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Citrus County chronicle
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02666
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 01-27-2012
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:02666

Full Text



Scarlet to pewter: Bucs sign Rutgers coach Greg Schy


-I F II I


CITRUS COUNT Y






www.chronicleonline.com
SBest Community -Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community 50* VC


TODAY & Saturday morning
HIGH Cloudy with a 40 percent
73 chance of showers and
LOW t-storms. Winds 10 mph.
46 PAGE A4
JANUARY 27, 2012


Loud crowd cheers on candidates


2012 PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY DEBATE


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Bobby Ward walks
through the charred
remains of a home
Wednesday. The
house belonged to
his friends Bryan and
Chenoa McCutcheon.
Nursery taking
donations for
family whose
home burned
Color Country
Nursery is accepting
donations to assist
one of their employ-
ees, Chenoa Mc-
Cutcheon, who lost
her home to fire early
Wednesday morning
in Crystal River. She
and husband Bryan
lost virtually all of the
belongings in the fire.
Clothing and furniture
can be dropped off at
the nursery located
at 1405 West Gulf to
Lake Highway,
Lecanto, west of the
Citrus County Land-
fill. The nursery may
be reached by calling
352-746 6465.
Giveaway for
families in
need going on
all weekend
Due to an over-
abundance of Christ-
mas donations,
Mission in Citrus is
hosting a giveaway
this weekend to help
families in need.
Dozens of cribs, toys
and other household
items are available at
no cost. The give-
away will be from 7
a.m. to 7 p.m. Satur-
day and Sunday at
2488 N. Pennsylva-
nia Ave., Crystal
River 34428. For
more information, call
352-794-3825.


Think he's an
AARP member?
Citrus County's favorite
hippo gets pampered on
his 52nd birthday.
/Page A3
FAMILY MATTERS:
The challenge of
caring from afar
Millions of Baby
Boomers struggle with
the task of caring for
their ailing parents from
thousands of miles
away/Page A6
DICTION FRICTION:
The new F word
We know what you're
thinking, and so does
the energy industry.
/Page A12

Comics . . . . .C10
Community ....... .C8
Crossword ........ C9
Editorial ........ A10
Entertainment . . .B8
Horoscope ....... .B8
Lottery Numbers . .B4
Lottery Payouts . .B8
Movies ......... .C10
Obituaries ....... .A6
Classifieds .... .. .Cl
TV Listings ....... C9


6 84178 2002! 5U I


Gingrich hints

at Rubio as VP
Associated Press
JACKSONVILLE An
aggressive Mitt Romney re-
peatedly challenged Re-
publican presidential rival
Newt Gingrich in a fast-
paced campaign debate
Thursday night, ridiculing
the former House speaker's
call to build costly projects
in key primary states and to
colonize the moon.
Romney vehemently de-
nied Gingrich's own accusa-
tion that he is


Republican
presidential
candidates
Newt
Gingrich
and former
Mass. Gov.
Mitt Romney
trade words
Thursday at
a debate in
Jacksonville.
Associated
Press


anti-immigrant more so
than any other candidate.
And, as charges flew back
and forth, Gingrich re-
butted any suggestion that
he couldn't rein in surging


federal spending.
"You don't just have to be
cheap everywhere. You can
actually have priorities to
See Page A2


CAST YOUR BALLOT
* Early voting for the Jan. 31 presidential preference
primary ends Saturday, Jan. 28, at 4 p.m. Remaining
early voting hours: Friday from noon to 6 p.m. and
Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
* Voters must present a photo and signature ID when
early voting or vote a provisional ballot. Voters who are
registered in another Florida county but are now resid-
ing in Citrus must update their address with the elec-
tions office prior to voting, or they will be statutorily
required to cast a provisional ballot.
Early voting locations:
* Central Ridge Library, 425 W. Roosevelt Blvd., Beverly Hills.
* Crystal River Elections Office, 1540 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd., Crystal River.
* Homosassa Public Library, 4100 S. Grandmarch Ave.,
Homosassa.
* Inverness City Hall, 212 W. Main St., Inverness.
For more information, go to www.votecitrus.com or call
352-341-6740.


They get an 'A'


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Michael Porcelli was named Teacher of the Year on Thurday at Citrus Hills Country Club. Porcelli, right, shakes
hands with teacher Scott Hebert while making his way toward a podium to be recognized. Hebert was named
Florida Teacher of the Year in 1999.

For Michael Porcelli and Dennis Bidlack, excellence is no sweat


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff Writer
CITRUS HILLS
One's a physical education teacher
and the other a custodian, but
Michael Porcelli and Dennis
Bidlack have something in common:
Both love their jobs in the Citrus
County School District.
And both were stunned when their
names were announced.
Porcelli, who teaches at Hernando
Elementary School, and Bidlack, custo-
dian at Citrus Springs Elementary
See Page A2


Dennis
Bidlack
was
named
Support
Person of
the Year.
Bidlack
works at
Citrus
Springs
Elementary
School.


Gingrich


reveals


income,


but not


its source

Tax returns

show earnings

of$3.1M
Associated Press
WASHINGTON For-
mer House Speaker Newt
Gingrich beat his main
GOP presidential rival,
Mitt Romney, to the punch
by releasing his most re-
cent tax return. But Gin-
grich still hasn't revealed
how he earned most of his
$3.1 million.
The 2010 tax return made
public last week shows that
$2.4 million, more than
three-fourths of Gingrich's
income, came in payments
he regularly received, in ad-
dition to his salary, from dif-
ferent businesses he ran
before announcing his can-
didacy for president. Those
businesses managed speak-
ing engagements, appear-
ance fees, consulting work,
book and video deals and
paid positions that Gingrich
held in other groups.
Gingrich, who has de-
manded more transparency
from Romney, doesn't iden-
tify where the money came
from, including amounts he
received from his consult-
ing business. He also does-
n't list some of the salary he
reported on his tax return
on a financial disclosure
filed last year after launch-
ing his campaign.
The Associated Press re-
quested details about Gin-
grich's income and the
See PageA2


Citrus gives warm welcome to new CF president


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff Writer
LECANTO-James Hen-
ningsen just can't stay away
The new College of Cen-
tral Florida president has
been on the job just four
weeks and has already vis-
ited the Citrus County cam-
pus four times.
Plus his December visit,
when he was in town to in-
terview with the college's
seven-member board of
trustees to fill the slot left
vacant by the May retire-
ment of 15-year president
Charles "Chick" Dassance.
Henningsen said he was
impressed with his first
visit to the Citrus campus,


and that feeling has not left
"I sensed a spirit from the
faculty, staff and students,"
Henningsen said. "The staff
takes pride in what they
do."
Henningsen was the
center of attention Thurs-
day during a community re-
ception at the Citrus
campus, hosted by the Cit-
rus County Chamber of
Commerce, which drew
about 150 people.
The former vice presi-
dent of academy affairs at
Seminole State College,
Henningsen said he has al-
ready seen the community
support shown CF cam-
puses in Citrus, Levy and
Marion counties.


"This college takes pride
in what it does and the com-
munity steps forward to
help the college," he said.
Henningsen discussed
strengthening community
partnerships with the
school system and business
leaders. He is from Vermont
and served on economic de-
velopment councils there.
Henningsen said he ap-
preciates CF's open-door
policy and its personal at-
tention to each student who
walks on campus.
He said the college
should meet the commu-
nity's needs, including in
partnerships with the
See Page A2


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
College of Central Florida President Dr. James Henningsen,
left, talks to County Commissioner Joe Meek and County Ad-
ministrator Brad Thorpe during a Citrus County Chamber of
Commerce mixer hosted by the College of Central Florida.


EWS





A2 FRIDAY, JANUARY 27, 2012


Bomb scare at CMH: No pins, only needles


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Citrus Memorial Health System's Medical office building was the scene of a scare Thursday morning after dis-
patchers received a call around 9:30 of a suspicious buzzing package inside a lab at the hospital, according
to Gail Tierney, spokeswoman for the Citrus County Sheriffs Office. A hospital maintenance worker was re-
moving a medical waste container in one of the labs and heard a buzzing sound coming from the hazardous
material box, so it was carried outside by hospital security, according to a deputy at the scene. The Citrus
County Sheriff's Office and Fire Services responded and the parking lot was secured. Afterward, the Marion
County Sheriff's Office's bomb squad responded because the CCSO squad was in Tampa for training. After the
box was X-rayed, it was found to contain used syringes, according to Tierney.


changes sought by then President
George W Bush.
A liberal-leaning watchdog group,
Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics
in Washington, is urging a federal in-
vestigation of Gingrich's activities.
"Mr Gingrich's claim that he simply
engaged in 'public advocacy' doesn't
pass the smell test," said Melanie
Sloan, the group's executive director.
"Mr. Gingrich was a lobbyist, and he
should not be allowed to play word
games with the American people."
To make its case that Gingrich was
lobbying, Sloan's group cites the Lob-
bying Disclosure Act, which defines a
lobbyist as someone who receives
payment for services from a client,
makes more than one lobbying con-
tact for the client on an issue and spends
at least 20 percent of their time in a
three-month period on lobbying ac-
tivities. A lobbying contact is defined
as communication on behalf of a client
regarding "the formulation, modifica-
tion or adoption of federal legislation."
Gingrich's tax return doesn't show
how much money he received as a
consultant working through his Gin-
grich Group and his Center for Health
Transformation. The center urges
changes to health-related policies and
laws, practices and technology but says
it "does not provide lobbying services
nor directly or indirectly participate
in lobbying activities of any kind." In-
stead, all of Gingrich's income is
lumped together as $2.4 million in
payments from Gingrich Holdings, a
sort of parent company managing his
interests in other businesses.
The Center for Health Transforma-
tion served more than 100 companies
in 2010, with some paying as much as
$200,000 a year to join Gingrich's or-
ganization. While the center has said


it generated $55 million from hun-
dreds of corporate sponsors from
2001 to 2010 with Gingrich leading the
effort, it said it won't release a list of
clients due to confidentiality clauses
in its contracts.
Last year as he prepared for the
presidential run, Gingrich sold his in-
terest in the Gingrich Group and the
Center for Health Transformation.
He hasn't said how much he received
in the buyout, but his financial dis-
closure form shows his Gingrich Pro-
ductions is owed between $5 million
and $25 million from the Gingrich Group.
Gingrich's tax return also doesn't
show how much he received from his
Fox News contract as a frequent on-
air contributor. That contract was
managed by Gingrich Communica-
tions, a business that handles his ap-
pearances and speaking
engagements.
While the $2.4 million in Gingrich's
business payments are not detailed,
the tax return does identify more
than $712,000 of other income:
$252,500 for his salary from Gin-
grich Holdings;
$191,827 for his wife's salary from
Gingrich Productions and $5,918 from
the Basilica of the National Shrine of
the Immaculate Conception in Wash-
ington as a member of the church's
professional choir;
$76,200 from a congressional pension;
$72,274 from his share of his
daughter's business;
$38,637 for dividend and interest
payments;
$33,124 in tax refunds;
$21,625 in speaking fees paid directly
to Gingrich and not his businesses;
$20,000 for him and his wife for
serving on boards of directors. The
boards are not identified.


Balfour said Hen-
ningsen's personality was a
big factor
"He connected on a per-
sonal level," Balfour said.
"He's just a normal guy
He's not pretentious. He's
approachable."
Balfour also said Hen-
ningsen will be an outgoing
president.


"He is committed to be a
visible presence on all
three campuses," she said.
CF has about 9,000 full-
time students; about 2,000
attend CF at the Citrus
campus.
Chronicle reporter Mike
Wright can be reached at
352-563-3228 or mwright@
chronicleonline. com.


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WEEKLY AQUATIC TREATMENT
SCHEDULE FOR CITRUS COUNTY
Citrus County's Aquatic Services Division plans the following aquatic
weed control activities for the week beginning January 30, 2012.

HERBICIDE TREATMENTS
Waterbody Plant Herbicide Used
Hernando Pool Tallow / Nuphar Garlon 3A / Glyphosate


Inverness Pool Limnophila / Floating /
Tallow / Hydrilla /
Tussocks / Cattails /
Nuphar


Floral City Pool


Floating/ Tallow
Tussocks / Cattails


Clipper / Quest / Aquathol
Diquat / Garlon 3A /
Super K / Glyphosate /
2,4D
Diquat / Garlon 3A/ 2,4D
Glyphosate


All treatments are contingent upon weather conditions and water quality. Treated
areas will be identified with 'Warning Signs" indicating the date of treatment and the
necessary water use restrictions. For further information, please call 352-527-7620.
Citrus County
Division of Aquatic Services


GINGRICH
Continued from Page Al

identities of who paid him for his
services. The campaign has not de-
cided whether it will release further
information about Gingrich's income,
spokesman R.C. Hammond said. Gin-
grich will amend his financial disclo-
sure to show $252,500 in salary from
one of his companies, Hammond said.
Other GOP presidential candidates,
including Romney and former Penn-
sylvania Sen. Rick Santorum, have
provided details of such income.
Romney's financial reports filed last
year and his 2010 tax return released
this week specify groups that paid
him for appearances and how much
he received. Romney's campaign said
Thursday he will amend his financial
disclosure to add investment funds he
did not previously report, including a
Swiss bank account that earned just
over $1,700 in interest that was re-
ported on his tax return.
Santorum, who has yet to release
his tax return, lists on a financial re-
port the businesses that paid him as
a consultant, payments he received
serving on specific boards and ac-
tivist groups, and money he earned as
a Fox News contributor and a news-
paper columnist.
Gingrich has said he was exercising
his rights as a citizen, not a lobbyist,
in 2003 when he publicly advocated
changes in Medicare. And he's argued
that he and his group, which received
millions from dozens of health-re-
lated businesses, made sure not to
cross the line into lobbying when he
met with congressional members and
others to promote the Medicare


CF
Continued from Page Al

school district and business
groups to educate students
to fill demands in the
workforce.
CF trustee Don Taylor,
who, along with Sandy Bal-
four, represent Citrus
County on the board, said


Henningsen was chosen fol-
lowing a national search
that brought applicants
from California, Texas, the
Northwest, Northeast and
Florida.
Five finalists were brought
to the area for two days
each to visit each campus
and then be interviewed by
the board of trustees. Hen-
ningsen was the board's
unanimous choice.


DEBATE
Continued from Page Al

get things done," Gingrich
declared, saying that as
speaker of the House he had
helped balance the budget
while doubling spending on
the National Institutes of
Health.
The debate was the second
in four days in the run-up to
next Tuesday's Florida pri-
mary. Opinion polls make
the race a close one.
While clashes between
Gingrich and Romney dom-
inated the debate, Santorum
drew applause from the au-
dience when he called on
the two frontrunners to stop
attacking one another and
"focus on the issues."
There were some moments
of levity, including when
Paul, 76, was asked whether
he would be willing to release
his medical records. He said
he was, then challenged the
other three men on the
stage to a 25-mile bike race.
He got no takers.
The first clash occurred
moments after the debate
opened, when Gingrich re-
sponded to a question by
saying Romney was the
most anti-immigrant of all
four contenders on stage.
"That's simply inexcus-
able," the former Massachu-
setts governor responded.
"Mr. Speaker, I'm not anti-
immigrant, my father was born
in Mexico," Romney said.
"I'm not anti-immigrant."



AWARDS
Continued from Page Al

School, received top honors
as the teacher and school-
related employee of the year
Thursday night during the
Galaxy of Stars banquet spon-
sored by the Citrus County
Education Foundation.
"This is a big shock!" Bid-
lack said. "Everybody de-
serves it Our hearts are here
for the kids. At each school
we're called to do our duty."
Before Porcelli could say
a word after accepting his
award, Superintendent of
Schools Sandra "Sam" Him-
mel told an amusing story
about falling flat on her
back while Porcelli led an
exercise routine with dis-
trict staffers.
"I thought I broke every
muscle in my back, so I'm
not sure how you got this,"
Himmel joked.
Porcelli, who believes in
urging exercise for children
and adults, said he too was
stunned with the award.
"I love Citrus County," he
said. "There's nothing but
love and respect for every-
one here."
Porcelli has 20 years of
teaching experience, in-
cluding eight at Hernando
Elementary His principal,
Laura Manos, wrote in her
letter nominating Porcelli as
district teacher of the year
that Porcelli is often think-
ing of new ways to capture
the interests of his students.
"With families often too
busy to sign their children
up for organized sports in
the evenings and weekends,
Mr. Porcelli has developed
what is called a Sports


Please RSVP
352.7953317
Crystal Eye Center
1124 N. Suncoast Blvd.
Crystal River, FL 34429


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

About an hour later, Rom-
ney pounced when the topic
turned to Gingrich's pro-
posal for an permanent
American colony on the
moon an issue of particu-
lar interest to engineers and
others who live on Florida's
famed Space Coast
"If I had a business exec-
utive come to me and say I
want to spend a few hun-
dred billion dollars to put a
colony on the moon, I'd say,
'You're fired,"' Romney said.
The audience erupted in
cheers, but Romney wasn't
finished.
He said Gingrich called
for construction of a new In-
terstate in South Carolina, a
new VA hospital in northern
New Hampshire and widen-
ing the port of Jacksonville.
"This idea of going state
to state and promising peo-
ple what they want to hear,
promising hundreds of bil-
lions of dollars to make peo-
ple happy, that's what got us
into trouble in the first
place," Romney said.
In response to a question
from moderator Wolf Blitzer,
the candidates said they'd
involve a number of Hispanic
GOP officeholders in their
Cabinet and three said
they're impressed by
Florida Sen. Marco Rubio.
Santorum, Gingrich and
Romney all name-checked
Rubio, who is widely con-
sidered a potential vice-
presidential nominee.
Gingrich implied he would
look hard at Rubio as his
vice-presidential nominee.


Camp," Manos wrote. "In
the mornings, parents are
able to drop their children
off to obtain a well-balanced
program that exposes their
children to many different
sports, thus preparing them
for the transition to middle
school intramurals. This is a
very popular program at
Hernando."
Porcelli also started an af-
terschool fitness program
for the staffers.
"While students are on
their way home on the
buses, our staff can be found
out back swearing to the
strenuous cross-fit program
he has designed especially
for them," Manos wrote.
Porcelli said he wants
children to understand the
importance of staying phys-
ically fit.
"I tell them, 'Your body is
something you will own for
the rest of your life,"' he
said. "I just want to be a
piece to the puzzle."
Bidlack also sets his goals
beyond custodial duties, Cit-
rus Springs Elementary
Principal Scott Hebert wrote
in his nomination letter.
Bidlack assists with the
school's track team.
"He works with the stu-
dents in learning the basics
of stretching, sprinting and
running," Hebert wrote.
"He motivates the students
to go above and beyond
their potential to achieve
success."
Bidlack said that is his
passion.
"I love working with kids,"
he said. "My heart has always
been for kids. I love 'em."
Chronicle reporter Mike
Wright can be reached at
352-563-3228 or mwright@
chronicleonline. cornm.


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Page A3 FRIDAY, JANUARY 27, 2012



TATE&


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE




THE STATE Man, woman arrested for battery


Citrus County
Farm show offers
fun for urbanites
City folk will be welcome at
Saturday's AGRItunity 2012
-A Large and Small Farm
Conference and Trade Show.
Families can enjoy modern
and antique farm equipment,
barnyard animals such as
sheep and llamas and a
kiddy corral with horseshoe-
ing and whip cracking
demonstrations. Workshops
will cover crop and livestock
topics. Lunch will be available
for purchase.
The event is set from 8
a.m. to 3 p.m. at West Cen-
tral Florida Agricultural Edu-
cational Center, 7620 State
Road 471, Bushnell (Sumter
County Fair Grounds). Tick-
ets are $20.
For information, contact
Susan Kelly at 352-793-2728
ext. 236 or email sakelly@
ufl.edu.
Seventh Purple Heart
ceremony Feb. 18
Members of the Aaron A.
Weaver Chapter 776 Military
Order of the Purple Heart
(MOPH) cordially invite all
veterans and the public to at-
tend the seventh annual Pur-
ple Heart Ceremony at 11
a.m., Saturday, Feb. 18, at
the Florida National Guard
Armory in Crystal River.
The ceremony will com-
memorate the proud legacy
of the Purple Heart and pay
tribute to Florida's fallen he-
roes of the global war on ter-
ror and America's wounded
warriors.
The ceremony will also
feature the MOPH Depart-
ment of Florida Afghanistan/
Iraq War Memorial Portrait
Mural. The mural honors
more than 300 Floridians who
have died during the
Afghanistan/Iraq campaigns
and is the first memorial to
bear engraved names and
color portraits. Vocalists Paul
and Jackie Stevio will provide
patriotic music.
For more information, visit
the Chapter 776 website at
www.citruspurpleheart.org or
call 352-382-3847.

Tallahassee

Students oppose
tuition increase
State university students
rallied in front of the old
Florida Capitol on Thursday
to say it's time to stop annual
tuition increases.
They also opposed legisla-
tion that would give the gov-
ernor the power to appoint
the student representative on
the board that oversees the
universities. In addition, the
students were against further
cuts in the popular merit-
based Bright Futures
scholarships.
That Board of Governors
seat currently goes to the
chairman of the Florida Stu-
dent Association. It's now
held by New College sopho-
more and student body presi-
dent Mike Long, who led the
rally.
Long said tuition has gone
up 60 percent over the past
four years while state support
for the universities has
dropped 24 percent. He
urged lawmakers to maintain
state funding and tuition at
current levels as recom-
mended by Gov. Rick Scott.
The tuition hikes have
come under a law that lets
the Legislature and the
board approve annual tuition
increases totaling 15 percent
until Florida in-state tuition
reaches the national aver-
age. Florida currently ranks
about 45th among the
states.
"Why have we accepted
the justification that tuition
should catch up to the na-
tional average?" Long asked.
"Can someone please tell me
why we are so eager to be
average?"
An initial budget proposal


awaiting committee action in
the House calls for an 8 per-
cent across-the-board tuition
increase.
-From staff and wire reports


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff Writer

INVERNESS An Inverness
man is accused of domestic battery
for tackling a woman in a bar park-
ing lot, according to Citrus County
Sheriff's Office reports.
Edward G. Ferguson Sr, 47, re-
portedly got into an argument with
the woman in the bar and it spilled
over into the parking lot where it
became physical.


Investigators no-
ticed red marks and
a scratch on the
woman's neck. She
also suffered dam-
age to her pinky fin-
ger after Ferguson
allegedly ripped
Edward keys from her hand.
Ferguson Ferguson was ar-
rested Saturday and
no bond was allowed.
Dawn Jean Carmichael, 44, of


Beverly Hills, is
accused of punch-
ing a man in the
mouth with a
closed fist during
an argument.
According to the
sheriff's office, the
Dawn couple had been
Carmichael drinking during
the day when an
argument started. Carmichael re-
portedly ended up punching


the man.
Investigators noticed the man
had a red, swollen bottom lip and
Carmichael admitted to striking the
man.
The man allegedly refused to
complete a statement form
against Carmichael, who was ar-
rested Sunday and no bond was
allowed.
Chronicle reporter AB. Sidibe
can be reached at 352-564-2925 or
asidibe@chronicleonline.com.


Celebrating large


Lu the hippo

turns 52
MATTHEW BECK
Chronicle
HOMOSASSA
SPRINGS More than
800 hippo-happy resi-
dents turned out Thurs-
day morning to Ellie
Schiller Homosassa
Springs Wildlife State
Park to celebrate Lu the
hippo's 52nd birthday
With his maw open
wide, park ranger Tricia
Fowler and park volun-
teer Ginny Svoboda care-
fully tossed a hippo-sized
bread cake into Lu's
mouth as visitors sang
"Happy Birthday"
Lu savored every morsel
of cake, making sure to
consume even the smallest
of pieces left floating in the
lagoon where he has lived
since 1966.
Rangers estimate the
park's largest resident
weighs about 6,500
pounds and they say he
eats about 50 pounds of
food daily
Along with park visi-
tors, more than 530 stu-
dents from the Lecanto
Primary School made the
trip to watch the celebra-
tion. After Lu's had his
cake, students and visi-
tors were treated to cup-
cakes and punch by park
volunteers.
Park Ranger Art Yerian
has seen the birthday cel-
ebration for 15 years and
doesn't tire of the annual
party.
"He's been the icon of
the park for the last 15
years that I've been here.
People just love that
hippo," Yerian said. "Cit-
rus County has kind of
adopted him as the mas-
cot for the park."
Lu's fame has spread
far and wide.
"He has fans all over the
world," Susan Straw-
bridge, park services spe-
cialist said. "Of all the
animals in the park, he has
more people that follow
him and what's going on
with him than any other.
There's an international
club called Hippolotofus
that is a hippo-lovers
group. They have mem-
bers who travel all around
the world to visit hippos in


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Lu the hippo has a large bread cake tossed into his open maw Thursday morning at Ellie Schiller Homosassa
Springs Wildlife State Park during his 52nd birthday celebration.


zoos and parks," she said.
"Nearly every year we
have one or two members
of the club come to see Lu.
He even has his own page
on their website."
April Home brought
her two daughters from
Jacksonville to celebrate.
"We came down just for
the birthday party," she
said. "My youngest daugh-
ter loves Lu. Everything in
our house is Lu, Lu, Lu."


Horne's 6-year-old
daughter dressed from
head-to-toe in a hippo out-
fit and said she thought
twice about bringing her
favorite stuffed animal, a
fluffy hippo named Lu.
"I was going to bring it
today but I was afraid it
might get lost," she said.
Trinity Louise Cox, 7, of
Inverness, shares her
birthday with Thursday's
guest of honor.


"I like it because I get to
spend time with Lu. I like it
when Lu laughs," she said.
But for those fans who
missed the first go-round,
there was a second oppor-
tunity to sing "Happy
Birthday"
"We have cake A and
cake B," the park ranger
said.
Ken Torres, park serv-
ices specialist, wheeled
the cake across the park to


A hippo-sized card
was signed by many of
those attending the birth-
day party.
: More than 800
people showed up for Lu's
birthday.
the hippo's lagoon as visi-
tors lined up more than a
half hour before the party
began.
"He's an old man," he
said. "He's been here a
bunch of years. He's a
noble man who likes to eat
a bunch of watermelons."
Chronicle staff writer
Matthew Beck can be
reached at 352-564-2919 or
mbeck@chronicleonline.
corn.


Cattle Baron's Ball benefits American Cancer Society


CATHY KAPULKA
Staff Writer
Cattle Baron's Ball committee
members are on a mission a mis-
sion to sell as many tickets as they
can for the event that benefits The
American Cancer Society
Glenda Brashear, committee
member, said this is the 10th an-
niversary for the fundraiser.
She said ticket sales are not what
they were in the past and she
blames it partly on the economy
So far the committee has sold 239
tickets far from the event's goal
of 300 and with the ball a little
more than two weeks away, more
tickets need to be sold to make the
evening a success, she said. In 2011,
315 tickets were sold and in 2010,
they sold 327.
"We want to get the word out that
this is a wonderful and exciting
event," she said. "Over the past year,
this event has had a committee of


50-plus volunteers working dili-
gently"
Brashear said the committee is
trying to raise $100,000 through
ticket sales and live and silent auc-
tion items that offer something for
everyone.
"Our community has been so gen-
erous with donations for our silent
and live auctions," she said opti-
mistically "Art work, spa pack-
ages, vacations, jewelry you
name it, we have it up for auction."
She said the evening would start
with an open bar, coffee bar and
chocolate fountain and feature en-
tertainment, a wine toss and gaming
tables. A grilled steak dinner will be
served at 7 p.m. and Chris Moling
will provide dance lessons.
A representative from the
R.O.C.K. (Reaching Out to Cancer
Kids) program will attend as well.
"We take great pride in the cause
and in our event," she said.
Suzanne Fuller's family has been


touched by cancer
She lost her husband, Dr. James
Fuller, to cancer several years ago
and she is a breast cancer survivor.
Fuller speaks highly about the
organization.
"As a patient, I was on the receiv-
ing end," Fuller said. "While still in
the hospital after surgery, I was vis-
ited by an American Cancer Society
volunteer who offered me emo-
tional and physical support during
my post-op as well as during my fu-
ture treatments which lasted for
about eight months. I did not call for
the help, they came to me."
She said she took advantage of
one of the organization's support
programs, the "Look Good, Feel
Better" (LGFB) program that sup-
plied her with more than $100 dol-
lars worth of makeup. They offered
her tips for makeup application
that helped her skin color appear
more normal.
"I found it gave me feelings of self


confidence during days when I did
not feel well," she added. "Most im-
portantly, it offered me an opportu-
nity to socialize with others
experiencing the same problems."
The American Cancer Society of-
fers the LGFB program to all
women with cancer who are under-
going chemotherapy, radiation or
other forms of treatment.
"Cancer robs a woman of her en-
ergy, appetite and strength, but pro-
grams like LGFB help her deal with
these difficulties," she said.
The ball is from 6 to 11 p.m. Feb.
11, at the Citrus Springs Community
Center. Cost is $150 per person and
includes entertainment, dinner,
open bar, coffee bar and a chocolate
fountain, Brashear added.
For more information call Bras-
hear's Pharmacy at 352-746-3420.
Chronicle reporter Cathy Ka-
pulka can be reached at 352-
564-2922 or ckapulka@chronicle
online com






A4 FRIDAY, JANUARY 27, 2012


Judge: BP contract


shielded Transocean


from oil spill claims


Associated Press


NEW ORLEANS The
rig owner involved in
drilling the ill-fated well
that blew out in the Gulf of
Mexico and spewed more
than 200 million gallons of
oil will not have to pay many
of the pollution claims be-
cause it was shielded in a
contract with well owner BP,
a federal judge ruled on
Thursday
The decision may have
spared the driller from hav-
ing to pay potentially bil-
lions of dollars. However,
U.S. District Judge Carl Bar-
bier said that Transocean
still is not exempt from pay-
ing punitive damages and
civil penalties that arise
from the April 20, 2010,
blowout 100 miles off the
Louisiana coast.
The ruling comes as BP,
the states affected by the
disaster and the federal gov-
ernment are discussing a
settlement over the nation's
largest offshore oil spill.
The Justice Department is
working with the states to
create an outline for a set-
tlement that would resolve
their potentially multibillion
dollar claims against BP and
other companies involved in
the disaster, Alabama Attor-
ney General Luther Strange
told The Associated Press.
Justice led a meeting last
week in Washington among
the states in an effort to for-
mulate an agreement that
would satisfy government
and state claims, including
penalties and fines, Strange
said.


A first phase of the trial is
set for Feb. 27 to determine
liability for the spill.
Despite the setback, BP
claimed victory and said
Barbier's ruling "at a mini-
mum" left Transocean fac-
ing "punitive damages, fines
and penalties flowing from
its own conduct."
Blaine LeCesne, an asso-
ciate professor at Loyola
University law school, how-
ever, said Barbier's ruling
was a "major victory" for
Transocean.
"If anything is going to
compel the parties toward
settlement, it's going to be
this," he said. "I think BP is
in a very bad position now,
and they don't have a lot of
leverage."
BP PLC, Transocean Ltd.
and Halliburton Co. have
been sparring over who was
at fault for causing the
blowout. The out-of-control
well was capped in July,
2010. Federal investigators
have said that BP bears ulti-
mate responsibility for the
spill, but has faulted all
three companies to some
degree.
Under a drilling contract,
BP and Transocean agreed
to indemnify each other in
the case of an accident, with
BP taking responsibility for
pollution originating from
the well and Transocean for
any pollution or accidents
aboard the rig.
However, in court BP ar-
gued that the contract did
not shield Transocean if the
drilling company acted in
manner that was grossly
negligent.


Workforce board bill gives
governor firing authority
A bill giving Gov. Rick Scott and future gov-
ernors more control over regional workforce
boards passed its first Senate stop on Thurs-
day in response to a series of embarrassing
incidents regarding mismanagement at the
local jobs boards. Following debate and some
amendments to align the bill with the House,
the Senate Commerce and
Tourism Committee unani-
mously approved SB 1398,
which gives the governor the
authority to fire top workforce
board officials for any reason.
A previous version gave the
governor the power to hire
workforce board executive di-
rectors and board chairmen.
An amendment offered Thurs- 2012 SE
day struck that provision but
lets the governor dismiss those two officials
without having to show cause. At least one
local workforce board chairman, Jay Over-
man, said the measure could politicize the
process and make it difficult for board execu-
tive directors and chairmen to do things op-
posed by the governor but supported by their
local community. A state audit found that from
2008 to 2010 the workforce boards handed
out more than $7.5 million in contracts to com-
panies controlled by or linked to their board
members.


Scott's property tax proposal
gets warm reception
A bipartisan pair of lawmakers gave a warm
reception to Gov. Rick Scott's proposal for a
$50,000 exemption from the tangible personal
property tax on businesses. The move, which
would require a constitutional amendment,
would slice more than 156,000 taxpayers from
the rolls about 49 percent of those who cur-
rently pay it. At a meeting
Thursday morning of the Sen-
ate Finance and Tax Subcom-
mittee, the proposal drew kind
words from Sens. Thad Altman,
R-Viera, and Maria Sachs, D-
Delray Beach. "This tax is a real
pain in the neck.... I hope we
can eventually completely do
away with it," Altman said.
SSION Sachs said that doing away
with the tax might actually save
the state some of the money used to administer
it. "I know that we must spend a lot in notifying
them and in computing the taxes, in assessing
the taxes, in enforcing the tax, prosecuting
those who don't pay," Sachs said. But Christian
Weiss, policy coordinator for Scott's budget of-
fice, said the tax was largely collected by locals.
"The savings, I think, on the state side ... are
probably small, or much smaller than on the
business side, because they have to comply,"
he said.
-From wire reports


LOCAL/STATE


Joshua Lee Huggins,
24, 5574 S. Thrasher Ave.,
Homosassa, 9:41 p.m. Tues-
day on charges of possession
of a controlled substance, pos-
session of marijuana, drug
paraphernalia and no motor
vehide registration. Bond $6,100.
James Herbert Lofty,
23, 753 NE 9th St., Crystal
River, 12:21 p.m. Thursday on
charges of credit card fraud
and possession of marijuana.
Bond $2,500.
Joseph Emmanuel
Coldsnow, 25, 8326 W. Oak
St., Crystal River, 1:08 a.m.
Thursday on charges of pos-
session of a controlled sub-
stance (Hydrocodone) and
driving under the influence
(DUI). Coldsnow was report-
edly speeding when he was
stopped and the officer de-
tected alcohol on his breath.
He subsequently failed field
sobriety tests. Bond $6,000.


,egal notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle


4 Meeting Notices.....................................015

Lien Notices ............................................ C15

Miscellaneous Notices..........................C15

Foreclosure Sale/Action Notices..........C15

Notice to Creditors/Administration......C14

.. Self Storage Notices ..............................C14

..... .... Surplus Property ....................................C 14
..* ***...* ** ** ** *** ** ** **


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
HI LOPR -HI LO PR HI L
81 59 0. NA NA NA 5!


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead

Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
sh
ts
ts


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
ts
ts
ts
s
ts
pc
ts
ts
ts


MARINE OUTLOOK


HI LO PR HI LO PR
82 59 0.00 85 58 0.00

THREE DAY OUTLOOKExsive daily
............................................ TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 73 Low: 46
AM showers exit

SATURDAY & SUNDAY MORNING
High: 72 Low: 49
.r..F'rl P cloudy


High: 70 Low: 39
Partly cloudy


ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Thursday 82/54
Record 83/23
Normal 71/43
Mean temp. 68
-'" pI ilui from mean +11
PRECIPITATION*
Thursday 0.00 in.
Total for the month 0.66 in.
Total for the year 0.66 in.
Normal for the year 2,56 in.
*As l 6 pmn at Inverness
UV INDEX: 3
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Thursday at 3 p.m. 29.99 in.


DEW POINT
Thursday at 3 p.m. 59
HUMIDITY
Thursday at 3 p.m. 43%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Juniper, elm and maple
Today's count: 4.8/12
Saturday's count: 10.5
Sunday's count: 10.3
AIR QUALITY
Thursday was good with pollutants


mainly ozone.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MI
(MORNING)
1/27 FRIDAY 8:34 2:23 8
1/28 SATURDAY 9:21 3:11 9


OFB. 7


NOR M
(AFTERNO
8:55
9:43


CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
SUNSET TONIGHT


c 4 .
FB. 14 FEB. 21


SUNRISE TOMORROW.............
MOONRISE TODAY
MOONSET TODAY


AJOR
)ON)
2:44
3:32


....6:05 P.t
7...7:21 A.,
;* r


BURN CONDITIONS


Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For
more information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's
Web site: http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi

WATERING RULES
Citrus County: Irrigation is limited to twice per week.
Even addresses: Thursday and/or Sunday before 10am or after 4pm.
Odd Addresses: Wednesday and/or Saturday before 10am or after 4pm.
No restrictions on fountains, car washing or pressure washing. Hand watering requires the
use of a shut-off nozzle.
PLEASE CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL NEW PLANT MATERIAL.
Questions, concerns or reporting violations, please call Citrus County 352-527-7669.

TIDES


*From mouths of rivers "At King's Bay
Friday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka' 7:47 a/3:45 a 8:17 p/3:53 p
Crystal River" 6:08 a/1:07 a 6:38 p/1:15 p
Withlacoochee* 3:55 a/11:03 a 4:25 p/11:34 p
Homosassa 6:57 a/2:44 a 7:27 p/2:52 p


**At Mason's Creek
Saturday
High/Low High/Low
8:29 a/4:24 a 8:45 p/4:21 p
6:50 a/1:46 a 7:06 p/1:43 p
4:37 a/11:31 a 4:53 p/-
7:39 a/3:23 a 7:55 p/3:20 p


West winds around 15 knots. Seas 2
to 4 feet. Bay and inland waters ..:ill
have a moderate chop. Expect a good
chance of showers and thunderstorms
early today.


Gulf water
temperature


70
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Wed. Thu. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 27.63 27.61 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 34.30 34.28 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 36.46 36.45 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 37.91 37.89 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level. Flood stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year flood, Ihe mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance ol being equaled or exceeded in allny one year. This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data. If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211.

THE NATION


. lrr
30s 4 -


.__ .-
" os soMrtraph --- -:' ,
~. 65,8 ( A


-i -
B.. ellow. ,
.. .70s


Thursday Friday
H L Pcp. Fcst H L


Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
M Burlington. VT
M Charleston, SC
* Charleston. WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus. OH
Concord. N H
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
I Nashville


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
@2012 Weather Central, Madison, WI.


. s


' ,,.,
e2s68


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
FRIDAY

Thursday Friday
City H L Pp. Fcst H L
New Orleans 73 62 1.32 s 63 44
New York City 40 33 .05 sh 60 35
Norfolk 66 40 ts 69 40
Oklahoma City 55 33 pc 60 25
Omaha 48 24 c 37 19
Palm Springs 81 50 s 80 50
Philadelphia 45 38 sh 60 33
Phoenix 74 45 s 76 50
Pittsburgh 49 33 .39 sh 39 29
Portland, ME 38 25 r 42 36
Portland, Ore MMMM na pc 45 32
Providence, R.I 41 32 ,01 sh 53 27
Raleigh 69 40 ts 69 36
Rapid City 46 24 pc 35 18
Reno 60 33 s 47 24
Rochester. NY 36 28 .14 sh 39 29
Sacramento 65 44 s 63 35
St. Louis 40 34 35 c 48 27
St. Ste. Marie 32 26 pc 33 23
Salt Lake City 47 32 11 sn 38 23
San Antonio 72 44 s 72 44
San Diego 77 51 s 71 50
San Francisco 60 54 s 61 43
Savannah 78 54 ts 75 45
Seattle 46 37 .32 pc 40 34
Spokane 39 34 trace pc 33 17
Syracuse 36 30 .10 sh 38 28
Topeka 57 21 sh 50 22
Washington 55 40 sh 60 35
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 85 Punta Gorda, Fla. LOW 0 Gunnison,
Colo.
WORLD CITIES


FRIDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 85/67/s
Amsterdam 43/33/sh
Athens 48/35/sh
Beiling 32/9/s
Berlin 31/22/c
Bermuda 72/64/pc
Cairo 62/47/pc
Calgary 32/17/pc
Havana 83/63/ts
i.. Kong 62/54/pc
Jerusalem 52/43/sh


Lisbon
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Paris
Rio
Rome
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Warsaw


57/38/pc
47/35/sh
50/33/sh
71/44/s
31/22/sn
5/-6/s
46/34/sh
82/73/ts
56/37/pc
75/69/sh
44/32/sh
36/29/rs
22/1 1/pc


C I T R U S


C U N TY


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


For the RECORD

Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Arrests
William Jones Curry, 39,
6260 W. Park Drive, Ho-
mosassa, 6:52 p.m. Tuesday
on the charge of resting an of-
ficerwithout violence. Bond $500.


I Legislative BRIEFS


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


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El


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Foreclosures in forefront


Lehigh Acres hit

har4 decides

politicians'role

in events

Associated Press

LEHIGH ACRES At
Our Daily Bread Food
Pantry, the conversation
often centers on real estate.
Once taboo details home
values and what people
paid for their properties -
are casually discussed, and
there appears to be little
shame in walking away from
a mortgage or fighting the
bank on a foreclosure.
With Florida's Republican
presidential primary just
days away, the talk has
turned to politics. At the food
pantry and throughout hard-
hit Lehigh Acres, frustration
over the housing crisis and
the federal government's
seeming inability to help has
turned into apathy at best,
and rage, at worst
"They destroyed Florida,"
said 69-year-old Bobbie
Ruggieri, a food pantry
volunteer.
Lehigh Acres is about 30
miles east of the Gulf of Mex-
ico's sandy beaches in south-
west Florida, slightly
northwest of the Everglades.
Once sleepy and rural, the
area boomed high and hard
between 2003 and 2007. The
population doubled to 65,000,
mostly from service and con-
struction workers living
large off the success of the
area's new housing. The fall
came just as fast. By 2008,
Lehigh Acres and the entire
Fort Myers area had the na-
tion's highest foreclosure
rate. Currently, one in every
96 homes is in foreclosure.
Here and likely else-
where, no politician is
spared the fury over the
housing crunch. Experts say
neither President Barack
Obama nor any of the Re-
publicans who want to chal-
lenge him in November have
solutions for falling prices,
depressed construction and
waves of foreclosures.
Obama said this week he
wants to help struggling
homeowners refinance
their mortgages. His GOP
opponents generally say the
government should not in-
terfere in the housing mar-
ket. But a growing number
of experts are advocating a
bolder approach to provide
relief to the 11 million
homeowners in the United
States who owe more on
their mortgages than their
houses are worth.
Republican candidate Mitt
Romney stood in front of an
empty, foreclosed home
Tuesday and told a small
crowd he would encourage
banks to work with home-


owners. He also defended
the banks, saying they also
were hamstrung by the crisis.
"In this case, it's because
of the banks," Romney
said. "Well, the banks aren't
bad people. They're just
overwhelmed."
Kit Bock, who owns a land-
scaping company, listened.
He said his company has lost
$10 million in business in the
past decade. It once em-
ployed 160 people but now
just 30 are on the payroll.
Bock said he thinks he'll
vote for Romney because of
his success as a business-
man. But Bock said he's not
wildly enthusiastic about
any candidate.
"What I'd like to hear
from a candidate is not how
bad things are and how
everyone else hasn't done
their job. I'd like to hear
specifically what they can do
to change things," he said.
Food bank pantry man-
ager Karen Balch was too
busy handing out deli meat
and bread to the needy to go
see Romney She wishes he
or former House Speaker
Newt Gingrich or any other
national politician would
drop by
"They're all good people
here," said Balch, who
started volunteering when
she lost her job at a flea
market "Hard-working peo-
ple. It seems like everyone
you talk to here in Lehigh is
losing a home."
Walt Romberg, another
pantry volunteer, bought a
$139,000 home with his wife
in 2004. They put down


$75,000 after selling a busi-
ness. It took them a while to
find jobs, then they lost
them. They nearly went into
foreclosure, and would have,
if not for a nonprofit that's
helping pay their mortgage
for 18 months. The home is
now worth less than $55,000.
Romberg said the nation's
problems started under
President George W Bush,
but he doesn't blame Bush
entirely He also doesn't
blame Obama, but thinks
Obama "hasn't helped all
that much, either." Romberg
said he was thinking of vot-
ing for Romney because
he's "created some jobs, like
Staples," referring to the of-
fice supply chain that Rom-
ney's former company, Bain
Capital, financed.
Ruggieri, who also volun-
teers as a nurse at a free
medical clinic with 200 peo-
ple on its waiting list, said
she won't vote for Romney
"I'm mad that he blamed
Obama for this," she said.
Ruggieri doesn't see the
housing crisis as any one
politician's or party's fault,
although she does have some
choice words for the banks.
But she's one of the lucky
ones in Lehigh Acres: She
and her husband bought a
foreclosed home for $33,000
in 2009, once worth $211,000.
Daniel Bozarth, who rents
a home a few streets away
from where Romney stood,
applauded his remarks. The
26-year-old, who is collect-
ing $160 a week in unem-
ployment after losing his job
repairing motorcycles and


Associated Press
ABOVE: Ryan Gress, left, and
his wife Crystal, right, talk
with Chancie Shelley, center,
a consumer loan representa-
tive with Wells Fargo Bank,
during a "Home Preservation
Workshop," on Jan. 12 in
Seattle. LEFT: Republican
presidential candidate and
former Massachusetts Gov.
Mitt Romney greets resi-
dents as he campaigns Tues-
day in front of a foreclosed
home in Lehigh Acres.


ATVs, also doesn't blame
Obama. He also likes Rom-
ney made millions during
his career.
"If we were to have some-
one like that, that's what we
need," Bozarth said. "We
need someone to get us a lot
of jobs. I think we've hit rock
bottom."
Another neighbor,
Michelle Wheeler, a 44-year-
old staunch Obama sup-
porter, refused to attend
Romney's event
"This is not a situation
that can get fixed in four
years," said Wheeler, who
was laid off from her job at
State Farm insurance after
injuring her knee.
Without health insurance,
she can't get surgery With-
out surgery, she can't walk
much or work. She is angry
Republicans, and some De-
mocrats, haven't supported
Obama's ideas.
"I blame anyone who is
opposing him," Wheeler
said. "Just work with the
president"


Panel rejects
health prices bill
A Senate committee
Wednesday rejected a pro-
posal that called for giving
more information to patients
about the prices of medical
services.
The Senate Health Regula-
tion Committee voted 4-3
against introducing a bill (SPB
7186) that, in part, would have
required doctors and facilities
such as ambulatory-surgical
centers and diagnostic-imag-
ing centers to provide informa-
tion to patients about the
prices of frequently provided
services. Also, the bill ad-
dressed an issue known as
"balance billing," which can
occur when patients face
charges for services provided
by doctors who do not have
contracts with the patients' in-
surance companies.
The bill would have helped
shield patients from such
charges for emergency care.
The Senate committee re-
fused to move forward with the
bill hours after the House
Health & Human Services
Quality Subcommittee ap-
proved its version (HB 1329).
Senate panel OKs
care for disabled
A bill intended to balance
the budget at the deficit-
plagued Agency for Persons
with Disabilities cleared a Sen-
ate panel by a unanimous vote
Wednesday.
The proposal (SB 1516) by
Sen. Joe Negron, R-Stuart, and
chair of the Senate Health and
Human Services Appropriations
Subcommittee, calls for the
state to prioritize core services
that ensure the "health and
safety" of people with disabili-
ties, while other services such
as respite care, adult day care
and transportation would be
provided by "natural supports
and community resources,"
such as family caregivers and
local non-profits.
"Even if you're doing the
Lord's work, you still have to
live within your appropria-
tions," Negron told the Senate
Children, Families and Elder
Affairs Committee.
Among its provisions, the
bill would make Medicaid the
"payer of last resort" for serv-
ices designed to keep people
out of institutions.


2012 SESSION

Critics say the measure
would limit APD to providing
"core" services, opening a can
of worms in defining those
services for disabled people
with multiple and varying
needs.
Random drug tests
approved
House and Senate commit-
tees Wednesday approved
bills that would allow state
agencies to conduct random
drug testing of employees.
The bills (HB 1205 and SB
1358) come after Gov. Rick
Scott issued an executive
order last year that required
employee drug testing. The
American Civil Liberties Union
filed a constitutional challenge
that has led to the suspension
of the executive order.
The bills would not require
drug testing but would allow ran-
dom tests every three months.
Others raised questions
about whether the proposal
would be an unconstitutional
infringement on privacy.
Kids may play on
school playgrounds
A bill allowing schools and
school districts to enter into
agreements with local govern-
ments or organizations to
allow public access to facilities
like ball fields and playgrounds
was approved unanimously
Wednesday by the House K-
20 Competitiveness Subcom-
mittee.
The bill (HB 431) would hold
schools harmless for liability
except in cases of gross negli-
gence if they choose to open
their exterior facilities to the
public during non-school hours.
"Study after study shows
how prevalent the obesity epi-
demic is," said bill sponsor Rep.
Peter Nehr, R-Tarpon Springs.
He said making it easier for
after-school recreation pro-
grams would help address that
problem.
News Service of Florida


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Legislative BRIEFS


STATE


FRIDAY, JANUARY 27, 2012 A5





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Millions manage aging



parents' care from afar


Associated Press

WEST PALM BEACH, -
Kristy Bryner worries her
80-year-old mom might slip
and fall when she picks up
the newspaper, or that
she'll get in an accident
when she drives to the gro-
cery store. What if she has a
medical emergency and no
one's there to help? What if,
like her father, her mother
slips into a fog of dementia?
Those questions would
be hard enough if Bryner's
aging parent lived across
town in Portland, Ore., but
she is in Kent, Ohio. The
stress of caregiving seems
magnified by each of the
more than 2,000 miles that
separate them.
"I feel like I'm being split
in half between coasts,"
said Bryner, 54. "I wish I
knew what to do, but I
don't."
As lifespans lengthen and
the number of seniors rap-
idly grows, more Americans
find themselves in Bryner's
perilous position, strug-
gling to care for an ailing
loved one from hundreds or
thousands of miles away
The National Institute on
Aging estimates around 7
million Americans are long-
distance caregivers. Aside
from economic factors that
often drive people far from
their hometowns, shifting
demographics in the coun-
try could exacerbate the
issue: Over the next four
decades, the share of peo-
ple 65 and older is expected
to rapidly expand while the
number of people under 20
will roughly hold steady
That means there will be a
far smaller share of people
between 20 and 64, the age
group that most often is
faced with caregiving.
"You just want to be in
two places at once," said
Kay Branch, who lives in
Anchorage, Alaska, but
helps coordinate care for
her parents in Lakeland,
Fla., about 3,800 miles
away
There are no easy an-
swers.
Bryner first became a
long-distance caregiver
when, more than a decade
ago, her father began suf-
fering from dementia,
which consumed him until
he died in 2010. She used to
be able to count on help
from her brother, who lived
close to their parents, but
he died of cancer a few
years back. Her mother
doesn't want to leave the
house she's lived in for so
long.
So Bryner talks daily
with her mother via Skype,
a video telephone service.
She's lucky to have a job
that's flexible enough that
she's able to visit for a cou-
ple of weeks every few
months. But she fears what


Associated Press
Lynn Feinberg, a caregiver expert at AARP, works Thursday in her office in Washington.
As lifespans lengthen and the number of seniors rapidly grows, more Americans find them-
selves struggling to care for an ailing loved one from hundreds or thousands of miles away.
Feinberg said the number of long-distance caregivers is likely to grow, particularly as a
sagging economy has people taking whatever job they can get, wherever it is.


may happen when her
mother is not as healthy as
she is now.
"Someone needs to check
on her, someone needs to
look out for her," she said.
"And the only someone is
me, and I don't live there."
Many long-distance care-
givers say they insist on
daily phone calls or video
chats to hear or see how
their loved one is doing. Of-
tentimes, they find another
relative or a paid caregiver
they can trust who is closer
and able to help with some
tasks.
Yet there always is the
unexpected: Medical emer-
gencies, problems with in-
surance coverage, urgent
financial issues. Problems
become far tougher to re-
solve when you need to hop
on a plane or make a day-
long drive.
"There are lots of things
that you have to do that be-
come these real exercises
in futility," said Ed Rose, 49,
who lives in Boston but, like
his sister, travels frequently
to Chicago to help care for
his 106-year-old grand-
mother, Blanche Seelmann.
Rose has rushed to his
grandmother's side for hos-
pitalizations, and made un-
expected trips to solve
bureaucratic issues like re-
trieving a document from a
safe-deposit box in order to
open a bank account
But he said he has also
managed to get most of the
logistics down to a routine.
He uses Skype to speak
with his grandmother every
day and tries to be there
whenever she has a doc-
tor's appointment. Aides
handle many daily tasks
and have access to a credit
card for household ex-
penses. They send him re-


ceipts so he can monitor
spending. He has an apart-
ment near his grandmother
to make sure he's comfort-
able on his frequent visits.
Even for those who live
near those they care for,
travel for work can fre-
quently make it a long-dis-
tance affair. Evelyn
Castillo-Bach lives in
Pembroke Pines, Fla., the
same town as her 84-year-
old mother, who has
Alzheimer's disease. But
she is on the road roughly
half the year, sometimes
for months at a time, both
for work with her own Web
company and accompany-
ing her husband, a con-
sultant for the United
Nations.
Once, she was en route
from Kosovo to Denmark
when she received a call
alerting her that her
mother was having kidney
failure and appeared as if
she would die. She needed
to communicate her
mother's wishes from afar
as her panicked sister tried
to search their mother's
home for her living will.
Castillo-Bach didn't think
she could make it in time to
see her mother alive once
more.
"I won't get to touch my
mother again," she thought.
She was wrong. Her
mother pulled through. But
she says it illustrates what
long-distance caregivers so
frequently go through.
"This is one of the things
that happens when you're
thousands of miles away,"
Castillo-Bach said.
Lynn Feinberg, a caregiv-
ing expert atAARP, said the
number of long-distance
caregivers is likely to grow,
particularly as a sagging
economy has people taking


whatever job they can get,
wherever it is. Though
caregiving is a major stress
on anyone, distance can
often magnify it, Feinberg
said, and presents particu-
lar difficulty when it must
be balanced with an
inflexible job.
"It's a huge stress," she
said. "It can have enormous
implications not only for
someone's quality of life,
but also for someone's job."
It can also carry a huge fi-
nancial burden. A Novem-
ber 2007 report by the
National Alliance for Care-
giving and Evercare, a divi-
sion of United Health
Group, found annual ex-
penses incurred by long-
distance caregivers
averaged about $8,728, far
more than caregivers who
lived close to their loved
one. Some also had to cut
back on work hours, take on
debt of their own and slash
their personal spending.
Even with that in mind,
though, many long-distance
caregivers say they don't re-
gret their decision. Rita
Morrow, who works in ac-
counting and lives in
Louisville, Ky., about a six-
hour drive from her 90-
year-old mother in
Memphis, Tenn., does all
the juggling too.
She has to remind her
mother to take her medi-
cine, make sure rides are
lined up for doctor's ap-
pointments, rush to her aid
if there's a problem. She
knows her mom wants to
stay in her home, to keep
going to the church she's
gone to the past 60 years, to
be near her friends.
"We do what we have to
do for our parents," she
said. "My mother did all
kinds of things for me."


Water pollution legislation on fast track


Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE,
Water pollution rules sup-
ported by business, agricul-
ture and utility interests but
opposed by environmental-
ists, who say they are too
weak, appear headed for
quick passage in the
Florida Legislature.
A bill (HB 7051) approv-
ing the Department of Envi-
ronmental Protection's
rules is headed for a floor
vote in the House after sail-
ing through a final commit-
tee Thursday
A similar Senate bill (SB
2060) is scheduled to get its
first and only committee
hearing in that chamber on
Monday The two rules also
need approval from the En-
vironmental Protection
Agency and are being chal-
lenged in an administrative
law case.
The state nutrient rules
were drafted as a lower-
cost alternative to more
stringent regulations pro-
posed by the federal agency
Environmentalists favor
the EPA version. They say
the state's rules would do
little or nothing to prevent
or clean up algae blooms
that are choking Florida
waters. Both would replace
existing rules that rely on
imprecise verbal descrip-


2012 SESSION


tions of what constitutes
pollution with numeric
standards for phosphate
and nitrogen.
Sierra Club Florida lob-
byist David Cullen told the
House State Affairs Com-
mittee that under the state
rules if numeric limits are
exceeded, a river, lake or
other water body would just
be put a study list but
there's no requirement for
an examination to be done.
Also, the object of the study
would be to determine
whether the water body is
out of biological balance, he
said.
If there is no biological
harm, no action would be
taken even though the nu-
trient levels exceed the
state standards.
"In other words, it brings
us right back to the current
situation in Florida, which
is the use of narrative crite-
ria as opposed to numeric


criteria, which are clear
and obvious and enforce-
able," Cullen said.
Associated Industries of
Florida lobbyist Kenya
Cory urged lawmakers to
act quickly so the EPA can
decide whether the state or
federal rules will apply to
Florida. In either case,
everyone in Florida will be
paying higher water bills,
she said.
"Floridians need to
know who's going to set
those standards and what
the cost is going to be,"
Cory said. "We cannot re-
cruit companies to the
state of Florida and we
cannot ask our Florida
companies to expand with-
out knowing the cost of
doing business."
A study conducted for
DEP by Florida State Uni-
versity estimated compli-
ance with the state rules
would cost between $51
million and $150 million a
year. The range for the fed-
eral rules was $298 million
to $4.7 billion.
EPA officials have dis-
puted that estimate, saying
their own study pegged the
cost at $135 million to $206
million.
Lawmakers are consider-
ing the rules because of a
law requiring legislative
approval for administrative


actions that increase pri-
vate sector costs more than
$1 million over a span of
five years.
EPA drafted its rules for
Florida to settle a lawsuit
by environmental groups.
They had accused the
agency of failing to enforce
its own 1998 order under
the federal Clean Water Act
for states to set numeric
standards.
The administrative chal-
lenge was filed by the
Sierra Club, Florida
Wildlife Federation, Con-
servancy of Southwest
Florida, Environmental
Confederation of Southwest
Florida and St. Johns
Riverkeeper.
They argue the state
rules are arbitrary and
capricious and violate ex-
isting state law. A hearing is
set for next month.



BROWN
FUNERAL HOME
& CREMATORY


5430 W Gulf to Lake Hwy.
Lecanto, Florida 34451
(352)
, 795-0111

Richard T Brown
FUERALDIRECTOR


Michael
DeBella, 84
FLORAL CITY
Michael R. DeBella, 84, of
Floral City, FL, died on Jan.
26, 2012, at the Highland
Terrace in Inverness, FL.
Michael was born on Au-
gust 21, 1927, in Queens, NY,
the son of Louis and Jennie
DeBella. He was a veteran
of World War II. Michael
worked as a travel agent for
TWA for 30 years. He moved
to Floral City in 2009, from
Altamonte Springs, FL.
Michael was a member of
Our Lady of Fatima Catholic
Church in Inverness and the
Knights of Columbus No.
6391.
Survivors include his sis-
ter, Rita M. McAvley, of Flo-
ral City, FL; nieces, Susan
Reaves, of Floral City, FL,
and Patricia Marra, of St.
Petersburg, FL; and
nephew, Al DeBella, of
Williston, FL.
Mr. DeBella's family will
receive friends from 9 to
10:30 a.m. at the Heinz Fu-
neral Home on Saturday,
Feb. 4, 2012. Following visi-
tation, a Mass of Christian
Burial will be held at 11 a.m.
at Our Lady of Fatima
Catholic Church in Inver-
ness. Father Charles Leke
will preside. Interment will
be at Dunnellon Memorial
Gardens Cemetery with Mil-
itary Honors. Heinz Funeral
Home & Cremation, Inver-
ness, FL.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. com.

Ron 'Bo'
Yarborough, 40
LECANTO
Ron Wilson "Bo" Yarbor-
ough, 40, Lecanto, died sud-
denly on Tuesday, Jan. 25,
2012, in Dade City, FL. A Cit-
rus County native, "Bo" was
born Feb. 7,1971, to Rennie
W Yarborough and Donna
Jean DeSimone. He at-
tended local

graduated



School,
class of
1991. He en-
Ron "Bo" joyed the
Yarborough outdoors,
fishing and taking care of
his many pets. "Bo" was a
heavy equipment operator.
He is survived by two chil-
dren, Trevor Yarborough of
Tampa and Erica Yarbor-
ough of Lecanto; his mother
and stepfather, Donna Jean
DeSimone and Jeffrey Hart
of Lecanto; his companion,
Lottie Chapel of Lecanto;
his uncle, Richard DeSi-
mone of Dade City; aunt, Pat
Chitty of Hernando; and his
pet dog, Gracie.
Funeral services will be
conducted on Sunday, Jan
29, at 3 p.m. from the Chas.
E. Davis Funeral Home with
Pastor Bruce Brunk of the
Citrus County Community
Church officiating. Inter-
ment will follow at a later
date. The family will receive
friends at the funeral home
on Sunday from 2 p.m. until
the hour of service. In lieu
of flowers, memorials re-
quested to Hospice of Citrus
County or the Citrus County
Community Church.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. cornm.

Joseph
Kucharewicz,
61
LECANTO
Joseph Kucharewicz,
61, Lecanto, died Wednes-
day, Jan. 25, 2012, at his res-
idence. Chas. E. Davis
Funeral Home with Crema-
tory is in charge of private
arrangements.


OBITUARIES
U Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear in
the next day's edition.


cfaz. 46. !b4a0i
Funeral Home With Crematory
JOYCE HELEN FUDGE
Service: Fri. 1pm Chapel
JERRY L. ZEBENDON
Memorial Service: Fri. 12:00 Noon
First United Methodist Church
POLLY NASH
Service: Sat. 3:00pm
Chapel
EDWARD MAHAN
Private Cremation Arrangements
ELIZABETH LEMBERGER
Private Cremation Arrangements
726-8323 000AS2S


Charles
Trobaugh, 61
HOMOSASSA
Charles F Trobaugh, 61,
of Homosassa, died Monday,
Jan. 23, 2012, at his home.
Private cremation
arrangements. Wilder Fu-
neral Home, Homosassa
Springs.

OBITUARIES
The Citrus County Chron-
icle's policy permits
both free and paid obit-
uaries.
Obituaries must be
submitted by the fu-
neral home or society
in charge of arrange-
ments.
Free obituaries, run one
day, can include: full
name of deceased;
age; hometown/state;
date of death; place of
death; date, time and
place of visitation and
funeral services.
If websites, photos,
survivors, memorial
contributions or other
information are in-
cluded, this will be des-
ignated as a paid
obituary and a cost es-
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(""InMemory" ad,

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msnyder@chronicleonline.com
or
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sschlumberger@chronicleonline.com
Clsig iefrpain ad-
is dyspior o rn dte.


- Obituaries


A6 FRIDAY, JANUARY 27, 2012





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


'We can't afford to wait'


Industry, govt

debate Calif.

clean car rules

Associated Press
SAN FRANCISCO -Auto
dealers say California's pro-
posed rules to require car-
makers to build more
electric and other less-
polluting hybrid cars and
trucks by 2025 will cost con-
sumers more money and
will stifle the industry's
growth.
Consumer groups say cus-
tomers might pay more for
the vehicles but will save in
lower fuel and other costs.
Both sides submitted tes-
timony Thursday during a
meeting of the state's air
quality board, which was
poised to vote on rules to re-
quire that vehicles emit
about 75 percent less smog-
producing pollutants.
The new standards, which
also include big cuts in
greenhouse gas emissions,
would begin with new cars
sold in 2015, and get increas-
ingly more stringent until
2025. The rules also mandate
that one of every seven new
cars sold in 2025 in the state
be a zero-emission or plug-in
hybrid vehicle.
California Air Resources
Board Chairman Mary
Nichols said she hopes the
rules lead "the nation and
the world."
"We can't afford to wait.
We have to act on these is-
sues now," she said at the
panel's meeting. "Our pro-
jections show continued
growth in population and
vehicle miles traveled,
which will affect air quality
for years to come."
Other states often adopt
California's smog emissions
standards because they are
stricter than federal ones.
Fourteen states, including
Washington, New Jersey,
New York and Massachu-
setts, have adopted the
state's current emissions
goals, which is why the new
regulations could have a


Associated Press
In this 2011 file photo, another car is reflected in the curved
bumper of a Toyota Prius hybrid bearing California DMV de-
cals in Los Angeles. California is poised to vote on new rules
that would require automakers to build cars and trucks by
2025 that emit about 75 percent less pollutants and also
mandate that one of every seven new cars sold in the state
be a zero-emission or plug-in hybrid vehicle.


wide-ranging effect. Of
those states, 10 also adopted
the zero-emission vehicle
standards.
But the California New
Car Dealers Association and
other industry groups rep-
resenting those who sell
cars said the board is over-
estimating consumer de-
mand for electric vehicles
and other so-called "zero-
emission vehicles."
Some dealer groups have
estimated that $3,200 would
be added to the average cost

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of a car because of the re-
quired technological chan-
ges, and that consumers have
been slow to adopt them.
Jonathan Morrison, of the
state dealers' association,
said car retailers are sup-
portive of new technologies
that are accepted by their
customers, but said the ac-
ceptance of electric and
other vehicles has been slow.
"Consumers do not make
purchasing decisions based
upon regulatory mandates,"
he said.


(


-


The board's research staff
disputes those estimates and
says increases in hybrid and
other sales continue to rise
as more cars hit the market
They argue that fuel cost sav-
ings will make up for any ve-
hicle price increase.
"Our research shows a
$1,400 to $1,900 car price in-
crease. But over the life of
the vehicles, the owners
save $6,000 in reduced fuel
and maintenance costs,"
board spokesman David
Clegern said.
One of the nation's fore-
most consumer groups, the
Consumers' Union, the pol-
icy and advocacy division of
Consumer Reports, sup-
ports the regulations.
The rules will "protect
consumers by encouraging
the development of cleaner,
more efficient cars that save
families money, help reduce
the American economy's
vulnerability to oil price
shocks and reduce harmful
air pollution," according to
a letter from the group.
Automakers including
Ford Motor Corp., Chrysler
Group LLC, General Motors
Co., Nissan Motor Co. Ltd.
and others said they gener-
ally supported the regula-
tions in short statements
delivered during the hearing.
The overall goal of the
state is to have 1.4 million
zero-emission and plug-in
hybrids on California roads
by 2025. But the program
also looks ahead to 2050,
laying groundwork for a
goal of having 87 percent of
the state's fleet of new vehi-
cles fueled by electricity, hy-
drogen fuel cells or other
clean technologies.


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Panel: Find


replacement for


nuke storage site


Nuclear waste stillpiling up


Associated Press

WASHINGTON The
United States should im-
mediately start looking for
an alternative to replace
the failed Yucca Mountain
nuclear waste dump in Ne-
vada, which cost an esti-
mated $15 billion but was
never completed, a presi-
dential commission said
Thursday
In its final report, the 15-
member commission said
the government also must
prepare for the eventual
large-scale transportation
of spent nuclear fuel from
storage sites across the
country to the new site -
or to interim storage facili-
ties yet to be built.
While the panel was cre-
ated before the nuclear cri-
sis in Japan,
commissioners said the
massive earthquake and
tsunami that damaged
Japan's Fukushima Dai-
ichi nuclear complex last
year added a sense of ur-
gency to their work. The
tsunami triggered the
world's most serious nu-
clear disaster since Cher-
nobyl in 1986.
The Obama administra-
tion's 2009 decision to halt
work on the Yucca Moun-


tain site was the latest sign
that long-troubled U.S. pol-
icy on nuclear waste man-
agement policy has now
reached an impasse, the
report said. Allowing that
impasse to continue is not
an option, the report said.
"The need for a new
strategy is urgent, not just
to address these damages
and costs but because this
generation has a funda-
mental, ethical obligation
to avoid burdening future
generations with the entire
task of finding a safe, per-
manent solution for man-
aging hazardous nuclear
materials they had no part
in creating," the report
said.
The panel, formally
known as the Blue Ribbon
Commission on America's
Nuclear Future, was cre-
ated two years ago by Pres-
ident Barack Obama to find
new strategies for manag-
ing the nation's growing in-
ventory of nuclear waste.
The United States cur-
rently has more than 71,000
tons of spent nuclear fuel
stored at about 75 operat-
ing and shutdown reactor
sites around the country
The U.S. produces more
than 2,200 tons of spent
fuel a year.


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NATION


FRIDAY, JANUARY 27, 2012 A7


2lI1-1467.11 1










ASFRDA, ANART2,H01 SMOCKSEiuCUTY IN)ECHRONICL


I HwToS EA'HEMRTINREI


MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) Here are the 825 most active stocks on the New York Stock Exchange, 765
Name Vol(00) Last Chg Name Vol(00) Last Chg Name Vol(00) Last Chg most active on the Nasdaq National Market and 116 most active onthe Ameri-
BkofAm 2573240 7.30 -.05 CheniereEn 79161 11.37 -.60 SiriusXM 900671 2.08 ...can Stock Exchange. Tables show name, price and net change.
S&P500ETF1596633131.88 -.68 NwGold g 51886 11.42 +.32 Intel 529303 26.75 -.15 Name: Stocks appear alphabetically bythe company's full name (not abbrevia-
Pfizer 979826 21.63 -.09 GoldStrg 47947 2.05 +.08 Microsoft 485738 29.50 -.06 tion). Names consisting of initials appear at the beginning of each letter's list.
SPDRFncl 808284 14.08 -.12 GrtBasGg 42088 1.22 +.06 MicronT 419357 7.55 -.31 Last: Price stock was trading atwhen exchange closed fortheday.
FordM 735563 12.79 -.14 NovaGldg 36046 9.96 +.12 Micromet 400786 10.94 +2.66 Chg: Loss or gain for the day No change indicated by.

