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Citrus County chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02665
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 01-26-2012
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:02665

Full Text



Our Time: Fitness yields health benefits/Inside


)ItNICL.
CITR U S CoOUNT Y.






www.chronicleonline.com


Florida's Best Community l Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community 50*


I ~ THRSA


TODAY & Friday morning
HIGH Partly cloudy. East
76 winds 5 to 10 mph.
LOW PAGE A4
63


JANUARY 26, 2012


Social Security fix confounds retirees


Hippo turns 52
and celebrates
The Ellie Schiller
Homosassa Springs
Wildlife State Park will
celebrate Lu the hip-
popotamus' 52nd birth-
day with a party
Thursday at 10a.m.
Regular park admis-
sion will apply for park
visitors. For more infor-
mation about this
event, call Susan
Strawbridge at 352-
628-5343, ext. 1002.
Dunnellon gas
station robbed
DUNNELLON -Au-
thorities are searching
for a suspect who
robbed Murphy Oil
USA around 7 a.m.
Wednesday morning,
fleeing with an un-
known amount of
cash, part of which
was recovered along
U.S. 41, authorities
said.
Police Chief Joanne
Black said the robber,
described as a black
male wearing a black
hoodie, jeans and
white sneakers, rode
his bicycle to Murphy
Oil USA at 11004 N.
Williams St.
The clerk said the
man indicated he had
a weapon but never
showed one. After re-
ceiving the money, the
robber rode away on
the bicycle. The sus-
pect is believed to be
in his 30s and about 5
feet, 6 inches to 5 feet,
8 inches tall.
Anyone with infor-
mation can call the
Dunnellon Police De-
partment at 352-
465-8510 or Crime
Stoppers at 352-
368-STOP, or visit
www.ocalacrime
stoppers.com.



SEALS STRIKE:




I HIOPIL Adado/



n Mogadishu
Indian Ocean
0 200 mi
0 200 km

Rescue
Navy SEALs kill Somali
pirates, save hostages
in daring nighttime
raid./Page A12
FLAIR FOR FOOD:
.-.


I Al A
Loyal patrons
La Casa di Norma
owners aim to please
their customers by
providing good
service./Page Cl


Comics . . . . .C5
Community .......C3
Crossword ........ C4
Editorial ..... .. .A10
Entertainment . . .B8
Horoscope ....... .B8
Lottery Numbers . .B4
Lottery Payouts ... B8
Movies .......... .C5
Obituaries ....... .A6
Classifieds ....... .C6
TV Listings ....... C4


6 1 84178 2002 5U I


Associated Press
THE VILLAGES It's an
urgent issue seemingly on
the minds of many in this
retiree mecca, if not the en-
tire state of Florida how
to fix Social Security And
voters' proposed solutions
to the tricky problem are
just as varied as the stances
of the Republican presiden-
tial candidates seeking
their support


2012 PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY


Jim Minucci, 76, backs
Mitt Romney and his idea to
gradually raise the age of
eligibility for younger work-
ers. "If we continue to
spend and take money from
Social Security, I think in
the long run it's going to be
hurting," Minucci said as he
walked through a town
square to meet his wife for


lunch.
But Bill LeBeau argues
that retirees should get
more to keep up with infla-
tion and likes Newt Gin-
grich's call for creating
private investment ac-
counts for younger workers.
"That would be really
good," said LeBeau, 89, as
he held a cigar while sitting


DEBATE TONIGHT
* WHEN: 8 p.m. on CNN.
* WHERE: University of North Florida, Jacksonville.
* PARTICIPANTS: Romney, Gingrich, Santorum, Paul.


in a golf cart adorned with
an American flag and a
"God Bless America"
bumper sticker.
On this recent day at
least, there seemed to be lit-


tle discussion here, in
Florida's largest retirement
community, about former
Pennsylvania Sen. Rick
See Page A2


Fire destroys couple's home


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Bobby Ward walks through the burned-out remains of a single-family home Wednesday afternoon which belongs to his friends Bryan and Chenoa
McCutcheon.

Despite no insurance, family thankful they and their pets safe after blaze
M / / // .41'J


MATTHEW BECK
Staff Writer
CRYSTAL RIVER- As Bryan
McCutcheon sifted through the
burnt remains of his bedroom
Wednesday afternoon, he found
solace in the fact that even
though most of his worldly pos-
sessions were lost, he and his
wife were safe.


"At the end of the day, at least
we have each other," he said.
An early morning fire that
started in the Crystal River cou-
ple's laundry room burned their
three-bedroom block home on
North Pennsylvania Avenue to
the ground, leaving little to
salvage.
McCutcheon's wife Chenoa, 30,
said she was awakened sometime


after 4 a.m. by a strong smell of
smoke and got out of bed to find
the cause.
"I thought we left something on
in the oven and it was burning,"
she said.
But after seeing the amount of
thick smoke in the house, she
said she knew a fire had started
and immediately went to wake
her husband.


LHS students get artful critiques


Editor's note: Throughout the 2011-12
school year, the Chronicle staff will follow
the progress of several classrooms across
the county during its series School Days.

SHEMIR WILES
Staff Writer
LECANTO Massaging her fingers
briskly over one of her colorful concentra-
tion pieces about gender
roles, Allison "Alley" Harden
gushed Friday afternoon - I
about the approaching week- J r
end trip with some of her fel-
low classmates.
"I'm so excited. I've been -r
looking forward to it since I I
knew I could go," she said.
A number of art students
from Lecanto High School's
School of Art plus several
other high school students
from around the state partic-
ipated in Ringling College of
Art and Design's annual Na-
tional Portfolio Day in
Sarasota.
More than 45 art colleges
from around the country sent representa-
tives to the all-day event Sunday to review
and critique students' portfolios and offer
information about their art programs.
However, Connie Phillips' class made the
trip south the day before to visit the Rin-
gling Museum of Art and participate in a
private three-hour figure-drawing class on
the Ringling campus.
Equipped with only a stick of graphite, a


Cont6 crayon and some newsprint, Phillips
said her students sketched busily as the
models did one-minute poses.
"Ringling only offers this to two high
schools in the state," Phillips said Tuesday
It was Harden's hope to walk away from
the weekend with better figure drawing
skills. Even though she has already been
accepted to the University of South Florida,
the 17-year-old senior said she still felt it
was important to hear some
feedback on the pieces in
her portfolio.
"I think it would be really
useful," she said.
j Cassandra Vientos and
i Jessica Bouton both went to
Sarasota last year. Though
the two 17-year-olds had an
idea of what to expect, they
still were anxious to see
what the weekend would
......... bring.
"It's a good way to meet
other artists," Bouton said.
"I hope to gain a new per-
spective on my work and
maybe discover something I
like."
Vientos described the figure drawing
class as fast-paced, but fun.
"Toward the end you sketch faster and
we start laughing," she said. "We're always
laughing at first. I ripped my paper a few
times trying to keep up."
But eventually everyone gets used to the
pace of the exercise, Bouton chimed in.
See Page A5


"It was surreal. I thought to my-
self, 'This isn't happening,"' she
said
They had little time to escape.
"We pretty much had time to
get our animals out and that was
about it," her husband said about
the fast-moving fire.
Most of their household
See Page A5


Damato questions

EDC bylaws vote


County

attorney asked

for opinion
CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff Writer
Whether a business
coalition can change its
bylaws without county ap-
proval
was a
question
1Q% posed
1 1Z Tuesday
to the
county
: attorney
Co n-
Dennis missioner
Damato De i
Damato asked County At-
torney Richard Wesch to
peruse the bylaws of the
Citrus County Economic
Development Council to
see if the EDC was enti-
tled to change its bylaws,
as it recently did to allow
city councils to choose
their representatives.
Wesch was tasked after
Dave Conant, a resident of


Port authority board
says it will stay open
to public./Page A7

Beverly Hills, raised the
issue before the Citrus
County Board of County
Commissioners (BOCC).
Conant asked for com-
ment on a column by Dale
McClellan published in
Tuesday's Chronicle,
"Keep politics out of
EDC," explaining why he
resigned from the EDC, of
which he was president-
elect. Commissioner Joe
Meek responded that Mc-
Clellan resigned following
the vote for the bylaws
change last week, in spite
of the executive board's
recommendation to keep
the bylaws as they had
originated: City managers
would represent Crystal
River and Inverness.
"Andy Houston, a mem-
ber of the EDC, brought
forward in November a
proposed change from his
city council that they
would like to change the
bylaws where the cities
See Page A7


A,


AM


li
I





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Contest winner


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
David Griffin, right, and Linda Foden, of Homosassa
Springs, are the winners of the y four-pack of tick-
ets to the 50th Anniversary Rolex 24 at Daytona, a
24-hour endurance race held each year at Daytona In-
ternational Speedway. The race starts at 3 p.m. Sat-
urday and ends at 3 p.m. Sunday. Race winners earn
a Rolex watch as part of their winnings.

Subscribers appreciated


David Griffin took part
in the subscriber appre-
ciation contest for the
month of January The
Chronicle says "thank
you" to its subscribers by
offering a valuable draw-
ing each month.
Coming in February is
a subscriber contest for a
four-day, two-ticket race
package for Speed
Weeks 2012, culminating
with the Daytona 500 on


Feb. 26. The tickets are
above the Start/Finish
line.
Race fans can pur-
chase tickets for Speed
Weeks 2012 by visiting
www. daytonainter
nationalspeedway.com;
calling 1-800-PITSHOP;
or visiting the Daytona
International Speedway
ticket office located at In-
ternational Speedway
Blvd, Daytona Beach.


SOCIAL
Continued from Page Al

Santorum's pitch even
though it's the most ag-
gressive position of any of
the Republican presiden-
tial candidates. He wants
to lower benefits for
wealthier retirees, raise
the age to qualify for full
benefits and restrict infla-
tion increases in benefits.
"We need to change ben-
efits for everybody now,"
said Santorum, who cam-
paigned in this area this
week. "We can't wait 10
years."
For decades, the idea of
tinkering with the retire-
ment safety net was taboo
for politicians. That was
especially true in Florida,
which has the highest pro-
portion of people age 65 or
over, its 2.8 million seniors
second only to California.
But with the skyrocketing
costs of entitlement pro-
grams boosting the na-
tion's debt, the Republican
candidates are advocating
for changes they say will
ensure future retirees can
draw benefits.
Of the GOP front-run-
ners, Romney wants to pre-
serve benefits for people
55 and over but would, for
the next generations of re-
tirees, raise the retirement
age for full benefits one or
two years. The former Mas-
sachusetts governor also
wants to reduce inflation
increases in benefits for
wealthier recipients.
Gingrich, the former
House speaker, supports
giving younger workers
the option of diverting So-
cial Security taxes to pri-
vate retirement accounts.
Employers would still pay
their share to the federal
government, which would
protect private account
holders in the event of a


Associated Press
Bill LeBeau, of The Villages, talks recently about his concerns over the future of
Social Security. LaBeau argues retirees should get more to keep up with inflation and
likes Newt Gingrich's call for creating private investment accounts for younger adults.


huge drop in stock
markets.
President Barack
Obama, who is seeking re-
election, hasn't proposed
any changes in current or
future benefits and has in-
stead called for a biparti-
san look at how to
strengthen the program.
He supported the $250 pay-
ment to Social Security re-
cipients in the 2009 federal
stimulus package and has
called for a second $250
payment to beneficiaries.
The issue is all but cer-
tain to be a major one in
Florida, both in the GOP
primary on Jan. 31 and in
the general election. An
estimated 31 percent of
people who voted in
Florida's general election
in 2010 were 65 or older,
and they voted at a higher
rate than any other age
group. Seniors made up 33
percent of voters in the
2008 GOP primary, the
highest share of any state


with a GOP exit poll that
year.
In September, a Quinnip-
iac University poll found
that registered Republi-
cans in Florida generally
hold a more positive than
negative view of Social Se-
curity, but they do support
some changes to the system
to keep it solvent
A majority (53 percent)
would favor increasing the
age to qualify for benefits,
a proposal opposed by
most Democrats and inde-
pendents, and 6 in 10 sup-
port raising the income
cap for Social Security
taxes in order to increase
the amount of money com-
ing into the Social Security
system. Majorities oppose
reducing benefits for cur-
rent (84 percent) or future
(55 percent) retirees in
order to increase funding
for the system.
Here in The Villages, re-
tirement is away of life. So
is collecting Social Secu-


rity and, it seems, the fear
of losing it
"We're afraid that it's
going to be cut or that
we're going to lose what
we put into it," said John
Turek, 62, of Council
Bluffs, Iowa.
In this community of
75,000 people, golf carts
are as common as cars and
hundreds of residents
gather each night for live
music, line dancing and
two-for-one drinks in a
town square surrounded
by a movie theater, church
and restaurants.
Voters here tend to be
conservative. And, judging
from a series of interviews
this month with residents,
there's a palpable worry
among residents about the
growing national debt,
budget-busting entitle-
ment programs and
whether Social Security
will be around as a safety
net for their children and
grandchildren.


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I


A2 THURSDAY, JANUARY 26, 2012


--------------------------------------







Page A3 THURSDAY, JANUARY 26, 2012



TATE2&


LOCAL
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Around
THE STATE

Citrus County
Early voting ends
this weekend
Early voting for the Jan. 31
presidential preference primary
runs through Saturday, Jan. 28,
with Sunday hours available.
Voters must present a photo
and signature ID when early
voting, or vote a provisional
ballot. Voters who are regis-
tered in another Florida county
but who now reside in Citrus
are encouraged to update their
address with the elections of-
fice prior to voting, or they will
be statutorily required to vote
a provisional ballot.
Early voting hours are
noon to 6 p.m. Monday to Fri-
day and 10 a.m. to4 p.m.
Saturday and Sunday.
Early voting locations:
Central Ridge Library,
425 W. Roosevelt Blvd., Bev-
erly Hills.
Crystal River Elections
Office, 1540 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd., Crystal River.
Homosassa Public Li-
brary, 4100 S. Grandmarch
Ave., Homosassa.
Inverness City Hall, 212
W. Main St., Invemess,.
For more information, visit
www.votecitrus.com or call
352-341-6740.
Bays to speak
at TOOFAR meeting
County Commissioner Re-
becca Bays will be the guest
speaker at the next meeting
of TOOFAR. She will address
water issues.
TOOFAR is a grassroots
organization dedicated to the
best management and con-
servation of natural resources.
It will meet at 7 p.m. Thurs-
day, Jan. 26, at East Citrus
Community Center, 9907 E.
Gulf to Lake Hwy., Inverness.
For more information, call
352-726-5004 or email
toofarinc@earthlink.net.

Tallahassee
Prison privatization plan
goes to Senate floor
The Senate budget commit-
tee has approved its chamber's
version of a prison privatiza-
tion plan.
The committee voted 14-4
on the bill (CS/SB 2038). The
four senators against the
measure are Mike Fasano,
R-New Port Richey; Bill
Montford, D-Tallahassee;
Nan Rich, D-Weston; and
Eleanor Sobel, D-Hollywood.
Plan proponents say it
guarantees savings of $22
million to $45 million a year.
Correctional workers say
the plan will put state employ-
ees out of work and reduce
public and inmate safety.
House panel moves
PIP overhaul forward
With a 10-5 party line vote,
the Civil Justice Subcommittee
on Wednesday approved a bill
(CS/HB 119) that addresses
the state's mandatory per-
sonal injury protection, or PIP,
coverage.
The proposed law requires
those hurt in a wreck to go to a
hospital emergency room or
hospital-owned walk-in clinic
within 72 hours for personal-
injury coverage to kick in.
Business and insurance in-
terests support the measure.
But many who spoke before the
committee said it would subject
accident victims to long waits
in understaffed emergency
rooms and prevent them from
seeing doctors or other health
care professionals who already
know their health condition.
Others said the 72-hour re-
quirement was too short. Symp-
toms of soft-tissue injuries
and concussions, they said,
may not manifest until later.
The bill also limits reim-
bursement to doctors, den-
tists, physician's assistants
and nurse practitioners.
A parade of attorneys who
represent emergency room


doctors also opposed the ex-
aminations under oath, say-
ing they will take time away
from treating patients.
The bill next goes to the
House Economic Affairs
Committee.
-From staff and wire reports


Windy weather keeping whoope:

Earliest arrival would be in first weeks of February grationed the parily
grounded the plane and the A


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff Writer
CRYSTAL RIVER At
their current rate of travel,
the annual wintering of
whooping cranes in the
area's marshes may be
short-lived but officials
say they are inching closer.
Michael Lusk, manager of
the Crystal River National
Wildlife Refuge, said the
cranes typically stay in the
area until March before
they turn around and jour-
ney north.
"The crew continues to
have problems with the
weather. They are still ex-


periencing bad weather and
have been unable to take
off," Lusk said Tuesday He
believes it will probably be,
at a minimum, a couple of
weeks before the young
whooping cranes and their
guides with Operation Mi-
gration arrive at the Chassa-
howitzka National Wildlife
Refuge and the St. Marks
National Wildlife Refuge in
Wakulla County.
According to Operation
Migration's website on
Wednesday, the team was
able to eke out only about
five miles of flying time in
Alabama due to high winds
aloft.


The pilots and young
whooping cranes were
grounded late last month in
northwestern Alabama be-
cause of a Federal Aviation
Administration investiga-
tion into the use of ultralight
aircraft, which are used to
help guide the avian flyers.
Operation Migration pays
its pilots, but FAA rules say
the craft are sport planes
and therefore can only be
flown for personal use.
FAA officials notified the
conservation group's pilots
in late November that the
agency had opened an in-
vestigation. Just before
Christmas, Operation Mi-


UI iUn nor I LiwesLern Ala-
bama more than halfway
to their destination. The or-
ganization was eventually
granted a waiver.
Most of the whooping
cranes spend the summer in
central Wisconsin, where
they use areas on or near
Necedah National Wildlife
Refuge, as well as other
public and private lands.
Whooping cranes were on
the verge of extinction in
the 1940s. Today, there are
only about 570 birds in exis-
tence, with approximately
400 of them in the wild, ac-
cording to the U.S. Fish and
Wildlife Service. The
cranes, named for their loud


CATHY KAPULKA
Staff Writer
CRYSTAL RIVER
The West Citrus Civil Air
Patrol FL-445 Cadet
Squadron was honored
Tuesday night at the Crystal
River Church of God.
The squadron, which is only
two years old, received a high
honor from the Civil Air Patrol
National Headquarters recogniz-
ing them as a "Quality Cadet
Unit."
"For two years (old), this pro-
gram is running very well," Ted
Lybrand, a lieutenant colonel in
the Civil Air Patrol United States
Air Force Auxiliary, said proudly
"It's totally outstanding."
Keith M. Shewbart, a major in
the auxiliary and squadron com-
mander, said the squadron's
motto is "excellence always."
He said the program, which
has 22 members, focuses on the
core values of integrity, excel-
lence, respect and volunteer
services.
"If you always do your best,
you're going to accomplish far


raise


LOCAL UNIT AWARDS


* Academic Top Gun: Senior Air-
man Chase Meahl.
Physical Fitness: Chief Master
Sgt. Kayla Papp, Chief Master
Sgt. Brandon Papp, Senior Air-
man Chase Meahl and Airman
Ryan Spivey.
Perfect Attendance: Lt. Col.
Landon Meahl and Airman
Dana Laurents.
Rocketry Award: 2nd Lt.
Matthew Brock, Senior Master
Sgt. Mason Murphy, 2nd Lt.
Thomas Sharp and 2nd Lt.
Sam Shewbart.
FL-445 Excellence Award:
Technical Sgt. Avrey Bush.

more than you ever thought pos-
sible," Shewbart said. "It's a very
positive program to participate in."
Cynthia Moody is a second lieu-
tenant in the auxiliary and works
closely with the cadets.
"One of the things that they re-
ally emphasize is leadership
skills," she said as she talked
about the squadron. "They learn


* Korean War Veterans
Outstanding Cadet: Airman
David Hogan.
* VFW NCO (noncommissioned
officer): 2nd Lt. Matthew
Brock.
* AFSA (Air Force Sergeant's
Association) Outstanding NCO:
Senior Master Sgt. Mason
Murphy.
* AFA (Air Force Association)
Outstanding Cadet: 2nd Lt.
Thomas Sharp.
* Promotions: Airman Dana Lau-
rents, Senior Master Sgt. Mason
Murphy, 2nd Lt. Matthew Brock
and 2nd Lt. Thomas Sharp.

a tremendous amount about
themselves in terms of character
development and physical devel-
opment and their awareness to
be a good citizen. Those three
components are key to what
they're doing here."
Chronicle reporter Cathy Kapulka
can be reached at 352-564-2922 or
ckapulka@chronicleonline. com.


Wildlife photographer to speak to 'Friends'


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff Writer
HOMOSASSA For wildlife pho-
tographer Gary Kuhl, his love for the
outdoors goes back to his boyhood,
learning about nature and wildlife
management and reptile study and
bird study at a camp north of Clear-
water in the 1960s.
Kuhl will be sharing his wildlife
photos and talking about the beauty
of Citrus County at the annual meet-
ing of the Friends of the Crystal River
National Wildlife Refuge Complex at
2 p.m., Sunday, Jan. 29, in the fellow-
ship hall of First United Methodist
Church of Homosassa, 8831 W Brad-
shaw Street. (Turn off U.S. 19 onto


West Bradshaw just south of the post
office and continue until you reach
the church on the right.)
A former public works director, water
management director and county ad-
ministrator, Kuhl retired a year and a
half ago from Sumter County public
works and picked up a camera.
Some of his best and favorite shots
were taken right outside his Floral
City home. One is of a heron at the
moment it speared a speckled perch,
and another is of a "flying turtle" a
river cooter on a log stretching, which
makes it look as if it's about to take off.
Kuhl has won several awards, in-
cluding "Top of the Photography Di-
vision" at the 2011 Citrus County Fair;
"Honorable Mention" in the 2010 In-


verness Art Show; and first place in
the 2011 "Save Our Waters Week"
photography contest.
To view Kuhl's work, visit http://
www.floridaartistsgallerycom.
"Our main theme is the beauty of
Citrus County, and Gary's photography
and his years in Citrus County show
it," said Lace Blue-McLean, president
of the Friends of the Crystal River
National Wildlife Refuge Complex.
The public is invited to attend this
free event. A donation of nonperish-
able food would be welcomed. Light
refreshments will be served. Infor-
mation about the Friends and
Friends' activities and events will be
on display For information, call 352-
201-0149.


rs away
and penetrating unison
calls, live and breed in wet-
land areas, where they feed
on crabs, clams, frogs and
aquatic plants. They are dis-
tinctive animals, standing 5
feet tall with white bodies,
black wing tips and red
crowns on their heads.
Ten cranes left Wisconsin
this fall. One young bird de-
toured and was later found
with a flock of migrating
sandhill cranes in Florida.
To track the journey, bird
enthusiasts can follow up-
dates at www.operation
migration.org or call 800-
675-2618.
Chronicle reporter A.B.
Sidibe can be reached at
352-564-2925 or asidibe@
chronicleonline. com.



Under bill,

state could

drug test

workers

randomly

Associated Press
The Republican-led
Florida Legislature is push-
ing ahead with a bill that
would allow random drug
testing of state workers and
other public employees
every three months, despite
ongoing questions about the
legality of the plan.
Gov Rick Scott ordered
random testing of state
workers last year, but he put
most of the testing on hold
after he was sued.
A House panel on
Wednesday
voted in
favor of a
drug-testing
F bill, which
includes a
S .provision
that says
public em-
Rep. Jimmie ployees can
T. Smith be fired if
R-Inverness, they have
bill's sponsor. one posi-
tive test. A Senate panel was
scheduled to take up the
measure on Wednesday
Rep. Jimmie Smith, R-In-
verness, did not assert that
there is a widespread drug
problem among public em-
ployees. Instead, he said, he
is trying to change what he
called society's growing ac-
ceptance of drug use.
"It's a tool in the toolbox
to fight the drug epidemic,"
said Smith, who last year
sponsored a bill that man-
dated drug testing of wel-
fare recipients.
The American Civil Lib-
erties Union which chal-
lenged Scott's executive
order as well as the welfare
drug testing law asserted
that courts have routinely
found random drug tests vi-
olate the Fourth Amendment
ban against unreasonable
searches unless it can be
proven there is a special
need for them.
"People don't sacrifice their
constitutional rights just be-
cause they become employ-
ees of the state," said Howard
Simon, executive director of
the ACLU of Florida. "The
Legislature has no power to
authorize government agen-
cies to violate the Fourth
Amendment."
Simon predicted that pas-
sage of the bill would only
"cost the taxpayers of
Florida more money"
Members of the House
Government Operations sub-
committee debated whether
allowing drug tests every
three months was too exces-
sive and whether it would be
costly for state and local gov-
ernments to pay for the tests.
Smith said testing yearly
would allow employees to
be able to avoid detection
and that there should be a


smaller time period in be-
tween tests in order to dis-
courage drug use.
The House subcommittee
voted 9-4 in favor of the leg-
islation, which has two more
stops before it goes to the
full House.


CATHY KAPULKA/Chronicle
Mason Murphy, 17, senior master sergeant in the West Citrus Civil Air Patrol FL445 Cadet Squadron, thanks
Cynthia Moody, second lieutenant in the Civil Air Patrol United States Air Force Auxiliary, for her help in the cadet
program during a squadron award ceremony Tuesday evening at the Crystal River Church of God.


ig


CivilAir Patrol squadron honored by national headquarters






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Man finds it's not cool to steal AC


Stolen units

lead to arrest

A.B. SIDIBE
Staff Writer

CRYSTAL RIVER Po-
lice have made an arrest in
a rash of air conditioning
thefts at various Crystal
River businesses.
Terreius D. Chambers, 27,
846 S.E. 8th Ave., Crystal
River, was arrested Tuesday
and charged with grand theft
after a series of businesses
were hit amid complaints


that parts of their air condi-
tioning units were missing,
often rendering the units un-
workable. The most common
items missing from these
units were copper, fans and
fan motors and radiators, ac-
cording to the report.
One of the businesses'
video cameras captured an
image of a clearly identifi-
able man removing a fan
and fan motor, according to
investigators.
Officers also noticed on
the video someone wearing
a dark hoodie (similar to the
clothes worn by the person
seen removing the fan)
pushing a shopping cart


down 8th Avenue.
Detectives reportedly
followed the path of im-
pressions made by the
shopping cart through
some woods to the doorstep
of Chambers.
The man who answered
the door was the same man
in the video images. A
search of the residence re-
vealed the dark hoodie
shown in the video.
Chambers was arrested
and later released on his
own recognizance.
Chronicle reporter A.B.
Sidibe can be reached at
352-564-2925 or asidibe@
chronicleonline. com.


C.R. man accused of child abuse


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff Writer

CRYSTAL RIVER A
Crystal River man is ac-
cused of punching a woman,
abusing a juvenile and
briefly barricading himself
in a bedroom while threat-
ening cops, according to a
Citrus County Sheriff's Of-
fice report.
Jason Earl Solomon, 31,
was arrested Sunday and
charged with child abuse,
false imprisonment, domes-
tic battery and withholding
911 from a victim.
According to the report,
Solomon had been drinking
most of the day and got into
an argument with a woman.
He reportedly followed the
woman into a bathroom and
would not let her leave, but
proceeded to grab a pair of
hair clippers and threat-
ened to chop off her hair.
When a 13-year-old boy
came to inquire about the


altercation, Solomon re-
portedly snatched him by
the neck and began to choke
him. With the help of the
woman, the teen was able to
wrestle free and escape the
residence while Solomon
gave chase.
While Solomon chased
the youngster, the woman
made dash for the phone to
call 911. Solomon soon re-
turned and knocked the
phone out of the woman's
hands, punched and spit on
her, according to the
report.
When deputies arrived on
the scene after the aborted
911 call, they heard yelling
coming from a residence.
When an investigator got
to the residence, Solomon
was seen running to a bed-
room and slamming the
door. Investigators report-
edly tried to get Solomon to
come out of the bedroom,
but he responded by saying
he had gun and was going to


shoot deputies.
Solomon eventually came
out and was detained. No
bond was allowed.
Chronicle reporter A.B.
Sidibe can be reached at
352-564-2925 or asidibe@
chronicleonline. com.


For the RECORD


Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Thefts
A petit theft occurred at
about 2:40 p.m. Jan. 20 in the
9100 block of N. Dickens Drive,
Citrus Springs.
A grand theft ($300 or
more) occurred at about 1 a.m.
Jan. 21 in the 3000 block of E.
Haven Street, Inverness.
A petit theft occurred at
about 12:30 p.m. Jan. 21 in the
600 block of W. Norvell Bryant
Highway, Hemando.
A grand theft ($300 or
more) occurred at about 2 p.m.
Jan. 21 in the 30 block of N.
Harrison St., Beverly Hills.
A retail petit theft occurred
at about 5:57 p.m. Jan. 21 in the
2400 block of E. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Inverness.
A retail petit theft occurred
at about 8:02 p.m. Jan. 21 in the
2400 block of E. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Inverness.
A retail petit theft occurred
at about 10:59 p.m. Jan. 21 in
the 5500 block of W. Ho-
mosassa Trail, Lecanto.
MA grand theft ($300 or more)
occurred at about 11:50 p.m. Jan.
21 in the 1500 block of S. Sun-


coast Boulevard, Crystal River.
A grand theft ($300 or
more) occurred at about 2 a.m.
Jan. 22 in the 5400 block of E.
Live Oak Lane, Inverness.
M A felony retail theft ($300 or
more) occurred at about 4:40 p.m.
Jan. 22 in the 2400 block of E.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Inverness.
A petit theft occurred at
about 6:30 p.m. Jan. 22 in the
6600 block of W. Treetop Lane,
Homosassa.
A grand theft ($300 or
more) occurred at about 6 p.m.
Jan. 5 in the 200 block of S. Line
Avenue, Inverness.
A grand theft ($300 or more)
occurred at about noon Jan. 20
in the 8700 block of W. Bluebird
Springs Lane, Homosassa.
A grand theft ($20,000 or
more) occurred at about 5 p.m.
Jan. 20 in the 100 block of S.E.
7th Avenue, Crystal River.
A petit theft occurred on
Jan. 23 in the 6500 block of
Mina Lane, Dunnellon.
A retail petit theft occurred
at about 2:30 p.m. Jan. 23 in the
6200 block of W. Cardinal
Street, Homosassa.
Vandalisms
SA vandalism ($200 or less)


ON THE NET
For more information
about arrests made by
the Citrus County Sher-
iff's Office, go to
www.sheriffcitrus.org
and click on the Public
Information link, then
on Arrest Reports.


occurred on Nov. 28 in the 80
block of W. Citrus Springs
Boulevard, Citrus Springs.
A vandalism ($200 or less)
occurred at about 6 p.m. Jan. 19
in the 900 block of W. Roosevelt
Boulevard, Beverly Hills.
MA vandalism ($200 or more)
occurred on Jan. 20 in the 8200
block of N. Empire Avenue, Cit-
rus Springs.
SA vandalism ($200 or more)
occurred at about 2:45 a.m. Jan.
20 in the 500 block of S. Adams
Street, Beverly Hills.
A vandalism ($200 or less)
occurred at about 6 p.m. Jan. 20
in the 4800 block of N. Forest
Ridge Boulevard, Beverly Hills.
A vandalism ($1,000) or
more occurred at about 9 p.m.
Jan. 21 in the 6300 block of S.
Esmeralda Terrace, Lecanto.


.legal notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle


Mr Dept. of Dev. Services........................................All

Fictititious Name Notices..................................Cll

Meeting Notices.................................................. Cll

SLien Notices.............................. ................. .......... Cl

Miscellaneous Notices........................................Cl1

Foreclosure Sale/Action Notices...............C10, Cll

Notice to Creditors/Administration...................C10

.. Surplus Property.................................................C10


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc

PC


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
pc
pc
pc

pc
pc
pc
pc
pc


MARINE OUTLOOK


Southeast winds around 15 knots.
Seas 2 to 4 feet. Bay and inland
waters will have a moderate chop.
Partly cloudy skies today.


84 60 0.00 --5 57 0.00

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Exclusive daily
ir TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 76 Low: 63
Areas of fog early, then partly
cloud y.
FRIDAY & SATURDAY MORNING
High: 71 Low: 55
Partly sunny with showers likely and a chance of
thunderstorms.


Gulf water
temperature


70
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Tues. Wed. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 27.64 27.63 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 34.31 34.30 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 36.37 36.46 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 37.94 37.91 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211

THE NATION


High: 73 Low: 49
Partly cloudy.


ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Wednesday 82/54
Record 84/23
Normal 71/43
Mean temp. 68
Departure from mean +11
PRECIPITATION*
Wednesday 0.00 in.
Total for the month 0.66 in.
Total for the year 0.66 in.
Normal for the year 2.46 in.
*As of 6 pm at Inverness
UV INDEX: 6
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Wednesday at 3 p.m. 30.10 in.


DEW POINT
Wednesday at 3 p.m. 5
HUMIDITY
Wednesday at 3 p.m. 401
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Juniper, elm and maple
Today's count: 8.9/12
Friday's count: 9.6
Saturday's count: 10.8
AIR QUALITY
Wednesday was good with pollut-
ants mainly ozone.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
1/26 THURSDAY 7:45 1:34 8:07 1:56
1/27 FRIDAY 8:34 2:23 8:55 2:44


S
FEB. 7


BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For
more information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's
Web site: http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi

WATERING RULES
Citrus County: Irrigation is limited to twice per week.
Even addresses: Thursday and/or Sunday before 10am or after 4pm.
Odd Addresses: Wednesday and/or Saturday before 10am or after 4pm.
No restrictions on fountains, car washing or pressure washing. Hand watering requires the
use of a shut-off nozzle.
PLEASE CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL NEW PLANT MATERIAL.
Questions, concerns or reporting violations, please call Citrus County 352-527-7669.

TIDES


*From mouths

City
Chassahowitzka*
Crystal River**
Withlacoochee*
Homosassa***


3 of rivers **At King's Bay
Thursday
High/Low High/Low
7:06 a/3:06 a 7:51 p/3:26 p
5:27 a/12:28 a 6:12 p/12:48 p
3:14 a/10:36 a 3:59 p/10:55 p
6:16 a/2:05 a 7:01 p/2:25 p


High/I
7:47 a/3
6:08 a/1
3:55 a/1
6:57 a/2


***At Mason's Creek
Friday
Low High/Low
3:45 a 8:17 p/3:53 p
:07a 6:38 p/1:15 p
1:03 a 4:25 p/11:34 p
2:44 a 7:27 p/2:52 p


chrti.eau "Hono'ulu '


es F


W(
City
Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, N.H.
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
Nashville


wednesday Thursday
H L Pcp. Fcst H L
36 32 c 39 32
51 32 s 53 33
62 28 r 58 46
68 40 ts 69 56
50 33 r 48 47
70 54 2.41 pc 61 40
49 32 r 46 43
50 35 c 42 22
75 43 ts 70 49
55 35 .02 sh 49 26
43 37 pc 39 33
32 29 c 42 32
36 28 c 32 24
70 40 pc 71 59
50 28 r 53 37
64 32 r 63 58
36 22 c 41 28
39 29 .01 r 44 30
34 30 c 41 30
67 35 c 72 58
34 30 sh 44 29
37 31 pc 37 23
51 48 3.24 c 55 37
62 19 pc 53 30
44 27 pc 39 25
32 29 c 41 35
61 38 s 62 39
36 26 .15 r 48 32
44 34 r 43 36
41 35 c 41 32
73 57 2.83 c 63 46
34 27 .09 pc 43 24
76 57 ts 73 47
66 39 s 69 44
48 45 .61 r 53 36
79 50 s 77 54
40 30 .25 r 51 32
54 45 .31 r 59 39
36 22 c 39 26
32 22 pc 34 18
75 59 ts 73 54
79 47 ts 74 57
48 34 .07 r 59 36


- D A I t >'i
* '-- "--"""






FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
THURSDAY


Wednesday Thursday
City H L Pcp. Fcst H L
New Orleans 79 64 ts 73 53
New York City 44 38 r 44 41
Norfolk 50 38 c 58 54
Oklahoma City 51 44 .70 pc 56 30
Omaha 46 24 s 41 25
Palm Springs 83 53 s 82 51
Philadelphia 46 38 r 47 41
Phoenix 71 45 s 75 49
Pittsburgh 36 30 r 45 31
Portland, ME 41 31 s 35 27
Portland, Ore MM MM na r 46 29
Providence, R.I. 43 33 c 40 34
Raleigh 64 34 c 65 57
Rapid City 57 13 c 43 25
Reno 60 31 pc 62 34
Rochester, NY 32 30 c 43 31
Sacramento 62 41 pc 62 42
St. Louis 35 31 .33 pc 50 30
St. Ste. Marie 31 14 c 34 26
Salt Lake City 46 32 sh 49 31
San Antonio 70 56 2.39 pc 65 40
San Diego 70 50 s 78 52
San Francisco 61 48 pc 57 45
Savannah 72 44 pc 71 59
Seattle 48 40 .30 sh 44 30
Spokane 39 32 .10 rs 40 19
Syracuse 35 32 c 38 35
Topeka 54 32 s 52 30
Washington 49 36 r 48 45
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 87 Harlingen, Texas
LOW -7 Crested Butte, Colo.
WORLD CITIES


THURSDAY
CITY HILISKY
Acapulco 85/68/s
Amsterdam 45/37/sh
Athens 47/39/sh
Beijing 34/11/s
Berlin 32/22/s
Bermuda 72/63/pc
Cairo 64/47/s
Calgary 33/17/pc
Havana 84/59/pc
Hong Kong 57/49/sh
Jerusalem 61/45/s


Lisbon
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Paris
Rio
Rome
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Warsaw


58/45/c
50/37/sh
55/31/pc
72/44/pc
27/22/pc
5/-4/pc
50/35/sh
90/73/ts
54/36/s
77/69/sh
42/30/pc
38/33/pc
25/11/sf


C I T R U S


C U N TY


LHIKON1CLL
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kileadowlres t
N I \ '- ":'

S ICourhose Inverness
Courthouse office
To mpkins St. square
0 C 106 W. Main
41 4 Inverness, FL
SA 34450


Who's in charge:
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Tom Feeney .................................................... Production Director, 563-3275
Kathie Stewart .............................................. Circulation Director, 563-5655
John M urphy ........................ ............................ Online M manager, 563-3255
John M urphy.................................................... Classified M manager, 564-3255
Jeff Gordon .................................................. Business M manager, 564-2908
Mike Arnold.................................... Human Resources Director, 564-2910
Report a news tip:
Opinion page questions.................................. Charlie Brennan, 563-3225
To have a photo taken ........................................ Darlene Mann, 563-5660
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S o u n d O ff ................................................................................................................ 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9
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By Citrus Publishing Inc.
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PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL
SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280


JAN. 30


CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
SUNSET TONIGHT ............................6:04 P.M.
SUNRISE TOMORROW .....................7:22 A.M.
MOONRISE TODAY...........................9:10 A.M.
FEB.14 FEB. 21 MOONSET TODAY ............................9:32 P.M.


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy
02012 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


I A


A4 THURSDAY, JANUARY 26, 2012


LOCAL





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ART
Continued from Page Al

Following up Tuesday
after the long weekend,
Phillips said it was a won-
derful, educational outing
for her students.
"We were all exhausted,
but the kids were elated,"
she said.
Phillips was especially
pleased with the fact her
students impressed many of
the professors at Ringling,
who apparently were sur-
prised to learn a number of
her students were only in
10th grade.
"I was so proud they knew
the answers to their ques-
tions," she said.
Working on a sketch of a
fellow classmate, Harden
said the trip rejuvenated
and inspired her.
"I would say the critiques
were helpful," she said.
"They mostly told me I
shouldn't work from photos
as much and work from



FIRE
Continued from Page Al

animals were rescued, in-
cluding three dogs, two cats
and a pair of birds. Only
some fish in a tank didn't
survive the blaze, according
to the couple.
The couple's house and
its contents were not
insured.
"We canceled our policy
two weeks ago," Chenoa
quietly said while staring at
the burned-out shell of a
home, still dripping with
water used to extinguish the
flames hours earlier.
The couple's friend
Bobby Ward lives in a recre-
ational vehicle behind the
residence and said in a mat-
ter of minutes the house was
engulfed in flames.
"When the roof over the
bedroom and laundry room
collapsed, a ball of flames
shot through the air that was
probably 40 or 50 feet high,"
he said.
The Florida State Fire
Marshal's office is conduct-
ing an investigation into the
fire, but McCutcheon, 31,
said he believes the fire
started in the dryer vent.
He said he had put a load


THURSDAY, JANUARY 26, 2012 A5


real life."
Though the event was
nicer than last year, Kori
Seymour left Sarasota still
itching for a more critical
evaluation of her work.
"I had one good critique,"
she said. "I wanted the
harshness."
Haylee Chelkonas agreed,
but said she was satisfied
with her one thorough eval-
uation from the New Eng-
land School of Art.
"I spoke to the same
woman I spoke to last year,"
said Chelkonas. "She told
me to speak the concept
more in my pieces, to be a
bit more obvious with what
I'm trying to say
"She told me not to be
afraid to do things outside
of my comfort zone,"
Chelkonas said. "It was
like having a conversation
on a professional level.
She didn't talk to me like a
kid."
Chronicle reporter
Shemir Wiles can be
reached at 352-564-2924 or
swiles@chronicleonline.


of laundry in the dryer be-
fore retiring to bed in the
early morning hours
Wednesday
"The fire marshal showed
me some junk that was clog-
ging the vent Loose change,
lint and even a tube of
Chapstick," he said.
The Citrus County Sher-
iff's Office, Division of Fire
Rescue responded to the
fire at 4:45 a.m. and arrived
on scene to find the home 75
to 80 percent engulfed, ac-
cording to an incident re-
port filed Wednesday
afternoon.
The 1,700 square-foot
home had flames coming
from the roof, all windows
and doors of the home the re-
port said. The fire was under
control 43 minutes later with
the assistance of six engines,
one tanker and an aerial
unit. The report states 100
percent of the home and con-
tents were lost, totaling
$204,000.
The couple, married
more than 10 years, said
they have been moved by
their neighbors' generosity
"We want to thank our
neighbors. They really
pulled together for us," he
said. "I understand some of
them have even collected
clothes. They came over to


Student journal
excerpts:
* Portfolio Day was fast-
paced and exciting ...
The environment was
helpful and informative
for both students and
parents. The school
staff and student
guides were a great
help in finding our way
and getting additional
information.
- Kori Seymour, 17.
* The Ringling Museum
was breathtaking. The
Rhode Island School of
Design told me that
they loved to see my
free-flow work and lay-
ering. The New England
School of Art and De-
sign told me to take
photographs of my
work in progress as
well as communicate
my concept more in my
work. I definitely have
to show my skill more.
- Haylee Chelkonas, 17.


help; one neighbor gave me
money for lunch and that
almost brought me to tears.
I haven't cried for any of
my belongings lost, but
what my neighbors have
done for us has moved me
to tears."
At press time no local
agency has a mechanism in
place to accept donated
items for the family


CONNIE PHILLIPS/Special to the Chronicle
Courtney O'Brien, a student in Lecanto High School's School of Art, applies the finishing
touches with a Cont6 crayon on a 10-minute figure drawing Saturday night at the Ringling
College of Art and Design in Sarasota.


GOT A NEWS TIP?
* The Chronicle
welcomes tips from
readers about breaking
news. Call the news-
room at 352-563-5660,
and be prepared to give
your name, phone
number, and the
address of the news
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Patrick Cox, 85
CRYSTAL RIVER
Patrick R. Cox, 85, of Crys-
tal River, FL, died Tuesday,
Jan. 24, 2012, at his home.
He was
Born Nov
23, 1926, in
Scranton,
PA, and
moved to
Crystal
River in
1993 from
Patrick Wharton,
Cox NJ. He re-
tired from
the Marotta Valve Corp of
New Jersey as a machinist
Patrick was a member of
the Catholic Church, an avid
New York Giants and Notre
Dame Fan.
He is survived by his wife
of 48 years, Marilyn L. Cox
of Crystal River; sons
Patrick R. Cox Jr, of
Garfield, NJ, and Michael
Cox of PA; daughter Sharon
Burke of Dunmore, PA;
stepchildren William En-
gers of NJ, Donna Engers of
FL, Sandra Jurgensen of
NJ, and Jeffrey Engers of
FL; sisters Lea Andrew of
PA, Audry Dominick of PA,
Judy Kalonoski of NJ, and
Ila O'Malley; several grand-
and great-grandchildren;
and numerous nieces and
nephews.
Funeral services will be
held at 2 p.m. Sunday, Jan.
29, at Wilder Funeral Home.
Friends will be received
Saturday at the funeral
home from 1 p.m. until 3
p.m.
Condolences may be
given at wwwwilder
funeral.com.

Edna Baker, 86
Edna Maxine (Mackie
Holt) Baker, age 86, died
January 20, 2012.
She was born to the late
Lillian and John T Holt on
May 24, 1925, in St. Peters-
burg, FL.
Maxine lived in Inver-
ness, FL, from 1988 to 2004.
Maxine is survived by five
children, Larry, Linda, Greg,
Cheryl and Shelley
She is preceded in death
by her loving brothers, John,
Chic and Lester Holt.
Share memories at
www.keehnfuneralhome.
com.


Jerry
Zebendon, 79
INVERNESS
Jerry L. Zebendon, 79, In-
verness, died Tuesday, Jan-
uary 24, 2012, at Citrus
Memorial
-. hospital.
A Cele-
I bration of
Life Memo-
B f" rial Service
will be Fri-
day, Janu-
ary 27, 2012,
at noon at
Jerry F i r s t
Zebendon U n i t e d
Methodist
Church of Inverness with
Pastor Tony Rosenberger.
Jerry was born on October
14,1932, in Plant City, FL, to
the late Francis and Eldis
(Porter) Zebendon.
He served our country in
the U.S. Army during the
Korean War.
Jerry was employed by In-
diana Bell as a manager
with more than 35 years of
service, also in public rela-
tions in Columbus, Indiana.
He was a member of the
Kiwanis, Rotary and Lions
clubs in Indiana and an ac-
tive member of First United
Methodist Church in Inver-
ness, serving as head usher
for three years as well as in
the United Methodist Men's
Fellowship.
He enjoyed fishing, gar-
dening, reading and work-
ing Sudoku puzzles.
Survivors include his wife
of 58 years, Sally K. Zeben-
don; two sons, Randy
(Cheryl) Zebendon, Shelton,
CT, and Kerry (Patricia)
Zebendon, Farmland, IN;
his brother, Charles (Jane)
Zebendon, Bloomington,
IN; sister, Mary Frances
Masters, Issaquah, Washing-
ton; and five grandchildren,
Andrew, Alison and Scott
Zebendon, Zac (Sara) Rich-
man and Cari (Kevin) Lewis.
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory is in
charge of arrangements.
The family requests me-
morial donations in Jerry's
memory to First United
Methodist Church, 3896
Pleasant Grove Road,
Inverness, FL 34452


in lieu of flowers.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.

Elizabeth
Lemberger, 84
CRYSTAL RIVER
Elizabeth A. Lemberger,
84, of Crystal River, Florida,
passed away on Tuesday,
January, 24, 2012, at Hospice
of Citrus County, Lecanto,
Florida. She was born on
January 15, 1928, in
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania,
to the late Theodore and
Anna S. (Mannion) Stubbs.
Elizabeth was a bookkeeper
for the Sears & Roebuck
Company She arrived in the
area in 2000 coming from
Clearwater, Florida. She
was a member of the Red
Hat Society, and was very
devoted to her husband and
family
Elizabeth is preceded in
death by one son, William A.
"Bill" Lemberger, and one
grandchild, Christopher.
She is survived by her lov-
ing husband of 58 years,
Adolph W Lemberger Other
survivors include two sons,
Robert (Elizabeth C.) Lem-
berger and David (Paula
Storck) Lemberger; as well
as Williams' surviving life
partner, Mike Myer; and one
grandchild, Kelly
A Mass of Christian Burial
will be scheduled by the
family at a later date. In lieu
of flowers, the family re-
quests donations be made to
Hospice of Citrus County of
the Nature Coast. Private
cremation arrangements
are under the direction of
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory, In-
verness, Florida.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.

OBITUARIES
The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy per-
mits both free and paid
obituaries.
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear in
the next day's edition.
Email obits@chronicle
online.com or fax 352-
563-3280.
Phone 352-563-5660
for details.


Charles
Ayers, 57
DUNNELLON
Charles Martin Ayers, 57,
of Dunnellon, died Satur-
day, Jan. 21, 2012.
Visitation will be from
noon to 2 p.m. Thursday,
Jan. 26, with a chapel serv-
ice following at Fero Fu-
neral Home. Interment with
military honors will take
place at Fero Memorial
Gardens.
Arrangements entrusted
to Fero Funeral Home.

SO YOU KNOW
Paid obituaries are
printed as submitted by
funeral homes.


To Place Your

"In Memory" ad,
Call Mike Snyder at 563-3273
msnyder@chronicleonline.com
or
Annemarie Miller at 564-2917
amiller@chronicleonline.com


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CRYSTAL RIVER
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J.C. Penney cuts prices


Associated Press


NEW YORK-J.C. Pen-
ney is permanently mark-
ing down all of its
merchandise by at least 40
percent so shoppers no
longer have to wait for
sales to get bargains.
Penney said Wednesday
that it is getting rid of the
hundreds of sales it offers
each year in favor of a
simpler approach to pric-
ing. Starting on Feb. 1, the
retailer is rolling out an
"Every Day" pricing strat-
egy with much fewer sales
throughout the year.
Here's how Penney's
pricing strategy will work:
Fewer sales. The re-
tailer will pick items to go
on sale each month for a
"Month-Long Value."
Items that don't sell well
would go on clearance
during the first and third
Friday of every month.

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SISTER ROSANNE JONES
Mass: Thurs.9:30am
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JOYCE HELEN FUDGE
Service: Fri. 1pm Chapel
JERRY L. ZEBENDON
Memorial Service: Fri. Noon
First United Methodist Church
POLLY NASH
Memorial Service: Sat. 3:00pm Chapel
EDWARD MAHAN
Private Cremation Arrangements
ELIZABETH LEMBERGER
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Doug(as Patton
who passed away
January 26D 2011

God looked around His garden
And found an empty place.
He then looked down upon the earth
And saw a tired face.
He put his arms around you
And lifted you to rest.
God's Garden must be beautiful
He always takes the best.
He knew that you were suffering,
He knew you were in pain.
He knew that you would never
Get well on earth again.
He saw the road was getting rough
And the hills were hard to climb,
So He closed your weary eyelids
And whispered "Peace be thine."
It broke our hearts to lose you
But you didn't go alone,
For part of us went with you
The day God called you home.
9Always in our ieartsD
Your Tamicn
O00ADTE


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Chicken Pilau Dinner
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A6 THURSDAY, JANUARY 26, 2012





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Feasibility study pitches to stay public


CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff Writer
The Citrus County Port Author-
ity Board learned Tuesday it could
conduct private sessions with the
firms that want to carry out its fea-
sibility study, but chose to stay
open to the public.
Richard Wesch, port authority
attorney, explained a
recent amendment to the state law
that makes an exemption to the
public records law and the gov-
ernment in the sunshine law.
'Any portion of a meeting at
which a negotiation with a vendor
is conducted pursuant to a com-
petitive solicitation, at which a
vendor makes an oral presenta-
tion as part of a competitive solic-
itation, or at which a vendor
answers questions as part of a
competitive solicitation is exempt
from section 286.011 and section
24(b) Article 1 of the State Consti-


tution," Wesch
read from the new
law. "Both of those
last references
are to what is
commonly called
government in the
sunshine law"
Richard Presentation by
Wesch applicants for un-
port authority dertaking the fea-
attomey. sibility study
could take place
out of the sunshine, Wesch said.
Anyone who is not a member of
the port authority or its staff and
members of the public would be
excluded.
The reason for this exemption
was to allow vendors confidential-
ity. Wesch said the board could in-
voke or waive the exemption. He
said he brought the matter to the
board's attention to give him di-
rection for advising the vendors


and the public.
Board member
Winn Webb asked
W H when the exemp-
tion came into ef-
fect. Wesch
replied July of last
year.
Joe Meek "We've been op-
port authority rating without it
board member. in the past and
everything's
worked fine," Webb said. "We don't
need to change it."
Board member Rebecca Bays
said she supported operating in the
sunshine.
"We have nothing to hide here,"
Bays said.
Board member Joe Meek said he
favored waiving the exemption.
"Let the public see what is going
on," Meek said.
Board member John "JJ" Ken-
ney asked if members of the pub-


lic would be able to address the
presenters. Wesch said they could
address only the board. Kenney
said he supported open sessions.
Board chairman Dennis Dam-
ato also supported open sessions,
and asked that the respondents be
notified of the board's decision.
Nine firms responded to the re-
quest for qualification (RFQ) to
conduct a feasibility study to de-
termine the options for establish-
ing a port in an area connected to
the former Cross Florida Barge
Canal in the northern part of the
county.
Those applications will be
pared down to three or four to be
asked to present their representa-
tives for interviews before the
board for a final selection.
One firm missed the dead-
line for the RFQ because a de-
livery service mishandled its
application and delayed it. A


representative asked to be con-
sidered anyway because the firm
was not a fault. Wesch, however,
read from the RFQ criteria ad-
vising applicants that they would
not be considered if the deadline
were missed, without exception.
The board agreed to not allow
acceptance of the delayed
application.
The board received a pres-
entation by Lindsay Ubinas
about the port authority's web-
site progress. Several logos for
the port were discussed. Ubinas
will take suggestions and report
back. It was agreed to post final-
ists for the logo selection on the
website at a future date to let
county residents vote for
favorites.
Chronicle reporter Chris Van
Ormer can be reached at
cvanormer@chronicleonline or
352-564-2916.


EDC
Continued from Page Al

would be able to designate
who they would desire to sit
on the board, instead of the
bylaws designating as it had
been that it would be the
city manager," Meek said.
Houston is the Crystal
River city manager
According to Meek, Mc-
Clellan said the executive
board should have been lis-
tened to. Meek explained
that Dr. Philip Geist, with
the Small Business Devel-
opment Council that is affil-
iated with the EDC, made
the case for uniformity in
board appointments for fed-
eral grant requirements.
Geist's information changed
the vote.
On Monday night, with its
new authority, the Crystal
River City Council ap-
pointed Houston to remain
its representative.
Meek said another indi-
vidual would represent
agriculture on the EDC in
McClellan's place.
Damato raised three
points.
"When the EDC was re-
structured, I suggested,
along with other commis-
sioners, the matrix of the
model on how this would be


put together, and I can tell
you it was absolutely delib-
erate that we use two city
managers," Damato said.
"And the reason was to
avoid the situation that's
coming up right now."
Damato's second point
was that the BOCC pays the
lion's share.
"The board funds the
EDC to the tune of $110,000
a year," Damato said. "We
have control of the business
tax, not the cities."
Then Damato raised a
legal question.
"Can you change the by-
laws without coming back to
the board of county commis-
sioners to do that change?"
Damato asked.
Commissioner Rebecca
Bays pointed out that the
two cities collect business
taxes and wanted to know if
they contributed those taxes
to the EDC.
John Siefert, executive di-
rector of the EDC, re-
sponded: "The cities pay
membership dues based on
the number of employees.
They do not contribute
those business license taxes
to the EDC."
Siefert said each city paid
$750.
"There's your equity dif-
ference," Damato said.
Bays commented about
the composition of the


EDC's board.
Most other counties' EDC
boards, Bays said, "are
made up of business owners
or job creators. When I take
a look at our particular
board, it's about a 50-50 mix.
A lot of them are I call
them paycheck collectors as
opposed to paycheck cre-
ators."
Siefert said the current
composition followed the
direction of the BOCC. He
also said the EDC made
changes to the bylaws in
such areas as term limits.
"That's operation proce-
dures of the entity you're
governing," Damato replied.
"But the structure, I believe,
still rests with the board of
county commissioners."
Rusty Skinner, chief
executive officer of CLM
Workforce Connection,
spoke in support of the



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BOCC sending a letter to
the governor to recom-
mend only limited changes
to the workforce board's
oversight and maintain
local control of board
appointments.
Skinner explained that
"leadership failed" at other
workforce boards and the
governor's reaction was to
take more control of all 24
boards in the state.
"That really changes the
dynamics of local control


and management of the sys-
tem and the focus on local
needs," Skinner said.
This change in policy was
a reaction to a newspaper
series last year about Work-
force Central Florida and
other regional agencies that
did business with board
members' companies.
Skinner said Marion
County already sent a letter
in support of maintaining
local appointments to Work-
force Connection, and he


expected Levy County to do
so soon.
The BOCC voted unani-
mously to send the letter.
Coming in Friday's
Chronicle: The new man-
ager of Chassahowitzka
Campground gives details to
BOCC of proposed improve-
ments to make more happy
campers.
Chronicle reporter Chris
Van Ormer can be reached
at cvanormer@chronicle
online.comrn or 352-564-2916


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THURSDAY, JANUARY 26, 2012 A7







A8 THURSDAY, JANUARY 26, 2012


STOCKS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


THE M RKETIN RE IEWU


I HowTKs *I '1D HE T I i W


MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) Here are the 825 most active stocks on the New York Stock Exchange, 765
Name Vol(00) Last Chg Name Vol(00) Last Chg Name Vol(00) Last Chg most active on the Nasdaq National Market and 116 most active onthe Ameri-
BkofAm 2401872 7.35 +.06 NovaGldg 157677 9.84 +.28 SiriusXM 710158 2.08 +.01 can Stock Exchange. Tables show name, price and net change.
S&P500ETF1717743132.56 +1.10 CheniereEn 65063 11.97 +.67 PwShsQQQ583817 60.43 +.75 Name: Stocks appear alphabetically by the company full name (not abbrevia-
SPDRFncl 829934 14.20 +.03 Minefndg 61544 13.86 +.17 Microsoft 572372 29.56 +.22 tion). Names consisting of initials appear at the beginning of each letter's list.
iShEMkts 642573 42.31 +.48 GrtBasGg 46555 1.16 +.13 Intel 532003 26.90 +.01 Last: Pricestockwastrading atwhen exchangeclosed fortheday.
Coming 591248 13.05 -1.57 GoldStrg 37853 1.97 +.25 RschMotn 458654 16.30 +1.29 Chg: Loss or gain forth day No change indicated by.

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) Stock Footnotes: ld- Issue has been called for redempton by company, d New 52-week
low. dd -Loss in last 12 mos. ec- Company formerly listed on the Amenrican Exchange's
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Emerging Company Marketplace. h-temporary exmpt from Nasdaq capital and surplus list-
DirDGIdBII 23.38 +3.64 +18.4 IntTowerg 5.18 +.53 +11.4 Illumina 55.15 +17.47 +46.3 ngqualification. n-Stockwasa new issue in the lastyear.The 52-week high andlowfig-
USAirwy 7.52 +1.11 +17.3 AvalnRare 3.20 +.31 +10.7 IndiCmtyB 20.85 +6.34 +43.7 ures date only fromthe beginning of trading. pf-Preferredstockissue.pr-Preferences.pp-
Textron 24.76 +3.15 +14.6 AlldNevG 35.26 +3.13 +9.7 EntreMd h 2.33 +.57 +32.4 Holder owes installments of purchaseprice. rt-Right to buy securityata specifiedprice. s-
NBGrce rs 2.77 +.34 +14.0 VistaGold 3.80 +.33 +9.5 GeneticTh 4.30 +1.00 +30.3 Stock has split by at least 20 percent within the lastyear. wi -Trades will be settled when the
ProSUtNG 16.94 +2.07 +13.9 NwGoldg 11.10 +.95 +9.4 TranS1 2.83 +.57 +25.2 stock is issued.wd -When distrbuted.wt -Warrant, allowing a purchase of astock.u -New
52-week high. un Unit, including more than one security. vj Company in bankruptcy or re-
LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) ceivership, or being reorganized under the bankruptcy law. Appears in front of the name.
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.
DirDGIdBr 32.71 -7.87 -19.4 Arrhythm 3.27 -.20 -5.7 BroadVisn 24.21 -9.78 -28.8
BrownFA 65.65 -14.55 -18.1 Aerosonic 2.88 -.15 -5.0 Rdiff.cm 7.40 -1.40 -15.9 iT_ _'_
Fusion-io n 25.50 -4.84 -16.0 NewConcEn 2.26 -.11 -4.6 EricsnTel 8.65 -1.58 -15.4


PiperJaf 21.21 -3.57 -14.4 NHItcrpfA 14.10 -.50 -3.4 BioLnRxn 4.78 -.77 -13.9
ProUShtNG77.13 -11.92 -13.4 OrchidsPP 18.16 -.64 -3.4 RubiconTc 10.59 -1.48 -12.3


DIARY


2,324 Advanced
722 Declined
98 Unchanged
3,144 Total issues
145 New Highs
9 New Lows
4,350,568,521 Volume


DIARY


322 Advanced
129 Declined
42 Unchanged
493 Total issues
34 New Highs
3 New Lows
123,996,031 Volume


1,671
840
129
2,640
95
11
1,906,463,671


52-Week
High Low Name
12,876.00 10,404.49Dow Jones Industrials
5,627.85 3,950.66Dow Jones Transportation
467.64 381.99Dow Jones Utilities
8,718.25 6,414.89NYSE Composite
2,490.51 1,941.99Amex Index
2,887.75 2,298.89Nasdaq Composite
1,370.58 1,074.77S&P 500
14,562.01 11,208.42Wilshire 5000
868.57 601.71 Russell 2000


Net % YTD % 52-wk
Last Chg Chg Chg %Chg
12,756.96 +81.21 +.64 +4.41 +6.44
5,282.00 +76.46 +1.47 +5.23 +3.43
453.49 +7.22 +1.62 -2.41 +9.70
7,914.81 +74.16 +.95 +5.86 -3.40
2,347.10 +33.66 +1.46 +3.02 +7.92
2,818.31 +31.67 +1.14 +8.18 +2.88
1,326.06 +11.41 +.87 +5.44 +2.27
13,968.07 +124.95 +.90 +5.90 +1.68
795.58 +7.31 +.93 +7.38 +.23


I NYSE


Request stocks or mutual funds to be listed here by writing

the Chronicle, Attn: Stock Requests, 1624 N. Meadowcrest

Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429; or call 563-5660. Include

the name of the stock, market and ticker symbol. For mu-

tual funds, list parent company, symbol and the exact name

of the fund. Staff will not provide real-time quotes.


