available for long-
term care, prescription drugs, mental health and substance
abuse.
Q: Are individuals covered by Medicaid?
A: Yes, if they meet certain requirements. Florida residents
age 65 or older, or disabled, are eligible for SSI-Medicaid.
Q: Where can I get more information?
A: Go to the Florida Department of Children and Families
website, www.dcf.state.fl.us; or the Florida Agency for Health
Care Administration, www.ahca.myflorida.com.
Source: Florida Department of Children and Families;
and ehow.com.


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff Writer
For Steve and Holly
Childs, a social networking
site and the intervention of a
local politician provided the
perfect solution to what had
seemingly become an in-
tractable and bloody family
affair
At issue was the family's
disabled male teen, Marcus,
who would get violent and
bloody himself and any oth-
ers who dared to approach
him.
Although Marcus was
wheelchair-bound, according
to Steve Childs, the son he
adopted with his ex-wife had
at 15 years old become a
strong and sinewy 6-foot-i-
inch man.
"He went from a normal
child to becoming pretty vio-
lent. He would bang his head
on things and when I try to
help to stop it, he would turn
on me and would sometimes
hurt me pretty bad," Steve
Childs said.
He said that is when he
and his current wife, Holly,
decided to seek help for Mar-
cus who was on Medicaid.
Marcus was also enrolled
with the Agency of Disabled
Persons (ADP), which was
started in 2004, funded partly
by Medicaid and other state
funds. The program helped
place the disabled in group
homes and find employment
Unfortunately for the fam-
ily, it was also when the na-
tional recession began and
program budgets were being
slashed.
"It went from ADP being
able to do everything, some-


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DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Citrus County residents Holly and Steve Childs visit their son
Marcus in an Ocala group home. Marcus has lived in Ocala
since November. Marcus will move back to Citrus County
soon and live in a home provided by the Key Training Center.
He will also be able to attend CREST School and live closer
to his family.


times even if you did not ask
for it, to having a waiting list
to get help," Holly said.
She said the family per-
sisted in getting help and, in
the meantime, Marcus be-
came an adult
Steve said the family hit a
breaking point when Marcus
attacked his younger sister
while they were riding in a
car Efforts to have the now
19-year-old Baker-Acted or
committed to a care facility
always ended up short-lived.
The family, now harried,
desperately sought help from
all avenues. Holly said that is
when a friend suggested
posting information about
their ordeal on Facebook
Soon after, another friend
who saw their posting on the
social networking site told
them to contact Sen. Mike


Fasano, R-New Port Richey,
and that he would also con-
tact the lawmaker on their
behalf. Steve said the senator
said he would see what he
could do, but in the mean-
time he told the family not to
pick up Marcus from the lat-
est facility he was committed
to.
"It was now our 13th at-
tempt at Baker-Acting my son
and the director of the facil-
ity called me and said I had to
pick up my son," Steve said.
He said he refused and
was being threatened with
prosecution for abandon-
ment, but Steve said he told
the manager that was what
the senator advised.
He said the family soon got
a call that Marcus has been
approved for a group home in
Ocala where he will also get


I


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It was now
our 13th
attempt at
Baker-Acting
my son.
Steve Childs
adoptive father of Marcus.
psychological help with his
behavior problems.
"I was like, wow, I didn't
know politicians rolled like
that, but we can't thank Sen.
Fasano enough for all the
help he gave us," Steve said.
He said he is very un-
happy with the current trend
of budget cuts targeting pro-
grams like Medicaid which
are "meant to help the least
among us."
"The cost of Marcus'
health care and the care he
is getting in the group home
is so high there is absolutely
no way we could ever afford
to pay for that and at one
point, thought about selling
everything we own to get
help for him," Holly added.
Fasano said he is glad he
was able to be of assistance.
"God bless them, seems
like they had a really tough
situation on their hands and
all I had to do really was re-
mind the agency that their
own people recommended
that the son should be
placed in a group home. I am
glad everything worked out
for them."
Chronicle reporter A.B.
Sidibe can be reached at
352-564-2925 or asidibe@
chronicleonline. com.


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A2 SUNDAY, JANUARY 29, 2012


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Miracle-Eare I







Page A3 SUNDAY, JANUARY29, 2012



TATE&


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Around
THE STATE

Citrus County

Public school
calendars now online
The 2012-13 Citrus County
School District calendar is
now available for the public to
view online.
The calendar can be found
at the district's web site,
www.citrus.kl 2.fl.us; go to
"information."
School board members
this month approved next
year's calendar.
Animal services to
host pet adoption
Citrus County Animal Serv-
ices will host BFF Best
Friend Fest--An Animal
Adoption Extravaganza from
9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday,
Feb. 4, at the Citrus County
Auditorium in Inverness.
The inaugural event, spon-
sored by the Citrus County
Chronicle and Humanitarians
of Florida, is dedicated to pro-
moting adoptions and educat-
ing the public on ways to care
for their furry friends.
The extravaganza will
bring local entities together to
introduce the public to the
many resources the county
has to offer. Several rescues
will be at the BFF who have
many loving pets that need
loving homes.
The focus will be on edu-
cation, awareness, and in-
creasing adoptions.Visitors
will have the opportunity to
meet neighborhood veterinar-
ians, visit one-on-one with
prospective groomers, or just
come to share that common
thread the affection so
many have for pets.
To inject a little friendly
competition into the festivi-
ties, a prize will be awarded
for the best decorated booth.
Anyone who brings pet food
for the needy will be entered
into a grand prize contest.
For more information, con-
tact Pattie Amon at 352-
746-8401 or email
pattie.amon@bocc.citrus.fl.us
(subject line BFF).
Mission hosting
giveaway today
Due to an overabundance
of Christmas donations, Mis-
sion in Citrus is hosting a
giveaway to help families in
need. Dozens of cribs, toys
and other household items
are available at no cost. The
giveaway will be from 7 a.m.
to 7 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 29, at
2488 N. Pennsylvania Ave.,
Crystal River. For more infor-
mation, call 352-794-3825.
-From staff reports

Campaign TRAIL

Joe Meek, Republican
incumbent for Citrus County
Commission District 3;
Sandy Balfour, Republican
for superintendent of schools;
Geoff Greene, Republican
incumbent for property ap-
praiser; and Angela Vick,
Republican for clerk of court
will speak at the 9 a.m., Feb.
11, meeting of the Nature
Coast Republican Club and
Citrus Republican Women's
Club at the American Legion
Post 155 on State Road 44 in
Crystal River. Information:
Fred or Rosella Hale, 352-
746-2545.
Angela Vick, Republi-
can candidate for Citrus
County clerk of court, will
have a fundraiser from 2 to 6
p.m. Saturday, Feb. 4, at the
Quail Run Community Cen-
ter, 1490 E. Redpoll Trail,
Hernando. Information: Angie
Snodgrass, 352-302-8319.
Sandra "Sam" Himmel,
Democrat candidate for Cit-
rus County superintendent of
schools, will have a fund-
raiser from 4 to 6 p.m. Satur-
day, Feb. 25, at the Citrus
County Builders Association,
1196 S. Lecanto Highway,
Lecanto. Information: Debbie


at 352-726-3181.
The Campaign Trail is a
listing of political happenings
for the 2012 election season.
Send events or campaign
fundraisers to Mike Wright at
mwright@chronicle
online.com.


Candidates duke it out before Tuesday primary


chusetts governor countered
a few hours later while in
Panama City. "I think we are
going to win here, I sure
hope so," he said.
As the two rivals made
their appeals to Hispanic,
Jewish and tea party voters,
veterans of the armed forces
and others, all known indi-
cators pointed to a good day
for Romney in the primary
He and his allies held a 3-
1 advantage in money spent
on television advertising in
the race's final days. Robust
early vote and absentee bal-
lot totals followed a pre-pri-
mary turnout operation by


his campaign. Even the
schedules the two men kept
underscored the shape of
the race moderate for
Romney, heavy for Gingrich.
Romney made few refer-
ences to Gingrich. Instead, he
criticized Obama's plans to
cut the size of the armed
forces. "He's detached from
reality," the former Massa-
chusetts governor said.
"The foreign policy of
'pretty please' is not working
terribly well," he added.
Romney said he wants to add
100,000 troops, not cut them.
If his personal rhetoric
was directed Obama's way,


the television commercials
were trained on Gingrich,
whose victory in last Satur-
day's South Carolina pri-
mary upended the race for
the nomination. A new ad
released as the weekend
began is devoted to the day
in 1997 when Gingrich re-
ceived an ethics reprimand
from the House while serv-
ing as speaker and was or-
dered to pay a $300,000 fine.
Nearly the entire 30-sec-
ond ad consists of NBC
News anchor Tom Brokaw's
nationally broadcast de-
scription of the events on
the evening news.


Associated Press

PORT ST LUCIE On
the weekend before the piv-
otal Florida primary, Newt
Gingrich vowed Saturday to
stay in the race for the Re-
publican presidential nomi-
nation until the national
convention this summer
even if he loses Tuesday's
vote. Front-runner Mitt
Romney poured on the criti-
cism of his rival in television


ads airing across the state.
Gingrich's pledge, in a
race defined by unpre-
dictability, raised the
prospect of an extended
struggle inside the party as
Republicans work to defeat
President Barack Obama in
the fall. "You just had two
national polls that show me
ahead," he said. "Why don't
you ask Gov Romney what
he will do if he loses" in
Florida. The former Massa-


Presidential Preference Primarypolls open 7a.m to 7p.m. Tuesday in county


Special to the Chronicle

Susan Gill, Citrus County
supervisor of elections, an-
nounces the polls for the
Jan. 31 Presidential Prefer-
ence Primary (PPP) will be
open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.
for qualified voters.
By law, Florida is a closed
primary state. Therefore,
the PPP is a partisan elec-
tion for registered Republi-
cans only
There are no democratic


candidates, minor party
candidates or amendments
on the ballot.
Some things voters should
be aware of for the PPP are:
Voters may not change
party at the polls. Applica-
tions for party changes were
due in the Supervisor of
Elections Office by book
closing date, Jan. 3, 2012.
Voters must present
photo and signature ID
when voting or vote a provi-
sional ballot.


Voters who have moved
to Citrus County from an-
other Florida county should
report their address change
to the Supervisor's office
before Tuesday, Jan. 31,
2012, or they will be statuto-
rily required to vote a provi-
sional ballot.
Voters new to Florida
who have never voted in
Florida must have submit-
ted a voter registration ap-
plication by book closing
date, Jan. 3, 2012, in order to


be eligible to vote in this
election.
Find your polling loca-
tion on your voter informa-
tion card, go online at
www.votecitrus.com by se-
lecting "Where do I Vote" on
the homepage or call 352-
341-6740.
Voters may check their
registration status online at
www.votecitrus.com.
Florida Statutes (Section
101.031(2)) delivers instruc-
tions to voters and estab-


lishes a Voter's Bill of
Rights and Voter Responsi-
bilities. Pursuant to statute,
copies of these are posted in
all polling places on Elec-
tion Day
The copies can be viewed
beforehand online at
www.votecitrus.com by
clicking the voter informa-
tion tab on the homepage.
For information or any
questions, call the Supervi-
sor of Elections office at 352-
341-6740.


Growing garden-wise


Part of the Little Green Thumbs workshop explained the
value of growing food and what popular foods look like
before they are processed to be consumed. These
groups of children looked at this bunch of radishes as if
it were something from another world and were not in
any hurry to try the roots that are a regular part of any
salad bar in town.

Youngsters give dirt

the green thumbs up


SHEMIR WILES
Staff Writer
INVERNESS More
than 30 children got the
chance to flex their "little
green thumbs" Saturday
morning during a special
workshop put on by the
Inverness Garden Club at
the Lakes Region library
branch.
The interactive class
featured a number of dif-
ferent hands-on activities
from building bird feeders
to giving children the op-
portunity to eat "leaves"
and "roots."
"This is the first time
we've partnered with the
Inverness Garden Club,"
said Aimee Marshall,
youth librarian at the
Lakes Region library
branch.
Throughout the week
and each month, the li-
brary hosts a slew of dif-
ferent youth programs,
and Marshall was pleased
to have the garden club at
the library to offer chil-
dren something special
during a typically slow
time during the year
"I'm excited to see the


turnout," she said.
Before letting all the
children loose to explore
the different stations set
up throughout the room,
Sandra Hunn gave a brief
presentation on what the
kids could expect to learn
and how important trees
are to the Earth.
"Nothing can take the
place of a tree," she said.
Standing at the tasting
station, Melissa Briggs
said she and her 7-year-
old daughter, Raeanne,
love coming to the differ-
ent youth programs at the
library
"It's nice that it's close
to home, and it gives me
an opportunity to spend
time with her," she said.
Raeanne did not seem
too keen on eating
spinach, arugula or bits of
radish, but everything
seemed to taste better with
a bit of ranch dressing.
"We love it. It makes for
a nice Saturday," Briggs
said with a smile.
Hunn drifted around
the room making sure
things were going
smoothly. Taking a quick
break, she said she was


DAVE SIGLERPJChronicle
Gabe Donovan uses a magnifying glass to look at the decay in a rotting piece of bark
under the direction of Betty Sperry. Children were given the chance to observe trees
and plants during Little Green Thumbs at the Lakes Regional Library in Inverness. The
workshop was a partnership between the Inverness Garden Club and the Citrus
County extension office. The program gave youngsters a hands-on explanation about
nature and the value of a healthy environment.


glad to see such a wonder-
fully large crowd. Thanks
to a bit of help from the
Citrus County extension
office, she said she was
happy she had enough ac-
tivities on hand to teach


the children about loving
trees and nature.
In the spring, Hunn said
the club plans to do an-
other program, but this
time the theme will be in-
sects, and the children


will get a chance to plant
a butterfly garden.
Chronicle reporter
Shemir Wiles can be
reached at 352-564-2924 or
s wiles@ chronicle
online.com.


State BRIEFS


Florida man
being extradited
WOLF POINT, Mont. -
Montana authorities say a
Florida man has been arrested
in North Dakota and is being
extradited to Montana to face a
negligent homicide charge in
the death of another Florida
man.
Roosevelt County Sheriff
Freedom Crawford says police
took 46-year-old Charles Bow-


man Bowen into custody Friday
in Williston, N.D., and he's
being held in the Williams
County Detention Center.
The body of 49-year-old
Brian Doyle was found Jan. 20
in a ditch along U.S. Highway 2
near Bainville, a small commu-
nity near the North Dakota
border.
Crawford says Doyle who
worked for an oil field mainte-
nance company in North
Dakota, died after he was run


over by a motor vehicle.
Home towns of the two
Florida men have not been
released.
Florida boaters can
find access online
TALLAHASSEE Florida
boaters have a new way to find
public launch sites.
The Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission on
Friday announced it has added
a new feature to its website that


lets boaters search a database
for ramps. It includes 1,600
publicly accessible boat ramps.
They can look for ramps in a
certain county or on a specific
lake. Another option is to
search for ramps near a spe-
cific street address or GPS co-
ordinate. The database
provides a map, other details
and often photos of the ramps.
To access the database click:
https://public.myfwc.com/LE/
boatramp/public/default.aspx.


One dead after
crash on lake
LUTZ Authorities say two
personal watercrafts collided on
a Tampa Bay-area lake, killing
one man. According to the
FWC, the two watercrafts col-
lided around 3 a.m. Saturday
on Lake Hobbs in Hillsborough
County. Authorities say the
sheriff's dive team recovered
the body of 30-year-old Ryan
Burke of Lutz.
-From wire reports


Gingrich plans to stay in the

race until GOP convention






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Man facing child sex charge


SHEMIR WILES
Staff Writer

CRYSTAL RIVER Citrus County
deputies arrested a 26-year-old Ho-
mosassa man Friday for allegedly mo-
lesting a 5-year-old Dunnellon girl.
The girl's father reportedly told law
enforcement Thursday he was in the
kitchen when he heard the girl telling
someone to stop. When he went to look
for the girl, the father stated he found
her lying on the bathroom floor with
Allen David Hamilton Jr. kneeling in
front of her in an alleged incriminat-
ing position.
According to the arrest report,
Hamilton quickly left the bathroom
and the girl, who reportedly suffers
from both speech and mental disabil-




VOTE The
Continued from Page Al at

for-9s-Vi ewers-Choice-
Hero-of-the-Year.
Also available on the site award.
are video newscasts of the level rigid
four finalists, of voluni
The award will be given tell you t
March 12 at the Salute to are the s
Everyday Heroes luncheon. In the
In an email, Mary Cather- out to th
ine Spires said she and Elis- porters,
abeth Moore were only rea
"reluctant stand-in faces" (people)t
for the program, but thrilled the awar
to be chosen as nominees, award w
They had only recently grant ap
learned that they were tential d
finalists, by the e
"I can't stand it, it's so year, the
awesome," said Debbie Lat- will be
tin, Blessings' director "We children
are humbled by the nomina- schools
tion for our program to be The mo
recognized and our board make th
members, Mary Catherine stantial,
Spires and Elisabeth Moore, every ye
to be nominated for Every- $100,000
day Heroes of the year tain our


ities, told her mother Hamilton had
touched her inappropriately
The family informed investigators
that Hamilton had done sexual acts in
the presence of children before that
concerned them; therefore, he was not
allowed to be around the children.
The family also reportedly told inves-
tigators Hamilton also has mental dis-
abilities.
The girl was transported to
Gainesville for a child protection team
interview and exam. While the exam
staff noted certain areas on the girl's
body were red, the girl could not ex-
plain what happened due to her dis-
abilities.
On Friday, investigators with the
CCSO's Special Victims Unit con-
ducted an interview with Hamilton.



award will be given March

the Salute to Everyday Hero

luncheon.


From our board
ht down to our army
teers, we would all
that the real heroes
students we serve."
email Spires sent
leir program's sup-
she wrote: "The
son we are asking
to vote is because of
'eness and clout the
would lend to future
plications and po-
onors. As you know,
end of this school
Blessings program
feeding over 1,000
in 10 elementary
in Citrus County.
ney required to
at happen is sub-
and has to be raised
ar. It takes close to
every year to sus-
current program."


Gina McQueen
News 9 said viewe:
nate people or o
tions for this award
"We choose 'herc
go above and beyo
everyday lives to
onnfrih1iiinn fn, the41


He reportedly denied touching the girl
and stated he was only in the bath-
room to use it. Though he was able to
describe what the girl was wearing
and how she was positioned on the
bathroom floor, Hamilton could not
explain how the girl got there while he
was in the bathroom.
He later declined to speak to inves-
tigators, stating he was "too upset" to
speak, the arrest report stated.
Hamilton was charged with one
felony count of lewd and lascivious
molestation. He was transported to
the Citrus County Detention Facility
in Lecanto, where he was given a no-
bond status.
Chronicle reporter Shemir Wiles
can be reached at 352-564-2924 or
swiles@chronicleonline. com.


future brighter for foster
12 children.
Des To vote, go online at
wwwbaynews9.com/article/
news/2012/january/370762/
Vote-for-9s-Viewers-Choice-
Hero-of-the-Year.
at Bay To learn more about
rs nomi- Blessings in a Backpack, go
)rganiza- online at www.citruscounty
1. blessings.com.
oes' who Chronicle reporter Nancy
nd their Kennedy can be reached at
make a nkennedy@chronicleon-
ai . line.com or 352-564-2927.


munity," she said.
Also nominated for
Everyday Hero of the Year:
Justin Jackson. a
Tampa teen who pulled a
woman from a burning car
after a car accident.
St. Petersburg chef
Tyson Grant, who built a
vegetable garden at All Chil-
dren's Hospital to give pa-
tients and families a special
place to visit.
Delwyn Collins, a hos-
pital employee who took his
struggles from the past to
make the Christmas of the


Florida
Department of
Environmental
Protection
Arrests
William Harold Chap-
nick, 55, of 1124 W. Bucknell
Ave., Inverness, at 7:45 p.m.
Friday on a misdemeanor
charge of falsely identify or give
false name to law enforcement
officer. Bond $500.
Shawn Marie Lindall, 27,
of 1101 Woodcrest Ave., Inver-
ness, at 8:30 p.m. Friday on an
active Citrus County warrant for
a failure to appear on an origi-
nal felony charge of retail theft.
No bond.

Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Domestic battery
arrest
Matthew J. Kanzlemar,
29, of Crystal River, at 5:36 p.m.
Thursday on a misdemeanor
charge of domestic battery. Ac-
cording to Kanzlemar's arrest re-
port, a woman said Kanzlemar
pushed her and slapped her sev-
eral times. Kanzlemar denied hit-
ting the woman. No bond.
Other arrests
Carla J. Pelli, 54, of 2391
S.E. 38th St., Ocala, at 11:59
a.m. Thursday on a misde-
meanor charge of petit theft.
Bond $250.


William Kelly King, 50, of
7673 E. Stagecoach Trail, Floral
City, at 10:30 p.m. Thursday on
a misdemeanor charge of using
a firearm while under the influ-
ence of alcohol/drugs. Bond
$250.
ThymithyA. Boroff, 21, of
2604 W. Woodland Ridge
Drive, Lecanto, at 5:55 a.m. Fri-
day on a violation of probation
for original felony charges of
burglary and grand theft. No
bond.
Sarah Marie Hayslip, 25,
of 2780 E. Center St., Inver-
ness, at 9:50 a.m. Friday on a
fugitive from justice charge in
reference to a Michigan warrant
on an original charge of break-
ing and entering. No bond.
Michael Edmon Law-
head, 27, of an unknown ad-
dress, at 4:33 p.m. Friday on
felony and misdemeanor
charges of criminal mischief.
Bond $4,500.
Donald William Carbary
Jr., 33, at large, at 6:56 p.m. Fri-
day on misdemeanor and
felony charges of battery, petit
retail theft and resisting an offi-
cer with violence. Bond $6,000.
Amanda Nadine Hamil-
ton, 27, of 8440 N. Firefly Ter-
race, Crystal River, at 6:56 p.m.
Friday on a misdemeanor
charge of falsely identify or give
false name to law enforcement
officer. Bond $500.


legal notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle

Susan Gill, Citrus County
Supervisor of Elections...............A.....10
Fictitious Name Notices.................... D10

Bid Notices........ ............................D10

Meeting Notices.............................0....D10
Miscellaneous Notices..........................D10

S .... .. .. Surplus Property....................................D10


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
s
PC
PC
s
PC
s
sh
s
s
s


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
pc
s
s
s
pc
s
s
PC
pc


MARINE OUTLOOK


North winds around 15 knots. Seas 2
to 3 feet. Bay and inland waters will
have a moderate chop. Mostly sunny
skies today.


70 42 0.00 75 42 0.00

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Exclusive daily
S TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 70 Low: 37
Mostly sunny


MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 70 Low: 46
Mostly sunny

TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
High: 76 Low: 50
Mostly sunny


Gulf water
temperature


68
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 27.61 27.61 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 34.26 34.27 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lInverness 36.44 36.43 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 37.85 37.84 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211

THE NATION


ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 71/38
Record 85/20
Normal 71/43
Mean temp. 55
Departure from mean -2
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday 0.00 in.
Total for the month 0.86 in.
Total for the year 0.86 in.
Normal for the year 2.77 in.
*As of 6 p m at Inverness
UV INDEX: 6
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Saturday at 3 p.m. 30.13 in.


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 50
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 49%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Juniper, maple, oak
Today's count: 10.4/12
Monday's count: 10.3
Tuesday's count: 10.8
AIR QUALITY
Saturday was good with pollutants
mainly ozone.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
1/29 SUNDAY 10:08 3:57 10:30 4:19
1/30 MONDAY 10:54 4:43 11:17 5:06


BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For
more information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's
Web site: http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi

WATERING RULES
Citrus County: Irrigation is limited to twice per week.
Even addresses: Thursday and/or Sunday before 10am or after 4pm.
Odd Addresses: Wednesday and/or Saturday before 10am or after 4pm.
No restrictions on fountains, car washing or pressure washing. Hand watering requires the
use of a shut-off nozzle.
PLEASE CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL NEW PLANT MATERIAL.
Questions, concerns or reporting violations, please call Citrus County 352-527-7669.

TIDES


*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Sunday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 9:16 a/5:06 a 9:16 p/4:50 p
Crystal River* 7:37 a/2:28 a 7:37 p/2:12 p
Withlacoochee* 5:24 a/12:16 a 5:24 p/12:00 p
Homosassa*** 8:26 a/4:05 a 8:26 p/3:49 p


***At Mason's Creek
Monday
High/Low High/Low
10:12 a/5:54 a 9:54 p/5:23 p
8:33 a/3:16 a 8:15 p/2:45 p
6:20 a/1:04 a 6:02 p/12:33 p
9:22 a/4:53 a 9:04 p/4:22 p


cho=re'aq Jun.eau Honolblu
edf^M?' O


Saturday Sunday
City H L Pcp. Fcst H L
Albany 43 31 pc 41 23
Albuquerque 50 30 s 53 27
Asheville 55 29 s 48 25
Atlanta 64 37 s 56 31
Atlantic City 50 34 pc 49 29
Austin 60 45 s 62 40
Baltimore 53 28 sh 47 33
Billings 39 27 pc 53 32
Birmingham 59 36 s 57 31
Boise 42 23 c 44 32
Boston 46 38 s 44 29
Buffalo 36 30 .09 sf 36 22
Burlington, VT 40 33 pc 35 17
Charleston, SC 69 41 s 61 33
Charleston, WV 46 34 pc 46 25
Charlotte 63 30 s 53 29
Chicago 34 26 .05 pc 30 22
Cincinnati 43 34 pc 38 24
Cleveland 36 30 .15 sn 33 23
Columbia, SC 67 35 s 59 30
Columbus, OH 40 34 .03 sn 35 21
Concord, N.H. 44 33 pc 38 21
Dallas 52 42 s 63 44
Denver 46 15 s 61 34
Des Moines 44 23 pc 36 29
Detroit 36 30 .04 sn 31 20
El Paso 56 43 s 61 35
Evansville, IN 43 33 .07 pc 43 30
Harrisburg 49 32 sh 44 24
Hartford 47 35 s 42 27
Houston 65 50 s 64 43
Indianapolis 38 30 .07 sf 36 25
Jackson 58 39 s 61 33
Las Vegas 61 42 s 62 42
Little Rock 52 39 s 60 33
Los Angeles 74 49 s 72 48
Louisville 45 34 .01 pc 45 30
Memphis 52 41 s 58 38
Milwaukee 37 26 .05 pc 26 20
Minneapolis 28 18 pc 22 21
Mobile 71 39 s 63 37
Montgomery 67 34 s 60 32
Nashville 49 35 pc 51 32
KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
2012 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


44. \ /





FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY


Saturday Sunday
City H L Pcp. FcstH L
New Orleans 70 44 s 61 42
New York City 46 37 pc 45 31
Norfolk 61 42 s 51 33
Oklahoma City 49 29 s 61 36
Omaha 47 23 pc 44 28
Palm Springs 77 58 s 72 49
Philadelphia 49 33 pc 48 31
Phoenix 77 46 s 76 43
Pittsburgh 40 32 .04 sf 37 20
Portland, ME 42 28 s 37 25
Portland, Ore 47 28 r 49 41
Providence, R.I. 46 29 s 43 27
Raleigh 62 32 s 51 29
Rapid City 39 15 pc 49 35
Reno 47 21 pc 57 33
Rochester, NY 39 29 .01 sf 38 23
Sacramento 62 32 pc 62 42
St. Louis 44 30 .07 pc 41 31
St. Ste. Marie 33 24 .21 sn 22 10
Salt Lake City 40 20 pc 44 32
San Antonio 63 48 pc 65 46
San Diego 76 50 s 78 48
San Francisco 61 40 pc 59 46
Savannah 67 39 s 62 33
Seattle 44 33 trace r 49 43
Spokane 35 22 sh 40 33
Syracuse 44 34 .01 sf 38 24
Topeka 50 22 pc 54 35
Washington 55 33 sh 48 32
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 84 Mission Viejo, Calif. LOW -19 Stanley,
Idaho
WORLD CITIES


SUNDAY Lisbon
CITY H/L/SKY London
Acapulco 86/70/pc Madrid
Amsterdam 33/27/pc Mexico City
Athens 48/41/pc Montreal
Beijing 31/12/pc Moscow
Berlin 28/21/c Paris
Bermuda 72/63/ts Rio
Cairo 66/53/pc Rome
Calgary 49/30/pc Sydney
Havana 82/64/c Tokyo
Hong Kong 67/60/s Toronto
Jerusalem 56/43/s Warsaw


55/39/s
42/34/c
47/24/s
65/44/pc
29/16/sf
11/-1/s
39/30/pc
77/70/ts
59/38/c
78/72/pc
42/31/pc
31/19/sf
20/7/s


C I T R U S


C 0 U N T


For the RECORD


LHRKON1CLL
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Courthouse office
To mpkins St. square
CI
0 L 106 W. Main
S 41 4Inverness, FL
I -34450


Who's in charge:
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Tom Feeney .......................................................... Production Director, 563-3275
Kathie Stewart .............................................. Circulation Director, 563-5655
John M urphy ........................ ............................ Online M manager, 563-3255
John M urphy.................................................... Classified M manager, 564-3255
Jeff Gordon .................................................. Business M manager, 564-2908
Mike Arnold.......... .................... Human Resources Director, 564-2910
Report a news tip:
Opinion page questions.................................. Charlie Brennan, 563-3225
To have a photo taken ........................................ Darlene Mann, 563-5660
News and feature stories ............................ Sandra Frederick, 564-2930
Community/wire service content.................... Sarah Gatling, 563-5660
Sports event coverage ...........................Jon-Michael Soracchi, 563-3261
S o u n d O ff ............................................................. .......................................... 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9
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Published every Sunday through Saturday
By Citrus Publishing Inc.
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
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PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL
SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280


JAN. 30


0
FEB.7


CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
SUNSET TONIGHT 6:06 P.M.
SUNRISE TOMORROW 7:20 A.M.
MOONRISE TODAY .........................10:48 A.M.
FEB.14 FEB. 21 M OONSET TODAY .................................NONE


A4 SUNDAY, JANUARY 29, 2012


r 7





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Week in state government and politics: Political stumps and maps


MICHAEL PELTIER
The News Service of
Florida

TALLAHASSEE
Florida became ground
zero this week as Republi-
can candidates flocked to
the state and flooded the
airwaves in preparation for
what could be a pivotal
presidential primary on
Tuesday.
While Wolf Blitzer tried to
pin down Gov Rick Scott on
his presidential preference,
state lawmakers slogged
through a week of commit-
tee meetings. Most propos-
als, both major and minor,
continued the trek through
the process, but there were
a few casualties as powerful
interest groups locked horns
over issues of attorneys vs.
insurance companies.
GOP TAKES
CENTER STAGE
With two televised de-
bates and numerous other
campaign stops, the GOP
primary road show moved
in this past week as the fates
of GOP hopefuls swung in
the balance. Televised de-
bates in Tampa on Monday
and Jacksonville on Thurs-
day underscored the state's
importance in the presiden-
tial race.
The state's Jan. 31 pri-
mary was made much more
interesting and pivotal fol-
lowing Gingrich's surpris-
ingly strong victory in South
Carolina over former Massa-
chusetts Gov Mitt Romney
But as the week wore on,
Gingrich's colors began to
fade. A Quinnipiac poll
taken Wednesday showed
the former U.S. House
Speaker in a virtual dead
heat with Romney among
Florida primary voters. The


same polling firm on Friday
announced that Romney
had a 38-29 percentage
point lead over Gingrich.
Regardless of the out-
come, the debates and up-
coming primary had state
once again in the national
electoral spotlight, a
celebrity that vindicates
state party leaders for hold-
ing off pressure from na-
tional political parties and
moving up the state's presi-
dential primary
"Every once in a while it
feels good to be right," said
Senate President Mike
Haridopolos, R-Merritt Is-
land. "It was a risk, don't get
me wrong, but it was a good
risk. The eyes of the nation
and the eyes of the world
are on us. "
BUDGETS MOVING IN
HOUSE, NOT SENATE
House budget builders on
Friday released their $69.2
billion spending blueprint
that includes more than $1
billion in additional funding
for K-12 education and more
than $2.5 billion in reserves.
The Senate spending
plan, however, may not be fi-
nalized for a couple of
weeks as budget leaders re-
view spending allocations -
particularly in the health
and human services sectors
- for potential cuts as they
attempt to fill a budget gap
that could reach $2 billion.
Haridopolos said his
chamber won't release its
budget allocations for at
least a couple of weeks as
leaders try to gather more
information on budget and
revenue issues, especially in
the area of social services.
"We have not put out allo-
cation and it's for a simple
reason," the Senate presi-
dent told reporters. "I want


some more information
from the individual budget
chairs before I tell them
what they can or can't
spend, especially on health
and human services."
PRIVATE PRISONS,
GREYHOUNDS
A legislative proposal to
privatize about 30 prisons in
most of the southern part of
the state is headed for the
Senate floor after a vote in
the Budget Committee that
angered prison guards who
feel they're not being heard.
The proposal was put into
law as part of last year's
budget, to be later thrown
out by a court. Senate back-
ers say the issue has been
thoroughly vetted, with sev-
eral committee meetings
last year in addition to three
this year, including one
where nearly 50 opponents
- and no proponents -
were heard on the matter
They also say the state
could save $20 million a
year in prison costs by out-
sourcing the facilities to a
private vendor or vendors.
Critics say the savings may
be less pronounced, espe-
cially if the more violent of-
fenders are shifted over to
state custody
Another bill racing to the
Senate floor would allow
dog tracks to continue to op-
erate, without the dogs. The
bill (SB 382), which passed
the Senate Regulated In-
dustries Committee on a 6-4
vote on Thursday, would let
greyhound tracks keep their
licenses without having to
offer live racing, opening
the door for them to become
card rooms or other types of
gambling venues.


Dog tracks back the bill -
they say they lose money by
continuing to offer a dying
sport just so they can keep
their pari-mutuel license,
which allows them to offer
poker, the real money-
maker and may one day
allow them to offer slots.
Opponents say the bill
will kill jobs for people, and
dogs, which will need to be
adopted and may not be.
Not to be outdone in mov-
ing quickly as the session
approaches the halfway
week, the House moved into
position to take up its pro-
posals to change political
boundaries. The House Re-
districting Committee fin-
ished its work Friday by
approving blueprints for
Florida's political future.
Measures redefining the
boundaries for the Legisla-
ture (HJR 6001, 6011) and
Florida's 27 congressional
seats (HB 6005) passed the
panel on a series of party-
line votes, bringing the
House role in the once-a-
decade redistricting process


Weekly ROUNDUP


close to a conclusion.
Few think, however, that
the process is likely to end
with final House and Senate
votes on the measures ex-
pected by the end of next
week.
While Gov Rick Scott
seems likely to sign the con-
gressional plan, the Florida
Supreme Court must review
the legislative plan and
both could be challenged
under either the state's new
anti-gerrymandering Fair
Districts amendments or
the federal Civil Rights Act.
INSURERS REBUFFED
IN BAD FAITH VOTE
In a defeat for business
groups and the insurance in-
dustry, a House panel Thurs-
day narrowly rejected a bill
that would add restrictions
in "bad faith" legal fights.
The House Civil Justice Sub-
committee voted 8-7 against
HB 427, which was backed by
groups such as the Florida
Chamber of Commerce, As-
sociated Industries of
Florida and the National
Federation of Independent
Business but was fought by
plaintiffs' attorneys.


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OOAFOP


Bad-faith lawsuits occur
when insurance companies
face allegations that they
have not properly settled
claims. Fred Cunningham,
president of the Florida
Justice Association trial
lawyers' group, said the
state does not have a "crisis
in the bad-faith world" that
would justify the bill's addi-
tional restrictions.
But business groups and
the insurance industry con-
tend that plaintiffs' attor-
neys have found ways to
game the legal system, lead-
ing to bad-faith cases that
can result in large settle-
ments or costly trials.
STORY OF THE
WEEK: Republican candi-
dates debate/campaign in
Florida in advance of the
state's Jan. 31 presidential
primary
QUOTE OF THE
WEEK: "Every once in a
while it feels good to be
right," said Senate Presi-
dent Mike Haridopolos, R-
Merritt Island, on the
decision to stand firm and
hold the Florida presiden-
tial primary on Jan. 31.


OOOAEEW


STATE


SUNDAY, JANUARY 29, 2012 A5





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries


:.


Theodore "Ted" Jacks




Theodore 'Ted'
Jacks, 79
BIG CABIN, OKLA.
Theodore "Ted" John
Jacks died Tuesday, January
24th, 2012, in the comfort of
his home in Big Cabin, Okla-
homa.
He was born May 9, 1932,
in Chicago, Illinois. He was
the youngest of three chil-
dren born to Theodore G.
Jacks and Ruth Freeman
Jacks. He spent his child-
hood summers on Lake
Geneva with his two sisters,
Trillis Jacks and Joan Stall,
where he developed a life
long love for boats. From
childhood, Ted excelled in
Athletics. He was named
All-American in high school
for football and went on to
play for Oklahoma A&M. He
eventually was named to
OSU's hall of fame for his
team's stellar perform-
ances. He was also a mem-
ber of the college track team
and later went on to com-
pete in the Pan American
games running the 100-yard
dash and throwing the disc.
While attending Oklahoma
A&M, Ted received a degree
in engineering and was a
member of the Sigma Alpha
Epsilon fraternity, meeting
his future wife, Jayne Dean
Jacks, of Tulsa, Ok, who was
a member of the Pi Beta Phi
sorority They were married
on May 14, 1954, at Boston
Avenue Methodist Church in
downtown Tulsa. While in
college, Ted joined the Navy
and was stationed at the
Great Lakes Naval base,
where he finished his tour of
duty The couple then had a
short stint in Texas, where
they purchased their first
home with the help of the G.I.
bill. They then moved on to
Florida's Gulf Coast, where
they would live for 40 years
raising a family while Ted
worked for Lenox heating
and air-conditioning. Their
vacations were spent in Key
West, where the family would
trailer their boat for deep sea
fishing trips and lobstering.
After Ted's retirement, the
couple moved back to Okla-
homa to start up the Cattle-
horn Ranch in Big Cabin.
Ted is survived by daugh-
ter Kimberly Jacks; son Chris
Jacks and wife Tammy of
Romeo, Fl.; daughterAndrea
Maynard of Tulsa, Ok.; son


Dean Jacks and wife Shelley
of Niceville, Fl.; grandchil-
dren Cameron Maynard,
Aubrey Novy and husband
John, Calahan Maynard and
wife Ashley, Josie Jacks, and
Emma Jacks; great-grand-
child Ella Jayne Novy Sister
Trillis Jacks; brother-in-law
Milo Dean; and nephews Jeff
Dean and wife Julie and
Timothy Dean. Also by his 12-
year-old yellow lab, Josie.
A memorial celebration
will be held at his home this
Sunday at2 p.m. with pastor
Geoff Buffalo presiding.
Please call 918-231-4464 for
directions to the memorial.
He was devoted to many
and admired by all, but had
only one true love, Jayne,
his wife of 51 years with
whom he now joins in ever-
lasting life.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.





Peter
Longobardi, 85
BEVERLY HILLS
Peter J. Longobardi, 85,
died on January 24, after a
brief hospital stay
Pete was a longtime resi-
dent of Beverly Hills,
Florida, having lived previ-
ously in Copiague, Long Is-
land, New York. He was
born in Astoria, Queens.
He was a proud World
War II Navy veteran Pa-
cific Theater; retired U.S.
Post Office letter carrier,
and he was both a 4th De-
gree and Past Grand Knight
of the Knights of Columbus
Council No. 6168.
He is survived in death by
his wife of 61 years, Mary;
sister Doris Apicella, of NY;
brother-in-law James Lee, of
NY, sister-in-law Carol Lee,
of NY; sons Peter, James,
David and Matthew; daugh-
ters-in-law Candace, Judy
and Jennifer; as well as nu-
merous cousins, grandchil-
dren, great-grandchildren,
nieces, nephews, grand-
nieces and grandnephews.
Per his request, he is to be
cremated. A memorial serv-
ice will follow at a later date
once the family can finalize
arrangements.
In lieu of flowers, the fam-
ily would appreciate dona-
tions in his name to the
Citrus Memorial Health
Foundation www.cmh
foundation.com.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.



BROWN
FUNERAL HOME
& CREMATORY

5430 W. Gulf toLakeHwy.
Lecant, Floda 34451
(352)
795-0111


Elmer
Rudolph, 95
INVERNESS
Elmer C. Rudolph, 95, of
Inverness, died Wednesday,
Jan. 25, 2012.
Private cremation
arrangements under the di-
rection of Chas. E. Davis Fu-
neral Home with
Crematory, Inverness.




Edward
Herd, 94
INVERNESS
Edward Herd, 94, Inver-
ness, died Jan 26, 2012 at
home under the care of his
family and
Hospice of
Citrus
County.
Mr. Herd --
was born in .
Newark, NJ,
on Nov. 22,
1917, and
moved to Edward
Central Herd
Florida 6
years ago from Broward
County He retired from
Broward County, Florida, as
a Production Control Man-
ager and served our country
in the U.S. Navy.
He is survived by his wife,
Helen Sacchetti Herd; 4
children, Robert Herd and
his wife Pat, New Jersey;
Edward Herd and his wife
Caryn, Orlando; Michelle
Cabot and her husband,
Alan, Inverness; Kimberly
Garcia and her husband,
Irvin, Orlando; 9 grandchil-
dren; and 4 great-grandchil-
dren.
Funeral services will be
conducted on Tuesday, Jan
31st, at 1 p.m. at the Chas. E.
Davis Funeral Home with
the Rev. Rick Cabot of the
First United Methodist
Church of Lutz officiating.
Burial will be in Florida
National Cemetery. The
family will receive friends
at the funeral home on
Tuesday from 12 noon until
the hour of service. In lieu
of flowers, memorials are
requested to Hospice of Cit-
rus Co., PO. Box 641270,
Beverly Hills, FL 34464.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.

T 0 0A8B3


FUNERAL HOMES
& CREMATORY
Inverness
Homosassa
Beverly Hills

(352) 726-2271
1-888-746-6737
Swww.HooperFuneralHome.comi


Vicki
Thornburg, 61
CRYSTAL RIVER
Vicki Sue Thornburg, 61,
of Crystal River, died Dec.
19, 2011, at Seven Rivers
hospital. A memorial will be
at The First Missionary
Baptist Church, Auburn-
dale, Fla., at 1 p.m. Satur-
day, Feb. 11, 2012. New
Serenity Memorial Funeral
Home handled the
arrangements.





William 'Billy'
Ripple Jr., 63
DUNNELLON
William Chester "Billy"
Ripple Jr, age 63, of Dun-
nellon, FL, passed away
January 25, 2012, at Legacy
House of Ocala, FL.
He was born August 16,
1948, at Munroe Memorial
Hospital to William C. Rip-
ple Sr. (deceased) and Lois
Parker Ripple. He was a re-
tired Citrus County building
inspector; honorably dis-
charged Vietnam veteran
from the United States
Navy; and a member of the
Dunnellon Moose Lodge
No. 2308. His hobbies in-
cluded darts, dancing, act-
ing, art, swimming, music,
and he loved to cook.
He was the father of Vio-
let Michelle Ripple and
Samantha Ripple; grandfa-
ther of Trinity Jean Tatlock;
the brother of Lydia Mills,
Diane Ripple, George Rip-
ple and Robert "Bobby"
Ripple; also multiple nieces
and nephews; and multiple
great nieces and nephews.
A memorial service was
held at the Moose Lodge in
Dunnellon, FL, Saturday,
January 28, 2012, at 3 p.m.
with a committal service at
Florida National Cemetery
in Bushnell, FL, Friday,
February 3, 2012, at 11 a.m.
The family suggests dona-
tions be made to Hospice of
Marion County-Legacy
House. Arrangements by
Roberts Funeral Home
Dunnellon, FL. Condo-
lences may be left at
RobertsOfDunnellon. com.


Willem
Kuiper, 75
INVERNESS
Willem Kuiper, 75, of In-
verness, Florida, passed
away on Saturday, January
28, 2012, at Arbor Trail
Nursing & Rehab in Inver-
ness.
He was born in Holland
on March 15, 1936, to the
late Jan and Altuja (Prins)
Kuiper. Willem arrived in
the area in 1978 coming
from Holland and was a
stucco worker and plasterer
in the construction busi-
ness. He was Catholic and
enjoyed gardening, fishing
and crabbing; but most of
all, he loved his dogs.
Willem had a great sense of
humor.
He is survived by his long-
time companion, Angelina
Reese of Inverness; two
sons, Michael (Debbie), and
Anthony (Hannah), of Inver-
ness; two daughters, Jean
and Francine of Inverness;
and one sister, Ga Kuiper of
Holland; seven grandchil-
dren, Melanie, Dusty, Angie,
Robert, Rusty, Mikey, and
Chase; and five great-grand-
children, Bobby, Faith,
Lucas, Amelia, and Brooke.
Private cremation
arrangements under the di-
rection of Chas. E. Davis Fu-
neral Home with
Crematory, Inverness,
Florida.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. com.

Norma
Rollins, 87
SPRINGFIELD,
OHIO
Norma Elaine Rollins, 87,
of Springfield, Ohio, died
Wednesday, Jan. 25, 2012, in
Clermont.
Local arrangements will
take place under the direc-
tion of Brown Funeral
Home & Crematory in
Lecanto, with services tak-
ing place at a later date in
Springfield, Ohio.




To Place Your

S"InMemory" ad,
Call Mike Snyder at 563-3273
msnyder@chronicleonline com
or
Saralynne Schlumberger at 564-2917
sschlumberger@chronicleonline.com
F'Clsingtimeorplcingad-
is dyspiotorndte. A


Rudolph
Trepasso, 93
INVERNESS
Rudolph T Trepasso, 93,
of Inverness, FL, died on
January 25, 2012, at his
home.
Rudolph was born on Oc-
tober 13, 1918, in St. Paul,
MN. He was a B17 side gun-
ner in the U.S. Army Air
Corps during World War II.
He retired from the Conrail
(formerly Pennsylvania Rail
Road) as a Block Operator.
Rudolph moved to Inver-
ness in 2001 from Rehoboth
Beach, Delaware.
He was preceded in death
by his wife, Phyllis, and his
son Terry Survivors include
his son Jerry Trepasso and
his wife, Mary, of Jack-
sonville, FL; and daughter
Pamela Palinski and her
husband, Victor, of Inver-
ness, FL; sisters, Mary
Schenkel and Julia Werner,
both of PA; five grandchil-
dren, Rebecca, Timothy,
Thomas (Tony), Nicole and
Christian; 10 great-grand-
children; and 2 great-great-
grandchildren.
Heinz Funeral Home &
Cremation, Inverness, FL.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. corn.

Richard
Walling, 79
BROOKSVILLE
Richard Louis Walling, 79,
of Brooksville, died Wednes-
day, Jan. 25, 2012.
Local arrangements are
under the direction of Brown
Funeral Home & Crematory
in Lecanto, with services tak-
ing place at a later date in
Sun Prairie, Wis.

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A6 SUNDAY, JANUARY 29, 2012


\ ___





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DEATHS
Continued from PageA6

Loyloa
Wayman, 74
HERNANDO
Mrs. Loyloa Wayman, 74,
of Hernando, Florida, died
Monday, January 23, 2012, in
Inverness, FL. She was born
February 19, 1937, in Buf-
falo, NY, and worked as a
sales associate for Wal-Mart
Mrs. Wayman was pre-
ceded in death by her hus-
band, Oakley T Wayman
(1995); and her parents. Sur-
vivors include son Larry
(Cheryl) Wayman of Her-
nando, FL; and two grand-
children, Morgan and
Jasmine.
Online condolences may
be sent to the family at
www. HooperFuneralHome.
com. Arrangements are by
the Inverness Chapel of
Hooper Funeral Homes &
Crematory

SO YOU KNOW
The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits both free and
paid obituaries. Email
obits@chronicleonline.
com or phone 352-563-
5660 for details and
pricing options.
Paid obituaries are
printed as submitted by
funeral homes.
Free obituaries, run one
day, can include: full
name of deceased;
age; hometown/state;
date of death; place of
death; date, time and
place of visitation and
funeral services.
If websites, photos,
survivors, memorial
contributions or other
information are in-
cluded, this will be des-
ignated as a paid
obituary and a cost es-
timate provided to the
sender.
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear in
the next day's edition.
A flag will be included
for free for those who
served in the U.S. mili-
tary. (Please note this
service when submit-
ting a free obituary.)
All obituaries will be
posted at www.chron
icleonline.com.


CITRUS COUNTY SCHOOLS
Elementary schools
Breakfast
Monday: MVP breakfast,
grits, cereal and toast, juice
and milk variety.
Tuesday: Sausage and egg
biscuit, tater tots, cereal and
toast, juice and milk variety.
Wednesday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, cheese grits,
cereal and toast, juice and milk
variety.
Thursday: Ultimate break-
fast round, cheese grits, cereal
and toast, juice and milk vari-
ety.
Friday: Ultra cinnamon bun,
grits, cereal and toast, juice
and milk variety.
Lunch
Monday: Baked chicken
tenders, pepperoni pizza, PB
dippers, fresh baby carrots,
peas, seasoned rice, straw-
berry cup, milk, juice.
Tuesday: Mozzarella Max
Stix, fajita chicken and rice with
Rip Stick, turkey super salad,
yogurt parfait, garden salad,
steamed broccoli, ranch pasta
salad, applesauce, crackers,
milk, juice.
Wednesday: Hot dog on
bun, macaroni and cheese, PB
dippers, fresh baby Carrots,
steamed green beans, mixed
fruit, milk and juice.
Thursday: Oven-baked
breaded chicken, turkey wrap,
chicken super salad, fresh gar-
den salad, roll, seasoned
mashed potatoes, peach cup,
crackers, roll, milk, juice.
Friday: Sausage pizza,
pasta with mozzarella and
meat sauce, PB dippers, fresh
baby carrots, sweet corn, fruit
juice bar, milk, juice.
Middle schools
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast sausage
pizza, MVP breakfast, grits,
peach cup, cereal and toast,
milk, juice.


Tuesday: Sausage, egg and
cheese biscuit, ultra cinnamon
bun, tater tots, cereal and
toast, milk, juice.
Wednesday: Breakfast egg
and cheese wrap, MVP break-
fast, tater tots, cereal and
toast, milk, juice.
Thursday: Breakfast sand-
wich stuffer, ultimate breakfast
round, peach cup, grits, cereal
and toast, milk, juice.
Friday: Ham, egg and
cheese biscuit, ultra cinnamon
bun, tater tots, cereal and
toast, milk, juice.
Lunch
Monday: Sausage pizza,
breaded chicken sandwich, yo-
gurt parfait, fresh baby carrots,
Normandy-blend vegetables,
Italian pasta salad, strawberry
cup, milk, juice.
Tuesday: Crispy Mexican
tacos, fajita chicken and rice,
ham super salad, PB dippers,
garden salad, glazed carrots,
Mexicali corn, Spanish rice, ap-
plesauce, crackers, milk, juice.
Wednesday: Hamburger on
bun, turkey wrap, yogurt par-
fait, fresh baby carrots, peas,
ranch pasta salad, colossal
crisp french fries, fruit juice bar,
milk and juice.
Thursday: Oriental orange
chicken, mozzarella Max Stix,
chef super salad, PB dippers,
garden salad, sweet corn,
baked beans, peach cup, Jell-
0, crackers, milk, juice.
Friday: Baked chicken ten-
ders, macaroni and cheese,
apple chicken super salad,
fresh baby carrots, broccoli,
seasoned rice, chilled mixed
fruit, crackers, milk, juice.
High schools
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, MVP break-
fast, grits, peach cup, cereal
and toast, juice, milk.
Tuesday: Sausage, egg
and cheese biscuit, ultra cin-


LOCAL


namon bun, tater tots, cereal
and toast, juice, milk.
Wednesday: Breakfast egg
and cheese wrap, MVP break-
fast, tater tots, cereal and
toast, juice, milk.
Thursday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, ultimate break-
fast round, grits, peach cup,
cereal and toast, juice, milk.
Friday: Breakfast sandwich
stuffer, ultra cinnamon bun,
tater tots, cereal and toast,
juice, milk.
Lunch
Monday: Fajita chicken and
rice, hamburger, pizza, fajita
chicken super salad, yogurt
parfait, fresh baby carrots,
broccoli, french fries, fruit juice
bar, crackers, milk.
Tuesday: Pasta with moz-
zarella and meat sauce,
chicken sandwich, pizza, ham
super salad, yogurt parfait, gar-
den salad, sweet corn, green
beans, french fries, peach cup,
crackers, milk.
Wednesday: Baked chicken
tenders, pizza, hamburger,
turkey wrap, turkey super
salad, PB dippers, baby car-
rots, peas, pineapple, mashed
potatoes, baked beans, french
fries, crackers, milk.
Thursday: Cheesy chicken
and rice burrito, chicken sand-
wich, pizza, ham super salad,
yogurt parfait, garden salad,
green beans, sweet corn,
french fries, mixed fruit, crack-
ers, milk.


Friday: Creamy chicken al-
fredo, hamburger, pizza, apple
chicken super salad, yogurt
parfait, fresh baby carrots,
peas, baked french fries,
strawberry cup, crackers, milk.
Lecanto High School lunch
Monday: Chicken tenders,
macaroni and cheese, ham-
burger, chicken sandwich, fajita
chicken super salad, pizza, yo-
gurt parfait, baby carrots,
baked beans, peas, french
fries, fruit juice bar, crackers,
milk.
Tuesday: Fajita chicken and
rice, pizza, turkey and gravy
over noodles, hamburger,
chicken sandwich, turkey
salad, yogurt parfait, garden
salad, sweet corn, green
beans, french fries, peach cup,
crackers, milk.
Wednesday: Turkey wrap,
chicken alfredo, hamburger,
chicken sandwich, pizza, ham
super salad, yogurt parfait,
baby carrots, french fries,
ranch pasta salad, broccoli,
pineapple, crackers, milk.
Thursday: Breaded
chicken, macaroni and cheese,
hamburger, chicken sandwich,
pizza, turkey super salad, yo-
gurt parfait, garden salad,
french fries, corn, seasoned
mashed potatoes, mixed fruit,
crackers, milk.
Friday: Crispy Mexican
tacos, pizza, hamburger,
chicken sandwich, pasta with
mozzarella and meat sauce,


SUNDAY, JANUARY 29, 2012 A7


apple chicken salad, parfait,
fresh baby carrots, peas,
french fries, Spanish rice,
strawberry cup, crackers, milk.

SENIOR DINING
Monday: Baked meatloaf
with mushroom gravy, mashed
potatoes, carrot coins, pineap-
ple, whole-grain roll, low-fat
milk.
Tuesday: Chicken Floren-
tine thigh, penne pasta with
garlic oil, Tuscan-blend vegeta-
bles (squash, mixed vegeta-
bles), tossed salad with Italian
dressing, apple, slice whole-
grain wheat bread, low-fat milk.
Wednesday: Sweet and
sour pork, wild rice medley,
Chinese Oriental vegetables
(broccoli, carrots, bamboo
shoots, red pepper, bean
sprouts), peaches, slice whole-
grain bread, low-fat milk.
Thursday: Hamburger on
bun with sides of ketchup and
mustard, baked beans, yellow
corn with diced tomato, mixed
fruit, low-fat milk.
Friday: Chicken salad,
sliced beet and onion salad,
three-bean salad, fresh or-
ange, two slices whole-wheat
bread, low-fat milk.
Senior dining sites include:
Lecanto, East Citrus, Crystal
River, Homosassa Springs, In-
verness and South Dunnellon.
For additional information
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Help me locate a provider


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff Writer
Mildred Bertrand feels like a newbie in
Citrus County having moved here a scant 2
years ago.
But what is proving even more difficult
for Bertrand, 75, about moving to a new
place is her inability to find doctors who ac-
cept Medicaid.
"I am on Medicare, but they don't pay for
some things like vision, hearing and dental,"
Bertrand said.
She said she has a laundry list of health
issues including an overactive thyroid, nine
aneurisms and stomach problems.
So, the Inverness resident said she has
been on a quest for a doctor who accepts
Medicaid and would be attentive to her
medical needs.
"I am very frustrated. I go to Citrus Me-
morial hospital for most my problems, but I
would like to get a doctor who is not going to
just come into a room and see me for a
minute and rush off," she said.
Kristi Gray, a spokeswoman for the De-
partment of Children and Families (DCF)


MEDICAID
Continued from Page Al

In Citrus County, 20,669
people 14 percent of the
population are eligible for
Medicaid services, according
to a WellFlorida Council Inc.
report.
It is a federal program
overseen by individual states.
Both federal and state share
in the cost and it is expensive.
In 2009 the federal govern-
ment spent $367 billion on
Medicaid, according to the
Kaiser Family Foundation's
statehealthfacts.org web site.
Florida spent about $15 bil-
lion in 2009; the state is ex-
pected to spend about $20
billion this year
Citing what they see as the
potential for fraud and abuse,
lawmakers are constantly
trying to reduce Medicaid
spending. Gov Rick Scott rec-
ommended a $2.1 billion cut
this year, mainly in payments
to hospitals (see related
story).
State Sen. Mike Fasano, R-
New Port Richey, worries
that Medicaid is an easy tar-
get for legislators who do not
understand the far-reaching
impacts of budget cuts.
"You don't play politics
with people's lives," Fasano
said. "If some people didn't
get their prescriptions
through Medicaid, they
wouldn't live the next day We
have children that need spe-
cial services because they
are special children. They
need bedside care because
they have that rare illness
that keeps Mom home all day
long."


said a list of medical providers for every
county is provided on the Florida Agency of
Health Care Administration (AHCA). The
agency also has a toll-free number for peo-
ple seeking information at 888-419-3456.
According its website, AHCA was statuto-
rily created by Chapter 20, Florida Statutes
as the chief health policy and planning en-
tity for the state. They are primarily respon-
sible for the state's $21.2 billion Medicaid
program that serves 3 million Floridians,
the licensure of the state's 41,000 health care
facilities and the sharing of health care data
through the Florida Center for Health In-
formation and Policy Analysis.
Bertrand said she would like to see a bet-
ter method of information dispersal by the
state regarding how to access services and
providers.
"Even if you need just simple information,
you have to call (a) whole lot of numbers be-
fore someone can tell you were you need to
go. Our system is not doing what is needed,"
she said.
Chronicle reporter A.B. Sidibe can be
reached at 352-564-2925 or asidibe@
chronicleonline. com.