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) Stock Footnotes: ld- Issue has been called for redempton by company. d New 52-week
low. dd- Loss in last 12 mos. ec- Company formerly listed on the Amenrican Exchange's
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Emerging Company Marketplace. h-temporary exmpt from Nasdaq capital and surplus list-
Xerium 8.44 +1.37 +19.4 MinesMgt 2.18 +.18 +9.0 VISTFncl 10.80 +3.90 +56.5 ngqualification. n-Stockwasa new issue in the lastyear.The 52-week high andlowfig-
Penney 40.72 +6.44 +18.8 BiPTin 55.63 +4.37 +8.5 StarScient 2.96 +.78 +35.8 ures date only from the beginning of trading. pf-Preferred stock issue. pr-Preferences.pp-
ETSh6mVix105.10 +13.71 +15.0 GenMoly 3.67 +.26 +7.6 RealNwkrs 9.89 +2.54 +34.6 Holder owes installments of purchase prce. rt-Rightto buy securityata specified pce. s-
PulseElec 2.98 +.36 +13.7 HalhwdGp 15.98 +.98 +6.5 Micromet 10.94 +2.66 +32.1 Stock has split by at least 20 percent within the lastyear. wi -Trades will be settled when the
NBGrcers 3.13 +.36 +13.0 BowlA 13.50 +.75 +5.9 EntreMd h 2.95 +.62 +26.6 stock is issued, wd- When distributed, wt- Warrant, allowing a purchase of a stock.u New
52-week high. un Unit, including more than one security. vj Company in bankruptcy or re-
LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) ceivership, or being reorganized under the bankruptcy law. Appears in front of the name.
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.
CarboCer 104.00 -27.03 -20.6 Gastargrs 2.93 -.19 -6.1 Momenta 15.13 -3.98 -20.8
MonstrWw 7.15 -1.83 -20.4 PionDrill 8.90 -.56 -5.9 EntFnSv 12.55 -2.92 -18.9 iT-r-
ChinaDEd 2.24 -.37 -14.0 SDgopfH 29.80 -1.65 -5.2 Clearfield 5.94 -1.30 -17.9
Mdbklns 10.02 -1.58 -13.6 ElephTalk 2.59 -.14 -5.1 SuperMda 2.79 -.59 -17.5 52-Week Net % YT[
QntmDSS 2.43 -.38 -13.5 CheniereEn 11.37 -.60 -5.0 BioLnRxn 4.00 -.78 -16.3 High Low Name Last Chg Chg Ct


DIARY


1,489 Advanced
1,540 Declined
98 Unchanged
3,127 Total issues
232 New Highs
6 New Lows
4,525,146,092 Volume


DIARY


DIARY


276 Advanced
175 Declined
48 Unchanged
499 Total issues
47 New Highs
2 New Lows
114,749,140 Volume


1,132
1,371
127
2,630
97
12
2,002,509,984


12,876.00 10,404.49Dow Jones Industrials
5,627.85 3,950.66Dow Jones Transportation
467.64 381.99Dow Jones Utilities
8,718.25 6,414.89NYSE Composite
2,490.51 1,941.99Amex Index
2,887.75 2,298.89Nasdaq Composite
1,370.58 1,074.77S&P 500
14,562.01 11,208.42Wilshire 5000
868.57 601.71 Russell 2000


12,734.63
5,302.85
454.04
7,883.90
2,353.27
2,805.28
1,318.43
13,891.43
792.91


I NYSE


D % 52-wk
ig % Chg


-22.33 -.17 +4.23 +6.21
+20.85 +.39 +5.64 +3.26
+.55 +.12 -2.29 +9.56
-30.91 -.39 +5.44 -3.94
+6.17 +.26 +3.29 +8.62
-13.03 -.46 +7.68 +1.81
-7.63 -.58 +4.84 +1.45
-76.64 -.55 +5.32 +.86
-2.73 -.34 +7.02 -.32


Request stocks or mutual funds to be listed here by writing

the Chronicle, Attn: Stock Requests, 1624 N. Meadowcrest

Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429; or call 563-5660. Include

the name of the stock, market and ticker symbol. For mu-

tual funds, list parent company, symbol and the exact name

of the fund. Staff will not provide real-time quotes.


I NEWYORK STOKECAG


Name Last Chg BkNYMel 20.00 -.57
Barday 13.93 +.12
BariPVix 26.64 -.01
BarnesNob 11.97 -.77
ABBLtd 21.30 +.22 BarrickG 48.86 +.45
ACELtd 71.25 -.42 BasicEnSv 16.82 -1.05
AESCorp 12.94 -.17 Baxter 55.65 +1.28
AFLAC 48.78 -.38 Beam Inc 52.48 -.39
AGL Res 42.28 +.31 BeazerHm 3.23 -.03
AK Steel 9.82 -.22 BectDck 79.37 +.12
ASA Gold 28.40 +.26 BerkHaAl119450.00 -500.00
AT&T Inc 29.45 -.76 BerkH B 79.66 -.19
AbtLab 54.87 -.36 BestBuy 25.02 -.69
AberFitc 45.88 -.96 BBarrett 27.12 -1.36
Accenture 56.92 -.27 BioMedR 18.28 -.01
AdamsEx 10.41 -.04 BIkHillsCp 34.43 -.11
AMD 6.77 +.04 BIkDebtStr 4.07 +.01
Aeropostf 16.37 -.49 BlkEnhC&l 13.47 -.04
Aetna 42.61 -.02 BlkGlbOp 14.74 +.12
Agilent 42.66 -1.39 Blackstone 15.60 -.16
Agniomg 37.79 +.21 BlockHR 16.92 +.02
AlcatelLuc 1.84 +.03 Boeing 75.31 -.51
Alcoa 10.36 -.12 BostBeer 99.89 -.12
AllegTch 47.71 -2.32 BostProp 103.68 -.07
Allergan 88.97 -.33 BostonSci 5.96 -.17
Allete 41.77 +.10 BoydGm 8.99 -.09
AlliBGIbHi 14.97 +.10 Brandyw 10.43
AlliBInco 8.26 +.04 Brinker 26.26 +.09
AlliBern 15.03 +.22 BrMySq 32.48 -.22
Allstate 29.15 -.03 Brunswick 20.92 -.69
AlphaNRs 20.45 -.47 Buckeye 62.14 -.39
AIpAIerMLP 16.88 -.03 Bunget 58.43 -.78
Altria 28.66 -.01 C&JEgyn 16.25 -1.73
AmBev 37.11 +.01 CBREGrp 19.01 +.86
Ameren 31.92 ... CBS B 28.72 -.04
AMovilLs 23.61 +.03 CFInds 174.05 -7.01
AmAxle 12.38 +.14 CH Engy 57.01 +.41
AEagleOut 13.99 -.05 CMSEng 22.31 +.14
AEP 41.28 -.10 CSS Inds 21.54 +.14
AmExp 49.98 -.19 CSXs 22.98 +.32
AmlntGrp 25.14 -.17 CVREngy 24.14 -.92
AmSIP3 6.59 +.03 CVSCare 42.18
AmTower 62.15 -.82 CblvsNYs 14.68 -.05
AmWtrWks 33.40 +.50 CabotOG s 32.44 -.87
Amerigas 44.02 +.03 CalDive 3.06 -.06
Ameriprise 54.68 +.40 CallGolf 6.47 +.05
AmeriBrgn 39.00 -.72 Calpine 14.95 +.15
Anadarko 79.31 -1.77 Camecog 23.61 -.19
AnalogDev 39.28 -.50 Cameron 52.95 -1.25
AnglogldA 45.06 +.59 CampSp 31.67 -.05
Annaly 16.88 +.17 CdnNRsgs 40.07 -.06
Anworth 6.44 +10 CPRwyg 71.40 +.03
Aon Corp 47.65 +.15 CapOne 45.61
Apache 97.91 -1.92 CapifiSrce 6.94 -.10
Aptlnv 24.75 +.34 CapM plB 14.61 +.03
AquaAmn 22.08 +.28 CarboCer 104.00 -27.03
ArcelorMit 21.80 +.43 CardnlHIth 42.12 +.04
ArchCoa 14.35 -.20 CareFusion 24.16 +.14
ArdhDan 29.84 -.24 CarMax 31.77 -.58
ArmourRsd 7.14 +.06 Carnival 30.48 -.67
Ashland 63.95 -.03 Caterpillar 111.31 +2.26
AsdEstat 16.43 +.29 Celanese 48.26 -.78
AstriaF 8.48 -.52 Celestcg 7.67 -.16
ATMOS 33.01 +.41 Cemex 6.78 +.19
AuRicog 9.39 -.02 Cemigpf 19.59 -.15
Avnet 33.60 -.23 CenterPnt 18.48 -.24
Avon 18.46 +.05 CntyLink 37.15 -.38
BB&TCp 27.04 -.66 Checkpnt 10.85 -.21
BHPBilILt 80.42 +.28 ChesEng 21.90 -1.48
BP PLC 44.77 -.13 ChesUfi 43.36 +1.03
BRT 6.63 +.01 Chevron 106.59 -1.14
BakrHu 48.10 -.06 Chicos 11.47 -.02
BailCp s 39.36 +1.66 Chimera 3.00
BcoBrades 18.85 -.11 ChinaMble 49.93 +.07
BcoSantSA 8.10 +.13 Chubb 70.35 -.07
BcoSBrasil 9.48 +.04 Cigna 44.10 -1.67
BkofAm 7.30 -.05 CindBell 3.43 -.10
Bklreldrs 6.25 +.12 Cifgrprs 30.38 +.42
BkMontg 59.54 -.95 CleanH s 64.73 -.53


CliffsNRs 75.18 -1.37
Clorox 68.84 +.20
CloudPeak 19.34 +.18
Coach 68.89 -.41
CCFemsa 98.99 +.46
CocaCola 68.01 -.42
CocaCE 26.88 -.45
CohStlnfra 16.69 +.01
ColgPal 91.35 +1.91
CollctvBrd 16.41 +.04
Comerica 27.89 -1.30
CmclMis 14.16 +.34
CmwREIT 19.64 -.05
CmtyHIt 18.63 -.60
CompPrdS 31.12 -1.63
ComstkRs 12.26 -1.26
Con-Way 32.36 +.78
ConAgra 27.04 -.13
ConocPhil 69.53 -.45
ConsolEngy 36.14 +.27
ConEd 59.77 +.40
ConstellA 20.92 -.23
ConstellEn 36.60 -.02
Cnvrgys 13.45 -.01
Corning 12.67 -.38
CottCp 7.03 +.25
Covance 43.31 -3.84
CoventyH 29.54 -.82
Covidien 51.29 +1.57
Crane 48.09 -.12
CSVS2xVxS 17.68 -.04
CSVellVSts 8.61 +.01
CredSuiss 26.71 +.10
CrwnCsfie 46.33 -.37
CrownHold 36.49 +1.13
Cummins 107.25 -1.71
CurEuro 130.48 -.12

DCTIndl 5.74 +.03
DDRCorp 14.26 -.07
DHT HIdgs .77 -.04
DNPSelct 11.29
DR Horton 14.12 -.37
DSW Inc 49.02 -.72
DTE 54.34 +.28
DanaHldg 14.79 -.21
Danaher 52.64 -.39
Darden 46.66 -.08
Deere 87.66 -.10
DeltaAir 10.17 +.21
DenburyR 18.61 -.49
DeutschBk 43.40 -.23
DBGoldDS 4.36 -.07
DevonE 64.82 -1.35
DiaOffs 62.58 +.24
DicksSptg 41.10 -1.11
DxFnBull rs 80.00 -1.54
DrSCBrrs 21.27 +10
DirFnBrrs 29.73 +.56
DirLCBrrs 25.16 +.40
DrxEnBear 10.20 +.42
DirxSCBull 55.03 -.24
DirxLCBull 70.74 -1.22
DirxEnBull 51.05 -2.23
Discover 27.96 +.51
Disney 39.35 -.21
DollarGen 42.42 -.28
DomRescs 50.85 -.26
DEmmett 20.84 +.16
Dover 62.93 +2.07
DowChm 33.41 -.33
DrPepSnap 39.08 +.32
DuPont 50.94 +.35
DukeEngy 21.47 +.11
DukeRlty 13.34 -.19
E-CDarng 7.07 +.01
EMC Cp 25.64 -.05
EOG Res 104.75 -2.06


EQT Corp 48.34
EastChms 47.12
Eabons 48.93
EVEnEq 10.69
Ecolab 60.76
Edisonlnt 41.38
BPasoCp 26.70
Ban 13.92
BdorGldg 14.15
EmersonEl 52.07
EmpDist 20.97
Emulex 9.27
EnbrEPts 33.33


EnCanag 19.68
EndvSilvg 10.73
EnPro 35.28
ENSCO 53.60
Energy 71.30
EntPrPt 49.63
EqtyRsd 59.25
EsteeLdr s 57.99
ExcoRes 7.97
Exelon 39.99
ExxonMbl 86.77
FMClTchs 53.14
FNBCpPA 11.57
FairchldS 14.44
FedExCp 92.74
FedSignl 4.23
Fedlnvst 18.71
Ferrellgs 17.90
Ferro 6.52
FibriaCelu 8.58
FidlNFin 18.25
RFidNatlnfb 28.41
FstHorizon 8.73
FTActDiv 8.35
FtTrEnEq 11.50
FirstEngy 42.72
HagstBch .66
Hotek 11.41
Ruor 56.97
FOrdM 12.79
FOrdMwt 3.90
ForestLab 31.65
ForestOils 13.82


FranceTel 15.10 +.33
FMCG s 46.50 +.42
Fusion-io n 24.52 -.98

GATX 43.42 -.51
GMXRs 1.00 -.16
GNCn 26.35 -1.98
GabelliET 5.28 -.04
GabHIthW 7.48 -.02
GabUlI 8.14 +.07
GafisaSA 5.13 +.07
GameStop 24.70 -.30


Gannett 15.35 -.16
Gap 18.78 -.22
GenDynam 71.51 -.06
GenElec 19.07 -.06
GenGrPrp 15.93 +.12
GenMills 40.39 -.23
GenMotbrs 24.72 -.20
GenOnEn 2.14 -.01
Genworth 7.80 -.26
Gerdau 9.69 -.07
GlaxoSKIn 45.45 +.44
GlimchRt 9.75 +.20
GolLinhas 7.08 -.24
GoldFLtd 16.56 +.22
Goldcrpg 48.61 +1.16
GoldmanS 108.56 +.29
Goodrich 124.50 -.03
GoodrPet 17.06 -.33
Goodyear 13.45 -.13
GtPlainEn 21.40 +.44
Griffon 10.46 -.31
GpTelevisa 20.08 -.67
GuangRy 17.99 -.42
HCA HId n 26.36 -.64
HCP Inc 42.03 +.68
HSBC 42.18 +16
HSBCCap 26.21 +10
Hallibrtn 36.16 -.25
HanJS 14.99 -.01
HanPrmDv 13.94 +.06
Hanesbrds 24.00 -.68
Hanoverlns 36.73 +.25


HarleyD 44.55
HarmonyG 11.82
Harsco 21.22
HartfdFn 17.56
HawaiiEl 26.10
HItCrREIT 57.33
HItMgmt 6.48
HIthcrRlty 20.96
Heckmann 5.21
HeclaM 4.96
Heinz 52.10
HedmPayne 60.76
Hertz 13.66


Hess 54.99
HewleftP 27.99
Hexced 25.93
HighwdPrp 33.16
HollyFrts 28.90
HomeDp 44.95
HonwIlInfi 57.83
Hospira 35.00
HospPT 24.39
HostHofis 16.39
HovnanE 2.67
Humana 87.11
Huntsmn 11.83
Hyperdyn 3.33
IAMGIdg 16.67
ICICIBk 35.25
ING 9.21
iShGold 16.77
iSAsfia 23.50
iShBraz 65.91
iSCan 28.19
iShGer 21.49
iSh HK 17.05
iShJapn 9.50
iSh Kor 57.52
iSMalas 14.09
iShMex 57.99
iShSing 12.23
iSTaiwn 12.64
iShSilver 32.43
iShDJDv 54.46
iShChina25 39.18
iSSP500 132.33


iShEMkts 42.14 -.17
iShSPLatA 46.81 -.33
iShB20T 117.71 +1.54
iS Eafe 52.40 +.02
iShiBxHYB 91.13 +.22
iSR1KV 66.35 -.42
iSR1KG 61.37 -.23
iSRuslK 73.06 -.45
iSR2KV 70.18 -.12
iSR2KG 90.59 -.18
iShR2K 79.18 -.09
iShREst 60.63 +.35
iShSPSm 72.95 -.15


iStar 7.18 +.05
ITT Ed 63.75 -5.65
Idacorp 42.56 +.38
ITW 53.01 +19
Imafon 5.93 -.19
IngerRd 35.00 -.70
IntegrysE 52.70 +.07
IntcnfiEx 117.45 -.08
IBM 190.98 -.75
InfiGame 16.06 +.23
IntPap 31.25 -.03
Interpublic 10.25 -.23
Invesco 22.78 +.60
InvMtgCap 15.85 +.31
IronMtn 31.23 -.53
ItauUnibH 20.78 -.08


JPMorgCh 37.49 -.11
Jabil 22.62 -.43
JacobsEng 45.28 -1.03
JanusCap 7.99 +.41
Jefferies 16.20 +.04
JohnJn 65.70 +.48
JohnsnCf 31.67 -.25
JoyGIbI 92.15 -.88
JnprNtwk 22.37 -.25
KB Home 9.70 -.08
KTCorp 15.09 -.28
KCSouthn 67.56 +.18
Kaydon 34.17 -.17
KA EngTR 27.09 -.45


Kellogg 49.99 -.92 MonstrWw 7.15 -1.83 PitnyBw 19.39
KeyEngy 14.33 -.77 Moodys 38.06 -.20 PlainsEx 37.57
Keycorp 7.88 -.36 MorgStan 18.20 +.07 PlumCrk 40.36
KimbClk 71.98 +.11 MSEmMkt 14.09 -.03 Polariss 63.33
Kimco 18.71 -.09 Mosaic 55.37 -.65 PostPrp 44.55
KindME 88.01 -1.87 MotrlaSolu 45.33 +.39 Potashs 45.81
Kinrossg 11.41 +.14 MotrlaMob 38.67 +.07 PwshDB 28.09
KnightTr 17.80 +1.19 MurphO 61.91 +1.26 PSUSDBull 22.15
KodiakOg 9.25 -.27 NCRCorp 17.96 -.03 Praxair 106.45
Kohls 46.45 -1.30 NRG Egy 17.08 -.25 PrecCastpt 166.34
Kraft 38.60 +.23 NVEnergy 16.09 -.17 PrecDrill 9.86
KrispKrm 7.18 +.15 NYSEEur 27.39 -.07 PrinFnd 27.19
Kroger 24.57 -.08 Nabors 17.48 -.36 ProLogis 32.55
LSICorp 7.85 +.77 NBGrcers 3.13 +.36 ProShtS&P 38.44
LTCPrp 31.76 +.17 NatFuGas 50.74 -1.20 PrUShS&P 17.47
LaZBoy 13.19 -.08 NatGrid 48.77 -.24 PrUlShDow 14.02
Ladede 41.36 +.39 NOilVaro 75.99 -1.21 ProUltQQQ 94.52
LVSands 48.97 -.77 Navistar 43.46 -.66 PrUShQQQ rs38.66
LeggMason 27.32 -.31 NewAmHi 10.30 -.03 ProUltSP 51.07
LennarA 22.13 -.67 NJRscs 48.91 +.73 ProUShL20 19.07
Level3 rs 19.57 -.24 NY CmtyB 12.72 -.15 ProUSSP50011.30
LbtyASG 4.05 -.01 NewellRub 17.43 +.10 PrUltSP500s 69.52
LillyEli 39.44 -.45 NewfidEqxp 39.54 -1.74 ProUSSlvrs 10.46
Limited 41.26 -.73 NewmtM 60.45 +.20 ProUltSlv s 59.60
LincNat 20.69 -1.25 NewpkRes 8.80 -.91 ProUShEuro 19.76
Lindsay 61.09 -1.89 Nexeng 18.39 +.05 ProctGam 64.80
LizClaib 9.45 -.14 NextEraEn 59.67 -.38 ProgrssEn 54.77
LloydBkg 2.02 +.07 NiSource 23.37 +.25 ProgsvCp 20.58
LockhdM 82.47 +.74 NikeB 102.30 -.91 ProUSR2Krs 33.27
Lorillard 111.38 -3.03 NobleCorp 34.81 +.02 ProLife 24.52
Lowes 26.95 +.04 NokiaCp 5.40 +.13 ProvEng 11.12
L BA 4029 +07 Nordstrm 48.46 -.28 Prudent 55.59
NorflkSo 74.87 -.30 PSEG 31.13
NoestUt 35.27 +.36 PubSrg 136.65
M&TBk 80.14 -1.86 NorthropG 59.32 -.27 PulteGrp 7.80
MBIA 12.00 -.36 Novarts 54.80 -.41 PPrIT 5.41
MDURes 21.68 +.02 NSTAR 45.58 +.44 QEPRes 28.96
MEMC 4.62 -.07 Nucor 4413 +39 QuanexBld 16.71
MFAFnd 7.25 +10 NuvMuOpp 14.99 +.07 QntmDSS 2.43
MCR 9.56 +.01 NvMulSl&G 8.35 -.06 QstDiag 58.99
MGIC 3.87 -.26 NuvQPf2 8.47 +.11 Questar 19.47
MGMRsts 13.05 -.06 OGEEngy 54.06 -.33 QksilvRes 5.12
Macquarie 27.68 -.35 OcciPet 100.19 -3.27 RPC 15.20
Macys 33.27 -.92 OfficeDpt 2.85 -.01 RPM 24.73
MageiMPr 67.06 -.38 OldRepub 9.56 +.08 RadianGrp 2.59
Magnalgs 42.14 -.32 Olin 21.95 -.15 RadioShk 10.03
MagHRes 5.52 -.28 OmegaHIt 20.92 +27 Rarp 87.27
Manitowoc 12.56 -.38 ONEOK 88.02 +.37 RaigeRs 55.92
Manulifeg 11.93 -.57 OneokPts 57.59 +.04 RJamesFn 34.40
Mauif ns 03Rayoniers 46.28
MarathnOs 31.54 -1.03 OshkoshCp 24.80 -.13 Raytheon 49.89
MarathPn 37.51 -1.25 OwensCorn 34.87 +.05 Rayn 49.89
MktVGold 55.76 +.53 Owenslll 24.41 +1.19 RedHat 47.40
MVOilSvn 123.99 -1,61 RegionsFn 5.17
MVSemi n 3373 -.17 RionsFn 5.17
MktVRus 30.27 +.17 PG&ECp 41.26 +.17 ReneSola 2.32
MktVJrGId 29.35 +.39 PNC 58.90 -.72 Renren n 4.16
MarlntA 34.63 -.53 PNM Res 17.79 +.13 RepubSvc 28.69
MarshM 31.77 +.26 PPG 88.83 -.59 Revlon 15.09
MStewrt 4.21 -.04 PPL Corp 28.20 -.03 ReynAmer 40.07
Masco 12.25 -.35 PallCorp 59.24 -1.28 RioTintd 60.61
McDrmlnt 12.81 -.32 PatriotCoal 8.23 -.29 RiteAid 1.41
McDnlds 99.18 -.05 PeabdyE 35.89 -1.44 RobtHalf 29.76
McKesson 78.56 +.71 Pengrthg 10.17 -.28 RockwlAut 77.55
McMoRn 12.06 -.62 PennVaRs 27.18 +.19 Ockoll 58.62
MeadJohn 74.01 +1.41 PennWstg 21.74 -.12 Rowan 34.82
Mechel 10.93 -.54 Penney 40.72 +6.44 RyCarb 27.90
MedoHIth 62.54 ... PepBoy 12.00 +.06 RoyDShllA 71.54
Mecc,; 3. 43o A. c3 Do,,ug,, o n nc 6 Royce 13.34


Merck 38.78 +.10 PepsiCo 66.52
Meritor 6.63 -.27 Prmian 20.62
MetLife 34.50 -1.45 PetrbrsA 28.77
MetroPCS 8.78 -.04 Petrobras 31.21
MetroHIth 8.00 -.19 Pfizer 21.63
MidAApt 63.71 +1.05 PhilipMor 76.38
Midas 8.10 -.02 PiedNG 33.48
MobileTele 16.74 +.04 Pier1 15.56
Molyoorp 30.30 -.84 PimomStrat 11.75
MoneyGrs 18.54 -.02 PinWst 48.53
Monsanto 81.15 -.17 PioNtrl 98.71


IA EIA N 5 XCANE1


Name Last Chg


AbdAsPac 7.64 +.09
AbdnEMTel 18.43 +.02
AdmRsc 38.81 +.33
AdeonaPh 1.75 -.45
Advenrbx .62 +.00
AlexomRg 7.41 +.01
AlldNevG 36.20 +.94
AlmadnMg 2.55 -.09
AmApparel .83 +.01
AntaresP 2.41 +.04
Augustag 2.98
Aurizong 5.50 +.24


AvalnRare 3.12 -.08 ChiGengM 1.04 -.06
Banrog 4.85 +.10 ChinaShen 1.80 +.11
BarcUBS36 43.74 +.06 ClaudeR g 1.41 -.03
BarcGSOil 25.34 +.02 ClghGlbOp 11.04 -.01
BrclndiaTR 56.61 +.14 CornerstSr 7.05 +.07
BioTime 5.63 -.11 CrSuiHiY 3.05 +.04
BrigusG g 1.17 shr .0+03
BritATob 93.20 +.69
CAMACEn .99 -.04 DoourEg .42 +.02
Carderog 1.53 +.13 DenisnMg 1.81 -.05
CardiumTh .34 +.00 EVLtdDur 15.88 +.03
CelSd .35 -.08 EVMuniBd 13.04 +.04
CFCdag 22.58 +.17 EVMuni2 14.49 +.11
CheniereEn 11.37 -.60 ElephTalk 2.59 -.14
CheniereE 21.56 +.07 EllswthFd 7.16 +.03


EnovaSys .37 -.13
ExeterRgs 3.38 +.10
ExtorreGg 9.46 +.38


GamGldNR 15.93 +.11
GascoEngy .20 -.01
Gastargrs 2.93 -.19
GenMoly 3.67 +.26
GeoGloblR .24 -.01
GoldResrc 26.11 +.45
GoldenMin 9.16 -.19
GoldStrg 2.05 +.08
GranTrrag 5.58 +.08
GrtBasGg 1.22 +.06


GtPanSilvg 2.71 +.07
Hemisphrx .32 +.06
HstnAEn 12.77 -.53
ImpOil gs 46.97 -.54
InovioPhm .55 +.01
IntellgSys 1.66
IntTowerg 5.37 +.19


KeeganRg 3.98 +.06
KimberRg 1.24 +.06
LkShrGldg 1.44 +.01
LongweiPI 1.46 -.10
LucasEngy 2.47 -.07


NthnO&G 26.21 -.86 Rentech 1.69 +.01
RevettMin 4.65 +.03
MAGSlvg 818 -11 : Richmntg 11.96 +.30
MGT Cap .06 +.00j 1jO +4
MadCatz g .66 -.01 ParaG&S 2.49 0
MdwGold g 2.09 +.07 PhrmAth 1.30 -.0
wGldg + PbnDrill 8.90 -.56 SamsO&G 2.16 -.02
MinesMg 14.04 +.18 PlatGpMet 1.12 +.01 SeabGldg 19.76 +.47
MinesMgt 2.18 +.18 PolyMetg 1.32 +.03 Senesco .26 +.01
NamdeaBio 2.70 Protalix 5.61 -.07 TanzRyg 3.21 +.07
NeoStem .66 -.04 PyramidOil 4.00 +.04 Taseko 3.43 +.06
NBRESec 3.99 Quaterrag .58 +.00 TasmanMg 1.94 +.03
Nevsung 6.52 +.16 Quepasa 3.68 -.01 TimberlnR .53 +.03
NwGoldg 11.42 +.32 QuestRMg 2.80 -.09 TrnsafiPet 1.25
NAPallg 2.73 +.11 RareEleg 5.94 -.20 TriValley .14 -.02
NDynMng 7.79 +.38 ReavesUtl 27.25 +.04 TriarngPet 7.03 -.28


Ur-Energy 1.09 -.02
Uranerz 2.39 -.10
UraniumEn 4.05 +.01


VangTotW 45.66 -.17
VantageDrl 1.25 +.03
VirnetX 24.35 -.25
VistaGold 3.80
VoyagerOG 2.56 -.02
WFAdvlnco 10.59 +.01
WizzardSft .18 -.00
YMBiog 1.72 +.01


IASD AQ AINL5AKT1


Name Last Chg


AMCNetn 41.82 -.07
ASML HId 42.97 -.28
ATPO&G 7.18 -.65
AVI Bio h .91 -.01
Aastrom 2.00 +.04
Abiomed 18.05 -.34
Abraxas 3.72 -.01
AcadaTc 40.75 +.56
AcadiaPh 1.53 -.03
Accelrys 7.51 +.06
Accuray 5.30 -.02
Achillion 10.34 -.16
AcmePkt 30.51
AcfvePw h .88 -.02
AcfvsBliz 11.95
Acxiom 13.77 -.01
AdobeSy 31.18 -.16
Adtran 34.97 -.49
AdvEnld 11.03 -.01
AEternag 1.63 +.05
Affymax 7.15 -.02
Afymetrix 4.72 -.13
AirTrnsp 5.80 -.15
AkamaiT 31.43 -.44
Akorn 11.03 -.02
AlaskCom 2.79 -.07
Alexion s 74.95 +.01
Alexza .73 -.01
AlignTech 24.95 +.15
Alkermes 19.28 +.23
AllosThera 1.52 -.10
AllotComm 16.53 -.02
AllscriptH 18.53 -.14
AlnylamP 10.80 -.09
AlteraCplf 40.38 -.19
AlterraCap 24.22 +.12
Amarin 7.83 -.38
Amazon 193.32 +5.52
Amedisys 9.60 +.04
ACapAgy 29.19 -.14
AmCapLd 8.21 -.12
ACapMign 19.25 +.19
AmSupr 5.15 -.04
Amgen 68.08 -1.13
AmkorTIf 5.64 +.03
Amylin 11.94 +.42
Anadigc 2.79 -.06
Anlogic 57.34 -.60
Analystlnt 6.21 -.14
Ancestry 30.69 +.44
ArngiesL n 15.59 -.05
Ansys 61.51 +.25
A123Sys 2.16 -.02
ApolloGrp 54.34 -1.63
Apollolnv 7.53 -.23
Apple Inc 444.63 -2.03
ApldMatf 12.40 +.04
AMCC 8.10 -.22
ArchCaps 37.13 +.11
ArcfcCat 28.58 +4.77
ArenaPhm 1.56 -.04
AresCap 15.91 +.11
AriadP 14.41 -.41
Ariba Inc 28.60 -.30
ArkBest 22.50 +.61
ArmHId 27.94 +.07
Arris 11.68 +.17
ArubaNet 22.74 -.34
AscenaRb 35.24 -.32
AscentSol h .83
AsialnfoL 11.60 -.03
AspenTech 18.01 +.14
AsscdBanc 12.44 -.70
AstexPhm 2.30 -.09
athenahlth 58.75 +1.45
AfiasAir 46.88 +2.50
Atmel 9.63 -.27
Autodesk 36.55 +.32
AutoData 55.82 -1.10
AvagoTch 34.08 +.13
AvanirPhm 2.87 +.01
AVEO Ph 13.31 -.33
AvisBudg 14.19 -.21
Aware 3.07 -.13


Axcelis 1.87 -.01 ColBnkg 21.02 -.63
BBCNBcp 10.17 -.32 ColumLabs .87 +.00
BEAero 41.64 -.81 ColSprtw 47.70 -.70
BGCPtrs 6.41 +.05 Comcast 26.31 +.19
BJsRest 47.93 +.42 Comcspd 25.30 +.15
BMC Sft 35.59 +.34 CmcBMO 39.57 -1.01
Baidu 123.90 -1.13 CommSys 15.04 -.24
BkOzarkss 28.46 -.90 CommVIt 48.04 -1.50
BeasleyB 3.39 +.34 CmplGnom 2.84 -.15
BedBath 62.26 -.67 Compuwre 7.98 -.10
BioReflab 19.52 +.38 Comverse 6.24 -.01
BioLnRxn 4.00 -.78 ConcurTch 53.51 -.13
BioFuelEh .65 ... Conmed 29.33 +.27
Biogenldc 117.85 -.50 ConsolWtr 7.80 -.41
BioLase 3.15 +.39 ConstantC 25.35 -1.02
BioMarin 34.90 -.59 Convio 15.95 +.03
Bionovo rsh .20 +.01 Corcept 3.53 +.04
BioSante .65 -.03 CorinthC 2.94 -.19
BIkRKelso 9.30 -.01 Costom 82.06 -.66
BlueCoat 25.72 -.03 Cree nc 26.26 -.25
BlueNile 40.53 +.53 Crocs 19.13 -.26
BobEvans 35.59 +.42 CrosstexE 12.96 +.24
BonTon 3.75 +.13 Ctrip.omm 27.40 -.17
BostPrv 7.93 -.62 CubistPh 39.44 -.35
BreitBurn 19.63 -.21 Curis 5.12 +.12
Brightpnt 11.79 -.15 Cyclacelh .56 +.02
Broadcom 35.29 -.50 CypSemi 17.20 -1.95
BroadSoft 29.44 -.93 CytRxh .29 +.01
BroadVisn 22.03 -2.18 Ctori 3.44 +.19
BrcdeCm 5.72 ...
BrklneB 9.33 +.22
BrooksAuto 10.83 -.07 DFCGbIs 19.18 +.52
BrukerCp 14.29 +.15 DeckrlsOut 82.35 -.55
BuffabWW 65.95 -.31 Delcath 3.81 -.13
CAInc 25.21 +.18 Dell Inc 16.69 -.10
CBOE 25.62 +.09 DemandTc 13.17 -.01
CEVAInc 28.02 -.61 Dndreon 14.26 -.46
CH Robins 69.47 +1.36 Dennys 4.23 +.04
CMEGrp 240.45 -1.66 Dentsply 38.19 -.70
CTCMedia 10.15 +.22 Depomed 5.92 -.08
CVBFnd 10.48 -.44 DexCom 10.99 +.06
CadencePh 4.16 -.11 DiamndFlf 37.59 +.69
Cadence 10.70 +.01 DigRiver 15.95 -.03
CdnSolar 3.59 +.41 Diodes 25.81 +.91
CapCtyBk 9.63 -.12 DirecTVA 44.54 +.10
CapFedFn 11.53 -.13 DiscCmA 44.34 -.14
CpstnTrbh 1.25 -.03 DiscCmC 39.87 -.16
CareerEd 10.32 -.47 DishNetwk 28.73 +.01
CaribouC 17.14 +.20 DollarTree 83.66 -1.68
Carrizo 24.94 -1.18 DonlleyRR 11.52 -.30
CarverBrs 9.75 +.47 DrmWksA 18.62 -1.04
CathayGen 15.74 -.16 DryShips 2.20 -.02
Cavium 34.00 +.10 Dunkinn 27.58 -.05
Celgene 72.66 -1.13 DurectCp .79 -.01
CellTherrsh 1.31 -.04 Dynavax 3.49 -.02
CelldexTh 4.46 +.47 E-Trade 7.99 -1.37
Celsion 1.77 -.02 eBay 31.71 -.23
CentEuro 3.97 +.04 EagleBulk 1.35 +.02
CEurMed 7.03 +.14 EaglRkEn 11.15 -.23
CentAI 10.73 -.19 ErthLink 7.06 +.01
Cepheid 34.35 -.04 EstWstBcp 21.78 -.57
Cerners 59.78 -.84 Ebix Inc 24.14 +.02
ChrmSh 4.92 -.09 EchoStar 25.47 +.26
Chartlnds 57.39 +1.32 EducDev 4.95 -.05
CharterCm 58.49 +.78 8x8 Inc 4.43 +.04
ChkPoint 55.63 -.93 ElectSd 16.65 +.14
Cheesecake 29.72 +.04 ElectArts 17.66 -.38
ChelseaTh 4.59 +.05 EFII 16.96 +.56
ChildPlace 50.50 -.59 Emomrelf 1.23
ChinGerui 4.16 +.13 EndoPhrm 37.45 +.09
ChinaMed 3.67 +.08 Endocyten 3.53
ChrchllD 54.93 -.09 Endobgix 12.60 -.25
CienaCorp 15.34 +.28 EngyCnvh 1.27 +.29
CinnFin 33.08 +.35 EngyXXI 32.55 -1.37
Cintas 37.56 +.11 Entegris 9.69 -.05
Cirrus 22.07 +.06 EntreMd h 2.95 +.62
Cisco 19.83 ... EntropCom 6.09 +.20
CitzRpBrs 12.71 -.29 Equinix 119.80 +1.92
CitrixSys 65.00 -2.61 EricsnTel 8.95 +.30
CleanEngy 14.40 -.71 ExactScih 9.34 +.11
Clearfield 5.94 -1.30 Exelids 5.40 +.42
Clearwire 1.79 -.04 EddeTc 3.30 +.08
CoffeeH 8.69 -.63 Eqxpedias 31.11 -.11
CogentC 14.90 +.09 Expdlni 44.72 +.48
CognizTech 71.23 -.54 ExpScripts 52.36 -.12
Cogo Grp 2.21 +.05 ExtrmNet 3.18 +.04
Coinstar 47.33 -.20 Ezcorp 27.14 +.39
ColdwtrCrk .93 +.01 F5Netwks 120.82 -1.66


FLIRSys 26.10 -.39 Illumina 52.65 -2.50
FSI Int 4.26 -.12 ImunoGn 12.57 -.17
Fastenals 46.78 +.04 ImpaxLabs 18.64 -.18
FiberTwrIf .22 -.14 ImperlSgr 3.25 -.15
FifthStRn 9.97 -.06 Incyte 18.20 -.36
FifthT ird 13.08 -.41 Infinera 7.39 -.01
Fndlnst 17.07 -.17 Informat 38.28 -.91
Finisar 21.04 +.21 Infosys 54.83 +.61
FinLine 21.11 -.24 Inhibitex 24.96 +.26
FstCalifFn 4.25 +.08 Insulet 19.87 +.19
FstCashFn 40.27 +.61 IntegLfSci 28.15 +.39
FFnclOH 17.55 -.35 IntgDv 6.55 +.07
FMidBc 10.74 -.21 ISSI 9.93 -.10
FstNiagara 9.68 +.25 Intel 26.75 -.15
FstSolar 40.94 +2.33 InteractBrk 15.30 -.15
FstMerit 15.81 -.27 InterDig 36.37 +.30
Fiserv 63.26 -.14 Intrface 13.08 +.11
Flextrn 6.83 +.07 Intermol n 8.53 +.63
Fluidigmn 14.71 -.15 InterMune 14.23 -.45
FocusMda 20.62 -.31 InftSpdw 26.32 -.43
ForcePro 5.55 ... Intersil 11.57 -.10
FormFac 5.23 -.12 Intuit 57.49 -.03
Forfnets 22.86 -.10 IntSurg 456.38 +.72
Fossil Inc 97.40 +2.33 IridiumCm 7.89 +.14
FosterWhl 23.00 -.55 Isis 8.16 +.03
Francesc n 23.75 -.64 IstaPh 8.11 -.06
FreshMkt 44.98 -.90 IvanhoeEn 1.05 -.03
FronterCm 4.47 -.28
FuelCell .98 -.01
FultonFncl 9.38 -.20 JA Solar 1.75 +.13
FushiCo 827 +02 JDSUniph 13.47 -.10
JackHenry 34.41 -.09
JamesRiv 6.69 -.19
GTAdvTc 8.62 +.14 JazzPhrm 46.52 +.56
GalenaBh .64 -.02 JetBlue 5.80 +.24
Garmin 41.73 -.14 JiveSoftn 14.90 +.17
GenProbe 66.53 +.01 KITDigit 10.96 +.06
GenComm 10.34 -.05 KLATnc 50.26 -.98
GenetfcTh 4.63 +.33 KeryxBio 3.06 +.03
Gentex 30.66 -.06 KratosDef 6.45 -.35
GeronCp 2.08 +.34 Ku6Media 1.92 -.02
GileadSd 48.59 +.30 Kulicke 11.07 -.10
GladerBc 12.86 -.22 LKQCorp 32.50 -.09
Globalstrh .61 +.01 LPL Inv 32.99 -.19
GIbSpcMet 15.45 -.06 LSI IndIf 6.82 -.21
GluMobile 3.02 +.05 LTX-Cred 6.74 -.17
GolLNGLtd 41.43 -.70 LamResrch 42.29 -1.26
Google 568.10 -1.39 LamarAdv 30.43 -.48
GrCanyEd 17.10 -.26 Landstar 51.47 +.78
GreenMtC 49.34 -1.71 Lattce 6.64 -.04
GrifolsSA n 6.36 -.09 LeapWirlss 9.25 -.49
Grouponn 19.53 -.55 LedxPhrm 1.46 -.01
GrpoRn 8.20 +.18 LibGlobA 45.65 -.06
GulfRes 2.94 +.42 LibGlobC 43.98 +.03
GulfportE 33.50 -.45 LibCapA 82.67 -.33
HMN Fn 2.19 -.01 LibtylntA 16.92 +.27
HMS Hd s 32.81 +.13 LifeTech 49.11 +.02
Halozyme 10.32 -.14 LimelghtN 3.22 +.01
HancHId 33.17 -1.50 LinearTch 33.20 -.30
HansenMed 3.18 +.10 LinnEngy 37.28 +.13
HanwhaSol 1.88 +.08 LiveDeal 4.15 +.62
Harmonic 5.95 +.05 LodgeNet 3.61 -.14
Hasbro 34.90 -.11 Logitech 7.20 -.98
HawHold 6.60 +.01 LookSmart 1.43 -.04
HrfindEx 15.02 +.32 LoopNet 16.48 -.16
HSchein 70.50 -.13 lululemngs 62.98 -.39
HercOffsh 4.48 -.08 Luminex 19.94 -.01
HercTGC 9.59 -.04
HimaxTch 1.39 +.08
Hologic 19.34 -.29 MBFncl 18.14 -.16
Home Inns 29.87 +1.35 MCGCap 4.85 +.14
HomeAwn 27.19 +.60 MELASci 4.20 -.10
HudsCity 7.02 -.22 MGE 45.61 +.49
HudsonTc 2.59 +.31 MIPSTech 5.55 +.20
HumGen 9.76 -.16 MTS 45.80 -.03
HuntJB 49.30 +.67 MagicJcks 17.17 +.72
HuntBnk 5.64 -.30 Magma 7.18 -.01
HutchT 1.57 +.04 Majesom 2.44 +.03
IAC Inter 41.48 -.68 MAKOSrg 37.13
IdexxLabs 87.31 +.34 MannKd 3.41 +.32
II-VI s 23.28 +.10 MarchxB 4.44 -.44
IPGPhoton 53.25 +1.04 MarinaBrs .84 +.00
iShAsiaexJ 55.38 -.12 MarshEdw 1.10 +.10
iShACWX 39.15 +.04 MarvellT 15.76 -.26
iShACWI 44.70 -.05 Mattel 29.55 +.02
iShNsdqBio 114.71 -1.02 MattrssFn 29.94 +.62
IconixBr 18.55 -.01 Mattson 2.23 -.09
IdenixPh 14.33 -.42 Mamlntig 27.37 -.19


MaxwlT 20.31 +.09 ParamTch 25.64 +4.07
MedAssets 10.61 +.01 Parexel 20.62 -.44
MedicAcIn 5.48 -.04 PrtnrCm 7.76 -.21
MediCo 19.22 -.09 Patterson 32.09 -.01
Medidata 21.39 +.72 PattUTI 18.05 -1.19
Medivafon 54.31 -.41 Paychex 32.56 +.10
MelooCrwn 11.86 +.57 PnnNGm 41.08 +.52
Mellanox 36.24 +5.08 PennantPk 10.49 +.04
MentorGr 13.97 -.14 PeopUtdF 12.63 -.11
MercadoL 88.03 -.42 PeregrineP 1.00 -.02
MrcCmp 13.44 +.04 Perrigo 96.13 -2.64
MergeHIth 5.50 +.07 PetSmart 53.31 -.69
Metabolix 2.72 +.01 PetMed 12.10 -.12
Methanx 27.53 -.14 PetroDev 33.30 +.45
Micrel 12.18 -.06 Pharmacyc 18.15 -.45
Microchp 37.13 +.34 PhotrIn 7.15 -.16
Micromet 10.94 +2.66 Plexus 36.72 -.15
MicronT 7.55 -.31 Polyomms 19.80 -.93
MicroSemi 20.38 -.44 Popular 1.69 +.02
Microsoft 29.50 -.06 Poflatch 33.50 -.07
Micrvisn h .40 +.01 Power-One 4.58 -.25
Misonix 1.90 ... PwShsQQQ 60.22 -.21
MitekSys 8.65 -.32 Powrwvrs 1.94 -.05
Molex 26.62 +.10 Presstekh .64 -.01
Momenta 15.13 -3.98 PriceTR 61.04 +.06
MonstrBev 106.47 -2.02 priceline 524.66 -3.69
Motricity .78 -.03 PrimoWtr 3.11 +.31
Mylan 21.20 -.01 PrivateB 14.60 -.11
MyriadG 23.08 +.25 PrUPShQQQ 15.58 +.16
NIl HIdg 19.92 -.06 PrUltPQQQs 84.97 -.91
NPS Phm 7.14 -.07 Procerars 16.31 +1.24
NXPSemi 21.30 +.26 PrognicsPh 9.32 -.16
Nanosphere 1.79 +.10 ProgrsSfts 22.19 +.38
NasdOMX 25.83 -.07 ProspctCap 10.68 +.04
Natlnstrs 26.60 -.57 PureCycle 2.33 +.08
NatPenn 8.66 -.16 QIAGEN 16.54 -.22
NektarTh 6.07 -.11 QlikTech 27.03 -.36
NetLogicM 49.75 ... Qlogic 17.05 -.05
NetApp 37.56 -.24 Qualomm 57.81 -1.18
Netease 48.24 -.74 QualityS s 39.38 +.16
Netflix 116.01 +20.97 QuantFurs .76 -.01
Neflist 3.44 +.09 QuestSft 20.10 +.09
NetwkEng 1.36 -.02 Questomr 35.99 -.02
Neurcrine 8.43 +.26 RFMicD 4.82 -.10
NewsCpA 18.82 +.04 RTI Biolog 4.08 +.15
NewsCpB 19.50 +.02 Radvisn 8.01 -1.19
NobltyHIf 5.64 -.24 RAM En h 3.31 -.10
Nordson s 45.83 -.11 Rambus 8.92 -.28
NorTrst 41.08 -1.18 Randgold 111.94 +1.12
NwstBcsh 12.43 -.13 RealNwkrs 9.89 +2.54
Novavax 1.35 -.04 Rdiff.cm 7.18 -.22
Novlus 46.80 -1.33 Regenrn 81.85 -1.05
NuVasive 15.57 -.74 RentACt 37.38 -.58
NuanceCm 27.69 -.26 ReprosTh 5.11 -.13
NutriSyst 12.44 -.41 RepubAir 5.33 +.80
Nvidia 14.71 -.14 RschMotn 16.26 -.04
NxStageMd 17.57 +.20 RetailOpp 11.93 +.06
OCZTech 8.73 +.33 RexEnergy 10.72 -.22
OReillyAu 81.99 -.58 RigelPh 9.20 +.66
Oclaro 4.56 +.05 RiverbedT 29.92 +.33
OdysMar 3.46 +.03 RsttaGrsh .43 -.12
Omnicell 16.46 -.03 RosettaR 49.32 -.43
OmniVisn 13.84 -.02 RossStrss 51.63 -.75
OnAssign 11.56 -.27 RoviCorp 29.94 +.45
OnSmcnd 8.67 -.33 RoyGId 74.02 +2.23
Onoothyr 6.43 -.02 RubiomnTc 10.68 +.09
1800FRowrs 2.93 +.20 Ranair 32.77 +1.63
OnyxPh 41.98 -.11
OpenTxt 53.11 +1.67
OpenTable 47.88 +.66 SBA Com 45.00 -.08
Opnext 1.14 -.03 SEIlInv 18.32 +.19
OpbmerPh 12.29 -.15 SLMCp 15.01 +.39
Oracle 28.29 -.22 STEC 9.66 -.16
Orexigen 2.58 SVB FnGp 53.00 -1.97
Orthfx 39.80 -.19 SabaSoftw 9.72 -.27
OtterTail 22.19 +.19 SabraHItc 14.04 +.14
Overstk 6.95 ... SalixPhm 45.72 -.28
Oxi ersh 132 +26 SanderFm 51.67 +.04
SanDisk 46.39 -5.95
Sanmina 10.81 -.05
PDL Bio 6.42 +.01 Santarus 4.63 +.07
PMCSra 6.58 +.04 Sapient 13.02
PSSWrld 24.48 +.01 Satconh .54 +.01
Paccar 44.55 -1.00 SavientPh 2.49 -.01
PacBiosci 4.43 -.16 SchoolSp 3.08 -.20
PacEth rs 1.09 -.10 SdGames 11.42
PacSunwr 1.98 +.01 SeagateT 19.80 +.03
PanASIv 22.51 +.14 SearsHIdgs 44.34 -.53


SeattGen 18.50
SelCmfrt 25.10
Selectvlns 17.98
Semtech 28.89
Sequenom 4.24
SvcSourcn 17.44
SvArtsrsh .33
Shanda 40.74
ShuffiMstr 12.34
Shutterfly 24.85
SifyTech 4.88
SigaTech h 3.01
SigmaAld 68.22
SignatBk 58.18
Silicnlmg 4.92
SilcnLab 44.79
SilicnMotn 20.93
SIcnware 5.47
SilvStdg 16.83
Sina 62.39
Sindair 12.78
SinoClnEn 1.33
SiriusXM 2.08
SironaDent 48.40
SkywksSol 21.62
SmartBal 5.19
SmtHeath .44
SmithWes 5.07
SmithMicro 1.84
SodaStrm 36.75
Sohu.cm 60.41
Sonus 2.60
SouMoBc 22.71
SpanBdrsh 6.14
SpectPh 14.05
SpiritAirn 15.80
Spreadtrm 16.09
Stamps.cm 31.33
Staples 15.95
StarBulk 1.09
StarSdent 2.96
Starbucks 48.34
SfiDynam 15.89
StemCell rs .90
Stericyde 83.72
SMaddens 40.45
SunHIth 4.32
SunOpta 4.50
SunPower 6.86
support.cm 2.72
SusqBnc 8.99
SwisherHy 3.84
SycamrNt 19.49
Symantec 16.88
Symetricm 6.19
Synapfcs 34.34
Synchron 33.69
Synopsys 29.18
Synovis 27.96
SyntaPhm 4.76
Syntrolm h 1.04
TDAmeritr 16.37
THQ .71
TTMTCh 12.24
tw teleom 20.37
TakeTwo 15.20
TaleoA 35.93
Targacept 5.99
TASER 4.70
TechData 52.78
Tekelec 10.98
Telikh .18
Tellabs 4.22
TennCBlfIh .16
TeslaMot 28.94
TesseraTch 18.27
TevaPhrm 45.45
TxCapBsh 31.50
Texlnst 32.36
TexRdhse 15.23
Theravnce 18.25
Thoratec 31.35
TibcoSft 25.48
TitanMach 26.32
TiVo Inc 10.63
TowerSm h .72
Towerstm 2.46
TractSupp 79.84


+.17 Travelzoo 27.52 -2.89
+.14 TrimbleN 45.55 +.78
+.09 TripAdvn 31.05 -.44
-.23 TriQuint 5.99 -.05
-.05 TriusTher 5.37 -.42
+.11
-.03 TrstNY 5.53 -.09
+.07 Trustmk 23.80 -.83
-.15 UTiWrldwd 15.47 +.08
+.83 Ubiquitf n 21.00 +.86
-.01 UltaSalon 76.69 -2.11
-.07 Ultratech 29.79 +2.25
-1.99 Umpqua 12.23 -.53
-1.74 UBWV 28.46 -.50
+.04
-1.98 UtdNtrF 44.20 +1.00
-229 UtdOnln 5.65 -.02
+.03 US Enr 3.39 -.05
+.04 UtdTherap 48.59 -.42
-1.91 UnivDisp 42.24 +1.34
-.10 UnivFor 31.95 -.46
-.02 UranmRsh 1.10 +.01
UrbanOut 26.83 -.71
-.15
+.07 VCAAnt 22.57 -.13
+.13 VOXX)In 12.95 -.29
+.06 ValenceT h .98 -.03
-1.65 ValVis A 1.59 -.06
-.72 ValueClick 17.05 +.23
VanSTCpB 78.80 +.04
+.58 Veeomlnst 24.07 -.24
-.92 Velin 9.18 +16
.94 VBradley 34.20 -1.35
-.45 Ve ey 35.92 491
+.01 Verisign 35.92 -.49
+1.19 Verisk 40.09 -.21
-.24 VertxPh 35.72 +.26
+.04 ViaSat 46.74 -.66
+.78 ViacomB 48.01 -.34
+.57 Vical 3.58 +.09
-.12 VirgnMdah 24.47 +.41
+.10 ViroPhrm 29.32 -.13
-.4503 VISTFnd 10.80 +3.90
+.37 VistaPrt 32.93 +1.68
+.05 Vivus 11.90 -.32
+.02 Vodafone 27.34 -.26
+.42 Volcano 27.90 -.01
-.21 Volterra 30.33 +.01
+.02 WarnerCh 16.34 -.51
-.22 WarrenRs 3.23 +.05
-.19 WashFed 15.52 -.25
-.09
+.08 WaveSys 2.46 -.11
+.93 WebMD 26.84 -.06
-.01 WellslyBn 12.00
+.01 Wendys Co 5.26 +.01
+.05 WernerEnt 26.05 +.33
Westmrld 12.02 +.19
-.43 Wstptlnng 38.53 -.38
+.00 WetSeal 3.54 -.11
+.02 WholeFd 75.19 -1.96
-.20 Windstrm 12.08 -.14
-.37 Winn-Dixie 9.44 -.02
+.07 Wintrust 30.98 -.74
-.13 Woodward 41.98 -.67
+.45 WdAccep 64.50 -1.64
-.01 WrightM 17.27 +.07
-.01 Wynn 119.15 -1.27
+.01 XOMA 1.42 -.05
+.97 Xilinx 35.84 +.32
-.29 YRCrs 13.99 +.27
-.64 Yahoo 15.53 -.03
-.78 Yandexn 20.89 +1.10
-.44 Yongye 4.35 -.12
-.04 Zagg 9.01 -.01
+.15 Zalicus 1.11 -.02
+.44 ZhoneTch h 1.32 +.30
-.24 ZonBcp 16.58 -.94
+.09 Zopharm 5.22 +.12
+.03 Zogenix 2.62 +.18
-.09 Zumiez 28.40 -1.35
-.96 Zyngan 9.52 -.01


-.01 RoyceplB 25.64 -.09
-.61 Rand 18.58 -.52
+.33
-1.99
+.50 SAIC 12.90 -.09
+.58 SAPAG 59.29 +.81
+.08 SCANA 45.01 -.04
-.02 SKTIcm 13.96 -.12
+.38 SpdrDJIA 127.06 -.19
-9.94 SpdrGold 167.27 +.85
-.32 SPMid 170.40 -1.13
-.10 S&P500ETF131.88 -.68
+.18 SpdrHome 19.05 -.25
+19 SpdrS&PBk 21.19 -.52
+.18 SpdrLehHY 39.58 +.09
+05 SpdrS&P RB 25.79 -.69
-69 SpdrRefi 55.45 .40
+.31 SpdrOGEx 55.01 -1.74
-.54 SpdrMetM 55.13 -.51
-.51 STMicro 6.94 +.12
+.16 Safeway 22.39 -.49
-1.01 Stoe 16.83 -.38
-.06 StUJude 40.92 +.62
+.21 Saks 9.64 -.24
+.03 Salesforce 116.22 -1.92
-.18 SJuanB 19.70 -.07
+.39 SandRdge 8.08 -.32
+02 Sanofi 36.95 +.31
+07 SaraLee 19.17 +.01
-.98 Schlmbrg 75.98 -.21
+.07 SdichwEMkt 25.18 -.21
-2.19 Sdichwab 11.61 -.53
+20 SeadrillLtd 36.90 +.46
+74 SealAir 20.03 -.09
-.19 SempraEn 58.18 +.99
+.01 Sensient 39.38 -.42
-1.04 Sherwin 98.03 +1.97
-.29 SiderurNac 10.49 -.02
-.38 SilvWhthng 34.62 +.14
-1.56 SilvrcpMg 7.76 +.17
-.07 SimonProp 136.53 +.73
-.61 Skechers 12.37 -.48
-.83 SmithAO 41.72 -.26
-.09 SmithfF 23.15 -.11
-.29 Smucker 79.02 -2.17
-.24 SonyCp 18.51 .15
+.05 Sothebys 33.96 -1.61
-3.94 SoJerInd 55.27 +.73
+.11 SouthnCo 45.32 +.20
-.08 SthnCopper 36.00 -.09
+.18 SwstAirl 9.38 -.13
+.23 SwstnEngy 31.39 -1.23
-.37 SpecraEn 31.80 +.15
-.15 SprintNex 2.17 -.03
+.19 SprottSilv 14.10 +.24
-.04 SP Madis 37.13 -.01
+.13 SP HIthC 35.80 -.16
+.08 SPCnSt 32.44 -.12
-.25 SP Consum 41.48 -.07
+1.40 SP Engy 71.63 -.99
+.04 SPDRFncI 14.08 -.12
-.50 SPInds 36.49 -.07
-1.87 SPTech 26.90 -.18
-1.03 SPUDI 35.16 +12
-.62 StdPac 3.90 -.11
-.21 Standex 39.40 +.33
-.37 StanBlkDk 72.55 +.21
-.04 StarwdHfi 53.74 -1.03


The remainder of the

NYSE listings can be

found on the next page.





Yesterday Pvs Day
Argent 4.3360 4.3380
Australia .9414 .9445
Bahrain .3770 .3770
Brazil 1.7418 1.7608
Britain 1.5688 1.5643
Canada 1.0014 1.0053
Chile 484.75 492.85
China 6.3380 6.3095
Colombia 1799.00 1812.50
Czech Rep 19.19 19.34
Denmark 5.6733 5.6822
Dominican Rep 38.85 38.90
Egypt 6.0360 6.0405
Euro .7631 .7643
Hong Kong 7.7565 7.7597
Hungary 225.01 226.56
India 50.110 50.025
Indnsia 8965.00 8890.00
Israel 3.7562 3.7675
Japan 77.49 77.81
Jordan .7100 .7100
Lebanon 1505.00 1505.50
Malaysia 3.0415 3.0767
Mexico 12.9899 13.0256
N. Zealand 1.2208 1.2287
Norway 5.8354 5.8630
Peru 2.694 2.693
Poland 3.23 3.26
Russia 30.3075 30.5585
Singapore 1.2576 1.2618
So. Africa 7.8202 7.9122
So. Korea 1122.53 1126.80
Sweden 6.7891 6.7547
Switzerlnd .9205 .9231
Taiwan 29.88 30.00
Thailand 31.25 31.60
Turkey 1.7912 1.8086
U.A.E. 3.6732 3.6731
Uruguay 19.4499 19.6495
Venzuel 4.2927 4.2927


British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.



li- Yesterday Pvs Day

Prime Rate 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate 0.75 0.75
Federal Funds Rate .00-.25 .00-.25
Treasuries
3-month 0.05 0.043
6-month 0.07 0.06
5-year 0.77 0.86
10-year 1.94 1.98
30-year 3.09 3.04



FUTURES
Exch Contract Settle Chg
Lt Sweet Crude NYMX Mar 12 99.70 +.30
Corn CBOT Mar 12 63412
Wheat CBOT Mar 12 6531V2+1214
Soybeans CBOT Mar12 12223/4 +914
Cattle CME Aug 12 128.72 -.48
Sugar (world) ICE Mar 12 24.73 +.22
Orange Juice ICE Mar 12 206.60 -4.55


SPOT
Yesterday Pvs Day
Gold (troy oz., spot) $1726.30 $1654.10
Silver (troy oz., spot) $33./02 $30.482
Copper (pound) $3.89/0 $3./9/b
Platinum (troy oz., spot)$1613.80 $1b16.00

NMER= NewYork Mercantile Exchange. CBOT=
Chicago Board of Trade. CMER = Chicago Mercantile Ex-
change. NCSE = New York Cotton, Sugar & Cocoa Ex-
change. NCTN = New York Cotton Exchange.


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I AMEX


I NASDA


YTD YTD
Name Div YId PE Last Chg %Chg Name Div YId PE Last Chg %Chg
AK Steel .20 2.0 ... 9.82 -.22 +18.9 Microsoft .80 2.7 11 29.50 -.06 +13.6
AT&TeInc 1.76 6.0 45 29.45 -.76 -2.6 MotrlaSolu .88 1.9 13 45.33 +.39 -2.1
Ametek .24 .5 21 47.07 +.24 +11.8 MotrlaMob ... ... ... 38.67 +.07 -.3
BkofAm .04 .5 ... 7.30 -.05 +31.3 NextEraEn 2.20 3.7 15 59.67 -.38 -2.0
CapCtyBk ...... 22 9.63 -.12 +.8 Penney .80 2.0 25 40.72 +6.44 +15.8
CntryLink 2.90 7.8 17 37.15 -.38 -.1 PiedmOfc 1.26 6.8 24 18.43 +.18 +8.2
Citigrprs .04 .1 8 30.38 +.42 +15.5 ProgrssEn 2.48 4.5 21 54.77 +.39 -2.2
CmwREIT 2.00 10.2 27 19.64 -.05 +18.0 RegionsFn .04 .8 30 5.17 -.15 +20.2
Disney .60 1.5 16 39.35 -.21 +4.9 SearsHIdgs .33 ... ... 44.34 -.53 +39.5
EnterPT 2.80 6.3 26 44.50 +.52 +1.8 Smucker 1.92 2.4 20 79.02 -2.17 +1.1
ExxonMbI 1.88 2.2 10 86.77 -.45 +2.4 SprintNex ... ... ... 2.17 -.03 -7.3
FordM .20 1.6 8 12.79 -.14 +18.9 TimeWarn .94 2.5 14 37.97 -.24 +5.1
GenElec .68 3.6 16 19.07 -.06 +6.5 UniFirst .15 .2 15 60.24 -.24 +6.2
HomeDp 1.16 2.6 19 44.95 -.31 +6.9 VerizonCm 2.00 5.4 44 37.34 -.35 -6.9
Intel .84 3.1 11 26.75 -.15 +10.3 Vodafone 2.10 7.7 ... 27.34 -.26 -2.4
IBM 3.00 1.6 15190.98 -.75 +3.9 WalMart 1.46 2.4 14 60.97 -.50 +2.0
Lowes .56 2.1 19 26.95 +.04 +6.2 Walgrn .90 2.6 12 34.32 -.37 +3.8
McDnlds 2.80 2.8 19 99.18 -.05 -1.1 YRCrs ... ... ... 13.99 +.27 +40.3


A8 FRIDAY, JANUARY 27, 2012


STOCKS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BUSINESS


FRIDAY, JANUARY 27, 2012 A9


I MB TA3lFUN Iy i


Name NAV Chg Name NAV Chg
Advance Capital 1: Dr5001n t 36.06 -.20
Balancp 16.35 -.05 GNMA 16.03 +.03
RetInc 8.78 +.03 GrChinaAr 32.43 +.86
Alger Funds B: HiYIdA p 6.37 +.03
SmCapGr 6.78 -.02 StratValA 28.01 -.29
AllianceBern A: TechGroA 31.94 -.47
BalanAp 16.09 -.06 DreihsAcInc 10.36 +.02
GIbThGrAp65.34 -.13 Driehaus Funds:
SmCpGrA 36.29 -.09 EMktGr 27.83 +.23
AllianceBern Adv: EVPTxMEmI 44.88 +.31
LgCpGrAd 27.82 -.17 Eaton Vance A:
AllianceBern B: ChinaAp 16.46 +.08
GIbThGrBt 56.31 -.12 AMTFMuInc 9.99 +.02
GrowthBt 25.71 -.14 MulICGrA 8.05 -.06
SCpGrBt 29.07 -.08 InBosA 5.76 +.02
AllianceBern C: LgCpVal 17.82 -.14
SCpGrCt 29.22 -.07 NatlMunInc 9.84 +.01
Allianz Fds Insti: SpEqtA 15.88 -.12
NFJDvVI 11.93 -.07 TradGvA 7.47 +.01
SmCpV 30.46 -.20 Eaton Vance B:
Allianz Funds A: HIthSBt 9.41 -.06
SmCpVA 29.03 -.19 NatlMuInc 9.83
Allianz Funds C: Eaton Vance C:
AGICGrthC 24.47 -.20 GovtC p 7.45
TargetCt 14.75 -.16 NatMunlnc 9.84 +.01
Amer Beacon Insti: Eaton Vance I:
LgCaplnst 19.59 -.12 FItgRt 8.93 +.01
Amer Beaconl nv: GblMacAbR 9.99 +.01
LgCaplnv 18.60 -.12 LgCapVal 17.87 -.14
Ameri Century 1st: FBR Funds:
Growth 26.47 -.15 Focuslnvtn47.44 -.25
Amer Century Adv: FMI Funds:
EqGroAp 22.52 -.18 LgCappn 16.12 -.07
EqlncAp 7.47 -.02 FPA Funds:
Amer Century Inv: NwInc 10.67
AIICapGr 28.39 -.20 FPACres 27.68 -.01
Balanced 16.51 -.05 Fairholme 25.94 -.15
DivBnd 11.03 +.04 Federated A:
Eqlnc 7.47 -.02 MidGrStA 36.12 -.26
Growth 26.26 -.14 MuSecA 10.49 +.02
Heritagel 21.07 -.21 TfiRtBdp 11.35 +.03
IncGro 25.49 -.21 Federated Insti:
InfAdjBd 12.90 +.06 KaufmnR 5.02 -.01
IntDisc 9.27 +.06 TotRetBd 11.35 +.03
InfiGrol 10.20 +.05 StrValDvlS 4.78 -.01
New Opp 7.88 -.04 Fidelity Adv FocT:
OneChAg 12.27 -.03 EnergyT 36.70 -.62
OneChMd 11.94 -.02 HItCarT 22.14 -.08
RealEstl 21.45 +.13 Fidelity Advisor A:
Ultra 24.39 -.08 Nwlnsghp 20.62 -.10
Valuelnv 5.89 -.04 StrlnA 12.25 +.04
American Funds A: Fidelity Advisor I:
AmcpAp 19.97 -.12 EqGrln 60.52 -.50
AMufiAp 26.61 -.08 Eqlnin 24.13 -.12
BalA p 18.90 -.05 IntBdl n 11.52 +.03
BondAp 12.64 +.05 NwlnsgtIn 20.87 -.10
CaplBA p 49.77 -.03 Fidelity AdvisorT:
CapWGAp 33.82 ... BalancT 15.54 -.05
CapWAp 20.92 +.11 DivGrTp 12.31 -.07
EupacAp 37.64 +.05 EqGrTp 56.66 -.47
FdlnvAp 37.36 -.13 EqInT 23.76 -.12
GovtAp 14.41 +.04 GrOppT 38.12 -.24
GwthAp 30.73 -.09 HilnAdTp 9.71 +.04
HI TrAp 10.93 +.06 IntBdT 11.50 +.03
IncoAp 17.13 +.02 MulncTp 13.42 +.02
IntBdAp 13.69 +.03 OvrseaT 16.35 +.08
InfiGrlncAp 28.54 +.03 STFiT 9.28
ICAAp 28.41 -.11 StkSelAIICp 18.74 -.12
LtTEBAp 16.24 +.01 Fidelity Freedom:
NEcoAp 25.66 ... FF2010n 13.54
NPerAp 27.90 +.02 FF2010K 12.51
NwWrldA 49.60 +.10 FF2015n 11.31
STBFAp 10.10 +.01 FF2015K 12.55
SmCpAp 36.10 -.05 FF2020n 13.63
TxExAp 12.74 +.03 FF2020K 12.91 -.01
WshAp 29.25 -.13 FF2025n 11.29 -.01
Ariel Investments: FF2025K 12.99 -.01
Apprec 42.17 -.14 FF2030n 13.43 -.01
Ariel 47.04 +.02 FF2030K 13.12 -.01
Artio Global Funds: FF2035n 11.09 -.01
InfiEqlr 24.52 +.35 FF2035K 13.17 -.02
IntEqlllr 10.34 +.15 FF2040n 7.73 -.01
Artisan Funds: FF2040K 13.21 -.02
Intf 21.34 +.15 FF2045n 9.15 -.01
InfiVair 26.45 +.12 Incomen 11.44 +.01
MidCap 36.13 +.12 Fidelity Invest:
MidCapVal 20.69 +.08 AIISectEq 11.82 -.09
SCapVal 15.88 +.08 AMgr50On 15.58
Baron Funds: AMgr70rn 16.22 -.02
Asset 48.35 -.39 AMgr20rn 12.96 +.02
Growth 53.27 -.55 Balancn 18.85 -.06
SmallCap 24.50 -.16 BalancedK 18.84 -.07
Bernstein Fds: BlueChGrn 45.16 -.29
IntDur 13.89 +.05 CAMunn 12.62 +.03
DivMu 14.88 +.01 Canadan 52.36 -.15
TxMgdlnI 13.49 +.02 CapApn 26.50 -.11
BlackRock A: CapDevOn 10.83 -.04
EqtyDiv 18.71 -.09 Cplncrn 8.98 +.03
GIAIAr 19.04 -.01 ChinaRgr 27.68 +.19
HiYInvA 7.61 +.02 CngS 465.09
InfiOpAp 30.05 +.03 CTMunrn 12.01 +.02
BlackRock B&C: Contra n 70.60 -.34
GIAICt 17.74 -.01 ContraK 70.55 -.35
BlackRock Instl: CnvScn 24.64 -.09
BaVlI 25.96 -.16 DisEqn 22.55 -.21
EquityDv 18.75 -.09 DiscEqF 22.52 -.21
GIbAllocr 19.13 -.01 Divntn 27.31 +.04
HiYldBd 7.61 +.02 DivrslntKr 27.27 +.04
Brinson FundsY: DivSkOn 15.57 -.09
HiYIdlY 6.06 DivGthn 27.97 -.15
BruceFund 389.62 +1.06 EmergAs r n27.60 +.17
Buffalo Funds: EmrMkn 22.35 +.10
SmCapn 26.80 -.06 Eq Incn 42.99 -.22
CGM Funds: EQIIn 18.06 -.08
Focusn 28.36 +.05 ECapAp 16.62 +.07
MutIn 26.71 -.03 Europe 27.37 +12
Realtyn 28.93 +.18 Exch 323.88
CRM Funds: Exportn 21.61 -.15
MdCpVII 28.12 +.01 Fidelrn 32.63 .22
Calamos Funds: Fiftyn 18.20 .23
rwt p 49.9 9 .29 FItRateHi r n 9.77 +.02
Calvernvest: FrlnOnen 27.26 -.05
Calvertx invest: GNMAn 11.86 +.03
ncopx 15.85 +03 Govtlnc 1076 +.03
InflEqAp 12.89 +.14 GroCon 87.59 -.43
SocialAp 28.89 -.06 Groncn 1911 .11
SocBdpx 15.82 +.05 GrowCoF 87.50 -.43
SocEqAp 35.20 -.27 GrowthCoK 87.52 .43
TxFLgpx 16.18 GrStratrn 20.26 -.30
Cohen &Steers Highlncrn 8.90 +.05
RItyShrs 64.52 +.36 ndepnn 23.61 -.21
Columbia Class A: InProBdn 12.94 +.05
Acornt 28.86 -.09 IntBdn 10.94 +.03
DivEqlnc 9.90 -.07 IntGovn 10.98 +.01
DivrBd 5.08 +.02 IntmMun 10.53 +.01
DivOpptyA 8.25 -.03 nfDiscn 29.24 +.07
LgCapGrAt23.82 -.16 nfiSCprn 18.66 +.05
LgCorQAp 5.98 -.04 InvGrBdn 11.73 +.04
MdCpGrOp 9.88 -.09 nvGBn 7.76 +.03
MidCVIOpp 7.66 -.05 Japanr 9.56
PBModAp 10.75 +.01 JpnSmn 8.57 -.02
TxEAp 13.90 +.02 LgCapVal 10.55 -.05
SelCommA45.14 +.09 LatAm 53.84 -.19
FrontierA 10.61 -.01 LevCoStk n 27.69 -.16
GlobTech 21.36 +.06 LowPrn 37.88 -.17
Columbia Cl 1,T&G: LowPriKr 37.85 -.18
EmMktOp I n 8.13 +.02 Magellnn 66.80 -.49
Columbia Class Z: MagellanK 66.73 -.49
AcornZ 29.87 -.09 MDMurn 11.50 +.02
AcornlntZ 36.73 +.10 MAMunn 12.54 +.02
DivlncoZ 13.95 -.07 MegaCpStknlO.61 -.06
IntBdZ 9.33 +.03 MIMunn 12.39 +.01
IntTEBd 10.90 +.02 MidCapn 28.26 -.25
LgCapGr 12.86 -.09 MNMunn 11.92 +.01
LgCpldxZ 25.48 -.14 MtgSecn 11.21 +.02
MdCpldxZ 11.38 -.08 Munilncn 13.23 +.02
MdCpVIZp 13.56 -.09 NJMunrn 12.14 +.03
ValRestr 47.79 -.33 NwMktrn 16.07 +.04
Credit Suisse Comm: NwMilln 30.29 -.21
ComRett 8.51 +.04 NYMunn 13.48 +.02
DFA Funds: OTC n 58.43 -.20
InfCorEqn 9.98 +.02 OhMunn 12.17 +.02
USCorEql nl.38 -.07 100ondex 9.23 -.04
USCorEq2nl1.22 -.08 Ovrsean 28.90 +.18
DWS Invest A: PcBasn 23.01 +.05
CommAp 16.76 -.05 PAMunrn 11.27 +.03
DWS InvestS: Purint n 18.38 -.06
CorPlslnc 10.81 +.04 PuritanK 18.38 -.05
EmMkGrr 16.14 +.05 RealEn 29.57 +.17
EnhEmMk 10.25 +.07 SAIISecEqF11.82 -.09
EnhGlbBdr 10.09 +.05 SCmdtyStrtng.30 +.01
GIbSmCGr 36.90 -.05 SCmdtyStrF n9.32 +.01
GIblThem 21.89 +.04 SrEmrgMkt 15.88 +.07
Gold&Prc 16.58 +.20 SrslntGrw 10.76 +.05
GrolncS 16.90 -.16 SerlnfiGrF 10.78 +.05
HiYldTx 12.50 +.03 SrslntVal 8.44 +.02
IntTxAMT 12.03 +.03 SerlnfiValF 8.45 +.02
Inf FdS 39.29 +.06 SrlnvGrdF 11.74 +.04
LgCpFoGr 30.60 -.27 StlntMun 10.85 +.01
LatAmrEq 41.68 -.14 STBFn 8.53 +.01
MgdMuniS 9.29 +.02 SmIICpSrn 17.85 -.19
MATFS 14.97 +.02 SCpValur 14.90 -.06
SP500S 17.53 -.10 S ISelLCVrnl0.81 -.08
WorldDiv 22.69 +.01 SllSlcACapn25.91 -.16
Davis Funds A: StSelSmCp 19.14 -.13
NYVenA 34.26 -.15 Stratlncn 10.97 +.04
Davis Funds B: SfrReRtr 9.48 +.03
NYVenB 32.78 -.14 TotalBdn 10.99 +.04
Davis Funds C: Trend n 71.50 -.40
NYVenC 33.06 -.15 USBI n 11.81 +04
Davis FundsY: Utilityn 16.81 -.04
NYVenY 34.61 -.16 ValStratn 27.28 -.18
Delaware Invest A: Value n 67.99 -.41
Diverlncp 9.19 +.03 Wrldwn 18.23 -.09
SMIDCapG 23.67 +.03 Fidelity Selects:
TxUSAp 11.84 +.03 Airn 37.64
Delaware Invest B: Banking n 16.92 -.43
SelGrBt 32.53 +.29 Biotchn 95.39 -.63
Dimensional Fds: Brokrn 45.13 -.25
EmMCrEqnl9.14 +.07 Chemn 105.52 -.32
EmMktV 29.29 +.12 ComEquipn23.64 -.11
IntSmVan 14.94 +.06 Compn 59.28 -.59
LargeCo 10.38 -.06 ConDisn 24.78 -.09
TAUSCorE2n9.13 -.06 ConsuFnn 11.73 -.08
USLgVan 20.19 .15 ConStapn 71.68 .06
USMicron 14.14 -.05 CstHon 38.96 -.14


USTgdVal 16.34 -.12 DfAern 82.23 -.75
USSmalln 21.93 -.11 Electrn 51.10 -.52
USSmVa 24.89 -.17 Enrgyn 52.40 -.89
InfiSmCon 14.97 +.04 EngSvn 69.61 -.89
EmgMktn 26.20 +.09 EnvAItEnrnl6.06 -.04
Fixdn 10.32 FinSvn 54.90 -.58
IntGFxlnn 12.95 +.06 Goldrn 46.37 +.62
IntVan 15.86 +.01 Healthn 129.60 -.47
Glb5Fxlnc n 11.00 +.04 Insur n 46.54 -.28
TM USTgtV21.43 -.14 Leisrn 102.25 -.15
2YGIFxdn 10.10 Materialn 68.48 +.02
DFARIEn 24.59 +.16 MedDI n 57.85 -.59
Dodge&Cox: MdEqSysn 27.31 +.12
Balanced 70.97 -.26 Multmdn 46.25 +.11
Income 13.52 +.05 NtGasn 31.46 -.46
InfiStk 31.45 +.13 Pharmn 13.77 -.02
Stock 107.95 -.62 Retail n 54.47 -.22
DoubleUne Funds: Softwrn 83.36 -.49
TRBdI 11.13 Techn 93.42 -.52
TRBdNp 11.13 ... Telcmn 43.58 -.47
Dreyfus: Trans n 53.31 +.32
Aprec 41.85 -.14 UtilGrn 52.19 +.10
CTA 12.22 +02 Wirelessn 7.36 -.04
CorVyA 22.47 Fidelity Spartan:
Dreyf 8.86 -08 ExtMklnn 38.12 -.18
DryMidr 27.64 -.18 5001dxlnvn 46.69 -.27


Here are the 1,000 biggest mutual funds listed on Nasdaq. Tables show the fund name, sell
price or Net Asset Value (NAV) and daily net change.
Name: Name of mutual fund and family.
NAV: Net asset value.
Chg: Net change in price of NAV.
Data based on NAVs reported to Lipper by 6 p.m. Eastern.