I NEWYORK STOKECAG


Name Last Chg BariPVix 26.65 -1.17
BarrickG 48.41 +2.93
BasicEnSv 17.87 +.65
Baxter 54.37 +.76
ABBLtd 21.08 +.19 Beam Inc 52.87 +.14
ACELtd 71.67 +.58 BeazerHm 3.26 +.17
AESCorp 13.11 +.37 BectDck 79.25 +.96
AFLAC 49.16 +.09 Bemis 31.79 +1.80
AGLRes 41.97 +.52 BerkHaAl119950.00+2376.00
AK Steel 10.04 +.75 BerkH B 79.85 +1.37
ASAGold 28.14 +.78 BestBuy 25.71 +.35
AT&TInc 30.21 +.12 BBarrett 28.48 +.08
AUOptron 5.28 +.14 BioMedR 18.29 +.04
AbtLab 55.23 -.75 BIkHillsCp 34.54 +.63
AberFitc 46.84 +1.17 BlkDebtStr 4.06 +.04
Accenture 57.19 +.56 BlkEnhC&l 13.51 +.13
AdamsEx 10.45 +.12 BlkGlbOp 14.62 +.06
AMD 6.73 +.20 Blackstone 15.76 -.33
Aeropostf 16.86 -.11 BlockHR 16.91 +.04
Aetna 42.63 -.14 Boeing 75.82 +.46
Agilent 44.05 +1.45 Boise Inc 7.59 +.04
Agnicog 37.58 +3.11 BostBeer 100.01 +.30
AlcatelLuc 1.81 -.13 BostProp 103.75 +1.80
Alcoa 10.48 +.21 BostonSci 6.13 +.16
AllegTch 50.03 -.77 BoydGm 9.08 -.07
Allete 41.67 +.67 Brandyw 10.43 +.10
AlliBGIbHi 14.87 +.22 Brinker 26.17 +.51
AlliBInco 8.22 +.02 BrMySq 32.70 +.45
AlliBern 14.81 -.34 Brunswick 21.61 +.02
Allstate 29.18 -.18 Buckeye 62.53 +.23
AlphaNRs 20.92 +.79 C&JEgyn 17.98 -.29
AIpAlerMLP 16.91 +.07 CBLAsc 17.05 +.25
Altria 28.67 +.39 CBREGrp 18.15 +.27
AmBev 37.10 +.08 CBSB 28.76 +.12
Ameren 31.92 +.66 CF Inds 181.06 +8.70
AMovilLs 23.58 +.50 CH Engy 56.60 +.44
AmAxle 12.24 +.03 CITGrp 38.05 +.75
AEagleOut 14.04 +.16 CMSEng 22.17 +.56
AEP 41.38 +.71 CSS Inds 21.40 +.19
AmExp 50.17 +.94 CSXs 22.66 +.81
AmlntGrp 25.31 -.01 CVSCare 42.18 -.26
AmSIP3 6.56 +.01 CblvsNYs 14.73 +.57
AmTower 62.97 +.50 CabotO&G 66.62 +2.58
Amerigas 43.99 +.34 CallGolf 6.42 +.22
Ameriprise 54.28 +.05 Calpine 14.80 +.05
AmeriBrgn 39.72 +.17 Camecog 23.80 +.48
Amphenol 54.70 -.05 Cameron 54.20 +1.13
Anadarko 81.08 +2.09 CampSp 31.72 +.11
AnalogDev 39.78 -.07 CdnNRyg 76.36 +1.33
AnglogldA 44.47 +1.16 CdnNRsgs 40.13 +.57
Annaly 16.71 +.27 CapOne 45.61 +.57
Anworth 6.34 -.06 CapifiSrce 7.04 +.04
Aon Corp 47.50 +.47 Caplease 4.30 +01
Apadche 99.83 +2.12 CapMplB 14.58 +.02
AquaAmn 21.80 +.13 CardnlHIth 42.08 +.23
ArcelorMit 21.37 -.03 CareFusion 24.02 +.25
ArchCol 14.55 +.79 CarMax 32.35 -.22
ArchDan 30.08 +.26 Carnival 31.15 -.63
ArmourRsd 7.08 ... Caterpillar 109.05 +2.76
Ashland 63.98 +.70 Celanese 49.04 +1.04
AsdEstat 16.14 +.35 Cemex 6.59 +.20
AssuredG 15.66 +10 Cemigpf 19.74 +.24
AstoriaF 9.00 -.25 CenterPnt 18.72 +.14
ATMOS 32.60 +.38 Cntyink 37.53 +.59
AuRicog 9.41 +70 Checkpnt 11.06 +.06
Avon 18.41 +.10 ChesEng 23.38 +.89
BB&TCp 27.70 -.05 ChesUfi 42.33 -.26
BHPBilILt 80.14 +2.02 Chevron 107.73 +1.01
BP PLC 44.90 +.20 Chioms 11.49 -.10
BRT 6.62 +.17 Chimera 3.00 +.07
BakrHu 48.16 +.72 ChinaUni 19.21 +.38
BailCp s 37.70 -.05 Chubb 70.42 +.36
BooBrades 18.96 +.39 Cigna 45.77 +.38
BomSantSA 7.97 +.08 CindBell 3.53 +.02
BomSBrasil 9.44 +.14 Cifgrprs 29.96 +.06
BkofAm 7.35 +.06 CleanH s 65.26 -.05
BkMontg 60.49 +.34 CliffsNRs 76.55 +2.65
BkNYMel 20.57 -.67 Clorox 68.64 +.01
Barclay 13.81 +.17 CloudPeak 19.16


Name Last Chg


ARCA bio 1.03 +.03
ASML HId 43.25 -.25
ATP O&G 7.83 +.21
AVI Bio h .92 +.04
AXT Inc 5.13 -.04
Abraxas 3.73 +.19
AcadaTc 40.19 -.27
AcadiaPh 1.56 +.12
Accuray 5.32 +.05
Achillion 10.50 -.25
AcmePkt 30.51 -.84
AeordaTh 25.69 +.17
AcfvePw h .90 -.00
AcfvsBliz 11.95 -.33
Actuate 6.25 -.04
Acxiom 13.78 -.02
AdobeSy 31.34 +.39
Adtan 35.46 +.20
AdvEnld 11.04 +.09
AEternag 1.58 +.02
Affymax 7.17 +.24
Afymetrix 4.85 +.10
AkamaiT 31.87 +.48
Akorn 11.05 -.18
AlaskCom 2.86 -.02
Alexion s 74.94 +.96
AlignTech 24.80 -.11
Alkermes 19.05 +1.10
AllosThera 1.62 +.04
AllotComm 16.55 +.95
AllscriptH 18.67 +.14
AlteraCp If 40.57 +.45
AlterraCap 24.10 -.13
Amarin 8.21 +.12
Amazon 187.80 +.80
Amedisys 9.56 -.09
ACapAgy 29.33 +.14
AmCapLtd 8.33 +.26
ACapMtgn 19.06 +.21
AmSupr 5.19 +.09
Amgen 69.21 +1.02
AmkorTIf 5.61 -.05
Amylin 11.52 +.09
Anadigc 2.85 +.09
Anlogic 57.94 +.47
Analystlnt 6.35 +.20
Ancestry 30.25 +.69
A123Sys 2.18 -.04
ApolloGrp 55.97 +.38
Apollolnv 7.76 +.24
Apple Inc 446.66 +26.25
ApldMatf 12.36 +.06
AMCC 8.32 +.10
Approach 34.42 +.10
ArchCaps 37.02 +.19
ArenaPhm 1.60 +.01
AresCap 15.80 -.02
AriadP 14.82 +.32
Ariba Inc 28.90 +.34
ArkBest 21.89 +.20
ArmHId 27.87 +.67
ArrayBio 2.36 +.05
Arris 11.51 -.01
ArubaNet 23.08 -.06
AscenaRi 35.56 +.01
AsialnfoL 11.63 -.26
AspenTech 17.87 +.28
AssodBanc 13.14 +.11
AstexPhm 2.39 +.17
athenahlth 57.30 +.80
Atmel 9.90 +.10
Autodesk 36.23 +.42
AutoData 56.92 +.19
Auxilium 19.37 +.10
AvagoTch 33.95 +.08
AvanirPhm 2.86 +.07
AVEO Ph 13.64 -.35
AvisBudg 14.40 +.33
Aware 3.20 +.09
Axcelis 1.88 +.13
BBCN Bcp 10.49 -.04
BEAero 42.45 +.88
BGC Pts 6.36 -.08
BJsRest 47.51 +1.82


Coach 69.30 +1.33
CobaltlEn 20.61 +.57
CCFemsa 98.53 +1.72
CocaCola 68.43 +.53
CocaCE 27.33 +.74
Coeur 28.29 +1.72
CohStlnfra 16.68 +.03
Colfax 31.37 -.56
ColgPal 89.44 +1.19
CollctvBrd 16.37 +.48
Comerica 29.19 -.41
CmclMfis 13.82 +.65
CmwREIT 19.69 +.37
CmtyHIt 19.23 +.85
CompPrdS 32.75 +.22
ComstkRs 13.52 +.64
Con-Way 31.58 +.48
ConAgra 27.17 +.16
ConchoRes 107.63 +5.61
ConocPhil 69.98 -.63
ConsolEngy 35.87 +1.18
ConEd 59.37 +.99
ConstellA 21.15 +.21
ConstellEn 36.62 +.71
ContlRes 82.47 +8.24
Cnvrgys 13.46 +.11
Corning 13.05 -1.57
CottCp 6.78 +.26
CoventyH 30.36 +.06
Covidien 49.72 +.83
Crane 48.21 +.80
CSVS2xVxS 17.72 -1.58
CSVellVSts 8.60 +.37
CredSuiss 26.61 +.19
CrwnCsfie 46.70 +.76
Cummins 108.96 +2.16
CurEuro 130.60 +.87

DCT Indl 5.71 +.05
DDRCorp 14.33 +.35
DHT HIdgs .80 -.01
DNPSelct 11.29 +.06
DR Horton 14.49 +.24
DSW Inc 49.74 +.66
DTE 54.06 +1.10
DanaHIdg 15.00 -.18
Danaher 53.03 +.23
Darden 46.74 +.66
Deere 87.76 +1.34
DeltaAir 9.96 +.58
DenburyR 19.10 +.79
DeutschBk 43.63 +.88
DBGoldDS 4.43 -.31
DevonE 66.17 +2.00
DiaOffs 62.34 +1.03
DiamRk 10.75 +.08
DicksSptg 42.21 +.47
DxFnBull rs 81.54 +.84
DrSCBrrs 21.17 -.59
DirFnBrrs 29.17 -.33
DirLCBrrs 24.76 -.69
DirDGIdBII 23.38 +3.64
DrxEnBear 9.78 -.35
DirEMBear 13.90 -.50
DirxSCBull 55.27 +1.33
DirxEnBull 53.28 +1.72
Discover 27.45 -.38
Disney 39.56 +.31
DollarGen 42.70 +.88
DomRescs 51.11 +.80
DEmmett 20.68 +.30
Dover 60.86 +.39
DowChm 33.74 +.36
DrPepSnap 38.76 +.96
DuPont 50.59 +1.18
DukeEngy 21.36 +.22
DukeRlty 13.53 +.34
E-CDang 7.06 +.18


BMC Sft 35.25 +.58 ColumLabs .87 -.03
Baidu 125.03 +3.28 Comcast 26.12 +.26
BkOzarkss 29.36 -.13 Comcspd 25.15 -.05
BeasleyB 3.05 +.01 CmcBMO 40.58 +.44
BebeStrs 8.56 +.04 CommSys 15.28 +.02
BedBath 62.93 +.08 CommVIt 49.54 +.81
BioRelLab 19.14 +.55 CmplGnom 2.99 +.49
BioLnRxn 4.78 -.77 Compuwre 8.08 +.15
Biodel h .60 -.00 Comverse 6.25 -.08
BioFuelEh .65 -.00 ConcurTch 53.64 +.68
Biogenldc 118.35 +1.32 Conmed 29.06 +.33
BioLase 2.76 +.13 Convio 15.92
BioMarin 35.49 +.46 Copart 48.68 +.37
Bionovorsh .19 +.00 Corcept 3.49 +.01
BioSante .68 +.03 CorinthC 3.13 +.20
BlkRKelso 9.31 -.04 Cosi Inc .70 +.02
BlueCoat 25.75 +.01 CostPlus 13.31 -.05
BlueNile 40.00 +2.10 Costeo 82.72 +.99
BobEvans 35.17 +.23 Creelnc 26.51 +.12
BonTon 3.62 -.14 Crocs 19.39 +.23
BostPrv 8.55 +.28 CrosstexE 12.72 -.30
BttmlnT 27.46 -.25 Ctrip.eom 27.57 -.01
BreitBurn 19.84 +.28 CubistPh 39.79 +.69
Brightpnt 11.94 +.02 Curis 5.00 +.14
Broadcom 35.79 +.57 CypSemi 19.15 +.34
BroadSoft 30.37 -.52 CytRxh .27 -.01
BroadVisn 24.21 -9.78 C(o ri 3.25 +.04
Broadwdh .67 +.01
BrcdeCm 5.72 +.02
BrklneB 9.11 -.10 DFCGbIs 18.66 +.79
BrooksAuto 10.90 -.02 DeckrlsOut 82.90 +1.77
BrukerCp 14.14 +.35 Delcath 3.94 +.08
BuffabWW 66.26 +1.97 Dell Inc 16.79 -.06
CAInc 25.03 +2.21 DemandTc 13.18
CBOE 25.53 -.11 Dndreon 14.72 +.75
CEVAInc 28.63 +.13 Dentsply 38.89 +.82
CH Robins 68.11 +.48 Depomed 6.00
CMEGrp 242.11 +1.59 DexCom 10.93 +.19
CVBFnd 10.92 +.04 DiamndFlf 36.90 +1.11
CadencePh 4.27 +.21 DigRiver 15.98 +.35
Cadence 10.69 -.04 DirecTVA 44.44 +.67
CalumetSp 22.74 +.27 DiscCmA 44.48 +.78
CdnSolar 3.18 +.05 DiscCmC 40.03 +.16
CapCtyBk 9.75 +.05 DishNetwk 28.72 -.13
CapFedFn 11.66 +.10 DollarTree 85.34 -.64
CpstnTrb h 1.28 +.04 DonlleyRR 11.82 -.38
Cardtronic 27.12 -.54 DrmWksA 19.66 +.55
CareerEd 10.79 +.26 DryShips 2.22 +.03
CaribouC 16.94 +.51 Dunkinn 27.63 +.88
Carrizo 26.12 +1.24 Dynavax 3.51 +.07
CarverBrs 9.29 ... E-Trade 9.36 -.19
CathayGen 15.90 -.04 eBay 31.94 -.01
Cavium 33.90 -.31 EPIQSys 12.00 -.11
Celgene 73.79 -.23 EVEngy 65.04 +.92
CellTherrsh 1.35 -.05 EagleBulk 1.33 +.01
CelldexTh 3.99 -.02 EaglRkEn 11.38 -.02
Celsion 1.79 +.05 ErthLink 7.05 +.03
CentEuro 3.93 +.11 EstWstBcp 22.35 +.04
CEurMed 6.89 +.01 Ebixlnc 24.12 +.03
CentAI 10.92 +.54 EducDev 5.00 +.08
Cepheid 34.39 +1.61 8x8 Inc 4.39 +.10
Cerners 60.62 +.25 ElectSd 16.51 +.39
ChrmSh 5.01 +.14 ElectArts 18.04 +.10
Chartlnds 56.07 +.39 EFII 16.40 +.67
CharterCm 57.71 +1.07 EndoPhrm 37.36 +.37
ChkPoint 56.56 +.04 Endocyten 3.53 +.07
Cheesecake 29.68 +.48 Endobgix 12.85 +.56
ChelseaTh 4.54 +.01 EngyCnvh .99 +.01
ChildPlace 51.09 +.10 EngyXXI 33.92 +.63
ChinaCEd 6.23 -.10 Entegris 9.74 +.02
ChinGerui 4.03 +.14 EntreMdh 2.33 +.57
Chinalnfh .68 +.01 EntropCom 5.89 +.10
ChinaMed 3.60 -.01 Equinix 117.88 +1.90
ChrchllD 55.02 +.88 EricsnTel 8.65 -1.58
CienaCorp 15.06 -.09 ExactScih 9.23 +.22
CinnFin 32.73 +.30 Exelids 4.98 +.07
Cintas 37.45 -.05 EddeTc 3.22 +.02
Cirrus 22.01 +.14 Expedias 31.22 -.18
Cisco 19.83 +.01 Expdlni 44.24 +.38
CitrixSys 67.61 -.23 ExpScripts 52.48 +.76
CleanEngy 15.11 +.18 ExtrmNet 3.14 +.14
Clearwire 1.82 +.01 Ezcorp 26.75 -.25
CoStar 59.99 -.14 F5Netwks 122.48 -.62
CogentC 14.81 -.34 FLIRSys 26.49 -.08
CognizTech 71.77 +.59 FSI Inf 4.38 +.02
CogoGrp 2.16 -.02 Fastenals 46.74 -.12
Coinstar 47.53 +.15 FiberTwrlf .36 -.02
ColdwtrCrk .92 ... FifthStFin 10.03 +.01


EMCCp 25.69 +.55
EOG Res 106.81 +2.26
EQT Corp 50.96 +1.26
EastChm s 46.94 +.69
Eabons 49.54 +.73
EVEnEq 10.71 +.14
Ecolab 60.94 -.05
Edisonlnt 40.91 +.79
BPasoCp 27.00 +.25
Ban 13.88 +.64
BdorGldg 14.06 +.74
EmersonEl 52.10 +1.46


ForestLab 31.80 -.31
ForestOil s 14.68 +.61
FMCGs 46.08 +2.11
FurnBrds 1.74 +.23
Fusion-ion 25.50 -4.84

GATX 43.93 +.70
GabelliET 5.32 +.06
GabHIthW 7.50 +.03
GabUlI 8.07 +.09
GafisaSA 5.06 +.30


FifthThird 13.49 +.06 IndiCmtyB 20.85 +6.34
Fndlnst 17.24 +.09 Infinera 7.40 +.01
Finisar 20.83 -.01 Informat 39.19 -.29
FinLine 21.35 +.43 Infosys 54.22 +.63
FstCashFn 39.66 +2.07 Inhibitex 24.70 +.11
FMidBc 10.95 -.21 Innophos 49.21 +1.16
FstNiagara 9.43 -.16 Insulet 19.68 +.19
FstSolar 38.61 +.53 IntegLfSci 27.76 +1.80
FTNDXEq 25.18 +.24 IntgDv 6.48 -.02
FstMerit 16.08 +.12 Intel 26.90 +.01
Fiserv 63.40 +.48 InteractBrk 15.45 -.48
Flextrn 6.76 -.04 InterDig 36.07 +.18
Fluidigmn 14.86 +1.03 Intrface 12.97 +.23
FocusMda 20.93 +.70 InterMune 14.68 +.77
ForcePro 5.55 ... InterNAP 6.59 +.03
FormFac 5.35 +.14 InfiSpdw 26.75 +.46
Forfnets 22.96 +.64 Intersil 11.67 +.05
Fossil Inc 95.07 +2.99 Intuit 57.52 +.19
FosterWhl 23.55 +.49 IntSurg 455.66 +15.66
Francescn 24.39 +1.48 IronwdPh 14.20 +.42
FredsInc 15.10 +.25 Isis 8.13 +.28
FreshMkt 45.88 +.48 Itron 39.34 +.49
FronterCm 4.75 -.01 IvanhoeEn 1.08 +.01
FudeSysSol 19.66 +.62
FuelCell .99 +.02
FultonFncl 9.58 +.22 j2Global 27.68 -.08
JASolar 1.62 -.06
JDASoft 29.63 +.35
GTAdvTc 8.48 +.03 JDS Uniph 13.57 +.00
Garmin 41.87 +.33 JackHenry 34.50 +.30
GenProbe 66.52 +3.15 JamesRiv 6.88 +.34
GenComm 10.39 -.03 JazzPhrm 45.96 -.04
GenetfcTh 4.30 +1.00 JetBlue 5.56 +.06
Gentex 30.72 +.08 JosABank 49.08 +.80
Genfivah 7.47 +.09 K Swiss 3.31 +.10
GeronCp 1.74 +.03 KIT Digit 10.90 +.33
GileadSd 48.29 +.62 KLATnc 51.24 -.02
GladerBc 13.08 -.02 KeryxBio 3.03 -.04
Globalstrh .60 +.01 Ku6Media 1.94 +.02
GIbSpcMet 15.51 +.22 Kulicke 11.17 -.07
GluMobile 2.97 +.23 LKQ Corp 32.59 -.15
GolLNGLtd 42.12 +.51 LPL Inv 33.18 -.94
Google 569.49 -11.44 LSI IndIf 7.03 +.05
GreenMtC 51.05 +.45 LamResrch 43.55 +.20
GrifolsSA n 6.45 +.06 LamarAdv 30.91 +.47
Groupon n 20.08 -.52 Landstar 50.69 +.83
GrpoRn 8.02 +.09 Lattce 6.68
GulfportE 33.95 +.65 LeCroy 10.11 -1.38
HMN Fn 2.20 -.04 LeapWirlss 9.74 +.20
HMS Hd s 32.68 -.42 LedPhrm 1.47 +.10
HSN Inc 36.35 +.22 LibGlobA 45.71 +.84
Halozyme 10.46 +.21 LibGlobC 43.95 +.58
HancHId 34.67 +.55 LibCapA 83.00 -.51
HansenMed 3.08 +.20 LibtylntA 16.65 +.04
HanwhaSol 1.80 +.02 LifeTech 49.09 +1.78
Harmonic 5.90 +.09 LifePtH 40.52 +.97
Hasbro 35.01 +.74 LimelghtN 3.21 +.02
HawHold 6.58 +.33 Lincare 25.89 +.33
HIthCSvc 18.14 +.28 LincElecs 42.49 +.50
HercOffsh 4.56 +.08 LinearTch 33.50 +.18
HercTGC 9.63 +.01 LinnEngy 37.15 +.26
HimaxTch 1.31 +.07 Liquidity 34.44 -.57
Hittte 56.17 +.46 LodgeNet 3.75 +.18
Hologic 19.63 +.22 Logitech 8.18 +.02
HorsehdH 11.40 +.27 LookSmart 1.47 -.03
HubGroup 34.21 +.10 Lulkin 76.29 +1.04
HudsCity 7.24 +.14 lululemngs 63.37 +1.19
HudsonTc 2.28 +.11 Luminex 19.95 +.03
HumGen 9.92 +.79
HuntJB 48.63 +.11
HuntBnk 5.94 +.13 MCGCap 4.71 +.07
HutchT 1.53 -.08 MELA Sci 4.30 -.01
IAC Inter 42.16 -.44 MGE 45.12 +.78
IdexxLabs 86.97 +.41 MIPSTech 5.35 -.09
iGateCorp 17.74 +1.18 MTS 45.83 +.24
II-VIs 23.18 +.40 Magma 7.19 +.01
IPG Photon 52.21 -1.38 Majeseo 2.41 +.26
iRobot 33.00 +.54 MAKOSrg 37.13 +2.79
iShACWX 39.11 +.45 MannKd 3.09 +.22
iShACWI 44.75 +.41 MarinaBrs .84 -.02
iShsSOX 56.46 +.24 MartenT 21.24 +2.12
iShNsdqBio 115.73 +2.76 MarvellT 16.02 +.27
IdenixPh 14.75 -.14 Masimo 21.93 +1.03
Illumina 55.15 +17.47 Mattel 29.53 +.44
ImunoGn 12.74 -.29 MattrssFn 29.32 +2.71
ImpaxLabs 18.82 -.40 Mattson 2.32 +.11
ImperlSgr 3.40 +.17 Madmlntg 27.56 -.24
Incyte 18.56 +.27 MaxwIlT 20.22 +.33


Hanoverlns 36.48 +.09
HarleyD 44.79 +1.47
HarmonyG 12.02 +.59
Harsco 20.24 +.24
HartfdFn 18.20 -.40
HawaiiEl 25.86 +.36
HItCrREIT 56.64 +1.17
HItMgmt 6.69 +.09
HlthcrRlty 20.61 +.32
Heckmann 5.64 +.04
HeclaM 5.03 +.26
Heinz 52.32 +.41


iSSP500 133.01 +1.10
iShEMkts 42.31 +.48
iShiBxB 114.94 +.39
iShSPLatA 47.14 +.75
iShB20T 116.17 -.28
iShBl1-3T 84.57 +.05
iS Eafe 52.38 +.54
iShiBxHYB 90.91 +.79
iSR1KV 66.77 +.39
iSR1KG 61.60 +.77
iSR2KG 90.77 +.90
iShR2K 79.27 +.67


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EmpDist 20.59 +.47
Emulex 9.32 +.15
EnbrEPts 33.50 +.26
EnCanag 20.65 +1.98
EndvSilvg 10.78 +.72
EnPro 35.29 +.46
ENSCO 53.43 +1.74
Entergy 70.89 +1.43
EntPrPt 49.23 +.26
EqtyRsd 58.13 +1.53
EsteeLdrs 59.21 +1.13
ExeoRes 8.68 +.41
Exelon 40.01 +.79
ExxonMbl 87.22 +.04
FMC Tch s 53.92 +1.70
FNBCp PA 11.84 -.27
FairchldS 14.74 +.35
FedExCp 92.59 +1.80
FedSignl 4.25 -.01
Fedlnvst 18.54 -.11
Ferrellgs 17.57 +.16
Ferro 6.52 +.23
RdlNFin 18.15 +.30
FidNatlnfo 28.33 +.28
FstHorizon 9.12 +.11
FTActDiv 8.49 +.06
FtTrEnEq 11.57 +.06
FirstEngy 42.13 +.86
RagstBch .61 -.18
Ruor 56.73 +1.60
FootLockr 26.67 +.59
FordM 12.93 +.11
FordMwt 4.03 +.09


GameStop 25.00 +.25
Gannett 15.51 +.10
Gap 19.00 +.37
GenDynam 71.57 +.23
GenElec 19.13 +.29
GenGrPrp 15.81 +.18
GenMills 40.62 +.52
GenMotors 24.92 +.13
GenOn En 2.15 +.01
Genworth 8.06 -.18
Gerdau 9.76 +.23
GlaxoSKIn 45.01 +.44
GlimdichRt 9.55 +.35
GoldFLtd 16.34 +.77
Goldcrpg 47.45 +3.07
GoldmanS 108.27 -.60
Goodridich 124.53
GoodrPet 17.39 +1.67
Goodyear 13.58 -.11
GtPlainEn 20.96 +.36
Griffon 10.77 +.24
GpTelevisa 20.75 -.30
GuangRy 18.41 +.30
Guidewren 17.12
HCA HId n 27.00 +.94
HCP Inc 41.35 +.36
HSBC 42.02 -.21
HSBCCap 26.11 -.10
Hallibrtn 36.41 +.05
HanJS 14.95 +.10
HanPrmDv 13.88 +.06
Hanesbrds 24.68 -.21


HeimPayne 62.95 +1.42
Hertz 13.62 +.22
Hess 57.31 -3.01
HewlettP 28.32 -.20
HighwdPrp 33.13 +.60
HollyFrts 29.35 +.55
HomeDp 45.26 +.30
HonwIllnt 58.11 +.48
Hospira 35.56 +1.52
HospPT 24.39 +.02
HostHofis 16.62 +.16
HovnanE 2.64 +.26
Humana 89.55 -1.27
Huntsmn 12.09 +10
Hyperdyn 3.43 +.04
IAMGIdg 16.95 +1.52
ICICI Bk 35.61 +.05
ING 9.14 -.02
iShGold 16.70 +.46
iSAsfia 23.43 +.59
iShBraz 66.85 +1.29
iSCan 28.35 +.49
iShGer 21.33 +.27
iSh HK 17.05 +.08
iSKJapn 9.52 +.13
iSh Kor 58.06 +.53
iShMex 57.97 +1.02
iShSing 12.26 +.25
iSTaiwn 12.66 +.11
iShUK 16.82 +.12
iShSilver 32.37 +1.29
iShDJDv 54.54 +.50
iShChina25 39.41 +.45


iShUSPfd 37.88 +.11
iShREst 60.28 +.76
iShDJHm 13.73 +.29
iShSPSm 73.10 +.51
iStar 7.13 +.05
Idacorp 42.17 +.67
ITW 52.80 +.87
Imafon 6.13 +.02
IngerRd 35.70 +.57
IntegrysE 52.63 +1.24
IntcnfEx 117.54 -1.39
IBM 191.75 -.18
InfiGame 15.82 -.05
IntPap 31.32 -.84
Interpublic 10.49 +.05
Invesco 22.16 -.23
InvMtgCap 15.52 +.05
IronMtn 31.77 +.26
ItauUnibH 20.86 +.53


JPMorgCh 37.60 -.06
Jabil 23.06 -.11
Jaguar g 7.13 +.30
JanusCap 7.57 +.02
Jefferies 16.15 +.41
JohnJn 65.21 +.21
JohnsnCfi 31.92 +.17
JoyGIbl 93.03 +3.89
JnprNtwk 22.61 -.54
KB Home 9.78 +.54
KKR 13.97 +.29


MedAssets 10.60 +.02 Paccar 45.55 +.55
MedicAcIn 5.52 +.19 PacBbsd 4.59 +.64
MediCo 19.31 +.57 PacEthrs 1.19 -.03
Medivafon 54.72 +2.17 PacSunwr 1.97 +.09
MeleoCrwn 11.29 +.14 PanASIv 22.37 +.52
Mellanox 31.16 -.77 PaneraBrd 148.19 +.95
MentorGr 14.11 +.13 ParamTch 21.57 +.10
MrcCmp 13.40 -1.58 Parexel 21.06 +.04
MergeHIth 5.43 -.04 PrtnrCm 7.97 -.42
Metabolix 2.71 +.02 Patterson 32.10 +.13
Methanx 27.67 +.24 PattUTI 19.24
Micrel 12.24 -.01 Paychex 32.46 +.12
Microchp 36.79 -.52 PnnNGm 40.56 +.38
Micromet 8.28 +.09 PennantPk 10.45 -.04
MicronT 7.86 -.09 PensonWw 1.37 -.03
MicrosSys 52.16 +.47 PeopUtdF 12.74 -.03
MicroSemi 20.82 -.11 PeregrineP 1.02
Microsoft 29.56 +.22 Perrigo 98.77 +1.23
Micrvisn h .39 +.02 PetSmart 54.00 +.60
MidConEn 20.88 +.43 PetMed 12.22 -.40
Misonix 1.90 +.09 PetroDev 32.85 +1.38
MitekSys 8.97 +.04 Pharmacyc 18.60 +.44
Molex 26.52 -.91 PhotrIn 7.31 +.25
MolexA 22.21 -.67 PinnaclFn 17.17 +.17
Momenta 19.11 +.39 Plexus 36.87 -.34
MonPwSys 16.66 -.41 Polyeoms 20.73 -.12
MonroMuf 42.02 +1.63 Popular 1.67 +.06
MonstrBev 108.49 +2.15 Power-One 4.83 -.07
Motricity .81 +.00 PwShs QQQ 60.43 +.75
Mylan 21.21 +.37 PremExhib 2.24 +.02
MyriadG 22.83 +.38 Presstekh .65
NETgear 40.80 -.51 PriceTR 60.98 +.44
NIl HIdg 19.98 +1.05 priceline 528.35 +4.62
NPSPhm 7.21 +.15 PrinctnRh .11 -.00
NXPSemi 21.04 -.71 PrivateB 14.71 +.83
Nanosphere 1.69 +.11 PrUPShQQQ 15.42 -.60
NasdOMX 25.90 +.24 PrUltPQQQs85.88 +3.16
Natlnstrs 27.17 -.26 PrognicsPh 9.48
NatPenn 8.82 -.07 ProgrsSfts 21.81 +.31
NatusMed 11.24 +.06 ProspctCap 10.64 +.13
NektarTh 6.18 +.12 PureCycle 2.25
NetLogicM 49.75 +.01 QIAGEN 16.76 +1.07
NetApp 37.80 +.14 QlikTech 27.39 +.59
Netease 48.98 +.41 Qlogic 17.10 +.17
Netfiix 95.04 +2.37 Qualeom 58.99 +.31
Neflist 3.35 -.15 QualityS s 39.22 +.83
NetSpend 8.60 -.08 QuantFu rs .78 +.01
NetwkEng 1.38 +.06 QuestSft 20.01 +.70
Neurcrine 8.17 +.07 Questeor 36.01 -1.28
NewsCpA 18.78 -.29 RFMicD 4.92 +.07
NewsCpB 19.48 -.19 RTI Biolog 3.93 +.15
NobltyH If 5.88 +.53 RAM En h 3.41 -.20
NorTrst 42.26 -.53 Rambus 9.20 +.22
NwstBcsh 12.56 ... Randgold 110.82 +3.52
Novavax 1.39 +.02 RaptorPhm 6.35 -.14
Novlus 48.13 +.16 Rdiff.cm 7.40 -1.40
NuVasive 16.31 +2.61 Regenrn 82.90 +3.49
NuanceCm 27.95 -.04 RentACt 37.96 +.45
NutriSyst 12.85 +.29 Replgn 3.89 +.38
Nvidia 14.85 -.09 RschMotn 16.30 +1.29
NxStageMd 17.37 +.37 RexEnergy 10.94 +.25
OCZTech 8.40 +.24 RigelPh 8.54 +.39
OReillyAu 82.57 +.76 RightNow 43.00 +.19
OceanRign 15.65 +.70 RiverbedT 29.59 +1.09
Oclaro 4.51 +.04 RsttaG rsh .55 +.28
OdysMar 3.43 -.02 RosettaR 49.75 +1.43
OmniVisn 13.86 -.04 RossStrss 52.38 +.36
OnAssign 11.83 -.14 RoviCorp 29.49 -.35
OnSmcnd 9.00 -.08 RoyGId 71.79 +3.96
Oneothyr 6.45 +.13 RubieonTc 10.59 -1.48
OnyxPh 42.09 +.98 rue21 25.77 +.72
OpenTxt 51.44 +1.77 Ryanair 31.14 +.28
OpenTable 47.22 +.69
OpnwvSy 2.07 +.05
OpbmerPh 12.44 +.32 S1 Corp 9.85
Oracle 28.51 SBA Com 45.08 +.35
OraSure 11.15 +.21 SEI Inv 18.13 -.58
Orexigen 2.58 +.20 SLM Cp 14.62 +.05
Orthfx 39.99 +.32 SMFEngy 3.59 +.59
OtterTail 22.00 +.02 STEC 9.82 +.03
Overstk 6.95 +.17 SVB FnGp 54.97 +1.75
Ox rsh .06 .04 SXCHIth 63.45 +.81
0 SabaSoftw 9.99 +.15
SaeixPhm 46.00 -.25
PDL Bio 6.41 +.05 SanDisk 52.34 +1.15
PFChng 32.50 +.11 Sanmina 10.86 -.07
PMC Sra 6.54 -.03 Santarus 4.56 +.04
PSSWrld 24.47 -.12 Sapient 13.02 -.36


KTCorp 15.37 +.46 MidAApt 62.66 +.86 Prmian 20.64 +.12 RepubSvc 28.56 +.21
KCSouthn 67.38 +.54 Midas 8.12 -.01 PetrbrsA 29.35 +.27 Revlon 15.01 -.10
Kaydon 34.34 +.26 MobileTele 16.70 +.38 Petrobras 31.81 +.26 ReynAmer 40.32 +.60
KAEngTR 27.54 -.28 Molyomrp 31.14 +2.23 Pfizer 21.72 +.06 Riointo 59.21 +1.18
Kellogg 50.91 +.41 MoneyG rs 18.56 +.34 PhilipMor 76.81 +2.66 RiteAid 1.37
KeyEngy 15.10 +.19 Monsanto 81.32 +1.21 PhilipsEl 20.20 +.35 RockTen 61.25 -5.95
Keycorp 8.24 +.11 MonstrWw 8.98 +.17 PiedNG 32.96 +.22 RockwAut 79.42 -2.33
KimbClk 71.87 -.40 Moodys 38.26 +1.38 Pier 1 15.49 +.20 RockColl 59.65 +.39
Kimco 18.80 +.30 MorgStan 18.13 -.01 PimoStrat 11.76 +.11 Rowan 35.44 +.88
KindME 89.88 +1.58 MSEmMkt 14.12 +.15 PinWst 48.24 +.77 RylCarb 28.11 -.55
KindMorn 33.23 +.55 Mosaic 56.02 +1.05 PioNtrl 101.49 +3.26 RoyDShllA 71.91 -.22
Kinrossg 11.27 +.69 MotrlaSolu 44.94 -2.92 PitnyBw 19.40 +.03 Royce 13.38 +.17
KodiakOg 9.52 +.45 MotrlaMob 38.60 -.04 PlainsEx 38.18 +.94 RoycepfB 25.73 +.05
Kohls 47.75 -.18 MurphO 60.65 +.93 PlumCrk 40.03 +.30 Rand 19.10 +.38
Kraft 38.37 +.07 NCRCorp 17.99 +.17 Polariss 65.32 +2.63
KrispKrm 7.03 +.08 NRG Egy 17.33 +.83 PostPrp 44.05 +1.10
Kroger 24.65 +.31 NVEnergy 16.26 +.28 Potashs 45.23 +.80 SAIC 12.99 +.11
LSICorp 7.08 -.06 Nabors 17.84 +.47 PwshDB 28.01 +.23 SAPAG 58.48 +.42
LTCPrp 31.59 +.12 NatFuGas 51.94 +1.61 PSUSDBull 22.17 -.10 SCANA 45.05 +.61
LaZBoy 13.27 -.10 NatGrid 49.01 +.23 PSSPLwV 26.01 +.27 SKTIcm 14.08 +.53
Ladede 40.97 +.35 NOilVarco 77.20 +1.22 Praxair 106.07 -3.03 SpdrDJIA 127.25 +.82
LVSands 49.74 +1.82 NatRetPrp 27.19 +.17 PrecDrill 10.18 +.35 SpdrGold 166.42 +4.41
LeeEnth 1.47 -.03 Navistar 4412 +1.14 PrinFnd 27.29 -.08 SPMid 171.53 +1.75
LeggMason 27.63 +.28 NewAmHi 10.30 +.08 ProLogis 32.37 +.19 S&P500ETF132.56 +1.10
LennarA 22.80 +.47 NJRscs 48.18 +.19 ProShtS&P 38.25 -.33 SpdrHome 19.30 +.40
Level3rs 19.81 +.93 NYCmtyB 12.87 -.22 PrUShS&P 17.29 -.30 SpdrS&PBk 21.71 +.12
LbtyASG 4.06 +.04 NewellRub 17.33 +.26 PrUlShDow 13.97 -.19 SpdrLehHY 39.49 +.34
LillyEli 39.89 +.28 NewfidExp 41.28 +1.39 ProUltQQQ 95.21 +2.30 SpdrS&P RB 26.48 +.13
Limited 41.99 +.17 NewmtM 60.25 +2.77 PrUShQQQrs38.35 -1.02 SpdrRef 55.85 +.49
LincNat 21.94 -.92 NewpkRes 9.71 +.29 ProUltSP 51.61 +.84 SpdrOGEx 56.75 +1.53
Lindsay 62.98 +2.73 Nexeng 18.34 +.44 ProUShL20 19.58 +.07 SpdrMetM 55.64 +1.91
LionsGtg 10.83 +1.08 NextEraEn 60.05 +.86 ProUSSP50011.14 -.28 Safeway 22.88 +.18
LloydBkg 1.95 ... NiSource 23.12 +.28 PrUltSP500s 70.53 +1.69 StJoe 17.21 +.25
LockhdM 81.73 -.51 NikeB 103.21 +1.00 ProUSSlvrs 10.52 -.98 StJude 40.30 +1.74
Loews 38.18 -.26 NobleCorp 34.79 +.24 PrUltCrders 41.39 +.51 Saks 9.88 -.05
LaPac 9.33 -.07 NokiaCp 5.27 PrUShCrde rs37.72 -.49 Salesforce 118.14 +.61
Lowes 26.91 +.03 Nordstrm 48.74 -.88 ProUltSGId 16.27 -.99 SJuanB 19.77 +.69
A 4 5 NorfkSo 75.17 .31 ProUISIs 59.39 +4.52 SandRdge 8.40 +.49
i i NoestUt 3491 +.36 ProUShEuro 19.73 -.27 Sanofi 36.64 +.35
NorthropG 59.59 -.41 ProctGam 64.98 +.48 SaraLee 19.16 +.13
M&TBk 82.00 +.31 Novarts 55.21 -.66 ProgrssEn 54.38 +.52 Schlmbrg 76.19 +1.60
MDU Res 21.66 +.23 NSTAR 45.14 +.43 ProgsvCp 20.56 +.23 Schwab 12.14 -.34
MEMC 4.69 +.17 Nucor 43.74 +.54 ProUSR2Krs 33.20 -.57 SeadrillLtd 36.44 +.71
MFAFnd 7.15 +.08 NuvMuOpp 14.92 +.06 ProvEng 11.05 +.05 SealAir 20.12 +.21
MCR 9.55 +.11 NvMulSI&G 8.41 +.10 Prudent 57.78 -.30 Sensient 39.80 +.23
MGIC 4.13 -.02 NuvQPf2 8.36 +.02 PSEG 30.93 +.57 SiderurNac 10.51 +.07
MGM Rsts 13.11 -.05 OGE Engy 54.39 .91 PubStrg 135.91 +.31 SilVhg 34.48 +2.55
Macquarie 28.03 -.09 OasisPet 34.69 +1.65 PulteGrp 7.99 +.23 SilvrcpMg 7.59 +43
Macys 34.19 -1.09 OcciPet 103.46 +2.54 PPrIT 5.40 +01 SimonProp 135.80 +2.06
MageiMPtr 67.44 +.59 OfficeDpt 2.86 +09 QEPRes 30.00 +1.10 Skechers 12.85 +.38
Manalgs 42.46 -.57 OficeMax 6.06 +.03 QuanexBld 17.00 +.17 SmithAO 41.98 +.49
MagHRes 5.80 +.19 OdNB 12.17 .21 QntmDSS 2.81 +.04 SmithfF 23.26 +.14
Manitowoc 12.94 +50 OdRepub 9.48 +04 stDiag 60.554 .18 Smuder 81.19 +.19
M a 12.50 .08 Olin 22.10 Questa 19.54 +.10 SoJerlnd 54.54 -.17
Manulifeg 125 .8 l 22 QksilvRes 5.73 +.19 SouthnCo 45.12 +.22
MahnOs 32.57 + OmegaHIt 20.65 RPC 16.03 -1.50 SthnCopper 36.09 +.76
MarathP n 38.76 -.28 Omncre 33.47 +.30 RPM 24.82 +.39 SwstAirl 9.51 +.35
MktVGold 55.23 +3.41 Omnicom 46.67 +.49 RadianGrp 2.88 .07 Swstnrgy 32.62 +.89
MVOilSvn 125.60 +2.36 ONEOK 87.65 +.40 RadioShk 10.27 +.02 SpecaEn 31.65 +.16
MVSemin 33.90 +10 OneokPts 57.55 +.59 Ralicorp 87.22 +1.40 SprintNex 2.20 +.03
MktVRus 30.10 +.68 OshkoshCp 24.93 +.25 RangeRs 59.86 +2.66 SprottSilv 13.86 +.37
MktVJrGld 28.96 +2.05 OwensCorn 3482 +.88 RJamesFn 34.29 +.04 SprottiGold 15.07 +.40
MarlntA 35.16 +.22 Owenslll 23.22 +.08 Rayonier s 3 46.3629 +.20 SprottGold 15.07 Mas 37.14 +.4058
MashM 31.51 +.36 Rayonrs 469.7136 +.02 SP HMa 37.96 +.26
MStewrt 4.25 -.03n
Maso 12.60 +.38 PG&E Cp 41.09 +.93 Rltylno 36.30 +.40 SP CnSt 32.56 +.37
Mastec 16.38 +.54 PNC 59.62 +10 RegalEnt 12.75 +.28 SP Consum 41.55 +.30
McDrmlnt 13.13 +1.19 PNMRes 17.66 +.11 RegionsFn 5.32 +.09 SPEngy 72.62 +88
MDlD.3,PP 894 2, Renrenn 4.20 +07 SPDRFncl 14.20 +.03


McKesson 77.85 +1.30 PPLCorp 28.23
McMoRn 12.68 +.36 PallCorp 60.52
MeadJohn 72.60 +1.85 PatriotCoal 8.52
MeadWvco 30.73 -.63 PeabdyE 37.33
Mechel 11.47 +.61 Pengrthg 10.45
MedeoHIth 62.54 +.53 PennVaRs 26.99
Medtrnic 39.96 +.63 PennWstg 21.86
Merck 38.68 -.10 Penney 34.27
MetLife 35.95 -.96 PepBoy 11.94
MetroPCS 8.82 +.26 PepeoHold 20.17
MetroHIth 8.19 -.09 PepsiCo 66.70


IA EIA N 5 XCANE1


Name Last Chg


AbdAsPac 7.55 +.09
AbdnEMTel 18.41 +.10
AdmRsc 38.48 +.63
AdeonaPh 2.20 -.05
Adventrx .62 +.03
AlexeoRg 7.40 +.51
AlldNevG 35.26 +3.13
AlmadnMg 2.64 +.18
AmAppared .81
AntaresP 2.37 +.10
Armour wt .02 +.00
Augustag 2.98 +.14


Aurizong 5.26 +.36 CheniereE 21.49 +1.19
AvalnRare 3.20 +.31 ChiGengM 1.10 +.08
Banro g 4.75 +.20 ChinaShen 1.69
BarcUBS36 43.68 +.67 ClaudeR g 1.44 +.06
BarcGSOil 25.32 +.16 ClghGlbOp 11.05 +.13
BrclndiaTR 56.47 +1.06 ComstkMn 2.00 +.01
BioTime 5.74 .15 CrSuiHiY 3.01 +.01
BrigusGg 1.17 +.06
BritATob 92.51 +.51
CAMACEn 1.03 -.02 DeourEg .40
Cardero g 1.40 +.06 DenisnM g 1.86 -.02
CardiumTh .34 -.03 EV LtdDur 15.85 +.11
CelSd .43 +.01 EVMuniBd 13.00 +.07
CFCdag 22.41 +.75 EVMuni2 14.38 +.11
CheniereEn 11.97 +.67 EllieMaen 5.67 +.04


EllswthFd 7.13 +.05
EnovaSys .50 +.16
EnteeGold 1.31 +.11
ExeterRgs 3.28 +.21
ExtorreGg 9.08 +.49


GamGldNR 15.82 +.10
GascoEngy .20 +.01
Gastargrs 3.12 +.13
GenMoly 3.41 +.11
GeoGloblR .25
GoldResrc 25.66 +1.17
GoldenMin 9.35 +.50
GoldStrg 1.97 +.25


GranTrrag 5.50 +.26
GrtBasGg 1.16 +.13
GtPanSilvg 2.64 +.16
Hemisphrx .26 +.02
HstnAEn 13.30 +.01
ImpOilgs 47.51 +.78
InovioPhm .54 -.00
IntellgSys 1.66 +.04
IntTo 518 +53

KeeganRg 3.92 +.17
KimberRg 1.18 +.06
LkShrGld g 1.43 +.09
LongweiPI 1.56 +.01


NovaGd 9.84 +.28 Uranerz 2.49 +.02
SuIniunmEn 404 +19


MGT Cap .06
MadCatzg .67
MdwGoldg 2.02
MineoG g .95
Mineftdg 13.86
MinesMgt 2.00
NeoStem .70
NBRESec 3.99
Nevsung 6.36
NwGoldg 11.10
NA Pall g 2.62
NDynMng 7.41
NthnO&G 27.07


ParaG&S 2.50 +.10 SamsO&G 2.18
PbnDrill 9.46 -.13 SeabGldg 19.29
PlatGpMet 1.11 +.03 Senesco .25
PolyMetg 1.29 +.03 SilverBull .48
Protalix 5.68 -.06 Solitario 1.65
PyramidOil 3.96 -.06 TanzRyg 3.14
Quepasa 3.69 -.02 Taseko 3.37
QuestRMg 2.89 +.17 TasmanMg 1.91
RareEleg 6.14 +.46 TimberlnR .50
Rentech 1.68 +.08 TrnsafiPet 1.25
RevettMin 4.62 +.12 TriValley .16
Richmntg 11.66 +.59 TriangPet 7.31
Rubicon g 3.96 +.09 Ur-Energy 1.11


VantageDrl 1.22
VirnetX 24.60 -.15
VistaGold 3.80 +.33
VoyagerOG 2.58 +.01
Vringo 1.09 +.25
Walterlnv 18.37 -.38
WFAdvlnco 10.58 +.15
WizzardSft .18 +.02
YMBiog 1.71 +.04


The remainder of the

NYSE listings can be

found on the next page.





Yesterday Pvs Day
Argent 4.3380 4.3335
Australia .9445 .9541
Bahrain .3770 .3769
Brazil 1.7608 1.7525
Britain 1.5643 1.5603
Canada 1.0053 1.0101
Chile 492.85 493.45
China 6.3095 6.3380
Colombia 1812.50 1814.50
Czech Rep 19.34 19.45
Denmark 5.6822 5.7097
Dominican Rep 38.90 38.90
Egypt 6.0405 6.0405
Euro .7643 .7680
Hong Kong 7.7597 7.7614
Hungary 226.56 230.03
India 50.025 50.055
Indnsia 8890.00 9005.00
Israel 3.7675 3.7802
Japan 77.81 77.73
Jordan .7100 .7092
Lebanon 1505.50 1505.50
Malaysia 3.0767 3.1075
Mexico 13.0256 13.1363
N. Zealand 1.2287 1.2334
Norway 5.8630 5.8951
Peru 2.693 2.692
Poland 3.26 3.28
Russia 30.5585 30.7800
Singapore 1.2618 1.2681
So. Africa 7.9122 7.9512
So. Korea 1126.80 1129.71
Sweden 6.7547 6.7604
Switzerlnd .9231 .9286
Taiwan 30.00 29.93
Thailand 31.60 31.49
Turkey 1.8086 1.8227
U.A.E. 3.6731 3.6731
Uruguay 19.6495 19.5495
Venzuel 4.2927 4.2927


British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.



Yesterday Pvs Day

Prime Rate 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate 0.75 0.75
Federal Funds Rate .00-.25 .00-.25
Treasuries
3-month 0.04 0.028
6-month 0.06 0.06
5-year 0.79 0.81
10-year 2.00 1.90
30-year 3.15 2.96



FUTURES
Exch Contract Settle Chg
Lt Sweet Crude NYMX Mar 12 99.40 +.45
Corn CBOT Mar 12 6341/2 +4/4
Wheat CBOT Mar 12 6411/4 +73/4
Soybeans CBOT Mar12 121312 -61/2
Cattle CME Apr12 129.17
Sugar (world) ICE Mar12 24.51 -.38
Orange Juice ICE Mar 12 211.15 -6.85


SPOT
Yesterday Pvs Day
Gold (troy oz., spot) $1699.80 $1659.50
Silver (troy oz., spot) $33.092 $30.b14
Copper (pound) $3.8250 $3./4/O
Platinum (troy oz., spot)$1b//.40 $1b23.30

NMER= NewYork Mercantile Exchange. CBOT=
Chicago Board of Trade. CMER = Chicago Mercantile Ex-
change. NCSE = New York Cotton, Sugar & Cocoa Ex-
change. NCTN = New York Cotton Exchange.


SaientPh 2.50 +.14 Toreador 4.28 -.35
SchoolSp 3.28 +.27 TowerSm h .69 -.01
SciGames 11.42 -.03 Towerstm 2.55 +.16
SeagateT 19.77 +.02 TractSupp 80.80 +.10
SearsHIdgs 44.87 -.91 TranS1 2.83 +.57
SeattGen 18.33 +.39
SelCmfrt 24.96 +.65 Travdzoo 30.41 +62
Selectvlns 17.89 +.01 TrimbleN 44.77 -.24
Semtech 29.12 -.02 TripAdvn 31.49 +.80
Sequenom 4.29 +.12 TriQuint 6.03 +.24
SvcSourcn 17.33 +.15 TrstNY 5.62 +.01
SvArtsrsh .35 -.08 Trustmk 24.63 -1.03
ShandaG s 3.81 TuesMrn 3.26 +.03
Shire 100.14 +.36 TwinDisc 30.81 -1.54
Shutterfly 24.02 +.31 UMB Fn 39.78 -.84
SityTech 4.89 -.32 UMBFn 3978 .84
SigaTedhh 3.08 +.02 UlWrldwd 15.39 +.03
SigmaAld 70.21 +1.69 UltaSalon 78.80 +1.42
SignatBk 59.91 -.13 UltraClean 7.86 +.29
SilganHId 39.82 -.31 Ultratech 27.54 -.35
SilicGrln 13.70 +.06 Umpqua 12.76 -.09
Silinmlmg 4.88 +.13 UBWV 28.96 -.38
SilcnLab 46.77 -.30 UtdOnln 5.67 +.06
SilicnMotn 23.22 +.71 US Enr 3.44 +.10
Slcnware 5.44 -.04
SilvStdg 16.79 +1.50 UtdTherap 49.01 +.92
Sina 64.30 -.14 UnivDisp 40.90 +.16
Sindair 12.88 -.04 UnivFor 32.41 +.48
SiriusXM 2.08 +.01 UranmRsh 1.09 +.02
SironaDent 48.27 +1.50 UrbanOut 27.54 +.93
SkyWest 12.64 -1.12
SkywksSol 21.77 +.22
SmtHeath .48 -.01 VCA Ant 22.70 +.43
SmithWes 4.94 +.06 VOXX Infl 13.24 +.24
SodaStrm 38.40 +.26 ValenceT h 1.01 +04
Sohu.cm 61.13 +.76 eThs 1 .03
SonicCorp 6.84 +.12 ValVisA 1.65 +03
SonoSite 53.89 ValueClick 16.82 -.14
Sonus 2.60 -.01 Veecolnst 24.31 -.13
SouMoBc 22.13 -.12 Velin 9.02 +.12
Sourcefire 31.69 -.39 VBradley 35.55 +1.05
SpanBdrsh 7.06 -.30 Verisign 36.41 -.11
SpectPh 14.99 -.34 Verisk 40.30 +.32
SpiritAirn 16.25 +.50 VertxPh 35.46 +.47
Spreadtrm 16.08 -.08 ViacomB 48.35 +.35
Stamps.cm 30.14 -.82
Staples 16.19 +.14 Vical 3.49 +.07
StarBulk 1.05 +.07 VirgnMda h 24.06 +.27
StarSdent 2.18 -.03 ViroPhrm 29.45 -.06
Starbucks 47.77 +.12 VistaPrt 31.25 +.78
SftDynam 16.01 +.55 Vivus 12.22 +.36
StemCeilrs .80 -.00 Vodafone 27.60 -.06
Stericyde 84.17 -.12 Volcano 27.91 +.61
SMaddens 40.48 +1.17 Volterra 30.32 -.45
StewEnt 6.28rr.
SunHIth 3.95 -.02 WarnerCh 16.85 +.38
SunPower 6.84 WashFed 15.77 +.08
support.cm 2.30 +.07 WebMD 26.90 +.25
SusqBnc 9.20 -.01 Wendys Co 5.25 -.02
Symantec 17.07 +.20 WernerEnt 25.72 +.23
Symetricm 6.28 +.22 WestellT 2.27 -.18
Synapfics 34.26 +.24 Westmrld 11.83 +.46
Synopsys 29.19 +.05 Wstptlnng 38.91 +.85
Synois 27.95 +.01 WetSeal 3.65 +08
SyntaPhm 4.71 +.05 Wtel 3.1 .1
TDAmeritr 16.80 -.35 WholeFd 77.15 -.16
THQ .71 -.03 Windstrm 12.22 +.10
TTMTch 12.22 +.25 Winn-Dixie 9.46
tw teleom 20.23 +.26 Woodward 42.65 -.07
TakeTwo 15.40 WdAccep 66.14 -5.53
TaleoA 36.30 +.19 WrightM 17.20 +.60
TASER 4.83 -.03 Wynn 120.42 +1.95
TearLab 1.80 +.19 XOMA 1.47 -.10
TechData 52.33 -.17
Tekelec 10.99 -.01 Xlinx 35.52 -.54
Telikh .18 YRCrs 13.72 -.19
Tellabs 4.21 -.16 Yahoo 15.56 -.13
Tengionh .62 +.04 Yandexn 19.79 +1.07
TennCBIfh .16 ... Yongye 4.47 +.18
TeslaMot 27.97 +.55 Zagg 9.02 +.22
TevaPhrm 46.09 +.23 Zalicus 1.13 -.02
TxCapBsh 32.28 +.20 ZonO&G 2.46 -.04
Texlnst 32.80 +.28 ZonBc 17.52 +.37
TexRdhse 15.27 +.02 ZonBcp 17.52 +37
Theravnce 18.10 +.15 Zopharm 5.10 .01
Thoratec 30.91 +.44 Zpcarn 15.40 +.54
TibcoSft 25.90 +.18 Zumiez 29.75 +.41
TiVoInc 10.54 +.11 Zyngan 9.53 -.18


DIARY


Advanced
Declined
Unchanged
Total issues
New Highs
New Lows
Volume


IASD AQ AINL5AKT1


I AMEX


I NASDA


YTD YTD
Name Div YId PE Last Chg %Chg Name Div YId PE Last Chg %Chg
AK Steel .20 2.0 ... 10.04 +.75 +21.5 Microsoft .80 2.7 11 29.56 +.22 +13.9
AT&Tlnc 1.76 5.8 15 30.21 +.12 -.1 MotrlaSolu .88 2.0 16 44.94 -2.92 -2.9
Ametek .24 .5 21 46.83 +.51 +11.2 MotrlaMob ... ... ... 38.60 -.04 -.5
BkofAm .04 .5 ... 7.35 +.06 +32.2 NextEraEn 2.20 3.7 15 60.05 +.86 -1.4
CapCtyBk ... ... 22 9.75 +.05 +2.1 Penney .80 2.3 21 34.27 -.33 -2.5
CntryLink 2.90 7.7 17 37.53 +.59 +.9 PiedmOfc 1.26 6.9 23 18.25 +.01 +7.1
Citigrprs .04 .1 8 29.96 +.06+13.9 ProgrssEn 2.48 4.6 21 54.38 +.52 -2.9
CmwREIT 2.00 10.2 27 19.69 +.37 +18.3 RegionsFn .04 .8 ... 5.32 +.09 +23.7
Disney .60 1.5 16 39.56 +.31 +5.5 SearsHIdgs .33 ... ... 44.87 -.91 +41.2
EnterPT 2.80 6.4 26 43.98 +.23 +.6 Smucker 1.92 2.4 20 81.19 +.19 +3.9
ExxonMbI 1.88 2.2 10 87.22 +.04 +2.9 SprintNex ... ... ... 2.20 +.03 -6.0
FordM .20 1.5 8 12.93 +.11 +20.2 TimeWarn .94 2.5 15 38.21 +.64 +5.7
GenElec .68 3.6 16 19.13 +.29 +6.8 UniFirst .15 .2 15 60.48 -.45 +6.6
HomeDp 1.16 2.6 20 45.26 +.30 +7.7 VerizonCm 2.00 5.3 44 37.69 -.10 -6.1
Intel .84 3.1 11 26.90 +.01 +10.9 Vodafone 2.10 7.6 ... 27.60 -.06 -1.5
IBM 3.00 1.6 15191.75 -.18 +4.3 WalMart 1.46 2.4 14 61.47 +.08 +2.9
Lowes .56 2.1 19 26.91 +.03 +6.0 Walgrn .90 2.6 12 34.69 +.42 +4.9
McDnlds 2.80 2.8 19 99.23 +.48 -1.1 YRCrs ... ... ... 13.72 -.19 +37.6


m


IIIII i... ...







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BUSINESS


THURSDAY, JANUARY 26, 2012 A9


I MB TA3lFUN Iy i


Name NAV Chg Name NAV Chg
Advance Capital 1: Dr5001n t 36.26 +.31
Balancp 16.40 +.09 GNMA 16.00 +.01
Retlnc 8.75 +.02 GrChinaAr 31.57 +.03
Alger Funds B: HiYIdA p 6.34 +.01
SmCapGr 6.80 +.08 StratValA 28.30 +.20
AllianceBern A: TechGroA 32.41 +.31
BalanAp 16.03 ... DreihsAcInc 10.34 +.01
GIbThGrAp63.75 ... Driehaus Funds:
SmCpGrA 36.02 ... EMktGr 27.50
AllianceBern Adv: EVPTxMEmI 44.20
LgCpGrAd 27.53 ... Eaton Vance A:
AllianceBern B: ChinaAp 16.38 +.15
GIbThGrBt 54.95 ... AMTFMuInc 9.97 +.04
GrowthBt 25.55 ... MulICGrA 8.11 +.08
SCpGrBt 28.86 ... InBosA 5.74 +.01
AllianceBern C: LgCpVal 17.96 +.15
SCpGrCt 29.01 ... NatlMunInc 9.83 +.04
Allianz Fds Instl: SpEqtA 16.00 +.18
NFJDvVI 11.96 ... TradGvA 7.46 +.01
SmCpVi 30.39 ... EatonVance B:
Allianz Funds A: HIthSBt 9.47 +.05
SmCpVA 28.96 ... NatlMuInc 9.83 +.04
Allianz Funds C: Eaton Vance C:
AGICGrthC 24.32 ... GovtC p 7.45 +.01
TargetC t 14.74 ... NatMunlnc 9.83 +.04
Amer Beacon Insti: Eaton Vance I:
LgCaplnst 19.71 +09 FItgRt 8.92 +.01
Amer Beacon Inv: GblMacAbR 9.98 +.02
LgCaplnv 18.72 +.09 LgCapVal 18.01 +.15
Ameri Century 1st: FBR Funds:
Growth 26.22 Focuslnvtn47.68 +.08
Amer Century Adv: FMI Funds:
EqGroAp 22.51 ... LgCappn 16.18 +.08
EqIncAp 7.45 ... FPA Funds:
Amer Century Inv: NwIlnc 10.67 ...
AIICapGr 28.15 ... FPACres 27.69 +.08
Balanced 16.56 +.09 Fairholme 26.09 +.16
DivBnd 10.99 +.02 Federated A:
Eqlnc 7.45 ... MidGrStA 36.02
GrowIhl 26.01 MuSecA 10.47 +.03
Heritagel 21.01 ... TtlRtBdp 11.32 +.03
IncGro 25.51 ... Federated Instl:
InfAdjBd 12.84 +.08 KaufmnR 4.97
IntDisc 9.08 ... TotRetBd 11.32 +.03
IntlGrol 10.15 +.10 StrValDvS 4.79 +.02
New Opp 7.83 ... Fidelity Adv FocT:
OneChAg 12.30 +.11 EnergyT 37.32 +.48
OneChMd 11.96 +.09 HItCarT 22.22 +.22
RealEstl 21.04 ... Fidelity Advisor A:
Ultra 24.11 ... Nwlnsgh p 20.72 +.29
Valuelnv 5.88 ... StrnA 12.21 +.04
American Funds A: Fidelity Advisor I:
AmcpAp 20.09 +.21 EqGrIn 61.02 +.75
AMuiAp 26.69 +.13 Eqlnin 24.25 +.12
BalAp 18.95 +.13 IntBdln 11.49 +.03
BondApp 12.59 +.03 Nwlnsgtln 20.97 +.29
CaplBAp 49.80 +.35 Fidelity AdvisorT:
CapWGAp 33.82 +.28 BalancT 15.59 +.13
CapWAp 20.81 +.09 DivGrTp 12.38 +.15
EupacAp 37.59 +.42 EqGrTp 57.13 +.70
FdInvAp 37.49 +.34 EqInT 23.88 +.11
GovtAp 14.37 +.02 GrOppT 38.36 +.60
GwthAp 30.82 +.42 HilnAdTp 9.67 +.03
HI TrAp 10.87 +.03 IntBdT 11.47 +.03
IncoAp 17.11 +.10 MulncTp 13.40 +.03
IntBdAp 13.66 +.03 OvrseaT 16.27 +.20
InitGrIncAp 28.51 +.30 STFiT 9.28 +.01
ICAAp 28.52 +.22 StkSelAIJICp 18.86 +.20
LtTEBAp 16.23 +.03 Fidelity Freedom:
NEcoAp 25.66 +.37 FF2010n 13.54 +.09
NPerAp 27.88 +.35 FF2010K 12.51 +.08
NwWrldA 49.50 +.55 FF2015n 11.31 +.07
STBFAp 10.09 +.01 FF2015K 12.55 +.08
SmCpAp 36.15 +.46 FF2020n 13.63 +.09
TxExAp 12.71 +.03 FF2020K 12.92 +.09
WshAp 29.38 +.19 FF2025n 11.30 +.09
Ariel Investments: FF2025K 13.00 +.10
Apprec 41.87 ... FF2030n 13.44 +.10
Ariel 46.47 ... FF2030K 13.13 +.10
Artio Global Funds: FF2035n 11.10 +.09
IntlEqlr 24.17 +.14 FF2035K 13.19 +.11
IntEqll r 10.19 +.07 FF2040n 7.74 +.06
Artisan Funds: FF2040K 13.23 +.11
Intl 20.95 ... FF2045n 9.16 +.08
InftlVair 26.15 ... Incomen 11.43 +.04
MidCap 36.01 ... Fidelity Invest:
MidCapVal 20.61 ... AIISectEq 11.91 +.14
SCapVal 15.80 ... AMgr50n 15.58 +.10
Baron Funds: AMgr70rn 16.24 +.13
Asset 48.74 +.42 AMgr20rn 12.94 +.04
Growth 53.82 +.42 Balancn 18.91 +.16
SmallCap 24.66 +.24 BalancedK 18.91 +.16
Bernstein Fds: BlueChGr n 45.45 +.57
IntDur 13.84 +.03 CAMunn 12.59 +.03
DivMu 14.87 +.02 Canadan 52.51 +.78
TxMgdlnt 13.47 +.17 CapApn 26.61 +.40
BlackRock A: CapDevOn 10.87 +.14
EqtyDiv 18.80 +.14 Cplncrn 8.95 +.04
GIAIAr 19.05 +.16 ChinaRgr 27.49 +.24
HiYlnvA 7.59 +.02 CngS 465.09
InflOpAp 30.02 +.36 CTMunrn 11.99 +.03
BlackRock B&C: Contran 70.94 +1.01
GIAICt 17.75 +.15 ContraK 70.90 +1.01
BlackRock Inst: CnvSc n 24.73 +18
BaVIl 26.12 +.13 DisEqn 22.76 +.16
EquityDv 18.84 +.14 DiscEqF 22.73 +.16
GIbAllocr 19.14 +.16 DivlntIn 27.27 +.30
HiYldBd 7.59 +.02 DivrslntKr 27.23 +.30
Brinson FundsY: DivSkOn 15.66 +.10
HiYldlYx 6.04 DivGthn 28.12 +.33
BruceFund386.92 EmergAsrn27.43 +.18
Buffalo Funds: EmrMkn 22.26 +.22
SmCapn 26.86 +.15 Eqlncn 43.21 +.22
CGM Funds: EQIIn 18.14 +.11
Focusn 28.31 +.49 ECapAp 16.55 +16
Muti n 26.74 +.32 Europe 27.25 +.25
Realty 28.30 Exch 323.88
CRM Funds: Exportn 21.76 +.24
MdCpVII 27.91 Fidel n 32.85 +.41
Calamos Funds: Fiftyrn 18.43 +19
Calamos Funds FItRateHi r n 9.75 +.01
GrwthAp 50.28 +.91 FrnOnen 27.31 +.23
Calvert Invest: GNMAn 11.83 +.01
Incop 15.82 +.07 Govtlnc 10.73 +.02
IntlEqAp 12.75 +.06 GroCon 88.02 +1.30
SocialAp 28.95 +.22 Groncn 1922 +.14
SocABdp 15.77 +.05 GrowCoF 87.93 +1.30
SocEqAp 35.47 +.24 GrowthCoK87.95 +1.31
TFLgp 16.18 +03 GrStratrn 20.55 +.31
Cohen & Steers: Highlncrn 8.85 +.02
RltyShrs 63.41 ndepnn 23.82 +.43
Columbia Class A: InProBdn 12.89 +.08
Acorn t 28.95 +.32 IntBdn 10.91 +.03
DivEqlnc 9.97 +.09 IntGovn 10.97 +.03
DivrBd 5.06 +.01 IntmMun 10.52 +.02
DivOpptyA 8.28 +.06 nlDiscn 29.17 +.31
LgCapGrAt23.98 +.30 IntSCprn 18.61 +.22
LgCorQAp 6.02 +.07 nvGrBdn 11.69 +.02
MdCpGrOp 9.97 +.14 nvGBn 7.73 +.02
MidCVIOpp 7.71 +.09 Japanr 9.56 +.11
PBModAp 10.74 +.06 JpnSm n 8.59 +.09
TxEAp 13.88 +.03 LgCapVal 10.60 +.02
SelCommA45.06 +.39 LatAm 54.05 +.70
FrontierA 10.62 +.14 LevCoStkn 27.85 +.38
GlobTech 21.30 +19 LowPrn 38.05 +.28
Columbia Cl 1,T&G: LowPriKr 38.02 +.28
EmMktOp In 8.11 +.08 Mageln n 67.29 +71
Columbia Class Z: MagellanK 67.22 +71
AcornZ 29.96 +.33 MDMurn 11.48 +.03
AcornlntZ 36.63 +.37 MAMunn 12.52 +.04
DivlncoZ 14.02 +.09 MegaCpStknlO.67 +.06
IntBdZ 9.30 +.02 MIMunn 12.38 +.03
IntTEBd 10.88 +.02 MidCap n 28.51 +.30
LgCapGr 12.96 +.13 MNMunn 11.91 +.02
LgCpldxZ 25.62 +.22 MtgSecn 11.19 +.01
MdCpldxZ 11.45 +.11 Munilncn 13.21 +.03
MdCpVIZp 13.65 +.13 NJMunrn 12.11 +.04
ValRestr 48.12 +.62 NwMktrn 16.03 +.07
Credit Suisse Comm: NwMilln 30.50 +.30
ComRett 8.47 +.08 NYMunn 13.46 +.03
DFA Funds: OTC n 58.63 +.79
IntlCorEqn 9.96 +.12 OhMunn 12.15 +.03
USCorEql 11.35 ... o100ndex 9.27 +.08
USCorEq2 11.21 ... Ovrsean 28.72 +.37
DWS Invest A: PcBas n 22.96 +.20
CommAp 16.81 +.09 PAMunrn 11.24 +.02
DWS InvestS: Puritnn 18.44 +.15
CorPsIlnc 10.77 +.02 PuritanK 18.43 +.14
EmMkGrr 16.09 +.16 RealEn 29.39 +.40
EnhEmMk 10.18 +.03 SAIISecEqF11.91 +.14
EnhGlbBdr 10.04 +.04 SCmdtyStrtn9.29 +.12
GIbSmCGr 36.95 +.42 SCmdtyStrFn9.31 +.13
GIblThem 21.85 +.16 SrEmrgMkt 15.81 +.18
Gold&Prc 16.38 +.73 SrslntGrw 10.71 +12
GrolncS 17.06 +.10 SerlntlGrF 10.73 +.12
HiYldTx 12.47 +.03 SrslntVal 8.42 +.08
IntTxAMT 12.00 +.03 SerlntlValF 8.43 +.07
IntlFdS 39.23 +.50 SrlnvGrdF 11.70 +03
LgCpFoGr 30.87 +.45 StlntMun 10.84 +01
LatAmrEq 41.82 +.57 STBFn 8.52 +01
MgdMuniS 9.27 +.02 SmIICpSrn 18.04 +.23
MATFS 14.95 +.04 SCpValur 14.96 +.12
SP500S 17.63 +.15 SFSelLCVrnl0.90 +06
WorldDiv 22.68 +.20 SlSlcACap n26.07 +.27
Davis Funds A: SllSelSmCp 19.27 +.17
NYVenA 34.27 ... Sfratlncn 10.93 +.03
Davis Funds B: SBrReRtr 9.45 +.07
NYVen B 32.79 ... TotalBd n 10.95 +.02
Davis Funds C: Trend n 71.90 +.93
NYVenC 33.08 ... USBI n 11.77 +.02
Davis Funds Y: Utilityn 16.85 +.20
NYVenY 34.63 ... ValStratn 27.46 +.38
Delaware Invest A: Value n 68.40 +.58
Diverlncp 9.16 +.03 Wrldwn 18.32 +.19
SMIDCapG 23.64 ... Fidelity Selects:
TxUSAp 11.81 +03 Aim 37.64 +.88
Delaware Invest B: Banking n 17.35 +.04
SelGrBt 32.24 Biotchn 96.02 +1.50
Dimensional Fds: Brokr n 45.36 -.04
EmMCrEqnl9.07 +.18 Chemn 105.84 +1.25
EmMktV 29.17 +.29 ComEquipn23.75 -.22
IntSmVan 14.88 +.19 Compn 59.88 +.90
LargeCo 10.35 ... ConDisn 24.87 +.24
TAUSCorE2 9.12 ConsuFnn 11.81 +.02
USLgVa 20.26 ... ConStapn 71.74 +.69
USMicro 14.09 ... CstHon 39.10 +.61


USTgdVal 16.32 ... DfAern 82.98 +.78
USSmall 21.86 ... Elecrn 51.62 +.13
US SmVa 24.89 Enrgy n 53.29 +.69
InDtSmCon 14.93 +.19 EngSvn 70.50 +1.22
EmgMktn 26.11 +.22 EnvAltEnrnl6.09 +.08
Fixdn 10.32 FinSvn 55.47 +.18
IntGFxInn 12.89 +.05 Goldrn 45.75 +2.30
IntVan 15.85 +.19 Healthn 130.07 +1.29
Glb5Fxlncn 10.96 +.03 Insurn 46.82 +.19
TM USTgtV 21.40 ... Leisrn 102.40 +.94
2YGIFxdn 10.10 +.01 Materialn 68.46 +.94
DFARIE 24.12 MedDIn 58.45 +.29
Dodge&Cox: MdEqSysn 27.19 +.46
Balanced 71.03 Mul"ndn 46.14 +.41
Income 13.47 +.03 NtGasn 31.92 +.64
InStks 31.17 Pharmn 13.79 +.10
Stock 108.30 Retail n 54.69 +.33
DoubleUne Funds: Softwrn 83.86 +.63
TRBdI 11.12 ... Techn 93.95 +.99
TRBdNp 11.11 ... Telcmn 44.05 +.37
Dreyfus: Trans n 52.99 +.93
Aprec 41.99 +.44 UtilGrn 52.09 +75
CTA 12.20 +04 Wirelessn 7.40 +.02
CorVA 22.47 Fidelity Spartan:
Dreyf 8.94 +08 ExtMklnn 38.30 +.45
DryMidr 27.82 +.28 5001dxlnvn 46.96 +.40


Here are the 1,000 biggest mutual funds listed on Nasdaq. Tables show the fund name, sell
price or Net Asset Value (NAV) and daily net change.
Name: Name of mutual fund and family.
NAV: Net asset value.
Chg: Net change in price of NAV.
Data based on NAVs reported to Lipper by 6 p.m. Eastern.