State Rep. Jimmie T
Smith, R-Inverness, said he
understands that, but he also
said Medicaid cannot be ig-
nored when the state is cut-
ting back.
"We understand there are
vitals. There are must-have
programs," Smith said.
"There are also areas out
there that can be fixed."
Costs outweigh
what Medicaid pays
To providers such as nurs-
ing homes and hospitals,
Medicaid is one of those ne-
cessities that will never pay
for itself.
It isn't regular insurance,
which helps pay for specific
treatment such as X-rays, lab
work and MRIs.
Rather, Medicaid reim-
bursements are a flat rate
based on a provider's prior
average costs.
Allen Curtis, administrator
at Citrus Health and Rehab
Center in Inverness, receives
$216 a day for each Medicaid
patient in his facility
That reimbursement, he
said, is short about $6 a day
per patient for the actual
care and services the patient
generally receives.
"We are reimbursed on a
very convoluted formula by
the state," Curtis said. "They
do not pay for the cost of
care."
The daily rate is adjusted
every six months based on
something like a per capital
cost in four areas: direct care,
such as nursing; indirect care,
such as dietary; social serv-
ices, including operations
and housekeeping; and fixed
costs, such as a mortgage.
While the reimbursement
changes based on those esti-


mates, the rates are capped,
so Curtis never recoups his
actual costs.
"We have to make a little
more money on the Medicare
side and the private insur-
ance side to make up for that
shortfall," he said.
Citrus Health and Rehab, a
non-profit 111-bed facility,
opened in 1994. Its state cer-
tification requires Medicaid
patients make up half the
census.
Curtis, who has been Cit-


Call Now!

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CITRUS COUNTY MEDICAL PROVIDERS ACCEPTING MEDICAID
Note: Doctors and providers do not have to accept Medicaid patients. Even with
providers on this list, it's best to call the office to make sure they still accept Medicaid.
Source: Florida Agency for Health Care Administration, www.ahca.myflorida.com.


Primary Care Physicians
Nature Coast Family Medical, Beverly
Hills: 352-746-2227
Dr. Bharesh K. Patel, Beverly Hills: 352-
746-0600
Citrus Primary Care, Beverly Hills: 352-
527-6646; Citrus Springs: 352-465-
4002; Inverness: 352-344-6930;
Homosassa: 352-382-5000
Dr. Uday S. Hiremath, Citrus Springs,
Inverness: 352-746-3338
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Crystal River: 352-795-5544 CITRU
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Crystal River: 352-794-3872
Dr. Mary Lee Howard, Crystal River:
352-794-7391
Dr. Esther Gonzalez, Crystal River: 352-
795-7883
Dr. Eihab Tawfik, Crystal River: 352-364-
4302
Citrus County Health Department, Crys-
tal River: 352-795-6233; Inverness:

rus Health and Rehab ad-
ministrator for nine years,
said keeping services intact
in the face of Medicaid cuts
and caps is becoming more
difficult.
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Dr. Jorge Ruiz-Llanes, Crystal River:
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A8 SUNDAY, JANUARY 29, 2012


LOCAL





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Providers say they cannot absorb Medicaid cuts


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff Writer
INVERNESS Potential cuts
to Medicaid could have an impact
at Citrus Memorial hospital far be-
yond the poor that the program
serves.
Gov Rick Scott proposed a $2.1
billion cut in Medicaid. Citrus Me-
morial would see a $5.9 million
drop in state funding next year,
putting an unknown number of
services, programs and jobs on the
potential chopping block.
Hospital chief financial officer
Mark Williams said he has not yet
formulated a budget reduction
plan because the governor's pro-
posal must still work its way
through the Legislature.
But he warned a budget cut that
size would have significant impact
"How do you take $5.9 million
out of an organization?" he said.
"There's not $5.9 million in fluff
around here."
Lawmakers say they do not be-
lieve the Medicaid cuts will be


that severe.
"The House has
made it very clear
'~ they are not going
to do the deep
Scuts and harm to
Medicaid," state
Sen. Mike Fasano,
Mike R-New Port
Fasano Richey, said.
R-New Port "That's good
Richey. news. I've heard
from my col-
leagues in the Senate and they
have no intention of cutting as
deep and harsh as the governor
proposed."
Still, Medicaid providers such
as Citrus Memorial Health System
say cuts in Medicaid funding hurt
more than just the poor.
Williams noted the hospital will
never turn away Medicaid pa-
tients regardless of the govern-
ment's willingness to pay Instead,
any necessary budget cuts would
occur in programs utilized by all
patients those served by Medi-
caid, Medicare, private insurance


or no insurance. CITRUS
Also, he said, Medi-
caid cuts would require TUA
hospitals and other U
providers to seek higher 0
reimbursement rates
from private insurers,
which likely would L
drive up the cost of pre-
miums or co-pays for 2012 Chro
workers and employers.
"I'll guarantee that every resi-
dent is going to be affected by it,"
he said. "Something will give
somewhere."
Fasano noted the economic im-
pact of Medicaid cuts, especially
to those in hospitals and nursing
homes. He said a University of
Florida study of Scott's budget
proposal pegged the economic hit
in Citrus County at $12.8 million,
including the loss of 107 jobs.
"The trickle down effect is more
people not getting the services
they need," Fasano said. "People
will be relieved of their jobs."
State Rep. Jimmie T Smith, R-
Inverness, said the reality is Med-


COUNTY




'F E

icle project


icaid spending is a drain
on the state budget
"Education and Medi-
caid make up over half
of the state's budget
each year and, while ed-
ucation was cut last
year, Medicaid was held
virtually harmless,"
Smith said. "However,
last year, we also made


several changes to the Medicaid
program, including moving pa-
tients into more flexible HMOs
and we are confident these
changes will result in needed sav-
ings to a booming budgetary item
which has the very real potential
to bankrupt our state in the near
future."
Allen Curtis, administrator of
Citrus Health and Rehab Center
in Inverness, said he understands
the state's budget issues. He also
knows that his state certificate re-
quires that half his beds be filled
with Medicaid patients and his fa-
cility struggles with funding cuts.
Proposed budget cuts, he said,


would require cut-
ting staff- and
yet still maintain a
quality of service 1
for patients.
"It affects peo- -
ple. When you
look at cutting that
type of money, Jimmie T.
you're talking Smith
about cutting peo- R-Inverness.
ple," he said.
"The Legislature has a very dif-
ficult job to do. You've got to pri-
oritize what you're going to do for
the citizens of this state."
Fasano, who is serving his last
year in the state Senate due to
term limits, said it is getting
harder to protect Medicaid at the
budget level.
"It's always the poor little guy or
gal who gets hit the hardest," he
said. "They don't have anyone in
Tallahassee to argue on their
behalf."
Chronicle reporter Mike Wright
can be reached at 352-563-3228 or
m wrigh t@chronicleonline. com.


WOMAN
Continued from Page Al

She said she tried for six
months before she could
qualify for Medicaid and
eventually began getting her
Social Security disability
check-$1,100 a month.
Then came the zinger
Medicaid told Simonton
she is in the "share of cost"
program, which meant she
had to pay up to $900 of med-
ical expenses incurred dur-
ing any given month.
Simonton is a diabetic and
has high blood pressure in
addition to her disability.
"My insulin alone costs me
more than $200 a month and
then you add my doctor visits.
I am supposed to visit three
doctors every month and
then my medications and any
tests they have to run. Typi-
cally, I would have bills in ex-
cess of $900. Where am I
supposed to get all that
money from?" she said.
Simonton said she can't
help her mother and food is
scarce because she only gets
$16 in food stamps.
"I can't even afford my in-
sulin most of the time. I don't
know what to do," Simonton
said.
"The system is broken and
it needs to be fixed," Simon-
ton added.
According to the Depart-
ment of Children and Fami-
lies' (DCF) website, people
who are not eligible for "full"
Medicaid because their in-
come or assets are more than
the Medicaid program limits,
may qualify for the Medically
Needy program. Individuals
enrolled in Medically Needy
must have a certain amount
of medical bills each month
before Medicaid can be ap-
proved. This is referred to as
a "share of cost" and varies
depending on the house-
hold's size and income.
Kristi Gray, a spokes-
woman at DCF, said the for-
mula of share of cost is
according to federal
regulations.
"It doesn't really matter
what any of us thinks about
that (share of cost), it is a fed-
eral rule," Gray added.
She said while she is not
fully versed in the particulars
of Simonton's case, there may
be avenues to relief she could
pursue.
Medicaid is a hybrid fed-
eral and state program for
the needy with specific in-
come, age and ability criteria
to qualify, Gray said.
And, Medicaid, according
to Citrus County Elder Law
Attorney John Clardy III, "is
a big deal in the state of
Florida."
The state, Clardy said,
spends something close to
$20 billion on Medicaid serv-
ices and some 3.2 million
Floridians are enrolled in
the state's health care sys-
tem. The federal government
provides about 60 percent of
the funding while the state
has to come up with the rest,
he said.
"That is part of the reason
the state is trying to reform
Medicaid and try to do some-
thing aboutthe growing cost"
Clardy, who is part of a net-
work of elder care attorneys
who, among other things,
keep a keen eye on all things
Medicaid, said his group is
unhappy with some recent
Medicaid reform efforts, es-
pecially the pilot program to
move the state's acute and
long-term care services into
a for-profit managed care
system.
The pilot program, which
was launched in 2006 in a


few counties and with plans
for it to go statewide, would
move some who are in nurs-
ing homes back into the com-
munity under a managed
care plan.
The state's proposed pro-
gram, (HB 7107), which will
cover adults 65 and older and
younger adults with disabili-
ties, will affect as many as
84,000 current state Medicaid
beneficiaries as well as an-
other 27,000 eligible individ-
uals who are on various
waiting lists for services, ac-
cording to Clardy
But Clardy said the prob-
lem with this plan is what
happens to all new people
they propose to move from
guaranteed care and Medi-
caid qualification in a nurs-
ing home to possible home
care on a waiting list?
The Jessie Ball DuPont
Fund and the Winter Park
Foundation sponsored a
study of Florida's Medicaid
Reform efforts through
Georgetown University and
their findings can be found at
dupontfund.org or www
dupontfund. org/wp-content
/uploads/2011/12/briefl-
florida-medicaid-in-2012.pdf.
Medicaid information
Who receives Medicaid
health services? In order of
who receives the most to the
least support: SSI (develop-
mentally disabled); temporary
assistance to needy families;
children in homes below
poverty level; medically needy
individuals; pregnant women
below poverty level; low-income
elderly and disabled; pregnant
women above poverty income;
children in homes above
poverty level; refugees.
How many Floridians re-
ceive Medicaid health serv-
ices? More than 2.5 million.
About 68 percent are children
and adults served and they re-
ceive about 39 percent of Medi-
caid spending. About 32
percent are blind, disabled, eld-
erly served and they receive
about 61 percent of Medicaid
spending.
Who pays for Medicaid
services? 2009-10: the federal


government paid about 67 per-
cent of the Medicaid costs and
state paid about 32 percent of
more than $18 billion expendi-
tures in Florida's health care in-
dustry. The state's $6 billion
share came from the general
revenue fund: about $3 billion.
The remaining $3 billion is from
state trust funds, which get fi-
nancial contributions from hos-
pitals (pay 79 percent of state
match for hospital services);
nursing homes (pay 59 percent
of state match for their serv-
ices); HMOs pay nothing to
supplement state match re-
quirements for Medicaid.
How much Medicaid
spending is "mandatory?"
About 40 percent of Medicaid
spending is for "mandatory"
services. As noted above, these
services include physician, hos-
pital and high cost nursing
home care. The federal govern-


ment requires basic health care
support services be funded if a
state chooses to participate in
the Medicaid entitlement pro-
gram. A state can exempt itself,
but in doing so, the federal gov-
ernment will not provide finan-
cial support. About 60 percent
covers "optional" services, in-
cluding: dental, birth centers,
hearing, vision, dialysis,
Healthy Start, home and com-
munity based services, hos-
pice, intermediate care facility
services for developmentally
disabled, optometry, podiatry,
prescribed drugs, state mental
hospital services. Optional
services can be cut by a state
and the federal share of their
funding will be discontinued as
well as the state share.
Who are the Medicaid
health service providers?
About 80,000 are "fee for serv-
ice" providers (private physi-


Where Quality and Value
Comne Together!.

I I
^y'^Blf gevdal--


cians, etc.). There are 23 Medi-
caid "managed care plans" in-
cluding 16 HMOs and hospitals
where Medicaid recipients must
be within a private company ad-
ministered system.
Medicaid changes coming:
Florida has almost 4 million
people who are "uninsured."
Available health services from
hospital emergency rooms,
physicians and any other
sources. This care is subsi-
dized by private insurance com-
panies and their policy-holders
and by private health care


providers. These costs increase
premiums and co-pays paid by
individuals and families. About
1.5 million of these uninsured
are due to be covered under
Medicaid in the State of
Florida's 2013-14 fiscal year.
The budget impact of this is an
estimated $141 million increase
in 2013-14 and $611 million,
$859 million, $1 billion, $1.2 bil-
lion and $1.27 billion, respec-
tively, each year thereafter.
Source: Bob Graham Center
For Public Service at the Uni-
versity of Florida.


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A10 SUNDAY, JANUARY 29, 2012



PITCH
Continued from Page Al

"failed leader," not to worry
They could have tuned in to
Tuesday's conference call.
Or Wednesday's. Or Thurs-
day's. Or checked out the
"unreliable leader" banner
splashed across a Romney
news release that labeled
Gingrich "unhinged."
Romney's political biog-
raphy, meanwhile, is all
about his leadership as a
businessman, Massachu-
setts governor and savior of
the 2002 Olympic Games in
Salt Lake City
It's hard to miss Gingrich's
frequent broadsides at Rom-
ney for failing to provide con-
sistent, visionary leadership.
Or the former House
speaker's pronouncements
that he, by contrast, offers
"exactly the kind of bold,
tough leader the American
people want." Or Gingrich's
descriptions of all that was
accomplished in his four
years as speaker in the 1990s.
Former Pennsylvania Sen.
Rick Santorum, trailing in
the polls, keeps trying to
muscle his way into the con-
versation by offering himself
as the steady bet who can be
counted on to offer more re-
liable conservative leader-
ship than "erratic" Gingrich
or "moderate" Romney
In a race where all the
candidates are trying to out-
conservative one another,
stressing leadership creden-
tials gives the GOP rivals a
way to try to distinguish
themselves. In a year when
Obama's own leadership
skills are seen as one of his
weakest qualities, it gives
the Republicans one more
arrow in their quiver as they
argue over who would be


most electable in a matchup
with Obama come Novem-
ber
Leadership is always a
part of the equation in pres-
idential elections. In 2008,
for example, the candidates
all were abuzz with claims
that they offered "transfor-
mational" leadership.
"I want to transform this
country," Obama said when
he announced he was
running.
This year, leadership is
getting an extra dose of at-
tention, perhaps because of
statistics such as this: The
share of Americans viewing
Obama as a strong leader
slipped from 77 percent at
the start of his presidency to
52 percent in a Pew Re-
search Center poll released
this month. Among Republi-
cans, only about one-fourth
of those surveyed in the most
recent poll said Obama was a
strong leader, compared with
80 percent of Democrats.
At a campaign debate last
week in Tampa, Fla., Gin-
grich and Romney both
turned a question about
electability into an answer
about the L-word.
"This is going to come
down (to) a question of lead-
ership," Romney said. Then
the former Massachusetts

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Local candidates

to speak Feb. 11
Special to the Chronicle

The Republican Party of Florida chartered Nature
Coast Republican Club and the RPOF chartered Citrus
Republican Women's Club will host its next meeting Sat-
urday, Feb. 11.
The unopposed Citrus County Republican candidates
for county commissioner District 3, school superinten-
dent, property appraiser and clerk of courts will attend
to speak and answer questions from the floor
This joint meeting of the NCRC and CWRC will meet,
as always, at the American Legion Post 155 on State
Road 44. Coffee and doughnuts atno charge at 8:30 a.m.,
with the meeting starting at 9.
For more information and directions, call Fred Hale
or Rosella Hale at 352-746-2545 or send an email to
chef8465@tampabayrr.com.


governor recited his track
record as a leader in busi-
ness and government and
took a dig at Gingrich for
having to "resign in dis-
grace" when he was speaker
in the 1990s.
Gingrich, answering the
same question, aligned him-
self with the leadership
record of conservative hero
Ronald Reagan and offered
himself as someone "pre-


pared to be controversial
when necessary" to bring
about great change.
The answers offer a win-
dow into how differently the
two candidates define lead-
ership: Romney more as a
manager with business
school credentials, Gingrich
more as a big-thinking
visionary
The leadership argument
is a particularly potent cam-


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paign weapon for Romney
because a number of Repub-
licans who served in Con-
gress with Gingrich have
been happy to describe his
shortcomings in running the
House.
"If you were somebody
trying to serve with him, you
were always sort of left
standing with your hands
empty in terms of moving
forward with an actual plan
or putting a plan to paper,"
Rep. Mary Bono Mack, R-
Calif., said of Gingrich on a
Romney campaign confer-
ence call Thursday "So for
me, it's an example that he's
just not an effective leader I
think Mitt has the tempera-
ment and the ability to lead."
Gingrich, who resigned
after a spate of ethics prob-
lems and a poor showing for
House Republicans in the
1998 elections, managed to
turn even his resignation as
speaker into evidence that
he's a strong leader
"I took responsibility for
the fact that our results
weren't as good as they
should be," he said in the


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Tampa debate. "I think that's
what a leader should do."
As for the turbulence of
his tenure as speaker, Gin-
grich casts that, too, as evi-
dence of his bold leadership.
"Look, I wish everybody
had loved me, but I'd rather
be effective representing
the American people than
be popular inside Washing-
ton," he said earlier in the
campaign.
Stephen Wayne, a presi-
dential scholar at George-
town University, said the
harsh judgment of Obama's
presidential leadership by
Republicans and even some
Democrats in part is due to
the high hopes that he raised
during the 2008 campaign.
Obama the president has
been measured against the
words of Obama the candi-
date ever since.
Now that it's campaign
season again, says Wayne,
"he's not competing against
his own image, he's compet-
ing against a real life person
that has frailties. ... In a
sense, that lowers the bar
for Obama."


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^VOTE 2012
CITRUS COUNTY SUPERVISOR OF ELECTIONS
120 N. Apopka Ave., Invernes, FL, 34450-4238
(352) 341-6740 TTY: (352) 341-6752
www.votecitrus.com


Polls Open:

Tuesday, January 31, 2012

from 7am to 7pm


Sample Ballot Presidential Preference Primary Ballot


This is your official Sample Ballot for the January 31, 2012, Presidential Preference Primary.
This information is being provided in advance of the election to give
you the opportunity to study the candidates. If you like, you may mark
this Sample Ballot and take it with you when voting to use as a reference.
This Sample Ballot shows all ballot styles.
Please urge your family and friends to vote on January 31, 2012. If you have
questions about the election process or need further information, please visit our web site
at www.votecitrus.com or call the Supervisor of Elections office at 352-341-6740.




Presidential Preference
Primary Election Sample Ballot


IV&-. JANUARY 31, 2012


Yaur Voter Information Card
contains your polling
location information.

POLLING LOCATIONS

00 Red Level Baptist Church
11025W. Dunnellon Rd.
01 Crystal River United Methodist Church
4801 N. Citrus Ave.
02 River Gardens Baptist Church
3429 W. Dunnellon Rd.
04 First Baptist Church of Crystal River
700 N. Citrus Ave.
05 Crystal River City Hall
123 N.W. Hwy. 19
07 Crystal Oaks Clubhouse
4958 W. Crystal Oaks Dr.
L08 V.FW. Building
2170 W. Vet Ln.
09 Pine Ridge Community Building
5690W. Pine Ridge Blvd.
10 Citrus Sorings Community Center
1570 W. Citrus Springs Blvd.
2Ws
00 Ouail Run Community Building
1490 E. Redpoll Trail
201 Hernando United Methodist Church
2125 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy. (C.R. 486)
02 Citrus Hills Lodge
350 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy. (C.R. 486)
03 Central Ridge Library
425 W. Roosevelt Blvd.
204 Knights of Columbus
2389 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy. (C.R. 486)
05 Beverly Hills Lions Club
72 Civic Circle
06 Our Lady of Grace Church
6 Roosevelt Blvd.
08 Good Shepherd Lutheran Church
439 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy. (C.R. 486)


POLLING LOCATIONS
300's
Citrus County Builders Association
1196 S. Lecanto Hwy.
National Guard Armory
8551 W. Venable St.
West Citrus Elks Lodge
7890 W. Grover Cleveland Blvd.
Christian Center Church
7961 W. Green Acres St.
Homosassa Methodist Church
8831 W. Bradshaw St.

400's
First United Methodist Church
3896 S. Pleasant Grove Rd.
Crossroad BaDtist Church
5335 E. Jasmine Ln.
Church of the Nazarene
2101 N. Florida Ave.
Inverness City Hall
212 W. Main St.
Point 0' Woods Clubhouse
9228 E. Gospel Island Rd.
Citrus County Auditorium
3610 S. Florida Ave.
American Italian Social Club
4325 S. Little Al Pt.
Floral City Methodist Church
8478 E. Marvin St.
Floral City Lions Club
8370 E. Orange Ave.


Voter Information


Presidential Preference

Primary Election
Republican Party
TUESDAY,
JANUARY 31, 2012
\ POLLS OPEN FROM


Requirement for Voters
You must show a photo and signature ID when voting
early or at the polls. Voters who do not show a photo
and signature ID must vote a provisional ballot (F.S.
101.043 (2)).
Acceptable Forms of Photo and
Signature ID:
* Florida Driver's License
* Florida ID
* US Passport
* Military ID
* Student ID
* Debit or Credit Card with Photo
* Retirement Center ID
* Neighborhood Association ID
* Public Assistance ID
Prepare Now for the Presidential
Preference Primary Election
ASK YOURSELF THE FOLLOWING QUESTIONS:
11 Is the address and name on my voter
information card correct?
o Do I have the appropriate photo ID with
signature to bring when voting?
0 Do I know enough about the candidates to
make an informed decision?
L- Do I know where my polling location is to
cast my vote?


Early Voting Dates and Locations
Early voting will run from the 10th to the 3rd day prior to each
election. Show your acceptable photo and signature ID, to
receive a ballot. Lack of photo and signature ID will require
the voter to cast a provisional ballot. (F.S 101.043(2))
Early Voting Dates and Hours
January 21-28, 2012 Saturday to Saturday (including
Sunday)
Hours: Monday Friday, 12pm to 6pnm, Saturday & Sunday,
10am to 4pm
Early Voting Locations
Central Ridge Library 425 W. Roosevelt Blvd.,
Beverly Hills, FL, 34465
Crystal River Elections Office -1540 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL, 34429
Homosassa Public Library 4100 S. Grandmarch Ave.,
Homosassa, FL, 34446
Inverness City Hall 212 W. Main St., Inverness, FL, 34450


Call for your Mail Ballot
for the upcoming Primary
and General Elections in 2012
Call (352) 341-6740 or apply
online at w-.votecitrus corn


OFFICIAL PRESIDENTIAL PREFERENCE PRIMARY BALLOT
REPUBLICAN PARTY
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
JANUARY 31, 2012
* TO VOTE, COMPLETELY FILL IN THE OVAL NEXT TO YOUR CHOICE.
* Use a blue or black ink pen.
* If you make a mistake, don't hesitate to ask for a new ballot. If you erase or make other marks,
your vote may not count.
PRESIDENT
(Vote for One)
Mcneie Bscnmanr.
erinr.gr, C.,n
New GCngricn
Jon lredu nsw n
GCry Jonnson
Ron Paul
RicK Perry
M.n Rom,'-ey
R.CK Sanlorum


MRK YOUR .k". tCOt'l.


O1L NLIT TO i--I
IOUR CHOICE. CD


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Paying it forward


Ala. tornado

survivors help

after latest

twisters
Associated Press
CLAY, Ala. Survivors
still haunted by memories of
last year's tornado outbreak
that killed 250 in Alabama
are writing checks, donating
diapers and standing over
hot grills to help victims of
the latest twisters to pum-
mel the state.
The April 27 outbreak of
62 tornadoes that swept
across the state in waves
caused more than $1 billion
in damage, hurt more than
2,000 people and destroyed
or damaged nearly 24,000
homes. The storms leveled
neighborhoods and virtually
wiped out some towns. The
latest outbreak of at least 10
tornadoes this week rav-
aged central Alabama,
killing two people near
Birmingham and destroying
or badly damaging more
than 460 homes.
RickJohnson is still living
with relatives and friends
after two tornadoes last year
killed four people and splin-
tered his home in rural Cor-
dova, where the downtown
area is still in shambles.
When the latest twisters hit
this week, Johnson stepped
up. He volunteered to cook
200 pounds of donated
chicken and help deliver hot
meals to volunteers, workers
and storm victims.
"You know what they're
going through. You know
what they feel. It's hard to
describe," said Johnson, 55.
Leaders from President
Barack Obama on down
praised the generosity and
volunteering spirit of Al-
abamians after last year's
deadly tornado outbreak.
The people who needed
help last year, many of
whom are still removing de-
bris and rebuilding, have
been among those lending a
hand this time around. The
Alabama Emergency Man-
agement Agency said 2,511
victims of last year's storms
were still living in tempo-
rary housing.
For Leah Bromley, help-
ing out victims of the latest
twisters is all about repay-
ing kindness. Mountains of
donated clothes and furni-
ture flooded her hometown
of Tuscaloosa after a twister
killed nearly 50 people
there last year.
"I just really believe in
paying it forward," said
Bromley, who started Re-
build Tuscaloosa, a non-
profit organization formed
after last year's twisters to
solicit donations and dis-
tribute money and services
for relief. Now, it's helping
out in communities far from
Tuscaloosa.
A University of Alabama
sorority from Tuscaloosa
gave donations to help vic-
tims of the latest twisters
northeast of Birmingham,
and a group brought more
from Cullman, which also got
slammed last year. A school
in a Walker County town that
was hard hit last year do-
nated supplies and made
sandwiches for survivors in
Oak Grove, which was bat-
tered both in 2011 and 2012.
Mary Foster couldn't go
home for weeks after a tor-
nado badly damaged her
home in Tuscaloosa, and
she's just now settling back
into a normal routine nine
months later. That didn't
stop her from writing a
check to a relief fund this
week.
Foster said she was com-
pelled to help because so
many people helped her last
year, including Bromley's
organization and Habitat for
Humanity, which helped fix
her home.
"I was glad to be able to
be a blessing to them be-
cause so many people were
a blessing to me," Foster
said.
Foster's house in east
Tuscaloosa was badly dam-


aged when a twister cut a
wide swath through the city
of nearly 90,000 last year,
forcing her and her two
daughters to move in first
with a brother, then into a
motel. Her home is now re-
paired, but broken trees and
splintered, vacant homes
dot the rolling hills all
through her Alberta City
neighborhood, providing a


Associated Press
Rick Johnson, 55, cooks chicken Friday for victims of the
tornadoes that hit Alabama recently in a church parking lot
in Cordova, Ala. Johnson is among the survivors of last year's
April tornado outbreak who are pitching in to assist com-
munities that were struck by the most recent onslaught.


constant reminder of the
terror that day
"When I came out and
saw people scream and hol-
lering. ... Oh, my," said Fos-
ter, her voice trailing off.
Thanks to contributions
from people in tornado-
scarred towns and else-
where, the gym is now full at
Bridge Point Church in Clay,
which opened a distribution
center after a twister last
Monday slammed neighbor-
hoods including one where a
16-year-old girl was killed
and scores of homes were
destroyed or damaged. A
steady stream of storm vic-
tims came by on Wednesday
gathering items off of a gym
floor covered with tables full
of cleaning supplies and
buckets, baby food and dia-
pers, tarps and canned foods.
Pastor Mark Higdon said
the outpouring of donations
has been gratifying, particu-
larly considering how many
Alabama families are still


HEALTH


struggling to recover from
the tornadoes last year,
which leveled entire neigh-
borhoods and virtually
wiped out some towns. The
church's gym was empty at 8
a.m. Tuesday, a day after the
twisters struck, and it was
overflowing 24 hours later.
"The generosity of people
is unbelievable," Higdon
said. "They're just more
than willing to give back."
A few minutes after Hig-
don spoke, two trucks and a
trailer loaded with dona-
tions pulled into the church
parking lot with donations
from Rebuild Tuscaloosa,
Bromley's group. Wearing a
T-shirt emblazoned with a
map of Alabama and the
date of last year's twisters,
Brian DeWitt helped unload
boxes of food, kitchen sup-
plies and other items.
DeWitt's home was
spared, but friends lost
theirs and he's been helping
with the relief.


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Morabito earns Chief


Fire Officer credential


Special to the Chronicle competen-
cies, contri-
Fire Rescue Chief Larry butions to
Morabito recently was the profes-
awarded the professional sion, as
designation of Chief Fire well as
Officer by the Commission community
on Professional Credential- i n v o 1v e -
ing (CPC), an entity of the Larry ment. Be-
Center for Public Safety Morabito yond that,
Excellence Inc. He was all appli-
named one of about 830 cants are required to iden-
CFOs worldwide. tify a future professional
The CPC awards the development plan.
Chief Fire Officer designa- According to Sheriff Jeff
tion only after an individ- Dawsy, Chief Morabito has
ual successfully meets all of an in-depth knowledge of
the organization's stringent the emergency services
criteria. The process in- profession and has sur-
cludes an assessment of the passed the critical core
applicant's education, ex- competencies for person-
perience, professional de- nel serving in senior fire of-
velopment, technical ficer positions.


The CFO designation
process uses a comprehen-
sive peer review model to
evaluate those candidates
who seek the credential.
As administrators of the
CFO designation program,
the nine-member Commis-
sion on Professional Cre-
dentialing consists of
individuals from the fire
and emergency medical
services professions, fed-
eral and local government,
plus academia.
Morabito has been a
member of the Fire Rescue
Division since September
2008. He previously served
as a fire chief in Michigan
and South Carolina. Mora-
bito also is active in various
fire service organizations.


Pentagon looks to weapons

of the past for military future


Associated Press
WASHINGTON The
lineup of weapons the Pen-
tagon has picked to fit Pres-
ident Barack Obama's new
forward-looking defense
strategy, called "Priorities
for 21st Century Defense,"
features relics of the past
They include the Air
Force's venerable B-52
bomber, whose current
model entered service
shortly before Obama was
born. There is the even
older U-2 spy plane, which
began flying in 1955 and
burst into the spotlight in
May 1960 when Francis
Gary Powers was shot
down over the Soviet
Union.
When Obama went to the
Pentagon on Jan. 5 to an-
nounce his new defense
strategy he said that as the


U.S. shifts from a decade of
war in Iraq and
Afghanistan it will "get rid
of outdated Cold War-era
systems." He was not spe-
cific. But when the first de-
tails of the Pentagon's 2013
budget plan were an-
nounced Thursday, it was
clear that some prominent
remaining Cold War-era
"systems" will live on.
That includes not just the
B-52 bomber and the U-2
spy plane, but also the
foundation of U.S. nuclear
deterrence strategy: a
"triad" of nuclear weapons
that can be launched from
land, sea, and air. That con-
cept, credited by many for
preventing nuclear conflict
throughout the Cold War, is
now seen by some arms
control experts as the kind
of outdated structure that
the United States can af-


ford to get rid of.
Some think the U.S.
should do away with at
least one leg of that "triad,"
perhaps the bomber role.
That would not just save
money and clear the way
for larger reductions in the
number of U.S. nuclear
weapons an Obama goal
in line with his April 2009
pledge to seek the elimina-
tion of nuclear weapons.
Carl Levin, D-Mich.,
chairman of the Senate
Armed Services Commit-
tee, said recently that
maintaining the current
structure of American nu-
clear forces was "not in
keeping with the modern
world." He and like-
minded lawmakers argue
that nuclear weapons play
no role in deterring
threats such as global
terrorists.


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SUNDAY, JANUARY 29, 2012 All


HBHNNE(TIONI











NATION


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


NationBREFS Arab League halts Syrian observer mission


rEa pt


Associated Press
An audience member lis-
tens as President Barack
Obama speaks Friday at
the University of Michi-
gan's Al Glick Field House
in Ann Arbor, Mich.


Missing tot case
adds evidence
PORTLAND, Maine In-
vestigators have been ana-
lyzing blood found in the
basement of a Maine home
where a missing toddler was
last seen six weeks ago, an
official said Saturday.
The blood was found early
in the investigation into Ayla
Reynolds' disappearance from
her father's home in Water-
ville, state police spokes-
man Steve McCausland said.
The state crime laboratory has
been running tests on it since
then, but it was unclear when
results would be available.
Ayla's father, Justin DiPi-
etro, reported her missing
Dec. 17. He had put her to
bed the night before in the
home he shares with his
mother and said she wasn't
there the next morning.
McCausland called the
discovery of the blood "trou-
bling." He declined to discuss
how much blood was found in
the basement or how old it
might have been.
Ayla was 20 months old
when she disappeared. She
had been staying with her fa-
ther at the time in the house
where DiPietro lives with his
mother. Her mother, Trista
Reynolds, lives in Portland.
DiPietro told police she
was wearing green pajamas
with polka dots and the words
"Daddy's Princess" on them
and had a soft cast on her
broken left arm. DiPietro, his
mother and a third adult were
home the night of Dec. 16,
and police have questioned
all three, McCausland said.
"We believe they have not
given us the full story," he said.
Trista Reynolds was partic-
ipating in a vigil Saturday for
the girl and could not be
reached for comment. DiPi-
etro did not immediately re-
turn a message left on his
cellphone.
The two came face to face
for the first time since Ayla's
disappearance at the vigil on
the City Hall steps in down-
town Waterville.

World BRIEF

Light it up


Nearly 100 dead in three days

of violence from Assad'orces


Associated Press
BEIRUT The Arab
League halted its observer
mission in Syria on Satur-
day because of escalating vi-
olence that killed nearly 100
people the past three days,
as pro-Assad forces battled
dissident soldiers in a belt
of suburbs on the eastern
edge of Damascus in the
most intense fighting yet so
close to the capital.
The rising bloodshed has
added urgency to new at-
tempts by Arab and Western
countries to find a resolu-


tion to the 10 months of vio-
lence that, according to the
United Nations, has killed
at least 5,400 people as
Assad seeks to crush per-
sistent protests demanding
an end to his rule.
The United Nations is
holding talks on a new reso-
lution on Syria and next
week will discuss an Arab
peace plan aimed at ending
the crisis. But the initiatives
face two major obstacles:
Damascus' rejection of an
Arab peace plan which it
says impinges on its sover-
eignty, and Russia's willing-


Associated Press
ST LOUIS -Thousands of people
lining downtown streets cheered
wildly as veterans, some wiping away
tears, marched through St Louis on
Saturday during the nation's first big
welcome-home parade for Iraq War
veterans.
Several hundred veterans, many
dressed in camouflage, walked
alongside military vehicles, march-
ing bands and even the Budweiser
Clydesdales. People in the crowd
held signs reading "Welcome
Home" and "God Bless Our
Troops," and fire trucks with aer-
ial ladders hoisted three huge
American flags along the route.
"It's not necessarily overdue. It's
just the right thing," said Maj. Rich
Radford, who became a symbol of
the event thanks to a photo of his
young daughter taking his hand
while welcoming him home from
his second tour in Iraq in 2010.
Since the war ended, there has
been little fanfare for returning
veterans aside from gatherings at
airports and military bases no
ticker-tape parades or large public
celebrations so two friends from
St. Louis decided to change that.
They sought donations, launched
a Facebook page, met with the
mayor and mapped a route in a
grass-roots effort that raised about


ness to use
its U.N. Se-
curity Coun-
cil veto to
protect
Syria from
sanctions.
Syri a' s
Bashr I n t e r i or
Assad Minister
Mohammed Shaar vowed
the crackdown would go on,
telling families of security
members killed in the past
months that security forces
"will continue their struggle
to clean Syria's soil of the
outlaws."
Government forces
launched a heavy assault on
a string of suburbs and vil-
lages on the eastern out-
skirts of Damascus, aiming
to uproot protesters and dis-


$35,000. More than half came from
Anheuser-Busch and the
Mayflower moving company, which
both have St. Louis ties.
On Saturday, the work paid off-
and the biggest cheers clearly were
for the veterans. People standing
along the route waved small Amer-
ican flags and wildly cheered as
groups of troops walked by, with
some veterans wiping away tears
as they acknowledged the support
Gayla Gibson, a 38-year-old Air
Force master sergeant, was proud
that her hometown was the first to
honor Iraq War veterans. Gibson
spent four months there in 2003
working as a medical technician.
"We saw some horrible things,"
she said. "Amputations. Broken
bones. Severe bums from IEDSs."
Gibson said she was moved by
the turnout and the patriotic fervor
"I think it's great when people
come out to support those who
gave their lives and put their lives
on the line for this country," she
added.
Radford, a 23-year Army veteran,
served two tours in Iraq totaling
about 25 months, never at ease.
"The Iraqis didn't like us, didn't
want us in their country They
would sellout our positions, our
missions. That invited danger
every day," he said.


sident soldiers who have
joined the opposition, ac-
tivists said.
Troops in tanks and ar-
mored personnel carriers
attacked the suburbs of Kfar
Batna, Saqba, Jisreen and
Arbeen, the closest of which
lie only a few miles from
downtown Damascus, said
the Local Coordination
Committees activist network
and the British-based Syrian
Observatory for Human
Rights. Dissident troops
were fighting back against
the attackers, they said.
In a nearby suburb,
Douma, gunmen ambushed
a bus carrying army officers,
the state-run news agency
SANA, calling the attackers
"terrorists." It said seven of-
ficers were killed.


When he came back from his sec-
ond tour, he said his then-6-year-old
daughter Aimee reached up and
grabbed his hand, saying simply: "I
missed you, daddy" Radford's sister
caught the moment with her camera,
and that image now graces T-shirts
and posters for the parade.
With 91,000 troops still fighting in
Afghanistan, many of those veter-
ans could be redeployed sug-
gesting to some that it's premature
to celebrate their homecoming. In
New York, for example, Mayor
Michael Bloomberg recently said
there would be no city parade for
Iraq War veterans in the foresee-
able future because of objections
voiced by military officials.
But others wanted to hold a
large, public event to say thanks.
While the parade in St. Louis was
held to mark the end of the Iraq
War, all military personnel in-
volved in post-Sept. 11 conflicts
were welcomed to take part, or-
ganizers said.
"It struck me that there was this
debate going on as to whether
there should or shouldn't be a pa-
rade," Tom Appelbaum, one of the
organizers, said ahead of the event
"Instead of waiting around for
somebody somewhere to say, 'Yes,
let's have a parade,' we said, 'Let's
just do it."'


College presidents wary of Obama cost-control plan


Associated Press
Associated Press WASHINGTON Fuzzy math, Illi-
Hundreds of Taiwanese pre- nois State University's president
pare to release "sky called it. "Political theater of the
lanterns" Saturday in worst sort," said the University of
hopes of good fortune and Washington's head.
prosperity in the new year President Barack Obama's new
and to celebrate the up- plan to force colleges and universi-
coming traditional Chinese ties to contain tuition or face losing
Lantern Festival in the federal dollars is raising alarm
Pingxi district of New among education leaders who worry
Taipei City, Taiwan. The about the threat of government over-
start of the Chinese reach. Particularly sharp words came
Lantern festival falls on from the presidents of public univer-
Monday, Feb. 6. sities; they're already frustrated by
-From wire reports increasing state budget cuts.


The reality, said Illinois State's Al
Bowman, is that simple changes can-
not easily overcome deficits at many
public schools. He said he was happy
to hear Obama, in a speech Friday at
the University of Michigan, urge
state-level support of public universi-
ties. But, Bowman said, given the de-
creases in state aid, tying federal
support to tuition prices is a product
of fuzzy math.
Illinois has lowered public support
for higher education by about one-
third over the past decade when ad-
justed for inflation. Illinois State, with
21,000 students, has raised tuition al-
most 47 percent since 2007, from


$6,150 a year for an
in-state undergradu-
ate student to $9,030.
Bowman said the
undergraduate expe-
rience can be made
cheaper, but there
are trade-offs.
Barack "You could hire
Obama mostly part-time, ad-
junct faculty. You
could teach in much larger lecture
halls, but the things that would allow
you achieve the greatest levels of effi-
ciency would dilute the product and
would make it something I wouldn't
be willing to be part of," he said.


The assault in the suburbs
seemed to be a sign of the
growing presence of dissi-
dent soldiers closer to the
capital. Although the tightly
controlled Damascus has
been relatively quiet since
the uprising began, its out-
skirts have witnessed in-
tense anti-regime protests
and army defectors have be-
come more visible and ac-
tive in the past few months.
"The fighting today is the
most intense near the capi-
tal since the uprising
began," said Rami Abdul-
Rahman, who heads the Ob-
servatory for Human
Rights. "The Syrian regime
is trying to finish the upris-
ing militarily now that the
case is being taken to the
United Nations."


Afghans

blast

French

withdrawal

plan

Associated Press
KABUL, Afghanistan -
France's plans to withdraw
its combat troops from
Afghanistan
a year early
drew harsh
words Sat-
urday in the
Afghan cap-
ital, with

u c u si n g
Nicolas French
Sarkozy President
Nicolas Sarkozy of putting
domestic politics ahead of
Afghans' safety
A wider proposal by
Sarkozy for NATO to hand
over all security to Afghans
of next year
also came
under fire,
with one
Afghan law-
maker say-
ing it would
be "a big
Hamid mistake"
Karzai that would
leave security forces unpre-
pared to fight the Taliban
insurgency and threaten a
new descent into violence in
the 10-year-old war.
Sarkozy's decision, which
came a week after four
French troops were shot
dead by an Afghan army
trainee suspected of being a
Taliban infiltrator, raises
new questions about the
unity of the U.S.-led military
coalition.
It also reopens the debate
over whether setting a dead-
line for troop withdrawals
will allow the Taliban to run
out the clock and seize more
territory once foreign forces
are gone.
"Afghan forces are not
self-sufficient yet They still
need more training, more
equipment and they need to
be stronger," said military
analyst Abdul Hadi Khalid,
Afghanistan's former inte-
rior minister.
Khalid said the decision
by Sarkozy was clearly polit-
ical. Sarkozy's conservative
party faces a tough election
this year, and the French
public's already deep dis-
content with the Afghan war
only intensified when un-
armed French troops were
gunned down by an Afghan
trainee Jan. 20 at a joint
base in the eastern province
of Kapisa.
Sarkozy announced
France's new timetable on
Friday alongside Afghan
President Hamid Karzai,
who was in Paris for a pre-
viously planned visit.
He also said Karzai had
agreed with him to ask for
all international forces to
hand security over to the
Afghan army and police in
2013, a plan he would pres-


ent at a Feb. 2 and 3 meeting
of NATO defense ministers
in Brussels.


Heroes, welcome


Associated Press
Spectators cheer and wave Saturday as they watch a parade to honor Iraq War veterans pass in St. Louis. Thou-
sands turned out to watch the first big welcome-home parade in the U.S. since the last troops left Iraq in
December.

First bigparade on Iraq War's end draws St. Louis throngs


*











EXCURSIONS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


* Veterans Notes can be found on Page A15 of .
today's Chronicle.



SI 1


'STAY-CATION' DOESN'T HAVE TO TAKE YOU FAR FROM YOUR ARMCHAIR






Old Courthouse Heritage Museum

Family-friendly, educational fun can be found as close as Inverness


SUSAN BRIDENSTINE
Special to the Chronicle

ou will want to take a new
look at The Old Courthouse
Heritage Museum. Kathy
Turner Thompson, historical
resources officer, the Citrus County
Historical Society and their
creative volunteers have lots of
ideas and activities that make The
Old Courthouse Heritage Museum
the happening place in Inverness.
And it doesn't look it, thanks to ongoing renovations,
but this unique icon will soon celebrate its 100th year.
So, "Don't forget to Save the Date! Come and Cele-
brate as Citrus County turns 125 and the Historic Cit-
rus County Courthouse turns 100
years old" on June 2. There
will be many exciting surprises
in store.
A visit to the Courthouse Mu-
seum is a wonderful way to
spend an afternoon. With so
many residents having come
here from other localities, the
museum gives us a sense
of place.
Susan Bridenstine Built before the existence of
MOONLIGHT electricity in Inverness, the
GYPSY structure has seen tremendous
change and development of the
area and has maintained a
record of it through archives,
artifacts, photographs and collections.
Today, the Courthouse Museum plays a vital role in
our community, offering so much to so many More
than 10,000 students have visited the museum where,
Kathy Turner Thompson says, "Children learn that
history is tangible and make the connection." The Mu-
seum's Outreach Program has taken artifacts, videos,
living history and displays to Citrus County Schools
reaching an additional 10,000 students.
The pre-history gallery exhibit, "Footprints in
Time," covers the climate, geography, animals, and
people of Florida and features the Seminoles, who
tenaciously fought for this land we now call home.
Exhibits from the 1800s to recent times are depicted
in the local history gallery
'A Long Way Home," displays the development of
the area as a result of the once prolific lumber, citrus
and phosphate industries.
The museum also hosts rotating exhibits. Currently,
'Art Teachers Make Art" displays the creativity of Cit-
rus County's art teachers and will run until Feb. 17.
Beginning in March, "The History of the Girl Scouts,"
honoring the Girl Scouts' 100th anniversary, will be
presented until June.
The various galleries offer dual-period history les-
sons. The galleries that now hold the exhibits were
once the offices of the sheriff, tax collector and ap-
praiser, and the original county courtroom.
Each year, four jazz concerts and four concerts of
various types of music are held in the 1912 re-
stored courtroom.
Next in the Jazz at the Museum \
Series, "Sweet Sounds of
Jazz," in time for
Valentine's Day,
will be presented
on Thursday, Feb. 9,
featuring Southern
Exposure. The final
concert in this series,
"Made in America -
Celebrating Jazz Appre-
ciation Month," will be
April 5.
On March 15, the Con-
certs at the Old Courthouse
series presents Jimmy
Crowley, from Cork, Ireland,
performing Gaelic music.
The Old Courthouse Heritage
Museum also hosts a number of
guest speakers in the Coffee and
Conversation series. The third
presentation in this series will be 0e'o9 .
Thursday, Feb. 16, when J. D. Sutton ,-1 4
will portray William Bartram, in a ,o '}
first-person re-enactment of the early


l.,.......- .-.'-'- .:_- ._ ... -.- -- ---- . .. -.... -.--
SUSAN BRIDENSTINE/Special to the Chronicle
For an inexpensive, educational and fun day out, spend some time at The Old Courthouse Heritage Museum in
downtown Inverness ... right here at home.


A view of the courtroom.


Florida adventurer And in the fourth and final pres-
entation in the series, Dr Jeffrey Mitchem will speak
on the Native American/Spanish contact that occurred
in Citrus County This archaeological program will be
Saturday, March 10.
The courthouse and courtroom, in particular, draw
people from all over the country to see where Elvis
Presley starred in the movie "Follow That Dream."
The courthouse was the center of attraction for six
weeks in 1961, when throngs of fans came to Inverness
for a chance to see Elvis film the courtroom scenes.
On April 20, 21 and 22, the Citrus County Historical
Society will host "When Elvis Came to Town," an origi-
nal stage production in the courtroom where Elvis
starred in scenes of the movie. Last year, the show
\% s such a hit that extra showings were added to ac-
i commodate the sold-out demand for tickets.
The historic courtroom is an impressive location
for events and is available to rent for weddings,
graduations and celebrations.
In October "ghostly guides" lead visitors on a
haunted tour of the courthouse with A Night
at the Museum: Haunted History Comes
Alive! Last year's haunting drew 530 visitors
in one night when Marjorie Kinnan
Rawlings, Dessie Smith Prescott, Elvis
Presley, Nancy Yulee, the Grim Reaper
and many other historical figures made a
ghostly visit in the family-friendly event
\s s The Museum Store is worth a visit in
i e itself and carries a variety of unusual
os gifts for adults and children.
The historic courthouse is be-
lieved to be one of a kind in the coun-
try because of its combination of
architectural styles and how it is situated on the


Works of the clock and bell in the tower.


square. It is one of only 25 remaining historic court-
houses in Florida. In 1992, it was listed on the Na-
tional Register of Historic Places.
The Courthouse Museum is wheelchair-equipped
with an outside lift and inside elevators. Hours of op-
eration are 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday
There is no charge to visit the museum, but donations
are greatly appreciated.
Visit www.cccourthouse.org for posts of events, ex-
hibits, and for more information about The Old
Courthouse Heritage Museum, or call 352-341-6436
for information on the museum or Coffee and Conver-
sation. For information on "When Elvis Came to
Town" or the Citrus County Historical Society, call
352-341-6427.
Volunteers contribute enormously through their in-
volvement with the Courthouse Museum and are
valuable assets. "I worked because I had to," says
Joanie Knapp, a volunteer "I volunteer because I
want to."
For an opportunity to share talent, time or knowl-
edge, call John Grannan, president, Citrus County
Historical Society, at 352-341-6427 or visit online at
www.citruscountyhistoricalsociety.org.
To help ensure the future of our past with a
contribution, checks may be made to: Citrus County
Historical Society Inc., and mailed to: Citrus County
Historical Society, 1 Courthouse Square, Inverness,
FL 34450.

Susan Bridenstine, has lived and traveled around the
U.S. and now resides in Inverness. She and her
husband, Kim, lived aboard their sailboat for seven
years, often sailing moonlit seas after dark You
can reach her at slbridenstine@gmail.com


Westernmost point

Four friends from Inverness recently spent 11 days on a tour of Portugal,
and enjoyed the history, culture and cuisine of the unique country. One of the
many places they visited was Cape St. Vincent, the westernmost point on
continental Europe. From left are: Judy Ireton, Anne Tang, Joanie Diffenderfer
and Barbara Whittemore.
Special to the Chronicle


DREAM
VACATIONS


The Chronicle and The
Accent Travel Group are
sponsoring a photo con-
test for readers of the
newspaper.


Readers are invited to
send a photograph from
their Dream Vacation with a
brief description of the trip.
If it's selected as a win-
ner, it will be published in
the Sunday Chronicle. At
the end of the year, a
panel of judges will select
the best photo during the
year and that photograph


will win a prize.
Please avoid photos
with dates on the print.
Photos should be sent
to the Chronicle at 1624
N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429
or dropped off at the
Chronicle office in Inver-
ness, Crystal River or any
Accent Travel Office.


I






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Sister frets about


SUNDAY EVENING JANUARY 29, 2012 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D: Comcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H Holiday Heights
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younger
Dear Annie: I am a 23-
year-old married
woman. I have two
much-younger brothers
from my mother's second
marriage. They live with her
in another state.
Recently, Mom admitted
that she is an alcoholic. I've
always had my suspicions,
but was never sure, since we
weren't close. When my hus-
band and I went to visit her
last summer, we could see
firsthand how severe it is.
Mom barely weighs 90
pounds. She gets so drunk
that she cannot walk or talk.
She told us she has driven
while drunk and that she
also becomes violent. Not
long ago, she broke several
bones when she
fell down the
stairs. My broth-
ers had to call
911.
Mom was not
this way when I
was growing up.
Her divorce was
only recently fi-
nalized, and she
received cus-
tody of my
brothers. I'm
worried sick ANNI
about them. MAILI
Mom has no
family in her
town, and I am far away My
brothers' father is bipolar
and a drug addict, so living
with him is not an option.
I'm trying to get my mother
to move closer to me. How
can I get some help? Des-
perate in Colorado
Dear Colorado: We're not
sure what kind of help you
need. Your brothers might
be better off in your custody,
if you are willing. Or, again
depending on your toler-
ance and economic situa-
tion, you might take all of
them into your home, Mom
included, while you help
her find employment and a
place of her own. Perhaps
other family members will
offer financial assistance.
Contact Al-Anon (al-
anon.alateen.org), and also
call 211 (Information and
Referral services) for social
service agencies that might
help.
Dear Annie: My husband
and I have been married for
15 years. We were both wid-
owed. This past holiday sea-
son, he dragged in several
boxes from the garage to
decorate our house with
things made by his first wife.
They were dog-eared, tat-
tered, yellowed calico fabric
items in multiple colors and
40 years old.
I gently told him that it in-
sulted me that he wanted


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Titleholder, for short
6 Small piece
11 Washed-out
16 Acute
21 Shakespearean lover
22 Hiatus
23 Express a belief
24 Danger
25 Lacking sense
26 Shaw or Lange
27 Send payment
28 Last letter
29 Drunken one
30 Sch.org.
31 Acknowledge
33 Gloomy
35 Collapsible bed
36 Charming
39 Revere
43 Foot part
44 Exist
45 Merited
47 Before deductions
49 Reply (abbr.)
51 Gusts
54 Famed Texas landmark
57 Aflying reindeer
59 Gaborand
Longoria
63 Destiny
64 Go wrong
66 Relocate
68 Mild expletive
69 and rave
70 Diner sign
72 Literary collection
74 Ripple
76 Abominable
snowman
78 Russian girl's name
79 Relative by
marriage
82 Allows
84 Lycanthrope
86 Playing card
87 Former student, for short
89 Function
91 Edge
92 Game official (abbr.)
93 Driver's
compartment
95 Surmounting
97 Ibsen character
99 passim
101 Jan., Feb., etc.
104 Mayday!
106 "Annie Get
Gun"
108 Flooring piece


110 Site
114 Release a certain way
117 Sketch
119 Peppermint stick (2 wds.)
121 Greek portico
122 Performs
124 Street disturbance
126 Crete's Mount-
127 Stake
128 Mountain lake
129 Butter squares
131 Condemn
133 Relative of
92 Across
135 -and abet
136 Raced
137 Weasellike
animal
139 Monk
141 British-
143 Mineral spring
145 Four (prefix)
147 Ingenious
149 Printer's
measures
152 Play part
154 Lab animal
(2 wds.)
157 Smells
161 Daddy
162 Action word
164 Hip joint
165 of hand
167 Curved path
168 Thoroughbred
170 Cry of woe
173 So long, amigo!
175 Box-lid hardware
177 Willow
178 Wall painting
179 Chili con-
180 Chekhov or
Rubinstein
181 French painter
182 Gab
183 Tire surface
184 Very little

DOWN
1 Crunchy
2 Treat with respect
3 Violin maker
4 Dudes
5 American poet
6 Petty quarrel
7 Old sailing ship
8 Furrow
9 Chinese, e.g.
10 Annoy
11 Basketball player


12 Mimic
13 Shadowy
14 Town in
Oklahoma
15 Coup-
16 Uttered
17 Skirt border
18 Betel palm
19 Strictness
20 Full-page
illustration
30 capital
32 Assoc. cousin
34 Bellow
37 Fresh
38 Set of
circumstances
40 Cheese variety
41 An amphibian
42 Elia's specialty
46 "The Chronicles
of-"
48 Mole relative
50 Asian goat
51 Sanctified
52 Unwilling
53 Aquatic mammal
55 Cut
56 Racetrack shape
58 Inscribe
60 Bravery
61 Fish with hook and line
62 Kind of sergeant
65 Go team!
67 Perpetually
71 Design detail
73 breve
75 English school
77 Rainbow
80 End
81 Tax
83 Opening for coins
85 Post or Dickinson

88 Mental state
90 the Red
94 Agent 007
96 Sound of
contentment
98 Jai -
100 Drug-yielding plant
101 Essential things
102 Available (2 wds.)
103 Twenty
105 Range
107 Police action
109 Tolerate
111 Man-made
waterway
112 Release, in a way


Kernels
Settles after flight
Change of-
Canine cry
Stop up
Scatter
Rocky hill
Third son of Adam
Isinglass
Jetty
Turn toward
Flow slowly
Town in


brothers

his first wife's decorations
on the walls and mirrors. He
blew up and started scream-
ing, ranting and raving and
got red-faced telling me
these were "his memories."
I felt he was flaunting his
past, and I surely didn't
want this reminder through
the holidays. He then pulled
the tree out from the win-
dow and completely un-dec-
orated it, took down all his
wife's items, slammed
things and pouted like a
child. Then he slept in the
spare bedroom.
It's been more than a
month, and he is still pout-
ing. I am still upset. I know
my husband has major
anger issues, but certainly it
was OK for me to
ask him to remove
these things. I
don't want his past
life in "our" home.
Are my feelings
justified? -Some-
where in Oregon
Dear Oregon: It
is pointless to be
jealous of a dead
woman. You might
have had a better
reaction from your
IE'S husband if you had
BOX lovingly incorpo-
rated his memo-
ries into your life
together. But that doesn't ac-
count for his sudden inter-
est in his late wife's
decorations and his temper
tantrum. We think some-
thing else is going on and
hope you can gently and
sweetly get him to open up
about it.
Dear Annie: As a man
who taught himself to cook
while in college, I think you
were way too easy on "Cali-
fornia's" husband, who
wrecks all the cookware
when he attempts to make a
meal.
If he's truly as low func-
tioning as she describes, she
shouldn't leave him alone in
the kitchen to play with the
stove. Instead, she should
say that she expects him to
replace what he's ruined.
Then go to a thrift store and
buy him an iron skillet and
some other old-fashioned,
"manly," indestructible
pieces of cookware just for
his personal use. You're
Just Too Nice


Annie's Mailbox is written
by Kathy Mitchell and
Marcy Sugar,. Email
anniesmailbox@
comcast.net, or write to:
Annie's Mailbox,
c/o Creators Syndicate,
737 Third St.,
Hermosa Beach, CA 90254.