Name NAV Chg
5001dx I 46.70 -.26
Infillnxlnvn 31.70 +.12
TotMktlnvn 38.08 -.21
USBondl 11.81 +.04
Fidelity Spart Adv:
ExMktAdrn38.12 -.19
5001dxAdv n46.70 -.26
IntAd rn 31.71 +.13
TotMktAd r n38.08 -.21
First Eagle:
GIbIA 47.09 +.04
OverseasA 21.32 +.06
First Investors A
BlChpAp
GloblAp 6.43 +.04
GovtApp 11.61 +.03
GrolnAp 15.31 -.07
IncoAp 2.52 +.01
MATFAp 12.37 +.04
MITFAp 12.69 +.03
NJTFAp 13.62 +.03
NYTFAp 15.11 +.02
OppAp 27.68 -.19
PATFAp 13.61 +.03
SpSitAp 24.46 -.09
TxExAp 10.15 +.02
TotRtAp 15.89 -.01
ValueBp 7.28 -.03
Forum Funds:
AbsStfrlr 10.99 -.02
Frank/Temp Frnk A:
AdjUS p 8.86 +.02
ALTFAp 11.65 +.02
AZTFAp 11.23 +.02
CallnsAp 12.58 +.03
CAIntAp 11.99 +.02
CalTFAp 7.29 +.02
COTFAp 12.18 +.02
CTTFAp 11.34 +.02
CvtScAp 14.69
DblTFA 12.27 +.02
DynTchA 30.34 -.28
EqlncAp 17.40 -.03
Fedlntp 12.36 +.02
FedTFAp 12.41 +.02
FLTFAp 11.84 +.01
FoundAlp 10.32 +.02
GATFAp 12.46 +.03
GoldPrMA 41.20 +.54
GrwthAp 47.40 -.24
HYTFAp 10.53 +.03
HilncA 1.99 +.01
IncomAp 2.15 +.01
InsTFAp 12.33 +.02
NYITF p 11.80 +.02
LATFAp 11.86 +.02
LMGvScA 10.41 +.01
MDTFAp 11.86 +.02
MATFAp 12.00 +.03
MITFAp 12.22 +.02
MNInsA 12.78 +.02
MOTFAp 12.57 +.02
NJTFAp 12.51 +.03
NYTFAp 12.01 +.02
NCTFAp 12.74 +.03
OhiolAp 12.91 +.02
ORTFAp 12.42 +.02
PATFAp 10.75 +.02
ReEScAp 15.67 +.10
RisDvAp 35.95 -.07
SMCpGrA 36.07 -.40
Stratlncp 10.42 +.05
TtlRtnAp 10.20 +.05
USGovAp 6.93 +.01
UbIsAp 13.18 +.04
VATFAp 12.08 +.04
Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv:
GIbBdAdv n 12.99 +.05
IncmeAd 2.13
Frank/Temp Frnk C:
IncomC t 2.17 +.01
USGvCt 6.89 +.02
Frank/Temp Mtl A&B:
SharesA 20.52 -.01
Frank/Temp Temp A:
DvMktAp 23.03 +.15
ForgnAp 6.36 +.05
GIBdAp 13.03 +.05
GrwthAp 17.43 +.10
WorldAp 14.76 +.07
Frank/Temp Tmp Adv:
GrthAv 17.42 +.10
Frank/Temp Tmp B&C:
DevMktC 22.48 +.14
ForgnC p 6.23 +.05
GIBdCp 13.05 +.05
Franklin Mutual Ser:
QuestA 16.60 +.02
GE Elfun S&S:
S&Slnc 11.74 +.04
US Eqty 41.11 -.25
GMOTrust Ill:
CHIE 21.34 +.03
Quality 22.55 -.08
GMOTrust IV:
InfiGrEq 21.79 +.06
InfilntrV 19.74 +.05
GMOTrustVI:
EmgMktsr 11.38 +.04
InfiCorEq 26.48 +.06
Quality 22.55 -.08
StrFxlnc 16.30 +.01
Gabelli Funds:
Asset 49.85 -.25
Gateway Funds:
GatewayA 26.64 -.03
Goldman Sachs A:
MdCVAp 35.52 -.19
Goldman Sachs Inst:
GrOppt 23.66 -.17
HiYield 7.05 +.04
HYMuni n 8.77 +.02
MidCapV 35.76 -.19
Harbor Funds:
Bond 12.41 +.07
CapAplnst 39.51 -.22
Infllnvt 56.70 +.18
Intlr 57.22 +.19
Hartford Fds A:
CpAppAp 31.60 -.11
DivGthAp 19.68 -.15
IntOpAp 13.71 +.03
Hartford Fds Y:
CapAppln 31.60 -.11
Hartford HLS IA:
CapApp 40.48 -.19
Div&Gr 20.19 -.15
Advisers 20.14 -.07
TotRetBd 11.72 +.05
Hennessy Funds:
CorGrllOrig
Hussman Funds:
StrTotRetr 12.40 +.05
StrGrowth 12.08 -.01
ICON Fds:
Energy S 19.03 -.34
HIltcareS 15.42 -.07
ISI Funds:
NoAm p 8.00 +.03
IVA Funds:
WCdwideAt 15.97 +.01
WdwideI r 15.97 +.01
Invesco Fds Invest:
DivrsDivp 12.29 -.09
Invesco Funds:
Energy 39.84 -.69
Uilidies 16.75 +.06
Invesco Funds A:
Chart p 16.94 -.09
CmstkA 16.07 -.08
Constp 22.84 -.17
EqIncA 8.60 -.03
GrlncAp 19.29 -.11
HilncMu p 7.85 +.02
HiYldp 4.14 +.02
HYMuA 9.60 +.02
InflGrow 26.56 +.02
MunilnA 13.61 +.03
PATFA 16.50 +.03
USMortgA 13.00 +.03
Invesco Funds B:
CapDevt 13.90 -.08
MunilnB 13.59 +.03
USMortg 12.93 +.03
Ivy Funds:
AssetSCt 23.72 +.15
AssetStAp 24.42 +.15
AssetSblr 24.63 +.15
JPMorgan A Class:
CoreBdA 11.91 +.03
JPMorgan C Class:
CoreBdp 11.96 +.03
JP Morgan Insth:
MdCpValn 24.86 -.17
JPMorgan R C:
CoreBondn 11.91 +.03
ShtDurBd 11.00 +.01
JPMorgan Select:
USEquityn 10.49 -.07
JPMorgan Sel CIs:
CoreBdn 11.90 +.03
HighYld n 7.84 +.04
lntmTFBd n 11.37 +.01
ShtDurBd n 11.00 +.01
USLCCrPIsn21.02 -.16
JanusT Shrs:
BalancdT 25.53 -.01
ContrarnT 13.13 -.01
EnterprT 62.39 -.21
FIxBndT 10.63 +.05
GllifeSciTr 26.46 -.13
GIbSel T 10.77 -.07
GITechTr 17.22 -.03
Grw&lncT 31.74 -.10
JanusT 29.13 -.09
OvrseasTr 37.45 +.20


PrkMCValT 21.32 -.11
ResearchT 30.18 -.09
ShTmBdT 3.08 +.01
Twenty T 55.59 -.34
VentureT 55.54 -.09
WrldWTr 43.36 -.08
Jensen Funds:
QualGrthJn28.07 -.07
John Hancock A:
BondAp 15.66 +.06
RgBkA 12.86 -.25
SrlnAp 6.56 +.01


Name NAV Chg
John Hancock B:
StrlncB 6.56 +.01
John Hancock CI1:
LSAggr 11.95 +.06
LSBalanc 12.74 +.07
LSConsrv 12.91 +.08
LSGrwth 12.56 +.07
LSModer 12.66 +.07
Lazard Instl:
EmgMktl 18.67 +.19
Lazard Open:
EmgMkOp 19.11 +.19
Legg Mason A:
CBAgGrp 116.84 -1.44
CBApprp 14.34 -.08
CBLCGrp 21.63 -.11
GCIAIICOp 8.07 +.05
WAHilncAt 5.88 +.02
WAMgMup 16.65 +.04
Legg Mason B:
CBLgCGrt 19.76 -.11
Legg Mason C:
CMSplnvp 28.35 -.25
CMValTrp 39.36 -.21
Longleaf Partners:
Partners 28.13 -.09
SmCap 26.06 -.27
Loomis Sayles:
LSBondl 14.42 +.06
StrlncC 14.96 +.05
LSBondR 14.36 +.05
StrlncA 14.88 +.05
Loomis Sayles Inv:
InvGrBdAp 12.28 +.07
InvGrBdY 12.29 +.07
Lord Abbett A:
AffilAp 11.17 -.09
FundlEq 12.79 -.10
BdDebAp 7.84 +.03
ShDurlncAp 4.58 +.01
MidCpAp 16.60 -.11
Lord Abbett C:
ShDurlncCt 4.61 +.01
Lord Abbett F:
ShtDurlnco 4.58 +.01
MFS Funds A:
MITA 19.67 -.07
MIGA 16.20 -.06
EmGA 43.72 -.34
HilnA 3.43 +.01
MFLA 9.65
TotRA 14.43 -.04
UtilA 17.11 -.02
ValueA 23.36 -.17
MFS Funds B:
MIGBn 14.58 -.05
GvScBn 10.55 +.03
HilnBn 3.44 +.01
MulnBn 8.70 +.02
TotRBn 14.42 -.05
MFS Funds I:
ReInT 14.63 +.06
Valuel 23.47 -.17
MFS Funds Insti:
InfiEqn 17.07 +.09
MainStay Funds A:
HiYIdBA 5.92 +.02
MainStay Funds B:
ConvBt 14.88 -.09
GovtBt 8.91 +.02
HYIdBBt 5.89 +.02
IncmBldr 16.48 +.01
InfilEqB 10.02 +.08
MainStay Funds I:
ICAPSIEq 35.78 -.28
Mairs & Power:
Growth n 75.41 -.23
Manning&Napier Fds:
WIdOppA 7.13 +.02
Matthews Asian:
AsianGllnv 15.81 +.04
Indialnvr 15.88 -.03
PacTgrlnv 21.77 +.05
MergerFdn 15.58 -.01
Meridian Funds:
Growth 44.27 -.31
Metro West Fds:
TotRetBd 10.46 +.04
TotRtBdl 10.46 +.04
Midas Funds:
Midas Fdt 4.05 +.09
Monetta Funds:
Monettan 14.84 +.08
Morgan Stanley B:
GlobStratB 15.19 +.03
MorganStanley Inst:
InflEql 12.96 +.04
MCapGrl 35.41 -.02
Muhlenkn 53.15 -.51
Munder Funds A:
GwthOppA 26.78 -.21
Munder Funds Y:
MCpCGrYn29.99 -.21
Mutual Series:
BeacnZ 12.20 +.02
GblDiscA 28.07 +.02
GIbDiscC 27.86 +.02
GlbDiscZ 28.42 +.02
QuestZ 16.73 +.02
SharesZ 20.68
Neuberger&Berm Fds:
Focus 19.88 -.11
Genesis 34.45 -.30
Geneslnst 48.37 -.42
Inftl r 15.77 +.05
Partner 25.50 -.22
Neuberger&Berm Tr:
Genesis 50.20 -.44
Nicholas Group:
Hilnc I n 9.54 +.04
Nichn 45.85 -.08
Northern Funds:
Bondldx 10.89
HiYFxlnc 7.17
IntTxEx 10.80
SmCpldx 8.76
Stkldx 16.44
Technly 15.66
Nuveen Cl A:
LtMBAp 11.21 +.01
Nuveen Cl R:
IntDMBd 9.26 +.01
Nuveen Cl YV:
RealEstn 20.21 +.12
Oak Assoc Fds:
WhitOkSG 40.08 -.32
Oakmark Funds I:
Eqtylncr 27.97 -.19
Globall 21.53 -.04
Intl lr 18.17 +.07
Oakmark 44.23 -.18
Select 29.75 -.12
Old Westbury Fds:
GlobOpp 7.07 +.02
GIbSMdCap 14.41 +.03
LgCapStrat 9.37
RealRet 9.78 -.04
Oppenheimer A:
AMTFMu 6.71 +.03
AMTFrNY 11.82 +.03
CAMuniAp 8.22 +.03
CapApAp 45.17 +.28
CaplncAp 8.69 +.03
ChmplncAp 1.80 +.02
DvMktAp 31.78 +.37
Discp 57.30 +.23
EquityA 8.94
GlobAp 56.84 +.08
GIbOppA 29.22 +.08
GblStrlncA 4.14
Goldp 38.70 +2.68
IntBdA p 6.29
LtdTmMu 14.84 +.02
MnStFdA 33.68 +.17
PAMuniAp 11.42 +.03
SenFltRtA 8.17 +.02
USGvp 9.65 +.03
Oppenheimer B:
AMTFMu 6.67 +.03
AMTFrNY 11.83 +.04
CplncBt 8.52 +.03
ChmplncBt 1.80 +.01
EquityB 8.26
GblStrlncB 4.15
Oppenheimer Roch:
LtdNYAp 3.37 +.01
RoMuAp 16.45 +.04
RcNtMuA 7.08 +.02
Oppenheimer Y:
DevMktY 31.41 +.36
InfiBdY 6.29
IntGrowY 27.02 +.33
PIMCO Admin PIMS:
ShtTmAdp 9.74 +.01
TotRtAd 11.06 +.06
PIMCO Instl PIMS:
AIAsetAutr 10.53 +.09
AIIAsset 12.02 +.09
ComodRR 6.91 +.06
Divlnc 11.49 +.06
EmgMkCur 10.36 +.05
EmMkBd 11.41 +.07
Fltlnc r 8.48 +02
ForBdUnr 10.99 +.08
FrgnBd 10.63 +.05
HiYld 9.22 +.05
InvGrCp 10.54 +08
LowDu 10.40 +.03
ModDur 10.71 +04
RealRet 11.59 +.10
RealRhil 11.96 +.06
ShortT 9.74 +.01
TotRt 11.06 +.06
TRII 10.72 +.05
TRIll 9.71 +.05
PIMCO Funds A:


AllAstAutt 10.46 +.09
ComRRp 6.77 +.06
LwDurA 10.40 +.03
RealRtAp 11.96 +.06
TotRtA 11.06 +.06
PIMCO Funds C:
RealRtCp 11.96 +.06
TotRtCt 11.06 +.06
PIMCO Funds D:
TRtnp 11.06 +.06
PIMCO Funds P:
AstAIIAuthP 10.52 +.09
TotRtnP 11.06 +.06


Name NAV Chg
Parnassus Funds:
Eqtylncon 27.00 -.17
Perm Port Funds:
Permannt 48.67 +.22
Pioneer Funds A:
BondA p 9.62 +.02
InfiValA 18.48 +.04
PionFdAp 40.79 -.21
ValueAp 11.28 -.05
Pioneer Funds B:
HiYldBt 10.01 +.03
Pioneer Funds C:
HiYIdC t 10.11 +.03
Pioneer FdsY:
CullenVY 17.85 -.04
Price Funds:
Balance n 19.77 -.02
BIChipn 41.03 -.21
CABondn 11.22 +.02
CapAppn 21.42 -.11
DivGron 24.34 -.13
EmMktBn 13.04 +.06
EmEurp 17.61 +.25
EmMktSn 31.48 +.02
Eqlncn 24.23 -.13
Eqlndexn 35.55 -.20
Europen 14.16 +.07
GNMAn 10.14 +.02
Growth n 33.82 -.20
Gr&ln n 20.98 -.09
HIthSci n 35.55 -.17
HiYieldn 6.67 +.03
InsfiCpG 17.14 -.14
InfiBondn 9.91 +.04
IntDis n 39.85 +.09
Intl G&I 12.20
InflStkn 13.31 +.02
Japan n 7.56 +.01
LatAm n 44.40 -.02
MDShrtn 5.24
MDBondn 10.87 +.01
MidCapn 56.18 -.37
MCapVal n 22.66 -.04
NAmern 33.61 -.23
NAsian 15.00
New Eran 44.98 -.34
NHorizn 33.48 -.11
Nlncn 9.71 +.04
NYBondn 11.62 +.02
OverS SFn 7.79 +.01
PSIncn 16.35
RealAssetrnl1.19 +.03
RealEstn 19.66 +.10
R2010n 15.62
R2015n 12.10 -.01
R2020n 16.71 -.02
R2025n 12.22 -.02
R2030n 17.51 -.04
R2035n 12.37 -.04
R2040n 17.61 -.05
R2045n 11.72 -.03
SciTecn 28.53 -.15
ShtBd n 4.83
SmCpStkn 33.46 -.17
SmCapVal n36.86 -.19
SpecGrn 17.97 -.06
Speclnn 12.53 +.03
TFIncnn 10.31 +.02
TxFrHn 11.19 +.02
TxFrSIn 5.69
USTIntn 6.26 +.02
USTLgn 13.38 +.14
VABondn 12.09 +.02
Value n 23.94 -.12
Principal Inv:
LgCGI In 9.45 -.06
LT20201n 11.79 -.01
LT20301n 11.63 -.02
Prudential Fds A:
BlendA 17.53 -.11
HiYIdAp 5.49 +.03
MuHilncA 9.84 +.02
UblityA 10.84 -.01
Prudential Fds B:
GrowthB 17.06 -.10
HiYIdBt 5.48 +.02
Putnam Funds A:
AmGvAp 9.20
AZ TE 9.35 +.02
ConvSec 19.39 -.05
DvrlnAp 7.41 +.02
EqlnAp 15.80 -.14
EuEq 17.87 +.01
GeoBalA 12.42 -.04
GIbEqtyp 8.73
GrnA p 13.50 -.11
GIblHIthA 41.10 -.11
HiYdAp 7.52 +.03
HiYld In 5.86 +.03
IncmAp 6.81 +.03
IntGrln p 8.74
InvAp 13.28 -.09
NJTxA p 9.72 +.02
MulTCpGr 51.92 -.44
PATE 9.38 +.02
TxExA p 8.83 +.01
TFInAp 15.38 +.03
TFHYA 12.11 +.02
USGvAp 13.70 +.04
GIblUtilA 10.01 +.04
VoyAp 21.66 -.18
Putnam Funds B:
TaxFrlns 15.40 +.03
DvrlnBt 7.35 +.02
Eqlnct 15.67 -.14
EuEq 17.17 +.01
GeoBalB 12.29 -.03
GIbEqt 7.89
GINtRst 18.48 -.05
GrlnBt 13.26 -.11
GIbIHIItB 32.88 -.09
HiYIdBt 7.51 +.03
HYAdB t 5.75 +.03
IncmBt 6.75 +.03
IntGrlnt 8.68
InfiNop t 13.28
InvBt 11.98 -.08
NJTxB t 9.70 +.02
MultCpGr 44.55 -.37
TxExB t 8.84 +.02
TFHYBt 12.13 +.02
USGvBt 13.63 +.04
GlblUtilB 9.98 +.04
VoyBt 18.26 -.15
RS Funds:
IntGrA 16.68 +.07
LgCAIphaA 40.03 -.35
Value 24.27 -.29
RidgeWorth Funds:
LCGrStkAp 10.73 -.07
Royce Funds:
LwPrSkSvr 15.76 +.19
MicroCapl 15.82 +.25
PennMulr 11.58 +.02
Premierlr 19.99 +.15
TotRetl r 13.33 +.02
ValSvc t 11.87 +.08
Russell Funds S:
StratBd 11.01 +.05
Rydex Advisor:
NasdaqAdv 14.90 -.06
SSgA Funds:
EmgMkt 19.83 +.05
Schwab Funds:
HIthCare 18.08 -.09
10001nvr 37.21 -.21
S&P Sel 20.54 -.11
SmCpSI 20.35 -.07
TSMSelr 23.83 -.13
Scout Funds:
Inf 30.10 +.05
Selected Funds:
AmShD 41.52 -.16
AmShSp 41.55 -.16
Sentinel Group:
ComSAp 32.81 -.17
Sequoia 150.96 -.89
Sit Funds:
LrgCpGr 44.12 -.27
SoSunSCInvt21.36 ...
St FarmAssoc:
Gwth 54.27 -.25
Stratton Funds:
Mul-Cap 34.83 -.48
RealEstate 28.81 +.20
SmCap 52.15 -.05
SunAmerica Funds:
USGvBt 10.19 +.04
TCW Funds:
TotRetBdl 9.77 +.02
TIAA-CREF Funds:
Bdldxlnst 10.82 +.04
Eqldxlnst 10.01 -.06
Templeton Instit:
ForEqS 18.05 +.17
Third Avenue Fds:
InfiValnstr 15.35 +.16
REVallnstr 22.48 +.13
Valuelnst 44.64 +.08
Thornburg Fds:
IntValAp 25.62 +.14
IncBuildAt 18.41 +.04
IncBuildCp 18.41 +.04
IntValuel 26.19 +.15
LtTMul 14.59 +.01
Thrivent Fds A:
HiYld 4.81 +.03
Income 8.85 +.07
Tocqueville Fds:
Goldtn 79.03 +1.01
Transamerica A:
AegonHYBp 9.08 +.01
Flexlncp 8.94 +.02
Turner Funds:
SmlCpGrn 34.64 -.20
Tweedy Browne:
GblValue 22.49 +13


Name NAV Chg
Grwth 15.33 -.05
Gr&lnc 15.44 -.05
IncStk 12.74 -.08
Inco 13.16 +.03
Infl 23.11 +.08
NYBd 12.24 +.02
PrecMM 34.34 +.41
SciTech 13.22 -.08
ShtTBnd 9.17 +.01
SmCpSk 14.26 -.07
TxElt 13.48 +.02
TxELT 13.48 +.03
TxESh 10.82 +.01
VABd 11.43 +.02
WIdGr 18.82 +.01
VALIC:
MdCpldx 19.92 -.13
Stkldx 24.48 -.14
Value Line Fd:
LrgCon 18.39 -.07
Vanguard Admiral:
BalAdml n 22.52 -.05
CAITAdmn 11.56 +.02
CALTAdmn11.68 +.03
CpOpAdl n 72.21 -.71
EMAdmr r n 35.06 +.13
Energyn 118.28 -1.56
EqlnAdm n n47.37 -.17
EuroAdml n 54.94 +.14
ExplAdmln 71.19 -.40
ExtdAdm n 42.30 -.22
50OAdml n 121.53 -.69
GNMAAdn 11.09 +.03
GrwAdmn 33.76 -.17
HlthCr n 55.45 -.36
HiYldCp n 5.81 +.02
InfProAdn 28.07 +.13
ITBdAdml n 11.84 +.06
ITsryAdml n 11.73 +.04
IntGrAdm n 56.59 +.18
ITAdmln 14.22 +.03
ITGrAdmnn 10.11 +.05
LtdTrAdn 11.18
LTGrAdmln 10.28 +.11
LTsyAdml n 13.01 +.14
LTAdmln 11.53 +.02
MCpAdml n 95.19 -.73
MorgAdrnm n 58.25 -.39
MuHYAdm n10.91 +.02
NYLTAdn 11.57 +.02
PrmCap r n 67.56 -.43
PALTAdm n11.54 +.02
ReitAdmrnn 87.59 +.59
STsyAdml n 10.81 +.01
STBdAdmlnlO.65 +.01
ShtTrAdn 15.94
STFdAdn 10.88 +.01
STIGrAdn 10.71 +.01
SmCAdm n 35.73 -.16
TxMCap r n 65.78 -.42
TfBAdml n 11.02 +.04
TStkAdm n 33.00 -.19
ValAdmln 21.35 -.14
WellslAdmrn n56.51 +.14
WelltnAdm n56.03 -.16
Windsorn 46.10 -.25
WdsrllAdn 47.65 -.30
Vanguard Fds:
AssetAn 24.74 -.05
CALTn 11.68 +.03
CapOppn 31.27 -.31
Convrtn 12.48 -.06
DivdGron 15.89 -.09
Energy n 63.00 -.83
Eqlnc n 22.60 -.08
Explr n 76.52 -.43
FLLT n 11.97 +.02
GNMAn 11.09 +.03
GlobEqn 17.05 -.01
Grolncn 27.69 -.15
GrthEqn 11.52 -.07
HYCorpn 5.81 +.02
HlthCren 131.43 -.86
InflaPron 14.29 +.07
InflExplrn 13.95 +.06
IntlGrn 17.79 +.05
InfiVal n 28.69 +.08
ITIGraden 10.11 +.05
ITTsryn 11.73 +.04
LifeConn 16.64 +.01
LifeGron 22.14 -.04
Lifelncn 14.35 +.03
LifeModn 19.88 -.02
LTIGraden 10.28 +.11
LTTsryn 13.01 +.14
Morg n 18.79 -.13
MuHYn 10.91 +.02
Mulntn 14.22 +.03
MuLtdn 11.18
MuLongn 11.53 +.02
MuShrtn 15.94
NJLTn 12.16 +.02
NYLTn 11.57 +.02
OHLTTEn 12.46 +.02
PALTn 11.54 +.02
PrecMtls r n 22.23 +.26
PrmcpCorn 14.10 -.10
Prmcparen 65.13 -.40
SelValurn 19.48 -.07
STARn 19.54 -.01
STIGraden 10.71 +.01
STFedn 10.88 +.01
STTsryn 10.81 +.01
StratEqn 19.59 -.13
TgtRe2005n1 2.25 +.02
TgtRetlncn 11.79 +.02
TgRe2010n23.12 +.02
TgtRe2015nl2.74 -.01
TgRe2020 n22.57 -.02
TgtRe2025 nl2.82 -.02
TgRe2030n21.95 -.04
TgtRe2035 nl 3.17 -.04
TgtRe2040On21.63 -.05
TgtRe2050n21.53 -.06
TgtRe2045 nl3.58 -.03
USGron 19.25 -.13
USValuen 10.65 -.07
Wellsly n 23.32 +.05
Welltn n 32.44 -.09
Wndsrn 13.67 -.07
Wndslln 26.85 -.17
Vanguard Idx Fds:
DvMklnPl r n93.51 +.19
MidCplstPl nl 03.70 -.79
TotlntAdm r r23.50 +.05
Totlntllnst r n93.98 +.20
TotlntllP r n 94.00 +.21
500n 121.52 -.69
Balancedn 22.52 -.04
EMktn 26.69 +.10
Europe n 23.59 +.06
Extend n 42.29 -.21
Growth n 33.76 -.17
LgCaplxn 24.37 -.14
LTBndn 13.74 +.15
MidCapn 20.98 -.16
Pacific n 9.67 +.01
REITr n 20.53 +.14
SmCapn 35.71 -.16
SmlCpGthn22.97 -.11
STBndn 10.65 +.01
TotBndn 11.02 +.04
TotllntlIn 14.05 +.03
TotStkn 32.99 -.19
Valuen 21.35 -.14
Vanguard Instl Fds:
Ballnstn 22.52 -.05
DevMklnstn 8.98 +.02
Extln n 42.29 -.22
FTAIIWIdl r n83.78 +.19
Grwthlstn 33.76 -.17
InfProlnstn 11.43 +.05
Instldxn 120.73 -.70
InsPIn 120.74 -.69
InstTStldxn 29.86 -.17
InsTStPlus rn29.87 -.16
MidCplstn 21.03 -.16
SCInstn 35.73 -.16
TBIstn 11.02 +.04
TSlnstn 33.01 -.18
Valuelstn 21.35 -.14
Vanguard Signal:
500SglIn 100.38 -.58
GroSign 31.26 -.16
ITBdSign 11.84 +.06
MidCpldxn 30.04 -.23
STBdldxn 10.65 +.01
SmCpSign 32.19 -.15
TotBdSgl n 11.02 +.04
TotStkSgln31.85 -.18
Virtus Funds A:
MulSStAp 4.80 +.01
Waddell & Reed Adv:
AssetS p 9.26 +.06
CorelnvA 5.95 -.02
DivOppAp 14.62 -.04
DivOppCt 14.47 -.04
Wasatch:
SmCpGr 40.44 +.01
Wells Fargo Adv A:
AstAIlAp 12.14
Wells Fargo Adv C:
AstAIICt 11.72
Wells Fargo Adv:
CmS glnv 20.26 .09
Opptylnv 38.52 .17
Wells Fargo Ad Ins:
UlStMulnc 4.82 +.01
Wells Fargo Inst:
UItSTMuA 4.82
Western Asset:
CorePlusl 11.20 +.05
William Blair N:
GrowthN 11.55 -.07
Yacktman Funds:
Fundpn 18.19 -.05
Focusedn 19.44 -.05


US Global Investors:
AIIAm 23.68 -.14
ChinaReg 7.57
GIbRs 10.03 -.07
Gld&Mtls 13.86 +.25
WdPrcMn 14.70 +.22
USAA Group:
AgvGt 34.50 -.25
CABd 10.72 +.02
CrnstStr 21.92 +.01
GNMA 10.41 +.01
GrTxStr 13.86 -.01


Dow rallies to post-crisis




high, stocks finish lower


Associated Press


A brief morning rally
Thursday pushed the Dow
Jones industrial average
above its highest close since
the financial crisis of 2008,
but disappointing economic
data tempered traders' opti-
mism later in the day, and
stocks finished lower.
Solid news on factory or-
ders and strong earnings
from U.S. manufacturers,
highlighting one of the econ-
omy's bright spots, helped
the market open higher The
Dow rose 85 points.
But the Dow and broader
indexes turned negative
after weaker reports on
home sales and future eco-
nomic growth were released
in the late morning. The
Dow closed down 22.33
points, or 0.2 percent, at
12,734.63.
The Dow and other in-
dexes are still up sharply for
the year, and for about 45
minutes Thursday morning,
the Dow traded above
12,810.54, its peak from last
year and the highest close
since the spring before the
2008 financial crisis.
Traders appear less
afraid of spillover damage
from the European debt cri-


Market
Jan. 26,

Dow Jones
industrials


Nasdaq
composite


Standard &
Poor's 500

Russell
2000


NYSE d
Advanced:

Declined:

Unchanged:

Volume:

Nasdaq
Advanced:

Declined:

Unchanged:

Volume:



sis, and data o
manufacturing
consistently s
Dow is up more
cent for the yea
"With global
ter stage and att
back to the fui
this market was


Capital gains taxed less than wages


gains the profit from sell-
ing an investment at a
lower rate than wages.
"There are two ways to
look at: There is a moral ar-
gument and an economic
growth argument, and they
both point to lower taxes on
capital gains," said William
McBride, an economist at
the conservative Tax
Foundation.
McBride says it is unfair to
tax income more than once,
and capital gains are taxed
multiple times. If you got the
original investment from
wages, that money was taxed.
If the stock you own gains
value because the company
you invested in makes a
profit, those profits are taxed
through the corporate tax.


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Citrus County's Two Premier Restaurants!

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I NE^^^ ~WYORKSTOCjECHNGE I


Name Last Chg
StateStr 38.78 -1.13
Steris 29.62 +.06
SIllwtrM 13.38 -.07
SratHotels 6.36 +.10
Stryker 54.87 -.19
SturmRug 39.13 -.48
SubPpne 46.93 +.18
SunOmts 40.45 +.74
SunCoken 13.51 -.26
Suncor gs 34.31 +.04
Sunoco 38.24 -.42
Suntedich 3.24 +.10
SunTrst 20.50 -1.12
SupEnrgy 25.78 -1.68
Supvalu 6.93 -.07
SwiftTrans 11.10 +.37
Synovus 1.75 -.01
Sysco 30.35 -.08
TCF Fncl 10.46 -.04
TE Connect 34.57 -.11
TECO 18.61 +.13
TJX 67.95 -.01
TaiwSemi 14.23 +.07
TalismEg 11.86 -.33
Target 50.50 -.64
TataMotors 23.40 +.14
TeckResg 42.74 +.41
TelNorL 9.62 +.01
TelcmNZs 8.64 -.05
TelelBrasil 28.13 -.82


TdefEsp
TelMexL
Templelnld
TempurP
TenetHlth
Teradyn
Terex
TerraNitro
Tesoro
TetraTech
Textron
Theragen
ThermoFis
ThmBet
ThomCrkg
3MCo
Tiffany
TWCable
TimeWarn
Timken
TitanMet
TollBros
TorchEngy
Trchmrks
TorDBkg
Total SA
TotalSys
Transocn
Travelers
Tredgar
TriConfi
TrinaSolar


TwoHrblnv 9.86 +.16 ValeantPh 49.22
Tyoolni 49.27 -.47 ValeroE 23.89
Tyson 18.90 +.06 ViyNBcp 12.22
UBSAG 13.98 +.09 VangTotBd 83.75
UDR 25.91 +.33 VangTSM 67.81
UIL Hold 34.55 +.13 VangREIT 61.84
USAirwy 7.85 +.33 VangEmg 42.32
US Gold 5.75 -.12 VangEAFE 32.50
USEC 1.63 +19 VarianMed 67.30
USG 13.29 -.24 Vectren 29.06
UltraPtg 24.70 -1.44 Ventas 58.98
UndrArmr 73.40 -4.09 VeoliaEnv 11.40
UniSrcEn 37.49 +.36 VerizonCm 37.34
UniFirst 60.24 -.24 VimpelCm 10.38
UnilevNV 33.39 +.02 Visa 100.86
Unilever 32.54 +.08 Vishaylnt 12.08
UnionPac 113.68 +.05 VMware 91.93
UtdConfi 21.70 +1.29 Vornado 81.14
UtdMicro 2.54 +.01 WGL Hold 43.46
UPSB 75.84 +.22 WMS 20.93
UtdRentals 37.87 +3.10 WPXEnn 15.69
US Bancrp 27.79 -.81 Wabash 8.70
US NGs rs 5.62 -.31 WalMart 60.97
US OilFd 38.37 +.02 Walgrn 34.32
USSteel 29.37 -1.03 WalterEn 69.38
UtdTech 77.41 -.24 WsteMInc 34.73
UtdhlthGp 50.35 -1.22 WatsnPh 58.65
V Af22.82 -.48 Weathflni 16.54
WeinRft 24.97
WellPoint 64.30
Vale SA 24.64 -.40 WellsFargo 29.05
Vale SApf 23.68 -.48 Wesco nf 63.97


plode, which is exactly
watch what it is doing," said Doug
2012 Cote, chief market strategist
with ING Investment
-22.33 Management.

12,734.63 The government reported

-13.03 early Thursday orders to
factories for long-lasting
2,805.28 manufactured goods in-

-7.63 creased in December for
the second straight month,
1,318.43 and a key measure of busi-

-2.73 ness investment rose solidly

792.91 That strong demand was
apparent in quarterly earn-
diary ings reports from U.S. man-
1,489 ufacturers. 3M stock closed
1,540 1.3 percent higher after its
1,540 fourth-quarter profit beat
: 98 Wall Street's estimates.

4.5 b Caterpillar, the world's
biggest heavy equipment
diary maker, rose 2.1 percent, the
1,132 most of the 30 companies in

1,371 the Dow, after beating ana-
lysts' estimates last quarter.
: 127 The company expects to do

2.0 b the same this year as global
AP demand remains high.
Later in the day, the gov-
on jobs and ernment reported an unex-
have been pected drop in new home
trong. The sales in December, capping
than 4 per- the worst year for home
r. sales since record-keeping
risk off cen- began in 1963. A private
mention going gauge of future economic
ndamentals, activity also grew more
ready to ex- slowly than expected.


Associated Press 2010 and 2011 tax returns
this week, has been forced to
WASHINGTON Why do defend the fact that he paid
Mitt Romney and other a tax rate of about 15 per-
wealthy investors pay lower cent on an annual income of
taxes on the income they $21 million. His tax rate is
make from investments than comparable to the one paid
they would if they earned by most middle-income fam-
their millions from wages? ilies. His income, however,
Because Congress, through is 420 times higher than the
the tax code, has long treated typical U.S. household.
investment more favorably The Republican presi-
than labor, seeing it as an en- dential candidate's taxes
gine for economic growth were so low because the
that benefits everyone, vast majority of his income
President Barack Obama came from investments. The
and the Occupy Wall Street U.S. has long had a progres-
movement are challenging sive income tax, in which
that value system, raising people who make more
volatile election-year issues money pay taxes at a higher
of equity, fairness and rate than those who make
Romney's tax returns. less. But for almost as long,
Romney, who released his the U.S. has taxed capital


Private Meeting

Room Available

For Parties,

Banquets &

Receptions


Gift -

Certificates

Available M i


WestarEn 29.02
WAstEMkt 13.89
WstAMgdHi 6.22
WAstlnfOpp 12.83
WDigital 37.01
WstnRefin 15.78
WstnUnion 19.14
Weyerh 20.62
Whrlpl 54.42
WhifngPts 50.38
WmsCos 28.87
WmsPtrs 62.00
WmsSon 34.61
Winnbgo 9.09
WiscEn s 34.78
WTEmEq 55.44
WT India 19.22
Worthgtn 19.01
Wyndham 40.24
XL Grp 20.66
XcelEngy 27.41
Xerox 7.85
Yamanag 17.06
YingliGrn 4.22
YumBmds 62.48
Zimmer 59.61
ZweigTI 3.21







Page A10 FRIDAY, JANUARY 27, 2012



PINION


"Example is the bestprecept."
Aesop, "Fables," c. 6th c. B.C.


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan............. .................. publisher
Charlie Brennan ............... .................. editor
Mike Arnold ............. .................. HR director
Sandra Frederick....................... managing editor
J Curt Ebitz............... ..............citizen member
Founded Mac Harris ............... ............citizen member
by Albert M.
Williamson Rebecca Martin ...........................guest member
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


CONSISTENCY IS BEST



Proposed septic



measure could be



toxic for waters


Legislation now being
considered in Tallahas-
see has the potential to
be a compromise between the
legislation passed in 2010 that
gives a statewide mandate for
septic tank inspections and the
efforts of some
legislators to re- THE I
peal the law.
Senate Bill 550, Legislati
passed by the 2010 move se
Legislature, re- regular
quires septic-tank count
inspections every
five years and sets OUR 01
high standards for
repair and/or re- Bill cou
placement. water pl
After com- across t
plaints about the
high cost of inspections, and
the higher cost of repair or re-
placement under the new law,
legislation was introduced last
year to repeal SB 550, but the
bill stalled in the Senate.
A bill introduced this year,
Senate Bill 820, would repeal
SB 550, but would replace the
statewide inspection program
with an optional, standard sep-
tic-system inspection program
for all counties and cities that
would be administered by
county health departments.
While the bill would offer an
option for septic-tank inspec-
tions, this bill is ultimately a
step backward, a step that has
the potential to significantly
weaken environmental protec-
tions passed just two years ago.


Sex everywhere
I read in the paper today an ar-
ticle about the vulgarity and nudity
on TV. You know, when you sit down
in the evening and you want to enjoy
TV, how can you enjoy it with all
that going on? You might as well
go downtown and sit on the street
corner and listen to all the vulgar-
ity and the sex and everything.
And they blame the parents be-
cause their kids pick it up? Where
did the kids pick it up? From TV.
And why is it on TV? Society al-
lows it. So don't blame
the kids and the parents;
blame society.
Guard proponent
A group from Crystal
River and also from Cit-
rus County went to Jack-
sonville for a meeting
with the U.S. Fish and
Wildlife Service in refer- CAL
ence to manatee injuries 5O
and deaths on King's Bay. 563-
One solution would be to
have a propeller guard around the
propellers so that the boaters can
have their fun, but the manatees
would not be injured or killed. It
seems like a simple solution to me
and one that would be advantageous
to both the boaters and the people
who want to protect the manatee
from propeller injuries and deaths.
I wish they would give this a look.
Coyotes' land
In today's paper, "Coyotes on
the prowl." Well, don't these people
who live in Pine Ridge know the
coyotes used to roam free when
there were no homes around?
They were there first. These peo-
ple from up North that bought
homes in Pine Ridge should learn
to get along with them. They're in-
vading their privacy. They're not
invading theirs. The coyotes were
there first, humans second.


S
o
p
t


P
I(
hr
th


I

c


There are approximately 2.7
million septic tanks in Florida.
Many of these are more than 20
years old. Some do not work
well. Some do not work at all.
Many are not being inspected,
so no one knows how well or
even if-- they are
;SUE: working.
We supported
>n would adoption of SB
itic-tank 550, because we
ion to believe this kind
level. of legislation is
important to pro-
INION: tect our springs
and our water
d harm supplies. It is un-
otection derstandable
e state. some homeown-
ers would be
angry at a law requiring the in-
spection of septic tanks and re-
quiring repair of failing ones,
but without such legislation,
inspection and repair is hit-
and-miss across the state.
We are concerned that if left
up to individual counties, sep-
tic tank inspections will simply
drift off the radar in some
counties while being vigor-
ously pursued in others. For
this reason, we believe it is a
mistake to remove legislation
requiring statewide standards
and replace it with a bill that
allows counties to opt in or out
of inspections, and lets 67 dif-
ferent county health depart-
ments set the standards for
septic tank performance in the
state.


What coyotes?
The Sound Off that was put in
on Jan. 12 about the "Coyotes on
the prowl" in Pine Ridge- I don't
know where they get that. I live in
Pine Ridge, I live on six acres and
hardly ever see a coyote. They're
very, very skittish around people. I
don't know, they just sound like
people that just want to kill all our
wildlife because they were here,
remember. And basically, if you
have your little dog or something
out, that becomes bait for them
because there's no food.
JgND There's hardly any ani-
lJND mals left in Pine Ridge at
OFfP all for the coyotes to prey
FIiF on. Unbelievable. People
are animal killers. I just
saw a baby gopher on the
street that someone had
to smash over it and
there was plenty of room
to get around. So we
r579 need to take care of our
)l 7 little critters here whose
lives are endangered any-
way because of all the overcrowd-
ing and traffic.
Ire for all
I find it amusing that Republicans
say President Obama is against the
wealthy and those who achieve great
things, while at the same time the
Republicans criticize Mitt Romney
for being wealthy and achieving
success. If it weren't so pathetic,
it would really be funny.
Septic specifics
My neighbor and I have spent
months reporting problems with
the septic tanks in our area. No
help is given, despite our pleas.
We should not do away with septic
tank inspections. Instead, we need
to advertise where residents can
go for help associated with septic
tanks, especially in problem areas
and in residential areas.


The demise of the blue-collar Democrat


ince 1932, blue-collar work-
ers have been the bedrock
upon which Democratic
presidential candidates have
built their coalitions. Franklin
Roosevelt drew them into his
party, and his successors, both
winners and losers in the effort to
win the White House, have put
the votes and interests of blue-
collar workers at the
center of their cam-
paign calculus and
campaign rhetoric.
No more which is
why what happened
last week in South
Carolina made even
the sharpest-eyed po- .
litical expert squint.
If the political land- David S]
scape seems out of OTi
focus, it is because
there has been a fun- VOI0
damental shift in the
topography of American civic life.
You might even call it a tremor, if
not an earthquake, rumbling
through the nation as a result of
this 21st-century development:
More blue-collar workers today
identify themselves as Republi-
cans than as Democrats.
"This is a significant change,
upending all of history from the
Roosevelt years on," says William
Leuchtenburg, the University of
North Carolina emeritus histo-
rian who, with more than half a
dozen books on FDR to his credit,
may be the leading expert on the
32nd president.
"The Great Depression was
blamed on Republicans, big
bankers and industrialists. At the
same time, Roosevelt managed
through his relief programs to
sustain millions of Americans.
The combination of those bound
workers to the Democrats."
That's why the new blue-collar
affinity for the Republicans is so
jarring, but it's based on com-
pelling Wall Street Journal-NBC
News survey data produced from
interviews of 8,000 people, with a
margin of error of a tiny 1.09 per-
cent. Its implications are stun-
ning, changing the way we look at
the parties and the way the par-
ties shape their messages, the
way they recruit congressional
and gubernatorial candidates,
the way they behave on Capitol
Hill and the way the 2012 cam-
paign is evolving.
Perhaps most startling of all:
Poll figures show that as many
Republicans as Democrats blame
Wall Street bankers for the na-
tion's economic crisis.
All this explains why the Re-
publican candidates, first in New
Hampshire and most recently in
South Carolina, have undertaken
a searing and searching critique


of capitalism, transforming all of
our established beliefs that led us
to assume that the Democrats
were the party of blue-collar
workers (and labor) and that the
Republicans were the party of
business (and capital).
The irony of this is that while
the move of blue-collar voters to-
ward the Republican Party began
with Richard Nixon,
who in 1968 cultivated
voters who fell under
the shorthand of
i ( "hard hats," and ac-
S' celebrated with Ronald
Reagan, who in 1980
deliberately sought
votes from workers
who became known as
hribman Reagan Democrats,
IER the real change in the
character of the Re-
CES publican Party may
have come during the
House speakership of Newt
Gingrich.
It was Gingrich who bid the
GOP to look beyond its usual pa-
trons on Wall Street and on the
Business Roundtable and who
tilled new political soil, creating
a profile for himself, if not for the
GOP, as being anti-government
but not pro-business.
With his ties to the information-
technology industries, which
themselves swept away old as-
sumptions of American com-
merce, and with a rhetoric of
revolution, which was anathema
to the stability-seeking zeitgeist of
big business, Gingrich plotted a
new path for Republicans. Just as
the new entrepreneurs showed
contempt for the staid, accommo-
dationist world of the old Fortune
500, Gingrich showed contempt
for the plodding, go-along attitude
of the old GOP, personified by
House Minority Leader Robert H.
Michel of Illinois, whom he toppled.
Thus Gingrich, with greater
affinity for the National Federa-
tion of Independent Business than
for the U.S. Chamber of Com-
merce, may be the true engine of
change in Washington and in the
broader modem political culture.
This change occurred roughly
during a period when the De-
mocrats, under the leadership of
House Majority Whip Tony
Coelho of California in the 1980s
and later under Bill Clinton in
the 1990s, began a groundbreak-
ing offensive to cultivate business
groups (and seek contributions
and support from commercial in-
terests). These groups once were
firmly in the GOP camp, so much
so that White House insiders, and
even the president himself, ex-
pressed surprise about the influ-
ence of the bond market on the
Clinton administration.


It was a small leap from Gin-
grich's positions in 1995 to his
blistering criticism this winter of
former Gov Mitt Romney of Mas-
sachusetts as a corporate viper
who put profits ahead of people,
just the sort of phrase that used
to tumble effortlessly from the
lips of politicians who opposed
Gingrich's party
Now, Barack Obama is putting
together a campaign effort that all
but writes off the greatest legacy
of a president he reveres, Franklin
Roosevelt. It is not so much Pres-
ident Obama's temperament that
veers him away from blue-color
voters as his reading of the polit-
ical landscape and perhaps his
political circumstances.
"We know that blue-collar
workers have been especially hard
hit and that definitely affects their
views," says Adam Seth Levine, a
Cornell political scientist "Even
in divided government, Ameri-
cans blame the president and his
party for the bad economy That
makes them more likely to iden-
tify as Republicans."
As a result, Obama is assem-
bling a coalition that doesn't de-
pend on the voters that were the
mainstays of the presidential
coalitions of Roosevelt, Truman,
Kennedy, Johnson, Carter and
even Clinton though it is telling
that each president in that string
was less committed to the old for-
mula than was his predecessor
Political coalitions change over
time, rendering them almost un-
recognizable from century to cen-
tury The 19th-century Democrats,
with strong religious-conservative
elements, opposed many principles
now associated with the party, es-
pecially a strong central government
and civil rights. The Republicans,
with a strong elitist and reformist
tint, advocated a strong federal
government and openness to rights
for newly emancipated slaves.
Now the parties seem to be
etching new profiles.
The old chestnut of Leuchten-
burg's lectures, that you always
could count on blue-collar work-
ers to be Democrats, is no longer
true, just as the reason for that
iron rule of politics the vast
mass of unionized voters in auto
plants steel and textile mills -
has faded. Parties in and out of
office campaign for change, but
the biggest change of all some-
times comes within the parties
themselves. That's the biggest
story of Campaign 2012 thus far
--In--
David M. Shribman is executive
editor of the Pittsburgh
Post-Gazette. He can be reached
at dshribman@post-gazette.com
or 412-263-1890.


_ LETTERS > to the Editor


Too much debt
President Obama has re-
quested another $1.2 trillion of
debt increase. This will be
added to the existing debt of just
over $15 trillion. All that is
needed to stop this increase is
for the senators to vote the in-
crease down.
The House of Representatives
has already stated that it will
take up the vote within the 15
days allowed by law. With a Re-
publican controlled House, the
increase will be defeated. All
that is needed is for the Senate
to vote to deny the increase.
Sen. Harry Reid has said he


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in Chroni-
cle editorials are the opinions of
the newspaper's editorial board.
All letters must be signed and
include a phone number and
hometown.
Letters must be no longer than
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limited to three letters per month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
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352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

will not even bring this issue up
to be voted by the Senate, assur-
ing the president get the $1.2
trillion increase. This is because
no Democratic senator wants to


be on record for increasing the
debt
What can you do to have a say
in this debt increase?? Call Sen.
Nelson's office at 202-224-5274 or
407-872-7161 and demand that
the Senate take a vote on the in-
crease. If no action is taken by
the Senate, our national debt
will be over $16,000,000,000,000
dollars by the end of 2012.
If you have grandchildren, you
should care, for this is their debt
to pay!
Make a difference one
phone call at a time.
Floyd Ford
Crystal River


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


1 ATE OF THE UNI


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Public radio agenda Triple-dipping
I just wanted to say that Editor: Did you see
I don't agree with the pub- where Mr. Browning, the
lisher on the public radio. I Florida election chief, is re-
don't want a nickel of my signing his position so he
money going to public can return from Tallahas-
radio. Public radio and TV see to visit his family? One
always have an agenda. option of future employ-
They can't just report the ment he is considering
news. I don't want none of would be a Pasco County
my tax money. superintendent. If
We've got enough 0 | elected, he would
communications OUND have a salary of
out there without F $134,400. Oh,
my taxes paying and he previously
for a radio station retired from
that has an Pasco's election
agenda I don't post, taking a
like. lump sum pay-
Yes but. CL ment of
Yes, but... CA $427,000 plus a
Regarding the 5Q6 057Q retirement pen-
"Be of service" in 5U6 "v0 I7 sion of $87,000 a
the Sound Off this year. If he was
morning (Jan. 12). I'd like elected, he would receive
to respond. I hope that it about $221,000. His wife
was taken out of context, is currently employed as a
in that when they say, nurse in the school sys-
"Those unemployed who tem. Thousands are doing
are sitting at home feeling the same thing. You can
sorry for themselves," is see why we're laying off
not really what they meant teachers, police and fire-
to say. Most of the unem- fighters. If elected, Mr.
played in Citrus County are Browning, counting the five
looking for jobs and are not years of state employ-
feeling sorry for them- ment, would be eligible to
selves. If you check the join the triple-dippers in
Chronicle classified, you'll this state.
see that there's not much Why not buy?
in employment. But that nt
being said, to visit the I was just wondering.
nursing homes would not I've lived here all my life
only bring a smile to those and I was wondering why
people's faces, but it might the school board did not
even help with the depres- buy the property across
sion that many of the un- from the high school
employed are going where the Baptist church
through. is. That would have made
No pain, no gains a nice middle school and
look at the gas they would
Retirees are complaining have saved driving all over
in letters and Sound Offs the place, and all the
that the payroll tax cut will schools would be together.
jeopardize their hard- Still, isn't there enough
earned funds. President land to build a middle
Reagan almost doubled the school by the high school?
tax in 1983. It began in Maybe even if it's two sto-
1937 at 1 percent, then 2, ries? Someone's not look-
3 and 4. Most retired now ing ahead. They could
worked before 1983 and have used that for govern-
paid the lower tax. The job ment buildings the mid-
deficit is harder on the die school, that is, and
fund's solvency than the wouldn't have the traffic
tax cut and the best quick problem.
fix is to raise or eliminate Minimum too little
the cap so the high earners
pitch in. I'm calling in reference
Can't you count? to the "Lazy Americans."
Here I'm reading the New
I read in the Chronicle York Post about the Kings
about the guy that got Bridge Armory, where they
upset about the woman want to rebuild it and
that had too many items in make it into a rental com-
the quick checkout lane for plex. But the congressman
10 items or less. I can re- in the Bronx is complain-
late to him really bad. I'm ing that $7.25, the mini-
tired of these people com- mum wage, was worthless
ing in over here to the nor- and it's not worth it.
mal checkout lanes with Meanwhile you're putting
two or three items and people to work, but their
blocking our aisle. And if congressman's saying it's
we go over, if somebody not worth it to work $7.25
has 10 or more items over an hour. See? Americans
in the 10 or less, they get are lazy.
mad at them and start Squat from Scott
counting their stuff. I do Squat from Scott
the same thing. I see where our wonder-
No trauma center ful governor who touts so
many jobs is laying off an-
This is for Citrus Memo- other bunch of people. All
rial hospital. I'd like to he's done is take away
know why we don't have a jobs. He hasn't added any-
trauma center here in Cit- thing. Come on, people,
rus Memorial hospital. wake up.
When you get into a bad The laws of motion
accident around here, they
fly everybody down to The people who usually
Tampa General. Now some celebrate by shooting a
people can't travel that far gun, they usually shoot
to see their relatives or straight up in the air. But
their loved ones. Why can't remember, what goes up
we have a trauma center must come down some-
out here in Citrus Memorial where. If you're going to
hospital? shoot, get blanks.


USPS pro
A few days ago
something and i
shipped by the p
tracked the pad
read that it was
to be delivered J
package arrived
mosassa Springs
around 9:45 a.m
of 4:10 p.m., the
has not been del
tried calling the
I got a recording
post office hours
to 4:15 p.m., their
connected.
I can see why
fices are going b
hours and 15 mi
hours and no on
swer a phone.
December of 1
my wife sent out
to our grandkids
sent two-day exi
took 10 days for
ceive it We aske
of our money ba
can guess what
told.


Missing
Some time ago
a suggestion tha
all save the post
mailing our pay]
stead of paying a
In October 201
fiva.- in TPhrf4 TMTa


)blems Liberal logic
o, I ordered Liberals and progres-
t was being sives believe in big govern-
post office. I ment that should provide
kage and for the needy so they do not
supposed have to. They firmly be-
Jan. 11. The lieve the ends justify the
at the Ho- means of achieving their
s post office goals.
. Jan. 11. As What are the dangers of
package such an idea? The means
livered. I can ignore ethics, tradi-
post office. tional moral values and
that the honesty as long as the goal
s are 9 a.m. can be attained. This is
n I was dis- why they do not subscribe
to traditional moral values
the post of- and why their arguments
roke 6 make little or no sense to
nutes! Nice the average person.
e can an- The media are part of
the liberal establishment
ast year, and do not want to be held
t a package to any moral standards
s. It was themselves. Therefore,
press. It they excuse liberal lies by
them to re- saying this is all part of
*d for some politics. Other liberal
ck, and you groups are the academics,
we were union leaders and enter-
tainers, who make up the
majority of the Democratic
Jake Little Party.
Homosassa This is why the major
priorities of the Demo-
mail cratic Party are homosex-
o there was ual rights/marriage, the
t we could separation of church and
office by state and abortion. These
ments in- issues violate traditional
online. moral values by condoning
10, a rela- sexually immoral lifestyles,
[0 h ra- de-emphasizing moral val-


Live inP rui M iviayi llct
some financial problems
and for three successive
weeks, I mailed her a
check. Checks 1 and 3
never arrived, nor was
there ever any attempt
made to cash them. Check 2
arrived in March 2011 with
no explanation of its
whereabouts or any dam-
age to the envelope.
All envelopes had my re-
turn address, but none
were ever returned.
Since I now have no faith
in timely delivery of the
mail, I will continue to pay
online whenever possible
and not risk late fees or los-
ing electric power due to
non-payment. Also I go far
out of my way to deposit di-
rectly into her account at
the nearest branch of her
bank.


Jeanne Kirkman
Inverness


PLEASE JOIN US FOR THE



CITRUS COUNTY

CATTLE BARONS BALL


HEART OF A COWBOY

AN FEBRUARY 11, 2012 6 11 PM
Citrus Springs Community Center
1570 W. Citrus Springs Blvd.

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ice Co-chairs: Steve Lo rt and Dianne Brashear
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e
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49


ues and the termination of
viable unborn life.
Example of ends justify-
ing the means:
President Obama
claimed the green industry
would create thousands of
jobs. So his stimulus plan,
which nobody had time to
read, allocated millions of
taxpayer dollars to green
industries. The thankful
green industry executives
were more than willing to
kick back hundreds of
thousands of dollars to the
president's campaign fund.
This is referred to as quid
pro quo.
As we all know now, the
executives and board of di-
rectors did very well while
the companies failed to de-
velop competitive products
and therefore went out of
business, leaving any in-
vestors and all employees
holding the bag.
The real goal was to beef
up his campaign war chest,
with taxpayer money for
his run for president in
2012, not to create thou-
sands of green jobs like he
said. The investors and
laid-off employees were
simply collateral damage of
reaching his goal. This is
liberal logic and it is
played out over and over
again by the liberals.
Don Holcomb
Inverness


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Follow the instructions
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Letters must be no
longer than 350 words,
and writers will be lim-
ited to three letters per
month.

Vet benefit
It has been decades since
our government ended the
draft and Americans had
the option of whether or
not to join the military, not
knowing that one day our
politicians would vote on
giving an advantage to vet-
erans and a disadvantage
to non-vets in their search
for employment. It's too
bad you didn't have a crys-
tal ball so you could have
known this day was coming
and it is also too bad for
you Americans who were
classified 4-E
In my opinion, this vote to
give employers a tax break
for hiring vets should have
been done when the draft
ended and consideration
should be given to Ameri-
cans who through no fault
of their own were deemed
unfit for military service.
Richard DePuma
Inverness


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Letters to THE EDITOR


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OPINION


FRIDAY, JANUARY 27, 2012 All


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NATION


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Ablaze Captors move hostage after rescue


GARY BARBER/The Dallas Morning
News
Firefighters try to put out
an early morning fire Thurs-
day at Selwyn College
Preparatory School in Den-
ton, Texas. The main build-
ing on the 90-acre campus
suffered heavy damage in
the blaze, which started
about 6:30 a.m. David
Biles, chairman of the
board at Selwyn, said the
building that was de-
stroyed was used for
kindergarten through third
grade and the administra-
tive offices.


Pentagon to
shrink military
WASHINGTON -The
Pentagon outlined a plan
Thursday for slowing the
growth of military spending,
including cutting the size of
the Army and Marine Corps,
retiring older planes and trim-
ming war costs. It drew quick
criticism from Republicans,
signaling the difficulty of scal-
ing back defense budgets in
an election year.
The changes Defense Sec-
retary Leon Panetta de-
scribed at a news conference
are many but hardly dramatic.
They aim to save money by
delaying some big-ticket
weapons like a next-genera-
tion nuclear-armed subma-
rine, but the basic shape and
structure of the military re-
mains the same.
The Army would shrink
from a peak of 570,000 to
490,000 within five years, and
the Marines would drop by
20,000, to 182,000. Those
are considerable declines,
but both services will still be
slightly larger than on 9/11,
before they began a decade
of war. Both will keep their
footholds abroad, although
the Army will decrease its
presence in Europe and the
Marines plan to increase
theirs in Asia.
Panetta said the adminis-
tration will ask Congress for
$525 billion to run the Penta-
gon in 2013 --$6 billion less
than the current budget.

World BRIEF

Displeased


Associated Press
Lawmakers from the leftist
Palikot's Movement cover
their faces with masks
Thursday as they protest
against ACTA, or the Anti-
Counterfeiting Trade Agree-
ment, during a parliament
session, in Warsaw,
Poland, after the Polish
government signed the
agreement.


Copyrigh
draws pi
WARSAW, Pc
Poland on Thurs
an international(
agreement, spai
demonstrations
users who have
days over fear it
online censorship
After the sign
ers rallied in the
of Poznan and L
makers for the IE
likot's Movemen
in parliament to,
dissatisfaction io
Counterfeiting T
ment, or ACTA.


t treaty
protests
)land -
sday signed
copyright
king more


Associated Press
MOGADISHU, Somalia-
Pirates moved an American
hostage at least three times
in 24 hours and threatened
Thursday to kill him after
U.S. Navy SEALs rescued
an American and a Dane in
a bold, dark-of-night raid
that raises questions about
whether other Western cap-
tives are now in greater
danger
"If they try again, we will
all die together," warned
Hassan Abdi, a Somali pi-


rate connected to the gang
holding the American, who
was kidnapped Saturday in
northern Somalia.
"It's difficult to hold U.S.
hostages, because it's a
game of chance: die or get
huge money But we shall
stick with our plans and will
never release him until we
get a ransom," Abdi said.
U.S. Navy SEALs para-
chuted into Somalia early
Wednesday and hiked to
where captors were holding
32-year-old American Jes-
sica Buchanan and Poul


Hagen Thisted, a 60-year-
old Dane. A shootout en-
sued and nine captors were
killed. Buchanan, Thisted
and the U.S. troops were all
unharmed. The two aid
workers had been kid-
napped by gunmen in Octo-
ber while working on
demining projects for the
Danish Refugee Council.
Buchanan and Thisted
were flown to the U.S. Naval
Air Base at Sigonella on the
Italian island of Sicily to un-
dergo medical screenings
and other evaluations be-
fore heading home, a U.S.
defense official said.
Buchanan's family was
meeting her at the base,
which is the hub of U.S.
Navy air operations in the
Mediterranean.
The U.S. government said


the raid was prompted by
Buchanan's deteriorating
health. An ailing French-
woman kidnapped by So-
mali gunmen died in
captivity last year after not
having access to her
medication.
In the aftermath of
Wednesday's rescue, the
gang holding the American
kidnapped in the northern
town of Galkayo have moved
him three times, Abdi said.
"Holding hostages in one
place is unlikely now be-
cause we are the next tar-
get," he told The Associated
Press by telephone.
He also expressed con-
cern that the U.S. has pirate
informants.
"It wasn't just a hit-and-
run operation, but long
planned with the help of in-


Associated Press
People take part in a rally Monday against hydraulic fracturing of natural gas wells at the Legislative Office
Building in Albany, N.Y. About 600 people registered to lobby lawmakers Monday on various bills related to the
technology known as crackingg." Many are pushing a bill that would ban cracking, which stimulates gas pro-
duction by using chemically treated water to fracture shale. Others are supporting a bill putting a moratorium
on shale gas development.