Name NAV Chg
5001dx I 46.96 +.40
Infllnxlnvn 31.58 +.33
TotMktlnv n 38.29 +.35
USBondl 11.77 +.02
Fidelity Spart Adv:
ExMktAd r n38.30 +.45
5001dxAdv n46.96 +.40
IntAdrn 31.58 +.33
TotMktAd r n38.29 +.35
First Eagle:
GIbIA 46.70
OverseasA 21.03
First Investors A
BIChpAp
GloblAp 6.36 ...
GovtAp 11.58
GrolnAp 15.26
IncoAp 2.51
MATFAp 12.33 +.03
MITFAp 12.66 +.03
NJTFAp 13.59 +.04
NYTFAp 15.09 +.04
OppAp 27.64
PATFAp 13.58 +.04
SpSitAp 24.42
TxExAp 10.13 +.02
TotRtAp 15.80
ValueBp 7.28
Forum Funds:
AbsStlr 11.01 -.01
Frank/Temp Frnk A:
AdjUS p 8.84 +.01
ALTFAp 11.63 +.02
AZTFAp 11.21 +.03
CallnsAp 12.55 +.03
CAIntAp 11.97 +.03
CalTFAp 7.27 +.02
COTFAp 12.16 +.04
CTTFAp 11.32 +.03
CvtScAp 14.69 +.11
DblTFA 12.25 +.04
DynTchA 30.62 +.38
EqlncAp 17.43 +.07
Fedlntp 12.34 +.03
FedTFAp 12.39 +.04
FLTFAp 11.83 +.03
FoundAlp 10.30 +.03
GATFAp 12.43 +.03
GoldPrMA 40.66 +1.65
GrwthAp 47.64 +.60
HYTFAp 10.50 +.03
HilncA 1.98 +.01
IncomAp 2.14 +.01
InsTFAp 12.31 +.03
NYITF p 11.78 +.03
LATFAp 11.84 +.03
LMGvScA 10.40 +.01
MDTFAp 11.84 +.03
MATFAp 11.97 +.04
MITFAp 12.20 +.02
MNInsA 12.76 +.04
MOTFAp 12.55 +.03
NJTFAp 12.48 +.03
NYTFAp 11.99 +.03
NCTFAp 12.71 +.03
OhiolAp 12.89 +.04
ORTFAp 12.40 +.04
PATFAp 10.73 +.02
ReEScAp 15.57 +.19
RisDvAp 36.02 +.16
SMCpGrA 36.47 +.42
Stratlncp 10.37 +.03
TtlRtnAp 10.15 +.03
USGovAp 6.92
UbIsAp 13.14 +.18
VATFAp 12.04 +.03
Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv:
GIbBdAdv n 12.94 +.08
IncmeAd 2.13 +.01
Frank/Temp Frnk C:
IncomC t 2.16 +.01
USGvCt 6.87
Frank/Temp Mtl A&B:
SharesA 20.53 +.08
Frank/Temp Temp A:
DvMktAp 22.88 +.16
ForgnAp 6.31 +.01
GIBdAp 12.98 +.08
GrwthAp 17.33 +.03
WorldAp 14.69 +.05
Frank/Temp Tmp Adv:
GrthAv 17.32 +.03
Frank/Temp Tmp B&C:
DevMktC 22.34 +.15
ForgnCp 6.18
GIBdCp 13.00 +.07
Franklin Mutual Ser:
QuestA 16.58 +.05
GE Elfun S&S:
S&Sl Inc 11.70 +.02
USEqty 40.99
GMOTrust Ill:
CHIE 21.31 +.06
Quality 22.46
GMOTrust IV:
InitGrEq 21.73 +.16
IntllntrV 19.69 +.15
GMOTrustVI:
EmgMktsr 11.24
IntCorEq 26.42 +.21
Quality 22.47
StrFxlnc 16.29 +.03
Gabelli Funds:
Asset 49.64
Gateway Funds:
GatewayA 26.64
Goldman Sachs A:
MdCVAp 35.71 +.39
Goldman Sachs Inst:
GrOppt 23.83 +.26
HiYield 7.01 +.01
HYMuni n 8.75 +.04
MidCapV 35.95 +.39
Harbor Funds:
Bond 12.34 +.05
CapAplnst 39.13
Intllnvt 55.91
Intl r 56.41
Hartford Fds A:
CpAppAp 31.71 +.34
DivGthAp 19.83 +.15
IntOpAp 13.68 +.12
Hartford Fds Y:
CapAppIn 31.71 +.34
Hartford HLS IA:
CapApp 40.67 +.43
Div&Gr 20.34 +.15
Advisers 20.21 +.12
TotRetBd 11.67 +.02
Hennessy Funds:
CorGrllOrig
Hussman Funds:
StrTotRetr 12.35 +.10
StrGrowth 12.09 -.02
ICON Fds:
EnergyaS 19.19
HIthcareS 15.41
ISI Funds:
NoAm p 7.97 +.03
IVA Funds:
WMdwideAt 15.84
Wldwide I r 15.84
Invesco Fds Invest:
DivrsDivp 12.38 +.10
Invesco Funds:
Energy 40.53 +.61
Utlibes 16.69 +.22
Invesco Funds A:
Chart p 17.03 +.11
CmstkA 16.15 +.05
Constp 23.01 +.30
EqIncA 8.63 +.04
GrlncAp 19.40 +.09
HilncMu p 7.83 +.02
HiYldp 4.12 +.01
HYMuA 9.58 +.03
IntlGrow 26.54 +.19
MunilnA 13.58 +.03
PATFA 16.47 +.04
US MortgA 12.97 ...
Invesco Funds B:
CapDevt 13.98 +.14
MunilnB 13.56 +.03
US Mortg 12.90
Ivy Funds:
AssetSC t 23.57 +.23
AssetStA p 24.27 +.24
AssetSbi r 24.48 +.25
JPMorgan A Class:
CoreBdA 11.88 +.03
JPMorgan C Class:
CoreBdp 11.93 +.03
JP Morgan Insth:
MdCpVal 24.85
JPMorgan R C:
CoreBond nil.88 +.03
ShtDurBd 10.99 +.01
JPMorgan Select:
USEquity 10.46
JPMorgan Sel CIs:
CoreBdn 11.87 +.03
HighYld 7.78
lntmTFBd n 11.36 +.02
ShtDurBdn 10.99 +.01
USLCCrPIs 20.99
JanusT Shrs:
BalancdT 25.34
ContrarnT 13.01
EnterprT 62.01
FIxBndT 10.55
GlUfeSciTr 26.32
GIbSel T 10.75
GITechTr 17.18
Grw&lncT 31.52
Janus T 28.93
OvrseasTr 36.66


PrkMCVal T21.22
ResearchT 29.99
ShTmBdT 3.07
Twenty T 55.42
VentureT 55.10
WrldWTr 43.20
Jensen Funds:
QualGrthJn28.14 +.22
John Hancock A:
BondAp 15.60 +.04
RgBkA 13.11 +.05
StrlnAp 6.55 +.02


Name NAV Chg
John Hancock B:
StrlncB 6.55 +.02
John Hancock Cl 1:
LSAggr 11.89
LSBalanc 12.67
LSConsrv 12.83
LSGrwth 12.49
LSModer 12.59
Lazard Instl:
EmgMktl 18.43
Lazard Open:
EmgMkOp 18.86

Legg Mason A:
CBAgGrp 118.28 +1.24
CBApprp 14.42 +.09
CBLCGrp 21.74 +.14
GCIAIICOp 8.02 +.06
WAHilncAt 5.86 +.02
WAMgMup 16.61 +.05
Legg Mason B:
CBLgCGrt 19.87 +.13
Legg Mason C:
CMSplnvp 28.60 +.24
CMValTrp 39.57 +.24
Longleaf Partners:
Partners 28.22 +.31
SmCap 26.33 +.28
Loomis Sayles:
LSBondl 14.36 +.07
StrlncCx 14.84
LSBondR 14.31 +.08
StrlncAx 14.75
Loomis Sayles Inv:
InvGrBdAp 12.21 +.05
InvGrBdY 12.22 +.06
Lord Abbett A:
AffilAp 11.19
FundlEq 12.77
BdDebAp 7.81 +.02
ShDurlncAp 4.57
MidCpAp 16.57
Lord Abbett C:
ShDurlncC t 4.60
Lord Abbett F:
ShtDurlnco 4.57 +.01
MFS Funds A:
MITA 19.56
MIGA 16.14
EmGA 43.51
HilnA 3.42 +.01
MFLA 9.65
TotRA 14.41
UtilA 16.95
ValueA 23.40
MFS Funds B:
MIGB 14.52
GvScBn 10.52 +.01
HilnBn 3.43 +.01
MulnBn 8.68 +.02
TotRB 14.41
MFS Funds I:
ReInT 14.45
Valuel 23.51
MFS Funds Instl:
Intln Eq 16.81
MainStay Funds A:
HiYIdBA 5.90 +.01
MainStay Funds B:
ConvBt 14.87
GovtBt 8.89 +.01
HYIdBBt 5.87 +.01
IncmBldr 16.38
IntlEqB 9.94 +.09
MainStay Funds I:
ICAPSIEq 36.06 +.17
Mairs & Power:
Growth n 75.63 +.72
Manning&Napier Fds:
WIdOppA 7.11 +.03
Matthews Asian:
AsianGllnv 15.77 +.10
Indialnvr 15.90 +.16
PacTgrlnv 21.72 +.13
MergerFdn 15.59
Meridian Funds:
Growth 44.12
Metro West Fds:
TotRetBd 10.42 +.02
TotRtBdl 10.42 +.02
Midas Funds:
Midas Fdt 3.96 +.20
Monetta Funds:
Monetta 14.76
Morgan Stanley B:
GlobStratB 15.16 +.11
MorganStanley Inst:
IntlEql 12.92 +.12
MCapGrl 35.42 +.63
Muhlenkn 53.66 +.26
Munder Funds A:
GwthOppA 26.99 +.36
Munder Funds Y:
MCpCGrYn30.20 +.29
Mutual Series:
BeacnZ 12.18 +.05
GblDiscA 28.05 +.08
GlbDiscC 27.84 +.08
GlbDiscZ 28.40 +.09
QuestZ 16.71 +.05
SharesZ 20.68 +.08
Neuberger&Berm Fds:
Focus 19.88
Genesis 34.41
Geneslnst 48.31
Intl r 15.72 +.19
Partner 25.56
Neuberger&Berm Tr:
Genesis 50.14
Nicholas Group:
Hilnc I n 9.50 +.01
Nichn 45.93 +.37
Northern Funds:
Bondldx 10.89 +.02
HiYFxlnc 7.17 +.01
lntTxEx 10.80 +.03
SmCpldx 8.68
Stkldx 16.30
Technly 15.56
Nuveen Cl A:
LtMBAp 11.20 +.01
Nuveen Cl R:
IntDMBd 9.25 +.02
Nuveen Cl YV:
RealEstn 20.08 +.23
Oak Assoc Fds:
WhitOkSG 40.40 +.34
Oakmark Funds I:
Eqtylnc r 27.87
Globall 21.30
Intl lr 17.86
Oakmark 44.23
Select 29.72
Old Westbury Fds:
GlobOpp 7.05 +.03
GIbSMdCap 14.38 +.18
LgCapStrat 9.37 +.08
RealRet 9.82 +.18
Oppenheimer A:
AMTFMu 6.68 +.02
AMTFrNY 11.79 +.04
CAMuniAp 8.19 +.02
CapApAp 44.89
CaplncAp 8.66
ChmplncAp 1.78
DvMktAp 31.41
Discp 57.07
EquityA 8.94
GlobAp 56.76
GIbOppA 29.14 +.64
GblStfrlncA 4.14
Gold p 36.02
IntBdA p 6.29 +.01
LtdTmMu 14.82 +.01
MnStFdA 33.51
PAMuniAp 11.39 +.02
SenFltRtA 8.15
USGvp 9.62 +.02
Oppenheimer B:
AMTFMu 6.64 +.01
AMTFrNY 11.79 +.04
CplncB t 8.49
ChmplncBt 1.79
EquityB 8.26
GblSfrlncB 4.15
Oppenheimer Roch:
LtdNYAp 3.36
RoMuAp 16.41 +.05
RcNtMuA 7.06 +.02
Oppenheimer Y:
DevMktY 31.05
IntlBdY 6.29 +.01
IntGrowY 26.69
PIMCO Admin PIMS:
ShtTmAd p 9.73
TotRtAd 11.00 +.05
PIMCO Instl PIMS:
AlAsetAutr 10.44 +.07
AIIAsset 11.93 +.06
ComodRR 6.85 +.11
Divlnc 11.43 +.03
EmgMkCur 10.31 +.06
EmMkBd 11.34 +.02
Fltlnc r 8.46 -.01
ForBdUnr 10.91 +.04
FrgnBd 10.58 +.01
HiYld 9.17 +.02
InvGrCp 10.46 +.02
LowDu 10.37 +.03
ModDur 10.67 +.04
RealRet 11.49 +.10
RealRhil 11.90 +.08
ShortT 9.73
TotRt 11.00 +.05
TRII 10.67 +.04
TRIll 9.66 +.03


PIMCO Funds A:
AIIAstAutt 10.37 +.07
ComRRp 6.71 +.10
LwDurA 10.37 +.03
RealRtAp 11.90 +.08
TotRtA 11.00 +.05
PIMCO Funds C:
RealRtCp 11.90 +.08
TotRtC t 11.00 +.05
PIMCO Funds D:
TRtnp 11.00 +.05
PIMCO Funds P:
AstAIIlAuthP 10.43 +.07


Name NAV Chg
TotRtnP 11.00 +.05
Parnassus Funds:
Eqtylncon 27.17 +.07
Perm Port Funds:
Permannt 48.45 +.47
Pioneer Funds A:
BondA p 9.60 +.03
IntlValA 18.30
PionFdAp 40.70
ValueAp 11.27
Pioneer Funds B:
HiYldBt 9.92
Pioneer Funds C:
HiYIdC t 10.02
Pioneer FdsY:
CullenVY 17.81
Price Funds:
Balance 19.64
BIChip 40.74
CABondn 11.20 +.03
CapApp 21.41
DivGro 24.31
EmMktBn 12.98 +.05
EmEurp 17.04
EmMktS 31.06
Eqlnc 24.21
Eqlndex 35.44
Europe 13.99
GNMAn 10.12 +.01
Growth 33.57
Gr&ln 20.91
HIthSci 35.21
HiYield n 6.64 +.02
InstlCpG 17.07
IntlBond n 9.87 +.06
IntDis 39.31
Intl G&I 12.06
InflStk 13.12
Japan 7.48
LatAm 43.84
MDShrtn 5.24
MDBondn 10.86 +.02
MidCap 55.70
MCapVal 22.41
NAmer 33.42
N Asia 14.80
New Era 44.42
N Horiz 33.18
N Incn 9.67 +.01
NYBondn 11.60 +.03
Overs SF 7.70
PSInc 16.25
RealAssetr 10.95
RealEst 19.34
R2010 15.51
R2015 12.02
R2020 16.59
R2025 12.13
R2030 17.38
R2035 12.28
R2040 17.47
R2045 11.63
SciTec 28.43
ShtBd n 4.83 +.01
SmCpStk 33.30
SmCapVal 36.72
SpecGr 17.83
Specln 12.46
TFIncn 10.29 +.02
TxFrHn 11.17 +.02
TxFrSI n 5.69 +.01
USTIntn 6.24 +.03
USTLgn 13.24
VABondn 12.07 +.02
Value 23.90
Principal Inv:
LgCGI In 9.40
LT20201n 11.70
LT20301n 11.55
Prudential Fds A:
BlendA 17.42
HiYIdAp 5.46 +.01
MuHilncA 9.82 +.01
UbIityA 10.85 +.15
Prudential Fds B:
GrowthB 16.89
HiYIdBt 5.46 +.02
Putnam Funds A:
AmGvAp 9.20 +.01
AZ TE 9.33 +.02
ConvSec 19.44 +.14
DvrlnAp 7.39
EqnA p 15.94 +.06
EuEq 17.86 +.19
GeoBalA 12.46 +.06
GIbEqtyp 8.73 +.09
GrInAp 13.61 +.09
GIblHIthA 41.21 +.35
HiYdAp 7.46
HiYld In 5.83 +.01
IncmAp 6.78 +.01
IntGrln p 8.74 +.09
InvAp 13.37 +.11
NJTxA p 9.70 +.03
MulCpGr 52.36 +.74
PATE 9.36 +.02
TxExA p 8.82 +.02
TFInAp 15.35 +.03
TFHYA 12.09 +.03
USGvAp 13.66
GIblUtilA 9.97 +.14
VoyAp 21.84 +.28
Putnam Funds B:
TaxFrlns 15.37 +.04
DvrlnBt 7.33 +.01
EqInct 15.80 +.05
EuEq 17.16 +.18
GeoBalB 12.32 +.06
GIbEq t 7.89 +.08
GINtRst 18.29
GrlnBt 13.37 +.09
GIblHIthB 32.97 +.28
HiYIdBt 7.45
HYAdBt 5.72 +.01
IncmBt 6.72 +.01
IntGrln t 8.68 +.08
InitNopt 13.28 +.16
InvBt 12.06 +.10
NJTxB t 9.68 +.02
MulCpGr 44.92 +.63
TxExB t 8.82 +.02
TFHYBt 12.11 +.03
USGvBt 13.59
GlblUtilB 9.94 +.14
VoyBt 18.41 +.23
RS Funds:
IntGrA 16.41
LgCAIphaA 40.28
Value 24.26
RidgeWorth Funds:
LCGrStkA p10.67
Royce Funds:
LwPrSkSvr 15.57
MicroCapl 15.57
PennMulr 11.56
Premierl r 19.84
TotRetlr 13.31
ValSvct 11.79
Russell Funds S:

StratBd 10.96 +.03
Rydex Advisor:
NasdaqAdv 14.77
SSgA Funds:
EmgMkt 19.78 +.21
Schwab Funds:
HIthCare 18.00
lOOOInvr 37.08
S&P Sel 20.48
SmCpSI 20.23
TSMSelr 23.74
Scout Funds:
Intl 30.05 +.27
Selected Funds:
AmShD 41.50 ...
AmShSp 41.53 ...
Sentinel Group:
ComSAp 32.99 +.26
Sequoia 151.85 +.94
Sit Funds:
LrgCpGr 44.39 +.53
SoSunSClnv t n21.36+.24
St FarmAssoc:
Gwll 54.16
Stratton Funds:
Mul-Cap 35.31 +.43
RealEstate 28.60 +34
SmCap 52.19 +.62
SunAmerica Funds:
USGvBt 10.14
TCW Funds:
TotRetBdl 9.75 +.03
TIAA-CREF Funds:
Bdldxlnst 10.78 +.02
Eqldxlnst 9.97 ...
Templeton Instit:
ForEqS 17.88 +.02
Third Avenue Fds:
IntlValnstr 15.19 +.12
REVallnstr 22.35 +.19
Valuelnst 44.56 +.33
Thornburg Fds:
IntValAp 25.48 +.12
IncBuildAt 18.37 +.06
IncBuildCp 18.37 +.06
IntValue I 26.04 +.12
LtTMul 14.58 +02
Thrivent Fds A:
HiYld 4.78
Income 8.78
Tocqueville Fds:
Goldtn 78.01 +3.74
Transamerica A:
AegonHYBp 9.07 +.02
Flexlncp 8.92 +.03
Turner Funds:


SmlCpGrn 34.84 +.34
Tweedy Browne:
GblValue 22.35
US Global Investors:
AIIAm 23.82 +.28
ChinaReg 7.57 +.06
GIbRs 9.90
Gld&Mtls 13.00
WdPrcMn 13.83
USAA Group:
AgvGt 34.31
CABd 10.70 +.03
CrnstStr 21.75


Name NAV Chg
GNMA 10.40
GrTxStr 13.80
Grwth 15.26
Gr&lnc 15.34
IncStk 12.77
Inco 13.13 +.03
Intl 22.80
NYBd 12.22 +.03
PrecMM 31.97
SciTech 13.17
ShtTBnd 9.16
SmCpStk 14.21
TxElt 13.46 +.02
TxELT 13.45 +.03
TxESh 10.81
VABd 11.41 +.02
WIdGr 18.67
VALIC :
MdCpldx 19.84
Stkldx 24.41
Value Line Fd:
LrgCo 18.30
Vanguard Admiral:
BalAdml n 22.57 +.14
CAITAdmn 11.54 +.02
CALTAdmnll.65 +.02
CpOpAdl n 72.92 +.54
EMAdmr r n 34.93 +.32
Energyn 119.84 +1.73
EqlnAdm n n47.54 +.31
EuroAdml n 54.80 +.43
ExplAdmln 71.58 +.73
ExtdAdm n 42.52 +.51
500Adml n 122.22 +1.05
GNMA Ad n 11.06
GrwAdrnm n 33.93 +.45
HlthCr n 55.82 +.23
HiYldCp n 5.79 +.02
InfProAdn 27.94 +.18
ITBdAdml n 11.78 +.05
ITsryAdml n 11.69 +.05
IntGrAdm n 56.41 +.58
ITAdmln 14.19 +.02
ITGrAdmrn 10.06 +.04
LtdTrAdn 11.18 +.01
LTGrAdml n 10.17 +.01
LTsyAdml n 12.87
LTAdmln 11.51 +.02
MCpAdml n 95.92 +1.28
MorgAdm n 58.64 +.76
MuHYAdm nlO.89 +.02
NYLTAdn 11.55 +.02
PrmCap r n 67.99 +.41
PALTAdrnm nll.52 +.02
ReitAdm r n 87.00 +1.11
STsyAdml n 10.80 +.01
STBdAdmlnlO.64 +.02
ShtTrAdn 15.94 +.01
STFdAdn 10.87 +.02
STIGrAdn 10.70 +.01
SmCAdm n 35.89 +.34
TxMCaprn 66.20 +.63
TlBAdml n 10.98 +.02
TSkAdmnn 33.19 +.31
ValAdmln 21.49 +.10
WellslAdmrn n56.37 +.21
WelltnAdrnm n56.19 +.29
Windsor n 46.35 +.30
WdsrllAd n 47.95 +.25
Vanguard Fds:
AssetAn 24.79 +.15
CALTn 11.65 +.02
CapOppn 31.58 +.24
Convrtn 12.54 +.08
DivdGron 15.98 +.08
Energy n 63.83 +.92
Eqlnc n 22.68 +.15
Explr n 76.94 +.79
FLLTn 11.95 +.02
GNMAn 11.06
GlobEqn 17.06 +.16
Grolnc n 27.84 +.24
GrthEqn 11.59 +.15
HYCorpn 5.79 +.02
HlthCren 132.29 +.54
InflaPron 14.22 +.09
IntlExplrn 13.89 +.16
IntlGrn 17.74 +.18
InfiVal n 28.61 +.29
ITIGraden 10.06 +.04
ITTsryn 11.69 +.05
LifeConn 16.63 +.08
LifeGron 22.18 +.18
Lifelncn 14.32 +.05
LifeModn 19.90 +.14
LTIGraden 10.17 +.01
LTTsryn 12.87
Morg n 18.92 +.25
MuHYn 10.89 +.02
Mulntn 14.19 +.02
MuLtdn 11.18 +.01
MuLongn 11.51 +.02
MuShrtn 15.94 +.01
NJLTn 12.14 +.02
NYLTn 11.55 +.02
OHLTTEn 12.44 +.02
PALTn 11.52 +.02
PrecMtls r n 21.97 +.60
PrmcpCorn 14.20 +.10
Prmcp r n 65.53 +.39
SelValurn 19.55 +.14
STARn 19.55 +.11
STIGraden 10.70 +.01
STFedn 10.87 +.02
STTsryn 10.80 +.01
StratEqn 19.72 +.24
TgtRe2005 nl2.23 +.06
TgtRetlncn 11.77 +.06
TgRe2010n23.10 +.14
TgtRe2015 nl2.75 +.09
TgRe20205n22.59 +.16
TgtRe2025 nl2.84 +.10
TgRe2030n21.99 +.18
TgtRe2035nl3.21 +.12
TgtRe2040 n21.68 +.19
TgtRe2050n21.59 +.20
TgtRe2045nl3.61 +.12
USGron 19.38 +.21
USValuen 10.72 +.06
Wellsly n 23.27 +.09
Welltnn 32.53 +.16
Wndsrn 13.74 +.09
Wndslln 27.02 +.14
Vanguard Idx Fds:
DvMklnPl r n93.32 +.97
MidCplstP nl 04.50+1.40
TotlntAdm r r23.45 +.25
Totlntllnst r n93.78 +1.02
TotlntllP r n 93.79 +1.01
500 n 122.21 +1.05
Balancedn 22.56 +.14
EMktn 26.59 +.24
Europen 23.53 +.18
Extend n 42.50 +.50
Growth n 33.93 +.45
LgCaplx n 24.51 +.22
LTBndn 13.59
MidCapn 21.14 +.28
Pacific n 9.66 +.15
REITr n 20.39 +.26
SmCap n 35.87 +.35
SmlCpGlthn23.08 +.24
STBndn 10.64 +.02
TotBndn 10.98 +.02
TotllntI n 14.02 +.15
TotStkn 33.18 +.31
Valuen 21.49 +.11
Vanguard Instl Fds:
Ballnstn 22.57 +.14
DevMklnstn 8.96 +.10
Extln n 42.51 +51
FTAIIWIdl r n83.59 +.88
Grwthlstn 33.93 +.45
InfProlnstn 11.38 +.07
Instldxn 121.43 +1.05
InsPIn 121.43 +1.04
InstTStldxn 30.03 +.28
lnsTStPlus r30.03 +.27
MidCplstn 21.19 +.29
SCInstn 35.89 +.35
TBIstn 10.98 +.02
TSInstn 33.19 +.30
Valuelstn 21.49 +.11
Vanguard Signal:
o500Sgln 100.96 +.87
GroSign 31.42 +.42
ITBdSig n 11.78 +.05
MidCpldx n 30.27 +.40
STBdidxn 10.64 +.02
SmCpSig n 32.34 +.32
TotBdSgl n 10.98 +.02
TotStkSgl n 32.03 +.29
Virtus Funds A:
MulSStAp 4.79 +.01
Waddell & Reed Adv:
AssetS p 9.20 +.09
CorelnvA 5.97 +.06
DivOppAp 14.66 +.15
DivOppCt 14.51 +.15
Wasatch:
SmCpGr 40.43 +.37
Wells Fargo Adv A:
AstAIlAp 12.14
Wells Fargo Adv C:
AstAIICt 11.72
Wells Fargo Adv
CmSlllnv 20.35 +.18
Opptylnv 38.69 +.39
Wells Fargo Ad Ins:
UlStMulnc 4.81 -.01
Wells Fargo Instl:
UItSTMuA 4.82
Western Asset:
CorePlusl 11.15 +.02
William Blair N:
GrowthN 11.44
Yacktman Funds:


undpn 18.24 +04
Focusedn 19.49 +.04


Fed promise boosts markets


Market watch
Jan. 25, 2012

Dow Jones +81.21
industrials 12,756.96
12,756.96


Associated Press


The stock market
bounced to its highest close
since last spring Wednesday
after the Federal Reserve
said it expected to keep in-
terest rates near zero for al-
most three more years.
Bond yields dropped
sharply, then climbed back
later in the day when in-
vestors began looking more
closely into the Fed's delib-
erations. The yield on the
five-year Treasury note
touched an all-time low.
The big moves in both
markets came at 12:30 p.m.,
when the Fed's monetary
policy committee said it was
unlikely to raise interest
rates before late 2014. It had
previously said it expected
to keep rates low into the
middle of 2013.
"Unless there is a sub-
stantial strengthening of the
economy in the near term,
it's a pretty good guess we
will be keeping rates low for
some time," Chairman Ben
Bernanke told reporters.


+31.67

2,818.31

+11.41

1,326.06

+7.31

795.58


NYSE diary
Advanced: 2,324

Declined: 722

Unchanged: 98

Volume: 4.3 b

Nasdaq diary
Advanced: 1,671

Declined: 840

Unchanged: 129

Volume: 1.9 b
AP

The Fed cut rates to near
zero in December 2008, dur-
ing the financial crisis, and
has held them there since.


The announcement was a
sign that the Fed expects
the economy, which is im-
proving, to need significant
help for three more years.
The Dow Jones industrial
average was down as much
as 95 points in the morning
and about 60 points before
the Fed announcement. It
shot to a gain of 103 points
during the afternoon.
The promise of lower
rates pushed the dollar
lower against other major
currencies. Low interest
rates make the dollar less
attractive because they re-
duce the returns traders get
on U.S. debt and other
bonds priced in dollars.
Technology stocks rose all
morning after Apple re-
ported its best quarter and
blew away analyst estimates.
Apple once again passed
Exxon Mobil as the com-
pany with the biggest mar-
ket value. Apple stock
jumped 6.3 percent, helping
lift the Nasdaq composite
index by 31.67 points, or 1.1
percent, to close at 2,818.31.


Business HIGHLIGHTS


Delta's fourth-quarter profit

soars on higher fares, demand

MINNEAPOLIS Delta Air Lines' quarterly profit
soared as higher fares offset a bigger fuel bill.
Like other carriers, Delta was able to raise
fares by cutting the amount of flying it did in the
fourth quarter. The money it made flying a pas-
senger a single mile rose 12 percent.
The company's fourth-quarter net income rose
to $425 million, or 50 cents per share.

US Airways' fourth-quarter

profit falls as fuel prices climb

NEW YORK US Airways Group Inc. ex-
pects ticket prices and passenger demand will
continue their upward climb this year, overshad-
owing stubbornly higher fuel prices.
It's just the continuation of a "transformation" to
an industry where promotional fares are less
common, tickets are more expensive and rapid
addition of flights is rare, says CEO Doug Parker.
Investors applauded the comments Wednes-
day and brushed off a decline in the company's
fourth-quarter earnings. The earnings still topped
Wall Street expectations and its stock jumped
more than 20 percent in afternoon trading.

Senate Democrats promise

to push Obama tax agenda

WASHINGTON President Barack Obama's
Democratic allies in the Senate promised
Wednesday to press ahead this year with legisla-
tion drawn from his plans to require millionaires to
pay at least 30 percent in taxes.
Senate Democratic leaders promised votes soon
on such tax "fairness" initiatives. The Democratic
drive would follow the ongoing push to renew the
payroll tax cut, a debate that has broken in De-
mocrats' favor as House-Senate talks began this
week. Among the ideas endorsed by the Demo-
cratic leaders Wednesday was Obama's proposal
to require millionaires to pay a higher minimum tax
rate, deny corporations the ability to completely
avoid taxes and reward companies that create jobs
in America instead of shipping them overseas.
-From wire reports


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I NEWYORKSTOCK EXCHANGE I


TJX 67.96
TRWAuto 39.74
ThawSemi 14.16
TalismEg 12.19
Target 51.14
TataMotors 23.26
TeckResg 42.33
TelcmNZs 8.69
TelefBrasil 28.95
TelefEsp 17.29
TelMexL 15.73
Templelnld 31.70
TempurP 67.81
TenetHIth 5.50
Teradata 54.01
Teradyn 16.13
Terex 20.97
TerraNitro 190.60
Tesoro 25.49
TetraTech 9.71
Textron 24.76
Theragen 1.66
ThermoFis 53.54
ThmBet 57.88
ThomCrkg 8.55
3M Co 86.48
Tiffany 63.73
TW Cable 69.11
TimeWarn 38.21
Timken 48.36
TitanMet 16.12
TollBros 23.23


TorchEngy 2.50
Trchmrks 45.51
TorDBkg 78.36
Total SA 53.20
TotalSys 21.83
Transom 47.36
Travelers 59.15
Tredgar 24.86
TriConfi 15.03
TrinaSolar 7.94
TwoHrblnv 9.70
TycolntI 49.74
Tyson 18.84
UBSAG 13.89
UDR 25.58
UGI Corp 26.91
UIL Hold 34.42
USAirwy 7.52
US Gold 5.87
USG 13.53
UltraPtg 26.14
UndrArmr 77.49
UniSrcEn 37.13
UniFirst 60.48
UnilevNV 33.37
Unilever 32.46
UnionPac 113.63
UtdContl 20.41
UtdMicro 2.53
UPSB 75.62
UtdRentals 34.77
US Bancrp 28.60


US NGs rs 5.93 +.39 Waters 87.91
US OilFd 38.35 +.25 WatsnPh 57.61
USSteel 30.40 +1.44 Weathflnfi 16.79
UtdTech 77.65 -.13 WeinRIt 24.76
UtdhlthGp 51.57 +.24 WellPoint 66.10
S 2323 WellsFargo 30.20
ik kl WestarEn 28.77
ValeSA 25.04 +52 WAstEMkt 13.78
ValeSApf 24.16 +.53 WstAMgdHi 6.21
ValeroE 24.65 +.46 WAstlnfpp 12.82
ai 100.56 -.45 WDigital 17.40
VangTSM 68.16 +.62 WsDiginl 37.40
VangDivAp 56.78 +.36 WshUnion 19.51
VangEmg 42.49 +.49 Weerh 20.28
VangEAFE 32.42 +.32 Whrlpl 54.89
VarianMed 69.24 +.73 WhiXngPts 51.88
Vectren 28.76 +.22 WmsCos 29.41
Ventas 57.92 +.53 WmsPtrs 62.60
VeoliaEnv 10.95 +.13 WmsSon 34.90
VerizonOm 37.69 -.10 Winnbgo 9.28
VimpelCm 10.36 +.09 WiscEns 34.56
Visa 100.56 -.45 WTIndia 19.17
Vishaylnt 11.97 -.09 Worthgtn 19.20
VMware 92.15 -.51 XLGrp 20.73
Vornado 82.04 +.53 XcelEngy 27.08
WGL Hold 43.20 +.20 Xerox 7.81
WPXEnn 16.18 +.87 Yamanag 16.92
Wabash 8.83 -.01 YingliGrn 4.20
WalMart 61.47 +.08 Youku 20.59
Walgrn 34.69 +.42 YumBrnds 62.65
WalterEn 70.14 +2.60 Zimmer 57.75
WsteMInc 34.61 +.28 ZweigTI 3.18


Name Last Chg
SP Inds 36.56 +.40
SPTech 27.08 +.21
SP UIl 35.04 +.57
StdPac 4.01 +.07
Standex 39.07 +.37
StanBlkDk 72.34 +2.45
StarwdHtl 54.78 +.26
StateStr 39.91 -1.40
Stabil ASA 25.52 +.32
Steris 29.56 +.21
SIIlwtrM 13.45 +.94
SratHotels 6.26 +.25
Sbyker 55.06 +2.12
StunnrmRug 39.61 +1.09
SubPpne 46.75 +.32
SuccessF 39.76 +.06
SunCmts 39.71 +.89
SunCoken 13.77 +.19
Suncorgs 34.27 +.52
Sunooo 38.66 +.94
Suntedich 3.14 +.08
SunTrst 21.62 +.33
SupEnrgy 27.46 +.32
Supvalu 7.00 +.06
SwiftTrans 10.73 +.73
Synovus 1.76 +.03
Sysco 30.43 +.14
TCF Fncl 10.50 -.02
TEConnect 34.68 -1.03
TECO 18.48 +.41


Nasdaq
composite


Standard &
Poor's 500

Russell
2000


Geithner: Obama won't ask me

to stay for second term

WASHINGTON Timothy Geithner says he
will not serve President Barack Obama as Treas-
ury secretary in a second term.
Geithner said in a Bloomberg Television inter-
view that he doesn't think Obama would ask him
to remain at Treasury should the president win
re-election.
Geithner is the only remaining top official on
Obama's original economics team. He helped
lead the administration's response to the 2008 fi-
nancial crisis and was a frequent target of Re-
publican criticism during his three years at
Treasury.

Sales contracts for homes

dip from 19-month high

WASHINGTON The number of Americans
who signed contracts to buy homes fell in De-
cember after hitting the highest level in a year
and a half.
The National Association of Realtors said its
index of sales agreements fell 3.5 percent last
month to a reading of 96.6. That's down from
November's reading of 100.1.
The December reading is the second-highest
since April 2010, the last month that buyers could
qualify for a federal home-buying tax credit.
A reading of 100 is considered healthy.

Netflix regains 600,000 US

subscribers in fourth quarter

SAN FRANCISCO Netflix gained 600,000
U.S. customers in the fourth quarter.
Figures released Wednesday show Netflix Inc.
ended December with 24.4 million subscribers in
the U.S. That was up from 23.8 million at the end
of September.
The uptick is a positive sign for Netflix after
several months of upheaval that battered its
stock. Netflix lost 800,000 subscribers last
summer after raising its U.S. prices as much
as 60 percent.
The fallout contributed to a 14 percent de-
crease in Netflix's fourth-quarter earnings.







Page A10 THURSDAY, JANUARY 26,2012



PINION


"Nothing is permanent but change."
Heraclitus (circa 500 B.C.), quoted in
Diogenes Laertius' "Lives and
Opinions of Eminent Philosophers
(third century A.D.)


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan........... .................. publisher
Charlie Brennan ............. ................. editor
Mike Arnold ........... .................. HR director
Sandra Frederick....................... managing editor
.JJ Curt Ebitz.............. ............ citizen member
Founded Mac Harris ........................ citizen member
by Albert M.
Williamson Rebecca Martin .........................guest member
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


REDISTRICTING




Political




landscape



changing


News that the Florida
Senate passed the new
redistricting plan in a
bipartisan vote last week is
welcomed, but critics say the
districts may not
pass judicial
muster. THE I
Voters approved
Amendments 5 Florida
and 6 to the passes re
Florida Constitu- pl
tion in 2010. The
amendments pro- OUR 01
hibit line-drawing Hopefull'
that intentionally will cre
favors a political disti
party or
incumbent.
The amendments are also
designed to be blind to minori-
ties, in terms of race and
language.
The Florida House is still
working out its plan, but the
goal is to make the districts
more compact.
Most agree the new districts
will allow Democrats to pick
up a few seats in each legisla-
tive chamber, but not enough to
impact the overwhelming ma-
jority Republicans currently
hold.
Citrus County is now wholly
situated within state Sen.
Charlie Dean's 10-county Dis-
trict 2 and represents 30 per-
cent of the districts total
population.


S

d
a

P


ri


The redistricting plan did
hurt some counties for exam-
ple, Marion County is split in
two, with the majority of its
roughly 331,000 residents in-
cluded in District
11. The other
;SUE: 92,000 make up the
second-largest sec-
Senate tion of District 2.
districting The new state
n. Senate map is
much more com-
INION: pact than its pred-
process ecessor, but still
ate fair has some district
cts. borders, such as
Districts 6, 9, 12, 14
and 34, which me-
ander across several counties
without fully providing repre-
sentation in any one county.
The previous map was so di-
vided that a small sliver of the
westernmost portion of Citrus
belonged in another Senate
district. Fortunately, state Sen.
Mike Fasano has demonstrated
concern for all of Citrus
County, despite elected being
to serve just a small fraction of
the population.
Ultimately, the process ends
in the courts as the Florida
Supreme Court must stamp ap-
proval on what is voted on by
state legislators to ensure it
passes the Florida Redistrict-
ing Amendment approved by
voters in November 2010.


Hot Corner: JOBS


Untapped job potential
How many times has President
Obama said, "Jobs are my top
priority?" Well, he has just killed
the Keystone pipeline, which
would have created 20,000 to
50,000 jobs all shovel-ready
jobs immediately- and added up
to 150,000 collateral jobs in steel
mills for the production of the
pipeline itself and the ancillary
equipment like pumps and power
plants. It's unforgivable that he
has put politics before the people.
We can't believe anything our pre-
varicator and chief says.


Declining county?
With the Crystal River Mall Sears
store closing notice, people keep
calling in for a Target, Bed,
Bath and Beyond,
Michael's and an assort-
ment of large retailers
that do not establish in
counties with small popu-
lation, low earnings and
stagnant growth. Citrus
County is in decline. That's
why Sears and others are
leaving. Soon it will be a CALI
Wal-Mart county because 563
of demographics. If you
want growth and develop-
ment, you need to move away. It's
not going to come here.
Gratitude to a stranger
I wish to thank the very nice
lady who picked up my little
change purse on the ground in
Winn-Dixie on Wednesday (Jan.
11). She's very lovely. She went to
the bank that had my ID in it and
they called me. It's so nice to
know that we have wonderful peo-
ple still living here in Beverly Hills.


Sound the alarm
The headline says, "Obama re-
jects pipeline." So this is how he
brings more jobs in this country?
All he wants to do is get the gov-
ernment to have the jobs, not in-
dividual companies. Wake up,
people, wake up.
Time to move?
Mitt Romney claims he can cre-
ate all of these jobs, but he
chooses to keep most of his wealth
and money in offshore accounts.
Maybe we will have to go to the
Cayman Islands for these jobs.


Thank you so much. Mrs. Austin, I
believe, is her name.
Good job!
I recently read
UND Wednesday's (Jan. 11)
Community (section) Cit-
OFF rus County Chronicle story
about the Cody and Joey
H Wright making the ban-
danas for animals. I think
it's such a wonderful
thing that their mother
S and grandmother did in
0 579 helping them do that and
0579 helping them to learn
how to run a little busi-
ness and take the money
and hand it over to the Ellie
Schiller Homosassa Springs
Wildlife State Park. That is a won-
derful thing they did. They should
be congratulated. You know, I'm
very proud of them, that, you
know, somebody from the area
has decided to really do some-
thing nice. Congratulations, boys.
Think about it
Dogs. If your dog is fat, you
aren't getting it enough exercise.


Those big snakes are here to stay


Now that federal
regulators
have outlawed
the importation of hu-
mongous, gator-eating
pythons, all Floridians
can breathe a grateful
sigh of relief. Finally,
we are saved from this
insidious reptilian
plague!
Sorry, but no. We
might as well try to
ban fleas.


Carl Hiaasen
OTHER
VOICES


As anybody who
knows anything about the Ever-
glades will tell you, the giant
Burmese python is here to stay If
last year's hard freeze didn't kill
off the tropical snakes, nothing
short of a nuclear disaster will do
it.
The import ban on the
Burmese and three other species
of constrictors which was an-
nounced last week is being
hailed by the Obama administra-
tion as a victory for Florida's na-
tive environment. In reality, it's
just a classic lesson of how Wash-
ington mulls and stalls until
things are out of hand.
That there was an actual de-
bate about the invasive snake cri-
sis is incredible to the point of
satire. Some reptile dealers and
breeders, joined by a few clueless
Republican lawmakers (none of
whom had experienced a 15-foot
python in their swimming pool),
claimed that a ban on imports
and interstate sales would be
"job killing."
As one who once collected and
bred snakes, I cannot overstate
how laughably bogus that posi-
tion was. The realm of commer-
cial reptile dealing, which has
always had a sketchy element, is
full of clever folks who always
find ways to market different ex-
otic species when one becomes
unavailable. Not one real job
would have been lost.
Still, the "herp" industry -
wholesale and retail herpetology
enthusiasts hired lobbyists to
fight the proposed ban, and the
big-snake argument dragged on
for six ridiculous years. During


that period, untold
thousands of baby
pythons were hatched
in the wilds of South
Florida and dutifully
commenced to devour
the local fauna.
By the time the ban
was approved, the gov-
ernment's original list
of "injurious" snake
species had been polit-
ically pared to four -
the Burmese python,


the yellow anaconda
and two species of African
pythons.
Spared from the blacklist was
the common boa constrictor, one
of the most popular species
among pet owners, and one of the
most likely to be turned free
when it becomes a little too inter-
ested in the family poodle. Boas
don't grow as hefty as pythons,
but they are equally fond of our
sunny climate and tasty bird
population.
The fact is, there are already so
many of these snakes being cap-
tive-bred in this country that a
ban on imports is essentially
meaningless. Most serious reptile
dealers buy from U.S. breeders
who specialize in extravagantly
hued strains, the product of years
of genetic tinkering.
It's true that certain exotic
species won't mate in captivity,
and must be caught in the wild
and then shipped here. However,
that's not the case with the four
snakes named in the new federal
ban.
Pythons and yellow anacondas
reproduce exuberantly, with no
shyness, in robust, rat-like num-
bers. The time is long past when
their importation is necessary to
the trade.
The significant part of the fed-
eral ban, which takes effect in
March, is the illegalizing of inter-
state sales of Burmese pythons,
their eggs and hybrids. That will
sure impact the sales of some
reptile dealers, but there's noth-
ing to prevent a customer from
purchasing as many snakes as
they want from an


in-state breeder
And it doesn't matter if you're a
reptile fancier in South Florida
or North Dakota. If you've got a
nice warm room in your house
and a love-struck pair of pythons,
you will have bushels of fertile
python eggs.
The snakes that now roam the
Everglades are most likely de-
scended from those set loose
when Hurricane Andrew flat-
tened rural reptile farms in the
summer of 1992. The jumbo spec-
imens might well be original
refugees from that storm, their
love lives spiced by chance en-
counters with ex-pet pythons
whose owners had lost (or pur-
posely ditched) them.
So ubiquitous is the python
presence that the notoriously
slug-like Florida Wildlife Com-
mission last year took steps that
practically bans private owner-
ship of the Burmese and seven
other species, for new collectors.
Herp lovers who already owned
the snakes could keep them if
they bought a permit and agreed
to implant microchips before July
2010.
When it comes to environmen-
tal protections, rarely does the
state of Florida take a leading
role over the feds. The delay
speaks to the embarrassing grid-
lock in the nation's capital, where
even a pernicious snake infesta-
tion generates pious, ideological
fuming.
Sen. Bill Nelson and others
worked long and hard to get the
Department of Interior to do
something, and a ban is probably
a good thing to have on the books
as a precedent before the next in-
vasive species settles in.
But as a way of containing the
Burmese python, it's way too lit-
tle, way too late. They're here,
they're hungry, they're happy -
and they're getting it on.


Carl Hiaasen is a columnist for
the Miami Herald. Readers may
write to him at: 1 Herald Plaza,
Miami, FL 33132.


's-iNL6 ATLTES R SUTf ARABiA StI AS Sr ASF NW


_ LETTERS to the Editor


No shame
Why would you want to peti-
tion the government to seize the
wealth and property of fellow
citizens? Is it because you have
decided they have too much, or
is it because you have too little?
No matter your reasons, it's so-
cialist clap trap. The 1 percent
the Occupy crazies rail against
pays 38 percent of all federal in-
come taxes, and these idiots
have the gall to suggest they pay
more. The upper 10 percent pays
70 percent of all federal income
taxes, and that pretty much gives
you a free ride on your taxes,
and that's still not enough for
you. You want to be taken care
of. We haven't done right by you.
Have you no shame?
I hardly know who Kim Kar-
dashian is, but I am aware she is
the poster girl for a bunch of Cal-
ifornia crazies called the
Courage Campaign who want a
tax on people making over a mil-
lion dollars. The big sponsor of
the campaign is the teachers'
union, which would like to see
more money available for salary


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in Chroni-
cle editorials are the opinions of
the newspaper's editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Groups or individuals are invited
to express their opinions in a let-
ter to the editor.
All letters must be signed and in-
clude a phone number and home-
town, including letters sent via
email. Names and hometowns will
be printed; phone numbers will
not be published or given out.
We reserve the right to edit let-
ters for length, libel, fairness and
good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
350 words, and writers will be
limited to three letters per month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to
352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

increases. Like the Occupy cra-
zies, they are fast and loose with
the truth, and they also want the


government to seize the wealth
and property of citizens and
award it to them.
Here's how they put it: Kim
made $12 million last year and
paid 10.3 percent in state taxes
on it. They compare her to a
teacher who made $47,000 and
paid 9.3 percent in taxes. They
say Kim made millions and only
paid 1 percent more than the
teacher Given the educational
level in California, they may buy
that, but we know that Kim paid
10.3 percent on $12 million, or
$1,236,000. The teacher paid 9.3
percent on $47,000 or $4,371.
Kim paid 283 times the amount
the teacher paid, yet these idiots
claim she isn't paying her fair
share. Have they no shame?
If state income tax is just a
bad memory, you might be ask-
ing how big a hole California is
in after 42 straight years of dem-
ocratic legislatures. Two hun-
dred and sixty-five billion
dollars is the answer That's so-
cialism at work.
Harley Lawrence
Homosassa


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


-





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Heavy-hitters at Davos fret



over effects of capitalism


Leaders still

defendprimacy

of markets

Associated Press

DAVOS, Switzerland A
four-year economic crisis
has left societies battered
and widened the gap be-
tween the haves and have-
nots, financial leaders
conceded Wednesday -
with one suggesting that
Western-style capitalism it-
self may be endangered.
As Europe struggles with
its debt crisis and the global
economic outlook remains
gloomy at best, there's a
sense at the heavily guarded
World Economic Forum that
free markets are on trial.
Many at the elite eco-
nomic gathering in the Swiss
Alps accept that more must
be done to convince critics
that Western capitalism has
a future and that it can learn
from its massive failures.
For David Rubenstein,
the co-founder and manag-
ing director of asset man-
agement firm Carlyle
Group, leaders must work
fast to overcome the current
crisis or else different mod-
els of capitalism, such as the
form practiced in China,
may win the day
"As a result of this reces-
sion, that's lasted longer
than anyone predicted and
will probably go on for a
number of more years ...
we're going to have a lot of
economic disparities,"
Rubenstein said. "We've got
to work through these prob-
lems. If we don't do in three
or four years ... the game
will be over for the type of
capitalism that many of us
have lived through and
thought was the best type."
Some 2,600 of the world's
most influential people
came for the forum this
week amid increasing wor-
ries about the global econ-
omy and social unrest due to
rising income inequalities.
China has reaped the re-
wards of its transition to a
more market-based econ-
omy and is now the world's
second-largest economy Un-
like the capitalist systems in
the U.S. and Europe, China's
market transformation has
been heavily guided by a
state apparatus that contin-
ues to balk at widespread
democratic reforms. Latin
America, too, has seen suc-
cess in the development of
"state capitalism" in certain
industries.
"You combine elements of
private enterprise with pub-
lic responsibility," said Col-
ombia's mining and energy
minister, Mauricio Cardenas.
Although Rubenstein's
stark appraisal may be an
outlier, there was a clear de-
fensive posture among
many participants on this
opening day of the forum.
There were numerous
references to the need to in-


Associated Press
Protesters from the group "Corporations on the Leash" demonstrate Wednesday outside the
42nd annual meeting of the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland.


novate, the need to consult
with employees and the re-
alization that power in the
world is shifting from the
west to the east. While the
traditional industrial
economies of the United
States and Europe have
limped through the last few
years, often from one crisis
to another, many economies
in Asia and Latin America
have been booming.
But Raghuram Rajan, a
professor at the University
of Chicago, doubted that the
Chinese model was likely to
last for too long.
State capitalism, he said,
may be good if you're play-
ing "catch-up" but it reaches
its "natural limits" once
that's been accomplished.
Others worried about con-
flicts of interest as the same
government officials run the
companies and set industry
regulations.
Mark Penn, global CEO of
the public relations firm
Burson-Marsteller, told The
Associated Press that "the
whole crisis has raised
larger questions about how
is capitalism working, how
do you redefine fairness in
the 21st century?"
Many rejected the sugges-
tion by Sharan Burrow, the
general secretary of the In-
ternational Trade Union
Confederation, that capital-
ism has lost its "moral com-
pass" and needed to be
"reset" Business leaders in-
sisted they were learning
from the mistakes that
dragged the world into its
deepest economic recession
since the World War II.
Bank of America's CEO
Brian Moynihan said bank
excesses in the run-up to the
credit crunch of 2008 re-
flected the economies the
banks were operating in, so
it is important now that pol-
icymakers don't overreact.
Moynihan, whose bank
had to back down on charg-
ing a $5 debit card fee after
protests by the Occupy
movement and others, said
banks have "done a lot" to
reduce earlier excesses. He
also noted that boom and
bust cycles are a part of the


Western capitalist structure.
Many outside the confines
of the Davos conference
center disagree, after years
of crisis in which hundreds
of millions have lost their
jobs even as top executives
still reap huge pay packets.
Protesters on Wednesday
sent aloft big red weather
balloons carrying a huge
protest banner reading "Hey
WEF, Where are the other
6.9999 billion leaders?"
The activists were from
the Occupy WEF move-
ment, a small group camp-
ing out in igloos at Davos
and following in the foot-
steps of the Occupy Wall
Street movement that
spread around the world.
Experts said protests
must be expected after the
excesses of the last decade.
"When you have a finan-
cial sector which is a casino,
that's putting at risk taxpay-
ers' money, you have a reac-
tion," said Guillermo Ortiz,
a former governor of the
Bank of Mexico.
Policymakers around the
world have sought to rein in
the excesses of the banking
sector by introducing new
regulations requiring them to
keep bigger capital buffers,
but that's not done much to
appease those voicing their
discontent around Davos.
Although some protesters
clearly have revolutionary
goals like the overthrow of
the capitalist system, many
just want their aspirations
and objectives met by an


often-distant political and
business elite.
The CEO of accounting
giant Deloitte, Joe Echevar-
ria, talked about developing
"compassionate capitalism."
"You're going to have to
deal with regulation bal-
ancing the need to protect
society along with stifling
growth," he told AP in an in-
terview. "I think that has to
manifest itself through the
choices that governments
and businesses make."
While the bigwigs de-
bated at Davos, key Greek
bondholders were holding
closed-door meetings in
Paris to discuss how and
whether to continue talks
central to resolving Eu-
rope's debt crisis that would
forgive 50 percent of
Greece's enormous debt.
Later Wednesday, German
Chancellor Angela Merkel is
expected to speak on Eu-
rope's crisis in her keynote
speech at the forum. In an
interview with six European
newspapers, Merkel drove
home the need for reform in
debt-troubled eurozone na-
tions instead of spending
more to beef up the region's
bailout fund.
Surveys ahead of the
meeting showed pessimism
among world CEOs, plung-
ing levels of public trust in
business and government
leaders and concerns that
fragility in the U.S. and Eu-
ropean economies could
hurt the global economy


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Wednesday, February 1 Homosassa 11 am
West Citrus Elks Lodge #2693
7890 W. Grover Cleveland Blvd.

Friday, February 3 Lecanto 10 am
Holiday Inn Express 903 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy.

v RESERVATIONS & INFORMATION:
1-888-685-1594 (toll free)
S www.LargoMedical.com


New results


put spotlight


back on Avastin

Drug might be effective in

early stages of breast cancer


Associated Press

Surprising results from
two new studies may re-
open debate about the
value of Avastin for breast
cancer. The drug helped
make tumors dis-
appear in cer-
tain women
with early stage
disease, re-
searchers found.
Avastin re- -
cently lost ap- -
proval for
treating ad-
vanced breast
cancer, but the
new studies AVA
suggest it might (bevaci
help women FeIntrw
whose disease
has not spread 'M
so widely These
were the first
big tests of the
drug for early r0..r..,
breast cancer,
and doctors
were cautiously Ass
excited that it
showed potential to help.
In one study, just over
one-third of women given
Avastin plus chemotherapy
for a few months before
surgery had no sign of can-
cer in their breasts when
doctors went to operate,
versus 28 percent of
women given chemo alone.
In the other study, more
than 18 percent on Avastin
plus chemo had no cancer
in their breasts or lymph
nodes at surgery versus 15
percent of those on chemo
alone.
A big caveat, though: The
true test is whether Avastin
improves survival, and it's
too soon to know that -
both studies are still track-
ing the women's health.
The drug also has serious
side effects.
"I don't think it's clear
yet whether this is going to
be a winner," Dr. Harry


Bear of Virginia Common-
wealth University said of
Avastin. But he added, "I
don't think we're done with
it."
Bear led one study, in the
United States. Dr. Gunter
von Minckwitz of
i the University
of Frankfurt led
the other in
Germany. Re-
sults are in
___ Thursday's New
-& England Jour-
nal of Medi-
m- c cine.
's, Avastin (uh-
w VAS'-tihn) is
T1No still on the mar-
zumab ket for some
US colon, lung, kid-
ney and brain
tumors. In
S 2008, it won
j conditional
U.S. approval
.... .- for advanced
breast cancer
because it
ociated Press seemed to slow
the disease. Fur-
ther research showed it
didn't meaningfully extend
life and could cause heart
problems, bleeding and
other problems. The gov-
ernment revoked its ap-
proval for breast cancer in
November.
Now doctors can pre-
scribe Avastin for breast
cancer, but insurers may
not pay Treatment can cost
$10,000 a month.
The drug is made by Cal-
ifornia-based Genentech,
part of the Swiss company
Roche. It is still approved
for treating advanced
breast cancer in Europe
and Japan.
The new studies tested it
in a relatively novel way -
before surgery This is
sometimes done to shrink
tumors that seem inopera-
ble, or to enable women to
have just a lump removed
instead of the whole breast.