Pennsylvania
Marquee
announcement
Cousins to bricks
From - Z
Cistern
Old Hebrew
vestment
Loop in a rope
Shoot
Trudge
Precise
Speeder's


undoing
Sea devil
Inert gas
Perfume
Make indistinct
No longer new
Caspian or Baltic
Macaw genus
Popular pet
Wrath
Owns
Abbr. in bus.


Puzzle answer is on Page A16.


2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


A14 SUNDAY, JANUARY 29, 2012


ENTERTAINMENT


I
I





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Veterans NOTES


Inverness Primary School's
17th annual Veterans Dinner
will be at 5 p.m. Friday, Feb. 17,
in Inverness Primary School
Cafetorium. Students and staff at
Inverness Primary School invite
all veterans and a guest to come
and be honored at the dinner
and program. Dinner will be pro-
vided this year by Rustic Ranch
Restaurant. There is no cost.
Dinner is at 5 p.m. and the pro-
gram will be at 6 p.m.
The theme this year is "Wel-
come Home our Vietnam Veter-
ans." For more information, call
352-726-2632.
Citrus County Veterans
Coalition has a new building
holding freezers, refrigerators
and all necessary requirements
to provide food to veterans in
need. Food donations and volun-
teers are always welcomed and
needed.
The new CCVC location is on
the DAV property in Inverness at
the corner of Paul and Independ-
ence, off U.S. 41 north. Hours of
operation are 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Tuesday and Thursday. Appoint-
ments are encouraged by calling
727-492-0292.
CCVC general meetings are
at 10 a.m. the fourth Thursday
monthly at the DAV building in In-
verness, 1039 N. Paul Drive off
U.S. 41. All active duty and hon-
orably discharged veterans, their
spouses, widows and widowers,
along with other veterans' organi-
zations and current coalition
members are welcome. Mem-
bers are encouraged to attend
general meetings.
Annual membership donation
is $10 for a calendar year or $25
for three years. The CCVC is a
nonprofit corporation, and your
donations are tax deductible.
Current members should check
their membership card for expira-
tion dates, and renew with Gary
Williamson at 352-527-4537, or
at the meeting. Visit
www.ccvcfl.org.
Blanton-Thompson
American Legion Post 155,
6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway,
Crystal River. For information
about the post and its activities,
call Cmdr. Jay Conti Sr. at 352-
795-6526 or visit
www.postl55.org.
American Legion Riders at
Post 155 will host its second an-
nual Super Spaghetti Dinner
from 5 to 6:30 p.m. Wednesday,
Feb. 1, at the post home.
Cost is $6, which includes
salad, all-you-can-eat spaghetti
with meatballs and/or Italian
sausage, garlic bread, dessert,
coffee and iced tea. The public is
welcome.
All money raised by the Riders
is donated to various veterans'
and community charities. For
more information, call Cindy
Heather at 352-563-9926, or
Post 155 at 352-795-6526.
American Legion Auxil-
iary Unit 155 meets at 7:30 p.m.
the fourth Tuesday of every
month at the post. The American
Legion Auxiliary is the world's
largest women's patriotic service
organization with nearly 1 million
members in 10,100 communi-
ties. The principles of the Ameri-
can Legion Auxiliary are to serve
veterans, their families and the
community.
Eligibility in the Auxiliary is
open to mothers, wives, sisters,


daughters, granddaughters,
great-granddaughters or grand-
mothers of members of the
American Legion, and of de-
ceased veterans who served
during war time (also stepchil-
dren); stepchildren; and female
veterans who served during war
time. Call Unit President Shawn
Mikulas, 352-503-5325, or mem-
bership chairman Barbara
Logan, 352-795-4233.
For more information, call Unit
President Shawn Mikulas, 352-
503-5325, or Barbara Logan,
352-795-4233.
0 H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post
10087, Beverly Hills, offers
meals, bingo, golf, karaoke and
pool. Review the monthly
newsletter for activities and up-
dates, and call the post at 352-
746-0440. The VFW Post 10087
is off County Road 491, directly
behind Superior Bank.
The Ladies Auxiliary will host a
Chinese auction fundraiser on
Saturday, March 3. Doors will
open at 10 a.m. and drawings
will begin at 1 p.m. Admission is
$2.50 to benefit the Junior Re-
serve Officers' Training Corps,
which instills in students the
value of citizenship service to the
U.S., personal responsibility and
a sense of accomplishment.
Hot dogs will be available for
$1, as well as free dessert and
coffee. For more information, call
Bettie at 352-746-1989 or Donna
at 352-746-5215.
Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs,
352-465-4864. Wi Fi is now
available at the post; bring your
laptop or any other item that will
access the Internet and enjoy the
free service.
There will be no dinner served
on Friday, Feb. 3, due to a spe-
cial event. All are welcome to join
us for dinner from 5 to 6:30 p.m.
Friday, Feb. 10; cost is $8.
On Saturday, Feb. 11, the post
will host Boy Scout Troop 452,
who will serve a steak dinner
from 5 to 6:30 p.m. Cost is $15;
tickets are available in
the canteen.
Information regarding any post
events is available at the post or
call 352-465-4864.
Disabled American Veter-
ans Chapter No. 70 meets at 2
p.m. the second Tuesday
monthly at the chapter hall, 1039
N. Paul Drive, Inverness, at the
intersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41. The chap-
ter hall is on the corner of Inde-
pendence Highway and Paul
Drive.
We thank veterans for their
service and welcome any dis-
abled veteran to join us from 9
a.m. to 1 p.m. any Tuesday or
Thursday at the chapter hall. This
is also the time that we accept
donated nonperishable foods for
our continuing food drive.
Our main function is to assist
disable veterans and their fami-
lies when we are able. Anyone
who knows a disabled veteran or
their family who requires assis-
tance is asked to call Com-
mander Richard Floyd
727-492-0290, Ken Stewart at
352-419-0207, or 352-344-3464.
Service Officer Joe McClister
is available to assist any veteran
or dependents with their disability
claim by appointment. Call 352-
344-3464 and leave a message.


Ambulatory veterans who wish
to schedule an appointment for
transportation to the VA medical
center in Gainesville should call
the veterans' service office at
352-527-5915. Mobility chal-
lenged veterans who wish to
schedule an appointment for
transportation to the VA medical
center in Gainesville may call the
Citrus County Transit office for
wheelchair transportation; call
352-527-7630.
For more information about
chapter activities, veterans' bene-
fits or membership, Call Ken
Stewart at 352-419-0207; leave
a message, if desired, should the
machine answer.
Disabled American Veter-
ans Auxiliary Unit No. 70 meets
at 2 p.m. the second Tuesday of
the month at the chapter hall,
1039 N. Paul Drive, Inverness.
The auxiliary plans a visit to
the VA nursing homes) and
needs toiletry items such as
packaged razors, combs, hair-
brushes, toothbrushes, sham-
poos and deodorant to fill ditty
bags, They are also accepting
cotton material and yarn to make
ditty bags, lap robes, wheelchair
and walker bags for disabled
veterans.
The auxiliary membership has
grown to include many more ex-
tended families. Call Auxiliary
Commander Linda Brice at 352-
560-3867 or Adjutant Lynn
Armitage at 352-341-5334 for in-
formation.
Eugene Quinn VFW Post
4337 and Ladies Auxiliary, 906
State Road 44 E., Inverness.
The post and Ladies Auxiliary
invite everyone to participate in
the third annual Soup Cook Off
on Sunday, Feb. 5.
All entries must be in by 2:30
p.m.; judging is at 3 p.m., with
prizes to be announced. Call the
post at 352-344-3495, or visit
www.vfw4337.org for more
information.
Stop by the canteen and pick
up a current monthly calendar.
Call the post at 352-344-3495
for information about all weekly
post activities, or visit
www.vfw4337.org.
The American Legion
Wall-Rives Post 58 and Auxil-
iary, 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnellon.
Dunnellon Young Marines will
meet at 6 p.m. Tuesday.
Free AARP tax services will be
available 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Wednesday from Feb. 1 to April
11. For more information, call
Wayne Sloan at 352-489-5066.
The public is welcome at
bingo at 6 p.m. Thursday.
All are welcome at the 38th
annual Four Chaplains Cere-
mony at 3 p.m.
Everyone is also invited to the
Outdoor Flea Market and Pan-
cake Breakfast will be from 7:30
to 10:30 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 18.
For information about activities
and the post, call Carl Boos at
352-489-3544.
Rolling Thunder Chapter
7, a POW/MIA awareness group,
meets at 10 a.m. second Satur-
day at the VFW Post 10087 in
Beverly Hills. Call Bob Bruno,
secretary, at 352-201-1228.
SA Marine Corps League
Ladies Auxiliary Citrus Unit
meets at 1 p.m. the third Tues-
day monthly at the VFW in Bev-
erly Hills. New members are
welcome. Membership fee is $30


a year. Female relatives ages 16
or older who are a wife, widow,
mother, stepmother, sister,
daughter, stepdaughter, grand-
mother, granddaughter, aunt or
daughter-in-law of honorably dis-
charged Marines and FMF
Corpsmen are eligible to belong
to the Marine Corps League. Fe-
male Marines (former, active and
reserves) and associate mem-
bers are eligible for MCLA mem-
bership. Call President Elaine
Spikes at 352-860-2400 or Sec-
retary/Treasurer Joan Cecil at
352-726-0834 for information.
Hunger and Homeless
Coalition -Anyone who knows
of a homeless veteran in need of
food, haircut, voter ID, food
stamps, medical assistance or
more blankets is asked to call Ed
Murphy at the Hunger and
Homeless Coalition at 352-382-
0876, or pass along this phone
number to the veteran.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW Post
4252 and Ladies Auxiliary 3190
N. Carl G. Rose Highway, State
Road 200, Hernando; 352-726-
3339. Send emails to
vfw4252@tampabay.rr.com.
Everyone is welcome. Post
and auxiliary meet at 6:30 p.m.
every second Thursday.
Post honor guard is available
for funerals, flag raising and
nursing home visits.
The public is welcome to the
Friday night dinner and dance at
5p.m.
See our post activities: Google
us as VFW 4252, Hernando.
Dumas-Hartson VFW Post
8189 is on West Veterans Drive,
west of U.S. 19 between Crystal
River and Homosassa. Call 352-
795-5012 for information.
VFW membership is open to
men and women veterans who
have participated in an overseas
campaign, including service in
Iraq and Afghanistan. The Ko-
rean Campaign medal remains
open, as well. Call the post at the
phone number above for
information.
Joe Nic Barco Memorial
VFW Post 7122, 8191 S. Florida
Ave., Floral City. For information
about the post and its activities,
call 352-637-0100.
Friday is AUCE fish or three-
piece chicken for $7.
American Legion, Beverly
Hills Memorial Post 237,4077
N. Lecanto Highway, in the Bev-
erly Plaza, invites all eligible vet-
erans and their families to visit
our post and consider joining our
Legion family: American Legion,
Sons of the American Legion
(SAL), or American Legion Auxil-
iary (ALA). Color Guard/Honor
Guard accepting volunteers.
American Legion Riders
Chapter now being formed. Visit
the post for printed schedule or
visit the website at
www.post237.org. For
information, call the post at 352-
746-5018.
The Korean War Veterans
Association, Citrus Chapter
192 meets at the VFW Post
10087, Beverly Hills, at 1 p.m.
the first Tuesday monthly. Any
veteran who has seen honorable
service in any of the Armed
Forces of the U.S. is eligible for
membership if said service was
within Korea, including territorial
waters and airspace, at any time
from Sept. 3,1945, to the pres-
ent or if said service was outside


of Korea from June 25,1950, to
Jan. 31, 1955. For information,
call Hank Butler at 352-563-
2496, Neville Anderson at 352-
344-2529 or Bob Hermanson at
352-489-0728.
Allen-Rawls American Le-
gion Post 77 and Auxiliary Unit
77 meet the first Thursday
monthly at the Inverness High-
lands Civic Center at 4375 Little
Al Point Road, Inverness. Call
Post Cmdr. Norman Brumett at
352-860-2981 or Auxiliary presi-
dent Marie Cain at 352-
637-5915.
The post will host a dinner
from 5 to 7 p.m. Saturday, Feb.
25, at the center. On the menu
are creamy onion soup, cabbage
soup, baked steak with mush-
room gravy, baked chicken
mashed potatoes, green beans,
candied carrots, dinner rolls, as-
sorted desserts, coffee, iced tea
and soda. Cost is $8; children
younger than 10 eat for $4.
Entertainment will be provided
by Bernie at the keyboard. Profits
from the dinner will be used to
support the American Legion
programs such as for children
and youths, Boys State, Boy
Scouts, Americanism, school
medals and more. For more in-
formation, call Post Cmdr. Nor-
man Brumett at 352-860-2981 or
352-476-2134, or the day of the
dinner at 352-726-0444.
U.S. Submarine Veterans
(USSVI)-Sturgeon Base meets
at 11 a.m. the first Saturday
monthly at the American Legion
Post 155, 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River. Visitors
and interested parties are always
welcome. Call Base Cmdr. Billy
Wein at 352-726-5926.
American Legion Post 166
meets 1:30 p.m., first Saturday
monthly at the Dumas-Hartson
VFW Post 8189 Ladies Auxiliary
facility on Veterans Drive, Ho-
mosassa, on the west side of
U.S. 19 at Dixon's Auto Sales
across from Harley-Davidson.
We meet in the small building to
the left of the main building. All
former and current post mem-
bers, as well as all interested vet-
erans, are cordially invited to be
a part of American Legion Post
166.
For information about the post
or the American Legion, call and
leave a message for the post
commander at 352-697-1749.
Your call will be returned within
24 to 48 hours.
Seabee Veterans of Amer-
ica (SVA) Island X-23 welcomes
all Seabees and Honeybees to
its monthly meeting at 10:30 a.m.
the third Tuesday monthly at Cit-
rus Hills Country Club, Rose and
Crown restaurant, Citrus Hills.
Call John Lowe at 352-
344-4702.
Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219
and Cabane 1219 conducts its
meetings at 7 p.m. the second
Thursday monthly at the Ameri-
can Legion Post 155 on State
Road 44 in Crystal River (6585
E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway). For
more information about the 40/8,
call the Chef De Gare Tom Smith
at 352-601-3612; for the Ca-
bane, call La Presidente Carol
Kaiserian at 352-746-1959; or
visit us on the Web at
www.Postl55.org.
Aaron A. Weaver Chapter
776 Military Order of the Pur-
ple Heart (MOPH) meets at 2


p.m. the third Tuesday of Janu-
ary, March, May, July, September
and November. All combat-
wounded veterans, lineal de-
scendants, next of kin, spouses
and siblings of Purple Heart re-
cipients are cordially invited to at-
tend and to join the ranks of
Chapter 776. To learn more
about Aaron A. Weaver Chapter
776 MOPH, visit the chapter's
website at www.citruspurple-
heart.org or call 352-382-3847.
The combat-wounded Patriots
of Aaron A. Weaver Chapter 776
Military Order of the Purple Heart
(MOPH) cordially invite all veter-
ans and the public to attend the
seventh annual Purple Heart
Ceremony at 11 a.m., Saturday,
Feb. 18, at the Florida National
Guard Armory, Crystal River.
The ceremony will commemo-
rate the proud legacy of the Pur-
ple Heart and pay tribute to fallen
heroes and wounded warriors.
For more information, visit the
Chapter 776 web site at www.
citruspurpleheart.org or call 352-
382-3847.
Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment
1139 will conduct its regular
meeting at 7 p.m. the third
Wednesday monthly at DAV
Post 70 in Inverness at the inter-
section of Independence High-
way and U.S. 41 North. All
Marines are welcome. Call Jerry
Cecil at 352-726-0834 or Wayne
Howard at 352-634-5254.
Marine Corps League Cit-
rus Detachment 819 meets at 7
p.m. the last Thursday monthly at
VFW Post 10087 on Vet Lane in
Beverly Hills, behind Superior
Bank. Social hour follows. All
Marines and FMF Corpsmen are
welcome. Meet new friends and
discuss past glories. Call Morgan
Patterson at 352-746-1135, Ted
Archambault at 352-382-0462 or
Bion St. Bernard at 352-
697-2389.
Gilley-Long-Osteen VFW
Post 8698 is at 520 State Road
40 E., Inglis, one mile east of
U.S. 19. The Men's Auxiliary
meets at 7 p.m. the second Mon-
day. LAVFW meets at 5 p.m. and
the membership meeting is at
6:30 p.m. the third Wednesday at
the post.
Call the post at 352-447-3495
for information about the post
and its activities.
Fleet Reserve Associa-
tion, Branch 186 will meet at 3
p.m. the third Thursday monthly
at the DAV Building, Independ-
ence Highway and U.S. 41
North, Inverness. Call Bob
Huscher, secretary, at 352-
344-0727.
American Legion Herbert
Surber Post 225 meets at 7
p.m. the third Thursday monthly
at the New Testament Baptist
Church of Floral City, 9850 S.
Parkside Ave. adjoining Floral
Park, southeast side.
Landing Ship Dock (LSD)
sailors meet at Denny's in Crystal
River at 2 p.m. the fourth Thurs-
day monthly. Call Jimmie at 352-
621-0617.
Suncoast U.S. Navy
Armed Guard and Merchant
Marine Veterans of World War
II meetings for 2012 will be at
11:30 a.m. at Kally K's restaurant
in Spring Hill on the following
dates: Feb. 11, March 10, April
14, May 12, Sept. 8, Oct. 13,
Nov. 10 and Dec. 8.


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I


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Learn how to get

wishes honored


Special to the Chronicle
If you would like help
understanding what and
why it is important to have
advanced health care di-
rectives to ensure personal
medical care and wishes
are honored, HPH Hospice
invites you to a free com-
munity presentation ad-
dressing these topics.
The seminar will be
from 9 a.m. to noon (with
registration at 8:30 a.m.)
Wednesday, Feb. 1, at HPH
Hospice administrative of-
fices, 3545 N. Lecanto
Highway (Winn-Dixie
Shopping Plaza), Beverly
Hills.
The presentation will be
given by George Germann,


PA., and David McGrew,
M.D. Germann is an attor-
ney specializing in pro-
bate, estate planning,
guardianships and elder
law and a HPH Hospice
Board of Directors mem-
ber. Dr McGrew is medical
director for HPH Hospice.
These experts will dis-
cuss advance directives,
choosing the right health
care surrogate, who should
have copies of your ad-
vance directives, pros and
cons of CPR and more use-
ful information; all ex-
plained in
easy-to-understand terms.
Pre-registration is re-
quired and seating is lim-
ited. Call HPH Hospice at
352-527-4600 to register.


Divorces 1/16/12 to 1/22/12
Sydney I. Defelice,
Jacksonville vs. Justin Alan
Heiss, Lecanto
Loren W. Lea, Homosassa
vs. Alicia Annette Lea,
Homosassa
Massimo Mozzachiodi,
Crystal River vs. Deborah
Mozzachiodi, Crystal River
Marriages 1/16/12 to 1/22/12
Michael Carl Aul, Crystal
River/Alorra Deonne
Puckett-Walls, Crystal River
Steven Benjamin Bontz,
Inverness/Sunshine Negrito
Redondo, Inverness
Frank Anthony Gentile,
Inverness/Dorothy Marie
Krause, Inverness


Citrus Cinemas 6 -
Inverness; 637-3377
"The Grey" (R) ID required.
1:20 p.m., 4:10 p.m.,
7:20 p.m.
"One For The Money"
(PG-13) 1:50 p.m., 4:45 p.m.,
7:50 p.m.
"Man on a Ledge" (PG-13)
1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m.,
7:30 p.m.
"Red Tails" (PG-13) 1
p.m., 4 p.m., 7:10 p.m.
"Underworld Awakening"
(R) ID required. In Real 3D.
1:40 p.m., 4:40 p.m.,
7:40 p.m. No passes.
"Joyful Noise" (PG-13)
1:10 p.m., 4:20 p.m.
7:05 p.m.

Crystal River Mall 9;
564-6864
"Man on a Ledge" (PG-13)
2 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:50 p.m.
"One For The Money"
(PG-13) 1:45 p.m., 4:20 p.m.,


James William Mears Jr.,
Homosassa/Patricia Ann
Yates, Homosassa
Jason Morgan Roe,
Hernando/Tina Marie
Verschraegen, Hernando
Charles Marion Young,
Lecanto/Sharon Gayle
Richardson, Lecanto
Divorces and marriages
filed in the state of Florida are
a matter of public record,
available from each county's
Clerk of the Courts Office. For
Citrus County, call the clerk at
352-341-6400 or visit
www.clerk.citrus.fl.us/. For
proceedings filed in another
county, contact the clerk in
that area.


7:30 p.m.
"The Grey" (R) ID required.
1:40 p.m., 4:40 p.m.,
7:20 p.m.
"Haywire" (R) ID required.
1:35 p.m., 4:45 p.m.,
7:55 p.m.
"Red Tails" (PG-13) 1:20
p.m., 4:05 p.m., 7:15 p.m.
"Underworld Awakening"
(R) ID required. In Real 3D.
1:30 p.m., 5 p.m., 7:45 p.m.
No passes.
"Contraband" (R) ID
required. 1:50 p.m., 4:50 p.m.,
7:40 p.m.
"Extremely Loud & In-
credibly Close" (PG-13)
1:15 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:05
p.m.
"The Descendants" (R) ID
required. 1:25 p.m., 4 p.m.,
7 p.m.

Visit www.chronicleonline.com
for area movie listings and
entertainment information.


Sunday's PUZZLER:

Puzzle is on Page A14.


CHAMP S C R A P FADED SHARI
RO0ME0 P AUJSE 0OP I NE PER I
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D E G A S 2012 A E S, Dist. by Universal click for U
1-29 (D 2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for U


Four GENERATIONS


Jewlie Gore celebrated her 42nd birthday with four genera-
tions at her birthday party. With Gore are Kimberly-Anne
Toohey, Jeanette Miles and Skilyn Bridewell.


Show to help B&GC Rewarding being bad?


Special to the Chronicle
The Soft Sounds of Carol
Kline return to Curtis Pe-
terson Auditorium at
Lecanto High School on
Feb. 4 with the "Country
Diamonds Show."
The concert benefits the
Central Ridge Boys & Girls
Club and will be opened by
local 12-year-old talent So-
phie Robitaille. Robitaille
performed at Teenstock
2011 and has performed for
the Tampa Bay Lighting,
Tampa Bay Rays, with
Blood, Sweat & Tears, at
the Citrus County Stam-
pede Rodeo, at the Ho-
mosassa Wildlife State
Park Festival of Lights, and
many other events.
Two years ago, Carol and
George Kline performed


their Patsy Cline retro-
spective for the Boys &
Girls Clubs at the request
of the Beverly Hills
Woman's Club. This year,
they will employ their
deep harmony as they sing
favorites of Dottie West,
Kenny Rogers, Dolly Par-
ton, Tammy Wynette,
George Jones, Jim Reeves
and, of course, Patsy Cline.
Doors open at 1 p.m. with
the show starting at 2 p.m.
Refreshments and a Chi-
nese auction of gift baskets
will take place at intermis-
sion. Tickets are $15 and
can be obtained from
Gerry Jones (352-527-8002),
Central Ridge Boys & Girls
Club (352-287-1412) or at
burnthermortgage.com, or
at BB&T, Cadence Bank or
Nature Coast Bank.


JL


thing."
If you made money losing
your clients' and your stock-
holders' money by taking
"legal" risks and you got a
taxpayer-paid bonus, don't
call it "capital-
ism." It's some-
thing else
entirely
Am I jealous of
the money that
rich stockbrokers
made for them-
selves by losing
money for their
clients? No.
M But, Wall
LLEN Street wants you
to think it's about


money
it's about justice.


when


Jim Mullen's book "Now in
Paperback" is now in
paperback You can reach
him via e-mail at
jimmullenbooks.com.


I
L


Engagement

Good/Gore


Richard and Barbara
Good of Hernando have
announced the engage-
ment and approaching
marriage of their daughter,
Jamie Good, to Johnny
Gore, son of Bobby and An-
nette Willingham of
Lecanto.
The bride-elect and her
fiance are both residents of
Pikeville, Ky. She is a 2010
graduate of Lecanto High
School and is a medical as-
sistant at Pikeville Medical
Center. The prospective
groom, a 2007 graduate of
Pike County Central High
School, is a coal miner at
Williams Brothers Coal Co.
Nuptial vows will be ex-


changed at 4 p.m. June 30,
2012, at Palace Grand in
Spring Hill.


Samuel and Mary Curtis
will celebrate their 65th
wedding anniversary on
Feb. 1, 2012.
Mary Eslocker and
Samuel Curtis were mar-
ried Feb. 1, 1947. Sam re-
tired from American
Shipbuilding, Tampa, after
21 years. Mary worked at
Bank ofAmerica in Tampa.
The couple have one
daughter and son-in-law,
Sue and Tom Sweeney, of
Hilton Head, S.C.


They moved from
Racine, Ohio, to Inverness
in 1997 and are members
of First Baptist Church of
Inverness.


1st BIRTHDAY


Cameron

Haugen

Cameron Haugen, son of
Amanda Haugen of Ho-
mosassa, celebrated his
first birthday Jan. 17, 2011.


65th ANNIVERSARY

The Curtises


For the RECORD


Today's MOVIES


When money man-
agers are asked why
they deserve tens of
millions of dollars for push-
ing around other people's
money, the answer is always,
"the risk." They
took the risk; they
made the bet and
won. To the victor
go the spoils.
That makes a lot
of sense. When you
take a big risk, you
deserve to make a
lot of money You
deserve the beach-
front house, the JI
private jet, the sec- MUI
ond home in
Aspen. Sure, that's
the same thing drug kingpins
say, but there's one big differ-
ence: When drug dealers
make the wrong bet, they go
to jail. When money man-
agers lose a bet, they get a
bonus.
I had a friend who chased
down a purse-snatcher in
Manhattan once and tackled
the thief in a busy midtown
crosswalk. The first thing out
of the purse-snatcher's
mouth was, "I didn't do any-
thing!" He kept yelling that at
the top of his lungs. When the
police arrived, they wanted
to arrest my thief-tackling
friend instead, until the
woman whose purse was
stolen finally set them
straight
It seems to me that if you're
going to be rewarded for tak-
ing a big risk and winning,
you should be punished for
taking a big risk and losing.
Even if you're a banker or a
stockbroker Even if you went
to Harvard or Yale.
Why is it that if you're a
money manager, you can
come in last place and win a
golden parachute?
If risk is the thing that de-
termines how we reward
people, why aren't our com-
bat troops making bags full of
money for going to
Afghanistan? Aren't they tak-
ing a risk? Aren't they risking
a lot more than any stockbro-
ker or banker? What about
our police officers and fire-
fighters? Wouldn't you say
they're in risky professions?
By Wall Street logic, they
should all be paid $100 mil-
lion a year for what they do.
Maybe more.
My friend Jack says, "If
those Occupy Wall Street pro-
testers are so against money,
why aren't they protesting
rich movie stars and rich
singers?" Excuse me, but has
some rich movie star ever
been bailed out of financial
trouble with your tax dollars?
Has some profligate basket-
ball star been bailed out with
the public's dime? If so, I sure
can't find any news stories
about it
Money-sucking stockbro-
kers want you to think that
the protest is rich vs. poor,
that those who object are
jealous of the rich. That's like
saying you are jealous of the
guy who mugged you because
he now has more money than
you do. No, you are ANGRY
at the mugger for the mug-
ging. And, you want your
money back
What if a mugger's defense
attorney argued: "Sure, my
client took the money, but
that's the way capitalism
works. That's the risk you
take by walking down a dark
street You know you're going
to get robbed someday -
what difference does it make
if my client robs you or if
somebody else does? Be-
sides, myclienthas these 'Get
Out of Jail Free' cards that he
printed on the back of thou-
sand-dollar bills and sent to
all his friends in Congress, so
let's just drop the whole


S


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CITRUS COUNTY


CHKONICLE
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A16 SUNDAY, JANUARY 29, 2012


TOGETHER & COMMUNITY


Sticky Note



Special











SPORTS


No. 14 Florida
tried to stay perfect
at home Saturday
against No. 18
Mississippi State./B2

CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


0 Basketball/B2
0 Local tennis/B2
0 Golf/B2
0 Football/B3
0 Sports briefs/B3
0 Scoreboard/B3
0 TV, lottery/B3
0 Entertainment/B4


Surging Tiger tops leaderboard after 66


Siv-underpar

puts Woods up

1 in Abu Dhabi

Associated Press
ABU DHABI, United Arab Emi-
rates Tiger Woods put himself
in position to win his second
straight tournament Saturday, and
this one would leave little doubt
about which direction his game is
going.
He finally won two months ago
against an 18-man field in
California.
On Saturday, against the
strongest field golf has seen in at
least three months, Woods shot a
6-under 66 for a share of the lead


with Robert Rock going into the
final round of the Abu Dhabi Golf
Championship.
The topic suddenly shifts from
the state of his swing and his
health. Woods has a 55-8 record
worldwide when he has at least a
share of the lead going into the
final round, and a win would be
the first time since August 2009
that he has won consecutive starts.
More than being atop the
leaderboard, it's how Woods got
there.
"It's fun when I'm able to con-
trol the golf ball like I did," Woods
said.
There wasn't a lot of fist-pump-
ing from Woods, who traded
drama for consistency, racking up
six birdies in a bogey-free round.
It was a memorable performance
by the American, mostly for his
ability to hit fairways, tame the


par 5s and sink clutch putts in-
cluding a 6-footer for birdie on the
final hole.
"It just seemed like I didn't do a
lot of things right but I didn't do a
lot of things wrong today, it was
just very consistent," Woods said.
"You know, made a couple putts
here and there. ... I stayed away
from trouble and tried to keep the
ball towards the fat side of some of
these pins, and I think I did a
pretty good job."
Woods finished at 11-under 205.
Rock, at No. 117 in the world,
birdied his final two holes to join
Woods in the last group along with
Peter Hanson, who had a 64 and
was two shots behind.
Also two back at 9-under 207
were Rory Mcllroy, who played
with Woods for the third straight
day and had a 68, keeping the No.
3 player very much in the picture.


Associated Press
Tiger Woods leads by a stroke after the third round of Abu Dhabi HSBC
Championship on Saturday in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates.


RIC BUSH/Special to the Chronicle
The driving team of No. 02 Chip Ganassi Racing interacts with fans on pit road prior to the start of the 50th Rolex24 at Daytona on
Saturday. The race concludes at 3:30 p.m. Sunday.



Pulling an all-nighter


Driving teams get ready to endure Daytona's famed 24-hour race Saturday


SANDRA FREDERICK
Staff Writer
DAYTONA BEACH Prior
to the start of the 50th Rolex24
at Daytona on Saturday, race
drivers mingled with a large
crowd of fans, racing officials,
car owners and crew members
in the garage area as
well as on Pit Road. ....
There were almost as
many golf carts as peo-
ple trying to navigate
the shoulder-to-
shoulder garage area. For m
By 3 p.m., the cars phon this
were already in place won w
and waiting for the online
green flag to drop. Dur-
ing a walk down the traditional
asphalt strip of pit stalls, it was
hard to find one that wasn't en-
closed with a canvas tents and
brimming with tires, tools,
computers and spare parts.
Some had large signs with a
team logo and others had as
much equipment on the out-
side of the tent as the inside.
Unlike their NASCAR coun-


I
or
,
hr
.C


terparts, drivers in the Grand
Am Road Racing series shared
the garage area at Daytona In-
ternational Speedway with
thousands of others. The
stands were only about half
full with racing enthusiasts -
the infield was the place to be.
Cody Llames and his dad,
Danny, drove more
) than three hours to get
to the track in hopes of
seeing Jimmie John-
son, who was sched-
uled to drive.
e Unfortunately, John-
click son was not in the
story at race.
ronicle He even wore his
om. team's colors for his fa-
vorite NASCAR driver
a leather jacket with the
Lowe's No. 48 across the back.
"This is my first time here,"
the 16 year old said as he
watched the cars jockey for po-
sition. "I plan to stay up all
night. It is different."
Prior to getting in the race
car, Jim Lowe, driver of the
See Page B3


RIC BUSH/Special to the Chronicle
Driver Jim Lowe takes a minute to chat with two brothers about
how hard it is to stay awake throughout the night.


Azarenka


is first-time


winner

Player routs

Sharapova to win

Australian title

Associated Press
MELBOURNE, Australia -
Victoria Azarenka started cele-
brating, then suddenly did a dou-
ble-take to ask her coach, "What
happened?"
The answer: She had just pro-
duced one of the most lopsided
Australian Open final victories to
capture a Grand Slam title and
the No. 1 ranking for the first
time.
Azarenka routed three-time
Grand Slam winner Maria Shara-
pova 6-3, 6-0 in 1 hour, 22 minutes
on Saturday night, winning 12 of
the last 13 games after dropping
her first service
game and falling
behind 2-0. -
"It's a dream
come true," she
said. "I have been
dreaming and
working so hard to
win the Grand
Slam, and being Victoria
No. 1 is pretty Azarenka
good bonus. Just the perfect ending
and the perfect position to be in."
Azarenka had won 11 straight
matches, including a run to the
Sydney International title, and
reached her first Grand Slam
final. Her previous best perform-
ance at a major was a semifinal
loss to Petra Kvitova at Wimbledon
last year Sharapova had all the ex-
perience, being in her sixth major
final and having won three dat-
ing to her 2004 Wimbledon title.
But it didn't unnerve the 22-
year-old Azarenka, the first
woman from Belarus to win a sin-
gles major She's also the seventh
different woman to win a Grand
Slam since Francesca Schiavone
won the 2010 French Open, and
the fifth different winner in as
many majors.
Azarenka became only the
third woman to earn the No. 1
spot after winning her first major
title. She moved from No. 3 to No.
1 in the rankings, helped by Car-
oline Wozniacki's loss in the
quarterfinals.


FAKE-UP

0:0100 -


000AAH2


INN-,





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


No. 14 Gators still spotless at home


Associated Press
Florida's Patric Young (4) shoots against Mississippi State
during the second half Saturday in Gainesville. No. 14 Florida
defeated No. 18 Mississippi State 69-57.


UF handles

No. 18 Bulldogs

Associated Press

GAINESVILLE -
Bradley Beal scored 19
points, Patric Young made
several crowd-rousing plays
and Florida beat Missis-
sippi State 69-57, extending
its home winning streak to
17 games.
The Gators (17-4, 5-1
Southeastern Conference)
used an 11-0 run in the sec-
ond half sparked by
Beal's third 3-pointer and
highlighted by Young's two
dunks -to turn a tight game
into a double-digit affair
Mississippi State (17-5, 4-
3) trailed 62-47 after the
spurt and never got the lead
to single digits. The Gators
made enough plays down
the stretch to secure their
second win in six games
against the Bulldogs.
Young, still battling ten-
dinitis in his right ankle, fin-
ished with 12 points and six
rebounds.
Arnett Moultrie led Mis-
sissippi State with 12 points
and 13 rebounds, his league-
leading 13th double-double
of the season. He fouled out
with 2:04 remaining.
No. 1 Kentucky 75,
LSU 50
BATON ROUGE, La. Ter-
rence Jones highlighted a 27-
point performance with a 13-0
run on his own and No. 1 Ken-
tucky pulled away in the second
half for a 74-50 win over strug-
gling LSU on Saturday.
Anthony Davis had 16 points
and 10 rebounds despite briefly
leaving the game when he hurt


his right shoulder in a scramble
for a loose ball.
Darius Miller added 13
points, including three 3-point-
ers for Kentucky (21-1, 7-0
Southeastern Conference),
which has won 13 straight.
No. 2 Missouri 63,
Texas Tech 50
COLUMBIA, Mo.- Kim Eng-
lish scored 19 points in the first
half, Marcus Denmon added 13
after the break and Missouri
had just enough to avoid a sec-
ond straight upset with a shaky
victory over Texas Tech.
Missouri (19-2, 6-2) finished
with six straight points, includ-
ing Ricardo Ratliffe's dunk in
transition with a minute left after
English blocked a shot and
then saved the ball from going
out of bounds.
No. 3 Syracuse 63,
West Virginia 61
SYRACUSE, N.Y. Bran-
don Triche had 18 points, in-
cluding a pair of free throws
that broke the final tie with 88
seconds left, and Syracuse
beat West Virginia.
Syracuse (22-1, 9-1 Big
East) has won 13 of the past
14 games against West Vir-
ginia (15-7, 5-4). The win was
the 878th for Orange coach
Jim Boeheim, moving him
within one victory of tying for-
mer North Carolina coach
Dean Smith for third in Division
I history.
Jones led West Virginia with
20 points and eight rebounds.
Iowa State 72,
No. 5 Kansas 64
AMES, Iowa Royce White
had 18 points and nine re-
bounds as Iowa State upset
Kansas, snapping the Jay-
hawks' winning streak at 10


games.
Melvin Ejim added 15 points
for the Cyclones (15-6, 5-3 Big
12), who had lost 13 straight to
Kansas since their last victory
in 2005.
Tyshawn Taylor led five play-
ers in double figures with 16
points for Kansas (17-4, 7-1),
which hadn't lost since Dec. 19
against Davidson. Thomas
Robinson had 13 points, but he
committed five turnovers and
the Jayhawks were outre-
bounded 36-23.
No. 6 Baylor 76,
Texas 71
WACO, Texas Perry
Jones III scored 22 points and
grabbed a career-high 14 re-
bounds, Pierre Jackson hit the
go-ahead 3-pointer and Baylor
withstood a second-half rally to
beat Texas.
Baylor (19-2, 6-2 Big 12) led
by 12 early in the second half
before J'Covan Brown led a
charge that helped the Long-
horns tie the game.
Quincy Miller had 18 points
for the Bears, who are 6-2 in
conference play for the first
time since 1986-87. Quincy
Acy added 10 points and 10
rebounds.
No. 8 Duke 83,
St. John's 76
DURHAM, N.C. Mason
Plumlee had 15 points and a
career-high 17 rebounds to
help Duke hold off St. John's.
Ryan Kelly scored 16 points
and Andre Dawkins added 14
for the Blue Devils (18-3), who
led by 22 with 17 minutes left
but shot just 30 percent in the
second half while the Red
Storm rallied.
Moe Harkless had 30 points
and 13 rebounds for St. John's
(9-12).


Volunteers make it happen


ERIC VAN DEN HOOGEN
Correspondent
The 7th Annual Crystal River
Open at Crystal River High School,
to benefit local food program and
the student in needs program, had
a nice cool start Saturday morning.
After a week of temperatures in
the 80s and the threat of rain,
which passed on Friday, the volun-
teers were very happy with the
outcome, even after having to get
up at 6 a.m.
Yes, that sometimes gets forgot-
ten but besides the days of calling,
making the draws, calling again
and getting everything else ready
for the weekend, the volunteers
have to be at the courts way in ad-
vance to set up. So a heartfelt
"thank you" to all of the volunteers
that have helped throughout the
last eight years putting together a
total of 14 tournaments.
One person in particular has
been a mainstay during all these
years and deserves a special men-
tioning: Sally deMontfort.
As one of the countless "soccer
moms" (except in this case it's a
tennis mom), she was there
throughout the high school tennis
career of her son, standout tennis
star Brian deMontfort Sally was so
good at taking care of all the play-
ers, organizing events around the
tennis courts and getting the ten-
nis communtiy involved (even
helping out to make the beautiful
facility happen at Crystal River
High School), that nobody wanted
to let her go. She has been, and
still is, the best thing that has hap-
pened to the CRHS tennis teams.
Thank you Sally!
The volunteers will be available
again from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on
Sunday to accept your donations
at the tennis courts.


Special 10 o e Cnronicle
Crystal River girls tennis coach Cindy Reynolds, front left, received a check form Sally deMontfort on Saturday
at the Crystal River Open. In the back row from left: Donnie Simmons, Brandon Papp, Jessica Reynolds, Eric van
den Hoogen and Mike Brown.


The results for the first day were
as follows:
Women's Doubles: First round;
Candace Charles/Jamie Elmhirst
def. Erin Davis/ Kathy Davis, 6-0, 6-
1; Jane Wilson/Sherry Maynard
def. Barb Edwards/Jessica
Reynolds, 3-6, 7-6, 6-3.
Second round; Judy Long/Linda
Martin def. Candace
Charles/Jamie Elmhirst, 7-6, 6-7, 6-
4; Carrie Ingersoll/Lisa Steed def.
Jane Wilson/Sherry Maynard, 6-0,
6-2.
Consolation Final; Erin
Davis/Jackie Davis def. Barb Ed-


wards/Jessica Reynolds, 6-0, 6-1.
Men's Doubles B: First round;
Peter Johnston/Bruce Sheldon def.
Dave Goddard/Andrew Welfel, 7-6,
6-1; Marcial Irrizarry/Gary Zol-
nierz def. AJ Glenn/Roger Murphy,
6-4, 6-1.
Second round; Wayne Steed/Vin-
nie Tremante def. P e t e r
Johnston/Bruce Sheldon, 6-3, 6-2;
Mike Tringali/Mike Walker def.
Marcial Irrizarry/Bruce Kaufman,
6-2, 6-2.
Consolation Final; AJ
Glenn/Roger Murphy def. Dave
Goddard/Andrew Welfel, 6-1, 6-2.


Men's Doubles A: Bryan Ed-
wards/Kevin Scholl def. Bob
Thomas/Jim Lavoie, 7-5, 6-3; Mike
Brown/Eric van den Hoogen def.
Donnie Simmons/Brandon Papp,
1-6, 6-1, 6-3.
Mixed Doubles: First round;
Sally deMontfort/Len Calodney
def. Susan Rosen/Toni Marro, 6-0,
6-0; Erin Davis/Mike Tringali def.
Mike Walker/Linda Martin, 6-4, 6-
1; Lisa Steed/Wayne Steed def.
Jane Wilson/Norman Monroe, 6-1,
6-3; Judy Long/Gary Zolnierz def.
Kelly Goddard/Dave Goddard, 6-1,


Stanley extends lead at Torrey Pines


Associated Press

SAN DIEGO Kyle Stanley
overpowered Torrey Pines and
opened a five-shot lead Saturday
in the Farmers Insurance Open.
About the only regret for Stan-
ley was missing a 4-foot birdie
putt on the 18th hole that would
have broken the 54-hole tourna-
ment record set by Tiger Woods
in 1998, before Rees Jones
beefed up the South Course for
the 2008 U.S. Open.
Stanley still managed a 4-
under 68, a spot alongside Woods
Kyle Stanley chips to the sixth
green on the South Course at Tor-
rey Pines during the third round of
the Farmers Insurance Open golf
tournament Saturday in San Diego.
Associated Press


in the record book at 18-under
198 and great position for his
first victory.
The performance looked famil-
iar, even if the name didn't.
Woods, playing this week in
Abu Dhabi, is a seven-time win-
ner at Torrey Pines as a pro, in-
cluding that U.S. Open. He used
his length on the South Course,
especially on the par 5s, and
holed his share of putts.
That's been the recipe for
Stanley, who has a slight build
and enormous speed. He build a
three-shot lead with a birdie on
the second hole and was never
really challenged on another glo-
rious days along the Pacific
bluffs.
His lone bogey came on the
12th, when he went just over the


green, chipped to 6 feet and
missed the putt. On the 526-yard
13th hole, he blasted a tee shot so
far down the hill that Stanley had
only a soft 7-iron into the green,
putting it 15 feet below the hole
on the fringe for a two-putt
birdie.
"Are you playing this as a par
4?" Sang-Moon Bae turned and
said to him with a smile.
John Huh, a 21-year-old rookie
who spent three years on the Ko-
rean Tour, and John Rollins each
had 68 and were at 13-under 203.
FedEx Cup champion Bill Haas
(70) and Bae (72) were another
shot behind. Bae was 5 over
through five holes until he ran off
four straight birdies to start the
back nine to get his name back on
the leaderboard.


Austin Rivers finished with 12
points for the Blue Devils, who
claimed their 94th straight non-
conference victory at Cameron
Indoor Stadium.
Pittsburgh 72,
No. 9 Georgetown 60
PITTSBURGH Nasir
Robinson scored 23 points and
made all nine of his field goal
attempts to lead Pittsburgh past
Georgetown.
Lamar Patterson added 18
points, seven assists and four
rebounds for the Panthers (13-
9, 2-7 Big East).
Otto Porter led the Hoyas
(16-4, 6-3) with 14 points and
Henry Sims added 10 but
Georgetown couldn't overcome
a 17-point first-half deficit.
Colorado State 77,
No. 13 San Diego St. 60
FORT COLLINS, Colo. -
Wes Eikmeier scored 19 points
and Colorado State made all 23
of its free throws, beating San
Diego State for its first home
win over a ranked team in more
than eight years.
Will Bell added 17 points and
the Rams (14-6, 3-2 Mountain
West) frustrated the fatigued
Aztecs (18-3, 4-1) all afternoon,
limiting them to 3-of-21 shoot-
ing from 3-point range.
No. 17 Marquette 82,
Villanova 78
PHILADELPHIA- Darius
Johnson-Odom scored 26
points to help Marquette storm
back from an 18-point deficit
and beat Villanova.
Jae Crowder had 20 points
and 11 rebounds for Marquette
(18-4, 7-2 Big East) and played
just as big a role in the second
half as Johnson-Odom in help-
ing the Golden Eagles win their
sixth straight game.



76ers


halt


Pistons

Associated Press

PHILADELPHIA
Andre Iguodala recorded
the eighth triple-double of
his career with 10 points, 10
assists and 10 rebounds, and
the Philadelphia 76ers won
their second straight game
with a 95-74 victory over the
struggling Detroit Pistons
on Saturday night
Iguodala, who turned 28
on Saturday, received a nice
ovation from the crowd
when he secured his triple-
double with a defensive re-
bound with 7:34 remaining.
Lou Williams scored 17
points, Elton Brand added
14 and Jrue Holiday had 13
for the Sixers, who im-
proved to 14-6 and 10-2 at
home. They are 3-1 on this
seven-game homestand,
which gets markedly
tougher next week with vis-
its from the Orlando Magic
on Monday, Chicago Bulls
on Wednesday and Miami
Heat on Friday
The Pistons received a
boost with the return of for-
ward Tayshaun Prince, who
had missed the previous two
games tending to a family
matter. Prince only scored
six points, however.
Wizards 102,
Bobcats 99
CHARLOTTE, N.C. -
JaVale McGee scored 22 points
and had 10 rebounds as the
Washington Wizards defeated
the Charlotte Bobcats for the
second time in a week, 102-99
on Saturday night.
The matchup between two
teams tied for the fewest wins
in the NBA came down to the
final shot, but Matt Carroll's 3-
point attempt at the buzzer fell
short.
McGee had a chance to seal
the game with less than 6 sec-
onds to go, but missed two foul
shots. But that was about all
McGee didn't do right, as shot 9
of 14 from the field. Like many


others this season, McGee ex-
posed Charlotte's poor interior
defense, using an effective
hook shot in the lane.
John Wall added 13 points
and 10 assists for the Wizards
(4-16).
Kemba Walker became only
the third Bobcats (3-18) player
to register a triple-double,
recording 20 points, 10 re-
bounds and 11 assists.


B2 SUNDAY, JANUARY 29, 2012


SPORTS






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




Men's College
Basketball Scores
EAST
Albany (NY) 72, Hartford 60
American U. 69, Lafayette 61
Bucknell 66, Navy 51
CCSU 69, Fairleigh Dickinson 62
Cornell 65, Columbia 60
Drexel 71, Delaware 55
Fordham 63, George Washington 58
Harvard 68, Brown 59
Holy Cross 76, Colgate 60
LIU 97, St. Francis (Pa.) 76
La Salle 71, Duquesne 68
Maine 67, Binghamton 59
Marquette 82, Villanova 78
Monmouth (NJ) 78, Bryant 68
Mount St. Mary's 81, Sacred Heart 80, 20T
Northeastern 58, Hofstra 51
Pittsburgh 72, Georgetown 60
Rutgers 61, Cincinnati 54
St. Bonaventure 62, Richmond 47
St. Francis (NY) 81, Robert Morris 68
Syracuse 63, West Virginia 61
Temple 78, Saint Joseph's 60
Towson 66, UNC Wilmington 61
UMass 72, Saint Louis 59
Wagner 51, Quinnipiac 50
Yale 62, Dartmouth 52
SOUTH
Alabama 72, Arkansas 66
Appalachian St. 81, Elon 66
Charleston Southern 75, Presbyterian 64
Clemson 71, Wake Forest 60
Coastal Carolina 70, Gardner-Webb 56
Coppin St. 73, Hampton 70
Delaware St. 76, NC Central 70
Duke 83, St. John's 76
East Carolina 73, UAB 66
Florida 69, Mississippi St. 57
Florida A&M 68, Bethune-Cookman 62
Florida Gulf Coast 92, Kennesaw St. 74
Furman 67, The Citadel 58
George Mason 89, James Madison 79
Georgia Southern 75, Chattanooga 72
High Point 52, Winthrop 47
Jacksonville St. 76, SIU-Edwardsville 65
Kentucky 74, LSU 50
Liberty 67, Radford 65
Louisiana-Lafayette 67, Louisiana-Monroe 60
MVSU 60, Jackson St. 54
Maryland 73, Virginia Tech 69
Mercer 75, Stetson 64
Mississippi 66, South Carolina 62
Morehead St. 56, Tennessee Tech 50
NC A&T 91, Md.-Eastern Shore 66
Norfolk St. 76, Morgan St. 59
North Florida 71, Lipscomb 59
Northwestern St. 55, SE Louisiana 38
Old Dominion 68, William & Mary 44
Prairie View 64, Alabama St. 57
Samford 77, Davidson 74
Savannah St. 71, Howard 50
Southern Miss. 78, UCF 65
Southern U. 65, Alcorn St. 54
Tennessee 64, Auburn 49
Texas Southern 73, Alabama A&M 61
UNC Asheville 95, Campbell 84
UNC Greensboro 89, W. Carolina 86, OT
VCU 59, Georgia St. 58
Vanderbilt 84, Middle Tennessee 77
Wofford 68, Coll. of Charleston 59
Xavier 74, Charlotte 70
MIDWEST
Akron 74, Cent. Michigan 64
Buffalo 74, N. Illinois 59
Cleveland St. 67, Youngstown St. 47
E. Michigan 55, Bowling Green 50
Green Bay 80, Butler 68
Illinois St. 60, S. Illinois 40
Iowa St. 72, Kansas 64
Kent St. 77, Toledo 61
Missouri 63, Texas Tech 50
Missouri St. 63, N. Iowa 51
N. Dakota St. 78, Oakland 75
North Dakota 71, Chicago St. 61
Ohio 59, Ball St. 55
Oklahoma 63, Kansas St. 60
Purdue 58, Northwestern 56
Rhode Island 86, Dayton 81
S. Dakota St. 74, IPFW 43
Valparaiso 55, Milwaukee 52
W. Illinois 57, IUPUI 55
W. Michigan 73, Miami (Ohio) 64
SOUTHWEST
Baylor 76, Texas 71
Lamar 80, Nicholls St. 56
North Texas 76, Arkansas St. 64
Texas A&M 76, Oklahoma St. 61
Texas-Arlington 82, Texas St. 79
Tulsa 66, SMU 60
UTSA 78, Sam Houston St. 66
FAR WEST
Arizona St. 71, Washington St. 67
Colorado St. 77, San Diego St. 60
New Mexico 71, TCU 54
UCLA 77, Colorado 60
Washington 69, Arizona 67
Wyoming 75, Boise St. 64
Women's Top 25 Fared
Saturday
1. Baylor (21-0) beat Kansas 74-46. Next: at
Missouri, Wednesday.
2. Notre Dame (21-1) beat St. John's 71-56.
Next: at No. 11 Rutgers, Tuesday.
3. UConn (19-2) beat South Florida 77-62.
Next: at No. 5 Duke, Monday.
4. Stanford (18-1) beat California 74-71, OT
Next: at Arizona State, Thursday
5. Duke (17-2) did not play. Next: vs. No. 3
UConn, Monday.
6. Kentucky (19-2) did not play Next: vs. Ala-
bama, Sunday.
7. Tennessee (15-5) did not play. Next: at No.
17 Georgia, Sunday.
8. Maryland (18-3) did not play. Next: vs.
Boston College, Thursday.
9. Ohio State (20-1) did not play Next: at Min-
nesota, Sunday.
10. Miami (18-3) did not play Next: at Boston
College, Sunday.
11. Rutgers (17-3) did not play Next: at No.
20 Georgetown, Sunday.
12. Green Bay (19-0) beat Valparaiso 65-37.
Next: vs. Milwaukee, Saturday.
13. Purdue (18-4) lost to Iowa 59-42. Next: vs.
No. 19 Nebraska, Thursday.
14. Texas A&M (13-5) did not play Next: vs.
Iowa State, Sunday.
15. Delaware (17-1) did not play. Next: at
James Madison, Sunday.
16. Louisville (17-4) beat Villanova 62-58.
Next: at No. 23 DePaul, Tuesday.
17. Georgia (16-5) did not play Next: vs. No.
7 Tennessee, Sunday.
18. Penn State (16-4) did not play. Next: at
Michigan State, Sunday.


SCOREBOARD


For the record


= Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning
numbers selected
Saturday in the
Florida Lottery:

LOTTERY
20 32 34 41 42 45
XTRA
3


CASH 3 (early)
1-5-2
CASH 3 (late)
2-2-9
PLAY 4 (early)
6-7-6-8
PLAY 4 (late)
3-9-9-5
FANTASY 5
17 23 24 32 36
POWERBALL
5 33 41 54 59
POWER BALL
13


On the AIRWAVES


TODAY'S SPORTS
WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
12 p.m. (FSNFL) Marshall at Tulane
1 p.m. (SUN) North Carolina State at Virginia Tech
2 p.m. (FSNFL) Auburn at Mississippi
3 p.m. (ESPN2) Penn State at Michigan State
3 p.m. (SUN) Iowa State at TexasA&M
4 p.m. (FSNFL) UCLA at Colorado
5 p.m. (ESPN2) Tennessee at Georgia
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
1 p.m. (CBS) Michigan at Ohio State
1 p.m. (ABC) Miami at Boston College
6:30 p.m. (FSNFL) Oregon State at Oregon
8:30 p.m. (FSNFL) Stanford at California
NBA
3:30 p.m. (ABC) Chicago Bulls at Miami Heat
6 p.m. (SUN) Indiana Pacers at Orlando Magic
6:30 p.m. (ESPN) San Antonio Spurs at Dallas Mavericks
3 a.m. (ESPN2) San Antonio Spurs at Dallas Mavericks
(Same-day Tape)
3:30 a.m. (ESPN) Chicago Bulls at Miami Heat (Same-day
Tape)
BOWLING
12:30 p.m. (ESPN) PBAAIka Seltzer Plus Liquid Gels
USBC Masters (Taped)
FOOTBALL
7 p.m. (NBC) 2012 Pro Bowl
GOLF
1 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: Farmers Insurance Open
3 p.m. (CBS) PGATour: Farmers Insurance Open
COLLEGE GYMNASTICS
9:30 a.m. (SUN) Florida at Kentucky (Taped)
HOCKEY
4 p.m. (NBCSPT) 2012 NHLAII-Star Game
MOTORCYCLE RACING
12 p.m. (CBS) Monster Energy AMA Supercross World
Championship (Taped)
RODEO
1:30 p.m. (NBC) Bull Riding PBR Tour (Same-day Tape)
FIGURE SKATING
3 p.m. (NBC) U.S. Championships
WOMEN'S SOCCER
8 p.m. (NBCSPT) CONCACAF Olympic Qualifying Tournament
TRACKAND FIELD
7 p.m. (ESPN2) MSG U.S. Open (Same-day Tape)
SKIING
2 p.m. (NBCSPT) Nature Valley Freestyle World Cup:
Aerials (Taped)
3 p.m. (NBCSPT) Nature Valley Freestyle World Cup:
Moguls (Taped)

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


19. Nebraska (17-3) did not play. Next: a
nois, Sunday.
20. Georgetown (16-5) did not play Nex
No. 11 Rutgers, Sunday.
21. Texas Tech (15-5) beat Texas 75-71. I
vs. No. 14 Texas A&M, Wednesday.
22. Gonzaga (19-3) beat Saint Mary's
75-70. Next: vs. Portland, Thursday.
23. BYU (20-3) beat Santa Clara 74-64. I
at Pepperdine, Thursday.
23. DePaul (15-6) beat Seton Hall 7-
Next: vs. No. 16 Louisville, Tuesday.
25. North Carolina (15-5) did not play. Ne
Wake Forest, Sunday.
NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct
Philadelphia 14 6 .700
Boston 9 9 .500
NewYork 7 13 .350
New Jersey 7 13 .350
Toronto 6 14 .300
Southeast Division
W L Pct
Miami 14 5 .737
Atlanta 14 6 .700
Orlando 12 7 .632
Washington 4 16 .200
Charlotte 3 18 .143
Central Division
W L Pct
Chicago 17 4 .810
Indiana 12 6 .667
Milwaukee 7 11 .389
Cleveland 7 11 .389
Detroit 4 17 .190
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct
Houston 12 8 .600
San Antonio 12 8 .600
Dallas 12 8 .600
Memphis 10 8 .556
New Orleans 4 15 .211


Northwest Division
W L Pct
Oklahoma City 16 3 .842


Denver
Portland
Utah
Minnesota


L.A. Clippers
L.A. Lakers
Phoenix
Golden State
Sacramento


14 5 .737
12 8 .600
10 7 .588
9 10 .474
Pacific Division
W L Pct
10 6 .625
11 8 .579
6 12 .333
6 12 .333
6 13 .316
Friday's Games


Philadelphia 89, Charlotte 72
Boston 94, Indiana 87
New Jersey 99, Cleveland 96
GB Atlanta 107, Detroit 101, OT
Chicago 107, Milwaukee 100
4 Houston 103, Washington 76
7 New Orleans 93, Orlando 67
7 Minnesota 87, San Antonio 79
8 Miami 99, NewYork89
Dallas 116, Utah 101
GB Denver 96, Toronto 81
Portland 109, Phoenix 71
12 Oklahoma City 120, Golden State 109
2 Saturday's Games
1012 Washington 102, Charlotte 99
12 Philadelphia 95, Detroit 74
Houston 97, New York 84
GB L.A. Lakers at Milwaukee, late
Memphis at Phoenix, late
312 Sacramento at Utah, late
8Y2 Sunday's Games
812 Chicago at Miami, 3:30 p.m.
13 Cleveland at Boston, 6 p.m.
Toronto at New Jersey, 6 p.m.
Indiana at Orlando, 6 p.m.
GB San Antonio at Dallas, 6:30 p.m.
Atlanta at New Orleans, 7 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at Minnesota, 7 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at Denver, 8 p.m.
1 Monday's Games
712 Chicago at Washington, 7 p.m.