No energy industry backing for controversial term crackingg'


Associated Press
NEW YORK A dif-
ferent kind of F-word is
stirring a linguistic and
political debate as con-
troversial as what it
defines.
The word is crackingg"
- as in hydraulic fractur-
ing, a technique long used
by the oil and gas indus-
try to free oil and gas
from rock.
It's not in the diction-
ary, the industry hates it,
and President Barack
Obama didn't use it in his
State of the Union speech
- even as he praised fed-
eral subsidies for it.
The word sounds nasty,
and environmental advo-
cates have been able to
use it to generate opposi-
tion and revulsion to
what they say is a nasty
process that threatens
water supplies.
"It obviously calls to
mind other less socially
polite terms, and folks
have been able to take ad-


vantage of that," said Kate
Sinding, a senior attorney
at the Natural Resources
Defense Council who
works on drilling issues.
One of the chants at an
anti-drilling rally in Al-
bany earlier this month
was "No cracking way!"
Industry executives
argue that the word is de-
liberately misspelled by
environmental activists
and that it has become a
slur that should not be
used by media outlets
that strive for objectivity.
"It's a co-opted word
and a co-opted spelling
used to make it look as of-
fensive as people can try
to make it look," said
Michael Kehs, vice presi-
dent for Strategic Affairs
at Chesapeake Energy, the
nation's second-largest
natural gas producer
To the surviving hu-
mans of the sci-fi TV
series "Battlestar Galac-
tica," it has nothing to do
with oil and gas. It is used
as a substitute for the


very down-to-Earth curse
word.
Michael Weiss, a pro-
fessor of linguistics at
Cornell University, says
the word originated as
simple industry jargon,
but has taken on a nega-
tive meaning over time -
much like the word "silly"
once meant "holy"
But "frack" also hap-
pens to sound like
"smack" and "whack,"
with more violent
connotations.
"When you hear the
word crackingg,' what
lights up your brain is the
profanity," says Deborah
Mitchell, who teaches
marketing at the Univer-
sity of Wisconsin's School
of Business. "Negative
things come to mind."
In hydraulic fracturing,
millions of gallons of
water, sand and chemi-
cals are pumped into
wells to break up under-
ground rock formations
and create escape routes
for the oil and gas. By


doing so, drillers have un-
locked natural gas de-
posits across the East,
South and Midwest that
are large enough to sup-
ply the U.S. for decades.
Natural gas prices have
dipped to decade-low lev-
els, reducing customer
bills and prompting man-
ufacturers who depend
on the fuel to expand op-
erations in the U.S.
Environmentalists
worry that the fluid could
leak into water supplies
from cracked casings in
wells. They are also con-
cerned that wastewater
from the process could
contaminate water sup-
plies if not properly
treated or disposed of.
And they worry the
method allows too much
methane, the main com-
ponent of natural gas and
an extraordinarily potent
greenhouse gas, to escape.
Some want to ban
the practice altogether,
while others want tighter
regulations.


London's unemployed strive to get Olympic jobs


Associated Press


by Internet LONDON The pay isn't great, the
protested for job is temporary and you could be a
will lead to target for terrorists. But when Mabel
ip. Cross heard that she might be able to
ing, protest- work at the 2012 Summer Olympics,
Polish cities she rushed to get to a London re-
.ublin. Law- cruitment center early
eft-win Pa- Immaculate in a navy suit and pink
i -wingshirt, Cross painstakingly filled out
t wore masks forms Thursday in hopes she could be
show their part of a vast new Olympic workforce.
ver the Anti- The recruitment effort at a school just
rade Agree- outside the Olympic stadium in East
London is the most visible signal yet
-From wire reports that organizers are ready to stop


building arenas and start delivering
sports events.
"I wish I could be successful," the
52-year-old said in a voice just above
a whisper "I would be so interested
to work for the Olympics."
Some 10,000 security guards are
needed and organizers have already
received three times that number in
applications from around the country.
The guards will work alongside British
police and the military to deliver a ro-
bust and expensive security op-
eration involving about 23,700 people.
Planners are also moving to final-
ize security, ticketing and transport
plans despite a series of setbacks that


have pushed costs higher
"We're switching from planning stuff
to really doing it," said organizing com-
mittee chief executive Paul Deighton.
While Britain's total cost for the
event remains at $14.6 billion, audi-
tors say there's little wiggle room for
the unexpected. The budget for the
games is "finely balanced," with less
than 0.4 percent of the total left to
cover unforeseen expenses, the Na-
tional Audit Office has said.
If anything unexpected and expen-
sive happens, Olympic officials will
have to ask British taxpayers, already
struggling in tough economic times,
for more money.


Somali pirates transport

American captive three times

after SEAL raid frees two


to a letter sent to Tehran by
Ashton in October


siders among us," Abdi said,
noting that the Americans
struck at a time when the pi-
rates were least on their
guard.
U.S. State Department
spokesman Victoria Nuland
said U.S. officials have been
in contact with the family of
the latest American kidnap-
ping victim.
"We are also working with
our contacts in Kenya and in
Somalia to try to get more
information," Nuland told
reporters in Washington.
"Obviously we condemn
kidnapping of any kind and
call for the immediate re-
lease of the victims any
victims. We also would note
that our travel warning for
Somalia does caution U.S.
citizens about the risk of
travel."



Iran


ready to


return to


nuclear


talks
Associated Press
TEHRAN, Iran Iran is
ready to revive talks with
the U.S. and other world
President
Mahmoud
Ahmadine-
jad said
Thursday,
but sug-
gested that
Tehran's
Mahmoud foes will
Ahmadinejad have to
make compromises to
prevent negotiations from
again collapsing in
stalemate.
Iran's insistence that it
will never give up uranium
enrichment the process
that makes material for re-
actors as well as weapons -
scuttled negotiations a year
ago and still looms as a po-
tential deal breaker even as
tougher Western sanctions
target Iran's critical oil
exports.
Ahmadinejad added his
voice to proposals by Iranian
officials to return to talks
Thursday at a rally in the
southeastern city of Kerman,
saying a nation that is in the
"right" should not be wor-
ried about holding dialogue.
Iran indicated earlier this
week that it was ready for a
new round of talks with the
five permanent U.N. Secu-
rity Council members plus
Germany. Ahmadinejad -
the highest-ranking official
so far to make the offer -
gave no further details
about a potential timetable
or venue.
The European Union's
foreign policy chief Cather-
ine Ashton had welcomed
the proposals to restart talks
- possibly in Turkey but
urged Tehran to bring
"some concrete issues to
talk about"
"It is very important that
it is not just about words. A
meeting is not an excuse, a
meeting is an opportunity
and I hope that they will
seize it," she said Monday in
Brussels as the 27-nation
bloc adopted its toughest
measures yet on Iran with
an oil embargo and freeze of
the country's central bank
assets.
That followed U.S. action
also aimed at limiting Iran's
ability to sell oil, which ac-
counts for 80 percent of its
foreign revenue.
In the past, Iran has an-
gered Western officials by
appearing to buy time
through opening talks and
weighing proposals even
while pressing ahead with
its nuclear program.
Britain's Foreign Office
said that the six world pow-
ers were awaiting a response


One loaded word











SPORTS


Tiger Woods
shoots solid round
on opening day of
Dubai event./B5


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


0 Youth recreation/B2
0 College basketball/B3, B4
0 NBA, NASCAR/B3
0 NHL; TV, lottery/B4
0 Golf, racing/B5
0 Baseball/B5
0 NFL/B6
0 Entertainment/B8


Hurricanes survive Tavares in shootout


Citrus moves on to District 3A-6 title

game after 4-2 victory on penalty kicks


JOE KORNECKI III
Correspondent

LEESBURG- The Citrus Hur-
ricanes boys soccer team kept its
season alive Thursday night by
winning a suspense-filled thriller
over the fourth-seeded Tavares
Bulldogs 1-1 (3-1 in penalty kicks)


to advance to Friday night's Dis-
trict 3A-6 championship game
against Leesburg.
The victory secured a spot for
the 'Canes (17-2-1) in the regional
playoffs, but a victory Friday over
the Yellow Jackets in Leesburg
would earn Citrus a home game
Tuesday


"You got to give it to Tavares,"
Citrus head coach David As-
sumpcao said. "We played the
best of the best and so did they. It
was neck-to-neck there
were chances every- --
body was nervous. I
told our players to
chill, and to do like
we did in practice and
the last goal was icing on
the cake."
The 'Canes nearly fell behind
in the second minute of the game,
but senior goalkeeper Kris Malz


came up with a big save to keep
the game scoreless. Malz had
nine key saves on the evening.
Citrus would threaten in the
Bulldogs' (7-11-2) zone in
.- the first half, but the
Hurricanes couldn't
get many shots on
goal.
For Tavares, it was
the same the team got
into the 'Canes' zone, but couldn't
muster any great scoring chances.

See Page B4


Bucs find captain


Tampa Bay

plucks Schiano

from Rutgers

Associated Press
TAMPA The Buccaneers
are counting on Greg Schiano to
lead them back to respectability
and transform Tampa Bay into
consistent winners much in
the same way he made Rutgers
matter again.
The 45-year-old former Scarlet
Knights coach was hired Thurs-
day, more than three weeks after
the Bucs fired Raheem Morris
following a 4-12 finish.
The team scheduled a press
conference for Friday to intro-
duce Schiano, who inherits a
team that allowed the most
points in the NFL this season.
"Coach Schiano is a bright,
meticulous teacher who knows
how to get the most out of his
players," general manager Mark
Dominik said. "He built and ran
a pro-style program at Rutgers,
and he's a defensive-minded
coach whose teams have always
been characterized by toughness
and a physical style of play"
Schiano was at Rutgers for 11
seasons, taking them from col-
lege football laughingstocks to a
program that has had winning
records in six of the last seven
years. He was an assistant coach
in the NFL with Chicago from
1996-98.
The Scarlet Knights ap-
pointed offensive line coach
Kyle Flood as interim head
coach while the school searches
for Schiano's replacement.
The Bucs fired Morris on Jan.
2 after Tampa Bay lost 10
straight to end the season, most
of them by double-digit margins.
The collapse following a promis-
ing 4-2 start came only a year
after the NFL's youngest team
went 10-6 and narrowly missed
the playoffs.
The Glazer family that owns
the team interviewed at least 10
candidates for the opening, in-
cluding Oregon's Chip Kelly, who
was offered the position before
turning it down earlier this week.
The Bucs also talked to former
NFL head coaches Mike Sher-
man, Brad Childress and Marty
Schottenheimer; Carolina Pan-
thers offensive coordinator Rob
Chudzinski; Tennessee Titans
defensive coordinator Jerry
Gray; Cincinnati Bengals defen-
sive coordinator Mike Zimmer;
Green Bay quarterbacks coach
Tom Clements and former Pack-
ers offensive coordinator Joe


Associated Press
The Tampa Bay Buccaneers announced the hiring of Rutgers coach Greg Schiano to become the team's
next leader. The 46-year-old Schiano has been with the Scarlet Knights for 11 seasons, taking them from
college football laughingstock to a program that has had winning records in six of the last seven years.


Philbin, who accepted the head
coaching opening with the
Miami Dolphins.
An 11th known candidate, ex-
Dallas Cowboys coach and cur-
rent Houston defensive
coordinator Wade Phillips, can-
celed a scheduled interview
with the Bucs that would have
taken place while the Texans
were in the playoffs.


Bucs co-chairman Joel Glazer
said the club was thrilled to en-
trust the team's rebuilding proj-
ect to Schiano.
"During our thorough search,
we met with numerous impres-
sive candidates, but coach Schi-
ano surely distinguished
himself," Glazer said. "From his
leadership skills to his consider-
able track record, he is, simply


put, the right man for the job."
It's not the first exhaustive
search the Glazers have con-
ducted for a coach.
The Bucs pursued Steve
Spurrier before hiring Tony
Dungy in 1996, then tried to lure
Bill Parcells and Steve Mariucci
to Tampa Bay before trading two


Page B4


District 3A-6 boys
soccer championship
* Who: No. 1 Citrus vs.
No. 2 Leesburg.
* When: 7 p.m. Friday.
* Where: Leesburg High School.
* What's at stake: Both teams
have already clinched a spot in
the regional playoffs on Tuesday.
The winner will be crowned dis-
trict champion and get to host at
least one regional playoff game.




Final


public


farewell

12,000 fill arena

to remember

Joe Paterno

Associated Press
STATE COLLEGE, Pa. -
The near-capacity crowd of
12,000 seemed to be just wait-
ing for somebody to bring up
the subject. Finally, when
someone rose in Joe Paterno's
defense to argue that he had
been made a scapegoat, the
audience was instantly on its
feet, applaud-
ously
Anger and
resentment
came spilling
out at a cam-
pus memorial
service
Thursday for Phil Knight
the football Nike founder
coach two Nike founder
coach, two unhappy with
months after Penn State.
he was sum-
marily fired by the trustees.
It was Nike founder and
CEO Phil Knight who broke
the dam, defending Paterno's
handling of child-sex allega-
tions that were leveled against
a former coaching assistant.
"If there is a villain in this
tragedy, it lies in that investi-
gation and not in Joe Pa-
terno's response," Knight
said. Paterno's widow, Sue,
was among those rising to
their feet
Later, Paterno's son Jay re-
ceived a standing ovation
when he declared: "Joe Pa-
terno left this world with a
clear conscience."
Capping three days of
mourning on campus, the 2
1/2-hour ceremony was filled
with lavish praise that proba-
bly would have embarrassed
Paterno, who died Sunday of
lung cancer at 85 after racking
up more wins 409 than
any other major-college foot-
ball coach and leading his
team to two national champi-
onships in 46 seasons.
One by one, Penn State foot-
ball stars and others credited
Paterno with building not just
better athletes but better men
and women. He was saluted
for his commitment to sports-
manship, loyalty, teamwork,
character, academics and
"winning with honor" He was
called a good father, a good
husband, a good neighbor, a
good friend, a good teacher.
Players from each decade
See Page B4


Nadal downs Federer in epic Aussie Open semifinal


Associated Press
MELBOURNE, Australia -
Only the trophy and the tears
were missing from this latest
Grand Slam installment of Rafa
vs. Roger.
Rafael Nadal and Roger Fed-
erer were on opposite sides of the
net Thursday, meeting in the
semifinals of the Australian
Open.
And Nadal was the winner
again for the eighth time in
their 10 Grand Slam matchups.
The Spaniard won 6-7 (5), 6-2, 7-
6 (5), 6-4, covering the baseline
with incredible speed and hitting
forehand winners from almost


impossible angles.
He applauded as Federer
started to leave the stadium, then
ran back onto the court, dropping
onto his haunches and pumping
his arms in triumph. All that,
three days before the final.
Defending champion and No.
1-ranked Novak Djokovic will
take on Andy Murray on Friday
for a spot against Nadal in Sun-
day's final.
Maria Sharapova is chasing
her fourth major title, and the No.
1 ranking, when she meets third-
seeded Victoria Azarenka in the
women's final on Saturday
Sharapova beat No. 2 Petra
Kvitova 6-2, 3-6, 6-4 to avenge her


loss to the 21-year-old Czech in
the Wimbledon final last year.
Azarenka beat defending cham-
pion Kim Clijsters 6-4, 1-6, 6-3.
The latest Grand Slam meeting
between Nadal and Federer -
who've won 26 majors between
them was a semifinal worthy of
a final.
Nadal didn't excuse his

See Page B3
Rafael Nadal hits the ball to the
crowd after defeating Roger Fed-
erer during their men's singles
semifinal at the Australian Open
Thursday in Melbourne, Australia.
Associated Press















ADULT LEAGUE SPORTS






GE T


CITRUS COUNTY'S RECREATIONAL GUIDE TO YOUTH SPORTS








HITTING THE LINKS OUTDOORS ,


IN THE


GAME"


Fishing clinic coming soon

Special to the Chronicle I M U a


Teaching children a lifelong
hobby, appreciation for marine
environment and a fun family out-
ing are the objectives for the Kids
Fishing Clinic.
The Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission (FWC)
and Citrus County Parks and
Recreation (CCPR) will present a
free Kids Fishing Clinic for pre-
registered children between the
ages of 5 and 15 on Saturday, Feb.
25 at 9 a.m., 10 a.m., 11 a.m., noon,
and 1 p.m. The clinic will be held
at the Fort Island Trail Park.
Because space is limited, pre-
registration is required by calling
Citrus County Parks and Recre-
ation at 352-527-7540 or visiting
www.citruscountyparks.com.
This free clinic enables young
people to learn the basics of envi-
ronmental stewardship, fishing
ethics, angling skills and safety. In
addition, environmental displays
will provide participants with a
unique chance to experience
Florida's marine life firsthand.
The main objective is to create
responsible marine resource
stewards by teaching children
about the vulnerability of


Special to the Chronicle
Participants from the 2011 Kids Fishing Clinic are pictured. The eighth annual clinic is set to cast off at Fort Island Trail Park in Crystal River on
Feb. 25. Space is limited, so sign up as soon as possible.


Florida's marine ecosystems. be accompanied by an adult.
This event is a catch-and-release The Nature Coast Volunteers
activity, and all participants must will be onsite with food and


drinks for purchase. event or volunteer at the clinic
Individuals or companies inter- should call Citrus County Parks
ested in helping sponsor this and Recreation at 352-527-7540.


Recreation BRIEFS


FEBRUARY
JA Pirate Bowl
is Feb. 4
Participants are still welcome
for the Junior Achievement Pi-
rate Bowl, slated for Saturday,
Feb. 4, at Manatee Lanes,
7715 Gulf-to-Lake Highway,
Crystal River.
Bowling begins at noon. For
more information about partici-
pating and getting pledges, call
Jon Epps at 813-631-1410,
ext. 237.
5k race to help
Covenant
An upcoming 5K race/1 mile
walk/Kids' Fun Run to benefit
the nonprofit Covenant Chil-
dren's Home in Dunnellon will
be Saturday, Feb. 11, at Spruce
Creek Preserve Community,
State Road 200, Marion County.
Registration is at 7 a.m.; run
at 8 a.m.; and walk at 8:30 a.m.
Pre-registration is $20; $25 the
day of the race. Register at
www.cchfl.org or www.
drcsports.com.
All pre-registered runners and
walkers are guaranteed a T-shirt
and gift bag. Awards will be pre-
sented to the top finishers in
each age group. All participants
in the Kids' Fun Run will receive
a participation medallion.
For more information, call
Dee Winey at 352-861-4502, or
email cbwiney@yahoo.com.
Men's flag football
needs players
Men's Spring Flag Football
is scheduled to start in the last
week of February. This is a 7-
on-7 league for players who
are 18 and older. The league
is semi-competitive and plays
at Homosassa Area Recre-
ational Park.
Sign-ups will be Feb. 6 to 10
at the Citrus County Resource
Center. Game times are 6:30,
7:30 and 8:30 p.m. The league
plays two 20-minute halves
with a running clock. The last
two minutes of each half are
regular clock.
There is a $50 registration
fee required to sign a team up.
Team fees are based on the
number of entries per league
and are divided up equally
among teams.
For more information, call
Jennifer Worthington at 352-
527-7547. If you are a single
player wanting to play, call for
help finding a team.
Get those roundball
rosters ready
Men's Spring Basketball is
scheduled to start in the last
week of February. This is de-
signed for players 18 and
older. The league is highly


competitive and plays at local
indoor school gymnasiums in
Citrus County.
Each team may roster up to
15 players. Game times are 6,
7 and 8 p.m. The league plays
two 20-minute halves with a
running clock. The last two
minutes of each half are
regular clock.
Signups will Feb. 6 through
10 at the Citrus County Re-
source Center. There is a $50
registration fee that is required
to sign a team up. Team fees
are based on the number of en-
tries per league and are divided
up equally among teams.
For more information, call
Jennifer Worthington at 352-
527-7547. If you are a single
player interested in playing, call
for help finding a team.
Men's softball
to start soon
Men's Spring Softball is
scheduled to start Monday,
Feb. 20.
This is an 18 and older
league that plays on Monday
and Wednesday nights at Bi-
centennial Park.
Game times are 6:30, 7:30
and 8:30 p.m. Teams can ros-
ter up to 25 players. Registra-
tion will be Jan. 30 through
Feb. 3 at the Citrus County Re-
source Center. There is a $50
registration fee required to
sign up.
Team fees are based on the
number of entries per league
and are equally divided up. For
more information, call Jennifer
Worthington at 352-527-7547. If
you are a single player wanting
to play, call for help finding a
team.
Coed kickball
begins Feb. 22
Citrus County Parks & Recre-
ation kicks off the spring coed
kickball league Wednesday,
Feb. 22. The competitive league
is designed for players 18 and
older who have the "young at
heart" spirit of kickball.
The league shows up to play
in retro socks, shorts and sport-
ing team shirts, accompanied
with protective eyewear, on
Wednesday nights. Game
times are 6:30, 7:30 and 8:30
p.m. Each team fields 11 play-
ers with a minimum of three
women. Teams can roster up
to 25 people.
Signups will be Jan. 30
through Feb. 3 at the Citrus
County Resource Center.
There is a $50 registration fee
required to sign a team up.
Team fees are based on the
number of entries per league
and are divided up equally
among teams.
For more information, call


Jennifer Worthington at 352-
527-7547. If you are a single
player wanting to play, call for
help finding a team.
Parks & Rec to host
coed softball
Coed Spring softball hosted
by Citrus County Parks &
Recreation will begin Feb. 22.
The league is designed for lev-
els of all play; however, with
the popularity of the sport con-
tinuing to grow, if there are
enough teams there will be di-
visions set up for the spring
season.
The league plays on Tues-
day and Thursday nights at
Bicentennial Park with games
at 6:30, 7:30 and 8:30 p.m.
Each team is required to have
a minimum of four women
each game. Each team may
roster up to 25 participants.
Signups will be Jan. 30
through Feb. 3 at the Citrus
County Resource Center.
There is a $50 registration
fee required to sign a team up.
Team fees are based on the
number of entries per league
and are divided up equally
among teams. For more infor-
mation, call Jennifer Worthing-
ton at 352-527-7547. If you are
a single player wanting to play,
call for help finding a team.
GOLF
Relay "Fore" Life
golf tourney
Eagle Buick of Homosassa
will present the Relay "Fore"
Life Celebrity Golf Tournament
Saturday, Feb. 18, at Juliette
Falls Golf Course. Shotgun
start is at 9 a.m.
Entry is $75, which includes
range balls and lunch. The tour-
ney is a four-person team
scramble format. Prizes will be
closest to the pin on par 3's and
longest drive. There will be a
silent auction and door prizes.
Hole sponsorships available
for $100, silver; $250, gold; and
$500, platinum.
Deadline to sign up is Friday,
Feb. 10.
Proceeds will benefit Team
Hope Crystal River Relay For
Life. For more information or to
register, email Nick.Maltese@
pgnmail.com or call 352-464-
7511, or email
Michele.Snellings@pgnmail.com
or call 352-697-2220.
ONGOING
Park offers tennis lessons
Whispering Pines Park offers
tennis lessons with Lindsay Ro-
driquez. Pre-registration and
pre-payment are required at the
park office.
Fee for lessons is $100 for
four hours, or $30 per hour.


Times are arranged with the
instructor.
Call 352-726-3913 for regis-
tration and information. Whis-
pering Pines also offers
racquetball lessons. Call for in-
formation.
Tai chi classes at
Whispering Pines
Tai chi class is offered at
Whispering Pines Park Recre-
ation Building. The class is 10
to 11 a.m. Cost is $20 for four
weeks with instructor Dave
Meredith. Gentle stretching pro-
vides participants with the abil-
ity to gain balance, strength
and flexibility.
All classes require preregis-
tration and payment at the park
office; the class requires at
least five participants. Call 352-
726-3913 for information or visit
www.inverness-fl.gov (Recre-
ation & Leisure- classes).
Zumba Gold
at rec center
The public is welcome to
Zumba Gold exercise classes
at the Beverly Hills Recreation
Center, 77 Civic Circle, Beverly
Hills, every Tuesday and Thurs-
day at 3 p.m.
Zumba Gold is an innova-
tive, fun and exciting program
for the active senior adult, true
beginner and people who are
new to exercising.


Classes are free for mem-
bers of the association; non-
members pay $3 per class.
Registration not necessary.
For more information, call the
office at 352-746-4882 from
8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday
to Friday. Bring a sweat towel
and water and wear comfort-
able clothing and tennis shoes.
Learn to stretch
with Parks & Rec
Citrus County Parks & Recre-
ation offers a new low-impact
stretching class. This on-going
class will be from 10 to 11 a.m.
at Citrus Springs Community
Center. Cost is $5 per class.
The low-impact class is
easy, fun with good benefits.
Stretching helps to make you
more flexible and regular
stretching will help mobility and
balance. This helps to slow
down the onset of common de-
generative conditions, such as
osteoarthritis. Stretching in-
creases physical and mental
relaxation and reduces the risk
of joint sprain, muscle strain or
back problems. Low-impact ex-
ercises can improve health and
fitness without harming weight-
bearing joints. Research sug-
gests that moderate-intensity,
low-impact activity is just as ef-
fective as high-impact activity
in lowering the risk of heart
disease.


For more information, visit
www.citruscountyparks.com
and click on instructional
classes, or call 352-465-7007.
Jazzercise at
community center
Citrus County Parks & Recre-
ation will offer Jazzercise at
West Citrus Community Center.
The 60-minute class includes a
warm-up, high-energy aerobic
routines, muscle toning and
cool-down stretch segment.
One-hour classes are offered
at 5:30 p.m. Monday, Tues-
days and Thursdays. Unlimited
monthly ticket is $25.
Call 352-465-7007 or visit
www.citruscountyparks.com.
Zumba at
Citrus Springs
Citrus County Parks &
Recreation offers Zumba
classes with instructor Lynn
DaSilva at Citrus Springs Com-
munity Center. Zumba is a fit-
ness program designed with
exciting Latin and international
dance rhythms. No member-
ship or contracts.
Ongoing classes are: 11:30
a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Monday;
6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Tuesday;
and 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Thurs-
days. Cost is $5.
For more information, visit
www.citruscountyparks.com or
call 352-465-7007.


Local boys play All-American game in 'Big D'


Special to the Chronicle
Citrus County residents Aiden Weber, left, and Brycen Kersh both traveled to Arlington,
Texas to compete in the Offense-Defense Youth All-American Bowl in the 7-9 age group
over the Christmas break. Weber and Kersh got to visit and play in Cowboys Stadium,
the $1.3 billion home of the NFL's Dallas Cowboys.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



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Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
N.Y Rangers 47 31 12 4 66132 96
Philadelphia 48 2914 5 63162 142
Pittsburgh 49 2817 4 60152 127
New Jersey 48 2619 3 55129 136
N.Y Islanders 48 1922 7 45115 143
Northeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Boston 47 31 14 2 64171 102
Ottawa 52 2719 6 60157 160
Toronto 49 2519 5 55151 147
Montreal 49 1921 9 47130 134
Buffalo 49 2024 5 45119 149
Southeast Division
GP W L OT PtsGF GA
Washington 48 2619 3 55136 137
Florida 48 2215 11 55122 136
Winnipeg 50 2222 6 50124 143
TampaBay 48 2123 4 46136 165
Carolina 51 1824 9 45130 159
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT PtsGF GA
Detroit 50 3316 1 67160 117
St. Louis 49 2913 7 65124 102
Nashville 50 3016 4 64140 127
Chicago 50 2915 6 64162 144
Columbus 49 1330 6 32115 163
Northwest Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Vancouver 49 3015 4 64158 122
Minnesota 49 2418 7 55115 126
Colorado 51 2623 2 54131 144
Calgary 50 2321 6 52120 137
Edmonton 49 1826 5 41122 142
Pacific Division
GP W L OT PtsGF GA
San Jose 47 2714 6 60131 110
LosAngeles 50 2416 10 58111 111
Dallas 48 2521 2 52126 136
Phoenix 50 2220 8 52130 134
Anaheim 48 1823 7 43124 144
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over-
time loss.
Wednesday's Games
Montreal 7, Detroit 2
Thursday's Games
No games scheduled
Friday's Games
No games scheduled
Saturday's Games
No games scheduled
2012 All-Stars Teams
Teams selected Thursday from the NHL All-
Star player draft (with player, position and team;
x-last pick):
TEAM CHARA
Captain: Zdeno Chara, D, Boston.
Assistant Captain: Joffrey Lupul, F, Toronto.
Draft: 1. Pavel Datsyuk, F, Detroit; 2. Tim
Thomas, G, Boston; 3. Evgeni Malkin, F, Pitts-
burgh; 4. Marian Hossa, F, Chicago; 5. Kimmo
Timonen, D, Philadelphia; 6. Corey Perry, F,
Anaheim; 7. Carey Price, G, Montreal; 8. Phil
Kessel, F, Toronto; 9. Ryan Suter, D, Nashville;
10. Jimmy Howard, G, Detroit.
11. Brian Campbell, D, Florida; 12. Patrick
Kane, F, Chicago; 13. Dion Phaneuf, D, Toronto;
14. Jarome Iginla, F, Calgary; 15. Dennis Wide-
man, D, Washington; 16. Marian Gaborik, F,
New York Rangers; 17. Jordan Eberle, F, Ed-
monton; 18. Tyler Seguin, F, Boston; 19. Jamie
Benn, F, Dallas.
TEAM ALFREDSSON
Captain: Daniel Alfredsson, F, Ottawa.
Assistant Captain: Henrik Lundqvist, G, New
York Rangers.
Draft: 1. Erik Karlsson, D, Ottawa; 2. Jason
Spezza, F, Ottawa; 3. Claude Giroux, F,
Philadelphia; 4. Jonathan Quick, G, Los Ange-
les; 5. Kris Letang, D, Pittsburgh; 6. Steven
Stamkos, F, Tampa Bay; 7. Brian Elliott, G, St.
Louis; 8. Shea Weber, D, Nashville; 9. Daniel
Sedin, F, Vancouver; 10. Dan Girardi, D, New
York Rangers.
11. Keith Yandle, D, Phoenix; 12. Milan
Michalek, F, Ottawa; 13. Henrik Sedin, F, Van-
couver; 14. James Neal, F, Pittsburgh; 15. Alex
Edler, D, Vancouver; 16. John Tavares, F, New
York Islanders; 17. Scott Hartnell, F, Philadel-
phia; 18. Jason Pominville, F, Buffalo; 19. x-
Logan Couture, F, San Jose.



NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
Philadelphia 12 6 .667 -
Boston 8 9 .471 3V2
NewYork 7 11 .389 5
New Jersey 6 13 .316 6V2
Toronto 6 13 .316 612
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 13 5 .722 -
Atlanta 13 6 .684 Y2
Orlando 12 6 .667 1
Washington 3 15 .167 10
Charlotte 3 16 .158 10Y2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Chicago 16 4 .800 -
Indiana 12 5 .706 212
Milwaukee 7 10 .412 712
Cleveland 7 10 .412 712
Detroit 4 15 .211 1112
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 12 7 .632 -
Memphis 10 7 .588 1
Dallas 11 8 .579 1
Houston 10 8 .556 1/2
NewOrleans 3 15 .167 812
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 15 3 .833
Denver 13 5 .722 2
Utah 10 6 .625 4
Portland 11 8 .579 412
Minnesota 8 10 .444 7
Pacific Division
W L Pet GB
L.A. Clippers 9 6 .600 -
L.A. Lakers 11 8 .579
Phoenix 6 11 .353 4
Golden State 6 11 .353 4
Sacramento 6 13 .316 5
Wednesday's Games
Cleveland 91, NewYork 81
Washington 92, Charlotte 75
New Jersey 97, Philadelphia 90, OT
Miami 101, Detroit 98
Indiana 95, Chicago 90
Milwaukee 105, Houston 99
Oklahoma City 101, New Orleans 91
Minnesota 105, Dallas 90
San Antonio 105, Atlanta 83
Toronto 111, Utah 106,20T
Denver 122, Sacramento 93
Golden State 101, Portland 93


L.A. Lakers 96, L.A. Clippers 91
Thursday's Games
Boston 91, Orlando 83
Memphis at L.A. Clippers, late
Friday's Games
Charlotte at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Indiana at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
New Jersey at Cleveland, 7:30 p.m.
Atlanta at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Milwaukee at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Washington at Houston, 8 p.m.
Orlando at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
San Antonio at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
New York at Miami, 8 p.m.
Utah at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Toronto at Denver, 9 p.m.
Phoenix at Portland, 10p.m.
Oklahoma City at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.
Saturday's Games
Washington at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Detroit at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
New York at Houston, 8p.m.
L.A. Lakers at Milwaukee, 8:30 p.m.
Memphis at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
Sacramento at Utah, 9 p.m.


NASCAR wants to

reduce two-car

drafting this year

Associated Press

CHARLOTTE, N.C. Since the sys-
tem isn't broken, NASCAR officials
have no plans to change it at least
nothing radical.
The sport enjoyed one of its most
exciting seasons ever last year, culmi-
nating with Tony Stewart winning his
third Sprint Cup championship in the
last race of the season. NASCAR
Chairman and CEO Brian France said
the sport is "in a very good place" as it
moves toward another season begin-
ning next month with the Daytona 500.
But France also believes it can be
even better.
So while NASCAR will pretty much
leave well enough alone, they will
make a few minor tweaks including
taking some measures to address re-
ducing two-car tandem racing at Day-
tona and Talladega.
"We have had a breathtaking num-
ber of close finishes at those tracks,
but the fans want a mixture of styles
including a return to a more tradi-
tional 'pack racing' and that close



Magic fall


hard to Celtic.


Orlando can't hold

2 7-point lead

Associated Press

ORLANDO Paul Pierce had
points and 10 assists, and E'Twa
Moore added 16 points to help t
Boston Celtics erase a 27-point defi
and beat the Orlando Magic for the s
ond time this week, 91-83 on Thursc
night.
Pierce and Moore had 10 points ea
in the fourth quarter.
Dwight Howard led the Magic with
points and 16 rebounds. Orlando had
11-point lead entering the fourth quari
but shot 2 of 17 in the final 12 minutes
The Celtics have won marks thi
straight for just the second time t]
season. It also was their fourth cons
utive victory over the Magic, dating
last season.


side-by-side competition that's unique
to Talladega and Daytona," France
said Thursday at NASCAR's annual
preseason press conference.
"NASCAR and the teams are working
hard on this and based on the test ear-
lier this month, we're encouraged that
we're making progress."
France said the two-car tandem rac-
ing "evolved into something that no
one saw coming, and now we're going
to deal with that"
NASCAR's vice president of compe-
tition Robin Pemberton said some
changes will be made to the cars in-
cluding adding a slightly larger re-
strictor plate, a smaller spoiler and
softer springs.
Those changes will be made begin-
ning at Daytona next month.
'"All of these combinations will help
the qualifying be more exciting," said
Pemberton. "... The changes we made
in the cooling system and the aero
package we believe will aid in getting
back to the more traditional style
pack drafting that we've come to ex-
pect at Daytona and Talladega."
Pemberton also said NASCAR will
be implementing some similar ad-
justments to the Nationwide and the
Camping World Truck Series.
"We know that the fans want to see
more of the traditional style pack
drafting, and so do we," said Pember-
ton. "We won't be able to totally elim-


TENNIS
Continued from Page B

S celebration, but explained it
letting off steam.
"It's a fantastic victory for m
Very, very happy playing agair
the greatest of the history
semifinals, big match on Ro
Laver (court)," he said. "It's on
of the victories that's going to st
in my mind forever It's a fanta
tic way to start the season. Ve
24 happy for everything."
un Apart from the 11 consecuti
the points Federer lost after a 1
cit minute delay near the end of t
ec- second set while the Austral
lay Day fireworks display was
progress the match was tighi
ach contested.
Nadal has labored with i
16 juries since losing the U.S. Ope
an final, and he'd talked about ha
ter, ing time off next month to let h
3. sore shoulder heal. On the eve
'ee the tournament, he hurt his kn
his while he sat in a chair at his hol
ec- -and thought for a while that]
to wouldn't be able to play at t]
Australian Open. He has play


SPORTS


inate the two car push. It will b
valuable tool that the teams will
able to use from time to time. H(
ever, we do believe that we've co
up with a rules package that will h
it be the exception rather than
norm."
Pemberton said test results at D
tona earlier this month w
productive.
"We've received great feedb.
from the teams, and it was unpre
dented, it really was," said Pemb
ton. "The communication was secc
to none."
While the 2012 season will be c
of continuity rather than ma
change, NASCAR will introduce el
tronic fuel injection into the Spi
Cup Series.
"EFI excites the manufacture
and technology companies," s
France. "To attract new companies
the sport), we've had to take a li
different view of that"
France said NASCAR is "very
courage" by increased television:
ings across its three national seri
the Sprint Cup, Nationwide o
Camping World Truck series.
He also pointed to attendance ga
at a number of venues.
"While we are still in a tough e
nomic climate that is still difficult,
are pleased with some positive st
we saw last year," he said.

with his right knee heaN
strapped, but has still won
straight matches.
B The 10th Grand Slam meet
between Nadal and Fede
as equaled the record for individ
major matchups since the O1
ae. era began in 1968. Ivan Le
ist beat John McEnroe in seven
in their 10 meetings. Nadal n
od leads Federer 8-2.
ne Federer said it feels like Na
ay plays his best tennis against h
as- Last time the pair met in A
ry tralia, Nadal won the 2009 fi
in five sets. He had to cons
ve Federer as he sobbed during
10- trophy presentation.
he "For me it didn't feel any
lia ferent, you know, a finals o
in semis against Rafa," Fede
tly said of Thursday's match. "It's
ways an occasion ... Yeah, it v
n- the same."
en It was easier to handle walk
av- off the court immediate
4is though, and not having his ei
of tions broadcast to millions
ee people.
tel "It's nicer," Federer said.
he prefer to walk off this way tl
he having to go through the trol
ed ceremony after losing."


FRIDAY, JANUARY 27, 2012 B3


No. 14 UF needs rally to beat Ole Miss


No. 7 UNC easily

defeats NC State

Associated Press

OXFORD, Miss. Patric Young
scored 15 points, Kenny Boynton
added 12 and No. 14 Florida rallied
from a double-digit first-half deficit
to beat Mississippi 64-60 on
Thursday night
Florida (16-4, 4-1 Southeastern
Conference) fell behind 20-4 in the
opening minutes and trailed 38-28
at halftime. But the Gators worked
their way back thanks to lockdown
defense and clutch 3-pointers from
Boynton and Mike Rosario.
Young was 7 of 10 from the field
despite playing on with tendinitis
in his right ankle. Erving Walker
had 10 points and nine assists.
Terrance Henry had 21 points for
Mississippi (13-7, 3-3), while Nick
Williams added 14. The Rebels shot
60.9 percent from the field in the
first half, hitting all six of their 3-
point attempts. They couldn't du-
plicate that success in the second
half, making just 8 of 29 (27.6 per-
cent) from the field.
Ole Miss got the pace it wanted


from the very beginning, forcing
Florida into a half-court, physical
game. That negated the Gators'
one major strength superior
guard play and they struggled to
find open 3-point looks for much of
the game.
The Rebels went on a 14-0 run to
take a 20-4 lead in the first 8 min-
utes before settling for the 10-point
halftime lead. They made 14 of 23
shots from the field in the first half,
and had an uncharacteristic good
touch from long range. Williams hit
four of the team's six 3-pointers,
knocking the Gators on their heels.
Ole Miss came into the game as
the worst 3-point shooting team in
the SEC, making just 27.2 percent
But Florida slowly climbed back
into the game in the second half be-
hind Young and some well-timed 3-
pointers, including Scottie
Wilbekin's with 10:11 remaining that
tied the game at 46. Young's dunk
gave the Gators a 48-46 lead their
first since the opening minutes.
The Gators have won six of their
past seven games.
No. 7 North Carolina 74,
North Carolina State 55
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. Tyler Zeller
had 21 points and a career-best 17 re-
bounds to help No. 7 North Carolina


Associated Press
Florida guard Erving Walker trips as Mississippi forward Murphy Holloway
tries to steal the ball in the second half Thursday. No. 14 Florida won 64-60.


beat North Carolina State 74-55.
Reggie Bullock added 11 points in his
first career start for the Tar Heels (17-3,
4-1 Atlantic Coast Conference), who
had no trouble winning their 11th
straight against their longtime rivals.
While North Carolina State (15-6, 4-
2) was off to its best start in the confer-
ence league in six years under new
coach Mark Gottfried, the Tar Heels


ended up making this game look like al-
most every other in the four years since
the Wolfpack last beat them.
With its bigger front line dominating
inside, North Carolina shot 48 percent
and led by 31 points in the second half.
Scott Wood scored 11 points to lead
the Wolfpack, whose only real highlight
came when Lorenzo Brown banked in an
80-foot heave to beat the halftime horn.




Jenkins



ready to



move on


Ex-UFDB

trying to impress

at Senior Bowl

Associated Press

MOBILE, Ala. Janoris
Jenkins missed the steady
supply of athletic shoes and
the big crowds during his
ress one-season stop at Division
Press 11 North Alabama, but he
sion didn't miss the chance to
forge an NFL career
Jenkins was still invited
to the weeklong job fair
S known as the Senior Bowl,
where he'll compete for the
South team on Saturday
V It's a chance to work on
the future, but first he's
fielding questions about his
e a past that probably won't go
be away before the draft in
ow- April about a year after
)me Florida coach Will
elp Muschamp dismissed him
the from the team following
Jenkins' second drug arrest
lay- in three months and third of
ere his college career
"It humbled me down a
ack lot, seeing that I had went
;ce- from Florida, a Nike school
3er- getting three or four pairs of
ond cleats a year, to going to a
Division II football school
one where I'm getting just one
jor pair of cleats," Jenkins said.
lec- "It really humbled me as a
rint kid. The environment was
totally different as far as
rers 95,000-plus in the Swamp to
eaid 3,500 at North Alabama. It
was a big difference."
(to Some draft analysts still
ttle project Jenkins as a poten-
tial first-round pick in the
en- April draft Underclassmen
rat- Dre Kirkpatrick ofAlabama
es and Morris Claiborne of
and LSU might be hotter
prospects but they're not el-
ains igible for the Senior Bowl.
Now, Jenkins is hoping to
*co- follow in the footsteps of for-
we mer Florida State receiver
eps Preston Parker Parker, also
from south Florida, played
his final season at North Al-
abama after getting dis-
vily missed from the Seminoles
six following his third arrest
and is now in his second
ting season with the Tampa Bay
rer Buccaneers.


ual
pen
ndl
aof
tow

idal
im.
us-
nal
;ole
the

dif-
r a
rer
sal-
was

:ing
ely,
mo-
of

"I
han
phy


Associated Press
Texas A&M's Jeff Fuller can't
find the handle on a pass as
North Alabama's Janoris
Jenkins defends as the South
team practices Wednesday
for Saturday's Senior Bowl in
Mobile, Ala.


B I1~Li~p.q m~ 'L-~'h -. _


Associated F
Greg Biffle, right, and Ricky Stenhouse, Jr, left, climb from their cars after driving the new 2013 NASCAR Ford Fus
race car at a news conference Tuesday during the NASCAR Media Tour in Concord, N.C.





Drafting no more






B4 FRIDAY, JANUARY 27, 2012



Super Bowl records
INDIVIDUAL RECORDS
SCORING
Most Points, Career 48, Jerry Rice, San
Francisco-Oakland, 4 games.
Most Points, Game -18, Roger Craig, San
Francisco vs. Miami, 1985; Jerry Rice, San
Francisco vs. Denver, 1990 and vs. San Diego,
1995; Ricky Watters, San Francisco vs. San
Diego, 1995; Terrell Davis, Denver vs. Green
Bay, 1998.
Most Touchdowns, Career 8, Jerry Rice,
San Francisco-Oakland, 4 games.
Most Touchdowns, Game 3, Roger Craig,
San Francisco vs. Miami, 1985; Jerry Rice, San
Francisco vs. Denver 1990 and vs. San Diego,
1995; Ricky Watters, San Francisco vs. San
Diego, 1995; Terrell Davis, Denver vs. Green
Bay, 1998.
Most Points After Touchdown, Career- 13
Adam Vinatieri, New England-Indianapolis, (13
attempts, 5 games).
Most Points After Touchdown, Game 7,
Mike Cofer, San Francisco vs. Denver, 1990 (8
attempts); Lin Elliott, Dallas vs. Buffalo, 1993 (7
attempts); Doug Brien, San Francisco vs. San
Diego, 1995 (7 attempts).
Most Field Goals, Career 7, Adam
Vinatieri, New England-Indianapolis, (10 at-
tempts, 5 games).
Most Field Goals, Game 4, Don Chandler,
Green Bay vs. Oakland, 1968; Ray Wersching,
San Francisco vs. Cincinnati, 1982.
Longest Field Goal 54, Steve Christie, Buf-
falo vs. Dallas, 1994.
Most Safeties- 1, Dwight White, Pittsburgh
vs. Minnesota, 1975; Reggie Harrison, Pitts-
burgh vs. Dallas, 1976; Henry Waechter,
Chicago vs. New England, 1986; George Mar-
tin, New York vs. Denver, 1987; Bruce Smith,
Buffalo vs. New York, 1991.
RUSHING
Most Attempts, Career-101, Franco Har-
ris, Pittsburgh.
Most Attempts, Game 38, John Riggins,
Washington vs. Miami, 1983.
Most Yards Gained, Career 354, Franco
Harris, Pittsburgh, 4 games.
Most Yards Gained, Game -204, Tim Smith,
Washington vs. Denver, 1988.
Longest Gain 75, Willie Parker, Pittsburgh
vs. Seattle, 2006.
Most Touchdowns, Career 5, Emmitt
Smith, Dallas, 3 games.
Most Touchdowns, Game-3, Terrell Davis,
Denver vs. Green Bay, 1998.
PASSING
Most Attempts, Career 156, Tom Brady,
New England, 4 games.
Most Attempts, Game 58, Jim Kelly Buf-
falo vs. Washington, 1992.
Most Completions, Career 100, Tom
Brady, New England, 4 games.
Most Completions, Game 32, Tom Brady,
New England vs. Carolina, 2004; Drew Brees,
New Orleans vs. Indianapolis, 2010.
Highest Completion Percentage, Career
(minimum 40 attempts) -70.0 (56-of-80), Troy
Aikman, Dallas (3 games).
Highest Completion Percentage, Game -
88.0, Phil Simms, New York Giants vs. Denver,
1987.
Most Yards Gained, Career- 1,156, Kurt
Warner, St. Louis-Arizona, 3 games.
Most Yards Gained, Game 414, Kurt
Warner, St. Louis vs. Tennessee, 2000.
Most Touchdowns, Career 11, Joe Mon-
tana, San Francisco, 4 games.
Most Touchdowns, Game --6, Steve Young,
San Francisco vs. San Diego, 1995.
Most Had Intercepted, Career 8, John
Elway, Denver, 5 games.
Most Had Intercepted, Game 5, Rich Gan-
non, Oakland vs. Tampa Bay, 2003.
Longest Completion 85, Jake Delhomme
(to Muhsin Muhammad), Carolina vs. New Eng-
land, 2004.
RECEIVING
Most Receptions, Career 33, Jerry Rice,
San Francisco-Oakland, 4 games.
Most Receptions, Game 11, Dan Ross,
Cincinnati vs. San Francisco, 1982; Jerry Rice,
San Francisco vs. Cincinnati, 1989; Deion
Branch, New England vs. Philadelphia, 2005;
Wes Welker, New England vs. N.Y. Giants,
2008.
Most Yards, Career 589, Jerry Rice, San
Francisco-Oakland, 4 games.
Most Yards, Game 215, Jerry Rice, San
Francisco vs. Cincinnati, 1989.
Most Touchdowns, Career 8, Jerry Rice,
San Francisco-Oakland, 4 games.
Most Touchdowns, Game 3, Jerry Rice,
San Francisco vs. Denver, 1990.
Longest Reception 85, Muhsin Muham-
mad (from Jake Delhomme), Carolina vs. New
England, 2004.
FUMBLES
Most By, Career 5, Roger Staubach, Dal-


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


For the record


Florida LOTTERY

SCASH 3 (early)
2-1-3

1-2-4
PLAY 4 (early)
iA 0-8-8-9
RordaLtty PLAY 4 (late)
Here are the winning 5-2-3-9
numbers selected FANTASY 5
Thursday in the 9 -13 15 22 30
Florida Lottery:


On the AIRWAVES

TODAY'S TELEVISION SPORTS
WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
6:30 p.m. (FSNFL) Florida State at North Carolina State
8:30 p.m. (FSNFL) Duke at Clemson
NBA
8 p.m. (ESPN, SUN) New York Knicks at Miami Heat
BOXING
9 p.m. (ESPN2) Ruslan Provodnikov vs. David Torres
GOLF
6 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour: Abu Dhabi HSBC
Championship
3 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: Farmers Insurance Open
4 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour: Abu Dhabi HSBC
Championship
COLLEGE HOCKEY
7:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) Yale at Harvard
SOCCER
12 p.m. (FSNFL) English Premier League: Everton vs.
Blackburn Rovers (Taped)
TENNIS
3 a.m. (ESPN2) Australian Open Women's Final: Victoria
Azarenka vs. Maria Sharapova
TODAY'S RADIO SPORTS
7 p.m. (104.3 WYKE FM) Lecanto at Citrus

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


Prep CALENDAR

TODAY'S PREP SPORTS
BOYS SOCCER
District 3A-6 Tournament at Leesburg High School
7 p.m. No. 1 Citrus vs. No. 2 Leesburg
District 4A-4 Tournament at Booster Stadium in Ocala
7 p.m. No. 3 Lecanto vs. No. 1 Springstead
GIRLS BASKETBALL
7 p.m. Citrus at Dunnellon
7 p.m. Seven Rivers at Master's Academy
7:30 p.m. Crystal River at Weeki Wachee
BOYS BASKETBALL
7:30 p.m. Lecanto at Citrus
8:30 p.m. Seven Rivers at Master's Academy
GIRLS WEIGHTLIFTING
4 p.m. Lecanto at Weeki Wachee


las, 4 games.
Most By, Game-3, Roger Staubach, Dal-
las vs. Pittsburgh, 1976; Jim Kelly, Buffalo vs.
Washington, 1992; Frank Reich, Buffalo vs.
Dallas, 1993.
INTERCEPTIONS
Most By, Career 3, Chuck Howley, Dal-
las; Rod Martin, Oakland; Larry Brown, Dal-
las.
Most By, Game 3, Rod Martin, Oakland
vs. Philadelphia, 1981.
Longest Return 100, James Harrison,
Pittsburgh vs. Arizona, 2009.
TEAM GAME RECORDS
SCORING
Most Points 55, San Francisco vs. Den-
ver, 1990.
Fewest Points-3, Miami vs. Dallas, 1972.
Most Points, Both Teams 75, San Fran-
cisco (49), San Diego (26), 1995.
Fewest Points, Both Teams 21, Miami
(14), Washington (7), 1973.
Largest Margin of Victory 45 San


Francisco vs. Denver (55-10), 1990.
YARDS GAINED
Most Net Yards Gained 602, Washington
vs. Denver, 1988.
Fewest Net Yards Gained 119, Min-
nesota vs. Pittsburgh, 1975.
Most Rushing Yards 280, Washington vs.
Denver, 1988.
Fewest Rushing Yards 7, New England
vs. Chicago, 1986.
Most Passing Yards 407, St. Louis vs.
Tennessee, 2000.
Fewest Passing Yards 35, Denver vs.
Dallas, 1978.
FUMBLES
Most Fumbles Both Teams 12, Buffalo
(8) vs. Dallas (4), 1993.
Most Fumbles, One Team 8, Buffalo vs.
Dallas, 1993.
Most Fumbles Lost 5, Buffalo vs. Dallas,
1993.
INTERCEPTIONS
Most Interceptions By 5, Tampa Bay vs.
Oakland, 2003.


NHL picks All-Star teams


Associated Press

GATINEAU, Quebec -
Daniel Alfredsson stuck
close to home both his na-
tive Sweden and his
adopted home of Ottawa -
in making his selections in
the NHL All-Star draft on
Thursday night
His opposing team cap-
tain, defenseman Zdeno
Chara, took a more offensive
approach as the two rosters



CITRUS
Continued from Page B1

The game was tied 0-0 at
intermission.
The real drama started to
unfold early in the second
half.
Citrus sophomore Austin
Wilcoxon got behind the
Bulldogs' defense and put it
past the goalkeeper for a 1-0
advantage in the 42nd
minute.
Tavares, however, didn't
throw in the towel and tied
it at 1-1 in the 57th minute
when senior Thomas
Krueger assisted from mid-
field to junior Shamir Davis,
who sprinted past the Citrus
defenders and put the ball
in the back of the net
Citrus would have a cou-
ple of great chances to take
the lead later in the game,
but it couldn't put in the
game-winning goal. The
game was tied 1-1 at the end
of regulation, and both
teams went into overtime


NHL All-Star teams
See Page B3

- Team Alfredsson and
Team Chara -were formed.
They will face each other in
the skills competition on
Saturday and the All-Star
game on Sunday
Chara, the Boston Bruins
captain, earned the right to
pick first after winning the
"puck flip." Leaving two


with their seasons at stake.
In the first overtime, Cit-
rus' season was almost in
jeopardy in the fifth minute
when Bulldog Omar Leon's
header nearly went in when
the goalkeeper was out of
position, but senior de-
fender Ivan Espinoza
blocked the shot and saved
the season.
The Bulldogs had another
great chance, but Jose Sal-
dana's blast went just over
the goal and the first over-
time ended with the score
still tied.
In the second overtime,
Tavares goalkeeper Trevor
Lloyd made a great save to
keep the score tied off a Cit-
rus shot in the second
minute.
The Bulldogs didn't
mount much pressure in the
Citrus end in the second
overtime frame, and the
game went to penalty kicks
to decide the winner.
In the penalty-kick round,
Tavares delivered the first
blow when Saldana scored
to give the Bulldogs the 1-0


teammates on the board,
Chara went with Detroit Red
Wings forward Pavel Datsyuk
"I love the way he plays
the game," Chara said.
The hulking defenseman
also acknowledged he would
have considered picking an-
other Red Wings player,
Nicklas Lidstrom, had the
seven-time Norris Trophy
winner been an All-Star.
Lidstrom asked the NHL in
advance not to select him.


advantage.
'Canes senior midfielder
Connor Killen would tie it 1-
1 when he was successful on
his shot. The Bulldogs' next
attempt went over the goal,
but the 'Canes also missed
on their second attempt,
keeping the score even.
Tavares missed again on
its third attempt with an-
other shot that sailed over
the goal. The advantage
went back to the Citrus
when junior Austin Kileen
scored for a 2-1 lead.
The Bulldogs' next shot
sailed wide, setting up Es-
pinoza, who delivered as he
beat the Tavares goalkeeper
on a shot into the top left
corner for the game-winner
that put the whole Citrus
team into a state of jubila-
tion.
"I did all I could to stay in
the game," Espinoza said.
"The team was falling apart,
and I wanted to keep going.
I surprised the goalie to the
left side, and we were able
to live another day, and
hope for a win."


No. 1 Bears pound Sooners


Associated Press

NORMAN, Okla. Brit-
tney Griner had 18 points
and seven blocks, Odyssey
Sims and Terran Condrey
scored 14 points apiece and
top-ranked Baylor ran away
in the second half to beat
Oklahoma 89-58 on Thurs-
day night.
The Bears (20-0, 7-0 Big
12) barely escaped with a
one-point win in Norman
last season on their way to
the regular-season confer-
ence title but this time left
nothing in question.
No. 6 Kentucky 66,
Auburn 48
AUBURN, Ala. -A'dia Math-
ies scored 20 points and Ken-
tucky forced 30 turnovers in an
easy win over Auburn.
The Wildcats (19-2, 8-0
Southeastern Conference) took
control with a 33-10 run that
carried over into the second
half. Kentucky moved within
two wins of matching its best-
ever start, 21-2 in the 1982-83
season.
Meagan Conwright shot 5 for
6 and had 10 points, while
Samarie Walker had only six
points on 1-of-11 shooting but
grabbed 15 rebounds for the
Wildcats.
Virginia Tech 75,
No. 8 Maryland 69
COLLEGE PARK, Md. -
Monet Tellier tied a career high
with 31 points and fueled a late
charge that carried Virginia
Tech over Maryland.
Aerial Wilson added 15
points for the Hokies (7-14, 3-5
Atlantic Coast Conference),
who came in with a five-game
losing streak and had also
dropped six in a row against
Maryland. But Virgnia Tech
overcame 38 percent shooting
by forcing 20 turnovers.
Lynetta Kizer scored 21
points, Laurin Mincy had 19
and Tianna Hawkins added 18
for Maryland (18-3, 5-3).
No. 9 Ohio State 73,
Indiana 55
BLOOMINGTON, Ind. -
Samantha Prahalis had 18
points and nine assists to help
Ohio State beat Indiana.
Tayler Hill, the Big Ten's lead-
ing scorer, had all 18 of her
points in the second half, and
Ashley Adams had 15 points
and 12 rebounds for the Buck-
eyes (20-1, 7-1 Big Ten).
Ohio State, the conference's
highest-scoring team at nearly
79 points per game, trailed 26-
25 at halftime.
No. 10 Miami 64,
Wake Forest 39
CORAL GABLES Stefanie
Yderstrom and Riquna Williams
scored 14 points each to lead
Miami past Wake Forest.
Shenise Johnson added 10
points and 12 rebounds to help
the Hurricanes (18-3, 7-1 At-


PATERNO
Continued from Page BI

of Paterno's career spoke af-
fectionately about him, say-
ing he rode them hard but
always had their best inter-
ests at heart and encour-
aged them to complete their
educations and make some-
thing of themselves.
Though the Penn State
campus has been torn with
anger over the child-sex
scandal and Paterno's dis-
missal, Jay Paterno said his
father didn't hold a grudge.
"Perhaps his truest mo-



SCHIANO
Continued from Page B1

first-round draft picks, as
well as a pair of second-
rounders and $8 million cash
to the Oakland Raiders in ex-
change for the opportunity to
negotiate a contract with Jon
Gruden after the 2001 season.
Gruden led the Bucs to
their only Super Bowl title
the following season, but
Tampa Bay hasn't won a play-
off game since. The Glazers
fired him three weeks after


the Bucs lost the final four
games of 2008 to miss the
playoffs, and promoted Mor-
ris as his successor
Tampa Bay went 17-31
under Morris, who served as
his own defensive coordina-
tor The Bucs allowed a fran-
chise-record 494 points in
2011, including 31 of more in
seven of the last eight games.
In addition to fixing a de-
fense that's been rebuilt over
the past two drafts, getting


Associated Press
Baylor center Brittney Griner blocks a shot by Oklahoma's
Nicole Griffin during the second half Thursday in
Norman, Okla. Baylor won 89-58.


lantic Coast Conference) win
their 36th straight at home.
Secily Ray scored nine
points to lead Wake Forest
(12-8, 2-5).
No. 12 Wisconsin-GB 60,
Butler 36
INDIANAPOLIS Julie
Wojta scored 13 of her 15 points
in the first half to lead Wiscon-
sin-Green Bay over Butler.
Adrian Ritchie had 12 points
and seven rebounds, and Han-
nah Qulling scored eight points
for the Phoenix (18-0, 7-0 Hori-
zon League).
Green Bay continued its best
start in program history and re-
mained one of the two remain-
ing undefeated women's teams
in the country with top-ranked
Baylor.
No. 13 Purdue 80,
Northwestern 70
EVANSTON, Ill. Courtney
Moses scored a career-high 29
points and KK Houser added
21 to help Purdue beat North-
western for its 11th win in a row.
The Big Ten's only unbeaten
women's team, the Boilermak-
ers (18-3, 8-0) never trailed
after Houser's baseline 3-
pointer opened a 28-26 lead
with 6:20 left in the first half.
No. 15 Delaware 84,
Hofstra 66
NEWARK, Del. Elena
Delle Donne had 41 points and
15 rebounds to lead Delaware
over Hofstra in a meeting of the
top two teams in the Colonial
Athletic Association.
It was the third time this sea-
son Delle Donne crossed the
40-point mark.
With the score tied 55-all

ment, his living testimony to
all that he stood for, came in
the last months of his life.
Faced with obstacles and
challenges that would have
left a lesser man bitter, he
showed his truest spirit and
his truest self," Paterno
said.
Only one member of the
university administration -
the dean of the college of
liberal arts and no one
from the Board of Trustees
spoke at the memorial,
which was arranged prima-
rily by the Paterno family
Among the speakers were
Michael Robinson, who
played for Paterno from


young quarterback Josh
Freeman back on track will
be a priority this offseason.
Freeman threw for 25
touchdowns and just six in-
terceptions in 2010, his sec-
ond year in the league and
his first as a full-time starter
The 24-year-old passed for 16
TDs vs. 22 interceptions this
season.
The timing of the move
could put Rutgers in a bind
with national signing day less
than a week away This is a
pivotal time in the recruiting
process, with coaches lock-
ing up commitments from
high school prospects who
make those agreements offi-
cial by signing national let-
ters of intent starting
Wednesday
Schiano's contract with
Rutgers runs through 2016
and pays him around $2.35
million per year.
He played linebacker at
Bucknell, but never in the
NFL. His first big break in
coaching came at Penn State,
where Joe Paterno hired him


midway through the second
half, the Blue Hens (17-1, 8-0)
went on a 14-0 run to take con-
trol. Delle Donne, who leads
the nation in scoring, hit a deep
3-pointer that made it 65-55
with just over 8 minutes left.
No. 18 Penn State 77,
Michigan 56
ANN ARBOR, Mich. Mag-
gie Lucas had 23 points and
eight rebounds to lead Penn
State over Michigan.
Alex Bentley had 18 points
and eight assists, and Nikki
Greene added 13 points and 11
rebounds to help the Lady
Lions (16-4, 6-2 Big Ten) win
their fifth straight.
Sam Arnold scored 12
points, Nya Jordan had 10
points and 11 rebounds, and
Courtney Boylan also scored
10 for Michigan (16-5, 5-3),
which lost at home for the first
time this season.
Penn State never trailed and
led 35-19 at the break thanks to
a 13-0 run midway through the
first half. Greene scored nine
points during the spurt.
No. 19 Nebraska 60,
Iowa 53
LINCOLN, Neb. Jordan
Hooper recorded her Big Ten-
leading ninth double-double
with 22 points and 15 rebounds
to help Nebraska held off
Iowa's late comeback attempt.
Lindsey Moore added 15
points for the Cornhuskers (17-3,
6-2), who led 30-17 at the break
but went almost 11 minutes be-
tween field goals in the second
half, allowing Iowa to storm back
from a 13-point deficit with under
10 minutes to play

2002 to 2005, quarterback
Todd Blackledge from the
1980s and Jimmy Cefalo, a
star in the 1970s. All three
went on to play in the NFL.
Former NFL player
Charles V Pittman, speaking
for players from the 1960s,
called Paterno a lifelong in-
fluence and inspiration.
Pittman said Paterno
pushed his young players
hard, once bringing Pittman
to tears in his sophomore
year. He said he realized
later that the coach was not
trying to break his spirit but
instead was "bit by bit
building a habit of
excellence."


to coach defensive backs in
1991. He was at Penn State
through 1995, before being
hired by the Bears.
Because of his success at
Rutgers, there had often
been speculation for years
about Schiano possibly re-
placing Paterno when the
Hall of Famer was done
coaching. But when Penn
State was looking for a re-
placement after firing Pa-
terno amid a child sex-abuse
scandal involving one of his
former longtime assistants,
the school hired Patriots of-
fensive coordinator Bill
O'Brien.
Schiano has been courted
by several other colleges dur-
ing his time at Rutgers, most
notably Miami in 2006 and
Michigan in 2007.
"I've had several opportu-
nities over the years and
none of them felt right," Schi-
ano told The Star-Ledger of
Newark, N.J., as he left Rut-
gers' football facility Thurs-
day night "This time, this one
felt right"


SCOREBOARD






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Dalziel captures pole for 24-hour race at Daytona


Associated Press

DAYTONA BEACH -
Ryan Dalziel's qualifying
performance was somewhat
surprising.
He knew his car was fast,
but given that the team had
just two weeks to tune it and
then failed to turn a lap in the
first practice session because
of engine failure, sitting on
the pole was hardly expected.
Nonetheless, Dalziel
bested Max Angelelli, Chip
Ganassi's two-car power-
house team and IndyCar reg-


ular Ryan Hunter-Reay on
the road course at Daytona
International Speedway
Dalziel turned a fast lap of
1 minute, 41.119 seconds in
Thursday's qualifying ses-
sion. He will lead the field to
the green flag for the 50th
running of the around-the-
clock event The race begins
Saturday and ends Sunday
"To get the pole is very re-
warding, but it's a long race,"
said Dalziel, who drives for
Starworks Motorsport "The
pole doesn't mean too much.
It proves to us that we have a


fast car, but we already knew blew an engine in practice
we had a reliable car and and failed to make a qualify-
had a great crew." ing lap in the DP
Angelelli will be class.
on the outside pole. Hunter-Reay
Scott Dixon will start h '" qualified ninth after
third in one of landing a last-
Ganassi's two minute deal to drive
entries. another car for Star-
Ganassi's other works. It looked as if
car, the one driven Hunter-Reay, who
primarily by two- DRyan had been slated to
time defending se- drive with IndyCar
ries champions Scott on pole for regulars Tony
Pruett and Memo 24-hour race. Kanaan and E.J.
Rojas, will start near the Viso, would miss the event
back of the class. The car after funding fell through.


But team owner Peter
Baron asked Hunter-Reay
to step into another ride.
Andrew Davis topped
qualifying in the GT class,
edging Jeff Segal and
NASCAR rookie of the year
Andy Lally
The GT class could have as
many as 46 cars in the start-
ing lineup. The DP class is
considerably smaller at 14,
and Dalziel believes his team
can compete with anyone.
Dalziel gained confidence
last September when he and
teammate Enzo Potolicchio


won the Grand-Am finale in
Lexington, Ohio, giving Star-
works Motorsport its third
victory in seven seasons.
"Last year, we deserved to
get more results than we
did," Dalziel said. "I think
sometimes the underdogs
are not expected to beat the
powerhouse teams. But
what's happened with Star-
works the past four or five
months is we've tried to cre-
ate a powerhouse team. I
think we've hired all the
right people and put to-
gether an unbelievable car."


Tiger solid in Dubai Fielder ecstatic
Tmig soli in +it b D t t"*Ii


Two golfers co-lead

at Torrey Pines


Associated Press

ABU DHABI, United Arab Emirates
- No momentous shots for Tiger
Woods. No bogeys, either.
The 14-time major winner opened
his 2012 season with a solid first round
Thursday at the Abu Dhabi Golf
Championship, shooting a 2-under 70
that left him three strokes behind co-
leader Rory McIlroy, his playing
partner.
"Hit the ball well all day today. It
was a good ball-striking round," Woods
said. "I had a hard time reading the
greens out there. The greens were
pretty grainy and I just had a hard
time getting a feel for it. Toward the
end I hit some pretty good putts but
overall I got fooled a lot on my reads."
McIlroy shot a 67, as did Robert
Karlsson. But the best shots of the day
came from Sergio Garcia (71) and Jose
Manuel Lara (70) each had a hole-
in-one on the par-3 12th hole.
Gareth Maybin, Richard Finch and
Jean-Baptiste Gonnet were one shot
behind the two leaders. Top-ranked
Luke Donald, who played alongside
Woods and McIlroy, shot a 71. Second-
ranked Lee Westwood (72) and fourth-
ranked Martin Kaymer (77) had poor
starts and never challenged.
McIlroy, the U.S. Open champion
from Northern Ireland, had three
birdies on his first four holes but er-
ratic driving led to two bogeys on the
next four. He steadied himself with
three birdies on his back nine, includ-
ing a chip-in on No. 8 from just off the
green.
"It's a nice way to start the competi-
tive season, I suppose," McIlroy said.
"I didn't feel like I played that good. I
definitely didn't strike the ball as good
as I have been the last couple of
weeks. I think it's just because your
first competitive round of the season,
card in your hand, you can get a little
bit tentative or a little apprehensive."
Woods missed several birdie
chances, including a 6-footer on his
ninth, the 18th hole. He also struggled
with his approach shots on a course
that was playing tougher than usual
with its thick rough, resulting in many
25- and 30-footers coming up short.
McIlroy calls Woods a friend and
chatted with him much of the day He
said he didn't take any satisfaction in
beating him in the first round.
"If it was the last day of the tourna-
ment and you're both going in there
with a chance to win, I would take a lot
of pride from that, obviously," said
McIlroy, who as a teenager followed
Woods during a Dubai tournament
when he played as an amateur in 2006
and 2007.
"But the first day of a tournament is
a little different," McIlroy said.
"You're just going out there and play-
ing and seeing what you can do. But
hopefully I can get myself into position
where I do play with him on a Sunday
and see how I get on."


Associated Press
Tiger Woods reacts on the 18th hole during the first round of Abu Dhabi HSBC
Golf Championship on Thursday in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates.


Levin, Stanley open with 62s
to lead at Torrey Pines
SAN DIEGO Spencer Levin and Kyle
Stanley knew they had to post low scores
on the easier North Course at Torrey Pines
to get off to a good start Thursday in the
Farmers Insurance Open. It went even bet-
ter than they expected.
Stanley made eagle on his final hole for
a 10-under 62, his best score in two years
on the PGA Tour. Levin shot 29 on the
back nine and had a 62, matching his ca-
reer best on tour.
"I played the pro-am on the North
Course yesterday. There were just a lot of
birdie opportunities out there, so I knew
there was a good score maybe not 10
(under), but I'll take it," Stanley said.
They were a shot ahead of FedEx Cup
champion Bill Haas, who had a double
bogey on his 15th hole and still managed a
63. The top 12 on the leaderboard played
the North, which played slightly more than 3


1/2 strokes easier than the South Course,
which hosted the U.S. Open four years ago.
The best score from the South was Marc
Turnesa at 66.
Phil Mickelson, meanwhile, went south
on the South. The three-time champion
and San Diego favorite thought his game
was rounding into form when he came
home from the Humana Challenge. In-
stead, he hit into 11 bunkers, missed a 3-
foot birdie putt on the final hole and signed
for a 77. It was his highest score at Torrey
Pines since a 78 in the third round of 2005.
"Obviously, I made some bad swings
just in the wrong spot and so forth," Mickel-
son said. "I felt like my game was ready
heading in, and I don't know what to say
about the score. Because it was pathetic."
A year ago, the fairways were pinched in
and the rough was unusually high on the
North Course, helping to make up for the
604-yard difference between the two
courses.