QOR KISSIMMEE
RUCTION 5 2012
At Osceola Heritage Park
Kissimmee, FL January 24-29
2000 VEHICLES P
Be part of the Live National TV Broadcast
on the Velocity Network
Tickets $15/Day Kids 12 and under Free
000ACK1 www.MECUM.com


1752-0126-THCRN
CITRUS COUNTY
ANNING AND DEVELOPMENT


REVIEW BOARD
THURSDAY February 2, 2012 at 9:00 AM
Lecanto Government Building
3600 West Sovereign Path
Room 166
Lecanto, Florida 34461
WILLIAM GARVIN, CHAIR JOHN JAMES BARD
ZANA ENNIS, 1st VICE CHAIR RONALD LUNDBERG 2nd VICE CHAIR
PAUL WHEELER JAMES A. WILLIAMS
CHUCK DIXON (SCHOOL BD)
DWIGHT HOOPER (ALTERNATE) DAVID LANGER (ALTERNATE)
A. CALL TO ORDER
B. INVOCATION
C. PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE
D. SWEAR IN NEW MEMBERS
E. ELECTIONS OF OFFICERS: CHAIRMAN, FIRST VICE CHAIRMAN,
SECOND VICE CHAIRMAN
F. ROLL CALL
G. CHAIRMAN TO READ THE APPEAL PROCESS AND
MEETING PROCEDURES
H. APPROVE MINUTES
I. STAFF ANNOUNCEMENTS
J. EXPARTE COMMUNICATION -ASSISTANT COUNTYATTORNEY
K. APPLICATIONS
1. VARIANCE- LAND DEVELOPMENT CODE (LDC)
A. V-12-01: JOHN LAFLEUR FOR MERCK
REQUEST: To allow for an accessory structure on a residentially
committed lot, having less than the required minimum building setback from
the center line of the right-of-way, pursuant to Section 4245. Building
Setback Reauirements. of the LDC.
LOCATION: Section 31. Township 19. Range 17: more specifically Lot 3,
Block 11, of Riverhaven Village, Plat Book 9 Page 31; which address is
5320 Running Brook Dr., Homosassa, Florida.
STAFF CONTACT: Joe Hochadel, Planner, Land Development Division
B. V-12-02 DEAN SWICKARD
REQUEST: To allow for construction of a carport to an existing single family
residence having less than the required 50-foot minimum building setback
from the ordinary high water line (35-foot with a berm and swale), pursuant
to section 4120. Surface Water Quality Protection, of the LDC.
LOCATION: Section 6. Township 19 South. Rance 21 East: more
specifically, Lot 31, Block 1A000 of Sherwood Forest Unrecorded
Subdivision; which address is known as 10 North Robin Hood Road,
Inverness FL 34450.
STAFF CONTACT: LauraA. Marley, Planner, Land Development Division
C. V-12-04- PHILLIP AND KATHLEEN BRUCKNER
REQUEST: To allow for construction of an addition and a detached garage
to an existing single family residence having: Less than the required 50-foot
minimum building setback from the outer edge of the riprap seawall (35-foot
with a berm and swale), pursuant to 4120. Surface Water Quality
Protection, of the LDC; and having less than the required 50-foot minimum
front yard setback from the centerline of a local roadway (minimum 25 feet
from the existing right-of-way line), pursuant to Section 4245. Building
Setback Reauirements, of the LDC.
LOCATION: Section 10. Township 19 South. Rance 16 East: more
specifically, Lots 23, 24, and 25 of St. Martins Estuary Retreats Unit 6; Plat
Book 4 Page 150 which address is known as 1575 South Wallace Point
Crystal River FL 34429
STAFF CONTACT: Laura A. Marley, Planner, Land Development Division
COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENTIATLAS AMENDMENT
A. CPAIAA-12-03- CC INVESTMENTS I, LLC
REQUEST: From: Professional Service and Office (PSO) to: General
Commercial (GNC) on the Generalized Future Land Use Map and the Land
Development Code Atlas.
LOCATION: Section 27, Township 18 South, Range 18 East. Further
described as a portion of Lots 136 and 137, Crystal River Country Estates,
PB 7, PG 147, AKA Tracts 1 and 2 of MSP-06-13 located in Section 27,
Township 18, Range 18, Citrus County, Florida. (Lecanto Area).
STAFF CONTACT: Cynthia L. Jones, E.I., Transportation Planner, Planning
Division
L. ADDITIONAL ITEMS -Assistant County Attorney to review Sunshine Laws.
M. PLANNING BOARD MEMBER COMMENTS
N. ADJOURN
If any person decides to appeal any decision made by the board with respect to any
matter considered at this meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of the
proceedings and, for such purpose, he or she may need to insure that a verbatim
record of the proceedings is made, which record includes testimony and evidence upon
which the appeal is to be based.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a disability
or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office, Citrus County
Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, (352) 341-6560, at
least two days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD
telephone (352) 341-6580. 000ADA


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THURSDAY, JANUARY 26, 2012 All


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CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Nation BRIEArmy to cut 80K troopsFS

Snowy day Army to cut 80K troops


Associated Press
With a look of determina-
tion, 5-year-old Nicholas
Sheeler skates his way
Tuesday across an ice skat-
ing rink with the help of a
kiddie chair in LaPorte, Ind.

Labor board chief
to press for
new union rules
WASHINGTON -The
chairman of the National
Labor Relations Board hopes
to have another round of reg-
ulations in place by the end of
the year that would make it
easier for unions to establish
and win representation elec-
tions in workplaces.
Undeterred by Republican
protests, Mark Pearce said
he will urge the board to ap-
prove the new rules now that
it has a full complement of
five members after President
Barack Obama bypassed the
Senate to fill three vacancies.
One change Pearce wants
is requiring businesses to
hand over lists of employee
phone numbers and emails to
union leaders before an
election.
He also wants the board to
consider other rule changes it
didn't have time to approve
before it lost a quorum last
year. They include the use of
electronic filings and quicker
timetables for certain
procedures.

WorldBRIEFS

Mass


Associated Press
German carnivalists dressed
in guard uniforms talk Wed-
nesday in the Saint Boni-
fatius cathedral in Leine-
felde, Germany.

Scots may let
16-year-olds vote
in referendum
LONDON Scotland's
leader has presented his pro-
posal for a ballot on independ-
ence and his ideas include
letting 16- and 17-year-olds
cast ballots in a vote that
could see the breakup of
Britain within four years.
First Minister Alex Salmond
announced the Scottish gov-
ernment's preferred options
for the vote on whether to
sever ties from Britain, which
it plans to hold in the fall of
2014. A"yes" vote would lead
to independence taking effect
with a May 2016 election for
the Scottish Parliament.
Scotland and England
united in 1707 to form Great
Britain. Scotland gained signifi-
cant autonomy after voting in
1997 to set up the Edinburgh-
based Scottish Parliament, but
some Scots want to go further.
Salmond told Scottish law-
makers in the Edinburgh as-
sembly Wednesday that the
ballot would ask "Do you
agree that Scotland should
be an independent country?"
And he said the voting age
should be lowered from the
current 18.
From wire reports


Budget cuts

force military

to downsize

Associated Press
WASHINGTON The U.S. Army
plans to slash the number of combat
brigades from 45 to as low as 32 in a
broad restructuring of its fighting
force aimed at cutting costs and re-
ducing the service by about 80,000
soldiers, according to U.S. officials
familiar with the plans.
Officials said the sweeping
changes will likely increase the size
of each combat brigade generally
by adding another battalion in an
effort to ensure that those remain-
ing brigades have the fighting capa-


abilities they need when they go to
war A brigade is usually about 3,500
soldiers, but can be as large as 5,000
for heavily armored units. A battal-
ion is usually between 600 to 800
soldiers.
The brigade restructuring is in-
tended to save money without erod-
ing the military's ability to protect
the country and wage war when
needed. Army officials contend that
while there would be fewer brigades,
building them bigger will give them
more capabilities and depth, and
will reduce stress on the units.
They said specialty units, such as
Army special operations forces,
would not be affected by the cuts.
Reducing the overall number of
brigades will also eliminate the
need for the headquarters units
that command and oversee them.
Officials acknowledged that merg-
ing battalions together into larger


brigades could shift some soldiers to
different bases across the country,
although that effort could be
stymied by members of Congress
who don't like to see the staffing de-
cline at bases that feed the local
economy Officials said the Army
will try to limit such shifts.
The cuts come as the Pentagon
puts the finishing touches on its 2013
fiscal year budget, which must reflect
about $260 billion in savings in its
five-year plan. Congress has ordered
the Defense Department to come up
with a total of $487 billion over the
next 10 years, and could face cuts of
double that amount if Congress can't
reach an agreement to avoid auto-
matic across-the-board reductions
mandated by lawmakers last year
Officials spoke about the budget
plans on condition of anonymity be-
cause they have not yet been made
public.


SEAL raid rescues hostages


Vt


Associated Press
Jessica Buchanan, top, and Poul Hagen Thisted, bottom, were rescued early Wednesday morning, local
time, when U.S. forces flew into Somalia in a nighttime raid and killed nine militants who were holding them
hostage. The two were captured last fall while working on de-mining efforts in Somalia. President Barack
Obama, accompanied by first lady Michelle Obama, places a phone call Tuesday from the Capitol in Washing-
ton, immediately after his State of the Union speech. The president called to personally inform John Buchanan
that his daughter Jessica had been rescued.

Elite unit that killed Osama bin Laden scores another success


Associated Press
MOGADISHU, Somalia Held
captive since last fall, an ailing
American woman and a Danish
man are safely on their way home
after a bold, dark-of-night rescue by
U.S. Navy SEALs. The commandos
slipped into a Somali encampment,
shot and killed nine captors and
whisked the hostages to freedom.
The raid's success was welcome
news for the hostages and their fam-
ilies, for the military and for Presi-
dent Barack Obama, who was del-
ivering his State of the Union speech
as the mission was wrapping up
Tuesday night He did not mention it
in his address, but dropped a hint
upon arriving in the House chamber
by telling Defense Secretary Leon
Panetta, "Good job tonight"
It was the second splashy SEAL
Team 6 success in less than a year,
following last May's killing of
Osama bin Laden in Pakistan.
The SEALs apparently encoun-
tered some degree of resistance
from the kidnappers at the en-
campment. One U.S. official said
Wednesday that there was a fire-
fight but the length and extent of
the battle were unclear.
One official said the SEALs para-
chuted from U.S. Air Force aircraft
before moving on foot, apparently
undetected, to the outdoor en-
campment where they found Amer-
ican Jessica Buchanan, 32, and
Poul Hagen Thisted, a 60-year-old
Dane, who had been kidnapped in
Somalia last fall. The raid hap-
pened near the town ofAdado.
Pentagon press secretary George
Little said the captors were heavily
armed and had explosives nearby


Special forces teams play

key role in terror war


WASHINGTON SEAL Team 6
is officially known as the Naval Spe-
cial Warfare Development Group,
one of the military's elite special mis-
sion units that carry out clandestine
operations like last year's raid that
killed al-Qaida leader Osama bin
Laden in Pakistan.
Based in Dam Neck, Va., SEAL
Team 6 was first developed to be a
maritime-focused hostage-rescue
force the seabound counterpart to
the Army's 1st Special Forces Oper-
ational Detachment Delta. Both were
established to build U.S. military ex-
pertise after the failed rescue attempt
to retrieve 53 U.S. hostages being
held in Iran in 1980.
Both units are members of the mil-
itary's elite Joint Special Operations
Command and number just a few

when the rescuers arrived on the
scene, but he was not more specific.
He declined to say whether there
was an exchange of gunfire and
would not provide any further de-
tails about how the rescue was com-
pleted beyond saying all of the
captors were killed.
The American raiders caught the
kidnappers as they were sleeping
after having chewed the narcotic
leaf qat for much of the evening, a
pirate who gave his name as Bile
Hussein told The Associated Press


hundred. There are more than 2,500
SEALs, with a small number who
spend time serving in the most elite
unit before taking their expertise
back to the other teams.
The SEALs were the go-to force
for the Somalia operation to rescue
aid workers Jessica Buchanan and
Danish citizen Poul Hagen Thisted
from kidnappers because of the
SEALs' longstanding presence in the
Horn of Africa. The unit had carried
out previous hostage-rescue opera-
tions like the one that safely retrieved
American cargo ship Capt. Richard
Phillips, who was being held by pi-
rates in his own ship's lifeboat in
2009. Navy SEAL snipers killed the
pirates, shooting from the fantail of
the destroyer USS Bainbridge.
From wire reports

by phone. Hussein said he was not
present at the site but had spoken
with other pirates who were, and
that they told him nine pirates had
been killed in the raid and three
were "taken away."
Little said the decision to go
ahead with the rescue was
prompted in part by rising concern
about the medical condition of
Buchanan. He said he could not be
specific but did say U.S. officials
had reason to believe her condi-
tion could be life-threatening.


Military leaders, from Defense
Secretary Leon Panetta on down,
insist they will come up with the
budgets cuts without hurting the
force's effectiveness. In fact, many
of the top Army leaders who have
been putting the budget together
were around when massive budget
cuts after the Vietnam war left
Army units badly undermanned
and ill-equipped leading to what
they call a hollow force.
According to officials, plans call
for the active duty Army to shrink
from a high of about 570,000 sol-
diers to roughly 490,000 over the
next decade or so.
The Army plans to shed soldiers
carefully, including through
planned departures, separations
for medical or behavioral problems,
and by scaling back the number of
people promoted or allowed to en-
list and re-enlist.


Egyptian


revolt,


one year


later

Islamists,

liberals at odds

Associated Press
CAIRO Hundreds of
thousands thronged major
squares across Egypt on
Wednesday, marking the first
anniversary of the uprising
that toppled Hosni Mubarak
with rallies that laid bare the
divisions that have replaced
the unity of last year's revolt.
Cairo's Tahrir Square, the
epicenter of the 18 days of
protests against Mubarak,
was transformed into the
focal point of the rivalry be-
tween revolutionary activists
intent on showing they can
still mobilize the street, and
the Muslim Brotherhood,
which emerged as Egypt's
dominant political force
after a landslide victory in
parliamentary elections.
The secular activists want
continued protests to force
the immediate ouster of the
generals which took power
after Mubarak's fall, saying
they are just as dictatorial
as the former president.
The activists touted their
powerful turnout as a sign
they can pressure the Broth-
erhood, who they fear will
accommodate the military
in order to ensure their own
political dominance.
"I have hope that these
marches will be a message to
the Brotherhood as much as
the military council," said
Sahar Abdel-Mohsen, who
walked 3.5 miles in a giant
march across Cairo to Tahrir
"We all know even if the
Brotherhood are strong, the
military council is still
stronger ... What we all want
is an end to military rule,"
she said.
Both sides were intent on
bringing out as many sup-
porters as possible to show
their weight in a nation still
reeling from the aftershocks
of Mubarak's ouster.
The Islamists got off to a
strong start, taking up posi-
tions in the morning and
claiming the right to police
the square, with Brother-
hood volunteers checking
the bags of those entering.
From a large stage with 10
loudspeakers, they blared
religious songs and chants of
'Allahu akbar," setting a tone
of celebration for what they
called the successes of the
revolution, particularly the
newly elected parliament
But a dozen large marches
organized by secular groups
converged on Tahrir from
various parts of the city,
chanting "Down, down with
military rule!" and filling
boulevards as passers-by
joined in along the way The
"non-Islamists" swarmed
into the downtown plaza be-
fore sunset, jam-packing it to
outnumber the Islamists.


*


F











SPORTS


No. 23 Florida
State, newly
ranked, took on
Wake Forest./B3

CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


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0 NFL/B5
0 Entertainment/B8


Lecanto boys advance to district title


JAMES BLEVINS
Correspondent
OCALA Lecanto goalkeeper
Ryan Good stepped up three times
in the trailing minutes of Wednes-
day night's District 4A-4 semifinal
boys soccer match at Booster Sta-
dium between the No. 2 seeded
West Port Wolf Pack and the
No. 3-seeded Panthers.
Three Wolf Pack attempts at
tying the game would be denied by


Good, securing Lecanto's one-goal
lead and preserving the 2-1 win.
With the victory, the Panthers will
meet top-seeded Springstead for
the district championship at 7 p.m.
Friday.
Springstead has defeated
Lecanto twice this season, by scores
of 1-0 and 4-1.
By advancing to the district final,
Lecanto has already wrapped up a
regional playoff berth.
These West Port shots were not


easy, wrap-up shots for Good; he
had to dive for each one with
crackerjack timing and skill. Two
of the shots were breakaways, forc-
ing Good to charge the top of the
box, steal the ball off the top
of a West Port forward's
foot, denying any and all
chances for the Wolf
Pack to mount a come-
back goal.
Good would cap off the
game with 11 saves (eight
in the second half, with four
coming in the last five minutes
of play).
"(Good) is usually a midfielder
for us," Lecanto head coach Doug


Warren said. "He came up real big
for us."
Lecanto (14-5-2 overall) easily
outshot West Port in the first half 8-
2 and lit up the scoreboard first
Midfielder Blake Par-
sons would head in a per-
fectly deflected corner
kick by Zeek Rice, put-
ting the Panthers up 1-0
in the 18th minute.
West Port wouldn't let the
first 40 minutes pass without
throwing its own goal into the net
in stoppage time, tying things up
See Page B4


District 4A-4 boys
soccer title game
* Who: No. 3 Lecanto vs.
No. 1 Springstead.
* When: 7 p.m. Friday.
* Where: Booster Stadium,
Ocala.
* What's at stake: Both
teams have already
clinched a spot in the re-
gional playoffs on Tuesday.
The winner will be crowned
district champion and get
to host at least one
regional playoff game.


Big four are through


Djokovic, Nadal

Federer, Murray

in Aussie semis

Associated Press
MELBOURNE, Australia -
With Novak Djokovic clutching
his leg and struggling to breathe,
it looked like the "Big 4" semifi-
nal lineup at the Australian
Open might not come together
Then Djokovic's champi-
onship instincts kicked in.
The top-ranked Serb held off
No. 5 David Ferrer in a second-
set tiebreaker Wednesday night
and then raced through the third
set for a 6-4, 7-6 (4), 6-1 win, set-
ting up a rematch of last year's
final against fourth-ranked Andy
Murray
Order was restored.
For 10 days, nearly everyone
at Melbourne Park has talked
about the top four players and
how they are on a higher level
than the rest of men's tennis. But
with the other three already in
the semis, Djokovic looked to be
in trouble in the second set.
"No, I don't have any physical
issues," Djokovic said, playing
down any health concerns. "I
feel very fit and I feel mentally,
as well, very fresh.
"It's just today I found it very
difficult after a long time to
breathe because I felt the whole
day my nose was closed a little
bit. I just wasn't able to get
enough oxygen."
The win ensured that the top
four men reached the semifinals
for the third time in four Grand
Slams. Murray beat Kei
Nishikori 6-3, 6-3, 6-1 earlier
Wednesday, while second-ranked
Rafael Nadal and No. 3 Roger
Federer were already preparing
for their semifinal showdown,
their 10th clash at a major but
their first meeting at that stage of
a Grand Slam since 2005.
Doubts about Djokovic's tem-
perament surfaced after he won
his first major at the 2008 Aus-
tralian Open. He went another
11 majors before reaching an-
other Grand Slam final, which
he lost.
In his first title defense in
2009, he struggled with breathing
problems and the heat and had
to retire from his quarterfinal
match against Andy Roddick.
Trying again to defend the
Australian Open title, and again
in the quarterfinals, the 24-year-
old Djokovic was leading by a set
and a break when he dropped a


Associated Press
Novak Djokovic plays a shot against David Ferrer during their quarterfinal match Wednesday at the
Australian Open in Melbourne, Australia. The top-seeded Djokovic will face No. 4 Andy Murray while No. 2
Rafael Nadal is set to square off with No. 3 Roger Federer.


service game against Ferrer
At break point, he scrambled
to hit a defensive lob on his
backhand and didn't even wait
for it to land out before turning
to face the back of the court,
grabbing at the back of his left
leg. He leaned over and rested
his head on the top of his racket
Ferrer was back in contention.
For the rest of the set,
Djokovic sneaked looks at his
coaches and team in the stands.
He cajoled himself at the base-


line and took time between
points.
At times he looked exhausted.
At times he looked sore.
"Look, you know, in these con-
ditions, at this stage of the tour-
nament, when you're playing
somebody like David, somebody
that has great shots from both
sides from the baseline, makes
you always play over five to 10
shots in the rally, your physical
strength and endurance comes
into question," Djokovic calmly


explained of his on-court de-
meanor. "Actually I'm not con-
cerned about that at all.
"I'm really fit and I have no
concerns of recovering for the
next match. It's just a matter of
breathing better through the
nose."
That may not be how Murray's
new coach, Ivan Lendl, sees it.
Lendl has been working with
Murray this month, trying to
See f Page B4


Six lifters


qualify


for state

Five Hurricanes,

one Panther

advance at meet
LARRY BUGG
Correspondent
NEW PORT RICHEY Cit-
rus High School's Lauryn
Rashley was a little relieved, as
well as happy Wednesday night.
The Hurricanes senior
weightlifter won the 110-pound
class in the District 4 Girls
Weightlifting Meet at Mitchell
High School. She had a bench
press of 150 pounds and a clean
and jerk of 120 pounds for a
total of 270 pounds.
In Rashley's case, it was re-
markable she was lifting at all.
She took second in her class
last year at the state meet but a
right shoulder injury kept her
from lifting for about half of the
season.
"There was a little pressure,"
Rashley said said. "I'm not as
strong as I was last year. I'm
kind of happy"
With Rashley's efforts, Citrus
was able to finish second in
team points at the meet Citrus
had five girls who qualified for
the state meet Feb. 11 in
Kissimmee. River Ridge High
was first with 48 points while
Citrus had 43 points.
Lecanto had eight points and
Crystal River finished with two
points; there were 22 teams
competing.
All lifters who placed in the
top 3 will advance to the
FHSAA state weightlifting
meet at the Kissimmee Civic
Center on Feb. 11.
Citrus' Vickie Lapps took
second in the 139-pound class.
She had a 155-pound bench
and a 140-pound clean and jerk
for a 295-pound total.
"I knew I was going to state,"
Lapps said. "I'm really happy"
Lapps then proceeded to
jump into the arms of a friend.
Besides Rashley, the Citrus
lifters who earned a trip to state
are: Savannah Bingham (sec-
ond in 129 pounds); Hannah
Evans (third in 154) and Swade
Kelleher (second in 199).
The Panthers' Melanesia
Thomas was the only qualifier
from Lecanto. She was third in
the 183-pound class. She had a
130 in the bench press and a
155 in the clean and jerk for a
See Page B4


Fans pay respects to Paterno


Associated Press
People pay their respects as the funeral procession of for-
mer Penn State football coach Joe Paterno passes through
the Penn State campus Wednesday in State College, Pa.
Paterno died Sunday at the age of 85.


Thousands mourn

death ofPenn State

coaching legend

Associated Press
STATE COLLEGE, Pa. Quiet
mourners lined the route of Joe Pa-
terno's funeral procession Wednes-
day, watching with grief and
reverence as the electric-blue hearse
carrying the Penn State coach's cas-
ket slowly drove by
Some took pictures with their cell


phones, or waved to his widow. Oth-
ers craned their necks hoping for a
better glimpse through the crowd
sometimes four deep or more.
The private funeral and burial
service capped another emotional
day for a campus and community
pained over Paterno's death from
lung cancer Sunday at age 85, and
over the way his stellar career ended
- being fired by university trustees
Nov 9 in the wake of child sex-abuse
charges against a former assistant.
Thousands of students, alumni and
fans took to the streets in and around
Penn State to say their last goodbyes
to the football coach who grew into a
beloved figure in Happy Valley, not


only for his five undefeated seasons
but for his love of the school and his
generosity.
"He cared about the kids. He
wanted to see us succeed. So for a lot
of us, he became a grandfather-like
figure," Jordan Derk, a senior from
York, said after the procession went
past Beaver Stadium.
"He loved us and we loved him
back," Derk said. "So saying goodbye
is very tough."
Jay Paterno, the coach's son and
quarterbacks coach, sent a message to
the mourners via Twitter
"Thank you to all the people who

See Page B4


Good makes three huge saves to give

Panthers 2-1 win over West Port






CITRUS COUNTY'S RECREATIONAL GUIDE TO OUTDOORS


GET


IN THE


Lane wins Harris Chain Open


Alabama angler lands 20-plus

pounds of bass daily in

2012 Bass Pro Shops

Southern Open kickoffevent


Special to the Chronicle
ORLANDO Chris Lane
of Guntersville, Ala., made it
look easy on Florida's Har-
ris Chain of Lakes in the
kick-off event of the 2012
Bass Pro Shops Southern
Open series.
Lane was the only angler
to weigh in 20 or more
pounds of bass each day on
the way to his third B.A.S.S.
win with a three-day total of
72-11 pounds. Clifford Pirch
of Payson, Ariz., finished
second with 58-1. Citing the
need to slow down and fish
his areas thoroughly, Lane
used a variety of baits to
claim the title and a provi-
sional berth in the 2013
Bassmaster Classic on Okla-
homa's Grand Lake of the
Cherokees, Feb. 22-24. If
Lane fishes the remaining
two events in the Southern
Open season, he'll cement
the spot in bass fishing's
greatest championship.
"I caught fish on several
soft plastics, including 7-inch
Gambler Sweebo worms,
Gambler Cane Toads and the
Gambler Big Easy, but I
found my bass with a char-
treuse Lucky Strike RC2
crankbait," Lane said. "I
used it as a search bait.


When I found bass with it, I'd
pick up the soft plastics and
really work the area over"
Despite having a five-
pound lead going into the
final round, Lane had a
scare on Saturday morning.
After catching a couple of
small keepers, his co-angler
caught two bass weighing a
cumulative 15 pounds on
consecutive casts.
"I was rattled," Lane ad-
mitted, "but I knew what I
had to do. I was making mis-
takes, and I needed to slow
down."
And he did. Lane's next
bass was his best of the day,
a lunker that inhaled a
Sweebo worm. When the
day was over, his best five
weighed 28 pounds, 5
ounces, good enough for the
Lucky Strike heavyweight of
the tournament.
Day three's big bass be-
longed Keith Carson of De-
bary, Fla., and weighed 9-13.
Avery McCormick of Mo-
bile, Ala., had the lead on the
co-angler side on days one
and two despite not catching
a limit (three bass for co-an-
glers) on either of the first
two days. It caught up with
him in the final round. He
had just one bass and it
weighed only 14 ounces.


JAMES OVERSTREET B.A.S.S. publications/Special to the Chronicle
Florida native-turned-Alabama resident Chris Lane displays two giant bass caught Saturday during the final day of com-
petition of the Bass Pro Shops BASSMASTER Southern Open. Lane landed more than 28 pounds Saturday on the way to
his third B.A.S.S. victory. The event was held in Leesburg on the Harris Chain of Lakes.


KAPITON KEEPING ON
Inverness bass angler George Kapiton had another solid fin-
ish on Lake Okeechobee last week finishing in seventh place on
the pro side of the 2012 EverStart Series event. His three-day
catch of 14 bass totaled 41 pounds, 6 ounces.
Kapiton took control of the tournament day one with a 21
pound, 6 ounce limit and backpedaled day two with 10 pounds,


10 ounces. The final day of the event was limited to the top 10
anglers. Lake Placid, Fla. angler Brandon Medlock took home
the championship trophy for his 15 bass that weighed 68
pounds, two ounces, Randall Tharp of Gardendale, Ala., locked
down second place with 62 pounds and Ocala's Keith Fels se-
cured third with 55 pounds, 10 ounces.
The Chronicle will follow Kapiton through the remainder of the
EverStart Series season and report on his finishes.


Michael Bradford of Cormick's stumble as an op- of 27-9 earned him $35,000 in cluding a Triton-Mercury
Scottsboro, Ala., saw Mc- portunity His three-day total cash and merchandise, in- boat and motor package.


What on Earth has that fish been


I'm going to
revisit the
matter of
scallop chum
one more time, ,.
and I promise
it's the last, un-
less I hear from
a reader who ,
tried it with ter-
rific success. I'm R.G. S
addressing it TIG
again not to beat LIN
a dead horse,
but because it il-
lustrates a trick often over-
looked by many anglers.
I suggested to Bob Webb,
the reader who tried scallop
innards as chum down in
Marathon with no success,
that those fish simply might
not have recognized what he
was doling out as food. At
one time, scallops were
found along the entire
Florida coast, but that has-
n't been the case for many
decades. For all practical
purposes, scallops are rare


chmidt
MHT
IES


south of Tampa
Bay In fact,
there wouldn't
be any in that
body if it weren't
for the success of
a restocking pro-
gram by the
FWC.
Scallops are
relatively short-
lived animals,
rarely living to
18 months. Since


they're "catastrophic
spawners," meaning an en-
tire population spawns at
the same time, it follows
that they will die off at more
or less the same time. Once
the adductor muscle doesn't
hold the shell halves to-
gether, pinfish, pigfish and
other small fish take advan-
tage of the opportunity to
pig out. In the Keys, that
doesn't happen, and I felt
the baitfish down there did-
n't recognize a free meal
when they saw it. I wanted


confirmation before going
public with my theory, as it
is, I admit, a bit off the wall.
Not off the wall, said biol-
ogist David Chagaris, an as-
sociate research scientist at
FWC's Fish and Wildlife Re-
search Institute. Kevin Bax-
ter, media relations
coordinator at the Institute,
passed my theory along to
Chagaris, who backed me
up.
"While some fish do pre-
fer certain prey over oth-
ers," he said, "maybe these
fish did not recognize this as
a food source at all, and
were wary of approaching it
- odor, color, texture, size
and buoyancy could all fac-
tor in to their decision to
avoid it." He also pointed
out that "... there might
have been a predator in the
area, keeping the fish in
hiding, and if the angler had
continued with the scallop
chum just five minutes
longer the fish would have


Ever since Dame Juliana Berners,
credited for penning "Treatyse of
Fysshing Wyth an Angle" in 1496,
those fishing for freshwater trout
have been urged to "match the
hatch," meaning to use a fly that
imitates whichever aquatic insect is
hatching at the time.


appeared." While I agree
with that point, Webb is a
regular reader of Tight
Lines, and we've had
enough exchanges of emails
for me to get an impression
of his angling ability, and
I'm convinced he gave the
chum sufficient time to
work. Add the fact that com-
mercial chum is quite oily
(menhaden, sardines, etc.)
and sinks at a calculated
rate, and the unfamiliar of-


fering had no chance of
success.
None of which, of course,
explains why the chum did-
n't work for Mike Hrabina,
who used it locally As any-
one who has cleaned scal-
lops on a dock, tossing the
unusable parts into the
water, knows, Nature Coast
baitfish are quite comfort-
able eating those leftovers.
Ah, well.
I said at the outset this co-


Sating?

nundrum illustrates an
often-overlooked trick for
anglers, and here it is. Ever
since Dame Juliana Berners
allegedly wrote the
"Treatyse of Fysshing Wyth
an Angle" in 1496, those
fishing for freshwater trout
have been urged to "match
the hatch," meaning to use a
fly that imitates whichever
aquatic insect is hatching at
the time.
Many saltwater anglers
overlook the opportunity to
do the same. Next time you
clean your catch, take an
extra minute to examine
stomach contents.
That's what they're eat-
ing, and that's what you
should match.
Tight Lines to you.
U-

Chronicle outdoors colum-
nist RG Schmidt can be
reached at rgschmidt@
embarqmail. com.


Outdoors BRIEFS


Flotilla offers chart-
ing course
Get help before you ever
leave the dock: Learn how to
use and read a chart, the nauti-
cal equivalent of a road map.
U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary Ho-
mosassa Flotilla 15-4 will offer
a course in charting from 7 to 9
p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 14, and
Thursday, Feb. 16, at the West
Citrus Community Center, 8940
Veterans Drive in
Homosassa.
The course will explain the
importance of having a nautical
chart aboard recreational boats.
The course also will provide
participants with the knowledge
and skills to interpret nautical
charts, identify navigational
hazards, plot positions and
courses, and use charts to nav-
igate local coastal waters. Cost
is $20. Bring sharp pencils,
eraser, compass, straight-edge
ruler, two right-angle triangles
(or a rolling straight edge).


For more information, or to
sign up, call Elaine Miranda at
352-564-2521 or Rusty Hays at
352-598-4369.
GPS course for
mariners slated
U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary
Crystal River Flotilla 15-01 will
offer a two-day, hands-on GPS
for Mariners course on Jan. 28
and Feb. 4.
Learn how to program your
GPS by putting in waypoints,
setting routes, how to use tide
charts on the GPS, and much
more.
This is a very comprehen-
sive class.
Class size is limited to 10
people for more one-on-one in-
struction with two instructors.
Registration will be on a first-
come, first-served basis. Cost
is $65.
For more information, email
LJones1501@gmail.com or call
352-503-6199 to reserve your
space in class.


Payne's Prairie field
trip on tap
Citrus County Audubon Soci-
ety has scheduled a birding
field trip at Payne's Prairie for
Sunday, Feb. 5. The public is
welcome; preregistration is not
necessary and participants with
all levels of birding skills are
welcome.
The field trip is managed by
CCAS members Franklin and
Mavis Grebenc. It begins at
8:30 a.m., will involve some
easy walking, and will last
about three to four hours.
Payne's Prairie is 22,000
acres of wilderness.
Some of the unusual birds we
hope to see include: whooping
crane, Wilson's snipe, vesper
sparrow, grasshopper sparrow,
white-throated sparrow, Bona-
parte's gull and white-crowned
sparrow.
Visit CitrusCounty
Audubon.com for more details
and directions.


CHRPONICLE


Tide charts
Chassahowitzka* Crystal River** Homosassa*** Withlacoochee*


High/Low


THURS 7:06 a.m.
126 7:51 p.m.


High/Low


High/Low


High/Low


3:06 a.m. 5:27 a.m. 12:28a.m. 6:16a.m. 2:05 a.m. 3:14a.m. 10:36a.m.
3:26 p.m. 6:12 p.m. 12:48 p.m. 7:01 p.m. 2:25 p.m. 3:59 p.m. 10:55 p.m.


FRI 7:47 a.m. 3:45 a.m. 6:08 a.m. 1:07 a.m. 6:57 a.m. 2:44 a.m. 3:55 a.m.
1/27 8:17 p.m. 3:53 p.m. 6:38 p.m. 1:15 p.m. 7:27 p.m. 2:52 p.m. 4:25 p.m.


SAT 8:29 a.m. 4:24 a.m.
1/28 8:45 p.m. 4:21 p.m.


6:50 a.m. 1:46 a.m. 7:39 a.m. 3:23 a.m. 4:37 a.m.
7:06 p.m. 1:43 p.m. 7:55 p.m. 3:20 p.m. 4:53 p.m.


11:03 a.m.
11:34 p.m.
11:31 a.m.


SUN 9:16 a.m. 5:06 a.m. 7:37 a.m. 2:28 a.m. 8:26 a.m. 4:05 a.m. 5:24 a.m. 12:16 a.m.
M29 9:16 p.m. 4:50 p.m. 7:37 p.m. 2:12 p.m. 8:26 p.m. 3:49 p.m. 5:24 p.m. 12:00 p.m.


MON 10:12 a.m. 5:54 a.m.
1/3o 9:54 p.m. 5:23 p.m.


TUES 11:26 a.m.
1/31 10:43 p.m.


8:33 a.m. 3:16 a.m. 9:22 a.m. 4:53 a.m. 6:20 a.m.
8:15 p.m. 2:45 p.m. 9:04 p.m. 4:22 p.m. 6:02 p.m.


6:54 a.m. 9:47 a.m.
6:05 p.m. 9:04 p.m.


WED 12:59 p.m. 8:08 a.m. 11:20 a.m.
2/1 11:48 p.m. 7:08 p.m. 10:09 p.m.


4:16 a.m. 10:36 a.m. 5:53 a.m. 7:34 a.m.
3:27 p.m. 9:53 p.m. 5:04 p.m. 6:51 p.m.


1:04 a.m.
12:33 p.m.
2:04 a.m.
1:15 p.m.


5:30 a.m. 12:09 p.m. 7:07 a.m. 9:07 a.m. 3:18 a.m.
4:30 p.m. 10:58 p.m. 6:07 p.m. 7:56 p.m. 2:18 p.m.


*From mouths of rivers. **At Kings Bay. ***At Mason's Creek.


GA





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


No. 23 Seminoles take down Wake Forest


No. 2Mizzou

shocked by OSU

Associated Press

WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. -
Michael Snaer scored 18 points
and No. 23 Florida State beat
Wake Forest 75-52.
Okaro White added 11 points,
Xavier Gibson had 10 and Snaer
hit four 3-pointers to help the
Seminoles (14-6,5-1) win their fifth
straight Atlantic Coast Conference
game, their longest winning streak
in league play in two years.
The ACC co-leaders shot nearly
51 percent, led the entire second
half and broke the game open with
an 18-2 run.
Oklahoma St. 79,
No. 2 Missouri 72
STILLWATER, Okla. Freshman
swingman Le'Bryan Nash scored a
career-high 27 points, Brian Williams
added a career-best 22 and Okla-
homa State knocked off No. 2 Mis-
souri 79-72.
Nash, a McDonald's All-American,
scored 13 points during a 17-4 burst
that sent the Cowboys into the lead in


the final 4 minutes and the Tigers (18-
2, 5-2 Big 12) didn't have a response.
Ricardo Ratliffe had 25 points and
12 rebounds to lead Missouri.
No. 4 Ohio St. 78,
Penn St. 54
COLUMBUS, Ohio Jared
Sullinger had 20 points and 13 re-
bounds, and No. 4 Ohio State took
advantage of Penn State's slow start
to roll to a 78-54 victory.
The Buckeyes (18-3, 6-2 Big Ten)
won their third in a row and fifth in six
games while tuning up for Sunday's
big home showdown with No. 20
Michigan. The Wolverines, Ohio
State and Michigan State came into
the week tied for the top spot in the
Big Ten.
The Nittany Lions paid tribute to
Joe Paterno by wearing black bands
on their jerseys. Paterno, Penn
State's football coach for 46 years
and the winner of a major-college
record 409 games, died Sunday at
age 85. A public viewing and funeral
was held earlier on Wednesday.
No. 18 Mississippi State 76,
LSU 71
STARKVILLE, Miss. -Arnett Moul-
trie scored 28 points and grabbed 12
rebounds for his 12th double-double of


the season and No. 18 Mississippi
State held off a late LSU charge to win
76-71.
Moultrie had 19 points in the second
half as the Bulldogs built on a 32-31
halftime lead. The 6-foot-11 junior
made 10 of 18 shots from the field and
grabbed six offensive rebounds.
Jalen Steele scored 15 points and
Rodney Hood added 13.
No. 10 Michigan State 68,
Minnesota 52
EAST LANSING, Mich. Dray-
mond Green had 22 points, 14 re-
bounds and six assists to help
Michigan State beat Minnesota and
give coach Tom Izzo his 400th win.
Izzo downplayed what the mile-
stone meant to him on Monday, but
was wiping tears off his cheeks during
the final seconds of the victory.
The Spartans (17-4, 6-2) moved
into a first-place tie in the Big Ten with
their second straight win after losing
two in a row.
The Golden Gophers (15-6, 3-5)
had won three straight, including their
previous two on the road. Rodney
Williams scored 15 points for Min-
nesota.
No. 15 Creighton 77,
Drake 69
DES MOINES, Iowa Doug Mc-


Associated Press
Wake Forest's Tony Chennault and Florida State's Terry Whisnant chase
a loose ball during the second half of the Seminoles' 75-52 win
Wednesday in Winston-Salem, N.C.


Dermott scored 30 points and
Creighton held off Drake for its sixth
straight road win.
Jahenns Manigat added 15 points
for the Bluejays (19-2, 9-1 MVC), who
have the program's longest road win-
ning streak in 37 years.


Creighton let a 15-point lead dwin-
dle to two early in the second half.
But McDermott helped keep the Bull-
dogs from getting any closer, scoring
10 straight points late in the half.
Rayvonte Rice had 23 points and
11 rebounds to lead Drake.


James reigns in Detroit


LeBron leads Heat

to win with 32

points over Pistons

Associated Press

AUBURN HILLS, Mich. Le-
Bron James scored 32 points, in-
cluding the game's last six from the
free throw line, to lead the Miami
Heat to a 101-98 win over the De-
troit Pistons on Wednesday night.
Chris Bosh hit his first seven
shots and finished with 27 points
for Miami which was without
Dwyane Wade, who sat out because
of a right ankle injury
Daye scored a career-high 28
points for the Pistons.
Cavaliers 91, Knicks 81
CLEVELAND -Anderson Varejao
had 16 rebounds, a powerful dunk
down the stretch and outhustled New
York's big men as the Cavaliers ended
a four-game losing streak with a 91-81
win over the struggling New York
Knicks, who lost for the seventh time in
eight games.
Antawn Jamison added 15 points for
the Cavs, who won their ninth straight
at home over New York. The Knicks
haven't won in Cleveland since 2006.
Amare Stoudemire had 19 points
and 14 rebounds for the sloppy Knicks,
who had 23 turnovers six in the
fourth quarter.
Thunder 101, Hornets 91
OKLAHOMA CITY Kevin Durant
scored 25 points to lead the Oklahoma
City Thunder to their 10th win in 11
games, 101-91 over the New Orleans
Hornets.
The Thunder improved to 15-3, the
best record in the Western Conference,
despite an off night from guard Russell
Westbrook and 21 turnovers.
Oklahoma City led throughout, in-
cluding by as many as 14 in the first
half. The Hornets pulled to 83-81 with
9:07 left in the game, but Westbrook hit
back-to-back shots and the Hornets
never got closer than four the rest of
the way.
Nets 97, 76ers 90, OT
PHILADELPHIA- Deron Williams
scored 34 points, including a go-ahead
3-pointer with 26.8 seconds left in over-
time, to help lift the New Jersey Nets to
a 97-90 victory over the Philadelphia
76ers.
Kris Humphries had 13 points and a
season-high 19 rebounds, and Jordan
Farmer added 12 points for the Nets (6-
13). Anthony Morrow had 16 points
starting his second straight game for
rookie MarShon Brooks (sore right
Achilles tendon).
Wizards 92, Bobcats 75
WASHINGTON Nick Young
scored 20 points, and Andray Blatche
had 17 points and 10 rebounds to
lead the Washington Wizards to a 92-
75 win over the Charlotte Bobcats in


Associated Press
Miami Heat forward LeBron James shoots over Detroit Pistons guard Damien Wilkins in the first half Wednesday
in Auburn Hills, Mich. The Heat got 32 points from James en route to a 101-98 victory.


Randy Wittman's first game as
coach.
Wittman took over for the fired Flip
Saunders on Tuesday, and guided the
team without the benefit of a practice.
Saunders' lead assistant has been an
NBA head coach twice with Min-
nesota and Cleveland. His career
record improved to 101-207.
Spurs 105, Hawks 83
SAN ANTONIO Matt Bonner and
DeJuan Blair both scored 17 points,
and the San Antonio Spurs handed the
surging Atlanta Hawks their first lop-
sided loss of the season, 105-83 on
Wednesday night.
Tiago Splitter added 16 points for the
Spurs, who relished a convincing win
over the Southeast Division leaders


after losing two of their previous three
and barely squeaking past woeful New
Orleans on Monday night.
Jeff Teague led Atlanta with 22
points.
Timberwolves 105, Mavs 90
DALLAS Kevin Love had 31
points and 10 rebounds after signing
his new contract and the Minnesota
Timberwolves handed defending NBA
champion Dallas another ceremonious
loss, 105-90 Wednesday night.
The end of the Mavericks' seven-
game home winning streak, and their
franchise-record streak of holding 15
consecutive opponents under 100
points, came after they finally received
their championship rings during a
pregame ceremony.


Bucks 105, Rockets 99
HOUSTON Stephen Jackson and
Brandon Jennings each scored 20
points, Ersan Ilyasova had a career-
high 19 rebounds after Andrew Bogut
sprained his left ankle, and the Milwau-
kee Bucks snapped an 11-game losing
streak in Houston with a 105-99 victory
over the Rockets on Wednesday night.
Bogut left in the first quarter and did
not return, but Milwaukee hit a season-
high 14 shots from 3-point range to win
in Houston for the first time since Nov.
2, 1999, when the Rockets still played
in the Compaq Center.
Kevin Martin scored 29 points, and
Samuel Dalembert had 13 points and a
season-high 18 rebounds for the Rock-
ets, who had a seven-game winning
streak snapped.


Canadiens stop Red Wings' winning streak


Associated Press

MONTREAL David Deshar-
nais had two goals and an assist,
and the Montreal Canadiens
ended Detroit's seven-game win-
ning streak with a 7-2 victory over
the Red Wings on Wednesday night
in the NHEs final game before the
league's All-Star break.
Alexei Emelin scored his first


NHL goal, and Montreal scored
four times in the opening period
against Jimmy Howard, who will
make his first All-Star game ap-
pearance on Sunday in Ottawa.
The Canadiens put their first two
shots of the second period past
backup goalie Ty Conklin, who
took over for Howard to begin the
middle period.
Rene Bourque, Max Pacioretty


and Erik Cole each had a goal and
an assist, and Tomas Plekanec also
scored. Tomas Kaberle had two as-
sists. Carey Price stopped 25 shots
for Montreal, which moved into
11th place in the Eastern Confer-
ence with 47 points, one ahead of
Tampa Bay
Jiri Hudler scored a pair of
third-period goals for Detroit,
which leads the NHL with 67


points despite falling to 13-14 on
the road. The Red Wings, who have
won 17 straight home games, had-
n't lost anywhere since a 5-1 defeat
at the New York Islanders on
Jan. 10.
The Red Wings extended their
team-record, home-winning streak,
with a 3-1 victory over St. Louis on
Monday They are 20-2-1 at the Joe
Louis Arena this season.


Els


hopeful


at Pines


Tiger, others in

Dubai this week

Associated Press
SAN DIEGO Ernie Els
was walking to the practice
range Wednesday at Torrey
Pines when he was stopped
by a security guard who has
not spent much time around
golf tournaments.
'Are you a professional?"
the guard asked him.
This is new territory for
Els, a three-time major
champion and former No. 1
in the world.
For the first time in nearly
20 years, the Big Easy starts
a new season without assur-
ances that he will be at the
Masters. He might not be eli-
gible for two World Golf
Championships over the
next six weeks.
And for the first time since
he cares to remember, Els
finds himself looking at the
world ranking. He is at No.
57, and that's after getting a
boost from a runner-up finish
last week at the Volvo Cham-
pions event in South Africa.
"I look at it now," Els said.
"I never used to. When
you're comfortably in the top
10, top 20, you don't look at
these things. Now, I'm on the
other side of the wheel. I've
got to play myself into events.
I've got to get into the Mas-
ters, into Doral, into the
Match Play And that's fine
with me. And if I don't get in,
that's fine with me.
"I feel like I'm going to
have a good year," he said. "I
feel good about it"
For what he's trying to ac-
complish, being at the Farm-
ers Insurance Open might
seem like a peculiar choice.
Most of golf's biggest stars
are halfway around the
world in Abu Dhabi this
week, which includes Tiger
Woods, whose seven wins at
Torrey Pines includes the
2008 U.S. Open. The top four
players in the world also are
in the Middle East Luke
Donald, Lee Westwood, Rory
McIlroy and Martin Kaymer
- meaning there figures to
be more world ranking
points.
Torrey Pines offers a
deeper field, yet only one of
the top 10 in Dustin Johnson.
Phil Mickelson is the biggest
star this week at No. 15 in the
world, no longer having to
share the state with Woods in
his hometown.
Among the PGA Tour play-
ers who waited until the
fourth week to make their
2012 debut are Hunter
Mahan, Geoff Ogilvy and
Rickie Fowler, who starts his
third full year still looking for
his first tour win.
Mickelson narrowly made
the cut last week in the Hu-
mana Challenge, and now
feels ready to go in a tourna-
ment he has won three times,
but not in the 10 years since
his old friend Rees Jones
beefed up the South Course.


SPORTS


THURSDAY, JANUARY 26, 2012 B3






B4 THURSDAY, JANUARY 26, 2012



NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
Philadelphia 12 6 .667 -
Boston 7 9 .438 4
NewYork 7 11 .389 5
New Jersey 6 13 .316 6V2
Toronto 5 13 .278 7
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 13 5 .722 -
Orlando 12 5 .706 12
Atlanta 13 6 .684 /2
Washington 3 15 .167 10
Charlotte 3 16 .158 1012
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Chicago 16 4 .800 -
Indiana 12 5 .706 212
Milwaukee 7 10 .412 712
Cleveland 7 10 .412 712
Detroit 4 15 .211 1112
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 12 7 .632 -
Memphis 10 7 .588 1
Dallas 11 8 .579 1
Houston 10 8 .556 112
New Orleans 3 15 .167 812
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 15 3 .833 -
Denver 12 5 .706 212
Utah 10 5 .667 3/2
Portland 11 7 .611 4
Minnesota 8 10 .444 7
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 9 5 .643 -
L.A. Lakers 10 8 .556 1
Phoenix 6 11 .353 412
Sacramento 6 12 .333 5
Golden State 5 11 .313 5
Tuesday's Games
New York 111, Charlotte 78
Orlando 102, Indiana 83
Miami 92, Cleveland 85
Toronto 99, Phoenix 96
Portland 97, Memphis 84
Wednesday's Games
Cleveland 91, NewYork 81
Washington 92, Charlotte 75
New Jersey 97, Philadelphia 90, OT
Miami 101, Detroit 98
Indiana 95, Chicago 90
Milwaukee 105, Houston 99
Oklahoma City 101, New Orleans 91
Minnesota 105, Dallas 90
San Antonio 105, Atlanta 83
Toronto at Utah, late
Denver at Sacramento, late
Portland at Golden State, late
L.A. Clippers at L.A. Lakers, late
Thursday's Games
Boston at Orlando, 8 p.m.
Memphis at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.
Friday's Games
Charlotte at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Indiana at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
New Jersey at Cleveland, 7:30 p.m.
Atlanta at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Milwaukee at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Washington at Houston, 8 p.m.
Orlando at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
San Antonio at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
New York at Miami, 8 p.m.
Utah at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Toronto at Denver, 9 p.m.
Phoenix at Portland, 10 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.



NHL standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
N.Y Rangers 47 31 12 4 66132 96
Philadelphia 48 2914 5 63162 142
Pittsburgh 49 2817 4 60152 127
New Jersey 48 2619 3 55129 136
N.Y Islanders 48 1922 7 45115 143
Northeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Boston 47 31 14 2 64171 102
Ottawa 52 2719 6 60157 160
Toronto 49 2519 5 55151 147
Montreal 49 1921 9 47130 134
Buffalo 49 2024 5 45119 149
Southeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Washington 48 2619 3 55136 137
Florida 48 2215 11 55122 136
Winnipeg 50 2222 6 50124 143
Tampa Bay 48 2123 4 46136 165
Carolina 51 1824 9 45130 159
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Detroit 50 3316 1 67160 117
St. Louis 49 2913 7 65124 102
Nashville 50 3016 4 64140 127
Chicago 50 2915 6 64162 144
Columbus 49 1330 6 32115 163
Northwest Division
GP W LOT PtsGF GA
Vancouver 49 3015 4 64158 122
Minnesota 49 2418 7 55115 126
Colorado 51 2623 2 54131 144
Calgary 50 2321 6 52120 137
Edmonton 49 1826 5 41122 142
Pacific Division
GP W LOT PtsGF GA
SanJose 47 2714 6 60131 110
Los Angeles 50 2416 10 58111 111
Dallas 48 2521 2 52126 136
Phoenix 50 2220 8 52130 134
Anaheim 48 1823 7 43124 144
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over-
time loss.
Tuesday's Games
Buffalo 2, New Jersey 1, SO
Philadelphia 3, Florida 2, SO
Pittsburgh 3, St. Louis 2, SO
Vancouver 3, Edmonton 2, SO
Toronto 4, N.Y Islanders 3, OT
N.Y Rangers 3, Winnipeg 0
Washington 5, Boston 3
Tampa Bay 4, Columbus 2
Nashville 3, Chicago 1


Caribbean Chillers in a
Jimmy Buffett Tribute
A-
CHKIoNICjE REGIONS


Dallas 1, Anaheim 0
Minnesota 3, Colorado 2
San Jose 1, Calgary 0
Phoenix 3, Ottawa 2
Wednesday's Games
Montreal 7, Detroit 2
Thursday's Games
No games scheduled
Friday's Games
No games scheduled



Australian Open
Thursday
At Melbourne Park, Melbourne, Australia
Purse: $26.83 million (Grand Slam)
Surface: Hard-Outdoor
Doubles
Men
Semifinals
Bob and Mike Bryan (1), United States, def.
Robert Lindstedt, Sweden, and Horia Tecau (7),
Romania, 4-6, 6-3, 7-6 (5).
Junior Singles
Boys
Quarterfinals
Luke Saville (1), Australia, def. Kyle Edmund
(7), Britain, 7-5, 7-5.
Adam Pavlasek (10), Czech Republic, def.
Kaichi Uchida (4), Japan, 6-3, 6-3.
Filip Peliwo, Canada, def. Joshua Ward-Hib-
bert, Britain, 6-3, 6-2.
Girls
Quarterfinals
Taylor Townsend (14), United States, def.
Sabina Sharipova (12), Uzbekistan, 6-3, 2-6, 6-
4.
Krista Hardebeck, United States, def. Irina
Khromacheva (1), Russia, 6-3, 6-3.
Yulia Putintseva (4), Russia, def. Barbora
Krejcikova, Czech Republic, 6-2, 6-3.
Wheelchair
Singles
Men
Semifinals
Maikel Scheffers (1), Netherlands, def. Ste-
fan Olsson, Sweden, 2-6, 7-5, 9-7.
Quad
Championship
Peter Norfolk (2), Britain, def. Noam Ger-
shony, Israel, 6-3, 6-0.
Third Place
David Wagner (1), United States, def. Andrew
Lapthorne, Britain, 6-0, 7-6 (5).


BASEBALL
COMMISSIONER'S OFFICE-Suspended
free-agent minor league LHP Dustin Richardson
and free-agent minor league 1 B Daryle Ward 50


games for violations of the Minor League Drug
Prevention and Treatment Program.
American League
BALTIMORE ORIOLES-Agreed to terms
with INF Robert Andino on a one-year contract.
BOSTON RED SOX-Agreed to terms with
RHP Andrew Bailey on a one-year contract.
KANSAS CITY ROYALS-Agreed to terms
with RHP Roman Colon on a minor league con-
tract.
NEWYORKYANKEES-Agreed to terms with
OF Andruw Jones on a one-year contract.
National League
ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS-Agreed to
terms with RHP Brad Ziegler on a one-year con-
tract.
CINCINNATI REDS-Traded LHP Jeremy
Horst to Philadelphia for INF Wilson Valdez.
Agreed to terms with RHP Nick Masset on a two-
year contract and UT Willie Harris on a minor
league contract.
COLORADO ROCKIES-Agreed to terms
with RHP Rafael Betancourt on a two-year con-
tract.
ST. LOUIS CARDINALS-Agreed to terms
with RHP Jason Motte on a one-year contract.
SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS-Named Bob
Mariano manager of Fresno (PCL); Steve Kline
pitching coach of San Jose (Cal); Mike Caldwell
pitching coach and Nestor Rojas hitting coach of
Augusta (SAL); Hector Borg coach of Salem-
Keizer (NWL); Derin McMains manager, Michael
Couchee pitching coach and Billy Horton hitting
coach of the Arizona League Giants; and Steve
Decker coordinator of minor league hitting in-
struction.
BASKETBALL
USA BASKETBALL-Named Travis Johnson
3x3 program director.
National Basketball Association
NBA-Suspended Phoenix C Robin Lopez
one game for improper conduct with a game of-
ficial during Tuesday's game against Toronto.
CHARLOTTE BOBCATS-Exercised their
fourth-year contract option on G-F Gerald Hen-
derson.
DENVER NUGGETS-Signed F Danilo Galli-
nari to a four-year contract extension.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
NFL-Signed commissioner Roger Goodell to
a contract extension through the 2018 season.
INDIANAPOLIS COLTS-Named Chuck
Pagano coach.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
CHICAGO BLACKHAWKS-Assigned F Ben
Smith and F Brandon Pirri to Rockford (AHL).
COLUMBUS BLUE JACKETS-Assigned LW
Dane Byers to Springfield (AHL).
OTTAWA SENATORS-Reassigned D Mark
Borowiecki and F Andre Petersson to Bingham-
ton (AHL).


Saturday, Feb. 18
Curtis Peterson Auditorium
3 pm.









Tickets available at Regions Bank, All
Chamber of Commerce offices,
Key Center Foundation or from any
member of the Homosassa
Springs Kiwanis
$15 advance $20 at the door
628-5281 or 795-5541 Ext. 313


Proceeds to benefit local projects
servicing children and youth


SCOREBOARD


For the re cord


= Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning
numbers selected
Wednesday in the
Florida Lottery:
LOTTERY
4-9-14-18-35-47
XTRA
4


CASH 3 (early)
2-6-9
CASH 3 (late)
2-0-7
PLAY 4 (early)
8-9-2-8
PLAY 4 (late)
2-9-8-2
FANTASY 5
7 8 23 34 36
POWERBALL
4-19-28-29-47
POWER BALL
5


Inverness LL
holding final signups
Inverness Little League is
holding its final two signups
Thursday and Saturday.
The Thursday signup will be
from 6-8 p.m. at Just Sports in
Inverness.
The Saturday signup will be
the final one and coincides


LIFTERS
Continued from Page B1

185-pound total.
"I was pretty happy,"
Thomas said of the lifts. "I
knew I could do it"
Lecanto coach Bob
LeCours lauded his lifters'
efforts.



SOCCER
Continued from Page B1

1-1 just before halftime.
"They got that goal at the
end of the first half." Warren
would say of West Port's
goal. "It was our mistake. It
wasn't that they did any-
thing great. We mis-marked
a guy and he was standing
wide open."
The second half would
begin with more Lecanto



PATERNO
Continued from Page B1

turned out for my father's
procession," he wrote. "Very
moving."
The elder Paterno won
two national titles and a Di-
vision I record 409 games
over 46 seasons as head



AUSSIE
Continued from Page B1

help him break his Grand
Slam title drought the
Briton has lost three major
finals without winning a set,
including the last two in Aus-
tralia.
Lendl lost the first four
Grand Slam finals he con-
tested, before winning eight
of his next 15.
He was doing some scout-
ing Wednesday night at Rod


(c


















Rotary
Inver
Charitable Fo


Sports BRIEFS

with tryouts. Those will be held
from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Whis-
pering Pines.
NASCAR to do away
with undisclosed fines
CHARLOTTE, N.C. -
NASCAR said Wednesday it
will stop issuing undisclosed
fines going forward, a practice
that made fans distrust the

"The kids did as well as
they could," Lecours said.
"Mel is a good kid. She de-
served it."
Citrus coach Tia Nelson
was excited about the out-
come, especially about
Rashley's comeback.
"She came back strong,"
Nelson said. "Her dad, Jim,
really helped her. She lifted
light for a while. I'm very

dominance as the Panthers
fought to win every footrace
and keep possession of the
ball at all times. These ef-
forts would result in
Lecanto once again out-
shooting West Port 9-8.
Forward Jacob Sims
tapped in the game-winning
goal for Lecanto in the 54th
minute to go up 2-1 on West
Port.
Good would take the
game from there, stopping
all Wolf Pack goal opportu-
nities while Lecanto de-

coach. His cancer was dis-
closed just nine days after
he was forced to leave the
football program he had
worked with since 1950.
But Wednesday was once
again a salute to Paterno's
life and accomplishments.
The service, a Roman
Catholic Mass, was attended
by a veritable who's who of
Penn State and Paterno con-

Laver Arena, sitting about 15
rows behind the Djokovic
group, surrounded by people
waving Serbian flags. He
couldn't have missed the
sideways glances from
Djokovic to his support crew,
or the fact that he sat down
in a line judge's chair when
Ferrer challenged a line call.
Murray and Djokovic have
been playing each other
since they were 12, and know
each other so well they
sometimes hit together and
kick a soccer ball around.
But they haven't been on


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




sanctioning body.
It's not clear how many times
NASCAR failed to disclose a
penalty against a driver or a
team, but the practice first
came to light midway through
the 2010 season when it was
learned that Denny Hamlin had
been secretly fined for posts he
made on Twitter.
From staff, wire reports

happy with our lifters."
Crystal River didn't have
anyone qualify, although
two girls finished fourth and
just missed going to the
state meet.
"Emily Laga took a
fourth," coach Randy
Owens said. "Martina
Tafoya rolled the weight on
her chest and finished
fourth. I'm proud of them."

fenders Joey Serrano, Scott
Howard, Dominic Hamrick,
Scott Stearns, Brower
Hunter and Blair Wunderly
would do their part to shut
out West Port in the second
half, assuring victory for the
Panthers.
"I think we handled (the
game) pretty well." Warren
said. "We knew what they
were going to do (having)
played them twice. We had a
good idea of the game plan
we had to work and the de-
fense just had to be solid."

nections.
Paterno's family arrived
about an hour before the fu-
neral service on two blue
school buses, the same kind
the coach and his team rode
to home games on fall Satur-
days. His wife of nearly six
decades, Sue, sat in the seat
traditionally reserved for
her husband and was first
off the bus, followed by Jay

the same side of a Grand
Slam draw for a while. Mur-
ray said he always seems to
be drawn with Nadal, while
Djokovic and Federer have
frequently been on the same
half.
Murray said he's not nec-
essarily more relaxed in
Australia, "just more used to
being in this position be-
cause of the experience."
"Definitely have more ex-
perienced than I had at this
point last year because I
played deep in the Slams the
last five or six of them."


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AUCTION



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On the AIRWAVES

TODAY'S SPORTS
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m. (ESPN) North Carolina State at North Carolina
7 p.m. (ESPN2) Florida at Mississippi
9 p.m. (ESPN2) Indiana at Wisconsin
10:30 p.m. (SUN) Washington State at Arizona
11 p.m. (ESPN2) Gonzaga at Portland
WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m. (FSNFL) Mississippi at South Carolina
8 p.m. (SUN) Baylor at Oklahoma
9 p.m. (FSNFL) Tennessee at Alabama
NBA
8 p.m. (TNT) Boston Celtics at Orlando Magic
10:30 p.m. (TNT) Memphis Grizzlies at Los Angeles Clippers
GOLF
6 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour: Abu Dhabi HSBC
Championship
3 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: Farmers Insurance Open
4 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour: Abu Dhabi HSBC
Championship
HOCKEY
8 p.m. (NBCSPT) 2012 NHL All-Star Fantasy Draft
TENNIS
3:30 a.m. (ESPN2) Australian Open Men's Second Semifinal

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


Prep CALENDAR

TODAY'S PREP SPORTS
BOYS SOCCER
District 3A-6 Tournament at Leesburg High School
5:30 p.m. No. 1 Citrus vs. No. 4 Tavares


I





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Colts hire Ravens' Pagano as new head coach


Associated Press

INDIANAPOLIS The
Indianapolis Colts hired
Baltimore Ravens defensive
coordinator Chuck Pagano
as their new head coach
Wednesday
The team said Pagano
will be introduced at a news
conference Thursday It will
be the first head coaching
job for the 51-year-old
Pagano, who has been a ca-
reer assistant until now with
stops in Oakland and Cleve-
land in the NFL and stints
at schools including Miami
and North Carolina.
He replaces Jim Caldwell,
who was fired after the
Colts' 2-14 season in which
quarterback Peyton Man-
ning never played a down as
he recovered from neck
surgery
The move is the latest in a
dizzying series of changes


by owner Jim Irsay
The Colts fired Caldwell
last week after three sea-
sons. The team went to the
Super Bowl during Cald-
well's first year, but this year
locked up the No. 1 overall
draft pick with a horrid per-
formance that cost team
vice chairman Bill Polian
and his son, general man-
ager Chris, their jobs.
Irsay has since hired 39-
year-old Ryan Grigson as
the new GM while letting go
of Caldwell's staff. In all, 11
of the 20 coaches who
started the season are gone
and others they may go, too,
once Pagano arrives.
Pagano spent three years
as the Ravens' secondary
coach before replacing
Bryan Mattison as Balti-
more's defensive coordina-
tor a year ago. The Ravens
ranked third in total de-
fense and allowed the third-


Associated Press
Baltimore Ravens defensive coordinator Chuck Pagano has
been hired to become the head coach of the Indianapolis
Colts on Wednesday. The Colts will hold a press conference
Thursday to announce the new hire.
fewest points in the NFL. NFL, and now it's Pagano's
Marvin Lewis, Mike turn.
Nolan and Rex Ryan all The Wyoming graduate
held the position before be- and former strong safety for
coming head coaches in the the Cowboys began his


coaching career in 1984 as a
graduate assistant at South-
ern California and spent
time in the college ranks at
Boise State, UNLY East
Carolina and Miami before
joining Cleveland to coach
the secondary In 2005-06, he
was defensive backs coach
at Oakland, then served as
defensive coordinator at
North Carolina before join-
ing the Ravens when John
Harbaugh became head
coach four years ago.
"Chuck is unorthodox,"
Ravens linebacker Terrell
Suggs said. "He's like The
Joker. You never really ex-
pect what he's going to do,
and everything has a
motive."
The Ravens considered
Pagano to be just one of the
guys.
"What makes him good?
He relates to the players a
whole lot," defensive end


Cory Redding said. "He's al-
most like a player in a D-co-
ordinator's position. The
guy has so much fun with us.
He treats you like more than
a player. It's like we're his
sons. He wants us to do well.
He keeps it fresh. He knows
everybody's strengths and
puts them in position to
make plays."
Asked last month if he
had aspirations to be a
head coach, Pagano
replied, "When I was a kid
growing up, my dad being a
football coach, he asked the
same question of all the as-
sistants that he ever hired:
'Is your goal to be a head
football coach?' He always
said if somebody had an-
swered him, 'Not really, I'm
OK just being a position
coach,' then I don't think he
really wanted him on his
staff because he wanted
ambitious guys."