SUNDAY, JANUARY 29, 2012 B3


Orlando at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
New Orleans at Miami, 7:30 p.m.
Minnesota at Houston, 8 p.m.
San Antonio at Memphis, 8 p.m.
Detroit at Milwaukee, 8 p.m.
Dallas at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
Portland at Utah, 9 p.m.
Oklahoma City at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.



NHL standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
N.Y. Rangers 47 31 12 4 66132 96
Philadelphia 48 2914 5 63162 142
Pittsburgh 49 2817 4 60152 127
New Jersey 48 2619 3 55129 136
N.Y. Islanders 48 1922 7 45115 143
Northeast Division
GP W LOT PtsGF GA
Boston 47 31 14 2 64171 102
Ottawa 52 2719 6 60157 160
Toronto 49 2519 5 55151 147
Montreal 49 1921 9 47130 134
Buffalo 49 2024 5 45119 149
Southeast Division
GP W LOT PtsGF GA


Florida
Washington
Winnipeg
Tampa Bay


48 2215
48 2619
50 22 22
48 21 23


SSports BRIEFS


Hurricanes go on road,
defeat Marauders
The Citrus boys basketball
team got 19 points from
Desmond Franklin during a 60-
48 victory at Clearwater Central
Catholic on Saturday afternoon.
Sophomore point guard
Devon Pryor added 15 points
while senior forward Jeloni
Sammy contributed 13.
The Hurricanes (12-8) host
Crystal River on Monday.
Jeff Keppinger signs
1-year deal with Rays
TAMPA- Free agent in-
fielder Jeff Keppinger has
signed to a one-year contract


with the Tampa Bay Rays.
The 31-year-old Keppinger
who plays shortstop as well as
second and third base split last
season between the Houston
Astros and San Francisco Gi-
ants, combining to bat .277.
A .281 career hitter in seven
seasons with the Mets, Royals,
Reds, Astros and Giants, the
right-handed batting Keppinger
has a .324 lifetime average
against left-handed pitching.
Last year, he hit .307 in 43
games for the Astros before
being traded to San Francisco
on July 19. He batted .255 in 56
games with the Giants.
From staff, wire reports


11 55122 136
3 55136 137
6 50124 143
4 46136 165


Carolina 51 1824 9 45130 159
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Detroit 50 3316 1 67160 117
St. Louis 49 2913 7 65124 102
Chicago 50 2915 6 64162 144
Nashville 50 3016 4 64140 127
Columbus 49 1330 6 32115 163
Northwest Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Vancouver 49 30 15 4 64158 122
Minnesota 49 2418 7 55115 126
Colorado 51 2623 2 54131 144
Calgary 50 2321 6 52120 137
Edmonton 49 1826 5 41122 142
Pacific Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
San Jose 47 2714 6 60131 110
LosAngeles 50 2416 10 58111 111
Dallas 48 2521 2 52126 136
Phoenix 50 2220 8 52130 134
Anaheim 48 1823 7 43124 144
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over-
time loss.
Friday's Games
No games scheduled
Saturday's Games
No games scheduled
Sunday's Games
Team Chara vs. Team Alfredsson, 4 p.m.
Monday's Games
No games scheduled
NHL All-Star Teams
TEAM CHARA
Captain: Zdeno Chara, D, Boston.
Assistant Captain: Joffrey Lupul, F, Toronto.
Draft: 1. Pavel Datsyuk, F, Detroit; 2. Tim
Thomas, G, Boston; 3. Evgeni Malkin, F, Pitts-
burgh; 4. Marian Hossa, F, Chicago; 5. Kimmo
Timonen, D, Philadelphia; 6. Corey Perry, F,
Anaheim; 7. Carey Price, G, Montreal; 8. Phil
Kessel, F, Toronto; 9. Ryan Suter, D, Nashville;
10. Jimmy Howard, G, Detroit.
11. Brian Campbell, D, Florida; 12. Patrick
Kane, F, Chicago; 13. Dion Phaneuf, D, Toronto;
14. Jarome Iginla, F, Calgary; 15. Dennis Wide-
man, D, Washington; 16. Marian Gaborik, F,
New York Rangers; 17. Jordan Eberle, F, Ed-
monton; 18. Tyler Seguin, F, Boston; 19. Jamie
Benn, F, Dallas.
TEAM ALFREDSSON
Captain: Daniel Alfredsson, F, Ottawa.
Assistant Captain: Henrik Lundqvist, G, New
York Rangers.
Draft: 1. Erik Karlsson, D, Ottawa; 2. Jason
Spezza, F, Ottawa; 3. Claude Giroux, F,
Philadelphia; 4. Jonathan Quick, G, Los Ange-
les; 5. Kris Letang, D, Pittsburgh; 6. Steven
Stamkos, F, Tampa Bay; 7. Brian Elliott, G, St.
Louis; 8. Shea Weber, D, Nashville; 9. Daniel
Sedin, F, Vancouver; 10. Dan Girardi, D, New
York Rangers.
11. Keith Yandle, D, Phoenix; 12. Milan
Michalek, F, Ottawa; 13. Henrik Sedin, F, Van-
couver; 14. James Neal, F, Pittsburgh; 15. Alex
Edler, D, Vancouver; 16. John Tavares, F, New
York Islanders; 17. Scott Hartnell, F, Philadel-
phia; 18. Jason Pominville, F, Buffalo; 19. x-
Logan Couture, F, San Jose.
x-last pick



BASEBALL
American League
TEXAS RANGERS-Agreed to terms with
OF Kyle Hudson on a minor league contract.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
NBA-Suspended Milwaukee F Stephen
Jackson one game for verbal abuse of a game
official and failure to leave the court in a timely
manner during Friday's game against
Chicago.
CHICAGO BULLS-Waived G Mike James.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
CHICAGO BEARS-Named Phil Emery
general manager.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
CHICAGO BLACKHAWKS-Assigned F
Jimmy Hayes to Rockford (AHL).
American Hockey League
AHL-Suspended Lake Erie RW Hugh Jes-
siman two games for his actions during Thurs-
day's game against Toronto.
BINGHAMTON SENATORS-Traded F
Maxime Gratchev to Springfield, who as-
signed him to Chicago (ECHL).
ECHL
GWINNETT GLADIATORS-Acquired G
Joe Palmer from Reading for future consider-
ations. Claimed F David Brownschidle off
waivers from Wheeling. Released G Nick Eno.
COLLEGE
CONNECTICUT-Reinstated G Ryan Boa-
tright to the men's basketball team.


Associated Press
South Squad wide receiver Joe Adams (4) of Arkansas is
stopped by North Squad defensive lineman Shea McClellin
(92) of Boise State in the first half of the Senior Bowl on
Saturday at Ladd-Peebles Stadium in Mobile, Ala.


North wins



Senior Bowl, 23-13


Associated Press

MOBILE, Ala. Isaiah
Pead took a stutter step for-
ward, then raced to the left
sideline and traveled 60 yards
up the field before finally get-
ting tripped up by a leg tackle.
The former Cincinnati run-
ning back followed that nifty
punt return with a 38-yarder
a couple of minutes later, late
in the first half, to play a star-
ring role Saturday in the
North's 23-13 victory over the
South in the Senior Bowl.
The first one set up a field
goal and helped Pead out-
shine bigger names to earn
Most Valuable Player honors.
"(Coach) told me what the
punt return call was, left,
right or in the middle, and
told me to make sure I set my
blocks up or the play would
be dead," said Pead, who set a
Senior Bowl record with 98


yards on punt returns. "I tried
to do that the best that I could.
The rest was just ability."
Michigan State's Kirk
Cousins and Wisconsin's Rus-
sell Wilson threw touchdown
passes for the North. Purdue
kicker Carson Wiggs put it
away with his third short field
goal, a28-yarder with 4:11 left
in the showcase for senior
NFL prospects.
Boise State's Kellen Moore
led that clinching 13-play
drive that consumed 8:36 with
the help of a running clock
It snuffed out a spark pro-
vided by South quarterback
Nick Foles of Arizona, who
started his career with
Cousins at Michigan State.
Foles had gotten the South
into the end zone by firing a
20-yard touchdown pass to
Arizona teammate Juron
Criner with 12:55 left in the
game.


the race.
At 6:12 p.m. team owner
Wayne Taylor announced he
Continued from Page B1 would retired his Corvette
from the race.
No. 77 Doran Racing Team "It took months, ab-
car, took a minute to sign an solutely months to get ready
autograph for two young for this race," one disap-
brothers. pointed team member said.
"Have you ever stayed up "We don't know what hap-
all night?" opened. I just
he asked Rolex 24 facts know we are
them. "Well, done for the
that is what 1 Only Rolf Stommelen night."
havetodo.I (19960s, 1970s and Sittingjust
have to stay 1980s) and Scott Prufitside the
up all night (1990s, 2000s and gates of pit
and drive in 2010s) have won the lane, Lee
the dark." overall Rolex 24 at Roy said by
In the Daytona in three the time the
middle of different decades. race started,
the infield 0 Hurley Haywood owns he had al-
was a very record five overall ~aq!yPut in
large Ferris 24 At Daytona victor llJday.
wheel offer- He also has the long stWe got in
ingacontin- span between first agreat8a.m.
uous look of last victories 18 hvrs.have
the nearly been going
three mile M There are 21 differegver since,"
track. In this countries in the worho said. "I
race, the represented among thhope I will
road course Rolex 24 overall still be here
deviates into champions. tomorrow at
the infield, 8 a.m. I want
just after the it to be the
start/finish line and then it's Rolex 46 hours at Daytona.
back onto the track and into It will mean we survived the
Turn 2. It is in this stretch race."
where many accidents hap- Chronicle managing
pen spin outs, crashes editor Sandra Frederick
into barriers and cars up can be reached at
against steel medians. 352-564-2930
It's the same area the Sun or sfrederick@
Trust Corvette died early in chronicleonline.com


Saturday's GOLF SCORES


Farmers Insurance Open
Saturday
At San Diego
s-Torrey Pines (South Course): 7,698 yards, par-72,
n-Torrey Pines (North Course): 7,094 yards, par-72
Purse: $6 million
Third Round
Kyle Stanley 62n-68s-68s 198 -18
John Huh 64n-71s-68s-203 -13
John Rollins 70s-65n-68s 203 -13
Bill Haas 63n-71s-70s -204 -12
Sang-Moon Bae 65n-67s-72s 204 -12
Cameron Tringale 67n-72s-66s 205 -11
Jonas Blixt 70s-70n-65s 205 -11
Brandt Snedeker 67s-64n-74s 205 -11
Scott Piercy 70n-68s-68s 206 -10
Justin Leonard 65n-70s-71s-206 -10
Rod Pampling 64n-75s-68s-207 -9
D.A. Points 70s-70n-67s 207 -9
Ryo Ishikawa 69s-69n-69s 207 -9
Tim Herron 68n-70s-69s -207 -9
Camilo Villegas 65n-72s-70s -207 -9
Pat Perez 66n-70s-71s -207 -9
James Driscoll 68s-69n-70s 207 -9
Martin Flores 65n-67s-75s -207 -9


Bubba Watson
Dustin Johnson
J.J. Killeen
Jimmy Walker
Robert Allenby
Hunter Mahan
Paul Goydos
Brendon de Jonge
Justin Rose
Rickie Fowler
Bryce Molder
Stewart Cink
Geoff Ogilvy
Chris Riley
Greg Chalmers
Michael Bradley
John Merrick
Vijay Singh
Bobby Gates
Tom Pernice Jr.
Charles Howell III
Chris DiMarco
Keegan Bradley
Jhonattan Vegas
Bill Lunde
Harris English


69n-71s-68s-
66n-72s-70s-
72s-69n-67s-
73s-65n-70s-
68n-67s-73s-
69s-65n-74s-
68s-72n-69s-
70s-70n-69s-
71s-68n-70s-
68n-70s-71s-
71s-70n-68s-
69s-68n-72s-
72s-70n-67s-
67n-70s-72s-
65n-72s-72s-
69n-71s-70s-
74s-66n-70s-
64n-75s-71s-
76s-64n-70s-
69n-72s-69s-
72n-69s-69s-
68n-70s-72s-
69n-68s-73s-
69s-68n-73s-
74n-68s-68s-
67n-72s-72s-


Spencer Levin
Marc Leishman
Kevin Chappell
Aaron Baddeley
Bud Cauley
Marco Dawson
MarcTurnesa
Ricky Barnes
Trevor Immelman
Seung-Yul Noh
Nick Watney
Blake Adams
Nick O'Hern
Charley Hoffman
Andres Romero
Ernie Els
Tommy Biershenk
Josh Teater
Greg Owen
Roberto Castro
Gary Christian
Steve Marino
Colt Knost
Chez Reavie
Cameron Beckman
Duffy Waldorf


62n-76s-73s-
72s-69n-70s-
73s-69n-69s-
70n-72s-69s-
69n-70s-73s-
67s-73n-72s-
66s-72n-74s-
69s-70n-73s-
71s-70n-71s-
69n-72s-71s-
69s-68n-75s-
75s-67n-70s-
69s-70n-74s-
71s-68n-74s-
68n-73s-72s-
71s-70n-72s-
70n-71s-72s-
64n-77s-72s-
75s-67n-71s-
70n-72s-71s-
72n-70s-71s-
69n-71s-74s-
66n-74s-74s-
72s-67n-75s-
68s-72n-74s-
70n-69s-75s-


Richard H. Lee


72s-69n-73s-214 -2


Mark D. Anderson 73s-68n-73s 214 -
Chris Kirk 70s-72n-72s-214 -
Made cut, didn't finish
M. Angel Carballo 70s-72n-73s -215 -
Jarrod Lyle 73s-69n-73s 215 -
Boo Weekley 71s-67n-78s-216
BrendonTodd 70n-71s-75s-216
Gary Woodland 70n-72s-74s-216
TroyKelly 68n-72s-78s-218 4+
Abu Dhabi Golf Champ.
Saturday
At Abu Dhabi Golf Club (National Course),
Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates
Purse: $2.7 million
Yardage: 7,510, Par: 72
Third Round
TigerWoods, United States 70-69-66 20
Robert Rock, England 69-70-66 20
Peter Hanson, Sweden 74-69-64 20
Francesco Molinari, Italy 74-67-66 20
Rory Mcllroy Norther Ireland 67-72-68 20
Paul Lawrie, Scotland 70-69-68 2'
George Coetzee, South Africa 71-72-65 20
Thorbjorn Olesen, Denmark 70-67-71 20


James Kingston, South Africa
Jean-Baptiste Gonnet, France
Thomas Bjorn, Denmark,
Jamie Donaldson, Wales
Graeme McDowell, N. Ireland
Matteo Mannasero, Italy
Keith Home, South Africa
Richard Finch, England
Gareth Maybin, N. Ireland
G. Fdez-Castano, Spain
David Lynn, England
Graeme Storm, England
Mark Foster, England
Liang Wen-chong, China
Johan Edfors, Sweden
Miguel Angel Jimenez, Spain
Sergio Garcia, Spain
Robert Karlsson, Sweden
Also
Lee Westwood, England
Padraig Harrington, Ireland
Charl Schwartzel, South Africa
Ben Curtis, United States
KJ Choi, South Korea
Luke Donald, England
Jose Maria Olazabal, Spain


69-72-67 -208
68-71-69-208
73-71-65-209
74-68-67-209
72-69-68 209
73-65-71 209
71-71-68-210
68-71-71-210
68-70-72-210
72-74-65 211
74-70-67 -211
74-69-68 211
75-67-69 211
70-71-70 -211
70-71-70 -211
72-69-70 211
71-69-71 -211
67-72-72 211


72-72-68 -
71-69-72-
70-70-72 -
72-71-70-
71-75-68-
71-72-73-
72-74-78-












ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE

Etta James
remembered
LOS ANGELES The
Rev. Al Sharpton says
Etta James should be re-
membered as a woman
and an artist who "turned
her pain into power"
Sharpton eulogized the
rhythm and blues singer
at a memorial service
Saturday in which he
highlighted James' vocal
talent but also her blunt-
ness and ability to break
down racial and cultural
barriers.
The reverend opened
his eulogy by reading a
statement from President
Barack Obama, who
danced with the first lady
to James' well-known hit
"At Last" during their in-
augural ball. His state-
ment praised her
"legendary voice."
James died Jan. 20
after battling leukemia
and other ailments.
Stevie Wonder per-
formed "Shelter in the
Rain" and Christina
Aguilera performed
James' signature song,
bringing the hundreds of
friends, family and fans
gathered to celebrate
James' life to their feet.

Miss. teen in
'Idol' top 40
Brandon, Miss. -A 17-
year-old Brandon girl is
one of the Top 40 candi-
dates on Fox's American
Idol.
Skylar Laine Harden
was one of the top 40 con-
testants who advanced to
the singing competition's
Hollywood round, plac-
ing her one step closer to
making her debut on a
stage that has launched
the careers of stars such
as Kelly Clarkson and
Carrie Underwood.
The Clarion Ledgerre-
ported Saturday that Sky-
lar's mother, Mary
Harden, has been with
her daughter during the
entire Idol process -
from her first time meet-
ing judges Randy Jack-
son, Jennifer Lopez and
Steven Tyler to her re-
cent venture to
Tinseltown.

Cooper, Saldana
at Sundance
PARK CITY, Utah-
Bradley Cooper and Zoe
Saldana came to the Sun-
dance
Film Fes-
tival to
promote
their clos-
ing-night
film, "The
Words."
The two
Bradley actors
Cooper play a
married
couple in the movie,
which follows an aspiring
writer who gains fame
when he
finds an
old manu-
script and
passes it
ano off as his
own.
The
pair
Zoe avoided
Saldana any ap-
pearance
of their reported off-
screen romance by stay-
ing apart from one
another while posing for
photos and giving inter-
views to support the film.
-From wire reports


Olympic start


Associated Press
Oscar-winning director Danny Boyle visits Colegrave Primary School, Newham London, a school selected to audi-
tion for the London 2012 Opening Ceremony, on Friday. Boyle offered a sneak peek of his vision for the 2012 Lon-
don Olympics opening ceremony, revealing that he would ring a massive bell to start the festivities and include a
segment on one of Britain's most maligned institutions, the National Health Service.

Danny Boyle offers glimpse ofopening ceremony in London


Associated Press

LONDON There's a nod to
Shakespeare, a big bell and ...
nurses?
Academy Award-winning director
Danny Boyle offered a sneak peek
of his vision for the 2012 London
Olympics opening ceremony, re-
vealing Friday that he'll ring a mas-
sive bell to start festivities that will
include thousands of performers
and offer a tribute to a British insti-
tution, the National Health Service.
The revelations are unusual as
the content of the ceremonies is
typically a closely guarded secret.
But Boyle seemed almost giddy as
he offered small hints during a
news conference to mark six
months to the games. His attitude
seemed a cross between "I know
something you don't know" and
"wait, wait you'll love it."
"It's an enormous bloody thing,"
he said to chuckles at London's 3
Mills Studio, where the production
is being shaped.
The ceremony, whose theme is
"Isle of Wonders" is partly inspired
by William Shakespeare's "The
Tempest" and by the industrial past
of Stratford, the East London site of
the Olympic Park. It starts with the
ringing of a giant bell, and has a seg-
ment devoted to the oft-maligned -
and much-loved NHS.
Enormous or not, Boyle's news
conference itself showed his skill as


a master storyteller, unraveling the
tale of his creation of the ceremony
with the feel of a fireside chat. He
began by noting how thrilled he was
to create a glory moment of the
games particularly since he lives
in the same part of London where
they are taking place.
It is personal to him, and he
wanted it to be personal to others so
he set about trying to get as much
"humanity," in it as possible.
While the specter of trying to beat
the monumental ceremony of the
Beijing Olympics looms, Boyle said
his goal would be to compare favor-
ably to those who staged another
Olympics the 2000 Sydney
Games. They were fun. Personal.
Then he looked at his assets. Lon-
don's Olympic Stadium was not
spectacular on the outside, unlike
Beijing's Bird's Nest, but the inside
is another story, a gorgeous "porce-
lain bowl" that seats the same num-
ber as China's nest, he said. It's a
place where spectators can see the
faces of those opposite them and a
connection can be made.
"We didn't want to slavishly be
bossed about by the TV audience,
which is a billion people," he said.
"We wanted the 80,000 people who
are lucky enough to be in there to
be the conduit through which you
feel this experience really"
Even the land beneath the sta-
dium figured in his thinking. The
soil was once a toxic waste dump,


poisoned by Britain's industrial
past. Boyle liked the notion that the
land had been recovered and a new
legacy created. He talked of his ex-
periments, and noted that his play
"Frankenstein" was a "dry run" for
elements of the show.
Boyle returned to live theater
after years directing movies with
"Frankenstein" at Britain's Na-
tional Theatre in 2011. The show
won wide praise for its visual
verve and the way it drew the au-
dience into the action shroud-
ing the theater walls in bandages
and running a clanging steam-
punk-style steam train on tracks
through the auditorium.
It also featured the work of
Boyle's frequent musical collabo-
rators Underworld, who will also
work on the ceremony. He then
weaved in the history of the British
Isles. Boyle ordered up a 27-ton bell
from the Whitechapel Bell Foundry
to ring in the games. Founded in 1570
and officially Britain's oldest manu-
facturing company, Whitechapel
made London's Big Ben and
Philadelphia's Liberty Bell. Boyle
loved that ringing a bell to begin a
performance was customary at
the time of Shakespeare.
The bell cast Friday will be in-
scribed with a line from "The Tem-
pest," in which Caliban says "Be not
afeard; the isle is full of noises."
"We want people to be able to
hear those noises," Boyle said.


SAG Awards menu months in the making


Associated Press


LOS ANGELES When
your dinner party guests in-
clude Brad Pitt, George
Clooney, Kate Winslet and
Glenn Close, and the whole
affair is televised live, it can
take months to plan the
menu. That's why the team
behind the Screen Actors
Guild Awards began putting
together the plate for Sun-
day's ceremony months ago.
It was still summer when
show producer Kathy Con-
nell and director Jeff Mar-
golis first sat down with chef
Suzanne Goins of Los Ange-
les eatery Lucques with a
tall order: Create a meal


Birthday: Substantial progress can be made in the year
ahead by sharing all the good things that come your way
with friends and associates. In order to succeed in this new
cycle, you must be completely unselfish.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -You should take extra care
to remember that you're not the only one on this planet ca-
pable of conceiving bright, clever ideas. Companions will
resent you if you badmouth their concepts.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) When it comes to an invest-
ment that looks like it could generate a big return from a
nominal amount of money, take another look. What's asked
of you might just be the down payment.
Aries (March 21-April 19) Because the people you
hang out with will have a strong influence over your atti-
tude, steer clear of companions who see only storm clouds.
Look for sunny skies and clear sailing.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Someone you know who is


that is delicious at room
temperature, looks beauti-
ful on TV is easy to eat and
appeals to Hollywood
tastes. Oh, and no poppy-
seeds, soups, spicy dishes,
or piles of onions or garlic.
"It can't drip, stick in their
teeth or be too heavy," Con-
nell said. "We have to ap-
pease all palates."
The chef put together a
plate of possibilities: Slow-
roasted salmon with yellow
beets, lamb with cous cous
and spiced cauliflower and
roasted root vegetables with
quinoa. There was also a
chopped chicken salad and
another chicken dish with
black beans.


Today's HOROSCOPE
never satisfied will be hitting the complaint desk once
again. There's no pleasing this person, so don't knock your-
self out attempting to try.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) Even if you're just trying to
help, be careful not to malign a mutual friend in the
process. If you accidentally do, what you say about him or
her will put the focus back on you instead.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) If there is something impor-
tant you need to accomplish, don't involve others in your
project, even if you feel you require help. Instead of easing
your burden, they could retard your progress.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) What you say could be both
questioned and challenged, so be certain about the facts
before you speak up. If you understand the issue at hand,
you won't give out faulty information.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Old obligations have a way of
rearing their ugly heads at the most inconvenient times.


Associated Press
SAG Awards producer Kathy Connell, left, and SAG Awards
supervising producer Mick McCullough participate Oct. 19
in the SAG Awards tasting and table decor preview at Luc-
ques restaurant in Los Angeles.


Something you've been putting off and keeping under
wraps may begin to make its presence known.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Be careful what you say to
your companions, even if you mean well. The fault you see
in someone else is likely to be due to the mote found in
your own eye.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Unfortunately, you're more
inclined to find excuses for why something can't be done
instead of making the time to do what needs doing. Unat-
tended chores will not go away, they'll only fester.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) If you're a bit tired at the
moment, you aren't likely to display your customary ingrati-
ating self. In fact, you might deal rather harshly with anyone
who unwittingly gets on your bad side.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -Although you're good at
achieving your objectives, you might unfortunately choose
targets that produce nothing but hollow victories.


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's winning
numbers, Page B3.

FRIDAY, JAN. 27
Mega Money: 4 30 38 41
Mega Ball: 2
4-of-4 MB No winner $500,000
4-of-4 7 $978.50
3-of-4 MB 35 $429
3-of-4 735 $60.50
2-of-4 MB 976 $32
1-of-4 MB 9,462 $3
2-of-4 22,865 $2
Fantasy 5: 4 5 14 22 24
5-of-5 1 winner $235,547.30
4-of-5 401 $94.50
3-of-5 11,134 $9.50
THURSDAY, JAN. 26
Fantasy 5:9 13 15 22 30
5-of-5 1 winner $214,032.99
4-of-5 280 $123
3-of-5 9,158 $10.50
WEDNESDAY, JAN. 25
Powerball: 4 19 28 29 47
Powerball: 5
5-of-5 PB No winner
5-of-5 3 $1 million
No Florida winner

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num-
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call 850-487-7777.

Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, Jan. 29,
the 29th day of 2012. There
are 337 days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On Jan. 29, 1845, Edgar
Allan Poe's poem "The
Raven" was first published in
the New York Evening Mirror.
On this date:
In 1843, the 25th president
of the United States, William
McKinley, was born in Niles,
Ohio.
In 1919, the ratification of
the 18th Amendment to the
Constitution, which launched
Prohibition, was certified by
Acting Secretary of State
Frank L. Polk.
In 1936, the first members
of baseball's Hall of Fame, in-
cluding Ty Cobb and Babe
Ruth, were named in Coop-
erstown, N.Y.
In 1963, poet Robert Frost
died in Boston at age 88.
In 1979, President Jimmy
Carter formally welcomed
Chinese Vice Premier Deng
Xiaoping to the White House,
following the establishment of
diplomatic relations.
Ten years ago: In his first
State of the Union address,
President George W. Bush
said terrorists were still
threatening America and
he warned of "an axis of evil"
consisting of North Korea,
Iran and Iraq.
Five years ago: Deeply
distrustful of Iran, President
George W. Bush said in an
interview with National Public
Radio "we will respond firmly"
if Tehran escalated its military
actions in Iraq and threat-
ened American forces or Iraqi
citizens.
One year ago: With
protests raging, Egyptian
President Hosni Mubarak
named his intelligence chief,
Omar Suleiman, as his first-
ever vice president as chaos
engulfed Cairo.
Today's Birthdays: Actor
Noel Harrison is 78. Author
Germaine Greer is 73. Actor
Tom Selleck is 67. Rhythm-
and-blues singer Bettye
LaVette is 66. Actor Marc
Singer is 64. Actress Ann Jil-
lian is 62. Rock musician
Tommy Ramone (Ramones)
is 60. Rock musician Louie
Perez (Los Lobos) is 59.
Rhythm-and-blues/funk
singer Charlie Wilson is 59.
Talk show host Oprah Win-
frey is 58. Country singer Ir-
lene Mandrell is 56. Actress
Diane Delano is 55. Actress


Judy Norton Taylor ("The
Waltons") is 54.
Thought for Today: "Mis-
quotations are the only quo-
tations that are never
misquoted." Hesketh
Pearson, British biographer
(1887-1964).











COMMENTARY


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Meet Tommy
Little Tommy Tucker is
a Citrus County "Super
Hero" to guide you to a
healthier lifestyle./C4


Geography lesson


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


Associated Press photos/map Special to the Chronicle a
Clockwise from top left: Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney smiles Friday as his wife Ann introduces him at The 1
Hispanic Leadership Network's Lunch at Doral Golf Resort and Spa in Miami. Republican presidential candidate Newt Th
Gingrich speaks Friday during The Hispanic Leadership Network conference at the Doral Golf Resort and Spa in e '
Miami. Republican presidential candidate Rick Santorum speaks Friday in Miami. Republican presidential can-
didate Ron Paul campaigns Friday in Bangor, Maine.

Republican presidential candidate roots don't much matter in diverse Florida


MATT SEDENSKY
Associated Press
WEST PALM BEACH Mitt Romney's ties to
the Northeast gave him a boost on the way to
winning the New Hampshire primary Newt Gin-
grich's roots in the South probably had at least a
little to do with his South Carolina triumph.
Neither presidential candidate is expected
to benefit from such geographic ties in next
week's Republican primary in Florida, a di-
verse state suffering through a world of eco-
nomic hurt.
"Geography will not play any role in my de-
cision," said Rich Cole, sounding like many vot-
ers across the state.


Cole, 68, lives in Florida's largest retirement
community, The Villages, and hails from Penn-
sylvania, which candidate Rick Santorum rep-
resented in the Senate. Cole said he likes
Santorum but plans to back Romney, for whom
he voted four years ago. He thinks Romney
gives Republicans the best chance of beating
President Barack Obama in November
A self-described "God-fearing conservative,"
Larry Dos Santos, of Venice, was leaning to-
ward backing Gingrich. Dos Santos, a 65-year-
old retiree from New York who lived nearly all
his life on Long Island, noted that the former
House speaker has some qualities that remind
him of home.
"Telling it like it is is definitely like a New


Health care cuts don't heal


Of all the unprecedented
challenges our Florida
health care system faces,
there is a new one that
dwarfs all the others. Our
governor is proposing
$2.1 billion in hospital
Medicaid payment cuts
that jeopardize our state ,-
health care system,
threaten access to qual-
ity care for all Florida
residents and put thou-
sands of jobs at risk.
These cuts may repre- Ryan
sent the most serious GU
threats Citrus Memorial COL
Health System, and
other hospitals, in
Florida have ever faced.
The Florida Hospital Association
estimates that a $2.1 billion cut is
equal to 40,000 jobs in our state. As
hospitals are forced to lay off staff,
patients will face longer wait times,
longer distances to intensive care,
and dramatic cutbacks in services.
We know this from experience: last
year, $500 million in Medicaid cuts
put an estimated 1,000 jobs in jeop-
ardy and led to a reduction in pri-
mary care clinics, OB/GYN
services, skilled nursing units and
outpatient chemotherapy services.
If his proposal is passed by the
Florida Legislature, our already
overcrowded emergency depart-
ments would overflow with pa-
tients who would have no other


IE
.1


option to receive care. Cutting pay-
ments to hospitals does not reduce
the cost of health care; it only shifts
the burden of cost for
care rendered. The
costs associated with
caring for patients with-
out access to health care
coverage doesn't go
away As hospitals are
forced to shift the cost to
those with private
health insurance, this
cut becomes a hidden
Beaty tax on insurance premi-
EST ums and small business
U MN owners.
Aside from the loss of
thousands of jobs, our
fragile Florida economy would be
further weakened by the cuts. Ac-
cording to a University of Florida
economic impact report, approxi-
mately $4.8 billion will be slashed
from the state's economy For every
dollar spent on health care jobs in
Florida, $2.84 is generated in posi-
tive economic impact; take away
$2.1 billion and our economy will
be shaken to its core, as the multi-
plier effect works in reverse.
He also argues these cuts protect
Florida's taxpayers. But which
taxpayers?
Certainly not taxpayers whose
living depends on the state's econ-
omy, which will be further weak-
ened by these cuts.
See Page C4


Yorker," he said of the former Georgia con-
gressman. "Nobody pulls punches in New
York."
While a candidate's roots may earn them kin-
ship in Florida, hometown ties are unlikely to
earn them a vote in a year when many Repub-
licans here tell pollsters that electability and
the economy are the two factors that rank
above all else as they decide whom to support
in Tuesday's primary
Geography seemed to make a difference in
previous contests this year
Romney, the former governor of neighboring
Massachusetts, led comfortably in polls ahead


Page C3


Key to Republican victory

in 2012 Ron Paul


Ron Paul continues to run
well in the primaries. He
took 21.4 percent of the vote
in the Iowa caucuses and
came in a close third
(Iowa recount). In New
Hampshire, his following
was strong and he took I
22.9 percent of the vote, a
second place finish. He
finished fourth in South
Carolina and took 13 per-
cent of the vote.
I know Ron from Wash-
ington not only in terms Lou
of his congressional ac- OTI
tivities, but as a fellow VOI
player (and coach) for the
congressional baseball
team. Ron was easy going (it goes
without saying that Ron's position
on the team was right field). He is a
decent person, an engaging person,
and someone who cares very much
about this country
There are issues, as in the fiscal
area where I think his ideas make
sense. He will support the Bal-
anced Budget Amendment, which
was something that a number of
young members on both sides of the
aisle tried to get through in the late
1970s and, unfortunately for the
country we failed. It would have
been a great roadblock to the
spending that has occurred and our
country, would have been in a lot


better shape if it had passed.
There are issues where I don't
agree with him, especially in the
foreign affairs arena;
B however, I have never
found a person or a
party who had all the an-
swers to all the ques-
k" tions. It is my personal
opinion that he will not
.. .' get the nomination but
in no way should he be
driven out of the Repub-
lican Party just the
Frey opposite.
HIER How many remember
CES Ross Perot? He ran as
an Independent and got
18.9 percent of the vote
(670,140) in 1992. Perot did not get
any electoral votes. Clinton won
with approximately 43 percent of
the vote (to Bush's 37.4 percent) and
was elected president. The elec-
toral count was 370 to 168 and the
popular vote 44,909,326 to
39,103,882. Enough potential Bush
voters went for Perot and changed
what otherwise could have been a
narrow Bush victory to a Clinton
win.
Many of Ron Paul's followers are
young and idealistic. There is noth-
ing wrong with either of these char-
acteristics. They also will be deeply

See Page C4


Make a

difference

with the

economy
One of the best
things you can do to
improve the econ-
omy in Citrus County is to
spend your money locally
When money is spent
locally, it circulates
throughout the commu-
nity about 2.5 times.
That means if you go to
the Crystal River Mall and
purchase a new pair of
shoes at Belk's, part of
your dollars is used to pay
the salaries of the people
who work there. They turn
around and spend their
paychecks at the super-
market, gas station and
restaurants. The folks who
own those stores or are
employed there do the
same thing.
The money just keeps
moving.
And when it moves, it
creates jobs.
We were so dependent
on the development and
home building business
for so many years that it
became like a drug. The
housing crisis has forced
us and many other
Florida counties to go
into a form of economic
cold turkey
We need to generate
wealth and opportunity in
new and different ways.
Citrus County is in a
weird place because only
about half our residents
are even interested in
working. We have one of
the largest percentages of
retirees (and veterans) in
the entire country Re-
tirees have also been
hammered by the poor
economy because fixed in-
vestments are paying very
little and Social Security
increases have been al-
most non-existent.
The workforce has had
it even worse because
nearly 11 percent of the
workers in the county
can't find jobs.
I was distressed to learn
that our local veterans of
the current conflict in
Iraq and Afghanistan are
suffering even worse than
most. I was on a tour last
week of the National
Guard Armory in St. Au-
gustine and when I told
Gen. Emmett Titshaw Jr
that I was from Citrus
County, he immediately
said we had a large num-
ber of the National Guard
members from our area
who have not found work
since they came home last
year In fact, the general
said, our unemployment
rate of veterans is the
highest in the state.
Jim Shidner, a retiree
friend of mine, wants to
push residents to really
focus on the need to buy
American and support our
national economy Jim has
suggested that we sell the
equivalent of war bonds
similar to those used in
World War II in an effort
to help pay down the na-
tional debt
Jim is right that a loy-
alty to American goods
will help us make
progress in this recession.
It's the manufacturing of
goods that creates new
value in any economy In
Citrus County, we only
have a limited number of
businesses that create a
product that they sell out-
side of this market
The largest manufac-
turer we have is Progress


Page C4


]
H
14







OPage C2 SUNDAY, JANUARY 29, 2012



PINION


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan........... .................. publisher
a Charlie Brennan ............. ................. editor
Mike Arnold ........... .................. HR director
Sandra Frederick....................... managing editor
Curt Ebitz................................. citizen member
Founded Mac Harris ........................ citizen member
by Albert M.
Williamson Rebecca Martin ..........................guest member
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


BIG STABILIZER





Nuke plant




future vital




to county


here is nothing good
about the possibility that
Progress Energy might
decide not to bring its Crystal
River nuclear plant back on
line.
If that decision THE IS
is made, it will ul-
timately result in The futu
a large tax in- nuclear
crease for every
resident of Citrus OUR 01
County; an in- Make th
crease in the cost get
of electricity opera
throughout the
Progress Energy
service area; a spike in the
local unemployment rate; a
loss of the highest paying jobs
in the region; and a general
kick in the shins to the local
economy.
Every resident of Citrus
County is a stakeholder in this
decision about to be made by
the CEO and board of directors
of Progress Energy.
Let our message be clear: We
think closing down the nuclear
plant is a bad idea.
The containment wall prob-
lems at the Crystal River nu-
clear plant are well known.
When the company took the
plant down to refuel and re-
place the generator, there were
cracks in the walls of the con-
tainment building. Efforts thus
far to repair the walls have
been unsuccessful, but a new
phase of repairs is scheduled
to begin later this year.
The Florida Public Service
Commission met recently and
agreed that the utility's cus-
tomers deserve a $288 million
refund for replacement power
costs associated with the nuke
plant outage.
Now, as Progress Energy ne-
gotiates with its insurance
company and consults with its
investors, the decision has to
be made as to how the com-
pany should strategically move
forward. In reacting to the PSC
agreement, the Progress En-
ergy Florida CEO conceded
that closing down the Crystal


Presidency too pricey
I just saw on the news where
they're saying that Mitt Romney
will probably win the nomination
and the reason they're giving is
that he has the most
money. I think that some-
thing needs to be done in
this country when the
common man can't run
for president, only some-
body who's very wealthy
and has a lot of money
and backing. The Ameri-
can people need to stop
looking and listening at CAL
these numerous ads 53-
against other candidates 563
that somebody with mil-
lions of dollars can put out. Peo-
ple should be looking at the
individual running for president.
His background and his experi-
ence is what they should be going
by when they decide who they're
going to vote for, not stupid TV
ads that somebody with millions
of dollars can put up, which a lot


S
r
r

P
e

t


River nuke plant is an option
on the table.
CEO Vincent Dolan and the
Progress Energy board cer-
tainly have the fiduciary re-
sponsibility to do
;SUE: what's best for
their private com-
e of the pany, but the resi-
plant. dents of this
community are
INION: also stakeholders
repairs; in the decision.
lant And from our
ional. stakeholder stand-
point, we think
that deciding
against repairing the plant is
an awful idea.
Citrus County has invested
decades of support for
Progress Energy in its efforts to
expand the energy complex
and grow in this community.
We have confidence that the
leadership of the utility can re-
pair the nuclear plant and get
it back on line in a profitable
way.
Nuclear energy is the least
expensive way to produce elec-
tricity for the consumers of
Florida, and billions of dollars
have already been invested in
putting the Crystal River plant
on line. While the repair prob-
lems are significant, walking
away from the capital invest-
ment at the nuke plant would
be an extreme reaction.
Make no mistake; Progress
Energy has also been a stake-
holder in Citrus County. For
years Progress Energy (and
previously Florida Power) has
been the largest taxpayer and
the largest private employer.
The employees of the company
are an intricate part of the
community and play key lead-
ership roles in community af-
fairs, education and public
policy development.
We urge the CEO Dolan and
the Progress Energy board to
move forward with the repair
plans. The residents and busi-
ness community in Citrus
County are supportive of that
effort.


of ads happen to be very biased
and you don't even know how true
they are. So the one thing wrong
in America is that the regular
common man cannot run for
president. That needs to
change. Only then will we
UND take this country back.
OFF come for the care
S Although I live in The
Villages, I chose to come
to Citrus Memorial
(Health System) to have
X-rays after I took a fall.
And not only X-rays, but
0579 I also chose to come to
the rehab center for
water therapy in Inver-
ness. The Villages may have lots
of glitz and a piano player in the
lobby, but that is all. Citrus Me-
morial, you're the best. That goes
for everyone from the front admit-
ting to the X-ray department, the
telephone staff everyone.
Kudos to Citrus Memorial hospi-
tal. Thank you.


"Every age is modern to those
who are living in it."
Justice Benjamin N. Cardozo,
1870-1938


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Onward civilian soldiers


ar, said James Madison,
is "the true nurse of ex-
ecutive aggrandize-
ment." Randolph Bourne, the
radical essayist killed
by the influenza un-
leashed by World War
I, warned, "War is the
health of the state."
Hence Barack
Obama's State of the
Union hymn: Onward /
civilian soldiers,
marching as to war.
Obama, an unfet-
tered executive wield- Georg
ing a swollen state, OTI
began and ended his VOI
address by celebrating
the armed forces. They
are not "consumed with personal
ambition," they "work together"
and "focus on the mission at
hand" and do not "obsess over
their differences." Americans
should emulate troops "marching
into battle," who "rise or fall as
one unit."
Well. The armed services'
ethos, although noble, is not a
template for civilian society, un-
less the aspiration is to extin-
guish politics. People marching
in serried ranks, fused into a
solid mass by the heat of martial
ardor, proceeding in lockstep,
shoulder to shoulder, obedient to
orders from a commanding offi-
cer- this is a recurring dream of
progressives eager to dispense
with tiresome persuasion and un-
tidy dissension in a free, tumul-
tuous society.
Progressive presidents use
martial language as a way of en-
couraging Americans to confuse
civilian politics with military ex-
ertions, thereby circumventing
an impediment to progressive as-
pirations -the Constitution, and
the patience it demands. As a
young professor, Woodrow Wilson
had lamented that America's po-
litical parties "are like armies
without officers." The most theo-
retically inclined of progressive
politicians, Wilson was the first
president to criticize America's
founding. This he did thoroughly,


H


rejecting the Madisonian system
of checks and balances the
separation of powers, a crucial
component of limited govern-
ment because it
makes a government
that cannot be wielded
. efficiently by a strong
executive.
Franklin Roosevelt
agreed. He com-
plained about "the
three-horse team of
the American system":
"If one horse lies down
e Will in the traces or
IER plunges off in another
DES direction, the field will
not be plowed." And
progressive plowing
takes precedence over constitu-
tional equipoise among the three
branches of government. Hence
FDR's attempt to break the
Supreme Court to his will by en-
larging it.
In his first inaugural address,
FDR demanded "broad execu-
tive power to wage a war against
the emergency, as great as the
power that would be given to me
if we were in fact invaded by a
foreign foe." He said Americans
must "move as a trained and loyal
army" with "a unity of duty hith-
erto evoked only in time of armed
strife." The next day, addressing
the American Legion, Roosevelt
said it was "a mistake to assume
that the virtues of war differ es-
sentially from the virtues of
peace." In such a time, dissent is
disloyalty.
Yearnings for a command soci-
ety were common and re-
spectable then. Commonweal, a
magazine for liberal Catholics,
said Roosevelt should have "the
powers of a virtual dictatorship to
reorganize the government." Wal-
ter Lippmann, then America's
pre-eminent columnist, said: "A
mild species of dictatorship will
help us over the roughest spots in
the road ahead." The New York
Daily News, then the nation's
largest-circulation newspaper,
cheerfully editorialized: "A lot of
us have been asking for a dictator


Now we have one. ... It is Roo-
sevelt. ... Dictatorship in crises
was ancient Rome's best era."
The New York Herald Tribune ti-
tled an editorial "For Dictator-
ship if Necessary"
Obama, aspiring to command
civilian life, has said that in re-
forming health care, he would
have preferred an "elegant, aca-
demically approved" plan with-
out "legislative fingerprints on it"
but "unfortunately" he had to
conduct "negotiations with a lot
of different people." His cam-
paign mantra "We can't wait!" ex-
presses progressivism's
impatience with our constitu-
tional system of concurrent ma-
jorities. To enact and execute
federal laws under Madison's in-
stitutional architecture requires
three, and sometimes more, such
majorities. There must be ma-
jorities in the House and Senate,
each body having distinctive con-
stituencies and electoral
rhythms. The law must be af-
firmed by the president, who has
a distinctive electoral base and
election schedule. Supermajori-
ties in both houses of Congress
are required to override presi-
dential vetoes. And a Supreme
Court majority is required to sus-
tain laws against constitutional
challenges.
"We can't wait!" exclaims
Obama, who makes recess ap-
pointments when the Senate is
not in recess, multiplies "czars"
to further nullify the Senate's
constitutional prerogative to ad-
vise and consent, and creates
agencies (e.g., Obamacare's Inde-
pendent Payment Advisory
Board and Dodd-Frank's Con-
sumer Financial Protection Bu-
reau) untethered from legislative
accountability.
Like other progressive presi-
dents fond of military metaphors,
he rejects the patience of politics
required by the Constitution he
has sworn to uphold.
--*--A
George Will's email address is
georgewill@washpost. com.


LETTER to the Editor


War means this
The picture of several U.S.
Marines urinating on what is
purported to be dead Taliban
fighters is certainly disturbing.
I'm sure this specialized unit's
only job, since it is a sniper unit,
is to kill people.
My point is, this thing called
war is serious business, about as
serious as it gets. I'm not excus-
ing the behavior in the photos,
but I think we need a little
introspection.
Our military and political
leaders have all condemned the
behavior They have called the
photos shocking, completely in-
human and utterly deplorable.
It sounds like the Marines
should be responsible for their
behavior, but are they? They say
there will be a full investigation
and if the results warrant, the
Marines involved will be
punished.
I hope the investigation in-
cludes the unbelievable sights
and sounds of war inflicted on
the youngest, best and brightest
our country has to offer I hope
they include the fear and intimi-
dation they endure on a regular


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in Chroni-
cle editorials are the opinions of
the newspaper's editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Groups or individuals are invited
to express their opinions in a let-
ter to the editor.
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at 352-563-5660.
All letters must be signed and in-
clude a phone number and home-
town, including letters sent via
email. Names and hometowns will
be printed; phone numbers will
not be published or given out.
We reserve the right to edit let-
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Letters must be no longer than
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SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
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352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

basis and I hope they include
the ones who sent them to this
private hell in the first place. I


also hope they take into consid-
eration that these atrocities
have occurred in every war
going back to possibly the 12th
century B.C., in Homer's "Iliad,"
depicting the Trojan War
I know they happened in the
Vietnam War; I, as well as many
of my friends, was there.
I understand the Pentagon
must not condone this behavior;
I understand they must enforce
the Uniform Code of Military
Justice and the Rules of War; but
I also understand that young
men trained even encouraged
- to engage in behavior repre-
hensible to any civilized society
for months on end, away from
the steadying influences of fam-
ily, friends and responsible citi-
zenship in general, may do
things they regret.
And by the way, I would really
like to know who took the video
and then, unless by error or mis-
take, allowed it to find its way to
the media.
Yeah ... fat chance of that
happening.
Richard "Dick" Callahan
Crystal River


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


1
.(





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


A woman who'll get up early and fix my breakfast


S scrambled eggs, w c e
with cheese;
Canadian bacon;
toast, smeared with
strawberry preserves;
and, decaf coffee; all
served with a smile by
a gentle and sweet,
beautiful blonde.
My, my, my
It wasn't a typical Fred B
breakfast. A Sl
I usually start the OF I
day with a bowl of cold
cereal doused in low-
fat milk. Even so, a few days ago, I
was treated to the breakfast de-
scribed above.
The night before, I made a late
night refrigerator raid and real-
ized we were out of milk.


Ir
L
L


As I came back into
the living room, I made
the comment, "I'm
1*' going to need to go to
the grocery store be-
fore I have my break-
fast in the morning -
we're out of milk."
Cheryl, replied, "No,
you won't. I'll keep my
rannen long-standing prom-
-ICE ise."
IFE Such a scrumptious
breakfast would be a
treat every day, but it
wouldn't be good for me.
But, would you like to hear
about Cheryl's promise? Yes? OK.
Here goes:
On a certain evening in late No-
vember 1965, I was sitting at a


table in the local bowling alley,
drinking a soda and sharing some
french fries with a young lady I'd
met briefly a few weeks earlier
and some of her friends.
As the evening wore on, this
special girl and I lost track of
everyone else and, in the process,
we made a tentative date for the
coming Monday night
Much too quickly, the clock said
I'd soon turn into a pumpkin; and,
since I was going to be the first one
to leave, I began to spin my way
through a verbose parting
monologue:
"It's been fun. Cheryl, it has
been so nice to see you again;
everyone else, it was nice to meet
you; but, I've got to call it a night
Tomorrow is Sunday and I must


attend an Army Reserve drill in
Tampa, which means I have to be
up and on my way early, no later
than 5:30."
Enough said, but I didn't quit.
No, I kept right on rambling.
"It'll be an early day for me, but
an even earlier one for my mother
... she'll be up by 4:30 and fix
breakfast for me before I go."
It was time to shut up, time to
leave, already, but I didn't, I made
one last, closing remark:
"If I ever find a woman who'll
get up so very early and fix my
breakfast, I might marry her."
To the surprise of everyone at
the table, especially me, Cheryl
said, "I would."
At first, the group fell silent,


then they broke into laughter as
some of the girls gasped, "Cheryl!"
Had she proposed?
Red-faced, my soon-to-be sweet-
heart tried to explain, "I meant I'd
do that for someone I love."
Her friends didn't let her off of
the hook; and, soon -very soon -
I found myself holding on to the
hope that she did indeed mean it
personally, specifically for me.
She said it; time has proven that
she meant it; and, most recently,
even though it didn't require that
she get up early, one more time,
she fixed my breakfast!
----
Fred Brannen is an Inverness
resident and a Chronicle
columnist.


Crystal River: State of the city

Editor's note: The following is the State the Stone Crab Jam, the Scallop Jam, the
of the City address by Crystal River Mayor Scarecrow Festival, Octoberfest, the Mana-
Jim Farley. tee Festival, Second Saturday,
2 011 was a year of accom- the Christmas Tree lighting, the
plishments to be proud of, Christmas Parade, the Fourth of
and a year of obstacles to be July fireworks display, the Mar-
overcome. We can take pride S tin Luther King Day parade and
that in a year of economic crisis barbecue.
nationwide, Crystal River is a" Currently in the conceptual
city that so many other cities and -"" and discussion stages are pro-
counties would envy While posals for a farmer's market and
many other local governments L- a wine festival. The city also
have been laying off employees, Jim Fl makes its contribution to culture
we gave ours a 3 percent raise. Jim Farley in the community with Music in
Our millage rate of 3.8 has been GUEST the Park, a free musical concert
carried into this new year with COLUMN series showcasing local talent.
no reduction in services. Although we can justly cele-
We have over $4 million Gen- brate many successes, the city


eral Fund reserves and over $12 million in
combined reserves.
Our water and sewer rates have not been
raised in three years.
With a bleak economic outlook for count-
less local governments across the nation,
Crystal River has truly been "the little city
that could."
Among the year's highlights:
New businesses have been built, in-
cluding a Baskin Robbins, a Dunkin'
Donuts, and an assisted living facility Oth-
ers have started up, occupying previously
empty store fronts, including Cattle Dog
Coffee Roasters, Off-the-Cuff, Wine Shop
III, Pickers and Peddlars, and Natalia's
Pizza and Pastries, to name just a few. Also,
The Boatyard, a landmark restaurant,
moved from the county into the city.
A Tree Board was appointed, with the
goal of having Crystal River designated a
"Tree City."
An ad hoc committee was appointed to
research and recommend the best use of
the Seminole Club.
Significant improvements were made
to King's Bay Park with the demolition of
two derelict buildings and construction of
a restroom facility that blends perfectly
with the surroundings. A performance
stage and a kayak launch will be completed
this year
The first stage of a golf cart program
was initiated.
Many other notable projects are either
under way or on the drawing boards, in-
cluding the sewer extensions to eliminate
septic tanks, renovations and improve-
ments for city parks, improvements to City
Hall, and to the wastewater treatment plant
and lift stations, to name a few.
Also, an alternative effluent disposal
process is under consideration, which
would reduce Progress Energy's usage of
fresh water by 16 percent.
Members of the Crystal River Community
Council are working to achieve buy-in from
downtown business owners for the board-
walk, and looking into the additional park-
ing options. And, perhaps most notably, the
possibility of a city marina is under serious
consideration.
Crystal River is truly a city of festivals:


faces serious challenges as well. The Tar-
mac mines will create 500 truck trips per
day along U.S. 19 250 heavy ore trucks
loaded with aggregate heading south and
those same 250, unloaded, returning north.
Clearly that would generate noise, vibra-
tion, air pollution, and hazard in our city
We need to take any steps available to mit-
igate the potential disruption. Sen.
(Charles) Dean has promised to direct the
state DOT to begin a feasibility study for a
truck bypass as soon as possible. Also, al-
though the DOT insists the road is rated for
such traffic, they have offered to cooperate
with us on a congestion management plan.
I believe we should try again to petition the
DOT to reduce the speed limit on Highway
19 through the downtown to 35 mph.
U.S. Fish and Wildlife plans to imple-
ment newer, stricter rules in King's Bay
that could potentially harm our community
economically, as well as reduce waterfront
property values, and the freedom of resi-
dents and visitors to fully enjoy the recre-
ational alternatives our waters afford. The
city's response is an agenda item for
discussion.
The Three Sisters Spring management
plan is an unresolved issue, but is still
being negotiated with a spirit of coopera-
tion being demonstrated by both sides.
The parent company for Sears an-
nounced they will be closing their outlet in
the mall. However, the interim mall man-
agement is actively seeking quality busi-
nesses while carrying on with long deferred
maintenance in order to be more competi-
tive in landing those tenants.
The county closed their offices in Crystal
River and moved them to Meadowcrest,
leaving us with a lot of empty office space.
There are, and will be, other challenges
and obstacles. But Crystal River is a com-
munity that has shown its ability to over-
come obstacles and to continue improving
on the services and amenities that make it
a great place to live.
I've said before and will say again that
I've lived in many communities, big and
small, but Crystal River is the best of them.
Our goal should be for Crystal River to be
the best city of its size in Florida. I believe
we are well on our way


Sound OFF


Morning patrol
To the person in Pine
Ridge who has a coyote prob-
lem: I live in Countryside Es-
tates. We also have coyotes.
At 6 a.m., I have to walk to
the mailbox to get my paper.
In the last year, I have seen
coyotes on four different oc-
casions. I believe they are at-
tracted to the garbage that is
set out for collection. It ap-
pears they are not afraid of
humans. On the last incident,
the coyote was too close for
comfort and appeared ag-
gressive. I'm not sure if it
had rabies. Therefore, when I



LESSON
Continued from Page C1

of the New Hampshire pri-
mary and played up his New
England ties often. He won
by roughly 17 percentage
points. In South Carolina,
Gingrich spent more than a
week emphasizing his
Southern ties even though
he had spent the better part
of a decade living near
Washington. Gingrich ended
up winning the state by
about 12 percentage points.
But Florida is different,
and in no way homogeneous.


get my paper, I no longer go
unarmed.