R) ev II rIIUIL


Associated Press

DETROIT Prince
Fielder stood with a smile
and recalled his earliest
memories of old Tiger Sta-
dium, when he would hang
out at the ballpark where
his father hit so many mas-
sive home runs.
"For me, it was always
Sparky saying I was going to
pinch hit and I really be-
lieved him," Fielder said,
referring to former man-
ager Sparky Anderson. "I'm
just glad I get to come back."
The Tigers introduced
Fielder on Thursday after
finalizing a $214 million,
nine-year contract with
the free agent first base-
man, who is expected to
hit a lot more home runs
than his dad.
Fielder was born in 1984,
the last time Detroit won
the World Series. After lur-
ing him back to Michigan
with the fourth-largest deal
in baseball history, the
Tigers are hoping Fielder
will help usher in a new
championship era for the
Motor City
"This is awesome,"
Fielder said. "It's kind of a
dream come true. I'm
excited."
Detroit began seriously
pursuing Fielder after des-
ignated hitter Victor Mar-
tinez tore the anterior
cruciate ligament in his
left knee during offseason
conditioning. Now the
Tigers have three of base-
ball's biggest stars -
Fielder, Miguel Cabrera
and Justin Verlander all
in their primes. Detroit
won the AL Central by 15
games last year but lost to
Texas in the AL champi-
onship series.
"We're trying to win right
now," general manager


Dave Dombrowski said.
"We tried to win last year.
We were close. I think we've
reached a point now, on a
yearly basis, we feel that
way When you look at the
core of our group of players,
there's a lot of guys that are
on that field right now that
are quality players."
It will be up to manager
Jim Leyland to figure out
where to play all of his
powerful hitters. He said
Thursday the Tigers will
move Miguel Cabrera from
first base to third to make
room for Fielder. He also
listed a possible batting
order, with Cabrera hitting
third and Fielder fourth.
It's a lineup based on
power, not speed. That
much is clear.
"If they hit it where
they're supposed to hit 'em,
they can trot," Leyland
said. "We're going back to
the old-fashioned baseball.
We've got big-time power
on the corners."
Fielder's father, Cecil,
became a big league star
when he returned to the
majors from Japan and hit
51 home runs with Detroit
in 1990. Cecil played with
the Tigers into the 1996
season, and young Prince
made a name for himself
with his prodigious power
displays during batting
practice at Tiger Stadium.
Detroit plays at Comer-
ica Park now, and times
have changed. Leyland
manages the Tigers, not
Sparky Anderson.
As for the Fielders, their
strained relationship has
been well documented,
and Prince didn't elabo-
rate on it Thursday
"I'm just ecstatic about
being with the Tigers,"
Prince Fielder said. "I'm
just here to enjoy the day"


Associated Press
Prince Fielder sits next to his son Jadyn during his
introduction to the media after agreeing to a $214 million,
nine-year contract with the Detroit Tigers on Thursday at
Comerica Park in Detroit.


Thursday's GOLF SCORES


Abu Dhabi Golf Championship
Thursday
At Abu Dhabi Golf Club's National course, Abu
Dhabi, United Arab Emirates
Purse: $2.7 million
Yardage: 7,600, Par: 72
First Round
Robert Karlsson, Sweden 33-34 67
Rory Mcllroy, Norther Ireland 33-34 67
Gareth Maybin, Northern Ireland 32-36 68
Richard Finch, England 33-35 68
Jean-Baptiste Gonnet, France 34-34 68
Nicolas Colsaerts, Belgium 33-36 69
Robert Rock, England 36-33 69
Richie Ramsay, Scotland 36-33 69
Tiger Woods, United States 35-35 -70
Michael Hoey, Northern Ireland 37-33- 70
Jbe Kruger, South Africa 36-34 -70
Liang Wen-chong, China 35-35 -70
David Drysdale, Scotland 34-36 -70
Charl Schwartzel, South Africa 34-36 -70
Thorbjorn Olesen, Denmark 34-36 -70
Johan Edfors, Sweden 34-36 -70
Paul Lawrie, Scotland 33-37-70
Anthony Wall, England 33-37 -70
Jose Manuel Lara, Spain 36-34 -70
KJ Choi, South Korea 36-35 -71
Marcus Fraser, Australia 37-34 -71
Luke Donald, England 36-35 -71
Anders Hansen, Denmark 37-34 71
Colin Montgomerie, Scotland 35-36 -71
Raphael Jacquelin, France 35-36 -71
Oliver Fisher, England 36-35 -71
Joost Luiten, Netherlands 37-34 -71
Richard S. Johnson, Sweden 37-34 -71
Jamie Elson, England 36-35 -71
Alejandro Canizares, Spain 36-35 -71
Sergio Garcia, Spain 36-35 71
Padraig Harrington, Ireland 35-36 -71
George Coetzee, South Africa 37-34 -71
Keith Horne, South Africa 34-37 -71


Also
Lee Westwood, England
Miguel Angel Jimenez, Spain
Martin Kaymer, Germany


36-36 -72
36-36 -72
39-38 -77


Farmers Insurance Open
Thursday
At La Quinta, Calif.
s-Torrey Pines (South Course), 7,698 yards, par
72 (36-36), n-Torrey Pines (North Course), 7,094
yards, par 72 (36-36)
First Round
a-denotes amateur
Spencer Levin 33-29- 62 -10n
Kyle Stanley 32-30 62 -10n
Bill Haas 32-31 63 -9n
Rod Pampling 31-33 -64 -8n
Josh Teater 31-33- 64 -8n
John Huh 32-32 64 -8n
Vijay Singh 31-33- 64 -8n
Greg Chalmers 33-32 65 -7n
Justin Leonard 32-33- 65 -7n
Camilo Villegas 33-32 -65 -7n
Martin Flores 35-30 65 -7n
Sang-Moon Bae 33-32- 65 -7n
Pat Perez 33-33- 66 -6n
Dustin Johnson 32-34 -66 -6n
Marc Turnesa 34-32 -66 -6s
Colt Knost 34-32 -66 -6n
Chris Riley 35-32 67 -5n
Marco Dawson 33-34 67 -5s
Brandt Snedeker 33-34 67 -5s
Harris English 33-34 67 -5n
Alexandre Rocha 32-35- 67 -5n
Kevin Sutherland 32-35- 67 -5n
Arjun Atwal 34-33- 67 -5n
Cameron Tringale 33-34 -67 -5n
Danny Lee 34-33 67 -5n
Paul Goydos 35-33- 68 -4s
Gavin Coles 34-34 68 -4n
Rickie Fowler 35-33- 68 -4n


Cameron Beckman
James Driscoll
Andres Romero
Tim Herron
Chris DiMarco
Robert Allenby
Troy Kelly
Bio Kim
Nick O'Hern
Brandt Jobe
Bud Cauley
Jhonattan Vegas
Stewart Cink
Michael Bradley
Keegan Bradley
Bubba Watson
Seung-Yul Noh
Ryo Ishikawa
Billy Hurley III
Ricky Barnes
Steve Marino
Tom Pernice Jr.
Kevin Streelman
Nick Watney
Hunter Mahan
Edward Loar
Brendon de Jonge
D.A. Points
Aaron Baddeley
Gary Woodland
Roland Thatcher
Robert Garrigus
John Rollins
Tom Gillis
Brendon Todd
Jonas Blixt
Roberto Castro
Kevin Stadler
Duffy Waldorf
Chris Kirk
Scott Piercy
Ben Crane


Tommy Biershenk
Kyle Thompson
Miguel Angel Carballo
Bryce Molder
Trevor Immelman
Steve Wheatcroft
Jamie Lovemark
Boo Weekley
Justin Rose
Ernie Els
Stuart Appleby
Charley Hoffman
Marc Leishman
Charlie Wi
Erik Compton
a-Jay Hwang
Gary Christian
Will Claxton
Nathan Green
Geoff Ogilvy
Angel Cabrera
Chez Reavie
Charles Howell III
Sunghoon Kang
J.J. Killeen
Kyle Reifers
Cody Slover
Richard H. Lee
Russell Knox
David Mathis
John Mallinger
Brendan Steele
Briny Baird
Jarrod Lyle
Kevin Kisner
Mark D. Anderson
Charlie Beljan
Jimmy Walker
Graham DeLaet
Ryuji Imada
Derek Lamely
Patrick Sheehan


Kevin Chappell
Stephen Gangluff
William McGirt
Steven Bowditch
Scott McCarron
YE.Yang
John Merrick
Scott Brown
Ken Duke
Rocco Mediate
Bill Lunde
Chris Couch
Matt Every
Jason Kokrak
Ted Potter, Jr.
Brian Harman
Ryan Moore
Mathew Goggin
Blake Adams
Matthew Giles
Gregory Casagranda
Daniel Summerhays
J.J. Henry
Vaughn Taylor
Greg Owen
Paul Imondi
Troy Matteson
Scott Dunlap
Anthony Kim
Bo Van Pelt
Stephen Ames
Garth Mulroy
Bobby Gates
J.B. Holmes
Michael Thompson
Daniel Chopra
Phil Mickelson
Billy Mayfair
Neal Lancaster
PeterTomasulo
D.J. Trahan
David Hearn
Matt Bettencourt
Tommy Gainey


SPORTS


FRIDAY, JANUARY 27, 2012 B5





NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE


Cruz to face familiar pal


Pats' Ihedigbo

was UMass

teammate

Associated Press

EAST RUTHERFORD,
N.J. -Victor Cruz has had a
season full of improbable
moments, and the Super
Bowl is set to be another.
In less than six months,
the obscure second-year
wide receiver from the Uni-
versity of Massachusetts has
set a single-season receiving
record for the Giants and
become one of the most pop-
ular athletes in the New
York area.
He catches a pass, and the
crowd screams "Cruuuuuu-
uuuuzzzzzz!" When he
scores a touchdown, he
draws cheers with his cele-
bratory salsa. People even
mimic his dance moves in
the stands.
Now, when the Giants (12-
7) face the Patriots (15-3) in
the Super Bowl on Feb. 5,
Cruz will get a chance to
face New England safety
James Ihedigbo who
served as his recruiting host
when he visited UMass 4 1/2
years ago.
Ihedigbo exchanged text
messages with Cruz before
the Patriots defeated the
Baltimore Ravens 23-20 in
the AFC title game and New
York edged San Francisco
20-17 in overtime in the
NFC championship game,
Cruz said Thursday
"He goes: 'We're going to
win our game, so I'll see you
in Indy" I was like: 'I'll see
you in Indy,' and here we
are."
Cruz has fond memories
of his time at UMass.
"It was a tremendous
ride," he said. "We under-
stand how much of a small
school it is, and how little
guys get an opportunity to
come out of that school."
What Cruz has done with
his opportunity is beyond
belief. He missed most of


his rookie season with a
hamstring injury after mak-
ing the team as a free agent
- largely based on a three-
touchdown
performance Th
in a preseason T1
game against Yeah,
the Jets.
This year phenol
has been one
eye-opening player
play after an-
other, includ- James
ing five Patriots safety
touchdown v
passes of at
least 68 yards in length from
Eli Manning. His 1,536 yards
receiving are a single-season
team record, along with his
seven 100-yard games. His 82
catches in the regular season
are tied for the second high-
est total in team history
"That guy Yeah, he's a
phenomenal player,"
Ihedigbo said Thursday
"He really is. He's having a
terrific year. I've seen him
do it before back in the old
days in college and he's re-
ally a terrific player. He's
having a great year, great go-


to guy for Eli and Eli does a
good job getting him the
ball, not to mention the
handful of playmakers they
have across
the board on
at guy. that offense."
he's a The 25-year-
old is coming
menal into the title
game after
catching 10
passes for 142
Ihedigbo yards in New
y, about Giants York's win
NR Victor Cruz over the Nin-
ers in the rain.
He has never been more
confident.
After recently speaking to
another Paterson native -
Mike Adams of the Browns
Cruz said it is finally sink-
ing how much has changed
for him this year.
Adams has played in the
NFL for 11 years and has
never made the playoffs.
"That really say a lot about
how fortunate I am just to be
here," Cruz said. "For a guy
like that, who has paid his
dues in this league, and he's
never made it to the postsea-


son, it's tough. It shows you
how tough this league is and
how hard it is to win each and
every week I am just a fortu-
nate guy and it is starting to
sink in how rare my story is
and how far I have come."
Cruz understands how
lucky he is. He was some-
what of a longshot to make
the Giants in 2010 until he
opened eyes with that pre-
season game against the Jets.
The big game for Cruz this
season was the third one,
when he got his first start
with Mario Manningham
out with a concussion.
Cruz caught five passes for
110 yards, scoring on touch-
downs of 74 and 28 yards.
"It was huge," Cruz said.
"That was my first start and
there were questions in the
receiver room. I just want to
come out and prove I could
play I just wanted to make
sure I caught everything
that came my way, every ball
and I was fortunate enough
to do some really positive
things. That's where it really
turned my confidence up
and my season around."


Rookie QBs


cap season


with Pro Bowl


Double debut first in history


Associated Press

HONOLULU From the
panorama of the Pacific
outside his hotel window to
watching NFC teammates
Aaron Rodgers and Drew
Brees throw the ball, Cam
Newton can't help but stare
and be inspired by all the
perfect views in paradise.
"This is unbelievable,
man. This is so gratifying
and just to have the oppor-
tunity to be here is a bless-
ing," the Carolina Panthers
quarterback said.
Newton and fellow
rookie quarterback Andy
Dalton of the Cincinnati
Bengals were chosen to re-
place Super Bowl quarter-
backs Eli Manning and
Tom Brady for Sunday's
Pro Bowl. Their selection
makes this Pro Bowl the
first time in history that the
all-star game will feature
two rookie quarterbacks.
In fact, the only two rookie
signal callers to make the
Pro Bowl since 1970 are
Vince Young and Dan
Marino.
Newton, the No. 1 over-
all selection in the 2011
draft, said he's just soaking
up the experience and en-
joying being with his new
teammates.
"I'm a fan of all these
guys Drew Brees, Aaron
Rodgers, Clay Matthews,
Larry Fitzgerald the list
goes on with all the All-Pro
guys that are here and I get
to share the field with," he
said.
Newton is backing up
Brees and Rodgers, and
doesn't mind starting on
the bench.
"I idolized them through-
out the year, watched so
much film on them, how


they play the game from
the check downs, to the
way they throw, to every-
thing," Newton said. "Lo
and behold, we're on the
same roster"
Newton's season wasn't
too shabby, either. He's the
first quarterback ever to
throw for 4,000 yards and
rush for 500 yards.
He completed 310 of 517
passes for 4,051 yards, the
most by a rookie quarter-
back in NFL history He also
threw for 21 touchdowns
with 17 interceptions. His 14
rushing touchdowns are the
most ever by an NFL quar-
terback in a season.
The Panthers missed the
playoffs after finishing 6-
10, but Newton promises
he has a lot more to offer as
his game matures.
As for Dalton, he's al-
ready tasted the playoffs,
even though it ended in a
lopsided 31-10 loss to
Houston in the AFC wild-
card round.
Dalton threw for 3,398
yards and 20 touchdowns,
leading the young Bengals
(9-8) to just their third win-
ning record and playoff ap-
pearance in the last 21 years.
Dalton still can't believe
how far he's come.
'"A year ago I was in Mo-
bile, Ala., in the Senior Bowl
trying to impress scouts. A
year later, I'm sitting here in
Hawaii at the Pro Bowl," he
said. "A lot has happened
and I just feel blessed to be
where I am."
Dalton, a second-round
selection in 2011, said mak-
ing the Pro Bowl never en-
tered his mind.
"Trying to get to the play-
offs is all I was worried
about. With that, I was able
to get here," he said.


Manning's comments raise


hackles of Colts owner


Irsay says problems

should be kept in house

Associated Press

INDIANAPOLIS Jim Irsay expects
Peyton Manning to keep his complaints to
himself. Or at least within the confines of
the Colts' team complex.
Shortly after introducing Chuck Pagano
as Indianapolis' new coach, the team owner
responded to the comments Manning made
earlier this week by referring to the only
four-time league MVP as a "politician."
"I don't think it's in the best interest to
paint the horseshoe in a negative light, I re-
ally don't," Irsay said, referring to the Colts'
logo. "The horseshoe always comes first,
and I think one thing he's always known,
because he's been around it so long, is that,
you know, you keep it in the family If you've
got a problem you talk to each other, it's not
about campaigning or anything like that."
Clearly, Irsay was not happy to see Man-
ning's comments in The Indianapolis Star
on Tuesday, just as the Colts were inter-
viewing Pagano.
Manning explained that the environment
at team headquarters was not the best and
said people were nervous because of the


major offseason overhaul that has already
claimed the jobs of vice chairman Bill Polian,
general manager Chris Polian, coach Jim
Caldwell and most of Caldwell's assistants.
Irsay didn't like that, either.
"I have so much affection and apprecia-
tion for Peyton. I mean we're family We al-
ways will be and we are," Irsay said. "He's a
politician. I mean look at, when it comes to
being competitive, let's just say on a scale of
1 to 10, 10 being the highest, we're both 11s,
OK? So there's been plenty of eggshells
scattered around this building by him with
his competitive desire to win."
Irsay's comments are indicative of how
tense things have gotten in Indy
Some considered Manning's comments
an acknowledgment that he was unhappy
in Indianapolis and that he could be play-
ing in another city next season if he re-
turns from his third neck surgery
The Colts, who also have the No. 1 pick in
this year's draft and could take Andrew Luck
as their quarterback of the future, also have
to decide whether to pay Manning a $28 mil-
lion by March 8 or risk losing him as an un-
restricted free agent Manning said he's been
told the decision will be Irsay's to make. And
Irsay again said Thursday that money will
not be the issue, Manning's health will.
"I think fans already understand that,"
Irsay said when asked whether Manning may
have played his final game in Colts' blue.


NFL: Concussion claims not for court


Associated Press

MIAMI Former NFL
players should not be per-
mitted to sue for damages
over concussions they suf-
fered because player safety
issues have long been gov-
erned by the league's collec-
tive bargaining agreements,
an NFL attorney said
Thursday
"You don't get to come to
court," league lawyer Beth
Wilkinson said. "They
should go through the
process that's laid out in the
agreement."
Wilkinson spoke following
a hearing before the U.S. Ju-
dicial Panel on Multidistrict
Litigation, which is consid-
ering whether to consoli-
date 21 player lawsuits filed
in six states before a single
judge for pretrial matters.
At least 300 former football
players, plus an equal num-
ber of wives and other fam-


ily members, are plaintiffs
in the cases.
They include Hall of
Famers Tony Dorsett, Lem
Barney and Joe De-
Lamielleure and other stars
such as Ottis Anderson, Mark
Duper, Jim McMahon, Paul
Krause and Marvin Jones.
The vast majority, however,
are players who toiled more
obscurely in the game's
trenches and often bounced
from team to team. Some are
suffering from degenerative
brain diseases, depression
and other mental ailments.
The six-judge panel made
no immediate decision. Still,
there was a clear consensus
between player attorneys
and the league to bring the
cases to U.S. District Judge
Anita Brody, who sits in
Philadelphia where the first
player lawsuits were filed.
"We can't go wrong there,"
said attorney Michael
McGlamry of Atlanta.


The players accuse the
NFL of negligence and mis-
conduct for the way it re-
sponded to players'
concussions and complaints
of dizziness, headaches and
related problems. The law-
suits also contend the NFL
deliberately downplayed
the dangers of head injuries
despite knowing the risks.
The lawsuits seek unspec-
ified damages and some
want the NFL to pay for
medical monitoring of for-
mer players to watch for fu-
ture problems such as
dementia and memory loss.
Rich Miano, who played
for the Jets, Eagles and Fal-
cons from 1985 to 1995, said
in his day "concussion wasn't
a word in the forefront It was
more 'getting your bell rung.'
'Getting a stinger.' There was
no sitting out a game."
"It was just 'Get back out
there.' It was your job," he
added.


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B6 FRIDAY, JANUARY 27, 2012


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Spotlight on
PEOPLE

Sajak: I drank
between tapings
NEW YORK-The
"Wheel of Fortune"
wasn't the only thing
spinning

Sj Sajak and
Vanna
White
back in
the day
Sajak
said in an
interview
Pat on
Sajak ESPN2
this week
that the long-time game
show team would occa-
sionally walk over to a
restau-
rant for
"two or
three or
six" mar-
garitas
during a
break in
taping
Vanna early
White "Wheel of
Fortune"
shows in California.
Sajak has hosted the
show since 1981; White
joined him a year later
Sajak recalled the mar-
garita stops after answer-
ing "yes" to a question
about whether he had
ever hosted the show "a
little bit drunk."
Although he joked that
he had "trouble recogniz-
ing the alphabet" for
shows taped after the
drinks, no one ever said
anything to them.
Now that he's older,
Sajak said he couldn't do
that anymore.

Opera to air at
Cowboys Stadium
ARLINGTON, Texas -
The Dallas Opera's per-
formance of Mozart's
"The Magic Flute" will
be featured on the giant
screens at Cowboys Sta-
dium this spring.
The opera announced
Thursday that the per-
formance will be simul-
cast on April 28 to the
home of the Dallas
Cowboys.
Tickets to the perform-
ance will be free. Seating
will be reserved.
Dallas Opera General
Director and CEO Keith
Cerny said he hopes the
performance will "draw
music and theater lovers
from all across North
Texas."
Gene Jones, wife of
Dallas Cowboys owner
Jerry Jones, said "sport-
ing events and great art
do something similar -
they get people talking."


Titular power


Associated Press
In this undated publicity photo originally released by New Line Cinema, Samuel L. Jackson is shown in a scene from
"Snakes On A Plane."

Five movies whose titles reveal everything before you see them


CHRISTY LEMIRE
AP Movie Critic

LOS ANGELES Some movie ti-
tles are wordy and complicated
("Borat: Cultural Learnings of
America for Make Benefit Glorious
Nation of Kazakhstan") or generi-
cally forgettable ("Someone Like
You"). Others, like this week's "Man
on a Ledge," tell you everything you
need to know about the movie in
just a few tidy words.
Here are five other movies whose
titles say it all. I also thought about
doing this list when Cameron Crowe's
feel-good "We Bought a Zoo" came
out at the end of last year Somehow,
though, my choices all turned out to
be genre pictures probably be-
cause they're so hilarious:
"Snakes on a Plane" (2006):
This was one of the most fun expe-
riences I've ever had at the movies:
I saw it at a packed, late-night
screening with a bunch of rowdy
college kids in Boston. And that's
really the best way to watch a movie
like this. Somehow, sitting alone on
your couch in the middle of the day
just doesn't produce the same ef-
fect It is, of course, about snakes ...
on ... a plane. They get loose and
they get angry All kinds of gnarly
carnage ensues at 35,000 feet. And
Samuel L. Jackson gets to shout one
of the greatest lines in film history
(which, sadly, we'll have to para-
phrase): "I have had it with these


(13-letter expletive) snakes on this
(13-letter expletive) plane!"
"Hobo With a Shotgun" (2011):
It's a bit of a one-note gimmick. Rut-
ger Hauer plays the titular
vagabond who rides into a new
town and finds himself in posses-
sion of the aforementioned firearm.
Transforming himself into a vigi-
lante killer, he cleans up this car-
toonishly depraved place full of
dealers and junkies, pimps and
prostitutes. It's a funny central
nugget of an idea, the novelty of
which wears off pretty quickly But
Hauer plays it completely straight
in the kind of stoic, quietly violent
character Clint Eastwood built a ca-
reer on, and he makes the repeti-
tively gory material work better
than it should. Plus, it's just a fun
title to say Go ahead: "Hobo With a
Shotgun." Feels good, right?
"The Human Centipede"
(2010): Yep, that's pretty much what
it is. A mad German scientist
abducts and mutilates three people,
then stitches them together mouth-
to-posterior to create a human cen-
tipede. It's a wild idea that
writer-director Tom Six executed
with surprisingly artistry- at least
here, in part one. This is just the be-
ginning of a trilogy; the disappoint-
ing part two came out last year, and
Six is working on part three. But
this original film is more suspense-
ful and less gratuitous than the title
and the concept might suggest, with


an unexpected, simple elegance to
the storytelling.
"Attack of the Killer Tomatoes!"
(1978): I have fond memories of
watching this as a child on Elvira's
"Movie Macabre." Yes, that's how
old I am. This spoof of B-horror
movies is gleefully silly and hilari-
ously low-tech. Menacing, mutant
tomatoes threaten humanity The
rumbling, grumbling pieces of pro-
duce are seemingly unstoppable.
Running is no use. Weaponry is in-
sufficient. They can even kill you
underwater (in a parody of "Jaws").
Only one thing makes them vulner-
able: playing the shrill hit song "Pu-
berty Love," which causes the
tomatoes to shrink. The San Diego
Chicken even makes an appear-
ance. That's how you know this is a
quality piece of filmmaking.
"Santa Claus Conquers the
Martians" (1964): This is a cheapo
B-movie classic: a weird, goofy com-
bination of family comedy and sci-
fi adventure. The children of Mars
are unhappy, so Martian leaders
cook up a scheme to kidnap Santa
Claus from Earth and bring him to
their planet. There, he can set up a
toy factory to please all the good lit-
tle girls and boys. But Santa even-
tually wins on his terms because ...
well, because he's Santa. This
movie is also notable as the film
debut of a young Pia Zadora as one
of the Martian children. Everyone's
gotta start somewhere.


Original Internet shows hint of coming change


Associated Press


NEW YORK After
Art dealer years of experimenting, the
charged in fraud top video destinations on
the Web are suddenly flush
NEW YORK A New with original programming:
York art dealer has been documenriginal programming:
charged documentaries, reality
charged in a $4 million shows and scripted series.
f raud for selling works by Over the next few months,
Picasso, Matisse and oth- YouThbe, Netflix and Hulu
ers without informing the YouTube, Netflix and Hulu
owners without informer givinghim the will roll out their most am-
owner or giving him the bitious original program-
prThechares in a crimi- ming yet a digital push
nal complaint in Manhat- into a traditional television
naln c t t business that has money, a
tan accuse Riobert Scott bevy of stars and a bold atti-
Cook of selling 16 works tude of reinvention.
of art without the The long-predicted colli-
owner/collector's knowl- sion between Internet video
edge. The artwork in- and broadcast television is
clouded watercolors, finally under way No one is
drawings, photographs, suggesting that the quality
and other works by on the Internet is close to
artists including Pablo that of broadcast TV but it's
Picasso, Henri Matisse broadcast TV, built's
andPicasso, Henri Mauuste becoming easy to imagine a
and ierre-Auguste day when it will be.
Renoir, among others. day when it will be.
Renoir, among others. And even though critics
-From wire reports question whether new


Birthday: Circumstances in the year ahead could produce
many more opportunities than ever to fulfill several of your
important ambitions. With the blueprint already in your
mind, all you have to do is manifest it.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -There is a strong possibility
that you might experience a rather unusual turn of events.
When trying to help out another, the party in question could
end up doing more for you.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Big rewards could come in
small packages, so don't be too quick to reject a job that
doesn't pay well. If you do good work, much more is likely
to be in the pipeline.
Aries (March 21-April 19) You're not only quick on you
feet, you're fast when working with your brain as well. Don't
let anyone set the pace for you disengage yourself from
others and operate on you own.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Because you'll be able to


media can rival a business
that's been around for about
70 years, the video sites have
sought partnerships with
seasoned professionals. And
they benefit from the differ-
ent economics of global
Web-based entertainment.
Either way, what's happen-
ing now is just the first wave.
"This convergence is
now," says documentary
filmmaker Morgan Spur-
lock, who created "The Fail-
ure Club," a series about
people trying to do the
things they've always
feared, for Yahoo, and "A
Day in the Life," a series
documenting 24 hours of
someone's life, for Hulu.
He says the quality still
varies, but viewers will soon
see talent and production
values begin to change. On
Feb. 6, Netflix will premiere
its first scripted show, "Lily-
hammer," in which Steve
Van Zandt ("The Sopranos")


Today's HOROSCOPE
handle most any dilemma with deduction and intuition, you
should resolve a problem with accuracy and lightning
speed.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) Get out and mingle. Not only
will you enjoy doing so, you're likely to meet someone new
with whom you could form an instant bond and maybe
even a lifelong friendship.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Several unique opportunities
having to do with your work or career might present them-
selves. However, the chance to take advantage of them is
fleeting, so don't shilly-shally.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Follow your inclinations if some-
one is constantly on your mind. There could be some very
good reasons why you need to touch base with this person
soon.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -Your ability to pick up on the
thoughts of others and use them in advantageous ways will


Associated Press
In this image released by Hulu.com, from left, Lindsey Payne,
Jordan T. Maxwell and Ben Samuel portray campaign work-
ers in "Battleground," a mock documentary about a third-
place political candidate in Wisconsin.


plays a New York mobster
in witness protection in
Norway. Later this year, it
will release "House of
Cards," a highly anticipated
adaptation of the British
miniseries produced by


David Fincher and starring
Kevin Spacey
Next year, it will debut
new episodes of the cultish
comedy "Arrested Develop-
ment," which originally
aired on Fox.


come in handy. Keep one eye on the zeitgeist, and the
other on the bottom line.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) You're likely to get an opportu-
nity to win someone important over to your side by objec-
tively discussing a matter with him or her that is of mutual
concern and interest.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -A little brainstorming with
some of your co-workers could pay off in spades. Some
rather ingenious ideas for increasing productivity and low-
ering stress could be the result.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Unusual circumstances
could once again involve you with someone whom you re-
cently met who you'd like to get to know better.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -An important matter can
be resolved to your satisfaction, but it might require the full
use of your imagination and resourcefulness. Happily,
these are two of your best assets.


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

WEDNESDAY, JAN. 25
Powerball: 4 19 28 29 47
Powerball: 5
5-of-5 PB No winner
5-of-5 3 $1 million
No Florida winner
Lotto: 4 9 14-18-35-47
6-of-6 No winner
5-of-6 24 $6,873
4-of-6 2,013 $65
3-of-6 40,619 $5
Fantasy 5: 7 8 23 34 36
5-of-5 4 winners $61,330.55
4-of-5 289 $136.50
3-of-5 10,292 $10.50
TUESDAY, JAN. 24
Mega Money: 10 39 41 43
Mega Ball: 3
4-of-4 MB 1 winner $550,000
4-of-4 4 $1,666
3-of-4 MB 41 $356
3-of-4 725 $60
2-of-4 MB 1,045 $29
1-of-4 MB 9,466 $3
2-of-4 22,078 $2

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num-
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call 850-487-7777.

Today in
HISTORY
Today is Friday, Jan. 27,
the 27th day of 2012. There
are 339 days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On Jan. 27, 1967, astro-
nauts Virgil I. "Gus" Grissom,
Edward H. White and Roger
B. Chaffee died in a flash fire
during a test aboard their
Apollo spacecraft.
On this date:
In 1756, composer Wolf-
gang Amadeus Mozart was
born in Salzburg, Austria.
In 1880, Thomas Edison
received a patent for his elec-
tric incandescent lamp.
In 1943, some 50 bombers
struck Wilhelmshaven in the
first all-American air raid
against Germany during
World War II.
In 1944, the Soviet Union
announced the complete end
of the deadly German siege
of Leningrad, which had
lasted for more than two
years.
In 1945, Soviet troops lib-
erated the Nazi concentration
camps Auschwitz and Birke-
nau in Poland.
In 1951, an era of atomic
testing in the Nevada desert
began as an Air Force plane
dropped a 1-kiloton bomb on
Frenchman Flat.
In 1973, the Vietnam
peace accords were signed
in Paris.
Ten years ago: The Super
Bowl matchup was decided
as the New England Patriots
upset the Pittsburgh Steelers,
24-17, to win the AFC cham-
pionship and the St. Louis
Rams defeated the Philadel-
phia Eagles, 29-24, to win
the NFC championship.
Five years ago: Tens of
thousands of anti-war
demonstrators marched in
Washington, D.C., calling for
the U.S. to get out of Iraq.
One year ago: Tens of
thousands of Yemenis de-
manded their president step
down; taking inspiration from
Tunisians' revolt, they vowed
to continue until their U.S.-
backed government fell.
Today's Birthdays:
Singer Bobby "Blue" Bland is
82. Actor James Cromwell is
72. Actor John Witherspoon
is 70. Rock musician Nick
Mason (Pink Floyd) is 67.
Rhythm-and-blues singer
Nedra Talley (The Ronettes)
is 66. Ballet star Mikhail
Baryshnikov is 64. Chief U.S.
Justice John Roberts is 57.
Country singer Cheryl White


is 57. Actress Mimi Rogers is
56.
Thought for Today: "The
most beautiful thing in the
world is, of course, the world
itself." Wallace Stevens,
American poet and author
(1879-1955).











SCENE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Pushin'


pulling'


& dragging'


Rev up your engines for down-home fn


Special to the Chronicle
The 13th annual Truck & Trac- t
tor Pull gets in gear this weekend,
pulling all classes of trucks and m .
tractors for three days at the Cit-
rus County Fairgrounds in .
Inverness.
The Citrus County Fair Associ- '
ation expects to have a record V '
number of pullers coming from all
over the country, some from as far .:
as Washington state.
Gates open at 4 p.m. Friday, Jan.
27, pulling at 6 p.m.; Saturday, Jan.
28, at 10 a.m., pulling at 1p.m.; and i A diesel smo
Sunday, Jan. 29, at 11 a.m., pulling distance pull during last yi
at 1 p.m. County Fairgrounds. Extrem
Tickets at the gate are $10 for motors mounted on the fra
adults and $5 for children. Ad- transmissions to let these b
vance tickets are on sale at the A woman covers her da
fair office and other outlets. running of the tractors. Peo
For information, call 352- the event should bring so
726-2993. event because decibels cai




Book festival to feature eight


Books and Beyond
slatedfor Feb. 4

Special to the Chronicle
People who love words can learn
how to publish their own books,
poems or songs at the second an-
nual Festival of Books in Inverness
on Saturday, Feb. 4.
Eight different seminars will
offer ideas on how to publish a
book, tips on how to attract a pub-
lisher's attention and how to have
songs and poems published.


The festival, dubbed
Books and Beyond, will fea-
ture Nancy Kennedy of the
Chronicle as the featured
author. Kennedy will con-
duct one of the seminars,
speaking about how to write
for the religious market.
Other seminars will occur in
the morning and afternoon.
Kicking off the morning
seminar will be local author
Joyce Moore and Bobbi Jan-
son of Hudson.
Moore will present "A


Nar
Kenr
will b
featu
speaker
book fe


Speed Course in Writing Fiction,"
while Janson will offer ideas on
how to have songs published. Both


seminars
Those inte
seminar si
rive at 8:30
ets and be
start of the
At 10:30
will talk at
into the
nedy market. A
be a Citrus C
hired Loretta Ro
r at the winning a
Festival. novels, wil
importance
script's first three
Dylan Newton a
will begin the after


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle file
ker makes the maximum
ear's tractor pull at Citrus
ie tractors have automobile
ime along with low-geared
easts roar to the finish line.
ughter's ears during the
ople planning on attending
me ear protection for the
n reach unsafe levels.


writing seminars
begin at 9 a.m. 1:15 p.m. Newton, who participated
rested in either as a newly published author last
should plan to ar- year, will advise festival-goers about
0 a.m. to buy tick- gaining a publisher's attention with
seated before the a traditional query letter. DuLong, a
seminar. Cedar Key resident who is winning
0 a.m. Kennedy wide acclaim for her series of books
bout how to break based in Cedar Key, will discuss the
religious writing mystique of women's fiction.
t the same time, Poet Madelyn Eastlund, who had
countyy resident an accident on her way to the 2011
ogers, an award- festival, will deliver a "tweaked"
author of western seminar on the "Magic of Poetry"
.1 speak about the Concurrently, Kathleen Walls of St.
;e of a manu- Augustine will deliver information
pages. on self-publishing.


nd Terri DuLong
noon seminars at


See Page C7


Heather Foster
FOSTER
ON FILM


'Red Tails'

falls flat

for pilots

of WWII
Shiny plastic-looking
planes and neon
bullets drew me to
"Red Tails." But for a
movie commemorating
the Tuskegee Airmen, the
candy-store feel is odd.
Still, transforming sub-
jects as dreary as World
War II and racism to a dog-
fighting glitz fest is com-
pelling. Just think of it -
indulgent shoot 'em up fan-
tasies can save the world!
Sadly, "Red Tails" right-
eous hedonism peters out
to a tiresome PSA. The
script is hokey as ever, but
solemnly self-convincing.
The cast also might have
been in a school play
Rather than committing
to glam, "Red Tails" shot
for nobler intentions,
twiddled with manipula-
tive drama and returned
empty-handed.
With racism running
rampant in the United
States, black pilots are
nothing more than a
charming idea. Nonethe-
less, the U.S. Army Air
Corps sets up the
Tuskegee program under
Col. A.J. Bullard (Terrence
Howard) during WWII.
First given petty missions,
like foiling Nazi ship-
ments, the eager, talented
airmen are finally as-
signed to escort bombers.
"Red Tails" follows a
handful of personalities,
Easy (Nate Parker), Jun-
ior (Tristan Wilds), Joker
(Elijah Kelley), Smoky
(Ne-Yo) and Lightning
(David Oyelowo) on their
quest for freedom on
global and personal
scales.
Cheese can be fun, but a
drop of conviction will
ruin it. "Red Tails"' rumi-
nates on emotion no more
than a Hallmark card. Ob-
noxious malarkey lec-
tures, spontaneous
romances and verbal slap-
fights devour half the
movie.
Sure, dilemmas (even
fake ones) are necessary
for structure, but these
are given too much impor-
tance as if they are good!
Every little "Red Tail"
tragedy seeks gasps and
wails. Passing dopey pro-
totypes for individuals
tremendous as the
Tuskegee Airmen, "Red
Tails" does not deserve a
fleck of serious emotion.
While perfectly articu-
late, the acting is just that,
articulate. Excluding
Oyelowo, the cast lacks
enthusiasm. Actors smile
and have intonations im-
plicative of some feeling,
but few break into their
roles.
As in mediocre produc-
tions, there is either an
obligatory stench or ob-
noxious self-aggrandizing
satisfaction. Rather than
slipping into new minds, I
kept getting the sense ac-
tors only considered how
"Red Tails" benefited
their real-life reputations.
Unable to get lost in "Red
Tails," I occupied myself
with the theatre's gum-
caked floors.
All in all, "Red Tails"
could have been a blast but
was a bust. I give it a C-.
With a running time of
125 minutes "Red Tails" is
rated PG-13 for some se-
quences of war violence.
[]
Heather Foster is a jun-
ior at the University of
Florida.


In Saturday Classifieds '\-' o a
Shop in our ',
Garage and Yard Sales Category
SAVE BIG!





C2 FRIDAY, JANUARY 27, 2012

MUSEUMS
"For the Love of the
Sea: Watercolors of Philip
Steel" is on display in Janu-
ary at the Appleton Museum
of Art, College of Central
Florida. The exhibit opens
Jan. 21 and exhibits 35 origi-
nal paintings produced by the
award-winning New England
artist whose nautical-themed
works reflect his knowledge
of the sea and deep respect
for those who make a living
from the ocean.
Daily admission to the Ap-
pleton Museum is $6 for
adults; $4 for seniors 55 or
older and students 19 and
older; $3 for youths ages 10
to 18; and free for members,
CF students, children age 9
and younger, and active mili-
tary personnel and their im-
mediate families.
Pathways to Freedom
Black History Exhibit, 8
a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday
and Thursday, Feb. 1 and 2,
in the Ewers Century Center,
Room 108, CF Ocala cam-
pus, 3001 S.W. College
Road. Display features more
than 2,000 artifacts ranging
from slave trade to the Civil
War, from reconstruction and
the Jim Crowe south to the
Civil Rights movement and
election of Barack Obama,
America's first black presi-
dent. For information, contact
Lisa Smith at 352-854-2322,
ext. 1243.
"Phosphate Boom
Years in Citrus County"
exhibit runs through spring
2012 at Floral City Heritage
Museum. Exhibit features
the history of the phosphate
industry in Citrus County
and includes new photos


SCENE


Learning about 'Birds of the World'


Special to the Chronicle
These birds are part of the "Birds of the World: From Science to Art" exhibit, which runs through the spring at Florida
Museum of Natural History. Hours 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Saturday and I to 5 p.m. Sunday. For more in-
formation, visit www.flmnh.ufl.edu or call 352-846-2000.


and artifacts. The Museum
is open for free from 10 a.m.
to 2 p.m. every Friday and
Saturday and is in the new
Town Center at 8394 E. Or-
ange Avenue/County Road
48. For more information,
visit www.floralcityhc.org or
call Council Chairman and
Museum Director Frank Pe-
ters at 352-860-0101, email
the-fchc@hotmail.com.


Special viewing can be
arranged.
"Birds of the World:
From Science to Art," runs
through the spring at Florida
Museum of Natural History.
Free exhibit showcases the
process of creating one of the
most comprehensive books on
birds and illustrates how the
printing process affects highly
detailed artwork. The exhibit


also highlights the personal
and professional relationship
the authors developed while
creating the book. The mu-
seum is near the intersection
of S.W. 34th Street and Hull
Road in the University of
Florida Cultural Plaza in
Gainesville. Hours 10 a.m. to
5 p.m. Monday through Sat-
urday and 1 to 5 p.m. Sun-
day. For more information,


visit www.flmnh.ufl.edu or call
352-846-2000.
Coastal Heritage Mu-
seum tours, 10 a.m. to 2
p.m. Tuesday through Satur-
day, Coastal Heritage Mu-
seum, 532 Citrus Ave.,
Crystal River. Extended
hours 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. the
second Saturday monthly.
Free. 352-795-1755.
Olde Mill House


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Gallery & Printing Museum,
"Pulp to Print" workshop will
be each month until May
2012. The museum is at
10466 W. Yulee Drive, Ho-
mosassa. Call 352-628-9411
for information.
FESTIVALS
Cagan Crossing Art &
Craft Festival, 10 a.m. to 5
p.m. Saturday, Jan. 28, and
10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday,
Jan. 29, at U.S. 27 and
Cagan Crossing Boulevard.
Free admission and parking.
For information, call Terri at
352-344-0657 or visit
www.tnteventsinc.com.
18th annual St. Pete
Beach Corey Area Craft
Festival, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Saturday, Jan. 28 and Sun-
day, Jan. 29, at Corey Av-
enue and Gulf Boulevard in
downtown St. Pete Beach,
595 Corey Ave., St. Pete
Beach. Free. Visit www.
artfestival.com, email
info@artfestival.com or
561-746-6615.
26th Annual Hogge-
towne Medieval Faire, Jan.
28 and 29 and Feb. 4 and 5,
at the Alachua County Fair-
grounds in Gainesville. Spe-
cial School Day celebration
Friday, Feb. 3, features half-
price tickets for guests.
Hours are 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Saturday and Sundays,
and 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Fri-
day, Feb. 3. Admission is
$14 for adults, $7 for chil-
dren ages 5 to 17 and free
for children younger than 5.
For more information, call
352-334-ARTS or visit
www.gvlculturalaffairs.
org.
See FESTIVAL/Page C3


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FESTIVAL
Continued from Page C2

Stomping in the
Swamp, the sixth annual
Bluegrass and Strawberry
Festival, Saturday, Feb. 11,
off State Road 200 and
Stokes Ferry Road. Turn at
Reds Restaurant and follow
the signs to the Community
Center. Concession stand
opens at noon. Music starts
at 1 p.m. Enjoy bands such
as "Up the Creek," "High
Overhead," and "Foggy Bend
Band". Bring a chair. For in-
formation, call 352-637-4335.
DANCE
Roaring Twenties tea
dance, 2 to 4 p.m. Friday,
Jan. 27, at the West Citrus
Community Center. Both
dances are $5 per person
and a portion of the proceeds
goes to In-Home Senior
Services. For information, call
Kris 352-527-5993 at Central
Citrus, 2804 Marc Knighton
Court, Lecanto, or Brenda at
352-795-3831 at West Citrus,
8940 W. Veterans Drive,
Homosassa.
Afternoon tea dances
and classical ballroom music,
twice a month at the commu-
nity centers, hosted by dee-
jay Sapphire. On the second
Wednesday monthly, the tea
dance is at Central Citrus
Community Center, 2804 W.
Marc Knighton Court,
Lecanto 352-527-5993, at
1:30 to 4 p.m. On the last Fri-
day monthly, the tea dance is
at West Citrus Community
Center, 8940 W. Veterans


SCENE


Drive, Homosassa, 352-795-
3831, from 2 to 4 p.m.
$5 per person with a por-
tion of the proceeds to benefit
In-Home Senior Services.
This is an all-year, ongoing
ballroom dance.
Sumter Singles and
Couples dinner dance, 7:30
to 10:30 p.m. the first and
third Fridays monthly at Lake
Panasoffkee Recreation Park
in the blue building at 1582
County Road 459 off County
Road 470. The Lee Ann Noel
Band will play Feb. 3 as part
of the potluck dinner dance.
Bon Tempo band will play
Feb. 17. Dances open to the
public, married, couples, sin-
gles, and groups from
churches and RV parks. All
ages welcome. No alcohol.
Finger foods or soda wel-
come. For information, call
352-424-1688.
Allan O'Neal sings and
deejays every first Saturday
at Citrus County Builders As-
sociation, 1196 S. Lecanto
Hwy. (County Road 491
across from Havana House
Cafe) Lecanto. The next
dance is Feb. 4. Cost $10 per
person at the door. Special
Valentine's Day dance will be
Friday, Feb. 17. Call Linda at
352-464-0004 in advance for
group savings. For 2012
dance schedule, visit
www.eventsolutionsbylinda.
Loyal Order of Moose
dinner dance, for members
and qualified guests, 5:30
p.m. Friday, Inverness
Lodge 2112 in Inverness.
352-726-2112.
Line dancing classes
with Kathy Reynolds, 1 to
3:30 p.m. Tuesday, East Cit-


Seeing a storm at sea


Special to the Chronicle
"Lightning Storm" is part of the exhibit "For the Love of
the Sea: Watercolors of Philip Steel" on
display at the Appleton Museum of Art, College of Cen-
tral Florida. Daily admission to the Appleton Museum is
$6 for adults; $4 for seniors 55 or better and students
19 and over; $3 for youths ages 10-18; and free for
members, CF students, children age 9 and under, and
active military personnel and their immediate families.


rus Community Center, 9907
E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway, In-
verness. $3 per class. 352-
344-9666.
Inverness Square
Dance Club's beginner
square dance lessons, 7:30
to 9:30 p.m. Tuesday at
East Citrus Community
Center, 9907 E. Gulf-to-
Lake Highway, east of In-
verness on State Road 44.
Call Robert Scoff at 352-
860-2090 or 352-465-700.
The next enrollment for
square dance classes is in
April.
Country Line dancing
classes, 9 to 11 a.m. Thurs-
days at Beverly Hills Recre-
ation Center. $3
nonmembers. 352-746-4882
or 352-527-3738.
Citrus Squares, 7 p.m.
Thursday, Fellowship Hall of
the First United Methodist
Church of Dunnellon, 21501
W. State Road 40, Dunnel-
Ion. 352-489-1785 or 352-
465-2142.
Spirit of Citrus
Dancers' has their dances
at the Kellner Auditorium
Jewish Center in Beverly
Hills. Doors open at 6:45


FRIDAY, JANUARY 27, 2012 C3

p.m. A complimentary dance
lesson at 7 p.m.; general
dancing from 7:30 to 10 p.m.
Admission $6 for members;
$9 for nonmembers. Ice and
coffee provided; sodas and
bottled water are available for
a small fee. For information,
call Barb and Jack at 352-
344-1383 or Kathy at 352-
726-1495 or visit
www.socdancers.org.
Ballet Folklorico
"Quetzalli De Veracruz," a
traditional dance and music
group from Veracruz, Mexico,
3 p.m. April 15, at Curtis Pe-
terson Auditorium in Lecanto
High School at 3810 N. Edu-
cational Path, Lecanto. Call
352-873-5810 or 352-746-
6721 ext. 1416 or email
Boxoffl @cf.edu.
THEATER
"Moonlight and Mag-
nolias," runs from Friday,
Feb. 17, through Sunday,
March 4, at the Art Center of
Citrus County, 2644 N. An-
napolis Ave., in Hernando.
Shows are Fridays, Satur-
days and Sundays. Call the
box office for times and tick-
ets at 352-746-7606.


TO SUBMIT ITEMS FOR BUZZ LISTINGS
* The deadline for Buzz items is 5 p.m. Friday for the
following week's publication.
* Items may be emailed to newsdesk@chronicle
online.com or faxed to 352-563-3280. In emails, the
subject line should say "Buzz announcement." On
faxes, it should say "Attention Buzz announcement."
* It is the responsibility of the organizations listed to
provide information and updates about their pro-
grams. Contact the groups directly for details.
* For more information, email charris@chronicle
online.com or jkdevine@chronicleonline.com.


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C4 FRIDAY, JANUARY 27, 2012

ARTS & CRAFTS
Marti Estep will be artist

month in
January at
the Florida
Artists
Gallery in
Floral City.
Patri-
Marti cia Ritter's
Estep artwork will
be on dis-
play for January at Easy
Street Home Decor, 100 N.
Brooksville Ave., Brooksville.
For information, call Grace
Ashcraft at 352-556-3984.
0 Wisconsin watercolor
artist Audrey Bunchkowski's
pieces will be on display in

I H Lakes Re-
gion Library
on Druid
Road in In-
verness.
The artwork
can be
Audrey viewed in
Bunchkowski the re-
search and
computer area of the library
during regular business hours.
Audrey has been wintering in
Inverness since 1998 and is a
member of the Citrus Water-
color Club and the Stoneridge
Snowbirds Art Group. She has
work in Forgotten Treasures
and The Florida Artists Gallery.
Betty Love's artwork
will be on display in January
at Art, Craft, Bridal and
Frame Inc. in Town Square
Shoppers Mall, 3021 U.S. 19,
Spring Hill.
Stoneridge Snowbirds
Art Group of Inverness will
exhibit its work during Febru-
ary the Lakes Region Library
on Druid Road. The exhibit
can be found in the research
and computer area of the li-
brary and is available for
viewing during regular library
business hours.
Floral Design Study
Series, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Wednesday, at Riverhaven
Village Community Club,
11450 W. Riverhaven Drive
in Homosassa. Six-week
class begins Feb. 1 and will
continue for six consecutive
Wednesday. Cost is $75 for
all six sessions. Call Elaine
Moore at 352-621-3004 for
more information and regis-
tration. The Riverhaven Gar-
den Club and the
Homosassa River Garden
Club is offering the classes,
which is six lectures/demon-
strations and critiqued,
hands-on workshops led by
talented, accredited instruc-
tors from throughout Florida.
Community Needle-
works Crafters meet at 10
a.m. first Wednesday. All quil-
ters, knitters and crochet
crafters are welcome. Call
Terri at 352-746-1973.
Sandhill Crane Chap-


SCENE


Florida Artists Gallery's new home


Special to the Chronicle
The Florida Artists Gallery's new home is at Historic Knight House, 8219 East Orange Avenue, west of U.S. 41 in Floral City.


ter of the Embroiderers'
Guild of America, 10 a.m. to
2 p.m., first Wednesday
monthly at Faith Evangelical
Presbyterian Church, 200 Mt.
FairAve., Brooksville. Bring
lunch. 352-621-6680 (Citrus),
352-666-8350 (Hernando).
Barbara Kerr and Jaret
Lubowiecki will be featured
artists at Florida Artists
Gallery's preview opening at
new location in February.
Their work will be on display
at a reception from 4 to 7
p.m. Friday, Feb. 3, at the
Gallery's new home at His-
toric Knight House in Floral
City. For more information,
visit www.floridaartistsgallery.
com or call 352-344-9300.
"Cleared Hot! An Ex-
clusive and Personal Pho-
tographic Journey into the
U.S. Air Force" will run
through Feb. 3, at Webber
Center Gallery, at College of
Central Florida, Ocala Cam-
pus, 3001 S.W. College
Road. Free and open to the
public. Gallery hours are from
11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday
through Friday and 10 a.m. to
2 p.m. Saturday. For informa-
tion, call 352-873-5809.
Nature Coast Decora-
tive Artists Chapter of the
Society of Decorative Artists
meets at 9 a.m. the first Sat-
urday monthly, at the Weeki
Wachee Senior Center, 3357
Susan Drive, off U.S. 19 and
Toucan Trail, Spring Hill. The
group will have a short meet-
ing, show-and-tell and a birth-


Displaying group art


Special to the Chronicle
Exhibiting artists from the Stoneridge Snowbirds Art
Group of Inverness are: from left, Audrey Bunchkowski,
Joan Mensch, Caroline Frary, Joan Meredith, Sylvia
Heymans and Jude Caborn. Their works will be on
display in February at Lakes Region Library in Inverness.


day raffle. The project for this
month is hydrangeas on wa-
tercolor paper taught by Ruth
Orwig. For information, call
Sandy Mihalus 352-688-
4106. Call Andi at 352-666-
909 or Pat at 352-249-7221
or visit www.ncda-artists.com.
Gulfport's First Friday
Art Walk, 6 to 10 p.m. Feb.
4, over a half-mile up and
down scenic Beach Boule-
vard. Third Saturday Art
Walk is 6 to 10 p.m. Feb. 18.
Live musicians, including The
New Horizons Band and oth-
ers, will appear at venues
throughout the Village. Indus-
trial Art Center continues to
offer "Blow Your Own Glass
Masterpiece" mini classes.


Gulfport Art Walk is the
First Friday and Third Sat-
urday of every month,
year-round. Parking free.
Free trolley rides available
from off-site parking areas.
Pet and family friendly. For
information, visit www.
GulfportMA.com or call
866-ART-WALK.
Needlework Fun
Groups, 2 to 4 p.m. first
and third Saturdays
monthly, Wildwood Public
Library, 310 S. Palmer
Drive, Wildwood. 352-748-
1158. els34785@
yahoo.com.
Citrus Watercolor
Club meeting, 1 p.m. sec-
ond Friday monthly,


United Methodist Church on
County Road 581, Inver-
ness. $5. 352-382-8973 or
352-622-9352.
Manatee Haven Deco-
rative Artists chapter of the
National Society of Decora-
tive Painters, meets second
Saturday monthly at 8089 W.
Pine Bluff St., Crystal River.
352-563-6349, 352-861-
8567. www.mhdartists.com.
Need lecraft Workshop
of FCNA offers instruction in
quilting, embroidery, knitting,
crochet and more, for begin-
ners to advanced levels at no
charge. This is a group of
needle artists who like to
share knowledge and experi-
ences of their craft. The
group meets from 9 a.m. to 4
p.m. the second and fourth
Tuesday monthly at the
Floral City Community House
(between the library and the
museum) on Orange Avenue.
Call Beth for more informa-
tion at 352-344-5896.
Art Center of Citrus
County's regular gallery
hours are 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.
Monday to Friday. For infor-
mation, call Jackie Huband at
352-746-4089. The Art Cen-
ter of Citrus County is at
2644 N. Annapolis Ave.,
Hernando.
Brooksville City Hall
Art Gallery is open from 8
a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday
through Friday except holi-
days at 201 Howell Ave.,
Brooksville. Call 352-
540-3810.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

ART CLASSES
The Florida Artists
Gallery, at 7737 S. Old Floral
City Road, Floral City, offers
several art classes taught by
local artists. For more infor-
mation about the classes, call
352-344-9300 or visit www.
Floridaartistsgallery.com. Up-
coming classes include:
Painting with Watercolor,
9:30 to 11:30 a.m. Thurs-
days. Instructor Darla Gold-
berg. $15 per person per
class if prepaid. $20 at door.
All levels welcome. Call
Goldberg at 352-341-6226 or
Florida Artists Gallery at 352-
344-9300.
Drawing with Ann, 10
a.m. to 11:45 a.m. Saturday,
Feb. 4, 11, 18 and 25. In-
structor Ann Covington. $20
per class or $15 if paying in
advance the month. Char-
coal, pencils and color pen-
cils will all be available. Class
size is limited. Call Covington
at 352-726-2979 or 352-344-
9300.
Acrylics and oils painting
class, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Tues-
days, for beginners to ad-
vanced. Instructor Connie
Townsend. $15 per session.
For information contact
Townsend at ConnieTown@
aol.com or call 352-
400-9757.
Journaling with Art, 5 to
7 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 1,
8, 15, 22 and 29. Instructor
Marti Estep. $20 per session;
$15 if registered in advance.
Work with paint, pencil, col-
lage, poetry around different
ideas and media in each
class. Small interactive
groups and all materials pro-
vided. Contact Marti at
artmarti@tampabay.rr.com
or call 352-419-5882.
Acrylic Collage Work-
shop, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Wednesday, Feb. 22. Instruc-
tor Nancy Eaton. $50 with all
supplies included. Class size
limited. No art experience is
necessary. Call Eaton at 352-
489-2993.
Introduction to Paper-
making, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. or 9
a.m. to 5 p.m. For half day,
$35, or full day $50. Instruc-
tor Keith Gum. Half-day stu-
dents will focus on Western
papermaking techniques. We
will harvest Mulberry to
process the best fiber and
work with Abaca (banana),
as well as cotton linters. All
equipment and materials are
provided. Wear appropriate
footwear (rubber boots are
best) and a waterproof
apron. Both sessions will be
at my home studio in Inver-
ness. For information on
dates and times, call Keith
Gum at 352-400-9778. Pay-
ments may be made in ad-
vance to the Florida Artists
Gallery.
See CLASSES/Page C5


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSES
Continued from Page C4

Fearless painting with
acrylics, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Lunch from noon to 1 p.m.
Monday, Feb. 6. Instructor
Susi LaForsch. $80 with all
materials included. $20 de-
posit due Jan. 30. In the one-
day workshop, participants
will create an 18-inch-by-24-
inch painting. Class limited to
four students. For information,
contact Susi at 352-726-8710
or laforsch@tampabay.rr.com
Life Drawing, 9:30 to
11:30 a.m. Monday, Feb. 20.
Instructor Darla Goldberg.
$10 per person per class if
prepaid; $15 at door. Live
model for class and a small
model fee will be collected.
Classroom set up is chairs,
no tables. Students may bring
an easel and a small side
table (like a folding TV tray).
This is primarily a drawing
class, but students can bring
whatever medium they like.
No photography permitted.
Call Goldberg at 352-341-
6226 or the Florida Artists
Gallery at 352-344-9300.
Watercolor classes
with instructor Pat Sistrand, 9
a.m. Tuesday, Citrus
Springs Community Center.
$10 per class, per person.
Register at www.citrus
countyfl.org, click on Parks &
Recreation to register. 352-
465-7007.
Watercolor classes, 1
to 4 p.m. Wednesday, with
instructor Delores Witt, at
Lorna Jean Gallery, 6136 W.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crys-
tal River. Call 352-564-2781
to register.
Jewelry class, Thurs-
day, Friday and Saturday,
with all materials included.
Limited to four adults per
class. For information, call
Lorna at Lorna Jean Gallery
at 352-564-2781.
Kids "Art & Craft" for
ages 8 through 12 from 3 to 5
p.m. Saturday at Lorna Jean
Gallery. Projects include
drawing, painting, clay sculpt-
ing and paper projects. All
materials are included. For
information, call Lorna or
Joseph at 352-564-2781.
Drawing 101 classes
for adults and children. Learn
basics with instructor Joseph
Thunderhorse. Individual and
group rates are available. Call
the Lorna Jean Gallery for the
schedule at 352-564-2781.
Classes at The Garden
Shed:
Calligraphy class, 10 to
11:30 a.m. every Thursday
at The Garden Shed. Instruc-
tor Gail Wepner. Classes run
for five consecutive weeks.
Space is limited. Bring your
own calligraphy pen set or
buy one at The Garden Shed.
Calligraphy classes,
6:30 to 8 p.m. every Thurs-
day at The Garden Shed. In-
structor Gail Wepner.
Classes run for five consecu-
tive weeks. Space is limited.
Bring your own calligraphy
pen set or buy one at The
Garden Shed.
Pre-registration required
for classes. To preregister
and for details, call Louise at
352-503-7063. The Garden
Shed is at 2423 S. Rock-
crusher Road in Homosassa.
SPECIAL INTEREST
Mandalas series by Na-
ture Coast Unitarian Univer-
salists, at 7633 N. Florida
Ave, Citrus Springs.


SCENE


Duprees to sing this weekend


Special 1o me unronicle
The Duprees will perform at 7 p.m., Saturday, Jan. 28, in Circle Square Cultural Center, at 8395 S.W. 80th St., Ocala.
For information, visit the website at www.CSCulturalCenter.com or call 352-854-3670.


SAt 1 p.m. Sunday, Jan.
29, locals have an opportu-
nity to learn how to draw a
personal mandala for enjoy-
ment, relaxation and medita-
tion. Jan Hitchcock to lead
each art class. Cost $10.
Sign up by calling Pam at
352-489-3545.
Appleton Museum of
Art anniversary gala, 6 p.m.
Saturday, Jan. 28. The theme
is "La Belle Epoque, A Beau-
tiful 25 Years in Ocala." Gala
includes cocktail hour, live
music, champagne toast and
"living art" displays. Three-
course meal will be served in
the Edith-Marie Appleton
Gallery. Tickets $150 per per-
son. Call 352-291-4455.
Crystal River of Life
Coffee House, Christian Fel-
lowship, conversation and
music from 7 to 9:30 p.m. Fri-
days, Village Cafe, 789 N.E.
Fifth St., State Road 44.
352-817-6879.
Crystal River Preserve
State Park boat tour, 10:30
a.m. and 1:30 p.m. Monday,
Wednesday and Fridays,
Crystal River Preserve State
Park Visitor Center. $10 for
adults; $8 for children age 7
to 12; free, children 6 and
younger. Tickets go on sale in
the Preserve Visitor Center
one hour prior to departure;
arrive no less than 15 min-
utes prior to departure. 352-
563-0450 from 9 a.m. to 5
p.m. Monday through Friday
or www.crystalriverstate
parks.org.
Mental Flossing, an


13th annual Truck & Tractor Pull, Friday, Jan. 27 to
Sunday, Jan. 29, at the Citrus County Fairgrounds. All
classes of trucks and tractors all three days. Gates open at 4
p.m. Friday, pulling at 6 p.m.; 10 a.m. Saturday, pulling at 1
p.m.; and 11 a.m. Sunday, pulling at 1 p.m. $10 for adults and
$5 for children. Advance tickets are on sale at the fair office
and other outlets. For information, call 352-726-2993 or visit
www.citruscountyfairtractorpull.com/tractor.
Roaring Twenties tea dance, 2 to 4 p.m. Friday, Jan.
27, at the West Citrus Community Center. Both dances are
$5 per person and a portion of the proceeds go to In-Home
Senior Services. For information, call Kris 352-527-5993 at
Central Citrus, 2804 Marc Knighton Court, Lecanto, or
Brenda at 352-795-3831 at West Citrus, 8940 W. Veterans
Drive, Homosassa.
Mandalas series by Nature Coast Unitarian Universal-
ists, at 7633 N. Florida Ave, Citrus Springs.
At 1 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 29, locals have an opportunity to
learn how to draw a personal mandala for enjoyment, relax-
ation and meditation. Jan Hitchcock to lead each art class.
Cost $10. Sign up by calling Pam at 352-489-3545.
Agape House benefit concert, 3 p.m. Saturday, Jan.
28, at First Baptist Church of Crystal River. Music by the Mast
Brothers. Concert is free, but a freewill offering will benefit
Agape House. For information, call the church at 352-795-
3367. Agape House can be reached on Wednesdays at 352-
795-7064.
The Duprees, Saturday, Jan. 28, in Circle Square Cul-
tural Center, at 8395 S.W. 80th St., Ocala. For information,
visit the website at www.CSCulturalCenter.com or call 352-
854-3670.
Cagan Crossing Art & Craft Festival, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Saturday, Jan. 28, and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 29, at
U.S. 27 and Cagan Crossing Boulevard. Free admission and
parking. For information, call Terri at 352-344-0657 or visit
www.tnteventsinc.com.
26th Annual Hoggetowne Medieval Faire, Jan. 28 and
29 and Feb. 4 and 5, at the Alachua County Fairgrounds in
Gainesville. Special School Day celebration Friday, Feb. 3,
features half-price tickets for guests. Faire hours are 10 a.m.
to 6 p.m. Saturday and Sundays, and 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Fri-
day, Feb. 3. Admission is $14 for adults, $7 for children ages 5
to 17 and free for children younger than 5. For more informa-
tion, call 352-334-ARTS or visit www.gvlculturalaffairs.org.


Take Stock in Children of Citrus County presents


"Dollars for Scholars"

a, Doo-Wop %A


Tickets
$10


Sunday, February 5,2012 ~ 3 p.m.

Curtis Peterson Auditorium
Located in the Lecanto School Complex
the hits of the '50s and .. .....
Lola and the Saints' songs from their new CD
"Embraceable You" l1 .
Tickets are available at: TSIC (......
CCSO Operations Center, Inverness,
CCSO Emergency Operations Center, Lecanto,
& Havana House Restaurant, Lecanto. Tao 1 Sck sE ( Nir j P
Tickets will also be available at the door. 000..cChildrerf .d....u
Fo tica et] inoraio, iasc132-J22.IIHtl.


Inverness community-based
Comedy-4-Charity theatre,
will have "running auditions"
at noon Sundays at the Com-
munity Center in Rain Tree
Apartments (behind Winn
Dixie). These will continue
until a full improve troupe is
assembled. No experience
necessary. For information or
to register, email Sid@
Mental Flossing.org and/or
info@mentalflossing.org.
The Florida Chapter of
the National Historical
Novel Society meets at 1
p.m. the first Saturday
monthly at Central Ridge Li-
brary in Beverly Hills. For
more information, call Marian
Fox at 352-726-0162.
13th annual Gong
Show, 6 p.m. Saturday, Feb.
4, at Jewish Community Cen-
ter in Port Richey Pasco
County. Tickets $40 (pre-
ferred seating), $30 and $25.
BYOB. Soft drinks provided.
Dinner catered by Carrabba's
Italian Grill. For information,
call the Alzheimer's Family
Organization's at (727) 848-
8888 or (888) 496-8004.
College of Central
Florida's 2011-12 Interna-
tional Film Series:
Feb. 7 "Last Train
Home"
Feb. 21 -"Milk"
Films will be shown at 2
p.m. Tuesday at the Apple-
ton Museum of Art, College
of Central Florida, 4333 E.
Silver Springs Blvd., and 7
p.m. at the CF Ocala Cam-
pus, Building 8, Room 110,


FRIDAY, JANUARY 27, 2012 C5

3001 S.W. College Road.
The viewing is free at CF. At
the Appleton, viewers must
pay museum admission. For
information about member-
ship, call 352-873-5808.
For more information, call
Joe Zimmerman at 352-854-
2322, ext. 1233 or visit www.
cf.edu/foundation/events/
filmseries.htm.
The College of Central
Florida's Hampton Center
Film Series is a free cultural
and educational outreach
program that presents three
enlightening films followed by
a brief discussion. Movies
include:
Friday, Feb. 17 -"The
Blind Side."
Friday, March 9 -
"Stand and Deliver."
Movies begin at 6 p.m. at
the CF Hampton Center,
1501 W. Silver Springs Blvd.,
Ocala. Free popcorn and
soda. For more information
or to reserve a seat, call 352-
873-5881.
Wildlife Jeopardy pro-
grams monthly, noon to
12:30 p.m. Saturday, Feb.
18, in Children's Education
Center, Ellie Schiller Ho-
mosassa Springs Wildlife
State Park. February's sub-
ject will be on bears.
Monthly Bird Walk, 8
a.m. Saturday, Feb. 25, Pep-
per Creek Trail, Homosassa
Springs State Wildlife Park,
4150 S. Suncoast Blvd. Must
RSVP. Binoculars and field
guide recommended. 352-
628-5343. Seven bird walks
will be offered at the Ellie
Schiller Homosassa Springs
Wildlife State Park this season
running through April 2012.
Chapter 156 of The Na-
tional Association of Watch
and Clock Collectors
(NAWCC) meeting, 8 a.m.
fourth Sunday monthly, Her-
nando Civic Center, 3848 E.
Parson's Point Road, Her-
nando. Call Roger Krieger,
president, at 352-527-2669.
Joan Rivers, 8 p.m.
Thursday, March 22, Lake-
land Center Youkey Theatre,
Lakeland. $38.30, $74.90.
www.ticketmaster.com.
Jon Stewart, 7 and 9:30
p.m. Saturday, April 21, at
Ruth Eckerd Hall. Reserved
tickets $72 and $59 and avail-
able at the Ruth Eckerd Hall
Ticket Office, 1111 McMullen
Booth Road, Clearwater or by
calling 727-791-7400.
FARMERS' MARKETS
Saturday at the
Market, Farmers' market, 8
a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday
weekly, in front of the historic
Courthouse, downtown
Brooksville. 352-428-4275.
Dunnellon's First Satur-
day Village Market, includes
a variety of street vendors, 9
a.m. to 2 p.m. first Saturday
monthly, Dunnellon's Historic
District on West Pennsylvania
Avenue, Cedar and Walnut
streets. 352-465-9200.
Inverness Farmers'
Market, about 30 vendors,
fresh produce, homemade
crafts, baked goods and
more, 8 a.m. to noon, first
and third Saturdays monthly,
Inverness Government Cen-
ter parking lot. 352-726-2611.
Market Day with Art &
Treasures, an outdoor event
with plants, produce, arts,
crafts, collectibles and more,
9 a.m. to 3 p.m. second Sat-
urdays on the grounds of
Heritage Village, 657 N. Cit-
rus Ave., Crystal River. Call
352- 564-1400.
See FARMERS/Page C6


Experience a world-class, permanent art collection and
year-round schedule of exciting temporary exhibitions,
unique musical events, workshops, lectures and more.
Through March 11
FOR THE LOVE OF THE SEA: Watercolors of Philip Steel
Showcased are more than 35 original paintings of boats and
the sea by this award-winning New England artist.

Tomorrow Saturday, Jan. 28
APPLETON'S 25th ANNIVERSARY GALA La Belle Epoque
Tickets available at the Appleton or call 352-291-4455.

Feb. 2
AFTER HOURS featuring Cuban and Caribbean music
performed by Gosia and All. 5-8 p.m. Complimentary light
hors d'oeuvres from Horse & Hounds Restaurant and art............
demonstraLions by Ocala's Art Group. Admission free for :"."....:
members, S8 for nonmembers.
"' Feb. 11 ,
:*, THREE OM CUBA& The Art of Vicente, Sandro and
... -. JFordo. The Faitaaeti to yte Sublime, VI m ae than 30.
cenrworkssby these top contemporary Cuban artistli ."


433 E.Sil erlvd.,Ocaa, L 3
^^^^^^fflf3Y2-291-4455ini^


.M. t M.