Saggy secondary


Consistency the


key for Belichick


Patriots DBs

still question

mark vs. Giants

Associated Press

FOXBOROUGH, Mass. -
Eli Manning could have a
pretty clear view downfield
against the hardly super
secondary of the New Eng-
land Patriots.
Get ready, Julian Edelman.
Here comes Victor Cruz.
A young group including
undrafted free agents, a Pro
Bowl player in a sophomore
slump and even a wide re-
ceiver was good enough to
help beat Joe Flacco and
the Baltimore Ravens -
barely in the AFC cham-
pionship game.
The New York Giants and
Manning, with his big-game
experience and receivers
Cruz and Hakeem Nicks,
pose a tougher challenge in
the Super Bowl on Feb. 5.
"The Giants are playing
like they're the best team in
the National Football
League at this point," for-
mer Patriots safety Rodney
Harrison said Wednesday,
"and Eli, he's been fantastic
and he will pick this sec-
ondary apart."
James Ihedigbo isn't lis-
tening to the doubters.
After three years as a spe-
cial teams player for the
New York Jets, he's started
the last 14 games at safety
for the Patriots with no
interceptions all season. He
is, Harrison said, a "service-
able" player but hard-work-
ing and team-oriented.
"We have a saying, All we
got is us,' and that's how we
play," Ihedigbo said. "We
play for each other"
Since the season began, 16
different defensive backs
have played. The changes
began in training camp when
the Patriots released starting
safeties Brandon Meri-
weather and James Sanders.
Cutting Sanders, a smart
leader, was "a big mistake"
by coach Bill Belichick,
Harrison said.
The Patriots allowed 70
completions of 20 yards or
more, nearly 4 1/2 a game.
But Belichick saw improve-
ment after the midpoint of
the season.


New England Patriots free safety Sterling Moore, rear, is one of 16 different players to start
in the Patriots' defensive backfield at some point in the 2011 season.


"I don't think that neces-
sarily the work ethic or the
desire or the competitive-
ness to do it has changed a
lot, but the results started to
improve because of a little
more continuity, a little bet-
ter execution, better tech-
nique, more confidence," he
said. "It's a group of guys and
coaches (who) have worked
hard and tried to get better
on a daily basis and I think
they have over the course of
the season, more so in the
last five or six weeks. "
Starters include Ihedigbo
and cornerback Kyle Ar-
rington, both undrafted,
second-year cornerback
Devin McCourty, and safety
Patrick Chung, who missed
seven games with a foot in-
jury before returning for


the next to last game of the
regular season.
Backups are Edelman,
Sterling Moore, Antwaun
Molden, Nate Jones and
Malcolm Williams. Edelman
is the only one of those five
who were with the Patriots
last season, and that was as a
wide receiver and punt
returned
The last time he played
defensive back?
"I think 1998," he said.
"Pop Warner. I was 12."
Edelman had finished his
junior season as a quarter-
back in 2007 at Kent State
when the Patriots and Gi-
ants last met in the Super
Bowl, where Manning was
named MVP David Tyree's
unforgettable catch, trap-
ping the ball against his hel-


met while closely guarded
by Harrison, set up the win-
ning touchdown in New
York's 17-14 win.
That was the last game for
Harrison, now an analyst
for NBC who spoke on a
conference call.
"One point in time I said
that I felt like this was the
worst secondary that the Pa-
triots had the last decade
and I felt strongly about
that," he said. "I'm not 100
percent sold on any of these
guys.'
There were missed tack-
les, poor communication
and lack of physical play, he
said. The Patriots allowed
293.9 yards passing, second
most during the regular
season.


Associated Press

FOXBOROUGH, Mass.
- Season opener or Super
Bowl, every game is a big
game to Bill Belichick.
His consistent approach
to preparation for the next
opponent, whether a pow-
erhouse or a pushover, is
the cornerstone of the
coaching that has brought
the New England Patriots
to their fifth Super Bowl in
11 years.
The more intense the
practices, the more pre-
pared his players are for
the game.
"You know what to ex-
pect week-in and week-out
with him," wide receiver
Matthew Slater said. "The
attention to detail is always
there. It doesn't matter if
it's a bye week or if it's a di-
visional playoff round. He's
committed to winning and
that commitment never fal-
ters, no matter what the
circumstance, no matter
how much success we've
had or how many games we
may have lost in a row.
"That commitment to
winning is always there."
During practices, Be-
lichick strolls the field,
sometimes twirling his
whistle on a lanyard, other
times stopping to talk with
players. His daily message
is simple get the funda-
mentals right and just do
your own job while prepar-
ing for the uniqueness of
the next opponent.
That's resulted in 10
straight victories, eight in
the regular season and two
in the playoffs. Another
win Feb. 5 against the New
York Giants would give the


Patriots their fourth Super
B o w 1
championship.
"I think every game is a
big game," Belichick said
Tuesday "Every time we
get an opportunity to com-
pete then we try to take ad-
vantage of the time leading
up to that opportunity -
the practice week, the
preparation, the film study,
understanding our game
plan and our adjustments,
all of those kinds of things.
"What else is there to
work on but the game, the
next one on your schedule,
the one that you're play-
ing? You try to cover all
your bases for that game,
you play it, and then you
start the process all over
again with the next one."
Right guard Brian Wa-
ters played his first 11 sea-
sons with the Kansas City
Chiefs. But when he signed
with the Patriots on Sept 4,
eight days before the sea-
son opener, he quickly
sensed the difference in
Belichick's style.
"I wasn't here in training
camp but, from day one, I
can tell that he's all about
the details," Waters said.
"He's all about everybody
doing their own job and
staying in their lane.
Everybody has their own
responsibilities. That's
something that you learn
early on and that's some-
thing that he still makes
sure that we understand
today"
Another part of the Be-
lichick playbook: Don't
focus on the past or far into
the future, just on the next
practice and the next
game.


Associated Press
Big game or just another regular-season matchup, New
England Patriots head coach Bill Belichick believes in
consistency as a cornerstone of his coaching.


Raiders set to appoint Allen as leader of team


Broncos defensive coordinator

will succeedJackson after a year


Associated Press

ALAMEDA, Calif. For
more than three decades,
the Oakland Raiders oper-
ated under a similar formula
with late owner Al Davis hir-
ing offensive-minded head
coaches and remaining
deeply involved in devising
the team's defense.
That pattern has changed
with new general manager
Reggie McKenzie's first
major hiring since taking
over the football operations
earlier this month.
McKenzie is finalizing a
contract to make Denver
defensive coordinator Den-


nis Allen the team's next
head coach, a person famil-
iar with the process said
Wednesday on condition of
anonymity because the
team is not publicly dis-
cussing the search.
Fox Sports and ESPN
first reported Tuesday night
the Raiders had chosen
Allen to replace the fired
Hue Jackson and become
the team's seventh coach
since 2003.
"He's a smart guy," said
Raiders punter Shane
Lechler, who played college
ball with Allen at Texas
A&M. "He knows defenses
well. He schemes really


good. It'll be interesting to
see how he handles the
head coaching role. This
will be his first time. We'll
see."
Allen, 39, will be
the first new
Raiders coach to
come from the de-
fensive side of the
ball since Davis
hired linebackers
coach John Madden
before the 1969 sea-
son. Madden won Dei
103 games in 10 sea- Al
sons and led Oakland to its
first Super Bowl following
the 1976 season.
But the Raiders structure
changed Oct. 8, when Davis
died at age 82 of heart fail-
ure. Davis had run the en-
tire operation for most of his
nearly half-century with the
team.


His son, Mark, took over
as managing partner and
began making changes after
the season. His first deci-
sion was to hire McKenzie
away from Green
Bay to make all the
major football
decisions.
McKenzie's first
move was to fire
Jackson, who went
8-8 in his only sea-
son on the job.
nis McKenzie then
en began a two-week
search that ended with his
choice of Allen.
Before serving as Den-
ver's defensive coordinator
last season, Allen spent five
years as a defensive assis-
tant in New Orleans and
coached for Atlanta.
While Allen has run the
4-3 defense that the


Raiders have used the past
seven seasons, there are ex-
pected to be stark changes
in strategy.
Allen was an aggressive
coordinator in Denver, with
a propensity to call blitzes
the Raiders traditionally
stayed away from during
Davis' tenure. He preferred
to pressure the quarterback
with a strong defensive line
and playing man coverage
in the secondary
The old way worked well
at times for the Raiders,
who won two Super Bowls
in the 1980s under Tom Flo-
res and won three straight
division titles from 2000-02
under Jon Gruden and Bill
Callahan.
But the team was far less
successful after losing the
Super Bowl to Tampa Bay in
January 2003. Oakland


failed to post a winning
record or make the playoffs
over the next nine seasons.
The Raiders' 99 losses over
those nine seasons are the
second most in the NFL and
their current nine-year
playoff drought is tied with
Cleveland for the second
longest in the league.
In his first season as coor-
dinator in Denver, Allen
helped the Broncos improve
from allowing a league-
worst 29.4 points and 390.8
yards per game to ranking
20th in yards (357.8) and
24th in points (24.4) this sea-
son on the way to an AFC
West title.
The Broncos increased
their sack total from 23 to 41
and were tied for the sixth-
most blitzes on pass plays in
the league this season, ac-
cording to STATS LLC.


FOOTBALL


THURSDAY, JANUARY 26, 2012 B5




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE

Jones to appear
on 'The View'
NEW YORK-Appar-
ently enough water has
flowed under the bridge
for Bar-
bara Wal-
ters and
Star
Jones to
S reunite
for a day
"The
View" an-
Star Jones nounced
Wednes-
day that Jones will ap-
pear on the daytime talk
show on Feb. 22 to pro-
mote an awareness cam-
paign about heart disease
in women.
Jones was one of the
talk show's five original
co-hosts. But she had an
angry exit in 2006 when
ABC decided not to
renew her contract and
she announced she was
leaving the show tak-
ing Walters by surprise.
The two women have
something serious in
common: they both un-
derwent open heart sur-
gery in 2010.

Swinton OK
with Oscar snub
NEW YORK-- Tilda
Swinton wasn't nomi-
nated for an Academy
Award for
her role
in "We
Need to
Talk
About
Kevin,"
but she
wasn't sad
Tilda after
Swinton hearing
the news.
"I wasn't disappointed.
I didn't know for hours,
but someone was telling
me apparently everyone
else was disappointed. I
had very low expecta-
tions, so perhaps my ex-
pectations were a bit
lower than everybody
else," the 51-year-old ac-
tress said Tuesday.
"I knew we were not
really going to be in
there. I am amazed that
our little film got as far as
it did," she said.
Swinton took home an
Oscar in 2008 for best
supporting actress for
"Michael Clayton."

Murphy makes
Sundance return
PARK CITY, Utah-
Nine years later, Cillian
Murphy is back at the
Sundance Film Festival,
where he got such great
exposure
that peo-
ple finally
learned
to pro-
nounce
his name.
The
Irish
Cillian actor-
Murphy whose
first name
begins with a hard K
sound was a breakout
star at Sundance in 2003
with the horror hit "28
Days Later."
The rousing reception
at Sundance built U.S.
buzz for the film and for
Murphy who went on to
appear in Christopher
Nolan's "Batman Begins,"
"The Dark Knight" and
"Inception" and returned
to this year's festival with
the thriller "Red Lights."
From wire reports


Horses for Hollywood


War Horse' equine star is part oflong Tinselton tradition


Associated Press

-ACTON, Calif.
ne star of Steven Spielberg's
latest epic likes to end his
work day by rolling around
in the dirt, kicking his legs in the
air and flaring his nostrils.
Finder, a 12-year-old thorough-
bred, is among more than 150
equine performers featured in the
Oscar-nominated "War Horse,"
and one of 14 who play the scene-
stealing Joey
He lives on a ranch about 45
miles northeast of Hollywood with
veteran horse trainer Bobby Lov-
gren, who oversaw all the equine
action on "War Horse."
"Plowing, riding, chasing- you
name it, it's in there," said Lov-
gren, who calls "War Horse" "the
biggest horse movie ever made."
Lovgren is the proteg6 of leg-
endary Hollywood horseman
Glenn Randall, who trained Roy
Rogers' Trigger
Thanks to the enduring appeal
of horses on screen, Lovgren,
Finder and "War Horse" continue
a longtime tradition of Hollywood
horses that began with the earliest
motion pictures.
"Bobby and his team literally
performed miracles with the
horses on this film," Spielberg
said. "I wanted it to feel like the
horses were performing their
parts as much as (actors) Emily
Watson or Peter Mullan, and that is
what happened. There were times
during production when the
horses reacted in ways I had never
imagined a horse could react. You
just sit back and thank your lucky
stars that these horses are so cog-
nizant that they are able to give
everything to a moment."
Those moments took months of
training and a 22-member team of
trainers, handlers and, yes, equine
makeup artists.
Set in England during World
War I, "War Horse" centers on the
enduring relationship between
Joey and the farm boy who trained
him.
When Joey is sold to soldiers
heading into battle, the horse be-
gins a journey that brings him
through various fighting factions
and into the lives of soldiers and
civilians who are moved by his
strength and spirit.
The film has been nominated for
six Academy Awards, including
cinematography and best picture.
As the film's "horse master,"
Lovgren oversaw everything
horse-related. His team prepared
the equine actors for their various
duties. Some became expert
jumpers, others learned to stum-
ble or feign a struggle. There were
horses for riding and horses for
pulling, and even stand-ins for the


Today's Birthday: Instead of looking for new fields to con-
quer in the year ahead, build upon the strong foundations
you've already established. Situations in which you previ-
ously met with resistance are now likely to be laced with
ample opportunities.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Unfortunately, you're not
suited for the role of being a borrower or a lender. Putting
yourself in either position could place you squarely behind
the eight ball.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Even though you might so-
licit advice from several people, it isn't likely you will follow
anyone's suggestions. You'll still erroneously do things as
you initially intended.
Aries (March 21-April 19) Be both realistic and sensible
about any of your physical limitations. If you attempt to lift
something that is too heavy, you'll suffer the consequences.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Unless you're careful about


star horses while shots were being
set. Lovgren's team was also re-
sponsible for teaching the actors
how to ride and handle the
animals.
"We all became incredibly at-
tached to the horses," said cast
member Patrick Kennedy "Getting
to know these horses and learning
to ride them was the greatest privi-
lege I've ever had."
None of the horses are credited
by name in the film, and the film-
makers wouldn't say why Lovgren
said it's not uncommon: "Some-
times they'll put a few of the
horses' names, but you know, real-
istically, it's very difficult to say
that there was one hero Joey"
The trainer, whose many credits
include last summer's "Cowboys &
Aliens," typically spends about
three months preparing his equine
actors for a film shoot He special-
izes in "liberty" work, meaning the
horses are not restrained in any
way and learn to respond to hand
signals and body language.
The 46-year-old horseman grew
up in an equestrian family in
South Africa that runs a large
jumping and dressage barn. Lov-
gren said he didn't much enjoy the
public dealings that work re-
quired, so he headed to Hollywood
to learn a new type of horse train-
ing. The 23 years he's spent work-
ing in movies prepared him for the
challenges of "War Horse."
"All the scenes that we had to do
had really all been done before in
other films that I'd worked on, but
never all in one. This took every-
thing and put everything in one
basket," he said. "I'm very proud
of my other films, like 'Zorro' and
'Seabiscuit,' but it just has a little
bit in there. The horse isn't the
focal point. But in 'War Horse' it is,
and it's all the time."
Though Lovgren doesn't typi-
cally work with his own horses on


Today's HOROSCOPE
how you conduct yourself when mixing with society, you'll
be in way over your head. A slip of the tongue will get
blown out of proportion.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) Don't take your luck for
granted when the stakes are higher than usual. Chances
are you'll miscalculate and take others down with you when
it's time to pay the piper.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Even if you've done some-
thing that is considered to be quite outstanding, subdue
temptation to boast about it. Praise will sound a lot better
coming from an impressed observer.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) There are a lot of sticky fingers
out there, so be extra watchful of your possessions, espe-
cially the stuff you keep in your car. Don't walk away and
leave items in plain sight.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -Your thinking about a personal
situation is apt to be right on the money, but that doesn't


set (he owns three, including
Finder), he said he was lucky on
this film that Finder was the right
color. (Finder and the other horses
playing Joey relied on makeup to
make them look identical, with
four white socks and a white star
on their heads.)
Lovgren met Finder while work-
ing on "Seabiscuit" and loved him
so much that he bought him. The
thoroughbred is more expressive
than most horses, Lovgren said,
which makes him an ideal movie
star.
Plus, he can play both genders.
Finder played the mother in an
early scene in the film showing the
birth of Joey That sequence and
working with a foal was among the
most difficult, Lovgren said.
"They're very young, so you don't
have much time to train them."
Almost everything in "War
Horse" was shot with real horses,
except for a few scenes that would
have caused injury to the animals.
Lovgren praised Spielberg's team
for their respectful approach to
the horses.
The toughest part of Lovgren's
job isn't working with the animals,
but communicating with filmmak-
ers and other workers on set about
what the horses need and what
they can and can't do. Once filming
begins, "it's more about communi-
cation skills than it is about train-
ing. That's something I've had to
really learn," he said. "Obviously, I
started working with animals be-
cause I don't work well with peo-
ple (laughs), so that's been very
important to learn to do that"
So with all the challenges of
"War Horse," is it harder working
with four-legged performers or
two-legged Hollywood types?
"I'm not going to answer that!"
Lovgren said with a smile. "We all
know that answer, but I'm not
going to answer that"


mean you can make judgment calls for others. You could
be way off track.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) In situations where you are
hoping to get more in return than you put out, you're likely
to be disappointed. There are no free rides in this economy.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) When invited to a social
gathering at a friend's house, don't overstay your visit.
Even if you're one of the late arrivals, be sure to be among
those who know when to leave.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Guard against a strong
inclination to blame a mistake that you make on another
who was trying to help you out. Avoid at all costs doing any-
thing that could make your friend feel unappreciated.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Be smart, and refrain from
entering into a conversation with a friend who feels just as
strongly about his or her opposing point of view as you do
about yours. Both parties would lose out.


Horse trainer Bobby Lovgren works with his horse. Finder, in
Acton. Calif. Finder, a 12-year-old thoroughbred, was the star of the
recent film "War Horse." He lives on a ranch with veteran horse
trainer Lovgren. who oversaw all the equine
action on "War Horse" and considers it
"the biggest horse movie ever made."


Hockey Hall-of-Famer Wayne
Gretzky is 51.
Thought for Today: "Time
is not measured by the pass-
ing of years but by what one
does, what one feels, and
what one achieves." -
Jawaharlal Nehru, Indian
statesman (1889-1964).


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

TUESDAY, JAN. 24
Mega Money: 10 39 41 43
Mega Ball: 3
4-of-4 MB 1 winner $550,000
4-of-4 4 $1,666
3-of-4 MB 41 $356
3-of-4 725 $60
2-of-4 MB 1,045 $29
1-of-4 MB 9,466 $3
2-of-4 22,078 $2
Fantasy 5: 14- 15 17 25 32
5-of-5 No winner
4-of-5 244 $555
3-of-5 8,505 $23
MONDAY, JAN. 23
Fantasy 5:1 14 21 29 30
5-of-5 1 winner $205,284.79
4-of-5 234 $141
3-of-5 8,016 $11.50
SUNDAY, JAN. 22
Fantasy 5:8 9 10 14 32
5-of-5 2 winners $90,413.82
4-of-5 220 $132.50
3-of-5 7,652 $10.50
SATURDAY, JAN. 21
Powerball: 12 24 43 44 45
INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num-
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call 850-487-7777.

Today in
HISTORY

Today is Thursday, Jan. 26,
the 26th day of 2012. There
are 340 days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On Jan. 26, 1942, the first
American Expeditionary
Force to go to Europe during
World War II arrived in
Belfast, Northern Ireland.
On this date:
In 1788, the first European
settlers in Australia, led by
Capt. Arthur Phillip, landed in
present-day Sydney.
In 1837, Michigan became
the 26th state.
In 1950, India officially pro-
claimed itself a republic as
Rajendra Prasad took the
oath of office as president.
In 1979, former Vice Presi-
dent Nelson A. Rockefeller
died in New York at age 70.
In 1992, Democratic presi-
dential candidate Bill Clinton,
appearing with his wife,
Hillary, on CBS' "60 Minutes,"
acknowledged "causing pain
in my marriage," but said
past problems were not rele-
vant to the campaign.
In 1998, President Bill Clin-
ton forcefully denied having
an affair with a former White
House intern, telling re-
porters, "I did not have sex-
ual relations with that
woman, Miss Lewinsky."
Ten years ago: In a pre-
view of his State of the Union
address, President George
W. Bush pledged in his Sat-
urday radio address to "work
to create jobs and renew the
strength of our economy."
Five years ago: The White
House said President George
W. Bush had authorized U.S.
forces in Iraq to take what-
ever actions were necessary
to counter Iranian agents
deemed a threat to American
troops or the public at large.
One year ago: Speaking
in Manitowoc, Wis., President
Barack Obama campaigned
vigorously for his revamped
economic message, warning
that other countries were
grasping for first place in the
global marketplace as the
U.S. fell down on the job.
Today's Birthdays:
Sportscaster-actor Bob
Uecker is 77. Actor Scott
Glenn is 73. Activist Angela
Davis is 68. Rock musician
Corky Laing (Mountain) is 64.
Actor David Strathairn is 63.
Rock singer-musician Eddie
Van Halen is 57. Talk show
host Ellen DeGeneres is 54.


Associated Press
In this film image released by Disney, Jeremy Irvine is shown in a scene
from "War Horse." The film has been nominated for an Oscar for best film.











FLAIR FOR FOOD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


The
Amish
Cook
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SERVICE TO FAITHFUL FOOD PATRONS


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MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
La Casa di Norma offers a variety of freshly prepared Italian dishes. Two of their more popular specialties include chicken a la Romano, left,
and seafood casserole.

La Casa di Norma attracts loyal customers with blend ofltalian, Spanish dishes


JULIANNE MUNN
Chronicle food writer
Since 1996, La Casa di Norma
has served a faithful clientele in
Crystal River, and the popular
restaurant featuring Italian and
Spanish cuisine shows no signs of
slowing down.
From made-to-order paella to
favorites such as piccata, francese,
lasagna and marsala dishes to
unique appetizers including es-
cargot-stuffed mushrooms and
eggplant rollatini, and homemade
desserts and soups, the caf6 has
something for almost everyone.
Among the nicest aspects of the
little restaurant off U.S. 19 in the
Crystal River Shopping Center
are friendly owners Norma and
Licio Ortiz, who served patrons at
the Brooksville Country Club for
10 years before moving to Crystal
River in 1996.
She is a native of Salerno, Italy,
and he is from Cunca, Ecuador,
which explains, they note, why
their menu features Italian and
Spanish dishes "about 85 per-
cent Italian and 15 percent Span-
ish," Norma Ortiz said.
The couple met in Chicago
decades ago, where he honed his
restaurant skills at various eater-
ies including Benihana's, a fa-
vorite place to dine for celebrities
in that area. Licio Ortiz points to a
photo of him at Benihana's with
actor Mickey Rooney
In fact, one wall at the casual
but elegant restaurant is covered
with photos of the couple as well
as regular customers who pro-
vide framed pictures for display
The general ambiance is quiet


Chronicle
With Super Bowl Sunday
less than two weeks away,
local residents planning par-
ties to watch the game or the
commercials with friends and
family may scour the Internet
to find some savory snacks to
serve at their events.
In an effort to save some
time, two Citrus County
Chronicle staffers baked up
some unique appetizers for
potential party planners or
party-goers wishing to con-
tribute to the eats and had
fellow staffers test them out
The two contending


LA CASA DI NORMA
* LOCATION: Crystal River Shopping Center, 1609 S.E. U.S. 19,
Crystal River.
* HOURS: 4 to 9 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday; closed Sunday
and Monday.
* SPECIAL SERVICES: Private parties are available by reservation
anytime with seating for 50.
* CALL: Reservations are recommended by calling 352-795-4694.
Credit cards are accepted for orders of $15 or more.


and the decor pleasing.
The Ortizes said they love to
travel and one month each sum-
mer they close the restaurant to
visit far away places. They were
in Ecuador last year, where they
purchased a condo for retire-
ment, previously toured Italy and
this year will see Hawaii for the
first time.
But cooking good food with flair
is the hallmark of Licio Ortiz for 35
years. He has one kitchen assistant
His wife makes desserts and takes
care of service in the 35-seat dining
room with only one helper, Jeannie
Mesker, an 11-year employee.
Ortiz said some his most popu-
lar dishes include seafood Riviera
with NortheastAtlantic clams and
gulf scallops saut6ed with fresh
garlic in white wine, $18.95; and
chicken Florentine saut6ed with
spinach and cheese, with white
wine and a touch of lemon, $13.95.
All served with pasta.
Veal dishes are standouts, too,
such as the Vitello Francese,
lightly breaded and saut6ed in
white wine and lemon-butter
sauce, $17.95, and Vitello Diana,
saut6ed in brandy and mushroom
cream sauce, $16.95.


Many of the dinner items are
available on the early dinner
menu from 4 to 5:30 p.m. at a re-
duced price. For example, floun-
der Francese, $12.95; chicken
piccata, $8.95; and spaghetti with
clams and white or red clam
sauce, $8.95, plus much more.
All entrees are served with
choice of homemade soup pre-
pared daily or house salad and
Cuban garlic bread baked on the
premises.
You will also find a good selec-
tion of starters: bruschetta, $4.95;
New Zealand mussels marinara,
$6.95, and black beans and rice,
$2.95 and $3.95, to name a few.
The paella tops the menu price
list because it's very labor inten-
sive, Ortiz explained. Diners wish-
ing to have that specialty need to
call and order it at least two hours
in advance. An order for one is
$19.95 and $35.95 for two.
Ortiz said he did take limited
culinary school classes many
years ago, but said "I worked my
way up cooking with enthusiasm
and with my heart."
"Heart" is also evident in the
desserts Norma Ortiz makes, in-
cluding the tiramisu, flan, tortufo,


spumoni, Key lime ice cream and
a special white chocolate rasp-
berry cheesecake.
A faithful customer is senior
citizen Anna Holub, who said she
travels to La Casa di Norma at
least three times a week to dine.
Her favorite dish is the chicken
Francese. "But," she noted with
emphasis, "everything he makes
is just delicious."
Maybe that's because patrons
count on the couple to meet most
any special wishes. Ortiz said
once a diner requested lobster,
which is not on the menu.
"I went out right away and got
the lobster and came back and
prepared it," he said, ensuring
another happy diner
Italian and Spanish wines and
popular brands of beer are avail-
able, plus cappuccino and espresso.
Salads are dressed with raspberry
vinaigrette or the house-made bleu
cheese and ranch dressings.
In a faltering economy, La Casa
di Norma has managed to be one
of the most durable restaurants
in Citrus County.
La Casa di Norma in the Crys-
tal River Shopping Center is
open from 4 to 9 p.m. Tuesday
through Saturday and closed
Sunday and Monday Private par-
ties are available by reservation
anytime with seating for 50.
Reservations are recom-
mended by calling 352-795-4694.
Credit cards are accepted for or-
ders $15 or more.
Here are a couple of favorite
recipes from La Casa di Norma
Chef Licio Ortiz:
See Page C2


FOOD RATINGS '
For individual votes of
Chronicle staffers, see
Page C2. e r

recipes were a bacon appe- .
tizer crescent and Aussient.
sausage rolls. The taste test
was conducted Monday and
the results were close. But -
one recipe won over the
newsroom judges it was
the Aussie sausage rolls.
To bake up your own ap-
petizer for you and your BRIAN LaPETERPChronicle
guests, here is the recipe. These Aussie sausage rolls won over the stomachs of Citrus County Chronicle staffers as
the preferred Super Bowl appetizer in the newspaper's unofficial food rating. The recipe
See Page C2 beat the bacon appetizer crescent by one-tenth of a point.


Julianne Munn
OVER EASY


Old,



new



celeb



foods

We are deep into
the annual
celebrity awards
season with shows dis-
pensing trophies nearly
every week. The grand-
daddy of them all, the Os-
cars, happen in February
For most of us, keeping
up with our favorite film
and television stars is a
guilty pleasure. So when
this ultra-famous Holly-
wood recipe came my way
via email, I just couldn't
resist sharing it this week.
Brown Derby grapefruit
cake is from the new "Los
Angeles Classic Desserts"
cookbook by Grace Bauer,
a New Orleans native and
graduate of a culinary
school in Los Angeles
($16.95 on amazon.com
and at major bookstores).
The recipes range in
style from classic and tra-
ditional old-Hollywood to
hip and trendy Los Ange-
les. The full-color book in-
cludes beautiful
photography illustrating
the recipes and a bit of
history of each restaurant
represented in the book.
See Page C2


Ron Drinkhouse
WINES
& SUCH


Learning

to identify

regions of

wine
entle readers famil-
iar with wine surely
have noticed while
strolling through wine
shops some labels are
grouped by grape variety
(merlot, chardonnay) while
others are tagged with
place names, such as Loire
or Medoc. And many are
simply arranged by coun-
try of origin such as Aus-
tralia, Germany and so on.
So when I am asked
about a good merlot, and I
point to Pomerol or Saint-
Emilion as districts to
search, I am too often met
with blank stares.
The reason is, in Eu-
rope, most wine is identi-
fied by the area where it is
grown. So if folks are not
up on place names, they
are in a bit of trouble.
Old-fashioned crib
sheets have helped many
students. So, it suggests
folks not overly familiar
with wine districts of the
world might appreciate a
one-minute browsing guide
to use at the wine store.
Let's begin with per-
haps the most confusing
and the granddaddy of
them all France.
See Page C6


qr
L t


Chronicle staffers pick

sausage rolls as best

Super Bowl appetizer


w !







CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE'S



Super Bowl appetizer food ratings




Voter Total

On a scale of With 8
1 to 5 spoons, Chronicle
voters score staffers voting,
two recipes Brian Brad Darlene Sandra Sarah the average is:
LaPeter Bautista Mann Frederick Gatling




sausage
rolls 4.0






Bacon



crescents





(Aussie (Bacon (Aussie rolls) (Bacon (Aussie rolls)
Comments sausage crescents) were a 5 out crescents) were

on the rolls) full would've of the oven, won me over interesting

appetizers of meaty been better but did not because of and spicy; a
goodness. fresh out of do well cream cheese nice, savory
oven. reheated. and pastry. treat.


SUPER
Continued from Page C1

AUSSIE
SAUSAGE ROLLS
1-1/4 pounds bulk
pork sausage
1 medium onion, finely
chopped
2 teaspoons minced
chives
2 teaspoons minced



EASY
Continued from Page C1

Restaurants represented
in the book include classic
favorites like: Chasen's, The
Polo Lounge, Chateau Mar-
mont Hotel and Romanoff's.
Recipes from new la la land
favorites include the Water
Grill, Patina, La Brea Bak-
ery and Sweet Lady Jane's
Bakery
Chef Bauer recommends a
classic Hollywood dessert for
a Valentine's Day lunch,
Easter or Mother's Day
brunch: grapefruit cake from
the famous Brown Derby
restaurant According to Chef
Bauer, this dessert was a fa-
vorite of some of the restau-
rant's famous regulars such
as Bob Hope, Jimmy Stewart,
Frank Sinatra, Lucille Ball
and Cecil B. DeMille.
BROWN DERBY
GRAPEFRUIT
CAKE
(This is one of the old
Brown Derby's classic
desserts. Founded in 1926,
the restaurant was very
popular with Hollywood's
most glamorous actors dur-
ing the heyday of the Brown
Derby In this recipe, the ad-
dition of crushed grapefruit
to the frosting, as well as
having grapefruit sections
placed between and on top
of the cake, offer a promise
of what's within.)
Cake:
1 1/2 cups cake flour
3/4 cup granulated
sugar
1 1/2 teaspoon baking
powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 cup water
1/4 cup vegetable oil
3 large eggs,
separated
4 tablespoons fresh
grapefruit juice
1/2 teaspoon lemon
zest
1/4 teaspoon cream of
tartar
Preheat oven to 350 de-
grees. Sift together flour,
sugar, baking powder and
salt into mixing bowl. Make a
well in center of dry ingredi-
ents. Into the well, add water,


fresh basil or 1/2
teaspoon dried basil
2 garlic cloves, minced
1 teaspoon paprika,
divided
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper
1 package (17.3
ounces) frozen puff
pastry, thawed
In a large bowl, combine
the sausage, onion, chives,
basil, garlic, 3/4 teaspoon pa-
prika, salt and pepper Un-


oil, egg yolks, grapefruit juice
and lemon zest Beat every-
thing until very smooth.
In another mixing bowl,
beat the egg whites and
cream of tartar separately
until the whites are stiff but
not dry Gradually pour the
egg yolk mixture over whites
and, with a rubber spatula,
fold them together gently
until they are just blended.
Do not stir mixture.
Pour the mixture into an
ungreased pan and bake 25 to
30 minutes, or until the cake
springs back when lightly
touched with a finger Invert
the cake on a rack With the
cake remaining in the pan,
allow it to cool. Then run a
spatula around edge of cake
and carefully remove it from
the pan. With a serrated knife,
gently cut cake in half hori-
zontally to create two layers.
Grapefruit
Cream Cheese
Frosting:
12 ounces cream
cheese
2 teaspoons fresh
lemon juice
1 teaspoon grated


fold pastry onto a lightly
floured surface. Roll each
pastry sheet into an ll-by-10
1/2-inch rectangle. Cut width-
wise into 3 1/2-inch strips.
Spread 1/2 cup of sausage
mixture down the center of
each strip. Fold pastry over
and press edges together to
seal. Cut each roll into six
pieces.
Place seam side down on
a rack in a shallow baking
pan. Sprinkle with remain-
ing paprika. Bake at 350 de-
grees for 20 to 25 minutes or


lemon zest
3/4 cup powdered
sugar, sifted
2 tablespoons crushed
grapefruit
3 to 4 drops yellow
food coloring
2 cups well-drained
grapefruit sections
Allow the cream cheese to
soften at room temperature;
then beat until it is fluffy.
Add the lemon juice and
zest. Gradually blend in the
sugar Add the food coloring
and beat the mixture until
everything is well blended.
Crush a sufficient amount
of grapefruit flesh to fill 2 ta-
blespoons and blend them
into the frosting. Spread some
of the frosting on the bottom
layer of the cake and top with
grapefruit sections. Place the
second layer atop the first and
spread more frosting on the
top and sides until they are
covered. Garnish with the re-
maining grapefruit sections.

Julianne Munn is the food
writer for the Citrus County
Chronicle. Email her at
jmunn2@tampabay.rrcom.


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until golden brown.
Prep time is 15 minutes
and bake time 20 minutes. It
yields 12 servings or about 3
dozen.
For the cooks who wish to
try the runner-up, here is
the recipe.

BACON
APPETIZER
CRESCENT
1 package (8 ounces)
Philadelphia cream
cheese, softened



NORMA
Continued from Page C1

GARLIC SHRIMP
1 1/2 ounces butter
3 ounces fresh
chopped garlic
2 ounces white wine
3 ounces half and half
cream


* 8 slices Oscar Mayer
bacon, cooked,
crumbled
1/3 cup Kraft grated
parmesan cheese
1/4 cup finely chopped
onion
2 tablespoons
chopped fresh parsley
1 tablespoon milk
2 cans (8 ounces
each) refrigerated
crescent dinner rolls
Heat oven to 375 degrees.
Mix all ingredients except


7 large shrimp
In a skillet, saute butter,
garlic and white wine. Add
shrimp and sautd for 2 min-
utes. Add cream and cook 2
more minutes.
Serve over or with pasta.
It makes one serving.
CHICKEN
FLORENTINE
6-ounce chicken
breast


crescent dough.
Separate each can of
dough into 8 triangles; cut
each triangle lengthwise in
half. Spread each dough
triangle with 1 generous
teaspoon of cream cheese
mixture; roll up, starting at
short side of triangle.
Place, point-sides down, on
baking sheet.
Bake 12 to 15 minutes or
until golden brown. Serve
warm.
Prep time is 20 minutes. It
yields 16 servings.


1 ounce butter
2 ounces white wine
1/2 ounce lemon juice
2 slices Mozzarella
cheese
2 ounces spinach
Sautd chicken in butter
Add wine, lemon juice and
spinach. When all ingredi-
ents are cooked, add Moz-
zarella cheese and finish in
oven until cheese is melted.


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C2 THURSDAY, JANUARY 26, 2012


FLAIR FOR FOOD


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







C Page C3 THURSDAY, JANUARY 26,2012



COMMUNITY ___
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


NeWOTES Museum fun for February NewSNOTES

Inverness Relavy GM Retirees slate


meeting is Jan. 31
Inverness Relay For Life
will meet at 6 p.m. Tuesday,
Jan. 31, in the Gulf Room of
Citrus Memorial hospital.
Anyone wanting to form a
team or join a team is wel-
come. Inverness Relay For
Life, an event to benefit the
American Cancer Society,
will be April 20 and 21.
Get tickets now
for cards, lunch
Crystal River Woman's
Club will host a Military Card
Party and luncheon Thurs-
day, Feb. 9, at the club-
house, 320 N. Citrus Ave.
Doors open at 11:30 a.m.
Tickets are $12 and it is rec-
ommended that you make
reservations for tables of four.
In addition to the first-, sec-
ond- and third-place tables
winning money, two entry
tickets will be drawn. The
winners of two tables of four-
somes may attend the next
Military Card Party free on
April 12.
Purchase tickets by calling
Lois Thomas at 352-382-
0777. Proceeds from the
event will benefit community
charities.
Jazz jam open to
public Feb. 5
Citrus Jazz Society will
host its monthly open jam
session from 1:30 to 4 p.m.
Sunday, Feb. 5, at the Citrus
Catholic Charity Community
Center, formerly the Knights
of Columbus Hall, Ho-
mosassa Springs. The public
is welcome.
The jam session features
local and visiting musicians
playing jazz, swing and Dix-
ieland favorites.
Donation at the door is $7
for nonmembers. Bring your
own refreshments.
Musicians interested in
playing may call Tony Caruso
at 352-795-9936.
Gym to host
classes as benefit
Mellodie's Gym will host
women's self-defense
classes at 3 and 6 p.m. Fri-
day, Feb. 3, for Karen Dixon-
Pulcini, who needs a kidney
transplant. Black-belt instruc-
tor Susan Marotta will lead
the classes.
Cost is $20. Space is lim-
ited, so reserve early. Baked
goods will also be for sale,
with all proceeds going to the
Karen Dixon-Pulcini Benefi-
cial Trust.
The gym is at 1101 Middle
School Drive, Inverness.
Email Lynda Hartman at
lharmanl2@tampabay.rr.com
or call her at 352-201-0015,
or visit www.akidneyfor
karen.com for reservations.


Animal Shelter
ADOPTABLES


Kebo


Special to the Chronicle
Kebo is a 1-year-old bulldog
mix and weighs approxi-
mately 50 pounds. He's
calm and gentle, loves to
be with people, gets along
with most dogs and does-
n't mind cats. He loves to
play fetch in the play yard.
He would make a wonder-
ful companion. Come meet
Kebo at Citrus County Ani-
mal Services, 4030 S. Air-
port Road, Inverness,
behind the fairgrounds.
View all our adoptable pets
at www.citruscritters.com.
Call 352-746-8400.


MARY ANN LYNN
Special to the Chronicle

There are several happenings on
the schedule for February at the His-
torical Courthouse Museum in Inver-
ness.
From 7 to 9 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 9,
the Sweet Sound of Jazz will feature
the sounds of Southern Exposure,
with tasty refreshments from Deco
Cafe and beverages available for pur-
chase (wine, champagne, beer, water
and sodas).


Cost is $25 and doors open at 6 p.m.
Coffee and Conversation with
William Bartram's Adventures in
Florida as portrayed by J.D. Sutton,
will be at 8:30 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 16.
As part of a Florida Humanities
Council Speaker's Bureau-funded
program, veteran actor J.D. Sutton's
portrayal of botanist, artist, adven-
turer and writer William Bartram will
bring to life Florida history on the eve
of the American Revolution, when our
state was a British colony, 1783 to 1783.
All are welcome to enjoy this excel-


lent presentation; it will appeal to
children, as well as adults.
The fifth annual African Ameri-
can Read-In will be from 2:30 to 4:30
p.m. Sunday, Feb. 26, in the Learning
and Conference Center at the College
of Central Florida Citrus Campus.
For information about any of these
events, call 352-341-6427.
Remember to hold the date -
March 25 from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., the
Hernando Heritage Council will have
its first Bluegrass Festival "Pickin'
and Grinnin' Goin' on Here" at the
Historical Hernando School. For in-
formation on sponsorships and tickets,
call Mary Sue Rife at 352-302-1429.


Crystal River Relay plans smoking' event


Special to the Chronicle

Crystal River Relay For
Life will host its inaugural
Smokin' out Cancer BBQ
Cook-off and Music Festival
for Charity on March 17 and
18 at Natures RV Resort on
the waterfront in Homosassa.


Barbecue entry fee forven-
dors and commercial cooks,
who will be allowed to sell
their barbecue, is $100. Entry
fee for amateur cooks, who
will compete for bragging
rights and trophies, is $50.
Barbecue will be prepared
on site.


Advance gate tickets are
available at various locations
around the county. Admis-
sion is $3; children younger
than 5 get in for free.
There will be entertain-
ment, food vendors, Miss/Mis-
ter Hope Beauty Pageant on
Saturday, classic car show on
Sunday, 50/50 drawings, arts
and crafts vendors, and live
bands all weekend. Gates


open at 9 a.m.
RV sites and cabins are
available at special rates for
barbecue cooks. All proceeds
will go to the Crystal River
Relay For Life to benefit the
American Cancer Society.
To participate or for more
information, call Tex Ashby
at 352-212-9425, or email
paintthewindfarm@
yahoo.com.


TD helping B&GC


Special to the Chronicle
A check for the grant amount of $11,453 was recently presented to the Boys & Girls Clubs of Citrus County from TD
Bank. From left are: Austin Ballard, club member; Lane Vick, executive director of Boys & Girls Clubs of Citrus County;
Alpha McGaughey, branch manager of TD Bank of Inverness; and Allison Carter and Roy Cooper, club members.


Come listen, chat, read at Old Courthouse


Help is available to complete income tax forms


Special to the Chronicle

AARP Tax-Aide will provide free income tax
form preparation and electronic filing services in
Citrus County again this year
AARP Tax-Aide is a nationwide service of the
AARP Foundation offered in conjunction with the
U.S. Internal Revenue Service. It is a volunteer-
run program whose mission is to provide high-
quality free income tax assistance to low- and
middle-income taxpayers with special attention to
those 60 and older It is not necessary to be a mem-
ber of AARP; taxpayers of all ages are welcome to
use this service.
In Citrus County, volunteers provide this service
at seven sites, open Feb. 1 through April 14.
What to bring to the appointment:
Social Security cards or comparable docu-
mentation for you, your spouse (if applicable), all
dependents and anyone listed on your tax return.
SAn official photo ID (driver's license, passport,
student ID or other state-issued photo ID).
MA copy of your 2010 income tax return, if avail-
able.
Income-related documents: forms W-2, unem-
ployment compensation statements, SSA 1099,
1099R and other 1099 forms showing home mort-
gage interest or other income.
Expense-related documents: receipts, can-
celled checks or other documentation showing
federal and state taxes paid, 1098 forms, docu-
mentation of medical, dental, charity, property
taxes, mortgage interest paid, or business ex-
penses. Receipts for expenses need to be in rea-
sonable order and legible.
Brokerage statements or other documentation
showing cost basis (purchase price) and date pur-
chased for all securities or property sold or trans-
ferred during the tax year.
All paperwork related to:


WHERE TO GO
All sites are by appointment only; you must go to the library in person to make an appointment.
Central Ridge Library: 425 W. Roosevelt Blvd., Beverly Hills, 352-746-6622; from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
every Friday, Feb. 3 through April 13 (except Good Friday, April 6). Saturday only on Feb. 18 and March
17 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Appointments must be made in person.
Citrus Springs Community Center: 1570 W. Citrus Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs, 352-465-7007;
from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. every Tuesday, Feb. 7 through April 10. No appointment necessary;
first-come, first-served basis only.
Coastal Region Library: 8619 W. Crystal St., Crystal River, 352-795-3716; from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
every Thursday, Feb. 2 through April 12. Saturday only on Feb. 4, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Appointments must
be made in person.
Crystal River Moose Lodge: 1855 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa, 352-795-2795; from 9 a.m. to 1
p.m. every Monday and Tuesday, Feb. 6 through April 16. No appointment necessary;
first-come, first-served basis only.
Floral City Public Library: 8360 E. Orange Ave., Floral City, 352-726-3671; from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
every Tuesday, Feb. 7 through April 10. Saturday only on March 24 and April 7, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Appointments must be made in person.
Homosassa Public Library: 4100 Grandmarch Ave., Homosassa, 352-628-5626; from 10 a.m. to 5
p.m. every Wednesday, Feb. 1 through April 11. Saturday only on March 10 and April 14,
10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Appointments must be made in person.
Lakes Region Library: 1511 Druid Road, Inverness, 352-726-2357; from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. every
Wednesday, Feb. 1 through April 11. Saturday only on Feb. 25, March 31 and April 14,
10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Appointments must be made in person.


Health Savings Accounts (HSA);
IRA rollovers, including Form 5498;
The purchase of a home by a first-time buyer;
Purchase and installation of energy-efficient
products for a primary residence;
Cancellation of Debt of a credit card(s) or the
foreclosure of a primary residence;
Dependent Care Provider information:
(name, address, employer ID or SSN) and amount
paid;
Documentation of self-employment income
and expense (Tax-Aide cannot prepare and e-file


your return if expenses exceed $10,000, or if you
had employees, inventory, cost of goods sold, real
estate, depreciation or loss from operations.);
A check with your name printed on it for di-
rect deposit/debit of any refund/balance due. (A
check in your checkbook is acceptable. A canceled
check is not required. It must be a check: no bank
statements, deposit slips or other documents will
be accepted.);
If you receive a pension or annuity from a for-
mer employer, bring the date that you began to re-
ceive payments. (In some cases, this is required.)


* Submit information at least two weeks before the event. U Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
* Early submission of timely material is appreciated, but Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
multiple publications cannot be guaranteed. community@chronicleonline.com.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be guaranteed.
* Expect notes to run no more than once.


luncheon Feb. 1
GM Retirees will have their
luncheon meeting beginning
at 11:30 a.m. Wednesday,
Feb.1, at Citrus Hills Country
Club, 505 E. Hartford St.,
Hernando.
On the menu are chicken
breast or stuffed flounder;
cost is $12.
Members may call Brenda
at 352-586-0496 or Kathy at
352-344-2833 if they have
not received a newsletter.
The March meeting will
feature a special speaker
from Detroit GM, as well as a
dinner.
Members should RSVP as
soon as possible to Kathy
David at 352-344-2833.
Scouts to serve
spaghetti Feb. 4
Boy Scout Troop 462 will
host its 15th annual Spaghetti
Dinner Silent & Chinese Auc-
tion from 4 to 7 p.m. Satur-
day, Feb. 4, at Hope
Evangelical Lutheran Church,
9425 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.,
Citrus Springs.
Dinner includes fresh
salad, bread, spaghetti with
sauce (meat or plain), drink
and dessert.
Donation is $6 per person
at the door, or $5 in advance.
For more information, call
Anita Black at 352-427-4034.
Legion Riders to
serve pasta meal
American Legion Riders at
Post 155 will host its second
annual Super Spaghetti Din-
ner from 5 to 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday, Feb. 1, at the
post home, on Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River.
Cost is $6, which includes
salad, all-you-can-eat
spaghetti with meatballs
and/or Italian sausage, garlic
bread, dessert, coffee and
iced tea. The public is wel-
come.
All money raised by the
Riders is donated to various
veterans' and community
charities.
For more information, call
Cindy Heather at 352-
563-9926, or Post 155 at
352-795-6526.
Library Friends to
meet Feb. 7
Friends of the Dunnellon
Public Library will meet at 10
a.m. Tuesday, Feb. 7, in the
library meeting room.
The library is at 20351
Robinson Road, Dunnellon.
For more information, call
352-438-2520.


Cook-off music festfor charity


*





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


THURSDAY EVENING JANUARY 26, 2012 C: Comcast,Citrus B: Bright House D/:Comcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
C B D/I F H 6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:0010:3011:0011:30
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0 WTP) CBS 10 10 10 10 10 6pm (N) News Edition Millionaire Theory PG '14' Red Book"'14' 11pm (N
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THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles, V -,
one letter to each square, WVuV vo
to form four ordinary words. Wouldyou like to start
today?l Ill make you an
S expert driver in no time at all.
CAMAW
L liJ, -- v.,,., *!.

2012 Tribune Media Services n /n -.
2 uAll Rights Reserved .. ,' 0 ,- -1 '
HOEUS ,I



ROERRT
^ 7 T| THE 57USPNT PPRIVFR
SVV5 LEERY OF TH15
C__HRCO_ I-TYPE OF PRIOVNG
ICSHRCO I N'RUCFION.


Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


A: A L
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's I Jumbles: WOOZY KNOWN SKETCH HICCUP
I Answer: He was in the market for a new banjo, so he
needed to do this PICK ONE


Bridge

PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

Juan Manuel Fangio, Argentinian Formula 1
champion in 1951 and 1954-57, said, "I learned to
approach racing like a game of billiards. If you
bash the ball too hard, you get nowhere. As you
handle the cue properly, you drive with more fi-
nesse."
Some bridge deals require brute force, but far
more require finesse or finesses. Take this deal.
The bidding given is sensible, but suppose North
steers his partner into seven spades. How should
South play after West leads the heart queen?
In the auction, South's three-spade rebid prom-
ised extra values. Since he could not have the val-
ues for this call unless he had heart honors, North
immediately used Blackwood. His subsequent five
no-trump said that his side had all four aces and
that he was thinking about a grand slam. When
South did not bid seven, which he ought to have
done with solid spades and the heart king, North
should have signed off in six no-trump. (Yes, this is
an excellent deal for users of Roman Key Card
Blackwood, when South can deny holding the
spade queen.)
South has to play the trump suit without loss.
With only eight trumps, he is mathematically much
better off taking a finesse than cashing the ace and
king. Playing the ace first, planning a second-
round finesse, wins when West has a singleton
queen. But finessing on the first and second
rounds brings home the grand slam when West has
a low singleton, which is four times more likely
The odds have spoken: Finesse spades immedi-
ately


North
*52
V 7643
*AKQ
* AKQJ
4 A K Q J


West
A 4
V Q J 10 9
+ 7 6 5 2
4 9 7 6 4


South
% A K J 10 9 7
YAK

4 8 5

Dealer: South
Vulnerable: Both


South
14
34
5 V
6 V


Opening lead: Q


West
Pass
Pass
Pass
Pass


East
A Q 8 6 3
V 8 5 2
* 10 8 3
* 10 3 2


North
2%
4 NT
5 NT
7 4


East
Pass
Pass
Pass
All pass


ACROSS
1 Cheesy snack
6 Desperado's
fear
11 Alteration
expert
12 Interlocked
13 Composure
14 Millionaires'
toys
15 Stitch loosely
16 "Puppy Love"
singer
17 Gentle
exercise
19 Ride the
rapids
23 Stone
or Ice
26 Eye shadow
28 Fish-to-be
29 Treats badly
31 "The Phantom
of the -"
33 Like Gandhi
34 Pitchers' hills
35 Compass pt.
36 1917
abdicator


39 Tank
filler
40 Orchid-loving
Wolfe
42 Bahrain VIP
44 Slightly
improper
46 At sunup
51 Undamaged
54 Shining
brightly
55 Kingdoms
56 Verdigris
57 One of five
58 Flaxen-haired

DOWN
1 Auto parts
store
2 Is not well
3 Get lumpy
4 Snug
5 Moon or
planet
6 Pike's
discovery
7 One of the
Muppets
8 Library
caution


Answer to Previous Puzzle


9 Clique
10 Mag execs
11 Dinner check
12 Chatty
starling
16 In time past
18 Signs off on


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


20 Wrestling
venue
21 Crosses
22 Mild brews
23 Get up
24 Lost cause
25 Finish
27 Old card
game
29 One of the
five W's
30 Kind of
reaction
32 Jowly canine
34 CAT scan
relative
37 Denominations
38 A Little
Woman
41 Unwritten
tests
43 Lordly
45 Zenith
47 Palo -, Calif.
48 Harness piece
49 Touch down
50 Peruvian
singer -
Sumac
51 Form 1040
org.
52 Before
marriage
53 Catch some
rays
54 Police dept.
alert


Dear Annie: Thirty years
ago, my husband had a
long-term affair. At the
time, he was 30, and
she was 16. He planned
to leave me, and our
two young children,
but he changed his
mind and supposedly
broke off the affair.
Last year, I found out
he had a daughter with
this woman. The girl is
now 17.
Four months ago, I
came home from a
short trip to discover ANNI
he had moved out be- MAIL
cause he wants to
spend more time with
his daughter. I told him I would
welcome the girl into our family,
but he said he no longer wants to
be married. He refuses to let me
meet his daughter, who now lives
with him in his newly renovated
home. Our own children want
nothing to do with him, and he
doesn't understand why
He still stops by for breakfast
and coffee most mornings and
often comes over for lunch or in
the evening to visit Do you think
he will eventually come back to
me, or should I tell him to get lost
so I can move on with my life? -
Frazzled
Dear Frazzled: Your husband
has a set-up that works for him -
free meals and visits with his wife,
and none of the responsibilities.
He has no reason to change it
You cannot make him behave
the way you wish, so if this
arrangement works for you, fine.
Otherwise, we recommend a
legal separation until you figure
out what is in your best interest.


You don't have to rush into di-
vorce. One step at a time.
DearAnnie: I recently married
my longtime
boyfriend. My father-
in-law is fun to be
around and loves to be
the life of the party
The problem is, every
other word out of his
mouth takes the
Lord's name in vain. I
cringe every time I
hear it and don't un-
derstand why he
swears so much in this
IE'S particular way. I've
BOX tried telling him
nicely that I don't like
cursing, but nothing
seems to make a dent. Any sug-
gestions? Not a Fan of Cursing
Dear Not a Fan: Dad has a bad
habit that will be difficult to
break, particularly if he isn't will-
ing to try Ask your husband to tell
his father you are very sensitive
to the swearing, and suggest he
try to substitute less offensive
words when you are around. You
also could employ a sense of
humor and exaggeratedly cover
your ears and look shocked when
Dad swears so he notices when
he's doing it. We can't guarantee
it will help, but at least you will
have registered your disap-
proval.
Dear Annie: Like "Adopted
Child," I, too, was adopted as an
infant. At the age of 25, I had
some medical issues, so I called
the home that handled my adop-
tion to see whether I could get
some medical information.
It turned out my biological
mother was looking for me. Al-
though my parents were not


happy about my contacting her, I
did it anyway For five years, I
thought we had a good relation-
ship. But apparently, my birth
mother blamed me for ruining
her life. She purposefully got
pregnant to trap my biological fa-
ther into marriage, but he would-
n't do it. I was born with a birth
defect caused either by a beating
he gave her or her attempts to
abort me. The defect was re-
paired at birth, but I carry a
hideous scar as a constant re-
minder that someone wanted me
dead. Worse, my biological
mother lied to help my ex-hus-
band gain custody of my daugh-
ters during our divorce, because
she wanted me to suffer the loss
of a child as she did.
Meeting this woman was the
biggest mistake of my life.
Adopted children should be con-
tent with the parents who raised
them. -Another Adopted Child
Dear Another: Your story is
horrific, but fortunately, it's not
typical. Frankly, your biological
mother sounds mentally ill. We
are sorry you had to go through
such heartbreak.


Annie's Mailbox is written by
Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar,
longtime editors of the Ann
Landers column. Please email
your questions to anniesmail
box@comcast.net, or write to:
Annie's Mailbox, c/o Creators
Syndicate, 7373rd Street, Her-
mosa Beach, CA 90254. To find
out more about Annie's Mailbox
and read features by other
Creators Syndicate writers and
cartoonists, visit
www.creators.com.


D|U|L|YWEJA VE|
1 0NT I Co L LI



NESMOLD EDAMS
BALED SLA VED
A E I U T TPE

LSE BEAN M
YAN KED



VIOLIN PROVEN
INUITS TOWELS
METED IN NSA


2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


C4 THURSDAY, JANUARY 26, 2012


ENTERTAINMENT


1-26-12


Lill I


I





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Peanuts


Garfield


For Better or For Worse

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tAINTO OT--
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Beetle Bailey


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:TED AND SALLY NEVER MET IN COLLEGE IT'S BEEN A WHILE SINCE UY DOESN'T
I WENT ON A REAL EVEN HAVE MATTER. YOU'LL
NID YOU JUST DIbrl YOU SAY YOU INTERVIEW, BUT IS A JOB FIND A GOOD
TELL ME YOU? WANT TO START THIS HOW THEY THIS S JOPENING2 JOB AFTER
IDEAL MAN A FAMILY ALL ARE? JUST TOO | m/ A YEAR OF
WEIRD. UNEMPLOYMENT.
MAYBE YOU WAIT, WHY DO
SHOULDL b I KNOW THAT?


Dilbert


The Born Loser

TRE W\(TERYh( NOV EL | 1' WOULD> KE. iAPPY? TO LE(T T ''TANK'OU, NO, 'A FRNbi
7I R AD,\G \S AIREL T VTTO'(OU WREN'IWS\RED, I'A RO LONGER UPTO
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Kit 'N' Carlyle Rubes


The Grizzwells


Blondie


Dennis the Menace The Family Circus


Doonesbury


6BNT2EMAR, COMEIAN AK E. ANP IT-'S
5TEPH6N COL.BERT RF- CN5(ATRICH, FUNI AM NT
CaNTLY OUTPOLL15P T/O 10,1 5T6- ALLY, AA-
REAL CAN1IPATS IAN PH COL- MATICA
SOULITH CAROLINA.,. pRiT' IT ,P '





LW,,."D HEL .Lv


Big Nate
ISx THERE A THAT'S ODD, IT WAS
PROBLEM NATE? WORKING THIS
/MORNING. LET ME
THE WATEK TAKE A LOOK.
FOUNTAIN
Arlo and JaBUSTE






Arlo and Janis


I POINT THINK ANY OF
U5 UKES TO 55EE THAT
MUCH TRUTH CONCEN-
TRATEP IN TH6 HANDP
OF A CABLE- SHOW
CLOWN!

J


"I PONT KNOW,MR. WILSON. WHAT WOULDN'T
40LU PO FOR A LITTLE PEACE AN' QUIET?"
Betty


-2 ,
www larnycrcsor
"Is this the year PJ is gonna be old
enough to know better?"


Frank & Ernest


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377
"Red Tails" (PG-13) 1:15 p.m., 4:20 p.m.,
7:20 p.m.
"Underworld Awakening" (R) ID required. In Real
3D. 1:50 p.m., 4:50 p.m., 8 p.m. No passes.
"Contraband" (R) ID required. 1:40 p.m.,
4:40 p.m., 7:40 p.m.
"Joyful Noise" (PG-13) 1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m.,
7:30 p.m.
"Beauty and the Beast" (G) In Real 3D. 2 p.m.,
5 p.m., 7:15 p.m. No passes.
"War Horse" (PG-13) 1 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:45 p.m.
Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Haywire" (R) ID required. 2 p.m., 5 p.m.,
7:50 p.m.
"Red Tails" (PG-13) 1:20 p.m., 4:05 p.m.,
7:25 p.m.


"Underworld Awakening" (R) ID required.
In Real 3D. 1:30 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
No passes.
"Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close" (PG-13)
1:10 p.m., 4 p.m., 7 p.m.
"Contraband" (R) ID required. 1:50 p.m.,
4:50 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
"Beauty and the Beast" (G) In Real 3D.
1:35 p.m., 4:15 p.m., 7:45 p.m. No passes.
"Joyful Noise" (PG-13) 1:40 p.m., 4:20 p.m.,
7:05 p.m.
"War Horse" (PG-13) 1 p.m., 4:15 p.m., 7:40 p.m.
"Mission Impossible: Ghost Protocol" (PG-13)
1:05 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:10 p.m.

Visit www.chronicleonline.com for area movie list-
ings and entertainment information.


Times subject to change; call ahead.


WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public Local RADIO WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Contemp. WSKY 97.3 FM News Talk WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WXOF-FM 96.3 Adult Mix WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s, '60s, '70s
WEKJ FM 96.7, 103.9 Religious WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WRZN-AM 720 Adult Standards

CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: F equals J

"SC'K YNC CRV JNKC SYCVDDVTCWBD


FNE SY CRV ANPDL, EWC S LN RBMV CN


HYNA CRV DVCCVPK."


- MBYYB ARSCV


Previous Solution: "Leadership ... the art of getting others to want to do something
you are convinced should be done." Vance Packard
(c) 2012 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 1-26


Pickles


Today MOVIES


COMICS


THURSDAY, JANUARY 26, 2012 C5






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Warmer winter than usual


his has been a different
winter so far, weather-
wise. We had another
snowstorm during the past
week. But then as quickly as it
snowed, it warmed back up.
Now, it rained during the
night and the temperature is up
to 45 degrees. We also had some
thunder and lightning while we
slept
The snow is mostly gone ex-
cept in the ditches and where it
was piled up. Some men have
been ice fishing, but it has not
been possible for most of the
winter because of the warmth.
Joe hasn't been able to go yet,
but he is eager to do so. Hope-
fully, it will turn colder again so
he can.
On up side, warmer tempera-
tures mean it takes less coal to
heat the house.
I like when the ground stays
frozen, so the house doesn't get
tracked with mud so much. It al-
ways seems like snow makes a
brighter world during the winter
On Saturday, Joe and the boys
went to help Elizabeth's friend
Timothy cut up some trees.
Timothy's brother and nephews
were also helping. Sounds like
they got a lot accomplished. Joe
likes doing outdoor work like
cutting up wood.
Meanwhile, here at home, the
girls cleaned and folded the
laundry from the day before.
While the girls were doing
that, I baked apple and custard
pies. Verena baked an apple
dump cake. She brought one
home from school that she made
in cooking class. She will write
down the recipe and I will share
it with readers in a future col-
umn. Everyone seemed to like it,
so Verena doubled the recipe.
On Sunday, we went to Emma
and Jacob's house for a deli-
cious dinner. We enjoyed bar-
becued-baked ribs, scalloped
potatoes, baked beans, cottage
cheese, coleslaw and sliced
cheese, hot peppers, home-


Lovina Eicher
THE AMISH COOK

made vanilla ice cream, choco-
late cake and apple and custard
pie. She put the ribs single
layer in a baking pan, seasoned
them with salt, pepper and bar-
becue sauce and baked.
Joe, Jacob and the boys froze
two 2-gallon cans of homemade
vanilla ice cream while we
were preparing dinner. Home-
made ice cream is always a fa-
vorite for us.
The children spent a lot of
the afternoon outside playing in
the snow. The rest of us played
games after the dishes were
washed. It seems like it doesn't
take long to get the dishes
washed when everyone pitches
in to help.
We started for home around 5
p.m. The boys did the evening
chores and Joe fueled the stove
for the night. We only had
snacks as everyone said they
weren't hungry for supper after
the big noon dinner at Jacob's
house. We all retired early for
the night as Joe had to start a
new week at the factory and the
children back to school.
On Jan. 24, daughter Susan
will have her 16th birthday
Seems hard to believe she has
reached that age. Where has
the time gone to so fast? Susan
enjoys outdoor work, and loves
horses and enjoys training
ponies. She would rather go
clean out the barn than do
housework. She does like to
bake, though I am still trying to
get her to sew. I always tease
her I'll move the sewing ma-
chine out to the barn if it would
make sewing more enjoyable


for her with the horses.
It is good we don't all have the
same interests or talents, other-
wise life would be less interest-
ing. When I need a horse
harnessed to run some errands,
she always volunteers to help.
We wish her a happy 16th birth-
day and many more happy years.
This is a recipe a lot of Amish
give as gifts around the holi-
days, or maybe for Valentine's
Day coming up.

OATMEAL CHIP
COOKIE MIX IN A
JAR

0 2/3 cups all-purpose flour
0 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
0 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
0 1/4 teaspoon salt
0 1/3 cup brown sugar
0 1/3 cup white sugar
0 3/4 cup chocolate chips
0 1 1/2 cups quick oats
0 1/2 cup pecans, chopped
0 Optional M & Ms
In a mixing bowl, combine
flour, baking soda, cinnamon
and salt Place flour mixture in
a 1-quart jar. Pressing down
firmly, layer the remaining in-
gredients in order.
Top with lid and decorate
with fabric or ribbon if giving as
a gift Recipe to attach to the jar:
Beat 1 stick softened butter, 1
large egg, 1/2 teaspoon vanilla
in a large bowl until blended.
Add cookie mix, mix well
breaking up any clumps. Drop
onto ungreased cookie sheet
Bake at 375 degrees for 8 to 10
minutes. Yield two dozen cookies.


Lovina Eicher and her hus-
band, Joe, are raising eight
children on their rural Michi-
gan homestead. For informa-
tion about the Amish Cook, or
to ask a question, write The
Amish Cook, PO. BOX 157,
Middletown, OH 45042 or visit
amishcookonline. com.