Chevrolet A-OK
I must commend Chevro-
let in Homosassa. They
were awesome today. A
friend called, needed some
gas. When I got there, they
needed a jumper cable. I
didn't have it. I went over to
them (and the) salesman
went and got me a me-
chanic. The mechanic went
and got me a man with a
jump box to help my friend
and they came out and did
it for us for free with no


Although it is home to the
southern-most tip of the
U.S., Florida's overall cul-
ture is hardly Southern. It's
filled with transplants from
the Northeast and Midwest
who settled along the Gold
and Gulf coasts, as well as
so-called snowbirds who
spend part of the year here
only to keep their voter reg-
istrations in other states.
Florida's southern region
has huge Hispanic and
Caribbean influences. The
northwestern Panhandle
has some communities that
strongly identify with parts
of the Deep South. Add in
the huge, transient military


problem and it was a won-
derful thing. We love Chevy!

Cruisers' tint
I'm calling about the per-
son who called in about an
article on the dark tinting
on these police officer vehi-
cles' windows. I've seen
some of these windows and
I noticed that they are very,
very dark... Have they been
checked? And if they are il-
legal, who's going to issue
the sheriff's department ci-
tations for these dark-tinted
windows? They should be
followed up on.


presence around Jack-
sonville and elsewhere, and
just about everybody can
call themselves a Floridian.
All things being equal,
Romney might be able to
count on benefiting from the
support of New Yorkers,
who constitute one of the
largest populations of non-
native Floridians now living
in the state, and other New
Englanders. And Gingrich
could seemingly count on
the support of those in the
conservative Panhandle,
which borders Georgia.
"In a different kind of year,
geographical roots could
have an impact in Florida,


Gingrich promises



entertaining race


electing a candidate for president to
carry the conservative banner is al-
ways difficult. The best and bright-
est of conservatives have a distaste for the
nasty, sometimes dirty process
that is politics. It appears this
time we are left with a choice
between Newt Gingrich and
Mitt Romney Likely, neither
man can best Obama in the gen-
eral election.
President Obama has formida-
ble advantages despite his fail-
ures and broken pledges, despite
the terrible economy and unem-
ployment rate. Just being a De- Dr. Willi
mocrat gives him the great OTI
majority of the votes of 20 million VOI
federal, state and local employ-
ees. More than 90 percent of
blackAmericans and 70 percent of Hispanic
Americans will support Obama. Those vot-
ing on the basis of his skin color include a
substantial number of guilt-laden white vot-
ers wanting to atone for the racism in their
souls which writers such as Leonard Pitts
assure them weekly they have.
Idealistic youths, not yet living long
enough to gain wisdom or experience the
harsh realities of life, will cast their votes
for Obama and his wealth redistribution
in the name of social justice and fairness
once again. College-educated women (can
they all be teachers?) will buy into the se-
curity of the bigger government with more
benefits offered by Obama and Democrats.
Ultra-rich crony capitalists like Jeffrey
Immelt, CEO of General Electric, George
Soros and even Warren Buffett have al-
ready showered the Obama campaign and
supporting organizations like Moveon.org
with millions. The Wall Street bankers of
Goldman-Sachs and Morgan Stanley are
on board with Obama as well. Chief exec-
utives of billion-dollar companies, edu-
cated in the ways of progressivism at Ivy
League colleges, support the Obama
agenda. Wealthy environmentalists, the
elite, the real money all are behind the
Obama campaign.
Most formidable are the mainstream
media, all, with the exception of Fox and
the Wall Street Journal, owned by pro-
gressives and espousing liberal, progres-
sive points of view. The once-reliable
Associated Press shows bias daily in favor
of the left in even routine reporting of
events and occurrences. This is the media


but not this year," said Jen-
nifer Donahue, a public pol-
icy fellow at Gettysburg
College in Pennsylvania.
"Florida has been hit so
hard by the housing crisis
that perhaps the only thing
that will help a candidate
reach voters is by articulat-
ing a vision that will help
Florida's economy"
There's no guarantee that
candidates can count on ge-
ographic ties. Former New
York Mayor Rudy Giuliani
hoped the love of trans-
planted New Yorkers would
carry him to victory here
four years ago. He ended up
falling flat


I


that can dig up detractors of a Herman
Cain or a Newt Gingrich but that could not
bring itself to look into the background of
candidate Obama with his ties to avowed
communists, the race-baiting
Rev Jeremiah Wright, a con-
victed crook named Tony Rezko
and crooked Chicago politi-
cians. The mainstream media
with their power to control
opinion are arrayed against any
conservative candidate.
That said, what are conserva-
tives to do? The national Re-
publican establishment, the
am Dixon elite, favor Romney. He is one
IER of them, an Ivy graduate,
CES wealthy, "clean" and moderate.
He seems to them more elec-
table, someone who will not
turn off the independent voters and cost
Republicans control of the Senate. Like
John McCain before him, Romney will not
inspire conservatives to turn out to vote in
large numbers. Obama wins.
Then there is Newt Gingrich, flawed in
his personal life, linked to the housing col-
lapse and censured by Congress, although
later found not guilty of any violations. An
expert on American history, the Constitu-
tion and government, he recommends
bold initiatives for improving the nation.
Sometimes in error but never in doubt,
Gingrich is a remarkable orator and de-
bater who espouses conservative princi-
ples in a manner, as did Reagan, which
wide audiences can understand and sup-
port. Gingrich's flaws and past missteps
will turn off many voters. Obama wins.
Nonetheless, Gingrich is my choice. Win
or lose, he will create much interest on the
campaign trail, get the conservative view a
wider hearing and crush Obama in every
debate. Candidate Gingrich, to me, would
make the campaign most entertaining. He
might even get elected!


William Dixon is a graduate of Columbia
University New York Medical College and
the USF College ofBusiness
Administration. He served in the Army as
a surgeon and as a Special Forces
Officer, achieving the rank of Lieutenant
Colonel. He was an assistant professor of
surgery at the University of Georgia
before entering private practice. Dr Dixon
can be reached at Wdixonl6@yahoo.com.


This year, Sean Foreman,
a political science professor
at Barry University in
Miami Shores, said ideology
trumps regional appeal.
"The moderate versus
conservative battle is more
important than where
someone cut their political
teeth," he said.
John Bowker, an 81-year-
old retiree in Sun City Cen-
ter, was born in Vermont
and lived most of his life in
New Jersey. He said he
wanted to watch Thursday's
debate and read the Sunday
papers before making up
his mind, but had ruled out
at least one criterion: "Ge-


ography? That has not
played a role in my think-
ing."
"I'm listening to what they
are saying and how they are
saying it," Bowker said.
Still, having a state in
common with a candidate
doesn't hurt.
Ellen Hoffman, a 73-year-
old retired teacher living in
The Villages, hails from
Michigan, where Romney
grew up.
"The Michigan connec-
tion first drew me to him,"
Hoffman said. But that was-
n't enough, she said. His po-
sitions and electability are
what made up her mind.


I


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, JANUARY 29, 2012 C3





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Tommy Tucker is a Citrus County "Super Hero" who will guide you to a healthier lifestyle
He is also the spokesperson against alcohol, tobacco & prescription drug abuse.


GUEST
Continued from Page C1

Certainly not the
nearly 40,000 taxpayers
who could lose their jobs
because of the cuts.
Certainly not the small
business owners and their
employees whose health
insurance premiums will
rise as the costs of treating
the poor are shifted on to
those with private health
insurance.
The fact of the matter is
we are all losers if the gov-
ernor's proposal passes.
Whether it is in the form of
longer wait times, fewer
health care services, less
access to cutting-edge treat-
ments, thousands of jobs
lost and billions of dollars
stripped from our economy,
everyone will lose.
This proposal is not only
damaging but inefficient as
well, cutting $2.1 billion to
only save $422 million in
general revenue. If there


This proposal is not only damaging
but inefficient as well, cutting
$2.1 billion to only save
$422 million in general revenue.


are any winners, it would
be the federal government,
which will keep $1.2 billion
in matching funds we cur-
rently receive for our Med-
icaid program.
Citrus Memorial Health
System will do its best to
protect our staff and pre-
serve the quality care we
deliver to the 200,000 pa-
tients we see every year.
While we cannot predict
precisely what would hap-
pen if those cuts are
adopted, we do know that,
given the size and severity
of these cuts, it is clear that
no one would escape
unscathed.
To fight this draconian
proposal, our hospital has
joined a newly formed
coalition called "Heal


Florida's Health Care."
The goal of this coalition is
to put a face and give a
voice to every Floridian
who would be impacted by
these devastating cuts. I en-
courage all citizens of our
state to join today
We must win this battle.
With millions of Floridians
depending on us for vital
health care services, the
stakes have never been
higher.

Ryan Beatyis the
president and chief
executive officer of Citrus
Memorial Health System.
For more information on
the Heal Florida's Health
Care coalition visit www
healflhealthcare. com.


WINDOW
Continued from Page C1

Energy. It's sometimes easy
to forget that our Crystal
River energy site is in the
top five energy-producing
sites in the nation.
Buying American is a
good thing. Buying in Citrus
County is a really good
thing. But manufacturing


things in Citrus County is
the best thing. If we can cre-
ate products to sell and see
the profits return to the
community, the increase in
assets improves the stan-
dard of living for everyone.


Gerry Mulligan is the
publisher of the Chronicle.
His email address is
gmulligan@chronicle
online.com.


VOICES
Continued from Page C1

disappointed if he doesn't win the
nomination.
The Republican Party should now be
working on how it is going to handle
these mostly young voters and also how
to keep Ron Paul in the Republican
Party Most importantly, the millennial
generation voters, those from 18 to 29,
are the largest voting bloc in the nation,


45 million. The baby boomers are sec-
ond with 40 million.
Everything being equal, this is going
to be an extremely close election. As
long as the Republicans keep ham-
mering away at the job issue and the
bad economy, there is a 50 percent
chance they can win. If, however, you
add Paul running as an Independent,
who will attract many of the conser-
vative young voters from the Republi-
can nominee, there is no way that the
Republicans can win.
I know Ron Paul; he doesn't want an


Obama presidency I just hope the Re-
publicans will make it clear that there
is a big tent and that Ron and his sup-
porters are welcome within that tent.


Lou Frey Jr served as a Florida rep-
resentative in Congress from 1969-
79. He is a partner with Lowndes,
Drosdick, Doster, Kantor & Reed,
PA., Orlando; and can be emailed at
lou.frey@
lowndes-lawcom.


C4 SUNDAY, JANUARY 29, 2012


COMMENTARY












BUSINESS UN
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


I


After 70 years,

impact of labor

law still unclear
TOM LoBIANCO
Associated Press
INDIANAPOLIS The battle
over the right-to-work issue may be
reaching a conclusion in Indiana
as the state prepares to adopt its
law, but the argument over exactly
what the measure means for a
state's economy is likely to rage on,
unresolved, as it has for 70 years.
Since the 1940s, 22 states have
passed laws barring unions from
collecting mandatory fees from
workers for labor representation.
Supporters, mostly Republicans,
insist the measure helps create a
pro-business climate that attracts
employers and increases jobs. Op-
ponents say the law only leads to
lower wages and poorer quality
jobs.
The evidence on the issue is
abundant, but also conflicting and
murky The clearest conclusion, ac-
cording to many experts, is that the
economies of states respond to a
mix of factors, ranging from the
swings in the national economy to
demographic trends, and that iso-
lating the impact of right-to-work
is nearly impossible.
Obscuring the answer is "the dif-
ficulty of distinguishing the effects
of the RTW laws from state char-
acteristics, as well as other state
policies that are unrelated with
these laws," said economists
Ozkan Eren and Serkan Ozbeklik,
who conducted a major study last
year of the right-to-work laws in
Oklahoma and Idaho.
For major industries, the chief
factors in choosing locations tend
to be access to supplies, infra-
structure, key markets and a
skilled work force, according to
business recruitment specialists.
For a state's workers, the impact of
right-to-work is limited because
only about 7 percent of private sec-
tor employees are unionized. Over
the years, job growth has surged in
states with, and without, right-to-
work laws.
On right to work, "The reason we
don't have clear views is because
it's always being debated at its ex-
tremes," said Gary Chaison, a pro-
fessor of labor relations at Clark
University in Massachusetts, who
assigns his students to analyze the
issue each year. In the end, when it
comes to jobs and the law, "We
don't know causation," he said.
The Indiana Legislature is ex-
pected to complete action on its
measure soon. However, the larger
debate will continue, focusing on
the following arguments:
Claim: Right-to-work brings
more jobs to a state.
According to a study commis-
sioned by Indiana's Chamber of
Commerce, which supports the
right-to-work law, employment
grew 100 percent in right-to-work
states between 1977 and 2008 but
only 57 percent in those without
the law.
Proponents point to an immedi-


Bruce Williams
SMART
MONEY


Associated Press
Bidders look at items being auctioned off Aug. 6, 2002, at Gulfstream Aerospace Corp., in Oklahoma City. Okla-
homa became a right-to-work state in 2001, and in 2002 added 7,822 jobs. But Gulfstream also shut down in
2002, illustrating the other factors that affect business decisions and jobs. As Indiana prepares to become the
first state in a decade to adopt the right-to-work law, the argument over exactly what the measure means for
a state's economy is likely to rage on, unresolved, as it has for 70 years.


ate impact in Oklahoma, which
adopted the measure in 2001. In
2002, the state added 7,822 jobs,
said Fred Morgan, president of the
Oklahoma Chamber of Commerce.
"In 2002, the Oklahoma Depart-
ment of Commerce reported that
companies announced plans to
add the highest number of new
jobs since 1995," Morgan said.
However, the chamber study
does not account for significant
factors affecting employment in
the period cited. A massive decline
in American manufacturing had a


severe impact on jobs in the Rust
Belt, where states without right-to-
work are clustered. The Sunbelt,
where most states have the law,
had fewer manufacturing jobs to
lose and also experienced big in-
creases in population.
In Oklahoma, the job gains after
right to work also were not unusual
in the region. Three neighboring
states without a right-to-work law
- Missouri, New Mexico and Col-
orado experienced similar job
growth, in some cases even ex-
ceeding Oklahoma's. Several


major employers shut down in
Oklahoma City, including Gulf-
stream Aerospace in 2002 and
Bridgestone Firestone in 2006.
Other factors affecting busi-
nesses may play a larger role on
job growth in right-to-work states,
Eren and Ozbklik's study con-
cluded. Many have "higher subsi-
dies for new factories, low taxes on
capital and weaker environmen-
tal/safety regulations," they said. In
Oklahoma and Idaho, "it is not


Page D5


Cruise disaster lawsuits face choppy seas in US


CURT ANDERSON
AP Legal Affairs Writer

MIAMI While the parent com-
pany of the owner of the stricken
Costa Concordia is based in Miami,
passengers who want to file a law-
suit in U.S. courts over the cruise
ship disaster will likely face choppy
seas.
That's because of fine print on
tickets purchased and signed by the
3,000-plus passengers before the
ship capsized Jan. 13 off the coast of
Italy, killing at least 16 and leaving
another 16 missing. The ticket con-
tract includes what's known as a
"choice of forum" clause stating
that lawsuits must be filed in Italy
Maritime law experts say that
similar attempts to sue in the U.S.
despite these clauses have been
turned away by the U.S. Supreme
Court and that the expense of filing
a lawsuit in a foreign court has de-
terred many plaintiffs in the past.
"It's well-settled law," said Jerry
Hamilton, a maritime attorney who
regularly defends cruise lines
against lawsuits. "The Supreme
Court has said those clauses are


Associated Press
Rough seas off Italy's Tuscan coast forced a delay in the planned Saturday
start of the operation to remove a half-million gallons of fuel from the
grounded Costa Concordia, and officials said pumping may now not begin
until midweek.


valid clauses. They will be upheld."
For a Costa cruise that touches
any part of the U.S., the clauses say
lawsuits should be filed in federal
court in South Florida. Same for


Carnival Cruises which owns
Costa and many other major
cruise lines. But for cruises such as
the Concordia that involve only for-
eign travel, the Costa ticket says


lawsuits must be brought in Genoa,
Italy where much of the sub-
sidiary's operations are based.
The clauses in the cruise indus-
try are not as common in other
forms of travel. Lawsuits against
airlines, for example, can be
brought virtually anyplace they do
business for domestic flights; for in-
ternational flights, lawyers can gen-
erally sue in the airline's home
location or where the flight de-
parted, among other venues.
Last August, the 11th U.S. Circuit
Court of Appeals ruled in favor of a
forum clause in a case involving Re-
gent Seven Seas Cruises Inc. A Cal-
ifornia woman, Nina Seung, fell and
broke her leg aboard a cruise ship
sailing from Tahiti, then tried to sue
in Fort Lauderdale federal court.
Her ticket required foreign cruise
lawsuits to be filed in Paris, and the
appeals court rejected her
challenge.
Seung, who was 74 at the time of
her accident, said in court papers
that the clause essentially barred
the door for her.


Page D4


Wanted:


Loan


shark

DEAR BRUCE: I re-
cently went
through a divorce
and am trying to get my fi-
nancial house in order I
would like to consolidate
some debt and refinance
my home. I would like to
borrow about $40,000,
which would be a great
start and would help me
get financially sound again.
Do you know if there
are private individuals
out there who lend
money? I would be willing
to pay 10 percent over six
years. I have heard they
are out there but don't
know where to start look-
ing. B.D., Exton, Pa.
DEAR B.D.: You said
you would pay 10 percent.
The people you're talking
about are going to want a
lot more than 10 percent.
Obviously you are a credit
risk; otherwise you would
be going to regular institu-
tions that lend money on a
daily basis.
Consolidating your
debts has a certain ap-
peal, but it doesn't really
change anything. It just
shifts the burden around
on the ledger. In my view,
you would be better ad-
vised to put all of your
debts down on paper, de-
termine which ones are
the most pressing and pay
those first. If you have to,
get a second job. Many of
us have had to do that
over the years, and while
it takes away a lot of your
free time, you don't have
that additional loan hang-
ing over your head and
you will have accom-
plished something on
your own. Good luck!
DEAR BRUCE: Due to
our expanding family, we
decided to do some work
on our home. It was get-
ting a little crowded. Our
friends told us of a "rep-
utable contractor" whom
they knew, so we hired
him. He said the job
would be about $16,000
and asked for 50 percent
down for materials, which
we gave him.
Yes, he did do some
work, but it has not been
completed. Now he does
not answer his phone or
has so many excuses, I've
lost track.
The fact is that we have
our money tied up and our
house is in limbo and looks
terrible. What can we do?
- Reader, via e-mail
DEAR READER: The
first mistake you made
was giving him that much
money These guys are al-
ways "reputable" until
they do something wrong.
If a contractor can't afford
to buy the materials out of
his own pocket, especially
in today's world, then you
don't want him working
for you.
Beyond that, there is
very little you can do ex-
cept to keep hounding this
guy If you wish, put him
on notice that unless he
comes back within five
working days and com-
pletes his job, you will give
it to someone else and
look to him for whatever
extra payment is required.
The problem is, this
contractor has your
money, and there's a very
good chance that even if
you went to court, he
wouldn't have enough to
pay you back.
I underscore: Don't give
this kind of deposit to
anybody!
See Page D2





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Business DIGEST


Workforce services
come to Dunnellon
OCALA- Workforce Con-
nection of Citrus, Levy and
Marion counties will bring job-
seeker services to the Annie
Johnson Senior and Family
Service Center in Dunnellon
beginning Wednesday, Feb. 1.
Workforce Connection's Mo-
bile Resource Unit will be on
hand the first Wednesday of
each month from 9 a.m. to 1
p.m. The center is at 1991 W.
Test Court, just south of the
Withlacoochee River.
On every second and third
Wednesday, Workforce will
partner with the Florida Depart-
ment of Children and Families
at the center by providing work
registration services for those
accessing public assistance
programs.
Rusty Skinner, Workforce's
chief executive officer, said the
effort is designed to make it
easier for job seekers to access
services without having to
travel to a resource center in
Ocala, Inverness or Chiefland.
All Workforce Connection serv-
ices, regardless of location, are
provided at no charge.
"We recognize that it's not
always possible to get to one of
our centers, and the Annie
Johnson Center is ideally lo-
cated to serve residents in the
northeast corner of Citrus
County, southeast area of Levy
and southwest portion of Mar-
ion," Skinner said. "The idea is



MONEY
Continued from Page Dl

DEAR BRUCE: My girl-
friend and I are in our mid-
20s and both read your
column. We are making
some career choices, and
we just want to make sure
we are doing the right thing.
It's a big decision for both of
us, as we are about to em-
bark on "the rest of our
lives." We think-but are not
sure-that we have made
the right decisions.
How do we know if we are
making the right decisions
regarding our future? Do
you have any words of wis-
dom for us? -J.S., via email
DEAR J.S.: I agree, it's an
exciting time for you in your
life!
No one knows completely
where he or she is going.
Often, serendipity is a major
factor. You may have a good
idea about the direction you
want your life to take, but
there may be many side
trips along the way No mat-
ter what you are doing,
there is a great deal to learn.
I wouldn't be concerned if
you find yourself changing
jobs from time to time at
your age.
Often you have an expec-
tation of what you think
your job will be like once
you graduate from college.
Then you get out into the


to provide seamless services
throughout our region."
Workforce Connection's mo-
bile resource unit is staff-sup-
ported and equipped with
satellite Internet, four computer
workstations and office equip-
ment to assist job seekers reg-
ister with the Employ Florida
Marketplace, conduct job
searches, work on their re-
sumes, fill out online employ-
ment applications, research
career information and re-
sources, get information about
upcoming hiring events and
apply for Unemployment Com-
pensation benefits and file
claims.
For more information about
the Annie Johnson Center, call
352-489-8021. For information
about Workforce Connection
services at the Annie Johnson
Center, call 800-434-JOBS
(5627).
Castillo named
hospice HR director
LECANTO Rick Castillo
has been
named Hos-
pice of Citrus
County direc-
tor of human
resources.
Castillo has
more than 30
years of ex- Rick
perience in Castillo
the field of Hospice of
human Citrus County.
resources.
Castillo is a resident of Ocala


real world of actually work-
ing at that profession, and it
all goes out the window.
Employers understand
that this is a learning period
for many people. The fact
you are perceptive enough
to realize this says a good
deal about your maturity.
Live and progress, and
don't worry about it. Enjoy
it-this time will come only
once.
DEAR BRUCE: Like
many people, I'm sure, I
keep getting in the mail
those "you have been ap-
proved" credit card propos-
als, so I finally decided to
apply
When I filled out the ap-
plication and returned it to
the issuer, I was declined
because of some spotty
credit issues.
I don't understand how
they can say you've been ap-
proved when, in fact, you
haven't. Isn't that false ad-
vertising? Reader, via
email
DEAR READER: I think
everyone who reads this
column will know exactly
what you're talking about, as
I'm pretty sure that every-
one old enough to have a job
has received these
solicitations.
I, too, get a lot of them in
the mail, and I just toss
them. But if you were to
read the fine print very
carefully, while it says in the
front that "you've been ap-


and holds an undergraduate
degree from the University of
Florida. He is a member in good
standing of the Society for
Human Resources Manage-
ment (SHRM), the world's
largest association dedicated to
human resources professionals.
For information about
Castillo, contact Hospice of Cit-
rus County at 352-527-2020.
Visit www.hospiceofictrus
county.org.
WeddingWire taps
Sam's Notary
BEVERLY HILLS Wed-
dingWire, the nation's leading
wedding marketplace, selected
Sam's Notary to receive the
WeddingWire Bride's Choice
Award 2012 for officiant.
The annual awards program
recognizes the top local wed-
ding vendors from the Wed-
dingWire Network who
demonstrate excellence in qual-
ity, service, responsiveness and
professionalism within the wed-
ding industry. Sam's Notary
was selected based on its stel-
lar reviews from past newlywed
clients.
Sam's Notary is recognized
as part of the top 5 percent of
wedding professionals in the
WeddingWire local vendor
community, comprised of more
than 200,000 wedding profes-
sionals throughout the United
States and Canada. The
Bride's Choice Award recog-
nizes the best local wedding
photographers, based on their


proved," on the back it says
"subject to credit approval."
Don't take it for granted that
if it says preapproved, you
will automatically receive
credit. This is not the case.
DEAR BRUCE: My 25-
year-old daughter has her
own place, is in the second
year of her job and rents an
apartment. She paid cash
for her car, and she has
some money saved. She
pretty much has no debt.
She has been trying to get a
credit card and keeps get-
ting denied on the grounds
that she has "no credit." It's
almost like a Catch-22. She
has no credit but can't get
any, despite the fact that she
owes nothing, has a good job
and pays her rent on time.
How can she get a credit
card? Even the bank where
her accounts are has denied
her. Is there anything she
can do? -Reader, via email
DEAR READER: Unfor-
tunately, getting that first
credit card can be difficult,
especially with the economy
in its current state. Many
companies are reluctant to
offer credit. It used to be
that college students were
sent credit card offers all
the time. Those days are
past.
If your daughter has done
everything you say, unless
she has had credit and
missed some payments, I'm
at somewhat of a loss as to
why she would be denied.


overall professional achieve-
ments throughout the past year.
"WeddingWire is thrilled to
honor the success of the top-
rated wedding professionals
within the WeddingWire com-
munity," said Timothy Chi, CEO
of WeddingWire. "Since the
launch of the Bride's Choice
Awards program four years
ago, thousands of outstanding
wedding professionals have
been recognized by the bridal
community for their supreme
service and dedication to the
wedding industry. It is with great
pleasure that we congratulate
Sam's Notary for their contin-
ues professionalism and com-
mitment to enriching the
wedding planning process for
engaged couples."
The WeddingWire Network
includes the websites Wedding-
Wire, Project Wedding,
Brides.com, Martha Stewart
Weddings and Weddingbee.
Contact Samuel D. Graham
of Sam's Notary at www.
weddingwire.com/biz/sams-
notary-beverly-hills/
d32bc7312f6500.html,
mmsam98@yahoo.com or 352-
425-4759. To learn more about
the Bride's Choice Awards, visit
www.Wedding Wire.com.
Microsoft Office
course at CF Citrus
LECANTO The College of
Central Florida will offer Mi-
crosoft Office Basics course
from 9 a.m. to noon Saturdays,
Feb. 4 through March 31, at the


However, what she can do is
open a collateralized
account.
She would make a deposit
in a savings account for
whatever amount of credit
she wishes. (There usually
is a minimum.)
If she fails to pay the
credit card bills, the card
company would take the
money out of the savings ac-
count.
These accounts are de-
signed for people who have
bruised their credit or to
whom credit otherwise is
not available.
Consequently, they are
more costly However, this
avenue would allow her to
get a credit card in her own
name and, after a couple of
years of religiously paying
on time, she should have no
trouble getting a regular
card.
A lot of the major card
companies are now offering
collateralized credit cards.
You can find them by
searching the Internet.
[]
Send your questions to
Smart Money, PO. Box 2095,
Elfers, FL 34680. Send
email to bruce@
brucewilliams. com.
Questions ofgeneral
interest will be answered
in future columns. Owing to
the volume ofmail,
personal replies cannot be
provided.


Citrus Campus in the Dorothea
G. Jerome Building, Room
201 B, 3800 S. Lecanto High-
way, Lecanto. The fee is $159.
The course will introduce stu-
dents to Microsoft PowerPoint
and Excel. Learn the basics of
PowerPoint to create slide
shows for business, meetings
or personal use. Learn Excel to
create a checkbook register,
amortization tables and more.
To register or for information
on other noncredit courses, call
352-249-1210 or visit
CFltraining.cf.edu.
Habitat benefit
builds business
Habitat for Humanity of Cit-
rus County Inc. plans its fifth
annual Building Dreams Wine
& Food Pairing Benefit from 6
to 10 p.m. Thursday, March 8,
at Skyview Clubhouse at Terra
Vista. Enjoy gourmet food
paired with exquisite wines, ac-
companied by the smooth
sounds of live jazz/R&B/soul
and a silent auction.
Tickets are $50 in advance
and $60 at the door (if avail-
able). For tickets and informa-
tion, call 352-563-2744. Every
dollar raised at this event helps
pay for the lumber and nails,
cement and shingles, plumbers
and permits needed to take a
new home from sitework to
move-in.
Habitat not only helps elimi-
nate substandard housing, but
provides business for local con-
struction services, tax dollars


It1


for local government, and stabi-
lization of local neighborhoods.
The Habitat for Humanity
Wishing Well Fundraiser draw-
ing will take place during the
benefit. Tickets for $1 each are
now on sale at the Inverness
and Crystal River ReStores, or
call 352-563-2744. Tickethold-
ers need not be present to win.
All proceeds assist Habitat
for Humanity of Citrus County's
mission to build decent, afford-
able homes for low-income
families.
Expose business
to South Marion
Need exposure for your busi-
ness, church or organization?
The Belleview/South Marion
Chamber of Commerce will
host a Community Expo from
10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday,
March 10, at the Market of Mar-
ion. All churches, civic organi-
zations and businesses are
invited to participate.
Participation in this event will
help your business/organization
facilitate business connections,
promote growth of companies
and organizations, as well as
help South Marion business
community to evolve.
To find out if you qualify for a
free booth or for more informa-
tion, contact Mariah Moody at
the Belleview/South Marion
Chamber at 352-245-2178 or
Belleviewchamber@gmail.com
Registration deadline is Feb.
23. Inside booths are available
and limited.


1 Olde Mill House Gallery & Cafe Photography, Painting
& Print Museum
2 River Safaris & Safari Cafe-Pottery,
Wood, Glass & Metal Work
3 Glass Garage Stained & Fused Glass, Jewelry
Wildlife Paintings on Wood
4 Pepper Creek Pottery Sculptural & Functional
Clay Works & Studio
5 Riverworks & Homosassa Smokehouse,
Copper Sculpture & Driftwood Furniture
All shops owned and operated by local artists!!
For more info call (352) 628-5222 or (352) 212-3617


~CiIH~


U LNI(s I)


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12TH ANNUAL







FRIDAY & SATURDAY, MARCH 2 & 3
5 PM. TIL 9 P.M.

Look for the lighted pathways
Get to know your local artists
Artist Demonstrations
Refreshments Free Admission & Parking


9NIClE z a= s


0 0ABU


I


For more

infori ation

on advertising

call Michael

I at 563-3273
9


D2 SUNDAY, JANUARY 29, 2012


BUSINESS





Promotional information provided by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce


numberr connectionn
28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


D3

SUNDAY
JANUARY 29, 2012


NGP sets Goal-Setting Workshop


Next Generation Profession-
als of the Citrus County Cham-
ber of Commerce has partnered
with College of Central Florida
to offer professional develop-
ment workshops that provide
hands-on experience. These
workshops provide career-
minded individuals under the
age of 45 with the knowledge,
skills and abilities (KSAs)
needed for long-term success.
The first workshop, "Get a
Grip! Goal-Setting for Success,"
is from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.
Feb. 9 at the College of Central
Florida in Lecanto.
Attend this workshop to learn
what it takes to get control and


* WHAT: "Get a Grip! Goal-
Setting for Success."
WHEN: 11:30 a.m. to
1:30 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 9.
WHERE: College of Cen-
tral Florida in Lecanto.
REGISTRATION: $40 for
members; $49 for non-
members. Lunch provided.
CONTACT: Call 352-
249-1210 to register.

move your life in the right di-
rection. Successful profession-
als know things rarely turn out
the way you desire if all you do
is daydream about them. It's not


enough simply to want some-
thing you must identify the
goal and structure yourself
around achieving it. You'll learn
and practice simple, proven,
goal-setting techniques and
leave with a plan for taking con-
trol of your future.
Registration fee is $40 for Cit-
rus County Chamber of Com-
merce members; $49 for
non-members. Lunch is pro-
vided. Call 352-249-1210 to
register
For additional information
about NGP, call the Citrus
County Chamber of Commerce
at 352-795-3149 or visit
facebook.com/ngpcitrus.


Next


Generation

Professionals

(t C(Ie


AFLAC Insurance/Britton Insurance


Gina Ballard-Kuznar has recently
moved her AFLAC Insurance of-
fice to 2032 State Road 44 W. at
Colonial Plaza in Inverness and
opened a second business called
Britton Insurance at the same lo-
cation. Ballard-Kuznar has been
offering AFLAC as an independent
agent to companies throughout
Citrus County and Florida since
2001. AFLAC Insurance has dis-
counted rates that can be offered
in a company with three or more
full-time employees participating
as long as the company provides
payroll deduction from pay-
checks. AFLAC plans include
short term disability, cancer, hos-
pital benefit plans for accident or
sickness, dental and more. She
stressed their office hours are
sometimes irregular due to on-
site business enrollments and
Medicare insurance home ap-
pointments, so please call for an
appointment at 352-637-2011.
Her office is an independent
agency, only servicing her exist-
ing and new AFLAC clients, so
she is unable to assist in ques-
tions about AFLAC policies sold
by other agents. All AFLAC
claims questions should be di-
rected to the corporate claims
department at 800-992-3522.


-!
k1.i~LI b [


K


Chamber Calendar of Events
Feb. 9: After Hours Business Mixer Robert Bois-
soneault Oncology Institute.
Feb. 10: February Chamber Luncheon at The Plantation
Inn, Crystal River.
Feb. 21: After Hours Business Networking Mixer Cy-
press Cove Care Center, Crystal River.
Feb. 22: BWA February Luncheon College of Central
Florida.
March 3: Floral City Strawberry Festival Floral Park
in Floral City.
For more information, call 352-795-3149, or visit
www.citruscountychamber.com.


Strawberry Festival Pageants


Applications for the Little
Miss Strawberry Princess
and Miss Strawberry
Princess pageants are now
available!
The Little Miss Straw-
berry Princess pageant is for
girls ages 4 to 6 years and the
Miss Strawberry Princess
pageant is for girls ages 7 to
12. Entry fee is $5 and the
deadline for application and
pictures is Feb. 17.


Pictures can be sent to
tobey@citruscountycham
ber.com and completed ap-
plications can be turned in
to either Chamber office.
Please stop by our Inver-
ness or Crystal River Cham-
ber offices to pick your
application or visit our web-
site at www.citruscounty
chamber com.
For more information,
please call 352-795-3149.


First International Title


First International Title, at 213 Courthouse Square in Inverness, recently joined the Chamber of Commerce. They are a
full service escrow and closing company specializing in a wide range of closings, including residential, commercial, re-
finance, reverse mortgages, construction, vacant land, short sale and foreclosures. For more information, please call 352-
341-1336.


YaiYai International


Style and Lounge


E^.-


YaiYai International Style and Lounge is a new Chamber member and hosted our January After Hours Networking Mixer.
Situated at 530 N. Suncoast Blvd. in Crystal River, they offer skin, hair, body care and clothing collections, hairdress-
ing and modeling academies, and a wine shoppe. Visit their website www.yaiyai.biz to see their unique menu at The
Lounge or call 352-795-7625 for more information.


CITRUS COUNTY
Chamber of Commerce

January Membership Luncheon
Sponsor and new members -
Citrus Memorial Health System
We would like to thank Citrus Memorial Health System
for being our sponsor for the January Chamber Member-
ship Luncheon! We also welcomed three new members
into the Chamber at the luncheon who are affiliated with
CMHS: Inverness Surgical Associates, Citrus Memorial
Family Care Centers and Citrus Primary Care Group.


Manatee Festival
Sponsor Thank-you
We would thank our sponsors for their generous sup-
port in making the 2012 Florida Manatee Festival a huge
success!
Title sponsor
Progress Energy
Presenting sponsor
Crystal Automotive
Platinum sponsor
Tampa Bay Times
Gold sponsors
Hometown Values
Bright House Networks
Sibex Electronics
Silver sponsor
Citrus 95
Bronze sponsors
Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center
Suncoast Schools Federal Credit Union
Job Site Services
Childhood Development Services
Nature Coast EMS
Copp Winery
Citrus County Sheriff's Office
Friends of the Festival
Chaz. E. Davis Funeral Home
Powers Protection
Festival Champion sponsor
Citrus County Chronicle


FoLoOoRo j oDoA





FEmTIVAL








Cruise ship victims mull $14,460 compensation deal


Associated Press
ROME How much is it worth
to suffer through a terrifying
cruise ship grounding?
Italian ship operator Costa
Crociere SpA on Friday put the
figure at 11,000 euros $14,460 -
plus reimbursement for the cost of
cruise tickets and extra travel ex-
penses, seeking to cut a deal with
as many passengers as possible to
take the wind out of class-action
lawsuits stemming from the Jan.
13 grounding of its Costa Concor-
dia cruise liner off Tuscany
But many passengers are refus-
ing to accept the deal, saying they
can't yet put a figure on the costs
of the trauma they endured. And
lawyers are backing them up,
telling passengers it's far too soon
to know how people's lives and
livelihoods might be affected by
the experience.
"We're very worried about the
children," said Claudia Urru of
Cagliari, Sardinia, who was on the
Concordia with her husband and
two sons, aged three and 12, when
it capsized.
Her elder son is seeing a psy-
chiatrist: He won't speak about
the incident or even look at televi-
sion footage of the grounding.
"He's terrorized at night," she
told The Associated Press. "He can't
go to the bathroom alone. We're all


Associated Press
View Friday of the bow of the grounded cruise ship Costa Concordia off
the Tuscan island of Giglio, Italy. Costa Crociere SpA offered uninjured
passengers 11,000 euros ($14,460) apiece to compensate them for
lost baggage and the psychological trauma they suffered after their
cruise ship ran aground and capsized off Tuscany. But some passengers
are already refusing to accept the deal, saying they can't yet put a fig-
ure on the costs of the trauma they endured.

sleeping together, except my hus- time," she said.
band, who has gone into another Costa's offer, which covers com-
room because we don't all fit" pensation for lost baggage and
As a result, she said, her family psychological trauma, was the re-
retained a lawyer because they sult of negotiations with several
don't know what the real impact consumer groups who say they are
financial or otherwise of the representing 3,206 passengers
trauma will be. She said her fam- from 61 countries who suffered no
ily simply isn't able to make such physical harm when the massive
decisions now. cruise ship hit a reef off the island
"We are having a very, very hard of Giglio.


Associated Press
MIAMI Six Costa Concordia
passengers have filed lawsuits in
U.S. federal court in Miami,
seeking hundreds of millions of
dollars in damages.
The lawsuit filed Friday seek-
ing $460 million in damages
names Costa Cruise Lines and
its parent company Carnival
Corp.

It's not clear, though, how many
of those passengers will take the
deal, even though they're guaran-
teed payment within a week of
signing on.
In addition to the lump-sum in-
demnity, Costa, a unit of the
world's biggest cruise operator,
Miami-based Carnival Corp., said
it would reimburse uninjured pas-
sengers the full costs of their
cruise, their return travel ex-
penses and any medical expenses
they sustained after the
grounding.
Costa said the $14,460 figure is
higher than current indemnifica-
tion limits provided for by law, and
added that it wouldn't deduct any-
thing that insurance companies
might kick in.


Both companies have offices
in South Florida.
The attorney representing the
six passengers told The Miami
Herald the stress of the disaster
off Italy's coast will never leave
many of the passengers.
A crew member has sued Car-
nival and Costa in Chicago fed-
eral court. That lawsuit seeks
class-action status and at least
$100 million in damages.

The deal does not apply to the
hundreds of crew on the ship,
many of whom have lost their jobs,
the roughly 100 people who were
injured in the chaotic evacuation,
or the families who lost loved
ones.
Sixteen bodies have already
been recovered from the disaster
and another 16 people who were
on board are missing and pre-
sumed dead.
On Friday, the first known law-
suit was filed against Costa and
Carnival by one of the Concordia's
crew members, Gary Lobaton of
Peru. The suit, filed in Chicago
federal court, accuses Carnival
and Costa of negligence because
of an unsafe evacuation and is
seeking class-action status.


CRUISE
Continued from Page Dl

"I do not have any savings
of note right now, I am going
further and further into debt
each month and because I
cannot work, I don't see how
I can ever afford this," she
said in an affidavit. "So if I
am forced to go to Paris,
France, I just will not be able
to bring my claim."
Depending on each coun-
try's laws, passengers can be
at a sharp disadvantage com-
pared to the U.S. legal sys-
tem. Italy, for example,
requires plaintiffs to post a
judiciary tax that is a certain
percentage for larger
amounts of damages, said at-
torney Bob Peltz, chairman
of the Cruise Line Commit-
tee of the Maritime Law
Association.
Other maritime lawyers
say Italian law makes it
more difficult for some peo-
ple to recover damages for
pain and suffering than in


U.S. courts. The Costa ticket
also contains a clause limit-
ing its liability for the death
or injury of a passenger to
about $71,000, although that
doesn't apply in cases of
recklessness and legal ex-
perts say it could be success-
fully challenged.
Despite the hurdles, some
attorneys are exploring a
lawsuit against either Costa
or Carnival in Miami. One
lawyer, David Singer, said
the theory is that Costa and
Carnival are identical "in
terms of who makes the de-
cisions" and that could make
Carnival a legitimate target.
"If one could establish that
they are really alter egos for
each other, that is one way of
maybe keeping these cases
in South Florida," Singer
said.
An Italian consumer
group, Codacons, has said it
plans to forge ahead with a
lawsuit in Miami. The group
claims it could win between
$164,000 and $1.3 million per
passenger. As of Friday, no
such lawsuit had been filed.


At least one lawsuit has
been filed against Carnival
and Costa in U.S. courts, by
Peruvian crew member Gary
Lobaton. That case, filed in
Chicago federal court on
Thursday, seeks class-action
status to represent all pas-
sengers and 1,000 crew
members. It blames the com-
panies for negligence be-
cause of an unsafe
evacuation and seeks at least
$100 million in damages, at-
torney Monica Kelly said in
an email Friday
Peltz said that case has
two big problems: The pas-
sengers are covered by the
forum clause, and crew
members likely have con-
tracts requiring them to sub-
mit first to arbitration.
"I think they are going to
have a difficult time," he
said of the Chicago lawsuit.
Neither Costa nor Carni-
val would comment about
potential lawsuits. Costa has
said it will reimburse pas-
sengers for travel expenses
and medical expenses. The
company is also offering un-


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injured passengers about
$14,460 each to compensate
for lost luggage and psycho-
logical trauma, but they
could still go to court.
Some attorneys say Costa
may want to create a claims
fund similar to that set up by
BP after the Gulf of Mexico
oil spill, in which people
who accepted money agreed
not to sue BP Costa would
not comment on that possi-
bility, but legal experts say
such funds have the advan-
tage of quickly putting
money into claimants' hands


and make the company's
losses more predictable than
a jury trial.
"That would be a fair
move as well as a very
thoughtful public relations
move," Singer said. "To keep
these cases in Italy, this stuff
is buried in the small, small,
small print. Nobody likes
that It's a billion-dollar com-
pany and they're taking away
your rights by burying these
clauses in their tickets."
Another attorney,
Gabrielle D'Alemberte, said
cruise passengers should


make sure to obtain and
read their documents
closely If the forum clause
mandates that lawsuits be
filed in a foreign country, she
recommended that passen-
gers simply take a pen and
cross out the words "I agree"
on the document
"While the agent has the
right to deny you from board-
ing, most likely you will still
be ushered aboard," she
said. "Then if a tragedy does
occur, you have a strong ar-
gument for filing your case
in the United States."


PLEASE JOIN US FOR THE



CITRUS COUNTY

CATTLE BARONS BALL

HEART OF A COWBOY

FEBRUARY 11, 2012 6 11 PM
Citrus Springs Community Center
1570 W. Citrus Springs Blvd.

RSVP %
Co-chairs: Steve Lo r, rt and Dianne Brashear
Ticket and sponsorship opportunities are still available
Individual Reservations $150 Table Reservations $1,200
For Reservations:
S* Call ACS: 1-800-ACS-2345
Mail a check: ACS 21756 SR 54, Suite 101, Lutz, Fl 33549
Give a check to an ACS representative
,j i Drev Code: Wear your favorite blue jeans.
\/ O. "Olimual: Boots and hats .......
--- '.


Citrus County


1-800-481-7599
VZw+ .%.'


MANATEE LANES
715 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy. Cir c
Crystal River ....... ..


Sixpassengers sue in Miami court


D4 SUNDAY, JANUARY 29, 2012


BUSINESS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


;It"





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

WORK
Continued from Page D1

likely that RTW laws have
any impact on manufactur-
ing employment rate."
The chamber study also
argues that right-to-work
boosts a state's population
by making it a more popular
place to live and work. Be-
tween 2000 and 2009, 4.9
million Americans left non-
right-to-work states for
those with the law, accord-
ing to the study However,
the study offered no evi-
dence on other causes for
the population shifts.
Claim: Right-to-work de-
creases wages.
The Economic Policy In-
stitute, which is supported
by organized labor, reports
that workers in right-to-
work states earn $1,500 less
annually than their counter-
parts in states without the
law, based on a 2009 analy-
sis of census data.
On average, "right-to-
work laws are associated
with wages for everyone,
not just union members -
that are 3.2 percent lower
than they would be without
such a law," according to an
EPI study released earlier
this month.


Military Card


I


Thursday, Feb.23


Gatorade Duel at DAYTONA
The fight to qualify for the 54th
annual Daytona 500 in two
action-packed races.
Each of the two races will have
half the entrants to the DAYTONA
500. The field is divided with the
first race having the cars which
qualified in the DAYTONA 500.


BUSINESS


The EPI researchers,
Elise Gould and Heidi
Shierholz, said their study
made adjustments for dif-
ferences in the costs of liv-
ing so that the higher wages
in right-to-work states didn't
just reflect the higher living
costs on the East and West
coasts.
But right-to-work sup-
porters counter with the
chamber's study showing
that personal income grew
164.4 percent in right-to-
work states between 1977
and 2008, while income
grew 92.8 percent in non-
right-to-work states.
Claim: Right-to-work is
designed to weaken unions.
Unions lose some paying
members when workers'
dues are made voluntary,
according to data gathered
by Georgia State University
professor Barry Hirsch and
Trinity University professor
David Macpherson at
UnionStats.com.
So-called "free riders," or
workers covered by union
contracts who chose not to
pay dues, increased 400 per-
cent in the decade after
Oklahoma became a right-
to-work state. In 2010, 4.7
percent of the state's private
sector work force was cov-
ered by union contracts, but
only 3.5 percent of the work


Party


Thursday, February 9, 2012
Reservations Required
Hwy 44 & Crystal Oaks Dr.


Lunch served at noon, Card play at 1 p.m.
Fun ~ Prizes ~ Raffle


For more information call 249-4415 or 746-4216













Thursday, Feb. 9th
6 PM 8 PM
(Followed by an hour
of individual counseling)

The seminar will be held at the
College of Central Florida
Citrus Campus in Lecanto,
3800 S. Lecanto Hwy., Lecanto
(Building C-4, Room 103)

The Citrus County Chapter of SCORE is
offering a free seminar for individuals
thinking about starting their own business.

The two hour session will cover the main
issues involved in becoming an
entrepreneur from the business idea to
the reality of owning your own business.
Following the seminar, interested
participants will have the opportunity to
meet with seasoned SCORE counselors to
further discuss their ideas.

"R U READY" is specifically designed
for individuals who are not business
owners, but who are interested in learning
what is involved in becoming one. If you
have ever asked yourself "Do I have what
it takes to be an entrepreneur?" then this
seminar is for you!

A one hour counseling session will
follow for those interested in meeting
with a SCORE counselor.

For more information and to register
for the seminar, please contact Dale
Maim at SCORE

352-249-1236
Seating is limited.


force were dues-paying
members.
In Idaho, the number of
workers covered by unions
who weren't members in-
creased roughly 130 percent
after the state approved its
right-to-work law.
However, by far the
largest blow to union mem-
bership and finances has
been the manufacturing de-
cline and the loss of millions
of jobs. Even in states with-
out a right-to-work law,
union membership dropped
54.2 percent between 1983
and 2010, according to data
from the UnionStats.com
website.
And even before a right-
to-work law goes into effect
in Indiana, union member-
ship there has dropped
from 14.1 percent to 8.9 per-
cent in the past decade.


in(
Friday, Feb. 24
NEXTera
ENERGY.'



NextEra Energy
Resources 250 NASCAR
Camping World Truck
Series
250 miles of intense racing
on Daytona's high hanks
under the lights. Tough
trucks, tough competition.


eluding:
Saturday, Feb. 25


DAYTONA 300 NASCAR
Nationwide Series
The rising stars of the
NASCAR Nationwide
Series face off against
the stars of the NASCAR
Sprint Cup Series in a
120-lap, 300-mile event.


SUNDAY, JANUARY 29, 2012 D5


Lotta lattes: Starbucks CEO

paid $16 million in 2011 fiscal year


Associated Press
PORTLAND, Ore. Starbucks CEO
Howard Schultz was given a pay package
worth roughly $16 million in the company's
2011 fiscal year
Starbucks performed well last year, but
Schultz's compensation shrank by 26 per-
cent compared to 2010, when he was given
$22 million for bringing the company roar-
ing back from the recession and more than
doubling its profit.
Schultz received a nearly $1.4 million
salary in 2011, according to a document
filed Thursday with the Securities and Ex-
change Commission. That's up 8 percent
from the $1.3 million salary in the prior
year His cash performance bonus, as well
as the value of his stock and option awards,
shrank


The Beverly Hills Civic
Association, Gerry Jones/
The Travel Club and the
Cik)NiLaE
are proud to welcome back


V1 Soft Sounds@

of Carol Kline
and "Love Bucket"
Performing their very highly acclaimed...

"Country Diamonds Show"
Saturday, February 4
Curtis Peterson Auditorium, Lecanto
Doors open 1 p.m. Show starts 2 p.m.
Tickets are $15 and may be purchased at:
BB&T, Nature Coast Bank, Cadence Bank,
Central Ridge Boys & Girls Club
or visit burnthemortgage.com


B snG slsfa tr Co y.


l0ooo0W5 For information call 527-8002 or 287-1421


CITUS COUNTY

M HIONICLE


Starbucks gave him stock awards in 2011
worth $5.5 million, which is down 48 per-
cent from the $10.5 million he was awarded
the prior year He was also given option
awards worth nearly $6 million, down 4 per-
cent from the $6.2 million in the prior year
The company gave him a cash perform-
ance bonus of nearly $3 million in 2011,
down from $3.5 million the prior year.
Schultz also received $235,294 in other
perks such as security and use of the com-
pany plane, compared with $231,664 in
perks the year before.
Starbucks continued its strong perform-
ance in 2011, as more customers began to
visit its stores around the globe. The Seat-
tle-based company's 2011 fiscal year rev-
enue increased 7 percent to $11.7 billion
and its profit jumped nearly 32 percent to
$1.25 billion, or $1.62 per share.


NO cNOxO XOXOOxOXOXOo

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U ., Make your reservations )
xo ,..'"-'. now tfor Feb. 13 or 14 0



0 C .11
H (603) 52-0227
(603) 582-0227


Donationm $41l
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Enter Today,
for a chance to win a
$50 Publix Gift Card

The sweepstakes ends on January 31, 2012


GOOD LUCK!


















www.chronicleonline.com .a j


- ~lU IL


Sunday, Feb. 26





DAYTONA 500 NASCAR Sprint Cup Series
The Day That lasts A Lifetime: Experience
a day that creates more legends, more
breathtaking moments and more
unforgettable memories than any other.
Most watched Motorspons event. Richest
and most prestigious race of the year.


To purchase ti1T Tickets forTSprintTowr C1800Pi[iII ~[ITSO oJistT
I w.aionainraionaIpedwv cm oIa!.


Name.....................................................
Phone....................................................
Email.....................................................


TO ENTER:
Fill out this form, mail or bring to
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429
Anytime before Noon on February 17.


1TRU S COUNTY E

CiIRONICL LE Thanks our
0009VLB ww.hronicleonline.com loyal subscribers ASK US ABOUT EZ PAY!


FOR SUBSCRIBERS ONLY


YOU COULD WIN TWO 4-DAY SPRINT TOWER TICKETS


I


I I


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I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


".


2i


a


* .4


S... ,


'"


.3.r-.


**4


*-T.


Get the Facts: Gators;

Seminoles; Hurricanes;

Bulls; Knights

College teams from coast to coast have a large Florida fan
base. 6.5 million Floridians consider themselves Florida
college football fans. Over 9.5 million Floridians
consider themselves Florida newspaper readers.

FLORIDA NEWSPAPERS... GET THE FACTS
AND GET IN THE GAME.


For more information on how to reach
Citrus County readers call
352-563-5592.


0008XGY


S CITRUS COUNTY


www.chronicleonline.com
Scarborough 2010


D6 SUNDAY, JANUARY 29, 2012


70,: ,.. -" .







CLASSIFIED


CITRUS COUNTY





H qONICLE
Swww.chronicleonline.com


BUSINESS HOURS:

MONDAY-FRIDAY

8:00 A.M. 5:00 P.M.

CLOSED SATURDAY/SUNDAY



WE GLADLY ACCEPT

- Bisfl i
i V IS 4 '-1 W "^


SUNDAY, JANUARY 29, 2012 D7


Classifieds



Classifieds In Print and Online All The Time!