C6 FRIDAY, JANUARY 27, 2012


FARMERS
Continued from Page C5

Circle Square Com-
mons Farmers' Market new
fall/winter hours, from 4 to 7
p.m. Thursday. Winter hours
end in May. Find fresh sea-
sonal produce, flowers, plants,
fresh baked goods, handmade
soaps, delicious pies and
more. Weekly cooking demon-
strations begin at 6 p.m. Circle
Square Commons is adjacent
to On Top of the World Com-
munities at 8405 S.W. 80th St.
in Ocala. For information, call
352-854-3670 or visit www.
CircleSquareCommons
FarmersMarket.com.
Gulfport Tuesday Fresh
Market, includes fresh pro-
duce, seafood, art, live enter-
tainment, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
every Tuesday, Gulfport water-
front district (Beach Boulevard).
http://gulfportflorida.us/tuesday-
moming-fresh-market.
The Ybor City Satur-
day Market, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
from October to May and 9
a.m. to 1 p.m. from June to
September. Historic Ybor City
in Centennial Park is at Ninth
Avenue and 19th Street. For
information, call Lynn Schultz
at 813-241-2442.
Music
Woodview Coffee
House, at 2628 Woodview
Lane, Lecanto, in fellowship
hall of Unity Church of Citrus
County, opens with a Talent
Showcase of area musicians,
starting when doors open at
6:30 p.m. Featured perform-
ers appear at 8 p.m. Admis-
sion $7 per person.
Refreshments available. In
the new season, Woodview
Coffee House will sometimes
appear at the Old Court-
house in Inverness. Featured
season performers and dates
include:
Feb. 3 perennial audi-
ence favorites Deux Oh! will
perform.
For more information www.
woodviewcoffeehouse.org or
Woodview@tampabay.rr.com
or 352-726-9814.
Willie Nelson concert, 7
p.m. Saturday, Feb. 4, in Cir-
cle Square Cultural Center at
8395 S.W. 80th St. Ocala.
For more information, visit
www.CSCulturalCenter.com
or call 352-854-3670.
Gulfport on the Rocks,
at 5413 Shore Blvd. S., Gulf-
port, events:
Feb. 3 Comfort Zone:
9:30 p.m. to 1:30 a.m.
Feb. 4 Cannon Quinn
Band: 9:30 p.m. to 1:30 a.m.
For more information, call
727-321-8318.
The Fabulous Country
Diamonds, 2 p.m. Saturday,
Feb. 4, to Curtis Peterson Au-
ditorium, Lecanto. Listen to
Carol and George Kline as
they entertain with the classic
country sounds of Patsy Cline,
Kenny Rogers, Dottie West,
George Jones, Dolly Parton
and others. Cost $15. Doors
open at 1 p.m. All proceeds


SCENE


Singing Tree


Special to the Chronicle
Singing Tree will perform at 2:30 p.m. Sunday, March 4, at Nature Coast Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, 7633 N.
Florida Ave (U.S. 41). $10 in advance by calling 352-746-0655 or at the door. Singing Tree is comprised of Ray
Belanger on the hammer dulcimer and Lloyd Goldstein on the double bass.


benefit the Central Ridge Club
of the Boys and Girls Clubs of
Citrus County. Tickets avail-
able at Citrus Area Offices of
BB&T Bank, Cadence (Supe-
rior) Bank, Nature Coast Bank
and online at www.Burnthe
Mortgage.com. For more info
or tickets, call Gerry Jones
352-527-8002 or Amy 352-
287-1421.
The Country Sunshine
Band, 11:30 a.m. to 1:30
p.m. Friday, East Citrus
Community Center, 9907
East Gulf-to-Lake Hwy. (State
Road 44 East), Inverness.
Call Annie at 352- 465-4860.
John Thomas Tradi-
tional Country Music Show
and Jam, 6 to 9 p.m. Mon-
days weekly, Oxford Commu-
nity Center, 4027 Main St.,
Oxford. $5. 352-560-7496.
Pianist and singer An-
drea will perform an ex-
tended engagement in the
east dining room every
Wednesday, Thursday, Fri-
day and Saturday beginning
at 6 p.m. at The Boathouse
Restaurant, 1935 S.E. U.S.
19, Crystal River, 34429. A
dance floor is now available.
No admission charge. Reser-
vations are not necessary,
but recommended for dining
in the entertainment room.
Call 352-564-9636 for more
information or go to
www.jazzyandrea.com.
Jazz pianist Terry
Coats, 5:30 p.m. every
Thursday through Saturday
in November and December,
at The Olive Tree Restaurant,
963 N. Suncoast Blvd. (U.S.


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offers or discounts. Discounts not valid on bulk or corporate purchases of 10 units or more. Offer expires 2/28/2012.
000ACRX

Take Stock in Children of Citrus County presents

"Dollars for Scholars"

&0 Doo-Wop OA


Tickets
$10


Sunday, February 5,2012 ~ 3 p.m.
Curtis Peterson Auditorium
Located in the Lecanto School Complex
the hits of the '50s and .... .-
Lola and the Saints' songs from their new CD
"Embraceable You" "A B "
Tickets are available at: TSIC (....
CCSO Operations Center, Inverness,
CCSO Emergency Operations Center, Lecanto,
& Havana House Restaurant, Lecanto. ToS ck ...N.LE
Tickets will also be available at the door. ,oooChIref ."."..-.
bFortcketinfor-mation lase caIllH32-22-34


19), in Crystal River. Reser-
vations not necessary, but
recommended on weekends.
Call 352-563-0075 or visit.
www.olivetreedining.com.
Crystal River Music in
The Park is looking for any
talented individuals or groups
who would be willing to per-
form for two hours on the third
Saturday of any month. All are
invited to audition. For more
details, call 352-601-3506.
Audition to become a
member of The Central
Florida Master Choir. Ability
to read music, harmonize
and match pitch required
along with prioritizing re-
hearsals and performances.
Call Hal McSwain at 352-
237-3035 or 352-615-7677 to
schedule an audition. Visit
www.cfmasterchoir.com.
George Jones, 7:30
p.m. Thursday, Feb. 9, The
Peabody Daytona Beach.
$52.75, $65.05. www.ticket
master.com.
Richard Reyes, 2 p.m.
Feb. 11, Crystal River Mall.
Richard Reyes returns to the
Crystal River Mall to entertain
in the food court. Call 703-
498-0498.
Brandi Carlile acoustic
trio, 8 p.m. Friday, Feb. 17, at
Capitol Theatre. Tickets on
sale noon Friday, Dec. 23.
Reserved tickets $46 and
$36. Call 727-791-7400 or


visit www.atthecap.com.
Jimmy Buffett tribute
concert, by the Caribbean
Chillers, 3 p.m. Saturday,
Feb. 18, in Curtis Peterson
Auditorium at Lecanto High
School. Only 1,000 tickets
will be sold. Tickets avail-
able at Regions banks, the
Citrus County Chamber of
Commerce, the Key Center
Foundation, and from all
club members. For infor-
mation or to purchase tick-
ets, call Jim Harris at
352-382-1470, Iris Whit-
taker at 352-795-5541 ext.
1313, or Wanda Ashley at
352-228-2253.
Nature Coast
Friends of Blues (NCFB)
presents the "2012 Live
Music Series" line up. All
events are at the Museum
Cafe, 10466 W. Yulee
Drive in Old Homosassa.
$7 non-members and $5
members. All events begin
at 2 p.m. unless otherwise
noted. Visit www.ncfblues.
com for more information.
Saturday, Feb. 18 -
Jeff Hess of Moccasin
Slough opens the show
with a set of original songs
prepared especially for this
gig. From 3 to 5 p.m. listen
to Deja Blues.
Saturday, March 24 -
TEENSTOCK.
Shemekia Copeland,


dling, taxes, or thid-party hosted products (e.g. wine). Discount will appear upon checkout and cannot be combined with other offers or
discounts. Discounts not valid on bulk or corporate purchases of 10 units or more. Images in this advertisement may include upgraded,
premium containers which are available tor an additional charge. Prices valid while supplies last. Offer expires2/28/2012
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Thursday, Feb.23


Gatorade Duel at DAYTONA
The fight to qualify for the 54th
annual Daytona 500 in two
action-packed races.
Each of the two races will have
half the entrants to the DAYTONA
500. The field is divided with the
first race having the cars which
qualified in the DAYTONA 500.


Friday, Feb. 24


NEXTera





NextEra Energy
Resources 250 NASCAR
Camping World Truck
Series
250 miles of intense racing
on Daytona's high banks
under the lights. Tough
trucks, tough competition.


8 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 18, at
Hard Rock Live Orlando.
Tickets $25 to $45. Visit
www.hardrock.com.
Praise Band's Concert
with a Cause, 6:30 p.m.
Sunday, Feb. 19, at First
United Methodist Church's
Family Life Center, 1126 E.
Silver Springs Blvd., (State
Road 40), Ocala, FL 34470.
Child care for nursery to pre-
K provided. Admission free,
but an offering will be taken
to benefit the Tuesday Morn-
ing Ministry to help the home-
less, jobless and others in
need. For information, call
352-622-3244 or 352-537-
0207 or email wayne@
fumcocala.org.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Ray Stevens, 7 p.m.
Tuesday, Feb. 21, The
Peabody Daytona Beach.
$49.65, $70.15. www.ticket
master.com.
Andy Grammer, 8 p.m.
Friday, Feb. 24, at Capitol
theatre in downtown Clear-
water with special guest
Ryan Star. Tickets on sale at
noon Saturday, Dec. 3. Re-
served tickets $25 and
$17.50. For tickets, call 727-
791-7400 or visit www.
atthecap.com.
The Doobie Brothers,
7 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 26, at
Ruth Eckerd Hall, with spe-
cial guest Pablo Cruise. Re-
served tickets $87.50, $53.50
and $39.50. Call 727-791-
7400 or visit www.rutheckerd
hall.com.
Nature Coast Commu-
nity Band concert dates:
Saturday, March 3,
Cornerstone.
Sunday, March 4,
FUMC.
Glen Campbell, 7:30
p.m. Thursday, March 22, at
Capitol Theatre. Tickets on
sale at noon Dec. 17. Re-
served tickets $75. Call 727-
791-7400 or visit www.atthe
cap.com. VIP tickets $125.
Valet parking is available at
most performances.
Diana Krall, 8 p.m.,
Wednesday, March 28, at
Ruth Eckerd Hall. All tickets for
original concert date of Tues-
day, Feb. 14, will be honored.
Tickets $135, $82 and $72 are
available at the Ruth Eckerd
Hall Ticket Office, at 1111 Mc-
Mullen Booth Road in Clear-
water. For information, call the
Ruth Eckerd Hall Ticket Office
at 727-791-7400 or visit
www.rutheckerdhall.com.
Suzy Bogguss, 7:30
p.m. Saturday, March 31, at
Capitol Theatre in Clearwa-
ter. Reserved tickets are $35
and $25 and available at
Ruth Eckerd Hall Ticket Of-
fice, at 1111 McMullen Booth
Road, Clearwater, by calling
727-791-7400 or visiting
www.atthecap.com.
Elvis Costello &
the Imposters, 8 p.m. Tues-
day, April 24, at Ruth Eckerd
Hall.


LIGHr SHINE 2012
Pr itenitdB\ Shepherdf tIht Hills Ep;icopil Church






Who Started the

Myth About a

Fountain of Youth?
by Dr. J. Michael Francis, Professor and Chair of the
Department of History, University of North Florida,
Jacksonville. A lecture and visual presentation on the
Spanish exploration and colonization of Florida as
we approach 500 years of Florida's Spanish heritage.

BThis presentation is funded by the Florida Humanities Council under
a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH)


This Light Shine event is produced by Shepherd of the Hills as an enrichment
program for Citrus County and co-sponsored by the Citrus County Chronicle


CHK6$.~ICLE]


DAYTONA 300 NASCAR DAYTONA 500 NASCAR Sprint Cup Series
Nationwide Series The Day That lasts A Lifetime: Experience
The rising stars of the a day that creates more legends, more
NASCAR Nationwide breathtaking moments and more
Series face off against unforgettable memories than any other.
the stars of the NASCAR Most watched Motorsporns event. Richest
Sprint Cup Series in a and most prestigious race of the year.
120-lap, 300-mile event.


To purchase ti1T Tickets forTSprintTowr Caf :l~l 800 ITSO oJistTR
I w.aionainenaional*peedwa.cmtdvI


Name.....................................................
Phone....................................................
Email.....................................................


TO ENTER:
Fill out this form, mail or bring to
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429
Anytime before Noon on February 17.


CITRUS COUNTY

CHRONICLE Thanks our
0009VLB www.chronicleonline.com loyal subscribers ASK US ABOUT I PAY


Shepherd of the Hills Episcopal Church.
2540 W. Nornell Bryant Highwa% (CR 486). Lecanto
For AMore Infornition. call: 352-52 -0052 am nto I pm


including:
Saturday, Feb. 25 Sunday, Feb. 26





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Teetering on brink of blah


Special to the Chronicle
Elizabeth Banks, left, and Sam Worthington are shown in a scene from "Man on a Ledge." The film opens today.

Review: Thriller about disgraced cop cliched and reheated


CHRISTY LEMIRE
AP Movie Critic
The so-called thriller "Man
on a Ledge," about a dis-
graced cop who threatens to
jump off a building to divert
attention from a heist going
on across the street, isn't even
implausible in a fun way
You see a movie like
"Ocean's 11" or "Tower
Heist" (which is themati-
cally similar to this with its
wily have-nots stealing from
the filthy-rich haves) and
you suspend some disbelief
because they have an irre-
sistible, knowingly giddy en-
ergy about them. "Man on a
Ledge" is so cliched and re-
heated, it almost feels like a
parody of a generic action
picture only no one
seems to be in on the joke.
Director Asger Leth's film
plods along in workmanlike
fashion with its trash-talking
New York cops and its foren-
sic evidence and its elabo-
rate surveillance systems.
Every few minutes, a new
star you recognize shows up:
Anthony Mackie, Edward


BOOK
Continued from Page C1

In between the morning
and afternoon sessions,
Florida folk singer and In-
verness resident Carly Bak
will demonstrate why she is
a popular performer by dis-
playing talent on the
acoustic guitar and man-
dolin from noon to 1 p.m.
One of her songs is about the
now-almost legendary
Turner Camp of Inverness,
which burned last year
The Festival runs from 9
a.m. to 5 p.m. at St. Mar-
garet's Episcopal Church,
114 N. Osceola, in down-
town Inverness, one block
north of U.S. 44.


Bums, Elizabeth Banks, Kyra
Sedgwick, Ed Harris. Some-
times Leth points his camera
through a hotel-room win-
dow and straight down to the
ground below, just to provide
a little rush of vertigo.
At the center of all this is
a bland Sam Worthington
doing a horrible job of dis-
guising his Australian ac-
cent. He stars as Nick
Cassidy, a fugitive who in-
sists he was wrongly impris-
oned for stealing a $40
million diamond from Har-
ris' reptilian real-estate ty-
coon. As Nick teeters along
a ledge on the 21st floor of
the Roosevelt Hotel in mid-
town Manhattan, stalling for
time while toying with
scarred police negotiator
Lydia Mercer (Banks),
Nick's brother Joey (Jamie
Bell) and Joey's stereotypi-
cally saucy Latina girlfriend
Angie (Genesis Rodriguez)
are trying to pull off a real
burglary across the street
How these blue-collar
young folks in love have the
skills, experience and an
unlimited supply of equip-

Admission to the authors'
area is free. Festival goers
planning to buy books
should expect to pay cash or
write checks to individual
authors.
Participants planning to
attend should buy tickets
early, as space will be limited
to no more than 30 people
per seminar, with the excep-
tion of Kennedy's lecture in
the church's sanctuary
Doors will be open at 8
a.m. A package of tickets is
$10 for all seminars. Any in-
dividual seminar will be $5.
More information about
the authors, synopses of
their books and information
about seminars may be
found at gfwcwomansclub
ofinverness.org or by calling
352-634-4216.


ment to rappel down eleva-
tor shafts and hang upside-
down to circumvent a
high-tech security system is
never really explained. But
it is eye-rollingly far-
fetched. Since the script
from Pablo E Fenjves does-
n't bother fleshing out these
characters, you may not
want to bother taxing your-
self by caring. (At least
Angie knew enough to wear
a hot pink pushup bra and
matching lace panties un-
derneath her skin-tight body
suit. Now that's planning.)
Meanwhile, back at the
hotel, things are getting
tense as trust is eroding.
Seems some people in-
volved here aren't telling
the whole truth. Lydia barks
into her walkie-talkie, "This


is MY negotiation," and
Nick shouts to the gawking
masses below, "I am an in-
nocent man!" Every once in
a while Sedgwick shows up
as a cynical TV news re-
porter named Suzie
Morales and she hits that
R in her last name hard as
she's doing her live shots, a
joke that's funny the first
couple times, max.
All the familiar, obligatory
pieces are in place, there's
just never much tension. Or
artistry Or a sense of peril.
Little things like that.
"Man on a Ledge," a Sum-
mit Entertainment release,
is rated PG-13 for violence
and brief strong language.
Running time: 102 minutes.
One and a half stars out of
four


MUSIC REHEARSALS
* Second Sunday Sunset Drum Circle, two hours before
sunset, Sunday, Fort Island Trail Beach Park, Crystal
River, at far end of the beach. Circle begins an hour
and a half before sunset. Bring drums and percussion
instruments (can be a 5-gallon paint bucket or can
filled with beans). Chair necessary, beverages optional.
Charlotte at 352-344-8009 or Linda at 352-746-0655.
* Encore Swing Band rehearses from 6 to 8:30 p.m.
every Monday at Calvary Chapel Cafe, 900 S. U.S. 41,
Inverness. For more information, call director Chaz
lannaci at 352-464-4153 or co-director David Morgan
at 352-302-3742 or email EncoreSwingBand@
embarqmail.com.
* Chorus of The Highlands, The Citrus County chapter
of the Barbershop Harmony Society, rehearses at 6:30
p.m. Tuesday weekly at First United Methodist
Church, 3896 S. Pleasant Grove Road, Inverness,
34452. All male singers welcomed to join. For informa-
tion, call 352-382-0336.
* Hernando Harmonizers, part of Men's Barbershop
Harmony Society, doors open at 6:45 p.m. and re-
hearsals start at 7 p.m. Monday, Nativity Lutheran
Church fellowship hall, 6363 Commercial Way, Spring
Hill. Written arrangements, training techniques and
professional direction provided. Call 352-556-3936 or
352-666-0633 or email BASSharmonySingR@
aol.com.
* Summer Springs Sweet Adelines Chorus invites
women of all ages to their open rehearsals from 1:30
to 4 p.m. Monday at St. John's Lutheran Church,
10495 Sunset Harbor Road, Summerfield. Chorus
membership is not required. Carpool is available from
Inverness. Call Nancy at 352-726-3323 for informa-
tion or to schedule a holiday program with a quartet,
ensemble, or whole chorus.
* The Nature Coast Community Band, under the musi-
cal direction of Cindy Hazzard, rehearses from 6:30 to
8:30 p.m. Tuesday at the Citrus County Canning
Plant Auditorium on Southern Street, Lecanto. Con-
tact Cindy at 352-746-7567 or nccommunityband@
earthlink.net.
* Citrus Community Concert Choir Inc., rehearsals 7
p.m. Tuesday at Faith Lutheran Church Fellowship
Hall, Lecanto. New members are welcome to audition,
beginning at 6:30 p.m. Call 352-628-3492.
* Sugarmill Chorale rehearsals are from 7 to 9 p.m.
Thursday in the choir room at First Baptist Church,
North Citrus Avenue, Crystal River. Enter the building
through the door under the black canopy by the big
trees and exit the same way. Email the director at
sugarmillchoraledirector@yahoo.com or call
352-697-2309.
* Nature Coast Festival Singers' rehearsals, 7 p.m.
Monday, Nativity Lutheran Church, 6363 Commercial
Way (State Road 50), Weeki Wachee. Shirley at
352-597-2235.
* Marion Civic Chorale rehearses from 6:45 to 9 p.m.
Monday at St. George Anglican Cathedral, 5646 S.E.
28th Street in Ocala. Repertoire this "semester" will
be Holocaust Cantata. Call 352-342-1796, 352-537-
0207 or email wayne@fumcocala.org.
Music rehearsals are published at least once a month, space permitting.


'oWt 0do and 4attaie AI faurckade
(7^ Cii)\i(.


IRELANDS NO. 1 BALLAD GROUP
8 Gold Albums!


DUBLIN


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RAMBLERS

ALL THE HITS
RARE OULD TIMES FERRYMAN FLIGHT OF EARLS
PUNCH & JUDY MAN RIGHT ALL RIGHT DUBLIN IN MY TEARS
MOLLY MALONE RAISE THE ROOF CRAIC AND THE PORTER BLACK
appearing at

Saturday, March 10, 2012

2 PM Show
Curtis Peterson Auditorium
All Seats Reserved $20
Tickets available at the American Irish Club,
Rt 490, Lecanto Starting January 30th
(Directly across from St. Scholastica Church & Pope John Paul H Catholic School)
Monday-Saturday 10 AM to 2 PM
For Information Call Carol At
352-341-3603


SCITRU COUNTY

CHpNICME


Enter Today,
for a chance to win a
$50 Publix Gift Card

The sweepstakes ends on January 31, 2012


GOOD LUCK!















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www.chronicleonline.com


Crvstalvf Oaks


Military Card Party

Thursday, February 9, 2012
Reservations Required
Hwy 44 & Crystal Oaks Dr.


I


Lunch served at noon, Card play at 1 p.m.
Fun ~ Prizes ~ Raffle


For more information call 249-4415 or 746-4216


m11e


SCENE


FRIDAY, JANUARY 27, 2012 C7


~I







C Page C8. FRIDAY, JANUARY 27, 2012



COMMUNITY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE ;


News NOTES Why let wishes be known? eWNOTES

Exhibit to show Come to market
work of park staff in Homosassa


The Florida Department of
Environmental Protection's
Ellie Schiller Homosassa
Springs Wildlife State Park
will host a staff arts and crafts
show from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Saturday, Feb. 4.
The exhibit will be in the
park's main entrance and Vis-
itor Center on U.S. 19 in
Homosassa Springs. Partici-
pants will find one-of-a-kind
artwork, photography and
handmade crafts produced
by the employees and volun-
teers of the wildlife park.
For more information, call
the park at 352-628-5343.
Dance, dine with
Lions clubs
Inverness Lions Founda-
tion will have a dance with
Catfish Johnny's Hushpuppy
Band, at 6 p.m. Saturday,
Jan. 28, at Dudley's Auction
House, 4000 Florida Ave.
(U.S. 41), Inverness.
Admission is $5. The event
will also feature Floral City
Lions Club's famous fish fry
outside, beginning at 4 p.m.
prior to the dance, for $5.
For more information, call
John Meyers, president, at
352-270-8529.

A Humane Society
CENTRAL FLA.

Mickey


Special to the Chronicle
Mickey is a wonderful little
7-pound, 7-month-old,
neutered, blue-gray, deer-
type Chihuahua. He is al-
ways happy, with a
non-stop wagging tail. He
enjoys companionship, rid-
ing in the car, sitting on
the couch, walking on a
leash and sleeping in a
bed. He is crate trained
and doing well at his
housebreaking. Mickey
and his canine and feline
friends will be available at
the weekly Saturday adop-
tion event from 10 a.m. to
noon at Pet Supermarket,
Inverness. Visit www.A
HumaneSocietyPet
Rescue.com. If you must
give up your dog, call 352-
527-9050 for little dogs, or
352-795-1745 for Dober-
man Pinschers. Leave your
name, number and infor-
mation about how you
need help.


Hospice to offer advanced health care directives presentation


Special to the Chronicle

If you would like help understand-
ing what and why it is important to
have advanced health care directives
to ensure personal medical care and
wishes are honored, HPH Hospice in-
vites you to a free community presen-
tation addressing these topics.
The seminar will be from 9 a.m. to
noon (with registration at 8:30 a.m.)


Wednesday, Feb. 1, at HPH Hospice
administrative offices, 3545 N.
Lecanto Highway (Winn-Dixie Shop-
ping Plaza), Beverly Hills.
The presentation will be given by
George Germann, PA., and David Mc-
Grew, M.D. Germann is an attorney
specializing in probate, estate plan-
ning, guardianships and elder law and
a HPH Hospice Board of Directors
member. Dr. McGrew is medical di-


rector for HPH Hospice.
These experts will discuss advance
directives, choosing the right health
care surrogate, who should have
copies of your advance directives,
pros and cons of CPR and more useful
information; all explained in easy-to-
understand terms.
Pre-registration is required and
seating is limited. Call HPH Hospice
at 352-527-4600 to register


Lunch with New Yorkers
The New York Club will meet for its Feb-
ruary luncheon at noon Thursday, Feb. 9,
at the Inverness Golf & Country Club.
The White Elephant Auction will be the
fun for the month. Bring all of your "ele-
phants" you no longer have use for to do-
nate to the auction. The auction is the
club's only fundraiser, and proceeds are
used to help those in need.
All are welcome; being from New York is
not a requirement. On the menu are: pot
roast or chicken marsala, baby bakers,
honey-glazed carrots, dinner rolls and
chocolate mousse. Coffee, tea, or soft
drinks are included with all lunches. Lunch
reservations must be made by
Wednesday, Feb. 1.
Check in when you arrive for your meal
choice ticket. Cost is $12 per person,
which includes tax and tip. Write your meal
choice on your check and mail to: New
York Club, P.O. Box 641261, Beverly Hills,
FL 34464.
Dues for the club are $6 per person for


WE WANT
TO USE
YOUR
PHOTOS


the season, October through May. The club
supports the nonprofit Citrus Abuse Shelter
Association (CASA) and requests dona-
tions of household supplies, toiletries, baby
supplies and cash.
For more information, call Dot or Ed at
352-527-2332.

Jerseyans, friends gather
New Jersey and Friends Club of Citrus
County will meet at 1 p.m. Monday, Feb. 6,
at VFW Post 4252, State Road 200, Her-
nando.
The guest speaker will address estate
planning and wills.
The club will have lunch at 3 p.m.
Wednesday, Feb. 8, at Crackers in Crystal
River, and at 3 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 22,
at Yanni's in Homosassa.
Reservations are being taken for the an-
nual bus trip to Biloxi slated for Jan. 29 to
Feb. 1. Also scheduled is a day trip to
Tampa Bay Downs on Feb. 29. For more
information, call Mary Anne at 352-
746-3386.


* Photos must be in sharp focus.
* Photos submitted electronically must have
resolution of at least 800, and be in JPEG
(.jpg) format.


Being from New Jersey is not a require-
ment to join. Call 352-527-3568.
Annual Maine Day Feb. 14
The "Annual Maine Day" celebration will
be Tuesday, Feb. 14, at the Beverly Hills
Recreation Hall, 77 Civic Circle, Beverly
Hills. Doors open at 9:30 and serving starts
at 11:30 a.m.
Cost is $5 per person plus a casserole
or salad to share. Coffee, iced tea, lemon-
ade, dessert and settings provided. Enter-
tainment will be by singer Carol Kline. Door
prizes will be awarded. A 50/50 raffle will
take place. All are welcome, whether from
Maine or not.
Call Mary Lou at 352-795-9181.
Michigan Belleville Day
A Michigan Belleville Day luncheon will
be at 12:15 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 15, at
Spartan Manor, 6121 Massachusetts Ave.,
New Port Richey.
Call 727-868-6748 for information
and reservations. Visit the website at
www.spartanmanor.com/home.html.


* All persons in the photo must be identified,
with full names, from left to right.
* For more information or to talk to a Chronicle
photographer for tips, call (352) 563-5660.


Herry's Market Day will be
from 8 a.m. to noon Satur-
day, Jan. 28, at the Hospice
Thrift Shoppe, 8471 W. Peri-
winkle Lane, Homosassa
(behind Wendy's, east of
U.S. 19).
The outdoor flea market
features a variety of mer-
chandise from old to ordinary
to useful, sublime, cool and
collectible. Vendor space is
available. Contact Caroline
at 352-527-2020 for more in-
formation or visit www.
hospiceofcitruscounty.org.
Vets plan cook-off
and auction
American Legion Auxiliary
Unit 155, Crystal River, will
have its annual Chili/Corn-
bread Cook-off and Chinese
Auction Saturday, Jan. 28, at
the post home, 6585 W.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crys-
tal River. After the judging,
the chili and cornbread will
be available for purchase for
a nominal donation.
If you would like to enter
either chili or cornbread,
have it at the post by 11:30
a.m. Saturday, Jan. 28.
While waiting for the
judges' decisions, enjoy the
Chinese Auction, which will
feature many items to win.
Doors will open about 11
a.m. and the winning tickets
will be picked about 2 p.m.
All members and the public
are welcome.
For more information, call
Unit President Shawn Miku-
las, 352-503-5325, or Bar-
bara Logan, 352-795-4233.
Learn about the
'ultimate flower'
The public is invited to a
free presentation by Ed and
Lyn Bugbee of Featherstone
Orchids at 10:30 a.m.
Wednesday, Feb. 1, in the li-
brary meeting room at Dun-
nellon Public Library, 20351
Robinson Road.
The talk is sponsored by
the Friends of the Dunnellon
Public Library.
After a trip to the Orient,
the Bugbees began growing
orchids in a sunroom adja-
cent to their farmhouse.
In 1994, they began
Featherstone Orchids in
Crystal River. Now they have
four
green-
will speak Feb. 1.with
Thmore
than
6,000
square
Ed and feet of

will speak Feb. 1. space.
grow an extensive array of
orchids through their world-
wide connections, while at
the same time sharing their
experiences to help others
grow and enjoy orchids.
For more information, call
the library at 352-438-2520.


Religion NOTES


Glad Tidings
Sabbath school begins at 9 a.m. Saturday with
song, then study at Glad Tidings Church. Divine
hour follows at 11 a.m.; Elder Sweet continues the
series on Hebrews with sermon No. 16. A vegan
lunch will follow.
Bible study is at 6 p.m. Thursday. All are invited.
CHIP (Coronary Health Improvement Program)
alumni meet at 5 p.m. the first Monday monthly.
For information, call Bob at 352-628-1743. The
church is at 520 N.E. Third Ave., Crystal River.
Inverness SDA
Saturday Sabbath school starts at 9:10 a.m.;
Saturday Children's classes begin at 9:30; Toddler
class at 9:45; adult Bible study at 9:50 a.m.
Pastor Sabo will speak on "Liberty: A Way of
Life?" at the 11 a.m. service Saturday. Vespers
with Kay Pallet and Friends will begin at 5:30 p.m.
in the sanctuary
Prayer meeting is at 6 p.m. Wednesday. Thrift
store is open 9 a.m. to noon Wednesday. The
Health Food Store is open 9 a.m. to noon and re-
opens again at 7 p.m. Wednesday, and after Ves-
pers on Saturday.
The church is at 638 S. Eden Gardens, 4.5
miles east of Inverness off State Road 44.
The church phone number is 352-726-9311.
See www.sda-inverness.org.


Hernando SDA
Hemando Seventh-day Adventist Sabbath serv-
ices start at 11 a.m. Saturday.
The adult Bible study begins at 9:15 a.m. Satur-
day with a song service, followed by a short pro-
gram and then main Bible study at 10 a.m.
Classes for children are at 9:30 a.m.
The church is at 1880 N. Trucks Ave., west of
Hernando; phone 352-344-2008.
Homosassa SDA
Norman Deakin will be speaker at the 11 a.m.
divine worship service Saturday.
Sabbath school at 9:30 a.m. Saturday will be a
special meet and greet. Sabbath school study be-
gins at 10 a.m. with Andy Roberts on "The God of
Grace and Judgement." Sue Halstead will talk
about "His Own Testimony" at the 10 a.m. adult be-
ginners Bible study class.
Bible study at 7 p.m. Tuesday will look at "Steps
to Christ." Men's study group meets at 6:30 p.m.
Thursday.
For more information, call Bob Halstead at 352-
382-7753. The church is at 5863 Cardinal St.
Congregation Beth Sholom
The fall semester of the Etz Hayim Institute-
Adult Education Program of Congregation Beth
Sholom continues on Monday evenings:


Medieval Jewish History is offered 7 to 8 p.m.;
Studies in Bible: The Writings (Part 2) is offered
8:15 to 9:15 p.m. Classes are open to the entire
community. Each class is $5 per session, plus
textbook. Register by email at mkamlot2@
gmail.com or call 352-643-0995.
Spring semester begins Feb. 6 with new
courses: The 613 The Torah, the Five Books of
Moses, contains 613 commandments and Ju-
daism teaches that Israel obligated itself to ob-
serve all these commandments with the covenant
at Sinai. If you've ever wondered what these com-
mandments are, this is the class for you. This
course will delineate all 613 and students will learn
how these commandments are derived either di-
rectly or indirectly from the biblical text. Class is 7
to 8 p.m. in 18 sessions; $5 per session.
Movers, Shakers and Thinkers Part biogra-
phy, part ideas, part analysis: This class will exam-
ine the most prominent movers, shakers and
thinkers of the Jewish world during the past 100
years and see how they impacted the develop-
ment of Judaism and Jewish history during this
time. Class is 8:15 to 9:15 p.m. for 18 sessions; $5
per session.
Congregation Beth Sholom with Hazzan
Mordecai Kamlot as cantor/spiritual leader, is at
102 Civic Circle, Beverly Hills. Call
352-643-0995 or 352-746-5303.


Advent Hope
Bible study is at 10 a.m. Saturday for all ages.
The worship service begins at 11:30 a.m. After
the service, there is a weekly potluck.
Vegetarian store is open from 10 a.m. to noon
each Wednesday. The church is at 428 N.E.
Third Ave., Crystal River. Call 352-794-0071 or
visit online at www.adventhopechurch.com.
Event benefits Agape House
The public is invited to a concert at 3 p.m. Sat-
urday, Jan. 28, at First Baptist Church of Crystal
River.
Enjoy an afternoon of music by the Mast
Brothers, while supporting the Agape House, a
church ministry for people in need. The concert
is free, but a freewill offering will benefit Agape
House.
Agape House is an all-volunteer ministry
where everything is donated and everything is
free for people in need. This includes clothing
and shoes for each family member, Bibles, toi-
letries and, if needed, household items such as
dishes, silverware, pots and pans, small appli-
ances, bed and bath linens, blankets, etc.
For more information, call the church at 352-
795-3367. Agape House can be reached
Wednesday at 352-795-7064.


* Submit information at least two weeks before the event. U Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
* Early submission of timely material is appreciated, but Crystal River; by fax at (352) 563-3280; or email to
multiple publications cannot be guaranteed. community@chronicleonline.com.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be guaranteed.
* Expect notes to run no more than once.


Grant for Tommy Tucker


Special to the Chronicle
At the Jan. 12 Partners for a Substance-Free Citrus Inc. Appreciation Breakfast at Cornerstone Baptist Church, TD Bank
awarded $5,000 for the Tommy Tucker Project. The project is a multidisciplinary educational program that focuses on the
harm of underage alcohol, prescription drug abuse and tobacco use. The curriculum utilizes a comic book with the char-
acter of a superhero, Tommy Tucker. Middle school students are trained to serve as mentors/trainers for fifth-grade stu-
dents, who in turn teach the curriculum to third-grade students. From left are: Alida Langley, chairwoman, Partners for a
Substance-Free Citrus Inc.; Renna Jablonskis, executive director, Partners for a Substance-Free Citrus Inc.; Catherine
Jamroz, TD Bank Crystal River manager; Alpha McGaughey, TD Bank Inverness manager; and Gwynn Virostek, TD Bank
retail market manager.


Affairs ofSTATES






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FRIDAY EVENING JANUARY 27, 2012 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D/: Comcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
c B D/I F H 6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 18:30 9:00 19:30 10:0010:3011:0011:30
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I0 WEU PBS 3 3 14 6 News Business Stereo) B Week sings with many artists.'G' writer Joan Baez.'PG
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0 WFLNBC 8 8 8 8 8 News Ton. 'PG' Sarah" (N)'PG' (N)'PG B Stereo) 'PG' c
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S ~lV ABC 20 20 20 News (N) G' Fortune ing service. (N) You Do? (N) PG'B News (N)x
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i*** "Dirty Dancing" (1987) Jennifer Grey A sheltered *** "Pretty Woman" (1990) Richard Gere. A corporate The 700 Club 'PG' B
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FIOD)1 26 56 26 Diners Diners Best |Best Diners Diners Diners |Diners Diners Diners Diners |Crave
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WGN-A 18 18 18 18 20 30 Rock 30 Rock Funny Home Videos Mother Mother Mother Mother WGN News at Nine 30 Rock Scrubs


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
AVREB E

2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc
All Rights Reserved
WIRTL



LOTTUES



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ENTERTAINMENT


Answer here: I I I I I I I
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's I Jumbles: MACAW HOUSE TERROR SCORCH
I Answer: The student driver was leery of this type of
driving instruction A CRASH COURSE


Bridge

PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

Mark Twain said, "If the world comes to an end,
I want to be in Cincinnati. Everything comes there
10 years later."
This deal was not played in Cincinnati, but one
of those words is apropos of the right line of play
South is in four spades. West leads the heart
queen. The defenders take two tricks in the suit,
then shift to a diamond. How should declarer con-
tinue?
It would be easy to end in three no-trump here,
North raising immediately when South shows a
balanced hand with a good 22, 23 or 24 points. But
with minimal game values and a low doubleton,
North is probably right to use Stayman to try to lo-
cate a 4-4 spade fit And here it is certainly better
because East and West can rattle off the first five
tricks in no-trump. (The snag with Stayman arises
when a 4-4 fit is not found, because the defenders
have been given extra information about de-
clarer's hand.)
In four spades, the mirror distribution is annoy-
ing (as it usually is). There are three side-suit los-
ers: two hearts and one diamond. So the trump
suit must be played without loss.
It is easy to get careless by immediately cross-
ing to dummy's king, then returning to the ace. But
that is fatal here, because there is no dummy entry
left to take a finesse of the spade 10.
Instead, South should cash his ace, then play the
five over to dummy's king. Upon seeing the bad
break (despite West's discarding a club!), declarer
knows to lead a spade to his 10, draw East's last
trump, and claim.
Don't overlook the power of your 10s, now or
later


North
4K 7 6 3
V 9 4
*652
4 8 7 5 2


West
4 8
V Q J 10 5 3
* 10 8 7 3
* 10 4 3


1-27-12


East
4 J 9 4 2
VA K 8 6
SQJ 9
49 6


South
4 A Q 10 5
V 7 2
AK 4
4 AK QJ

Dealer: South
Vulnerable: North-South


South
2NT
2 NT
3


West
Pass
Pass
Pass


North
24
3 J6
44


East
Pass
Pass
All pass


ACROSS
1 Cement
component
5 Less than Ige.
8 English
cathedral
town
11 Was able to
13 Wield an ax
14 Beads on
grass
15 Mannequin
16 Vast
18 Grandson of
Adam
20 Dalai Lama's
city
21 Wild
23 Sault Marie
24 voyage!
25 Legend
27 Swiss range
31 Diligent insect
32 Mr. Sharif
33 Cold cuts
vendor
34 Theory
36 Stuffed shirt
38 $1,000,000,
slangily


39 Mountain lake
40 Consumer
41 Plastic -
Band
42 Startled cries
44 Loggins or
Rogers
46 Ooze out
49 Hairy twin
50 Peruses again
52 Footlights
56 Not Dem. or
Rep.
57 Split
58 Bygone
anesthetic
59 Perfume label
word
30 Diego
61 Sturdy lock

DOWN
1 Kind of DPC


Answer to Previous Puzzle


. ..nu . 5 Electrical
monitor units
2 Cash titute 6 Common
substitute Market, briefly
3 Shaggy flower 7 Resided
4 Big name in 8 Ms. Ferber
glue 9 Oahu wear


Swimming
pool loc.
Go-getter
Out in front
Zeus' home
"On Golden
Pond" star
Register for
Piercing
screams
Enticement
Old salts
Bummer of a
car
Roman
naturalist
Fodder
storage
Battery's "+"
end
Bribe,
informally
Holds up well
Zany
Great Lake
TV warrior
princess
Language of
Pakistan
Sports
network
Width of a cir.
Gleeful shout
Hair tamer
Before, in
sonnets


D ear Annie: I never
thought I'd be writing,
but here I am. I was a sin-
gle mother and strug-
gled to raise my
children without
help. They are all
good kids.
One daughter,
"Susan," lives 2,000
miles away from the
rest of the family. She
left home early, went
to the big city and ed-
ucated herself. She is
the only member of
the family to have a ANN
degree, and we are MAIL
very proud of her.
Susan has worked
hard to distance herself from
her blue-collar roots. She has
high expectations of the rest of
her family in terms of our be-
havior and attitudes, and we in-
variably disappoint her.
Recently, Susan cut off all con-
tact because the stress of deal-
ing with us is "making her ill."
Next spring, Susan will be
marrying into a wealthy family.
She has made it clear we are not
to behave in any manner that
embarrasses her and informed
me she will have friends "keep-
ing an eye on us" throughout the
event. It hurts all of us that we
are not up to par for the social
circles she is now a part of.
If I go to the wedding, I cannot
genuinely be myself. I was look-
ing forward to meeting her new
in-laws. (I haven't met them in
the five years she's been with
her fianc&.) I want to share in
Susan's joy, but I feel I'll be an
actor in her play. She doesn't
truly want me there. She only


wants me to fill a role.
Do I bow out of the celebra-
tion and regret it for the rest of
my life? Or do I at-
tend and participate
in this charade? -
Heartbroken Mother
of the Bride
Dear Mother:
You've answered
your own question. If
you don't attend,
you'll regret it for the
rest of your life. So
go. Most weddings re-
quire a certain
IE'S amount of play-acting
BOX and being on one's
very best behavior.
Surely you can man-
age it for a few hours on Susan's
wedding day. Yes, she seems
more than a little snobby, but if
you don't focus on how much
you dislike your role at the wed-
ding, you might even enjoy your-
self. Please try
Dear Annie: I am a bartender
and waitress at a small local
restaurant. We recently worked
a big party that included drinks
and a three-course meal. When
it came time to pay, the cus-
tomer left us a fairly large tip.
When my boss found out how
much money they left, he de-
cided to take a portion of it. He
said he deserved it, because he
provided the atmosphere and
decorations and helped cook
the meal.
I was under the assumption a
tip goes to the server. Wouldn't
the customer be insulted to
know the owner is not only get-
ting the profits from the restau-
rant, but also taking the tips?
Am I being greedy, or does this


seem wrong to you? -Michigan
Dear Michigan: In most in-
stances, owners are not legally
entitled to take the tips given di-
rectly to their servers, even if the
owners are helping out in the
kitchen or at the bar. If your boss
makes a habit of this, you can re-
port him to the local labor board.
Dear Annie: I read the letter
from "Jane in Ohio," who is
angry because her husband only
takes her dancing once a week.
Many of my friends and I are
widows. We go dancing four or
five times a week, but we do
country line dancing. This
means we no longer need a
partner and can be on the floor
all night without having to wait
to be asked to dance. It is good
fun and great exercise, and
there are lessons at almost
every senior center. Jane might
enjoy doing that on the nights
when her husband wants to stay
home. Marci in Ohio
Dear Marci: Several readers
recommended line dancing
since it doesn't require a partner.
We hope Jane will look into it.


Annie's Mailbox is written by
Kathy Mitchell and Marcy
Sugar, longtime editors of the
Ann Landers column. Please
email your questions to annies-
mailbox@comcast.net, or write
to: Annie's Mailbox, c/o Cre-
ators Syndicate, 737 3rd Street,
Hermosa Beach, CA 90254. To
find out more about Annie's
Mailbox and read features by
other Creators Syndicate writ-
ers and cartoonists, visit the
Creators Syndicate Web page
a t www crea tors. com.


Opening lead: V Q


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


NACHO POSSE
A I LOR MESHED
PLOMB YACHTS
B S E AN KA
YO GAERAFT
AGE K LROE
RONGS OPERA
INDU FOUND
ESEMTSARGAS
N O EM
RAC EARL
INTACT AGLEA
REALMS PATINA
ENSE BLOND


FRIDAY, JANUARY 27, 2012 C9

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
I hear he needed the
I hear they are moneyto cover his
paying him a lot gambling debts.
of money'or th -. ,.
I can't belie. : -
meeting yo : '
Highne:

1 A

' i i




THE PRINCE 51GNED
THE BOOK DEAL- 50 HE
COULP GE-T --
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


I





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Peanuts


Garfield


I LEARNED A I
LOT AT TIE PIP,
ART MUSEUM.. TOO..
C-3


I THINK I
LEARNED 50METHING
VERY IMPORTANT...


F~L


I'LL NEVER BE
ANDREW WYETH..


Pickles


I6-rA,"\ / Eg ,
YCo thi IT I6,
T16 PHTO, T ELSO),i
SRAMMAT t-




F!-? -


Sally Forth


TED AND SALLY NEVER MET IN COLLEGE WHAT ARE YOU TALKING
-- ^ ABOUT? I CALL YOU "SAL"
OKAY, I KNOW THIS DID YOU JUST ALL THE TIME.
INTERVIEW'S BEEN CALL ME "SAL"?
ODD, SAL, BUT- NO ONE'S EVER WHAT DO YOU MEAN
CALLED ME "SAL." "ALL THE TIME"?


ARE THE MAN, THIS BETTER
WALLS NOT BE THAT FLU
STARTING SHOT I GOT AT THE:
TO GET 99 CENT PHARMACY.
XAA 0 T "


Dilbert


The Born Loser


Kit 'N' Carlyle Rubes


t "...And in the wake of massive layoffs,
S2012 UFS, Inc. management is pleased to report a
Distributed by Universal Uclick for UFS significant reduction of employee time
spent in unproductive meetings."


Doonesbury


60YERNOR TH. PROB&FM WITH
ROMVY, P&EA AMERICA TOPAY 15
HNISH THI5 1EA HUAVE TOO MANY..
5 NTeNCE..








Big Nate


SPLUTTER'. I'M
D.ENCHEDC!D









Arlo and Janis -


MATE, WHAT
ON EARTH...
I. T .

AH-
HA!


I KNEW IT! I KNEW
YoU'D SCREW UP!
T WIN THE BET,
'CAUSE YOU'RE ABOUT
TO GET DETENTION!


WHAT BET? AND
wHO SAYS HE'S
ABOUT To GET
DETENTION?


For Better or For Worse

ER/y WINTLKERHE K1DS THIS VEfARo HN OT-fEM
USED -To fTSO BORED. f VIDEO GRMEFOKR CHRISTMfl
ThE NOISE DROVE E -RNDTMEy/'RE OCCUPIED FLL
2RflZL/! ^ET ME' E








Beetle Bailey


BUPl TROUBLE IS .-.THE
T NOIGE STILL DRWES
E ME- CRf ..-





/ -. -
L--'*>- '^i -lj. -^r


The Grizzwells


Blondie

wantsT S THAT?||


ACTUALLY, IT'S ONE' HOW MANY
OF MY HUSBAND'S PEOPLE
I- CREATION5 ( DOES IT
S.FEED




V,%_ \"\i


Dennis the Menace The Family Circus


"IF 'OUdRE THE SITTER,POESWTAT
MAKe F THE SITTETE "
Betty


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377
"The Grey" (R) ID required. 1:20 p.m., 4:10 p.m.,
7:20 p.m., 10:10 p.m.
"One For The Money" (PG-13) 1:50 p.m., 4:45
p.m., 7:50 p.m., 10:15 p.m.
"Man on a Ledge" (PG-13) 1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m.,
7:30 p.m., 10:15 p.m.
"Red Tails" (PG-13) 1 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:10 p.m., 10:05
p.m.
"Underworld Awakening" (R) ID required. In Real
3D. 1:40 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7:40 p.m., 10:10 p.m. No
passes.
"Joyful Noise" (PG-13) 1:10 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:05
p.m., 10:05 p.m.

Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Man on a Ledge" (PG-13) 2 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:50


p.m., 10:15 p.m.
"One For The Money" (PG-13) 1:45 p.m., 4:20
p.m., 7:30 p.m., 9:50 p.m.
"The Grey" (R) ID required. 1:40 p.m., 4:40 p.m.,
7:20 p.m., 10:05 p.m.
"Haywire" (R) ID required. 1:35 p.m., 4:45 p.m.,
7:55 p.m., 10:15 p.m.
"Red Tails" (PG-13) 1:20 p.m., 4:05 p.m., 7:15 p.m.,
10p.m.
"Underworld Awakening" (R) ID required. In Real
3D. 1:30 p.m., 5 p.m., 7:45 p.m., 10 p.m. No passes.
"Contraband" (R) ID required. 1:50 p.m., 4:50 p.m.,
7:40 p.m., 10:10 p.m.
"Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close" (PG-13)
1:15 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:05 p.m., 9:55 p.m.
"The Descendants" (R) ID required. 1:25 p.m., 4
p.m., 7 p.m., 9:45 p.m.


Times subject to change; call ahead.


WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public Local RADIO WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Contemp. WSKY 97.3 FM News Talk WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WXOF-FM 96.3 Adult Mix WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s, '60s, '70s
WEKJ FM 96.7, 103.9 Religious WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WRZN-AM 720 Adult Standards

CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: K equals L


"AWRGLY CRX SGHOLW CHW ON FW


TNHW NUOWR UNLRX DKNOPWX GR AHCM


OPCR GR VWCDNDJ FHGAPO."


SCR ZMDJ FHNNJY

Previous Solution: "It's not the most intellectual job in the world, but I do have to
know the letters." Vanna White
(c) 2012 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 1-27


ONE..I.F YOU'RE
MY HUSBAND



- \ ,.


"I'm not sure whether Daddy does
that 'cause he likes us or is just
trying' to build his muscles."


Frank & Ernest


Today's MOVIES


C10 FRIDAY, JANUARY 27, 2012


COMICS






CLASSIFIED


CITRUS COUNTY





HkONICLE
Swww.chronicleonline.com


BUSINESS HOURS:

MONDAY-FRIDAY

8:00 A.M. 5:00 P.M.

CLOSED SATURDAY/SUNDAY



WE GLADLY ACCEPT

- Bisfl i
iVIS4'-1 W"^


FRIDAY, JANUARY 27, 2012 ClL


Classifieds


Classifieds In Print and Online All The Time!


Publication Days/Deadlines

Chronicle / Daily..................................... 1 PM, Daily
Homefront / Sunday...............................3 PM, Friday
Chronicle / Sunday.............................4...4 PM, Friday
Chronicle / Monday............................4...4 PM, Friday
Sumter County Times / Thursday.............11 AM, Tuesday
Riverland News / Thursday.....................2 PM, Monday
South Marion Citizen / Friday..................4 PM, Tuesday
West Marion Messenger / Wednesday.......4 PM, Friday


A GENT, 69-79+ with
old-fashion manners
would be my ideal
friend, to share simple
joys If you are tender
hearted,
optimistic and like
laughter, it would be
great to hear from you.
Send response to
Cit. County Chronicle
Blind Box 1752 M
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Bvd. Crys. Riv. Fl. 34429
Male 64 5' 5" 2201bs,
trimmed beard, full
hair, spiritual, romantic,
understanding, diplo-
matic, looking again to
grow and luminate the
future with casual
clean cut positive
woman. Send response
to: Chronicle, Blind box
1753M, 1624 N Mead-
owcrest Blvd, Crystal
River, FL 34429

,. e ._


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
# ,# -- ,# ,# ,


Meadowcrest
Emily, Hi Honey, I have
not talked to you in
quite a while. Bought
new phone, new com-
pany and new answer-
ing machine. Address
is the same phone
number is 352-419-7673.
Call or stop by.
Your Lover, Rodie

Single White Female,
Searching for
Older gentleman,
outgoing, pretty, fit and
fun. Relocating Soon
to area. Write or Email
413 Route 940 #222
Mt. Pocono PA, 18344
email: mwoodcock204
@gmailcom

Would a handsome
man in his seventies
like to meet a still
attractive widow who
is independent, and
needs desperately a
good man for
company?
Please respond to:
Citrus Chronicle
Blind Box 1751P
1624 N Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River, Fl
34429.

WWS seeking female
for friendship. Age not
important. Semi-retired,
NS, ND. Real Estate
interest a plus. Call
Randy(352) 563-1033




8 Person Hot Tub
$500 obo
(989) 553-3631

22 GOLF CARTS
$5,900
(315) 466-2268

5,550 W Generator
Brigg & Straton,
w/ 11.5 HPSubaru
Engine Like New
$400.
(352) 302-6069

12x24 Metal Shed
with roll up doors, regu-
lar $5000, sell for $4000
delivered w/extras
used 1 month!, New!
352-341-8479








Beverly Hills
Fri. & Sat. 8am-3pm
Household tools
furniture, lots of misc.
95 S Jefferson St


'99 Nissan Frontier
4 cyl, AT/AC 1 senior
citizen owner with
gentle miles $3950
(352) 726-3268
CHICKEN
MANURE/FERTILIZER
Time to get your
garden's ready! 201b.
bag $4.00 352-563-1519
Citrus Springs
Friday & Sat 9-?
TVs. and lots of misc
2410 W Jonquil Dr
CLUB CAR
'06 $1,400,
with charger
352-344-8516


MOVING
SALE

Crystal
River
Fri. & Sat. 8am-5pm
Sunday 1pm-5pm
Too much to List!
8358 Marinozzo Terr.
Derosa area


YARD SALE
CRYSTAL RIVER
Sat. Feb. 18, 7A-1P
Spaces for Rent
$10 ea. Benefit the
First Pres. Church of
Crsy. Riv Food Pantry
1501 SE US 19
(352) 746-7585
Estate Sale
1417 W Pringle PI
Citrus Springs
Sat. 1/28-Sun. 1/29
8am-4pm Only

HOMOSASSA
LIONS CLUB
INDOOR SALE.
Sat. Feb4th 8a- 1p
SR 490
DEALERS Wanted
call Lion Bob,
(352) 382-3679 Info.
House helper
B&B needs help, ideal
for student Call
between 6pm-8pm
352-726-1832
INVERNESS
710 MayflowerAve
ESTATE SALE PLUS
MORE. Vintage china,
misc. HH, W/D, ladies'
clothes l/xl, huge coll.
country 8 tracks & 78's,
NEW fridge,+++
JUSTIN LAWN CARE
Fast and Affordable.
and Friendly, Licensed.
(352) 476-3985
MERCURY '99
Villager Estate, 7 pass.,
low mi., loaded, hitch,
excel. cond. $3,200
(352) 270-8475


000A291

Sudoku ***** 4puz.com

314


7 54 9


9 6


3 68 1


6 7


_4 25 3


3 5


5 62 4


________367

Fill in the squares so that each row, column, and
3-by-3 box contain the numbers 1 through 9,


BATTERIES: BATTERY REBUILD SERVICES:
Laptop / GPS Cordless Power Tools
Cell / Cordless Phone U.P.S. Backup |
Camera / Camcorder Cordless Vacuums
Watch / Electronics Custom Battery Rebuild
Wheelchair / Scooter J I
Rechargeables / Chargers atte |
Airsoft/RC etC. M

3850 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy, Inverness

New Store Hours: Mon.-Fri. 9am-5pm, Saturday 10am-5pm & Closed Sunday
(352) 344-1962 Mention this coupon geta free pack of batteries.


Lecanto 2/1
MH $550./mo $500 dep.
352- 628-2312 Lv mess
UTILITY TRAILER Open
5x10, drive up ramp, 3
new R15 tires, good
condition. $650.
701-526-3619



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
Paid for Junk Vehicles
J.W. 352-228-9645
$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not
CASH PAID $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL OF
Scrap Medal, Mowers
Appliances and MORE
Call (352) 224-0698



4 ADULT CATS
Declawed, spayed
& neutered
(352) 344-3138
America Pit Bull


NO CATS!!!!
(352) 464-3983
Free beautiful small
brindled female cat,
fixed, has shots, 1 year
old, indoor or outdoor
companion. Prefers a
single cat family. Great
for a senior.
352-257-1794
Free Chickens
6 Chickens
1 Rooster
(352) 465-1688
FREE FIRE WOOD
2 Large Oaks cut down
(352) 564-4598
Free puppies, pit and
kerr mix, 6 weeks old,
outside dogs, good
watch dogs.
(352) 287-3384
Jack Russell male
8 y.o.Free to good
home UTD on shots
needs fenced yard.
Call CJ (352) 270-6200
KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Savage Pays top $$$.

MOVING OR DE-
CLUTTERING ? Quality
items needed for church
yardsale. Tax deductible
receipt provided.Can pick
up. 352-621-0175
PIT BULL MIX Fun loving
well behave approx 2
year old female great
around kids and other
pets needs some one to
love her badly contact
352-628-5465 for more
info
Sammi, large dog
needs loving home
w/fenced yd. call
(352) 794-3768



FRESH CITRUS @
BELLAMY GROVE
STRAWBERRIES,
CABBAGE
Located 1.5 mi. E. on
Eden Dr. from Hwy. 41
Inv. GIFT SHIPPING
9A-5P, 352-726-6378
CLOSED SUN
FRESH JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct.@ $5 per lb
Stone Crab@ $6 per Ib
d.Iil; .r.... 7 27-77/=1 _7! fn


REWARD $1000.
No Questions ask.
Min Pin Female 10 lbs
name Zoey, Needs
meds. last seen Sun 8/7
Holiday Dr off Turkey
Oak Crystal River
(352) 257-9546
352-400-1519
We have lost our
beloved 4yr old male
Golden
Retriever/Poodle mix
who goes by the
name Toby; S.
Apopka and Lynn St.,
Inverness. If anyone
has seen him, please
call 352-302-6277 or
352-257-8610. He may
be wearing half of a
nylon leash around
his neck or body
since it was either
chewed or cut. He is
not wearing a collar
or tags. He is VERY
friendly and shows
NO aggression at all.


LOST Aluminum
Walking Cane
4 legs on bottom
last seen at
Sheriff Ranch Thrift
Store on 1/20/12
Bad back. Please call
(352) 794-3463




Small Dog
Female, youth
Forest Lake Subdivision
Hernando
(352) 637-5961
STILL LOOKING FOR
HIS HOME ORANGE
MALE CAT FOUND IN
BEVERLY HILLS
PLEASE CALL TO IDEN-
TIFY HE REALLY
MISSES HIS HOME
(231)597-6577






Precious Paws
Rescue, Inc.
preciouspawsflori-
da.com
726-4700




"RESCUING PETS
FOUR PAWS AT A
TIME"







ADOPTIONS
CRYSTAL RIVER MALL
U.S. Hwy. 19
Crystal River
THurs. Fri. Sat & Sun
Noon-4pm


PETSUPERMARKET
2649 E. Gulf to Lake
Hwy.
Inverness
(cats only)
Regular store hours


ADOPTIONS are
held Sat
llamtill 1pm
Pet Supermarket
Inverness
We are in NEED of
FOSTERS to help save
more dogs. To foster
or volunteer please
contact us or come
to visit us at Pet
Supermarket
Inverness

CAT
ADOPTIONS










Come see
our
adorable cats and
kittens that are
available for
adoption.
We are open
10:00 A. till 4:00 P.
Monday-Saturday.
All Cats and Kittens
are micro-chipped,
altered, & tested for
Feline Luk and Aids.
Up to date
on vaccines for age
appropriate.
Phone 352-613-1629
Visit us at
www.hofspha.ora.
or stop by our offices
at 1149 N Conant Ave.
Corner of 44 and
Conant.
Look for the big white
building with the
bright paw prints.


Huge discounts when
you buy 2 types of
advertising! 122
weekly newspapers,
32 websites, 25 daily
newspapers. Call
now to diversify your
advertising with Ad-
vertising Networks of
Florida
(866)742-1373 ww.
florida-classifieds.com
RED GREEN LIVE
Experience this hilarious
one-man show.
April 5,Tampa Theatre
800-745-3000.
April 7. News-Journal
Centre. Davidson
Theatre, Daytona State
College. 800-595-4849
www.redgreen.com



FRESH JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct.@ $5 per lb
Stone Crab@ $6 per lb
delivered 727-771-7500



FOR HIRE
Able body, has truck,
enclosed trailer, variety
of tools, odd jobs/labor
(352) 464-1688
Ret. Sales Exec
seeks P/T work,
nights-weekends ok,
(352) 422-1533




NOW TAKING
APPLICATIONS
For experience
Childcare Teacher
(352) 527-8440




F/T PARA LEGAL
Experience or Degree
Preferred. Worker's
Compensation &
Social Security
Disability Law Firm.
Fax Resume
352-344-5760
oremail lawoffdeu
@embaramail.com




HAIR STYLIST
FT/PT Immediate
Openings, Call Sue
352-628-0630










Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966




#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)
CNA/HHA's

Apply At
HOME INSTEAD
SENIOR CARE
4224W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Lecanto

NEEDED
Experienced,
Caring &
Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885

NURSE PRACTITIONER
(ARNP) or a
Physicians Assistant
(PA)
For a "Busy Specialty
Office".
Please send resume
to Citrus County
Chronicle, Blind Box
1749P, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd.
Crystal River, FI
34429.


NOW HIRING

RN'S
All Units, with Hospital
Experience
Apply on Line: www.
nurse-temps.com
(352) 344-9828

Receptionist
& Dental/Surgical
Assistant
For High Quality
Oral Surgery Office.
Experience
preferred, excel.
pay & benefits.
Email Resume To:
marvamoli@
vahoo.com

RECEPTIONIST
For Busy Medical
Office
Please Send Resume
to P.O. Box 3087
Homosassa Springs,
Florida 34447

RN
3-11 Full-Time
Looking for an
experienced
Nurse leader to join
our Great Team!!
We offer excellent
benefits: 401 K/Health
/Dental/Vision/Vacatio
n /Sick/CEUs
Apply in person:
Arbor Trail Rehab
611 Turner Camp Rd.
Inverness, FL
or email resume to:
atdon@southern
LTC.com
An EEO/AA
Employer M/F/V/D




CLOSING AGENT
Law firm seeks experi-
enced real
estate/title/closer for Bev-
erly Hills office. Salary
commensurate with expe-
rience. Fax resume to
(352) 867-5787.
Front Desk/Recp.
Energetic, cheerful,
fast learner for busy R.E.
Office. Computer skills a
must.F/T Fax Resume:
352-746-7203

INSURANCE
AGENT
Looking for motivated
220 or 440 agent.
If you are dishonest,
lazy or don't care,
don't bother.
Apply Insurance Den
5447 S. Oakridge Dr.
Homosassa
352-628-5619
insuranceden@
aol.com

Licensed
Insurance Agents
Needed
Life/Health/Annuity
Nature Coast
Financial Advisors
Inc. Email information
aarv@naturecoast
financial.com
352-794-6044

Massage Thera-
pist

Salon seeking a pro-
fessional therapist.
Patrice 352-270-4069,

Sunshine Gardens
Crystal River
Assisted Living facility
is opening soon.
We will be serving
24 seniors in our
state-of-the art,
loving home We cur-
rently are seeking a
full time
MARKETING DIRECTOR
Ideal candidate
will be a dynamic,
self-starter with a
bachelor's degree
minimum and two
years outside or
business to business
sales experience
with demonstrated
success. Candidate
must also possess
strong networking,
marketing, and
closing skills. Must be
able to self-manage,
be a team player,
and have a passion
for the elderly. Base
salary plus commis-
sions, based on exp.
Please email resume
and cover letter to
hr@sgwseniors.com.


CAFE SHOPPE
COORDINATOR
F/T position for per-
son to engage in sell-
ing a variety of cafe
food items, located in
a busy Thrift
Shoppe.Candidate
also assists manager,
employees and volun-
teers as necessary.
Min 2yrs exp in re-
lated field. Computer
skills to include abil-
ity to create flyer's,
memos, e-mails, etc.
Interpersonal skills a
must. Position does
require frequent
heavy lifting, items to
include clothing
boxes, furniture, fix-
tures and equipment.
Excellent salary and
benefits. Apply
on-line at
www.hospiceofcitrusco
unty.org

CHG&CC
is now accepting
applications for all
Food & Beverage
positions.
Please apply in
person Tues-Fri
from 2:00-4:30pm at
The Grille Restaurant
505 E Hartford St
Hernando. No phone
calls please.

EXP. LINE COOK

Aooly in Person
at cracker's
Bar & Grill

F/T, Receptionist
/Hostess
needed for
high end country
club restaurant. Expe-
rience required.
Applicants must be
professional, organ-
ized and able to
multi-task. Resumes
& applications
accepted Tues-Fri
from 2:00-4:00pm at
2100 N Terra Vista
Blvd, Hernando




2 AC SALES TECHS

Needed. Experience
preferred. $60K+
annually + benefits.
Email or Fax Resume
mdp@newair.biz
Fax 352-628-4427

PROFESSIONAL
PEST CONTROL
EXP. SALES TECHS
Needed. Our proven
in home Sales Record
Company Vehicle
Hourly Pay
Commission
Benefits
APPLY 5882 Hwy 200
SALES/SERVICE
TECH
Needed today! I will
train the right person!
Pest Control Email
to:jdsmlthpest@
gmall.com or call
(352) 726-3921




2 AC SALES TECHS

Needed. Experience
preferred. $60K+
annually + benefits.
Email or Fax Resume
mdp@newair.biz
Fax 352-628-4427
AUTO
TECH/MECHANIC
Apply in person to Allen
Ridge Tire & Auto, 1621
N. Lecanto Hwy, Lecanto,
FL 34461 (Look for 491
road construction in front
of our shop) Has repaired
a variety of makes and
models of autos, is
familiar with computers,
dependable, and owns
his/her own tools. Clean
driving record required.
Pay based on experience.


BRICK PAVER IN-
STALLERS
Looking for one hon-
est, hard working,
preferably experi-
enced paver applica-
tor. Pay commensu-
rate with experience.
Call-352-342-9911
DRIVER WEEKLY
HOMETIME.
Dry and Refrigerated.
Daily Pay! 31 Service
Centers, Local Orienta-
tion. Newer trucks.
CDL-A, 3 months cur-
rent OTR expereince.
800-414-9569
www.driverknight.com
Drivers Wanted:
Class A- CDL
w/hazmat. Company &
O/O's Lots of Freight to
move!! CAll
877-893-9645
Eagle Buick GMC, Inc
is in need of
experienced
automotive service
consultants/advisors.
One of the best deal-
ership pay plans in
the county. Minimum
2 yrs experience
preferred. Great
opportunity for one to
find a career path,
and earn a great
living. Very produc-
tive repair facility and
a professional
environment with
plenty of growth po-
tential in a growing
community. Benefits.
Drug Free Workplace.
Application Available
@ Eagle Buick GMC
Inc
Send Resume:
Fax (352) 417-0944
Email
robbcole@eagle
buickgmc.com

IMMEDIATE
OPENINGS
Driver-clean CDL
*roll/off & compactor
experience a must
'pay DOE *benefits.

Fuel Island
Attendant
clean DL or CDL
*40 hrs week(12 noon
to ?) *Service writing
experience with truck
experience a must.
Outside work top
pay* benefits.
Customer Service
Rep.
High energy office
Must have superior
computer skills, great
phone skills previous
experience as CSR
'benefits.
Apply In Person Only
at 711 S. Adolph PT.
Lecanto, Fl.


on. op of i.h. Wold
C N--pm I-L & aMd L-IU.


JOB FAIR
February 8th
10AM 2PM
CHANDLER HILLS
COMMUNITY CENTER
8143 SW 90th Terr. Rd.
POSITIONS INCLUDE:
CABLE INSTALLATION
TECHNICIAN
ASSISTANT PROPERTY
MANAGER
WAIT STAFF &
BARTENDERS
COOKS
TICKET AGENT
GROUNDS
MAINTENANCE
LICENSED SPRAY
TECHNICIAN.

Come find
your place
in the World!
DFWP/EOE


II I 'II


There are immediate opportunities for independent contractors to manage

and grow single copy newspaper routes in Citrus and Marion Counties


Be at least 18 years of age. Possess a valid driver's license.

Possess proof of liability insurance.

CCITRU......, 0 ..... Routes are 7 days a week, early morning hours.


0o00 ,I.\.,_onacofl.n=crLU Email: mgaouette@chronicleonline.com or bring resume to 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


76 5-4 3 2 189
892 6 7 1 543
237 9684 15
9563 1 -47218
1482 57 9 36
62974385 1
57318629 4
481529367


(ONNE(TINGTf HETIGH





[BUYERlllWIHYOUR]111MlESSAGE
:t @Jk, vd II i'~
^^ "i~i*a 11 *. 1 | j 1||ii ln J i B







C12 FRIDAY, JANUARY 27, 2012


Drivers:
Run 5 States Regional!
Get home weekends,
earn up to 39cent mile,
1 yr OTR Flatbed Exp.
required. Sunbelt
Transport, LLC
800-572-5489 X 227

FLOOD, FIRE,
MOLD REMEDIA-
TION TECH
Seeking applicants
with WRT, AMRTand
FSRT certifications.
Also seeking appli-
cants with Xactimate
experience. Please
email your resume to
jd@restorationx.com.

Need 13 Good
Drivers

Top 5% Pay &
401K, 2 Mos.
CDL Class A Driving Exp.
Call (877)258-8782
www.meltontruck.com



Ge r al
Hel

$300 is a bad
day! Fortune 500
Company.
Security equip. dist.
Several positions
avail. entry-level to
mgmt. Great pay /
full benefits. We train.
Advancement
oppy's. Co. trans.
avail. H.S. Diploma or
GED req'd.
No Felonies.
352-597-2227

APPOINTMENT
SETTERS NEEDED

Seniors Welcome
No nights, No wknds.
Apply at
6421 W. Homosassa
Trail, Homosassa FI

FRONT DESK

Hotel experience
required. Great benefits
Apply in person:
BEST WESTERN
614 NW Hwy 19
Crystal River.
No calls please!