WINES
Continued from Page C1

This Old World country is divided
into almost 400 different wine dis-
tricts, each with its own set of laws.
The most important subdivisions are:
1. Bordeaux.
Main grapes are cabernet sauvi-
gnon and merlot blended always with
minority grapes such as Malbec and
Petite Vedot. White grapes grown
mostly are Semillion (not found often
in the U.S.) and Sauvignon Blanc. No
chardonnay is planted here.
2. Burgundy.
This famous region runs north and
south down the center of the country
No brainer, the only red grape is
pinot noir. The only white is
chardonnay
The region known as Chablis in the
north end is composed entirely of
chardonnay It will not resemble its
California cousins.
3. Beaujolais.
It is at the southern end of Bur-
gundy and is entirely composed of
gamay grapes.
4. The Rhone Valley.
It is a huge district, home to mostly
Grenache and Syrah. But more than
a dozen other varieties are culti-
vated. Cote de Rhone is a prime
example.
5. Alsace.
On the German border, this area is
home to delicious dry rieslings, spicy
gewurtraminer and pinot blanc. All
are quite dry and delicious.
Let's travel to another old-world
nation Italy
Here the country is divided into a
number of sub-districts, too.
Three which concern us the most
are:
1. Tuscany.
It is home to chianti, made entirely
from the Sangiovese variety.
2. Piedmont
It is further to the northeast and fa-
mous for the three Bs barolo, bar-
bera and barbaresco. A nice light red
is called dolcetto, and white grapes
are the sparkling asti and fragrant
gavi.
3. To the east of Venice lies the
Tres Venetia, a popular grape-grow-
ing area for prosecco, soave, valpoli-


cella and its brother bardolino. Good
everyday table wines.
Let's continue our European jour-
ney in Spain, another ancient wine
growing nation.
Spain's signature red grapes are
"Tempranillo," the cabernet of this
country Lovely grenaches abound as
well.
Make Spain your next area to ex-
plore. A wonderful white grape if you
can locate it is "Albarino." It will re-
mind you of fresh peaches.
Too many good folks are ready to
dismiss Germany because "the wines
are too sweet." The constituency suf-
fers from what I think of as the "Lit-
tle Blue Nun" syndrome. And those
labels with the forbidding unpro-
nounceable place names!
The fact is, with its northern lati-
tudes, Germany produces some of
the world's most exotic and delicious
white wines made mostly from the
noble riesling grape. By all means,
consult the wine specialist in your fa-
vorite store to talk about the pleas-
ures of German riesling and expect a
real treat beyond the pale.
Our crib course now leaps across
to other continents.
Australia is home to many vari-
eties, but is most noted for syrah or
shiraz as it is pronounced there, most
often blended with cab or merlot.
Chardonnay and riesling abound
among the whites.
Another New World pair is Ar-
gentina where the latest "hot" vari-
ety is malbec. A new label seems to
show up weekly
And finally there's Chile. It is home
to a large variety of friendly con-
sumer-priced reds and whites, in-
cluding the big four cabernet,
merlot, chardonnay and riesling.
So there you have it, a spot-on
guide to local wine aisles.
Do remember there is never a sub-
stitute for your own palate, so be dar-
ing and venture forth. The best is
always yet to come.


Oak Ridge resident Ron
Drinkhouse was a buyer and seller
of wines in his native Connecticut
He welcomes inquiries, and can be
reached via email at
ronoct9@aol. com or via telephone
at 352-445-0328.


C CITRUS COUNTY




H RONICLE

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BUSINESS HOURS:

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A GENT, 69-79+ with
old-fashion manners
would be my ideal
friend, to share simple
joys. If you are tender
hearted,
optimistic and like
laughter, it would be
great to hear from you.
Send response to
Cit. County Chronicle
Blind Box 1752 M
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Bvd. Crys. Riv. Fl. 34429

I l n. l,1 1 1.
1,,Lnn I ,,n,11II ISt.

C NClssfeds
k N Clssifieds_


Cale s4 5
trimmed beard, full
hair, spiritual, romantic,
understanding, diplo-
matic, looking again to
grow and luminate the
future with casual
clean cut positive
woman. Send response
to: Chronicle, Blind box
1753M, 1624 N Mead-
owcrest Blvd, Crystal
River FL 34429


Emily, Hi Honey, I have
not talked to you in
quite a while. Bought
new phone, new com-
pany and new answer-
ing machine. Address
is the same phone
number is 352-419-7673.
Call or stop by.
Your Lover, Rodie


#1 Employment source is
cIww Ic lhilelonl Mie.Ie
www.chronicleonline.com


Searching for
Older gentleman,
outgoing, pretty, fit and
fun. Relocating Soon
to area. Write or Email
413 Route 940 #222
Mt. Pocono PA, 18344
email: mwoodcock204
@gmailcom
Single White Female,
Searching for
Older gentleman,
outgoing, pretty, fit and
fun. Relocating Soon
to area. Write or Email
413 Route 940 #222
Mt. Pocono PA, 18344
email: mwoodcock204
@gmailcom
Would a handsome
man in his seventies
like to meet a still
attractive widow who
is independent, and
needs desperately a
good man for
company?
Please respond to:
Citrus Chronicle
Blind Box 1751P
1624 N Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River, FI
34429.
WWS seeking female
for friendship. Age not
important. Semi-retired,
NS, ND. Real Estate
interest a plus. Call
Randy(352) 563-1033



2007 Toyota
Camry LE, 56k miles,
$12000
(352) 422-1533
'94 Dodge Grand
Caravan,runs good,
looks good, $1500
(352) 344-4229
AKC YORKSHIRE TERRIER
PUPPIES, MALE,
Available immediately,
health cert., vet exam,
Healthy, Happy, Han-
dled (352) 489-0960
BEVERLY HILLS
Thurs.9-4 & Fri. 10-3
993 W. Catbrier Lane
Due to Illness No Early
Birds. Womens XL Peitie
Clothing, Craft Supplies
Dolls, Finished Crafts.

BRICK PAVER IN-
STALLERS
Looking for one hon-
est, hard working,
preferably experi-
enced paver applica-
tor. Pay commensu-
rate with experience.
Call-352-342-9911


ea ~ T owDVesTIin leWitCeAl BVLYHL: SM
352m563m5966^^^^^

OR Py~LAEYOU A OLINE TT

www-hroniicloljinelffcom

(ONNE(TINGu TH 1 *1 ri Rj IGH11rs-ir]T^^


BUYRS ITHYOU MESAG

Chro ictle hrncl oas o


^~~~~~~~ ~~~~~ Tlo~wrs w, i,- --. FFIHISM


3/ /Carport, patio,
fenced yard, $550. mo
352-422-2433
Complete home work-
shop, 8 power tools,
many extras,
$500 firm for all
(352)563-1180
CR Mini Farms-
3/2 DW Remodeled
on 1 1/4 acres fenced,
Owner Financing $6000
down, $500 month
(850) 557-0356
CREATION ELECTRIC.
Full service electrical
contractor. Residential
& Commercial. Service
changes, large & small
repairs, spa hookups &
more. LicI Ins. Call
352-427-4216
CRYSTAL RIVER
Fri. 27, 8-3, Sat. 28, 8-1
TOOLS, Househld., Furn.
Equip-fish /camp /golf,
Camera, Misc. 7275 W.
Milwe Ln., Seven Rivers




DOG OBEDIENCE
CLASSES STARTING
Feb. 4th In Lecanto
352-794-6314
Electric wheelchair,
with rising seat and
new battery charger
and walker with seat,
both for $500
(352) 621-7505
HEWLETT PACKARD
PHOTO PRINTER hp
photosmart 1000. $20.00
352-344-3472
HP Office Jet All in One
Printer/fax, like new
condition $75.00
Desay DVD player,
used very little $20
352-382-1154
LEATHER SOFA 3
seater,double recliner
wall hugger, dark
taupe,good condition.
200.00 Call
(352) 637-9526

YARD SALE
Lecanto
Fri. &Sat. 8am-1pm
Antique kitchen table
&chairs, and misc
house items!
2715 Spring Leaf Lane

Massage Thera-
pist
Salon seeking a pro-
fessional therapist.
Patrice 352-270-4069,


:RCIIRY


4 dr, all electric, newer
tires, paint & inter.
showrm perfect, great
looking and driving car
$2,650, (352) 464-1537
Oriental Rug
Kirmann 9x12
ivory w/ pastels
Take with $950
(352) 422-1533
Patio Set,
round 48" glass top and
4 chairs $60.
Treadmill, electric,
works good $50.
(352)621-0674 after 5p

S 0..




Pine Ridge
Thurs & Fri 8 am-2pm
Antiques, seasonal
decor, collectibles,
tools, generator,
household items
5395 N Red Ribbon Pt
Refrigerator RCA
21.7 cu. ft almond
side/side, no frost w/ice
maker $145. Treadmill
good cond $75. firm
(518) 314-7130
Ret. Sales Exec
seeks P/T work,
nights-weekends ok,
(352) 422-1533
SHARPER IMAGE
SUPERWAVE OVEN got
new range,selling
oven.$80.00
352-344-3472



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
Paid for Junk Vehicles,
J.W. 352-228-9645
$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL OF
Scrap Medal, Mowers
Appliances and MORE



2 FREE HORSES
1 Full blooded quarter
horse, 10yrs. old
1 half quarter 1/2 Mus-
tang, Strawberry rown
8 yrs, Needs to go to-
gether (352) 341-0031


America Pit Bull
Black & White 4 months
old female, needs lov-
ing forever home with
NO CATS!!!!
(352) 464-3983
fertilizer, horse manure
mixed with pine shavings
great for gardens or as
mulch. U load and haul it
away. 352-628-9624
Free beautiful small
brindled female cat,
fixed, has shots, 1 year
old, indoor or outdoor
companion. Prefers a
single cat family. Great
for a senior.
352-257-1794
FREE FIRE WOOD
2 Large Oaks cut down
(352) 564-4598
Free puppies, pit and
kerr mixn 6 weeks old,
outside dogs, good
watch dogs.
(352) 287-3384
FREE TO GOOD HOME
ORANGE FEMALE CAT
ABOUT 1 YEAR OLD
SHE IS LOOKING FOR
HER FOREVER HOME
SHE HAS BEEN
SPAYED MUST BEIN-
SIDE CAT PLEASE
CALL TO COME SEE
HER (231)597-6577
Jack Russell male
8 y.o.Free to good
home UTD on shots
needs fenced yard.
Call CJ (352) 270-6200
KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Savage Pays top $$$.
352-628-4144
MOVING OR DE-
CLUTTERING ? Quality
items needed for church
yardsale. Tax deductible
receipt provided.Can pick
up. 352-621-0175
PIT BULL MIX Fun loving
well behave approx 2
year old female great
around kids and other
pets needs some one to
love her badly contact
352-628-5465 for more
info
Sammi, large dog
needs loving home
w/fenced yd. call
(352) 794-3768



FRESH CITRUS @
BELLAMY GROVE
STRAWBERRIES,
CABBAGE
Located 1.5 mi. E. on
Eden Dr. from Hwy. 41
Inv. GIFT SHIPPING
9A-5P, 352-726-6378
CLOSED SUN


FRESH JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct.@ $5 per lb
Stone Crab@ $6 per lb
delivered 727-771-7500



Lost Aluminum
Walking Cane
4 legs on bottom
last seen at
Sheriff Ranch Thrift
Bad back. Please call
(352) 794-3463





REWARD $1000.
No Questions ask.
Min Pin Female 10 lbs
name Zoey, Needs
meds. last seen Sun 8/7
Holiday Dr off Turkey
Oak Crystal River
(352) 257-9546
352-400-1519
We have lost our
beloved 4yr old male
Golden
Retriever/Poodle mix
who goes by the
name Toby; S.
Apopka and Lynn St.,
Inverness. If anyone
has seen him, please
call 352-302-6277 or
352-257-8610. He may
be wearing half of a
nylon leash around
his neck or body
since it was either
chewed or cut. He is
not wearing a collar
or tags. He is VERY
friendly and shows
NO aggression at all.



Small Dog
Female, youth
Forest Lake Subdivision
Hernando
(352) 637-5961


STILL LOOKING FOR
HIS HOME ORANGE
MALE CAT FOUND IN
BEVERLY HILLS
PLEASE CALL TO IDEN-
TIFY HE REALLY
MISSES HIS HOME
(231)597-6577




Huge discounts when
you buy 2 types of
advertising! 122
weekly newspapers,
32 websites, 25 daily
newspapers. Call
now to diversify your
advertising with Ad-
vertising Networks of
Florida
(866)742-1373,www.
florida-classifieds.com



%% ES/ 50l






That special little dog
might be at the
ADOPTION EVENT
of
A Humane Society
OF CENTRAL FLORIDA
Pet Rescue, Inc's
PET SUPERMARKET
INVERNESS
SATURDAY'S
10-12PM
Need to re-home
a small dog?
www.
AHumaneSociety
PetRescue.com
352 527 9050
WANTED
VOLUNTEER
FOSTER PARENTS
IN ORDER TO RESCUE
MORE SMALL
DOGS AND CATS


5612 7 348
3 *82 -4 1 5 967
14 7'9 1863 1J52
93 1 3425 7 6
625378491
14 79 568 23
25 -463 1789
936784215
718529634


Sudoku **** 4puz.com

5 6 2 4

8 15

4 86

89 76

5 4

14 _23

31 9

78 1

1 __9 34
Fill in the squares so that each rove column and
3-by-3 box conlain Ihe numbers 1 Ithrough 9




YOUR AD HERE


$250/month

Call Finette to reserve this space


352-564-2940


C6 THURSDAY, JANUARY 26, 2012


FLAIR FOR FOOD






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


RED GREEN LIVE
Experience this hilarious
one-man show.
April 5,Tampa Theatre
800-745-3000.
April 7, News-Journal
Centre, Davidson
Theatre, Daytona State
College. 800-595-4849
www.redgreen.com



FRESH JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct.@ $5 per lb
Stone Crab@ $6 per lb
delivered 727-771-7500



FOR HIRE
Able body, has truck ,
enclosed trailer, variety
of tools, odd jobs/labor
(352) 464-1688
Ret. Sales Exec
seeks P/T work,
nights-weekends ok,
(352) 422-1533




NOW TAKING
APPLICATIONS
For experience
Childcare Teacher
(352) 527-8440




F/T PARA LEGAL
Experience or Degree
Preferred. Worker's
Compensation &
Social Security
Disability Law Firm.
Fax Resume
352-344-5760
or email lawoffdeu
@embaramail.com











Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
,# Or#' # f< r-sir,


ALL EXTERIOR
ALUMINUM
6" Seamless Gutters
Lic & Ins 352-621-0881

SUBURBAN IND. INC.
Screen rms, Rescreens,
Siding, airports, rf.overs
wood decks, Fla. rooms
windows, garage scrns.
628-0562 (CBC1257141)





SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Washer &
Dryers, Free Pick Up
352-564-8179





Vertical Blind Factory
We custom make all
types. Best prices any-
where! Hwy 44 & CR
491. (352) 746-1998





Affordable Mobile
mechanical, electrical
fiberglass, OB/lO/IB.
WE BUY BOATS
711 NE 6thAv. Cry Riv
352-795-5455





Loving Adult Care
Home (SL 6906450)
Alzheimer/Dementia
No problem. Nursing
homes do not need to
be your only alternative
352-503-7052


#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)
CNA/HHA's

Apply At
HOME INSTEAD
SENIOR CARE
4224 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Lecanto

NEEDED
Experienced.
Caring &
Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in.
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885

NOW HIRING

RN'S
All Units, with Hospital
Experience

Apply on Line: www.
nurse-temps.com
(352) 344-9828

NURSE PRACTITIONER
(ARNP) or a
Physicians Assistant
(PA)
For a "Busy Specialty
Office".
Please send resume
to Citrus County
Chronicle, Blind Box
1749P, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd.
Crystal River, FI
34429.

Receptionist
& Dental/Surgical
Assistant
For High Quality
Oral Surgery Office.
Experience
preferred, excel.
pay & benefits.
Email Resume To:
marvamoli@
vahoo.com

RECEPTIONIST
For Busy Medical
Office
Please Send Resume
to P.O. Box 3087
Homosassa Springs,
Florida 34447


ROGERS Construction
All Construction
sm jobs Free Est (352)
637-4373 CRC1326872



Clean Ups &
Clean Outs
(352) 220-9190



DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469



Bianchi Concrete
inc.com lic/ins
Driveways-Patios-
Sidewalks.352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL/ Lic
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River rock
reseals & repairs. 352
364-2120/410-7383
ROB'S MASONRY
& CONCRETE Slabs,
Driveways & tear outs
Tractor work, All kinds
Lic. #1476, 726-6554



All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing,Hauling,
Site Prep, Driveways.
Lic. & Ins. 352- 795-5755



COUNTYWIDE DRY-
WALL 25 years exp.
For all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Lic/ins. 352-302-6838


#1 Employment source is



www.chronicleonline.com


RN
3-11 Full-Time

Looking for an
experienced
Nurse leader to join
our Great Team!!

We offer excellent
benefits: 401 K/Health
/Dental/Vision/Vacatio
n /Sick/CEUs

Apply in person:
Arbor Trail Rehab
611 Turner Camp Rd.
Inverness, FL
or email resume to:
atdon@southern
LTC.com
An EEO/AA
Employer M/F/V/D

I -I


CLOSING AGENT
Law firm seeks experi-
enced real
estate/title/closer for Bev-
eriy Hills office. Salary
commensurate with expe-
rience. Fax resume to
(352) 867-5787.

Licensed
Insurance Agents
Needed
Life/Health/Annuity
Nature Coast
Financial Advisors,
Inc. Email information
aarv@naturecoast
financial.com
352-794-6044

Sunshine Gardens
Crystal River
Assisted Living facility
is opening soon.
We will be serving
24 seniors in our
state-of-the art,
loving home We cur-
rently are seeking a
full time
MARKETING DIRECTOR
Ideal candidate
will be a dynamic,
self-starter with a
bachelor's degree
minimum and two
years outside or
business to business
sales experience
with demonstrated
success. Candidate
must also possess
strong networking,
marketing, and
closing skills. Must be
able to self-manage,
be a team player,
and have a passion
for the elderly. Base
salary plus commis-
sions, based on exp.
Please email resume
and cover letter to
hr@sgwseniors.com.


Make Walls & Ceilings
Look Brand New!
Custom textures & paint
* Ask about Popcorn
Removal (352)812-3388
Wall & Ceiling Repairs
& Sprays. Int/Ext.
Painting. since 1977
Lic/Ins 352-220-4845




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Plasma TV installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
ANNIE'S ELECTRIC
Husband & Wife
Team.(352) 341-5952
EC-13002696
BRIGHT ELECTRICAL
Res./Comm. Lic & Ins.
$50.hr. EC0001303
352-302-2366
CREATION ELECTRIC.
Full service electrical
contractor. Residential
& Commercial. Service
changes, large & small
repairs, spa hookups &
more. Lic I Ins. Call
352-427-4216
DUN-RITE Elect
Elec/Serv/Repairs
New const. Remodel
Free Est 726-2907
EC13002699 Serving
Citrus Co. Since 1978
Thomas Electric LLC
Generator maint &
repair. Guardian
Homestandby, &
Centurion. Cert. Tech.
Briggs Stratton 352-
621-1248 #ER00015377


Massage Thera-
pist

Salon seeking a pro-
fessional therapist.
Patrice 352-270-4069,






CAFE SHOPPE
COORDINATOR
F/T position for per-
son to engage in sell-
ing a variety of cafe
food items, located in
a busy Thrift
Shoppe.Candidate
also assists manager,
employees and volun-
teers as necessary.
Min 2yrs exp in re-
lated field. Computer
skills to include abil-
ity to create flyer's,
memos, e-mails, etc.
Interpersonal skills a
must. Position does
require frequent
heavy lifting, items to
include clothing
boxes, furniture, fix-
tures and equipment.
Excellent salary and
benefits. Apply
on-line at
www.hospiceofcitrusco
unty.org


CHG&CC
is now accepting
applications for all
Food & Beverage
positions.
Please apply in
person Tues-Fri
from 2:00-4:30pm at
The Grille Restaurant
505 E Hartford St
Hernando. No phone
calls please.


EXP. LINE COOK

Aoolv in Person
at Cracker's
Bar & Grill


F/T, Receptionist
/Hostess
needed for
high end country
club restaurant.
Experience required.
Applicants must be
professional, organ-
ized and able to
multi-task. Resumes
& applications
accepted Tues-Fri
from 2:00-4:00pm at
2100 N Terra Vista
Blvd, Hernando


DRY OAK FIREWOOD
Split, 4 X 8 Stack $80
Delivered & Stacked.
352-344-2696

Firewood $75 Per Stack
(4x8) Free Delivery
(352) 527-8352



ALL EXTERIOR
ALUMINUM
6" Seamless Gutters
Lic & Ins 352-621-0881
ALUMINUM
STRUCTURES
5" & 6" Seamless Gutters
Free Estimates, Lic &
Ins. (352) 563-2977



1 CALL & RELAX! 25 vrs
exp in home repairs &
remodel WE DO IT ALL!
Lic. 37658. & Ins. Steve
& Scott 352-476-2285
#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Plasma TV installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
Andrew Joehl
Handyman.
Gen/Maint/Repairs
Pressure cleaning.
Lawns/Gutters. No job
too small!Reli able ins.
0256271 352-465-9201
ABC Painting &
Handyman.
Low, Low Rates
30


yrs exp lic/ins uale
352-586-8129
Affordable Handyman
V FAST
A 5 STAR COMPANY AFFORDABLE
GO OWENS FENCING e RELIABLE
All Types Free Est. H
r n *100% Guar. *Free Est
Comm/Res. 628-4002 352-257-9508 *

BOB BROWN'S Affordable Handyman
Fence & Landscaping s FAST
352-795-0188/220-3194 AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE
ROCKY'S FENCING HOME REPAIRS
Free Est., Lic. & Ins., 100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352 422-7279 352-257-9508 *


CLASSIFIED




2 AC SALES TECHS

Needed. Experience
preferred. $60K+
annually + benefits.
Email or Fax Resume
mdp@newair.biz
Fax 352-628-4427


PROFESSIONAL
PEST CONTROL
EXP. SALES TECHS
Needed. Our proven
in home Sales Record
Company Vehicle
Hourly Pay
Commission
Benefits
APPLY 5882 Hwy 200

SALES/SERVICE
TECH
Needed today! I will
train the right person!
Pest Control Email
to:jdsmlthpest@
gmall.com or call
(352) 726-3921





2 AC SALES TECHS

Needed. Experience
preferred. S60K+
annually + benefits.
Email or Fax Resume
mdp@newair.biz
Fax 352-628-4427

AUTO
TECH/MECHANIC
Apply in person to Allen
Ridge Tire & Auto, 1621
N. Lecanto Hwy, Lecanto,
FL 34461 (Look for 491
road construction in front
of our shop) Has repaired
a variety of makes and
models of autos, is
familiar with computers,
dependable, and owns
his/her own tools. Clean
driving record required.
Pay based on experience.

BRICK PAVER IN-
STALLERS
Looking for one hon-
est, hard working,
preferably experi-
enced paver applica-
tor. Pay commensu-
rate with experience.
Call-352-342-9911

DRIVER WEEKLY
HOMETIME.
Dry and Refrigerated.
Daily Pay! 31 Service
Centers, Local Orienta-
tion. Newer trucks.
CDL-A, 3 months cur-
rent OTR expereince.
800-414-9569
www.driverknight.com


If Its Broke, Jerry Can
Fix It. Housecleaning
also. 352-201-0116 Lic.
Affordable Handyman
FAST
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
se FAST
V AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
S100% Guar. Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *
EXP'D HANDYMAN
All phases of home
repairs. Exc. work
Honest, reliable,
goodprices.Pres/was
paint Ins/Li c860-0085






Handyman Dave
Pressure Clean, Paint &
Repairs, oddjobs &
hauling (352) 726-9570
Remodeling, Additions,
Doors, Windows, Tile
work. Lic.#CRC1330081
Free Est. (352)949-2292




Citrus Cleaning
Team. top quality
work & great
rates. 302-3348
(352) 527-2279
MAID TO ORDER
House Cleaning *
(352) 586-9125
Have Vacum Will Travel




The Tile Man
Bathroom remodel
Specializing in
handicap. Lic/Ins.
#2441. 352-634-1584


E nversWanMd
Calss A- CDL
w/hazmat. Company &
O/O0's Lots of Freight to
move!! CAll
877-893-9645
Drivers:
Run 5 States Regional!
Get home weekends,
earn up to 39cent mile,
1 yr OTR Flatbed Exp.
required. Sunbelt
Transport, LLC
800-572-5489X227
Eagle Buick GMC, Inc
is in need of
experienced
automotive service
consultants/advisors.
One of the best deal-
ership pay plans in
the county. Minimum
2 yrs experience
preferred. Great
opportunity for one to
find a career path,
and earn a great
living. Very produc-
tive repair facility and
a professional
environment with
plenty of growth po-
tential in a growing
community. Benefits.
Drug Free Workplace.
Application Available
@ Eagle Buick GMC
Inc
Send Resume:
Fax (352)417-0944
Email
robbcole@eagle
buickgmc.com

FLOOD, FIRE,
MOLD REMEDIA-
TION TECH
Seeking applicants
with WRT, AMRT,and
FSRT certifications.
Also seeking appli-
cants with Xactimate
experience. Please
email your resume to
jd@restorationx.com.
Need 13 Good
Drivers

Top 5% Pay &
401K, 2 Mos.
CDL Class A Driving Exp.
Call (877)258-8782
www.meltontruck.com




$300 is a bad
day! Fortune 500
Company.
Security equip. dist.
Several positions
avail. entry-level to
mgmt. Great pay /
full benefits. We train.
Advancement
oppy's. Co. trans.
avail. H.S. Diploma or
GED req'd.
No Felonies.
352-597-2227


A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs, trash,
lawn maint. furn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
ALL OF CITRUS
CLEAN UPS CLEAN OUTS
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790

HAULING
FREE ESTIMATES
scrap metals, haul for
FREE (352) 344-9273,




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
ABC Painting & Handy
man Low. Low Rates
30 yrs exp lic/ins
Dale 352-586-8129
CheapCheapCheap
DP painting/press.clean
Many, many refs. 20 yrs
in Inverness 637-3765








Handyman Dave
Pressure Clean Paint &
Repairs, odd jobs &
hauling (352) 726-9570
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./ins.
(352) 726-9998



Tim Herndon Plumbing
s$10. off w/this ad
10 yrs serving Citrus Co
lic/insCFC 1428395
(352) 201-8237




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996


THURSDAY, JANUARY 26, 2012 C7






[*lI


APPOINTMENT
SETTERS NEEDED
Seniors Welcome
No nights, No wknds.
Apply at
6421 W. Homosassa
Trail, Homosassa Fl


C C

Y lr \\ .1 'I '.st.





(',i ,i,...'


#1 BOBCAT FOR HIRE
Light land clearing, site
work, grading, hauling.
NO JOB TOO SMALL!!!
Lic. & Ins. 352-400-0528

All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955

All AROUND TRACTOR
L i. ,, H I_,: ,-,:
352-795-5755






CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, curbing,
flocrete. River rock
reseals & repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120

Florida Sitescapes, LLC
FREE est: Yard Clean Up
Mowing, and MORE
Call 352.201.7374

YARD CLEAN UP
Flowers, Bushes, Mulch
Rock & MORE! Call for
Your Yard Make Over
Lic/Ins (352) 425-0109




Florida Sitescapes, LLC
FREE est: Yard Clean Up
Mowing, and MORE
Call 352.201.7374

LAWN CARE 'N" More
Fall Clean up, bed,
bushes, haul since 1991
(352) 726-9570

Leaves, TRIM, MULCH
Hauling FALL Clean
since '91 352 220-6761




AT YOUR HOME
Mower, Parts Service &
Repair.Visit our store@
1332 SE Hwy 19
352-220-4244


CHURCH NURSERY
ATTENDANT
Approx 6 hrs weekly Sun
AM, Wed PM
352-726-2522
Housekeeper Needed,
1-2 days per week, light
ironing required, Please
mail resume to :Blind
Box 1754P c/o Citrus
County Chronicle, 106
W Main St., Inverness, Fl
34452


Look
$60. Bahia Pallets
U-Pick Up. Special
Winter Pricing. Call
Now!! 352-400-2221




A Cutting Edge
Tile Jobs Showers.
Firs .Safety Bars. ETC
352-422-2019
Lic. #2713, Insured.




A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest Rates
Free est.(352)860-1452
All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
DOUBLE J Tree Serv.
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
KING's Land Clearing &
Tree Serv. complete
tree & stump removal
hauling, demo& tractor
work 32 yrs. exp.
(352) 220-9819
R WRIGHT Tree Service
Tree removal & trimming.
Ins. & Lic.# 0256879
352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree Serv
Trim, Shape & Remove
Lic/Ins Free Est.
352-628-2825



344-2556, Richard
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!

i "ll ll' L1'


L ) LDa)


QCHRpNI


FRONT DESK
Hotel experience
required. Great benefits
Apply in person:
BEST WESTERN
614 NW Hwy 19
Crystal River.
No calls please!



SECURITY OFFICER
Inverness Area

Must have Class D
security lic. and be
able to work nights,
wknds, All shifts
352-258-5615


ABC Painting &
Handyman.
Low. Low Rates
30 yrs exp lic/ins Dale
352-586-8129








Handyman Dave
Pressure Clean, Paint &
Repairs, odd jobs &
hauling (352) 726-9570
Pic PICARD'S Pressure
Cleaning & Painting
352-341-3300




Remodeling, kitchens
baths, ceramic tile &
tops. Decks, Garages
Handyman Services 40






Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers are
required by state law
to include their state
license number in all
advertisements. If you
don t see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious that
you may be contact-
ing an unlicensed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For questions
about business
licensing, please call
your city or county gov-
ernment offices.


FR t Engineering Fees
'iFR Up to $200 value
-,-, .- - ,






352-628-7519
www.Advancedaluminunmofcitrus.com





AAA ROOFING


Free Written Estimate

$100 OFF:
Any Re-Roof
I Must present coupon at time contract is signed
Lic./Ins. CCCO57537 000A7YO

*1zj M6*.T


*BN *

* 1 Day Cabinets Laminates
* Remodeling Supplies Woods
* Refacing Supplies Glues
* Hinges Saw Sharpening
Cabinet Supplies & Hardware

M" |m| a= iblum

3835 S. Pittsburgh Ave., Homosassa, FL
00OA7ZV 352-628-9760






Diamond Brite
-?* Florida Gem
Marcite Decks
"FREE Pavers
FREE \ ,Tile x
ESTIMATES
GREG'S COMPLETE
GREG S REMODEL

MARCITE, INC.
LiCENSED 352-746-5200


BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Day,
We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over"Your Old One!!!
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!
Call now for a FREE
In-Home Estimate

1-866-585-8827
BATHFITTER.COM
000AECJ



REMODELIN


Ron's Affordable

Handyman Services
ALL Home
S Repairs
Small Carpentry
Fencing
SScreening

V Vents
Affordable & Dependable
Experience lifelong
352 344-0905
cell: 400-1722


DRE. EN L AN G


Reveal The Beauty
of Your Wood


* Pressure Washing
* Lawn/Shrub Maintenance

Classical Custom
Services, Inc.
Mark McClendon

352-613-7934
Over 20 Years Experience Licensed & Insured


COPES POOL Cuslom Furnilure

AM D PAVER LLC a&Cablinelry
YOUR INTERLOCKING BRICK PAVER SPECIALIST Furnl ore
Build your new pool now and Refinishine
WILL CONSTRUCTION be ready for next summer! & Repair
352-628-2291 Refinish your pool duringthe cooler months. Antique Reslorin
PreventDryerFiresNow.com 352-400-3188


1 26 LaughingStock International Inc, Dist by Universal UCIck for UFS, 2012

"This hammer keeps hitting
two inches to the left."


wl,


..........
31" tARVIN Adwm%6 *
ja ^Aoi"A






ty







C8 THURSDAY, JANUARY 26, 2012




y WORDY GURDY BY TRICKY RICKY KANE
1. Male child's delights (1) Every answer is a rhyming
pair of words (like FAT CAT
and DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
2. Purple-hued opposable digit (1) they will fit in the letter
squares. The number after the
definition tells you how many
3. Little demon's brief viewing (1) syllables in each word.


4. More solemn hoarder (2)


5. Action star Chan's toadies (2)

S I I I I I I
6. Attempting espionage (2)


7. Bell puller's brandy or vodka cocktails (2)


SH3DNIIS SHNOIIH ONIdS ONIU aI9 *A8sIDaVI SHaIIOVP '
HIAVS HIAVHIO 3 SdrA'ID SdWIT'8 CIflH I W fl d *' SXOP SXoa t*
1-26-12 SIIAmSN





II R IN I T *L








Bar 6 araL..Cr A A


#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.comrn
352-341-PREP (7737)



^1:1M
AIRLINES ARE HIRING -
Train for hands on
Aviation Maintenance
Career. FAA approved
program.
Financial aid if qualified
Housing Available.
Call Aviation Institute Of
Maintenance.
(866)314-3769




#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.comrn
352-341-PREP (7737)

ALLIED HEALTH

Career training
-Attend college 100%
online. Job place-
ment assistance.
Computer available.
Financial Aid if quali-
fied. SCHEV certified.
Call (800)481-9409
www.Centura
Online.com




TAYLORCOLLEGE



NE&RIE.W


2 Week Courses!
*NURSING ASST. $475.
*PHLEBOTOMY $475.
*EKG $475.
*ALF ADMINISTRATOR
$300.

tavlorcolleae.edu
(352) 245-4119

SNOW

ENROLLING
For January
2012 Classes
BARBER
COSMETOLOGY
FACIAL
FULL SPECIALTY
INSTRUCTOR

MANICURE/NAIL EXT.
MASSAGE THERAPY

BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
New Port Richey/
Spring Hill
727-848-8415
352-263-2744


Business ni
I 1





8 MOBILE HOMES
12 AC., Good Income
Lots of Possibilities
(352) 212-6182
COMMERCIAL Lawn
equipment w/custom
trailer Gravely & Stihl
347-308-3853
EARN $1000 $3200
a month to drive our
new cars with ads.
www.PaidDriven.com




$$$ ACCESS
LAWSUIT
CASH NOW!! $$$

As seen on TV. Injury
Lawsuit Dragging?
Need $500-$500,000++
within 48/hours? Low
rates APPLY NOW BY
PHONE! Call Today!
Toll-Free: (800)568-8321
www.lawcapital.com

Coleci


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966


Hot tub for 2, new
motor, pump and
heater, Excel. cond.
$700 Firm(352) 563-1933




A/C + HEAT PUMP
SYSTEMS
Starting at $880
13-18 Seer
Installation w/permit
REATES uo to 2. 500
362-746-4394
Lic.&Ins. CAC 057914
BLACK DISHWASHER
$30.00 352-621-0718 h
352-364-2806 c
ELECTRIC RANGE
Older Tappan elec stove,
very good condition, $50,
352-344-5853
in Hernando
KENMORE DEEP
FREEZER ALL WHITE
STAND UP $85.00
352-621-0718 H
352-364-2806 C
Refrigerator
Like New, water
dispenser inside, white,
$200.
(352) 795-7254
SHARPER IMAGE SU-
PERWAVE OVEN got
new range,selling
oven.$80.00
352-344-3472
Side by Side,
whirlpool, white, works
perfectly
$250
(352) 621-0942
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR, washers
dryers,FREE pick up
352-564-8179
WANTED DEAD
OR ALIVE
Washers & Dryers
Working or not.
(352) 209-5135
WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 Each.Reliable,
like new, excellent condi-
tion. Can deliver
352 263-7398
WATER SOFTENER
Whole House Water
Softener (Used)
Very Good Condition -
$200.00 Phone:
269-532-8100



COMMERCIAL DESK
CHAIR Ergonomic Fully
Adjustable PreOwned
Fabric Covered $85
727463-4411
DESK CHAIRS (2)
PreOwned Commercial
Adjustable Fabric Cov-
ered $45 727-463-4411
DESK CHAIRS (4) Com-
mercial PreOwned Dark
Gray Fabric $25 each
727-463-4411
LATERAL FILE CABINET
3 Drawer Commercial
Metal PreOwned
40"x36"x18" $65
727-463-4411
Ten, 4 Drawer, Hon
Filing Cabinets
$45. Ea
(352) 628-1030
Ask for Tara




2 AUCTIONS
THURS. Jan. 26
Estate Auction
Prev:12 Auction 3PM
Outside 6PM Inside 2009
Pontiac VIbe/w Onstar
54K, 1997 PU Mazda
SOLD @5:30. 1980 Cor-
vette, blue, Ivory Int.,
120K ml. 13.5FT Delquay
Run-about, 40HP
Evinrude, Front load
washr/dryer, designer
furn., hshid & tools

FRI. JAN. 27
Prev: 4PM Auction 6PM
Carnival & Vintaae
Glass Auction
Llve & On Line 125 lots
of Fenton, Imperial,
Northwood, Opales-
cent, Depression, Early
Pressed Glass & More!
DudleysAuctlon.com
4000 S. Fla. Ave.
(US 41-S) Inverness
(352) 637-9588
AB1667-AU2246
12% BP-2% ca.disc


AUTO CREEPER "The
Bone" Rough Rider
Creeper, like new, asking
$75.00 (352)270-3559
Complete home
workshop, 8 power
tools, many extras,
$500 firm for all
(352) 563-1180
Electric Lincoln Welder
Input 230 Volts.
50 amps Out put 225
$100 firm
(352) 726-0198



20 INCH RCA FLAT
SCREEN In good condi-
tion. Asking 35.00 OBO
352-465-8841
JVC FLOOR SPEAKERS
300 watts in good
condition.$60.00 OBO
352-522-1918
SONY 13 INCH T.V.
WITH REMOTE GOOD
CONDITION $20.00
352-726-0686
STEREO SPEAKERS
4 sets small to large
$5 to $20 per set
352 564-2746



DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
HEWLETT PACKARD
COMPUTER MONITOR
HP M500 monitor.
unused 30.00
352-344-3472
HEWLETT PACKARD
PHOTO PRINTER hp
photosmart 1000. $20.00
352-344-3472



****DINING SET****
54"RD GLASS TOP
PEDESTAL TABLE,
TUSCAN STYLE
4 CHAIRS
$260 634-2004
6 FOOT METAL FOLD-
ING TABLES (2)
PreOwned Wood Grain
$35 each 727-463-4411
36" ROUND TABLE Like
New Rugged Formica
Top Sturdy Steel Base
Misc Colors $65
727-463-4411
36" SQUARE TABLE
Rugged Gray Formica
Top Sturdy Steel Base
Like New $65
727-463-4411
Bureau, with mirror, good
condition, 5 feet long,
white $35.00
(352)382-7687 or
(352)201-1221
CHAIR OFFICE Dark
wood very old $30,
excellent condition
352-270-3909
Coffee table
46"Lx28"W $75.
excellent condition
352-270-3909
COMMERCIAL
STACKABLE CHAIRS (4)
Preowned Sturdy Metal
Framed Vinyl Chairs $10
each 727-463-4411
COUCH White and
black couch,$0,must be
able to pick up, in Citrus
Springs. (352)792-7610
DESK
30"h-30"d-60"w-seven
drawers [2-file] all lock.
excl. cond. $250.00 more
info.call 352-527-9982
DINETTE PEDESTAL
TABLE ONLY Color of
butcher block blonde.
Appr 2 1/2' x4'. $25.00
call Ruth 352-382-1000
Dinette set with pull out
leaves, 4 chairs, like new,
$100 (352)382-7687 or
(352)201-1221
DINING ROOM TABLE:
78Lx38Wx30H, cherry
finish with 6 chairs in
great condition for
$350. Call (352)
489-1527.
Entertainment CENTER
Solid Wood, 64x44 w/ 2
Drawers below. 27x37
1/2 Opening for TV.
$100.352-389-4569
King Size Bed with oak
headboard,w/ phone
& Light connection, Ig.
drawers and storage in
bottom of bed, good
cond. $400 795-7513


#1 Employment source is














www.chronicleonline.com


I 2012UFS, Dist by Univ Ucickfor UFS


Pine Ridge
Thurs & Fri 8 am-2pm
Antiques, seasonal
decor, collectibles,
tools, generator,
household items
5395 N Red Ribbon Pt
ROYAL OAKS
ANNUAL
YARD SALE
Saturday, Jan. 28,
8am-lpm B/G
SELECTION! From Inv.
S. on 41 to Royal Oaks
sign (before airport)
turn right, follow signs.
Yard Sale-Beverly Hills
Thurs, Fri Sat 9-?
All outside items!
388 Sugarmaple Lane



DANCE COSTUMES
Several, different sizes
and styles. $100 for all of
them. 352-476-9563


I I ill I I I


CASIOI LK-33 Auto play
or you play. Lightedkeys.
Books included. $75.
352-476-9563
MUSIC LESSONS
Piano, Organ, Keyboard
at your home. Limited
openings. 352-422-7012



BALDED EAGLE NEW.
WAS $59.95/SELLING
FOR $20.00
Linda 341-4449
CHINA DINNERWARE
Fine china svc. of 8 w/
petite floral pattern &
silver trim. $100 Call
352-586-6746
FIRE & WATER FOUN-
TAIN Was 29.95 / selling
for 10.00
Linda 341 -4449


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


COUCH Floral couch,
great condition,$50. Must
pick up. (352)792-7610
King Size Bedroom Set,
Solid Oak, Sealy pillow
top, chest of drawers,
dresser/mirror 2 night
stands, $1,300 Excel
Cond., 352-586-6746
LEATHER SOFA 3
seaterdouble recliner
wall hugger, dark
taupe,good condition.
200.00 Call
(352) 637-9526
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30,
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
352-628-0808
RECLINER Large clean
recliner. Cream color.
$75.00 352-257-5722
Recliners-2 custom
made, multi color
stripe, like new $250
each. Moving!
(352)382-4912
SM COMPUTER DESK
Fair condition / 20.00
Linda 341-4449
SOFA BED Queen size,
shades of blue/green,
good condition. $75
(352)382-7687 or
(352)201-1221
STACKABLE CHAIRS (4)
Commercial PreOwned
Metal Frame with Arms
Fabric Covered 2 for $35
727-4634411
Sugarmill Woods
LEATHER couch and
love seat, beige, good
condition $500
(352) 634-4225
WHITE PAINTED WOOD
BOOKCASE 3 Shelves
Great for a Childs Room
40"x32"x12" $30
727-4634411




Briggs & Straton
Lawn Vac. 6.5 hp, very
low hours with
attachments,New
$2100 Sell $650 firm
(352) 628-9848
FARM SOLD Clearing
plants & statuary,
1000's of plants, OPEN
Sat/ Sun or call for
appt.(352) 465-0649
5019 W StargazerCitrus
Co. Dunnellon
Hustler riding mower
Fast track zero turn
$2200 obo Craftmans
riding mower 42" deck
$400.(352) 746-7357




BEVERLY HILLS
Thurs.9-4 & Fri. 10-3
993 W. Catbrier Lane
Due to Illness No Early
Birds Womens XL Peitie
Clothing, Craft Supplies
Dolls, Finished Crafts.
CRYSTAL RIVER
1923 SE 3rd Ct Stove/
toys/kitchen/books/boat
motor/more! Fri-Sat 9-3
CRYSTAL RIVER
Fri. 27, 8-3, Sat. 28, 8-1
TOOLS, Househld., Furn.
Equip-fish /camp /golf
Camera, Misc. 7275 W.
Milwe Ln., Seven Rivers


DUNNELLON
7589 W Riverbend Rd. -
Fri & Sat, 8am-3pm.
Moving 2 houses into 1.
Furn, appliances, tools,
household & more.



DUNNELLON
9836 198th Circle ES-
TATE SALE Fri 27 & Sat
28 8AM-2PM Furniture,
household items, yard
tools, and many golf
items.352-209-2421
HOMOSASSA
Jan. 25 thru Jan31st
MOVING SALE*
(352) 382-1502
HOMOSASSA
Thur., Fri., Sat., 8-3p
4655 S. Sawgrass Circle
HOMOSASSA
Thur., Fri., Sat., 8-3p
4655 S. Sawgrass Circle
INVERNESS
Estate Sale, Fri. 9a-3p
Sat. 9am-lpm
Dbl beds, dressers,
chaise lounge, French
Prov. bedroom set,
wing chair, antique
rocker, maple hutch,
living room turn. Dinette
set, antique school
desk, wrought iron &
wicker porch turn.
Fridge, stove, oven,
exhaust hood, hanging
pot rack, micro,
kitchen items, china,
glassware, Waterford
crystal, books, oriental
rug, chandeliers, art
work, costume jewelry,
health care equip.,
Tools, elec. lawn
mower, etc.
EVERYTHING MUST GO
8611 E. Henderson Trail




Inverness
Sat 8-4p TOO MUCH TO
LIST. 1280 Stately Oaks
INVERNESS
Thurs. Fri., & Sat.8am-?
MOVING SALE *-
Antique Furn., & Dishes,
6122 E. Chapel Lane


YARD SALE

Lecanto
Fri. &Sat. 8am-1pm
Antique kitchen table
& chairs, and misc
house items!
2715 Spring Leaf Lane




'


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966


CLASSIFIED




Sizes 03- and 3 mos. 60
pieces total. $40.00/
From a smoke free
home352-637-4916
GIRLS BABY CLOTHES.
Newborn 35 pieces
$15.00 From a smoke
free home 352-637-4916
MEN'S 2X,XL,L UNDER-
SHORTS Tommy Hilfiger,
Lowrider, Playboy.
4 for $1.00
(352) 634-2737
Two ladies Leather
coats 7/8 & 9/10
$35 Ea.Leather Jacket
$20.All good cond.
(352) 637-4645




#1 A Big Sale
Open Tues-Sat 8a-4p
Furn, Appliances, tools,
clothing, misc. Items,
@ N. Maynard & Hwy 44
1/4 ml E. of Stokes FLea
1HP, Submersible
pump, $75.
Guaranteed
will demonstrate
352-726-7485
48" Glass Dinette Set,
with 4 swivel Chairs,
$95
8 ft. fiberglass Type 2
Ladder $45
(352) 726-7765
Back-To-Life
Therapeutic Massager
New $200 sell. $100 obo
(352) 726-0292
Bakers rack w/ glass
shelves, $40
PLATES PERFORMER
EXERCISE MACHINE w/
instruction video and fold-

BIRD CAGE White bird
cage. 26 x24 x 39 high. 5
feet high when on the
stand. 3/4 inch bar spac-
ing. $60.00 352 726 5753
COMMERCIAL
Bubble Gum
Machine,2 Jars on
pedestal
$60 352-364-3009
DISNEY PRINT-
cert.no.838 of 2000-size
18"by 24"-$100.00 more
info call 352-527-9982
Electric Gate Opener
Mighty Mule 350 + solar
panel, + 12V battery +
3 remotes, also can be
powered by 120 V
have manual, & all
hardware, cost $689.
Sell $475 obo, 341-0791
FOREMAN ELECT
GRILL Med. size, table
top excellent $15 352
382 0220
HAY coastal hay for
horses. 12 large bales.
$5.00 each Hernando
726-6224
HP Office Jet All in One
Printer/fax, like new
condition $75.00
Desay DVD player,
used very little $20
352-382-1154
Janome Memory Craft
9000 embroidery/
sewing machine, plus 8
memory cards &
access. & lessons $475.
(352) 249-7892
KRUPS WAFFLE IRON
Excellent cond. $15
352 382 0220
Learn medical
transcription-self
paced books, tapes,
and transcripts-$75
Terry-352-746-1973
Oriental Rug
Kirmann 9x12
ivory w/ pastels
Take with $950
(352) 422-1533
OUTSIDE DOG HOUSE
Molded plastic. Medium
to large dog. $30.00 call
Ruth 352-382-1000
Patio Set,
round 48" glass top and
4 chairs $60.
Treadmill, electric,
works good $50.
(352)621-0674 after 5p
PRAYERS Thank you St,
Jude,Mother Mary,and
Baby Jesus of Prague for
prayers answered.
Prayers work!!
Refrigerator RCA
21.7 cu. ft almond
side/side, no frost w/ice
maker $145. Treadmill
good cond $75. firm
(518) 314-7130
Wii Console- like new
cond.,w/balance
board & all attach-
ments, 7 games, most
new in box $150 for all
795-0113 or 464-0650



Electric wheelchair,
with rising seat and
new battery charger
and walker with seat,
both for $500
(352) 621-7505
INVACARE ZOOM
220 SCOOTER, exc.
cond. very good
batteries, $350.
(352) 726-8208
Jazzy 1113
Low Rider power chair
w/ new batteries, exc
cond cover & manuel
$550.(352) 726-3263
NEW SHOWER CHAIR.
$25 352-527-9518
NEW WALKER WITH
SEAT. $100
352-527-9518
WHEEL CHAIR
New Collapsible
$250.(352) 527-9518



BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We Also
Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676



- V* 31


LECTION 28X40 picture,
cutting board, cheese
board, trivets, etc. $100
Call 352-586-6746
KENMORE SEWING
MACHINE AND
CABINET. $50
352-527-9518
LIGHT HER FIRE
CASSETTE TAPE PRO-
GRAM FOR MEN with
workbook /NEW/20.00
IINDA 341-4449
Mickey MOUSE
FIGURINE NEW.Was
34.95/selling for 15.00
Linda(352) 341-4449
VACUUM BAGS for
Sharp vacuum 7 left in
bag. Vacuum died! Type
PU2. $7.00 Also drive
belt Call 746-1017
VACUUM CLEANER
Kirby Generation 3
all attachments-
needs belts $50.00
352 -746-9483




AB LOUNGER
Ab lounger, excellent
condition. $50 Call
352-586-6746
Boflex Extreme
Brand New
3 months Old
$550 obo
(727) 643-7652
Horizon RST 5.6
Tread mill, $200.
(352) 527-9518
TURBOTRACK Brand
new, still in the box. $50
352-476-9563




BUYING FIREARMS
Cash paid for firearms,
ammo, and reloading
equipment. Call
352-556-1789
CABIN ON 40 ACRES
of Prime Hunting Land
Located in Gulf Ham-
mock Management.
Area. $165,000 OBO
(352) 795-2027
(352) 634-4745
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
ELECTRIC SCOOTER
Razor E200, Green,
Runs great! $150 OBO.
Call 352-628-2176
FRESH JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct.@ $5 per lb
Stone Crab@ $6 per Ib
delivered 727-771-7500
Golf Clubs ,2 sets Ladies
graphite w/bags $90 &
$135.2 Ladies Big Ber
tha 460 Drivers.Golf
bag.(352) 382-0051

GUN & KNIFE
SHOW
BROOKSVILLE
HSC CLUB
Sat. Jan. 28th 9-5p
Sun. Jan 29th 9a-4p
HERNANDO COUNTY
FAIRGROUNDS
Admission $6.00
(352) 799-3605
Hunting Bow
Hoyt Trykon hardly
used,(bad shoulder)
Like new, viper sights,
ACC Arrows $400.
(352) 527-2792
Jason Model 330
Spotting Scope
20X-60X
60 zoom, like new
original box $65
(352) 527-9323
Tree Stand-Summit
'Viper' climbing tree
stand, like new $150
352-527-2792

WE BUY GUNS
On Site Gun Smithing


used, 10" barrel Ruger,
44 magnum, $690.
7-1/2" barrel Ruger, 44
magnum, $550
(352) 726-7932 Iv. msg




2004 H & W Flatbed
Utility Trailer, dual axle
5,000 GBW rating, ship-
ping weight 1,200 Ibs

Kathy

EZ PULL TRAILERS,

Utility & Enclosed
BUY, SELL, TRADE
Custom Built, Parts,
Tires, Whis, Repairs,
Trailer Hitches

16' Car Trailer, Reg.
$1765 CASH $1695.

Stehl Tow Dollies
$895 (limited supply)
w/brks $1195

Hwy 44 Crystal River
352-564-1299

GULF TO LAKE
TRAILER SALES

Largest Selection &
Lowest Prices.
Offering New & Used
Cargo & utility trailers

Triple Crown Utility TRL
6 x 12 w/new spare
$995.
6 x 12 Enclosed w/
V nose, rear ramp
door, $1895.

Trailer Tires
starting at $69.95

352-527-0555
Hwy 44, Lecanto




FIREWOOD Aged, split,
firewood. $100. Delivery
possible. 352-476-9563


Looking for Fenced
Pasture for Goats
Call Mike
(352) 634-4237


WANT TO BUY HOUSE or
MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation.
Call (352) 726-9369




1 Yorkie Puppy, Male
Teacup, 1.6 lbs,
Beautiful
Please Call
(352) 419-7489
Any time
2 Pitt Bull Puppies
1 male, 1 female,
4 months old
All shots $50 ea.
(352) 566-7667
2 SHELTIES AKC regis-
tered, male 3yrs old and
female 4yrs old, very
gentle, asking 400.00 for
both call 352-287-3390
AKC, Registered
English Bull Dog
Puppies for Sale
$1,800. (352) 543-0163
(727) 784-0732
(352) 493-5401
DOG AGILITY EQUIP-
MENT 4 piece agility
setup equipment good
condition asking 100.00
352-726-9964


INVERNESS
55+ Comm. 2/1.5,
carport, screen rm.
shed $6900
(352) 586-7962
INVERNESS
Waterfront 55+ Park
w/5 piers for fishing &
enjoyment, clubhouse,
onslte shuffleboard
and much more!
Single wide 1 & 2 BR,
starting @ $6,900. Lot
rent $274/mo. H20
Included. 3 mo. free
rent with purchase.
352-476-4964
Palm Harbor Homes
NEW HOME STIMULUS
$5k for your used
Mobile Home any
condition
800-622-2832 x 210




2/2 SW Homosassa
on Fecnced /2 acre
$39,900. Cash $45,900 if
financed $5,000 down
(352) 527-3204
2/2, New Screen Rm,
New Back Rm, 1.4 AC
Steal It! $30K Firm,
6.4 Easy Credit Finance
Appraised at $39,500
(352) 637-6608
CR Mini Farms-
3/2 DW Remodeled
on 1 1/4 acres fenced,
Owner Financing $6000
down, $500 month
(850) 557-0356
DUNNELLON
5159 W. Disney Ln
Large lot, new CHA
quite area $32,500
(727) 536-9443


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday "
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





Brooksville
NO DEPOSIT
$100. PER WEEK
2/1, WATER GARBAGE
INCLUDED
Call Tom
352-754-8687
C.R/Homosassa
1& 2 Br. furn, quiet park
Util. incl. clean, shrt/long
term 352 220-2077
Citrus Springs
2/1.5 on 2.5 acres,
clean, bright, quiet,
$650.(352) 603-0024


CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1, $425, 2/2 $450,
3/2 $450 All on Acre
Lots (207) 205-0592
CRYSTAL RIVER
Nice 2/1, close to
everything. $500. +
Sec. (352) 446-3933
352-794-3323
HERNANDO
2/1, $400 Mo. No Pets.
(352) 344-1476
HERNANDO
2/1, Irg. lot, water, $375
mo. 3/2, 2-acre lot,
Cent. Air, Washer/Dryer
Storage, $625 mo. No
pets, (352) 860-0904
HERNANDO/INV.
2BR, 1BA, C/H/A, $350
no pets, 1st, last, sec.
352-564-0578
HOMOSASSA 2/1
fenced acre. shed
huge deck, addition
$500/m 352 628-5244
Homosassa 2/1
off Hwy 19, Ig fenced
yard,shed $450 mo
352-422-1300
INVERNESS
Close In, 1 & 2 BR MH
Clean, Quiet & Com-
fortable 352-212-6182
INVERNESS
RENT SPECIAL: Sec. dep,
pro-rated over 3 mo.
period In the INVERNESS
WATERFRONT 55+ Park
w/5 piers for fishing &
enjoyment, clubhouse,
onslte shuffleboard, and
much more! 1 BR home
$325 plus. 2BR home
$450 Includes H20. 2 BR,
1.5 bath, Park Model
$500. Pets considered.
Section 8 accepted.
(352) 476-4964




Bank foreclosures
USED HOMES/REPO'S
Doublewides from
$8,500
Singlewides from
$3,500
Bank authorized
liquidator.
New inventory daily
CALL (352) 621-9183

HOLIDAY SALE
Bad credit OK.!
New 2012 Jacobsen
w/ 5 yr. warranty.
Appx. 1200 sq. ft. 3/2,
many upgrades.
Buy for only $36,900
or have delivered
and set up with A/C,
heat, steps & skirting
only $2,600 down,
$379.97/mo.
for 20 years W.A.C.
Come by or call
352-621-9181
Taylor Made Homes


2 bath. Mobile Home w/5
acres Jacobsen Mobile
Home built in 2000, 32ft x
68ft, central air/heat
w/appliances. Master
Bedroom 14x20, Master
Bath w/jetted tub & dou-
ble vanity 10x15, 2 bed-
rooms 14x20, living rm.
14x16, family rm
w/fireplace 15x14, kitchen
w/38 cabinets 16x16,
dining rm. 14x12. Low
taxes 685.00 for current
year. Asking $145,000,
open to offers.
352-682-0266
FLORAL CITY on 3 Lots,
Assum Mortg. Priv Fin. 2
Mast Suites New appls.
horses ok, $33,900
Cridland Real Living.
J. Desha 352-634-6340

Green Acres
Is The Place To Be
3/2 ON V2 ACRE
New carpet through-
out, new appliances.
Nice Home
$2,200 down P& I only
$369.84/mo. W.A.C.
Call to View
352-621-9182

HOLDER
3/2, Fireplace, fncd,
yd $450/mo 10% down
Owner Finance Avail
(352) 302-9217
Homosassa
3/2 DWMH Fleetwood
'96. All new roof, car-
pet, & Appls. REDUCED
$8K, to $46K, Quick
SALE due to ILLNESS
OPEN HOUSE 9-5 Daily
incls New years Eve &
day @ 7038 W. Jackson
Ln. call (352) 503-7328
COME SEE!!!!!!!
HOMOSASSA
3394 Arundel Terr
3/2, lamaniate & tile
floors, All appls. CHA
New Roof, $1500 moves
you in $650/mo
Rent to Own
Tony Tubolina Brk
Owner(727) 385-6330


DOG Buddy is a 4 year
old brindle bulldog mix.
He's well behaved,
knows basic com-
mands, very gentle,
and lovable. He's look-
ing for a forever home.
He has all shots and is
neutered and
micro-chipped. Call
352-270-8512






DOG OBEDIENCE
CLASSES STARTING
Feb. 4th In Lecanto
352-794-6314

FEMALE YORKSHIRE
TERRIER Free to a good
home. 10 year old
spayed female. Owner
passed away.
Call 352 341 4704, leave
message
KITTENS & CATS
many breeds, all
neutered micro chip,
tested, shots some
declawed $85-$150

Koi and Gold Fish
FOR SALE, Great Prices
ALL SIZES. Call Jean
(352) 634-1783
MINI-DACHSHUNDS I
have Mini-Dachshunds
for sale. Dapples, black
and tans, reds and
pibolds. Males and fe-
males. PPOP, florida
health cert, sample of
food and toy come with
each pup 352-463-7345
Shi-A-Poo Puppies
Paper trained, good
with kids, will not shed,
health certs. CKC reg.
Fem $275Males $250
Yorkie Poos Male
$300(352) 489-6675
Shih-Tzu Pups, ACA
starting@ $300. Lots of
colors, Beverly Hills,
FL (352)270-8827
www.aceofpups.net




FOR SALE
Ponies and horses,
used saddles and
tackDiamond P Farm
352-873-6033




Emerald Valley Evitex,
I gallon, less I cup
$75.
(352) 270-9372







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


acre, huge deck, shed
& addition. $29,900 as
is (352) 628-5244
INVERNESS
2/2 SW, 2 nice big
additions / AC, fenced,
near lake, part turn.
$37k 352-341-1569
LECANTO
2 BR, SW on 1/2 acre
MUST SELL!
$17K OBO
352-586-2976
Sugarmill Woods
Area
3/2, approx. 1500 sq.
ft. on over I acre.
Quite,, nice home on
paved road. Brand
new A/C & heat &
appliance, under full
warranty. Ceramic
tile in master bath,
guest bath & kitchen.
New wood cabinets,
new deck & driveway
This house has a
great location,
2 mi. from Publix,
3 mi., from Suncoast
Pkwy. 5 mi. from new
Walmart. $2,200.
down $399.00/mo.,
P & I, W.A.C. Must See
to steal this house
352-621-9181




2/1 FURNISHED
MOBILE HOME,
Over 55 Park $190 Lot
Rent Village Pine, Inglis
Lot 4 A $9,500 OBO
(906) 281-7092
2/1 Manatee, Clean
55+ 3TAC/H, porch,
$110 lot rent, $12,900.
#37, 109 Stag Ct.,
Inverness, FL 34450
Beverly Hills
55 + park 2/2 fully
remodeledIlg screen
lanaicarport, shed,
laundrylandscape & ir-
rigation all appliances
Club house activities,
Heated pool.Lot rent
$258, $39,900
Call 352-422-0927
Dunnellon, FI 2 bedroom.
2 bath. 1997 Redman
14x60 MH. 2 BR 2 Bath.
New kitchen, new roof,
Air conditioner only 3 yrs
old. 12 x 14 glassed in
patio, tiled floor. Two
sheds, one is 10x12,

$240.00 pm Asking
$31,500.00 Call
352-465-1761
EEDGE WATER OAKS
55+ Comm.lake ac-
cess, 2/1.5, 12x56
turn.12 x 30 scr. porch,
shed, new 200 amp.
$11,500(352) 419-6477
Furnished 14 x 50 w/
added enclosure, vinyl
& scrn. rm.55+ Lecanto
Park, SS appl's
New W/Dworkshop
w/power, Remodeled
inside/out $11,000 obo
(352) 418-5926
Homosassa Springs
2008 12x40 park model
home, completely
furnished, ready to
move in $23,500
Tony 828-674-9996
HOMOSASSA'S
Best Housing Value
Modern homes from
$8 400 or Lease to Own
from $139/mo.
$800.down + Lot rent at
Evanridge Community
an exceptional 55+Park
352 628-5977
Inv. Ft Cooper 55+
2/1.5, furnished,
florida room, carport,
REDUCED TO $12K
(352) 419-5114
INVERENESS 55 +
Comm. 14X54 MH, 2/1
55' carport w/deck,
front scr room
w/storage shed, CHA
part furn, W/D, Reduce
to $5K, 352-344-1002
INVERNESS
55+park, 1/1 carport,
screen room, shed,
$7000 (352) 726-8071
INVERNESS
Waterfront 55+ Park
w/5 piers for fishing &
enjoyment, clubhouse,
onslte shuffleboard, and
much more! 2 BR 1.5 BA
for $2.000. must be
approved 352-476-4964
WESTWIND VILLAGE 55+
Park. Updated 2/2 DW's
for sale. Reasonable
(352) 628-2090

m-I

CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1 on land, remod-
eled rent $600. long or
short Sell $54K OBO
(352) 307-4564
Homosassa-3/2 nice
and large, doublewide
on 1/2 acre $39900
owner financing or
lease at $750 month
(352) 628-5598
Rock Cr Canyon
Area
3/2 DW, 6acres
fenced, gated,
Rent or Buy owner
financing avail
(352) 302-4546













835 NE Hwy 19
Crystal River, Fl
(352) 795-0021
View our website
C21 NatureCoast.com
CHASSAHOWITZKA
3/2 House, $600.
3/2 Furnished DW., $600
Agent (352) 382-1000


CRYSTAL RIVER
2 BR. $550., 3BR House
$800., 352-563-9857
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025



CRYSTAL RIVER
Lrg 2/1, W/D hkup, incld
water & lawn. $500 mo.
+ Sec. 352-634-5499
FLORAL CITY
FREE Use of boat ramp,
fishing dock, canoe &
Jon boat rentals. 1 BR
$450/$200 dp. incis Sat
TV electric, walk to river
Trails End Camp, A
Friendly Place to Live
352-726-3699


1 & 2 Bd. $450. no pets
628-7300 or 697-0310
INVERNESS
Close to hosp 1/1 $450
2/2 $600 352-422-2393

Lecanto
NEWER 2 BR 2 Ba
duplex, $595
352- 634-1341
LECANTO
Nice 1 Bedrm $500
352-270-0218/216-0012,




HERNANDO
2/2, 400 E Glasboro,
$675 Incl pool, water
trash etc 352-697-1907




INVERNESS 2/1/1
Great Area no smk/pets
$600/mo. 1st, Ist & sec.
352-341-3562/400-0743




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1 -$600 mo. inc. some
util. Ist/last/sec.
628-1062
INVERNESS
Country Living: 3BR, 2BA
home $595. RENT
SPECIAL: Security dep.
pro-rated over 3 mo.
period. 352-476-4964
Specializing in
Sugarmill Woods
Rentals


CRY RIV 2/1 $775
near bay, w/util./cable
212-2051 or 220-2447
Royal Oaks
Inv. 2/2/2, den firm.
very clean, no pet non
smoking $850. incl
Cable/water
(920) 210-6788


BEVERLY HILLS
3/1/Carport, patio,
fenced yard, $550. mo
352-422-2433
BEVERLY HILLS
3/2/2, and 3/1/1
352-464-2514

CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/2 $850.
(352) 400-0230
CR/HOM 3/2/1
RC Elem,
fenced, $575
352-220-2447 212-2051
CRYSTAL RIVER
3 bedroom. 2 bath.
House for rent Please
contact for details.
$650.00 per month
352-212-9682

CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 Split plan on % acre.
$600. Mo. Fst./Lst.
Cell (727) 992-1010
CRYSTAL RIVER
Rent or Rent to Own
$699 Move-in Special
3/2 Lrg. fm. rm., tiled,
Spotless, Cul-de-sac,
Copeland Pk., Fncd.,
Pets OK.352-527-0493

INVERNESS
2/1/1, Very clean well
maintained Lease. $650
mo., Fst, 1st, sec. Near
schools, Hospital. 4212 S
Apopka, 561-395-5735
INVERNESS
2BR, 1BA, Irg. yard, In
town, close to Hosp.
and shopping.$500 mo.
+ util., 1st, last, Refs.
352-860-2108
INVERNESS
3 bdrm, 2 bath home with
screen end pool on lake.
Beautiful setting on
cul-de-sac, golf comm.
$1000/mo, 813-909-0234


Homosassa Springs
3/1 No pets,Clean $700
mo. (305)619-0282, Cell
INVERNESS
3/2/2, Avail. Feb.Near
Sch. & Hosp. $800. Mo.
FILlS (352) 527-9268

INVERNESS
3/2/2, Highlands
Starting @ $730.
352-601-2615
INVERNESS
Large 2/2/1 fenced
yard, pet w/ additnal
fee. 1st & sec $700 mo.
352-422-5482




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




CRYSTAL RIVER
Clean House, cable w/d,
$115/125wkly
$430/475mo. No hidden
cost. 563-6428




C.R/Homosassa
1& 2 Br. furn, quiet park
Util. incl. clean, shrt/long
term 352 220-2077
INVERNESS
Waterfront 32//2, furn.
$1,300. Nice 527-9268




FARMS, LAND,
COMMERCIAL
UNIQUE &
HISTORIC HOMES,
SMALL TOWN
COUNTRY LIFESTYLE
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989


"LIFE IS BETTER
WITH A PORCH"
WWW.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.

PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ille-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination. "
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



EOvt HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY

Specializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches &
Commercial


Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com

WATERFRONT
EQUESTRIAN &
INVESTMENT/
INCOME SALES
*Buyer's
Representative
*Concierge Level
Service


Andrea M/gllacclo
andreaworks 4u

Assoc. Realtors,
Direct 352-422-3261
Office 352-527-8090

sherrcparker.com




For Sale By Owner
3/2/2, Custom built
in '08 by Wheeler
Construction $129,500
Call (407) 739-2646 or
407-442-3597
Reduced to $168,900
5 bedroom, 3 bath,
3,800 sq. ft. 1/2 acre
open concept home.
Ideal for live-in elderly
group home, assisted
living facility, foster care
home. 352-522-0883 or
603-289-0134




3 Bedroom, 2 Bath
Double carport,
fenced yd. new roof,
1,100 sf $55,500
(352) 464-0641
(239) 298-0076
LAUREL RIDGE
Deed res./newly
remodeled 2/2/2,
open floor plan w/den,
$109K. comm pool &
clubhse(352) 270-8488


No credit check, 3
bdrm. 352-464-6020
JADEMISSION.COM



2 Bedroom, 2 bath
house with heated pool

lot in Citrus Hills. In ex-
cellent cond., Owner
finance with D/P +
Excellent credit. Call
352-860-1872 or
304-673-0110 or
304-673-5550.
Reduced to $139,000
Clearview 1 Acre
w/3 bdrm w/office/den off
master,2.5 baths,2plus
garage,great rm w/pocket
sliders to 50x24 lanai,
cooks kitchen, Master
suite to die for.Much
more! $254,900.
352-860-0444



Apache Shores
2 bdrm. 1 bath. close to
lake central heat and
air, new well & water
softening system,
corner wooded lot.
Excellent Investment
opportunity, $35.000,
352-322-0454



297 S. Canaday Dr. 1/2
ac. 3BR, 2BA, gar/work
shop lot 198ftX110ft
paved St. front and rear
parking for RV's, boats
etc. Inside of house
needs updating$37,500
OMO 352-726-6568
3/2/2, I.G. &C.C.
3k sf. new kit. Ig closets,
CHA, firepl on golf
course $139K make of-
fer, norealtors 726-0652
3BR, 3BA,Pool home,
2,000 sq.ft. $165,000
OR BEST OFFER

352-860-0878.
FOR SALE OR LEASE
2/2/1, enclosed porch,
Central Heat and Air
All Kitchen Appliances
$95.K (352) 742-2770

YOU'LL THIS!

Over Flowing With

S.Carol Terrace. Huge
1 Family. Major up-
dates you'll enjoy
only in a new home.
Owner down sized,
will negotiate. In
nature's paradise this
4 bedroom 3 bath on
2.8 acres fits a family
with children who
love to play explorer.
Own deep well (no
water bills), plus new
whole-house water
treatment system,
16x34 in-ground
screened pool with
fountain and lights.
New 2-zone energy
efficient heat/cool;
new full attic R-30
insulation; new attic
solar fan; new
ducts/vents; updated
bathrooms, 2 new
AirMaster air cleaning
units to remove dust,
pollen, mold spores.
Majestic trees. Extra
long concrete drive-
way. Watch the deer
play from the lanai or
living room window.
Newer (2002) Timber-
line roof, ridge vents,
7 solar tubs thru out
the house. Two hot
water heaters. Wired
for generator. Com-
pletely chain link
fenced. Corral your
horses, park your
boat or RV. ON
property 7 palm trees
value miniumn $10K
each. Occupancy at
funding. Approx. 2700
sq ft under air.
$212,500.
(Price below Estimate
Zillow.com) Contact
owner, 352-556-1510,
352-238-6274 email:
rosepub@excite.com
INVERNESS
Waterfront 55+ Park
w/5 piers for fishing &
enjoyment, clubhouse,
onslte shuffleboard
and much more!
Single wide 1 & 2 BR,
starting @ $6,900. Lot
rent $274/mo. H20
Included. 3 mo. free
rent with purchase.
352-476-4964


CLASSIFIED




Lakefront Gospel
Island Location
Spacious 3/2/2
for rent $700/m or for
sale..... 908-322-6529




Riverhaven Village,
Homosassa, FL
GREAT LOCATION,
GREAT HOUSE,
GREAT NEIGHBOR-
HOOD! 2147 sf, 3/2 +
Ir/dr comb, den, sun-
room, inside laundry,
all appliances. bit. by
Rusaw in 1989, well
maintained, upgrades,
move in ready.
Asking $160,000
all offers considered.
Realtors 3%
See visual tour:
www.visualtour.com/sho
w.asp?t=2656780&prt=10
003&sk=13
Frank or Helen Harris,
352-628-1434
email: hharris3
@tampabay.rr.com


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work For You!

BETTY HUNT,
REALTOR
ERA KEY 1 Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.

Condo for Sale
2/2. 1,850 sq. ft..
35 Beech Street
(352) 503-3294


Best Time To Buy!
I have lease options,
owner financing &
foreclosures
call Phyllis Strickland
(352) 613-3503
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.


DEB INFANTINE

3 HOMES SOLD
In December
I Need Listings!

Real Estate!..
it's what I do.

ERA American
Realty
Phone:(352) 726-5855
Cell:(352) 302-8046
Fax:(352) 726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com


Michele Rose Realtor
Simply put I 'll work
harder 352-212-5097
isellcitruscountyv()
yahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515


ROUTES



AVAILABLE


NOW!!'





















V Able to work early morning
hours before 6am
V Must be 18 years old
V Florida driver's license
and insurance

If interested come to the
Meadowcrest Plant
between 1 and 2 am,
drive around to the back and
ask for a district manager.

1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.
Crystal River


IT REALLY PAYS

TO WORK FOR THE

C I T U C 0 U N T


2 www.dhr lonllslo ine.c n


THURSDAY, JANUARY 26, 2012 C9


For Sale %ld


20 ACRES Live on
Land ONLY $99/mo. $0
down,Owner Financ-
ing. NO CREDIT
CHECKS! Near El Paso,
Texas. Beautiful moun-
tain views! Free
Color brochure
1-800-755-8953
www.sunsetranches
.come




2/2, Garage, heated
pool/spa, 8500 Gospel
Isl. Road, Inverness
$112,000 Owner financ-
ing, email for photo,
trader@tampabay.rr.
corn (727) 415-7728
CRYSTAL RIVER/OZELLO
$299K, 2+/2/2
Open floor plan,
Hardwood floors,
www.waterfrontozello.co
m or 352-563-5527
Salt waterfront stilt


LAKE ROUSSEAU

2 bedrm cottage
fenced, 1/2 acre,
boat dock. $85,000
775-230-2240




CABIN ON 40 ACRES
of Prime Hunting Land
Located in Gulf Ham-
mock Management.
Area. $165,000 OBO
(352) 795-2027
(352) 634-4745




6550 W CYRUS
2 1/2 acres on SE corner
of Cyrus & Donovan.
Mkt. Value: $20,000
Assessed Value:$24,858
Sell for $18,000
Call 828-586-2283
LAND 1.5 acres fenced
partially cleared, on 480







CABIN ON 40 ACRES
of Prime Hunting Land
Located in Gulf Ham
ewerk Manaevail. t.
Area. $165K obo
352 795-2027634-4745



INVERNESS
For Sale 12 lots (20 X
120 each) $8,000. Zoned
residential.At 3109 E


Robinson 832 549 0286
or
ShaynRobinson@hotmail.c

INVERNESS,
Beautiful Wooded Lot
on Edged Dry Lake,
100 x 150 $8,900
Owner Finance

Premium Home Site on
Sky View Golf Course
Great price to build
your new custom,
maintenance FREE
home. Country Club
membership including
45,000 sf fitness & spa
$42,000 OBO
Call (910) 512-2550




BOAT LIFT
Single Pole,
1500 lb. capacity.
$900 obo
352-613-8453




'06 ProKat 20 ft
140 HP Suzuki 4
strokelow hours, very
clean, Magic alum tan-
dem trailer, VHF,
Depth, GPS, Windless
anchor $18k obo
(352) 464-4877
'07 Proline 17 ft
4 stroke 90 HP Suzuki,
very low hours, ready
to fish trailer & more
$13,500 352-795-3894
18ft Runabout
wlth a Galv. Trailer
$400. (352) 476-1113
20ft Pontoon
2000 Fiesta, Fish N Fun,
no carpet, fiberglass fir,
85 Yamaha, Galv. trlr.
$6,500. 352-613-8453


15ct.@ $5 per lb
Stone Crab@ $6 per lb
delivered 727-771-7500
HOUSE BOAT
30 ft fiberglass, hrd
wood firs, & more
Live Aboard or eniov
weekends in Paradise
$14,500 (423) 320-3008
Pontoon 18'
88' Fiesta, 40hp Eviinr
runs great solid fir,
good carpet,bimini
capt chrs,'07 gal tril.
w/new tires, $3550
352-586-9498
PROLINE
21' Cuddy, full transom,
w/brack, 150 HP Yam.,
Bimini, VHF, porta pot,
dep. finder, trailer
$5,900. (352) 382-3298
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LAKE
MARINE
We Pay CASH For Used
Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck & Fishing
Boats (352)527-0555
boatsupercenter.com
























2000 Rialto Winn22ft
20MPG, runs greatnew

(352) 746-6559

2001 38 ft Holiday
Rambler, Cummings
diesel,2 slides, fully
loaded sell or trade
property $600000
859-814-3573
2009 DODGE RAM
3500s quad cab terbo
deisel, loaded 27K mi.
still in warr. $30,000 obo
(419) 307-8954, ALSO
2010 MONTANA
Mountaineer, 5th wheel
36ft., 3 slides, great rm.
layout, like new
$32,500 obo Downsizing
(419) 307-8954
'94 Fleetwood
454 engine Bounder,
32ft., loaded, self
contained, 79k
$9,800. 352-795-6736
I Buy RV'S, Steve
Henry, RV World of
Hudson Inc.Since
1974. (888) 674-8376
(727) 514-8875
Infinity 99 M/Home
by 4 Winds, 35 Triton
V-10 gas, 44K mis. front
rear a/c, Onan Gen.
back up camera,
leveling jacks, TV, fully
equipped inci tow bars
& hitch + brks buddy,
assisted for towvech.
all manuals for coach
& appls. NON Smoker
incis hoses, sewer &
electric hook-ups,
7 new NEW Goodyear
tires, See at Oak Bend
Village Route 40 W.
Dunnellon call for tour
(352) 465-6335 Was
$22,500 Now $19,750


glass Ext, free standing
dinette, elec. fireplace.
over 30K new asking
$13,000 obo
(352) 637-1796
SUNSEEKER '05
29 ft. Class. C., nearly
all options, generator,
needs awning fabric,
non smoker, 33k mi.
Only $26,500., 464-0316
WINNEBEGO
2001 Chieftain 35U,
garaged, non smoker
no pets, 2 slides, Cen.
Heat Pump, exc. cond.
76K mi., $38,900
(352) 208-8292



2011 Grand Junction
5 wheel. 40 ft. 4 slides.
w/Bumper to bumper
for 16 years, too many
extras to list! $37,000
(603) 991-8046
'07 32 foot KZ toy
hauler, like new, full
slide out, sleeps 7, new
tires, Owan Gen., gas
tank, alumwheels
Lrg living area separate
cargo area $18,900
352-795-2975
I BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
call me 352-201-6945
JAYCO
2005 Jay Feather
LGT 25Z
New tires/brakes; sleeps
6;new queen mattress;
shower/tub; stove/oven;
refrig/sep freezer; lots of
storage. Like new $9,500
priced below blue book
retail see in Inglis
352-447-5434
SPARTAN
1983, 30 FT.,
good condition
$1,800
(352) 563-2896



Diamond Plate Truck
Tool Box
Good Condition
$60.
(352) 344-9479
Fiberglass truck top-
per and liner. GMC
pewter color, fits 2008
GMC Sierra. $400
(352) 697-2724
Maroon Cap 63V2 x 80
Rear slide, locks & keys
exc cond. fiberglass
broke & inter lights off a
Dakota, New $1500 sell
$400.OB0352-795-3920
Seats for 2003 Town &

1 Middle seat and back
row split bench seat
Gray Leather all 3 for
$200 (352) 344-4192




BIG SALE!
Consignment USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
AUTOS' FROM $1,500.
US 19 BY AIRPORT
US 44, BY NAPA
Low Payments *
461-4518 & 795-4440
consignmentusa.org
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars Trucks
& Vans, For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES,
Hwy 19... 352 564-8333


,l For more information on how to reach CfI u coU m T
Citrus County readers call IC
352-563-5592. r h o icll
o Fi www.chronicloonline.com
^itis Jmun.a su~o..ucmenm.cm~u..aetnon n~..s.mns...2s







CIO THURSDAY, JANUARY 26, 2012


CLASSIFIED


FoelsreSl/


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CASH PAID FOR JUNK
CARS Any Condition
Up to $500., Free
Towing 352-445-3909

KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Salvage Pays top $$$
for your autos.
352-628-4144
WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
Perfect Cond or not
Titled, No title,
No problem. Paying up
to $25K any make,
any model Call A.J.
813-335-3794/531-4298




2 AUCTIONS
THURS. Jan. 26
Estate Auction
Prev:12 Auction 3PM
Outside 6PM Inside 2009
Pontiac VIbe/w Onstar
54K, 1997 PU Mazda
SOLD @ 5:30. 1980 Cor-
vette. blue. Ivory Int..
120K ml. 13.5FT Delquay
Run-about, 40HP
Evinrude, Front load
washr/dryer, designer
Turn., hshid & tools

FRI. JAN. 27
Prev: 4PM Auction 6PM
Carnival & Vintaae
Glass Auction
Live & On Line 125 lots
of Fenton, Imperial,
Northwood, Opales-
cent, Depression, Early
Pressed Glass & More!
DudleysAuctlon.com
4000 S. Fla. Ave.
(US 41-S) Inverness
(352) 637-9588
AB1667-AU2246
12% BP-2% ca.disc
2007 Toyota
Camry LE, 56k miles,
$12000
(352) 422-1533
'03 Buick LeSabre
Runs Perfect, electric
everything,89k, silver,
totally clean $5000 firm
352-586-9570
'08 Chrysler Sebr-
ing Touring
Convertible,34k miles,
loaded, $14995 firm
352-897-4520
'89 Chevy Baretta
Runs good, $1800 obo
Blue, auto. Great first
car! 352-746-4789

BIG SALE!
Consignment USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
AUTOS' FROM $1,500.
US 19 BY AIRPORT
US 44, BY NAPA
Low Payments *
461-4518 & 795-4440
consignmentusa.org

LINCOLN
'06, Towncar, Signature,
37K miles, looks, drives
even smells like new.
$16,500. (352) 746-1184
MERCURY
'95,Grand Marquis GS,
4 dr, all electric, newer
tires, paint & inter.
showrm perfect, great
looking and driving car
$2,650, (352) 464-1537



MUSTANG
2004 Convertible-V6
50,000 miles excellent
condition
2 Year warranty -$10,500
352-628-6731




MERCURY
'74, Cougar XR7
80K mi, one owner
shows like new $6,500
(352) 726-0258

Noie oCrdtr/


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966






2 AUCTIONS
THURS. Jan. 26
Estate Auction
Prev:12 Auction 3PM
Outside 6PM Inside 2009
Pontiac VIbe/w Onstar
54K, 1997 PU Mazda
SOLD @5:30. 1980 Cor-
vette, blue, Ivory Int.,
120K ml. 13.5FT Delquay
Run-about, 40HP
Evinrude, Front load
washr/dryer, designer
furn., hshid & tools

FRI. JAN. 27
Prev: 4PM Auction 6PM
Carnival & Vintaae
Glass Auction
Llve & On Line 125 lots
of Fenton, Imperial,
Northwood, Opales-
cent, Depression, Early
Pressed Glass & More!
DudleysAuctlon.com
4000 S. Fla. Ave.
(US 41-S) Inverness
(352) 637-9588
AB1667-AU2246
12% BP-2% ca.disc

BIG SALE!
Consignment USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
AUTOS' FROM $1,500.
US 19 BY AIRPORT
US 44, BY NAPA
Low Payments *
461-4518 & 795-4440
consignmentusa.org

DODGE '06
Dakota R/T, real sharp,
has been treated very
well 50K + easy miles
$13K (352) 795-7993

FORD '01
Lariat F 350 DRW 7.3
turbo diesel super cab
84K mis. exc cond $14K
call Bob(352) 794-3142

FORD 04
Lariat, super duty die-
sel, crew cab tan,
loaded, goose neck
hitch, new tires, brks,
140K mis. well maint
$12,500(352) 344-4087
VW'83
5 spd. restored, a/c
CD, bedliner & ton-
neau cover, new
tires/paint $4500
(352) 447-2330


'Vehicle


FORD ESCAPE XLT
SPORT
2005, Red SUV, grey in-
terior, tinted windows,
219k mi, new engine,
FWD, 6 cyl, 3.0L, 200
hp. Nice, clean, great
vehicle! Asking $6,000
OBO. Call 352-613-6354,
Iv mess if no ans.




1743-0126 THCRN


Cs


Potts, Josh Raymond 2011-CP-809 Notice to Creditors
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO.: 2011-CP-809
IN RE: ESTATE OF JOSH RAYMOND POTTS a/k/a JOSHUA R. POTTS,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of JOSH RAYMOND POTTS a/k/a JOSHUA R. POTTS,
deceased, whose date of death was October 1, 2011 and whose Social Security
Number is 267-40-2142, File Number 2011-CP-809, is pending in the Circuit Court for
Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 110 North Apopka Av-
enue, Room 101, Inverness, Florida 34450-4299. The names and addresses of the Per-
sonal Representative and the Personal Representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is served must file their claims with
this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE TIME OF SERVICE OF A COPY
OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate, must file their claims with this Court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702
OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this Notice is January 19, 2012.
Personal Representative:
/s/ NANCY A. DONALDSON
500 Home Avenue, Whitehall, Arkansas 71602
Attorney for Personal Representative:
BRETT & REYNOLDS, P.A. /s/ JOEL 0. PARKER, Esquire Florida Bar No. 0070201
P.O. Drawer 2480, Dunnellon, Florida 34430
January 19 and 26, 2012.


1745-0209 THCRN
Bachinsky, Andrew G, 2011-CP-787 Notice of Action
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File No.: 2011-CP-787
IN RE: ESTATE OF ANDREW G. BACHINSKY,
DECEASED.
NOTICE OF ACTION (formal notice by publication)
TO: ANDREW MICHAEL BACHINSKY
Address unknown

YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that a Petition for Administration has been filed in this
court. You are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, on
petitioner's attorney, whose name and address are:
BRADSHAW & MOUNTJOY, P.A. Michael Mountjoy, Esquire
209 Courthouse Square, Inverness, FL 34450
on or before February 19, 2012 and to file the original of the written defenses with
the clerk of this court either before service or immediately thereafter Failure to serve
and file written defenses are required may result in a judgment or order for the relief
demanded, without further notice.
Dated on January 12,2012.
BETTY STRIFLER, As Clerk of the Court
(SEAL)
By: /s/ Marcia Davies, As Deputy Clerk
January 19, 26, February 2 and 9, 2012.


1751-0126 THCRN
Humphrey, Nelson Alan 2011-CP-637 Notice to Creditors
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
CASE NO.: 2011-CP-637
IN RE: The Estate of NELSON ALAN HUMPHREY,
Deceased,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the Estate of NELSON ALAN HUMPHREY, deceased, whose
date of death was November 21, 2010, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus
County, Florida, Probate Division, Case Number 2011-CP-637, and the address of
which is 110 N. Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450. The name and address of
the Personal Representative and the Personal Representative's attorney are set forth
below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims on whom
a copy of this notice is served within three months after the date of the first publica-
tion of this notice, must file their claim with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against
the decedent's estate including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims must
file their claim with this Court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUB-
LICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE ANY CLAIMS FILED TWO
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DEATH IS BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has begun on January 19, 2012.
Personal Representative:
SAMUEL WAYNE SMITH
Attorney for Personal Representative:
WAYNE CARROLL, FBN 133454 P.O. Box 1898, Keystone Heights, FL 32656
(386) 496-4799
January 19 and 26, 2012.


PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO. 09-2010-CA-002611 DIVISION

WACHOVIA MORTGAGE CORPORATION,
Plaintiff,
vs.
WILLIAM B. WILKINS, et al,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure
dated January 05, 2012 and entered in Case No. 09-2010-CA-002611 of the Circuit
Court of the FIFTH Judicial Circuit in and for CITRUS County, Florida wherein
WACHOVIA MORTGAGE CORPORATION is the Plaintiff and WILLIAM B. WILKINS; FAYE
TAYLOR WILKINS; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER,
AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN
TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS
SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; are the Defendants, The
Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at JURY ASSEMBLY
ROOM IN THE NEW ADDITION TO THE NEW CITRUS COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 110 NORTH
APOPKA AVENUE, INVERNESS, CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA at 10:00 AM, on the 9th day
of February, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judg-


Mountaineer,cranberry
red, 5.0 L, 126K mi. ex-
cel. shape all receipts
$3,500 (352) 503-2792




Classic Jeep CJ-5
runs great, looks great
w/many new parts.
$4500 (352) 586-3107




94 Dodge Grand
Caravanruns good,
looks good, $1500
(352) 344-4229




KYMCO
2008 MXU 300,ONLY
390 MILES, GARAGE
KEPT. LIKE NEW
$2000.00 CALL KEVIN
AT 352-212-8121




2005 HD Ultra
Classic w/Fat Bagger
kit, Custom seat,
wheels ect $15000 OBO
352-563-6327or 860-3481
'07 HD Sport 1200
Lowl500 miles, Perfect
cond.,custom exhaust,
blackwindshield, $6900
(352) 564-0856
Harley Davidson
04, $9700., Bagger
Crystal River
Cell (727) 207-1619
KAWASKI 2011
Vulcan 900 LP
low miles, many extra's
50 mpg $7,499. obo
over 1000's in options
(352) 697-2760
Lucky U Cycles
(352) 330-0047

2003 HONDA
GOLDWING TRIKE
W/TRAILER. LOADED
$18,995
2012 GOLDWING
801 MILES
$22,500.00
2004 HARLEY ULTRA
CLASSICLOADED
$10,750.00
2009 HARLEY 1200N
ALL BLACK
$6,995.00

FINANCE AVAIABLEII
WWW.LUCKYUCYCLES.
COM
352-330-0047
SUZUKI
2009 DR200SE DUAL
SPORT ONLY HAS 380
MILES ON IT. GARAGE
KEPT UNIT IS IN EX-
CELLENT CONDITION.
$2965.00 OBO CALL
KEVIN AT 352-212-8121



Your World

9artape4 4a1e





CHIONICLE








900-0229 DAILY CRN
Surplus Prop.
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County Board
of County Commissioners
will be selling surplus prop-
erty and equipment via
the internet at
govdeals.com from Jan.
15 until Feb. 29, 2012.
Jan. 15 thru Feb. 29, 2012


The Real Property or its address is commonly known as 753 NE 9th Street, Crystal
River, Florida 34428.

PARCEL III
Lots 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, and 21, Block I of HYDE PARK ADDITION TO THE
TOWN OF CRYSTAL RIVER, according to the plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1,
Page(s) 42, of the Public Records of Citrus County, Florida.

The Real Property or its address is commonly known as 645 NE 10th Street, Crystal
River, Florida 34428.

at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, Jury Assembly Room of the
Citrus County Courthouse in the Atrium of the Courthouse, at 10:00 a.m., on Feb. 16,
2012.

A person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the prop-
erty owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the
sale.
BETTY STRIFLER, CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
(SEAL)
By: /s/ Amy Holmes, As Deputy Clerk

January 26 and February 2, 2012. M0312987.1


1744-0126 THCRN
Vs. Donovan, William J, 1-CC-1646 Notice of Sale Pursuant to Ch, 45
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE COUNTY COURT OF THE 5TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA, CIVIL DIVISION
CASE #: 11-CC-1646

THE ISLANDS CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION, INC., a Florida not-for-profit corporation,
Plaintiff,
vs.
WILLIAM J. DONOVAN, JUDITH M. GIAMMARCO, MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC
REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. and UNKNOWN TENANT,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated
January 11, 2012, entered in Case No 11-CC-1646 of the County Court of the Fifth
Judicial Circuit in and for Citrus County, Florida, wherein THE ISLANDS CONDOMINIUM
ASSOCIATION, INC. is Plaintiff, and WILLIAM J. DONOVAN, JUDITH M. GIAMMARCO,
are Defendants, BETTY STRIFLER, Citrus Clerk of Circuit Court, will sell to the highest
bidder for cash on February 9, 2012 at 10:00 a.m. at the Citrus County Courthouse,
Jury Assembly Room, 110 N. Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL 34450, the following
property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit:

That certain Condominium parcel composed of Family Unit No. 18 and an undivided
share in the common elements appurtenant thereto, in accordance with and subject
to the covenants, conditions, restrictions, terms and other provisions of Declaration of
Condominium of BAY VILLA, BUILDING #5, a Condominium with the schedules an-
nexed thereto as recorded in O.R. Book 306, Pages 517 through 530, Public Records
of Citrus County, Florida.

DATED: January 12, 2012.
BETTY STRIFLER, Clerk of Circuit Court
BY: /s/ M. Evans, Deputy Clerk

ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.

January 19 and 26, 2012.

1746-0126 THCRN
Vs. Quackenbush, Marjorie L. 09-2011-CA-000397 Notice of Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: 09-2011-CA-000397

U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION ND
Plaintiff,
vs.
MARJORIE L. QUACKENBUSH; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MARJORIE L. QUACKENBUSH; IF
LIVING, INCLUDING ANY UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID DEFENDANTSS, IF REMARRIED,
AND IF DECEASED, THE RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING
BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE NAMED DEFENDANTSS; UNKNOWN TENANT 1l;
UNKNOWN TENANT #2;
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE

Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure
entered in the above-styled cause, in the Circuit Court of Citrus County, Florida, I will
sell the property situate in Citrus County, Florida, described as:

LOTS 20 AND 21, BLOCK 285, INVERNESS HIGHLANDS SOUTH, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT
THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGES 51 THROUGH 66, OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA.

at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, Citrus County Courthouse,
The Jury Assembly Room, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450 at
10:00 AM, on February 9, 2012.
DATED THIS 9th day of January, 2012.

Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days
after the sale.

Witness, my hand and seal of this court on the 9th day of January, 2012.
Betty Strifler, CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT
(SEAL)
By: /s/ Amy Holmes, Deputy Clerk

THIS INSTRUMENT PREPARED BY: Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra, 9204 King Palm
Drive, Tampa, FL 33619-1328 Phone: 813-915-8660 Attorneys for Plaintiff

If you are a persons with a disability who needs an accommodation in order to par-
ticipate in a proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, the provision of certain
assistance. Please contact John Sullivan, ADA Coordinator for the Courts within 2
working days of your receipt of your notice to appear in Court at (352) 341-6700. You
can also use the online Florida State Courts System Title II ADA Accommodation Re-
quest Form. Once submitted, this will go to the appropriate ADA Coordinator in your
county.

January 19 and 26, 2012.

1747-0126 THCRN
Vs, Rumson, Linda Ann 2010-CA-003206 Amended Notice of Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT OF THE 5th JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
Case #: 2010-CA-003206

Regions Bank d/b/a Regions Mortgage
Plaintiff,
-vs.-
Linda Ann Rumson a/k/a Linda Rumson; Unknown Tenants in Possession #1; If living,
and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named
Defendants) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties
may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants
Defendants)
AMENDED NOTICE OF SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order rescheduling foreclosure sale dated
December 12, 2011, entered in Civil Case No. 2010-CA-003206 of the Circuit Court of
the 5th Judicial Circuit in and for Citrus County, Florida, wherein Regions Bank d/b/a
Regions Mortgage, Plaintiff and Linda Ann Rumson a/k/a Linda Rumson are
defendants) I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, ON THE FRONT STEPS
OF THE COURTHOUSE TO THE JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM IN THE NEW ADDITION TO THE
NEW CITRUS COUNTY COURTHOUSE, at 10:00 AM on February 9, 2012, the following
described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit:

THE SOUTH 82.50 FEET OF THE EAST 141.43 FEET OF LOT 14 OF R.G. HOBBS SUBDIVISION,
ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 22, PUBLIC
RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA, BEING PARCEL 7 OF AN UNRECORDED
SUBDIVISION;
AND
LOT 7, BLOCK D, GOSPEL ISLAND HOMESITES, ACCORDING TO PLAT THEREOF AS RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 178, PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA.
TOGETHER WITH ALL GRANTOR'S INTEREST IN AND TO THE FOLLOWING: AN UNDIVIDED
1/7TH INTEREST IN LOT 24, BLOCK C, OF GOSPEL ISLAND HOMESITES, ACCORDING TO
THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 178, PUBLIC RECORDS OF
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA, AS RECORDED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 56, PAGE 223,
PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA.

ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.

If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to par-
ticipate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of cer-
tain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator; 110 North Apopka Avenue, In-
verness, Florida 34450; (352) 341-6700 at least 7 days before your scheduled court
appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the
scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call
711.
BETTY STRIFLER, CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
Citrus County, Florida
By: /s/ Robert Kirby, Deputy Clerk of Court

ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHE, LLP 4630 Woodland
Corporate Blvd., Suite 100, Tampa, FL 33614 (813) 880-8888 (813) 880-8800

January 19 and 26, 2012. 10-178746 FC01

1748-0126 THCRN
Vs. Genco, Janice 09-2010-CA-002845 Notice of Foreclosure Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO. 09-2010-CA-002845 DIVISION

CHASE HOME FINANCE LLC,
Plaintiff,
vs.
JANICE GENCO, et al,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure
dated November 10, 2011 and entered in Case No. 09-2010-CA-002845 of the Circuit
Court of the FIFTH Judicial Circuit in and for CITRUS County, Florida wherein CHASE
HOME FINANCE LLC is the Plaintiff and JANICE GENCO; INVERNESS ACRES PROPERTY
OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; TENANT #1 N/K/A NICK GENCO; are the Defendants,
The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at JURY ASSEM-
BLY ROOM IN THE NEW ADDITION TO THE NEW CITRUS COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 110
NORTH APOPKA AVENUE, INVERNESS, CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA at 10:00 AM, on the
9th day of February, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final
Judgment:

LOT 10, BLOCK 3 OF INVERNESS ACRES UNIT 2, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 6, PAGES 52 THROUGH 58, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA.

A/K/A 2608 TYLER STREET, INVERNESS, FL 34453

Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60)
days after the sale.

WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on November 10, 2011.
Betty Strifler, Clerk of the Circuit Court
(SEAL)
By: /s/ Amy Holmes, Deputy Clerk

"See Americans with Disabilities Act If you are a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Mr. John D.
Sullivan, 110 N. Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL 34450-4231 Phone: 352-341-6700 Fax:
352-341-7008

January 19 and 26, 2012. F10029014

1749-0126 THCRN
Vs. Wilkins, William B. 09-2010-CA-002611 Notice of Foreclosure Sale


Foelsr


Foelsr ae


FoelsueS


FoelsueS


Feo r


ment:

A PORTION OF THE NORTHEAST 1/4 OF THE NORTHEAST 1/4 SECTION 22, TOWNSHIP 17
SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST AND A PORTION OF THE NORTH 1/2 OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4
SECTION 23, TOWNSHIP 17 SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST, FURTHER DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:
THAT PART OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF THE NORTHEAST 1/4 OF THE NORTHEAST 1/4 OF
SECTION 22, TOWNSHIP 17 SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST, LYING EAST OF STATE ROAD NO.
495 EXCEPT THE SOUTH 50 FEET THEREOF; AND THE SOUTH 1/2 OF THE NORTH 1/2 OF THE
NORTHWEST 1/4 OF SECTION 23, TOWNSHIP 17 SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST, EXCEPT THE
EAST 1425.30 FEET THEREOF AND EXCEPT THE SOUTH 25 FEET THEREOF, AND EXCEPT THE
SOUTH 50 FEET OF THE WEST 50 FEET THEREOF; AND THE NORTH 1/2 OF THE NORTH 1/2
OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4 OF SECTION 23, TOWNSHIP 17 SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST, EXCEPT
THE NORTHWEST 1/4 OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4 OF SAID SECTION 23 AND EXCEPT THE EAST
808.33 FEET THEREOF; AND THE WEST 616.97 FEET OF THE EAST 1425.30 FEET OF THE
SOUTH 1/2 OF THE NORTH 1/2 OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4 OF SECTION 23, TOWNSHIP 17
SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST, EXCEPT THE SOUTH 25 FEET THEREOF, ALL LYING AND BEING SIT-
UATE IN CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA.

A/K/A 7855 ADIRONDACK STREET W, DUNNELLON, FL 34433

Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60)
days after the sale.

WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on January 6, 2012.
Betty Strifler, Clerk of the Circuit Court
(SEAL)
By: /s/ Amy Holmes, Deputy Clerk

*"See Americans with Disabilities Act If you are a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Mr. John D.
Sullivan, 110 N. Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL 34450-4231 Phone: 352-341-6700 Fax:
352-341-7008

January 19 and 26, 2012. F10034209


1753-0202 THCRN
Vs. Lentine, Brian 2009 CA 006928 Re-Notice of Foreclosure Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: 2009 CA 006928

CITIMORTGAGE, INC.
Plaintiff,
vs.
Brian Lentine, et al
Defendants.
RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order to Reschedule Foreclosure Sale filed
January 12, 2012, and entered in Case No. 2009 CA 006928 of the Circuit Court of
the FIFTH Judicial Circuit in and for CITRUS COUNTY, Florida, wherein CITIMORTGAGE,
INC. is Plaintiff, and Brian Lentine, et al are Defendants, I will sell to the highest and
best bidder for cash, beginning at 10:00 a.m. at Citrus County Courthouse, Jury As-
sembly Room, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL 34450, in accordance with
Chapter 45, Florida Statutes, on the 16th day of Feb., 2012, the following described
property as set forth in the recorded Lis Pendens filed in the instant matter, to wit:

LOT 14 IN BLOCK 12 OF CAMBRIDGE GREENS OF CITRUS HILLS FIRST ADDITION, AC-
CORDING TO THE MAP OF PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 14, PAGES 66
THROUGH 70, PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA.

and all fixtures and personal property located therein or thereon, which are included
as security in Plaintiff's mortgage.

Any person claiming an interest in the surplus funds from the sale, if any, other than
the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days
after the sale.

Dated at Inverness, CITRUS COUNTY, Florida, this 18th day of January, 2012.
Betty Strifler, Clerk of said Circuit Court
(CIRCUIT COURT SEAL)
By: /s/ Amy Holmes, As Deputy Clerk

If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assis-
tance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator for the Courts within 2 working days of
your receipt of your notice to appear in Court at: Citrus County, John Sullivan (352)
341-6700

January 26 and February 2, 2012. PH # 16965

1754-0202 THCRN
Vs. Ford, Crystal N. 09-2009-CA-005262 Re-Notice of Foreclosure Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 5th JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO. 09-2009-CA-005262

THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE, FOR THE
CERTIFICATEHOLDERS, CWABS, INC., ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-8,
Plaintiff,
vs.
FORD, CRYSTAL N., et al.,
Defendants.
RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment entered in Case
No. 09-2009-CA-005262 of the Circuit Court of the 5th Judicial Circuit in and for
CITRUS County, Florida, wherein, THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF
NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE, FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS, CWABS, INC., ASSET-BACKED
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-8, is Plaintiff and FORD, CRYSTAL N., et. al., are Defendants,
I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at Jury Assembly Room in the New Addition to
the New Citrus County Courthouse, at the hour of 10:00 a.m. on the 16th day of Feb.,
2012, the following described property:

LOT 30, BLOCK 582, CITRUS SPRINGS, UNIT SIX, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT
THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 6, PAGES 15 THROUGH 22, INCLUSIVE, OF THE
PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA.

Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after
the sale.

DATED this 17th day of January, 2012.
BETTY STRIFLER, Clerk Circuit Court
By: /s/ Amy Holmes, Deputy Clerk

January 26 and February 2, 2012. 20187.2423

1755-0202 THCRN
Vs. Wheatley, Sandra A. 2009-CA-004504 Notice of Foreclosure Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO: 2009-CA-004504

BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P. FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P.
Plaintiff,
vs.
SANDRA A. WHEATLEY; CITRUS COUNTY, A POLITICAL SUBDIVISION OF THE STATE OF
FLORIDA, and any unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, and other unknown
persons or unknown spouses claiming by, through and under any of the
above-named Defndants,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE is hereby given that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Citrus
County, Florida, will on the 16th day of February, 2012, at 10:00 o'clock A.M. at the In
the Jury Assembly Room in the new addition to the Citrus County Courthouse, 110
North Apopka Avenue, Inverness FL 34450 sale time is 10:00 a.m., offer for sale and
sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following-described
property situate in Citrus County, Florida:

Lot 14, Block 15, INVERNESS ACRES UNIT NO. 1, according to plat thereof recorded in
Plat Book 3, Pages 24 and 25 of the Public Records of Citrus County, Florida.

pursuant to the Final Judgment entered in a case pending in said Court, the style of
which is indicated above.

Any person or entity claiming an interest in the surplus, if any, resulting from the
foreclosure sale, other than the property owerr as of the date of the Lis Pendens,
must file a claim on same with the Clerk of Court within 60 days after the foreclosure
sale.

WITNESS my hand and official seal of said Court this 18th day of November, 2011.

In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities Act, persons with disabilities
needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact
Court Administration at 110 N. Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, telephone
(352) 726-8500, not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If hearing im-
paired, (TDD) 1-800-955-8771, or voice (V) 1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service.

Betty Strifler CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
(COURT SEAL)
By: /s/ Amy Holmes, Deputy Clerk

January 26 and February 2, 2012. 275796

1756-0202 THCRN
vs. McGovern, Dennis S. 2011 CA 2440 Notice of Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO. 2011 CA 2440
BRANCH BANKING AND TRUST COMPANY,
Plaintiff,
vs.
DENNIS S. MCGOVERN, KIM E. MCGOVERN, CENTERSTATE BANK, N.A. F/K/A
CENTERSTATE BANK WEST FLORIDA, N.A., CITY OF CRYSTAL RIVER, FLORIDA AND
UNKNOWN TENANTS 1 6,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure en-
tered in this cause in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, I will sell the property
situated in Citrus County, Florida::

PARCEL I
Lots 4, 5, 6 & 7, Block 2 of ALLBRIGHTON'S ADDITION TO CRYSTAL RIVER, FLORIDA, ac-
cording to the plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 3, Page(s) 35, of the Public
Records of Citrus County, Florida.
The Real Property or its address is commonly known as 750 NE 10th Street, Crystal
River, Florida 34428.

PARCEL II
Lots 18, 19, 20 and the West 1/2 of Lot 21, Block 2 of ALLBRIGHTON'S ADDITION TO
CRYSTAL RIVER, FLORIDA, according to the plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 3,
Page(s) 35, of the Public Records of Citrus County, Florida.







CLASSIFIED



MUM


1757-0202 THCRN
Vs. Solomon, Angela Beth 2009 CA 006795 Notice of Foreclosure Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 5TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO. 2009 CA 006795

BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING,
LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP
Plaintiff,
vs.
ANGELA BETH SOLOMON, A/K/A ANGELA B. SOLOMON, A/K/A ANGELA SOLOMON;
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ANGELA BETH SOLOMON, A/K/A ANGELA B. SOLOMON,
A/K/A ANGELA SOLOMON; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFE; UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF GEORGE SOLOMON, JR., IF ANY; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, DEPT OF THE
TREASURY, INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE; JOHN DOE AND; JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN
TENANTS IN POSSESSION;
Defendants.
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
(Please publish in CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated Jan.,
12, 2012, and entered in Case No. 2009 CA 006795, of the Circuit Court of the 5th
Judicial Circuit in and for CITRUS County, Florida. BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCES-
SOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME
LOANS SERVICING, LP is Plaintiff and ANGELA BETH SOLOMON, A/K/A ANGELA B.
SOLOMON, A/K/A ANGELA SOLOMON; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ANGELA BETH
SOLOMON, A/K/A ANGELA B. SOLOMON, A/K/A ANGELA SOLOMON; UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF GEORGE SOLOMON, JR., IF ANY; JOHN DOE AND; JANE DOE AS UN-
KNOWN TENANTS IN POSSESSION; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFE; UNITED STATES
OF AMERICA, DEPT. OF THE TREASURY, INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE; are defendants.
I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at THE JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM IN THE
NEW ADDITION TO THE NEW CITRUS COUNTY COURTHOUSE, AT 110 NORTH APOPKA
AVENUE, INVERNESS IN CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA, at 10:00 a.m., on the 16 day of
Feb., 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to
wit:

LOTS 14 & 15, BLOCK 1713, CITRUS SPRINGS UNIT 23, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT
THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 7, PAGE 115 THROUGH 133, INCLUSIVE, OF THE
PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA.

A person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the prop-
erty owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the
sale.

Dated this 13 day of January, 2012.
BETTY STRIFLER, As Clerk of said Court
By: /s/ Robert Kirby, As Deputy Clerk

This notice is provided pursuant to Administrative Order No. 2.065.
In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you are a person with a dis-
ability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding,
you are entitled, at no cost to you, to provisions of certain assistance. Please contact
the court Administrator at 110 N. Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL 34450-4299, Phone
No. (352) 637-9853 within 2 working days of your receipt of this notice or pleading; if
you are hearing impaired, call 1-800-955-8771 (TDD); if you are voice impaired, call
1-800-995-8770 (V) (Via Florida Relay Services)

Submitted by: Kahane & Associates, P.A. 8201 Peters Road, Ste. 3000, Plantation, FL
33324 Telephone: (954) 382-3486 Telefacsimile: (954) 382-5380
January 26 and February 2, 2012. 10-23400 BOA


1758-0202 THCRN
Vs. Eagle Ironworks, LLC 2011-CA-3375 Notice of Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO. 2011-CA-3375

GARETH WALMSLEY and PATRICIA A. WALMSLEY, Trustee of the GARETH WALMSLEY
TRUST dated September 27, 1993,
Plaintiff,
v.
EAGLE IRONWORKS, LLC, a dissolved Florida Limited Liability Company, THE UNITED
STATES OF AMERICA, and BRIDGEFIELD EMPLOYERS INSURANCE COMPANY, as
Successor in Interest to Employers Self Insurers Fund,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE

NOTICE is given that pursuant to a Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated Jan.
12, 2012 in Case No. 2011-CA-3375, of the Circuit Court of the Fifth Judicial Circuit in
and for Citrus County, Florida in which GARETH WALMSLEY and PATRICIA A.
WALMSLEY, Trustees of the GARETH WALMSLEY TRUST dated September 27, 1993, is
the Plaintiff and EAGLE IRONWORKS, LLC, a dissolved Florida Limited Liability com-
pany, THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, and BRIDGEFIELD EMPLOYERS INSURANCE
COMPANY, as Sucessor in Interest to Employers Self Insurers Fund are the Defendants,
I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the Jury Assembly Room in the
New Addition to the new Citrus County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Avenue, In-
verness, Florida at 10:00 a.m. on the 16 day of February, 2012, the following de-
scribed property set forth in the Summary Judgment:

Lot 9, Block A, of GRANT'S LAKESIDE ADDITION, according to the Plat thereof as re-
corded in Plat Book 2, Page 65, of the Public Records of Citrus County, Florida.
THERE MAY BE ADDITIONAL MONEY FROM THE SALE AFTER PAYMENT OF PERSONS
WHO ARE ENTITLED TO BE PAID FROM THE SALE PROCEEDS PURSUANT TO THIS FINAL
JUDGMENT. IF YOU ARE A SUBORDINATE LIENHOLDER CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS
REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK NO LATER THAN
60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO
ANY REMAINING FUNDS. NOTWITHSTANDING THE FOREGOING, THE UNITED STATES
SHALL NOT BE BOUND BY THE SIXTY DAY TIME PERIOD IMPOSED BY S/S 45.032, FLA.
STAT. UPON MOTIONS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF SURPLUS PROCEEDS

DATED the 13 day of January, 2012.
BETTY STRIFLER, Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: /s/ Robert Kirby, As Deputy Clerk

January 26 and February 2, 2012.


1759-0202 THCRN
Vs. Rogers, Charles Vincent 09-2011-CA-001079 Notice of Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 09-2011-CA-001079

MIDFIRST BANK
Plaintiff,
vs.
CHARLES VINCENT ROGERS; MARYANN ROGERS; UNKNOWN TENANT 1; UNKNOWN
TENANT 2; and all unknown parties claiming by, through, under or against the above
named Defendant(s), who (is/are) not known to be dead or alive, whether said un-
known parties claim as heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors, trustees,
spouses, or other claimants; BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.; CITRUS SPRINGS CIVIC
ASSOCIATION, INC.
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE

Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated
January 12, 2012, in this cause, I will sell the property situated in CITRUS County, Flor-
ida, described as:

LOTS 16 AND 17, BLOCK 59, CITRUS SPRINGS UNIT 1, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT
THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGES 89 THROUGH 106, OF THE PUBLIC REC-
ORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA.

a/k/a 1390 W. ANZA CT., CITRUS SPRINGS, FL 34434-4906.

at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, in the Jury Assembly Room in
the New Addition to the New Citrus County Courthouse, 110 N. Apopka Ave.,
Inverness, FL 34450, at ten o'clock a.m., on February 16, 2012.

Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days
after the sale.

Dated at Inverness, Florida, this 17th day of January, 2012.
Betty Strifler, Clerk of the Circuit Court
(SEAL)
By: /s/ Amy Holmes, Deputy Clerk

IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY ACCOMMODATION IN
ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO YOU,
TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACT THE ADA COORDINA-
TOR (352) 341-6400, 110 N. APOPKA AVENUE, INVERNESS, FL 34450 WITHIN TWO WORK-
ING DAYS OF YOUR RECEIPT OF THIS NOTICE. IF YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IM-
PAIRED, CALL 1-800-955-8771.

January 26 and February 2, 2012. 111100469


1760-0202 THCRN
Vs. Martone Jr., Dominic 2011-CA-000087 Notice of Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 2011-CA-000087

U.S. BANK, N.A.
Plaintiff,
vs.
DOMINIC MARTONE, JR.; CARRYL MARTONE; UNKNOWN TENANT 1; UNKNOWN TEN-
ANT 2; and all unknown parties claiming by, through, under or against the above
named Defendant(s), who (is/are) not known to be dead or alive, whether said un-
known parties claim as heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors, trustees,
spouses, or other claimants;
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE

Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated
January 12, 2012, in this cause, I will sell the property situated in CITRUS County,
Florida, described as:

LOT 13, OF GOLDEN VILLAGE, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, AS RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8, PAGE 15, PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA.
TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN 2006 FLEETCRAFT CORP. DOUBLEWIDE MANUFACTURED
HOME, MODEL #4483T VIN NUMBER GAFL634A79568TW21 TITLE NUMBER 96689153 AND
VIN NUMBER GAFL634B79568TW21 TITLE NUMBER 96689333.

a/k/a 5164 N. DEWEY WAY, HERNANDO, FL 34442.

at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, in the Jury Assembly Room in
the New Addition to the New Citrus County Courthouse, 110 N. Apopka Ave.,
Inverness, FL 34450, at ten o'clock a.m., on February 16, 2012.

Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days
after the sale.

Dated at Inverness, Florida, this 13 day of January, 2012.
Betty Strifler, Clerk of the Circuit Court
(SEAL)


By: /s/ Robert Kirby, Deputy Clerk

IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY ACCOMMODATION IN
ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO YOU,
TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACT THE ADA COORDINA-
TOR (352) 341-6400, 110 N. APOPKA AVENUE, INVERNESS, FL 34450 WITHIN TWO WORK-
ING DAYS OF YOUR RECEIPT OF THIS NOTICE. IF YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IM-
PAIRED, CALL 1-800-955-8771.

January 26 and February 2, 2012. 665101976


1761-0202 THCRN
Vs. Rogers, Falon I. 2009-CA-004005 Notice of Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: 2009-CA-004005

NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC F/K/A CENTEX HOME EQUITY COMPANY, LLC
Plaintiff,
vs.
FALON I. ROGERS; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF FALON I. ROGERS; SANDRA ROGERS; IF LIV-
ING, INCLUDING ANY UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID DEFENDANTSS, IF REMARRIED, AND


IF DECEASED, THE RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES,
CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE NAMED DEFENDANTSS; COMMONWEALTH
FINANCIAL SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR CITIBANK; WHETHER DISSOLVED OR PRES-
ENTLY EXISTING, TOGETHER WITH ANY GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, OR
TRUSTEES OF SAID DEFENDANTS) AND ALL OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH,
UNDER, OR AGAINST DEFENDANTSS; UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2;
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE

Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure
entered in the above-styled cause, in the Circuit Court of Citrus County, Florida, I will
sell the property situate in Citrus County, Florida, described as:

COMMENCE AT THE SW CORNER OF THE WEST 300.00 FEET OF THE EAST 814.00 FEET OF
THE SOUTH 150.00 FEET OF THE SE 1/4 OF THE SW 1/4 OF SECTION 3, TOWNSHIP 18
SOUTH RANGE 17 EAST, THENCE N 1 DEGREE 06 MINUTES 42 SECONDS W ALONG THE
WEST LINE OF SAID WEST 300.0 FEET OF THE EAST 814.0 FEET, A DISTANCE OF 310.0 FEET
TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, THENCE CONTINUE N 1 DEGREE 06 MINUTES 42 SECONDS
W ALONG SAID WEST LINE, A DISTANCE OF 340.0 FEET, THENCE N 46 DEGREES 46 MIN-
UTES 02 SECONDS W A DISTANCE OF 143.51 FEET TO THE EASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE
OF AN ABANDONED RAILROAD, THENCE S 16 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 58 SECONDS W
ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE, A DISTANCE OF 462.39 FEET, THENCE N 89 DEGREES
03 MINUTES 45 SECONDS E, A DISTANCE OF 246.12 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING.

at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, Citrus County Courthouse,
The Jury Assembly Room, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450 at
10:00 AM, on February 16, 2012.
DATED THIS 19th day of January, 2012.

Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days
after the sale.

Witness, my hand and seal of this court on the 19th day of January, 2012.
Betty Strifler, CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT
(SEAL)
By: /s/ Amy Holmes, Deputy Clerk

THIS INSTRUMENT PREPARED BY: Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra, 9204 King Palm
Drive, Tampa, FL 33619-1328 Phone: 813-915-8660 Attorneys for Plaintiff

If you are a persons with a disability who needs an accommodation in order to par-
ticipate in a proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, the provision of certain
assistance. Please contact John Sullivan, ADA Coordinator for the Courts within 2
working days of your receipt of your notice to appear in Court at (352) 341-6700. You
can also use the online Florida State Courts System Title II ADA Accommodation Re-
quest Form. Once submitted, this will go to the appropriate ADA Coordinator in your
county.

January 26 and February 2, 2012.


1762-0202 THCRN
Vs. Clarkson, Richard G. 09-2011-CA-002430 Notice of Foreclosure Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO. 09-2011-CA-002430 DIVISION

PHH MORTGAGE CORPORATION,
Plaintiff,
vs.
RICHARD G. CLARKSON, et al,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure
dated January 12, 2012 and entered in Case No. 09-2011-CA-002430 of the Circuit
Court of the FIFTH Judicial Circuit in and for CITRUS County, Florida wherein PHH
MORTGAGE CORPORATION is the Plaintiff and RICHARD G. CLARKSON; KATHLEEN
CLARKSON; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and
best bidder for cash at JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM IN THE NEW ADDITION TO THE NEW CIT-
RUS COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 110 NORTH APOPKA AVENUE, INVERNESS, CITRUS
COUNTY, FLORIDA at 10:00 AM, on the 16 day of February, 2012, the following de-
scribed property as set forth in said Final Judgment:

LOT 32, CRYSTAL WOODS, AN UNRECORDED SUBDIVISION FURTHER DESCRIBED AS FOL-
LOWS: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4 OF THE
NORTHWEST 1/4 OF SECTION 13, TOWNSHIP 19 SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST, THENCE SOUTH
89 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF SAID
NORTHWEST 1/4 OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4 A DISTANCE OF 1343.04 FEET TO THE NORTH-
EAST CORNER OF SAID NORTHWEST 1/4 OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4, THENCE SOUTH 1 DE-
GREE 14 MINUTES 26 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE EAST LINE OF SAID NORTHWEST 1/4 OF
THE NORTHWEST 1/4 A DISTANCE OF 934.43 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, THENCE
CONTINUE SOUTH 1 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 26 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID EAST LINE A
DISTANCE OF 133.49 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 04 SECONDS WEST
332.99 FEET, THENCE NORTH 1 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 21 SECONDS WEST 133.52 FEET,
THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 21 SECONDS EAST 333.34 FEET TO THE POINT
OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO A 25 FOOT WIDE EASEMENT ALONG THE WEST BOUNDARY
THEREOF FOR ROAD RIGHT-OF-WAY. TOGETHER WITH AN EASEMENT FOR INGRESS AND
EGRESS OVER AND ACROSS THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED LANDS:
A 50 FOOT WIDE ROAD EASEMENT:
COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4 OF THE NORTHWEST
1/4 OF SECTION 13, TOWNSHIP 19 SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST, THENCE SOUTH 1 DEGREE 50
MINUTES 08 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE WEST LINE OF NORTHWEST 1/4 OF THE NORTH-
WEST 1/4 A DISTANCE OF 1336.27 FEET TO THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SAID NORTH-
WEST 1/4 OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4, THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 31 SECONDS
EAST ALONG THE SOUTE SOUTH LINE OF SAID NORTHWEST 1/4 OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4 A DIS-
TANCE OF 548.43 FEET, THENCE NORTH 50.00 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 51 MIN-
UTES 31 SECONDS WEST PARALLEL TO SAID SOUTH LINE A DISTANCE OF 192.39 FEET,
THENCE NORTH 1 DEGREE 41 MINUTES 12 SECONDS WEST 192.14 FEET, THENCE NORTH
89 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 04 SECONDS EAST 307.92 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING,
THENCE CONTINUE NORTH 89 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 04 SECONDS EAST 307.91 FEET,
THENCE SOUTH 1 DEGREE 23 MINUTES 21 SECONDS EAST 242.05 FEET TO A POINT ON
SAID SOUTH LINE OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4 OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4 THENCE NORTH 89 DE-
GREES 51 MINUTES 31 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID SOUTH LINE A DISTANCE OF 50.01
FEET, THENCE NORTH 1 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 21 SECONDS WEST 1209.02 FEET TO A
POINT ON A CUL-DE-SAC, CONCAVED SOUTHERLY, HAVING A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 300
DEGREES AND A RADIUS OF 50 FEET, THENCE NORTHEASTERLY, NORTHWESTERLY, SOUTH-
WESTERLY, AND SOUTHEASTERLY ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CUL-DE-SAC A DISTANCE OF
261.80 FEET (CHORD BEARING AND DISTANCE BETWEEN SAID POINTS SOUTH 88 DE-
GREES 36 MINUTES 39 SECONDS WEST 50.00 FEET), THENCE SOUTH 1 DEGREES 23 MIN-
UTES 21 SECONDS EAST 915.78 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 04 SEC-
ONDS WEST 308.04 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 1 DEGREE 32 MINUTES 17 SECONDS EAST 50.02
FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING.

A/K/A 2191 S MOONLIT POINT, HOMOSASSA, FL 34448

Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60)
days after the sale.

WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on January 12, 2012.
Betty Strifler Clerk of the Circuit Court
(SEAL)
By: /s/ Robert Kirby, Deputy Clerk

**See Americans with Disabilities Act If you are a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Mr. John D.
Sullivan, 110 N. Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL 34450-4231 Phone: 352-341-6700 Fax:
352-341-7008

January 26 and February 2, 2012. F11017279


1763-0202 THCRN
Vs. Little, Cynthia E. 09-2010-CA-005885 Notice of Foreclosure Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO. 09-2010-CA-005885 DIVISION

WELLS FARGO BANK, NA,
Plaintiff,
vs.
CYNTHIA E. LITTLE, et al,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure
dated January 12, 2012 and entered in Case No. 09-2010-CA-005885 of the Circuit
Court of the FIFTH Judicial Circuit in and for CITRUS County, Florida wherein WELLS
FARGO BANK, NA is the Plaintiff and CYNTHIA E. LITTLE; HOWARD E. LITTLE; ANY AND
ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN
NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE,
WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVI-
SEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court
will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM IN THE NEW
ADDITION TO THE NEW CITRUS COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 110 NORTH APOPKA AVENUE,
INVERNESS, CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA at 10:00 AM, on the 16 day of February, 2012,
the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment:
ALL THAT CERTAIN PARCEL OF LAND SITUATE IN THE COUNTY OF CITRUS AND STATE OF
FLORIDA, BEING BOUNDED AND DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:

COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE NORTHEAST 1/4 SECTION 7, TOWN-
SHIP 19 SOUTH, RANGE 21 EAST, THENCE SOUTH 01 DEGREES 01 MINUTES EAST ALONG
THE WEST LINE OF THE SAID NORTHEAST 1/4, A DISTANCE OF 1264.04 FEET, THENCE
NORTH 88 DEGREES 59 MINUTES EAST 420 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 01 DEGREES 00 MINUTES
40 SECONDS EAST 100 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH 01
DEGREES 00 MINUTES 40 SECONDS EAST 150.41 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 57 DEGREES 20
MINUTES 17 SECONDS EAST 127.86 FEET TO A POINT IN THE CENTERLINE OF AN EXISTING
CANAL, THENCE ALONG SAID CENTERLINTHE THE FOLLOWING COURSES AND DISTANCES:
NORTH 47 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 50 SECONDS EAST 130.58 FEET AND NORTH 18 DEGREES
50 MINUTES 20 SECONDS EAST 143.28 FEET TO A POINT THAT BEARS NORTH 88 DEGREES
59 MINUTES EAST FROM THE POINT OF BEGINNING, THENCE SOUTH 88 DEGREES 59
MINUTES WEST 252.79 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING.
SUBJECT TO AN EASEMENT ACROSS THE CANAL ALONG THE SOUTHEASTERLY BOUND-
ARY THEREOF, AND SUBJECT TO AN EASEMENT ACROSS THE WEST 25 FEET THEREOF, AND
TOGETHER WITH AN EASEMENT ACROSS THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED LANDS: COM-
MENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE NORTHEAST 1/4 OF SECTION 7, TOWNSHIP
19 SOUTH, RANGE 21 EAST, THENCE SOUTH 01 DEGREES 01 MINUTES EAST ALONG THE
WEST LINE OF SAID NORTHEAST 1/4, A DISTANCE OF 1264.04 FEET, THENCE NORTH 88
DEGREES 59 MINUTES EAST 420 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, THENCE CONTINUE
NORTH 88 DEGREES 59 MINUTES EAST 25 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 01 DEGREES 00 MINUTES
40 SECONDS EAST 100 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 88 DEGREES 59 MINUTES WEST 25 FEET,
THENCE NORTH 01 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 40 SECONDS WEST 100 FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING.

A/K/A 565 S TUCK POINT, INVERNESS, FL 34450

Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60)
days after the sale.

WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on January 13, 2012.
Betty Stifler, Clerk of the Circuit Court
(SEAL)
By: /s/ Robert Kirby, Deputy Clerk

tSee Americans with Disabilities Act If you are a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to you to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Mr John D.


Sullivan, 110 N. Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL 34450-4231 Phone: 352-341-6700 Fax:
352-341-7008

January 26 and February 2, 2012. F10104334


1764-0202 THCRN
Vs. Graff, Carol C. 09-2011-CA-001538 Notice of Foreclosure Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO. 09-2011-CA-001538 DIVISION

CENTRAL MORTGAGE COMPANY,
Plaintiff,
vs.
CAROL C. GRAFF, et al,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure
dated January 12, 2012 and entered in Case No. 09-2011-CA-001538 of the Circuit
Court of the FIFTH Judicial Circuit in and for CITRUS County, Florida wherein CENTRAL


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


1736-0202 THCRN
Alan B. Yermal- Sheriff's Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Writ of Execution issued in the County
Court of Citrus County, Florida, on the 18th day of October, 2011, in the cause
wherein PREMIUM ASSET RECOVERY CORP., was plaintiff, and ALAN B. YERMAL, was
Defendant, being Case No 2004CC001562, in the said Court, I, JEFFREY J DAWSY, as
Sheriff of Citrus County, Florida, have levied upon all the right, title and interest of the
above-named Defendant, ALAN B. YERMAL, in and to the following described per-
sonal or real property, to-wit:

1989 MERCEDES-BENZ 300SEL VIN# WDBCA25E7KA477563

and on the 16th day of February, 2012 at ADVANCED TOWING, 9224 E. PEMBERTON
PATH, in INVERNESS, Citrus County, Florida, at the hour of 11:00 a.m. or as soon there-
after as possible, I will offer for sale all of the said Defendant, ALAN B. YERMAL, right,
title and interest in the aforesaid property at public outcry and will sell the same, sub-
ject to taxes, all prior liens, encumbrances and judgments, if any, to the highest and
best bidder or bidders for CASH IN HAND. The proceeds to be applied as far as may
be to the payment of costs and the satisfaction of the above-described execution.
Property will be available for viewing one half hour prior to sale. Sale and all docu-
mentation will be executed in accordance with Florida State Law. Please call our of-
fice at 352-341-6525 with any questions.

IN ACCORDANCE with the Americans with disabilities act, persons with disabilities
needing special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact
the A.D.A Coordinator telephone # 352-341-6400 not later than seven (7) days prior
to the proceedings. If hearing impaired, (TDD) 1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Serv-
ice.
JEFFREY J DAWSY, SHERIFF
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
Warren "Butch" Slusser, Deputy Sheriff

January 12, 19, 26 and February 2, 2012.


1767-0126 THCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice is hereby given that the Southwest Florida Water Management District has re-
ceived Environmental Resource permit application number 658061 from RIF 304, LLC.
Application received: December 2, 2011. Proposed activity: commercial subdivision.
Project name: Crystal River Commons, Phase 1. Project size: 160.29 Location:
Section(s) 03, Township 19South, Range 17 East and Section(s) 34, Township 18 South,
Range 17 East, in Citrus County. Outstanding Florida Water: No. Aquatic preserve:
No. The application is available for public inspection Monday through Friday at
Brooksville Regulation Department, 2379 Broad Street, Brooksville, Florida 34604-6899.
Interested persons may inspect a copy of the application and submit written com-
ments concerning the application. Comments must include the permit application
number and be received within 14 days from the date of this notice. If you wish to
be notified of agency action or an opportunity to request an administrative hearing
regarding the application, you must send a written request referencing the permit
application number to the Southwest Florida Water Management District, Regulation
Performance Management Department, 2379 Broad Street, FL 34604-6899 or submit
your request through the District's website at www.watermatters.org. The District
does not discriminate based on disability. Anyone requiring accommodation under
the ADA should contact the Regulation Performance Management Department at
(352) 796-7211 or 1-800-423-1476; TDD only 1-800-231-6103.

January 26, 2012.


1766-0126 THCRN
2/9 sale
Notice of Public Sale
The following vehicles will
be sold at public auction
on the property of Scally's
Lube & Go Towing and
Recovery, 1185 N. Paul


Dr. Inverness, FL 34453
(Citrus County) (352)
860-0550 in accordance
with Florida Statute, Sec-
tion 713.78. Auction Date
as follows. Sale Date and
Time: Feb. 09, 2012, 8 AM
1992 Ford Ranger


(#46902) VIN#
1FTCR10A2NUA98515
Scally's Lube and Go Tow-
ing and Recovery Re-
serves The Right To Bid on
all vehicles. All sales are
FINAL at 9:00 AM
Jan. 26, 2012.