Publication Days/Deadlines


Chronicle / Daily..................................... 1 PM, Daily

Homefront / Sunday...............................3 PM, Friday

Chronicle / Sunday.............................4...4 PM, Friday

Chronicle / Monday............................4...4 PM, Friday

Sumter County Times / Thursday.............11 AM, Tuesday

Riverland News / Thursday.....................2 PM, Monday

South Marion Citizen / Friday..................4 PM, Tuesday

West Marion Messenger / Wednesday.......4 PM, Friday


A GENT, 69-79+ with
old-fashion manners
would be my ideal
friend, to share simple
joys. If you are tender
hearted,
optimistic and like
laughter, it would be
great to hear from you.
Send response to
Cit. County Chronicle
Blind Box 1752 M
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Bvd. Crys. Riv. Fl. 34429
Male 64 5' 5" 2201bs,
trimmed beard, full
hair, spiritual, romantic,
understanding, diplo
matic, looking again to
grow and laminate the
future with casual
clean cut positive
woman. Send response
to: Chronicle, Blind box
1753M, 1624N Mead-
owcrest Blvd, Crystal
River, FL 34429
Meadowcrest
Emily, Hi Honey, I have
not talked to you in
quite a while. Bought
new phone, new com-
pany and new answer-
ing machine. Address
is the same phone
number is 352-419-7673.
Call or stop by.
Your Lover, Rodie
Single White Female,
Searching for
Older gentleman,
outgoing, pretty, fit and
fun. Relocating Soon
to area. Write or Email
413 Route 940 #222
Mt. Pocono PA, 18344
email: mwoodcock204
@gmailcom
WWS seeking female
for friendship. Age not
important. Semi-retired,
NS, ND. Real Estate
interest a plus. Call
Randy(352) 563-1033




2 BIKES Ross Pro-26"
ladies $15.00 mans $25..
(352) 6372499
Chris Satchell Painting
ASAP
30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-464-1397

Beverly Hills 2/2
1st/last $500 mo, move
in ready, 352-302-6941
CRYSTAL RIVER/OZELLO
$299K, 2+/2/2
Open floor plan,
Hardwood floors,
www.waterfrontozello.co
m or 352-563-5527
DELL 19 INCH FLAT
SCREEN MONITOR
used for 6 months cost
$150. asking $50.00
352 6372499
FLORAL CITY on 3 Lots,
Assum Mortg. Priv Fin. 2
Mast Suites New appls.
horses ok, $33,900
Cridland Real Living.
J. Desha 352-634-6340
RIVENBARK
LAWN & LANDSCAPE.
15% off Tree Trimming
in Feb. (352) 464-3566
YANKEETOWN
Furnished 2/2, Beautiful
stilt home, on last canal
to Gulf, floating dock,
on 150ft. off waterfront
Beautifully furnished,
water, garb. & cable
incl.'d $1,100. mo.
Seasonal rates Avail
(352) 726-1172




$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
Paid for Junk Vehicles,
J.W. 352-228-9645

$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not*
CASH PAID $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL OF
Scrap Medal, Mowers
Appliances and MORE
Call (352) 224-0698




2 Black w/green eyes
female sisters, 4 months
old, inside/outside cats
Illness forces founding
them a home
(352) 628-2952
4 ADULT CATS
Declawed, spayed
& neutered
(352) 344-3138
America Pit Bull
Black & White 4 months
old female, needs lov-
ing forever home with
NO CATS!!!!
(352) 464-3983
Dashound mix
male, 8 mos old.
very friendly, loves
chidren(352) 795-2717
fertilizer horse manure
mixed with pine shavings
great for gardens, plants.
U load and haul.
352-628-9624
FREE ADULT CAT,
Female
Name Tiger 3 2 yrs. old
(352) 447-0072
Free beautiful small
brindled female cat,
fixed, has shots, 1 year
old, indoor or outdoor
companion. Prefers a
single cat family. Great
for a senior.
352-257-1794


FREE FIRE WOOD
2 Large Oaks cut down
(352) 564-4598
Free puppies, pit and
kerr mix, 6 weeks old,
outside dogs, good
watch dogs.
(352) 287-3384
FREE
WHITE LEGHORN,
& BANTAM ROOSTERS
(352) 302-6955
KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Savage Pays top $$$.
352-628-4144
Mission in Citrus has a
FREE garage sale to
those in need.No resale
agents! Lots of baby
items, household items
and kids toys. A little bit
of everything.
If you are in need or
know someone who is,
please tell them.
2488 N. Pennsylvania
Crystal River
(near Manatee Lanes)
Sat & Sun all day
MOVING OR DE-
CLUTTERING ? Quality
items needed for church
yard sale. Tax deductible
receipt provided. Can
pick up. 352-621-0175
Sammi, large dog
needs loving home
w/fenced yd. call
(352) 794-3768




FRESH CITRUS @
BELLAMY GROVE
STRAWBERRIES,
CABBAGE
Located 1.5 mi. E. on
Eden Dr. from Hwy. 41
Inv. GIFT SHIPPING
9A-5P, 352-726-6378
CLOSED SUN
FRESH JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct.@ $5 per lb
Stone Crab@ $6 per Ib
delivered 727-771-7500




Lost Aluminum
Walking Cane
4 legs on bottom
last seen at
Sheriff Ranch Thrift
Store on 1/20/12
Bad back. Please call
(352) 794-3463






REWARD $1000.
No Questions ask.
Min Pin Female 10 lbs
name Zoey, Needs
meds. last seen Sun 8/7
Holiday Dr offTurkey
Oak Crystal River
(352) 257-9546
352-400-1519



Small Dog
Female, youth
Forest Lake Subdivision
Hernando
(352) 637-5961




Huge discounts when
you buy 2 types of
advertising! 122
weekly newspapers,
32 websites, 25 daily
newspapers. Call
now to diversify your
advertising with Ad-
vertising Networks of
Florida
(866)742-1373,www.
florida-classifieds.com
RED GREEN LIVE
Experience this hilarious
one-man show.
April 5,Tampa Theatre
800-745-3000.
April 7, News-Journal
Centre, Davidson
Theatre, Daytona State
College. 800-595-4849
www.redgreen.com



FRESH JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct.@ $5 per lb
Stone Crab@ $6 per lb
delivered 727-771-7500



FOR HIRE
Able body, has truck ,
enclosed trailer, variety
of tools, odd jobs/labor
(352) 464-1688
Ret. Sales Exec
seeks P/T work,
nights-weekends ok,
(352) 422-1533




NOW TAKING
APPLICATIONS

For experience
Childcare Teacher
(352) 527-8440




F/T PARA LEGAL
Experience or Degree
Preferred Worker's
Compensation &
Social Security
Disability Law Firm.
Fax Resume
352-344-5760
or email lawoffdeu
@embaramail.com


SENIOR
SECRETARY
Announcement
#12-07

Advanced Secretar
ial work performing
general clerical
duties in Parks &
Recreation. Must
possess a current
valid Florida driver
license. $10.77 hourly
to start.
Excellent benefits.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE:
Please visit our
website at
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 West Sovereign

Lecanto, F1.34461
to apply online
by Friday, February 3,
2012. EOE/ADA




HAIR STYLIST

FT/PT Immediate
Openings, Call Sue
352-628-0630











Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aevtourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)
CNA/HHA's

Apply At
HOME INSTEAD
SENIOR CARE
4224 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Lecanto

NEEDED
Experienced,
Caring &
Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885

NOW HIRING

RN's
All Units, with Hospital
Experience

Apply on Line: www.
nurse-temps.com
(352) 344-9828

NURSE PRACTITIONER
(ARNP) or a
Physicians Assistant
(PA)
For a "Busy Specialty
Office".
Please send resume
to Citrus County
Chronicle, Blind Box
1749P, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd.
Crystal River, FI
34429. 1


Receptionist
& Dental/Surgical
Assistant
For High Quality
Oral Surgery Office.
Experience
preferred, excel.
pay & benefits.
Email Resume To:
marvamoli@
vahoo com

Residential SA
Tech Pool

The Centers is
seeking Residential
Substance Abuse
Techs- Pool
(as needed) for our
Citrus County
Adolescent
Residential
program in Lecanto,
FL. Duties focus on
reducing or minimiz-
ing the effects of
substance abuse, a
12-Step recovery
process, assisting the
professional staff in
the assurance of
quality client care &
transporting clients.
Exp with troubled
adolescents reqd.
Must be available for
shift work & week-
ends. Background
screenings reqd.
Salary $9.25-$9.75/hr
plus 10% shift diff
for 2nd/3rd shifts.
DFWP/EOE/We
E-Verify. Fax or e-mail
resume to HR, the
Centers, Inc.,
(352) 291-5580,
iobs@thecenters. us
For more info visit
www.thecenters.us

RN
3-11 Full-Time
Looking for an
experienced
Nurse leader to join
our Great Team!!
We offer excellent
benefits: 401 K/Health
/Dental/Vision/Vacatio
n /Sick/CEUs
Apply in person:
Arbor Trail Rehab
611 Turner Camp Rd.
Inverness, FL
or email resume to:
atdon@southern
LTC.com
An EEO/AA
Employer M/F/V/D





COLLEGE o/
CENTRAL
FLORIDA
Community of
Promise an equal
opportunity college

Manager -
Public Safety
Screening begins
02/10/12
Retired Senior
and Volunteer
Program Project
Manager
Screening begins
02/06/12
Complete
job description is
available on the CF
Employment website.
To apply
for a position visit
www.CF.edu, click on
Quick Links then
Employment at CF.
Submit unofficial tran-
scripts, cover letter
and resume with the
online application at
time of submission.

3001 SW College Rd.
Ocala, FL 34474
CF is an Equal Oppor-
tunity Employer


* COLLEGE of
CENTRAL
FLORIDA
Community of
Promise an equal
opportunity college

Vice President
Administration
and Finance

Celebrating over 50
years of excellence,
College of Central
Florida is one of Flori-
da's most accessible
and affordable
institutions of higher
education in the re-
gion.

The college seeks an
energetic, accom-
plished individual of
vision to serve as the
Vice President of
Administration and
Finance. The Vice
President of Adminis-
tration and Finance
is an executive
officer of the college
and reports directly
to the President.
Major responsibilities
of the Vice President
include providing
leadership and
administrative
direction for the fiscal
and administrative
areas of the college.
Represent areas of
responsibility as a
member of the
College Council,
Management Team
and President's Staff.
Complete job
description is
available on the CF
Employment website.
Qualifications
Candidates willbe
evaluated for the fol-
lowing professional
requirements: A Mas-
ter's degree prefer-
ably in Higher Educa-
tion, Administration,
Business, Finance or
a related field. Five
years of experience
in administration
required, community
college experience
preferred.

Screening begins on
March 2, 2012.
How to Apply
Visit www.CF.edu,
click on Quick Links
then Employment at
CF. Submit unofficial
transcripts, cover
letter, resume and
letters of reference
with the online
application at
time of submission.
Alternatively, fax re-
quired documents to
352-873-5885 or email
to hr@cf.edu (email
not to exceed 5MB).
3001 SW College Rd
Ocala, FL 34474
CF is an Equal Oppor-
tunity Employer


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
AArAAArAAA


CLOSING AGENT
Law firm seeks experi-
enced real
estate/title/closer for Bev-
erly Hills office. Salary
commensurate with expe-
rience. Fax resume to
(352) 867-5787.

INSURANCE
AGENT

Looking for motivated
220 or 440 agent.
If you are dishonest,
lazy or don't care,
don't bother.
Apply Insurance Den
5447 S. Oakridge Dr.
Homosassa
352-628-5619
insuranceden@
aol.com


Licensed
Insurance Agents
Needed
Life/Health/Annuity
Nature Coast
Financial Advisors,
Inc. Email information
aarv@naturecoast
financial.com
352-794-6044


Massage Thera-
pist

Salon seeking a pro-
fessional therapist.
Patrice 352-270-4069,






Broiler Person

Nights -Full time
Exp. pref.
for high volume
casual dining rest.
Good pay and
benefits.
Apply in person
1 -4 p.m.
Cody's Original
Roadhouse
310S.E. U.S. 19N.
Crystal River


CAFE SHOPPE
COORDINATOR
FIT position for per-
son to engage in sell-
ing a variety of cafe
food items, located in
a busy Thrift
Shoppe.Candidate
also assists manager,
employees and volun-
teers as necessary.
Min 2yrs exp in re-
lated field. Computer
skills to include abil-
ity to create flyer's,
memos, e-mails, etc.
Interpersonal skills a
must. Position does
require frequent
heavy lifting, items to
include clothing
boxes, furniture, fix-
tures and equipment.
Excellent salary and
benefits. Apply
on-line at
www.hospiceofcitrusco
unty.org


CHG&CC
is now accepting
applications for all
Food & Beverage
positions.
Please apply in
person Tues-Fri
from 2:00-4:30pm at
The Grille Restaurant
505 E Hartford St
Hernando. No phone
calls please.


EXP. LINE COOK

Applv in Person
at Cracker's
Bar & Grill


F/T, Receptionist
/Hostess
needed for
high end country
club restaurant. Expe-
rience required.
Applicants must be
professional, organ-
ized and able to
multi-task. Resumes
& applications
accepted Tues-Fri
from 2:00-4:00pm at
2100 N Terra Vista
Blvd, Hernando


2 AC SALES TECHS

Needed. Experience
preferred. $60K+
annually + benefits.
Email or Fax Resume
mdp@newair.biz
Fax 352-628-4427

Professional Sales
Positions Available

Must possess a cur-
rent Florida insurance
license (#214 or #215)
Demonstrate excel-
lent prospecting.
communication.
presentation, closing
and follow up skills.
Computer literate
and enjoy helping
people.
Comprehensive
Benefit Plans.
401K, Competitive
Compensation -
Fax Resumes Attn:
Debbie Brymer
(352) 746-9160
Email Resume:
Deborah
Brvmer@dianitv
memorial.com
Mail or drop

resume

at: 5891 N.

Lecanto

Hwy Bevery

Hills R.

34465 Attn: D.

Brymer



Dignity

Fero Memorial Gar-
dens & Funeral Home
No Calls Please
EEO, MF/DW Drug
free workplace

SALES/SERVICE
TECH
Needed today! I will
train the right person!
Pest Control Email
to:Jdsmlthpest@
gmall.com or call
(352) 726-3921

Urgent!
Want to make $?
Need motivated,
hungry, licensed real
estate assistant for
busy office
352-634-0129





2 AC SALES TECHS

Needed. Experience
preferred. $60K+
annually + benefits.
Email or Fax Resume
mdp@newair.biz
Fax 352-628-4427

A FEW PRO DRIVERS
NEEDED.
Top Pay &401k 2 Mos.
CDL Class A Driving
Exp. 877-258-8782
www.meltontruck.com

BRICK PAVER IN-
STALLERS
Looking for one hon-
est, hard working,
preferably experi-
enced paver applica-
tor. Pay commensu-
rate with experience.
Call-352-342-9911

Carpet Cleaners
Positions open now at
Stanley Steemer.
Clean Fl MVR record
21 yrs or older. Drug
free, background
check. Benefits
include Paid training,
401k, holiday pay
and morel!
Apply at 911 Eden Dr.
Inverness, or email
toni.aronert@
steemer.com

DRIVER WEEKLY
HOMETIME.
Dry and Refrigerated.
Daily Pay! 31 Service
Centers, Local Orienta-
tion. Newer trucks.
CDL-A, 3 months cur-
rent OTR expereince.
800-414-9569
www.driverknight.com


Drivers Wanted:
Class A- CDL
w/hazmat. Company &
O/O's Lots of Freight to
move!! CAll
877-893-9645

Drivers:
Run 5 States Regional!
Get home weekends.
earn up to 39cent mile
1 yr OTR Flatbed Exp.
required. Sunbelt
Transport, LLC
800-572-5489 X 227

Driver-Start out the
year with Daily Pay and
Weekly Home Time! Sin-
gle Source Dispatch.
Van and
Refrigerated.CDL-A, 3
months recent
experience re-
quires.(800)414-9569
www.drivekniaht.com

Eagle Buick GMC, Inc
is in need of
experienced
automotive service
consultants/advisors.
One of the best deal-
ership pay plans in
the county. Minimum
2 yrs experience
preferred. Great
opportunity for one to
find a career path,
and earn a great
living. Very produc-
tive repair facility and
a professional
environment with
plenty of growth po-
tential in a growing
community. Benefits.
Drug Free Workplace.
Application Available
@ Eagle Buick GMC
Inc
Send Resume:
Fax (352) 417-0944
Email
robbcole@eagle
buickgmc.com

IMMEDIATE
OPENINGS
Driver-clean CDL
*roll/off & compactor
experience a must
'pay DOE *benefits.

Fuel Island
Attendant
clean DL or CDL
*40 hrs week(12 noon
to ?) 'Service writing
experience with truck
experience a must.
Outside work top
pay* benefits.

Customer Service
Rep.
High energy office
'must have superior
computer skills, great
phone skills previous
experience as CSR
*benefits.
Apply In Person Only
at 711 S. Adolph PT.
Lecanto, Fl.


n. Top of the Word.
C 0w1u. I'C b AwEd vrEurl


JOB FAIR
February 8th
10AM 2PM
CHANDLER HILLS
COMMUNITY CENTER
8143 SW 90th Terr. Rd.
POSITIONS INCLUDE:
CABLE INSTALLATION
TECHNICIAN
ASSISTANT PROPERTY
MANAGER
WAIT STAFF &
BARTENDERS
COOKS
TICKET AGENT

GROUNDS
MAINTENANCE
LICENSED SPRAY
TECHNICIAN.

Come find
your place
in the World!
DFWP/EOE

Welder/fabricator

Must have 5 yrs
experience working
with old and new
materials* *dumpster
repairs"* plazma
cutters"* mig and stic
welder* bring refer-
ences, apply in
person only at
711 S. Adolph Pt
Lecanto, Fl.


Need 13 Good
Drivers

Top 5% Pay &
401K, 2 Mos.
CDL Class A Driving Exp.
Call (877)258-8782
www.meltontruck.com




*CALL NOW*
Looking to fill
immediate
positions in the
CUSTOMER
RELATIO
DEPARTMENT.
Training, 401(k),
Medical. No Exp.
Necessary. call
Michelle
352-436-4460

$300 is a bad
day! Fortune 500
Company.
Security equip, dist.
Several positions
avail. entry-level to
mgmt. Great pay /
full benefits. We train.
Advancement
oppy's. Co. trans.
avail. H.S. Diploma or
GED req'd.
No Felonies.
352-597-2227

Animal Services
Technician
Announcement
#12-06

Manual labor work
taking care of
impounded animals
at the Citrus County
animal shelter.
Experience dealing
with the general
public desirable.
Must have sufficient
physical strength and
agility to handle or
restrain large or
potentially danger-
ous animals. Must be
euthanasia certified
within 6 months of
hire date. Must
possess a current
valid Florida Driver
License. Beginning
pay $8.45 hourly.
Excellent benefits.

ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE:
Please visit our
website at
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit one
of the local Libraries
or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461
to apply online by
Friday, February 3,
2012 EOE/ADA

APPOINTMENT
SETTERS NEEDED
Seniors Welcome
No nights, No wknds.
Apply at
6421 W. Homosassa
Trail, Homosassa FI

Court Data Entry
Operator
Announcement
# 12-08

Performs involved
work methods and
procedures in
accordance with a
working knowledge
of local Criminal
Justice Systems
procedures in the
Public Defender's
Office. Starting pay
$10.77 hourly.
Excellent benefits.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE:
Please visit our
website at
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also
visit one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 West Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, Fl. 34461
to apply online by
Friday, February 10,
2012. EOE/ADA.

FRONT DESK

Hotel experience
required. Great benefits
Apply in person:
BEST WESTERN
614 NW Hwy 19
Crystal River.
No calls please!


COLLEGE of

CENTRAL

SFLORIDA

an equal opportunity college -
Experienced trainers needed for the
following noncredit workforce development
training in Marion, Citrus and Levy counties.
*Lean Six Sigma
*Microsoft Office Certified
*Photoshop and/or Web Design
*AutoCAD
*Resume Development
*Interviewing Skills
*Allen/Bradley Programmable Logic Controls
*Basic Pneumatics Systems and Controls
*Sensor and Motor Controls
*Financial Planning and Accounting Continuing
Professional Education
Send your resume to
Donnah Ross, Director CF Institute
College of Central Florida
3001 S.W. College Rd., Ocala, FL 34474-4415


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Looking Come


For A Place grow
__with us!!

To Make A


Difference?, i/
Look no further!!



SEVEN RIVERS
REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER

Dedicated to quality patient care with a personal touch.

Clinical Dietician PhysicalTherapist
Director of Emergency Services Phlebotomist
Experienced MonitorTech Case Manager-RN
MedicalTech RespiratoryTherapist
MRITech Surgical Technician
Quality Management Coordinator-RN
RN-Cath Lab, ICU,Surgery, ED and Women's and Family Center

Our highly skilled nurses and physicians, state-of the-art technology, flexible scheduling,
competitive wages and benefits package are just a few of the reasons why you will want to call
SEVEN RIVERS REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER your home.

For these and other opportunities, please apply to:
Human Resources
Career Center at www.srrmc.com
3201 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34428
Fax # 352-795-8464 Job Line# 352-795-8418
Email: stephanie.arduser@hma.com 352-795-8462

Be part of a team with a passion for "excellence in healthcare"
EOEDRUG/TOBACCO FREE WORKPLACE OOOAFJD


J^ -----i ,.^V^^ -
SENIOR ACCOUNTANT II
THE CITRUS COUNTY SHERIFF'S OFFICE IS
ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR A FULL TIME
SENIOR ACCOUNTANT II.
Regular, full time position working Monday through Friday Under the
general direction of the Assistant Finance Director, this position
performs a vanety of tasks in directing, and supervising the staff and
activities of the fiscal services division of the Shenriff's Office Duties
include performing a vanety of complex tasks involving supervision of
payroll and accounts payable functions, review of purchase orders
and other expenditure items, assisting with developing, and
monitoring of the sheriff's office personnel and operating budget,
supervising and reviewing accounting staff work, forecasting fiscal
availabilities, providing management analysis and technical
assistance to various divisions within the sheriff's office, monitoring
grants and contracts for fiscal compliance and billing, and heavily
involved in year-end audit
REQUIREMENTS: Must be a United States Citizen or resident alien
Must be a high school graduate or its equivalent Bachelor's degree or
education and training equivalent to four years of college education in
business administration, accounting, finance, or a closely related field
preferred Three years work experience in governmental accounting
administration or closely related field Supervisory experience
preferred Complete familiarity and skill in the use of Microsoft Office
programs including Excel spreadsheets, Power Point, and other
software programs used in modern accounting practices Knowledge
of pubic sector budgetary development principles and practices
Must not have any felony convictions
Must not have any misdemeanor convictions involving perjury or false
statements Must successfully complete a background investigation
including drug testing
Human Resource Division
Citrus County Sheriff's Office
1 Dr Martin Luther King Jr Ave, Inverness, FI 34450
(352) 341-7429
On-line employment applications are available at
www shenriffcitrus org
OOOAFOE Equal Opportunity Employer MF/D/V


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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2012 CHEVY 2011 CHEVY
VOLT SILVERADO
IVE FOR ONLY ... DEALER DSCO -$1,100
REBATES & INCENTIVES: .............- $605S
USAA DISCOUNr -$750
CASH OR TRADE EQUITY:-V-$2,500
36 month lease, 12K mileear. $2.495 out of pocket YOU AY. 1 j 245
2012 CHEVY 2012 CHEVY
MALIBU LT EQUINOX LT
MSRP $24.805
DEALER WSCOiUN ......I 61o )0 D IVE FOR ONLY ...
REM .- ...... 2500
GM OWNER LOYALTd. $,500
USAA DISCOUN'n ..S7.......- -.50
CASH OR TRADE EQUrFY:-r.. $2,500
YOU PAY.. 1 60 6 39 month lease, 12K rilestyear, $2,495 out of pocket
2012 CHEVY 2011 CHEVY
CRUZE LT SUBURBAN
IVE FOR ONLY ... $47
I-REBATES & INCMENTIVES:.$4.000
FM CASH OR TRADE EQUm .--. $2,5OO ..
27 month lease, 12K rrileear. S2 495 oui ol pei YOU MPAY.

T joR&l-)sNjE'HlMaLngo



2005 CHEYYVENURE LS W207SUZUKISX4 2008SUZUKIFORENZA 2006CHEY MAUBU 2001DOGERAM 2008MAZDA3i 2008 CHEVY IMPALA 206 SUBARUOUTBACK 2006 FORD RANGER
L4as E;K1m OR M4Mff 4C. 4ICMY SWaI.Nom XtWX= wsAM an Mx
IOWeS mN o PU OCSIU AS m=w0 10KES NMlT alU
$8,988 $9,978 S9.995 $9995 $9,995 $12.888 12.898 $13.888 $13.888



2006 BUICK LUCERNE 007 FORD MUSTANG 2008 HONDA CIVICS 2008 CHEVY MAUBU2LT 2012 NISSAN SENTRA 2007 FORD EDGE 2008 SATURN VUE 2005 GMC SIERRA 1500 201 GMC SIERRA 2500
iTuIRnMS l1IPmEIoNStoILM WWEHsseO *mH LMEw Xm "am s2 AMWRDEi ml.uMSIwa m4m. MLRfWMBM DOsauFTEWWM
L"MW RTWCDIMAro SU2FI WI SOELCIEM A6LLffMEO16TM SUS 1OgaKilHE
$13.898 $13.995 514.788 $14,987 $15.99 $16.888 $16,995 $21.988 542,888
Come See What LOVE Can Do For You!
In Inverness on351341 A1
T'Highway 44 Wet 352.341. 0018


All new car prices include $2.500 cash or trade equity. All offers OAC All options at dealer retail. limited to in stock vehicles only. All prices and/or payments
plus l3 lill e, ao & stale fees. Dealer installed npi ons and accessories additional cost. Vehicles subject to prior s-3e Applies Io in slock units.
Ofter expires on date of publication


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D8 SUNDAY, JANUARY 29, 2012







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




Housekeeper AIRLINES ARE HIRING
Train for hands on
Part time, experience Aviation Maintenance
preferred. Apply at Career. FAA approved
BARRINGTON PLACE program.
2341 W Norvell Bryant Financial aid if qualified
Hwy. Lecanto Housing Available.
Call Aviation Institute Of
SUPPORT Maintenance.
PROFESSIONALS 866)314


Moving Mountains,
Inc.
reliable individuals to
work flexible hours
with the develop-
mentally disabled.
HSD/GED. clean
background check.
reliable transporta-
tion required.
Training provided.
Applications and
services details at
www.moving
mountains.me or at
2615 N Florida Ave.,
Hernando, FL
8AM-4PM Mon-Fri.

TRUCK DRIVER
CDL CLASS A

Local, Must have
forkliftexperience
and know the area.
Established

354 28








352-726-2522
House helper
B&B needs help, ideal
for student Call
between 6pm-8pm
352-726-1832
Housekeeper Needed,
1 -2 days per week, light
ironing required, Please
mail resume to :Blind
Box 1754P c/o Citrus
County Chronicle, 106
W Main St., Inverness, FI
34452




#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)
Heat & Air JOBS -
Ready to work? 3 week
accelerated program.
Hands on environment.
Nationwide certifica-
tions and Local Job
Placement Assistance!
(877) 741-9260


#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)

EARN COLLEGE
DEGREE ONLINE
Online from Home

*Medical, *Business,
*Criminal Justice. Job
placement assis-
tance. Computer
available. Financial
Aid If qualified. SCHEV
certified. Call
877-206-5165
www.CenturaOnllne
.com




TAYLOROLLEGE



NEIRf.W


2 Week Courses!
*NURSING ASST. $475.
*PHLEBOTOMY $475.
*EKG $475.
*ALF ADMINISTRATOR
$300.

tavlorcolleae.edu
(352) 245-4119

NOW

ENROLLING
For January
2012 Classes
BARBER
COSMETOLOGY
FACIAL
FULL SPECIALTY
INSTRUCTOR
TRAINING
MANICURE/NAIL EXT.


BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
New Port Richey/
Spring Hill
727-848-8415
352-263-2744
&l llllm m m


ALLIED HEALTH

Career training
-Attend college 100%
online. Job place-
ment assistance.
Computer available.
Financial Aid if quali-
fied. SCHEV certified.
Call (800)481-9409
www.Centura
Online.comrn


COMMERCIAL Lawn
equipment w/custom
trailer Gravely & Stihl
347-308-3853
EARN $1000 $3200
a month to drive our
new cars with ads.
www.PaidDriven.com




Mullet Hut
for sale, Hwy 19 Sunny
Days Plaza, Homosassa
33 yrs in business
cell (607) 743-4662




$$$ ACCESS
LAWSUIT
CASH NOW!! $$$

As seen on TV. Injury
Lawsuit Dragging?
Need $500-$500,000++
within 48/hours? Low
rates APPLY NOW BY
PHONE! Call Today!
Toll-Free: (800)568-8321
www.lawcaoital.com


Collect ble


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966








FE ,


1983 CHATTY PATTY
DOLL IN BOX New in
Box Excellent Condition
$60 Call
(352)-489-5245.

AUTOGRAPHED BOWL-
ING PIN with many PBA
signatures $100. Call
(352)489-5245.

MADAME ALEXANDER
PUSSY CAT DOLL IN
BOX excellent condition
$75. Call
(352)-489-5245.
VINTAGE SCHOENHUT
PIANO FOR
CHILD/DOLL in good
condition no bench -
$85. Call (352)489-5245

ZODIAC BARBIE IN
BOX in excellent
condition $25.
Call (352)-489-5245.




8 Person Hot Tub
$500 obo
(989) 553-3631

Hot tub for 2, new
motor, pump and
heater, Excel. cond.
$700 Firm(352563-1933




1-FREEZER,1 -LAWN
MOWER StandUp
Freezer, $40.00.Good
Lawnmower 20.00.
352-503-2792

A/C + HEAT PUMP
SYSTEMS
Starting at $880
13-18 Seer
Installation w/permit
REBATES uo to $2.500
352-746-4394
Lic.&lns.CAC057914

ELECTRIC RANGE
Older Tappan elec stove,
very good condition, $50,
352-344-5853
in Hernando

GARMIN NUUVI1300
with accessories.
Like new.
$50.00 Telephone
352 382-2591

KENMORE DEEP
FREEZER ALL WHITE
STAND UP $85.00
352-621-0718 H
352-364-2806 C

SHARPER IMAGE SU-
PERWAVE OVEN got
new range,selling
oven.$80.00
352-344-3472


CLASSIFIED



BLACK DISHWASHER
$30.00 352-621-0718 h
352-364-2806 c
Side by Side,
whirlpool, white, works
perfectly
$250
(352) 621-0942
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR, washers
dryers,FREE pick up
352-564-8179
WANTED DEAD
OR ALIVE
Washers & Dryers
Working or not.
(352) 209-5135



COMMERCIAL DESK
CHAIR Ergonomic Fully
Adjustable PreOwned
Fabric Covered $85
727-4634411
DESK CHAIRS (2)
PreOwned Commercial
Adjustable Fabric Cov-
ered $45 727-463-4411
DESK CHAIRS (4) Com-
mercial PreOwned Dark
Gray Fabric $25 each
727-4634411
LATERAL FILE CABINET
3 Drawer Commercial
Metal PreOwned
40"x36"x18" $65
727-4634411
Ten, 4 Drawer, Hon
Filing Cabinets
$45. Ea
(352) 628-1030
Ask for Tara




5,550 W Generator
Brigg & Straton.
w/ 11.5 HP Subaru
Engine Like New
$400.
(352) 302-6069
AUTO CREEPER "The
Bone" Rough Rider
Creeper, like new, asking
$75.00 (352)270-3559
Complete home
workshop, 8 power
tools, many extras,
$500 firm for all
(352) 563-1180



20 INCH RCA FLAT
SCREEN In good condi-
tion. Asking 35.00 OBO
352-465-8841
JVC FLOOR SPEAKERS
300 watts in good
condition.$60.00 OBO
352-522-1918
STEREO SPEAKERS
4 sets small to large
$5 to $20 per set
352 564-2746


Computers/


DELL 19 INCH FLAT
SCREEN MONITOR
used for 6 months cost
$150. asking $50.00
352 6372499

DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469

HEWLETT PACKARD
COMPUTER MONITOR
HP M500 monitor.
unused 30.00
352-344-3472
HEWLETT PACKARD
PHOTO PRINTER hp
photosmart 1000. $20.00
352-344-3472




PIGEON SUPPLIES
Feeders, Drinkers, Bob
Trap,Cages, Nest
Bowls.$50.00/ALL
352-503-2792




***DINING SET****
54"RD GLASS TOP
PEDESTAL TABLE,
TUSCAN STYLE
4 CHAIRS
$260 634-2004
6 FOOT METAL FOLD-
ING TABLES (2)
PreOwned Wood Grain
$35 each 727-463-4411
36" ROUND TABLE Like
New Rugged Formica
Top Sturdy Steel Base
Misc Colors $65
727-463-4411

5-piece dinette set.
Oak table and 4
arrowback chairs.
Table has inverted leaf
and is 42 inches by 58
inches with leaf in
place, 42 inches round
without. Top has pretty
tile inlay. Chairs have
dual cross supports for
extra sturdiness. Seat
cushions included.
$225 obo. Two large
table lamps. $15 ea.
Will email photos.
352-746-1644.

a wN-.


CHROME CRAFT
DINETTE SET 6 chairs,
pedestal table ( 78 x 42
) $450 352 527-2760


Rugged Gray Formica
Top Sturdy Steel Base
Like New $65
727-463-4411
CHAIR OFFICE Dark
wood very old $30,
excellent condition
352-270-3909
Coffee table
46"Lx28"W $75.
excellent condition
352-270-3909
COMMERCIAL
STACKABLE CHAIRS (4)
Preowned Sturdy Metal
Framed Vinyl Chairs $10
each 727-463-4411
COUCH Floral
couch,great condi-
tion,$50. Must pick up.
(352)792-7610
Craftmatic Bed
single w3/remote
control $100.
(352) 726-3631
DESK
30"h-30"d-60"w-seven
drawers [2-file] all lock.
excl. cond. $250.00 more
info.call 352-527-9982
DINETTE PEDESTAL
TABLE ONLY Color of
butcher block blonde.
Appr 2 1/2' x 4'. $25.00
call Ruth 352-382-1000
DINING ROOM TABLE:
78Lx38Wx30H, cherry
finish with 6 chairs in
great condition for
$350. Call (352)
489-1527.
Entertainment CENTER
Solid Wood, 64x44 w/ 2
Drawers below. 27x37
1/2 Opening for TV.
$100.352-389-4569
Futon
Black $50. glass top
table 4 chairs $100.
Black entertainment
center $50.
(352) 795-7254
LEATHER SOFA 3
seater,double recliner
wall hugger, dark
taupe,good condition.
200.00 Call
(352) 637-9526
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
352-628-0808
Rattan sofa, chair and
ottoman, excellent
condition $300(352)
795-7325
STACKABLE CHAIRS (4)
Commercial PreOwned
Metal Frame with Arms
Fabric Covered 2 for $35
727-463-4411
TV CONSOLE
cherry 80" tall, 42" w
perfect for small
spaces. room for 4 or
more components, plus
storage & glass
display shelf's $250.
(352) 341-6991


RECLINER Largeclean
recliner. Cream color.
$75.00 352-257-5722
WHITE PAINTED WOOD
BOOKCASE 3 Shelves
Great for a Childs Room
40"x32"x12" $30
727-463-4411




12x24 Metal Shed
with roll up doors, regu-
lar $5000 sell for $4000
delivered w/extras
used 1 month!, New!
352-341-8479
CHICKEN
MANURE/FERTILIZER
Time to get your
garden's ready! 201b.
bag $4.00 352-563-1519
FARM SOLD Clearing
plants & statuary,
1000's of plants, OPEN
Sat/ Sun or call for
appt.(352) 465-0649
5019 W StargazerCitrus
Co. Dunnellon
Lawn Sweeper
42", very good cond.
$185.

SOLD!!!!
Briggs & Straton
Lawn Vac. 6.5 hp very
low hours with
attachments ,New
$2100 Sell $650 firm




CITRUS SPRINGS
Inside Estate Sale
1417 W Pringle PI
Sat. 1/28 -Sun. 1/29
8am-4pm Only
HOMOSASSA
Jan. 25 thru Jan31st
MOVING SALE*
(352) 382-1502
HOMOSASSA SMW
Sat.28 & Sun. 29, 9a-4P
MOVING SALE *
64 Oak Village Blvd, S.




Inverness
Fri 2/3 Sat 2/4 9a-5p,
yard & barn equip.
horse tack, furn. hsehld
items, books & jewelry
10759 S. Flutter Terr. (off
Stagecoach between
491 & 581)




48" Glass Dinette Set,
with 4 swivel Chairs,
$95
8 ft. fiberglass Type 2
Ladder $45
(352) 726-7765


Bakers rack w/ glass

PLATES PERFORMER
EXERCISE MACHINE w/
instruction video and fold-
outs $95, 352-860-0444
BIRD CAGE White bird
cage. 26 x24 x 39 high. 5
feet high when on the
stand. 3/4 inch bar spac-
ing. $60.00 352 726 5753
BLOWER & TRIMMER
Gas blower $30.
Gas line trimmer $30.
Both Homelite
716/860-6715
COMMERCIAL
Bubble Gum
Machine,2 Jars on
pedestal
$60 352-364-3009
Electric Gate Opener
Mighty Mule 350 + solar
panel, + 12V battery +
3 remotes, also can be
powered by 120 V
have manual, & all
hardware, cost $689.
Sell $475 obo, 341-0791
FOLD-A-CART TFC-150
MULTI-PUR FOLDS
FLAT FOR
STORAGE.6CUFT CARP.
EXEC CON. $90
727.857.6583
FOREMAN ELECT
GRILL Med. size, table
top excellent $15 352
382 0220
GAS GRILL COVER
Weber-premium excel-
lent-$20 352 382 0220
HAY coastal hay for
horses. 12 large bales.
$5.00 each Hernando
726-6224
HP Office Jet All in One
Printer/fax, like new
condition $75.00
Desay DVD player,
used very little $20
352-382-1154
INVERSION TABLE
inversion table in good
condition.30.00 dollars
please call 3524464418
KRUPS WAFFLE IRON
Excellent cond. $15
352 382 0220
Learn medical
transcription-self
paced books, tapes
and transcripts-$75
Terry-352-746-1973
MOVING BOXES (50)
Sm. .25, med.50. large
$1. (352) 726-3631
Oriental Rug
Kirmann 9x12
ivory w/ pastels
Take with $950
(352) 422-1533
OUTSIDE DOG HOUSE
Molded plastic. Medium
to large dog. $30.00 call
Ruth 352-382-1000


ia2.m


ALL EXTERIOR
ALUMINUM
6" Seamless Gutters
Lic & ins 352-621-0881
SUBURBAN IND. INC.
Screen rms, Rescreens,
Siding, airports, rf.overs
wood decks, Fla. rooms
windows, garage scrns.
628-0562 (CBC1257141)




SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Washer &
Dryers, Free Pick Up
352-564-8179




Vertical Blind Factory
We custom make all
types. Best prices any-
where! Hwy 44 & CR
491. (352) 746-1998




Affordable Mobile
mechanical, electrical
fiberglass, OB/IO/IB.
WE BUY BOATS
711 NE6thAv. Cry Riv
352-795-5455

V THIS OUT!
PHIL'S MOBILE MARINE
Repairs & Consigment
30 yrs Cert. Best Prices
& Guar 352-220-9435




Loving Adult Care
Home (SL 6906450)
Alzheimer/Dementia
No problem. Nursing
homes do not need to
be your only alternative
352-503-7052




ROGERS Construction
All Construction
sm jobs Free Est (352)
637-4373 CRC1326872


Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
Repairs. 352 613-2518





Clean Ups &
Clean Outs
(352) 220-9190




DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469




Bianchi Concrete
inc.com lic/ins
Driveways-Patios-
Sidewalks.352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL/ Lic
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River rock
reseals & repairs. 352
364-2120/410-7383
ROB'S MASONRY
& CONCRETE Slabs,
Driveways & tear outs
Tractor work, All kinds
Lic. #1476, 726-6554




All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing,Hauling,
Site Prep, Driveways.
Lic. & Ins. 352- 795-5755




COUNTYWIDE DRY-
WALL 25 years exp.
For all your drywall needs
Ceiling &Wall Repairs.
Lic/ins. 352-302-6838
Make Walls & Ceilings
Look Brand New!
Custom textures & paint
* Ask about Popcorn
Removal (352)812-3388


Wall & Ceiling Repairs
& Sprays. Int/Ext.
Painting. since 1977
Lic/Ins 352-220-4845




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Plasma TV installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
ANNIE'S ELECTRIC
Husband & Wife
Team.(352) 341-5952
EC-13002696
BRIGHT ELECTRICAL
Res./Comm. Lic & Ins.
$50.hr. EC0001303
352-302-2366
CREATION ELECTRIC.
Full service electrical
contractor. Residential
& Commercial. Service
changes, large & small
repairs, spa hookups &
more. Lic / Ins. Call
352-427-4216
DUN-RITE Elect
Elec/Serv/Repairs
New const. Remodel
Free Est 726-2907
EC13002699 Serving
Citrus Co. Since 1978
Thomas Electric LLC
Generator maint &
repair. Guardian
Homestandby, &
Centurion. Cert. Tech.
Briggs Stratton 352-
621-1248 #ER00015377




A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002

BOB BROWN'S
Fence & Landscaping
352-795-0188/220-3194
ROCKY'S FENCING
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
k 352 422-7279 k




DRY OAK FIREWOOD
Split, 4 X 8 Stack $80
Delivered & Stacked.
352-344-2696


m eaonespI
Firewood $75 Per Stack
(4x8) Free Delivery
(352) 527-8352



ALL EXTERIOR
ALUMINUM
6" Seamless Gutters
Lic & Ins 352-621-0881
ALUMINUM
STRUCTURES
5" & 6" Seamless Gutters
Free Estimates, Lic &
Ins. (352) 563-2977



1 CALL & RELAX! 25 vrs
exp in home repairs &
remodel WE DO IT ALL!
Lic. 37658. & Ins. Steve
& Scott 352-476-2285
#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Plasma TV installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
Andrew Joehl
Handyman.
Gen/Maint/Repairs
Pressure cleaning.
Lawns/Gutters. No job
too small!Reli able ,ins.
0256271 352-465-9201
ABC Painting &
Handyman.
Low, Low Rates
30

yrs exp lic/ins Dale
352-586-8129
Affordable Handyman
*FAST
V AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handyman
FAST
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
FAST
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *


if Its Broke, Jerry Can
Fix It. Housecleaning
also. 352-201-0116 Lic.
Affordable Handyman
FAST
AFFORDABLE
Ve RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. -Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *
EXP'D HANDYMAN
All phases of home
repairs. Exc. work
Honest, reliable,
goodprices.Pres/was
paint Ins/Li c860-0085







Handyman Dave
Pressure Clean, Paint &
Repairs, oddjobs &
hauling (352) 726-9570
Remodeling, Additions,
Doors, Windows, Tile
work. Lic.#CRC1330081
Free Est. (352)949-2292




Citrus Cleaning
Team. top quality
work & great
rates. 302-3348
(352) 527-2279
MAID TO ORDER
House Cleaning *
(352) 586-9125
Have Vacum Will Travel




The Tile Man
Bathroom remodel
Specializing in
handicap. Lic/Ins.
#2441. 352-634-1584




#1 BOBCAT FOR HIRE
Light land clearing, site
work, grading, hauling.
NO JOB TOO SMALL!!!
Lic. & Ins. 352-400-0528


All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing,HaulingSite
Prep,Driveways Li/Ins
352-795-5755





Leeak
CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, curbing,
flocrete. River rock
reseals & repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
Florida Sitescapes, LLC
FREE est: Yard Clean Up
Mowing, and MORE
Call 352.201.7374
YARD CLEAN UP
Flowers, Bushes, Mulch
Rock & MORE! Call for
Your Yard Make Over
Lic/Ins (352) 344-8672




Florida Sitescapes, LLC
FREE est: Yard Clean Up
Mowing, and MORE
Call 352.201.7374
JUSTIN LAWN CARE
Fast and Affordable.
and Friendly, Licensed.
(352) 476-3985
LAWN CARE 'N" More
Fall Clean up, bed,
bushes, haul since 1991
(352) 726-9570
Leaves, TRIM, MULCH
Hauling FALL Clean
since '91 352 220-6761




AT YOUR HOME
Mower, Parts Service &
Repair.Visit our store@
1332 SE Hwy 19
352-220-4244




A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs, trash,
lawn maint. furn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767


CLEAN UPS CLEAN OUTS
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790
HAULING
FRE E ESTIMATES
scrap metals, haul for
FREE (352) 344-9273,




Chris Satchell Painting
ASAP
30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
A-I George Swedlige
Painting/press cleaning
Int/Ext. texture/drywall
repair (352) 794-0400
ABC Painting & Handy
man Low. Low Rates
30 yrs exp lic/ins
Dale 352-586-8129
CheapCheapCheap
DP painting/press.clean
Many, many refs. 20 yrs
in Inverness 637-3765








Handyman Dave
Pressure Clean Paint &
Repairs, odd jobs &

INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998




Tim Herndon Plumbing
$10. off w/this ad
10 yrs serving Citrus Co

(352) 201-8237



CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996


ABC Painting &
Handyman.
Low. Low Rates
30 yrs exp lic/ins Dale
352-586-8129









Handyman Dave
Pressure Clean, Paint &
Repairs, odd jobs &
hauling (352) 726-9570
Pic PICARD'S Pressure
Cleaning & Painting
352-341-3300





Remodeling, kitchens
baths, ceramic tile &
tops. Decks, Garages
Handyman Services 40
Yrs Exp. crc058140
344-3536; 563-9768




Attention Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers are
required by state law
to include their state
license number in all
advertisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious that
you may be contact-
ing an unlicensed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For questions
about business
licensing, please call
your city or county gov-
ernment offices.


Leok
$60. Bahia Pallets
U-Pick Up. Special
Winter Pricing. Call
Now!! 352-400-2221





A Cutting Edge
Tile Jobs Showers.
Firs .Safety Bars. ETC
352-422-2019
Lic. #2713, Insured.





A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest Rates
Free est.(352)860-1452

All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955

DOUBLE J Tree Serv.
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852

KING's Land Clearing &
Tree Serv. complete
tree & stump removal
hauling, demo& tractor
work 32 yrs. exp.
(352) 220-9819

R WRIGHT Tree Service
Tree removal & trimming.
Ins. & Lic.# 0256879
352-341-6827

RIVENBARK
LAWN & LANDSCAPE.
15% off Tree Trimming
in Feb. (352) 464-3566

RON ROBBINS Tree Serv
Trim, Shape & Remove
Lic/Ins Free Est.
352-628-2825





344-2556, Richard
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


tnJlI'IUt nGuIIIJ S
00~a


em322


Ron's Affordable

Handyman Services
-"- All Home
Repairs
Small Carpentry
Fencing
Screening
Clean Dryer
Vents
Affordable & Dependable
Expenence lifelong



DRYER V~~ENTCENN


BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Day,
We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over"Your Old One!!!
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!
Call now for a FREE
In-Home Estimate

1-866-585-8827
BATHFITTER.COM
000AECJ




Reveal The Beauty
of Your Wood



SPressure Washing


Classical Custom
Services, Inc.
Mark McClendon

352-613-7934
Over 20 Years Experience Licensed& Insured


CABINETRY


* 1 Day Cabinets Laminates
* Remodeling Supplies *Woods
* Refacing Supplies Glues
* Hinges Saw Sharpening
Cabinet Supplies & Hardware



3835 S. Pittsburgh Ave., Homosassa, FL
OOO.A7 352-628-9760






S* Diamond Brite
-iFlorida Gem
Marcite Decks
I* Payers /l
FREE Tile
ESTIMATES

DGREG'S COMPLETE
GRElG' REMODEL

MARCITE, INC.
CENSED 352-746-5200
& INSURED 321550


Freed Wrte mstiate

na Permit And
SEngineering Fees |
I Up to $200 value





Siding Sofit Fascia Skirting*Roofovers*Carports
.ScreenRooms Decks Windows Doors Additions
352-62n-7519






AAA ROOFING


Free Written Estimate



Any Re-Roof
I Must present coupon at time contract is signed
Lic./Ins. CCC057537 000A Y

ww* arofnfihmsta~o


SUNDAY, JANUARY 29, 2012 D9


COPES POOL
AND PAVER LLC
YOUR INTERLOCKING BRICK PAVER SPECIALIST
Build your new pool now and
be ready for next summer!
Refinish your pool during the cooler months.

352-400-3188







D0O SUNDAY, JANUARY 29, 2012




round 48" glass top and of Prime Hunting Land
4 chairs $60. Located in Gulf Ham-
Treadmill, electric, mock Management.
works good $50. Area. $165,000 OBO
(352)621-0674 after 5p (352) 795-2027
Refrigerator RCA (352) 634-4745
21.7 cu. ft almond CLUB CAR
side/side, no frost w/ice '06 $1,400,
maker $145. Treadmill with charger
good cond $75. firm 352-344-8516
(518) 314-7130
(518) 314-7130 Concealed Weapons
Seats for 2003 Town & Permit Course
Country Van DAN'S GUN ROOM
1 Middle seat and back (352)726-5238
row split bench seat (352)
Gray Leather all 3 for FRESH JUMBO SHRIMP
$200 (352) 344-4192 15ct.@ $5 per Ib
Sink Garbage Disposal Stone Crab@ $6 per Ib
Kenmore, new in box delivered 727-771-7500
3/4 hp $100 GLOCK 36
(352) 322-6456 45ACP, titanium
plugger, 3.5 LB
Medcl connector, 3 megs.
Eq im t holster, must D/L & V/R
$525.(352) 322-6456
Electric wheelchair,
with rising seat and GUN & KNIFE
new battery charger SHOW
and walker with seat,
both for $500 BROOKSVILLE
(352) 621-7505 HSC CLUB
GO-GO Pride Sat. Jan. 28th 9-5p
$400. Space Saver Jr. Sun. Jan 29th 9a-4p
$400. Shoprider $150 all HERNANDO COUNTY
w/chargers FAIRGROUNDS
(352) 489-3264 Admission $6.00
INVACARE ZOOM (352) 799-3605
220 SCOOTER, exc. Hunting Bow
cond. very good Hoyt Trykon hardly
used.(bad shoulder)
batteries, $350. Like new. viper sights,
(352) 726-8208 ACC Arrows $400.
Jazzy 1113 (352) 527-2792
Low Rider power chair Jason Model 330
w/ new batteries, exc Spotting Scope
cond cover & manuel 20X-60X
$550.(352) 726-3263 60 zoom, like new
NEW SHOWER CHAIR. original box $65
$25 352-527-9518 (352) 527-9323
NEW WALKER WITH Merkel model SRI,
SEAT. $100 30-06, new, $750.
352-527-9518 SAKO, manlicher stock,
WHEEL CHAIR 375 H&H, new, $975.
New Collapsible Browning, BAR, 25-06,
$250.(352) 527-9518 new, $875. Ruger,
extra mags, new, $575.
Enfield, Jungle Carbine,
.303, $625. Russian
sniper rifle, 7.62x54,
BUYING US COINS ammo, $375. S/W 460
Top $$$$ Paid. We Also V, .460, .354, and .45LC,
Buy Gold Jewelry new-in kit, $1,250.
Beating ALL Written Savage Striker, model
Offers. (352) 228-7676 516, .223, holster, new,


cellent, $375. Stoeger
Uplander, 28 ga, SXS,
new, $350.
(352) 356-0124
.Tree Stand-Summit
S'Viper' climbing tree
stand, like new $150
352-527-2792
MUSIC LESSONS WE BUY GUNS
Piano, Organ, Keyboard On Site Gun Smithing
at your home. Limited (352) 726-5238
openings. 352-422-7012 2)7265238
Your choice, never
used, 10" barrel Ruger,
44 magnum, $690.
7-1/2" barrel Ruger, 44
CHANDELIER 5 LIGHT, magnum, $550
UMBER GLASS, (352) 726-7932 Iv. msg


BRONZE METAL.
EXCELLENT CONDI-
TION $99 727.857.6583
KENMORE SEWING
MACHINE AND
CABINET. $50
352-527-9518
TOILET Clean, used,
bone color $5
352-201-0876
VACUUM BAGS for
Sharp vacuum 7 left in
bag. Vacuum died! Type
PU2. $7.00 Also drive
belt Call 746-1017
VACUUM CLEANER
Kirby Generation 3
all attachments-
needs belts $50.00
352 -746-9483
VERT BLINDS,120"X79"
VINYL, BAMBOO LOOK
VAL,TRAC&HARDWARE.
$99 727.857.5383
WATER CROCK ON
STAND ceramic jug with
spout on wooden stand
holds 5 gallon bottle
352-503-6037 $ 35.00



Aero Pilates Performer.
Model 55-4298A. Easy,
lie-down exercise as
seen on TV. Includes
neck pad and cardio
rebounder. Like new
cond. $150 obo.
352-746-1644.
NORDICTRACK T5ZI
TREADMILL Excellent
condition! Folds up for
easy storage. Built in
speakers, ifit compatible,
multiple programs to
choose from. Priced to
sell quickly at $500. Call
(352) 489-1527

-I

2 BIKES Ross Pro-26" la-
dies $15.00 mans $25..
(352) 6372499
22 GOLF CARTS
$5,900
(315) 466-2268


2004 H & W Flatbed
Utility Trailer, dual axle
5,000 GBW rating, ship-
ping weight 1,200 lbs
1,000 (352) 637-2846,
Kathy
EZ PULL TRAILERS,

Utility & Enclosed
BUY, SELL, TRADE
Custom Built, Parts,
Tires, Whis, Repairs,
Trailer Hitches

16' Car Trailer, Reg.
$1765 CASH $1695.
Stehl Tow Dollies
$895 (limited supply)
w/brks $1195

Hwy 44 Crystal River
352-564-1299

GULF TO LAKE
TRAILER SALES

Largest Selection &
Lowest Prices.
Offering New & Used
Cargo & utility trailers

Triple Crown Utility TRL
6 x 12 w/new spare
$995.
6 x 12 Enclosed w/
V nose, rear ramp
door, $1895.

Trailer Tires
starting at $69.95

352-527-0555
Hwy 44, Lecanto
UTILITY TRAILER Open
5x10, drive up ramp, 3
new R15 tires, good con-
dition. $650.
701-526-3619



LADIES WATCH very
nice crystal band and
face by anne klein $
75.00 firm 352-503-6037


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday "
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966



S I


2 SHELTIESAKC regis-
tered, male 3yrs old and
female 4yrs old, very
gentle. asking 400.00 for
both call 352-287-3390
DOG AGILITY EQUIP-
MENT 4 piece agility
setup equipment good
condition asking 100.00
352-726-9964





DOG OBEDIENCE
CLASSES STARTING
Feb. 4th In Lecanto
352-794-6314

KITTENS & CATS
many breeds, all
neutered micro chip,
tested, shots some
declawed$85-$150
352-476-6832
Koi and Gold Fish
FOR SALE, Great Prices
ALL SIZES. Call Jean
(352) 634-1783
MINI-DACHSHUNDS I
have Mini-Dachshunds
for sale. Dapples, black
and tans, reds and
pibolds. Males and fe-
males. PPOP, florida
health cert, sample of
food and toy come with
each pup 352-463-7345
Shi-A-Poo Puppies
Paper trained, good
with kids, will not shed,
health certs. CKC reg.
Fem $275Males $250
Yorkie Poos Male
$300(352) 489-6675
Shih-Tzu Pups, ACA
starting@ $300. Lots of
colors, Beverly Hills,
FL (352)270-8827
www.aceofouos.net
SOLD!!!!!!
2 Pitt Bull Puppies
1 male, 1 female,
4 months old
All shots $50 ea.


FOR SALE
Ponies and horses,
used saddles and
tack,Diamond P Farm
352-873-6033


Livestock


"r r "# ^

Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966


You can earn at least $800 per month
delivering the




Swww.chronicleonline.comr
Independent contractors delivering the Citrus County
Chronicle can earn as much as $1,000 a month
working only 3-4 early morning hours per day. The
Chronicle is a permanent part of Citrus County with
an excellent reputation. To find out more, call
and speak to one of our district managers or leave
your name and phone number and we will get right
back with you!



563-3201 OO...


I Sell or


Tropical LX Diamond
'05, 3 slides, 40'
19k miles, 350
Cat-Diesel. gen. 7.5
too many xtra's to list.
$98,500.352-503-3663




900-0229 DAILY CRN
Surplus Prop.
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County Board





361-0129 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF SALE OF
ABANDONED PROPERTY
The personal property of
Danielle Richards, 9297 N.