Housekeeper

Part time, experience
preferred. Apply at
BARRINGTON PLACE
2341 W Norvell Bryant
Hwy. Lecanto

TRUCK DRIVER
CDL CLASS A

Local, Must have
forklift experience
and know the area.
Established
Company
352-726-7828





CHURCH NURSERY
ATTENDANT
Approx 6 hrs weekly Sun
AM, Wed PM
352-726-2522
House helper
B&B needs help, ideal
for student Call
between 6pm-8pm
352-726-1832
Housekeeper Needed,
1 -2 days per week, light
ironing required, Please
mail resume to :Blind
Box 1754P c/o Citrus
County Chronicle, 106
W Main St.. Inverness, FI
34452




#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)


Ready to work? 3 week
accelerated program.
Hands on environment.
Nationwide certifica-
tions and Local Job
Placement Assistance!
(877) 741-9260
1 I


AIRLINES ARE HIRING -
Train for hands on
Aviation Maintenance
Career. FAA approved
program.
Financial aid if qualified
Housing Available.
Call Aviation Institute Of
Maintenance.
(866)314-3769




#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)
ALLIED HEALTH

Career training
-Attend college 100%
online. Job place-
ment assistance.
Computer available.
Financial Aid if quali-
fied. SCHEV certified.
Call (800)481-9409
www.Centura
Online.com

EARN COLLEGE
DEGREE ONLINE
Online from Home

*Medlcal, *Business,
*Crlmlnal Justice. Job
placement assis-
tance. Computer
available. Financial
Aid If qualified. SCHEV
certified. Call
877-206-5165
www.CenturaOnllne
.corn




TAYLORCOLLEGE

fT

NE6IA.fW

2 Week Courses!
*NURSING ASST. $475.
*PHLEBOTOMY $475.
*EKG $475.
*ALF ADMINISTRATOR
$300.

tavlorcolleae.edu
(352) 245-4119

NOW
ENROLLING
For January
2012 Classes
BARBER
COSMETOLOGY
FACIAL
FULL SPECIALTY
INSTRUCTOR
TRAINING
MANICURE/NAIL EXT.
MASSAGE THERAPY

BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
New Port Richey/
Spring Hill
727-848-8415
352-263-2744
--- --- J



COMMERCIAL Lawn
equipment w/custom
trailer Gravely & Stihl
347-308-3853
EARN $1000- $3200
a month to drive our
new cars with ads.
www.PaidDriven.com




Mullet Hut
for sale, Hwy 19 Sunny
Days Plaza, Homosassa
33 yrs in business
cell (607) 743-4662


$$$ ACCESS
LAWSUIT
CASH NOW!! $$$

As seen on TV. Injury
Lawsuit Dragging?
Need $500-$500,000++
within 48/hours? Low
rates APPLY NOW BY
PHONE! Call Today!
Toll-Free: (800)568-8321
www.lawcapital.com



1983 CHATTY PATTY
DOLL IN BOX New in
Box Excellent Condition
$60 Call
(352)-489-5245.
AUTOGRAPHED BOWL-
ING PIN with many PBA
signatures $100. Call
(352)489-5245.
MADAME ALEXANDER
PUSSY CAT DOLL IN
BOX excellent condition
$75. Call
(352)-489-5245.


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966

VINTAGE SCHOENHUT
PIANO FOR
CHILD/DOLL in good
condition no bench -
$85. Call (352)489-5245
ZODIAC BARBIE IN
BOX in excellent
condition $25.
Call (352)-489-5245.




8 Person Hot Tub
$500 obo
(989) 553-3631
Hot tub for 2, new
motor, pump and
heater, Excel. cond.
$700 Firm(352) 563-1933



1-FREEZER,1 -LAWN
MOWER StandUp
Freezer, $40.00.Good
Lawnmower 20.00.
352-503-2792
A/C + HEAT PUMP
SYSTEMS

13-18 Seer
Installation w/permit


Lic.&Ins. CAC 057914
BLACK DISHWASHER
$30.00 352-621-0718 h
352-364-2806 c
ELECTRIC RANGE
Older Tappan elec stove,
very good condition, $50,
352-344-5853
in Hernando
KENMORE DEEP
FREEZER ALL WHITE
STAND UP $85.00
352-621-0718 H
352-364-2806 C
SHARPER IMAGE SU-
PERWAVE OVEN got
new range,selling
oven.$80.00
352-344-3472
Side by Side,
whirlpool, white, works
perfectly
$250
(352) 621-0942
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR, washers
dryers,FREE pick up
352-564-8179


OR ALIVE
Washers & Dryers
Working or not.
(352) 209-5135
WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 Each.Reliable,
like new, excellent condi-
tion. Can deliver
352 263-7398
WATER SOFTENER
Whole House Water
Softener(Used)
Very Good Condition -
$200.00 Phone:
269-532-8100



COMMERCIAL DESK
CHAIR Ergonomic Fully
Adjustable PreOwned
Fabric Covered $85
727-463-4411
DESK CHAIRS (2)
PreOwned Commercial
Adjustable Fabric Cov-
ered $45 727-463-4411
DESK CHAIRS (4) Com-
mercial PreOwned Dark
Gray Fabric $25 each
727-463-4411
LATERAL FILE CABINET
3 Drawer Commercial
Metal PreOwned
40"x36"x18" $65
727-463-4411
Ten, 4 Drawer, Hon
Filing Cabinets
45. Ea
(352) 628-1030
Ask for Tara




2 AUCTIONS
THURS. Jan. 26
Estate Auction
Prev:12 Auction 3PM
Outside 6PM Inside 2009
Pontiac VIbe/w Onstar
54K, 1997 PU Mazda
SOLD @5:30. 1980 Cor-
vette, blue, Ivory Int.,
120K ml. 13.5FT Delquay
Run-about, 40HP
Evinrude, Front load
washr/dryer, designer


FRI. JAN. 27
Prey: 4PM Auction 6PM
Carnival & Vintaae
Glass Auction
Llve& On Line 125 lots
of Fenton, Imperial,
Northwood, Opales-
cent, Depression, Early
Pressed Glass & More!
DudleysAuctlon.com
4000 S. Fla. Ave.
(US 41-S) Inverness
(352) 637-9588

12% BP-2% ca.disc



5,550 W Generator
Brigg & Straton,
w/ 11.5 HP Subaru
Engine, Like New
$400.
(352) 302-6069
AUTO CREEPER "The
Bone" Rough Rider
Creeper, like new, asking
$75.00 (352)270-3559
Complete home
workshop, 8 power
tools, many extras,
$500 firm for all
(352) 563-1180



20 INCH RCA FLAT
SCREEN In good condi-
tion. Asking 35.00 OBO
352-465-8841
JVC FLOOR SPEAKERS

condition.$60.00 OBO
352-522-1918
SONY 13 INCH T.V.
WITH REMOTE GOOD
CONDITION $20.00
352-726-0686
STEREO SPEAKERS
4 sets small to large
$5 to $20 per set
352 564-2746



DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469


CLASSIFIED



HEWLETT PACKARD
COMPUTER MONITOR
HP M500 monitor.
unused 30.00
352-344-3472
HEWLETT PACKARD
PHOTO PRINTER hp
photosmart 1000. $20.00
352-344-3472




PIGEON SUPPLIES
Feeders, Drinkers, Bob
Trap,Cages, Nest
Bowls.$50.00/ALL
352-503-2792




...DINING SET*
54"RD GLASS TOP
PEDESTAL TABLE,
TUSCAN STYLE
4 CHAIRS
$260 634-2004
6 FOOT METAL FOLD-
ING TABLES (2)
PreOwned Wood Grain
$35 each 727463-4411
36" ROUND TABLE Like
New Rugged Formica
Top Sturdy Steel Base
Misc Colors $65
727-4634411
36" SQUARE TABLE
Rugged Gray Formica
Top Sturdy Steel Base
Like New $65
727-4634411
5-piece dinette set.
Oak table and 4
arrowback chairs.
Table has inverted leaf
and is 42 inches by 58
inches with leaf in
place, 42 inches round
without. Top has pretty
tile inlay. Chairs have
dual cross supports for
extra sturdiness. Seat
cushions included.
$225 obo. Two large
table lamps. $15 ea.
Will email photos.
352-746-1644.
Bureau, with mirror, good
condition, 5 feet long,
white $35.00
(352)382-7687 or
(352)201-1221
CHAIR OFFICE Dark
wood very old $30,
excellent condition
352-270-3909








CHROME CRAFT
DINETTE SET 6 chairs,
pedestal table ( 78 x 42
) $450 352 527-2760
Coffee table
46"Lx28"W $75.
excellent condition
352-270-3909
COMMERCIAL
STACKABLE CHAIRS (4)
Preowned Sturdy Metal
Framed Vinyl Chairs $10
each 727-4634411
COUCH Floral couch,
great condition,$50. Must
pick up. (352)792-7610
COUCH White and
black couch,$0,must be
able to pick up, in Citrus
Springs. (352)792-7610
DESK
30"h-30"d-60"w-seven
drawers [2-file] all lock.
excl. cond. $250.00 more
info.call 352-527-9982
DINETTE PEDESTAL
TABLE ONLY Color of
butcher block blonde.
Appr 2 1/2' x 4'. $25.00
call Ruth 352-382-1000
Dinette set with pull out
leaves, 4 chairs, like new,
$100 (352)382-7687 or
(352)201-1221
DINING ROOM TABLE:
78Lx38Wx30H, cherry
finish with 6 chairs in
great condition for
$350. Call (352)
489-1527.
Entertainment CENTER
Solid Wood, 64x44 w/ 2
Drawers below. 27x37
1/2 Opening for TV.
$100.352-389-4569


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Black $50. glass top
table 4 chairs $100.
Black entertainment
center $50.
(352) 795-7254
King Size Bed with oak
headboard,w/ phone
& Light connection, Ig.
drawers and storage in
bottom of bed, good
cond. $400 795-7513
LEATHER SOFA 3
seaterdouble recliner
wall hugger, dark
taupe,good condition.
200.00 Call
(352) 637-9526
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
352-628-0808
RECLINER Large clean
recliner. Cream color.
$75.00 352-257-5722
Recliners-2 custom
made, multi color
stripe, like new $250
each. Moving!
(352) 382-4912
SM COMPUTER DESK
Fair condition / 20.00
Linda 341-4449
SOFA BED Queen size,
shades of blue/green,
good condition. $75
(352)382-7687 or
(352)201-1221
STACKABLE CHAIRS (4)
Commercial PreOwned
Metal Frame with Arms
Fabric Covered 2 for $35
727-463-4411
Sugarmill Woods
LEATHER couch and
love seat beige, good
condition $500
(352) 634-4225
TV CONSOLE
cherry 80" tall, 42" w
perfect for small
spaces. room for 4 or
more components, plus
storage & glass
display shelf's $250.
(352) 341-6991
WHITE PAINTED WOOD

Great for a Childs Room
40"x32"x12" $30
727-463-4411




12x24 Metal Shed
with roll up doors, regu-
lar $5000 sell for $4000
delivered w/extras
used 1 month!, New!
352-341-8479
CHICKEN
MANURE/FERTILIZER
Time to get your
garden's ready! 201b.
bag $4.00 352-563-1519
FARM SOLD Clearing
plants & statuary,
1000's of plants. OPEN
Sat/ Sun or call for
appt.(352) 465-0649
5019 WStargazerCitrus
Co. Dunnellon
Hustler riding mower
Fast track zero turn
$2200 obo Craftmans
riding mower 42" deck
$400.(352) 746-7357
SOLD!!!!
Briggs & Straton
Lawn Vac. 6.5 hp, very
low hours with
attachments ,New
$2100 Sell $650 firm





,


7 RIVERS
Sat 8a. 2p antiques,
toys & others items
7425 W. 7 Rivers Dr.








Beverly Hills
Fri. & Sat. 8am-3pm
Household tools,
furniture, lots of misc.
95 S Jefferson St


BEVERLY HILLS
OUR LADY OF
GRACE CHURCH
FLEA MARKET!
SAT. Jan. 28th
8AM to 2PM.
6 Roosevelt Blvd.

CITRUS HILLS
1773 E Cleveland St
SAT 9am-2pm, Mini
Fridge, Microwave,
TV's, Household Items,
Books, Videos &
MORE

Citrus Springs
Friday & Sat 9-?
TVs. and lots of misc
2410 W Jonquil Dr

CITRUS SPRINGS
Sat 8 am- ?
Many $1 Items
2288 W. Nautilus Dr



CRYSTAL MANOR
11809 W. CALADIUM
ST.
US 19, I mile North of
power plant, right on
Basswood, 1 mile.
Furniture, tvs, trundle
bed(bottom only)
lamps, kitchen items.
Sat & Sun 1/28 & 29.
8A-2P


MO VI HG



Crystal

River
Fri. & Sat. 8am-5pm
Sunday 1pm-5pm
Too much to List!
8358 Marinozzo Terr.
Derosa area

CRYSTAL RIVER
Fri. 27, 8-3, Sat. 28, 8-1
TOOLS, Househld., Furn.
Equip-fish /camp /golf,
Camera, Misc. 7275 W.
Milwe Ln., Seven Rivers


CRYSTAL RIVER
1923 SE 3rd Ct Stove/
toys/kitchen/books/boat
motor/more! Fri-Sat 9-3






household & more.


DUNNELLON
9836 198th Circle ES-
TATE SALE Fri 27 & Sat
28 8AM-2PM Furniture,
household items, yard
tools, and many golf
items.352-209-2421
FLORAL CITY
Sat. & Sun. 8:30am-4pm
China cabinet, dish-
washer, coffee table,
much much more!
7909 S. Great Oaks Dr.
FLORAL CITY
Yard sale, 8710 E.
Orange Ave. (48)
Fri. & Sat. Jan. 27 & 28,
8am-3pm
HERNANDO
1435 E Ray St., Friday &
Saturday, 9-3PM,
household items

YARDSALE
HOMOSASSA
5644 W. Keating Court.
Moving Se. le. Saturday 8
to 3.
Something for everyone.
HOMOSASSA
Jan. 25 thru Jan31st
MOVING SALE*
(352) 382-1502
HOMOSASSA
LIONS CLUB
INDOOR SALE.
Sat. Feb 4th 8a-Ip
SR 490
DEALERS Wanted
call Lion Bob,
(352) 382-3679 Info.
HOMOSASSA
Thur., Fri., Sat., 8-3p
4655 S. Sawgrass Circle


INVERNESS
710 Mayflower Ave
ESTATE SALE PLUS
MORE. Vintage china,
misc. HH, W/D, ladies'
clothes l/xl, huge coll.
country 8 tracks & 78's,
NEW fridge,+++
INVERNESS
Estate Sale, Fri. 9a-3p
Sat. 9am-Ipm
Dbl beds, dressers,
chaise lounge, French
Prov. bedroom set,
wing chair, antique
rocker, maple hutch,
living room furn. Dinette
set, antique school
desk, wrought iron &
wicker porch furn.
Fridge, stove, oven,
exhaust hood, hanging
pot rack, micro,
kitchen items, china,
glassware, Waterford
crystal, books, oriental
rug, chandeliers, art
work, costume jewelry,
health care equip.,
Tools, elec. lawn
mower, etc.
EVERYTHING MUST GO
8611 E. Henderson Trail


MOVING
SALE
Inverness
Sat 8-4p TOO MUCH TO
LIST. 1280 Stately Oaks
INVERNESS
Thurs. Fri., & Sat.8am-?
MOVING SALE *
Antique Furn., & Dishes,
6122 E. Chapel Lane








Pine Ridge
Thurs & Fri 8 am-2pm
Antiques, seasonal
decor, collectibles,
tools, generator,
household items
5395 N Red Ribbon Pt


~ihu Dwen~Qor'y


ALL EXTERIOR
ALUMINUM
6" Seamless Gutters
Lic & Ins 352-621-0881
SUBURBAN IND. INC.
Screen rms, Rescreens,
Siding, airports, rf.overs
wood decks, Fla. rooms
windows, garage scrns.
628-0562 (CBC1257141)




SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Washer &
Dryers, Free Pick Up
352-564-8179




Vertical Blind Factory
We custom make all
types. Best prices any-
where! Hwy 44 & CR
491. (352) 746-1998




Affordable Mobile
mechanical, electrical
fiberglass, OB/lO/IB.
WE BUY BOATS
711 NE6thAv. Cry Riv
352-795-5455

*THIS OUT!
PHIL'S MOBILE MARINE
Repairs & Consigment
30 yrs Cert. Best Prices
& Guar 352-220-9435




Loving Adult Care
Home (SL 6906450)
Alzheimer/Dementia
No problem. Nursing
homes do not need to
be your only alternative
352-503-7052




ROGERS Construction
All Construction
sm jobs Free Est (352)
637-4373 CRC1326872


SHADY VIEW CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
Repairs. 352 613-2518




Clean Ups &
Clean Outs
(352) 220-9190



DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469



Bianchi Concrete
inc.com lic/ins
Driveways-Patios-
Sidewalks.352-257-0078

Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River rock
reseals & repairs. 352
364-2120/410-7383
ROB'S MASONRY
& CONCRETE Slabs,
Driveways & tear outs
Tractor work, All kinds
Lic. #1476, 726-6554



All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling,
Site Prep, Driveways.
Lic. & Ins. 352- 795-5755



COUNTYWIDE DRY-
WALL 25 years exp.
For all your drywall needs
Ceiling &Wall Repairs.
Lic/ins. 352-302-6838
Make Walls & Ceilings
Look Brand New!
Custom textures & paint
* Ask about Popcorn
Removal (352)812-3388
Wall & Ceiling Repairs
& Sprays. Int/Ext.
Painting, since 1977
Licins 352-220-4845


#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Plasma TV installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
ANNIE'S ELECTRIC
Husband & Wife
Team.(352) 341-5952
EC-13002696
BRIGHT ELECTRICAL
Res./Comm. Lic & Ins.
$50.hr. EC0001303
352-302-2366
CREATION ELECTRIC.
Full service electrical
contractor. Residential
& Commercial. Service
changes, large & small
repairs, spa hookups &
more. Lic / Ins. Call
352-427-4216
DUN-RITE Elect
Elec/Serv/Repairs
New const. Remodel
Free Est 726-2907
EC13002699 Serving
Citrus Co. Since 1978
Thomas Electric LLC
Generator main &
repair. Guardian


621-1248 #ER00015377




A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002

BOB BROWN'S
Fence & Landscaping
352-795-0188/220-3194
ROCKY'S FENCING
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
352 422-7279 *




DRY OAK FIREWOOD
Split, 4 X 8 Stack $80
Delivered & Stacked.
352-344-2696
Premium Seasoned split
Firewood $75 Per Stack
(4x8) Free Delivery
(352) 527-8352


ALL EXTERIOR
ALUMINUM
6" Seamless Gutters
Lic & Ins 352-621-0881
ALUMINUM
STRUCTURES
5" & 6" Seamless Gutters
Free Estimates, Lic &
Ins. (352) 563-2977



1 CALL & RELAX! 25 vrs
exp in home repairs &
remodel WE DO IT ALL!
Lic. 37658. & Ins. Steve
& Scott 352-476-2285
#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Plasma TV installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
Andrew Joehl
Handyman.
Gen/Maint/Repairs
Pressure cleaning.
Lawns/Gutters. No job
too small!Reli able ,ins.
0256271 352-465-9201
A HANDYMAN
If Its Broke, Jerry Can
Fix It. Housecleaning
also. 352-201-0116 Lic.
ABC Painting &
Handyman.
Low. Low Rates
30


yrs exp lic/ins Dale
352-586-8129
Affordable Handyman
FAST
V AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
FAST
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
FAST
s AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *


Affordable Handyman
FAST
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
k 352-257-9508 *

EXP'D HANDYMAN
All phases of home
repairs. Exc. work










Handyman Dave
Pressure Clean Paint &
Repairs, oddjobs &
hauling (352) 726-9570
Remodeling, Additions,
Doors, Windows, Tile
work. Lic.#CRC1330081
Free Est. (352)949-2292




Citrus Cleaning
Team. top quality
work & great
rates. 302-3348
(352) 527-2279
MAID TO ORDER
House Cleaning *
(352) 586-9125
Have Vacum Will Travel





The Tile Man
Bathroom remodel
Specializing in
handicap. Lic/lns.
#2441. 352-634-1584




#1 BOBCAT FOR HIRE
Light land clearing, site
work, grading, hauling.
NO JOB TOO SMALL!!!
Lic. & Ins. 352-400-0528


All Tractor Work Service

prop. maint. 302-6955
All AROUND TRACTOR
L -. , ,.,,H .H ,
e ;. ..,, -" *) I_,: I,-:
352-795-5755






CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, curbing,
flocrete. River rock
reseals & repairs.




Call 352.201.7374
YARD CLEAN UP
Flowers, Bushes, Mulch
Rock & MORE! Call for
Your Yard Make Over
Lic/Ins (352) 425-0109



Florida Sitescapes, LLC
FREE est: Yard Clean Up
Mowing, and MORE
Call 352.201.7374
JUSTIN LAWN CARE
Fast and Affordable.
and Friendly, Licensed.
(352) 476-3985
LAWN CARE 'N" More
Fall Clean up, bed,
bushes, haul since 1991
(352) 726-9570
Leaves, TRIM, MULCH
Hauling FALL Clean
since '91 352 220-6761




AT YOUR HOME
Mower, Parts Service &
Repair.Visit our store@
1332 SE Hwy 19
352-220-4244




A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs, trash,
lawn maint. furn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767


ALL OF CITRUS
CLEAN UPS CLEAN OUTS
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790

HAULING
FRE E ESTIMATES
scrap metals, haul for
FREE (352) 344-9273,




Chris Satchell Painting
ASAP
30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
ABC Painting & Handy
man Low. Low Rates
30 yrs exp lic/ins
Dale 352-586-8129
CheapCheapCheap
DP painting/press.clean
Many, many refs. 20 yrs
in Inverness 637-3765








Handyman Dave
Pressure Clean Paint &
Repairs odd jobs &
hauling (352) 726-9570
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998




Tim Herndon Plumbing
$10. off w/this ad
10 yrs serving Citrus Co
lic/insCFC 1428395
(352) 201-8237




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996


ABC Painting &
Handyman.
Low. Low Rates
30 yrs exp lic/ins Dale
352-586-8129








Handyman Dave
Pressure Clean Paint &
Repairs, odd jobs &
hauling (352) 726-9570
Pic PICARD'S Pressure
Cleaning & Painting
352-341-3300





Remodeling, kitchens
baths, ceramic tile &
tops. Decks, Garages
Handyman Services 40
Yrs Exp. crc058140
344-3536; 563-9768




Attention Consumers!
Please make sure you

and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers are
required by state law
to include their state
license number in all
advertisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the adc you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious that
you may be contact-
ing an unlicensed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For questions
about business
licensing, please call
your city or county gov-
ernment offices.


Leek
$60. Bahia Pallets
U-Pick Up. Special
Winter Pricing. Call
Now!! 352-400-2221






A Cutting Edge
Tile Jobs Showers.
Firs .Safety Bars. ETC
352-422-2019
Lic. #2713, Insured.





A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest Rates
Free est.(352)860-1452

All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955

DOUBLE J Tree Serv.
Stump Grinding, bulk


KING's Land Clearing &
Tree Serv. complete
tree & stump removal
hauling, demo& tractor
work 32 yrs. exp.
(352) 220-9819

RWRIGHT Tree Service
Tree removal & trimming.
Ins. & Lic.# 0256879
352-341-6827

RON ROBBINS Tree Serv
Trim, Shape & Remove
Lic/Ins Free Est.
352-628-2825





344-2556, Richard
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


1-27 LaughingStock International Inc Dist by Universal UCIick for UFS, 2012

"Just because we're outnumbered
100 to one is no excuse for that
kind of language!"






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




Thur., Fri., Sat., 8-3p Printer/fax, like new
4655 S. Sawgrass Circle condition $75.00
Desay DVD player,
used very little $20
YAR SALE352-382-1154
INVERSION TABLE
Lecanto inversion table in good
Fri. & Sat. 8am-1pm condition.30.00 dollars
Antique kitchen table please call 352-446-4418
& chairs, and misc Janome Memory Craft
house items! 9000 embroidery/
2715 Spring Leaf Lane sewing machine, plus 8
AL OAmemory cards &
ROYAL OAKS access. & lessons $475.
ANNUAL (352) 249-7892
YARD SALE KRUPS WAFFLE IRON
Saturday, Jan. 28, Excellent cond. $15
8am-lpm B1G 3523820220
SELECTION! From Inv.
S. on 41 to Royal Oaks tran ipdicl
sign (before airport) transcription-self
turn right, follow signs. paced books tapes,
and transcripts-$75
Yard Sale-Beverly Hills Terry-352-746-1973
Thurs. Fri Sat 9-?
All outside items! Oriental Rug
388 Sugarmaple Lane Kirmann 9x12
ivory w/ pastels
-Take with $950
(352) 422-1533
OUTSIDE DOG HOUSE
DANCE COSTUMES Molded plastic. Medium
Several, different sizes to large dog. $30.00 call
and styles. $100 for all of Ruth 352-382-1000
them. 352-476-9563 Patio Set,
n round 48" glass top and
4 chairs $60.
Treadmill, electric,
works good $50.
S#1 A Big Sale (352)621-0674 after 5p
Open Tues-Sat 8a-4p PRAYERS Thank you St,
Furn, Appliances, tools, JudeMother Maryand
clothing, misc. Items, Baby Jesus of Prague for
@ N. Maynard & Hwy 44 prayers answered.
1/4 ml E. of Stokes FLea Prayers work!!
SHP, Submersible RerigersaorR nA
pump, $75. Refrigerator RCA
Guaranteed 21.7 cu. ft almond
will demonstrate side/side, no frost w/ice
352-726-7485 maker $145. Treadmill
good cond $75. firm
48" Glass Dinette Set, (518) 314-7130
with 4 swivel Chairs,
$95 Seats for 2003 Town &
8 ft. fiberglass Type 2 Country Van
Ladder $45 1 Middle seat and back
(352) 726-7765 row split bench seat
Gray Leather all 3 for
shelves, $40 $200 (352) 344-4192
PLATES PERFORMER Wii Console- like new
EXERCISE MACHINE w/ cond.,w/balance
instruction video and old- board & all attach-
outs $95, 352-860-0444 ments, 7 games, most
BIRD CAGE White bird new in box $150 for all
cage. 26 x24 x39 high. 5 795-0113 or 464-0650


feet high when on the
stand. 3/4 inch bar spac-
ing. $60.00 352 726 5753
BLOWER & TRIMMER
Gas blower- $30.
Gas line trimmer -$30.
Both Homelite
716/860-6715
COMMERCIAL
Bubble Gum
Machine,2 Jars on
pedestal
$60 352-364-3009
DISNEY PRINT-
cert.no.838 of 2000-size
18"by 24"-$100.00 more
info call 352-527-9982
Electric Gate Opener
Mighty Mule 350 + solar
panel, + 12V battery +
3 remotes, also can be
powered by 120 V
have manual, & all
hardware, cost $689.
Sell $475 obo, 341-0791
FOLD-A-CART TFC-150
MULTI-PUR FOLDS
FLAT FOR
STORAGE.6CUFT CAP.
EXEC CON. $90
727.857.6583
FOREMAN ELECT
GRILL Med. size, table
top excellent $15 352
382 0220
GAS GRILL COVER
Weber-premium excel-
lent-$20 352 382 0220
HAY coastal hay for
horses. 12 large bales.
$5.00 each Hernando
726-6224


Electric wheelchair
with rising seat and
new battery charger
and walker with seat,
both for $500
(352) 621-7505
GO-GO Pride
$400. Space Saver Jr.
$400. Shoprider $150 all
w/chargers
(352) 489-3264
INVACARE ZOOM
220 SCOOTER, exc.
cond. very good
batteries, $350.
(352) 726-8208
Jazzy 1113
Low Rider power chair
w/ new batteries, exc
cond cover & manuel
$550.(352) 726-3263
NEW SHOWER CHAIR.
$25 352-527-9518
NEW WALKER WITH
SEAT. $100
352-527-9518
WHEEL CHAIR
New Collapsible
$250.(352) 527-9518



BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We Also
Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676


CLASSIFIED


CASIOI LK-33 Auto play
or you play. Lighted keys.

352-476-9563
MUSIC LESSONS
Piano, Organ, Keyboard
at your home. Limited
openings. 352-422-7012



BALDED EAGLE NEW.
WAS $59.95/SELLING
FOR $20.00
Linda 341-4449
CHANDELIER 5 LIGHT,
UMBER GLASS,
BRONZE METAL.
EXCELLENT CONDI-
TION $99 727.857.6583
FIRE & WATER FOUN-
TAIN Was 29.95 / selling
for 10.00
Linda 341-4449
KENMORE SEWING
MACHINE AND
CABINET. $50
352-527-9518
LIGHT HER FIRE
CASSETTE TAPE PRO-
GRAM FOR MEN with
workbook /NEW/20.00
IINDA 341-4449
Mickey MOUSE
FIGURINE NEW.Was
34.95/selling for 15.00
Linda(352) 341-4449
TOILET Clean, used,
bone color $5
352-201-0876
VACUUM BAGS for
Sharp vacuum 7 left in
bag. Vacuum died! Type
PU2. $7.00 Also drive
belt Call 746-1017
VACUUM CLEANER
Kirby Generation 3
all attachments-
needs belts $50.00
352 -746-9483
VERT BLINDS,120"X79"
VINYL, BAMBOO LOOK
VAL,TRAC&HARDWARE.
$99 727.857.5383


Eoqun p trsent
Aero Pilates Performer.
Model 55-4298A. Easy,
lie-down exercise as
seen on TV. Includes
neck pad and cardio
rebounder. Like new
cond. $150 obo.
352-746-1644.
Boflex Extreme
Brand New
3 months Old
$550 obo
(727) 643-7652
Horizon RST 5.6
Tread mill, $200.
(352) 527-9518
TURBOTRACK Brand
new, still in the box. $50
352-476-9563



BUYING FIREARMS
Cash paid for firearms,
ammo, and reloading
equipment. Call
352-556-1789
CABIN ON 40 ACRES
of Prime Hunting Land
Located in Gulf Ham-
mock Management.
Area. $165,000 OBO
(352) 795-2027
(352) 634-4745


ROUTES





AVAILABLE





NoOW !l

/z x


V Able to work early morning

hours before 6am

V Must be 18 years old

V Florida driver's license

and insurance


If interested come to the

Meadowcrest Plant

between 1 and 2 am,

drive around to the back and

ask for a district manager.


1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.

Crystal River



IT REALLY PAYS

TO WORK FOR THE


A% CITRUS n COUNTY




8 www.chronicleonline.com


$5,900
(315) 466-2268
CLUB CAR
'06 $1,400,
with charger
352-344-8516
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
ELECTRIC SCOOTER
Razor E200, Green,
Runs great! $150 OBO.
Call 352-628-2176
FRESH JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct.@ $5 per lb
Stone Crab@ $6 per lb
delivered 727-771-7500
Golf Clubs,2 sets Ladies
graphite w/bags $90 &
$135.2 Ladies Big Ber-
tha 460 Drivers.Golf
bag.(352) 382-0051

GUN & KNIFE
SHOW
BROOKSVILLE
HSC CLUB
Sat. Jan. 28th 9-5p
Sun. Jan 29th 9a-4p
HERNANDO COUNTY
FAIRGROUNDS
Admission $6.00
(352) 799-3605
Hunting Bow
Hoyt Trykon hardly
used,(bad shoulder)
Like new, viper sights,
ACC Arrows $400.
(352) 527-2792
Jason Model 330
Spotting Scope
20X-60X
60 zoom, like new
original box $65
(352) 527-9323
SCHWINN
Man's bike, NEW, 21
spds. helmet, rear
bracket, travel bag,
bike lock night lights &
xtra rear lights $215
(352) 322-6456
Tree Stand-Summit
stand like new $150
352-527-2792
WE BUY GUNS
On Site Gun Smithing

Your choice, never
used, 10" barrel Ruger,
44 magnum, $690.
7-1/2" barrel Ruger, 44
(352) 726-7932 Iv. msg



2004 H & W Flatbed
Utility Trailer, dual axle
5,000 GBW rating, ship-
ping weight 1,200 Ibs
$1,000 (352) 637-2846,
Kathy
EZ PULL TRAILERS,

Utility & Enclosed
BUY, SELL, TRADE
Custom Built, Parts,
Tires, Whis, Repairs,
Trailer Hitches
16' Car Trailer, Reg.
$1765 CASH $1695.

Stehl Tow Dollies
$895 ( limited supply)
w/brks $1195
Hwy 44 Crystal River
352-564-1299

GULF TO LAKE
TRAILER SALES
Largest Selection &
Lowest Prices.
Offering New & Used
Cargo & utility trailers

Triple Crown Utility TRL
6 x 12 w/new spare
$995.
6 x 12 Enclosed w/
V nose, rear ramp
door, $1895.
Trailer Tires
starting at $69.95
352-527-0555
Hwy 44, Lecanto
UTILITY TRAILER Open
5x10, drive up ramp, 3
new R15 tires, good con-
dition. $650.
701-526-3619



FIREWOOD Aged, split,
firewood. $100. Delivery
possible. 352-476-9563
'. 0dgzA,.-


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966










WANT TO BUY HOUSE or
MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation.
Call (352) 726-9369



2 Pitt Bull Puppies
1 male, 1 female,
4 months old
All shots $50 ea.
(352) 566-7667


uuDO Buddy is a 4 year
old brindle bulldog mix.
He's well behaved,
knows basic com-
mands, very gentle,
and lovable. He's look-
ing for a forever home.
He has all shots and is
neutered and
micro-chipped. Call
352-270-8512


tered, male 3yrs old and
female 4yrs old, very
gentle, asking 400.00 for
both call 352-287-3390
AKC, Registered
English Bull Dog
Puppies for Sale
$1,800. (352) 543-0163
(727) 784-0732

DOG AGILITY EQUIP-
MENT 4 piece agility
setup equipment good
condition asking 100.00
352-726-9964





DOG OBEDIENCE
CLASSES STARTING
Feb. 4th In Lecanto
352-794-6314
FEMALE YORKSHIRE
TERRIER Free to a good
home. 10 year old
spayed female. Owner
passed away.
Call 352 341 4704, leave
message
KITTENS & CATS
many breeds, all
neutered micro chip,
tested, shots some
declawed $85-$150
352-476-6832
Koi and Gold Fish
FOR SALE, Great Prices
ALL SIZES. Call Jean
(352) 634-1783
MINI-DACHSHUNDS I
have Mini-Dachshunds
for sale. Dapples, black
and tans, reds and
pibolds. Males and fe-
males. PPOP, florida
health cert, sample of
food and toy come with
each pup 352463-7345
Shi-A-Poo Puppies
Paper trained, good
with kids, will not shed,
health certs. CKC reg.
Fern $275Males $250
Yorkie Poos Male
$300(352) 489-6675
Shih-Tzu Pups, ACA
starting@ $300. Lots of
colors, Beverly Hills,
FL (352)270-8827
www.aceofpups.net



FOR SALE
Ponies and horses,
used saddles and
tackDiamond P Farm
352-873-6033



Emerald Valley Evitex,
1 gallon, less I cup
$75.
(352) 270-9372
FOR SALE, COW HAY
Round Bales, no
delivery $30. a bales
352-726-2986
Looking for Fenced
Pasture for Goats
Call Mike
(352) 634-4237


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





Brooksville
NO DEPOSIT
$100. PER WEEK
2/1, WATER GARBAGE
INCLUDED
Call Tom
352-754-8687
C.R/Homosassa
1& 2 Br. furn, quiet park
Util. incl. clean, shrt/long
term 352 220-2077
Citrus Springs
2/1.5 on 2.5 acres,
clean, bright, quiet,
$650.(352) 603-0024
CRYSTAL RIVER 2/1
Sr. Disc. $500. Call
For Info 352-584-3348


CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1, $425, 2/2 $450,
3/2 $450 All on '% Acre
Lots (207) 205-0592
CRYSTAL RIVER
Nice 2/1, close to
everything. $500. +


HERNANDO
2/1, $400 Mo. No Pets.
(352) 344-1476
HERNANDO
2/1, Irg. lot, water, $375
mo. 3/2, 2-acre lot,
Cent. Air, Washer/Dryer
Storage, $625 mo. No
pets, (352) 860-0904
HERNANDO/INV.
2BR, 1BA, C/H/A, $350
no pets, 1st, last, sec.
352-564-0578
HOMOSASSA 2/1
fenced acre. shed
huge deck, addition
$500/m 352 628-5244
HOMOSASSA
Beautiful 2 Br. DW, on
2 acres, paved road.
$375. Mo.(352)621-5309
(352) 212-0715
INVERNESS
RENT SPECIAL: Sec. dep,
pro-rated over 3 mo.
period In the INVERNESS
WATERFRONT 55+ Park
w/5 piers for fishing &
enjoyment, clubhouse,
onslte shuffleboard, and
much more! 1 BR home
$325 plus. 2BR home
$450 Includes H20. 2 BR,
1.5 bath, Park Model
$500. Pets considered.
Section 8 accepted.
(352) 476-4964
Lecanto 2/1
MH $550./mo $500 dep.
352- 628-2312 Lv mess

-yi M .3 f


FRIDAY, JANUARY 27, 2012 C13


HOLIDAY SALE
Bad credit OK.!
New 2012 Jacobsen
w/ 5 yr. warranty.
Appx. 1200 sq. ft. 3/2,
many upgrades.
Buy for only $36,900
or have delivered
and set up with A/C,
heat, steps & skirting
only $2,600 down,
5379.97/mo.
for 20 years W.A.C.
Come by or call
352-621-9181
Taylor Made Homes
INVERNESS
55+ Comm. 2/1.5.
carport, screen rm.
shed $6900
(352) 586-7962
INVERNESS
Waterfront 55+ Park
w/5 piers for fishing &
enjoyment, clubhouse,
onslte shuffleboard
and much more!
Single wide 1 & 2 BR,
starting @ $6,900. Lot
rent $274/mo. H20
Included. 3 mo. free
rent with purchase.
352-476-4964
Palm Harbor Homes
NEW HOME STIMULUS
$5k for your used
Mobile Home any
condition
800-622-2832 x 210




2/2 SW Homosassa
on Fecnced /2 acre
$39,900. Cash $45,900 if
financed $5,000 down
(352) 527-3204
2/2, New Screen Rm,
New Back Rm, 1.4 AC
Steal It! $30K Firm,
6.4 Easy Credit Finance
Appraised at $39,500
(352) 637-6608
CR Mini Farms-
3/2 DW Remodeled
on 1 1/4 acres fenced,
Owner Financing $6000
down, $500 month
(850) 557-0356
DUNNELLON
5159 W. Disney Ln
Large lot, new CHA
quite area $32,500
(727) 536-9443


uunnellon, I-i 3 beuroom.
2 bath. Mobile Home w/5
acres Jacobsen Mobile
Home built in 2000, 32ft x
68ft, central air/heat
w/appliances. Master
Bedroom 14x20, Master
Bath w/jetted tub & dou-
ble vanity 10x15, 2 bed-
rooms 14x20, living rm.
14x16, family rm
w/fireplace 15x14, kitchen
w/38 cabinets 16x16,
dining rm. 14x12. Low
taxes 685.00 for current
year. Asking $145,000,
open to offers.
352-682-0266
FLORAL CITY on 3 Lots,
Assum Mortg. Priv Fin. 2
Mast Suites New appls.
horses ok, $33,900
Cridland Real Living.
J. Desha 352-634-6340
Green Acres
Is The Place To Be
312 ON &/2 ACRE
New carpet through-
out, new appliances.
Nice Home
$2,200 down P& I only
$369.84/mo. W.A.C.
Call to View
352-621-9182
HOLDER
3/2, Fireplace, fncd,
yd $450/mo 10% down
Owner Finance Avail
(352) 302-9217
HOMOSASSA
2/1 furnished fenced
acre, huge deck, shed
& addition. $29,900 as
is (352) 628-5244
HOMOSASSA
3394 Arundel Terr
3/2, lamaniate & tile
floors, All appls. CHA
New Roof, $1500 moves
you in $650/mo
Rent to Own
Tony Tubolina Brk
Owner(727) 385-6330
INVERNESS
2/2 SW, 2 nice big
additions / AC, fenced,
near lake, part furn.
$37k 352-341-1569
LECANTO
2 BR, SW on 1/2 acre
MUST SELL!!
$17K OBO
352-586-2976
Sugarmill Woods
Area
3/2, approx. 1500 sq.
ft. on over 1 acre.
Quite,, nice home on
paved road. Brand
new A/C & heat &
appliance, under full
warranty. Ceramic
tile in master bath,
guest bath & kitchen.
New wood cabinets,
new deck & driveway
This house has a
great location,
2 mi. from Publix,
3 mi., from Suncoast
Pkwy. 5 mi. from new
Walmart. $2,200.
down $399.00/mo.,
P & I, W.A.C. Must See
to steal this house
352-621-9181




Beverly Hills
55 + park 2/2 fully
remodeled,lg screen
lanaicarport, shed,
laundry,landscape & ir-
rigation all appliances,
Club house activities,
Heated pool.Lot rent
$258, $39,900
Call 352-422-0927
Dunnellon, Fl 2 bedroom.
2 bath. 1997 Redman
14x60 MH. 2 BR 2 Bath.
New kitchen, new roof,
Air conditioner only 3 yrs
old. 12 x 14 glassed in
patio, tiled floor. Two
sheds, one is 10x12,
other is 12x14. Lot rent is
$240.00 pm Asking
$31,500.00 Call
352-465-1761


Mobile HomesH
ForSale-I


7. Sect's deeds that speak louder than words (2)

| -|-|-||-|-|- |*-|-|-||-|-|-


1-27-12


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Barbara L.Cro PA.

35-34-50 -35-76-35


2/1 FURNISHED
MOBILE HOME,
Over 55 Park $190 Lot
Rent Village Pine, Inglis
Lot 4 A $9,500 OBO
(906) 281-7092
EEDGE WATER OAKS
55+ Comm.lake ac-
cess, 2/1.5, 12x56
furn.12 x 30 scr. porch
shed, new 200 amp.
$11,500(352) 419-6477



Park SS appl's
New W/D workshop
w/power, Remodeled
inside/out $11,000 obo
(352) 418-5926
Homosassa Springs
2008 12x40 park model
home, completely
furnished, ready to
move in $23,500
Tony 828-674-9996
HOMOSASSA'S
Best Housing Value
Modern homes from
$8,400 or Lease to Own
from $139/mo.
$800.down + Lot rent at
Evanridge Community
an exceptional 55+Park
352 628-5977
Inv. Ft Cooper 55+
2/1.5, furnished,
florida room, carport.
REDUCED TO $12K
(352) 419-5114
INVERENESS 55 +
Comm. 14X54 MH, 2/1
55' carport w/deck,
front scr room
w/storage shed, CHA
part furn, W/D, Reduce
to $5K, 352-344-1002
INVERNESS
55+park, 1/1 carport,
screen room, shed,
$7000 (352) 726-8071
INVERNESS
Waterfront 55+ Park
w/5 piers for fishing &
enjoyment, clubhouse,
onslte shuffleboard, and
much more! 2 BR, 1.5 BA
for $2.000. must be
approved 352-476-4964
WESTWIND VILLAGE 55+
Park. Updated 2/2 DW's
for sale. Reasonable
(352) 628-2090



Homosassa-3/2 nice
and large, doublewide
on 1/2 acre, $39,900
owner financing or
lease at $750 month
(352) 628-5598
Rock Cr Canyon
Area
3/2 DW, acres
fenced, gated,
Rent or Buy owner
financing avail
(352) 302-4546















(352) 795-0021
View our website
C21NatureCoast.com

CHASSAHOWITZKA
3/2 House, $600.
3/2 Furnished DW., $600
Agent (352) 382-1000




CRYSTAL RIVER
2 BR. $550., 3BR House
$800., 352-563-9857
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025


-I*

Alexander Real Estate
(352) 795-6633
Crystal River Apts
2 BR/1 BA $375-$500

CRYSTAL RIVER 1/1
HD cap access,.small
pet ok. (352) 628-2815
CRYSTAL RIVER
Lrg 2/1,W/D hkup, incld
water & lawn. $500 mo.
+ Sec. 352-634-5499
FLORAL CITY
FREE Use of boat ramp,
fishing dock, canoe &
Jon boat rentals. 1 BR
$450/$200 dp. incis Sat
TV electric, walk to river
Trails End Camp, A
Friendly Place to Live
352-726-3699
HOMOSASSA
1 & 2 Bd. $450. no pets
628-7300 or 697-0310
INVERNESS
Close to hosp 1/1 $450
2/2 $600 352-422-2393


-I
Nice 1 Bedrm $500
352-270-0218216-0012,
SEVEN RIVERS
APTS

A Beautiful place
to come home too.
35 units on private
street, situated on 10
wooded acres, near
Crystal River &
7 Rivers Hosp. fish-
ing, walking, trails,
shopping near by.
Old Florida setting,
quite, clean well
maint. central
laundry room.
352-795-3719
Directions:
Hwy 19 turn W. at
onto Tallahassee Rd



.1 L ,




HERNANDO
2/2, 400 E Glasboro,
$675 Incl pool, water
trash etc 352-697-1907



INVERNESS 2/1/1
Great Area no smk/pets
$600/mo. 1st, Ist & sec.
352-341-3562/400-0743




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp





CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1 -$600 mo. inc. some
util. lst/last/sec.
628-1062
INVERNESS
Country Living: 3BR, 2BA
home $595. RENT
SPECIAL: Security dep.
pro-rated over 3 mo.
period. 352-476-4964
Specializing in
Sugarmill Woods
Rentals


Debe Johns
Brkr/Assoc/PRM

Coldwell Banker Next
Generation Realty
Property Manager
(352) 382-2700 www.
coldwellbankernext
aeneration.com

See what a
Professional
Residential Manager
can do for you.

Rent: ouses
Furnishe


Kristi Bortz
Let our property
management team
help you with your
short or long term
rentals.
See all our rentals in
Citrus Co.
www.plantation
rentals
352-795-0782 or
866-795-0784


Kristi Bortz
Let our property
management team
help you with your
short or long term
rentals.
See all our rentals in
Citrus Co.
www.plantation
rentals
352-795-0782 or
866-795-0784


CRY RIV 2/1 $775
near bay, w/util./cable
212-2051 or 220-2447

Royal Oaks
Inv. 2/2/2, den firm.
very clean, no pet non
smoking $850. incl
Cable/water
(920) 210-6788




BEVERLY HILLS
3/1/Carport, patio,
fenced yard, $550. mo
352-422-2433
BEVERLY HILLS
3/2/2, and 3/1/1
352-464-2514

CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/2 $850.
(352) 400-0230

CR/HOM 3/2/1
RC Elem,
fenced, $575
352-220-2447 212-2051

CRYSTAL RIVER
3 bedroom. 2 bath.
House for rent Please
contact for details.
$650.00 per month
352-212-9682

CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 Split plan on % acre.
$600. Mo. Fst./Lst.
Cell (727) 992-1010

CRYSTAL RIVER
Rent or Rent to Own
$699 Move-in Special
3/2 Lrg. fm. rm., tiled.
Spotless, Cul-de-sac.
Copeland Pk., Fncd.,
Pets OK.352-527-0493

Homosassa Springs
3/1 No pets,Clean $700
mo. (305)619-0282, Cell

INVERNESS
2/1/1, Very clean well
maintained Lease. $650
mo., Fst, Ist, sec. Near
schools, Hospital. 4212 S
Apopka, 561-395-5735

INVERNESS
2BR, 1BA, Irg. yardIn
town. close to Hosp.
and shopping.$500 mo.
+ util., 1st, last, Refs.
352-860-2108
INVERNESS
3 bdrm, 2 bath home with
screen end pool on lake.
Beautiful setting on
cul-de-sac, golf comm.
$1000/mo, 813-909-0234
INVERNESS
3/2/2, Avail. Feb.Near
Sch. & Hosp. $800. Mo.
F/US (352) 527-9268

INVERNESS
3/2/2, Highlands
Starting @ $730.
352-601-2615

INVERNESS, 3/2
1 Blk. to Cath. Church
352-464-0901, 637-3371




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




CRYSTAL RIVER
Clean House, cable w/d,
$115/ 125wkly
$430/475mo. No hidden
cost. 563-6428




C.R/Homosassa
1& 2 Br. furn, quiet park
Util. incl. clean, shrt/long
term 352 220-2077
INVERNESS
Waterfront 3/2/2, furn.
$1,300. Nice 527-9268




FARMS, LAND,
COMMERCIAL
UNIQUE &
HISTORIC HOMES,
SMALL TOWN
COUNTRY LIFESTYLE
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989


"LIFE IS BETTER
WITH A PORCH"

WWW.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.


WORDY GUARD BY TRICKY RICKY KANE
1. Harbor boat carpet alternative (1) Every answer is a rhyming
pair of words (like FAT CAT
and DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
2. Former spouse knocks to the floor (1) they will fit in the letter
_squares. The number after the
definition tells you how many
3. "57 Varieties" maker kvetches (1) syllables in each word.
@2012 UFS, Dist byUniv Uclickfor UFS
4. Grouchy "Dear" advice columnist (2)


5. Prison hue and cry (2)


6. Comedian Joan shakes from the cold (2)







C14 FRIDAY, JANUARY 27, 2012


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ille-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination. "
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.







Specializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches &
Commercial


Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com

WATERFRONT
EQUESTRIAN &
INVESTMENT/
INCOME SALES
*Buyer's
Representative
*Concierge Level
Service


Sherrl C. Parker &
Assoc. Realtors,
Direct 352-422-3261
Office 352-527-8090
www.
sherrlcparker.com




For Sale By Owner
3/2/2, Custom built
in '08 by Wheeler
Construction $129,500
Call (407) 739-2646 or
407-442-3597

Reduced to $168,900
5 bedroom, 3 bath,
3,800 sq. ft. 1/2 acre
open concept home.
Ideal for live-in elderly
group home, assisted
living facility, foster care
home. 352-522-0883 or
603-289-0134




3 Bedroom, 2 Bath
Double carport,
fenced yd. new roof,
1,100 sf, $55,500
(352) 464-0641
(239) 298-0076
LAUREL RIDGE
Deed res./newly
remodeled 2/2/2,
open floor plan w/den,
$109K. comm pool &
clubhse(352) 270-8488
RENT TO OWN!!
No credit check, 3
bdrm. 352-464-6020
JADEMISSION.COM


S
2 Bedroom, 2 bath
house with heated pool
& fireplace on I acre
lot in Citrus Hills. In ex-
cellent cond., Owner
finance with D/P +
Excellent credit. Call
352-860-1872 or
304-673-0110 or
304-673-5550.
Reduced to $139,000

Clearview 1 Acre
w/3 bdrm w/office/den off
master,2.5 baths,2plus
garage,great rm w/pocket
sliders to 50x24 lanai,
cooks kitchen, Master
suite to die for.Much
more! $254,900.
352-860-0444




APACHE SHORE
2 bdrm. 1 bath. close to
lake central heat and
air, new well & water
softening system ,
corner wooded lot.
Excellent Investment
Opp. Assumable loan,
$30.000, 352-322-0454




297 S. Canaday Dr. 1/2
ac. 3BR, 2BA, gar/work
shop lot 198ftX110ft
paved St. front and rear
parking for RV's, boats
etc. Inside of house
needs updating$37,500
OMO 352-726-6568

3/2/2, I.G. &C.C.
3k sf. new kit. Ig closets,
CHA, firepl. on golf
course $139K make of-
fer, norealtors 726-0652

3BR, 3BA, Pool home,
2,000 sq.ft. $165,000
OR BEST OFFER
518 Poinsettia
352-860-0878.


YOU'LL 4 THIS!
Have it all! Inverness
Over Flowing With
Value!!! Highlands,
S.Carol Terrace. Huge
1 Family. Major up-
dates you'll enjoy
only in a new home.
Owner down sized,
will negotiate. In
nature's paradise this
4 bedroom 3 bath on
2.8 acres fits a family
with children who
love to play explorer.
Own deep well (no
water bills), plus new
whole-house water
treatment system,
16x34 in-ground
screened pool with
fountain and lights.
New 2-zone energy
efficient heat/cool;
new full attic R-30
insulation; new attic
solar fan; new
ducts/vents; updated
bathrooms, 2 new
AirMaster air cleaning
units to remove dust,
pollen, mold spores.
Majestic trees. Extra
long concrete drive-
way. Watch the deer
play from the lanai or
living room window.
Newer (2002) Timber-
line roof, ridge vents,
7 solar tubs thru out
the house. Two hot
water heaters. Wired
for generator. Com-
pletely chain link
fenced. Corral your
horses, park your
boat or RV. ON
property 7 palm trees
value miniumn $10K
each. Occupancy at
funding. Approx. 2700
sq ft under air.
$212,500.
(Price below Estimate
Zillow.com) Contact
owner, 352-556-1510,
352-238-6274 email:
rosepub@excite.com

INVERNESS
Waterfront 55+ Park
w/5 piers for fishing &
enjoyment, clubhouse,
onslte shuffleboard
and much more!
Single wide 1 & 2 BR,
starting @ $6,900. Lot
rent $274/mo. H20
Included. 3 mo. free
rent with purchase.
352-476-4964

Lakefront Gospel
Island Location
Spacious 3/2/2
for rent $700/m or for
sale..... 908-322-6529


Homes
Riverhaven Village,
Homosassa, FL
GREAT LOCATION,
GREAT HOUSE,
GREAT NEIGHBOR-
HOOD! 2147 sf, 3/2 +
Ir/dr comb, den, sun-
room, inside laundry,
all appliances, bit. by
Rusaw in 1989, well
maintained, upgrades,
move in ready.
Asking $160,000
all offers considered.
Realtors 3%
See visual tour:
www.visualtour.com/sho
w.asp?t=2656780&prt=10
003&sk=13
Frank or Helen Harris,
352-628-1434
email: hharris3
@tampabay.rr.com

S=11E^^


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work For You!

BETTY HUNT,
REALTOR
ERA KEY 1 Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.

Condo for Sale
2/2, 1,850sq. ft.,
35 Beech Street
(352) 503-3294

fC^itrus ount
Homes^^*


Best Time To Buy!
I have lease options,
owner financing &
foreclosures
call Phyllis Strickland
(352) 613-3503
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.


For Sale8)u
Citrus County
3BR/2Bath Make
Offers 352-563-9857


Independent contractors delivering the Citrus County
Chronicle can earn as much as $1,000 a month
working only 3-4 early morning hours per day. The
Chronicle is a permanent part of Citrus County with
an excellent reputation. To find out more, call
and speak to one of our district managers or leave
your name and phone number and we will get right
back with you!


-I








Michele Rose Realtor
Simply put I 'll work
harder 352-212-5097
isellcitruscountyv()
vahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515




20 ACRES Live on
Land ONLY $99/mo. $0
down,Owner Financ-
ing. NO CREDIT
CHECKS! Near El Paso,
Texas. Beautiful moun-
tain views! Free
Color brochure
1-800-755-8953
www.sunsetranches
cornn




2/2, Garage, heated
pool/spa, 8500 Gospel
Isl. Road, Inverness
$112,000 Owner financ-
ing, email for photo,
trader@tampabay.rr.
corn (727) 415-7728
CRYSTAL RIVER/OZELLO
$299K, 2+/2/2
Open floor plan,
Hardwood floors,
www.waterfrontozello.co
m or 352-563-5527
LAKE ROUSSEAU
South side of Lake
2 bedrm cottage
fenced, 1/2 acre,
boat dock. $85,000
775-230-2240
Salt waterfront stilt
home on Ozello Key
Owner finance,3%
down payment, pri-
vate boat ramp and
dock, 1000 square foot
living upstairs, 1000
square foot screen
downstairs workshop
$174,900 Call Craig or
Debra at 352-422-1011
or 352-634-3872


CABIN ON 40 ACRES
of Prime Hunting Land
Located in Gulf Ham-
mock Management.
Area. $165000 OBO
(352) 795-2027
(352) 634-4745




LAND 1.5 acres fenced
partially cleared, on 480
in Homosassa across
from firehouse. water
sewer are avail. MUST
SEE!!! 352-382-0535




Hunting recreational in
Gulf Hammock Mgt..
Levy Co area, well,
pondATV trails $165K
352 795-2027/ 634-4745




INVERNESS
For Sale -12 lots (20 X
120 each) $8,000. Zoned
residential.At3109 E
Millside Ln, Inverness.
Sold together or sepa-
rately. Contact: Shayn
Robinson 832 549 0286
or
ShaynRobinson@hotmail.c
om
INVERNESS,
Beautiful Wooded Lot
on Edged Dry Lake,
100 x 150 $8,900
Owner Finance
(352) 621-1664
Premium Home Site on
Sky View Golf Course
Great price to build
your new custom,
maintenance FREE
home. Country Club
membership including
45,000 sf fitness & spa
$42,000 OBO
Call (910) 512-2550




BOAT LIFT
Single Pole,
1500 lb. capacity.
$900 obo
352-613-8453




'06 ProKat 20 ft
140 HP Suzuki 4
strokelow hours, very
clean, Magic alum tan-
dem trailer, VHF,
Depth, GPS, Windless
anchor $18k obo
(352) 464-4877
'07 Proline 17 ft
4 stroke 90 HP Suzuki,
very low hours, ready
to fish trailer & more
$13,500 352-795-3894
18ft Runabout
with a Galv. Trailer
$400. (352) 476-1113
20f t Pontoon
2000 Fiesta, Fish N Fun,
no carpet, fiberglass fir,
85 Yamaha, Galv. trlr.
$6,500. 352-613-8453
FRESH JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct.@ $5 per lb
Stone Crab@ $6 per lb
delivered 727-771-7500
HOUSE BOAT
30 ft fiberglass, hrd
wood firs, & more
Live Aboard or eniov
weekends in Paradise
$14,500 (423) 320-3008
Pontoon 18'
88' Fiesta, 40hp Eviinr
runs great solid fir,
good carpetbimini
capt chrs,'07 gal trial.
w/new tires, $3550
352-586-9498


CLASSIFIED




21' Cuddy, full transom,
w/brack, 150 HP Yam.,
Bimini, VHF, porta pot,
dep. finder, trailer
$5,900. (352) 382-3298
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LAKE
MARINE
We Pay CASH For Used
Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck & Fishing
Boats (352)527-0555
boatsupercenter.com

























2000 Rialto Winn22ft
20MPG, runs greatnew
generator,86K, See to
appreciate $19 500
(352) 746-6559
2001 38 ft Holiday
Rambler, Cummings
diesel,2 slides, fully
loaded sell or trade
property $600000
859-814-3573
2009 DODGE RAM
3500, quad cab, terbo
deisel loaded 27K mi.
still in warr. $30,000 obo
(419) 307-8954, ALSO
2010 MONTANA
Mountaineer, 5th wheel
36ft., 3 slides, great rm.
layout, like new
$32,500 obo Downsizing
(419) 307-8954
'94 Fleetwood
454 engine Bounder,
32ft. loaded, self
contained, 79k
$9,800. 352-795-6736
I Buy RV'S Steve
Henry, RV World of
Hudson Inc.Since
1974. (888) 674-8376
(727) 514-8875
Infinity 99 M/Home
by 4 Winds, 35 Triton
V-10gas, 44Kmis. front
rear a/c, Onan Gen.
back up camera,
leveling jacks, TV, fully
equipped incl tow bars
& hitch + brks buddy,
assisted for tow vech.
all manuals for coach
& appls. NON Smoker
incls hoses, sewer &
electric hook-upsd
7 new NEW Goodyear
tires, See at Oak Bend
Village Route 40 W.
Dunnellon call for tour



Like new '06, 33FT, T.T.
w/14FT slide, Has fiber-
glass Ext, free standing
dinette, elec. fireplace.
over 30K new asking
$13,000 obo
(352) 637-1796
SUNSEEKER '05
29ft. Class. C., nearly
all options, generators
needs awning fabric,
non smoker, 33k mi.
Only $26,500., 464-0316
bac upcamra


Tropical LX Diamond
'05, 3 slides, 40'
19k miles, 350
Cat-Diesel. gen. 7.5
too many xtra's to list.
$98,500.352-503-3663
WINNEBEGO
2001 Chieftain 35U,
garaged, non smoker
no pets. 2 slides, Cen.
Heat Pump, exc. cond.
76K mi., $38,900
(352) 208-8292



2011 Grand Junction
5 wheel, 40 ft, 4 slides,
w/Bumper to bumper
for 16 years, too many
extras to list! $37,000
(603) 991-8046
'07 32 foot KZ toy
hauler, like new, full
slide out, sleeps 7, new
tires, Owan Gen., gas
tank, alumwheels
Lrg living area separate
cargo area $18,900
352-795-2975
I BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
call me 352-201-6945
JAYCO
2005 Jay Feather
LGT 25Z
New tires/brakes; sleeps
6;new queen mattress;
shower/tub; stove/oven;
refrig/sep freezer; lots of
storage. Like new $9,500
priced below blue book
retail see in Inglis
352-447-5434




Diamond Plate Truck
Tool Box
Good Condition
$60.
(352) 344-9479
Fiberglass truck top-
per and liner, GMC
pewter color, fits 2008
GMC Sierra, $400
(352) 697-2724
Maroon Cap 631/2 X 80
Rear slide, locks & keys
exc cond. fiberglass
brke & inter lights off a
Dakota, New $1500 sell
$400.OB0352-795-3920




BIG SALE!
Consignment USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
AUTOS' FROM $1,500.
US 19 BY AIRPORT
US 44, BY NAPA
Low Payments
461-4518 & 795-4440
consignmentusa.org
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191


a
Buying Used Cars Trucks
& Vans, For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES,
Hwy 19... 352 564-8333
CASH PAID FOR JUNK
CARS Any Condition
Up to $500., Free
Towing 352-445-3909
KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Salvage Pays top $$$
for your autos.
352-628-4144
WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
Perfect Cond or not
Titled,No title,
No problem. Paying up
to $25K any make,
any model Call A.J.
813-335-3794/531-4298




2 AUCTIONS
THURS. Jan. 26
Estate Auction
Prev:12 Auction 3PM
Outside 6PM Inside 2009
Pontiac VIbe/w Onstar
54K, 1997 PU Mazda
SOLD @5:30. 1980 Cor-
vette. blue. Ivory Int..
120Kml. 13.5FT Delquay
Run-about, 40HP
Evinrude, Front load
washr/dryer, designer
furn., hshid & tools

FRI. JAN. 27
Prev: 4PM Auction 6PM
Carnival & Vintaae
Glass Auction
Live & On Line 125 lots
of Fenton, Imperial,
Northwood, Opales-
cent, Depression, Early
Pressed Glass & More!
DudleysAuctlon.com
4000 S. Fla. Ave.
(US 41-S) Inverness
(352) 637-9588
AB1667-AU2246
12% BP-2% ca.disc
2007 Toyota
Camry LE, 56k miles,
$12000
(352) 422-1533
'03 Buick LeSabre
Runs Perfect, electric
everything,89k, silver,
totally clean $5000 firm
352-586-9570
'08 Chrysler Sebr-
ing Touring
Convertible,34k miles,
loaded, $14995 firm
352-897-4520
'89 Chevy Baretta
Runs good, $1800 obo
Blue, auto. Great first
car! 352-746-4789

BIG SALE!
Consignment USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
AUTOS' FROM $1,500.
US 19 BY AIRPORT
US 44, BY NAPA
Low Payments *
461-4518 & 795-4440
consignmentusa.org
KAWASAKI '82
11,662K ,mis. LTD 550
lots of extras
great cond $1600 obo
(352) 228-1897
LINCOLN
'06, Towncar, Signature,
37K miles, looks, drives
even smells like new.
$16,500. (352) 746-1184
MERCURY
'95,Grand Marquis GS,
4 dr, all electric, newer
tires, paint & inter.
showrm perfect, great
looking and driving car
$2,650, (352) 464-1537



MUSTANG
2004 Convertible-V6
50,000 miles excellent
condition
2 Year warranty -$10,500
352-628-6731




AUTO SWAP
CORRAL SHOW
19th Annual
Sumter
Swap Meets
SUMTER COUNTY
Fairgrounds Bushnell
Feb. 17, 8, 19th
1-800-438-8559

AUTO SWAP
CORRAL SHOW
19th Annual
Sumter
Swap Meets
SUMTER COUNTY
Fairgrounds, Bushnell
Feb. 17, 18, 19th
1-800-438-8559







Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





2 AUCTIONS
THURS. Jan. 26
Estate Auction
Prev:12 Auction 3PM
Outside 6PM Inside 2009
Pontiac VIbe/w Onstar
54K, 1997 PU Mazda
SOLD @ 5:30. 1980 Cor-
vette, blue, Ivory Int.,
120K ml. 13.5FT Delquay
Run-about, 40HP
Evlnrude, Front load
washr/dryer, designer
furn., hshld & tools
*******A


SFRI. JAN. 27
Prev: 4PM Auction 6PM
Carnival & Vintaae
Glass Auction
Live & On Line 125 lots
of Fenton, Imperial,
Northwood, Opales-
cent, Depression, Early
Pressed Glass & More!
DudleysAuctlon.com
4000 S. Fla. Ave.
(US 41-S) Inverness
(352) 637-9588
AB1667-AU2246
12% BP-2% ca.disc

BIG SALE!
Consignment USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
AUTOS' FROM $1,500.
US 19 BY AIRPORT
US 44, BY NAPA
Low Payments *
461-4518 & 795-4440
consignmentusa.org


'99 Nissan Frontier
4 cyl, AT/AC 1 senior
citizen owner with
gentle miles $3950
(352) 726-3268
DODGE '06
Dakota R/T, real sharp,
has been treated very
well 50K + easy miles
$13K (352) 795-7993
FORD '01
Lariat F 350 DRW 7.3
turbo diesel super cab
84K mis. exc cond $14K
call Bob(352) 794-3142
FORD 04
Lariat, super duty die-
sel, crew cabtan,
loaded, goose neck
hitch, new tires, brks,
140K mis. well maint
$12,500(352) 344-4087
VW'83
5 spd. restored, a/c
CD, bedliner & ton-
neau cover, new
tires/paint $4500
(352) 447-2330

SprtUilt


FORD ESCAPE XLT
SPORT
2005, Red SUV, grey in-
terior, tinted windows,
219k mi, new engine,
FWD, 6 cyl, 3.0L, 200
hp. Nice, clean, great
vehicle! Asking $6,000
OBO. Call 352-613-6354,
Iv mess if no ans.




900-0229 DAILY CRN
Surplus Prop.
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County Board




894-0127 FCRN
2/7 sale Units A50 & B36
PUBLIC NOTICE
By reason of default
Homosassa Storage, Inc.,
8787 S. Suncoast Blvd.,


Classic Jeep CJ-5
runs great, looks great
w/many new parts.
$4500 (352) 586-3107




'94 Dodge Grand
Caravan,runs good,
looks good, $1500
(352) 344-4229
MERCURY '99
Villager Estate, 7 pass.,
low mi., loaded, hitch,
excel. cond. $3,200


2008 MXU 300,ONLY
390 MILES, GARAGE
KEPT. LIKE NEW
$2000.00 CALL KEVIN
AT 352-212-8121



L.^^k


of County Commissioners
will be selling surplus prop-
erty and equipment via
the internet at




Homosassa, Florida 34446
will sell the personal prop-
erty stored in Units A50 ( a
I0xi0 unit) and B36
(10X20 unit) containing


32-5300-O6/Or OOU0-3481

Harley Davidson
04, $9700.,Bagger
Crystal River
Cell (727) 207-1619


KAWASKI 2011
Vulcan 900 LP
low miles, many extra's
50 mpg $7,499. obo
over 1000's in options
(352) 697-2760


Lucky U Cycles
(352) 330-0047

2003 HONDA
GOLDWING TRIKE
W/TRAILER. LOADED
$18,995
2012 GOLDWING
801 MILES
$22,500.00
2004 HARLEY ULTRA
CLASSICLOADED
$10,750.00
2009 HARLEY 1200N
ALL BLACK
$6,995.00

FINANCE AVAILABLE !
WWW.LUCKYUCYCLES.
COM
352-330-0047


SUZUKI
2009 DR200SE DUAL
SPORT ONLY HAS 380
MILES ON IT. GARAGE
KEPT UNIT IS IN EX-
CELLENT CONDITION.
$2965.00 OBO CALL
KEVIN AT 352-212-8121




govdeals.com from Jan.
15 until Feb. 29,2012.
Jan. 15 thru Feb. 29, 2012





household and personal
goods of Teri-An Consaul.
This public auction sale
shall take place on Feb.
7, 2012 at9AM.
Pub: Jan. 20 & 27, 2012.


808-0203 FCRN 2/15 sale
PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned intends to sell the personal property
described below to enforce a lien imposed on said property under The Florida Self
Storage Facility Act Statutes (Sections 83.801- 83.809). The undersigned will sell at
public sale by competitive bidding on Wednesday, the 15th day of February 2012,
scheduled to begin at 1:30 PM, on the premises where said property has been stored
and which is located at StoreRight Self Storage, 1227 S. Lecanto Hwy., City of
Lecanto, County of Citrus, State of Florida, the following:
Name: Unit : Contents:
Roberta Damron C030 HHG
Purchases must be paid for at the time of purchase by cash only. All purchased
items are sold as is, where is, and must be removed at the time of the sale. Sale is
subject to cancellation in the event of settlement between owner and obligated
party.
January 27 and February 3, 2012.


I *1. I


804-0127 FCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
STATE OF MICHIGAN PROBATE COURT, COUNTY OF WESHTENAW
FILE NO. PRP-11-1160 DE
ESTATE OF SHIRLEY ANN AHEARN, Date of birth: 3/1/1948
NOTICE TO CREDITORS (Decedent's Estate)
TO ALL CREDITORS:
NOTICE TO CREDITORS: The decedent, Shirley Ann Ahearn, died 11/23/2011.
Creditors of the decedent are notified that all claims against the estate will be for-
ever barred unless presented to Rodger Daniel Ahearn, named personal representa-
tive or proposed personal representative, or to both the probate court at 101 East
Huron St., Rm. 314, P.O. Box 8645, Ann Arbor, MI 48107, and the named/proposed
personal representative within 4 months after the date of publication of this notice.
Date 1/24/2012.


January 27,2012.


Personal Representative:
/s/ Rodger Daniel Ahearn
9218 N. Hawkweed Drive, Citrus Springs, FL 34433 (352) 489-9090


809-0203 FCRN
Nestor, Robert C. 2011-CP-837 Notice to Cred.
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT COURT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY
IN PROBATE FILE NO.: 2011-CP-837
IN RE: ESTATE OF ROBERT C. NESTOR, a/k/a ROBERT CLARENCE NESTOR,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the Estate of ROBERT C. NESTOR, a/k/a ROBERT CLARENCE
NESTOR, deceased, whose date of death was October 17, 2011, and whose Social
Security Number was 236-68-8268, File Number 2011-CP-837, is pending in the Circuit
Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 110 North
Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450. The name and address of the personal
representative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against
the decedent's estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, on
whom a copy of this notice is served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE
LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE
ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims,
must file their claims with this court WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is January 27,2012.
/s/ TERRY ALLEN NESTOR
Personal Representative
DEAN AND DEAN, L.L.P. BY: /s/ Susan E. Dean, Esq. Florida Bar No. 746827
230 Northeast 25th Ave., Ocala, Florida 34470 (352) 368-2800
Attorney for Personal Representative.
January 27 and February 3, 2012.