Meeting^
Notices^


1765-0126 THCRN
2/6 meeting Citrus County Water & Wastewater Authority
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the CITRUS COUNTY WATER & WASTEWATER AUTHORITY
will meet on Monday, February 6, 2012, at 1:00 P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible,
in the Lecanto Government Building, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Room #166, Lecanto,
Florida to discuss such matters as may properly come before the Authority.

This meeting is open to the public.

Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the Office of Utility Regulation, 3675
E. Orange Drive, Hernando, Florida 34442-4353, at least one week before the meet-
ing. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD Telephone (352) 527-5312.

The Citrus County Water & Wastewater Authority will render its decisions based on
the evidence brought forward under the powers vested in it in F.S. 367.171 and Citrus
County Code, Chapter 102, Article IV. ANY PERSON WHO DECIDES TO APPEAL A DE-
CISION OF THIS AUTHORITY WILL NEED A RECORD OF THE PROCEEDINGS PERTAINING
THERETO AND THEREFORE MAY NEED TO ENSURE THAT A VERBATIM RECORD OF THE
PROCEEDINGS IS MADE, WHICH RECORD INCLUDES THE TESTIMONY AND EVIDENCE
UPON WHICH THE APPEAL IS TO BE BASED.
BY: ROBERT K. HNAT, CHAIRMAN
CITRUS COUNTY WATER & WASTEWATER AUTHORITY

January 26, 2012.


1769-0126 THCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE
PUBLIC MEETING OF
THE CITRUS COUNTY CANVASSING BOARD
PRESIDENTIAL PREFERENCE PRIMARY ELECTION
CANVASSING OF ABSENTEE, PROVISIONAL, OVERSEAS BALLOTS AND
POST ELECTION AUDIT
The Citrus County Canvassing Board will convene at 1:00 p.m. on Saturday, January
28, 2012 to canvass Absentee Ballots and will be available for public inspection be-
tween 12:30 p.m. and 1:00 p.m. This meeting will be held at the Citrus County Su-
pervisor of Elections Office, 120 N. Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida, and in ac-
cordance with the Sunshine Law of Florida, all meetings are open to the public, the
press, and representatives of political parties. All candidates or their designated rep-
resentative are invited to attend.

The Canvassing Board will reconvene on Tuesday, January 31, 2012 at 9:00 a.m.
Canvassing of the provisional ballots will begin Friday, February 3, 2012 beginning at
9:00 a.m. Overseas ballots will be canvassed on Friday, February 10, 2012 at 1:00
p.m.

The Post Election Audit will commence on Monday, February 13, 2012 at 8:30 a.m. in
the Supervisor of Elections office. A race and precinct will be randomly selected
and immediately following the random selection the manual audit will commence
and continue until completed.

Persons with disabilities requiring reasonable accommodation to participate should
call the Elections Office at (352) 341-6740; (352) 341-6752 (TDD).
Susan Gill, Supervisor of Elections
120 N. Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL 34450

January 26, 2012.


1770-0126 THCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE
Finance Committee meetings of the Citrus County Hospital Board will be held on
Monday, April 09, 2012 at 12:00pm and on Monday, May 14, 2012 at 12:00pm and
on Monday, June 11, 2012 at 12:00pm in the Citrus County Hospital Board offices lo-
cated at 123 N. Apopka Ave., Inverness. The Citrus County Hospital Board offices are
located within the building of the Law Office of Grant & Dozier, LLC to discuss:
Approval of Minutes.
Finance Report.
Other.

A regular meeting of the Citrus County Hospital Board will be held on Monday, April
09, 2012 at 12:30pm and on Monday, May 14, 2012 at 12:30pm and on Monday,
June 11, 2012 at 12:30pm in the Citrus County Hospital Board offices located at 123
N. Apopka Ave., Inverness. The Citrus County Hospital Board offices are located
within the building of the Law Office of Grant & Dozier, LLC to discuss:
Approval of Minutes.
Citrus County Hospital Board Finance Committee Report.
Foundation Governance Issues.
Citrus County Hospital Board Committees Report.
Other

Copies of the Agenda are available by calling the Citrus County Hospital Board at
352-419-6566. Any person wishing to appeal any decision made by this Board, with
respect to any matter considered at such meeting, must ensure that a verbatim rec-
ord of the proceedings is made, which record must include the testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal is to be based.

Persons who require special accommodations under the American with Disabilities
should contact the Citrus County Hospital Board Office, 123 N. Apopka Ave., Inver-
ness, Florida, 34450 (352) 419-6566.

January 26, 2012.


1768-0126 THCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Fictitious Name
Notice under Fictitious
Name Law. pursuant to
Section 865.09, Florida
Statutes. NOTICE IS
HEREBY GIVEN that the
undersigned, desiring to


engage in business under
the fictitious name of:
Abbey Court
Transcription
located at 12200 South
Fern Point, Floral City, FL
34436, in the County of
Citrus, intends to register
the said name with the


Division of Corporations of
the Florida Department of
State, Tallahassee, FL.
Dated at Floral City, FL,
this 23 day of Jan., 2012.
/s/ Lisa M. Kalkbrenner
Owner
Jan. 26, 2012.


oe


FoelsueS


FrcourS


Foelsr


Feo ea


THURSDAY, JANUARY 26, 2012 CJlJ




MORTGAGE COMPANY is the Plaintiff and CAROL C. GRAFF; ROBERT GRAFF; CITRUS
HILLS PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the
Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM IN THE
NEW ADDITION TO THE NEW CITRUS COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 110 NORTH APOPKA AVE-
NUE, INVERNESS, CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA at 10:00 AM, on the 16 day of February,
2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment:

LOT 17 IN BLOCK 57 OF CITRUS HILLS FIRST ADDITION, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR
PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 9, PAGES 73 THROUGH 83, PUBLIC
RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA.

A/K/A 202 NORTH INDIANAPOLIS AVENUE, HERNANDO, FL 34442

Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60)
days after the sale.

WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on January 13, 2012.
Betty Strifler, Clerk of the Circuit Court
(SEAL)
By: /s/ Robert Kirby, Deputy Clerk

**See Americans with Disabilities Act If you are a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Mr John D.
Sullivan, 110 N. Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL 34450-4231 Phone: 352-341-6700 Fax:
352-341-7008

January 26 and February 2, 2012. F11008297


I Misc. Nod


I Mis. Notc^es


I Misc. Noti




C12 THURSDAY, JANUARY 26, 2012


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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,Iil in
Discovering the joy of r

a l i











H.
Sii^^HHH.....-

4. ip,.

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1411V
retirement







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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


New name,

new content
Welcome to Our Time, the
Citi a, County Cl, i.ii "-L
new and improved
monthly publication aimed at helping
readers who are retired or are nearing
retirement "discover the joy of
retirement.
We're keeping some of the favorite
things from Senior Style (the publica-
tion's previous name) like travel, fit-
ness, good health, a listing of
community center activities and some
of the columnists who make us laugh.
And we're adding some regular top-
ics that surveys have shown many of
our retired readers are interested in -
like reading, gardening, technology, nu-
trition and healthy eating and more.
We've made the content as interac-
tive as possible with lists of upcoming
plant clinics, computer classes at Citrus
Couty libraries and community center
activities.


Index

Cover story Maria and Salvador Ro-
cafort discover that working out together
not only provides health benefits, but
has made their relationship stronger as
well. Cover photo is by Cathy Kapulka
................................................... Page 8

Let's Talk ................................ Page 3
Whatcher Point ...................... Page 3
Savvy Senior .......................... Page 4
Tax help offered .................... Page 5
Reading .....................................Page 6
News From SRRMC .............. Page 6
Technology .......................... Page 11
Healthy eating ...................... Page12
Travel .................................... Page 15


AmI ",iA


A n imfor
Gerry Mulligan
Publisher
Ken Melton
Community Affairs
Editor
Cindy Connolly
Community Affairs
cranhipr Artist


Sarah Gatling
Community Edit(
I Trista Stokes
Advertising
Sales Manager

Citrus Publishing
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
352-563-6363
www.chronicleonline.com


Independent Living


...let us do the driving,
cooking & cleaning

7Tme for

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Hot Meal Daily Housekeeping
Transportation for Doctors Visits & Shopping
Library with Computer & Internet Access Clubhouse
* Great Social Activities Beauty Salon & Wellness Center
w~~o www.lnvernessClubApartments.com
SOpen Monday-FridayWeekends b Appt.
Call for your free lunch & tour


verness
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Serving Citrus County Over
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With Excellence in Orthopaedics.
Medicare & Most Insurance Accepted
New Patients Welcome!


Walter I. Choung, MD Orthopaedic Surgeon
Jeremiah A. Hubbard, DO Orthopaedic Surgeon
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2155 W. Mustang Blvd. Beverly Hills 746-5707
2236 Hwy. 44 West Inverness 344-Bone (2663)
520 SE 8th Ave. Crystal River 564-Bone (2663)


G2 Thursday, January 26, 2012


OUR TIME


1 & 2


or


r


-!
*A y






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Just try not


to laugh
Ya'll, we really need to talk.
Do you ever just start laughing at
something and you just can't quit? It has
happened to me at the most inopportune
times.
Once, my cousin and I were sitting
around the dinner table at her house. We
were eating a piece of cake, but we
couldn't swallow it. Really, it was so dry.
We started to laugh so hard we just
couldn't stop.
My uncle threatened to beat us within
an inch of our lives. It was perfectly OK
for a parent to do that back then and
even though it had never actually hap-
pened to us, we knew it was a
possibility. Even with that
knowledge rolling around in
our heads, we just could not
stop.
You would think that with
adults, that would not happen.
Well, it has happened so many .
times in my adult life.
Many years ago my sister,
mother and I were attending a Ma
cousin's wedding in a very Ti]
small country church. During LET'-
a very solemn part of the cere- -
mony we had to stand. As we stood up, I
accidentally kicked something metal on
the pew in front of us.
Quiet church, big sound.
My mother was mortified because we
could not stop laughing. And to tell you
the truth, my sister and I were embar-
rassed, but we just couldn't stop. The
more we tried to stifle the laugh, the
worse it got.
I can't believe I'm confessing this, but I
used to have a really bad habit. Honestly,
I do not know where this came from, but
I used to laugh when people fell down.
Not if there was a real injury or any-
thing, but just seeing people lose control
like that like Red Skelton used to. Dick
VanDyke was a good faller, too, but I
used to have to run in the house or hide
while someone else took care of the
faller.
I know this is horrible, but it was an af-
fliction of some kind. Believe me, as I
grew older I was cured of that.
To all of you who have had this same
ailment, (and I know you are out there)
let me say that I did read an article years
ago that talked about this very subject.
The psychologist who wrote the article
stated that people laugh when others fall


y A
lm
51


because they are embarrassed for the
person who fell and it is a nervous reac-
tion. I'm going with that theory.
Even our pastor, Jeff, is not immune to
such behavior.
He recently shared with us an incident
that happened over Thanksgiving while
he and his family were visiting family in
Louisiana. One evening, Jeff and another
family member started laughing hysteri-
cally about something. About the same
time, Jeff's father, also a pastor, had been
speaking with a church member in an-
other part of the house.
He brought out the gentleman to intro-
duce him to Jeff. The father explained
that Jeff was a pastor and that Jeff would
be glad to pray with him before he left.
This, as it turns out, was really bad tim-
ing. Jeff and the family member could
not quit laughing long enough to say a
prayer. They both had to retreat to the
bedroom in order to avoid fur-
ther embarrassment to all con-
cemed! I can identify with this.
Recently, while sitting in
church, I had one of these
"spells."
I was reading the story about
how this guy named Ahaziah
fell through the lattice of his
dice upper room. That right there
lce was enough to get me started.
an Anyway, some other stuff took
TALK place, but mainly an angel
-- came to the prophet in that
town and started talking to him about
the king and how the king was confused
about who God was. The king gets word
of all of the commotion.
So, the king decides to send a captain
in his army along with 50 men to the top
of the hill where the prophet is staying to
tell the prophet to come down. The
prophet told the captain that very likely
(well, for sure) fire was going to come
down and consume him and his men.
Sure enough, they were zapped.
And, what happened next was only
funny if you were on top of the hill. Yep,
the king decided to send another captain
and another 50 men. Now, if I were part
of that second detail, I would be slightly
apprehensive as to the outcome of this
piece of brilliant military strategy.
But orders are orders and off they
went. Same request and same outcome.
Really, this could have been a "Saturday
Night Live" skit.
You would think the king would re-
group. Obviously the king wasn't the
one climbing the hill. Nope, he gave the
exact same order one captain and 50
men up they went.
see Talk Page 7


It w asall sing "Auld Lang Syne" instead of
It wa s| a waiting until midnight.
Cid Chains, the DJ we hired to host the
*party, played Guy Lombardo's music
night to when the balloons dropped down from
night to the ceiling and landed on the candles.
The popping sounded like gunshots.
Even after the paper tablecloths caught
1rem em e fire some of us reacted by pouring our
drinks on the fire. Unfortunately, some of
One thing is for certain, the the drinks contained alcohol.
New Year's Eve party was We are very thankful that
something to remember. everyone made it out safely.
We had the best turnout Chains was able to save his
ever for our New Year's Eve equipment that was on top of
party. Some of you danced the rolling cabinet that stored
until the rubber tips wore out the bingo apparatus.
on your walkers. The fire department was un-
The musical wheelchairs able to save the clubhouse.
didn't work out as well as we It certainly seems strange how
had hoped. When the music Larry Elsenheimer something so insignificant as
stopped, everyone was still WHATCHER having baked beans at a potluck
sitting. POINT supper could have such ramifi-
We want to thank Hazel cations. As some of you remem-
Melon and her sister Helen Bemus, Elsie ber, one time when the usual
Pickles, Myrtle Pearl and her sister Ester, signup sheet was not posted on the bul-
for decorating the clubhouse. It's a letin board, everybody brought baked
shame none of the balloons and stream- beans. Everyone laughed when the bio-
ers survived the fire. logical reaction from eating beans
By mutual agreement, it was decided
that when the clock struck 10 we would see Point age 7


m(ewie 9w nf JO




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* Month to Month Rentals
* Preference of Studio or One or Two
bedroom Apartments
* Patio for Easy Access to Outdoors
* Fine Dining Country Store Library Pool
* Jacuzzi Beauty & Barber Shop
* Housekeeping/Laundry Transportation
* Planned Programs, Activities, Outings
SERVING SENIORS FOR OVER 25 YEARS


i BRENT'

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RETIREMENT COMMUNE BEST
1900 West Alpha Court Lecanto, FL 34.:- 1 EST
Phone: (352) 746-6611
www.brentwoodretirement.com -._ .


Thursday January 26, 2012 G3


OUR TIME







G4 Thursday, January 26, 2012


2011 tax filing


requirements for seniors


Dear Savvy Senior,
What are the 2011 IRS income
tax filing requirements for sen-
iors? I had to file and pay fed-
eral income taxes last year, but
my income dropped and I'm
wondering if I'm exempt this
year.
Recently Retired
Dear Retired,
According to the Tax Policy
Center, 56 percent of retirees
will not have to file or pay fed-
eral income taxes this
year mainly because
their incomes are
under the IRS filing
threshold. Here's a
breakdown of the
2011 filing require-
ments along with a
few other tax tips to
help you determine if
you need to file. Jim
IRS requirements SA
If your gross in- SEI
come is below the
IRS filing limits, you probably
won't have to file a federal tax
return this year. Gross income
includes all the income you re-
ceive that is not exempt from
tax, not including Social Secu-
rity benefits, unless you are
married and filing separately.
You probably don't have to file
this year if:
* You are single and your 2011
gross income was less than
$9,500 ($10,950 if you're 65 or
older).
* You are married filing jointly
and your gross income was
under $19,000. If you or your
spouse is 65 or older, the limit
increases to $20,150. And if
you're both over 65, your in-
come must be under $21,300 to
not file.
* You are head of household
and your gross income was
below $12,200 ($13,650 if age 65
or older).
* You are married filing sepa-
rately and your income was
less than $3,700.
* You are a qualifying
widow(er) with a dependent


M
LV
NI


child and your gross income
was less than $15,300 ($16,450 if
age 65 or older).
Special situations
You also need to be aware
that there are some special fi-
nancial situations that require
you to file a tax return, even if
your gross income falls below
the IRS filing requirement. For
example, if you had net earn-
ings from self-employment in
2011 of $400 or more, or if you
owe any special taxes
to the IRS such as al-
ternative minimum
tax or IRA tax penal-
ties, you'll probably
need to file.
To figure this out,
-the IRS offers a page
on their website
called "Do You Need
iller to File a Federal In-
VY come Tax Return?"
OR that includes a list of
financial situations
and a series of questions that
will help you determine if
you're required to file, or if you
should file (if you're due a re-
fund). You can access this page
at www.doyouneed2file.info,
or you can get help over the
phone by calling the IRS
helpline at 800-829-1040.
Tax help
If you do need to file a tax re-
turn this year, you can get help
through the Tax Counseling for
the Elderly (or TCE) program.
Sponsored by the IRS, TEC pro-
vides free tax preparation and
counseling to middle and low
income taxpayers, age 60 and
older. Call 800-829-1040 to lo-
cate a service near you.
Also check with AARP, a par-
ticipant in the TCE program
that provides free tax prepara-
tion at around 6,100 sites na-
tionwide. To locate an AARP
Tax-Aide site call 888-227-7669
or visit aarp.org/findtaxhelp.

How to help elderly
limit or stop driving
Dear Savvy Senior,


OUR TIME


I'm worried about my fa-
ther's driving. At age 84, his
driving skills have diminished
significantly, but I know he's
bound and determined to keep
going as long as he's alive.
What tips can you recommend
that can help me help my dad
stop driving?
Nervous Daughter
Dear Nervous,
For many families, telling an
elderly parent it's time to give
up the car keys is a very sensi-
tive and difficult topic. While
there's no one simple way to
handle this issue, here are a
number of tips and resources
you can try to help ease your
dad away from
driving.
Take a ride
To get a clear pic-
ture of your dad's
driving abilities,
the first thing you
need to do is take a
ride with him
watching for prob-
lem areas. For ex-
ample: Does he
drive too slow or
too fast? Does he
tailgate or drift be-
tween lanes? Does
he have difficulty
seeing, backing up
or changing lanes?
Does he react
slowly? Does he get
distracted or con-
fused easily? Also,
has your dad had any fender
benders or tickets lately, or
have you noticed any dents or
scrapes on his vehicle? These,
too, are red flags.
Start talking
After your assessment, you
need to have a talk with your
dad about your concerns, but
don't sound alarmed. If you
begin with a dramatic outburst
like "Dad, you're going to kill
someone!" you're likely to trig-
ger resistance. Start by gently
expressing that you're worried
about his safety.
For tips on how to talk to
your dad about this touchy
topic, the Hartford Financial
Services Group and MIT Age-
Lab offers some guides titled
"Family Conversations with
Older Drivers" and "Family
Conversations about


Alzheimer's Disease, Dementia
& Driving" that can help, along
with a online seminar called
"We Need to Talk" that was
produced by AARP. To access
these free resources, visit
safedrivingforalifetime.com.
Like many elderly seniors,
your dad may not even realize
his driving skills have slipped.
If this is the case, consider sign-
ing him up for an older driver
refresher course through AARP
(aarp.org/drive, 888-227-7669),
your local AAA or a driving
school.
By becoming aware of his
driving limitations, your dad
may be able to make some sim-


ple adjustments like driving
only in daylight or on familiar
routes that can help keep him
safe and driving longer. Or, he
may decide to hang up the
keys on his own.
Refuses to quit
If, however, you believe your
dad has reached the point that
he can no longer drive safely,
but he refuses to quit, you have
several options. One possible
solution is to suggest a visit to
his doctor who can give him a
medical evaluation, and if war-
ranted, "prescribe" that he
stops driving. Older people
will often listen to their doctor
before they will listen to their
own family.
If that doesn't do it, ask him
to get a comprehensive driving
evaluation done by a driver re-
habilitation specialist this can


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

cost several hundred dollars. A
driving evaluation will test
your dad's cognition, vision
and motor skills, as well as his
on-road driving abilities.
To locate a specialist in your
area, contact the Association of
Driver Rehabilitation Special-
ists (driver-ed.org, 866-672-
9466) or the American
Occupational Therapy Associa-
tion (aota.org/older-driver).
If he still refuses to move to
the passenger seat, call your
local Department of Motor Ve-
hicles to see if they can help.
Or, call in an attorney to dis-
cuss with your dad the poten-
tial financial and legal


consequences of a crash or in-
jury.
If all else fails, you may just
have to take away his keys.
Arrange transportation
Once your dad stops driving
he's going to need other ways
to get around, so help him cre-
ate a list of names and phone
numbers of family, friends and
local transportation services
that he can call on. To locate
community transportation
services call the Area Agency
on Aging. Call 800-677-1116 for
contact information.
Send your senior questions to:
Savvy Senior, P O. Box 5443,
Norman, OK 73070, ,:, ;.i-it
SavvySenior.org. Jim A lilhr is a
,..,,ta ilat.,,' to the NBC "Today"
show and author of' T1he Savvy
Senior" book.







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Get


on




taxes


Special to the Chronicle

AARP Tax-Aide will
provide free income tax
form preparation and
electronic filing services
in Citrus County again
this year.
AARP Tax-Aide is a
nationwide service of the
AARP Foundation of-
fered in conjunction with
the U.S. Internal Rev-
enue Service. It is a vol-
unteer-run program
whose mission is to pro-
vide high-quality free in-
come tax assistance to
low- and middle-income
taxpayers with special
attention to those 60 and
older. It is not necessary
to be a member of AARP;
taxpayers of all ages are
welcome to use this serv-
ice.
Volunteers are trained
locally and certified by
the IRS to assist taxpay-
ers in preparing their
federal income tax re-
turns. All taxes are pre-
pared using
IRS/AARP-provided
computers and software
and the returns are filed
electronically free of
charge. In Citrus County,
more than 110 volunteers
provide this service at
seven sites, open Feb. 1
through April 14. The


Where

All sites are by appointment
only; you must go to the li-
brary in person to make an
appointment; calls not ac-
cepted.
Central Ridge Library: 425
W. Roosevelt Blvd., Beverly
Hills, 352-746-6622; from 10
a.m. to 3 p.m. every Friday,
Feb. 3 through April 13 (ex-
cept Good Friday, April 6).
Saturday only on Feb. 18 and
March 17 from 10 a.m. to 3
p.m. Appointments must be
made in person.
Citrus Springs Community
Center: 1570 W. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs,
352-465-7007; from 9 a.m. to 1
p.m. every Tuesday, Feb. 7
through April 10. No appoint-
ment necessary; first-come,
first-served basis only.
Coastal Region Library:
8619 W. Crystal St., Crystal



final day for filing is denta
April 17 this year. taxes,
What to bring to the paid,
appointment: pense
* Social Security cards pense
or comparable documen- reaso]
station for you, your legibl
spouse (if applicable), all 0 Brc
dependents and anyone or ott
listed on your tax return, show
* An official photo ID chase
(driver's license, pass- purch
port, student ID or other ties o
state-issued photo ID). transf
* A copy of your 2010 tax ye
income tax return, if 0 All
available, to:
* Income-related docu- Hea
ments: forms W-2, unem- count
ployment compensation IRA
statements, SSA 1099, ing F(
1099R and other 1099 The
forms showing home by a f
mortgage interest or Pur
other income. tion o
* Expense-related docu- prodt
ments: receipts, can- residE
celled checks or other Can
documentation showing a crec
federal and state taxes forecl
paid, 1098 forms, docu- residE
mentation of medical, Dep


to go to rec

River,
352-795-
3716;
from 10 -
a.m. to 5 -
p.m. =
every -
Thurs-
day, Feb.
2
through
April 12. --
Saturday --
only on -
Feb. 4, _
10 a.m.
to 3 p.m.
Ap-
point-
ments
must be
made in
person.
Crystal River Moose
Lodge: 1855 S. Suncoast Blvd.,


1, charity, property
mortgage interest
or business ex-
s. Receipts for ex-
s need to be in
nable order and
e.
kerage statements
ter documentation
ing cost basis (pur-
price) and date
rased for all securi-
r property sold or
erred during the
ear.
paperwork related

lth Savings Ac-
s (HSA);
rollovers, includ-
orm 5498;
purchase of a home
irst-time buyer;
chase and installa-
f energy-efficient
icts for a primary
ence;
cellation of Debt of
lit card(s) or the
osure of a primary
ence;
endent Care


"eive tax assistance


I


Ho-
mosassa,
-_ - 352-795-
..... 2795;
S- from 9
i a- a.m. to 1
p.m.
,. every
SMonday
and Tues-
day, Feb.
6 through
April 16.
No ap-
point-
ment
neces-
sary;
Sfirst-
come,
first-
served
basis only.
* Floral City Public Library:
8360 E. Orange Ave., Floral


Provider information:
(name, address, em-
ployer ID or SSN) and
amount paid;
- Documentation of self-
employment income and
expense (Tax-Aide can-
not prepare and e-file
your return if expenses
exceed $10,000, or if you
had employees, inven-
tory, cost of goods sold,
real estate, depreciation
or loss from operations.);
- A check with your
name printed on it for di-
rect deposit/debit of any
refund/balance due. (A
check in your checkbook
is acceptable. A cancelled
check is not required. It
must be a check: no bank
statements, deposit slips
or other documents will
be accepted.);
- If you receive a pen-
sion or annuity from a
former employer, bring
the date that you began
to receive payments.
In some cases, this
is required.


City, 352-726-3671; from 10
a.m. to 5 p.m. every Tuesday,
Feb. 7 through April 10. Satur-
days only on March 24 and
April 7, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Ap-
pointments must be made in
person.
* Homosassa Public Library:
4100 Grandmarch Ave., Ho-
mosassa, 352-628-5626; from
10 a.m. to 5 p.m. every
Wednesday, Feb. 1 through
April 11. Saturday only on
March 10 and April 14, 10
a.m. to 4 p.m. Appointments
must be made in person.
* Lakes Region Library: 1511
Druid Road, Inverness, 352-
726-2357; from 10 a.m. to 5
p.m. every Wednesday, Feb. 1
through April 11. Saturday
only on Feb. 25, March 31 and
April 14, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Appointments must be
made in person.


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An exclusive 24 bedroom "key west style" home for
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Reservations are now being accepted so today for a personalized tour!
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Thursday January 26, 2012 G5


OUR TIME






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Reading


E-books


and your


library

By Sabrina Smith
Special to the Chronicle

In the past few years, e-books
have surged in popularity.
E-books are convenient and
often cheaper than traditionally
bound books. For those of us
with overflowing bookshelves,
e-books offer compact storage.
A thousand books can now rest
comfortably in the palm of
your hand. E-readers, the de-
vices used to download and
view e-books, are also more af-
fordable than ever: four years


ago, the Amazon Kindle de-
buted at $399, and now the in-
troductory Kindle sells for just
$79.
Currently there are more
than 50 different e-readers
available on the market, such
as the Amazon Kindle or the
Barnes & Noble Nook; tablet
computers like Apple's iPad or
the Samsung Galaxy are also
popular e-reading devices. One
in six Americans now own an
e-reader, and that number is
only expected to grow.
According to the American
Library Association, about 66
percent of U.S. public libraries
currently offer e-books in some
form. The majority of these li-
braries contract with Over-
Drive, Inc., to provide access to
downloadable audiobooks and
e-books.
The Citrus County Library
System has contracted with
OverDrive to launch a digital
collection, which includes e-
books, this February.


OverDrive provides access
through special software that is
downloaded to a library user's
e-reader, computer, or other de-
vice. This software allows users
to digitally browse a collection,
check out items with their li-
brary card, and then download
the items to their device.
The library purchases e-con-
tent just like its regular collec-
tion content, so you will find
titles from many of your fa-
vorite authors, as well as non-
fiction and technical titles.
Users also have access to classic
literature and a large body of
public domain content.
E-books are still a new field,
and the e-book market is
changing fast.
Competition between pub-
lishers and content providers
like OverDrive and other
emerging services encompasses
complex issues centered on
digital copyrights, content dis-
tribution, and access to digital
materials by public libraries.


While
library
staff is woi k -
ing to bring e-
books online as
soon as possible, the
library is also focusing
on providing streamlined
steps to discover and bor-
row e-books easily on a variety
of platforms and devices. Li-
braries are looking for strong
publisher support for library e-
book lending programs so that
library patrons can access a vi-
able collection well into the fu-
ture.
Emerging technologies can
sometimes be confusing, which


February's
Tech Talks will
focus on computer
safety. Please visit
http://citruslibraries.org
to access the calendars or to
learn more.

Sabrina Smith is the communi-
cations facilitator for the Citi i-
County Li,,aii y System.


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Reasons to go to

emergency room

When does an injury or illness rise to
the level of a medical emergency?
Sometimes it's hard to know.
But there are some warning
signs that shouldn't be ig-
nored.
Here are 12 good reasons to
make a trip to your closest
emergency room:
* Difficulty breathing or
shortness of breath
* Chest or upper abdominal
pain or pressure Amy
* Fainting, sudden NEW
dizziness, weakness NEW
* Changes in vision S
* Confusion or changes in
mental
status
* Any sudden or severe pain
* Uncontrolled bleeding
* Coughing or vomiting blood
* Suicidal feelings
* Difficulty speaking


Shortness of breath
Unusual abdominal pain
These medical problems are often
symptoms of a serious condition that
should be treated as soon as possible.
Changes in vision, difficulty speaking
or weakness may signal you are having
a stroke; and with stroke, timing is
everything.
If you feel that you or a
loved one are experiencing a
life-threatening medical con-
dition or the condition will
worsen on the way to the
hospital, then you need to
call 911 and have an emer-
gency medical services
provider come to you.
nOn the other hand, some
Kingery medical conditions may not
S FROM warrant emergency care.
:RMC Colds, coughs, fevers, sore
throats, ear infections, stom-
ach aches, minor burns and sprains are
examples of conditions that can also be
treated by your family doctor or at an
urgent care clinic.
The Citrus County Health Depart-
see SRRMC Page 7


G6 Thursday, January 26, 2012


OUR TIME







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


POINT
Continued from Page 3

set off the smoke
detectors.
The sprinkler system
failed because the smoke
detectors didn't work. It
was later determined that
the smoke detectors were
burned out so that the
heat sensors couldn't turn
on the overhead
sprinklers.
Smoke was still coming
out of the ruins the next
morning when we all
gathered in front of the
clubhouse steps. The main
concern was, where will
we hold bingo, potluck,
and all of the other activi-
ties normally held in the
clubhouse?
Our homeowners asso-
ciation president, Dwight
Dicks, asked some mem-
bers to go home and fill
their thermoses with cof-
fee and then bring it back
to the clubhouse. He


OUR TIME


asked other people to
bring their lawn chairs. A
makeshift meeting was
then held.
Dwight spoke with
management about the
fire and was assured that
it was insured and that a
new clubhouse house will
be built. Management de-
clined Dwight's request to
rent a tent to hold the
park activities.
A suggestion was made
to have a golf cart wash
and bake sale to raise the
necessary funds. A vote
was taken and was unani-
mously accepted.
The tent was erected on
the clubhouse parking lot
and then had to be moved
twice as it was in the way
of the demolition crew
and the construction crew.
The activities resumed
on borrowed card tables
and chairs. Extension
cords were everywhere
until the county said they
were a hazard and had to
be removed.
Undaunted, some sen-


iors organized a commit-
tee to keep watch while
extensions cords were put
back for potluck supper -
and again for bingo.
It's amazing how we
seniors react to conditions
that would normally cre-
ate sadness and despair.
As long as the bingo
equipment was saved the
loss of the clubhouse was
considered a temporary
setback. As one member of
the porch dwellers re-
marked, the construction
of the new clubhouse will
be a source of entertain-
ment for months to come.
Although the library was
lost in the fire, most of the
medical reference books
were loaned out. However,
the loss of 40 years of
National Geographic mag-
azines won't be missed.
The ladies will take turns
hosting mah jongg, bridge,
and dominoes in their
homes. The men will con-
tinue watching sports at
the home of whoever has a
large, flat-screened TV.


Potluck will continue as
usual. The bulletin board
will be located under the
shuffleboard roof.
Plans are already being
made for the St. Valentine's
Day dance. Make sure you
attend the Friday morning
coffees for up-to-date park
information.
So, until next month,
don't forget to take your
meds and stay healthy.

Larry Elsenheimer and his
wife of 41 years, Kathleen,
live in Homosassa. Before
moving here, they lived five
years in a retirement
,..i'i i!i, iti where he
served as vice president for
a year and president for two
years of a homeowners asso-
ciation. He also called
bingo and was /;'/i gJ to
host Friday morning cof-
fees. It is from his experi-
ences and folks he met that
he draws the ideas for the
' \h iitl6 r Point Commu-
nity Newsletter." The
names have been changed to
prevent 1ii.-,,it-


TALK
Continued from Page 3

I'm thinking this could
go on until the entire army
was wiped out. This time,
though, the captain laid
down on the ground before
he ever got to the prophet
(smart guy) and asked the
prophet to spare him and
his men.
He probably said some-
thing like, "My stupid king
sent me and I had to come,
so please do not kill me or
my guys." That exact quote
is not really in the Bible.
That's just my
paraphrasing.
So, I'm thinking I might
have said something like
that. I can't imagine the
king messing with some-
one who has direct contact
with angels as in convers-
ing with them on a daily
basis.
I digress, but the point is,
I got so tickled that I could-
n't stop laughing.


Thursday January 26, 2012 G7

I started thinking about
all the other funny stories
in the Bible you know,
like talking donkeys that
only their master can hear,
angels appearing out of
nowhere and a lot more
stuff that makes me know
that God has a sense of
humor.
Come on now, I know
that some of you have
laughed uncontrollably be-
fore and maybe even at the
wrong times. It's kind of
like we are going to be
sorry for it later, but we
just can't quit.
I suppose if one has to
have an ailment this one is
not so bad. Honestly, most
of the time, I feel so much
better all over after a really
good laugh.
Maybe that is because
laughter is the best
medicine.

Mary Alice Tillmian, execu-
tive director at Brentwood Re-
tirement C'.,i i ii,,ity in
Lecanto, can be reached at
lt/ h l i u 'l '-'_ t, il J ',ill',il I I ,,."


SRRMC
Continued from Page 6

ment has two urgent care
clinics one in Crystal
River and the other in In-
verness. They accept
Medicare/Medicaid and
most major insurances. For
more information, call 352-
726-1731 or 352-795-6233.
There are many re-
sources for learning more
about emergency rooms,
when to call 911 and what
to expect. The American
College of Emergency
Physicians has a helpful
website: www.emergency
careforyou.org. Here you
can learn the difference be-
tween a cold and the flu,
silent killers like carbon
monoxide and ER 101
(basic knowledge for your
visit to the emergency
room).
Your local emergency
medical services provider,
Nature Coast EMS, is also a


wonderful source for infor-
mation. In fact, on Tuesday,
Feb. 28, from 3 to 5 p.m.,
they're opening the doors
of their Education Center
to the public for a free
workshop about heart-re-
lated emergencies.
A lineup of medical pro-
fessionals will discuss con-
ditions that lead to heart
attack, when to call 911,
what to expect in the emer-
gency room, lifesaving pro-
cedures and the value of
CPR and AED training.
Cardiologists from Seven
Rivers Regional Medical
Center will be available to
answer questions about
prevention and heart con-
ditions that should be reg-
ularly monitored.
For more information
about the workshop, call
352-795-1234 or visit
SevenRiversRegional.com.

Amy Ki,,, !,y is the public
relations and communications
coordinator at Seven Rivers
Regional Medical Center.


Companionship
Cooking
Laundry
Light Housekeeping
Medication Reminders
Escort for Shopping &
Doctor's Appointments
Alzheimer's Care
Bathing & Incontinence Care

Call us for a free in-home consultation.
(352) 726-4547
OUR FAMILY IS HERE TO GIVE COMFORT TO YOUR FAMILY!






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Fitness is


paying health


dividends for


Citrus Hills


couple


Salvador and Maria Rocafort hit the weights as part of their physical fitness routine at Dynabody Fitness Club in Inverness. Both say tt


By Cathy Kapulka
Staff Writer
"Use it or lose it," is the motto that
Maria and Salvador Rocafort live by.
The Rocaforts have been exercising to-
gether for almost four years. They walk
through their Citrus Hills' neighborhood
and work out at Dynabody Fitness Club
in Inverness.
"My health has improved tremen-
dously," Maria, 60, said. "I can breath
better, and I can concentrate better."


While both walk together at least four
times a week, each time for about two
and a half miles, Maria concentrates on
weight training, Pilates and the Ab and
Bun Blaster class with Linda Bishop,
which the gym offers.
Bishop said her class offers a zero-im-
pact workout.
"We work very hard on balance and
strengthening, and we work on building
bone and flexibility," Bishop said. "We
work each side of the body independent
of each other, so the strong side doesn't


take over the weak side."
Bishop said the gym he
ages who work out.
"We have people in the
who work out religiously
"They're happy because
mobility."
Salvador, 63, concentra
training, riding a bicycle
the cardio-elliptical macd
"I like to exercise my b.
makes doing my regular
things I normally do easi


G8 Thursday, January 26, 2012


OUR TIME







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Salvador Rocafort, at
left, works on a
biangular back
pulldown machine,
while Maria Rocafort,
below, does some
stretching exercises
in the weight
training room.


Photos
by
Cathy Kapulka


r their overall health has improved since they became more active.


has people of all

heir 80s and 90s
4ly," she added.
e they have their

rates on weight
[e and working on
chines.
back," he said. "It
ir yard work and
isier."


Salvador said that working out has
helped his valvular heart condition, mi-
tral valve prolapse, avoiding surgery for
the last two years.
He said he loves to work out with his
wife, and it would be hard for him to go
to the gym alone.
"The emotional benefit of working out
together makes us closer," he said. "It's
made our relationship stronger. It's like
teamwork."
see Couple Page 10


Thursday January 26, 2012 G9


OUR TIME






G10 Thursday January 26, 2012


"It enhances life, our life. I would recommend

this to anybody who wants to maintain the best quality of life."

Maria Rocafort


Salvador Rocafort adjusts weights on the leg press machine
for Maria Rocafort.


Maria Rocafort uses a lateral pulldown machine.


Salvador Rocafort works out on a cable cross-over machine.


COUPLE
Continued from Page 9
He said one of the main reasons
they work out is to stay in shape to-
gether, so they can travel together,
as they make a trip to Spain each
year.
They help keep each other moti-
vated, he said.
Maria said exercising together
makes them appreciate day-to-day
life.
"It enhances life, our life," Maria
said. "I would recommend this to
anybody who wants to maintain the
best quality of life."


Mike DeSilva is a personal trainer
and manager at the gym. He has
helped train the Rocaforts and said
he has seen a noticeable improve-
ment in the couple's physical condi-
tion since they have been working
out.
"The concept that people forget
about, it doesn't matter when you
start (exercising), age or flexibility
levels," he said. "All that matters is
that you start."
DeSilva talked about Healthways'
SilverSneakers Fitness Program, an
exercise program geared toward
seniors that is covered by some in-
surance companies for Medicare-


eligible members. He said the gym
has about 340 SilverSneakers mem-
bers.
The Rocaforts are not members of
that program, but DeSilva stressed
how important it is to exercise and
get the body moving in any type of
exercise that is well suited for the
individual.
"Age doesn't matter," he said en-
thusiastically. "Things that stay in
movement, stay in movement and
things that rest, stay at rest."
Ci .,ii I'c reporter Cathy Kapulka
can be reached at 352-564-2922 or
ckapulka@chronicleonline.com.


at


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estate transaction "stress-free".


Mike DeSilva helps train the Rocaforts at Dynabody Fitness
Club in Inverness.


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OUR TIME


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE






Thursday, January 26, 2012 Gil


Technology


Putting



it back



in order

By Tresa Erickson
Special to the Chronicle
Picture it. It's late on a
Saturday afternoon and
you are just wrapping up
a home improvement
project. You have some er-
rands to run, so you pick
up your tools and toss
them into your toolbox,
with the intention to
straighten out the mess
later. Two weeks pass by,
and you forget all about
your toolbox until some-
thing breaks and you
need such and such and
can't find it. Now you've
got to take the time to
straighten out your tool-
box in order to find the
item you're after. Ugh! If
only you had done this
weeks ago when you in-
tended to.
We've all been there and
done that, and if you
haven't, you should give
yourself a pat on the back.
It is not easy to stay or-
ganized, but the time you
put into it will be worth it
in the end. If you are look-
ing to get your home or-
ganized, don't forget
about your computer.
While having a clean,
organized workspace
around your computer is
important, it is just as im-
portant to have an organ-
ized computer. The first
step in this is to find out
exactly what you have on
your computer and get rid
of any programs and files
that you do not use. If you


The Citrus County Library System offers a wide variety of computer classes.
Here is the schedule for February:
TITLE DATE TIME END TIME LIBRARY BRANCH LOCATION
Getting Started
With Computers 2/2/12 10:15AM 12:15 PM Central Ridge Learning Center
Getting Started
With Computers 2/7/12 10:15AM 12:15 PM Homosassa Learning Center
Tech Talk 2/7/12 2:00 PM 4:00 PM Homosassa Community Room
Hot Tech Topics:
Mousing & Keyboarding 2/9/12 10:15AM 12:15 PM Central Ridge Learning Center
Tech Talk 2/9/12 2:00 PM 4:00 PM Lakes Region Community Room
Hot Tech Topics:
Mousing & Keyboarding 2/14/12 10:15AM 12:15 PM Homosassa Learning Center
Tech Talk 2/14/12 2:00 PM 4:00 PM Central Ridge Community Room
Web Browsing:
Getting Started 2/16/12 10:15AM 12:15 PM Central Ridge Learning Center
Tech Talk 2/16/12 2:00 PM 4:00 PM Floral City Library Program Room
Web Browsing:
Getting Started 2/21/12 10:15AM 12:15 PM Homosassa Learning Center
Tech Talk 2/28/12 2:00 PM 4:00 PM Coastal Region Community Room


think that you might need
something later, store it on
a separate disk or CD.
Once you have sorted
through all of your data,
the next step is to defrag-
ment your computer. Each
time you run a program,
files are taken from your
hard drive, loaded into
memory and returned to
the hard drive not where
they were previously, but
in the first place available.
Before long, files from this
program and that pro-
gram are scattered all over
the hard drive, resulting
in your hard drive having
to search longer for the
files it needs to run certain
programs. After too much
fragmentation, the hard
drive can even lock up.
In order to defragment
your computer, you need
a defragmenting program,
which may have been in-
cluded with your com-
puter. Running this
program periodically will
pull together all of the like


files scattered about your
hard drive and rearrange
them accordingly. After-
wards, you may find that
there is more space on
your computer and the
hard drive retrieves infor-
mation faster.
Defragmenting your
computer is an important
step in keeping it organ-
ized and running effi-
ciently. If you use your
computer occasionally,
you may only need to run
the defragmenting pro-
gram every two or three
months. If you use your
computer daily, you may
need to run it more fre-
quently, from once a
month to once a week. It
all depends upon how
much use your computer
receives.
Keep your computer
running smoothly. Re-
move old programs and
files as needed and run
the defragmenting pro-
gram often. It could just
save you time later!


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


OUR TIME







G12 Thursday January 26, 2012


Healthy eating






Stock-up, health nut!


Making bad choices is easy too

easy Here's how to fill the cupboard,
.---- .... ..fridge and freezer with staples to

make healthy choices a no-brainer


By Jeff Schnaufer
CTW Features

If Judy Caplan had her way,
every home in America would be a
"health haven."
"Your home is one place where
you can control what you eat. Make
your home a health haven," says
Caplan, a registered dietitian in Vi-
enna, Va. "If you stock your pantry,
refrigerator and freezer with
healthy foods, you will be consum-
ing a more nutrient-dense, calorie-
light diet, which leads to lower
weights and better health."
It's not as painful as it sounds.
From daybreak to dessert, nutrition
experts say there is a supermarket
(or farmer's market) full of easy,
taste-tempting healthy foods and
beverages to stock up for the indi-
vidual or family on the go.

The cupboards
If you love sandwiches, stocking
your cupboard with healthy condi-
ments is a healthy start.
Dr. Barbara Rolls, nutritional sci-
ences professor at Penn State Uni-
versity and author of "The
Ultimate Volumetric Diet" (William
Morrow Cookbooks, 2012), sug-
gests jarred and canned vegetables
such as water-packed artichokes,
roasted red peppers, pickles and
flavored mustards.
"All these things can give you
more flavor without more calo-
ries," Rolls says.
For soups, Rolls suggests canned
or dried beans, reduced sodium
chicken beef or vegetable broth,
canned tomato products, spices


and seasonings. For salads, con-
sider canned beans, canned fish,
healthy fats likes olive oils, and
olives, vinegars and low-calorie
salad dressings.
"If you are talking quick, I
would stock up with foods that are
easy to grab like raw nuts, but
watch the quantity because the
calories add up fast," Caplan says.
"Mix the nuts with a handful of
dried unsweetened cranberries or
cherries for a sweet snack. Whole
grain pretzels, whole grain crackers
and whole grain chips can be good
snacks but again, portion size mat-
ters. Kale chips are making a splash
these days and are good. Look for
baked rather than fried."
Whole grains are a quick and
healthy meal starter to keep handy.
"You can cook up a batch of rice
or pasta over the weekend and use
them in stir fry or pasta dishes,"
Caplan says. "You can throw on a
jarred pesto sauce or toss in some
veggies for a delicious Asian dish."

The freezer
"We tend to eat what is quick and
easy. The heart-healthy choice
needs to be the easy choice," says
Judith Wylie-Rosett, a spokesper-
son for the American Heart Associ-
ation and nutrition research
professor at Albert Einstein College
of Medicine, Bronx, N.Y.
"Frozen vegetables with a wide
variety of mixed combinations as
well as traditional choices are es-
sential for the busy household
where everyone seems to be eating
See Page 13


OUR TIME


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







Thursday, January 26, 2012 G13


FOOD
Continued from Page 12

on the run. Adding
frozen vegetables to a
casserole such as maca-
roni and cheese or tuna
and noodle casserole
can help us reach the
goal of half of our plate
being filled with vegeta-
bles and fruit," Wylie-
Rosett said.
Frozen dinners can be
a quick meal when eat-
ing alone or to take for
lunch.
Adding a few raw
veggies or a salad
makes the meal more
complete. Freezing
meats in serving size
portions help with the
defrost time, making
them a better quick
meal option.
If you have trouble
eating the fresh produce
before it spoils, Caplan
suggests stocking the
freezer with frozen
sugar and salt-free fruits
and veggies.


"These are the foun-
dation of so many
meals," Caplan says.
"You can add them to
smoothies, add to stir-
fry, add to instant bean
soups."
Fruit pops made from
whole fruit are good
sweet tooth satisfiers.
Keep hormone-free
chicken breasts on hand
to add to the stir fry or
to throw on the grill.
If you defrost, do so in
the refrigerator.
Frozen whole grain
pizzas, whole grain hot
pretzels, veggie
dumplings all make
good snacks or meals.

The refrigerator
"A refrigerator
stocked with fruit, veg-
etables, cheese sticks,
low-fat yogurt and diet
yogurts can allow us to
grab healthful choices
with little thought. If
they are portioned out,
it makes it easier,"
Wylie-Rosett said.
Prewashing salad
greens and storing them


in a salad spinner with a
paper towel makes
preparing salad quick
and easy, Wylie-Rosett
adds. Baby carrots and
grape tomatoes make
grabbing veggies easy.
"Whole wheat wraps
are good to keep on
hand as they can be
used in quick ways,"
Caplan said. "Add hum-
mus, avocado and let-
tuce or beans, low-fat
cheese, guacamole and
salsa. Add sliced hor-
mone-free turkey, pesto
and tomato.
"Eggs are also good to
have on hand, as is al-
mond butter and natu-
ral peanut butter,"
Caplan said.
"I also like many of
the pure fruit spreads
on the market for a
quick peanut butter and
jelly sandwich on whole
grain or gluten-free
bread."
She says yogurt is a
good snack mixed with
fresh fruit, nuts and
flaxseed. Kimchi, sauer-
kraut and pickles with-
out preservatives and


sugar are always good
to have on hand for
added punch, too.

A word
about beverages
"The main recommen-
dation there is water,"
Rolls says. "I'm not re-
ally encouraging a lot of
juice consumption, for
example, because I rec-
ommend whole fruit.
It's more satiating. Fruit
juice is mostly sugar."
Tea and coffee have
no calories at all except
what you add to them,
Rolls says.
Unsweetened iced tea
is also a great choice.
"If you have to have
soda, go for diet and
don't use that as an ex-
cuse to eat more food,"
Rolls says. "I also rec-
ommend skim milk.
People need dairy. I re-
alize people are not al-
ways going to be drawn
to skim, and it may take
time. Ultimately, if you
can lower your percent-
age of fat, that's good."


-j

--

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4 9^^-B -,


I'a **
:ri~


jr
["

Ii



- s


CTW Features


A t oln.

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Michael Snyder

(352) 563-3273

or Saralynne Schlumberger

(352) 564-2917


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


OUR TIME


^^, ij



I,:







G14 Thursday January 26, 2012


Upcoming

Events at the

Citrus County

Community

Centers

New Art Class
at East Citrus
Holly Fisher teaches art classes at
East Citrus on Thursdays at 10 a.m.
Cost per class is $5.
Holly teaches a variety of tech-
niques including water, acrylic, oil,
and sculpting. Whether you are a be-
ginner or just want to refresh your
skills, join Holly for her class.

New Schedule for Line
Dance Classes
Line Dance Classes, Improver to
Intermediate Level, with Linda Heeb-
ner, will be at the Central Citrus
Community Center on Mondays from
1 to 3 p.m. Cost per class is $5.
Line Dance Classes, Beginners
and Improver Level with Carl Raff,
will be at the Central Citrus Commu-
nity Center on Fridays from 1:30 to
3:30 p.m. Cost per class is $3.

Computer Classes
These are conducted using the
Microsoft Operating System; call the
center to register and for the next
class date.
If you have a laptop, you may use
it for the class. Please let us know
when you are registering.
Introduction to the Computer: A
class for the beginner that will take
you through the Windows Operating
System, word processing, Internet
activity and mailing. $25 for a six-
week session
WCCC Mondays at 2 p.m.
Instructor is Dick Bromley
CCCC Tuesdays at 2 p.m. with
Chris Dusombre (new instructor)
Friday at 2 p.m. Instructor is
Dick Bromley
Advanced Computer:
CCCC Wednesdays at 2 p.m.
Instructor is Dick Bromley. $25 for


OUR TIME


five-week session; started Jan. 18

Sign Language Classes:
Instructor for all classes is Sue
Paulus. Cost is $35 for eight weeks.
Call East Citrus, West Citrus or
Central Centers to register. The
classes are Introduction to American
Sign Language, Basic Sign Lan-
guage, and American Sign Lan-
guage I & II. Home-schooled
students' class is at Central Citrus.
For more information, call Sue at
352-527-8479 or email
handjivesue @yahoo.com

Games
Bingo: Call centers for days and
times
Duplicate Bridge Groups:
CCCC Wednesdays at 1 p.m. and
Thursday at noon
ECCC Thursdays and Fridays at
noon
Bridge Lessons: Sandy Brown. $5
per lesson
CCCC Wednesdays at 2:30 p.m.
Mah-Jongg Lessons: Sandra
Brown. $5 per lesson
CCCC Tuesdays at 12:30 p.m.
Mah Jongg Players at CCCC, ECCC,
and WCCCC, call for times and days
Billiards: Offered at Central Citrus,
East Citrus and West Citrus
WCCC Pool Lessons with Ron at
2 p.m. on Mondays. Women's pool
lessons at 12:30 p.m. Thursday
Table Tennis: Offered at Central
Citrus, East Citrus, and West Citrus
Pinochle: At WCCC and CCCC
Cribbage and Canasta: At CCCC
Wii Games: Sports at Central
Citrus, East Citrus and West Citrus
Community Centers
Join the fun with the latest games,
great exercise and entertainment.
Wii Bowling Leagues at Central
Citrus
Skipbo: At WCCC, CCCC, and
ECCC
Hand and Foot Card Game: At
CCCC on Wednesdays at 1 p.m.
and Fridays at 1 p.m.
Rummikub: At CCCC, Monday
through Friday Tournaments are
Monday at noon


Dancing & Music
Social Tea Ballroom Dance:


EAST CITRUS COMMUNITY CENTER (ECCC)
9907 E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway,
Inverness, FL 34450
(352) 344-9666


WEST CITRUS COMMUNITY CENTER (WCCC)
8940 W. Veterans Drive,
Homosassa, FL 34446
(352) 795-3831


INVERNESS COMMUNITY CENTER (ICC)
10821 N. Paul Drive,
Inverness, FL 34450
(352) 726-1009


CENTRAL CITRUS COMMUNITY CENTER (CCCC)
2804 W. Marc Knighton Court,
Lecanto, FL 34461
(352) 527-5993


Hosted by DJ Sapphire. $5 per
person, light refreshments
CCCC Wednesday, Feb. 8, at 1:30
p.m.
WCCC Friday, Feb. 24, at 2 p.m.
Karaoke:
ECCC Wednesdays at 10 a.m.
WCCC Mondays at noon with Walt
and Kay


Musical Entertainment
and Social Dances:
WCCC Social Dance Tuesdays at
1:30 p.m.; Thursdays with Walt and
Kay at 10 a.m. and Back Porch Band
the third Thursday monthly at noon
ECCC Country Sunshine Classic
Country Band on Fridays at 11:30
a.m. to 2 p.m.
Jaime Roldan entertains the first
Monday monthly at 10 a.m.
Guy and Pam Smith Country and
Western Music first and third
Wednesday monthly at 10 a.m.
CCCC Jaime Rolan entertains the
last Thursday monthly
Ballroom Dance Lessons: June


Queripel instructs
CCCC Wednesdays at 1:30 p.m.
for Beginners and 2:45 p.m. for Ad-
vanced. $5 per class
WCCC Fridays at 1:30 p.m. for Be-
ginners. $5 per class

Line Dancing:
ECCC Beginners and Intermediate
classes. $5 with instructor Kathy
Reynolds Tuesdays
at 1 to 2:30 p.m.
Beginners and Intermediate classes
for $1 with Ben and Ann -
Wednesdays at 1 p.m.
WCCC Beginners and Intermedi-
ate classes. $3 per class.
Tuesday at 9 a.m. and Thursdays at
1 p.m. with instructor, Linn
CCCC True Beginners Step by
Step. $3 with instructor Sandy Brown
Improver and Intermediate classes,
$5 per class. Instructor Linda Heeb-
ner- Mondays at 1 p.m.
Beginners and Improvers. $3 per
class. Instructor Carl Raff on Fridays
from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m.
Tap Dancing Lessons: Sandra


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Brown instructs all ages
CCCC Tuesdays at 11:30 a.m. $5
per class

Fun Klogging Class: Marcy Male
instructs
WCCC Beginners, intermediate.
$2 per class
Tap and Jazz Dance Class:
WCCC Joyce Lane teaches all
types of dance. $4 per class


Exercise Programs
Yoga for Seniors:
WCCC Tuesdays and Thursdays
$7 per class
Chair Exercises:
WCCC Wednesdays and Fridays
at 10:45 a.m.
CCCC Monday through Friday
at 10:15 a.m.
ECCC Mondays and Wednesdays
at 10a.m.

Walking Program:
ECCC Mondays and Wednesdays
at 10:30 a.m.

Tai Chi:
CCCC Tuesdays at 10 a.m. with
Connie
WCCC Mondays at 10:30 a.m.
with Nancy

Aerobics:
WCCC Power Hour Aerobic Video,
Monday, Wednesday, and Friday
CCCC Aerobics with Ann, Monday
through Friday at 8 a.m. (videos)
Indoor Walking Video Mondays and
Wednesday at 3 p.m.


Arts & Crafts
ECCC Ceramic Painting,
Crocheting, Quilting and Knitting
CCCC Stamping Class, Mondays
at 9 a.m. $3; card-making with
stamping classes
Nature Coast Carvers meet
Thursday at 12:30 p.m.
Art Classes: Thursdays at 10 a.m.
Call to register
WCCC Craft Time Wednesdays at
1 p.m.
Art Classes all kinds Wednesday at
10:30 a.m. $10
Call the individual centers for more






Thursday, January 26, 2012 G15


Day Trip Destinations


LEGOLAND


When the gates of the
old Cypress Gardens re-
opened on Oct. 15,
LEGOLAND Florida be-
came the second park in
the United States.
Located in Winter
Haven in Polk County,
LEGOLAND Florida is a
150-acre family theme
park designed specifically
for families with children
2 to 12.
The largest LEGOLAND
park in the world there
are three in Europe fea-
tures more than 50 rides,
show and interactive at-
tractions, restaurants,
shopping and botanical
gardens.
Attendance at the park
has exceeded expectations
and it was recently
announced a water theme
park will open at the facil-
ity this summer.
Themed zones include:
The Beginning Park
entry, ticket and sales pass
sales, restaurant and shop.
Fun Town Where guest
get a sense they've en-


At a glance
Tickets:
Seniors 60 and older, $65
Child -3-12, $65
Adults -13-59, $75
Children younger than 3
are admitted for free
Season passes are also
available. Visit online at
www.LEGOLAND.com
Address:
1 LEGOLAND Way,
Winter Haven, FL 33884
For more information:
www.LEGOLAND.com;
Facebook.com/LEGOLAND
Florida and
Twitter@ LEGOLANDFIorida.


tered a LEGO village.
Miniland USA Home to
themed areas including
Florida, Las Vegas,
Washington, New York
and pirates.
LEGO Kingdoms Takes
visitors back to medieval
times.
Land of Adventure -
Where visitors explore
hidden tombs and hunt
for treasure.
LEGO Technic Features
Test Track, Wave Racers
and Technicyle.
LEGO City A scaled-
down town created just
for children.
Botanical Gardens The
historic gardens from the
Cypress Gardens has been
restored to pristine
condition.


Don't Miss

A Single Moment!





Delivered
To Your Home


q-



f ^ ^ A f w'wwwchronicloonline.com

(352) 563-3295

Ask how you can get

2 FREE IVEEKS.1 .....^


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


OUR TIME







G16 Thursday January 26, 2012


February

plant clinics


Put leaves

to work in


your yard

By Joan Bradshaw
Special to the Chronicle

Now is a perfect time to take
advantage of nature's annual gift
to gardeners autumn leaves!
Rather than expending a lot of
energy raking and burning
leaves, put them to good use.
Tree leaves that accumulate in
and around your landscape are a
valuable natural resource that can
be used to provide a good source
of organic matter and nutrients
for use in your
landscape.
It is an estab-
lished fact that
the trees in one
acre of forest shed
as much as two
tons of leaves
each fall.
As you lean
wearily on a leaf
rake you may
complain that
your neighbor-
hood outdoes any '
forest, but put a
positive spin on these rich assets.
Hang on to your leaves and if
your neighbors don't want them,
hang on to theirs.
It makes no sense to send valu-
able treasure up in smoke.
In forests, pastures and other
natural settings, tree leaves and
other organic wastes form a natu-
ral carpet over the soil surface
which conserves moisture, modi-
fies temperatures and prevents
soil erosion and crusting.
In time bacteria, fungi and
other natural-occurring organ-
isms decompose or compost the


Vegetable Gardening for Florida

Feb. 1 2 p.m. Floral City Library
Feb. 8 1:30 p.m. Central Ridge Library


leaves and other organic material,
supplying the existing plants
with a natural, slow-release form
of nutrients.
You can, and should, take ad-
vantage of this same concept.

Options for managing
and recycling leaves
Leaves are truly a valuable nat-
ural resource! They contain 50 to
80 percent of the nutrients a plant
extracts from the soil and air dur-
ing the season. Therefore, leaves
should be managed and used
rather than bagging and dispos-
ing of them or burning them.
There are three great ways in
which you can recycle leaves in
the landscape.

Mowing
A light covering of leaves can
be mowed, simply leaving the
shredded leaves
in place on the
lawn. This tech-
nique is most ef-
fective when a
mulching mower
is used. In fact,
during times of
light leaf drop or
if there are only a
few small trees in
your landscape,
this technique is
probably the most
Sufficient and easi-
est way to man-
age leaf accumulation.

Mulching
Mulching is a simple and effec-
five way to recycle leaves and im-
prove your landscape. Mulches
reduce evaporation from the soil
surface, inhibit weed growth,
moderate soil temperatures, keep
soils from eroding and crusting,
and prevent soil compaction. As
organic mulches decompose, they
release valuable nutrients for use
by your landscape plants.
Leaves can be used as mulch in
vegetable gardens, flower beds


OUR TIME


Feb. 15-1 p.m. Citrus Springs Library
Feb. 10 -1:30 p.m. Coastal Region Library
Tuesday 1 p.m. Lakes Region Library
Feb. 28 2 p.m. Homosassa Library


and around shrubs and trees. As
an option to raking, a lawn
mower with a bagging attach-
ment provides a fast and easy
way to shred and collect the
leaves. Leaves that have been
mowed or run through some
other type of shredder will de-
compose faster and are much
more likely to remain in place
than unshredded leaves.
Simply apply a three- to six-
inch layer of shredded leaves
around the base of trees and
shrubs. In annual and perennial
flower beds, a two- to
three-inch mulch of
shredded leaves is
ideal. For vegetable Gree
gardens, a thick layer
of leaves placed be-
tween the rows func-
tions as a mulch and an
all-weather walkway that will
allow you to work in your garden
during wet periods. Mulches are
especially beneficial when used
around newly established land-
scape plants, greatly increasing
the likelihood of their survival.

Compost leaves
Another method of reusing
your leaves is backyard compost-
ing. This process involves the mi-
crobial decomposition of organic
matter with the end results being
a dark, friable, partially decom-
posed substance similar to natu-
ral organic matter found in the
soil. Composting speeds natural
decomposition under managed
conditions.
The first step to improving leaf-
composting success is to grind or
shred your leaves. This will save
space if you are placing them in a
bin, it will minimize their blow-
ing around and matting if you are
placing them in the garden, and it
will hasten their eventual decom-
position into composted organic
matter. If you do not have a
shredder, and do not wish to rent
one, you can use your lawn
mower to shred the leaves. If the


Classes are free and no registration
is required.
Hosted by master gardener volunteers.
For information call 352-527-5700.


leaves are on your lawn attach a
bagger to your lawn mower be-
fore you begin cutting.
The simplest but longest
process is to place the shredded
leaves in a wire bin. Leave them
there for a year, turning them oc-
casionally, and you will have a re-
ally nice product. Leaf mold is
special fungus-rich compost that
can retain three to five times its
weight in water, rivaling peat
moss. The only disadvantage of
using leaves alone for composting
is you will find that you need a
tremendous amount of
leaves to produce any
quantity of compost.
Leaves can break
down more effectively
as a component in a
nin IS compost pile that con-
tains a variety of or-
ganic matters. A good balanced
compost pile contains materials
rich in nitrogen and others rich in
carbon.
Leaves can provide the carbon
component of your pile. Other
good carbon components include
straw, nonglossy paper, wood
and bark chips. Good nitrogenous
materials include grass and plant
clippings, uncooked fruit and
vegetable scraps, eggshells, and
coffee grounds.
Use your shredded leaves and
other carbon materials to layer
between your nitrogenous mate-
rials in a bin. Turn the pile occa-
sionally to aerate it, and make
sure that it is moist, but not soggy.
It is not necessary to add com-
mercial compost starters or fertil-
izer to a compost pile to start it
"cooking" but doing so may has-
ten the process. The amount of
time it will take to produce com-
post depends upon its size, com-
position and conditions.
For more information call 352-
527-5700.

Dr. Joan Bradshaw is director of
UIF IFAS Cit, i- County Extension.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


February

gardening tips

What to Plant

Bedding Plants: petunias,
pansies, verbena, dianthus,
strawflower, and lobelia. Protect
from frosts and freezing
temperatures.
Bulbs: Amazon lily, crinum,
agapanthus. Provide adequate
water to establish and protect
from cold weather with mulch.
Azaleas: With azaleas in full
bloom this month, now is a great
time to select varieties to add to
the landscape.
Vegetables: Beans, peppers,
cucumbers, tomatoes and
squash can be started while
temperatures are cool.

What to Do

Cold damage to palms: If cold
weather has damaged palms,
proper care may prevent loss of
the palm and encourage recov-
ery. Avoid removing damaged
leaves until the danger of addi-
tional cold weather has passed.
Even dead leaves provide some
insulation value to the palm
meristem.
Citrus: Now is a good time to
check citrus trees for scab dis-
ease. Apply a copper fungicide
when new leaves appear and
again when 2/3 of the flower
blossoms have fallen.
Prune roses: Roses should be
pruned this month to remove
damaged canes and improve the
overall form. After pruning, fertil-
ize and apply a fresh layer of
mulch. Blooming will begin eight
to nine weeks after pruning.
Lawn weeds: Apply a pre-
emergent weed killer to lawns this
month to prevent germination of
warm season weed seeds. Timing
is important for good control.
Fertilize citrus: If not done in
January, fertilize citrus now.
Frequency and amount of
fertilization depends on the age
of the tree.


jI