Emerald Valley Evitex,
I gallon, less I cup
$75.
(352) 270-9372
Looking for Fenced
Pasture for Goats
Call Mike
(352) 634-4237




BOAT LIFT
Single Pole,
1500 lb. capacity.
$900 obo
352-613-8453
Evinrude 65 hp 1992
OB $1,200. FREE 15"
boat w/trailer
(352) 897-4287




'06 ProKat 20 ft
140 HP Suzuki 4
strokelow hours, very
clean, Magic alum tan-
dem trailer VHF
Depth, GPS, Windless
anchor $18k obo
(352) 464-4877
'07 Proline 17 ft
4 stroke 90 HP Suzuki,
very low hours, ready
to fish trailer & more
$13,500 352-795-3894

18ft Runabout
with a Galv. Trailer
$400. (352) 476-1113

20ft Pontoon
2000 Fiesta, Fish N Fun,
no carpet, fiberglass fir,
85 Yamaha, Galv. trr.
$6,500. 352-613-8453
FRESH JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct.@ $5 per lb
Stone Crab@ $6 per lb
delivered 727-771-7500
HOUSE BOAT
30 ft fiberglass, hrd
wood fts, & more
Live Aboard or eniov
weekends in Paradise
$14,500 (423) 320-3008

JON BOAT
14ft Extra wide, with
trailer & new never
used 20HP Yamaha
4-stroke, $4,800 obo
(352) 726-9369

PROLINE
21' Cuddy, full transom,
w/brack, 150 HP Yam.,
Bimini, VHF, porta pot,
dep. finder, trailer
$5,900. (352) 382-3298

WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LAKE
MARINE
We Pay CASH For Used
Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck & Fishing
Boats (352)527-0555
boatsupercenter.com

























2000 Rialto Winn22ft
20MPG, runs greatnew
generator 86K, See to
appreciated 19,500
(352) 746-6559

2001 38 ft Holiday
Rambler, Cummings
diesel,2 slides, fully
loaded ,sell or trade
property $60000
859-814-3573

2009 DODGE RAM
3500, quad cab, terbo
deisel, loaded 27K mi.
still in warr. $30 000 obo
(419) 307-8954, ALSO

2010 MONTANA
Mountaineer, 5th wheel
36ft., 3 slides, great rm.
layout, like new
$32,500 obo Downsizing
(419) 307-8954

'94 Fleetwood
454 engine Bounder,
32ft., loaded, self
contained, 79k
$9,800. 352-795-6736

I Buy RV'S, Steve
Henry, RV World of
Hudson Inc.Since
1974. (888) 674-8376
(727) 514-8875

Infinity 99 M/Home
by 4 Winds, 35 Triton
V-10 gas, 44K mis. front
rear a/c, Onan Gen.
back up camera,
leveling jacks TV fully
equipped inc tow bars
& hitch + brks buddy,
assisted for tow vech.
all manuals for coach
& appls. NON Smoker
incls hoses, sewer &
electric hook-ups,
7 new NEW Goodyear
tires, See at Oak Bend
Village Route 40 W.
Dunnellon call for tour
(352) 465-6335 Was
$22,500 Now $19,750


tires, paint & inter.
showrm perfect, great
looking and driving car
$2,650, (352) 464-1537
VOLKSWAGON
BUG
2000, rare car, 5 spd
custom wheels $5,800
352-697-5677




of County Commissioners
will be selling surplus prop-
erty and equipment via
the internet at





Saponaria Dr., Citrus
Springs, FL 34433 is to be
sold at 9297 N. Saponaria
Dr., Citrus Springs, FL
34433, on Feb. 5, 2012, at
11:00 A.M. The property


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED



LAREDO
Like new '06, 33FT, T.T.
w/14FT slide, Has fiber-
glass Ext, free standing
dinette, elec. fireplace.
over 30K new asking
$13,000 obo
(352) 637-1796
SUNSEEKER '05
29 ft. Class. C., nearly
all options, generator,
needs awning fabric,
non smoker, 33k mi.
Only $26,500., 464-0316
WINNEBEGO
2001 Chieftain 35U,
garaged, non smoker
no pets. 2 slides, Cen.
Heat Pump. exc. cond.
76K mi., $38,900
(352) 208-8292




2004 TRUCK CAMPER
ADVENTURER 85 WS
ASKING $7600 EXCEL-
LENT CONDITION SEE
CRAIGS LIST ADD
#2758438332 CALL
352-628-4294
2011 Grand Junction
5 wheel, 40 ft, 4 slides,
w/Bumper to bumper
for 16 years, too many
extras to list! $37,000
(603) 991-8046
'07 32 foot KZ toy
hauler, like new, full
slide out, sleeps 7, new
tires Owan Gen. gas
tank, alumwheels
Lrg living area separate
cargo area $18,900
352-795-2975
I BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
call me 352-201-6945
JAYCO
2005 Jay Feather
LGT 25Z
New tires/brakes; sleeps
6;new queen mattress;
shower/tub; stove/oven;
refrig/sep freezer; lots of
storage. Like new $9,500
priced below blue book
retail see in Inglis
352-447-5434




Diamond Plate Truck
Tool Box
Good Condition
$60.
(352) 344-9479
Fiberglass Tonneau
cover w/liner GMC
pewter color, fits 2006
GMC Sierra, $400
(352) 697-2724
Maroon Cap 63V2 x 80
Rear slide, locks & keys
exc cond. fiberglass
brke & inter lights off a
Dakota, New $1500 sell
$400.OB0352-795-3920




BIG SALE!
Consignment USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
AUTOS FROM $1,500.
US 19 BY AIRPORT
US 44, BY NAPA
Low Payments *
461-4518 & 795-4440
consignmentusa.org

BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not*
CASH PAID $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars Trucks
& Vans, For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES,
Hwy 19... 352 564-8333
CASH PAID FOR JUNK
CARS Any Condition
Up to $500., Free
Towing 352-445-3909
KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Salvage Pays top $$$
for your autos.
352-628-4144
WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
Perfect Cond or not
Titled,No title,
No problem. Paying up
to $25K any make,
any model Call A.J.
813-335-3794/ 531-4298




2007 Toyota
Camry LE, 56k miles,
$12000
(352) 422-1533
'03 Buick LeSabre
Runs Perfect, electric
everything,89k, silver,
totally clean $5000 firm
352-586-9570
'08 Chrysler Sebr-
ing Touring
Convertible,34k miles,
loaded, $14995 firm
352-897-4520

BIG SALE!
Consignment USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
AUTOS FROM $1,500.
US 19 BY AIRPORT
US 44, BY NAPA
Low Payments *
461-4518 & 795-4440
consignmentusa.org

Cadillac 05
Sedan DeVille 89K mis.
loaded, mint, leather,
30MPG hwy $6995
352-422-7863
KAWASAKI '82
11,662K ,mis. LTD 550
lots of extras
great cond $1600 obo
(352) 228-1897
LINCOLN
'06, Towncar, Signature,
37K miles, looks, drives
even smells like new.
$16,500. (352) 746-1184
MERCURY
95,Grand Marquis GS,
4 dr, all electric, newer


FORD ESCAPE XLT
SPORT
2005, Red SUV, grey in-
terior, tinted windows,
219k mi, new engine,
FWD, 6 cyl, 3.0L, 200
hp. Nice, clean, great
vehicle! Asking $6,000
OBO. Call 352-613-6354,
Iv mess if no ans.
MERCURY '97
Mountaineer,cranberry
red, 5.0 L, 126K mi. ex-
cel. shape all receipts
$3,500 (352) 503-2792



'94 Dodge Grand
Caravan,runs good,
looks good, $1500
(352) 344-4229
MERCURY '99
Villager Estate, 7 pass.,
low mi., loaded, hitch,
excel. cond. $3,200


KYMLU
2008 MXU 300,ONLY
390 MILES, GARAGE
KEPT. LIKE NEW
$2000.00 CALL KEVIN
AT 352-212-8121




2005 HD Ultra
Classic w/Fat Bagger
kit, Custom seat,
wheels ect $15000 OBO
352-563-6327or 860-3481
Harley Davidson
04, $9700., Bagger
Crystal River
Cell (727) 207-1619
KAWASKI 2011
Vulcan 900 LP
low miles, many extra's
50 mpg $7,499. obo
over 1000's in options
(352) 697-2760
Lucky U Cycles
(352) 330-0047

2003 HONDA
GOLDWING TRIKE
W/TRAILER. LOADED
$18,995
2012 GOLDWING
801 MILES
$22,500.00
2004 HARLEY ULTRA
CLASSICLOADED
$10,750.00
2009 HARLEY 1200N
ALL BLACK
$6,995.00

FINANCE AVAIABLEII
WWW.LUCKYUCYCLES.
COM
352-330-0047
SUZUKI
2009 DR200SE DUAL
SPORT ONLY HAS 380
MILES ON IT. GARAGE
KEPT UNIT IS IN EX-
CELLENT CONDITION.
$2965.00 OBO CALL
KEVIN AT 352-212-8121




govdeals.com from Jan.
15 until Feb. 29, 2012.
Jan. 15thru Feb.29,2012






consists of Clothing, pic-
tures, make-up, personal
items and children's cloth-
ing & toys.
Jan. 22 & 29, 2012.


lul go yuuu, lIuu uvu
Blue, auto. Great first
car! 352-746-4789




AUTO SWAP
CORRAL SHOW
19th Annual
Sumter
Swap Meets
SUMTER COUNTY
Fairgrounds, Bushnell
Feb. 17, 18, 19th
1-800-438-8559







Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





'99 Nissan Frontier
4 cyl, AT/AC 1 senior
citizen owner with
gentle miles $3950
(352) 726-3268
BIG SALE!
Consignment USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
AUTOS' FROM $1,500.
US 19 BY AIRPORT
US 44, BY NAPA
Low Payments *
461-4518 & 795-4440
consignmentusa.org
DODGE '06
Dakota R/T, real sharp,
has been treated very
well 50K + easy miles
$13K (352) 795-7993
FORD '01
Lariat F 350 DRW 7.3
turbo diesel super cab
84K mis. exc cond $14K
call Bob(352) 794-3142
FORD 04
Lariat, super duty die-
sel, crew cabtan,
loaded, goose neck
hitch, new tires, brks,
140K mis. well maint
$11,500 (352) 344-4087
FORD 05
Sports Trac, 6 cy. 4 dr.
exc cond. 1 owner,
tamneau cover, 80K m.
$11,900 (352) 726-2038
FORD '99
7.3 Diesel, heavy
duty, 4x4 156K mi.
$10,900
(352) 628-4265
S t i


365-0129 SUCRN
2/9 Meeting CC Economic Development Council, Inc.
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Citrus County Economic Development Council,
Inc. will meet on Thursday, February 9, 2012 at 8:30 am. at the College of Central
Florida, Lecanto, Florida.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact 352-795-2000, at least two (2) days
before the meeting.
If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Council with respect to
any matter considered at this meeting, he/she will need to ensure that a verbatim
record of the proceedings is made which record shall include the testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal is to be based.
BY: John Siefert, Executive Director
January 29, 2012.


366-0129 SUCRN
2/8 Regular Meeting CC Tourist Development Council
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the CITRUS COUNTY TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL
will hold a regular meeting on Wednesday, February 8, 2012 at 9:00 a.m. at the
Lecanto Government Building, Room 166, Lecanto, FL 34461.
Any person desiring further information regarding this meeting may contact the
Executive Offices of the Board of County Commissioners, 110 N. Apopka Avenue,
Inverness, Florida, 34450 (352) 341-6560.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office, 110
N. Apopka Avenue, Room 102, Inverness, Florida, 34450 (352) 341-6560, at least one
day before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD tele-
phone (352) 341-6580.
WINN WEBB, CHAIRMAN
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC: Any person who decides to appeal any decision of the
Governing Body with respect to any matter considered at this meeting will need a
record of the proceedings and for such purpose may need to provide that a verba-
tim record of the proceeding is made, which record includes testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal is to be based (Section 286.0101, Florida Statute).
January 29, 2012.


350-0129 SUCRN
Inv, to Bid- Reroofing of Citrus High School Bldg, #3
PUBLIC NOTICE
INVITATION TO BID
Sealed bids for furnishing of all labor and materials and performing all work neces-
sary and incidental to Reroofing of Citrus High School Building #3 will be received by
the Citrus County School Board prior to 2:00 p.m. local time March 15, 2012, in the
Purchasing Department, Citrus County School Board, Building 200, 1007 West Main
Street, Inverness, Florida, 34450-4698. Immediately following all bids received will be
opened and read aloud in Building 200, Purchasing Department.
Each bid must be accompanied by a certified check or bid bond in the amount of
not less than five percent (5%) of the maximum amount of the Bid as a guarantee
that the Bidder, if awarded the Contract, will within ten (10) calendar days after writ-
ten notice being given of bid acceptance, enter into a written Contract with the
Citrus County School Board, in accordance with the accepted Bid, and give a
surety bond satisfactory to the Citrus County School Board equal to one hundred
percent (100%) of the Contract amount.
No Bidder may withdraw his/her Bid for a period of thirty (30) days after the date set
for the opening of the Bids.
All prime contractors must hold a Citrus County School Board Certificate of
Pre-qualification to bid on Citrus County School Board construction projects. Prime
contractors must be pre-qualified by the Citrus County School Board prior to submit-
ting a bid. Prime contractor's bids must be within the bid limits specified on their
pre-qualification certificate. For contractor pre-qualification information call the Cit-
rus County School Board Facilities and Construction Department at 352/726-1931,
ext. 2208.
Pre-bid Conference:
A. A mandatory pre-bid conference for Prime Contractors, and optional for
sub-contractors, will be held at Citrus High School, 600 West Highland Blvd.,
Inverness, Florida in the Cafeteria.
B. Conference will occur February 20, 2012 at 10:00 a.m..
Bidders may obtain a maximum of two (2) sets of Contract Documents from Rogers &
Sark Consulting, Inc., 2021 Palm Lane, Orlando, Florida 32803 upon deposit of a
check made payable to the Citrus County School Board in the amount of $100.00
per set. A refund of this deposit will be made upon the return of these Documents in
satisfactory condition within ten (10) days after the opening of Bids.
The Citrus County School Board reserves the absolute right to award the Bid to the
lowest, responsive Bidder, to waive any informality or irregularity in any Bid, or to re-
ject any and all Bids received based solely on the Board's determination of the best
interests of the School District.
CITRUS COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD, INVERNESS, FLORIDA
BY: Sandra Himmel, Superintendent of Schools
January 15, 22 and 29, 2012.


351-0129 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County School Board will accept sealed bids for:
Bid # 2012-30 HVAC UNIT REPLACEMENT FOR INVERNESS MIDDLE SCHOOL
MANDATORY PRE-BID MEETING WED. FEBRUARY 1, 2012 @10:00 A.M.
AT TECHNOLOGY RESOURCE CENTER, ROOM 101
Bid specifications may be obtained on the CCSB VendorBid website;
Automated Vendor Application & Bidder Notification System:
www.vendorbid.net/citrus/
Sandra "Sam" Himmel
Superintendent, Citrus County School Board

January 15, 22 and 29, 2012.

352-0129 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County School Board will accept sealed bids for:
Bid # 2012-31 HVAC UNIT REPLACEMENT FOR LECANTO HIGH SCHOOL
MANDATORY PRE-BID MEETING WED. FEBRUARY 1, 2012 @10:00 A.M.
AT TECHNOLOGY RESOURCE CENTER, ROOM 101
Bid specifications may be obtained on the CCSB VendorBid website;
Automated Vendor Application & Bidder Notification System:
www.vendorbid.net/citrus/
Sandra "Sam" Himmel
Superintendent, Citrus County School Board
January 15, 22 and 29, 2012.


353-0129 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County School Board will accept sealed bids for:
Bid # 2012-32 HVAC UNIT REPLACEMENT FOR TECHNOLOGY RESOURCE CENTER
MANDATORY PRE-BID MEETING WED. FEBRUARY 1, 2012 @ 10:00 A.M.
AT TECHNOLOGY RESOURCE CENTER, ROOM 101
Bid specifications may be obtained on the CCSB VendorBid website;
Automated Vendor Application & Bidder Notification System:
www.vendorbid.net/citrus/
Sandra "Sam" Himmel
Superintendent, Citrus County School Board
January 15, 22 and 29, 2012.


367-0129 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Fictitious Name
Notice under Fictitious
Name Law. pursuant to
Section 865.09, Florida
Statutes. NOTICE IS
HEREBY GIVEN that the
undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under
the fictitious name of:
Brush Strokes Painting
and Handyman Services
located at 14 Matricaria
Ct., Homosassa, FL 34446,
in the County of Citrus, in-
tends to register the said
name with the Division of


Corporations of the Flor-
ida Department of State,
Tallahassee, FL.
Dated at Homosassa, FL,
this 25 day of Jan.,2012.
/s/ Russell D. Novak
Steve Maas
Owners
Jan. 29,2012.
369-0129 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Fictitious Name
Notice under Fictitious
Name Law. pursuant to
Section 865.09, Florida
Statutes. NOTICE IS
HEREBY GIVEN that the
undersigned, desiring to


engage in business under
the fictitious name of:
West Coast Metal
Fabricators
located at 1965 N.
Dunkenfield Ave., Crystal
River, FL 34429, in the
County of Citrus, intends
to register the said name
with the Division of Cor-
porations of the Florida
Department of State, Tal-
lahassee, FL
Dated at Crystal River FL,
this 24 day of Jan., 2012.
/s/ Ronald Hauter
Owner
Jan. 29, 2012.


368-0129 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF FINAL AGENCY ACTION BY
THE SOUTHWEST FLORIDA WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICT
Notice is given that the District's Final Agency Action is approval of the Environmen-
tal Resource General Construction Permit on 55.04 acres to serve a Commercial De-
velopment known as Wal-Mart Store No. 5772-00 Beverly Hills FL. The project is lo-
cated in Citrus County, Section(s) 28 and 21 Township 18 South, Range 18 East. The
permit applicant is Wal-Mart Stores East Manaaement, LLC whose address is 2001 SE
10th Street, Bentonville, AR 72712-6489 and Gulf To Lakes Associates Ltd whose ad-
dress is 2600 W. Black Diamond Cir, Lecanto, FL 34461. The permit No. is
44024165.009.
The file(s) pertaining to the project referred to above is available for inspection Mon-
day through Friday except for legal holidays, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., at the Southwest
Florida Water Management District (District) Brooksville Regulation Department, 2379
Broad Street, Brooksville, Florida 34604-6899.
NOTICE OF RIGHTS
Any person whose substantial interests are affected by the District's action regarding
this permit may request an administrative hearing in accordance with Sections
120.569 and 120.57, Florida Statutes (F.S.), and Chapter 28-106, Florida Administrative
Code (F.A.C.), of the Uniform Rules of Procedure. A request for hearing must (1) ex-
plain how the substantial interests of each person requesting the hearing will be af-
fected by the District's action, or final action; (2) state all material facts disputed by
each person requesting the hearing or state that there are no disputed facts; and
(3) otherwise comply with Chapter 28-106, F.A.C. A request for hearing must be filed
with and received by the Agency Clerk of the District at the District's Brooksville ad-
dress, 2379 Broad Street, Brooksville, FL 34604-6899 within 21 days of publication of
this notice (or within14 days for an Environmental Resource Permit with Proprietary
Authorization for the use of Sovereign Submerged Lands). Failure to file a request for
hearing within this time period shall constitute a waiver of any right such person may
have to request a hearing under Sections 120.569 and 120.57,F.S.
Because the administrative hearing process is designed to formulate final agency
action, the filing of a petition means that the District's final action may be different
from the position taken by it in this notice of final agency action. Persons whose sub-
stantial interests will be affected by any such final decision of the District on the ap-
plication have the right to petition to become a party to the proceeding, in accord-
ance with the requirements set forth above.
Mediation pursuant to Section 120.573, F.S., to settle an administrative dispute re-
garding the District's final action in this matter is not available prior to the filing of a
request for hearing.
January 29, 2012.


I Misc. Not


I Misc. Noti


I Mis. Notes


Meeting
I Notices I


Meeting
I Notices I


Metn


I ^^Bi oc


I Bi


I Bid Notic




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


A -
CRY SAv


'11 IMPALA


'10 300


'10 ELANTRA


'10 CIVIC


$12,999 $1699 $9,999 $13,99
184R M OE 40sOR PER 1R SPER
OR$1MOR$2 4 O. OR $141MO. OMO


PT CRUISER


'09 JOURNEY
W. -- aih


'09 WRANGLER


'08 IMPALA

a Mi i


$6,999 $11,999 $16,999 $8,999
OR $99 M OR$170 lo.o240M OfoR$127Mo.


'08 CAMRY


'08 300


TOWN & COUNTRY


'06 ALTIMA
10 - --


-UEg2 HR MMEDNWAE WM
1-80-W-755 ^ d.204


$10Q999 1Q999 $12999 $9,499
OR ME 1O R$5 R MO$1 1R1571 .


'06 SILVERADO


'05 WRANGLER


'05 ACCORD


'04 F-250


$7999 $11,999 $7,999 $11,999
O 33oR$ MO99ROR0M OR 33MO.OR$243O.


II1


CALL THE INSTANT APPRAISAL LINE:

800M440-9054


0


*


*


FRE 4 RREDREDMSSE HINF M SEC PM
lb-800.58"7:5 Ei.17172


FRE 4 RR! OMD ESAE IT1NF=A SPR MCN
1-800-8"7:5W3716


SUNDAY, JANUARY 29, 2012 D11


RUE 2 HR RECORD MSSAG WH FU M ORPRN
1l8005N-875 E:t5132


REEHRR MStMDEL
1-80-58"55 EZ134


FRE 4 R! OREDMESGEWHIN A SEC WN
1-800-58"755 Bd3716


FRE 4 R IjIECO MSM rH INF ID SPEK y1^1IN
1i800-58"755 EiA202


FRE2 R EODDMESEWTH NOADSPK lMN


FRE2 H EOMDMSSG IH IFO MSIMIM


|NE!24If REC M MSA rHINFOMIDSPb PO
1-800%%"75 E^d.3132


FEE R ECRDD EM WITHIN NDSPCKPM
:- ^ :8jb: E=.200


FREE24 R WODEDMESAE: N M| SIECKWIN
1-800-8"755 xtA120


lRM 4H EIZI MBM WilINOMI SIK MCN
l-BM58"755 :dA20l


RUE24 RiECODEl=E E H NO Dl URPMIN
1-8005U-875 Ext621i




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


OF CR


BefterCars. !


Beffer Deals.


Better Hury p


Ii V1H4l1 'i I


All New
Redesigned!
I-- e-rm


#T120145


2.5L 4-Cyl DOHC 16V W/Dual VVT-I Engine 6-Speed ECT-I Transmission
Star Safety System Includes: VSC, TRAC. Air Conditioning AM/FM/CD Player
Cruise Control Power Windows Power Door Locks
MSRP........................................... $22770
Village Savings................................ $2,772

s19.9 99 8 .


u10
Featurii
ol


Star Safety System: VSC, TRAC, Anti-Lock
* Side Curtain Airbags & Dr. Knee Airbag AM/FM CD Player W/6 Spkrs
Dr. Smart Key Sys. Rmte Keyless Entry & Push Button Start
Cruise Control Power Locks &Auto Up/Down Power Windows
MSRP............................................$24,335
Village Savings...............................$1,840


yotaCare
ng a complimentary maintenance
an with roadside assistance


22 49 5


v
LIMITED -
SUPPLY Y


HWYi ''_ 2.5L DOHC 4 CYL.16V Engine W/Dual WT-1 179 HP
Electronic Power Steering System Star Safety System: Enhanced Vehicle
Stability Control, Traction Control Air Conditioning With Air Filter
AM/FM CD W/6 Spkrs Cruise Control Power Windows/Door Locks/Keyess Entry
MSRP........................................... $23,779
Village Savings.............................. $2,289

s21F.490


* 4.01 V6 DOHC 24V WT-1 270 HP/278 LB-FT 5-Spd Automatic Trans W/Sequential Shift
Automatic Limited-Slip Differential Dual Zone Air Conditioning
AM/FM CD W/MP3/WMA, 6 Speakers Power Windows/Door Locks
MSRP.............................................$27,510
Village Savings.............................. $3,660

s23.850


2002 CH1EI[ULlMONTE[CARI 2 BUICK LUCERNE
2 Dr. Cpe SS 4 Dr. Sdn V6 CXL
56,995 s14,995


Slack #J112.
2011 KIA FORTE 2009 NISSAN CUBE
5 Dr. HB Auto SX 5 Dr. Wgn 14 CVT 1.8 S
s16,995 s12,995


Stock #12010047
2009 CHEVROLET MALIBU
4 Dr. Sdn LS w/1LS
s12,995



Slock #11120338.
2008 CADILLAC DTS
4 Dr. Sdn w/1 SC
122,995


Sloc 12010204
2001TOYOTA SIENNA 2000TOYOTA4RUNNER 20071 HYUNDAITIBURON
5 Dr. XLE 4 Dr. SRS 3.4LAuto, 4WD 2 Dr. Cpe V6, Auto, GT
s8,995 12,995 '9,995


Slocv v11120396
2009 CHEVROLETAVEO
5 Dr. HB LT w/1LT
s8,995

IN WA


352-628-5100


www.villagetoyota.com


Price excludes tax, tag, registration,
title, and $499 dealerfee
Prices include all VllageToyota
incentives Offers cannot be combined
All vehicles subject to poer purchase
Al customers who purchase or lease a
newToyota receive a 2 year, 25K mile
free maintenance plan Photos for
illustration purposes only We reserve
the right to correct typographical errors


T1I


VILLAGE
19 *


- ----~


D12 SUNDAY, JANUARY 29, 2012


MUST PRESENT AD PRIOR TO PURCHASE


pp-


L7VA


NO R







Section E -SUNDAY, JANUARY 29, 2012




CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE REAL ESTATE GUIDE


INSIDE
I Sikorski's
r. Attic
PAGE E6


14 l-. w-
' 1*


dl


/ LW
t


': .*'I
I.


a
j


Jr


~wj.


Manager Jerry Holub looks at seed
packages on display Tuesday at the
Earl May Nursery and Garden Center
in Des Moines, Iowa. The USDA an-
nounced new maps for plant hardi-
ness zones, a key to determine
which plants can survive in what
parts of the country. The govern-
ment's official guide of colorful
planting zones is being updated for a
warmer 21st century.


f 13W


\


A


\-.^


~_-1


VIIIV.









E2 SUNDA'I~ JANUARY 29, 2012 Cimus Couivn' (FL) CHRONICLE


FITNESS CENTER & SPA!!!
* GORGEOUS HOME EASY ENTERTAINING
* Liv. Rm. + Fam. Rm. Backyard Patio
* Huge Master Suite Stunning Kitchen
* Clearview Estates WOW FACTOR!!!
KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997
VIRTUAL TOURS ii vil .Floildlltslinglnlo.com


Big screened porch with lake view. Really
clean, move-in condition. Detached shed/
workshop has washer/dryer, lots of storage.
Furnished and ready for a winter retreat.
Cash offers only.
JENNIFER STOLTI (352) 637-6200
Email: Info@CitruscountyHomes.com '
www.CitrusCountyHomes.com


1956 W. MARSTEN COURT, LECANTO
* Nice 3BR/2BA/2CG Brentwood Home
* Great Room Eat-In Kitchen
* Screened Lanai & Pool Nicely Landscaped
* Well-Maintained I
LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611
Email: lenpalmer@remax.net I


A t2417TN~FoIlNE
~ S 52)637 C
E thot j:-828
-- il*j^-l I j, #81A


0 I N. iEI.LUI1UNI UHIVE
CITRUS SPRINGS
* 3BR/2BA/2CG Beautiful Kitchen
* Great Room 18 In. Ceramic Tile in Living Area
* Newer Carpet & Paint Lots of Nice Upgrades
* 16x24 Patio Fenced Backyard
* Move-In Ready
LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611
Email: lenpolmer@remax.net


*LOVELY DECOR! BEAUTIFUL POOL!
* Split 3/2/2 Car. Gar. Wood Cabinets Galore
* Stunning Entry Custom Paint
* Oversized Lot!! Ruane Built!!
KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997


SUNDAY, JANUARY 28 1-3PM
20 TORENIA VERBENAS
3/2/3 with pool, built 2003
DIR.: U.S. 98 Rt. on Oak VIg. Blvd. S,
Rt. on Torenia Verbenas
NANCY BOWDISH (352) 628-7800 I.
Direct: (352) 422-029E KF
Visual Tours at www.buycitruscouity.com
SUNDAY, JANUARY 28 11-2PM
37 SAINT PAULIA ST.
3/2/3 with pool, built 2006
Dir.: U.S. 98 Rt. on Oak VIg. Blvd. S, Rt.
on Daisy, Rt. on Saint Paulia. I
VAL MAHONEY (352)220-4023
Email: vmohoney@atmpoboy.rr.com


' 188O Tear bullt m1212 on ./0 Acre
* Hardwood Floors Throughout Home
* Large Master Suites Split Floor Plan
* Security System Fully Enclosed Screen
* Room for Pool and More
* Close to Schools Must See!!! F'
CHERYL LAMBERT 352-637-6200 i L
Email: cheryllamberl@remax.net


I 100 W. Main Inveness63
8375 S. Sucos Bld. Ionssa6870 w.oueos~a~flecm54N w.1,C lRvr7524


626 E. BENJAMIN ST.
CRYSTAL HILL MINI FARMS
* 3BD/2BA/1 Carport Beautiful 2.34 acre lot
* Mobile home, shed Caged inground POOL
* Wood fireplace Screened porch
PETER & MARVIA KOROL _
(352) 527-7842
352) 422-3875


DUNNELLON!!
10 Acres of pasture, 3 bedroom, 2 bath
Homes of Merit doublewide, fenced and
cross-fenced, above-ground pool, shed,
20x24 metal building w/2 roll-up doors,
paved road.
DIANNE MACDONALD (352) 212-9682
Email: dfmfl@yahoo.com


ADORABLE 2/2 and minutes
to the Gulf of Mexico. Seawall,
dock and fish cleaning sink.

LUCY BARNES (352) 634-2103
Email: lucybarnes@remax.net
Visual Tours: www.crystalriverm.com


E2 SUNDAY, JANUARY 29, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Purchasing a new toilet seat


Q I know this sounds Polypropylene, basically a
like a basic ques- hard plastic material, is a
tion, but I want to very good choice. Think of it
make sure I get as going to a big
things right. My sporting event, and
wife informed me .- stay away from the
that my job was to cheap seats.
get a new toilet Features and
seat. Can you give maintenance. Many
me some tips? new toilet seats
What type of mate- lower slowly These
rial should the seat seats include tech-
be made of? Ed Del Grande nology that pre-
Fred, Virginia ASK THE vents the seat from
A: When it PLUMBER slamming into the
comes to making bowl. Also, look for
the right choice in a seat that unlocks
toilet seats, you really need at the hinge and can be re-
to consider three issues: moved easily from the bowl.
Toilet style and color. This is a great cleaning fea-
Toilet seats basically come ture, and can help put a lid
in two shapes: elongated on any toilet seat odor issues.
(egg-shaped) or round (circu-
lar). Check your toilet to con-
firm the correct seat needed. Master plumber Ed Del
For color, you can take your Grande is the author of"Ed
toilet-tank lid with you to the Del Grande's House Call,"
home store to make sure the the host of TVand Internet
new seat's color matches. shows, and a LEED green
Make and material. Buy associate. Visit eddel
a well-known brand name, grande.com or write eadelg
and spend the extra money @cs.com. Always consult
for a quality seat material, local contractors and codes.

LOOKING TO BUY OR SELL?
I'LL TREAT YOU RIGHT!!
DAN HOFFMAN, Realtor
KELLER WILLIAMS OF CITRUS COUNTY
OFFICE (352) 746-7113
DIRECT CELL- (352) 601-3627

KELLER WILLIAMS
R L A L I 0AFWX

.. Jackie Gaffney Jason Gaffney
Realtor A HOusE Realtor Et
E" 302.3179 SOLDwma' 287-9022 M ll
WEEKS REALTY, 5 BEVERLY HILLS BLVD.
The Golden Girl 746-.6700
6340 N. WHISPERING OAKS LP.
IN OAK RIDGE
T. I I 1: I

*21318 W. BUITONBUSH DR.
BEVERLY HILLS
h I l ., I I .I'.... . Ul),-
I I I h.


SHNS photo courtesy Kohler
When it comes to toilet seats, there are a few issues to con-
sider to ensure you make the right choice.


Clogs are causing


gutters to overflow


Q I had a contrac-
tor install pop-up
gutter drains.
They were supposed to be
dug 10 feet out. He
only did this for
one at the back of
the house. The
other three are I *
only 4 to 5 feet out.
I wasn't aware of
this and wouldn't
have realized this
wasn't proper. I
am now con- Dwight
vinced that this is HO
the reason that MAINTI
the gutters at the
front overflow. Am I right?
A: Having the buried
drains closer to the home's
foundation will not cause
the gutters to overflow. As
long as the drains are at
least 6 feet from the foun-
dation and the yard slopes
away from the home, the
pop-up drains are properly
installed.


)I


Gutters overflow be-
cause the drains or the gut-
ters themselves are
clogged. Gutters should be
cleaned and
1Q maintained annu-
ally; if you live in
a heavily wooded
S4 area, the gutters
may need to be
cleaned every
four to six
months. Leaf-
clogged gutters
Barnett can lead to foun-
ME dation flooding
NANCE and possible
structural dam-
age, so it is important to
keep the gutters free of de-
bris.
When working from the
roof area or from a ladder,
make sure you stay clear of
all overhead wiring. If you
must lean a ladder against
the gutter, use a short piece
See GUTTERS/Page E4


Ik4L h ITRUS RII R1EA LI LI y


Amanda & mrk Johm Tom Ballour Ul Aweus & Hd Stner Art Paty
BROKER/ASSOC. REALTR REALTOR REALR-BROKER REALTOR


746-9000


238 E TRIPLECRWNLP 4/33 353329 $385 000 7170 N. GRACKLE, 3/2/2 348792 $109,900 96N. EARLSHIRE TER. 4/2/2 350502135,000




4144 N. MAE WEST, 3/2/2 351560 $89,900 325 S. HARRISON, 2/1 352747 $42,90 870 N. CORTANDDR.,2/2/2352002$74,50


1/3 acre, 352170
$9,900


I 510 W. PLAYER PATH 2/2/1 352984 $92,500


CIOME


9570 N. CITRUS SPRINGS, 348850 $176,900 1


3521 N. LECANTO HWY., BEVERLY HILLS, FL 34465 1-888-789-7100


CITRUS SPRING
GOLF3CO3REL22T


I I


I I


I I


SUNDAY, JANUARY 29, 2012 E3







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


GUTTERS
Continued from Page E3

of a 2-by-4-inch board placed inside
the gutter to prevent crushing damage
from the ladder.
Make sure the feet of the ladder are
on a solid footing and that it does not
lean to the left or to the right Wear rub-
ber gloves, a long-sleeved shirt and eye
protection when scooping debris from
the gutter. Rather than dump the de-
bris on your lawn, use a small bucket
hung from a rung on the ladder, using
an old coat hanger bent to make a hook
Cover shrubs and flowers with a
tarp to prevent damage from loose and
falling debris. Once the gutters are
clean, use a garden hose to flush the
downspouts until they are running
free and clear
If the downspouts are clogged, they
will need to be removed, cleaned and
reinstalled. After the gutters are clean
and have had time to dry, you should
caulk and seal all joints and seams
against future leaks. It would be a
good idea to install a leaf-guard sys-
tem to prevent leaf and debris from
getting into the gutters in the future.


DwightBarnett is a certified master
inspector with the American Society
ofHome Inspectors. Write to him
with home-improvement questions at
C. Dwight Barnett, Evansville
Courier and Press, PO. Box 268,
Evansville, IN47702 or email him at
d.Barnett@insightbb. com.


12805 N. RIVER GARDEN DR., DUNNELLON 91 W. FOREST OAK PL, BEVERLY HILLS
Custom 3BR 2BA Riverfront home on 1/2 acer 3BR 2.5 BA in lovely Oak Ridge Community
RV parking area with electric & water hookup Solar heated pool & spa, Summer kitchen,
Dock for boat launch, great location. $325,000 40-year roof. $199,900




6329 N. MISTY OAK TER, BEVERLY HILLS 6301 N. MISTY OAK TER., BEVERLY HILS
3BR 2BA with loads of upgrades. 3BR, 2BA with oversized kitchen, corian countertop,
Lovely wood floors and 18" Tile. block glass in bath area, Hurricane shatter proof films on


I.
S1078W. WHITE OAK PL, HERNANDO ,,,ni........ .. d. ,,nI, .I. 11, .I
Bank Owned home. 4BR, 4BA with in-law suite. Over 3400 sq. over 2300sf which wll be great for entertaining on this 42x14
I dl . 1...i Fo Shi n 1.52.... ..1.. f.
... ... .... ...... .. .. .... ,I. l,, l lid..


Garden water features: Think small


Zaretsky and Associates Inc./Associated Press
This pondless waterfall built by Zaretsky and Associates in Rochester, N.Y.,
uses a below-grade water basin/filter system to house the pump. Four-inch
pipe carries the water to the top of the waterfall.


Less waste,

less work

DEAN FOSDICK
For The Associated Press

Water features can bring
interest, beauty and wildlife
to a garden, but they also
can be work.
That's why many home-
owners are choosing rela-
tively small options such as
fountains, bubbling urns
and waterfalls, rather than
ponds and streams, industry
analysts say
'"A big backyard pond
takes a lot of time to clean,"
said Laura Dickinson, ex-
tension master gardener co-
ordinator at Kansas State
University "You have to
fight with the critters, keep
the water in balance and
prevent algae from building
up. You have to do special
things in winter to shut it
down and again in spring to
set it up.
"It can get pretty expen-
sive if you want to hire all
that done," Dickinson said.
Sharon Coates, vice pres-
ident of Zaretsky and Asso-


ciates Inc., a landscape de-
sign and consulting firm in
Macedon, N.Y, said many of
her clients are forgoing
water features "because of
the perception of high
maintenance." The biggest
problems, she said, arise
from unforeseen circum-
stances.
"These can be caused by
chipmunks or other animals
nesting and chewing on the
liner, or even by herons de-
ciding to go fishing in your
pond," Coates said. "Bub-
bling urns or boulder water
features have a below-grade
plastic composite basin that
is not easily damaged."
Some things to consider
when deciding whether to
landscape large with ponds
or small with fountains:
Work: Water features are
a labor of love, and many
homeowners enjoy the ac-
tivities required to keep a
smooth-running pond, creek
and waterfall, Coates said.
But she adds a cautionary
note: '"As people work more
hours and feel the pressures
of balancing work and home
life, they are looking for the
benefits of a water feature
See WATER/Page E13


A CAROLE LISTER AD
S Multi-Million Dollar Realtor
EA Cell: 422-4620 Office: 382-1700
View virtual tours @ www.listerlistings.com

~.]
I 11-


NEW HOME & HOMESITE IN SUGARMILL WOODS
S. We have the finest
', team of
_: subcontractors
-in Citrus County
and the staff to
S- handle any job!


u6i Of citrus Inc. ----

HOMEBUILDER 8016 S. Suncoast Blvd.
Hwy. 19, 4/2 miles south of Homosassa Springs.
352-382-4888
www.sweetwaterhomes.com swhsales@tampabay.rr.com
NEW HOMES, VILLAS, REMODELS & COMMERCIAL


E4 SUNDAY, JANUARY 29, 2012


11:111 Ap









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE










COMMERCIAL INVERNESS
Retirement is the reason for the sale of this fine auto
service shop that has been successfully operated by the
owners for 28 years in this location. Between the City limit
and the expanding Inverness airport, on the recently 4-
laned US Hwy 41, on acres with a second access road in
rear. Shop has 6 bays, 4 hydraulic lifts, fully equipped and
ready for some young energy. Only hand tools and tool
boxes leave with owner/mechanics. Bldg has an office, 2
ea. baths, and a 270 sq ft loft.
MLS #344729 $499,000
JOHN HOFFMEISTER 352-476-7236


SUNDAY, JANUARY 29, 2012 E5


.American Realty



I & Investments


117 S. Hwy. 41, Inverness, FL



ER A 800-476-2590


R E A L ESTATE 352-726-5855


COMMERCIAL INVERNESS
Unique Resi/Commercial Combo: in prime location at the
corner of Dampier/Pine across from Skoors. 1 blk from the
Courthouse, this 1925 Cracker has been designated by the
City as a historic structure. Cut overhead by living where you
work. Original hardwood floors, fireplace and bead board
ceilings. Metal roof, updated elec and plumbing, commercial
Trane A/C, blown-in insulation and shed w/elec. Remarkable
property has 2 driveways and additional parking in back.
MLS #351246 $189,000
JENNIFER MUNN 352-422-8201


BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY INVERNESS
LOCATION is WOW! Excellent opportunity to own a
successful business in the ever-improving Historical Olde
Downtown Inverness business and walking mall area. The
consignment side of the business has been in operation
for 32 years and the second oldest retail shop in the City.
The formal attire side offers rental or purchase of Tuxedos,
Bridal Gowns, and tasteful evening gowns, dresses and
related attire. Inventory is the $100,000 range. Books open
to interested and qualified buyers only.
MLS #352683 $85,000
JOHN HOFFMEISTER 352-476-7236


VACANT LAND INVERNESS
Great building site for your new home. Flat land with
trees. Close to shopping & medical. Lots of golf courses
within 15 minute drive, bike and walking path close by.
Enjoy suburban living and still be close to all your needs
and desires.
MLS #353373 $4,000
BETTY POWELL- PAGE 352-422-6417


COMMERCIAL INVERNESS
Unique & excellent opportunity for versatile, commercial
building located just 2 blocks from Olde Downtown
Inverness. Prior usage was as a Amcraft, Custom
Cabinet company and Ponces Commercial Bakery.
Building can be separated into 3 sections all containing
power meter, A/C, 1/2 bath restroom, shipping bay w/
overhead doors plus entrance doors. Most interior walls
can be moved to suit needed configuration Handicap
parking & ramps at rear. Building is cleaned up, vacant
and ready for its new function, being sold As-Is.
MLS #353150 $250,000
JOHN HOFFMEISTER 352-476-7236


Cheerful and bright split 3/2/2 set on a hill on fenced 2.3
acres. Workshop with electric, wired for security, RV
parking w/elec h/up, 2 pear trees, and 2 gates make this
one extra special. The inground/caged pool with a view
has a solar cover and an additional entrance to second
bathroom. This private home is well taken care of with
termite contract and newer screen on cage.
MLS #351705 $154,000
JENNIFER MUNN 352-422-8201


"'---.-

VACANT LAND INVERNESS
If you are looking for a prime location to build your
business your search is over with this corner lot on
Courthouse Square in the Central Business District of
Inverness. Apopka, Hwy 41 and Courthouse Square gives
this property that sought after visibility and exposure. Can't
get much better than this.
MLS#351132 $115,000
SANDI HART 352-476-9649


RESIDENTIAL INVERNESS
Gorgeous Waterfront home in the very desirable Moorings
at Point 0 Woods. This 2/2/2 offers many extras and is
unique in itself. Stained glass accent windows, wood-
burning fireplace, lanai with Murphy bed, French doors,
etc. All of this and waterfront tool Fish from your backyard
in this beautiful maintenance free community with Walking
Trails, pool, RV & Boat storage, boat ramp and community
Point 0 Woods Golf Course.
MLS #349820 $125,000
SANDI HART 352-476-9649


MOBILE- INVERNESS
2/2 with detached 2 car a/c in garage and 1/1 w/den
guesthouse Many updates. On canal, close to Potts
Preserve. Owner finance, lease option, seasonal rental.
MLS #348380 $68,900
BETTY POWELL PAGE 352-422-6417


RESIDENTIAL HERNANDO
This 3/2/2.5 beauty with split floor plan and spacious feel
nestled in desirable Canterbury Lake Estates is offering a
delightful lifestyle in paradise. Wonderful master suite,
open living and dining room, enclosed lanai with outside
patio. Large lot with plenty of room for a pool. Community
Clubhouse area includes tennis courts and pool. Come
see why this community is a great place to call home.
Close to rails to trails.
MLS #350161 $172,000
SANDI HART 352-476-9649


Sunny cottage in downtown Inverness 1 block from Bike
Trail. This could be a dollhouse with a little work. It has a
newer roof and inside laundry. Passed a 4 point
inspection! SELLER will do OWNER financing. It has been
income producing in past years. Property is priced below
tax value. Historic homes close by. Convenient to Historic
downtown Inverness. Hospital and shopping close by.
MLS #352473 $39,900
BETTY POWELL PAGE 352-422-6417


CONDO/VILLATOWNHOME INVERNESS
Beautiful Villa in desirable Windermere. This spotless 2/2
split plan offers many extras beckoning that discerning
buyer. Beautiful view from lovely glassed lanai, plant
shelves with mood lighting etc. Maintenance fee of $148/
month provides easy living with roof care, lawn and shrub
care with irrigation, very active club house with heated
pool, exterior paint, basic cable and all this on our 46 mile
Rails to Trails. Windermere has fishing dock and Gazebo.
MLS #352069 $110,000
SANDI HART 352-476-9649


Immaculate, well maintained home located in Celina Hills,
one of the 7 Villages of Citrus Hills. Your newer home
offers a wide open and airy feeling with spacious inviting
rooms, cathedral ceiling, and huge Master closet. The
sparkling inground pool runs on an efficient and healthier
salt system, and uses solar heating to extend the
swimming season. The spacious and very ample kitchen
with nook adjacent to lanai and caged pool area.
MLS #350994 $209,000
JOHN HOFFMEISTER 352-476-7236


RESIDENTIAL INVERNESS
In upscale Baymeadows at Seven Lakes, just minutes to
Olde Downtown Inverness, Inv Golf CC, boat ramp & park
on Lake Spivey, & 46 mi Rails to Trails. 635' road front &
208' lakefront border this 1.8 ac site. Custom Rusaw
'Hartford' model w/central vac, alarm, wchair/handicap
mod, wood-burning fireplace, sitting area in Master.
Upgrades: Master BA-03; AC-04; roof-05; tankless water
heater-06; pool Diamondbrite-07. 1 yr Home Warranty w/
full price offer. Furniture is negotiable outside of Closing.
MLS #352231 $349,000
JOHN HOFFMEISTER 352-476-7236


RESIDENTIAL INVERNESS
2 Master Suites!! Bring the horses and your favorite
chaise lounge to savour the beautiful sunrises over your
Private 1 ac Pond! This 2 owner home has been
meticulously maintained and is squeaky clean from the
beautiful Terrazzo thru all of the upgrades and updates.
The home sits well off of the road and has long
sweeping circular drive for easy, safe access. Plenty of
room to park your toys, and then relax by your own pond
and enjoy your piece of laid-back Citrus Co., just
minutes from Downtown. Home Warranty.
MLS #352694 $159,000
JOHN HOFFMEISTER-352-476-7236


Ilim ilii, al ,, -. = "..... __ 11
RESIDENTIAL FLORAL CITY
Family Time Country 3 bedroom, 2 bath home on 1/2
acre. Cute Jim Walters 2-story home across from open
pastures. Large closets in bedrooms and ample storage
under the stairs. Nice tile in living-dining, kitchen area.
House has dual pane windows throughout. Property next
door is available at 8060 Julia, if interested.
MLS #352815 $58,900
PEGGY TAYLOR 352-408-0676


iM'- i- s- W -.-: .- -.

RESIDENTIAL INVERNESS
Awesome location on an acre. Room for animals and kids.
2 bedroom, 2 bath with large open plan and a den, office
or extra bedroom to make the house a 3 bedroom. A
gardeners dream with nice landscape in back and extra
storage in a little barn. Great detached double car garage
and small potting area. Newer outside paint, roof and a/c.
Come and decorate to your taste.
MLS #353258 $84,900
PEGGY TAYLOR 352-408-0676


RESIDENTIAL FLORAL CITY
Golden opportunity!! That is what you will have with this
30.50 piece of property. Bring your ideas for this parcel of
land. This is a retired fruit grove, some trees still produce.
Spring feed canal has a total of 4,000 feet water front.
There are 2 cabins, pole barn and a large work area with
office. So much to offer come and check it out. You will
not believe the grand oak trees with all that nature has to
offer. This parcel is connected to MLS# 349789.
MLS#349781 $355,000
MARGARET BAKER 352-422-0877


mu7 ILI. I"LUrruL .111
Come and Get IT! No more waiting this home is move-
in ready. Large living room, large eat-in kitchen & master
bedroom has room to spare.
MLS#351525 $59,000
MARGARET BAKER 352-422-0877


i n e..r- 1 m.. um vr-mnl.r-
Water Beautiful! This Hampton Lake home has so much
to offer. From the inside of the home there is a panoramic
view of the lake. Stone fireplace in the huge great room,
master suite has office in it and you have a great view of
the lake! Come see this home you will not be
disappointed.
MLS #352296 $315,000
MARGARET BAKER 352-422-0877


UNI IDA U A 2 ,


REDUCED~


Jim






E6 SUNDAY, JANUARY 29, 2012



HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information........352-563-5592
..................................... .............. advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information........................352-563-5966
News information................................................ 352-563-5660
....................................... ............. newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listing............www.ChronicleHomeFinder.com
"The market leader in real estate information"

Cifik 'iiE

HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-563-
3280, attention HomeFront.
News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
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Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes for
space and/or clarity.
For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


Bird feeder designs


lure different species


attracting birds by using bird feeding
stations is not a new concept, and
you may be surprised to learn bird
feeding in the United States dates back to
1845, when Henry David
Thoreau reported feeding birds
at Walden Pond.
The first commercially-made
bird feeder was designed for .
hummingbirds, and went on the
market in 1926. Today, more ..
than 50 million Americans put
out a billion pounds of bird food
each year
In most cases, native plants Joan B]
are best suited to provide food FLOI
for birds, and require little FRIE
maintenance. One of the most LIV
effective ways to attract birds to LI
your backyard is to use native
plantings to provide the natural habitats
that have supported the birds for thou-
sands of years. However, bird feeders can
be used to supplement the food provided
by native plantings. They also provide a
way to observe birds at close range.
Before placing bird feeders in your
backyard, consider the wide range of bird


r
R

1


feeders available:
Tube feeders: A tube feeder is a hollow
cylinder, usually made of clear plastic or
glass so that the seed is clearly visible,
with multiple feeding ports and
perches. These hanging feeders
can be filled with a variety of
different seeds. Because
perches are generally fairly
short, usually only small birds
such as chickadees, titmice,
"' wrens, and finches can eat from
tube feeders.
Hopper feeders:This type of
adshaw feeder comes in many whimsi-
IDA- cal designs, with the most com-
NQDLY mon resembling a small barn
with clear plastic sides posi-
NG tioned in a V shape. Hopper
feeders typically hold more
seed than other feeders and require fill-
ing less often. The quantity of seed they
hold can also attract pesky squirrels. Hop-
per feeders attract all the same bird
species as tube feeders, along with larger
birds like blue jays, cardinals, grosbeaks,
and woodpeckers.
See FEEDERS/Page E15


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Inside...




WV.


Zone shift
PAGE E8
Jane's Garden
PAGE E9
For current property transac-
tions, use the search features on
the website for the Citrus County
Property Appraiser's Office,
www.pa.citrus.fl.us.


Specialty auction firm can determine value of antique reel


Dear John: I am enclosing sev-
eral pictures of my Mohawk
fishing spool reel No. 3123600.
As you can see, it depicts two anglers,
presumably on
a lake, with one
rowing the boat
and the other
pulling in a
bass, with
somewhat de-
tailed cat reeds i
in the fore-
ground and pos-
sibly unrefined John Sikorski
cat reeds in the SIKORSKI'S
background. ATTIC
The handle it- Atec
self is some-
what detailed, depicting what I
believe are oak leaves. The spinners
on the reel handle appear to be mar-
ble; however, I think they might be
plastic. As you can also see in the pho-
tos, the reel has a spooling guide to
evenly spool the fishing line back onto
the spool as you reel in the big one. On
the pole mounting plate it says "PAT.
APP FOR MADE IN USA 37."


Special to the Chronicle
ABOVE: This is an ox yoke, most likely a reproduction done for decorative pur-
poses. Items such as this fall under the Farm Antiques collecting category. Be-
cause of their popularity as decoration, reproductions of antique farm equipment
are fairly common. RIGHT: Antique fishing equipment has long been of interest
to collectors; this reel was produced by Mohawk, a recognized manufacturer.


I do not know what kind of metal or
alloy this was made from, because
only the spool seems to be magnetic.
Any info on age and or value would be
truly appreciated, as I received this
from my late step- grandfather, even
though I never knew him to be an an-


gler other than when we used to catch
blue crab with chicken legs tied to a
string and hung off a dock.
Oh, I failed to mention, it is not very
clean, but is in fairly presentable
See ATTIC/Page E14






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Don't let the winter


blues get you down


Some people thrive during the
winter months. For them, there's
not a shortage of fun activities to
do. But for those who don't enjoy cold-
weather sports, the winter
months can drag on. Cabin
fever sets in.
What frugal activities do
you do during winter
months?
To help you avoid going
stir-crazy waiting for spring,
here are a few blah-busting
tips:
Food luxe: Splurging a bit Sara
on food is a nice winter lux-
ury. Planning a special FRL
meal once a week will give LIV
you something to look for-
ward to. Winter is the perfect time to
expand your cooking repertoire. Buy
or borrow a new cookbook or search
online for new recipes to try Make
eating healthier a part of your goals
for 2012. It's the perfect time to grow
kitchen herbs, too.
Watch programs: Grab a comedy
and laugh, catch up on a TV series you
might have missed or watch programs
that focus on the outdoors. Gardening
shows can inspire you, and it's not too
early to order seeds and get a jump-
start on your garden with winter sow-


I


ing. For more information, check out
www.wintersown.org.
Get outside: While you can't stay out
as long during colder months, a brisk
walk will do you some good.
Breathe in the air and ab-
sorb the sunlight. Set up a
bird feeder and birdwatch.
Grab your camera and take
some scenic pictures, too.
Exercise: If you're not
into winter sports, there are
plenty of exercises you can
do inside. There's time to
Noel get in shape before sum-
mer. Work out with an exer-
GAL cise video for 20 minutes a
NG day For ways to stay fit at
home on a budget visit:
www.frugalvillage.com/2009/12/03/
stay-fit-on-a-budget.
Take a class: If you've been thinking
about taking a class like cake decorat-
ing, knitting or learning a foreign lan-
guage, do it. Get out and interact with
other people. Look for classes that in-
terest you at your local craft store,
gym, community center or community
college. If you can't find an affordable
class, start a group yourself.
Prefer not to be around other
See FRUGAL/Page E10


GOT A NEWS TIP?
* The Chronicle welcomes tips from readers about breaking news. Call the newsroom at 352-563-
5660, and be prepared to give your name, phone number, and the address of the news event.
* To submit story ideas for feature sections, call 352-563-5660. Again, be prepared to leave a
detailed message.


ON QUIET STREET
Close to the Golf and Country Club,
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-inground caged pool. Over large garage
-- with office. Circular driveway backs up to
NICE PRICE REDUCTION on the downtown Duplex. Great preserve so no neighbors behind you.
location in the heart of Inverness. In 2005 new central AC and heat ONLY ASKING $229,000 MLS #353220.
units. Tip Tp shape. location, condition, is duplex has it all. Owner
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urs I I* I, ll *


,JER! PERFECT IME TO -BJI !! I


SUNDAY, JANUARY 29, 2012 E7


~r~i~ ~:







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


New map to shift plant zones


The USDA is changing its planting zone map' Ler:a,.,e ine
country is warmer and data and map'-niakin: leC:n iK oh.j, are
better. Average low temperatures for .aro.._; region.

-60 to -50 degrees -20 to -0 1 0 to 4,, 1I :. r .: 1 7, r.:. :


below -50 degrees -20 to -25
below -50 degrees -20 to -25


0 to 5 20 to 25 40 above








.AP


New guidelines ref

Associated Press

WASHINGTON
Global warming is hitting not
just home, but garden. The
government's colorful map of
planting zones, most often seen on
the back of seed packets, is chang-
ing, illustrating a hotter 21st century.
An update of the official guide for
80 million gardeners reflects a new
reality: The coldest day of the year
isn't as cold as it used to be. So some


lect warming trend due to climate change


plants and trees that once seemed
too vulnerable to cold can now sur-
vive farther north.
It's the first time since 1990 that
the U.S. Department of Agriculture
has updated the map and much has
changed. Nearly entire states, such
as Ohio, Nebraska and Texas, are in
warmer zones.
The new guide, unveiled Wednes-
day at the National Arboretum, also
uses better weather data and offers
more interactive technology. For the


first time it takes in factors such as
how cities are hotter than suburbs
and rural areas, nearby large bodies
of water, prevailing winds, and the
slope of land.
"It truly does reflect state of the
art," said USDA chief scientist
Catherine Woteki.
Gardeners can register their zip
code into the online map and their
zone will pop up. It shows the exact

See Page E13


SOURCE: USDA


I


E8 SUNDAY, JANUARY 29, 2012







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


February flowering plants in Florida

ebruary is still winter, even in thickets. One of the first flowering

SFlorida. The northern hemi- trees in February, it has showy clus-
sphere is tilting on ters of small white five-
Earth's axis back toward petaled blossoms. Edible
the sun. Each day now has I round fruit matures from a
more daylight. half-inch to about an inch
Central and North diameter Tart yellow plums
,'. Florida can expect several blushed with red have a
more frosty mornings lo- white glaze.
cally until March. Longer Chickasaw Plum is a
daylight and the accumu- thorny, scraggly, multi-
.a.z lated number of chill-hours stemmed deciduous tree
trigger some Florida plants valued as an ornamental.
to bloom this month. Jane Weber Webworms frequently in-
S- Native, deciduous Chick- JANE'S habit it Supplemental irri-
Sasaw Plum, Prunus angus- GARDEN gation and fertilizer are not
tifolia, is a shrubby, small GARDEN necessary
S'tree of dry sandy soils. It Flatwoods Plum, P um-
ranges from Central Florida north to bellata, is a respectable single-
,Delaware and west to Texas in Zones 5 trunked tree which grows up to 20 feet
,to 9. Rarely more than 10 feet tall, it
suckers from root runners to form See Page E15


JANE WEBER/Special to the Chronicle
Chickasaw Plum is one of the first flowering trees in February. It has showy clusters of small white
five-petaled blossoms. This thorny, scraggly, multi-stemmed deciduous tree is valued as an orna-
mental. Supplemental irrigation and fertilizer are not necessary.