810-0203 FCRN
Thomas, Melvin L. 2010-CP-879 Notice to Cred.
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2010-CP-879
IN RE: ESTATE OF MELVIN L. THOMAS
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Melvin L. Thomas, deceased, whose date of
death was October 11, 2010, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of which is 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness,
Florida 34450. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file
their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is January 27,2012.
Personal Representative:
/s/ John A. Nelson
2218 Highway 44 West, Inverness, Florida 34453
Attorney for Personal Representative:
/s/ John A. Nelson, Esq. Florida Bar No.: 0727032
Slaymaker & Nelson, P.A. 2218 Hwy. 44 West, Inverness, Florida 34453
Telephone: (352)726-6129 Fax: (352) 726-0223 E-Mail: john@slaymakerlaw.com
January 27 and February 3, 2012.


811-0203 FCRN
Taibl, Gloria M 2071-CP-000801 Notice to Cred
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2011-CP-000801
IN RE: ESTATE OF GLORIA M. TAIBL
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of GLORIA M. TAIBL, deceased, File Number
2011-CP-000801, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 110 North Apopka Ave., Inverness, Florida 34450. The
name and address of the ancillary personal representative and his attorney are set
forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, on
whom a copy of this notice is served must file their objections with this Court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR
30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims,
must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is January 27,2012.
Ancillary Personal Representative:
/s/ CHRISTOPHER D. TRADER
3456 Lockner Blvd., Joliet, IL 60431
Attorney for Ancillary Personal Representative:
/s/ DAVID C. SASSER, ESQ. Florida Bar No. 297720 JOHNSTON & SASSER, PA.
P. 0. Box 997, Brooksville, FL 34605-0997 Telephone: (352) 796-5123
January 27 and February 3, 2012.


816-0203 FCRN
Hicks, Frederick Joseph 20711 CP 862 Notice to Creditors
PUBLIC NOTICE


I Trucks


CITRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




Mountaineer,cranberry 2005 HD Ultra
red, 5.0 L, 126K mi. ex- Classic w/Fat Bagger
cel. shape all receipts kit, Custom seat,
$3,500 (352) 503-2792 wheels ect $15000 OBO


Noie t rdi S


Noics o reitrs







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FRIDAY, JANUARY 27, 2012 C15


Nio 1Cet


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File Number: 2011 CP 862
IN RE: ESTATE OF FREDERICK JOSEPH HICKS a/k/a FREDERICK J. HICKS,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of FREDERICK JOSEPH HICKS a/k/a FREDERICK J.
HICKS, deceased, whose date of death was November 10, 2011, and whose Social
Security Number is 470-07-9996, File Number 2011 CP 862, is pending in the Circuit
Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 110 N.
Apopka Avenue, Room 101, Inverness, Florida 34450-4299. The names and ad-
dresses of the Personal Representative and the Personal Representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate, upon whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must
file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE TIME OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE (3)
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702
OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is January 27, 2012.
Personal Representative:
/s/ JANICE M. WATERS
14520 W. Tulane Street, Brookfield, Wisconsin 53005
Attorneys for Personal Representative:
BRETT & REYNOLDS, P.A. /s/ ROBERT J. REYNOLDS, Esq. Florida Bar No.: 0021415
P.O. Drawer 2480, Dunnellon, Florida 34430
January 27 and February 3, 2012.


895-0127 FCRN
McLeish, Edna V. 2012-CP-005 Notice to Creditors
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2012-CP-005
IN RE: ESTATE OF EDNA V. McLEISH,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of EDNA V. McLEISH, deceased, whose date of
death was October 12, 2011, and whose social security number is XXX-XX-8648, is
pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division, the address
of which is 110 N. Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450. The names and ad-
dresses of the personal representative and the personal representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file
their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decdent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is January 20, 2012.
Personal Representative:
/s/ Carolyn M. Wiegner
Attorney for Personal Representative:
/s/ Diane Cohen, Esq. Florida Bar No.: 0011801
DIANE COHEN, P.A. 111 W. Main Street, Suite 203, Inverness, Florida 34450
Phone: (352) 637-1899 Facsimile: (352) 637-4909 Email: dcohen@dianecohen.com
January 20 and 27, 2012.


800-0127 FCRN
Vs. Lillie, Beverly A. Estate 09-2011-CA-003907 Notice of Action
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 5TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO. 09-2011-CA-003907

REVERSE MORTGAGE SOLUTIONS, INC.
Plaintiff,
vs.
UNKNOWN SPOUSE, HEIRS, BENEFICIARIES, DEVISEES, ASSIGNESS, LIENORS, CREDITORS,
TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHERS WHO MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST IN THE ESTATE OF BEVERLY
A. LILLIE, DECEASED; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UN-
DER AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS) WHO ARE NOT
KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN IN-
TEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; UNITED STATES
OF AMERICA ON BEHALF OF THE SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT;
LINDA JANSSEN; UNKNOWN TENANTS) IN POSSESSION OF THE PROPERTY
Defendants
NOTICE OF ACTION

To the following Defendant(s):
UNKNOWN SPOUSE, HEIRS, BENEFICIARIES, DEVISEES, ASSIGNESS, LIENORS, CREDITORS,
TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHERS WHO MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST IN THE ESTATE OF BEVERLY A.
LILLIE, DECEASED
Last Known Address: 5020 N. WESTERN DRIVE, HERNANDO, FL 34442

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the following
described property:

LOT 60, FOREST LAKE NORTH, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8, PAGE 101, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA.

TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN 1998 PEACH STATE HOMES MOBILE HOME, MODEL
NUMBER 2013, SERIAL NUMBER PSH6A-21844AB.

a/k/a 5020 N. WESTERN DRIVE, HERNANDO, FL 34442

has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written de-
fenses, if any, to it, on Marinosci Law Group, P.C., Attorney for Plaintiff, whose ad-
dress is 100 W. Cypress Creek Road, Suite 1045, Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33309 on or
before Feb. 20, 2012, a date which is within thirty (30) days after the first publication
of this Notice in THE CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE and file the original with the Clerk of
this Court either before service on Plaintiff's attorney or immediately thereafter;
otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demand in the com-
plaint.

This notice is provided pursuant to Administrative Order No. 2.065.

IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, if you are a person
with a disability who needs an accommodation in order to participate in a proceed-
ing, you are entitled, at no cost to you, the provision of certain assistance. Please
contact the ADA Coordinator, John Sullivan, at 352-341-6700, or the Courts within 2
working days of your receipt of your notice to appear in Court.

I HEREBY CERTIFY that a true and correct copy of the foregoing Notice of Filing was
mailed to all the parties in the attached mailing list.

WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court this 9 day of January, 2012.
BETTY STRIFLER, As Clerk of the Court
(COURT SEAL)
/s/ Kathy Stalbaum, As Deputy Clerk

January 20 and 27, 2012. 11-07238


812-0203 FCRN
Abreu, Julio M. 09-2011 -CA-003935 Notice of Action
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 09-2011-CA-003935 SEC.:

BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. AS SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS
SERVICING, LP,
Plaintiff
vs.
JULIO M. ABREU, et al,
Defendant(s)
NOTICE OF ACTION FOR FORECLOSURE PROCEEDING-PROPERTY

TO: BERTILA 1. ABREU, ADDRESS UNKNOWN BUT WHOSE LAST KNOWN ADDRESS IS: 17
South Tyler Street, Beverly Hills, FL 34465

TO: JULIO ABREU, ADDRESS UNKNOWN BUT WHOSE LAST KNOWN ADDRESS IS: 17 South
Tyler Street, Beverly Hills, FL 34465

Residence unknown, if living, including any unknown spouse of the said Defendants,
if either has remarried and if either or both of said Defendant(s) are dead, their
respective unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, creditors, lienors, and
trustees, and all other persons claiming by, through, under or against the named
Defendant(s); and the aforementioned named Defendant(s) and such of the
aforementioned unknown Defendants and such of the aforementioned unknown
Defendant(s) as may be infants, incompetents or otherwise not sui juris.

YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action has been commenced to foreclose a
mortgage on the following real property, lying and being and situated in CITRUS
County, Florida, more particularly described as follows:

LOTS 17 AND 19, BLOCK 22, BEVERLY HILLS UNIT NUMBER TWO, ACCORDING TO THE
PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGES 96 THROUGH 98, PUBLIC REC-
ORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA.

COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 17 SOUTH TYLER STREET, BEVERLY HILLS, FL 34465

This action has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your
written defense, if any, such Morris Hardwick Schneider, LLC, Attorneys for Plaintiff,
whose address is 5110 Eisenhower Blvd, Suite 120, Tampa, FL 33634 on or before Feb.
27, 2012, and file the original with the clerk of this Court either before service on
Plaintiff's attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint.

WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court on the 17 day of January, 2012.

BETTY STRIFLER, Clerk of Courts, Clerk of the Circuit Court
(Seal)
By: /s/ Kathy Stalbaum, Deputy Clerk

"In accordance with the American with Disabilities Act, persons needing a special
accommodation to participate in this hearing, should contact ADA Coordinator not
later than 1 (one) day prior to the proceeding at Community Legal Services of
Mid-Florida, Inc. (Citrus), 1300 Highway 41 North, Suite A, Inverness, FL 34450-3984
352-726-8512 (Citrus) and for the hearing and voice impaired 800-955-8770."

January 27 and February 3, 2012. FL-97004709-11


813-0203 FCRN
Vs, Stukey, Kevin P. 2011 -CA-003834 Notice of Action Foreclosure
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT OF THE 5th JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR CITRUS
COUNTY,
Case #: 2011-CA-003834 Division #:

Bank of America, National Association, Successor by Merger to BAC Home Loans
Servicing, L.P. f/k/a Countrywide Home Loans Servicing, L.P.,
Plaintiff,
-vs.-
Kevin P. Stukey and Debbie A. Stukey, Husband and Wife; Cypress Village Property
Owners Asssociation, Inc.; Unknown Parties in Possession #1, If living and all Unknown
Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s)
who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an
interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants; Unknown Parties in
possession #2, If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and
against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive,
whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees,
Grantees, or Other Claimants
Defendantss.
NOTICE OF ACTION FORECLOSURE PROCEEDINGS-PROPERTY

TO: Kevin P. Stukey; ADDRESS UNKNOWN BUT WHOSE LAST KNOWN ADDRESS IS: 34
Greentree Street, Homosassa, FL 34446 and Debbie A. Stukey; ADDRESS UNKNOWN


BUT WHOSE LAST KNOWN ADDRESS IS: 34 Greentree Street, Homosassa, FL 34446

Residence unknown, if living, including any unknown spouse of the said Defendants,
if either has remarried and if either or both of said Defendants are dead, their
respective unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, creditors, lienors, and
trustees, and all other persons claiming by, through, under or against the named
Defendant(s); and the aforementioned named Defendant(s) and such of the afore-
mentioned unknown Defendants and such of the aforementioned unknown
Defendants as may be infants, incompetents or otherwise not sui juris.

YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action has been commenced to foreclose a
mortgage on the following real property, lying and being and situated in Citrus
County, Florida, more particularly described as follows:

LOTS 43 AND 44, BLOCK B-123, CYPRESS VILLAGE, SUGARMILL WOODS, ACCORDING
TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 9, PAGES 86 THROUGH 150, PLAT
BOOK 10, PAGES 1 THROUGH 150, AND PLAT BOOK 11, PAGES 1 THROUGH 16, PUBLIC
RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA; AS AMENDED IN PLAT BOOK 9, PAGE 87-A,
PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA.

more commonly known as 34 Greentree Street, Homosassa, FL 34446.

This action has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of
your written defense, if any, upon SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHE, LLP, Attorneys for
Plaintiff, whose address is 4630 Woodland Corporate Blvd., Suite 100, Tampa, FL
33614 within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this notice, and file the origi-
nal with the clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiff's attorney or immedi-
ately there after; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief de-
manded in the Complaint.

WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court on the 17 day of January, 2012.
BETTY STRIFLER, Circuit and County Courts
(SEAL)
By: /s/ Kathy Stalbaum, Deputy Clerk

If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to par-
ticipate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of cer-
tain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator; 110 North Apopka Avenue, In-
verness, Florida 34450; (352) 341-6700 at least 7 days before your scheduled court
appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the
scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call
711.

January 27 and February 3, 2012 10-207652 FC01



896-0127 FCRN
Vs. Ellison, Don 2010-CA-4004 Notice of Action Constructive-Service Property
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 5TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: 2010-CA-4004

REGIONS BANK, an Alabama banking corp., d/b/a REGIONS MORTGAGE
Plaintiff,
vs.
DON ELLISON and JOAN ELLISON, his wife, BERNICE M. THOMAS, TRUSTEE FOR THE
BERNICE M. THOMAS TRUST UTD MAY 21, 1986, A-ABLE SEPTIC SEWER SERVICE, INC., a
Florida corp., TILE IMPORTERS, INC., a Florida Corp., SUNCOAST PLUMBING & ELEC-
TRIC, INC., a Florida corp., and UNKNOWN TENANTS #1 and UNKNOWN TENANTS #2,
Defendants.

NOTICE OF PUBLICATION NOTICE OF ACTION CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE-PROPERTY

TO: Defendantss, BERNICE M. THOMAS, TRUSTEE FOR THE BERNICE M. THOMAS TRUST
UTD MAY 21, 1986, present address unknown, present address unknown, whose last
known address is 324 South Poincietta Terrace, Crystal River, FL 34429 and all parties
having or claiming to have my right, title or interest in the property herein described.

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action has been filed to foreclose a mortgage on the
described real property located in Citrus County, Florida:

LOTS 13, 14, BLOCK 180, PLAT OF UNIT NO. 4 OF HOMOSASSA, ACCORDING TO THE
MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 46, OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA.

and that you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on
Caridad M. Garrido, Esq., attorney for REGIONS BANK, an Alabama banking corp.
d/b/a REGIONS MORTGAGE, whose address is 2800 Ponce de Leon Blvd., Suite 190,
Coral Gables, FL 33134 on or before Feb. 20, 2012, and file the original with the Clerk
of this Court either before service on Plaintiff's attorney or immediately thereafter;
otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the
Complaint.
This notice shall be published once a week for two weeks in the Citrus County
Chronicle.

Witness my hand and the seal of this Court on the 11 day of January, 2012.
BETTY STRIFLER, CLERK OF COURTS
(Seal)
/s/ Kathy Stalbaum, Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff: Caridad M. Garrido, Esq., Florida Bar No: 814733
Peter A. Hernandez, Esq. Florida Bar No. 64309
2800 Ponce de Leon Blvd., Suite 190, Coral Gables, FL 33134 Tel: 305-447-0019
Email: Cary@garridorundquist.com Peter@garridorundquist.com

January 20 and 27, 2012.


897-0127 FCRN
Vs, Johnson, Karen C, 2011-CA-4103 Notice of Action
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO. 2011-CA-4103

EDWARD ROWE and SILVERINE ROWE, Husband and wife,
Plaintiffs,
vs.
KAREN C. JOHNSON, a married woman,
Defendant.
NOTICE OF ACTION

TO: Previous known address: Previous known address:
KAREN C. JOHNSON KAREN C. JOHNSON
1874 SW Buttercup Avenue 1020 South 15th Street
Port Saint Lucie, FL 34953-5123 Fort Pierce, FL 34950-4938

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage concerning the following
property in Citrus County, Florida:

LOT 4, BLOCK A, WITH-LA-POPKA ISLANDS UNIT NO. 6, according to the Plat thereof as
recorded in Plat Book 5, Page 64, Public Records of Citrus County, Florida

Together with a 1979 NOBI single-wide mobile home, ID #N10742, and Title No.
16095080

has been filed against you, and you are required to serve a copy of your written de-
fenses, if any, to it on KEVIN K. DIXON, ESQ., the Plaintiff's attorney, whose address is
210 West Highland Blvd., Inverness, FL 34452, on or before Feb. 20, 2012, and file the
original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiff's attorney or
immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief
demanded in the Complaint.

DATED this 11 day of January, 2012.
BETTY STRIFLER, As Clerk of the Court

By: /s/ Kathy Stalbaum, Deputy Clerk

January 20 and 27, 2012.


898-0127 FCRN
Vs. Crain, Brian K. 2011-CA-3829 Notice of Action
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 2011-CA-3829

FRIER FINANCE INC., 12788 U.S. Hwy. 90 West, Live Oak, Florida 32060,
Plaintiff,
v.
BRIAN K. CRAIN and REBECCA A. CRAIN,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION

TO: BRIAN K. CRAIN and REBECCA A. CRAIN:

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a civil action has been filed against you in the Circuit Court,
County of Citrus, State of Florida, to foreclose certain real property described as
follows:

Lot 7, Block E, Holiday Heights Unit No. 2, according to the plat thereof recorded in
Plat Book 6, Page 51, Public Records of Citrus County, Florida; together with that cer-
tain 2006 Townhome doublewide mobile home, VIN# FLTHLCT32061119A and
FLTHLCT32061119B located on the premises.

You are required to file a written response with the Court and serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on Timothy D. Padgett, Plaintiff's attorney, whose ad-
dress is 2878 Remington Green Circle, Tallahassee, Florida 32308, at least thirty (30)
days from the date of first publication, and file the original with the clerk of this court
either before service on Plaintiff's attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a
default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint.
Dated this 9 day of January, 2012.
BETTY STRIFLER, Clerk of Courts, CLERK OF COURT
(SEAL)
By: /s/ Kathy Stalbaum, Deputy Clerk

January 20 and 27, 2012.


899-0127 FCRN
Vs, Stone, Leona M, 09-201 -CA-003992 Notice of Action
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 5TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: 09-2011-CA-003992
BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
LEONA M. STONE A/K/A LEONA MARIE STONE, et al,
Defendants
NOTICE OF ACTION

TO: LEONA M. STONE A/K/A LEONA MARIE STONE
Last Known Address: 10070 East Dollarosa Court, Floral City, FL 34436
Also Attempted At: 8245 South Cove Point, Floral City, FL 34436
Also Attempted At: 16057 Tampa Palms Boulevard, Apt 233, Tampa, FL 33647 2001
Current Residence Unknown

TO: NICOLE WOODARD, THE LIMITED GUARDIAN OF THE PROPERTY OF LEONA MARIE
STONE, WARD
Last Known Address: 10070 East Dollarosa Court, Floral City, FL 34436
Also Attempted At: 16057 Tampa Palms Boulevard, Apt 233, Tampa, FL 33647 2001


Current Residence Unknown

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the following
described property:
SEE EXHIBIT "A" ATTACHED

has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written de-
fenses, if any, to it, on Marshall C. Watson, P.A. Attorney for Plaintiff, whose address is
1800 NW 49th STREET, SUITE 120, FT. LAUDERDALE, FL 33309 on or before February 20,
2012, a date which is within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice in
the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE and file the original with the Clerk of this Court
either before service on Plaintiff's attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a
default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint.

IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY ACCOMMODATION IN
ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO YOU,
TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACT THE ADA COORDINA-
TOR, TELEPHONE (352) 341-6700, 110 N APOPKA AVENUE, INVERNESS FL, 34450, AT
LEAST 7 DAYS BEFORE YOUR SCHEDULED COURT APPEARANCE, OR IMMEDIATELY
UPON RECEIVING THIS NOTIFICATION IF THE TIME BEFORE THE SCHEDULED APPEAR-
ANCE IS LESS THAN 7 DAYS. IF YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL 711.

WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 9 day of January, 2012.
Betty Strifler, As Clerk of the Court


/s/ By /s/ Kathy Stalbaum As Deputy Clerk

EXHIBIT "A"
Commence at the SW corner of Section 13, Township 20 South, Range 20 East, thence
N 89 degrees 05' 48" E. along the South line of said Section 13 a distance of 594 feet,
thence N. 0 degrees 41' 33" W. 750 feet, then S. 89 degrees 05' 48" W. parallel to said
South line a distance of 114.18 feet, thence N. 0 degrees 41' 33" W. 459.56 feet to the
Pont of Beginning, thence continue N. 0 degrees 41' 33" W. 485.18 feet, thence N. 89
degrees 05' 48" E. parallel to said South line a distance of 553.30 feet, thence S. 0 de-
grees 49' 44" W. 484.96 feet, thence S. 89 degrees 05' 48" W. parallel to said South line
a distance of 540.42 feet to the Point of Beginning. TOGETHER with a non-exclusive
easement for ingress and egress over and across the following described lands:

Commence at the SW corner of Section 13, Township 20 South, Range 20 East, thence
N. 89 degrees 05' 48" E. along the South line of said Section 13 a distance of 741.71
feet to a point on the Northerly right of way line of a 50 foot wide County Road, said
point also being on a curve, concaved Southeasterly, having a central angle of 20
degrees 40' 31" and a radius of 400 feet, thence Easterly along the arc of said curve
and along said Northerly right of way line a distance of 144.34 feet to the P.T. of said
curve, (chord bearing and distance between said points being N. 77 degrees 46' 59"
E. 143.56), thence N. 88 degrees 07' 13" E. along said right of way line a distance of
106.55 feet, thence N. 0 degrees 49' 44" E. 1650.54 feet to the Point of Beginning,
thence continue N. 0 degrees 49' 44" E. 20.01 feet, thence N. 89 degrees 17' 31" E.
919.82 feet to a point on the West right of way line of said 50 foot wide County Road,
thence S. 6 degrees 16' 27" W. along said West right of way line a distance of 20.15
feet, thence S. 89 degrees 17' 31" W. 917.91 feet to the Point of Beginning

January20 and 27,2012. 11-10953


801-0210 FCRN
Vs. Kinney, Shawn 11-3608-CA Notice of Action
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 11-3608-CA

LINDA LANNON,
Plaintiff,
v.
SHAWN KINNEY,
Defendant.
NOTICE OF ACTION

TO: SHAWN KINNEY

YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that a Complaint for declaratory relief and breach of
contract, has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your
written responses, if any, to the Plaintiff's attorney, R. GREGG JERALD, of Landt,
Wiechens, LaPeer & Ayres, 445 Northeast Eighth Avenue, Ocala, Florida 34470, and
file the original with the Clerk of the above Court on or before February 20, 2012, or
a Default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint.

WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court on this 11 day of January, 2012.
BETTY STRIFLER, Clerk of the Circuit Court
(SEAL)
By: /s/ Kathy Stalbaum, Deputy Clerk

January 20, 27, February 3 and 10, 2012.


815-0127 FCRN
1/30 Citrus County School Board
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County School Board will hold a Workshop; 9:00 a.m. on Monday, January
30, 2012 in the Large Conference Room, Second Floor, of the District Services Center
located at 1007 West Main Street, Inverness, Florida.

The purpose of the Workshop is for Master Board Training on "Essentials of Leader-
ship".

If any person decides to appeal a decision made by the Board, with respect to any
matter considered at this meeting, he may need a record of the proceedings and
may need to insure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which rec-
ord should include testimony and evidence upon which his appeal is to be based.
Sandra Himmel, Superintendent
Citrus County School Board
January 27, 2012.


817-0127 FCRN
Feb. Auctions
PUBLIC NOTICE
PUBLIC AUCTION
The following vehicles will
be sold at PUBLIC AUC-
TION on the property of
SCALLY'S LUBE & GO TOW-
ING AND RECOVERY, 1185
N. Paul Drive, Inverness, FL
34453; 352-860-0550; in
accordance with Florida
Statute 713.78. Auction


Date as Follows: All Sales
will begin at 8:00 AM, Ve-
hicle may be viewed 30
minutes before sale. For
details call 352-860-0550.

1) 1999 Daewoo Laganza
COLOR: WHITE VIN#
KLAV6921XB177737
Auction Date: 2/7/2012

2) 2005 CHEVY MALIBU
COLOR: SILVER VIN#


1GIZT52815F271287
Auction Date: 2/23/2012

3) 1995 NISSAN MAXIMA
COLOR: WHITE VIN#
JN1 CA21D5ST636070
Auction Date: 2/29/2012

Scally's Lube and Go re-
serves the right to bid on
all vehicles in Auction. All
sales are final at 9:00 AM
Published Jan. 27, 2012.


Meeting^
NoticesH


805-0127 FCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Southwest Florida Water Management District (SWFWMD) announces the follow-
ing public meeting to which all interested persons are invited:

Cooperative Funding Public Meeting: Governing Board members will discuss,
evaluate and prioritize fiscal year 2013 requests for project funding in the Tampa Bay
region.
DATE/TIME: Thursday, February 9, 2012; 9:00 a.m.
PLACE: SWFWMD Tampa Service Office, 7601 US Highway 301 North, Tampa FL
33637

A copy of the agenda may be obtained by contacting: WaterMatters.org Boards,
Meetings & Event Calendar;l(800)423-1476 (FL only) or (352)796-7211

For more information, you may contact: Lori.Manuel@watermatters.ora
1(800)423-1476 (FL only) or (352)796-7211, x4604 (Ad Order EXE0187)

If any person decides to appeal any decision made by the Board with respect to
any matter considered at this meeting or hearing, he/she will need to ensure that a
verbatim record of the proceeding is made, which record includes the testimony
and evidence from which the appeal is to be issued.

Anyone requiring reasonable accommodation as provided for in the Americans with
Disabilities Act should contact the District's Human Resources Director, 2379 Broad
Street, Brooksville, Florida 34604-6899; telephone (352) 796-7211, ext. 4702 or
1-800-423-1476 (FL only), ext. 4702; TDD (FL only) 1-800-231-6103; or email to
ADACoordinator@swfwmd.state.fl.us

January 27, 2012.


806-0127 FCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Southwest Florida Water Management District (SWFWMD) announces the follow-
ing public meeting to which all interested persons are invited:

Cooperative Funding Public Meeting: Governing Board members will discuss, evalu-
ate and prioritize fiscal year 2013 requests for project funding in the northern counties
of SWFWMD.
DATE/TIME: Tuesday, February 7, 2012; 9:00 a.m.
PLACE: SWFWMD Headquarters, 2379 Broad Street, Brooksville, FL 34604

A copy of the agenda may be obtained by contacting: WaterMatters.org Boards,
Meetings & Event Calendar;1(800)423-1476 (FL only) or (352)796-7211

For more information, you may contact: Lori.Manuel@watermatters.ora
1(800)423-1476 (FL only) or (352)796-7211, x4604 (Ad Order EXE0188)

If any person decides to appeal any decision made by the Board with respect to
any matter considered at this meeting or hearing, he/she will need to ensure that a
verbatim record of the proceeding is made, which record includes the testimony
and evidence from which the appeal is to be issued.

Anyone requiring reasonable accommodation as provided for in the Americans with
Disabilities Act should contact the District's Human Resources Director, 2379 Broad
Street, Brooksville, Florida 34604-6899; telephone (352) 796-7211, ext. 4702 or
1-800-423-1476 (FL only), ext. 4702; TDD (FL only) 1-800-231-6103; or email to
ADACoordinator@swfwmd.state.fl.us

January 27, 2012.


807-0127 FCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Southwest Florida Water Management District (SWFWMD) announces the follow-
ing public workshop to which all interested persons are invited:

Agricultural Tour: Governing Board members will tour agricultural properties in the
Dover/Plant City area including Meyers Nursery, Florida Pacific Farms and Sewell
Farms to observe FARMS projects and Resource Regulation activities.
DATE/TIME: Thursday, February 9, 2012; 1:00 p.m.
PLACE: SWFWMD Tampa Service Office, 7601 US Highway 301 North, Tampa FL
33637

A copy of the agenda may be obtained by contacting:
Lou.Kavouras@watermatters.ora 1(800)423-1476 (FL only) or (352)796-7211, x4606 (Ad
Order EXE0189)

Anyone requiring reasonable accommodation as provided for in the Americans with
Disabilities Act should contact the District's Human Resources Director, 2379 Broad
Street, Brooksville, Florida 34604-6899; telephone (352) 796-7211, ext. 4702 or
1-800-423-1476 (FL only), ext. 4702; TDD (FL only) 1-800-231-6103; or email to
ADACoordinator@swfwmd.state.fl.us

January 27, 2012.


814-0127 FCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE
PUBLIC MEETING OF
THE CITRUS COUNTY CANVASSING BOARD
PRESIDENTIAL PREFERENCE PRIMARY ELECTION
CANVASSING OF ABSENTEE, PROVISIONAL, OVERSEAS BALLOTS AND
POST ELECTION AUDIT
The Citrus County Canvassing Board will convene at 9:00 a.m. on Tuesday, January
31, 2012 to canvass Absentee Ballots and will be available for public inspection be-
tween 8:30 a.m. and 9:00 a.m. This meeting will be held at the Citrus County Supervi-
sor of Elections Office, 120 N. Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida, and in accordance
with the Sunshine Law of Florida, all meetings are open to the public, the press, and
representatives of political parties. All candidates or their designated representative
are invited to attend.

Canvassing of the provisional ballots will begin Friday, February 3, 2012 beginning at
9:00 a.m. Overseas ballots will be canvassed on Friday, February 10, 2012 at 1:00
p.m.

The Post Election Audit will commence on Monday, February 13, 2012 at 8:30 a.m. in
the Supervisor of Elections office. A race and precinct will be randomly selected
and immediately following the random selection the manual audit will commence
and continue until completed.

Persons with disabilities requiring reasonable accommodation to participate should
call the Elections Office at (352) 341 -6740; (352) 341-6752 (TDD).

Susan Gill, Supervisor of Elections
120 N. Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL 34450

January 27, 2012.


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FRIDAY, JANUARY 27, 2012




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2012, there are also new
12-volt accessory out-
lets and a 115-volt AC
outlet.
I was able to drive the
Wrangler 4x4 Rubicon
with a base price of
$29,995, while extras
such as the leather-
trimmed seats (heated


front), Connectivity
Group, Power Conven-
ience Group, 5-speed
automatic transmission,
3-piece hardtop kicked
the total to $34,625.
The 2012 Jeep Wran-
gler 4x4 Rubicon may
well be the ultimate,
rugged off-road vehicle
in terms of performance.
The Wrangler's new
powertrain delivers a no-
ticeably more refined
ride on-road, too, with
leading off-road capabil-
ity. The approach angle
is 44.3 degrees, depar-
ture angle 40.4 degrees
and the breakover angle
is 25.4 degrees. Front
axle to ground clearance
measures 10.5 inches,
and the rear axle to
ground clearance is 10.2
inches.
I personally prefer the
added convenience,


versatility and functional-
ity that the Unlimited
Wrangler models pro-
vide, with four doors and
added cargo capacity.
For those concerned
with the Unlimited's ex-
tended wheelbase and
overall length, adding a
4-inch lift and 40-inch
tires provides the same
breakover angle and
clearance as a regular
Wrangler.
If you're the adventur-
ous type and are really
serious about off-road-
ing, you can't go wrong
with the Jeep Wrangler.
With all the models and
configurations available,
there's a Jeep Wrangler
to suit nearly every need
and budget. Essentially,
Jeep has long been the
most capable and
iconic vehicle on the
planet.


15 mYEARS/1moOuMILES


6 CRYSTAL 352-564-1971
N NISSAN


NEW ON WHEELS
BY ARV VOSS, Motor Matters


FRIDAY, JANUARY 27, 2012 D1





D2 FRIDAY, JANUARY 27, 2012


Price versus value:

When is it worth

the upgrade?
In today's economy, people want to know how
they can keep their vehicles on the road for longer
periods of time. Frequent maintenance will keep
your car in good health, ensuring you get the most
out of all those expensive-to-replace parts, accord-
ing to the Car Care Council. When does it make
sense to upgrade to a premium automotive prod-
uct?
That's a question that stumps a lot of people when
confronted with the wide range of prices for seem-
ingly comparable products. Here are a few tips on
common automotive product categories to help you
make informed decisions.
Gasoline: Engines are designed to use a particu-
lar grade/octane of gasoline. While some auto man-
ufacturers specify using a high-octane gasoline,
some consumers purchase the higher octane gaso-
line based on the assumption that it's better for the
car. However, there is no benefit in using a higher
octane than recommended by the manufacturer. In
fact, if you paid 40 cents a gallon extra to purchase
super premium gas as opposed to regular, that
would cost you an additional $320 a year (assuming
12,000 miles driven and 15 miles per gallon).
The bottom line: Don't use a higher octane rating
than recommended by the car's manufacturer.
Motor oil: Lubrication technology has seen signif-
icant improvements over the years. The longer oil
life of high-performance synthetic motor oil allows
for extended oil drains, saving time and money, and
reducing the impact on the environment. Addition-
ally, some high-performance synthetic oils such as
Royal Purple have been reported to improve
mileage as much as 3 percent or more. Three per-
cent may not seem like a substantial amount, but it
can result in hundreds of dollars in savings over the
course of a year.
The bottom line: Upgrade to a high-performance
synthetic motor oil for extended oil drains and im-
proved fuel economy.
Wiper blades: Where you live is the critical factor
in determining the value of upgrading to a premium
wiper. There is a noticeable performance difference
in low-cost wiper blades versus those specifically
designed for rainy and snowy climates. Premium
wiper blades are considerably sturdier and more
durable than low priced blades.
The bottom line: Rainy and snowy climates justify
spending a few dollars more for premium wiper
blades.
Oil filters: Inexpensive filters are typically made
with the 3,000 mile interval in mind. These filters
often use low-quality paper media for filtration and
deteriorate rapidly after 3,000 miles. The new gen-
eration of high-performance premium oil filters from
manufacturers such as K&N, Royal Purple and oth-
ers allow for extended oil drain intervals. For exam-
ple, Royal Purple uses a proprietary long-life,
micro-glass media that provides protection for
12,000 miles. It also provides an increased level of
protection due to the density of the filtration. You can
find out more at www.royalpurple.com.
The bottom line: Upgrade to a premium oil filter if
you plan to extend oil drain intervals or if you oper-
ate your vehicle in extreme conditions such as dusty
environments or cold weather climates.



CAR REPAIR ADVICE
The steering wheel vibrates between 60-65
mph on my 2006 Toyota 4Runner. The dealer
said the tires needed to be replaced, so I did, so
why didn't that stop the vibration? Answer: The vi-
bration is from a tire balance problem. Go back
to the dealer and have them remove the tires to
recheck the balance. A good shop will have an
adapter that bolts to the wheel and then the as-
sembly is put onto the balancer.
Source: Ask the Auto Doctor, Motor Matters


here's much to like
in a 19-foot, 2.75- CLASSIC CLASSICS
inch-long 1974 BY VERN PARKER, Motor Matters


Cadillac Sedan deVille
four-door hardtop. At least that is what Tom Mc-
Queen recalls, "My late mother drove Cadillacs
for years, so I had grown up with 'The Standard
of the World' in the garage."
Afew years ago, McQueen traveled to the old
car Mecca of Carlisle, Pa., in search of an inter-
esting older Cadillac that would be suitable for
touring, preferably an Eldorado, Coupe deVille or
a convertible. "I was not looking for a show car
or trailer queen," he says, "just a nice running
and driving Cadillac."
After walking through 99.9 percent of the car
corral where nothing caught his eye, he came
to the third car from the end in the back row of
the hundreds of cars for sale.
"I initially took a quick glance," McQueen says,
"and walked a few feet before turning around to
take a second look." He thought, "That's a nice
paint job on that car." It was Apollo Yellow.
"I've never owned a yellow car and never
wanted one," McQueen says. "Neither have I
ever had a car with a black interior, because they
tend to be much hotter in the summer," he says.
Even though the yellow and black combina-
tion was not one of his favorites, McQueen was
drawn by the remarkable condition of the Cadil-
lac. "This particular car was striking," he said.
Upon closer examination, McQueen found the
car had a virtually perfect interior, an exception-
ally nice original exterior and a reasonably clean
engine compartment. "The a/c system wasn't
working," he says, "but otherwise the car ran and
drove beautifully."
McQueen bought the car and was soon driv-
ing his "like new" 1974 Cadillac home to
McLean, Va., on what appeared to be new tires.
The tires were new from a mileage perspective,
but old and dried out from an age perspective.


Nevertheless, the trip
home was without in-
cident.
The car came with


incredibly complete purchase and service
records that showed it had always received gen-
fte care. The records show that the car was pur-
chased new in August 1974 from a Cadillac
dealer in Seven Valleys, Pa. McQueen says the
list price, with options, was $9,180, but the sales
price paid was $8,220. He surmises the dis-
counted price was due to buying at the end of
the model year and also because of the 1973-
1974 oil embargo. McQueen has learned that a
total of 60,419 Cadillacs like his were manufac-
tured in the 1974 model year.
The first owner held on to the carforfive years
before selling it to a friend who kept it more than
20 years. The second owner's son then inherited
the Cadillac. All three owners babied the car. Fi-
nally, it was offered for sale at the Carlisle event.
When McQueen became the fourth owner it had
been driven only 24,500 miles. Since then 5,500
more miles have been recorded on the odome-
ter.
Beneath the expansive hood is an enormous
472-cubic-inch V-8 engine that develops 205
horsepower. The 5,032-pound Cadillac provides
a comfortable ride on a 130-inch wheelbase. For
convenience each of the fourdoors is equipped
with a red and a white light. When a door is
opened the red light shines to the rear while the
white light illuminates the area into which the
passenger is about to step. Each front fender is
capped with a small light to alert the driver the
turn signals are operating.
McQueen offers a word of caution to any an-
tique car buyer: "Although nothing can match the
pleasure of driving a low-mileage original car, be
prepared to spend anotherfew thousand getting
the 'garage queen' back on the road if you plan
to drive it any distance."


A V R I IN


needed. First have the battery
tested followed by the connec-
tions at the battery, starter, as
well as the engine ground wire at
the engine block. Make sure the
technician examines your vehi-
cle when it's in a no-start condi-
tion.
Junior Damato is an
ASE-certified Master Technician.
E-mail questions to
info@motormatters.biz
Mail questions to:
Auto Doctor
3 Court Circle, Lakeville, MA 02347
Listen to Junior online at
www. 1460wxbr.com
Saturday from 7am to 10 am eastern time.


To advertise in


1. Crystal Chevy
866-434-3065 4. Nick Nicholas Ford
2. Crystal Chrysler 726-1231
Dodge Jeep 5. Nick Nicholas
866-434-3064 Ford Lincoln
3. Crystal Nissan 795-7371
866-434-3057


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




ASK THE


AUTO


DOCTOR
WITH JUNIOR DAMATO


Voltage Test
Needed on 2002
Ford Taurus
Dear Doctor: My 2002 Ford
Taurus had trouble with some in-
terior lights, electric windows and
moonroof not functioning after
starting. After driving a few min-
utes everything was normal.
Then it had additional trouble of
not starting. After sitting for two
days it started and ran fine. I re-
placed the Gem box with an
identical numbered one and
everything was fine. Now itwon't
start again. I replaced the Gem
box again, but the problem per-
sists. Is there something power-
ing the Gem box that needs
replacing? Bob
Dear Bob: The Gem module
(aka body computer or body
module) handles a lot of driver in-
puts. Before replacing any mod-
ule, check for trouble fault codes,
perform a voltage test at all in-
puts and outputs. If I were work-
ing on this car I would check all
the basic power and grounds.
Next, would be research on our
Identifix web site to view all other
vehicles with similar problems.
Alldata has all the wire diagrams,
pin numbers and wiring colors to
help find the source of the prob-
lem.
Dear Doctor: Are there differ-
ences among all the various
windshield washer cleaners I see
in the auto parts stores? Some
are more than double the price
than the lower priced washer flu-
ids. Mary
Dear Mary: This is a great
question. Yes, there are big dif-
ferences among the washer flu-
ids, especially in the Snow Belt
and area that suffer from ex-
treme cold temperatures. The
blue color fluid is the most com-
mon and often the cheapest. The
good stuff is either orange or pur-
ple. I have purchased a case of
the orange color that contains
Rain-X additive that really
does work. The original blue
color, often-discounted washer
fluid, is great for the summer
months and in non-freezing con-
ditions.
Dear Doctor: I own a 2009
Ford Mustang GT and only dive
the car in the summer. It's parked
in my garage for the long winter.
Should I disconnect the battery
or connect a battery tender to the
battery? Jake
Dear Jake: I'd like to see you
keep a battery tender on the ve-
hicle and every other week plug
in the tender vs. keeping it on
charge 24/7. This way the battery
is actually getting exercised.
Dear Doctor: I own a 2005
Chevrolet Monte Carlo with
128,000 miles. It uses a quart of
oil every 900 miles. The engine
runs great, but should I have a
valve job done to correct the oil
usage? Jay
Dear Jay: Do not even think
about taking the engine apart. If
you do anything just change the
oil and filter and start using high-
mileage oil. This will cut down on
the oil consumption and give
extra protection to the engine. A
lot of engines will use a quart of
oil every 1,000 miles or so. The
auto manufacturers consider this
a normal condition.
Dear Doctor: I own a 1995
Cadillac DeVille. My problem is,
when I drive the car to the store,
shut the engine off, return in 10
minutes, the starter does not turn
the engine over. If I wait 30 min-
utes, then the engine starts right
up. Any advice on this? Eleanor
Dear Eleanor: The most com-
mon failure is the starter motor.
Before the starter motor is re-
placed a voltage check is


Low-Mileage 1974

Cadillac Sedan deVille

Kept Pristine


Would you like your car to be considered for an upcoming article?
E-mail us your jpeg image, plus brief details and phone number.
Type "Classic Classics" in subject box to info@motormatters.biz.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


61


2013 Ford Fusion: Sleek design will differentiate Fusion from other sedans in the midsize segment, with class leading fuel economy in gasoline (37 mpg on
the highway with the 1.6-liter EcoBoost engine), hybrid (at least 47 mpg in the city) and an all-new plug-in hybrid.



2012 Car Buyers Gain by Strong


Auto


industry Rebound


Last year was a good year for the auto
business. Sales are projected by Ed-
munds.com to be around 12.8 million
when they are announced later this month, the
highest volume since 2009, when sales had
dropped to 10.4 million, a 27-year low.
Paul Taylor, chief economist of the National
Automobile Dealers Association, predicts
nearly 14 million new cars and light trucks will
be purchased or leased in 2012. Taylor, who is
forecasting sales of 13.945 million new cars
and light trucks for 2012 in the U.S., cites three
key factors for the increase: aging vehicles, af-
fordable credit, and aggressive incentives.
A key factor is pent-up demand caused by
more consumers shopping out of necessity to
replace older vehicles. According to the NADA,
automakers will also wage an aggressive bat-
tle to capture market share in 2012 by rebuild-
ing a diverse selection of inventory at
dealerships, ranging from cars and CUVs to
truck-based SUVs.
As the auto industry strongly rebounds, what
will be the emerging trends for consumers?
Fuel efficiency will continue to dominate, but
style takes on a bigger role, too.


FREEWHEELING
BY KATE McLEOD, Motor Matters
What's going to sell in 2012? If automotive
designers have anything to say about it and
it appears they do style could be the deal
breaker for 2012 car shoppers. Case in point
are a couple of recent unveilings of visually ex-
citing new models to hit the showrooms in
2012, as well as concept cars cruising this
year's auto show circuits.
Ford is debuting its new design language ex-
pressed in its new Evos concept car. Expect to
be shaking your head and say, "That's a Ford?"
The 2013 Ford Fusion, which made its debut
at the Detroit Auto Show, looks to be the first
production vehicle to debut Ford's new design
direction.
Cadillac recently debuted a concept luxury
model called the "Ciel" (which mean sky).
Cadillac's history of beautiful names is back. It
is significant that Cadillac is calling its concept
a name with the-sky-is-the-limit imagery, and
not a robotic code like "XCEWSVQ97."
The automaker signals Cadillac has its con-
fidence back and is no longer trying to imitate


the Europeans. When you look at the Ciel's
sweeping lines and it's luxury front end you
couldn't call it anything but a Cadillac. Cadillac
is equipping cars with state-of-the-art tech-
nologies and luscious interiors. The concept
Ciel's doors are hinged at the rear for easy,
graceful access for both front and rear occu-
pants. Whether this shows up in a production
version is unknown.
BMW has come up with an exciting techno-
logical combination. Announced in 2011, Ac-
tiveHybrid becomes available in the 2012
BMW 5 Series around March. ActiveHybrid
combines a twin turbocharged engine with an
electric drive system and an eight-speed gear-
box. ActiveHybrid uses power electronics to
manage energy output precisely, adding even
more efficiency to the vehicle. The BMW Ac-
tiveHybrid 5 is the most powerful and efficient
full hybrid in its segment.
Ethanol tax credits have ended, as did tariffs
on imported ethanol. That means we are not
giving refiners our tax dollars anymore and the
industry is no longer protected from competi-
tion. However, the government now allows re-
finers to add more ethanol to fuel 15 percent
up from 10.
The Fiat 500 has huggable styling and meets
expectations in the fun-to-drive column. Unfor-
tunately, the 500 is probably too small to make
it big in the U.S. The Mini, with its great styling
and powertrain, is bigger and geared much
more to our preferences. Fiat's plans to bring a
sedan here in 2011 fell through leaving Fiat's
dealers with only one car to sell. Fiat sold only
about 15,000 cars in the U.S. not the 50,000
they predicted. The Fiat dealers 130 of them
- are sitting there with a big investment and
no cars to sell other than a car that isn't sell-
ing.
Forecasters say that North American light ve-
hicle production will increase about 5 percent in
the first quarter of 2012 and that production will
increase more over the year. In most of the au-
tomotive sector, it seems that things are look-
ing up.


Cadillac introduces the
Ciel concept, an open-air
grand-touring car. The
Ciel (pronounced C-L) is
a four-seat convertible
powered by a twin-tur-
bocharged version of the
3.6-liter Direct Injection
V-6 engine, paired with a
hybrid system using
lithium-ion battery tech-
nology.



The Ford Evos Con-
cept previews a new
global design language
for the next generation
of Ford vehicles.


FRIDAY, JANUARY 27, 2012 D3





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


.- --




The 2013 Dodge Dart redefines performance with Alfa Romeo DNA, fuel-efficient powertrains and Dodge's
passion for performance. The all-new Dodge Dart is a thoroughly modern vehicle that's fuel-efficient, beau-
tifully designed and crafted, agile and fun-to-drive. Loaded with innovative technology, class-leading safety
features and clever functionality, the 2013 Dodge Dart sets a new standard in the compact car segment by
offering unmatched personalization, roominess, style, and functionality.



Dodge Reincarnates



Dart to Replace Caliber


Dodge has offi-
cially ended pro-
duction of the
much-maligned Caliber.
Introduced in 2006 as a
replacement for the
Dodge Neon, the Cal-
iber never lived up to
expectations. It was a
good example of what
happens when a finan-
cial group gets control
of product develop-
ment.
When Italy's Fiat SpA
took over the au-
tomaker as part of the
2009 government
bailout, CEO Sergio
Marchionne made the
replacement of the Cal-
iber a top priority. Its
successor is the all-new
2013 Dodge Dart.
Dart's reintroduction
to the compact sedan
segment is based on a
lengthened and
widened Alfa Romeo
Giulietta platform. The
Giulietta is well known
for its road-holding
agility and driving dy-
namics. It uses a
MacPherson strut front
suspension and a bi-
link independent rear
suspension.
"The Dodge Dart was
a dream to design,"
said Joe Dehner, head
of Dodge design,
Chrysler Group LLC.
"The Alfa Romeo-based
architecture allowed us
to design an exterior
with great proportions."
The platform was


the lower intake at high-
way speeds when less
engine cooling is re-
quired and aerody-
namic drag is most
significant. When
closed the shutter sys-
tem improves aerody-
namics by redirecting
airflow around the front
of the vehicle and down
the sides, rather than
through it. The shutter
opens and closes
based upon engine
coolant temperature
and vehicle speed.
Underbody panels
cover most of the lower
vehicle from front to
rear. Constructed of a
black composite mate-
rial, the panels enhance
the aerodynamic per-
formance and also
block road noise. Tire
spats located ahead of
the tires function as
mini air dams and add
to the underbody effi-
ciency.
The 2013 Dodge Dart
will be available in five
trim levels: SE, SXT,
Rallye, Limited and R/T.
It will be built at
Chrysler Group's
Belvidere, Ill., assembly
plant. Production is ex-
pected to begin by mid-
year 2012. For those
who want to customize
their vehicles, Mopar
will offer more than 150
customization options
and themed packages
specifically developed
for the Dart.


ideal for accentuating
the fender formations
and pushing the wheels
as far out to the corners
as possible, to create a
very stable look. The
face of the Dart is styled
with the Dodge split
crosshair grille. The
rear features a
Charger-inspired "race-
track" full-width taillamp
with 152 indirect glow
LEDs, and dual ex-
hausts mounted in the
rear fascia. The result is
a compact sedan that is
undeniably a Dodge.
"The all-new Dodge
Dart is the showpiece
for Dodge's next gener-
ation philosophy of inte-
rior design," said Klaus
Busse, head of interior
design, Chrysler Group
LLC. "The Dart interior
takes the beautiful, pre-
cision-crafted interiors
we rolled out last year
and adds a little bit of
fun with surprises of
color, eye-catching am-
bient lighting and some
really cool technology."
Inside, the major
high-tech attraction is
the floating island
bezel, which houses a
7-inch thin film transis-
tor (TFT) customizable
gauge cluster display
with a light pipe sur-
round. The glove box is
the right size for a
stowed iPad and the


center console has aux-
iliary jacks to plug in the
usual array of electronic
devices.
Console side pockets
are handy for storing
cellphones and other
small items. High-qual-
ity, soft-touch materials
and ambient lighting for
the door handles, map
pockets, foot wells,
glove box, storage bin
and cupholders add a
touch of class to the
cabin.
There's a choice of
three four-cylinder en-
gines: a new 160-
horsepower, 16-valve
2.0-liter; a 160-hp, 16-
valve 1.4-liter MultiAir
Intercooled Turbo ver-
sion and a new 184-hp,
16-valve 2.4-liter Multi-
Air 2. Better yet there
are three transmission
choices, a six-speed
manual, six-speed au-
tomatic or six-speed
dual dry clutch version.
MultiAir technology
improves combustion
under all driving condi-
tions with direct control
of air intake and com-
bustion. The result is up
to a 15 percent in-
crease in low engine
rpm torque and a 7.5
percent improvement in
fuel efficiency.
An active grille shutter
system automatically
stops airflow through


Following a delayed fire in a crash-tested Volt, GM has switched battery suppliers, going from LG toA123 for its Volt
extended range vehicle. The difference is in the chemistry. The A123 battery delivers about 10 percent less energy
and will impact the Volt's mileage. MIT's Professor of Materials, Science and Engineering, Yet-Ming Chiang, says, "Not
only are electric cars inherently safer than gasoline powered cars, today's automotive-class lithium-ion batteries
have to prove their safety in exhaustive testing before they are ever used in commercial products. I am confident that
any early-stage kinks that pop up in EV technology will get worked out." Source: FreeWheeling, Motor Matters


THE FAST LANE

Send us your automotive and auto club events
information to wheels@chronicleonline.com


LOCAL CLUB NEWS
SUNDAY
CITRUS COUNTY RETREADS meet for breakfast at 8 a.m.
Sunday at the restaurant at rear of B&W Rexall Drugs, Inverness.
All makes and models of motorcycles welcome. Ride follows.
TUESDAY
CITRUS COUNTY CORVETTE CLUB meets each second
Tuesday on the month thereafter to Seven Rivers Golf & Country
Club 7395 W. Pinebrook Crystal River, FL. You can find directions
and maps on our web site www.citruscorvettes.com Guests are al-
ways welcome come check us out.
CITRUS A'S MODEL A FORD CAR CLUB meets the 1st
Tuesday of every month at 7:30pm at the Floral City Lions Club on
E. Orange Ave (next to the library) in Floral City, FL. www.cit-
rusas.com or contact Pat at 352-746-7790.
WEDNESDAY
INVERNESS "BIG DOGS" MOTORCYCLE CLUB
meets for breakfast at 8 a.m. Wednesday at rear of B&W Rexall
Drugs. Ride follows, all bikes welcome. Call J.R. and Rachel Harris
at 726-6128.
CITRUS MOPAR CAR CLUB meets for breakfast and car
chat every Wednesday at 9 am at various restaurants in Citrus
County. All car enthusiasts are welcome to join them. For specific
locations call Ken McNally at 352-341-1165 or Mike Bonadonna at
352-341-1019.
NATURE COAST CORVAIR CLUB meets the second
Wednesday of every month at 7:00 p.m. The club gathers at the B/W
Rexall Drug Store in Inverness. (They have a private dining room in
the back of their restaurant.) Their address is 214 US Hwy 41 S In-
verness. Most of of the club arrives at 6:00 p.m. to have dinner and
welcomes the company of other classic car and Corvair enthusi-
asts. For any additional information, contact David Langdon,
Secretary, Nature Coast Corvair Club, 352-563-1817, or by email at
dlangdonl @tampabay.rr.com.
THURSDAY
GOLD WING ROAD RIDERS CHAPTER FL1-R OF
DUNNELLON meets at 6:30 p.m. on the second, third and fourth
Thursday of each month at McDonald's in Dunnellon. Monthly gath-
ering is the first Thursday at the Charlie Horse Restaurant, 20049 E.
Pennsylvania Ave., Dunnellon, 6 p.m. to eat and 7:30 to meet. Call
chapter director Bruce Schlimme at (352) 465-1228.
GOLD WING ROAD RIDERS ASSOCIATION CHAP-
TER T OF INVERNESS kick tire at 6 p.m. Thursday at Burger
King parking lot, corner of U.S. 41 and S.R. 44 East. Call directors
Rachel, JR Harris at 726-6128 or Ken and Jackie Smith at (352) 476-
7151.
CITRUS COUNTY CRUISERS CLUB meets on the first
Thursday on the month, at the Homosassa Moose Lodge at 7 p.m. If
interested in joining our club, you must have a vehicle 20 yrs or older.
Or come visit us on Saturday night at Wendy's (see Saturday).
FRIDAY
NATURE COAST MUSTANGs meets at 7 p.m. Friday at the
Wendy's on U.S. 19 in Homosassa across from the wildlife park.
Bring your car and enjoy a fun evening. Call Bob at 860-2598.
THE WANDERERS CLUB meets from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday at
the parking lot of the Beall's Department Store on State Road 44
West of Inverness. Bring your old car and have fun with other car
enthusiasts. Call Frank at 212-2966 or visit wandererscarclubofin-
vernessfl.com.
FRIDAY NIGHT THUNDER is hosted by the City of Inverness
and the Citrus MOPARS Car Club every third Friday of the month
from 5 to 8 PM at the Government Center at 212 W Main St in down-
town Historic Inverness. All cars, trucks, car clubs and spectators are
welcome for music, 50/50 drawing and more. Contact Ken McNally
at 352-341-1165 or Mike Bonadonna at 352-341-1019 or go to
www.inverness-fl.gov for more info.
SATURDAY
FREE WHEELIN' SERTOMA CLUB MOTORCYCLE
CLUB meets at 9 a.m. Saturday "on the road." Call Rainer Jakob at
726-7903 for destinations.
NATURE COAST RETREADS meets at 8 a.m. Saturday at
Momma Sally's, US 19 in Crystal River. A ride follows. All styles of
motorcycles are welcome. Call Jacque at 637-4693 or Dave at 628-
2401.
CITRUS COUNTY CRUISERS invites you to its weekly
cruise-in from 6 to ? (depending on the weather and no-seums) every
Saturday at the parking lot next to Wendy's in Crystal River. We have
oldies music, trivia, 50/50s and special events the second and third
Saturday of every month. Questions call Kathe at 794-7625 or
Lester at 628-7021. www.citruscountycruisers.com.
CITRUS MOPAR Citrus MOPARS Car Club will have their
weekly cruise-in each Saturday at 5 PM in the parking lot next to
Wendy's on Rt. 19 in Crystal River. Call Ken McNally at 352-341-
1165 or Mike Bonadonna at 352-341-1019 for more info.



LOCAL EVENTS LEVENTSmASUETTONMGE
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 4
CITRUS COUNTY SPEEDWAY Open Wheel Modifieds, Sports-
man, Pure Stock, Miini Stock, Hornet Division, Dwarf cars. Call 726-9339 for
more information..
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 11
CITRUS COUNTY SPEEDWAY Super Late Models, Modified Mini
Stock,Street Stock, Mini Stock, Hornet Division. Call 726-9339 for more infor-
mation..
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 18
CITRUS COUNTY SPEEDWAY Open Wheel Modifieds, Sports-
man, Street Stock, Pure Stock,Mini Stock, Pro Figure 8, Outlaw Modified Miini.
Call 726-9339 for more information.
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 25
CITRUS COUNTY SPEEDWAY Modified MiiniStock,Sportsman,
Pure Stock, Hornet Division, Street Stock/Pure Stock Figure 8s. Call 726-9339
for more information..



2012 JEEP PATRIOT

The Patriot offers segment-leading 4x4 capability,


aggressive exterior styling, clever interior features
and unsurpassed off-road capability with the Free-
dom Drive II system. The Jeep Freedom Drive II Off-
Road Package is an available four-wheel-drive
system that delivers Jeep Trail Rated capability. It
includes a second-generation continuously variable
transaxle with low range (CVT2L) that engages
when the off-road mode is activated, 19:1 crawl
ratio, 17-inch all-terrain tires and aluminum wheels,
a full-size spare tire, skid plates, tow hooks, fog
lamps and manual seat height adjuster.
Source: Jeep


DOWN THE ROAD
BY DAVE VAN SICKLE, Motor Matters


D4 FRIDAY, JANUARY 27, 2012




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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NEW YEAR CELEBRATION


2012 200


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s399 .MO.
2012 TOWN & COUNTRY


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2012 JOURNEY


BUYFOR
$19,855
2012 CHALLENGER


BUY FOR


2012 RAM


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2012 WRANGLER


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2012 Nissan Quest Minivan







Offers Hi-Tech Comfort


The Nissan Quest
minivan has been
produced since
1993, but most of us
have forgotten those
dark days when it was a
re-badged Mercury Vil-
lager. Since 2004, the
Quest has been a Nis-
san-unique vehicle.
Built on the same plat-
form as the current Nis-
san Maxima, Altima and
Murano, its 118.1-inch
wheelbase and 200.8-
inch overall length give
the Quest family hauler
a roomy interior and ma-
neuverable overall size.
It's difficult to design a
minivan that doesn't
look much different from
the typical box on
wheels, but Nissan has
succeeded in creating a
unique appearance that
makes it instantly recog-
nizable. Full surround
privacy glass, black
sash molding and
chrome trim accents
combine with the wide,
low stance to give Quest
a dynamic and distinc-
tive appearance. Trin-
kets such as chrome
door handles and rear
roof spoiler make the
2012 Nissan Quest
stand out in a crowd.
The Quest exterior de-
sign is also one of the


most wind-efficient, with
a 0.32 Cd for the Quest
S model.
The 2012 Quest is of-
fered in four models: S,
SV, SL and LE. The
Quest S is the base
model with minimal
standard equipment.
Moving upward in the
progression, each
model gets more and
more standard equip-
ment, making the top-of-
the-line LE almost
luxurious.
The Quest is a com-
fortable and roomy way
to take care of routine
family travel needs, and
it's also ideal for an oc-
casional long vacation
trip. Prices start at
$27,750 for the S;
$31,050 for the SV;
$34,500 for the SL; and
$41,350 for the LE.
All models come with
power sliding side doors
and power-opening win-
dows. Quest's door rail
system is designed to
make the sliding door
step-in height lower than
competitive minivans.
The interior layout in-
cludes quick-release
fold-flat second and
third row seats. The
60/40-split third-row
seat can be switched
from upright to fold-flat


position with the simple
pull of one strap or push
of a button. A spring as-
sist helps the manual
fold and return opera-
tion. There's a standard
second row walk-in de-
vice for easier access to
the third row.
Front seating includes
a special "trilaminar"
structure, which uses
three types of cushions
to distribute body pres-
sure more evenly than
traditional padding, and
the first application of
Nissan's Quick Comfort
front seat heaters.
When activated, this so-
phisticated system im-
mediately begins
warming the body parts
that are most sensitive
to heat, such as the
thighs and hips. Then, to
maintain a warm, cozy
feeling, the heater in-
creases heating on
body pressure points.
A new climate control
system works three
ways to help reduce al-
lergens and unwanted
odors inside the cabin.
Its air-intake control has
sensors to monitor out-
side odors and automat-
ically closes the intake


port to prevent inflow of
exhaust fumes or other
unpleasant smells.
The new system uses
a special filter to help re-
duce the number of al-
lergens in the interior air
and it generates ions to
"scrub" the interior air of
unwanted odors -
whether they come from
outside or inside the ve-
hicle. Upscale models
feature a tri-zone auto-
matic temperature con-
trol system.
A range of audio sys-
tems is also available,


starting with the Quest S
model's AM/FM/6CD
system with four speak-
ers. A Bose premium
audio system with
AM/FM/CD/DVD and 13
speakers is available. A
USB port with iPod con-
nectivity is available on
some models.
The only powertrain
available is 3.5-liter
DOHC V-6 and Nissan's
Xtronic continuously
variable transmission.
With 260 horsepower
and 240 lb.-ft. of torque,
fuel economy is esti-
mated at 19 miles per
gallon city and 24 mpg
highway.


The four-wheel inde-
pendent suspension
uses struts with coil
springs up front and a
multi-link design in the
rear for nicely balanced
ride and handling quali-
ties. Brakes are four-
wheel discs and
steering is speed-sensi-
tive, power-assisted
rack-and-pinion design.
The 2012 Quest also
offers standard stability
control, anti-lock brakes,
dual-stage supplemental
front airbags and a full
array of popular safety
features. A blind spot
warning system is avail-
able on some models.


The 2012 Nissan Quest is more than just another standard minivan it's a new take on innovation for the family. From its bold styling with full surround glass to its ex-
tensive list of family friendly features and innovations, Quest also brings dynamic performance to the minivan segment. The 2012 Quest features a 3.5-liter V6 with 260
horsepower and 240 lb.-ft. of torque.


BOAT LIFT
Single Pole,
1500 lb. capacity.
$900 obo
352-613-8453



'06 ProKat 20 ft
140 HP Suzuki 4
strokelow hours, very
clean, Magic alum tan-
dem trailer, VHF,
Depth, GPS, Windless
anchor $18k obo
(352) 464-4877
'07 Proline 17 ft
4 stroke 90 HP Suzuki,
very low hours, ready
to fish trailer & more
$13,500 352-795-3894
20ft Pontoon
2000 Fiesta, Fish N Fun,
no carpet, fiberglass fir,
85 Yamaha, Galv. trlr.
$6,500. 352-613-8453


HOUSE BOAT
30 ft fiberglass, hrd
wood firs, & more
Live Aboard or eniov
weekends in Paradise
$14,500 (423) 320-3008
PROLINE
21' Cuddy, full transom,
w/brack, 150 HP Yam.,
Bimini, VHF, porta pot,
dep. finder, trailer
$5,900. (352) 382-3298



2000 Rialto Winn22ft
20MPG, runs great,new
generator,86K, See to
appreciated 19,500
(352) 746-6559

'94 Fleetwood
454 engine Bounder,
32ft., loaded, self
contained, 79k
$9,800. 352-795-6736


Infinity 99 M/Home
by 4 Winds, 35' Triton
V-10 gas, 44K mis. front
rear a/c, Onan Gen.
back up camera,
leveling jacks, TV, fully
equipped incl tow bars
& hitch + brks buddy,
assisted for tow vech.
all manuals for coach
& appls. NON Smoker
incls hoses, sewer &
electric hook-ups,
7 new NEW Goodyear
tires, See at Oak Bend
Village Route 40 W.
Dunnellon call for tour
(352) 465-6335 Was
$22,500 Now $19,750


LAREDO
Like new '06, 33FT, T.T.
w/14FT slide, Has fiber-
glass Ext, free standing
dinette, elec. fireplace.
over 30K new asking
$13,000 obo
(352) 637-1796


SUNSEEKER '05
29 ft. Class. C., nearly
all options, generator,
needs awning fabric,
non smoker, 33k mi.
Only $26,500., 464-0316
WINNEBEGO
2001 Chieftain 35U,
garaged, non smoker
no pets, 2 slides, Cen.
Heat Pump, exc. cond.
76K mi., $38,900
(352) 208-8292


2011 Grand Junction
5 wheel, 40 ft, 4 slides,
w/Bumper to bumper
for 16 years, too many
extras to list! $37,000
(603) 991-8046
'07 32 foot KZ toy
hauler, like new, full
slide out, sleeps 7, new
tires, Owan Gen., gas
tank, alumwheels
Lrg living area separate
cargo area $18,900
352-795-2975


JAYCO
2005 Jay Feather
LGT 25Z
New tires/brakes; sleeps
6;new queen mattress;
shower/tub; stove/oven;
refrig/sep freezer; lots of
storage. Like new $9,500
priced below blue book
retail see in Inglis
352-447-5434



'03 Buick LeSabre
Runs Perfect, electric
everything,89k, silver,
totally clean $5000 firm
352-586-9570
'08 Chrysler Sebr-
ing Touring
Convertible,34k miles,
loaded, $14995 firm
352-897-4520
LINCOLN
'06, Towncar, Signature,
37K miles, looks, drives
even smells like new.
$16,500. (352) 746-1184


2007 Toyota
Camry LE, 56k miles,
$12000
(352) 422-1533
MERCURY
'95,Grand Marquis GS,
4 dr, all electric, newer
tires, paint & inter.
showrm perfect, great
looking and driving car
$2,650, (352) 464-1537


'99 Nissan Frontier
4 cyl, AT/AC 1 senior
citizen owner with
gentle miles $3950
(352) 726-3268
DODGE '06
Dakota R/T, real sharp,
has been treated very
well 50K + easy miles
$13K (352) 795-7993
FORD '01
Lariat F 350 DRW 7.3
turbo diesel super cab
84K mis. exc cond $14K
call Bob(352) 794-3142


FORD '99
7.3 Diesel, heavy
duty, 4x4 156K mi.
$10,900
(352) 628-4265


FORD ESCAPE XLT
SPORT
2005, Red SUV, grey in-
terior, tinted windows,
219k mi, new engine,
FWD, 6 cyl, 3.0L, 200
hp. Nice, clean, great
vehicle! Asking $6,000
OBO. Call 352-613-6354,
Iv mess if no ans.


Mountaineer,cranberry
red, 5.0 L, 126K mi. ex-
cel. shape all receipts
$3,500 (352) 503-2792


'94 Dodge Grand
Caravanruns good,
looks good, $1500
(352) 344-4229
MERCURY '99
Villager Estate, 7 pass.,
low mi., loaded, hitch,
excel. cond. $3,200
(352) 270-8475

Lwo .L'
l ift l l i t \' '
,uIr \\ ,i Il Ist.
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KYMCO
2008 MXU 300,ONLY
390 MILES, GARAGE
KEPT. LIKE NEW
$2000.00 CALL KEVIN
AT 352-212-8121



2005 HD Ultra
Classic w/Fat Bagger
kit, Custom seat,
wheels ect $15000 OBO
352-563-6327or 860-3481
HARLEY
DAVIDSON
2002 Low Rider 14,000
miles, one owner, lots
of extras. $9500.00
352-560-3731
SUZUKI
2009 DR200SE DUAL
SPORT ONLY HAS 380
MILES ON IT. GARAGE
KEPT UNIT IS IN EX-
CELLENT CONDITION.
$2965.00 OBO CALL
KEVIN AT 352-212-8121


DOWN THE ROAD
BY DAVE VAN SICKLE, Motor Matters


D6 FRIDAY, JANUARY 27, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SALES


LIMITED-TIME


OFFERS


EVE


ON OUR VE


Every Certified PreI
Lincoln comes with


APRF


* 169-point inspection by
factory-trained technicians
* 6-year/100,000-mile comprehensive
warranty coverage*
* Vehicle history report
* 24/7 Roadside Assistance
* Full tank of gas at no extra charge
* 3 months of SiriusXM Satellite Radio'on
equipped vehicles at no extra charge


LINCOLN


CERTIFIED
PRE-OWNED
LINCOLN.COM 'CERTIFIED-USED


Nick Nicholas


-tL


INCOLN


rysta


it


River 795-73


7


us at www.nicknicholasfordlincoln.com


* 1.9% for 48 months. Not all buyers will qualify for Lincoln Automotive Financial Services limited-term financing on select vehicles. APR may vary. Offer ends 1/31/12. Residency restrictions apply. See
dealer for complete qualifications and program details. **See your dealer for limited-warranty coverage details. tSubscriptions to all SiriusXM services are sold by SiriusXM after 3-month trial
expires. Subscriptions are governed by SiriusXM Customer Agreement; see www.siriusxm.com. Sirius U.S. Satellite Service available [only to those 18 and older] in the 48 contiguous U.S., D.C.
Sirius, XM and all related marks and logos are trademarks of SiriusXM Radio Inc.
OOOAD3K


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FRIDAY, JANUARY 27, 2012 D7


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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CRYSTAL
AUOMTif^CIViE


'11 IMPALA


'10 300


'10 ELANTRA


'10 CIVIC


$12,999 $16$99 $9,999 $13999
oRPE PR 0 P ER 198
OR~lBON MO.D240HWMO. OR $141 Mo.$98M O.


'09 PT CRUISER


'09 JOURNEY
7 -- *k


'09 WRANGLER


'08 IMPALA


p :;T 13 Vill -l
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R IE R M ITHINFOAM S .WI
1l800-58"755 FAA2W


$6,999 $11,999 $16,999 $8,999
o R$99 9* 0 oR$170M oI. o$240M O. o$127 t.


'08 CAMRY


'08 300


TOWN & COUNTRY


'06 ALTIMA


$1Q999 $10,999 $12999 $9,499
oR$155 O 0RE p$155PER 0 I184 ME 0R $157 E0r
LO~lMo O~lMo.O. IMuO. Rl o


'06 SILVERADO


'05 WRANGLER


'05 ACCORD


'04 F-250


$7999 $11,999 $79999 $11,999
$RPER 0RPER PER
,oR$133 MOLLR lTN99&ToRN A133MO. 0$243AmEo.





CALL THE INSTANT APPRAISAL LINE:
^^^'800=440=9054f~s


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IlIEE2R REOREDMESAG WrHINFO ANDSWb PRK
1-800-5 -8755 Et.1717


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1-800-58"755 Ext.376


D8 FRIDAY, JANUARY 27, 2012


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1-800-58"755 EdZI32


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1l800:58"755 Ex.376


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FRE24H EDREDMSAGtE Wr NOANDW RCN


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1l800-58755:F=di322


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1l800-5"755:Ed.6204


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^i-NO b:^=75 E .120


FRE2 RFRE OAE W-rJ H INF N II PRIC
1-800:58"755 Ex.610


lRIEE24HRREOEDMB IH INFOAM PMWI
1-800-8"755FAA20


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