REALTY GROUP


fillas/3Bd/2.5Bath/Den/2Car/Hillside Villas Detached Villa 3Bd/2Bath/2Car/Southgate Villas
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Great single family home in Terra Vista. Tile in living areas. Terra Vista Maintenance Free Villa. Popular Lantana Model.
Features include a great kitchen with center island and Open floor plan features formal dining, breakfast bar and the
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cart bay. Home is situated on a beautiful oversized private lot. finished with pavers for nice curb appeal. Well maintained.
M LS#352902 ................................................................... $274,900 M LS#353077 ......................................................... $219,000

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Brentwood Townhomes spacious unfurnished end unit. Great Nice furnished end unit townhome in Brentwood. Open floor
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#1149 ...................................................................................... $1100 #1272 ....................................................................................... $1100
Terra Vista Realty Group, LLC Office in the =
2400 North Terra Vista Blvd., Hernando, Florida 34442 Terra Vista I
(352) 746-6121 0 (800) 323-7703 Welcome Center R


SUNDAY, JANUARY 29, 2012 E9







E10 SUNDAY, JANUARY 29, 2012


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E7

people? Take free classes
online. There are plenty of
resources available, such
as:
Open Yale Courses. In-
formation on free introduc-
tory courses is available at
oyc.yale.edu.
The OpenCourseWare
Consortium at www.ocwcon-
sortium.org is a collabora-
tive effort by colleges and
universities to share
courses and lectures online.
Notably, MIT is now offering
official certificates for on-
line study
UC Berkeley offers
audio and video classes at
webcast.berkeley edu.
Apple makes lectures,
films, foreign language les-
sons and more available
through iTunes U at
www.apple.com/education/i
tunes-u.
The BBC offers audio
and video foreign language
classes in French, Spanish,
Greek, Italian, German, Por-
tuguese and Chinese at
www.bbc.co.uk/languages.
Search YouTube and
you're sure to find virtually
any how-to instruction video
you're looking for.
Add some color: Open up
curtains and blinds and let
the sunshine in. Add a fruit
bowl, scented candles or a
decorative accent, such as
placemats, toss pillows or a
new shower curtain, to add
a touch of cheerful color.
Bring a few green or bloom-
ing houseplants or bulbs
into your home, and listen to
your favorite music, too.
MEN
Organizational tools can
help family schedules run
more smoothly Items such
as a household notebook,
folders, totes, baskets, bins,
a dry erase board and
checklists work well.
The first reader tip shares
another helpful tool:
Handy calendar: I buy a
big desktop calendar at the
dollar store, attach a couple
magnets to the back with
glue and hang it on the
fridge. I add all the birth-
days, anniversaries, ap-
pointments and important


dates, then have all the kids
write what they have going
on as soon as they know
what their schedules are.
It's big enough to hold a ton
of info, which saves time, as
everything is in one spot.
There's also room on the
bottom to add notes. I check
the calendar each night be-
fore bed, and again first
thing in the morning, so I
know who is doing what for
the day -Patty, Utah
Reuse milk cartons: I
often mail a dozen cookies
to my sister using an empty
milk carton. I wrap the
cookies in plastic wrap, then
use wax paper to fill any re-
maining space. It always ar-
rives whole. Being
waterproof helps, too. -
Sue, Massachusetts
Reuse plastic ice-cream
tubs: I save them up and we
use them at the food bank to
pass out laundry soap and
shampoo. R. Sullivan,
email
Flea control: My parents
used to put a hot plate in the
middle of the room to get rid
of fleas. The fleas seek heat
and make a satisfying
"ping." You have to keep
pets and small children out
of the room, of course; and it
doesn't do anything about
the fleas on the pet. EW,
Michigan
Price Book app: If you
have a smartphone, you
might be interested in an
app called Price Book. It's
my new best friend. The app
asks for the name of an item,
the number of units (as an
example, I tracked my milk
in ounces because there's so
many different containers
and they all have an ounce
listing), the price you paid
for the item, what store you
found it in and whether it
was on sale. The next time
you click on the item, Price
Book brings up a list of all
the places you've seen it,
with the price per unit
arranged from lowest to
highest Very helpful for fru-
gal shoppers! -Nishu, Cal-
ifornia
Sticker greetings: On hol-
idays like Valentine's Day, I
put themed stickers on the
fruit in my kids' lunchboxes.
It's a fun and inexpensive
way to say "I love you." -
Carrie, Indiana


MEN
Dear Sara: I want to make
no-bake cookies with oat-
meal and peanut butter,
cooked on the stovetop.
Other people make them
and they are moist, with a
glossy sheen. Mine are dry
and dull. I'm not sure what
I'm doing wrong. Any tips or
suggestions? Anny,
forums
Dear Anny: There are
quite a few different no-
bake cookie recipes that
contain oatmeal, peanut
butter and chocolate in var-
ious quantities, and some in-
clude maple syrup, honey,
milk and/or chocolate pow-
der. The difference in ingre-
dients can make the end
result look considerably dif-


0 CTRUS -- &I I OFFICES


SdO
Sandra Olear



Brian Murray



Anna Moore



DickHildebrandt







IMf
FlorenceCleary



Helen Forte



Jane 0. Gwynn



Joann Martin




Matt Robinson




Tami Mayer


ferent and taste quite a bit
different, too.
One problem with some
no-bake cookie recipes is
that if you don't cook the
chocolate long enough, the
cookies fall apart and end
up a crumbled dry mess.
They can also become dry if
you use the wrong kind of
oats (most recipes call for
quick-cooking oats).
When I make mine, I use
an electric skillet rather
than the stovetop. I opt for a
medium setting so the
chocolate isn't boiling on
high. You don't want to over-
boil or under-boil the choco-
late. You need to boil
exactly one minute from the
time it hits a rolling boil,
stirring constantly, then re-


move from heat and mix in
the other ingredients.
Rather than simply drop-
ping them by the table-
spoon, I shape them a bit to
form a more uniform cookie
shape, too.
Dear Sara: I would like to
use my oven to dehydrate
foods like celery, peas, etc.
What temperature should I
use, and for how long? -
A.D., forums
Dear A.D.: To dehydrate
whole celery stalks in your
oven, you would need a tem-
perature of around 135 de-
grees for six to eight hours.
The lowest temperature set-
ting on most ovens is 150 de-
grees, so you would need to
prop the door open a bit to
get the lowered tempera-


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

ture. Keep in mind that you
would need to blanch your
celery beforehand and
shouldn't use a cookie sheet
(mesh screen is preferable),
too. In other words, it can be
done, but using your oven
would be pretty costly If you
don't own a dehydrator,
even buying it already dried
would be more cost-
effective.
Another option is to
freeze your celery You can
freeze it as-is or blanch it for
three minutes before freez-
ing (chopped rather than
whole stalks would be best).
As for peas, they need
about 120-140 degrees to
dry So again, you'd need to

See FRUGAL/Rage E15


Wv Prudential

Florida Showcase
Properties


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Open 1 Days For Your Convenience
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OPEN HOUSE SUN 1-3




MLS#346701 $117,900
You will not find a better Meadowview Villa Period

Directions tie. 486 to south on Annapolis,
to right on Hillsborough to #804.
Mark Casper 352-476-8138
REDUCED 4K


382i, M P 1l, .I, V4II t Ie
MLS #345550 $37,900
Cozy maintenance-free villa in congenial
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paint and beautiful rear and front patios.


- -oc w" -
211859 N. Bluff Cove Path
MLS #353225 $189,900
corner Surrounded by estates valued in
the 400K+, pay less than $200K for this
20043/2/2 perfect Florida floor plan


MLS #346943 $199,000
Beautiful 3/2/2 pool home in prestigious
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leading to huge lanai and free-style pool.
The wooded one acre lot even has a lovely
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MLS #349777 $449,000
Unique 3/3/3, two masters each w/large
siting areas. 3rd bedroom has 4 built-in
bunk beds used as family rm. Kitchen w/
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Ig. lanai meditation area, game room &
wet bar. Motivated seller.
PENDING




'' 1 *1" M Buinir Terr.
MLS #347583 $165,000
4/3/2 Pool home w/m-law suite.
Main house is 3/2/2 w/spacious
kitchen. The attached in-law suite
has its own kitchen, living rm., BR
& private BA.


1- M,,1 M. t 04 LI,
MLS 350733 $159,900
3/2/2 Nearly new, part-time home w/eat-
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a beautifully landscaped private cul-de-
sac. The home is built for coziness &
comfort Owners will consider all offers.


PENDING


/" "*'" oW20V Dlh.Hin Ti..
MLS #350716 $65,000
Nice 2/2 splt plan villa w/a huge 1 car
garage on a quiet cul-de-sac. Ready for a
new owner w/newer hot water heater,
newer Puron hi-efficiency air conditioner
and a screened lana with vinyl windows.


2011 Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entitles. An independently owned and operated broker member of Prudential Real Estate Affiliates, Inc., a
Prudential Financial company. Prudential, the Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are service marks of Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities,
registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Used under license. Equal Housing Opportunity.


Joy Holland


1j
KathyDagle



LoriNickerson



Mark Casper



MikeMcHale



Phil Phillips



Steve Dobbyn



Teresa Boozer




Joann Condit




Barry Cook


OPEN HOUSE SUN 1-3 OPEN HOUSE SUN 1-3 OPEN HOUSE SUN 12-2




L i3 .. 7 4i0 0it ,, S 3. ............. .. I I IN 15-2 .10 1 4
MLS#352377 $174,.900 MLS #347113 $149,000 MLS #352602 $114,900
Put your own touches on this well cared for, one


Dirions: RMt. 486 to Cims Hills Blvd., to eight on
R1hill left on Lncasto, to eight on Knightsbidge to
home on let
D ick H ildebrandt 352-586-0478


" .;.5 .. ,, . .. .
P.."v '" I -


REDUCED 50K REDUCED 5K


Jo, Ann Martin 352-613-2238
Jo Ann Martin 352-613-2238








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


-C chronic


To place an ad, call 563-5966


Brooksville
NO DEPOSIT
$100. PER WEEK
2/1, WATER GARBAGE
INCLUDED
Call Tom
352-754-8687

C.R/Homosassa
1& 2 Br. furn, quiet park
Util. incl. clean, shrt/long
term 352 220-2077

Citrus Springs
2/1.5 on 2.5 acres,
clean, bright, quiet.
$650.(352) 603-0024

CRYSTAL RIVER 2/1
Sr. Disc. $500. mo. Call
For Info 352-584-3348


CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1, $425, 2/2 $450,
3/2 $450 All on % Acre
Lots (207) 205-0592

CRYSTAL RIVER
Nice 2/1, close to
everything. $500. +
Sec. (352) 446-3933
352-794-3323

HERNANDO
2/1, $400 Mo. No Pets.
(352) 344-1476

HERNANDO/INV.
2BR, 1BA, C/H/A, $350
no pets, 1st, last, sec.
352-564-0578


HOMOSASSA2/1
fenced acre. shed
huge deck addition
$500/m 352 628-5244


HOMOSASSA
Beautiful 2 Br. DW, on
2 acres, paved road.
$375. Mo.(352)621-5309
(352) 212-0715


HOMOSASSA
Lg 3/2 & 2/1 no pets
(352) 637-1142


Lecanto 2/1
MH $550./mo $500 dep.
352- 628-2312 Lv mess


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INVERNESS
RENT SPECIAL: Sec. dep,
pro-rated over 3 mo.
period in the INVERNESS
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enjoyment, clubhouse,
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much more! 1 BR home
$325 plus. 2BR home
$450 includes H20. 2 BR,
1.5 bath, Park Model
$500. Pets considered.
Section 8 accepted.
(352) 476-4964





Bank foreclosures
USED HOMES/REPO'S
Doublewides from
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Singlewides from
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New inventory daily
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Bad credit OK.!
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w/ 5 yr. warranty.
Appx. 1200 sq. ft. 3/2,
many upgrades.
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Taylor Made Homes


INVERNESS
55+ Comm. 2/1.5,
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shed $6900
(352) 586-7962


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Waterfront 55+ Park
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NEW HOME STIMULUS
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3 BR, 2 BA, Completely
Remodeled, inside &
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(352) 302-7451
2/2 SW Homosassa
on Fecnced 1/2 acre
$39,900. Cash $45,900 if
financed $5,000 down
(352) 527-3204
2/2, New Screen Rm,
New Back Rm, 1.4 AC
Steal It! $30K Firm,
6.4 Easy Credit Finance
Appraised at $39,500
(352) 637-6608
CR Mini Farms-
3/2 DW Remodeled
on 1 1/4 acres fenced,
Owner Financing $6000
down, $500 month
(850) 557-0356
DUNNELLON
5159 W. Disney Ln
Large lot, new CHA
quite area $32,500
(727) 536-9443
FLORAL CITY on 3 Lots,
Assum Mortg. Priv Fin. 2
Mast Suites New appls.
horses ok, $33,900
Cridland Real Living.
J. Desha 352-634-6340

HOLDER
3/2, Fireplace, fncd,
yd $450/mo 10% down
Owner Finance Avail
(352) 302-9217


Moirle Hml
and Land


uullieIlluI rl o UeuluuIII.
2 bath. Mobile Home w/5
acres Jacobsen Mobile
Home built in 2000, 32ft x
68ft, central air/heat
w/appliances. Master
Bedroom 14x20, Master
Bath w/jetted tub & dou-
ble vanity 10x15, 2 bed-
rooms 14x20, living rm.
14x16, family rm
w/fireplace 15x14, kitchen
w/38 cabinets 16x16,
dining rm. 14x12. Low
taxes 685.00 for current
year. Asking $145,000,
open to offers.
352-682-0266

Green Acres
Is The Place To Be
3/2 ON '/2 ACRE
New carpet through-
out, new appliances.
Nice Home
$2,200 down P& I only
$369.84/mo. W.A.C.
Call to View
352-621-9182

HOMOSASSA
2/1 furnished fenced
acre, huge deck, shed
& addition. $29,900 as
is (352) 628-5244

INVERNESS
2/2 SW, 2 nice big
additions / AC, fenced,
near lake, part furn.
$37k 352-341-1569


HOMOSASSA
3394 Arundel Terr
3/2, lamaniate & tile
floors, All appls. CHA
New Roof, $1500 moves
you in $650/mo
Rent to Own
Tony Tubolina Brk
Owner(727) 385-6330

Sugarmill Woods
Area
3/2, approx. 1500 sq.
ft. on over 1 acre.
Quite,, nice home on
paved road. Brand
new A/C & heat &
appliance, under full
warranty. Ceramic
tile in master bath,
guest bath & kitchen.
New wood cabinets,
new deck & driveway
This house has a
great location,
2 mi. from Publix,
3 mi., from Suncoast
Pkwy. 5 mi. from new
Walmart. $2,200.
down $399.00/mo.,
P & I, W.A.C. Must See
to steal this house
352-621-9181




2/1 FURNISHED
MOBILE HOME,
Over 55 Park $190 Lot
Rent Village Pine, Inglis
Lot 4 A $9,500 OBO
(906) 281-7092
2/2 on Lake Rousseau.
Was $27,500 NOW
$19,900 Low Lot Rent
$240/m 2003 Mobile
Home. Owner bought a
house, our lost is your
gain (352) 817-1987
Beverly Hills
55 + park 2/2 fully
remodeled,lg screen
lanai,carport, shed,
laundry ,landscape & ir-
rigation all appliances,
Club house activities,
Heated pool.Lot rent
$258, $39,900
Call 352-422-0927
EEDGE WATER OAKS
55+ Comm.lake ac-
cess, 2/1.5, 12x56
furn.12 x 30 scr. porch,
shed, new 200 amp.
$11,500(352) 419-6477


Dunnellon, Fl 2 bedroom.
2 bath. 1997 Redman
14x60 MH. 2 BR 2 Bath.
New kitchen, new roof,
Air conditioner only 3 yrs
old. 12 x 14 glassed in
patio, tiled floor. Two
sheds, one is 10x12,
other is 12x14. Lot rent is
$240.00 pm Asking
$31,500.00 Call
352-465-1761
Furnished 14 x 50 w/
added enclosure, vinyl
& scrn. rm.55+ Lecanto
Park, SS appl's
New W/D workshop
w/power, Remodeled
inside/out $11,000 obo
(352) 418-5926
Homosassa Springs
2008 12x40 park model
home, completely
furnished, ready to
move in $23,500
Tony 828-674-9996

HOMOSASSA'S
Best Housing Value
Modern homes from
$8,400 or Lease to Own
from $139/mo.
$800.down + Lot rent at
Evanridge Community
an exceptional 55+Park
352 628-5977


Inv. Ft Cooper 55+
2/1.5, furnished,
florida room, carport,
REDUCED TO $12K
(352) 419-5114


INVERENESS 55 +
Comm. 14X54 MH, 2/1
55' carport w/deck,
front scr room
w/storage shed, CHA
part furn, W/D, Reduce
to $5K, 352-344-1002


INVERNESS
55+park, 1/1 carport,
screen room, shed,
$7000 (352) 726-8071


INVERNESS
Waterfront 55+ Park
w/5 piers for fishing &
enjoyment, clubhouse,
onsite shuffleboard, and
much more! 2 BR 1.5 BA
for $2,000. must be
approved 352-476-4964

WESTWIND VILLAGE 55+
Park. Updated 2/2 DW's
for sale. Reasonable
(352) 628-2090


---ACTION-

SRNTAL MANAGEMENT REALf, INC.




HOMES MOBILES APARTMENTS
FEATURED PROPERTIES
CRYSTAL RIVER
REDUCED 10350 W. Deepwoods Dr.
2/2/1CP House on 5 wooded acres! New carpet, paint, tile, A/C!
1,200 sq ft .............................................................................................. $ 7 5 0
REDUCED 11184 W. Samson Ln.
3/2/2 House Charming w/ open floor plan, large screen lanai
1,437 sq ft .... .................................................................... $ 9 0 0

HOMOSASSA
7650 W. Homosassa Tr. 2/1 Duplex nice & clean, outside
sto. Has well/ no pets 1536 sq ft ....................................... $ 500
80 Douglas St. (SMW) 3/2/2 Large home, screen room,
rent incd lawn. 1919+ sq feet ............................................................ $ 8 5 0


SUNDAY, JANUARY 29, 2012 Ell









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Homosassa-3/2 nice
and large, doublewide
on 1/2 acre, $39,900
owner financing or
lease at $750 month
(352) 628-5598
LECANTO 55+
*FOR RENT OR SALE *
1 /1, Furnished $525.
2/2 Furnished $550.
352-287-9175, 746-1189













835 NE Hwy 19
Crystal River, FI
(352) 795-0021
View our website
C21 NatureCoast.com




J.W. MORTON
REAL ESTATE, INC.
1645 W. MAIN ST
INVERNESS, FL
Property Management

2/2/1 Fenced Yard,
Screen Room ......... $650
3/2 Townhouse......... $650
2/2/1 Corner Lot ........ $650
2/2 Pritchard Island Villa. $700
2/1 Apartments......... $475
2/2 Villa,
Inverness Landings. .. $550

2/2/2 Tile Throughout... $725
2/1/1 Ouiet Neighborhood $500
Jennifer Fudge,
Property Manager
Cheryl Scruggs,
Realtor-Associate
352-726-9010













CHASSAHOWITZKA
3/2 House, $600.
3/2 Furnished DW., $600
Agent (352) 382-1000




CRYSTAL RIVER
2 BR. $550., 3BR House
$800., 352-563-9857
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025




CRYSTAL RIVER 1/1
HD cap access,.small
pet ok. (352) 628-2815


Alexander Real Estate
(352) 795-6633

Crystal River Apts
2 BR/1 BA $375-$500



CRYSTAL RIVER
Lrg 2/1, W/D hkup, incld
water & lawn. $500 mo.
+ Sec. 352-634-5499


FLORAL CITY
FREE Use of boat ramp,
fishing dock, canoe &
Jon boat rentals. 1 BR
$450/$200 dp. incis Sat
TV electric. walk to river
Trails End Camp, A
Friendly Place to Live
352-726-3699


INVERNESS
Close to hosp 1/ 1 $450
2/2 $600 352-422-2393


LECANTO
Nice I Bedrm $500
352-270-0218/216-0012,



RIVER REACH
APARTMENTS

Affordable Rent,
Accepting
Applications
62 and older plus
disabled with or
without dependants
2151B N. River Reach
Cir., Crystal River.
Rental Assistance
Available
to those who qualify.
1 & 2 Bedrooms
Office Hrs ; Mon. Fri
8ato 12pm & 1pm to
3:pm
TDD Hearing impaired
number:
1-800-955-8771
"This institution is an
equal opportunity
provider and
employer."
(352) 795-8024



UJ I IJHI LNII'V



SEVEN RIVERS
APTS

A Beautiful place
to come home too.
35 units on private
street, situated on 10
wooded acres, near
Crystal River &
7 Rivers Hosp. fish-
ing, walking, trails,
shopping near by.
Old Florida setting,
quite, clean well
maint. central
laundry room.
352-795-3719
Directions:
Hwy 19 turn W. at
Days Inn, first right
onto Tallahassee Rd



OPOATUNITY


Ventura Village
Apartments
3580 E. Wood Knoll
Lane
Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 637-6349

Now Accepting
Applications

Central H/A
Storage;Carpet
Laundry Facilities;
On Site Mgmt
Elderly (62+)
Handicap/Disabled
children
1Bds $396;
2 Bds $ 436
TDD# 800-955-8771
"This institution is an
Equal Opportunity
Provider & Employer."









CRYSTAL RIVER
Lg 2 bdrm. 1 ba. unfurn
$475/m or furnished
$595 (352) 212-9205



HERNANDO
2/2, 400 E. Glasboro,
$675 inci pool, water
trash etc 352-697-1907



INVERNESS 2/1/1
Great Area no smk/pets
$600/mo. 1 st, 1st & sec.
352-341-3562/400-0743




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




INVERNESS
Country Living: 3BR, 2BA
home $595. RENT
SPECIAL: Security dep.
pro-rated over 3 mo.
period. 352-476-4964


I Ret oss


BEVERLY HILLS
2/1, Fl. Rm., CHA, $525.
mo. +$275 Sec 87
Regina Blvd. (352)
422-0139


m


At Lecanto/Hom.
School dist., builder
model 3/2 custom
home FP, jacuzzi tub,
lots of granite & tile.
$1,000 Also 2/2 same
location 12 ACfenc'd
yrd. pets ok, $750
(352) 422-1933

Beverly Hills 2/2
Ist/last $500 mo, move
in ready, 352-302-6941
BEVERLY HILLS
3/1/Carport, patio,
fenced yard, $550. mo
352-422-2433
BEVERLY HILLS
3/2/2, and 3/1/1
352-464-2514

CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/2 $850.
(352) 400-0230

CRYSTAL RIVER
2/2/1 + Family Room
$650 + dep 464-2716

CRYSTAL RIVER
3 bedroom. 2 bath.
House for rent Please
contact for details.
$650.00 per month
352-212-9682

CRYSTAL RIVER
Rent or Rent to Own
$699 Move-in Special
3/2 Lrg. fm. rm.. tiled,
Spotless, Cul-de-sac.
Copeland Pk.. Fncd..
Pets OK.352-527-0493


YOU'LL v THIS!
DUNNELLON 3/2/2
RENT TO OWN
Close to Rainbow River
(561) 719-8787
(561) 575-1718 affr 7pm
FLORAL CITY S.
3/1/2, private yd $550/
mo +$500 dep, No Pets
352-637-0475,586-6304
INVERNESS
2/1/1, Very clean well
maintained Lease. $650
mo., Fst, Ist, sec. Near
schools, Hospital. 4212 S
Apopka, 561-395-5735
INVERNESS
3/2, $650mo, Ist/Lst. &
$300 sec.(352) 726-9475
INVERNESS
3/2/2, Avail. Feb.Near
Sch. & Hosp. $800. Mo.



3/2/2, Highlands
Starting @ $730.
352-601-2615

INVERNESS, 3/2
1 Bilk. to Cath. Church
352-464-0901, 637-3371

SUBSIDIZED
RENTALS IN
Lecanto/Crys. Riv
3 bedrm-Starting
@ $582/mo.




352-746-0373
TDD: 888-341-2355


"LIFE IS BETTER
WITH A PORCH"

www.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.


Specializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches &
Commercial


Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com


HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225

Picture Perfect
CHASSAHOWITZKA
Lg. 2/2 on canal/gulf,
scrnd patio, cov.
parking/storage, w/
boathouse$650/mo.
(727)459-2871


YANKEETOWN
Furnished 2/2, Beautiful
stilt home, on last canal
to Gulf, floating dock,
on 150ft. off waterfront
Beautifully furnished,
water, garb. & cable
incl.'d $1,100. mo.
Seasonal rates Avail
(352) 726-1172




CRYSTAL RIVER
Clean House, cable w/d,
$115/125wkly
$430/475mo. No hidden
cost. 563-6428




C.R/Homosassa
1& 2 Br. turn, quiet park
Util. incl. clean, shrt/long
term 352 220-2077
INVERNESS
Waterfront 3/2/2, turn.
$1,300. Nice 527-9268




FARMS, LAND,
COMMERCIAL
UNIQUE &
HISTORIC HOMES,
SMALL TOWN
COUNTRY LIFESTYLE
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989


Andrea Migliaccio
andreaworks 4u
@gmail.com
Sherri C. Parker &
Assoc. Realtors,
Direct 352422-3261
Office 352-527-8090
WWW.
sherricparker.com




For Sale By Owner
3/2/2, Custom built
in '08 by Wheeler
Construction $129,500
Call (407) 739-2646 or
407-442-3597




3 Bedroom, 2 Bath
Double carport,
fenced yd. new roof,
1,100 sf, $55,500
(352) 464-0641
(239) 298-0076
RENT TO OWN!!
No credit check, 3
bdrm. 352-464-6020
JADEMISSION.COM


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ille-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination. "
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



EOUAL USING
OPPORTUNITY

WATERFRONT
EQUESTRIAN &
INVESTMENT/
INCOME SALES
*Buyer's
Representative
*Concierge Level
Service


LAUREL RIDGE
Deed res./newly
remodeled 2/2/2,
open floor plan w/den,
$109K. comm pool &
clubhse(352) 270-8488



2 Bedroom, 2 bath
house with heated pool
& fireplace on 1 acre
lot in Citrus Hills. In ex-
cellent cond., Owner
finance with D/P +
Excellent credit. Call
352-860-1872 or
304-673-0110 or
304-673-5550.
Reduced to $139,000
Clearview 1 Acre
w/3 bdrm w/office/den off
master,2.5 baths,2plus
garage,great rm w/pocket
sliders to 50x24 lanai,
cooks kitchen, Master
suite to die for.Much
more! $254,900.
352-860-0444



APACHE SHORE
2 bdrm. 1 bath. close to
lake central heat and
air, new well & water
softening system ,
corner wooded lot.
Excellent Investment
Opp. Assumable loan,
$30.000, 352-322-0454



297 S. Canaday Dr. 1/2
ac. 3BR, 2BA, gar/work
shop lot 198ftX110ft
paved St. front and rear
parking for RV's, boats
etc. Inside of house
needs updating$35,500
OMO 352-726-6568
3/2/2, I.G. &C.C.
3k sf. new kit. Ig closets,
CHA, firepl. on golf
course $139K make of-
fer, norealtors 726-0652
3BR, 3BA, Pool home,
2,000 sq.ft. $165,000
OR BEST OFFER
518 Poinsettia
352-860-0878.
INVERNESS
Waterfront 55+ Park
w/5 piers for fishing &
enjoyment, clubhouse,
onsite shuffleboard
and much more!
Single wide 1 & 2 BR,
starting @ $6,900. Lot
rent $274/mo. H20
included. 3 mo. free
rent with purchase.
352-476-4964

Lakefront Gospel
Island Location
Spacious 3/2/2
for rent $700/m or for
sale..... 908-322-6529


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work For You!

BETTY HUNT,
REALTOR
ERA KEY 1 Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.

Condo for Sale
2/2, 1,850 sq.ft.,
35 Beech Street
(352) 503-3294


Best Time To Buy!
I have lease options,
owner financing &
foreclosures
call Phyllis Strickland
(352) 613-3503
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.

For Sahle ,.
Citrus County
3BR/2Bath Make
Offers 352-563-9857


S#www. chEmron l eon line co
WW.ClotiI~lne.COm


Riverhaven Village,
Homosassa, FL
GREAT LOCATION,
GREAT HOUSE,
GREAT NEIGHBOR-
HOOD! 2147 sf, 3/2 +
Ir/dr comb, den, sun-
room, inside laundry,
all appliances. bit. by
Rusaw in 1989, well
maintained, upgrades,
move in ready.
Asking $160,000
all offers considered.
Realtors 3%
See visual tour:
www.visualtour.com/sho
w.asp?t=2656780&prt=10
003&sk=13
Frank or Helen Harris,
352-628-1434
email: hharris3
@tampabay.rr.com

^S=11m~


E12 SUNDAY, JANUARY 29, 2012







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


WATER
Continued from Page E4

without all the work of a full-blown pond."
Safety: Consider any risks to your own or
neighboring children, Coates said. "Many mu-
nicipalities are considering ponds of a certain
size to be swimming pools, and therefore they
need to be fenced like a pool," she said.
Price: Fountains cost less to buy and install,
said Genevieve Schmidt, a landscape designer
in Arcata, Calif. "Ponds are the most expensive
item per square foot commonly installed in the
landscape more expensive than flagstone pa-
tios," she said.
Energy Savings: Fountains require less power
to operate than ponds. "They use a smaller
pump since they have less water in them, and the
pump can be set to run only during the times
when someone is likely to view the fountain,"
Schmidt said.
Accessorize small water features with plants
generally found near ponds. That would include
lotuses, lilies (Tropicanna cannas), bog plants
and other moisture-loving perennials and annu-
als.
Groundcover plants (Tesselaar water-wise car-
pet roses, for instance), bulbs (Siberian iris) and
grasses (Black Mondo or Blue Fescue) also en-
hance fountains and bubbling urns.
"I do genuinely love to see a pond in the gar-
den," Schmidt said. "When constructed with
some shallow areas around the edges, they pro-
vide great benefits to wildlife birds and am-
phibians and they're just plain beautiful.
"But most of my landscape design clients are
interested in doing as little maintenance as pos-
sible in their gardens, and a fountain can pro-
vide many of the benefits at a lower cost and with
less ongoing care."


ZONES
Continued from Page E8

average coldest temperature for each zip
code. The 26 zones, however, are based
on five degree increments.
For example, Des Moines, Iowa, used
to be in zone 5a, meaning the lowest tem-
perature on average was between minus
15 and minus 20 degrees Fahrenheit.
Now it's 5b, which has a coldest temper-
ature of 10 to 15 degrees below zero.
"People who grow plants are well
aware of the fact that temperatures have
gotten more mild throughout the year,
particularly in the winter time," said
Boston University biology professor
Richard Primack. "There's a lot of things
you can grow now that you couldn't grow
before."
He uses the giant fig tree in his subur-
ban Boston yard as an example.
"People don't think of figs as a crop you
can grow in the Boston area. You can do
it now," he said.
In the old 1990 map, the USDA men-
tions 34 different U.S. cities on its key
Eighteen of those, including Honolulu,
St Louis, Des Moines, St. Paul and even
Fairbanks, are in newer warmer zones.
Agriculture officials said they didn't ex-
amine the map to see how much of the
map has changed for the hotter But Mark
Kaplan, the New York meteorologist who
co-created the 1990 map and a 2003 up-
date that the USDA didn't use, said the
latest version clearly shows warmer
zones migrating north. Other experts
agreed.
The 1990 map was based on tempera-


The 1990 map was based

on temperatures from

1974 to 1986; the new

map from 1976 to 2005.

tures from 1974 to 1986; the new map
from 1976 to 2005. The nation's average
temperature from 1976 to 2005 was two-
thirds of a degree warmer than for the
old time period, according to statistics at
the National Climatic Data Center.
USDA spokeswoman Kim Kaplan, who
was part of the map team, repeatedly
tried to distance the new zones in the
map from global warming issues. She
said even though much of the country is
in warmer zones, the map "is simply not
a good instrument" to demonstrate cli-
mate change because it is based on just
the coldest days of the year.
David W Wolfe, professor of plant and
soil ecology in Cornell University's De-
partment of Horticulture, said the USDA
is being too cautious and disagrees with
Kaplan about whether this reflects
warming.
"At a time when the 'normal' climate
has become a moving target, this revision
of the hardiness zone map gives us a
clear picture of the 'new normal,' and
will be an essential tool for gardeners,
farmers, and natural resource managers
as they begin to cope with rapid climate
change," Wolfe said in an email.
Another and even more dramatic sign
of global warming in the plant world is
that spring is arriving earlier in the year,
Wolfe said.
An earlier effort to update the planting


map caused a bit of an uproar when the
USDA in 2003 decided not to use an up-
dated map that reflected warmer
weather. Kaplan said the 2003 map was-
n't interactive enough.
The Arbor Day Foundation later is-
sued its own hardiness guide that had
the toastier climate zones.
The new federal map is very similar to
the one the private plant group adopted
six years ago, said Arbor Day Foundation
Vice President Woodrow Nelson.
"We got a lot of comments that the 1990
map wasn't accurate anymore," Nelson
said. "I look forward to (the new map).
It's been a long time coming."
Nelson, who lives in Lincoln, Neb.,
where the zone warmed to a 5b, said he
was used to "a solid 4" but now he's got
Japanese maples and fraser firs in his
yard trees that shouldn't survive in a
zone 4.
In Des Moines, Jerry Holub, a manager
for the Earl May Nursery chain, doesn't
think the warmer zone will have much of
an impact on gardeners. But he said this
may mean residents can even try passion
flowers.
"Now you can put them in safely, when
you couldn't before," he said.
Vaughn Speer, an 87-year-old master
gardener in Ames, Iowa, doubts the
change in zones will mean much to him,
but he said he has seen redbud trees, one
of the earliest blooming trees, a little fur-
ther north in recent years.
"They always said redbuds don't go be-
yond U.S. Highway 30, but I'm seeing
them near Roland," he said, referring to
a small Iowa town about 10 miles north
of the highway that runs across central
Iowa.


DEB INFANTINE
3 HOMES SOLD
In December
I Need Listings!
Real EstateL..
it's what I do.
ERA American
Realty
Phone:(352) 726-5855
Cell:(352) 302-8046
Fax:(352) 726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com
Get
Results in
the
h omeFront
classified!


Michele Rose. Realtor
Simply put I '11 work
harder 352-212-5097
isellcitruscountvy
vahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515

Your World


CHR NICLE


20 ACRES Live on
Land ONLY $99/mo. $0
down,Owner Financ-
ing. NO CREDIT
CHECKS! Near El Paso,
Texas. Beautiful moun-
tain views! Free
Color brochure
1-800-755-8953
www.sunsetranches
.com





2/2, Garage, heated
pool/spa, 8500 Gospel
Isl. Road, Inverness
$112,000 Owner financ-
ing, email for photo,
trader@tampabay.rr.
corn (727) 415-7728

CRYSTAL RIVER/OZELLO
$299K, 2+/2/2
Open floor plan,
Hardwood floors,
www.waterfrontozello.co
m or 352-563-5527


H
LAKE ROUSSEAU
South side of Lake
2 bedrm cottage
fenced, 1/2 acre,
boat dock. $85,000
775-230-2240
Salt waterfront stilt
home on Ozello Key
Owner finance,3%
down payment, pri-
vate boat ramp and
dock, 1000 square foot
living upstairs, 1000
square foot screen
downstairs workshop
$174,900 Call Craig or
Debra at 352-422-1011
or 352-634-3872





Employment
source is...


Thank You To All
Our Loyal Clients


m .m
Office Open
7 Days a Week


Lisa VanDeboe
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129



CABIN ON 40 ACRES
of Prime Hunting Land
Located in Gulf Ham-
mock Management.
Area. $165,000 OBO
(352) 795-2027
(352) 634-4745


For Sale, .A
HOMOSASSA, OFF
GROVER
CLEVELAND
1.2 Acres off Grover
Cleveland Ave. Already
has power pole, septic,
and well. Call Richard
352-897-6777



LAND 1.5 acres fenced
partially cleared, on 480
in Homosassa across
from firehouse. water
sewer are avail. MUST
SEE!!! 352-382-0535




CABIN ON 40 ACRES
Hunting recreational in
Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Levy Co area, well,
pondATV trails $165K
352 795-2027/ 634-4745


INVERNESS
For Sale 12 lots (20 X
120 each) $8,000. Zoned
residential.At 3109 E
Millside Ln, Inverness.
Sold together or sepa-
rately. Contact: Shayn
Robinson 832 549 0286
or
ShaynRobinson@hot-
mail.com


INVERNESS,
Beautiful Wooded Lot
on Edged Dry Lake,
100 x 150 $8,900
Owner Finance
(352) 621-1664


Premium Home Site on
Sky View Golf Course
Great price to build
your new custom,
maintenance FREE
home. Country Club
membership including
45,000 sf fitness & spa
$42,000 OBO
Call (910) 512-2550


LotsFoS








Twe


SUNDAY, JANUARY 29, 2012 E13


Cir sCo 4


Hme








E14 SUNDAY, JANUARY 29, 2012



ATTIC
Continued from Page E6

shape. So is this just an heir-
loom, and might you know
someone to contact to have
it either cleaned or re-
stored? R., Internet
Dear R.: Fishing reels,
lures, and all things con-
nected with fishing tackle
are a category of collector
interest. Mohawk is a widely
recognized name among
collectors.
I suspect the reel is low
on the totem pole of collec-
tor interest. For more spe-
cific information about
restoration and what it
might sell for, contact the
auction specialty company
Lang's Auctions, located in
Waterville, NY at
www. langsauction. com.
They are considered the
world's leading fishing
tackle auction firm. The
phone number is 315-841-
4623.
Dear John: We have had
this item on the wall since
moving into this house,


where we originally found
it. I am not quite sure what
it was used for, but have al-
ways liked it.
Do you know what it is
and can you please tell me
how much value it could
have, if any? L. W,
Homosassa
Dear LW: Your ox-yoke is
in the Farming Antiques
category In your photo-
graph, the yoke does not
show any signs of use and
abuse that one would ex-
pect to see if it were gen-
uine and actually had been
used.
About 25 years ago these
yokes became popular
among decorators for inte-
rior home decoration. They
were converted into lamps,
tables, and simply hung on
the wall to provide a coun-
try look. This interest
brought reproductions into
the marketplace. I think you
have a reproduction. Cur-
rent interest has disap-
peared, leaving potential
dollar value catch-as-catch-
can.
Dear John: Your column
in the Chronicle is very in-


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


teresting and I look forward
to it each week. I am enclos-
ing pictures with identifying
information on the backs.
Can you tell me anything
about the origin of them? Is
there any value besides sen-
timental?
The plate is "Old Glory
and her Allies," Copyright
55402, in gold lettering
within a circle. There is
dark lettering reading "KT
& K., S_V China," and
"PC.J." on the bottom. The
color of the flags is very vi-
brant.
The calculator says The
Calculator Corp., Grand
Rapids, Mich. on it. -
E.A.S., Crystal River
Dear EAS.: Your decora-
tive plate was made by
Knowles, Taylor & Knowles.
The company was located in
East Liverpool, Ohio, and
was in business from 1854
until 1931. I think your plate


Jackie & Bob Davis
American Realty & Investments
,, 117 S. Hwy 41 Inverness, FL
(352) 634-2371 Cell *(800) 476-2590 Toll Free
E RA bob@bjdavis.com "
For a Visual Tour of our listings and all MLS: bidavis.co


TTAN EFFICIENT COMPACT,
COZY AND CHARMING VILLA
2 Bedrooms, 2 baths, a garage, no
wasted space. A sweet front porch, a
patio at the rear. The window
treatments are "bottom-up, top-
down" shades with insulating factor.
Newer carpeting, immaculate, cheery
S enough to lift your spirits.
T r Maintenance fee: exterior paint, roof,
irrigation, lawn care, cable, trash
pickup. The Glen is a 55+ community.
.. -: $54,900 MLS 353299
An immaculate, well cared-for
2 bedroom, home with a garage,
a Florida room, an amazing
- "detached, 2-car garage/
workshop, fenced yard. New roof
..... in '09, newer C/H/A, freshly
[ .._ painted, looking good. Furniture
is available at no charge.
_$53,900 MLS 353397


was made in the 1920s. Po-
tential dollar value is below
$50.
To discover what your cal-
culator might sell for, there
is an auction company that
specializes in technical an-
tiques: Breker Technical
Auction.
The website is
www.breker.com. The
phone number is 703-
796-5544. Good luck.


John Sikorski has been a
professional in the an-
tiques business for 30
years. He hosts a call-in
radio show, Sikorski's Attic,
on WJUF (90.1 FM) Satur-
days from noon to 1 p.m.
Send questions to Siko-
rski's Attic, c/o The Citrus
County Chronicle, 1624 N
Meadowerest Blvd., Crystal
River, FL 34429 or
asksikorski@aol. com.


Investors Realty
of Citrus County, In
Visit my website at:
www.myflorida-hou


115i N. LEGION TERR'
CRAB THIS BARGAIN!
acre and take a 360' inte
wwwarnycounrydreamhome.c
MLS# 350369.$




115 N. LEGION TERR
Enjoy nature with mature
landscaping in beautiful Cit
one acre corer lot, this 3
screened in pool and patio
privacy you want'' Ever
maintained. New roof 5/2
suitcase and moveright in'
MLS #346203 $


* Follow these guidelines
to help ensure timely
publication of submit-
ted material. The earlier
Chronicle editors re-
ceive submissions, the
better chance of notes
running more than
once.
* Community notes: At
least one week in ad-
vance of the event.
* Veterans Notes: 4 p.m.
Wednesday for publica-
tion Sunday.
* Together page: 4 p.m.
Wednesday for publica-
tion Sunday.
* Business Digest: 4 p.m.
Wednesday for publica-
tion Sunday.
* Chalk Talk: 4 p.m. Mon-


_ GITTA BARTH
REALTOR
C. (352) 220-0466
se.com gbarth@myflorida-house.com





3560 N WOODCATE DR. THE CLEN


active virtual tour at for you to move in, relax on your front porch and watch
om. the wildlife in the large greenbelt
565,000 MLS #350097 $59,000




- CITRUS HILLS 7373 E. SHADYWOODS CT. FLORAL CITY
oak trees and nice I .... I I I 11 I
us Hills' Situated on a .. I I. I .I ....I .
BR, 3BA home with i ....
o area offers you the .. iiiI
thing is very well . , ,. I .. ..
009. Just bring your.... , ..
175,000 . $89,500
175,000 4 $89,500


4602 CASPER LN. PINE RIDGE 7080 DUVAL ISLAND DR., FLORAL CITY
One-of-a-kind horse lover's dream home in the Incredible Vistas open waterfront on Lake Tsala
. ..1. r . i . Apopka, beautiful landscaped yard with waterfall
t .. i .1 . and pond, a dock for yo i
shows throughout the 3 bed, 2.5 bath, 4-car garage 3/2/1 pool home on 0.5
home. Fenced paddock w/water & shelter, privacy you deserve. It can be your paradise.
MLS #349970 $429,000 MLS #351008 $239,000





1432 SEATTLE SLEW, INVERNESS -
3644 E. LAKE TODD DR. ARBOR LAKES
SBeautiful 2/2/1 home in gated 55+ community
community o on Lake Tsala Apopka. Open floor plan, vaulted
like hardwood floors, gourmet kitchen and an ceilings, tile floors, a spacious patio and the
$225,000 ,$116,000


day for publication
Wednesday.
* Health Notes: 4 p.m.
Friday for publication
Tuesday.
* Religious events : 4
p.m. Tuesday for publi-
cation Saturday.
* Real Estate Digest: 4
p.m. Thursday for publi-
cation Sunday.
* Photos and stories are
published as space is
available. The Chronicle
cannot guarantee place-
ment on color pages.
* Submit material at
Chronicle offices in In-
verness or Crystal
River; or by e-mail to
newsdesk@chronicle
online.com.


SUBMISSION DEADLINES


000AFUO
--ES
REAL ESTATE, INC. BT
5569 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY. BE,
CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429 AL
OFFICE: (352) 795-6633 Realtor
WWW.ALEXRE.COM E-MAIL: SALES@ALEXRE.COM







LECANTO 2003 Palm Harbor D/W M/H on HOMOSASSA 2007 duplex w/2 bedrooms, 2
over 5 acres w/pool 4 bedrms, 2 baths, family ,, i. .1. i. .1 ...
rm, fenced & x-fenced circular drive, 4 car ... i i ..... 1
detached garage, 20 x 40 metal drive thru u i. ....... ,
barn, 40x2 workshop #353359 $185,000 sinks #345956 price reduced to $130,000





HOMOSASSA 1988 3 bdrm, 2 bath 1/2 acre, CRYSTAL RIVER 2 bedroom, 2 bath home on
with living & family rooms & wood burning spnng fed canal *, i
fireplace; roof over in 2000; both baths renovated lanai w/patio Pr. ..... . i
recently; dbl paned windows, 4-cumquat trees, another screed porch w/ entry to laundry room
deadendpaved road #352370$47.000 #351846 $134,900




CRYSTAL RIVER WATERFRONT 3 HOMOSASSA Jacobson D/W M/H on 1.80
bedroom, 2 bath; 84 ft on deep water canal, acres w/3 bedrooms, 2 baths, fully furnished,
covered boathouse (21 x 30), dock, seawall, well appointed, central heat & A/C in 2006,
Tile floors, new carpet in bedrooms, new large screen porch on back. Walk in closets
roof, double paned windows, updated kitchen in bedrooms, inside laundry. #348065


HERNANDO Citrus Hills 3 bedroom, 2 bath CRYSTAL RIVER S/W M/H on just over 1
pool home on 1 acre family rm w/gas acre of land w/ 2 bedrooms, 2 baths, has
fireplace, split ,.. 1 1 1 1, 1 ... , , ., .. 1
ln #,11 u, .li~h ,,11










CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FEEDERS
Continued from Page E6

Platform feeders: This
simple tray feeder is com-
prised of a flat, raised sur-
face on which seeds, fruits
and other foods are spread.
Some have roofs, which
help keep seeds dry. Al-
though it is important to
keep all feeders clean, extra
care must be taken with
platform feeders. This
feeder type has been cited
in studies as having a higher
rate of disease transmission
among birds because their
droppings collect on the
platform and mingle with
the food. To reduce the risk
of disease transmission, use
a platform feeder with a
wire mesh bottom to allow
droppings to be washed
away during rain.
Platform feeders located
close to the ground can be
used to attract a slightly dif-
ferent bird audience that
includes ground feeding
doves, juncos, blackbirds,
towhees and sparrows.
Suet feders: This simple
feeder is usually a wire
cage sized to hold a suet
cake. The birds that visit
the feeder cling to the wires
and peck at the suet inside.
Woodpeckers, bluebirds,
cardinals, chickadees, jays,
nuthatches, titmice, and
wrens are all regular visi-
tors to a suet feeder.
Hummingbird feeders:
This type of feeder is de-
signed to mimic the flowers


GREAT NEW PRICE!
3/2/2 Sweetwater pool home
* South Oak Village cul de sac
* Fresh paint & carpeting in neutral color
* Kitchen has oak cabinetry
* Expanded back guest room
* Home warranty for buyers
#352388 $216,000


UNIQUE STYLE ON THE GOLF COURSE!
* All tile 3/2 pool home by Country Estates
*180 degree sweeping views of 7th green
* 24x21 garage with 8x20 workshop
* Granite faced gas fireplace
* One complete 15' hallway of storage
* Home warranty for buyers
#353186 $198,000


SUNDAY, JANUARY 29, 2012 E15


from which these birds get
their nectar, and is usually
filled with sugar water.
They come in a variety of
shapes and sizes, but most
feature plenty of red, since
this is a very attractive
color to hummingbirds.
Orioles, cardinals and
woodpeckers will also use
nectar feeders with larger
feeding ports. Nectar feed-
ers must be frequently
cleaned because the sugar
water they contain rapidly
ferments and poses a seri-
ous threat to feeding birds.
Fbr more information on se-
lection and care of bird
feeders, call Citrus County
Extension at 352-527-5700.
Citrus County Extension
links the public with the
University of Florida/IFAS'
knowledge, research, and
resources to address youth,
family, community and agri-
cultural needs. All pro-
grams and related activities
sponsored for, or assisted
by, the Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences are
open to all persons without
discrimination with respect
to race, creed, color, reli-
gion, age, disability, sex,
sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, po-
litical opinions or affilia-
tions, genetic information
and veteran status as pro-
tected under the Vietnam
Era Veterans' Readjust-
ment Assistance Act


Dr Joan Bradshaw is
director of UF IFAS Citrus
County Extension.


a I
AllGtr ealy N


BANK OWNED-CITRUS SPRINGS, FL
3BR/2BA home built in 2004. 80 x 125 lot. Central
water. Front & rear covered porches. $57,900
MLS#353187
I[[


WATERFRONT PARADISE-FLORAL CITY, FL
3BR/2BA doublewide on over 1 acre. Over 200' of canal
for boating, kayak, fishing & air boating.
$109,900 MLS#353099


GOLF COURSE
HERNANDO, FL
1/2 acre on The Oaks in
BANK OWNED FLORAL CITY, FL Citrus Hills
Waterfront 3BR/2BA mobile on wide canal. Boat dock.
Great wee ender, winter or year round living. $29,900 MLS#321216
$34,900 MLS#352914
CALL Roy Bass TODAY (352)726-2471
Email: roybass@fampabay.rr.com www.allcitrusrealty.com After Hours 352)302-6714


JANE
Continued from Page E9

tall, with profuse, showy flowers in Feb-
ruary Not thorny, it has purple fruit con-
taining one seed in April or May, less
tart than Chickasaw plums. Wildlife and
birds distribute the seeds, which sprout
readily in moist, richer soils.
Carolina or Cherry Laurel, Prunus
caroliniana, is a dense, evergreen tree
which can reach 20 to 45 feet in height
during its lifespan of about 50 years.
Ranging from around Orlando north
to Virginia and west to Louisiana in
Zones 7 to 10, it flowers a week or two
after Chickasaw and Flatwoods
Plums. Temperatures are a bit
warmer, so more insects are about to
pollinate the thousands of tiny white
flowers in the dense, showy clusters.
All three Prunus species are useful for


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E10

prop your oven door open
and they can require six to
14 hours to dehydrate, so
they can end up being even
less cost-effective than dry-
ing celery Not to mention
the nutrient loss associated
with using your oven.
Dear Sara: When freezing
leftover bagged baby car-
rots, do I need to do any-
thing to them or can I just
put them in a freezer bag
and freeze them? Carol,
Maine
Dear Carol: You can't
freeze them raw and then
thaw and eat them raw. But
you can freeze them to use


wildlife food, pollen, nectar, cover,
nesting sites and perching.
Some of the shiny black fruit up to
half an inch diameter matures in time
for the end of spring bird migration.
The rest may persist on the tree dur-
ing summer This easily grown native
makes a good pruned hedge, taller
screen in a hedgerow or an erect lawn
specimen tree.
Red Bud, Cersis canadensis, is a na-
tive deciduous tree that has abundant,
pretty pink flowers in February Many
buds sprout right from old stems,
branches and even from the bark on
the trunk. Seeds ripen in a flat pod
about 4 inches long, which often stays
attached to the tree until winter
White-flowered Walter's Viburnum,
Viburnum obovatum, a dense, ever-
green native shrub, blooms at the same
time as Red Bud. Its fruit is a small,
oval drupe, starting red then ripening
to black. Other native and exotic vibur-


for cooking later. You need
to blanch them for three to
five minutes and then
plunge them into ice water
and let them cool for five
minutes. The cold water
prevents the carrots from
overcooking, which would
result in mushy carrots once
thawed and cooked later.
Once the carrots have
cooled, place them into
freezer bags, removing as
much air as possible to pre-
vent freezer burn. I'd eat
them within nine months.
Dear Sara: I'm looking for
gift ideas for a family of four
(two parents and two chil-
dren). I'd like to purchase
something that isn't just for
the parents and costs less
than $100. -Linda H., New
York


Dear Linda: I ha'
ideas, but here ai
few. You could buy
ice-cream maker
tickets, an Original
Pop stovetop popc
per set, a restaui
card, a karaoke r
board games, vide
or a Boochie or Bl
set. You can gift a
ship or annual pass
traction such as th


nums also bloom in February
Cultivated garden plants blooming
in February include Indian azaleas,
mid-season Camellias, fruit trees such
as peach and nectarine, and blueber-
ries.
Although exotic, non-native species
are discouraged in Florida State Parks,
Rainbow Springs is an exception due
to its past heritage as a tourist attrac-
tion. Hundreds of Formosa purple
Azaleas flank the long entry road. The
gardens display many pretty camellias
in white, pink, red and mixed colors.
February is a good time to see flower-
ing trees and shrubs in Florida.


Jane Weber is a professional gar-
dener and nursery owner She wel-
comes weekend visitors to her
Florida Friendly Yard and Wildlife
Habitat at 5019 W Stargazer Lane,
Dunnellon. Call (352) 465-0649.

ve lots of museum, aquarium, nature
'e just a center, etc., too.
them an
movie
Whirley Sara Noel is the owner of
orn pop- wwwfrugalvillage.com, a
rant gift website that offers money-
nachine, saving strategies for every-
o games day living. Write to Sara
ongoBall Noel, c/o Universal Uclick,
member- 1130 Walnut Street, Kansas
to an at- City MO 64106, or email
e beach, sara@frugalvillage.com.


* Chronicle photographers will consider requests to take
photos of community events. Call 352-563-5660.


ONE American
E R A Realty &
A 'A Investments
117 S. Hwy. 41
Inverness, FL
800-476-2590
352-726-5855


Alay BARBARA
Y BANKSS r
Realtor
cell: 352-476-3232 P J
Please visit website www.barbarabanks.net


PRICE REDUCED ON THIS
INVERNESS POOL HOME
3/2/2
Lovely Pool Home
offering eat-in kitchen,
dining area,
laundry room
i l ,dere: ,lare yr, n
fre hl, ,p r.led.
,ns,de ar.id :.u i



All lh. A r. J i-,- .:.r ., r .g .:.r I 2
&,'re. I,, ,r, a ,J. ierat.Ie. are- a
MLS #392 193

Sj $144,500
Zechariah 4:6 000AF9P


1E "Always There For You"
KE GAIL COOPER
aM Multi-Million Dollar Realtor
ERA- Cell: (352) 634-4346
OFFICE : (352) 382-1700x309
E-mail me: homes4u3@mindspring.com


I Se Vrtul Tours @ www^res lehoes uBco









E16 SUNDAY, JANUARY 29, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


hI m .....I .-hmj

Ill -I bm.-.i bu. hi l....J i. in..'u'mm
111 = -'lIll $107,000
I1lillatd Pictkel 352 201/9871
wizviz CitiusCounti Sold com


WATERFRONT HOME 1,600 SF INDUSTRIAL CONDO
: II r i,. '.'..'. IN HOMOSASSAI

r I,, JIj.l. ,. l h .i ..... i ll i I ll,.jI 'in ll .i m ll 1 In ]li :l 1s.m il. 1 I ii 'll.

$69.900 ..". P li."":l i. *i11 hi $42.000
Call Ruth fiedetick / 352 563 6866 Call Ouade Feesei 352 302 7699


CUL-DE-SAC IN GREAT COMMUNITY

..II j. IlM ni I II .1 I6 i...l .. 6 .' 1

ASKING $185,000
Call Maltha Snyde, 352 476/8727
Ask /oI ble =352101


EDEN FARMS i....- 1.i ii..i..


... I ...I ,,I6 I ....I. ..... II...
I .nn ..n.n..... I. i... .nni n ...i.I- i.,.- I I
rii = I OFFERED AT $105,000
Cill f-ii R BSoni, 352 429 9252


* B ,i l. .i h ln.ui *h l.h 1 n. ll 111 inn I. .-
Mi =-. "'11I ONLY $69,900
Call Charles Kelly 352 422 2387


1590 S. REGAL PT., INVERNESS

* 48f bhih ..... I
* I 1 n.. ,. I'..ulni- a
Mi =-. ..._ $164,500
iv'in'lr CiinsCounli Sold comn
Jeanne & Willaid Pictkel 212 34/0


INVERNESS HOME WITH 4 BEDROOMS!!!

* C I l. h. I 3,6242n ..i23in8.7.i


Mi = .. i ONLY $64,500

Call Charles Kelly 352 422 2387


3 ACRES FOR ELBOW ROOM

II I I I. .I..' I, I, II I
I l i I I -l 1 h I


M I c = 3 3.36 ASKING $108,900
Pat Davis 352 212 7280
iewr hosting at wivmi c2/1aldaris comn


LECANTO ALMOST 8 AC.

I .. i h n-,lh l l ITn.,.. l m f inim.nlh .ii. n -

$229,900
Call N/i/da Cano cell/ 352270 0202


m i n nin. ...l .V i I ll i Ii . .. i ...I..... In .
C :I I? . h .0I4 ........D..... IIi2

iMI = 3,):I $165,000
C.ill 41 omli 563 9B61 of f Do,, .in. 220 0328


CHEAP CHEAP.
REALLY CHEAP MOBILE:
.' I .."1 p, -d I"J :In d I N""J .H lb l'lhlll
n i, i..- I.. Ih I in Ii.. l ..I ,llub 11 1" l

SOLD AS IS $13,900
Call Ruth Fiedetck / 352 563 6866


ATTENTION! BANK OWNED PROPERTY!

V.1II: ... inn.n. l ll.. I-. ..II ,, .i. ....i lh...., .1,,
..II I I I II ..I .h .....i I .... I in .i ..II
''' 'i .- 'nliu in,11 hill ii, .I. i .lni.-
hMi =, '_ '_ ONLY $68,000
Call Ehas G Kuallah 352 400-2635


DEVEiLT nILL)



hi.- '.I'.. ASKING $74.900
PAil D.An is 362 212 /280
lll l|r l; J i frll l ;ll |ll "'111m / | II II l


AWESOME 2 BEDROOM/
2 BATH, MOVE-IN READY!
H ..i'ii: h:,:ll ,i /(.II f ih .p hc.,:I h(. 5i:
,1 '. 1 iI,-I I I II I h .. I. i h `,:l i: I(II: ; H (.n.. I: si
lH inn I Ihd.... Hh inln.l .- li I l..i i
PRICED TO SELL $84,500
Call Ouade Feesei 352 302 7699


GREAT OUTSIDE ENTERTAINMENT AREA
LARGE LANAI AND LOVELY SELF-CLEANING POOL!
I h ill ,. m. I 1 I. ..I hl i .. l i.. I l.
.' I' r' -h ..p II l...Ii l .ii l llMlW I' hln i..l ...I
.....n.lin 1.L i I I. i .] . n I. i nh I l-. I .. il

-..i $99,500
Cll Dnl.s Ilinei 362 422-4621 loi .ipp


OWNER FINANCING
h~l l .Issol l .-I . ... l:I(h.: .l ..
i.l.l:l l siw l 1 _' ml: ll i( a I ltl ul l l. .

Mi i = 11m:6. ASKING $55,000
Call Enuil upu 352 302 1713


ELEGANT BEAUTY!
PINE RIDGE ESTATES

i l, I.n n Inii : l.. ni:i ieig n lni.n I i5i6n0l

C.al l : -ii jni n n .l*e liI l n i. l ihlm

Call lortaine 0 Regan 352-58650075


l 1, 1h l I.ll.j h I. I..II. I, nIII l I l sII I $ h $ ...Ih; fi

_" i. .ii _. : : n : .J^ :.. I :.l., i
$149,900
Call Mat/ha Snydei 352 476 8727
and ask lot file =352412


INVERNESS
b..jhhjl u 'l'Ji"I.Ji 1, h I..I Inj i. i i] i'llJ.ii ll
...., lh ..il I I... I. h1.. ..l I.i I .1 .. l
,:. r".J i" S4,500
(5) additional adjoining lots available
S4.000 ea. or make offer for all 6 lots
David Km Iz Cell 954383 8786
0/hice 352 726 6668


* ; ;B b.i r.h .J .ubl n .i..I r.

* I_11 r. I'll un, \ I\\ l HIn .'nn..I J b-.J I I. .1
Ml 5. = :1 _1 $59,000
fi'i'ir' citinscoun/I sold con
Jeanne Pickiel 212341/0


I


I